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Full text of "Eighteenth Annual Report of The National Farm School November, 1915"

Eighteenth Annual Report 



OF 




THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

November, 1915 

^^ FARM SCHOOL BUCKS COUNTY, PA. ^^ 

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EIGHTEENTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



The National Farm 
School 



Farm School 
Bucks County 
Pennsylvania 



»TiF«> XT«»y \art\wi a' 




NOVEMBER, 1915 



Officers of The National Farm School 

1915-1916 



LOCAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

■JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF 

4715 Pulaski Avenue, GenTiantown 



Vice-President 
HARRY B. HIRSH 

Executive Secretary 
A. H. FROMENSON 



Treasurer 
ISAAC H. SILVERMAN 



Field Secretary 

MISS AMELIA M. ABRAHAMSON 



HONORARY TRUSTEES 

(Having served consecutively for ten years) 
HART BLUMENTHAL ABRAHAM ISRAEL HOWARD A. LOEB 

ADOLPH EICHHOLZ MORRIS A. KAUFMAXN LEON MERZ 

SIMON FRIEDBERGER ALFRED M. KLEIN BERNARD SELIG 

S. GRABFELDER ARNOLD KOHN I. H. SILVERMAN 



(Term expires 1916) 
ALBERT J. BAMBERGER 
HARRY FELIX 
DANIEL GIMBEL 
JOS. N. SNELLENBURG 



ELECTED TRUSTEES 

(Term expires 1917) 
HERBERT D. ALLMAN 
HARRY B. HIRSH 
LOUIS NUSBAUM 
EUGENE M. STERN 



(Term expires 1918) 
HENRY BRONNER 
MORRIS FLEISHMAN 
HORACE HANO 
BERNARD KOHN, M.D. 



GEORGE WTIEELER, Ph.D. ISAAC LANDMAN 



NATIONAL AUXIIIARY BOARD 

LOUIS I. AARON Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DANIEL ALEXANDER Salt Lake City, Utah 

Mrs. JULIUS ANDREWS Boston, Mass. 

HENRY BEER New Orleans, La. 

I. W. BERNHEIM Louisville, Ky. 

NATHAN ECKSTEIN Seattle, Wash. 

HENRY FRANK Natchez, Miss. 

MAURICE FREIBERG Cincinnati, Ohio 

BERNARD GINSBURG Detroit, Mich. 

MILTON D. GREENBAUM Baltimore, Md. 

A. HIRSHHEIMER La Crosse, Wis. 

I. B. LEVY Oklahoma City. Okla. 

JACOB M. LOEB Chicago, 111. 

LOUIS NEWBERGER Indianapolis, Ind. 

J. E. OPPENHEIMER Butte. Mont. 

E. RAAB Richmond, Va. 

EDW. E. RICHARD Mobile, Ala. 

Mrs. MORRIS RIPLEY Denver, Colo. 

ALEX. SANGER Dallas, Tex. 

LOUIS SCHLESINGER Newark, N. J. 

SIG. SICHEL Portland, Ore. 

DAVID STERNBERG Memphis, Tenn. 

ISAAC M. ULLMAN New Haven, Conn. 

MORRIS WEIL Lincoln, Neb. 

HARRIS WEINSTOCK Sacramento, Cal. 

MAURICE WERTHEIM New York, N. Y. 



THE FACULTY 



JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, D. D. 
President 

JOHN PIOSEA WASHBURN, Ph. D. (Gottingen, Germany) 

Director, Professor of Agricultural Chemistry 

WILLIAM H. BISHOP, B. Sc. (Mass. Agricultural College) 
Professor of Agriculture and Superintendent of Farms 

WALTER F. FANCOURT (Kew Botanical Gardens, England) 
Professor of Horticulture 

GEORGE EATON, Jr. (Harvard) 
Professor of Poultry Culture and Dairying 

PHILIP H. PROUTY, B. S. (Mass. Agricultural College) 
Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

LYDIA PRICHETT BORDEN 
Professor of Biology 

JULIA VAN HORN NIGHTINGALE 
Instructor in English 

WESLEY MASSINGER, V. S. (Cornell) 
Professor of P^eterinary Science and Farm Hygiene 

DRUE NUNEZ ALLMAN, B. S. (Cornell) 
Instructor in Horticulture and Chemistry 

ELIAS NUSBAUM 
Instructor in Applied Electricity 

CHARLES A. LIEBIG 
Secretary to the Director and Faculty 

HETTY ABRAHAM 
Matron 

HARMAN KRAFT 
Foreman of Home Farm 

JULIUS L. MALCOLM 
Assistant Foreman of Home Farm 

HOWARD F. YOUNG 

Foreman Schoenfeld Memorial Farm No. j 

HENRY ROSS (National Farm School) 

Post-Graduate and Student Foreman Schoenfeld Memorial 

Farm No. i. 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

1915-1916 



Finance 

Harry B. Hirsh, Chainnan 
Herbert D. Allman Adolph Eichholz 

Budget 

Alfred M. Klein, Chairman 
Herbert D. Allman Leon Alerz 
Hart Blumenthal Louis Nusbaum 
Horace Hano Bernard Selig 

Harry B. Hirsh George Wheeler 

Admissions 

Morris A. Kaufmann, Chairman 
Hart Blumenthal Louis Nusbaum 
Alfred M. Klein Bernard Selig 
Bernard Kohn J. H. Washburn 
Isaac Landman George Wheeler 

Propaganda 
Horace Hang, Chairman 
Henry Bronner Daniel Gimbel 
Harry Felix Isaac Landman 

Morris Fleishman Eugene M. Stern 

Curriculum 

Louis Nusbaum, Chairman 
W. H. Bishop Isaac Landman 

Alfred M. Klein J. H. Washburn 
George Wheeler 



Discipline 

Alfred M. Klein, Chairman 
Isaac Landman J. H. Washburn 
Louis Nusbaum George Wheeler 

Graduates 

Isaac Landman, Chairman 
Hart Blumenthal Harry B. Hirsh 
Supplies 
Hart Blumenthal, Chairman 
Adolph Eichholz Harry B. Hirsh 

House 

Leon Merz, Chairman 
Henry Bonner Jos. N. Snellenburg 

Property 

Bernard Selig, Chairman 
A. J. Bamberger Morris Fleishman 
Bernard Kohn Eugene M. Stern 

Farm Products 

Daniel Gimbel, Chairman 
Herbert D. Allman Harry Felix 

Schoenfeld Farms 
Herbert D. Allman, Chairman 
Harry Felix Leon Merz 

Daniel Gimbel Jos. N. Snellenburg 



LADIES' EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOCAL BOARD 



Mrs. R. B. Schoneman, 
Mrs. 
Mrs. A. J. Bamberger 
Mrs. Isidore Baum 
Mrs. Max Berg 
Mrs. David Berlizheimer 
Mrs. Hart Blumenthal 
Mrs. B. B. Bloch 
Mrs. C. Davidson 



Chairman Mrs. Jos. Guckenheimer, Treasurer 

Harold C. Krauskopf, Secretary 



Mrs. Adolph Eichholz 
Mrs. Martha Fleisher 
Mrs. Simon Friedberger 
Mrs. Harry B. Hirsh 
Miss Frieda Jonas 
Mrs. David Kirschbaum 
Mrs. A. M. Klein 



Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf 
Mrs. M. F. Langfeld 
Mrs. Henry Rosenthal 
Mrs. Meyer Schamberg 
Mrs. I. H. Silverman 
Mrs. Meyer Sycle 



AFTER THE WAR -WHAT? 

Address by Rabbi Jos. Krauskopf, D. D. 

President and Founder of THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

at 
Farm School, Pa., September 26, 1915 

Notwithstanding that this year of 191 5 is the darkest in the 
history of civiHzation, the hearts of the directors of The National 
Farm School, gathered once more in annual session to give an 
accounting of the sacred stewardship entrusted to them, are filled 
with joy. 

DESTRUCTION In this oasis of nearly 400 acres, hope baffles 

cREAm)N^^~ despair. Here, grief for a world destroying itself 
HERE. gives way to joy in contemplation of a world re- 

born — re-born to the pursuits of peace, re-born to human service 
and to the development of all that is best in mankind. With the 
rest of the world tearing down what has been built up, we, here, 
are building up anew. With the rest of the world madly destroy- 
ing the fruits of human labor, we, here, are creating new life, and 
training those who are to lead it. With a myriad energies devoted 
elsewhere to slaughter and death, we, here, are devoting our best 
energies to the conservation of life. While the young men of an 
entire continent are being sacrificed on the altar of the demon of 
war, we, here, are training young men for blessed usefulness, con- 
secrating them to a new priesthood of service. 

Well for the world if it had actualized the 

AGRICULTURE, , -nr 11 r 1 u 

THE VOCATION visiou of the Jewish prophet! Well for the world 
OF PEACE. j^ ^j^^ teaching of war had long, long ago ceased! 

Well for the world if long, long ago, men had learned to live un- 
der their own vines and fig-trees, with none to hurt, and none to 
make them afraid — if, long, long ago, the spear had been fash- 
ioned into pruning-hook and the sword beaten into plough-share ! 
Aye, well for the world if, instead of devoting itself to excel- 
lence in the art of war, it had trained its youth as our students 
are being trained, to excel in the highest vocation of peace! How 



6 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

different, how much nobler and better for the future of mankind 
would have been our modern civilization, had agricultural effi- 
ciency been as highly prized by monarchs as military supremacy. 
The world would not to-day have been a veritable Valley of the 
Shadow of Death. Instead of world-war, we would have known 
world-peace ! 

Sad, immeasurably sad, as this is, yet we draw 
TURNING comfort from the signs of the time. Our young 

men are turning from those vocations that bring 
strife and contention, competition, envy and war. Our young 
men are turning to the vocations that bring harmony and con- 
tentment unto the world; that bring them in contact with God, 
through nature. 

None has better proof of the truth of this than we. The 
large number of applicants — during certain periods of the year 
not less than five a day — testifies to this gratifying truth. They 
apply for admission to our institution from all parts of this 
country, from all conditions and classes of the people, Jew and 
Gentile, many of them students of high schools, some of them 
of universities, and some of them coming to us after having fol- 
lowed profitably other callings for a number of years. 
CHANGE IN AVhat a mighty transformation in the world's 

WORLD'S attitude toward agriculture we are happilv witness- 

ATTITUDE ... . i r - 

TOWARD ing! It is within the memory of all of us when 

FARM. ^j^g farmer was the target of ridicule, the world's 

yokel and clown, and his vocation the object of contempt and 
disdain — when, if a young man of parts or means evinced a 
leaning toward agriculture, his relatives and friends would fear 
that his sanity was impaired. Even the sons of farmers regarded 
their parents' calling as low and unworthy, and rushed pell-mell 
to the city. The feeble-minded, the homeless, the failures — for 
these the farm. At least, so thought the world. 
FARMER But, happily, the world has grown wiser; the 

PET°oF^^ city is losing its lure. The farmer, to whom the 

NATION. automobile-maker looks for his best customer, and 

the author for his most discriminating reader, is coming into his 
own. The world has begun to respect, yea, even to envy him 
who maketh his own abundant bread by abundantly supplying 
bread for others. No longer the world's yokel and clown, he is 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 7 

the world's best, most useful citizen. No longer held in contempt, 
his vocation has become the ambition of the city-jaded. We sum- 
mon the merchant prince, the captain of industry, the manufac- 
turer and the banker, to confess the secret yearning of their 
hearts ! We summon these to acknowledge before the world the 
longing to abandon the department store, the factory, the mill, 
the counting-house, to flee from all the dollar-making machinery 
with its strife, turmoil, and spiritual degradation, and seek peace 
and contentment on the farm ! 

And in none is this secret longing so strong as 

LONGING FOR , ^ . , 

FARM STRONG amoug the Jews, falsely regarded as fanatic devo- 
IN JEW. ^^^g ^£ Mammon. Scrutinize the rosters of all the 

agricultural departments of all the universities in the United 
States, and witness the large number of Jewish names. 

Here is the proof of our assertion: many of these Jewish 
young men, studying agriculture at the universities, are so en- 
gaged because their city-jaded. Mammon-sickened fathers look 
forward to the day when their sons' ability to manage a country 
estate will make it possible for them to gratify that secret longing 
that is in their hearts ; others, because the father, having realized 
the futility of all that spells "success" in the city, would dedicate 
the son to that vocation whose usefulness is supreme and still 
others because, early in their scholastic life, they themselves have 
felt the call of soul to the soil. 

It is "the call of the soil" that is summoning young men to 
the agricultural schools. And to none is that call stronger, and 
none are more eager to respond than those Jewish lads whose 
early youth has been spent in poverty, whose early environment 
has been the tenement street. Happy the lad whose parents' 
means enable him to gratify his laudable ambition! 
MANY UNABLE But what of the youth without means? Shall 

TO SATISFY j-jjg eas^erness to respond to "the call of the soil" 

THAT * . , . . T . 

LONGING. be naught more than vam longmg? It is no an- 

swer to say: "If he wants to become a farmer, let him become a 
farmer." Agriculture is an exact science, not a haphazard voca- 
tion. It is no longer necessary to prove this axiom. The world 
realizes it. And where can these eager, worthy, resourceless 
young men gain the ability to respond to "the call of the soil" if 
not at The National Farm School? 



8 THE NATIONAL FARAI SCHOOL 

The Jewish young men of the cities know this, and they 
would flock here by the thousands if only we could receive them. 
For all the happiness this institution gives us, it brings to us also 
a large measure of grief, as we witness the tragedy mirrored in 
the faces of those to whom we are compelled to deny admission — 
merely because we lack the room and the funds. 
ONLY 18 PER At the last admission of the new Freshman 

APPLICANTS class, only i8% of the candidates could be entered. 
ADMITTED. The Other 82% had to be turned back, though they 
possessed every required qualification. Consider w^hat this means 
to the Jewish people. Consider what this means to our beloved 
Republic. 

82 PER CENT, What does the future hold in store for those 

back\^ whom, with reluctant hands, we were compelled, 

GHETTO. by forcc of necessity, to bar from our institution — 

to consign back to the misery, to the soul-destruction of the tene- 
ment street ? In our daily newspapers we find the answer.- What 
would the future have meant to them had we the room to house 
them, and the means to train them? Let the career of just a few 
of our graduates, culled at random, be the answer: 
INSTANCES OF Mauricc J. Mitzmain is one of the experts in 

GRADUATEs^^ Entomology of the Federal Department of Agri- 
succEss. culture. His researches and successful diagnosis 

of the life and action of types of insects, that prey upon fruit 
trees and upon cattle, have contributed valuable additions to the 
science of Orcharding and of Animal Husbandry. 

Bernard Ostrolenk is the director of the Agricultural De- 
partment of the State High School, of Canby, Minn. This type 
of Agricultural High School in Minnesota and other States is 
modeled after the curriculum of The National Farm School. 

Morris Salinger has recently been selected from a large 
number of applicants, by the Jewish Colonization Association, 
of Paris, to become the director of its Jewish Agricultural Colo- 
nies n the Argentine Republic. 

Charles Horn is assistant superintendent and instructor of 
the Vacant Lots Cultivation Association, of Philadelphia. Meyer 
Goldman is in charge of the boys' and girls' gardens in the 
Jewish Farm Colony, at Norma, N. J. Sam S. Rudley is in- 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 9 

stinictor in agriculture and horticulture for the Board of Public 
Education, of Philadelphia. Joseph H. Wiseman holds a similar 
position under the Board of Education, of Pittsburgh. Harry 
Weiss is instructor in agriculture for the Jewish Foster Home, 
of Philadelphia. 

Twenty-nine graduates of the School are cultivating their 
own farms in eight different States. When it is considered that 
few if any of our students have the means to purchase a farm 
when they graduate, that they have to work for others until they 
earn enough to buy farms for themselves, this record of twenty- 
nine of them owning their own farms, a few years after their 
graduation, is a proud achievement. 

Twelve of our graduates are taking Post-Graduate Courses 
in various agricultural colleges. 

Sixty-six of the graduates are managers of farms and es- 
tates, herdsmen, dairymen and orchardists, in nineteen different 
States. 

The percentage of graduates of The National Farm School 
who are in agriculture today is 83% — probably the best showing 
of any secondary technical institution of the class of The National 
Farm School. 

Of those who are not now in agriculture, quite a number 
gave up the calling on account of domestic affairs, a death or 
illness making it imperative for them to take up immediately the 
work of the head of the family. Even those who are not follow- 
ing an agricultural calling have, by virtue of the outdoor life and 
training received during their instruction at the Farm School, 
developed the kind of physical and mental strength and the love 
of labor that makes for success in any calling. Some of them 
feel themselves only temporarily out of agriculture, and have 
expressed their hopes some day to return to their chosen calling. 
Others of those who have received instruction at the School, but 
who are not in agriculture, are engaged in allied trades. Some 
who have shown efficiency in handling machinery while at th^ 
School have become engineers. Others have contributed inven- 
tions to applied electricity. Though we cannot count these among 
our agricultural graduates, we are, none the less, proud of th-'n 
and their achievements. 



10 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

WHICH THE Which is the better investment for society? 

INVESTMENT Voung men Hke these, launched on their careers of 
FOR SOCIETY? honor by The National Farm School, or those 
others hurled back to the Ghetto, instead of being admitted where 
they might become a credit to themselves, their people, their 
country, to revive in themselves and in their posterity that sturdy 
race from which sprang the prophets, lawgivers, bards, to whom 
the civilized world still does homage? 

^TTTT r,T70TTTrrc Cato Cttdcd hls evcrv address to the Roman 

OF GHETTO Senate with the words : "Carthage must be de- 

FORETOLD 

YET NOT ' stroyed." It has been my fate for almost a quarter 
BELIEVED. q£ ^ century to punctuate many of my public ad- 

dresses and private conversations with the slogan : "Back to the 
Soil." It has become my fate to be like another Cassandra, fore- 
telling misfortune, if this call be not heeded, yet not believed 
until it is too late. 

"Back to the Soil," I pleaded, when signs that could not be 
mistaken foretold the consequences of the great inrush of refu- 
gees from the Russian pogroms of the early '8o's. "Visionary" 
and "dreamer" were the least of the epithets hurled upon my 
devoted head. But there grew up the horrible ghetto that 
curses Jewish life in America, and a chain of hospitals and sana- 
toria and relief societies and asylums and corrective institutions, 
that drain our philanthropic resources to the uttermost limit, that 
make charity a burden, not a joy. If the millions herded in the 
foul tenements, if the millions chained to the sewing machines of 
the sweatshops, had been scattered far and wide over the vast 
acres of America, we would to-day have had hundreds, aye, thou- 
sands of small Jewish rural communities, self-reliant, nobly pro- 
ductive, abounding in health, in happiness, in spiritual exaltation. 

ANOTHER Today we are on the verge of another inrush 

WARNING. of refugees. Let but the war come to an end, let 

the avenues of traffic be re-opened, and there will be an exodus 
from Europe unparalleled in history. I have no fear that the 
gateway to this blessed Republic will be barred to them — I believe 
that the American people will be true to that noblest of American 
traditions : that this country is, and always shall be, the haven 
and refuge for suffering mankind. The gateway will be opened 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 11 

wide. They will come! Then what? Let me be no longer a 
Cassandra. Prepare, American Jewry! Prevent the super- 
congestion of the present tenement districts! Prevent the up- 
rearing of new tenement-monsters ! Lead our people to the soil — 
to the land where will flow milk and honev! 

"Ah!" responds the wiseacre, "But the Jews are unfit for 
farming!" "Ah!" responds the "experienced" philanthropist, 
scrutinizing his catalog of results, "See how many Jews have 
failed as farmers! It can't be done!" 

No, indeed, it cannot be done, if the old mis- 

IGNORANCE 

AND UNWISE takes are to be repeated. As we said before, f arm- 

PHILANTHROPY - . , . i. i. u j i.' 

CAUSE OF PAST i"g IS an exact science, not a haphazard vocation. 
FAILURE, ii must be learned, it must be taught ! The colon- 

ies that failed foundered on the rock of ignorance — a two-fold 
ignorance; that of philanthropists, who did not know what was 
needed to ensure the colonies against failure, and ignorance of 
the very rudiments of agriculture on the part of the colonists. 
Leaders trained to train others to become successful farmers 
were lacking. And unless the new immigration is supplied with 

9 

such leaders, its attempts to establish itself on the soil are fore- 
doomed. 

WHAT MAKES Jcwish agricultural colonies, to be successful, 

FUL coLON^^' "^^^* ^^ made up principally of young men, trained 
iZATioN? in an institution such as The National Farm School, 

where instruction is given in the practice and science of agricul- 
ture, and where the course of instruction keeps especially in mind 
the needs of the Jewish immigrant. 

When the Scandinavians and the Germans came to settle in 
our country as colonists, they succeeded, for the most part, be- 
cause they came from the farm and luent to the farm. Jewish 
colonists, to succeed, must proceed along the same line. They 
must proceed from the farm school to the farm, the work of which 
they have studied and the life of which they have learned to love. 
These trained young men will gather around them on their farms, 
members of their respective families, and others ; and, in time, 
they will build up, in various parts of our country, agricultural 
settlements of considerable size. Their trained brawn, added to 
the proverbial Jewish brain, will help them to make all the greater 



12 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

success of their undertaking. Owners of vast lands in Texas and 
California and other States are ready to turn over suitable tracts 
for colonization purposes, and build homes and barns and stables 
upon them, and equip them, if properly trained agriculturists can 
be gotten to occupy them. 

*«r.rTTAWTnAT To assure yet more such success, there should 

AMECHAI7ICAL •' ' 

DEPARTMENT be Started at The National Farm School a Mechan- 
ics' Department, in which should be taught car- 
pentry, masonry, bricklaying, plumbing, concrete construction, 
farm engineering, and the use of gas and electrical machinery. 
Not that the students are expected to become experts in each of 
these branches, but to become sufficiently skilled in handicrafts 
which are indispensable in an agricultural colony. 

There must also be started a department where 
DEPARTMENT girls may be instructed in agricultural branches — 
NEEDED. j^ dairying, poultrying, trucking, bee-culture, horti- 

culture, and general rural household economy — in order, subse- 
quently, to become helpful wives of graduate colonists of The 
National Farm School. Accustomed to rural life, they will be- 
come not only helpmates of their husbands, but also valuable 
assets in making farm work eminently profitable. 
HOW It is self-evident that such a school should ac- 

iNCREASED commodatc at least soo students. Means would, 

£XP!ENS£ 

MIGHT BE therefore, be required to erect, besides additional 

dormitories, a new Domestic Hall (for the en- 
larged dining and culinary department), a Mechanics' Hall, a 
larger dairy, additional green-houses and class rooms. Of course, 
there would also be required additional farm lands. 

The buildings could be erected at a considerably less expense 
than ordinarily, because our students are trained to take part in 
all building construction. 

But where is the money to come from for such a needed, 
larger, fuller plant? 

After the erection of the necessary buildings, and acquisi- 
tion of increased acreage, and a student roll many times as large 
as the present, $100,000 would be needed annually to run the plant. 

One of the National Jewish Orders would be the best fitted 
organization to make possible such needed enlargement of The 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 13 

National Farm School. It would start with a splendid nucleus 
(The National Farm School having a property value of some 
$150,000, entirely free from debt, and, in addition, a Sinking 
Fund of nearly $100,000, and an annual income of some 
$40,000). 

Each of the districts of such a fraternity could erect and 
equip one of these needed additional buildings, and name it after 
its respective district. 

After these buildings shall have been erected and equipped, 
each district could maintain a certain number of scholarships, to 
be granted to students hailing from their respective territories. 

Members of districts of such fraternities, living near Thf 
National Farm School, could represent their respective district 
on the local board, while members of the other districts, living at 
a distance, could serve on the National Auxiliary Board. 

But, conceding that it would not be an easy matter for one 
organization to assume the maintenance of an institution like The 
National Farm School, it should not be difficult for the many 
Jewish organizations, which have as their object the amelioration 
of the immigrants' condition, to make it possible for The National 
Farm School to attain its highest measure of usefulness. 

If all the Jewish orders would levy a small tax of not more 
than five cents upon each member for this purpose ; if the Federa- 
tions of Jewish Charities would each of them vote a certain per- 
centage of their income; if the Union of American Hebrew Con- 
gregations and each individual congregation would grant us a 
certain annual subvention, the necessary sum would be raised 
without difficulty. So distributed, the contribution of each organ- 
ization would be relatively small. The results, however, would 
be increasingly great. Year by year, the present need for palli- 
ative philanthropy, for emergency relief, would grow smaller and 
smaller, until, finally, we might close the doors of some institu- 
tions whose demands to-day seem imperative. 

I do not delude myself with the hope that this plan will be 
taken up at once. We are entirely too conservative in our philan- 
thropic outlook promptly to recognize the value of a suggestion 
so thorough-going, so preventive, and yet so comparatively easy 
as this. 



14 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

FAILURE OF Meanwhile we appeal to those of our philan- 

MERE PALLIA- ^^ ^ 

TivE CHARITY thropists, who have already learned to what a large 
STIMULATE extent palliative philanthropy is sheer waste; who 
PREVENTIVE havc already learned the futility of attempting to 
THROPY. heal after putrefaction has set in ; of trying to rem- 

edy after demoralization has begun. We appeal to them to make 
our plan a reality now, while there is yet time. Let them begin 
an era of creative, constructive philanthropy. At no time could 
this be done more opportunely than at the present. 

Owinsf to commercial and industrial depression 

DEFICIT *= \ 

DURING THE during the past winter, and to large collections 
PAST YEAR. having been made for war sufferers, our annual in- 
come decreased some $4000, making a total deficit for the year of 
$6209.03. 

To make matters worse, the State of Pennsylvania found 
itself obliged, on account of insufficient funds in its treasury, to 
reduce all State appropriations by ten per cent. This unfor- 
tunate circumstance clipped from our allowance $1000. And 
our local Federation of Jewish Charities was likewise obliged to 
lessen its appropriation to us by $100 quarterly. 

To add yet more to our financial burden, so great was the 
pressure on us for admission of applicants to our School, that we 
were obliged to enroll a larger number of students than ever be- 
fore, crowding hallways and garret and outlying farm buildings. 

And, at the present time, we are facing an expenditure w^hich 
we have all too long deferred, but which can no longer be put off, 
the installing of a new sewage disposal plant, which will involve 
an expense of over $3000, increasing our deficit. 
FRIENDS IN B'^t' ^s has happened on previous occasions, 

NEED. when we found ourselves in a financial crisis, kind 

Providence came to our aid by sending to our rescue a number 
of helpful friends. Foremost among these we must mention: 

Mr. M. Lasker, of Galveston, Texas, who notwithstanding 
his life-membership of many years ago, voluntarily added a dona- 
tion of $2000, in appreciation of the good work done by our 
School. Another helper was Mr. Alfred Benjamin, president of 
the Federation of Jewish Charities, of Kansas City, who gave us 
$500 toward the imperatively needed new building, notwithstand- 
ing an annual contribution by the Federation of his city. He 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 15 

volunteered, moreover, to pay an additional personal annual sub- 
scription of $50. And his brother, Mr. David Benjamin, learning 
that the Federation of Jewish Charities, of Kansas City, found 
itself obliged, by reason of insufficient income, to reduce its an- 
nual contribution to The National Farm School from $350 to 
$250, made a personal subscription of $50 to cover a part of the 
reduction. 

Others w^ho came to our relief during the past year were: 

Federation of Jewish Charities, of Philadelphia $8,500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Straus, New York 5,000.00 

Mr. Jacob H. Schiff, New York 1,100.00 

Mr. Nathan Krauskopf, New York '500.00 

Mr. Nathan SneUenburg, Philadelphia 500.00 

Associates of the Late Joseph E. Oppenheimer in the SneUenburg 

Clothing Company 282.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Simon L. Bloch, Philadelphia 250.00 

Mr. Felix M. Warburg, New York 250.00 

Air. Arthur K. Kuhn, New York 200.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Mack Latz, Atlantic City, N. J 150.00 

Mr. Mortimer L. Schiff, New York 100.00 

Mr. Samuel Friedheim, Rock Hill, S. C lOO.oo 

Mr. Louis Marshall, New York lOo.oo 

District Grand Lodge 2, L O. B. B 100.00 

District Grand Lodge 7, L O. B. B 100.00 

Grand Lodge L W. S. O loo.oo 

U. S. Grand Lodge, L O. B. S 100.00 

Society for Care of Jewish Orphans and Friendless Children, of 

Luzerne County, Pa 100.00 

Mr. Louis Schlesinger, of Newark, one of our National Auxiliary Board 
Members, raised for us, in memberships, the sum of $160.00. Quite a 
number of others gave us special sums, less than $100.00, to whom 
we are no less thankful, whose names appear in the general list of mem- 
bers and contributors on pages 
In addition to the above, the following contributions to the Endowment Fund 
were received : 

Edward P. Kelly, Philadelphia, Bequest $1,333-33 

Jacob Straus, Ligonier, Ind., Bequest 1,000.00 

Mr. Charles J. Basch, Newark, N. J., Life Membership 100.00 

Mrs. Jacob Kaufmann, Pittsburgh, Life Membership 100.00 

Mr. E. Lasker, Galveston, Tex., Life Membership 100.00 

Mr. M. J. Orleans, Dallas, Tex., Life Membership 100.OO 

Mr. Eugene Warner, Buffalo, N. Y., Life Membership 100.00 

We are also happy to announce that we have just received a 
Decatur Motor Truck, the gift of Mrs. J. Isenberg and sons, 
Roman Automobile Company, which will prove most serviceable 
in the disposal of products of our farms, and enable us to obtain 



16 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

better prices than we otherwise can. A few more of such trucks 
would prove of inestimable value to the School, and yearly in- 
crease its income. 

Our Local Federation of Jewish Charities, until its recent 
deduction of $ioo quarterly, has allowed us $8500 annually. 

The directors of the Philadelphia Federation keenly regret 
the necessity of reducing their subscription to us, as well as to its 
other beneficiaries. We appeal here to the friends of The Na- 
tional Farm School to increase their subscriptions to our Federa- 
tion and to assist the Membership Committee in enrolling new 
mernbers, so that our Federation can, in turn, not only restore 
the original grants to its fourteen beneficiary societies, but offer 
nee;ded increase for the efficient management of these institutions. 

Members of the Appropriations Committee of the Legisla- 
ture of the State of Pennsylvania have expressed their pro- 
found regret that they were obliged to lessen the State's annual 
grant to us. There is no institution in the State, they assured us, 
to which they would rather afiford aid than ours, that has for its 
object the training of lads, irrespective of creed, from all sec- 
tions of the country, especially from the congested centres of our 
large cities, in the practice and science of agriculture for agri- 
cultural callings, and giving them, during their three or four 
years' course, not only their education, but also their board, lodg- 
ing, clothing and other necessities, free of charge. 

Some years ago the Hon. Edward S. Stuart, Governor of 
our State, was visited by the president of this institution, and 
asked to give favorable consideration to the Farm School's appli- 
cation for State aid. "The State," said Governor Stuart, "ought 
to come to such institutions as yours and offer voluntarily its aid, 
and all it can possibly afford to give, instead of your coming 
here to ask it." 
FARM SCHOOL This friendly attitude toward our School by 

PREPARATORY ,, , o rr ■ , ■ i , ^\ 

TO STATE '^h the State omcials is the best answer to those 

NOT^ADUPLi ^'^''^°' i-i^^" formed, frequently raise the charge 
CATE OF IT. against us that there is no need for an agricultural 
school like ours, seeing that all the different States support agri- 
cultural schools of their own. It is true that our State College 
has a most excellent agricultural department. And what is true 
there, is, to a large measure, true of the agricultural departments 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 17 

of all the other State colleges. But it is not true that any one of 
them does the work that is done at The National Farm School. 
Theirs is a college, requiring a completed High School course for 
admission. Ours is a High School, requiring a completed gram- 
mar school course for entrance. They are institutions which, 
even if tuition be wholly or partly free, require the students to 
provide themselve with board, lodging and clothing ; we give our 
students everything free. They gather the students, for the most 
part, from those capable of helping themselves; we give prefer- 
ence to orphan lads, to poor, but capable immigrant lads, or sons 
of immigrants, many of whom often are unconversant with the 
vernacular. They gather largely farmers' sons, who enter to 
receive advanced or special agricultural instruction, whilst ours 
come to us wholly unacquainted even with the rudiments of farm 
work, many of them never having even seen a fa.rm before they 
enter our School. While little or no practical work is done at the 
State colleges, in our School the practical work goes hand in hand 
with the theoretical, all of our work, from seed time to harvest, 
being done by our pupils, while at the colleges the practical work 
is done by hired men. In fact, some of our graduates, who have 
entered State colleges after leaving us, have made their living 
by doing the practical work for which men are generally hired at 
the colleges. 

RECORD OF The Director's Report will speak in detail of 

THE YEAR. the work accomplished at the School during the 
past year. One hundred and twenty-nine students were instructed. 

The dairy produced over 147,000 quarts of milk, most of which was 
supplied to hospitals and institutions in Philadelphia. 

The orchards produced 1,500 baskets of peaches, 600 bushels of 
apples and 75 bushels of pears. 

The farms produced: 

170 tons hay 150 bushels onions 

20 tons straw 200 bushels potatoes 

10,000 bundles corn stover 10,000 heads cabbage 

1,700 bushels of corn 5,000 ears sweet corn 

100 bushels rye 100 baskets lima beans 

100 bushels wheat 1,000 bunches asparagus 

350 tons silage 50 tons mangels 

Besides this, we filled our four large silos with 442 tons of silage. 
The Horticultural Department sold over $1000 worth of products. 



18 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

IMPROVE- Many improvements have been made to our 

plant during the past year, especially on the Flora 
Schoenfeld Memorial Farms. On Farm No. 3, another tract of 
land of eight acres, was underdrained and reclaimed, making 
a total of added valuable lands to this farm, during the past two 
years, of ten acres. A new water system has been installed 
on this farm, giving a surer, safer, and purer water supply. 

On Farm No. i an addition has been built to the barn, a new 
silo has been erected, and a new milk room built. 

On the Home Farm a new Hall Incubator System, which 
hatched over 3000 chickens this year, has been installed. 
MOST URGENT The report of the Director will show in detail 

NEEDS. the numerous needs of the School. We are work- 

ing with inadequate room for the Chemical Department, the 
Physical Department and the Study of Bacteria, Zoology, and 
Entomology. Two years ago we added an entirely new Biologi- 
cal Department to our institution, but this department is home- 
less. Our laboratories have long ago outgrown the space allotted 
to them, and our class rooms have been inadequate for years. 
We are still pleading for a Domestic Hall. In our Department of 
Agriculture we need a class room so constructed that the study 
and judging of farm animals, large and small, may be made pos- 
sible. Considering the limitations under which our faculty labors, 
the achievements which we are, nevertheless, able to record, speak 
volumes for their zeal and enthusiasm. 

During the last year we lost one of our oldest 

LOSS OF ONE *= ^ 

OP THE and staunchest friends, Mr. Ralph Blum. At a time 

when the friends of our School were few, when few 
men grasped the significance of agricultural training, and of the 
return to the soil as a solution of some of our vexing social prob- 
lems, when the possibility of success was questioned, even denied,, 
when failure was predicted for it, when the prophets did their best 
to prove their prophesies true by denying the School their aid, and 
by discouraging others from helping it, it was then that our de- 
parted friend bravely stepped to its aid, resolutely espoused its 
cause, pressed it to the fore with his characteristic zeal, gave to 
its upbuilding liberally of his time and labor and means, and con- 
tinued working for it and watching over it, until he felt that it 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 19 

had progressed sufficiently to be able to shift for itself. At our 
spring meeting, last June, we planted a tree in his memory upon 
these grounds which he loved so dearly. We deeply regret that 
the financial status of our School makes a more substantial memo- 
rial impossible. 

EXPRESSIONS ^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^° express our thanks to both the 

OF THANKS. Board of Directors of the School and the Ladies' 
Auxiliary Board. These ladies and gentlemen have been untiring 
in their unselfish efforts in behalf of the School and the young 
men who are under their care. No labor is too hard for them, 
no call upon their time too great, where the interests of the 
School and its students are concerned. Thanks are also due to 
our efficient office force, upon whose interest in the work so much 
depends, as long as the School needs to continue its numerous 
and expensive propaganda to raise funds for its maintenance. We 
cannot praise too highly the work and efficiency of our faculty and 
our matrons. The reports of the separate departments of the 
School will indicate how earnestly and successfully the members 
of the faculty and the matrons are doing their duty. We express 
our appreciation to the speakers who assisted in making our spring 
exercises so unusually successful last June, and to the men who are 
with us on the platform to-day. 
HELPING FARM 'p|^g demands upon our people for the relief 

SCHOOL SANEST ^ f f 

ANSWER TO of war sufferers have not abated. Nor should they 
"AFTER WAR ^'^^'^ upou deaf ears and hearts of stone. In all 
-WHAT?" sincerity, we say to the Jews of America: "Give — 

give — give to the helpless victims of the world's insanity." 

Our School itself has given much, very much, to that urgent 
cause. It withdrew its field secretary, Mr. A. H. Fromenson, 
from his propaganda work in our behalf, and loaned his valuable 
services to the American Jewish Relief Committee for many 
months, and left the field entirely to the latter organization for 
its needed work. This transfer of our field secretary meant a 
loss to the Farm School of a number of thousands of dollars. 
Its increasing deficit necessitates our re-entering upon our propa- 
ganda work, and as much in the interest of the Jews suffering 
abroad as of our brethren crowded in the cities of our own land. 

As soon as released from the trap of the contending armies, 



20 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

vast numbers of European and Asiatic Jews will turn to us for 
help and opportunity. Many of them will come stripped of all. 
There will be no room for them in the congested cities, no chance 
in the sweat-shops of the ghetto. There will, however, be 
abundant room for them on the farm. They will meet with scanty 
courtesy in the cities ; a whole-hearted welcome will await them 
on the broad and fertile acres of our land. They will come, bowed 
low by memories of past cruelties and suffering; they will build 
up a new spirit, a new vigor, a new future, behind the plow. 

Our noble President Wilson, in his memorable Address of 
Welcome to four thousand newly Naturalized Citizens in Phila- 
delphia, emphasized this truth — that of leaving all other countries 
behind "to better the ideals of men, to make them see finer 
things than they had seen before. . . . You were drawn 
across the ocean," said he, "by some beckoning finger of hope, by 
some relief, by some vision of a new kind of justice, by some 
expectation of a better kind of life." 

How better realize their hope, their soul's agonized needs, 
than to prepare early for their coming by scientifically utilizing 
God's broad and sunny acres, making thus a home for them, 
where that which is best in the soul can be grown as well as that 
which is best in the soil. 

The National Farm School can be a medium for such 
much-desired and much-needed transformation. Help The Na- 
tional Farm School, and you will help thousands of Jews who 
are in direst need of answering the call "Back to the Soil," and 
hundreds of thousands more who shall need to answer that call in 
the very near future. 

Help The National Farm School, and you give the sanest 
and godliest answer to the question, "After the War — What?" 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 21 

THE FOURTEENTH GRADUATION EXERCISES 

March io, 191 5. 

Of the sixteen students graduated by The National Farm 
School on March loth, twelve entered immediately upon agri- 
cultural positions offered to them; one assumed control of his 
own farm ; two departed for the Ohio State Agricultural College 
for special studies in animal husbandry and horticulture, and 
one remained for the post-graduate course. 

Louis I. Helfand was awarded a post-graduate certificate 
for a second year in farm management. 

N 

Diplomas were awarded to: 

Israel Bautman, Philip Light, Frank Seligman, 

Samuel Davidson, Charles R. Nussbaum, Max Semel, 

Elmer Klein, Henry Ross, Harry Shor. 

The following received certificates: 

Morris Burton, Jacob Finkel, Samuel Lechner, 

Abraham Ehoodin, Howard B. George, Morris Woolwich. 

Dr. Krauskopf presided at the exercises, and Professor 
Wheeler, Associate Superintendent of the Philadelphia Pub- 
lic Schools, made the principal address. Other speakers were: 
Superintendent Hoffman, of the Bucks County Schools, and 
Principal Ross, of the Doylestown High School. The baccalau- 
reate address was delivered by Mr. Horace Stern. 

The George F. Hoffman prizes for essays on "Why I Want 
to Be a Farmer" were awarded as follows: First prize, Charles 
Nussbaum ; second prize, Nathan Magram ; third prize, Maxwell 
Barnett. The Massinger prize in veterinary was awarded to 
Henry Ross. 

The graduation exercises were preceded by a meeting of 
the Executive Board, at which Dr. Krauskopf eulogized the 
memory of the late Ralph Blum, of Philadelphia, who was one 
of the founders of the school and served it seventeen years as 
an active director. The exercises closed with a dinner, at which 
the graduates were the guests of the directors. 



22 THE NATION'AL FARM SCHOOL 

THE SPRING EXERCISES 

JuxE 6, 19 1 5. 

The Annual Spring Festival of The National Farm School, 
held on the grounds of the School, at Farm School, Bucks 
County, Pa., on Sunday, June the 6th, was pronounced by the 
more than eighteen hundred participants, who came to the School 
from far and near, the most successful and brilliant public func- 
tion in the long line of successful affairs in the history of the 
School. The throngs that gathered at the various railroad way 
stations were so great that it was necessary to run two special 
trains from Philadelphia to the School. 

Beginning with an impressive dedicatory ceremony, held in 
a grove of stately trees, the exercises included the consecration 
of 128 memorial trees and 39 festive trees; the dedication of a 
handsome pergola in the School's nurseries in memory of Joseph 
E. Oppenheimer, of Philadelphia ; .tours of inspection over the 
vast farm lands cultivated by the students of the School; and 
closed with the presentation of an elaborate historical Biblical 
pageant on the campus. 

The guests of honor were the Hon. Samuel Kalisch, Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey, who presided; 
Mr, Maurice Wertheim, of New York, who administered Jewish 
relief in Palestine at the outbreak of the war, under the direc- 
tion of the Hon. Henry Morgenthau, U. S. Ambassador to Tur- 
key; Ben Yehudah, the father of the rebirth of Hebrew in Pales- 
tine and pioneer of the new colonization; Dr. Ernest Lacy, of 
Philadelphia, Professor of English Literature and author of 
distinction; Mr. Louis Wolf, president of the Federation of 
Jewish Charities, of Philadelphia ; and Attorney Milton D. Green- 
baum, of Baltimore. 

Dr. Joseph Krauskopf , president and founder of the School, 
delivered the opening address. 

Justice Kalisch, the presiding officer, declared that the boys 
of the Farm School have before them great opportunities to add 
to the wealth of the world and to become the sustainers of the 
nation. 

To Mr. Wertheim fell the duty of installing the Freshman 
-class of thirty-two boys. Mr. Greenbaum paid a special tribute 
to Rev. Dr. Adolf Guttmacher, late rabbi of the Baltimore 
Hebrew Congregation ; while Mr. Louis Wolf told of the work 
of the late Ralph Blum, who was the first vice-president of the 
Farm School. 

Dr. Ernest Lacy, in consecrating the memorial and festive 
trees, spoke of the countless blessings bequeathed to us by the 
noble dead — our poets, scientists, reformers in religion and gov- 



THE NATIOXAL FARM SCHOOL 23 

emment, and last, but not least, the thousands of unknown dead 
who gave their all for the common weal. 

"What need in death, have genii of the brain, those homeless palace 
builders? No earthl}' reward, truly, unless they have the power of looking 
on the world, as they may be looking on us today, and know how well they 
wrought and that their brave deeds are commemorated by a grateful people. 
And is it not an appropriate as well as a beautiful custom to plant trees to 
the memory of departed spirits? Of all things that grow trees are, in truth, 
the aptest symbols of strong and beneficient souls ; and alas ! our treatment 
of the forests is the aptest symbol of man's ingratitude to his benefactors. 

"There is an old Latin maxim, 'Nothing but good of the dead,' to which 
Heinrich Heine has added 'and nothing but evil of the living.' Truly, I 
have long held that, if we must be forgetful, let us be forgetful of the 
past; if we must be merciless, let us be merciless to those who have ceased 
to be. It is true that they can not defend themselves, but it is also true 
that between us and them Death has interposed his shield invincible to 
earthly points. 

"Above these two beautiful ceremonies, however, he placed the trans- 
planting from deadly environment of human bodies and the nourishing of 
them to fullest growth — the chief aim of The National Farm School." 

In closing his speech he praised highly the great work al- 
ready accomplished by this institution under the direction of 
its president. Dr. Krauskopf, whom he said was a man whose 
charity was confined by no creed and whose feeling of brother- 
hood embraced all races under the sun. 



FEDERATION OF JEWISH FARMERS OF AMERICA 

Second Annual Field Day, August 24, 191 5. 

Under the auspices of the Federation of Jewish Farmers 
of America, the secretary of the Federation, Mr. Joseph W. 
Pincus, arranged for the Second Annual Field Day, to be held 
on the grounds of The National Farm School, on August 24th, 
for the Jewish farmers residing in Bucks County, Pennsylvania ; 
Hunterdon County, New Jersey, and other Pennsylvania coun- 
ties in the vicinity of the School. 

A beautiful day brought out about thirty Jewish farmers 
and their families, who were given the opportunity to inspect the 
dairy, poultry, field and horticultural departments of the School, 
under the direction of the professors of these departments. Lec- 
tures were made by the following speakers : 

"How to Buy a Cow," W. H. Bishop, Professor of Agri- 
culture; "Making the Farm Home Attractive," W. F. Fancourt, 
Professor of Horticulture ; "Poultry Feeding," George Eaton, 
Instructor in Poultrying; "The Necessity of Keeping Crops Free 
From Insects, Pests and Diseases," Miss Lydia Prichett Bor- 
den, Instructor in Biology and Natural Science. 

Isaac Landman delivered a short address of welcome, in 
behalf of the Board of the School. 



24 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL MEETING AND SUCCOTH 
PILGRAMAGE 

September 26, 1915. 

The great urge of Jews toward the soil, and the important 
role that The National Farm School has in making this longing 
possible was emphasized in the addresses delivered by Louis D. 
Brandeis, Esq., of Boston, chairman of the Provisional Com- 
mittee for General Zionist Affairs, and Prof. Jacob H. Hol- 
lander, of the Department of Economics, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, Baltimore, at the Eighteenth Annual Meeting and Suc- 
coth Pilgrimage of the institution on Sunday, September 26, 
191 5, before one of the largest assemblages that ever crowded 
into Segal Hall. 

The meeting was presided over in an unusually graceful 
manner by Arthur K. Kuhn,. Esq., of New York, a son-in-law 
of the late Max Schoenfeld, who was an enthusiastic friend and 
supporter of The National Farm School. The platform from 
which the orators spoke was converted into a Succah with the 
foliage, fruits, vegetables and cereals grown on the broad acres 
of the institution, serving also as a concrete exhibit of the stu- 
dents' achievements. 

Rabbi Rudolph L Coffee, head of the Social Service Depart- 
ment of the Independent Order B'nai B'rith, opened the exercises 
with prayer. 

In assuming the chairmanship, Mr. Kuhn referred to the 
conditions that will confront America when the European War 
will be at an end. "Now is the time," said Mr. Kuhn, "to pre- 
pare men in this country to be able to do the needed work when 
the thousands who come to us from devastated Europe will need 
their help. For this work, such an institution as The National 
Farm School is of vital importance." 

Following the delivery of the annual message by Rev. Dr. 
Joseph Krauskopf, founder and president of The National Farm 
School, Mr. Brandeis, speaking on the theme "Back to the Land," 
said: 

"The new agriculture is something radically different from the crude 
methods of farming which prevailed in the United States when the great 
majority of the inhabitants devoted themselves to that occupation. The new 
farming is imbued and led by science — chemical, mechanical and social- 
economic, and is making a profession. For many centuries the Jew has, in 
most countries, been separated by law from the culture of the land. Where 
the opportunity for intelligent farming has existed, he has shown he is not 
lacking either in aptitude or in love for the occupation. The Jew, a city 
dweller for many generations — weak, frail and nervous as the result of 
congested conditions under which he has lived, has developed in the Massa- 
chusetts and Connecticut farms, as fine a physical development as any of 
his neighbors. He has demonstrated the capacity of earning on formerly 
abandoned farms a reasonable living; and in connection with the occupa- 
tion there are ample manifestations of his inherited intellectual capacity and 
social spirit. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 25 

"li it be true that good leadership implies a sense of impending events, 
the Hebrew has certainly shown that quality of leadership in respect to the 
land movement. Moses Hess urged the cry of back — or forward, as I pre- 
fer to have it — to the land in the early sixties as an answer to the present 
day economic difficulties. Lilienblum and Pinsker suggested it independently 
in the eighties ; and Dr. Carl Lippe, who died only a few weeks ago, had his 
part in establishing the first Jewish agricultural settlement in Palestine in 
the seventies. And, what The National Farm School is doing in America 
in fitting Hebrews for agricultural life, the Zionists are doing, on a larger 
scale, in Palestine. Forty years of effort in Palestine have unquestionably 
established 'That Palestine is fit for the modern Hebrew, and the modern 
Hebrew is fit for Palestine.' 

"Between this National Farm School founded by members of an old 
people in the new world ; and that new Jewish development in the old 
world — both leading the Hebrews to normal, happy lives, there should be 
not only complete sympathy, but perfect understanding." 

Professor Hollander stressed the great value of The Na- 
tional Farm School in solving America's economic problems, 
and its high usefulness in helping the Jews of this country to 
render the republic the highest usefulness. He insisted that the 
effort of the institution's officers must be directed toward mak- 
ing it a really national institution, in which all the Jews of every 
part of the United States shall be equally interested. "At pres- 
ent," said the speaker, "it is not known outside of this section. 
Endowment should be derived not only from Philadelphia or 
Pennsylvania, but should be provided by the Jews of the country 
at large. Its well-being affects not only a city or a State, but 
society and the nation." 

Dr. Coffee, speaking of "The Soil and the Soul of the Jew," 
said: 

"For developing the soul of Israel we need the soil, a return 
on a magnificent scale to agricultural industries. When this war 
is ended, thousands of immigrants will come to this country. 
Jews in large numbers will come here, and we must prevent their 
congregating in the larger cities. Let us prepare a way for them 
to lead their lives in the culture of the land." 

Reports were submitted by the treasurer, Mr. I. H. Silver- 
man; Mr. Herbert D. Allman, chairman of the Schoenfeld Farms 
Committee; the Director, Dr. John H. Washburn; Professor 
Bishop, head of the Agricultural Department; Professor Fan- 
court, of the Horticultural Department; and by Miss Lydia 
Prichett Borden, biologist and librarian. 

After the distribution of prizes to the students, the annual 
election was held, resulting in the re-election of Dr. Krauskopf 
as president and Harry B. Hirsh, vice-president. 

Four members of the local board, who had served on the 
board consecutively for ten years, were elected to honorary trus- 
teeship, with the same rights, privileges and duties of elected 



26 THE xNATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

members, as follows: Hart Blumenthal, Alfred M. Klein, Leon 
Merz, Bernard Selig. 

Five members were elected to succeed those members of 
the local board whose terms expired this year, for a new term of 
three years, as follows: Henry Bronner, Morris Fleishman, 
Horace Hano, Dr. Bernard Kohn, Isaac Landman. 

To succeed Mr. Leon Merz, whose term expires 19 17, 
Eugene Stern was elected. 

The following were elected to the National Auxiliary 
Board: To represent the State of Maryland, Milton D. Green- 
■baum, of Baltimore ; to represent the State of New York, Maurice 
Wertheim, of New York City; to represent the State of Connec- 
ticut, Isaac M. Ullman, of New Haven; to represent the State 
■of Colorado, Mrs. Morris Ripley, of Denver; to represent the 
State of Oklahoma, I. B. Lew, of Oklahoma City. 



MEMORIAL AND FESTIVE TREES 

Owing to the increased number of memorial and festive 
trees, it was necessary to re-chart the entire farm. New blue 
prints have been made and an entirely new system of number- 
ing installed, by which no two trees on Farm School property have 
the same number. This entailed a tremendous amount of work. 
A new set of typewritten records has been made, and a card index 
prepared, giving the name, address, date of death and date of 
consecration. As an aid in locating trees, every label on the farm 
has been numbered. 

This year our students have done all the painting of the 
labels, 469 memorial and 39 festive labels being painted by them 
this spring. During the summer, 174 others were painted (mak- 
ing a total of 682) and inscribed. Printing the library index 
cards has proved such good training, that it is no longer neces- 
sary to employ outside labor for our tree labels. In the future, 
the entire work of painting, inscribing and numbering memorial 
and festive labels can be done by our students. 



SUNDRY DONATIONS OTHER THAN MONEY 

Bachrach, Mr. Harry, Philadelphia — Case of books for library. 

Burpee, Mr. W. Atlee, Philadelphia — Subscriptions to newspapers and magazines for 

library. 
Burpee, W. Atlee, & Co., Philadelphia — Seeds for farm, kitchen gardens and boys' 

gardens. 
"Chicago Israelite," Chicago, 111.— Complimentary subscription. 

Dill & Collins Co., Philadelphia — Cover paper and glazed paper used in this book. 
J^ckstein, Mr. Herman, Philadelphia — Repair of electric fan. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 27 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1915 

GENERAL FUND 

Bank Balance, October 1, 1914 $2,320.47 

MAINTENANCE INCOME 

Interest on Investments $4,945.63 

Sale of Farm Products 4,890.32 

State of Pennsylvania 9,641.05 

Federation of Jewish Charities of Philadelphia. . 8,393.75 
Dues and Donations 13,952.25 

41,823.00 

MAINTENANCE DISBURSEMENTS 

Beds and Bedding $867.08 

Brooms and Brushes 168.65 

Conveyance 1,236.96 

Dry Goods 3,063.73 

Educational Supplies 568.35 

Farm Supplies 6,352.97 

Fuel 2,213.29 

Groceries 2,546.15 

Horticultural Department 770.29 

Ice 58.15 

Insurance 822.68 

Lighting 683.57 

Medical Supplies 214.18 

Painting 371.74 

Printing and Stationery 378.87 

Plumbing 495.59 

Provisions 6,465.23 

Rent '. 287.04 

Repairs 654.08 

Salaries — Matron 1,140.00 

Officers 2,720.88 

Teachers 8,152.75 

Spraying 111.88 

Sundries 470.29 

Taxes 362.11 

Wages 3,434.86 

44,611.37 

Excess of Maintenance Disbursements Over 

Income 2,788.37 

$467.90 
IMPROVEMENT TO PLANT 

Power Washing Machine $22.90 

Poultry Department 286.61 

New Roofing 219.05 

Pennsylvania Hall 53.17 

Chemical Laboratory 300.00 

Total Improvement to Plant 881.7.3 

T < 

E-'l ' : . ! , $1,349.63 

EXTRAORDINARY INCOME 

Library $92.63 

Oppenheimer Memorial Fund 282.00 

Students' Deposits 1,062.59 

$1,437.22 



28 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

EXTRAORDINARY DISBURSEMENTS 

Library $43.28 

Oppenheimer Memorial Fund 180.13 

Students' Deposits 695.51 

Endowment Fund Repayments Account of Loan. 1,896.36 

2,815.28 

Excess of Extraordinary Disbursements 

Over Extraordinary Income 1,378.0& 

$2,727.69' 

PROPAGANDA INCOME 

General $3,036.47 

Dr. Krauskopf s Special Appeal 1,775.00 

$4,811.47 

PROPAGANDA DISBURSEMENTS 

Spring and Autumn Exercises $376.54 

Commission 612.93 

Propaganda Literature, Printing and Postage. . 1,524.98 

— — 2,514.45 

Net Propaganda Balance 2,297.02- 

Excess of Total Disbursements Over Income $430.67 

ACTUAL FINANCIAL STANDING 

Due Endowment Fund $4,100.89^ 

Students' Deposits 1,885.2a 

Library 49.35 

Oppenheimer Memorial Fund 101.87 

Escess of Total Disbursements Over Income $430.67 

Total Liabilities $6,567.98- 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

Bank Balance, October 1, 1914 $259.82 

INCOME 

Bequests — 

Jacob Straus, Ligonier, Ind $1,000.00 

E. P. Kelly, Philadelphia 1,333.33 

$2,333.33 

Life Memberships — 

M. Orleans, Dallas, Texas . '. $100.00 

E. Lasker, Galveston, Texas 100.00 

Mrs. Jacob Kaufmann, Pittsburgh 100.00 

Eugene Warner, Buffalo, N. T 100.00 

Chas. J. Basch, Newark, N. J 100.00 

500.00 

Principal Account 

Repayment of Mortgages — 

1035 South Street $5,000.00 

2008 South Tenth Street 2,000.00 

2871-75 Tulip Street 1,500.00 

8,500.00 

Sale of Securities 9,726.53 

Repayment of Loans — 

National Farm School $1,896.36 

Schoenfeld Farm, No. 3 650.00 

2,546.36 

Total Income $23,606.22 

$23,866.04 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 29 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Mortgage Expense, Interest $470.62 

Mortgage Purchases — 

Northeast Corner Seventh and Hoffman Sts. . $7,000.00 

544 North Second Street 5, 000. 00 

S69 North Marshall Street 3, -500. 00 

Northwest Corner Marshall and Parrish Sts. 4.000.00 

19,500.00 

Total Disbursements 19,970.62 



Bank Balance, September 30, 1915 $3,895.42 

INVESTMENTS 

l«t Mortgages, 5.4% — 322 N. Sixth St $3,000.00 

323 Washington Ave., rear League St. 2,500.00 

611 Lombard St 2,000.00 

S. E. Cor. Marshall and Oxford Sts. . . 3,000.00 

2106 W. Norris St 3,000.00 

601 Dickinson St 4,000.00 

709 S. Eighth St 2,000.00 

N. E. Cor. Chester Ave. and 55th St.. 6,000.00 

60 N. 54th St 1,800.00 

964 N. Second St 4,500.00 

4170 Poplar St 2,000.00 

1411 N. Wanamaker St 1,400.00 

N. W. Cor. 32d and Berks Sts 4,000.00 

611 Pike St 1,200.00 

305 S. Sixth St 2,700.00 

822 South St 5,500.00 

544 N. Second St 5,000.00 

869 N. Marshall St 3,500.00 

Marshall and Parrish Sts 4.000.00 

5y2% — 1816 N. Marshall St 1,800.00 

515 Wolf St 1,400.00 

N. E. Cor. Seventh and Hoffman Sts.. 7,000.00 

6 % — 224 N. Ohio Ave., Atlantic Citj' 3.500.00 

Market St. "L" 4's, 4% 5,000.00 

P. & R. 4's, 4% 2.000.00 

Wisconsin Central 1st, 4's 2,000.00 

E. & P. 4's, 4% 4,200.00 

Participation Bond Mtg. Trust Co., St. Louis, 5% 100.00 

Baltimore & Ohio Convertibles, 41/2% 1,000.00 

Lake Shore & Michigan Railways 4's 500.00 

Union Pacific 4's 1,000.00 

The National Farm School 4.100.89 

94,700.89 

Total Endowment Fund $98,596.31 



SUNDRY DONATIONS OTHER THAN MONEY 

Friedman, Mr. B. C, Philadelphia — Quantity of motzos. 

Gimbel Bros., Philadelphia — Loan of flags and bunting for public exercises. 
Helfand, Mr. Louis I., Philadelphia — Ice cream and cake treat to household. 
Hirsh, Mr. H. B., Philadelphia — Box of technical journals for library. 
Isenberg & Sons, Mrs. J. (Roman Automobile Co.), Philadelphia — Automobile truck. 
Jessup & Moore, Philadelphia — Paper used in this book. 
^'Jewish Criterion," Pittsburgh, Pa. — Complimentary subscription. 
"Jewish Exponent," Philadelphia — Complimentary subscription. 
Jewish Publication Society, Philadelphia — Number of volumes for library. 
"Jewish Review and Observer," Cleveland, O. — Complimentary subscription. 



30 THE NATIONAL FARAI SCHOOL 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON GRADUATES 

Isaac Landman^ Chairman. 

Notwithstanding the great difficulty in keeping in touch with 
the graduates of The National Farm School, because they are 
scattered all over the country, the chairman of the Committee 
on Graduates, with the assistance of Mr. Charles Horn, secre- 
tary of the Alumni-Association of The National Farm School, 
has communicated with 125 of our young men during the past 
year. 

Of these, 29 are cultivating their own farms, in 8 different 
States, distributed as follows: Pennsylvania, 10; Wisconsin, 2; 
Massachusetts, i ; Connecticut, 2 ; New Jersey, 4 ; Ohio, 4 ; New 
York, 2; Illinois, 2; Rhode Island, i ; Georgia, i. 

Nine are instructors in agricultural colleges, argicultural 
schools, public school gardens and vacant lots associations. 

Two are experts in the Federal Department of Agriculture. 

One is a rural health officer. 

One is director of the Jewish Agricultural Colonies in Ar- 
gentine Republic, established by the Jewish Colonization Asso- 
ciation of Paris, France. 

Two are practising veterinarians; one in Pennsylvania and 
the other in Texas. 

Sixty-seven are managers of farms and estates, herdsmen, 
dairymen and orchardists in 19 States; distributed as follows: 
New York. 12; Florida, i; New Jersey, 7; Ohio, i; Pennsyl- 
vania, 23 ; Illinois, 5 ; Massachusetts, i ; Iowa, i ; Utah, i ; Mich- 
igan, I ; Connecticut, 3 ; Georgia, i ; Texas, i ; California, 2 ; 
North Carolina, i ; District of Columbia, 2 ; Maryland, i ; Min- 
nesota, 2; Indiana, i. 

Fourteen are specializing in agricultural colleges in five 
different States. 



WHAT SOME OF OUR GRADUATES ARE DOING 

Aarons, Harry, Downsman, Wis. — Cultivating his own farm ("Sunnybrook 

Farm"). 
Abrams, S. M., Collegeville, Pa.— Cultivating his own farm 
Amrum, Philip, R. F. D. No. 4, New Brunswick, N. J.— Herdsman. 
•Anderson, Victor, Sanatoga, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Atkatz, Joseph, St. Augustine, Fla. — Manager large dairy farm. 
Bautman, Israel, Beesley's Point, N. J. — General farming. 
Berg, Henry, East Mansfield, Mass. — Cultivating his own farm 
Blackman, Morris, Philadelphia, Pa. — Chemicals. 
Borovick, George, Chicago, III. — Pharmacist. 
Blume, Henry, Mt. Orchard Farm, Narvon, Pa. — Orcharding. 
Brodie, Samuel, Berkeley, Cal. — Specializing, University of California. 
Brown, Benj., Cincinnati Sanitarium, Cincinnati, Ohio — In charge of Poultry 

Department. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 31 

Capek, Thaddeus S.. Elmwood, Conn. — Dairying. 

Charen, Oscar, care of J. Linden Heacock, Hatboro, Pa. — In charge of estate, 

Chodesh, Benj., Gap, Pa. — Doctor of Veterinary Science. 

Coltun, IMax J., Cumberland, Md. — Rural health officer. 

Crohn, Lawrence W. — Truck farming in New Jersey. 

Davidson, Samuel, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. — With Park Commission. 

Druckerman, Benjamin — Specializing in Horticulture, Maryland State Agri- 
cultural College. 

Ehoodin, Abram, New Richmond, Ohio — Cultivating his own farm. 

Einstein, Sylvan D., Norma, N. J. — Assistant instructor in agriculture to chil- 
dren of Jewish Colony. 

Epstein, Abraham, R. F. D. No. 3, Stamford, Conn. — Dairying on rented farm. 

Erde, Herman W. — Specializing, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Feldman, Nathan, D. V. S., Kingsville, Tex.— Doctor of Veterinary Science. 

Fereshetian, Martin, Meadville, Pa. — Specializing at college. 

Fleisher, Max, Vineland, N. J. — Superintendent of Dairy and Poultiy Depart- 
ments, New Jersey Training School. 

Frank, Harry, Jr., care of S. Ettinger, Tinley Park, 111.— Poultry farm 
manager. 

Fried, Albert, Vermillion, Ohio — Cultivating his own farm. 

Friedman, Aaron J. — Specializing, Pennsylvania State Agricultural College. 

Friedman, David — Specializing, Utah State Agricultural College, Logan, Utah. 

Ginsberg, Leo, West Bridgewater, Mass. — Farming. 

Glantz, Emanuel, Danboro, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Goldberg, Benj., Hillside Home, Clark's Summit, Pa. — In charge of dairy. 

Goldman, Jos., Rockford, 111. — Dairying. 

Goldman, Meyer, Norma, N. J. — Instructor in elementary agriculture to chil- 
dren of Jewish Colony. 

Gordon, Abe, Rochester, N. Y. — On his own farm. 

Green, Meyer, Elizabeth, N. J. — Civil engineer. 

Halbert, M., Erie, Pa. — Farming. 

Harrison. Beryl, Hyperion Dairy, Des Moines. la. — Dairying. 

Hausmann, Samuel, Ellensville, N. Y. — On his own farm. 

Helfand, Louis I.— Specializing, Ohio State Agricultural College, Columbus, 
Ohio. 

Hecker, Geo. M., Chestnut Hill, Pa. — Rose growing. 

Hirsch, Harry S., Lyons, 111. — On his own poultry farm. 

Horn, Charles, Philadelphia, Pa.— Assistant Superintendent, Philadelphia 
Vacant Lots Cultivation Association. 

Horn, Irving, Philadelphia, Pa. — In business. 

Ibaugh, George W., Rockport, Pa., Middleport Coal Field Poor District — 
Steward. 

Jaffe, David, Oklahoma City Nursery, Oklahoma City, Okla. — Tree Doctor 
and Spraying Specialist. 

Johnston, Edwin A., New Britain, Pa. — Farm manager. 

Kahan, Jacob, Rushland, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Kahn, Carl H. — On cotton plantation in South. 

Kerner, Samuel — Specializing, Valparaiso University, Indiana. 

Klein, Elmer, Ohio State Agricultural College, Columbus, Ohio — Specializing 
in Horticulture and Entomology. 

Krivin, David, care of Alvin Hill, Ringoes, N. J. — Herdsman. 

Krinzman, Philip, Elizabeth, N. J. — Cultivating his own farm. 



32 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Kysela, Rudolph, Denver, Colo. — Expert electrician. 

Landsman, Harry, Yonkers, N. Y. — On dairy farm. 

Lasker, Samuel, Interlaken, N. Y. — Orcharding. 

Lauchman, Wm., Goldsboro, N. C. — Farm manager. 

Lebeson, Harry, Columbus, Ohio — Attending Ohio State Agricultural College, 

Columbus, Ohio. 
Lebeson, Herman — Texas Experiment Station. 
Lechner, Samuel, Perkiomenville, Pa. — General farming. 
Leff, Isador, Novelty, Ohio — Cultivating his own farm (Ivermoot Farm). 
Leib, Louis, Washington, D. C. — Manager of dairy. 
Leiser, Monroe. Eagle Lake, Fla. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Lenik, Benjamin, R. F. D. No. ZT, Mendota, 111. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Leon, Marcus, Des Moines, la.— In business. 
Levin, Julius, North Scituate, R. I.— Cultivating his own farm. 
Levinson, Julius, Aurora, 111. — Greenhouse work. 
Light, Philip, Passaic, N. J. — General farming. 
Lipschutz, Nathan, Rider, Baltimore County, Md. — Farm manager. 
Lubin, Harry, Philadelphia, Pa. — With Chestnut Tree Blight Commission. 
Major, Edward. — Specializing, Cornell University. 
Malis, Emanuel. — Superintendent of Grounds and Assistant Instructor in 

Horticulture, California Polytechnic School, San Luis Obispo, Cal. 
Malish, M., Philadelphia, Pa. — Dairy business. 
Margoliuth, Aaron, Minneapolis, Minn. — General agriculture. 
McCracken, Wm., R. F. D., Chalfont, Pa. — General farming. 
Michaelson, M., Indianapolis, Ind. — Manager National Tree Surgery Company. 
Miller, A., Chicago, 111. — Seeds and floriculture' business. 
Miller, Joseph, Salt Lake City, Utah — With Park Commission. 
Minkowsky, J., Sheboygan Falls, Wis. — Dairying. 
Mitzmain, Maurice, B. A., M. Sc, Washington, D. C— Expert in Entomology ; 

engaged in special research work for the Department of Agriculture. 
Monblatt. Alex., Chicago, 111. — In business. 
Morris, Max, New Orleans, La. — Treasurer of land compan3\ 
Moskovitz, Morris, Neshaminy, Pa. — On his own farm. 
Naum, Harry, Nassau, N. Y. — Managing farm for brother. 
Nussbaum, Chas., Aurora, Ohio — General farming. 
Ostrolenk, Bernard, Canby, Minn. — Director, Agricultural Department, State 

High School. 
Ostrolenk, Lewis, Gloversville, N. Y. — Dairying. 
Packer, Benjamin, Chicago, 111. — Farm manager. 
Peyser, Sol., New York Q,\\.y — Attorney. 

Putterman, M., Columbus, Ohio — Specializing, Ohio State Agricultural College. 
Ratner, Henry, Norristown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm (Valley Brook 

Farm) with brother. 
Ratner, Jacob, Norristown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm (Valley Brook 

Farm) with brother. 
Ratner, Joseph, Detroit, Mich. — Farm manager. 
Redalia, Lewis, St. Augustine, Fla. — Fruit growing. 

Rich, Harry, Hartford, Conn. — General manager, tobacco plantations of Amer- 
ican Sumatra Tobacco Company. 
Rochlin, S. S., R. F. D. No. 3, Station H, D. C. — Manager of large dairy farm. 
Rock, Louis, Philadelphia, Pa. — In business. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 33 

Rose, Leonard, Milwaukee, Wis. — Studying chemistry. 

Rosenberg, N., Rome, N. Y. — General agriculture. 

Rosenberg, Samuel M. — On farm near Philadelphia, Pa, 

Rosen felt, Maurice, Philadelphia, Pa.— With Park Commission. 

Rosenthal, Jos. L.— Specializing, Ohio State Agricultural College. 

Ross, Henry — Cultivating Schoenfeld Farm No. i. Farm School, Pa. 

Rubenstein, Harry H., Warrington, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Rudley, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa. — Instructor in gardening and in charge of 

beautifying public school grounds for the Board of Public Education. 
Salinger, Morris — Director of the Baron de Hirsch Agricultural Colonies in 

the Argentine Republic. 
Schlesinger, Alphonse, New Orleans, La. — In business. 
Schmookler, M., Wynnewood, Pa. — Estate manager. 
Schuldt, Rudolph E., Little Silver, N. J. — Nursery work. 
Schulman, Harry, St. Louis, Mo. — Assistant manager, Traffic Department, 

Missouri-Pacific Railway Company. 
Schutzbank, Jacob, Freehold, N. J. — Father's farm. 
Seligman, Frank, Howell-Purdy Farm, Monroe, N. Y. — Dairying. 
Semel, Max, Howell-Purdy Farm, Monroe, N. Y. — Dairying, 
Serber, D., Land Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. — Attorney. 
Serlin, Wm. J., Detroit, Mich. — In business. 
Shor, Harry, Amenia, N. J. — General farming. 
Silver, Chas., Monroeville, N, J. — Cultivating his own farm, 
Sobel, Samuel S,, Greenlawn, L, I., D. D. S. 
Sobel, Sol., Ridgewood, N. J. — Farm manager. 
Snowvice, Wm., Bridgeton, N. J. — On his own farm. 
Sparberg, Geo, L., Oshkosh, Wis. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Speyer, Aaron, R. F. D. No. 3, Painesville, Ohio — Cultivating his own farm. 
Stabinsky, Julius, Atlanta, Ga. — Dairying. 
Stern, Isaac, New York City — Manager, machine company, 
Taubenhaus, Jacob, Newark, Del. — Assistant Chief, Department of Plant 

Pathology, Delaware Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Ulman, Julius, R. F. D, No. 2, Savannah, Ga. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Wallman, Israel, Indianapolis, Ind., D. V. S. — Bureau of Animal Industry, 

United States Department of Agriculture. 
Weightman, Benj., care of H, E. Richards, Falls of Schuylkill, Pa. — Manager 

of estate. 
Weigle, Frederick H,, Mt. Orchard Farm, Narvon, Pa. — Orcharding. 
Weinberg, Harry, Palestine, Tex. — In charge of tobacco plantations of Wm, 

Taussig Tobacco Company. 
Weiss, Harry, Philadelphia, Pa. — Agricultural Instructor, Jewish Foster Home, 
Wiseman, J, H,, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Instructor in Gardening, Board of Public 

Education. 
Witkin, Abraham, Philadelphia, Pa. — Florist and decorator. 
Wolf, E. H., Philadelphia, Pa. — In business. 
Wolf, Hyman, Dr. Todd's Farm, R, F. D. No. 3, New Canaan, Pa. — General 

farming, 
Woolwich, Aaron, Stratford Flower Farm, Stratford, Pa. — Floriculture. 
Woolwich, Morris, Rutledge, Pa. — Farming. 
Work, James, Perkiomenville, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Zalinger, Bernie A., Chicago, 111. — Florist. 



34 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



« 



In memory of Flora Schoenfeld, 

by her husband, Max Schoenfeld, 

of Rorschach, Switzerland. 



I. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 1 

40 acres, in the Spring of 1904. 

II. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 2 

38 acres, in the Spring of 190S. 

III. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 3 

163 acres, in the Fall of 1907. 

These farms all adjoin the original tract of 
Farm School land 



By Henry Hellman, New York City 

750 acres, in Polk County, North Carolina; sold at a price of $9,000, which 
money will be expended in the development of The National Farm 
School. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 35 



^ml&tnga BanuUh 



I. Theresa Loeb Memorial Green House 

In memory of Theresa Loeb, Ogontz, Pa., by family. 
Erected 1898. 



II. Ida M. Block Memorial Chapel 

In memory of Ida M. Block, Kansas City, Mo., by her 
husband and family. Erected 1899. 



III. Zadok M. Eisner Memorial Laboratory 

In memory of Zadok M. Eisner, Philadelphia, Pa., by 
his wife. Erected 1899. 



IV. Rose Krauskopf Memorial Green House 

In memory of Rose Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Pa., by her 
children. Erected 1899. 



V. Dairy, by Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Aaron 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Erected 1899. 

VI. Adolph Segal Hall 

Containing Library, Lecture Hall, Administration Offices 
and Dormitories, by Mr. Adolph Segal, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Erected 1906. 

VII. Frances E. Loeb Vegetable Forcing Green House 

In memory of Frances E. Loeb, by her husband. Erected 
1908. 

VIII. Louis I. Aaron Ice House 

In honor of his 70th birthday, by Mr. Louis I. Aaron, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa. Erected 1911. 



36 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



iM^momla 



I. Lake Archer Rosenthal 

In memory of Archer Rosenthal, Philadelphia, Pa., by 
his brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Rosenthal, built in 1908. 

II. Elise Binswanger Nursery 

In memory of Elise Binswanger, Kansas City, Mo., by 
her grandson and granddaughter, planted in 1909. 

III. Samuel Strauss, Jr., Division of Nursery 

Rhododendrons and Roses in memory of Samuel Strauss, 
Jr., Philadelphia, by his wife, 1910. 

IV. Feineman-Binswanger Memorial Arch 

In memory of Mr. B. A. Feineman and Elise Bins- 
wanger, by Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, 1912. 

V. The Washburn Pergola 

By John Hosea Washburn, Director of The National 
Farm School, 1912. 

VI. Bertie Gans Ochs Flag Pole 

In memory of Bertie Gans Ochs, Philadelphia, by 
Mr. Adolph S. Ochs, of New York, 1913. 

VII. Henrietta Krauskopf, Division of Nursery 

Circle of Evergreens and Shrubs enlarged annually by 
Mr. Nathan Krauskopf, of New York, in memory of his 
mother. 

VIII. Jos. E. Oppenheimer, Division of Nursery 

In memory of Joseph E. Oppenheimer, by his associates 
in the Snellenburg Clothing Co., Philadelphia, 1915. 



1908— "WM. S. RAYNER SCHOLARSHIP." The 
income of $5000 contributed to the Endowment 
Fund by his daughter, Mrs. Bertha Rayner 
Frank. 

1908— "DR. SAMUEL L. FRANK SCHOLAR- 
SHIP." The income of $5000 contributed to 
the Endowment Fund by his wife, Mrs. Bertha 
Rayner Frank. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 37 



PRIZES TO STUDENTS 

The prizes awarded to the students of the School at the Gradua- 
tion Exercises, Spring Festival and Harvest Pilgrimage, for pro- 
ficiency, effort and improvement in the various branches of the 
School's work, are contributed as follows : 

"The Herbert T. Hyman Prizes." The interest of $150.00 con- 
tributed to the Endowment Fund by Mrs. Bernard Sluzier, in 
memory of her son. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of $250.00 con- 
tributed to the Endowment Fund by Mr. Harry Louchheim, of 
New York City, in memory of his father. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of $250.00 con- 
tributed to the Endowment Fund by Mrs. L. S. Eliel, of Philadelphia, 
Pa., in memory of her father. 

"The Anchel Rosenthal Prizes." The interest of $500.00 be- 
queathed to the Endowment Fund. 

"The Harriet B. Labe Prizes." The interest of $100.00 be- 
queathed to the Endowment Fund. 

"The Martha and David Kohn Prizes." The interest of $200.00 
bequeathed to the Endowment Fund by Martha Kohn. 

"The Barnett Binswanger Prizes." The interest of $150.00 
contributed to the Endowment Fund by Mrs. Barnett Bhiswanger. 

Mr. Geo. F. Hoffman, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) $25.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) . . 25.00 
Mr. Louis Loeb, New York City, in memory of his wife 

(annual) 25.00 

Mr. Joseph Potsdamer, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) 25.00 

Mr. Max Berg, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) 10.00 

Mrs. Gabriel Blum, Philadelphia, Pa., in memory of her sister 

(annual) 10.00 

Family of Ralph Blum, Philadelphia, Pa., in his memory .... 10.00 
Mr. and Mrs. Hart Blumenthal, Philadelphia, Pa., in memorj' 

of their son Ralph (annual) lO.oo 

Mrs. Sol Blumenthal, Philadelphia, Pa., in memory of her 

husband (annual) 10.00 

Mr. David Kirschbaum, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) 10.00 

Mr. Moe Lieberman, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) 10.00 

Mr. I. L. Marks, Chicago, 111., in memory of his son (annual), 10.00 

Mr. I. H. Silverman, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) lO.OO 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Sinberg, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) . . . lO.OO 

Mrs. D. Berlizheimer, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) 5.00 

"The Barnett Binswanger Memorial Prize," by the Board of 

the School (annual) 5.00 

Mrs. H. Bloomfield, Philadelphia, Pa., in memory of her 

mother (annual) 5.00 

Mr. Wynne James, Doylestown, Pa S.oo 

Mr. Samuel D. Lit, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) 5.00 

Mrs. Max Oppenheimer, Philadelphia, Pa., in memory of 

Hulda Oppenheimer (annual) 5.00 

Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) 5.00 

Mr. G. William Ullman, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) 5.00 

Mr. George C. Watson, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) 2.00 

"The Simon Wilson Perpetual Prize," by his daughter. Miss 

Rose Wilson, Philadelphia, Pa. (annual) 2.00 



•38 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

John Hosea Washburn, Ph. D. 

The School and Its Students: The past year has been 
one of earnest work and constant endeavor on the part of our 
Faculty and Student Body. Many of the experiences of the 
pioneer Agricultural Colleges, both of the Eastern and Middle 
States, are lived over again by the pioneer Agricultural Schools. 

Today there are scores of secondary Agricultural Schools in 
our land. When The National Farm School was established only 
one or two were in existence. 

Just what topics in the class room should be taught to give 
the pupil the most assistance to understand the problems of prac- 
tical and scientific agriculture was then to be determined largely 
by experiment. Today we have much more light on the subject. 
However, at the present time, there are two distinct classes of 
Agricultural Schools. 

One class draws its pupils from a farming community. Such 
a school finds it unnecessary to give instruction in simple farm 
operations, the handling of ordinary crops, the care of the dif- 
ferent farm animals, the use and operation of ordinary farm 
tools. These subjects have been taught and practiced by its 
pupils from early childhood. Schools having such pupils devote 
the major portion of their time to instruction in Mathematics, 
English, History and the elementary sciences of Chemistry, 
Physics, Geology, Botany, Physiology and Entomology in their 
application to Agricultural practices already familiar to their 
pupils. Their courses of instruction are arranged as preparatory 
schools to the Colleges of Agriculture. 

Another class of schools, and to this belongs The National 
Farm School, draws its pupils almost entirely from the cities or 
villages. These students have had no opportunity to learn the most 
elementary farm work. Everything is new to them. They have 
absolutely no ideas of or previous experience in farming. They 
come to us with a love of agriculture in their heart, and a desire 
to learn how to become farmers, that they may successfully 
conduct farms for themselves. A school with such pupils must 
began right at the beginning. The first books upon agricultural 
subjects have to be slowly explained because the every-day terms 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 39 

employed by the farmer must be taught, and the major portion 
of school time must be used in agricultural practice that they may 
become farmers as soon as possible. The agricultural sciences 
are taught when time will permit. A portion of each day is spent 
in the class room learning the sciences and their application to 
farming. As has been said, one school is educating Agricultur- 
ists, the other teaching city boys how to farm. 

The National Farm School, from its earliest establishment, 
has endeavored to teach farming. It has never attempted to give 
a college course or to prepare its pupils for college. It has con- 
farming. As has been said, one school is educating agriculturists, 
the other is teaching city boys how to farm. 

The School's Needs: Our school is sadly in need of a 
Recitation Hall with sufficient rooms for an adequate Chemical 
Laboratory and class rooms accommodating 50 pupils each. A 
similar space should be provided for our Physical Department. 
The Biological Department has no home. It should have a 
Laboratory and class room for the study of Botany, Zoology and 
Entomology. Our courses in Agriculture suffer from the lack 
of an adequate agricultural recitation room with its accompany- 
ing laboratory, where classes may be taken to test corn and other 
farm seeds, analyze milk and study the mechanism and construc- 
tion of agricultural implements. This laboratory should be on 
the ground floor, conveniently arranged, so that the large and 
small farm animals could be taken before the whole class for 
judging and study. 

In the early years of the school a chemical laboratory was 
donated that sufficed for the instruction of about eighteen students 
in Chemistry and Physics. But today it is necessary to use the 
whole of this laboratory as an apparatus and storage room for 
the educational equipment of the departments of Physics, Chem- 
istry, Geology, Botany and Entomology. It is further used for 
teachers to prepare their illustrative lectures previous to taking 
them before their classes. 

. A Science Hall containing four lecture rooms and labora- 
tories for Chemistry, Physics, Botany and Entomology, each 
large enough for fifty pupils, is a necessity. 

The library has been more helpful to the pupils, due to cata- 



40 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

loging and the making of an author and subject catalog index, 
under Miss Borden's direction. Both agricultural and scientific 
books, together with hundreds of the more important and recent 
bulletins, have been catalogued. 

Biological Department: The instruction given by Pro- 
fessor Borden in Economic Fungi has been useful in explaining 
the "why" we spray our orchards and some ornamental trees and 
shrubs, when dormant. 

Poultry Department: Professor George Eaton, Jr., has 
been able to make the practical instruction in his department 
reach more pupils by alternating the pupils assigned to the Dairy 
with those sent to the Poultry Department for instruction. 

The Hall incubator recently installed has hatched over 3,000 
chickens this year. The number of laying fowls kept over winter 
has increased two-fold. The number of eggs sold and furnished 
the Boarding Department for the year was over 773 dozen. 

Horticultural Department: Professor W. F. Fan- 
court's report will show the progress made in this department. 
The Nursery and Green Houses have added to the wealth of 
materials for instruction. The orchards were never in better 
condition nor did they ever produce better fruit than this year. 
The price that this fruit brought in the open market, however, 
was never so low, due to abundance of crops and the economic 
conditions of our country. The department has sold for cash 
over $1,000.00 worth of products, while a like amount has been 
furnished our Domestic Department for school use. 

General Agriculture Department: Professor W. H. 
Bishop's report shows his results in this department. The amount 
of milk produced during the year was over 147,000 quarts. The 
general crops have not been as valuable as in other years. We 
have harvested 170 tons of hay, 20 tons of straw, 10,000 bundles 
of corn stover, 1,700 bushels of corn, 100 bushels each of rye 
and wheat, 350 tons of silage, 600 bushels of apples, 75 bushels 
of pears, 150 bushels of onions, 200 bushels of potatoes, 1,500 
baskets of peaches, 10,000 heads of cabbage, 5,000 ears of sweet 
corn, 100 baskets of lima beans, 1,000 bunches of asparagus and 
50 tons of mangels. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 41 

ScHOENFELD MEMORIAL Farms: The Flora Schoenfeld 
Memorial Farm Number One has improved its stock and crops 
each year. A larger silo, holding at least four times as much 
silage as the old one, has been erected. A new addition to the 
barn has been built by the students. This will provide for a ma- 
terial increase in the cattle kept on this farm. A new milk room 
and manure pit have been built which will materially aid the 
sanitary conditions of the milk delivered from this plant to the 
hospitals in Philadelphia. 

The Schoenfeld Memorial Farm Number Two has had an 
excellent crop of peaches from the orchard. The interplanted 
apple trees have grown so well that some this season are yielding 
one to two bushels of fruit. The two-acre asparagus bed im- 
proved this season in quality and quantity of product. A young 
cherry orchard was planted on this farm this spring. 

Schoenfeld Memorial Farm Number Three has undergone 
changes this year. Mr, Howard F. Young, the foreman, has 
worked very diligently with the pupils, whenever possible, to 
underdrain and reclaim the lot between the dwelling house and 
the eastern wood lot. Much of the field has been reclaimed. An 
efficient water system has been installed. The old tank, that 
formerly stood in the grove back of the chapel, was moved to 
Farm Number Three and furnishes to the barn and piggery an 
excellent supply of water. This was much needed because both 
wells at the barn went dry last summer. The cattle had to be 
driven to the open brook to be watered. The new system saves 
much time and insures a purer water for the cows. 

The Household: Our Matron, Miss Hetty Abraham, and 
her assistant, Mrs. J. N. Loeb, are entitled to much credit for the 
excellent care of the household and health of the students. The 
Jewish Hospital has taken care of the few serious cases, for 
which we are extremely grateful. It gives to all parents a de- 
cided feeling of security to know that their sons can procure at 
a place so near the wonderful treatment that is given by the 
Jewish Hospital to all its patients. 

The cash receipts for the year from all the farms amounts 
to $9,730.66. Value of produce raised and taken to Boarding 
Department, $3,489.53. Total value of crops raised, $13,220.19. 



42 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT REPORT 

Professor William H. Bishop. 

The present season has been characterized by an unusually- 
large number of those peculiarities, not to say disasters, that 
make farming the somewhat uncertain business that it is for 
those who have not the qualities which enable them to stick to it 
for a long term of years. 

The winter and spring were notable for favorable condi- 
tions. By the eighth of January our ice house was filled with 
the best ice ever put up and but once during the past ten years 
have we cut our ice earlier in the season. It is significant that 
after that date no ice thick enough to cut was formed in this 
locality. 

The continued diseased condition of our chestnut trees 
made it necessary to cut several thousand feet of timber during 
the winter. By spring the v/ork in the woods was well cleaned 
up and about 75 cords of wood sawed ready for the stoves. 

We began plowing earlier than ever in the history of the 
school, and favorable weather enabled us to push the spring work 
faster than usual. Our first corn was planted a week or two 
earlier than common, and until the first of August we had on 
our farms the finest fields of corn to be seen in the country. 

Then on the third and fourth of August came one of the 
worst storms ever known so early in the season and the prospect 
for an unusual corn crop was blighted in a night. The leaves 
were stripped to ribbons, the corn roots torn from the soil and the 
stalks laid almost flat on the ground. This interfered seriously 
with the further growth of the crop and has put it in such shape 
that much extra labor and trouble will be necessary in harvesting. 

The weather in the early part of the season seemed favor- 
able for the grass crop, but when hay was harvested we found 
that the yield was less than was expected and the almost daily 
rains damaged much of it. The bright spot in this crop is that 
an unusually large second crop is being harvested which partially 
remunerates us for the shortness of the first crop. 

Never has our country seen such a luxuriant oat crop. Just 
at the time of harvesting, however, the rains were more per- 
sistent than ever and few were the fields that were not com- 
pletely ruined. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 43 

On the other hand the wet weather has given us a very large 
crop of mangels and cabbages, but thus far the price of the latter 
has been so low as to make it more profitable to feed them to 
<^attle than to market them. 

The potato crop throughout the East is a general failure, 
owing to the prevalence of rot. Ours is no exception to the rule. 
With land naturally unadapted to the crop those tubers already 
dug are of very poor quality and many are rotten. 

Some of our sweet corn has been almost a complete failure. 
In no year of the past eight have we had so little. 

Lima beans, sometimes a profitable crop for us, are yield- 
ing very little. 

This season is the one when our apple crop is generally 
large, but the wet weather during the spraying season prevented 
the spray from being as effectual as usual, and we shall probably 
have a large proportion of defective fruit. 

A favorable season resulted in the setting of another large 
crop of peaches. Thorough thinning early in the season gave 
promise of a crop of very fine fruit. But wet weather caused a 
large amount of rot and with abundant crops wherever peaches 
are grown, the prices have been anything but profitable for the 
grower. 

The crop which has been an unqualified success is the weed 
crop. All species known to this region have thrived and, except 
where conditions were such as to make expense a matter of no 
account, they have persisted in showing themselves predominant 
over the crops. Everywhere they grew. No sooner was one 
rooted out than a hundred strove to fill its place, while the up- 
rooted one struggled hard to regain its old roothold. They 
fought with the corn, they overtopped the potatoes, they beat 
the alfalfa and today the rag weed is triumphant on the wheat 
stubble, crowding down the clover and uniting with the smart 
wed for possession of the land. No blight attacked them and rot 
affected them not. In the orcha'rds they seemed ready to climb 
the trees and take the fruit. However, enough peaches escaped, 
so that housewives have had the privilege of buying them for far 
less than it cost to grow them. We hope that another year the 
tables may be turned and the farmer's innings be called. 



44 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Some garden vegetables have grown to unusual size and 
given great yields. 

Amid this catalog of woe it is fair to state that there is a 
partial exception in the dairy. 

From the live stock divisions of our farms we shall this sea- 
son derive a larger proportion than ever of our profit. The 
dairies have continued week by week and month after month to 
give a regular income and, as for several years past, have given 
the best returns for our labors. 

We feel more strongly than ever that our plan of teaching 
farming by having the students engaged in real productive com- 
mercial agriculture gives a reality to the instruction that cannot be 
attained by mere laboratory work where the product has no 
economic value. 

With the increase in the number of students and no increase 
in number of acres to cultivate we find it necessary to change 
somewhat our farm organization and cropping systems, to suit 
the changed conditions. It would be well, if, as students increase, 
our acres could also be increased. 

It is in the production of the great staple crops that most 
farmers will be employed as far into the future as we can see 
and, consequently, more opportunities are open for success in 
general farming than in any other line of soil culture. Hence 
we must continue to provide adequate means of instruction in 
that line, and land is a necessity for that. 

It must not be overlooked, however, that while this report 
has dealt with the conditions and growth of crops, that our farms 
are worked primarily for the purpose of making efficient farmers 
of our boys and that, while for that purpose we earnestly desire 
to produce good crops, yet, in connection with that and over- 
topping it in importance, is the direction of the work in such a 
manner as to give a maximum of efficient, thorough instruction 
to the students for the education of whom the institution exists. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 45 

HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT REPORT 

Professor Walter F. Fancourt. 

Nursery : In my report last year I spoke of the attractive 
features of the Nursery and of its being a source of income. This 
year we have disposed of more stock than before, but through 
the annual planting of new propagations we are able to maintain 
its unbroken front. 

Privet (of which we sell many thousands) were propagated 
in large quantities last winter, and will soon be ready for sale. 
Evergreens were also produced in large quantities and have been 
planted in the Nursery. 

Oppenheimer Memorial: Friends of the late Mr. Joseph 
E. Oppenheimer contributed funds and requested that a memorial 
for him should be located in the Nursery. This has been done. 
Situated near the evergreen bed, planted in memory of Mrs. 
Henrietta Krauskopf a rustic summer house has been erected. 
Japanese maples and other decorative plants and flowers surround 
it, and the donors have expressed themselves as pleased with the 
work accomplished. 

The Japanese hydrangea bed planted to the memory of Mr. 
Samuel Strauss has produced a wealth of bloom this summer. 

Greenhouses: Like the Nursery, the greenhouses have 
increased their output. It takes an ever-increasing number of 
plants for our grounds. The sale of plants and flowers has ex- 
ceeded former years. Our students are now treating our green- 
houses to a coat of paint. 

Vegetable Garden: Our household has been abundantly 
supplied with vegetables. We have had a profusion of all varie- 
ties ; copious rains contributing to this. 

Vegetable Cellar: The vegetable cellar below the labor- 
atory, provided for the purpose last year, has proved a valuable 
asset. We can now protect our stores from frost and have 
access to them in all weather. 

The main building cellars are packed with canned vegetables 
and fruit for winter use. String beans and tomatoes take the 
lead in hundreds of two-quart jars, cucumbers in thousands for 
pickles, peaches galore, jellies in variety, with apples and pears 
to follow shortly. 



46 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

In my reports I never fail to speak of the students' individual 
gardens. These, I believe, to be a valuable feature of our train- 
ing, giving to the students a sense of proprietorship and responsi- 
bility. Dr. and Mrs. Krauskopf as usual furnish the money for 
prizes in this contest. 

The cash sales of this department in the past fiscal year were: 

From the Nursery $441.00 

From the Greenhouses 560.40 

From the Garden 42.46 

Total Cash Sales $1,043.86 

Transferred from Nursery to various places on farm 

valued $62.00 

Greenhouse plants valued 136.00 

Vegetables supplied Boarding House 773.12 

. 971.12 

Grand Total . . .■ $2,014.98 



REPORT OF THE BIOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Professor Lydia Pritchett Borden. 

This department has been much improved by the addition 
of a new high power microscope equipped for bacteriological 
work, which will be of great value in laboratory studies in the 
Agricultural and Bacteriological courses. 

During the spring and summer months a large collection of 
useful and harmful insects has been made for use in next win- 
ter's class work, as many as a quart of some species being gath- 
ered. As far as possible, these have been secured in various 
stages of development from tgg to adult, so that the life history 
of the species can be well illustrated in the class room. This 
work is not only useful in obtaining material for class instruc- 
tion, but has been of direct benefit in teaching the student to 
associate a given species with the proper food plants and also in 
fixing in his mind the destructive stages of different species, the 
season when found, and even the hour of the day when damage 
is caused, the students being greatly interested to learn that in- 
sects found on a given plant at one time of day may not be seen 
again until the corresponding hour of another day, and that 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 47 

even then their presence or absence often depends on weather 
conditions. 

In addition to the class material, a permanent collection for 
the school has been started. Considerable and increasing inter- 
est has been shown in this important work and many of the 
students are making good personal collections. Records of each 
day's collections are carefully kept, with date and hour. This 
work will be continued throughout the year. Some good zoologi- 
cal specimens have also been preserved as well as some plant 
material. Considerable attention has been paid to destructive 
fungi. The department is greatly in need of a suitable case 
in which to keep our permanent collection where it can be con- 
stantly seen and referred to by the students. 



THE LIBRARY 
Lydia Pritchett Borden, Librarian. 

During the past year a number of valuable books have been 
added to our shelves, but we are much in need of the new Inter- 
national Encyclopaedia, and are hoping (through the kindness of 
Dr. Krauskopf and Mr. Blumenthal) some means will be found 
of securing it in the near future. 

With the termination of half-day classes, it was possible to 
resume cataloging the books. During the summer, hundreds 
of unbound publications of the Department of Agriculture, as 
well as many bound volumes, have been indexed, thus making 
their use available to students. As the card printing is done en- 
tirely by the students, who have had no previous training as 
librarians, the work (considerable in itself) is necessarily pro- 
longed, especially as the students are changed from one depart- 
ment to another every few weeks. Incomplete though the index 
still is, it has already proved of great assistance. 



SUNDRY DONATIONS OTHER THAN MONEY 

"Jewish Voice," St. Louis, Mo. — Complimentary subscription. 

Latz, Mrs. Mack, Atlantic City — Twenty-three white enamel beds, springs, pillows and 

mattresses. 
Loeb, Mr. Ferdinand L., Philadelphia — Car of cement. 
Lubin, Mr. S., Philadelphia — Weekly moving picture entertainments at School during 

harvest season. 
Manischewitz, Mr. Jacob, Cincinnati — Quantity of motzos. 
Mastbaum, Mr. Stanley V., Philadelphia — Donated films for weekly moving picture 

entertainments at School during harvest season. 



48 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT REPORT 

Hetty Abraham, Matron. 

The number of this household was much enlarged by the 
entrance of the Freshman Class in April, counting in all about 
one hundred and thirty souls to be looked after as to food, health, 
sleeping quarters, laundry, etc. 

The students are housed in four different buildings, which 
tends to make housekeeping complicated. Dormitories are in- 
spected every day by the Governor and Matron while the stu- 
dent stands at "attention" in his respective cubicle, in the sum- 
mer at 7 A. M. and in the winter season at 7.30. 

A new domestic hall is very much to be desired to fill the 
demands of this overcrowded institution. There are absolutely 
no accommodations for an increase in the faculty, which has 
been decided upon by the Board of Managers. The lack of 
enough rooms for the domestics, the number of which must be 
augmented in proportion to the household, hampers the economy 
of this department. 

It is pleasant to report that the health of our students is all 
that can be desired, and though the Jewish Hospital has, as 
usual, attended to several cases during the year, none has been 
of a serious nature. 

The Boarding Department has had a bountiful supply of 
ice, milk, cream, butter, cheese, skimmed milk, eggs, fruits and 
vegetables from the Farm Department. Several thousand 
quarts of fruits and vegetables have been preserved and canned 
for winter use, and grapes, pears and peaches are yet to be 
handled. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary Sewing Circle has been most gen- 
erous in supplying linens, which include spreads, sheets, pillow 
cases, face, bath, roller and kitchen towels, table cloths, napkins 
and laundry bags. 

A grateful donation came from Mrs. Max Latz, of Atlantic 
City, who furnished the dormitory at Schoenfeld Memorial Farm 
Number One with twenty-three white enamel beds, mattresses 
and pillows. 

The Philadelphia Branch of the Needle Work Guild of 
America sent us in November two hundred and sixty-four useful 
articles of wearing apparel. Other donations to this department 
will be recorded elsewhere. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 49 

REPORT OF THE LADIES' BOARD OF THE 
NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

(Mrs. R. a.) Rosa B. Schoneman, Chairman. 

During the year 1914-1915 the Ladies' Board held meet- 
ings monthly at the Alumni Building at which work for the 
betterment of conditions at the Farm School was discussed. A 
committee of two (2) visited the Farm School twice every month 
and conferred with the matron and housekeeper. 

At the Spring Outing and the Fall Pilgrimage, the ladies 
took charge of the refreshments. The Sewing Circle, which met 
on the first and third Thursdays from November to April in- 
clusive, sent the following articles to the Farm School : 

144 bath towels, 16 roller towels, 397 face towels, 

120 bed spreads. 30 laundry bags, 60 kitchen towels, 

154 sheets, 3 table cloths for faculty use, 

356 pillow cases, i ironing sheet. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The sixth annual meeting of the Alumni Association was 
held on Sunday, September 26, 19 15, at The National Farm 
School. 

A large number of the graduates cultivating their own farms 
or working for others, in the vicinity of the School, were present. 
Many of those who could not attend forwarded letters expressing 
their interest in the Association and in their Alma Mater. 

Reports of the work and of the successes achieved by many 
of the graduates were read by the Secretary, Charles Horn, '06. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: 

President, James Work, '13; Vice-President, Samuel S. Rochlin, '11; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Charles Horn, '06. 



SUNDRY DONATIONS OTHER THAN MONEY 

National Farm School Sewing Circle — 1013 pieces, including sheets, pillow cases, towels, 

laundry bags and waiters' aprons. 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Max, Philadelphia — Treat of ice cream and cake for New Year'i 

dinner. 
Philadelphia Branch, Needle Work Guild of America — 264 useful wearing articles. 
. Rosenthal, Mrs. Henry, Philadelphia — 25 prayer books. 
Rosenthal, Mrs. Henry, Philadelphia — Plunger potato masher. 
Samuel, Mr. J. Bunford, Philadelphia — Subscription to "Popular Electricity." 
Silverman, Mr. I. H., Philadelphia — Driving horse. 
Silverman, Mrs. I. H., Philadelphia — Cork carpet. 

Snellenburg & Co., N., Philadelphia — Loan of flags and bunting for public exercises. 
Spitz, .Mr. S., Philadelphia — Bucket minced meat. 
"The Day," New York — Complimentary subscription. 
Wolf Bros., Philadelphia — Envelopes for mailing this book. 
"Young Judaean," Brooklyn, N. Y. — Complimentary subscription. 



50 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

REPORT OF FLORA SCHOENFELD MEMORIAL 
FARMS COMMITTEE 

Herbert D. Allman, Chairman. 

It is with pleasure that, as chairman of the Flora Schoen- 
feld Memorial Farms Committee, I am permitted to submit to 
you the seventh annual financial report of the Schoenfeld Farm 

No. 3- .. . . 

This farm is giving ample demonstration of the purpose 
which the late Mr. Max Schoenfeld had in mind when he gave 
this farm to the School; that is, that it should be used as a model 
farm with a manager, to give practical instruction to the students 
how a farm can be run as a money-making investment. When 
we took hold of this farm, seven years ago, we incurred an in- 
debtedness of $5,000 in stocking the place. In that time, we have 
made numerous improvements to the barns and out-buildings, 
and we have reclaimed some twenty-five acres of land, thus not 
only greatly enhancing the value of our property, but also giving 
us more workable ground, and affording practical instruction for 
our students, in the reclamation of the soil. In addition, we have 
not only paid off the entire indebtedness, with which we started 
the farm, but we have a cash balance in bank, giving practical 
proof that a farm, carefully and properly managed, can be made 
to pay. 

Schoenfeld Farms No. i and 2 have had a very successful 
year. On Farm No. i, extensive improvements are being made. 
As these alterations are not yet entirely completed, a fuller ac- 
count will be given in our next report. This farm is managed 
by a post-graduate on shares with the School, and the improve- 
ments are being paid for out of the farm's net earnings. From 
Farm No. 2, we have just taken the largest crop of peaches 
which its orchard has ever yielded. The actual work on these 
farms will be reported on more fully by the director of the 
School. 

In conclusion, I desire to express my appreciation to the 
other members of my committee, and to the faculty of the School, 
for the earnest help and co-operation they have given me in the 
administration of the affairs of these farms. 

FARM No. 3— FINANCIAL STANDING 

GENERAL FUND 
Get. 1, 1914— To Balance on Hand $336.45 

INCOME 

Sale of Farm Products $4,024.69 

Interest on Bank Deposits 24.67 

Mr. Arthur K. Kuhn toward Erection of Hay House. ...;.. 200.00 

Total Income 4,249.36 

$4,585.81 



THE NATIONAL FAR^I SCHOOL 51 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Live Stock $397.00 

Endowment Fund, Account T>oan 650.00 

Wages 724.24 

Provisions 317.69 

Horseshoeing 18.72 

Implement Repairs 80.30 

Farm Supplies 1,667.31 

Farm Sundries 416.81 

Total Disbursements $4,272.07 

Balance on Hand, September 30, 1915 $313.74 

REVENUE AND EXPENSE ACCOUNT 

REVENUE 

Sale of Farm Products $4,024.69 

Interest on Bank Deposits 24.67 

Inventory, September 30, 1915 3,076.50 



$7,125.86 



EXPENSE 

Wages $724.24 

Provisions 317.69 

Horseshoeing 18.72 

Implement Repairs 80.30 

Farm Supplies (Including Inventory of September 30, 1914, 

of $2,797.00) 4,464.31 

Farm Sundries " 416.81 



6,022.07 



Net Gain, September 30, 1915 $1,103.79 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

GRADUATING CLASS— MARCH 10, 1915 

Bautman, Israel, Nevirburgh, N. Y. Ross, Henry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Davidson, Sam'l, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Seligman, M. F., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Klein, Elmer, Cleveland, O. Semel, Max, New York, N. Y. 

Light, Philip, Nevi^ark, N. J. Shor, Harry, New York, N. Y. 
Nussbaum, Charles, Philad'a, Pa. 

CERTIFICATES 
(Students who left on Graduation Day with certificates.) 
Burton, Morris, Philad'a, Pa. George, Howard, Philad'a, Pa. 

Ehoodin, Abraham, Cincinnati, O. Krivin, David, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

POST-GRADUATE CLASS 
Ross, Henry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SENIOR CLASS 

Abrams, Charles, Philad'a, Pa. Feinberg, Harry, New York, N. Y. 

Bilig, Samuel, New York, N. Y. Feldman, Arthur, Everett, Mass. 

Citron, Hyman, Brooklyn, N. Y. Fleishman, Leon, Philad'a, Pa. 

Dorfman, Sam'l, New York, N. Y. Goldfine, Benj., New York, N. Y. 

Ellis, Robert, Brooklyn, N. Y. Goldman, Jacob, St. Louis, Mo. 

Ellner, Joseph, New York, N. Y. Hantcharow, Pincus, New York, 

Ezrin, Benjamin, Philad'a, Pa. Harkavy, Morris, New York, N. Y. 

Falkowitz, Isidore, New York,N.Y. Kaskin, Louis I., Philadelphia, Pa. 



52 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Kesselman, Benj., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Klevansky, Abraham, Reading, Pa. 
Levintow, Arthur, Philad'a, Pa. 
Magram, Nathan, New York, N. Y. 
Moreinis, Wm., New York, N. Y. 
Qxenhandler, Isaac, New York. 
Rubinoff, Louis, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Schweitzer, Hyman, Cleveland, O. 



Selecter Meyer, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Shapera, Solomon,New York, N.Y. 
Stamen, Harry, Chelsea, Mass. 
Toor, Cecil, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Wade, Benjamin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wolf, Jesse, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Wolfson, Morris, Philad'a, Pa. 
Zach, Harry, New York, N. Y. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Adler, Solomon, New York, N. Y. 
Barnett, Maxwell, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Belof sky, Simon, New York, N. Y. 
Bergstein, Samuel, Mobile, Ala. 
Berman, P., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Bowers, Theodore S., Phila., Pa. 
Brenner, Morris, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Burner, Samuel, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Gamen, Abraham, Baltimore, Md. 
Donchin, Solomon, Newark, N. J. 
Druckerman, Jos., New York, N.Y. 
Erde, Samuel, New York, N. Y. 
Fischlowitz, Victor K., St. Louis, 

Mo. 
Frank, Abraham, New York, N. Y. 
Frank, Meyer, New York, N.Y. 
Frankel, Karl, New York, N. Y. 
Golub, Nathan, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Goldberg, Louis, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Goldston, Abraham, Cleveland, O. 
Haber, Edward, Cleveland, O. 
Haiken, Joseph, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Jackson, Charles A., Philad'a, Pa. 
Jacobs, Alexander H., Phila., Pa. 
Jaffa, Victor, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Jacobson, Clarence, Ports- 
mouth, Va. 

Kasselman, Max, Alliance, N. J. 

Kaufmann, Matthew, Brooklyn. 

Koshowsky, Clarence, Easton, Pa. 

Lieberman, Aaron, Houston, Tex. 

Malloy, Benjamin, Philad'a, Pa. 

Manis, Elias, New York, N. Y. 

Mirin, Hyman, New York, N. Y. 

Pech, Emanuel, Newark, N. J. 

Radler, Abraham, Newark, N. J. 

Reid, Wm. L., 2d, Phila., Pa. 

Rozet, Isidore, Philad'a, Pa. 

Schannon, Samuel S., New York. 

Schulze, Julius, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Schwartz, Abraham N., Greens- 
boro, N. C. 

Segal, Julius M., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Smith, Benjamin, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Shapiro, Isaac, Baltimore, Md. 

Tobolsky, Louis, Philad'a, Pa. 

Wagner, Chas. R., New York, N. Y. 

Wilensky, Morris, New York. 

Wolf, Samuel, St. Louis, Mo. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Aidman, Geo., New York, N. Y. 
Becker, Isaac, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Boyes, Richard H., Philad'a, Pa. 
Cohen, Charles, Jersey City, N. J. 
Davidove, Maurice, Phila., Pa. 
Elpern, Gerald, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Feldman, Alfred, Everett, Mass. 
Fishman, Harry, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Friedman, Andrew N., 

New Haven, Conn. 
Glaser, Harry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Goldstein, David, Cincinnati, O. 
Gutner, Chester C, Philad'a, Pa. 
Halpern, Morris, Charleston, 

W. Va. 
Flelfand, George A., Philad'a, Pa. 
Toy, Wm. J., Hazelhurst, Pa. 
Tacobstein, Abe, Louisville, Ky. 
Kaplan, Simon, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Kunis, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Levin, Edward, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Levitch, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Margolin, Louis, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mayer, Morris, Easton, Pa. 
Naefach, Wm., Cincinnati, O. 
Perlman, Solomon, Phila., Pa. 
Rosinsky, Charles, Philad'a, Pa. 
Rovinsky, David, Philad'a, Pa. 
Sabath, Sholam, Davenport, la. 
Schlosberg, Chas., Pine Bluff, Ark. 
Schuffman, Harry, Newark, N. J. 
Sawilowsky, Sam'I, Savannah, Ga. 
Seligson, Moses, Passaic, N. J. 
Schulman, Emanuel, New York. 
Sherman, Abe., Phila., Pa. 
Thompson, Samuel E., 

Grand Valley, Pa. 
Walters, Abram B., Roxbury, 

Mass. 
Yaspan, Benj., New York, N. Y. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 53 

FESTIVE TREES 
Dedicated at the Exercises on June 6, 1 915, in honor of 

Mr. and Mrs. Angelius Anspach, Philadelphia, Pa., Twentieth Wedding Anni- 
versary, February 12, 1915. 

Jeannette M. Anspach, Philadelphia, Pa., Confirmation, October 11, 1914. 

Ralph Anspach, Philadelphia, Pa., Confirmation, May 22, 1912. 

Rev. William Armhold, Philadelphia, Pa., Golden Jubilee, March 27-28, 1915. 

Milton M. Barmach, Philadelphia, Pa., Thirteenth Birthday, November 8, 1914. 

Max Berkowitz, Philadelphia, Pa., and Emma Cerf, Pittsburgh, Pa., Wedding, 
June 9, 1915. 

Joseph Bernhard, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa., Birth, November 28, 1914. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bronner, Philadelphia, Pa., Twenty-fifth Wedding An- 
niversary, May 14, 1915. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Cohen, Pittsburgh, Pa., Wedding, November 9, 1914. 

David Hyman Colin, Baltimore, Md., Birth, October 21, 1914. 

Mrs. Henrietta Dannenbaum, Philadelphia, Pa., Eighty-first Birthday, January 
16, 1915- 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron De Haan, Philadelphia, Pa., Golden Wedding, February 
7, 1915. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Elkish, Philadelphia, Pa., Golden Wedding, March 30, 
1915- 

Mr. and Mrs. Leopold Freiburger, Fort Wayne, Ind., Golden Wedding, 
January 11, 1915. 

Virginia Dorsett Harris, St. Louis, Mo., Confirmation, May 19, 1915. 

Irwin M. Hertz, Philadelphia, Pa., Confirmation, October 11, 1914. 

Hilbronner & Jacobs, Philadelphia, Pa., Founding and Completion of Ten 
Years of Business, 191S. 

Rev. Dr. Samuel Hirsch, Philadelphia, Pa., Centenary of His Birth. 

Philip Jacobs, Philadelphia, Pa., Confirmation, October 11, 1914. 

Salamon and Fanny Klinordlinger, Pittsburgh, Pa., Golden Wedding, March 
I, 1915- 

Dr. Krauskopf's First Confirmation Qass, 1884, Congregation B'nai Jehudah, 
Kansas City, Mo., by Charles Sachs. 

Madeline Rebecca Landau, Ambridge, Pa., Birth, May 20, 1914. 

Amos Landman, Philadelphia, Pa., Birth, October 6, 1914. 

Milton Latz, Atlantic City, N. J., and Evalyn Rose Loewy, Baltimore, Md., 
Wedding, June 16, 1915. 

Rev. Dr. Max Lilienthal, Cincinnati, Ohio, Centenary of His Birth. 

Hamilton M. Loeb, Chicago, 111., Confirmation, 1914. 

Mrs. J. Mayer, Fort Worth, Tex., Successful Operation, July, 1914. 

Morton Charles Meyers, Philadelphia, Pa., First Birthday, November 9, 1914.; 

Leonard Needles, Elkins Park, Pa., Confirmation, June 11, 1913. 

Lola Needles, Elkins Park, Pa., Confirmation, October 11, 1914. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Needles, Elkins Park, Pa., Nineteenth Wedding Anni- 
versary, June 7, 1915. 

Richard Abraham Press, Philadelphia, Pa., Birth, February 26, 1915. 

Richard Bernard Rothschild, Philadelphia, Pa., Birth, April 5, 1915. 

Babette Julia Stamm, Philadelphia, Pa., Birth, August 15, 1914. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Straus, Jr., New York City, Wedding, April 29, 1915. 

Mrs. L. S. Thalheimer, Philadelphia, Pa., Seventieth Birthday, September 
27, 1914- 

Lewis P. Weil, Philadelphia, Pa., Confirmation, May 19, 1915. 

Lester H. Weil, Philadelphia, Pa., Confirmation, June 11, 1913. • 

Isabella V. Weinreich, Philadelphia, Pa., Betrothal, November 8, 1914. 



54 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



LEGACIES AND ENDOWMENTS 

Money received in legacies is placed in the Endowment Fund. 

189s — In memoriam Jacob Tuck and wife, by their children, 

Philadelphia, Pa , $1,000.00 

1899 — Carolyn Parent Nirdlinger, Philadelphia, Pa 500.00 

1903 — Jacob H. Hecht, Boston, Mass 500.00 

1905 — Moses Lichten, Philadelphia, Pa 500.00 

1906 — Marx Wineland, Frostberg, Md . . . 500.00 

1907 — Frances Seligman, Philadelphia, Pa. (for Bernard and 

Frances Seligman Library Alcove) 200.00 

1907 — Fannie Houseman, Philadelphia, Pa. (in memory of 

her son, Arthur Ballenberg Houseman) 100.00 

1907 — Edward Popper, Greenville, Tex 100.00 

1907 — Samuel W. Goodman, Philadelphia, Pa 200.00 

1907 — Fannie Simon, Philadelphia, Pa 50.00 

1907 — Isaac Sailer, Philadelphia, Pa 500.00 

1908 — Leah Bernheimer, Mobile, Ala 100.00 

1908 — Eleanore Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa 343-29 

1908 — Solomon Blumenthal, Philadelphia, Pa 250.00 

1909 — Moses H. Stern, Philadelphia, Pa 500.00 

1909 — Esther Sailer, Philadelphia, Pa 78.05 

1909 — Rebecca Haas, Indianapolis, Ind 100.00 

1909 — Blanche Loeb, New York City 1,000.00 

1910 — Louis I. Aaron, Pittsburgh, Pa. (in honor of his 70th 

birthday) 1,000.00 

1910 — Anchel Rosenthal, Philadelphia, Pa 500.00 

1910 — Abraham Lipman, Pittsburgh, Pa 500.00 

1910 — Henrietta Morgenroth, Louisville, Ky 500.00 

1910 — In Memory of Milton L. Snellenburg, by his Father. . 2,000.00 

191 1 — Samuel Baldauf, Oskaloosa, la 300.00 

191 1 — Max Bamberger, Philadelphia, Pa 5,000.00 

1911 — Harriet B. Labe, Philadelphia, Pa 100.00 

1911 — Adolph Leberman, Philadelphia, Pa 100.00 

1912 — Annie M. Ferguson, Pittsburgh, Pa 100.00 

1912 — Mina Friedman, Chicago, 111 100.00 

1912 — Benjamin Kahn, Philadelphia, Pa 200.00 

1912 — Louis Lowenthal, Rochester, N. Y 500.00 

1912 — Levi Stern, Philadelphia, Pa 100.00 

1912 — Abraham Weiler, Columbus, Ohio 200.00 

1913 — Leopold Keiser, Bufifalo, N. Y 500.00 

1913 — Estate of Sophia Rothschild, Summitville, Ind 100.00 

1913 — Cass Sunstein, Pittsburgh, Pa 100.00 

191 3 — Estate of Samuel Woolner, Peoria, 111 500.00 

1914 — In Memory of Barnett Binswanger, Philadelphia, Pa., 

by his Wife 150.00 

1914 — Martha Wertheimer Kohn, Philadelphia, Pa 200.00 

1914 — Nathan Herrmann, New York City 1,000.00 

1914 — Isaac Van Baalen, Detroit, Mich 100.00 

1914 — Mrs. Ferdinand Westheimer, St. Joseph, Mo 100.00 

1914 — Simon Zweighaft, Philadelphia, Pa 250.00 

1915 — Edward P. Kelly, Philadelphia, Pa 1,333-33 

1915 — ^Jacob Straus, Ligonier, Ind 1,000.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



55. 



MEMORIAL TREES 
Consecrated at the Exercises on Jane 6, 1915, in memory) q/ 



MOBILE, ALA. 
Frohlichstein, EsauHursch 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Kohlberg, Benjamin F. 

ATLANTA, GA. 
Haas, Carolina A. 
Haas, Jacob 
Liebemian, Louis 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
Brucker, Bertha 
Katz, S. „ ^ ,, 

Lebensberger, Mr. and Mrs 

Abraham 
Lehmann, Louis 
Mayer, Joseph E. 
Newman, Frederick J. 
Rosenthal, Jette 
Rosenthal, Julius 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 
Salzenstein, Albert 
Salzenstein, Frances R. 

ATTICA, IND, 
Hirsch, Solomon 

FORT WAYNE, IND. 
Young, Bina 

LIGONIER, IND. 
Straus. Jacob 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 
Schnadig. Robert Sabel 
PADUCAH, KY. 
Dreyfuss, Sol. 

BATON ROUGE, LA. 
Mayer, Benjamin R. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Leucht, Rabbi Isaac L. 
Mendelsohn, Sigmund 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
Guttmacher, Rabbi Adolf 
Hecht, Albert S. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Heavenrich, Sadie T. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Fishlowitz, Isidore 
Levy, Babetta 
Levy, Mathias 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 
Latz, Hortense Irene 
Latz, Solomon Lewis 

ORANGE, N. J. 
Brentano, Simon 

LAS VEGAS, N. M. 
Rosenwald, Elise 
Rosenwald, Emanuel 

ALBANY, N. Y. 
Lowenthal, William 



NEW YORK CITY 
Auerbach, Mathilda 
Cahn, Emma Weis 
Hecht, Helen C. 
Hecht, Sidney L. 
Myers, Herman A. 
Strauss, Walter 
Weil, Max 
Wein, Bertha 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
Zenner, Fanny 

CANTON, OHIO 
Stern, Max 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Bing, Julia 
Brov/n, Leopold F. 
Brown. Duffie K. 
Freiberg, Joseph 
Levy, Maria 
Levy, Samuel 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
Weil, Meyer 

TIFFIN, OHIO 
Gottlieb, Bertha Strieker 

LANCASTER. PA. 
Hecht, Mrs. Samuel 

LOCK HAVEN, PA. 
Auerbach, Clara Levi 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Abrahamson, Max 
Arnold, Katharine 
Arnold, Millie 
Asher, Abraham 
Baumgarten, Albert Frank 
Berkowitz, Betty 
Blum, Ralph 
Casper, Henrietta 
Eppscemer, David 
Feldstein, Charles H. 
Friedman, Henry 
Friedman, Tillie 
Fridenberg, Hannah 
Fridenberg, Isaac H. 
Gerstle, Regina 
Gerstle, Meyer S. 
Greenewald, Esther 
Greenewald, Rachel 
Herman, Hattie Baer 
Herzstein, Julius L. 
Heymann, Fannie 
Jacobs, Isaac 
Jacobs, Mildred Levy 
Jacobs, Rebecca 
Kaiser, Abraham 
Langstadter, Isaiah B. 
Levy, Lewis 
Levy, Milton J. 
Lipper, Clara 
Loewy, Gustave 
Mayer, Franz 
Mayer, Ida 
Mayer, Mrs. Regina 



Newhouse, Abigail 
Newman, Samuel 
Newmayer, Dr. Harry 
Nusbaum, Isaac 
Oppenheimer, Joseph E. 
Plonley, Henry 
Randle, Dr. William H. 
Schweizer, Sara 
Seehoff, Solornon 
Simons, Amelia 
Spitz, Samuel 
Stern, David H. 
Stern, William A. 
Tandler, Abraham 
Ullman, Helen Augusta 
Weber, Henrietta 
Weinmann, Albert 
Weinmann, Bertha 
Young, Bertha R. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 
Goldstein, Esther 
Sanes, H. Sarah 

WILKES-BARRE, PA. 
Reese, Abraham 

BROWNSVILLE, TENN. 
Sternberger, Moses 

NASHVILLE, TENN, 
Elkan, Nettie 

DALLAS, TEX. 
Edloff, George G. 
Edloff, Le Roy Alvin 
Levi, Godcheaux A. 
Levi, Theresa 

FORT WORTH, TEX. 
Brann, Herman 

GALVESTON, TEX. 
Lovenberg, Fleurette 
Lovenberg, Isaac 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 
Greenewald, Jacob J. 

ALDORF, BADEN, 
GERMANY 
Weis, Ricke 

ARNSBERG, WESTPHA- 
LIA, GERMANY 
Stern, Rudolph 

FRANKFURT A /MAIN, 
GERMANY 
Auerbach, Adolph 
AMSTERDAM, HOLLAND 
Frechie, Abraham M. 
Voorzanger, Andrew S. 
Voorzanger, Yetta Judic 

SAFFET, PALESTINE 
Bernstein, Toba 

KOVNO, RUSSIA 
Borkon, Florence 



56 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Tht following is a Hst of legacies and endowments to 

THE FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES 

OF PHILADELPHIA 
and ia published here as required of constituent institutions 

igo2 — Mrs. Carrie Hamberg, in memory of her husband, 

Isaac Hamberg $100.00 

T[go2 — Children of David Ettinger, in memory of their 

father 100.00 

igo3 — Mrs. Alice Hagedorn, in memory of her husband, 

John J. Hagedorn 5,000.00 

1903 — Herman Jonas Bequest 7,500.00 

1903 — Mrs. Carrie Hamberg (additional) 100.00 

1903 — Ernst ICaufmann Bequest 2,000.00 

1904 — Mrs. Carrie Hamberg (additional) ._ _ .••■.■•.• 100.00 

1904 — Augustus Marks, in memory of his wife, Virginia 

Marks So.oo 

1904 — Augustus Marks (additional) 10.00 

1905 — Augustus Marks (additional) 300.00 

1905 — SiGMUND Roedelheim Bequest 500.00 

igos — Mrs. Carrie Krieger, in memory of her husband, 

Samuel Krieger _ 1,000.00 

1905 — Wm. Krieger, in memory of his father, Samuel 

Krieger 100.00 

190S— Herman B. Blumenthal Bequest 2,000.00 

1905 — S. M. and M. S. Fridenberg, in memory of Esther, 

wife of S. M. Fridenberg 1,000.00 

1906 — Augustus Marks (additional) 140.00 

1908 — Mrs. Fannie A. Leberman Bequest 500.00 

1908 — Isaac Herzberg Bequest 3,000.00 

igog — Simon and Rosa Fleisher Endowment (by their 

children) _. 5,000.00 

1909 — D. Frank Greenewald, in memory of his mother, 

Sallie Gimbel Greenewald _ 2,000.00 

1909 — Adolph Weyl, in memory of his wife, Rose Weyl 50.00 

1909 — Herman Loeb Bequest 3,000.00 

1909 — Henry Rothschild Bequest 1,500.00 

igio — The Milton L. Snellenburg Fund (Endowed by his 

father, Nathan Snellenburg) 2,000.00 

1911 — Simon Bacharach Bequest 200.00 

1911 — Adolph Weyl (additional) 50.00 

191 1 — Mrs. Florence Liveright, in memory of her son, 

Benjamin Kahn Liveright 500.00 

191 1 — Albert M. Nusbaum Bequest 1,000.00 

191 1 — Esther Bacharach Bequest 200.00 

1911 — Abram Herzberg Bequest 500.00 

191 1 — Leon Gans Bequest 5,000.00 

1911 — Charlotte Harburger Bequest 200.00 

191 1 — Meyer Frank Bequest 200.00 

191 1 — Adolph Weyl, in memory of his grandchild, Ruth 

Weyl Bernheimer 25.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 57 



1912 — Joseph Rosskam Bequest 1,000.00 

1912 — Adolph Weyl Bequest 100.00 

1912 — AL-vRTiN Frank, in memory of his parents, Leon and 

Matliilde Frank 500.00 

1912 — The Simon and Esther Bacharach Endowment, by 

their children 1,500.00 

1912 — GusTAv Bacharach Fund 50.00 

1912 — Leah Abeles Goldsmith, in memory of her brother, 

Simon Abeles 500.00 

1912 — Meyer Seidenbach Bequest 1,000.00 

1913 — Julius Siedenbach Bequest 1,000.00 

1913 — SiGMUND Heilbron Bequest 400.00 

1913 — Emanuel Rubel Memorial 900.00 

1913 — Mrs, Henry Schwarz Bequest 100.00 

1913 — Mrs. Hannah Hoffman, in memory of her son, 

Alexander Hoffman 100.00 

1913 — Morris Pf^lzer Bequest 5,000.00 

1914 — Isaac Blum Bequest 250.00 

1914 — Mrs. Gabriel Hirsh, in memory of her husband, 

Gabriel Hirsh 1,500.00 

1914 — Henry Jonas Bequest 2,000.00 

1914 — Marcus Katz Bequest 100.00 

1914 — William Kaufman Bequest 5,000.00 

1914 — I. B. Langstadter Memorial Fund, from the Officers 

and Directors of the Federation 170.00 

1914 — The Children of Mrs. Lizzie Rosenstein, in her 

memory 100.00 

1915 — Joseph E. Oppenheimer Memorial, from the Seven- 
thirty Club 100.00 

1915 — Mrs. Bertha Uffenheimer, in memory of her hus- 
band, Aaron I. Uffenheimer 1,000.00 

1915 — Herman Wolf Bequest 750.00 



SPECIAL DONATIONS TO THE ENDOWMENT FUND 

OF THE FEDERATIONOF JEWISH CHARITIES 

OF PHILADELPHIA 

1912 — Benjamin Wolf, upon his fiftieth birthday $5,000.00 

1913 — The Children of Mrs. Elias Wolf, in honor of her 

eightieth birthday 2,500.00 

1914 — The Children of Elias- and Amelia Wolf, in their 

memory 25,000.00 

1915 — Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Selig, in commemoration of 

their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary 250.00 

1915 — The Bernie Kirschbaum Improved Housing Fund, 
by Mrs. Cecilia Kirschbaum, in memory of her son, 
Bernie Kirschbaum 2,000.00 



58 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 

For the Year ending September 30 1915. 



ALABAMA 

Benton 

Cadden, J. I $5.00 

Birmingham . 

Adler, Ike 10.00 

Adler, Morris 25.00 

Blach, Mrs. M 5.00 

Congregation Eman- 
uel 5.00 

Marx, Otto 10.00 

PiziLz, Louis 5.00 

Spiro. S 5.00 

Livingston 

Tannenbaum, B 5.00 

MobUe 

**Bernheimer, Mrs. L. 
Federation of Jewish 

Charities 100.00 

Montgomery 

Pake, L. J 5.00 

United Hebrew 

Charities 100.00 

Weil, Mrs. Emma L., S.OO 

Selma 

Benish & Meyer .... 5.00 

Kahn, Nathan 5.00 

Kayser, Isidore 5.00 

Ladies' Hebrew Be- 
nevolent Society ... 10.00 

Lehman, M. M 2.50 

Schuster, Ben. J. .. 5.00 

Wetumpka 
Hohenberg, M., Co., 5.00 

ARIZONA 
Tucson 
Jacobs, L. M 20.00 

ARKANSAS 
Dumas 

Dante, Chas S.OO 

Helena 

Seelig, B 5.00 

Solomon, Louis 2.00 

Little Rock 

Baumgarten, Mrs. R., S.OO 

CALIFORNIA 

Bakersfleld 
*Cohn, C. 

Cohn, C S.OO 

Fresno 
Einstein, Louis, & 

Co 10.00 

Los Angeles 

Bibo, Jos S.CO 

Cohn, Kaspare 10.00 

Goldstein, M. H. ... S.OO 

Hecht, Rev. Dr. S. .. 2.00 
Hoffman, Estate of 

Hugo 5.00 

Kingsbaker, Mrs. 

Clara 5.00 

Levi Co., Simon .... 10.00 

Loew, J 5.00 

Meyer, Alex. A. ... 5.00 

Murphey, Mrs. J. L., 5.00 

Newmark, Harris ... 10.00 

Newmark, M. H. ... S.OO 

Newmark, M. R. ... 5.00 

Nordlinger, Louis S., 10.00 

Norton, Isaac 5.00 

Roos, Jacques S.OO 

Seljgman, Carl 5.00 

*Life Member. 
••Deceased Life Member. 



Oakland 

Jonacj, Abraham .... 5.00 

Lavenson, A. S 10.00 

Sacramento 

Bonnheim, A 10.00 

Cohen, Isidor 25.00 

Klaber, Mrs. Herman, 5.00 

San Diego 

Lieber, Bondine J... 15.00 

San Francisco 

Abrahamson, Hugo.. S.OO 

Anspacher, Philip .. 10.00 

Arnstein, Ludwig . . 10.00 

Aronson, A lO.OO 

Bloom, Samuel 5.00 

Boas, Judah 10.00 

Brandenstein, Edw'd, 10.00 

Brenner, Gus 5.00 

Bruml, Mrs. Henry J., 5.00 

Dinkelspiel, Jos. S., 5.00 

Gellert, Isaac S.OO 

Greenebaum, Jacob.. 10.00 

•Gunst, M. A. 

Haas, A 25.00 

tHellman, Isaias W. 

Hellman, Isaias W., 25.00 

Hellman, I. W 25.00 

Heyman, Kurt S.OO 

Hirschfelder, Dr. J. 

5.00 

Ichelheimer, S 5.00 

Jacobi, J. J 10.00 

Kaufmann, William, 5.00 

Lachman, Henry . . . 5.00 

Levisoii, J. B 10.00 

Levy, Emile 10.00 

Levy, Jules 10.00 

Lilienthal, Jesse W., 10.00 

Metzger, Louis 10.00 

•Meyer, Mary Jeanette. 

•Neustadter, Mrs. J. H. 

Newman Bros 10.00 

Rapken, M. A 5.00 

•Rosenbaum, Mrs. C. 

W. 
Rosenberg Bros. & 

Co 25.00 

Sahlein, Mrs. Henry, 5.00 

•Samson, Mrs. Rud. 

*Samson, Rudolph W. 

Schoenberg, Louis .. 10.00 
Schwabacher, Mrs. 

Louis 10.00 

Sinsheimer, B 10.00 

Sloss, Mrs. M. C. .. 5.00 

Son, Mrs. Adolph A., 5.00 

Walter, Clarence R., 10.00 

Weinstock, Harris . . 25.00 

San Rafael 

Herzog, S. K S.OO 

Lichtenstein, Benj. 

H 10.00 

COLORADO 
Colorado Springs 

Cahn, Isaac S.OO 

Denver 

Goldsmith, Herman.. 5.00 

Mayer, Leopold 5.00 

CONNECTICUT 
Hartford 

Aishberg, Edwin ... S.OO 

Fox, J. L 10.00 



Goldschmidt, L. S... 10.00 

Haas, Benj. L 10.00 

Haas, W. P S.OO 

Hartman, A. & S. . . 10.00 

Hartman, Eman. M., 10.00 

Hartman, Gustave .. 10.00 

Kaplan, David 5.00 

Kashmann, Ben 10.00 

Kashmann, Isaac . . . 2.00 

Katzenstern, M 5.00 

Lyon, Bernhard S.OO 

Rapaport, B 5.00 

Rome, Louis H 2.00 

Meriden 

Bush, Alex 5.00 

New Haven 

Abrams, Jacob 1.00 

Adler, Max 10.00 

Chase, 1 1.00 

Freedman, Isidor ... 10.00 

Ginsburg, H 1.00 

Gompertz, Mrs. J. M., 5.00 

Kafka, A. & C 5.00 

Kleiner, Charles ... 5.00 

Lander, Abraham ... 3.00 

Levin, 1 1.00 

Lonsky, Benj 3.00 

Mann, M., & Bro... S.OO 

Mendel, Adolph 10.00 

Newman, Jacob J. .. 25.00 

Perlroth, A 3.00 

Pickus, J. D 1.00 

Potter, L 1.00 

Rosen, L 1.00 

Rosenbluth, L. M 5.00 

Rubin, J. H 3.00 

Stock, B 1.00 

Ullman, Isaac M. .. 10.00 

Ullman, Jos. H 5.00 

Ullman, Louis M. .. 10.00 

Wall, Isidore 1.00 

Zunder, Albert 5.00 

Stamford 

Stokes, Rose Pastor, 5.00 
Weatogue 

Rich, Harry 10.00 

DELAWARE 
Seaford 

Greenabaum, E 5.00 

Van Leer, Charles .. 5.00 
Wilmington 

Levy, Morris 5.00 

Moses Montefiore 

Beneficial Society, S.OO 

Wilson, James H. .. 10.00 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington 

Behrend, Amnon .... S.OO 

Behrend, Rudolph B., S.OO 
•Berliner, Emile. 

Blumenfeld, Mrs. M., 5.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Edw'd, 10.00 

Eisenmann, Jacob . . 5.00 

Fellheimer, M S.OO 

Goldenberg, M 50.00 

Hahn & Co., Wm. .. 5.00 

Hecht, Alex 20.00 

Heilprin, G. F 10.00 

Hillman, Joel S.OO 

Hopfenmaier, Lewis, lO.OC 

Lansbergh, James . . S.OC 

Lauchheimer, A. H., S.OC 

Luchs, Jos 2.0C 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



59 



Luchs, Leopold 5.00 

Lyon, Simon S.OO 

Oppenheimcr, Gust., S.OO 

Rich, M. M 3.00 

Salamon, B 2.00 

Sondheimer, J S.OO 

Wallerstein, Mrs. G., 1.00 
Weser, Mrs. Fanny 

B 10.00 

FLORIDA 
Jacksonrllle 

Hirschberg, Julius .. 10.00 

Pensacola 
Elkan, M. J 5.00 

GEORGIA 

Albany 

Brown, S. B 10.00 

AtlanU 
Haas, Children of 

Tac. and Car. A., 10.00 
Haas, Leopold, Tr. .. 3.00 
Hebrew Benevolent 

Congregation 10.00 

Kaufmann, H 5.00 

Lieberman, I. B 10.00 

Eastman 
Herrman, Mrs. J. D., 5.00 

Sanders vlUe 

Cohen, Louis 5.00 

Savannah 

Falk, David B 10.00 

Myers, Lee Roy .... 25.00 
West Point 

Hagedorn. P 5.00 

IDAHO 
Boise City- 
Ladies' Judith Mon- 
tefiore Society .... 5.00 

ILLINOIS 

Athens 

Salzenstein, C. S. ... S.OO 

Bloomington 

Greisheim, & Sons, 

W S.OO 

Heldman, S 2.00 

Livingston, & Sons, 

A S.OO 

Livingston, & Co., 

Mayer S.OO 

Mandel, O S.OO 

Schwarzman, A 3.00 

Tick, Morris 1.00 

Champaign 

Kaufman, J. M 5.00 

*Kuhn, Caroline L. 
•Kuhn, Florence L. 

Chicago 

Aaron, Mrs. B 10.00 

Abt, Henry E S.OO 

Adler, Mrs. D. K. . . 5.00 

Alschuler, Alfred S., 5.00 

Alschuler, Samuel . . 10.00 

Austrian. Edwin 10.00 

Bachrach, B. C 10.00 

•Bauman, Mrs. Edw. 

■ Baumgarden. B 10.00 

Becker, A. G 25.00 

Becker, Benj. V. ... 10.00 

Becker Bros. & Co., S.OO 

Belson, David 5.00 

Bermond, Harry D., S.OO 

Binswanger, Aug. . . 10.00 

Binswanger, Jacob . . 20.00 

Birkenstein, Harry.. 10.00 

Birkenstein, Louis. . 25.00 

Block, E. J 10.00 

*Life Member. 
•'Deceased Life Member. 



•Block, Joseph. 

Block, L. E. 10.00 

Block, P. D 10.00 

Born, M., & Co 10.00 

Brenner, Nathan ... lO.OO 

Burger, Anton 5.00 

Cash 5.00 

Conn, Max 5.00 

Davis, Abel 10.00 

Davis, Dr. H. I S.OO 

Davis, James A S.OO 

Eisendrath, Louis .. 5.00 

Eisenstaedt, Isidore, 10.00 

Eliel, H. J 10.00 

Elkan, Henry 5.00 

Engelhard, Benj. M., 10.00 

Englander, M 10.00 

Faroll, B S.OO 

Finn, Joseph M 10.00 

Florsheim, Simon ... 10.00 

Foreman, Edwin G., 10.00 

Foreman, Oscar G... 10.00 

•Frank, Henry L. 

Freis, Roy 25.00 

•Freund, Gustave. 

Gatzert, August 10.00 

Gimbel, Charles A., 10.00 

Click, L 5.00 

Greenebaum, Elias.. 10.00 

Greenebaum, Hy. E., 25.00 

Greenebaum, Hy. N^ S.OO 

•Greenebaum, Moses E. 

Grosfeld, S. E 5.00 

Grossman, I. A S.OO 

Harris, Mrs. S. H. .. 5.00 

Hart, Mrs. Harry ... 10.00 

Hartman, Jos. S. ... 10.00 

Heiman, Marcus .... 10.00 

Herst, Frank 5.00 

Horner, Joseph 5.00 

Hyman, Mrs. D. A., S.OO 

Hyman, Jos 5.00 

Isaiah Temple 10.00 

•Joseph, L. 

Kahn, Jules R 10.00 

Kahn, Julius M 5.00 

Kanter, 1 5.00 

Keller, Louis P 10.00 

King, Charles 10.00 

Kirchberger, Rich. S., 10.00 

Kirchberger, W. A., 10.00 

Klee, Max 10.00 

Klee, Simon 10.00 

Klein, Henry A. ... 10.00 

Klein, S S.OO 

Kohn, Simon A S.OO 

Komaiko, S. B 10.00 

Kraus, Adolph 20.00 

Kuppenheimer, 

Louis B 10.00 

Lebensberger, Mrs. L., 5.00 

Lehmann, Mrs. Louis, S.OO 

Leppel, Sig 5.00 

Liebman, A. J S.OO 

Linick, Adolph 10.00 

Lipson, Isaac B S.OO 

Loeb, Jacob M 50.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Jac. M., 5.00 

Loewenthal, B S.OO 

•Mandel, Edwin F. 

•Mandel. Mrs. Eman. 

••Mandel, Leon. 

Mandl, Sidney 10.00 

Meyer, Abraham W., 25.00 

Meyer, Alfred C. ... 10.00 

Meyer, Isaac 10.00 

Meyer, Julius H 5.00 

Moos, J. B. 10.00 

Morris, Louis 10.00 

Newman & Gach . . . 5.00 

Orschel, Mrs. Isaac, 5.00 

Ottenheimer, D. M., 10.00 

•Phillipson, Samuel. 

Pick, Richard 10.00 



Regensburg, Henry.. 5.00 

•Reitler, Chas. 

Richter, Simon 5.00 

Rieser, Herman 5.00 

Rosenbaum Bros. ... 50.00 

Rosenblum, Frank .. 5.00 

Rosenfield, J. A. ... 10.00 

Rosenthal, Tames ... 5.00 

Rosenthal, Lessing. . 15.00 

Rosenwald, M. S. .. 10.00 

Rubovits, Toby S.OO 

Samuels, Benj 5.00 

Samuels, Caesar .... 10.00 

Samuels, Max 10.00 

Schaffner, Chas 25.00 

Schaffner, Jos 10.00 

Schanfarber, Rev. 

Dr. Tobias 5.00 

Schiff, Bhnj. J 10.00 

Schnadig, Jacob 10.00 

Schuchat, H. W 3.00 

Schwabacher, Morris, 10.00 

Seelenfreund. A. B., 5.00 

Silberman, Adolph... 25.00 

Silberman F 10.00 

Sommer, Chas 10.00 

Speyer, Mrs. Etta M., 5.00 

Spiesberger, H. T. . . S.OO 

Stein, Adolph 10.00 

Stein, Albert 5.00 

Stein, Ignatz 10.00 

Stein, Philip 10.00 

Stein, S. M 5.00 

Stern, Max 5.00 

•Stettauer, Mrs. D. 

Stolz, Rev. Dr. Jos., S.OO 

Straus, Aaron 10.00 

Straus, Leo 10.00 

Straus, Meyer L. ... 10.00 

Straus, S. J. T 25.00 

Taussig, M. 10.00 

Thorsch, Victor 5.00 

Weil, 1 10.00 

Weiss & Benjamin, 10.00 

Woolf, Alfred E. ... 10.00 

Woolf, Morris 10.00 

Wormser, Leo. F. .. 5.00 
Wurmser, Lucile 

Pauline 2.00 

Wurmser, Jacob 2.00 

Galesburg 

Jewish Aid Society, 5.00 
Moline 

Harris, J. J 2.00 

Sklovsky, Max .... 2.00 

Peoria 

Bennett, C. M 10.00 

Bloom, J 5.00 

Chic Mfg. Co 5.00 

Cohn, Max 5.00 

Field, J. W 3.00 

Friedlob, E 3.00 

Gumbiner, M 5.00 

Gumbiner, Saml. ... 5.00 

Kahn, Mrs. Rosa... 10.00 
Lehmann, & Co., 

Arthur 20.00 

Newman, M. G 10.00 

Nusbaum, 1 5.00 

Oppenheim, N. B. .. 5.00 

Oppenheim, L. S. .. 10.00 

Schradski, A., Co.... 10.00 

Strause, E. A 5.00 

Strauss, Herman ... 10.00 

Szold, Esther 3.00 

Wachenheimer, J. .. 5.00 

Wolfner, Wm. F. .. 25.00 
Woolner, Adolph, 

Jr., 25.00 

Woolner, E. S 10.00 



60 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



*Woolner, Mrs. Mir- 
iam S. 

*Woolner, Seymour 
A. 

•Woolner, Mrs. W. B. 

•Woolner, W. B. 

Rochelle 

*Hilb, Emanuel. 
Rock Island 

Brady, Chas. S 5.00 

Greenblatt, M 5.00 

Lewis, Simon 5.00 

Morris & Lewis 2.50 

Mosenfelder, A- 5.00 

Mosenfelder, Mr. 

and Mrs. Louis... 25.00 
•Mosenfelder, Mrs. 

Louis. 
Springfield 
Salzenstein, Eman- 
uel 20.00 

INDIANA 

Angola 
Stiefel, Mrs. L. C. 3.00 

Attica 

Levor, Victor 3.50 

Columbia City 

Ladies' Hebrew Be- 
nevolent Society... 5.00 

Mier, Mrs. Sam .... 5.00 

EvansTlUe 

Berman, 1 2.00 

Bernstein, D. S 3.00 

Bitterman, A 10.00 

Bitterman, Theodore, 5.00 

Brentano, August... 5.00 

Dejong, Max 10.00 

Eichel, Jacob 5.00 

Cans, 1 5.00 

Gans, Mr. and Mrs. 

Mose 5.00 

Gross, N., & Son.... 5.00 

Hammer, Sol 5.00 

Hebrew Ladies' Be- 
nevolent Society .. 25.00 
Heimann, Abraham, 5.00 

Horn, E 5.00 

Ichenhauser Co 10.00 

Kahn's, S., Sons 5.00 

Klyman Bros 5.00 

Levy, A. E 1.00 

Levy, Henry 10.00 

Loewenthal, Harry . 5.00 

Mannheimer, R. ... 10.00 

Paul, Ben 2.00 

Salm Bros 5.00 

Shevitz, Mike 1.00 

Strouse, Abe 15.00 

Trockman, J 3.00 

Tugendrich, 1 5.00 

Weil, Emil 5.00 

Weil, Jacob L 2.00 

Fort Wayne 
Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 100.00 

Freiburger, Leopold, 10.00 

Young, C 10.00 

Goshen 

Salinger, Nathan . . . 5.00 

Hammond 

Wolf, Leo 10.00 

Huntingdon 

Lauferty, D. E 10.00 

Indianapolis 
Federation of Chari- 
ties 200.00 

Kahn, Henry 10.00 

*Life Member. 
•♦Deceased Life Member. 



Messing, Rabbi 

Mayer 

Newberger, Louis .. 
•Schwartz, Martin. 
Sommers, Chas. B... 

Eendallvllle 

Keller, L. J 

Eokomo 

Levi, J. S 

La Fayette 

Jewish Ladies' Aid 
Society 

Loeb, J. Louis 

Llgonler 

Ackerman, Ferd .... 

Hebrew Ladies^ Be- 
nevolent Society.. 

Henoch, Sol 

Jacobs, Eli 

Jacobs, Meyer 

Mier State Bank ... 

Selig, Joseph 

Selig, Sam 

•Straus, Isaac. 
••Straus, Jacob. 

Straus, Simon J. ... 

Wertheimer, L. & A., 

Madison 
Congregation Adath 

Israel 

.Mt. Vernon 

Ladies' Temple So- 
ciety 

Muncie 
Hene, M 

Portland 
Weiler, Morris 

South Bend 

Adler, Max 

Bing, Mrs. Joe 

Burke, J 

Civalsky, Ira 

Cronbach, Rabbi 
Abraham 

Frank, A 

Frankel, M. J 

Freudenstein, M. B., 

Kaplan, Hyman .... 

Lemontree, H 

Livingston, Abe .... 

Marks, Henry 

Mayerfeld, A. R. ... 

Moore, Leo 

Ries, H. E 

Sax, Fred 

Seeberger, Julius ... 

Spiro, Sam 

SummltsvlUe 

Warner, Children of 

Anna 

Terre Haute 

Blumberg, Max .... 

Brown, Louis 

Frank, Mrs. Augusta, 

Goldberg, Ben 

Goldstine, S. J 

Hammel, Max J. ... 

Hebrew Ladies' Aid 
Society 

Herz, A 

Kohn Bros 

Less, Maurice 

•Levi, Simon. 

Levin Bros 

Petersdorf , Sig 

Seligsberger, Mrs. L. 
M 

Shatsky Bros 

Silberman, Louis ... 



Smith, J. B 1.00 

2.00 Werbner Bros 3.00 

10.00 Wabash 

5 00 Hyman, Louis L. ... 10.00 

Keller, L. J 5.00 

5.00 IOWA 

eoo Charles City 

Hecht, Jos 10.00 

Davenport 

5.00 Adler, E. P 10.00 

5.00 Deutsch, Jos 5.00 

Landauer, Moritz . . 5.00 

3 00 Moritz, Sol 5.00 

Ochs, John, Sons 

10.00 Co. S.OO 

10 00 Petersberger, Isaac. . 5.00 

s'oo Raphael, Albert 5.00 

S'oo Rosenthal, Max .... 5.00 

25;oO Scharfl, Herbert E., 2.50 

SJOO Simon, L S.OO 

3-00 Decorah 

Bear, Ben 5.00 

10.00 Des Moines 
S.OO United Jewish PMl- 

anthropies 350.06 

-^ Dubuque 

5-00 »Slimmer, A. 

Keokuk 

5.00 Weil, J. B 5.00 

Oskaloosa 

,-- Rosenblatt, Aaron .. S.OO 

Sioux City 
,^ Davidson Bros. Co., 25.00 

5-00 Galinsky, H 10.00 

Jewish Ladies' Aid 

1.00 Society 10.00 

10.00 'Wise, Mrs. Chas. 
2.00 
1.00 KANSAS 

, n-i Leavenworth 

,X'^ Ettenson, Mrs. Henry 5.00 

^0-Og Woolfe, B. B 5.00 

5^00 McPherson 

l]00 Strouse & Son, J... 5.00 

I'oo Salina 

2'oo Stiefel, Moses 5.00 

2^00 Stiefel, Mrs. S 5.00 

1-00 KENTUCKY 

2.00 Bowling Green 

i'oo Cristal, Saml 5.00 

550 Nahm, Fred 5.00 

5^00 Nahm, Mrs. Saml.... 5.00 
Danville 
Lyons, Saml 10.00 

15.00 Lexington 

Shane, Miss R S.OO 

10 00 Speyer & Sons 5.00 

LOO Wolf, Simon 5.00 

2.00 Louisville 

5.00 Bernheim, B 50.00 

1.00 Bernheim, Frank D., 10.00 

5.00 Bernheim, I. W. ... 50.00 

Bernheim, Lee S. ... 5.00 

15.00 Blum, S. 5.00 

10.00 Brooks, Mrs. Marie, 5.00 

2.50 Ehrmann, Hilmar .. 5.00 

5.00 Flarsheim, A. B 10.00 

Flarsheim, M. H. .. 10.00 

10.00 Haas, Saml S.OO 

3.00 Hess, Mrs. B S.OO 

Hyman, Jacob 5.00 

2.00 Isaac Bros 5.00 

10.00 Kaufman, Henry ... S.OO 

10.00 Levy, Sol S.OO 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



61 



Liebman, H. R 5.00 

Mann, Josephine 

Levy 10.00 

Sabel, M., Sons 10.00 

Sachs, Edward 5.00 

Schnaidig, Jos. B.... S.OO 

Selligman, Alfred ... 5.00 

Sloss, Stanley E S.OO 

Straus, Mrs. Her- 
man 5.00 

Straus, Benjamin .. 10.00 

Trost Bros 5.00 

MaysvlUe 

Merz, Mrs. A. L. ... 5.00 

Merz, Eugene 5.00 

Merz, Millard 5.00 

Owensboro 

Hirsch, Col. A 10.00 

Rosenfeld, Mrs. Silas, 25.00 

Rosenfeld, Mrs. A... 10.00 

•*Shortell, J. D, 

Paducah 

Cohen, Ike 3.00 

Dreyfus, Mrs. Sol... 100.00 

Fels, Mrs. E 5.00 

Friedman, Herman .. 15.00 

Keiler, John M 10.00 

Livingston, M., & 

Co 5.00 

Weil, H., & Sons... 5.00 

Weille, B., & Sons.. 10.00 

Shelbyville 
Samuel, Leopold ... S.OO 

LOUISIANA 

Alexandria 

Ginsberg, B 10.00 

Kaufman, L J 2.00 

Mann, Dan E 5.00 

Mamis, Harry 2.50 

Posner & Fried 10.00 

Pressburg, H. H. .. 1.00 
Rothstein, Rabbi L. 

J 5.00 

Sackman Bros 5.00 

Simon, A. E 10.00 

Simon, H S.OO 

Simon, Mr. and Mrs. 

H. L 10.00 

Simon, S 10.00 

Monroe 

Baer, I S.OO 

Gross, Mrs. Floran- 

tina 2.50 

Natchitoches 

Levy, Samuel 5.00 

New Orleans 
Jewish Charitable 
and Educational 
Federation 487.00 

Herrmann, Mrs. J. J., 5.00 

Kohn. Joseph 5.00 

Mendelsohn. Mrs. S., 5.00 
•Newman, Mrs. Henry. 

**Newman, Isidore. 

Plaquemlne 
LTiry, H., & Bros.... 2.50 

Shreveport 
Federated Jewish 
Charities 30.00 

St. Francisville 
Teutsch, R 2.50 

St. Rose 
Levy, A 5.00 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 

Adler, Chas 5.00 

Adler, Simon C S.OO 

*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



Adler, Mrs. S. J. .... 2.00 
IJernheimer, Ferdi- 
nand 10.00 

Burk, Fried & Co... 5.00 

Cohen-Adler Shoe Co. 10.00 

Cohen, Miss Bertha, 5.00 
*Cohen, Mendes. 

Cohen, Emanuel .... 5.00 

Cone, Dr. Claribel.. 5.00 

Cone, Frederic W.... 5.00 

Deiches, Wm 5.00 

Eilan, Abraham 5.00 

Eisenberg, Abraham, 10.00 

Engel, Jacob 10.00 

Epstein, Jacob 5.00 

Frank, Solomon .... 10.00 

Goldenberg, Julius.. 10.00 
Goldenberg, Mrs. R. 

H 5.00 



Wertheimer Bros. ... 
Westheimer, Henry 

F 

Westheimer, Milton 

F 

Wyman, Maurice 

Cumberland 
Rosenbaum, Simon... 
Rosenbaum, Susman., 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

Agoos, L 

Agoos, S. L 

Baer, Louis 

Brandeis, Louis D... 
Demelman, L. E. . . 

Fox, Isidor 

Gold, Samuel 

Goodman, Mrs. Saml., 
Hailpam, Miss Julia, 
*Hecht, Mrs. Lina. 
Hillson & Co., H. M., 

Joseph, A 

Koshland, A 

Koshland, J 

Peavy, G. I 

Ratshesky, A. C. ... 
*Rawitzer, Fred. 
Scheinfeldt, Solomon, 
Schooner, Jos. Y. .. 
Schwartz, H., & Co. . 
*t'human, A. 

Wangenheim, H 

Ziegel, L 

Brookline 

Andrews, Julius 

Kaffenburgh, Mrs. 
Isaac 



Van Noorden, E. 



Goldschmid, Mrs. R., 10.00 

Gottschalk, Jos 10.00 

Gottschalk, Levi .... 10.00 

Greenbaum, Leon E., 10.00 
Greenbaum, Milton 

D 10.00 

Greif, Leonard 5.00 

Greif, Simon 5.00 

Halle, Isaac 5.00 

Hamburger Bros. & 

Co 5.00 

Hamburger, Manes 

J. ...:... 5.00 

Hanline Bros 10.00 

Hecht, Mrs. Albert 

S. 10.00 

Hecht, Emanuel .... 25.00 

Hecht, Mrs. L. A... 10.00 

Hecht, Moses S 5.00 

Hochschild, Max ... 10.00 
Hollander, Prof. J. t>„^v,„_„ 

H. 10.00 Roxbury 

Hollander, M 5.00 

Katz, Meier 5.00 Springfield 

Katz, Mrs. Zadock.. 5.00 Isenberg & Co., H 
Kaufmann, Louis, & Kramer, Paul 

Sons 5.00 Terry, A 

Kemper, David 5.00 -^T^altham 

Kohn, Benno 5.00 

Kohn, Louis B S.OO 

Lauchheimer, S. H.. S.OO 

Lauer, A. C 5.00 

Lehman, Judah 5.00 

Leopold, Isaac 5.00 

Levy, Alfred 10.00 

Levy. Wm 10.00 — lotte 

J^.'*"^!' ,^'"^ '^ -5-HX Vnnnhpr 

Mandelbaum, S 

Oppenheim, I. M 

Pollack, Mrs. Han^ 

nah 

Rayner, Albert W.. 
**Rayner, Wm. S. 
*Reinhard, Saml. E. 
Roenigsberger, Mrs. 

Rosa 

Rosenthal, Samuel .. 



Bayard, Harris ... 

MICHIGAN 
Alma 
PoUasky, M 

Bay City 
Greenberg, K. . . . . 



10.00 



5.00 
S.OO. 



10.00 
10.00 

Rothholz Bros 5.00 

Rothholz, J. . 



5.00 

Rotiischiid" M 5.00 

10.00 
50.00 
10.00 



Seliger, Mrs. Leon 
Sonneborn, Henry 

Strouse, Ben 

*Strouse, Isaac. 
Strouse, Mrs. 

Mathilda 5.00 

Thalheimer, Mr. and 

Mrs. Saml lO.OO 

Ulman, Nathan 5.00 

"Van Leer, Milton... 5.00 
Walter, Moses R.... 10.00 
Weinberg, Mrs. Ce- 
cilia 5.00 



Vomberg, M 

5.00 Detroit 

Brown, Jacob G. ... 

Cohen, Sol. R 

Fechimer, H. M. ... 
Goldberg, Isaac .... 

Goldman, A 

Goldstein, Harry J., 
Heavenrich, Samuel, 
Heineman, Sol. E. .. 
Helfman, Harry .... 

Kahn, Albert 

Krolik, Henry A. .. 

Levy, Chas 

Levy, Wm. K 

Marx, Mrs. Bertha 

I 

Musliner, Louis S. .. 

Parish, Jos 

Peritz, I 

Rosenfield, Monroe.. 

Rothman, E. M 

*Schloss, Seligman. 
Siegel, Benjamin ... 
Sloman, Eugene .... 
Wineman, Andrew .. 



5.00 
10.00 



10.00 
5.00 



S.OO 
5.00 



10.00 
5.00 
10.00 
25.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 
S.OO 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

25.00 

10.00 
3.00 
3.00 

S.OO 



5.00 

1.00 

S.OO 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 
5.00 
2.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

S.OO 



62 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Wineman, Henry ... 5.00 

Wineman, L 15.00 

Giand Rapids 

United Jewish Wel- 
fare Society 35.00 

Hawks 

Horwitz, Harris 10.00 

Lansing 

The Jewish Woman's 

Aid Society 5.00 

Petoskey 

Rosenthal, Alick ... 5.00 
Saginaw 

Heavenrich. Max . . . S.OO 

MINNESOTA 

Austin 
Hirsh, Geo 10.00 

Bemidji 
Barman, Miss Leah, 5.00 

Duluth 

Friedman, Ben 5.00 

Sattler, J. B 5 00 

Selig, Leon J S.OO 

Shapiro, Max P 10.00 

Minneapolis 

Gross, A. M 5.00 

Harpmann, J 5.00 

Harris, M. H 5.00 

Moss, Chas 5.00 

Robitshek, Jos 5.00 

Tankel, M. L 5.1)0 

Weil, Isaac 1100 

St Paul 

Maxman, J 5.00 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 100,00 

MISSISSIPPI 

Brookhaven 

Cohn, David Z 10.00 

Cohn, Louis 10.00 

Greenville 
Goldstein, Nathan .. 5.00 

Kosciusko 

Lowenberg, Alvin A., .50 
Lowenberg, Mrs. L., 1.00 

Meridian 

Moskovitz, A 5.0O 

Threefoot, H. M. ... 10.00 

Natchez 
•Frank, Henry. 

Frank, Henry 5.00 

Zerkowsky, Chas. .. 5.00 
Zerkowsky, Isaac .. 5.00 

Vlcksburg 

Hirsh, J 5.00 

Ladies' Hebrew Be- 
nevolent Ass'n. .. 10.00 
Rose, Mrs. Adolph.. 10.00 
MISSOURI 

Kansas City 

Benjamin, Alfred .. 50.00 
Benjamin, David .. 50.00 
Kansas City Federa- 
tion of Jewish 

Charities 250.00 

Levy, Family of 

Isaac 10.00 

Meyer, L 5.00 

Louisiana 
Michael Bros 5.00 

St. Joseph 

Binswanger, I. J 5.00 

Binswanger, Simon, 5.00 
Block, Ellsworth ... 10.00 
Block, Mrs. Fannie, 10.00 

*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



Block, Harry 

Block, Samuel 

Ehrlich, Wm. H. ... 

Feltenstein, David, 

Handler Bros 

Hassenbusch, Saml., 
*Hirsch, Sol. 

Newburger, Bern- 
hard 

Phillip, Ben 

Schloss, Moses A. . . 

Westheimer, David 
F 

Westheimer, Eugene 
F 

Westheimer, Sidney 

F 

•"Westheimer, Mr. and 

Mrs. Fred. 
••Westheimer, Saml. 

St. Louis 

Ackerman, Leopold. . 

Aloe, Louis P 

Baer, J. A 

Baer, Sigmond 

Bry, Nathan 

Drey, Mrs. A. L 

Eiseman, David 

Emanuel, E. R 

Fishlowitz, Mrs. Isi- 
dore 

Frohlichstein, S. H., 

Fuller, Aaron 

Glaser, Julius 

Goldman, Alvin D... 

Goldman, I 

Goldman, M 

Greensfelder, Ber- 
nard 

Harris, Ben 

Harris, Mrs. Marcus, 

Herzog & Bro., L... 

Husch, Herman 

Landau, A 

Lesser, Harry 

Levis, Leo 

Levy, Miss Rebecca, 

Lippman, Jos. M. ... 

Littman, M 

Marx, E. J 

May, David 

May, Morton J. 

Mayer, G. F 

Mayer, Herman 

Nathan, Emil 

Renard, Louis 

Rice, A. J 

••Rice, Jonathan. 

Rothschild Bros. Hat 
Co 

Schoen, Mrs. I. L. .. 

Schwab, Leon J. ... 

Seelig, S 

Schoenberg, Col. M., 

Singer, Adolph 

Singer, James W. .. 

Sommers, David .... 
•Stix, C. A. 

Stix, Chas. A 

Stix, Ernest W 

Straus, Mrs. Hannah, 

Swope, Meier 

Waldheim, A 

Weil, Max 

Wolff, E. H 

Tipton 

Cohn, Rosalie 

MONTANA 
Butte 

Linz, Mose 

Meyer, Wm 



10.00 Oppenheimer, J. E... 50.00 

10.00 Wein, J. H 5.00 

5.00 Great Falls 

5.00 Wertheim, Nathan... 10.00 

^■00 Missoula 

I"-"" Leiser, Miss Esther, 5.00 



3.00 
5.00 
2.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 



10.00 
10.00 

10.00 
lO.OO 
10.00 

5.00 
10.00 

5.00 

5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

10.00 

25.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

25.00 

10.00 

10.00 

20.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

25.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 



5.00 
S.OO 
5.00 
5.00 

25.00 
S.OO 
5.00 

10.00 

15.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 

10.00 

5.00 



NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 

Friend, Morris 5.00 

Mayer, Chas 5.00 

Mayer, Henry L. ... 5.00 

Mayer, Simon D. ... 5.00 

Pepperberg, Julius .. 5.00 

Schlesinger, H 10.00 

Weil, M 10.00 

Omaha 

Gluck, Israel 5.00 

Kirschbaum, L. & N., 10.00 

Levy, M 10.00 

The Novelty Co 5.00 

Rosenthal, B. & H., 10.00 
Sigma Theta Pi So- 
rority 10.00 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 
Armhold, Miss Nettie, 5.00 
Latz, Mr. and Mrs. 
Mack 155.00 

East Orange 
Back, Albert 5.00 

Merchantvllle 
Polk, Mrs. May 

Florance 5.00 

Montclair 

Hirsh, Mrs. Samson, S.OO 

Newark 

Bamberger, Louis ... 10.00 
*Basch, Charles J. 

Foster, Rev. Sol.... 5.00 

Fuld, Felix 25.00 

Goetz, Joseph 5.00 

Hertz, Max 5.00 

Kussy, Meyer 10.00 

Lindeman, Philip .. 10.00 

Michael, Chas 5.00 

Michael, Oscar 5.00 

Miller, Bernard .... 10.00 

Osterweil, D 5.00 

Plaut, Moses 5.00 

Rich, Wm. S 5.00 

Salzman, Nathan .... 5.00 
*Schlesinger, Louis. 

Straus & Sons, M.... 5.00 

Strauss, Mrs. B 5.00 

Orange 
Brentano, Mrs. Fred- 

ericka 10.00 

Roth Bros 5.00 

Paterson 
Holzman Silk Mfg. 

Co 5.00 

Kantor, S 5.00 

Rogowski, M. L 5.00 

Phillipsburg 

Nie, Miss Alice E... 5.00 

Somerville 
Mack, Alexander W., S.OO 
Mack, Mrs. Louise C, 5.00 

Woodbine 
Rosen, Jos. A. . 



10.00 



NEW MEXICO 



5.00 Albuquerque 

5.00 Ilfeld, Louis 5.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



63 



Las Vegas 

Ilfeld, Charles 5.00 

Rosenwald's Sons, 

Emanuel 10.00 

Rosenwald, Mrs. G. 

E 5.00 

Santa Fe 
Hersch, Mrs. Jos 5.00 

NEW YORK 

Albany • 

Congregation Beth 

Emeth 25.00 

Sporborg, Mrs. Henry 

J 5.00 

Steefel, Jos. L 10.00 

Thanhauser, Mrs. F. 

L 5.00 

Waldman, Louis I.. 10.00 
Blnghamton 

Hirschmann, Sig- 

mund J 5.00 

Brooklyn 

Blum, Edw. C 10.00 

Taffee, Louis J 5.00 

Joachim, Chas. J.... 10.00 
*Kalvin, Mrs. Henry M. 

May, Daniel 1.00 

Sternau, S 5.00 

Buffalo 

Block, Mrs. Jos. ... 10.00 

Boasberg, Emanuel, 5.00 

Brozman, N. H. .... 2.00 

Fleischmann, Simon, 5.00 

Jacobson, S 5.00 

Keiser, August 5.00 

Maisel, Louis 5.00 

Spangenthai, A 5.00 

•Warner, Eugene. 

Warner, Mrs. Eugene, 10.00 

Wile, Herman 5.00 

♦Winkler, Mrs. R. S. 

Winters, A 10.00 

Wolff, Mrs. Nathan, 2.00 

Delhi 

Stern, Aaron 5.00 

Far Rockaway 

Eiseman, Mrs. Sam, 5.00 

Glen Falls 

Baumann, Julius P., 5.0O 
Herkimer 

Schermer, Benj 2 00 

Newburgh 

Stroock, Jos 10.00 

New Rochelle 

Ladenburger, Thee, 25.00 
*Ladenburger, Mrs. Theo. 

Niagara Falls 

Silberberg, Bros. ... 5.00 
*Silberberg, Bertha. 
*Silberberg, Isaac L. 

Silberberg, Moses L., 5.00 

Olean 
Marcus, H. W 5.00 

Rochester 

Adler, Abram 10.00 

Adler, Isaac 5.00 

Adler, Mrs. Lewis.. 5.00 

Adler, Solomon 5.00 

Bakrow, Mrs. J 5.00 

Benjamin, A. E 5.00 

Katz, Abram J 10.00 

Kochenthal, Marcus. 5.00 
**Lowenthal, M. 

Meyers, M. M 5.00 

Michaels, Jos 20.00 

♦Michaels, Jos. 

Miller, Wm 5.00 

*Life Member. 
♦^Deceased Life Member. 



Rosenberg, Mrs. Lena, 5.00 

•Silberberg, G. 

•Silberger, M. 

Stern, Morley A. . . . 10.00 

Weil, S. M 5.00 

Weil, Mrs. S. M.... 5.00 

Wile, Mrs. Carrie .. 5.00 

Wile, Julius M 10.00 

Wile, Sol 10.00 

Schenectady 

Lichtenberg, Chester, 10.00 

Syracuse 

Amdursky, A 5.00 

Eisner, Henry 5.00 

Guttman, Rabbi A... 5.00 

Hurwitz Bros 5.00 

Landau, Miss Anna, 5.00 

Levy, T. Aaron 5.00 

Light, Samuel 5.00 

Lowenthal, Mrs. Ber- 
tha Z 5.00 

Oberdorfer, M. L. . . . 10.00 

Rosenbloom, Marcus, 25.00 

Rubenstein, A 5.00 

Shopiro, S 5.00 

Thalheimer, G 25.00 

New York City 

**Abraham, A. 

Adler, Max 5.00 

Alexander, Leo 5.00 

Armstrong, Paul 5.00 

Auerbach, Louis 10.00 

Austrian, Mrs. J. .. 5.00 
Bash, Mrs. Hen- 
rietta 20.00 

Bauer, Abram 5.00 

Beer, Mrs. Julius ... 10.00 
Beller, Mr. and Mrs. 

A 10.00 

Benjamin, Eugene S., 10.00 

Benjamin, M. W. ... 10.00 

Berliner, S 5.00 

*Bernheimer, Miss 
Rosie. 

Berolzheimer, Emil., 25.00 

Bijur, Nathan 10.00 

Bing, A. M. ........ 10.00 

Bloomingdale, Hiram 

C 5.00 

Bloomingdale, Mrs. 

L B 10.00 

Blum, Jos. A 10 00 

*Blumenthal, Geo. 

Blumgart, Louis 5.00 

Bookman, Mrs. Jacob, 5.00 
Borg, Miss Edith, 
Mrs. Elsie Borg 

Goldsmith 30.00 

Bowsky, Louis ...... 5.00 

Brand, Herman 5.00 

Brill, 1 5.00 

Buchman, Julius 10.00 

♦Budge, Henry. 

Buttenwieser, Jos. L., 10.00 
Centennial Lodge, 
No. 763, F. & A. 

M 10.00 

Cohen, Max 10.00 

Cohn, Salo 5.00 

Cowen, Moses 10.00 

Danenbaum, Chas. .. 5.00 

De Boer, David H. .. 5.0O 

Dreyfuss, Ludwig .. 10.00 

Einstein, Julius 10.00 

Eiseman, Mrs. Sam, 5.00 

Elsberg, Mrs. R. ... 10.00 

Erlanger, A 35.00 

Esberg, A. 1 10.00 

Fechheimer, C 5.00 

Felsenheld, E 10.00 

Fleischer, Nathan .. 5.00 



Frank Bros 5.00 

Frankel, D. J 5.00 

Friedman, Sol., & 

Co 10.00 

Fuerst, Albert F. .. S.OO 

Fuerst, W. F 5.00 

Glazier, Mrs. S. W„ 25.00 

Goldberg, D 3.00 

Goldenberg, S. L. .. 5.00 
♦Goodhart, Philip J. 

Goodman, A S.OO 

Goodman, Edwin .... 10.00 

Goodman, Edw. B. .. 10.00 

Gottheil, Paul 5.00 

Gotthelf, Master Edw. 

B 5.00 

Greenhut, J. B 50.00 

Grossman, Emil 5.00 

♦Guggenheim, Wm. 
Guinzburg, Col. H. 

A 25.00 

♦Hays, Daniel P. 

Heavenrich, Julius .. 1.00 
♦Heinsheimer, Alfred 
M. 

Heller, C. S 5.00 

Heller, L., & Sons... 10.00 
Hendricks, Mrs. Chas., 10.00 
♦Hermann, Ferdinand. 

Hess, Selmar 10.00 

Heyman, Samuel ... 10.00 

Hilder, Moritz 10.00 

Holzman, S. L S.OO 

Horkheimer, Bert- 
hold S S.OO 

Ikelheimer, Ida .... 5.00 

Iserson, A. S S.OO 

Jacobson, Henry H., 10.00 

Janowitz, Julius 25.00 

Jonas, William 20.00 

Kahn, Leopold 10.00 

Katz, Eugene 80.00 

Kaufman, Julius .... 10.00 
♦Kaufmann, B. 

Kaufmann, B 25. CO 

Kaufmann, Herbert 

M 10.00 

Kaufmann, Mrs. Her- 
bert M 10.00 

Kayser, Julius 10.00 

Klein, William 10.00 

Kleinert, Mrs. Isaac 

B 5.00 

Kohlman, Charles .. 10.00 
Kohnstamn, Leo, Ed- 
ward and Joseph. . 25.00 
♦Krauskopf, Mary G. 
Krauskopf, Nathan, 500.00 

Krower, Louis 10.00 

Kuhri, Arthur 200.00 

Lang, Gabe 5.00 

Lauterbach, Edw. ... 10.00 

Lehman, Herbert H., 10.00 

Leventritt, David .. 10.00 

Levi, Mrs. Leo N... 5.00 

Levine, Edmund J., 10.00 

Levor, Gustav 10.00 

Levy, Ephriam B... 5.00 

Levy, Morris 5.00 

♦Lewisohn, Adolph. 
Lewisohn, The 

Misses A. and I... 25.00 

Lewisohn, Sam A.... 10.00 
Liebmann, Mrs. Chas., 5.00 

Lilianthal, Mrs. C... 5.00 

Loeb, A. M 5.00 

Loeb, Louis 10.00 

Loewenstein, Her- 
man 5.00 

Lorsch, Henry 10.00 

Lubin, David 10.00 

**Mack, Jacob W. 



64 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Mack, Marc H 10.00 

Marcuse, A. J 5.00 

Marks, Sigmund .... S.CO 

•Marshall, Louis. 

Marshall, Louis 100.00 

Mautner, Julius 10.00 

Mayer, Otto L 10.00 

Mendelsohn, Sigmund, 10.00 

Meyer, Harrison D., 20.00 

*Meyer, Wm. 

*Morganstern, Albert 
G. 

Modry, 1 3 00 

Morgenthau, Henry, 10.00 

Moses, D. K 10.00 

Moses, Mrs. E 5.00 

Moses, Rev. Isaac S., 5.00 

Naumburg, Elkan ... 50.00 

Ochs, Adolph S 25.00 

Oppenheimer, Z. H., 10.00 

Ottinger, Marx 10.00 

Peierls, Siegfried ... 10.00 

Pfeiffer, Isaac 10.00 

Reiter, Leon M 5.00 

Rich, Mrs. Matilda, 10.00 

Rich, M. P 5.00 

Rosenbaum, Arthur 

A 10.00 

Rosenbaum, Selig ... 25.00 

Rossbach, Jacob .... 10.00 

Rothschild, Louis ... 10.00 

Rothschild, Louis F., 10.00 
Rothschild, Mrs. Wm., 5.00 

Sachs, Harry 25.00 

Sachs, Samuel 25.00 

Saks, Isadore 5.00 

•Salomon, Wm. 

Samuels, J 10.00 

Schaffner, Abe 5.00 

Schiff, Isaac L 5.00 

Schiff, Jacob H 1100.00 

Schiff, Mortimer L., 150.00 

Schoenfeld, David... 25.00 

Scholle, Mellville J., 5.00 

Seasongood, A. J..., 10.00 

Seligman, Jefferson, 25.00 

Shaff Carl 5.00 

Shapiro, H 25.00 

Shiman, David 10.00 

Shoenberg, L. D 25.00 

Shrier, Samuel 5.00 

Sicher. Dudley D 10.00 

**Sidenberg, G. 

Sidenberg, Henry .. 5.00 
Sidenberg, Mrs. 

Richard 5.00 

♦Silberberg, G. 
Simon, A. L. & L. L., 5.00 
Simon & Co., Frank- 
lin S.OO 

Simon, R. E 10.00 

Simons, Isaac 5.00 

Sloss, A. M 10.00 

Sommerich, Edwin. . 5.00 

Sondheim, Max 5.00 

Sonn, Mrs. Florence, S.OO 
Sonneborn, Moses S., 5.00 
Spiegelberg, Willi .. 10.00 
Steinam, Mrs. Abra- 
ham lO.OO 

Steiner, Saml. S 10.00 

Steinhardt, Henry .. 10.00 

Stern, Alfred 5.00 

Stern, Benjamin 10.00 

Stem, Leopold H 5.00 

Stern, Meyer 10.00 

Stern, Nathan B 10.00 

Straus, A. D 5.00 

Straus, Mr. and Mrs. 

Kathan 5000.00 

Straus, Percy S 50.00 

Strauss, Charles .... 25.00 

*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



Strauss, David R 10.00 

Strauss, Ignatius .... 5.00 

Strouse, Mrs. Eli... 2.00 

Sulzberger, Cyrus ... 5.00 

Sutro, Lionel 5.00 

Swope, J. L 10.00 

Sylvester, James .... 5.00 
Tanenbaum, Leon, 

Sr 10.00 

Temple Beth-El .... 5.00 

Toch, Henry M 5.00 

Toch, Maximilian... 10.00 

Tuska, Benjamin ... 10.00 

Ulmann, Bernhard... 10.00 

Ulmann, C. J 10.00 

Veit, B S.OO 

Vollter, A 5.00 

Vorhaus, J., & Sons.. 5.00 

Vorhaus, Louis J.... 5.00 

*Warburg, Felix M. 

Warburg, Felix M., 250.00 

•Warburg, Paul M. 

Weil, Dr. Isaac 5.00 

Weinberg, A 10.00 

Werner, Adolph 10.00 

Wertheim, Jacob 10.00 

Wertheim, Maurice.. 25.00 

Wile, Edwin W 10.00 

Wineburgh, Jesse ... 5.00 

Wolfe, Herbert S.... 5.00 

Wolff, A. L 10.00 

Wolff, Lewis T 10.00 

- Wolff, Wm. E 5.00 

*Wollman, Henry. 

*Wollman, Wm. J. 
Wormser, Mrs. Isi- 
dore 10.00 

Younker, Herman ... 10.00 

Zeckendorf, Louis .. 5.00 

Zinke, Isaac L 10.00 

NORTH CAROLINA 
Durham 

Kronheimer, B. F. ... 5.00 

Goldsboro 

Weil, Mrs. Henry.. S.OO 

Weil, Leslie 5.00 

Greensboro 

Cone, Caesar 60.00 

Cone, Julius W 5.00 

Statesville 
Hebrew Ladies' Aid 

Society 5.00 

Wilmington 

Jacobi, Mrs. J. N... 5.00 

Solky, J. M 5.00 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Fargo 

Stern, Max S.OO 

OHIO 

Akron 
Akron Schwester- 

bund S.OO 

Bellaire 
Jewish Ladies' Re- 
lief Society S.OO 

Bluffton 

Wise Bros 5.00 

Canton 
Ladies' Temple Aid 

Society 10.00 

Stern, Mrs. Max 5.00 

Stern, Miss Mary .. 5.00 

ChilUcothe 

Schachne, Richard... 10.00 



Cincinnati 

Ach, Samuel S.OO 

Berman, O. A 5.00 

Bettman, Levi 10.00 

Bernheim, E. Pal- 
mer 5.00 

Bing, Ben M 5.00 

Bing, Mrs. I. M 10.00 

Block, Jos. E S.0O 

Block, Leon S.OO 

•Block, Samuel. 

Brown, B S.OO 

Dreifus, Mrs. Rosa, 5.00 

Eichberg, Harry .... S.OO 

Englander, I S.OO 

Fox, Henry S.OO 

Fox, Solomon 20.00 

Frank, Miss Pauline, 5.00 

Freiberg, Abr 10.00 

Freiberg, Dr. Albert, 10.00 

Freiberg, Arthur M., 5.00 

Freiberg, Bernard .. 5.00 

Freiberg, Harry A... S.OO 

Freiberg, Arthur J., 5.00 

Freiberg, J. W 10.00 

Freiberg, Maurice J., 25.00 

Freiberg, Sidney J... 5.00 

Fries, Gus R 5.00 

Furst, Jos 10.00 

Goldsmith, Hugo .... S.OO 

Guggenheim, Eli .... 5.00 

Hahn, Henry 5.00 

Hessberg, Mrs. Danl., 5.00 

Huttenbauer, Emil.. 10.00 

Johnson, D. 1 10.00 

Jonap, H S.OO 

Kahn, E., Sons Co... S.OO 
Kaplan, Rev. Dr. J. 

H. 5.00 

Kaufman, Lee S.OO 

Klein, Mrs. Babetta, 5.00 

Klein, Jos. D 10.00 

••Klein, Samuel. 

Krohn, Irwin M 5.00 

Krohn, Louis S.OO 

Lefkowits, Chas 5.00 

Levy, Harry M S.OO 

•Lowman, Leo J. 

Magnus, Jos. A 10.00 

Marks, Leslie V.... 5.00 

Marx, Louis 10.00 

May Bros 5.00 

Mayer, Mrs. L S.OO 

*Meis, Henry. 

Meis, Nathan S.OO 

Meiss, Harry 5.00 

Meiss, Leon 5.00 

Mendel, Henry 10.00 

Miller, E. L S.OO 

Ottenheimer, Jacob.. S.OO 

Peyser, Sol. D 10.00 

Phillips, Godfrey J., 10.00 

Plaut, Aaron S.OO 

Plaut, Mrs. Ei^^na... 3.00 

Pollak, Emil 10.00 

Pritz, Carl E S.OO 

Pritz, Sidney E S.OO 

•Reiter, A. 

Rheinstrom, Sigmund, S.OO 

Rosenthal, Samuel .. 10.00 

Rosenthal, Wm. H., S.OO 

Rothschild, Lester... 5.00 
Seasongood, Est. of 

Alfred 10.00 

Shohl, Chas S.OO 

Silverglade, M 5.00 

Sinsheimer, Miss 

Bessie 10.00 

Smith, Mrs. J. J 2.00 

Stark, Dr. Sigmar... 10.00 

Stein, Hugo 10.00 

Stern, Max 10.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



65 



Stix, Mis. Fanny 5.00 

Straus, Samuel lU.OO 

**Sturni, Simon. 
Thurnauer, Chas. M., 

In Memory of .... 5.00 

Trager, I. Newton .. 5.00 

Trager, Mrs. Isidore, 10.00 

Trager, J. Garfield .. 5. CO 

Trost, Saml. W 10.00 

Troy, Ernst 5.00 

Waldner, Adolph ... 5.00 

Wertheimer, Em 10.00 

Westheimer, Leo F., 5.00 
Westheimer, Morris 

F 10.00 

Wetzstein, Mr. and 

Mrs. Mentor 5.00 

Winkler, Eli 5.00 

Winkler, Mrs. I.... 5.00 

Wolf, Mrs. Jacob.... 5.00 

Wolfstein, Jesse .... 5.00 

Cleveland 

Braham, L. A 5.00 

Dauby, N. L 5.00 

Daughters of Israel 

Lodge, No. 1 5.00 

Eisenman, Chas 5.00 

Forchheimer, B 5.00 

Gottdiener, H 5.00 

Gries, Rabbi M. J., 10.00 

Gross, Samuel 5.00 

Halle, Mrs. Manuel, 10.00 

Hartman, Samuel . . 5.00 

Hays, Clarence J.... 5.0O 

Hays, Jos 5.00 

Hexter, Kaufman W., 5.00 

Hexter, S. M 5.00 

Joseph, Isaac 10.00 

Joseph, Siegmund... 5.00 

Landesman, Ida .... 10.00 

Lowenstein, Ben 5.00 

Mahler, B 10.00 

Marks, M. A 5.00 

New, Benj 5.00 

Newburger, E. N.... 5.00 

Peskind, Dr. A 10.00 

Shlesinger. H 5.00 

Shlesinger, Sig 5.00 

Weil, S. D 5.00 

Columbus 

Basch, Jacob 5.00 

*B'nai Israel Sister- 
hood. 
*Lazarus, Fred. 

Lazarus, Fred 50.00 

*Lazarus, Ralph. 
*Miller, Leopold. 

Weiler, Miss Amy.. 5.00 

Crestline 

Reder, Jake 5.00 

Dayton 

Ach, F. J 10.00 

Daneman, Mrs. Jacob, 2.00 

Lessner, Adam 5.00 

Kahn, Bertrand B... 5.00 

Kahn, Felix 5.00 

Kahn, Lazard 5.00 

Lima 

Michael, N. L 5.00 

Mt. Vernon 

Meyers, Mrs. Max.. 5.00 

Plymouth 

Spear, Sol 5.00 

Sandusky 

Kaplan, Samuel 5.00 

Springfield 

Jewish Ladies' Aid 
Society 5.00 

*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



Tiffin 

Gottlieb, Jos 5.00 

Toledo 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 100.00 

Landman, Otto 5.00 

Wooster 

Freelander, Mrs. I., 5.00 

Youngstown 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 95.00 

Grossman, Dr. J. B., 5.00 
*»Theobold, Mrs. C. 
Zanesville 

Starr, A. E 5.00 

OKLAHOMA 

Bartlesville 
Degen, H 5.00 

Enid 

Temple Emanuel 
Congregation 10.00 

Oklahoma City 

Engelsman, A. D. .. 5.00 
Temple Ladies' Aid 

Society 5.00 

Sapulpa 
Katz, A. J 5.00 

Tulsa 

Dreyfus Bros 5.00 

Jankowsky, Simon... 5.00 
Madansky Clothing 

Co 10.00 

Producers' Supply 

Co 5.00 

OREGON 
Portland 

Boskowitz, A 5.00 

Goldsmith, R 10.00 

Lang, M 10.00 

Lesser, J 5.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Elisa.... 5.00 

Shemanski, J 5.00 

Swett, Z 5.00 

Weinstein, N. & S., 5.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 

AUentown 

Heinz, Maurice 5.00 

Herrman, S. M 2.50 

Hess, Chas 5.00 

Hess, Max 3.00 

Hoffman, Solomon . . . 5.00 

Kline, Chas 5.00 

Samuels, A. 5.00 

Altoona 

*Kline, Henry S. 

Ambridge 
Landau, Mrs. S. H., 5.00 

Berwick 
Schain, Jos. M 20.00 

Bethlehem 

Reis, Louis .....' 5.00 

Belief ord 

Anonymous 1.00 

Braddock 

Katz, Leo A 5.00 

Bradford 

Greenewald, David 

C 5.00 

Carlisle 

Berg, Miss Selma... 10.00 
Chester 

Levy, Moses 1.00 



Coatesville 

Braunstein, Isaac... 5.00 

Marcus, Jacob 5.00 

Doylestown 
Shoemaker, Harry 
J 5.00 

Easton 

Hellman, Israel 5.00 

Hochmann, I. B 1.00 

Mayer, B. D 2.00 

Mayer, Jacob 5.00 

Menlein, M 5.00 

Ralph, Herman 5.00 

Sherer, S 5.00 

Elkins Park 
Brunhild, Mrs. Fan- 
nie 10.00 

Needles, Mrs. Louis, 10.00 

Erie 

Schaffner, Morris 5.00 

Sobel, Isador 5.00 

Warner, Edgar W... 5.00 

Farm School 

Abraham, Miss Hetty, 2.50 

Loeb, Mrs. J. N. ... 2.50 

Harrisburg 

Claster, Henry C... 5.00 

Jacobson, M. E 5.00 

Kaufman, Dan S.... 10.00 

Kuhn, Sol 5.00 

Miller & Kades 5.00 

Strouse, Benj 5.00 

Hazleton 

Benjamin, David .... 5.00 

Friedlander, M 5.00 

Jenkintown 

Silberman, Nathan... 5.00 

Johnstown 

Rothstein, Myer 5.00 

Kittaning 

Einstein, Jacob R.... 5.00 

Lancaster 

Cohn, E. M 5.00 

Cohn, Mrs. E. M.... 5.00 
Congregation Sharri 

Shomayim S.OO 

Hirsh, Monroe B.... S.OO 

Loeb, Mrs. Julia G.. 5.00 

Moss, S. R 5.00 

Rich, Israel 5.00 

Rosenstein, Albert... 5.00 

Rosenthal, Morris... S.OO 

Siesel, Samuel 5.00 

Weill, Henry S.OO 

Langhome 
**Branson, I. L. 
Lock Haven 
Hecht, Edward 10.00 

Luzerne 
Freedman, Max .... S.OO 

McKeesport 
Friedman, Henry ... 5.00 

Mechanicsburg 

Jacobson, A. S S.OO 

Jacobson, D. R 5.00 

New Castle 
Feuchtwanger, Mar- 
cus S.OO 

Oil City 

Braunschonger, M., 

Jr. 10.00 

Pittsburgh 

*Aaron, Marcus. 
Aronson, Leonard I., 5.00 
Benswanger, E S.OO 

*Browarsky, Max. 



66 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Cerf, Miss Emma K., S.OO 
*Cohen, Aaron. 
*Cohen, Josiah. 
•Dreifus, C. 
Federation of Jew- 
ish Philanthropies, 500.00 
Floersheim, Berthold, 5.00 
**Frank, Samuel. 

Goldstein, Mrs. J 5.00 

Goldsmit, Louis 5.00 

*Guckenheimer, Isaac. 
*Hamburger, Philip. 
*Hanauer, A. M. 
*Kaufmann Bros. 
Kaufmann, Isaac ... 10.00 
*Kaufmann, Mrs. Jacob. 
Kaufmann, Nathan. . S.OO 

Lipman, H. M 5.00 

*Rauh, Marcus. 
Rauh, Mrs. Rosalia.. 20.00 
*Rauh, Mrs. Rosalia. 

Sanes, Dr. K. 1 10.00 

Solomon, Kaskel 10.00 

Stadtfeld, Jos 5.00 

*Weil, A. Leo. 

Weil, A. Leo S.OO 

Philadelphia 
Abrahamson, The 

Misses 5.00 

Adler, Sam G S.OO 

Anspach, Angelius .. 10.00 
Anspach,- Ralph and 

Jeannette S.OO 

Asher, Solomon 5.00 

Auerbach, Charles... 50.00 
Ballenberg, Mr. and 

Mrs. A. A S.OO 

Barmach, A S.OO 

Beckman, S 10.00 

Berkowitz, Minnie H., 15.00 

Bernhard, Jos 5.00 

Bernstein, M 5.00 

Bernstein, Moses ... 10.00 
*Betz & Son. 

Blank, Mrs. H 2.00 

Bloch, Arthur 50.00 

Bloch, Mr. and Mrs. 

Simon L 250.00 

*Bloch, B. B. 
**Blum, Ralph. 

Blum, Mrs. Ralph.. 25.00 
**Blumenthal, Herman. 
**Blumenthal, Sol. 

Bronner, Henry 25.00 

Brown, J. Howard... 5.00 
*Byers, Jos. J. 
Caldwell, Chas. S... 10.00 

Camp, Arden 50.00 

*Clothier, Isaac H. 

De Haan, Aaron 5.00 

Delaney & Co 5.00 

Eppsteiner, Mrs. 

Lissette S.OO 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 8,393.75 

Feldstein, Adolph M., 3.00 
Felix, Mrs. Harry... 5.00 
Felleman, Mrs. M. 

S 5.00 

Feustman, Maurice 

M 5.00 

*Fleisher, Martha S. 
Fleishman, Charles 

and Janet 5.00 

Friedman, Arthur B., 5.00 
Fuguet, Howard .... 10.00 
Gans, Mr. and Mrs. 

Aaron 50.00 

Geiger, Mary S 10.00 

Goldsmith, Louis 15.00 ■ 

Goulson, Mrs. A. L., 2.50 ■ 
*Grant, Adolph. 

*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



Greenewald, Miss 

Hannah S.OO 

Greenfield, Mr. and 

Mrs. Albert M.... 25.00 
Gundelfinger, Arnold, 25.00 

Gutner, Mrs. S 5.00 

Hackenburg, Wm. B., 5.00 
*Hagedorn, Mrs. Alice. 
*Harrison, C. C. 
Hecht, Mr. and Mrs. 

Henry 10.00 

Heebner, Samuel . . . 5.00 
Heidelberger, Chas., 5.00 
Heilbron, Mrs. H. 

H 5.00 

Herman, Hattie 
Baer, In Memory 

of S.OO 

Hertz, Mr. and Mrs. 

S 2.0O 

Herzberg, Mrs. Wal- 
ter 5.00 

Himeles, Mrs. David, 10.00 
Hirsch, Mrs. 

Carolyn 5.00 

Hirsh, Fannie D 10.00 

Hirsh, Mrs. Gabriel, 10.00 

Jacobs, Miss Eva 10.00 

Jacobs, Sidney 5.00 

Jacobs, Philip 5.00 

**Tonas, Herman. 
■"Kaas, Andrew. 
'Kaufmann, Morris A. 
*Kayser, Samuel. 
Kirschbaum, Mrs. 

Simon 50.00 

Klinordlinger, A. ... 10.00 
Kohlberg, Mrs. 

Bertha 10.00 

*Krauskopf, Harold. 

Lane, David H 45.C0 

Lang, Mrs. Gabe 5.00 

*Langfeld, A. M. 

Lehman, Jos. G 15.00 

Lehne, Richard W... 5.00 

Levy, Isaac 2.00 

*Levy, Sol. 
Lieberman, Mrs. 

Florence 5.00 

Lieberman, Jane and 

Eleanor 5.00 

*Lit, S. D. 
Loeb. Mrs. Hortense 

H 5.00 

*Manko, L. H. 
^*Merz, Daniel. 
*Merz, Mrs. Regina. 
Meyers, Morton J... 5.00 
*Morris, Chas. E. 
*Morris, Effingham B. 
*Muhr, Jacob. 
Myers, Mrs. Yette... 5.00 

Nachod, Julius E 5.00 

Netter, David and 

Rachel 5.00 

Newcorn, Miss 

Frances 10.00 

Newman, Mrs. Lillie, 5.00 
Newmayer, Miss 

Claire S.OO 

Nusbaum, Dr. Louis, 10.00 

Oppenhelmer, Jos. E., 
In His Memory, by 
His Associates in 
the Snellenburg 
Clothing Co 282 00 

Oppenheimer, Mrs. 

Max 25.00 

*Pepper. Dr. Wm. 
*Pfaelzer, Simon. 

Pfeifer, Mrs. Carrie, 2.50 



Picard, Mrs. Elsie 

M 5.00 

Plonley, Irving and 

Flora '. 5.00 

Press, Mrs. A 10.00 

*I<.aab, Mrs. Julia. 
*Reform Congr. Keneselh 

Israel. 
Rich, Mr. and Mrs. 

M. W 5.00 

**Rorke, Allen B. 
*Rosenberg, Grace. 
*Rosenberg, Walter I. 
*Rosenberg, Walter J. 
Rosenthal, Harry ... 10.00 

Rothschild, S 10.00 

Rubin, Mrs. Jos 20.00 

Sachs, Charles 31.00 

*Schloss, Mrs. Her- 
man. 
*Schoch, Henry R. 
Schweizer, Simon ... 5.00 
Seehoff, Mrs. Jessica 

and Children 10.00 

Segal, Mrs. Josephine, 2.00 

Sharp, S. S 10.00 

Showell, E. B 5.00 

*Silberman, Mrs. Ida. 
Silberman, Mrs. Ida, 25.00 
*Silverman, I. H. 

Simons, H. G S.OO 

**Snellenburg, J. J. 
*Snellenburg, Nathan. 

Snellenburg, N 500.00 

Snellenburg, Mrs. 

Nathan 25.00 

*Snellenburg, Samuel. 
Springer, Eugene ... 5.00 

Stahl, Chas. C S.CO 

Stamm, Jos 5.00 

Stern, Eugene M 25.00 

Stern, Hannah B 5.00 

Stern, Lina, In Her 

Memory 30.00 

Stern, Mrs. Mary H., 25.00 

Stern, Morris H 10.00 

Sternberger, John 5.00 

*Sternberger, Saml. 
Strauss, Mrs. Rosa.. 10.00 
*Swaab, M. M., Jr. 
Swope, Carrie 

Gerstle 5.00 

**Teller, Benj. F. 
*Teller, Mrs. B. F. 
**Teller, Jos. R. 
Thalheimer, Mrs. L. 

S 10.00 

**Trautman, Dr. B. 
*Wanamaker, John. 
Weber, Hermann . . . 5.00 

Weil, Jacob 100.00 

Weil, Simon 10.00 

**Weiler, Herman. 
Weinmann, Benj. .. 20.00 

Weinreich, N. C 5.00 

Wells, Geo. B 10.00 

Wessel, Henry N... 50.00 

Weyl Bros 15.00 

Whitall, Wm. H 10.00 

*Wolf, I., Jr. 

Young, David R 3.00 

**Zweighaft, SimoH. 

Pottstown 

Mosheim, S 1.00 

Weitzenkorn, Morris, 5.00 

Pittston 
Brown, Albert 10.00 

Reading 

Bash, Wm S.OO 

Epstein, Justus S.OO 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



6/ 



Goldman, E 5.00 

Schweriner, S. S. ... 10.00 

Sondheim, Jonas 5.00 

Whiteson, Mrs. I.... 5.00 

Scranton 

Feld, Jacob 3.00 

Finkelstein, I S.OO 

Frank, Saml. H 5.00 

Goldsmith, Solomon, 5.00 

Goodman, N. G 5.00 

Heinz, Bernard 5.00 

Kleeman, Oscar 5.00 

Krotosky Bros 10.00 

Levy, K 5.00 

Lew. N. B 5.00 

Levy, N. M 5.00 

Moses, B 5.00 

Oettinger, Louis 5.00 

Oppenheim, J. E. ... 10.00 

Phillips, Geo 5.00 

Rice, Alfred 10.00 

Roos, Dr. Elias J.... 5.00 
Young Men's Hebrew 

Association S.OO 

Shamokln 

Gelb, W. B., & Co., 5.00 

Slatlngton 

Rice, S. M S.OO 

Titusville 

Berwald, H. P 10.00 

Uniontown 
Rosenbaum, Mrs. 

Lena 10.00 

Wilkes-Barre 

Coons, Jos. S 5.00 

Davidow, Edw. B. .. 5.C0 

Lazarus, H 10.00 

Long, Mrs. Dora 5.00 

Marks, Mrs. Lillian 

U 5.00 

Reese, Miss Ella S.OO 

Society for the Care 
of Jewish Or- 
phans and Friend- 
less Children of 

Luzerne County ... 100.00 

Strauss, S. J 5.00 

Weitzenkorn, J. K. . . 10.00 

Williamsport 
Goldenberg, C. N., & 

Co S.OO 

York 

Lebach, Mrs. Lena.. 3.00 

Lehmayer, Louis R., 5.00 
Lehmayer, Mrs. 

Nathan 5.00 

Wilhelm, Mrs. J. T., 1.00 

RHODE ISLAND 
Pawtucket 

Shartenberg, J. S... S.OO 

Providence 

Bellin & Bellin S.OO 

Bernkopf, David .... 5.00 
Dimond & Sons., 
Inc., L S.OO 

SOUTH CAROLINA 
Florence 

Sulzbacher, S. 1 10.00 

Rock Hill 
Friedheim, Julius ... 5.00 
Friedheim, Samuel... 100.00 

TENNESSEE 
Chattanooga 

Adler, H; C 10.00 

Goodman, H., Jr 5.00 

Rosenheim, Wm. . . . S.OO 

*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



Shoenig, Abe 2.00 

Silverman, N. M.... S.OO 

Slabosky, A 3.00 

Clarkesville 

Adler, M S.OO 

Knoxville 

Caplan, Isaac 1.00 

Rosenthal, D. A 5.00 

Memphis 
Binswanger, Milton 

S 5.00 

Coleman, Mrs. Han- 
nah 5.00 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 200.00 

Roth, Louis 5.00 

Nashville 

Bernstein, Philip 

and Clarence, Jr., 10.00 

Elkan, Mrs. J S.OO 

Hirsch, Sam 10.00 

Jacobus, J. M 5.00 

Loveman, Adolph ... 10.00 

Loventhal, Lee J.... 5.00 
Meyer, Misses Evalyn 

and Norma 5.00 

Rich, Schwartz & 

Joseph 5.00 

TEXAS 
Beaumont 

Goldstein, Dr. L. ... 2.50 
Ladies' Benevolent 

Society 10.00 

Corpus Christi 

Gugenheim & Cohn.. 5.00 

Weil, Chas 10.00 

Adler, Dr. Henry L., S.OO 

Dreyfuss, G 5.00 

Edloff, Mrs. Geo. G., 10.00 

Eppstein & Co., E... 25.00 

Freshman, Saml. . . . 2.00 

Goettinger, Max 5.00 

Hexter, T. K 5.00 

Hexter, Victor Henry, 10.00 

Hurst, A. K 2.50 

Hyman, Abe 5.00 

Kahn, E. M 25.00 

Kahn, J 10.00 

Lasker, Wm S.OO 

Levi. Chas. G S.OO 

Levi, Marcus 5.00 

Levy, Henry S.OO 

Levy, Maurice S 5.00 

Liebman, Morris S.OO 

Liebman, R. .... S.OO 

Linz, Albert .... S.OO 

Linz, Simon 5.00 

Mayer, Sigmund 5.00 

Michalson, L. A S.OO 

Mvers, Seymour 5.00 

*Orleans, M. J. 

Ortlieb, Max 5.00 

Reinhardt, Sidney .. S.OO 

Rosenbaum Bros. . . . 10.00 

Sanger Bros. S.OO 

*Sanger, Alexander. 

Sanger. Elihu A 25.00 

*Sanger, Mrs. Philip. 
**Silberstein, A. 

*Silberstein, Mrs. A. 

Swope, Jos 10.00 

Titche, Edward S.OO 

Wertheimer, Mrs. 

Nathan 5.00 

El Paso 

Jewish Relief Soc'y, 25.00 

Krupp, Harris S.OO 

Ravel, E 5.00 



Ravel, Jos S.OO 

Weiss, 1 5.00 

Ft, Worth 

Art & Shain S.OO 

August, A S.OO 

Bath, Felix P 10.00 

Brann, Mrs. H 5.00 

Brown, Dan, Jr 5.00 

Brown, Isidor S.OO 

Chanowsky, J S.OO 

Council Jewish Wom- 
en 5.00 

Eppstein, Milton L., 25.00 

Friedman, Mrs. A... 5.00 

Friend, Alex. M 5.00 

Cans, A. 1 5.00 

Gilbert, L. G S.OO 

Gross, Leon 5.00 

Heinz, Chas 5.00 

Jackson, L 5.00 

Joseph, Sam. A S.OO 

Keene, D. H 5.00 

Kramer, Alvin 5.00 

Lasker, E 5.00 

Lederman, H S.OO 

Levine, H 5.00 

Levy, Dan 5.00 

*Levy, Sam. 

Loewenthal, M. L. . . S.OO 

Mack, Theodore .... 5.00 

Marx. Herman 5.00 

Mayer, J 15.00 

Mayer, Max K 10.00 

Rosenthal, M 5.00 

Weixel, Mone 5.00 

Weltman, Mrs. L.... 2.00 

Galveston 

Cohen, Robert I.... 5.00 
*Kempner, Mrs. H. 

Kempner, L H 10.00 

*Lasker, E. 

Lasker, M 2000.CO 

*Lasker, M. 

Lovenberg, Mr. and 

Mrs. 1 25.00 

Ullman, Julius L. ... S.OO 

Ullman, M S.OO 

Houston 

Lyons. LA.. 1.00 

Mineola 

Bromberg, I. G...... 5.00 

Palestine 

Maier, S 5.00 

San Antonin 

Berman, O. 5.00 

Blum, Mrs. Fannie.. S.OO 

Frank Saddlery Co., 5.00 

Halff, Tac 5.00 

Halff, Mrs. M 25.00 

Halff, Mrs. S 25.00 

Holzmark, Mrs. 

Thresa S.OO 

Oppenheimer, Her- 
bert Meyer .... 15.00 

Oppenheimer, Julius, 5.00 

Oppenheimer, J. D., 10.00 

Texarkana 

Heilbron, Louis 5.00 

Kosminsky, I. J. 

and Leo Krouse... S.OO 

Toyahvale 

Mayer, Miss Tessie.. 50.00 

Mayer, Sol 100.00 

Tyler 

■Bruck, S 2.50 

Wadel, B 5.00 



68 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Victoria 

Bettin, Max 5.00 

Ladies' Benevolent 
Society 5.00 

UTAH 

Salt Lake City 

Alexander, Daniel, 10.00 

Jewish Relief Soc'y, 5.00 

Rosenblatt, N 10.00 

VIRGINIA 
Harrisonburg 

Bloom, Bernard .... 5.00 
Lynchburg 
*Guggenheimer, Mrs. 
Max. 

Lazarus, L 5.00 

Norfolk 

Cohen. B. E 5.00 

Hirschler, E 5.00 

*Ladies' Hebrew 
Benevolent Ass'n. 
Richmond 

Binswanger, Harry 

S 5.00 

Binswanger, M. I 5.00 

Galeski, Dr. S 5.00 

Hutzler, Henry S... 5.00 

Levy, Arthur 5.00. 

*Millhiser, Mrs. Clar- 
ence. 
Millhiser Mrs. Clar- 
ence 35.00 

Millhiser, Emanuel.. 5.00 

Millhiser, G. K 5.00 

*Millhiser, Gustave. 
*Raab, E. 

Thalhimer, M. G. ... 5.C0 
*Whitlock, Philip. 



Staunton 
Strauss. L. G 5.00 

WASHINGTON 
Everett 

Hochstadter, Bernard, 5.00 

Seattle 

Eckstein, Mrs. 

Nathan 10.00 

**Galland, Bonham. 
**Galland, Mrs. C. K. 
*Gottstein, Meyer. 
*Gottstein, Rebecca. 
*Lang, Julius C. 

Loeb, Sam S 10.00 

Moyses, Ben 10.00 

Tacoma 

Feist, Theo 10.00 

Kaufman, H. A 10.00 

Ladies' Montefiore 
Society 5.00 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Bluefield 

Heller, Mrs. Flor- 
ence Simon 5.00 

Charleston 

Baer, Ben 5.00 

Frankenberger, Max, 5.00 
Clarksburg 

Levy, Ben 2.50 

Parkersburg 

Nathan, Mrs. Ben... 5.00 
Wheeling 

Bloch, Saml. S 5.00 

*Horkheimer, Mrs. B. 

Horkheimer, Mrs. 
Morris 15.00 

Isenberg, Israel 5.00 

Kline, Simon 5.00 



*Solomon & Rubin. 

Sonneborn, M 5.00 

*Weil, J. 

Wolf, Leo ; 5.00 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 

Marshall, Louis J.... 5.00 
La Crosse 
Ansche Chesed Con- 
gregation 5.00 

Bloom, Bernhard 5.00 

Hirshheimer, A 25.00 

Milwaukee 

Aarons, Lehman 5.00 

B'ne" Jeshurun Sab- 
bath School 10.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Gertrude, 5.00 
Federated Jewish 

Charities 150.00 

Heller, Simon 5.00 

Landauer, Max ..... 10.00 

Litt, Miss Bessie 10.00 

Miller, Morris 5.00 

Newman, Jacob H. . . 5.00 

Schuster, Bertha 5.00 

Schuster, Chas 3.00 

CANADA 

Toronto, Ontario 

Scheuer, Edmund .. 5.00 

ENGLAND 
London 

*Meyer, Arthur. 

SWITZERLAND 
Rorschach 

"'^Schoenfeld, Max. 



BENEVOLENT ORDERS 

Contributing Lodges 



Independent Order B'nai B' 

ALABAMA Oakland 

„. . , Oakland Lodge No. 

Birmingham 252 5.00 

Birmingham Lodge 

No. 368 5.00 Sacramento 

Demopolis Etbam Lodge No. 37, 5.00 

Morris Ely Lodge san Francisco 

No. 283 5.00 Cremieux Lodge No. 

Huntsville 325 5.00 

Ezora Lodge No. 236, 5.00 Golden Gate Lodge 

Mobile No. 129 10.00 

^11^.^^^'.^.^^^..^.°: 5.00 COLORADO 

Montgomery Colorado Springs 

Alabama Lodge No. Colorado Springs 

299 5.00 Lodge No. 523.... 5.00 

Emanuel Lodge No. Denver 

103 5.00 Denver Lodge No. 

ARKANSAS '^' ^^'OO 

Helena CONNECTICUT 

Aaron Meyers Lodge „ __ 

No. 159 10.00 New Haven 

Horeb Lodge No. 25, 25.00 

CALIFORNIA Stamford 

Stockton Jacob B. Ullman 

Hope Lodge No. 126, 5.00 Lodge No. 685 .... 5.00 

*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



rith 

DELAWARE 

Wilmington 
Wilmington Lodge 
No. 470 5.00 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 
Washington 
Argo Lodge No. 413.. 5.00 

GEORGIA 
Albany 

Micah Lodge No. 

707 10.00 

Columbus 
Columbus Lodge No. 

77 5.00 

Savannah 
Joseph Lodge No. 
76 5.00 

ILLINOIS 
Chicago 

Oriental-Hillel Lodge 

No. 72 10.00 

Danville 
Danville Lodge No. 
568 10.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



69 



Lincoln 

Liberty 

294 ... 



Lodge No. 



East Las Vegas 
J. E. liosenwald 
5.00 Lodge is'o. 545 . 



^^°^^^ T J TV.T NEW YORK 

Progress Lodge JNo. 

113 15.00 Albany 

Gideon Lodge No. 



Springfield 

Ernes Lodge No. 67, 

INDIANA 

Fort Wayne 

Emek-Beracha Lodge 
No. 61 

KANSAS 

Leavenworth. 
Sholem Lodge No. 
78 



KENTUCKY 



5.00 



25.00 



5.00 



5.00 



140 
New York City 



10.00 



5.00 



San Antonio 

Edar Lodge No. 211, 5.00 
Leo N. Levi Lodge 
No. 675 10.00 

UTAH 

Salt Lake City 
B. F. Peixotto Lodge 
No. 421 10.00 



Edward Everett 

Lodge No. 97 10.00 Seattle 

Hebron Lodge No. 

5 

Henry Jones Lodge 

No. 79 

Jordan Lodge No. 15, 
Manhattan Lodge No. 

156 

Zion Lodge No. 2... 



WASHINGTON 



5.00 



5.00 
10.00 



10.00 
10.00 



Hildesheimer Lodge 
No. 503 5.00 

Rainier Lodge No. 
627 



5.00 



Tacoma 

Tacoma 
741 ... 



Lodge No. 



15.00 



Plattsburg 
Joel Lodge No. 118, 



5.00 



Lexington 
Lexington Lodge No. 
289 

LOUISIANA 



New Orleans 
*District Grand Lodge 
No. 7. 
District Grand Lodge 

No. 7 lOO.CO 

International Lodge 
No. 500 10.00 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Holyoke 
Holyoke Lodge No. 
728 

MICHIGAN 

Kalamazoo 



Mishan 
247 



No. 



Minneapolis 

Minneapolis 
No. 271 .. 



Lodge 
MINNESOTA 

Lodg 

MISSISSIPPI 



5.00 



5.00 



Rochester 
Zerubbabel Lodge 
No. 53 10.00 

OHIO 

Cincinnati 
The Cincinnati Lodge 
No. 4 10.00 

District Grand Lodge 
No. 2 lOO-OO 

Cleveland 
Cleveland Lodge No. 
16 10.00 

Dayton 

Eschol Lodge No. 55, 10.00 

Columbus 

*Zion Lodge No. 62. 

Youngstown 
Mehoning Lodge No. 
339 5.00 



10.00 



5.00 

5.00 



10.00 



Columbus 
Joseph Herz Lodge 
^ No. 181 2.00 



MISSOURI 

Kansas City 
Kansas City Lodge 
No. 184 



10.00 
10.00 

10.00 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Bradford 

Bradford Lodge No. 

745 

Homestead 
Homestead Lodge No. 

586 

Lancaster 
Lancaster Lodge No. 

228 10.00 

McKeesport 
McKeesport Lodge 
No. 573 10.00 



5.00 



5.00 



WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Fox River Lodge No. 

209 

Milwaukee 
Gilead Lodge No. 

41 

Isaac Lodge No. 87.. 

Independent Order 
B'rith Abraham 

COLORADO 

Denver 
Pride of Denver 
Lodge No. 333 2.50 

CONNECTICUT 

New Haven 
Columbus Lodge No. 

61 5.00 

New London 
Pride of New Lon- 
don Lodge No. 466, 5.00 

Norwich 

Independent Norwich 

Lodge No. 309 1.00 

ILLINOIS 

Chicago 
Pavelocher Lodge 

No. 612 5.00 

Dr. George Sultan 

Lodge No. 307 10.00 

INDIANA 



St. Joseph 

Joseph Lodge No. 73, 

St. Louis , ^^ 

Eben Ezra Lodge No. 

47 •••• 

Missouri Lodge No. 
22 

MONTANA 

Butte ^^. . 

Baron De Hirsch 

Lodge No. 420 ... 

NEW MEXICO 

Albiiquerque 

Albuquerque Lodge 
No. 336 5.00 

*Life Member. 



Scranton 

Amos Lodge No. 136, 

TENNESSEE 



5.0O 



Indiana Harbor 

Ezra Lodge No. 434, 
Indianapolis 
Zion Lodge No. 221, 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 
Benjamin Szold Lodge 

No. 211 

MASSACHUSETTS 



2.00 
5.00 



10.00 



Memphis 
Memphis Lodge No. Attleboro 

35 ^"--^ First Attleboro Lodge 



5.00 Nashville 

Maimcmides Lodge 
No. 46 5.0 



S.OO 



TEXAS 

El Paso 

El Paso Lodge 
509 



No. 



Galveston 

Zacharias Frankel 
Lodge No. 242 



10.00 



10.00 



No. 442 5.00 

Boston 

Knights of Liberty 
Lodge No. 271 .... 5.00 

Brockton 

Pride of Brockton 
Lodge No. 373 .... 3.00 

Cambridge 
Cambridge Lodge 
No. 198 2.00 



70 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Worcester 
Sons of Maccabees 
No. 579 S.OO 

MISSOURI 
Kansas City 

Star of Kansas City 
Lodge No. 424 .... S.OO 
St. Louis 

Nathan Frank Lodge 
No. 87 5.00 

KEW HAMPSHIRE 
Manchester 
Granite State Lodge 

No. 181 S.OO 

Hillsboro Lodge No. 
392. S.OO 

NEW JERSEY 
Elizabeth 
Elizabeth Lodge No. 

676 2.50 

Morristown 
Morristown Lodge 
No. 375 1.00 

NEW YORK 
Elmlra 

Berger Lodge No. 



ILLINOIS 

La Salle 

La Salle City Lodge 
No. 317 5.00 



Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 
No. 230 .. 



INDIANA 

Lodge 



Wilkes-Barre 

Diamond City Lodge 
No. 135 S.OO 

Independent Western 
Star Order 



5.00 



MINNESOTA 



ILLINOIS 
Chicago 
Grand Lodge 



100.00 



Minneaoolis 
Minneapolis City 
Lodge No. 63 5.00 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Manchester 
Manchester City 
Lodge No. 264 .... 5.00 



NEW YORK 

Buffalo 
Niagara Lodge No. 

148 

Elmira 

Elmira City Lodge 
Lodge No. 272 



3.00 



Kingston 

Kingston Lodge No. 

321 S.OO 

New York City 
Roumania American 

Lodge No. 83 3.00 

Utica 
R o s c o e Conkling 
Lodge No. 364 2.00 

OHIO 
Cleveland 
Gotthold E p h r a im 
Lessing Lodge No. 
37 S.OO 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Homestead 

Homestead Lodge 

No. 437 2.00 

Philadelphia 

Victor Hugo Lodge 
No. 299 5.00 

Hyman Lodge No. 75, 10.00 

Jezerzane Lodge No. 
405 



Lorain 

Lorain 

502 ., 



OHIO 

Lodge No. 



5.00 



3.00 



2.00 



OHIO 

Steubenville 
Jehudah Hamachbv 
Lodge No. 131 .... S.OO 

Youngstown 
Youngstown Lodge 
No. 136 5.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Philadelphia 

Germantown Lodge 
No. 218 



Bradford 
Wm. Penn Lodge 
No. 145 



5.00 



5.00 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Pittsburgh 

Allegheny County 
Lodge No. 296 5.00 

RHODE ISLAND 

Providence 

Rhode Island Lodge 
No. 213 5.00 

Star of Rhode Island 
Lodge No. 330 



TEXAS 
Dallas 

Alexander K o h u t 
Lodge No. 247 



4.00 



S.OO 



5.00 



i.OO 



Pittsburgh 

Pittsburg Lodge No. 
359 



South Bethlehem 

South Bethlehem 
Lodge No. 324 5.00 

RHODE ISLAND 
Providence 
Hope of R. I. Lodge 
No. 549 3.00 

VIRGINIA 
Newport News 
Virginia Lodge No. 
195 5.00 

Order B'rith Abraham 

COLORADO 
Denver 

Queen City Lodge 
No. 113 5.00 



Independent Order 
B'rith Sholom 

COLORADO 
Denver 

Harmony Lodge No. 
155 10.00 



WISCONSIN 
Sheboygan 

Shebogan Hebrew 
Lodge No. 78 5.00 

Independent Order 

Free Sons of 

Israel 

CONNECTICUT 
New Haven 
New Haven Lodge 
No. 46 S.OO 

NEW YORK 

Kingston 
Lebanon Lodge No. 
55 5.00 

Order Knights of 
Joseph 



NEW YORK 
Elmira 

Elmira Max Nordau 
Lodge No. 281 3.00 

OHIO 

Youngstown 
Federal Lodge No. 
170 



MISSOURI 
St. Louis 

Kaiser Franz Joseph 
Lodge No. 110 2.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Pittsburgh 
Abr. Goldfaden Lodge 
No. 80 5.00 

Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Greensburg 
Greensburg Lodge 
No. 194 5.00 



PENNSYLVANIA 
10.00 Pittsburgh 

Montefiore Lodge 
No. 794 10.00 



Workmen's Circle 

NEW JERSEY 



Philadelphia 

U. S. Grand Lodge . . 100.00 Hoboken 

Ponevyezh Lodge No. Workmen's Circle, 

43 3.00 Branch No. 198.... 1.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 
LADIES LODGES 



71 



Independent Order NEW YORK 

rr B, , New York City 

True Sisters Bathia Lodge No. 10, 5.00 

Hadassah Lodge No. 
CONNECTICUT 8 S.OO 



New Haven 

Jochebed Lodge No. 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Philadelphia 

B'noth Jeshurun 
S.OO Lodge No. 2 10.00 



Independent Order 
B'rith Abraham 

MISSOURI 
St. Louis 
Leah Ladies Lodge 



No. 5 



2.00 



CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED FROM RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS 

ALABAMA 



Anniston 

Beth El $4.30 

FLORIDA 

Jacksonville 

Ahavath Chesed 2.00 

ILLINOIS 

Chicago 

Isaiah 10,00 

Temple Sholom 10.00 

Peoria 

Anshai Emeth 5.00 

INDIANA 
Fort Wayne 

Achduth Vesholom 5.00 

IOWA 
Davenport 

B'nai Israel 5.00 

LOUISIANA 
Alexandria 

Gemiluth Chassodim 5.00 



New Iberia 

Gates of Prayer 



5.00 



MISSOURI 
St. Joseph 
Adath Joseph 5.00 

NEW YORK 
Buffalo 

Temple Beth Zion 10.00 

OHIO 

Bellaire 

Bellaire Temple 1.52 

Piqua 

Anshe Emeth 



Toledo 

Shomer Emoonim 



S.OO 
5.00 



TENNESSEE 
Knoxville 

Beth El 5.50 

El Paso 

Temple Mt. Sinai 10.00 



72 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



SOME OF THE ACTIVE HEADS OF THE NATIONAL FARM 

SCHOOL 

THE REV. DR. JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, President. Rabbi Congregation Keneseth Israel, Phila- 
delphia. Member of Housing Commission of Philadelphia. Founder Patriotic Society of Philadelphia. 
Founder of Jewish Publication Society of America; Director General, Isaac M. Wise Memorial Fund 
of the Hebrew Union College; originator of the Model Tenement Dwelling Movement, of Philadel- 
phia; United States Special Relief Commissioner to Cuba during the Spanish- American War; sent by 
the Agricultural Department of the United States to Paris Exposition ■ as Special Commissioner to 
inspect exhibits of agricultural schools, visit the European agricultural schools in general, and report 
to the United States Department of Agriculture; founder of The Kational Farm School. 

HARRY B. HIRSH, Vice-President. Director Locust Realty Company; Director Federal Trust 
Company; Director Jewish Hospital; Vice-President and General Manager Belmont Iron Works. 

I. H. SILVERMAN, Treasurer. District Manager Edison General Electric Company of 
Pittsburgh; President Atlantic City & Shore Railroad Company, and Central Passenger Railway 
Company; President Stern & Silverman; President Philadelphia Railways Company; Director of the 
Jewish Hospital of Philadelphia. 

JOHN HOSEA WASHBURN, Ph. D., Dean. Studied in the agricultural departments Goettingen, 
Berlin and Halle; President of the" Rhode Island College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts for 
thirteen years; Secretary and Treasurer of the American Association of Agricultural Colleges and 
Experiment Stations, a national society endowed by the Government. 

ADOLPH EICHHOLZ, Esq., Solicitor. One of the founders of The Farm School. Elected member 
of the Constitutional Convention of the State of Pennsylvania; decorated in 1909 by Emperor of 
Austria with Officers' Cross of the Order of Franz Joseph for "distinguished legal aid rendered to 
Austro-Hungarians"; eleven years Vice-President and nine years President, Y. M. H. A. of Phila- 
delphia, now Honorary Director; Trustee Thomas R. Patton Memorial Fund for Widows of Free 
Masons', appointed by the Grand Master of Free Masons of Pennsylvania. 

ALFRED M. KLEIN, Chairman Budget Committee of the Farm School. President Congregation 
Keneseth Israel, Philadelphia. 

HART BLUMENTHAL, Chairman Committee on Supplies. Member of the firm of Jeitles & 
Blumenthal; Director Jewish Publication Society of America; Director Temple Keneseth Israel, 
Philadelphia. 

MORRIS A. KAUFMANN, Chairman of the Admissions Committee. Member of the firm Moss 
Rose Manufacturing Company; Director Orphans' Guardians Society of Philadelphia. 

BERNARD SELIG, Chairman of Property Committee. Vice President United Hebrew Charities; 
Chairman Bureau for Jewish Children; Director Orphans' Guardians Society of Philadelphia. 

PROFESSOR GEORGE WHEELER, Ph. D., Member of the Admissions and Curriculum Com- 
mittees; Associate Superintendent of Public Schools, Philadelphia. 

LOUIS NUSBAUM, Member of Admissions and Chairman Curriculum Committees; Associate 
Superintendent of Philadelphia Public Schools; member Pedagogical Staff New Jersey Training School 
for Feeble Minded Children, Vineland, N. J. 

JOSEPH N. SNELLENBURG, Director. Of the firm of N. Snellenburg & Company, Phila- 
delphia; Director Jewish Hospital, Philadelphia. 

DANIEL GIMBEL, Director. Member of the firm of Gimbel Brothers, New York, Philadelphia 
and Milwaukee. 

HERBERT D. ALLMAN, Chairman Schoenfeld Memorial Farms Committee. Retired manufac- 
turer; Director of the Philadelphia Vacant Lots Cultivation Association; Chairman Philadelphia Civic 
Committee of 100, and Chairman Philadelphia Transit Committee of 1000. 

HORACE HANO, Chairman Propaganda Committee. President Oppenheim-Collins Company, New 
York, Philadelphia, Buffalo. 



Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, D. D., President I. H. Silverman, Treasurer 

4715 Pulaski Avenue, Philadelphia 605 Land Title BIdg., Philadelphia 

Abraham H. Promenson, Executive Secretary 
407 Mutual Life Building-. Philadelphia 



ilembpralti|.t of (5I|p Nattnttal iFarm ^dionl 

I, the undersigned, being in sympathy with the object of "The 
National Farm School" — the training of the lads in the practice and 
science of agriculture, for agricultural callings — do hereby agree to 
subscribe as one of the JMaintainers of the institution, the dues of 
a Life Member ($100.00) Patron ($25.00) Supporter ($5.00) 
Friend ($50.00) Member ($10.00) 



Name 

Address . 
Date 



NOTE — Underscore the class of membership you wish to join. Life Mem- 
bership calls for but one (the first) payment. Make check payable to THE 
NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 



iFflrm of Upgarg to (lit|f Nattunal iParm #rl|ool 

"/ give and bequeath unto The National Farm School, Bucks 

County, Pa., near Doylestozvn^ the sum of dollars 

free from all taxes, to he paid to the Treasurer^ for the time being, 
for the use of the institution." 



3x^xm of Spuiar 

ON REAL ESTATE OR GROUND RENT 

"/ give and devise unto The National Farm School, Bucks 
Countx, Pa., near Doylestozvn {here describe the property or ground 
rent), together with the appurtenances, in fee simple, and all policies 
of insurance covering said premises, zuhether fire, title or otherwise, 
free from all taxes." 



AN APPRECIATION 



The l"ollo\vin,i; letlcr, L-iitin.-l\- iinsdlicitc-d . attests tliu lii^^h 
L'haiacter of our work: 

"My Dear Mr. Gutekunst: 

"Please accept my sincere thanks lor llie photograplis you 
have made of me, and which have just reached me. They are 
certainly a magnificent likeness, and well attest the fact that the 
hancl that has delij^hted Philadelphia with its art for the past half 
century has not lost its cunning. 

''Trusting that kind Providence may spare you to us and to 
your art yet many a year in health and good cheer, I am 

Very appreciatively yours, 

"JOS. KRAUSKOPF." 



F. GUTEKUNST, 712 Arch Street and 1700 N. Broad Street 




JACOB REED'S SONS 

Men's and Boys' Wear, Clothing, 
Furnishings, Hats, Custom Tailor- 
ing, Uniforms, Liveries and Auto- 
mobile Apparel. 

1424-26 CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



WALNUT AT THIRTEENTH 
PHILADELPHIA 



ROBERT J. RITCHIE, Manager 



1833 



1914 



Davis' Furs 

Now in Our 8 1 st Year 

Up-to-Date and Exclusive 
Styles in 

FINE FURS 

We Invite Your Inspection 

Davis' Fur Shop 

1120 Chestnut Street 

Next to Keith's 
PHILADELPHIA 



BAILETBANK5 

(^ Diamonds 

BlDDLE OD. 

Mountings s^ Platinum 

Finger Rings Bar Pins 

Bracelets NecKlaces 

The least expensive Jewel in 
this Collection is designea 
and. finishea with the same 
care as the most expensive. 

Chestnut Street 



INCORPORATED 1876 



The Real E^ate Title Insurance 
and Tru^ Co. of Philadelphia 

523 Chestnut Street 

Across from Independence Hall 

'^he Oldest '^itle Insurance Company in the World 

Capital, (full paid) $1,000,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, (earned) $1,600,000 

Member of the Clearing House 
State and City Depository 

Insures Titles Executes Trusts Becomes Surety 

Receives Deposits Rents Safe Deposit Boxes 

EMIL ROSEN^ERGER, President 



/ 


H. Caldwell & 


Co. 


~ 


Jewels 

Goldware 
Silverware 
Stationery 

902 CHESTNUT STREEl 
"PHILADELPHIA 


-, 



JOHN B. STETSON COMPANY 

^\^i(ai7 Store 

122^ Chestnut Street 



^jMfadi 



ma 



Your Frank Suggestions Welcomed 

Every day we learn more of what our 
consumers desire in the way of gas ser- 
vice from the suggestions they give us. 
It is our aim to get as near to perfection 
as is humanly possible. We realize 
that good gas service helps to make gas 
indispensable as a kitchen fuel and home 
illuminant and that this, in turn, helps 
to increase the consumption of gas. 
Your suggestions will be welcomed and 
given prompt attention. 

The United Gas Improvement Co. 




''Everybody Knows 
the Hoskinsman 

because of his unfailing attention 

to business. We are Printers, 

Engravers, Loose Leaf Makers, and Business 

Counsellors. ^ Our stock is the greatest in 

Philadelphia." 

— '^he Hoskinsman. 

WILLIAM H. HO SKINS CO. 

904-906 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 



When Better Automobiles are Built 




WILL BUILD THEM 

NOTHINQ BUT SIXES 
Factory Branch - 235 North Broad Street 

AS PHILADELPHIA LEADS THE WORLD SO 

HARDWICK & MAGEE COMPANY 

LEAD PHILADELPHIA IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

RUGS AND CARPETS 

The high standard of our well-known weaves has been 
uniformly maintained for years and today we enjoy the 
confidence and respect of the best houses throughout the 
country. Forty sizes of rugs in stock. Special sizes 
made to order. 

HARDWICK & MAGEE COMPANY 

Successors to Ivins, Dietz & Magee 

• Retailers of All Standard Floor Coverings 

1220-1222 MARKET STREET 



i 



D« 3tABLE AS IRON 




iHE GEUTING 

Idea has created 
a Shoe Store and 
a Service that is well- 
nigh irresistible to the dis- 
criminating man or woman 
who has once experienced 
its benefits. 



GeiiniLm; 



1230 MARKET 

Shoes and Stockings for 
the Family 

19 South nth 

Quick Service Men's Shop 



m^s 



^^ 



EVERY FOOT PROFESSIONALLY FITTED 
-THREE GEUTING BROS. SUPERVISING 



The Commonwealtli Insurance Title and Trust 

Company chestnut and Twelfth Streets, Philadelphia, Pa, 
Capital, $ 1 ,000,000 Surplus, $ 1 ,250,000 

Pays Interest on Daily Balances Rents Safe Deposit Boxes $3 to $100 

Insures Titles to Real Estate Takes Entire Charge of Real Estate 

Acts as Executor, Administrator, Guardian and Trustee 

Wills Receipted For and Kept Without Charge 

We Invite Your Business 

DIMNER BEEBER, President JAMES V. ELLISON, Treasurer 




Ever stop to consider what sort of place your clothes are in when you 
send them to the cleaners? 

When you send them to us, you can rest assured they are in the hands 
of sanitary experts; no time or expense was spared to develop in Philadelphia 
a Cleaning Establishment with all the latest sanitary features found in a 
similar establishment in this country or abroad. 

A. F. BORNOT BRO. CO 

S. E. Cor. 17th and Fairmount Avenue 

12th & Walnut Streets 1535 Chestnut Street 

1714 N. Broad Street Broad & Tasker Streets 

52d and Chestnut Streets PHILADELPHIA 

''PHONE US— POPLAR 608" 

The Liverpool and London and 
Globe Insurance Co* L^t'd 

of Liverpool^ England 

(A STOCK COMPANY) 

WILLIAM E. BATES, LOCAL MANAGER 

33 J -337 Walnttt Street Philadelptiia, Pa. 



The Fur and Millinery Shop 

INCORVORATET) 

1423 Walnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pji. 

'Bell "Phone, Spruce, 25^66 



c 



9 IS ABSOLUTELY 

rane s pure 



Store, Tea Room and Order Department 

13th and Sansom Streets iCC 



PHILADELPHIA 



Only 2 blocks from either 

Broad Street Station 
or Reading Terminal 



Cream 



Main Office: 

Twenty-third below Locust 



Crane's Ice Cream costs more than others 
there is a reason 



Brass Beds-Hair Mattress- Box Springs 

"Faultless" bedding is made with mathematical accuracy; that 
is why it keeps its shape, always presents a flat resilient sur- 
face and is so luxurious. The only mattress or box spring that 
compares with one branded "Faultless" is another bearing the 
same name. 
"Faultless" Bedding is faultless because made so— by rule. 

Why Put Your Money Into Any Other? 

DOUGHERTY'S 1632 Chestnut Street 



Telephone, Lozust 2739 



ADLER 

Gowns, Suits, Wraps 

1632 WALNUT STREET, "PHILAT^ELPHIA 



/TT PHILADELPHIA'S MOST BEAUTIFUL SHOW 
vU^ PLACE. Comfort Without Extravagance. 

®Ij^ iiai^stir Apartment l^nt^l 

(gtrar^ PiXtmm at Iroab i'trt^t 

A $3,000,000 PROPERTY 
Jlhsoluiely ^ew Ownership With Practical Management 

French, German and American Cuisine Reasonable a la Carte Prices 

Latest enlivening music by the Rozo-Busoni Orchestra 

Parking Stations for Hundreds of Automobiles 

JAMES A. MEAD, Prop. JAMES S. McCARTNEY, General Manager 



I. T. SHICK & SON 

flIMUiner\) 
Umporters 

3240 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, Pa. 



Bell Phone, Locust 1534 

S. SACKS 

Importer of Furs and Gowns 

1831 SPRUCE STREET. 'PHILA'DELPHIA 



iSiS!&Si.<..KSSSi$sM 



FURS BETTER GRADE 




THEO. F. SIEFERT 

1426 WALNUT STREET 




This entire building used in sup- 
plying Maule's Seeds direct to our 
customers. 

W. HENRY MAULE, Inc. 

SEEDSMEN 

Twenty-first and Arch Streets, 

Catalogue free Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mention this report when writing 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

ROSE MFG. CO. 

POILADELPOIA 



Pamttg an& flinttstrurtton 

GENERAL 
CONTRACTORS 



1923 Cherry Street 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Compliments of A Friend 

JESSE SHULMAN & CO. /. DRESSES 

12 and 14 West 32ci Street, New York City 

Weltman, Pollack & Co. Cloaics and Suits 

35 West 33d Street, New York 

Powers-Weightman-Rosengarten Co. 

A. B. Megraw 

J. R. Grundy 



Aaron Gans 



T. W. Sparks, 121 Walnut Street 



Joseph Thomas 



Compliments of Wm. R. Dougherty 




TAILORED SUITS 
1732 CHESTNUT STREET 



L. BLANK & SONS 

Incorporated 

CONFECTIONERS 

Ice Cream, Cakes, Jellies, 

Frozen Fruits, Water Ices, 

Fancy Fruits, Stuffed 

Dates 

1024-26 Chestnut St., Phila. 

Special attention to telephone orders 

Henry J. Walter 

Secretary of 
Building Associations 

Fourth Floor Bailey Building 
1218 Chestnut St., Phila. 



Penna. Knitting Mill 



Sixteenth and Callowhill Sts. 



DIAMONDS 

Direct from the diamond cutters, saving 
you at least one third. 

WATCHES 

All standard makes at approximately 
one half regular retail prices. 

JEWELRY 

Most complete stock in this city — prices 
much lower than elsewhere. 

I. PRESS &. SONS 

Cor. 8th and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia 



JUNGMANN'S 

BEEF, WINE AND IRON 

Cn^ FULL PINTS 
>JUC NONE BETTER 

Jungmann's Drug Store 
Fourth and Noble Sts. 

The Hasting & Nclntosh Truss Co. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 
Hard Rubber, Elastic and Leather 
Covered Trusses 
Sole Makers of the Celebrated 
Dr. Mcintosh Natural 
Uterine Supporter 
For Home and Export Trade. Abdom- 
inal and Uterine Supporters, Shoulder 
Braces, Crutches, Elastic BEosiery and 
Body Belts. 
912 Walnut St., Philadelphia, U.S. A . 



O. FUHRMANN 

Vienna Ladies' Tailor 
1507 North Fifteenth Street 



Factory, Burlington, Iowa 

niSSlSSIPPI PEARL 
BUTTON COMPANY 

Salesroom, 1017 Arch St. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
P. Lauber 

LINSK & BASS 

Manufacturers of 

CHILDREN'S and JUNIORS' 
DRESSES 

Broad and Wallace Sts. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Wawa Dairy Farms 

22 South Thirty-second St. 
Philadelphia 

Certified and Household 
MILK 

Bell, Preston 2531-Plioiies-Keystone, West 211 

Established 1883 Both Phones 

Merchants' Parcel Delivery 

Stewart & Graham, Props. 

Packages delivered to all parts of the 
city at lowest rates. Special arrange- 
ments made with business houses of 
other cities for delivery of packages 
in Philadelphia and Camden. 

1010-1014 Race St., Phila. 
Bell Phone Keystone Phone 

AUGUST GEIGER 

Heating and Contracting 

Engineer 

Steam and Hot Water Heating 

114 North Sixth Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

CHRISTIAN PFAFF 

Wholesale Wine and Liquor 
Dealer 

S. E. Corner Passyunk Avenue 
and Catharine Street 

Philadelphia 



CHARLES GROSS 

Pasteurized Milk and Cream 
2123 Westmoreland Street 

Philadelphia 



PRESSER'S 

Distinctive Apparel for Women and 
Misses 

Ready to Wear and Made to Order 

1531 Locust Street 
Philadelphia 

The Best 
Seeds, Plants, Bulbs 

Catalogue Mailed Free 

HENRY A. DREER 

714-716 Chestnut Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bell Phone, Poplar 4100 

The Novelty Shop 

1225 West Girard Ave. 
Philadelphia 

Millinery, Gowns, Blouses and 
Under Garments 

Miss B. Stupelman 

Bell Phone, Lombard 126 

Wiener & Poliner 

Manufacturers of 
Men's, Youth's and Children's 

Clothing 
416 Market St., 411 Ludlow St. 

Bell Phone, Tioga 3767 

THOS. A. DONNELLY 

General Paving Contractor 

Cement Work a Specialty 
Pavements, Floors for Factories, 

Garages, Etc. 
Reinforced Concrete Construction 

1207 W. Cambria St., Phila. 



HENRY R. HALLOWELL 
& SON 

HOT HOUSE AND IM- 
PORTED FANCY FRUITS 

Real Estate Trust Co. Bldg. 

Broad and Chestnut Streets 

Philadelphia 

RYAN'S 

Theatre Ticket Offices, Inc. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Main Office, The Bellevue- 
Stratford 
Phone, Locust 1200 

BOTH PHONES 

The Antique Shops of 

J. M. WINTROB 

918-926 PINE STREET 
Philadelphia 

Rare Old Pieces, Oddities 

Skillfully Reproduced 

ROMAN 

AUTOMOBILi: 
CO. 

203-205 NORTH BROAD ST. 

M.J.DaltonCo. 

CIGAR IMPORTERS 
Wholesale and Retail 
111 South Thirteenth Street 
Cor. Fifth and Chestnut Sts. 
Philadelphia 



Philadelphia 

Manufacturers' Mutual 

Fire Insurance Co. 

Commercial Trust Building 
Philadelphia 
Edwin I. Atlee, President 



Asa W. Vandegrift, President 
Nelson M. Vandegrift, Vice-President 
F. W. Hudtwalcker, Secretary and Treasurer 
Keystone and Bell Telephones 

Sheip 8c Vandegrift, Inc. 

Lumber and Mill Work 

Poplar, Bass, Chestnut, Oak 

Planing, Re-Sawing, Moulding 

814-832 North Lawrence St. 
Philadelphia 



F. BRECHT^S SONS 

Cigar Box Manufacturers 

109-113 N. Orianna Street 

Philadelphia 

PRINTERS 

and 

Compilers of Trade Lists 

Howe Addressing Co. 

208-210 South Fourth Street 

SCHEIBAL'S 

Art Bl}op 

EVERYTHING IN PIC- 
TURES AND FRAMES 

20 North Ninth Street 



Bell Phone, Kllbert 2')-l9. 29-50 

Keystone Phone, 3cS-35, 38-16 

H. D. REESE 

Dealer in the Finest Quality of 

Beef, Veal, Mutton, Lamb and 
Smoked Meats 

1203 Filbert Street 
Philadelphia 

J. SELLERS PENNOCK 

SANITARY PLUMBING 
AND HEATING 

S. E. Corner Seventh and 
Filbert Streets 

M. L. SNYDER & SON 

Manufacturers of 

Rubber Goods and Fire 
Equipment 

311 Market Street 
Philadelphia 



H. TOGGWEILER 

HEATERS, RANGES 
ROOFING 

3120 Ridge Avenue 



Wills- Jones -McE wen Co. 

MILK— CREAM 

Specialties: Certified, Nursery, 

Red Clover Buttermilk 

New Plant, Finest Sanitary 

Dairy in This Country 

Come See Us 

Germanto-wn Delivery 



ROYAL PALACE HOTEL 

COTTAGES AND CASINO 

On the Beach 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

Open All Year 

S. Hanstein, Proprietor 

P. S. Shartiiess Co. 

FANCY TABLE BUTTER, 
CHEESE AND EVAP- 
ORATED MILK 

813-818 North Eleventh St. 
Philadelphia 



PHILADELPHIA'S 
BEST BREAD 




TYPEWRITING THE BEST LISTING 

IMITATION TYPEWRITTEN LEHERS 

$1.00 Per 1000 Up. They Bring Results 

THE RIGHTQUICK 

Publicity and Addressing Bureau 

1314 ArcK Street 

Teleplione, Walnut 3826 "The Best Work, but lower Prices" 



FEINNER 



Drugs 



Broad and Columbia Avenue 




EYEGLASSES 

STREET 
LINDER'^ 
PROPERT 

OPTICIANS 



N.E. CORNER 
OF igVfASl 
CHESTNUT 
STREETS 

PHILADELPHIA 




R. E. W. W. 



JONATHAN RING & SON 

Incorporated 
Hancock and Montgomery Ave. 



D. ATLAS 



FARM JOURNAL 



Asher's 

S. E. Cor. 22cl and Walnut St. 

PHILADELPHIA 

Swimming and Dancing School 

Open All Year 

All the latest and modern 
dances in class and private les- 
sons. Ball Room, Banquet 
Room, Reception Rooms, can 
be engaged ; especially adapted 
for weddings and receptions. 
Instruction in swimming all 
year for ladies, gentlemen and 
children daily. Swimming party 
nights, Tuesday evening, with 
dancing ; Saturday evenings 
only, swimming. Apply to 

MR. SIDNEY S. ASHER 

or 

MR. RUDOLPH CALMANN, 

Manager 



SACKS BROTHERS 

1228 Cherry Street 



Andreas Meng's Sons 



Both Phones 



Established 1849 



JOSEPH P. AVILDE 

Importer of Cheese, Delicacies 
and Fancy Groceries 

Coiiiinission Merchant 

825-827 North Second Street 

Philadelpliia, Pa. 

FRED'K SABIN & CO.. INC 
Howard Miller, President 

HEATING CONTRACTORS 

237-239-241 Bread Street 

Philadelphia 




International Printing 

CxOnipany . . . General Printers 

236 CHESTNUT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA. PENNA. 



Sixth National Bank 

N. W. Cor. SECOND AND PINE STREETS 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

JOHN P. WILSON, President 

DANIEL BAIRD, Vice-President 

JAMES C. SUTTON, Second-Vice Pres, 

WILLIAM SALTER, Cashier 

Telephone Connection 

OSWALD LEVER CO., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

"^{^^Sf^grndXrTextile Machinery 

For COTTON, WOOLEN and SILK 

Lehigh Avenue and Front Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

Disinfectants and Disinfecting Appliances 

Houses Scientifically Fumigated 

WE ARE EXPERTS IN THE LINE 

WEST DISINFECTING CO., Inc. 

The largest manufacturers of Disinfectants and Disinfecting 
Appliances in America 

Main Office and Laboratory, New York 

Philadelphia Office - - - 1303 Race Street 

CHARLES AUERBACH, Manager Both Phones 




"Novelty" 

The Best Answer to All Heating and 
Cooking Problems Since 1847 

Boilers for Steam and Hot Water Heat- 
ing, Warm-Air Furnaces, Coal, Gas, and 
Combination-Coal-and-Gas Ranges 
REMEMBER THE NAME "NOVELTY" 

Tii BY Abram Cox Stove Co. 



Charles I. Kent, President 



AVilliaiii L. Gvienther, Vice-President 



Leon llosenbaiiui, Treasurer and Secretary 

J. JACOB SHANNON & CO. 



/-w A I g- V Mill, Mine, Railroad, Builders, 
N r and Contractors Supplies, 

HARDWARE Hardware and Equipment 



1744 

I Market Street i 

Philada. 
^Shannon &CQi 

LEOUIPMENTr 



1744 Market Street 1744 



R. A. HEYMANN & BRO. 



REAL ESTATE 



WIDENER BUILDING 



T^he Thomas W. Price Company 

*Paper, Cardboard, Envelopes, 

Printers' Specialties 

503-505 LUDLOW STREET, PHILADELPHIA, ■PENNA. 
Correspondence Solicited 




The Name Burpee 



is known the world over as 

synonymous with the Best 

Seeds that Grow. This name 

on your seed packets is an 

assurance of "seeds of quality." Burpee's Annual for 1915 is 

a brisht book of 1S2 pages, beautifully illustrated, a.n6. a Safe G m'de 

to Success in the garden. Mailed free. Write for it today. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO. Seed Growers, Philadelphia 



MASTBAVM BROS. & FLEISHER 

Real Estate 

1424 South Penn Square 



JOSEPH S. KEEN, Jr., President and General Manager 

GEORGE M. BUNTING, Vice-President and Treasurer 

H. BAYARD HODGE, Secretary and Asst. Treasurer 
WILLIAM H. ROTH, Assistant Secretary 

American Pipe and Construction Co. 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 



112 N. BROAD STREET 



PHILADELPHIA 



J. W. LEDOUX, Am. Soc. C E. Chief Engineer 

JAMES H. DAWES, General Superintendent Construction Dept. 

HAROLD PEROT KEEN, General Supt. Operating Department 




BOILERS 
For Heating by Steam, 
Hot Water and Vapor 



THE H. B. SMITH CO. 

1225 ARCH STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



No. 24 Mills Boiler 



The Eighth National Bank 

Second Street and Girard Avenue, Philadelphia 

ESTABLISHED 1864 

Saving Fund Department 
Safe Deposit Boxes to Rent in Vaults 

OFFICERS 
WILLIAM J. MONTGOMERY, President 

SAMUEL BELL, Jr., Vice-President 

CHARLES B. COOKE, Cashier 

JOHN D. ADAIR, Assistant Cashier 



Samuel Bell, Jr. 
Robert S. Irwin 



DIRECTORS 

Robert Carson Frank Buck 

Theo. F. Miller 



Samuel T. Kerr 
Wm. J. Montgomery 




NATIONAL CASKET COMPANY 



Reading Terminal Market and Cold Storage 

1118 ARCH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Largest Market in the World 

Foods of Quality at prices no higher than you 
pay for inferior goods elsewhere 

SELECTED FARM PRODUCTS FROM FOUR STATES 

GEO. H. McKAY, Superintendent 



Bell Phone 
Filbert 4890, 4891 



Keystone Phone 
Race 2178, 2363 



DAVID H. SIMON 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer 

Fruits and Vegetables 

Reading Terminal Market, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Wm. J. Woerner 

High Grade 

BEEF 

STAL S 515-17-19 Reading 
Terminal Market 

ARCH STREETS rillLAUtLrnlA 

Bell Phone, Walout 4238 



T 1 u J Keystone. Race 733 

Telephones: j^^,, pnbert 4467-68 

MEMBER OF THE PHILADELPHIA 
PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

Arthur H. Bonsor 

SHARPLESS & DARLINGTON GILT 
EDGE BUTTER 

Fancy Jersey Poultry, Eggs and Game 

Sole Agent for the Lancaster Creamery Butter 

Agent for Morgan Squab Ducks 

16 STALLS, SEVENTH AVE. 

Reading Terminal Market PHILA., PA. 



\VlLLIAM B. MaRGERU M 

"Dealer in the Finest Quality 

Beef, :mltton, Lamb, Veal, 

HAMS, BACOIV, LARD, TONGUES 

A.ND PROVISIONS IN GKNKRAL 

The Standard House for the Choicest the Market Produces 

Stalls '^?rto 9?>f >Tnth Avr Reading Terminal Market. Office -iVe'T 

13TH AND ARCH STKEETS, PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 

Bell, 2702 Filbert, 2703 Filbert — Teleplione Connections - Keystone, 258 Race 



The New Hotel Hanover 

CLA UDE M. MOHR, Manager 
ARCH AND TWELFTH STREETS, PHILAT>ELPHIA 

^TT Newly Furnished 1 hroughout. European Plan. Music in Cafe. 
VII ^ Rooms, without bath, $1.00 per day and up. Rooms, with bath, 
$1 .50 per day up. Running Hot and Cold Water and Telephone in Every 
Room. Table d'Hote Dinner, 50 Cents, 1 2 to 8 P. M- Special Table 
d'Hote Dinner, $ 1 .00, 12 to 8 P. M. Cuisine and Service Unexcelled. 

BEYOND COMPETITION 

BAILEY'S PURE RYE 




For the use of gentlemen who can appreciate a perfect 
flavor and aroma combined with all the requisites 
necessary to assist convalescents when recommended 
by a physician. Fully matured and bottled. 

HUEY & CHRIST 

1308 ARCH STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 

1762 1916 

Oscar A. Fow & Son 

. . MEATS . . 

Stalls, 1234-42 Reading Terminal Market 

Arch Street Front 
Telephone Connection Philadelphia 



EDWARD ATKINS 

(HanUnttav unh Mxxiihn 



249 S. 24th Street 

Bell 'telephone, Locust 961 



Philadelphia 

Keystone Telephone, Race 30-78 



North Philadelphia Trust Co. 

Broad Street, Germantown and Erie Avenues 

OPEN MONDAY EVENINGS 
UNTIL 8 P. M. 



N. CRAMER & SONS 

Manufacturers of 

Cloal^s anb Suits 

1427 VINE STREET, PHILADELPHIA 



Philadelphia SiloS 

Hocking Valley Cutlers and 
Blowers. Tanks and Towers. 
Ensilage Trucks. 

E. F. Schlichter Company 

10 S. 18th Street, Philadelphia 

Factory, Norristown, Pa. 




Hoffman-Corr Mfg. Co. 

Ask Your Dealer and insist on having your Awnings 
made from 

Hoffman Gold Medal Brand 
Awning Stripes 

Largest Rope and Twine House in the 
World. Contractors to the Government. 

312 Market St., Philadelphia 
150 Duane St., New York 



Frank H. Stewart Electric Co. 






ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

37 and 39 North Seventh St. 
Old Mint Bldg. Philadelphia 



Compliments of 

Wilkinson Bros. & Co. Inc. 



Henry Bell, President 

Henry K. Walt, Vice-President 

Freeman S. Hunsberger, Treasurer 

BELL, WALT & CO. Inc. 

WHOLESALE BOOTS, 

SHOES AND RUBBERS 
28 North Third Street 

EZRA LEVINSON 

Wrapping Paper, Envelopes, 
Paper Bags, Twines, Etc. 

26 South Fifth Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Bell and Keystone Phones 



BERGER BROS. CO. 

TINNERS' HARDWARE 

and ROOFERS' SUPPLIES 
237 Arch Street, Philadelphia 

Both Phones 

Let Us Estimate on Anything 

Edward Fay & Son 

Contractors and Builders 

2 South Mole Street 

Philadelphia 

HARRY R. RUST 

Manufacturer of 

Interior Hardwood Fittings 

Office and Store Work 

Fine Furniture, Wood Mantels 

Steam Saw Mill 

724 and 726 Ludlow Street 
41 North Hutchinson Street 

Margolin & Bloch 

203 South Fifth Street 



Bell Phone. Market 899 
Keystone, Main 1 70 and 36-36 

Edward J. Schoeltle Co. 



PAPER BOXES AND 

MAILING TUBES 

237 North Sixth Street 
Philadelphia 



Cable Address, ".Minaret Phila." 

Geo. S. Cox & Bro., Inc. 

Minaret Mills 

Manufacturers of Hair Cloth 

Cambria and Ormes Streets 

Philadelphia 

BOYEKTOWN BIKIAL 
CASKET CO. 

Bronze, Metallic, Hardwood 

and Cloth-covered Caskets, 

Robes and Linings 

Phila., Pa. Boyertowii, Pa. 
?J^ew York, X. Y. 

L. A. FOnEIGER. Fres. H. BACHRACH, Sec'y 

E. C. HAINLEY, Treas. 

Fotteiger & Hainley 

Incorporated 

Painting of the Better Kind 

PAINTING CONTRACIOKS 

1829 Filbert St., Philadelphia 

Estimates Furnislitd 
Teleplioue 

Coiikling- Armstrong- 
Terra Cotta Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Archilectural Terra Cotta Work. 

Philadelphia, Pa, 

Office: Nicetown, Phila., Pa. 

Harrison C. Rea Co. 

EXGIXEBRS 
CONTRACTORS 

and 
BUILDERS 

1027 WOOD STREET 



Magaziner & Potter 

Architects 



603 CHESTNUT STREET 

THE MANLFACTUKEKS 
iSATIOlVAL BANK 

Capital >H500,0C0 

SUKPLirS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS 

$483,911.94 

■William H. Heislor, President 

Samuel Canii>bell, Cashier 

P. Fairianib, Asst. Cashier 

Your Business solicited and will be well 
cared for. 

Pliilaclelpliia Fanners' 
Supply Company 

1918 Market St., Phila. 

Osborne Harvesting Machinery 
and Tillage Implements 

30tli Century 3Ianure Spreaders. All 
supplies for Farm, ciardeii and Dairy. 

ESTABLISHED 1885 

Ignatius Haaz & Bro. 

llanutacturers of 

Sample Cards and Sample Books 

404-412 Brown Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

>Iarket 1403 Telephones Park 47 7 

3IALLALIEU iS: CONKEY 

JOBBERS 

Agricultural Implements and 
Supplies 

Gasoline Engines 

1816 MARKET STREET 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



HuttenlOGk's Sweet Shop 

ICE CREAM AND 

CONFECTIONS 

of the Better Grade 
4801 Wayne Ave., Germantown 
A trial order of our ice cream 
will convince you of its quality. 
Phone, Germantown 4205 



Telephone Connection 

GEO. F. REICaMAN 

Tin and Sheet Iron Worker 

Heaters and Ranges 

Tin Roofing and Spouting 

3053 North Fifteenth Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Oscar A. KaHler 

Fine Sanitary Plumbing 

Steam and Hot Water Heating 

Alteration Work and Jobbing 
a Specialty 

3103 N. 15tK St., PHila. 

Telephone Connection 

THE-MAN-ON-THE-SPOT 




CHARLES W. RUETER 

Everything in Real Estate 
1703 Tioga Street 



bell Phone, Wyoming 670 

Cars to Hire. Repairing and Vul- 
canizing. Free Air 

GIBB'S GARAGE 

4807-4811 North Broad Street 

4806-4810 Old York Road 

Logan, Philadelphia 

Morris M. Gibb, Proprietor 

Bank and Office Partitions 
JOHN E. SJOSTROM CO. 

INCORPORATED 

Cabinet Makers 

1719 North Tenth Street 

Philadelphia 

Both Phones 

Novelty Gas and Electric 
Fixture Co. 

Show Room and Factory 

S. W. Cor. Fifth and Green Sts. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



'ABOVE ALL' 



BOLD CIGAR 



5c. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Dr. Ellis Levy 



Estate of 

THOMAS H. WILSON 

Manufacturer of 

FINE WORSTEDS 

1420-1432 N. Howard St. 
Philadelphia 

J. G. GRIEB & SONS 

WHOLESALE SHOES AND 
RUBBERS 

531 Market Street 
Philadelphia 

CARNWATH, BELL & CO. 

Steam Packing Box Manufacturers 

613 and 615 Cherry Street 

608 and 610 Quarry Street 

Phone Philadelphia 



Compliments of 

S. HOWELL 



G. A. Knoblauch & Sons 

READING 

TERMINAL 

RESTAURANT 



BIBERMAN BROS. 

Manufacturers of 

WASH DRESSES 
N. W. Cor. 23d and Chestnut Streets 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

"PAKSAFE" 

Corrugated and Solid Fibre 
Shipping Cases 

Paper Boxes of All Descriptions 

DAVID WEBER & CO. 
N. W. Cor. 5th & Locust Sis. 

0. K. Addressing Co. 

Eleventh Floor Lincoln Bldg. 

Mimeographing 
Typewriting 

Multigraphing 
Both Phones 

FOUNDED 1850 

FINNEY & SON 

GRANITE AND MARBLE 
MONUMENTS 

529-531 N. TWELFTH STREET 
12th AND SPRING GARDEN STREETS 

PHILADELPHIA 

HEBREW LETTERING A SPECIALTY 



Compliments 

Isadore Rosenbluth 
Carl S. Gross 



l<(^ The joy of eating something 



# 



s?- 






Better than Good 



Finds rich 

fulfillment in 

every Luncheon or Dinner in every one 

of our many Styles of Cakes and Pastries 

Our Japanese Cake, orientally mellow, rolled in 
roasted Almonds and filled with Butter Cream, 
dirrers trom all o'her Cakes you ve ever tasted. 

Our Honey Webb CaA e with a layer of Vanilla 
Custard is the Cake Par Excellence, 45c. Only Place for such Delicacies 



1700 Chestnut Street 



1520-1522 Market Street 




The Integrity Title Insurance 
Trust and Safe Deposit Co. 



S. W. Cor. Fourth and Green Sts., Philadelphia 

Capital Stock, Full Paid 5500,000.00 

Surplus 1,125,000.00 

Undivided Profits 171,735.93 

Deposits 4,161,370.85 

BANKING DEPARTMENT 
Receives money on deposit, subject to 
check on sight, allowing 2 per cent, interest. 
Rents boxes for safe keeping of valuables in 
burglar and iire-proof vaults, for S3. 00 and 
upwards. Letters of Credit and International 
Checques for Travelers issued, available 
everywhere. 

SAVING FUND DEPARTMENT 
Open from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 
Monday to 7 P. M. Saturday to 1 P. M 

3 per cent, interest allowed on deposits. 
TITLE AND REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 
Examines and insures titles to real estate. Collects rents, dividends, interest, etc. 
Money loaned on mortgage and mortgages for sale. Attends to all details pertaining to 
buying, selling and conveying of real estate. 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 
Transacts all Trust Company business and acts in the capacity of executor, adminis- 
trator, guardian or Trustee, taking entire charge of estates. All valuables received for 
safe keeping. Wills receipted and kept in safe boxes without charge. 



OFFICERS 

President 
GEORGE KESSLER 

First Vice-Pres. 
PHILIP SPAETER 

Second Vice-Pres. 
PHILIP DOERR 

Sec. and Treas. 
HERMAX WISCHMAX 

Trust Officer 
PHILIP E. GUCKES 

Title Mgr. 
THEO. E. KXAPP 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



George Kessler 
Philip Doerr 
Fred'k Orlemann 
Philip Spaeter 
Wm. H. Rookstool 
Albert Hellwig 
John Greenwood 



Geo. Xass 
C. J. Preisendanz 
Daniel W. Grafly 
J. Edwin Rech 
A. P. Kunzig 
Chas. W. Miller 
Wm. G. Berlinger 



Jacob Kramer 

I. P. Strittmatter, 

M. D. 
J. McGlinn 
Gustave A. Kirchner 
A. F. Schoenhut 
Philip E. Guckes 



DIE BEAMTEN SPRECHEN DEUTSCH 



Compliments of 



M. Haber & Co. 



PHONE. WALNUT 12-76 

' CHAS. K. FIEN 



Ladies' Tailor and Furrier 



916 PINE STREET 

Philadelphia 



WAMPOLE'S 

FORMOLID 

Antiseptic Solution) 
A Concentrated, But Harmless A.ntiseptic 



FORMOLID, properly diluted, may be used with perfect freedom in 
the treatment of diseased or inflamed "eonditons of the mucous menu 
brane of the mouth, nose, throat, etc., and as a lotion in the treatmen- 
of cuts or other abrasions of the skin. 

Excellent as a mouth-wash or gargle. 



PREPARED SOLELY BY 

Henry R. Wampole (Si Co. 

Incorporated 

MANUFACTURING PHARMACISTS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 



BALLINGER & PERROT 

Arrlttt^rts ani 

Philadelphia Nel^ York 



EMANUEL ASHER & SON 

1 602 Diamond Street Philadelphia 

Bell Phone, — Diamond 898 Keystone Phone— Park 979 

Atlantic City, 1619 Pacific Avenue 

Phones: Bell 570. Coast 328 

The entire building, 1 602 Diamond Street, 
is now devoted to the business, and is at the 
disposal of our patrons for the care and 
burial of the dead. Funerals can be held at 
the parlor at any time. 

Residence, 1906 Erie Avenue 

Bell Phone, Tioga 3239 



North Penn Bank 

Twenty-ninth and Dauphin Streets 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



2 per cent interest on check accounts on 
balance of $100 or over. 

3% per cent interest on saving fund ac- 
counts. 

Every courtesy extended consistent with 
safe banking. 

Your account is solicited. 



LOUIS H. MICHEL, President F. T. MOYER, Cashier 

ESTABLISHED 1855 

THOMAS DELAHUNTY 

(^xmxtt Mnxbk Marka 

Underground Vaults and 
Mausoleums a Specialty 

3811 to 3821 Ridge Avenue 

North Laurel Hill Cemetery T HlLADllLPHIA 



^^ "PHILADELPHIA" 

THE LAWN MOWER STANDARD SINCE 1869 




GRAHAM" ALL STEEL 



For over 47 years the 
"riiiladelphia" Mowers 
have maintained un- 
challenged supremacy 
amongst I^awn Mower 
Manufacturers. We are 
the originators of ALL 
STEEL Mowers, Styles 

"A" & "GRAHAM" 

All Knives Vanadium Crucible 
Steel 
•22 Style HAND and 6 
style HORSE, all of the 
Mowers Highest Grade. 
For Catalog and Prices 
Address 



The Philadelphia Lawn Mower Co. 

THIRTY-FIRST AND CHESTNUT STS., PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 



THE PEN-DAR CONSUMER 

A New and Safe Idea 

Made entirely of galvanized Wire and Irrn, 
almost indestructible, used for Burning Waste 
Paper and other combustible material; also a neat 
Basket for Waste Paper, Leaves, etc. 

No. 1, 20 in. diameter x 30 in. high $3.00 

No. 2, 17 in. diameter x 25 in. high 2.00 

No. 3, 14 in. diameter x 21 in. high 1.80 

No. 4, 12 in. diameter x 18 in. high 1.50 

We also manufacture Wire Cloth, Wire and Iron 
Work, Wire Garden Furniture, Trellis and Flower 
Bed Border, Lawn and Poultry Fencing and Gates. 
Everything in Wire and Iron. 

PEN-DAR LEAF RACKS r^^^^^^z^^ 

Used en wheelbarrows with removable ^ ' \ v\' \^ 
sides, for gathering leaves, cut grass and ^O fS o^ ' '''^ '^ 
rubbish; capacity, 1 bushels; made of gal- V <(^ V^f^' J//''' 
vanized wire, bolted to a wooden case. ^^m^A' -M." 

Price (not including wheelbarrow), $4.00. 
Ask for Catalog of what you may want. 
MANUFACTURED BY 

Edward Darby & Sons Co., Inc., 233t"235Xcr'st. 





Edward Towill 

WHOLESALE 

Rose Grower 

ROSLYN, ------ PENNA, 



1 n € 



DAVID BOTTINELLI Works— Bell Phone, Ogontz 752 W 

JOHN C. BIECKER Show Room— Bell, Ogontz 752 D 



Hillside Granite Co. 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

Granite and Marble Memorials 



Showroom at Trolley entrance Cutting Plant on 

Hillside Cemetery Susquehanna Street 

ROSLYN, PA. 



O0O 



c/1* Fareniveld 

CTv Roslyn, Pa, 



WesleyStead, Pres. Theo. F. Miller, Sect. & Tieas. Jno. W. Snowden, Vice Pres. &Genl. Mgr. 

NEPAUL MILLS 

THe Stead &. Miller Co. 

UPHOLSTERY GOODS & DRAPERIES 

^*^ ^rrxol^r"''*^ 4th & Cambria Streets 

160JJ Heyvrorth BulUUng Philadelphia 

TV^ abash & Madison ,St., Cliicago -^ 

NEW YORK, 345, 347 Broadway BOSTON, 67 Chaiincey St. 

CHICAGO, 605 Medinali Temple 

Qlatlin $c Qlnmpang 

YARNS 

128-130 CHESTNUT STREET PHILADELPHIA 

Cops^ Skeins, Cones, Tubes and Warps 

B. HOOLEY & SON 

SILK MANUFACTURERS 

435-439 NORTH BROAD STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

THE JEWISH EXPONENT 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE 

Representative of Jewish Institutions and welcomed in the Jewish Home 

Published Every Friday Subscription Price, $3.00 Per Annum 

Philadelphia Office, 608 Chestnut Street 

Baltimore Office, 1 20 Aisquith Street 

$2,500,000 

1 O r\r\C\ P^'i'^^s have more than the above 
J- ^ <)^yjyj amount on deposit here. 

The Northwestern Trust Company 

■WILEIA3I FREIHOFER, t».i. i^~ii i. A 

President Kidge and Columbia Avenues 




Klosfit are made with 
"V" shape elastic gusset 
over each hip 



I PETTICOAT I 

Needs No Alteration 

Thousands of Weil-Dressed 

Women are Wearing the 

"KLOSFIT" Petticoat 



because it is the most perfect fitting petticoat ever devised and real 
petticoat comfort was never realized until the coming of the "Klosfit" 

To the Woman who desires to be well-gowned the 
Klosfit is an absolute necessity 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS 



WRIGLEY'S 
BIG 10 
CLEANER 

BETTER 
CLEANER 

BIGGER CAN 

AT ALL 
GROCERS 



Electrical Work 

of Every Description 
Installed or Repaired 

We also have a stock of 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

AND SUPPLIES 

If your residence is not wired for 

Electric Lighting, we can wire 

without damaging your 

walls or floors. 

Albert Gentel, Inc. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

1503 Columbia Avenue 
4466 Germantown Avenue 

Philadelphia 



D . J. H. Douglas 



H. A. Tibben 



Doylestown Garage 

Agents for Oakland, CKevrolet Cars 

57 "W. Court Street, DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

BELL PHONE 110 



Bell Phone 

WYNNE JAMES 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 

REAL ESTATE 

Bargains in Farms always on hand 

Hart Building 
Doy'estown, Pa. 

H. B. Rosenberger 

COAL, LIME, CEMENT 
HAY 

West Ashland Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 

Long Distance Phones 

Monument House 

J. G. Mitchell, Proprietor 
MAIN STREET 
Doylestown, Pa, 

Botli Phones 

Frye & Weidner 

Poreign and Domestic Fruits 

Fish, Oysters and Clams in 

Season 

Fancy Dressed Poultry 

37 North Main Street 

Doylestown, Pa. [ 



Henry S, Beidler 

Coal, Flour, Grain, Feed, Clo- 
ver Seed, Timothy and Agri- 
cultural Implements, Fertil- 
izers, Lime, Etc. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

JOS. WINDHOLZ 

THOS. F. COURTNEY 

Bell Telephone Estimates Given 

Windholz & Courtney 

Painting and Paperhanging 

Paints, Oils, Glass, Etc. 

Stuckert Building, Main St. 

Doylestown, Pa. 

Plumbing, Steam, Hot Water and 

Warm Air Heater Work 

General Repairing and Machine Shop 

Both Phones Doylestown, Pa. 

Michael A. Rufe 

(Formerly Rufe Bros.) 
New Location, Taylor Street 
Between Main and Pine Sts. 

C. Louis Siegler, D. D. S. 

21 North Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 

Established 1882 

Frank J. Gerlitzki 

Manufacturer of Wood Work 
Doylestown, Pa. 



Doylestown Trust Company 

CHARTERED 181)<» 

Authorized Capital, $250,000.00 

Paid in Capital, $125,000.00 

Surplus, $130,000.00 



FOKREST PARK 

Don't forget to look us up 
when your church, lodge or 
club is looking for a day's out- 
ing. 

ISAAC FUNK ESTATE 
Chalfont, Pa. 

H. L. WEAMER 

General MercHandise 

Bell Phone 35-4 
CHALFONT, PA. 

"Get It at Pearce's and It Will 
Be Right" 

SAMUEL R. PEARCE 

PHARMACIST 
Hart Building, Doylestown, Pa. 

MILTON REED 

Watches, Clocks, Jewelry and 
Silverware 

Doylestown, Pa. 

Repairing a Specialty 

WM. P. ELY & SON 

Dealer in 

Ready-to-Wear Clothing for 

Men, Boys, Children ; Gents' 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Caps, Boots and Shoes 

Opposite P. & R. Depot DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



IMiiiiihinjj, lioofing and Spoviting 
Gasoline Enjjinos 

R. M. JOHNSON 

DEALER IX 

Hot Water, Steam and Hot 

Air Heaters, Stoves, Ranges 

and Wind Mills 

CHALFONT, PA. 



in M^alfg iKaaatngfr 

VETERINARIAN 
Chalfont, Pa. 

CHALFONT, PA. 
Harry W. Kelly, Proprietor 
Gas Light and Steam Heat 

Excellent Accommodations for Transient and 
Permanent Boarders 

Livery Attached 

W. H. Swartley 

Manufacturer of 

CIDER and VINEGAR 

Corner State and West Streets 

P. O. Box 412 Doylestown, Pa. 

Bell Phone 321 W 

Xarnopol Cleaning 
&L Dyeing WorKs 

State and Hamilton Streets 
Doylestown, Pa. 



State Charter, 1834 National Charter, 1864 

THE DOYLESTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Capital $105,000.00 

Surplus $105,000.00 

Undivided Profits 145,000.00 

250,000.00 

Deposits 1,137,000.00 

John M. Jacobs, President John N. Jacobs, Cashier 

ROYAL SILK COMPANY 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

When in Doylestown do your trading at Clymer^s Depart- 
ment Store — Bucks County's Largest Store 

R. L. CLYMER 



36, 38, and 40 West State 



Doylestown, Pa, 



Bell Phone No. i Keystone No. 25 



The Fountain House Livery at Doylestown, Pa. 



Both Phones 



Daniel G. Fretz, Proprietor 



JAMES BARRETT 

Dealer in 

Paints and Oils, Cement, Terra Cotta Pipe, 

Horse Clothing, and a Full Line of 

Hardware, Etc. 

Corner Main and Ashland 
Doylestown, Pa. 

Bell Phone ISi.-A 

David L. Gehman 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

Harness and Blankets 

Repairing Promptly Done 

279 West Court Street DOYLESTOWN 

AUSTIN B. BENNER 

General Merchandise 
Cor. Ashland and Clinton Sts. 

Doylestown, Pa. 
Both Phones 



Fine Shoes for Man and Boy 

EDWARD G. CASE 

Gents' Furnisher 

Lenape Building 

Main Street Front, Doylestown 

WM. A. TAXSON 

Stationery, School Supplies 

and Legal Blanks 

Daily and Sunday Newspapers Delivered 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 
Hulshizer's Vegetible Liver PiUs 

Will relieve Biliousness, Torpid Liver, Headache 
and Indigestion, 25c. BOTTLE 

HULSHIZER'S PHARMACY 
Doylestown, Pa. 



KXKCUTKSTRUSrS PAYS INTKIilOST ON WKPOSITS INSUIIKS TUXES 

Bucks County Trust Company 

Authorized Capital, $2r,(>,<KK) Pjiid-iii Capital, $125,000 

Surplus, $U)0,000 

HUGH B. KASTlJlfRlV, Prt'si<UMit aiul Trust Orticd- 

GKOKtili; AVA T'SON, Vit«>-Prosi<U'nt and Asst. Trust Officer 
THOMAS KOSS, Second Vice-President 
T. O. ATKINSON, Treasurer 

GKO. H. MI LLl<:K,Assistant Treasurer 

HAUUY C. G AllN KK, Assistant Secretary 

Doylestown, Pa. 



BEI.L PHONK 184-A 

EMIL PEITER 

Bakery and Confectionery 

Pure Ice Cream 

OPPOSITE MASONIC HALL 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



I1AN13 ALL'S 

HARDWARE DEPARTMENT STORE 

MAIN ST. AND OAKLAND AVE. 

Builders' Hardware, Meelianics' Tools 
and Supplies, Housefurnisliing Goods, 
Cutlery and Stationery, Sporting Goods, 
Wall Paper, Paints and A^arnislies, 
Farm Kquipments and Garden Supplies. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Both Phones Kstahlished 187.3 



BOTH PHONES 



GEORGE L. SIPPS 

Carpenter, 'Builder and Contractor 
91^ Locust Street, Phila. 



WILLIAM GORDON 

MEATS, PROVISIONS 



1214 Atlantic AVe, 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 



1701 Vassyunk AVe, 

PHILADELPHIA 



Abbott^s Alderney Dairies 

1317 Memorial Avenue 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 
Jacob Mandery, Manager Phone 615 

We make a Specialty of CERTIFIED MILK AND CREAM 

Hotel Guests and Cottagers given Special Attention. All Bottle? Sterilized 
before using. 



Columbia Avenue Trust Company 

Broad and Columbia Avenue 

Capital Paid In $400,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided "Profits [earned] $500,000.00 

PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

SYL. A. LEITH, President WM. ALLEtK, Vice-President 

WM. A. C A RULE, Secretary and "Ureasurer 

Orders called for and delivered in all 
parts of city and suburbs. poplar^ss 

Robert Ralston & Son 

IMPORTERS and GROCERS 
Girard Ave. and 13th St., T^hdadelphia 

When Dissatisfied with Your Work, Try 

FORREST LAUNDRY 

1221-23-25 Columbia Avenue 
Lace Curtains and Floor Linens a Specialty 

BOTH PHONES 

Dyers and Finishers of Piece Goods 

We are specially equipped for Fine All- Wool 
and Silk and Wool Mixed Fabrics 

"BRIGHT COLORS-SUPERB LUSTER" 



THE TENTH NATIONAL BANK 

OF 
PHILADELPltlA, PENNSYLVANIA 

1645 NORTH BROAD STREET 

Capital $200,000.00 Surplus, $100,000.00 

Accounts Solicited 

Presidenf Vice-Presi<Ient Cashier 

AVAI.TER SCOTT CHARLES CLASS JOHN F. BAUDER 

IN WAR OR PEACE 

"ARISTOCRAT" 

and 

"CLASS & NACHOD LAGER" 

are Always Good 

THE CLASS & NACHOD BREWING CO,, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Your Tie Will Slide Easily Into Place 

Yonr tie slides easily in your collar, if the collar was laundered by us. 

We iron the inside of your collars as smooth as the outside, and mould them 

into shape so they will not pinch your tie or bind upon it. 

You will certainly appreciate this point. It saves your ties, prevents the 

mussing and' tearing of your collars, and preserves your temper and saves your 

time when dressing. 

Excelsior Laundry Co. Moniomer" Ave. Will treat you right 

Delivery in Philadelphia, Camden and Nearby Suburbs 

Both Phones or Postal 31 YEARS IN PHILADELPHIA 

Bell Telephone, Germantown 3038 

Robert Bredenbeck 

Janrg QIakfa unh Jr^ (Etmm 

Corner Clapier Street and Wayne Avenue 
Germantown^ Philadelphia 



Bell Phone, Baring 13-22 Keystone, West 45-49 A 

Wm. S. Bonsairs 
Sons 

Snnfing 



55^ 



Roofing, Furnace and 
Range Supplies. Light 
and HeaVy Sheet Iron 
Wor%. Ventilating and 
^Refrigerator Wor% ^ 






REPAIR WORK 
A SPECIALTY 



3824-26 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



KEYSTONE PHONE. PARK 377 BELL PHONE, TIOGA 74-20 

MURRELL F. DOBBINS 

LIMOUSINES 

AND TOURING CARS 

TO HIRE 

1130 Westmoreland Street 

Philadelphia 
AUTOMOBILES REPAIRED 
Stanley Steamers a Specialty STORING AND HIRING 

Owen Letter's Sons 



Best Coal 



MAIN YARD 

Trenton Avenue and Westmoreland Street 




Wire Your House for Electricity 
on the Deferred Payment Plan 

YOU can have your house wired for Elec- 
tricity and pay for it as convenient — each 
month a small amount will be added to vour 
Electric Light bill and you can pay for both 
wiring and Electricity at the same time. If you 
rent your home your landlord will certainly be 
interested in this proposition. 

You may obtain wiring bids from any recognized contractor, 
and when you have accepted the same and contracts have been 
signed on our regular forms, we will pay the contractor's bill, after 
the wiring has been completed and approved by the Board of 
Fire Insurance Underwriters and our own inspectors. You will 
then refund us the amount of this bill in twelve or twenty -four 
monthly payments, as you may elect, free of interest charge. This 
plan applies only to unwired, completed dwellings, and will not 
hold good in the case of new building construction. The only 
condition is that the risk must first have been approved and ac- 
cepted by this Company before the work is commenced. 

You can have your home wired for less than the cost of a player-piano or 
talking machine; and it will be done without causing dirt or confusion. We will 
obtain the wiring estimates for you, if you say the word, without any obligation 
on your part. The wiring may easily be completed in time to enjoy Electric 
Light and Electrical Conveniences during the coming hot summer months. An 
interesting booklet on wiring already-built houses sent on request. 



^ 



IF PHTT^^RTPHT/M 



ECTRIC 



TENTH AND 




COMPANY 



CHESTNUT STSu