(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Edwin Davis French; a memorial; his life, his art"

Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 




UAKVAKD COLLEGE LIBRARY 

CROM TRK LIBHART OW 

JOHN CHIPMAN CRAY 

CLA»* or ii&» 

PnOrKSflOB UFLAV I>TS.I*|] 



BUT FOUR HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-FIVE COPIES OF THIS BOOK 
ARE PRINTED; OF WHICH FOUR HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE 
ARE ON ITAUAN HAND-MADE PAPER AND FIFTY ON IMPERIAL 
JAPANESE VELLUM. OF THE ITALIAN PAPER EDITION THIS IS 



no.8(j 




yVi«raV A«««.c<A4X^ ww*-^ 



£"• ^.<^vZZ 



u^. 



• 



HAIVARD COLLEGE LlfiRAltr 
FROM THE LIBRARY OF 
JOHN CHIPMAN GRAY 
GIFT OF ROUND tiRAY 

JUL 42 1933 



Copyright, 1908, by 
Mary Brainerd French 



i 




PREFACE 



THIS volume is the response to the generally expressed 
desire of Mr. French's intimates and acquaintances 
for a memorial record of him and of his woik. 

Unforeseen details have enlai^ed the book beyond its 
original outline. These are chiefly shown in the inclusion 
of some hundreds of states of the copper engravings, num- 
bering nearly four hundred, by which he is known. 

The biographical sketch of Mr. French is restricted to a ■ 
simple narrative of the chief events of his life, and sugges- 
tions of the influences that governed it; a brief showing of 
what it was. 

In gathering and verifying many facts I have had the 
use, very kindly granted by Mr. John P. Woodbury and 
Mr. W. E. Bullie, of the long series of letters from Mr. 
French to them. More than this, for from these letters I 
have added much to my impressions of his personally 
gained in twen^ years of friendship with him, and I have 
hoped more than an3rtbtng else to convey his personal!^ to 



PREFACE 

the reader. If I shall have done this I shall in some measure 
have justified the confidence that Mrs. French has placed 
in me. 

It has been found imperative to divide Mr. French's en- 
gravings into two classes : First, his book-plates^ the list of 
which follows his notation with the little continuation 
needed to carry it to completion. Second, his miscellaneous 
engravings and designs, including practically everything 
save book-plates that is surely known to have come from 
his hand. Occasionally he did some bit of engraving or 
sketched a design that seemed to him too slight to attach 
his name to or even to keep note of. Some engravings and 
designs may, therefore, have escaped notice in the compila- 
tion of the latter list. It may be stated, too, that there are 
designs and engravings mistakenly attributed to him and 
such have been omitted. 

The compilation of the two lists has been somewhat diffi- 
cult; absolute completeness is not claimed, for that is im- 
possible, and unrecorded states of some coppers may appear 
in time. Care has been taken to accurately record the 
various plates and their various states that the lists may be 
a sure guide to the collector. A minute examination has 
been made of the proofs and prints of the various plates 
and a considerable correspondence has been had with their 
holders. As a rule some distinguishing feature only has 
been cited to mark a state, although the state indicated may, 
and usually does, differ materially in other respects from 
other states of the same plate. The lists make no distinc- 
tion between working proofs and impressions from different 
states of the plates. Strictly speaking, a working or trial 
proof is one taken, while the plate is in a progressive state, 
to aid the engraver in its completion; whereas an engrav- 
ing appears in different states only when there has been a 

• •• 

Vlll 



PREFACE 

change in the engraving of some detail of the completed 
plate or an addition to it. In some instances Mr. French was 
at liberty to strike off several copies of a working proof 
and he thought them of sufficient interest to hand them to 
friends who followed his work. These, therefore, are to 
greater or less extent within the reach of the public. In 
several clubs and libraries the successive states of the club 
or library book-plate are preserved and are, therefore, rea- 
sonably accessible, and a complete series of them is of the 
greatest value to the student. 

Only in very few, exceptional, instances have cotors used 
in printing been noted, as, of course, the holder of a plate 
may at any time print his plate in any color he may choose. 

Mrs. French feels that note has been made of ever3rthing 
that Mr. French himself would have recorded, and she 
wishes to express here her obligation to Mr. French's 
friends who have willingly and cordially cooperated in the 
two lists. That of the book-plates would hardly have been 
what it is without the industry and aid of Mr. Paul Lemp- 
erly, who published a list of Mr. French's book-plates in 
1899; Mr. Charles Dexter Allen, Mr. John P. Woodbury, 
Mr. Arnold Wood, Miss Messenger, Rev. William A. 
Brewer, Miss Emma Toedteberg have given valuable sug- 
gestions and information; and finally, Mr. W. E. Baillie's 
long friendship and correspondence with Mr. French and 
his very accurate and thorough knowledge of book-plates 
made his aid invaluable. 

In regard to the miscellaneous engravings Mrs. French 
feels particularly indebted to Mr. Frank Weitenkampf, 
curator of the Print Department of the New York Public 
Library, who gave his experience and judgment in outlin- 
ing this record of his friend's work, and who contributed 
largely to it. And in her behalf I also thank Mr. William 

ix 



PREFACE 

Loring Andrews and Mr. Richard Hoe Lawrence for use- 
ful suggestions and courtesies. 

The examples of Mr. French's art here given are printed 
from the original coppers by the kind permission of the 
owners. Grateful acloiowledgment of this courtesy is made 
to The Bibliophile Society, Mrs. Holden, and Mr. Andrews, 
and to the owners of the book-plates included. 

In the list of book-plates the names are given exactly as 
they are on the plates, and, with a few obvious exceptions, 
this rule is followed in the list of miscellaneous designs and 
engravings. 

Italicized words and dates are also as engraved, excepting 
in the use of the word Cypher with the later signatures. The 
marginal date shows the year of completion of a plate. 
When the plate is dated, the date is associated with its 
name or signature. 

I. H. B. 




CONTENTS 

PAQl 

PREFACE vii 

EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 3 

BOOK-PLATES 33 

MISCELLANEOUS DESIGNS AND ENGRAVINGS . 77 

INDEX OF BOOK-PLATES 91 



LIST OF PLATES 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH, PORTRAIT, 1894 . . . Frontispiece 
THE SOWER Vignette on Title-page 

FAaNO PAGE 

EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH, PORTRAIT, 1906 12 

HARVARD QUADRANGLE 30 

EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 33 

ARTHUR WEST LITTLE 44 

CANDIDATI 46 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 49 

MARY BARBER ROBINSON 50 

SARAH ELIZABETH WHITIN 58 

EDWARD DEAN ADAMS 60 

VERY REV. EUGENE AUGUSTUS HOFFMAN 64 

MABEL SLADB 68 

IRA HUTCHINSON BRAINERD 76 



xiii 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 



I 



■ 

I , 

I' 



i; 



I 

I 

! i 

I 



v 




EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 



I 



THE old village of North Attleboro, Massachusetts, 
threaded on the post-road by which the colonists 
frequently passed between Providence and Boston, 
has been for many years a home of the jewelry industry. 
For many years the town has been peopled with designers 
and engravers, with goldsmiths and silversmiths, whose art 
and influence have permeated the place, affecting even thc^e 
not at all concerned with their work. 

Here John French settled from England in the latter part 
of the seventeenth century, founding one of several Ameri- 
can branches of the French family. His descendants in 
direct line have ever since been associated with the town and 
its affairs, and in the third generation they were represented 
by Ezra French in the patriot army of the Revolution. 

Ezra French's grandson. Deacon Ebenezer French, was a 
man of more peaceful life, a carpenter and builder by trade; 
a man of responsibility, highly esteemed as a citizen and as 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

a workman. He married Maria Norton of Attleboro who 
also was of early New England parentage, and they lived 
simply as their ancestors had lived, contributing their part 
in town and church and social activities. 

Edwin Davis French, their only child, was bom in North 
Attleboro on the nineteenth day of January, 1851. The 
town still had something of the New England village 
character, and he lived a country boy's life until, after a year 
in preparatory school at Suffield, Connecticut, he entered 
the class of 1870 of Brown University. 

Mr. French was, from his boyhood, strongly influenced 
by his mother. She was a woman of native refinement and 
gentleness, and he resembled her both in character and in 
features. He never swerved from the principles of life and 
conduct that he learned from her, and though a wider ac- 
quaintance and cosmopolitan studies modified its expression, 
her faith was his through life. 

While the boy Edwin played a boy's part in these early 
years and enjoyed the games of the time as did other boys 
of his age, yet perhaps he accepted that unaccountable 
nuisance of boys' life, school, with greater grace than is 
usual. In his amusements he went a little aside from the 
ordinary, and exercised a natural tendency to art that was 
no doubt stimulated by the atmosphere of the town itself. 

In the back yard of his home stood a little abandoned 
workshop which his father cleared and altered for him and 
let him furnish to his own fancy. When he was eight or 
ten years old he held art exhibitions in the little shop that 
were the delight and wonder of his fortunate playmates who 
enjoyed them at the extravagant rate of two pins admission. 
Two small panoramas, done off in water-colors and pencil, 
survive. The smaller of them, measuring about eight feet 
long by four inches wide, contains seventeen views ; the sec- 

4 



HIS LIFE 

ond, somewhat more pretentious, is about eight inches wide 
by perhaps fourteen feet in length. He was, however, not 
satisfied with undertakings of this size and passed on to 
larger panoramas made on the reverse side of wall-paper. 
Among these panoramic pictures is a representation of what 
was at that time a sensation in the town, and probably was 
regarded by the children as a supreme effort in architecture, 
Barden's store. The three great arches of its front no doubt 
appeared as wonderful to them as the three arches of Peter- 
borough do to the traveler of to-day. Record steamships, 
State capitals, and lighthouses are here, together with trees 
and flowers drawn and colored for reality, although in a 
green rose his imagination anticipates Burbank. The views 
of Sunnyside and Sleepy Hollow testify to a general interest 
in the genial Irving too little familiar to-day. It is inter- 
esting, too, to find on various of these panoramic pictures 
the now more widely known signature of the artist, E. D. 
French. 

He was fond of books, and faithful to his studies, and 
his school-days passed happily. Yet two years' close applica- 
tion to his studies at Brown University seriously affected his 
health ; and although he still reserved a longing for a com- 
plete college course and possibly a literary or professional 
career, he )rielded to the invitation of a friend, Mr. W. D. 
Whiting, the founder of the firm that bears his name, to 
become an engraver of silver. His special gifts in design 
and in execution were soon recognized, and he became chief 
of the engraving department. Except during the two years, 
from 1881 to 1883, when he was designer for Mr. Frank M. 
Whiting, he held that rank until he left the Whiting Com- 
pany in 1894. 

His nature almost demanded that he give his life to art, 
and of all arts engraving was the most opportune. It in- 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

vited and environed him and so became the channel through 
which his artist's temperament made itself most widely 
known. 

The arts of music and painting also attracted him, and 
he practised them as an amateur. North Attleboro, with its 
many artisans, after its days' work on brooches, watch- 
chains, and silver, regaled itself in the evenings and on holi- 
days with a brass band of fifteen pieces in which the town 
took pride. The parts for trombone, French horn, comet, 
fife, and the like, were drawn off and distributed by the 
quiet and reticent lad, Edwin French, who played the 
trombone, and, further, composed the "Wamsutta Quick 
March," and other pieces for the band. Later in life he 
enjoyed the piano, which he played well, and he turned also 
for recreation to the palette and brush, though with a self 
depreciation that no praise or evidence seemed able to dis- 
lodge, for in all his life he never regarded any of his color 
sketches as of any worth. They seem rather to be a kind 
of playing with colors and form, and were, as a rule, only 
so far completed as a single afternoon might allow, and the 
next holiday brought new tints and shadows and he turned 
to those and a clean canvas. 

No doubt each man has to a large extent his choice in 
giving to the world, and as the world possesses work from 
Mr. French's graver that would have given him distinction 
at any point in the history of art, we will not regret that 
its considerable volume, and the thought given to its detail 
and to each plate's full eflFect robbed America of a land- 
scape-painter of distinction. 

Enfield, Connecticut, is a long way from North Attleboro, 
Massachusetts, yet Mr. French always loved walking, and 
to him the air was bracing and tinged with romance, for at 
Enfield lived Mary Olivia Brainerd, daughter of Harvey P. 

6 



HIS LIFE 

Brainerd. They were married in 1873. ^^ was a happy 
unioQy characterized by that ready understanding and com- 
panionship that bears all things, and Mr. Frclnch found in 
his wife a source of cheer and encouragement which carried 
him through many a dark season when his hold on life 
seemed failing and the doctors were grave. 

In 1876 Mr. French removed from North Attleboro to 
New York, where, with an interval of two years in his old 
home, following his mother's death in 1881, he lived until 
the summer of 1897. 

Once established in New York, Mr. French very readily 
restmied his quiet, systematic life, plying between his home 
and the Whiting Company, which were his only interests of 
moment He did not concern himself with the political 
struggles of the times unless fundamental principles were at 
stake, and he did not enter very actively in social life, or 
interest himself with the topics of the day. The hurly- 
burly of city life was hardly in accord with his feeling. 

In school and college he had shown a fondness for lan- 
guages; indeed, he was a natural linguist. A leaf from a 
copy of Dante was often on his bench before him for refer- 
ence from time to time in the intervals of his work, and he 
read the "Divine Comedy" as he walked Broadway with 
the jangle and commotion of the traffic about him. His 
book-plate records his taste in the classics; Dante, Virgil, 
and Lucretius, standing side by side with Emerson, whose 
serenity he shared. Volapiik very naturally attracted him, 
and for years he held an extensive correspondence in this 
language, attending conventions, and contributing to jour- 
nals devoted to it. His enthusiasm led him, in 1893, to loan 
a group of Volapiik books to the Chicago Exposition. These 
books, not more than twelve in nmnber, contained a little 
book-label which was printed to his notion from type. On 

7 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

accotint of its personal interest this plate has been included 
in the list of his book-plates. 

As Volaptik subsided in interest and Elsperanto replaced 
it, Mr. French transferred his attention to the latter lan- 
guage, and was proud of its progress. He found that al- 
though he had read French with ease for many years and 
had known Esperanto but a comparatively short time, yet 
when at Montreal he could talk freely in the latter language 
while he felt much less at home with the classic French 
there spoken. Among his papers there are many jottings, 
essays, and translations in Esperanto, among them transla- 
tions from Stevenson, a rubricated translation of the Lord's 
Prayer, and a carefully engrossed address of some twelve 
thousand words on the necessity of a universal language. 

It was a treat to discuss these new languages with Mr. 
French, and he liked to prove their availability and smooth- 
ness by reading them. A passage in Esperanto from "Ham- 
let," read in his resonant, expressive voice was quite as 
impressive to the foreign ear as though delivered in Italian 
by Salvini. He would turn, however, from these to Dante, 
who, after all, was his favorite and whom he rendered with 
something akin to reverence. If asked for English verse 
he would choose Rossetti's ballads, in which he turned most 
readily to "Sister Helen," and the "Blessed Damozel," or, 
possibly, he would read the simple verse of Longfellow and 
that of Whittier, whose "At Last" he lingered over : 

Be near me when all else is from me drifting; 

Earth, sky, home's pictures, days of shade and shine. 

In English fiction he was content to be a simple lover of 
Scott and Dickens. He never outgrew them, and with them 
he relished Victor Hugo and the recent French and Italian 
novelists. He was acquainted with the history and literature 

8 



HIS LIFE 

of art, especially of engraving and the subjects of ex-libris 
and heraldry, which were associated with it in his own 
engraving. The last book he read was Lippmann's "En- 
graving and Etching." 

During Mr. French's earlier years in New York, he 
studied art at home, gathering and compiling many scrap- 
books of designs and specimens of engraving; but in 1883 
he availed himself of the opportunities oflFered by the Art 
Students League, and there he for some years studied draw- 
ing under George de Forest Brush and William Sartain. 
The association with Mr. Sartain was peculiarly forttmate, 
and the future designer and engraver on copper was an apt 
pupil of the engraver whose father before him had earned 
fame in the same field. 

In 1886 Mr. French became a member of the League's 
Board of Control; in 1887, its treasurer; in 1889-92, its 
president for two terms. Painstaking, systematic, and al- 
most eager for details, he was an effective factor in the great 
advance made by the League during his official connection 
with it. 

In 1887 the League moved from Fourteenth Street to 
ampler quarters in Twenty-third Street, and in 1889, with 
the Society of American Artists and the Architectural 
League of New York, it united in forming the American 
Fine Arts Society, and the movement began which resulted 
in the permanent home of the three organizations in Fifty- 
seventh Street. 

The president of a large and restlessly progressive society, 
though loyally supported by vigorous and capable assist- 
ants, as was Mr. French, has a multitude of questions to 
consider and a mass of work to do, and although he had an 
aversion to asserting his views, he gave time and thought 
without grudge, and with some sacrifice, to these duties. 





EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

Publicity was particularly disagreeable to him, and he 
felt keenly the ungracious attack made on Mr. Saint- 
Gaudens for using a nude model in his mixed classes. The 
deathless question of the nude in art rang through the press 
and stormed about the League. Much wholesome editorial 
comment and some woeful wit resulted, and perhaps the 
public was educated, for, as an echo, some casts from the 
antique in a western city were draped. But the unfortu- 
nate thing was that the League lost the services of the first 
and noblest sculptor of our generation. 

Mr. French conceived his first duty to be to the League, 
and he declined to hamper its action by voicing his views in 
the press. The reporter of a minor journal resented this, 
and said his paper must have a "story"— and sure enough, 
Mr. French found in the next issue a clever concocted tale, 
which he duly scrap-booked and marked "fake." His one 
contribution to the public discussion was a brief note to the 
leading journals stating that Mr. Saint-Gaudens had simply 
continued the two-year-old practice of the League. 

The receptions to Benjamin Constant and E. A. Abbey in 
1889, the costume reception in 1891, and the other public 
functions of the League were a pride to him. But his great- 
est satisfactions were to see the classes grow, to see their 
graduates take positions as artists and teachers of art, and 
to have the opportunity to help and by his sympathy and 
encouragement to win the affection and reliance of some 
who were students as he had been a student. 

When his ofiicial connection with the League began, its 
records showed a membership of four hundred and twenty- 
three students. It had a membership of more than twice 
that number when, in 1891, he retired as president, and be- 
came one of the trustees of the American Fine Arts Society. 

For something more than two years after Mr. French 

10 



HIS LIFE 

withdrew from the Whiting Company, he lived in New 
York and devoted his energies entirely to work on copper. 
His attention had been called to book-plates by the collec- 
tion that his sister-in-law, Miss Helen Elvira Brainerd, then 
a librarian in Columbia College, was making. 

Merely for the jest he engraved, somewhat coarsely, fol- 
lowing old English models, what was to all appearance a 
book-plate, now in its way famous. It was heraldic— shield, 
crest, and motto : u sepe ars so ap, disposed on the ribbon 
underneath. This he printed roughly on old paper and 
slipped into the little collection, whose owner was for a time 
mystified by it; and, somewhat as the ancient heralds on 
the appearance of an unknown champion, amateurs of to- 
day have since been puzzled by the novel blazonry, and by 
the motto so apparently an uiicouth mixture of Welsh and 
Latin. This was in the autumn of 1893. '^^ j^^^ s^>on 
became earnest, for Miss Brainerd was rightly entitled to 
a book-plate in place of the sham, and Mr. French designed 
and engraved his first serious copperplate. 

Having decided to give his future to copper engraving, 
and to make a specialty of ex-libris, he engraved an an- 
nouncement of his intention which, in the beauty of its 
setting, was an enticing specimen of his work. He took a 
natural pride in the fact that he never had to distribute this 
announcement, for after he had once started he never 
needed to consider whence the next commission might come. 
He always had two or three plates in progress, commissions 
were waiting his hand, and there was correspondence that 
looked yet farther into the future. 

In the summer of 1897, ^^ removed from New York to 
Saranac Lake and established his home in the midst of the 
rugged Adirondack scenery that gratified his love of nature. 

He frequently traveled to the South in the winter to 

11 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

escape the sharper cold, yet he held his Adirondack home 
until the end. Many are the brief descriptions of nature in 
his letters, showing his pleasure in the mountain prospects, 
the sunsets, and the tinted skies. 

Whenever he journeyed from home he carried with him 
his sand cushion, lens, and graver, and where he stopped 
he set up his bench, framed a screen, and continued his en- 
graving. This had its difficulties, as he sets them forth in a 
letter to Mr. Baillie : 

"The light is not just right for engraving in my present 
quarters : I doubt if I could get altogether used to it so as to 
do my best work, or if it would not be an injury to my eyes 
to try it. For drawing it is good enough; there you have 
white paper and black ink, and the problem of lighting is 
comparatively a simple one. But in engraving, the surface 
of the copper is polished, and excessive or insufficient light 
is more readily felt ; moreover, the surface and cuts are the 
same color, and so the engraved lines are seen only by reflec- 
tion until you rub foreign matter into them, which you can't 
stop to do with every stroke; for this reason uneven light 
or cross lights are very confusing to one's optic nerve." 

In the October of 1905 he made his greatest journey into 
the world, a trip to Europe that he had looked forward to 
for many years, and wherever he went he found a welcome 
with those to whom his name was already known. The 
doctor he had occasion to consult in France was a book- 
plate collector and a student of engraving; he pulled proofs 
of Mr. Gould's and Mr. Simmons' plates at Stecchini's in 
Rome ; he here and there met correspondents in Esperanto ; 
the art galleries of England, France, and Italy attracted 
him ; but, best of all, he visited in Nuremburg the old home 
of the father of copper engraving, Albert Diirer, and in 
England he at last met, face to face, his friend and cor- 

12 



HIS ART 

respondent of years, the veteran master, Mr. C. W. Sher- 
bom. 

His outing was over; Jtrne of 1906 found him again in 
America, and as ever still at work. This last year of his 
life showed that, while his health was far from secure, there 
was no waning in his enthusiasm, or in the firmness of his 
line, or in the fertility of his invention. The fourteen book- 
plates of this year, the year of his great vacation, maintained 
his prestige to the end. 

At the end of October he left Saranac, intending to spend 
the winter in New York, and he eagerly anticipated the 
closer association with his old-time friends in the city where 
he so long worked, and so many of whose historic old build- 
ings and points of interest he had pictured with his graver. 
But his hope could not be fulfilled, and on the eighth of De- 
cember, in the Sherwood studio building where, years 
before, as president of the Art Students League, he had 
joined in the formation of the Fine Arts Society, his life 
closed. 



II 



Mr. French's name in art will always be associated with 
designing and engraving on copper, for although, as we 
have seen, he was for some sixteen years a silver eng^ver 
of unusual skill, his work in silver is unsigned. 

Yet his debt to these years of silver engraving was a 
large one. While in the Whiting Company he became a 
master of the technique of the craft; when he turned to 
copper engraving he was as though bom with a burin in his 

13 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

hand. While there he had eagerly absorbed suggestions 
and had gathered flowers and vines, drawing first-hand 
from nature in his study for designs and their rendering. 
His matchless lettering and his monograms, firm and digni- 
fied in character, he learned there ; there, too, he learned to 
grave so gracefully the flowers and sprays that g^ve charm 
to many of his copperplates. Years afterward, in 1899, 
when he was known through a hundred and fifty copper 
engravings, he inscribed a book to Mr. Charles Osbom of 
the Whiting Company: "To whose instruction, example, 
and energy I am so largely indebted for what skill in 
handicraft and taste in design I may possess." Thus the 
period of silver engraving was a fortunate training for his 
later work in copper, and his gift in designing rapidly 
adapted itself to his later and freer medium. We find this 
transition in his six earliest book-plates, and in some of the 
later ones the monogram motive readily suggests silver en- 
graving. 

The difference between engraving on silver and on cop- 
per is quite radical, however akin the two may be in some 
respects. The silver engraver has in mind the direct result, 
which he sees as his graver unfolds it; the engraver on 
copper works for a reflected result— a print— the reverse 
of the cutting on the metal ; the depth of his cut, the text- 
ure of his engraving, is still to be interpreted by the printer, 
and he must keep this interpretation in view. He has the 
advantage, however, of working always upon a level sur- 
face, while coffers, vases, mirrors, or the endless variety of 
trinkets and household silver, all in infinite shape and size, 
pass under his brother's hand. Yet the two branches of en- 
graving are so closely alike that many artists and workers 
have pursued both simultaneously, and many, like Paul 
Revere and Mr. French, have passed from silver to copper. 

14 



HIS ART 

Mr. French's copper engraving is marked by a direct- 
ness and confidence that grew to an instinct as he became 
accustomed to his medium ; it is characterized by what Mr. 
Weitenkampf well styles a nobility of line, a line fearless, 
certain, and always with a definite purpose toward which 
he wrought with a firm hand and a sure eye. He knew the 
value of the heavy line for strength and shading, and 
passed easily from heavy to light for form and perspec- 
tive, avoiding the suggestion of flatness that condemns 
many engravers to but transient success. His finer shad- 
ing is as etching in its effect, though in some plates, for 
example, that of Mr. Godfrey, he mingled etching and en- 
graving. At times he used the dry-point, as in the twelve 
delicate remarques that are associated with as many plates. 
His engravings exhibit a remarkable technique governed by 
a sincere and true artistic feeling. It lay in his power to 
impart to them a glowing luster, a warmth as of burnished 
metal that gives them a brilliance and life not often reached 
in engraving, and that so notably enhances the beauty of his 
landscapes and seems to increase the illusion of their per- 
spective, whether in such exquisite little gems as are 
shown in the book-plates of Miss Slade, Mr. Merriman, 
and Mr. Woodbiuy, or in the larger engraving of the Har- 
vard Quadrangle. 

The strongest influences he had among engravers were, 
as Mr. Woodbury truly writes, the early German masters, 
Diirer, the Behams, and Aldegrever. They were his mod- 
els. The achievement of Mr. Sherbom was an inspiration 
and example to him, particularly in heraldry, where he 
noted Mr. Sherbom's methods and recognized his author- 
ity. One connoisseur, oddly, finds close resemblance to the 
work of Vaughan at a time when Mr. French was not fa- 
miliar with it, so easily do artists of similar gift, traveling 

15 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

on similar lines reach similar results. There seems to be 
something honest and lasting in the work of these German 
and English masters that he reached by sympathy. The 
French engravers, lighter, graceful, but having as a rule 
less strength, he studied, though he seldom chose their 
style of decoration. 

In talking of him at different times with two engravers, 
one skilled in heraldic work, and the other notable in land- 
scape engraving I was struck by the enthusiasm with which 
each spoke of Mr. French's supremacy in his own field. 

Beyond this mastery of the burin that distinguishes his 
plates and wins the admiration of true critics and of en- 
gravers, lay a striking gift for designing, and a controlled 
imagination. He loved beauty and he loved sincerity, and 
these form the basis of his original work. He fotmd the 
lotus and acanthus, the laurel, dirysanthemtmi, and pine in 
nature or in the works of many artists, and he utilized 
them, literally or conventionally, with almost unerring 
taste; the graces of his ornament and foliation furnishing 
a welcome to their wealth. 

With those details and accessories of a design that give 
personality to the plate, Mr. French was most careful— an 
instrument or book or scene in one of his plates is usually 
definite of its sort, and in its rendering he was delighted to 
bring reality and art together. He searched high and low 
for a pine-cone that would accord in its setting and be 
found in nature; an old plate misled him in engraving a 
tarpon, and he hunted for an authoritative representation 
to g^ide him; a photo-reproduction of the Jost Amman 
prints in the Grolier plate was not enough, he borrowed an 
original. Often his clients aided him to this exactness, oft- 
times he traced to it himself. 

The most fortimate of his clients were those who placed 

16 



HIS ART 

the least restriction on his freedom in composition and dec- 
oration, once they had indicated the desired features. Def- 
erential as he was, for he felt it was another's and not his 
book-plate that he might have in hand, yet he had the ar- 
tist's feeling very strongly, and in one instance this was 
crossed by a client's wish for an alteration — ^the change was 
made, and he took his name from the plate. 

He was not one ever to take a commission in a perfunc- 
tory spirit ; even in so many plates having the same general 
purpose, he searched out the distinctive qualities of each. 
To the lover of the sea each day that shines upon it has its 
own peculiar quality in tint of sky or water, in wave or 
cloud, that attracts attention and gives enjoyment; and to 
Mr. French each copper had its own fascination as into it 
was cut the new design with its new possibilities. He stud- 
ied and enjoyed his art as he pursued it ; always there was 
something in it that he would still attain. 

His interest in engraving was a loyalty. He had pride in 
its traditions and took great satisfaction in being allied to it 
and recognized in it. He was pleased always to meet an- 
other engraver and exchange points of view. His counsel 
was often sought and willingly given. In the pressure of his 
work he was often glad to introduce a proposed client to 
some other engraver, and sometimes his health urged him to 
this course. "It is not easy for me," he writes, "to be quiet 
and tranquil, when there is so much I would like to do." 

Aside from the idea of a book-plate there was little of 
suggestion in the collection of Mr. French's sister-in-law to 
which reference has been made. These plates were in large 
part English, and of course armorial. Among them were 
the Nathl. F. Moore, Rich'd Hanson, Esqr., and Joseph 
Murray, Esqr., this last the richest of them. The distinctly 
American plates in the collection were crude though varied 

17 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

in their rigid styles. The fantastic joke that Mr. French en- 
graved and put with them was a very clever imitation, an 
old-style plate as he intended it to be. But when he be- 
gan Miss Brainerd's plate he threw precedent aside and 
produced an original design. It is a complex plate, pictur- 
ing its owner's home at Enfield and bearing the monog^ram 
and name, cut as in stone; these are surrounded by a set- 
ting of the wild roses and ox-eyed daisies of New England 
and the f reely-dealt-with "Chippendale" shell that already 
under his hand impatiently burst into leafy scrolls. 

His interest in Volaptik led to his second attempt, an al- 
most symmetrical plate, built about the winged torch and 
double globe symbol with the motto of the Volapuk Society, 
with the legend, Lonol al Edwin Davis French, on a tablet 
cased in a frame of "Chippendale" shells, which he again 
uses as freely as its originator used the original shell. 

His third book-plate, engraved for Mrs. French, shows 
again his love of the rose, and he deftly studs the mono- 
gram with the forget-me-not; making the monogram the 
feature of the plate, he gives it proportion to the freer 
scrollwork which he more fully commands. 

In the next three plates he breaks from the confinement 
of the rectangle, and furnishes three new varieties of the 
monogram motive. He had already shown a liking to re- 
view and correct his work by later judgment, and after a 
change of thought. Few plates there are in the long list 
but had some final touch, a shadow deepened here or a 
scroll lengthened or restrained there, and, generally, some 
little improvement where his client was probably already 
content. 

His own plate. No. 5, shown in its final state in this book, 
was a marked evolution. Its main features he had at the 
outset. Flowers blossom at top and bottom and in the 

18 



HIS ART 

midst, and scrolls float lightly from the initials. At the 
bottom he placed on record his chosen volumes from all the 
world's libraries— Dante, Lucretius, Emerson, Virgil— 
and an open book that breathes his love of nature, while 
under these are the symbols of his chosen and favorite arts. 
The later changes show the comers of a supporting frame 
appearing from behind, and the readjustment of the ribbon 
to bear his name. It is a very significant plate, not only 
for the lavish decoration and for its combined delicacy and 
cheering boldness, but because it is strongly and definitely 
personal in its character. 

These six plates were all in a sense the play of a man 
whose play must show some result. "Produce," cries Car- 
lyle, and to Mr. French such a voice was welcome. He was 
now on the threshold of his fruitful career as an engraver 
on copper. 

On the fourteenth of January, 1894, he received a letter 
from Mr. Beverly Chew stating that Miss Brainerd had 
said that Mr. French was prepared to execute orders for 
ex-libris, and asking for an interview. Mr. Chew wished 
two plates, his own and that of the Players. He had readily 
recognized the promise of the little sheaf of plates already 
done ; their more than promise he had noted too, and he in- 
dorsed his appreciation with good counsel to Mr. French 
and with generous praise to his own friends. 

Each of these two plates had its peculiar test. The 
Players was a difficult design for the engraver, yet he ren- 
dered the lights and shadows of a wash-drawing and the 
doleful and jovial masks with success. Mr. Chew wished 
an armorial plate, and that must bring comparison with the 
heraldic engravers of all time. The shield and crest are 
so executed that they at once suggest antiquity, and while 
the plate has no uncertainty, it has no thought of the hard 

19 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

machine-like work of much modem engraving, a misfor- 
tune skilfully avoided in the crisp scrolls and in the waving 
palm. 

Mr. Chew's double commission anticipated the similar 
order of Dr. Qark by but a few hours. Hard upon these 
four followed other orders and commendations from well- 
known connoisseurs, the natural fruit of the six first plates. 
The names of most of them stand early in the roll of plate 
owners :— Mr. S. P. Avery, whose encouragement of Ameri- 
can art was tireless ; Mr. John P. Woodbury, whose faithful 
friendship had in it something akin to a father's pride ; Mr. 
William Loring Andrews, who recognized Mr. French's 
skill in almost every field of copper engraving, and secured 
its use in numerous plates ; Mr. William E. Baillie, chief of 
American book-plate collectors, eager and ceaseless in his 
friendship; Mr. Charles Dexter Allen, whose "American 
Book-Plates," containing four of Mr. French's plates, 
printed from the coppers, won for him generally the title of 
"Little Master," already given him by the German author- 
ity, Count Leiningen Westerburg; and there were still 
others. From them and through their introduction came 
more commissions than Mr. French felt able to fill. He had 
reason in the spring of 1894 to feel confident of his field. 

It is not my purpose, nor is there need, to describe each 
of Mr. French's book-plates. Their art is not conveyed in 
words, and their personal features, for the American in- 
dividualized book-plate is most distinctly associated with 
Mr. French, of course, are not always at command. More- 
over, private collectors have long since been busy gathering 
them, and there are few persons actively interested in book- 
plates who have not a valued group of his work. It is so 
too with public collections. 

In 1894 Mr. French was gratified to find his plates in tiki 



HIS ART 

Boston Museum, and the same year they were an important 
part of the exhibition of book-plates held by the Grolier 
Qub. In 1898 nearly all that were then engraved, and 
some in different states, were in the extensive collection 
shown in Boston by the Club of Odd Volumes. An exhibition 
entirely devoted to Mr. French's book-plates was held in 
Qeveland in 1899, and through the stunmer of 1907 the 
New York Public Library held, at the Lenox branch, an 
exhibition of upward of two hundred, not only of the book- 
plates but of the miscellaneous engravings as well. 

A book-plate should be more than a decorative label. It 
should have in motto or in symbol, and quite aside from its 
art, some clear and lasting token of its owner. The splen- 
did plate of the Worcester Art Museum, with its bronze- 
like seal, flanked by torches and over it the generous motto, 
*Tor the benefit of all the people of the City of Worcester," 
stamps the purpose of each volume that contains it. 

The Edward Tompkins McLaughlin Memorial plate, 
largely planned by the professor's friend, Mr. George Dud- 
ley Seymour, is a more deeply impressive one. The pres- 
ence of the chalice— the Holy Grail — suggests to his inti- 
mates his interest in the Arthurian legends and his love of 
Browning's line : 

**OnIy grant my soul may carry high through death her 

cupunspilled." 

Qosely associated with this reminder of the man is the bur- 
den of his counsel, the motto from Matthew Arnold, "Think 
clear, feel deep, bear fruit well." He thought that the poet 
had in this verse expressed the best of modem culture. The 
seal of Yale University, and the panel for the President's 
autograph, and the name of the prize winner, complete the 
plate. 

21 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

The noble plate of Ernest Kempton Adams is a fine ex- 
ample of this cardinal principle. The motto "Seek Truth," 
at the top, almost suggests a halo above the bust of Socra- 
tes, which stands, with scientific instruments at either side, 
on a small cabinet containing books, some without titles, 
and some with the names of famous scientists. On the 
dexter side is a small engraving of a cross-country rider 
accompanied by a hotmd ; on the sinister side a Stradivarius 
is represented incased in pansies. The relative placing of 
these elements has its suggestive value, as, surrounded by 
graceful ornament, they bespeak the character and pursuits 
of the owner. 

It would be difficult to find a purely symbolic design ren- 
dered with more appreciation and evident delight than that 
of the Candidati, which evidences character in a somewhat 
different way. There is a touch of hiunor mixed with ear- 
nestness in it that appealed to Mr. French. This plate is 
used by the members of a circle of women writers. The 
badge of the society, designed in jest, the bauble with the 
initial "C," lies half buried underneath the manuscript and 
finished books which represent the hope and achievement 
of the members. An ominous boomerang, that is, a re- 
turned manuscript, is there too. A full circle represents the 
lasting friendship of the members. The wreath is the re- 
ward, and across the whole lies the ribbon that bears the 
name of the society or of one of its members. 

Mr, W. K. Bixby's plate is a peculiar example of the in- 
dividual design. He humorously accepted the generic slang 
title of "octopus" given to large commercial combinations, 
one of which he was president of, and applied the idea to 
collecting. Mr. French quizzically enjoyed making a design 
that shows a fierce octopus in the center, reaching its tenta- 
cles to every side in pursuit of the books and manuscripts 

22 



HIS ART 

tiiat tumble about in the seething water. Contradictory it 
is, to be sure, but how novel and startling in its effect 1 Few 
of Mr. French's engravings ftunish, in their different 
states, a better study than this of his power and methods. 

Even to the prosaic "book-pile," of which sort of book- 
plate he engraved but one, that of Mr. Julian Marshall, Mr. 
French gave individuality in the tokens of music and nature. 
Partly it is these, partly the fine sense of proportion, partly 
the perfect execution, that makes this the most beautiful 
book-pile plate in existence. 

The abstruse and technical science of heraldry has been a 
problem to American engravers, and not unlikely to foreign 
ones as well. Mr. French studied Fairbaim and Boutell to 
good purpose, and gathered all hints that came to him on 
that subject, and he so well availed himself of the decora- 
tive opportunities it offered that his armorials are apace in 
beauty with the more practised work of the foreign en- 
gravers of any period. His armorial designs are usually 
strong and decided, even when the insignia are supported 
and surrotmded by generous ornament. His trained eye al- 
ways gave proportion to them, not less, but more clearly, 
than to others. -The roll of successes is a long one, yet 
could it be done without seeming to forget others, I would 
speak of the heraldic plates, each distinct in treatment, of 
Mr. Vamum, Mr. Hopkins, Mr. Livermore, Mr. Gushing, 
and the plate of Mrs. Whitin, as beautiful in its execution 
as it is clever in its design. 

Frequently designs mingle heraldry with other motives, 
a more difficult matter. The plates of Mr. Talmage, Mr. 
Gale, Mr. Baillie, Mr. Arnold Wood, and the Dean Hoff- 
man Library, this last, one of Mr. French's most digni- 
fied engravings, follow this method. 

There is no class of designs in which an error so quickly 

23 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

hand. While there he had eagerly absorbed suggestions 
and had gathered flowers and vines, drawing first-hand 
from nature in his study for designs and their rendering. 
His matchless lettering and his monograms, firm and dig^- 
fied in character, he learned there ; there, too, he learned to 
grave so gracefully the flowers and sprays that give charm 
to many of his copperplates. Years afterward, in 1899, 
when he was known through a hundred and fifty copper 
engravings, he inscribed a book to Mr. Charles Osbom of 
the Whiting Company: "To whose instruction, example, 
and energy I am so largely indebted for what skill in 
handicraft and taste in design I may possess." Thus the 
period of silver engraving was a fortunate training for his 
later work in copper, and his gift in designing rapidly 
adapted itself to his later and freer medium. We find this 
transition in his six earliest book-plates, and in some of the 
later ones the monogram motive readily suggests silver en- 
graving. 

The difference between engraving on silver and on cop- 
per is quite radical, however akin the two may be in some 
respects. The silver engraver has in mind the direct result, 
which he sees as his graver unfolds it; the engraver on 
copper works for a reflected result— a print— the reverse 
of the cutting on the metal ; the depth of his cut, the text- 
ure of his engraving, is still to be interpreted by the printer, 
and he must keep this interpretation in view. He has the 
advantage, however, of working always upon a level sur- 
face, while coffers, vases, mirrors, or the endless variety of 
trinkets and household silver, all in infinite shape and size, 
pass under his brother's hand. Yet the two branches of en- 
graving are so closely alike that many artists and workers 
have pursued both simultaneously, and many, like Paul 
Revere and Mr. French, have passed from silver to copper. 

14 



HIS ART 

him. There lies a danger in this combination of designer 
and engraver, for a heavy-line plate like those of the 
Authors Qub and Mrs. Ward, or a plate like Mr. Dana's 
which combines both heavy and light lines, is simple as 
compared with a wash-drawing that calls for photogravure 
or mezzotint rendering— if the latter were within reach— 
and may well dismay a line-engraver. Occasionally an- 
other's design was suited exactly to Mr. French's art, and 
he must have lent himself to it with zest. Such were Mr. 
Tyron's designs of the Sovereign plates, that of Mr. Bell 
for Mr. Osbom's plate, Mr. Curtis's design for the Cosmos 
Qub, the fine classic designs by Mr. Goodhue, and the de- 
sign by Mr. Black of his own plate. I fancy Mr. French 
must have treated these designs by other artists somewhat 
as studies, quite as, in 1893, he studied and varied the 
"Chippendale" plate of Samuel Vaughan adding much to 
its grace; or, perhaps, as he reproduced the armorial plate 
of Mr. Livermore after the copper was destroyed, adding 
here and there in detail and giving what might be called a 
second edition. Again, and more generally, he endeavored 
to follow the design literally, as in the De Chaig^on plate 
and in the Acorn series of Old New York views. 

It was his good fortune to execute many book-plates for 
collectors and connoisseurs of national, or, rather, inter- 
national repute, and, with deference it may be said that no 
class of clients could be more particular or more exacting. 
It must also have been a matter of pride to him that he was 
called upon to design and execute the book-plates of so 
many societies, clubs, and libraries. Those of the Grolier 
Qub and the Club of Odd Volumes almost record the his- 
tory and the purpose of each. The Princeton University, 
Union League Club, and Metropolitan Museum plates are 
fine examples, incidentally, of the progress of art in this 

25 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

class of book-plates, and more particularly of Mr. French's 
aptness in rendering a local or personal quality to plates 
that in old days would have been but formal labels, or 
worse, mere educational rhapsodies. 

In this relation one cannot pass without mentioning the 
splendid group of work he did for Harvard University, 
comprizing the Hohenzollem, the Child Memorial, the 
Harvard Union, the Societas Sig^atis, the Digamma Soci- 
ety, and the Cercle Frangais book-plates, three of which are 
from dignified designs by Mr. Goodhue. It is difficult to 
choose between them in beauty or in fitness, though per- 
haps by virtue of its purpose and its fame among plate 
collectors the Hohenzollem stands distinct. No German 
engraver, inspired by patriotism and breathing the air of 
the Durer country, ever gave a wilder vigor and more tri- 
umphant majesty to the eagle of the HohenzoUems than 
Mr. French has given it here. The circumstances govern- 
ing the plate forced on it an unusual amount of text, which, 
in its variety and balance, perhaps presents in it a better 
study of what may be called the science of lettering than 
any other of his book-plates. Lettering was not a branch 
of the art that he particularly sought, however much he ex- 
celled in it. He considered rather that for his purpose there 
was in it neither nature nor human nature, whatever its 
evolution might be. Writing to his friend, Mr. Baillie, he 
discusses its difficulty, sa)ring that it is a very "narrow 
track to follow between having your work look as though it 
were made with a machine and having it appear the work 
of an unskilled and incompetent workman." This narrow 
path he followed, where he could, and the character of the 
plate admitted it, choosing the exacting but always satis- 
factory roman alphabet, which he varied by shading or by 
an added graceful touch to the more flexible letters. 

26 



HIS ART 

The HohenzoUern plate is also a good example that 
might be duplicated among the private plates, of Mr. 
French's unflagging interest in the desires of his client. 
The design was long under discussion, letters on letters 
passed to and from Mr. French, German and American 
authorities were consulted, every possible detail was care- 
fully considered and decided, and finally the plate was 
struck off in various colors for the immediate purpose of 
celebrating the advent of the Germanic Library for which 
it was engraved, and the visit of Prince Henry to the Uni- 
versity. 

It seems a long step from this important g^oup of col- 
lege, library, and society plates, strong in their character, to 
the larger group of ladies' book-plates that Mr. French 
produced. These are so attractive in their delicacy and re- 
finement, and in their widely different ornamentation and 
symbolism, that if Mr. French had confined his attention to 
this class of designing, they would have given him dis- 
tinction. The plates of Miss Robinson, Mrs. Whitin, and 
Miss Slade, are but three of many that might be cited with- 
out approaching similarity. The exquisite plate of Miss 
Lawrence, so ruthlessly sacrificed in an English reproduc- 
tion, is fine and clear as an intaglio, perfect in its way, and 
quite unlike the equally charming plates of Mrs. Wood, 
Miss Cheney, Miss Adams, Miss Lefferts, Mrs. Lee, Miss 
Messenger, Mrs. Gary, and Mrs. Metcalf. Taken together 
they amaze one by their revelation of the pictorial possibil- 
ities of the book-plate. 

Mr. French's great delight in the work of the German 
Little Masters helped him to follow in their footsteps and 
produce in scarcely thirteen years this long series of nearly 
three hundred book-plates, these little masterpieces of his 
own. They won for him too the same title, of which 

27 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

in their rigid styles. The fantastic joke that Mr. French en- 
graved and put with them was a very clever imitation, an 
old-style plate as he intended it to be. But when he be- 
gan Miss Brainerd's plate he threw precedent aside and 
produced an original design. It is a complex plate, pictur- 
ing its owner's home at Enfield and bearing the monog^ram 
and name, cut as in stone; these are surrounded by a set- 
ting of the wild roses and ox-eyed daisies of New England 
and the freely-dealt-with "Chippendale" shell that already 
under his hand impatiently burst into leafy scrolls. 

His interest in Volaptik led to his second attempt, an al- 
most symmetrical plate, built about the winged torch and 
double globe symbol with the motto of the Volapuk Society, 
with the legend, Lonol al Edwin Davis French, on a tablet 
cased in a frame of "Chippendale" shells, which he again 
uses as freely as its originator used the original shell. 

His third book-plate, engraved for Mrs. French, shows 
again his love of the rose, and he deftly studs the mono- 
gram with the forget-me-not; making the monogram the 
feature of the plate, he gives it proportion to the freer 
scrollwork which he more fully commands. 

In the next three plates he breaks from the confinement 
of the rectangle, and furnishes three new varieties of the 
monogram motive. He had already shown a liking to re- 
view and correct his work by later judgment, and after a 
change of thought. Few plates there are in the long list 
but had some final touch, a shadow deepened here or a 
scroll lengthened or restrained there, and, generally, some 
little improvement where his client was probably already 
content 

His own plate. No. 5, shown in its final state in this book, 
was a marked evolution. Its main features he had at the 
outset. Flowers blossom at top and bottom and in the 

18 



i 



HIS ART 

midst, and scrolls float lightly from the initials. At the 
bottom he placed on record his chosen volumes from all the 
world's libraries— Dante, Lucretius, Emerson, Virgil— 
and an open book that breathes his love of nature, while 
under these are the symbols of his chosen and favorite arts. 
The later changes show the comers of a supporting frame 
appearing from behind, and the readjustment of the ribbon 
to bear his name. It is a very significant plate, not only 
for the lavish decoration and for its combined delicacy and 
cheering boldness, but because it is strongly and definitely 
personal in its character. 

These six plates were all in a sense the play of a man 
whose play must show some result. "Produce/* cries Car- 
lylc, and to Mr. French such a voice was welcome. He was 
now on the threshold of his fruitful career as an engraver 
on copper. 

On the fourteenth of January, 1894, he received a letter 
from Mr. Beverly Chew stating that Miss Brainerd had 
said that Mr. French was prepared to execute orders for 
ex-libris, and asking for an interview. Mr. Chew wished 
two plates, his own and that of the Players. He had readily 
recognized the promise of the little sheaf of plates already 
done ; their more than promise he had noted too, and he in- 
dorsed his appreciation with good counsel to Mr. French 
and with generous praise to his own friends. 

Each of these two plates had its peculiar test. The 
Players was a difficult design for the engraver, yet he ren- 
dered the lights and shadows of a wash-drawing and the 
doleful and jovial masks with success. Mr. Chew wished 
an armorial plate, and that must bring comparison with the 
heraldic engravers of all time. The shield and crest are 
so executed that they at once suggest antiquity, and while 
the plate has no uncertainty, it has no thought of the hard 

19 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

The hesitancy with which he approached these large 
plates is curiously in contrast with his triumphs over them. 

A certain trait in Mr. French's work appears more gen- 
erously in the certificates than in any others of his engrav- 
ings. It lies in the field, or cartouche, whereon is placed the 
inscription and the name of the holder of the certificate. 
This is not merely a field for lettering; it is not stippled; 
nor is it lightly run across with faint lines or delicate cross- 
hatching; but it is engraved with infinite pains to represent 
parchment, and most thoroughly it does so. A fountain 
pen would ill be used upon it; it should be engrossed with 
a quill or nothing. 

The generous courtesy of Mrs. Holden allows the origi- 
nal publication here of one of Mr. French's most signifi- 
cant plates of general character, the Harvard Quadrangle. 
As here represented, these old buildings have a reality; 
there is no stiff formality about them ; they speak the digni- 
fied welcome that the Quadrangle itself offers. The trees, 
whose bark and leaves have life, arch gracefully over the 
scene, which shimmers and gbws with the stmlight and 
suggests the atmosphere attained by a successful land- 
scapist. Historically and alone the plate is notable, but it 
seems also to fitly complete Mr. French's association with 
Harvard. 

It was Mr. French's good fortime to be largely associ- 
ated as an engraver with the city of New York, and to have 
the appreciative friendship of those interested in the pic- 
turesque and historical points of the city; an interest that 
resulted in a group of engravings, excelled perhaps by the 
similar work of no other engraver. In these he rightfully 
took great interest, for he loved his adopted home. The 
loonophile plates, a rare and much sought series of engrav- 
ings of New York buildings of importance, represent several 

30 



HIS ART 

Boston Museum, and the same year they were an important 
part of the exhibition of book-plates held by the Grolier 
Qub. In 1898 nearly all that were then engraved, and 
some in different states, were in the extensive collection 
shown in Boston by the Club of Odd Volumes. An exhibition 
entirely devoted to Mr. French's book-plates was held in 
Qeveland in 1899, and through the stmimer of 1907 the 
New York Public Library held, at the Lenox branch, an 
exhibition of upward of two hundred, not only of the book- 
plates but of the miscellaneous engravings as well. 

A book-plate should be more than a decorative label. It 
should have in motto or in symbol, and quite aside from its 
art, some clear and lasting token of its owner. The splen- 
did plate of the Worcester Art Museum, with its bronze- 
like seal, flanked by torches and over it the generous motto, 
'Tor the benefit of all the people of the City of Worcester," 
stamps the purpose of each volume that contains it. 

The Edward Tompkins McLaughlin Memorial plate, 
largely planned by the professor's friend, Mr. George Dud- 
ley Seymour, is a more deeply impressive one. The pres- 
ence of the chalice— the Holy Grail — suggests to his inti- 
mates his interest in the Arthurian legends and his love of 
Browning^s line : 

''Only grant my soul may carry high through death her 

cupunspilled." 

Qosely associated with this reminder of the man is the bur- 
den of his counsel, the motto from Matthew Arnold, "Think 
clear, feel deep, bear fruit well." He thought that the poet 
had in this verse expressed the best of modem culture. The 
seal of Yale University, and the panel for the President's 
autograph, and the name of the prize winner, complete the 
plate. 

21 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

The noble plate of Ernest Kempton Adams is a fine ex- 
ample of this cardinal principle. The motto ''Seek Truth," 
at the top, almost suggests a halo above the bust of Socra- 
tes, which stands, with scientific instruments at either side, 
on a small cabinet containing books, some without titles, 
and some with the names of famous scientists. On the 
dexter side is a small engraving of a cross-cotmtry rider 
accompanied by a hotmd ; on the sinister side a Stradivarius 
is represented incased in pansies. The relative placing of 
these elements has its suggestive value, as, surrounded by 
graceful ornament, they bespeak the character and pursuits 
of the owner. 

It would be difficult to find a purely symbolic design ren- 
dered with more appreciation and evident delight than that 
of the Candidati, which evidences character in a somewhat 
different way. There is a touch of humor mixed with ear- 
nestness in it that appealed to Mr. French. This plate is 
used by the members of a circle of women writers. The 
badge of the society, designed in jest, the bauble with the 
initial ''C," lies half buried underneath the manuscript and 
finished books which represent the hope and achievement 
of the members. An ominous boomerang, that is, a re- 
turned manuscript, is there too. A full circle represents the 
lasting friendship of the members. The wreath is the re- 
ward, and across the whole lies the ribbon that bears the 
name of the society or of one of its members. 

Mr. W. K. Bixby's plate is a peculiar example of the in- 
dividual design. He humorously accepted the generic slang 
title of ''octopus'' given to large commercial combinations, 
one of which he was president of, and applied the idea to 
collecting. Mr. French quizzically enjoyed making a design 
that shows a fierce octopus in the center, reaching its tenta- 
cles to every side in pursuit of the books and manuscripts 

22 



HIS ART 

that tumble about in the seething water. Contradictory it 
iSy to be sure, but how novel and startling in its effect I Few 
of Mr. French's engravings furnish, in their different 
states, a better study than this of his power and methods. 

Even to the prosaic "book-pile," of which sort of book- 
plate he engraved but one, that of Mr. Julian Marshall, Mr. 
French gave individuality in the tokens of music and nature. 
Partly it is these, partly the fine sense of proportion, partly 
the perfect execution, that makes this the most beautiful 
book-pile plate in existence. 

The abstruse and technical science of heraldry has been a 
problem to American engravers, and not unlikely to foreign 
ones as well. Mr. French studied Fairbaim and Boutell to 
good purpose, and gathered all hints that came to him on 
that subject, and he so well availed himself of the decora- 
tive opportunities it offered that his armorials are apace in 
beauty with the more practised work of the foreign en- 
gravers of any period. His armorial designs are usually 
strong and decided, even when the insignia are supported 
and surrounded by generous ornament. His trained eye al- 
ways gave proportion to them, not less, but more clearly, 
than to others. -The roll of successes is a long one, yet 
could it be done without seeming to forget others, I would 
speak of the heraldic plates, each distinct in treatment, of 
Mr. Vamum, Mr. Hopkins, Mr. Livermore, Mr. Gushing, 
and the plate of Mrs. Whitin, as beautiful in its execution 
as it is clever in its design. 

Frequently designs mingle heraldry with other motives, 
a more difficult matter. The plates of Mr. Talmage, Mr. 
Gale, Mr. Baillie, Mr. Arnold Wood, and the Dean Hoff- 
man Library, this last, one of Mr. French's most digni- 
fied engravings, follow this method. 

There is no class of designs in which an error so quickly 

23 



HIS ART 

that time in its march has now swept aside or materially 
changed; the Distributing Reservoir, the old Tombs, the 
National Academy of Design, and Fraimce's Tavern, are 
worthily recorded among them. In the Acorn series and in 
New Amsterdam, and "The Old Book-Sellers of New 
York," Mr. French very truthfully reproduced some fine old 
views not easily gathered, and nowhere else found together. 
In addition to these invaluable groups there are in the book- 
plates of Mr. Blackwell, Mr. Andrews, Mrs. Plummer, the 
Dean Hoffman Library, A. C. Bemheim, and Mr. Black, 
and in the membership certificates, some choice miniatures 
that those interested in New York views cannot overlook. 

Time seems already to have given its test to much of 
Mr. French's work. It is often what in verse we would 
speak of as occasional, but with what imagination and 
soul he has infused it and given it a lasting interest 1 He 
gave himself quite wholly to his art, and with what may be 
called a resolute enthusiasm. He could but put his own 
character into his engravings, and that character was noble 
in its strength and honesty and delicacy. 

Ira Hutchinson Brainerd. 



31 



BOOK-PLATES 



1 Helen | Elvira | Brainerd. | 1893 1893 

a Background of cypher formed of dotted and continuocis 

alternate lines. 
b Lines of background all continuous. 
EJ>Jf. Sc, 

2 Mary I Brainerd I French I 1893 1893 



a Plate dark, unsigned. 
b Plate lighter. 

3 Edwin Davis French 1893 

E.D.F, Sc. 1893. 

Mr. French's "Volapiik'* plate. 

4 Helen Elvira Brainerd. MDCCCXCIV .... 1893 

EDPSc 

5 EDF (Edwin Davis French) 1893 

EDP.Sc, 

a Without frame, in which form one hundred copies were 

printed, Ex Libris on ribbon in centre. 
b With frame added, and motto re-engraved. Printed in 

brown, black, green and red. 
c Change in motto, — imifare to imitari. Printed in black, 

brown and blue. 
d Full name, Edwin Davis French, in centre. Ex Libris on 

33 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

ribbon at side, and signature replaced by ipse fee. This 
change was made in 1901. Printed in brown, black and 
green. 

6 Cora Artemesia Leggett 1894 

EDF, Sc. 1894 

7 Beverly C3iew 1894 

EDFSc. 1894 

8 Charles E. Qark, M.D. 1894 1894 

EDFSc. 

With books. 

9 Charles E. Qark, M.D 1894 

EDFSc, 1894 

Floral. 



10 In Memoriam. | Ellen Walters Avery. 

New York, March 25, 1893 1894 

a Panel blank. 
b As above. 
EDFsc. 

c With these words: Her books presented to Teachers Col- 
lege 1897 

1 1 William Loring Andrews 1894 

E D French sc. 1894 

12 The Oxford Club. Lynn 1894 

EDFSc. 1894 



13 The I Players | Either for Tragedy | Comedy History. 

Hamlet. Act II. | Scene II 1894 

EJ).F.Sc. 1894- 

34 



BOOK-PLATES 

Design by Howard Pyle. 

a As above. 

b A smaller plate, — a photogravure reduction three inches 
high, retouched with graver by Mr. French, but with- 
out his signature. 

14 Whitelaw Reid 1894 

E D French sc, 1894 

A few proofs were taken with darker clouds and sky. 

15 Marshall Qifford Lefferts 1894 

E D French sc. 1894 

16 Edward Hale Bierstadt 1894 

E D French sc, 1894. 

17 W. E. BaiUie 1894 

E D French fee, 1894 

18 Colonial Dames of America 1894 

a Panel and ribbon blank. 

b Twelve proofs only, signed on ribbon. 

E D French sc, 1894 

c With copyright notice on ribbon. 
EDPsc, 

19 Charles B. Foote 1894 

E D French sc, 1894, 

a Rays from lamp overflow edge of medallion. 
b Field of rays reduced, not touching medallion. 

20 Henry BUckwell 1894 

E D French sc, 1894 

35 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

21 The Grolier Qub 1894 

a Before all letters, save titles of books. Leaf and scroll 
work nearly all shaded. Open volume at bottom heavily 
etched. 

b Plate lettered, decoration shaded, open volmne lightly 
etched. 

B D French sc, 1894 

c Initials / A (Jost Amman) added in panel showing early 
method of presswork and composition. 

d Date, is68, added after letters / A. 

e An dectrotype with the words No.^Case—^helf^. This 
electrotype was used, before the index words were added, 
in printing the frontispiece of the small paper edition of 
Mr. Allen's American Book-Plates, The copper plate 
was used for the large paper edition. 

22 Hiram Edmund Deats | Flemington, N. J 1894 

a tipper part engraved, panel not lettered, lower part not 

begun. 
b As above. 
B D French sc, 1894, 

23 Edwin B. Holden 1894 

B D French sc. 1894 

a Left hand of figure, save index finger, closed, wreath promi- 
nent. Plate destroyed after six impressions. 

b The same design, left hand, save middle finger, open, 
wreath close to head as in the antique, no motto. 

c Motto from De Bury added. 

The signature in b and c is above the date, in a, beneath it 

24 Edwin B. Holden 1894 1894 

BDPSc. 

The smaller plate, with open book at bottom of plate. 

25 Alice C. Holden 1894 

a Upright book not lettered. 

36 



BOOK-PLATES 

b Engraving deeper cut; book lettered. 
E D French sc. 1894 

26 Edwin R. Holden 1894 

E D French sc, 1894 

Zl John Page Woodbury. 1894 1894 

a Foliage and ribbon only at top ; books outlined. 
h View of Boston and library interior added. 
c Books engraved, also portrait of Cruikshank. Plate com- 
plete. 
E D French sc. 

A few proofs have remarque; an arbutus spray. 

28 Richard B. Coutant 1894 

a Books lack titles. 
h Titles indicated. 
E D French 1894 

29 James J. Goodwin 1894 

E D French 1894 

30 Francis Goodwin 1894 

E D French 1894 

a Panel white, no titles on books. 

b Church in panel, titles of books indicated. 

31 Beverley Warner, MA 1894 

E D French fee 1894 
Proofs in two states. 

32 Jonathan Godfrey I Fairfield, Conn 1894 



a Unsigned. 

b Signed, plate darker. 

E D French sc. 1894. 

37 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

33 Charles Conover Kalbfleisdi 1894 

E D French sc. 1894. 

a Scales and feathers shaded. 

b Scales not shaded, feathers shaded but lightly. 

34 Henry Sherburne Rowe 1894 

E D French, 1894 

a Stipple or horizontal lines used in background of two 

small panels at sides. 
b Slanting lines substituted for stippling. 

Two states of proofs. 

35 Emily Hoe Lawrence 1894 

EDF 1894 

36 James Hale Bates 1894 

E D French sc, 1894 

a Boolcs under lamp not lettered. 
b Books lettered. 

37 Richard Soudicote Mansergh I Friarsfield, I Tipperary. 1895 

a A few proofs taken before insertion of name. 
b Without frame or signature. 
c With frame and signature. 
E D French sc, 1895 

38 Lotiis I. Haber 1894 

E D French 1894 

39 L B L (L. B. U5wenstein) 1895 

EDF 1895 



40 Library | of the | Metropolitan Museum of Art 

New York City 1895 

E D French sc, 1895 

38 



BOOK-PLATES 

a With view of the Cruger Mansion, home of the Museum 

from 1873 to 1878. 
b With view of the home of the Museum in Central Park. 

The word Purchased — ^in panel, a few dotted lines in 

road. 
c Road shaded in stipple. 
d The same, with words Presented by — substituted. The 

first variety appears both with and without the words 

Case — Shelf—, the others only with theuL Proofs have 

word Proof, 

41 E. D. Church 1895 

EDF 1895. 

a Outline of continents faint 
b Continents clearly defined. 

42 A. C. Beraheim 1895 

E D French Sc, 1895 

43 Alice C. Bakewell. 1849-1893 1895 

E.D.F. 1895 

44 Charles B. Alexander 1895 

E.D.F. 1893, 

45 James J. Goodwin 1895 

EDF 1895 

46 James William Ellsworth 1895 

E D French. 1895 

47 Beverly Chew 1895 

E D French sc. 1895. 

48 Henry H. Vail 1895 

E D French sc. 1895 

a Cartouche notched an eighth of an inch at top. 
b Cartouche notched three eighths of an inch. 

39 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

49 Thomas Jefferson McKee 1895 

EDF 1895 

50 M. Taylor Pyne. 1895 1895 

B D French sc. 

51 Micajah P. Clough. 1895 1895 

a No date in plate. 
EDF 1895 

b As above. 
EDFsc. 

Adapted from a design furnished by the owner. 

52 Henry A. Sherwin 1895 

ED French sc 1895 

53 Samuel F. Barger 1895 

E.DJ^. sc. 1895 

54 Maris Gerard Messenger 1895 1895 

E D French sc, 

a No shading on lower dexter side of shield with Branden- 
burg book-plate. 
b Stipple shading added. 

55 William Frederick Havemeyer 1895 

Design by Thomas Tryon. 

56 Theo. L. DeVinne 1895 

Design by G. F. Babb. 

( Thomas Mott > 

57 J Agnes Devens J 0^»>o™^ ^8^5 

a Framed, panel blank, flowers in outline. 

b As above. 

EDF 

40 



BOOK-PLATES 

58 Frank Evans Marshall 1895 

a Panel and ribbon white. Outside lower frame outline. 

b Decoration nearly all shaded ; frame shaded. 

c As above. 

E D French 1895 



59 Champaign Public Library | This book was purchased | by 
the I Julia F. Bumham I Memorial Fund. . . 1895 



60 Biltmoris GWV 1895 1895 

Design by the owner, George W. Vanderbilt 

a With date on cartouche. 
h With date on ribbon. 

Some early proofs, in olive ink, have the figure $, incomplete. 
Two trial proofs.' 



61 EH (EdidiHolden) 1895 

EDP 

62 The I Qub of Odd I Volumes 1895 



a Upper half of plate engraved, the rest chiefly outline. 
h Plate completed, somewhat dark. 
E D French Sc, 1895 

c Plate rubbed down, impression much lighter. 

63 Percy Rivington Pyne 1895 

E D French sc. 1895 

64 J. King Goodrich 1895 

EDF 

65 William Lanman BuU 1895 

E D French sc. 1895 

41 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

66 Micajah Pratt Qou^. 1896 1896 

EDFsc 

67 The Association of the Bar | of the City of New York. | 

The Library of | Charles H. Woodbury, | a former mem- 
ber of this Association, | was given to it by his widow, | 
and this book forms part thereof. I 1895 



68 V. E. M. (Valentine Everit Macy) 1896 

a Six unsigned proofs were printed before letters. 
b With letters V£M. and No, . • Unsigned. 
c Changed in 1900 to 



Valentine Everit ) ^ 
Edith Carpenter J ^^^ 



EDP 



69 Biltmoris GWV 1895 1896 

Like No. 60, but smaller, foliage slightly more elaborate. The 
date, 1895, on prints only, refers to the design. Prints 
without date also exist 

a With date on cartouche. 
b With date on ribbon. 



70 Tracy Dows 1896 

EDP 

A few trial proofs. 

71 Sovereign 1896 

Design by Thomas Tryon. 

a In outline, before letters. 
b Finished plate. 

The Crown plate. 

This design was originally process engraved. The name was 

in the plate and there was no panel underneath. Several 

sizes. 

42 



BOOK-PLATES 



72 The Edward Tompkins McLau^lin | Memorial Prize in 
English I Composition. Founded a.d. | MDCCCXCIV | 
Awarded to I I President. . 1896 



a Three large panels and book blank. 

b Panels engraved, no ornament in lower panel. 

c Plate complete, as above. 

E D French sc. i8g6 

73 Oiristian Archibald Herter 1896 

E D French 1896 

74 A. J. Morgan 1896 

EDF 1896 

a Portrait of Thackeray as grey haired. 
b Thackeray younger, more erect 

75 Howard WiUets 1896 

EDF 

a Lower panel blank. 

b Portrait of George Cruikshank. 

A few trial proofs. 



76 Presented to | , Esq' | With the Compliments of 

William Loring Andrews 1896 

a Flowers, books and ribbon only. 

b Ribbon lettered; script lettering engraved. 

EDF 

c Lettering completed; frame added. 

77 Robert Sedgwick 1896 

a Without signature or date. 
b Signed and dated. 
E, D. French fee*, 1896 

Signed proofs exist with tuft of crest lion's tail pointing back. 

43 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

78 Chas I H | Taylor | Jr 1896 

EDFsc. 1896 

Design by R B. Bird. 

Some proofs show slight changes in shading of sea and sails. 

79 Sovereign 1896 

Design by Thomas Tryon. 
The Eagle plate. 

80 Harriet Blair Borland 1896 

EDPsc 1896 

a Rays spring from flame, their field large. 

b White ring about flame. 

c Field of rays small : they spring from flame. 



81 Mary Emma Plummer 1896 

a Books only engraved, rest in outline. 

b Face shaded. 

c View of New York outlined. 

d Outlines filled in, plate lettered. Wake of boat rough. 

E.DJ^rench sc. 1896 

e Water quite placid. 



82 Henry A. Sherwin 1896 

E D French sc. 1896. 

Same as No. 52, one and three-quarters inches high, name 
' included. Two states of proofs. 

83 The John Crerar | Library Chicago. | 1894 . . . 1896 

a Portrait engraved and background finished. 
b Plate completed. As above. 
E D French sc. 1896 

c With words Presented by — 

44 



BOOK-PLATES 

84 The Denver Club 1896 

Design by Cora £. Sargent 

a AVith name of designer. A few impressions only. 

b Signature added. A few only. 

EDFsc. 

c Engraving lighter. Name of designer and signature erased 

85 Edwin Ruthven Lamson 1896 1896 

Design by Edmund H. Garrett. 

a Twelve proofs were taken without letters. 
b Name and address in panel. 
E D French sc. 

Trial proofs exist with the three graces engraved, border in 
outline. 

86 Maria Gerard Messenger 1896 1896 

Dono • Hunc • Librum • Dedi. 
E D French 

a With panel blank. 

b With books. 

c With child's portrait Four copies only. 

d With view of Pleasantville Library. 

e With inscription : Associata \ Bibliothecam S. Maria \ Sci- 

entug Sacrct. \ St Mary's School, 8, East 46th Street \ 

New York City. 

87 Catherine A. Bliss 1896 

EDF J896 

A few trial proofs. 

88 The Collection of|Tho*. Addis Emmet M.D| Presented tyy| 

John Stewart Kennedy | to the | New York Public Li- 
brary I Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations. 1 1 896. 1 896 
EDP 

45 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

89 Adelle Webber Gray 1897 

EDF 

90 O. A. K. (O. A. Kahn) 1897 

ED French 1897 

91 Lucy Coleman Carnegie 1897 

EDF (Script cypher.) 

92 Robert H. McCarter 1896 

E D F-1896 

93 John Lloyd Steams 1897 

EDF (Script cypher.) 1897 
Proofs in two states. 

94 Edith Davies Kingsbury 1897 

Design by Lilian C. Westcott 

a Without signature or date. 
b With signature and date. 

E D French sc, 1897 

95 JulianiMarshall. MDCCCXCVI 1897 

a Upper part of plate, save music roll, finished; the lower 

part in outline. 
h (Complete, signed. 
E D French Sc. 

Twenty proofs of this plate, some in blade, some in reddish 
brown, and one with half the plate in sepia and half in 
black tempered with carmine, have, as a remarque, a por- 
trait in drypoint of Mr. French by himself. 

96 Candidati 1897 

E D F sc (Script cypher.) 

a Without name of owner. 

46 



BOOK-PLATES 

b With name, Helen Runyon Belknap, in curved line below 

the design. 

* 

There are several electrotype variations of this plate but the 
above are the only impressions from the original copper. 
Some of the later plates carry the owner's name beneath 
the design while some carry it on the ribbon and omit 
the word Candidati: — 

c Helen Hunt Daly. 

cc Helen Keyes. 

d Margaret Chase Wilson. 

e Sara King Wiley. 

/ Georgiana Goddard King. 

g Kate Dickinson Sweetser. 

h Eveline Warner Brainerd. 

Two states ; name under the plate, and on ribbon. 

y Ellen Rose Giles. 
k Elsie Lewis Day. 
/ Louise Collier Wilcox. 

97 WiUiam Connell 1897 

EDF (Script cypher) 1897 

98 Authors Qub Library 1897 

Design by George Wharton Edwards. 

Outside measure, 3^ inches high. 

The engraved plate by Mr. French is not to be confounded 
with a process plate slightly larger made from the same de- 
sign. 

99 Ruth Mary Sabin 

a Horse's head in outline, upper sinister comer of plate not 

engraved. 
EDF 

b Horse's head engraved ; golf clubs in upper comer. 

100 Child Memorial | Library | To | Harvard University | In 

47 



EDT^IN DAVIS FRENCH 



JlcaBOfy of FmoB Jinif^ Quid Rrst Pnofesnr of 
EoffiA 1807 



c€ . « . jfro i inuiiitt plate Xa iool 



101 Tbe MmA Skxaaer Ubntj. n^nriipcjp^ ; VennoiiL | 

XD0CX3CCVII '. . . 1»8 

EDPu. 

m Hair to poftrait fliaded but listidj. 

^ Hair wmtrmhal duktr. 

e Tkrp th^ing is oval frame dosdy fonfinrd to dexter ade. 

d With words PreseuUd by^ 

WoMnfi proofs exist whli ribbon, book, and pand imen- 
frared; portrait fmishfd 

102 Pttil Lemperty, His Book 1897 

m Frame ool j, imsigngd, midatcd, A few proofs. 
b Vzmd oomplcted. Monk's cbeek bearilj shaded. 

Fhre pTOoi% oafy. 

ED French fee. 1897. 

e Hook's i2ctUffi>Uoe± 

i Henry Clay ) 
«<» { Helen Burgess 5 R««>^ ^^^ 

EDPrench 1897. 

104 Edward R Borke 1897 

EDF 1897 

a With leopard crest Six proofs. 
h Catamount sobstitttted for leopard. 

105 Mollie Cozine Lefferts 1897 

EDPic. 1897 

48 




laORARY OF 

PKIJS'CETOIV I 



BOOK-PLATES 

106 Mary I Minturn I Hartshorne 1897 

Design by Miss E, Brown. 

a As above. 

b Name changed to Mary \ Minturn | IVard. 

107 M. Taylor Pyne 1897 

E D French Sc, 1897 

a Ribbon blank save for word Pyne, 
b As above. 

c An electrotype with name changed to Percy Rivington 
Pyne. 

No proofs were taken after letters. 



108 Library of | Princeton | University 1897 

E D French fee. 1897. 

109 Florence de Wolfe Sampson 1898 

EDF (Script cypher.) 

110 Abraham Goldsmith 1898 

EDF (Script cypher.) 

111 George Allison Armour 1898 

EDF ( Script cypher.) 

a Book without inscription. 

b Book inscribed. Minor touches in shading plate. 

112 A. Dwight Stratton 1898 

EDF 

113 Samuel W. Lambert 1898 

EDP 

114 Barrett WendeU 1898 

EDF. 1898. 

a Flag at stem of ship. 
b Flag removed. 

49 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

115 ExLibrisMedicis 1898 

EDF 

Used by several members of the Gushing family. 
Design by one of the owners. 



1 16 Vassar Alumns | Historical Association. 

MDCCCXCVI 1898 

ED French sc, 1898, 

Some impressions are without the date 1898. 

117 Samuel Smith Sherwood 1898 

EDFsc 1898 



118 The Association of the Bar | of the City of New York. 
The John E. Burrill Fund 1897 

This is similar to No. 67, yet fuller in decoration. 



119 The Association of the Bar | of the City of New York. 

Gift of James C. Carter 1898 

a As above. 

b Lower line broken to read Gift of \ James C. Carter. 

c Without name James C. Carter. 

Same in design as No. 118. 

120 Henry Rogers Winthrop. 1898 1898 

EDJ^rench sc. 

a Sky denoted by broken and somewhat heavy lines. 
b Sky reengraved, in continuous fine lines, figure and foliage 
retouched. 

Proofs in two states. 

121 James A. Goldsmith 1898 

EDF 

50 



BOOK-PLATES 



122 Twentieth Century | Club | Ex Dono 1898 

EDFsc. 

Design by Evelyn Rumsey Carey. 

a As above. 

b Without panel at bottom which carries the "£x Dono" in- 
scription. 



123 Frederick W. Van Wagenen 1898 

EDF 1898 (Script pypher.) 
Proofs in two states. 

124 Georgette Brown 1898 

Design based on an Eighteenth Century copper plate. 

a Without border, a few proofs only. 

b Slight alteration in figures. A bright spot on stone seat. 

c With heavy cross-hatched border added. 

125 Jennings Stockton Cox 1898 

EDF 

126 E. P. Williams 1898 

EDF 

127 Katherine Cecil Sanford Thome. 1896 . , . . 1898 

E D French Sc 

a As above. 

b The Gift of Katherme Sheffield, and i8g6 at top erased. 

128 Florence Coleman Nimick 1898 

E D French 

129 James Edmund Scripps 1898 

EDFsc, 

Design by Albert Kahn, 1896. 

51 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

a Upper third of plate engraved, the rest in outline. 
b Two heavy lines on dexter side of western tower of cathe- 
dral; four windows in small tower. 
c These lines light ; six windows in small tower. 



130 Arnold Wood. New York MD(XCXCVIII . . . 1898 

ED French sc. 

131 Charles L. Dana 1898* 

Design by A. Kay Womrath. 

132 Eva I Snow | Smith | Prescott | 1898 1898 

E D French sc 

Some proofs have remarque in red or in black; a toy house 
and soldier. 

133 Sidney Ernest Bradshaw 1898 

ED French sc. 1898. 

a Back of Bums volume without decoration. 
b With three heraldic roses. 



134 Edward Swan Stickney | Presented to the Chicago | His- 

torical Society by | Elizabeth Hammond Stickney | 
+ ObitJulyXIMDCCCXCVII+ 1898 

a As designed, outlined and commenced by Mr. French. 

Owing to ill health he requested Mr. J. W. Spenceley to 

continue it 
b Nearly completed by Mr. Spenceley. 
c Finished by Mr. French, the last work being the head of 

Hermes, with final touches. 
E D French sc, 189S 

135 John F. Tahnage. MDCCCXCK 1899 

E D French fee 

52 



BOOK-PLATES 



k 1L3B0 dka«ap£ » TwBmmft^ 



137 Eftel llMrtfcrMT Wmd I 

m TaAad 
k Tides 




138 Ilcflif KtBwxk Scugvnt ..••••••« 18W 



130 Endi Leopold Bob. ISM 

EDF 1399 

140 Louise Taylor Hansfaonie Moore MDOOCXdV. ISM 

EDFremch '99 

m As above;. 

b Lomise Taylor HartAorme Leeds. 

141 diaries Dexter ADen 1800 

E D French fee. 1899 

m Large pands empty, tipper smister small fwiid las m 
diarmmg reduced coaraYuig of die Aiidiors dub bool^ 
plate. 

b Witb portrait in oval ; pnx»fe ooly. 

c Books in ovaL 

d Books in oval, and seal of Bibliographical Society tobsli* 
tnted for that of Caxtoo Qnb. 

Proofs of d have remarque; Mt McKenzie as seen from Mr« 
French's stadia 

142 Allan C. BakeweU 1808 

Portrait engraved by S. Hollyer. 

a Portrait engraved, — rest of plate in outline. 

53 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

b Plate complete, as above. 

EDF 

There exist a few proofs of a slightly smaller plate, with 
much smaller oval. It is in outline save that the portrait is 
completed. 

t George Van Waeenen ) 
Margaret Van Nest | ^uiyee 1899 
DF 1899 

a Four horizontal lines across windows. 
b Windows have diamond panes added. 

Some proofs of b have remarque; a pine tree. 

144 A W (Arnold Wood) 1899 

EDF 1899 

145 Gushing. [Armorial] 1899 

146 John Skelton Williams 1899 

EDF 1899 

147 H B (Henry Blackwell.) 1899 

148 K M (Katharine Mackay.) 1899 

EDF 

149 Cornelia Horsford 1899 

EDFsc 1899 

a Landscapes quite dark. 

b Landscapes lightened, and horse reengraved. 

1 50 To 1 with compliments of | Henry Blackwell. 1 899 

ED French Sc 1899. 

a Some proofs are with blank panels. 
b Panels filled with New York views. 

54 




BOOK-PLATES 

151 Maria Gerard Messenger and Elisabeth Chamberlain [ 

The Orchards 1899 

E D French ic. 

Bark, one broken line in roof shading. 

b Lighter, roof shaded in unbroken lines. 

152 Treadwell Library | Massachusetts General Hospital | The 

Gift of 1899 

Design by B. G. Goodhue, 

There are proof impressions without the inscription. 

153 This volume, | for insertion in which the Author | has been 

pleased to write his name, | | is the property 

of I Paul Lemperly 1900 

ED French Sc. 1900 

154 The University Club. | Cleveland, ] MDCCCXCVIII. 1900 

EDP 1900 

155 Robert Emmet Hopkins 1900 

E D French Sc. 1900 

15fl Alice S. Cheney 1900 

E D French fee. 1900. 

157 The Union League Club. ] New York | JS63 . . . 1900 

EDF 1900 

a All windows clear. 

b Stained glass window and Venetian blinds engraved : clear 
space, unshaded, on floor. 

C Venetian blinds erased. 

d Floor entirely shaded in sCipple; two shadows, line en- 
graved, starting from lower sinister comer, point toward 
center of floor. 

e Venetian blinds restored. 
55 



EDVIN DAVIS FRENCH 



/ Tbt two ffaadowE (d) 
beyond ceiiire of fioar. 
^ Word6 FresemXed by added. 

Tbe firft siz states, li'jna^li 

158 O L. F. RohinsDiL N&vjiort, 

£ I> Fremck jec. lyoD 
169 Jobs IL Livei'iuore ......l 

JE V Fremck Sc 39OQ. 

Thai plant wac destrogwd Iqr fire, and jh iBiawud 1>r 
Frcndi ; wot No. ^fio. 

J«) N«fluui T. Pewter, Jr. * 1100 

E D French jyao 

Priiili ihow retoncliiziK ok fiiTDi^ 

J«l Sa»Vodel] ItOO 

£ Z^ French r/jo 

1«2 RJS IIOD 

EDF 290D 

1^3 Knr Ywt Yadit Cbib Ubmy IMO 

Duimi lyr IK'slter G. Ovens. 



Ssdh ^lS 

t? Widi shbdiDf of Bsilfi. 

r S2£if lif^hter. Ship's Btcm afishtil?' chm g e d. 

ED French Sc. jym 

€ Fr€ienUd by — 

Tjk ori^ni^: o^rci^. czmded I9' Mr. FiriMli . pa»ed fluLim l t 
tibr^ '.rii^' v^'r.«f< to the sool ismr as iiic>vB I9' tibe frazoed 
veritt ST tot C^al T^^Hr ^i r j 

A ttzis.! v^vc^rtft r* y fc i djcaap is used in sdbS 

56 



BOOK-PLATES 

164 Walter B. James, M.D 1900 

EDF 1900 

a Very dark, rays from sun touch mountain. 
b Light, rays do not touch mountain. 

165 Lucy Maynard Salmon. MDCCCC 1900 

E D French Sc 

166 John H. Buck 1900 

Design by Marian Buck. 

a Unsigned. 

h Has a hawk in the sky. 

EDFsc, 



167 Elisabeth Chamberlain | The Orchards. .... 1900 

EDF 1900. 

168 Margaret H. Foot 1900 

ED French 1900 

169 John W. & Lee Partridge | Loveland 1900 

EDFsc, 1900 

Proofs unsigned and undated. 

170 Amy B.Alexander 1900 

EDF 1900 

171 James Wilson Bullock MD(XCC 1900 

E D French Sc 

a Minerva's face white, space under oval white. No date in 

roman figures. 
h Face engraved. Date and study from Paul Potter's bull 

added. 
c Portrait of Washington substituted for bull. 

57 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

172 Arthur West Little 1900 

E D French Sc. Dec, igoo. 



173 John B. Larner. | Washington, D. C 1000 

E D French sc. 1900 

174 Ruth Adams 1900 

EDF 1900 

175 M. C. D. Borden 1900 

A replica of No. 71, with an eagle instead of the crown, and 
change of name. 

176 M. C. D. Borden 1900 

Same as No. 175 but smaller. Height i^ inches. 



177 S. Walter Woodward | Washington, D. C 1901 

EDF 1901 

178 Sarah Elizabeth Whitin 1901 

EDF igoj 

179 William Watts Shennan 1901 

EDFSc. 1901 

Design by B. G. Goodhue. 

180 John Sanford Barnes 1901 

EDF igoj 

181 Bibliotheca | Societatis | Signeti | in Academia Harvard- 

iana | Ex Dono | 1901 

E D French Sc jgoj 

Design by B. G. Goodhue. 

58 



:=-.« 2l IJ^IB =^E3tZS. 




" t 1 ~ 






L 1 :i 



.3 



rci' 



*" Sin] 



Jtfr 



BOOK-PLATES 



182 The Worcester | Art Museum. | The Gift of— . . 1901 

ED French Sc. igoi 

183 Hartshome 1901 

EDF igoi, 

a Signed. 

b Unsigned, and with mantling reduced. 

184 Harbor Hill 1 1901 1901 

EDF 

185 Mabel Carleton Gage 1901 

EDFsc. 1901 

Design by owner. 

186 Library | of the | Harvard | Union | The Gift of | James 

Hazen Hyde | of the class of 1898 | in memory of | 

Henry Baldwin Hyde I M C M 1901 

EDJ^^c, 

Design by B. G. Goodhue. 

a As above. 

h Date altered to MDCCCC. 

EJJ.F, sc. igoi 

c The Gift of 

d With inscription A gift \ in Memory of \ Robert Fields 
Simes \ A. B, 1885. LL. B. and A. M. 18S8 \ 1901 

Plates a and b printed from the original copper; c and d 
from electrotypes retouched with graver by Mr. French. 

187 Frances Amelia Adams 1901 

EDF 1901 

Proofs and prints show a slight di£Ference in the miniature 
of Emerson. 

59 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

188 Roger Bigelow Merriman 1901 

EDF jgoi 

a Mountains in outline. 

b Mountains shaded. Forequarters of lion darkly shaded. 

c Lion uniformly shaded. 

d Mountains and clouds lighter. 

Plate contains view of Mt Washington and shields of Har- 
vard and Balliol. 



189 William Phillips 1901 

EDFsc jgoj 

Design by P. deC la Rose. 

a Signature on a single line. 

b Two slits on sinister side of helmet. 

c Signature and date E D F\sc\ igoi, in small circle. 

190 Sarah Rodman Baldwin 1901 

Design by Addison B. Le Boutillier. 

191 Walter Davis Richards 1825-1877 1901 

EDP igoi 



192 Long Island | Historical Society | Storrs Memorial 

Fund 1901 

a As above, inscription in open-face lettering on white back- 
ground, book in lower comer blank. 

Two trial proofs preceding a, are preserved by the Society. 

b Lettering and panel shaded, book decorated. 

E D French igoi 

c With inscription : Long Island Historical Society | Bequest 
of the I Rev, Richard Salter Storrs, D. D„ LL, D. \ for the 
Enlargement of the | Department of Ecclesiastical His- 
tory I MDCCCC. 

60 



BOOK-PLATES 

193 Library of the | Society of Colonial Wars | in the State of 

Connecticut 1901 

Cypher EDF igoi 
Proofs in two states. 

194 Field Memorial | Library Conway | Massachusetts | Built 

A.D. MCMI I Class I Book No. I Accession No. . 1901 



Originally printed in type at the Merrymount Press and from 
this engraved by Mr. French. 



195 The Adriance Memorial | Library. | Poughkeepsie . 1902 

Cypher EDF IQ02 

196 James M. Vamum 1902 

Cypher EDF jgo2 

197 James B. Dill. MDCCCCII 1902 

Cypher EDF 

a As above, with portrait, slightly turned to sinister side, en- 
graved by S. Hollyer. 

b Has, underneath, the words : Vol. No. . . . Shelf No. . . . 

c A full face portrait, by J. A. J. Wilcox, substituted. A few 
impressions with scarf light, afterward changed to dark. 

Working proofs show plate in outline, portrait and diamond 
figured mat engraved. 

198 Dorothy Furman 1902 

Cypher EDF igo2 

199 Edward Dean Adams 1002 

Cypher EDF jgo2 

Two states of proofs exist 

200 Natala Washbume Bishop 1902 

E D French fecit jgo2 
Four states of proofs exist 

61 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

201 Digamma Library 1902 1 The Gift of 1902 



a No date at top. Wolf in outline on white shield. 
b As above. 

EDFsc. 



202 John Chipman Gray 1902 

a One book on rug stands on its fore edge. 

b This book replaced by two, one lying on the other. 

Cypher EDF 1902 



203 Edward Duff Balken 1902 

EDFsc igo2 

Design by George Greene amended by Mr. French. 

a Shelf extends beyond window line. 

b Shelf reduced, books under window darkened. 

204 R. Stockton Pyne 1902 

Cypher EDF igo2 

a Ermine charges have three flourishes. 

b The conventional three dots substituted for the flourishes. 

205 William Beverley Rogers 1902 

a Head and neck of crest plain. 

b Head and neck of crest cross-hatched. 

Cypher EDF 1902. 

206 The Washington County | Free Library. Hagerstown | 

Maryland I MDCCCCI 1902 

Cypher EDF 1902 

a Border in outline. Portrait unfinished, background shaded. 
b Portrait finished, background reshaded. 

Proofs exist in several states. 

62 



BOOK-PLATES 

207 Ernest Kempton Adams 1902 

Cypher EDF 1902 

a Violin lightly shaded. 

h Shading heavier, chin rest added. 



208 Walter B. Adams 1902 

Cypher EDF 1902 

209 Nona Newlin Hooper 1902 

Cypher EDF 1902 

210 John Gerard Heckscher ......... 1902 

Cypher EDF 1902 

a One palm tree. 

b Two palm trees. 

c Mouth of tarpon closed. 

211 Charles D. Armstrong 1902 

Not designed by Mr. French. 

a No inscription on tablet. 
b Inscription added. 

212 Ira Hutchinson Brainerd 1902 

EDF 1902 

a Outline of ledges clearly defined by white lines. 
b This white defining line graved over, mountains shaded 
more softly, adding distance. 



} 



( William Henry and 
2'3 I Katharine French )" Burnham 1902 

E D French 1902 

a Chevron argent, 
b Chevron or, 

63 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

214 Homer Gage 1902 

Design by Mabel Carleton Gage. 
EDFsc, igo2 

215 Wynne Winslow 1902 

Cypher EDP igo2 

216 From the Library of the Very | Rev. Eugene Augustas 

Hoffman, | D. D., LL. D., D. C. L 1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 

217 Wilhelmus Mynderse 1903 

a Without signature or date. 
h Signed and dated. 

EDFsc, jgo3 

218 L M P (Lowell Mason Pahner.) 1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 
The palm plate. 

219 L M P (LoweU Mason Palmer.) 1903 

EDP 1903 

The chrysanthemum plate. 

220 Edward Duff Balken 1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 

a Upper part of plate nearly filled with scrolls. 
h Scroll work much thinner showing cross-hatched back- 
ground, e.g., lower dexter side of globe. 

221 Philip Lippincott Goodwin 1903 

Cypher EDF JQ03 

64 



BOOK-PLATES 

222 W C W (W. C. Wood.) 1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 

a Lower end of C turns out 
h Lower end of C turns in. 



223 De la Biblioth^ue | du | Cercle Fnangais | de rUniversit6 

Harvard. 1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 

a With cypher at top, made of letters J H H. 

Of this there were forty autograph proofs in black, ten in red 
and five in blue. 

h With portrait of Moli^re at top, replacing cypher. 

Of this there were twenty autograph proofs in black, ten in 
red and five in blue. 

224 Ruth Lancaster Hoe 1 903 

Not designed by Mr. French. 

a With one figure in canoe. 

h Canoe changed, contains a dog also. 

EDFSc 

225 Charles Williston McAlpin 1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 

226 Herman Simon 1904 

Design by Thomas Tryon. 
Proofs in two states. 

227 The Henry A. Rowland | Memorial Library . . .1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 

228 William Augustus Brewer 1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 

a Trunk of tree by gate is light and dark. 
b Tree entirely dark, plate lighter. 

65 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

229 Waraer Mifflin and Louise Hartshorne Leeds. 

MDCCCCI 1903 

E D French 1903, 

230 Annie Lyman 1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 

231 Caroline Seagrave Bliss 1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 

232 Qark University 1904 

Design by Mabel Carleton Gage. 

a Frame work and the three flowers in centre unshaded, no 

sifi^nature or date. 
b Frame work, and flowers shaded, but unsigned. 
c With signature. 

EDJf, sc. 1904 

233 Elizabeth Sage Goodwin 1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 

234 Cincinnati Law Library | Rufus King Fund. ... 1903 

Cypher EDF 1903 

235 Lowell Melvin Palmer 1904 

E D French, 1904, 

a Motto, Ultra aspicio, 
b Motto, Palma virtuH, 

Some proofs have no motto. 

236 Herman Simon 1904 

ED.French sc 2904 

Design by Thomas Tryon. Reduction of 226. 
Frame four and three-sixteenths inches high. 
Proofs in three states. 

66 



BOOK-PLATES 



237 Mary Barber Robinson | Chester Place .... 1904 

Cypher EDF 1904 

a Window much lighter than in b and other shading is in 

accord. 
b Window darkened. Plate reshaded. 

238 Katherine Cecil Sanford Sheffield. 1904 . . . 1904 

Cypher EDF 1904 

239 Harvard College Library | Hohenzollem Collection | In 

commemoration of the visit of | His Royal Highness | 

Prince Henry of Prussia | March sixth, 1902 | On behalf 

of His Majesty | The German Emperor | Presented by 

Archibald Cary Coolidge, Ph.D., | Assistant Professor 

of History 1904 

E D French Sc, 1904 

a As above. 

b No commas in next to last line and no period after History. 

Proof impressions with remarque (a small Roman lamp) 
were printed, seventeen copies each in red and blue, and 
twenty-nine in black, all on Japan vellum with the excep- 
tion of three of the impressions in black, which were on 
India paper. 

A panel was later added at bottom for the insertion of names 
of donors of books. 

There is a photo electrotype reduction, about four inches high. 

240 Library of the | American Institute | of | Electrical Engi- 

neers 1904 

E D French fee, 1904, 

a As above. 

Electrotypes are as follows : 

h The Gift of \ Edward D, Adams 

c The Gift of \ Schuyler Skaats Wheeler 

ccA zinc reproduction of c four inches high. 

d The Gift of \ The Carnegie Fund 

e The Gift of 

67 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

Associated with e dies are used to record gifts of : 

/ Thomas A, Edison, 
g BioH J, Arnold, 
h C. O. Mailloux. 
j Charles L, Clarke, 
k Cary T, Hutchinson. 
I W. D. Weaver, 
m Nathaniel S. Keith, 
n Joseph Wetgler. 
o W. J. Johnston. 
P Edward Caldwell 

Associated with a similar dies are used for : 

q The Gift of the New York \ Electrical Society 

r The Gift of the American \ Bell Telephone Company 

s The Gift of the \ McGraw Publishing Company 

Proofs are unsigned and have word Proof in panel 

241 Mabel Slade 1904 

EDF 1904 

a Large tree has much foliage, clouds quite heavy. 
h Foliage on large tree much thinner, clouds lighter. 

242 Henry C. Bemheim 1904 

Cypher EDF 1904 

243 Henry Fairfield Osborn 1904 

ED F Sc ( Script cypher. ) 

Design by Edward Hamilton Bell. 

244 George Edward Dimock 1904 

Cypher EDF 1904 

245 Benjamin Baraes Lovett MDCCCCIIII .... 1904 

E D French sc. 1904 

a Has no date in plate. 

b Date in plate in roman numerals. Some proofs have re- 
marque: an open book on a branch. 

68 



ff 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

254 John Notman 1904 

EDF 1904. 

255 Lucy Wharton Drexel 1904 

Cypher EDF 1904 

256 Gertrude Clarkson Welsh 1904 

Cypher EDF 1904 

257 Katharine Thomas Gary 1905 

Cypher EDF 1905 

a Trunk without shading. 
h Trunk shaded. 

Some proofs of b have remarque; view of Whitefaoe in the 
Adirondacks. 



I Theodore , 
258 j ci.-^.- 1- Taft 1905 



Eleanor 

Design by C. Grant La Farge. 



259 Harriette M. Stevens 1905 

Cypher EDF 1905 

a Hills uniformly shaded, light Proofs only. 
h Hills at dexter side darker. 

260 Mary Lois Seagrave Downes 1905 

EDF 1905 

261 Ethel Hartshome Wood 1905 

EDF, 1905 

a Signed in circle. 

b Signed in body of plate. 

262 Davis Righter Vail 1905 

Cypher EDF 1905 

70 



BOOK-PLATES 

263 Queen's University | Kingston Canada. .... 1905 

Cypher EDF 1905 

264 George Harvey 1905 

Design by J. Venier. 

a Without signature. 
h Signed. 
BDFsc, 

265 Lucius G Fisher 1905 

E D French fee 1905 

a Dotted line from dorsal fin to tail. 

h Fish shaded for rotundity, water improved. 

266 Mary Nixon Smith 1905 

Cypher EDF 1905 

a Qover blossom at top dark. 

b Qover shaded light on dexter side. 

267 John S. Holbrook. 1905 

Design by owner. An earlier process plate exists. 

a Prints unsigned. 
b Prints signed. 
EDF. sc. 1905 

Proofs are unsigned. 

268 Mardia A. Symon 1905 

Cypher EDF 1905 

269 George J. Gould. I Georgian Court 1906 



270 Parke E. Simmons 1906 

Cypher EDF 1906, 

71 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

271 Henry Van Deventer Black 1906 

Design by the owner. 

a Sky nearly clear, clouds only at edge. 
b Sky overspread with clouds. 

272 Elizabeth Jordan 1906 

E,D.F. 

Design by J. Venier. 

273 The Cosmos Club 1906 

EDFsc 

Design by William Fuller Curtis. 

274 Emma Stewart Bixby 1906 

Cypher EDF igo6 

275 W K Bixby 1906 

Cypher EDF igo6 

a Four marks on body of octopus. 
b Six marks. 
c Three marks. 

The three states show marked differences in shading of octo- 
pus, books and water; careful studies of a difficult and 
novel subject. 

276 Julius C. and Emily S. Bemheim 1906 

a Sky uniformly shaded and rather dark. Star very distinct, 

distant water uniformly shaded. 
b Sky lighter near star, distant water shows bars of light 

corresponding to outline of trees. 

Cypher EDF 1906 

277 John R. Sayler 1906 

Cypher EDF 1906 

72 



BOOK-PLATES 

(LHJ) 

278 S SE J ( (J<^<^laiuui) MDCCCCVI 

Cypher EDP 

279 Cora Paschall Davis 1906 

Cypher EDF jgo6 

a Letter ^4 in the name has curved line on sinister side, re- 
sembling the letter R. 
b The letter A is reversed, curved line being on dexter side. 

280 John Walton Livermore 1906 

E D French Sc. 1900-1906 

a A few proofs were taken with name John R. Lwermore, 
b As above. 

This plate is nearly a replica of No. 159 though the detail of 
engraving differs in the two plates. 

281 Esther Pierce Metcalf 1906 

Cypher EDF 1906 



282 Utica Public Library. | From die | John E. Brandegee 

Fund 1906 

E D French 1906 

a No lettering over door. Proofs only. 

b Name of Library and date of building added. Prints. 

283 The Yale Qub of I New York I aty 1906 

Design by Howard Pyle. 
EDFSc. 1905. 
Proofs in four states. 

284 Henry Qay Frick 1906 

Cypher EDF 1906 

73 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

285 Beverly Chew 1896 

A small oval plate, stamped in gold upon leather of different 
colors from a die designed by Mr. French. 

286 Henry A. Smith 1898 

Engraved by J. W. Spenceley. Design by Mr. French. 

287 J. Hood Wright 1897 

Design by Mr. French, following the book-plate of Daniel 
Webster. Engraver unknown. 

288 Byrd 1899 

A reengraving of the Jacobean book-plate of William Byrd 
of Westover in Virginia Esqr. 

a Before all letters. A few proofs. 
b George H, Byrd of New York, 

Electrotypes were then made for the following: — 

c Richard Evelyn Byrd of WincJiester in Virginia, 
d William Byrd of New York, 
e Francis Otway Byrd, 

289 William and Helen Woodruff Tatlock 1893 

a Before letters — a few proofs. 

h With Edwin Davis French \ Saranac Lake, N. Y. printed in 
red from a letter-head die. In this form 50 copies were 
printed, a few of them by printer's error with the frame 
reversed, top for bottom. 

c The joint plate, as above. 

d An electrotype with name; William Tatlock. 



290 For the Volapfik Exhibit at | the Columbian Exposition 
in I Chicago MDCCCXCIII. Loaned | by E. D. French, 
217 West I Thirteenth Street, New York. 

74 



BOOK-PLATES 

This label in small capitals and half bordered was inserted in 
the Volapuk books loaned by Mr. French to the Chicago 
Exhibition in 1893. Though printed, it is included here 
for it was Mr. French's first book-plate. 



291 W. L. Andrews. 

A leather label, designed by Mr. French. 
A myrtle wreath inclosing motto and name. 



292 Marshall C. Lefferts. 

A leather label, designed by Mr. French, showing masks of 

comedy and tragedy, and fool's bauble. 
Two sizes : one inch and one and three eighths inches high. 



293 Frederick Judson Holden Sutton 1903 

Design by Mr. French. Engraved by F. O. Coombs. 

294 Martha Elizabeth Brainerd 1905 

Design by Mr. French. Engraved by F. O. Coombs. 

295 Gertrude M. BailUe 1906 

Design by Mr. French. Engraved by A. N. Macdonald. 

296 U-sepe-ars-so-ap 1893 

A piece of burlesque heraldry, engraved by Mr. French in the 
spirit of the old English book-plate engravers; his first 
known copper engraving. 

297 Timothy Jones, Esq' 1893 

A copy, with much variation, of the Samuel Vaughan Esqr 
plate, engraved as a study of the Chippendale style. 

a As above. 

b Name partly erased, still traceable. 

c Name quite obscured. 

75 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 



298 Je GMiPM IW 



Weat4«ASL NnrTofk iflN 

dai mil Mr I ■■■of Mr. Fi^df's 

ibt tVO bits CI &3 




76 



MH DAVrS r-RFNCM 



T>w*iriti'4 I 



€> 



MISCELLANEOUS DESIGNS AND 

ENGRAVINGS 



Andrews | Printed at the De Vinne Press 
1894 I and embellished I with engravings 



1 E. D. French | 217 West 13th St., N. Y 1893 

Changed in 1894 to : — 

E. D. French. 1 204 W. 46th St. | New York 
A scroll-enclosed "Chippendale" design, not engraved, used 
on envelopes and letter cards. 

2 A stray leaf | from the | correspondence | of | Washington 

Irving I and | Charles | Dickens | By | William Loring 

New York, 
on copper 

and zinc 1894 

Type title. The illustrations include two copper engravings 
by Mr. French. 

I Frontispiece : The Steamship ''Brittania.** 
ED.French sc. 

Engraved from the painting by Clarkson Stanfield R. A. 
Copies Nos. 1-15 of the edition contain proofs of the first 
three following states: 

a Unfinished proof. 
b Proof before letters. 
c With inscription as above. 

d In subsequent copies the name of the ship is changed to 
Britannia, 

n Inq)rimatur of W. L. Andrews. 

This is a small reproduction of Millet's The Sower, also used 
by Mr. Andrews in others of his publications. 

77 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

a Without motto. 
EDFsc. 

Three trial proofs, each deeper in shading than the one be- 
fore it 

b With motto. 

The plate appears in this state on the title-page of the present 

book. 
Mr. French engraved, without signature, a slightly smaller 

copy of The Sower, with border of a single line. 

3 The Trustees | of the | Metropolitan Museum of Art | re- 
quest the I honor of your | presence at the | inaugura- 
tion I ceremonies of | the new building, | on | Monday 
afternoon | November fifth, 1894, | at two o'clock. | 
Henry G. Marquand, President. | L. P. Di Cesnola, 
Secretary. I To 1894 



a Before all letters ; much of decoration in outline. 

b With The Trustees of the and To . . . engraved. No 
other letters. 

c Seal of the musetun still wanting in centre circle; the in- 
scription complete excepting the date. 

d As described. 

E.D,French inv, et sc. 



4 The President and Board of Trustees | of Union College 
request the honour of the presence of 



at the Centennial Celebration | commemorative of the 
founding of | the College, commencing Sunday June the 
twenty-third, and ending | Thursday, June the twenty- 
seventh, I eighteen hundred and ninety-five, at | Sdie- 
nectady, New-York 1895 

E D French fee. 

There exists an impression of this plate with the centre 
obliterated, and the dexter portion, containing the vignette 
of the ''Blue Gate," lamp and book, elaborated by pencil and 
pen into a book-plate for the Library of Union College. 

78 



DESIGNS AND ENGRAVINGS 

5 The Society of Iconophiles of the City of New York. 

1895-1897 

PnUication. 

I February, 1895. St Paul's Chapel. 1895. 
EDJPrench sc, 

n April, 1895* Interior of St Paul's Chapel. | (View of 
Chancel) 

E D French sc. 

m May, 1895. Fraunces' Tavern. 
E D French sc, 1895 

17 June, 1895. The Roger Morris House. 
E D French sc, 

y December, 1895. Hamilton Grange. 
E D French sc 1895 

Yi February, 1896. St. Mark's Church. 
E D French sc 1896 

vn May, 1896. Qty Hall. 

E D French sc, 1896, 

vm September, 1896. The Halls of Justice. | ("The 
Tombs".) 
E D French sc. 1896. 

DC November, 1896. National Academy of Design. 
E D French sc. 1896 

X December, 1896. St John's Chapel, Varick Street. 
E D French sc. 1896 

XI January, 1897. The Murray Hill Distributing 
Reservoir. 
E D French sc. 1897 

xn March, 1897. Bowling Green. 
E D French sc. 

Each one of these twelve views of New York City was is- 
sued in a wrapper giving number, date and title of the pub- 
lication, and this statement : "loi impressions of this engrav- 
ing have been taken and the plate destroyed. All impres- 
sions are on Japan paper, 11 being artist's proofs before let- 
ters." 

Working proofs of some of these plates exist; 6 and 7 in 
outline ; 5, 6, and 10 partly in outline ; 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10 with- 
out the seal of the Society, though practically finished. 

70 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

6 Univeisitas et civitas 1895 

B D French del & sc. 

Omaxnental border with small view of Merton G>llege, Ox- 
ford. 

a With large panel Uank. 

b Panel contains the business announcement of The Baldwin 

and Gleason Gnnpany. This was sketched in by Mr. 

French, and engraved by another's hand. 



7 The Old Booksell | ers of New York | and other papers i 
by I William Loring Andrews | New York: Anno Domini 
one thou I sand eight hmidred and ninety-five . 1895 



Type title. 

Contains the following designs and engravings by Mr. 
French :— 

I Frontispiece. An E. View of Trinity Church N. York. 
Signature reads: 

Engraved on Copper \by E D French, from the Orig- 
inal in the New York Magaeine 1790. 

XL Head-band on title-page, with miniature of Caxton. 
EDF 

in Title-page ornament; roman lamp in panel with scroll, 
not signed. 

IV Nassau Street, New-York. 
E D French sc. 

Shows the signs of Sabin and Thomas Bradbum. 

V Head-band Part the First. 
EDF 

VI Initial / p. 3. 
vn Initial W p. 29. 
vm Tail-piece p. 50. 

DC Government House 

Signature reads: 

Engraved on copper by E D French from the Original 
in the New York Magaeine 1795, 

80 



DESIGKS AXD EXGRAVIXGS 






^ ^. 



not i ii nmnflirf mat imsicnad. :ai tht l»if«eriik ^"Uit^itti^str 



8 T(H^s JkH s Ghrisdni AsKoaMii iiif the Oiisr ^ Ne% 



To Ae xal d ibt Assxaknoa Mr. F^roc)i 4(43<^ vn^rOe 



9 Beicrif l:^ 

The sell oi BeiniT, llass. It shcvrs the ^««re ot ah «nNK>i( 
Puritan, with mocta and the inscni^ion: .^v>WN^^ ^^\ 
Tamm i66S. City 1994- 



10 Commemontion | of die j Fifdetfi Anniversiury '■ tit j T1^ 

Rrst PdUic Demonstntioa | of Surgictl An«<«th«ijti« 

at the I Missacfaiisetts General Hospital | BoshMH iV> 

tober 16tfi 1846. j The Honour of your Omfmny t» 

requested | Octot>er 16tti 1896 at ten o*clock. | - 

for the trustees for the staff • • • » * ISW 

EJ?J^. sc. 

Design by B. G. Goodhue. Similar in motive K> \hf KiH^k^ 
plate of the hospital. 

a Thirteen windows in basement of hospital. 
b The middle basement window replaced by a dm^r. Honpi 
tal engraved more lightly. 

81 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 



1 1 Admit I 1 to the I Massadmsetts General Hospi- 
tal I October 16th I 1896 1896 



Design by B. G. Goodhue. Similar to the book-plate of the 

hospital. 
In first proofs the letter t in October is not crossed. 



12 A catalogue of books pub | lished by Lamson WolfTe | and 
Company Boston New | York and London 1896 . 1896 

E D French jr. 

This engraving, signature omitted, was enlarged by photo- 
gravure. Sizes 5^ and 7^ inches high. 

The body of the plate is the same as that of book-plate 
No. 85. 



13 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. | Founded 1870. | This 
is to certify that 1 is a Fellow in Per- 
petuity of the Metropolitan | Museum of Art, and as 
such is entitled to the | privileges which now are or 
hereafter may be | connected with such fellowship. 
President. I Secretary. 



New York, 19— 1896 

a Scroll work in outline. No lettering except word Excel- 
sior. 

b Scroll work shaded and seal of New York City added. 

c Inscription engraved in part; portion from is a fellow to 
such fellowship not yet engraved. 

EJ^.French fecit, 1896 

d Conq)leted plate. 

e Same plate, with for Life instead of in Perpetuity, 

f Same plate, with words an Honorary Fellow instead of 
a Fellow in Perpetuity, 

g Same plate. Fellowship inscription changed to : This is to 

certify that | is a Patron of the Metropolitan 

Museum of \ Art, and as such is entitled to the privileges \ 
which now are or hereafter may be connected \ with such 
patronship. 

82 



DESIGNS AND ENGRAVINGS 

14 Dirtmoiidi GoBcBe Tkt Sour GtaB reqaoB 
Honour of Toar PjcjMut m dbeir Cammemc 



14di 1807 

a Word iCr intteid of iSuw; ac Vnrdsr 
fr As described; 



15 Tbe Joumef of the loooopliiles swaf Sew Tork in 
seticii of ' the Instorkal mod p i ULj e a qne i By W. L. 
Andrews.) Printed st Nev Tork in die jenr of our 
Lofd, eig|ilc<in faimdred nod ulaCwT-sereo. . 1897 



Tjpc 

Frondsinece: .4 rirv e* r«^ BMtUry amd Hirzvwr of Sy 
York, amd the Ambuscade frigMU, IT',2, Em^wotd cm cof- 
fer by ED Freuck. frum the Ong%uai w ^Drayic^s North- 
ern amd Eastern Tcnr." 

Six copies oo Americaz: hizd'^saj^t yaryr h^rt the frontis- 
piece in two states, before letters and axnplttt. 

This book cntitaHs an a cc o ur.! oi the esLgraringi done by 
Mr. French for the Society of IccRophiues. 



16 New Amsterdjun New Onmse New York A cfaronolog- 
ically ar r an ged ' aooonnt of engraved views ! of the 
dtf from die first ' pictiffe published in MDCLI | un- 
til the year MDCCC By Winiam Loring Andrews \ 
Published and for sale by Dodd, Mead and Company, 
New York Anno DommiMDOXXCVII. . . 1897 

Type title. 

The iUustrations include the following engravings on copper 
by Mr. French: 

I Lines to the Reader. 

n-xm Head-bands and initial letters, pp. XVII, XXVII, 
3, i8; Head-band only, pp. 31, 57, 75 f 97- 

xsv-xx. Tail-pieces, pp. XXIII, XXXI, 27, 54» 72» 93. 132. 
The head-bands include small early views of New York City. 

83 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

Frocff cxat of tbt 



Tke ijgy to l4r Rgmd^r, dbe head fiiiwin a^ ^ 
oa ^. XXXI are bcik>^ £ O F; 



17 A trio of offitMilh fwiiiiiy Freadi cu^aicis of 1 
puf uiui ID HiiiiMiiuic 1 ir<|iir I oflm ijtuuoHp f 
WilKtmLoriiigAiidrevs NevTorkMIXXXXCVim 



Deeccame cngramed title bj Mr. FrcndL 



b Fnaae complete, sa^e for k>vcr smister otal, 

ootfine; pands Uank. 
E D French tc. 

c As described. 



18 A biblsography i of , 'The Complete Angler^ ^ of Inak 
Wtlton , and Charles Cotton > being a ciironologicallf ! 
arranged list of the several \ editions and reprints, 
from I the first edition MDCLIII mitil | die year MCM. | 
by j Arnold Wood . Illustrated by 86 photographic j re- 
productions of title pages | New York j Charles Scrib- 

ner's Sons , MCM 1900 

£ D French sc. 

Decorative engraved title by Mr. French. 

a Three-fourths engraved, frotn dexter to sinister side. 

b The date in Arabic ntimerals, igoo. 

c Entirely engraved excepting the nnmber 86. Date in 

Roman numerals, MCM. 
d Number 86 inserted. 



19 The Society of Iconophiles of ttie | City of New Yoik | 
Founded MDCCCXCIV. | Amsterdam MDCLI. |New 

84 



DESIGNS AND ENGRAVINGS 



York MDCCCC | Pro Urbis Amore | This is to certify 

that is a | duly elected member of the 

Society of Iconophiles | of the City of New York, and 
as such is entitled to the | privileges which now are or 
hereafter may be connected | with such membership 
President I Secretary. 



20 Paul Revere | and his 
Andrews I New York 



New York 19— 1900 

E D French sc jgoo. 



Engraving | By | William Loring 
Charles Scribner's Sons | MCMI 

1901 

Decorative title "designed and engraved on copper by E. 
Davis French in the style classed by book plate collectors 
as Jacobean." 

a Lettering and much of decoration in outline, Old South 

Church finished. 
b Plate complete, but unsigned. 
c Signed. 
E D French, igoj 



21 New York Public Library. Astor, Lenox and Tilden 
Foundations 1903 

From the seal by V. D. Brenner. 

This plate is used on the Library's form of acknowledg- 
ment of gifts. An electrotype is used on the cover of the 
Library's monthly "Bulletin" and elsewhere. 



22 Andre's Jotunal. | An authentic record | of ttie movements 
and engagements I of ttie British Army in Americg 



from June 1777 to November 1778 
day to day by | Major John Andr6 

85 



as recorded from 
Edited by Henry 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 



Cabot Lodge | Issued by | the Bibliophile Society | for 
members only | Boston | MDC(XCIII 1903 

E D French fee. 

DESCRipnoN BY Mr. French: "The design of this title- 
page, a line engraving on copper, shows the portraits of Gen- 
eral Washington and of Sir Henry Clinton, respectively com- 
manding the American and English forces at the time 
this Journal was written. Beneath depend the shields with 
their armorial bearings. More nearly in the centre of the 
plate appears a representation of the capture of Major Andr6, 
the Hudson and the Palisades in the distance at the right. 
At the left are grouped the newly adopted stars and stripes, 
the thirteen stars arranged in a circle, as they were displayed 
until 1795, and the 'Pine Tree' flag, bearing the words 
'Liberty Tree — An Appeal to Heaven.* Opposite appears 
the British flag, with the fimbriated cross of Saint George 
upon a white saltire, — the cross of Saint Andrew; the white 
cross of Saint Patrick of the modern flag being a later addi- 
tion. Behind it is partly shown the rojral standard, preten- 
tiously quartering the lilies of France with the leopards of 
England. The fleur-de-lis above the representation of the 
capture alludes to the French origin of Andre's family, and 
the cross of Saint George in the oval at the top of the de- 
sign to his English allegiance. The remarque at the lower 
left-hand comer is a representation of Andre's montunent in 
Westminster Abbey." 

In the published work the title-page is given in two states, 
on parchment, with the remarque^ and on paper without it 
A few impressions exist with the remarque in a reddish- 
brown ink. 

a Without names under portraits. 

Six first impressions on Japan paper. 

h With names under portraits, and with remarque. 
c Without remarque. 



23 The New York Historical Society | This is to certify that 

is a Patron of the New York Historical 



Society and as | such is entitled to the privileges whidi 
now are or | hereafter may be connected with sudi pat- 

86 



DESIGNS AND ENGRAVINGS 



ronship. | President. | Re- 
cording Secretary. | New York, | 19 — . 1904 

ED French fecit 1904 

At the top, on a flowing ribbon, is the name of the society, 
and under it are the symbols of nation, state and city. To 
the left of these is "The arrival of Henry Hudson on the 
4th September, 1609," a copy of the engraving by A. B. 
Durand on the old certificate of the Society; to the right, a 
view of the Society's new building; below, a copy of Block's 
view of "Novum Amsterodamum," 1650. 

a Proof. "Patron" lightly scratched into spaces here indi- 
cated: is a of the and connected with such 

ship, 

h Same. With w a of The, the * in the being 

changed to a capital. 

c As described. 

d With Fellow, instead of Patron, 

e With the following change in the lettering : is an Honorary 
Member of The New York Historical Society \ and as 
such is entitled to the privileges which now are or | here- 
after may be connected with such membership. 



24 Views | of | early New York | with illustrative sketches 
Prepared for the | New York Chapter of the | Colonial 
Order of the Acorn | New York | Privately printed | 
MDMIV 1903, 1904 

Type title. Extract from introduction — "The committee 
having this work in charge was fortunate in securing the ser- 
vices of Mr. Edwin Davis French, who has faithfully repro- 
duced on copper all of the features of the original prints." 
The plates are as follows, and, save the last, are unsigned. 

I Fort NIeuw Amsterdam (New York) 1651. 

n New York in 1671. 

ra New York in 1673. 

IV New York in 1733. 

y City of New York before the Revolutionary War. 

VI New York in 1801. 
Cypher EDF 

Trial proofs exist of the 1651, 1671, 1673 and 1801 views. 

87 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 

25 American Badminton Series 1905 

Unfinished engraved title, showing decorative border, with 
nude figures of men and boys, representing various sports, 
and without the title itsell 

Design by F. W. Taylor. 

E D French sc. 

26 The letters of | Charles Lamb | in which many mutilated 

words I and passages have been restored | to their orig- 
inal form ; with | letters never before published | and 
facsimiles of original MS | letters and poems | With 
an introduction by | Henry H. Harper | Issued by | 
The Bibliophile Society | for members only | Boston 
MDCCCCV 1905 

E D French fee. 

The last decorative title engraved by Mr. French, with por- 
trait of Lamb centered at top.' 

Remarque; Roast sucking pig on platter. 

This title was used with the remarque in the announcement 
of the book. Some proofs have no remarque, 

Zl Camp Wild Air I Upper St. Regis. 



Picturesque vignette with pine needle decoration. 
Letter-head designed for Mr. Whitelaw Reid. 
EDFsc 



28 Brook Farm Proctorsville Vt. I 189- 



A letter-head having a scroll-surrounded engraving of the 
country place of Mr. James Hale Bates. 



29 Stationery Department | Charles Scribner's Sons. 

An engraved heading of flowing scrolls, with circular panel 
containing lamp and books. 

88 



DESIGNS AND ENGRAVINGS 

30 Carnegie Institute of Washington 1902. 

A seal, lettered in circle surrounding portrait. Engraved by 
Mr. French, but used only in photo-electrotype. 

31 A view of the Harvard Campus. 

Engraved for the late Edwin B. Holden, but never published 
before its inclusion in the present volume. Working proofs 
exist with trees in outline. 

Without letters, unsigned. 




89 



INDEX OF BOOK-PLATES 



Adams, Edward Dean, 199, 240 
Adams, Ernest Kempton, 207 
Adams, Frances Amelia, 187 
Adams, Ruth, 174 
Adams, Walter B., 208 
Adriance Meml Library, 195 
Alexander, Amy B., 170 
Alexander, Charles B., 44 
Allen, Charles Dexter, 141 
American Institute of Electrical 

Engineers, 240 
Andrews, Wm. Loring, 11, 76, 291 
Armour, George Allison, iii 
Armstrong, Charles D., 211 
Arnold, Bion J., Gift of, 240 
Authors Qub, 98 
Avery, Ellen Walters, In Memo- 

riam, 10 

Baillie, Gertrude M., 295 
Baillie, W. E., 17 
Bakewell, Allan C, 142 
Bakewdl, Alice C, 43 
Baldwin, Sarah Rodman, 190 
BaUcen, Edward Duff, 203, 220 
Bar, Ass'n of the, 67, liS^ 119 
Barger, Samuel F., 53 
Barnes, John Sanford, 180 
Bates, James Hale, 36 
Bell Telephone Co., Gift of, 240 
Belknap, Helen Runyon, 96 
Bemheim, A. C, 42 
Bemheim, Henry C, 242 



Bemheim, Julius C. and Emily 

S., 276 
Bierstadt, Edward Hale, 16 
Biltmoris, 60, 69 
Bish(9, Natala Washbttme, 200 
Bixby, Emma Stewart, 274 
Bixby, W. K., 275 
Black, Henry V. D., 271 
Blackwell, Henry, 20, 147, 150 
Bliss, Caroline Seagrave, 231 
Bliss, Catherine A., 87 
Boas, Emil Leopold, 139 
Borden, M. C. D., 175, 176 
Borland, Harriet Blair, 80 
Bradshaw, Sidney Ernest, 133 
Brainerd, Eveline Warner, 96 
Brainerd, Helen Elvira, i, 4 
Brainerd, Ira H., 212 
Brainerd, Martha Elizabeth, 294 
Brandegee, John E., Fund, 282 
Brewer, William Augustus, 228 
Brown, Georgette, 124 
Buck, John H., 166 
Bull, William Tinman, 65 
Bullock, James Wilson, 171 
Burke, Edward F., 104 
Bumham, William Henry and 

Katharine French, 213 
Burrill, John E., Fund, 118 
Byrd, Francis Otway, 268 
Byrd, George H., 268 
Byrd, Richard Evelyn, 288 
Byrd, William, 288 



01 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 



Caldwell, Edward, Gift of, 240 

Candidati, g6 

Carnegie, Lucy Coleman, 91 

Carnegie Fund, 240 

Carter, James C, Gift of, 119 

Cary, Katharine T., 257 

Cercle Frangais, 223 

de Chaignon, 298 

Chamberlain, Elisabeth, 151, 167 

Champaign Public Library, 59 

Cheney, Alice S., 156 

Chew, Beverly, 7, 47, 285 

Child Memorial Library, 100 

Church, E. D., 41 

Cincinnati Law Library, Rufus 

King Fund, 234 
Clark, Charles E., 8, 9 
Clark University, 232 
Clarke, Charles L., Gift of, 240 
Qough, Mica j ah P., 51, 66 
Colonial Dames of America, 18 
Connecticut Society of Colonial 

Wars, 193 
Connell, William, 97 
Cosmos Qub, 273 
Coutant, Richard B., 28 
Cox, Jennings Stockton, 125 
Crerar, John, Library, 83 
Cushixig (Armorial), 145 
Cushing, Ex Libris M edicts, 115 

Daly, Helen Hunt, 96 
Dana, Charles L., 131 
Davis, Cora Paschall, 279 
Day, Elsie Lewis, 96 
Deats, Hiram Edmund, 22 
Denver Qub, 84 
DeVinne, Theo. L., 56 
Digamma, 201 
Dill, James B., 197 
Dimock, George Edward, 244 
Downes, Mary L. S., 260 
Dows, Tracy, 70 
Drexel, Lucy Wharton, 255 



Duiyee, George Van Wagenen 
and Margaret Van Nest, 143 

Edison, Thomas A., Gift of, 240 
Ellsworth, James William, 46 
Emmet, Thos. Addis, Collection 
of, 88 

Field Memorial Library, 194 
Fisher, Lucius G., 265 
Foot, Margaret H., 168 
Foote, Charles B., 19 
French, Edwin Davis, 3, 5, 289, 

290, 299 
French, Mary Brainerd, 2 
Frick, Henry Qay, 284 
Furman, Dorothy, 198 

Gage, Homer, 214 
Gage, Mabel Carleton, 185 
Gale, Edward Courtland, 136 
, Giles, Ellen Rose, 96 
Godfrey, Jonathan, 32 
Goldsmith, Abraham, no 
Goldsmith, James A., 121 
Goodrich, J. King, 64 
Goodwin, Elizabeth Sage, 233 
Goodwin, Francis, 30 
Goodwin, James J., 29, 45 
Goodwin, Philip L., 221 
Gould, George J., 269 
Gray, Adelle Webber, 89 
Gray, John Chipman, 202 
Greene, Francis Bunker, 252 
Grolier Qub, 21 

Haber, Louis L, 38 
Hagerstown, 20(S 
Harbor Hill, 184 
Harper, Henry H., 249 
Hartshome (Armorial), 183 
Hartshome, Mary Mintum, 106 
Harvard University 
Cercle Frangais, 223 



92 



INDEX OF BOOK-PLATES 



Child Memorial, lOO 

Digamma, 201 

Harvard Union, i86 

Hohenzollem Collection, a39 

Societatis Signed, i8i 
Harvey, George, 264 
Havemeyer, Wm. Frederick, 55 
Heckscher, John Gerard, 210 
Herter, Christian A., 73 
Hoe, Ruth Lancaster, 224 
Hoffman, Eugene Augustus, 216 
Hoffman, Samuel Verplanck, 248 
Hohenzollem Collection, 239 
Holbrook, John S., 267 
Holden, Alice C, 25 
Holden, Edith, 61 
Holden, Edwin B., 23, 24 
Holden, Edwin R., 26 
Hooper, Nona Newlin, 209 
Hopkins, Robert Enmiet, 155 
Horsford, Cornelia, 149 
Hutchinson, Cary T., Gift of, 

240 
Hyde, James Hazen, Gift of, 186 

James, Walter B., 164 
Jackman, S. E. and L. H., 278 
Johns Hopkins University, Row- 
land Memorial, 227 
Johnston, W. J., Gift of, 240 
Jones, Timothy, 297 
Jordan, Elizabeth, 272 

Kahn, O. A., 90 
Kalbfleisch, Charles C, 33 
Keith, Nath'l S., Gift of, 240 
Keyes, Helen, 96 
King, Georgiana Goddard, 96 
King, Rufus, Fund, 234 
Kingsbury, Edith Davies, 94 

Lambert, Samuel W., 113 
Lamson, Edwin Ruthven, 85 



Lamer, John B., 173 
Lawrence, Emily Hoc, 35 
Lee, Georgia Medora, 253 
Leeds, Louise Hartshome, 140 
Leeds, Warner Mif&in, 229 
Leeds, William Bateman, 247 
Lefferts, Marshall C, 15, 292 
Lefferts, Mollie Cozine, 105 
Leggett, Cora Artemesia, 6 
Lemperly, Paul, 102, 153 
Little, Arthur West, 172 
Livermore, John R., 159, 260 
Livermore, John Walton, 260 
Long Island Historical Society, 

Storrs Memorial, 192 
Loveland, John W. and Lee Part- 
ridge, 169 
Lovett, Benjamin Barnes, 245 
Lowenstein, L. B., 39 
Lyman, Annie, 230 

Mackay, Katharine, 148, 184 
Macy, Valentine Everit, 68 
McAlpin, Charles W., 225 
McCarter, Robert H., 92 
McGraw Publishing Co., Gift 

of, 240 
McKee, Thomas Jefferson, 49 
McLaughlin, Edward Tompkins, 

Memorial, 72 
Mailloux, C. O., Gift of, 240 
Mansergh, R. S., 37 
Marshall, Frank Evans, 58 
Marshall, Julian, 95 
Medicis, Ex Libris, 115 
Merriman, Roger Bigelow, 188 
Messenger, Maria Gerard, 54, 86^ 

151 
Metcalf, Esther Pierce, 281 
Metropolitan Museum, 40 
Moore, Louise Taylor Harts- 
home, 140 
Morgan, A. J., 74 
Mynderse, WUhelmus, 217 



03 



EDWIN DAVIS FRENCH 



N. Y. Electrical Society, Gift 

of, 240 
N. Y. Public Library, Emmet 

Collection, 88 
N. Y. Yacht Club, 163 
Nimick, Florence Coleman, 128 
Notman, John, 254 

Odd Volumes, Qub of, 62 
Orchards, The, 151, 167 
Osbom, Henry Fairfield, 243 
Osborne, Thomas Mott and 

Agnes Devens, 57 
Oxford Qub, 12 

Palmer, Lowell Mason, 218, 219 
Palmer, Lowell Melvin, 235 
Phillips, William, 189 
Players, The, 13 
Plummer, Mary Emma, 81 
Porter, Jr., Nathan T., 160 
Prescott, Eva Snow Smith, 132 
Princeton University, 108 
Pyne, M. Taylor, 50, 107 
Pjme, Percy Rivington, 63, 107 
Pyne, R. Stockton, 204 

Queen's University, 263 

R J S, 162 

Ranney, Henry Qay and Helen 

Burgess, 103 
Reid, Whitelaw, 14 
Richards, Walter Davis, 191 
Robinson, C. L. F., 158 
Robinson, Mary Barber, 237 
Rogers, William Beverley, 205 
Rowe, Henry Sherburne, 34 
Rowland, Henry A., Mem'l, 227 

Sabin, Ruth Mary, 99 
Salmon, Lucy Maynard, 165 
Sampson, Florence de W., 109 
Sayler, John R., 277 
Scripps, James Edmund, 129 



Sedgwick, Henry Renwick, 138 
Sedgwick, Robert, 77 
Sheffield, K. C S., 127, 238 
Sherman, William Watts, 179 
Sherwin, Henry A., 52, 80 
Sherwood, Samuel Smith, 117 
Simmons, Parke E., 270 
Simon, Herman, 226, 236 
Skinner, Mark, Library, loi 
Slade, Mabel, 241 
Smith, Henry A., ^86 
Smith, Mary Nixon, 266 
Societatis Signeti, 181 
Sovereign, 71, 79 
Sprague, Mary Bryant, 250, 251 
Steams, John Lloyd, 93 
Stevens, Harriette M., 259 
Stickney, Edward Swan, 134 
Stratton, A. Dwight, 112 
Sutton, Frederick J. H., 293 
Sweetser, Kate Dickinson, 96 
S3rmon, Martha A., 268 

Taft, Theo. and Eleanor, 258 
Talmage, John F, 135 
Tatlock, William and Helen 

Woodruff, 289 
Taylor, Chas. H., Jr., 78 
Thorne, K. C S., 127 
Tread well Library, 152 
Trucsdell, Winfred P., 246 
Twentieth Century Club, 122 

U'Sepe-arS'So-ap, 296 
Union League Qub, 157 
University Qub, 154 
Utica Public Library, 282 

Vail, Davis Righter, 262 
Vail, Henry H., 48 
Van Wagenen, Fred. W., 123 
Varnum, James M., 196 
Vassar Alumnse Hist. Assn., 116 
Volapuk, 3, 290 



94 



INDEX OF BOOK-PLATES 



Ward, Mary Mintum, io6 
Warner, Beverley, 31 
Washington County, 206 
Weaver, W. D.. Gift of, 240 
Welsh, Gertrude Clarkson, 256 
Wendell, Barrett, 114 
Wetzler, Joseph, Gift of, 240 
Wheeler, S. S., Gift of, 240 
Whitin, Sarah Elizabeth, 178 
Wilcox, Louise Collier, 96 
Wiley, Sara King, 96 
Willets, Howard, 75 
Williams, R P., 126 
Williams, John Skelton, 146 
Wilson, Margaret Chase, 96 



Winslow, Wynne, 215 
Winthrop, Henry Rogers, 120 
Wodell, Silas, 161 
Wood, Arnold, 130, 144 
Wood, Ethel Hartshome, 137, 261 
Wood, W. C, 222 
Woodbury, Charles H., 67 
Woodbury, John P., 27 
Woodward, S. Walter, 177 
Worcester Art Museum, 182 
Wright, J. Hood, 287 

Yale Qub, 283 

Yale University, McLaughlin 
Memorial, 72 



INDEX OF MISCELLANEOUS DESIGNS 

AND ENGRAVINGS 



Acorn, Colonial Order of the, 24 
American Badminton Series, 25 
Andre's Journal, 22 
Andrews, William Loring, En- 
gravings for, 2, 7, 16, 17, 20 

Bates, James Hale, 28 

Beverly, Seal of, 9 

Bibliophile Society, The, Titles 

executed for, 22, 26 
Britannia, The, 2 

Cam^e Institute, 30 
Complete Angler, The, 18 

French, E. D., i 
French Engravers, 17 

Harvard Campus, 31 

Iconophiles, Society of, 5, 15, 19 

Lamb, Charles, Letters of, 26 



Lamson Wolff e and Co., 12 

Mass. General Hospital, 10, 11 
Metropolitan Museum, 3, 13 

New York City Views, 5, 7, 15, 

16, 19, 24 
N. Y. Historical Society, 23 
N. Y. Public Library, 21 

Reid, Whitelaw, 27 
Revere, Paul, 20 

Scribner's, Charles, Sons, 29 
Sower, The, 2 

Union College Centennial, 4 
Universitas et civitas, 6 

Wood, Arnold, Title executed 
for, 18 

Young Men's Christian Ass'n , 8 



95 



I 

1/ 




o £044 023 802