(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Edward Kienholz; an exhibition organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in cooperation with the Museum's Contemporary Art Council"

• ».- . -,* 



.I(^^l('^^T(^15;iI^W4«i!(•.1^^^^ 




m<?fr9it^i^5i^MN:^^^^ 



Edward Kienholz 

An exhibition organized by 

the Los Angeles County Museum of Art 

in cooperation with the Museum's 

Contemporary Art Council 




Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Lytton Gallery 1966 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY 
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

Burton W. Chace 
chairman 

Frank G. Bonelli 

Ernest E. Debs 

Warren M. Dorn 

Kenneth Hahn 

Lindon S. Hollinger 

chief adminislrative officer 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Edward W. Carter 
president 

Howard Ahmanson 
Vice president 

Sidney F. Brody 
vice president 

Mrs. Freeman Gates 
vice president 

Franklin D. Murphy 
vice president 

Mrs. Rudolph Liebig 
secretary 

Maynard J. Toll 
treasurer 

Mrs. Aerol Arnold 

Theodore E. Cummings 

Justin Dart 

Charles E. Ducommun 

Joseph B. Koepfli 

Charles O. Matcham 

Taft B. Schreiber 

William T. Sesnon, Jr. 

Richard E. Sherwood 

Norton Simon 

Mrs. Kellogg Spear 

Mrs. Stuart E. Weaver, Jr. 

STAFF 

Kenneth Donahue 
acting director 

James Elliott 
chief curator 

Henry T. Hopkins 
chief of educational services 

Talmadge L. Reed 
chief of museum operations 

William Osmun 
senior curator 

Ebria Feinblatt 
curator of prints and drawings 

Stefania P. Holt 
curator of textiles and costumes 

George Kuwayama 
curator of oriental art 

Gregor Norman- Wilcox 
curator of decorative arts 

Maurice Tuchman 
curator of modern art 

Larry Curry 
assistant curator 

Eugene I. Holt 
assistant curator 

Ann A. Latferty 
assistant curator 

L. Clarice Davis 
librarian 

Frieda Kay Fall 
registrar 



Foreword 



Among the artists of Southern CaUfornia Edward Kienholz's position is unique. His 
work is the most independent in style and its creation has had the widest following 
from a broad section of the art community. The authority of his varied expression 
has also received international attention and praise. In the development of a program 
of contemporary art at this Museum he was one of the first choices of the staff for a 
one-man exhibition. The decision to do the exhibition received enthusiastic support 
from the Contemporary Art Council. 

Presented in an art museum with an historical collection, Kienholz's work at 
first may seem surprising for its violation of traditional concepts of fine art. In our 
day, as the avant-garde has tended to disappear, more and more museums have 
assumed the broader role of presenting art of the present as well as of the past. 
This juxtaposition of innovation and tradition is thereby exhibited to a greatly 
enlarged audience which can now more easily see the one eventually assimilated to 
the other. This in itself is one of the most characteristic, major developments in 
the museums of today. j^^^^ EUiott 



Acknowledgements 



I am most grateful to the artist for his unflagging assistance at 
every stage in the preparation of this exhibition. His dealer, 
Miss Virginia Dwan of the Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles and 
New York, and John Weber, director of Dwan in Los Angeles, 
were always helpful. Irving Blum of Ferns Gallery was also 
generous in providing information. And John I. H. Baur's 
cooperation is greatly appreciated. 

I am indebted to Michael Blankfort for his generous 
cooperation. Discussions with Monte Factor about the artist's 
work were extremely beneficial. Mrs. Mary Kienholz was 
helpful in resolving questions of chronology. I am also grateful 
to Ed Bereal and Harold Dreyfus for useful conversations we 
had on the artist. 

Miss Virginia Ernst, Research Assistant, who has been 
devoted to the artist's work for several years, assisted me at 
all points in research and in the organization of the exhibition 
and the catalogue; she also prepared the bibliography and list of 
one-man shows. 

I am grateful to James Elliott who devoted his perception and 
energy to editing the essay and to many issues that arose in the 
preparation of the show. Henry Hopkins and William Osmun 
were similarly helpful. Miss Frieda Kay Fall also edited 
the essay. 

My gratitude is extended to the officers and members of the 
Museum's Contemporary Art Council for their firm support 
of this exhibition. 

Maurice IXichman 



Lenders to the Exhibition 

L. M. Asher Family, Los Angeles 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Blankfort, Los Angeles 
Miss Virginia Dwan, New York 
Mr. and Mrs, Donald Factor, Beverly Hills 
Mr. and Mrs. Monte Factor, Los Angeles 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Hirsh, Beverly Hills 
Dr. and Mrs. Merle S. Glick, Los .^ngeles 

Sterling Holloway, Laguna Beach 

Brooke and Dennis Hopper. Los Angeles 

Walter Hopps, Pasadena 

Edwin Janss, Los Angeles 

The Kleiner Foundation, Beverly Hills 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Regehr, Los Angeles 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Thompson, Los Angeles 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick R. Weisman, Beverly Hills 



The Museum of Modern Art, New York 
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York 



Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles and New York 

Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles 

Alexander lolas Gallery, New York 



Edward Kienholz 

Maurice Tuchman 



Edward Kienholz was bom in 1 927 in Fairfield, 
Washington, near the Washington-Idaho border. 
The son of a farming family, Kienholz was expected 
to become a rancher and was diligently taught the 
skills of carpentry and plumbing, basic mechanics 
and engineering. In grade and high school in Fair- 
field, he was active in the choir, played French horn in 
the band and won letters in baseball, basketball and 
football. He attended Eastern Washington College 
of Education, left after a semester and a half to 
study for varying but brief periods at a half-dozen 
colleges in the West. To support himself he worked 
successively in a hospital, managed a dance band, 
bought and sold cars, owned a bootleg club, did 
window display, sold vacuum cleaners, was an 
attendant in a mental institution, opened a restaur- 
ant ("The Black Boris"), ran a foreign car agency, 
did crepe and corobuff liquor display and worked 
in a Las Vegas club. In 1953, he moved to Los 
Angeles and in 1956 he opened the Now Gallery, 
which, with Syndell Studios, was the region's first 
vanguard art gallery. After the Now Gallery closed 
the following year, he and Walter Hopps opened 
the Ferus Gallery. Even if Kienholz had never 
produced a work of art, he would have earned a 
place in the history of art in Southern California by 
his devoted efforts as builder and owner of van- 
guard galleries. 

Since his high school days, Kienholz painted in 
oil and watercolor. In 1954 he began making 
wooden relief paintings (cat. nos. 1-3, 5). With 
these he often set himself the problem of starting 
and finishing a painting a day. Bits and wedges of 
left-over wood were nailed and glued to a panel and 
aggressively painted with a broom. The wood 
fragments comprised an armature, like a prepara- 
tory drawing on canvas, but they also served as a 
vessel into which paint could be poured and then 
smeared. In San Francisco Jay de Feo was work- 
ing somewhat analogously at this time, using thick 
paint layered onto canvas. Kienholz conceived of 
painting with the pouring process as a means of 



"getting into" the painting, "swimming around in 
it, like in a bathtub!'' In contrast, Kienholz titled 
these works (after their execution) with humorous 
names in order "to be able to laugh at the piece 
and thereby be shed of it!'^ 

The tenor of these early works is surprisingly 
elegant and gay — surprising, for at the time of their 
execution, Kienholz conceived of the "broom 
paintings" as exercises in a non-artistic territory, 
a region of "ugliness!' He proceeded on the premise 
that if he "could make something really ugly!' it 
would help him "understand beauty!' 

TRIPTYCH (cat. no. 1), an early work of this 
period, displays a fluid relationship betweeii thick 
wood boards and dense pigment— the one tends to 
take on the characteristic substance of the other. In 

GEORGE WARSHINGTON IN DRAG, 1957 (cat. nO. 3), 

there is an inclination toward construction in mass : 
shapes are clustered into units which in turn form 
a single centralized shape— the resultant image 
stands like a figure against a background. The fact 
that Kienholz often titled these early abstract relief 
paintings with reference to human personnage 
signifies the growing need in him for figurative rep- 
resentation. Such a desire relates to the increasing 
employment, evident in "george warshington!' 
of entire objects found in the junkyards of the city. 
The technique and imagery of his broom paint- 
ings constitute an original achievement, affected 
in a general and oblique way by action painting. 
The unusual color of these paintings — a rich murky 
brown, suggestive of natural aging, though often 
with a single bright orange or yellow patch — 
was prompted by Kienholz's encounter in the early 
fifties with a painting by the San Francisco artist 
Julius Wasserstein. (Chemically incompatible 
paints were deliberately mixed by Kienholz to prove 
that in art even sacrosanct technical laws can be 
broken to advantage. The ultra-sensitive receptivity 
of these painted surfaces to changing fight is extra- 
ordinary and proves the artist correct.) Beyond this a 
search for influences upon Kienholz proves futile. 



By 1957 one critic could already appreciate 
"the insouciant wit in [Kienholz's] built-up con- 
structions, as if a Victor Pasmore or a Vantongerloo 
had set out to mimic his more serious side!'' Kien- 
holz felt threatened by aesthetic appreciation of 
work he had tried to make non-aesthetic. At the 
end of the fifties he abandoned the concept of 
roughly painted wall-bound abstract painting in 
favor of increasingly three-dimensional and 
figurative object making. 

In THE LITTLE EAGLE ROCK INCIDENT (cat. nO. 

4) of 1958, Kienholz affixed a fully three- 
dimensional found object (a deer head) to a relief 
painting. This was the first work he titled in 
reference to a topical event (the crisis in racial 
integration at Little Rock), although the assem- 
blage was not conceived explicitly in symbolic 
terms. A year later, in the medicine show, Kien- 
holz adapted his relief painting in another manner 
by hinging the wooden armature to the wall surface, 
giving it the character of sculpture rather than 
drawing. Certain sections open and swing into 
space. Significantly, the work is valid both "open" 
and "closed" so that the viewer's active involve- 
ment is required to experience the work. Later this 
two-fold possibility became characteristic of many 
box-like assemblages. 

Reference to contemporary life was first implied 
in "eagle rock!' It appears more overtly in 
GOD-TRACKING STATION #1 (cat. no. 6) which was 
constructed in 1959 in response to Russia's launch- 
ing of Sputnik and subsequent anxiety in the United 
States. "STATION" is a machine designed to "over- 
take" the Soviets, at least psychologically, by 
photographing God; "in case it sees Him, it takes 
His picture!' said Kienholz. 

JOHN doe (cat. no. 9), his first free-standing con- 
struction, wryly synthesises the artist's view of the 
modern American male. It has been described well: 

John Doe . . .is a creature composed of a male 
department store dummy cut in half with the 
clothed upper portion facing front and greeting one 
with his desperate smile of friendship. He is the 
exquisite corpse of the great A merican masculine 
ideal resplendent with all of his standard status 
symbols all the way down to the white wall tires on 



which he rides— the carriage being obviously a baby 
stroller. Facing rear is the secret half of this ideal 
creature— the nude lower half of the manikin 
standing on a wooden box in which is concealed, 
for his own ego's protection, the symbol of the 
prowess he so much wants to believe he has.'* 

Other assemblages of this time were explicitly 
conceived as interpretations of topical issues and 
gave rise to Kienholz's reputation as a "social 
critic!' Yet it is misleading to categorize assemblages 
such a§ the psycho-vendetta case or history 
AS A PLANTER (cat. nos. 14, 18) only as social com- 
mentary, for to do so would oversimplify the point 
and soften the artist's thrust, "psycho-vendetta" 
refers to the execution of Caryl Chessman and by 
pun to Sacco and Vanzetti, but is not a protest 
against capital punishment per se; the assemblage 
declares that if Chessman's punishment had been 
in line with the justice of "an eye for an eye, a tooth 
for a tooth!' he should then have been sexually 
degraded, "psycho-vendetta" refers, as has been 
said of Bruce Conner's work, to a "murky connec- 
tion between the sexual and the maniacal, the 
never-ending dark dialogue of the sexual sickness 
and the social sickness!'^ history as a planter, 
with war-time news clippings and a swastika formed 
when the oven doors are closed, has been inter- 
preted as an expression of horror at the Nazi holo- 
caust. The theme actually concerns time and the 
white-wash it permits one to make of evil: the 
extermination of a people becomes, like a house- 
hold planter, a conversation piece, merely a subject 
for discussion in middle-class homes. As "social 
protest"" this is remote from the simplistic espousals 
and condemnations of 1 930s art, or from other 
conscience-stricken art implying a recognizable 
dichotomy of good and evil. 

It should be noted that in these works as in others 
of the late fifties, Kienholz's move off the wall led 
him to the box form. Containers of different kinds 
have continued to fascinate him and led to his 
creating the tableaux, roxy's, back seat dodge — 
'38 and the beanery (cat. nos. 22. 40, 46). Kien- 
holz has described the latter as a "large box or 
shipping crate!' The box shape serves two purposes: 
as an intractable, hmiting shape (like the wooden 



armatures of his relief paintings), it provides a 
secure matrix for impulsive painting and fiberglas 
smearing. Secondly, the box shape implies that the 
work of art may be handled as well as looked at. 
In Kienholz's view, consequently it gains status: 
the artist resents the idea of art as something unap- 
proachable, something to be revered at an emo- 
tionally safe distance. Kienholz would have the 
viewer more involved, even physically, by requiring 
that doors be opened and closed by him and that 
materials be touched and prodded. (The works are 
sturdily built to endure ordinary usage.) 

His work on assemblages like "psycho-ven- 
detta" was protracted and intense. Then a new 
series of boxes (cat. nos. 15-17)— low-toned, wryly 
conjectural rather than strident— provided relief 
from this intensity. These works convey Kienholz's 
penchant for symbolic caricature. They consist of 
wooden boxes in which are inserted manikin torsos 
cut in half lengthwise, covered with canvas and 
painted. The problem set by this series again con- 
cerned making variations in a restricted format. 
There is a sense here of formal exercise, recalling 
his self-imposed necessity in the fifties to produce a 
painting a day. Works such as American girl and 
AMERICAN LADY (cat. nos. 16, 17) are nevertheless 
fresh and lively. Comparing these is revealing: the 
high thigh of "girlT fragmented as it is, comes to 
seem an American fetish, like the desire for ever- 
larger eyes; the "lady's" torso becomes the quintes- 
sence of middle-aged dowager trim, and "when you 
open up AMERICAN lady;' remarked Kienholz, 
"you find there's nothing there!' 

However, rqxy's and the nativity (cat. nos. 
22, 23), Kienholz's first tableaux, were the artist's 
major efforts in 1 961 . Tableaux-Kienholz's term 
for his environmental assemblages-are discussed 
later as a group. 

Kienholz often derives inspiration for a series of 
works from the possibilities offered by specific 
materials. Such was the case with the early wood 
relief paintings and the series of sliced manikins. 
Late in 1961 he purchased a supply of tin and 
developed a series of wall-bound assemblages. Tin 
was combined with antlers and a small American 
eagle in blind ignus and with wads of steel wool. 



paper and a deer skull in queen for a day. (cat. 
nos. 24, 28) These extraordinary fusions of 
materials provoke some of the most sensuous tactile 
experiences in Kienholz's work. 

Although works such as ella laugh and the 
four bears (cat. nos. 32, 33) made later in 1962, 
were not inspired by the use of a new material they 
nevertheless seem to form parts of a series. This is 
due to two conditions. First, the assemblages are 
made of dark materials and painted and fiber- 
glassed in somber tones. Secondly, these works 
more sharply than before refer to autobiographical 
situations; the two works just mentioned, for 
example, were conceived as portraits of the artist's 
mother and father. From this point references to 
the artist's memories, needs and anxieties became 
increasingly frequent. 

After his first show in 1955 at a coffee shop in 
Los Angeles, the Cafe Galleria, Kienholz had regu- 
lar one-man exhibitions of his work at Syndell 
Studios, Ferus Gallery, and, in 1961, at the Pasa- 
dena Art Museum. He has since exhibited at Dwan 
Gallery in Los Angeles and New York. His reputa- 
tion and influence have steadily grown in the past 
decade. One Los Angeles artist has aptly expressed 
Kienholz's stature: "He has consistently marked 
one end of the polarity in art here. He works in the 
'farthest-out' region. Like Charlie Parker, you 
always know Kienholz is there'.' One source of such 
admiration is the extraordinary breadth of Kien- 
holz's craftsmanship, the vivid fusion of skills, from 
carpentry and electrical wiring to straight painting. 

Another source is the strength and fertility of 
Kienholz's inventiveness. He has constandy 
explored aesthetic territory other artists might be 
content to mine for decades, only to quickly dis- 
card it.* To defy the straight-jacket of "stylej' 
Kienholz has refused to maintain for long any set 
combination of technique, material and image. A 
new, extremely fecund series was begun in the 
Spring of 1963. Works such as a star is birthed 

and UNTITLED, or, I'M NOT A FIG PLUCKER NOR A 
FIG PLUCKER'S son, BUT I'LL PLUCK YOUR FIGS 'TIL 

A FIG PLUCKER COMES (cat. nos. 35, 37) are com- 
posed of cloth materials which have been covered 
with masking tape and then fibergla.s,sed. No paint 



is used in this series. Some of the artist's most com- 
pelling and mysterious images emerged— explicit 
symbolism became greatly reduced in favor of 
haunting images such as "untitled fig plucker:' 
consisting of a ripped medicine ball sitting heavily 
on a sling chair. Here the viewer's response is less 
to texture and surface provocations (as in the "tin 
series"), than to the strange and moving effect of 
objects of mass and structure in space. The space 
where Kienholz chose to work is uncannily affect- 
ing; he spoke of wanting to "work close to the floor; 
to consume the space between where paintings 
hang and the ground!' Rug-thin plastic bases permit 
the objects to sit right on the ground; the shiny 
reflective surfaces illumine the undersides of the 
objects. 

The consistent element in Kienholz's work since 
his rehef paintings has been the use of junk mate- 
rials. When artists on both coasts turned to the use 
of junk materials in the late fifties, a common tend- 
ency emerged: to transform the lowliest of material 
into elegant and beautiful shapes. Often the point 
was so easily proved that one wondered if it was 
worth making. In fact, the more successful the 
sculpture, as in work by sculptor John Chamber- 
lain, the less it seemed to depend on the fact that 
the material once had been junk. In contrast, Kien- 
holz makes no romantic attempt to transform his 
material into precious stuff. He accepts the qualities 
of age and usage— he is touched by the history 
every object exudes, "all the little tragedies are 
evident in junk',' he once remarked— but he changes 
one essential characteristic: to junk, the symbol of 
imminent death, Kienholz lends permanence. 
Another artist might use chrome to radiate a sense 
of permanence, a quality chrome is unsuited for; 
contrarily Kienholz pours fiberglas resin on cloth 
and thereby grants to an ephemeral material a 
sense of eternity. There is an inversion here, an 
ironical jab at the viewer's conditioned responses. 



The basic thing about Los Angeles . . . was that 
it lacked the dimensions of time . . . There were no 
seasons there, no days of the week, no night and 
day; beyond that, there was (or was supposed to be) 
no youth and age. But worst and most frightening, 
there was no past and future — only an eternal 
dizzying present^ 



In a city which strives to deny time, the cit}' 
chosen by the artist as his home, Kienholz, primar- 
ily in his tableaux, has made an art redolent of 
time's ineffable claim. A compelling theme in these 
environmental works concerns the transformations 
wrought by time. Concern with time was noted 
earlier in the 1 960 box-like history as a planter. 
In works such as roxy's, back seat dodge— '38 
and THE beanery, specific historical moments are 
recreated. 

roxy's, referring to a Las Vegas bordello, 
was made in 1961 and is set in 1943. It can 
be dated 1 943 by a calendar and magazines, the 
furniture and clothing styles, juke box tunes, the 
call-to-arms portrait of General MacArthur. 
"dodge" created in 1964, evokes the war-time 
period with other objects, such as brand-name beer 
bottles, cigarette wrappers, the shoes and the rac- 
coon tail on the radio aerial. The used 1938 car 
model, commonly the property of teen-agers in the 
war years, along with these vintage objects, evokes 
the life-style of a rural adolescent generation in the 
forties, the beanery, made in 1965, presents the 
Los Angeles painters' bar, Barney's Beanery, in 
1964— dated precisely by the newspapers in the 
stand at the entrance way. Evidence of Kienholz's 
growth and ambition is verified in his latest work, 
in which he chooses to contend with recent time, 
rather than the already determined, resolved period 
of his youth. The artist went to extraordinary 
lengths, foraging and scavenging endlessly for min- 
ute elements necessary to recapture the nuances of 
a moment. Many earlier artists, especially 1 9th 
century "history painters'' also set up extensive and 
detailed reconstructions— but only as models. 
Meissonier anticipated Hollywood's flamboyant 
productions by arranging costumed figures, stacks 
of straw and great heaps of cotton when real snow 
could not be made available. Today, some would 



find the models more interesting than Meissonier's 
transformation into oil on canvas. Ivan Albright is 
a recent example of another artist also concerned 
with time who painted from a model he laboriously 
constructed. His "Poor Room— There is No Time, 
No End, No Today, No Yesterday, Only the For- 
ever, and Forever and Forever Without End" was 

painted from a life-size model. When exhibited 
beside the oil it projected a startling presence rival- 
ing that of the painting.* 

Kienholz's assemblages project an uncanny 
immediacy because they are the three-dimensional 
"models^ not a translation. More important, how- 
ever, is the artist's attitude about the past. For 
Kienholz does not recreate the past so much as he 
frankly proffers a view of the past by the present. 
Despite the artist's meticulous use of 1 943 props, 
for example, the viewer does not feel he has been 
thrown back in time. One's experience with a 
Kienholz tableau is not related to the shivery won- 
der felt in a wax-works museum. Nor is there the 
fascinating deception of the senses provoked by 
trompe I'oeil wizardry. In roxy's the figures do not 
merge with their environment— they are deliberately 
set apart by their placements on white tile bases— 
they are isolated from their setting as objects of art. 
Although THE BEANERY presents a more integrated 
relationship between figure and environment, a 
similar implication of the present moment is con- 
veyed by the reduced scale: the compression of 
space (the beanery is two-thirds the size of 
Barney's Beanery) makes the viewer vividly aware 
that he is in a work of art. 

This attitude of simultaneously fusing imitation 
with creation, literalness with outrageous fancy, is 
singularly contemporary. It is an attitude shared by 
an artist like Roy Lichtenstein, who has chosen the 
style and subject of a specific period— comics dating 
from the time of the Korean War. Except in scale 
his paintings are stardingly close to the appearance 
of the original cartoons. When they were first 
shown, it was said that Lichtenstein had failed to 
change the original source in any way except to 
blow it up, that he had made "no transformation!' 
Another equally disparaging critic maintained that 
Lichtenstein was actually just another hard-edge 



painter— but one with a "handle!' The balloons, 
words and strip figures were interpreted as soften- 
ing devices, a means of disguising the true nature of 
the work, clean and fashionable abstractions of the 
1960's, to permit facile audience acceptance. 
Lichtenstein was thus damned simultaneously as 
being imitatively "fifties" and modish "sixties!' In 

fact, Lichtenstein, like Kienholz, so aggressively 
recaptured the past that it became identifiable with 
the present. The fusion of time is integrated and 
complete: past and present become interchangeable 
—and almost palpable. 

Kienholz contends with time in other tableaux to 
achieve different effects. In the birthday (cat. no. 
39) the precise instant of birth is seized in an image 
of agony, the illegal operation (cat. no. 34) 
presents the instant after a ferocious seizure of hfe. 
In both works, he attempts to arrest and hold the 
most elusive moments of existence. In contrast, the 
wait (cat. no. 44) is a compendium of memories: 
souvenirs are strung in a necklace of glass jars 
around the old woman's neck. In a detail of roxy's, 
FiFi, a lost angel, Kienholz has combine^ the 
face of an infant, the torso of a girl (with a clock in 
her stomach) and a mature woman's legs. And in 
many works Kienholz chooses a timely issue— the 
Chessman execution, the summit meeting embar- 
assment (the u. s. duck or home from the 
SUMMIT, cat. no. 11), the Kennedy assassination 
(instant on, cat. no. 43)— and makes the issue 
define the time. 

THE BEANERY is hls most complex and ambi- 
tious attempt to cope with time, particularly since 
the recent time of the tableau presses upon the 
present.' Each of seventeen figures' heads is a clock. 
Fifteen of them are fixed at the same time (10:10, 
to suggest eyebrows as well as an appropriate time 
for the scene). The head of the proprietor, "Barney!' 
however was cast from life. Aloof from the crowd, 
he reads a newspaper, immersed in the "real" time 
indicated by a newspaper outside his bar, the 
August 28, 1964 issue of The Herald-Examiner 
headlined "Children Kill Children in Viet Nam 
Riots!' Kienholz has summed it up: "The whole 
thing symbolizes going from real time— the August 
28 headline— to surrealist time inside the bar where 



people waste time, lose time, escape time, ignore 
time!' Contrast between the continuous quality of 
real time and the suspension of escape time is 
movingly conveyed by the loud sounds of music 
and talk, recorded in the actual bar, which suddenly 
cease and throw the tableau into sharp, frozen relief. 
As in THE BEANERY One is invited to participate 

in the tableaux of roxy's and the "dodge!' One can 
sit on a sofa, smoke, browse through magazines, 
read letters, open compartments, treadle the sewing 
machine of five dollar billy (p. 29); or peer into 
the automobile and become involved by the omni- 
present mirrors, which call forth one's own pres- 
ence. These tableaux are womb-like enclosures, 
with one entrance which is the only exit. They come 
fully equipped to provide for all the senses : sound 
(forties tunes in the juke box, on the radio), smell 
(incense, perfume and the mixed odors of kitchen 
and bathroom) and touch (fiberglassed mink, a 
blue flock paint job). These enclosures offer sanc- 
tuary to their inhabitants and to the viewer. But 
the artist makes clear that sanctuary based on the 
past is always frightful delusion; roxy's is night- 
marish, the "dodge" is nothing more than a dodge. 
Kienholz involves the viewer, forces him into 
confrontation with the present by thrusting the past 
at him. Time, in Kienholz's work, is the call to 
seize the moment. 



1 This reminds him now of the human brushes of Yves Klein, 
although Kienholz did not know then the work of the late 
French painter. 

2 Some of these titles: "George Warshington in Drag!' "They 
Tarred and Feathered the Angel of PeaceJ' "The Bluebird of 
Happiness Returns as a Bleached Blonde;' "Diagram Without 
Little B's!' 

3 Jules Langsner, "Los Angeles;' An News, vol. 55, no. 9, January 
1957, p. 62. 

4 Donald Factor, "Assemblage;' FM & Fine Arts, vol. 3, no. 9, 
September 1962, p. 7. 

5 Philip Leider, "Bruce Conner: A New Sensibility;' Artfonim, 
vol. 1, no. 6. December 1962. p. 30. 

6 He used sound in 1959 in "Pioneer #1 with Hemstitch and 
Buttonhole Attachment"— firecrackers were imbedded in this 
rocket" and exploded; smell was provided in 1961 by incense, 
perfume and disinfectants in "Roxy's"; motion came first in 
"John Doe;' 1959, and then in 1960 in "Odious to Rauschen- 
berg (which also contained a diathermy machine)— and there 
was a "soft sculpture" in 1960: the long twisted neck of "The 
Critic" is made of stuffed cloth. 

7 Alison Lurie, "The Nowhere City;' New York, Coward- 
McCann, 1966, p. 267, quoted by Charles Champlin in the 
Los Angeles Times. February 13, 1966. 

8 The painting and the model were exhibited in the Albright 
retrospective at the Art Institute of Chicago, 1964. 

9 Writing on Pop artists, Barbara Rose noted that "the artist 
•senses the present so quickly becoming the past that he already 

feels a nostalgia for it;' and that these artists "approach time 
from the angle of the frozen moment" ("Dada Then and Now;' 
Art International, vol. 7, no. 1, January 25, 1963, p. 26). 



10 



One-man Exhibitions 



1955 

March 

Cafe Galleria, Los Angeles 

May to June 1 

Coronet Louvre, Los Angeles 

1956 
November 24 to December 16 
Syndell Studios, Los Angeles 

1958 

January 6 to 3 1 

Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles 

(with A I toon, De Feo) 

March 9 to 29 

Exodus Gallery, San Pedro 

1959 

February 17 to March 14 

Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles 

(with Bengston) 

1960 

December 5 to 3 1 

Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles 

1961 

May 17 to June 21 

Pasadena Art Museum 

1962 

March 6 to 24 

Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles 

1963 

February 5 to 23 

Alexander Tolas Gallery, New York 

June 17 to July 6 

Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles 

1964 
September 29 to October 24 
Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles 

1965 

October 23 to 25 

Barney's Beanery. Los Angeles 

(a three-day showing of "The Beanery") 

November 23 to December 29 

Dwan Gallery, New York 



Bibliography (chronologically) 



Major Articles 

"The Story of an Artist" (Motion 
picture). David L. Wolper Productions, 
196). 26min., sd., b&w, 16 mm. 
Credits: Producer, writer and director, 
William Kronick. 

FACTOR, DONALD. "Assemblage" 
FM and Fine Arts [Beverly Hills], 
vol. 3, no. 9, September 1962, 
pp. 6-9, illus. pp. 6-9. 

SECUNDA, ARTHUR. "Johu Bernhardt, 
Charles Frazier, Edward Kienholz'," 
Artforiim, vol. 1 no. 5, [November 
1962], pp. 30-34, illus. pp. 31, 33. 

FACTOR, DONALD. "A Portfolio of 
California Sculptors: Edward 
Kienholz" Artforum, vol. 2, no. 2, 
August 1963, pp. 24-25, illus. p. 25. 

LEIDER, PHILIP. "Art: Kienholz^ 
Frontier [Los Angeles], vol. 16, no. 1, 
November 1964, p. 25. 

COPLANS, JOHN. "Assemblage: The 
Savage Eye of Edward Kienholz" 
Studio International, vol. 170, no. 869, 
September 1965, pp. 1 12-115, 
Ulus. pp. 112-115. 

GABLIK, suzi. "Crossing the Bar" Art 
News, vol. 64, no. 6, October 1965, 
pp. 22-25, illus. pp. 22-25. 

HOPKINS, HENRY T. "Edward Kienholz;' 
Art in America, vol. 53, no. 5, October- 
November 1965, p. 73, ill. p. 73. 

WIGHT, FREDERICK s. "Edward Kien- 
holz" Art in America, vol. 53, no. 5, 
October-November 1965, pp. 70-72, 
illus. pp. 70-72. 

"Art: Painting;' Time, vol. 86, no. 25, 
December 17, 1965, pp. 68-73, 
illus. pp. 69-72. 

"Art: TTie Beanery;' Newsweek, 
vol. 66, no. 25, December 20, 1965, 
pp. 103-103A,illus. p. 103. 

"Art: Beanery Built For Art;' Life, 
vol. 60, no. 2, January 14, 1966, 
pp. 78-80, 83, illus. pp. 78-81 , 83. 

Reviews of One-Man and 
Group Exhibitions 

LANGSNER, JULES. "Art News from 
Los Angeles: Kienholz, Earle;' 
Art News, vol. 55, no. 9, January 1957, 
p. 62. 

LANGSNER, JULES. "Art: San Gabriel 
Show Viewed;' Los Angeles Times, 
October 27, 1957, part V, p. 8. 



LANGSNER, JULES. "Art News from 
Los Angeles: San Gabriel Valley 
Annual;' Art News. vol. 56. no. 8, 
December 1957, pp. 51, 54. 

LANGSNER, JULES. "Art News from 
Los Angeles: Other Shows Around Los 
Angeles;' Art News, vol. 57, no. 1 
March 1958, p. 54. 

NORDLAND, GERALD. "Art;' Frontier, 
vol. 9, no. 5, March 1958, p. 22. 

LANGSNER, JULES. "Art News from 
Los Angeles: Kienholz Collages Inter 
Alia;' Art News, vol. 58, no. 2, April 
1959, pp. 65-66. 

LANGSNER, JULES. "Los Angelcs Letter;' 
Art International, vol. 5, no. 1, 
February 1, 1961, pp. 68-70, ill. p. 70. 

"College Exhibiting Far-Out Art Works;' 
Progress-Bulletin [Pomona, Calif.], 
February 1 5, 1 96 1 , Section 2, p. 1 1 , 
ill. p. 11. 

ASHTON, DORE. "Art;' Arts and Archi- 
tecture, vol. 78, no. 3, March 1961, 
pp.7, 11. 

NORDLAND, GERALD. "Kicnholz Happy, 
Affirmative in New Pasadena Art 
Show;' Los Angeles Mirror, May 22, 

1961, p. 2. 

SUMNER, BILL. "Sumner's Report: Art 
Show Comment? &%$x?c!" Pasadena 
Independent, June 2, 1961, p. A- 1. 

MYHERS, JIM. "Neo-Dadist Field Day 
in Pasadena: It's Really Very Symbol;' 
Pasadena Independent, June 8, 1961, 
pp. 1, 3, illus. p. 3. 

COATES, ROBERT M. "The Art Galleries: 
Innovations;' New Yorker, vol. 37, 
no. 36, October 21, 1961, pp. 175-176, 
178-179. 

NORDLAND, GERALD. "Art : The Art of 
Assemblage;' Frontier, vol. 13, no. 3, 
January 1962, pp. 22-24. 

ASHTON, DORE. "Art;' Arts and Archi- 
tecture, vol. 79, no. 1. January 1962, 
pp. 4-5, 32-33. 

ASHTON, DORE. "Art USA 1962;' 
Studio, vol. 163, no. 827, March 1962, 
pp. 84-95, ill. p. 92. 

LANGSNER, JULES. "Los Angeles Letter;' 
Art International, vol. 6, no. 3, April 

1962, pp. 64-67, ill. p. 66. 

NORDLAND, GERALD. "Neo-Dada Goes 
West;' Arts, vol. 36, no. 9, May-June 
1962, pp. 102-103. 



BOGAT, REGINA. "Fifty California 
Artists;' Artforum, vol. 1, no. 7, 
[January 1963], pp. 23-26. 

LANGSNER, JULES. "Los Angeles Letter',' 
Art International, vol. 7, no. 1, January 
25. 1963,pp. 81-83,ill.p. 81. 

SMITH, VIC. "Reviews: Los Angeles: 
TTie Pacific Coast Invitational, Fine 
Arts Gallery of San Diego;' Artforum, 
vol. 1, no. 8, February 1963, pp. 9-10. 

WHOLDEN, r[osahnd] g. "Reviews: 
Los Angeles: My Country 'Tis of Thee, 
Dwan Gallery;' Artforum, vol. 1, 
no. 8, February 1963, p. 20. ill. p. 20. 

ASHTON, DORE. "Art : Ed Kienholz;' 
Arts and Architecture, vol. 80, no. 3, 
March 1963, p. 6, ill. p. 6. 

C, L. [LAWRENCE CAMPBELL]. "RevieWS 

and Previews: New Names TTiis 
Month: Edward Kienholz;' Art News, 
VOL 62, no. 1, March 1963, p. 17, 
ill. p. 17. 

JUDD, DONALD. "In the Galleries: 
Edward Kienholz;' Arts, vol. 37, no. 6, 
March 1963. pp. 63-64. 

rose, BARBARA. "New 'Vork Letter;' 
Art International, vol. 7, no. 3, 
March 25, 1963, pp. 65-68, illus. p. 66. 

Mc CLELLAN, DOUG. "Rcviews: Los 
Angeles: Dealers Choice, Dwan 
Gallery;' /I r//ori/«j. vol. l,no. 11, 
May 1963, p. 50. 

LEIDER, PHILIP. "Three Major Group 
Exhibitions: The Ideas in the 
Exhibitions'.' Artforum, vol. 1. no. 12, 
June 1963, pp. 21-23. 

MC CLELLAN, DOUG. "Reviews : Los 
Angeles: The Object Maker;' -4 r//<?r«m, 
vol. 1, no. 12, June 1963, p. 14. 

WOLFE, CLAIR. "The Art of Evii;' 
Beverly Hills Times, July 5, 1963, p. 4. 

BERKMAN, FLORENCE. "SculptOr and 

Curator Give Views: How Far Out 
Does Art Extend?;' The Hartford Times 
[Hartford, Conn.], July 6, 1963, p. 26, 
ill. p. 26. 

LANGSNER, JULES. "Art News from Los 
Angeles: Kienholz;' Art News. vol. 62, 
no. 5, September 1963, p. 16, ill. p. 15. 

LANGSNER, JULES. "Los Angeles Letter;' 
Art International, vol. 7, no. 8, 
October 25, 1963, pp. 80-81, ill. p. 81. 

HOPPS, WALTER. "Boxes;' Art Inter- 
national, vol. 8. no. 2, March 20, 1964, 
pp. 38-42. 



12 



REUSCHEL, JOHN. "Edward Kienholz, 
Three Tableaux, Dwan Gallery'," 
Artforum, vol. 3, no. 1, September 
1964, p. 14, ill. p. 15. 

RIVAS, PAUL. "Art Forum',' Beverly Hills 
Times, October 2, 1964, p. 7. 

sEi-Dis, HENRY J. "In the Galleries: 
Kienholz Artistry Deeply Pessimistic" 
Los Angeles Times, October 2, 1964, 
Part IV, p. 9. 

WHOLDEN, ROSALIND G. "Los Angelesl' 
Arts, vol. 39, no. 3, December 1964, 
pp. 14-15. 

"Art: Sculpture: Era of the Object;' 
Time, vol. 84, no. 24, December 11, 
1964, p. 84. 

COPLANS, JOHN. "Art News from Los 
Angeles: Kienholz, Compulsive 
Puritan',' Art News, vol. 63, no. 10, 
February 1965, p. 51, ill. p. 51. 

ROSE, BARBARA. "Looking at American 
Sculpture^' '^rr/orHm, vol. 3, no. 5, 
February 1965, pp. 29-36. 

WILSON, WILLIAM. "In the Galleries: 
Competitive, Demanding Art in 
UCLA's Dwan Collection;' Los 
Angeles Times, October 15, 1965, 
Part V, p. 7. 

SEIDENBAUM, ART. "Spectator: Scenery 
in Hollywood Beanery;' Los Angeles 
Times, October 22, 1965, Part FV, 
pp. 1, 10. 

BART, PETER. "Art in a Beanery Is 
Beanery As Art;' New York Times, 
vol. 115, no. 39, 359, Thursday, 
October 28, 1965, p. 50. 

OPLIGER, CURT. "Los Angcles: The 
Virginia Dwan Collection;' Artforum, 
vol. 4, no. 4, December 1965, p. 16. 

Related Material 

NORDLAND, GERALD. "Art;' Frontier, 
vol. 8, no. 2, December 1956, p. 24. 

"Edward Kienholz, Abstractionist: He 
Constructs a Painting;' The Spokesman- 
Review: Inland Empire Magazine 
[Seattle, Wash.], February 10, 1957, 
p. 5, illus. p. 5. 

SEITZ, WILLIAM c. The A rt of 
Assemblage, New York, The Museum 
of Modem Art, 1961, pp. 81,85,86, 
ill. p. 134. 

JANIS, HARRIET AND RUDI BLESH. 

Collage: Personalities, Concepts, 
Techniques, Philadelphia, New York, 
Chilton Company, 1962, pp. 232-233. 

SEITZ, WILLIAM c. "Assemblage: 
Problems and Issues;' /I rr International, 
vol. 6, no. 1, February 1962, pp. 26-34. 



LANGSNER, JULES. "Art News from Los 
Angeles: Ant i- Art Demonstrations;' 
Art News, vol. 61 , no. 3, May 1962, 
p. 46. 

CULLER, GEORGE D. "California Artists;' 
Art in America, vol. 50, no. 3, Fall 

1962, pp. 84-85, ill. p. 89. 

HODGES, DONALD CLARK. "Junk 

Sculpture: What Does It Mean?;' 
Artforum, vol. 1, no. 5 [November 
1962], p. 34. 

COPLANS, JOHN. "Common Object 
Paintings;' Artforum, vol. 1, no. 6 
[December 1962], pp. 26-29. 

COPLANS, JOHN. "British Art Today;' 
Artforum, vol. 1, no. 7 [January 1963], 
pp. 27-31. 

"Nude Torso Stops Show: Art Exhibit 
Closes After Senate Acts;' Valley State 
Sundial [San Fernando Valley State 
College, Northridge, Calif.], March 19, 

1963, pp. 1, 5, m.p. 1. 

SELDis, HENRY J. "In the Galleries: 
Area Art Centers Buzzing Over 
'Censorship' Row;' Los Angeles Times 
March 22, 1963, Part IV, p. 6. 

ciFARELLi, TONY. "Banned Art To 
Return: 'Objectional' Torso Shown Off 
Campus;' Valley State Sundial [San 
Fernando Valley State College, North- 
ridge, Calif.], March 29, 1963, pp. 1, 5. 

THOMPSON, MIKE. "Questionable Art 
Motivates Faculty Action;' Valley 
State Sundial [San Fernando Valley 
State College, Northridge, Calif.], 
March 29, 1963, pp. 1,4. 

CULLER, GEORGE D. "Dada and 
Surrealism;' Art in America, vol. 51, 
no. 2, April 1963, pp. 68-75, ill. p. 75. 

DIAMOND, BETH. "Off-Campus Art 
Exhibit Stopped Here;' Valley State 
Sundial [San Fernando Valley State 
College, Northridge, Calif.], April 2, 
1963, p. 1. 

NORDLAND, GERALD. "Art : 'Bunny 
Bunny'-Not So Funny;' Frontier, vol. 
14, no. 7, May 1963, pp. 19-21. 

COPLANS, JOHN. "Sculpture in 
California;' Artforum, vol. 2, no. 2, 
August 1963, pp. 3-6. 

COPLANS, JOHN. "Notcs from San 
Francisco;' Art International, vol. 7, 
no. 8, October 25, 1963, pp. 91-94, 
ill. p. 92. 

NORDLAND, GERALD. "The Suppression 
of Art;' Artforum, vol. 2, no. 5, 
November 1963, pp. 25-26, ill. p. 26. 

COPLANS, JOHN. "Wallace Berman;' 
Artforum, vol. 2, no. 9, March 1964, 
pp. 26-27. 



GENAUER, EMILY. "Can This Be Art?;' 
Ladies' Home Journal, vol. 81, no. 2, 
March 1964, pp. 151-155. 

FACTOR, DONALD. "Assemblage;' 
Artforum. vol. 2, no. 12, Summer 
1964, p. 38, illus. p. 39, cover. 

COPLANS, JOHN. "Circle of Styles on 
the West Coast;' Art in America, 
vol. 52, no. 3, June 1964, pp. 24-41, 
ill. p. 34. 

o'doherty, brun. "The Present and 
Future of Pornography: In the 
Galleries;' Show, vol. 4, no. 6, June 

1964, pp. 55, 89. 

GORDIN, SU)NEY. "Letters;' Artforum, 
vol. 3, no. 1, September 1964, p. 57. 
[A poem by Anita Fisher in response 
to "The Birthday"]. 

geldzahler, HENRY. "Los Angeles: 
The Second City of Art;' Vogue, vol. 
144, no. 5, whole number 2125, 
September 15, 1964, pp. 42, 56, 62, 64, 

ROSE, BARBARA. "New York Letter: 
Lucas Samaras: His Life in Art;' Art 
International, vol. 8, no. 9, November 
25, 1964, p. 54 

Art '65: Lesser Known and Unknown 
Painters: Young A merican Sculpture- 
East to West, New York, American 
Express Co. [1965], p. 83. [Catalog for 
an exhibition at the American Express 
Pavilion, New York World's Fair, 
1965]. 

Happenings (& Actions), U.S'. Pop Art, 
Nouveau Realisms, Etc., Dusseldorf, 
Germany, Kalendar, Hansjoachim 
Dietrich, February 1965, illus. 
pp. 94-95. 

COPLANS, JOHN. "Los Angcles: The 
Scene',' Art News, vol. 64, no. 1, March 

1965, pp. 28-29, 56-58, ill. p. 29. 

SELDIS, HENRY J. " 'Art of Assemblage' 
—the Power of Negative Thinking;' 
Los Angeles Times: Calendar, March 
18, 1965, p. 26. 

"Art: Artists: Assemblage at the 
Frontier;' Time, vol. 86, no. 16, Octo- 
ber 15, 1965, pp. 106-108, ill. p. 107. 

WURDEMANN, HELEN. "A Stroll on La 
Cienega;' Art in America, vol. 53, 
no. 5, October-November 1965, 
pp. 115-118. 

"Essay: The Year's Best, or. There is 
Room at the Top;' Time, vol. 86, 
no. 27, December 3 1 , 1965, p. 17. 

"The Beanery" (Motion picture). A film 
by Tom Koester and Ginny Ernst, 1965. 
12 min., sd., color, 16 mm. 

ROSE, BARBARA. "Los Angcles: The 
Second City;' Art in America, vol. 54, 
no. 1, January-February 1966, 
pp. 110-115. 



13 



Catalog of the Exhibition 

1 

Triptych 
Painted wood on plywood 

1»56 70 X 61" 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Robert Regehr 

2 

Church 

Painted wood on plywood 

1957 74 X 36" 

Lent by the«artist 

3 

George Warshington in Drag 

Painted wood on plywood 

1957 32'/2 X 36" 

Lent by Walter Hopps 

4 

The Little Eagle Rock Incident 

Painted stuffed deer head on plywood 

1958 61 '2 X 48% X 17" 
Lent by Alexander lolas Gallery 

5 

The Medicine Show 

Painted wood and hinges on plywood 

1959 68>^ X 48V4 x 23" 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Monte Factor 

6 

God Tracking Station *1 

Materials include painted oil lantern, camera, training 

chair, plastic animal, wood 

1959 29?4 X 52x13" 

Lent by Alexander Tolas Gallery 

7 

Conversation Piece 

Materials include painted manikin parts, boots on plywood 

1959 44 X 30 X 37" 

Lent by Walter Hopps 

8 

Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps 

Materials include painted sign, wood, bones, candy 

1959 78 X 34 X 12" 

Lent by Edwin Janss 

9 

John Doe 

Materials include painted perambulator, toy, manikin parts 

1959 41 X 19 X 34" 
Lent by Sterling Holloway 

10 

O'er the Ramparts We Watched, Fascinated 

Materials include painted doll parts, electronic parts on wood 

1959 liVi X 45V^ x 5" 

Lent by Ferus Gallery 

11 

The U.S. Duck or Home from the Summit 

Materials include painted stuffed duck in wooden box 

1960 28'/2 X 21 x 6" 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Michael Blankfort 

12 

The American Way, U 

A hidden construction covered with painted canvas 

1960 22x22x7'/2" 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Michael Blankfort 

13 

Odious to Rauschenberg 

Materials include painted wood, canvas, stuffed deer head, 

motor, diathermy machine, tape recorder 

1960 42x22x16%" 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Hirsh 

14 

The Psycho-Vendetta Case 

Materials include painted wood, canvas, tin cans, handcuffs 

I960 23x22x16" 

Lent by Ferus Gallery 



15 

Bestform 

Materials include painted canvas, wooden box 

I960 26 x 20'/4 X 9W' 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Donald Factor 

16 

American Girl 
Materials include painted canvas, manikin, wooden box 

1960 20% X 13W X 3" 

Lent by the artist 

17 

American Lady 

Materials include painted canvas, manikin, doll's eye, 

wooden box 

1960 37xllWxl5" 

Lent by Dr. and Mrs. Merle S. Glick 

18 

History as a Planter 

Materials include painted kiln, manikin parts, Wandering Jew 

plant, Jew's harp, newspaper 

1961 33 X 185/9 X 12H" 
Collection Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 

Contemporary Art Council Fund 

19 

The Big Eye 

Materials include painted TV console, plastic, 

newspaper, figurine 

1961 56x24x30" 

Lent by Miss Virginia Dwan 

20 

Tomorrow's Leaders Are Busy Tonight 

Materials include painted wood, doll parts, bones, metal, glass 

1961 64 X 11 X 10" 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Monte Factor 

21 

// Takes Two to Integrate, Cha Cha Cha 

Materials include painted dolls, dried fish, glass in wooden box 

1961 31x22x7" 

Lent by Ferus Gallery 

22 

Roxy's 

Materials include furniture, bric-a-brac, live goldfish, incense, 

disinfectant, perfume, juke box, clothing, etc. 

1961 

The Madame 

Materials include paints and fiberglas, boar's skull, dress form 

1961 56V4X 20x17" 

Dianna Poole, Miss Universal 

Materials include paints and fiberglas, manikin parts, 

burlap sack, puppets, chair 

1961 40x17x32" 

Cockeyed Jenny 

Materials include paints and fiberglas, artificial legs, 

bed pan, garbage pail 

1961 30 X 30V4 X 35" 

Miss Cherry Delight 

Materials include paints and filjerglas, motor, chicken wire, 

manikin parts, cosmetics, jewelry 

1961 Table: 61 x 37 x 20W" Stool; 19 x 18 x 17" 

Five Dollar Billy 

Materials include paints and fiberglas, sewing machine, 

manikin parts, squirrel, nuts 

1961 40 X 45 X 22V'4" 

Fifi, A Lost Angel 

Materials include paints and fiberglas, manikin parts, 

doll parts, clock, cards 

1961 26 X t2V4 X 22V5" 

Ben Brown 

Materials include paints and fiberglas, manikin parts, towel, 

pitcher, bread box, chastity belt 

1961 45x20x24!^" 



14 



A Lady Named Zoa 

(duplicate by the artist of "A Lady Named Zoe," 1960) 

Materials include paints and fiberglas, manikin parts, 

dispensing machine, enameling kiln, stool 

1962 64x 18x 18" 

Lent by Dwan Gallery 

23 

The Nativity 

Materials include painted wood, fiberglas, metal, glass, 

jewelry, cloth, bones, stuffed toys 

1961 101V2 xl80xS6V4" 

Lent by the artist 

24 

Queen for a Day 

Materials include bones, steel wool, glass, paper on 

sheet metal 

1961 44x20x3V2" 

Lent by the L. M. Asher Family 

25 

The Widow 

Materials include painted plaster heads, wood, metal, 

aluminum foil, fur 

1962 433^ X 45 X 16W 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Donald Factor 

26 

The Gossip 

Materials include painted masks, hair, tin, glass, stuffed cloth 

1962 26 X 37 X 15" 

Lent by Ferus Gallery 

27 

Ode to Kathy Fiscus 

Materials include doll parts, stained glass window, aluminum 

foil, toys on sheet metal 

1962 24x28x 3'/2" 

Lent by Sterling Holloway 

28 

Blind I gnus 

Materials include deer antlers, toys, insulators on sheet metal 

1962 61% X 24 X 4Vz" 

Lent by Dwan Gallery 

29 

The Quicky 

Materials include painted manikin parts, roller skate, 

gold braid 

1962 22 X 15 X 10" 

Lent by Brooke and Dennis Hopper 

30 

Untitled American President 

Materials include paint and fiberglas, milk can, bicycle seat 

1962 25x9x9" 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. John F. Thompson 

31 

The Daddy Fish 

Materials include dispensing machine, dolls, lamp shade, 

stuffed fish on wood 

1962 58 X 25 x 17" 

Lent by Ferus Gallery 

32 

The Four Bears 

Materials include flberglassed wood, stuffed bear parts, 

cello stem, life preserver, glass bowl 

1962 43 X 29 X 32" 

Lent by Dwan Gallery 

33 

Ella Laugh 

Materials include flberglassed white tape, garbage can, 

metal letters, smoke cloth, deer antlers 

1962 50 X 43 X 38" 

Lent by Dwan Gallery 

34 

The Illegal Operation 

Materials include flberglassed shopping cart, furniture, 

concrete, medical implements 

1962 59 X 48 X 54" 

Lent by Dwan Gallery 



35 

A Star Is Birthed 

Materials include flberglassed, taped globe, plasma stand, 

stuffed cloth, wheels 

1963 72x48x50" 

Lent by Miss Virginia Dwan 

36 

National Banjo on the Knee Week 

Materials include flberglassed, taped furniture, rug, flag, 

mirror, scale, hat box 

1963 110x48x30" 

Lent by Dwan Gallery 

37 

Untitled, or, I'm Not a Fig Plucker Nor a Fig Plucker's Son, 

But I'll Pluck Your Figs 'til a Fig Plucker Comes 

Materials include flberglassed, taped canvas chair, 

medicine ball 

1963 37 X 34 X 30" 

Lent by Dwan Gallery 

38 

The Sky Is Falling: A ct One 

Materials include flberglassed, taped chair, cocoanut husk, 

lamp base 

1963 45 X 24 X 22" 
Lent by Dwan Gallery 

39 

The Birthday 

Materials include paints, fiberglas and flock, furniture, 

clothing, manikin, lucite 

1964 84 X 120 x 60" 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Frederick R. Weisman 

40 

Back Seat Dodge -'38 

Materials include paints, fiberglas and flock, 1938 Dodge, 

chicken wire, beer bottles, artiflcial grass, cast plaster figure 

1964 66" X 20' X 144" 

Lent by Dwan Gallery 

41 

The Commercial 

Materials include flberglas, cloth, lunch pail, antenna, cup 

1964 7"/2 X 9 X IW 
Lent by Miss Virginia Dwan 

42 

Six o'clock News 

Materials include flberglas and flock, mop squeezer, light, 

glass, knobs 

1964 20'/2X 10x91/2" 
Lent anonymously 

43 

Instant On 

Materials include flberglas and flock, electric blanket control. 

photographs, antenna 

1964 11 x6x6" 

Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Monte Factor 

44 

The Wait 

Materials include paints, flberglas and flock, furniture, bones, 

clothing, photographs, live bird 

1964-65 80" x 20'8" x 78" 

Lent by Whitney Museum of American Art, Gift of the 
Howard and Jean Lipman Foundation, Inc. 

45 

The Friendly Grey Computer— Star Gauge Model 54 

Materials include fiberglas, paint, electronic componenls, 

doll parts, rocking chair 

1965 40 X 39i^ x 24'/2" 

Lent by The Museum of Modern Art. Gift of 
Jean and Howard Lipman 

46 

The Beanery 

Materials include fiberglas, paint, varnishes, shellacs, wood, 

bottles, metal, cast plaster figures, clothing, juke box, 

tape recorder, odor-producing chemicals 

1965 84" X 72" x 22' 

Lent by The Kleiner Foundation 



15 




Triptych 
Painted wood on plywood 

1956 70x61" 



17 








top 

Church 
Painted wood on plywood 

1957 74 X 36" 



bottom 

George Warshington in Drag 
Painted wood on plywood 

1957 32Vi X 36" 



18 





top: God Tracking Station #1 
Materials include painted oil lantern, camera, training 
chair, plastic animal, wood 
1959 29% X 52x 13" 



The Little Eagle Rock Incident 

Painted stuffed deer head on plywood 

1958 611,2 X 48% X 22" 




The Medicine Show 

Painted wood and hinges on plywood 

1959 eSVz X 481/2 X 23" 





left 

Conversation Piece 

Materials include painted manikin parts, boots on plywood 

1959 44 X 30 X 37" 

right 

Left: John Doe Right: Jane Doe* 
Materials include painted perambulator, toy, manikin parts 

1959 John Doe: 41 x 19 x 34". Jane Doe: 42 x 27 x 16". 
•Not in exhibition 



21 



»T I 1 f % ' I J 





The American Way, II 
A hidden construction covered with painted canvas 

I960 22 X 22 X TVi" 



The U.S. Duck or Home from the Summit 

Materials include painted stuflEed duck in wooden box 

1960 28'^ X 21 X 6" 






^ 





Odious to Rauschenberg 

Materials include painted wood, canvas, stuffed deer head, 

motor, diathermy machine, tape recorder 

I960 42 X 22 X 163/4" 



Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps 

Materials include painted sign, wood, bones, candy 

1959 78 X 34 X 12" 



22 





O'er the Ramparts We Watched, Fascinated 

Materials include painted doll parts, electronic parts on wood 

1959 251/2 X 451/2 X 5" 



bottom 

The Psycho-Vendetta Case 
Materials include painted wood, canvas, tin cans, handcuffs 

I960 23 x22x 16" 



23 



alls to l\j.n"nS}if*';'", 





History as a Planter 

Materials include painted kiln, manikin parts. Wandering Jew 

plant, Jew's harp, newspaper 

1961 33 X 185/8 X 12%" 



24 




// Takes Two to Integrate, Cha Cha Cha 

Materials include painted dolls, dried fish, glass in wooden box 

1961 31 X 22 X 7" 



25 



».' 



i 




Tomorrow's Leaders Are Busy Tonight 
Materials include painted wood, doll parts, bones, metal, glass 

1961 64x11x10" 



26 







center 

American Lady 

Materials include painted canvas, manikin, doll's eye, 

wooden box 

I960 37xllWxIS" 

left 

Bestform 

Materials include painted canvas, wooden box 

I960 26 X 20V4 r. 9W 

right 

American Girl 

Materials include painted canvas, manikin, wooden box 

I960 203/4 X 131/4 X 3" 



27 




Roxy's 

Materials include furniture, bric-a-brac, live goldfish, incense, 

disinfectant, perfume, juke box, clothing, etc. 

1961 



28 




top left 

Miss Cherry Delight 

bottom left 

Five Dollar Billy 



top right 

Dianna Poole, Miss Universal 

bottom right 

Cockeyed Jenny 



29 




« 



I I 





t> 



m 



I 







30 




The Nativity 

Materials include painted wood, fiberglas, metal, glass, 

jewelry, cloth, bones, stuffed toys 

1961 lOlVi X 180X56V4" 



31 





top 

The Gossip 

Materials include painted masks, hair, tin, glass, stuffed cloth 

1962 26 X 37 X 15" 



bottom 

The Quicky 

Materials include painted manikin parts, roller skate, 

gold braid 

1962 22 X 15 X 10" 



32 




The Widow 

Materials include painted plaster heads, wood, metal, 

aluminum foil, fur 

1962 43% X 45 X I6V4" 



33 







top left 

Queen for a Day 

Materials include bones, steel wool, glass, paper on 

sheet metal 

1961 44x20x3V4" 



top right 

The Daddy Fish 

Materials include dispensing machine, dolls, lamp shade, 

stuffed fish on wood 

1962 58 X 25 X 17" 



top center 

Blind Ignus 

Materials include deer antlers, toys, insulators on sheet metal 

1962 615/8x24x4^2" 



bottom 

Ode to Kathy Fisciis 

Materials include doll parts, stained glass window, aluminum 

foil, toys on sheet metal 

1962 24 X 28 X iVi" 



34 





Untitled American President 
Materials include paint and fiberglas, milk can, bicycle seat 

1962 25 X 9 X S>" 



35 




Ella Laugh 

Materials include fiberglassed white tape, garbage can, 

metal letters, smoke cloth, deer antlers 

1962 50 X 43 X 38" 



36 




The Four Bears 

Materials include fiberglassed wood, stuffed bear parts, 

cello stem, life preserver, glass bowl 

1962 43 X 29 X 32" 



37 




The Illegal Operation 

Materials include fiberglassed shopping cart, furniture, 

concrete, medical implements 

1962 59 X 48 X 54" 



38 




\ 



National Banjo on the Knee Week 

Materials include fiberglassed, taped furniture, rug, flag, 

mirror, scale, hat box 

1963 110x48x30" 



39 





A Star Is Birthed 

Materials include fiberglassed. taped globe, plasma stand, 

stuffed cloth, wheels 

1963 72 X 48 X 50" 



The Sky Is Falling: Act One 

Materials include fiberglassed, taped chair, cocoanut husk, 

lamp base 

1963 45 X 24 X 22" 



40 




Untitled, or, I'm Not a Fig Plucker Nor a Fig Pliicker's Son, 

But I'll Pluck Your Figs 'til a Fig Plucker Comes 

Materials include fiberglassed, taped canvas chair, 

medicine ball 

1963 37 X 34 X 30" 



41 



\ 



s 



<.• 



■^ I 





/ 




The Birthday 

Materials include paints, fiberglas and flock, furniture, 

clothing, manikin, lucite 

1964 84x120x60" 



42 




Backseat Dodge— '38 

Materials include paints, fiberglas and flock, 1938 Dodge, 

chicken wire, beer bottles, artificial grass, cast plaster figure 

1964 66" X 20' X 144" 




The Friendly Grey Computer — Star Gauge Model 54 

Materials include fiberglas. paint, electronic components, 

doll parts, rocking chair 

1965 40 X 39'/8 X 24'/2" 



46 



Detail, THE BIG EYE. 1961 



-PANTIMES 90" presents THE LAST LAUGH AS A HICCUP 
written by Carl Slender produced by Norman Channel sponsored by John Candy Co.. New York 

the players: 
Ed Kienbusch Clod Cowie Millard Threesheets Henry J. Smellish 

a carpenter person an art bore an art bore #2 a witty critic person 

the scene: 



A disagreement in an art saloon. Clod Cowie has been debating with 

Ed Kienbusch about cultural values and holds a strong second place. 

Kienbusch .... Must I be angry? That's enough from you. BE OFF! 

Clod But! 

Kienbusch .... Fly! or does my art offend you? 

Clod I 

Kienbusch .... (advancing) What's wrong with it? 

Clod (shrinking back ) Nothing, Mr. Kienbusch — 

Kienbusch .... You're not smart if you think I dabble in my art. 

Clod (still retreating) Far from it. 

Kienbusch .... Perchance you find it too obscure? 

Clod Sir! 

Kienbusch .... Clean contrary to nature? 

Clod I never looked; since there was naught to stare for. 

Kienbusch .... You never looked? Explain the why and wherefore. 

Clod I swear. 

Kienbusch .... The things disgust you? 

Clod Sir! 

Kienbusch .... You mean the colour's foul? 

Clod Dear Sir! 

Kienbusch .... The shape's obscene? 

Clod Certainly not! 

Kienbusch .... Then why be so critical? Does it hit too close to home, 
old bean? (boxes his ears with a jack plane) 

Clod Police! Postmaster! Help! Help! 

Kienbusch .... I warn the world of brutes who find my kind of art 
a joke and seek to crab it, that, if the jester's 
persistent, 'tis my habit, to make him out a fool, 
with my special brand of ridicule. 

Threesheets . . . (coming down from up stage) He becomes tedious! 

Smellish (shrugging his shoulders) He blows his own trumpet. 

Threesheets . . . Will none return his lead? 

Smellish Watch me! I'll trump him! You know my articles where 

wit and satire rule— (he swaggers up to Kienbusch like 
a young turkey-cock ) . Your art, Sir, is — your art is 
another tired try by the broken toy school! 

Kienbusch .... Very. 

Smellish (laughing at his own humor) What? 

Kienbusch .... Is that all? 

Smellish But 



Kienbusch .... For a man of the pen it seems immoral 
to be so clumsy when picking a quarrel. 
Forgive me, therefore, if I adumbrate 
merely in outline, 1 need hardly state, 
certain suggestions, which you'll let me call 
perhaps, "The Young Insulter's Manual!' 
First, then, I should have raised my eyes thus 
then, tapping on my chin so, half courteous, 
half wondrous, I should have gazed awhile 
upon the art, then murmured with a smile, 
under my breath, "Impossible, my trouble is that 
a drink or two makes me see double!' 
Then I'd have rubbed my eyes, straining my sight 
and cried, "Still there! My God, a cultural blight!" 
Then as my reason tottered and when all gaga, 
I'd scream. "Just warmed-over, re-fried Dadal' 
Then drawing near to further the fun, 
I'd allow it as bad as a bad. bad pun. 
"Can this be evolution's agenda. 
Mankind hung up by his own pudenda?" 
Then shrinking back with a simulated start, 
I should have muttered, a hand against my heart: 
"Pardon the reaction, please, if you can. 
You see — I'm a cultured, intelligent, civilized man!' 
"And if my observation is not imprudent 
I've seen better work from a first-year student!' 
Then with the ego completely sunk, 
I'd suggest, "Restore them all right back to junk!' 
That is a sketch of what you might have stormed. 
Had you been just a little more informed. 
But had you said so, friend, even a little bit, 
I'd have stabbed you then with my insouciant wit. 
(he un-zips Smellish's fly with a pallet knife slash, 
revealing once and for all the critic's secret ) 
For though I mock myself with flawless verve. 
Pulp paper writers get what they deserve. 

Smellish Cad, Bounder, Performing Ass!! 

Kienbusch .... (lifting his hammer and returning the introduction) 
Let me in turn present Edwin Kienbusch. 
(loud laughter) 



Detail, THE BIRTHDAY. 1964 
Text of the greeting card 

Dear Jane 

I couldnt 
come down now 
because Harry need 
me here. 

Ma says she 
might make it 
later. 

Keep a stiff upper lip Kid. 
(ha-ha) 
Dick 



Detail, THE FRIENDLY GREY COMPUTER - 
STAR GAUGE MODEL 54. 1965 



Detail, ROXY'S. 1961 
Text of the letter to "Miss Cherry Delight" 



Directions for Operation 

Place master switch in off position. Plug computer into power 
supply. Print your problem on yellow index card provided in rack. 
Word your question in such a way that it can be answered with a 
simple yes or no. IMPORTANT: Next program computer 
heads (C-20 and G-30) by setting dials in appropriate positions. 
You are now ready to start machine. Throw master switch to on 
setting. Red bulb on main housing and white tube on C-20 will light 
indicating computer is working. Remove phone from rack and speak 
your problem into the mouthpiece exactly as you have written it 
on your index card. Replace phone in rack and ding dinger once. 
Under NO circumstances should you turn computer off until answer 
has been returned. Flashing yellow bulb indicates positive answer. 
Flashing blue bulb indicates negative answer. Green jewel 
button doesn't light so it will not indicate anything. Computers 
sometimes get fatigued and have nervous breakdowns, hence 
the chair for it to rest in. If you know your computer weU, you 
can tell when it's tired and sort of blue and in a funky mood. 
If such a condition seems imminent, turn rocker switch on for ten 
or twenty minutes. Your computer will love it and work all the 
harder for you. Remember that if you treat your computer well 
it will treat you well. When answer light has stopped flashing, 
turn master switch to off position. Machine will now re-cycle 
for the next question. Repeat procedure from beginning. 



Dear Sis 

How are you. We are 
fine except Momma has 
her dizzy spells yet. 
Poppa got the crops in 
but he says it doesn't 
look too good this year 
what with the dry spell 
and all. By the way 
Poppa said to thank 
you for the $20.00 as it 
came in real handy. 
Poppa says you must 
have a real good job 
to be able to spare 
that kind of money. 
I have to go back to 
school this fall. I'll 
be a senior this year 
and then maybe I can 
come to the city and 
get a good job too. 
huh? Things are 
about the same in this 



place. Fultons barn 
blew down and last 
week the Guthmillers 
cow had twin calfs. 
Its all so dry and dull 
here. If only I could 
be there with you and 
see all the there are to 
see. Carl Rathbum 
asked after you again 
and wanted to know 
when you were coming 
home so I told him. huh 
that'ed be a pretty day!! 
I got to quit now and 
help momma with the 
chores. 

Love till I see you. 
Sis 

P.S. Write soon as we 
haven't heard from you in 
quite a spell. 



47 




The Big Eye 

Materials include painted TV console, plastic, 

newspaper, figurine 

1961 56 X 24 X 30" 



48 





Instant On 

Materials include fiberglas and flock, electric blanket control, 

photographs, antenna 

1964 11x6x6" 



Six o'clock News 

Materials include fiberglas and flock, mop squeezer, light, 

glass, knobs 

1964 201/i X 10 X 9V2" 




The Commercial 

Materials include fiberglas, cloth, lunch pail, antenna, cup 

1964 7V2 X 9 X VVi" 



49 




The Wait 

Materials include paints, fiberglas and flock, furniture, bones, 

clothing, photographs, live bird 

1964-65 80" X 20'8" x 78" 



SO 





51 



Gatefold opposite: 

The Beanery 

Materials include fiberglas, paint, varnishes, shellacs, wood, 

bottles, metal, cast plaster figures, clothing, juke box, 

tape recorder, odor-producing chemicals 

1965 84" X 72" X 22' 



52 




:«r«.gi-^T)iTO?»«M 



\m(^Mmmmtmym^^i(jr^imm€)immi6^^^ 



m 






V.I 



^B 



r"-^ 



i 



'si&^y 






An additional 2500 copies 
of Edward Kienholz 
designed by Miss Deborah Sussman 
^ printed by Koltun Bros. 

published for the 
Los Angeles County Museum of Art 
.. on the occasion of the exhibition 
'■' March 30 to May 15, 1966 

; Photographs by 

Bob Bucknam 
Ed Cornachio 

Bob Kays 

Nathan Rabin 

Seymour Rosen 

JohnD. Schiff 

Delmore E. Scott 

;. John Thomson 



m 



W'-^ 



.r-^m^ 



"'-;« -iss*. 



.ti^V 



■J^f -.x 



'V&»H^ 









*3* *?• *3* ^ rs* ♦^ ^:* •;* •s*- *3*23S