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Full text of "Education in the Louisiana press"

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iiuiUIfA ^i-.^w^<iA Ui4^<i.;wX'y«t 




A Thesis Sutaai^ted i« Conformity «ltri th« 
i^equlremoiilts for tho iJe^jreo of 
Doctor ofreidasogy in the 
Unlvez^sity ^f Tonjfito 
195a 



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APPumix 



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APPENDIX 
PHOTOSTATS OF NEWS ARTICLES DiSCUSSjiD IN CHAPTER VIII 
Athletics 
Informati on. -- 

Heavy Offensive Drill Pelican Squad 
Given Most Attention I« ^f^tH^^"*"^ 



Sale of Tickets Going Rapidly; 
Bobby <^legg Moved to Halfback 

By D«n H«rd»»ty 

Working on the time-tested theory that no team cai 
execute its plays and wiiy ball games unless its player 
are efficient in the basic fundamentals of football, Coacl 
Bernie Moore yesterday devoted his practice session ti 
those fundamentals — blockir.<Jt> and tackling. 



Workouts 



The candidates for the 1947 
Pelican football team will get 
heavier work with more contact 
this week, as they are about over 
the aches and pains of condition- 
ing drills. Two a day, workouts 
are being held as the sauad had 



In the early stages of i ,e drill, the backs and end only three weeks for the B squad 



wer» engaged in passing «n<l pass li^ 
catching and punting, but down f 
at the end of the field, the guards 
and tackles were iriving two new 
tackling dummies a thorough 
working over. 

The new dummies are body- 
shaped figures suspended on a 
cable with a pulley arrangement 
which allows the charging player 
to grab the dummy and pile Into 
a pit. 

After all tha varsity 
were caiiert together, (i 
had the managers issued big padded 
apron-like affairs to 
line and line backers 



I>*o l'Ia>rr)* .'^idrliiir 

Uuriiig Fir^l lour 

Davs of Drills 



BV KKKNARD <;HIO 

With the .'^quari already pan 

I'vn to .'iS. ;ind 14 more .slaLed to I 

t off by !he end of next week, if 

Centenary college gririders ronlil 

squadipen; ued their two-a-day workouts In w 

Moore blistering heal yesterday in prepar.i 

for the sea.'^nns opener wllhth 

I defensive) University of Hou.ston at Houslo 

which they Sept. 20. 

wore to cut down the chance of After four days of vigorou.s trair.. 

njiiries In the full-speed drill. inc, two injuries were reported from 

Full SpMd Blocking the Genus' camp, and both sidelined 

Tiie teams took turns lining up players were expected to bark ioi 

ind running plays full speed at more rough work after a short lay 



he big defensive line in their off 

ladded gear. Coach Moore stood W. L. .Matnry, 16S-pound quaripr- 

the backfleld. pointing outback from Vernon, Texas, received 
Mocking errors and urging the of- fractured Jaw boije in Tiiesrt«> 
(ensive club to. execute Its blocks ■''frimmage, but the Injury is^'re 
kith more precision, timing and'Ponding tojtreatjneni and be 1^ ex 
t)ower. pected to Be put in light inus WiMi 

AH in all. It was a pretty rough "» the next few finys and ix.ijc fc 
ifternoon. although there was noheavy work w;tb ,; -^ week or 10 day.sj Talley have been working at the 
(tackling on the part of the de- John I.ultey '■ .MoiMtie wi 
fense. It was a first class block- during veMerd;i>s .s|riniina<;e . 
•ing drill — something whi.vh will nad to have three stitches taken 
come in very handy on the night ti's chin, but it is believed he wil 
Sept. 27 and -on eight other be back m lull pear Monday. 



opener with Cotton Valley and 
only four weeks before opening 
the regular schedule with the 
Class AA Lions of Ouachita Par- 
ish High School on the Pelican 
Field. 

Most of the boys reported for 
practice in poor physical condl- j 
tion, but are beginning to round] 
into shape. Extreme heat, blis- ^ 
tered feet and "charlie horses" 
have taken their toll. < 

The squad will be put through 
heavy scrimmage drills this week 
with the hope of finding tack- 
les to replace the three regulars 
Clint Brown, Hutto Tabor and 
Bobby Hamil, lost from the 1946 
team. The end position will come 
in for special attention as Jack 
Kimbell is the only returning let- 
terman at the terminal part. 

George Emerson, Claude Clary, 
J. C. Rogers, Billy Hayes and Roy 



i^ick- 



tackle slot with "Smoky" Smith 
alternating between guard and 
tackle. 



^^turdays during the faJl. 



By the end of next week. Heart 
. Coach Jesis Thoinp.son will have hi.s 
squad trimmed to 44 players. ih« 
number he plans 4o carry on -h' 
raster during the playins season. H" 
ha.s rlropped eight players since the 
opening sessions Monday. 

Although It IS loo early to evalu- 
ate the tram, the defense has on- 
shone the offense In the scrimm^ges^ 

■ rnntiniird On Fnllnwinr 



[\GHl-'i~ZS 



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ST- 47-3-5 



2B7 



288 



Schools Use 4 Major 
Sports In Recreation 

Bjr Harold CaattUe, Senior SuMet Hlgk Sclioa 

Almost every school in this parish includes in its 
recreation program the four major sports: that is, foot- 
ball, basketball, boxing and spftball, This i_s an excel- 
lent practice, for this plani ^ebraary, .<=..» tbtJT," "the UtUe bro- 

brinPS advanta^pc: tn hnth "*^'" ^ baeebaU, is a game pUy- 
ormgs aavaniages to DOtn ^^ ^ ^^^^^^ ^^ summer and ap- 

Ihe pupil and the school. peals aUke to boys and girls. 

Sunset High school has a six- Each sport appeals to different 
man footbaU team coached by |. students. Boxing is an indlvid- 
Jack DelBueno and the school, uai sport which teaches a l»oy to 
boasts a newly illuminated field. . "take it". Th« other three are 

The different sporta are plan-' teams where the players work 
ned according to season. Boxing together. Football requires stren- 
occupies the interest of the stu- gth and courage; basketbaU, 
dents In winter from January to 
March; football, probably the 
most popular of all, is played 
from September 'til Thanksgiv- 



ing; basketball, a fast aand enter- 
taining game, appeals to both I 
boys and.elrls from December to 



® 



speed and accuracy; Softball, « 
keen eye and good Judgement. 
Has Advantages 
A sports program ha^ many ad 
vantages for us and the school. 
First, taking part In sports re- 
quires that pupils stay out-of- 



. doon a few hours more eacn oay, ■ 
making for a happier and health- I 
ler generation. A sports pro(^ ^ml 
a lso develops good aportsm aaaiJp. i 

rThen, too, It t«achea a person "to 
I keep Ilia head when he wins, and 
I to old his heart when he lose^". 
iMany a boy has made good in 
professional sports because of 
these programs In his school days. 
Finally, it arouses a school spirit 
among the students and makes 
for a better schooL 

The school derives advantages 
from these sports as well as the 
students who partldapate. It 
usiially makes money by charging 
a small admission fee which Is 
used to buy equipment, jackets 
and trophies for the athletes. The 
community Is attracted to the 
school and takes a keener inter- 
est In its developmeat. 

All In all, the lives of the boys 
and girls are probably healt hier 
and happier because of their In- 
terest in sports. Students taking 
part in one or all major sports 
almost certainly will acquire hab- 
its and qualities which will make 
them better men and women. 



Basketball Top Sport 
Of Smaller Schools 



OW-47-/i-'« 



By LawteU High School 

Basketball is the major sport of most of the small 
high schools of Louisiana. The statement is borne out 
by the fact that 149 teams competed in the South 
Louisiana district basket- ' 

ball tournament held at basketbaU. There are four bas- 
Southwestem InsUtute during the ketbaU courts at 
spring of 1947 



The LawteU High school beUev- 
es in developing the whole child. 
Therefore, in addition to the regu- 
lar academic course, each child 
(particularly in upper elementary 
and high school) is directed 
through a vigorous physical ed 
ucation prog^^^un. There seems 
to be no other sport that can 
carry out The objective so well 
(in a small high school) as does 



vanishing point. | 

To carry effecUvely such a pro- 
gram, cooperation must be at Its 
I)e8t — not only among the ball 
players but with every member 
of the school in and out. Teach- 
ers, pupils, and parents must 
come together; plan together, and 
work atogetter In order to 
achieve that goal. Last year the 
faculty called upon the parents, 
and all got together to raise 
.funds for the support of the 



LawteU High 

iJrfiool which are used at planned 
intervals so that most chUdren 
may have access to them. ' program. 

No team can develop to any They raised eleven hundred 
degree of success »mless it learns , aoUars in a single evening, and 
cooperaUon, obedience and above there was no lack of cooperation. 



aU love and respect for leader- 
ship. 

It is found at the Lavrtell High 
school that the accelerated bas- 
ketbaU program has caused the 
discipline problems to reach the 



The parents are more interested; 
they are visiting more, and they 
are helping more to build a great 
team and a grea»ter LawteU High 
school. An undefeated team is 
evidence of this fact. 



^^ C>V-47-/l-l^ 



2g9 



DeRidder Wins 
Dual Track Meet 



IDlsCTM -nirow-A. Peters. DeRid- Mile relay: Opelousas team 
^ "miJ? 'i^'Jh. °»R^dd*. see- composed of Miller, Orteco Hal- 
r.nce mTi i^"*- *'''"'■ ""- P^"'^ ^^^ Mayer. 'sunlfe'^am 

Hon ^iHn .^H , • ^. composed Of Hebert, Fontenot. 

Hop. Pklp and .Jump— CMen Ray Soileau, and GulUorv Crowlev 

^fZ\7- ^rn'd''"*!!"' ,.®'"^- '"^ composed of ^imon Tr- 
,p^, T. ^-^^«. ,.,».. D^R^d^ ^7 U. *""■ ^S"^*"' naud. Ancelet. and Hoffpauir 

DERIDDER. 1* . April 30 -De- S^h^'^'*' '^'^'^- *«•»•• » " S"^ , Low hurdles: Peterson of Ope- 

Ridder hiffh nchool jrwamped Lees '— - jousas, Arnaud and Cox of Crow 

ville Saturday IM points to 8(5 points 
in s dual mset. The win wa,< the 
third straight for th Dragons and 
marked their last show before en 
terlng the district rally at Natchi 
toches in the near futnre. 

Summary: 

100 Yd. Da«h— C. E. Cooler. De- 
Ridder first; Jlmmle Simmons. De- 
Ridder. second: Smart. Leesvllle 
third: time 10.8 



TRACK MEET 
TO BE RUH 
flERE TONIGHT 



ley. 

High hurdles: Cox and Regan 
of Crowley. 

Pole vault: Plonsky and C. 
Chachere of Opelousas, Jack 
Miller of Eunice, and Arnaud 
and Toney 6f Crowley. 

Broad jump: Halphen and 
Purser of Opelousas, Andrews 
and Shuff of Eunice, Credeur 
and Moss of Crowley. 
To High jump: Glasscott of Ope- 
lousas, Gillette and Hebert of 



220 Yd. Dash— Grafton. LeesvlUeCsOwley PlayS HoSt 
first: Daiy. DeRidder second; Bar- Eunice AnH OnAlnn«u)<: '0"sas, Gillette and H( 
ron. DeRidder third; time 34 tunice Ana upeiOUSas Eunice, Moss of Crowley. 

High Hurdles— Lew Barron, Cinder Squads Shot put: Boagni and Andre- 

. Pont of Opelousas. Williamson 

„ , and Francois of Eunice, Credeur. 

Eunice, Opelousas, and Crow-Cuccio, and Cox of Crowley 
•^ ^?, f*"":::^^" walker. De-ley High schools will meet to- _ Javelin: Miller of Opelousas. 



120 High Hurdles— Lew 
DeRidder. first: Lester Bullet. De- 
Ridder. second: James Ne.'bttt. 
LeesvUle. third: time 18 1. 



Parish Tourney 

ev ■ 

Scores 



!!!«![: "?„*n,^H" ^r^n ^^V^J^- night at 8 o'clock under the^^Uow of Eunice, and Cox and 
«eond. Pollard. Leesvllle, third ,, °, , ^, ,, .., , ,. Arnaud of Crowlev 

Irn. 2:17.0 lights of the Mobley stadium Discus DevllUer and Chachere 

440 Yd. Da^h-orafton. Leesxille. for a triangular track session. ^f^^^f^usa^W^^^^^^ 

irst: w. H. Pugh. DeRidder. second; Fu" squads fi:om three schools^rancois of Eunice Morgan and 
•ames shlrler, DeRidder. third are expected to participate since^uccfo of Crow^v ^°'^^^ ^ 

ime 58. the district and parish trac'- ^'- f^ 

200 Low Hurdles- J. gimmons. rallies are due up soon, and tc«^_ ■ ^ |^ \^/ 

leRidder. first; Hutchins. Leesville. (night's session will shake dowF 
econd; Hill, l.ee«nlie, third; time the teams in preparation for thj 
14.3. *' big events. 

Mile Run— J. O. Kita DeRidder. 1 Coach Albert Zock of Crowley 
tfst; L. Hullett. DeRidMer. second: 'stated today, that the following 
Tommy Guest, i^ees^iv. third; time entries in each event are expect- 
>:24.8 jed. 

440 Yd. Relav— DeRidder. first (W. I 100 yard dash: Budd and Pe- 
H. Pugh. J. Shirley. Bob sitipper. c. terson of Opelousas, Andrews By George Leon McGuffee 
E.cooleyi; time 49 3 land Guillory of Eunice, and _, „ .„k„.,i, Po-uh Tmima 

Mile Relay-DeRldder. first and 'HoffpaulT and Lege of Crowley, ^he Catahoula Parish T(^urna_ 
third; LeesviUe. second. Daly. Pugh. 220 yard dash: Entries wlU be "Jf "' ^f ."tl''. at Harrisonburg 
Shirley and Simmons; time 3.57.1. the same as in the 100. ^^^^ school Februar> b-7. 

880-yard relay— First. LeesvlUi. 440 yard dash: MiMer and Ma- This touinamenl was one of the 
'Smart. Blackbimi. McRae, Hutch- 'yers of Opelousas. ^uillory ahd hest parish tournaments ever held 
.^>; time 1:43 7. iShuff of EunkC*. alW Slmon^nd here. . 

Sprint medlej' relay— DeRidder 'Fruge of Crcyvley. I Final game scores were as fol- 

firat and third: L«etviiie aeeond. 880 run; Qnachere and iylves-iows. 

Shot put— DeRidder first and sec- ter of Opeltusas SoUeiU -and Grade pii*s— Sicily Island 21, 
ond^ Leesvllle third^Billy Bassham. pigher of EuilSe, add AilceletlHarrisonburg IS. . 
?^f « V ? MeCurley, DeRid- ^^^ j^gg^^ of rfowleV. "' * I Grade Boys -Block 10, Harrison- 

Tavel*l„*t?^w-OrvelI Peters. De- soM.Hfn'^nH ISnnt ^Fnn1?f'l "?^,t 
Ridder. first; Richard Green. De- ?°^«^^„„^"1 J°"^!"?i5„.^-iJ?i2f ' ^""'"^ 



Rjddw.' «i^^;"'Anrho"ny"'thi^d; 132 ffi? Brown and Guillory of Crow-j --onburg^ '^ X_V^.j^ /^ 



Harri- 



der; Wood, Lee.-rrille; distance 39 '^^ 
feet and one Inciv *'" 

High jump — J. Simmons. DeRid- 
der, flrtt; L. Barron. DeRidder, gec- 
■)nd: Larry Bailey. Le*!nille, third: 
neight five feet six inches. 

Broad Jump — J. Grafton. Lees- 
ille. first; C. E. Oooley. DeRidder. 
second; J. Jordan. DeRidder. third; 
jiftance 18 ft. liv, inches. 

Pole Vault— A. Peters, lwiv.^*- 
first; Kite. DeRidder. second; B A 
GUI. Lee«ylll«. third; hMght. 9 « 
I inches. {j^ 



ft. 



Junior ^pdN-.";— ^ock /?6j 
yard relay: Opelousas! island o. 
team composed of Budd, Purser, Second tenm Girls 
Oonzulin, and Sylvester. Eunice burg 31. Biotk 2«. 
team composed of Guillory, Fls- .Second, teim^ys 
her, Jones and Andrews. Crow- 

880 yard relay: Opelousas 
team composed of Miller, Halp- 
hen, Ortego, and Oonzulin. Eu- 
nice team composed of Fisher, 
Hebert, Gillette, and Andrews. 
Crowley team composed of Lege, 
Arnaud. Ancelet. and. Hoffpauir 



^icily 



01. OIUl'K .J». 

;ond. teim Bbys— Harr 
lock 30. / / / 

lior (?»efs — Haftrison 



sonburg 
23. Blc _, . ' 

Senior (?»efs — Hafrrisonburg 42, 
Sicily Lsland 21. 

Senior Boys — Eiiterprise 23. Si- 
cily Island S . 

We are proud of Harrisonburg : 
High as we won three of the four I 
main trophies. All who missed thei 
second boys game between Harri- 1 



LCAP-4M50 cDS-4«'4-€ HCN - 46-2-/9 



JLJ. 



290 



32 Kasketbail l earns 
To Vie for Titles 
In Parish Tourney 

Thirty-two Catahoa?i •' parish 
basketball i" j:iis frill sijuarr; off 
In eight <;■ • ns Friday aml'Satur 
day trf V f.r tiule i': ili'i'a:uiual( 
parish hi)o/ tou^ey to \J held in 
the Harrisonburg gymn^iuin. 

Teams from Harri«onburg. lones- 
ville. Enterprise and Sicily Isiand 
will participate in the foliowins? 
divisions: Senior boys. Senior girls, 
second team boys, second team 
girls, junior boys, junior girls, ele- 
mentary boys and elementary girls. 
The opening game will be play- 
ed Friday morning at 10 a.m. be. 
tween Entverprise and Harrison- ' 
burg second team girls. Finals will 
begin Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m. 
Opening round schedule is as 
follows: 

Sepior boys — Enterprise vs. 
Block pf Jonesville, 5:30 p.m., Fri- 
day; Sicily Island vs. Harrison- 
burg, 7:30 p.m. Friday. 

Senior girls— Block vs. Sicily Is- 
land, 4:30 p.m., Friday; Enter- 
prise vs. Harrisonbrg, 6:30 p.m.. 
Friday. 

Second team boys — Harrison- 
burg vs. Enterprise, 11 a.m.. Satur- 
day; Sicily Island vs. Block, 1 p.m., 
Saturday. 

Second team girls — Enterprise, 
vs. Harrisonburg, 10 a.m., Friday. 
Block vs. Sicily Island, 12 noon, 
Saturday. , 

Junior boys — Sicily Island vs. 
Enterprise, 2:15 p. m., Friday; 
Harrisonburg vs. Block, 3:45 p.m., 
Friday. 

Junior girls — Harrisonburg vs. 
Sicily Island, 1:30 p.m., Friday; 
Enterprise vs. Block. 3 p.m., Friday 
Elementary boys — Block vs. Sici- 
ly Island. 12:45 p.m.. Friday; Har- 
risonburg vs. Enterprise, 1:15 p.m., 
Friday. 

Elemebtary girls — Block vs. Har- 
risonbBTg, 10:30 a.m., Friday; Sici- 
ly Island vs. Enterprise, 12 noon. 
Friday. 

Schedule for the final games Sat- 
urday is as follows: 

Elementary girlfe, 2 p.m.; Ele- 
mentary boys, 3 p.m.'; junior girls, 
4 p.m.; Junior boys, 5 p.m.; second 
team girls, 6 p.m.; second team 
'icya, 7 p.m.; senior girls. 8 p.m.: 
senior boys. 9 p.m. /iS^ 



57 Track Meets Carded 
in City Park Stadium 



City Parlj stadium will he the 
scene of 57 dual track and field 
meets this season, according to a 
schedule released Ujday by Tad 
Gormlev. These are in addition 
to Goimley's regular Sunday 
morning handicaps which get un- 
der wav this week. 

The first meet is scheduled Fri- 
day with the Nicholls High inter- 
chips events on the menu. The 
climax comes on July 29 with 
the 'ciivwide "play day" spon-- 
sored by the City Recreation De- 
partment. 

In between those dates loca. 
track fans will witness plenty ol 
hi2h-class activity, featured bj 
Titlane dual meets against Ala- 
bama. Georgia Tech and Pensa- 
cola Xavv Base; the senior and 
nmior prep meets; Riverside 
meet: PS.\A, PSAL. CSAU CYC 
ami NORD meets. 

The complete schedule follows: 

v.a.cn 5 — Nicholls Hlgfi school lnt«r- 



Fortlef ira'k mtet. 
Fortler' track mfH, 



rk meet. 



siarrh 17— Jesuit tuti T>3\ 
March 19— W»rrea Easton t.„. .._- 
Mirch 2i>— Boy S«>iit senior track meex. 
, March 22— Jesjjit ..FieW P,";,.,, „,,h 
• March 22 — N^-tl"ll^ v Metairle Hign. 

■ Marcl; 2/-Warre„ i:a5ton track meet. 
MSrch 30— P.= .\.\ pre ims. 

■ Msr.V- 31— P.-:A.>. prelims. 
^ April •»— r.S.>.\ tlnals. 

■ Apr.l i~Ho;:. Cross intetclasf. 
April •— Mkl-Clty PSAL. 

April Ij— Aiatiama vs Tulaoe track meet. 

April 111— Item Relays. 

April 13 — Downtown PSAL. 

\pTi\ 13 — New Orleans prep freshmen- 
sophomore trials. 

April 14 —NORD Mid-City elementary 
schools boys and girls. ' 

.\pril 16 — .New Orleans prep freshmen- 
gophomorc preliminaries. 

.\pril 17 — New Orleans prep freshmen- 
Bophor-iore flna's. 

April 17— Tulane university vs Georgia 

'April 19— Holy Cross vs Fortler 

April 20— Jesuit vs Baton Rouge Hieh 
school. „ 

April il— Nicholls vs Peters. _ 

April J*— Warren Easton-Petere-Terre- 
bone triangle meet. 

April 23— PSAL ooys 

.\pril 21 — NORD downtown alementary 
achools. boys and girls. 

April 25 — Holy Cross vs Jesuits. 

April 26— NORD citywlde elementary 
•chools. girls. 

.\pril 27— Nicholls vs Easton. 

April 28 — NORD cltywide boys' elemen- 
tary 

April 29 — Riverside League preliminaries 

April 30 — PS.\L girls. 

May 1— Riverside League finals. 

May 2— NORD boys' cltywide elemen- 



"'SS?"'3r-^NORD*"citywld. playgrounds. 1 
bovs and girls. 
June 6--CT0 

jiir/ 2»rgl?>°wi de Play r.»! NORD- 1 

Intra-mural Sports 
Get Underway At 
L. P. High School 

The intra-mural sports schedule at 
Lake Providence high school swung 
into its first games this week. 

The boys are playing touch football 
and the girls are competing in soft- 
ball. The object of the program is to 
give all children a chance to compete 
in some athletics and also to fumisl" 
them With the exercise and recreatioi 
that is so necessary to a school chUd 
The program is utider the direction: o 
Bill Duncan and (will continue thro- 
ughout Uie ^chool ^ear with the game; 
changing .es the seasons, change. 
Champions wiH be decUred in all 
sports and then th£ grand champion/ 
of the i*f(ra-mural games will D 
named. All grades are taking part ar ^ 
every chi"-'! is urged to take part 
some activity- 

FLORIDA RELAYS WILL"' ^ 
BE HELD ON MARCH 27, 



® 



u 



Fortler. 



May 4 — Nicholls v« 

May 7 — CS.\L tra. k ...»^.. 

Miv g — Tulane vs Pensacola Navy Bass. 

i'ay 9— NORD el-nenlary. girls. 

Ma 11— Jesuit vs Warren Easton. 

Miy 14- CSAL track meet 

Mny l.S— Holy CrMs meet 

V-y 16 — NORP Sowntoiyi playground 
meet, boys and girls. " 

Mav IJ^New Orleans prep Junior trials. 

M?v 20 — Jefferson parish preliminaries 

.May 21 — New Orleans prep Junior track 
ehampionnshins. prelims. 

M;^v 22— New Orleans prep lunlor track 
•hampionjhips. finals. 

Mav 23— Jefferson parish finals 

May 26 — New Orleans prep senior trials. 

Mav 2^ — New Orleans prep senior track 
ehampionsblps, preliminaries. i 

May 29 — «•» Orleans prep senior tracjul 

■ 0^ 



GAINESVILLE. Fla., Feb. 7.-(SpeJ 
ciali— Sixteen colleges and univer» 
iities, eight high schools and two 
junior colleges have already filed pre' 
liminary entires for the fifth annual 
Florida Relays to b» held at the 
University of Florida on March 27. 

Invitations to the annual Gaines* 
villc track and field festival were 
, sent to more than 200 institutions, 
mainly to southern schools, and many 
more entries are expected in the next 
few weeks. 

' Colleges and universities indicating 
they plan to have rimners or field 
event men here froin the relays ara 
Alabama. Duke, E .iciy,, ''Georgia, 
Georgia Toifli.^ Howard. Mjjimi. Mis- 
sissippi Si»te, K. C. .''Uiw-yO'.drthoma 
A. and M.. South CarOlftia, Soutii- 
westerif 'Mc-mphiiO, >«outhwestcrB 
Louisiana College, Tennessee, Tennes- 
see Polytechnic Iiiotitute, and Van- ^„ 
derbilt, Q 2- 



LPBD-47-/d-^ 



UcH'i9-Z'S NOS 41-3-3 MMW-4t-2-« 



IQl 



Fortier Takes Team Honors 
in Annual Relay Carnival 



Cummins Sets Discus Mark, 
Wins Shot Put 



RV JRRRV ROMIG 

Fort 1*1 g K«>ily Green and the 
.lexuit Blue anri White dominated 
the rimnir.R of the annual Prep 
Relay Carnival siafjed Sunday aft- 
ernoon at City Park stadium. 

Biuk Seehe'-'s cimipimen took 
home team honors w iih ^'■>i points 
and the Blue .Ia\s followed second 
with .11 point? Holy Cross was 
third in team honors with 27J 
p<iints. 

The Jays topped the majority 
of relays run Sunrta\. The 440 
S80 and mile e\eiu.s all were won 
hy Jesuit toriiei brichlened us 
trophy tase by gamine the sopho- 
more and varsity sprini meiilej 
awaitls. 

Redemploilst took home the 
other relay when the Ram fiosh 
breezed in the freshmen 440-yard 
1 ela\ . 

IndividUril hunon went ip Fi^r- 
tiers Geor.;p ( uiiiinin.«, the Ion*- 
record hr-.i^n ai^ thr Carnival 
Cuininiii.. honripi'l tlip disiii 
mark « heri he lienied ihf o\;ii 1 \.l 
feet. 4 iiVi. Iif-s The old ipcord «a« 
set in l^tT iiv Haioi.l \os= of 
Baton Roiigr whd ihieu the di.-c 
141 feet ."> iiu hp< Cummins aUo 
won the shot put event, be.iiini? 
Henri Billon of Metairie b\ a 
quarter-inch. 

Warren Easton"s Sammy Astani 
copped two first-place ties In the 
hiph jiimp and pole vault events. 



ISammv- deadlocked with' Holy 
Cio»s lads on both occasions. 

«(nv«:1 Prttnirtn Bf:iv— Won h^ R». 
«».Trtnn»! .Ifijii xr ord rorlltr »fo 
W'-rtr Eijion r:»a 'fr ihird Tim* «r 1 
W'ur.-nt t«>ni coiBrft«<! t>< VTlltf«rr«, 
o^a.d: ArsttDd Bed Aimnvrmftn 

F til Hci' li»-v«rt Hixn Hurd.«»— 
-Woo by Dv.'a^rolx Cattoo . Nattatl. H^'v 
CroM. Mcond; CothffrD. Fortttr. third. 
Tlnn. HI MCprdi 



bird. T ant 15 > ircondf 

nil.T«-d Hl«1 HurdUi Wor »v 

Ul-^umt .\-««t«5; Hnly Cr«!». 

lohn^'.m i»»u:t third. Cothfrn. 

Timr 1.^ ■ »«renap. 



four;h T 



Sprin M»dl« 

mpoitd or Dciii 



Wrtn hv Fc- 

1^: third Ni'-h 



W^nnlns l«ai 

rirtc-. S.- _ _ 

44n-Y»tc V«r< iv R»!«\ W ab h> .l»gj ■ 

Holv lTo' ^lond. Pof fr tlilrd «• 

PiiM', fourn TiTTit. iS i ■•conl« Winn;nE 

i«am rniT)T>o.4«d of Rappoid. Breaux Ktll^ 

aPd Pfritbor 

Var>it. Sp' nt M»dl»\- Woa l>v Portifr: 
, Hov rro«< K^oni: J«5uii third. Nicholij 
I fourth Timr n minur** 30* second* 

Winning (fani rompostd of Battle Pia- 

tnk Adiim> and Rat" K 
' Shotpur Won h\ Curamini Fortier; Br- 
I Ion llttalMr. ^e^ond. Broujsard Baton 

Rouce. third Diftance 47 feel, 4 - inchea. 

High Jump— Dunn Holv Croti and A»- 

'oanl- Eaator lied for firat. Helch: 5 fael. 

it mcber Nallasi Holv Oroii Nicaud. 

Jeault. and 0«en Metairie. tied for lecond 
I Polt Vault -Himei. Holy Croaa. and At- 
irani Eaator ti»d (or firat. Heicht It 

fee' LaurMin St Paul: Creeap, Fortier. 

«nd Barousie. Baton Rouge. ti«d for ate- 



LACK OF DEPTH 
HUMEENIES 

Tulane Good 'On Paper,' But 

L. S. U.. Georgia Tech 

Track Favorites 



Rela 



Pail 



third: 



litr. 



omptned of Chan 



Nichol'i 

fourth 

Winning 



Boudreo 
I rro..5 I 
I S8fl-Vi 



and Petithor 



3;i S aeronda Win- 
nf Rappold. Braaux. 



©^. 



Gp<frK» '^ummiBs Tor- 
rouma ttrond . Rock»r 
ouM«r(t B>ton RouR* I 
142 fe«t 4 tnchM. <Ntwl 
d record ©f 141 fMt. 5 
Bid Von 0t BfttoB Route 

t riling .n» »-»•»- W'^0 hV Cltff BfAtUI ' 

Holv «"ro»». Hoov»r rorti*r MCOBd 01«-l 
noB. Jmuu. third; »n>ltnt. rortl»r. fmirth, 
"nm*. 15. 4 ••condi 



JffftiK third . E 
fourth. DUt»nr« 
record Bttt»ri < 
tnchM ««t by Ha 



HOTP-n-^-iz 



Field of 850 Boys, Girls Entered'^^'j 
in PSAL Track, Field Meet Today 

Kight hunflred and fifty boysi The propiam will lie the usua" 



relays, running 



hunflred and fifty boys^ 
and pills ipprc-cntinp 11 down-jone. with dashe 

town schools will rompete in thr] ^jj^ and running broad jumps 

third sectional PuMic School Ath- " „;„,,, i 
letic League tnuk and field meeMThree events will be run simul , 

at Citv Park ..liidium that after- laneously and there w ill ba 34 

noon startinc ai. i o'clock. events in. all for boys and girls. | 

Gentillv T.iiacr school ^^ i'Tl* 0/"^'^'*: Y'"' »?« T"'^%'lf^'nH 
PSAL. High school coaches and 

their track men. Joseph Dresner 
will be referee, Tad Gormley. 
starter, Jack Pizzano, head finish 
judge. John Alf Rousseau, head 
field judge, and Bill Higgins and 
L. diBenedetto clerks. 

Gentilly Terrace has entered 
157; Gayarre. 119; McDonogh 15, 
117; T. J. Semmes. 93; William 
Frantz, 73; Shaw, 68; McDonogh 
19, 64; Washington, 47; Mc- 
Donogh 16, 36; McDonogh 18, 22 



1 1 race 

78 boys and 7:i giiis leads the list 
of entries, follow etl closely by 
.Gavarre with 119 anfl McDonogh 
15 is third uith 117. Capdau, Col- 
ton, Jefferson Davis, Higgins and 
Palmer are not represented. There 
'is a possibility that some of them 
imay file this "morning and if they 
'do "they v\ ill be accepted. 



BIRMINGHAM, Ala.. May 12.— (/P)_ 

Tulanes Greenie.", — rn paper would 

appear a good bet to give Louisiana 
State n battle for '.ampionship honors 
in the Southeaftern Conference track 
championships t'.-is week-end. 

Of the 15 cvcnta, Greenie athlct^ 
have turned in the best comparative 
performances during the "ast season 
in MX c -nts. Thai matches the beM 
efforts of L. S. U. s defending cham- 
pions. 

The only catch is that Tulane lacks 
the depth of the L. S. U. squad In 
fact, some track experts figure Georgia 
Tech for tlie runner-up sixjt, >wi»h 
Auburn due to give the Greenies a 
strong scrap for third. 

A Ubulation of the best perform- 
ances during the past season gives this 
lesult for first places: 

Tulane 6: L. S. U 6; Miesiafjppi j. 
Tennessee 1: Auburn V T ^ ' 

In some of the longer ri„y~s this 
means I ttle because the calibw o> the 

rr;";^;es. '-"^^^^^'o-ththe 

PrelimmaVi,-.. arc .scheduled at I » 
gion Field Fii.i.y aflernooi, an.d finaU 
wdl be run ,.r, Saturday pf,c:.„oon 
^,e evcnus ^nd best marl ., of 'the 
1948 s- '(son : ""= 

100-yard da4h: Paul Bienz.':T«lan« 
9.4 Conference record. 9.5 "kl" tf^ 
woHd. lecord. but had foUow:^ 

220-yard dash: Bienz. Tulane 20 6 
Conferr - record. 20.6 

440-yard dash: Tom Dickev T^,,;.- i 
nna State. 48.5. Cor>ference record 4^^" 

880-yard dash: Dickey. £ S n ilfif ' 
Conference record. 154 " '■^'' '• 

Mile ™n: Spencer Johnson. Tulane 
4:2.). Conference record 4 16 3 

Two mile run: White,; Overton, Au. 
burr 9:49.3 Conference record 9 36 

120-yarf^hi«h hurdles: Frank Burgi 
Tulane. 14.7. Conference recoi-d 14 1 ' 

220-yard low hurdles: Burpc. Tu- 
lane. 23 7. Conference record. 231 

Mile relay: Louisiana State, 3-20 
Conference record. 3:16.5. 

High jump: Roland Knecht. L S U 

5 [^^- \ W'""^'''- Conference record' 

6 feet. 5 12 inc'^es. 

• ^o\c vault: Martin Korik. Tennes 
see. 13 feet. 8 inches. Conference re 
cord. 1.1 feet. 6 3 4 inches. 
Broad jump— Alex Athas, Tulane, 23 



MMV/-4f-S-l2. 



292 
Contributions and positive values « -- 



•CI 



College Golfers Show Promise 

BY RUSS NEWLAND. - ■ ^ 1 1 ^^ 

San Francisco (IP). — College golf has wrapped up its fifty-first national championship. 
Among the crack field that trod the Stanford course last week may have been future winners 
of the United States amateur and possibly the open title. 

The collegians have scaled, 

the national amateur and open doubtedly has been the most suc-l these parts. He's 19, and for a 
heights before. Not manv have cessful among the former college teenager, plays his shots with the 
hadthetime. o/-money,.tocon """' *'«—'"-" Tmivorci.v t i,.l 



tinue gfelf /on a iv..rh > orhpet 
tive pla^e Bs an avocation after 
student di'.s. A few hav^ gone 
in for tn^ spor*. o.i a ^^ofes- 
sional ba.^i.^. 

But from National Collegiate 
tournament victories have gone 
on to win the U. S. Amateur such 
stars as H. Chandler Egan of Har- 
vard: Jess Sweetster of Yale; 
George Dunlap of Princeton and 
John Fischer of Michigan. 

The great Bobby Jones attend 



skill that makes pro instructors 



men. At Stanford University, Lit 
tie's participation in golf was in-i 

. j^^^ j^g ^^,^^ the!nod with approval 

The San '--- 



Jose lad barely 
squeezed out a 1 up win over Ed 
Hopkins. Jr., of the University o( 
Tj.xas in a 36-hole thriller iha' 
saw the Texan come from fai 
back. He was six down at th' 
18th and four down at the 27t 
He squared the match on t' 
35lh. 



$6-A8-7-S 



QD 



IN OUR MAIL 



consequcntia 

U. S. and British amateur crowns 
twice each in succession and 
bagged the National Open in 1940. 

Besides Little, former colleg- 
ians well up in the professional 
ranks include Fred Haas. Jr.. who 
won the National Collegiate while 
at Louisiana State, and Skip Al- 
exander, who studied at Duke. Al- 
exander is among the top money 
winner.', so far this year. 

Observers at the National Col 
legiate tournament. concluded 

Ui..; . !ul mat my 60n can par- 

-I ticipate in such a program, be- 

I cause I know that there he is 

not subject to those "adverse 

influences" that are apt to take 

I hold of any youthful mind and 

I body that has "time on nis 

hands" to spend "killing time" 

downtown. 

mlsina „„ , Certainly, football is a stren- 

such nat,?,^']^ K^w" ^ho showea' """s game and there are occa- 

n , field ?^^^n^'^^}y ^" the back- 1^'^"^"^ ^o^e .serious injuries. 

Crowley, La. , "^^° ^°^ t"e Crowley High Gents P"^ ^^ o"^ will bother to check 

ept. 24, 1947! but whose c^rp«,. ^ — '-^statistics they'll find these dan- 

because nf rf ^^^ ^^^""^ cut gers are far less than what they 

havl r, P^^'ental objection i are subject to when we let them 

fno his ^.f^^'^y 'or that bov itv .drive our automobiles 

n't i^t^^.t^ ^'' parents would- °" i^^ highway-who ever saw 

thislJo^^ c^o'Werfv°e ?r^ 'T^' ' "" ''""" °" ' '°°'- 

- Of the injii;iS'hVmP.',i?^.5:.^'d 



...^ „.^_v „ — ,.. „„..^o oii.ci.u- 1 legiaie tournament. conciuaea 
: ed Emory College but hunted big-'saturdav. were impressed by the 
|ger game than collegiate golf. He i possibilities of many of the con- 
,iwon the I. S. Open four times testanis 

and theamat^eur^f^ve. | Bobby Harris, who won the In-. 

,' * dividual title and helped his San 

^jLltJle More Successful. jjogg gtate College win the team 

I In the professional competition championship, has bagged many 
jtfora livelihood, Lawson Little un-ljunior and other tournaments in 



Sept 
Sports Editor 
Crowley Daily Signal 
Crowley, La. 

rr^I^^^^ ^°^ your timely re- 
marks concerning the "rumor 

sfoHP? Pf t^'"i"g to the wild 
the T,tr ^''°"^ the injuries of 

SI KT?nK\1eT/te^S; ""'^^^^^^ he ^1^^'%--' 
stop and think and bfe.ure of ta?^hf^h ^"d^'-oti, our boys are 
Se'thev^.^ .^^"^^"^ about 'be- i'^"^"^' ^^^ '^«^«" -^ Rood Sorts! 

fo^th"??"'""^''''^- f°^ the game ofl Prelchlng- "^Se^ t\ "n/'^'if"^^' 
football and the bovs who not work" brines a i^cc^ "^ -t^^m 

tal ob7eL°on'VTh?gam'l^lf;L^SCr°wley High school we 
just too bad that the glod^of thf '■'' u°'"^""^te i" having two 
game doesn't receive the Lm!-^""'^^^^„'^ho ^''e men of high 
attention from thesl seemSl n?'^ ^°"'' ^"^-^h Zock and 
uiese seemmgly coach Ramsey are splendid ex- 
"mples of the fine principles of 



talented "gabbers 

on^'your^'lt^ir^ ^""'' '^^"'^^nts 
day afteri^r, P'"°g'-am Mon- 
day aiiernoon about the "pro- 



good character and body build- 
ing that results from the par- 
ticipation in high school and 
college sports. Personally, I am 



'ball field 

As parents it is natural for 
us to want to "protect" our 
children, however, being human 
we can and many of us do, car- 
ry that feeling a bit too far, in 
that often many parents are 
really protecting themselves 
from the -fear" that their boy 
will get hurt. 

In Crowley, our high school 
athletic program, like our Boy 
Scout program, cant do what 
its leaders would like to do for 
our boys because they lack the 
cooperation of the parents. 
Here's hoping that some day our 
parents will give these facts 
serious thought — for when they 
do. they'll be helping those near- 
est and dearest to their hearts, 
their children, and not the 
eoachs. 

Sincerely yours, 
Parent Of a "Gentleman" 



© 



.CDS-17-3-26 



293 



Probl»»." and needs ♦ - 



APPRECIATING SIX- MAN 
FOOTBALL 



four 



Six-man football was never i a field goal after tonchdown 
meant to go into competitiqp Lgg two points; running or 
^ with the 11 -man game, much less .ginug the ball over the goal 
replace U. It was originated in 
1934 by Stephen E. Epler, as a 
means of providing A game for 
small high schools, thus giving 
more boys an opportunity to 
participate in this sport. 

And as for "hot bping football," 
it is football in the truest sense 



By Barney 
Football is king now, and will 
be for tilt next three months. 
Right through the war those of 
us who were lucky enough to be 
in the states could enjoy football 

games between the' universities, _ 

colleges, and larger high schools. | of the word. The basic skills of 

The sni.iJlfer sdhools though, like I football — blocking, tackling, and 



)res one point. 

9. A field goal sc 

ints. 

As you can see by these rules, 



those in this parish had to givi 
up athletic activities imtilj equip 
ment and-^tffM tic di.ectois were 
available agtm. / 

Hostilities hkve npw ceased, 
and the schoi>l-agt fchiliiien oJ 
East Feliciariu arc among the 
lucky ones who are able to enjoy 
the benefits of football and ar 
athletic program. But the abovj 

reasons are not responsible, alone, beat off by some small team 
for thousands of kids including because they know "how 



especially ball handling — will 
take a six-man team much far- 
ther than an 11 -man team. Also 
the 11 -man team which is lucky 
enough to have plenty of big men 
can often dtTSetad on the power 
alone, while the six-man team 
which depends on power alone 
will find itself getting fts socks 



» justU 



those of this parish enjoying play-?'''^' ^00*^)^11. 

Perhaps a look at ruler wiU 
lelp you to understand the 
ibove. Practically alL of the rules 



ing football. The game of six- 
man football opens the field up 
to several thousand schools in 
the United States which other- for 11-man footbaU apply to six- 



wise would be without any foot- 
ball program. 

Probably most of yoiNare like 
I was when the title "six-man' 
football was first used. I flatly 
stated, "It just can't be football," 
and I argued, "It'll never replace 
the old 11-man game." /f'aS 



man footbal with these ex- 
:eptions. 

1. The field is 40 by 100 yards 
;80 yards Tsetween goals). 

2. Six players per team (left 
end, center, right end, quarter- 
back, halfback, and fullback). 

3. The offensive team must 
have three players on line scrim- 
mage when the ball is snapped. 

4. Any player is eligible to re- 
ceive a forward pass. 

5. The ball must be laterafed 
at least one before it can be run 
past the line of scrimmage. 

6. Any ball dropped or uatt^Cl 
down behind the line of scrim- 
mage is a free ball and can be 
advanced by either team. 

7. Fifteen yards must be gain- 
ed for a first down. 



CW- ♦7-9-26 



very player on a six-man ball 
lub has to know his footbaU and 
now how to think Skillful ball 
andling is required because the 
lan who receives the pass from 
jenter cannot go past the Une 
of scrimmage until the ball has 
changed hands at least one. A 
well trained defense is necessary 
because any player can receive 
a pass which makes all players 
potential scorers. An«l all around 
sound quick thinking is needed 
because the game is so fast and 
so exact. 

Yes, I m completely sold on the 
game of six-man football; for 
entertainment, for recreation; and 
for building healthy and sound 
bodies and minds. I think you, 
too, will be sold on it once you 
see a game and understand it. 
The game is only 13 years old and 
it has spent the last five of those 
waiting out the war; yet last year 
there were over 5,000 registered 
teams in the United States and 
this year there will be many 
more. There must be something 
to it. 



IS COLLEGE FOOTBALL 



^oc»^ 



THAT WAS a gridiron season, wasn't 

It? Now that It's over we can sit back 
and reflect that college football certain- 
ly is big business. 

Yem, aad the co«t of prodnctJoa U 

threatemlag to wreck that baataeaa. 

How could that be, with 45,000 spec- 
utprs paying a $3.75 average for 
Uckeu? We shall see: 

Let's take a mythical private univer- 
sity by the name of Alma, with a sta- 
dium seating those 45,000. The univer- 
sity has a student body of 7500, with 
some 1000 of the boys married veterans. 
Then there is a faculty of 1000, mostly 
married, which adds up to 12,000 spec- 
tators paying an average of 50 cents 
each. counUng wives and throwing in 
the many high school sudents at 50 
cents apiece also. 

That 12,000 fills up one side of the 
stadium. The other side will bring $3 
(the government gets the tax) from 12 - 
000. or $36,000. Then there are 1000 
team tickets and ducats and passes for 
lettermen. press and radio. With end 
•ones full, a sell-out crowd brings In 
$70,000. from which must be deducted 
$1000 for officials, including their ex- 
penses, and $6000 for game expenses 
such as printing Uckets, police, secre- 
Urlal work, advertising, ticket sellers. 

That $7000 from $70,000 leaves $63,- 
000, which is split between the two 
teams. So Alma gets $31,500, but from 
that must be subtracted half the $5000 
traveling expenses which Alma must 
put up every other year (home-and- 
home agi-eemenu). So Alma winds up 
'*nth less than $30,000 per game. Adding 
other iiems that invariably bob up In 
any business, you might say Alma fin- 
ishes the game $25,000 in the black. 

It is pretty generally agreed by ath- 
letic directors that a college in Alma's 
class can gross a maximum of $25,000 
per game (after taxes are paid and the 



^t^ 



Bi« hierMSM hi crowds of qrM 9«hm Ut 
recast years mak* casMi observers thlak 

thot pigAia cask pears iato colleges; bat 
wbot's happeaed to expeases7 Here's o 

PMk at tbe books of a mytkleal school 



visiting team has Uken its share). 
or $250,000 a season of regular play. 

Now let's uke the expenses. First, 
there is the matter of tuition, which ev- 
ery boy must pay, or have paid for liim. 
In the case of a football player, the tui- 
tion plus board (all players board) 
amounts to approximately $1500 each. 
Thus a squad of 100 players represents 
$150,000 that must be paid to the uni- 
versity. That's quite an item, and 
quite an increase in recent times. 

Back in 1925 Tulane beat Northwest- 
em, Big Ten champion, and was invit- 
ed to the Rose Bowl — all with only 18 
men on the squad. But those days are 
gone forever. Now the squads number 
around 100 — everywhere. 

Next comes tbe cost of feeding 
those l>lc boys. Bermle Moore of 
Ij8U cobM slve yoa aa idea. Hla 
Tigers OB a trip to Miami were 
charged $9 each tor toarheoa and 
II potatoes for dinner, for 60 men. 
That means a $20 average for 60 
men or $1X00 for only two meals! 
Then there is the cost of uniforms ' 
and equipment. Without going into de- 
tails it adds up to a minimum of $130 
to dress one of those stars, and just as 
much for the rest of them. Of course, 
there's the it«n of 12 dozen footballs at 
12 bucks a throw. 

Now comes the recruiting angle. To 
get 100 promising players you have to 
contact no less than 300. bring them to 



^ 



the campus, entertain them and gena*- 
ally Interest them in the particular kind 
of curriculum you have to offer. They 
are not all as hard to please as was 
"Choo Choo" Justice, who touched all 
the bases before settling down at Chap- 
el Hill, but they are getting smart 

On the subject of recruiting, let's not 
be so naive as to believe some sections 
do it and others don't. Whether the 
boys are offered room, board, tuition 
and 10 bucks a month or whether they j 
have to "work" their way through, it | 
amounts to the same thing. '■ 

Anj-way you figuj-e it, the income 
is around $250,000 and the expenses 
close to S245.000. leaving a profit of 
$5000. The most successful Almas 
right now are operating only 2 to 3 per 
cent in the black. The situation is pretty 
much the same in the so-called "non- 
subsidization" schools. 

Plenty of real expenses don't 
show up in state .luditors' reports, 
being anidentified in tbe bark row, 
bat whether they show np or not, 
they are there no matter whether 
you wUI caU it snbaidlzaUon or 
what. .All that doogb has got to 
come from somewhere. 



HOTP-Hyi<tz{n*. Sec-hon- 47-|2-7 



295 
Misunderstandings and controversial issues. - - 



Scribe Says Lack of Security for | 
Coaches Is Cause for Recruiting 

By Whitney Martin I moment while it ia hypnotized by tice or coaches going out after 

New YkK Jan. IS (Ai')4-The a flne season. lathletes. The cure is In offerint 

National Co;ieslateAthIet|:- Asso- Coach Must Win l^^e coaches .•security, and thi 

elation. )n rasslnt ;i^v so-called ^t„,.K„ ,>,., „„„. ... schools themselves can do that, 

sanity code tp cufh .".fcinciJl , aid ^'^j be the next season, or the 
to athlet«s ana offf .r,„X .,..«„f,. ••'*'^*°" «"" ^*''^^' '«°'t s" gool. 



."ifcinc 
all jt 



ing. has dan. ab<^u- all >t -i In ^^* ''■°"'" T n- '"''^'«. *",<* 

a position to 'do to k/p .,. Ige ,"'"*"'' .'°T J ^"^^'^ officials 

sports on a I*vel a. U^st .. rp^or! ^'^^ ' stand the racket any longer, 
tedly • hone-i/ ' Influenced by pressure from alumni 

,. ' ■*^ , I they call In the coach for a talk. 

It Is taken for srantecl it will. ,, .,. 
follow through with Its Intention' u} %""" '*" ' too e^eat they 
to Investigate reports of Molatinns "''^^* ""'''' K^"-' "P ^^^ contract. 
of Its rules, and take suitable ac-l. "^ "^-^^''e ''''' <=oach is allowed 
Uon if violations are proven '° ^^^- *""* '* ™^^^ *" '*'^' »" 

TKo,. ,• „„, „ V. ' uncomfortable that he finally says 

^CAA rlt> T u ""?" '^^ '° heck with it. tears up his con- 

^^ . K. , ' '^'"1"°* ^"'""^ «'■''" «"d departs, with honeyed 

he two chief reasons why recruit- words if regret -in^ng in his ears 

inc and pay-for-play athletes exist. ,.,.». ^ , '^ 

T» ,_ • .^ " '"s school would hire a man 

one of t^h"eT / r ex-,.«tence ofigive him a long-term contract, and 
U Is a T^rnhlL ,"?• /"''"«t'"5: abide by that contract, refusing 
U Is a problem yet to he solved.'to listen to the wails of an! 
?he^rra°bird?,.'''.''"'"°'. ""^ '° ^'^''^d ^'"mnl after a poor sea- 
ma errrenresen^r k'^ '''^''' ^'"'^ ^°"' 'he coach would not feel 

Blame* Schools Should Have Security 

The other, factor concerns the " coaches ertjoyed the same 
individual schools themselves That ^'^'"^ ^"'^ security as professors 
i». the profe.ssors and deans and"'*'^^ would be no trouble. A pro- 
various boards which might have''*^*^""" <'"esn't lose his job if he 
charge of hiring coaches, and in-l'^?"'®^ "^ *'**> a flock of pupils 
cidentally, firing them. '*"*' might be exposed to education 

The cold fact is that as long as ^'"" ^""'^ ^"^ i'^^" without ever 
a coach's stay at a school depends! '="*'''''"« "• 

upon his ability to turn nut win- 1 " 's taken for granted that' 
It f h . k"'^' '"^ ^"'"S «o '^ee to the professor is capable, and in 

"that he gets the material for the "'os* instances we believe that 
winning teams. It is his bread and ''oo'ball conches are capable. It 

It'/' ., . is unfortunate that their capability ■ 

»nrt = , ^^ '^'''^ of .security, 's rated on the success of their 

./goig'r br ^r%:^z^:' orihf u-r;. — ^^ 

i;^'^orat^:[er- - -n--^tXra™=^ tr-^^h^- 

5 ^a"n'd- irv:arr;^a'r%^"ni^^' '---"-- fo-scroi 

«- .V ate sch.::^--.^':::;^!-^';,— --^-- eatin.^. 



BR/4«-/-H 



tJt-' T^iy^rists irhn wring 



AS WE WERE SAYING 

By OTIS HARRIS. Joani*J Sport» Kditor 

At the end of each college foot-ll ^- Application of thf fire-the- 

ball season, two developments in- | <^oach technif^iie as a solutton 

ivariably are brought into sharp I for ihe losing-ttani di'emnif. and 

I focus as results are submitted usually stemming from bl^ck- 



I to twstmortpm smitinv. 



j, balls cast by irritated al.imni. 



semipiofessJonal I 



, and solemnljyvow to purs^ the 
sport of its . ^ ^ tne 

aspects. 

Dismissai.* W coaches are in- 
tended to rid the premises of in- 
dividuals who become fouled ir, 
'the lines of character building 

7rJ\l^'r '^"^' '"'' g^'"^^ and 
are practiced generaJlv by col- 
leges whose teams ^ or, ■- ' 



the horrible examples of the sea- 
son just closed. 

• « * 

MECHANICS VARY. 

The mechanics of firing a coach 
take varied forms. 

Some are permitted to "resign." 
That is a face-saving gesture (in 
behalf of the coach) and is in- 
tended to create the impression 
that the leave-taking was entirely 
voluntary and was not" initiated 
by something more substantial 
than a gen\le prod by embittered 
old grads who seem to call the 
{shots on coaching turnovers. 

Expired contracts are not re- 
newed "by mutual agreement," or 
at least by the agreement of one 

fof the interested parties — tha 
i^chool. 1 

• • * ;j 
Long-term contracts of others 

are bought up by the rollege.*. 
and in one Instance, that of 
Homer H. .Norton was bought 
up by Te.\as A. & M. alumni ' 
I while the contract still bad more 
than two year.s to run. Mean- 
while, .Norton will continue to 
receive his salary from the 
school until Sent. 1, 1948. and ' 
I will .serve until that time in I 
[ what has been described as an I 
• "advisor.v rapacity." That his 
j advice wUI be sought in the 
j light of the confused state of 
■ affaii-s at College .Station prior [ 
to the payoff to Norton is [ 
doubted. i 



296 



"What Price Turity?' -^ ' I 

If the directors of the Sputheastern Conference, who 
meet today in Biloxi. allow the National Collegiate Ath- 
letic Association to cram down their throats the hypocriti- 
cal policy of "under-the-table" dealings with athletes, then 
it will be to their everlasting shame, in my opinion, and 
for the life of me I cannot see why such a price as for- 
feiture of self-respejt should be paid for the privilege of 
competing with schools who insist that the dishonest way 
is the better — the "cleaner." 

without regard lor the dangers of ranrellation* of contracts 
that are almoM snre to rome ap orer racial questions, many of 
the most highly respected men of the South will object to 
alMndonlng the Southeastern Conference's honest pollc.v for one 
that practically tarns our athletes into "double dealers." All 
Jnst for the sake of competing with teams of other sections. 
No better proof of the hypocrisy practiced by at least one team 
in the "pious" Western Conference (and if one team operates thai i pp"^oap^ a 
■way you can be sure others doK ran he obtained than the first- [j^^iy ^ju 



NEW YORK, Jan. 21 (AP)— Since a 
two-year effort by the'college baseball 
coaches to obtain a "hands-ofr" agree- 
ment with organized baseball has re- 
sulted in little but kind and meaning- 
less words, this dept. hereby suggests 
itaking a new angle Instead of try- 
|ing to get everything at once, they 
Should adopt the "Smorgasbord Sys- 
tem" — a little bit here and a little bit 
there — in hopes of eventually achiev- 
ing satisfactory results As a starter, 
jvhy shouldn't they merely aik that 
pro scouts be forbidden to approach a 
itoUege player until they had first con- 
sulted his coach and college president? 
Ij That way the collegians would at 

tast get an even brea^ when they 
ally want to keep a byjand as far as 
his writer can learn, no\college co^h 
iTants to stanij iniUK way of x irtyci" 
7ho has a cltfincy ttJbecome a higlly- 
aid big leafuen It's the back,^oor 
thk sKning of klAt^who 
peno^itheir baseball 



the mine 
guawks. ' 



rs that causes :qpost of 



hand^ charge of well-posted authorities in that district. And just 
a few (lays ago the Cleveland Press of Cleveland. Ohio, exposed 
the fact that football play.ers at Ohio State university drew, in 
salaries from the state of Ohio, S3436 for the month of Octohe'r. 

"This pay scale is at the rate of $30,000 a year for part-time 
Jobs," said the Press. 

"Departmental heads of the bureaus hiring the players profess 
to be hazy as to the exact time the players worked." the story con- 
tinued, "but at least some of the players' salary rates appear to 
equal or exceed the pay of full-time state workers in similar jobs. 
"Topping the football players' pay roll Is Fullback OUie 
CHne of Fredericktown, Ohio, who was paid $125.41 In October 
as a messenger In the highway department pa.v rolls list 

43 Ohio State football players, who draw state salary checks 
•CTen of them drew more than $100 a month besides Cline 

they were Center Jack Lininger 8102.19. Halfback Park Bln- 
bangh $100,'iO. Guard Joe Taberner $100..V), Tackle Bob Momsen 
tl00.50, Halfback Eugene Rife «100.38, and Halfback Bob Wright 

$100.58. ... _ 

"Athletic Director Richard C. Larkins and Coach Wes Fesler lerpretive bulletin to 3£0 schools. 
defended the practice, saying it waf "as- clean as a houiid's tooth . i ,^^ bulletin was thfe first to 
Larkins said he thought it was ^« ri^t -ay to h^lp the players, tn |^/h^-,^ bulletin -|^^th>^.[;rst^^to 

'°"?l.?°p?a;'e';s^"^ro•rV;ve?v hX'^as'igned to tkem, he sa.d. but |compliance_ committee headed by 

this will be hard for players ■m-.Qtber schools to believe. „ Tnffc 

The average college football >plaver attends class until 2 or 3'^"ijs. 

p. m., practices until 5 or 5:30 p. m., must study at) least two "ifiirs: tne 

and often must attend blackboard practice sessions at nieht. Sever arships may be awarded on 1, 

'the basis of need; 2, high schol- 
arship, and 3, otMer basis of 
qualifications af \wViich athletic 
ability is mot\cons|Mfed. presum' 
ably for VoAnsic Audents, tal 
ented mu^cilns' ancT 
cialists. 

The wofc "need" means tu- 
ittion and incidental institutional 
fees. "High scholarship" means 
students in the upper 25 per cent 
of their class. 

Athletes given Jobs must be 
paid at the current community 



LCAM«-fai 

iGrid Sanity Code 
Scholarship Types 
(Listed by NCAA^, 

Chicago (JP). — Three types of! 
scholarships permissible under i 
the XCAA's "sanity -code" for 
combating subsidization of ath-| 
letes were listed today in an in-i 



irman Clarence P. Houston of 



The commit'.ee reported schol- 



hours of labor on top of that would be quite an assignment. 

MOTP-47-ll-a 



other spe- 



HERE AND THERE 

The boys in the Pacific Coast conference arfe taking 
the NCAA purity code to heart. Seems as if the facultj 
representatives have fined 10 schoole some $8150 for vio- 
lating rules of .the group. ^„ _ „. .,_ .^^ ^ ^ 

Some of the violations were entertainment of pros- rates for services actually "per 
pective students on campus in excess of that permitted b.v formed. 

the Pacific code, off-campu.s interviews b^ members of the athletic 
staffs with prospective students, y-regul«fities In the form of grant 
ing of loans to student athj«ites,/and ^Mjyietltioi 
dents In intercollegip.te ajOn^ics.y 



/ 



.T 



BRT-48-<-/4 



tion by Ineligible stu- 



The committee also agreed that 
tutors may be provided by 
schools to assist students and al- 
lowances may be granted for ac- 



SJ-4«-S-26 



297 



up . oni 
"sdove 
of Xak 



COULD DO SOME GOOD 

Now that there is an air of reform hovering around | 
the American game of football the prep coaches and prin- 
cipals meeting in Alexandria can do a few things that^ 
would benefit the prep game. ^ , ,, , „ .v,„» ■ 

Thev certainlv could change the playoff system that 
nrolones the season to almost Christmas or as this season 

llTchrJ^ts L mentioned In ,T,i. ..epartment football In h,,.h 

We'itc BndVv- ,.i„.6. t»k* . barle. and Bogalusa, d.dn t finish | 
until several fl« -. Hfter th** Chri'aiiii«» holidays. i 

% Z U u ^ dont realize fat they are creating trouble foe 
thet -wV. v,«l. *"«•'• e,Wvlv.^V orfone sport they are RO.ng o ,^ako 
thet.. 1». o^u. educators and prinripals liH%ei 

'"Xe^.riV.t ot vcfi.m3do«-..ictr- throats' a. Coach R S. K.llen 
ake C^ rle:. Tid "nt; moi n:iig. i 

Simpl" cation of the'^piay-off system would do much), 

tor elt." K up . lot or friction in the State Athletic Assn. The P an 
a^anced by thi. department several weeks ago to organize thei 
^Ite "hools intia conference and let the winner ot that play New I 
C^leans for the title would shorten the season by several we^^s , 

U would have other advantages such as uniform and creditable 
schedules could be drawn up. accurate statistics could be k«pt. and 
eve^ game on the schools schedule would then count for "omethlnK. 
' The present system of usht little districts with numerous play-|| 
offa was antiquated years ago. . 

Another change that will come up for discussion at' 

the meeting te the abolition of spring football, which isn't bo hard 
to take as It first seems. 

Several of the New Orleans schools. "« ""f«7'%""'' ?"" "! 
soring football and thev dont seem to have suffered. Last year texa.s 
Xllshed It io that their kids could play baseball in the aprin, or 
other sports. There football hasnt suffered. „,..,„i„ni 

Ajld at its last meeting the Big Eight confemce of Mlssleeippi 
voted out spring footbll al>o. 

That's the picture In many state and those that have it police 
Jt so that the kids are occupied only lor specified periods and not 
' throughout the spring. 

Whether the spring training is ruled out here or not 

U certainly should be limited so that youngsters that wish to com- 
pete In baseball or track ralgh be able to do It without any irksome 
grid duties In his way. . 

Some Louisiana schools prolong spring training and tnen 

engage In extensive fall pracUces, long schedules, and prolonged 

play-offs that have youngsters are playing football almost all the 

i school term. , 

Coach Stanley Galloway of Bogalusa several years ago broacnea 
a plan that might be well considered. Galloway wanted it mandatory 
that four major sporte, football, baseball, track, and basketball, be 
played in all AA schools. 

If not made mandatory it could well be encouraged and tlie 
officials at Alexandria would do no harm in looking intj>_the possi 
fciUties. 



Grid Officials 
Not Enforcing 
Clipping Rule 



National Chairman 
Rules (^minittee 
Stressios Point 



of 



BRT- 4^-1-/6 



Cambridge. Mass.. Oct. IS <JP\. — 

Asserting that •officials this year are 
not calllne clipping," William J. 
Bingham. Harvard AA. director and 
national chairman of the football 
rules committee, late today ordered 
that officials be briefed immediately. 

In a telegram to K. C. Krieger, na- 
tional secretary of the rules com- 
mittee. Bingham ordered: 

•■.\ bulletin should he sent Im- 
mediately to all officials concerning 
clipping bet-,-) ife officlnis this year 
are not ca'.Uni: clipping and \ lolatlons 
are occurring too frequently." , 

In explanation, of his move Bing- 
ham salt that "too many hoys are 
being h.,-'. H.irvtird has lof ts foot- 
bai; cap ,!in for the sen.<on because 
be was ^ •'.•iped %hich. uniortunately, 
was ii'i: .'ai.ed " 

.^t til:, n'-'.n: he einphx&ized "Don't 
misunUcraiand. Virginia played a 
^ood. h.iid. clCAn game isaturday and 
I'm decide.-tly not mak-.ng any accusa- 
tlo!,s against any of the Virginia 
players. There's a twilight zone in 
clipping you know," he added, "and 
it's a hard play to call." 

(Fullback Vluce Moravec suffered 
torn ligamenlt In his left knee Sat- 
urday when he was dumped while 
running down the field under a punt ' 
Saturday. Virginia walloped Harvard' 
47-0.) 

The rules committee chairman con- 
tinued, "Clipping Is the moat danger- 
) ous thing In football. 

"Before the war the penalty was 25 
yards and officials were reluctant to 
'.call it because of Its severity. 
< "Subsequently th* cdr^mlttee re- 
duced the penalty to 1|^ yards and 
^for a time officials cKjled clipping 



ST- 17-/0-4 



_//^-ACy 



298 



'Drunken Revelry' 
Louisiana and Ole 



Charged At 
Miss Game 



statements which reflect upon 
the good name of the university.! 



"If they are true, I will be 
equally glad to do whatever lies 
n my power to remedy the situa- 



Baton Rouge (/P). — The president of Louisiana State University was ready today to investi- 
gate charges of a Mississippi editor that the LSU-University of Mississippi football game here 

Saturday night was an occasion of "drunken revelrj'." 

The charge was made yesterday by Editor Oriver Emme- he will be glad to retract the 
rich in a page one editorial in the McComb Enterprise-Journal. 

Emmerich, who is a member of Thi.s may be within the Demo- 
the board of trustees of Missis- cratic iroce.sses but it is certain- 
sippi institutions of higher learn-jly not within the cultural realm 
ing. wrote: to be encouraged by a great uni- 

"The president of tlje Louisi- versity. . . . Many drunks weretion. 
ana State University who is re- 'stretched out upon the concrete ' * * * 

sponsible for the conduct of the seats when the game was over.jiiggjsgjppiang share Blame 
university campus, and all who not knowing who had won nor xhe McComh editor declared 
hold dear the name of LSL' who had lost the game." the edi-that Mi.«sissippians were among 
should hang their heads In torial said. ,ho.se who share the blame for 

shame." ' Dr. Harold V. Stoke, president what he called "debauchery and 

His editorial charged that whis- of the university here, had thisconduct dangerous to the general 
key bottles were scattered about comment: welfare." 

the aisles and that scores rif bot-J "If such a state of facts exists "Many Missis.':ippi;ins imaccus- 
tles and seat ruslrrons ware! am sure it will be deplored b>tomed to the availabilitv of liquor' 
thrown from a\c<p the stadiViBi til citizens who care for the goodexcepl through the bootlegger 
falling "with 'daheerous foice/name of the irtiiversity or of th<made hogs of themselves at the 
among the speotAior.s. ^state. jjame but similar conduct pre-l 

* • ' , ■'!. personally, saw no sucl vailed throughout the stadium 

Child Offered Whl>'.e.v. IsUte of affairs as the editor d« that night." the editorial said 

"A mother with a bottle bl sciibed. I shall be glad to tak Emmerich called on the LSU 
whiskey in her hand turned to such steps as jnay be necessar; president to close the stadium if 
her 10-year-old daughter in the to e.stablish the truth of the charg; nece.ssarv. "until reasonable de- 
seat behind her and said, 'honey,, es he makes. jcencv can prevail— until self re- 
■et mother pour you out a drink.' "If they are not true, I am surispecting fans can be proceted 

from such abuses." 



SJ-47-//-4 



[Drinkers Asked to Stay Away 
From Louisiana State Stadium 

Baton Rouge (/P).— Louisiana State University President Harold W. Stoke said bluntly last 
night that persons who wish to use the school football stadium as a place for drinking are not 
welcome at JvSt' home games. i 

/ gaiiica. I '-J Here is . . . general agree- 

Stokr B sta'piiT nfvas issued in connection with the recent "lent that the students conduct 
Chargo-of 'a Mis.-i.v-ippi newspaper editor, Oliver Emmerich of 'bemselve.=; well . . ." Stokes said, 
the McC.'omb Entrim-isf^ .lournal "^ ^''" ^'■'"' ''""^■'"''p'' "i^" 'he 

^1 majority of people who come to 
per-/lthe games come for the purpose 



Minority Blamed. 

Stoke said in his written state- 
ment last night that whereas he 
would see that police enforcement 
(vas tightened on tippler^ he felt 
that "a small miuority bf ' trre- 
iponslbie persons' had'Tinvited 
Emmerich's crltici^ny. \ . 



He said, too, that he ^ i^ 
onally proud of the con(|<jct'"'of 
he Louisiana State s 1 1, d ^ r, ^ 
"iod>'." He particularly empha- 



of seeing football. No wondni 
they feel indignant that they and,, 
respectabre university should./ 



ized this point, but did pot en- ibe indicted for the acts of a small 
ter into a controversy sponsored number of irresponsible people.' 
recently by Louisiana sports writ- 
ers who declared that most of the 
hard drinkers at the Ole Miss 
gariie were Mississippians, 



SJ-47-IHX 



299 



Pupils Receiving Mention 



Seeks Singing via Chemistry 



RV HKI.KX E. Wl It/.I.ow 

.Shps SI inlying clicinistry — so 
the can be a singer. 

TliHis \hc WHv Baibiiia Bier- 
niaii. aiiriK(i\e young senior at 
Lr>iiliiie coiii-^je. Y)'i'~ i'- 

Shos niiikini; plans ir) \vork in 
a chenii-u> tali ihis snimner — so 
■he ran take mmlelini; Ic-sons so 
j«lie i-Hii mi III New Vnik lo be a 
model— and uilh Ihe inum v she 
makes nioileling. lo .~' \> re 



Triple-Career 
Girl Has a Plan 

In the meantime, It isn't all a 
mailer of "great expectations" as 
far as Barbara is concerned. She 
isn't letting the grass grow under 
her feet, miisicall.v speaking. She's 
>Ui(iyiiig voice at Loyola — and 



Tiipk 




P" 'o h\ Thf Tlmes-PlcayL 

R.\RR.\K.\ BIKRM.W 
there's a ""oni; in her hp;irt. 



NOTP-^3-2-29 



she's a member of the New Or 
leans Opcia House Association': 
chorus. "Its lots of fun,' she says 

..^!e-Caieer Girl 

In looks Baibaia isn't a hi 
what you'd call .scientific. "Clam 
orous" is the woid wed like t< 
u.se — except that it doesn't givi 
you an idea of her serious inten 
and direcl intelligence. 

Although cheniistiy is lo be thi 
starting point on her singinj 
journev. it's the only one of thr 
three careers she's contemplating 
in which she has had no practica 
experience. She appeared af 
Countess Ceprano in "Rigolelt" 
when she «as l.'i — anil once she 
liad a small part in ".Martha " She 
has al.so done a bit of modeling. 
.Mother Majelhi. head of Ursuline 
college s Spanish and public rela- 
tions departments, says. 

Barbara's a native of New Or- 
leans—and one of two daughters 
of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Biernian. 
She began singing when she was 
a wee bit of a girl— made her first 
appearance on the stage in high 
school operettas as a junior. 
That's when she joined the opera 
chorus too. 

Vou can hear her soprano, akso, 
in the college glee club and choir. 

Turns (o Chorus 

Hut she doesn't confine her in- 
terests solelv to singing— and 
chemistrv. her college majors. 
She's a Thalpomenian, honor dra- 
matic groui) — and the glee club's 
vice-president. She rates scholas- 
ticallv too. Mother Majella says- 
has two college fourrageres (giv- 
en for scholastic merit), an aver- 
age of 93 or better for the year, 
and is president of the U-Club. 
an honor group. 

RHibara hasn't time to squeeze 

much el.-c into her day. but she s 

planning to join a Palestrina 

chorus being organized bv the 

Rev. Robert Stahl. musical in- 

"Tstruclor at Notre Dame seminary. 

1 Her other hobby's gardening— 

' when she can find time from 

singing and chemistry, that is. 

Struggling with tesi tubes and 

formulas isn't just a means to an 

- end for Barbara. In her case it« 

■not that 1 love chemistry less. 

but that I love singing more. ' 



300 



jTeich Senior Advisers To 
Freshman Girls Named 

Ruston.— Eighty-three Louisiana Tech coeds have been 
selected as senior advisers to freshman girls entering the 
college at the beginning of the fall semester on Sept. 13. The 
senior students will return to the college from their summer 
vacations on Saturday, Sept. 11. 

The new students wiil arrive at Cotton Valley; Dorothy Baker, 

the college, beginning on Sunday, " 

Sept. 12. They will be met by 
the senior coeds, who will assist 
the newcomers in preparing for 
their entrance examinations and 
registration. Freshman registra- 
tion will be on Tuesday, Se^t. 14, 
and upperclassmen will register 
on Wednesday and Thursday 
Sept. 15-16. 

Those selected to serve as 
senior advisers are: 

Clyde Connell. Belcher; Olive 
Ann Sumlin, Simsbord: Edna 
Briggs, Oak Grove; Alice Harriss, 
Bernice; Hosalie Hatgiud, Green- 
wood; Ro.-;cmary Stcrnhg, .Mans- 
field; 'Carolyn Watsor. Hmner; 
Jane Brown, IJonwr; KuA: Gill, 
Homer; Nc1'.^\d McDonald, lones- 
boro; :^Iary l.ynch, Rus'on;"- Eber- 
line Beatty, Uuston. 

Margaret Colvin. Ruston; Hazel 
Whelan, Ruston; Marjorie Kelly. 
Ruston; Rita Harrison, Ruston; 
Anne Baker. Ruston. 

Hilda Stephenson. Ruston; Nan 
Terrill, Huston; Mary Olive 
Chandler, Huston; Betty Jo Shep- 
jpard, Marion; Eugenia McBride, 
[Alexandria; Mary Lee Koonce. 
I Quitman. 

Chlotilde MeCasland, Oak Grove 
Eloise Mounger, Ruston; Janice 
Garmany, Logansport; Eleanor 
Averett, Logansport; Claire Baird, 
Homer; Gene Courtney, Monroe; 

Sybil Kelly, Shreveport; Kathleen „ .u ^ 

Thompson, Bastrop s^tieth Durrett, Arcadia; Norma 



Helen Smelley, Bienville; Mary 
Francis Manry, Plain Dealing; 



Ratcliff, Taliulah; Alice Cole, 
Bossier City; Elaine Taylor, Jena: 
Frances Sue W y n n, Bernice; 
Eloise Brown. Delhi; lone Wors- 
ham, Shreveport. 



Homer; Henrietta King. Tullos; 
Violet Atkins, Shreveport. 

Sue Ellen Proctor, Urania; 
Carolyn Deal, Shreveport; Patsy 
Ruth Newman, Ruston, Dorothy 
Willet, Jonesboro. 

Mary Mosley, Homer; Mabel 
Ratcliff, Juntion City; Jean Gray. 
Logansport; Virginia Hargrove, 
El Dorado; Bonnie Jean Ginn, 
Mer Rouge; Billie Jean Massey, 
Ferriday. 

Zoe Ann Poimbouef, Logan- 
sport; Elaine Nyegaard, Farwer- 
ville; Bobbie Smith, Shreveport; 
Mary Blunrell, Jonesboro; Jose- 
phine Cousins, Hodge. 

Elaine Burgess, Ruston; Bennie 
Mel Liner, Vienna; Dolly Aulds, 
Choudranl; Rita Catherine Dug- 
dale, Ruston. 

Katie Lou Cooper, Ruston; Mil- 
bur Jeffcoat, Hilly; Mrs. Ira C. 
J a g g e r s, Jonesboro; Lamerce 
Tucker, Lillie; Maurice Stokes, 
Ruston. 

Clandine Crawley, Jonesboro; 
Dorothy Hudson, Jone.sboro; Beth 
Holstead, Ruston; Billie Eaves, 

Cimhoro. 

Nelwyn Sledge, Shrevepoi-t: 

Joan BeviUe, H'aynesville; Mary 

Lou Anthony. El Dorado, Ark.; 

Dorothy Dowdy, Shreveport; 

Betty Fuller, Dubacli; Carolyn 

Lee, Columbia. 

Billie McCalla, Shreveport; 

Billie Jewel Sanders, Kilborn; 

Beth Durrett, Arcadia; Norms 

Craig. Oak Grove; Betty Smith 

Minden. 
Beula Mae Civens, Bastrop; JoWi ^^^a^garet Fisher. Shreveport; 
Rafriiff Taiii.ioh. ai;„„ /-„i„ Mary Elizbeth Sparks, Homer; 

Virginia Smith, Bastrop; Carolvn 



SJ-48-7-I2 



Haggard, Greenwood; Lucille Mc- 
Call, Eros; Van Pruitt, Monroe. 

Bettye Beasley, Bastrop: Joann 
Weldon. Bernice; Marv Thomas, 



STATE LAW REVIEW 
TO PRINT ARTICLE 
BY LOCAL STUDENT 

Baton Rouge, June J7, (Special) — 
Article! written by two North Lou- 
isiana men, have been oboscn (or 
publication In itn tuue released this 
month of Louisiana Law Review, 
professional publication of the Lou- 
isiana state unlveiBlty law school. 
Articles by Pred Jcr.ee, RayvUle sen- 
ior, and John Jaui Woodley. 853 
Robinson, Shreveport. graduate of 
1B48, win appear. 

Jones' contrlbikon 1^ » discuaslon 
of a recent decision dJ/ihe Loulalana 
Supreme court d«-»llng with the 
rights of the empk. ee« widow under 
the Louisiana Workmen's Compen- 
sation act. T^oodlpy contributed a 
discussion of the recent decision of 
the United Staiee Supreme court 
awarding mineral rights off the coast 
of California to the United States 
govemnf*nt. This article waa choaen 
m April by the L S. U. law faculty 
as the b»8i. student contribution of 
the year. 

This Is the second occasion on 
which the Review haa published 
material by each of thes men, Jones 
having written an article for the 
March. 19*8. Issue, and Woodley for 
the Issue which appeared In March. 
1947. Jones is a member of the 
senior law class ^no will graduate In 
February. 1940. Woodley graduated 
In May. 1948. ^ 

Youth, 21, Going 

Back to Classroom 

PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 11.— (/P) 
— Edward Lee Beahm, 21 — para- 
lyzed from the waist "down since 
a roller skating acident fotced him 
to stop liis formal schooling in the 
sixth gradfc-»-is g^^.ng back tu the 
classroom. 

This fall Kdward will drive in 
a specially - sqi-ipped automobile 
of the typo I'sed by ampnt.'es to 
the Universi;., of Pennsylvania to 
start work as -i iroshman. 

For despite his childhood injur- 
ies Eward put in hours of volun- 
tary study at home, successively 
completing his grade, junior high 
and senior high school courses- 
the latter with honors. 



ATT-'fy-S-ll 



301 



TULANE GIVES 
HIGH HONORS 
I TO IMMIGRANT 



Man Who DiHn"! Vim^U 

Grade School ^a:)l«•*l 

Phi Brla Kiippa 



New Orleitn^. April ii iJV^. — A 
/oung YvieoKlftv iininigrant 'vhoae 
Kontmor nohool edvicntinn "as llmlt- 
Ml to tht ftrs'i And ^fcond gradp!; 
«a( elrcied 'o Pht Bn* Kappa at' 
rulane mil', ei-sity tod:iy. | 

Phi BetA Kappa '..=; a national hon- 
orary scholastic fraternity. Elecv;, 
tlon to Its mpmbe'shlp Is eonslderea 
one of the highest honors a ptiident^ 
can obtain. ,/ I 

The younK Yugoslav !.« Erii! Vela,, 
born In PodEora, Y\igo.slavj8 Mn 1921. 
He entered the fl'st jrarleln that 
country but his e6iic.>i;on was In- 
terrupted In !?TO vjien hi« family 
moved to Bura«, La. 

The next year Ei>i11 did nut (to to 
achool becausp h» oild not spealc 
English, hut in 1030 he entered the 
second grade of a aouth Louisiana 
grammar school. 

Family finances and the distance to 
the school, however, made It neces- 
sary for him to quit school at th»; 
end of that year and go to work. ' 
j For Emil there wa.s no more formal 
' education until 1942 when he vol-i 
j unteered for the Seabees. While serv-j 
Ing In the Aleutians, and later In 
the South Pacific. Emil began to take 
correspondence courses through th« 
U. S. Armed Forces Institute. 

When he was discharged In 1945, 

I h» applied for admission to Tulans 

1 university. Authorltlee there told 

I him he would first have to complete 

his grammar school and high school 

education, 

Emll pleaded with them, and 

finally a faculty committee gave 

' him a special entrance examUiatlon 

which he passed. He was allowed to 

enter on a probationary basis. 

Because of his outstanding record 
he »,t* elected to Phi Beta Kappa, 
and wa.s among the 28 studentsljom 
Tulane's 7,000 fo honored. P^^ji 

J4 



I 



She's a Double-Double 
Threat in College Lite 



Only once has there come to L'r- 
euUne college a sludeiii who was 
president of her class all four 
years — from freshman right 
straight through senior. 

Ursuline college, just 21 years 
old, is not Ursuline academy, old- 
est girls' school in the United 
States, founded some 220 years 
ago. Mother Ma.iella, head of the 
Spanish and public relations de- 
partments, points out. 

Joyce Routier Is Ursuline's 
fourth-teimer. She Mas just one 
year past sweet 16 when she came 
to college, fresh from St. Francis 
de Sales academy in Houma, her 
home town. 

Double President 

She's one of six children — five 
sisters and one brother — the only 
"man" in the family in the young- 
er generation, born October, 1947. 
Joyce's father is a vice-president 
of the Citizens' National Bank and 
Trust Company in Houma. Her 
grandfather is former City Judge 
Eugene V. Routier. 

Joyce Is really two kinds of a 
president — she's also chief execu- 
tive of the college glee club. She 
loves music and has played the 
leading role in at least one college 
operetta. 

In dramaiics. she's a four' It- 
termer, also — made TlialponiPiii- 
ans, hoiuir ilramaiic siviciy for 
four straight >eais at collogc. 

She's a i hemistrv niajnr and 
math mii'.ur — and if \ou looked, 
you've seen her name twice in 
"Who's ^\■|ln in the American Col- 
leges and Iniversities," She be- 
longs to the student <i>uncil, 
Ibero-American Circle and Las 
Flores de CasUlle, honor Spanish 
•ociety. 

Athletics. Too 

But the brown-eyed senior has 
a gayer side — in addition to her 
chemical and musical knowledge. 
She rushed breathlessly around 
the campus as general chairman 
for Ursuline's Mardi Gras ball this 




. . . first four-t«irm«c_ 

♦.year, sponsored by the senior 
girls and was a maid in the Hou- 
ma Carnival court. 

In athletics, Jo.vce shines on two 
varsitv team.s — basketball and vol- 
leyball. 

Ursuline likes hei' so much 
they've asked her to sta.v after her 
graduation in June as teacher of 
music in the academy, sajs Moth- 
er Majella. 

But come fall, Joyce plans to 
continue her studies at Loyola I 
university , . while teaching 
music at'Ursuline! 
ahreveport Student 

Outstanding Scholar 



NOTP-48-3-i4 



A Tui&ne tuUveralty student from 
Shreveport has been recognized as tne 
outstanding undergraduate scholar 
of Zeta Beta Tau, tjatlpnsl social tra- 
ternity. ' 

He Is Morris S<hartf . 1,8/. T*C °^^ 
son of Mv. and Mrs, Lester D. Scharif ; 
jof Shreveijort. . j 

j A senior in the cffllege'i.-: fcrts and 
'■clen/e.-. at TtUane, Scnarffs out- 
' standing scholastic re^ord enabled 
him to win over 1.500 other studenu 
from 40 colleges and universities. 

The award was announcad at the 
recent national convention oi the 
traternlty In Cleveland, Ohio. /^^ 



302 



St. Landrians Win Top Honors 
At SLI in Studies, LeadersJiipj 

A large group of St. Landry parish students at i 
Southwestern Louisiana Institute, from Opelousas, j 
Eunice, Washington, Arnaudville, Port Barre, Morrow j 

and Grand CoteaU, diS- ond year womm sludpnts. inclu.l- 

dinguished themselves this «'^ ^:''^" ^*'"'">' °^ <^'"""'' "^°^'-«" 

year, by mention in "Who's Who 



One-Year Degree 



Among Students in American col- 
leges," by winning leadership and 
scholarship honors, and by other 
outstanding citations. 

They were honied at a special 
convocation inkthAmen's gjinnas- 
lum. \ \ 

Erlce Vig* of Op»lousas became , 
a member ol Btue V^ey, national 
honorary fraterAity, and Dean l< 
V. Harrell o9 Cpelouseis. already 
a member, was presented at the 
event. 

Listed In "Who's Who" were 
HATVpy \ . Gardiner, Dean 11. 
Harrell and Elaine Louise Vott- 
ler, all of Opelousas. 
Among members of Vermilion 



Jackie Brown of Opelousas. Wy- 
mie Pruetlo Kiddi-r of Arnaudville. 
Margie Simpson of Morrow, In.s 
Wyblc of Washington and Glenora 
Jor_y of Eunice 

SENIORS who had a 2.5 aver- 
ago or better included Joseph 
Eugene Rivette of Arnaudville. 

JUNIORS included Coy Carroll 

Hail. Joe Allen Hundley and Char- 

Morcll Milburr., all of Eunice 

SOPHOMORES included John 
Atkins Brown of Opelousas. Geo- 
rege Wallace Haydel of Arnaud- 
ville. Louis WiUio Ryder of Port 
Barre and Mildred Louise Cazau- 
dcbat of Church Point. 

FRESHMEN included Oscar 
Jo.scph Bienvcnu of Opelousas ai 




honor society presented were Glenora Jory of Eunice 
Wanda Kidder of Araudville and 
Ola Marie Coates of St. Landry 
PLEDGES of Lamda Omega 
honor society for first and .sec- 



\V iilii.m Hamburger, of New 
York, has earned his bachelor's 
degree after only one year's 
studies at the University of Chi- 
cago College. The institution 
permits students to study ac- /^/\\ 



•'rln(t. 

<« the M 



»900 .SCHOLARSHIP 

AT F.SU IS GRANTKr) 
SHREVEPORT STUDENT 

Lr»\, rrunk Moor». »r.n of Mrs. 
T. H. 8norterm» Mn .stophen,«on 
•'r»ft. h«. h#,n «w«r(1e<1 a »900 f.l- 
lowshlp at LrulsUn, st»(» unlvfr- 
..'v^ .rror^ing to .n Arno„ncPm<. 
ft RI.p H Cox. flirvfpr 

•••hooi of rtydriulio ^i^. 
Moor.. M. ,.«, cho^ii 

Inw..hlp B-Jnnrr on «fi. ,.„„ „, „„ 

.rhoU.tir r«-Arri ,nd , p.p.r on 
„»»!» -opir Th. Advi.-a^Mity of Pro- 
'Tirtlng < Tidewater ransi, Npw Or- 

l«n. to tv»p WM.r In the Gulf. 

• nd Also , p,x.d Wat»r L»vel Harbor 

• t Nfw Oreann." 

Th» fellowship was MtablishPd by 
I|«»'" r. Alexander, prwld.nt of th* 
Tidewater Canal association 

A p-aduate of Byrd high school m 
the ela» of ibm. uoot» served three 
yeiir. in the n„^y and wa, jradu- 

• ted from LSU last Mav He h^s 
f«turn»d to LSU to begin hi. ead,,- 
•te atudlas. y^^i^ 



T^,^ ¥ ^^., LJ^--,«.-* cording to their own speed. ^ 

aa ¥ err r^' . -J^^- MartinviUe 
At LSU Utven ^. u ^r .^ 

W.M.Meyers .f^g^c/i Wmm 



William Morrison Meyers of Lafay^ 
ette has been Initiated into the Lou- 
isiana Chapter of the Order of the 
Coif in Baton Rouge. 

Induction Into this organization 



(Special to the Advertiser! 
ST. MAR-nNVILLE, July 10 — Miss 
Sylvia Braquet, daughter of Mi: Elm- 
er Fournet, has been declared winner 



the i<?iT the highest scholastic honor bestowed .,.„..,„ . 
" ^" by the Louisiana State University Law of the National French contest in se- 
- •• cond year French, Miss Jeanne Cas- 



School and is restricted to a very small 

percentage of the graduating class. At tiHe, professor of Romance Languag- 

this initiaUon five other students re- es at St. MarlinviUe High school, has 

ceived this honor aad John B. Four- announced. ,i . . 

not. senior associate justice of the Lou- In a letter from the America* Assoc- 

isiana Supreme Court was made an lation of T-.^hers of French, Miss Bra. 

honorary member. Quet was 24'en the choice of two 

M°yers. a senior In the L. S. U. law scholarships J- one to M;!ls College 

school is also associate editor of the at Oakl.-^nd.i California and thy other 

Louisiana Law Review and has served to SouUi \v.> rftern of Memphis. Tennes- 

as president of the J- S. U. chapter of see. Thi> Icjtter advised thai a medal 

Phi' DelU Phi, intem^onal legal fra- and other ^wards were to follow 



tcmrty. He was rwAitly named a 
member of the Pbr I9tppi PW nation- 
al honorary society who selects seven 
percent of each gradu-'.tion class. This 



Miss Bratju't, a valedictorian of her 
class of 1948 and receivef of nearly 
every honor bestcwed by St Martin- 
viUe high shcool to graduates, says that 



Top-ST-4«-7-6 



i$ leported as one of the highest hon- she will not be able to accept eitherl 
ors that can come to a student at L. S. of the two scholarships. She plans to| 
U_ tenter the order of the Sisters of Mer- ; 

Mr Meyers is the son of Mr. and cy at Webster Grove, Missouir' i 
Mrs, Frank \?in. Meyers of 1422 John-] September, 
iton St '"■ C^^ ^ ' 

LOA- ^«- 5- g B<sVVo>n^ LDAM8-7-IO 



303 




lyiARCUS SPEED AND FRIENDS 

. . . lifa In a wheelchair was not for him. 

Lad, 8, With No Feet Balks 
at Life in a Wheel Chair 

Eight-year-old Marcus Speed romped with kids in the school 
yard this morning. 

He was Klad school was open because it meant seeing all of 
his friends again. 

As the boys got together for ^am early morning baseball game 
before classes began. Marcus grabbed ud the bat. 

••Throw the ball." he yelled. ' He' could pitch, bat, and run 

u ^*l^"v n""'"?^^',"^ 7^"'"^ y idown «y balls just as good as 
hit the ball solidly and ran hard. ! „i»rf,„ „f »v,„ „,v,^.. n^ ° i„ ,i,„ 



He ran just like the other 
kids — but they had feet and 
Marcus did not. 

His "feet". were heavy clotn 
wrappings bound tightly around 
his slim ankles. 

Marcus lost both feet when he 
fell under a train in December. 
'We Hare Fun' 

The youngsters stout heart 
would not let him reconcile 
himself to life in a wheelchair. 

He was going to get bark 
with the gang and play baseball 
and maybe even football, +iis 
'•favorite games." 

"I wanted to get back to 
school, too." the bright-faced 
boy said. "We have fun here. ' 

And he was having fun this 
morning. 



, plertty of the other kids in tlic 
Thomas Jefferson school yard 
this- morning. 

Maybe, l^'ootball 
I When the school bell rang he 
I' raced ahead of the other kids 
' and up the stairs to the third 
I grade classroom where h i s 

I education stopped abruptly late 
last year. 
Marcus rides to school on a 
chain drive tricycle but he's 
learning to ride a bicycle, too. 

"I wouldn'f be surprised tj 
see Marcus playing football with 
the boys this year," said Joseph 
Abraham, school principal. 
"That kid has more courage 
than I've ever seen in a child." 

"He's a good student, Jtopri! 
A-braham added. (2^ ) 



NOS- il^^s^ 



Jewish Student 
Gives Arab Home 
at Boston College 

BOSTON, Dec. 18. — (uP) — 
Jews and Arabs are fighting in 
the Holy Land, but in Boston's 
back bay a lonely Arab has been 
given a h'-mie b.\- Jews in their 
fraternily house, ^it v. as j;e%caled 
today. 

Principal.-- in tliis story of ln.tdv- 
erly lo\f ^re EiiuifinA Catto,i_ r% 
year-ohl A-ab from BfelesUne uov. 
studyin;; • ' ,'csait Boston CoMego, 
and Milt Ciatis of Biooklirte. a Jew- 
ish studciil a- P.G.slon llnivcisiry. 

HomoMck iM a room he ob"i.ained 
only after diligent search, Catton 
struck up an acquaintance with 
Gans who told him some months 
ago his fraternity, Tau Epsilon 
Phi, planned to open a new house 
in October. 

"Eddie, I think we can squeeze 
you into a room there," Gans said. 
Since November the Ai;ab and 
the Jew have shared a comfort- 
able double room on the fourth 
floor of the Jewish , trjiternity 
house. , '' 

The welcome he received has 
confirmed his priginal belief that 
America is the land of opportunity, 
regardless of race or creed, Catton 

ATT-47-JZ-r8 



Teddy Tannehill, 6, 
Wins Artist Award 

HUSTON, La , May 10— Teddy 
Tannehill, son of Dr. and Mrs. T. 
L. Tannehill has won an award in 
the Milton Bradley "America the 
Beautiful" contest. Teddy is six 
years old and is in the first grade 
at the Tullos Elementary school. 
The following is quoted from a 
letter sent lu him by the Milton 
Bradley Co- ,,j, ly. 

"I wish ■tn -ivise yoi ' /hat your 
entry in thr. ' '.^jllon Bia/'ley 'Am- 
erica the F.'autiful' <»ntest has 
been selert«>d oy-ji groi-.p of prom- 
, inent artists, a.s tiie best for its 
grade in your state. I wish to per- 
sonally congratulate you a? do the 

fi'-e leading Trtists who selected 
your entry for this single honor. 
All state and national winnen 
were listed in the current issue ul 
j American Childhood. 



LOYOLA MAROON 
EDITORS NAMED 

Staff of Student Paper Has 
Annual Banquet 



Appinnimont of Harold K. Bci- 
riRaii. Jr.. as executive ediioi- of 
the l.oyola Marnon. publication of 
IX)yola univnslty. was annriumed 
Sunday nitht at the annual stu- 
dent st;iff banquet at Arnauds 
restauiant. 





\ 

FUXAN BFRRIGAN 

Others named to the staff are: 
Arthur t"uxan. business man- 
ager; Alvin Beiker, managinp ed- 
itor; P'erriinand Schlumbreclit, 
news editor; Rose Mary Gutierrez, 
desk editor; Phil Johnson, sports 
editor, and Carrol Van Gaffen. ad- 
vertising manager. ■ 

Guest speaker was William F'itz- 
patrlck, editor of the New Orleans 
States, who spoke on the "Free- 
dom of the Press" and stressed its 
need If the world is to remain 
free. 

Mr. Fttzpatrirk said that free- 
dom of the press "has been 
maintained by the press itaelf — 
those who own the newspapers i 
and those who worit with 
news." He added that if the 
"I'nlted States is to remain free 
it miut always hare a free 
press." 
An appeal for the adoption of a 
standard code of ethics and morals 
came from the Rev. Lester F. X. 
Guterl, S. J., assistant dean of the 
university. 

Father Guterl said (that news- 
paper writers "should never crit- 
icize a JuimaH insiiiuiioii if it is 
not immoral and nnles-i sompthjng 
better in ii» P'-ice can he ofoi^. 
Constructive? (liiiiifim is c'^atly 
needed." he j^Mcrf • 

Gold ke\s u.r mitstanainfr Avnik 
on the .Maraoii were present ml lo 
Mr. Johne«(n !'■(■ teature writme, 
Garland Hjnirs as the best re- 
iiorter and HerrlRan for^jmting 
, nc best editorials. /^J^J 

i\jOTP^^8-5-/7 



LEADING ROLE ACTORS— Wallace Gray. left, and Hunter Nor- 
niand. both of Alexandria, will portray major characters this week 
in the I^uisiana College production of Shakespeare's "Julius Cae- 
sar." The play will show two nights in the Alexandria Hall audi- 
torium of the camp :s. with curtain tmie scheduled for 8:15 p. ni 
Thursday and Fri. v, April 29-30. Professor MacDonald Held,' 
head of the speech ■• partment. is director for the show. 

W lUace Ofay \. ill play Brutus, which is in reality the major 
role if the production that has been called "a play about Julius 
Caes.i '' Ho -s a .-;<'iior speech major, is the business manager 
for tl . coHo;4v newspaper, and is well-known in Central Louisi- 
ana i.ir his previous p»>rformances in Louisiana College Theater 
proc :o.tion< 

Pla>inK ("Bssius. the chief conspirator in the "assassination of 
Caesar, is Hunter Normand. Normand. who graduated from the 
college in January, has also done work in the theater. He will 
receive his b;i[ Imii' of • .'s- demei" ■ May. 



ATT-48-4-28 



Byrd High Play, 
Two Cast Members 
Receive Awards 

The Byrd High School play, 
i^ittle Women. ' and two mem- 
bers of its cast received special 
awards Saturday at the first state 
■Irama festival at Northwestern 
State College. Natchitoches. 

Charlyn Hutchinson, who 
alayed Jo, was named to the all- 
slate cast, and Claru K'm nig, who 
alayed. Mrs. March, \v.is presented 
in hoiidrsWe mem "n a^ard. 

"Lit I ^ Wonien" ^ r,^ awarded a 
super)"!' r.u ing hy itjr National 
iThe • ' Society f<r Us rneril on 



I The 



'o.(ley festival, first of.l| 



its kind to be held in the state 
was cosponsored by the National 
Thespian Society and the North 
western speech department Eight 
high schools presented one-act i 
plays and were rated either good 
l| excellent or superior. 'I 

Other superior' ratings: Con ' 
verse. Istrouma. Lake Charles 
and Sulphur High Schools Ex i 
cellent ratings: Rayvilie, Bolton I 
and Natchitoches high schools 

Others named to the all-statP 
cast: Margaret Taylor, Converse- 
Jack Reuvnnell, Istrouma; James! 
Harris, Istrouma: Dora Lou Jar 
vis, Istrouma, and Sherrill Milner 
Lake Charles. 

Other recipients of honorable 
mention certificates: Annie Merle 
Pugh, Converse: Bobbie Lynn 
Boydstun, ' Natchitoches: Houston 
Noreau, Bolton; Pat Chenet, Lake 
Charles and Ray Thompson, Rav- 
,vllle. 



S J -3 -8- 48 



305 



PLWS I.N (:0\( I,|{T 




Jfrrv MiirlDii. is-x"'"'-"''' »"" "' 
Mr. mill Mr>. J. W. Morton. «KK 
Slaltrry ItoiilvMiril. unci a Junior at 
thr Ka<lniitii Hrliixil i>r inii'lc hi 
Ru<hp»trr. >. V.', reifntlv took part 
In a ronrrrt In Kllhoiirn llinitrr 
ill K<M'lif-tpr. H» pertormra ■tht 
"Rhapwiillr for Savaiilioiir and Or- 
rhmira" b,i Hfliii-"!. Morion w«» 
nrlrrtPil »<liiiol rr|He»diinll»r to 
the \ p « /N' i7T\ >■ ! » I f ,Mii«lc 
awuM-lalliiij i'oiiv*uil>>ii i<.-lil 
rnur Iit-v. il. r' <iiiiiil in. -I 
tiir Mill) rlMir lit IliP s'Htr liilrr- 
I'ollPKMr li.iiiil*'or Nr* t'oik M.lte 
thin ySar. MiHlon, « lin ' ''^ 

tows 

man lindilH.vii lln'. 21. lie will to 
to Hollinood. Calif. , iir\l miniinrr 
ta Ktiidv with thp MIckp.v (illlrttr 
Srhwil of Mii<ilr. Morton was (rad- 
uatrd rruni Bjrd ^IjCli M-hool 
1843. 



iifur 



I" .ivni. «|inii»ii, fi 111' I- «iiri*\ii<fi 

Aard hi.' liacliPliir l>l iii>i.Ji <Ip- 
•*, Hill lip hninr for tlir riir'l<l- 



7 6^" 



. — • I 

TulaheNewcomb Groups I 
Do Fine Job on 'Rudd'igore' 

BY MARIE GOODSPKED 

• "Marking a quarter century of Gilbert and Sullivan opera at 
N'ewL'.inb college, the Tulane-Xewconib choral groups presented 
"Uudciigore' or "The Witch's Curs e" last night at Dixon Hall, New- 
comb campus. * " 

The satire in Tjoth Gilberts li- Warren Gadpaille gave inter- 
bretti and Sullivan's music plus pretaiions of the shy \ oung farm- 
the easy flowing melodies and|er and the ivluctantl\ cruel ba- 
the tongue twisting arias make ron. Sir Ruthven .\^iirgatroyd, 
up a combination of entertaining jthat have' vai*'y ^beciv >urpassed. 
(ioinedy and good nnisic that is There wc.'t other .-M^e^b per- 
kical for .student )-)erformances. formancps. lo iv.;merou-s to com-i 

• There were ?ome fine voices in Unent on iu.'t\ li.v ghavli's May, 
Oie cast, but even more inipor-|.\ubre\ Mo. ire. Winifred Beier, 
tant to the •'Opera." the nctir>glXell Moore \Vin>top.r.r)onald Dex- 
had a knowing, natural quality iter and Chivies Br'^n. . 

that kept the drama moving at I Director- Maynmt) Klein con- 
as brisk a pace hs possible. Iducted the orchestra and greatly 
. .\s Rose Maybud who always laided the flow of the drama, 
resorted to her etiquette book be- 1 Leon Rayder Maxwell was as- 
fore deciding or doing anything. |sistant director and Dan Mullin, 
Jlarv Clarke Webster delighted idramatic coach, 
her "audience as much as she did | "Ruddigore ' will be repeated 
her suitors on stage. tonight at 8:15. 



N0S-i^7-;2-l3 



5 Students From Area 
in Politics' at LSU 

' Central Louisiana was repre- 
sented by five students in tiie 
',student elections in progress at 
Louisiana State University yester 
day and today. 

C. Creighton Owen of Lees 
ville, was elected outright yester- 
day to the office of student vice- 
president for the college of arts 
and sciences. The office of stud- 
ent vice-prp^dent for the law 
school WBS lakKi b.v F.dwin Ed- 
wards of Marksville. Both students 
were unopjfosed. ' 

In the runoff r)<:-ctroi,s called 
today after the voting yesterday 
'left tlie top joJ»s and a good many 
others in dcubt,- vera Olln B 
iQuinn of Gleiuncrs, running for 
'representative at lai'ge in the col- 
lege of agriculture, and C. William 
Schroll of Alexandria, in the race 
for vice-president of tBe coUege of 
engineering. Beverly Bogan of 
Castor was in the competition for 
coed-vice-president of the student 
body. 



OFHCERS ELECTED 
p^; BY CHEMISTRY CLUi 

^'Elertion of Earl Vicknair a 
president of the Chemistry Clul 
of Loyola university was an- 
nounced Sundav. 

Other officers are Charles Jar- 
reau, vice-president: Marie Haves 
secretary, and Drew Baker treas- 
urer. 

Presentatioh of kevs to the fol- 
lowing members of the Nichelaon 
Physics Club for outstandine 
work also i\at announced 

Allard Villpre. Dan wjllsh .<? 
Laurent, Satii Silverman, Edward 
Hughes. Robert Orv. Francis 
Clark. Robert Haslin. Mr. Jarreau 
John Hidalee and Malcolm Tuhr.v' 

The. Rev. .\. William Crandeil' 
deSn of faculties, said tha' final 
examinations will start today and 
continue for two weeks ifi the 
schools of law and denti<5try. Ex- 
ams in the college of phannacv 
arts and sciences, music and busi-! 
ness administration will begin 
Tuesdav f"-^--^ 

(5G 



ST-47-a-ll ATT-18->/5 NOTP-%-5-\7 



306 



STUDENT FROM LUXEMBOURG 
IS ATTENDING COLLEGE HERE 



Joseph Prost Fits In Easily 
With Lite On N. J. C. 

Campus ^ ^ 

EasipR into 4ie undergraduate Iffe 
at Northeast Junior college has 
proved no great difficulty for Joseph 
Pro5t 19-year-old Luxembourg stu- 
dent nnd after a pleesant eight-month 
sojouiTi thw. PioFt \}as developed 
Into a typical A^ericalrv college stu- 
dent. ' / 

Prost ent^W'l 'he iurtior college last 
rebruai> aftrr beina -^olected by the 
Monroe FWrtiy, CI iiB' to be the recip- 
ient of a two-yey exyf-nse paid schol- 
arship, given irv's gesture to broaden 
world relation^ip.' 

The youthful Luxembourger has 
lived up to his promise of superior 
■diolarship. In spite of the language 
difficulty he has made amazing prog- 
ress in all studies and is respected 
by instructors for the long hours 
spent daily digging out the mass of 
facts that come easily to the average 
student. 

While he breezes through language 
classes, he struggles with aocial 
sciences, such as economics, where he 
finds his fund, of English strained to 
t"^e utmost in efforts to translate his 
thoughts from the native German itno 
understandable form. 

According to Joseph, homesickness 
affects him only occasionally. Part of 
this longing for home is allayed by 
the letters and newspapers rac«ived 
from Luxembourg. In weekly pack- 
ets of seven the local paper, 'Ober- 
mosel Zeitung' (Mosel River District 
Newspaper) is mailed to him. Every 
Inch of the paper, including the ads, 
suffers the clo.sest reading, he said. 

•-— ■ —^ — — - 

However, the papers are always one 
month late in arriving, making him in 
reality one month late on develop- 
ments at home. 

Socially, Joseph is fast becoming 
adept. His old-country courtesy and 
graveness, coupled with a friend- 
making disposition, has brought him 
many friends, both among the men 
and the girl students. Being a tall, 
darkeyed, nice looking lad with ai 
pleasing personality and an accent de-j 
scribed by a coed as 'adorable' hasn'il 
appreciably hurt his chancfB with thel 
coeds. 

However, he faced several bleak 
evenings at dances imtil a girl friend 
I promised to teach him the classic 
I 'jitterbug'. Lessons are under way, 
Joseph says, and he expects to move 
I out of the wallflower line soon. 
' Back in Luxembourg Joseph ex- 
celled in local sports. Here he moved 
into a world of youth that grew up 
engaged in sports activities that he 
had never witnessed. But a competi- 
tive spirit carried him Into Softball 




Baylor Studentb 
to Talk on Youth 

Interests of the youth of today 
will be presented by five young 
men from Baylor university, 
Waco, Tex., in a series of meet- 
ings to be held over the week- 
end under the sponsorship of the 
Baptist young people of New Or- 
leans. 

Discussions will be centered 
around the General theme of the 
sessions, 'The Great Difference: 
Christ." 

The group of featured speakers 
are students of Haylor university 
and graduatcs^y.-ho have taken up 
careers in tht .ministry. The lat- 
ter group will be represented by 
Jack Robinson, young pastor of 
the Ninth Street Mission in Waco 

Other member s of the party in- 
clude Charles F'anning of Dallas, 
Baylor football star; Howard 
Butt, theological student at Fort 
Worth, and Franklin Boggs. Bay- 
lor's drum major who will present 
musical selections during the ses- 
sions. 

Open to the public, the ffrst 
imeeting is scheduled for 4 p. m. 
[Friday on the Tulane campus, 
lother meetings, to be held at the 
1st. Charles Avenue vB a p 1 1 s t 
church are schedulefl 'or I-"riday. 
Saturday, and Sunday. 



© 



competition where he was at first 
lost but soon found himself on the 
fundamentals. 

His first football game was confus- 
ing. When an ambulance rushed out 
on the field to carry a player off with 
a broken leg received in the first 
two minutes of the game he decided 
that it definitely different from the 
Luxembourg game of soccer. To lay, 
after witnessing a string of six games, 
he says that he wants to play. 

Joseph rooms in a private residence 
near college. Walt Griffin of Gil- 
bert, Jack Baldwin of Bernice, and 
Jack Millikcn are his room-mates and 
best friends. During the summer 
Griffin introduced Joseph to Louisi- 
ana fishing, mosquitoes, and water- 
melons, while on a four-day vacation. 
Baldwin taught him the classic hitch- 
hiking lore required by most students. 

Plans for Joseph's future revolve 
aroimd the home town, Greven- 
macher, Luxembourg, where his 
father is the mayor and owner of a 
well-established chemical plant. He 
intends to return there at the close 
of the 1948 summer semester. 

He admits, however, that his life 
here has been so pleasant and passed 
so fast that he will not be quite 
ready to live In Luxembourg by 194S. 
A lifetime in America as a professor 
of languages would be particularly 
hard to refuse, hT added. 



MMW-47-II-I9 ^ NDS-4f^^23 



Law Classes 
Elect Heads 

student officers have been 
elected in three classes in the lu- 
lane university college of law. 

E L Ingram of New Orleans 
was picked .to lead the senior 
class; Sidney W. Provensal, Jr., 
Slidell vice-president; J. Gibson 
Tucker, Jr., Leland, Miss., secre- 
tary. * 

In the junior class Eustace L. 
Edwards, Many, was chosen pres- 
ident; Eugene Hupperbauer, Jr 
New Orlesns, vice-president, and 
Gilbert L. Hetherwlck, Shreve- 
port, secretary. 

Elected to office In the fresh- 
man class were Bernard Horton, 
Los Angeles, president; Albm 
Scott, Alexandria, vice-president 
and Mrs. Marion Dismukes Tiche- 
nor New Orle,=»ns, secretary. 

Dr. Harold W. Stoke, president 
of Louisiana State university will 
be the principal speaker October 
29 when Tulane resumes its uni- 
versity convocation Profapis 
The program wiU be held at 10-3',ifC'^ 
la. m.inM- ^'.1:; An<iJitorium. A3) 






307 




CENTRAL. GRAMMAR PROGHAM — The second grade of Central Grammar School (above) gave a 

spring musical program at the school last week under the direction of Mrs. Kathleen Hayden, their 

teacher. 

The Land of Song, a fantasy! was shown agaitist an effective background of color and frjigrant 
spring flowers. The players be-*' 
comingly costumed sang and act- 
ed their parts exceptionally well. 

The program: | 

Piano — Viennese Waltz, Mrs. 
Frank Hayden; Dance and Be I 
Merry — 18th Century, Morris 
Dance; Cock Robin; "Lullaby" — 
From Berceus^e by Godard; "The 
Wind and Ihe Rreeie" f i oin piano • 
Concerfo— Ti h8iko*r^-: Fiock-A- t 
Bye Baby 'Tifc Si. ngtime; i 
"Spring," /fir.'n Melody -jn "F," I 
Rubinstei/i- In the r">od Old 
Wintertime,"' froni Aninr Uis, by 
Chys; Waitwir IcL&fow -Whenf 
Grandma J5 • rflb the Minuet," 
from Minuet, l>y 'Beethoven; "My 
Tiny. Two- Wheel Scooter"; "The 
Jolly Farmer," Shumann; My Lit- 
tle Toy Boat, from Barcarolle. Of- i 
fenbach; When the Circus Comes j 
to Town, from Rilstic Dance. How- l 
ell; "Belli in the Steeple," from 
"Andantino," Lemare; "Marche ' 
Militaire," Schubert. | 

Cast of characters: Queen of 
Song Land, Billie Frances Hust- i 
myre; attendant. Bobby Ligon; ' 
robin, Linda Smith: Bob White, | 
Obie Ford; Crow, Danny Trice; ; 
Cat, Tommy Swafn; Dog, Gerald 1 
Everett; Wind, Larry Haynes. ' 

Chorus — Audrey Fay Brown, i 
Cecelia Cruse, Elda Mae Dubroc, I 
Barbara Foster, DorothyLemoine, 
Antionett? Liotto, Patricia Paul, 
Mary Ann Serio, Hazel Stalnaker, 
Thelma White, Lee Connella. Day- 
ton Crooks, Frank Crook.<!, Willis 
Dickerson, Albert Dozert, Jerry 
Guillory, Gerald Lamartiniere, 
Carl McDaniel, Lester Strong. 

Sara Tom Hornsby, Thelma 
Kennedy, Marilyn Marshall and 
Winifred Craig, in pastel picture 
frocks, were ushers. The back- 
ground was furnished by 
Schwartzberg's. 




(^ 



ATT-^&-3-2l 



from Glartewater, Texas, will appear 
as s soprano soloist In the first 
cltywlde "Shreveport Ser.-r.Klf." to 
be pre>.fni,(l at 8:1% ji. in. fiievday 
In MiP.iU (tr.ju nii(1U«rniiii in tiie 
Centen)»r- i<hlle(!e . >'>ij ii . (^(^ife 
ausplt'F^ h< t!ie Jiiiiuf IWiifffhiT of 
COminen c. A full y^eaitt "' inusl- 
cal e iiteftaiiiment l» proiiil'-'d. 



ATTIE 81 E PI.tMMER 
Miss .\ltle Sue FUiiii'iier of Bos 
sler CItv is a soprano In the <;eii 
tenary eholr, Th^ ".ereyaileri In ro;- 
tumes n(/l\* .>lil')«r)ittli wlir^liiK 111 
a settiitj; yf nOiitiiai pillar^^t thi 
"Shreiepiiit semiaile " ^t M\rt' 'Jl>a 
siidltorii 



ri.l.iirii 
iemiaile ' at M\i 
meml^iy eTenl«e. 



Srt -47-/2-7 



30g 



14 Students Qn Shreveport Girl 

Who's Who List );;'r^°rT°""' 

In Speech Tourney 



Bolton Senior 

Award Winner! 

James Ernest Ratcliff, Jr., 16, 

a senior at Bolton High School, 

Bush, (idughlei- of today was inrornied that he had 

Br\an E Bush of been chosen from among 46.112 

colleges and 1348 Kings highu.y. walked aw^o-^^^^-^oo. ^^en,s_to^w,n a^ 



Listing of 14 Newcomb college 
■tudents will appear in the forth- Martha Jo 
coming annual edition of "Who's ^''"' and Mrs 
AVho in Americ, 



Universities." iwilh top honors in the women's Jimmie was one of 15 top-ranking 

The girls were selected by the division in extemporaneous speak-l students in Louisiana who were 

Newcomb student council on basis ins at the ihirioenth annual LouJ 'I'']fi!i'^^/°r '^^l^^ '^^ {P^Vfi^fl 

, . ^ ,, , . ■■ u . ) . college scholarships being oiierea 

of outstanding scholastic and ex-)'s'ana speech totirnament at ^,y jj^g Pepsi-Cola scholarship 

ira-curricular achievements. Xo^lhwestcrn State College at board this year, and as a runner- 



Ten seniors, five of whom were 



Xa^chiloches. 
This honor 



Included last year, were selected marked her 

along with four juniors. Two-year|has won top 

selectees are Betty Gray of ing in ijie; toiinirimem were 1 

Shieveport, Ruth Boulet Larose; Texas, Okjahoma. Missi.-^->f)pi, Ai' 

Betty Browne. Pat PhiUios and kansa-s .ind, Louisiana coiif'^es am 

Merle Fischer, all of New Or- universmrs. 

leans. 7he .n;; or men's tc;::ii, coni 

Remaining seniors chosen are r.n=ori d "i-iwivi u^ui^ , . ,r a .1 
Marv Alvce Jackson. Monroe, Vir- P^'f^^ «, h !^p ri.rt r I^ ' , 
ginia Jones. Alexandria. Patricia ^^^^'^^.„'^'^',' ^f'^'^^R'S^^^^ 
Evans, Lake Providence. Ela ^!\'^^^P" '■ " "" f've stra.phi da 
Hockaday, Fort Worth, Tex., and ''•»^Pf' o"'>' "-o he eirminated in the 
Mary Ellen Sheehan. New Or- f'"^''^ by Southwestern Louisiana 
leans. Institute. They were the only jun, 

ROTC . Off icers .'"'" team to win all of their prej 

Juniors selected were Elaine 'iminary rounds. 
Jones. Nashville. Tenn.. Frances I Winning two and losing two, Al 
Crumbaugh, Beatrice Rault andQuinonez of San Salvador and 
Page Carey, all of Ne^v Orleans. .I.eonard Lew of Baton Rouge, 

Meanwhile, in the Army ROTC the second junior team, wore eliin- 
unit at Tulane It has been an- inated in the preliminary con- 
nounced that 15 student members '^g^t, 

IVT ^irfn^ThP ^^nrrpm '''.Xol ^"l^'«' '" ^he Oratory compeli- 
the^umt for the current school ,j„„ ^^.^..^ ^^^..^ Robinson and 

The cadet captains are Peter H.l^^.l'"'^-^ Kellers of Freniont, Iowa, 
Beer New Orleans, commanding h">h of uhom fell by the wayside 
officer of Companv "A"; Joseph '" the first roimds. 
- - - Knbxville. Tenn.. M'^s Bush and Dorothy Burt, 



j up he will i.-eceivc $.50 when 
ill! enters college in the fall. 



. he 

for Miss BusH 
'lid year that she The announcement that ,Iimmie 
nings. riu-ticipat'i had won an award in the .$.330,(100 



nation-wide scholarship competi- 
tion was sent to Joseph D. Smith. 
principal of Bolton High, by John 
M. Stalnaker, director of the Pep- 
si-Cola .scholarship board. Mr. 
Smith said that Jimmie was one 
of 575 students in the United Stat- 
es to recei\e the college entrance 
award and that he had participat- 
ed in the competition with 440 
other Louisiana students from 14,'? 
public, private, and parochial 
schools, 

Bolton's winner is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. James E. Ratcliff of 
130 Jefferson Court, Pineville. He 
is a member of the National Honor 
Society, Quill and Scroll, and the 
Key Club, International, and he 

Iis also a member of the editorial 
staff of the annual and school 
paper. An Eagle Scout, Jimmie 
was a counselor at a Boy Scout I 
camp last summer. His father is a 
building contractor, and he plans } 
to study construction engineering | 
at Princeton University. 



E. Stockwell . 

commanding officer of Company ff;^ teammate, and the daughter ,'^" "'he-- outstanding seniors 
"B'- and Charles G, Mitchell. Jr., I ' u ^ ,, , f «f Bolton High School were elect- 
Birmingham. Ala., commanding!"' •*"■ and Jlis. h. u. nuit o: g^j ^y their classmates to try for 



Ala., 
officer of Company "C 

( adel first lieutenants are For- 
»»«t C. Wilson. New ti'-leans, pla- 
toon 'eader^ first I'loon, Com 
pany ' V"; i^am Mn- i la. Tampa 
Fla.. e;. ^cutive offic Companv ;,i,„,.. 
"B" and John R.'R? k. Goshen, ^"^'^ 
Ind., eii''?cutive offic-r Company 
"C: ■ 

, YWCA Founding 

Cadet second lieutenants are 
Robert L. Dobglas, New Orleans, 

platoon leader, second platoon, Louisiana Stale University on School, Shreveport; Henry S 
Company "A": Ray S. Clement. . March 20. when LSU teams will iBradsher, David Weeks Wall, and 
New Orleans: Company "A": Riv- . engage thfe debaters from West Ezra Jasper Westbrook. all of Ba- 
ersR. King. New Orleans platoon Point. ton Rouge High School; Cherie 

leader, first platoon^ Company j ^jjgg g„gj, jj. ^ s„pho,„„,.e in Marie Chachere, St. Joseph's Ac 



n^i'l„^^*i^^l^l?,,,-.'n--''Jr'fiw,.^*r ''he college of arts 'and sciences Memy. and Mary Frances McKoy, 
9rlll"^',??I^P^"^^.? •„!l'i''f,'?.,?',at the uni;-e)<i.v _ University High School, also in 



(184 Herndon. also participated in the Pepsi-Cola sch>)larships. They 
the women's senior debate com- were Armilda Broussard, Warren 
„, , , . ., Broussard, Eloise Capppl, Fred 

petition. They advanced to the Goldstein. Glen Headrick. Cor- 
seniifinals, but were eUminated nelia Howell, Juanita Raxdale, 
John Schroli, Bill Stierman, and 

T^, If ij If n 1 . Jo Anne Trammel. 

Di. Waldo W. Bradc.v associate Ten college entrance awards 
prof;essor of speech, who accom- .^^grg granted this year to high 
panics the teams to off-campus school students in Louisiana, Stal- 
mceting.s. announced that the next naker said. Thev were won by 
forensic event will be held at John Robert Anders, Byid High 



Alker, platoon leader, second pla- I 
toon. Company "R ': Lawrence 
CampuUi. New Orleans, platoon 
leader, first platoon. • Company 
"C"; Charles S. F'ontelieu, New 
Orleans; Company "C": James W 
McCran-. New Orleans, Company 
"C" and Samupi F. Parker. Folev. 
Ala.. Co-in-Tiv "A". C^7) 

Nbs-47-ll-IZ 




SJ -45-3-3! 



Baton Rouge; Sally Gene Clayton, 
leanerette High' School; Jimmie 
Ratcliff, Bolton High School, Al- 
exandria; Samuel G. Wellborn, 
New Orleans Academy: and Mar- 
jorie Zernott. Mount Canii'al Ac- 
ariemv, Lafavctte. 

/\TT-^8->Z9 



309 
Exoracurricular Activities 



Ion.- 



50,000 Pupils Pay Honor 
To Memory of McDonogh 



Special Ceremonlea 

Kqriier. students in the McDon 

ogh. FYank T. Howard, Rudolph 

Danneel. and I,. E. Rabouin 

schools held special ceremonies In 

honor of their benefactors. 

More than 50.000 public s< hool .pupils rxprcssed with flowers Money left by the tour men 

today gratitude to John M-jDonogh, the bachelor whose fortune be- built 3.^ public ' schools. NfcDon- 

came tMe corneifi^ne of putolic today are still benefitting from ogh's $600,000 bequest, which has 

education here, McDonoghs gift. , McDonogh. I dwindled only $150,000 because 

_ _ . „ , . , believe, was the inspiration be- '"« Interest was used in con- 

Beglnnlng at 9 a. m. KimUrgHr-L j„^ ,j^p p^,^,,,, ^j,^j system we structing schools; built 30 of the 

ten children, high ^hooi studprt^Jhave today." , buildmigs. 

and war veterans in postgraduate Twelve-vear-old Kav Stromboe. „ "^""^vjl ^"'l.^n'Jii^^' ?^^^ ^un^ 
studies began filing .ast ^he I^" ^^ixthpade student^ a. Mc^^^^^^^ edu^catf^n^^Thei^Vtuni^ 

fayette Square monument of Mc- .No-^,31, -^oo^. ^^ ^^cDon^l'', ^'^"^^^^^'^^^^^^ , 

" —^ .k«-, —^ . ™ . ♦_ i.i_ haboum Vocational .school, one 

(Another picture on Page 23) ^^° show great respect to him. „, j^e modern technical training 

"I like my .school and think all centers in the South, is a tribute 
of the girls and b<tys in McDon- to L. K. Rabouin who willed his 
ogh schools like their schools, »ntire fortune of some $700,000 to 
too," Kay said. he school, .«> stpm. 

After passing through Lafay- Split with Helm 
ette Square the celebrants filed -j-j^p ,„ii,]j,. i;(i,,,ol 



Donogh to lay flowers at the feet 
of the generous Scotsman who 
willed $600,000 for the building of 
schools. 



They also paid tribute in their 



later .«plit 



schools to all school benefactors (through City Hall where they },;, („iu,np ,v lUi RHhouin heirs 
with particular thanks beiiig ^iv- iwere greeted by Mayor Chep Mor- ,nd receivfl ml' a^out S300 000 
en to McDonogh and three other'rison. One child from each school pj^j^ ,-,.,iom • vip'r- into the con- 
men whose bequeaths builf more 'class was given an opportunity to jtruction nf thr \- ■ •ional school I 
than one-third of the 90 existing be mayor for a minute and sit of-. Music was heme lurnUhed by 

public scTiool buildings in Newjficially at the mayor's desk. ■ - ', 

Some 400 children of McDonogh th»' Sopi \ 'ri -ht Hich .school! 

No. 26 school, Gretna, participated prche.viiH ;i-. ■; n- .pjii', .if -Behr-J 

in ceremonies at the tomb of Mc- ' man. Ni<'hollsi. I'c-c..<, Kaston andi 

Donogh in McDonogh cemetery Fortler High schools. The choral; 

L^frvette"sQ^re^"l2"'of'rhe3r^here he was originally buried, groups of Washington and Mer- 1 

surl^vinTmeS^of the McDon- IJhF-Pi '''!^Ai^°^l.:^t:t lirjl°!r.: ' 

ogh No. 13 class of 1885 placed a' 



Orleans 

Place Floral De»ign, 

As an unusual feature of the 
traditional McDoBogh ceremonies 



floral desigrn on McDonogh's 
monument. 

Some participants in the exer- 
cises tried to put their thanks in 
words. 

School Superintendent Lionel 
J. Bourgeois reminded that in the 
51 years of McDonogh celebra- 
tions "it has never rained, during 
the exercises." 

"The day of sunshine such as 
we have today is typical of the 
"Warmth in the hearts of New Or- 
leanians who express in such a 
tangible way each year their 
gratitude for the bequeath of 
John McDonogh." said Bourgeois. 

And George "Joe" Reiss. 75- 
year-old member of the McDon- 
ogh No. 13 class of 1885, said: 
"Without McDonogh I don't know 
what kind of education we w6uld 
have received. The children of 



land sang the McDonoeh hvm n. 

rsiOS-48-5-7 



As the children and oldster.<»hon-| 
ored the bachelor McDonogh. the' 
.school board and city had plans 
imder way to spend the last of 
the $450,000 In the McDonbgh 
Fund. 
Xew Srhoor~I>P8iKn 

A new school in Gentilly to be 
'built with the money will be a 
'radical departure from the tradi- 
tional design of other McDonogh 
schools in <he vlty. 

School officials are planfiing ; 
one-story modernistic structure. 
It will contrast with the original 
McDonogh No. 1 school built in 
1858 and still in use as an ele- 
'mentary school. 

I McDonogh No. 1 is a two-story 
brick structure healed with anti- 
quated "pol-belly" stove.?. i 



310 



4-H Club Shorf^ittfif-'tis Rai 
Course Opens ^'""^ ^""* 
Today At LSU 



n High Schools To 
Meet for Debate 
At Northwestern 



-NaUhiloclios. Foh S l.M'r- T.ou 
is;ana's Citizens and Politicians o 
TiMuonow took 25 taps at th 
stale's constitution yeslorday a 
-, ., , ,rir"r7r , 'he annual mudcnts Louisiana con 

More than 1.200 AU Ckib boys and stiiutional oonVeniion 
girls from tbrjiijj'iout th» state are ti,-. ..i;.i ^ i - ^ « „ „-- 

expected to atynd . the 3t:n annual,,,^''' ^^""^"'"^ f"'* -•"' P«'- 'o attend the f 

4-H Club shi^; ■ course tatL Louisiana c|,.,V^ 
State Univ4:£::v jjiy m*24i4ccording , 
to an annoimcon.fnt bv '.\ i ■ Abbott, ^"i 
4-H Club A«...^ :, ■ ti?t Lis U. Ag-,|o 
ricultural Exicri i»n Sei\ lic Abbott 



Natchiioihes. — One hundred 
and seveniy-Mx studetfts repre- 
senting n high schools are slated 
annual high 
urire,! that many specific schools debate liinig on the cam- 
is in tlio Louisiana constliu- pus of Northwestern >\ate Col- 
io>. :Utor liearinK Mrs. Irina Tuck- lege Salurdav, a<\..rC-.ng Vo R L 

H.uigc call the Ropp, dire( lor of lorenM*^. Open- 
ciimont "too voluminous, con- ine with a.-. «s^f.i,n.l,r ;„ l;-„ t?: 



said that reg,.-...,;\pn for the Short ^" ;'*,""'' '"'■, "' .'•""•■••"."-■tions. , Arts atidito, aim at 9:15 al v,. the 
be o,r Monday. July 26. '"'^'"'"''P ;?;' T'^^^^^^^ . ^I'^- Clinic Vih cont-t,e tJuTughout 
rucUe. is state affairs >l'aiiman ^he dav uni I ft r. ni. ' 




Course will be on' Monday. July 26. Vucl'^rr i,/ ""'■".^'^^"•■', . ^"'^ 
and that the youngsters will return f"''\ 't • \' ', '^,"''"" 

to their homes on the 29th. f^<ho Louisiana tcaeue of ^V omen Xatchit.H ;,c,. Marthaville. St. 
Highlights of the program announc- ' _,^ ' , ' Marv's / :ademv. Mansfield 

ed by W. C; Abbojt. state club leader. I ^^^ students proposed that: Tli. Havnetv.lp" Bolton Bvrd «;t 
include a general assembly on opening '"""^ ^^^ ^^ lowered to IS: and Viiicen''^ Aiademv' 
night " _ . .. . _ >,„ :.._ _— :j ... , . 

Super 
Jackson. 
01 L. 

the science of farming and homemak ''^"""^''"^ «'^=^'""'"'""" 'for"'can'di- f " '"V *^^I '"" , '" ^^V,' J'^^''^^^"^* 
mg Awards will include, among oTher """^^ """ ''»'^ ''"'"'°'- «'"'' "'^'^' entrv blanks hL's '^n^"^'' I''"'' 
valuable prizes, trios to the National'''^ a.ssessor be required: and the ^""> 1 .]r^ ^"^^ "«' ^et been 
4-H Congress in Sago the Ati.crU^''''^f J"«*'^^ °' "^« ■^l«'«' »>« «'^<='^<' ttlT u ^?' ^^''^ indicated that 
can Royal Livestock Show in Kansas ^"'^ "" eight-year period. The c inic^"^.n, », 

City, and New Orleans later this vear '•''>''>' «'^o "■f"ild l>an all livestock '. '"""^ ^'" "ave as its 
Most of the awards are made possible^*^"' »''« hlrhwavs: adopt piopor- vi%".c J, ,'^^ u^^ analysi.s of the 
by commercial companies which chosef'""-''' rephsT'atiorf: •et^biish n , |"!, "}^" school question: Re- 
this way of encouraging greater in- f'" ''"•'""era; ; ep is l*toti re^ exempt s<^'Ved. that the federal govern- 
terest on the part of all young peoplef"'"'esteadi. Jrirn tan..-- I'ntll the ment should require arbitration 
in 4-H work. i:)\vner,'fia 1 n. " favor. .btc' "income j of labor di.sputes in all basic 

Membership in the 4-H Club is openh"'' ris'.u .stvjbut^ons of home- American industries, 
to all boys and girls interested inf'*'''^ vfx- .iiliin nfuids to all Included on the progitm will 
iBBrning by actual practice how to beh'''"s utn'* >• "■. i QOO povilutlon. The be « lecture on the fundamental 
ptter farmers, better homemakers andP«'herini; Mso proposal that local principles of argumentation, dem- 
Better citizens. The organization is '^^ ""^te ludts he lifted, and that I onstration debates bv two college 
sponsored by the L. S. U." Agriculturall-ill public officials be required to and high school teams, and an 
Extension Service. There are morejhave epeclal traininK. open forum on the current ques- 

than 60,000 club members in the state.l Duncan R. Burford. Ouachita . tion. Critiques will be presented 

High school, wns elected president b.v judges following each debate 
of the convention, which Is spon- held during the Clinic 
sored by the department of social 
sciences. Northwestern State col- 
lege. Dr. Charles G. Whitwell, 
professor of government at the 

college, acted as program ch^pJs^r aenionstration ol slass blowing -wi 

he given by J. S. I^quidlce. 

J. R. Shoptaugh, Jr., a senic 

Piiysics student, will give an ac 

companying lecture to a demon 

everything fro^i iron Wuv ,.. ..ncv^*--*""" °f »'l"''l «'!: H. L. Madi 

— > >. I- ;.i i iiJ. It th^ >\«*i\«n- 1^"" "'" operate WdYM, a shor 

Open u, Public |;".^4V.v;r"-^'.'•"•»^■i -irs-r-ss^s ■••r- :sc 

Louisiana State university's ^"=°''*- J throughout the world. 

Nicholson hall »iU be transformed The demonstrations will .he held other features of the sclentifli 
into a veritable fal^e^ ot sci^nVfi^f'om » """1 9:30 p. m.jach day , ^^hlbltion will be polarized light 
— '.-J T-..1 1. .J as ' I stroboscope, cartesian devils and 

Icsl with the public invited to atteto| oscilloscopes. 
ai« exhibit I ot|i free of charge. 

, Dr. W. A. Rense and Dr. D. A 
Guthrie will be on hand at th 
astronomical observatory to hel 
'identify various stars and planet^ 
as seen through the telescope 






SJ-47-i6-/e 



Physics Exhibit 
AtLSVWillBe 
ten to Public 

Louisiana State university's 



BRA -f8 -2-5 



wonders 
faculty and 
department 



tomorrow- and VriJ^ol 
nd students of t! « ph\-> 



Ligi 
stige 



'^ 



BRA- 48-4-2 1 



311 



Boifon High Notes 

Bit E>ress Club 

At opportunity period Monday, 
all home room representatives and 
any interested faculty members or 
students were urged to attend a 
meeting (o^ thf discussion of the 
new student constitution for par- 
ticipation if the government of 
Bolton. At the meeting the new 
constitution ^^•as read aiid altered 
to fit the A-ishes of ihe various re- 
presentatives. As soon as possible 
it will be presented to Joseph D. 
Smith, principal, for his approval; 
then it will be approved by the 
faculty as a whole; it will then be 
given to "Cumtux," the school 
paper, sa that it can he printed: 
and it will then be \nic<l ..n by the 
student body. 

"The Association for Student 
Participation ii) Bolton Hi?h 
School Government" will have as 
its membei-s: the principal, the ad- 
ministrative officers, the teachers, 
and the students of the school from 
term 8-1 to term VIII inclusive. 
Its purposes are to: aid in the in- 
ternal administration of- the school, 
promote law and order, promote 
the general activities-of the school, 
and to provide educative respon- 
sibilities and privileges which will 
further the democratic ideal. 

The legislative department 
which shall consist of a S'enate 
and a House of Representatives 
shall have vested in it all legisla- 
tive power enumerated in the con- 
stitution. The House of Represen- 
tatives shall consist of two mem- 
bers from each homeroom while 
the Senate shall consist of three 
members from each term In case 
of any vacancies in either house, 
new members shall be elected to 
take their places within one week. 

The duties of the legislature will 
be: to work for the betterment of 
Ihe school, to further the various 
activities of the .school, to have 
charge of the school calendar, to 
make all necessary laws to carry 
out the state purposes of this as- 
sociation, and to appoint a com- 
mittee of eight teachers to be pre- 
sented to the principal from which 
he shall select four as faculty 
sponsors of this organization to 
ser%e for one rear. 



Ballots will be cast for the legis- 
lators and for the executive offi- 
cers on the second Monday of each 
May and the people elected will 
take office at the beginning of the 
next school year. 

Besides these excerpts from the 
constitution, •others are: "A bill 
^ may originate in either house: 
every bill shall be passed by a 
majority of the House of Repre- 
sentatives and Senate before It is 



I The/Httibnal Hort^ Sodety 
I held Ity re^lar lne«ting after 
school ^n Friday, at which tim« 
they discussed the quallficatloni 
' for membership, in order to be 
of help to their honie rooms in 
making the nominations which 
are due next Monday. A tenta- 
tive draft of the constitution for 
student participation in govern- 
ment was read an^ discussed at 
great length. A ^eat deal of 



presented to the principal of the quiet study and -work is being 



carried on through the differ- 
ent organizations and home rooms 
at the present time, with the 
view to decjde practicability of . 
trying to develop more student! 
participation in t^e government ' 
of the school. 

Ushers at the Jennings game 
were Doris Nell Penny, Ann Bol- 
en, DcH-othy Barmore. Betty Ger- 
rets, Mary Ann Kelley, Freddie 
Cleveland, Fallie lyAuuoy, Joan 
Marshall, Johnell Rush, and Doro- 
thy Carruth. 

' Next week the senior class, both 
Term VII and VIII, will vote for 
I the Bruin dedication. The work 
of the annual is more advanced 
I than is usual at this season of the 
school year. All the individual 
pictures have been taken and a 
number of the gr6up pictures. 
Others are scheduled for next 
week. 

The fact that teachers and pu- 
pils are unusually busy this week 
on account of six weeks, exam- 
inations, final grades, and making 
out reports to be issued on Tues- 
day, prevented the usual cele- 
bration of Fire Prevention week 
A special meeting of the d.-bate with an elaborate fire drill. It is 
club was called Friday afternoon merely postponed, however, and 
to select members to go to the will take place next week, 
debate clinic to be held at North- In line with the nationwide 
western State College. Bolton has movement to fingerprint every- 
been asked to bring ten mem- body, not for the sake of crime 
bers, and the girls of the affirma- prevention and detection, but as 
tive team will serve as demon- a measure of safety and means 
strators. This clinic will be held of identificatioiT, all pupils in Bol- 
on October 18, and should prove ton will be fingerprinted some 
' of great pleasure and profit to , time within the next few weeks, 
all participating. Elaborate blanks are beng pre- 

I The infiriMal dance staged by pared, and when all the school 
the band, boosters after the Jen- preparations are completed, the , 
nings gome Jast night was a grand work will be done by trained ex- 
, success, with a big crowd in at- Iperts. 
; tendance, and a lot of J\m for 
everyone. , 



school: there shall be no further 
action taken in support of a pro- 
posed bill which is vetoed by the 
principal unless such action is on 
the written request of said offi- 
, cers; any vacany occuring in the 
I office of vicer-president or secre- 
tary-treasurer will be filled two 
weeks after such a vacancy oc- 
curs; the legislature, whenever a 
majority of both houses shall deem 
it necessary, shall propose amend- 
ments to this constitution, which 
shall be valid as part of this con- 
stitution when ratified by two- 
thirds of the student body: and the 
ratification of this constitution by 
the majority \ote of the student 
body shall be sufficient for the 
establishment of this constitution 
in Bolton High School." /f~c\ 

ATT- -17-11-9 



Bolfon High Nofes 

By Pi-eis ai:b 



ATT- 48- l-a9 



312 



ICreweOflSOR 
To Roll Ajrain 

"fho Krewe of NOR will parade 
■gam this year. 

The parade, will be held the 
usual day, the Saturday before 
Mardi Gras, said A. S. Sonntag. as- 
sistant superintendent of public 
schools and krewe captain. | 

The school children have not 
had their parade since 1941. This 
year's parade will be the ninth 
held since the krewe was organ- 
ized in 19.'?4. 

Thirty-five float*, representing 
35 public and Catholic schools, will 
take p«rt. Each will carry four 
to six childrer. 

The parad» was organized in 
1934 by a group of citizens who 
fumifhed money for floats and 
costumes for the school children. I 
It origirially had over 50 floats. 

The parade was . discontinued 
after 1941 because of the war. 
Some attempt to revive it was 
made last year, but the efforts 
failed for lack of money. 

This year the city has 'taken over 
the parade. Floats will be deco- 
rated by Miss Betty Finnin, city 
decorator, and built on the krewe's 
35 model-T Ford chassis which 
have been used in all previous 
NOR parades. 

The floats measure seven by 
twelve feet. In the past, each was 
drawn by four boys from the up- 
per elementary grades. It has not 
been decided yet whether the 
boys or jeeps will be used to pull 
this year's floats, Mr. Sonntag sai 



-Carolers In Square 



^\ 1 



Freskm«n Get "Breaks 
In Share-Alt Plan '^ 

Alfred, N. Y. <UP)— Art lovers 
among Alfred ITniversity's stu- 
aent body are profiting from a 
painting rent plan. 

Under the plan, rerpodvtced 
paintings of such famed masters 
as Rembrandt, Van Gogh, Gains- 
borough and Grant Wood, are 
available to the students for xise 
in their dormitories at l»sp than 
a cent 4, day. / ir''/'/' 

The originality of the T^nvplan, 
however, is surpassed by {he novel 
way the paintings are distribut- 
ed. Freshmen, usually the last m 
line, have first choice, while the 
upper classmen wait on the side- 
lines for "second choices" aiKi the 
faculty walk off witli "leftovecg^ 







CHRISTMAS CAROLS ring over ancient Jackson 
Square as St. Mary's Dominican College choir gives first 
of serie*: of Ytilettde tp/ograms. Mayor Morrison threw^ 
switch which lighted t-ee. erected by Vieux Carre Com- 
mission. Patio Plant?r3 and city. Programs will bfe given 
nightl^ threugh Chr^tmas Eve. r/^] 



NOI-^7-Z-i9 



J 



313 



Just Nine To Go To Hit 1 ,000 

♦ ♦ » » » ♦ 

Membership Mark In Lafayette 



/ 



Lafayette parish total membership 
in 4-H Clubs is 991. The dream of 1,- 
000 enrolled for 1948 could be a real- 
ity before the close of National 4-H 
Week. Only nine new members are 
needed to reach the goal set for the 
parish. 

N. P. Moss heads the enrollment list 
with 89 girls and 38 boys. The enroll- 
ment by schools is as follows: 

Boys Girls Totals 



N. P. Moss 


38 


89 


127 


St. CecUia 


50 


66 


106 


Cathedral 


106 




106 


F. M. Hamilton 


44 


34 


78 


Myrtle Place 


27 


48 


75 


Judice 


28 


44 


72 


Youngsville 


36 


36 


72 


Scott 


39 


22 


61 


Duson 


22 


83 


55 


Mt. Carmel 




49 


49 


Central 


11 


32 


43 


Carencro 


33 


9 


42 


St. Ann's 


10 


22 


32 


Broussard 


9 


17 


26 


Lafayette High 


11 


14 


25 


Milton 


12 


10 


22 



Parish totak , 476 515 991 

These boys and girls range between 
the ages of 10 and 19. They have 
agreed to "learn to do by doing" some 
phase of farming, homemakjfig. or 
community activity. They are being 
guided by cooper:i '.ve extension work- 
ers and their lo' 1 Readers to solve 
their individua! iroblems 

MEME • SS ACTIVE ' 
A study of ,' p.Tri3h enrcUrry- ii. 
the various <-M ciojects i- t^ live 
proof that T .'ayfette paris'n > ,. s and 
girls are "creaUn.g better r.or ^ today 
for more responsible ciiii-^'iship to- 
morrow." Statistics for 1148 project 
enrollment show that 590 club mem- 
bers are improving their health. There 
will be 112 gardens grown by 4-H 
members. Girls (and boys, too!) are 
caring for and improivng 204 rooms. 
The parish has 77 insect collections 
underway in the wildlife project. 
There are 199 girls making their own 
clothing, 89 learning to bake yeast 



LDA- 48- 



bread and quick breads. Poultry flocka 
are owned by 90 club members. Food 
preservation, including canning and 
freezing, is the project of 16 girls and 
two" boys. 4-H members this year will 
raise 62 pigs, 23 beef calves, and 81 
dairy calves. At least one acre of cot- 
ton will be grown by each of four 
boys. Each of eight boys are growing 
one acre of corn and one acre of pota- 
toes each will be the project of nine 
boys. V 

Lafayette parish contributed to the 
1947 national accomplishments of 4-H 
Clubs. Last year clubs learned and 
demonstrated the best methods of 
growing food needed at home and 
abroad. The national figures for 1947 
are; 100,000 acres of vegetable gard- 
ens, nine million chickens, 716,000 
heads of livestock, and 440,000 acres 
of food and feed crops. Conservation 
was learned and practiced by canning 
15 million quarts of food, making or 
repairing two million garments, im- 
proving 472,000 rooms. Soil and water 
conservation practices were adopted 
on 172,000 acres. .Manting and caring 
for forest trees covered 51,000 acres. 

Club members guarded their own 
and their communities' health by hav- 
ing periodic health examinations. They 
took part in organized recreation, 
checked and improved their health 
habits, prepared and served meals in 
helping win the food needs of their 
families. They enrolled in first aid and 
home nursing courses and improved 
health and safety conditions around 
the home and community. 

The 4-H Clubs are launching a pro- 
gram for an inter-nation exchange of 
visits with farm youths of other coun- 
tries. They gave and collected money, . 
food, clothing, and other needed sup- 
plies for those in distress in other 
countries. 

They are learning to be more un- 
derstanding citizens through running 
their own meetings, discussing world 
peace issues and responsibilities and 
acting as leaders in their clubs and in 
community undertakings. -^ — ~^ 

2-28 ® 



3U 



Senior Class Of 
LPHS Goes On Tour 
In Natchez, Miss. 

The Lake Providence higli school 
senior class and a few of the juniors. 



went to Natchez. Miss.. March 26. 
visit the old homes in a Pilgrimage 



to 



tween 1798 and 1804. by Winthrop Sar- 
geant. first territorial governor of Mis- 
sissippi territory'. It is a type of col- 
onial architecture which stands alone 
in beauty and stateliness. Constructed 
of brick, it stands two stories high, 
with a basement surrounded by a 



Iota Seniors On 
Edncational Trip 
To Baton Ronge 



... -T^ ^ v., 1. „ -1 IOTA. La.. May 25— (Spit — 

■moat . The double hallways and Members of the Senior Cla^ of 

stairs of hand-turned mahogany rails Iota High school left early Tues- 

This trip had long been anticipated ^^^ ^ ^^j,^ ^^^ ^.^^^ beautiful. It is day morning by chartered bus, 

by the seniors. Plans had been flying _ . . . „„^ ,. ^, ,„^„,^ ,„ ,^^ :_..„ for Baton Routje to spend the day' 

'in old home that appeals to the imag- cppina the rnnl»Ql r-ii-u tvi^ »i„..v. 

around like dLsrs for some time We • seeing me capital CUy. I ne ClaSS 

arouna UKe aiscs lor some time, we i^atjo^ ji^^s. Lenox Stanton now members expect Likmeet Gover- 

iives there. The old kitchen, used back nor Earl K. Lfingv^Me in Baton 

O'clock '" '""^ """' """ '*"*■' "^'' °' '"'"!!!'' ^Thle^up Wn3 visit S. M 
interest to the senior girls. The boysi jackson. «ate luperlntendent of 
Everyone thought the scenery along ^^^j^ ^^^ ^.^^ ^,,j. interest in the kit- educationL>ind witness the le- 
ihe way was i^autiful. The first event ^^^^ ^^.^^^ ^^^^^^ ,.^ ,,„ j^ in It. gislatu^^Tn & 



left Lake Providence at approximately 
6:00 o'clock Friday morning and ar- 
rived in Natchez about 9:00 



session. 



came when we made a side-trip in 



. I After~ seeing the campus of 
The next place of mterest was Kmg sj Louisiana State university the 
Vicksburg to see the reproduction of .^^^p,.,^ ^,^p ^^^^^^ ,,^,^3^ ^^ Missis- [ class wiU dine in the LSU cafe- 
Tara, the house in "Gone With The ^ j ^ j^ f^^^ t^^^^ ^n the NaN|tfria and then go to the old 
winH" _...,,«,-.' state capitol building which now 

^'"'^ ■ Chez Trace. It is owned by Mrs. A. C. jg ^ museum. Swimming in thl 

When we arrived in Natchez we Register, whose family has owned and city park pool will be the final 
bought our tickets, which were for the occupied King'.s Tavern for 130 years. ?^^"^ on the senior-day prograjn 
Green morning tour. The houses were xhe item of interest here was a jewel- '"j j^ McCrory princinal 
open from 9:00 a. m. to 1 p. m. The ed dagger. This tavern was built in Mrs. C. S. Robison, teacher in the 
first place visited was the Elms, buUt the early 1700s high school department at lot; 

during the Spanish era in 1782. It Last, but not least on the list was ,*"1 accompany the group 
contained many interesting architec- igtanton Hall, most palatial house 
tural feature.';. This home, owned by Natchez, built' by Frederick Stanton 
Mr. and Mrs. Jos. B. Kelloeg, is mel- during the great cotton era, 1851. It is 
lowed by aye and set In the midst of now the Restoration project and club 
an old-fashioned garden. All of the house of the Pilgrimage Garden Clu'u. 
seniors were immensely interested infrhe old carriage house has been con- 
the lawns and the beautiful flowers verted into a tea room. The two- 
storied columns are Corinthian in 



and shrubbery here. 

The next place of interest was Twin style. 
Oaks, built on a Spanish land grant in After the tour was over the seniors 
1814. It was occupied by federal troops spent a while looking around and 
during the War Between the States, "window-shopping". The seniors were 



ICDS-4S-5-a5 



ISTROUMA 
By Wilfrtd Perry, Hi.tonan 

h wn.s Koinan „,ght Saturday 
night. April 17. when the Istrouma 
High School l^tin club members 
dressed a.^ Latins to attend their 
.innii:)! R.iman twnquet The en- 
tire theme of the banquet 
Roman witli Roman 



I ota 



which m 
Roman 
Vi« 



This home of Dr. and Mrs. Homerj ^^^^^p^^ied on the trip by Mrs. J. O. .^ Hi.« 



Whittington Is a charming, rambltng 
house, shaded by ancient live oaks 

Next on the list was Longwood, 
which was never completed. This home 
is owned hy Mr. James H. Ward 
descendant of the builder, Dr. Haller 
Nutt, ai'id Is set in a forest of moss- 
draped trees and is weird and ghostly. 

Then the class proceeded to Glou- 
cester, the first Natchez mansion, built 
prior to 1803. The date is not exactly 
known, but it was built sometime be- 



Alton 1«" J^''""^ 

oii.-taiitU 



Was 

n dress and foitt. 

prepai.'d from ancteiit 
ipi^s. The banquet jes- 
■lov Ann l^ruerk. save 

imi.o.rs.inatior of Rom- 
•i.v keepm? h.-r audience 

l.Tjsrhlo-, and -.niiling. 
•luuished pupsts of the 
"re thr AUsses Annie 



Pinkston. class sponsor, Mrs 
Hull, and Mrs. L. S. Pinkston. |othf 

Everyone reported having a wonder- even 
ful time. The only regret expressed ^^^Y."!';.^'""* ^'''"""''''- *""^ "«'" 
I was that we only saw six of the 92 
colonial homes located in Natchez. 
— Sibyl Green, Senior. 




H-i 



en Davis 

The "Latins" took time out from 
their revelry to listen as C. A 
Ives lo'.k them hack over a num- 

■er nf >..nr« to traoo the develop 



LPBD- 48-5-2 BRA-48-4-i 




315 



GUEYDAN NEWS 

The nlneteenl:. anuuai Future 
Farmers of America State con- 
vention was held at SOuthwest- 
eui Louisiana ihstltutc June 7 toi 
11. Approximately 1000 .boysr 
from 187 chapters participated 
in this convention. 

The convention began Monday | 
morning wlt^h the registration 
of chapters. Then these chap- 
ters were assigned to rooms In 
halls over the campus. 

At four o'clock that evening 
there was a huge parade. The 
Eunice. Melville, and Opelousa.s 
High school bands participated. 
The F.F.A. members and ad- 
visers assembled at the Southern 
Pacific Railroad Station for the 
parade. • i 

Tuesday was a big day for all ' 
members. The first and secoAd 
cessions of.'- the 'house of. dele- 
gates atid th^ F.F.A." judging 
contests we;:»,.the main events 
of the^ d."..-. . 

The first sessKJn oftjie house 
of del^gatefe was heTa Tuesday 
mornirte at eight fifteen, and 
began with , the opening cere- 
i mony by the state officers. Then' 
Reverend Paul FusiUer gave the 
invocation. Next on the list was 
the roll call and seating of 
delegates. 

The Judging contest lasted all 
day, except lor a two hour re- 
cess for dinner. Weston Mon- 
ceaux of the Oueydan chapter 
placed first in the judging of 
poultry. 

Wednesday was the day for 
t^e annual F.F.A. Barbecue. The' 
barbecue was to be held by the 
farm equipment show, but it 
rained and had to be held in 
the dining hall. The main course 
was barbecued chicken which 
everyone said was delicious. ' 

After the barbecue there was 
an F.F>A. talent show in Burke 
Hall auditorium. Any member 
■who had talent cbiild try out 
to be in this show. The results 
of the livestock judging contest 
were given, and prizes were 
■warded to the wlnnnm 



S"English Fraternity 
iHas Literary Contest 



Thursday morning was started 
off with 'he flr.st session of the 
house of delegates. .The 
ceremony began this session 
was followed by the report o) 
accomplishments of the Area 
and IV winners of the bes 
chapter contest. 1 

That night the Teen-Age A literary contest wm be spon- , 
club gave a bam dance for thei'^^-'ed by S«i"a Tau Delta, hon- 
F.F.A. The State F.FJi. Queen o^ry English fraternity, in whioh 
was chosen at this dance. It all Tech students interested in 
seems as all the members turned creative writing may participate, 
out for this dance. There were Glenroy Emmons, president of the 
many attractive girls at this organization has announced. 
dance and all the boys seemed 

to have had a great time. Entries may include short 

Friday morning presented the 1 stories, poetry, and essays, and 
sixth and last session of the 'must be submitted to Miss Fran- 
house of delegates. "ITie new ces Fletcher in the English de- 
state officers were installed, and partment not later fhan 12 p. m. 
each gave a few remarks. ^^ Thursday, April 8. All con- 

Then the session was adjourn- |tributions must be ori»i/^al, type- 
ed and all the boys got ready j.^ritten, and double-.->^ced. 



to go home. All boys \vho parti 
clpated In this convention said 
It was a great success. 

Submitted by Oueydan F.F.A. 
Chapter Reporter, W a I te r 
Daniels. ^^4) 

CDS-48-e-29 

' District Music Festival 
Slated at Southeastern 

Hammond. .M:ir. 2— More than 
iJuO high school students will be 
truests of SouthcaiStern Ix>uisiana 
lollege Friday. Mar. 12 and Sat- 
' iiicla.v. Mar. 13. when the Fourth 
district niii.sic festival will be held 
on the canipu.s. Dr. lialph «: Pottle, 
■istival chairman and head of the 
tine trts department, announced 
'odaj. 

The fourth'li.«iiict f-^stUtal serve.-. 
!=• Other iVsdials will be 
L-l.^tiin Hoi'se ar.d New 
If'. IS ana 20. 



held 
Urle. 

iHl.ir 



rating 
ludgfs 



«>ixani'/.i*i 1,1 
(>H rt V ill be 
liAn ceAlfi.Mt 
as.siffned tor 
will not be 



Mod loloist 

.^arded a 

> stating the 

perliirmance. 

named until 



ie da.v of ihe festival. 
Winners of a superior ratlns 
go to the state festival to be 



The beit niateriu' vill be se- 
lected by' a comnintec from Sig- 
ma Tai; Delta r.r-d >vili be pub- 
lished I'l s sc:iK-iteir in a literary 
section i-i the Tech Talk. Miss i 
Fletch.i- will cc'it>ll literary ma- 
terial submitted. 

"Some of bur best writing has 
been done in the past by students 
who were not pursuing conven- 
tional literary majohs," Miss ^ 

Fletcher said. \7^ 

Hilkrest Third Grade To 
Present 3 Plays Thursday 

Third grade pupils at Hill- 
crest Elementary school will 
present' three playlets to tlio 
faculty, pupil.s and mizWq^ ^f■ 
the ichool auditorium !U7"l"(i 
o'clock Thursday nfttfipooj^. 

The playlet.s wii:- be entitled: 
"What the Traffic Light Sees," 
■X .sp'oTv nlav "Court Convenes 
in Health City'' a play on 
-o^lth- and the "Awakening of 
Spring." ' 

Thirty pupils will have parts 



held at XorthweHtern sute college. ^ on the program, whlch will 



m- 



.Vatchltoches, on April 15, 16 



BR A -48-3-3 



elude songs by the children. 
Director of the event will bo 
Mrs. O. C. T4illcr, .third .t^radg,, 
ieacher at Hillcrest. \f~f\ 



1^01-48-4- 




316 



loica High School Band Canierbury ciub is 

Tj 1 r ^ J. Yo ^r rormed at Centenary 

Umiefeated in 18 Year's 

'' of 

Wins First Divisinr *"'"* '">■ "'^'^ '"" pioud of its an 

Cent.enarf' i ••l|p£r^ wnd y 



Award Every Time, 
Says Director 

RV HAL BOYLE 



*" 1 ne ci\y \\;\s so proud of its 
■aiifl that in 1934 its citizens \oted 
o eiect a S25.000 school building 
icxolcd exclusively to instiumen- 
al musii— the first of iVs kind in 
he nation. 

"Since that was still a depres 
ion year it showed strong com 
nunity enthusiasm and support . . 
ior our music program," said . K<"i'P 
Stewart. 

Own Recording Machine 
Some 400 pupils are now study- 
"°" 'I"" "' 5^"'=' Ting instrumental music. The mu- 
"Lt !:i?!?J5^''.?'J ^f.1^ sic laboratory has its own record- 
ing machine and a movie camera 



Rev. Frank E, Walters, rector 
St. Marks- Episcopal Church, 
announced ia<;^ Sinjday evening 
the fnruiaii'Mi r • a Canterbury 
ulents at 
. oung peo- 
ple rr tp.lpcr' ?Kt'/ 
Dr. fffpigp ]. (Si.vbey, professor 
.of E^^ll^i^ at Centenary, was- ap- 
pointed faculty sponsor for the 



AlASOX CITY. Iowa. Oc(. 18.— 
i^t — Here the school kids learn to 
spell Tschaiko'.vsky as soon as they 
do Mississippi. 

This is one of the most music- 
conscious small cities in Amer 
ica. and i( 

that hasn't iieen defeated in state 
een"vea"r?' '^'''"P****"'" '" ^'«^*- "The movie camera is good for inite plogram of ^^orphip, .study, 

xv,"a„ ' „„, — ,u 1 wij— , esprit de corps," said Stewart, -service, giving and .evangeli.-<m 

banrr,,frrc;e\?rr vork^ere'"; "'^'^^ '^^^ '} T^r^"' '" """"rem- f ''"'^ ' ''''"'^' ' "'^''"''''^ 

"• pictures of the band. them for parlicipalion in social 

Our band really starts hi kin-i.service and other work while on 

^ The.^/-uinio77niim'be>s of th« P'.^'".'^'^ .''^"'^'"-^'^'''"^^J. " ^'""'''■'P!'""' «« <^hurchmpn, in com 



A national a.ssociation of stu- 
dent organizations.Mhe association 
,of Canterbury Clubs has member 
feroups at many colleges and uni- 
versities in this country. 

The students are united in a dcf- 



intensi\olv at Xotre Dam» jfries ir 

for foolball. And the' trainini . , , ji.ji..u.i. . - 

Wnderearlcn dorgarlen A good band has to be, the campus and more active par- 

inior membe'/s of .u. V^»t'"ed years m Advnnce. Its too ticiplion 
bubble'fi.m .set'aie too young tc !A"*^ to start ,n senior high schooK munity life after graduation 

huff and putt throught regula, ,^°".^"^''„*", '^r%^''"^'""',''',h° " 
wind instruments, so thev W ^■-^'"'"S .«'' ^^^''^■. I "" S"?" 'h" 

bv learning the basis of music- ^J"""'" *"^Vu now and pick ai St. Mark.s pari.sh 
rhythm. Each kindergarten ha? *'''" 'T " ^^' f^'"'!"*^'' '*"'' « program 

its own small rhvthm band, and ^*'f"' H"^^', , , .i, v, a 

the concerts are more fun thaS L"s than 1 per cent of the band 
Mother Goose players become piotessional mu- 

Band pla^iilg is something Voi! ^''i;»"^-,''"V^^' 'f.'V^^ "T' , 
have to sink your teeth into th? . ^°^* .'■^'«'" » "f^'°"« 'nt'-est 
children therefore aren't encour '" "1"^"^ 
aged to start playing wind instru 
menls until the third grade. 
Teeth Aren't Good 



The Canterbury Club will meet 

on Sunday evenings at 6 o'clock \ 

house for 

SJ-47-/6-I6 



Stewart sai>', "and 
I band playing teaches the many 
: other things— teamwork, coordina- 
1 linn, how to get along with the 
I other fellow.' 
''Before that their teeth aren't] The city annually has a band 
too good, and the.v have trouble festival that brings here as inany 
with the reeds," smJed Carleton as fift.v neighboring town Viands. 
.Stewart, high school band direc- It also has a woman's symphony 
tor and president of the National orchestra, a tax-supported corn- 
High .School Band Association. miinit.v band for sujnnipr park 
.Stewart is a small, pleasant man (■niuc; Is, a ."iO-member chamoer 
with a neat dark mou.stache and of commerce glee club and a clio- 
is now in his seventeenth year ral society for both men 
here. He has a record in compe- women.- 

tition that the late Knute Rockne Yes, music matters in Mason 
might envy. • IC'ity. Incidentally, it' actually is 

"Our band has been in nine na- leasier to learn to spell Tschai- 
tional contests and won a first di- kowsky than Mississippi. You do| 
vision award e\ery time." hip said, it with chant and rhyme, as \\\ 
"Our orchestra has \\ on a fust college yell— like this: 
ii\ision award in five of its six "T-S-Cl 
lational contests." 'H-A-ll 

'K-ow: 

-s-k-y; 

"Tschaikowsky! Tschaikowsky; 
'Tchaiko^^sk^■: 



ATT-47-/0-I8 



Oxford Debating: Team 
To Appear at LSU " 

The deba'in'c, '. ai i' o* Oxford m»t- 
verslty, pxfqrcl. England. wlU com- 
pete with ajj'XSU team in the law 
a udltorluVn at g p. m. Monday, 

I Dec. S wffh 'the question being a 
discussion of the nationalliatlon of 
basic Industries. 
The Oxford team, known as one 
and I of the world's best, started Its tour 
of the United States at Columbia 
university on Oct. 8. 

The names of those debating will 
be released at a later <Jate by Dr. 
"W'aldo Braden. as.soclate professor 
of speech and director of debate. 



BM -47-1/26 



317 




SM SEASON 



LSU Moot Court 
Begins Tonight 



Colle9«^ Choir To Give First;^^" 
Corncert Of Year In jn 

/ day 

Winnsboro / ^*B.ui 



Moot court competition begins to. 
lu-lit for student lawyers of^ the 
1 -^U law school who begin to" try 
"sts based on scripts used on 
radio show: '"Famous Jury 
Trial« " it was aftnounced yester- 
day bv Dr. Dale E. Bennett, faculty 
sor. It will begin at 7:30 In the 
Law auditorium. 
(Spe-i .pjjg second trial of the semi- 
choir|„„„, ..Qund will be held on Nov. 5 



linal 



EmpannelinK of the 
ill take place on the pre-|| 
evening at the -same time, 
tne ' direction of Kred A.| 
of the! 



WINNSBORO, La., Oct 18.- 
ci.iD— The Centenary College 
will give its first conceit of the *e»'' ^^ -.-^n 
son at the Methodist Youth RaUy ,^,^j. ^^. 
of the Monroe district to be held ■j.^jjj^g 
in Winnsboro, 'Monday, October 20. jjjnder — - 

This group of fifty voices repre- juianche. Jr.. chief- justice 
sented the state of Louisiana art the iniversity Honor Court. 
L-ons International Conventicn in San I Caldwell Herget of the 

Francisco in July. Going by special ■ judicial District court wlir 
Pullman on the Lions' specia tram ^^^ opening trial. Judg-j 

to California, they took the leadmg ^If^*;* second trial will be Judgei 
part on the convention program. ■• ^ ^^^ ^^^^ district. 

The Necrology service, high point "-ii-ios oi 
I on the program, was conceived, writ- i ^n an effort to simulate as close- 
'ten and staged by Mr. A. C. Voran, n- as possible actual trial con- 
director of the choT, using all the ditions. Dr. Bennett said, witnesses 
members in the group. will be secured by the student at- 

torneys from students' wives, law 

students and other members of the 

student Ix'ily. .None of the witne-seg 

inle to testify that iher 

titiates committed. 

Loceduce for the 
; ^cli»si(H five " 

.•Hj- statemapts anc 
■mt of time for the 



Whilt on the west coast, the choir 
broadcift from both San .Francisco 
and Los Angeles radio stationa on 
national networks. 

Last year the choir traveled 3,500 
miles over Louisiana, giving concerts 
for youth rallies, churches and clubs. ' Court 
They also gave a weekly program over 1«111 pe' 
a Shreveport radio station. i fo"" °P 

When they s.ng in Winnsboro, they 1 same a 



be 
the 



the 

, log- 



Byrd High Paper 
Wins Second Place 
In Annual Contest 

Byrd High School's student 
newspaper, Byrd High Life, won 
second prize in its classification at 
the 24th annual junior iournalism 

' newspaper derby, held on the 
campus of New Yorks Columbia 
University. I 

The annoi nccnient vas made 

1 Friday in .\cw York bV the 
Columbia SiJio'.asilc Press Asso- 

I elation, spopso. of the contest. 

1 Byrd's newspaper competed 

I with publications 'of schools with 



enrollments from 1,001 to 1,.jOO 
students. Papers were judged on 
the basis of points received in 
various categories: News cover- 
age, story content, editorial policy, 
typography, advertisements, fea- 
tures, sports and creative writing. 
Attending the three-day derby 
are more than 3,500 writers and 
editors of the nation's grade 
schools, high schools and junior 
colleges. If will close Satuidayj 
with a luncheon, at which War- 
len- Austin, United Slates dele- 
gate to the United Nations, will 
speak. 



SJ-48-3-.5 



wiii-7pp;a7 in- tV ante-bellum ^^^ ^l^^^iJ^'^, '.'^d, Nursery Plot Projects^ 

tumes specially designed for them to uuioiidi nt' ■" ,,„„„.„„ mill f i • j l t l 

symboli^ the Centenary gentleman ' '•o««-«''«-'"^''°" °' j'^""*;"',el^^ by Teocher 

,ml the Cenfenarv ladv be employed: The winning team. 

"^e^pro^m will consist of sacred Dr. Bennett said, will "ot be de- OAKDALE. I^ Oct. ^ Many 

mUMc, Negro spiritual and some of termined by the jury s verdict but, homes in Oakdale and thr ,, ral 
the numbers they sang in San Fran- TT^ "T — . ..„, «"« ^^^ ^ beenlandscaped .. n oth- 

-isco AUo included on the program ^y the decision of the presiding erwi.se • od thi^uc!, • h - .s^^f 

A-iU be soloists who look part In the J'^fe. 'theloca: i- > e Faifnr: 'f vu^-nca 

C-fornia appearances. ^ 1 ^"^ <f ''- '"'"-^ ""'^^r.Ha.s'-*'^"'^'^ '"° '■"''• 'I " ''' ^'^ 

The choir will make the trip ia^e public in prewar criminal trlas ^f ,he .„ ■ V>re de; . ■ y nt of 
their traditional way. by bus. and'f '"-"■ -M""* /""•'^ ^'^ ^!"°*'^'he Oakapl« i ^'^ .s<*ool. ^<f today, 
will carry their tr^iditional traveling 'has announced that the Presentl ^ clean-./ ;-",p|ign . now un- 
rations, a crate of Delicious and Wine- l-eries of competitions will be open ^erway in tlr . •:: ery K 



Lteries 
sap apples. This custom, said to be '" "i* public. . . „„ I "^^^ "^^ 

easy on their voices while sustaining -Vrrangements tor the court con | wepds thrived, . 
them, has earned for the young peo- test, are in charge of a c^niraittee .vacation In tli 
pl.^ the iSame of the "Apple Eaters.'i composed of ''"^^ A''/'"^*'- S**°J' future farmer.- 
The choir will return to Shrevei r.o.iRe. chairman: 1- letcher Hinton. method 



wlicre 



port. Monday night, at the conclu. 
sion ot-the concci i 

■ ^ J*— 



Slueveport: Warren Ferris. Mor- 
gan City: Bill Henninga. Sulphur: 



located 

ass and 

rins the summer 

: nursery plot the 

IT tauchi various 

of propa!;;i!ine and trans- 



plantine plant.s. 'mfidine snd graft 

san \„ii.> : out i.o. ...."»». » ing. Mr. Bakn p.xplained Many 

v:dward Engolio. Plaquemine; Sam plant,,; propasa'' d and grown here 
■ Pangelosl and Dan Hunter. Bat- 3,-^ gi\pn to thr FFA members, who 
Rouge, and Beggie I-'arra . Hu s- place them on ih" market at a 
ton. /^-T^ ina-sonable pi ire for the FFA trr.? ^ 



(g) 



HMW^47-|0-19 BRA -47-/0 -30 LtAf>- 47- 10-3 



3 IS 
r.nnhri hilt ions and positive values,- 



^8 Student 'Y^ Is Potent 
Force in Buildifig Character 



^ O- 1 « C'%7'9 W Tk . '' wh«t hui Impslled mut In hla 

Says !^tuaent i is rotent /"•*"•> f""" . 

^ 1 'The Unlvcraity eampua ta vary 

Impresalva. lu biick and (ton* 

knd concret« bulldlDKi are forc«- 

|(ul testtmonl&I to th« placa cduea> 

The Student TMCA is one of social responsibility In those »hon>|"^°plt'^r'i^'uUla^ll.* "^^' °' ^ 
the most potent and effective forces if influences, the Student T acU „.p.. - . ^ ,^ . ^ 

for the development of good cltl- ,„„„, „,. „ .rt„^,.i„, I"* , *®^ *'°'*^" amidst tb* 

«enshlp at work on the campus of ^* * supplecientlng educative academic building, of LSU U ■ 
Louisiana State university, accord- agency to the- academic agencled small, wooden, frame building, • 
Ing to Arden O. French, dean of of the University. Such 8ervlcJ|''«'"ltable shack when comparad 
men. Is essential, for It Is from the with the buildings surrounding tt 

In his discussion of the Student ranks of college educated peopIeiThls 'shack' Is V. k home of the 
T, Dean French said "Good ciy-*'*'^' ou"" leaders come; those lead- 1 Student TMCA. V 

lenshlp means not only- llvlnc-wjth- e™ should be men and women of| "At practically every- ovhcr Unl- 
In the law and meeting ofke'a 'deals aa well as Ideaa. verslty having a Student YMCA It 

personal responslh'.lltles. tut iflso "The LSU Student TMCA baa "*" *>• found housed In a building 
realizing and J^c-eptln? one's social for the 55 years of Its existence]"' dignity and. good appearance, 
responsibility by making a con- 'taught .Its Ideals of service by An example of such a building 
trlbutlon to the eoinraunlty. Gtv- preept and example, by the service l'* the home of the Student TMCA 
tng to life as well as. tak-.ng and services It has given to the)** Mississippi SUte college. Dlffer- 
from It. students of the University. 'Mant'o* '" architecture but typical In 

•The Student TMC..^ Is dedicated lives not by bread alone." Is the 'he completeness of Its facllltle* 
to the teaching of these Ideals of theme of the Student TMCA'sphe StudentJT building at Mlssls- 
dtlzenshlp. In developing a strong teaching. Homely and familiar as alPPl StateTar surpasses what la 
religious sense and a sense of that saying is, in Jt Is the essence "-vallable to the students of LSU. 



BRA-47-a-2i 



High School, College 
Students Hear Trio 
Of Clergymen Today 

Botli Ru.slon li!j;h solioo] .inrl 
Louisiana Tech .'itudents ^^-el-e 
able to hear a trio of distinguish- 
ed clerrymin — Protestant, Catli- 
olic and Jewish — at assemblies 
held at tiii^ 1 vo ;t-hnols this 
morning. • 

The three church leaders, un- 
der the nii.'^pi'es' of the Nationn'. 
Conference of C:ii!.,tians and 
Jews, were <^'ckCii» at the hish 
school at '.I :i. ni today and at 10 
a. ni. at the collego. 

The sprjt-.> of t.-i1ks were a part 
of a nr.tior-.vidc ellort on the part 
of the org-iJMr.Lition to strenptl'C-. 
r.ational i.nity and democrot^^- 
traditions by promoting attitudes 
ol tolerance, nritu .1 r?.-;pe;t. ?n-T 
?noi''.vili arion^ peoples of difTer- 
ent faiths and nati'innlitie.":. 



Rev. D. Swan Haworth. tie 
Rev. A. William Crandell, S. J., 
and Raibbi Jufian B. Feibelmnn 
were the three religious leaders 

who .<5poko-on the theme, 'Broth- 
erhood, Pattern For" Peac." at 
the two student gatherin.s. 

Dr. Hawoith is the p-iKtor of 
the First Baptist church in Vicks- 
1-urH. and a graduate of Wake 
Forest College in Noith Carolina. 

Futher Crandell i.s Dean of tlie 
Faculties at Ixt.vola University of 
the South in New Orleans. He is 
n graduate of Jesuit hi^jh school 
in N. O. and CJonzaia University 
in Spokane, Washington. 

Dr. Fiei)clman is at present a 
rabbi at Tem|>le 'Sinai in Nov.- 
Orloan.s. Ho is a graduate ol Mill- 
sans college in Mississippi an<l 
Hi'hrpw Union college in Cincin 
nati, Ohio. /^^ 



RDL-48-5-e 



Pastor Discusses Role 
Of Church on Campus 

"Student work In the Christian 
sense Is the church seeking to 
bring about the full Impact of the 
Christian philosophy on Instltutlone 
of higher learning." the Rev. Parks 
:Wll8on, pastor of the University 
Ipresbyterian church, declared In 
la speech on the LSU campus be- 
Tore an audience of local business 
and protesslocial people. 

He stated efhphatlcally thai seiia- 
ration of church and »tite la a' 
lound principle, but evpreesed tbe 
Opinion that i" eii'mliiat«> r=,!i?ioc 
, trom state jp.i,ututlonr, "is to cjurt 
lldlsaater." >«8-!e':t of tbW t»uth, he 
jWaid, "renders students open to the 
I developtnent ol alien Ideologies." 
I Th speakf P' »i!-vi1 the spirit of 
I co-operation airtl interest which the 
I administration and faculty at LSU 
manifest toward the University 
I congregations. He called the re- 
' llKlous life at LPU "a wholesqme 
' and moral condition of a high 
ordT " 



BRA- 48-1-38 



319 



F.H. A. MEMBERS 
OBSERVE WEEK 



Tulane Pi Kappa Alphas 
Adopt Czech War Orphan 



One of the Tulane university social fraternities is playing fa 
ther to a war orphan. 

For a little fair-haired, blue-eyed 13-year-old ^zecho-Slovakian 
is being fed, clothed and given medical attention through the dona- 
tions of Eta chapter of Pi Kappa 
Alpha, national college social fra- 
ternity. 
The boy. Leos Sauerstrom, 
the Foster Pa- 
War Children 



(By Irma Savoy) 

Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica members at St. Amant High 
School have really had a busy 
week helping other girls all over 
this nation observe National F. 
H. A. Week. 

Monday, November 3 was set 
aside as '•Good Deed Day." On 
this day the girls cleaned the was selected by 
principal's office, washed black- rent's Plan for 
hnarHQ for tearhpr^ denned the ^f'^"" "^^ Tulane chapter of the 
boards for teachers cleaned the fraternity expressed the desire to 
girls basement, and the teath- financially adopt a war orphan, 
ers' room. < Chapter members, many of 

Flowers were brought to school them veterans of the war in Eu- 
Tuesday by different home eco- rope, have voted to adopt Leos 
nomics" students. These were used ^°\ ^^^. Period of one .vear. 

to dernrntP vanr>n<! r-lnssrrv.me ' ^^°^ father. aAlve m '.he un- 

to decorate vanous classrooms (jgrground movement, was cap- 
and the office. Members were .tured and interned in a concen- 
urged by their teacher, Miss |tration camp. Shortly after his 
James, to grow red roses which is lliberation he died as a result of 
their flower '5tarvation and brutal treatment 

A number of persons noticed '^^'^''^'^ ^^ ^^^ '"'"''■" -' '='^ "P" 
girls wearing their national col- "^^^^^ ^^^^j^ „f Le^,. „^,j,p^ ,, 
ors red and white. Could this attributed to malnutrition and the 
mean there are several loyal iprivations of the w.nr >rars. 
members? According to infoimation re- 

Wednesday, "Hobby Day," call-i reived by the chapter, Leos is. a 
interestine eco- '^^^ ''^'^'^ fellow with a naturally 
u,»,i^<, i,^i.,j<.-q sunny disposition. He is honesi, 
1,. f ,v, «^ '"f'"'^^^ straiKht-forward and well liked 

items from the first pair of baby by his supervisors." 
shoes to movie stars. After the liberation of Czecho- 

AU the teachers had a treat Slovakia. Leos was among the 
Thursday with that delicious cof-i f'rst of a group of Czech chil- 
fee prepared and served solely by ^'"^" ^° ^^ transferred to a colony 

Jhose industrious future home- ^^ » i'^,''^'^,'" 'H"fi^"'^-. u 

— "uiuc- ^ drive for clothing to be sent 

makers. Too, tht gins, uiemseives' ^o Leos is now under way in th# 

I were inspired by a talk made by chapter. President Jack Morrif- 

.Father Wyshoff on the toplcj ^°" ^^^^- - •- - . /-^o^ I 

'How Homemaking Makes far ( uZ/J t 

Better Homes." *^ ^ 

\«°A. w:,l,";/"i:'J„'r,"J<,LSU N<«rs Community, 
SrpSSu,i??„.^S:r,S,*«" Chert Goal for 1948 ^ ' 

I As a conclusion for their sched- ^ "^"""^ 
I uJed events openhouse was 



ed forth those 
nomics students 



held.) 



At that Ume mothers visits their 
' daughter's home-economics de ' 
partment and had refreshmen 



r— w.,c.,i „,u naa rerreshments. 



Singletary announced : 
that the Community Chest drive j 
on the I.SV i-ainpu* n«>-^ 



ttTil. goal ', ^ 



within $1167.50 ^t 
set for the drlvn. • 

The 885.- contributions msU 
date totaf »!C0 mere than wintri- 
butlons mad* li*t tear. Mr. ?ingle- 
tary, of Jtie Horticulture -depart- 
ment, said that the soal is ex- 
la^tpd to be reached soon. 




to 



JL£OS SAUERSTROM 



NpS-47-;i-JS 



320 



[First Ward Colored 

I 

Give $509.05 to Red 



Pupils 
Cross 



»-- / 



She has been a teacher at the | 
"It wa^- no trouble," Mary Belle |pjrst Ward school for 22 years, prin- 
WllUams said. "We just asked peo-^jpai there for eight The school 
pie to give and they did." enrollment now is 679 pupils, none ! 

She was explaining how pupils higher than the sixth grade. There 
of the First Ward colored school, g^p 12 t«achers to all of whom the 
of which she Is principal, turned in principal gives credit for the suc- 
$509.05 in the current Red Cross ggss of the Red Cross drive, 
fund drive. There were no triclcs. i There were no large contributions, | 
no special entertainments, no pres-ig^e said. Two children, one in the] 
sure campaign. They just started f^rst grade and the other in the sec- 
their drive on March 9 and stayed ' o^d, gave between three and four 
right behind it until It closed on | jjoUars Other glfu Were in much 
March 31. smaUer amounU. the average being | 

"People lust naturally hav« con- slightly less than 71 cents. But it 
fldence in the Red'Cross." she said, mounted up. j 

"We're trying to tea:)-, our pupils g^e makes it sound easy but [ 
I civic responsibility and the Red. $50905 Is an unusually creditable | 
I Cross drive was a means of doing' 1 

that. But we couJ.int have donelsum for any school to report, par- 
lit without plent.v of help. We got I ticularly a school in jvhlch the ma- 
lt froia everybody — teachers, stu- Ijority of pupils are below the sixth 
I dents. * our white .and colored jgrade. 
'friends." 



European Aid 
Students Promote 



Christmas Carol 
Sin^ Is Slated - 
At University^ 

An LSU "Christmas Carol Slnp" 
on Thursday. Dec. 18 at 6;30 p.m.. 
will "brlriK to a focus the spirit of 
Christmas piving- on the campus. 
as representatives of organizations 
place their symbolic gifts befr.ie a 
Nativity scene In the rotunda of 
the memorial tower. 

The brass choir of •"iie i-t L". 
band, together wlUi < (♦nri'iiilti 
sinirlns led by the Conqrall .s. piirle 
chorus, and the P.-'-.ker ,f 'itij^y 
chorus will accom . 1 •. I'.o' audi- I 
ence In singing' fanii: a- Christmas 
caroLs at this tr.ic" ....-' I all-cam- 
pus observance. 

Gifts laid It the mang-er scene 
will be representative of the donar 
tlons of varlouis campus organiza- I 
tlone. who may de.ilenate their 
gift to some specific object of their ■ 
choice. Undeslpnatfd gifts of; 
money will be divirled amnnir the 
Blundon home, suffers from the 
war abroad, the C.ood F(>IIo\v8 or- 
ganization, and gifts to the YanJ<s 
at Christmas.' A committee of the 
religious council of IvSU will syi 
•)ervlse the dl.= trlbutlon. 






CoUce 



whit they .hop? .will crow into 
a nationwir!e ■tO!;"g:.>'e pro- 
gram for stii'-^ent aid to ."t.irv 
ing European -. *■ 

The H&milt->V r-I m, begyr 
Congress dehaied 
aid prbgrani, w^l! 



by three uppt-r >• ass honorar^ 
.societies on th^ c'ampus and by 
European rcpr.-'sor.tatives who 
are Hamilton alumni now 
studying in Switzerland. 



I The students hop- colleges 
and uni\ersities throughout the 
I country will take up the idea, 
I working through their own cam- ^ i; r. . 

pui organizations and the hun- '^O'-^ge ^tuden> 
idreds of American college stu- Buine<f-Ouf FiT: 
dents and alumni now in Eur 
I ope. 

EJetails, of. European distribu- 
tion will be worked out by the 
. three alumni now studying in 
, Sv.-itzerland. They are Lee H. 
as BristoV Jf^ ftt W^stfielt?, N. J.; 
the JovDign William Sherman, of Oneonta, 
be carried dpi ~ 



jc-ip 



(UP)— Hamilton 
3r.t3 havo started 



— '■'iftpcn 
itudonts 



Hanov'T, .\. H. ( 
Dartmouth Co I I v 
liave joined proffs.sionr.I rai-. 
pentcrs in rf-huiJ,imTv>i^ burned 
hoc cf a L*^%>f' il'ian.KY. 

They co^i^^eJ ineir/.-^?,-\ices 
v.is:' ^hurman 



At Hamilton, the students 
plan to coJfect food and sup- 
plies from every dormitory' 
room, married veteran's apart- 
ment, every fraicrni'y house 
and faculty home— 



N. Y.; and George W. Thompson 
of Oalesburg, 111. 

Elton L. Francis, Utlca, N. Y., 
ai my . veteran and a -senior 
honor society member at Ham- 
ilton, £aid t;ie program would 



I They r.n^^ 
Land o.\!,iect J, 
jMartin',', iii/t,. 






A .^p^';«•.smar•1fo^'l^o group, 
n iurfnbers of Phi Gamma 
olta fraternity, said Ihoy prob- 
bly would be credited with 
aints in Dartmouth's interfra- 
■riiiiy co.-npo!ition .sy.slom. 



show Europeans that "younger i The youths spend their time 
Americans — a great percentage If- 1 vagi n^' charred materials, 
of whom fought In Europe — are ' "'ping the carpon1or.-5 and in- 
also their friends in peace." .Jailing t'l'imbijicr fi ;fur ; 



321 



A GOOD PROGRAM 

Every afternoon about one hundred youngsters gather 
at the hi^h school for instruction in arts and'crafts work. | 
The Leader thinks this is a grand program and deserves ] 
niucli more financial support and personnell assistance than | 
't is receiving. Our children are getting vauable lessons in 
uow to use their hands, to entertain themselves, and to make i 
aseful and attractive articles. [ 

We are often surprised at the awkwardness of a child 
and his inability to do certain things most adults take for 
granted. They usually do learn soon enough, but skill with 
;he fingers and the careful toikch needed to do any sort of 
irt work is something that takes many long tedious hours 
;o acquire. Most children have ?ome special work they en- 
joy because their parents or some interested adult has 
taught them how to use their hands. Here at this school they 
can learn anv* one of a .dozen things and become more or i 
less skilled in all. I 

, Most of us do, not realize until too late how little we 
can do around a hpme because we have been busy trying to 
earn a living. But the little things that practically keep a; 
house from fallin:? apart must l)e done and when they can 
be done quickly, easify and correctly life is much happier for 
all concerned. Huston children (an learn here to do much of 
hesi^ thiivgs .md with these skUls they can add others and 
make the whole thing fun. 

We suggest all parents who have children attending the 
arts and craft.s'school take an hour and visit this class. They 
will find teachers gi\ing instruction in basket weaving, 
metal craft, leather working,' beads, clay moulding, paint- 
ing, and wood working. Other incidental work is done be- 
sides these and best of all th'ere is cheerful discipline among 
the boys and girls. They enjoy what they are doing, they 
want to learn and they reFl)e^t what the teachers are try- 
ng to do. We think this i« a good thing and we trust it can 
be expanded. 



TECH APPROVAL 

give™ FRAT 

student Chapter Is Author- 
ized At Ruston Col- 
lege 



RDL-48-6-29 



(35) 



RUSTON, La , Feb. 26.-(Special)- 
Authorization for the establishment ol 
a student chapter of the Society for ( 
the Advancement of Management at 
Louisiana Tech has been granted by 
the national organization, Dr. Edward 
G. Cornelius, business administration 
profesEor and faculty adviser for tlie 
Tech group, announced. The society 
has its lit iOquartcrs m N?w York 
City. 

The soricty «-as organi..id af a busi- 
ness fia crn.;>, 10 ye,u» afo. First 
compoied oriiy of senior chapters With 
a nicinbrrsiijp of busin-^.^ leaders, 
student ciiapters wiCre laier adn.itted 
by the society. Branches of the organ- 
isation ai& novi operating throughout 
the United Clates, Canada, England 
and Sweden. 

Dr. Cornelius said that the societj- 
selects colleges considered most 
pi'omif>ing and tdpable of contributing 
outstanding student material to the 
business profession as sites for chapt- 
ers. Through the_ student chapters, he 
said, the society seeks to stimulate 
student interest in executive positions . 
nd bu.^iness profe?iior.s. » Q £ 



airls of Home Economics 
Club Nome Objectives 



I T9 Am«r%etA Prm». 



Cited as objectives lor t ji* "^ear 

were beautillcatlon of the --rHool | 

ground?; rooperatlrn -^.'h other 

school activities; a mo-.h-.-uauslitei 

_ 50Cial; impmvemem of p--- locality 

OBERlS^. ll'.. Feb. 21,-Objec-of ^^<^ ^^^ ■ ^''''^;;;!^^'^^^^^''cX- 
ttves forl948 were dl^^ussed at thement^ ^.'1* „"T, 'rt,nrT at t*o 
bimonthly meeting of the Home tage and lull »»*^^^"" «' '5"' 
Econo. ics club which met Wednes- NK^lar """"^f » '"°"/'?^, ^r k . 
day at the Home Economic cottage On request b^ ^i* "f^f'' f^^ j^ 
. -.L 1- »- 1- J » ' on ffirW were norninaiea to run i*» 

at the Oberlm high wljool. , ^O^Rirl^ «^e^r ^^^ ^ ^^^^^^ Farmers' 



ef Aaurlc* qu9«B. B«leetteB« ffom , 
ti-.ese nominees will b* mad* by the ] 
tcvs of the FF.A. i 

Judy Wilson was named chair- j 
man to plan for the spring dance to 
be held the first week of May. Bob- 
'bie Nell Chaney and Dorothy Jean 
!Font ... t were named to assist her. 

Miss Bobbie Nell Chaney, presi- 
dent, presided. 



LCAP-4S-a-2l 




Problems and needs. - 



322 



Decline Invitation 
For Milwaukee Show 
Of SU 'Evangelme 



The 'Evr-ngcline" p' ?>;.t ' which 
•was presented by S<>j-i:'.vt?«u r i Loiis- 
iana Institute at Iho Naatioi-i con- 
vention of the Fuiun- Fj-i.is of 
America in Kansas Cuv wa ; such a 
success Ui3t its sjon:ior.^ weie invited 
to present it at the national conven- 
tion of tht Africtltural Vocational As- 
sociation in Milwaukee on December 
1. However the inviationwas declined. 

The pageant was presented before 
an F. F. A. audience of about IR.OOO 
on November 17. Among those who 
witnessed it was Dr. W. T. Spanton 
of the United States Office of Educa- 
tion, who is national F. F. A. advisor 
and ii connected with the Agricultural 
Vocation Association. 

The education officer arranged to 
have the pageant and its cast in- 
vited to present the show at the Mil- 
WBukee conventioa. and the Sears 
Roebuck foundation off'^ied to cor- 
tribuie $o.(X)0 foi' exiM.nsos in con- 
nection with .he proposed M'lwaukee 
appearand 

Difficulty ill linding a suitaiile place 
on the gen :r.il •program of th^ con- 
vention cau le'i the director. T>lrs. Hu- 
bert J. Boursfjois, of S. L I., and 
others to di cUiic the invitation. 

The pageant will be presented in 
Abbe\'lle on December 1 _and in 
Lafnyctte on December 9/^ 

LDA -48-11^4 



Tulane Fraternities Work 
Hard for Mardi Gras Joy 

When you see the cailv decoratpd tnuks of Tulane fraternities 
rumble by on Mardi i;ra.<. don't think it was easy. 

Bit.-; of atnio.-sphere from the juncles of Africa to the snow- 
hlankned South Pole have been* ' — 



trap(>ed for 
dav. ' 



presentation Tues- 



Kvon Columnist Dorothy Dix! 
was consulted to iron out a prob-| 
lem. 



the girls to finance their own cos- 
tumes. 

"If you can talk the girl Into 
paying for her own costume, 
that's fine,"' commented Ray- 
The iiri>rc(iuip is to line up thel'^fntl- 
number (if i^rople that w;int to go' Trucks used in the parade are 
,on the ndo. soiur.- a tnuK, de- "ot available until Monday night, 
isign ...slulii-b anil Iwvl- themiann fraternity men often stay up 
made. iTiilsior xviiii the Krewe of a'' night decorating the trucks for 
OrleaiUJii.-. -ioiciraie ilm truck,! *"« Parade the following morning 
and take ofi Tuc^'lav morning. 1 ^'^ a" 'he fraternities took the 

Out of Thi., World L^f^L^f ,^' if\'.iH» ^i^PP"* S'S^a 

Lining up ttuik-ri.lers isn't ! ^|f^f (f*;"^"^ "^* '««t year for 
hard, but finding a place to put ''^g™; on ^ Mardi Gras 



them 



Charlie Raymond of 



flay this 
B^Tta xWoelU rV^r;ed^ha^^j^^«';,3J^°^nn^^^ ^^e 

they have so many there is only ™f^'f,.^'^J°^^^^ 
one and a half square feet allotted P'^"'^"^'' ^^r^"^ °' *°'' " a" they 



per person. 

Securing trucks isn't hard 
either. But Pete Smith, who is 
in charge of the Phi Kappa Sig- 
ma affair, commented that "The 
prices that we are paying are out 
of this world." 

Now comes the trouble. All the 
fraternities agree that the hard- 
est thing was collecting the 
money to finance the spree. 

Each member Is assessed for 
his costume and that of his date.i 

Thus, the problem of arrang-l 

ing a costume that is effective 

but won't encourage too man> 

groans when the price is quoted 

Pay for Costume 

Some thought the girls shouk 
pav for their own costumes. Frei 
Wagner of Pi Kappa Alphf 
thought so. too. 

He consulted Dorothy Dix, and 
she agreed that it was cricket for 



can get. 



NOS- 48-3-2.(53 



BY MAUD O'BRYAITS P 
CAMilNG ALiL TRUCKMEN! 
The Tulane University New- 
man CInb, an organization of 
Catholic stodrnts, has collected 
a tremendoDs amount of toys, 
reports Robert GngKenhelmer of 
The Hallabaloo staff. But the 
students have no \rsty to get the 
toys to their destination — Ram- 
sey, La. , 

"The toyg were collected for St 
Margaret's Daughter.';' orphan 
asylum, at ftamsey. near Coving- 
ton," 'Guggonheimer explained. 
'Ever«Ching hss been painted, re- 
paired, decorated, wrapped and Is 
waiting to be delivered. If some 
man with a truck could pick up 
these toys Sunday. Dfecembrr 21, 
he would be a real Santa Claus 
when he arrivcl in Ramsey. 
Please ask va! .nteers to cpU Bob 
Bosp at CHestnpt 6297." 



1>|0S'47-a-l6 



323 



Misunderstandings and controversial issues.- 



Frat Initiation Killing ff^^W 
Of Dog Is Under Probe 



Log Angeles. Feb. 21 (UP) — The I Higson said he knew nothiv 
cJty attorney's olTlce today Investl- about the alleged killing of tb* 
I gated charges that fraternity | puppy. 

pledges at the University of Call-| "If any of the. pledges decides 
fornia at Los Angeles beat a on some little prank It was most 
puppy to death and may have eaten I unfortunate but npt the responst* 
It during '•hell week" initlatlops. |blllty of the whole fraternity," b« 

Investigators said they received said, 
a Up. from a psrfon NMios|^namei Hallock. a former a!r force ser- 
was withheld, tl.it th< allesid Incl- geant. said the member told th« 
dent occurred ih conViectjfn with pledges to have a "freshly killed 
the Initiation of pledges 'into the dog" at the house by « p. ra. 
UCLA chapter j^t Beta Theta Pi. | "The pledge's were told the da« 

They began iiuestifning student] must not be poisoned, because th«jr 
-•-- " Hallocl ' - - 



jJohn G. Hallock. 24, "after learningjwere going to have to eat It," be 

[that he suddenly resigned his said. 

jpledge on Tuesday. He said thati Lapoed Up Milk 

jhe resigned because he was "re- 1 He said the pledges return^ 

jvolted" by the killing of a 6- , with the puppy playfully scampering 

,months-old cocker spaniel byjbeneath their feet and licking their 

pledges. He said the pledges were hands. He said he did not se« the 
jactlng on orders of an active fra-.dog killed but saw its body carried 
jternlty member. jlnto the fraternity house basement. 

Three Questioned "I guess it was glad to get out 

I After hearing Hallocks story, the of the pound." Hallock said. "RIcH- 
I Investigators ordered the chapter !ard Roberts told me they hated 

president. Him Higson. and two to go through with their orders but 

pledges. Richard Roberts and C. G. decided ttie best way would be to ^'" continue to function through ^ 

Van Duke, to appear Tuesday at hit it over the head. They went to Saturday. /^' TA 

the city attorney's office. the grocery and bought some milk 

The fraternity issued a statement and while the dog was drinking 

that said the pledges got the cocker they killed it. It was alive after 

spaniel out of the dog pound at 1 the first blow so they hit It 

Santa Monica last Tuesday, but'couple more times." 

said they wanted the dog for e' Hallock said he did not know 
I mascot. It said the dog has run [whether the dog actually was eatea 

away. The fraternity denied the because he was "revolted" and left 
Icbargea of cruelty. Itbe house and never went back; 



Boys' State 
Splits on Frats 

Jackson, Miss., June 9 (AP) — The; 
T-ahirted solons of the boys' state' 
legislature here today split on thel 
subject of legalizing high school' 
fraternities. j 

The moci^Sy^nVe passed a ^)ini 
that /*t)uw 'repAil the ' 1946 law' 
whic^r-miple^tCcflities and soror- 
ities ly^fU/lh high schools. 

Bifc^he mock House, by commit- 
tee action, killed a similar bill. 

Both houses passed bills that 
would repeal the state prtlhlbiUor 



law, and acted on a number of | 
other matters that were contro-l 
verslal 194S regular session of thel 
state Legislature. . I 

The Legislature, organized yes- 
terday, is part of the Magnolia 
Boy.s state training program. Spon- 
.sored by the American Legion, the 
program is intended to train high 
school youths in citizenship and 
leadership. 

Begun last Sunday, the "state" 



Saturday. /^' \ 



BRA-48-a-ai 



® 



LSU Students Reject 
Affiliation With 
National Group 

Baton Rouge (;P). — Students at 
Louisiana State University have 
voted tyo to one against affilia- 
tion with the National Student 
Association, the Daily Reveille, 



Frats Drop "Hell yfeek" 
As T©o Rugged-^ / ^ 

Bloom ington, In(!tr fUF) — Stu- 
dents who plap to enroll at In- 
diana Unive/sJty^nd p^ge to a 
fraternity/ ,yon't -havf" .to worry 
about "Hell Week" a^y longer. 

Uni\w>rsi,y offirialfi^^id frater- 
nities'" k^d agregfftj^ drop all 
spirited elections' "rouihireature/' *f rt>*h initiations 
in the future. Among the banned 
octtivitics v.'ere road trips, scav- 
enge.- hunts, and trips to sorority 
houses or women's dormitories 
"except for the express purpose 
of social affairs." 



I In colorful 

Wednesday, the Reveille said 
; 1,302 voted against t* projHfsat 
and 820 voted fo? it The W\ 
affiliation, crop of four proposed 
amendmtti-.s -o '^P .«;Mdent-pon- 
-stitution, Mafi iiK r ghiiciit of the 
iballDting. :*#three:0l U.e other 



ons for 



ameiKlraejjts passed. I 

Thesi^inclu(fcd pUvisi. 

the recall of elected student body 
officials, prohibiUon of a percent- j 
age limitation on student eJec-i 
tions and extending the right to 



campus publication, reported to-; vote in student elections to the 
iday. [graduate school 



SJ -48-2 -20 



& 



The agreement was reached 
after one fraternity was suspend- . 
ed by m^iversty . rixlals when 
nine pledges we.e arrested for 
bil^aking into lot j1 stores to ob- 
tain prescribed 'Hell We<;k" ma- 
terials. 



RDL-48-a-l3 



Itl 'v'xation,- 



324 
Administration and Related Topics 



offered in the seventh and eighth 

Kear of education. These classes. 

I he emphasize<l.' would each be in 

use only -two hours a week." 

I However" he continued, "if 

wt have iniermeiliatc schools wiin 

these types of classes, the rooms 

will be in use *very school hour 

of every week hetause there will 

A coiiuiiuiee of school adminislratoi ,■;. principals, teachers. and|he many more seventh and eighth 

parents will lie appointed next week by School Superintendent Lionel [graders to take the courses " 

J. Bouigeois to study possible revision of the Orleans parish plan ' ' ' 



Committee Will Study 
Orleans School Revision 



of public school education 

Bourgeois said today he would 
isk the committee to "thoroughly 
study" the eight-year-elementary., 
four-year - hiR>i - school plan of 
schooling and the six-year-ele- 
mentary. three-\ ear-intermediate. 
three-\ ear-high school plan and 
to make a recomrtiendation for 
use of one of these systems be- 
fore construction of any new- 
buildings. 

The public schools nqw o»erate 
under the eight-,\ear, fo/r^year 
plan but a re<ron>V!e:v]atiijn^as 
made bv a sta'e d' iia/tmentA«m- 
mittee to chrig/ !»• -''le '•i.V-.v'far. 

hree-vear. siAn t/> dk^s .'"Out 

ull litilizat on of,'Ney Orleans 

chbol buildings, i ( 
Bourgeois lirg^ the . school 

ward adopt a plan to be used for 
It least the next 1.5 or 20 years 
30 the proposed building program 
can conform with the typie of edu- 
cation. -^""^rX 



Immediate Change 

The superintendent in a report 
last month to the board recom- 
mended immediate , change from 
8-4 to 6-3-3 in the Negro division 
of the public schools. He said the 
plan will go into operation in Ne- 
gro schools in iSeptember if ap- 
p!o\ed by the hoard. A Ne^ro 
ommittee has already studied and 



Regional Schools 

The Intermediate schools would 
handle onl\ seventh, eighth, and 
ninth graders and would be re- 
gional schools housing th« grad- 
uates of several elementary 
schools in the vicinity. 

His decision to name the com- 
mittee followed a meeting yester- 
day of the committee to discuss 
Iieeds of the proposed new school 
n Gentilly. 
This group is to recommend the 
vpes of rooms and equipment 
ieeded for the school. If the 8-4 
)lan is to he followed, the school 
switch to the 6-3-3. our Duimingspeeds will be "entirely different" 



would not conform to the type of 
education offered." 
' Bourgeois said a building con- 
structed to house eight years ele- 
mentarv- would have to include 
"expensive" home economic and 
industrial arts classes 



the' 



NOS-49-2-6 



from those of the 6-3-3 plan 
superintendent stated. 

Bourgeois said he believes that 
some $400,000 of the funds avail-! 
hble to huild the Gentilly school 
fvill build a "good six year ele- 
which are|nientary school" but that he 
didn't know how far the fund^ 
would eo toward construction r 
;in "eight grade school ' 



City High Schools Have No 
Seniors-Theoretical ly 



There are no senior class^a 
In New Orleans public hign 
schools this year — technically. 
that is. / 

An addition four years ago oi 
one year to the grammer gra'ie 
program should have left ilie 
high schools without a senioi 
class this vear. I 

Principals,, however, s^ tha» 
about 800 are enrolled as sen- 
iors, more tjlan one-third of liie 
normal nvii^ber in the higu 
school senior flassesv 

Edwin W. • Eley,* assistjim 
school superintendent in charif 
of high schools, explained tha, 
theoretically there has been a 
ghost class moving up througn 
the high schools each year. 



So Freshmen 

When the school board added 
a year at the elementary le^ ^l 
children went to the eighth 
grammar grade Instead of high 
school thereby leaving the high 
schools without an. entering 
freshman class. 

Technically the f o II o w i a g 
years there wefe no soph"- I 
mores, and the next year no 
juniojii. I 

; But because of enrollment 
from other cities, plus "irregu 
lar students," and students wlio 
have quit school and returned 
the "empty year" has been filled. 



NOS-47-9-6 



Thus the seniors this year. 

And when schools get back to 
normal next year, with the pUu 
for 12 instead of 11 years o' 
schooling completely "under 
way, there will be a better edu- 
cation in store for New Orleai.s 
children. 

'More Capable' 

"After 12 years of school a 
student will be more matuie, 
more capable of holding a job," 
said Eley. "And he will be a 
better trained graduate." 

Many high school graduates, 
Eley added, have been too 
young to enter college -and Coo 
young to work. 

"Next year the average age of 
our graduate will be boosted to 
17," the superintendent sat" 
"This means that the boy or 
girl will be 21 or 22 vThen he 
gets out of college and wuli 
a more mature outlook on lile 
they can enter business, indus- 
try, or profession with confS 
dence." 



325 



SCHOOLS ON "> 
EVE OF YEAR 
OF CHANGE 



41- Lrpislalurcs Have 
Made Adjuslmeiits in 
Education - 



k J. (.RESUMES 
SERVICE BY BUS 



New York. Aug. 30 (yPl. — America's 
•tHicatlon systems, on the eve of k 
banner season, are undergoing some 
major adjustments. 

In the last year, at least 44 state 
legislatures have made noteworthy 
Changes In the status of schoolmarm 
• nd pupil. This follows a rash of 
■trtkes and complaints against sal- 
aries and working conditions and re- 
ports thai a bumper crop of new 
pupils Ls coming up. 

When the legislative halls cleared, 
•ccording to Information gathered by 
the National Education association. 
the lawmakers had passed nearly 400 
•t?.tues providing In general for more 
adequate school financing, greater 
equalization of «ducf<tlonal oppor- 
tunities. Incrcmed teachers' salaries. 
liberalized teac-heis' mlrrment bene- 
fits, tightened requiramenrs for 
leaching ceilKlcation and modified 
Instructional programs 

Analysis of the new laws discloses 
that 3.1 states increa.sed the amounts 
appropriated to support their mini- j 
mum programs and that 26 boosted | 
appropriations to help equalize edu- i 
eatlonal opportunities among school | 
tflstrlcU. I 

The high spot In school legislation 
*'a8 widespread agrerment that t«ach- 
•rs' salaries were ton low., with the 
exceptions of Connecticut. Iowa. Mon- 
tana. Nebraska. New Mexico. South 
Dakota and WyomlnK. each of the 
44 states reporting pa.ssed emereency 
epproprlatlons to grant coot-of-living 
bonusss or raised minimum salaries. I 

New or li'o^ralized retirement plans ^ 
Hso were authorized by 27 states. I 



In the matter of proiesMonBi stand 
trds. Arlt«08»s provided for pre^rss- | 
ilve raising of . certification require- 
ments after July 1. ie4«. Idaho made 
four years' college training mandatory 
after Septemoer 1. 1958. and Nevada 
•ought to eliminate emergency cer- 
tificates "as soon 'as possible." 

Both Maryland and Arkansas ''Ul**' ' . .». ■ • 

that classes should be cut to aver- Will Operate TO Bring 

' ^V: VoTohlo. Pennsylvania and,, Student, To Colleg-d^ 
Texas all passed laws outlawing I Doilv 

teacher strikes.- Texas also outlawed £ 

•ollectlve bargaining. ^ Northeast Junior College sAiounccs 

The legislatures of Pensylvanla »n<l resumption of bus service to towns 
Missouri decreed revisions In tbeT^^j commimities on U. S. highway 
teaching of American history and tj^ ^^y Stops will be made at TuUos, 
government. In Missouri. In addl- tjrania, OUa, Standard. Kelly, Clarks, 
tlon. the constitution of the United Grayson, Columbia, Riverton, Bosco 
States and the History of Missouri „d fondale. 

Here made required subjects to beF jhis route was started last fall but 
taught not later than the seventh Lgj discontinued through lack of bus 
^rade and running through higt facilities. Now a fine new bus has 
school and Into college. been obtained and service will be 

In Oregon, state law now require) resumed September 11. 
the teaching of racial and religiaui Three other routes that were oper- 
tolerance In the public schools, j gted last year will again serve their 

Both Indiana and Montana ra respective areas. One will start at 
quire elementary and high school Jones, La., and travel south over 
to teach the effects of Intoxlcatlnj highway 165 to Monroe with stops at 
llqur 



ST- 47- 8-31 



Bonita, Callion, Mer Rouse, Bastrop 
and Perryville. 

Another route slartinjr sf Oak Grove 
will travel state highway r.'o. 16 to 
Delhi, thence ilo Monroe o.*. highway 
80, with sloiJs at /ore.st. Woneer, 
Darnell. Epp^ Delhi, Diiui, Holly 
Ridge, Rayvilr and Slarl^ - 

The fourth begins «i VVjsnpr and by 
state highway -No. l.i. -travels north 
to Monroe stopping at Gilbert, Chase, 
Winnsboro, Baski^, Manghara, Archi- 
bald and Alto. • 

Some of the rate*- previously 
charged have been materially re- 
duced, particularly those applying to 
RayvUle and Bastrop. 

L. L. Price, head of the depart- 
ment of agriculture, has been visiting 
towns and communities along the 
proposed bus routes in order to assist 
in enrolling those who will be pas- 
sengers on the various bus routes. 

Northeast Junior College is able 
through its bus service to bring many 
boys and girls to college here and 
at the same time permit them to re- 
turn home each night. This is re- 
garded as promoting family-home i 
relationship for students in their two 
early years of college. j 



(7g) 



J 26 



C ontribution's -. nj rositive values . - 



Five Hig!) Schools 
In Area Listed as 
Fully Accredited 

G. W. Ford Returns From 
Southern Association Meet 
In Leuisvilte, Ky. 

FlT» high Khoois In this arpa wpr«- 
ftmong the lOS in «>uirlanii tlai«l- 
fled M luUr #ccred:tei '"4 the 
Bouthem AssoclB'Jon of Ti^UeRer; *rjd 
Secondary Rchoo!«. a. Vf . F-srd, 
ehalnnan of the i^ssoclatioh's Ifu- 
Islana con-.mltt^. anj>*unced 
Wednesday '^ 

They are Ijaka Charle*. DeQuincy, 
Kinder. Vinton and Welsh high 
•chooU. 

Pord. principal of Lake Charles 
high school, recently returned from 
the association's annual meeting at 
LouimUa, Ky.. where applications 
tK9 pubUe and privat« high schools 

were handled by the central review- 
ing commiitee. 

There are 15* high schools in the 
association for the 1947-48 school 
year. Of that number, in the public 
school cateRory. 91 are fully accred- 
iitf>d. 36 have been "advised." nine 
(■"warned" and four new ones added. 
InnB n-as dropped from the member- 



ship list. In the private .school cBt«-| cHouma); Jeanerette; Kannef 
gory. IJ are fully accredited, one Kentwood; Kinder: Uk« Charles' 
has been "advlsed^and one added.' Lecompte; LecsvUle; Usbon- Lo- 
Terns Ekvftihetf |BHn.spoil: Longstreet: Lute her: 

.. ■''"f' '"PlauiPd that .schooU are Many; Man.^field; Marerro; Marlon- 
advised for mmor infractions of Mer Rouge: Harris and Mlnden high 
ii'.*./"'"J'?u'""**^ ^^ "^* com- parish (Monroe;: Morgan City; 
mittee Ih the majority of cases MoorinRsport: Nktchltoches; Eleanl 
rl^^n'^tK'"". '* ^^' ""=" °' • '""y °' ^^""'"' J«"«.on. John S 



trained librarian. 

Schools which were '•warned" are 
those with principals who have not 
received masters degrees. Pord 
pointed out that the principals In 
the.se schools are army and navy 
. veterans who ente/ed the service 

during World War 11 before receiv- 
ing their masters degrees. Upcm 
discharge, they were given these 
positions to which they wer« other- 
wise entitled 

Schools Listed I 

The names of the 91 fully-accred- 
ited public high schools are as fol- 
lows : 

Abbeville: Amite: Arcadia: Ath- 



noRh, Martin Behrman. Metarie 
Ridse, Sophie B. Wright (all of New 
Orloansi: Oil City; Patterson; PeU- 
can; Plaqucmine: Rayne; Loon 
Oodchaux (Reserve); Ruston; Ju- 



lius Preyhan (St. PranclsvUle) ; 8t. 
Gabrie; Saline; C. E. Byrd high. 
Fair Park high (Shreveport > ; Sicily 
Island: Summerfield; Tallulah; 
Thibodaux; Vinton; Vivian; Welsh; 
Westwego; White Castle; Winns- 
boro; Wi.sner and Zachary. 

The four public schools which 
were admitted to membership in the 
association are Gibsland; Jonesboro- 
Hodge iJoneAoroi; Francis T. Nich- 
olls (New Orleans), and Rodessa. 

The 12 fully-accredited private 



ens; Bolton (Alexandria; Central 

llstrouma. University laboratory, Ba- ^nc <• »u.ij-=i...ii:uinru piivbh; 

|ton Rouge high, all of Baton Rouge; hlRh schools are Academy of the 

jBelcher, Bogalusa; Bossier; Breaux Sacred Heart. Isadore Newman. Je- 

iBridee; Cecelia': Comnti: Castor: 'uit high. Holy Cross. Louise Mc- 



Bridge: Cecelia: Compti; Castor 
Chenevville; Church Point; Colum- 
bia; Cotton Valley; Covington; 

I Crowley; DeQuincy; Dutchtown; 

1 Elizabeth; Ferrlday; Forrest Hill; 
Franklin (Franklinton); Gilbert; 
Glenmora; Greenwood; Gretna; 
Southeastern Loui.';iana Training 
school iHammonfii; HavnesviUe; 



uit high. Holy Cross. Louise Mc- 
Ghee, Metarie Park Country Day, 
Most Holy Name of Jesus. St. Jo- 
seph's academy. St. Marys Domini- 
can and Ursuline (all of New Or- 
leans"; St. John"! high, St. Vin- 
cent's (both of Shrtveport). 

The new member, in the private 
school classification, is Sacred Heart 



school iHammonfli; HavnesviUe; 'J school classification. 
Homer: Hosston: To, rolio-me hich jlhigh ol New Orleans 

LCAP-f7- 12-11 "^ 



Bascom N. Timmons 



Educational Level of American People Is Rising, Says Census Report 

lege. In the age group 25-29, how- 
ever, fewer than 5 per cent have 
had less than five years schooling. 



WASHINGTON — The amount 
of education attained by the aver- 
age American citizen is showing 
a rapid and promising Increase, i 
In spite of the war. with its in-^ 
terruptlon of schooling for thou- j 
sands of youth, the average | 
amount of learning posse.'ised hy 
Americans has increased 10 per 
cent since 1940, the census bu- 
reau declares in a rather surpris- 
ing report. 

As of April 1, of this year the 
census bureau estimates that the 
average American over the age of 
14 had 9.6 years of formal instruc- 
tion. In 1940, the average was 
only 8.7 years. Thus in the past 
eight years, the educational level 
of the hation has been substan- 
tially E^ised. 

The eilect of the war i.s seen. 
hOw«ver, in the extraordinary 
fact that at the present time wom- 
en, on the average, have had more 
formal schooling than men. The 
average for the feminine half of 
the population is 9.9 years, while 
for the masculine half it is only 



i).2 years. Far moi-e young nieir 
than women had their education 
interrupted by the war. 

Among 107 million .Americans 
above the ase of 14, some 4,717,- 
000 are college graduates, com- 
pared with 3.800,000 in 1940. ac- 
cording to the census estimate. 
Almost 35,000,000 Americans 
have completed high school, a 
gain of 10,000,000 since 1940; 



while more than half have grad- 
uated from high school. 

Men hold 2,600,000 college de- 
grees, against about 2.000,000 for 
women. Among high school grad- 
uates, however, women currently 
outnumber men by over 2.000,000. 
Veterans of 'World War II, 
many of whom are still in col- 
About 10 per cent of the pop- jegg j^ave the highest level of 
ulation has had less than five education of anv segment of the 
years of formal education: and population. The 13.765,000 vete- 
47.000,000 never went beyond j.^^^ j^gye completed an average 
grade school. Twenty-two million ^f jj years of school each. More 
attended high school, but dropppd (jjgjj 2.000.000 have been to col- 
oiit before graduating, while 7.- igg^ an(j 342.000 have degrees, 
000.000 have taken some college .while about 7.000.000 have com- 
work, but not enough for a four- pieted high school, 
year degree. , Negroes have been making very 

The older you are. the less rapid strides in education. The 
chance vou've had for education, average Negro now has 7.4 years 
Among "oldsters 65 and over are education, a gain of 20 percent 
2.300,000 persons with less than „'7,he average of 6.2 years that , 



Dnlv 354.000 



over the average 
prevailed only *' 
Over 200,000 Negroes 



five years of schooling against ":p'VlSl"oniv"' eight years ago. 
who completed col- P"?,?'.;^ nno Negroes have col- 



nOS-48-5-13 



lege degrees. 



<U^ 



327 



Problems and needs. 



Bare Need for Complete 
Change In School System 

BY EMILE COMAR ' ' 

New Orleans' rapidly shifting and steadily increasing population will soar to 650,000 
br 1970, virtually forcing a complete change in the city's public school system. 

This is the keynote of a 200-page report received by the Orleans parish school board 
fc-oni the state department of education. The report, based on a survey of needs and 

*^rikties. was made at the request of the school board under the direct^ion of John B 

iMvers, Tormer siaic-sTrpmvis-i^f-— r — ; ™-n-«.. 

I ' , , , . j^ Negro schcols will need to ac- 

or of school plants and trans- commodate more than one and a 

portation. The complete re- ^^'^ ^''"^s 'he present enrollment. 

port was released today. , ^^ Figures Presented 

Public schools a.» f^r.^ ™i.hL."'^^,""™''er of white children 



fared with'»,v — i. ,j ^' "' wiiiie cnuaren 
•1. ■_. r ■ 'f'^^° wiin who should attend nubile school 

the problem of carmg for nearly ifinHo-^o-t-.- .u. j;"""c scnooj 



enrollment '''."J^ergarten through grade six 
enrollment ^^^ increase from 21.014 this 



twice their present _ 

within the next 20 years, the re- year *t^"4sT=;a Vrr"iQ=;-'co''*v ""^ 

port disclosed. KltaenPin' the'sam'e'' ^S 

Lakefront Need Greatest will increase from 18.307 in 1947- 

This 100 per cent increase, ac- i8 to 29,532 in 1957-58 
cording to the Myers report, will White school enrollment In 
be a result of Catholic school en- grades seven through eight will 
rbllment leveling off at just above Dump from the present 7381 to 
its present peak and of skyrocli- 23,250 in 1960-61- Negro from 
eting birth rate figures. 8091 to 14,550 in 1961-62. ' 

The greatest number of new. The number of white students 
schools to accommodate this in-jin grades 10 through 12 will jump 
crease, he added, will be neededjfrom 11,040 this year to 22 388 in 
in the area between Florida ave- 1964-65; the number of Negro stir- 
nue and the lakefront where pop- dents from 7552 to 14 531 
ulatlon has increased more than There will be slight decreases 
500 per cent during the last 35 in enrollment in the few 
years. following these peak 

Stressed In the report were the terms, Myers stated 
following facts; I Nm~„ v.^^ r^ ,.- . 

New Orleanfkns ire still mi- «. \^' ^^^ Critical 
grating rapidly toward the lake-L, '"'^® Negro population in New 
front area, j a m ni i n g presentfi ^"?, '^ increasing more rapidlv 
school facilities there and leaving^"^" /"? ,_T*'""p. apparently as a 

ThU Is the first of a series of IT^ , °" f""*"" farming areas, the 
articles presented to outline the H^^" 'O"" Negro schools is critical, 
problems and proposed changes S-K^^'i'!' ^^'d. 
in pnbUc school education in '■"^ Negro enrollment In all 
New Orleans as suggested In a f'^cnools in New Orleans, both pub- 
report by the state department J"^ ^J}° Catholic, is largely limited 
of edncationi and In connection P-^ '"« capacity of school build- 
wHh American Education '"§?• 
Weelc, Novebmer 9-15. ^"^ ™ost efficient and cheapest 

jvay of handling this tremendous 

many downtown schools with'"*^r^^s^ would be through a com 



years ' 
enrollment 



Orsranization of 



-ReoM 



only half the students they canf'"* revision of the Orleans par- 
educate. '5 P"o''c school system, it was 

The main area of decreasing ?^'^^^''*^d. 
population is in the belt between (Tomorrow 
the Mississippi river on the south the schools 

and St Charles avenue, Rampart 

street snd St. Claude avenue on f/ i 7) 
the north. VJJJ 

At the peak of school enroll- 1 , .^^ ^ a._ *»-^^~i. «. .^ - -•— t. r,„^ ,- ' 

^f^s. I5.i?'3's o7'a.^»xKlQS '47-10-25 MOS - 4 &- 6- 1 T 

lie school will have to accommo- CTT^^ 

date more than twice the number ^^^-Jj^ 

of children it now ' has enrol lefi 



Adequate Negro 
Schools Assured 

School Superintendent Lionel 
.1. Bourgeois announced today 
some Negro schools will be op- 
eiatpd on a "double shift" basis 
becinning in September to take 
care of the expected increase in 
the number of Negro pupils. 

"Were going to put all the Ne- 
gro children who apply for 
.-^cliooling in school," Bourgeois 
said. "We will operate double 
.shifts in schools where necessary. 
We will have one faculty operat- 
ing the school in the morning and 
another faculty operating in the 
afternoon. Both shifts will offer 
full time schooling." 

He said nearly 1200 students 
will enter high school from ele- 
mentary school in September. 
^ In the elementary division 
Bourgeois anticip^cs a "very 
large increase' in Sevtpmber. The 
elemeniarv schools ■:V\ al.so op- 
erate dr.iible -shifts uith separate 
facultirs "where neres.--ar5-," Bour-s 
geois said. ■ • " | 

He said' (be double" shift plan I 
has worked siiece^si'uny in Detroit I 
and other citie.- where school I 
building plans are under way but I 
facilitiei? are not vet adeouatp. | 
The superintendent estimated f 
more than 50 new teachers willf 
be needed to handle the addition- ' 
al facilitie.s. The double shift' 
schools, he emphasized, would be 
full time schools and not part 
time facilities ^s operated in some 
Negro schools during the past ses-l 
sion! 



32g 



NEW STATE SCHOOL SETUP 
/-,» IS PROMISED BY JACKSON 

1 I 



I^Oandidofe Outlines Plans md integrate the acadecilc and voca 

On Six Specific Phases ?:^ iTaZu'*^ *" '^^^ *' 

Of Public Education ^^- I^^^'^P b ^°^ efficient veteran 
xaining program to meet the needs. 

BATON ROUGE. Feb. 9. -(Special) . ^\-^^*'°P ^* *^,°°' ^^^^ »"«* 
-A pledge to work in full co-opera- ^"'* Pr^eram to the extent that 
tion with the state board of educa- "" schools >nay have the opportunity 
tion and with parish school systems in *? ..T^' adequate hot lunches to all 
furthering public school education in *^,°^ °." ', satfl ac^ry basis, 
the state as a whole and in its in- -■"• "^^'de for the safe transporta- 



dividual sections is contained in a 
comprehensive platform on which 
Shelby M. Jackson, formerly state di- 
rector of vocational education, now is 



tion of our children. 
U. IMPROVE SCHOOL FACILJTIES 
EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS 
OF INSTRUCTION 



campaigning U>t election to the Post |pj[;, ^°"^"« ^^ textbooks, libraries. 



of state suptrintendent. 



cils, paper, and other school sup- 
iplies. 
Mr. Jackson now is touring north 2. Make a thorough study of the 
Louisiana .-.nd expects to reach vir- state textbook adoption and recom- 
tually aU parches inrthe state before ^end that the state board of educa- - 
the second primary Jvoting on Feb- tion make such changes as are needed authorities, being careful at aU times 



a greater service in meeting the 
needs of the people. 

2. Develop strong teacher training 
departnients with laboratory schools 
and research departments so that 
all children will have well-trained 
teachers. 

i 3. Give preference to veterans and 
Louisiana students in our state sup- 
ported colleges and university. Recom- 
mend substantial scholarships in col- 
leges for children of veterans who died 
or were incapacitated as a result of 
the war. 

4. Cooperate with and assist 
wherever possible the board of super- 
visors of L. S. U. in a greater univer- 
sity program. 

VI. IMPROVE THE STATE DEPART- 
MENT OF EDUCATION SERVICES 

1. Provide for efficient and compe- 
tent leadership in the state department 
of education. Take politics out of 
schools and schools out of politics. 

2. Under my direction, the state de- 
partment of education will furnish the 
needed leadership in all school matters 
and will always work in friendly co- 
operation with the parish school 



niary 24. He is opposing John E. Coxe. .jn the light of the study. 

present supenntcndent, who is seeking I 3. Assist the parish school boards 

re-election. ,, , in providing plans for developing ade- 

In the first primary Mr. Jackson quate facilities, equipment, and ma- 
ran more than 50,000 votes ahead of terials of instrWWon in meeting the 
Mr. Coxe and more than 100,000 votes needs for ■all schools, 
ahead of his own ticket. - m a SOUND STATE SCHOOL FUND 

Part of Mr. Jackson's platform is a 1. Increase state school funds under 
plan for him, if elected, to make fre- consiuarrtTmn- proiecuon to provide 
quent visits to parish school systems, for an expanding school system and 
to work with them in striving their for educational progress, 
problems, and to co-ordinate their | 2. Provide a fair, sound, scientific 
efforts into the department's efforts Li^n for the distribution of state school 
at the state level. His platform, spe- tfunds. 

cifically covering six phases of public 3 Work for federal aid for education 
education, follows in full: under state control. 

I. AN IMPRO'VED SCHOOL IV. EFFICIENT SCHOOL 

PROGRAM , PERSONNEL 

1. Make every school a community i_ Adopt a state-wide minimum 
educational center offering a complete salary schedule for all school personnel 
program of education and training to —school officials, teachers, bus drivers, 
meet the needs so that aU will have janitors, and other school employes- 
equal educational opportunities. Ln a twelve months basis so that 

2. Develop an outstanding program ^jj ^ju receive higher salaries com- 
of education that will insure prog- mensurate with what oUier professions 
ress and make practical the twelve gjjj trades receive. 

grade plan. 2. Improve the teacher retirement 

3. Emphasize good instruction in all L^ and school bus drivers retirement 
•chool subjects. |a^ in order to provide an adequate 

4. Develop ti-aining for character 'income for all school employes retir- 



education and useful citizenship 

5. Provide for all children to have 
the advantages of music, art, indus- 
trial arts, and handcrafts. 

6. Provide for conservation educa- 
tion. • 

7. Emphasize the teaching of the 
principles of democracy. 

8. Improve the physical fitness of 
oiur youth through practical instruc- 



ing and those retired. 

3. Uphold, classify, and strengthen 
teacher welfare laws, providing for 
retirement, tenure, sick, and sabbatical 
leave. 

4. Ask the state board of education 
to continue the study of teacher 
certification by appointing a state- 
wide committee to study and recom- 
mend desirable improvements and 



tion in health, physical education and interpretations of the recent bulletin 

•afety. 

». h^oviue for each parish a com- 
plete program of vocational education 
in all of its branches of agriculture, 
home economics, trade and industrial 
education, distributive occupailoas, 
business, commerce, pre-nursing and 
other types of education that pre- 



No. 497 published on this subject 

V. DEJVELOP THE PLAN FOR 

HIGHER EDUCATION IN 

THE COLLEGES 

1. Work with the state board of 

education in the development of the 

coUeKe program in order to render 



to avoid interfering in any way with 
Ithe present system as provided by law 
(which gives local control of all school 
affairs in the parishes. 

3. Will assist school boards in pro- 
viding the principal, who is the chief 
administrator of the school, adequate 
teaching personnel and clerical help. 
Also, assist school boards in providing 
visiting teachers with adequate clerical 
help. 

4. As state superintendent of educa- 
tion, I will work with the state board 
of education as one elected public of- 
ficial should work with eleven elected 
public officials in the interest of edu- 
cational progress in Louisiana. 

5. Recompile and annotate, in con- 
junction with a state-wide committee, 
the school laws of the state of Lou- 
isiana, so that all persons interested — 
teachers, parents, school boards, and 
school officials— may enjoy the use of 
an efficient reference work on the 
basic laws of our public school system. 

6. Cooperate with all governmental 
agencies, civic groups, and lay citizens 
toward attaining a bette i ag o rdinated 
program in building for a greater 
Louisiana. 

7. Cooperate with agriculture, in- 
dustr>', conunerce, business and labor 
interests of the state toward the de- 
velopment of a greater Louisiana. 

8. Piomote a closer relationship be- 
tween the schools, homes, civic and 
other groups. 

9. Advocate an adequate School pro- 
gram in every community to meet the 
needs of the people. 

10. I promise to visit in tiie parishes 
of the state, confer witli the teachers, 
supervisors, principals, superintend- 
ents, school board members, bus 
drivers, ' janitors, and others so that 
I might know first hand the problems 
and wishes of those concerned and to 
do my utmost to direct an educational 
program in keeping with their needs. 



^^ 



329 



School Study ' ^ , 

The committee named by Governor 
Davis in 1946 to study Louisiana's pub- 
lic education system prepares a report 
to the Legislature which notes that 
Louisiana is 44th in general literacy 
•nd 48th in rural literacy. 

This means that Louisiana as a 
whole has more illiterates than any 
other state of the Union with the ex- 
ception of just four. It means that 
Louisiana has more rural illiterates 
than any other state without exception. 
In that respect Louisiana stands at the 
vei-y bottom. 

An illiterate person is one 10 years 
old or older who cannot write in any 
language. If he can write, but has no 
education beyond this simple require- 
ment, he is classed as literate. ' 

The record is a sliame and a di~2/ace. 
Our high percer^age^'of ilJireia -v. and 
the vei-y much/hi.£rfi<*p^percemjge of 
men and wome/( whi)(^hii\e had h maxi- 

Nos-4S-5-e 



mum of a few #ears klementarji* scnout- 
ing, is one of the prime reasons why 
political grafters and corruptionists 
have thrived so amazingly well in 
Louisiana and why the public will and 
determination to punish the miscreants 
is so lamentably lacking. 

The committee studying the educa- 
tion system draws up a report of 15 
specific recommendations for legisla- 
tive action, and seven recommenda- ' 
tions that do not require legislative ap- 
proval. The committee finds that the 
expenditure of $55,893,000 for public 
education the la.st year, while a great 
deal more than it was a decade ago, is 
still not enough. A law allowing the 
parishes to increase the school tax 
from the present seven-mill limitation 
to 12 mills is favored. Total state ap- 
propriation of S40 per educable, includ- 
ing comparable increases for the insti- 
tutions of higher learning, is favored. 
For the school year now snding the 
state's contribution was about $38.50 
per educable. fTTch 



The bulletin stated: i. Continuous investigation and 

"A bona fide co-operative plan- study of the present and probable 
^ning for the impending increases enrollment trends in the commu- 
in school enrollment is essential nity's schools, 
as it is a demonstrable fact that o. The exchange, on the basis 
the children are here, more arejof mutual confidence, of the gen- 
coming, and they must be(eral plans of each eroup relating 
, schooled." • to the extent to which thev ex- 

Doe to Three Factors pect to absorb the children ofi 

The bureau said the increased educable age 
enrollment mow. which may be- The conference may be expand- 
come "more or less continuous," ^j the bulletin further suggested. 
, is due to three factors: -q include representatives from I 

1. The numebr of births In the city planning and zoning com- 1 
mission, department of recreation 



Urge City wide 
Conference on 
School Problem 

A cltywlde conference of pub 
lie, religious and noDsectarren pri-,., _ , . . j -^ 

vate school repre-en ^tjves sUtJuld'New Orleans Jias mcreased rapid- 

be formed in 'the mn ediate fu- '^ ^^^^^ ^^^^ °"^ ^° conditions of the citv and the state depart- 1 
ture to determine how V •■ Or- '""°"S*^^ about by war and ensu- nient of edi'cation. 
leans will care fnr the in-i easing ^f P^P^PfJ'^y- ^..^ Failnre Swells Grade* 

number of scho<,l rjunils 2. Death rates among children The bulletin also contend.'?' that. 

of pre-school age have dropped retardation or failure of children I 
sharply since 1930 with the result in elementary grades is so prevat-' 
that more of the children born ent that fr«iuentlv pctual enroll-, 
h- *^..r,™,.i~_ < .u r ' ■ *re ultimately reaching school ment is almost twice as much asl 

he formation of the^ conference . ,ge. ■ enrollment statistics indicate! 

3. Migration of additional faml- there will be. ' 

lies to New Orleans. ' "This means." the report sal(U| 

The bulletin pointed out that "that a very large number of chil- 
enrollments "will be further ac- dren who have reached the age.s 
centuated in 1948-49 as this will at which they are normally ex- 
be the first full year of a 12-grade pected to be in high .school are 
school system." still struggling along in the ml4- 

^ Fnnctions of Conference die elemehtary grades. F^lemen- 

ITirr T~IZ* !r; 'Zr, I The functions of the conference tarv srhool enrollment is mflatedj 

ponting put that "New Orleans recommended, to be called the and will continue to be inflated as 
will shortly produce all-time peak conference on School Population, long a.<; large numbers of children I 
enrollments m our schools." should Include at least the fol- are failed In the lower grades." | 



The Bureau, 
Research, in in 
in released last 



Orleans parish administration 
offices have begun a survey to 
determine what percentage of 
the children In public elemen- 
tary schools are retarded, .A.s- 
sistant Superintendent Donald 
Marsball said today. 



JJU 



M isunderstandings and controversial isj|.t»^. - 



The AppominHs System 

Tbe iong b»tUe in tdncattonal, editorial and oth- 

^^r^ . "f^^I^ ^ "" "^ o"l<» cf State Superln 
tendent of Educ&Uon out of the maws of poUtlcsand ' 

^^^^^^^^'''^ -^^^^ ^^><» seem at long last' 
to be wKhta tbe grasp of the oeoDle if n^v^no*. 

^t^T^^"^ i^',^'*'^^ memt^iH'^lheJreJSS^ 
S^i^i^ '"?1 legislator may be given ^J^,\ 

the ba lot on tills issue In wblch every citS^of 
the stole haa a deep-rooted stake. ""—ea oi , 

■nie DAILY ADVERTISER has long and reoeat- : 
•dly expressed Its stand on.^thls matter. So hSthe 
Bhreveport Times long been In the forefrorvt of the 
battle lines. A clear elucidation of the issue has been 
eet forth once more by the Times ns a ^^lsty barrage 
to feU tile sniping from certain quarters with di- 
verse motives: i 

"Tile Hmes again endorses the appointive meth- 
od as the means of f.lling the post of state superin- 
tendent of education tor Louisiana and we hope that 
the present legislature, as one of Its early acts will 
submK to the people of the state a consUtttUonaJ 
amendment esUbllsiiing this system for our own de- 
partmen* of education. We are gratified to learn tJiat 
Governor Long and his admlnlstrat.on apparently 
have decided to give the appointive RLai full support 
aiui we extend our commendations to all concerned 
to that decision. We feel qertaia'thpv at the proper 
moment and after he has taken cf fice officially, 
the new state supermt(jndeiit, Shelby %!. Jackson, will 
give his unequivocal dndpisfement, aita we hereby 
recommend liim to tiife' st^Ce board or education for 
full consideration when it makeS the first appoint- 
ment. - 

"WMh a neiw .state administration, and with so 
many new legislators, The Times feels that certain 
points about the appointive system should be clari- 
fied again, even though in the past we have dealt 
with them fully. For one thing the appointive sys- 
tem does not deprive the people of any right that is 
Inherent under American form of government. On 
the contrary, it follows specifically the basic princi- 
ples of democratic government as established by the 
Founding Fathers of the nation when they made all 
federal administrative posts appointive where special 
training or professional qualifications are Involved. 

"Under that system, the elected president of the 
United States appoints the heads of the various de- 
partments of the government and they in turn ap- 
point their subordinates. 

"How much efficiency would there be in our na- 
tional federal educaUon office if the U. S. commis- 
aioner of education were elected by popular vote and 
forced to put himself up for re-election every four 
years? • ^ . 

"How much efficiency would there be in our 
federal health service If the surgeon general had 
to seek and gain his office through poUtical ma- 
chines? 

LDA-48-5-23. 



"What efficiency -or integrity— could be expect- 
ed In the federal tbomlc energy commission If Us 
memt}«rs, and chairman, were subject to political ma- 
chlnattons every four years? ! 

"Tl>eae same things apply directly here in Lou-| 
telaTia. In our parishes we ELECT OUR SCHOOL, 
BOARD and It In turn APPOINTS THE PARISH 
SUPERINTENDENT. 

"That Is exactly what is proposed for the Louisi- 
ana state prat — that It be made appointive by the 
all-etected state board of education .'n the same man- 
ner that parish superintendents are appointive by 
. the parish school board The state board is made up of 
11 members— all to become elective next fall — ^with 
one member elected from each congressional district 
and one from eacn public service district, just as 
parish board members are elected from different 
wards. 

"The Times certainly does not contend that the 
•ppotatlve plan automatically always will assure that 
the best man, or a good man, always holds the post 
of state superintendent. No plan Is perfect. It Is 
Quite poeaible to get a good superintendent through 
statewide election, and a poor one through appoint- 
ment If a mediocre fctate board has been elected to 
office. . ^ ^ , . 

"Bat, in the long run, appointment In posts | 
where special profe»lonal qualifications are need-| 
•d te ^"ri has proven the best system whether the 
post be one of education, public health, or anything 
fimllar. x x x i 

"In Louifiana, leading educators all over the, 
ttate haveendorsed the appointive plan and, so far i 
as we know, no educator of extensive reputaUon ha^ 
opposed it. All daily newspapers that have studied 
thrproposal have endorsed i^The Shxeveport 
Times the Monroe News-Star and World, the New, 
Orleans States, tha Times-Picayune, the New Orleans. ■ 
Item and the Lafayette Advertiser— all have given j 
full endorsement. No daily newspaper in Louisiana | 
hai opposed the appointive plan. | 

"So far as Mr. Jackson is concerned, we do noti 
believe there is anything for him to worry about, al- : 
though some of his political enemies and followers 
; of liis predecessor have tried to spread a rumor that 
the appointive system might be used to "appoint him 
ou.t" of office. That, we believe, is ridiculous, and our 
.belief is founded on information from what we be- i 
'ilieve to be accurate and auchoritatire sources. .Jl 
"For one thing, Mr. Jackson has just been over-i 
whelmingly elected by bi-factlonal support which 
found him running 100,000 votes ahead of his own 
, ticket^-this being due to the strong support he re-; 
iceived from many Long leaders and voters. He went! 
Jin to office on his own steam — not on someone's coat- 
tails. 

"For another thing, he and Govemor Long are, \ 
we understand, gettirig along In full friendship and' 
In mutual de--ire to give the ."^'a+e the best In public 
education^a'id without either inerfeiing into the do- 
main of the oilier. 

j "Also, tiie state board of education, which would 
make the ,ippointment, fought Mr. JaclJson's fight j 
when he wa3 ousted ^y John E. Coxe. I 



(776) 



331 



LEADERS PROPOSE Cliaii«5eDueIiiColleffe 

COLLEGES' BOARD c • • o "^ 

Supervision system 



Four Presidents Concur on 
Co-Ordinating Body 



The system of supervising state-operated universities 
(Th< A«Ki.t«i pr.,., *"^ colleges is due for a change. This became apparent 

Baton Rouge, La./ D#c. H/~ ^^^^ week when bills on the subject were introduced by 



President* of four Loulaiana state 
colleges tO(»a\ conctirrsd in a pro- 
posal for a f^frmmn*! I Aodv tore 
ordinate -the work o; the oolteges 
«nd the state university — but. 
without an actual merger of the 
colleges' and the university's 
governing boards. 

The recommendation was made 
at a meeting of the legislative 
educational survey committee. 

At the same»meeting President 
Harold W. Stoke of the state uni- 
versity warned that an "unseen 
deterioration" was going on in the 
college teaching profession and 
that salaries should be raised to 
check it immediately. 

President Jo'seph E. Gibson 
of Northwestern State college 
proposed the co-oixUnating 
b«dy. It wonld consist of four ' 
members from the state univer- 
sity board by supervisors and , 
an equal number from the ' 
state board of education, which 
administers the other colleges. 
He said the higher education 
commission should "have consti- 
tutional authority to act in any 
matters of co-ordination," rather 
than merely advisory functions, 
and should be given a research 
sUff. 

Three Agree on Plan 
Presidents Joel Fletcher of 
Southwestern Louisiana Institute, 
G. J. Tinsley of Southeastern 
Louisiana college and Claybrook 
Cottingham of Louisiana Polj' 
techftic Institute said they gener 
ally agreed with Gibson's pro- 
posal. Tinsley added that he 
thought the university board of 
supervisors should always have 
"its Independence protected" so 
that "the state university can do 
its job of independent research 
and special w;ork." 

Sen. A. A. Fredericks of Natchi- 
toches, committee member, re- 
newed his advocacy of a single 
board to administer all the insti- 
tutions of higher learning. He 
said an advisory commission 
would be valueless and a commis- 
sion with constitutional authority 
would be "approaching the idea of 
a single board, anywav." I 



Agreement^ 



Senators C. H. Downs' of Alf'-'-^jdria and Gilbert. F. Hen- 
nigan, Fields 

Both bills would take ^An<r from 
the State* Board of Edutati'Ci any' •— -^ ._ _ ^~^ 

The one difference' is this: \i\SClCltOil \JlX 

Sen. Downs wants to keep the' 
present board' of s^ipervisors of y^ ft 
Louisiana State University for LSU.f .Of /^0'/>C - 
only and 5>t up another board .to T^ *^' ^^'^^ ^'^ 
Vcolleges and junior col- • 



(The Itent Capital Bureau) 
BATON ROUGE.— O p p o s i n g 
camps . have worked out » com- 
promise on the "one-university. 



supervise 
leges. 

I WOULD ABOLISH BOARD 

Sen. Hennigan wants to do away 
with the LSU board and set up one-board" bill, and are expected 
another that would supervise LSU to bring if, before the Senate soon,' 
and the colleges and junior col- possibly today. 

They have to.sycd/ovf^r board the 
plan to merge all s(^^collegcs 
and LSU un|er a singia board, 
with one cKancellor. J 

Instead, Vthey V'ill *f(er a plan 
to chu£c VHX trms of present 
memKerK of tie LSU board of 
suDCrviBfk mAuch a manner that 
Gov. Long^viTl be able to have his 
appointeey in the majority. 

■This it^ reliably reported today. 
The compromise plan will in- 



leges 

' The Downs bill was recommend- 
. ed by a legislative committee 
5,formed in 1946 to study the state's 
.(educational systems. Tlie Hennigan' 
_ bill represents the opinion of a 
..minority of that committee. I 

Both factions believe the State 
Board of Education is devoting to i 
I colleges time that would be spent 
'"better on problems of high schools' 
""and elementary schools. Both i 

^ would have their new boards ap- elude three hoards recentlv rec- 

pointed by the governor with the , om,^ended by a commiUee that 

consent of the Senate. J surveyed the state's educational 

Sen. Hennigan, backed by former system. 

i! Sen. A. A. Fredericks, now execu-!| one would be the LSU board 

|! live secretary to Gov. Long, be- and another would be a new board. 

• lieves the unified board for all 

schools of higher learning would 

cut down expense, time and dif- 

\ ferencesas well as eliminiate polit- 

1 ical squabbling between colleges 

5 and LSU. 

^ Sen. Downs thinks i separate 
( board for colleges is necessary to 
j keep the smaller schools from bc- 
r ing overshadowed by LSU. 



MOI-12-5' 



^ 



29 



I to control the state's other col- 
leges. 

' The third would be the board of' 
I education, which would exercise 
control over the elementary and, 
secondary schools. |> ■ 

DEVELOP OPPOSITION ; ! 
j .* c i-ordinalin^ council -with i 
|K ..ives from e»ch oi the 1 

I th • .. wo.id4^ttX$^'* QiMrations. I 
(C positronro ■tS?'v ipttig out of 
the LSU board developed. The 
compromise in expected to placate ,. 
those who wished to preserve the 

NO (-48- 6- '7 (3 



N0TP-47-)2-»5 



332 



Education Appointive 
Bill K illed In S enate 

Proposal To Have State Superintendent 

Named By Board Rather Than Elected 

Downed 6-5 In Committee 



Rep. Morrison 
Opposes School 
Consolidations 



BY B. L. KREB8 

The TimM-Pic»yure Staff Corrtiponrttnt i 

KRIKNDSHIIP, Jan. 8. — Con- 
IJiesinian James H. Morrison. 



BATON ROUGE. La.. June 3.— (AP)— A senate com-* 

Pnf nf^H^^^ '^'' ''' P'^^.P*^^^'?' to make the state superintend- !-ampaigning for governor in Bi- 

than electee ^P^*''"^'''^ by the board of education rather >nville parish yesterday, told a 

The vote^w'as^s to 5 ■Eainst the Dro I ■ .■ • . .-neeting in the school house that 

pose, consftutiona. ."nfeT^enU 't^".- k?H°r T:./"„^1"'?„'^^.?,1 11=^ .!'.1^T- '^ °PP°-^ ^° ^'^^OOl consolida- 

ions which result in moving the 
jchools from the smaller commu- 
lities. 

There have been times in the 

he said, •'when a movement 

A'as on foot to consolidate this 

school. I do not believe in such 

.. . u o . i " ---■ ""•■ " '» tl>€ rOnsoliflations and the moving of 

they compete with students from oth- j s c i e n c e of government. Certainly Ischools away from small commu- 
cr paru of Uie country for entrance schooU are in politics-and they will Inities. The schools Should remain 

sUy in politics whether we appoint jwhere they are, in the copinlunity 
the superintendent of education ur they serve. W, . 

elect him."' ^ "As governor I will oppose the 

Sen. Reimer Calhoun of Mansfield iCOnsolidation of your school or the 
obs-er\'ed that "93 percent of the people faking away of any of the teach- 
do not know what they are voting I'""'* or of part of the classes. On 
for when they vote on "constitutional If ^^^ contrary, I will help you to 
amendments." improve it." 

The present elected superintendeii' ' 
S. M. Ji'ckson, attG..ded tl> 
t<e heciing, but took no part 
' .Tuisiops. 



comminec on education acted 
hearing prop<.>nenlj> say Uie measure 
would strengthen the state education - 
il system and opponents declare it 
• step towards bureaucracy. 

Sen. Charles T. Tooke, Jr., ci 
Shreveport. said he was "tired of being 
embarrassed by the grades Louisiana 
high school graduates make when 



appointive superintendent than 
"riding into office on the coat ta:ls | 
after | of a successful candidate (or gover- I 
nor." 

Sen. C. E. Barham of Huston de- 
cisred that removing the office from' 
election by the people would tend ,ast 
towards government by bureaucracy. ' 

"I hate such government." he said. 

"The word politics sounds bad." 
Barham continued, "bu 



to West Point." 

District Attorney I^ander Perez of 
Plaquemines and St. lemard parishes 
»!so spoke for Uie bili sa\ ing he was 
satisfied there woulrf^be "great im- 
provement in our *chool sy5tapi"i if 
it were adop^d and voters "paij clos- 
er attention t<j the eteclior\. of ihc 
members of U»e state board 4 educa- 
tion." 

Sen. Gilbert Hennigan of Fields skid 
that it would, be- better to have an 



4Ae) M Mw-4 fi - e^il 



!rintendeii' ' ' ■"" ''"" "^ — "" ■ I 



State University Need Not 
Be in Politics, Say's Stoke 



todav 
•Ai 



President Harold W. Stoke of Louisiana State university 
took exception to the idea that a state university "is of neces.^ity 
polities'." 

"A great university should be socially sensitive but not po- 
Uticallv active, " the recentlv appointed head of the state university 

said in a speech to the Mid-Citj Ji". S"*^]! "^*?J\?.^!I|^\I^^ is useful this vear. bat not 

Kiwanis CU.ib at L^fant s reslau ^ pHvaTe or =puhlie are to be dis-"^'^^. <"• ^hich can be di..contin 
rant. ,- - tlngiiished by the work they do 



"I cannot believe that in its 
work of educating young men and 
women, in providing research j 
piogram.^ and public services, a! 
state umversiiv somehow be-i 
comes less nece.'^sary or less val- 
uable because one party Is in 
jpower rather than another or be- 
cause one group of men is elected 
o office rather than another. 
. "The educational work of a 
'jate university must be xarried 
\ ^f'r'V'r it is an indi<:p^nsible 

vice to the state, not a matter 



ued and then reviVed. If this na- 
ture of a state university is wide- 



Declaring he yrished tj* "mak* source of their sup- ly and clearly understood, its sup- 

dear, mv iHea^f the pohiical po| not by tne source or uieir auy ^^^^ ^^^ rtovoinnm<.nt «-in „,,t iL 



Bition ^f a-^-wate univeriity," Dr|Port. 
Stoke saii-i ' , # 

'Too ofl^n if is tai^ei for grant .. ^^ -V A-^ |A i^ 
ed that ifceq^se a imiversity i"^ KlOSr^ t^lQ*'^ 
created and supported by tlit^f^>^*^ • ' t^^ t^ 
state, it is of necessity 'in polt ^i^ "Tv 



port and development will not be 
a matter of partisan or personal 
politics. Rather it will be a mat- 
ter of united agi cement among 
aiblfc - spirited officials and 
rhoughtful citizens." , 



333 



LA. COUNCIL 
ON EDUCATION 
(^ TO BE URGED 

Unifor^m Policy-Makingi 

Body Would Control 

Slate Schools 



Single Board 



Baton Rouge. Oct. 24 i/P..— Esiab- 
lUhment of a Louisiana Council of 
Jllgher Education to work for uni- 
ronn policy-making by th« state) 
unlveralty and colleges will soon be' 
recommended by the legislature's 
eommlttee on educational survey. 

The committee decision was an- 
nounced last night by Rep. C. H. 
Downs of Rapides parish. He sug-l 
gested that the propoced council 
might consist of the presidents of 
the university board and the board 
of education, the university and state 
colleges, with provision for the chair- 
man of the house education and 
appropriation committees and thei 
senate education and finance com- 
mltte«« and possibly some laymen to | 
•It In on financial discussions. 

At a public hearing by the com- 
mittee there was some sentiment ex- 
pressed for a more far-reaching mer- I 
ger of the controlling bodies of the! 
institutions of higher learning. j 

At present Louisiana State uni-| 
veralty and lu outlying schoole and 
Junior colleges are under a board I 
appointed by the governor. The other! 
stata college* are under the elected | 
atate board of education, which also 
•unerTisea the states primary and 
wcondary »chools. i 

"•en. A. A. PredericlLs. of Naichl- 
tochea, a member of the Investigat- 
ing committee, said the divided con- 
trol of the state institutions of high- 
er learning Is due to "nothing but 
politics." 

He said that when the present 
constitution was written In 1921. 
plana were made for a single board 
to control all institutions, but that 
tha then President T. D. Boyd, of 
Louisiana State university, had suc- 
cessfully Insisted on a separate board 
for the university.. 

"There never has been any central 
plan for higher learning m Louisi- 
ana." Fredericka said. "The appro- 
priation given each Institution tias 
depended on Its Influence with the 
legislature One board would make 
for economy." 



An "Education Councir's'f 

The proposal for a Louisiana Coun- ^ i ■ *• 

cU on Higher Education, offered b>:fAw All NtfltO 
the Legislative Committee on Educa Jwl Mil JIUIC 

tion, Is not a new one. It returns after 
a somewhat similar idea was offered 
by the Louisiana Educational Survey 
some six years ago. 

The work of LSU and the state col- 
leges should be better co-ordinated. 
But it is unlikely that the LSU Board 
of Supervisors and the State Board of 
Education can be merged. Too many 
are interested in retaining the present 
system. 

However, there is no reason why the 
boards can't work together to offer 
the Legislature an, over-all program 
for higher education in the^tate. This 
might be achieved by tj5/~jlroposed 
Council to be raiade up of the chairmen 
of the LSU gnd Statr. Boa/ds, the 
president/ of LSU arid , the ■•^ooileges, 
and the gttit^supevi iVpndent of edu- 
cation with 'Occasional help from 
chairmen" of legislative committees. 
Or it might be achieved by a joint 
committee of the Boards. 

It is interesting to note, that, with 
jtwo boards in the field, Chairman 
Downs of the legislative committee 
"says legislators seek a "clearing house 
for requests to enable the legislators 
to feel that a competent body has 
t acted upon them." The sense of his 
discussion wsis that better and sound- 
er provision might be made for the 
University and colleges if recommen- 
dations are based on an over-all es- 
timate of what is required. The pro- 
posed Council, or a modification of it, 
might thus give higher education in 
Louisiana positive and progressive di- 
rection. 



MOIH7-11-13 



Schools Argued 

I Tim Asaoclatrd Preaii 
BATON" ROUGE, La., Nov, 17.— 
K proposal to place all Louisiana 
public education — elementary and 
nigh schools, state colleges and 
the univeisity — under a single 
Doard provoked hot debate today 
U a meeting of the legislative 
:ommittee on educational survey. 
Senator A. A. Fredericks of 
Natchitoches advocated the uni- 
fication, saying he had worked for 
!the move since 1934. He introduc-j 
ed a bill in 1940 for a single board j 
to covern the state university and' 
colleges, he said, but withdrew It 
because of "pressure" from Louisi- 
ana State university faculty mem- 
bers and alumni. ^ 
'"They were asking, 'what do you 
want to do, turn the university 
over to Tulane' '" Fredericks said. 
President Rufus Harris of Tu- 
lane universit.v is a member of the 
stale hoai'd of education, which 
administers the state colleges, 'ex- 
cluding I-SL' and its branche.s. 
'which have their own board of 
supervisor.':. 

Fredericks .said a proposed 
council on higher education to 
unify state college policy without 
actually merging the boards would 
amount to " a spy system." 
j He advocated a partly-elected, 
partly-appointed board of regents 
Tor the whole educational system. 
Even now. he said, fe%V Loutsian- 
ians realize that responsibility is 
divided Jytween two boards. 

Senat9< II H. Richafd.<on and 
fRepresentaijv'e Raean .\Ta Iden of 
Lincoln pafi.sh =aid Ihry, doubted 
that the OiJ^ge i-ould m accom- 
plished. 

MaddPTi s^n,; iit did 'not favor 
"doing awajf wiiH the LSU board." 
Represeniati\« Bonnie V. Baker 
of East Baton Rouge parish said 
the dual board system was well 
understood in Baton Rouge and 
that universit.v alumni here and 
elsewhere .would oppose a merger. 
The committee Iset another 
raeeUng December 14 at which col- 
liege presidents again will be in- 
|vited to give their opinions on 
leducational changes. 

NOS-"47-lT-r7 



334 



Negro Again 
Tries To Enter 
Okla. Schoof^^j^ 

OKLAHOMA CITY. (.\P) — A negro 
professor, who has sought unsuccess- 
fully to enter a graduate school at the 
University of Oklahoma, is go:ns to try 
again. 

The professor. G. W. McLaitrln. 55. 
disclosed lhrou»;h iiis attorney thai he 
h.td a transcript of his college credits 
f.om the Un'.versity of KanssLS — he 
received his master's degree there — 
and from Jackson College, Jackson 
Miss., and would furnifb it to the uni- 
versity . 

The sta'e ct a recent hearing before 
n three-Judjo federal court argued Mc- 
Laurin failed :o ccir.plete his applica- 
tion by his failure 'o furnish t^ tran- 
script. 

McLaurin asked ths federa' court 
to enjoin unJv,T*ity ; ^i.oials fitan en- 
forcing the sLij.s cd.:cat»onal .^gre- 
gation laws. Th-- '••■i;i Indicated it 
would order f. cL urin's «dniission 

I Sept. 24 unless l.? ^tatf provided a 
school with the loufse. ^hich the 
negro is seeking McLaurin has asked 

I for graduate study in education. 

Segregation Brings ; . 
ClidMe at N. Y. College 

' M^^V York UP).— A student 
dormllory of the College of the 
City of New York was under new 
management today after a facult.v 
board charged its director had 
[••pursued poijcies of racial segre- 
'gation." J 

I The director \yilliarT(.C. Pavif. 
-an asslstanf to the r>re.sirlpni of 
^the college. '■n-;'^e<! from hi^ f.o>t 
ishorily aftp' The im^rd's report 
I was relea.'spl^ 

The repo^ ^fd thart n^vis" 
^practice of • ::piierajj.v a.=sipning 
negroes to nit/ij.= with other ne-' 
groes" was ■■\pr\ unsound" and! 
•contrary to ail of the traditions; 
of City Ccillege." , | 

It quoted Davis as saying at a 
hearing that he had practiced 
putting negroes m Separate quar- 
ters because they 'apparently pre- 
fer their own company." The re- 

SJ-f?-3-26 



Oklahoma Students 
Demonstrate Over 
Ban on Negroes j 

Xorman. Oklo. (;P).— Siudeiits 
deinonstrating against the ban on 
aii)ni-;sions of negroes to the Uni- 
versity of Oklahoma today burnedi 
a copy of the 14th amendment to 
the constitution and mailed the 
ashes to President Truman. | 

The campus demonstration was' 
witnessed by an estimated l.OOOj 
students. It was held before ilassi 
work opened for the second semes 
ter and followed the f'enial of .\da 
Lois Sipuel Fishers M5plication 
for admission ttv the liniversity^ 
law school, on ^e p-minds the, 
state provided for ^-^ separate 
school 36l3bli.>hfd ik< Oklahoma 
City: . •; I 

Six o - -nciroes,- nought ad- 
mission ,v.'-:c'.rl,4y tCi' four gradu-j 
ate Bchoi Ls Rr;(ffits-lf higher edu- 
cation a;Kl of tVi/ I'niversity .ofi 
Oklahoni. nseix to ipcel today toj 
consider ,Ti":tioiiTn their case. ; 

The datrionstratimi, which was 
orderly, opened with the reading: 
of the 14th amendment, which pro- 
vides for equal citizenship for alli 
races and creeds. 

Howard Friedman, a senior 
from Oklahoma City, told th( 
group "we protest any type 
discrimination. Those who say 
can have equality under sepa^ a 
schools are blind." / 

He poi-nted out the negroes 
were denied eijtrance on ract 
alone. "The university is to de 
velop minds, not preserve -color 
lines," Friedman added. 



(TJ^ 



Delaware School 
Ads To Admit 
Negro Students 

Trustees Coll Action 
"First Token By South- 
ern University" 

NtWAPK. r>l . rrb. J lAP. In 
t* • "ftr^f surh (iction l«kpn by a 
touth»m univpr.'iitv' the Unufr»ity 
of Delaware < board of trusippn have 
ele»r"i rh^ wav for the admi.vilon 
of Negrn iTRidPnl.s of Delawarf with 
accepted academic standard 

Dr. William S. Carlson, president 
of the university with 2.000 .«iudenta, 
said ve^'erdav that under the 
board'i" niltnK NeKroe.5 will be per- 
Hiiffed for the fint time to sit aide 
bv sidp with while .Mudent.s. 

Dr. Arl.snn pointed out: however, 
that the lulinR doe:- not open the 
wa^ for ttia admission of any Negro 
Student The board he .said, decided 
to permit Negroes to enroll at Dela- 
ware in courses not provided by the 
Delaware State college for Negroes 
at Doyer. Del. 

The hoards nilint: cover-s only 
bona fide re.sidenls of Delaware and 
no provision wa.-. made for the ad- 
mts.s'on of Np^i-o .studcntx not liv- 
ing in the stai" 

The ruling »/n'> vnlunt#rilv. Dr. 
Carlson .«aiii. ■;/ the mnn*! was in- 
troduced bv a ^->nt ml rig of the 
U. S. sirpr/'P' court *h!>t a Negro 
woman waff' 'Uled ►.o fo(;?l educa- 
tional rigo; R-ith whiif students 
after she .vo i.-ht to onter ihe Okla- 
homa r inPi.f V la'^ school 

The National A.'-'-onatioii for Ad- 
vancement of Colored People 1r 
Wilmington said that the two mer 
whose names were used In the t««t 
before the board probably would no' 
enroll at th* university for the ae- 
mester to start this wee' . 

The two are Benjamin Whitten 
Wilmington, now studying at Penr 
State, and John H. Taylor, alao ol 
Wilmington, a high .school teacher 
Taylor .sai^ the court* he seeks It 
not available this semester and 
friends of Whitten .said he planned 
to continur hi.i study for a. master's 
degree at Penn State. 



■ (7^ 



335 



5 SOUTHERN 
GOVERNORS TO 
MEET SUNDAY 



Stale Leaderfi to Disriisg 
E ducation Facilities 
( j S^ /or Negroes 

Nashville, Tenn . Jan. 17 OP— The 
gcvernor* of five soxithem states 
meet here Sunday to plan a possible 
middle cotiree between mandates of 
the United States «upreme court 



»nd southern tradition on the ques- 
tion of equal educational opportuni- 
ties for negroes. 

The plan Is to establish reRlonnl 
schools, supported Jointly by all 
southern states which bar the doors 
of their white universities to ne- 
groes. They would offer negroes de- 
grees In medicine, law, Journalism 
and other professions. 

The five governors are member* 
of a .special committee on regional 
education of the southern gover- 
firmed last Oct-oher after Gov. Jim 
former last October after Oov. Jim 
Mcrord of Tennessee warned, that 
sruthern states had three alterna- 
tives under recent supreme court 
declsloas— admit negro students to 
their white srhnni.s clo&e ,rhrir srhlte 
frhools, ori set .n^reglon.U scfcools 
Xor jlerrnX. , 






REGIONAL EDUCATIONAL BILL 
PROFFERED TO CONGRESSMEN 



, WASHINGTON. Feb. 24. 
I States pool their money to bui 
was offered congres.s today. 

It was introduced by Rep. Hobbs cD- 
Ala). Senator Holland iD-Flai said 
he would offer a (similar bill in tiie 
I Senate. 

Separat"I>. ^uthom rtales can not 
[finance -tl'L best .n et^^cation." Gov- 
ernor Miila i Caldwell of^Florida told 
the governors co:ilc]cr>cc. 

"By conffcinin^ re.'ioi>i*es. we can 
provide the bestfin everything." 

The plan includes some regional 
imiversities for whiles, and some .'or, 
Negroes. 



— (AP)— A bill to let Southern 
Id H arvards and Yale.s in Dixie 

Dixie spokesmen said this woui'l 
fi 1 all equiremenls of a Supreme 
court decision requiring equal educa- 
tional facilities for all races. 

How many schools will be built, an.-l 
where, will be worked out after Con- 
gress authorizes tlie plan. 

Sen. Holland (D-F^ai said he WiU 
offer the Senate bill as soon as Sena- 
tors from the 15 affected states can 



(Continued on Ninth PasH 



Ba+^m-MMW-4«-2-'Z5 



IVEY TO PREPARE 
EDUCATION PLAN 

Study Will Outline Southern 
' , Regional System .^ 

(Th« Awociattd Presa) 

Tallaha.ssee. Fla., Aug. 2. — Dr. 
John E. Ive.v of the Univprsity 
of North Carolina today was cho- 
sen to prepare a detailed plan on 
which the South can build its re- 
gional education system. . 

The 30-year-old specialist on 
Southern resources was named by 
a committee of educators to di- 
rect an 18-month study of the re- 1 
«ion's needs and ooportunitles for' 
Interstate co-operation in training | 
pf youth in technical and profes- 
[slonal fields 

He will have headquarter* in 
■\t?anta. He has resigned from the 
L'niversity of N'onh Caroli.na 
'acuity and will h^giif his new 
llutics i'^nufdlalelv. 
i Gov. AlTllVirJ 
i:!a, chairrnan/j 
isional cocnrwv 
jDr. Ivet/V\'iTl 
Sobs: 

1. To draft plans for setting 
I up regional courses and re- 
search facilities qulcklv In 
fields where there Is an iwime- 

I diate need. : 

2. To prepare a long-range 
study on wiiich the South can I 
build a s.vstem of co"Or>eratlve 

• institutions designed to give 
Southern youths the technical 
tiaining ihey need without 

] leaving the South for educa- 
tions and never bringing their 
talents home again. 
Th«i e«wr#mnr said Dn. l»-R>fc-and 



V:ilc4>;*l of Flori- 
rf jthp |l4-state re- 
tar edijcation. saldj 
have two major 



336 



Segregation In College Permitted 
Under Supreme Court Decision 



WASHINGTON. {VV) 
what the Supreme Court means 
when it says Negro and white cit- 
izens are entitled to equal oppor- 
tunity for higher education within 
a state: 

A state can open its schools to 
both Negro and white students. Or 
it can maintain separate school 
syslems, segregating white and 
Negro students. 

If specialized training — law or 
medicine, for instance — is available 
for white persons, Negroes, too, 
must be afforded equal training. 

A state cannot postpone its obli- 
gation by promising to open a 
school for Negroes tomorrow, next 
week or next year. If a white stu 
dent can get that education now, 
the Negro must be given a chance 
lor an equal education now 

An out-of-state tuition does not 



Hprp it, ^*y '" "''^ "*® °^ 4''* L"'* Sipi/el, 
ntre isi ^^^ ^^^^^ g ,3^ sthool education 



OBLIGED NOW 

The circumstances of 'the Sipuel 
case were identical with those of 
the Gains case, and the court re- 
ferred Oklahoma to the 1938 opin- 
, . .-, t ,u 1 .11 io"- But it went one step further, 
equal protection of the laws to alL u said the state is obliged to pro 



in Oklahoma. Th4 coiA-t's com- 
mands were drawn from the lan- 
guage of th e 14th Amendment to 
ITie ^Constitution which assures ' 



citizens. 

In December, 1938. the court 
was considering the case of Lloyd 
Gains, who was refused admission 
to the University of Missouri law 
school because he was a Negro. 

Chief Justice Charles Evans 
Hughes said then that the court 



vide Miss Sipuel with a law train- 
ing "as soon" as it does for any 
white applicant. I 

Oklahoma University law school' 



begins its winter term on Thurs- 
day. 

, , While the case was being argued 
on several earlier occasions had before the high bench last week, 
recognized the right of states to justice Felix Frankfurter suaeest- 
maintain segregated school sys- Ld these ways fn which Oklahoma 
tems. But he continued: Icould handle the matter: 

"The white resident is afforded ,• , . ,, e 1 ,. ^ , 

legal educaUon within the state; /i Let Miss Sipuel attend law 

the *Iegro resident having the 1 5<^*>°°1 '^'^sses with white students. 

same qualifications is refused ill t Let her into the law school on 

fulfill the state's obligation to thelthere and must go outside the a segregation basis, giving her a 

Negro student, when a white stu- 1 state to obtain it. That is a denial private teacher. 

dent can get the desired schooling. of the equality of the privilege, •; Admit her according to plan 

within the home state. | which the state has set up, and'| No. 1 or No. 2, but only until a 

DFrinrn iv H« > '*'* provision of the payment of, Negro state law school is estab 

" '^' tuition fees in another state does lished. 

The Supreme -Court outlitiod not remove the discrimination." " — 

those comm.Tiids in 1938. It re.t- 

erated them morcj curtly ycsier- 



(^^ 



NOl-48-1-14 
URfiE NEGROES TO 
BAmE Sf IDOL 
DISCRIMINATION 



WASHINGTON. fAPT - Two Negro 
1 attorne.vs yesterday advised the presi- 
dents of Negro hnd-grant colleges to 
keep fighting race segregation in state- 
opera'ed schools. 

James M. Nabri;. secrctarv of How- 
ard University. Washington, told a 
news conference of Negro college presi- 
that he believec "segregation 'in 



dents 



education is discriminatory on the ^'as- 
is of race ard c.lor ;-.i-^ _ uiiC— sti- 
tutjonal." 

"Nev ;.;K\iiS!i.the Supreme Court V 
not yet cdo ..'.c the view x x v (.;■ 
segreg.-'. . :i /, » .-.cca 
are stuck with the 'doctrine iintiT the 
court strikes it down." 

Herbert O. Reid. Howard University- 



law instructor, recommsndcd that Ne- 
groes take this sction: 

1. Apply for an injunatien to restrain 
the federal lecurity administrator from 
certifying federal payments for land- 
grant colleges to states which fail to 



Rule Whites 
May Not Attend 
Negro School 



AUSTIN, Tex., 



N^^'^S' wh'tir'^ fairly -b^u:.^ Ide^H^ay ' noH^glflJ^^^;^^/;:; 
iNe ro.s and wn tes. the Texas State University for negroes, 

2. Ta.tc similar action where a state State Attorney General Price Daniel 
fairly distributes federal funds but de- ■ *^as ruled. 

creases i's own proportionate aid to i Daniel gave two reasons for the 
Negro institutions. 1 findings. 

3 Ask Congress to require states in I I- That Texas' Constitution and laws 
which separate schools for Negroes are'P^vide that white and negro students 
maintained to contribute proportion- j shall be educated separately; 
ately equal amounts from state funds P ^- That "substantially equal courses 
to the Negro schools. \o^ study and physical facilities are of- 

4 At the siatp level qppW =n in;„„o l^^^^*^ '<"■ white students at the Univcr- 
tion or wnt " of mandl^'s'^equ nn" 1^^^!'^'^^ °'''" "'^'^ '°''%'''" 
statp officials to distribute ^^^^0 iun£ l^^^^^t^- ^,^^!^\^^'^^^ 

'^■■' . , land, the Sipuel case from Oklahoma, 

0. Bring damage action as individual Daniel's opinion said: 
Nctro citizens. I "Under these decisions, it is unaucs- 

G. Sue to gain admission to whit jtionably now the law that the ^ates 

L^oaal, and welT»nd-grant schools on the grounds thst r^^^ constituticnaUy prtvide separate 
th? Negro school fails to provide th-i f^"^'^'^*' ^°^ {^'^ edycation ofivegro 
equal bene/iis of the law as guaranteed! f °„i,;,^„ l^, ^T'^^.'***.; «« '°"8 as the 
by the Htii ..\ nendment. 



facilities ofle 



derrts 

d bbui groups are slib- 






337 



Nuns in Schools Nuns to Don \ 
Issue at Polls 



Anfigarb Measure 
Before Voters Of 
North Dakota 

BY GEORGE MOSES. 

BiRmarclt, X. D. (/P). — North Da 
kota will vote next week on a 
question which has cut the state 
quietly and deeply — whether Cath- 
olic nuns shall be permitted to 
continue teaching in public 
schools. 

The measure was placed on the 
June 29 primary electlMii ballot 
under North Dakuta','^ ^iiit^ttve 
law, which permits the ;'eopV ^i 
act as a leBi,= '>ture. k w.is placed 
there after ffiihire of efiort.s to get 



TWO LA. P\RISH 
Sr.HOOL BOARDS AfiK 
SUED BY NEGROES 



Civilian Dress tr..: 



Catholic Sisters To 
Conform to New State 
Law in North Dakota 



OrlPint. June S '4»i.-Two 

purls n >chool boards hii\« 

c;i»r«ed In United St»t*i dl«- 

rlct court «uln with dlscrlmlnRtlng j 

igalnst negro jliidents «nd violating 

he 14th amendment to the Constl- [ 

utlon. I 

The aulU were filed by 34 negroe* 

I igalr.il the Orleane and Iberville i 

Bismarck. N. D. {/P). — Catholic' parish achool boardu yesterday. | 

nuns in North Dakota will be per- -j^^ Orleans parish board wmJ 

mitted to don civilian dress next i ^ h,,ge<i ^^^ denving negro thi'.dren' 

fall so they may conform to the I instruction in certain r-)ur9e« of 

new state law banning teachers gtvidy afforded white smafnn it is' 
from wearing of religious garbiaiBo rherged thst advii' nerri-' are: 
in public schools. 'barred from 'he pnb'ic Klur tlon] 

The authorization was given '^proRram stI thi-t mntlern •nc' «anl- 



yesterday by two ranking mem- tary schools 
bers of the Catholic Church in lor white fiv 
North Dakota. , vided for negr < 

lii a joint statement. Bishop .that there -i-m 
Vincent J^ T{van of Bismarck and' cndsry achool-; 

U.C.C....C. .fumrcw. CM, Mu,. us,-.. Auxiliary Bi.ihop Leo Dworschak negro children 

the 1947 legislature tp pass such a of Fargo said the church has no ifrom .iemen.,r 

la^v objection, to Catholic nuns don- j The iberviiie 

Sponsoicu ')>« g'' M f f'r.iJes- 

tants, largfli clergy. neri.^the Bieas- 

ure would prohibit public ^hooj 

teachers fr*m wearing any 

denoting religious order. 



There are about seventy-five; 
nuns teaching in public school* In 
North Dakota, out of a total of 
more than 6..500 teachers. In 1936 
there were 44. 

The anti-garb backers say this 
would enable the Catholic church 
to make inroads on public educa-! 
tion 



h »s .<re pro Ided 

n's, are r>n( pro- 

Th» 1fi>< »'-<i churns 

« nn ledequate aec- 

a.lsbl* 'r-r the 1.100 

,0 will be gradiialtd 

schools this year. 

nun.s tlon-;; Tn» Ibervllle snit demands that 

ning •Tr.-pectable SCC^»r dress" jnegro children be provided with bus 

to- coir.plv with the 'ne^/•^^O^th>' transportation facilities eqt,al to 

Dakota 1 .v. nthoae provided for white children 

earb ' Tup K i was .teppio^ed at the jl and cepeats the Orleans parish 

June 2'J piimarv election bv a ma- 1| charge* of a denial ol instruction and 

joritv of about 10,000 votes. Called|» Uck of modern eanltar" -— — - 

the ■•anti-garb' act. the law pro- 'ondarv schools 

teacher 



Tearh in 19 Schools. 

Catholic church officials say 
nuns teach in 19 public schools, 
'all but four of which are in the 
I west-central part of the state. 
They say all pupils in 10 of these 
schools come from Catholic fam- 
'ilies and that enrollment in other 
nine is predominantly Catholic. 






nltar y and aec- 



hibits any public school — — 't cti intMTC DDOTPCT 

from wearing garb denoting mem- . 9 I UUEI^ I 9 riVV I K,9 I 

bership in a religiotis order. It 
was sponsored by a group of 
Protestants. 



To Wear Head Covering. 

An aide of Bishop Dworschak 
said that the "sisters will wear 
ordinary dress, modern but mod- 
est" — not extreme. 

"Tl)ey will wear some kind of 
a head covering and some mayp 
wear no head covering at all if I 
their hair grows out enough," he 
added. ■They will probably make 
th^r own dre.sses." 

In their statement, Bishop Ryan 
and Bishop Dworschak said that 
although some-of the acts spon- 
sors contended the law would 



., .EGROES-IN SCHOOL 

RY, Ind.. Sept. 4.-/A^Nine 
hundred white pupils of Emerson 
school who stayed away from classes 
yesterday in protest against a new 
ruling which permits Negro pupils to f 
attend any Gary school, were urged by 
the school superintendent to retvim 
by noon today. 

Superintendent Charles D. Lutz said 
all pupils not in class by noon today I 
would be charged with truancy. He , 
said all more than 16 years of age j 
would be suspendafl and fcli athletes i 
would be ruled ineRgible for the year. ; 



C2i> 



-^° ST- ^2-6-4 -Top 



33a 



DOWN STDTTTTT 

By Thurman Sensing 




LIFT EDUCATION 
BARS, IS DEMAND 



The Negroes in this country were 



freed from slavery by the War Be- 
tween the States, but they were left 
like a yoke around the neck of the 
South. 

Yes. the Negroes were freed — and It 
might have been thought that they 
would Immediately move to thofc re- 
gions occupied by the people ^who 
brought it about — hut w% know now 



DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH 

Soufhern States Industrial Council 

NASHVIUE, TENNESSEE 



/ .' .. White House Group Also 
Urges More Federal Aid 



UashinKton, Dec. 15.— Removal 
of all religious and racial bar- 
riers to learning, together With 
greatly expanded federal aid for 



all citizens must be treated alike— 

that Negroes in the South must either ».c<.tiy exoannwi fori.r=.i .1^ , 
be allowed to go to coUege with the education were '^emandedodav 
wh.tes or equivalent insUtutions of by a White HouseTommission'^ 
higher leammg must be provided. President Trnman™ 28-m»m 
Since the South does not propose to ber commission on hlih^p •.rtnl 
give up segregitien, and need not be — '~ '- - - "'»"«' enn 

asked to do so, this means that the 
states of the South must make avail- 
able schools of medicine, engineering, 
law, etc., for Negro students. This, of 



cation, in Its first report, set . 
pal of 4.600.000 students In col- 
lege by I960, nearly double to- 
nay s total of 2.340,000. 
iiri'n'd""'l.i^!.«^«'-«K?"On Of 



that they were d-^tined to remum In law, etc., for Negro students. This, of It denounced the segregation of 
the South. The faot that they were al- f^oiirae. Immediately raises the eco- Negroes from whites in the dual 
ready located In th.- South, of ccirse. ; "omic problem of how to finance Mhool systems of 17 states and 
had a lot to do with it. The clunate ">em. • "e District of Columbia as well »» 



had a lot to do with it. The clunate 
undoubtedly bad Its influence.' But 
not the least of the reasons was the 
fact that the Negroes w;ie bette un- 
derstood by ViC Sou'.'.sin people and 
trtated more sympavheiicaily in the 
South than elsewhere. 

This third reason may seem out of 
One for some folks, but It is unques- 
tionably true. The South practiced 
segregation and in othei' ways differ- 
entiated between the races, but it was 
open and aboveboard treatment: It was 
not the hypocritical treatment of 
•quality, practiced by the North 



them. ' . - ■ " the District of Columbia aVwelF as 

That Is why reference was made to the quou system" bv which it 
the "yoke" at the beginning of this ar- ■f'd, many colleges denv admis- 
ticle. The war left the South hnpov- *?°" to "certain minorities oar- 
erished, but It also left the Couth with tJCU'arly to .N'egroes and Jews " 
the necessity of providing a dual sys- '' "^aSens'fcMirfv^ 

tern of education. That the South has ^ Perhaps the greatesit Pmr.H,ci 
done so to the extent It has is to tha fe^Jaid^n whf["T1omZssion 



- ,- ," ' .."v^u^ .^ i.as u) 10 mo I"" laju on wnat the COmmi^Rinn 

eternal credit of the generosity of the idescrlbed as dlscrimlna?^ prac" 
Soutoem people and ample evidence |tices within the educaUonal^Iv^ 
of their sympathetic atUtude toward (tem. The quota system it ril 
the Negro race. clared, violates "a i^a o?^Ameri- 

The expense of providing Instltu- can principle and is contributing 
tions of higher learning for Negroes', to the growfag tension In one of 
however, Is simply beyond the finan- the most crucial areas of our de- 
That'the Nortris'hvp7critV<^"in its i ™^i^ V/ 'Jjf Southern states. This ""^/ify-",. 
attitude toward discrimination could I ^ff^^f'Hif* ">e current movement Segregation not only brings In- 1 
be shown in many ways, but one sim- ' Z r/.-nnl? k°' .*^T ^'^'^^ *° "' th .'".r^?"''"^ l" '^'^Sroe/ said 
pie UustraUon will suffice: in one Mi- 1 "^ ."f °",fL ^^°°J^- }°y-^'^, ^^e sup- , ^e fomn, „ ^^^ ..^^^^^^^ 1 
chigart city in particular and In the P°^' ^..Y^'^^/f^h ^^,^''1'*="" ^^^" wmtif ^A f,^,"^at'0" ^or the 

?h^^s!te^^»o^s^--d543^- - -s^^ -- - 

^^^r^^^ls ;^eTtr:;^n"°a sSl ^ ^ ^f- t° feby far the wisest ^^'f "^ the qSy%t{ 
where about 80 per cent of the^^chil- ^^3 ' C"''/;, ^^"^^^^^^^ Tefo^l '^f^^\LZ'\f^^l 

if the Supreme Court some of these *>'S'«"i- ' 
dajra will not "r'ar . p on its hind legs" r,.. Br.'ngs Dissent 

and say this also is unconstitutional— lKr,;.V„;,.^i; °" segregation! 
that a student cannot be forced tolcI?,VP * dissent from four 
cross the state line for his education, mission nrI^fI!l^K'■^,°^ J'^^ '^°"'- 

"iission created by Mr. Truman in 



where about 80 per cent of the chil 
dren are colored. Those Negroes who 
prepare themselves for the teaching 
profession cannot find Jobs In the 
North. They must go South and leach 
In Negro schools, where they are mis- 



cattle or floAs of geese. It Is best for 
both races. It should always be re- 
membered that whenever man sta.-ts 
to tamper with the laws of nature, he 
usually gets himself into trouble. 
SUii, Lhc Supreme Court says that. 



Association- for the Advancement o3 it va= seated wm h!"^ ."'ssenters. 
Colored People has already expressed .iocon^of he ^TxloInrnJc^ni'" '^^. 
its opposition to the plan-but thai bv "he Vomiri^sion Thel -« 
was to be expec.ed-it is rather gen- Goodrich Whteprelident of 
erally known that what they are liv Kniory university, Atlanta a?- 
teres.ed in is not education anyway! tliur H. Comptoti. chancellor of 
A \ ^ a.shington university. St. Louis; 

C>J R""^'^^ 5- F^i-efman, editor of the 

Richmond, \\,.. Xews Leader, and 
Lewis \y. Jones, president of the 
'piver.'^itv ofArkansas. Favette- ' 

NOTP-4>a-»6 



LDA-48-2-28 



(^ 



339 



LACK OF SCHOOL DISCIPLINE 
SHOWS IN ACTION OF YOUTH 



NBY ROGER W. BABSON 

GLOUCESTER. Miss..— As this is the 
last column which I shall write in 
Gloucester this year. I want to relieve 
my mmd on something that has troub- 
led me all summer. It is cocerning the 
utter lack of discipline and thorough- 
ness which I note amongst the young 
people of Gloucester today compared 
with that of mv boyhood. 
TEACHERS DONT HAVE TIME TO 
TEACH 
I cannot now comment intelligently 
regarding the teaching and discipline 
■within the school buildings; but I have 
seen enough this summer of young 
people on the streets and at work to 
believe that teachers do not have suf- 
ficient time to drill, Drill and DRILL. 
They have too many interruptions and 
are obliged to teach too many sub- 
jects to do thorough work in any one. 
School committees are too much in- 
flunced by text book publishers. They 
should do less to amuse the kids and 
more to serve the taxpayers. In fact, I 
believe that we are making life too 
easy for our young people. 

Psychologists assure me that young 
people know what is right and what 
they should do and should not do 
These experts prove this statement by 
reminding me that when boys destroy 
property, lie, steal and make them 
selves a nuisance, they always run- 
away as soon as they see anyone com 
ing. In other words, young people do 
not need to be taught what is right 
and wrong so much as they need to 
learn to control and io distipline them- 
selves. I 

WHAT ABOUT COI9>ORAL 
Bm^HMBNt 
For centurie^ the old-fashioned 
rwitch, cane or whip has been used to 
instill disciplinai If it never had been 
xised in the past I would recommend 
Its adoption teday: but considering 
that human nature has been dependent 
for centuries on such for correction 
and punishment experts on heredity 
say that it is absolutely foolish to try 
to get on today, in our public schools, 
without corporal punishment. 

School committees, principals and 
teachers make various excuses. In other 
States corporal punishment may be 
against the law and, of course, any 
teacher is subject to being sued if, in 



temper, he or she abuses a pupil. How- 
ever, school committees can take out 
liability insurance to protect teachers 
against any such suits. Some few pa- 
rents will complain at having their 
dear children "whipped"; but instead 
of being influenced by these few, why 
could not a school committee take a 
vote of all parents and *ee what the 
great majority would- desire? When 
such a vote is taken In a community, 
I hope to be told the result. 
LONGER SCHOOL HOURS MAY 

BE WISE 
When I went to school we were in 
the buildini; from nine to twelve in 
the morning and from two to four irt 
the afternoon. We had very few books 
to take home. Our study hall was su- 
pervised and we learned there in one 
hour what would take two hours to 
learn at home. Moreover, in those days 
there was no radio at home to dis- 
tract us, nor were there automobiles or 
movies to j/empt us. Would it not be 
well to rSurn to afternoon sessions 
and supervised study, especially In 
view of the coming television? A girl 
may be able to study while the old 
radio is going, but she certainly can't 
study while watching television! 

Parents would like to have some o^ 
the "frill" studies omitted, but with 
perfection stressed in a fewer impor- 
tant studies. As ar employer of many 
young people, I find that they have a 
smattering of a lot of subjects but are 
proficieat in none. I am beginning even 
to question the value of vocational 
courses as now set up. I believe in 
an assignment of outside work, select- 
ed news;paper reading, certain worth- 
while movies and radio talks, requiring 
the scholars to report theron. The 
trips to factories and stores, which 
were given when I was in high school, 
would still be very useful. Most im- 
portant of all, scho<)l committees 
should rate high quality of teaching 
above the attainment by teachers ot 
college degrees. Achievement in pro- 
ducing good students through exper 
ience and love for the students, is far 
more important than the ability to get 
much overrated academic degrees. 



LDA-46-9r3 



School Case 
Worker Has 
Growing Tasks 



Miss Carmelite Janvier, public 
school director of special services, 
said yesterday' that the role of the 
case worker in helping "problem" 
children is becoming more import- 
ant in the fight against juvenile 
delinquency. 

She has returned to New Or- 
leans after attending the National 
Conference of Social Work in At- 
lantic City and the meeting of the 
/Citizens Crime Prevention Com 
mittee in Atlanta, Ga. 

Miss Janvier said that the need 
for individual rather than mass 
treatment of school children was 
emphasized at both meetings. 

"It was pointed out rhat a good 
school program ranks amonf? the 
most effective, means of combat- 
ting juvenile delipquency,"! she 
said. 

In Atlantic City ^he ispokp on 
"Essentials of Training for Visit- 
ing Teachers." She discussed "The 
School's Part in Preventing Ju- 
venile Delinquency," at the meet- 
ing in Atlanta. 

"There are now 10 case work- 
ers in the New Orleans school 
; system," Miss Janvier said. "They 
investigate the problems of school 
J children referred to them by other 
jteachers. Their recommendations 
!are then acted upon in an effort' 
jto improve the student's schooF 
[Conditions." 

r Miss Janvier said that there wi 
pe more school case workers ne: 
year. 

"A child who is unhappy 
school is more likely to get in 
trouble," Miss Janvier said. ' 
thorough survey of his individ"^ " 
problems and home life has be 
proved to be one of thet most ■ 
fective means of correcting t' 
'condition." 

N0H8-4-25 



340 



Ban Whipping of Children |No state Law 

.^r. /^i I r I I ;Agatnst Spanking 

in bt. Charles 5cnoo/sof School Kids 



St. Charles parish pulilu school teachers ucre under strict orders 
today to retrain from whipping children as a disciplinary tneasure 
•fler several coiiiplaml<: hy parents that their children had" been sub- 
jected to bc-itiiv;? 

R. J. "Itick" Vial. Sr.. president of the St. Charles parish school 
board, said that the Ixiaidi. order to teachers to spare the rod in 
punishments Nvas h\- im»ninious vot,e recently following complaints 

putiuhment to Gail Cortez. Ii.':"„*'j'ltl- if^'^^'l!.".*!^. *.h^.',"f r^^^ 



third-grade pupil at the Bayovl 
Des Allemands school. 

The father. Frederick Cortez 
had complained that the child 
was whipped severely, 
of parents of children at th€ 
Bayou Des Allemands sch(X)l. 
Whipped With SUck 



Louisiana ha.<! no law prohibit- 
ing the use of corporal pu'ni.sh- 
mcnt in public schcv^!,^. a commit- 
tee of the Caddo Teachers As- 
sociation, which has been con- 
ducting a study of discipline In 
the schools, reports. 

According to information gath- 
ered by the committee from re- 
search bulletins of the National 
Education Assixiation. courts 
have generally ht d t'.iiU a teacher 
is "in loco parent ;-.' m the place 
of tlir ivircnt coni_»ining discip- 
line of I'lipils In hi< iharge. 

The.>iu'l^v was bf^iun bv the 

CTA in .<»ir! Members of the 

present diicipline committee 

which made the report are: Elva 

chairman. .Mrs. Katie 



and she could show, no marks 

Vial said that parents had com-, 
plained of the •'paddling' punish- i 
ment meted out to correct the l>e- 
havior of some of the pupils. 
Complaints, he said, were made 
to the school board. j 

"There was a little whipping i 
but not too much." he said. ■'.Some. 
The Cortei child said she was|of the parents complained about 
given a "whipping" by Mrs. John it a little. Thev .seemed to think 
Candles, principal of the school; the teachers should not hit <hil-l 

for "talking." dren on the hands or legs either :.R"Kg- - j ,--.-. xvont 

"She whipped me with a piece with a ruler or whip because of' Kemper. Mrs. Ruth Brazzil. Mrs 
of slick," the child said, and In- the possihilitv of fracturing the i Laverne Smith. Edna Brevston 
dicated with her hands the length bones. ' and Virginia Whiteman 

of the stick — about 12 inches. Xo Hrrioas Injury 

, '^f v^n "^ hi'r" d«\''.*n7,'iS «« ^^<^' however, that "no 
for leaving her de^k and talk ng ,,.3, ^f^^,^ ^^^ f,^, ,^3 

while the prli^cipal was out of tha, how serious 'Injury from 
iwm. Her father said her thighd^.^ippings g„.en the children in 
were discolored as a result of ihflthe t>ast 

spanking. ... I "I told them (the teachers) sev- 1 

Mrs. Candles said the whippin|Lrai tmies in the past to stop 
of Gail and two other children foil whipping the children and when! 
misconduct was administered H complaints continued to reach the I 
September, 1946, a year and a hal board, we decided to adopt a reso- ' 
before the no-whlpplng order wa; lution ordering this method of 
issued. She added three teacher punishment stopped. " Vial said. I 
at the school had atfminUtered I Unless parents agree to whip-| 
spankings. since tbe school board P'^*^ ^"^ punishment for their chil-, 
order ending. this type of punish- F*"' teachers are to use somei 
menu pther way of correrting their 

uplls. Vial 3aid. j 

And if t-arents do agree to' 



SIUOENI OBJECTS 
TO 'BELT-LINE' 



North Louisiana High School 

^ Boy Feels Obliged To *■ 

Question Rule 

BATON ROUGE. La., March 23 i 
-(4»)-The attorney general of LouiJ I 
siana has been asked whether he 
thinks "the belt Une" is proper pun- 
ishment for walking on the grass of 
a school lawn. 

The question came in a pencil, 
written letter. The writer identified 
himself as a student in a nortii Lou- 
isiana high school; . . 

Attorney General FVe^ S, Le&lBnc, 

who acts as legal ad%so» to slate 

'' agejicics only, jicfei rod .>hf letter to 

Sute Superintjendent of Education 

John L Coxe. j t 

"Needless to say such form of pun-i 

ishment is illegal as it would con- 1 

'slitulc assault and battery. 1 hope vou' 

lof pain. After schoor'she wp'nt fechool be gi-/en written notice to ^iU be able to Investigate this ques- 

lu.J'- __ , 'inooi She went.^_ „„„„, ,K,t .k„„ ,.h„ „., -v— , 1 ,; ,, „{ discipline and satisfy all par- 

- r , ,, .^■lltie-s concerned." 

jtreme disciplinary cases shall bej ^„^ ^e wrote fo the author of the 
^"aieferred to the principal." j j^^^^^ ^^ he had best Ulk the matter , 

over with the parish superintendent : 



Of the incident concerning Gail 
uli' ^'^\i Candle said: l^•hlpplnc as"punishment.""he ex-' 

!.=„ lu* "* principal. I 'had to hiained, "ihey must give the prin-i 
i^f. . .f'^"' ''"'*« °f^«>"- While tipal their consent in writing." I 
out at that particular morning I Ocrasional Slaps I 

tound Gail Jumping from one desk The subject of "occasional In- i 
top to another. stances of teachers whipping, slap-[ 

, . Whipped Three ping pupils, especially at the Al-f 

I threatened to punish her bntfemands school, was placed before 
with my work and being in and the board by Landry. M. Dufrene, 
out of the room throughout the board member, 
tnoming I forgot to administer Dufrene reminaed the board 
the punishment. that teachers had been advised 

"During the afternoon I was previously against whipping and 
called out again. When I returned slapping children, but at least two 
'to ray room I found Gail and twoS"<-'i incidents occurred at the Al- 
other pupils jumping again jlemands school in sptte-ot the ver- 
took the ruler and whipped ' all ^^^ orders. ' ' ' ^ 

three children in the croijer olace The resolunon. in part, reads: 
—three or »our licks api^e '^e it hereby resolved, that the 

■■-\t recess Gall showed no signs f"!'"^T '°- ^^^ ^^»"''-^ f^ ^^'^ 
,-. pain. After school she wpnt^'^'^o°' ^ ^^'■"'^ written notice to 

'home and complained to her^*^* ^"^'' 't^' V^^-f ^''' T ^'^'P' 
mother about the whipping Her^^^P or strike children and all ex- 
mother came to my house 



K f ^O ^ A _ 2 I *^ ^ >v over with the parish superintendent 

NOS -48 -3-0 & MMWHS-5-2<^ 



OS) 



341 
ochool-Public Relations 



Inf Qfaatldn .- 



Gallup Poll- 
Poll Giveis Views of Eleven 
Nations on Today's Schools 



BY GEORGE GALLUP, 

Director, American Institute of 

Public Opinion. 

Princeton, N. J. — Here In the 
l-'nlted States six out of 10 people 
think Junior and Sis are getting 
a better schooling than their 
father and mother did People in 
three British Commonwealth na- 
tions — England. Canada and AUS' 
tralia — have an even stronger 
feeling that ediu-ation i.': better 
today than when they went 
Khool. , 

But, i/1 ><>nirasf to the .^u^V 
mlsm of Kngli5h-t-pe»king p<%.plcs 
the citizen.s ql fh<^ Scandinavian 
countries. antLUolland. Italy and 
France are more Inclined to be] 
pessimistic about the profiress, 
made by their educational sys- 
tems. This IS particularly true ot 
France where half the population 

thinks the quality of educaiior 



Finland 

Xorwny 

Sweden . 

Denmark 

ttalj . , . 

Fruncp 

Holland 



to, 



taught, although this point also9"""*'" 
I •was raised by many people. 2".* , 
Americans, when asked to name,.*"""'" 
their main criticism of educatior *• 

today, follow the pattern notice 
able In all the countries. In ordc 
of frequency mention these ar 
the complaints they registered 

1. Lack of discipline, lack 
o f fundamental character 
training. 

2. Criticism of subjects 
taught and their presenta 
Uon. . • 

3. Criticism of parents for 
lack of Interest and control. 

4. Too many extracurricu- 
lar activities. 

5. Schools inadequate and 
overcrowded, old textbooks, 
etc. 

6. Critlci.im of teachers, 
qualifications, shortages, 
competency, etc 



The aur -ey wai conducted 
•Imultaneously In the 11 nations, 
all using this question. 

'■Do you think children to- 
day are being educated bet- 
ter or worse than you were?" 
The comparative result*: 

No 
Better Worst Same Op. 
.T49fc 12% 10% 4% 



has declined since they were stu 

^nts. • large differences were 

ilhe United States In the 



78 
-M 

S0 

54 
.44 

2« 
.SI 

20 
.It 

lO' 



9 
IB 
M 

21 
30 
37 
45 

40 
SO 
4« 



9 
11 
10 
17 
18 
SS 
21 
23 
27 
27 



8 
10 

8 
13 
17 
11 
17 



N E.ACH NATIOX the most 
universal complaint about pres- 
ent day education is the lack of 
discipline. This criticism covers 
many parental dissatisfactions, 
such as "too much freedom," 
should be taught better manners," 
"receive no training In assuming 
responsibility," and "character 
.ia"i'<.=' utv. neglected." 

Educators here and abroad 
probably would argue that many 

7. Teachers undepald. =' ^^^^.^ thrhome'as weu't at 

It is interesting to note that nc»'>^!l^„l/'^,t,'^°r,*„ ,Yi' ' ' 



?^ ,„H irlhe school, that parents have :ust 

found II* .^^ ^^ ^o In child train- 

Comments about uTe lack ojl^"^ ^ n'^*"" ^}»^^ '" .»"e views of '« d » ^ ^ ^^ ^^^ peo. 

discipline training ran high in all"''^'*''-'' ^'^^ *^*^ * ^^'^her formal "« 

rniintrips hiphep thVn =„„ ,„„ education and rf those whose edu- 



countries, higher than any spe 
ciflc criticism of the subjects 



cation stopped 
high school. 



at grammar or 



ng as ._ 

)le surveyed likewise put the ma 
or blame for poor discipline on 
he fathers and mothers them 
selves 



Sd -17-8-513 



QE) 



P.-T..A. IS NOT A WOMAN'S CLUB ' ^J:':;'^JTi'""^S > 
LEADERS IN TWIN CITIES DECLARE .h.™".. r.^™ •».• •■ i»» u •'1 

:^ •■ *) 100 P.-T. A. board mombcrs are mep, , 

_ '" y^"^ I «n ._ . , . as well as four state president*. ' 

The National Cohgreas of Parents P-^- A. membership, more than , , , ., tu,.^„~y,r.„t ih^ 

and Teacher. wantTto removed" U 000 strong in Louisiana last year. '^°""*1^^ '""^ """t *^°,y«\°"* "? 
label of bein« known as a •■woman's! u expected to rise 20 per cent this -^- "T!" ^"^J^ sUrted M%ears 

year, including a good representation ^^^ ^^ ^ mothers' club, is celebrating 
[of males," said Mrs. Varino. its golden anniversao' this year with 

a new program— to bring more and 
more parents and teachers of both 
sexes together. 

The object is eventually to make 
parent-teacher relations and tech- 
niques of cementing these rcUUon- 
shirS an estabUshed part of teacher- 
training. 



being known as a "woman's | is expected to rise 20 per cent this 
club. It isn't so, say the leaders of 
the 4JOO,000 organization. 



It isn't so in the Twin Cities— and , 
it isn't so in Louisiana either. About "^^ reason why the male members 
IS per cent of the P.-T. A. stale mem- <^°" ' attend as many P.-T. A. meet- 
bership is ante; acpording to Mrs. '"8S as the female P.-T. Aers is not 
I J .1 ^ -. . because they're not equally interested, 

but becausf the meetings are held in 
the daytime. The new state-wide po- 
licy is to conduct more and more 
night meetings when the men can 



George Varino r«f this cifc, .who 
•erving as slat-; ntembei*hi6 chair- 
man. ' I / 

Mrs. W. E. AlcCoy, presidb.U of the „.„„, 
Twin City p/t. A. eounci/states that '^^^ 

many men/aie senring i, chairman I 

-.« ii._ ..*: L -. V- . . * :: 



of the vaUr.us tnits. Mr. Linton 
Ethridge, 3r., is president of the 
Neville P.-T. A. and several men are 
serving on the committee of the Bark- 
dull Faulk P.-T. A. 



MM W- 47-11-36 



342 



Mothers to Be 
Special Guests 
'\At University 

I'arker dormitory will be mothers' 

and daughter*' playground thU 

*f»k end on the oninpue »■ (re.^h- 

man women entertain the mater- 

nnl aide of the family Friday and 

Saturday, and then Invite father 

Sunday afternoon to the festivities. 

Mothers will register Friday at 

1 p. m. and the rounds of activity 

will begin that afternoon with a 

K-a In the reception room of the I 

dormitory. Jo Bush of Shreveport, i 

prealdent of Parker, will welcome, 

the guests. Miss Loulae Oliver of] 

the LSL* extension department will 

(then present a program. "A Jour- 

iney In Song In French Louisiana." 

land exhibit Acadian handicraft. 

! FUday night the mothers will 

i'be entertained at a muslcale. Sev- 
eral solos, Including a violin selec- 
tion by Louts Ferraro of the music 
school faculty, will be the first 
part of the program. The aecond 
part Is to be under the dlrectloaj 
I of Gene Quaw, who lias written aj 
medley of LSU sunss whiih are 
to be sung by a chorus 6f Id girls. 
During a special ntini|)er. Pattlel 
Cotter of Shreveport will be jnt/o- 
duced as '•The Darling of Ldy." 
PrlM* will bt> givpo to 15 D Cith- 
er* at the -i;»odnlgttt Parti>/ Frl- 
d»y at 11 p. m. .Awards 'ij^ill be 
made to thp youngest moraer, the 
mottaar with the most 'children, 
mother of the yoiinRest child and 
to others. 

A coffee Saturday morning will 
jpreoada talks by Dean of Women 
Helen Gordon, women's counselor 
In the Junior division; Joyce oJnes. 
director of Parker dining hall Cleo 
Wllley and the Rev. Father Rob- 
ert B. Tracy of the Catholic stu- 
dent center. Their discussions will 
be on the personal, academic, 
physical ^nd religious sides of a 
woman student's life at LSU. j 

Following a tour of the campus 
.<«aturday afternoon, there Is a style ^ 
show scheduled for 7 p. ra. under ^ 
the direction of Ann HumplHies of I 
West Monroe. || 

Latin-American students will sing 11 
to the mothers with a "midnight 
serenade" later Saturday night. 
The next morning, mothers will be 
guests of the various churches on 
the campus. . ' 

Both mothers and fathers will 
be honored at an InformaJ recep- 
tion Sunday afternoon. Honor 
guests win include President and, 
Mrs. Stoke. The mother theme wlllj 
be carried out In the special flower 
centerpiece of the tea ta)>ltf 



COLLEGE GIRLS TO 
BE MOTHERS' HOSTS 



V- / 



PINEVILLE, La., April 3.-(SpeclBl) 
—Louisiana College's dormitory girls 
will be hoft to their mothers from 
Louisiana and other states in the sec- 
ond annual Mother's House Party 
April 9-10, MisB Ann Cook, . Ruston 
sophomore in charge, said tod 

The college's gu 
uiday morning, . 
will be aligned 



SJAjmODAY 

Schools Here To Observe Pe- 
riod Of November 

9 To 15 . • > J^ 



welfare of all the children of Ouachita 



The school of Ouachita paiish are 
observing Americau-E^ucation Week 
will 81-1 ive Sat- during the veek November 9-15, Th«^ 
ril 10, aficl' each ^^^ asking. r«ienti and other ciUiens 
a her. daug'uer's , . /, ,u ..tu e-,i. ' i • 

r. .J . Ik. rj_ nAj to accept llic theme The ScTiools Are 
lotwn. Pre^ijlei t ?na Mrs. Edga.- Ood- 
bold will w'elc5i:ie the mother. ^.Iheir Yours.' alvi lo vis t them, yk ques- 
home in 'a Si'tUiday lafteriu)<>n tea. tions about theni^.' and 3o .serious 
and campus 'opijn hoi*e will lo ob- ihinkinfe about the future educational 
served for the visitors! 

HighliijhW of flie w^k-cnd will be 
the mothcr.dPu^Uer dinner Sa.urday I-— --^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^g 
evening ,„ the coUege din nB loom cooperating with this national 

and a repeat perforYnance of the an- , , .."^ u • ■ •• « 

1 /- . A„„..;„,„.. ...i.v, .v,,, celebration by giving time for a 

nual Concert Americana, with mu- ... j i. .i. m •• i 

1 i 1 . « .u. ii_- ~._f„..~;„™ broadcast prepared by the National 

sical talent of the college performing _ , , .. . ■ .• trtrr r. :ii 

._ . A_..i ™,,.;„ Educat-.on Association. iCMLB will 

great American mu.'!rc. u j . •« j kt - i in 

c . J <_,. ..:.^ ...;a ,.t«o« ,..ii>, broadcast on Monday, November 10, 
Saturday fcitivitie.s wi^ clo.se with -.,,.„ . v-Mr\c __ 

a community .inV in each girls' dor- 3:« <o <:00 p. m and KNOE on 
mitory. and Sunday m^.tiing tl>e Wednesday, November 12, 7:30 to 7:45 
mother.": will be served breakfast in ''J"' . " j- . u .• « <h. 

bed. M0J141S ha^e been iAvited to, ^^-^'ce^^lubs are dislributmg the 
attend loi^ar chuwbes Sunday morn-1 e""^'-;-, '» f^^^' * "Vf^'J'"!; 
ing wi.!.Ttl*ir daugluers, and the ""Bs of the United States Chamber of 
party closes that afternoon. t-o.miierce and answers the question. 

One hundred and twenty-five moth- | "What Makes Business Good?" 
ers attended the 1947 house party and This naUonal organizaUon found 
approximately the same number are ,, . ,, . .,., 

expected this year. Miss Cook -said. ""' ^° '°'''*y °'/ P^-P'* «° Produce 
Several nearby states are reprejentcd ^°, "}^ °^^""« °' ' P«°P'e ^ ^"V , 
in the group planning to attend. made business good. They found that: 

_ (a) Where schools are best incomes 
are best; (b) u^here schools are best ' 
retail sales are greatest; (c) where ' 
schools are best rentals for homes arc 
highest; (d) where schools are best 
more telephones are used; (e) where 
schools are best more magazines are 
' read, and (f) where schools are best 
' fewest men were rejected under j 
selective service. Upon these findings | 
they state: "Education makes people 
'good producers and good consumers! | 
The Chamber of Commerce recognizes i 
, also the cultural and citizenship I , 
: values of education." i < 

During education week all citizens 
should test their faith in this state- 
ment: "The mpney we spend for edu- I 
cation is the wisest investment our 
nation could make. Except on the '. 
{solid foundation of a well-educated I 
.people we cannot maintain r high na- i' 
I tional income or undergird our de- | 
mocracy with good citizenship.' 



MMW-48-4-f 

^3) 



t 






MMlV-47-IM$ 

dlT) 






3i3 



PARISH BOARD AUTHORIZES 
SCHOOL SURVEY COMMITTEE 

'/•.■ '^ 

Presented With a state education dc)5ai tinent ^rvey 
callinff ftjr a ?j).000,000 school expansion and improvement 
projrranil the Ouftchita parish school board yesterday au- 
thorizeci/appoin^ent of a special citizens' committee to study 
the jeporV and implement its recommendations. 

Conferi*ini tl>e committw the boards i„ „,^, ^^^^ presenUtion. Williams 
T' r- rf represenUUves from ^,,ged tl,e board to coouder the find- 

all ciJic ■ciiibs. parent-teacher associa- 
tions, and farm groups in the parish. ■ "'SS of the survey ("impartially and 

The suivey. proposing reorganization *'th a view to providing the best in 
of the parish and city school systems, educational programs for children of 
establishment of a West Monroe jun- ''oth the city and the parish, 
ior-senior high school, and a thorough.' Summarizing the recommendations 
iverhaxil of existing parish educational of the report, Williams suggested that 
Facilities, was presented to the board. a merger of the present parish and city 
jy J. B. Myers and J. E. Williams, two systems might facilitate financing of 
the program and also effect some econ- 



members of the education depart „„•. ■ u i . 

_.„,• .„.„:_! . .. ,. , *^ 'omies m school operation. 

pnent s special committee which con- 

ducted the project. Myers is super- 
visor cf school plAits for the depart- 
ment, and Williams, inspector of high 
schools. 



MMW-47- 10-4 



The two alternatives to a merger, 
Williams said, are cooperative plan- 
ning and administration between the 
two systems, or independent operation 
altogether. 

William! also emphasized a finding 
of the survey, which indicates that the 
population in the parish *ill continue 
to increase much more rapidly than . 
the population of the rest of the state. I 

"Awareness of this growth." Will- 
iams asserted, "is fundamental to car- 
rying out any school plans." 

In accepting the survey. Parish 
Superintendent George Welch de- 
clared that it would "most likely de- 
termine the direction of the school 
program for at least the next 20 years." 

Welch also pointed out to the board 
that achievement of the expansion pro- 
giam outlined in the survey, entails 
the possibility of a larger indebted- 
ness—a condition, he said, from which 
the parish system is at present free. 

Other business of the board included 
a decision to advertise for bids on 
moving 16 surplus army structures 
from Camp Livingston to \arious lo- 
cations in the parish, and providing 
three buses for transportation of Negro 
students. 



L 



27 From Twin-Cities Named 
To Select Special Commit- 
tee For Board Report 

The first positive step toward future 
action on the Ouach-ta parish school 
survey was made yesterday afternoon 
at a meeting held in 'he Virginia 
hotel when 27 citizens of the twiii- 
cities area were named to select a. 
special committee to study tlie survey 
and make recomiqendations. 

Representatives of virtually every 
club and civic group in ihe t*in cities 
attended u^% meeting called by the 
Ouachjla I'vriVi sfhoc^l boprd) to dis- 
cuss the s(J>ooi survey IhalAvas re. 
cenllv ii.-«? fnr the psilsh by the 
state Doar^ ot cduca^o^ 



The mrftmg uas presided over Dy 
Thomas 'DaveAort, local attorney, 
w ho in turn introduced J. E. Williams 
of the State Board of Education, and 
one of three men who prepared the 
local school survey-. • 

At the close of the talk given by 
Mr. Williams, the assemblage took the 
first positive step toward some future 
actjbn by naming a committee of 27 
who arc to name 15 pcr.sons as a spec- 
ial committee to make a careful 
study of tlie survey and to make their 
recommendations. • 

These persons, unanimously named 
as a temporary committee to select 
the permanent committee, are as fel- 
lows; W. L. Ethridge. Jr.. Mrs. A. E. 
Montgomcr.v, Mrs. John Filhiol, Mis. 
C. E. Faulk. Gardiner Young, Clyde 
Blanchard. T. H. Scott. Clyde Gar- 
land. A. B. Downs Ed Rutledge. Tom 
Davenport. Tom Hicks. R. L. Phillips, 
John McCaskJe, F L. Jones. John Mc- 
Cormick. Dr. H? E. Guerriero. George 
Trousdale. Mrs. J. B. Landreau, Mrs. 
Courtney Olfver. Tom Water. Joe 
Freddy, Murrav Hudson, Mrs. C. R. 
Wilde--. Walter" A. Mills, Lealis Hale 
and Travis Oliver. Jr. 



H. Flood Madison, Jr., <■ as named . 
chairman for the group and it was . 

I tentatively decided to have Uie next ! 

I meeting on Tuesday. 

I Mr. WiUiams. early In the meeting 

I went into detaiJ concerning the sur- 
vey which will be the ^asis of study 
by the committee to be named. He 
reviewed the 'various chapters and 
showed faults in both the city and 

I parish school systems in the opinion 
of those making the survey. He de- 

' clared that population has grown 
rapidly from 25,825 in 1910 to 59,000 in 
1940 and has been one cause of the 
congested conditions that schools of 
the parish face today. | 

He said that in the estimate of costs : 
of new construction that the makers 
of the survey had taken figures that 
should prevail at a more normal time 
which he admitted is not now. 

He added that in 30 years in which I 
he has been associated with educa- | 
tional projects and surveys that the , 
one presented here is one of the most ' 



HMW-47-I0-I5 



(TsT) 



344 



'Back to School' NEV|[[[ 
Edition Slated 
Next Week 




SCHOOLS TO MARK 
EDUCATION WEEK 



There's Just one* week left! 

And then the big special "Back- 
to-School" eJitlons of The Jonee- 
vllle Booster and The Catahoula 
News will go out to over Z.OOO 
reaA«ra who are preparing for the 
opening of Catahoula parish 
sohoeis on Sept. 1. | 

To send each of these a pncc^nt 
postcard would co»l somewhere in 
the neighboriioou of $20, and to 
send them a direit mall circular 
would cost $30 for postage alone! 
A quarter page ad which would 
appear Is both the News and 



'Back To School' 
Gets Hearty 
By Parents 



"The Schools Arc Yours." 

With this keynote, New Orleans 

public and parochial schools will 

rrogranijoin the naUon in celebvating 

o,,__. . American Education Week No- 

ouppori vembpr n through 15. 



Procrn-ns are beink planned in 
each school to acquaTnt as many 



^ K'd. 



. The newly-oiganized Neville 
P.-l. A. got cff to a flying, stjit witl ^'I'''' 
I the "Back to Sctiool Meeting" Thurs ' 



■s possible with the work 
le by teachers and chil- 



Thurs _. 
dav nighf. Partnts w^i* ^mblc ""'« 'iincipal aii|i for the 
Iwilh their offspiing in thr auditoriun :i;;*^*'i._3'^,"^'li?S 'vvas emphasized | 
'where Fictider.t Linton ijthridge, Jr 
outlined the program and, the project 
for the year The Utter included sue 
items as ti-ansportation for childrei 
from the t»ii'h side — police piotec 
tion during trnffic congested period 
and at games — vocational guidance 
curriculum planning and others. 



Principal Paul Neal' spoke on the 



Tuesday ! ly Lionel J. Bourgeois . 

uperintendent of Orleans parish 
lublic schools, and the Rev. Hen- 
.V C. Bezou, archdiocesan super- 
iitendent of schools. 

Bourgeois said the schools are 
;ven being encouraged to hold 



high standards of scholarship ma'n- "8ht classe,';, so that working 
tained in the school, pointing out that '^°}J}^^^ *"° fathers mAy attend. 
Booster will cost only 124 20 and 1 65 per cent cf Neville graduates go .'We are asking the schools to 

US impact Will be much "neater ' -J-°>i-t.rll^-!r.^l^.i" 'l^! rX^eV^^o^Ti^.l^r'^^}}^^ 
because of the outstanding fea- 
tures that attract reader interest 
to the newspapers. 

Incladed in these special edl- 



me grade averagei i/yhich they had 
held in high school. / He illustrated 
with a chart which has been kept for 

number of years, diowing the grade 
In both h:gh fcUooT and college for 
eaah subject. TTie^e grades were iden- 



tlons will be Information about r'"' '".**'^ .P"^^' majority of cases 



rapport betwee'n pupils 
eachers and pefrents, sijjce that is 
jne of the cardinal ohipotlves of 

N0TP-47-I0-I5 



parish schools, messages from the 
school superintendent and princi- 
pals, procedure of enrolling, teach- 
ers, etc. And, parents of school 
children are lookfng forward eager- 
ly for the special values merch- 
ants will feature on sciiool cloth- 
ios and supplies. 

t A* 

Grocers are expected to open 
their fall advertising of specials in 
foods because all school children 
must have proper nourishments il 
they are to handle their lessons 
properly. 

The Back-to-School editions will 
appear in time for shoppers' to 
utilize one full week and two 
week-ends for readying thefr chil- 
dren for this sciiool term. 

Su^rintendent Aubrey L. Brooks 
states that CaUhoula probably 
will have one of the largest en- 
rollmenu in history during the 
1947-48 term. • 

WCN-5Z-S-H 



high school math being 
matchoi! by an .\ in college math, etc. 

The Neville band, an outstanding 
musical organization, entertained with 
rcveral selections and then the cheer 
leadeis demonstrated the school pep 
qu te' convincingly. 

The parents were then conducted 
to each classroom where they were 
introduced to the teachers. 

P.-T. A. officers are President Lin- 
ton Ethridge, Jr.: first vice-president, 
VIrs. W. W. Stevens; second vice- 
president. R. M. Troy; secretary. Mrs. 

'. Leon Dennis; treasurer, Mrs. W. A. jbers when they took the 
fohnson. ' Ithe stage. Mrs. Amelia 



orkdull Faulk ] 

^.-T. A. CoiVipIetes 
r'ear's Work 

The BarkduU Faulk Parent-Teacher 
ssociation held its last meeting of ' 
e current school term on Thursday 
icmoon. The out-going president, 
Irs. F. H. Peterson, presided. The 
(nusic for the afternoon was pro- 
vided by the first grade rhythm band. 
The program chairman, Mrs. James 
Hudson, introduced the band mem- 
places on 
Surglinor, 



President Ethridge stated that an- Kirtt grade teacher, asked the mem- 
ither meeting will be held in No- ^rs to demonstrate the methods used 
'ember, the date to be decided later, jand to interpret the different types of 

nuiic. 
Three little girls showed how tliey 
ad learned to read mUfic, using 
'lumbers instead of notes, and to play 
on the keyboard of a piano. First 
they used caixlboard keyboards, end 
then the small piano. The final dem- 
onstration sho\*ed how they luKl 
learned to follow the directions writ- 
ten on a blackboard, as they accom- 
panied the piano on their drums and 
Fpikes. This demonstration was great- 
ly enjoyed by the audience. 



MKW-47-I6-ia 



KMV/~48-5-l5 



345 
Contributions and positive values. - 



See Good Work of Annual Milk Fund 




Mr«. IJo>d Henclrfik. p'liirlMil of AllMl<lnTr^•^*M^I. (Ifft) tells Mm. 

C. M. Hlllon, P»rriit-I'>-.' Iw,- » i ' ;it i.'ic'fv rli:ilrniHii. the ail- 

vantaiieii the pupil* Jr li.r ■>•„■■■ : ilril.i- .n>>ii . K >\hl('h !• l>nii|;ht 

for them thVouih if e I- -T. A. milk tniiil. I iiii '.■ i » hiiy f^Hk for the 
rlty Mhool rhllrirett Hill be <olle<teil on riiMntowii streets on annual 
milk fund Ian day Sept. >(;. (Time 



111.. ,-. p.. .... ^iiii.r- ,-,..,. _^ 

ST- 47-9 -2 1 & 



P.-T. A. Observes 
Annual Back To 
School Night 

"Back to School Niglit," planned by 
membei-s of St Matthew's P.-T. A. 
attracted a representative gathering of 
parents and teachers with the presi- 
dent, Mrs. Stanley Hodges, presiding, j 
Monsignor John Marsh led the as- ! 
semblage in prayer. The minutes of 
the previous meeting were read by 
Mrs. Charles Brogan and the treas- 
urer's cepmt gifen by Mrs. John 
Spatafora The president's message 
was read hyjMrs. Leo FJtter. She said 
in part "I. Mabel W, Hughes, presi- 
dent ol tl.ivNaliinal Congress of Par- 
ents aiW Teachers, do hereby desig- 
nate the month beginning October 1 
as membership enrollment month, and 
I call upon every parent-teacher unit 
and every member to proclaim the 
supreme value o*f the scr\-ices that 
can be rendered through our organ- 
ization. If we honestly believe that 
children can be educated to think 
freely and intelligently and that par- 
ents and teachers are their educators, 
then v» shall wc-k ";in?!v and as a 

MMW-47-l6-a6 



group to bring all parents and teach- 
ers in the land into our membership." 

The new P.-T. A. year books, un- 
usually attractive, were presented to 
each member by Mrs. Will Hanrahan, 
chairman of the year book committee. 

Mgr. Marsh talked on the "Objects 
of Parent Teacher Associations,' 
namely: 

To promote the welfare of children 
and youth in home, school, church 
and community; to raise the stand- 
ards of home life; to secure adequate 
laws for the care and protection of 
children and youth; to bring into 
closer relations the home and the 
school, that parents and teachers may 
cooperate intelligently in the training 
of the child; to develop between edu- 
cators and the general public such 
united efforts as will secure for e\-ery 
child the highest advantages in phys- 
ical, mental, social and spiritual edu- 
cations. 

Rep)ort on membership was given by 
the membership chairman, Mrs. Tcm 
Mulheam. , 

Mrs. Hodges announced that the 
Twin City Council would p>resent Miss 
Maijorie Oliver in a series of lectures 
on 'Child Development" in the audi- 
torium of the Central Grammar 
School, on November 5 and 19. at 10 
a. m., and urged all members to 
attend. 



PLANNING FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
CHILD SCHOOL 

Foundation Established, 

Dr. Crowe Is Made 

Chairman 

A furvfv r>f physlca^jy handicapped 
chUdren 'u Caddo and Boaster 
Jfitnfir.^s t( b«:^ig made by the Junior 
■ Cha|r.-.i5cr o[ tommtrct here In co-l 
opfrn-vion wnh civic and fraternal 
or^Biil^ati'jils Glenn Dunmlre of the 
Jkyc{i gifganlzatlon, said yesterday. 
/ When the volunteer survey la com- 
pleted and the names of the handi- 
capped children are obtained, the re- 
sulU win be submlted to the Caddo 
parish school board, which Is in- 
terested In establUhlng a school for 
handicapped children. Dunmlre »ald. 
To further Interest In the esub- 

iIlAhment cS th« school, the Caddo 
Foundation for Exceptional Chll- 

Idien has been organized and Dr. R. 

penman Crowe has been made chalr- 
n.en, Dunmlre said. 

Affiliated with this organization 
arc the Jaycees, the American Legion 
and the auxiliary. Forty and Eight' 
blub. Pan-Hellenic council. Rebwahj,,' 
Business and Professional Women's 
j:lub. Queens Workers of St. John's 
pl'.urch, West End Civic club, Parenu 
l».5£oclatlon of Cottage school. Zeta, 
ITsu Alpha, and the Soroptlmlst club,! 
bunmlre sald.> • | 

The proposed school, he said, would i 
be designed for physically handl-| 
tapped children between the ages! 



ST.48-J-27 

College Relations 
Goal Is 'Kespect' 

The main object oC a college 
public relations program is not to 
win popularity but to win or re-| 
tain respect. Horace Renegar, di-: 
rector of public relations at Tulane' 
University and president of tbej 
American College Public Rc-latioMi 
Assn., said at a meetinc of thai 
Far West District of ACPRA. 

The mppting was in Sail Lake^ 
City this week-end. | 

"We know " that education' 
through its improving public relarj 
tlons has achieved progress in its I 
winning of a great community tol- 
erance for academic freedom," he^ 
added. _ . _ - 



(l('°) 



@) 



346 



SCHOOL TRYINIi 



IINT 



Sherrouse Roundup Will Be Of 

Different Nature Tfiis 

Time 



FIFTH OISTIT 
lEI IS HELD 



"A unique experiment In summer 
roundup is to be tried at Sherrouse 
School this year," stated Mrs. W. 
O. Webb, president of the school's 
P.-T. A. 

"There is no greater gift which 
you can give to your child than to f""" 



"We. the people, want better 
schoob. All working together can 
build better schools. • better program 
of education, sounder educational 
standards, and more adequate school 
legislation. Only through carefully co- 
j ordmated and cooperative effort, how- 
I ever, can educational practices be im- 
proved. The 6thpols are literally of 
and by the people. Educators aiid 

Educators And Leading Citi-'"*"''* °' «i""''°"' therefore, should 

bear in mind that the attitudes and 
opinions of the people of a commu- 
nity should be directly reflected in 
the schools. 

"The schools to be sure arc to be 
the source of an' individual's formal 



zens Discuss School 
Improvements 

A group of educators and promi 



nent citizens of the Fifth district met ^^^^„^„ ^^, education is both for": 
April l^t ... the Cameo room of th«,,„,, ,„j .nformal. The churches, the 
V.rgm.. hotel «id formuUted plans j^^,,^,^^^ ^^e industries, the organ! 

and the home in his com- 



,._ „... ._ _, __ „ ,„ active fact-finding citiie.is'(''"'*'°"* 

send him to school on the first d.iy ,<^°"""'"" ^ interpret the needs and "lunitj— all these and many other in 
feeling happv and free. You owe it function of education to the general f'uences play a part in his education, 
to your child to attend to all of the Puhlic and to enlist their active aid e.ther for good or evil. 
diitails that will aid in assuring him *"d support: to coordinate tiie work "In view of this highly imporlan'. 
a happy start at school." stated Mbs °' ■" school giuups. teachers, prin- fact we should strive to unify and 
Marjorie Oliver, elementary supervisor cipals. superintendents, school boards, coordinate all educational forces, for- 
of city schools and recognized authori- *'"'' other organized gioifps. A ten- mal and informal, in our communi- 
ty on child study. tative list of organization^ tliat could' ties. In view of world conditions we 
It is to make these things possible ^ represented on this conunittee are: dare not fail to make full use of oun 
for children who will enter Sherrouse '• M'n"'"»e''ial A*socii<tion; 2. Lions vast potentialities as builders of 
School for the first time that Mrs. •*■ ^-'hamber of Cominj^rce; 6. Bus.ness worthier citizenship. 
L. G. Corley. summer round-up chair- ^'o"ie"» Club; 7. Veterans of Foreign "We seek to develop the whole 
man for Sherrou-e P.-T. A., and her ^'^"^'• *• Amwican Legion: 9. P.-T, A.; child. Too often we have identified 
committee are working. •'• •a'x"' Upi»ns; 11. fsnn nrganiza- the world "culture" with a limited 
In addition ' to the health check ^^°'^'- ''• P>;l'''c Health and Public range of experience, especially in the 
these potential first graders will be I W^'f^'"'^: '^^ <:|('«i" not «lreariy repre- field of literature and the fine arts 
introdi»ced t'l the school program. ; rented: 14. future teadiers. seniors and a limited group of people— the 
Some fimo vill W s^KXfin the first ^^"^ ^I'S'i schools or coliegts; 15. pro- leisured upper-class group. We are 
grade roum f'ai'?icipatir/^ in plays. ' fessional ed^cat^on fcrganizatioiv! likely to forget that the w orld culture 
~ ■"" During a round table discussion .^.as originally associated with the 
these pertinent facts were brought out: dea of giowth. of cultivation of rich 
This citizens' committee on education ,nd fertile life. In this sense the cul- 
has within itself the power to unite urcd person is one who grows and 
; various community forces so that , concerned with his own growth— 
what we could not accomplish by any vith the growth of his understand- 
single force may be brought to fiu- ng of community needs and his grow 
iUon by combined operations. ng ability to help other c.tizens do 
omething about them." 



game; hnd fher activitior.. They will 
then b« invi'^d to the c-acteria for re- 
freshnfcnt?. 

While the, r'.iilciien are being gi%'en 
this orientation progra»ii of the school. 
their mothers will meet with Mirs 
Oliver who will discuss a readinc-^s 
program for children who are ready 
to enter school in the fall. 

Individual booklets called "Is Your 
Child Starting to School" will be 
given to each parent who brings her 
child to the .summer round-up ex- 
amination. The.se booklets will be 
studied through the summer by the 
parent with a view in mind of having 
the child thoroughly prepared phy- 
sically, mentally, socially and morally. 
When the child enters school in Sep- 
tember the parent will see that the 
teacher receives the pamphlet signed, 
which assures the teacher that the 
proper cooperation has been con- 
formed with. 

ML's Oliver sarys: "Your child is 
entering into a new world which prom- 
ises him jolly adventure and pleasant 
comppnionshins. Much of his success 
or failure will deoend upon his pre- 
school training. Parents and teachers 
must 'be partners. ' Home and school 
must work harmoniously together and 
come to a common understanding of 
the child's needs." 



MMW- 48-5-; 



P. T. A. Asks More Education 
For Tax Dollars Expended 

Mere education from the school dollar was demanded yester- 
l day by Mrs. Fred Benton of Baton Rouge, first vice president of 
! the Louisiana Parent-Teacher association, at a gathering of apt- 
: proximately 75 women from AMENDMEI^ of the ft;onsmu-- 
j Southwest Louisiana cities who lion whereby the state superin- 
; attended the third P.T..\. dist- dendent is decteo by popular 
i I ict conference in Opelousas yes- vote, so that/ the superintendent 
r terday. will be appointed by the state 

h The Opelhusas Elementary board of education, 
f PTA, of which Mrs. F. H. Year-; REPEAL of the constitutional 
? Kcrs is president, was host to the jimcndment permitting children 
i, «roup. The meeting and lunch- |„ enter the first crade at the 
;■ eon was held at the civic center, ygc of 5 years, eight months. 
] Mrs. Benton, who is chairman DISTRIBUTION of ichool funds 
of a special ta.x rtudy ojfmimit- on daily average attendance: and 
tee. listed the le8lslatioi| which PROVISION of additional 
I the Parent-Tc«ch«r asfcciation fund? for solving ot critical edu- 
* will seek: / / cational problems which affect 



((^T) 



347 



Problems and needs.-- 



Schooling -A Joint Enterprise 



The opening of St. Landry parish schools is only a few weeks away, and 
our youngsters, along with those of the entire nation, will be resuming or b^ 
ginning the process of receiving (or being exposed to, aa the case may be) an 
education. mincis adsorb at Jeast a passing percent- 

Our schools have come a long way in age of it, and the children emerge "edu- 
Ihe past couple of generations. Tlieyi cated." 
now offer more than the rudiments of' This is not at all the case, 
"reading, writing and 'rithmetic." In The development of a youngster from 
the poorest and least equipped of our an unschooled, untrained, undeveloped 
high schools, there are agricuJhiral de- person into a discerning, thoughtful, pa- 



partments, many have hqfeie economic 
departments, and some offer other spec- 
lalty courses. 

All have finer books, better educated 
teachers, larger libraries and more fa- 
cilities than ever before. 

They still do not offer enough, be- 
cause although we in Louisiana have 
dedicated huge svuns of money to the 
schools — one of the highest school fund 
dedications in the nation figuring on 
per dollar of income — we just plain do 
not make enough money in Louisiana to 
give enough to our schools to have the 
completely equipped, shining, fully- 
manned institutions which we would 
like. 

Nevertheless, we have good schools. 

But we need here a change of atti- 
tude, or an increase of a better attitude 
by the general public toward our schools. 

There seems to be a tendency on the 
part of too many of us to regard our 
schools as mere factories of education, 
wherein our students are exposed to' so 
many units of education, their little 



tient and well-informed adult is a high- 
ly technical, difficult, challenging task. 

The mere dispatching of your child 
to a school will not guarantee that the 
desired result will accrue. 

Few teachers can take a completely 
unwilling pupil and do anything with 
hin. or her. Few teachers have sufficient 
classroom ability to train a child suffi- 
ciently in the classroom only, if that 
child does not do a certain amount of 
work out of class. And so on. 

The job of educating our children is 
not one for teachers and* principals 
alone, but for the entire public, parents 
and taxpayers as well. 

For public education is not a stable, 
definite entity. It is an ever-expanding, 
complex subject, and to do it properly 
everybody must take an active interest 
in it, must support and assist their 
.schools through every means available 
Hs there to be a P.-T.A. at Opelousas 
High school this year, for instance, or 
will it continue to lapse because of "lack 
of interest" as happened last year?). 



OV-47- 8- 19 <>65 



348 



Ve All Teach'- 

By Angela Pntri 



The professional teacher has 
but a small share of the educa- 
tion of our children. Everybody 
teaches them, and if most of the 
teaching were not good we would 
be in a worse plight than we 
are now, and that is bad enough. 

We should be giving thanks to 
every good man and woman, 
every fine force in the commu- 
nity for the lift they give the 
children. 

The good v oman who ,has a 
kindly though', .-ind a goo4 word 
for a child as >iic meets him, the 
good man who shakes his hpad 
and says. •'No. b»^-, don't do thai. , 
He's a good old /dog. Give him a 
bit of your cookie and see hi.<i twl 
wag. Thar.>; the boy," is tioii^ 
his bit for thp education o'f tlK I 
children who come his wa>. I 

There is a "candy ma»" who I 
runs a little shop near a big 
city school He is old and a bit j 
lame and cannot get about very ' 



fast. But his eyesight is keen 
and his ears are wonderful, so 
that he sees and hears what 
many another would never 
notice. 

He is "Grandpop" to the chil- 
dren who go to his shop 

He drops a word of advice to 
one, a caution in the ear of an- 
other, and showers affection and 
sympathy to all of them. He is 
a positive force for good, a pillar 
of home and school. 

The community owes ''Grand- 
pop" more than they will ever 
know. He is one of the most in- 
fluential of teachers. 

The clergyman does his share 
— so do the doctor and the nurse 
— to teach children the right 
way. That is their chosen field 
of duty, but they go far afield 
in their endeavors to teach and 
help their charges. We take 
their services far too much for 



granted. We should stop in our 
haste now and then to say a 
word of thanks for all they do. 

When responsibility like this 
rests on all the people, as it 
surely does, we all ' should be 
more conscious of it and make 
the most of our opportunities to 
help — not only by what we do 
hu«.hy \'h-,i UP do not do. 

The" fact that Mrs. Jolly docs 
not smoke but is "swell." that 
I Dr. King never uses bad lan- 
I guage but tells a story that 
carries one out of this world and , 
sets a standard for the boss who » 
look up to him. that the stylish 
young lady who lives on the hill 
uses very little make-up and is 
always so courteous even when 
voungsters get in the way of her 
, bar— all this helps to teach chil- 
dren how to live. 

The teaching is often com- 
pletely unconscious but most ef- 
fective. ". . . little kenl the 

strength hi-! creed to his neigh- 
bors life had lent" just about 
sums up the story. 

We all teach and we all are 
responsible for what we teach 
by our daily doing. The profes- 
sional teacher has the lesser 
share. 




' Our Children^-; 

WORK rOR KIB p. T. A. 

Parents are, and ought to be, Uj- 
terested in what goes oV in the fcho 
their children attend. School aiould 
be a partnership, it it is to do its full! 
duty toward the children. A ?4od 
I partnership fueari a sharing of Vnork 
I and respcnsibili»> , each pai uier keep- 
I ing clearly ipr^'mirki his function and 
' place in the schem* and niver cros«- 
j ing the line without an inv.tation. 

If a teacher makes an effort to as- 
sume a parent's duty or responsibility, 
I she loses authority and respect in re- 
lation to that parent and child. If 
a parent attempts to take over thej 
duty or authority of a teacher, he 
loses strength of influence at once. 
Each must carry his share of the loadl 
and cooperate cheerfully with the 
other. In that way the pupils will be 
the better ser\'ed by home and school. 
Parents should not'expect to inter- 
view • teacher without making an ap- 
pointment. Teachers are bu.-^y people 
and have nvany extra duties apart 



Irom Classroom worK. un no condition ical defects. The record is made on 
should a pa-.ent enter a teacher's the pupils' cards. Many, many times 
classroom without an invitation. To that is as far as the matter goes— a 
interrupt a clais at work is to cause mark on a card. Children carry their 
losi of time, lom of work, and good defects on through school life, tliose 
will. No teacher can attend to a class needing attention most getting the 
and talk to a visitor at tlie same time lesst because their mothers cannot 
with satisfaction to anybody con- get away from their younger ch Idren, 
cemed. Visitors should first report to from their work, or because they are 
the head of the school before going to ill or because their free hours never 
confer with a teacher. That is only coincide with the hours of the clinics, 
common sense. School is an organ- If a group of parents whose time 
ized workshop, the details of which was free would just take a group of 
organization are important to the har- Isuch children under their care and 

follow up their treatments, see that 

mony and activity ol tlie great giouplhey get their glasses, that ther teeth ' 
jwithm Its walls.' gre cleaned and filled, that thev get 

I Just what can the Parents Associa-jxtra food if it is needed, what a 

lion do to be useful to Hie school? lelp that would be. In my opinion, . 

There is so much Uiat it can do in t would be far more helpful to school 
I br nging the wjiole soci^ fabric into md community than many other more 

useful relationship with the school Jiowy activities. | 

I that tclecting any one activity is not Is your child poor in spelling? Dr. 

easy. Tlicie is one field, howevei-, tliat ;>atri gives reasons and rules to help 

to my mind Is of first imporUnce'im master this problem. '^Vrite for 
i'^ere. j.gflet P-30, "SpeUing." 

I Every year the achool doctors and To obuin a copy, send 5 cent* In 

nurses examine the ch Idren for phys- >in and a stamped self-addressed en- 



MMW-48-/-// 



® 



349 



Controversial issues. — 



Probe of All 
Schools Set 
for Metairie 

All r\tHViii\o (oniniitteo of 
lelferson pari s h pnveni- 
learlser officials will in-iHTt 
all Metairie R( linols Sumkiv 
morning lor nliep^O rcpiir 
rest irre>.'ularilies and l-./ar- 
dous t ondilio'.is. 

Till- ,. uiu'emem c;iiiie today 
from T ' .1- J. Gach, chaiinian 
lof ihf Niii\- ifiinmittep if the 
|.leffer>'ii: P;ii i-h' Parem-Teacher 
Ass(>ciatil>n. who was refused per- 
mission to inspect the boiler room 
of Klla Dolhonde school by the 
.scb/vil hoard. 

I "I don't see how the hoard can 
refuse to admit our proup Sun 



Inaportion Rrfused I 

C:nh said thp sihool board had 
refused to prnnt him permission 
to inspect the boiler room oi 
Klla Dolhonde school. I 

i He ri^larcd he "had roasnn toi ' 
belicvf" that unsafe rondi' nn 
I exist in the boiler room. ' 

Bert \V. Clarke, .school 1. 
member, who, with Mrs 1 
rc(iupsted the firsi inve.--iiL- 
;isked the board to allow Ch' ' ■ 
inspect the buildinR and was turn 
ed tlown. Gach said. 

Loney J. Auiin, First Ward 
board member, said the Mare-, 
chal's repair job on McDonogh 
elementary school mav also be in- 
vestipated. Autin claims the S870J 
contract should not' have been l 
worth more than SIOO. 

All char.ijes "^f irregularities J 
'and dangerous conditions will ben 
aired at a special school board | 
jeeting early next week. 



rftrne la a r.«»omtion 

iieetthg of ilV- '■ 
y of the looaiy r r \ 
'l8 represcrjlaiut^ 
i'areniTeaohef asso- 



1 ne ofier < 
adopted at a 
ecutlvc boar< 
cotmcll andy 
from local 1 
cialiins. ' 

Vhe withdrawal offer was the 
f lilt of a report made by the 
I ] ritlnnnl rnunri! 



\\ hii 



which is coin- 
■ i.s and thrpfi 
■<\g the en- 
Mem. The re- 
read to ihp^ 



- iiool board at iis March meet- 
iMK. staled that the problem of 
donations, drives, and similar in- 
teiruptions in the schools has be- 1 
cume so enormous thai "some- 
thing needs to be done about it" 

The PTA was one of inany 
groups menlioncd in the report. 

At their meeting Tuesday, the 
P-TA membeis passed a resolu- 
tion stating "if the association's 
work is a hindrance in our chd- 
dren's education, then we are de- 
"■-^ting our purpose and are ready 
withdraw from our schools 
, .ivided that is the wish of the 

SCHOOL CONDUCT ;»;rr."°^ °"^ ^""'""^^'^ ^"' 

The resolution was forwarded 

Afler studying children's conduct |io R. E. Jacobs, president <•( "• 
I the classrooms of the various 'school board 



GRAND JURY EYEs(/<?^. 



said Gach, 



safelv 



engl- schools in the parish, the grand Jury 
ask that parents cooperate with the 



Marshal _ Campbell ^^^.hcrs and see tlaat their child 



day 

neer. _. ., 

State Tire 

Palfrey today had entered 

ferson parish school investigation '^''^^ instructions and conduct them- 
as Deputy J. \V. LeJeune becan a seWes properly in the classrooms, 
check of reported hazardous con- 
dition.s in school buildings. 

.\i the same time. Guy LeBre- 



Tlie jury reported that school teaoh- 

Jers in both the city schools and the 

ish schools outside of the city 

great deal 

nitrolling children in 

council to investigate charges of r'^*'°°'' 

cost irregularities. • I Teachers are prohibited by law from 



ton. head of the Jefferson parish j-:^ experiencinii 

calie l" .°\f,^rT\f'^^'. g'^'h^^' - "^«i"^ty i^ -"tr^^ 
called a special session of his . , ' 



The Jefferson Parish League of 
Women Voters last night pledged 
support of the investigations "if 
charges . <• . are true." 

These were the latest in a se- 
ries of developments since it was 
revealed that the board paid S2115 
to Henry Marechal. Lafitte con- 
tractor, for a roofing job on Met- 
airie High school that another! 
contractor said should have been 
done for Si 50. 

Another Prol>e Hinted 



inflicting corporal punishment upon 
the children, and since many of the 
pupils arc aware of this fact they 
refuse to obey the teacher's instruc- 
[tion and cause a general confusion, 
the grand jury pointed out. 

Parents hie ui-gently requested by 
the grand juiv in their rep.irt. tn make 
it their busii.et-s.. to see ;'-iit their 
childrai f.illow instructio; s and con- 
duct then.sej^.'es in the proper manner 
while in the classroom. 



If parents fail i-> crcperate with 
State Superintendent of Educa- ,he teachers and tiicir children be- 
tion John E. Coxe announced his ^ome disorderly, the i;cl-,ools must re-, groups 
office might also launch a probe j^rt to expelling sxich pupUs^ 

after ^frs. J, F. Knoff. president ^ ^ 

of Uie Metairie High scnoo! P.-T. 

.\.. telephoned him yesterday. K>l k. lO ^.O Vj " p| 
The Jefferson school l5OTTtt also p^f\[ J*"T'0 "" ' "^ J/ 



school board. . ^\ 

P-TA Activities 

Termed Valuable 
Part of Caddo 
Educational System 

An unfavorable impression of 
'the activities of the Shre\':p."» 
Parent-Teacher Assoc 
been create** in the jn 
public h " ■ " " r 
pari?h 
the a'i 

the Caru ■ n . u 
acknowledged irtr 
adopicl at a meeiin; 




with the P-TA Friday 
night. 

The resolution expressed ap- 
preciation for the association".- 
valuable role in the school in the 

»»»m'*» ■• -^^ - ^^ ••<*-'• and asked for its continued 

has been asked to check a roofing ' »• » »- pport 

job at McDonogh school 4"^"^, n -p a r\LL-,-c Tn The meeting Friday night wa- 

First Ward, which a merriber; p_ | A UfteTS 10 ,>mpted bv an offer made iv> 

said, "was not worth more than , , ^ -.p local FTA to withdraw fron, 

,$100" and for which S8<0 ^^^^ ^|f-h(j fQW FrOm , .e school?, provided -u.c.n ^v,i, 

^\,- rr , i i 'he wish of the maiori;y of the 

Mrs Knoff said today she wouldyi. 11 rL^I- llteachers and principals, 

ask the P.-T. A. council next Mon-V-aaaO jCnOOli ij ^^^ withdrawal' offer resulted 
day to wire Superintendent Coxe p=.r«.nt Teacher Assr^oa-'ffmm \v hat members termed "un-, 

for a formal answer as to wheth- Loc|^^J^y^S^J,^^^g''^to alleged ' :.vo,able publicity given their: 



er he would investigate Jefferson lion 



rcanization in a report made by 



.' gommittee 



sciiuois. ine council meeting "untavoraoie ^'""" ■ ■ v." v,;;^l !,h^ r^^rich crlnralinnal rmmril ' 

I will be held at 8 p. m. at Metairie them by the Cafldo/ parish f f',^'' '^% P^'l'^'^^^f'^"""""^' f°"^^^^^ 
'High school. , board. offer^(»-^ue^ay ^oj;^';''-;^-''''^ ^^ ^^^""' ^^""^ administra- 

Mrs. Knoff said also she would draw from our/schools, J!^)v idea 

ask support of the Jefferson civic .t is the wisV"f the majoNiy of 

council which meets Tuesday. (gur princip^ and tcach^." . . ^ ^ 

it)) 



SJ-f8-4-L« 



Infornation. -- 



350 
Teachers 



N. E. A. OFFICER 
TO SPEAK HERE 



SEVENBILLS 

ON EDUCATION l'^'" "''*'° Maehling win 
. _^-, . .^^ir^^.r^.^ Participate On Con- I Jt 
ARE APPROVED ven,ion Program I * 



Loral Trarhers LchH in 

Fiphi to AinenH llir 

Toiiiirp Art 

Ba'nn Rr>ii»e June 7 iS'"-' ill — 
The hnnse rommjttee nn p^:if;^tion 
tvlav upproved »even bills designed 
to benefit ediirntlon In LoulslsnB. 

Three Shreveport hich school 
tearhern led thei fl(th» for approval 
pf a hill whirh woiiM 'amend the 
tearher tenure -art The bill ■aouM 
reoiilre all tearhfrs with tenure to 
«len a 'inTTt \r, rirnpiv 'vini a 
ruline bv the TkttVrJiev seneral 'hn» 
ear'l '7*\^'V "VjH[^ ''"" " fon'rart 
w'h t/.ir /eKoeVtile K-hool boards 

Mrs/ lAe Do*iBon.\fvi>lnK tearher «• 
Pvrrt (^\ s^ljool. Y\<\ t'-ie rommi'- 
for. ■ ^ -ti-lier wnd"r tonure rruist 
b»ie at lie":! one '"bitten rontra'" 
with the a'-hool hoard, arcordins tr 
the ru;in2 or the attorney general 
We have been advl«ed that If «•' 
have one rontrart It will eufflce and 
roTnpiv oHh the law. We have been 
advised of this hy the state depart- 
ment of education and the Louisiana 
Teachers' association ' 

To Meet Ruline 
Mrs. Dobson. who attended the 
meeting with Mis-s Clara Griggs of 
B>Td hish and Mrs. L. F. McCot- 
mlck of F.flr Park, contended that 
teacherf -hoild not need written con- 1 
tracts, since the tenure law protects ' 
them Howe-er. she said, the bill was 
introduced to comply W'lth the at- 
torney ceneral't ruling. 

Mrs. Grigzs. chairman of the re- 
tirement research committee of the 
state board of education, charged be- 
fore the committee that too many 
bills of a special nature, purportedly 
seeking to help many teachers, are 
Introduced In the legislature each 
\'^7k r. 

Mrs. Grigaa remarka were made 
di;rinE a hearing on a bill to dedicate 
»10.000 out of the public school fund 
to a retirement fund for teachers 
with prior ser ice who have returned 
'o the teaching prnression...^ — 



ST- 48 -6-8 



Miss Hilda Machling, executive 
secretary of tlie Dep.nrtment of Class- 
room Teachers. Nalional Education 
Association, \. vU ]j;irticipate in the 
program of the Southern Cmial Re- 
gional cotvi.:~u.r» oprnin'; !■ rtday at 
7:30 p. ni. r<l ' extenUin' tHrough 
Saturday. All njectings will be' held 
at the Virgi. i.-- Tiotel/ , 
j A native of.Tene Haute, Ind., Miss 
Maehling has had years of experience 
as a teacher and worker in state and 
national organizations. She has held 
her present position with the Class- 
room Teachers since 1942. 

She graduated from Indiana State 
Teachers College and did graduate 
work at that iiistitution and at Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University. Her 
teaching experience includes serving 
as instructor in the grades in Terre 
Haute city sch lols, critic teacher for 
Indiana State Teachers College, teach- 
er of social studies in tlie junior high 
school of that city and holding the 
position of dean of girls, McLean 
Junior High School there. 

Active in organizations. Miss Maeh- 
ling was president of Terre Haute 
Teachers Association, president of 
Terre Haute Teachers Federal Credit 
Union and a member of the American 
Association of University Women. 

In state organization work she held , 
the presidency of the Indiana Stale! 
Teachers Association and that same ' 
office in the Indiana State Depart- 
ment of Classroom Teachers. She held 
membership on the Indiana Teacher 
Board, official magazine for teachers 
of that state. She also was legislative 
representative for the Dep-artment of 
jClassroom Teachers in 1929-35, and 
legislative representative for the In- 
iiana State Teachers Association, 
937-41. She held membership on the 
;tate executive board of the Indiana 
!!redit Union League, the teachers re- 
irement fund boa"rd of that state and 
he chairmanship of the defense com- 
nittce, a state group. 

National recognition includes Miss 
Maehling holding membership on the )' 
tenth yearbook committee. Depart- 
ment of Classioom Teachers, N. E. A., I 
I and the following other groups of the 
N. E. A.: chairman, resolutions com- 
mittee, 1939r42; audit committee, 1935; 
academic freedom committee, 1940-41; 
legislative commission, 1941-42. Sh 
also is on the legislative committee of 
Delta Kappa Gamma, national_cduca- 
tional honor society 




— WIRP:PHOTO bv Thp AssocUtPd P 

.\ $2.>n,000 BKQIKST Rriinted 
by Samuel Zemurray of .New 
Orleans for a piofesMorship, 
open only to women, at Har- 
vard nni\er>l»y Ims ri-hultcd In 
appoint iiieiil of Mjss Hflcn 
Maud (a in, ii<, Iftp ijisl full. 
time niinian im-ipIi-m.i ai Uie 
univer>-it.\. 111,. |)r..lesx.,ii,i| 
chair in Dnuliil. < 'on.stitnOoiMl 
history iv (.ill.d n„. Samml /,- 
iiiuria.v ,n>l IhiiK Zeniun ly 
.Stone-Radclill.- profes.soi -l.i|,. 
Miss (am iv an authority "»\i'aA-\ 
Knglish (onNtjtutional history. V^ • ^V 

NOTP-48^4-17 

RURAL TEACHERS 
OF TEXAS GIVEN 
PAY ASSURANCE 

Austin. Texas. April flP).- School- 
marms and ma.ster«|of rural aid dis-l 
'ricts in Texas received assurance to- I 
day that they win be paid for a full I 
term. 

A crisis in tljt foi-m at a »2.2a.s.r>0fl 
rural aid neflcit wa« resolved by two 
rapid developirfents . • 

i. The Joint legislative comniUee 
on equalization aid approved C4r!y 
payment of up to 50 ^ir cent of state 
grants .for the fiscal year beginning 
Sept. 1, 1948. • 

2. The Texa.s Bankers association, 
assured that state funds would be 
made available to school districts In 
early September, reversed itself and 
agreed to make loans for tcacheri 
m the current term without holdinf 
the teachers personally reaponslble Toi 
r«pa\-ment. 



hOS). ST- 48-4-2 



(@) 



MNS-48-I-I4 



>^ 



,^ 



FOR MORE TEACHERS 



There is underway over the country at this time ^ 
movement for recruitment of prospective teachers, to 
help fill the shortage in many schools. 

This is a Worthy effort in that it calls attention to 
an important profession, in which the human values 
play so* large a role. Many young men and women look- 
ing about for a life work in which they can find outlet 
for their knowledge and training and ability, and op- 
portunity for service, might do well to consider teach- 
ing, either in the elementary and high schools, or the 
colleges. 

At the same time, we are hesitant about urging any 
young people to go into teaching. Not everyone is fitted 
for the classroom in temperament and personality, in 
vision and in human understanding, and in a sense of 
idealism that will guide and inspire the girls and boys 
who sit before him. 

A teacher should of course be well educated, and 
trained in methods, and grounded in the best principles 
of pedagogy. In knowledge he should always be well 
ahead of his pupils. Yet it is possible for one to have all 
this, and to possess the highest degrees, and yet fall short 
of being a real teacher. 

At this time as efforts are rightly being made to 
pay adequate salaries, arvd to pnayidei^bettec huildingi 
and equipment, some young people may be attracted to 
teaching by the practical and monetary values, in states 
in which good provision is being made for the payment 
and benefits to teachers. 

This is natural. Yet because teaching is a peculiar 
and responsible profession, none should go into it unless 
fie or she is well fitted to be a teacher and to accept the 
responsibilities of teaching. One regards it in a sense 
as one docs the ministry or the medical profession, in 
that it calls for personal dedication, and the obligation 
of service. 

There are persons of the finest character, highly 
educated and trained, who somehow fail to fit into the 
demands and atmosphere of the classroom. If there is a 
misfit, it is better for that person to leave teaching, and 
to find some other life work in which he or she will suc- 
ceed and be happy. .^. „ .. 

<*■ ^On the encoiiraging' sidiG?;' there a-e thousands and 
tiiousaeSds of splendid teachers, in oiir own commumty 
a&d state, and in every state. They are doing an excel- 
lent work. They add to their pupils' knowledge and self- 
dep^dence from day to day. They are influencing them 
to grow up into good and useful mep and women. For 
such &;- teacher, there is deep satisfaction, and the con- 
tacts that keep one young and bupyant long past the day 
of retirement. •; « «.. 

CDS-4Q-5-17 076 



MODERN ART 
TO BE SHOWN 
HERE IN M\ 



Work of Iiistruotors ai 

Newcoinb College to 

Be Exhibited 



Twenty paintings of modern art, 
the works of three art Instructors 
at Newcomb college. New Orleans, 
will be displayed In an exhibit In 
the historical gallery in the Louisiana 
State Exhibit building to be opened 
to the public Sunday. The exhibit 
will be open from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.. 
and will continue throughout the 
month of May. according to H. B. 
■ Wright, curator of the building. 
' Works to be exhibited are those 
of Win Henry Stevens, art professor 
at the college; Pat Trlvlgno, who 
IS Instructor In drawing and paint- 
ing; and Robert G. Scott, associate 
profes.sor who teaches architecture 
and design. Tne paintings range 
frorr\ $150 to $700 'n price. 

Stevens, whose trend Is toward the 
modern, fantastic and geometrical 
painting,?, studied at the Cincinnati 
I Academy of Art. Later he received 
Instruction from Jona.s Die, Van 
Deerlhg R?rlne and Albert Ryder In 
New York. His most recent exhibi- 
tions have been held In the Chicago 
Art mstitule. Brcxiklyn museum. Bos- 
ton Museum r.f Flue Arts, Metro- 
politan nTn^wXUj !n New^ork, Klee- 
m:in gallerv.'^n New Yuj^and Willard 
gallery lor lifw York. In the local 
exhibit, he Is showing seven of bll 
paintings. ^ 

I Trlvlgno. a /rtative of *i^W York 
I City, received his nrr "^'•ainlng at 
1 Columbia unH;er.-i:t\ JH^ seven 
I works tcj be «ho*n • dtiring May re- 
veals an extremel? modern technlquel 
and a tendency toward strictly de- 
sign painting. His works have been! 
exhibited In the Arts and Crafts clubj 

i national painting exhibit In New 
Orleans. Louisville Fine Art museum 
sponsored by the Sellgmann gallery 
In New York, and the A.C.A. gallery 
I In New Vork. 

The paintings of Scott's are mora 
liberal, more natural and less mod- 
I em than th# one« of his contem- 
j porarles. Stevens and Trlvlgno. Scott, 
! who waj born In St. John's, Mich., 
' studied art at Michigan State college, 
I Harvard and Yale universities. Prior 
to Joining the Newcomb faculty, he 
taught at Yale and Harvard and the 
University of Texas. Hla paintings 
were shown In the exhibit of Michi- 
gan artists at th* Detroit Institute 
of Art, and the Arts and Crafta club's 
] national exhibition held in New Or- 
I leans. 

I Piece* of guild ware, well-known 
I products of the Newcomb art classes, 
will be displayed with the paintings! 
In the historical gallery Sadie Irvine 
and Franrls Ford are Instructors of! 
the guild .'.ri'-e rUsses at Newcomb. 

ST-48~-~4"-36 



Decides to Exchange Her Steno Pad 
for Textbook as Schools Up Salarie 

YiewlnK the teaching P^^^^^^j ^j^^ "^r' Tulan'l^Tn.tersr 
a* a more lucrative field it a rev- -^ijss Ajubita had continued to 
otutlonarv idea ttiat api^ircivly work as a secretary until the 
la winning s.;pr>frrri-$ . e' en teaching field became more en- 
among the ranlip oi" a-1w.>o1 ad-'ijn- ticing. 
tatration emplpyAS. J ^ j "I've always kept In mind that 

Miss Beatrl? Aji'bl/n. 21 year- I'd like to teach, though," she 
old secretary- to Assistant Public said. During past sumfners. she 
School Supcrinttn«>ent Bdwin \V has studied at Loyola univer.sit 



land acquired her. bachelor's de- 
gree at St. Mary's Dominican co 



Eley, said Tu^ay that she will 
exchange her steno pad for a 
ttxtbook and teach In an elemen- 
tary city School this September. 

Her decision, she explained ^ -—. |^ «-^ ^ .^ 
frankly, was brought on by the l^rj 1 f-^A |-Q~ Lj 
school board's approval of teach- • ^V^ "I • » v* •^i* 

•r salarv Increases in July. 
»r Baiirj' ini, . ♦ .,„k tiounced. He will .•speaK on iiie 

Although^ irpr'efent^'^o^k^^'.lHistory of the Tulare School of 



Dr. Kiiirikin to Attend t 
Texas CheiniirfKio Meet 

Dr. Dr. John B. EntrlklQ. h«ad of 

the dep«r-tm»ut nf iHeml«tr<- (if C»n-] 
tenarv <-nll»(?».' -Mi; renrekeiyl tlft 
Bhrexfpon Chumbcr of ComnTrrre at 
thf Trxas state ch^m irjir coMo. ear* 
to be held in ("orpu. Chn«tl Texat, 
April 1 and 3..' '; 

r. fijitriklnVu rhairman of th*l 
;hemuW!lc committee pf the Shrevf 
jon Chamber. | 

While at the Texaa meet, he wiul 
oiitact outstanding men In the field I 
who win be Invited to appear In 
Shreveport later thU year. I 



Spanish 



GRIFFITH TO JOIN 
TULANE FACULTY 

Expert on Guatemala Will 
Teach History 



.Appointment of Dr. William J. 
Griffith, special repiesenlative of 
the Inter-Ameiican Research Edu- 
cational Koimdation in Guatemala, 
as assistant professor of history 
In the Tui;une university graduate 
school ^^;ls announced "Thursday 
bv Di. ;UifuS C. Harris, Resident 
of Tulanp. I 

He vnij al<o ^nrvp a? ijpsearrh 
scholar' rv "tl ij '.Ij'ldlc \^Piican 
Reseaic h,ln=i/tii'p at 'IiilrHpe. 
A spp(iali>;i in the field of 
Latin American 'b 1 s l o r y. Dr. 
Griffith served on the staff of 
the office of the co-oidinalor of 
Latin American affairs in Wash- 
ington from J9d2 until 1944. He 
later was appointed special rep- 
resentative in Guatemala and 
while there organized a nation- 
wide cultural program. As part 
of his work. Dr. Griffith played 
a major role in the complete 
overhaul of the rural educa- 
tional program of the Central 
American coimtry. 
A native of Kanopolis. 
Dr. Griffith was graduated from 
Southwestern college, Winfield.i 
Kans., in Ifl.iO, He received his' 
master of arts degree from the' 
I'niversity of Wichita in 19.37 and! 
his doctor's degree in 1942 from I 
the U.riversity of California. I 

Dr. Hiram Koslmayer, director 
of the divl.>iion of graduate medi- 
cine at Tulane, will speak before 
the Tulane History of Medicine 
Society at 7::iO p. m. today in the 
Tulane Sluden'. Center, Alton J.' 
Ochsner, Jr., society president, an-i 



Medicine." 

Special tribute will be paid Dr 
M. J. Magruder and the part he 
played in the activities of the 
school as chairman of the medical | 
advisory committee of the Tulane' 
board of administrators, Ochsner 
said. • ' 

X member of the Tulane board 
for 32 vears until his retirement 
in January, 194fi, Dr. Magruder 
was recently made a life member', 
pt the medical staff of Touro Ir,. 
firmary. He has been a membe ■ 
of the Touro staff for .58 \ears. 

— — C.n9) 

MOTP-47-5-11 

;SIX TEACHERS TO 3,5 
ATTEND ST. LOUIS 
EDUCATION MEET 



S 7-46-4- ( 

Grant Awarded i 
I To Dr. Overdyke 

I' Centenary Professor 
To Write Book On 
Antebelum Homes 



SIX Shreveport teachers will leave Dr. Ovt'nl> k 
this afternoon to attend the annual '^K 3 bor k. 



1 

[ A grant from the Carnegie- 
Centenary fund has been awarded 
to Dr. W. Darren Overdyke, pro- 
fessor of history ,at Centenary 
College, according to a recent an- 
nouncement by Dejn Ernest H. 
Cherrington, Jr. 

The grant was -made for pre- 
liminary siuC.^c ofmatcrial •which 
I us to u»e iry writ- 



The bjh*rci .-natter to.»be cov- 
ered wi)i be ante-bellum "homes of 
northern Louisiana 

These homes. Dr. Overdyk* 
stated, are practically unknown 
and no published records of them 
3xist. While the early houses of 
.north Louisiana do not compare 
n pretentiousness with those of 
he lower Mississippi valley, they 
"o home, nevertheless, an Individ- 
ality of architectural design and 
historical association worthy of 
[being recorded. ' 

Dr. Overdyke has, for a number 
man: Vera Snelllng, program ch;nr- Uf years, taken a great interest in 
man: Annie Mae McNair. membrr- jstudying the history and architec- 
ship chairman: Vera Mae Mc'^ae. jture of the northern parishes and 
finance chairman, and Mrs. Sidney j^gs taken his class in history of 
Baker, social chairman. t^e ante-bellum South on tours of 

Next, meeting of tlic local f^rowp ^^^^^ ;„ ^^^^ ;„„ 
will be held April 27 at the Caddo 



American Childhood Education con- 
ference In St. Louis. Mo. 

Those who will attend thB confer- 
ence arc Mrs. M. T. Jones. Mrs. Alice 
Balrd. Vera Snelllng. Naomi Robuis. 
Mrs. Mary C. Kent and ^pnie Mae 
VlcNair. « 

The .Shrevfnort lirjinfi.. of the 
srroup was orS-in^^oo lit r>ecember 
Officers for the; local ripnicr air 
Mrs. M. T. "•Jon'>. ,->rf -rtrn': Mrs. 
.^llce B?irri. \1 e-prcsidcnt: ^nie 
Kans.,! Stampley. ser.ftaiy-trcasujrr; Mrs. 
MHdred Walker, publication • chair- 
man: Naomi Robins, leelslative chalr- 



paiish materials library at 7:30 pm 

ST-48-4-17 

7sr 



S^i-48-> 1 1 <fe 



353 



RETIREMENT 
OF TEACHERS 



D. Desth beneliis: 1. n , member 
Qic» in srrvic* hi« .ontrlbmioru plu« 
interMt ,hall b* pg,d to his beneti- 
ci»r>. a. If th« mrmbfr ha* com- 
pleiert 5 years or »enice. the oenf- 
ficury shall be pam an additional 



TEACHER PENSION 1 
OF $100 PROPOSED 



IS EXPLAINED s-r srii'T^TsFEii' *°"" *'<»'" ct $i5o un. 



diately preceding date of death 

E Disability ,Noie the changer 
>Vw Art \^oiil«l Providp '■ M""'hly beneuts shall be paid 
after 5 years of service, except that 
U accident occur* while member ii 
m line of duty no time limit of «er 



S«>() |»,.r Moiilh \fier 
30 ^ rai>' Sri"^ ice 



_^_^^_^_^^ equal to 75 per centum of the »er 

Th. nrn,^ -- '" """^onc* that would have been 

The propo^d amendment to the received at ape 60 .same .. origin." 
atate teacher retirement act. it was «<'ti. 

•aid yesterday by Miss Clara Griggs ''• Creditable serMce: l.Yeaj-» oX 
of Shrevepor-, will provide lor - *"*"^* '" '"« "»'« or out of the 



der Retirement Plan 

A plan that would retire New 
O! leHiijc public school teachers at 
the aee of 65 with a pension in 

■• ^•' -f"- 'he neighborhood of $100 per 

ice IS required. 2. Allowance shall be nioiUh for 12 months each vear 



teacher who receiv ■ . "*'^ ""■""■ '° '"® ""»> be counted. 

.ry of MO^, fT H I ' '"'" l'^^^^'<*«* that vou are a member 

to re ire oW .i^.. , .o!;" '' '"" "' ">* »>'""" °" °' "efor. May 1 i I^'"" POJ=sible will he submitted to 
Mter 30 veTr/^ "" """""^ '*«■ «"d contribute for at least fiver'"" "'^'^ Lefiislaiuie as soon as 
"ter 30 years of serMce. at the aec >».„ ,„,„ ^,,. .., ^._~ . ,' rossihle. alonp « ith nihor Kiiio f„^ 



^^as approved by teachers a't „ 
nu^ctinp today at Rabouin school. 

William E. Groves, consulting 
actuary for the city teacher re- 
tirement board, said the plan 
would raise benefits for practical- 
ly every- public school teacher. 

A proposed act to make the new 
plan possible will be submitted to 



• fter in v.^r. , '""*"■ '"'' <''»>tribute for at least five . - -- -■"•• ~ 

■fter 30 year, o f «erMce. « t the age years from date of membership J ' ''"**'.^''^- ^'onp with other bills for 
mittA* u-Kt.^K » • . veHTft nf «*rt.i,>. -.« »«...- . . . the impro\'ement of the school 



mittee which prepared research ma 
terial the p.isi winter In order to 
better the teacher retirement sys- 
tem in Ihe state. About 7.000 teach- 
ers In Louisiana contributed $1 or 
more for the fund which paid ex- 
pense for the study and for the pro- 
posed amendment 



Years of service since 1936 provided 



that persons who withdrew their con- '''•''^^"'- *"'^ "°l"''' M "aas. 
iributions redeposit by September 1 P'f^'l^"' of ^^f Orleans parish 
1850 an amount eou.l ,o^H- ".*'''«" "oani 



1950 an amount equal to the con- 
tributions withdrawn plus interest 
rot to exceed 4 per centum. 3. Serv 



MveliliotMl Provided 

The plan was devised so that 
between 1936 and the date a teacher ''•'pai'dless of whether a teacher is 

— - - elected or was able to elect to be '"*''"■*'*' during an economic boom 

The formula for tne amendment ^"'"' •""""'" Provided that he de- arv «irrD'^ride''Lr1vi,T!"ll-lr' 

so would provide that « te,..i.., : I P°*" "y September 1. 1950 the hnnd \ r"^ r, nvL ! ^ ^ '''^''' 

amount he normally would have con- ' *^'"^^'' ^''^■ 



aUo would provide that a tciicheri 



retire on HOC a month at th 
sge of 60, U he has taught 35 years 



|iributfd had he become a member In Because the new plan is bas- 

A dic.e«i of th« .^ ^ ^ '*^*- Intet-Mt not to exceed 4 oer *^ "" *''^ average .salary of a 

A digest of the amendment, whlcn centum shall be paid on .h« teacher during her five cons^CB- 

of re'TrrT,, " "1' --tnlttee.^^..^, , ^, service romda.eo "^' highe.t-paid , earv and be- 

of the LTA. lollowa: membership. 5. Military senicedo« ''^"''^ """"' ^•"^ <•"■'''""* ^^- 

IMgest of H B 237. amendment to not Interrupt continuous service *"'''' ''^'^^ "" ""**' '""« P«"rtods 

teacher retirement vt. sponsored by i G. Return of contributions and "''•''"" f- '"■■'"> «>' «he teacheni 

retirement committee of Louisiana ' re-entrance Into svstem i ii„ '^"l ''••'•''vp as much an $150 pep 

Teachers association , withdrawal a memK.. ! u^*^ """""' '^°'' '^ nionthM nnder 

A. Service reu/J4^u. 1. \o years, ■"«> """ "-enter, redeposit an bv the following formula- 

of age with l(f yJ&rs of crlduable r"*"""* '«!"«' to that withdrawn One and one-half percent limes 

service. 2. S5 ««mA-o< ^ge ilth 20 " i"'""' -—.- - - - ^ """ 

or more years of strvle. 3. 30 years 



service refardlek/of age. service 

B. Service retirement benefits **' General provisions: 1. Teacher's 
1. A retirement allowance at age of contribution Is Increased from 5 per 
60 comp uted bv the formula 1', centum to 6 per centum of his 

salary. 2. A cellln.; of «7,500 Is fixed 
per cent of the average salary for any. upon which a member may con- 
five year period of the highest salary tribute 6 per centum of hU salary ' 
multiplied by the years of creditable One may, however deposit an 
service plus »150. amount, not to be matched by the 

2. A retirement allowance after 30 state, which will cause hU retire- i 
or more years of service computed ment allowance not to exceed 75 per' 
by the formula. If you have con- centum of his total retirement al- 1 
iributions until age of 80 you get low ance at age 60. 3. Two additional 
full amount. If you draw benefits classroom teachers are placed on' 
before 60 deduct 3 per cent for each ,he board of trustees 4 Member 

"T ^l,"*'."" ^- „ ''"P '"»>• "* transferred to or from' 

C. Deferred retirement allowances :other actuarilly funded systems with- 
I. After 20 years of service one maym the state. ». Age of retirement ■ 
quit teaching and leave his contribu-^hall be reduced one year for each 
uonsinthe treasury. At 60 he -^oulc, ear Leglnnlng In 1950 until in I 
get fun amount by formula at o.,g^, ^^e mandatory retirement agel 
or any year less 60 thereafter deduct.hail be 65. 6. Optional retirement 
3 per rent for each year less 60. 2^„„, ,,, ,,,,, ^^J retlremen. 
After 10 years of servicec one may 
sepal 
oeferred 
Ih 

tribu 
ID teaching in another state 



with interest, remain a contributor the number of veaiTof "service 
for 5 years and restore ils prior , times the average salarv of the 

ce. • - _ 



Ifive highest consecutive earning 
■years. 

"I'nder the proposed act. the 
fund for increased benefits will be 
raised by increasing the school 
boards contribution by about one 
per cent and by extending the pe- 
riod for liquidation of prior serv- 
ices for each teacher," Groves 
said. 

Haas Non-Committal 
In addition to the teacher re- 
tirement board, of which Lxiuis H. 
Pilie is president, the New Orleans 
Classroom Teacher Federation has 
been active in the move to raise 
teacher retirement benefits. 

I'pon questioriiiii: from a rep- 
resentativr of thi' federation 
.Monday, President H <aN declin- 
ed to promise fhal 'Iif school 
board would iM»<h tlir nian he- 
fore tlip T.egi-jlatnre i ;;.irdlpH.<» 
of itN eff I-. ■ vtion other Improve- 
mentK, thf bonrd is seelting for 



Iter 10 years of servicec one may of iIn elf .■. " vjion other Improve- i 

parate from the system and taK« ^^ j jmk ^ *'\ T "I mentis thf bonrd is seelting for | 

!ferred annuity al age 60. provided ^ "T" _ 4j3"* J •",2 J *** acli'.vi-. ' i 

let he does not withdraw his con-O • ' '^ "-J ^ ^ K. I A*T*D ilfl — *?— i/3 I 

ibutlons and that he does engage ^"T^T^'^ P^^ * *" »0 ^ I 

teaching in another atate. C S 3 y ^-C ^""~^ 



Contributions and positive values,- - 



SCHOOL BOARD OFFICER TOPS 
THEM ALL IN TEACHING FEATS 

JON'ESVUXE. La., Aug. 23.— (Spe- I Bennett, w lio lias three sons. Iihs' 
ci»l)— When Ci.tii)ioula teachera get '""ssed the ictirement point under t)ic 
together to lalk about tough jobs •*a«^*'«'' ''et'remcnt fund rules but will 
they've held, there's one man in tlic :ont"iue his job until next July wher* 
parifh school system who can always \^^ cui rent fiscal year ends. 
go them one better. [ Two of h s soivs served in Worli 

Scth W. Bennett, prcsunt book- 'l^ *"" " and one is in the servici 
keeper for the parish s-hool board, ■">'■*• Edwin Seth Bennett was . ii 
hai been connected with parish schools '■'* na\y and is new attending Lou 
since September 9. 1909. when he be- -'ana Slate University, ar)d Marcu 
gan teaching at Parhanis. He hds Bennett was a army man. The young 
lerved under five superintendents, in- ■^^- Charles, is now wearing a nav 
eluding J. C. Hardin. J. K. Stone. <nifoim. 

Howard Wright. C. C. Elkiiis and the Bennett Itad littlr- form,-' schooling 
present. Aubrey L Brooks. laving attended session.- ni privaU 

He's most proud of his 1921-22 schi^l ''omcs ^u at one time i a Negrc 
session feat when he taught at Block t*'''" o" a plantalio.i. Tlx s-tate pro- 
High School, ran a school bus and •'dcd only tliioe inontjf fur e^ch 
kept books in the school board office. 
In 1922, he dropped the teaching to 
keep books and operate the trans-fer 
le abandoned the transfer in 19J6. 



5 



lerm andAiie parenl-s cf'pupls oftei I 
paid tutifrs for extra months. Among I 
his bo\hood teachers were the late 
Mrs. Ma?gie Wright. Mrs. M. E. Ban- 
iierman. Mrs. Adcle Nath. C C. Snod- 
dy and Richaid Robert Champion.] 
The latter taught hun preliminary ' 
bookkeeping. • j 

He is a graduate of Soule Business 
College in New Orleans and has at- i 
tended summer sessions at Louisiana I 
Tech, Louisiana Normal (now North- 
western) and L. S. U. 

In 19U, he Uught at the old Mag- 
nolia School near Harrisonburg. He 
interrupted his teaching for a while I 
for private business and then re- 
sumed it in 1914 at Parhams. School 
funds ran short and he shifted to tlie 
Mt. Hermcn School the same year. 
In 1915, he ;oincd the Block staff and 
operated a school transfer by boat 
on Little River _ between Jonesvillc 
and Utility. In 1919. he again entered 
private buiineif but returned for the 
1921-22 sess on. Tlie next year, he 
halted his teaching career for the 
school board office job. 



EDUCATORS AT 
CENTENARY TO 
' DO RESEARCH 



(...!».-.• ^>;ilf Alrml. 
I :M;iii IJii»y .Siiiiiiiifr 
(III .">linlips 



• 'Bl member* of the {Bcnl'.y of 
.arv rollpge will i)e douia sp<"- 
I ■'. work Slid rt-.s(>ari-h In thoir I.pI'Js 
• ''. duty this summer. 

Don BroAn. a-i'lsmnt prorer-=or of 
»rt at tie cor,p,!e. will w rk •'•: hi- 
hi.itorlcal novel about the C.'. .1 V'-'T 
period. He is wori;iiis! on h Cineje- 
Cnntt-nary ,;raiit and expc'-is rohr-r 
'he bo«< readv I'lr !he pubh.-!.fr h\ 
f?ll. He 18 illu.slii.'ini; the £t.,ry with 
his o'A'ii drawins^. 

r .^nna Rwift Nn'tall \ii onotii.' 
renpiriii of a Cariiegie-Ceii"n^rv 
II. She will do re.^eari'h on i''" 
try of Alfr-d ih- Or.-.t it !: ■ 
librnnen of Hanard and Boston iin - 
tersiiies. Dr. Nuitill i.^ ;<isi = i.iii' 
profewor In the deparinirn?, of Enc- 
lish. 

Dr. A. .1. Mjddlehrnok).. he^id of tie 
oepartmrnv o( ediKa'iou and pivi In'.- 
osy. v:l. occupy the Fuller C'n.i.r 
of Edr.cation at .S'et>ion i.nUer-i:iv. 
Dclaiid Fl... He will begin h;» xfrk 
In early June. 

Mrs. Ora V. Wa'.soii. assisi;>'.t^ pio- 

lefssor of socio'o2\. will >iudy *'K-i./.'»- 

:v with special » . rk in criniin<:'.oiy 

the Univer-itv of Soviihern Ca!:- 

Tul.i during the posl-«ewion after 



roiiliiiiir (ami"' Stmly 
Dr. .M.iiy Wa.ler.s. head uf the de- 
I)artmenl of biology. wUi continue 
lesearch she bejan last year on can- 
cer at the University of Mls.sn.irl. 
HYi^ is doing the work f.<r the Ameri- 
c.in Cancer Society. • 

R. E White, associate prufe.sjsor of 
modern language, plii-.s to lomole'e 
a dissertation tor his doctoin'e »• 
Texas university when Centenar. 
summer srs,slnn ends. 

William P. Frasfr. dean 4( gulden's 
will make a ttudv of <lal«ical de\o- 

CenterlirJ' /riint ai tnA»libr»ry 
VRiidcJbA huli-.r-htfv. J^feuif. 
work. Ibi ii/ al'cnrt/(n .».Mgusl 
coiifeiri'le W Re .2 :>n(on the ToUe; 
.-■lid liii.ersilv C:imi>u8 
be held U\ Michigan 



which wl'l 



.Mrv 38 to conduct a tour of Kurope 
w:lh IV! Shreveporters. The group 
will re'.urn July 2R. 

Mr.'.. Helen Riitfin Marsha!'. In- 
Mrtictrr in voice at the Cenienary 
school of music, plans in af.snU if-.e 
Berkshire music festival i;> Lenox. 
Mass.. in late August. 

Merlpx G. Cm. assl.stanl profesror 
■>{ hlclor; and gcvernincnt. wil! work 
I in his doctor's ihes,s at the Unl- 
leraiiy of Illinois after the Cenienary 
lummer session. 

j Dr Edward M Clark, prof.-ssor of 

English, will aludy under a Co:neg:e- 

""' . Centenav grant the Influence of 

rhurca liturjv on Engllsli mysteij 

'I pla.?. He will work at tne Huni- 

ngion Library In San M:lrlll.^ Ca!. 

Mrs. Merv Wilhs -Shiiey. ussislnnt 

professor of English, will continue 

»ork on her binzraphicai novel. 



Joseph Gitlord. head of the rte- ,^^^^^^^ stanlev. ■ the stxjr- of the 
partment of speech and oramatirs .^ ^^^^^ __, stanlrv-and-LI . ings'.oi. 
IS direr! int! proflurtlon of -he Shre e- .^_^^ ^^^ ^ ^ ,cr.pie;,t of a Carneg.e- 
port .Summer Theatre durl.is the „ 



iipeail Ti 



)8& 



"enleiiiirv arrant. 

Mill Work KM (;<>terniiieut 

Brvanl BavMson. he«d •■! lie fie 
■•p-'mtnl if ni'i<ir\. wiU 'i.se h' 
arnf -le-Ceiuenary grant .lo do re 
earrh on the ■.ili|.%soilhy a.rt hist «r-, 
■t the <lenio'raiic Mrm i.' g.>ve.-nme'i!.j 
He will W'TK near Fav»liei iMe. Ark ' 
,Miin the library of the University ol 
Arkansas 

Dr. A. M. Sha». Jr.. profer.sor "f I 
'nsiisn wiil re-ene a Carneg'e- 
Ceiit.'n.-.rv grant' for worit or. i.. 
aiti.les on the an'e-oePiim s .uMie ;• 
'ultiire. .Hid history «h:rn vvi'.l he 
|iui)li .h»d In ll'.er.iry and hi"i>:;Mi; 
niagaziii--.s. He «:". al.so bei'.n wukj 
'•n bis biLgraphv rir Oeii. .^loe.l .^ :rt- | 
nev Johnston, for wtilcii lie ha« been 
d-^.tig research l.»r nf^veral vear.-. 
Dr. W. Darrell Overm i.e v. ill wor'<. 



iih 



C-.i 



era 



booK It 

orih I.O 



lies In 



355 



TEACHERS ARE 
TOLD WORK OF 
ASSOCIATION 

j.i.iv, III ,,r \hj (1.,,. ooiii 

<»■ U':ii'i/;ili«.ii l>rlHil,<I 
l»> »1is« M;ii hiiiijj 



"llnE. rallrcl bv r^prMrnim n «■* 
"m n atnm. mi"t In PhUnrti'lphlii.l 
nong 'hl« Rrnnp of 4S r»pr»n»niii- ]j 
• « iho 'wo womrn prMcni roulrt 



irt 111 



lid 



tlnpat 



lrt»a 



of rh« 



n r. ,v„4. ... ..,r„^rv of 

par'mpn' of "..- .v>ni ♦.»rh». 
N^'ionm Btl»i'^.. -n^i-.coclat(on, ari- 
r\r.^,n a larc- cio.ip -,, ti»arh»rii of 
ih. fMir.h ri.=.rir, ,, , ,i,nnT m»-- 
inz «• -hP Padrto oo'.l PTIfl.v nlEht 
Th» psri--;-.», of Wph=ipr, n. Roto, 
fmlrto and niaihorn» vp-- r<'prp»«'nT - 
"t Mi-.e Maphllnj (.pok» on Th» 
Roi. of .h, riasisroom Tpachcr in Pro- 
fp<;5ional Orennization.' 

.>?h» itaK<rl 'hat fsarhpra and oihpr 
Prt'iraiora ha-p rpa1i7Pd for manv 
v»Br< ihaf <o arhlpve ihp big drpam 
of improving all mankind rpqulrps 
»hp iinlfiPrt pffort of th.i'iaanda of 
fparhpra working togPthpr through 
thplr local, dutrict. state, and na- 
tional organizations. No one change 
can be rrediled to one individual; It 



CO. 



operative work of many, .'she 



thP rt «ru««ion, Aiv 
ion ihPv hid mieh' 
hp whiappTPd >o thp np»rp»t male 
I mpmher of ihia national aapnriation 
^ntl " Mlao MaPhllng ohaprvpd. 
' ■ thPra wa« mifh «'hi»ppnng." 
Two Pitrpnapa 
ThP .p.jik.r r>"ln'»d nuf th*» the 
fTo piirpo«p« of pdiiraMonal aa^oz-ia- 
tiopa arp. fi's'. to >rtvan<-p 'hp ra'ia. 
of pdurition rhroijghout th» na'ion 
and. aprond. to promote tparher wel- 
farp. 

ThP dpparfinanf of rtaaaroom tPafh- 
pra of 'hp National Edifation aaaoria- 

ition «■«» crpatpd In lfll.1. one ypar 
after a petition requesting It* forma- 
tion. In the beginning, thla depait- 
ment. wa« not allowed partuipation 
' in the pruijrama. but iia financial 

(support helped lo keep the mother 
on^.iiii/.iiiun alive. U l» nuie«i<rihv 
Ihut oiiglnally the NEA wn> iiui iii- 
lerested In salary arhedulrs. or re- 
tirenieiil. leiuue and otliei »<-lIare 
' lu\ha and refused even lu make a sur- 
vey uf ilieie and publi&h Ibeir find- 
ings, she said. It pointed out thai 
the pvjrpuae of the NEA waa proles- 
' slonal and not leather welfare. 
I With. 11 the past 25 years the cla.w- 
room 'eachers have made their power 
' felt through organ! /at ion, and. a.** a 
reatilt. thP NEA now taken the initia- 
Jtivp In teacher wp|f.ire. realizing 
ter conditions for the teach- 



»di 



for 



The first Pdiiration 'groups were 
formed :o help solve lr>cal problems, 
but soon It was found that their 
probl<'ms evtended fteyond their im- 
mediate communities Into state, na- 
tional and p., en international fields. 
I she said. Mis.-! Maehling reviewed the 
[ dP\elopment of teacher organization 
from U-t inception In 1845 to the 
prp.«ent. In 1857 the fust naiioiia'. 



children of the nation. Miss Maehling 

9ald, 
. I.UIa ArhlpveniPiiU 

! Among the achipvempnts realizpd 

through thp efforts of thp classroom 

tPachPrs arp the following: 

I,' TeachPf Tpnurp law Twcnlv- 

fivp TPsrc ago onlv four Blat«»a bad 

tpntire inm-B Now twpn'v-fivp per cpnt 

of Ihp'.p. chert of -hp nation ar, pro- 

ST-47-10-5 



tpcipd hv such lawa. Mlas MaPhlmg 
emphasirprt thai "wp must not stop 
working un'il pvpry state has » tpntifp 
law with tppth In It • 

a. Rptlrpment I jiw-Kverv slate now 
ha« * retirement law. but many are 
too Inalgnlficent to assure security 
In old age Our aim. then. Is to se- 
cure an actuarially sound retirement 
law which will give eecurlty for our 
(■etired teachers. 

S. lymger school term Only » few 
remaining slstea require only a five 
months school term. 'Our goal Is' 
every state a term of nine months or 
more." , 

4. ComjHilsory attendance law, 

5, More s'ate financial support I 
The trend Is 'n shift the tax burdpn| 
from thP local to the state, and par-' 
tially to the federal government 
Through many svites are pin'inc 
forth their best ef/mort. ypt thpy ar"' 
unablP lo supply-* minimum Pduca 
tlonal program 

(I. Higher a'andards of professions 
training We ahould work for thi 
parage of state lawa requiring iha 
all teachers, particularly new teach 
era entering the profession, shouli 
have at least a B.A. degree or It 
equivalent. 

Miss Maehling atiribiited the 
progresa to three reasons: 

1 In loo many commiiniiies and 
states teat hers are not encouraged 
an dare e<en forbidden, to take par' 
in. legislation. Miss Maehling stated 
that teachers must Inform ihem- 
,pl.ps and take an active part In 
pontics- not partiaan 

3 Xhestructu'-e "f "ur aovernmen' 
is dTft^ulT^To rhancp. Once we get 
a dpsirable statute enac'ed, we have 
to nork for years to keep it— not 
because It isnt good, but because U 
•1 good. 

3. Lack of orEanization Tb" teach- 
ers have failed to set their orn hovi;p 
in order, in their enthiisia'=m to par- 
ticipate in various civic organization;, 
attending to the affairs o( othera. 



slow 



Tulane Medical Appointment 

By splpcting Dr, Gpoi k'p Edwarti Burch 
to serve ai chairman of the department of 
medicine in TuUne'g medical school, the uni- 
versity gives merited honor to a young 
scientiit already acclaimed nationally. 

Further and more importantly, the ap- 
pointment of the 37-ypar-old native of Ed- 
gard. La . shotjid lend impriu.s to ihe impor- 
tant work ill \',nft'h '^ilane staff ir.Piiihors — 
and Dr. Buich -aic pKiietri.TK 'he employ- 



ment o( al'^irr.ii. aijir ic 'tl.s in 
knowledge to (ir-hr Jj.'se'app. 



Ih'- 



In his firld, Dr. Burch and hi.s a.ssistants 
verified through tracing radioactive par- 
ticles in the human body that ordinary table 
.^alt is a factor in congestive hrait disease. 
Their studies opened the way t'l additional 
research that may eventually cut the toll 
from this killer. 

The American Medical Association pre- 
sented Dr, Burch the Gold Medal award for 
his exhibit on that work and brought at- 
tention to leadership of Tulane university 
in using know-how gained in atomic re- 



quest for search for the good of mankind. 



NOTP-47- 10-16 



356 



Miss Keitz, After 50 Years 
as Teacher, to Accept Keys 



Principal to Have Post 
Honor at Ceremonies 



time it was taken out of The Iiik'1. 
or .schools and put in a building to 
itself. .She was a moiriber of the 
only year-anda-half class of the 
norrnal school, which came in the 
transition pcrioti from a one-year 
to a two-vear course. 

Likes Modern Ideas 
"ThouKe I'll never poke fun at 



U. S, TEACHER 
REMEMBERED 
m ARGENTINE 



(Pirliire on Paep 1) 
I BV WILM.\M K. I)()/.IKK 

I Fifty ^ears aco. .\liss Henrietta 

jKeitz as a girl had her heart set _ _. ^_..^ „, 

on being a nurse or a doctor, but ''i^ o'd McGuffe\'s reader which 
'her physician father objected. I both studied and taught, and 
•So 1 decifled that if 1 was to be 'he rigid Three R"s curriculum 
a teacher. I'd be the very best one of old. I do believe there is better 
I that I could be, " she said Wednes- opportunity today for a child to 
day niRht. get a broader knowledge from 

Miss Keitz, who entered her school." she said 



Nation Celebrates 100th 

Anniversary of Mo. 

School Marni 



50th year in the public school 
■system here in Seplemher, has 
been chosen as the rrpresenta- 
live teacher to receive the keys 
of the city in Teacher .Apprecia- 
tion I>ay ceremonies to he held 
as a part of .American Kduca- 
tion AVeek at City Hall Friday 
at 3:30 p. ni. 



"Especially do I like the read- 
mg prosrams and the libraries. 
and the audio-yi.-ual aid teaching 
methods of today. Moie and more 
now good reading bmiiks are be- 
ing devoloperl m chUclren. a mat- 
Iter whhh for so long was not 
stressed. 

' "The rcfidin? requirements for 
The one and only principal each grade ami lie reading readi-| 
that the tJentilly Terrace elemen- "ess tests are wonderful methods! 
tary school has had since its open- of judging a ihild's ability and' 
'ing in 1914. she started her career readiness to take up formal read- 
at the age of IS. teaching at Mc- ing." 

Donogh No. 5 school in Algiers. Modern children are more 
then a Negro institution, at the a'ert than youngsters she in- 
scant recompense of S:!.") a month, sti-ucted in her early days, she 
iMUg AA'alk to School said, hut are also more difficult 

"I walked every day from our to manage. '•This I attribute to 
jhome at 2819 North Rampart to- all thejj; outside activities and 
;the ferry, and then walked six- interest.s," she said, 
'blocks to school on the Algicr.s; Miss Keitz is a firm believer Ip 

side," she recalled. '"But jt was* 

fun, I founri the pupils earnest', „ , ,. . ^ , , o 

and attentive, and that there wa.-: homework. 'A child can under- 
about the same percentage ol^^""/* ^ '''"*'J«'=^ much be;tier if 
llittle demons among them as ^^ ''^^ '" S^^. P^'"^ °f ^.'^ je^sons 
among the white children.' ^"^f,^'^ and doesn t wait for the 

After 74 months in the xegro ^^^^^ V '^'^^^^ ■^''^ l"^^^" "'^^' 
school. Miss K>itz taught five ^^^ ?"<1 'P°"'; "• '"t° him^ 
years at the Gavarre school, four Homework makes a child ap- 
vears at .Jefferson Davis, and six P'eciate hi.s responsibilities a.s a 
vears at B. M. Palmer before be- student. And, her eyes sparkled, 
ing appointed principal of the .^""^"i,'^^ P^""^"'-^ relearn a lot 
then-spanking-new Gentilly Ter- "tLl i:-„l\^^'^„i,°J"^°!i^1:„!°.°' 
race school. 



AP Newsfeaiurts 

Buenos Aires — Argentina ha'a Just 
celebrated the 100th anniversary ot 
the birth of a St. Louis. Mo., school 
teacher who became a minor national 
heroine In Argentina. 

She was Mlaa Mary Olstlne Gra- 
ham, first trained normal school 
teacher to practice in this coun 
try. She came in 1879 and was still 
teaching when she died here in 1902,, 

Miss Grah.^m was brought to Ar- 
gentina by President Domingo rsusto! 
Sarmlento. exiled from Argeniln" un-j 
der the r^girr.o of Juan Manuel P .'sas. 
lived In the t.ic United States There 
he met .Abraham Lincoln anrt Horace i 
Mann, pioneer of sclentlfu :»aher| 
training. With Roeas o*erthro»n. Sar- 
mlento returned to Argentina and was| 
elected president. The new executive J 
was already a believer In more edu-| 
cation and the system be foundecf' 



But she never forgot her 
love of medicine. "I've always 
kept cotton bandages and lini- 
mept and boxwood splints near 
at liand for the little emergen- 
cies that always come up," she 
smiled. ".And I've pulled a good 
many loose teeth in my years, 
too." 



Miss Keitz plans to retire at 
the end of this school year "unless 
something comes up and I'm 
needed for ne.xt year." 

'Tm 68 years old and don't 
mind admitting it. I had no con- 
trol, over rny advent onto this 
sphere — why should I be shy 
about admitting my age? 

"But." she laughingly warned 



Miss Keitz was graduated from ^^^, interviewer, "don't you dare 
the Esplanade Girls' High school "}'i^^ "1^ out an infirm, crabbed 
at the age of 15. attended the old °^'^ mai d, because 1 m not!" | 

New- Orleans .Normal sthonl at the 



was to give Argentina the lowest Il- 
literacy rate In Latin America. 

Part of this system was the pro- 
vision of normal schoola. Miss Gra- 
ham was recommended by Sart- 
mentos United States friends as a 
trained teacher of teachers. Argentina 
was more remote from the United 
States then than now. but she agreed 
to come. 

She knew teaching methods, but 
she didn't know Spanish. Simultane-, 
ously she s'tudled Spanish and taught I 
In the new Parana province normal 
school. Six months later she knew! 
enough Spanish to become assistant | 
director of the San Juan normal 
school. Three years later she was- 
named director. 

She went to St Louis on vacation 
that year, but time back determined 
to say. Sarmle.-.o named her first 
director of t.-.e normal school of 
Buenos Aire* province, which Is now| 
called the Escuela Mary Graham " 
She held that post 14 years until her 



NOTP- 47-1 1-6 ifft^ "•»"» ■"'"■' " "■" °'" " ° V-^ 



357 




BEST TEACHER— Little Miss Sally McFarland is pictured 
above entertaining her teacher, Miss Nell Dorman, at a party 
given Tuesday afternoon at her home, 121 North Allen avenue. 
Sally won a "best teacher" certificate on the radio Quiz Kids 
program and decided to give a party for teachers at her 
school with the idfea of promoting a better understanding 
between the te^ltAand child. She hopes to have one day of 
the schodi fcrm ^Wdicaled to "Child-Teacher Appreciation 
day." She] islpisfeing along the idea to Gov. Earl K. Long. 
Besides Mfcs Uorman, teachers attending the party were Anna 
W. Allen, Cornelia Bolin, Mrs. Bryan Hardin, Hazel D. Starritt, 
Clara Brown, Mary Terrell,- Aline Mills, Hester Jinman, Mary 
H. Smith, Mrs. Gladys Hendrick, principah^Grace Hensley, 
Mrs. D. H. Fleming and Mattie Mae English. — (lournal Photo.) 
Fleming and Mattie Mae English. — (Journal Photo.) 

HONORS HIS TEACHER 

New York (UP' — A public 
school gra'duate gave a $1,000 
j bond td the Board of Education 
I to honor his lormer teacher for 
the guidpnce and training she had 
given hiiti The donor, who asked 
to remain anonymous, said he 
wished to honor Miss Etta Wills. 
The bonds interest will provide 
a prize of $20 a semester to a 
graduate of Junior High School 
47, the basis of scholarship and 
character. 




Pnoto by Thf TlmM-Plc«yun«. 
.MRS. F. B. DELERY 



French Teacher 
Presented Medal 



' Mrs. Prank B. Delery, assistant 
professor of French at Newcomb 
college, Monday was awarded a 
medal of "Off icier de L' In.struc- 
tion Publique" by the French 
government for "outstanding 
work in the field of education." 

Presentation was made by, 
Lionel Vasse, consul-general of 
France at New Orleans, at a cere- 
mony at the home of Mrs. Thomas 
Sloo, 2512 Chestnut. Mrs. Delery 
is program chairman of Ciuisorics 
du Lundi, French Jiterarj- so<-ii?t.v, 

Vasse said th4 medal • vviis 
awarded to Mr^. Delery liy the 
French niini-^wy of nationa.l .edu- 
cation as an "'Expression of iippre 
ciation for her good work in ai"' 
Causerle.s li'i ...undi." . 1 

He said, "In our co^imon fiKht 
against the- C'onimuniiis. all men 
and womeiV ni free nations are 
waging a ^ar of ideals. Causeries 
du Lundi i.s one of the numerous! 
outposts for the defense of West- 
ern civilization, of which France; 
is the traditional bulwark in Eu- 
rope. Euch outposts must be kept 
during this 'cold' war with the 
Soviet fninn '■ ' 



L 



RDL-48-1-23 



(^ 



_J 



35S 



A Bow to the Real Miss America 



Into the life of almost eveiy Ameri- 
can boy and girl there comes a person 
to occupy a place in the charmed inner 
circle of happy childhood. This person 
is usually a young woman. She is re- 
spected and esteemed, and trusted too 
for she has opened the door to that big 
outer world into which young feet ven- 
ture for the first time to pursue in- 
terests outside the home. Frequently 
slie is loved and adored just after Mom 
and Pop. 

This is the young woman who fills 
one of the really important jobs in 
America. She is Miss Public School 
Teacher, the 24-karat Miss America. 
Hers is one .ioli that must be done well, 
or the ronsequencos may be rather dire. 
She takes the most fragile and valued 
of all ran- n\ateriab— childish dreams, 
energies. impulse.s. hop«s, fears, desires 
. and molds them into Anierican citi- 
zens. 

She sort of takt- > up an here monl and 
pop leave off. She takes over when par- 
ents turn their offspring over into oth- 
er hands for this second, the education- 



al phase uf up-bringing. That she does 
.so well the myriad of extra-curricular 
tasks of the classrooms is a testimonial 
to her generous nature, the ardor she 
feels in her calling, the responsibihties 
she would not shirk. 

As a functioning segment of the toil- 
ing population the teacher is prodigi- 
ously successful. Attest: The uncount- 
ed millions of American men and wom- 
en who have made splendid. God-fear- 
ing, useful, fruitful lives out of the rudi- 
ments gained in the little rural one- 
roomer or the palatial affair in the city 

Today is Teacher Appreciation Day. 
climaxing the observance of National 
Education Week. Thank heaven for the 
faithful and devoted "school-ma'am." 
Her part in making this nation great 
and the American people gi-eat deserves 
all the plaudits poured out to<lay and 
much more. She and the small mascu- 
line band that is sei-\ing in the pubUc 
schools of the counti-y will continue to 
inspire boys and girls, and guide the 
shaping of their lives, as long as this 
is a free repubhc. 



<^ NOS-47-M-I4 



The Ideal Teacher 

The life of Miss Elsie Pullen, whose pass- 
ing has brought sorrow to the hearts of both 
young and old in the Vivian comnrunity and 
great loss to the teaching profession at large, 
was that of the ideal teacher. 

Her career as educator was unique m that 
•'8 years ago she began her leachirtg in Vivian 
and taught the seventh grade ther^ until re- 
cent illness forced her from the classroom. In 
ear'-.- Ktoanhood she selected teaching as a 
lif rotession. -Through experience in prac- 
tii J ieachins and continued study in training 
ins. ;...tion.-. she developed an ability which 
airoined/frnrniv recognition in the state. 

yei- philosophy of education dealt with the 
development of youth physically, intellectual- 
ly, emotion^ly and spiritually. Throughout her 
teaching career she practiced what modern 
educators advocate, the growth of the who e 
child Opportunities were given to stimulate 
the whole being in her classroom. She was 
sensitive, underst^ding and wise enough to 
bring all the appropriate resources of the 
sthool and community to bear upon the task 
of guiding the students in meeting their ner- 

30-48- 



sonal educational and vocational problems. 
Countless boys and girls have achieved recog- 
nition and places of usefulness and honor in 
adult society because of her guidance. Po^ 
ses-^ing the nobler virtues of character herself, 
she believed that character education was 
fundamental to the education of all children. 
Miss Pullen was a devoted Christian whose 
work in the school' and community activities 
was -always distinguished by loyalty to duty 
faithfulness in service, courage in action and 
intelligent understanding. During her time m 
Vivian she was a consistent and effecUve 
worker in the church. Love for family, friends, 
school, church and the finer things of life 
characterized this worthy teacher, an ideal 
representative of those noble characters, the 
unselfish school teachers, who devote their 
lives to the cause of youth and future manhood 
and womanhood. The devotion she gave to her 
efforts was inspiring to others. Her memory 
will live long in the minds and hearts of her 
issociates and her influence will be felt in the 
mprint she made upon the character of those 
.vhose lives she touched. Her life was evidence 
hat •to live in hearts we leave behind is not 
o die." 

h2S> 



359 



Veteran Homer 
Teacher Retires 

Miss Belle Davidson 
Concludes 51 Years 
Of Service Monday 

BY KARL ETZEL. 

A HoiTipr teacher who has 
taught continuously for over a 
half century retired Monday. She 
may hold two state records, as htr 
M years of teaching includes 39 
years at one school — the Homer 
school. 

Her eyes could make you 
quiver with their sharp glance 
or smile with their gentle look of 
kindness. Her voice was soft but 
commanded instant obedience. It 
is said Miss Belle Davidson never 
had to raise her voice to maintain 
discipline. 

"Miss Belle." as she is affec- 
tionately known in Homer, began 
her teaching career in 1897 at the 
Lisbon school of Claiborne parish 
at the age of 18. according to rec- 
ords of the teachers' retirement 
system of Louisiana. Baton 
Rouge. Leaving Lisbon in 1899, 
she returned to teach there again 
In 1902 and 1903. 

* * * 

Made Pnplls Want to Learn. 

In 1901 and 1902 this outstand- 
ing teacher taught at Colquit; 
1904-05 at Thurmon: 1905-06 at 
Junction City; 1906-09 at Athens. 
From September, 1909, until her 
retirement she taught without in- 
terruption in the Homer school. 

What Miss Belle meant to the 
teaching profession is expressed 
excellently in this opinion by one 
of her pupils who said: "She was 
the first teacher whoever made 
me want to learn." 

Her superior regarded her 
highly. Two principals of the 
Homer schools, one working with 
Miss Belle for 14 years, and the 
other, 13 years, praise this veteran 
teacher. 

P. C. Rogers, secretary-treas- 
urer of the teachers' retirement 
system and principal of the Ho- 
mer school from 1921-1936 with 
the exception of one year as as- 
sistant state high school in- 
spector, stated: 



P.-»M Fine Tiit.mr. 

■ Mi.ss Bell.^ -c of <h'- m" ' 

teachers I hav. er K<ioun. 
.Ti.-;o one of tli' . t\st ,'tr.-'>i. 
think of her a< t • kind cf pus( r. 
we teachers n.e to n.ive- our 
pupils becom>- 

•There are ri;isons why Miss_ 
Belle is such a splendid teacher" 
and has rendered such fine serv- 
ice. First, she is well adapted by 



nature to teach; her voice is soft 
and pleasing; she is gentle and 
kind, and has a very even temper- 
ament; is sympathetic with her 
pupils and their problems and is 
never harsh in working with 
them; and she has high native 
ability — a keen mind. In addi- 
tion she has a splendid education. 
"Miss Belle knows well that it 
is what one values that stamps 
his character and molds his con- 
|duct. She has planned and di- 
jrected the activities of her pupils 
[With this thought in mind. Al- 
Iways, she has sought to have her 
■pupils learn to value the things 
'that best made for a happy and 
successful life." 

Present principal of the Homer 
High School. H. G. Robinson, who 
has been working with her for 
the past 13 years, says; 

"She was the backbone of that 
grade school for a long time. I 
have a great deal of respect for 
her because I started teaching for 
her father. I have been acquainted 
with her 30 years. 

"At teacher institutes 20 years 
ago when we went to observe 
teachers teach, we always ended 
by observing Miss Belle teach a 
geography or history class. She 
has had a lot to do with building 
the character of youngsters 
around here. " 

* » ♦ • 

Great Disciplinarian. 

Asked for his opinion of Miss 
Belle, another pupil said; 

"She was an exceptionally good 
teacher. She was exceptionally 
firm. There wasn't any foolish- 
ness in any of her classe.■^ ' 

SO-48-3-1 ° ' 



In the Homer scnooi mux ^..^...,1 

:iKvays laughl the seventh grade., I 
but some timt>s taVight a pan of 
the sixth grade. Her pupils num- 
ber in the thousands, including 
parents and their children in 
numerous families still residing 
In Claiborne parish. 

When the teacher retirement' 
system was inaugurated in 1936,1 
Miss Belle was eligible for retire-; 
ment. Then she could have put 
away her books under two pro- 
visions, and now under three. 

Under this system a teacher 
may retire at the age of 60 re- 
gaRtlless of experience, with 35 
years of teaching irrespective of 
age. with 30 years' service and 
have reached 55 years of age and 
is compelled to retire at 70 unless 
special permission is obtained 
from the school board to teach one 
more year. After 71 no one is 
allowed to teach. 

During Miss . Belle's employ- 
ment in Homer the elementary 
school has been housed in two 
buildings, both at the same loca- 
tion. While the present school 
i structure was being erected in 
'1917 Miss Belle taught all over 
town in churches, warehouses 
and "any place big enough to 
house a group." she said. 

^ » • « 

Witnessed Many Changes. 

Beginning her teaching career 
with a first grade certificate. Miss 
Belle now holds an A. B. degree 
from Louisiana Polytechnic In- 
stitute at Ruston and a master's 
degree from the University of Ar- 
kansas. She also did college work 
at George Peabody College, LSU 

' and the University of Texas. 

' Three times the number of 

' grades has changed since her I 

' teaching career began, but the! 

I seventh grade has remained thei 
same. Miss Belle said. At the be-] 

Ij ginning there were 11 grades, then 
12, then 11 and again in 1945 the 
number became 12. 

Her retirehient has broken a! 
trio of a teacher, her pupil and! 

I her pupil's pupil which has ex- 
isted in the Homer schools for the 
past 13 years. Miss Belle taught 
Miss Mary Tooke, Miss Tooke 
taught Miss Kula Linton and all 
have been teaching together over 
this period. 

Other students of this beloved 
teacher in the Homer schools be- 
sides Miss Tooke include Miss 
Sybil Moore, Miss Dessie McKen 
zie, Miss Marion Dorman anc 
Mrs. Mary Simpson. 



L 



_I 



Problems and needs. - 



360 



I une of 

PUBLIC FORUM k :X„^, ". 

•mr-OTD Dr--..^^ lirement : 



TEACHER RETIREMENT 

Monroe, Louisianii, 

November 11, laiT. 

To the Editor 



une of the beit .ctu.riei In the 
<■«•• ■ complete »jid inde- i 
Jurvey of the Teacher Re- ! 
, Ostem with the idea of I 

bringmg it up to date. I 

The children of thi5 .tate will be 
freatly benefitted by . modern retire- 




I while serving on teacher committees The schools belong to all the neo 
the conclusion is drawn that in many ple and so great are the oLt»r1. T 

During the 1H4 session of the sUle " cooperatively in order to make 
legislature, a senator from north Loui- ' " ther progress towards alleviating 
siatia introduced a bill guaranteeing'*"^ '°"8 existing inadequate condi- 
a floor of $50 a month retirement for''""-" °f our public schools of this 
teachers having 35 years of teaching *^°""'''>'- 

experience and a representative of . ^* presently are spending three 
the teachers who was, and is, paid a''"^*'* " much for beverages and 
handsome salary appeared in the'"*^"" «« for public secondary edu- 
committee hearing in opposition to'^^''°"- Do ' 



we choose to have this i 
LOCAL TEACHER. 



es ours. That individual is still on 

thr payroll being paid by the SUte 1 , 

Teacher Retirement system. |i _, 

■"Only recently one of our city police- ]ECOnOniiC FGOTS 
men retired after 21 years experience « ,, 

on a pension of two-thirds his salary, ibeeil QS KeeDinQ 
Yet one of our teachers recently re- ' ^ 

tired who had 26 years experience le^rffh^TC /^D 1 nihk 
in this SUte plus 7 years out of state, ^^^^^^^i^ ^ii J ^iJ 
on the stupendous amount of J53 a (Womens National Ntws Strvue) 

month, notwithstanding the fact the I Boston — One of the many rea 
system has over fourteen million dol- son.s why teachers stay in their 
lars invested in bonds, .-oUected last 'P'"°*^^^^'°" '"^ "economic cow- 



year over X800,000 in teacher contribu- 
tions and over a million and a quar- 
ter from the state and paid out only 
$135,000 in retirement beneffts. 

Two millions were invested in bonds 
to bring the total investments over 
fourteen million. Further, only 388 
tcochers are presently drawing retire- 
ment benefits compared to the total 
active membership of approximately 
21,000 which number incidentally, in- 
cludes also college and imiversity 
teachers. This fact proves beyond 
doubt the inadequacy and non-func- 
tioning of the retirement system in 
that so few have and are now retired. 
About as many died while on the ac- 
tive list as actually retired during the 
ten year period of existence of the 
present law. 



ardice." according to Dr. ,Iohn D 
Glover of the Harvard university 
scliool of business administration. 
The convention of New Eng- 
land school supei intendcnts heard 
him .sav that -many teachers feel 
that tenure is a positive satisfac- 
tion." 

Some continue to teach, he as- 
serted.- because 'they are refu- 
gees from reality." Professor Glo- 
ver listed other reasons they slay 
on their jobs: 

1. They're egoists, who want to 
try their ideas out on otheis. 

2. They enjoy the status of 
snobbishness their position gives 
them. 

3. Th*^\' like the syn-.pailiv llieir 
low sal;irios get thcin li"in per- 



"How about my buying a few shares sons making more mone 
in this retirement system?" you ask. 4. Toaihing if the only .lob they 
No such luck. Regardless of the fi- can haiiiUr 



nancial condition of the system, the 
law as presently written allows a 
member to retire only on a.i amount 
as determined by an old "depression" 
formula. 

The retirement SNsirm just estab- 
lished for the Louisiana stale em- 
ployes has a far superior benefit and 
one that would allow a fair r^tire- 



lo-gQOders" tbry like to 
they have a mis-ion in 
I llicy will lr.<\e the 
lietlor place than they 



tlTV 

feel that 
lifc-"ili 
wen Id ^ 
lOUIKi i'. ■ 

.Most of tho.^e motives, said Dr. 
Glovrr, aie nothing to be asham- 
ed of. Without them, he elated, 
the remunerative rewards being 



one inat woma auow a lair r.tire- ^^^^^ ^j^ ^^^ j^^ teachers, Amer- 
ment for teachers . . cs«.ntly retiring ,f ^^.^ ^^^^^ chUdren would suffer. 

the same methods \^ ere used inca|- ^ >^ 

culating the benefits. y^'^Z-^^ flCX Q 1 

[MNS-47.//-./2 N0TP-4«-/^ 



ASSOClvTioN cm I I 1 
' »{<^K,s TKW.S HIKK ' 

Ji \(:hin(; ,^ai.ai{ik.s 

'•' '" T»)c«», Marrh an ,/p, — 

'"""' hv ,h, pr..in.,u of the TMaa 
. t«if Twrh^r. .Mori.Kon. The hiRhl 
-•"" of n,-,ns >,,. .,.,p»d n„i recent' 



Brot7p ^ 


< ^A»nrshi,:! 


.T 


rursrod the 


nveri>Kp 


• Icrv nt 


.,... 


"f ^ 




»2,!>0n , 


!) the hi 


' "'■(! 


pre-war 


to « f^u 


hPTk of m 


n2i 


>Ofl 

n 


Is equal 
he 1935- 



•19 pcilofl 

With income tax a rtuctlons— 
whichwere not made on teachPrs 
'nlarlrs prior to 1936 lotiay'.s take 
home pay of the average-salary 
teacher l.s equivalent to Jl.306 be- 
|fore the «Br. Mls» Brot7e continued 
In a prepared stRtement rele<i.<ied In 
Au.<iiin. 

Despite the legislatures provision 
of ■« »2.000 minimum salary scale 
lor tearhers with degrees. Texa.s Is 
s'Ul \indpr the nvcrage pay for 
tea.hers in the United States she 
><ld. 

Miss Prnixr sold Trxas will ,on- 
'miip to hKv» rtifficiiUv obtpiniiit; ' 
1'ialified tenrhprs bemuse th» in- ■ 
rr»BEini cost o( lIv-lnE I5 fornriR 
m»nv people to fnter other kinds 
m •WJ)loj-m»nt 

ST- 48-3-2 /Qg^ 

Teaching Group 
Studies Problem 



The discipiinr committee of th? 
Caddo Teachers' s.soci tion presented 
its formal report '.o t'lc organization 
at the nicftnii; held 3t".urday morn- 
ing In the parish cou-.ihouse. 

The ciiram'.tlcc .stated that a clari- 
fication of the def'nltiou of corporal 
punishment in the sciiools and its 
legality is needed. Statementa and 



suggestions on the question of dis- 
cipline made during the meetlng't 
open floor discussion will be glvea 
additional consideration by the com- 
mittee. 

The committee was formed by Mrs. 
Daisy Dobson. president of the asso- ^ 
ciatlon. a.'i a result of a questionnaire 
answered by the teachers of the pav- 
Ith. The questionnaires showed that 
three-fourths of the teachers' prob- 
lems Involve discipline. 



sr- ^^--2.-23 

1^ 




U 



361 



I Cliy CLASSROOM 
lEACmEEI 

Mrs. DeWift Henry Gives De- 
tails Of United Natio ns 
r Organizations (^ToJ) 

The clasfToom ' ^'■h. '.5 of Ihe city 
tchoob of Monrof lield their regular 
meeting on Tiie;<i, .. in th.' audiloiium 
of the Cenlrjl Gr.unmar school. The 
president. Mrsj AJwine Duncan, pre- j 
sided. Miss Cliffie Olmstcad, program 
chairman, mtroduced the guest speak- 
er, Mrs. DeWitt Henry. Mrs. Henry 
had been a.<;ke<l to discu.<B the United j 
Nations, ib: organizations, and the ' 
work of each division. Her talk was i 



committee-one from ead, school-- School Board, and lllii,, a. y 

were aakpd to take care of th« dona- • t> . 1 

tiona m her school <* "ona 1 hll)odau.\. Iji. 

Teachers «..-.. 1. .. . Editor, The Tlmes-Puavime: 

Ne^X whar^v h'*' '\"°"'^ ^^- , '^^ ' "* "' °"'- K°vet nor Is 
to a enrf .h c? '^'^'' ••''y *''>"^ "•^■'"8 '° persuade the people 
,;J'l!"l,!.':.^^:'"<' Teachers- conven- «Kam that increase in salaries 

will .stamp out llllteracv. That's 
iinpo.-Jsible a.s long a.s we keep 
'he old method of allowing school 
Hoards to control education They 
have forced more good teachers 
lit of the profession than lack 
f funds ever did. 
Wo ha\e a law whi.h i.^', -ires 
M tPHcheis K. have a ba. raiuire- 
te ilpcrcc (t years 01 coh.ge) 
rom h^t giaci- on up to M>per- 
ntei uont. Then ne have .iiiotlier 



MMV/-47-II-+ 

TEACHER LAW IS 
TO IJF STUDIED 

- ..v^, .,> ,.i ,,,ci. «e nave .iiu.tlier 

Actuary W^ii Be Em'^loveW *"' V ''"^ *V '^^ "^hooi board 
7 "«- cm..ioyednemlv.>, mi^t be ahle to read 

By Commitfet Of 
Association 



I clear and graphic, and most informa- 

Itive. 

I Following the address by Mrs. Hen- 

I ry, the president disposed of the rou- 
tine business, and called for reports 
of the advisory committee. Mrs. El- 

I nora McClendon armounced that the 
committee had met, and drawn up a 
number of resolutions as objectives 
for the group this year. Mrs. Agnes 
Miller read these resolutions, and aft- 
er discussions and a few amendments, 
the following were adopted: 

1. Resolved: That the elementary 
teacher load be reduced to^ thirty pu- 
pils as in the high .schools. 

2. Resolved: That we keep our ten- 
ure law in the present form. 

3. Resolved: That we urge the adop- ' 
tion of the N. E. A. salary schedule ' 
as a basis of our city salary schedule. 

4. Resolved: That a summer work- 
shop be conducted in Monroe in 1948. 

i. Resolved: That the question of ' 



,nd w<\':. These <a\»r »nen, who 
ire not leiniired to be educated 
fre the ones who hire and fire 

— -. ihe teachers. Many of them are 

Miss Clara Cii^ps, of .Shrevcporl "°''^ concerned with their per- 
yesterday said the committee of the' ?"^' Po""cs than thev are in 
; .." " '. — - j'tacing teachers accordinR to their 

jLoui-'iana Teacher Association which special training. When vacancies 
lis studying the state teacher retire- occur they give first preference 

ment law is making plans to employ 1° '■^l?"''^!,.?"^,^"^"'^^' regard- 
I „ ,,, . ,. ' ■' 'ess of qualifications or conir)«^ 

Ian actuary, an expert on figu.ins tence. If there are any left 0^6^ 
insuianco risks and premiums. then other applicants are consl- 

The committee was appointed last dered. More often vou'll find the 
fall by Mack Avants, Baton Rou.ee. outstanding teachef- with special 
who is president of the L. T. A. Its training in this group, who is 
puipose is to study the retirement forced either to accept what the 
law with the view to request ng the Preferred group wouldn't have 
IcRislature to pass a new law. The or leave the profession. ' 

committee was appoint<^d as a re- Again I state that unless vou 
.suit of a resolution adopted at tlie change this law which gives 
1D47 L. T. A. convention to the effect the school board the power to 
that the liiw should be revised. control education, you can never 

The committee applictl to actuaries hope to stamp out illiieiacv 
ecommended by the National Edura- INTERESTED, 

ion association and received 17 re- Ik l^\"T*Q Aft ^^ 

■lies. Miss Griggs said yesterday that TMLi/ I T "~4R -"fi" 
t was decided at a meeting of the ^^ 

ommittee Saturday to choose the , ' _ 

ne they will employ after hearing | _- 7 t-» • 

urther from three persons '^^oscn t^OSVU tO I\.6V1€W 

All members of the L. T. A. are be- I J^ fitirf^mf^nf Plsnci 
ig asked to submit their views on ll '^CLU CIIICUL r I dHii 



I securing college credits for work-shop 
be carefully studied. 

6. Resolved: That a study of in- 
come tax deductions on sick leave 
pay be made, 

7. Resolved: That a study of the 
transportation problems of the school 
be made. 

8. Resolved: That we favor the age 
requirement for entering first grade 
be six years. 

9. R*olvcd: That teachers be se- 
cured for extra-curricular work. 

10. Resolved: That we favor state 
funds being distributed on a basis 
of attendance rather than on the per- 
educable basis. 

11. Re.solved: That study of the re- 
tirement law be continued, and that 
the legal actuaries be employed to 
study the situation. 

The secretary, Mrs. Audrey Boggs, 
read a letter frorn the N. E. A. urging 
aid for over-seas teachers. The mem- 
bers voted to respond to this call for 
help, and members of the advisory 



what is needed in the teacher retire- 
ment law as soon as pos.sible. The 
leaislature convenes in May, and the 
bill to be drawn up by the L. T. A., 
with the a-ssistants of others interested 
in teaching, must be prepared before 
tlie session opens. 

One person from each congressional 
district in the state and a member 
of the retirement board of trustees 
serve on the committee. The com- 
mittee members are L. J. Bourgeois, 
.superintendent of schools of New Or- 
leans; A. P. Tugwell, of Baton Rouge, 
who represents the board; Miss Olga 
Jeanfreaii, of Destrehan; Mrs. Theda 
M. Ewinp, of New Iberia; D. W. Grif- 
fith, of Monroe; Dr. W. A. Lawrence, 
of Baton Rouge; W. J. Austin, of 
Winnfield and Miss Griggs. 

L. T. A. members are being asked to 
contribute SI each to fnance the 
study being made by the committee. 

Miss Griggs teaches at Fair Park 
High Scl;ool in Shreveport, But is on 
leave of ah.?ence for six months to 
I do thLs worl:. 



In a move d?.sigiie<l to obtain 
higher pension benefits, the Or- 
leans parish teacher retirement 
fund will survey its present teach- 
er retirement plan. .Miss Jennie 
Roch, secretarv. said Thursday. 

The board authorized the move 
at a retirement meeting Wednes- 
day, and announced it would meet 
next week to work out details of 
the survey, .Miss Roch .said. The 
survey, she added. « III have to be 
made by a professinnol man who 
understands retiremeni fuintions. 

The survey whs ic<iuested by 
the New Orleans Cla.ssroom 
Teachers' I- cdcritllon. which 
pointed out the low benefits 
teachei s now receive. .\li.»s Kmh 
said 'h;it the avcr;if;e letircmctit 
pay nf New Orieaiis teachers was 
now SIiiiii ii \ear. She evplaiiied 
that this lines. not ii-.cjudo ;i ^mall 
state aliouuent li> .some HHchers 
whose rptiiemeni lienefiM are 
verv low . 



NOTP-4 




362 

iisunderstandings and controversial issues. 



TEACHERS' GROUP .ASK CANDIDATES' siNfil F WAfiF ^ 
CITES PAY ISSUE \ EDUCATION^ VIEWS SCALE URGED 



Circulars on Sabbatical |Teachert Demand Positions 
Leave Salary Sent Out «>" Federal Aid 



FOR TEACHERS 



Th* New Orleans Classroom 
Teachers' Federation. AFL. dis- 
closed Wednesday that it has sent 
out 3000 cirrulais explaining its 
position with regard to salaries 
of teachers on sabbatical leave. 

It has also sent out letters to 
the Young Men's Busines*: Club 
and several individuals asking for 
appoiniiTirnis to counsel with 
ihem on the matter. 

The federation has been r>eli- 



(Th« AMociaitd Prcii) 

Glenwood Springs, Colo. July! 
12. — The American Federation of, 
Teachers Sunday called for all 
presidential candidates to state 
their positions on federal aid to 
education. 

Tht federation adjourned its 
31st annual convention after hear- 
ing a report from the New 'York 
Teachers' Guild criticizing Gov. 



La. 



Crriiip nrrnrniiirndtf 
Samr Salary for 
Both Rares 



ioning for fi\e months for $950 Thomas E. Dewey, the Republican 
ipiece which it claims is tiue 29 nominee. 

Local unions were jn^lincte<j to 
learn the st^'iid of coj\t;re«sion8l 
candidates oii ;.'deral aid and pub- 
lish the ansuei^ locall\ . 

"Never hrfr'r? have 'Ik' schools 
of the count -' nepcled more ilii- 
mediate anti substaniial aid to 
maintain and develop hich stand- 
ards, to rehabilitate buildings and 
to pay teachers decent wages," 
Isaid a statement adopted by the 
'group. 

The convention also asked that: 

Universal niiliUry training not 
ibe enacted while the draft law is 
I operating: 

Segregation in the armed forces 



teachers oa sabbatical leave. It i 
asking the Orleans parish Svhool 
board to sei a ilatc for its deci- 
sion on this matter. 

Haitkett Derb.v. evorulive sec- 
retary, 't.ild Wednes'l.iy lh«l the 
federation i«i now Ir^inE '<> in- 
form th* pohlir of it-i (■;>«■«•. He 
added th^- frderalion rr|)rp»ent- 
ative* aii'I irfnihpr* of the Cpn- 
tral Tradrv roiinni will ai;;iin 
bring the • inter up befoVp the 
hoard at ii« merting Keliiuary 
13. 
In the ciii 'Urs, sent to groups 
and individuaK. it points out that: 
The purpose of sabbatical leave is 
to help increase teacher 
ciencv: that teacher 



effi- 
morale suf- 



fers when teachers" are "arbitrar- ije ended; 
llv divested of their legal rights' 
by their employer: ' and that per- 
sonnel procedures are -danger- 
ouslv at fault" when teachers 
must "threaten suit to have their 
legal rights recognized by their 
school board." 

The teachers claim that f^ec-; 
tion 13 of Act 319 of 1940 sets I 
forth that a teacher on sabbatical | 
leave should receive the differ- 
ence between his or her salary 
at^d that of a day-by-day substi- 
tute, whereas the board has in- 
stead for eight vears paid these 
teachers the diffe'rence between 
their salary and a begin ning 
teacher's pay. vCO^^ 



N0TP-49-a-5 

TEACHER SEEKS TO 
REGAIN POST WITH 
CATAHOULA SCHOOL 



Draftees under the new selec- 
tive service act be given full bene- 
fits of the GI Bill of Rights: 

Congress pass bills providing 
low-cost housing, a fair employ- 
ment practice? commission and 
elimination of the poll tax as a 
voting requiremsnt in federal 
elections. (^^Ct^) 

NOTP-48-7-13 

Dennis B. l^irr, *ho *a.'= r^leved| 
by the board pri^r i" thr opeoin- ofj 
the present teri- \mw J'mployed a 
Jena law firm »t ounhfl m votrlevei 
benefits which o" .laimf uiifi. r the 
teacher tenure »">l of the »t»i» legis- 
lature. ■ ' / i 
• . Furr's counsel ron:endcd/in a let- 
ter to Jessie' C. McGec, tbe school 
boards attorney, that the dismissed 
instructor was protected by the ten- 
ure law as a permanent employe. 

The school board maintains that 

; Furr was dismissed because of a state 

(Special).— a' board of education ruling on teacher 

.allotment in the parish. Only one, 






JoneavlUe. April 
•howdpwn fight appears certain 

tween the Catahoula parish «:hooli t^-^^er was alloted the Boggy -Bayou 
board and .•» former, teacbrr wfco' '^hool where Purr and hi. wife havei 
Claim., the bnard ow.,- hhn lor the '«^ght for the -past five years be- 
1947-48 term a*.d my.. . :nplnv iUm cause of an .nrollment average of elM^ 
somewhere In The pfrish schoou'sys- , thaa 31 pupUa In ie4«-47. j 

tern. 



Baton Rou(?e. Sept. 18 , /PI.— Adop- 
tion of a single salary schedule for 
«hltp and negro teachers In Louisiana 
was recommended here today by a 
•pertai commission appointed by the 
•tale department of education. 

The motion, made by George Longe. 
Nev Orleans, executive secretary of 
the State As.soclatlon of Negro Teach- 
ers, and seconded by Mr-s. Paul Elan- 
Chard. Baton Rouge, former Louisiana 
P-TA. president, was adopted 24 
to 2. 

Oppoelng the motion were J. B. 
Snell of Mlnden and H W. Wright 
Bat^^n Rouge, executive secretary of 
the L-oulsiaiia Teachers association, 
who argued thai It is not the time 
to lake such * f«r«-rehchiiig step. 

The motTfxjiHiriop'ed UBid In part: 

•It Is the »en.sp of |K|« commlg- 
•lon that thp '.ecessary lunds should 
be made available t^clntung with the 
session of I94J.49 for the ef,ualliwtlon 
of salaries of all teachejs in the local 
•chool ^ystem.s and thai the local 
School boards he ref)ulred to adopt a , 
aingle salary .schedule." 

Data compiled by the department! 
of education indicales that It wotild I 
take »4.034.307 to bring the .salaries I 
or Loiilslana'.s present 4.543 negro 
teachers up to the current average I 
Xor white teachers thla year. 

The department also reported that 
• n additional 2.500 negro teachers 
»-e required, which would necessitate! 
•6 M4.825 more. i 

The department al.so reported that i 
an additional a.,SO0 negro teachers 
■ re required, which would neceasl- 
tate »6.234.82S more. 

State Rep. Bonnie V. Batter, Baton I 
Rouge, chairman of the bouse ap- 
propriations committee, discussed the 
possibility that the state legislature 
may aid In building new schools for 
negro children, arguing that "build- 
ings are needed to get the children 
In school." 

Cecil Morgan. Baton Rouge, com- 
mission chairman, declared that "it 
Is my belief that separate resignations 
for white and negro teachers can no 
■longer be accepted a« a criterion for 
paying 'earhers." 



ST~48-+-n (J^ 




363 



School 'Sit-Down' Threat 

Controversy over pay checks, especially 
the time of delivery, has been threatening en- 
forced vacation for public schools in Chicago. 
ReprL'sentatives of more than one half of the 
city's 14,000 classroom instructors recently an- 
nounced that those for whom they spoke had 
voted to engage in a "sit-down" unless in- 
creased compensation were promptly forth- 
coming. T^e city council, according to reports, 
postponed -ff5 approval of the school board's 
budget, embracing a pay hike for the teachers. 
This was followed by the threatened inactivity 
in classrooms, starting early this week. 

Due to rise in costs of living, teachers In 

j different parts of the country have been and 
many still are inadequately compensated for 

I their important services. However, in most 
states, including our own, substantial increases 
are in effect and additional pay is being con- 
sidered. The problem calls for serious study 
and as favorable action as circumstances war- 
rant. 

Since postponement of the city council's 
OK of the school budget inChicago wa.? not re- 
ported as covering a lon^ or definite period 
of time, it evidently was only temporcry, per- 
haps due to some offi«fal financial teciiiucality. 
We can not imagine any move to bibck school 
authorities' decision to increase budgets to 
meet recognized emergencies. Adjustment, as 

[promptly as possible, of whatever conditions 

I may be temporarily provoking serious mis- 
understanding should be sought in Chicago or 
elsewhere. 

The welfare of school children deserves a 
get-together and stay-together policy by all 
concerned, teachers as well as officials repre- 
senting the electorate, since the children are 
tbe ones to suffer most from interruption of 
class work. 

Classrooms should never be closed, regard- 
less of individual sacrifices, unless ^atu^e is 
responsible. 

SJ- 48- 1-27 

Red Propaganda - 
In Orleans Schools 
Under Investigation 

NEW ORLEANS, May 7. (UP) — 
Vn investigation of alleaed Commu- 
lifit 8u:tivties among New Orleans 
chool teachers was under way to- 
lay after one substtiute teacher ac- 
:usecl of spreading Communist jjro- 
)aganda was fired. < 

Orleaii.<; Parish School Supcrin- 



SCHOOL TEACHER 
STRIKE SETTLED 



Pay Boosts Provided AH onj 
Minneapolis Rolls I 



1 , iThi. A..oci«le(l PrfMI 

Minneapolis, .March 21,— The 27-' 
day-old Minneaixijis teacher slrikel 
was seiiled late today and the 6o.- 
OOf) idled siho.>i children were' 
told to leiurn to classes to- 
moii ow. 

The .settlement was announced 
in a joint stateineni hy the AFl, 
Federation of Teachers and the 
office of .Superintendent of 
Schools Willaid K. Goslin. 

The strike began February 24, 
and affected more than 2000 
teachers in 92 .schools. Eleven 
hundred of the teachers were 
mpnibei!« of the federation which 
called the strike. 

Terms of thr vpflleniriil pro- 
vided for iifrni.'ineiit nhIhi.v lii- 
crea>ies raiigliiK from £20 to fHO 
a month, and restoration of the 
)H4« biidKet which tlie lioard of 
education p r e v i o ii s I ,v had 
slashed ax an emnom.v move. 
The ,?40 a month boost is appli- 
cable to all teaches in the lower 
brackets and the .SJO to those with 
master's depees. However, the 
terms provide that for the balance 
of 1948 all teachers now employed^ 
would' receive the $40 monthly 
increase. 

The .eachers agreed to make up 
nine of the 19- days lost duiinp 
the strike. Four will be made up 
duing the spring vacation which 
was originally scheduled lo o[)en 
tomorrow. The other fi\e da.ysg 
will be made up in June 

Beginning January' 1, .1949, the; 
teachers agreed to gi\p nn addi- 
tional week of if^vicc -'h year 
to be used in p<'ofe.s,si<M'? prepa- 
ration andlplanning imin^diately 
prior to tre regul3r .S#^tember^ 
school opening, j . ' ', | 




I .endent Lionel J. BourgeTis disclosed 
j that he discbareed the tenrher sev- 
I sral weeks ago after obtainin? "suf- 
ficient . evidence that ,<^he was def- 
initely leaning teward "Commu- 
nism." 
He derhnpd to name the teacher. 
The full-scale investigation began 
yesterdav after pohtical science 
Prof. John Kieffer of Tulane uni- 
versity charged that high school 
student!* wer^ being 'fed Red party 
I theories' In their cla.ssrooms. 



.CAP -48-5-7 



364 



Faculty Member 
Resigns, Charges 
Polish Infiltration 

New York (JP\. — A Columbia 
University faculty member has 
resigned, charging that the Polish 
government was attempting "aca- 
demic Infiltration" at the univer- 
sity. 

Dr. Arthur Prudden Coleman 
said yesterday his decision result- 
ed from the acceptance by Co- 
lumbia of a grant from the Polish 
government, which he described 
las aentrolled by "Moscow and the 
cominform." 

To jiay ^ his pwst, Coleman 
said, he would be "conniving at' 
the sort of intellectual collabora- 
tion'." typified by "the professors 
who stayed at their posts and 
drew fat salaries during Hitler's 
regime." , ; , 

Coleman, who has been an as-i 
sistanfr professor of Polish lan- 
guage and literature at the uni- 
versity since 1928, said the grant 
provides for the founding of an 
Adam Mickiewicz chair of Polish 
studies. 

Dr. Manfred KridI, a Smith Col- 
lege faculty member, has been 
named incumbent of the new 
cha ir. 

^2i3>S J -48-7HJL 
AFL TEACHERS 
SLATE STRIKE IF 
DEMAN^FAILi ' 

MINNEAPOLIS, Feb. 23 (.^P)— Thei 
Minneapolis Board of Eduuri'ion oOUghU 
today to aveti u threal^necl ttiiki^^Bil 
Its public icbijal teacbs'S. Supe.-inten- 
dent Willard V. Go>Wa >-.id h-» 's 'op- 
timistic" the .' rik« i.suee »r>. b4 setU- 



Negro Teacher 
Wins in Court 

Practice of Paying 
Whites More Is Held 
Unconstitutional 

-N'ew Orleans (JP). — Federal Dis- 
trict Judge Herbert W. Christen- 
berry ruled unconstitutional to-- 
day the practice of paying negro 
school teachers anjl principals sal- 
aries less than those paid white 
persons of similar qualifications. 

The decision came in a case 
brought by Eula Mae Lee. a 
teacher in a negro school in Ken- 
ner in Jefferson Parish. La. 

The suit was filed March 29. 
1943. It asked a declaratory 
judgment be issued and the par- 
ish school board be enjoined 
from further alleged discrimina- 
tion. 

* * * 

Difference In Pay Cited. 

Judge Christenberry held that 
the official policy of the school 
board in pa.'^'ng '!'" plaintiff and 
other nfsrioes .smaller salaries 
"insofar a.-; .such niscriminHiloii.s 
are predicilefl on race, creed or 
color," is iincnnsiiuitional. 

The teacher claimed in Iirr 
suit that she had 12 yens of 
teaching e.xpo- 1 .mi'c and holds a 
bachelor of aits degree. She .^aid 
she is paid S67"i a j-ear while a 
white teacher of sirpilar quaiifi- 
colons receives a miin mum an- 



nval salary of SI.: 



SJ-W-y-si 



ad. 

The board ^in 
Charles E. i*j/er. 
Teacher Feii 'iti... 
would be o.^r r'^ 
mg if wage .n'l 
today's deouu..-; ' 

The teaAe: 
salaries booj 



jLd las. ni^ht by| 
i-'ad of 'lid Men's 
/FL>. -hf.! a sUike 
' ^ Tuet-jay raorr. 
;» .-Id c >: Settled by 



I'.ihimum annual 
■ VI, «-2.000 'o «!30O" 
and maxim vr-; for tho-«- with Masters 
degrees raised from $4 200 to $6X)00. | 

Boyer said the teachers also w3 . 
the board to rescind iU. recent ecoi 
omy reduction In 'he !^i-.g'h of ''^ 
1947-I94fi and the 1948-1949 school term 

"Hje men and women's teachers fed- 
erations have about I.IUO members Ir.i 
MinnoapoJi.; \ ,.■_ ■U-i ■va'.ld affect 65,- 

IDA -48-2-39 



FACOTSOII 

Catahoula Teacher Alleges Il- 
legal Dismissal Last 
September 

JONESVILLE, La.. May 22.-fSpe- 
ciaU— Dennis Fuir. former instructor 
at the Boggy Bayou Elementary 
School, hiis filed tuit against the Cat- 
ahoula i>arisli school, board. aLsking 
J2.250 as bocR pay he claims the 
board owe-s him becau5e he alleges 
he was dismissed last September with- 
out proper iwthority. 



Furr sls^ asks five per cent In- 
terest on J^t tZJSO from October 1, 
1947, until > time ,of settlement, and 
payment of' costs of court. In addi- 
tion, Ke Jeiyaltds reemployment in 
the CatahoulJl 0krlsh school lystem. 

A. B. PBrk6r jft attorney for the suit 
ai a memt>cr of the Parker and Parker 
law fuin of Jena. Tht cut will t>e i 
decided in wvenlh judicial district | 
court at Harrisonbu\'g. Fifteen days 
are allowed the fccliool (xiwd to an- I 
swer the .suiL a 

FuiT. who s^ad^ated frojn the teach- 
ers college at Louisiana State Uni- 
versity ill 1927, clairr^ l<e is duly qual- 
ified and proi(T^.ted cy the Louisiana 
teacher tenure law. 

Under the law. as Furr pointed out, 
the scliut^l board must afford an em- 
ploye a (rial and declare him un- 
quaUfied before he can be dismissed. 

The whole thing started back in 
July, 1947, when a delegation of par- 
ents from the Bbggy Bayou area ap- 
pealed at a meeting of the parish 
school board and asked that Furr 
be replaced or they would refuse 
to send their children to school. They 
declaied Furr an incompetent teacher 
who was not popular in the com- 
munity and did not explain subjects 
sufficiently to pupils. . 

In September, tlie S(<hool board 
adopted tiie state's recommendation 
for allocation of teachers, based on 
average daily attendance. The Boggy 
Bayou school, with an average of 
less than 31 pupils per day, was al- 
lotted only one teacher and Mrs. 
Dennis Furr, who has been principal, 
was retained and her husband dis- 
mLsed. 

However, shortly after the 1947-48 1 
term opened, enrollment at Boggy 
Bayou jumped to over M pupils and ! 
the school beard was fiiced to over- I 
look the .-iHtc re.'omiiicndalion and 
employ another teacher as an emer- 
gency measure. Henry Doughty was 
named as istant to Mrs. Furr. I 

The plaintiff claims he should have 
been given the job back. He said 
he was uilliiig to take a job any- 1 
where in tlie parish school system 
where his qualifications were suf- 
ficient. 

Furr first was emploved as an in- 
structor in Cat^Viouia at Manifest in 
i»S5. From 1935 to 1937, he was prin- 
cipal of Larto Elementary School. In 
1937, he went to Boggy Bayou school 
and taught three yeai-a. Leaving the 
parish itchool sy?tem n while, he re- 
turned in Janu,-iry. 1944. to the Boggy 
Bayou pcsition where he agisted Mrs. 
Furr until his dismissal in Septem- 
ber, 1347. 

Basis for Furr's S2,25() claim is the 
ten months of salary at $225 which 
he claimed he would have earned 
if the school btiard had provided em- 
ployment. ^' V. 



MMW-48-5-:i3 



The Curriculum 



Information. •* 



The Nation Today 



Making Business Training Pay 



Br JAMKS MARinU 

BOSTON Oct ac. Kf.—K nriRht 
character, a jfudeni in the Harvard 
buslnts* school <l*nd»<l the top if 
the 'T's^t piac« lo Ro for artv;re 
when you pick a career 

Hi^L' b« jracuatad in February, 
fraj.ieu ic ?" nr/j business but what 
bufir.e»5* He wVited t^"> best in- 
formstlon or. /aU. kind>. ti busi- 
n«. c? .«^ "•» r'wJ«Cthoose 'ne as a 
ftar-.ns p!s -f 9qf hlmsp'.t 

Ht wrote '.etlFrs to 1* of ^Jhe most 
prorpinenf itmi in the crviirjtry. In- 
cludine Bernard Baruch !>;id Henr\ 
Moreenthau. Jr. former .secretary 
of the trea.<!ur>, ' 

H» tnld them he d like to talk to 
them and ret their advlc*. Thirteen 
M the ifi .t.ald "Sure, come on" and 
prcml.'ied to taJk to him. 

He met Baruch. talked with him 
IS minutes on bankinft. and Baruch 
Invited him to lunch.- Morgenthau l.s 
next on his list. 

Put that i.sn t the way all. or 
^■en anv others, of the 1.400 stu- 
*nt.5 in the busineas .vhool ti-III go 

about looking for Jobs when thev 
Ret out. 

Some hive 1ob promises Some 

have spots picked out. Some will be 

offered Jobs by businea* firms Some 

"ill Ret .lobs the Ijest way thev can. 

Some Hand Picked 

Almost all the ."iiadent* in the 
,school— It s a two-.\ear cour.se — are 
roUeRe Kraduates. Some few are not. 



Prnhlems t« Selore 

The smdenu are given the.se prob- 



Some have never gone to college 

The non-college men there are - h'-'^.- , 

handpicked from those wanting lo Ifms to trv lo solve and. through thej 
^P' i" trying, to train thpm.selves in hand-^i 

But m the clasa that graduated "f* aitualions which will confront' 
la.st June the No. 1 man wa.s a for- t^*"* when they 'go Into bu.stness 
mer sir corps ma lor who had never "'"SfrJiXTf 

been to college. The No .S graduate ^hool.nn' "'''''** '"'■'' *"" '"* 
was 3 non-college man. loo. • ■^.""' "V^ ""■" "^'''- "^ " ^"me of 

In the first vear all the student* „„!, ^5°'',';";"' ^^'y^-* had to tacki? 
mu.st take drilling in these things: '"„ .lli'^''"'" out Without di.sclos- 
Product ion problems How you gel ,?5„ 'f ' "^";''' "' '^^^ '"-nis. the in- 
, work done In a factory; marketmg'lVn:''^^" ""^ •*"• ^""'^ ta 

-which means getting goods sold; ' The th^ h '' , 
1 finance-how to ral.se money, such |„,„' **'^"°' 2"'' « f"'""^ "f 150 
,as by floating stocks or bonds or '^w'"'!""'" ""' 'trough the ^ ear 
Uoing to « hank for It. -^ntrols-a '^e stlTdTntV "" '" '" """ ^ 
Icombinnlion of busine.ss statistical t-v,-„. 

bve'rc«ce™s;ch'"'^ ....in^--irof-r;:nir.^ ,i'c,erd! 

to Re, p;- ---ers'"-"' ^^ ,;r,a^b^: 'T.' ^L^^^^. T^^ 
can sneCT""'' •'" "^" ^'udent.s leaders look at them ^" 

can specialize in what they want. The .student.s who were graduat-d 
nor^.M '■ ^''"'^•'"'^'»'* on -If nans- last ,Iune have found nbftoh*^ , 
rnother"ln «?;''" '" «"-'nt.ng. Mklng average , s'amng sa?.rv o ' 
Th^s doecn, '"""^^^'^en,. WOO s month A ,ob psving »R0^ 

students To, r'"".'^"* '^' '^^ "" "'" '^' highe.st paving o^ 
banks^nrt . """ •" f«^<"rle.s. Tound bv a graduate. 

turea are nsert^! Illustrated lee- ;)u.sme.ss men aie .sent there bv their I 
Ite^hlng •" "*" '"■■ "" '"■■"' '" ""'^ "dv anced courses that ' 

iprobiLr r^'r*"-^ °' busin,asi"t::.ne:;men;;o^goToT;hrs',;:;';:v 

Pm "■rrn"Terr«7n"?u:,n'r' »^-« i ■,"'"'"« ^"^ »'-" '" businesaTo'li! 
Lnor».„. " ^^';t«ln business_«re ..-S years. 

Further, the armed service^, send 
,to the .school about 60 to 70 offi- ' 
cers to learn busine.ss admtiustra- 
tion since the armed services have 
|t« b« run In » busln«M-Uk« way, too 



important in the training 

LCABM7- 



»^0 



Driving Course 
Being Inaugurated 
In High School 



jenlors and older members of lower 

Itrades will be eligible to enroll. 

I Book work will be started as soon 

U the outline of the course is com- 

' jjleted. 

The course, under the supervision 

,Df the health and physical education 

»n ,>^n ~ 1 ,n I J . . department, wlU be non-credit at 

An optional 30-week driving course .i. . r . ,. . ._^ ... 

h'Ui k- ._ _• r , •"^^' Later it is expected the class 

h htr;''^"'^ "' ''''"■'"' •^'» »'*-'"« P"t of the curriculum. 

h.Rh school B,. soon w organization g^^^,„^ ^^„ ,^^^^^,^ ^^, 

plans are completed. Ward Ander^^,, ,^^,^ ^^ „„,.^„^ 

nnouTed r'^"' °\'''' '^*'°°'^- o^- It will be taught by JaSd 
announced Monday. < ^^^^^„ ^, ^^^ ^^^^^^^ 

ine course, part of a nationwide instruction in the car wlU be 
program sponsored by the American given to three students at a time, 
Automobile association will include °'^^ *" ^^ front at the dual controls 
book work and actual' 'behind the ^"^^^ ^^* instructor, and the other 
wheel" tn.tr,w,». . two observing from the rear seatJ 

KM ,. '"""^"^"on in an automo- a rotation system will be used so] 
DUe with dual controls. The car is ' 

being furnished by Ed Taussig, only I CAP^^^T ^5^ 



that each student will have an op- 
portunity to use the dual controls 
with the instructor during the ex- 
planations. 

The movement for driving classes 
aegan in colleges and universities 
several years ago.. 
' The governor's highway safety 
committee which met In Baton 
I Rouge during the summer is work- 
ing with the state department ot 
education to set up the system to 
Louisiana. 

G. W. Pord, high school principal, 
said LCHS is believed to be the sec- 
ond school in the state to Institute 
the course, the other high school 
being In New Orleans. 

Pord took the course at Louisiana 
State university about 10 years ago ! 
in preparation . for the movement j 
which was being discussed for high 
schools at that time. However, a 
shortage of dual-control cars and 
then the war. forced the abandon- 
ment of plans until now. 



366 



Safely Education In 
Public Schools Plan 
Of Slate Department 

Baton RoUge, La., March 15 — 
The stale dfpartinents of educa- 
tion .';id public safety arc co- 
operatin-i in a comprehensive and 
statewide program of safety ed-.i- 
cation in public schools, it _ was 
announced here today. 

John E. dox? 'stafe s»aperinten- 
dent of edyfcatioir ,ancf Hi nter f I. 
Huckabavj state dir^tor of pub- 
lic safot/l' annoj iced torlay that 
the pr v^;.m had been planned for 
Severn L months, iri response to re- 
•auests' frcm'inar.y civic, indus- 
trial and educational groups and 
the Oo\>rnor's }I gliway •i-lety 
conference. 

The program, they explained, 
is desisned to help qorrclate safe- 
ty teaching in thd individual 
scbcol and communities and 'wiil 
include development of a state 
plan for driver education, short 
courses for instructors in driving, 
and aid in establislii;ig safety 
councils and patrols. 

In charge of the program is For- 
rest Gaines, a native of Ray\ille. 
who holds B.S. and M.S. P. E. 
degrees Irom Louisiana State uni- 
versity. He taught first aid and 
safety education at Louisiana 
State university before he en- 
tered armed services, where he 
also sp'.ializd in similar work as 
a navy officer. 

Both before and after the war 
Gaines also woiked with the Red 
Cross. He is now with the staff 
of the health, physical and safety 
education division of the statt 
education departnitiit, as first 
lull-time assistant supervisor in 
charge of safety education. 



(UP 



Veferans May Obtain 
High Scliooi Credib 

13 Colleges Listed 
As Centers For Tests 

Baton Rouge — Ten white col- 
leges and three Negro colleges 
have been designated by the 
State Department of Education 
as official testing agencies for 
giving GED (general education 
development) tests to veterans 
desirous of obtaining a high 
school diploma, State Superin- 
tendent of Education John E. 
Coxe announced tod*y. 

"Morp;"^han 2,000 Louisiana 
veterans possessing eight units 
of high school credit have been 
granted their diplomas as a re- 
sult o| having successfully 
passed ^hese tests, heretofore 
given by parish school boards, 
and 476 others who lacked the 
necessary number of high school 
credits have received equival- 
ency certificates on passing the 
GED test, which enable them to 
enter state colleges," Coxe said. 
"We believe that there are many 
other veterans who on learning 
of these testing centers will be 
interested in taking advantage 
of the unique opportunity af- 
forded them, since job oppor- 
tunities and advancement fre- 
quently hinge upon possession 
of a high school diploma." 

The following colleges and 
universities are the GED test- 
ing agencies: (White) — Louisi- 
ana State university, Baton 
Rouge; Louisiana Polytechnic 
Institute, Ruston; Northwestern 
State College, Natchitoches; 
Southwestern Louisiana Insti- 
tute, Lafayette; Southeastern 
Louisiana College, Hammond; 
John McNeese College, Lake 
Charles; "Northeast Junior Col- 
lege, Monroe; Tulane University, 
New Orleans; Centenary College, 
Shreveport; Louisiana college, 
Pineville. (Negro) ' — Southern 
University, Scotlandville; Gramb- 
ling College, Grambling; Dill- 
ard University, New Orleans. 

RDL-4T^6 



Engineering-Agriculture 
Course At Tech 



Ruston, La., Dec. — ':i(i'>rii->n — An 
agricultural engineering curriciUum, 
a four-year course leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, will 
be available to studenu nt Louisi- 
ana Tech at the beginulng of the 
f:'ll semester in September, M. H. 
Polk. Jr.. dean of tha Te<5V School 
of Apr1ci.i'.tu:? and ".'orestky, an- 
|| nounc-^d . ' 

With I'i." =;chool oi peering 

.iiid c^iiN-'rtiPC-nt of ag? -ic co- 

operatiiv^-. t 'le new cuii .!um has 
been or^nnizcd to provide training 
for st-(u;.-rits T\-lshlng to enter the 
profession In which engineering Is 
applied to agriculture. 

Instruction will be offered in the 
use of power on the farm, the use, 
repair and adjustment of farm! 
machinery, and design of farm I 
buddings. Special attention also will 
be given to rural electrification,! 
Isoil and water conservation, farm 
water supply, sewage disposal, and 
insulation and ventilation under 
I Southern climatic conditions. 
I Graduates of the course will be 
prepared for positions Tilth farm 
! equipment manufacturers, firms 
I selling farm equipment and ma- 
Iterials, and for employment with 
soli erosion and land leclamatlon 
agencies and rural electrification 
projects. 

Agricultural-engineering gradu. 
ates also will be prepared to become 
farmers, farm managers, designers 
of farin buildings, advisors for 
utility companies, banks, mortgage 
companies, farm journals and as 
consultant engineers. 

Other new courses now being of- 
Ifered at Tech Include animal 
husbandry and pre-veterinary med- 
icine. ,— -<r — 1~~> 



hE-47-ia-i8 



367 



r 



Bascom N. Timmons 



n 



""""':;:':*•!''••"*• *"" '- ^-^^ ■• "- «„. scn... «,. 



\\\S||i\(:t()\ _A Brass ,o...» 
IHilKv III high school Pfiiiration jg 
si.iilini; which mav revoliiiioniye 
curricula In Ihp next fp« vm,s 

Th^ Irtra of pdiicallon f.^r ool- 
lecp Is sivlnE wav hp<-aiisp onv 
one-fifih of thp hich 8rhm>l grad- 
ualps CO on to iinlvprsiilps. 

The irmaindpr. under thp pi pt;- 
ent iygtem be<o>iiP -niislits i,v 
Ihp tens of thousands a vrar." a.- 
cordine to offjri.ils at the V. S 
office of educati<in. 

The new emph..:ij win he upon 
fitlinit RliidentK '..r int "«oik of 
the world, for irn i„b the hulk 
of them a'li:alb- v> l|| pmer Vora- 
tional imiiiianoe and ira.ii.al ap- 
plication will hp :hr kp> stonen of 
tlip proc';im. 

In a vnrd. :|,.. rlasvjr.d poursen 
are -givine wa> t>i more practical 

shop Wnllc 

The n?! ion's educators have 
been askmc for thin for years 
hilt tlKv were tinheeded. One of 
I hem was Dr. flalon Jonps head 
nf thp scondar.v school division 
of the rilucalion office. 

Now the office of education is 
takinit a lively tnteregt. It |i 
ilrawinK plana to spread the idea 



n.minissioner .1. W. Sludehaker 

•fhortlv to studv it further 

It will he called the national 
pommis.ion on life adiustment 
for secondary school \nuth 

Sludehaker said: "It' Is the dntv 
of the school to recognize the 
<li«rn.lv of all tvpcR of labor pssen- 
IMI to the worlds work and to 
provide vouih with a realistic 
sense of values which will pre- 
pare thein for life and a' job. 

Vocational tests will show if a 
student sets alonir with people 
has manual dextei itv. is co,,d with 
figures or can do detail work 

The practical part of the pro- 
^'.^"i/\''l '""me in shop work 
with lathes field trips to huslne.ss 
firms, summer «ork. part-time 
work and thp like. 

The hieh school praduate of 10 
years from now may know a good 

fh^l 1,""^ ^'Z""" f^'i'iK P'PPs 
Than hp does about Latin or AIijp- 

M?, ,t ■ ^r.f^'-ding to the new 
)dpa. that will be quite all risht 

^or one thing, it will help the 
student. Ret a job. Tor another 
be will be content to he a plumb- 



lUSSR SCHOOL 
BOOK PAINTS 
OWN PICTDRE 



Text Teaches Students 

Ab^iit CapitaliMc 

I rom Red A iew 



Loudon OJ*— The first post-vsr 
geography tMtbooi; for Soviet teacb- 
er.i' training co.lege h.is reached Lon- 
don. It attacks the British Labor 
government, stresses the importance 
of communisrr, in France and dp- 
scribes the Italians ■< a people of 
musicians. 

The textbook U called "geograph;, 
ol the principal capitalistic countries' 
and Is admitted tor school u.s« by the 
mlnistr)- of educaion of the Russian 
Soviet federation. 

As ■prlacipal capitalistic countries 
W« considered Britain, France. Italy, 
Germany, U. S A , Japan, and China 
The small esatein European countries 

uated ihthl;i the Ituesian sphere 



of inlljjeutt a.e. h&wever, lU.- v r. 
iealt wit I 111 fic' •>!.\-oook "Ic (-ii- 
nectlon wn i the grt.,t inverenl -..list- 
ing for iMfcir." Hi ine S<ivie' ..iilnn. 
Over 30 lU il.f 166 pag-s .; the 
textbook ..re devoted to the Jnited 
States. incl(;ding 13 photographs 
showlr.i; the otaiue of Liberty In New 
York harbor. Wall Street. Broadway. 
Manhattan, the Empire State bulla- 
. Ing, a landscape on the Ohio river. 
I the Ford worker of Detroit, a timber 
store on Oregon, etc. The textbook 
do>s not attack American institutions 
l^jt dwells on various aspects of 
'"American Imperialism." 
I The textbook charges the United 
(States of America In particular wltt^ 
I factually dominating the Central 
{American republics of Cuba, Halt;, 
Dominican Republic. Nicaragua. Pan- 
ama 'and others," and with Inter- 
feniig In the political life of China 
and actively supporting Chinese re- 
aation with establishing economic In- 
fluence In Japan, Southern Korea 
and Saudi Arabia. 

In Its chapter on Britain, the texl- 
I book says that tht present Labor 
I government differs little Irom a 
'government of bourgeois parties," add- 
jlng that the British Communist party 
has 90,000 memlwrs. while H never 
had more than 50.000 bttoi: 



er insiead of aspiring to be a doc- 
tor iawver. hanker or engineer, 

1 lie professions are the coal of 
most high ,school students, bin 
only a few of them make It Most 
will be farnipis salesmen, clerks, 
shoe desicncrs. watch repairmen 
oi- operators of beaiilv parlors, 
fillinc si.itKins or slreeicars 

In a sense, the piociam will de- 
emphasize some traditional be- 
liefs. One of these is the "mvth 
of white-collar superiority." An- 
other is the "pironeoiis" belief 
that fame and fortune in the pro- 
fessions are available or anvone 
wil'injj to work hard enough 

Statistics show that few grad- 
uates enter professions One in 
20 was the average a few veais 
ago .\mong American men in 
1910 there were onlv '.'1.0(1(1 archi- 
tects compared with 4 r,on 000 
elerks: l,^n,000 doctors compared 
with ,-.,-.00,000 crafl-men. and 1 - 
fiOOOOO chauffeurs and truck dri- 
vers. 

Among women, there were 
.T 1,000 female writers compat-pfl 
w ith 800,000 school 'teachers and 
4000 women lawvers comparech 
with 400,000 waitre.s.ses. 



The textbook gives the following 
picture of the French political situa- 
tion: "The Communist party, enjoy- 
ing great authority among the popu- 
lation. Is waging a struggle for the 
democratization of state administra- 
tion, for its purge from fascist ele- 
ments and for the reconstruction of 
economy In a way corresponding to 
the national Interests, Reactionary 
circles are opposing wild resistance 
to this policy. By provopitlon and 
slander, they are trying to Incite the 
masses against genuine democrats 
and patriots." 

The chapter on Italy, comprising 
eight pages and a picture of the 
Fiat w'orks In Turin. Includes the 
following pajBsage in the section "pop- 
latlon and constitution": 

"The misery of the popular masses 
In Italy is reflected in their eulturai 
development. Tliere are many Illit- 
erates In Italy, the intiueaca of the 
clergy Is tremendous, superstition 
widespread. It is rather dirty In the 
villages and towns. 

"The majority of the Italians are 
lovers of mUslc. Music and songs 
can be heard everywhere In Italy 
Popular music Is particularly famous 
In southern Italy, where many street 
singers with beautiful voices can be 
n".ct." 



Top-N0S-47-S-2S 
BoH^»r>-3T-47-/t)-2€ 



'2 J. 



368 



Oil Training Course" 



To 



"(chinisi instructor, will rellnquisn 
'those iuties to teach the new class. 
'The course of study will include 
operation .maintenance and over- 
hauling of Diesel, nttro-gas and gas- 
oUne engines. 
^^ • 9 ft ^1'*'^ "^"^ anlling practice class will in- 

KAflin in VAMTAIMfflAy '=>"'" laboratory worlc and actual 
DtfUIII III JCDLdllllCl field practice In drilling with a study 
^^■■" ■■■ ^^I^^W"""****" '{ elementary geology, petroleum | 

Ichemistr-, drilling mud control and 
I various problems In drilling. That 
class will be started as soon as ar- 
Irangementa are completed for em- 
! ploying an instructor and obtaining 
a practice drilling rig- Plans may be 
AppUcationi .fe nom-/being accepted for entrance into ^^''^ ^^ September, the director 
the Southwest Ojouisiant Trade schools new petroleum The production practices class 
training coursW which >«iM be started in September. Rex generally deals with various pro- 
H. Smelser. school director, announced today ^:^^ problem, and how to handle 

Th« new two-year course is the first of its t^pe instituted X^wumum number of 75 studenu 
■1 ^^7 'k'ttd* iehool in the United States, Smelser said. There 
are similar criiirses in tu'o' 



Local Trade School Now Accepting 
Applications; Class Limited to 75 



junior colleges in the country 
he pointed out. 



can b« accommodated in the course. 
Three Classes Smelser said. Funds for operation 

Divided into three classes, the are provided hi the state's general' 
tou'se will co'-er indu.'trla! engines, appropriation of $79,468 for oper- 
KiUlng practices and product ion ating the trade school during tne 
An ourgro^nh of the mud control practices The course is ?et up sojl948-40 fiscal year 
..-■ii, , w , » .w-MiBt reeardle<i^ which of the thred In explaining wie need lor mis 

drtllln* class begun last year. '»^ '^*^';/,'\"7„'d\^t ^^^^ spe- training in this particular area. 

Idea for this t^ue of tralmne «"f,ai,'jp ,„ he must schedule the Smelser pointed out that the course 
promoted by th? American Assocla- ^ther two for a general 'worklngls designed to prepare men m two 
tlon of Oil Well Drilling contrac- knowledge. ' Smel.^er said years for the tvpe of oil '""'I '"^^ 

1 «.iiithnt *n th» pss*^ has wen learnea 
tors and the local Petroleum Ad- The ;ndu.tnal engmes ;^«;= -/» '^^^^ t'^^-ough year, of experience and 
vlaory committee of Southwest l-ul-t.^ started ^^^^^l^^^^^^^^^^ ^^: ap^nticeship onth^ab^ 



LCAP-48-7-IX 



Director Of Local Trade School Reviews 
Functions And Operations Of Louisiana 
Area Vocational Industrial Institutions 



A comprehensive explanation 
of the functions and operations 
of the Louisiana area vocational 
industrial . schools, with the 
Southwestern Louisiana Trade 
school of Crowley being cited as 
an example, was given by Di- 
rector J. W. Mitchell in the 
March issue of "The Boardman," 
the official journal of the Louis- 
iana School Boards Association. 

Mitchell pointed out that the 
area vocational industrial lo- 
cated in strategic areas of Louisi- 
ana give training in both trade 
and commercial work, the type of 

training varying in each of the I portunities were great and the 
schools to meet the needs of the demand by business and Indus- 
area the school services. In order | tries, regardless of whether the 
to accomplish this, he said, local trainees had fully completed the 
advisory comimttees comprised | course, accounted for many 
of tradesmen and employers, aid 
the school administrators in the 
planning and development of 
the training program in the area. 

The extent of the training giv- 
en in the Crowley establishment 
was reviewed by Director Mit- 



pletion of the course. Many of I 
these trainees are now attending 
night classes while employed, in 
order to earn their (certificates." 
Turning to the night extension 
courses, Mitchell said. "Enroll- 
ment from 1939 to 1947 a/s 1174. 
' All of these ;rainees were em- 
ployed during the day ;tnd en- 
rolled in cour.ses .Supplementary 
to their daily employiT,''nt." 

The article showed that en- 
rollment in the day school classes 
came from 30 cities in 10 parishes 
and that the night school en- 
rollment was from 23 cities in 
urrounding the 
Louisianp Trade 



chell when he declared that since 

the opening of the school on 

October 10, 1939, "A total of 2875 

trainees have been enrolled In 

the day school pre-employment 

courses from 1939 to 1947. Of 

these trainees, 735 completed 

their courses arid of the total en- 
rolled, 1102 have definitely been,^ 

placed in employment. The rea- \ 8 parishes 

son for the number placed in em- f Southwestern 

ployment exceeding the number school. 

completing their courses is due to; Mitchell's article concluded 

the trainees accepting employ- 1 with the statement that "The 

ment before final completion of j increasing number of industries 

the training. Employment op- 1 locating in our state require a 

' trained labor force in order for 
them to operate efficiently. Also, 
the increasing mechanization 
of our agricultural program re- 
quires an expansion of our main- 
tenance and repair shops 
throughout the state. All this 
requires additional trained semi- 
skilled and skilled labor. The 
area vocational school is in a 
position to furnish the training 
necessary to meet our industrial 
expansion." 



trainees leaving school to accept 
employment before final com- 

CDS-48-3-30 



369 
Contributions and pos iti ve values , 



SPEAKERS DEFEND i;--'^', rsi",::;;;'. sr,,;.,; ;- 
COLLEGE training;-;-'^' '"^'-.'-^rs'-^i^ 

_ pmplifv <ii.(ii<'ih. of the hiKhe^t 



standard 
a woiiiai' 
dien to I 
humans." 
Dean l.oKan 



V\iMi hf- 



ifainiDK, 
li liPi- rhil- 
(fhts of all 



jNewcomb Symposium Fea- 

- tures Child Expert 

\ii.. f .1 — '■ ' ^^'"'' '•f'K"" Wilson of \,.u- 

i.h. r„^ i .''"* I^enroot. chief of ™'"b said that, in K< neial. s..,iei> 

.2f„ A-^"^, •'''^'*"'' children's bu- '^«''evps a Reneial education is the 

\1 I ^^^'"'""K""". L). v.. said t'PSl foundation for hoth a prn(es- 

:. Monday at .\pw(oiiih tolleRe ih.a ■'^'"'ial taieer and ho.-neniakinc 

me world e.vpen.s Ameiican col- Spokesman for colleKP vonipii 

limfr].,.^" ur.jversiiie.s to furnish •\''^'= Beatrice FUtilt,- pre.sidpnt- 

op^snnli" ^ '"«■. 'hat will develop f'«t of the Newcomh stu.iem 

itoKn . ■''fc',^""V and emotiond hodv. said that 'the world will al- 

siaonit.v \vhile they are in school "'^.^s look upon the institutiois 

; I niversity life will be used to °' higher learninp as the hest life 

,meet future pioblems and the re-. ^*^-'"*'''''* '" e.xistence.' 

maTin^"i"r °^ "larriase. ho,nP ° '- 

I making and a career, .\liss l.en 



l;;oot said at . svmpositm, „ 

U hat the World Expect.s ro 
(ollege CJrariiiate.s.' 

nriiiaiid U Greater 

■L niver.sitie.s and universiiv- 
irained women are called on moie 

.and more to ascertain, collect and 
disseminate information on iiu- 

|man le.souices of the communii 

Miss Lenrooi said 



.Sponsored by .4liimnap 

The discussion was sponsotef 
by the Newcomh Alumnae ^sso 
nation as part of commeiicenicn 
exercises and was the fitsi discus 
sion of its kind in the Dee 
South's history of higher edu 
cati >n. 

Mrs. Ralph Conseiyea, Houstoi 
Tex., national president of the r.; 
sociation. acted as moderator. Ko 
lowing the panel, a public que.- 



Miss Lenrooi said. ' ' lowing the panel, a 

"Proper training during four h'"" hour was held, 
years of college provides a more' 

"'"""' NOTP-^S-e-/ 

2;is 



responsive 
mand 



reaction to this de- 



Horace Renegar, director of put,- 
lic relations at Tulane. spoke m 



Students Embrace 
Sociolog[y Study 

NEW YORK (U,P'_A gaunt, soft- 
spoken sociology professor has 
made good with Columbia Univer- 
sity undergraduates. 

Prof. William C. Casey runs a 
one-year course In flscal problems 
and community service. A student 
poll showed overwhelming approv- 
al of the course. 

Casey was pleasantly surprised 
by the results of the college year- 
book poll. 

"Whafs really wonderful Is that 
so many students should appreci- 
ate the Importance of the social 
sciences In the world today," he 
said. "We cant survive on tech- 
nological advances alone; the so- 
cial sciences must keep pace." 

Prof. Casey's unique course, 
which attracts almost one-quarter 
of Columbia students. Is punctu- ' 
ated with delightful and revealing 
anecdotes, some of which take sev- 
eral class hours In the telling. 

He uses a novel system of black- 
board symbols which none but his 
students can understand — and 
sometimes not even they. 

One undergraduate, learning of 
the poiJ's oondBslon. remarked 
•For the first fhr*e months I didn't 
kno«- t«rhat he was talking about 
Looking ba«k, though. I tlUiHc 1 got 
more out of 'Ca^eyology' than any 
other course In college.- ' 



Welfare Curriculum 
At Louisiana Tech 
Lauded By LSU Man 

Louisiana Tech's new prc-pro- 
fessional curriculum in social 
welfare, instituted at the iolle':e 
last fall, provides excellent prcp- 
£.ration for gr.iduate study and 
for employment in oosiiinns not 
requiring profe.ssionaI trainin?, 
according to Dr. Earl K. Klein, di- 
rector of the Graduate School of 
Social Welfare at Louisiana State 
university. 



OW-48-6-4 



"I am gratified by the breadlh 
of social science content wiiich 
studcnf.t; enrolled in your curric- 
ulfm will get," Dr. Klein said. 

The pre-professional curricu- 
lum, offered at Louisiana Tech 
for the first time during the fall 
semester just ende-d, was organ- 
ized by Dr. G. W. McGinty. head 
cf the social science department; 
L. J. Fox, professor of sociology, 
and Mrs. Lillian G. Foster, di- 
rector of social welfare for Lin- 
coln pari.sh. 

Dr. Klein said that students 
successfully conKi'trtin/ >he cur- 
riculum and Tiavif^g "thB other 
lecessary qj;.li:*cation.s for social 



-^ >i ^"-t*. ■i.uv<v/ii.>t rut. Auuidi 

_, ^, . , . work will po<rt(ve:y meer/he re- 

UT. Klein expres.sed his opinion quirements fo/ ad 
alter analyzing the curncuium at 1 Graduate Sr^ol, c 

, Ihe request of members of the [ fare at the university. 

I Tech social science faculty 



ii»eer^he 
ssiotT to the 
Social Wei- 



RDL-48-2-6 



370 




1 



JENNIE VACCARO 

. novelty stationery for 
teen-agers. 



KAY LO^ 

o letter to a friend in 
Scotland. 



SHIRLEY Ml NSON 

. business letters for her 
father. 



N. O. High School Courses Polish 
Rough Corners In Letter-Writino 



BY EMILY TOWE 



The Item asked these letter] 

writers at McDonogh High School ; 

to tell how thtfir English classes! 

Teen-agers like to write letters. have helped them in correspond- I 

In public schools classes where thev once studied only *"" ^'■'" friends: 

the formal forms, they are today learning how to write , J*'?,".'* Vaccaro 17, who '■just i 

friendly letters— Jane to Joe notes, vacation descriptions, l°'"..J°i'f^*/ ,^|,%'°;^fj'-g,an^0 

and longer missives to foreig n countries. three .vears ago, I was so home- 1 

Since the English department ••r.c--;'"„°"'"i,.":,"„HoVniirfri««,l 1*'*^*^ ' """"'^ ^^ letters and 76 post- 
started its international corre- ,^ w,' inT.nfctron/T Jve ^S; "'?' '"'= *'"' *""• I've been 
spondence project last October, ^.'f"*^^„".^/"'*X/ hrv should "''"''^ t^"' *'"'=5- ^"""^h not ,o' 

'iifthe'?''t' "T 'I' ''''' \'Tf1- .T e''r'7herr%:?'fne'nl.-'£'"'">'- "^ -"-••'. 

^ut the city have been writing let- g^^„^ ^^j^ SCOTCH FRIEND 

c ./ /H"'*"'^?"' u ,. "We urge Ihem not to put ^y- Kay Long. 16, who writes i 17- 

ijo that New Orleans boys nave thing on paper that thcv would rtDt year-old girl in Scotland- "l' 
>een advertising themselves and ^vant read before ? : ■•jp o{. theUTsUrted our letters last year afteri 
the Crescent City to girls in many classmates. «he adderi. ,.^ ' she asked for someone in New Or-! 

European countries, according to English teachers al«o give in- leans schools to write her. I have! 
Joseph S. Kluchin, principal of S. sjructions on headings for friendly her picture. I know what she likes 
). Peters High School. letters, warn against over-workingto eat tu-- • .» her even! 

Meanwhile, the girls have been certain slang words, and suggeslthough we've never seen eacn 
ATiting both girls and boys in far- how to make vacation letters read- other." 

iway lands, according to Miss able. Shirley Munson, 16. who gives 

losephine Thomas, principal of] NOVELTY DESIGNS I special" attention to learning to 

VfcDonogh High School. _. , . " _, ,„ »,- „_;_ write business letters because she 

. Miss Caroline B6rne, an English . T/ie «'';'»■ ^'^^'0*".^°^'^ hi!; helps her father in after-school 
leacher in the latter school, said i"«^ '"'^'inrnnvJv H«!^L thJ hours: I've learned the right I 

That the course in letter writing of- g7„«'".^°%"°;^''„^^ form and signature for 

'ered in Orleans Parish public '"f,?,™^ w* tin? ^^nnoun^^r^nt ■ business letters. My father often 
^gh schools has kept pace -iiK^lK.'J^'''^lJ''^^T'lZ'^•' o ""ds someone to write for him 

I when a regular .secretary is not 



i;jH4f-g-^'^ 



"Vacation is swell!" 



■ available. So I fill in.' 



371 



r 



n 



Problems and needs. — 



Hebert Says Education Geography, Hislorft. 
Remedy for Com/nf/n/sm"Neglecled Areas" 
SJ Teachers Told K 



Sulun Cites* Bcntley Case As Example of Ijiiiorancc' 
of Democratic \'aliies 



Describing geography and the 

history of "all the Americas" as 

being among the "neglected 
Washington, Aug. 3 (/P). — What this country needs tOareas" in the nation's school 
combat Communism, says Rep. Hebert (D.-La.), is moregystem, Dr. Erling M. Hunt, 



education about Americanism 
for. 

Too m»ny Americans, he told > 
reporter, are growing up with only a 
btzy Idea of the advantages o( Democ- 
racy, or how and why It waa estab- 
lished In this country. 

To illustrate thi 



what it is and what it standsprofessor of history at Columbia 
' uniyersity and editor of the So- 

which. of course, exist and there ispiai Studies magazine, told a 
CO denying them. meeting of the North Louisiana 

■Their final arguments was 'If youSq^jal Sc'^'nce association Tues- 
feci like a liberal, and if you feel(Jay at Louisiana Tcch that the 
that these conditions are bad, thentwo courses should bO revised, 
point he cited jou should ally yourself wiih the He said courses in history 



Miss Elizabeth T. Bcntley. who hasigroup that will be strong and di«-should be revised to include the 

crmuTirrpr'actrtl^^'in^rj -■"'-'« "- -""'«"* "- '^•'-^^^y °^ civilization instead of 
country. could really do something about these the story of nations. Our pres- 

Mis. Benf.ey. he .aid, is a native <^°n'"i'°'«' ^"' courses in history." ho said, 

of the United States and attended' 'As for whether it was American "neglect the Soutll American na- 
•everal collegee. Bui fhe ir.tii'ied or not, they represented tbemselvea tions, Canada, and the Fur East 
never waa taught Amenccnism j to be an American party," and Soviet Russia, and many 

She admit' edly bcrainp a I Hebert asked if her education 1" Americans have reached 'matur- 
ity without any conception of 
world geography and the ccon 



she 

in school 

Communist. 

'We are concerning oursel 
much With the presence til 



had 



influence , 



American schools 
too Jon her. 

In- 1 Her reply. . . ,,..,. 

noli ■•! knew so lit-le about American omic and political rtjlation^ips 
-ri government, and I was so very littn of any area to another^" ^5i3(K 

schooled as to the Americaji govern- 



democracy 
men made 
they did," 



munifm in this co'ijiry a 
enough with whab r/iu,.?s it. 
averted, ^^ 

"We dont devoir "-acjiigh atict, ment. 
tion to the education of our chilrlrcii. I ■Did they not have courses at 
We assume a . hiw knows i* hat , Columbia university?' Hebert aaked 
Americanism and dfcmo.iacy are B i. "No. they did not teach it." 
wo n^ver explain •■ nai nvin^ ,„ ,[ Hebert: "So you grew up as a typl- 
means. what sacrifices cal young woman and you were never 
to establish It. or why exposed to or put In contact with 
what American biatory wai, what 
Hebert quoted from testimony America stands for, and what our 
which Miss Bentley gave Saturday jform of government was?' 
before the bouse committee of un-j Miss Bentlev: "No, 1 never waa." 
American activities, of which he is a Hebert asked where the fault might 
member. • j^. 

He afked her why she. a native- 1 Miss Bentley: "I think it la the 

born American, educated in the bes'. fault that runt straight tbrougn 

school* (Vassar and Columbia ) because there are numerous people 

f.^ Communist. ^kt myself who have been brought 

What argumenu did they use? up like myself, who have not the 

What perauaded you to Join up with slightest comprehenaton 'of what 

the Communists?" he asked. I America la really like, nor what It' 

Mlaa Bentley replied: I means to live in a democratic country I 

They were the same arguments. I under a democratic syatem." 

that they put to almost any j Hebert told the committee at this | 

Who U dissatisfied with vari- point that 'it ia Incumbent upon 

this countryiua to atart now and ahow our chU- 



think 
liberal 
ous conditions 



Schools Aske< 
For Questions 

High Schools of New Orleans and 
the entire Mississippi Vallev have] 
been asked to devote a week dur- 
ing March to a discussion of world 
questions. 

The request was made by A. E. 
;Hegewisch, president of Interna- 
tional House, which will assist in 
■ the New Orleans-Time World 
Forum. . , . j 

He asked the high schools to de- 
vise five qupjtions which the stu- 
dents would most like to have 
lanswerfd. "This discussion could 
be Jield in a history, civics, cur 
'rent events, social science or an> 
I other appropriate class where the 
most interest would be stim- 
ulated.' 



L-ST- 4^^F4 ^ Top-RDL - 48-5-/7 -J 



Bottom- NOf-^2- 2-7 



372 




About Education 



WASHINGTON. (AP)— Do you ever talk, or 
even think, very much about the kind of educa- 
tion your boy or girl is getting? 

Do you ever hear your neighbors talking 
•bout it? Probably not much. 

This writer is continually astonished by the 
lack of such talk among 
grown people who otherwise 
spend a lot of time discussing 
politics, or the movies, or for- 
eign affairs,' or books, or 
fashions, or food, or prices. 

And yet there is nothing in 
this country which affects all 
of us more, in one way or an- 
other, than education for our- 
selves and our children. 

A boy or girl who finishes ^""" ^"^o" 
college has, at the end, gone through 16 years 
of schooling: eight in grammar school, four in 
high school, four in college. 

That's a lot of time out of anyone's life. 

Yet do you — as a parent, say — have enough 
Information about education, or enough ideas, 
to think much about the kind of schooling your 
child is getting? 

Are you able to suggest to him, when he 
goes to college, what course might help him 
come out with a broader view of the world 
and his place in it? 

Or do you leave it up to him to choose his 
courses without advice from you, assuming that 
educators and teachers must know best what's 
good for him? 

Can you answer this question and give good 
reasons for the answer: 

Is it better for a boy to study a lot of 
engineering without paying much attention to 
anything else, such as history or literature? 

So far what has been said here has men- 
tioned only parents and students and educators. 
But the problem o/ education is of prime 
importance to any adult, since some of his 
money through taxes is being used to support 
schools. , 

This is what comes from the special com- 



- J antes Marlow 



mis.sion on higher education which President 
Truman appointed to study educational prob- 
lems in this country: 

."Pre.sent college programs are not con- 
tributing adequately to the quality of students' 
adult lives either as workers or as citizens. 

"This is true in large part because the unity 
of liberal education has been splintered by 
overspecialization." 

In short: Too many schools let too many 
students- spend too much time in one field of 
study without making them take, along with 
their specialty, a course of studies which will 
round out their thinking. 

The commission, which this week made the 
first of several reports on education, said: 

"Specialization is a hallmark of our society, 
and its advantages to mankind have been re- 
markable. But in the educational program it 
has become a course both of strength and of 
weakness. 

"Filtering down^'ard from the graduate and 
professional school levels, it has taken over the 
undergraduate years, too, and in the more ex- 
treme instances it has made of the liberal arts 
colleges little more than another vocational 
school, in which the aim of teaching is almost 
exclusively preparatory for advanced stud* in 
one or another specialty. . . . 

"Today's college graduate may have gained 
technical or professionaJ training in one field of 
work or another, but is only incidentally, if at 
all. made ready for performing his duties as a 
man. a parent and a citizen. 

"The crucial task of higher education today, 
therefore, is to provide a unified general edu- 
cation for American youth. Colleges must find 
the right relationship between specialized train- 
ing on the one hand, aiming at a thousand dif- 
ferent careers, and the transmission of a com- 
mon cultural heritage toward a common citizen- 
ship on the other." 

Which means: It's all rj^ht to specialize in 
some field but a youth should know enough 
about other fields of thought so he wont have 
a narrow, one-track mind. 



N0l-^7-IZ-IB 




George Sokolsky 



373 



Major$ and Minor»—Our Educational 
Syttem Lack* Breadth 

It U poMlbU fnr a m»n or a woman th«M younf psople? Why do they 
n th« United 8Ute5i to b* (ridutt»d | t«n*r»lt»» from th* particular? How 
nth th. hlthaat honor, from tb* Terr ^. *^" «•""»""' from th. parti- 



nth tha hlfhaat honor* from tb* very 
Mat unlTWraltMa and ba an r-ppalltng 
(noramua axc«pt in ruch lubjecu 



cuUi? How do they move from 
point A to B to C? What U tha UM 
of their education, if tljelr minda 



who do not give, at an Mrly age. th« 
appaarancc of inch potential laader- 
ahlp. : 

Small wonder thit ao many of our 



, ,. .« , a, tneu- eaucatlon, if their mInda 

u the student aeiecu aa a "major." I have not been trained to acreen th* 
rhe »o-call*d "malor" -nay be In ao I obvloualy falae? How u it poaaibia 
imlted a field of human culture aa ' 'or them to accept aa facu dau 
o provide no brendth of view, bo •^'>''^'> canbe dliproved by any. year* 
oaals for forming Judgment*, no | Ixwlt. encyclopedia or dictionary? 
»mpet*no* for public laadarahlp. I ^"^I "o th*y ap*ak of bllla of congre** 
ret many collegia and unlveraivie* ' *"'> on'T • headline famlUarlty 
mak* It a point that they are train- *"•> the t*xt. for which one do«a 
Uif men and woman for public °o' require four yeari ot collage edu- 
i*Mlerahlp and refua* to admit thoa* e«tlonf 

_^. — -._._ -_- -w- Then one di*c*v*ra that what 

««>»*•• »n educetM man different 
from and more competent mentally 
uui.ii wuuuci vii-i. >u niBiiy ui uur than an uneducated man, namely, a 
•tateamen. ^adiiale* of American i hroad. humanlatlc knowledge, reach- 
unlveriltlee. »ome not only with one I '"• ^^^ '"to 'hi total cultural ex- 
but with two degreee. becom* putty I P«r'«nce of mankind. 1* lacking in 
In the hand! of Europeans, even of their experience becaua* their "ma- 
th* repreaehiatlvM of amaller ooun- J°rs" take ao much of their tlm* 
trie*. A man untumlllar with 1U»- *•"* human knowledge ha* become 
tory. whose language I* th* unlet- ' ■ minor. No -nan can, for example, 
tared Ulk of th* sidewalk, who atands| *''"'y undersu.id why Henry Wallace 
In awe before anyone familiar with I *^^ ■• he doe» without a good 
his o«n tongu*. to say nothing of ' knowledge of the constant struggle In 
two or thre* others, l* not to be ' human history between freedom and 
tru*t«d In dealing.* with thoae whose ' »'»*e'T'. between government by con- 
eultural training i% universal. h* ' •*"' °' *he governed and government 
Mcomas a weak ba^y la «J««lr y^-.ttOt.^ self-proclMmed and salf-anolnted 
btcaui* b* llt»rii:» u uneducated **P*rt*. Nor can . man understand 
wan though he m<- wear a Phi Beta *•"• '">' 'ore* of the American resU. 
t»ppa key. the product of pqraon* 
4 A's In a narrow ^eld. A m* ter's 
l*fr*« In lan<lsrap« gardenli.i u rep- 
•••ntatlve of nothing •xec.i' land- 
«»P* gardenlni. .» represent;) tlve of 
lOthIng except iaadacape sardenlng 



tance to ga amment by experts 
(maybe called dlcutors or deepou or 
duces or fuehrer! or even commie- , 
—zt) without a competent gragp of | 
CngUsb and American history and 

..., uLc^L .i<.iaiH'ape saraening "** Phlloaophles of life that have 

nd even a mas'i* cum laude In auch »upPort«d these people*. 

. field U no ndl;atlon of an ability '* •• ^°^' Important for an Amerl- 

undersund the atruggl* within "° student therefore to read John 
W for power. Locke, the grandfather of the Amen- 

Many American unlveraltle* r«- 1 "° oonatltutlon. than It la for him 
ulr* one year of mgllsh and evi- ' ** repeat th* latest palaver of the 
ence of havln, passed a high achool | "'*•* B«publlc " or "The Nation." It 
ourae In a foreign language. How ^ Infinitely more important to read 
»n a man b« expected to know hu *"*.■""• »•'»•» to read Karl Marx 
ountry. lu people lu phllo*ophy of'"" *•*• f uttering* of the atomic 
f* who** knowledge of lU literature »ci*ntlsU. It U e^entlal that he 

1 limited to what a young man can ''""""■'" hlmaef with the constl- 
in one achool year? The theory. *'"'on «n<l the American philosophy 
f course, U "hat having Usted wu- ' '"•' *P'^t* from it. 

ow. he win pursue 11. The fact U 

h«t for ten y»ars after graduation 

• Is harried br th» need for a llve- 

Ihood. Have you ever dlacussed a 

woad public queetion with atudents 
>f engineering or medicine or even 
some »-ho hive suffered for four 
>**rs in th* major call*d ' govern- 
m*n'. ■■< 

Th* first qu«sMon that on* ask> 
hlmaair after such sn *xp*ri*nce is 
•hat are the thought proeseses «f 



L 5T-f8-6-22. 



C/ossroom Rec/s ^ 

I'p to this writin? it has not been dis- 
closed whether, or to what extent, boys 
and Rirlt of the New Orleans high 
schoolg have been subtly fed capsules 
of Communist doctrine by regular or 
substitute teachers, along with the 
standard classroom fare. 

If distributors of pro-Moscow or anti- 
American propaganda have invaded 
the high schools, the best antidote, in 
our opinion, is some positivt propa- 
K.inda presenting the American side of 
the argument. In or out of school, the 
youngsters, and adults too. have all 
the opportunity in the world to receive 
and ab«;orb Marxi.^m and Stalinism, 
The mails are full of Commy literature. 
Letters, handbills, circulars and pam- 
phlets are circulated everywhere. Who 
i.s going to .see that this stuff is not 
slipped into the hands of American 
youth in the high schools'' Some of it 
is so deceptively phrasri ss not to ap- 
. pear, on casual glance, lu be .\lo.«row 
I propaganda. 

Our suggestion Mould be lo li.ve the 
students a crjij^.^p , truth about Cm- 
munism, trui*5> ^^^ nt life in Pai.-sia. the 
truth about the ii'Utal /dictatorship ijiat 
I holds childi* n as well as lidults in a 
form of slavery and prohibits high 
school or college education to all boys 
and girls except to a chosen few. 

Red propaganda can be fought with 
Freedom propaganda. 



<iSU> 



NOS-48-5-8 



374 



^ Higher Education's Role ScientisU Needed 

■^I" How and when in a rapidly changing world can a satis- _■ . , 

factory conclusion be attained as to the role higher educa- Jn AtOmiC Aff e. 

tion should play in Anireican society? This was the theme , _^ 

of Dr. 0. C. Carmichael, president of the Carnegie Founda- Rot&ri&nS TCrad 

tion for the Advancement of Teaching, in a recent address to 

the National Conference on Higher Education in Chicago. ABBEVILLE La Dec IG <3pl) 

In a comprehensive summation of the trends of collegiate ^Abbeville Rotarlans Uc-urd Bar- 
education since 1900, Dr. Carmichael's words were all the t^i Williams, Massachosetts In- 
more effective because he was not a special pleader and had stltute of Technolopy graduate 
no ready-to-hand answers to any of the questions he raised, and associate professor of phy* 

It is Dr. Carmichael's view that "social as well as in- f'^'',.t^u\/°at^Sv^te^°d'S5 
tellectual interests are assuming a new importance." In [hi need of science for recruit* ' 
this connection he cites the five-year study begun this year during the coming days of pre- 1 
at Princeton to seek to determine "the relevance and effec- paration for the advent of the 
tiveness of an entire educational program." Every college Aton:\lc Age. . ] 

teacher, he holds, should wiUch soclal trends tmd "keep in Williams, son of Vermilion 
mind what the youth needs to prepare him lor most effec- School Board superintendent J. 
tive participation in the life of his communi,> ." JenWd^'sSlX' Se^se^4 

Languages, literature, history a^d philosophy are, as ^y ^^e need for preparing their- 
Dr. Carmichael maintains, anioDg the esseati-ils to prepare §elv^ lor scientific study and 
youth for such participation, despite which fact "the hu- researob to take the place of 
manities occupy a less imporalnt place in the college pro- today's leaders. WlUianis said 
Srram than formerly." Why? Because their need is not that Europe, the blrthp ace of 
off/»^f,„o.i„ .f-aneo^ SO many pure" .scientists, had 

effectively stressed. been so disrupted by the war 

And the question Is raised, too, why the social sciences t,hat It was doubtful if Uie ' 
In student popularity and budget appropriations are being schools there would be able to 
subordinated sharply to the natural sciences. Here Dr. produce the necessary talent 
Carmichael emphasizes the fact of an educational imbalance, to continue development of 

There is a far greater shifting of the scales, as most educa- fi^b?em%qtaTe!y\o1he"l!niS 
tional students are aware, since the war s end. States. 

If it is a primary function of higher education to pro- jj^ advised the schools of the 
duce leaders of men in these troubled times, those leaders, nation, and especially the south, 
as Dr. Carmichael points out, cannot dispense with the to offer more courses designed 
sciences that deal with human relations. '^ train deeper, more compre- 

Of "the ills that beset society" there is ample general tensive »"ental dlscipltae and 
awareness. In any effective campaign against them "the study by emphasizing mathema. 
engineer, the doctor, the lawyer, the preacher and countless 
other professional and business leaders have important roles 
to fill," the speaker asserted. 

But the swing is already so far away from the purely 
cultural and the subjects that make for understanding of 
one's fellows that higher education needs to take stock anew 
of its aims and of its results in terms of rel c\an ce to the 
needs of a troubled world. CTz~3^ 



tics and science courses In tjieir 
^inriculum. '^^ » 



FVSH IDEA FOR 

SCHOOL CLASS IN 

CURRENT AFFAIRS 



(Fourth of Six Articles on Schools) 

BY JANE EADS 
WASHINGTON— The study of histo- 
ry is essential, but in itseU not enough 
to equip today's citizens for the future, 
say leading educators who recommend 
a place for the study of current af- 
fairs in American schools this fall. 

A committee of the National Coun- 
cil for the Social Studies prepared a 
report on the teaching of cuirent a/f- 
I fairs at the request of the World Or- 
ganization of the Teaching Profession. 
lit says: "Contemproary events must be 



ticipate in public affairs. By capita^ 
lizing on the natural interest of pupils 
in current atfairs. says Ihe report there 
surance thst the following 
rievcd; 1 To develop 



I temporary aava.ilage. ' It says Uie qua- 
'lity of citizenship can be improved 
'through education focused on an al- 
legiance lo democratic values, com- 
petence in the skills of inquiry and 
discussion, and understanding of tne 
studied directly— not only for the f»«6 background of contemporary prob- 
of acquiring imnfediat^ly (useful infor- ^^^^^ ^^^ ^ disoooilioii to keep current- 
mation. buy also as a fieaiw of develo-l, jf,(ornied, and a willingness to par- 
ping a livdy and intelligent interest in ' ' .'.,._ _•,.:_.•• n,. ^,^n=- 
woild affairs- Such infoimation and 
such inter^t in world affairs are es- 
sential for young 'people if they are to 
fulfill their duties as citizens. " 

The report says that history by it- 
self is not adequate to give students 
"a sympathetic understanding of the 
complex and constantly 
world, the future of which they wiU 
help to shape " ' 

The report emphasises "a great lack 
of knowledge of issues, domestic and 
international, a tendency to reach con- 
clusions not based on an appraisal ol 
all oertrnent evidence: a lack of skiU 
in dealing with social problems: and a 
willing'ijs= to sacrifice the general 
welfare to achieve personal gain and 



welfare to achieve personal ga 



is some 

goals will b. J 1 - 

concern for the immediate and long 

ran"e welfare "of people in our own 

=. - nat;"on and in other Qountnes. 2. To 

changing helo pupils acquire and integrate in- 

■ formation from many sources needea 

for an understanding of contemporary 

problems. 3. To d*veicp competence m 

thise skills which are necessary for 

cl-ar and objective thinking: reading, 

listening, observing, discussing; obtain- 1 

in" evaluaUng and organizing mfor- 

laTtion and reaching conclusions 4. To 

dtve'op competent and resiJbnsible ciU- 

zens who take an active part in local, 

rti.nal and international affairs. I 

(Next: Contioveriial issuM) , 



375 



n 



^'i5unde^standinp:s and controversial 1s31»B3 .- 



n 



RULING IS NOT 
LIKELY TO HIT 
(SD-LA. SCHOOLS 




Religious Instruction May 

Continue Despite High 

Court Decision 



. IN NISCHOOLS 

Brooklyn Official Prohibits An^l 
Religious Observ- 
ance 



Baton Rouge. March S (/P),— A 
TJnlt^l SUteg »upreme court decision 
•S'lnit the use of public schools lor 
religious Instruction today seemed 
unlikely to have Immediate reper- 
cussions In Louisiana. 

State department of ednraui-.n of- 
ficials said thfv were Inlnrmffl ihat 
X«llglous classes had been ronuucted 
Under ccn.-.in rlrcumslanrr': m the 
public sch'iolsr'of some p..rK;hes, but 
that the ^u/e departpieiii never had 
laid down R policy in -hf matter. 
There w,<^' jio Immetiiate Indication 
that It would now do so. 

"The question has been entirely a 
matter for the decl.'lon of local of- 
ficials." Norman Edwards, depart- 
ment attorney, said. 

"In many cases, religious classes 
for public school children have been 
held outside of school "^ours and off 
•chool property. This, of course, 
raises no problem. In other cases. 
free time, such as study hall periods, 
have been used. 

In some cases, especially in rural 
kreas where churches did not have 
meeting halls or other facilities 
Within reach, use of the school build- 
ings has been permitted." 

State Superintendent of Education 
John K. Coxe was out of the city 
today. 

The case in which the supreme 
court ruled yesterday was Inltiatfd 
by an Illinois mother who com- 
plained that her son became an ob- 
ject of ridicule because, alone of his 
class, he did not participate In volun- 
tary instruction offered in the school 
building. 



.NEW YORK, Dec. 4.-(.^>-An as- 
sistant superintendent of schools to- 
day banned the singing of Chiislma! 
carols making reference to Ihc na- 
tivity and celobrations having "re. 
ligioub .Mcnificanofe" in 2.1 BrooklyE 
public ,^JlooU 

It rii'v ;in immedifte protest from 
the Nr\\- York stat.' primcil of the 
KnighLs ct Columbus which termed ill 
"an in.'^iilt to all Christians" and de- 
manded a public schools system in- 
ve.>:tisalion to have the order re- 
voked. 

Assistant Superintendent Isaao 
Bildersee. in charge of the public 
schools of two districts, declared in 
his order; 

"Christmas, and other similar oc- 
casions, may be celebrated only asl' 
season, pre- vacation occurrences. Theral 
must not be any reference in drama- 
tisations, songs, or other aspects of 

the occasion to any religious signifi- | 
cance involved. 

"Christmas carols with reference to 
the nativity may not be sung, nor 
may decorations include religious 
symbols of any faith." 

Bildersee told a reporter he had 
complete authority to issue the order, 
adding, "it is merely my statement of , 
my judgment in the matter as to the 
way Christmas should be celebrated" 
in the public schools. ' 

Elxplaining his order, Bildersee said 
"personal jollity and merry-making" 
are fine for the children of the public 
schools, "but tlie religious features of 
the day should be eliminated. It 
should not have any sectarian re- 
ligious significance." 

Dr. William Jansen, superintendent 
of New York public schools, said in 
a statement that Bildeisee's aruiounce- 
ment "did not ban the singing of all 
Christmas carols." 

"I have known Mr. Bildersee for 
many years," Dr. Jansen added, "and 
I have faith in his attitude toward 
persons of other religions than his 
own." 



INSTAJSCHOOLS 

United States Supreme Court 
Rules Against Use Of 
Systems y:^ 

WASHINGTON. March «.- 
t*>— The Supreme Court ruled today 
that achool systems may not be used 
to assist religioui groups in giving in- 
struction about their beliefs. 

The 8-1 decision held that an inter- 
denominational plan for religious in- 
struction in the Champaifn, 111., 
schools is unconstitutional. 

How it may affect other practices of 
teaching of religion is a question on 
which the justiecs disagreed. Mostlv. 
such arraiigeme^ts are> puraky local 
ones and differ from each zither in 
small ways at least. ' 

Justice Rted. dissenting, ^id the de- 
cision raisea a bar against (practically 
all forms oflreligieus instruction con- 
nected in »|iy wey with Jkchool sy;- 
tems. He s^id many states including 
New York have systems which th- 
rilling makes questionable. 

Justice Jackson, although joining in 
the majority findings in the particular 
case before the court, said he believei 
it goes too far. 

He argued the decision would open 
the way to a flood of litigation by 
groups dissatisfied with local prac- 
tices. 

He contended that it would even 
make difficult the teaching of the lib- 
eral arts. Specifically he mentioned 
church architecture in art ctas.'^' ref- 
erences to religious reformation is- 
1 tory courses, and sacred mum; in 
music classes. 
! Justice Black delivered the majority 
opinion. 

In its ruling the court upheld pro- 
testa by Mrs. Vashti McCoUum. wiio 
says she is an atheist, that the system 
employed in Champaign. III., breaus 
down the constitutional wall between 
church and state. 

' Under the Champaign plan, 'he 
[school board permits a local council 
' on religious education to conduct 
classes in tlie school buildings once 
a week, on school time. The council 
provides teachers for the religious 
classes. 



L 







376 



Religious Teaching 



n 



More Suits Possible^ 
To Determine Limits 

WASHINGTON, (UP)— Public school officials all over 



this plan, all children are excused i 
from school an hour early one day 
each week. They are free to go 
to church classes or wherever they 
please and no effort is made by the 
school to check on the pupils' ac- 
tivities. 

, X--, ^ Possibly unconstitutional — Re-| 

the country* are Voncerned about the religious education Ugious classes held o"'s|fe °£| 

, •' school hours in school buuoings. 

%;„. • w i , V, tw^ o„.,,.»^-»NEA said this program may be il- 

Their worry began two weeks ago when the Supreme j^gg, because tax-supporte d prop- 1 

Court handed down a decision entitled "McCoUum vs. I 

Board of Education of Cha mpaign, 111." grty ,5 used for sectarian educa- 

That decision held that the Con- 1 ' ^ jj^^ 

titution prohibits the compulsory tem was used to assist religious Bible-reading is required byi 
.*ublic School System from co- sects in carrying out their, pro- A,i,,n«,c npla- 

operating in the religious instruc- gram of instruction. law in Alabama, ArKansas, ue a 

Uon of school children. KEA lawyers have prepared a^ware. Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Ken- 

The best available figures show summary of the probable effect theUu{.yty_ Maine, Massachusetts, New 
that two million children in 22001 champaign case on other religious' jgj-sey. Pennsylvania, Tennessee 
lowns were attending some kind I instruction plans. Here is what j^j the District of Columbia. An- 
)f religious classes during school they think: other 24 states permit reading of 

lours a year ago. The number had % "Definitely unconstitutional" j^e bible of repeating the Lord's 
doubled in seven years. Today, — Any plan under which the school praver without comment, 
the number of communities in- system releases pupils from regu- ^.rw,„^, ,^ criifiEi'ivTC 
volved probably is closer to 3000, liar school classes and provides 1^.-^ 1 nllLH, M l.'UM> 1 n . . 



educators say. classrooms and other services for 

Legal experts now have sifted 'the religious classes. 
through the 20,000 words of Jus- 1 Some school districts in at least 
tice Hugo L. Black's majority opin- 1 11 states conduct such programs: 
ion, two concurring opinions and|Alabama. Illinois, Louisiana, Mich- 
one dissent. igan. North Carolina, Ohio, Okla- 

Their analyses do not agree on j hom"i, Oregon, Texas. Vermont and gr-tn 



ADVISED TO LEAVE 
BALDWIN-WALLACE 



what specific religious programs 
fall within the Supreme Court ban. 
Several more lawsuits may be nec- 
essary to clarify the matter. But 
all are agreed that the scope of the 
ruling goes far beyond Cham- 
paign, III. 

OFFER YARD STICK 

The U. S. Office of Education 
and the National Education Assn. 
have suggested a simple test. Com- 
pare the features of the now-ques- 
tioned religious instruction plans 
with the Champaign system. The 



greater the similarity, the more, Alabama, Arkansas, California, 
likely the plan is illegal. On the [Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, 



Cleveland, Jan. 12 (/P).— The 163 
Catholic studenln atiidylng lor de- 
Baldwin-Wallace coUeg* 
Virginia, and Hawaii. must withdraw from the Methodist 

«1 A1?0 unconstitutional — Any institution »t once if they wish to 
plan where religious education is conform with the doctrines of their 
conducted off school premises but church, a diocesan priest advised a 
durini^ school hours and with the ma.ss meeting ^f the students last 
active co-operation of the school night. 

administration. Pupils are re- a compulsory r'ligion course and 
leased from the regular school, reiigiou» cjj«r.»i i)r'TKrams .-,' the 

and teachers and church authori- nearby Berc. .>.»ll.uM,^n are r^rftrary 

ties co-operate in keeping attend- to catholic ■ apor law and mnke it 

ance records. "impossible f.>r « Cnthollr t.i'pursue 

IN 34 STATES courses lesdlng ;o a degree 'and re- 

main . a (tood Csthollc." me Rev. 
Some schools in at least these Joseph T. Morlany, pr^fps««r of re- 

34 states have that type of a plan: iigion »t e- John's colieire tnid the 

tudenis, who met In the .auditorium 
f a Catholic school. Severtil of them. 



other hand, "the greater the dis 
similarity. . . . the more debat- 
able is the application of the Mc- 
CoUum decision." 

The lawyers say the court's opin- 
ion rested on these three points in 
the Champaign plan: 

* Public school buildings 
were used for religious educa- 
tion. 

* The school authorities co- 
operated in the program. 

1 The compulsory school sys- 



Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, including two prominent athletes, 
Kansas,. Kentucky, Louisiana, already have withdrawn, 
Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, The long-brewing issue was brought 
Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, to public light recently when a 
New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Okla- catholic student, who has since 

homa. Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode I withdrawn, asked for an authorlta- 
Island, South Carolina, South Da-|tlve statement on a course, phlloso- 
kota, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, phy of religion, which is required of 
West Virginia, and Wisconsin, and seniors working toward degrees. 
Alaska and Hawaii, 

•■ Probably constitutional — The! ^ -r- ^/7 | _ , ,. ^ 
"dismissed time" plan in use in a >^ I _ T'Ys "^ / iv3( 5-4j? 
handful of communiUes. Under I '-' • ' ^ \<^ '-^> 



NOI-4-2-3-Z5 



(MP) 



L 



J 



377 



Finance 



Information. — 



School Ouflays 

Back in the 1939-40 school year Lou- 
isiana spent an average of S45 per nu- 
pil. For the last full term (lf)46-jJ7) 
that expenditure had bef r^ sitepped up 
to $72 — an increase of 59.2 g»r cent.'- 

With other factors con^ant thi\ 
growth in the education -bunget wouldV 
have constituted one of the all-time 
bits of good news for the state. The 
bitter truth is, however, that Louisi- 
ana's and the nation's schools are in. 
worse straits than in 1939-40. So re-' 
minds the National Education Associa- 
tion which undertook compilations of 
the various states. 

Inflated costs encounteped in educa- 
tion as well as all other fields are the 
bug under 'the chip. For schools to 
have maintained in 1946-47 the same 
standards they had seven years earlier 
would have necessitated an 86 per cent 
greater .budget for the nation as a 
whole. Instead, the actual increase was 
66.3 per cent. 

For this state's schools to have re- 
mained on a par last year with 1939- 
40 would have required spending $84 
per student, or $12 more than was 
spent. 

NEA's charts show Louisianians 
their financial interest in education is 
better than average for the geographi- 
cal section of the county. But there 
can scarcely be any comfort in that 
when this state is 37th in expenditures 
per pupil and 34th in percentage 
growth in outlay. Public sentiment 
must continue to crystallize orf^ our 
school needs. 

NOS-48-2-20 



Millions for Schools 

In the opinion of spokesmen at the 
Monroe meeting of the Louisiana 
School Boards Association, the public 
school system needs a minimum of 
SI 10.000.000 for construction of new 
buildings, alone. Speakers cited the 
need for buildings to provide 4000 
more classrooms for white and Negro 
pupils, in addition to gymnasiums, 
lunch rooms, auditoriums and special 
workshops. These facilities were listed 
as essential by 50 of the state's 67 par- 
ish superintendents. 

Besides this expenditure for new fa- 
cilities, other millions will be required 
for equalizing the salaries of white and 
Negro teachers, the employment of ad- 
ditional teachers and the establishment 
of the $2400 minimum pay scale. 

There is no way of knowing whether 
the .school board meibbers are soa/ing 
too high into the-znilllons in their Esti- 
mates. But ^yone familiar wilh'tUe^ 
school situation \Vi!] realize that a lot 
of money will ha\ e to be raised to pro- 
vide the kii (I nf educational svstem' 
the stat€ ou^lil; to have and must have 
to escape 'a charge nf indecent neglect 
of the XoT 1 step in building good men 
and women and good citizens. Super- 
intendent Bourgeois of Orleans parish 
estimates the needs of this city alone 
at S40.000.000. And the source of the 
money is. of course, taxes 

'04 4 

NOS- 48-3-10 



37B 



State Board 
Allocates 
School Funds 

ALEXANDRIA. La.. July 
2'' —Parish school boa ids 
and rollPRPs today were allo- 
raied a major share of the 
$6S002..Tin educational ap- ' 
propriation for the next fis- r 
cal year. 

Allocations wore made bv 



BudKrts .Apprnrril 

The board approved the follow- 
tnc hudpets: ; 

Southwestern lyoul.slana Instt- 
Uite. Ijifayette. $1.6^1.300 

Ix>uisiana Polvtechnic In.ititute. 
Riiston. $1.S?3.1SS. 

Norf hwestern State college. 
N^fchirnrhes. SI 273.2:^8 

Southeastern l/>in.siana collese. 
H.rnmond. $fi."S.85.T 

Southern nniver.sftv, Scotland- 
vilio. ?c';q,ififi 

'•r.ii^ihltng oolle(?e, r,ramt>llnB.i 
S? '1.272 

t?t» Sihool for the Blind. 
I >'i ^{n•I.^e. S13n.?».-.3. 

tate School for the Deaf. Baton 
Tp. S271.19-I. 
Si.ite School for Spn-tic Chil- 
dren. Alexandria Sm.lRfl. 

State School for VeRro Blind, 
the state board of education SoMi?ndville. S79.4."iO 

a. ,t. meeting here yesterday. Sc';?and'll'e"'s7/,3S1. '"'''" """' 
The board also told parishes Baton Rouge Trade school. 
$143,240. 



to put into effect the mini 
mum teachers' salarv sched 



Southwest Louisiana Trade 
school Crowley, S97,230. 
ule which was enartpH hv thp Southwestern Louisiana Trade 
uip wnicn was enacteo ov tne school. I.ake Charles. $103.4RS 



recent Legislature. The 
schedule ranges up to -$3600, 
regardless of race. 

.Another principal step taken 



Caddo School 
Costs Mounting 

Spend Average Of 
$128.99 for Eoch , . 
Child in Class 

Taxp3.\prs of CaC-lo parish paid' 
I an averairc of ^fi".":* 'or the edui 
jcation o" e«.'li -onopl child who 
:attende<i 'he pub'n- fohools- of the 
pari-iii !»st >ear. according to a 
staii-iiv. repon ef the school 
year l9*-fi47. whi. h was submitted 
to trf Caddo pa-i^h school board 
at n> .nonihly nieeting Wednes- 
day ai'lcrnoon 

The cost of education per pupil 
in the elemeiuary schools was 
S102.7o. while for high scho<)l stu- 
dents the average was S243.09. 
The average cost for educating: 
each white child was S12o.28, 
while for the negro school child~it' 
was $67.S3. j 



Ouachita Vallev to r a t i o n b I 
school, West Monroe. S7R.00n 

Shreveport Trade school. SI 44.- \^ ^ ^ .'. ' ' 
004 Teacher Salaries Higher. I 

The board authorized South-' Caddos cost of instruction per' 
hv tlie board was approval of western lyoulslana Institute to' 'pupil was considerablv higher' 
formulas for distribuUon of the make Us stadium available for the! than that of other parish school I 
three principal funds for public P''<'P<'*^'' f^^mellia Bowl football 'systems due to the fact that Caddo 
ischool support. The three call for K^"^* '"<^ °^''^'" SP*""^ ^^'^"'5 ''"'"-llpays much higher teacher sal.[ 
$:7,777.79fi for distribution 'ppr Inf.the week before Christmas i^aries. for both white and neerni 
enucable." 59,259,265 for equaliza- ^^ action was taken on the .teachers. * | 

tion of school funds in poorer par- budget of the state department of j xhe report re\ealed that tho' 
ishes and 58,000.000 for .special aid •<l"catlon headquarters and on' ...^ooi board spent S2'>"s«14qI 
to guarantee payment of the new procurement of new textbooks i^^,,. ,nst„,c,ion which'" conlu.ci 
teacher salarv scale. The boaro voted to name a com- ; , ^ teacher salaries tk^ 

School I,nnrh l-'nnii mlttee to Study proposed changes; ,. , 'V; , ' ^^a^^^e' '■a'aries. This I 

Tre'brS'ar:^"endorsed plans »« certification requirements ^or;^-^^^^-\/-. ^^ hi«h ^^ , 

lchooi'\^;n",^'7 1 ''^ ''■""',■''' i^u'irk. for Teacher, 'rihe .o,'aro;"eVa"1ng' ^un^s' ''"' 

Sli^a^k^o^^sliperTteJ^dJ-tlro-f fjhi "fopJ"ord"stribut.nP^ Another m^^^ ,te^i of expense 
educaUon, was directed to arrange the per educable and equalization wa.^foi ope ation which includes 
for statewide purchase of food and '""f's *«re left practically nn- ' .lanitors salaries, supplies, fuel, 
•upplles, a step which the board '^'^^"^^'^ although parishes, under light.-; and water, and other ex- 
estlmated would .save ''0 per cent ^he new minimum salar\ sched- ,pen<e5. Credited to this account 

The board approved budgets for "'«• ^■"' •'l^'" P^^'^S «-hite and , was .S105.362.70. ' 
the state colleges, trade schools I .^^^''O.^^^^'^^IL^^^^'^'^ s^"^^ •■\^^' The other expenses, which made 
and special schools. Pa.rishes were ™'^^'^'^'-^- "."* aMotment to the; up a total operating cost of $2- 
notified that beginning next Julvl Pa^^hes per teacher out of thel s5o.655.73. included; General con- 
1. no equalization funds would be «2"' '*"!"« '""°. ';"' continue to Upol loperation of the srhool board 
made available to parishes that show a differential for one year l^ffi^.^, S89669.19: maintenance 
dlo^not levy the full 5^-mi,l schooo, ^ut the^dlfferentia. tsjeduced^and ^^,,,,^,^ 3,,„.3,^, agencieT u1: 

Salaries of state college presl- ^■'" ^ eliminated next vear 
dents were raised 5500 each. A 
Blmllar boost was granted to 
Spencer Phillips, director of the 
state schools for handicapped chil- /^« ^ ^ 



NQS-48-7-2g 



593,321.83 

braries. health ser\ ice. school 
lunch fund anti pupil transporta-: 
tioni. S1T3.611.67, and fixed 
charges i insurance, rent, contribu- 
tions! were $164,875.41. 



SJ-48-8-1 



379 

Report Revealed On 
Teachers' Salaries 

BY PATRICIA SINCLAIR 

Does Louisiana pay teachers as much as other states? 

How much does she spend per child for education? 
What do other states spend? | 

How much of her total income goes for schools? What 
about other states? 



These questions wert- answered 
today in a report from the School 
of Rural Social Kconomics at the 
University of Virginia j 

Here am. some of ihe statistics! 
contained i.i tho repntt. j 

This year the average salary paidj 
a Louisian teacher will be S2600. In 
the South, only Florida pays more 
$2715. Te\as pays $2700. 

For Other SUtes 

Average salaries for other South- 
ern states are: Alabama-$1800; j _s2974: Kontuclcv-$2800: Ala- 
Arkansas-S1500: Georgia-SlSOO; ! bania-S2640: South Carolina- 
Mississippi— | 52460: Arkansas— S2384, and Mis- 
sissippi —$2067 



Louisiana ranked 37th in ability 
and 19th in effort. Her per-child 
income in 1945, the year used for 
comparison, was $3418. 

In the south, only Florida had a 
higher per child income, and that 
figure was considerably higher 
than any other Southern states.. 
Florida's per child income wasl 
$5463. . ( 

Figures for other Southern states^ 
are: Tennessee- $3418; Oklahoma 
—$3257; Georgia— $3127; Virginiai 



Kentucky — $1600 
$1350; North Carolina — $2015 
Oklahoma— S1890; South Carolina 
—$1450; Tennessee — $1785, and 
Virginia— $2050. 

In the nation, only three states 
pay an average salary of more than 
$3500. They are: California, New 
YoA and the District of Columbia. 

Last year. Louisiana spent 
$116.22 per child in "average daily 
attendance." That term refers to 
the average number of pupils in 
school every year. 

$129 for Texas 
I In the South, only Oklahoma 
spent more — $118. Texas spent 
$129. 

Figures for other Southern states 
are: Alabama — $71.96; Arkansas — 
$72: Florida— $107.30; Georgia— 
$7904; Kentucky— $90: Mississippi 
—$51.46; North Carolina— $74.24; 
Oklahoma— $1V8; South Carolina— 
%S0: Tennessee— $72, and Virginia 
-=^100. 

Louisiana ranked 38th in the na- 
tion in the expenditure per child 
in "average daily attendance." 

Only five states spent more than 
$200 per child. They are: Illinois, 
Montana, New Jersey, New York 
and Wyoming. California spent 
$165. 

Thirteen spent between $150 and 
$200 per child. 

SUtes were compared acccordiog 

to "ability' and "effort" to support 
schools. "Ability" was determined 
by the total income per child: "ef- 
fort" by the percentage of that in- 
come spent for education. 



In the nation. California was first 
[With a whooping 59009. Thirteen 
states ranged from S.iOOO to $7000. 
j They are: ^Colorado. Florida. In-' 
Idiana. Kansas. Massachusetts. 
Michigan, Montana, Missouri. North 
Dakota. Oregon. Pennsylvania, 
V. isconsin and Wyoming. 1 

9 Above S7U00O 1 

Nino other states went above 
$7000 per child. They are: Califor- 
nia. Connecticut. Delaware. Illi- 
nois. \cu York. New Jersey, New- 
Mexico, Rhode Island and the 
State of Washington. 

Louisiana was 19th in the nation 
and fourth in the South in "ef- 
fort." She spent 1.76 per cent of 
her total income for education in 
1944-4.'i. the year of comparison. 

Oklahoma was first in the south 
wiht 2.04 per cent. North and 
South Carolina were second and 
third with 1.88 and 1.81, respec- 
tively. 

1.26 Is Lowest 

Florida and VJreinia were low- 
est with 1.26 .IV I I "8 per cent, re- 
spectivelv. M.i-issippi was sixth 
with 1.67. / 

In the niliion. ten states spent 
more than two per cent of their 
total income for education. They 
are: Iffwa. Minnesota. Montana, 
New Mexico, .North Dakota. Okla- 
homa. South Oakota, Utah, West 
|i Virginia and Wvoming. 



Makes Comparison 
Of School Budgets 

Now Orleans .spciuls more of its 
schiiol huriget fm (racher and ad- 
niini.-itiative .ial,iri(.v-, on a per- 
centage basi.s, ih;in the .mi age 
city, fitrures conipjied bv H ilier 
U. Latapie. school b<Vard' .u , 
ant. showed toda.v. 

However, explained Suht"-! 
erintendenl I.i<int-1 J. I'.oui 
llie public .v-hnnl -. -t. n V. 
operating on Tf -•i; r i 
than most s\ 
atteniptine ' 
biul'.er saliirio 
ers thiovighniiT ihe country. 

The city .s,icnds 74.4.5 per cent 
of its biiilpet on teachers and ad- 
ministrative wapes while tl.e 11a- 
'ional avera.se .spent on t\\\- \\cm 
is r.fl.-'ig |ier com. 

"We are still below the teaih- 
oi- --Hiary scale of cities the size 
of Now Orleans. ' Boiirceois said. 

Other percentage comparisons 
.show New Orle.iiis schools are 
,<peni|iiijr only aboui half the na- 
tional average on operation of 
build in !?s. 

The figures were compiled ai 
the request of the .American As- 
sociation nf School .Administrators, 
who met last week in New Oi?' 
leans. _-- -^, 



size .1 
paie 
given to. 



mt- 



'I i.s. 
ith 
.Lh- 



NOS- 48-5-5 



2.t OF NATIONAL 
INCOMK 10 HK I ,^I:F) 
ON SCHOOL SY.SIKM 

Nf'v York. Nov. 2.1 i/pi.— Tli» In- 
s'l'iiK? of Llfo Inf'irance t'vi = > «*- 
tima'pd onlv 2 4 p"t ecn' of 'h» 
1P47 national mrornr '•til ^f ii-ied 
for iiplCMP "' 'ti» nation- «"hool 
pyst^m. 

TlK" exp<»n'i Mlvps frfr '>>p pre.«<>nt 
school yi>ar > HI «pproxini:^tf» »< flOO.- 
000,000. an<1 Inrreafo 
years, bwt liie perr 
education vll! be ron.s-.ffi-iably lower 
than thf 1B.!9-4P ect*<ii year when 
expendii.iri'.'; were 4 4 per cent Of 
1939 iiiconie. 

Adjusictl lo the number of Amer- 
ican famlUea, the estimated educa- 
tional yeir expenditure.'^ will be ap- 
proxlmarplv »121 per family, com- 
pared with ^92 per family (or the 
in:59-40 school year. ^ ^ '■ 



use over »ievloi 
rei"-'j» ^eiit f 



ions 



ST-47-/l-i4 



3^0 



IParishes, Colleges 
I Gef Major Portion 
Of Education Funds 



AI#K«ndri«. July ;E— Major por- 
jtloni of the $«8.n92,aio educational 
appropriation for the next fiscal 
y»ar were allotted to parish' achool 
boards and rolleices when the atate 
: board of education 'met yesterday. 

AmonK the prlndpal actions 
taken at a ilay-long board meetlns 
I here were ^ 



I 1. DliSir<tnr parishes to put AVpJ 
leffect the nrfjilniu .. teacher:!' saw" 

}ls 
ro 



by the I.. 

to $3(^11 

of^ rx 

ilak fi.i 



ary sched'i;? ena 
lalure. . 'iTiginrf 
teacher*, .• letsni 

J. A^pr(>\iinir I'lumula^ fi.i dis 
tribuiln^ the three ■ majoi funds 
for -import ..f the public schools 
These Include 127,777.796 for dis- 
tribution Of "per ediicable," ac- 
cording to the number of school 
ase children In each parish: J9,- 
•JiiS.26a for equalization of school 
funds In poorer parishes: and »8.- 
000,1100 for special assistance to 
guarantee payment of the new 
teacher salary acale. The actual 



|Parlah-b> -parish allotment* from 
|the three funda atlll are to be 
iworked out by the department of 
education ^ . 

Budget* Approved 

*. Approving budgets for the 
ataie colleges, trade schools and 
specla; schools.' 

*. Serving notice on parishes that 
beginning July 1. 1»4». no equali- 
sation funds would be made avail- 
able In parishes that do not levy 
the full nve-mill school tax. 

S. Approving plans for dlstrl- 
biillng the »4, 000.000 school lunch 
fund appropriation and directing 
Superintendent of Education Shel 
by Jackson to arrange for state 
wide purchase of food and supplies. 
The board estimated this procedure 
would save about 20 per cent of 
the cost. 

«. Raising the salaries of state 
college presidents $500 each. The 
salary of Spencer Phillips, director 
of the three state schools for 
handicapped children, also was 
raised t&OO. 



will begin paying white and negro | 
teacher* at th» same rate Immedi- 
Hely. The allotment to the parlah- 
es per teacher out of the equallM- 
tlon fund will continue to show 
I differential for one year, but the 
differential Is redu<ed and the 
board served nnllce that it will 
be eliminated next year. 
Equalization Fund 
Jackson aaid the special teach- 
ers' salary fund would serve in 
effect as a "second equalization 
fund " guaianleelng the payment I 
of Increased salaries in parishes 
with limited financial resources 
The board also directed. In view \ 
of the Increased teachers" salary 
funds available, that each parish 
I add one teacher per high school 
and one additional teacher In the i 
parish to its Instructional staff. 
The board also recommended pay 
raises for bus drivers out of in- i 
creased transportation funds. 

The board authorized the presl 
dents of the two negro colleges. 
Southern university and Qrambling 



„^ . , . ^. . ^, . ,,_ I college, to prepare estimates of 

The formulas for distnbilt.ng the 1 j^^,^ minimum building needs for 

funds were left practically i.n- I jb,, ,„bm,«.ion later to the 

changed although parishes. ijnder|i " 

the new niinimiirn salary scheilule.; iboard of liquidation of th* tUtt 

j'dett for special appropriation*. 
Board President George Madison 
:4a id the L«gi*latur« had not pro- 
vided building funds for either In- 
stitution. 



BRT-48-7-2i 



Orleans School Tax 
Bill Passes Senate 

(The Item Capital Bureau) ^ Jy ^ I' 

BATON ROUGE.— The Senate -completed action last 
night to send to a vote of the people in November a pro- 
posed constitutional amendment to permit higher property 
taxes in Orleans Parish for school use. 
This amendment is the one rec 



)mmended by Supt. Bourgeois oti t,iii that would prevent application 
needs «, survey of school 'f ,j,„j„g restriction* to commer- 

cial firms which have been in 

It would permit the Orleans i operation at their present locations 

School Board to raise taxes by | for 20 years. 

three mills. It would further per- 



mit the board to call an election 
to submit an added property tax up 
to five mills {or school construc- 
tion to the extent of four of the 
five mills. 

The Senate last night sent to 
Gov. Long for signature the four 
bills providing for creation of ur- 
ban re-development corporations 
for slum clearance. Sen. A. E 



Another bill sent to the governor 
for signature would re-divide the 
revenues from racing. More than 
$100,000 would be dedicated from 
these revenues to Delgado Trades 
School, but in the re-allocation it 
is estimated the city council would 
continue to receive about the same 
revenue as at present. - 

A pet bill of Gov. Long's, to 



Rainold handled the bills ' <» ' the ' ^*e 'h« penalties for drunken 
I driving some 25 per cent, cleared 



floor. 
The Senate also approved the 



the Senate and now goes to him 
for signature. 

Without objection the Senate 
adopted bills providing for re- 
financing of the Upper Pontalba 
building. 

After adopting a minor amend- 
ment, the Senate passed the bill to/ 
create a board of arbitration ii 
the State Department of Labor. 
The amendment would exemi^t em- 
ployers as well as employes fr*m 
provisions of the bill whertjhey^ 
are already covered by the T^ft- 
Hartle^ law. 

COUNCIL BILL 

Over the week-end the governor! 
also signed into law the eight-man 
Commission Council bill which 
would return New, Orleans to a 
form of aldermanic government in 
1950. 

Under this law's provisions 
[seven council members would be 
[elected, one from each of the seven 
I assessors districts and a mayor to 
'be chosen at large. i 

The measure was bitterly fought,! 
jthe main contention of opponents' 
1 being that it changed a basic sec- 1 
Ition. of the charter without the, 
[people having a vote in the matter. 
;In 1912 New Orleans decided by 
I election to adopt commission gov- 
ernment to replace the aldermanic 
type. 



N0I-4S-7-5 



Q2Z)' 



361 



LA. SCHOOLS 
HAVE $1,059,000 
ON RESERVE 



Fitndx Held Rack Pciiiliiig 

(^oiistiliilioiial 

Ainrii(iniriit 



Baton Roiiftf, Mar. h 5 i Special!.^ 
A total of H. 059 .087 89 In school 
funds U being held In rfserve for 27 
parish s-hool boards pending ap- 
proval by the people of an amend- 
ment to the constitution In the 
eeneral eler:on oi April 20. 

The anirndment would eliminate 
that portion of section 14. article 12 
of the con..-t!iu'|on whlf;n set for'h 
hat no parl.-h mnv receive In .iinte 
md.' mor» 'hrin so per cent of t!ie 
1st of a mliiln-iirr. .'tate rdur.Ti on 
program The rrohlbltlon kep' ?A 
parishes from ret-rivlng their 'ii:i 
share of the 5perli<l approprlai mr. of 
t7. 500.000 made t\v ijie leRisla'ii: r at 
a special ac-^.on rarii this yer.i 

Ninety per rm- n: ihe funds were 
specifically •ll'iued to Increase the 
salarlei of teacher* and »2. 500000 

was (or the year 1948-47 while ihe 
rpmalnlnK »3.000.000 was for the year 
1947-48 0( the funds withheld, therr- 
fore. »933.179 10 will go to pay the 
.■■alarles of teachers. 

Orleans parish will benefit most 
from nassace of the amendment 
state department of education work- 
ers East Feliciana. »10.297.O7 of 
reserve for Orleans tor the two years 
:« a total of »375.762 71 of whi^ h 
• 138 188.44 IS allocated to teachers 
.salaries. Orleans receives no equali- 
zation money, but the per educable 
allotment brings the amount paid b\ 
'he ."late to more than 90 per cent 
or the cost of a minimum program 
there. In fact for the 1946-47 se.sslon 
the equali7.«tlon formula was revised 
(or Orleans alone whereby the al- 
lotment for "other cosis" wai revised 
sharply upwards In order that New 
Orleans might receive all of Its per 
ed;:cable moiiev. 

The oth"r parishes are largely those 
which draw heavllv on equalization 
fund. Next to Orleans the pariah 
scheduled to receive the largert sum 
of money Is Washington. lor «hlch 
I6494.S7 la being held In reserve Of 
this amount «58.245 11 Is alloted to 
teachers' inlarles. 

Other parishes which will benef.r 
from passase of the proposed amend- 
ment with 'he amount each "^ill 
receive and the portion allo'ated to 
Increasing the salsries of teachers 
follow: 

Allen. »3l.437?.8 with •C8.293 64 
allixated to teachers salaries: Ascen- 



.'Mun. I8.g62 50 of which 18.066 35 goes 
to salaries: Assumption t680 0t> 
»ei2 05 for teai her : Avoyelles. »849 18 
of which »7.64j 68 goes to teachers: 
Bieiivine. »20 611.75. tl8 550S8 for 
teachers: Caldwell 11796830 with 
$16 171.40 for teachers: Catahoula, 
»23 430 07 with »2l,087 06 for teach- 
ers: East Feliciana. I10,?»7 07 of 
which 19, 26738 goe.s to salary In- 
creases. 

Franklin. »45 450.7B. with t4090».71 
for salaries; Oram »37.681 80 with 
133 895 62 (or teachers: Jackson. 127,. 
331.73 Of which «24 59* 56 goes for 
salaries: Lincoln, $23,454.31. of which 

I 121.108.88 Is for salaries: Livingston. 

l»523016O of which I47.071.44 goes 
(or salaries. Natchitoches. J21.373 16 
or which «1923494 Is for salaries: 
Polnte Coup,ee. »9,333 46 of which 
»8.400 11 Is f/>r .salaries. 

Rapides. »1 301 41 of which «1. 171 27 
Ls alloted to salaries: Red River. 
»13 845 85 with «i2.46127 Is for sal- 
aries: Sabln, 159.012 45 with §53,111,21 
for teachers: St. Helena 127.587 89 
of which $24,829 10 goes to salaries. 
St. Tammany. 117.68564 with (IS- 
89008 for salaries: Tangipahoa. $48- 
169.77 with $43,352.79 for salaries. 

Vernon, $44.3(18.94 of which $39.- 
94825 Is for salaries: West Carroll. 
$43.82001 of which $39,258 01 Is al- 
lotted to teachers: West Feliciana, 
$4,783 78 with $4,305 40 Is for teachers 
and Winn, $21,678.71 with $19,510.84 
goes to teachers. 

STH8-3-15 




BE m UPON 

Affects Distributon Of State's 

Big Fund For 

Schools 



BATON ROUGE. La . March «.— i/Tl 
—The general election in Louisiana 
April 20 won't be just the usual mat- 
ter of rubber-stamping the choices 
made in tlie Democratic primaries. 

There is also a real issue to be voted 
on — a proposed constitutional amend- 
ment fundamentally affecting the dis- 
tribution of the stale's multimiUion 
dollar school funds. 

The issue isn't exactly simple. Here's 
some background; 



As the constitution now stands, th 
stale's tax revenues for the public 
school* are divided into two msjor 
fund;. Three-fourths of the receipts 
JO into the "per educable" fund. The 
remaining fourth .;oeB into the 
"equalization " fund. 
• The per educable ( d Is divided 
among the parishes in , 'oportion to 
the number of children of school age 
in each parish. It isn't involved ui 
the profv-)aed amendment. 

But the equali '.81: jn fund, which is 
'mvolved, has amounted in U - iiast to 
nearly $10,000,000 a year. Equalisation 
refers to the metJiod of distribution. 
The late department of education sets 
up aii'vially what it considers a mini- 
mum 'andard educational program 
for caci: parish. If a parish can't pro- 
vide »ucn a program, even though it 
is using all its Iwal revenues plus 
what it gets from the states per 
educable fund, the difference is made 
up to it out of the equalization fund. 

But elsewhere in the constitution 
there is a provision that the state's 
contribution to the school system of 
any one parish cannot exceed 90 per 
cent of the total parish budget for 
education. That has kept some 24 par- 
ishes from receiving the full amount 
which otherwise vt'ould have been al- 
latted to them under equalisation. 

The proposed constitutional amend- 
ment would remove the 90 per cent 
limitation. 

It was approved by the legislature 
at the special session last year when 
big 5r>ecial school appropriations were 
made to provide teachers' pay raises 
Now the proposal goes to the people 
for ratification or rejection. 

There was much discussion at the 
session, not a little of it critical, o' 
the whole sjstem of allocating schcxj 
revenues— the two funds, the methods 
used by the department of education 
in arriving at the minimum program, 
and the 90 per cent limitation. The 
big new appro'priatiorts so increased 
the state's contribution to the public 
schools that the whole method was 
threatened with breakdown. 

Among other tKings. the legislative 
discussions brought ■ it that some mis- 
cellaneous item<- ere carried at a 
higher level ir e minimum program 
for New OrV .s- than in those of other 
parishe.s, ' : ■ increasing New Orleans 
share of iie extra funr!j 

Some lawmakers ought parishes 
should be required to levy the full 
permissible amount of local taxes be- 
fore becoming eligible for equaliza- 
tion funds Other.s suggested the basic 
distribution should be keyed to the 
number of children actually attending 
public schools, not all "educables." 

But the legislature didn't anive at 
a general revamr-'i of the system 
It only proDofed the amendment •' 
eliminate the most obvioas limitat, -r 
on the distribution of stale schoo 
funds— the 90 per cent clause. 

MHV/HS-3-7 



n 



J 



3^2 



Contributions and 



'^OcLCLvti va 1 u es , 



Teacher Pav 
Increase v; 
Take Effect 

BY PATRICIA SINCLAIR 

The law giving teaichers their 
$2400 to S3600 salary scale went 
into effect today. ■ 

At the same time, another law j 
giving many retired teachers sub- 
stantial raises in pensions went 
into effect. 

The School Board here will get 
SH.S.OOO from the state to pay 
for the salar>' increases. explainpH 
Walter Latapie, chief accountant. 
It will also get approximately S81.- 
000 a year from the state to pay 
for the pension raises. 



(- Mr. Latapie said the School 
Beard will spend approximately 
$5 million for salaries of 1850 
' teachers. 

* Mr Latapie said the School 
Board has not yet decided upon 
the salary scale for teachers here. 

MINIMUM SET 

The state has set up a minimum 

salary scaHe. and the School Board 

Ihere must' pay at least as much 

money as the scale calls for, he 

e.xplained. 

That m«ans that non-degree 

I teachers mii.=t get at least the 

■ S1850 to $30.50 scale they had 

I last year. The sCale for teachers 

I with a bachelor's degree must 

I range from $2400 to S3200 after 

NOl- 4^-7-28 



nine years, with a $100 a year 
increase. The scale for teachers I 
with a masters degree mu.it range; 
from S2500 to S31300 after 12 years 

Last year's icsle for bachelor's: 
degree teachers ranged from $2050 
to S3250 after 11 years. For mat- I 
ters degree teachers, it was $2200' 
to $3400 af'er 11 years. 



25 CENVrS Ti 



^ v^ 



50 



School 
Income 
Hiked 



Public schools in New Orleans 
will get approximately $250,000 
more this year than the School 
Board expected when the current 
budget was adopted. 

The money will come from in- 
creased assessemnts on real and 
personal property. 

Walter Latapie. chief accountant 
for the School Board, explained 
that the school share of tax money 
brings in approximately S7000 on 
each SI million in assessments. 

Assessments have gone up S36 
million this year over 1947, 
Charles Zatarain. member of the 
I..ouisiana Tax Commi.«;sion. said 
today. In 1947. real and personal 
property was assessed at S534.- 
736.834. This vear. it is assessed 
at $570,704,742. That is an increase 
of $35,967,908. 

OWE $1,800,000 

Mr. Latapie explained that the 
money might not be available this 
I year, becaiise ordinarily taxes are 



I not collected before the end of the 
school sc.«.'ion in May. 

In all I i-jlihood, it v ill be added 
to the in48-49 budget which will 
be adopted by the School Board in 
July, he said. 

He explained that the School 
Board borrows money each year to 
finance schools operation, while it 
lis waiting for the tax money to be 
collected. If the School Board 
wants to spend the $250,000 before 
school closes in June, the board 
will have to amend its budget and 
borrow more money from the 
banks. 

. "I don't know whether we can 
|do that." Mr. Latapie said. At 
present, the School Board owes the 
banks Sl.800.000 which it has bor- 
rowed for current operations. That 
money will be repaid by July when 
all 1947 taxes have been collected. 

TEACHERS ASK RAISE 

The School Board did not expect 
(he S250.000 when the present 
budget was adopted, and therefore 
has not decided how the money 
will be spent. 

However, the Classroom Teach- 
ers' Federation has demanded a 
$950 annual increase for each 
teacher on sabbatical leave. If that 
increase is granted, it will cost 
approximately S27.550. The School 
Board has promised the federation 
|a re-hearing on its demands. 

NOl-48-Z-l6^ 



Miss Jenn" l!oo|i. secret-i'-,- of 
the TeachT' R«f(irement l.-jard j 
said that ITv of the 202 efiredl 
teachers will i;et pension ii>croases 
ranging from 25 cents to ?r2.50 a 
month. 

Eighty-nine retired tearhers will 
have their pensions brought to 
$100 a month, and 65 will gei 
slinhtly less than $100. she said. 

The 32 retired teachers which 
are not getting any increase are 
already receiving IlOO or more a 
month, she said. 

The amount of each teacher's in- 
crease is based on a complicated 
formula. 

Alabamai 
Teachers 

Salary Hike 

.MONTGOMERY, .^a.. (AP) — 
Adoption of the constitutional 
iniendment diverting income tax 
unds to education will enable the 
itate Department of Education to 
itarly double its minimum pro- 
:ram allocation to county boards 
or rank five teachc-s. those with a 
ear of college or Ic.^.s. Education 
SuperiBiendcnt . A. R Meadows' 
aid today. ; ' , 

Rank ooe teachers, thpse with a' 
nastf r's degree, will i -^alize a mm- ; 
mudi alioca'ipn l^ikc of more than 
;700 a \ ear. The intermediate , 
anks will be increased propor- 
ionalel>. ' 

This does not mean, however, 
^at teachers necessarily will re- 
.•eive salar>' increases in this pro- 
portion. .Meadows said. This "in- 
crease applies onh' to the scale 
used in allocation of state funds 
to supplement local funds of the 
various schools. 
j FUNDS AVAILABLE 

"Local school boards determine 
the salary of the indi\idual teach- 
er in terms of funds available, ex- 
perience and other measures of 

NO 1-^7-8-28 



3^3 



roblems and needs. -- 



Urge More Scholarships to Attract Best 



I • line (uu oi e\er.\ tliiee studciii^ 

I \\ uh tlje iii^i .11 rlinalidii lu>;h. on the Princeton lunipiis is woik- 
Ainei'ii'iin iollPCc> and unnersi- mp his way thioush collcRe with 
ties miiNi piovide a steal tiuiTihei a iMmpii.- job which pa>> wliole 
of adrliiional scholaiships and. or pait of his tuition and ex- 
cantpiis jolw to attract Kood sin- penses, it was reported. 



dents, three Prinicton iiniversit.\' 
officials deilaied here toila.v . 

The men. principals in a scliol- 
arship loriini at liie.St. Charles. 



srfid The.v are plncln:■M.^ .., u-- 
sir values as taught in liberal 
education schools." 
. Blown believes thei* Is 'too 
much stress on specialization " 
Donald Holmes Wallace, head 



"We realize" added Morgan. 

Ulal the best student is not al- 

wa.vs the one who can afford col- 

lece An increased number of 



are William Kdwards. head of Ihelscholarships and iobs should be 
admi.-sious oftice oi Princeton made available so that colleges 
Mlnot f. .Morgan. .Ir., director of|ian attract the best students. 
Princetons rfiudeni employ nienl whether or not tliev can afford 
bureau, and* Austin P. IMaittl. 'the entire cost of their education." 
Jchairman of ilic -rhools ancj 
scholarship c.,.nu. It lee. .^^^ ,„,,,„„ „..^^ ,,,„ opening 



scholarship c.,.nu.iti«. - ron.m ..pens ^,e.vslol, 

I TK- ,,i.„.. „.ii ... Ai^„ The forum was the opening 

and "na"J al 'we V •r.^ch hei=" "meeting of the National .Xlum- 
stage Where w. will ha^e no Gl !"' •^l■"^rl'"" " ,r''";,":'i:"„.^'^f': 



bill students. ' the trio said. 
Must Rrplarr Gl .Aid 

But though <!1 suidem ranks 
will be depleted the increase in 
education, which has soared in 
the United States since war days. 



will continue upward, the Prince- 
ton men agieed. . 

"This means." said Kdwards. 
"colleges and universities \^■ill 
have to provide a good number of 
scholarships and campus jobs to 
replace the CI bill." 



ngs will continue through to- 
morrow. 

lames Douglas Brown, Prince- 
ton dean of faculty, who was to 
adfiress a luncheon session at .4n- 
toines. .said he would stress the 
importance of a liberal education. 
"Many of the problems of to- 
day — the one with Russia, for in- 
stance — are not alwavs the jobs 
for men in specialized fields." he! 



M0S-48-4-Z — 



of the Woodiow Wilson School oi 
Public and International Affairs, 
which will be inaugurated at 
Princeton this fall, also favored 
the liberal education plan. 
To .\(ldrp!i$ Dinner 

Wallace will addre,s.« the alum- 
ni dinner at International House 
at 8 p m. today and will point 
out the aim of the new school. 

Tiltlcn Cummings. chairman of 
the conference, was to preside at 
the luncheon meeting lodav and 
Robert .M. Walmsley. president of, 
the Louisiana as.sociation of^ 
Princeton, was to give the wel- 
coming address. 

The third session will open to- 
morrow at in a. m. at the St 
K'harles. Cummings will receive 
executive reports on alumni as- 
sociation activities. 

Mr. and .Mrs. P'rank G. Stra 
Chan. 1134 First street, w-lll 
hosts at a leception at 7 p ni t( 
morrow for the visiting alumni 



he 




TulaneWili 
.Raise Tuition 

j Rising costs have forced an in- 
crease of appioximatelv 17 per 
cent in all the colleges and 
■schools of Tulane university, 

•resident Rufus C. Harris an- 

lounced today. 

He also said the probability of 
)peratlng the university on a def- 
»cit budget was another factor in 
the tuition Increase. 

All Increases become effective 
August 15. 

I In all colleges except the school 
|of medicine, tuition will be hiked 
Ifrom $300 a year to $3.M). Tuition 
|I|) the school of nw«lci»e will be 
Oicreased from $4.<0 >o $550 a 
vear. 

The $100 yearl'- univejwftv fee 
charged all fulWi..ie -.tifdents will 
not be raiscfr. ^residem Harris 
added. '^ ^ 

Part-time 'ij|»ior.' -.pU'' be In- 
creased proportlopiiijej^,'^ 

"At present 'tuition 'covers 75.8 
per cent of the total educational 
lincome of the cui'rent vear which 
has been placed at $3,037,084. In- 
Icome from endowment invest- 



ments, unrestncie*- invt xn.ent.s. 
unrestricted gifts and g.-ants for 
current operations and miscel- 
llancous sales_and service.* consti- 

Presiljln-'T^*"*"^ -'■' « ''P-- '«■"«.•• 
t^ies dent Harris poiiued out 

'hese figures "^^h"." '""",' P^lT' ■'" ' 
uK ures, he continued, "is 

the unduly high proportion of in- 
come derived from student fees. 
National averages indicate that in 
state institutlpns student fee.o 
constitute only 2.'i-.?0 per cent of 
total educational income, while in 
privately endowed institulionw 



students contribute not more than 1 
50-55 per cetit of the total In- 1 
come. This dependence on student! 
fees makes Tulane's financial pic- 1 

•lire hio-hU- .pp^invp to pnrnll-' 

NOS-48-5-tf 

,Ask tree \ 

\College 
Tuition 

WASHINGTON, (UP)— Pr/g- 
ident Truman's commission on 
higher education urged today that 
all worthy students be given 



tuition-free schooling through the 
first two years of college. 
I Calling for "sweeping changes" 
lin higher education, the commis- 
sion also recommended a reduc- 
tion in tuition fees for college up- 
per classmen and graduate stu- 
dents, prompt elimination of the 
"quota system" and segregation 
and doubling present college at- 
tendance by 1960. 

In the first of six volumes re- 
porting on "higher education for 
American democracy," the 30- 
member commission also told Mr. 
Truman that many of the Euro- 
pean concepts bt education should 
iDe abandoned and that the Amer- 
ican education system should be 
'strengthened and attuned "to the 
I needs of the free citizens of our 
democracy." 

NEW SYSTpi 

It recommended i system of 
"community colleger' to proVfde 
all qualified sUpents with *t least 
14 years, of "DOication at. public 
cost — eight yVais of elementary 
schooling, four < 'ctgh school and 
the first two y^^rs in <^llege._The 
proposed community r o 1 1 e'g e i 
I would correspond to junior col^ 
! leges. / 



@) 



3S4 



ISNGFiir 
FORJDUCATl 

Discuss Additional Appropria- 
tion For State Public 
Schools 

»,?^T.*""*'*'°"' *° provide J59,. 
725,000 .dd.tional fmai.cal support for 
t-uman. .chooU in the next two 
years, and suggestions to the legisU- 
«ure on how such funds might be 
derived were under discussion by the 
United School Committee of Louisiana 
in Alexandria, said ^Irs. W. S Vin- 
cent, a member of the committee. 

Composed of represenUtives of sUte 
organizations of school boaj-ds, super- 
intendents, parent-teachers, teachers, 
and classroom teachers, the committee 
has as its major function "to sceure 
agreement on a legislative program 
tor the children of the sUte that all 
school groups can and will support." 

Before going mto the list of 13 rec- 
ommendaUons that had been sug- 
gested, the committee voted to invite 
the president of Louisiana Sute Uni- 
versity to attend or to send a repre- 
sentative to the next committee meet- 
ing. 

WhUe sUting that "it is the pro- 
vince and duty of the legislature to 
determine sources of revenue for gov- 
emmenUl funcUons, including, educa- 
tion," the recommendations suggested 
as means of securing additional dedi- 
cated funds for schools: 

1. The present one per cent sales 
tax. 

2. An additional one per cent sales 
tax. 

3. An increase in the gas gathering 
tax. 

i- Tax derived from revenues from 
tide water bottoms and other mineral 
lands. 

j 5. Repeal of the ten-year ta\ ex- 
emption for new industry. 
I 6. Increase the state income lax. 

7. Appropriations from the general 
fund. 

The estimate for the $39,723,000 ad- 
ditional funds to be needed by the 
schools in the next two years was 
based on the report of an investigat- 
committce. which reported the find- 
ings to the slate convention of the 
Louisiana Teachers' Association last 



, It includH 11.250,000 for additional 
I teachers required by the 12-year pro- 
gram; $550,000 for addiUon.l children 
I due to the increased birth rate; J8 100 - 
'000 for 50,000 children not now en- 
I rolled in school; $500.00« foT'^pHng 
teacher pekilions vacant because if 
teacher shfcrugea. and lack of sch(»ol 
funds; Jl,ao,<M»to ^upply 300 teacWers 
needed -^o meet the needs of the 
new eri."; S8.100.000 for equaliition 
of the SBliiries of white and -TJegro 
teachers: $12,500,000 for 2,500 additional 
Negro teachers; $3,000,000 for addition- 
al transporation for Negro children; 
$24,000,000 for the $2,400 minimum sal- 
I ary and adequate pay for other school 
employes. 

Also slated for discussion were rec- 
ommendations that the teacher tenure 
law remain as is, that changes be 
made in other teacher welfare laws 
'as requested by the L. T. A., and that 
the SUte legislature consider the 
change in the method of selection of 
a state superintendent of education. 

The seventh recommendation slated ' 
for study is that an expert in school ' 
finance be employed to study, the { 
present method of apportioning school ! 
funds and to make recommendations 
for a more equitable distribution 
thereof, and the eighth that the "lax 
assessment system in Louisiana be 
carefully studied by competent au- 
thorities and adjusted to bring about 
an equalization of values for tax as- 
sessment purposes." 

The report urged that the state 
recognize the need to assist parishes I 
in providing satisfactoi-y school plants 1 
and that it provide funds on a mateh-t 
mg basis for the improvement and ■ 
furnishing of school plants, and that i 
school boards be given authority to [ 
increase total indebtedness from ten. 
to fifteen per cent of assessed prop- 
erty valuation for the improvement 
of plants, and that funds now held in J 
trust by the state (from 16th sections) 
be made available at the option of' 
the loacal boards for improvement 
and furnishing of plants. 

The report also recommended that | 
the school lunch program be ex-' 
panded, that the present five-miU 
maintenance tax be continued and 
that the constitutional tax of five 
mills now levied by school boards be 
increased to ten mills on the doUar 
of assessed valuation. 

The report urged support of the 
legislative school program by all or- 
ganizations and their legislative 
groups, and that each parish and city 
school system create a committee sim- 
ilar to the state organization to dis- 
seminate information and create and 
mobilize interest in and for the school 
progiam. 



TO URGE OIL ^ 
REVENUES FOR 
SCHOOL FUND 



Proposal Will Be Made 
at Convention of 
Board State ^ 



Monroe. March 7 (;P),-a propoaal 
to use tldeUnda oil lease revenues 
and roysltles to augment Louisiana's 
public school finances win be prs- 
sente<l to the state school boards 
convention here tomorrow. 

A constitutional amendment would 
be necessary to divert the funds. The 
associations' support of such an 
amendment will be sought. 

Fre<l O. Thstcher. executive secre- 
tary of the association, who revealed 
plans for the proposal said It was 
one of two suggested remedies for 
the schools' financial plight. 
' The other and less favored pro- 
posal, he said, was to turn all pro- 
ceeds of the state sales ux over to 
the educstlonal system. 

Thatcher said educators are wor- 
ried now over a 814.800.000 deficiency 
In the current school budget which 
provided 133.000.000 for the cur- 
rent term. In addition, he added. 
•3,600,000 Is needed for the employers 
stiare of the teacher retirement pro- 
gram. 

Thatcher said the school system 
geu tl2.000.000 from the state sever- 
ance tax. (3.500.000 from the ad 
valorem property tax. 11.500.000 from 
the gasoline tax and tl.SOO.OOO from 
the tobacco Ux. This $18,500,000 Is 
permanenily !ledlcaf<>d to school use. 
The balance of school funds must 
come from emergency appropriations. 
he saM. 

Krri'-rgency HPi'ropriatlons from the 
stats general fund and the property 
tax relief fund will Axplre soon, he 
addfd, leavlns the .'scnools short. 

Thatxihor <>xpUlned thai under the 
constitution tidelands revenues now 
must be used for retirement of the 
state debt. 

"However." he said, "state bonds 
are secured by specific taxes and 
(10.000.000 in tidelands revenues are 
lying Idle in the state treasurers of- 
fice right now." 

Approximately 200 delegates are ex- 
pected to attend the two-day meeting. 



MMV/-4S-4-H 



57-^8-3-3 



L 



J 



385 



Increase in Tuition for War Vets ---^ .::Z :::.,"'V..::: .Iv 

Sought by Private Trade Sc/200/s ,-,;:-- ;::,:. r ::.::;• t" 






Contendinp thai .1' en i 
lowances from flie Ww. 
ministrauoii for ti.M"i> 
Tetera ns has made it uiiy 

I to fonduct their ii;iile ^c■hool!<. a 
numlipr of school operators have 
launched here efforis t<- obtain 
more liberal payments from 



the 



lion so vetiniM-; mav mt lr:iin- 

b»it is Dill »illiiiir to -iul^idizeUfui 
■ .1 i'i-<? opernlion of the (school. | private 
iiistrotv^ nor Ynrhrnueh jiaiii-d 
set up for 



.eiiion. he innnt!' 



iniiion 
profit" 



\-iih 

• I 'hat tlie standard 
1- iriide Mliods :ir. 



hi:;h. 



Tra.li? 



iho.ds 



mill (red I 



ukU 



<i:«M 



rni 



■ei thoM- siaiuhirils luiore they 
appr<ived f,.r Vetera 
VA for the veterans enrolled injiion by ihe eiliiration department 
these schools. la necessity before thf VA will per- 

The operators i laini that thej iniil veteians to attend, 
cannot nieci the standard.-' set ui | The standaids. they 
by the State Uejiartnient of Kdu-^||ino with tho.-^e of 



■ hool 



or o|>cration ol 
.. - pi.llows onh a ineacrc pro' it 
in^fuc-' less Ihe s-n.iul is e.\rei-ilinKl.\ 
.peialed. lie sa>s. to... Ihal 
lei'.iitnieiu "f •diication do 
IV ant ih." ^. hoo" 



the 
•snt 
iwn. 



say, 
other 



na just has no facilities for 
(lucalion ."f its ni^aro vei- 
ns. The state d.>i-sn't particular- 
■f the public tr.ide schools. They ly want to enter the traile 8cho.>I 
nsist a principal or .lireit.ir is fiehi 'n a larue «ay jiist now. 
so that the school will ^perhaps on the ihe..rv that the 
stanilards do Itleniand is a teni|iorar.\ oiie. boucht 
director does jon by the V-\s willint-ness to fool 
■ teach if he the costs of schooling for vet- 
wishes. However. VA has refused jf"J'=' 
to allow adilitional tuition money lo 
meet the ir\ ..f this director. 

Protest 8-Hour Limit 



Dv Tne •^laif l/c|".i. i...^... -■» »^<"".|iiii^- «ii.i ..i.»>t' ..i i.ii.i'i relates tl'ade 
cation under the present Hnancia ^and ai-e in line with those required 
arraneemeni. r'f the piii>ii.- ii:..ip -;ci.....ls Th<.v 

There an- 4.'' private tradt; insist a 
schools in the state with approxj-lnccessary so 
mately .iiMiii veterans enrolled, ac- have a head. The 
cordine to .Max Yarl.roiich. super-'not reimire that thi; 
visor of tra.le artd industrial educa- „.i teachin:;. He m 
ti(,>n vvith tlo- fState Department of 
Educ^ttion. The majority of these 
are nepro veterans. In addition 
Itheie are TJ public trade schools, 
'two of which are for negroes. 

The Southern reRional office of 
Ihe V.^ with headquarters in .N"e 
• 'rleans is prrsentlv alli 

montn for tuition plus supplies. 

sharp decrease from the $40 to 

a month previously allowed. The 



Another re.|iiiremeni auuinsll 

^^ ..Inch objection has be<n raised 

J.,- limits actual leacbinK time to eisht 

hours a da.v. The department savs 

il is is pl'-nty to spend in teachins 

a •111 the efficiency decreases after 

" r- ;his point. The schools, most of 

orthern reeional office with head- ^vhich run two five-lioui- shifts 
"'' "■"■ """■■'■ Liid like this raised to 10 hours a 



irters in Shrev.port n. 
flat S4n a ni.^nth with 
• nt for i-iii.pliP.«. ■ 

Allotments Differ 



allows 
allot- 



.la 



The situatloi 

explains, when 

one .if the bones of ..intention nepro veterans 

the difference in the allotments jn trade school 

l.iwed by the two reuior.al olTices. | public trade schools 

ih .if which are under the juris- sections of liie state 

. tion of Ihe Dallas branch office 

. f V.\. Nicholson iiosi of the 

Vinerican l>e.sion has adopted a 

. -olution asking I lie .New Orleans 

■ rrice to inci-ease the allounent for 

■ iiion. 

The VA offers an alternat 
Ihe flat $36 plus supplies fee||vide the 



ar ise. Varbrouah 

.ttieat numbers of 

desired to enroll 

Louisiana h 



in 



one at 
Southern 
than :;oo 
Ki schools 
ided and 



|Yarbrough and his immediate chief 
Donovan Arnistronp. supervisor of 
distributive .ducat i.m in the De- 
partment of Kducati.m. sa.v. Sch.'.ils 
'U-hich can justify higher tiiiti.m 
through submitting: cost data are 
mvit.'d to do so. 

.\rmstrons: says, 'however, that 
■le schools complain that the VA 
as refused to allow the salary of 
director, insisted upon by the 
iH|iartment of Kducatioii. for the 
• hools with more than one teach- 
r. The VA in justifving thi.. stand 
as held that there is no reason for 
: lo assume the full cost of main- 
ainin? and establishins trade 
. Iiools in Louisiana. It is willing 



(irambling and one a 
ol"fer facilities for les; 
neffi-o students. Even th 
lor whites are overcr 
have waiting lists. 

The V.\ was wilting to pay a 
to Ij I humping sum for tuition to pro- 
training. The result: 



And eilucation for the trades is 
recognized to be an expensive 
type of education, he p.iinis out. 
Special eqii'pnu'nt is needed, some 
of it expensive, and the state in- 
sists that the instructors have at 
least the status of journeymen in 
their nade .\t thi« iM)int such in- 
struction comes high. 

Then. too. the state insists that 
the school is not a commercial 
venture and work done by th* 
students cant be allowed to com^ 
pete against private business. Thf. 
the operators contend, cuts dow| 
,in profits. Yarbrough said. 

ActuaMv if the school could hii 
i.iit its students in auto mechanics 



various i baking 



shoe r 
ing. cooking. 



numerous trade schools, privately 

BRT-47-U-6 



i-pair work, lailot 
baking and th, 



ilar trades they are learning, 
it might take in a tidy sum. 

But the main quarrel of the 
sclio.ils seems to be wilh the \ .-V 
at this point. Tli.^ allotments for 
tuition vary from s(ate lo stale, 
region to region and even from 
cily lo eiiv- 

In Houstim lu.tion is avoiil %M 
a month including su|)plies while 
in San .\ntoi\io it ranges from 
S.!6 to *2» a month, all sent out 
from the DaM.is office which also 
passes on the Ixiuisiana allot- 
ments. ,\llotinents for Mi.-sissippi 
are even higher I ban those of 
Ixiuisiana or Texas. 
' The Deiiartment of K.ducaii.in 
believes its standards are rea.son- 
uble an. I in line with what is 
necessary for a good education. 
I.Mo.st schools are meeting the 
stati.lards. But the department 
admits iKe decreased allotment 
probably does work a Hardship, 
.-specially for smaller schools. 



366 



New Fund 
Sources Held 

Education Need 



BT PATRICIA SINCLAIR 

Schools must tap new sources of revenue to get the 
money they need, school superintendents said here today. 
Most agreed that property taxes have gone as high as 
the public will permit. 



A survey of superintendents 
ihowed that New Orleans' seven- 
mill tax on real and personal prop- 
erty for schools is one of the low- 
est in the country. 

Thirty-eight superintendents 
from cities over 200.000. popula- 
tion are here today for th** semi- 
annual meeting of the American 
Association of School Ad^ninis- 
trators. 

"The only ultimate base ■ is a 
graduated income tax." Supt. Low- 
ell P. Goodrich, of Milwaukee, said. 
Supt. Earl A. Dimmick, of Pitts- 
gurgh, agreed. 

Other superintendents suggested 
tales taxes, corporation taxes, fed- 
eral aid, more state aid and other 
forms of taxation as the answer 
to the school money problem. 

TAXES LEVIED 

Here are some of the property * 

taxes levied for schools in various /^ t T C T I 

cities: Pittsburg, IP* mille; Mil- S^lcLTK 03yS LSLCK 

waukee, 14''2 mills; Louisville, /^ e r^ f r bt 

Ky , 13>i! mills, and Akron, O., 13 (Jt t 1^/205 IS NegTO 

A survey of superintendents also CollGSG P T Oul G 112 
owed that New Orleans, with ° ^• 



000 for 37,000 children and Akron, 
$7,500,000 for 45,000 children. 

At least one city, San Diego, 
levies a sales tax for schools. At 
present the tux is 2! mills, but 
Supt. Will C. Crawford expects it 
to be increased to 3 mills soon. 

Superintendents said schools 
must have more money to do a 
first-class job in high schools. 
They say too many children drop 
out of school when they finish 
elementary grades. 

They talked about the school 
problem yesterday aboard the 
"Good Neighbor" while they 
cruised around the port as guests 
of the Dock Board. 

Supt. William E. Moreland, of 
Houston, cited his city as an ex- 
ample. 



•how 

approximately 45,000 children at 
tending public schools, has a 
smaller school budget than most 
cities. Total school revenue here 
from state and local sources is 
approximately $9 million 



Dr. Felton Clark, president of 
Southern university, and Ralph 
.tones, president of Grambllng col-: 
lege, last night told a meetlngr of 
the legislative committee on edu- 
r^.- J ,,„„ .,,. cation survej- -that the primary 

Chicago spends $103 million on „,.„h,.„ „, '^, „„ii..„ ■ ™1 

nnnn -i.;ij r;„ / | problem of negro colleges is one 

of finances. Enrollment. they 
pointed out. is far above facilities 
and hundreds of applications are 



380.000 children. Figures from 
other cities are: Houston, $14 
million for 87.000 children; Seat- 
tle. $12,500,000 for 55,000 chil- ru7ned"dow7 verrlv 
dren; Toledo, $7 million for 33,- 
000 children; Louisville $7,500,- 



L 



Clark pointed out that Southern 
is one of 17 land grant colleges 
for negroes in the I'nited States, 
Is the third largest negro land 
grant school in the country and 
the sixth l<-)rgest negro college in 
the United States. There are now 
2200 students. 90 per cent of whom 
come from Louisiana. , 

Southern, he said. Is offering In- 
struction to 247 GI students be- 



jlow the college level and iheae 
are receiving vocational tralnlnf. 
Trendi to Continue 
"We believe this ht^b enroll- 
ment will : continue." Clark said. 
I "The.negfo believe* In education. 
Your'Waah^Cman will go without 
[■■hots to tend her chtlit^jo college 
'largely! because to the i)fegro edu- 
cation i« a panacea." 

Soujhvi u draws ' its enrollment 
froaf/ all over Louisiana, with 
smallest enrollment from the 
southwest section of the state, he 
continued. Clark pointed out that 
there is a need for negro physi- 
cians, dentists and nurses and said 
that education must be provided 
for the negro if he Is to carry his 
own weight economically speaking. 

The faculties of the negro col- 
leges are almost as well prepared 
as those of the white colleges, he 
said, and many former Instructors 
at Southern are now on the facul- 
ties of white colleges. Sixty-two 
negroes are now teaching In white 
institutions, he said. 

This situation. Clark pointed oul 
means that not only do negT' 
schools compete for the service 
of negro teachers but white col 
Irffp.s are now employing them. H" 
pointed out that a negro fron 
Southern is now with the state 
dep.irtment serving on a commis- 
sion In South Africa. 

The Gaines decision in which the 
United States Supreme court held 
that a negro had a right to enter 
the University of Missouri unless 
the state provided equal educa- 
tional opportunities In the same 
field has meant that Southern 
states are establishing additional 
schools for negroes and are provid- 
ing additional educational oppor- 
tunities, he pointed out. 
Lists Needs 

Clark listed as spe#ial needs at 
Southern more classroom buildings, 
additional dormitories, a building 
for the new law school and campus 
improvements. 

Jones said that Gramhling col- 
lege is specializing in the Held of 
rural elementary education and has 
field teams that follow up the 
school graduates to' see that they 
are taking the lead in a program 
of community betterment. 
I Grambllng ' was established In 
1928 and now has an enrollment 
of 710 student*, he continued. The 
.school i.s building racial good will,: 
he continued, and works constantly < 
among negro communities In an 4 
effort to improve living conditions 



.for negroes. All the students are 

from Louisiana. 
I A representative from Readers" ' 
r Digest will visit Grambllng next I 

tfee^k to write about what the school* 
;)s doing in the field of community; 
I service, he reported. The work is 

'innue in the nation. Dr. J W ' 

Brouillette, advisor to the commit- I 
I tee. said. • | 



387 



Fletcher Complains 

SLI's Funds Are Slashed 
$129,305.00 By Legislature 

Lafayette. La. (Sp!/' — The house Monday approved an appropriation for 
S?. 569. 5 18 for '.he rcxt two years for Southwestern Louisiana Institute. This 
means that Southwestern will actually have $129,3 05 less with which to op- 
erate during the next year. tion--Sr-$24.0«0: a requirement 
according to President t!-.at the coUete contiibpte about 
.)oel E. Fletcher. S35,iK)0 a ye«.- out of its SjMflget 



as its shar« to the retirement 



The . institute president said , . ■, u- . ^^ , 

t).a» the reduction represented in fJ-^'^"* for jmp oy^ of 4 he col - 
the house-approved apprnpria- '^^'^ " ^^'^^ "^^ ' V-"" T2, 1 p, h , -, . k 
tionco-pesfrom an acfuarreduc-,f^'^°""'"' " ^'^'^■^''- ^-t'-^'Pated I President rletoher sn>d 



reduction In vt*e(anf fee* 

Altogether, ♦.he i hoi'se-aporovet 
'imount means a redu^ion o 
$1.4Ii2,3o-; ^rom the .imount re- 
commended by the state bonrt 
of education for Southwestern 



Ov/-48-«-Z3 



$110 Million 
In School 
Jobs Urged 

MONROE, La., March 9. lAP'— Ai 
I $110,000,000 construction program 

was described to the Louisiana 
I School Boards association here as | 

an "Immediate requirement" for 

maintenance and expansion of the | 
I states educational systeiii. 
i C. E. Laborde, itate siArvisor of 

school plants aid transportation. 

told delegates that white jjul ilegro 

building neads Include ,^iore than 

4,000 cla&srpoms in «dditlon to 

gymnasiumsl lunchrooms, auditor- 
iums and sjpcial workshops. 
These facilities, he said, were 

listed as essential by . superlnten- i.„j _,_._-_._, I ment 

sy^mt' "tS^ '"" T^'' " ^r' ' Un"'"^T^:^nate measure. Dr.' Teaching is 

omL^ l^T l^'an »8o.- shared in the proportion of each r,«-!arin» th,t ^«, 

000,000. Similar requirements m the I ^^ j^e total population of the ,,°r k! i.I ,L ™ ' 



delegates heard a variety of sug- 
gestions on means of obtaining 
necessary funds. 

State Senator Gilbert F. Henni- 
gan of Beauregard parish declared 
the Louisiana legislature must pro- 
vide a minimum of $27,000,000 dur- 
ing the next two years. Even this, 
he said, "will not finance an ade- 
quate program. ' ' 

In addition to the construction 
program. Louisiana schools need 
$59,000,000 more during the next two 
years for expansion of sen'ices and 
broadening of educational pro- 
grams, said Dr. L. P. Terrebonne, 
superintendent of Iberville parish 
schools. 

Dr. H. M. Ivey. superintendent ot 
Meridian. Miss., schools, praised a ' , _, , 

bi-partisan measure awaiting action "« »''" ^'TZ.L '^ '' =''""- 
,...._. ,_^ ... „,5 ,j '«e<l salary of in.nno to ts.eoo ■-- 



CONSTITITION :MrST 
BK AMENDED TO AID 
SCHOOLS, COXE SAYS 

j B^top Ro.iee. Oct 25 t^.- State 
I Suoerlntpn<lpn» of Education John E. 
Coxp rtfclareri today that the state 
: ronstltiition shniiirt be amendpd to 
Ziiarantpc .statp .support of .srhools at 
least tip to the «.i.i 000.000 »n;iually 
now provided. 

In a ;p<-i!>n prepared for delivery 
at the Oftnber eriiic«llonal conference 
at Louisiana S'ate university the 
."superintendent propoaed dedication 
by law of taxe.? "to guarantee that 
the present amounts ol sta'.e iinan- 
cial supp.nrt. amounting to ».33.262,- 
868. wii: be maintained as a mini- 
mum." 



by tne senate which, he said, would 
provide $300,000,000 a year "with no 
strings attached." i 

He emphasized that 'local control 
of the schools must continue," but 
expressed the opinion that federal 

(funds could be granted without any' encouraKed some temporary teachers 
•interference" In school operation to qualify for permanent appomt- 



nvially for teachers as "the onlv /air 
thing to do." 

He said pay raise* already provided 
Tor teachers had partially checked 
the exodus from the profession and 



I career with a fu- 
sald 



remairung systems will bring the 
total to approximately $110,000,000. 
he said. 

Faced with an operating deficien- 
cy of nearly $14,000,000 for the re- 
mainder of the current school year. 



group 
.state in 
60 to 40. 



pro. .,;ion 
, . , must be made for vocational edura. 

Louisiana, approximately ,. „ „„,, ^,,^ ..,.„,„ ' "' J'auca- 
'^'^ lion. Coxe said. > nur state depart- 

ment of eci'icatlon :» earnestly seek- 
!n? to develop a state pro-am of 
vocntloi^al edi.ication fha* Is reaiisti'- 



LCAP-4fi-3-5 ST- 48-5-8 (%^ 



388 



r 

The Washington Merry-Co-Round 

Roads vs. Schools 



n 



By DREW PF.ARSON j*o 'h* asspmbled citmentT thM tne 

WASHINGTON. Aug. 9. — Ttieiro"'' which pa.tses In front of the 

other dav I wrot« lomethlng about "''""' ''' "— "- •— — -■- 

poorly p«ld schoolteachers of Penn- 
sylvania. R 8tat« in which I used to 



ilivB Todai' I want to wri» some- 
thins ahout the sohoolii of Mary- 
land, a state In which T \\-^J now. 

Some p^ple may thlnJitpat I am 
hipped onVthe question of schools. 
But t/1 me tSpy are one of fce great- 
est bulwark.'* of the na'fin They 
are as much responsible (tr the Ifi- 
telllitence ond Idealism of the 
American people ac anv other in- 
stitution. We cannot stand by and 
see them neglected. 

However, I live In a roimty which 
appears to believe In educational 



school would finally be made over 
new. This hroueht loud rheer.'» from 
evpivone. 

Howevpf. the co.";! of the new I 
road is golnK to be $130,000: and for| 
one-half that amount a new addi' 
tion to the .^choolhouse could be 
built. And althouRh cost* are high 
for building a school, they are 
equally high for laying a road. 

Now some readers of this column 
In Seattle or San Diego may won- 
der why T am boring them with a 
local problem In the distant state 
of Maryland. However, the problem 
isn't local. Prom what I gather it 
exists everywhere, schools through- 



TOEUMRGEO 

UNESCO Wants Project Sup- 
plies Admitted Duty Free; 
Include Former Foes 



appears to believe In educational ^^^^ ^^^ nation are overcrowded, un- 
neglect. That county happens to be cprmanned. the teachers underpaid, 
one of the wealthiest in the wor d. -Thousands of communities are go- 
Thousands of people conunute daUy . ^^ ^^^^^ ,„ aec\6e whether to 
from the District of Columbia into jj^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ „^ „p^ schools 
Maryland, people who help to nin ^^j ^j^jj^ ^oads are Important, 
the goremment of the United ^ ^^^^ ,p ^^ ^ore important 
St.ates. who should believe m good ^ ^^^ j^^^ ^j^^^ children's minds 
e^'ucaUon. ^ , .... cannot wait. Roads can. We can buy 

Yet the school in my part of the ^^ j,^^^ ^^ retread them But you 
county would put to .shame some of ^^^.^ retread children's minds. 
the schools In war-famished Eiirope. Ir^^jj. characters and mentahty are 
Cla*.srooms are overcrowded. Some 'Inoui^p^ young For them the clock 
of the kids have to study in the ^^^ never be turned back. The men- 
halta. Teachers are so overworked|.^^j cobwebs they gather from six to 
and harassed that discipline Is •'"i^foiirteen can never be brushed out. 
most impo.sslble. Furthermore, this fall will see 

The other day a group of citiaen!«gj,jjQQ]j, ^Q^e crowded than ever, 
met In the western part of Mont^lg^^^j^^p^j^ million war babies were 
gomery rounty— a» citizens do ev-i^,^^ ,^„„ j941 through 1!>4B. an in- 
ervwhere— to complain about varl-V-^g^e m our birth rate of SO per 
ous things which the county gov- j-.j^^j g„j n,e biggest crop of chll- 
emment hadn't done but which the .^^^^^ ^^H^ country has ever seen, 
citizens thought should be done. |j^|.,, ^jj^ ^^^ flooding the schools 
Among other things they com- .j^,j, ,^j, 

plained, quite properly, about the j^ ^^^ jgp, „f this, the commis- 
Potomac school. lionera of my county have e\rt the 

Roads ym. Sehoola Ijroposed educational bud get by 

The an.swer. given by one of fhe^^^^Q^Q^ unj pjgn building TTTiew 
county officials, was that building | ^^ instead of new schools, 
costs were too high. Therefore, an, j^ ^^^ ^f n,y neighbors a« sore at 
[addition to the school would have .^^ j^ frowning on the new road. 
Ito wait until building cost* went; .^j yp^jj ^fie school* are Improved, 

'down. Almost tn the same breath, j.^p going to put in my two cents' 

*lhowever. county officials announced ^o^th against It. 



CHICAGO. Sept. 13. -W -The 
United States commission for 
UNESCO today adopted a report of 
one of its sections recommending the 
by-passing of some "nonessential" 
UNESCO projects because of "mere 
important things to be done." 

At tlie same time, it approved the 
report of another section urging 
UNESCO to secure agreement by na- 
tions receiving educational rehabili- 
tation ."njpplios "to assure their en- 
trance free of duty" and advocated 
that the' United States government 
consider including former enemy 
countries within the educational re- 
habilitation program. 

The recommendations, wliich were 
forwarded to the American delefia- 
tiim of the Mexico City conference of 
UNB^CO. convening in November, 
were described by a commission 
spokesman as "not necessarily bind- 
ing" on the 10-member delegation. 
However, the spokesman said, such 
recommendations have been followed 
"almost verbatim in the past." 

As the three-day conference closed, 
a plenary session adopted the recom- 
mendation of the commission's section 
on "Man and the Modem World" 
which disapproved .such UNESCO 
projects as proposals regarding con- 
servation of wild life and town and 
country planning "because they do 
not appear to be appropriate as a 
contribution toward ticace and .-se- 
curity." J 

The corrunission d<*lined to ap- 
prove "nonessential programs because 
they lack merit," but because the 
commission members said they be- 
lieved there were "more important 
things to be done." 



LCAP-^7-g-9 



MMVZ-'IV-^-K 



L 



_l 



389 



r 



Kisunderstandinr.s aad controversial issues . — 

A Better Way Can Be Found 



Within the past day or so, strono- 
opposition has been voicrd to a pro"- 
posal to change the -per educablc' 
system of allocating state school 
funds to one based on average daily 
public school attendance. This op- 
position stems from the fact that un- 
der the proposed formula of thr^ Legis- 
lative School Committee, the funds 
now going to some 22 parishes from 
the state educational appropriation 
would be sharply curtailed. New Or- 
leans -schoolmen, for example, point 
out that state scliool mon'y to this 
city would bq reduced by "approxi- 
mately a million dollars a'year. 

None the less, it is our yiew that a 
demand to retain the faulty per-edu- 
cable yardstick, is not the "right way 
to approach the problem which this 
reduction of school money poses. The 
better method would be to seek a cor- 
rection in the new formula. This 
should present no insurmountable ob- 
stacles. 

On the "per educablc" basis each 
local unit receives so and so much — 
at present $37.50— for each child of 
school age in the parish, without re- 
gard to whether or not that child at- 
tends the public schools. The -infir- 
mity 01 such a system is manifest. In 
some parts of Louisiana a large num- 
ber of children attend parochial or 
other private schools; while in other 
sections, many children from the agri- 
cultural-labor part of the population, 
attend no schools. 



It is now proposed to allot state 
school funds to the parishes on the 
basis of average public school atten- 
dance. In theory, this is far and 
away a rnuch fairer yardstick than 
the number of educable cJiildren in 
the community, where many of these 
do not attend the public schools. Our 
city schools are already in need of 
more money than is available to them. 
According to Superintendent Bour- 



geois, at least, two million dollars more 
is needed annually right now. A cut 
of a million dollars a year from state 
sources would mean tliat three mil- 
lion dollars more would have to be 
put up_ by the local community. 

In considering this it should be 
borne in mind that New Orleans al- 
ready puts into the state .school fund 
much more than is sent back by the 
state to this city. Actually a cut of 
one million dollars in the state allo- 
cation would not mean that some- 
thing the state contributes to the city 
would be cut, but that the city would 
get back even le.<:s of its contribution 
to the state than it gets back now. 

Obviously, that is no' equitable. 
But going back to an e;ivlir r and very 
dubious system is not thr -vay to cor- 
rect it. Tlie maUer i.-^ n-t too diffi- 
cult. It p;,.c';t., an ?- ' -arial prob- 
lem that c :' ii -.ivcd : ■ ordinary ac- 
tuarial ir ; ' r ; All at is nc'eded 
is to dc' - ..- for: ■ a for distrib- 
uting f'!';- ^ .,:■ ihe b.isis of average 
school :iti !i( mce which, with \ 
radical revi.siiii of tli" presently in- 
defensible •equalization fund."" will 
give to every parish. New Orleans in- 
cluded, a proper proportion of the 
state school appropriation. 

By limiting the amount of this 
equalization fund and setting forth 
the stipulations under which it can 
be used to .supply additional educa- 
tional revenue for the really ni-edy 
parishes, and then working out an. 
honest and just formula for allocating 
the main body of state school moneys, 
each parish can receive its proper 
share, to be administered to the ben- 
efit of the children for whom the state 
schools are maintained. The present 
method is a subterfuge, and as such 
is unworthy of being utilized for the 
maintenance of the system through 
which Louisiana's children are to be 
educated to upright, decent and use- 
ful citizenship. 



L 



NOI-12-5-7 



■cxj^ 



~\ 



J 



390 



Mayor Opposes Any Hike 
In Taxation Now 



Gives View 
In Letter To 
School Plea 

M«yor Morrison Saturday ex- 
pressed opposition to any plan that 
v/oxild increase the tax. burden on 
the public "at this time " 

In answer to a letter from Lionel 
J. Bourgeois, superintendent of 
public schools, who asked that the 
city take cognizance of the financial 
plight of the school board when 
earmarking more revenues hv ad- 
ditional taxes. Motrison said that 
he opposes "any idea of additional 
taxation or additional indebtedness 
t^his time." , 

The mayor said he had i\e sup 
port of Commissioner, McOloskei 
«nd Commissioner Hoiard pn hi 
viewpoint. . \ 



'> 



Committee Okay 
Bill for Sales 
Tax Poll Here 

A bill to give the East Baton' 
RouKe parish school board power 
to call an election to levy a sales 
tax- cleared its first legislative' 
hurdle yesterday when it won a 
favorable report from the house 
ways and means committee. The 
measure now comes up in the 
house for final passage. 

Amended to include all parishes. 
the bill as finally approved by the 
committee provides that farm 
machinery would be exempt from 
the tax. As original drawn, the pro- 
posal applied only to £ast Baton 
Rouge and Caddo. The vote for a 
favorable report was 10 to six. 
Jack Leads Fight 

Rep. Wellborn Jack of Caddo, 
^ and Rep. J. H. Anderson of Ver- 
non led the fight agaimit the bill, 
with Rep. A. Douglas Booth of 
Richland joining them. 

Dr. C. L. Barrow. East Baton 
I Rouge school superintendent, read 
I a statement to the committee, ex- 



T h e corresptindcnce bAweer" 
Morrison and Bourgeois afosi aftei 
Commissioner Qtt made public 

• plan for new taxation hr wa; 
considering. 

OTT PLAN 

The Ott plan was to float a $2f 
million bond issue to be earmarkec 
for the repair and construction o: 
streets. 

Ott explained that by placing ar 
annual tax on all motor vehicle 

• n estimated $1 million dollar rev 
enue could be secured by the cit> 

This $1 million per year wouic 
be used to pay off the bond issue 

However. Morrison pointed out 
In his letter to Bourgeois that "this 
^v■as his own (Ott's) personal view. 
not mine or the commission coun- 
cil. , 

NOI-47-8-18 



c^IP 



I plaining the need tor.^additional| 
I funds for building purpcBes in the 
parish. He poi^dTouKithat the 
I people arel adrea^- payinV a big . 
! property taMJarU^^iiabe thought I 
' the people IpemBfu-gg'^hould have 
I the chainceWo vote on the sales I 
levy. . j 

I Barrow said that the cities of, 
Shrevepcrt and Baton Rouge 
(where the original bill would have 
made the tax permissible) are large 
shopping centers "but even so it 
would be conservative to estimate 
that at least &5 or 90 per cent of 
such a tax would be paid by the 
people of Caddo and East Baton | 
Rouge if the tax were voted. . . .i 
It should be remembered." he con- 
tinued, "that most of the state 
sales tax has been and will con- 
tinue to be collected in the larger 
centers of the state while the bene-' 
Iflts of such taxes are state-wide 
in application." 



■As a matter of fact. I disos.ee 
completely with any additional in- 
debtedness at this time. We prom- 
ised to reduce taxes and not to 
increase them, and we do not pro- 
pose to disregard our obligations." 
"NO NEW PROJECTS • 
Morrison said that only the condi- 
tion on which he would favor any 
borrowing of money at this time 
would be in the same manner that 
the $23,500,000 bond issue was fi- 
nanced. 

He said that it did not authorize 
any new taxes and did not pro- 
vide for any change in present 
taxes or present assessments. As 
explained in the bond election, 
Morrison said, we are using as 
seciiritv ti'" ■■ eds of the 

same 10 mills of ad valorem tax 
I we have had since 1890. 

Furthermore, he said, "until the 
$23,50».000 is expended and the 
S5 million voted in 1943 for avia- 
tion bonds is used, we should not 
entertain new projects involving 
additional taxes or additional obli- 
gations." 

I Barrow Speaks i 

He added that the parishes ad- ■ 
Joining these large trading centers t 
partiripate "very* substantially" In 
the distribution of the State Equal- 
ization fund, w'hich East Baton 
Rouge parish does not get. 

"In this process," he said, 
'wealth is being taxed where It is 
found and distributed where it is . 
needed, and it can be safely said" 
that East Baton Rouge contributes! - 
■nore through this process to other 1 
parishes th.an it recefxes from 1 1 
■other parishes, or will recejvt from'< 
other parishes if the additional' 
sales tax is voted." 

Reps. Anderson and Jack raised 
the objection that people from out 
if the palish would have to pay 
he East Baton Rouge and Caddo 
ax, and Rex Beard, East Baton 
touge school hoard business Hun- 
ger, told them that sales made to 
9ople living out of the parish 
. ould not have to pay the tax if 
le purchase they made was billed. 

Wants Cad^o Out 
Anderson said that he thought 
le sales tax should be left to the 
^te as a means of revenue and 
lid that if the schools vote a tax 
ad the state ever needs to In- 
•ease its levy it would be upl 
gainst the same problem It now 
ices with New Orleans. 



F edera l Aid For 
Priv ate Schools 
Is Undetermined 



BY PATRICIA SINCLAIR 

Will private and Catholic 
fchools receive federal monev if 
«he federal aid to education bill 
pafSP!!? 
This is an open question. 
The bill (S 47Ji has alreadv 
passed the Senate. It is now bc"- 
ine studied in committee by the 
House of Representatives It 
provides for $300 million to be 
distributed next vear among the 
states for school's. Each .stale's 
j. share is ba^ci on the number of 
children attending school and 
I its need. 

Louisian,. would get $11.- 
07.5.000. Sctool Supt. Bourcpo:: 
has estim.rrd that New Orlp-,r 
public sciK !s would get at least 
$1 million. 

The bill L-: discussed this week 
in a specf;il issue of "Govern- 
mental Affairs," published by 
the U. S. Association of Com- 

mrrrp 

According to that magazine,' 
Louisiana would get $18.10 per 
child in average daily attend- 
ance. 

Attendance in what schools? 
Public schools? Certainly. Pri- 
vate and Catholic schools? The 
bill does not say. 

It does say. however, that 
"Where state funds may legally 
and constitutionally be expend- 
ed for non-public elementary or 

cn/<nnH:>rv School PUrPOSBS. thC 

I federal aid funds can likewise be 
used." / 

In other words, the federal 

[ government will permit states to 
decide what schools get federal 
money. 

Section 8 of Article 4 of the 
Articles of Constitution, 1921, 
prohibits any money being taken 
from the public treasury in aid 
of any church, sect or denomina- 
tion of religion. 

But Louisiana does supply its 
private and Catholic school stu- 
dents with free textbooks, free 
transportation and free lunches 
tor the needy. Catholic schools 
in New Orleans feceive t h e 
«er\ices of the City Health Dept. 
Eighteen other states aid non- 
public schools through free text- 
book.s free transportation or 

I free lunches. 



Many Catholic and private 
schools receive federal money 
•l^rouKh their participation in 
ITieTeaerai luncn program 

Rev. Kr. Henry C. Bezou. su- 
perintendent of Catholic schools 
«^v,^n/.A ■ ^'^f'oo's receive about 
$12^000 a month for lunches 

He said tpday that, if the bill 
passes Congress without being 
more specific, the question uill 
probably have to be decided by 
the state legislature. 

"Dont you think it just and ' 
equitable that we get part of the 
monev-'- he asked 



<£3) 



Teacher Pav 
Limits Valid 

BATON' ROl GE. (UP". The 
Louisiana Legislature's recen! re- 
striction on ihe use of extra school 
money voted for teachers in the 
regular and special session held 
I good today. 

Attorney General Fred S. Le- 
Blanc upheld the Legislature's act 
in an opinion handed down yes- 
terday. 

An opinion given Caddo Parish 
Supt. Rostoe H. While held that 
90 per cent of the fx'.ra fit^ds 
must fo to (fincher salaries a.>. pro- 
vided in fh* statutr. 

LeBlanc said that, if it is n^c- 
essar>- io rednco M>«^base pa' Jof 
teacher- la ordei" ''> operate vMiiin 
the inc.'.im' of the school bqfrA. 
that should be the last iterti re- 
duced. 

In a further ruling on the use 
of extra school money, LeBlanc 
said that 90 per cent of the funds 
must go to teacher salaries and 
not to supervisory employes. 

N/0 1 -47-5-^3 



Compromise 1 
Ends French 
School Issue" 



(Wnmra'i .N»uoniil N»w» R»r.|i-») 
Paris— Public v.s chun h oduea- 
lion. which ha-; cau.sed miv nim- 
hling.s of hnuU- in the '.'nltert 
Staies. lias bo.onie a fiiil-flrfl^ed 
polili.rti fi»ln all over Knmi.^. 

The latP.'Jt selllenioiil ,,n :lr :ige- 
old que-itinn -the fictji >;,,.>. hack 
at lea-i to rnedioval lines — was 
made here, w hen the re>eii' e<im- 
promi.se gave l)a< ker.s of -ctaie edu- 
cation and of leliKimis fd-.ration 
the idea thai their own yule had 
!Won. The lompniniise saved a 
'situation so Tense that it had 
ihieatened to lireak \:p tlie mid- 
dle-of-the-road French labinet. 

A similar fight in Belgium par- 
alleled the one here, when the 
Catholic party wanted the state to 
subsidize technical schools run by 
the church. And in Hungary, the 
proposed nationalization of the 
schools is bringing the same ques- 
tion to a head. 

Compared with the European 
nations, where political parties go 
all out over the question of what 
lagency may educate the children. 
ithe situation in the I'nited Staleii 
seems tame, although the recent 
decision of the supreme court 
banning the use of public .school 
facilities for "release time" reli- 
gious education already is caus- 
ing local court cases. 
I Here, although PYance Is com- 
' monly considered a Catholic coun- 
Itry, four million of the five mil- 
lion children between eight and 
I.-? years old go to state-supported, 
free schools. The rest go to church 
I schools. 

I When Mme. Germaine Poinso- 
Chapuis, tYance's first and only 
woman cabinet minister, who 
heads the ministry of public 
health and population recom- 
mended that the sute give aid "lo 
families able to prove their diffi- 
culties in the Instruction of chil- 
dren," the leftist opponents of 
state aid to church .schools Imme- 
diatelv went into battle on the 
grounds that this could mean 
state support of Catholic schools. 
\ The compromise action merely | 
changed the wording, and it Isi 
now provided that aid may he 
given to families having difficulty 
in bringing up their children. And 
each side thinks It has won — the 
MRP (Popular Republicans,) or 
rightists, think 'bringing up' 
means "instruction," while the 
Socialists believe there is no 
chance of church schools getting 
slate aid on the basis of the new 
wording. Onlv the Communists 
held out against the compromise. 

NOTP-48-e-Z7 



392 



CHURCH SCHOOLS 
U. S. AID FLAYED 

Bopfisfs Press for Recall 

Of Ambassador to 

Vatican 



PROTESTANTS WILL 
FKillT TAX AID FOK - 
PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS 



n 



Washington. March 7 i/P).^A group 
of ProtestRnts said today n will <-a;n 
palgn politically «g«m.t spending 
lunds on ehurch schools. 

Th* group, whosr lull 
"Protestants 
United 
State 

•Th 



lo secure 
for Its church a uoinn wiui vhe state 
at the public trcasiliy. Protestaiiit 
and Other Americans United have 
accepted the hleraic.nj chnlle^e. 

"The situation thu.s resolve* Itself 
Ui|o a political contest. T.ie issue Is 
nott a religious one, in the sense th.u 
leliKious differences are Involved 
Ifc a political ssue ' 



Memphis. Tenn., May 20 (UP 

A speaker on reliRlous liberty toid| •"'*"■*<* '*»* politics! aren 

.Ithe Southern Baptist convention 

, today that certain religious groups 

In America "are g-oing to bring all 

possible pressure to bear upon the 

government to support their 

I church-owned schools." 

Walter Pope Bions. president of 
I William Jewell college. Liberty, 
Mo., said that '•there are religious 
grcups who do not agree with the 
jBaptists in their opposition to the 
appropriation of publie fund.e for 
jthe support of sectarian institu-j 
jtlons." 

I Blnns' speech preceded prepara- 
tions for the election of a .successor 
to retiring President Dr. Ixiuie D. 
I Newton of Atlanta. Ga., at the 91st 
.annual meeting. I 

I Blnns cited recent Supreme courti 
case.s that '•public funds cannot 
, be used for support of sectarian 



;:iU. S. School Aid 

satants »;id Other Americans 1 

1 for SepacMiion of ^urch and ^1 IN p, 

.^i;rc,-;..r-.„.PIan Draws Fire 



Catholics Critical Of 
Provision for Use Only 
In Public Schools 



inotitution 

Blnns urged support of the re- 
cently organized "Protestants and 

other Americans united for separa-j must rr; 
tion of church and state." Objec-I thp sUil 
tlves of the group. BinTut said, in- 
cludes a "demand for il\ Imnipdi- 
ate discon(yiua«ce of' il-\ ambas- 
sadorship t\ lie pap»l lifad 
the Roman c-jlholic cW.i.V." 
;. The group, he said s.-t-ll-.s "re- 
jpeal of any la j n. v on the staute 
I hooks of any ^tai- which sanc- 
tions the giant. IE of aid to church 
jschcols from the public school 
ilreasur>^" 

' .Oifferenc* in Faith 

j "In seekine these objectives we 
are determined to pursue a course 
that cannot be justly characterized 
as anti-Catholic, or as motivated 
by anti-Catholic animus." Binns 
I said. ".As Protestants, we can be 
jCalled" anti-Catholic only in the 



ST- 48 -3^ 

La.-Miss. Educators 
Would Reject Funds 

rTh» Associated Preasl 

Education spokesmen of Louisi- 
ana anfl. .Mississippi said Sunday 
night they nanl nn federal funds 



.u Washington (/Pi. — Pipsirlcnt Tru- 

it nan's commis.^ioM on higher edu- 

■ation vants Sl.ST.'i.OOO.'icn m fed- 

•ral aid for colleges in the next 

ive years. ' 

But a rerommen'latir..- that the 
;overnmenl money ..;.^ unly to 
lublicly suppoited . irstitutions 
)rought a vigorous dlf^pppt ft-oml 
"0 Catholic members of the com- 
fiisslon. 

The majoiity report .said that 
my school accept ins public funds '- 
should also accept "the right of 
the people as a whole to exercise 
review and control of the educa- 
tional policies and procedures of 
that, institution." 

"Such acceptance by privately 
controlled institutions would . . 
tend to destroy the competitive 
advantages and free inquiry 
which they have established and 
which are so important in pro- 
viding -safeguards to freedom,', 
the majority said. 



every Catholic 



I sense in whiil 
anti-Protestant 

I "Profound differences separate 
lis in the area of religious faith 
but these differences have no rele- 
vancy in the pursuit of our ohjec- 
t'ves. ... The issue of separation 

I of church and .state has ari.sen in 
the political area, and we propose 

.to meet it there." j 

The Rev. John W. Hughston. 

.Kichmod. Va.. introduced a re.solu- 
tion concerning federal aid to par- 
ochial schools. The res..Iution| 

lurged that the .McCown bill inl 
Congress be amended -to prohibit 

I the use of federal funds, either di I 



for colloRc -cholaisiiips. if. a.~ sug- 
gested liy the pi-c<i(lent's commis- 
sion on hipher educaficm. they 
p racial sogrHsaJion from 
.- colle'-:p>. 
In .Meridian, .Miss.. .Martin V 
B. .Mill'-'. ch-Hirmaii of the board 
of trustees of slate in^li'utions of 
of higher IciirniniLr. said: 

j '1 here is not the sliuhtest pos- 
,.| sibility of Mississijipi accepting 
a dime of that ivioney on those 
conditions Nor rlo I believe any 
college in the South w-ould be in- 
terested." 

I J. M. McLemore. of Alexandria. 

La., president of the board of su- '^'a't. higher education director of 
'pervisors of Louisiana State «ni- S^^ National Catholic Welfare 
versity,.said LSI' would not be Conference, and Martin R. P. Mc- 
interested in the proposal. Guire, dean of the Graduate 

' He agrees, he said, with four School of Catholic University, dis- 
' dissenting members of the com- agreed. They said: 
"mission, that removal of racial "We believe it is timely to 

segregation in colleges would call attention to the dangers of 



Dangers Pointed Out. 

Monsignor Frederick G. Hoch-' 



J 'threaten tragedy to the people higher education svstem largely 
1 of the South, both white and Ne- 1 or comp!eteI:- domi"nated by the 

state. Exclu.sive control "of edu- 



gro. 

Frank A. Godchaux. Sr., of Ab 
beville. La., president of the state cation, more than any other fac- 
board of education which admin- tor, made the dictatorship of Ger- 
isters colleges other than LSU, many, Italv and Japan acceptable 
was not available for comment. to an ever-iivreasing number of 
However, Jacob H. Morrison, of Uj,e populations 

,^^^\^^ «f <w. „^.^ j.^_^^ ^^^^ legislation im- 
plementing the commission's rec- 
^^__^____^_________^^_^ ommendation would go a long 

iiave racial segregation. L per- "^'^^ toward establishing an ad- 
-.onally, would not take funds on mmistrative structure for higher 
those conditions. I don't speak P'lucation whereby government in 
for the board but I don't know 'he United States might easily 
of anyone who would approve I'se the nation's public colleges 

universities to promote po- 
ral purposes" 



I New Orleans, a member of the 

I board said; 

c, "All of our colleges, of course 



Jrectl.v. or indirectly, tor the aid of iJutllization of a grant that banned and 
I school""*'*' ^®"*"*" "'■ Par-'chial ||i-acial segregation In our coll eges." litic 



T, 



.393- 



proposed School Cleanup 
Expenditure Is Blasted 

A l)l;i<t ai;;im<l Silmol Siipci iiilcnilnil l.icinpl .1. HoiiiKPois" as- 
•ipitiiiii S1(^).0<<o is neeilpd to rionn up Imal srluiols was issued to* 
day hv t)ip Ontial Tiades Coiincil ni" tho AKI.. 

The coimfil. at a tupolitiK last night, wfhl on reconl as oppoa- 
iMvr tht' r\|>on(liniie ;)iiil, l;i\tiiod 'Ihr ininioili.it' . iiu'ie effirient lis* 
of the iii'cscnt iilriiiifiilly staffed niiiiiiiiMianic •Ioi.m' tinrnt !■ this 
pii- 1'\'-'' needed repairs av.d assvr • that 

Another resohition stated: ilv (w<i per lent of thf oni- 

lliis ImuIv likewise l>olieVfS| ^i^jp,,.; ,.;,,, .!)(. iran'd t" P"or 
h.uisek.-.|.; .•- "h<le 9s p.r cent 
- ick oi funds. 



ihai iln' tise of a onivideralilf por- 
tion of the VXilUXMi pstra aniii- 
M1K I" the s.-tuMil tmard m-M year 
should !>.■ dp\r)tpd to Rivini: a suh- 
siantial r.iise to e\perien> eil tejuli- 
ers now n'relviuK ina\inuni> sal- 
aries." 

(' iril ShockiMl 

'I'lie i-oui:i il add 
■ sh<H ked and stu p 
from the repoit 
lohn M. Whitney 



il 



of the litv board of health, of the 
■deplorable health iondiln>ns e.\-, 
isting in our public schools." 

liperintendeni Bourgeois, saiil 
ihe councjl. blat^es tV«»'-«'|ndi- [ 
ii(.iit oti a '.'."i-v^ear tmrklf^t of| 



are the i. fUvt "f 

fhsrite NpuHjfure ' ■ 

"An e\:ni-|liKiMon of I'r. WJiit-' 
ney'."! rpp'Mt reveals not a back- 
log of nee<led repairs but rathti . 
a backlog of gross administrati\<' 
negligp'ice in matters of the sini- 
wasj,pipst s.hool housekeeping." the 
ispd to le.iMi council dp«lare<l. 
-sued by Dr I,, asking for increa.sed iiiaNi- 
upei Mitendent muni pav scales for teachers, the 
council pointed out that ll'<' Ne" 
Orleans leacheis will leteive i^^' 
salarv raises next year luiless the 
sihool t«>iird raises them from the 
S'ton.oiMi in ftuids which is half 
..|l,„ve In-: ve;ir> hudgPt, 



Board of Education! 
UrgcH to Equalize 
^^hite, Negro School 

BATON ROrOE. T,s . Nov. 18.— 
TXr ;t9'e bonid nf priucaiion today 
%■»• "ilH that Pflviralinnnl oppor- 
tuni for NpRroes and whiles 

Bhou "p equalised lmmediat.ely. 
brit It- • leglsl.iure nnd taxpay- 

ers pT'^ n'.v WO' 'rt nol \n<t the 
^md.° neeOfri ur'.lcsa ihplwiiol? sys- 
tem of school «aminl^in'-.on in 
Ui« stRtp were r-ri^haulert 

T>\e rommiv "i.r.'on ihp • n-jrove- 
m«nt of Negru ••■J»i-a''oii aooolnted 
lost June rpporif>( th<" ' i .iilizatlon 
incUidlne pstabli omen^ ; ♦he same 
saUry scale for f^a'-hc - <jf either 
race with nqtial nusliflc:. ' '.its would 
coat Ji;t.;fin.l12 a year. 

In a v(-t)arate letlev to Board 
Presirieni Frank A. Godchaux. Certl ' 
Morgan of Baton Rouge, chairman 
of the rnmmi'i.sion. said that a piece-! 
meal approach to the school prob- 
lem couM tv" •futilp' and that the' 



(^' NOS-48-7-24 

V^c- c Schoo Lunch leak 

rax Figures Err, j 

Says Bourgeois 



the whole srhoor stnicture of 
state. 






A charge hv an Orleans parish 

' school board "member the school 

The bureau of government*! re- , j, nrogram here was operat- 

search s report that the Orleans jj^^ ^^^ ^^ ,^^5 either through 

"leakage" or "mismanagement" 



Orleans 
parish school board's income 
might be incre'ased to S19.000.000 
by lax proposals before the Legis- 
lature has been refuted by Super- 
intendent of Schools Lionel J. 
Bourgeois. 

Bourgeois noted that legislation 
has been submitted providing for 
the levying of three additional 
mills on real and persona) piop- 
erty. He added that if the prop- 
erty taxpayers of New Orleans so 
vote in the election called for that 
purpose it may increase the levy 
five more mills. 

He estimated that these ta.Nes 
would vield additional revenues 
of $4,800,000. » 

He asserted that. oVier tax 
measures would "iH'rlo inse add 
to the operating /^venuas of the 
board, since the tfWt fipr|cate the 
revenue for fflWcifcftn'Poses." 

Bourgeois aflbiJI*OT the board 
may get .SoOflfMlO extra from the 
gei^eral schoorTund as a result of 
the increase in per educable allot- 
ment. 

"This." he asserted, "when add- 
ed to the three mills which we 
propose to levy will fall far short 
of the amount of money which i.'- 
imperatively needed to carry out 
the proposed program for the im- 
I provement of the public schools 
Orleans " 



has been dropped. 

Lionel J. Bourgeois, superin- 
tendent of schools, said following 
an executive session of thr hoard 
yesterday that board nen>i'ei> px- 

essed complete satiFf:ii iu>ii with 



Pf 



ition at 



I provi 
[oj_N 



the lunch pro.t;|-anVs ope 
this time. 

William C. I->tcher. a board 
member, lasi iv.onth chai^jed the 
public scho"! lunch department 
lost $7000 dcni-.c the fir.st four 
months of tht current .school term 
through careless operation of the 
program. 

Bourgeois .satn the boatd did not 
feel the program should be con- 
ducted with a view to making 
profit, but it required the depart- 
ment break even after leaving out 
equipment and increases in salary 
"which the board assumes." 

When equipment costs and sala- 
ries are not taken into considera- 
tion, he pointed out. the depart- 
ment no longer operates at a loss. 

The board's written statement 
announced the administration is 
in the first stages o( revising the 
federal lunch program, and sales 
of lunches have decreased con- 
siderably "during this period of 
adjustment. Profit on a decreased 
volume ie not possible 



NOS-48'6-<7 nOS~48-J*^^ 

(JL8I) (E^ 



Morgan ssaid both in his letter and 
In a verbal report to the board that 
while hp rritici7pd ' inefficiency" In' 
the use of lyiuisiana school reve- 1 
nups. he was not aiming criticism 
at anv pariicular individual or' 
hodv He .said that .school fund ad-! 
minisratmn now wa.s hampered bv 
constitutional limitations, poUtlcs ' 
outmoded siatutp.s and changed' 
pconomic conditinn.s. so that a fresh I 
.start was needed. i 

Thp survpy he propo.sed would be' 
conducted bv pxpprls not only in 
pducation hut also in bu,sine.ss ad- ! 
ministration and govprnment or- 
ganization. I 

Morgan said Louisiana .stood l,St,h ' 
cation, as mea.surpd by money spent, I 
but 3Rth ni rp.sults. "meaning get- 
ting our monpvs worth " 

"That means Inefficiency," he 
commenlPd. 

Ke -said that on a basla of at- 
tendance, the school wa,s spending I 
»9B04 annually per child, so that 
"we rank a 1th the IndURtrial East 

a im-i.* *»t w far kalaw te a«. , 

*lmn?nt. • " • W» are pounnt our 
nonfv into a rat hole." 

"The taxpayers are not going to 
t>nilnua to do It," Morgan amid In ' 
lis letter, "and the future of the 
tate depend^ upon an adequate 
ducational system. • • • Find the 
rouble — correct U. Then the people ' 
'ill pay for the sr toI system they 
eed and wpi-t. '^ut not before," i 

LCAM7-IH8 

{fS3) _J 



394 



Tnfomjation. 



lings and Eouipment 



Small Schools 'Coming Trend 
In Education, Planner Says 

Smaller puuiic elementary ^ ^^^^^ school "can and should i asphalt shingles are "as suitabla 
schools and more of them instead be" one story in height, he adds, I for small, pitched-roof school 
of large, centralized school build- whLe a larger building probably | buildings as for homes, where 
ings are considered by Henry S. •■ would be several stories tall, re- ' these shingles are the most Ire- 
Churchill, New York architect quiring a concrete or steel frame, quently used roofing material. 



and city-planner, to be the "com 
ing trend" in facilities for educa- 
tion. 

Centralized schools originally 
were thought to be more econom- 
ical, he says, but ec'.ually are 
more expensive to construct, cost- 
lier to oprrate and involve teach- 
ing JbffiruUies not found in small- 
er, neighborhood schools. • 

"The small school also is more 



desirable architecturally and itU"^;'-"! aoaU-ii.;; -is-'if ""prob&'jiy 
creates a more personal, intimate ^ ^oul .-, ' ^ yphalt ihiaclea, wh xcl^^ 
feeling," Mr. Churchill explains, l""^ ""*■'* — ' ' ' " , "^ 

"A school building should be for fare fire-resistant and which con- 
children who U!i^ It. not 3 



the 



St form architecturally to charac- 



teristic small building designs. , ^.gn '^^ mere 'quantity 
Colors. texturesL_and natterns of ' - ■ 



monument to an ajvf.itect op the 
school board.". ^.'^ 

Fire E.iznrd Less 
He says thjn ics."^ t-xJcnjiv* con- 
itruction t^-.n, A a/»d .jullding O r\ I _ /I fl iC .^"^ 1? 
n aterials otn bo Jsel fir ajbmall H U i- "^O "J "1-/ 3 
b.iilding 'in f.-r/a llfc ■ a|([e be- ' ' •^ ** ^ \* ^ .^ 

cause the fire ^nga-iiiv-* small 
building, frow^k-hicji pupils can I 
be taken outdoors quickly, is not 
so ,(reat. I 



metal doors and trim, masonry Better Lighting Needed 

enclosed steel stairways and other j^ ^is insistence on a contem- 
high-priced structural features porary approach to planning, Mr. 
noj necessary for a smaU build- Churchill, who is a partner in 

Churchill-Fulmer Associates, ar- 
chitectural firm, calls for the use 
of modern materials and equip- 
ment to permit multiple use of 
space in the schooL 

"For example," he says, "both 
^eating and lighting can be far 
more efficient in rooms which do 
not conform to those standards 
set down forty years ago. The 
quality of light, both natural and 
artificial, is now, a consideration 



ing 

i.'ost small schools cafl be con- 
structed of cinder bloci or simi- 
lar material, he says, aad wood 
rafters axe suitable as roof .suo- 
porf:. t>;i:tkuiaily for the sna'le'st 
'o\i\''i.r,y,t. \\v. C>:jr'l-.:11 s.-.yv the 



"Provision must be made for 
visual aids, for sound systems, for 
more assemblies, for more types 
of specialized vocational or psy- 
chological training. Most school 
audito."iums are hang-overs from 
the worst period of 'assembly 
room' design, bad acoustically and 
visually, inadequately equipped 
and over-'decorated.' " 



Gentilly School Plans 
'Completely DifferenfB^fE 

•■ »/ 'fept and 



tain individual lockers for eacn 
pupil to store his coat and school 
materfels. aS well as plenty of 
stoi^ge space for class equipment. 
The school will have four sepa- 
rate playgrounds. Children in the 
dergarten classes will have 
sun. terrace, 20 by 100 
. , _ . , , feet, and playground, 80 by 45 
nomics and an indu^nal arts igei. 
room, a library, a multi-purpose ,' ,.... , ., , 
The new GentiUv school will room for school activities requir-. J" ^dd'tion to the play space. 
. . , • jnp (-nn<;iHprahIp <;Darp alone wit»"S SchOol will have a roofed pa- 

have more windows and m.v- '"g considerable space, along vMf .,„_ ^^ by 120 feet, which will 

ground space than anv public standard school facilities such as.^^rve as a playground in rainy 
school in the city. toilets and the principal's office. I weather. 

Its plan is a "complete depar- The site is .590 bv 320 feet The The gymnasiiim-aud i t o r i u m, 
IrrtiflT.,! " '^0"^"e"'"'nal schoo^uilding will be spread out over I cafeteria, pavilion and several 

classrooms will ser\-e as a commu- 
nity recreation center. 



BY PATRICIA SINCLAIR 



Supt. Bourgeois said he plans to ' 



architecture. . h^lf th^ area, with independent 

So said Si'rf. Bourgeois and play yards on nearlv every side 
f^^^^. Archi'-ct E A. Christy The classrooms will be the "cog- 

hp L 'hfV revealed /-plans fo.-:type," with each jutting out from a '^^l' '" 'eachers. parents living in 
me new ioK..-!^. ' hallwav. giving each room itself I ^^r.tilly and other citizens to ask 

The «ch,.ol wiJT Ij* built with three exposures. The outside walls. ^^ suggestions which might be m- i 
the $400. 0(X f'^ujDir.ing in the V.i^ |Will h\ almost all windows of the corporated into the plan. ' 

Donogh Funi!. ;Jliis S200.000 whiA i"a«ni* tvpe." which permit fresh "^ ^'^° ^^'^ "^^' ""^"^ "^ '^^ 
will be obtained from the sRiejBair to Siter but keep out rain and '*^^^^ ^'"' "^^ building were sug- 
unuscd ifi vacant sdlool prop- wind. \ gested by the research project on 

erties. .Sufit BourgeoiAaid. It will \ ii xn vnnvi school architecture by students in 

be buijf on a tw92Tqiiare site I Jo lu kuu.h ^^^^ School of Architecture at Tu- 

boundtfd by Si. Roch. Athis, Man- | Each classroom, designed to ac- lane University, 
deville and Pressburg Sts. [commodate 35 pupils, will be 24 Students are now staging an ex- 

The one-stor>- brick building '^•^' ^° ^^^^ "'"^ ^° square feet of hibit on school architecture at New 
will contain 12 "classrooms a com- P^^*^*^ P*"" P"P'' Classes in old- (Orleans Public Service Inc. The 
bination auditorium-gvmnasium a P^^ioned schools have only 16 [Gentilly School will be the same 
cafeteria and kitchen, "a home eco- square feet of space per pupil. Itype as the schools in the exhibit. 

The cla.'^sroom itself will con- 'Sunt. Bourgeois said. 



HOI- AS -4-23 



i 



395 



How School Rooms Should Look 



BY 



They should 
centers, adapted 



In the ■ opon plan." the building 
b* community as.sumcs almo^l any shape 11 is no 
ye«r - "round uidor than one classroom plus a 
Ismail hall. Some buildings arc 
' ■coR-shapcd." with each classroom 
open on three sides and connected 
I to the rest of the school by a cov- 
ered passacewav. 

' Students point out that, with the 
I "open plan," it is much easier to 
add extra classrooms or other la^ 



P.XTRKI.V SINCL.MR 

Children look out the big win-;uie by both 'children and adults, 
dows along two opposite walls of ! _ _. 

the room. Thev see a smooth lawn ' ""* *''* "^"^^ "^ '^'"P^ enough, 

bordered bv shrubbery and flow-,?' '*ast eight acres (four city 
ers. ' I blocks) for 500 children. 

Inside. tM room is painted a ' Provision must be made (or 
cheerful pastel. Cabinets and •'"Pansion. 

bookshelves line the inside walls Students made a study of weath- „, ^..^ 
From one cabinet, a motion picture " conditions. They recommend jcilities 
Iprojector rolls out. .\cross the Rrcaler use of the outdoors fori 
I room, a student pulls down a;''o'h classwork and recreation, 
movie screen. The class U ready ''Classrooms should open onto ter- 
for an educational film. races so that on good days the 

There is a fireplace in the room '^'*" "" '"°'' °"'**<^* . 
I Bright curtains frame the windows ^^'^^ classroom should have at 
I The furniture is light-colored and '^as' two exposures, and windows 
easy to move. It is a pleasant, should almost cover those outside 
classroom in a public elementary walls. That means better lighting. L auditorium 

school. and eliminates the need for •- i ' ' 

That is the way classrooms t'f'C'al lighting on good days. , j^,^ woodworking, home economics 
should — and can — look, say the 3?> Windows on opposite sides of and music, an infirmary w h e r •? 
students in Architecture 201 at I the room also provide cross ven-jsjck students are housed and doc- 
Tulane University. They have tilation, making classrooms com- tors make periodic examinations of 
adopted the new Gentilly School as' fortable in t h e hottest weather. I stuaents. and an i n d o'oT 
a project. I| Students advise a row of windows " " " 

The class made a study of ele- 'near the ceiling, far above the 
mentary schools in New Orleans. ' children's heads, to provide fresh 
They interviewed architects, school', air without drafts in cold weather, 
administrators, teachers, parents. They favor the "open plan" school 
social workers and recreational di- Ibuilding, instead of the traditional 
rectors. "closed plan." 

The results fill two, thick voU 
umes. . ^ 

Now each 



slinlrn'. 



goinc .do 



They believe schools should 
make better provision for so-called 
'extra-curricular" activities which 
arc rapidly becoming part of the 
standard curriculum. 

In grandfather's day, a school 
consisted of a handful of class- 
rooms, a principal's office and per- 1 
Today it in- 
1 eludes a cafeteria, special rooms 



where children play in inclement 
weather. 

Students believe schools should 
be designed to take care of future 
changes in curriculum, too. i 

They suggest several changes! 
which old-line school administra 



building. Instructor Charles R 
Colbert thinks the architect who 
designs the school may get some 
ideas from them. 

On several points, students have 
agreed: 

I • Schools should have only one, 
1 story. I 



tilated. 



In the "closed plan," the school tors might call "revolutionary 
usually has a rectangular shape "Why have bells? Put a clock 
with a hall down the middle and in every classroom, and you won't 
make his own dosiga for the school.; claiwroftms owning off each side, nerd the unnecessary noise of a 
Although nono will be used for thellThe result is dark and poorly ven-|l'e" 

I "Vou dont need a fence around' 
a school. It just means constant re- 
painting and repair. Shrubbery will 
serve the same purpose and look 
better. 

"Remember that parents use the 
school, too. Give them parking 
space on the school grounds." 



NOI-48-I-:25 



;OLOR IS URGED 



IN SCHOOLROOMS 



For example says Breldert, In. 
th» boys" athletic dresBlng room, 
where the boys lounee and relax. 

g, eotU restful blue should be used. 

i«»k:»a^» RoI:a»«. Tkrtf In the room where' toe " leJ hot" 

^rcnitecr Deiieves tnat ^^ ^^,^3 ^^^g p,a,ce, the waiis 

Moods Are Vitally shoouia be painted a dashing red 

' color. 

A typical elenvntai*' claAsroom 
should have__a, lan<|hcat.e-typy cen- 



Affected 



Chicago, (UP)— It is the color ol 
lb* scboolroom that puts the stu- 
lant In the osood for studying. 

That Is what O. H. Breidert, 
Chicago architect, told the dele- 
fatea of the 16th annual confer- 
>nc« of adTnlnlstratlve officers of 
oabllc and private schools meeting j 
U the University of Chicago. 



BRT-47- 8-25 



ter winding wllii UJo aiile wiluuws. 
The entrance to 'tii© room ;iiould 
have a plass fiJielei Aooi with 
glass stSv ligh '. /Thy UF.e 4t lan- 
seape xc-lsdowf' brmj^ th« outdoors 
into i.-'cla: ^^I■oor.■l wi it« light 
green? vrllo -i and Vi^'ics- 

Adequate lighting is another lm« 
portani fattoi, 'A' t .luate natural 
IlghtintC should be obtained by use 
of large window areas, according 
to the architect. This may be ob- 
tained by long strip windows or 
vision panels, extending from the 
Bill to a height not to exceed 8V4 
feet above the floor. Above this 
height directional glass block ex- 
tending to the celling should be 
installed. 

As for artificial illumination, Mr. 
Breidert recommended fluorescent, 
low glare fixtures either suspended 
from or attachd to the ceiUng. 



3'^6 



School^f^ Today Designee 
^Tit Students 



Grandpa^s Little Red 
Schoolhouse Is Gone 



BY PATRICIA SINCLAIR 

Grandpa learned his lessons in 
the little red schoolhouse. 

Daddy went to class in a massive 
building that could have doubled 
for city halL 

Junior's new school ought to be 
different. 

So said Buford Pickens, head of 
the School of Architecture at Tu- 
line University, id an interview 
today. 

His comments followed tte recent 
recommendation from School Supt 
Lionel J. Bourgeois and his citi- 
lens' committee that New Orleans 
■pend $40 million on a 10-year 
■chool building program. 

"Schoolhouse design has moved 
farther along in the past 10 years 
than any other building type," Mr. 
Pickens said. 

CHILDREN UNHAPPY 

"During the 1920's, wfe didn't 
build schools. Wa built monu- 
ment*. Big impressive looking 
buildings witli ireat columns. The 
community v«| impressed, and the 
children wrre ii ihappy. 

"Scho .Is ouglr. to be bui t to fit 
ehildrer ' .tel 5 -.id. "The; ought 
to be in scife w.'h chiWren. They 
must nrt look and feel like insti- 
tutions. 

"I believe that the child's tra- 
ditional dislike for school partly 
iteams from the fact that his school 
ia often cold, austere and too big 
for his size. It isn't cozy. 

"Children say they don't likie 
being cocped-up in a classroom aU 
day," he centinued. "Let's have 
class outside. Let's build class- 
rooms with walls that open up. 
Let's bring the outside inside." 

Mr. Pickens advocates one-story 
•chools, particularly for primary 
and elementary pupils. 

"The one-story school is more 
txpensive to build, but it eliminates 
fire hazards and the necessity of 
fire escapes and stairs," he said. 
"That more than justifies the addi- 
tional expense." j 

Modem schools are no Ionger| 
square and rectangular shaped. "I| 
like the cog-tj^pe school, with a' 



hallway and classrooms opening off 
it. Each classroom has three out- 
side exposures and its own outside 
entrance. 

"'In these classrooms, the pupils 
have more privacy. They are not 
disturbed by noises in the class 
next door. Each room has its own 
patio, where children can have 
gardens, raise animals and have 
outdoor classwork," he said. 
SMALL BUILDINGS 

The new trend in elementary 
schools is toward groups of small 
buildings on the same site, instead 
of one large building. 

"For example," the architect 
said, "for an elementary school of 
500 children, we could have four 
buildings. One for the kinder- 
garten and primary grades. One 
for lower elementary grades. One 
for upper elementary, and a fourth 
for community use. The latter 
would contain the auditorium, 
gymnasium, cafeteria and other 
central facilities. The buildings 
would be connected by covered 
passageways." I 

Mr. Pickens believes that' 
school-builders' greatest mistake I 
is choosing a small site. "You can 
do nothing about the building if 
the site is too small," he said. ' 



—for night classes, meetings ana 
entertainments," he said. 

The use of the school as a com- 
munity center, as well as the ad-' 

vances in teaching methods are 
responsible for the totally-changed 
idea of school architecture, he, 
said. 

A good deal of research has gone 
into school lighting, heating and 
ventilating in the past few years, 
he said. 

"We've even gone so far as to 
measure the bottoms of thousands 
of children, and design seats to fit 
them," he said. 

Instead of old-fashioned steam 
radiators, new schools have radiant 



heat — coils in the floor which heat 
the whole room evenly. 

The problem in lighting is to 
provide even, glare-less light for 
the whole room. This is accom- 
plished with glass blocks. Archi- 
tects cover one wall with glass. At 
eye-height is a row of windows 
that open and shut. Above the 
windows are glass blocks which 
I deflect light rays upward. "That 
' gives the little guy across the room 
the same light as the boy by the 
window," he said. 

All schools, particularly those in 
New Orleans, should be artificially 
ventilated, he said. 

Ducts in the wall draw out stale, 
hot air and bring in fresh air. 

"We need something better than 
radiators for heat and open win- 
dows for fresh air," he said. "Ra- 
diant heat and artificial ventilation 



MORE GROUND 

An elementary school for 500 
children should have SVt to 9 
acres of ground (approximately 4 
to 6 city blocks) and a high school 
of the same size should have 6Vi 
to 12 acres, he said. 

"Of course, in the city the 

streets cutting into the site should 
be closed," he said. 

He pointed out that today's 
school is not meant to be used only 
from 9 a. m. till 3 p. m. school- 
days. 

"School facilities should be 
available to children after school, 
on holidays and during vacations. 
They should also be open to adults 



provide a controlled temperature 
and a constant supply of fresh air." 
Air-conditioning is a possibility 
for New Orleans, he said. "How- 
ever, if we have artificial venti-, 
ration and well-insulated buildings,! 
our classrooms will be comfort- j' 
able, even in hot weather." J 

NOI- 17-12-17 



<5£^ 



J 



397 



Preliminary Plans For hew 
Grammar School Biiilding 

Accepted by Committee 



Buildiner WiU Be 
One of Most Modem 
In This Section 

Preliminary drawings of the 
new grammar school building to 
be erected in Homer, have been 
accepted by the Building Com- 
mittee, and at present the archi- 
tect is working on the blue prints. 
' The building, when completed, 
will be one of the most modem 
in this section of the state. It 
will be a one-story structure, with 
the most modem and up-to-date 
fumltxire. There will be 18 class 
rooms, a teachers' loimge, a teach- 
ers' work room, principal's of- 
fice, reception room, a large play 
reom, approximately 40 by 60 
feet. The building will be well 
lighted with a large number of 
windows and also indirect light- 
ing from the roof. There will 
be no cafeteria or auditorium in 
the building. 

The committee on building the 
structure consists of five local 
citizens, Clyde White, Joe Rob- 
ertson. Ben Fortson, Mrs. P. B. 
Martin and Mrs. S. A. Tatum, in 
addition to thp three school 
board members from this ward, 
including L. G. Sale, J. T. Gib- 
son and O. M. Kerlin. The com- 
mittee is high in its praise of 
the new building plans, and the 
men have turned over to Mrs. 
Tatum and Mrs. Martin, the job 



of deciding th#coior oi ine walls. 

Much has been done in . the 
parish in the past year or mdre 
to better the educational facili- 
ties. A new vocational building, 
which consists of a class room, 
office, bathroom and shop is near- 
ing completion at the local school. 
According to Superintendent Ha- 
ley, this building will be the most 
modem and most complete voca- 
tional building in .North Louisi- 
ana. 

Arrangements have been made 
to completely finance the build- 
ing of the vocational shop from 
the Vocational Funds of the 
State Department of Education. 
This means that the building is 
not costing the local district any 
funds in way of special appro- 
priation. At first about one-half 
of the finances were being furn- 
ished by the State Department, 
but recently new plans were made 
whereby all the finances will be 
taken care of. 

The cafeteria at the Athens 
high school has been . completed, 
and will be equipped and ready 
for use by the time school starts. 
This building is a brick struc- 
ture built at a cost of approxi- 
mately $26,500, not counting the 
equipment. The building is very 
modem and up-to-date in everv 

H&J-48-7-I5 



way. It is located near the school 
building, and the pubUc is invit- 
ed to go by and see the building. 
H. W. Whatley, principal of the 
Athens schools, is high in his 
praise of thejBew structure. He 
states that the cafeteria will be 
of much use to the students and 
teachers. 

A cafeteria is being construct- 
ed at Summerfield; also a deep 
water well is being drilled, and 
indoor sanitary toilets are being 
installed. The cafeteria will be 
a wood structure, but it will also 
be modem and up-to-date, in 
structure as well as equipment. 
H. H. McKlnney is principal at 
the Summerfield schools, and is 
always striving to secure the best 
of facilities for the Summerfield 
students. 

The Lisbon cafeteria was com- 
pleted about two years ago, and 
last year a two-class room build- 
ing was completed about the mid- 
dle of the school term. M. J. 
Haynes is principal at the Lis- 
bon school. . 

Mr. Haley states that school 
will probably open the first week 
in September, but that he will 
call a meeting of all school prin- 
cipals soon and a definite date 
will then be set. The colored 
schools of the parish wyll prob- 
ably start a month later than the 
white schools. 



398 




COVSTRirTIOX rXPKR THK XKWM.AN M-hool imnrovrTenn^R^nTvll^lI^irhle^^si 
itcalf model of the proposed n ew S150,000 primary, fir'^t and necond grade buildtnK. ' 

1 1 world. The purpose is lo turnisii 
ija seiene. healthy environment. 
iXaiRe school buildinRs sometimes 
• I tend to oppress a child and the 
'contrast lietween home and the 
1 1 school becomes too great. 
* "The Newman school has al- 
Iwa.vs tried lo be in the forefront 
chool of sound educational trends and 
we believe that this new school 
building reflect.s this aim." 

Koimdedin 1903 by the late Isi- 
dore Newman as part of the Jew- 
ish Children's Home, the .Newman 
school in November, J 946. was in- 
corporated as an independent, 
.school. It offers 



Newman School to Add 
$150,000 New Building 

Work \Mli hegin In ^ai'l.v spiiiig on the construmon of a school 
building loi ilie prlmaiy. first and second grades of the Isidore 
Newman >chool, Edd.v iJ. Kalin. .school director, announced today. 

The stfVKture. to ccst'Sl.'jO.OOO, will be the first step in Newman 
schools building inipiv/\finpnt program. It will incorporate a num- 
ber of architectural ini'^vations. One of the features will be radiant 
heating ii;,lfie floors V' 'hat young children may play on the floors 
i n pe rfecl comfoi^.--^ * 



_ - - ^_ . ^^ '1 he psychological use of color 

An Interesung aepartment will ! to quicken a child's interest in hisi,"'*^'^'^'''^" -- —.-.- 

Ibe a shop for woodworking and 'suiroundings is another innova-:?.^''^^-'^ ^''°'" '*'"*^6''8a''ten through 
clay modeling. One classroom will tion. Commenting on the design! 'S.*? '^''"ool. 

be designed for visual education, of the proposed new building, Ka- .9, "^^''' school will be made 

- ""■^•"'^''' ^- ■■ gift from Percival 



so arranged that it can easily and ilin said: 
quickly be darkened for showing 
of educational movies or slides. • 

The new building will be anil the child and the 
addition to the present Newman 
structure at IS.'Bl Jefferson ave- 
nue. 



ihigh school 
The new 
possible by 
•The design is primarily In-^.^^'"" ^"d the Percival Stem 
pired by an imderstanding of *■ °""°^"°"- • '^''■^'° 




N0S-4«-^-3 



grandchildren 

cale of his°' \"^ benefactor are now time 

students in Newman school, and 

a daughter. Mrs. Lois Stern 

Brown, graduated from it. 



ITULANE BUILDING 
PLANS REVEALED 



Construction to Start Soon, 
Says Dr. Harris 



tory building:.^nother floor to tne 

structure wliFch hou.ses the air- 
conditioning laboratory and ma- 
chine shop: a second floor to the 
old book "ori an'l a new thiee- 
floor buftdine whli h will I* used 
as a school 'if engineering.' 

A second floor bridgewav will 
also he i-oiutructad at Stanley, gchoo.s of eip,.tri,ai 
Thomas Kail, the' college of en- eleitncal 



Construction on a $35!2.000 ad- 
dition to the college of engineer- 
ing at Tulane university is sched- 
uled to begin in the near future. 
Dr. Rufiis C. Harris, president of 
the university announc-ed Monday. 

He said the new additions will 
Include construction of a second 
floor to the engineering labora- 



James M. Roliert. dean of the 
college of engineering, said that 
space will be allocated to the 
schools of mechanical, chemical 
civil and experimental engineer- 
ing according to needs. The 
engineering 
gineeriiig's main building. Dr. (""' architecture will occupy 
Harris said. The building will space vacated in Sunley Thomaa 
be constructed of hollow brick r^^"- ''^ said.- 
and tile by the Chris Larsen and! ''' « "ew program Is the fourth 
Company, which was awarded (''''ise of construction now under- 
th»."contract with ■"low bid i? ''^-\ ■^\\^^ umvei-sity. Dr. Harris 
»-ioi 1 en A„k;i». « o ij . , said. He said the new Ristory 
$322,160. Architects are Goldstein,, i,^,„di„g j^ nearing completion 
Parkham and Labouisse of New jand work on a new geology build- 
Orleans, ling and an addition to the college! 
' - Tf r\ A "* ft ^ 'of commerce and busine.ss admini- 
^J/jVl/^ M /•• I I— .A stratlon is progressing rapidly... 



399 



New Orleans To Gel 
Cool School Cla88roo/fi^j\/io(|el School 



BY PATRICIA SINCLAIR 

Public schools, in New Orleans 
will be the first in the I'nited 
Stales to have air-conditioned 
classrooms. 

Plans for air-conditionin? three 
classrooms in three elementary 
schools by September were re-' 
vealfd today. The purpose is to 
determine whether children learn 
more and grow up healthier in air- 
conditioned classes. 

The Louisiana Education Foun- 
dation will conduct a lhr»e-year 
study to find out how air-tondi- 
tioning /vfCrcis school childron 
George RlnuT May, enaineci al 
New Orleans Public Service Inc 
and monihr. of th<? foundation's 
executive board, will be iiT trharge 
of the protect. 

Detuil.« o) the project were re- 
vealed tod.i^ by William C Fletch- 
er. School ftoard momber. 

"It won't cost the School Board 
a cent." he explained. The air- 
conditioning equipment and its 
installation will be paid for by the 
American Society of Heating and 
Vefitilaling Engineers. The foun- 
dation will make the study. 
HOW TEST WORKS 

Here's how the project will 
work. 

Three third grade classrooms in 
three different schools will be air- 
conditioned. Next to those class- 
rooms and identical in every re- 
spect will be three other class- 
rooms but they won't be air-con- 
ditioned. 

Psychologists will test the third 
graders, then distribute them 
equally among the two third 
gradfs. Each room will have the 
same number of children and the 
same portion of bright and normaj 
children. , 

The children will remain in tha 
classrooms for their fourth and 
fifth grade work. 

LONGER TERM 

The children will be tested at 
intervals throughout the three 
i years to find out which class learns 
more. They will also be given 
extensive medical examinations to 
determine whether air-condition- 
ing makes children healthier. 

At the end of the three years, 
the foundation will know whether 
air- conditioning is a good idea 
for schools. 

Studies show that the school 
term in. New Orleans (170 days i 
is 10 days to three weeks shorter 
than the term in most large north- 



ern cities. That is because it is 
too hoi here to have school in 1 
early September and June. 

Although the 10 days mean little 
in onp year, they add up to nearl> 
a whole year's schoolwork over a 
12-year period. 

The foundation believes that air- 
conditioning will permit New Or- 
leans to have a longer school term, 
thereby giving children here a 
better education. 

Complete details of the project 
will be revpalfd soon. 

Laborde Explains 
Schoolroom Setup 

The cor.stmction of a school- 
room pla.vs a Jaree part in the 
health of schoi^l chikfren a(;toid- 1 
ing to C. E. Laborde, Baton ' 
Rouge, state superintendent of, 
school plants. " i 

Laborde niulined some of his 
Ideas on Schoolroom construction 
last night as ho addressed the' 
third session of the teacher-par- 
ent institute on school architec-' 
ture. sponsored bv the New Or- 
leans Classroom Teachers' Feder- 
ation at L. E. Rabouin Vocational 
school. 

"Large schoolrooms," he said, 
"should be constructed to provide 
adequate space for a normal num- 1 
ber of children. 'I 

"Nothing should be black in the 
j-oom. hecaiis;e black absorbs light 
pnd mav be the rea.son so rhan.v I 
iChildien begin wearing glasses at I 
an early age. 

"Chalkboard should be colored P 
a dark green and should he placed' 
at one end of the room, not over! 
20 feet in length." I 

Laborde who is chairman of the ' 
executive committee of the na- 
tional council on schoolhouse con- 
struction, declared the "need for 
a new school building program is 
ver.v urgent." 

Buildings now in use were con- 
structed on requirements of 40 
years ago and do not fit the re- 
quirements of today's needs, he 
said. 

He expressed the opinion al- 
though it is the duty of the par- 
ish school board to select the 
architect hould in turn work 
closely with classroom teacher- 
on plans for the building. 



Designs Put 
on Exhibition 

A full-sitile exhiliu oy an tii- 
tectufal sHidents at Tulane uni- 
versity, biised on a study of New 
OrlP.Ti<i' eleinentaiv schools, will 
go on (lispkiv .Monday at the New 
Orleans Public Service Inc. build- 
ing 

The exhibits, with scale mod- 
els. depUl ihe New Orleans 
schools of today, those of the past 
and tho^e of the future 

The exhibit was planned by 
the second-vear Tulane univer- 
sitv arclii'o' lural class under the 
direction oi Iiijitructor Charles 
Colbert. ' .. < ' 

To Make .s^'lr<-(iOD<! ■ 

The It- I. exainpies or, student 
designs " t.p seirctrd iMnorrow 
by a tolni '^ilee' of ji.Hli;a.>; which 
Includes Lidnei J. Bourgduis, par- 
ish supprintr>ndent of schools: 
William C. Flafcher. member of 
the Orleans parish school board; 
Miss Beryl Hdffnian, represent- 
ing the New Orleans Classroom 
Teachers' Federation, and Mrs. i 
Edwin Blum. i 

rtr Altrin OrVicner T^rofooor.r nf 

N0SH8-4-K 



PAIXT JOB IXCREASKS 
TEACHERS' WORK ^v . / 

I Chicago (>Pi.— The StOlp school 
in suburban Wilmette is bright — 
and so. it seems, are the children. 
i The place has a new painfjob. 
Walls are pale yellow, baby blue 
and other pastel hues. The black- 
board is dark green and the chalk 
is ,vello\v. 

"There's ?D entirely .'dilferent 
attitude now. • sa.vs C-irdoii Wal- 
ker, oil instructor. "T/iere's . no 
Jate afternoon letdown. -The kids 
stay a\jako and, always arc ready 
for something. ' Of course, that 
makes the teacher's job a little 
harder." 

"5 J- 48-4-1 



/»00 
Contributions and r)ositiv3 values. 



Many Tasks 'to Re Done I 
Before College Can Reopen 



(■pKliI to Th« Tlinei-PtrayuM) 

Halilcoburg, Miss. — There's 
more to reorganizing and re- 
opening a college than meets the 
•tudent's eye. 

To be the prMsidfni of a church 
college which Mbeiiik' reorganized 
calls for tlirf Jalfenta of an interior 
decorator, ifce organi>jitional abil- 
ity of an»; army enerai, the 
mathemaiit^ gEniiw of an Ein- 
stein and itie ppticnce of Job. 

And although* X>r. I. E. Rouse, 
president of Mississippi Woman's 
college which will reopen Septem- 
ber 8, would modestly deny that 
he embodies these characteris- 
tka. the work he has accomplish- 
ed in directing the remodeling 
and renovation nrofrram at the 
school is tremendous. 

Inactive since 1040 as an aca- 
demic institution. MWC for the 
most part was converted into liv- 
ing quarters for army families 
, during World War II. 



The paint had to be scraped off. 
and three coats of oil-base paint 
for interior walls were needed. 

Formerly, a metal celling In 
the auditorium produced poor 
acoustics. This has been replaced 
by cream-colored acoustical ma- 
terial which, according to an 
architect, will correct about 80 
per cent of the difficulty. 

Seats in the auditorium which 
had been damaged by rain leak- 
ing through a skylight have been 
replaced by 532 opera seats for- 
merly used in a Camp Shelby the- 
ater. 



I FINDS BID HIGH 

And when Dr. Rouse accepted 

' the presidency of the institution 
In October. 1946. tasks to be done 
in connection with choosing a fac- 
ulty, solicitation of students (to 
say nothing of needed funds) and 
remodeling and renovating the 
entire plant were staggering. 

To t)egin with, the general con- 
tract price submitted for remod- 
eling and reworking the brick 
buildings on the campus — Tatum 
Court. Ross and Johnson Halls, 
the dining; hall, the Mary Ross 
hospital and the president's home 
— touied S96.000. Acting as his 
own general contractor for the 
Job. after the proposed contract 
had been rejected. Dr. Rouse has 
reduced this initial estimate by 
$46,000. But being a contractor 
has its problems, Dr. Rouse ad- 
mits. 

For example, the walls of the 
building at .MWC had mildpwpd 



OTHER REPAIRS 

The two-manual pipe organ in 
the auditorium has been rework- 
ed Inside and out. The concert 
grand piano on the stage likewise 
lias been overhauled, as have 18 
upright practice pianos. 

Other details of the improve- 
ment program include: Repairing 
and repainting , the swimming 
pool: renovation of the home eco- 
nomics rooms, for which new elec- 
trical equipment will be purchas- 
ed: construction of a concrete 
walkway connecting Ross and 
Johnson Halls; refinishing of all 
modern bedroom walls in pastel 
shades: renovation of the dining 
hall, the president's home and the 
hospital; reworking the college li- 
brary; conversion of a storage 
room into a gym room, and over- 
hauling of the science building 
which will be the onlv frame 
structure in the plant. The unit 
will contain about five labora- 
ties, two classrooms and an of- 
fice. 

Even though the college libra- 
ry has been unusued since 1940 
the more-than 1.3.000 volumes are 
in excellent condition. 

Dr. R'ouse hopes to enroll a stu- i 
dent body of about 200 girls in 
September, and by next year he 
believes there'll be a ''waitingL 
list." 



Construction On 
School Building 
Progresses ^11 

Freshly Painted School- 
/ Rooms And Library Will 
Soon Be Ready 

I Construction is progessing ni- 
; cely in the repair project on the 
Main High School building of 
Ville Platte High, according to 
Principal J. D. Lafleur. A new 
roof has been installed and all 
classrooms are being fully repair- 
ed and freshly painted. 

A radical departure from tradi- 
tion will be the newly painted 
rooms which will boast light blue, 
light green, ivorj- and other pas- 
tel colors. The library will soon I 
present a beautiful spacious room 
done up in sheetrock. The paint- 
ing job is just about complete. 
All books, periodicals, and fur- 
niture are being arranged to pro- 
sent a pleasant atmosphere in 
that study hall. 

THe Ville Platte" High Libr- 
ary is fully accredited by the 
State and 'the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondar>' 
Schools. It employs a full time 
librarian, and students are en- 
couraged to use the librarj- liber- 
ally. The motto there is "the 
school is built around the lib- 
rary." Elementar>- grade pupils 
are being serviced on a weekly 
schedule. ^^ 

Th? ne^- priniarj-^ building 
which wa^ expected to.' be ready 
for occufiancy sometime this 
fall will ngt be riady Ijefore next 
year, Mr. • Laf leiJr said. Because 
of the sh^rtige of construction 
material, the contractor is un- 
able to obtain foundation steel 



gg5) NOTP- 47-8-31 VPG -47-iO-Z *^:2^ 

Expand, Repair 
Catholic Schools 



the Reverend Henrv c. ^„ 

perintendent of Catholic schools 



uezou, su-i 'i'^'^o new tins 
added 



' J^acihties of manv of the arch- 
olocesan schools have been ex- 
panded, renovated and repaired 
during the summer in prepara- 
tion for the opening of the fall 
term. September 2-3, according to 



^roonis have bcon 

.. , . - f^i'r Lady of I.ourdos 

The recentlv dedicated St 'school. Pupils t.f the Utile Floxv- 
Pauls Church on Gentiiiy Hich- f" °\-'f,^"^ -'''"'ol will begfn its 
way is to open elementarv grades ^^ I' ••Tf^'" "'^'^^'^ ""^ '"*«' i°' 

in September, under thrdirSn%",^T,''.'l!.'*' •'''•'";"• . v I 
of the Sjsters of the Holy Kam-,,^^ L classroom, hare also been' 
ily. ^ "^'^ pdfJed to St. Dominic's school. Sa- 

I A ^„ I, ij- 'cred Heart' of Jesus school will 

from thP tv ^"'"^'"f- IHTChaced have one bt,ild>ng devoted to The 
[o^ h/c h '■ -^''m ^y^'''^i""""'- "'"'*^ department alone. A new 
^n^'c P '"j'^^'iat'ted at St. fe- school, .St. Gerard .Majella. will 
cihas Paro.lnal school and at St. wen in Baton Rouge and will pro- 
Leo the Great school. 'vjoe a two-year high school cur- 
riculum. 



NOS-47-8-^3 



401 



<t2OO,OOO.00 School 
Improvement Now 
Under Way In 
DeSoto Parish 

Long T«rin Program Will Include 
Cveryiking From Roof to Foundation 

■Y JOHN anAY THOI.I. I port and Indicated that It h.d be«n 

A matter of p^tloular lnt««t If anything, on ST conSllJvS 
to the people of DeSoto Parish' ^We. 
the public aobool Improvement 



and modernization program. In an 
interview Wednaday, August 20. 
Mr. 8. M. StoMn, Superintendent 
of EducaUon for DeSoto Parish, 
told of the work that has been 
done and that Is belxig done under 
this i>roffram. 

Mr. Bcnca R. Brown, Oenstnic- 
tlon Supervisor, Division of High- 
er Sducatlon, made an Inspection 
of the Parish school buildings in 
Febniary, IMS. 

I Since this survey took In the 
I schools at Mansfield, Oak Grove, 
JLogansport, Longstreet. Lula, Ben- 
son, PeUcan„ R^mbla, Wallace 
Frlerson, Stdnewall and Grand 
Cane, It was/ Immediately apparent 
that the improvement o^ogram 
would be aJ long /range -<ne. Mr. 
Brawn's suggestlghs for improve- 
ment Included everything from re- 
pairing leaky roofs to improve- 
ments on the foundations and 
plumbing. And there was much to 
be done in between. He estimated 
the total cost of the over-all pro- Company, of Houston, Texas, at 
gram at around $200,000.00. Many a cost of $9,985.00. Both contracts 
of the buildings have been in use were let July 7, 1M6, and the 



««* roof la guarantewl by bond 
for twenty Vears. Work on the 
roofs ran -until July iMe 

■nie Mahsfleld el«imi|«y school 
was waterproofed by a patented 
prooMs of the A. O. Horn Company 
of Houston, utilising an oU base 
substance which is put on with 
a trowel to cover the craoks be- 
tween stones and bricks. 

Next on the program came the 
painting of the buildings. Begin- 
nJug in the summer of i»46 a 
number of the buUdings were paint- 
ed on the outside to preserve the 
roofs and walls. Pelican. Benson 
Mansfield, Grand Cane, Longstreet,' 
*"<! Logansport buildingB were all 
upon careful study of the survey,! attended to In this manner dIv 
It was decided to map out a "five labor was employed, and the' woi^ 
year plan" and to go about the was largely under the aupervlston 
repairs in a common sense way, of the principals of the schools 
doing first things first. Since the since the architect advised that 
leaky roofs were the most im- this was the cheapest way These 
portant conslderaUon, they were repairs were largely accomplished 
attended to immediately. Mr. Ed- last session at a coat ofOTlyl 
ward F Nleld, an archltet of »3,000.00 to the Parish. Mr Sbowa 
Shreveport, who has done all the pointed out that had thl* 
School Board work for the past 
32 years with the exception of two 
buildings, was called in to inspect 
the roofs. He then drew plans and 
specifications to re-roof the build- 
ings at Pelican, Benson, tiogana- 
port. Longstreet. «dMl Stonewall, 
and for waterproofing the out- 
side walls of the elementary school 
at Mansfield. 

Bids were taken, and contracts 
let. The H. H. Bain Co., of Shreve- 
port, made the lowest bid for the 
re-roofing, at a cost of (34,433.00. 
Contract for waterproofing the 
walls of the Mansfield elementary 
school went to the A. C. Horn 



■ 



for thirty years, and during the 
war repairs were of necessity lim- 
ited. 

Since Mr. Brown's repwrt was 
made March 25, 1M5, the Parish 
School Board made an inspection 
in April and May of that year to 
verify his figures. Mr. Green Rives 
of Mansfield, and Mr. S. B. Piatt, 
of Grand Cane, were the permanent 
members of the Parish Inspection 
committee, wfaUe etuij ward mem- 
ber made a third committee mem- 
ber while it was in his ward. Their 
report confirmed Mr. Brown's re- 



waterproofing was finished by 
Christmas. 

Old roofs were stripi>ed to thi 
sheeting, the old fire walls whlcl 
extended above the roofs were re- 
moved, and new five-layer build- 
up roofs of tar, roofing paper, and 
gravel were ijut on, with copper 
flawing and trim. This removing 
of the parapet and extending the 
roof deck to form eaves prevents 
water getting Into the wall sipace. 



been done by a contractor, em- 
ploying Union labor, It would have 
cost much more, as well as taking 
longer. 

Beginning at the close of school 
this summer, the Inside renovation 
was begun on the buildings. Laboc. 
was not available to do this all at 
once, but much has been done. This 
summer the Longstreet and Stone- 
wall hjgh schools were renovated 
completely. Including auditoriums 
and buildings, while the Logans- 
port and Mansfield high schools 
were repainted Inside with the 
exception of the auditoriums. Since 
the stage of the audltorlimi In the' 
Mansfield High School Is to be 
enlarged, it was decided to reno- 
vate the auditorium later, when 
all the work could be done at one 
time. The other buUdings In the 
parish will be taken In their turn. 

This redecoratlon of the inside 
walls of the schools represents an 
entirely new idea in school In- 
teriors. The first Impression on en- 
tering the hall of the Mansfield 
High School Is that it has been 
enlarged by about half. The use of 
white for ceilings, ivory for walls, 
and iJeach for door and woodwork 
trim, makes the Interior much 
lighter and gives an Impression of 
greater space. Baseboards are of 
light oak. 



402 



Problems ana neecis, -- 



10-YEAR SCHOOL 
PROGRAM SOUGHT 



Bourgeois Proposrs Outlay 
of $20,000,000 



But to properly expand tne svb- 
tem, other needs must he niet, 
Bourgeois pointed nut. These In- 
clude more teachers, special serv- 
ices, medical services, clerical 
and maintenance workers, and ad-' 



Lionel J. Bourgeois, superin- 
:tendent of Orleans parish public 
ischools, said Tuesda.v he is pre- 
Ipared to recommend to the school 
board a 10-year renovation pro 
Icram which he estimates will cost 
from S20.000.000 to S-JO.OOO.OOO. 

An addition of SI. 500.000 to the 
annual budget will be needed to 
maintain the expanded program. 
Bourgeois said. 

He oripinallv estimated that 
the program would cost about 
$20,000,000. and to maintain it the 
board would need $1,000,000 more 
per vear. 

The superintendent said study 
of the recent scliool .survey by 
John B. Myers, stale department 
of education, indicated that if 
followed exactly, the renovation 
program it recommended would 
cost »3."),noo,noo. 
"I feel that this is more than 
we need to spend or could spend 
wisely over the next 10 years," 
Bourgeoi.s added. 

$6,000,000 for Renovation 
His report to the board in lan- 
uary, he said, ^yill include, rrf.iny 
of the M.vers survey recommenda- 
tions p\^> .som^of his «)wn rela- 
tive tQ?vaffing and trpUpping' 
the sdSooli. ^' 

He sai(' his e.>;tlmate of tl)e ^^c- 
essary e.vpenditure foi; rfi*it'\aiion 
and building is based pn con=iruc- 
tidh costs of $15 per square foot 
of floor a'ea, including roof and 
floor. . I 

About $6,000,000 of the total; 
would go for renovatioil and the! 
remainder for erection of new 
schools "on ample sites," includ- 
ing "four to seven" white elemen- 
tary schools, a "like number" ofl 
Negro elementary schools, a white 
co-educational technical high 
school, and a Negro high school, 
the superintendent said. 

Gyms for High Schools ^ 

This would also -include two or; 
three white intermediate schools 
and two Negro intermediate 
schools if the school system is 
changed to the elernentary. inter- 
mediate and high school plan. 
And It would include the 
erection of gymnasium — field | 
houses In all high schools that 
the board retains as high 
■chools, he said. 



ditlonal equipment and supplies 
Fmally. the superintendent em- 
phasized, the improved school svs- 
lem is in the hands of the tax- 

INOTP-4>I0tB 

WALL INSISTS I 
I ON NEW school! 

Declares West Monroe's I 
Need Is Most Urgent; 
Survey To Come ' 

Charles G. Wall. Jr., of West Mon- 
roe, member of Ward 5 of the Oua- 
chita parish school, board, is releas- 
ing through the press an insistant 
action for that city in the way of 
erecting a senior high school. He 
states, that the long-awaited school 
survey will be' released at the next 
meeting of the parish school board I 
October 3. 

In Mr. Wall's statement, he says as 
follows: "Partisanship with relation to 
school s>'stems has no part in the 
problem now before us. Whether they 
have one or a dozen systems in Mon- 
roe, whether they consolidated, elim- 
inate or reorganize, does not affect 
the immediate solution of our prob- 
Oems. I have ever found the people 
of Monroe willing and eager to see 
West Monroe enjoy the services of a 
modern junior and senior high school 
and so 1 happily believe the solution 
of the problem here in West >ionroe 
'will x>e worked ^ut sa^;>faftorily." 

"Our simalion. however. Is desper- 
ate. We sjdli' need an exp^oaed build- 
ing program Jorfxhc Ou^hita parish 
school system meeting needs of every 
ward and especially do^s our system 
need a higli school in West Monroe. 

"We cannot approve of the policy 
of the past which has failed to pro- 
vide for normal building expansion. 
Even at this moment. I feel safe in 
saying that no plars have been drawn 
nor cost estimates provided for needed 
expansion in any part of Ouachita 



SCHOOL BUILDING 1 
, PROGRAMS SOAR 



I Construction Pushed in 

Effort to Keep Up 

With Populotion 

By Alfred L*«oh 
Chicago (I'P) — Record amounts 
are being spent to build new schools 
to meet the rapid growth In popu- 
lation. 

The Municipal Finance Oflieera 
Assn. reports that school bond sales 
durlns the first thre months of the 
year totaled more than J16, 000.000. 
The association said the need tor 
new schools results from these four 
factors: 

1. A boominc birth rate from 
194S to 1947. 

2. Rapid urban growth, which 
puta ttie biggest strain on big city 
school systems. 

3. War-time curtailment of 
school construction. 

4. A long-range increase In pop- 
ulation which has congested claas- 
rooms for a decade. 

California leads all othej 
this year In bon 



Improvemen 
; assoclati«n 
the fact \hat 
the faste 
Callfon 




states 

chool 

leers 

eflects 

ia la one of 

tates. It said. 

school bond sales 

for the fi%t quarter of 1948 totaled 

J23, 800,000. Texas was runner-up 

with $12,580,000 and Ohio was 

third with $8,660,000. New York 

was fourth with $7,050,000. 

The association pointed out that 

school expansion is being- financed 

in many other ways than bond 

sales. Indiana school districts are 

' getting construction money -tor a 

I special property tax level. 

In five years, the crest of the 
war-baby wave wlU hit the elemen- 
tary achools. The census bureau 
predicts that 2,750,000 youngsters 
of the bumper poat-'war bahy crops 
win enroll In tint grade next faU. 
a 800.000 Increase over 1947. ' 

The tide will rise until llEt,: 
when about 3,750.000 children wlll^ 
start school. 



HNS-47-5-22 



BRT-48-5-31 



403 



club m their noon lunchapn 



School Building 
Expert to Study 
xr^ Parish Program r%'''2£i:*,.''r.",',,,;;''':r, 

\y __^ """l enit iJiiiit and to broadened 



d.y .t Mike A- T^"../ "'""l l!:','- »"C= """'"/^•-•'«''' -"l' 

Zm ^ lorlum-K>m and cateterla, 1101 

BeMdes i,e »?,lfef.4S!>.Sl» rerTialn- , 000; Central audltorlum.»im caf« 
Ing from the tince :nllllc.a U..liar; terla and muMc 
bond Issue vulod In 194<, ari .'mMI 
llonal Jv("ru,.''iiv» i» require. I . ful 
nil the edti-'itlortiil i^^d-.' .f Ih 



East 
>>->ard 



8.cur|t> ,^,„^,. 
Edu<-4ti 



i the impor;nnce of pub- 
tion In a democracy. Bar- 



room. 1181.000; 
Seventh ward audltorlum-iom 
cafeteria. 1100.000; .Monte Sano 
cafeteria. J30.000; Wyandotte cafe- 
teria. »22.000; Falrllelds cafeteria. 
J38.000: Zachary Vocational bulld- 
Ingr and cafeteria. 161.000; Prld« 
vocational building and cafeteria. 
"=' "»"■ school sites. J200.000- 



151.000: 



.concept 

Mion Route tMlrirt|iic edu. _ , ... 

'<?•• "f Dr - .."" "^""'"'^ '*'"""^'' '"""' fuvrgested the school board J"'" '° Present facilities. Jl.OOO.- 
school hous ■ ^ Haraon. chlef.jcould either construct the bulldlnK .'""= contmgent fund. I258.489.88. 

"inr section. Federaljmo.st ursently needed or taxp.iyers ^ ^\«M» M^ tfk .^^ 

r S: Office oricould be given an opporttmlty to K K I "* *t /-• \ L -^XQs. 
°f "»• natia "' "' "' *^ ' ""^'^'f'te addltlolnal taxes for the com- V^ • » I ' ' '* «W 

"leg nn h ' """t'l'llfiR author- plete Sjulldlns prtujiam. 
Dr. r •"^T'^'^"'"'"* construction. \Vhi!e one mllllcin dollars of the 

annn.,^ "^ ""rrow. superintendent, bond 
Ba?on To** '"''»'"■ "' ■"'" be In the < 

18 and n** *'"' ^^ through Sept. at various schools and the purchase 
hoard T 1! confer with the school of sciiool slt.es. Rtrrow depliired 



issHe has bten allocated to 
structlon of additlona units 



'-aborrtr**"' """^ ""hitects. C. E. te7.4:2.<)00 Is required, with as ad 



f I 



and ., 'P«>.rvisor. school plsnt 

""1 transportation. Stat 



review and 

Plans f"r the 

■"mergency program 



vlte.; , K-lucatlon. has been In- 

ferencer. "' ""''"' " «»"" 'o"" 

^ Hamon win 

,rh r'" P'-^""^'narv 
school hoards 

^nl 'L^'" '*" following build- '<"• 
w. Which are to he completed bv "ard 
ho!!" i\. ""^ f'""-al Hieh 
rL '^ ''"'' ^'"''^ elementsrv 
-r ho„,^f,„„^^^^^ "K-nient^rv ,cho,M 
and Seventh w„rd Hi^^ school 
H'» advice „iii „,„ h^ reoue-ted 
tor problems confrontlnr the EnM 
«<«ton Rouep p,^i,^ ,^^„^, ^^^_.^ 

"« future hunrtinr pr-^ersm 
LighUnt (artificlar and fiaturali 
"••ting. t\tf and shape of ciass- 
rooms, equipment, orientation of 
irooms within the buildings, orien- 
|t..tlon of buildings on the sitw. 
functional planning and utilization 
<^i space, building materials, utili- 
sation and modernization of pre- 
sent structures, etc.. will receive 
special attention. 



liltlonal |3.045.4!i9.S8 being needed 
modernization of existing 
plants. 

He disclosed that construction Is 
now under way on a three-room 
inlt at the Baker school and that 
lids would soon be advertised for 
he following work: classroom unit 
emcntary school in Third 
classroom for elementary 
school In Goodwood, high school 
rlassroom at Central and an ele-' 
iientar>- and hl.ih school classroom 
inlt for the Seventh ward. 

"In order to provide for the ex- 
pected enrollment In 1952-53. which I 
includes the additional 12th grade. 
-62 additional classrooms over 



Bill Seeks 
Change In 
Ownership 

BY WIRT WILLIAMS 

(Item Capital Bureau) 
BATON ROUGE. — Reps. 
Blanchard and Garvey. of New 
Drleans, today introduced a bill 
uthoriiing transfer of all New 
)rleans school property held in 
he name of the City of New Or- 
eans. to the Orleans Parish School 
ioard. 

The bill would authorize a con- 



bove the number now available '>titutional amendment. 



will be required." he stated. The 
.-inllclpated enrollment, he dis- 
closed. Is based on an estimated 
:ro«th.to 120.0U0 population within 
he next five years. 

Pv. Barrow listed the cla.-sioom 
needed and estimated cost of each 
as follows: White schools (total 
..■s3.S45,ono) Istrouma High, 36. »].- 
12. $331.«00: Third ward elemen- 
tary (No. 2). 14. ,«364.OU0: Tiiiid 
ward elefontary (Xo. 3). 24!>.0(i0; 
Goiidwood element.i-y. 8, ft.'4:).0iio: 
Asia St. elementary. 10. J200.00ii: 
J249.000; Raker Hi;h. 13. fl304.0i"i. 
SfiUthdowns elementarj-, S. $24:'.000; 
East Fairflelrts elementary. S, 
Negro schools (total $3.3 



Every effort is being made to 

«*t the final plant and speclfl'-a- 
.tlons ready at the earUest pos- 
:»ible date so that these structures 
■can he made available as so«n ae 

possible, even before the deadline 

Of September. 1»4». Crowded condl- 
Itlons now existing in the schools 

"'«ke It mandatory that additional 

facilities be provlde<l as rapldij: as 

possible. r>r. Barrow -aid Dr. 
i Hamon s visit has been timed so' 
|a* to make use of his broad knowi- 
ng* of fhl. Arid in the present 

em ergency program, he ex plained 

Dorroir Uiscussefl 
School BuilcUup 
Needs of Parish 

Mnre than one million do!....s Is 
needed merely to complete the 
planned renovation pro-'ram of the. 

parish schools. Dr. Clark L. Barrow. g>'m. cafeteria. $115,000; Standard 
superintendent of parish schools. Helehta audltorium-gjm and cafe- 
loid members of the Co-operative 



It involves some $10 millions 
vorth of public school buildings 
n New Orleans 

Until 1916. public schools here 
vere operated by a 17- man board 
'f aldermen, and all property ac- 
luired was placed in the name of 
he city. 

Among the properties acquired 
vere the schools left by John Me- 
)onogh and other benefactors. 

When the School Board, was 
created as a separate, Independent 
30dy in 1916. it loolc over Opera- 
tion of the school proper!;c<. but 
title was never changed to the 
board's name 
Rep. Blanchard said Mavor Mor 



Scotlandvilie elementary. 12. $27<.- rison and the Commission Council 

000: Easy Town elementary. 2>\ have approved li^e bill 

J464.000; F.a.«ey Town element.iry "From time lo lime, it become* 

(No. 2). 10. J231.1M10: Keddy. 14. necessari- to sell school proper- 
$352,000; Perkins Rd. elementary ties no longer needed " he said 
(No. 2). 12. $2;s.ooii: Easy Town jn many instances, where title is 
Junior-Senior. 30. $502,000; Scot- y„ted in the citv, proceeds of 
landvllle Junior High. 11. $326.iim": ggi„ n,y,t ^.^ ", ^ . 

Zachary Junior High. 13. »352.0iiO: .- .- » me ciiy. n 

iChaneyvllIe Junior High. 11. $297.- 
000: rooms for consolidation, 21. 
$197,000. 

The other facilities needed for 
:modemlzat:on and estimated co 



is true that the city has been le- 

hient with the School Board, but 

»t is limited to the extent of the 

present constitutional provision 

*hich prohibits the city from I 

„ J , „ „ """ flienating property without proper, 

|were I -,.d as follows: Baton [nj .dequate consideration" I 

Rouge High Kymnasium. cafeteria I Xn hecom* lsu> »!._ uii •' 

and «hon. $430...00; Baton Roii.:. Lo,%e a iTo hvU .'*' ' T"l* i 

Junior High bymna,fu,K *,T„- ..V. ,: S^^ * j^-'^"^!^ J°* V ^1!^ 

$209,000: North Highlands gym le^Sn""a1.e•rr^T*'' ''''''" ""H ' 

and cafeteria. $166,000; Hollywoo.l I 



NOI-^5-a5 



404 



Remodellins oF Block Elementary 
School a 'Must* 



By JAY PAUL VVADE 
Edltc-. The News-Booster 

Often when we refer to 
something worn oui we say: 
"It needs to be jacked up and 
a new o^e put unier it" 

That's the situation existing 
for the Block Elementary 
school buildfrig in Jonesvllle. 
At thj special inrltatlon of Prin- 
cipals Tandy \V. McElwe« of Block 
High school, and J. Eldon Dougthy. 
of Block Elementary school, this 
writer visited the 26year old build- 
ing Wednesday morning to make 
a personal inyestlgatlon of condl- 
whlch have plagued the admini- 
sters and faculty all during the 
present term and for several terms 
past. 

The fr«eslng temperatures which 
have caused mlserr throughout the 
parish the past two weeks have 
■lAde the plight of the elementary 
ktttMlng all tke more distreMlaf. 

On Wednesday morning only a few 
children were In attendance and 
they were huddled around the In- 
adequate radiators In the rooms 
"keeping the heaters warm". A 
few minutes after we arrived 



In a move to accomodate tne 
heavy grammar grade enrollment 
school officials attempted to con- 
vert much space into additional 
classrooms. The home economics 
department was made into four 
classrooms and the school audi- 
troium Into two. In both these con- 
versions, much space — of necessity 
—was wasted. Also, an Insufficient 
number of windows for lighting 
was available. 

In two classrooms this writer 
Inspected, desk* are Jammed 
•e tightly in the confining space 
that the teachers have to go 
te the rear of the room te !•• 
lew the pupil* U fct te the 
kiMkbeard, (n en* cubicle, tt 

pupils are supposed to learn 
their three "R's" in such a con- 
gested state of affairs that It 
seems miraculous that any- 
thing is accomplished. In the 
other, 28 pupils are under the 
same handicap. Neither room, 
has enough windows for light- 
ing. 

Throughout the building, a com- 
plete revision of wiring and elec- 
trical facilities seems mandatory. 
There are few wall outlets for mo- 
Uon picture machines or any other 
aids requiring electricity. The con 



-- ^ — . . . . ^«, »..«B ■^^uataus ciociriciiy. ine con- 

senool was dismissed for the day dltlon of the window shades walls 
—or until the weather was better, and interior in general are'hardljr 



in the drafty and poorly 
lighted halls on each flight of 
the old building of the old 
building are only two radia- 
tors — far too small and Inef- 
fective. The classrooms — many 
of them converted from form- 
er high school departmental 
laboratories and auditorium — 
were etlil not heated eufflclent- 
ly at 10 a.m. though the ateam 
had been on for over three 
houra 



-•rjt 



Naturallj, the diacomforU w. 

enhanced by the bitter cold but 
»«y obaarrar eotUd teU that on a 
aonaal day, th« teachara were 
h«dl«appad ia tkalr aftarta to In- 
struct our youngsters. 

The Block elementary building 
was constructed in 1922 as a com- 

sSSF"'- HCN-48-l-a9 



conducUve to good morale of both 
.faculty and student body. 

Nothing abort of deplorable la 
the sanlUUon conditions of the 
tolleta of both boya and girls. The 
dralna are Inadequate and com- 
modea continually overflow onto 
I the floor canalng: water to ataa4 
thronchoot the achoolday. WB DID 

NOT SEE A SINGLE LAVATORY 
WHERE A PUPIL COULD WASH 
HIS OR HER HANDS! 

Separated only by a parti- 
tion from the toilet* Is the 
school lunchroom. Odors from 
the restrooms permeate the 
lunchroom at all times, causing 
a condition which should not 
be allowed by health authori- 
ties. 



The lunchroom, which serves 
both elemenUry and high school 
itudents. Is so crowded that It 
takes nearly two hours to accom- 
modate those patronlilng It. 

This article Is no condemnation 
of the parish school board which 
long has realised the condltlona 
existing at the elementary school. 
Part of them were to be corrected 
In the parish-wide bond election 
which the board had planned to 
hold last summer. A technicality 
caoaed postponement of the vote 

at that time. 

However, we believe the seri- 
ousness of the Block situation was 
not emphasized enough. Few peo- 
ple have failed to hear the com- 
plaints from faculty members, 
school children and parents of 
conditions existinp. 

We have voted funds for Im- 
proving our streets, our drain- 
age, our water and lights, to 
build a gas system, a sewer 
system and a municipal park. 
It's high time We did more re- 
garding the education of our 
children. 

Many would like to see a com- 
plete new building to house the 
lUock Kiementary pupils but we 
lliink that is impractical. The brick 
siructure itself is still in good ex- 
teiioi- condition, with the e.\cej)tion 
of minor repairs to. and replace- 
ment oi windows and doors. 

liowever. the ituerior needs re- 
niodelliiig llirougliout. This would 
talve a cousiduiable amount of 
iiciucy but much less than a new 
I iiilding would cost. A good archi- 
iLct should be engaged to plan bet- 
ter arrangement of classrooms, 
electrical and heating facilities and 
sanitation improvements, i'ossibly I 
a library and a small auditorium ' 
bliould be included because the I 
tieiiientary pupils seUion have the -l 
opiioitumiy to , utilize ihe high 
school auditorium-gymnasium com- 
bination. 

No doubt there are other build- 
ings In the parish that need better 
lacilities and we hope to visit 
more of them as time goes by and 
help present their situation to the 
public. 

At tha February meeting of 
the parish school board, it is 
urged that members take a 
few minutes out from other I 
duties and visit hiock tiemen- 
ary school. 



405 



LOUISIANA'S UNIVERSITIES, 
COLLEGES NEED MORE SPACE 

gram. Oneyiouifh of th( idcexmrv — ..-..^ 

Classroom And Residen- '"""^ "* tepo^Si ^rt*ir^TZ!i'°' m.terl.U Hm cu»d many col. 



campuM*. would be equivalent to IS i 
Empire Stale buildings or 76 Penta> ' 
gons. On a per student basis, col- 
leges will still have 15 per cent less 
space per student than before the 
WW— even If they get all they are 
a5king for. 
High building co!>-ts and the scarcity 

, J . ^3y m hand 

by educato^f.^^vercrowding is pre*- 1 '*«** *° delay permanent building 
ent everywhere. American caiiiv,>*^^,' construction. A dollar will build only 
built for a pre-war enrollment of two-fifths as much space today as it 
1,500,000 now . have 2.340.000 student^s would in 1940. A spotcheck of 100 
crowded into them. By 1950, nearly colleges, including several in Louis- 
three million students are expected iana, reveals that of 240 million dol- 
to be in attendance, and colleges aie lars available in immediate resources 
going to have to increase their facili- for building purposes, only gO million 
lies to care for them. dollars was under contract. 

Louisiana institutions of higher edu- Only the help of tlie federal gov- 
caUon are crowded far beyond nor-|emn,ent has prevented a tight squeeze 
mal. the survey discloses. They hav.L,„ existing facilities. Concerned with 
only 101 square feet of classroom' the education of one million veterans 

. , „ „,^.„„^ ,., *"'* laboratory space per student, „q^^. ^„ college, the government has 

a square foot, this building program , ^"'"P""^ *"h 14« square feet, ^t asi helped inslituUons house them 38 mil- 
would cost almost 40 million dollars. .* minjmum goal for 1950 by educa- ,jo„ ^^^,^ ,ect of residential space 
The figures are taken from a sur- []?"■ ^"'y ^ ^•"f'^?. **** "' I"'" at a cost of 200 miUion dollars, much 
vey of the needs of each individual T^"" ^" ." ■^*'''"' P^^,»*"'**'"'-i of it taken hom war surplus or 
instituUon made by the federal agency. ^T'T'^o^ ' ' **''"""'' °^^'' temporary housing. The gov 

Preadenu and officials of each school r„,,°^„_- ... . 

were asked to report o* the amount „M,°"^«f '""^ universiUss have 342 
of space now available»in their >f- ("l'"'°" '"""'■* JL?' °' «P"~ "»<* ."'- 

ciliUes and on the-n.inimum hoXi .fr i). ^^"7 "" i " f"""* '*!' 

.».» ».-,»„».«< -/ .. . -a J . |0f additional space, educators report. ... 

le^^r'TtLf^e;i'7;^.n^l^en\1^^P-^-? '— ' *'"^'^ -""^ program . undertaken on the nation's 



tial Need Set At 3,- 
843,000 More Feet 

By Glenn D. ENerctt 

(Nfw'-Si.r- World Wiililnglon Burfaui 
WASHINGTON, AprU B.— Colleges 
and universities in Louisiana need to 
add 3,843.000 square feet of classroom 
and residential space by 1950 to take 
care of their permanent post-war in- 
crease in enrollment, the United Stales 
office of education reports. At pres- 
ent building costs, which average {10 f 



emment has also helped provide 17 
million square feet of classroom, lab- 
oratory and library space. 
Wh^ the real post-war buildirts 



Nation. wicc tot. Is show tiiat Ameri- 
can colleges plan tj undt,i lajie.a five- 
billion-doUjr' bulding exujduiin pro- 



M^4S-'^8-4-l2 



I nearly double the size of American campuses, approximately three-fUths 

will be financed from public tax 
sources ffor state colleges) while two- 
I fifths will come from philanthropic 
(Sources or religious bodies, 
had available only $500,000 fori 
those two buildings and an addi- 
tion to the Music building at Mc- 
-Veeae and the bids were rejected 



(5^ 

LSU Restudies Building Program ; 

— _ *— ' *^ " j - - -»~v.' «..-■ i.i(^ Lfiuo were r 

Construction Costs Are Too High "^rT\Z: trnt 



LSU is re-studylng its bulldingl^!.''!^!^!' ^°"T i""" '""•"" "'"=•' on Dec. 2 
program to "figure out what build- ''°"^"' • '"'^'"de^ »"000 for 
ing, to eUminate" because of the I :,^""""^"'- '"'" .**""' 
'I Increased costs of construction - ' ^'"* °P*°"^ 

The board. meeUng in executive ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ Uo^ZT ^ZTMT ^" '°^ »'/"- 

Dr. Emmett Irwin of New Orleans """■ ^^^^^ """ ''"^ °P^°"^ ''" 



I session on the main campus here 
for most of the day. vesterday 
ordered the building progiaw »e- 
Checksd ^Uh a -irw "o pr-Ani«# it 



ngs were 
opened at the Lake Charles campus 



McLemore ^, ^tudy Girl. Dorm. Bid. 
Monroe on ^"® '°" ^'<* °° ^ proposed 
dormitory for 406 girl, on the 



and E. Monnot Lanier of Plaque- 1 !?^''- "" 1^*,!'°"'* postponed ac- 



ana r,. aionnoi i^&nlar of Plaque- .■ Z ^.^ ^— r .» ~.- 

mine. board member., over accept- °" "" '*"* ""'• ""^'"^ Insteao to 
ing the bid i^hich they said rep-, 
'^'-i-!ist< r®**"*^'' * ^°^^ °' $17:40 per squareU 



I ask tfie administrative staff 
latudy 

f""!°'l._^''r^^*Z°'^ -•■•''Vi'e."2t'^e'dj'°?* ,"?«" the' "boird 'k7\lr^dy|"^^™„*Jl''*/j°"^„*'.^^°'j;|^';,^ 



- <^rd dia a-^c i r tfi for '"^ ">« '"''^ ^hich they said rep- ,.„ ^ 
Bcteroe ,bull.ltn» ..t ~-.^U' resented a cost nf *l7-*n no- .n>..-«lr'""^ 



the proposal and 



la etudwof bnlldins plana at John r^^^'^t^'* " *oo high bids which 
McNeeA Junfor coilegre at Laher*P''»»e"'e'l a cost of $15 per square 
Charles and took under advise- r°°*- However, the bid 



(? before Jan. 18. the deadline for 
action on the bid. 
advise- 1 """• "owever, the bid was ac- I "^^^ proposed dormitory would 
ment a bid on a woman's dormitory [ ''"P*"' '^'•' **<"'' voting againrt P® ''"'"■ ^^^k of the present wom- 
on the Baton Rouge campus. ^tbo action. Jen's bousing unit on the east side 

Th« hr,.r^ . . '. ■''•'« ''""'■d authorized on motion f" '^''* ^^^ campus, McLemore 

Tbe board went into session at of Homer Brinkley of Lake C^trlt^ h *'^- '^*"' "Chairman also said that 
a. m.. and remained h»hi„H ^ -^esurvey and reanalyzaUon - of '^* ^"^ ''«<' ^'o<=a»e<l »1.500,000 
-■ulIdlnK needs at John MeNe^jBeK'''"" * $3,500,000 bond Issue, sold 

— I to provide funds for dormitories 

college, after which th» projecta ', f °r both men ana women. The 
men's dormitory Is now under con- 
struction and will cost around 



and remained behind 
closed door, until late afternoon 
when the meeting was opened. Dr. 
Harold W. Stoke, president of LSU, 
and J. M. McLemore, board chair- 
man, announced that the day wa« 
devoted to a discussion of the ex- 
ceedingly high bids submitted for 
University buildings. 

Secret Sea.ion 



will be readvertlsed. 

Dr. Stokes explained that tbe 
administrative ataff of the Unl- 
I versity rejected on Dec. « bids 
I totaling $382,878 for a gymnasium 
. ind home economics building at 
At its brief open session, the John McNeese, 
board on motion of Thomas Leigh 
of Monroe accepted a bid from 
Frank Masling & Son of Monroe 
for a new Science building at 



Tbe University 



BRT-47-l2r30 



$3,000,000. the funds from the 
bond Issue having been supple- 
mented by a surplus In the LSU 
funds. 

Dr. Stoke said that the dajf's 
closed meeting wa. devoted largely 
to a discussion a« to whether '-he 
University should spend that much 
for a dormitorj' for women since 



406 




fund yronofe^ f^^'^ ,?hn!.i h^' la. " ''^''">°'» a" "•at.'d to g^t a major portion of the $40,000,000 
in"r dancrh^ll Vhirh 1? '""'"'"K P':"P"T *•: ""W section of Hoffman eirmentar.v school, a for- 
Page 1 r '"'"iJiilii;^' •»« "» electricity In its rooms. (New Orleans .States Photo.) (Story on 



I Start Probe 
Into Schools' 
97 Buildings 

I A fact-finding survey to inves- 
tiK&te the construction needs of! 
New Orleans public schorls was 
started today, said .Supt. Bourgeois 

The survey is being conducted 
by F. Gordon F.berle. assistant sii- 
nerintendent of schools; Theo O. 
Hotard. Jr.. maintenance superin- 
tendent; Joseph Ruffo. as<:istant 
director of research; Charles P. 
Cieutat. maintenance denartment 
employe, and Thomas Green, re- 
ses'ch director. 

The points to be included in the 
survey of 97 schnni buildings are: 

' An investigation of all b'uid- 
ings to determine what schnf^ls in 
the city, duf to location or "slate 
of disrepair," wiU have Wbe aban- 
doned. 

* The number of wbUe. schools 
now in use Avhich can be corryerted 
into Negro educational factliiies. 

*■ The «rno,uot of alterations and 
repairs "ibsolutelv nrrpinary" for 
renovation of the builriinTs. 

• A pupil population plot to de- 
termine location' size and cost of 
"urgently needed" new buildings 

' Presentation of photographic 
evidence showing conditions, both 
interior and exterior, of each 
building. 

' Estimation of the total cost 
required for a complete renovation 
program. 




KRXEST O. BFCKER. ai«sis(ant school siipeiintondrnt in rharee 
of \ecro schools, examines a hole in the reilinc of McDonogh ^6 
Nfhool Hhich nses old-fashioned "pot-bellied" stoves to provide 
heat- for pupil.s, other reasons why the school hoard wishes to 
Mfbend lai'Re sums to improve \ecro educational facilities. i\e\v 



407 



r 



Misunderstanding s and controversial issues . - 

Mr. Bourgeois And The Schools 



n 



Superintendent Bourgeois' report 
to the School Board, in which he seeks 
to defend his administration against 
criticism arising from a recent Health 
Department report on unsanitary 
conditions in the public schools, is 
an able discussion of the manifold 
problems besetting a physically run- 
down school system. He recognizes at 
the outset that "the responsibility for 
the proper and efficient management 
of the public schools rests squarely 
upon the shoulders of the superin- 
tendent." 

Mr. Bourgeois again draws atten- 
tion to the large back-log of needed 



ficial who gives the impression that 
he is above justifiable criticism, es- 
pecially when the issue involves the 
health of their children. 

As we stated at the time of its pub- 
lication, the Health Department re- 
port cited numerous instances of 
filthy' conditions in school toilet.s and 
cafeterias, which could not fairly be 
attributed to lack of funds for neces- 
sary repairs. Some of these cases Mr. 
Bourgeois either attempts to justify 
by shifting responsibility to some un- 
named parties, presumably students, 
or tries to dismiss as "inconceivable." 

Again, when he complains that the 



repairs built up over a period of many Health Department report, based on 



L 



years, and quotes at length from the 
Grace Report of 1938 to buttre.ss his 
argument. He then announces that 
a committee composed of two school 
board employes has completed a six- 
month survey of school repair needs 
and has estimated the cost of neces- 
sary renovations at 87,605.895.98. 

Although it is a little difficult to 
understand how such an exact esti- 
mate could have been made without 
bids, and although the figure now 
used is almost double the amount 
cited by Mr. Bourgeois a few weeks 
ago, it is not our intention to take 
issue with him on this score. For even 
the briefest inspection of the public 
school plant of New Orleans will con- 
vince anyone of the urgent need for 
large-scale repairs. Kcreovcr. all he 
evidence bears out the superintend- 
ent's contention that the pvesm'iv 
debilitated condition h Ux result o." 
cumulative neglect. 

But when Mr. Bour^eoj- seeks to 
belittle the Health D-^p: : . mcnt in- 
vestigation and its findinp .s, he is do- 
ing a disservice to tlie cawse which 
he so competently and fei-^'ently em- 
braces. This community has great 
sympathy for his long-range improve- 
ment program, as is shown by its en- 
dorsement by 156 adult groups 
throughout the city. But the citizens 
will not take kindly to any public of- 



an mvestigation made in April and 
May, came into his hands too late for 
"verification" of the "accusations" be- 
fore classes resume in the fall, the su- 
perintendent leaves the unfavorable 
impression that he distrusts any 
agency other than his own which 
seeks to determine whether or not the 
public school system is being main- 
tained and operated satisfactorily. 

Nowhere in his report does Mr. 
Bourgeois clearly admit the possibil- 
ity that some of the school principals 
or custodial workers may have been 
negligent in the performance of their 
duties. On the contrary', he begs the 
question by asserting that similar con- 
ditions exist in the city's non-public 
schools, but that only the public 
schools have been censured. 

In short, the superintendent's re- 
port is all black and white. He speaks 
with knowledge of the school system's 
problems, the real need for money, the 
many admirable improvements made 
during his two-year tenure, and the 
essential preparatory surveys of edu- 
cational and physical needs prepared 
under his direction. But he refuses to 
acknowledge even a partial adminis- 
trative failure. This' will have the un- 
fortunate effect of leading many par- 
ents of school children to believe that 
the defects of management are great- 
er than they really are. 



NOl-^2-7-2? 



J 



4 OS 



METAIRIE SCHOOL J!*f ^*7t 
CONDITIONS HllSchool Is 

ailed Safe 



Hazards Revealed in Build- 
ing Inspection 



• lety, In convention here, who vis- 

Iilcd the school Wediiesriay to 
offer their service?, lights and 
paint without charpe. 
ThPir proposal. s*id Ieo> W- 
HiKRlns. Jef(er.s/(n parish «up»rin- 
, tendent of scho>»ls. will have tp he 
discussed by the school board be- 
fore it can be accepted. 
_. The experts were Or Daren- E. 
The state fire marshal i report . [^j,rmon. Te.\as slate department 
n Metairie High School conditions I of health expert on school plan- 



als of the -JefTerson /"ar-I ,. . , ,; h«»«rds exi8t.I"'ne and lichtinp: T. D. Wake 

ent-Teacher Association at- H'"*« '^'^^ ""'"* ""„"rl field. Vermilion. Ohio, lightin 
the alleged hazardous con- B e r t Clarke, Jefferson Parisn)|.jj^,„j.p manufacturer, and .loh 
ol Meuirie grammarfcchool Board member, said today,' Marshall 7,iv. representative of 
after an invesugationr ,,„o^„,. ^„.,_ ,^, .;„. <i,v of Chicago. 111., paint maniifactunn 
V >,howpd that the 7-year-P» students began the first day oi ^^^^^^^. ^hev visii 
iding was in "gicai need of the new school session. ^^^y j^jf] after r 

Mr. Clarke, member from the I paper stories on cor 
vas conducted by|Ei ^th Ward, met Saturtlay with I caused a wa/kfui o 
f. president of the. *_, „. . _, .«„..„„, „.i the thud grade. 

School P-TA. ancl'L- W. Higgins, superintendent of i Wednesday, after 



npw 
which! 



of 19 pupils in 



The probe was conducted 
Me?airie^HS"choo!TTA°^"nd|L• W. Higgins, superintendent ot i -Vednesday. after a plea to re- 
Mrs M D Jones, secretary, who schools in the parish, at Metairie turn the children was voiceri h\ 
,said that four rooms in the build-, school and went over the report Ouy J. I.ehreton, P'?,^'^*'"/ "' 'l?^ 
Ii„» v, = v» h«.n closed .since 1946i ^ Metairie Council of Parent-Teach- 

er Associations. 20 of the 26 pu- 
pils were in class. 

.After rhcckiiiK tlie lizhline. 
desk si/PS and layout of the 
ronm involvpcl. r>r. Harmon 
said: "Tlip situation here is had, 
but it isn't any Horsp than If ts 
In 2."»0.()no classrooms all over 
the United States." 
Xlipce were the faults he found | 
at Metairie: ' 1 

I "The decnratine cnniiasts are, 
excessive here. In a school build-| 
ling liehted for efficiency, con- 



'ing have been closed since 1946i . 
because of low enrollment. P*'>"t «"m- 

After conducting the lnvesti?a-' Mr Clarke pointed out that he 
tlon. which showed that floors was ir.fo-med a special inspection 
and ceiftngs were buckled when ^ | ^ i roof was to be made 

water from an old roof leak flood- ^"^ ^ ,^_ ,._ ^^,,., „„,^^ 

ed the rooms. Mrs. Knoff charged 
■ that 

"The M-hool, which U located 
one block Inside thp parith 
line. Is misplaced and is a me- 
morial to the S4iaandering of 
taxpayers' money." 
She said that facilities at .Metai- 
rie High school, which also han- 
dles elementary pupils, were 
overtaxed while four room# ir the 
grammar school ha-« ryot i^een 
itsed in a 'year. 

Mrs Knoff .-..id the 
hazaidous conditions a 



000 scho;>; revealed tile 



toda by the fire marshal's office 
"The report showed the cornices 
and parapet of the roof are in 
satisfactory condition and should 
not require another inspection for 
five years, " Mr. Clarke said. 
AWAITS REPORT 
Mr. Clarke said a report on the 
•;Ua Dolhonde School revealed it 
, be in a safe condition also, and 

'. T,'"'^'fei,°^ said he was awaiting a fire inspec 



illow- ''°" report on Metairie ElemenUry 
. / School. 

' \Vair--ard leilingsare faliing in Meanwhile. Mrs. J. F. Knoff. 
parts of the school and other sec- president of the Metairie Parent- 
iions. which have been renalled. Teachers Assn.. said no action on 
are buckling. kchool conditions is planned prior 

Drains in the children's rest- [jo the first meeting of the year 
room and in the boilerroom do not ^^ ^j,g third Tuesday of this 
I function. , month. 

Paint and plaster througnout received no state- 

^o^orbSrfem^n to^Tu^^^wh^e men[s ^b^ then on general condi- 
repairs were started on one of the ions in the high school, I am con- 
rooms and "never completed." ^ident the P-TA wi!l take some 

Mrs. Knoff said that records ,ction in the matter. Mrs. Knott 
show that the property was pur- ,8,^. "ParenU continue to ask 
chased at a cost of $35,000. for ,^^^ j,y gbout the school's roof."| [ 

which the owners paid only • *^, 

$3750. This transaction was one 
of a number recommended for 
vesiigation by the attorney gener- 
al and the Louisiana crime com- _ . ,. Offer S»»rvires 
mission bv the state supervisor of ^ Specialists Utter :>ervices, 

public funds, who conducted a 
probe into Jefferson parish school j 
systems in 1940. 



KIOI- 47-9-1 



Lights, Paint Free 



trasts should be reduced to a min- 
imum. Blackboards are too high. 
'The children can't reach the trp 
Ivf them, and the unnecessary part 
'ruts down on the room lightinp 
"The supplpmenlarv lighting is 
actually a joke. There is not 
enoupli of it to do any good, li 
just cieates more glare. What if 
needed is control of davlieht com 
ing into the room, more supple 
mentary lightinc lighter color; 
and equipment adaptable to thf 
children, not tablet arm chairt 
,with the children adaptable to the 
jchairs. .V rcananKcment of dp.sks 
in the room would cut down on 
glare and give maximum natural 
light when the children write. 
I "Thp situation in >Ipt;iirip i« 
nothing dilfrrrnt than in iIip 
ip^t of thp (ounlry. lot loo Ions 
HP havp Ix-i-n riiiiippinp .rnri 
(Ipcoratinc M-hool* lor I lip bpnp- 
fil of IliP i.inilor anil not lor llip 
cliihlipn. SlranitP Ihoiii-'h if may 
!.ppm. thp ro»t of niainlpnanrp 
<;op>i down "hpn Ihp colors in 
rooms arp lichlPi'." . 
The illuminating expcils piclvPri 
one classroom and asked that pic- 



- -. , ,.„ Mo.aivipJ'inps and specifications of the 

It was al.so charsed aftpr the \ classroom at the •^'P'^'"^P,.nnm be .sent to them so that 
Invpstieatlon Tuesday that the iHich school, where parents have! _ 



. I High school, where P^'/"'^,""^^^ proper recommendations equip- 
roof on the school has onl.v classed rooms as unf't 'or human >^^^^^ ^^^ .^^ ^.^^i,j ,,p f^^. 
been partially repairpd after it 'habitation." mav tjecome a moaci! . ^^^^I 
caved In last ypar soon after jpqual to the best in the Lniteai 
-•---' |?tates. ^ ., 

The change will be brought 
.-.hout hv three lighting experts of 
'he Illuminating Kngineering So- 



•chool was closed 



NOTP-47-8-ai 






(I25> 



SCHOOL SPENDING 
PROPOSAL RAPPED 

Bad Housekeeping Blamed 
for Unsanitary Conditions 



409 

Schooi-cleanmg (^ 

Every parent of school-age children 
Imust have been shocked and dis- 
mayed by the grossly unsanitary con- 
ditions revealed in the New Orleans 
public schools by a City Health De- 
partment report. Net one of the 
system's 96 schools was spared in this 
disclosure of deplorable conditions in 
cafeterias, toilets, halls and class 
rooms. The Health Department warns 
that, unless this situation is remedied 
by the time classes convene in the 
fall, many schools will not . be per- 



The exPcuUve hoard of thp New 
Orleans Classroom Teachers' Fed- 
eration Friday hlamed mo.st of the 
unsanitary conditions in many 
public schools on bad housekeep- 
init. 

The board, in a statement made 
public following a n^eeting Thurs- 
day, took issue with Public School mitted to reopen. 

fhe'r" e^Situres°"forcor°ectmg The immediate question, of course, 
the unsanitary condiUons. is what's to be done. Superintendent 

It said, "The federation believes Bourgeois blames a 25-year backlog 
that a ratio of 08 per cent admin- -r nppfiprt rpnnir<; n<;<!Prt«! that nnlv 
istrauve correction and 2 per cent °^ neeaea repairs, asseris inai oniy 
use of money is a more acwu-ate two per cent Of the complaints can 
appraisal of twfe situati<*i. -^n ob- be traced to DOor housekeeping while 

Jectlve ovaluation of Dr. Writ- no ^ t. i.>. ^i i.- r i i 

nev's rrVt eioq«*aiiv confirms 98 P^r cent are the reflection of lack 
our posi:ioii." - of funds, and estimated that $400,000 

Dr. k.>n M. Whitney, director is needed to Clean the schools. 

of tlir 4iiv health department, t^ i. ai- a. ■ ,■ ' 

listed the conditions In a reportj But the most cursoi7 examination 
recently released. of the Health Department's report 

The statement of the federation tells another story entirely. Time and 
said that the conditions "are by „„_• -i, . •'. ,•' j^., * 

10 means confined to the older) again, the inspectors found toilets 

chools where new facilities are WithOUt paper, tOWelS, SOap, or any 

n°ewttts1s'.^"f.'Tr w^u-^evl ^^^f^^^^ ^^ P^oper cleaning.. Outright 
report does not deal with a -25-1 Violations of Sanitary rules for the 
year backlog of accumulated handling of food were observed in 
{;«Uh^lSu?o'n^fof'o.?r'tTooiI f^ny of the school cafeterias. Many 
in .^prii and .May of 1948. Such facilities, such as drinking fountains, 

conditions are a direct reflection had been allowed to deteriorate for 
— present administrative prac- 



Uces 

The board added that 'insuf- 
ficient inspection by the depart- 
ment of superintendents — along 
with general administrative la.v- 
ness and indifference to these 
matters, and a widely diffused 
division of responsibilities already 
noted by Dr. Robert P'.lsasser (in 
an earlier report) — have brought 
about this iinproper use and abuse 
of the public school facilities." 

"The federation belie\es that 
the immediate expenditure of 
$400,000 of additional money for 
maintenance — as suggested by the 



NOT P-4&- 7-17 



NOI-48-7-20 

Hardships Many 
in Jefferson Hi 

Jefferson Parish. 
Editor. N'ew Orleans States: 

Wouldn't it be just too wonder- 
ful if we could get something 
done to our .Tefferson High 
.srhooP Every time the tempera- 
ture goes dp\* n to 40 or 50 de- 
grees, "no heat." 



lack of mechanical attention. 

It is well known that many of the 
city's schools aae in grievous need of 
repair. But to plead a lack of money, 
when the bulk of complaints by tlie 
Health Department clearly relate to 
poor administration. Ss a feeble argu- 
ment. It must be obvious that those 
directly responsible for the failure to 
maintain proper sanitary safeguards 
were given no incentive to do other- 
|vise by the school administration, 
■superintendent— is an ill-advised Therefore, all talk of $400,000 being 
approa"crt'o 1%^^'^^' t'^'^^'^ to remedy the situation should 
largely a matter of good house- be set aside Until Superintendent 
keeping in the schools." the board ^Bourgeois and the School Board have 
'^^The board said that it will ask gi^P"^ ^ convincing demonstration of 
'he Parents' Co-operative iiubs. lability to put their house in order. 

'he Bureau of Ciovernmenlal Re- 1 
search, the Parent-Teaiher .\sso- 
^cialion. the '\"oung Mens Busine.ss 
;Club and the I.ouisiana FJduca-; 
;iiona1 Foundation to sft up a 
{health and sanitation cominittee' 
[for public schools wiih represen- j 
'aii\p>; of 'he fedc!n'ir<n 



My daughter has been goitut ''^ 
this school (pr three yeat^. jind 
'•very time h turn* cold the last- 
ing sy.stem breaks. Teachers 
must send tha children hoii)*- or 
they ju»t rnii the sli-eets. This 
past week they lost/two days. 

Since the hurrloene the roof 
has needed repairs. When It 
rains water pours in the g>'m and 
down the walls of the classrooms. 
"There was a nice floor in the 
g>'m but it is almost ruined be- 
cause it is so warped. 

Next let me tetl you abotit the 
girls' locker room. Instead of 
having nice steel lockers like a 
high school should have, the girls 
have their parents to fix apple 
boxes, old trunks, etc.. into make- 
shift lockers, and put locks on 
them. Right now. these make- 
shift lockers are sitting all over 
the floor, and when the girls go 
in to get their books or to dress 
for physical education they have 
to junip across, and stumble on 
these lockers. 

Of c6tH-se • our school board 
members are much too busy to 
attend to these things. There art 
other things more important. 

DISGUSTED PARENT. — ^ 

MOl-48-1-23®^ 
STATEMENT DUE 
ON FIRE HAZARD 



Bourgeois, Palfrey Expect- 
ed to Meet Today 



Public School Superintendent 
Lionel J. Bourgeois and Campbell 
Palfrey, slate fire marshal, are 
expected to meet this morning to 
issue a joint statement concern- 
ing the discussion of fire hazards 
in public schools. 

"Palfrey and I. as public offi- 
cials, are desirous of improving 
public welfare insofar as otir re- 
spective public services are con- 
cerned and wish to put an end to 
the di-scussion of fire hazards in 
schools," Bourgeois said Tues- 
day. 

Bourgeois said that it was' 'un- 
fortunate';-that the cf^py of Pal- 
frpv'.s letter, addressed Aue.iSl 22 
to Roljcvl ,M. Haa.., as picsident 
of the school boHnl. « as not '-ent 
to the sui'fi.-intendciifs office 
along with t/ie orders to enclose 
staircases in nearly half of the 
schools. 

"However, the publicity in- 
I vnlvpd has served- one very use- 
ful purpose in that the public is 
now reassured with I'egard to 
safely measures to combat fires 
in public schools." the superin- 
tende.it said. "They know now 
that our situation in that respect 
doesn't differ from that of the 
private and parochial schools in 
the citv." 

NOTP-47-3-3 



(ftj) 



410 
Research 



LSV Astrouomist Says Solar 
Storms Are Reaching Maximum 

Tornado- ;.k» »olar »ioims. whirh throiirh th» tsl^srop*. hut 1b r*«!- 

ippear from th» Mrth as tiny hlack iiy they are d;gtiirbanc«« of \aat 

iiin »pot». ar* buiMinie up to their propoitions." the LSU ociential ex- 

erular n -year tnaximum.pr. Pa vlrt'pla inert, "Some of iheae apeck^ 

V-. Guthrie, heart of I>j.nsi«n=. 5fn.t»,,^ so large that the earth could 

inivaraity » department of r..N«gahe dropped into them. Thit Is not 

«nd astronomy, diseloseri 1 c-'er.iH)N hard to conceive when it l« re« 

Obiervationa marie over a {•crio'^i memhered that the sun is approxl. 

>f several months. Dr. Guthii" s id. "lately one mKllon miles in dia- 

ndicata that the sun spo' p?akf"'''er, while the earth is close to 

■na.v be reached prior to tlie antici- ""''* miles across. 

sated 1949 deadline. The spots Hardest for scientists to explain, 

have been ..b.«rved in increasm^/, ?"?,"' '*''*■ " "" «°'""»tency 

numbers o^ er ,he aunr surface °l ' ' '}''''" ^'"^*- Centuries of 

.iiice «arlv tni, year """^'""l observation has failed to reveal the 

_, , " " ' cause of thf- cyclic build-up of the 

Tl,-f unusual .'olar phenomenon, spots. E\en more perplexing are 

Which h«s o«en studied hy scient.Ihe "lost years" between lfiofi-1725 

T>.» ».M centi.nes. is attributed to'durinir which the solar storms were 

■h« .."• elopr, em of Risrantic forna- reportedly not observed. 

do- '.if storms among: ihe sas.ses 



sufioi ndii.c the sun. Internal rtis- 
Ibirances of the sun are heli 
to generate the whirling ga.se.i 
"Sun spots appear as merp di-ii 



'' BRA-47'W-a6 

725 



.Xsironomers. the L'nKerslly scl- 
entl.«t said, have had Bome succeas 
, In determininr the effects of sun 
snot.« on the eaith. .^t the peak of 
the «Mn spot cluster, when the con- 
retiiric sioims pass through Ihe 
renter of the suns face, marnetio 
disturbances will cause fluctuations 
III iiiSKneiic compasses. Radios are 
al.vo subject to Rieater Interference, 
aiut lelepianhic coinmunicalicn Is 
(apt in suffer. During the lecent 
(war «un spots were closely charted 
i.«o that (Oinpensations could ba 
made in navigation and communU 
cation equipment. 

Of a more unusual nature. Dr. 
Guthrie continued, are the flndinga 
of an .American scientist which re. 
veal a close correlation between the 
lirge llth annual ring on trees and 
the years of sun spot maximums. 

"Kfforts have even been made," 
IDr. Guthrie said, "to associate the 
price of beef on the Chicago mar- 
ket with sun spots. Correlations 
of this nature, however, rely on 
weather-conditions which, in turn, 
are dependent on many other fac- 
tors." 



Business Trends 
In Louisiana Given 
In Latest Review 



-vholesaie ana lorelgn uade, 
imanufacturinp, natural resour- 
ces, public utility, cmploymer.t 
and payroll, transportation, con- 
struction, finance and agricul- 
ture statistics, with decrease 
or increase percentages com- 
pared with the sanT- month a 
I year ago and the previous 
Baton Rouge — Current busi- month of the current year, re- 
ness trends and conditions in all fleet a clear picture of Louisi- 
phases of Louisiana's business [ana bu.siness for the business- 
world are covered in the Louisi- iinon. 

ana Business Review, publi.shed [ Mu^-h of this infoniiation is 
monthly by the Bureau of Busi- \^^^.j .supplemented by the na 
ness Research of the, Lo-psigna tional increase or decrease; and 
State University College of ^.y .ncrease or decrease in indi 
Commerce. ividual Louisiana towns. One 

Material appearing in - the 'section of the magazine is de- 
Review is derived frorn d'^ta voted to local busiijess condi- 
obtained by the Burtjau of busi- jjons in 17 different Louisiana 
ness Research, from'ronfidei;tial towns. 

reports made by Louisiana biisi- I characterized throughout the 
ness menand other cooperating Lables, graphs and indexes, the 
agen^es^ who collect informa- L^^^ Review presents Louisiana 
tion on Louisiana business. I^^j ^ glance 

"Any number "of publicati ons i ^.j^^ publication is an import- 
dealing with business and econ--p^ - — ~ 7I~7-r^o Bureau 
omic trends on the national ant activity oi tne - 

level are available,- explained Business Resea.ch, which i^= 
Dr. P. F. Boy'er, assistant direc- 
tor of the bureau, "but most 
Louisiana business men are in- 
terested in Louisiana and what 
15 going on in his own town." 
The Louisiana Business Re- 
v-iew meets that demand. Retail, 



commercial resouices witli spe- 
cial reference to the location of 
indusiiy and the dcelopment 
of trade, both foreign and do- 
meEtic. 

Tiie Bureau al.^io provides fa- 
ciliiv.'s for the making of spo 
cal studies at a .niaimiim cost 
\n busini-'ss coiicii.'" sviiicn ••! 
SI • a scientific analvsis of their 
poiic-ics, their practices and their 
problems. The- development of 
problems for u.se in teaching 
speciali7.ed courses in econom- 
ics, account iiig, business admin- 
istration and secretarial science 
is also included in Ihe activities 



of the Bure.TU. 



/ 



O 



In addition to thi- cf^^e, the 



so organized, to prepare hull 
tins on business and econom. 
problems which affect the econj 
omv of Louisiana. It also stud, 
ies' Louisiana's industrial and 

RDL-47-8-13 



for students in business re- 
search and gives encourage- 
ment and facilities for research 
to individual faculty members. 

A special survey was com- j 
pleted last summer for the New j 
Orleans Parking and Traffic ^ 
and Improvement Association, ; 
Inc. Actual co.st of living for , 
five Louisiana cities is gathered 
and compiled semi-annually, > 
and the Bureau is now engaged j 
in a special proK''' dealing with , 
employment and wages and | 
another on .sales and typo-i of I 
businesses by city. 



411 



iHYBRlD CORN New Fertilizer 

IS DEVELOPED 
FOR SOUTH LA. 



In Demonstration 



Exprriiiiental Plaiiliiip .il 

LSI' Yirlds Ql H.i.1,,1. 

Per \<*rr 



B«inr Roufir. La. D»r !T .r Tt\f 
houmxrn Slat* viniversiiy a^.-icul- 
turn; fxpfrinifn! jmtlon today »n- 
nouncMt d»^•^^pm^nt of a hvbrid 
corn w.t;. n i: sairt was the flrsi fatis- 
: »ctory on' of the type prefrrred in 
<.nilh 1.01 ."laiia. 

It »a.« rtfSl^nnTMl on'.v a.« I'ThsI- 
«n« .^ai.' rhr hvbnd ;s « whii». two- 
e*re<t tvi^ with 'nrduim-;.Tr;e fHrs 
and a «mor;h crajn. Thr tinnersity 
said 11 f^mb.iirrt hi(!h vie'd;nc ability 
«ith an excellent ahiicK rn\eraje that 
gave protection from In^erta preval- 
ent m south Louisiana. 

An. experimental plan'uig yielded 
94 bushela an acre 

The hybrid w«a bred by Hugo 
Stoneherg of the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture In * corn breeding 
program conducted Jointly by the 
experiment station and the federal 
department. LInea of native var;e- 
tle* grown for many year* In the 
cane belt were used In Its develop- 
ment. 

The U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture alao h»« shown Interest In the 
Creole onion, which has been a 
Louisiana staple for more than 100 
year* 

Several strains of the Creole were 
collected at the experiment station 
at the request of federal officials 
who plan to use them in a breeding 
program along with other onions. 

Dr. Julian Miller, state university 
horticulturist. h«.« recommended the 
strain known as C-S as b«»t for use 
In Ix)ul8iana. 

The extension servlcs has advised 
Louisiana poultrymen that eaxly 
hatched chicks In January. February 
and March win bs more Important 
In ISM. during the continuing grain 
shortage, than ever before. 

Producers were advised to bring 
off enough chicks In the early spring 
montha to replace the entire flock 
of chickens now on the farms. 

The service said that early hatched 
chicks make for better utllltl7.ation 



At Farm Field Day 

A demonstration of the applica- 
tion of anhydrous amruona. the 
new form of nitrogen fertilizer that 
is a liquid uiidpr pressure but Is 
sealed In the soil as a gas, was 
one of the features of tke- annual 
Field Day held at tlie Northeast 
Louisiana Expi-iinieul bita'ion at 
St. Joseph recently. 



ol feed, better growth, lower mortal - 
|lty, and profitable laying In the 

Tall and winter. 

In addition. It predicted that sfg 
I prices In Louisiana are almost osr- 

tain to be high during the flr«f 

two and the last six months of 194;! 

4t -47-12-1?: 



Approximately 2Mo NoVtIi Lou- 
isiana farmers attamled the event 
to study exiierfmeuts and \vitness 
demonstratlonii of many of the 
latest items of farm equipment. C 
B. Haddon, superintendent of the 
station, was fn charge of the pro- 
gram, asslted by otner experiment 
station workers and representatives 
ot the L. S. U. agricultural exten- 
sion service. 

Harold T. Barr, experiment sta- 

I tlon agricultural engineer, listed as 
advantages of anhydrous ammonia 
Its cheapness, low cost of applica- 
tion, and the fact that It has been 
available whereas supplies of other 
forms of nitrogen fertilizer have 
been llmltefl. He said that nitro- 
gen In the form of ammonia costs 
only about one-fourth as much as 
in other forms and that one man 
with a tractor equipped for Its ap- 
plication could fertilize from 35 to 
60 acres In a day. 

Corn fertilization, experiments at 
the St. Joseph station this year are 
showing that a good corn crop can 
be made even under drought con- 
ditions when proper methods are 
followed, R. A. Wasson, extension 
agronomist, said. He showed- the 
farmers a field of corn estimated 
to make between 80 and 12S bush- 
els an acre although the crop has 
had only two light showers since 
ft was i)anted about May 15. The 
high yield was attributed to heavy 
nitrogen fertilization — up to 100 
pounds of nitrbgen per acre — deep 
preparation of land. Intensive cul- 
tivatioD in early stages of growth, 
and tlose spacing of plants — eight 
inches apart on 40-inch rows. 



LSU Discovers 
Teche Area Best 
For Sugar Cane „ 

Baton Rouge, La., (UP1-- The 
Teche region was established to- 
day aa the best (^ace to grow 

I sugarcane in Louisiana. 

I A Louisiana State university 
experiment .•'.ation bulletin . on 
sugar mill operations showed 
higher suga; yields per ton of 
cane in the Teche a« compared to 
the rest of the Mississippi area. 
The Teche region averaged from 
seven to 10 pounds more raw 
sugar per ton of cane than the 

I yield in the Mississippi area, thfi^ 
bulletin _said. /TCtlt) 

PRICES FOR^^-^ 
FARMS HIGH, 
LSU REVEALS 

Coul Iiirrrasrs hy .^^.(MM) 

Over 1939. Kdmaiors 

Report 



com- 

»i ion 



Baton Rouge. Aug. 26 iff>, ^ tonl- 
siana farm which iold for »S nnn m 
10^9 t--)day would cost »l4 00n aa a 
result ot at.,idy Increase in rural 
real estate Ofcea. ac-ordlng to Bu- 
,'ord M. Oile and Jc.-rv M. Law 
nl the State unlvrrMtya department 
of agr>cuutural economics. , 

Writing In the l,oul»i|i'na Rural 
Ennomlst, )iin-'.,,,^ bv'~T>.t LSU 
Pre*<. they r>-p. r-rd thai durlno the 
yMir ending March 1, (arm 1/hd prices 
rose 17 per c.eui .n f oulaiairK. 
pared to 12 p-r '•»n-for the i 
as a whole. And during the eight 
years betweer. lOsn ann 1947. land 
prices In the st,at» rose 75 per cent, 
compared to 8» per cent for the en- 
tire country. 

The authors advised caution In buy- 
ing Louisiana farms at 1947 prices, 
aaaerting that "when the break comes 
there will be opportunities to buy 
good farms at bargaUis." 

Current reporU, they said. Indicate 
that farm real estate prices are 
leveling off and. In some areas at 
lea.'t. are beginning to decline. 

The agricultural economists at- 
tributed the Increase In land prices 
to rising prices for farm products. 
Increased cash savings by farm people, 
apeculailon by non-farm Investors, an 
accumulation of young farmers want- 
ing to buy farms due to the war. 
a plentiful supply of credit, and dls- 
rr.v»r'»« nf nil 



412 



\Blood Test for , £51/ Research 
Detection of Bureau to Make 
Lancer Holds 



Polio Vaccinei 
Is Developed 
Railroad Survey by Researchers 



WW f, , _. Th« bureau of business research -, WASHINGTON. Aug. 5. — {/p)~ 

MMfindy T/>V f-f If'vM^Mo' the L9U collere of commerce development of an InfanUle par- 
**VtfC f C/r Jl UlflClflS *s been selected by the Texas A, •lys'» vaccine said to be capable 

•acinc railroad to conduct an eco- ?' producing "a high degree of 

■y Alton L. Blakealao ,1 n<""ic aurrey of the parishes In the "nmunity" in a certain type of rate 

(Aasoclated Preas Science Reporter) "***'* •«•*'«<» by Us lines. '*'^» described today in the techni- 

St. Loula. Sept. 2 (AP)— A blood [ The project Includes the n^or "'journal, 'Science." 
teat for early detection of cancer. Natural, human and IndustriaJ re- ^^e report, describing the work 
which haa shown strlklnny quick! ti»*u ot Lxiulslanik with' ". gener^ °' ■ 'earn of Stanford University 
and accurate results In animals, ' roc=.,.„ „,„ , 

waa disclosed today by Dr. Loula 
Herly of the Department of Cancer 



Reaearch, Columbia unlrerelty 

It Is being tested on humans 
with resulta yet Inconclusive, he 
said, but there is hope It may be 
valuable In humans. The chances, 
of curing cancer are rreatest If It' 
Is caurbt earlier. 
■Dr. Herly ta demonstrating the 



sketch of econotnla dfvelopment. researchers, contained no state- 
'f%yalcal cpndltlo. natural le- '"ent as to any significance of thu 
sources, na^tural vest-^ulnp. mlp- Studies with relation to the dis- 
«r*Is, capital reaourcBB sjifl fa«t»ease in human beings. 
oa local irovernment Incamp and The vaccine was preparafjkwith 
community facilities/ abd activlaes a strain of infantile paralysii vj 



will be included A> the repirt, rus experimentally developed Vi 

wkich Is scheduled to be complied the cotton rat — a long-haired b\tt- 

br Auk. 1, 1948 rowing rodent native to the-Scuth- 

• The railroad, wliicu .ins from El em United States knd\ Central 

Buo, Tex., through Shrereport to America. 

teat in exhlblu at The fourth' ^•'' °'"'*»n»' recenUy received an The virus usecj in p.eparing the 

International cancer research con- ^«>"''"y *">ro » '^rge maoufactur- vaccine was "iivctivated" with 

?ress. He examines blood under '°* "''"' "^f^rdlng resourcea along formaldehyde— that is, iU ability 

ultra-violet light, so filtered that J^ ""*'• V""' ,*''• research proj-to cause infection was destroyed. 

only the invisible or "black light" "' ""f "°''*V*^*''- " '^ ""'*" Vl® S"' s*'" ^^<^ the ability to stim- 
* supervision of Dr. P. F. Boyer. dl-yjgjg ^j,^ 



rays of ultra-violet come through 

the lamp. 
Normal blood shines brightly, or 

fluoresces, and appears turbid on 
^ murky under the black light, he 
{•aid. lilt Mood of animals with 

cancer does .-■ot show any fluores- 
cence or murklness. 
Some substance In th« blood 

which fluoresces apparently is 
'^ken out r,t the blood when cancer 
j begins to grow, Dr. Herly said. 

Whether this substance goes to the 

laite of the tumot^ Is r^pt yet known i 

Dr. Heily inj4cced' some cancer' 

cells under the skin of animals 

which are known to get cancer 

after aiich Injections. 

The blood test detected cancer, 

ilmost surely within 20 hours after ' 



the Injections, and detected It with 
definite sureness within iS hours, 
he said. 

Within this short period of time, 
the cancers never had growh to 
a size where they could be detected 
either visually or by touch. Dr. 
Herly said. Ususally they cannot 
be detected by such means In ani- 
mals until 120 hours, or Ave days, 
after the cancer cells are Injected. 
Future work will determine 
whether the test works efficiently 
in humans. But several other Inter- 
'estlng things have been found. 

If the cancer tumor is removed 
from the animals or from humans 
by operations, the fluorescence and 
murklneaa return In the blood. Dr. 
Herly said. 

"It has to be assumed that when 
a cancer is not completely removed 
by operation, that this change te 
normal would not occur, but this 
.still has to l>e demonstrated In hu- 
mans. If this is found to be true 
In humans, it would be a check 
Ion whether all the cancerous 
I growth had been removed." 

BRT=l£7-5H3 



rector of the LSU bureau o, ^^i-^^^^^^^^^^'^ ;^,;^ 
ness research, and 1. bel"* /o"« mechanism against the disease-in 
by Gerald 8ongy. employe of th« ^^ j^,^ ^ vaccinated 
bureau from Matthews, who gradu- Aft»r v=r7^ir,oti^„ . „ , 

ated from LSU laat August. twentt fo^fr rTt, ^^' / ^""""^ ?' 

To accumulate the Informatloi .vh^i^; °" H^^. f exposed to 
needed for the survey, Dr. Boya *^k *?^* ''°*" °' ^,"^^'^5 ^"^^ 
said that parish pUnnlng board] —"^■t'S-Serms capable of caus- 
chamber. of commerce, state dJ |"8 infection. The active virus 
partments. Individuals and othd ^^<^ previously been obUined 
groups "have given excellent co| 'rom experunentally infected rats 
operation." ' °' *^e same cotton family. 

When the a\irvey Is completec Only one of the twenty-four 
the Texas 4 Paclflc railroad ex vaccinated rats developed "polio", 
pectj to publish the Information — and it recovered. . 
making It available to intereste. In contrast, among a similar 
groups. "Results of this kind o number of unvaccinated rats used 
work ' should bo very beneflclal tc as "controls," 83 per cent devel- 
the state In helping to proraoti oped the disease. 
Industry," Dr. Boyer declared. The researchers were Hubert S. 

The railroad will then be abULorin, C. E. Schwerdt, Nancy Law- 
to tell any business which locatesrence and Jane Cillier Anderson. 






Method Found to Keep 
Lard Foods Fresh Longer 



along its lines exactly what re- 
sources that win aid that industry 
are located elsewhere along the 
Une. 

Parlibes served by the Texas & 
Paciflc Include Acadia, Ascension, 
Assumption. Avoyelles, Bossier, 
Caddo, De Soto, Evangeline, Iber- 
ville, Jefferson. I^afourche, Natfbl- 
tochea. Orleans. Polnte Coupee, Ra- 
pides. Red River. Sabine. St. Ber- 
nard, St. Charles. St James. St. ' Chicago ilf— A new chemical which 
John the Baptist, St. Landry and keeps roods such as pastries and 
West Baton Rouge. potato chips fresh up to 50 times at 

The bureau of business research Ion; is when no prcs'rvallve Is used 
was organized to furnish Informa- , has been de>'<"ped »t the Dnlverslty 
tlon on current business conditions 1 01 Cbtcago. »( f 

and other matters of business In. The pro.i.r. dls^Mcri-t: f-v the 
Louisiana; to prepare special bul- American M--!" inititii'r .'oTindatlon 
letlns on problems which affect theL^ j^e univrr itv. "help* •" preserve 
economy of Loutalana; to study I ^p pfojucu n-pdr -vuh la.vl snd other 
Louisiana's industrial and commer- ! animal (atx. 
dal resources with special refer 



ence to the location of Industry: 
to provide facilities for making 
special studies at a minimum of 
cost for business concerns. 

BRT-47-ll-i 



The founfiaMon »»• « ih» productl 
Ir, inexpensivr. essy <n add to lard 
tnd requires no special equipment. 

ST- 4b- 6- (8 



'►13 



r 



1 



NEW FINDING TULANE SHOCK , , . , , ^ -^ 
REPORTED IN RESEARCH IS U"';'«"'%°f Texdf- 

Df AAf\ orrTTTXTr *^^'^*'*^*^^" ^"^ To Make Summary 

BLOOD STUDY NEAR RESULTS of state's Oii Fields 



Austin, Texas. — A comprcsen- 

Rp»«»Brchcr» Discover An Srirnii«l« l^arri Chronir t'^^ summary of the oil fields of 

arirniisi» urarn t^nromr y^y^g^g js g ^^y, project to be un- 
dertaken by the University of 



Important Role of 
Zinc in Cells 



Pniirnts May Be Aided 
bv Transfusions 



Ne» Orleans 
Eighteen mcnlhs 



If r<>5enreh 



at Tu 



Texas Bureau of Economic Geo- 
logy. 

Frank A. Hearld, specialist In 
the economics of oil and gas pro- 
Iductlon, will be supervisor of the 
"Iproject and editor of the publica- 



Wr Al.Tnv I,. R|.\KESI.F.R 
Aunrlatrd rr»« Xclrncr Krpiirirr 

.H..-. „„.,„, o,,,,,„g Possib.eir.em^a ot what torto ."h^'pt^r. John T. Lonsdale, director, 
e1n«. to treatment of . usually f.tBl tients .,>"cri,,.i from r-.ronlc shock ""^PP"^- . , ... , ., . . 

«l.ea« of white blood celU-wa,. Chronic .-^hock: .. the term medical Geological societies of the state 
• nnounced today by a research team men a-^ilv to patient.^ who have lost will CO-operate With the bureau 
from Harvard university and Massa- weight and suffer from greatly re- '" gathering information. 
ehu<iett« InstH'ite of TeehnoloKV. jduced hiood volume due tn cancer.' Herald has had a career In 
The disease is Leukemia, which 'malnutnuon. or one of the group petroleum geology that has tak- 
"uiy be a kind of a cancer. White lot Infectious diseases. en him from Texas to New York, 

•ells at patients with the disease. The Dlllcma Is Ih.s; Chronic shock China and Mexico. He has held 
they found, contain only oue-tifth, victims need an operation to arresl administrative positions With 
to one-tenth of the normal quantity their disc^<sf. But most suffers, in numerous oil firms, and has been 



'^nc .the whit* metal used In 
wartime pennies. 

The findings were announced to 
the Fourth Jnternational Cancer Re- 
search congress by. Dr. Bert L. Vallee 
• nd Dr. John Gibson, II. of Harvard 
medical school and Dr. Robely D. 
Evans and Dr. J. E. Nelson of MIT. 

This »ame research team has been 
working on blood studies since 1940, 
»nd during the war developed the 



Si-4S-l-2%^H 



l-eir run down slate, cannot under- an independent consulting pe- 
go the needed surgery. Tho.'^e whnUroleum geologist and engineer 
can. face > long, complicated con 
valescence. 

Under a contract with the V. 
surgeon general's office, a group o 
scientists in the physiology and sur- 
gery departments of Tulane unlver- 

itj" have worked on the problem for 

8 month.«. 
Yesterdav they announced they he- 



reehnique Eases Ulcers; 
Doctor Reports 250 Cases 

method of sending whole blood pla«- .leve transfusions may be the answer NEW HAVEN, CONN. — A rel*- 

ma abroad. Direct transfusions of whole blood, tlvely new surgical technique to 

Usine tracer atoms of radioactive said Dr. H. S. Mayerson and Dr, cur^ peptic ulcert which, he laid, 

line .they found that there was 25 Champ Lyons, heading the scientists, jja,j not failed la more than 250 

times as much 7.lnc in normal white beve been found to be the stmple.'it operations was described by Dr. 

blond reiis as in normal red tells. »"«! quickefs way to get patients In ^g^t^j. g_ Dragstcdt of Unl<«rslty of 

The tracer atoms appeared in new- sl-aP* for their operations, Chicago school of medicine, 

ly-formed white cells soon aUer the "»'''"8 f°"n«« **>" 'h^^ ^«"^^'^ ctneaktee before more than BOtt 

to be the best treatment for chronic apeajong uu.ui«i lu 

shock, the scientists are now work- Connecticut physlcl^ at the 22d 

ing to ascertain its cause. In their annual clinical con«res« iponsoreO 

work, which they term a "metabolic by Connecticut State Medical iod- 

' "Iwar." patients at Oschner Founds- ^jy ^^d Yale unlverilty »ch«ol of 



radioactive zinc was introd 
animal n rh iman bodlee. \:,f— said. 
The con. .iitratlon ofjz.in- m these 
tells would, reach 'a peak, a.nd then 
fall ofL This rycl» corre.-,>->'ided 



the hreak<1>* 
and the .-i---.^ 
In the 
the r)n 



( old whi'e cells 
•rr.Miion of new ^nes wlth- 
r.' marrow, -ftxe hc'dy used 
1 er rnd over agii:ii. 
Imniari t» .eiis did not have the 
norm_»l 7:n. content. This wa« the 
first :.nn,r.i. they said, of a differ- 
•n' e in r, „;f.ni ol the metal be- 
tween n. r na; . .Us and The cancerous 
one*. Zin. apparently plays a role 
In the ■hue cells comparable to 
that of iron in red blood cells. Lack 
of Iron IB the red cells causes some 
anemias. 

Through the discovery It might b«- 
•o'Tie poseible, they said, to find 
•ome methrvi of tr eating or curing 
'»iikemla 



tlon hospital here will be seprceaieti 
to facilitate both treatment and re 
I search. 



3^ 

ST-47-g-ll 



medicine. Dr. Dragitedt Mentlfled 
the operation as a "vagatomy." 

He »ald that It comprUed the re- 
moval of two-Inch »ectlon of the 
vagus nerves which lead from the 
stomach wall to the nervous system. 

The surgeon said results had 
proved so satisfactory that thli type 
of surgery had replaced all other 
methods for treatment of peptic 
ulcers. '' '"WM| 

Dragstedt said that on the basis 
of successful operations of this type 
performed over a period of four and 
one-half years, "good evidence" ex- 
isted to consider the origin of such 
ulcers as psychosomatlo In nature. 



MB-Al- 11-6 @^ 



r 



414 



n 



The A loin For Peace 

Tiilaiie Hunts Aiisv, <lt 

Tulane University is taking an active part in the 
search for peacetime uses of atomic energy. 

The U. S. Atomic Energy Commission reported today 
that Tulane was among 170 institutions and researchers 
participating in this work. Because of rtie radioactive prop- 

Radiosodkim. radiopotassium ane erties of the isotopes it is possible 
radiomercury are being used a' for scientists to use sensitive in- 
Tulane for investigations in hu- struments or photographic film to 
man physiology and heart disease follow, for instance, the progress of 
the commission said. isotopes introduced into the human 

It was one year ago that thf body. ! 

Clinton Laboratories at Oak Ridge. One instance of this use can be 
Tenn . operated for the government found in the work at Tulane, which 
by Monsanto Chemical Co.. began is under the direction of Dr. 
distributing the radioacti\-e iso- George E. Burch of the School of 
topes produced in the chain-react- Medicine. He has been using ra 



ing pile at the plant. 

AMONG BENEFITS 

Among the benefits to be gainer 
from this distribution, the repor 
said, was the "fact that student 
may now be trained in techniqui 
for handling such materials. 

"It has also been mentioned tha 
should an atomic war occur, i 
would be essential that as man; 
scientists as possible be trained ii 



dioactive sodium to determine the 
causes and cure of edema, or 
dropsy, in heart failure. 

The Atomic Energy Commission 
said Dr. Burch injected radioactive 
sodium into the veins of human 
patients — both normal and those 
with congestive heart failure — and 
collected blood at rapid inter\'als. 
Urine was collected from the kid- 
neys at the same time. 

The experiment showed that in 
the technique of working witl diseased patients more of the so 



radioactiNT material 



dium which diffused to the body 



Dr. Paul C. .\ebersold. c\\\ci of tissues remained in the tissues. 
the Isotope Branch of the Com- Because sodium is a "thirsty" 
mission, ?.i6. "great achievements element, water followed the sodium 
in the fieH of medicine, biology into the tissues of diseased pa- 
and indi!.-!ry already have been tients, causing edema. This re- 
made but tho.^e are' only infant suited in massively swollen limbs. 
Bteps in a i entirely new field of "Through these studies," the re- 
endeavor port said, "Dr. Burch was able to 

"We can expect to see not onlv recommend, the proper treatment 

great a1v?nces in medical science i'^J. elimination of excess sodium. 

and the alleviation of suffering This, in turn, reduced the symp- 

and disease, but also a more com- tom of edema by lessening the 

forUble and abundant life through amount of wat^r in the tissues, 

the application of this new science The report also noted the work 

to industry and agriculture," Dr. ! of the experiment station of the 

Aebersold said. Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Assn. in 

"Radioisotopes," it was explain- Honolulu, 

ed, "are variations of common ele- ■ "Radiocarbon dioxide was fed 

ments with the same chemical for one hour in full sunlight to a 

properties as the stable element leaf of a large cane plant, ap- 

but having a different atomic proximately 11 feet high and 

weight, and exhibiting the property weighing about seven pounds," it 

of radioactivity." was reported. 

About 100 varieties of isotopes 
havc been made from around 60 
elements. 



"The plant was harvested three 
days later and activity analyses 
made of various chemical fractions 
of each ioint, leaf and sheath." 

The experimenter, Dr George 
Burr, said, "The results were very 
striking in showing a large amount 
of new sugar, even .n the oldest 
joints of the plant, which was then 
6'? months of age. 

"As was to be expected, the 
growing tip, roots and voungest 
leaf received the largest amounts 
of radiosugar. In only a few of the 
old leaves was it possible to detect 
any radioactivity. 

"Such a rapid exchange of sugars 
in the old tissues is surprising to 
some plantation men who have 
thought of the old joints as store- 
houses of sugar formed earlier in 
the life of the plant." 

It was pointed out that application 
of radioisotopes to oil well logging 
is now a "highly developed 
science, and that another applica- 
tion in the oil field is in the loca- 
tion of permeable zones. 

The report said Or R. T. Over- 
man, who did graduate work at 
Louisiana State University was 
one of the scientists who helped' 

develop "methods of more ac- 
curately determining the amount 
of energy released by radiations " 
He also helped find the wavs 
and means of establishing the 
■decay scheme." or manner ir 
which a radioactive substance di= 
integrates. 



L 



NOI-47-8-5 



qJS) 



Green Light, 
Best For Hard 
Work with Eyes 

NEW YORK. lAP)— For doing hard 
woek with !'.ic eyes, lajrips of a slight- 
ly greenish color of oght are found 
best, an article- in the Journal of the 

■ Optical Society of America says. 

fj The studies vrre made by Einst I 

fSimonson and Josef Brozek of the lab- 
oratory of physical hygiene. University 

I of Minnesota. They usM six young 
men who spent two hour periods writ- 
ing very small letters of the alphabet. 
The greenish colored lamps were 
compared w^th white light and a 
slightly blue color. The report said 
that at present there is no definite ex- 

'planation of the results, but with thf 
greenish light there was less fatigue. 



/.15 



Scientists Trace 
Human Ancestry 

Old Fossils of Dark Africa 

Probed for Data on 

Man's Origin. 

. BERKELEY. CALIF. — Scien- 
tists poking through 40 milllon- 
rear-oid layers of earth in Airica 
believe they are getting close to the 
»rlgin of man. 

Their search may lead them back 
n million years, and even then may 
not jrleld the final evidence, but 
ihelT chances for throwing new 
.tight on human ancestry appear to 
ve better than that of any prevl- 
tus expedition. 

They have probably the greatest 
•ggregation of scientific know-how, 
manpower and equipment ever to 
taclde the fossil records of the dark 
continent. 

This is the University of Califor- 
nia's African expedition. It is made 
jp of sn or more scientists and tech- 
aicians. scores of native workers, 
irmy. navy and marine personnel, 
•Jie navy tankers Aucilla and Ala- 
gash 'and nearly $500,000 worth of 
iqnipment 

Digging in Desert. 
The expedition has the support of 
Ihe Egyptian government; Marshal 
hn C. Smuts. South African pre- 
taler; Adm. Chester Nimltz, Rear 
Mm. Richard E. Byrd and Lt. Gen. 
fiimea H. Doolittle. 
f It has set up to sweep Africa for 
lost its full length, from Cairo to 
nesburg. TTie project got 
Ber way last fall. 
In the Faiyum desert. 50 miles 
southwest of Cairo, one arm of the 
txpedition Is digging for addition- 
al traces of the oldest anthropoid 
kpe which lived about 35 million 
rears ago. 

At Taungs. near Johannesburg, 
mother branch of the expedition is 
seeking fossil; of a man-ape which 
lived somewhere between 500,000 
tnd 1,500.000 years ago. 

The Faiyum party will move 
louthward by truck and plane along 
the Nile river through the Sudan and 
Uganda to set up another headquar- 
ters at Nairobi, Kenya Colony. 

• -> 




Formations around Lake Victoria 
and Lake Tangyanyika will be 
worked and the party will move 
louthward again through Rhodesia 
\o South Africa, Joining the 
ither arm near Johannesburg. The ■» i_ j • 

«xpedition will return to Berkeley NeW Method GiveS Piomise of 
»ome time this faU. Thereafter It 



Elecfronic Device 
Used to Grade Eggs 



will take months, perhaps years, to 
prepare the findings. 

Leads Expedition. 

Wendell Phillips is expedition 
leader. The northern arm now Is 
leeking evidence which may orient 
•he 35 million-year-old Faiyum ape, 
technically called propliopithecus, 
3T some closely related form. Into, 
he direct lineage of man. 



Revolution. 



miACA. N. V. — An electronic 
method of gra()ing and*sort1ng egg* 
that is said to hold promise of rev- 
olutionizing egg grading, has been 
Invented at Cornell university agrl 
cultural experiment station by 
Pruf. Alexis L. Romanoff. 
It sorts eggs for Internal quality 
Propliopithecur (pronounced pro- "nd potential perishability better 
lUo-plth-e'-cus) was a small, primi- *an present procedures. leUing 
Ive app with a Jaw only about an about internal conditions that can- 
nch and a half long, but he had at not be seen 

least one manUke quality — his Ordinarily eggs are graded by 
leeth had the same general struc- candling. An egg Is held before a 
hire as those of humans. light. •»»«* the Candler oasenres siat 

Ifle must have inherited that fea- of air ceU. cclor and movement of 
Jure from his ancestors. Hence the yolk, and clearness of albumen, all 
fcienlists must look still farther] of which help to determine the 
back fOT the beginning of human grade. 

evolution. '" ^he new Romanoff method, the 

Charles Darwin, who sponsored egg Is placed Into a coil lying In an 
the theory that m^ and monkey electromagnetic field of radio fre- 
had a common ancestor, believed Quency. In this field the current 
this forebear of all primates lived passes through the egg. which ab- 
In Africa in the Eocene period, about sorbs the electric power. The power 
70 million years ago. 's measured and shows up on a 

H Darwin was right, the Califor- meter, 
fiiaus will have to dig deeper than Good eggs absorb the least power 
the Oligocene period deposits of and poor eggs the most. The elec- 
Faiyum to find the evidence. tronic method does not reveal blood 

spots If present, making one can- 

dUng necessary, but It does ellml- 

. '»at« several subsequent candling 

Electric Sleep Offers operations, and this would be an 

Hope for Insanity Cure SkTeggV:'"* °" '"' ''"'*™ "' 

SAH FRANCISCO. — Electrically In the experimental laboratory 

Induced sleep, which keeps a pa- equipment the meter shows fine dls- 

tient unconscious for 7 to 15 min- tinctions In egg quality, but for 

utes, offers a hopeful means of treat- wide use the dial could simply be 

Ing one form of Insanity, say two labeled, "Good, medium, poL- " 



University- of Culifomia medical 
researchers. 

This U'eal''nent. called electro- 
narcosis, is not qew but has not 
yet been used sufficiently for doc- 
tors to know exactly what can be 
expected of it. 

It Is a modlQcation of an older 
form of treatment, electroshock. 

TTie researchers, Dr. Karl M. 
Bowman and Dr. Alexander Simon, 
reported the recovery of 5 of 31 
persona who took the treatments. 



Romanoff said. 

The new method Is considered 
close to 100 per cent accurate as 
compared with the 75 per cent ac- 
curacy of the candling system. Cor- 
nell Research founds tioo has re- 
ceived the gift of the patent on the 
invention. The device Is not yet 
made In a commercial form. 

Romanoff came upon the elec- 
ttonie metood through research on 
egg fertility extending back to 1938. 
In the process of studying thou- 
sands of eggs, certain peculiarities i 
were observed, due to quality. ' 



M£ -17-8-2 « Me-n?-?'/^ 



416 




III. ViiKinU miliums .inH Dr. K. A. Kiogpr of Louisiana S(at<" 
nnivprslly pxainine rnlliirp* nf pvppriiiipiilal h;4r(dia in fhrir 
sftidv nhlrh indliRtrs Hn orgaiiivtn ,-,in •■iiivhr nitlitml lijntin. 

Microbe Turns Up His Nose 
at Vitamin^ Brings Discovery 



'Pp»ei»l to Th« Tlmei-Pi.»yiin»> 

Bainn Rouge. I,a. — Becausp a 
microbe, muih too small for ihf 
eve to .see, .spurned one of their 
vitamin H>:, biochemi.sis »t L.oiiisl- 
ana ."^late univeisiiy may h* tn 
the trark of a discover}- w lii<li 
will contiibute to "modern 
wience's storehouse of know 1- 
edge. 

When the lado'bac illiis ra.<=pi 
literally turned up its mirrohic- 
no.se at biotin, scientists in the 
tiniversitys department, of aRii- 
riiltural chemistry and biochem- 
istry reacted like a mother 
vxatchinK junior toss his spinach 
o\pr his shoulder. Fnr iirijpss the 
rasei pets his hioiin on the slv. 
the university researcioeis helic\e 
they have uncovered some of the 
first evidence of any organism 
thriving without this important 
nutrient. 



I. ike many advances in .science, 
the discovery of the casei and its 
apparent indifference to biotin 
was made accidentally. Valued by 
biochemists for years as a bac- 
terial "guinea pig." the casei was 
being employed by Dr. K. A. 
Fieger, head of the re.-carch de- 
partment, and Dr. Virginia Wil- 
liams in tests for biotin in rice 
polishes. To their .siirpri.sc the 
bacteria continued to thrive on a 
diet believed to be devoid of 
biotin. 

TEDIOUS TESTS 

Excited by their discovery, the 
pair got down to serious work to 
determine if their initial observa- 
tions had been accurate. That was 
four years ago. Today, supported 
by a vast collection of data on the 
casei's dietary habits, the two, 
are firmly convinced that their 
■t laboratory bug gets, along quite 
well without biotin. 

Although the casei is rather; 
commonplace, playing a maior ' 



role in the making of chce>e and, 
the souring of milk, e.xpeiiment.^ 
h.\- the LSI' chemlst.s have been i 
painstaking and tedious. Particu- 
larly difficult \\a-( the procure- 
ment .of substances completely 
free of biotin. Inbolievably po- 
tent, biotin crops up even in such 
quantities as one-millionth of a 
gram. Cost. loo. became a press- 
ing factor in the experiments. 

Kven though a method of 
.-ynthesizing the vitamin had 
been perfected, biotin still mar- 
.keied at $1 for every 25 one-mll- 
iionths of a grain. Stymied by 
Ibis prohibitive price, hr. Fieger 
pnd Dr. Williams were able to 
r-arry on certain of their experi- 
ments only after receiving a 
eraiuitious supply of the synthe- 
sized vitamin. 

LOOK AHEAD 

.\\\are that their findings will 
he subjected to extensive analysis 
by other scientists. Dr. Fieger 
and Dr. Williams have neverthe- 
less released their observations in, 
articles appearing in national 
scientific publicatioru:. A detailed 
.account of her work with the I 
casei was u.sed bv Dr. Williams! 
for her doctorate dissertation. i 

The I.SK scientists are eager to 
see where their discnvcrv will 
lead. They know that biotin, like| 
Imany of the vitamins, is stir- j 
Irounded by an aura of mystery, i 
Their hope is that the unsuspect-l 
ing casei may serve as a stepping 
stone toward a more thornugh 
knowledge of vitamins at work in 
the human body. 

"If we are right." Dr. Williams 
explained, "the lactobacillus casei 
will become a vital analytical tool 
in our study of nutrients. 
Through it we may be able to 
learn more of the ways in which 
vitamins function and affect one 
another in the human organism," 



417 



Univ^rFsitif^.c: Conduct 

Much Research 



MY HAKKY HKI\r/.K\ 

liisiriiilion IS niilv h;ilf llio jub 
«if a medical mIiooI. The t>ther 
li.ilf is ii>sfai>li. 

New Orleans' two nietliial 
sehixils — those of Tulane and 
1-oiiisiana State universities — ;ive 
condut tinp large-scale re.seaiih 
programs in aildition to their 
leaching. And the teachers aie 
the researchers. 

Tiilaiir's vai'ii-i) |i<»tgi':iiliiale 
prnRrains attract •.tiiilciils from 
all parts of ilu- rIoIh-. I'liiici- 
IKill.v, the foirimi •.(iKlt-iils <<iiiii- 
(roiii Soiilli .\iiMTi<;i lo iMi'ii til- 
ilegi'ee of master of piihlic 
health ilro|iical meiliciiie), of- 
frieil at oiil.v one olher medical 
srhixd — in Kngland. 
liuler this pi.)giam. research 
deal.s with the study of new ma- 
laria drugs, chiefly of a preventa- 
tive nature. The school of medi- 
cine at Tulane has an elaborate 
Briangement for such study 




found to improve when infected 
with malaria. Tulane provides 
the infection and when the nerv- 
ou.s disease is controlled, the new 
diugs are used to cure the ma- 
laria. 

Oddly enough, the biggest dif- 
ficulty is in maintaining a con- 
tinuous supply of malaria blood. 
New Orleans, once an epidemic 
spot for malaria, hasn't had a ma- 
laria victim reported in yeai^. 
Kxservicemen, infected in tft 
tropics, have piovided the dis- 
easetl blood so far. And. malaria Is 
dying out in thein. 

Other postgraduates studies in- 
clude one- and two-week reviews 
for specialists and genetal piac- 
titioners. covciing pediatrics, 
electrocardiography, gynecology, 
obstetrics, internal motiicine and 
general surgery. A special course 
in obstetrics and gynecology was 
conducted this year for Cuban 
and Mexican doctors. 

In addition to these teaching 
duties. Tulane in.structors work 
individually or in groups on a 
variety of research nro.grams. 

A nutritional research labora- 
tory oneraled bv a group of doc- 
tors, is emphasizing' the investi- 
gation of nutritional problems in 
the South, ^specially the relation 
of vitamins and amino acids (pro- 
tein foods) to the prevention of 
pellagra. 

A nutritional clinic makes diet 
recommendations for children 
sent to it by Charity hospital and 
the state public school system. 




Dr. Russell L. Holman (left), professor of patholo- 
gy at Louisiana State medical school, uses a col- 
orimeter to determine the percentage composi- 
tion of a specific element in a substance by .col.-^ 
or matchinq, " ' 

(Ml thf top lioor oi me 
lane medi.al iMiildiug are 
riidly built rooms where 
teniperatiire and .lelativ- 
midity can be 
this "controll 



th 

midil.v, 
change 
studied. 



>.pe- 

thp 

hii- 

regulated. In 

environment" 

F-fferts of heat, relative hu 



ilrugK anil emotional 
on blood vessels are 



phase under close -nut my is the 
cellular character of the cancer 
tumor in relation to cure and re- 
moval Methods developed at Tu- 
lane and elsewhere have shown 
that cancer of the lung can be 
treated when found early. Ana 
research at Tulane has a'so shown 
Told age not to be a negative fac- 
tor in cancer of the lung opera- 



tions. 

To improve maternal and child 



A DlOieCl. lU UCUri Millie: "11.7 ... i..*.^ *v# 

Chronically ill per.sons aie unable health in the neighboring state of 



to form hemoglpbin is being con 
ducted under sponsorship of the 
office of the surgeon general, 
r. S. .\i'my. The Tulme doctors 
have developed methods of esti- 
mating the amount of red cells in 
the bodv. Also developed are 
methods of tagging with radio- 
active material substances intro- 



Mississippi (which has but one 
medical school) members of the 
department of pediatrics and ob- 
stetrics are consultants in guid- 
ance programs there. 

At Louisiana State .school of 
>le<licine, on the verge of a $2, 
000,000 building expansion pro- 



duced into the body, to tell if ,^oni, activity centers on train 

these substances go into the mak- .^^ physicians for the slatr 

ing of hemoglobin. Hand-iii-hand, however, go ll: 

Cancer is of special interest toi research projects that Inch-b; 

.Tulane researchers, and morel jn<h enlarge the knowledge «. 

than 600 cases have been studiedl human biology and disease con 

to improve methods of diagnosis,! i^ol. 

treatment and prognosis. One 



hJOTP-48-7-5 C339 






Inf" >-raation . - 




— Pbolo by Tulint Photo 

PAX W. Mr I.I.I >• 
. Ilntrna whll» lh»f work 



'Plot' Grades Students 
Strictly on Their Records 



■r HARBY HKINTV.KX 

Whilt oth«»r Tulane facult 
memb»i« trt grading paper* this 
week of exam*. Dan \V. Mullin, 
a*«i*tant profes.«or In the depart- 
iHient of theater and »peeth, is 
jgrading, ot all think*, phonograph 
I record*. 

1 A* part of the final •xamlnation 
for Profe«.<nr Mulling course In' 
Vtflio fundamental*, student* are 
required to turn in. beside* a 
•Tltten te«t, • recording of the 
'following: ' ' V I ' • 

A three-minute new^rasU'v^iicii 
the student adapts Itif r^<\r>Hf"TT\ 
from page new* items. '^ 

A one-minute uffiiynercial /■••ni- 
lOded hy the strfdprtt. / 

A one-minute rirfmatic n^rio- 
ogue from a pro|^-«ional play. 



I Students ^ ef e g**n two 
Iweeks- noti< «o/ihe »ecordinK 
pari of the exai^M/ation and were 
Irllowed to %sork with a '•^hjiical 
assistant, as lonx as lah hours' 
would permit, before ciinne the 
final diKO. The poor lab as.4isi- 
ant wa» swamped with ••'>' Pn" 
charmed by the »ound of their 
own voire*. . , 

The rour.<e in radio fundamen- 
Itals was offered for the nr« time 
the past scme.-iter and will he a 
permanent feature of the depari- 
Iment of theater and .peech^ FVe-. 
tigned •* a turvey of rad|o the 
TOUrae also acquaint* aludents 
with the technical problem* of r^ 
"ording and broadcasting. 

Well known to Orleanian* a* dl 
Vector of the TuUne Radio ^ oi k 



/ P 



"^0 



shop, and for hi*j»'ork with the 
l.ijtle TliPiiler, Hofpssor Mullin 
has been In nine I.iiile Theater 
proiiiiLliiiiis diiit >'i>-(lirpctp(l the 
reteiit ".Xiiii.* and the Man." lit 
has acted in .<p\eial 'I'lilane the. 
ler pioduriloiw hiuI rlneiied th 
Tulane .Summer Theater In ''LadN 
I'l Pilous St;- earn" and "Oiu- 
Town." lie did the siage diieilliig 
for Tulane'H (lilheil and Sullivan 
opera "lttiililii;oi e.'' 

Koiniei ly acting head of the 
speech depailiupiu at the I'nivei- 
sllv of .Mississippi, insliuctor of 
speech ami leihnical director fori 
the Iniveisiiy of .Nebraska. Pro- 
fessor .Mullin is an old hand • 
Crading re<'ordin){s. 

They are the best of all tes 
or Vdice tiainiii;;. he sa\s. ai 
me of the feu final exaininaliu 
lia t suule iit.s eiijov taking. 



LPHS Speech Class 
Completes First 
Recordings Of Year 

The speech class of the Lake Provi- 
dence high school has Just completed 
lis first recordidngs of the year. 

The purpose ol these recordings, as 
pointed out by their teacher. Mrs. Ge- 
orgia Payne Pinkslon, Is to have stu- 
dents aware of any defects in speech, 
enunciation ai'd pronunciation, so that 
positive effort* can be made for Im- 
provements. Then at the end of the 
school year, a second recording will be 
made and compared to this first one. 
The records are being used In class for 
self-analylsls. 

Students taking part In this class 
I activity are: Jayne Braswell, Irene 
Bridges. Billy and Jack Brown. Mar- 
garet Carter. Dean Chandler. Lloyd 
Clement, Polly Edwards, James Ezell. 
Maxine Fautheree. Vivian Goode, Cora 
Mae Grigsby. Jlmmle Sue Hammon- 
Uee. George Hart. W. T. Hart. Joe 
Hamilton. Parllne'Harville. Carol Keen, 
jUAnlta Odocn, Herman Ragus, Marvin 
"Bud" Ragland. Sanford Riddle. Craw- 
ford Rose. Woodrow Sanderson, Susie 
Shawberger. Pat Shay, Jack Thames, 
MarUielle Tbomas. and Betty WUllam- 

LP60-47-II-2/ 



'.19 



Trade Schoo 
Is 'Learn by 



Policy 
Doing' 



I>e«rn by doing— th«t U the theory 
of instruction at Southwest Lou- 
l8lfin« Trade school 
»nd women enrolled «re doing just 
thfti. 



torches, six acetylene weidinp t .Dies, | 
two cutting tables and five •■work 
stations" or booths for beginners. 
The 200 men Cinders Give Protection 

A contradictory note if stnicls In 
the up-to-date school, in the blaclt- 
_. . ^ , ^ smith shop or "forge room" as well 

Their pmriue equipment jpcludes ^^^ welding i!.r,p. In toth the 

evervthmg fmm « wide variety of ■ , i^j^ned custom of c'ovr.r-.ng the 
the latest modeh of busine... ma- ^.^^ ^^^^,^^3 ,3 g^m practiced, 

chines to an eight-room, two-story ^,^^ explained that molten 

apartment (not Inr rent'. , solatters and "explodes" when 

Por example, the 10xl4-foot apart- ^/Jp'^^n concrete or similar sur- 
ment. about 14 feet high. wa. built ?^°P'itcd f^equenny in thc.e stream- 



Schoolmarms Use 
Appeals to 2 Es 
to Teach 3 Rs 

'Audio-Visual' Aids 

Speed Up Training 

75 Percent 

NEW YORK. Nov. 6. — (jT^ — 
More and more schoolmarms 
teaching the three Rf are using 
special appeals to the two Es— the 
eyes and the ears. 

The National Education Asso- 
ciation (NEA). reporting on a 
survev nf more than a thousand 
city school systems, says the suc- 
cess achieved during the war is 
use of "audio-visual" aids has 
spurred their use in the classroom. 
However, these "audio-visual" 
aids, which usually take the form 
of motion pictures and radio pro- 
gram.':, are heing neglected by 
many schools and u.<ied only in- 
effectn ply in many others, the 
surv ev shows. 

frr example, only one rity in 
four rould report thsl a majority 
of leaijiers made frequent" use 
of e'lurbtional mntion pirtuie? and 
onl.' o.O percent found a nisjority 
of "esrhers 'ising ednrational 
film.- 'occasionally." I.'~fs than 
10(0f>o rlassroom radm": nere re- 
poited available for stiid<>nts' use. 
Mnvp than a million slass slide? 
were arailable in 7.'?7 nf the sys- 
tems, liut 80 percent of them were 
found in ."i^ of the largest cities. 
The curriculum fields named 

_ „ „^. ^ _.. most often as those in which audi- 

' compressor (the only non-plastic Lji {iie Lake Charles high school | visual aids were used most effec- 
parti through the condenser, f reez- ^ ^J^Jll^lJJ^ seats. 

Ing chamber, and finr'.iy to the other machine shop equipment In- 
evaporator. \uaes a miller for cutting gears and 

Discarded electric or g! - refriger- imuar work and a newly acquired 
Btors, domestic and commercial, are \^^^x used like a shaper which 
no^ needed for study and practlc- .j,^ metal down, however, the 
Ing repair work. Any person who pJa^er can be adjusted for much 

j^^^^^ strokes. 



to scale and presents all the prob 
lems In wiring a real house. Stu- 
dents in the electrical department 
use it for practice. 

Student,'! in that department are 
also building a is KW power unit 
with a full Diesel prun* motor for 



lined times. Only the cinders provide 
real protection for the workers. 

The machine .shop which Emelser 
believes to be the best equipped m 
the state. Is a labyrin'h of cruc- 
looklne but amazing machines. 
'There "are 10 metal turning lathes. 
Instruction on the generation of ^j^g backbone of any macliine shop, 
electric power. When the plant is ^^^ ^^^ turret lathe, the only one In 
completed ihe cour.se will Include ^^^y jjgde school In the South. Smel- 
ihe stuov of various pha.ses of elec- ^gj." g^itj 
tricity and its u.se. Varied Shop Equipment 

Better Than Book Study The turret lathe is used strictly 

In the refrigeration and air- Ifor mass production of an ar'icle at 
conditioning department students Ugr a model has been made on the 
helped in the construction nf an ice Imuch smaller metal lathe, 
box made of transparent plastic for ! There are three drill presses for 
observation of mechanical opera- jniaklng holes In metal and two 
tions. grinders for sharpening and grind- 

Instructor Nick Reeves said stu- ing metal to the desired size and 
denta can learn more about refriger- 'shape. 

ation from a 10-minute observation l ^ metal saw, much like a wood 
of the box than from a month of [band saw, is used for such work as 
instruction and book sfud> [cutting letters and figures for 

The student can follow the prog- [stadium seats. Students have been 
ress of the refrigerant from the working on the numbers to be used 



wishes to donate a useless box or 
parts Is asked to contact the trade 
school. 

Ice Flake Machine 
Plans are being made for a spe 



Intriguine Fork Lifter 

Particularly impressive about the 
entire school and especially in the 
machine and auto mechanics depart- 



dal housewives- class where women . ,^g extreme cleanliness. Ap- 

may receive simplified insUuctions " "'hv the dav of the eternally 
on care and operation of mechan- '^„riEed and grii^v "grease monkey- 
leal refrigerators and other kitchen "'^"^f f"" the auto shop even the 
appliances. Rex H. Smelser. school ^™'- ^iiH be steam cleaned be- 
io,^H°K""^ ^'JT^ preparations ^^^.'^^p,^;' ^.^.^ is begun! 
Anntw ""P'^'*'* ^°°"- ^ (Le of the most interesting ma- 

Another of the unusual mechan- 
Isms is the Ice fiake machine which ) chines in that department la an 
produces wafer-thin, irregular chips army surplus self-propelled fork 
of Ire. Commercially, suct^a ma- | lifter which raises and transports 

burdens. The frail looking little ve- 
hicle Is driven by one operator, but 
it can lift massive loads high into 
the air. It can handle any piece of 
equipment at the schools as well as 



eh a 
anrSr 



chine la used In restauranrSr bars 
and hotels. The trade schooFs ma- 
chine, believed to be one of two In 
town. Is used for Instruction pur- 
poses. 



Students are Installing equipment ■ ^ slightly wary but curious reporter. 

In their new 44 by 35 foot welding ; - 

shop. They have six electric welding /^'^J~n~\ 



LCNP-47-A-iO 



lively were: social science and 
science in elementary and high 
schools, and practical arts in high 
school. 

Teachers are pretty much 
agreed, says Prof. William H. 
Hartley in the Seventeenth Year- 
hook of the National Council for 
the Social Studies, that "no tea- 
cher can bring to his pupils the 
best possible background . . . un- 
less his school is equipped to make 
use of modern materials, T^n 
many teachers are handicapped by 
trying to teach without the proper 
tools." 

For the social studies. Prof 
Hartley recommends the use of 
pictures, maps and graphs: pro- 
lectors to enlarge pictures from 
textbooks, magazines, etc.; slide, 
filmstrip and motion picture pro- 
.lertftrs; a rqdio and a record play- 
er and recorder. 

Teachers of vocational sub.iects 
have also come to realize that \ is- 
uals can speed up training as 
much as 15 percent. Research has 
shown that facts learned from 
• isuals are retained or remem- 
iieieri ,=i,=i percent better than when 
learned in other wavs. 



420 



New Method Teaches Children 

To Play Piano in 40 Minutes 

III forty minutes you can learn to play the piano. 
At a recent demonstration in Chicago, Dr. Raymond Bur-| 
rows, professor of Music Education at Columbia University, 
took ten children, eight to ten years old, and in forty minutes 
had them playing the piano with both hands, according to an 
article in the March issue of Good Housekeeping magazine. 

While the new method of .vfarting vvitFr~fTie same note 
teaching the piano is not a I) and playing ewry other 
complete solution, as it qan in>te, first separately and 
be used only with a group of then together. Now, Ixith left 
eight to ten children, it is an hand and right hand — for 
important step forward the harmonized melody. Finally, 
article declares. he shows them that the A^>^•[is 

All 'you need is a compe- can start with almost an,\ 
tent teacher, one piano, a note they choose They puk 
wall chart of *he keyl>oard, out the melody by ear, now 
and a silent keyboard for; ,.-.,,, 
each pupil. A silent keyboard P'^y>"? ^^'^ck keys as well as 
is a small, cardboard replica i ^^ ',f: 



Bowling in Classroom 
Teaches. Arithmetic 

MUNCIK. Ind'. —rcP)-- Par- 
ents of cliiUJrcn ;illcnrlinf; Wa.sli- 



ington Si 
surprised 
.sprino .si ' 
metic. 

-Mmo.'-i 
Degan to 



iiiilcr:;di't»"M were 
■ .-iiorti lh<ir "fl- 
lO Ipaniiii". ;iij11i- 



of the piano keyboard. The 
child places this on his desk. 

"The first lesson begins," 
the article states. "The teach- 
er sings any simple song. 
Then the children sing it 
with him. The teacher points 
out that the song's melody 
has movement, that it goes 
up and down. He holds up his 
hand . and shows how this 
movement can be expressed 
by the fingers ; how, by mov- 
ing different fingers, you can 
'follow' the tune. 'The chil- 
dren do it. Then he points to 
the chart, and says: 'This 
melody start* with this note, 
called D. Can you find that 
note on your keyboard V 

"Pretty .soon the children 
can find that note. Now the 
same finger movement theA' 
have wiggk-d ir. the air i.i. 



Although this is an easy 
manner to make the child ac- 
quainted with the piano, 
there still has been found no 
substitute for constant prac- 
tise, and if Junior wishc- to 
be able! to dash off a Mo/..rt 
Sonata for his own enjoy- 
ment, daily -practise is ab.so- 
lutely essential, according to 
the article, which points out 
however that a. child who 
has been introduced to the 
piano in this way will be 
more willing to practise 



.' <iiiii;lil (he t ;dien 
d(l :in«1 .siibliaci. ihey 
said. Visiliii;; cliissrooin.^, I'le par- 
ents found I'ln why. Tlic boys and 
girls were learning by bowling. 

Hotly - contested games were 
rolled by the .iuvenile keglers on 
an idley in the bi-himl mnr". They 
had to add and siibi. • : l 
their own scores. 

ATT- 4 9- 2-3 

iTelevision Mav 
iPIdV Bi«r Part in 
Medical Education 

.New Ynrk. Sfpl n (UP) — Th.» 

i,i.M..r -• r.. ,,...,,,„( siii-Keoni! tcinishi 
■ -y whpn the coun- 



UPle 



be 



done with their fingers op- ^h^'^^' 

•1.1 1 1 -T^, 1C» '"E '50d 

Silent keylxiards. Then eacl!^ — — 
child does it on the piano. In 
a few minutes the children 
have learned to play theii 
first tun.'. Well, if they tar 
play tunes they can i)ia> 
chords. The teacher ask> 
them to use the left ha mi. 



Philadelphia Begins 
New Teaching Method 

PHIL.XDIXPHI.^. Sept. ll._(/Pi 
— Philadelphia.s school children 
are getting tiiei. srithmeUc IJiese 
days wiiii \<r 
acorns and in.,: 

Dr. C. I. 



nlocks. 



ATT-47-3-1) 



work, hjiiiiiinc '■. Ui- 
' \isiial «(liM alir., ;ii 1 

iral m>-tlH..i.. 

Tliis piissiliilii.v «H= f.vpiessed 

after cliniml operaiions were tele- 

Ms.nl finni liie Nrw York liosprla' 
1 to the. Waldorf-Astoria hotel where 
Vie :t3id annual iiieeling of the 
^ .Vnerican Collejse of Physicians 

has been in se.ssjon. 

ThH lelevispti operations have 

t-e^n held each iiioiniiiR and aller- 

noon for four da.vs. The> \veip fo 
I popular with the ?mgeons that 

iiliendanre at operative clinics wa.^ 

.•iharply reduced. 

I The operations were televiseil on 
a .special heam and rould not tic 
(licked lip by s-els in private d«el- 
1 lings. Xo operations ,«honins; th- 
' (ace of a patient weie televised. 
M a pre.s.s conference lalp to- 
Ur. ^lalcojin T. MacKaehern. 
"iate director of the colleae 
' there were ilnee iinporlaiit 
fi'Hves i,f the lievelopiiu-ni. 1. Tli' 
a.1\antaKe of pernniltinR: siudeni- 
:n a i'ospital to \:.u - n. ■ .,: i.-i , , 
. liisp range. J. 
sion at great ni. ■ 
av the Alavo . 
■ loilors ao each c!a> i. 

, BRA-47-l-l. 



New Tests Indicate 
Future of Children 



Infant Responses Dstermine 
Pattern of Growth. 



WASmNGTON. — Whether :. child 
will become a dullard, a ncrniril boy 
or girl or a genius in older life may 
be detected by examination in in- 
fancy and observation in prc-school 
days, a Yale scientist reports. 

Such tests to determine the "de- 
velopmental potentials o( the infant" 
have been developed and successful- 
ly tried at the clinic of child devel- 
opment, school of medicine, Yale 
university. Dr. Arnold Gesell told a 
meeting of the National Academy 
of Sciences. 

"These studies," he said, "in- 
dicate a high degree of predict- 
ability in the sequences of mental 
growth." 

Dr. Gesell said that a cimical 
crib, a test table and test objects 
were designed to elicit character- 
istic responses in the four major 
fields of Ijehavior — motor, adaptive, 
language and personal-social. 

"Selected children were observed 
for a period of 10 yoars." he sail 
"One pair of identical twins h;is 
been Intensively followed from in- 
fancy for a period of 20 years." 



We All Got Rhythm, 
Educator Contends 

CHICAGO— (UP)- A niu.^ic rd- 
nratnr say.<; the sons "I Got 
Rhythm" applies to e\cryijn''. 

No one is born cnlirel.v v ilhout 
rhythm, accuiding to Dchu ,!nhn 
W. Bcattic. oi :hc Norliiwostern 
University .S> I'lol of M'.isic. 

Bcaltie fa ■ - S'>rv chilrlrfn be- 
come "rh.vl.i : ic.':.'; adulT.'^. bc- 
lau.sc leachr/s trv tn make thcrn 
sin before th<;\- me read^ 



The sequences in the studies. helUa e:l_ D^-^,J!«-.- 
said, follow a general ground plan "*® ^""^' ReCCalngS 
with variations which are distinctive! tO Check School Kids 

for each individual. He said that CHI(^\GO.— A kid just hasnt 
normal infanU in the first three! pot a chance at the University of 
months of life "tend to lie with headjChiiaKos laboratory school, 
and arm directed to one side, thel Sure, he can toss a spitball or 
opposite arm being crooked at the ''"O''^ "^^ stuffings out of his 
shoulder" " Ineifihlior when teacher's back is 

."Tlus 'tonic-neck-renex- pattern,"' f"'"^'^- But everything he does 
he said, "may be right or left or ^ , --[^ isT a'tld^U^t^vrr^'l^e 
mixed. Deep-seated preference for gavs is picked up by a recording 
the left is predictive of ultimate left- machine. 

handedness. Second-praders are being ob- 

"With the aid of finely graded iserved by a hidden camera while 
norms of behavior griuvth, a clin- tl'e recorder eavesdropb on their 
ically trained diagnostician can ap- conversation. The experiment is 
praise the development potentials of '■'^'"'^ cond-..cted by Herbert. A. 
the infant. By systematic methods Chelan, ass-.-^tant professor of edu- 
of development diagnosis it is pos- nation who .loMener! ,he set-up a« 
sU^le to d.agnose .n the «rst yea^ of ^".^ ^^c^^ll'^^^t^^-^Lcr. 
life nearly all cases of amcni.a meet a. I pln\ hack the record- 
(mental deficiency), of cerebral in- jngs anri .--.uOy each child's reac- 
j'iry, sensory and motor defects, tions. :;\en more, thou«:h. they 
id serious personality deviations." study tl'i- way the teacher acts 



toward cai ^• child. 

In th.Tt WHY. fhc'lan .^ays, it can 
be determined whether she is 
treating each child as a human 



ne said 

One or two examin;tions in in 
fancy usually are enough to deter 
mine whether a child is suitable for t'^atrng ea 
adopUon and whether the develop- ^^l^'f^^^^^i^^^""-"^-^-^"" 
mental outlook is "favorable, hi^iily 
favorable or unfavorable," Dr. (Jes 
ell pointed out. 



BB6-48-I-8 

"CHILD BEHAVIOR 
DOKS.N'T H.\PPE> 
— IT IS CAUSED* 



••We discuss the happenings re- 
corded — why John said this and 
why Barbara felt the need to be 
so domineering, and relate it to 
what the teacher said or did.' 

Thus every chil(!l's action ca 
be interpreted, he added. 



K10S-47-a-a7^^ 



He .say.«: .voungstcrs shOukV' 1* 
encouraged to move rhythmically 
before they're taught to sing. 



ATT-48-5-6 



"Ber.avior In children is caused. 
It does i.jl jUst happen. " Dr. Diiniel 
A. Presfijf. director of the institute 
oi child study at the University of 
Maryland, told the study group ol 
the A. C. Steere Parent -Teacher as- 
sociation here yesterday. 

R<!taavior is the result of a combi- 
nation of factors — physical, soclo- 
loglcal and psvcholoslcal— and no one 
lactor cause.' behavior patterns, he 
said. 

Dr. Fresco-- toll the P -T A. mem- 
oers that eve y clilio ts different and 
•-eacts dlifpTeni»y to the sHine combl- 
latlon of .' orrgt No two children, not 
■ven twins, are alike, iie sairt 

Parents should understand theae 

ts if they are to understand their 

I iren. Dr. Prescott said. 



Says Fast Readers Get 
More Out of Book 

NEW YORk (U R)_A fast leader 
develops a much keener precep- 
tion -and understanding of the 
material than the .slow reader 
Norman Lewis, supervisior of read-' 
ing-impiovement courses for City 
Colleges adult education piORram 
said. 

A study of the habits of 700 men 
and women attending his cour.se 
in the la.st three years shows that 
slow readers learn le.ss.'he said. 

•Too - careful leadini;. where 
speed is .sacrificed by plodding 
through material." he said, 'leads 
to an exce.s.sivp concentration on 
detail and the le.sult is that the 
reader lo.ses the meat of the text ' 



SJ-^7-li-26 



ow- 47- a-2e 



422 



'Tower of BabeV to AidLSU 
Foreign Language Students 



of Bal>el wUl ha^^ nothing on ,be on .he LS '"c'^n ^.k*^',; '^IZTil 
new lanRiiaKe laboratory openmp Professor Alfred Have, heart of 
a^^lou.s.ana State university this Uie department otGennantr ''and 

operated under ,he joint-spo.v thai'" ■•orar'apr^oach"'" a^'^fSn 
sorsJUn of the Romance. German- lansuage is'^'the most effecTive 
ic and Slavic lanptiage depart- means of paining confidence in 
ments. the laboratory will con-ithe languace " *-""""Pn<-e m 

tain the latest equipment for| A clinical service with a full- 
teaching foreign languages by the time director has also brpn nlan- 
oral method, used so successfully ned, according to Charles C Har- 
by the army during the war. ris. technical supeivi.soi- of the 

The undertaking is a direct out- laboratory. This clinic will he es- 
growth of a trial lahoratorv con-'ahlished as soon as fcnsiolc for 
ducted by the department cif Ger- aiding language major."; and oth- 
manic and Slavic languages dur-ers intere.sted in pronunciation 
Ing the past year. The cost of the project first of 

The laboratory will have facili-its kind in the Deep Soyth has 
ties for 130 individual listening been placed at appro.ximatelv $■'5- 
stations for the ^tudy of PYench.OOO. This amoimt includes Tsb 
German, Italian. Portugtieso. Rus- phonograph machines micro- 
sian and Spanish. There will he phones, earphones and sets of rec- 
three sound-proof rooms for re-ords. 
cording of materials hv the com- 



I nder the direction of Mr. Har- 
ris, the Romance languages de- 
naitment has made a survey of 25 
. .■"lieges and universities prepara- 
tory to putting the plan in opera- 
tion. 

The text materials have been 
decided upon. German will con- 
tinue to use tlie same material? 
used the past year. The records 
were made by Pr. Wolfgang Born 
of the fine arls department and 
Mr. Hayes. The laboratory man- 
lual was written last summer by 
l.\lr. Hayes. 

•Parler. Lire. Kcrlre" is the 
jtitle of the hook to he used with 
I the Hrenrh records. It was ^vrit- 
Iten by Professor Judith Major 
land .■Associate Professor Alice 
ICapdeville of the I.SU Romance 
llan.cuapcs department. Marc t'on- 
!iaine, an engineering student at 
il.su, spoke the FVench lines on 
I the records. 

• On the Spanish records, Hum- 
Iberto Temorle, a student in the 
collpge of engineering, speaks the 
Spanish lines, and Marshall Ka- 
son, instructor in the Romance 
languages department, speaks the 
Knglish. N'ason is' in charge of the 
Spanish part of the program. 



Colgate Classmen 
Stydy Government 
At First Hand 



Splitting up amonp departments. See Actual Problems 

commissions and other parts ofj -We see problems that are actu- 
government, the 10 students study [ally confronting these men." Steln- 
the organization and problems of imann said 

administration. The group includes eight veter- 

Everybody Helpful ans. It is the ninth to come to 

Walter Steinmann, senior from Washington since 1935 and the 

Bloomfleld. N. J., and a prospective first since the plan was interrupted 

^ by the war in 1942. Living together 



law student, said: "Everybody has i 

been very helpful. In the Civil Ser- li in the YMCA, they hold classes I 
WASHINGTON OJ R' — Thie ways vice Commission they reserved a i with Dr. Jacobsen In the mornings 
of American -iemocracy in action room, phone and typewriters for and devote afternoons to their I 
are being stii."tjj fro-i behind-the- us. besides arranging interviews." |i areas of study. 
scenes > ^ 'Colg. te University "They speak right across the j But when not working on spe- 
student<i c. government. table with no holds barred, said ^^f^^ topics they have managed to 

To combine "the advantages of "^0°^ OReilly, of New York City, g^g ^ lot of Washington's notables, 
reality" with classroom theory, the '"^^^^ ''o" ' ^^^^ ^°'"^ ' '" 



to us. 



The Colgate group looked for- 
Colgate Washington study group In an interview with a member ] ward to the opening of Congress, 
has settled again in the capital for of the National Labor Relations , They plan to attend the sessions 
four months of "close contact with Board, he said he learned more and committee meetings, and ex- 

about the problems of labor and I jject to have group conferences 

with congressional heads. 

Members of the group are Rich- 
ard Bales. Albany, N. Y.: Thomas 
O'Reilly, New York City: Karl 
Schmidt. Utlcft, N. Y.: George 
Whitney, Frankfort, N. Y. 
Ersklne, New York City; 
Saletan. New York City; 
Erbe, Valley Streanl, L. I. 



the administrators." said Dr Pauj management than he had m thft 
Jacobsen, head of the pohtlcal scl- college library even though he had 
ence department at Colgate andl "debated the subject several 
adviser for the group. j times." 

"By conferences, interviews anci However, the group has met 
general co-operation of govern-^ some snags. George Whitney of 
ment ofBclals. the boys are learnJ Frankfort. N. Y., chose the State 
Ing the Inside of government," hflDepartment as his first area of 

said. "They have the advantages ofistudy and ran into seciirtty trou- ^,,„ , 

reality and of seeing govemmenSble. "They wanted to give us the stelnman Bloomfleld N. J 



In operation, brought about by pernlowdown, but usually cut It short Godson. Buffalo. N. Y., 
sonal contacts." I when we hit confidential topics. Kendell of Nebraska. 

' The students all were agreed i 

that the time spent in Washington 

was more valuable to them than it j r 3 ^^ 

would be studying back at the 

campus. 



Waltei 
Lloyd 
Arthur 
Walter 
Frank 
and John 



OW-47-M-26 



423 
intributions and positive values. -- 



Public SchooW Reading 
Program Assisting Many 



Some Children, Other-'Tt 
wise Normal, Find It '"' 
Hard to Learn 



s getting a lo» o( emphasis. 

fr>r not a small number of 

cases of ^u^enllf dclinquMicy lia' e 

been traced to poor reading abilit>' 

in school. It's logical (oo. Ima- 

BV C OKA SCHl.EV 8'"* ■ child of better than normal 

lown Tklk SUff Member fbility. who still . aiil learn to 

_^ . 1. 4 1. re«d. The ieers of hi? school mates 

T^k"' ' i*MrK''°".l'» ''"'J.nd hi, oivn sense of frustration 
and abou a little bov that went \ 

out 'n the \« oods. and just lots cf maxe an infenontv complex c 
ethers, and i can read them cv ery an otherwise normal personality- 
one." Johnnie told his mother, ex- •Well,' his subconscious tells him. 
cited and imoortant over the new, "you may not be able to read as 
book hed gotten m school thai well as thev can. but >ou ran be 
dar Inaughtier than they. And a ca- 

Remarkable' Maybe not — un- veer of msladjustment has :i- be- 
leis Johnnie "as one of the scores ginning, 
of children who v as ha\ ing trou- Improve Readlnv 

ble -(x ith his books until the new | Rapides parish schools began a 
reading program w as started in ' drh e to improv e reading about 
Rapides parish four years ago. four years ago. starting in the pri- 
There are literally hundreds just mary grades. This year the upper 
like him, whore really learning elementary grades ha\e been in-' 
to read even though they may be | eluded in the program. The re- 
in the fourth or fifth grade — (or suits, according to Mr. Aiken, have 
tk.e first time. That's one of the been remarkable, 
reasons vou frequently see child- The program has three major 
ren and" teachers in their class- ■ features. Fir.st of all came mater- 
rooms at w ork before and after , lals. Each student must ha\ e books 
school these days. , he can ■"ead-whether they are 

Reading, according to E. S. At- pre-primers for third-giaders or 
ken assistant superintendent of second grade readers for eigntn 
the parish public schools, if basic grade students. The '-I'-a is 'o 
to success in all academic vjMerts build from the bottom ,^P- j"^""^ 
And there are lots of n., id ren of resignedly saying a third grad- 
who, for some reason or other, er us hopeless because he can t 
dont get the right start. read regular third grade material. 

••Unfortunateb- many of them j Secondl.v, teachers were en- 
are branded dull because they couraged to divide each ^' then. 

grade reading material. ^'/ ■• ;' fhe"^rogrers of each of them, 
them ^ent on ana graduated and we P « ^^^^ ,^.„ the in- 

became ouln^-r^ing ntizcns. ] ^""° " . Z .. ».,,.i,.r<: .o 

Superior Intelligence 



ial troubles. Tr 

right or left e 

head o\ er 



The answer tv. tliat i.s superior 
inteUigence. They couldn t read, 
fpr some reason or .--ther, but they 
could reason ana think bnlliantlv 



sen ice training of teachers, 
thev could more readily locate and 
help the student who was back- 
ward in reading. 

"The program is going over line 
in manv of the schools," Mr. Aiken 



couia reabuii xuu .m.." « in manv oi inc i<-ii""ij, .■"..»-■—•■ 

To get through school, many of ^^^^ .,j, j^g^ tj,e 1^^\\ support of| 
A, 1 - ja<-»innod extremelv »u- ;„,.;.^ioc anH of the tea- 



them ha\e developed extremely 
acute "listening ability," so they 
coujd pick up and remember the 
things that other children got by 
reading. It takes a good mind to 
do that, , . 

Learning to read is a complicat- 
ed process. And trouble can start 
at an-r number of points. Educa- 
ters sometim.es remark that th 



the principles and of the tea 
chers " And improved reading 
has reflected in the other subjects 
as well for tests have repeatedly 
shown that a child who is nor- 
mal in reading ability wiU have 
little trouble with other subjects. 
Some tots have advanced fro'ii 
second to fifth or sixth grade 
reading in a year, and ha\e thus 



thing that can go wrong. I ""^./P^^; branded failures. 



^<perlal C'aae* 

llieie are some children, how- 
ever, -v* ho constitute special cases, 
requiring the diagnosis and treat- 
ment "f expert:. .\ clinic for 
children such as those na: es 
tabhshed at Northwestern State 
College t"o ^ears ago. with Dr. 
Mary C W ilson as its head. While 
It ir operated primarily in con- 
nection uith the teacher-training 
school, on occasion special cases 
from outside the school ha\e been 
referred there. 

.Ml kind' of scientific equipiiient 
if needed actually to diagnose 
such reading troubles. Special 
machines ra'rh the "auses the 
eves make in i cttrrg a une. Others 
are ronstriirted to test eye-dom- 
inanre of the subject, and its af- 
fect on reading Highly specialized 
training is needed t.i operate the 
equipment and to interpret the 
result; fron its u:.e. 

Eye dominance for example, is 
le of the niajor sources of spec- 
tell vvhether your 
IS dominant, take 
a ■cnj ••>ci .>our finger or Jie 
end of a pencil at a spot ten or 
twenty feet away. Get lined up 
with both eyes open. Then clo.se 
one eye. Then close the other. If 
the spot niov ed off the bead when 
you closed your right eye, then 

your right eye is dominant. If 
it stayed on the bead when you ; 
closed vour right eye, then vour ' 
left eye is dominant. Usually, right I 
handediicss and risht eyed-ness go ' 
together. Wlipn both eyes are al- 
most equal frequently you run 
into tioultle learning to read. The , 
remedy is comparati\ ely simple, 
once the trouble is spotted. 

Many Vted Help ' 

Mr. Aiken wouldn't estimate the ■ 
number of students who could i 
; be helped if the clinical equip- | 
' ment were available for use in 
Rapides parish. "There'd be a 
great many of them. ' he said, but 
without a standardized testing 
program, the number would be 
hard to guess. 

He predicted that the northwes- 
tern clinic would be e.Npanded as 
the realization of its importance 
spread, but right now it isn't large 
enough to take care of the Ccii- , 
tral Louisiana children who c(i,jld' 
be sent there for diagnosis.'^ 

Others interested in the reading 
problems here ha\e suggested the 
establishment of a Central Louis- 
iana reading clinic in .\Ie\aniria 
wth school boards from three or 
four adjoining parishes participat- 
ing in its support and sending in 
children for diagnosis and pres- 
cription as IS needed. 

The probelm of improving the 
reading of the pupils in Rapides 
parish schools hasn't been sohed 
completely. But teachers and 
pupils alike will attest to the ad- 
vances that the program already 
has brought. 



ATT-^«-4-Z4 



rroblercs and ne ed i; . - - 



424 



Our Childre 

By ANGKLO FATU 



"v. 



\ 



> . TCACHER LIKES< ME 

f 1^51 Btarifr'Bcnt over the rumpled, {incer-sUined 
'iheel^f paper ofer which Tllli* Lou had traced with 
pecaplring hands ilhe words. "I am a good girl.'' The girl 
>Was good bey oni^ doubt, but the penmanship certainly did 
not qualify foi; the star that waa to fall on all the 
peri^ct pa^tv 

Miss Warie paused, he'd her hand with the star 
stamp over the paper for a breathless instant, then— 
with a tender smile at the little upturned, anxious face 
—•tamped a clear, bright star on the paper. 

The star must have reflected its Ugh . on Tlllie Lou's 
face. Its radiances could not come front any other 
source. Her eyes were starlights; her whole being shone 
with the joy that was overflowing her happy heart. 

When school was over for the day, Tillie Lou flew 
down the street and burst into the kitchen shouting, 
"Teacher likes me. Mother, Teacher likes me," and 
waving the paper like a banner. 

"Now isn't that nice?" said Mother beaming at the 
shining face before her. "I knew she would like you. 
Everybody likes good little girls. Well put the paper 
here and show it to Father tonight." 

"And won't he be glad the teacher likes me?" sighed 
Tillie Ix)u, 

Father studied the star-marked paper after Tillie Lou 
had gone to bed and shook his head. "\>ell, the teacher 
must have truly liked her for she couldn't have liked 
that writing. It is simply terrible. What do you suppose? 
Did she just give up, or was she encouraging the child, 
2r what? Anyway she must be a good sort to make the 
child happy." 

The teacher had held her hand for that brief in- 
stant to decide whether she was teaching penmanship 
or helping a chjld to live gladly. She decided for the 
child and set the star on her paper. That did more to 
help Tillie Lou than all the remarks, suggestions, helps 
that the manual provided, for what Tillie Lou wanted 
most from the people about her was love and Miss Mane 
knew it. 

Children sense the thoughts of the people about 
them. They know when they think kindly about them, 
when they are displeased with them, when tliey are 
sorry for them or angry with them. We don't have to 
speak to Ic'l children how we feel about them. They 
know, and it cither lifts them on wings or bows them 
to the earth. 

It is so easy to love a child and it means so much 
to him— even to the seemingly toughest one of them. 
Trv it and sec. 



MNS«48-/-7 



Our Children 

By ANUEU) fATKI 






^^3^ — 

STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES 

"Why is it that Marie can get top marks in arithmetic, 
can solve the difficult problems easily, and yet fails in 
spelling? Her spelling is miserable and while she reads 
inteHJgqntly the^often miscalls little words saying saw 
for ivi^and'tli* liCe. It seenjs to us that she is very 
care'Jep;." , !, 

Nferie^ isj'rfot caijjtevs. If she could sijell as easily 
as srte docs l<er arithmetic .-lie would do so gladly. She 
happens to h.iv.e a spelling difficulty which is based on 
some physical defect. The defect cannot be determined 
without cdreful tests by an authorized psychologist, one 
who is usually to be found associated with a college or 
university. This is the specialist's field and no one else 
should tamper with it. 

Children, like their parents, have certain strengths 
and weaknesses. Nobody is born 100 per cent perfect. 
There is no such thing in all nature. Each of us has 
his strong points and his weak ones, because we were 
born that way. 

Our brains are made in sections, each one with a 
function of its own and all connected so that there is 
the unity which we call intelligence. We have a Utile 
spot in our brains that we see things like letters with 
and still another little spot that interprets those letters, 
and still anothe- center that stores what these others have 
old us for future use and we say "remember." All those ; 
spots or centers m our brains have their oart to do in 
learning to spell and if any one of them is weak we 
spell poorly. If this is so with Marie she cannot help it. 
The expert psychologist will test such a child, suggest 
ways of overcoming whatever trouble there is and maybe | 
she can learn to spell. Just maybe. 

I have set down this very rough sketch to impress 
upon parents and teachers that children do not WILL 
to do poor work. Sometimes they have a difficulty that 
they know nothing and can do nothing about. Only the 
expert can help and he should be asked to do so. 

Don't drill children who show a specific weakness 
like this. You can do a lot of harm that way. It is 
something like the mistake people make when they give 
a child a dose of physic when he is actually suffering 
from an attack of appendicitis. Call the expert for 
marked ca.ses of v, .a..ness in school subjects, and do re- 
member that no child wants to fail. 



MNiS-47-9-2f 



<^57) 



Third of LSU Freshmen 
Can't Read Properly 

BATON ROUGE, La., lAP) ^ A 
third of the freshman at Louisiana 
State University cannot read proper- 
ly, according to examinations by the 
University's Bureau of Testtny and 
Guidance. 

The report made public yesterday 
said 33 per cent of the first year 
students an- b.'ow standard in read- 
ing abUity and will be given remedial 

reading classes. ^^ ^ ^*\ 

LDA-4-7-11-1S 



Misunderstand ini:^^ and controversial issues. -- 



Our Children 

By ANGELO PATRI 



(— 



CERTAIN RESERVE Rai'sillg fhc I Q 

nam reserve in leadership. The A young Chicago woman, now" teachint, i" liiiijjti 

,.loof. a litUc ahead of the others eis College in Terre Haute, has succeeded in d, urm j 

rcr.ce in their attitudes, thinking, arrfl,-i«oH ^^■«,^,-^„., „k^... fu„ „^..-„uri:... -. .__, 

their minds. The leader is superior 



standard of work, of duty, good manners, the school vir- 
tures is likely to be called "old maid," "crank," and 
spoken of at home as "being down on me." 
A boy I knew had reached the eighth grade in grammar 



There i< alwa>.s .1 miain reserve in leaaersnip. ine r\ jrouiig v-nic-ago woman, now teachint, i" liiujiti S' at- Teach- 

le.dcr ar.,ibe » l.itlc .,loof, a litUc ahead of the others ers College in Terre Haute, has succeeded in di. uiom,.,- many lona- 

bcc.iuse ilxre is « diticrcr.ce in their attitudes, thinking, arro.i«oH tho^-i^o r,K„... .u j v.-i-. . . .. >"««'iy loiig 

dune, .nd e<iual,ty ti their minds. The leader is superior ^'^^^P**^ «heories about the educabihty of feeble-minded children, 

to thooc hi leads. » he is not a leader. "^ '"* "^* °' "«'' °^" unorthodox teaching methods she has actually 

Experience tells iis this and so when we hear of plans ^^'^^'^^ "■« I Q '» of a group of adolescent children from a mean of 51 

that call ("i- pupil and student criticism of teachers— 1'° nomuil. according to an article in a current woman'.s magazine. 

which adurtUy mean that the nuality of a teachers lead- p(»rtnrHln<. c .KmiH< ...o., „:..«„ «t, ., * • 1 . ,. . 

. . u 11 u • j_ J u • . . Jjorn.irnine f>i.amidt was given charge of special classes in a Chi- 

ership shall be judged by sucii criticisms— we wonder 1 i- , . ^ . , K^>--"t ..■oi;>o<.» a ^^lll 

what oils those who make such suggestions. If children. '^'^'^° ''"'^'"^ '*^'''^'"' ^"'^ «'v«" ^ ''■«e hand as to methods. Her first 
If students in high school and college know more than jfiPProach was social, and after glaring physical defects were taken 
their teachers, have better understanding of the values care of, she taught her pupils the proper care of hair, skin, and cloth- 
'lac*^*'' "'"*'°"^'^''^' """ *'*** °' ^* °^" " °"' °' '"^ ''^ improve their personal appearance. She was uncritically af- 
"u'ii true that the teacher the children like is usually *«'=t*°n-'^*e '" '" '• 'le>'"nRs with them, making them feel useful and 
■ fine instructor; especially is this so in the beginners" co"''P«tent- This innately sympathetic teacher found that many of her 
grades. As the pupils advance and become restless under charges Were suffering from fright, from feelings of inferiority, and 
authority, how'ever. interested in things apart from from paralyzing shyness. Modem progressive school methods were 
school «,diU lessons the picture changes. There are pu- used in teaching academic subjects, and the results were so good that 
pus who pick the easy teachers, the easy, snap courses o.?»-»<-i.jl..,. 

when they can, and for such the come-easy, go-easy ^^ P**^ "*"' finished high school, and all but seven per cent reached 
teacher is just tops. The teacher who holds them to a normality, holding useful jobs. 

This teacher is now engaged in training others to carry on this 
work, a project which should give hope to many parents. Children 
whose lives have been blighted by the idea that their condition makes 
school without knowing elementary grammar. He knew them permanent outcasts, may. with understanding treatment, become 
and his teacher knew tliat he could not enter high school valuable citizens. 

if his marks in English, which included grammar, did .^,., . , , . , , . 

not reach standard. But the boy said. "I hate grammar ^"^'^ '* "°^ ^ "^^ approach; it has long been known that sym- 

and I don't care about going to high <ichool.' But his pathy. understanding, careful, patient teaching and the placing of as 
parents cared and this teacher cared. much responsibility on such a child as he is able to take will improvo 

"You are going to have an extra lesson every after- 
noon after dismissal until you have mastered the ele- 
ments of grammar and composition," said the teacher. 
The boy was furious, but stay after school he did. After 
three months of this trairring, he stood at the head of the 
class in English. He did go to high school and to college 
and did well. Had his opinion of that teacher been ac- 
cepted as important, it would have been too bad for him 
and for his fine teacher. 

The teacher is to be the authority in the classroom. He 
is to hold his pupils to a high standard of achievement. 
He is to be respected. He is not to be called by his first 
name or by a nickname just to prove that he is a good 
fellow and liked by his pupils. Such an idea is degrading 
to our scheme of education ahd we want none of it. The 
teacher should be judged by his superiors on the basis of 
work accomplished else why the educational superiors? 
Let's cut out the nonsense. 

MN S-47-n (35^ 



his status. But it is a fresh reminder that most of such cases are not 
lopeless. They may never become normal, but they can be trained 
X) become far better and happier than they arc. 

ATT- 47-^ -23 



Such a teacher, he went on, will kui 
initiative, enterprise and any other out- 
ward, growth in a child in order to 
make the cftild obedient. They resort 
to ridicule and other means of deflation 
»n compel such obedience, thus doing 
_more harm to the child's emotional 1 
"growth than f whipping would do. I 
- One big trouble, said Stephens. Is' 
__ ^_ ^^ ^^ I that the teaching profession Is placea 

MtlptlS r TtlStVCLtB 1 BCLCnBTS "« cler^'"^""e medfc^piSesslon. 

■ •••.*' M. ^vk^a a.^ ■ *» "Possibly thU U the reason why w« 

BY RICHARD TOMPKIHS "' "° °^^ sc^ooftibuse atXl many such find that children more frequently conu 

LONDON lAPi wv,=* ^TTvI- . teachers are incapable of paying even ply to frustrating teachers than they 

frustrated scl^olc.hTlHfi^,.*^^Hrp., lip service to the ^nodem concepts of do to frustrating parents." he added 

c»Si^ tW^ it^, a f^i^^%*^!ril^^^ And why are teachers frustratedt 

chiMtruts think its a Inistrated teac- g^^^^ teachers, he declared, regard Very probably. Stephens thinks, be- 

■pi. ♦• w » 4v T spontaneity, humor or emotional dis- cause their Initiative is smothered by 

wars what the International Con- U.jrbances — except their own — as high- too rigid supervision. Public meddling 

lerence of Child Phychiatry told >"'-»l — ,in a teacher's personal life also is a 

^L'^^n'^Z' ^if 'w * P^^fL^u^jly immoral. The great concern of phy- cause. Many teachers cannot relax with 
ten by Dr. Gordm Stephens, chief phy chiatrUts today Stephens continued is la cigarette because prejudiced school 



Contrary To Average Public Opinion 

ils Frustrate Teachers 



chiataric consultant at the Winnipeg the teacher who thwarts her pupils. I trustees frown on .rooking by teacheri. 
Jr^K T u°'^i^i"'f- " *""* '"**'* "*' their initiative and other evidences of At the same time, however, too many 
f^-T, L .K ^ Seeley, execuUv» of- growth "to the extent that pathological j teachers are inclined to " 
miH , Canadian NaUon^ Com-I submission U the only accepUble be- 'profession as a meanj of 



mittee for nienUl hygiene. havior reaction. 

A frustrated Wacher. he said. Is like ■ 
a bad apple in a barrel. The teadier's 
personality is takep tip by the pupils. 
A drab teacher' increases the drabness 



LM-48-8-( 



any 
dioose their 
eecafit from 
^aggressive and nfere mature adtilt en- 
vironment." Stephen* said. 

"The same," he added, "can be lald 
about some psychiatrists." 



i*26 



Quick and Slow Class j.i^ , 
Plan Dropped by School ' 

iwomen. N.uoo«iNtw. »,rvicei tachcd to the "B" groups. While 

New York -School childrenUhe children don't ordinarily jib^ ' 
have been divided into -slowLj ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^-^^ .^ 

groups and 'quick groups at [smarter, the so-called "B" chil- 
various age leveU in schools allj^ren naturally feel a bit unhappy I 
over the country for some 20jabout their lower status, 
vears, but the practice — called „. . ,,., ... 

'•sectioning on the basis of ability"! *'"" ^"^ '^'^"** ^ ability to learn 
—is slowly begining to crumble. 'depends on his emotional stabiliiy. 

For a long time elementary andt*'^°^«. '' ^^'l '*'"^.,"P^^ ^>' ,*'^'"K 
secondary school classes havejP'^'^t'' ",' '^ir -P S^'^^'l'-^rp Oi'th- 
been split in, that way. on thei*^"" P'^'iali-ipd. -s^e rointr<; out. 
theory that children who dont' ^n addition, \ir-. Spangenberg I 
leam quickly shouldn't he pen- ■~^ul. the, lr-«(ij..is hnVe found i 
allzed by being expected to keepifiere's as ini/<ti_ v:ir|ation in 
up Willi brighter youngsters. liability of the stiident.-> in each' 
was argued al.^o that bright chil- iSroup as there wouM ht if both 
riren shouldn't be held back to Proups were in one class. Kven ' 
the slower pace. I if >o" 'lo section the plass, she 

Though the que.stion is far from ■'^/''' '^e'"? "till must be teaching 
settled, the practice of -section- "f,^^ *^"^»i'>: '"''V,"^"^"^^'' nature 
Ing- is rapidly becoming the dom-i^'-'-li t^'''''^ attention to each 
inant protest among educatots, child, geared to his own ability.,; 
and a number of schools are' ^o. she said, the Bedford schopi 
abandoning it. iwiH experiment ne.xt year with 

yor example, the Bedford Kle- having all the children at one age i 
mentary school in Westport, i^^vel in a single class. It will have , 
Conn., has just announced that] the added advantage of making! 
some of its sectioned classes will the class somewhat representa- 
he united next semester. Instead ''ve of society, instead of Irving I 
of a fourth grade "A" class of to set up an artificial homogeneity ' 
bright children and a fourth, — and children should lealn to 
grade 'B" class of slower ones, 'a^e society as it is in a democra- 
there'll be just one fourth grade tic way, she said. v ': 

group. I "With all the childien together,^ 

Mrs. Nettie Spangenberg, prin-Mrs. Spanpenberg continued, thev 
cipal. explained that the main (will be taught in small groups | 
reason for the switch is that the within the classroom according to 
youngsters have felt a stigma at- 1 their achievement. I 

^1 



Juniors Are 
Brawny Too 

OnCAGO. July 2, (AP)_Ch ;dren 
with unusual intelligence generally 
are superior physically, Paul Witty 
Northwestern University professor 
Mid today. , 

Witty said in the national Parent- 
Teacher magazine that the notion 
■nhat extremely bright children are 
^ysicaliy weak, unsocial, bespectacl- 
ed bookish misfiU, had no founda- 
tion v.natever." 

Refe-nng to d study of 1.500 "very 
brigh; .ndividuals whose careers were 
traced from ch.;<lnood into adulthood," 
Witty £..;d. -bn-ht children tend to bd 
superior ,n size, strength, muscula 
control, and general health to olhe 
Children in the same age group 

Nor are gifted children one-sided ii 
their educational development In al 
types of school work the gifted chiU 
tends to excel." 

A big problem for parents and 
teachers today. Witty said, is to recog 
tafe^nl^" "=°n*e'-ve unusual ability and 



LbA-41-7'X 



lJQrP- 48-6-17 



Our Children 

By ANUCLO PATRI 



_l 



EQUALITY IN EDUCATION 

Lnless we are careful and exercise a bit of com 

xpp-^^r^a;-=-d€^ 

.11 h^r''l^ .°' educational courses-that is givin. 
.11 high school sluaent^ the same courses, fiounrng uo^n 

">«rke11f„etLriraJra;*'^B':t7er "' "-"^ *"" 

not the'^tar a^d^ P^^ferXs" "^f tLtar^ ^A ""^ 
women who .et those courses '"^" *""' 

' ^J.^nl'T u""^".'" '^^ ^'^ "^°°'^ to «" boys ana 
girls of high school aie tenpraii 

come regardless ot soolasfic record ^Th""* "'" ""-^ 

• '™' 'S fine 111 



_._l It Keeps a hold on youth, and makes an effort tu 
guide it to usefulness and a successful maturity. But 
if the young people find that there is nothing for tiieiu 
.ill school except the bool<s tliey cannot read and have 
no use for. wiial then.' It is happening in many places 

We have a thoiougli mixture ut young people in 
secondary schools, m which we fina, side by side, 
students who are brini.iii- liook learners and sludems 
who can scarcely read sluoeots who are keen scientists 
and students who would (tot know a solution from a 
crystal. But Ehglish anu science are in the curriculuiii 
and must be taken. 

It is wiif ana right to keep boys and girls in school 
until they' aie ripe to enter college and pursue a 
career, or tintil uic> have learned tlie techniques of 
some useful \^ork.. But the schools must ije equipped 
and sUifed f.ir tlje task. There is no equality in educa- 
tion when the, hand -minded child is lorced to hold a 
book in his nahd when what he needs is a hammer 
and a saw. Such an administration is paym lip service 
to an ideal while it wastes youth's precious hours. 

The time has come when education and industry 
must join forces for the good of the nation, tnlignttaed 
labor leaders, school mtii. civic leaders have a duly 
here and the citizens should call upon tliem to perform il, 

MNS-48-6-2b 



427 



TABLE XLI 

EDUCATIONAL ADi-lINI3TRAT0iio WHU GAVii INi-'OrU^iATION RELATING TO THEIR 

PUBLICITY PUOGPiAMS 



Admini strat ive 


Name of Person 






Unit liepresenteci 


Replying 




Position 


Allen Parish 


Thomas J. Griffin 


parish 


ouperintendent 


Ascension Parish 


L. J, Babin 


Parish 


duperintendent 


Assumption Parish 


ilonnan £j, Can;iouche 


Parish 


Super intenaent 


Avoyelles Parish 


L. A, Cayer 


P;;rish 


Superintendent 


Beaure^iard Parish 


K. R. Hanchey 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Bienville Parish 


J. A. Shelby 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Bossier Parish 


R. V. Kerr 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Calcasieu Parish 


H. A, ijorton 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Ca;;.eron Parish 


Thomas vv, i-cCall 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Cataiioula Parish 


A. L. Brooks 


Parish 


Superintendent 


East Baton Rouge 








Parish 


Clark L. Barrow 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Evan.reline Parish 


F, V. Launey 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Frani-.lin Parish 


John L, l-.cDuff 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Grant parish 


o. C, ohaw 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Iberville Parish 


L. P. Terrebonne 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Jackson Parish 


iv. A. licLaurin 


Parish 


Superintendent 


J--fferson Parish 


Paul J. oolis 


assistant Parish 








Superintendent 


Jefferson Davis 








Parish 


X.. A. Pdchard 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Lafayette Parish 


A. A. llcJride 


Parish 


Superint endent 


Lafourche Parish 


.i, 0. lioncla 


Parish 


Superintendent 


■ille Parish 


J, D. Roussell 


Parish 


S upe ri nt e ud e nt 


coin Parish 


ii. A, Campbell 


Parish 


Superint onuent 


.'ingston Parish 


./atson Bankston 


parish 


Superintendent 


■ehouse Parish 


K. J. dhaw 


Parish 


Superintendent 


Leans Parish 


D. Hay 


Executive Assistant to 






Parish 


Superintendent 


1 









r 



1 



L 



J 



428 



TAtiLi-'j Ai.1 — Continuod 









Adnlnldtratlve 


Nome of i arson 




Unit Represented 


utiulyin/; 


. asitioa 


■uu-t'iiLa ; p.riah 


l.ori.^dU ... ;v;:ri3 


uachita i uriah 


:'! ;-•;. 


ratrick Jlinde 


i^•5ri- Jilt 


ris , 


J, P, Lorio 


i'.iri ;ut 


. arish 


H. «. fills 


; ari ^nt 


_- -.or x'ariah 


A« L* jif^iier 


''uriw ,,„._..: oat 


4r-1''n(i '.'irish 


J. '3, ThOEJpaor: 


. triah Superintendent 


3h 


iioy Alford 


< -irioi. Juporinteiiaent 


_. ... .- - a : aristi 


J, F, Gautliier 


I ariah Juperinteadaat 


jt. Jh^irleo i ariah 


. . J. Vial 


iariijh juparintendent 


•^. Johi. the lieptiote 




# 


Parish 


:' r3, t}« ii, Kolea 


Principal of High 
ichool 


-, . crtin .arish 


'^, J» fr'onte>~ut 


.^aris- ">-:■.. -i--i r'^-(-^- ant 


jt. . ■ ry rorish 


3, E« .joudreaux 


r-ciri ont 


>''. ' -'n^' ;'arish 


a. D, --■-• 


Pari-.- -nit 


ariah 


J. F. 


.«ri3L . :»t 


..*,.. .*jn 


li, J. .. .. 


Parish -...^.-.....^^..s,viat 


^tbster -srish 


J, ft» Pitchor 


arish Superintendent 


•St SutOii louge 






i'&riah 


J* H» Bres 


iriah Juperintondent 


-est Carroll Pariah 


0. S, Huey 


.-iriah Juperiatunviont 


est Feliciana i'ariah 


•U K, » at son 


arish Juporinte.'ideiit 


Inn "arish 


U L. Terry 


Parish ^iuperinteudeut 


iogaluaa City 






jchoola 


Ajsy vuick 


jsistant (iigh ,>chool 
Irincipal 


l^ke Charles City 






Jchojls 


U'» Anderson 


ity jiiporintendent 


-oaroe Jity 






ochools 


E* L, rieville 


City Juperintendent 


^, Archdiocese oi ^;'2w 






Orleans 


II* C» Sezou 


Archdlocesan 

iuperi nteivient 


Diocese of 






Lfifayette 


^. A. j.artin 


ioceaan Juperinteaient 


(i) Has local aator 


lomy. 




(2) Ad-dnistrutora 


of uoaan Catholic 3ch 


oola. 









r 



n 



L 



J 



429 



i MUX)£» j^^ 



iX 



,Oi*..^vju .v.>..a. :.^i,ATIONo RE' 



oa»- xaFORMATIOH 0» TH^IH 



Collage .lopresentative 


"e: • : 


osition 


Centenary College 


jharlua T. iior^^an 


i ..rector of nblic 

-i,t»iatiori3 


'3 of the Jacred 






•? 


. other : • .rskine 


jean of Perso-inel 


a..ic«n College 


. artin . iorey 


director of 'ublic 
Eelations 


wOulaiana College 


iJnaif^ned 


Letter ..airesiaed to 
director of .'xiblic 
violations 


Lojrola University 


ortin I joray 


Director of .ublic 
Relatione 


ostern jtate 






-oge 


X. C. itrickltind 


director of Ixiblic 
delations 


•outhea3:.em 






i ^iana College 


:•• T. Tins ley 


President 


■ <3Stem 






.^^uiaiana Institute 


^uidella Prliaeaux 


director of iublic 

violations 


lane University 


iiorace :fonegar 


director of i\iblic 
relations 


:uline College 


Unaifpned 


Letter A. dressed to 
director of rudic 






lielations 



r 



n 



L 



J 



430 



'i'Ai)Li:i 4^.111 



-, 1J4^ 



of 

News- 
paper 


i or Cent of jpace Occupied by Topics 


.t.l:letic8 


Di^e - 1947 


1947 - 194t^ 


voi'a :e 


.M'a-.;ber of 
:Jolur.iii 
Inches 


of 
.. jca 


. lii.sber of 
■>3lui2n 
ricnes 


or Jent 
of 


1 er vent 
of 

.>ace 


XI 

jA 
J A? 


lw,:.4^.9 
27,524.4 
lt,lL»2.6 

4,901.7 

1,046.3 

12,0c/*. 4 

6,u5t.5 

lu,9v>'5.1 

17,w40.2 

2^212.4 
» • 

i5*,>2il4 
20,473.7 


45.2 
57.4 

51.5 
42.1 
35.1 

-7.3 

54.5 

4>-'.o 
2o.6 
17.9 
4S.4 
47."? 


12,016.0 
32,622.5 
23.425.2 
t5,907.6 
16,073.5 

11,413.9 
1£,527.S 

11,330.3 
19,vSUi.4 
19,o59.6 

36,609.6 
7,151.7 

J, ^59.1 
^l,c-2i^«4 
34,537.2 


49.3 
61.1 
56.6 
62.3 
45.2 

53.1 
u4.5 
59. iJ 
54.9 
56.4 

53.4 
35.4 
35.1 
6U.1 
:.U3 


47.3 
59.2 

54.1 
52.2 
40. i 

5<-'.2 
ol.a 
ol.4 
55.0 
55.5 

:.5.1 
31.0 
:-6.5 
54.2 
54.9 


oxmI 




697. 


- - - ■ 


ai9«o 


75fc.5 


\arage 




4.. 5 


54. o 


50.6 


nif 


1 




■ 











r 



n 



L 



J 



431 



--.'ontlnued 





-- _... _- -, „.„, ..^ .,. ._ 


o: 


uplls E«ceiving I'lention 


^/a^■e^ 


^40 - 1947 


i9'V. - 1742 


..VLira.Lje 




. u..iber of 
:olu&m 
- nchea 


i er ZQtxt 
of 


Inches 


jpaee 


er Cent 
of 

- ..'ace 


TT 

.1 
■•OTP 

it 


.-..;l7 

. - o. / 
-.'■■■ '.3 


14.6 
5.6 
t.4 

13.1 
15. S 

14.9 

12.2 

7.6 

9.2 

25.6 
14.7 

lo.l 

i4.3 


4134.7 

540i*.7 
4322.3 
1S57.4 

}BJ}.2 

3774.;. 
3231.6 
2076.0 
37^7.5 
3510.6 

4646. g 
5536.1 
194^^.5 
5955.2 
6o54.3 


lw.5 

13. >- 

io!5 
lu.o 

cJ.O 
27.4 
17.7 

1,..0 


15.4 

7.8 

9.5 

13.0 

lo.5 

16.2 

11.7 
9.3 
9.9 

10.0 

7.3 
26.5 
16.2 

16.2 
13.2 


^al 




lSa.7 




20;.?. c^ 


-.h',7 


v» ■ *, ■» 




12.6 




13.9 


13.2 


2 



r 



n 



L 



J 



432 



XABL4 xLUl — -Continued 













' .tt:;-e 


Per Cent of lipacB Occupied by Topics 




of 
I'.ews- 




.x«racurricular 'vctivitioa 




u^ .xjr 


.94C - 1947 


1947 . 1946 


Avorag« 




.. ;.c.;ua 


ir Zatit 

of 
.J pace 


: 7' 


oc uei*t 
of 

..pace 


i or Jeat 
of 

.--•ace 


'.A • 
.il 

LCAP 

:ii 
.1 

JTP 


2714.0 

Oi43al 

2i>2Z,B 
511.4 

1562.6 

1357.1 
1014.0 
652. t^ 
1526.6 
1403.0 

9291.4 

1200.5 
1203.4 

2oc^.",4 
ld70.1 


U.4 

12.6* 
9.0 
5.5 

11.2 

0.2 
5.0 

4.7 
5.0 

4.5 

17.2 

11. tJ 

13.2 

e.l 

3.9 


.^.216.2 
3072.3 
1774.6 
922.9 
1576.2 

641.0 
132a. 4 

o26.1 
1447.6 

144 u. 5 

20a9.fi 
1122.3 

911.6 
1191.9 
1721.6 


0./ 

5.7 
4.3 

0.5 
7.1 

3.0 

4.6 

4.4 
4.0 
4.1 

3.6 

5.6 

c:.3 

3.3 

3.^ 


10.1 

>.o 

-.6 

J, 2 

4.6 
4.6 
4.5 
«*.5 
4.3 

10.4 
5.7 

10.8 
?.7 
J. 5 


otal 




129.5 




76.4 


L.2.7 


vera^'o 




f..6 




5.1 


b,A 


ink 


3 



r 



n 



L 



J 



433 



of 

. ewG- 


rer Cent of .Space Occupied by Topics 


AcU.iriistration and ;1elated Topica 


;.'■;: lor 


: , - 1947 


1947 - 1943 


v<jra;,e 




er of 


. jr Ceiit 
of 

.^yace 


i»ic:-.ea 


of 

J pace 


fer Jeut 

of 

^pace 


■ ■•J 
JA 

.UP 

'J 

.'I 
Ji 

J?P 


l-^^o.? 

12v/v>a3 

967.7 , 

1445.8 
1251*3 
35U.2 
2372.7 
2751.2 

2796.2 

i^45.9 

1263.7 

1719.0 
577-^.3 


C.3 

^ • y 

7.1 

12.9 

f- ."> 
^« y 

2.6 
7.7 

e.8 

5.2 
-.3 

13.2 
5.2 

13.5 


154t.2 

23r\v 


4.6 

^.9 

.3 

6.2 

...a 

.3 
..5 
■.2 

4.0 
-.4 

;.l 

^.4 
^..3 


4.' 9 
o.Q 
7.9 
6.6 

• 4 
5.5 
4.0 
6.1 
7.0 

4.6 
5.9 
9.2 
4.3 
'.9 






ii7«9 




70.5 


::^4.5 


Avera..;v, 








• 


'J 


•ink 


1r 















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n 



L 



J 



434 



TABLii JiLIil — Oontinuod 



:.a.j.o 


Per Cent of . 


»pace Oocupiod by Topics 




of 




~»chool-j 


\ibllc Helationa 




Ntfirs- 










P«p«r 


1946 - 1947 


1947 • 194^ 


V :r:.. :c 




.'■an-iber of 


er Cent 


,j..-„,^ -,r 


er Cent 


ar Cent 




;.,T ,.-.., 


of 




zV 


of 




.ricr.es 


pace 


- ..-J..*-. J 


., ace 


-pace 


ATT 


C>45.1 


^.? 


1456.7 


:.7 


4.2 


nn \ 


•1 -!_;..<. 


3.f: 


3121.5 


:..S 


i*.^ 




. 


0.3 


J319.2 


,0 


7.2 


j».*^ 


'^^ '-* ■^ 


5.g 


699.C 


^..9 


5.3 


LD' 


943.4 


6.g 


1507. C 


.g 


6.a 


LCA; 


X550.3 


7,1 


1735. c 


.1 


7.6 


' .- '-• 


•/:'... 2 


3.1 


I .- ( 1 "-; 


1..0 


4.0 




, 


3.0 


, 


M 


5.1 


..^^ 


J. J. 'J 7 • >. 


3.6 


»- v" '■>••- 


.-•ti 


5.1 


NOS 


1706. b 


5.5 


2494.(1 


/.2 


0.4 


Korr 


1083.5 


2.0 


2570. L 


..4 


3.2 


■iu- 


597.1 


5.9 


-1, ';:-■.,,- 


.3 


7.1 




''26»C 


C.7 


. 


.'.^ 


9.0 


>v 


2253.1 


6.8 


/.. I..' .-.■ » v 


7.9 


7.3 


iT 


154^.7 


3.6 


4324. S 


7.7 


5.7 






74.7 




102. S 


:-^::.S 


veraj-e 




SO 




o.a 












5 















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n 



L 



J 



435 



TABiuii XLill — Ooi.tiauou 



tUuae 


ler Cent of j^^ace ;ccupie<l by Topics 


ol 




reachers 






noWO- 










P«P«r 


:-;4u - 1947 


1947 - 1943 


Vura,; -.e 




urbcr of 


or Cent 


Jiunbor of 


cr Cent 


''sr Cent 






of 


,0>Ui.Ul 


of 






- --- 


>pace 


-;ic;.es 


^tiaCO 


JO 


:r 


• 


4.0 


1171.2 


4.6 


.,L 


..•» 


• ' 


4.3 


2342.6 


4.4 


.4 


.7 


, 


5.2 


1919.1 


4.6 


,.9 


j6 


■ • . 


6,0 


362.6 


2.5 


...2 


LfiA 


a^i.o 


•;...l 


1119.2 


5.0 


5.6 


:af 


55X,0 


^.5 


5oo.C 


2.6 


.-.5 


w 


912.7 


4.5 


1125.6 


3.9 


4.2 


c» 


71.7 


4.9 


071. u 


3.5 


4.2 


I 


1796.9 


5.9 


1963.7 


5.5 


^.7 


J 


153c. 1 


4.9 


1909.2 


5.5 


5.2 


«OTP 


315.7.4 


5.9 


369v.O 


0.4 


..2 


OW 


. J I- mt^ 


5.2 


7ai.i 


3.9 


4.5 


u 


-.3 


9.0 


7VC.4 


7.2 


.1 




■ - ^ * J 


4.6 


1123.5 


3.1 


4.0 




-503. U 


5.9 


1921,0 


3.4 


.,.6 


I'otal 




7'. 


06.1 


72.9 


. arare 




5.3 




4.4 


4.B 








6 















r 



n 



L 



J 



43o 



.ui Xi,lli — '.ontinuod 



. oi' >uiit. ai .j^>tica wccui-'iou by iopica 



C'irrlculuo 



19i;o - 1947 



•uaber of 



1740.7 



1275.3 

1232.4 
727.0 
50?,6 

1159.5 
975.4 

1665.1 
7<^5.9 
944.1 
62c. 

1266.6 



^r '"ent 



3,0 



72.3 



.V47 - 1946 



nr.bGT of 



1^.9 



i2>7,5 



1072, 



or Cent 
of 

ipaca 



4.0 
2.9 
3.2 

3. - 
5. 



<» .5 
1.7 
2.2 
3.4 

3.6 

2.7 

■."■ ^ 

7.5 



55.5 



Averare 



Per Cent 

of 
ipace 



J. 7 

3.3 
3.9 
...3 
7.0 

5.1 

^.6 
3.0 
3.6 
3.3 

3.1 

7.9 

.7 

l.e 

^.5 



u.'-^ 



r 



n 



L 



J 



437 



TABUJ JLLIii — Coj oinuod 













:.aine 


ier Cent of 


opaco Cccupied by Topi 


sa 


of 






Fiiianc« 




I.ews- 










jjiiper 


- 1947 


l)ir7 -.1943 


v^ra .:e 






er Cent 


!^U-Jbfirr of 


Per C©nt 


fer C«nt 




^O-u..... 


of 






:f 




^liC ou 


jyUC9 


550.3 




-ce 


:tt 


;4i,'-i 


3.9 


J. 2 


3.1 


RRA 


954.2 


2.0 


05.C 


1.2 


1.6 


IT 


■ • ■ 


1.9 




.:.2 


2.0 


J 


i -.-,.. 


3.7 


• -^ 


.^.0 


2.9 


J3A 


530.5 


3.7 


3>0.7 


i.g 


.7 


:ap 


1070.0 


4,9 


47 . 


J.2 


3.6 


// 


500.7 


2.5 


4^ . . 


1.7 


3.1 


J 


390.0 


2.8 


.:2i.7 


1.2 


.0 


X 


904.2 


2.9 


1051.3 


-.9 


.9 




1095*7 


3.6 


997.3 


1.9 


.2 


.;OTr 


1955.2 


3.6 


114 .. 


.:.o 


2.^ 


ov 


340. e 


3.3 


5' . 


1.9 


3.1 


aDL 


4S2.7 


5.1 


259.3 


.4 


3.6 


3J 


957.9 


2.9 


462.1 


1.3 


2.1 


3T 


1245.5 


2.9 


1033.4 


U9 
3t^f* 


.4 


t.al 




49.7 




4w'.3 






3.3 




.-.1 


.7 








6 



r 



n 



L 



J 



43« 



TABLS ILIli — ^onLinuoU 











MM 


Per ^©nt of .jpaco Occupied by Topics 


of 


uildin^a and Phyaieal Neods 




'.6^3- 






paper 


1946 - 1947 


19.// - l.>^6 


Av:^ruco 




r^unifcor of 


cr ".ent 


(iV of 


•or 'ent 


■ or Oent 




'olurin 












inches 






■ - 


-^ U 


AIT 




2.0 


.3 


1.2 


1.9 


KU 


1012.!. 


2.1 


;.9 


1.0 


1.6 


Bsr 


^13. 


1.6 


..v5.1 


1.6 


1.6 


COS 


225. V 


2.4 


131.7 


^.9 


i.b 


LDA 


-♦*-#• 


I.l 


23i>.3 


1.1 


i.l 


Zkr 


3^.1.' 


. 


.4 


J. 6 


1.1 


. M 


I5i>.4 


• - 


.4 


0.7 


0.7 


ms 


^^4.7 


-.7 


122,0 


0.6 


.7 


NOI 


J<-^3.5 


1.2 


U44.3 


i.a 


i.5 


SOS 


595.9 


1.9 


929.3 


2.7 


2.3 


BOTP 


6j6,'- 


1.1 


3.4 




- • '-■ 


OW 


.iG.<: 


1.2 


.2 


, 


— • w 


^L 


1 7.2 


1.7 


.2 


^.1 


^.4 


,j 




1.6 


.7 


0.9 


1.2 




Coi^.T 


-3*6 


V>1.4 


1.3 


1.7 


■r^.l 




20.3 


22.0 


verare 




I.L 




1.4 


1.5 


cink 








' 



r 



n 



L 



J 



UJ9 



TABLS ALII I — '>:!n^i^ucd 



tisce 


.•^or 


Jent or opaco cx^cupiea 


oy Topics 




of 




i.oscorch 






;,cw3- 










paper 


1946 - 1947 


1%7 - 194^ 


Avorag© 




... ..•T 'jT 


"'er Jeiit 


.•r of 


Tor ",©nt 


r-^br Cent 




."•0 


of 




jf 


of 






i>iJlCO 


..J.u^ 


..p-^CO 


jpac© 






1.5 




^.7 


1.1 






1.2 


, 


0.9 


1.1 






1.9 


• - 


1.5 


1.7 




"--r •- •1' 


2,6 


— V- - - • ,■ 


i.2 


1.9 




^74.^ 


2.0 


152.9 


0.7 


i.4 






1.3 


170.3 


J.8 


1.1 




-*- • 


0.9 


1 ',u,7 


0.5 


0.7 


;S 


1; . . 


1.5 


« ^ 


>.4 


1.0 


I 


— ^ ** • * 


^.3 


-- • - 


1.0 


1.6 


vi 


26U.8 


Q.S 


260#X 


o.a 


o.a 


orp 


14J37.3 


3.4 


912,6 


1.6 


2.5 




2^^0..'i 


-^.4 


-^■1^ ,7 


1.2 


l.e 


L 


• ■ 


3.3 


• 1 


1.7 


2.5 


J 


l^.^ .V. 


0.5 


•• • i» 


0.2 


U.4 


' 


492.0 


i.2 


324.5 


0.6 


U.9 


Dtal 




20.(5 




13. i^ 


2-J.5 


'■--■-■ •' 




l.S 




U.9 


1.4 


aiik 








10 















r 



n 



L 



J 



440 



:5 XLIIl — Jontiiiuod 



■K^- 


- - - -^ . ...;.,--- ■ ./ ■• - -^ 


or 

0W3- 


AliKsnl 


p!\ per 


1746 . 1947 


1947 - 194^ 


.verac« 




:nc ' 


Per Cent 

of 




?er Cent 
opace 


; er Oent 

of 
J pace 


■J 

J 


266.7 

4vt^7 

401.5 

15.4 

175.6 

179.2 
2:^1.7 
144.7 
259.4 
192.7 

1281.2 

9*.:). 5 

121.6 
^16.2 
550.4 


1.2 

0.9 
1.6 
0,2 
1.3 

0,3 

1.3 
1.0 

0.8 
0.6 

2.4 
0.9 
1.3 
^.5 
1.3 


'•->••♦ 

19.3 

o?7.e 

145. i? 

261.3 
135.4 
4fi5.6 
316.0 

632.7 

123.2 

• 1 ■ 


0.9 
1.7 

z,Q 

u.l 

3.1 

0.7 
0.9 
0.7 
1.3 

U.9 

1.1 
0,6 
.1,0 
2.1 

• 


1.1 
1.3 
l.fcJ 

U.2 
2.2 

0.7 
1.1 
0,9 
1.0 
J.o 

1.7 

1.7 
^.3 

1.4 


tal 




1^.1 




19.6 


19.0 


V ora-e 




1.2 




1.3 


1.3 


:ik 


11 



r 



n 



L 



J 



441 



NfiiHft 


3r Cent of jpace 


Occupied by Toplca 




of 










sychoio^y 


and ::ethod3 




Dews- 








papor 


i'?4tv - 19''«7 


li?47 - 1943 


Average 




■.or of 


--' -.c;:t, 




jv Cent 


r.r ;;ent 




can 


of 




of 


of 




^:iches 


• 0.5 


-iiGi;e3 


.?pace 


-pace 


■n 

■ I 


127,6 


13H.0 


0.5 


■».5 




• 


. 


4--^^2 


o.- 




_ ^ 


* 


, 


273.2 


0.7 




J 


- — • . 


-.7 


13.7 


0.1 




A 


13.,C 


J.9 


164.2 


0.7 


• 


'\r 


230,5 


1,0 


137.3 


0.6 


o.a 




, 


, 


100.9 


0.4 


0.6 




, 


, 


747.3 


3.9 


^^.2 


. 4. 


'^=^j»7 


^•L. 


1277.4 


3.'^- 


5.1 


-■■J 


539,4 


1.7 


252,a 


0.7 


1.2 


.TP 


1291,5 


2.4 


454.9 


o.a 


1.6 




116.2 


i.l 


477.1 


2.4 


i.7 


■L 


2.,'U.3 


...1 


v4.^ 


U.u 


L-4 


,' 


^ f;.'. 


, 


^7.t^ 


0.1 


-.3 


• 


-^:i.'.7 


• , 


244.7 


^^.t; 


■^.5 


Ual 




-; 1 •« 

• •4 




i.l 


".7 


vtirao« 




i.2 


nk 






12 



r 



n 



L 



J 



442 



TABLS ILIII —Continued 



Name 
of 
News- 
paper 


?9r Cmnt of 3pace Occupied by Topics 


.Ml Topica 


ixvu - i';47 


1947 - 1945 


: .-...:, or of 

23,..'4o.o 
47, -■... 

I3iy/iilv 

30,732.1 

j 1,260.9 

32,.,.. 
^2, 73-:. 7 


Ter Jent 

of 

. >.-ce 


.ju;:iber of 
-olu.'r.n 
inches 


of 
..pace 


. i 

.A 

--n 

■ X 

■\ 

■ ■J 
I 

..)TP 


...0 

:-' .0 

.0 

^ .0 

iOU.O 

.0 

.. .0 

:...0 
l.-'.O 

ivO.O 

.0 
.0 

.0 

-. -.0 
10.;. 


25, i^l^7.7 
53,499.5 
41,36i..a 
14,292.3 
22,26^.5 

21,500.4 
26,731.0 
19,035.5 
36,071.3 
34,675.6 

57,o41.4 
20,131.3 
11,006.4 
36,291.6 

55,B59.7 


l;u.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

I'JO.O 
100,0 
lOo.O 

i>v/.0 

100.0 

1 .>.0 
Ij^.O 
iOJ.O 
100.0 
100.0 













r 



L 



J 



443 



>gt Ciirtl Ot 




TABLB I 


LI? 

L> TO JiACK OF r»t'BL?B 

.... ...woT 1, 1946, TO 

1» 1948 


.■^o.jUJT 


MflM 
Of 

paper 


liuiaber iuid 1 er Gent of -rticlos on i.8ch Topic 


Achlotics 


1946 - 1947 


1947 - 1948 


varag© 


Kuaber of 
rticlea 


Zont 


.Ni^ber of 
Articles 


Far 
z&at 


Per 
Jent 


TT 
ilA 

at 

OS 
"A 

;P 

w 


1684 

2426 
1824 

488 

824 

1403 

1783 
1268 
2024 

2001 

2777 

360 

217 
1979 
2781 


44.4 
49.5 
49.8 

42.3 
32.3 

43.6 

61.9 
60.9 
52.4 

50.3 
48.6 
25.6 

17.6 
46.1 
50.2 


1827 

3088 
2364 

1060 
1368 
1392 

2789 
1774 
2094 

1983 

3264 

893 

495 
2668 
4057 


46.9 
53.5 
51.6 

56.8 
39.5 
45.3 

66.1 

60.4 
51.9 

50.3 
53.3 
37.8 

31.5 
57.2 

62.7 


45.6 

51.5 
50.7 

49.6 
35.9 

44.4 

64.0 

cO.7 
52.2 

50.3 
51.0 
31.7 

24.5 
51.6 

56.4 


tal 




675.5 




704.8 


72.. 1 


v«rage 




45.0 




51.0 


4S.0 


ank 


1 


1 













r 



n 



L 



J 



TABLli aLIV — .^ontlnuod 



... .acli i':>jjic 



>aipil« Hec«ivln»3 lientlon 



- 1947 



1947 - l.^ifS 



.voruG© 



117 
271 
267 

170 
432 
550 

249 

160 
319 

399 
364 
320 

183 

600 

745 



3.1 
.3 



16.9 
17.1 

^•6 
7.7 
C..3 

10.0 

6.4 
22.7 

U.9 
14.0 



ler of 
.cles 



622 
06? 
517 

266 
5d2 
637 

386 
274 
337 

347 
476 
524 

279 
677 

096 



i ar 

Gent 



lo.O 
11.6 

11.3 

14.2 

16.^ 

2C. 

9.2 



0.8 

7.8 

22.2 

17. e 
14.5 
10. S 



Cont 



9.6 
fi.5 

9.3 

14.5 
16.9 

ie.9 

8.9 

.9 

9.4 

7.1 

22.5 

16.3 
14.2 
12.2 



170.6 



200.6 



lt;5.7 



1.1.4 



r 



n 



L 



J 









445 










TABL& XU? — ConLiau«<l 


I 




:aae 


ffeiBbar ftnd Per C«nt of Articles on Each Topic 


iixtracurricular ..ctlvities 


1946 - 


1947 


1947 - 1948 


voragtt 


.i b©r of 
..ruiclas 


Tor 
>ont 


:. umber of 
rticloa 


: or 

Gunt 


/er 

Oent 


BRA 


452 
3S5 


11.9 
lo.o 
10.5 


379 

44d 
305 


>.7 


10,8 
12.2 

e.6 


'ill 


80 
329 
235 


6.9 

12.9 

7.3 


139 
323 

147 


4.7 


7.2 

11.1 

6.0 


Si 


156 
112 
24^ 


5.4 
5.4 

C.4 


252 

193 

205 


.0 
5.1 


5.7 
6.0 
5.7 




22a 
580 
179 


5.7 

10.1 
12.7 


251 
32s 
186 


.4 
-.3 


6.0 

7.7 

10.3 




191 
436 
276 


15.5 

10.2 

5.0 


15X 
219 
222 


' • I.' 
U7 
.^.4 


12.5 
7.4 

4.2 


otal 




U2.5 




100.6 


121.4 


veraj^e 




9.5 




6.7 


.1 


ftok 


3 


1' 




• 







446 



l.i: ■'- 

of 
I.ev.'s- 




r Cent of Artlel«» on ;.. . _^ _ 


- 




dzslxil strati on iind Related Topics 




1946 - 


1947 


1947 - 1948 


-worage 


NuQbor of 
Articles 


lor 

-Tont 


:.unber oi' 
Articles 


>■• 


Tor 
Cent 


An 

BtA 
BBT 


377 
3U 
327 


9.9 

7.0 

.9 


289 
295 

242 


• > 


0.7 

6.1 
7.1 


LCA. 


105 
1S7 
227 


V.l 

7.3 
7.1 


72 
237 

147 


3.9 

L.9 

4.7 


0.5 
7.1 
5.9 


WW 
MIS 


lei 
127 

3oa 


6.3 
o.l 
B.O 


U3 
132 
249 


4.3 
4.5 
1,2 


5.3 
5.3 
7.1 


NOS 

soil 


372 
535 
112 


9.4 
9.4 
7.9 


277 
365 
112 


7.0 
6.0 
4.7 


^.2 
V.7 
6.3 


3T 


123 
279 

496 


10,0 
.0 


88 
204 
34a 


5.6 
4.4 
5.4 


7.8 
5.5 
7.2 


Total 




121.9 




-n.4 


101. i» 


^▼•rat-e 




S.l 




5.4 


6.7 


itnv 








4 



r 



n 



L 



J 



w',7 



TASLE aXIV — -oixliiueu 



Of 


ISuraber and Per 


Cent of Articles on r^ach 


Topic 














vCi.OOl 


•iubllc . relations 














1946 - 1947 


1947 - 1946 


/verui:e 


Number of 


i er 


I.'iuaber of 


i ur 


/er 




Articles 


Cent 


.-.rticlea 


:ent 


Jtjnt 


ATT 


497 


13.1 


215 


1^.5 


V.3 


Sdk 


164 


3.5 


3o2 


-.3 


5.1 


BRT 


16S 


4.6 


343 


7.5 


0.0 


. , 


i^5 


7.4 


119 


6.4 


0.9 




211 


^.3 


2S1 


>M 


c:.2 


UA? 


307 


V.5 


340 


...1. 


10.3 


mv 


95 


3.3 


211 


%o 


4.2 


103 


63 


3.0 


201 


(..8 


4.9 


ROI 


157 


4.1 


24< 


^•1 


5.1 


R03 


224 


5.6 


293 


7.5 


-.6 


HOTP 


175 


3.1 


440 


7.2 


5.1 


OV 


92 


6,5 


190 


CO 


7.2 




109 


6,S 


150 


9.6 


9.2 




252 


5.9 


31S 


:.£» 


•.V.4 


il 


207 


3.7 


260 


■v.o 




Total 




:o,7 




105.9 


9S.3 


Average 




0*0 




7.1 


;..6 


^ak 








5 



r 



n 



L 



J 



us 



TAfiLa Ax>^V >- ^o..uirii.oa 



of 


Kunb«r and I'er Cent 


> of Articles on Lech Topio 
















i 


uiachera 






pap«r 












1946 


- 1947 


1947 - 1946 


'.verai;e 


Nuaber of 


f er 


:>uEiber of 


. or 


Per 




Art Idea 


Junt 


Articles 


.ont 


3ent 


ATT 


/ 


4«t> 


204 


5.2 


4.9 


SEA 




5.7 


3oo 


C.3 


o.O 


aaT 


-iui 


5,5 


277 


6.1 


5.3 




72 


b.2 


ol 


3.3 


4.7 




179 


7.0 


203 


5.9 


o«4 




114 


3.5 


109 


3.6 


3.5 




141 


4.9 


lo2 


3.8 


4.3 




101 


^.6 


109 


3.7 


4.2 


- 


}ii7 


7.9 


334 


<J.3 


o.l 




2i3 


tj.6 


312 


7.9 


7.2 




k'm- 


7.3 


5U7 


2.3 


7.a 




^5 


6.0 


U6 


4.9 


5.4 




117 


9.5 


146 


9.4 


9.4 




249 


5.^ 


-214 


ii-.O 


5.2 




337 


,.1 


J ^'3 


:5.o 


5.5 


:otai 




91.4 




• -> 


:o.4 


i'uge 




0.1 




:.a 


5.9 


1 
1 










6 



r 



n 



L 



J 









449 








TABLli XLI? — -ontinuod 






HasM 
of 


Number and i or Oont of Ait ic lea 


on ;jach 'i?o,ji 


c 










Curriculiin 














19^0 - 1947 


194/ - 194 




. vcrage 


Number of 


i'er 




j cr 


i'or 




Articles 


Oont 


. w^^^u;. 


:cr.t 


■ent 




133 




135 


3.5 


3.5 




-14 


•~.i» 


200 


^.5 


3.9 




ioO 


H • V' 


107 


3.6 


4.3 




r3 




58 


3.1 


3.« 


mA 


17^ 


, ' 


16(J 


'■< 


5.« 


m 


127 


' 


119 




3.9 


■ 


99 


..4 


7d 


1.9 


2.6 


■ 


75 


^ ♦ - 


63 


2.1 


2.9 


■ 


157 


*» ♦ -L. 


134 


^.3 


^.7 


■ 


155 




139 


3.5 


3.7 


!WTP 


253 


H e^ 


195 


3.2 


}.B 


3W 


102 


.' ♦ *- 


160 


7.6 


7.4 




119 


'.7 


106 


6.e 


a. 4 


Jtj 


109 


^..5 


74 


1.6 


2.1 


3T 


i9S 


->«^ 


150 


^.^ 


3.0 


iOtal 




70.4 




54.8 


t2»e 


rag* 




4.7 




3.7 


4.2 


-.iLik 






7 



r 



L 



J 



450 



TABLE XLI7 .- :ont>inu»4 



of 


NuiRber and P«r Cent of Articloa on acn Vopic 


rinane* 


1940 - 1947 


1947 - 194^ 


,verao« 


Huabor of 
Articlo3 


Cent 


/..ticloa 


.jat 


. or 
-ont 


it 


12a 

112 

7 

43 

S2 

$6 

67 
50 

115 

139 
23^ 

160 


3.4 
2.3 
2.2 

3.7 
3.2 

2.7 

2.3 

2.4 
3.0 

3.5 
4.1 
3.8 

4.1 
2.9 
2.9 


71 
77 

lo2 

40 
72 
71 

3 

J} 
125 

129 
155 

42 

32 

74 

140 


1.8 
1.3 
2.2 

2.1 
2.1 
2.3 

1.5 
1.1 
3.1 

3.3 
2.5 

1.8 

2.0 
1.6 
2.2 


2.6 

1.8 

2.2 

2.9 
2.7 
-.5 

1.9 
1.7 
3.1 

3.4 

3.3 

3.1 

2.3 
2.6 


uuitl 




46.5 




.'-'•/ 


36.9 


-V ■ u 




3.1 




2.1 


2.6 


\.mnk 


6 















r 



n 



L 



J 







?/^LE XMl 


45X 






'tarn 
of 


! arber and Ter Cent of Articles on Lach fonlc 


*iur.Jii 


194''> - 1947 


1947 • 1943 


Avereic* 


liuaber of 
Articles 


. er 
Cent 


iiusibor of 
Articles 


i'or 
Gent 


lor 
Cent 


f 


53 

'A. 

1 

41 

35 

40 

45 
56 
21 

23 
126 

93 


1.4 
1.7 
2.1 

v.l 

1,6 
1.3 

1.2 
1.1 
1.0 

1.2 

1.0 

1.5 

1.9 

2.9 

- • ' 


52 

130 
103 

5 

142 
36 

35 

20 
71 

64 

100 

22 

34 
134 

;a7 


1.3 
-.3 

2.2 

U.3 
A.l 

— • »- 

U.9 
0.7 
i.(J 

1.6 

1.6 
0.9 

2.2 
2.9 

i.a 


1.3 
2.0 
2,2 

0.2 
2.9 
1.3 

1.1 

0.9 
1.4 

1.4 
1.3 

1.2 

2.1 

::.9 

1.6 


total 




21.7 




25. o 


-4.5 


Iferag* 




1.5 




1.7 


- • *- 


Iftak 


9 


i 



r 



n 



L 



J 



TAflLi. ^iV — i^ 


[ 






ltec« 
of 

or 


uriber end P&r Cent of Articles on ^:ach Topic 


,:uildlr.~3 :;•' "hyalcal -qui^ait 


19Z»L> - 1%7 


1%7 - i->4-^ 


'.vorai-:© 


;.\4: :'.:or of 


?er 
Jent 




rcr 
Cent 


; er 
:ent 


1 


97 

62 

20 
31 
49 

ZB 

19 
64 

67 

103 

22 

29 

90 

140 


2.6 
1.4 
1.7 

1.7 

1.2 
l.P 

1,0 

0.9 
1,6 

1.7 

1.6 

2.4 
2.1 

2.5 


52 

60 

o4 

20 
32 
29 

26 
23 

71 

Be 

149 
25 

41 
59 
81 


i.3 
1.0 
1.4 

l.i 
1.1 
1.6 

0«6 
0.8 
l.£ 

2.2 
2.4 
1.1 

2.t 
1.3 
1.2 


1.9 
1.2 
i.5 

1.4 

-L.I 

i.3 

o.d 
i.7 

2.0 
2.1 
1.4 

2.5 
1.7 

1.) 


al 




25.7 




2G.9 


-c>.3 


^T«rafC* 




1.7 




1.4 


1.5 


.A 


10 





r 



n 



L 



J 









453 










TABL 


^ -^iv — jd^ 






I.uabor and 


rer Jent of Articles on Lacli 


Topic 
















Rfta«&rch 




c_ 


1940 - 1947 


1947 - 194ti 


Avorase 


■ uTiber :)f 


Per 




or of 


J or 


; or 




Artie lea 


::eiit 




-olos 


■.:or,t 


'ant 


kTT 


53 


i.4 




37 


l.u 


1.2 


lU 


6fi 


i.4 




39 


0.7 


1.0 


Mtr 


71 


1.9 




ua 


1.5 


1.7 




30 


^.6 




25 


1.3 


2.0 




45 


l.S 




27 


0,8 


1.3 


•■~ 


41 


1.3 




27 


0.9 


1.1 




25 


0.9 




18 


0.4 


0.6 




22 


1.1 




12 


J, 4 


0.8 




74 


1.9 




50 


1.2 


1.6 


.) 


39 


1.0 




36 


0.9 


0.9 


'; 


144 


2.5 




101 


1.7 


2.1 




46 


3.3 




38 


1.6 


2.5 




51 


4.1 




32 


2.0 


3.0 




25 


J. 6 




14 


0.3 


0.4 




74 


1.3 




52 


o.a 


1.1 


1; 




27.1 




15.5 


21.3 


..ra;jO 




i.a 




1.0 


1.4 


lank 








11 



r 



n 



L 



J 







TABLE . 


iCLIV — Continued 




Name 
of 


i;iiaber and Per Cent of Articles on ^ach Topic 












Psychology and Teaching Methods 




News- 

prper 








1946 - 


1947 


1947 - 194ii 


.vera^e 


Niimber of 


Per 


liumber of 


Per 


Per 




Articles 


Cent 


Articles 


Cent 


Cent 


ATT 


23 


0.7 


17 


0.4 


U.6 




34 


0.7 


36 


0.6 


0,7 


■- 


23 


0.6 


29 


0.6 


0.6 


CDS 


7 


0.6 


2 


0.1 


0.3 


LDA 


19 


O.S 


19 


0.5 


0.6 


LCAP 


39 


1.2 


19 


0.6 


0.9 


yr^ 


22 


O.g 


14 


0.3 


0.6 


MNo 


53 


3.0 


106 


3.6 


3.3 


NOI 


49 


1.3 


65 


1.6 


1.4 


NOS 


44 


1.1 


21 


0.6 


0.9 


NOTP 


72 


1.3 


40 


0.7 


1.0 


OW 


17 


1.2 


35 


1.5 


1.3 


RDL 


19 


1.5 


14 


0.9 


1.2 


3J 


23 


0.5 


4 


0.1 


0.3 


3T 


25 


0.5 


26 


0.4 


0.4 


Total 




15.3 




12.5 


14.1 


Average 




1.1 




O'.S 


1.0 


Sank 






12 



r 



n 



L 



J 



455 







TABLB XLIV — Continue^ 






Nar:« 
of 


liuciber and Per Gent of 


Artlcloa on ::ach V 


>piC 












All Topics 






NevfS- 










1946 . 1947 


1947 - 194i> 


N'unber of 


P«r 




Lumber of 


Per 




Articles 


'^erit 




Articles 


3ent 


ATT 


3795 


100. Q 




3900 


100.0 


"■w\ 


kB9B 


100,0 




5768 


luO.O 


.i 


3663 


100,0 




45^1 


ia.'.o 


J 


1154 


100.0 




1667 


luo.o 


\ 


2552 


lOu.O 




3460 


100.0 


;.;P 


J219 


100.0 




3073 


100. 


»l 


2681 


lOQ.O 




4220 


I'JO.O 


3 


2052 


100.0 




2940 


100.0 


T 


3^62 


100.0 




4031 


100,0 


'3 


3976 


100.0 




3940 


100,0 


j':i 


5709 


^A).C 




6120 


lUO.O 




1409 


uo.o 




2363 


100.0 


-L 


1232 


IcO.O 




1570 


100,0 


.J 


4294 


ll^O.O 




4559 


100,0 


it 


5534 


100,0 




6472 


100.0 


otal 


502fSO 


1500.0 


5e?964 


1500,0 


vora."e 




100.0 




IwO.O 


1 











r 



n 



L 



J 



. .. „-.. 


.. . -, . 


45C 
TABUS ILV 


X w^ Xi« 


of 
papar 


Per Cent of 3pi»ce Occupied by Topics 


t uplls /iecelving Iiantlon 


194u - 1947 


1947 - 1946 


Averaso 


dumber of 
Colimn 
Inches 


For Gent 
of 
ipace 


liucber of 

"OlUOSi 

Inches 


Per Cent 

of 
Jpace 


I'QT Cent 

of 

J pace 


ABD 
UBS 

J 

3D 

t 


E21.6 

434.7 

72.5 

,>4«4 

^ . * < 

^■^3.2 

7w^.7 

51:'^.S 

" '7 
• i 

•■ -^ ^ • ■>- 

425.6 


2!^.3 

..;:.4 

0.5 

25.9 

rr:..3 
23.7 

:23.9 

.;,..l 

■■ ■ • - 

1^..9 


:;7j.3 
561.4 

1022.9 

■:-o.i 

- ■ • I 

- - • ^r 

662.1 


3o.o 

25.7 
2o.7 

37.0 

29.1 
35.7 

24.4 

32.6 
16.7 
32.8 

30.9 


2^.3 

30.6 

8.5 

25.fi 
26.5 
30.3 

26.5 
36.2 
27*5 

2^.9 
13.7 
28.7 

24.9 


'tal 




305.7 




330.4 




Average 




23.5 




30.0 


26.8 


r<ank 


1 











r 



n 



L 



J 



457 



TABUi xLV — -Continued 



Mum 

of 


Per Cent of Space Occupied by Topics 


Adsiinistration and Jielated :roblens 


1746 - 1947 


1947 - 1948 


..veraoe 


-<OA.u>".';r. 
Inchcc 


.or Cent 
of 
Jpace 


;■; ._• 


er Cent 

of 
jpace 


i or Cent 
of 
-^pace 




fi3o.l 

3.?2.7 

605.^ 

1466.1 

612.6 

357. S 

30o,9 
379.0 

395.9 
551.7 

27O.0 

1054.2 


2S.9 
24.0 
46.0 

28.0 
31.6 

1%5 

x3.t 
ll.O 
lo.5 

19.3 
^^9.1 

o.l 

46.9 


219.4 

39t5.2 
3S8.9 
377.2 

919.4 
39^.4 
503.9 

360.4*. 

542.0 

90.2 

204. S 


12.7 

15.2 

10.6 
10.9 

26.1 
13.7 
17.0 

14.5 

22,2 

i.2 

9.6 


2^,9 

ic;.3 

46.0 

23.1 
21.1 
13.2 

19.9 

12.4 
lo.8 

lo.9 

35.6 

5.7 

2S.3 


Total 




.^)C,.^ 




i5B.7 




.;rago 




26.1 




14.4 


20.3 




2 







r 



n 



L 



J 







45e 










. ..^^ .^V — -ysiVinu^ 




..«. c 




Fer Cer.t of Jpac« Occupldd by Topics 




oi 










. ap«r 




Athlotlcs 




1946 . 


1947 


1947 - l'^4S 


.VuVH-.Q 


I^u^fiber of 


I'cr Cent 


oer of 


. «r Gent 


• =r ;ont 






of 


.Diuun 


of 






.. i4 Vj -.<J J 


^pace 


inches 


..puce 


.<i 












C.3 




• > 


- > 


•" 


•* 




. 


., 


181.2 


i.0.4 


lu.2 




jy.i 


«••/ 


- 


- 


4.7 






_- 


275.6 


1^.0 


11.6 




J 




319.1 


f.7 


.-.e 




-^7»o 


i.a 


449.1 


12.9 


14.5 




t t ■ cj 


15.6 


433.1 


12.3 


13.9 




^/-.l 


l/,.6 


526.4 


1^-5.2 


1^.5 




2^5.6 


10.2 


446.7 


15.1 


12.7 




145.3 


7.0 


15C.0 


6.0 


6.5 




64 ,{3 


5.7 


306.5 


12.5 


9.1 




527.5 


15.4 


233.2 


£.4 


U.9 


- 


1?5.9 


*^7 


2a. 5 


12.3 


10.5 


-al 




135. g 




129.4 




rage 




10. 4 




ll.g 


11.1 


:.k 








3 



r 



n 



L 



J 



459 



TABL* XL? —Continued 















Haae 




r«r 'ent of . 


jpaoe Occupied by Topics 




-•■a. 


Hone 4jeau>nstr8tlon ».ork 


,.:^er 


1946 - 


1947 


1947 - 1943 


vorai:« 




Nuaber of 

ColUi.iTj 


cr Gent 
of 


.UEnber of 

v^OlUfiUi 


Per Cent 
of 


i or Cent 
of 




Inc'-.oi;. 


opAO« 


Inches 


-*pac8 


opace 


4BD 


204.5 

314.7 

20.0 


7.0 

1-^.2 
>.l 


.7i.7 


-3.3 


7.0 

13.3 

3.1 


X 


193.3 

427.7 

224.2 


''.9 
-.2 
?.6 


- 1<. / 


• 
• 


i3.2 
7.5 

9.5 






13.5 
13.2 
13.4 


..-Vvl^- 


7.1 
7.3 
4.7 


io.3 

10.3 
9.0 




22e,7 

79.1 

869.0 


ii.l 

7.0 

25.3 




• 


9.6 
13.9 
19.9 


.■?G 


1?.6 


» / 


210.t 


9.B 


5.6 


Total 




133.2 




no. 4 




^▼era=:e 




10.3 




10.0 


iO.2 


tank 








4 



r 



n 



L 



J 



4cO 







TABLE XLY — :.-;;i^j:yA^ 






of 
News- 
paper 


Per Cent of cipace Occupied by Topics 


^tracurricular '.ctivitiea 


L)k:j - 1947 


1947 - 194^ 


veraije 


or of 
J. actios 


or Gent 
of 

.■pace 


Iftuaber of 
Coliuan 
Inches 


: er Cent 
of 

,'aco 


i'ar Cent 

of 

-■pace 


;3D 

r 


263.0 
154.6 
liO.3 

1S4.5 
2?4.i 
275.3 

219.5 
153.2 

150.0 

211.9 

^3.9 

151.2 

225.4 


9.1 

d.O 

15.3 

7.5 

7.0 

7.7 
%5 

7.a 

-.3 

7.5 
i..4 

10.0 


110.4 

159.7 

396.3 
2U.3 

105.5 
172.3 
411.7 

1S7.S 

1.^1.7 
134.6 

229.6 


6.4 

*• 

7.3 
IQ.S 

0.1 

3.0 

5.9 

13.9 

7.6 
7.4 
4.6 

10.7 


al 

7.2 
15.3 

7.4 
6'. 5 
6.6 

5.4 
10.8 

9.0 

7.4 
4.6 

lu,4 


F 

^cal 




iOo.4 




53.9 




vijrage 




0.2 




7.6 


7.9 


itnk 


5 


1 





r 



n 



L 



J 







TABLK XLV , 


—Continued 






of 


t ar Cent of Jpac« Ooeupied by Topios 














Jchool-r*ubllc iielatlons 




paper 








19i»6 - 


1947 


1947 - 1946 


-vepare 


Kuiaber of 


yr Cent 


. uciijva' o . 


^r Cent 


i or C«rit 




wOjkUiTXi 


of 


.'oiuinn 


of 


of 




Incnes 


^pac« 


-acnes 


jpace 


->pace 




£5.3 


2.9 


^ 


^ 


^.9 




95.6 


4.9 


'^ r: 

-. ; u ^ 


2.5 


3.7 




64.2 


':^5 


- 


" 


7.5 




1 .', \^ t 


XV « . 


197.«5 


J • -» 


7.5 






6»6 


340.2 


9.3 


C.O 




^-^.> 


5.'^ 


295.6 


8.5 


7.1 


wmm 


1/.'=*1 


f. 


245.7 


7.0 


6.0 


m 


. . .- - 


7.7 


194.5 


6.7 


7.2 


m 


iii^ j.»v^ 


10.'^ 


406.0 


13.7 


12.3 


m. 


177.5 




350.6 


U.l 


a.. 3 


m 


105. a 


9.4 


170.2 


7.0 


• . 


f 


341.3 


10.0 


215.7 


7.7 


^m > 


•Mri 


45.6 


2.0 


105.6 


4.9 


3.4 


tal 




g?. 




90.5 




• i'age 




6.7 




t^2 


7.4 


atC 






6 



r 



n 



L 



J 







«p > rj : • I 


tr _ J 










~" 




of 


r Cant of >/pace Occupied by Topics 








J l>er 




.'icumce 




1940 - 


^V47 


1947 - 194^ 


Avcra>::o 


NuiabCNT of 


; er Jont 


. usbor of 


:er :ent 


. or Cent 




-'oiuian 


of 


.olirnn 


of 


of 




.nci;d6 


-i;^aco 


^nc 


./•ace 


.pace 




il3.2 


3.9 


. 


. 


3.9 




2?.l 


1.5 


36,5 


t:.o 


3-2 




47.^ 


r 


« 


- 


5.6 




1:^2.5 


c.o 


219*1 


10. 


7,5 


3., 


.5 


.3 


0I3.3 


16.6 


y.5 


:Z 


• 1 


^.J 


52.4 


1.5 


1.8 




135.3 


.'>.7 


'24.7 


6.4 


•;.5 








.7 


5.1 


V.3 


J 


.1 


.!.• ^ 


. .6 


U.O 


3.6 




^5.6 


2.2 


9i.O 


3.7 


) 




31.1 


' • ' 


.2 


5.9 


,.4 




i54.4 


■i- • ,»* 


.^.0 


22.0 


12.2 




■> r'', *> 


'".1 


312.9 


U.6 


v.-.f* 


-VbT_ c 








r^.f? 


6.1 



r 



n 



L 



J 







TABLE JU.7 ..Continual 
r Cant of dpac« Ooeupiad by 






of 


Pe 


Topi«s 
















Teachers 






paper 










1946 


- 1947 


19^? . 


. 194a 


^wrmt^9 


:. : >«r of 


Per 3ent 


;unber of 


ror Cent 


roT Cent 




JO^UCUl 


of 


:olunn 


of 


of 




lnch«8 


ipaea 


Inches 


.:)aco 


Jpace 


«•.»[) 


102,5 


3#5 


^ 


^ 


3.5 


■; 


l'JS.5 


5.5 


62.7 


3.6 


4.5 




9.2 


1.0 


• 


• 


1.0 




77, 5 


3.2 


129.2 


5.9 


4.6 




145.7 


3.1 


93.2 


2.6 


2.8 


uv 


171.6 


4.3 


140.4 


4.x 


4.2 


■JCK 


174.4 


6.1 


65.7 


1.9 


4.0 


6 


90.4 


3.3 


94.2 


3.3 


3.3 


VJ 


S5.4 


3.7 


6i»e 


-^.X 


2.9 




164.H 


8.0 


101.7 


4.1 


6.0 




27.9 


2.5 


31.0 


1.3 


1.9 




134.2 


3.9 


33.4 


1.2 


2.6 


■ ■ 3 


^:}.4 


2.4 


29.9 


1.4 


1.9 


rotal 




50.5 




31.5 




average 




3.9 




2.9 


:j.4 


Sank 








B 



r 



n 



L 



J 



46^ 



..ncho 



149.7 
11.7 

^9.3 
12.9 

122.8 



5.2 

2.4 

1.2 
3.6 



.2.1 



^urriculun 



:-».9 



-0.9 

-11.9 

1.0 

^3.4 



1.1 



of 
ace 



3.3 
/•2 

5.9 



2.7 

1.7 

1.0 



-.7 



r 



n 



L 



J 









465 










TABLH 


illV --Continued 




;.a.-:e 
of 




'^or Cent of J 


pace Occupied by Topics 
















ilesearch 




..ew3« 
paper 










1946 - 


1947 


19^7 - 194a 


vera 


NuBib«r of 


i ar Cent 


:ivuaber of 


er >ent 


- cr ;ent 




voluon 


of 


.oluan 


of 


of 




Inch33 


>jp&ce 


Inches 


.vpace 


.pace 


^ 


83.5 


2.9 


. 




2.9 


I^B 


49.6 


2.6 


59.2 


^.4 


3.0 


r^ 


25.3 


J.O 


- 


- 


3.0 


H^ 


13.7 


C.6 


^..4 


0.3 


0.5 


|H^ 


17.9 


0.4 


25.7 


0.7 


0.6 


ne 


74.5 


1.9 


24.4 


0.7 


1.3 


■hi 


65.9 


2.3 


90.1 


..... 


2.5 


|Hv 


42.2 


1.5 


e.o 


-* « J- 


0.9 


IfrBD 


34.5 


1.5 


53 .a 


-i. •■-- 


1.6 


Rp 


29.5 


1.4 


44.7 


• 


i.6 


2a.3 


2,5 


9.9 


•'. 


1.4 


w 


30.2 


^.9 


25.1 


0.9 


0.9 


IfPC 


23.0 


1.0 


6»1 


- 


0.7 


l^tal 




22.5 




13.2 




|lverftg« 




1.7 




.: • ,.' 


1.4 


-Jt 








10 



r 



n 



L 



J 



46o 






-diQ£8 and Pbyaioal Lqulp; 



S 



lA'r 

)J 

rpG 



Total 
lank 



19-.-. - 


:.~'.7 


aer oi 


or 


.uian 

;che3 






1.7 
1.7 
^'.3 


^, •': 


^.2 

0.5 




0.2 
1.6 


■.J 


2.5 
1.5 
1.0 



.1.3 



15.7 



1 "i.T — " ~Lr* 




..nciies 




jnt 

-0 


33.2 

0.0 
38.9 
13.8 

113.9 

44.2 
6.C 

4i5.4 
11.1 

23.4 

u6.4 


^ • 

0.0 
1.1 
0.4 

3.3 

U5 
0.2 

1.9 

vJ.5 
'■^ • •■ 


0.4 
1.6 
^■.5 

1.7 

1.2 

0.9 

2.2 

1.0 




14.8 






1.3 





r 



n 



L 



J 



467 



TAB 



*mJ Aiirfll ••^Jli^ 



• inuMi 



ox 


P«r 


C^dat of opAoe Occupi«<l by Topics 












.' 




Alutani 






194o - 


1947 


1947 - 194fi 


AT«r«g« 


Number of 


c-r ei-t 


^ J. } J. 


r ent 


or Joiit 




Coliaan 


_,■, 


■>J - -^ .. . . 


.-,..^' 


of 




lJEieh«8 


-,--._•- 


-^iic..u.-i 


-^acti 


splice 




26,7 


0.9 


^ 




0.9 




2.5 


0.1 


12.4 


- • . 


0.4 




16. i^ 


2.W 


- 


- 


2.0 




21.3 


0.9 


17.S 


O.d 


o«a 




14.3 


0.3 


42.4 


1.2 


o.d 




54.1 


1.4 


39.6 


1.1 


1.3 




165.3 


0.7 


17.1 


0.5 


0.6 




34.9 


1.3 


35.0 


1.2 


1.3 




29.1 


1.3 


0.0 


0.0 


0.6 




11.6 


0.6 


52 .a 


2.1 


1.4 




-0.0 


0,0 


39.a 


1.6 


'■^ .o 




0.0 


0,0 


35.a 


1.3 


0.7 




0.0 


0.0 


23.6 


1.1 


0.6 


..-al 




?,5 




il.o 




r*g» 




0.7 




1.1 


0.9 


uiiik 








12 



r 



1 



L 



J 



466 



?ABLK X!V — ' :r.tim»ovi 



or >ent or* ^pace uccupitd by Topics 



ijit-: - 1947 



§ni 



Kvera o 






17.3 



11,2 
0,2 



11. 

0,: 



.3 

.4 

.0 

0.9 
1.3 

1.5 

;./> 

.4 

i.5 

.3 

.0 



.7 



;4« 



'.0 

3.1 
30.1 

0.0 

3.f 

0.0 

12.2 

10.7 

3«.4 

0.0 

0.0 



u.l 

0.0 



-.3 
1.1 



0.1 
0.0 
0.4 


0.8 

-.2 


0.4 

1.6 
c. 


i.O 


• 


• 


: 


, 



r 



n 



L 



J 



469 



TABU JkLV -•CoBftimi 





I'er J 


ent of .ipace 


Occupiod by " 


'wtpies 




of 




All 


Topics 






..ows- 












r**? pQr 


1946 - 1947 


1947 - 194« 


voru e 




{iupiber of 

volucin 
Inches 


Per Cent 

of 
3 pace 


::u3>b«r of 


i er Cent 

of 

ipuce 


of 
opace 


/IBO 

33B 


2903,2 

1944.5 

o53.4 


lOu.O 


1734.4 


100,0 


100.0 




■^-*-'i • - 




.-piJ.O 
3470,1 


lUv.J 

lOU.O 
100,0 


100,0 
100,0 
100,0 


HQJ 

LPBD 


2855.1 
2779.0 
2305.2 


iuu,0 
100,0 


3513.3 
2904.1 
2964«d 


loc.J 

luo,j 
100.0 


100,0 
100,0 

100,0 


M£ 


2061,: 
1123.1 

3426.0 


100,0 


2465.6 
244^.0 
2791.7 


IC. . -. 

luo.w 

100,0 


_.. .0 
lOv^vO 


^ a 


2250.3 


100,0 


2144.5 


100,0 


100,0 



r 



n 



L 



J 



470 



Auviuaf i, iy^t 



; on c.ac;i Topic 



UkIIs Aoceiving 2 ention 



1946 


- 1947 


1947 - 


. I94S 


or of 
. __cle3 


.cilt. 


., 




112 
60 
11 


ly.i 


S7 


3S.2 


102 


23I0 


113 
131 

149 


34.9 

27..^ 


73 


- ,•'•-- 


125 

17ii 

c:i 


32,0 
44.3 


74 

13 

110 


24.7 
10.2 
25.2 


103 

60 

103 


34!' 


58 


26.9 


•- 


31.2 




322.6 




352.7 




24.'- 




32. 



VQrag« 



..c. 



29.6 
31.7 
13.1 

32.9 

27.2 
28.4 

26.1 
42.0 
25.5 

28.5 
15.3 
29.7 

29.0 



26.4 



r 



n 



L 



J 



471 





iM^i^iSr -^ixa > vi' v«i 


ol 






__._ 






. ^•*' 


19'*^ 


- lA 




.u;i -or ^. 




.*■ 




rticlea 




.Qi'X 




3^ 




10.-. 




ao 




, 




4 




• 




52 








56 




^ 




57 




. 




il 




• 




J3 




'via 




29 




lj.4 


■^ 




luw«l 


- -" 


^ .— 


— 






, 





,1 — ^ 

1/^7 - 1/.. 
rtlcl- 

35 



05 
56 
55 

17 
33 

3e 

43 



•' 


o 




r 




.0 

4.d 


it-.? 

• 


12.7 
.1 

.J 


I':.: 

• - 


16.« 

14.7 

13.9 


5.3 

- • 


.2 

'.5 

14 .0 


15.1 


14.5 


i--- .^ 


l-i.3 



r 



n 



L 



J 



472 



TABLE ^LVI —Continued 



Of 

paper 


LL;ibcr rid . er Jent of Articles on t^ach Topic 


..octracurricular Activities 


1946 - 1947 


1947 - 1943 


..vjriit:e 


Number of 
Articles 


ler 
Cent 


uuffiber of 
Articles 


icr 




1 r;ri 

ccw 

D£ 
DC 

iJi LliJ 

ME 
NAP 

OJ 

?PG 


42 
24 
20 

41 
45 
43 

36 
27 

25 

40 
19 
27 

43 


11.1 

10,1 
23. g 

11.4 

10.9 
9.7 

11.3 
7.2 

9.3 

13.4 
14.6 

0.2 

19.9 


20 

42 

63 
45 

19 

51 

30 

40 
31 

42 


■l-J) • ^ 

Ivy. ti 

4.6 

7.0 
15.0 

9.4 

13.7 
10.3 


11.1 

9.5 
23.8 

U.2 
12.2 

10.0 

5.0 

7.1 

12.2 

11.4 

14.3 

6.2 

17. t 


Total 




159.1 




120. S 




Average 




12.2 




11.0 


11.6 


Rank 


3 













r 



n 



L 



J 



473 







TAfiLc 


idtXl — JontinueJ 




'.ncie 
of 


. uniber unci Var Jent of Aiticlea on ;iach 


Topic 








ncininiatration and Related Topics 




paper 






i';4o - 1947 


1947 - 194c 


\veraKe 


Kuaber of 


j or 


Nviffiber of 


' er 


Per 




Articles 


:ent 


irticles 


-ont 


ent 




53 


14,0 






14.0 


,y 


41 


17.3 


26 


1-.3 


U.6 




18 


-1.4 


- 




^1.4 




43 


12.0 


26 


e,o 


10.0 




52 


12,0 


37 


7.9 


10.3 




53 


11.9 


31 


7.0 


9.5 




35 


1..4 


55 


14.1 


12.3 


. 


22 


5.9 


22 


5.5 


5.7 


J 


33 


12.3 


29 


^-.;- 


10.4 




33 


11.0 


22 


., 


9.0 




35 


27.4 


26 


0.6 


18.1 




29 


0.6 


11 


3.6 


^.1 




3t! 


17.6 


15 


• ■ f- 


11.5 


I'otal 




it;o.4 




oc.O 




. -rage 




13.9 




• 


11.0 


iank 




4 















r 



n 



L 



J 



^74 



TABLE ILVI — :o:Xinuo<l 







•b 


er and Per 


C«nt of Articlea on jich Topic 














Fioae 


Denoustration Uork 




ewa- 










, ■u /^uV 


1^40 - 


1947 


1947 - 194a 


Averai^e 




Uuaber ol 




. or 


'.'unber ol 


.^ V 


. er 




..rticies 




oat 






:ent 


ABD 


51 

42 

3 




^^3 

17.7 

^.5 


io 


7.^ 


:.3 

12.3 
3.6 




12 
57 

o3 




3.1 


36 

25 

:4 


11.1 

!'.3 
U.5 


7.1 
-.5 

-4.3 


J 


14 
3 

4 




4.2 
1.5 


37 
34 

18 


^5 
0.5 
5.3 


3.4 




40 

10 
16 




13.4 
7.B 

3.6 


36 

00 
43 


11.3 
20.3 
14.3 


12.4 

14.0 

^0 


' 


5 




?.3 


41 


14.9 


. J 


Total 




- 


■ V • •^ 




122.0 




jra :e 




•;.3 




11. 1 


2 


.-•■.k 











r 



1 



L 



J 



475 



tAOLi J^yi — Continued 



of 

,0W3- 

paper 


tiuober and ;'br Cent of Articles on £a«h Topic 


achool-iubllc rlelatlona 


1940 - 1947 


194'/ - l'?i*ti 


Average 


JOT Of 

nicies 


. or 

:ent 


-oer 01 
ruiclea 


: er 

:ont 


Per 

Cent 


ABD 
BBB 

iJC 
OJ 

no 


17 

24 
41 
26 

17 
30 
35 

30 
16 
44 


4.5 
3.4 

9.5 

6.7 
9.9 

5.8 

5.1 

i^.l 

13.1 

IQ.O 
12.5 
10.1 

3.7 


9 

26 

52 
37 

2a 
34 

o3 

S5 

y9 

36 

18 


3.9 

5.0 

11.0 

S.4 

7.2 

8.5 

U.5 

17.2 
13.2 
12.0 


4.5 
3.7 
9.5 

7.4 

10.4 

7.1 

6.1 
8.3 

I5.fi 

13.6 
12.fi 
11.1 

.1 


Total 




102.4 




114.4 




Average 




7.9 




lu.4 


9.2 


Unk 


6 













r 



n 



L 



J 



476 



TAflLii iLVl — :onLinu«ci 



of 


ur.:ber una : «r Ceiit of Articlea oii uikcii Topic 


Teaohers 


1940 - 1947 


1947 - 1946 


AVorai;e 


Nurr.ber of 

.••rtioloc 


ont 


i' o A w if w 


r 


Per 

Cent. 


J 
J 

3 J 


U 

T 

J. 

16 
15 
23 

21 
15 
14 

22 

24 


5.0 
5.9 
1.2 

4.5 
3.7 

5.2 

0.2 
4.0 
5.2 

7.4 
7.0 
%5 

3.7 


14 

26 
52 
19 

12 

16 
9 

15 
J, 

5 


'.1 

:\0 
U.O 

4.3 

3.0 

^.5 

2.6 

'r.7 

..0 
1.7 

1.6 


5.6 

6.0 

1.2 

6.3 
7.4 
4.6 

4.6 
4.2 
3.9 

6.0 

4.5 

3.6 

2.6 


lu&al 




o5.1 




49.7 




J rage 




5.0 




4.5 


4.C 


r.k 


7 









r 



n 



L 



J 



477 



TAaLi IL?I ^^Zont.: 



of 

..OWJ- 


-- 


— — 


^ J».v» v^ 1. » rf^ .jn^.j jii .u.iii» iOplC 


Currlculun 


1}^^ - 1>^7 


1947 - 1948 


•vorage 






er of 




•jr 


.i 
.i 

DC 

J 

Id 

r 


9 

2; 

12 

19 

50 
43 
30 

6 

1 

102 

J. 


2.4 
2,6 
4.8 

a.3 

2.9 
4.3 

U.8 
11.5 
11.2 

2.0 

0.8 
23.4 

0.5 


9 

7 

19 

4 
4 

6 

12 

7 

10 

3 


3.9 

2.2 
4.3 

'^.3 

1.0 

1.0 

X.6 

>.7 
2.4 
i.3 

1.0 


2.3 

i.3 
'».8 

:.3 

3.6 
-.3 

7.9 
-.2 

->.5 

:^.8 

1.6 

13.3 

0,7 


.al 




i^9.5 




2a. 9 




- 




6.9 




2. 


4.7 


.:k 


e 



r 



n 



L 



J 



478 

TABLii XLVI — 



Number and i er Cent of Articles on i^ach Topic 



inance 



- V 


■-,^ - 


1947 


1947 • 194B 


Average 




liuwbcr of 


_ 
er 


l.'uiibttr of 




:'er 


?or 




Artie lea 


-ent 


rticles 




Cent 


Cent 


.-. , 


22 








5.9 




7 


3.0 


iJ 




3.5 


3.2 




9 


Io«7 


- 






1 




16 


h.5 


o 




-. 


.^ 




16 


J. 9 


22 




. 


4.3 




11 


2.4 


7 




• 


. '■» 




la 


5.3 


23 




, » ' 


, •'-•' 




9 


2.4 


17 




4.2 


->.3 




6 


2.2 


18 




5.3 


3.7 




9 


3.0 


12 




3.7 


3.4 




7 


5.5 


13 




4.4 


4.9 




9 


2.1 


12 




4.^ 


.1 


rare 


19 


e.g 


10 




3.t 


, .2 




59.6 




4.. 






4*6 




3.9 


4.2 












9 



r 



n 



L 



J 









476 

VI —Continued 






. o•..•y- 


Humber and i er Cent of Articles on ilaoh Topic 


I inance 


^V - 1947 


■47 - 194fi 


Averat^o 


I»uwbcr ox 
Articles 


3XJt 


IVotiber of 
•rticles 


I'er 
■:«nt 


lor 
Cent 




22 
7 

9 

10 

16 
11 

la 

9 

6 

9 
7 

9 

19 


>!o 

.7 

.5 

-.9 
^.4 

5.3 

.4 

^.2 

3.0 

^.1 

fc\6 


6 

22 

7 

^3 
17 

iS 

12 
13 

12 

10 


4^2 

S3 

• r • ■- 

3.t- 


5.9 
3.2 

' -.7 

^.2 
4.3 
2.0 

.6 
.3 

,7 

-.4 
.9 
.1 

. .2 


i era re 




■'.6 




4. . 






4.6 




3.9 


4.2 


'■. ly 


9 













r 



n 



L 



J 



479 



TABL& JLLVI .~c 



■'■-3 

of 

paper 


-bor and Per Cent of Articles on ..acli Topic 


.t .;2crch 


1946 • 1947 


1947 - 194^ 


vura.^e 


Kutaber of 
.'rticles 


■ r 

k.5 

3.? 
^•^ 

c*a 

G.5 

1.3 

2.7 
1.6 
1.5 

2.0 
3.9 

0.5 

l.S 


Kunber of 
Articles 


ur 
ront 


..or.t 


.. .3 

ocv 
•c 

■ n 


17 

2 

6 

9 

o 
4 


7 

1 
2 
5 

11 

1 
7 

3 
1 

2 

1 


3.1 

0.3 
0.4 
1.1 

2.g 

0.2 
2.1 

2.5 

0.3 
J.6 

0.4 


.5 

.4 

..a 

.5 
^.5 
1.2 

2.g 
^.9 

i.a 

2.2 
2.1 

0.5 

1.1 


^•\^ 




i^.7 




13. S 








:?.3 




1.3 


1.8 


t3c 


10 















r 



n 



L 



J 







4«) 






- 


riuaber and : or :ent of Articlas on -ac . 


JiiilUlnt^a find Physical 


-qui 


194 J - 1947 


1947 - 




o 


'y^.i:\,.7 




:->: . 


l.C 

O.L 

1.3 

0.5 

1.0 

0.3 

O.L 

1.0 

1.7 
2.5 






9 
3 

1 

3 
7 
2 

2 
4 
6 

2 

3 

4 

3 


0,6 
1.7 
0.5 

0.6 
1.1 
2.2 

0.7 
2.3 

0.9 

.4 


4 


(^ 

2 

7 

4 

1 

■-) 

3 
5 

7 


-^.4 
1.5 

1.2 

• »♦ 
1.5 

0.5 

1.2 
1.0 

1.2 

0.6 
1.6 

1.3 

1.9 


.31 




17.1 




12.5 




':^ 




1.3 




:.l 


1.2 


ii 















r 



n 



L 



J 





431 










Nane 

of 


- . - - 






i9«.7 - i04S .je 


lur.bcr of 
Articles 


i er 

Jent 


1- 


■ t 


1 er 





1 

1 

6 
3 

7 

3 
7 
5 

2 







'-.3 
•- .^ 
1.2 

1.7 

0.7 
1.5 

0.9 

1.9 

1.^ 

0.7 
0.0 
0*0 


5 

7 

i 

5 

c. 


1.3 

•^ r 

1.6 

1.0 

1.3 

0.0 

2.2 
1.7 
1.7 

1.5 


1.3 

0.9 

,2 

i.6 
1.1 

c 

- • • 

'..0 
1.4 

o>.o 


^otal 




U.2 




15.3 




ATora^e 








1.4 


1.1 


Rank 


12 



r 



n 



L 



J 









452 








T.'vBLii XLYl U 






"*" 




of 


Kumber and Per Cent of Artie .^^ ^,. , ^.. . 


. * '^ 








iaycholOc*:: .thoda 




.:r.:cr 






1)46 - 19**7 


1947 - 1948 


.vvera;;e 




rer 


;.u:.iber cl 




,, 






Gent 


Articled 


^..u 


-^^.X 


^ 


2 


f 


_ 


^ 


0.5 


1 


'> 


', •:_ 


. 


n.o 


.9 




■-■■ 


'.U 


- 


- 


.0 






-' • '-" 


1 


0.3 


0.5 




'". 


1 2 


3 


0.7 


0.9 




U 


.9 





U,0 


0.4 




5 


..5 


T_ 


0.3 


0.9 


,' 


2 


J. 5 





0,0 


0.3 


iD 


2 


;*g 


2 


0.6 


-.7 




2 


0.7 


1 


0.3 


0.5 







.0 


2 


0.7 


0.4 




- 


^•5 





0.0 


0.2 


i 





J dO 


1 


0.4 


0.2 


i&l 




c.O 






jrage 




J. I. 


0.4 


0.5 


ik 




13 















r 



n 



L 



J 



483 



j:it of Arti-__- ., 



All Topics 



^al 



A vera ITS 



19:. f; -m l"*:.? 



41:^ 

373 

26t 



43c 
216 

3973 



i'or 

.9t*t 



Xuu.O 



luO.O 

1 .0 

IcO 



100,0 
100.0 

13C0,0 

100.0 



1947 - l94iJ 



er of 



.QB 



.28 



24 
.70 
441 

391 

vOl 
40 

320 

.~:95 
01 

276 



3767 



■•.0 



- - » ^ 
I0t,0 



iuO.O 



iuO.O 
ICO.O 



lloJ.O 



lO^j.O 



..veraj-.e 






.0 



r 



n 



L 



J 



4^4 



ABuiu xLVll 



Topics 



r 



i' 'i.'stration 

ica 



ctivitiea 

.ance 
-'■■ "10t:y and 

Doi-;ublic 
..jlati'ons 
uents 



■--'-—* -Ij i./**/ f *N' ..wvJU-t4' i, A>Sr<- 



vcra -a . ercenta;^© of all .'rticlesj on i:ach Topic 



-at''U3t 



irsT 
-If 



3.9 
i.l 

j.4 



i.9 
2.6 



• econd 
air 



5.9 
1.1 

1.2 

^•o 

3.7 

1.3 

2.8 

d.2 
3.6 



^.1 
i.5 
3.6 



Joptewber 



irst 

-if 



ocond 
:.alf 



B.2 
3.0 

6.0 
4.9 

i.2 

3.2 

7.4 
.1 



4.0 
1.9 
2.9 



4.2 

5.6 

3.6 
5.4 

2.1 



4.1 
3.1 



5.5 

3.0 
4.7 



?tobcr 



. irat 

i;alf 



3.f' 
7.8 
J. 9 

0.5 
3.4 

J. 7 

2. a 

5.3 

M.7 



7.1 
4.7 
5.3 



-second 
i.alf 



2.9 
.7 

3.1 

4.6 

4.4 

3.5 

4.9 
5.1 



o«6 
5.0 
4.2 



rhe writiar has the data uf?oii v/hich thio 
wted the calculations in order vo :-voia the , 
tistical nateriiil. 

iixplanatioR, - ':ho table iiii- 
?nt of all articles on^.a-inistratio: - 

J daily Louisiana papers during the first nali oi Au*=.uat< 



, but 
too iuuch 



.9 per 
\^roa in 




r 



n 



L 



J 







TAOLa 


425 
-iLVll — Oo 








Topics 


\verar,e ; or coat ^ 11 Articles on lach Topic 


£iovcf.:bor 


.'ecoiabcr 


Januairy 


1 irst 

iialf 


J econd 


r'lr„L 

ialf 


..uU- 


;.air' 


econd 
ulf 


.inl St ration 

C8 

luxfi 

iTicuiar 
activities 

nance 

fehology and 
Mthoda 
March 

bool-iublic 
lelations 
■dents 
Mhers 


2.7 
4.2 
7.2 

4.0 

3.2 

7.2 
4.4 

f:.7 

4.2 
4.S 


3.2 

0.1 

4*4 
3.0 

3.7 

3.2 

o.O 
^.4 

5.9 
4.3 
7.2 


3.1 

4.1 
7.1 

4.1 
5.2 

5.2 

5.1 

3.8 

7.0 

5.6 
4.9 
4.0 


3.6 
3.S 

3.6 

3.6 

2.2 

6.6 

3.0 
3.0 
2.0 


1 


r.4 

', • '- 

r 

*- • --' 

,. • '* 

^.3 
2.3 

^.7 



r 



n 



L 



J 



4^6 



Topics 


Averaee i orcenta, 


:e of all 


Articles on L.ach Topic 


i'ebruary 


. ,iirch 


i>ril 


firat 
Half 


.^ocont- 
lialf 


; air" 


><9cond 
;.alf 


I'irjt 
alf 


second 
ialf 


aiatratlon 

nl 

atiC3 

aing« 

•iculurn 
acurrlcular 
-tiivities 

■ ZV and 
:s 

- oi-i ublic 
iationa 
onts 


.•:.4 

^ • • 

2. 

3.:: 

1.'.' 

S 9 ' 

3.7 


J. 4 
4.0 

5.0 

3.7 

4.6 

4.1 

4.4 


4.1 

4.1 

4.4 

2.8 
5.4 

7.3 

5.7 

• • 

5.4 
4.5 
5.1 


3.3 

4.4 
4.2 

3.1 

4.3 

o.l 

5.0 

■j.l 

2.2 

4.0 

5.0 
4.2 


3".7 
3.1 

5.3 

4.4 

...5 
..-.1 

3..' 
4.3 

5.3 

4.1 
4.2 


5^0 
3.0 

4.4 
3.7 

7.8 

4.2 

4.6 
4.5 

4.7 

0.2 
4.3 













r 



n 



L 



J 



4*J7 







TA3LS 


XLVli — 


,j^ 










.ivora:o , erconta£;e of ail irticlo.j on .ach Topic 


Toplca 


ay 


>'une 


July 






i-irst 


.>ecor.u 
4.9 

• 

3.1 
2.9 

i.7 


:rot 

.-.If 


. ecDixl 


rirut 

..If 


Jocond 

:^alf 


.otal 


:\1 :;t.ration 

.iCB 

.ildings 
irriculun 
vtracurricular 
ctivitles 

i. w, .1 ,^;o 

.•■- ".o^y and 
is 
. . , -11 

r.-ioAblic 
ions 


-.1 

^ --1 

.-. •«> 

4.2 
.3 

' • - 
r -■) 

: .7 


.0 

• ,■' 

• .' 

4.S 

- •J 
» • - 

4.0 
4.2 

J^i3 


3.C 

-■ • . ' 

5.1 

J. 3 

* . » »^ 

-f • ■ - 

4.5 
3.9 

- . • _ 

4.0 


- • 
1 '^ 

3.3 

2.7 
3.2 

• - 
• • -t. 
3.7 


5.1 

2.0 
0.7 

%1 

3.6 

.-.1 
0.7 

2.0 

3.6 

-- , 1 
.J. 2 
3.2 


.0 



10^,0 
100.3 

IJO.2 

iOu.l 

.0 

.J 

.0 

7V.9 

















r 



n 



L 



J 



hUB 



V^. 






XAJLa .iLVlil 



.W>il^~<A X| -i-jit/f ^■^ i,x,^C^k A. I X-/4' 



Vopics 



liatration 
i 
il«tic3 

friculuu 

tracurricular 

Activities 

nance 

iJe;;iOn- 

•tration .ork 

C ho logy and 
thods 

••arch 

tool-i ublic 
It la t ions 
•dftnts 

laehers 



vara re ■ crcoataj.e of vrticloa on .^oh Vopic 



.u 'uat 



ii.5 

25.7 

::.4 



U,0 



jeptember 



13.5 
.4 
4 

4 



12 



:)ctobor 



11.5 
IJ.l 
14.5 

10.6 
15.7 



5.7 

12.5 

1.4 

12.9 
11.9 



lioveuber 



0.2 
10.5 



5.1 
: .2 

11.1 

6.6 
10.6 

9.5 



./ecozaber 



1.9 



0.7 
.:.i 

J.O 
37.4 

b.O 

9.0 
-1 j» 



;oiic 



January 



,.1 
5.3 

10.9 

.1 
.3 

'.7 

o.S 
;.l 

6.2 

16.1 

9.5 

O.C 

t'.9 



In the case of laieekly newspapera there wore uiuo inUividual 
ffferences in allotuonts to topics for each ^)eriod. 



r 



n 



L 



J 









4^9 














■x.'3L.c. XLVIIi — 




4 












i jpics 


\vera,:e . 


er:.- . of Artlcl_„ 


-■■ 


. - ,..ic 




irebruary 


. arch 


•■.--'r' ~- 




• 


■t 
• • 


jtal 


lBinl3trat.ion 


4.5 

10.2 


• ..-' 


' • -4- 


1 -.2 

.0 

-. .2 


T- 

*r • 

Actlvltlod 


.V.4 


• 

li-.o 


- • 

i'j.i 


1^.5 




m . 


_v .1 

luo.o 


nance 

ttrstion ork 
Kcthoda 


25^.0 


• 

Ic • c 


11.9 

...0 


7.V 




• - 


*->>j»l 

00.0 

1-C.O 


•earch 
fcool-. ubllc 
Relations 
adents 


1.4 

H 


- . ) 

V.7 


0.0 

iia 

13.1 


^.7 

b.7 

15.4 


U. V^' • 'J 

0.4 
7.5 


1.^ 

6.5 
3.'^ 


lOO.O 
.0 


•chers 


i^»'^ 




i.:.4 


■ •-' 


^-.3 




.' • 



















; 



r 



n 



L 



J 



490 



TABLlk uklji 



TICS 






.- 


August 




. irst Half 




Athletics 


^ucational 


Total ) 






--•-ora 




paper 








• - . Ol' 


er Gent 


Kuci'oor of 


i er Oeiit 


-..■;er of 


, r ;ex.t 




i'>.iOiao 


:jl' Vot?.! 


Articles 


of Total 


..wlcleo 


oL' i A -.1 


»rr 


24 




42 


1.1 


Ot) 


1.7 


w 


35 


• 


57 


1.0 


92 


1.6 


siri 


25 


, ; 


65 


1.4 


90 


.9 


aio 


4 


• • •- 


12 


U.fj 


16 


.8 


U}A 


2 J 


0.8 


39 


1.1 


u5 


.9 


lca: 


15 


. 


49 


l.o 


-4 


2.1 


•Ttv 


15 


> • •* 


26 


>J.O 


41 


1.0 


m^ 


16 


0.5 


26 


1.0 


44 


1.5 


i»i 


4:. 


• •- 


o9 


1.7 


1 1 r 


2.9 


«.. 


24 


• 


46 


1.2 




.8 


WT? 






9H 


1.0 


143 


.3 


V 




^ 


44 


1.9 


'I 


.2 








27 


1.7 




.9 




f. 1 


. 


41 


0.9 




.3 




3 


- • »■■ 


64 


1.0 





'.5 


vura :e 






1. .4 


2. .4 




•: 




• 




1.7 



r 



n 



L 



J 







4VI 


onLlnuoil 






of 


HUgUSt 


oocond lialf 


Athletics 

'I — ■ ^ 


Jther -.aucational 


Total 


er of 
cles 


or ":orit 

of "ot;il 


".unbor o; 

rtio les 


)-, '.J . 


er of 


er Jent 

of Totril 


Jl 


17 

50 

35 

5 

17 

14 
34 
9 
25 
*i4 

52 

lo 

34 

41 


0.5 
0.9 
0.7 
0.2 

'.5 

O.a 

0.3 

'J. 6 
0.6 

0.9 
0.7 

'■•. n 


o3 
60 
72 
18 
53 

37 
34 
13 
57 
81 

92 
26 
24 
66 

a5 


1.6 
1.5 
1.6 
1.0 

1.5 

1.2 
O.g 
U,4 
1.4 

2.1 

1.5 

1.1 

1.5 
1.4 
1.3 


60 

110 

107 

23 

70 

51 

OS 
22 
82 

105 

144 

^2 

32 

100 

126 


.1 
^.9 
2.3 

1.2 
.0 

1*6 
1.6 
0.7 

n 
• t 

1.8 

2.0 

2.1 

. ) 


•otal 








1-J.4 




2c. 3 


average 




• 




1.3 




.) 

















r 



n 



L 



J 









492 










TABLE LaIX — Continued 








oeptcjj.iber 


- *_t - -. -J 




First Half 






Ol 

e..o- 










Athletics 


3ther Lkiucational 


Total 








iiatters 






..aper 










i.umber of 


Per Cent 


..u.7jber oi 


i yr Cent 


iL:;ber of 


1 er Cent 




Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


ATT 


50 


1.3 


74 


1.9 


124 


3.2 


BRA 


/ 


1.7 


73 


1.3 


170 


3.0 




•J 
It 


l.fc' 

1.0 


69 
21 


1.5 
1.1 


14) 
3.' 


.3 

.:.l 




^J 


0.7 


73 


2.1 


9b' 


^.S 




36 


1.2 


61 


2.0 


97 


3.2 




95 


^,^ 


4- 


0.9 


135 


3.2 




42 


1.4 


35 


1.2 


77 


2.6 




51 


1.3 


93 


2.3 


144 


3.6 




51 


1.3 


a 2 


2.1 


133 


3.4 




34 


1.4 


97 


l.o 


lc:i 


3.0 




11 


J. 4 


35 


1.5 


46 


1.9 




16 


1.1 


43 


2.7 


59 


3.8 




40 


0.9 


84 


l.fi 


124 


2.7 


1 


S9 


1.3 


101 


l.o 


190 


2.9 


Oti.1 




19.1 




25.^ 




44.7 


verage 

i 




1.3 




i.7 




3.0 



r 



n 



L 



J 



'.?3 







fABLB LllA — .0. 


:)nulnu«l 






i*e: . 


-■*-■ r 
















.- 


iecond Half 








'.tnletics 


.ith«r 


-lal 


i'otal 




: u.;r.ber of 


■ er J.Qzit 


u; ;ber of 


: er 


• of 


er 0«iit 




••rt,icl«3 


oi Tot -a 


rticles 


..f -. . 


03 


'jf Total 


-~ 


L15 


•■ • ■■ 


j3 


•^.4 




5.3 




:57 


*- • / 


134 


<;.3 




5.0 




123 


., • ■_ 


i2c. 


i.S 








42 


*J 2 


22 


1.2 








^23 


J. 5 


94 




*X7 


,z 




X) 


J • '^-' 


75 


. 




5.4 




.:,1 


J ' J 


55 


, _; 




4.6 




71 


.2.4 


•C y 


•i-»7 








.J2 


■ - • v 


'^ 


2.1 


X 


H.7 




'>? 


'"-'• • X 




• 


IBC 


4.^ 




.1 


^ • ,■ 


71 


1.5 


292 


4.a 




-.5 


. 


K^ 


.;.o 


93 


3.9 




J- 


. , 


33 


2.1 


71 


4.5 




_v- 


. 


69 


1.5 


2J1 


4.3 




1^5 


^ ♦ ^ ' 


-Jl 


1.4 


2t'c. 




1 




41.1 








7.^.1 


irer 




^.7 









r 



n 



L 



J 



494 







1 


'ABLii JUIA - 


-Continued 








October 


Nfiune 




/irst Half 






of 
News- 










Athletics 


r.her iducGtional 


Total 






Tatters 






paper 










I.uraber of 


or Cent 


.NUi-nber of 


i'er Cent 


iiumber of 


i er Cent 




Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


4TT 


123 


3.2 


9S 


2.5 


221 


y»7 


MU 


246 


S-O 


128 


2.2 


374 


' ' . 5 


BRT 


139 


3.1 


121 


2.6 


260 


'.7 


3Do 


77 


4.2 


30 


i.9 


113 


...1 


LDA 


146 


4.3 


105 


3.0 


251 


7.3 


WAP 


114 


3.8 


lOo 


^.4 


220 


7.2 


It 


199 
120 


4.7 
4.1 


71 
72 


1.7 
2.4 


^70 
192 


0.4 
0.5 


IDI 


101 


2,5 


92 


2.3 


193 


4.3 


IDS 


106 


2.7 


72 


l.H 


17a 


4.5 


»TP 


213 


3.5 


97 


1.6 


310 


5.1 


It 


53 


2.3 


50 


2.5 


113 


4.i5 


«L 


39 


2.5 


45 


2.9 


^4 


5.4 


tf 


173 


3.7 


111 


2.4 


284 


6.1 


IT 


236 


3.7 


125 


1.9 


361 


5.6 


'Qtal 




52.6 




35.1 




«7.7 


'ivera<-e 




3.',^ 




2.3 




5.fc' 



r 



n 



L 



J 



495 









'- 


.oj;tiaue<i 










cv-'^cr 






^ 


'ocond Half 






Athletics 




■ \.onal 


.otul 


i;'.i-ur 












•i.-bar of 


.*. i^ 


1 .....I ,„ - .. 


r ' - .ly 


-. 


r ;eiit 




-C ii'Jd 


J j - . 




■ 




i^ joal 


m 


"' •'■'~^ 


4,0 


100 


^.6 


?-bl 


■ .0 


mt 




%o 


137 


2.4 


425 


7.4 


m 


A'~J± 


^.4 


110 


.;.4 


311 


6.C 


m 


n 


^.9 


41 


2.2 


132 


7.1 


Wk 


132 


3,9 


123 


•'■ 


255 


7.4 


^i' 


12b 


4.1 


107 


J»:' 


233 


7.6 


If 


zn 


6.9 


65 


1.5 


356 


<i.4 


Bs 


1^6 


6.3 


; 1 


2.1 


247 


-.4 


Bi 


141 


J. 5 


'4 


^.3 


235 


5.3 


Ks 


150 


3.9 


o5 


• 


215 


5.5 


■DTP 


2n 


4.6 


loa 


L,C 


3C9 


•-■ . 4 


-k 


2.7 


70 


3.0 


134 


5.7 


**• • 


bi 


3.2 


53 


3.4 


104 


...6 




217 


',.7 


93 


2.0 


310 


6.7 




321 


w. V 


102 


1.6 


423 


.5 


Total 




o?.0 




35.9 




102.9 


ra^-e 




4.5 




-.4 




..9 



r 



1 



L 



J 



496 



».i^ — -onuinued 





■ 














ov«., .ber 






<- 


K 


irat Hair 


...^- 


t;hlGt.ic3 


t' r - .cational 


. .'..■ 


i 


. Y* 










■ . -* 








er ci 






. ufflbor of 


: cr ''.:..t. 


. U ', ;u:* jl' 


1 . . . c 


. cr ^ont 




i'ticloa 


VJ. . ... - 


■ '- • -- 




.icloa 


jf .Otiil 


gr 


i07 


— • / 


ilo 


J.O 


22j 


. • / 


■U't 


226 


^ • 


122 


2.1 


34^ 




s^ 


179 


> • * 


i--7 


1,9 


2wO 


L><i 


w^ 


66 


..i> 


4L . 


1.4 


;2 


4.9 


U)A 


160 


-..? 


1^: 


■ • ,- 


283 


r>.2 


^t 


110 


'' ^ ' 


6v> 


— • L 


no 


0.2 


m 


255 


, 


47 


1.1 


302 


^.1 


m 


U2 


• 


42 


i.4 


_;:4 


.3 


P 


141 


, '. 


i09 


2.7 


-■50 


.2 


■s 


145 




K'". 


" i^. 


*:04 


.2 


i- 


274 


.^ 


lOo 


v./ 




-.2 


■ 


i*6 


, . 


70 


3.0 




v.O 




30 


. 


53 


• •^- 


^j 


5.3 




232 


. . 


^3 




315 


;.8 




420 


• •- 


75 


-i-.'i 


^95 


7.6 








32., 




'2.5 


Average 




.>.o 




'^.fc 




W.2 



r 



n 



L 



J 









497 


i«.l 







V. » — 


. . -- V 0<^-aw<*a' 


ocond Half 


Achle&ics 


t> t: uional 


iottil 


;er of 
. V tcj.es 


o: ,oual 










r 


io7 

121 

102 
143 
149 

276 
54 
31 

2oe 

345 


.5 

-■.5 
^.7 

^.3 


93 

da 

49 
11. 

62 

65 

es 

i-^4 
75 
44 

fc4 

79 


^.4 

1.7 
1.9 

-aU 

2.1 

2a2 

2.U 
J.2 
2.3 
1.3 
1.5 


^o3 

,.27 
231 
2id 

75 
352 

444 


o,2 
7.3 
^.4 
6.8 
g.2 

6.0 
y.l 
7.7 
5.7 

5.5 

0.6 
5.5 
4.8 

7.6 

U.9 






--■ . • - ■ 




33.5 




.3 


■■- ' 




', • K 




2.2 




v-,U 

















r 



n 



L 



J 



498 



«== 


---- 







- 







"n & 














- 




^' 


irat Half 








.t.:.i 


-?t^!c;3 


rJ;e-r .i;..r 


iUi .n;i 1 


oto 


\ 


-u:;ber OJ. 


J er Jent 


KUffiber of 


'or Cent 


ii-.:.Qr of 


r'or Cent 




rticias 


of Total 


Artlcloa 


•ji" Total 


-rticloa 


of Total 




157 


;*»0 


1..'4 


2.7 


■j ,1 


0.7 




253 


4.4 


137 


•'- • ■ 




o.a 




171 


3. a 


112 


2.V 




6.2 




73 


4.0 


i». 


^.2 




0.2 


• — 


105 


3.0 




- -7 

• • 




5.7 


kt 


95 


3.1 






•7 


u.l 


wt 


2U3 


4.d 




• 




C.2 


■ 


149 


5,0 


5^ 


*•• - 




6.9 


■ 


105 


2.6 


72 


1.8 




4.4 


m 


13B 


3.5 


70 


2,0 


• ..-■, 


!:'.5 


mv. 


le?? 


^.1 


lOik 


1.7 


■ ;i 


4.H 


m 


44 


1.9 


48 


2.0 




3.9 


i'- 


3t? 


2,i» 


68 


4.4 




U.5 


i 


193 


4.2 


99 


2.1 




0.3 


X 


342 


%2 


146 


2.3 


* 


7.5 


1^ 




55.0 




35.0 




>..'.0 


Ateraire 




^.7 




.:.3 




.0 


i 
1 















r 



n 



L 



J 









499 












TAB! 


^^ LHa — Joutiiiuea 










,-; r 




Jeceniber 






c»econcl Half 


..ti 


leuics 


Other educational 


iOtal 


. -*' 






I avi^ers 






. . ,.jer of 


. er Jeiit 


i«Ui.iber of 


r er uCiit 


.<u.4Ucir of 


/ er ^eut 




- w-.oi.es 


Ol' .iuU(al 


Ai'ticitJS 


j1 ivjLal 


-■u-txcies 


of i'otal 


ATT 
UtA 

KT 

LOA 


152 

230 

lf>2 

79 


^.9 

^..0 

^.6 


51 

e? 

56 
32 
50 


1.3 
1.5 

1.3 
1.7 
1.4 


203 
317 


?.2 

%5 
4.6 

i.9 

If. 


LCAx'' 

tt 

N03 


103 
155 
lo4 

174 


..4 
>.7 

^+•4 


35 

41 
35 
79 
59 


1.1 
1.0 
1,Z 

2,L 
1.5 


133 
190 
1Q9 
237 


4.5 
^.7 

5.9 

:.9 


r 


2i^7 

104 

17 

193 
334 


H • '^ 
^-.■^ 
1.1 

4.2 
5.1 


77 

68 
43 
53 

75 


1.3 

2.9 
2.7 

1.1 

1.2 


->o4 
232 

'♦09 


5.9 

9.S 

5.3 

•3.3 


- ... i 




60.9 




23.2 




:v.l 


iVYerage 

1 

1 
1 

j 

1 




4.1 




1.5 




^.o 



r 



n 



L 



J 









500 


Ji 






. ^- 




First Half 


U) 


letlcs 


•tVior. ,■*<«... <,.-., T 


otal 


\mbor of 
■tides 


i er Ceiit 
of Total 


2?unl>«r of 
'I't Jcles 


r<T Cent 

oi' Total 


* .. -. . r* 


t 

1 




U3 

}>*3 

147 

61 

21 

165 
116 

205 
105 

176 
t3 
16 

173 

2:.0 


3.9 
3.1 
3.2 
3.3 

' * . '• 

3I9 
3.9 
5.0 

^•'-' 
2.7 
1.0 
3.7 

4.0 


73 
56 
63 
19 
77 

39 
45 
31 
63 
54 

76 

ze 

39 
3fi 
51 


1.9 
1.0 
1.4 
1.0 
2.2 

1.3 

1.1 
1.1 
2.1 

1.4 

1.2 
1.2 

- • , 


vl 

' r 

, — -i- 


5.6 
4.1 
4.6 

t.3 

. ,H 

*,.l 

5.0 
.SO 

7.1 
• .0 

I., 2 
2.9 
,.5 

4.5 

V.6 


Vtfil 

1 




46.6 




2I»0 




67.5 


1 . 




J.l 




i.4 




' . . 5 















r 



n 



L 



J 



50i 



dU 







■ ■ »-*jr 










Jacond lialf 






;.thlot.ic3 


' •^'' r- ^ r;"'! 


,•» ,r, n 


■■' >T-, 


,1 






. a."., .r". 




■^'"-iber of 




fluabar of 


or -J out 




-.« '-,-if, 


CT .'ent 




Articles 


of Total 




1.4 


xlcl9« 


of Total 


■v-> 


■; 




1 ' /. 


3.7 








102 


l.« 




-,.6 




j~ J J. 


-J •w' 


65 


1.4 


..-».- 


^r.7 




?4 


^f.5 


27 


1.4 


ill 


5.9 




3S 


la 


ti 


• 


•> I 


?.9 


bi. 


.^4 


3.7 


-» / 


i • 


'J J 


^.3 


»''^' 


■1 ^j ij 


;.o 


49 


1.2 


\11 


4.2 


Wo 


75 


2.6 


45 


■| « 


■ ^r, 


H.l 


ni 


127 


3.1 


72 


1 




*.v 


lOJ 


127 


3*2 


O" 


- 


.»^. K/ 


!) .0 


M^-r 


Itl 


2.7 


13v 


1 


291 


4.6 


■ 


3« 


1.6 


49 


j 


t7 


3.7 


Rl 


19 


1.2 


54 


j • '* 


73 


Jti.C- 


u 


145 


J>.1 


t2 


1.3 


207 


4.4 


3T 


1 rv-; 


3.1 


i02 


1.6 


301 


^..7 


rbtwi 




40.3 




' 




t:7.1 


iVera. e 




C.7 




i.S 




4.5 


1 
























1 













r 



n 



L 



J 



^02 



TABLE LX.IX —Continued 

















.'cbruary 


-i .e 
or 


First Half 


."" d — 


Athletics 


Otlier Educational 


i'otal 






I alters 






j.ai:er 












•aciber of 


; er Cent 


iJUinber of 


i er Cent 


l4U/abcr of 


Per Cent 




■rticles 


of Total 


Articles 


of i'otal 


•articles 


of Total 




105 


2.7 


75 


i.9 


l^iO 


4»o 




131 


2.2 


96 


1.7 


227 


3.9 




118 


2.0 


74 


1.6 


192 


4.2 




64 


3.5 


27 


1.4 


91 


4.9 




■k 


l.C 


4S 


1.4 


112 


3.2 




^>) 


2.; 


ol 


2.0 


150 


4.9 




13Q 


3.3 


60 


1.4 


19J5 


4.7 




&7 


3.0 


53 


1.3 


140 


4.S 




43 


1.1 


37 


0.9 


30 


2.0 




77 


2.0 


49 


1.2 


126 


3.2 




100 


l.o 


102 


1.7 


202 


3.3 




4a 


2.0 


46 


1.9 


94 


3.9 




27 


1.7 


4B 


3.1 


75 


4.S 




160 


3.4 


be> 


1.5 


22a 


4.9 




19-. 


3.0 


102 


1.0 


29s 


4.6 


otol 




y.,s 




25.1 




tl.9 


vera.je 




^.4 




1.7 




4.1 



r 



n 



L 



J 



^U3 



TABLl^ ii.vlA — Contlnuou 







__________ 


ebruary 










i. 








Mane 












of 


ieeoQd !!alf 








.:V,U- 


.thlotlcs 


thrr ■ t" 


'clonal 


Total 




^r 














;;unb«r of 


■ er Cent 


•w. ;ber of 


.or Gent 


Uiber of 


. ar eiit 




rticles 


of roOul 


. ;-iciea 


o£ Total 


rticlea 


jf Tot.il 




100 


2aO 


i^ 


.;.2 


■> ; 


/*.o 




15a 


2.7 


13^5 


.4 




5.1 




12L* 


-..8 


?.l 


...3 


.- '^ * * 


i^.G 




^4 


2.9 


.12 


..2 


70 


4.1 




05 


1.3 


.1 


^.b 


156 


4.4 




^^4 


r:.7 


, 1 


1.5 


131 


4.2 




125 


3.0 




i.G 


m 


4.6 




7c 


2.7 


/ i. 


1.4 


119 


4.1 




104 


<i.'i 




1.6 


170 


4.2 




■-»» 


£.1 


- 


.1.1 


loa 


4.2 




123 


^.0 


ii-u 


1.9 


239 


^.9 




^■4 


2.3 


50 


2.4 


110 


4.7 




^5 


1.6 


35 


2.2 


60 


3.6 




123 


2.7 


4 


i.4 


l;2 


4.1 




1^5 


2.9 


y) 


1.5 


1 '' 1 


',.4 






37.4 




27.d 




65.2 


ra-?;e 




^.5 




1.9 




^.4 



r 



n 



L 



J 





>vi4 

-Joi 


kwinuoa 
















. iirw.: 




i irst Hair 


Athletici* 


^ t^ional 


.otal 


u- ■■ or r 


- 


. :• of 
-03 


. or :ent 
of Total 


er of 

:loo 


. or out 

oi' . tal 




(J2 
120 

134 

C9 
42 

90 
95 
64 
^7 

133 
37 
23 

116 
15^ 


2.1 
2.1 

3.7 

1.2 

3.0 

«:.4 

2.0 

2.2 
l.b 
1.5 

2.4 


39 

■41 

U5 

35 

99 

66 
73 

44 

10 

101 

}5 
o3 

^^2 

109 


2.3 
2.4 
2.5 

2.V 

2.1 
1.7 

1.5 

2.2 

•J «; - 

3.^ 
4.V 
4.V 
2.;. 
1.7 


171 
261 
249 
104 

150 
166 
108 
167 

132 

Bo 
236 

267 


4.4 

4.5 
5.4 
5.6 
...1 

i>*l 
4.0 
3.7 

4.6 

4.6 

5.2 
5.6 
5.5 
5.1 
^.1 




34.1 
2.3 




37.4 




71»5 


•>a ;e 






-.5 




4.t> 



r 



n 



L 



J 



505 



Uame 

■ < J — 

or 


r»arch 


'.h3 


.econa -uilT 


LCtiCS 


>th«r Kducational 

.•«tt.era 


otnl 


' unber of 
rticlos 


0r Gent 
of rot{«i 


Nuctber of 
/Vrticlea 


i cr Cent 

of Total 


.i>«r of 
•ticleo 


.:r ZquX, 
of iOtal 


i.''ii a 


63 
93 
92 
cO 
34 

4o 
1^7 

97 

^1 

140 

55 
25 

107 

201 


1.6 
1.6 
2,1 
3.2 
1.0 

2.9 

^.4 
Z,l 

^.3 
2.3 
1.6 

2.3 
.>.l 


90 

103 

112 

33 

^7 

64 
53 
54 

£5 

119 

148 
^9 

53 

i2 
114 


l.c 

^.4 

2.1 
1.3 

i.t 
2.1 
3.0 

2.4 
3.^i 
3.4 

-.3 

3.1 


no 

144 

■■-> 


3.4 
4.5 
5.2 
3.5 

3.6 

..7 

'♦.5 
' .1 

4.7 
..1 
5.0 
^.1 
V.9 


32.5 


- 




-7.0 


^.2 


• •> 




1 • 1; 











r 



n 



L 



J 



506 



TABLE LXn —Continued 

















..jril 




.- i. 




i-irst Half 








■,Xj 


hletics 


Jther hiducatJonal 


•jt 


al 


■ o — 






:-at.ters 








umber of 


r-er Oent 


dumber of 


: er Zent 


;:ui2ber of 


"er Gent 




;-ticles 


of rotal 


Articles 


of Total 


/irt^iclea 


of Total 




43 


1.1 


lOo 


2.7 


149 


>.s 




92 


1.& 


13S 


2.4 


230 


4.0 




7J 


1.5 


100 


2.2 


170 


3.7 




27 


1.4 


2a 


1.5 


55 


2.9 




32 


'.0 


122 


3.5 


154 


^..5 




12 


• '+ 


;.l 


^.0 


73 


2.4 




:a 


2.2 


59 


1.4 


150 


3.6 




c2 


2.1 


54 


l.B 


116 


3.9 




7B 


1.9 


77 


1.9 


155 


:^.^ 


■' 


S7 


2.2 


106 


2.7 


195 


4.9 




118 


1.9 


164 


2.7 


;^->2 


4.6 




27 


1.2 


72 


;.u 




^.2 




26 


1.7 


44 


<_ • ..:. 


\J 


4.5 




43 


-■.9 


o6 


1.4 


lu9 


2.3 




137 


2.1 


131 


2.0 


Z',S 


4.1 


I 




23.2 




34.0 




57.2 


^a^e 




1.5 




2.3 




3.8 



r 



n 



L 



J 



TABLii Ljili — ^OiiUiZiued 







April 




...e 








,, ■■ 




.lecona Half 




,_ 


Athletics 


Jther liducational 


Votal 








ii^ttera 




pa,-er 












liuraber of 


i er Gent 


^^ -cr of 


. ..T Jent 


i.uaber of 


ivr Cent 




Articles 


of I'otal 


\. j^e-i 


of i'otal 


.'•rticles 


of Total 


!F 


51 


i.3 


133 


J. 4 


la 


^.7 


fcA 


59 


1.0 


144 


Z.5 


203 


j'.S 


Hk 


77 


1.7 


103 


.2 


ISO 


^.9 


^H 


35 


1.9 


31 


1.7 


bt) 


J. 6 


V 


j>- 


U.9 


93 


•- • / 


123 


^.o 


^Lp 


35 


1.1 


S£ 


-.9 


123 


4.0 


^H^ 


BS 


^.1 


ol 


1.4 


14^y 


^.5 


Hb 


44 


1.5 


59 


2.0 


•03 


,-.5 


Iv^ 


51 


1.3 


91 


--.3 


142 


^.6 


l»s 


2 


1.6 


109 


-• ■ 


171 


4.4 


|p>p 


120 


1.9 


151 


2.5 


271 


4.4 


12 


IS 


0.8 


90 


J.& 


106 


4.6 


^k 


JO 


1.9 


44 


^.6 


74 


4.7 


^v 


74 


1.6 


loo 


3.6 


240 


5.2 


■ 


112 


1.7 


113 


!.■' 


2.^5 


3.4 


Ctal 




Zd.3 




36.3 




o0.6 


-■a,; e 

1 

( 
1 

1; 




i.5 




2.5 




«> • w 



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T.aB 


.ij LAiA — :jntinued 








Mny 






. e 








of 


j^irst Half 






.v.-i- \thletic3 


Either Educational 


:otal 




ilatters 






■; ^cr 








; "umber of 


Per Jent 


Number of 


Per Cent 


Lumber of 


i'or ,^ent 


Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


30 


u.C 


12c] 


3.3 


l^:. 


4.1 


70 


1.2 


179 


J.l 




4.3 


57 


1.2 


142 


j,l 




4.3 


17 


0.9 


99 


5.3 


116 


0.2 


12 


0.3 


139 


4.0 


151 


4.3, 


8 


0.} 


122 


4.0 


130 


4.3 


S3 


2,0 


110 


2.6 


193 


4.6 


46 


1.6 


BO 


2.7 


126 


4.3 


64 


1.6 


78 


1.9 


142 


J. 5 


62 


1.6 


104 


2.6 


166 


4.2 


70 


1.1 


155 


2.5 


225 


3.6 


15 


0.6 


106 


4.5 


121 


5.1 


15 


1.0 


57 


3.6 


72 


4.6 


64 


1.4 


156 


3.3 


^20 


4.7 


f?0 


1.3 


151 


2.3 


231 


3.6 


- 


16.9 




4a. a 




65.7 


v.rase 


1.1 




3 .^ 




=v.4 















r 



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T ABLli LllA —Continued 









' - J 








Name 


























Jecona Half 








of 
News- 














"•tiiletics 


Other Educational 


iDta] 










I'attero 








paper 














Nuuber oi" 


ler Cent 


i.uribor of 


/ er Cent 


liUf/iber of 


; er Jent 




Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


jf Total 


Articles 


of T Jtal 


tfT 


23 


' • ' ' 


13 o 


:>.5 


lol 


4.1 


■A 


13 


_ , 


183 


>.i> 


^•Jl 


^.5 


UtT 


33 


. 


143 


3.1 


170 


3.3 


31)- 


27 




74 


4. 'J 


J.Ol 


5.4 


Xi 


■-i 


•V • »•- 


149 


4.3 


155 


^.5 


Xk? 


14 


0.4 


1S4 


6.0 


193 


0.4 


f^ 


40 


0.9 


117 


2.8 


^57 


J. 7 


«s 


20 


0.7 


^2 


2.3 


102 


3.5 


101 


53 


1.3 


113 


2.3 


loo 


4.1 


K>S 


43 


1.1 


113 


2.9 


156 


4.0 


lOTF 


70 


1.1 


159 


2.6 


-29 


3.7 


9 


16 


0.7 


120 


5.3 


142 


0.0 


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0.3 


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2.9 


50 


3.2 


■ 


Lx. f 


1.1 


137 


2.9 


186 


4.0 


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0.6 


17^ 


2.8 


217 


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11.3 




52.0 




o3.3 


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TABLE LllA —Continued 















~^ 


m 


lame 






^irst Half 






— 


of 














Athlotics 


OLh or «;du cat 1 onal 


■j 


tal 




'■" 






tLers 








::iiniber of 


; er Cent 


'Jxir.ber of 


?er Cent 


Kuinber of 


i^u-r Cent 






rticles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 






7 


0.2 


90 


-.3 


97 


2.b 






15 


o , Jt 


112 


1.9 


127 


2.2 




• I 


21 


■ • - 


- ) 


2.1 


115 








13 


V ■ / 


, -i 


l.a 


47 


2.5 






5 


^.2 


~, 


2.5 


92 


2.7 






3 


0.1 


12 


2.3 


75 


2.4 






13 


0.3 




2.1 




2.4 






11 


0.4 


w 


1.7 


C'w* 


2.1 






51 


1.3 


10b' 


2.7 


159 


4.0 






uo 


1.0 


140 


3.6 


180 


4.6 






42 


0.7 


201 


1>.^ 


243 


4.0 






3 


0.1 


U-j 


2,3 


69 


2.9 






4 


0.3 


i>l 


3.2 


55 


^.5 






27 


0.-. 


lOu 


2.1 


127 


2.7 






41 


0. ", 


l-..'4 


1.6 


145 


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-. .1 




7.2 




3o.O 




43.2 


•■ai;e 

i 








2.4 




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511 



TAiJi^ ^Ali. — Ci->nti' 





June 








:'a;.;e 


Jecond Half 








.-jf 










• -■" ■ 3 — 


Athletics 


other 


liducational 
Jtters 


Tc 


tal 


jr 














anber of 


. er Cent 


.NoTiber of 


Ter Oent 


U'ui.iber of 


i'er Oent 




•rticles 


of Total 


Alt idea 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 




13 


:.3 


o6 


1.7 


79 


2.0 




23 


:.4 


93 


1.6 


116 


.:.0 




;-2 


^^.5 


65 


1.4 


BS 


1.9 






0.4 


22 


1.2 


30 


1.6 






0.3 


36 


1.0 


44 


1.3 




3 


.1 


3S 


1.2 


41 


1.3 




16 


C.4 


48 


1.1 


64 


1.5 







-.3 


37 


1.3 


46 


l.C 




35 


0.9 


65 


1.6 


100 


^.5 




23 


;:.5 


73 


1.9 


96 


2.4 




40 


-.7 


89 


1.5 


135 


2.2 




4 


0.2 


51 


2.2 


15 


2.4 




4 


0.3 


43 


2.7 


47 


3.0 




42 


0.9 


51 


1.1 


93 


2.0 




42 


0.7 


79 


1.2 


121 


1.9 


_.l 




• '■ 




22.7 




29.6 


vcra^e 




0.5 




1.5 




2.0 



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T/\.)iji. -^-vj... — ..ontinued 





July 


.0 


■■i 


rJt Half 




of 








' -,'■>' ^ — 


ithletics 


Other i'^ducational 
attars 


mai 


■.. -r 










umber of 


Per Cent 


Number of 


I'or Cent 


i umber of 


Per Cent 




".rwic.les 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


/-.rticles 


of Total 


ITT 


12 


^'.3 


56 


1.4 


-.c^ 


1.7 


1^ 


25 


J. 4 


74 


1.3 


100 


1.7 


26 


O.fa 


63 


1.4 


eg 


2.0 


3D3 


4 


• 2 


20 


1.1 


24 


1.3 


:.0A 


13 


..4 


5a 


1.7 


71 


2.1 


Xk? 


S 


-'.3 


39 


1.3 


47 


1.6 


m 


9 


.'.2 


34 


U.8 


43 


1.0 


us 


11 


0.4 


3S 


1.3 


49 


1.7 


101 


46 


1.2 


70 


1.7 


lie 


2.9 


fOS 


33 


U.9 


6S 


1.7 


IJl 


2.6 


IOTP 


37 


U.6 


9S 


l.u 


135 


2.2 


ir 


5 


0.2 


19 


'w.6 


24 


i .0 


ibL 


2 


U.l 


27 


1.7 


29 


I.B 


■ 


Ig 


0.3 


49 


1.1 


o7 


1.4 


1 


29 


U.5 


61 


0.9 


90 


l.u 


# 

Total 




6.6 




19.8 




2... 4 


\toraze 




• if 




1.3 




1.7 



r 



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TABLE LXIX —Continued 



Na:..e 


- 














:>QCond Half 






of 










, uijlatics 


"ithar iiducatioiKil 


;'.-)t 


al 








lattera 






pai-t-r 












Kuinbcr cf 


Tor Cent 


'.uir.ler of 


Ter Jent 


" umler of 


y^is- Cent 




Articles 


of Total 


;.rticle3 


of Tot .: 


Lie lea 


of Total 


It 


7 


>.2 


::5 


l.V 


o2 


i.6 


A 


23 


0.5 


83 


1.4 


111 


1.9 


T 


22 


0.5 


S8 


1.9 


110 


2.4 


s 


4 


0.2 


32 


1.7 


30 


1.9 


A 


9 


0.3 


73 


.;.l 


82 


^.4 


AF 


k 


0.1 


9 


1.5 


51 


1.6 


K 


3 


0.2 


43 


1.0 


51 


1.2 


S 


5 


:.2 


/*4 


1.5 


49 


1.7 


(I 


30 


0.7 


3 


1.6 


93 


2.3 


Is 


20 


-.5 


^1 


1.0 


61 


1.5 


OTP 


25 


0.4 


S8 


1.4 


113 


l.g 


i 


4 


0.2 


33 


1.4 


37 


1.6 


BL 


4 


0.3 


33 


2.4 


42 


2.7 


i 


19 


0.4 


47 


l.C 


66 


1.4 


f 


19 


0.3 


53 


O.Q 


77 


3.2 


Otal 




f .0 




22.2 




27.2 


fera^e 




0.3 




i.5 




i. » C 


1- 











r 



n 



L 



J 









514 












TABLfi LXli —Continued 






Mane 


Total for Year 














/thletic nxticles 


on- filet ic /.rticles 


Total 


of 












KUinber of 


or Jent 


i,uianer of 


hor Cent 


i.uiaber of 


t er Cent 




Articles 


oi Total 


Articles 


of Total 


rticlea 


of Total 


pa:^er 














^TT 


. ■^ 


ko.^> 


2U73 


53.-:: 


j'/oO 


. 1 


«A 




53.2 


2o80 


4t).5 


576b 


-.7 


K 


•P 


51.6 


2217 


^C..} 


4531 


,'^•9 


K 




56. S 


807 


43.1 


1867 


99.9 


r 


XJ jO 


1,0.2 


2.>92 


oO.O 


3460 


10. '.0 


*AP 


13-?2 


45.b 


1681 


54.6 


3073 


xOU.2 


•iv; 


2739 


o. .2 


1431 


33.8 


4220 


iOO.l 


us 


1774 


•ju,5 


llo6 


39.7 


2940 


l;;u.2 


ni 


20Q4 


52.0 


1937 


48.0 


4031 


iOu.O 


lOi 


ir>f'3 


:■'.} 


1?57 


9.8 


3940 


l'.0.1 


IOTP 


32A 


5^.^ 


£356 


^fo.7 


;.120 


iU'J.l 


m 


fi93 


J7.9 


1470 


62.3 


2363 


10 ..2 


tOL 


495 


31. e^ 


1075 


bo. 3 


1570 


luO.l 


(^ 


2668 


57.3 


1991 


42.7 


4659 


100.0 


r 


4-57 


.i.4 


2415 


37.4 


.^472 


'^»S 


•tal 




705.9 




73^^.5 




1500.4 


llerage 




51.0 




49.0 




I'jQ.O 



r 



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515 



TABLci L 



;x'.i^ iiUt .uiJuw w*. 



.OF THii TOTAL 
.^*li;J TO ATHLiiTl- 



.iaXlCi 



,ui.Y 



UiTie 


u Tiat 












/kthleoics 


other Eklucational 


Total 


of 






: a , .ers 


















Nuiaoer of 


rer Cent 


:iu:;.ber of 


Per Cent 


iiuiTiber of 


i-cr Cent 


»per 


Articles 


of Total 


.-.I'ticles 


of Total 


/rtic Les 


of Tot,i.l 


P 


2 


0.9 


13 


^.^ 


15 


6.6 


K 





0.0 


12 


3.7 


12 


3.7 


l{ 





0.0 


17 


3.0 


17 


3.6 


I* 


4 


0.9 


IC 


2.3 


14 


3.2 


■ 


1 


0.3 


3'- 


7.9 


32 


8.2 


b 


1 


0.2 


U 


3.5 


15 


3.7 


^W} 


2 


0.0 


IC 


4.7 


IS 


5.3 


H^ 


1 


0.3 


27 


8.5 


28 


8.-8 


^^ 





0.0 


16 


5.4 


16 


5.4 


P 


X 


0.4 


7 


2.5 


e 


2.9 


i 




3.0 




47. £ 




51.4 


■'•rare 




0.3 




4.^' 




5.1 



r 



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lABLiit L — Goni/inuou 





















oepteniber 




Nanie 












Athletics 


Other Educational 


Total 








..alters 


















.umber of 


: er Jent 


Wuiiiber of 


1 er Cent 


Number of 


Per Cent 


. '^^ 


'.rticlQS 


of i'otal 


^-.uiclea 


of iOtul 


nrticlea 


of Total 




3 


1.3 


1^ 


:).? 


lb 


7.0 




4 


1,^ 


iX 


O.i) 


f. 


7.7 




5 


1.2 


27 


5.7 


■5 -■ 


6.f? 




6 


1.4 


23 


5.2 




6.6 




i* 


1.0 


26 


6. 


'• 


7.6 




3 


0.7 


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5.'w 




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7.3 




£.5 




3 


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20 


6.3 


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1.1 


4 


1.4 


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2.5 


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12, (J 




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67.0 


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5.4 




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517 



TABLE L — ..oiitinued 





















Jctober 








Athletics 


Uther educational 


i 


otal 


of 




i'-.attera 






: ..'3— 


.umber of 


;'er Cent 


.^iuaber of 


er Cent 


.'umber of 


i'er Gent 


pai>er 


\rticles 


of Total 


Articles. 


of Total 


.rticles 


of Total 




1 


U.4 


32 


14.1 


33 


14.5 




2 


0.6 


35 


U.7 


40 


12,3 




3 


0,6 


34 


7,3 


37 


7.9 


j 


lo 


3.6 


50 


11.4 


66 


15.0 




5 


1.3 


24 


-.1 


•-1 


7.4 




11 


^.7 


33 


•:^.5 


49 


12,2 


J 


11 


3.2 


33 


9.7 


44 


12.9 


.. 


1 


-^.3 


39 


12,2 


40 


12.5 




lo 


3.4 


19 


6,4 


29 


9.3 




7 


2,5 


24 


'.7 


31 


11,2 


)t. 1 




1<5.6 




97.1 




115.7 


/era ,36 




1.9 








11,6 



r 



n 



L 



J 



5lfi 



TABLjt; L — Joritinuod 

















.a.'.ie 


■.oveL.ber 












Athletics 


Other Educational 




Total 


of 
ev/s- 




- aLters 




















. uaber of 


I'er Cent 


iNumber of 


; er Jent 


livunber of 


: er Cent 


aper 


Articles 


of Total 


articles 


of Total 


;\rticle3 


of Total 




1 


U.4 


16 


7.0 


17 


7.4 


C 


1 


0.3 


20 


6.2 


. 1 


0.5 


Z 


9 


1.9 


50 


10.7 


•", ■ 1 


12.6 


C 


S 


l.a 


3^ 


6.6 


40 


10,4 


CN 


S 


^.0 


20 


5.2 


28 


7.2 






2.2 


29 


7.2 




9.4 







2.6 


25 


7.4 


34 


10.0 




3 


0.9 


35 


11.0 


33 


11.9 




4 


1.4 


26 


u • O 


30 


lu.2 




6 


2.2 


30 


10.9 


3o 


13.1 


otal 




15.7 




c'2.9 




'..7 


vera -e 




1.6 




S.3 




9.9 



r 



n 



L 



J 



I'AdLE L — Continued 





















- eceiuber 




Name 












ithletics 


Other Educational 


Total 


of 
News- 






ratters 


















Ijuciber of 


i\ir .ient 


iMur.iber of 


i er Gent 


.ur.bor of 


i er Jent 


paper 


Articles 


of Total 


('i-t-icles 


of lOtal 


Articles 


of Total 


9B 


c. 


2.2 


16 


7.0 


21 


9.2 


W 


1 


0.3 


17 


5.3 


IS 


5.6 


1 


9 


1.9 


39 


S.3 


48 


10.2 





e 


l.S 


27 


6.1 


35 


7.9 


8M 


7 


l.o 


11 


2.8 


18 


4.6 


3J 


7 


1.7 


31 


7.8 


38 


9.5 


PBD 


3 


w' . ';; 


15 


4.4 


18 


5.3 


1 


3 


0.9 


23 


7.2 


26 


8.1 


IP 


2 


0.7 


23 


7.e 


25 


i'.5 


PC 




•-•■' 


28 


10.1 


36 


13.0 


Hal 




15.1 




u(..B 




rl.9 


rvrage 




1.5 




0.7 




8.2 



r 



n 



L 



J 



52. 



TABLE L —Continued 



















Jaiuiary 


Name 












Athletics 


Other educational 


Total 


of 
News- 




i-stLers 




















wuaber of 


or Cent 


.'.uifioer of 


J er 3ent 


huiaber of 


; er Cent 


paper 


f^rticles 


of Total 


Articles' 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


IB 


1 


0.4 


11 


4.9 


12 


5.3 


W 


12 


3.7 


34 


10.5 


4o 


14.2 


5 


2 


0.4 


3^ 


t^.l 


40 


ii.5 


• 
> 


7 


1.6 


35 


7.9 


42 


9.5 


m 


7 


l.c^ 


16 


4.1 


23 


5.9 


u 


5 


1.2 


2B 


7.0 


33 


S.2 


>BD 


10 


2.9 


23 


6.8 


33 


9.7 


1 


1 


0.3 


25 


7.6 


20 


8.1 


J> 


1 


0.3 


22 


7.5 


23 


7.8 


« 


3 


1.1 


17 


6.2 


20 


7.3 


tal 




13.7 




70.8 




£4.5 


t era jq 




1.4 




7.1 




8.5 



r 



n 



L 



J 



TABLii L — Continued 















.' ".C 






i obruary 






Athlet 


ics 


)ther .iducational 


Total 


Jt" 






. at tors 






umber of 


Per Cent 


I^UTiber of 


, or Cent 


Number of 


Per Cent 


.. ,-er 


rticlea 


of Total 


Articles' 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 




2 


0.9 


14 


6.1 


16 


7.0 




3 


0.9 


18 


5.6 


21 


^^.5 




4 


'J. 9 


29 


0.2 


33 


7.1 




3 


J. 7 


3b 


'6.1 


39 


d.iJ 




11 


2.8 


19 


4.9 


30 


7.7 




9 


2.2 


20 


5.0 


29 


7.2 




5 


1.5 


15 


4.4 


ZO 


5.9 




1 


^.3 


17 


5.3 


15 


5.6 




4 


1.4 


2& 


9.5 


32 


10. g 




7 


2.5 


25 


9.1 


32 


11.6 


'L-1 




H.l 




■o4.2 




7c.. 2 


.'•".1 .Vi 




1.4 




6.4 




7.3 



r 



L 



J 







1 


522 

ABLb; L — Continued 






Mane 

of 
News- 
paper 


: nrch 


Athletics 


Other Educational 
i atters 


rotal 


r.vuabor of 
Articles 


: er Cent 
of Total 


iiunber of 
'.rticle's 


. er Jent 

ji' Total 


» (.iriber of 
Articles 


i'er Cent 

of Total 


IB 

:v. 
1 

3 

:n 

y 

•BD 
S 


2 

4 
3 

1 
6 

4 
4 
2 
2 
4 


^^.9 
1.2 
0.6 
0.2 
1.5 

1.0 
1.2 
0.6 
0.7 
1.4 


23 

18 
29 
34 
29 

29 
18 
19 
31 
19 


10.1 

5.6 
6.2 
7.7 
7.5 

7.2 

') . 

10.5 
. 6.9 


25 
22 
32 
35 
35 

33 

22 
21 
33 
23 


11.0 

L.8 

-:.8 
7.9 
9.0 

e5.2 
U.5 
6.6 
11.2 
6.3 


>tal 




^3 




73.0 




82.3 


rerage 




0.9 




7.3 




a. 2 

















r 



n 



L 



J 



TABLii i, — Jontinued 



Same 




April 












thletics 


Other ..ducational 


total 


of 
Kews- 




I atters 


I 


















uuinber of 


Ter Jent 


T! umber of 


-■'jr Cent 


liujnber of 


T'er Ceut 


paper 


-Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


3B 


3 


1.3 


21 


9.2 


24 


10.5 


W 


D 


1.9 


30 


9.2 


36 


11.1 


1 


o 


1.7 


60 


12. g 


68 


14.5 


1 





Q.O 


31 


7.0 


31 


7.0 


» 


7 


l.g 


42 


10.7 


49 


12.5 


W 


6 


1.5 


40 


10.0 


46 


11.5 


»BD 


3 


0.9 


34 


10.0 


37 


10.9 


S 


2 


0.6 


32 


IJ.O 


34 


10.6 


iP 


1 


0.3 


21 


7.1 


22 


7.4 


>G 


4 


1.4 


32 


11.0 


36 


13.0 


>tal 




11.4 




97.6 




109.0 


rerage 




1.1 




>.o 




xO.9 

















r 
I 



r 



n 



L 



J 



524 









TABLh L --^ 


Joritinued 






- ..,e 


I«iay 
















Athlet 


»ics 


Other Educational 


Total 


of 
ews- 






I'latters 






















number of 


Per Cent 


Number of 


: er Cent 


iiu.v.ber of 


i er Jeut 


aper 


Articles 


of i'otal 


Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


3B 





o.O 


14 


6.1 


14 


6.1 




2 


0,6 


32 


9.9 


34 


lo.5 




4 


0.9 


uO 


12.il 


64 


13.7 


4 


2 


0.5 


43 


9.6 


45 


10.3 


:n 


4 


1.0 


04 


16.4 


o8 


17.4 


}j 


1 


0.2 


55 


13. ii 


56 


14.0 


_. 


2 


0.6 


40 


11. g 


42 


12.4 







0.0 


23 


7.2 


23 


7.2 


1^ 


1 


0.3 


22 


7.5 


23 


7.^ 


•'G 





■:..o 


22 


.0 


22 


o.o 


1 




4.1 




103.2 




107.4 


/era^e 




■^.4 




10.3 




1(^.7 

















r 



n 



L 



J 



525 



TABLii L — Continued 

















: - 


June 


Athletics 


Other liducational 


Total 


-.,3- 






.' atters 






.umber of 


r-er Gent 


Number of 


er Jent 


i/tunber of 


Per Cent 


.->er 


Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 




1 


0.4 


13 


5.7 


14 


0.1 




J 


0.0 


27 


S.3 


27 


8.3 




3 


0.6 


13 


2.S 


16 


3.4 







j.O 


2B 


6.3 


28 


6.3 




5 


1.3 


32 


^.2 


37 


9.5 







■' • '^' 


2B 


7.0 


28 


7.0 




2 


u.u 


27 


7.9 


29 


S.5 







0.0 


15 


4.7 


15 


4.7 







0.0 


19 


0.4 


19 


6.4 







0.0 


13 


4.7 


13 


4.7 


. i 




2.9 




62.0 




->4.9 


■•-'". :e 




»> 




U.2 




U.5 



r 



n 



L 



J 









526 
I'ABLE L —Jo 


ntlnued 






of 
News- 
paper 


July- 


athletics 


Other i^ducational 
.' atters 


Total 


-iuaber of 
Articles 


er Cent 
of Total 


Number of 
Articles 


Per Cent 
of Total 


Nmaber of 
Articles 


■' -r Cent 
of Total 


BB 
S 




G 
1 









0.0 

u.O 
0.0 
0.2 
0.0 

0.0 
U.O 
..0 

U.O 

O.u 


21 
22 
24 
30 
12 

13 
14 
23 
21 
12 


9.2 

6.S 
5.1 
0.8 
3.1 

3.2 
4.1 
6.8 
7.1 
4.3 


21 
22 

24 
31 
12 

13 
14 
28 
21 
12 


9.2 

6.8 
5.1 
7.0 
3.1 

3.2 
4.1 
3.8 
7.1 
4.3 


.tal 




J. 2 




5o.5 




5o.7 


-er . .-. 




0.0 




5.9 




5.9 

















r 



n 



L 



J 



527 



TABLE L — CouCinued 



















Total 


,".e 














■ithlfi 


tics 


Other "^iucational 


■j. 


Otal 


jf 






..atters 






News- 
















I.uruber of 


' er Cent 


r.'unber of' 


Ver Jent 


l-unber of 


, er Cent 


paper 


Articles 


or Total 


Articles 


of Total 


Articles 


of Total 


IB 


21 


;.i 


207 


90.8 


22c 


■9.9 


91 


35 


10.7 


289 


89.3 


324 


IJO.O 


\ 


50 


10.6 


420 


89.6 


470 


luO.2 


5b 


12.7 


3S5 


£7.2 


441 


.<9.9 


» 


o5 


16.6 


326 


t'3.5 


391 


luO.l 


W 


50 


13.6 


345 


86.2 


401 


99.6 


>6D 


55 


1':,.2 


285 


83.8 


340 


100.0 


I 


17 


:.l 


303 


95.0 


320 


100.1 


1 


33 


11.2 


262 


^.B.B 


295 


100.0 


( 


43 


15.5 


233 


84.4 


276 


99.9 


ital 




121.3 




878.6 




999.9 


'era:e 




12.1 




87.9 




IQJ.O 



r 



n 



L 



J 



r n 



THSJii3 UJED IN THIJ oTUiJY 



1. Adams, J, liarry, 'A otudy of the Relationshipa of the 

-jchoola and the Iresa in llichit'an juring 
1933-1934." 'Jnpublisheo !,ascer»s thesis, 
i)epartntent of riaucation, Lniv rsity of 
I.ichigan, 1934. i'p. xxv ■+ .5, 

2. 3auserman, James Kdwara, "A : ublic IiolRt,ion3 rro^raia 

in Fairfax County, Virf^inia," Unpublished 
iiaster's thesis, ueparti;.ont of education, 
Geor e ashin/^ton University, i94b« Pp« iv 
-+ o4. 

3. Penford, l.arry D. "The Jcope of uducational Newspaper 

.ublicity iii Certain Thira Class school 
Liistricts in feniisylvania." Unpublished 
Mastv^T's thesis, Depart-inent of f.ducation, 
ciyracuse university, 1937* i-p. 72. 

4. Brown, ivelyn Beatrice. "An Analysis of i^ewspaper 

iubiicity in Central and Village Hi^h 
Jchools in liev York otate." Unpublished 
j .aster* 5 tiiesis, tJepartrr;ent of I^ducation, 
Syracuse University, 1937. ip. v + l9» 

5. Carlssn, H. W. "Jchool iubiicity as Found in North 

Dakota newspapers." Unpubli.ihed Ifistor's 
thesis, L>epartn;ent of oducation, Univei^sity 
of North Dakota, 1941. i'p. iv -t- 55. 

6. Farley, Beluiont II, "What to Tell tne ^eople about the 

Public School." U'Octor»s uissertation. 
Teachers College Jontrib-^tions to 'Education, 
Ho. 355, Kew 'fork: Teachers College, 
ColuKbia 'Jnivsrsity, 1929. Pp. 72. 

7. Foster, Charles :i, "ijditorial Treatment of education 

in the A;..orican Fress." Doctor's Disserta- 
tion. ^y:/jridr:e: riarvar-i Hniversity Press, 
1936. Fp. 305.' 



L J 

52g 



529 



r 



n 



a, C/arlin, iU:^. "A .Stud/ ol .Educational lubliclty in 
Texas .i.w3 papers." Austin: University of 
Jexas Press, 1930. Tp. 1 -»- 107, 



9. fluff, :.dwin C, ".niblic .School Publicity iu the News- 
papers of lioirtheustern iMchi^an," Un- 
.^ubliahod . astor's tresis, jepartment of 
Education, University of ilichigan, 1934. 
Pp. Ill + 117. 

10. Kaner, 'Jhirles. "i\iblic Jchool .ublicity in the Jix 

. iUf^ Newspapers of Joston, i-assachusetcs." 
..., uijlished i.'istor's thesis, Jepartwent of 
Education, Boston University, 1935. Pp. v 
■^ 161, 

11. Kluc!<-horn, Harvey li. "?f.:'./spaper "Publicity for the 

Public Schools of iowa," Unpublished 
'-.aster's thesis, Departmont of education. 
University of Iowa, 1930. 2-p, 1 -*- 172, 

12. Knoblauch, A.L. "lublic Relations service of a 

Jelected Group of .'jnorican City Jchool 
3ystQifis." Unpublished Doctor's thesis. 
Grusiuote Library, Harvard University, 1942. 
Fp. xviii -+- 512. 

13. Jantzen, J. Karc. "Types of News Storeis Desired by 

i'aroiits and Students in Four liich Schools 
in / arion County, Kansas." Unpublished 
/'faster' s tliesij, [jepartnent of iiducation. 
University of Kansas, 1937. Fp. vi -h 63. 

14. Johnson, Charles a, "A Comparative otudy of Jchool 

rublic iielations ?ro grains." Unpublished 
Doctor's thesis, 3epartiaent of Education, 
Kew fork University, 1943. Pp. vii + 201. 

15. i arshall, Iloger r. "A Study of the hnowied£;e and 

Opinions of the Teople of ilimersbor,^^, 
Pennsylvania, about their iciiool. Un- 
published Master's thesis, Dopartiaent 
of oducation, .'ennsylvunia jtr.'s^e Coller^e, 
1936. Pp. Ill -t- 5o, 

16. Merrill, J. Vey. "Public School P>ublicity," Un- 

published i asttsr's taesis, Jep^^rtment of 
Education, joston University, 1934. Pp. 
11 -h ilo. 



L 



J 



530 

r n 

17. .' ichaol, L, 3. "A i'rorosed i rograti of Iu;>roved :-ublic 
.ielatioaa for the .schools of .(Ood County, 
. ost Virginia.'' In^'ublishec i.iictar'a tiieaia, 
Jepairtnent of Sducation, IJcw York University, 
1941. I p. ix + 330, 

IS, I.'aegle, Charles J, "Interpretin/- the i^anction and 
.jei^ice of r-'ublic lor'Ml Jchools and 
leachera Coliu.;e3," Unpublialied Doctor's 
thesis, iJejxirtraent of uducation, New York 
University, 1930, I'l), IcJo, 

19. .leyaolds, I. :i, "newspaper Tublicity for ublic 

Schools, " Bureau of ; ublications, Teachers 
\^oliege, Coluiubia university, 1}22, Pp. 1 
-t 125. 

20, itabley, .Ihodes it, ♦♦Newspaper .editorials on American 

i.ducation." ^Jactor's t::e3i3, Thiladelphia: 
University of -"ennaylvania, 1941. Fp. xii 

-i- 2o3 . 

21. Todd, \:illiam rlall, ^i hat Citizens Know about Ti^eir 

Jchool." Teachers Collei^e Contributions to 
;^ducation, i'o, 2?9, : ew Yori:: Veachcrs 
College, Columbia University, 1927. Pp. 125. 

22, Van .-'.leeck, K,u. "Local Jchool News in l.'eekly News- 

papers in Cejrtain Incorporated Villages in 
Naw York Jtate." Unpublished J.cster's 
thesis, Jepartr.ent of iiducation, Cornell 
University, 1932, Pp. 1^6. 



L J 



531 

r -] 

aooKS 

1. Iblii, tfllliati. ^tllc ■yii.i^n . Hew Yorki KcGnw- 
Hill Book Jo., l')3'5. i'p, xili -f 486, 

?. iJakor, flele- ^-■-. -'^ ...... ,..^ -y :iw«ln, iiow 

k . ^^» i-Jew Yorkj 

3. iiaud, Kerbert K, ^ijfeilslt', • v; V a. : roduc^ 
1942. /p. xlx -t- <^.;., 

■*• Bird, C»«.>or>^e 1.., tUi'l ^erwln, "^' c-^-ic U. ""* ■ ~ -.- 
i^all, Inc., 1942* . t'* ^^-^ii + C)iV. 

5. '^rehner, J. !'. h^hlic ;r cl^tlons and ''u bllci^jy. 

wouoon: inati&ut© ct .'ujj.ic dm ini at rat. ion, 
l'!^4>. » p. 44. 

w. li-.ilds, Harwaod L. '; -'•'--.--•>='- . 'lie 

.'pinion, Tone, 

•inc., X^rtfj» ■ I' * *A "t~ A,ju» 

V. Joiiiva dsi on on f ."—•'■-• •' the Ircss. A_J - ■ --^ 

vijrsiwj v^i . -..ur^o i'-reaa, 1947. :,-•• 
xli + 139. 

i-ourth Y --' -^ , -n -t 02' .lonentary 

School Iv: , '-on, J.J.: 

l*«tional .A^;<i.r-. wii ^:.-.A.j.«.i.i.vn, 1945. 
Pp. 351. 

9. Cn»£i, J..... how to I'snfale uollclyy. ..u«b«ci 
i:KcIk>nald Golldge Tno t^ate). i'p. 24* 

i-'. . arioy, Jc>ijaoKt. -icho-:! r'ublicit/ . otanTord 
;'iuver;iil.y, IJsil-ondii: ^taai'ord 
Uiiiverjity . r«ata, l.i34. ' p. iii 
118. 

11. Fln«, hea^&siin* c^uu catlontjl > uolicity . j'cw forte: 

iimrpmr ana iiroa*., 1943. > p. xili 32U. 

12. :isk, ilobert J. *' V-" -^ " ••'"!. : of v^t^at 

Gp-^c; iV; : Coiuabia 

L -. ■ J 



532 

r n 

13. Gallup, George. A Guide to l\iblic Opinion loll^ , 

I'rinceton: i'rinceton University Preaa, 
1948. Pp. xxlv ~t 117. 

14. Grinnell, J. i:.rle. Interpreting, the i'ublic ochoola . 

New York: i.cGraw-Hill Book Co., 1937. 
Pp. ix -r 360. 

15. Hand, H.G. 'A^at People Think about Their Jchoola . 

Yonkers, liev York: V.'orld Book Co., 194S. 
Pp. iv 4- 219. 



16. 



Harris, Seymour E. How Shall We Pa v for ^Jklucation? 
Kew York: Harper L Bros., 194S. Pp. x^ 
214. 



17. Hyde, Grant rilnor. Kowspaper Handbooks . New York: 

Applet on Century Co., 1941, Pp. xlx -h 
335. 

18. Jones, Galen. Sxtraci:rricular Activities in the 

American Jecondary School . Kcv; York: 
i.cGraw-Hill Book Co., 1930. 

19. Kingsbury, Susan M. , Hart, Hornell, and Associates. 

Newspapers and the I'^gwg . New Yoric: 
G.P, iSitnam's Sons, 1937. Pp. xi -f- 238. 

20. Kreishbaum, Hillier. Report on New York University - 

National /.ssociation or Sci,ence . rite^'jEt * 
Science \ rltin?-^. Survey . J.'ew York: 
New York University, 1951. Pp. H. 

21. Lesly, Philip. Pu blic Tcelations in Action . Chicago: 

Ziff-Davis Publishing Co., 1947. Pp. xxi-t- 
280. 

22. Lippman, ,;alter. Public Opinion . New York: The 

llacraillan Co., 1947. Pp. x h- 427. 

23. Loizeaux, i-iarie D. Publicity Prlxjer . Uevj York: 

The H.v/. i';il3on Co., 1948. Pp. 103. 

24. MacDousall, CD. Interpretative Reporting . New York: 

The Macmillan Co., 1938. Pp. viii -h 682, 

25. MaciX>ugall, CD. Newsroom iroblerns and iol;lcie3 . 

Nev/ York: The Kacmillan Co., 1941. Pp. 
X 4- 592. 

26. Markel, Lester. The lievjspaper > Its i .akiuf. and 

Meaninr:. Hew York: Charles Scribner* a 
I Sons, i946. Pp. viii -h 207. | 



533 

r n 

27. Kenbera of the Staff of the New York Times. The 
Newspaper . Its i;akiu,; and 1 eanin ^ ^ . 
New York: Charles Jcribner's oons, 1945, 
Pp. viii -f, 207. 

2B, Miller, Clyde H. and Cru>rles, Trea. publicity and 
the Public school . Boston: houi:;hton 
MiTlin Co., 1924. Pp. 123-24. 

29 • i'lOrelock, Thoaias C. Jchool Ijev/spaper i roduction. 
Columbia, i is3ouri: Lucca Jros., 1931. 
Pp. 206. 

30. Olsen, Edward G. ocho'l and Cot..mmity . New York: 

Prentice Hail, Inc., 1945. Pp. ix + 422. 

31. Farraenter, Lev.- E. and Crosby, Otio A. Public 

/Relations PrJMer . Chicago: national 
Jchool 3ejrvice Institute, (no date). 
Pp. 24. 

32. Persons, Christopher ckigar. Jublic aelatioua in 

Universities and ColleKea . Stanford 
University, C^.llf. : Jtanford University 
Press, 1945. Pp. vii + 61. 

33* Sorter, Philip, and Luxon, Nerval lieil. The 
Aeporter and the ^gws . liew York: 
Appleton-Gentury, 1935. Pp. xiii -H 56O, 

34. Publicity Dij?:e3t . Williaixisport, Penn,: Grit 

rxillishin- Co., 1944. ??. 167. 

35. Public Helations in iecondarv Jchools . Bulletin 

of the National ssociation of Secondary 
School Principals, Volume a;J[II. iiashington, 
D.C.: National iJducation Association, 194^. 
Pp. 34^. 

36. iladder, HozTian J 

^ditin 
McGraw 




■+ 297. 



37. Ramsber^er, Jack. How to I^Iake Publicity • ork * 

New York: Reynal and Hitchcock, 194^. 
Pp. 123. 

38. fieck, .V. iiiaerson. (ed.) Qolleee Publicity r-u^ual . 

New York: Harper and Bros., 1948. Pp. x 
+ 245 . 

L J 



534 

r n 

39. Reck, W. Emerson. Public liclrtions . Kew York: 

Harper k dros,, ±946. Pp. xiv + 2i?o. 

40, Reader, Vard G, An Introduction to Public-School 

Relations . I'o-; York: The :;acjuillan 3o., 
1948. Pp. xii -h 260. 

41» Reeder, Ward G, The Fundamentals of Public School 

Ad::.ini strati on . tio;v York; The r.acr.lllan 
Co., 19:fl. .p. XV + 796. 

42. Rope, Frederick T, Opinion Conflict and School 

S upport . ContributionG to Gducatiou i.'o. 
^38, Nev; York: Teachers Coilo^je, Columbia 
University, 1941. Pp. viii -h 164. 



43 



. Salmon, Lucy Ilaynard. The iJcwspaper and Authority . 
New York: Oxiord University Press, 1923. 
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44. School new3Pa;:er Funda^eatals and JiTicicl Jcorebook . 

Hew York: Goluabia Scholastic Press 
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45. Teacher and Public , lii.^hth Yearbook, uepirtment 

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46. Wright, J. Handley and Christian, Byron H, Public 

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47. Yeager, Vv'illiam A. Home-School-Coinmunity Relations . 

Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh 
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ARTlCLi23 

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4. 



Anderson, Vivienne. "Leadersiiip otudy Inciuent," 

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6. Andrews, i.ary u, ". ointers on iublicity," . ublic 

lela Dions ixi oeconJary 3chool3 , bulletin 
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6» Beaumont irincipals' Olub. ''Our Public" Jo.'.ur.unlty 

2^ivin - and tho .llepentary ochjol-s , T\.'enty» 
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9. Bergin, Jci^ieanor Ney, "The School ?age and trie News- 
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536 

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13. axnice, Williao George, and Bruce, William C. "y,ill 

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U. 



15» Cocking, waiter D* "Schools and CojJinunity Resources," 
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16. Corbett, Helen A. "So Ycju want to Print a Bulletin," 

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17. Crosby, Otis A. "The Essentials of Good Public Re- 

lations," The School executive . LXVI 
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IB, De Gamp, Jolin P. "Jiiblicity Through Pictures." 

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19* Deisenroth, J.J. and Cook, Williaa A. "The lilditor 
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20. Oerthick, L.G. "Acquainting the i^iblic with School 

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21. Edgar, J.W. "A Siaall Community Program of Public 

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22. Kvans, Jol-m. ">Jducation in the News," Publicity 

Digest, uilliansport, Penn. :' Grit 
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23. Faris, Paul W, "Publicity for Student Recruitment," 

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24. Frye, Leslie 5, "^..t.ni.. - ^^^.s — . .^, ^.^■^.... .^ . .^^.j^ „ 

jMxiH'JX. .. ..... , ,„ .,,..... . ,\.,,^_ , /xoTTof 

--econdary Jchool i'rincipala, Volume iXXII, 
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25. Gerow, Janea a, "?:i© xrincipal's i ublic Relations 

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26. Geatie, Bertiice Jaiaard, "oduc-tional i-'ress,'* 

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27. Gonser, Thoiuas A, "The Long Tana Trograra,'* iVolicity 

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2B, "Good Publicity Gets iiesults," The Jchool i:lxec utive. 
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29. Goodrich, Lowell P. "This is i^ibiic .iclntiouo as 

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30. Goodrich, Lowell ?. "Understanding Of, By, and For 

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31. Grieder, Calvin. ^3an School ixpendituras for ioiblic 

liolations be Justified?" The /jaerican 
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33. Griffith, 3.1. "Superintendents Learn Public Re- 

lations reclmiques at Campaign Golle^ie," 
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34. Grinnell, John Erie. "Keep in Touch with the Parents," 

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35. Hagiaan, Harlan L. ''Seven Concepts of School Public 

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36, Harrol, Stewart, "liakinj Your .:eacler ait tha oi;wdu3t 

Trail/* i'ubllcity i^iroat . .(illiiuasport, 
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37. Hatton, Otis C, "Garnering Good Will Alon^i with 

school I-Xinds •' The Nation's Gchoola . XLII 
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3S. "Headlines Lnlivcn Report," The Nation's Jchoola . 
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39. Hedlund, Paul A, "I'.easuring Public Opinion on Jchool 

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CXVI {April, 1948), 29-30 and 86. 

40. "How to Read Kowspapers," The Nation's Schools . 

.viail (June, 19477T 

41. Hull, Henrich, "A Seven Point ttiblic Relations 

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42. Hull, Hcnrick. "Public Relations Can Wake or Break," 

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43. Hunt, Harold C, "Public ilelations Through Public 

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44. "Introduction," Teacher and iublic , liiishth Yearbook, 

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45. Ivans, J .3. "What Parents Expect of the School," 

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WT. 

46. Johnson, Carroll F. "School News in Every Home," 

The School Lxecutive . LiVIII (I'iay, 1949), 
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47. Kelley, Sari C. "I^ake Them Like It and They'll 

Support It," The Nation's Schools, XXXVII 
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46. Kennedy, A.M. "Features and Photo;-raphy," Publicity 

Jigest . V/illiaiasport, Penn. : Grit Publishing 
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49. Koopman, Robert G. " j\ Fornula for Morf-inr: School and 

Coniiunity/' I'lie i<at.Iwn*3 :>chool3 . XLII 
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50. Kristeller, Robert. Tlanr.in/: Our iicw Jchool nulld- 

i^Si" The ochcol i:xecutlve . LXVI (?,arch 
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51. Kruinbiegcl, Walter 0, '♦Looking at lublic ;ielation3 

Through iose-Colored i31iaes," The Jciiool 
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52. Lafferty, II.F, '♦i'ublic i:ducation on Trial," The 

Nation* a Schools . iiXVl ( jeptej;;ber , I945 ) , 

53. Larson, Jordan L, "Koepinfi; the .'tibiic Up-toDate on 

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54. Leipold, L.;:;. "-.'hy Juperintendenta lail, '' The .uaerican 

jchool Board Journal s CXV (July, 1947), 
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55. Ludeman, W,W. "Lay Press iiighlights School lieeds." 

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56. Mason, Charles C. "r\ibllc Helations and I3ond iasues," 

The Aaerica n ^jc ho ol B oard Journal, CXII 
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57. I^cCuskey, Dorothy. "Teacher-Conciunity Cooperation," 

rj,t:: .A« Journal . XjLiVTi (JJeceniber, 194^), 

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5S, Miller, John L, "i-oundation lor 'rioporting to the 

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59. Morphet, Sdgar L. "what Should Teachers Know About 

School Finance," The Saskatchewan Bulletin, 
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60. Murray, J. A. "Newspaper Gaupai^ for Setter schools," 

Th e School tiLxecutive . LXVI (Karch, 1947), 
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61. Kulford, Herbert 3. "Handy Tools of r'ublic Relations," 

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t>2, "K.ij.A. Cari'103 Problems to th( 'lout 

ttie Nation,' p »»'■»_ ■ 
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63. Nelson, Thomas L. ".eoter ^ ublic tolations Pro.t^aras," 
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64* Oberholtzer, Kenneth c;, "Facts and Figures Told the 
itory, ' The Jchool .ixscutive . L:CVIII 
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65» Postley, ^'jaurice G, ",ji.:.pie Candor in Good rublic 
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66« Hoatley, i-iaurice C-, "How to i-.provc iour ublic 
-ieiations," The .oiiorican ochool Board 
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67* Postley, I-aurice (j, " isconcGytiuns of ubiic :io- 
iations," xhe /'.laerican oc hool Boajrd 
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68, Postley, i'.aurice G, ''r\iblic delations Sooby Traps," 
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69« "Public Relations thru American Education ■..oe!c," 
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70. "Publicity of Jchool Activities," .toericnu School 

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71. Heck, >., :I«aerson. "Introduction," College rublicity 

ilanual . .Suited by '.. . i^raersoii Leok. New 
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72. Renegar, Horace. '*:\iblicity through the Newspapers: 

ritini; and -'iditin^ News," Collez^a 
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i , 23. 

73. .Roberts, rtoland. "Report to the Public," Th e Jchool 

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74. Robinson, Thomas ii, "The school Newspaper Can : ro- 

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75. Jaauelaon, '-nes. "Alartiiiij t'le Public to School 

(Karch, W;y), 1^(5-^01. 

76. Saimdors, Carleton K. "The Jchool»3 Aole in :o;-Bnunity 

iolations," The 3cho > 1 i-jcocutlvo. LlVIII 
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77. 3cxson, John A. ''Pictures 3peak Louder than Viorda," 

The Jchool !:xecutive . LXVI (i:ay, 1947), 

78. ohibler, H.L. "i\iblic Kolations - A Comparative 

Approach,'' Tho .uuerican School .l oard 
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79. Stubblefield, G.^. "The iVulic Aelatioua /rogrum 

of the iil Dorado ochools," The .Unerlcan 

■ • >ol Dorrd Journal . CXVIIi ^ yebruory. 

T-,^^)'." 45 and 10. ^' 

do, "The Press and the Radio." Teacher and ^^blic . 

^i.'hth Yearbook, Oepurtaent of Claasrooa 
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&1, Thomas, F.G. "oitizens Remodel School Systens," 

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i2. Van Zwoll, James A, "The JJeed for I'ublic Relations," 
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S3. 



"A'ellwood, Robert H, "Heport of Public ilelations 
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w. 



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^