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Full text of "Electric railway review"

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FlectriG Railway Review 

FORMERLY THE STREET RAILWAY REVIEW. 
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. THE WILSON COMPANY, CHICAGO. 



Harrison Street, Chicago v VTV .... ,_ K Subscription: Domestic . 

Na-au Street. New York ^ui^A^rt I A >mi a r->w . , „~^ Whole No. 

1629 Williamson Bids;.. Cleveland 



N0.1 CHICAGO, JANUARY 4, 1908 



Electric railway employes who wish to get the greatest good 
from their work in the New Year should surely 

Buy Read Study 

The Motorman 
and His Duties 



By following this plan each will secure in- 
timate knowledge of the principles govern- 
ing the operation of electric railway cars. 

This book explains in simple language, devoid of mathematics and 
technicalities, many points not generally understood by the average 
employe who has to do with the operation or care of electric railway roll- 
ing stock. Such knowledge cannot fail to make his services more valu- 
able to his company and more satisfactory to himself, and it will also 
better fit him for promotion. 

The revised, enlarged and improved sixth edition is now ready. Two 
hundred pages; 138 illustrations; three folding sheets of multiple-unit 
wiring diagrams; cloth binding. Price, $1.50 per copy, prepaid. 

Send your address on a postal for a pamphlet of sample pages, etc. 
r T , \_ T17*l i~* 160 Harrison Street 

lhe Wilson Company Chicago, u. s. a. 



Alphabetical List of Advertisers, Page 4. Advertisers' Classified Directory, Pages 4-6*10. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 




For 



Electric Railway Service 




possess distinctively new and improved 
features which invite the careful con- 
sideration of progressive railway men. 

They have attained an enviable dis- 
tinction as the standard of efficiency, 
reliability and simplicity. The careful 
design and construction of the com- 
ponent parts of the apparatus make 
" National Air Brakes " the most effi- 
cient, compact and serviceable brakes 
for modern traction service at a mini- 
mum of expense for operation and 
maintenance. 



Diagram of National Straight Air 
Brake Equipment 



Bulletins on any or all of the 
apparatus sent upon request. 




Wk$mb&i*&m* U« Bl Jk* 



NEW YORK: 111 Broadway 
PHILADELPHIA: Land Title Building 
BOSTON: F. E. Huntress, 131 State Street 



General Sales Office DENVER: Hendrie & Bol(hoff Co 

519 First National Bank Buildind SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.: w. F. McKENNY 

526 Mission Street 
CHICAGO LONDON: 14 Great Smith St., Westminster 



Ftectric Railway Review 

FORMERLY THE STREET RAILWAY REVIEW 



VOLUME XIX 

January 1 to May 31, 1908 



THE WILSON COMPANY 

160 Harrison Street 

Chicago 



>l. \<\ 



GENERAL INDEX 



Uirora Elgin & Chicago Railroad 
i '■■Hi ral Illinois Tractl !o Neai 

' 'ii.ii le: '■ , 305 

I (etroll Jai ks S Chicago Railwa 

Fpsilanti 

idulenl i '[.urn- in Bal i I 

Indian < ' i: ... I .... L8S, 

intci-borough Rapid Transit Co 

Metropolitan West Side El 

(Chi. ,■■■■■ 

New \ ork i 'itj I >ui ing April, 1908. 

Philadi Iphla Rapid Transit Co 

' Intario, < Canada, I (uring 190' 

rn \ ention of, Boston Ele\ ated Rail- 

X-. L86, 

Qui bei Briil t:i' I masM. Repot i on 

Rei 'in 23, 52, 21 .. 275, 

Reduction of in ( nriaha ; 

South Sid. Elevated Railroad (Chi- 

\. . Idents. See Also < Maims. 

Accomac Power & Traction Co Track 

and Roadway 55, 

Recounting — 
i !entral Electric \ counting Confer- 

.ii. e 142, is:.. 211, 275, IT::. 

1 'eproeiat inn f 

By C. V Duffs 

By Daniel Royse 

Cardiff Properties 

International Traction Co., Buffalo.., 

Steam Plant 

— Government Supervision .>f Railway 
A... .nuts. By Henry ('. Adams... 
— Interstate Commerce Commission Sta- 
tistics and Accounts. Bv C. L. 

Wight 

Interstate Commerce Commission Sys- 
tem — 
Abbreviated Classification of Operat- 
ing Expenses : :: 1. 

Action by Ohio Commission 

Co-operation of Interstate and State 

Com missions 

— Electrical and Gas Corporations 

Indiana ami i Hiio Lines 

Michigan Railn.a.l Commission Will 

Not Adopt 

New Hampshire Railroad Commis- 
sion's Attitude 

Petition on Behalf of New York State 

Association 

Resolutions of New York State Asso- 
ciation 

Revision of Classification ..!" Operat- 
ing Expenses :i:i ), 

Tentative Classification of Operating 
Expenses. . .266. 299. ,347, 349, 351. 1 
Replies to Circular No. 20.t374, 375, 
177, 379, 108, 409, 119, II.'. I ! I. 
(71. 171. :,i::. ;:.2::. 525. 558, 572, 
Monthlj Coal statement. United Rail- 
ways & Electric Co. Of Baltimore.' 
t Between Banket- and Engi- 
ne, r 452, i 

Uniform System foi Electrl. Lighting 

i lompanies 

Henry C, Government Supervi- 
sion of Railwa: Accounts 

Adams, P. O., Rail & Safetj Appli: 



Adan 



i'.i. 



Westlake Co 

\dr t & Co 

Advertising 

\ Means for TrafBi I '•■-. elopmenl 

Aurora Elgin iX- Chicago Railroad 

Chicago Railways 

Conestoga Traction Companj Methods. 1 

Illinois Traction Sj stein 

Indiana Union Tiaetimi i !o. 

Inland Empire S\ stem. Methods 

Portland Railwa> Light .x- Power Co.. 
■ ii. .ii ..t Traffic. By c. F Price. 

Station Service 

United Railways & Ele trie Co. of 
Baltimore 393, 128, 131, 515, 

Vali i 

Africa. Long-Distance Transmissi... 
\ii Brakes 

Vnt atie. Valve Interlock 

National, for Chi. ago Railw tys Co 
\ir Compressors — 

National Type 

Wfestinghouse, For Pumping. 

' :. bama Railwaj ,x Electi ii Co 

orpoi ated 

:.... i way 581, 



.\ n. an | S 1 1 a. ]■ nn Railroad 

Financial 

Power Plant 310 

AM. an> Street Railwa; . Ti a. k and Road- 
waj 

\ 1 1 . i , i 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 . i . ii Railwa: Trai 

Roadwa r,r,. 

Alexanderson, E. !•' . Single-Phasi Rail- 
waj MotOl «78, B4, 85, 

Mien. ' '. I .noun-.. Practical Vii 

Ti ucks foi i '.!■■■ trli \i 

1 ■ '■■ 

. .30, 157. 165, 226, 

MOtOl I > I i X .ii TOOl ' rl ill. ler > 

Sci ew Pump 

Alton Granite & St I Trai Co., 

Effei i ni -' ' lent 

I-'. i I,. tin 

Alton St. Louis >X- Cairo Railroad, Incor- 
porated 

A ni.-ii illn, Tex., Electric 1 line i (pern I 

Amarillo Street Railway, Semi-Steel Cars 
\inei i. ,,n Architect 

American Blowei Co 

Ventilation of New Fork Central Powei 
Stations * 

American Brake Shoe ,x Foundrj I !o.3 13, 

—New Foundry at Chattanooga * 

American Bridge Co 

American Car & Foundry Co. 343 

— Cars, Northwestern Elevated Railroad.* 

American Car Co., Orders 552, 

American Cities Railway & Light Co. 
(New York), Dividends 

American Equipment Co 

American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neers 23. 52. 84. :>i. 92, 12\ 159. 

IN.".. 186, 219, 245, 275, 276, 306, 332. 
334. 394, 129, 186, 1x7. 545, 546, 579, 

American Korean Electric Co.. Bonus 
System 

American Light i<- Traction Co.. Finan- 
cial 164, 

American Light Heat & Traction Co., 
Financial 

American Locomotive Co 

29. 611. 165, 400, 435, 

American National Corporation 

American Railway Appliances Co 

American Railway Insurance Co 

American Railways Co. — 

— Dividends 

—Earnings 98, 225. 466, 519, 

American Society for Testing Materials.. 

American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers 159. 306, 516. 546, 

American Steel Foundries 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 435, 

Americus Railway & Light Co. — 

— Power Plant 

— Track and Roadway 25, 

Amusement Parks. See Parks. 

Anderson, Ind . Indiana Union Traction 
Co., Repair Shops ,64. *67, 

Anderson & Athens Electric Railway, 
Track and Roadway. 

Anderson Traction Co., Financial. 340, 466, 

Annapolis. Md.. Track and Roadway.... 

Anniston Electric ,x- Gas Co.. Track and 
Roadway 

Arc Lamps for Lighting ' 'at Interim s 
1318 

Archbold-P.rtnlv Co 

Ardmore Traction I '.. 

—Rolling Stock 

— Track and Roadway 188, 366, 

Rrgenta Railway, Track and Roadway.. 

Arizona Southern Railway, Incorporated. 

Arkansas Vallej Traction Co., Ti icl ind 
l toadway 

Armature Rearing. Jig for * 

Armature I loxes, I [and Lai he « 

Armature Disc Notcher, Ferracute 

Armature Repair simp Methods * 

Armature stands » 

A rm::i in. Truck * 

Armstrong. Albei I n Heai i tri> 
Tra ' i inn 

Am. as. Alexander. Rolling Stock 

Arnol I, Bio 

Ri lew York Sub- 
way 

-Report on New STork Subwaj Cars.... 



Signal and Interlocking System, New 
York Subway 

Ashenfelter, n. M., Some Useful Shop 



!■ 




Ash. 



.hemes 

ml!.- ,X- I lender 

tid Road 



ille Railroad. 



Ashtabula I 
140 and Roadwa 

368 

American G 

396 — Goven m Supervision ol Railway 

Vc in By H. C. Adam . .'. 43 

396 —A ;,,,,! 

M ai n 1 1 
86 - ' 

way — 

L03 X- ■ ounl Ing Cin ulai ' ■ lla 

lii.il ion Of i i|i. i.il in" Ex p.-nsns. . . . 
664 

136 i lulletins 245 660 

284 — I : • i nn ... ting 179 

M ' hip Pamphlet . 173 

Standing ' '.mmnt tecs 

76 Statistii al Buret f Infoi 

American si n et and Intei ui ban Rail- 
517 way Accountants' — 

52 E xi eutivi Committei Meetin lxn 

•61 — American Street and Interurban Rail 
610 way i 'laim Agents' — 

610 Executive Committee Meeting ixn 

Standing Committees :i;,x 

'494 Index Bureaus 295 

552 — American street and Interurban Rall- 
346 way Engineering — 

552 Executive Committee Meeting. ... 127. lxrt 

435 Standardization Committee — 

500 Asks Data on Cars *G41 

664 Meeting 590,615 

Standing Committees 325 

370 — American Street anil Inteiurban Rail- 

60 way Manufacturers' 343 

— American Street and Interurban Rail- 
way Transportation and Traffic — 
Organization of f63. 65. 127, 143, 179 

632 Standing Committees 358 

— American Supply and Machinery Manu- 

217 facturers' 435 

— Australasian Tramway Officers' Asso- 

369 ciation Organized 181 

— Canadian Electrical 394 

RSf — Central Electric Accounting Conference 

142, 1S5. 211, 275. 473, 513 

c, n — Central Electric Railwav 

qq 3S. 325. 362. 379. 516. 596, 645 

fi 2j Annual Meeting 92, »106 

.'.!' -Classification of Operating Expenses. 

Resolutions Concerning 379 

,- n Standing Committees 237 

««■! —Central Electric Traffic 362 

?£'* Organization of tl, 13, tlOl, 108, 186 

Fitehburg & Leominster Street Rail- 

-,_ way Relief 504 

2$ — Ft. Wayne & Wabash Vallev Traction 
2?n c '°-. Employes' Mutual Benefit As- 

ni sociation 647 

,,„ — Fox River Valley Railway & Lighting. 

,00 391. 545 

— Georgia Railway & Electric Employes' 334 
Grand Rapids Electrical Show Associa- 
te tion 193 

— Iowa Electrical 504 

.,. — Iowa Street and Interurban Railwav... 4Nfi 

,'■' Annual Meeting 242, 503 

:,.,- —Michigan Electric 46o 

sil — Missouri Ele. .trie Light, lias and Street 

Railway 275, 516 

■sus. — National Electric Light 528 

Uniform System of Accounting for 

.;:'■• Electric Lighting Companies.. 

371 — Northwestern Electrical 77 

Annual Meeting 12s 

:! 'l —Officers' anil Empl.i\os' Ass.., iali.ui. Ft. 

633 Wayne & Wabash Valley Traction 

188 . ,, 21- 

633 — Ohio Electric Railway Beneficial. 

—Oklahoma Electric Light. Railwav and 

-; 1 Gas 657 

388 — Pennsylvania Street Railway, Uniform 

109 \ turn Si stem x; 

401 — Railway Signal . 23 

565 — Southwestern Electrical and Gas 

1S3 Convention 597 

360 Question Box 

— Street Railway Association ol State of 

358 New York 306, 

192 —Brief on A.-.. muting Scheme Submit- 

ted to I'li.ii. Service Commission, 

Second I ijstt i.-t 591 

654 Interurban Rules 91 

Resolut urns 1 '..ni. -iniiig Tentative 
262 Classification 

—Technical Publicity 586 

355 Atha Steel Casting Co 167 

i;.-. us for Electric Traveling Cranes .... »522 
..:'•:: Athens. La., Track und Roadway 188 

Athens & Anders. .11 Ele. trie Railway, 
Bit Track ..n.l Roadway 366 



"An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger indicates an editorial 

207655 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Athens Electric Railway — 

— Dividends 59 

— Power Plant 339 

Atlanta. Ga.— 

— Track and Roadway 25 

— Fare Cases 308 

Atlanta & Carolina Construction Co., 

Track and Roadway. ..221, 308. 431. 488 
Atlanta & Carolina Railway. Track and 

Roadway 337 

Atlanta Norcross & Gainesville Electric 

Railway. Track and Roadway .. .94, 247 
Atlanta Northern Railway. Fare Reduc- 
tion 25, 308, 336. 365 

Atlantic City & Shore Railroad, Ticket 

Methods 

Auburn & Northern Electric Railroad — 

—Rolling Stock 552 

— Track and Roadway 3 

Auburn & Turner Railroad. Track and 

Roadway 5 1 7 

Augusta & Columbia Railway. Track and 

Roadway 337. 396 

Augusta-Aiken Railwav & Electric Co.. 

, Financial 583 

Aurora, Mo., Track and Roadway 25 

Aurora Elgin & Chicago Railroad- 

— Accident Near Maywood 459 

— Advertising Methods *14 

—Cars «178 

—Dividends 28, 434 

—Earnings 164, 250, 584, 663 

Milk Traffic »296 

—Rolling Stuck 250, 664 

—Substation 637 

— Whitening Shop Floors with Lime *474 

Austin & Lockhart Interurban Railwav. 

Track and Roadway 1 fi 2 

B 

Baker. William C. Heating & Supply Co.. 

Hot Water Heaters 166 

Balaguer. Pinckney J.. Classification of 

Operating Expenses 408 

Baldwin Locomotive Works — 
— Electric Locomotives for Chicago Sub- 
ways *495 

— Electric Motor and Trailer Trucks. .. ,*382 

— Truck with New Motor Suspension *470 

Baltimore. Md. — 

— Unite! Railways & Electric Co. — 

Accident Frauds 42S, 451 

Car Defect Report *272 

Car House at. Electric Park *232 

Cars. Crane *658 

Employment of Trainmen 515 

Monthly Coal Statement *391 

Overcapitalization t524 

Public Relations. 91. 276, f285, 362. 393. 578 

Repair Shop Records *526 

Repair Work Record *327 

Transfer Methods *299 

Baltimore & North Branch Railway. In- 
corporated 366 

Baltimore & Pennsylvania Railway * 

Power Co.. Incorporated 220 

Baltimore & Washington Transit Co.. 

Track and Roadway 366 

Bangor Railway & Electric Co.. Divi- 
dends 2S. 399 

Banker. Relation with the Engineer. By 

J. C Kelsev 452. 1472 

Barnard, B. S., & Co 98 

Barnes, G. H. Hardwood Lumber Co. ... 227 

Barnev & Smith Car Co 520 

Barstow. W. S.. &Co : 193 

Bartlesville Interurban Railway, Track 

and Roadway 337 

Bavlv Manufacturing Co 29 

Bavou Teche Railway & Light Co., 

Track and Roadway 95. 247 

Bear Lake Electric Light & Power Co., 

Power Plant 549 

Beaver Falls & Koppel Electric Railway. 

Pittsburg, Pa.. Track and Roadway 95 
Beaver Valley Traction Co., Wages In- 
creased 660 

Beilharz. W. E.. Housing for Embedded 

Bolts 

Belleville & Pinckneyville Tracti !o., 

Track and Roadway 581 

Bennington ,v North Adams Street Rail- 

way, Track and Roadway 581 

Benton Harbor-St. Joe Railway & Light 

CO. 

— Effect of 2-Cent Steam Rai 

on Traffic 124 

— Track and Ros 431 

Berger Manufacturing Co 135. 343 

' ii . Track and Roadway 606 

Berlin & Bridgeport Electric Street Rail- 
way. Ti .ii i. Ruailwav 

Berlin & Waterloo Street Railway, Roll- 
ing Stock 

Berkshire Street Railwaj Financial 60i 

Bi thlehem Steel Co 343 

d Pool El< i trie Railwaj 
and Roadway ISs 

Birmingham * Gulf Railway & Naviga- 
tion i 

— Financial 

I, and Roadway 5 1 i 

Birmingham Railwaj Light .V: I 
Co. 

—Dividends 59 



— Earnings -636 

—Substation 607 

— Track and Roadway 581 

— Transfer Law Violated 516 

Black Hills Traction Co., Power Plant.. 490 
Black River Trection Co.. Single-Truck 

Cars Without Monitors *144 

Blake Signal & Manufacturing Co 193 

—Signals with Oil Lights »2S4 

Bloomington & Normal Railway & Light 

Co.. Franchises. Validity of 4S7 

Bloomington Pontiac & Joliet Electric 
Railway — 

—Rolling Stuck 610 

—Track and Roadway 277, 517 

Blue Hill Street Railway, Fares In- 
creased 

Blue Ridge Light & Power Co.. Financial 28 
Blue Ridge Traction Co., Track and 

Roadway 221 

Boilers, Cleaning of 176 

Boise & Interurban Railway. Description. *320 
Boise Valley Railway, Track and Road- 
way 188. 633 

Bnlts, Embedded. Housing fur *554 

Bunds. Shawmut Auxiliary 283 

Book Reviews — 

— Beven, Thomas. Negligence in Law.... 360 

— Karapetoff. V.. Experimental Electrical 

Engineering 179 

— Lyndon, Lamar. Development ami Elec- 
trical Distribution of Water Power. 499 
— McGraw Publishing Co., Standard 

Handbook for Electrical Engineers 21 1 
Norris, Henry H.. Introduction to the 
Study of Electrical Engineering.... 179 
— Radcliffe. W. H.. Telenhone Construc- 
tion. Installation, Wiring, Operat- 
ing and Maintenance 499 

Boston, Mass. — 

— Traffic Congestion 256 

Washington Street Tunnel. Engineering 

Features 655 

Boston & Eastern Electric Railroad. Re- 
cis.d Construction Estimates 542 

Boston & Northern Street Railway — 

—Fares 237 

— Financial 583 

Boston & Worcester Electric Companies, 

Dividends 2S 

Boston & Worcester Street Railway— 

— Financial 3 4 u 

— Schedules 160 

Boston Elevated Railway 590 

— Accidents. Prevention of 1S6. 246 

— Car House 193 

— Commutating-Pole Generators *194 

— Comparison with Brooklyn Rapid Tran- 
sit Co ties 

—Dividends 192 

— Earnings. Comparison of fin" 

— Fares 1 1 237 

—Financial 59. 191. 224. 369 

— Fire at Sullivan Square Terminal 460 

— Maintaining Schedules at Charlestown, 

Mass 633 

—Schedules »329 

— Terminal Station at Forest Hills 254 

—Track and Roadwav. .55. 130, 247, 396, 462 
— Washington Street Tunnel. Boston. En- 
gineering Features fir,:. 

Boston Suburban Electric Companies, 

Financial 28, 191 

Boston Waltham & Western Electric 

Railroad. Track and Roadwaj . 277 
Bowling Green Railwav — 

—Power Plant 278 

— Rolling Stuck 

Box. Alfred, ti- Co 25] 

Brady Brass Co 314 

Brake Rigging, Fundamental. By R. C. 

Taylor 114. tl39 

Brakes, New York City Lines 

Brantford & Hamilton Electric Railway, 

Track and Roadway 396 

Brantford Street Railway. Track and 

Roadwav 547 

Brill, The .1 G., Co 165 251 5 

— Fare Receiver *4S4 

—Orders. .165. 192. 250 100, 193, 552 610, 637 

— Pay-As-Tou-Enter Cars 359 

—Strang Gas-Electric Motoi Car *454 

Bristol Co 193 

British Columbia Electric Railway, Track 

and Ro civ- a; 861 

1 trockton & Plyi I Rs llwav, 

Earnings 

Brockville, Out., Track and 308 

N. Y. 
— Bridge — 

Improvements 51 

--New Vui-k Extension 1 , 1 



Brooklj n I'm. R 1, 1 'i ,,]. 1 1 

Brnoklj n Rapid Ti ansit 1 !o 
1 lompai is. hi ■ Ith Boston Blei ate 1 Rail- 



Elevate 1 Car *171 

I'H'ial 97. 399, 19 

in! eased Servii Ordered 

--Transfers, Aims, of 4111 

1 :r.i\vns\ ille Cai 

Railwaj Tri 1 Roadwaj 

Brownsville Masontown & Smithfield 
Stree! Railway 



—Power Plant 635 

— Track & Roadway 221, 547 

Brush-Holder Maintenance t347. 

Buffalo, N. Y.— 
—International Railway— 

Car House *476 

— International Traction Co. — 

— —Cars, Pay-As-You-Enter »37 153 

Depreciation t472 

Buffalo & Lake Erie Traction Co. — 

— Financial 28, 551 

— Track and Roadwav 51 7 

Buffalo Forge Co 343 

Buffalo Lockport & Rochester Railway — 
— Combination Passenger, Smoking and 

Baggage Cars *453 

— Track and Roadway 95, 337. 547 

Bumpers. Standard Height 1; I 

Burlington, Ind., Track and Roadway. ... 
Burlington-Bonaparte Interurban Rail- 

way, Track and Roadway 1S8. 633 

Burlington Interurban Railroad. Track 

and Roadwav 634 

Burns & Co 62 

Button. Chauncey F., Telegraph Signal 

System «117 



Cable Connectors, Dossert *226 

Cables, Motoi Connections *273 

Cade, G. B.. Classification of Operating 

Expenses 377 

Calgary, Alberta, Track and Roadwav.. 

462, 4\s 

California <'.as & Electric Corporation, 

Financial 551. 663 

Calumet & Lac la Belle Traction & 
Power Co., Track and Roadwav... 

95. 247. 277 

Calumet & South Chicago Railway — 

— Financial 551 

— Incorporated 366 

— Franchises 128 

Cambridge Power Light & Traction Co..^ 
Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railwav 

Fare on Traffic 75 

Camden & Trenton Railwav. Financial.. 

249. 3411. 5X3. 663 

Camden Interstate Railway, Financial. 369 
• lanada — 

-Accidents in Ontario During 1907 r,15 

—Electric Railway Statistics. 1907 104 

Canadian Crocker-W r heeler Co 371 

Canadian Valley Railway — 

— Incorporated 48S 

— Track and Roadway 606, 661 

I'anailian Westinghouse Co 435 

Capital Traction Co. — 

-Dividends 28. 466 

Financial ' 191 

Car Building. Los Angeles & Redondo 

Railway *445 

Car Cleaning *20 

— Vacuum Method 468 

Car Cleaning and Inspection, Chicago 

City Railway f406. *410 

Car Construction, Ft. Smith Light & 

Traction Co 427 

Car Houses — 

— Fire Protection 541 

—United Railways & Electric Co. (Balti- 
more) at Electric Park *232 

Car Lighting t286, + 318. »453 

Car Storage, Subdividing tl97 

Car Wiring — 

—Cables. Oakland Traction Co *236 

— Metropolitan West Side Elevated Rail- 
wav (Chicago) *601 

Valves and Governors t63 

Carlyle-Johnson Machine Co 313 

Carnegie Steel Co 29 

\n I. ninns for Illuminating. f286, f318, *453 

— Bumper Heights t64 

— Cleanliness. Decision Regarding ::;: 

— Combination Platform Gate and Trap..*638 

—Defect Report *272 

— Mirrors for Motormen t523 

1 1, erhaulina 1406 

-Standardization Committee of Engi- 
neering Association Requests Data. "fill 
1 'av- \s- Vim. 1 '■ ■• n T pi 

■ en- Railway 264 

Vloines City Railway 572 

For Citv Service. By T. J. Nicholl. . 35 

int. ■rniuiu mil Railway [Buffalo) . . 453 

New York City Railway 583 

Pittsburg Experiments tl 

Platform Gate 

162, 128 

— Trailers Advantages of t374 

-Ventilation 

-Ventila Ex] troit 1 

Railwav isi 

—Without Monitors U39 

PVindo lash »2S3 

' ':us. I '. si , iptions nf — 

■ M, in & 1 hicago Ri I . . ,*17S 

Rapid Transit 1 !o . Eli 



Set 



'171 



rvpi 1 takl md Tracti 0, 

Chicago .- Southern Traction Co »352 

1 Lake Shun' ,v South Bend 

*628 

V.-iii. Traction Co *156 

( '-.iisti 1: 1 ion, Ft. Waj ne & Wabash 



An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger 



ates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



( Irane, for Handling Coal *2,0 

Crane, United Railways .v Electric 

Company of Baltimorr *658 

Express Boise & Interurban Railway.: . *321 

Gas-Electric Motor Car Ml" 

Hanover & Fork Railway *289 

Indianapolis Crawfordsvllle >v- Western 

Traction Co *622 

[nterurban, Choctaw Railway & Light- 
ing Co '422 

Mexico, Semi-Steel Cars 'loo 

-Motor and Trail in St. Joseph, Mo....*386 

Motor, Stovi r *22» 

Motor, Strang Gas-Electric *454 

Now York Subway, Arnold Report 

,256, »262 

—Northwestern Elevated Railroad, Chi- 
cago *- ,IM> 

— Oregon Electric Railway *26o 

— Parlor. Mexico Electric Tramways Co. *47 
■Passenger an. I ItiSKiiS''. Waterloo 

Cedar Falls i- Northern Railway. .*425 
—Passenger and Freight. Los Angeles & 

it.-d. .mil. Railway '445 

Passenger Smoking and I'.aggage. Ruf- 
falo Lockport & Rochester Rallws 
- Pay-As-You-Enter Type 

Chii ago Railways Cb: *265 

Cleveland Kiel-trie Railwai *424 

International Railway, Buffalo ..'»37 

.lew, -it Cari'-,,. Design *553 

Montere: Railwaj Ught & Power Po..*239 



•273 



I -Hi, in Sei i li •■ Railwaj of New Jer- 

*213 

Fan R< elvei *4S4 

Semi-Steel, Cincinnati Car Co *42:i 

Pittsburg Harmony Butler & New Cas- 
tle Railway *-•"' ' 

Refrigerator, Ft. Wayne & Springfield 

Railway *330 

-Richmond ,v Chesapeake Bay Railway. *298 
Semi -Convertible, Utah Light & Rail- 
way Co *403 

Semi-Steel', Amarillo street Railway... *6l 
Semi-Steel Semi-Convertible for Mex- 

ie :.noo 

—Single -Truck, Without Monitors * 1 44 

Typical Traction Cars. By Charles A. 

I Lion ■ *151 

— Washington Baltimore & Annapolis 

Electric Railway *20I 

Water. Oakland Traction Co *656 

Cassi.t Magazine C, , '. 552 

Cassville & Western Railway. Track and 

Roadway 488 

Catenary Sectionalization *so. 84. 86 

Catoctin & Pen-Mar Railway. Incorpo- 
rated 337 

Cedar Rapids & Iowa City Railway— 
— Effect of '-'-Cent Steam Railway Fan- 
On Traffic '. . .' 76 

— Power Plant '. 607 

—Traffic Arrangement with Chicago & 

Northwestern Railway 395, |43S 

Census of Electric Railways 535 

Central Arkansas Electrjc Railways Col, 

Track and Roadway 247 

Central California Traction Co.. Financial 369 
Central Crawford Traction Co.. Track 

and Roadway 130 

Central Illinois Traction Co.. Accident 

Near Charleston 53. 274, 305. 546 

Central Inspection Bureau 60, 61" 

Central Pennsylvania Traction Co.. Power 

Plant *455 

Central Railway (Clinton. Ia.l. Track and 

Roadway 162 

Central Railway (Peoria, 111.), Electroly- 
sis Suit 364 

Central States Bridge Co 134 

Central Texas Traction Co.. Track and 

Roadway 130 

Centralia & Central City Street Railway. 

Rolling Stock 493 

Centralia & Chehalis Railway & Power 

Co.. Track and Roadway ISs 

Chambersburg Greencastle & Waynesboro 
Street Railway — 

—Power Plant 190, 222 

—Rolling Stock 637 

—Track and Roadway 221. 431. 548 

Chaniplain & Sanford Railroad. Incorpo- 
rated 547 

Charleston & Casey Traction Co.. It r- 

porated 661 

Charleston & Summerville Electric Rail- 
way — 

—Financial 28. 369 

—Track and Roadway 25, 338. 488 

Charleston Consolidated Railway Gas & 

Electric Co.. Dividends 98 

Charleston Railway Gas & Electric Co.. 

Power Plant 26 

Charlotte Electric Railway Light & Power 

Co., Track and Roadway 397 

Chase- Shawmut Co 282 

— Shawmut Auxiliary Bond 283 

"'her. ike. ■ Belt .v Interurban Railway, 

Incorporated 396 

Chester Railway SuppU <',, ::71. in:: 

Chester Traction Co., Strike 

487. 515. 545, 579. 604 

I 'iii.ago — 

Advertising Methods of Railways 24 

— Compensation Payments of Elevated 

Loop t348 



—Elevated Railroad Traffic 186, 308 

Metropolitan West Side Elevated Rail- 
way — 

Accident 219 

Annual Report 169 

Car Wiring '601 

Employment of Trainmen. . 119 

Valves ami Governors Under Seats.. t63 

Northwest, -in Elevated Railroad — 

Cars ■ *•'>"" 

Bvanston Extension Opened 63" 

— Public Service Commission Proposed.. 90 

—Railways Advertise Service 21 

South Side Elevated Railroad— 

Accident .460 

Extensions and Improvements *269 

Increase, i Expenses tl67 

Suhwav Plans I'n.ler Consideration . 487,,B46 
—Through Routes on Elevated Roads. 26S. 335 
—Through Ront.s on Surface Lines. .325; !65 
—Transfer I'sed on Through Rout.-... '325 

Union Elevated Loop Service 

53 128, 187, 220, 268, 515, '539, 604, 632 
Chicago ,v- Juliet Electric Railway—' 
— Kffe.t of 2-Ceni Steam Railway Pare 

on Traffic •_< 

— Power Plant 163, 27s 

Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad — 

— Financial 

59, 191, 224, 249, 311, 340, 434, 466. 583 
—Joint Rates with Steam Roads... 24, 54, t64 

— Receivership 17. 156 

—Track and Roadway 518. 606 

Chicago & Oak Park Elevated Railroad— ■ 

— Animal Report ■••■ 257 

— Financial 191 

— Track Elevation 604 

Chicago & Southern Traction Co.— ■ 

— Description 351 

—Rolling Stock •• 381 

— Track and Roadway •• 1''-' 

Chicago Bailey Co 313 

Chicago City Railway— 

— Annual Report 23] 

— Car Cleaning and Inspection -406. »410 

— Car House 313 

—Car House Records and Terminal 

i 'leaning -I"". "410 

—Cars. Pay-As- You-Enter 264 

— Dividends 192,, 281 

— Fenders 297 

—Financial 164. 191, 249. 311, 340, 192 

—Police Kxpedite Traffic 93 

—Rolling Stock 192 

—Thermit Welding -*447 

— Through Routes 2b... 325 

—Track and Roadway 221, 431, 4b2 

Chicago Consolidated Traction Co.— 

— financial "63 

—Reduction in Fares 246 

Chicago Inland Traction Co., Incorporated 431 
Chicago Kankakee & Champaign Electric 

Railway. Track and Roadway . .366. 517 
Chicago Lake Shore & South Bend Rail- 
way — 

—Cars *628 

— Description 54. 

— Financial ••_•■ 249 

—Rolling Stock 3d. 520 

— Track and Roadway 95, 162. 462 

Chicago-New York Air Line Railroad 245 

— Receivership 305 

Chicago Ottawa & Peoria Railway, Roll- 
ing Stock 342. 400 

Chicago Ottumwa & Western Railway— 

— Incorporated 431 

—Track and Roadway • • • »1T 

Chicago Pneumatic Tool Co 193, 251 

Chicago Railways Co. — 

— Air Brakes 52.. 

— Betterment of Service 220 

— Cars. Pav-As-Yon-Enter Tvpe '265 

— Chicago Union Traction Reorganiza- 
tion 127. 158 

—Financial 191. 249. 

280. 311. 340. 369, 434. 466. 492. 519. 609 
—Rolling Stock.... 250. 313. 371. 400, 493. 520 

— Strike Threatened 603, 631 

— Through Routes 325 

—Track and Roadway 338. 462, al < 

— Trainmen Ask Wage Increase 545 

Chicago South Bend & Northern Indiana 
Railway — 

— Power Plant 222 

—Rolling Stock 585 

—Track anil Roadway 221. 277. 366, 661 

— Useful Shop Schemes *533 

Chicago to New York by Trolley 428 

Chicago Union Traction Co. — 

—Financial 97. 609 

— New Depot Route 52 

Chippewa Valley Electric Railroad, Roll- 
ing Stock 134 

Chippewa Valley Railway Light & Power 

Co., Rolling Stock 400 

Choctaw Railway & Lighting Co.— 

— Interurban Cars ..»422 

—Roiling Stock 134. 493.552 

Cincinnati. O., Track and Roadway 606 

Cincinnati Car Co. — 

—Orders 226. 342. 552. 585. 610. 664 

—Pay-As- You-Enter Car. Semi-Steel *423 

— Pay-As- You-Enter Cars. Newark. N. J.*213 
Cincinnati Madison .v.- Western Traction 

Co., Incorporated 188 



Cincinnati Newport At Covington Light 
& Traction Co., Dividends 

Cincinnati Northern Traction Co. — 
-Limited Service Between Cincinnati and 

I >aj ton 129 

Power Plant 

— Track and Roadway 55 

Cincinnati Street Railway. Dividends.. 

Cincinnati Traction Co., Substation 490 

Cincinnati Wilmington & Xenia Traction 

Co., Incorporated 488 

Citizens' Electric Co., Financial 191 

Citizens' Electric Streel Railway. Divi- 
dends 2S 

Citizens' Light & Transit Co,, Track and 

Roadway 606 

Citizens' Traction Co.. Dividends 636 

City & Elm Grove Railroad. Power Plant 5 19 
City & Suburban Electric Railway, Track 

and Roadway 55 

Claim Investigator, Successful Qualifica- 
tions of 136, 14*. 475. 536, 567 

City Railwaj-. Dayton, i ).. Dividends. .28. 466 
Claims — 

— Index Bureau 295 

—Methods of Handling. By Arthur W. 

Gross 512 

Clark Manufacturing Co 9S 

— Lightning Arrester *46S 

Clark. H. P.— .„„„ 

— Practical Motor Coil .Making *627 

— Practical Shop Hints *238 

Clarkston. Wash., Track and Roadway.. 25 
Cleveland, O.— ■' „„„ 

—Strike. Municipal Traction Co.. 5, 8. 63". 660 

—Three-Cent Fares ^523, t587 

Valuation and Merger of Railways... 

90, 127. 149. 158, 

185, 21S, 1230, 244, 274. 305. 362. 393, 
428, 459, 486, 515. t523, 537. t588, 604 
Cleveland & Indianapolis Interurban Rail- 
way, Track and Roadway 462 

Cleveland Alliance & Mahoning Valley 
Railway. Cleveland, O.. Track and 

Roadway 95 

Cleveland Brookhn & Elyria Railway. 

Track and Roadway 431. 606 

Cleveland Electric Railway — 

— Financial • 133. 280 

— Pav-As-You-Enter Cars *424 

Columbus Canton & Eastern Transit Co., 

Incorporated 605 

Cleveland Painesville & Eastern Rail- 
road — 

— Annual Report : ".". 169 

— Contest for Trademark Design 395 

— Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fare 

on Traffic 76 

Cleveland Southwestern & Columbus 

Railway — 
—Effect of 2-Cenl Steam Railway Fare 

on Traffic 75 

—Financial 224, 280 

—Substations • • • 662 

— Track and Roadway 24 1 . 661 

Clubs— 

—Employes'. Illinois Traction System... 114 

— Engineers', of Philadelphia 186. 54n 

— Machinery, of New York 631 

—New England Street Railway 384, 632 

—New York Railroad 389. 5i9 

— Railroad, of New York 631 

— Suburban Railway ■ 275 

Coal— 

— Purchase of i -29 

—Weathering of 245 

— Tests 53 

Cochise County Electric Railroad, Incor- 
porated 580 

Colburn. R. D. Hand Lathe for Arma- 
ture Boxes *409 

Cole. Adam, Trolley Wheels, Harps and 

Poles *385 

Columbia & Walla Walla Traction Co., 

Track and Roadway 488 

Columbia Electric Street Railway Light 

& Power Co.. Power Plant 549 

Columbus. Miss.. Track and Roadway 130 

Columbus Electric Co.. Earnings. 133. 342. 609 
Columbus Delaware & Marion Railway — 

— Financial 311 

— Track and Roadway 162. 51 • 

Columbus Magnetic Springs & Northern 

Railway — 
— Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fares 
on Interurban Electric Railway 

Traffic 124 

Columbus Newark & Zanesville Electric- 
Railway. Dividends 28.434 

Columbus Railway. Dividends 

98, 25". 5S5. 636 

Columbus Railway & Light Co. — 

— Car House 134 

—Dividends 192, 466 

— Financial 191 

— Trail Car Operations ^374 

Columbus Street Railway & Light '',,. 

Track and Roadway 308 

Columbus Urbana & Western Electric 

Railway. Rolling Stock 400. 435 

Commissions, Railroad — 
— Illinois — 

Annual Report .-.- 328 

— Indiana — 

Accident Reports 185. 603 



•An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger indicates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Bureau of Inspection 109 

Inspection of Interlocking Devices Re- 
quired 52 

Interchange of Traffic Between Steam 

and Interurban Roads 128 

Interurban Mileage 18 

Investigation of Operating Condi- 
tions 90 

Low Rate to Amusement Park Not 

Discriminative 25 

Meeting with Operating Officials of 

Electric Railways 235, t255. .106 

Train Operation and Maintenance of 

Way Rules 394 

Uniform System of Filing Tariffs... 16n 

— Massachusetts — 

Annual Report 39 

Maintaining Schedules at Charles- 

town. Mass 633 

Springfield. Mass., Fares 219 

— Michigan 307 

Use of Steam Cars by Michigan 

United Railways 516 

Will Not Adopt Accounting System of 

Interstate Commerce Commission.. 439 
— Minnesota — 

Jurisdiction over Electric Roads.... 276 

— New Hampshire — 

Classification of Operating Expenses. 474 

— New York Public Service Commission, 
First District — 

Brakes and Fenders, Plans for 540 

Chart, Interborough - Metropolitan 

System *294 

Coney Island Fare Case 516 

Fares 307 

Ranid Transit Law. Proposed 

Changes 91 

Report for Six Months Ended De- 
cember 31, 1907 104 

Service Investigation 

25. 333. 430. 516. 632. 659 

Subway — 

Capacity of, Arnold Report 654 

Cars, Arnold Report t225. *262 

New Route Recommended *19, 52 

Plans t471 

Signals. Arnold Report 355 

Work of 274, 459 

— New York Public Service Commission. 
Second District — 

Annual Report 126 

Brief on Accounting Scheme Sub- 
mitted by New York State Associa- 
tion 591 

Fares 307 

Long Island Fare Case 335 

Reduced Fares for Students 160 

Service Orders 632 

—Ohio— 

Action Concerning Classification of 

Accounts 588 

— Pennsylvania — 

Personnel 128 

— Public Service Commission for Chi- 
cago Proposed 90 

— Wisconsin — 

Bond Issue of Southern Wisconsin 

Railway Approved 45 

Commutators. Repairing of *183 

Concord Maynard & Hudson Street Rail- 
way — 

—Fares : 237. 307 

— Financial 133. 609 

Concrete — 

— Materials. Selection of 385 

— Reinforced — 

Failures of \ 461 

In Electric Railway Work. Bv N. M. 

Stark 511 

Tests 364 

—Surface Finish. By M. C. Tuttle 265 

—Track Foundation. By H. L. Weber.. *121 
Conestoga Traction Co. — 

— Advertising Methods *327 

— Car Houses 664 

— Fare Receipts, Prizes for Retaining. .. .*268 

•Track and Roadway 462, 517 

Coney Island & Brooklyn Railroad — 

— Financial 280, 519 

—Power Plant 96. 310 

— Substations 131 

i Jonnectieut Co. — • 

—Power Plant 368 

— Track and Roadwav 

188, 338, 397, 131, 548, 581 

Connecticut Railwa3 & Lighting Co. — 

— Cor Houses 400 

—Dividends 192, 585 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway— 

— Car Houses 467 

— Fares Increased 430 

— Rolling Stock 552 

Consolidated Car-Heating Co 60 

Consolidated Railways Light & Power 
Co., Method of Making Motor Con- 
nections *273 

Consolidated Traction Co., Dividends 28 

Construction — 

— Boise & Interurban Railway 320 

— Car House. International Railway *476 

— Car House. United Railways & Electric 

i', i. (Baltimor..). at Kleotric Park. ,*232 

— Chicago & Southern Traction Co "352 

— Engineering Features, Washington 

Street Tunnel, Boston 655 



-Indianapolis Crawfordsville & Western 

Traction Co *617 

-Kokomo Marion & Western Traction 



Co. 



— New Mileage in Indiana 123 

— New York New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad, New York-Port Chester 

Electric Line 44 

— Oregon Electric Railway t255, *258 

— Power Plant, Central Pennsylvania 

Traction Co *455 

— Repair Shops, York Railways Co *440 

— South Side Elevated Railroad (Chicago), 

Extensions and Improvements *269 

— Steam Railroad. During 1907 17 

— Steubenville & East Liverpool Rail- 
way & Light Co 291 

— Syracuse Lake Shore & Northern Rail- 
road *174 

— T-Rail. Bv Mark Lo wd *598 

—Track, in 1907 t3 

Conveyor, Dirt, San Francisco Oakland 

& San Jose Railway *82 

Cook. C. Lee, Manufacturing Co 226 

Coos Bay Gas & Electric Co., Track and 

Roadway 488 

Coquille Valley Power Co., Power Plant.. 490 
Corsioana-Palestine Interurban Railway. 

Track and Roadway 367 

Coupler, Automatic, Gibbs *391 

Coupling, Hendershot *195 

Crafts, P. P., Handling Fares on Interur- 
ban Railways *504 

Crane Co., Pipe Threading and Cutting 

Machine *638 

Cranes — 

— Electric Pillar. Northern Engineering 

Works *196 

— Jib Type. Oakland Traction Co *457 

Creosotes. Grading of +555 

Crocker- Wheeler Co 371. 493, 637 

Crookston. Minn., Power Plant 549 

Crown Point. Ind.. Track and Roadway. 581 
Cumberland Valley Railroad. Rolling 

Stock 165 

Curtain Supply Co 552 

— Closed Groove Ring Fixture *314 

Curtis Motor Truck Co., Orders 225 



Dallas, Tex.. Track and Roadwav 462 

Dallas Consolidated Electric Street Rail- 
way, Track and Roadway 277 

Dallas Electric Corporation. Earnings.... 133 
Dallas Electric Corporation and Subsid- 
iary Companies, Earnings 342, 584 

Dallas Interurban Electric Railway, 

Track and Roadway 247. 548 

Danburv & Bethel Street Railway. Finan- 
cial 609 

Danville Car Co 60. 520 

—Orders 60, 165. 281, 342. 371. 400 

— Semi-Steel Cars. Amarillo Street Rail- 
way *61 

— Semi-Steel Cars for Mexico *100 

Dartmouth & Westport Street Railway, 

Dividends 585 

Davenport & Manchester Interurban Rail- 
way. Track and Roadway 462. 488 

Davton & Troy Electric Railway — 

— Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fare 

on Traffic 76 

Dayton & Xenia Transit Co.. Financial.. 369 
Dayton Covington & Piqua Traction Co., 

Hand Lathe for Armature Boxes... *409 
Davton Street Railway — 

— Rolling Stock 493 

— Track and Roadway 308 

Dearborn Drug & Chemical Works 251 

Decatur, Ind., Track and Roadway 396 

Dedham Franklin Medfield & Medway 

Street Railway, Fares 307 

DeKalh-Sycamore & Interurban Traction 
Co., Effect of 2-Cent Steam Rail- 
way Fare on Traffic 75 

Delaware i*;- Atlantic City Railroad. 

Financial 434 

Delaware & Hudson Co. — 

—Electric Railways *483 

— Financial 369 

—Motor Car *110 

Delaware Marion Ml Gilead Mt. Vernon 
Newark & Southern Coal Tramway 

Co., Track and Roadway 55 

Delaware River & Atlantic City Railroad. 

Financial 311, 341. 399 

Delaware Subway Railwav Co 332 

Denneen, Francis S.. Insulation of High- 

Tension Transmission Lines *64S 

I lenver <£- Interurban Railroad — 

— Car House 281, ?.12 

— Rolling Stock 60. 192. 225 

-Track and Roadwav 

25, 188, 221, 367, 462. 54S 

Denver City Tramway Co. — 

— Financial 133 

— Improvements During 1907 42 

— Track and Roadway 634 

—Trail Car Operation t374 

Deppe. W. P.. Possibilities of Electric 

Railways 381 

Depreciation. See Accounting. 
Des Moines, la. — 

— Franchise Case 91. 275 

— Track and Roadway 188 



Des Moines & Sioux City Railway. Track 

and Roadway 247. 548 

Des Moines City Railway — 

—Financial 311 

—Owl Car Service 54, 220 

— Pay-As-You-Enter Cars 572 

—Power Plant 248 

-Rolling Stock 520 

— Track and Roadwav 338 

—Wages 159. 276. 334 

Des Moines Interurban Railway, Re- 
trenches 159 

Des Moines Winterset & Creston Electric- 
Railway, Track and Road Wav. .247. 33S 
Detroit Flint & Saginaw Railway. Finan- 
cial 636 

Detroit Jackson & Chicago Railway. Ac- 
cident at Ypsilanti 546 

Detroit United Railway — 

— Annual Report 199 

— Earnings 636 

— Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railwav Fare 

on Traffic 76 

—Financial 191, 434 

— Injunction Against Fare Ordinance Dis- 
solved 305 

—T-Rail 48, +63 

— Three-Cent Fare 332, 459 

— Ventilation of Cars 181 

Diamond State Rapid Transit Co. — 

—Rolling Stock 520 

—Track and Roadway 462. 517 

Dickinson .t Southern Railway, Track 

and Roadway 221 

Dielectric Manufacturing Co 520 

Discipline — 

— Employment of Trainmen. Metropolitan 
West Side Elevated Railway, Chi- 
cago 449 

— Bonus Svstem, American Korean Elec- 
tric Co 217 

—Merit Svstem. Ft. Wayne & Wabash 

Valley Traction Co fl97, 215. 653 

— Relations with Employes 1167 

Dispatching. Telegraph Signal Svstem. 

Bv C. P. Button *117 

Doble. Robert McF.. Hydro-Electric 

Power Development 226 

Donora & Eldora Street Railway, Track 

and Roadway 221, 548 

Doors — 

— Kinnear 166 

— Reversible Rolling. Erwood *344 

Dossert & Co 60. 165. 251, 282, 343. 403 

— Connectors *226 

Drake's Branch. Va.. Track and Road- 
wav 5S1 

Dressel Railway Lamp Works 493 

Drouve, G.. Co 226 

Dry Dock East Broadway & Battery 

Railroad. Rolling Stock 281 

Duffy. C. N.— 

— Classification of Operating Expenses.. 419 

— Depreciation 83 

iMiluth Street Railwav — 

— Earnings 192. 584 

—Office Building *456 

—Shelter Stations »292 

Duluth-Superior Traction Co.. Dividends 

59, 466 

Dunnv'lle Wellandport & Beamsville 
Electric Railwav, Track and Road- 
wav 309. 338 

i Hvyer, Dennis. Public Taxation 119 



Earll. Charles I.. Trolley Retriever 135 

Earnings — 

— Electric Railways During Financial 

Depression 1405 

Statistics for 194 Lines During 1907 483 

East St. Louis & Surburban Co. — 

— Dividends 9S. 519 

-Passenger Duplex Hat Checks *456 

East Shore & Suburban Railwav. Power 

Plant 163 

Eastern Pennsylvania Railway. Track 

and Roadway 338 

Eastern Railway Construction Co.. Track 

and Roadway 338 

Eastern Wisconsin Railway cV Lii'ht Co., 

Effect of °-Cent Steam Railway 

Fares on Traffic 124 

Easton Transit Co., Track and Roadway 489 

Economizer. Profit from 344 

Edgefield .V- Augusta Electric Railwav. 

Track and Roadwav 634 

Edmonton Street Railway, Track and 

Roadwav 548 

Education Address of H. H. Norris at 

Purdue University 173 

Edwards. O. M., Co.. Compression Sash 

Fixture *345 

Eldorado Springs Tiffin Monegaw Springs 

£- Lowry city Railroad, Track and 

Roadway 55 

Electric Cable Co 193.343 

Electric Express Co 94 

Electric Railway Review, Consolidation 

with Street Railwav Journal +587 

Electric Railway Service in Central 

States. By H. A. Nicholl 113 

Electric Railways — 

—And the General Public. By E. B. 

Grimes 118 

— Experimental Trip. New York to Chi- 
cago +101 

—Future of the Interurban Road +286 



*An asterisk 



ates maps, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger indicates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



— Jurisdiction of Interstate Commerce 

I'linimissi'iii 77 

—Possibilities of. By W. I'. Deppe 3S1 

—Report of Michigan Commission of 

Labor 603 

-Under Federal Jurisdiction t63 

United States Census 535 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. Grip Nut.*227 

Electric Shocks 378 

Electric Storage Battery Co 29,435 

Electric Traction, Heavy. By A. H. 

Armstrong 358 

Electric Traction Supply Co 251 

Electrical Exposition, international 52 

i ■!, . 1 1 Machinery, Severe Tests. Gen- 
eral Electric 346 

Electi leal Shows — 

N,w York 186 

— Omaha 313 

—St. Louis 275 

Ble< t ririeation 7373 

— Mexican Railways 404 

-New York Central & Hudson River 

Railroad, Results Attained 300 

— New York New Haven & Hartford 

Branch Lines t317 

— Sarnia Tunnel 23 

—St. Petersburg Street Railways 151 

—Swedish Stat,- Railways 1285 

Electrolysis Suits — 

— Central Railway (Peoria) 364 

— In Massachusetts 306 

Elgin Woodstock & Lake Geneva Rail- 
road, Incorporated 462 

Elizabeth. N. J.. Track and Roadway 309 

Elizabethtown & Florin Street Railway, 

Track and Roadway 367 

Elkins, W. Va., Track and Roadway.... 221 
Elkins Electric Railroad. Track and 

Roadway 247 

Ellendt. J. G.. Co 435 

Ellwood Citv, Pa., Track and Roadway. 309 
Ellwood City & Wurtemburg Electric 

Railway. Incorporated 431 

Elmira Corning & Waveiiy Railroad. 

Track and Roadway 548 

Elmira Water Light & Railroad Co., 

Financial 399 

El Paso Electric Co., Earnings. .133. 342, 609 
El Reno Railway. Track and Roadway.. 431 
Elyrla Southern Railway. Track and 

Roadway 130 

Employes — 

— Beneficial Association. Ohio Electric 

Railway 295 

— Bonus System. American Korean Elec- 
tric 'Co 217 

— Examination on Illinois Traction Sys- 
tem 275, 334 

— Fitohburg & Leominster Street Rail- 
way Relief Association 504 

Merit System of Discipline. Ft. Wayne 

& Wabash Valley Traction Co 

tl97. 215. 653 

—Mutual Benefit Association. Ft. Wayne 

& Wabash Valley Traction Co 647 

—Trainmen. Employment of. Metropoli- 
tan West Side Elevated Railway of 

Chicago 449 

— Trainmen on United Railways & Elec- 
tric Co. of Baltimore 515 

Employes. See Also Discipline. 

Engineering Agency 195 

Erie Railroad. Rolling Stock 192 

Erwood, John. Reversible Rolling Door. .*344 
Escanaha Electric Street Railway. Power 

Plant 490. 635 

Express Service, Springfield (Mass.) 

Street Railway 220 

Essex Valley Land Co., Incorporated.... 488 
Eunice Lafayette & Abbeyville Railroad. 

Track and Roadway 188 

Evansville & Southern Indiana Traction 

Co.. Track and Roadway 162. 431 

Evansville Henderson & Unlontown Trac- 
tion Co.. Track and Roadway 26 

Evansville Mt. Carmel & Olney Inter- 
urban Railway. Track and Road- 
way .' 248. 309 

Evansville Railways Co.. Track and 

Roadway 338 

Evansville Suburban & Newburg Rail- 
way. Effect of 2-Cent Steam Rail- 
way Fare on Traffic 75 

Evansville Terminal Railway — 

— Financial 583 

— Track and Roadway 431 

Exeter Hampton & Amesbury Street 

Railway. Financial 249, 34] 

Exeter Railway & Lighting Co., Incor- 
porated ■ 488 

Expanded Metal & Corrugated Bar Co.. 371 

Exposition. International Electrical 52 

Express Service — 

—Between Springfield. Mass., and Hart- 
ford. Conn 94 

— Contracts with Electric Lines 94. 276 



Fairbanks. Morse & Co.. Office Building 

and Warehouse 664 

Fairmont & Clarksburg Traction Co. — 

— Financial 583 

—Power Plant 549 

—Track and Roadway 489. 517 

Fairmont & Mannington Electric Rail- 
road. Track and Roadway 489 



Fare Box. Tec Registering '32 

Fare Boxes t436 

Fares — 

—Atlantic Case 25, 365 

—Between Brazil and Terre Haute. Ind. 365 

— Blue Hill Street Railway Increases t33 

—Chicago Consolidated Traction Co 246 

—Cleveland. Three-Cent t523, 7587 

— Coney Island Controversy 187, 364, 516 

—Detroit United Railway 305. 332, 459 

— Four-Cent, Louisville Railway Co 160 

— Five-Cent, Between Council Bluffs and 

Omaha 94 

—Georgia Railway & Electric Co 308 

Handling on Interurban Railways. By 

P. P. Crafts '504 

— Illinois Traction System 430 

Between Springfield and Decatur.... 246 

— Long Island Railroad 516 

— Low Rate to Amusement Park Not 

1 liscriminative 25 

Massachusetts. 53, 93. 94, 237. t256, 272, 

101 356, 364, 129, 130, | 1ST, 139, 187, I !97 

— Methods of Increasing t:',4 

— Mexico Street Railways "231 

— Minneapolis. Minn 161 

—New York, N. Y 307 

— New York and Long Island Traction 

Co. Reduces 335 

No-Seat No-Fare Ordinance in New 

Jersey 23 

—Omaha & Council Bluffs Railway & 

Bridge Co t614 

—Omaha & Council Bluffs Street Rail- 
way 161 

—Portland, Ore.. Reduction Contested... 336 
— Portsmouth & Exeter Street Railway- 
Increases 395 

— Prizes for Retaining Receipts 268 

— Pupils' Identification Cards. Public 

Service Railway. Newark *184 

— Pittsburg Railways Co 25 

— Reductions Between Toledo and Cleve- 
land 186 

— Registers, Rooke Automatic 469, 495 

— Round-Trip Tickets, Illinois Traction 

System 53 

—Springfield (Mass. 1 Street Railway 93 

— Steam Railway 2-Cent. Effect on In- 
terurban Electric Railway Traffic. 

T65. 75. 124. 176 

— Students of New York Schools 16n 

— Terre Haute Indianapolis & Eastern 

Traction Co 277 

— Through Ticket System on Massachu- 
setts Lines *439 

— Ticket System. Indianapolis & Cincin- 
nati Traction Co "241 

— Twin Citv Rapid Transit Co 246 

—Two-Cent Steam Railway Fares and In- 
terurban Electric Railway Traffic. 

t65, 75, 124.176 

— United Traction Company of Albany.. 546 
— Waverly Sayre & Athens Traction Co. 580 
Fares. See Also Tickets. 
Fargo & Moorehead Street Railway. Roll- 
ing Stock 192 

Fast Run. Inland Empire System 129 

Fav. J. A., & Egan Co 282 

Fayetteville. N. Y.. Track and Roadway. 221 
Fenders — 

— Chicago Citv Railway *29, 

— Lambert Device Adopted by Portland 

Council 92 

—New York City Lines 540 

— Worcester Double-Acting *402 

Ferracute Machine Co.. Armature Disc 

Notcher *401 

Findlav-Marion Railway & Light Co.. 

Track and Roadway 309. 489 

Fire Hazards t437 

Fire Protection in Car Houses 541 

Fitchhurg & Leominster Street Rail- 
way — 

— Freight Service 277 

— Relief Association 504 

Fitzgerald & Ocilla Railway & Power 

Co., Incorporated 130 

Flange and Gear Records *297 

Flexible Compound Co 343 

Flexible Mesh Rail Bond Co 282 

Floor Surfacer, Wattles Electric *403 

Ford. Bacon & Davis 467 

Foreclosures and Receiverships During 

1907 8 

Forest City Railway — 

— Dividends 28, 434 

— Financial 519 

—Rolling Stock 435 

Forsvth Brothers Co 585 

Ft. Dodge Des Moines & Southern Rail- 
road. Financial 551 

Ft. Dodge Emmetsburg & Spirit Lake 

Railway. Track and Roadway 221 

Ft Smith Checotah & Shawnee Inter- 
urban Railway — 

— Incorporated : ' 5 

— Track and Roadway 367 

Ft. Smith Light & Traction Co. 

New Car Construction 127 

— Track and Roadway 548 

Ft. Wavne & Snringfield Railway — 

—Refrigerator Cars *330 

—Rolling Stock 225 

—Track and Roadway 189. 338. 489. 548 

Ft. Wavne & Wabash Valley Traction 
Co.— 



Accidents, Preve oi 

Blue B I 

Construction Car 

—Earnings 59, 466, 492, 

— Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fare 

on Traffic 

Employes' Mutual Benefit Association. 

— Financial 

—Merit System .1 

Officers' and Employes' Association... 

— Terminal Station 

—Welfare Wo, i: 

Ft. William, out.. Financial 

Fi. Woiih Sprlngtown & Mineral Wells 
Electric Railway, Track and Road- 
way 

Ft. Worth Weatherford & Mineral Wells 
Interurban Construction Co., Track 
and Roadway 

Ft. Worth Weatherford & Mineral Wells 
Interurban Railway, Track and 
Roadway 

Franchise Tax Bill, Ohio 

Franchises 

— Aberdeen. S. I) 

Acworth, Ga 

— Argenta. Ark 

—Augusta, Ga 94. 

—Atlantic City, N. J 

— Ballston Spa. N. Y 

— Baltimore. Md 

— Batavia. N. Y 

— Bellefontaine. O 396, 

— Berkeley, Cal 55, 

— Birmingham, Ala. 

— Bloomfield. N. J 

— Bloomington, Ind 

— Bloomington & Normal Railway & 
Light Co 

— Bluefield, W. Va 

— Bowling Green, O 

— Bridgeport, Ala 

—Brooklyn. N. Y 580, 

— Brownsville, Tex 

—Cairo, 111 

— Calgary. Alberta 94. 

— Calumet & South Chicago 

—Charlotte. N. Y 

— Chattanooga. Tenn 

— Cherokee Belt & Interurban Railway . . 

— Chesaning. Mich 

— Cheyenne, Wyo 

—Chicago, 111 55, 220, 337, 

— Christiana, Pa 

— Citronelle. Ala 

— Claremore. Okla 

—Colfax. la 

— Colorado Springs. Colo 

— Columbia. Mo 

— Corpus Christi, Tex 

— Culiacan. Mex 

—Dallas. Tex 55. 130. 337. 396, 

— Decatur, 111 

—Defiance, O 

— Des Moines Case 91, 

—East St. Louis. Ill 

— Edmonds. Wash 

—Elk Lick, Pa 

—El Paso, Tex 

— Enid. Okla 

—Evans, Colo 

— Evansville. Ind 

—Faribault. Minn 

— Farmingdale. L. I 

— Flat Rock, Mich 

—Gary, Ind 

— Glasgow. Pa 

— Goderieh. Ont 

— Goldsboro. N. C 

— Greeley. Colo 

— Greensboro. N. C 

—Greenville. Pa 247, 

— Gresham, Ore 

— Harris.burg, Pa 

— Haverstraw. N. Y 

— Houghton. Midi 

— Houston. Tex 

— Hummelstown. Pa 

Indeterminate — 

Bv J. C. Hutchins 376. 

Bv William J. Meyers 

— Indianapolis Frankfort Delphi . 

cago Traction Co 

— Ithaca. N. Y 

— Kansas City, Mo 

— Kimmswick & Northern Railway 

—Klamath Falls. Ore 

— La Crosse. Wis 

i oln, 111 

— Lincoln. Neb 

—Littleton I !olo 

— Logansport, Ind 

— London, Ont 

—Los Angeles. Cal 188, 

— Martinez. Cal 

Mattoon, 111 

Millville, X. J 

Mnilen, La 

— Mineola. N. Y 130. 

— Monongahela, Pa 94.130. 

— Monroe. Mich 

— Nashville. Tenn 

— Nazareth. Pa 

— New Iberia. La 

— Newburg, Ind 

Xiles. Mich 

— North Adams. Mass 



:. I J 
130 
54 I 
220 
661 
633 
r.sn 
220 
605 
130 
:::i6 



187 
547 
188 

::::; 
633 
337 

130 
.".So 
428 
547 
5X7 
661 
517 
.;:::: 
::'.)•: 
H'.I 
247 

2211 

488 
633 

366 
462 
130 

462 

220 



131 
633 
131 
130 

337 

r.47 
661 
580 
661 
366 
308 
130 
547 
■:.M 
366 
308 
161 
462 

::i;t; 
220 
130 



661 

:.47 
161 

396 
633 

L61 
:,17 
580 
162 
131 
:,17 
661 
t>- 
25 
130 
396 
162 
.',(.:, 
162 



! An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger indicates an edito 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



— North Yakima, Wash 

— Oakland, Cal 

—Ocean Citv, N. J 

— Ogden. Utah 

— Oshkosh, Wis 

— Oxnard, Cal 

— Paducah, Ky 

— Pavilion. N. Y 

— Perry. N. Y 

— Phoenix. Ariz 

— Piedmont. Md 

— Pittsburg. Pa 

—Portland. Ore 130, 366. 4SS. r>Sfl 

— Pueblo. Colo 

■ — Racine, Wis 

—Redding, Cal 

— Redlands. Cal 1 

— Richmond, Cal 

— Sacramento. Cal 

—St. Louis, Mo 308, 

—Salt Lake City, Utah 130. 

— San Diego. Cal 

— San Francisco. Cal 188. 

— Seattle. Wash 337. 

— Shelbyville, 111 130, 188, 

— Shreveport. La 

— Sioux Citv, la 

—South Bend, Ind 

— South Waverly. Pa 

— Spokane. Wash 

— Springfield, 111 396, 

— Springfield. Mass 366, 

—Stockton. Cal 

— Streator, 111 

— Summerville, S. C 

— Taylorville. Ill 

— Terre Haute, Ind 517, 

— Toledo, O 308 

— Tolleston, Ind 

— Vancouver. Wash 

— Walla Walla, Wash 220, 

— Washington. D. C 94. 130, 

— Wenatchee. Wash 

— Weston. Ore -. . . .462, 

— Wilmington, Del 366. 

Frankfort Delphi & Northern Traction 
Co., Track and Roadway 

Franklin. Pa.. Track and Roadway 

Franklin & Towamensing Street Railway. 
Track and Roadway 162. 

Freeborn Engineering &- Construction Co 

Freeman & Sons Manufacturing Co 

Freeport. 111., Track and Roadway 

Freight, Fitchburg & Leominster Street 
Railway 

Freight Rate's. See Rates, Freight. 

French Point Street Railway. Track and 
Roadway 

Fresno Traction Co.. Track and Roadway 

Fruita Land & Power Co. — 

— Incorporated 

— Power Plant 

Fuel. Coal Tests 

Fulton Ferry Railway. New York. Finan- 
cial 

Fundy Park Amusement Co.. Track and 
Roadway 

Funeral Car Service in Mexico 



580 
247 

:::n; 



Gainesville Whitesboro & Sherman Rail- 
way. Track and Roadway 309. 489 

Gaither. William R., Separation of Boiler 

House and Engine Room Expenses 375 

Galena-Signal Oil Co 313 

Galesburg & Kewanee Electric Railway. 
Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway 

Fare on Traffic '. 76 

Galesburg Railway & Light Co.. Rolling 

Stock 281 

Gallatin Valley Electric Railway, Incor- 
porated 396 

Galveston Electric Co., New Transfer 

System 54 

Galveston-Houston Electric Co. — 

— Dividends 312 

— Earnings 133, 341, 636 

Gardiner. Me.. Track and Roadway 463 

Gardner Westminster & Fitchburg Street 

Railway, Fares 272 

Gary & Interurban Railway — 

— Rolling Stock 60 

— Track and Roadway 248 

Gas. Producer, for Engine Use 1555. 571 

Gas Engines — 

—Rating t640 

— Westinghouse *553 

Gears. For Electric Traveling Cranes »522 

General Electric Co 251, 435. 520, 610 

— Annual Report 586 

— Comrmitating-Pole Generators. Boston 

Elevated Railway *194 

— Curtis Turbine Sales 442 

— Electrical Machinery 346 

—Exhibit at Chicago Electrical Show 138 

— "Grade F" Pinion 612 

— Locking Socket for Incandescent 

Lamps «402 

— Motor Car *110 

—Orders 226. 400 

General Fireproofing Co 29, 98. 135, 193 

Generators, Commutating-r. .1. li.iston 

Elevated Railway »194 

Geneva Railway Securities Co.. Incorpo- 
rated 633 

Georgia Railroad. Track and Roadway.. 131 



Georgia Railway & Electric Co. — 

—Dividends 98, 225, 519 

— Employes' Benefit Association 334 

— Fare Cases 308 

— Financial 191, 280 

—Rolling Stock 192 

Gibbs, W. A.— 

— Automatic Couplers *391 

— Train Indicating Device *521 

(Hidden Varnish Co 98 

Globe Ticket Co., Improved Forms of 

Tickets »62 

Glue Pots, Electrically Heated, West- 
inghouse *284 

Goble, W. F.. Car Building. Los Angeles 

& Redondo Railway *445 

Goldschmidt Thermit Co 193. 586 

Goose Creek Railway & Power Manufac- 
turing Co. — 

— Incorporated 396 

— Power Plant 549 

—Track and Roadway 221 

Government Regulation of Railway Ac- 
counts. By H. C. Adams 43 

Grafton Street Railway, Track and Road- 
way 309 

Grafton Traction Co., Track and Road- 
way 221 

Grand Central Traction Co. — 

—Rolling Stock 493, 520 

—Track and Roadway 221, 517 

Grand Haven. Mich.. Track and Road- 
way 338 

Grand Junction, Colo.. Track and Road- 
way 489 

Grand Ranids Electric Railway, Track 

and Roadway 189. 309 

Grand Rapids Grand Haven & Muskegon 
Railway — 

— Competition with Steam Roads 160 

— Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fare 

on Traffic 76 

Grand Rapids Holland & Chicago Rail- 
way — 
— Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fares 

on Traffic 124 

— Handling Intoxicating Liquors 546 

Grand Rapids Railway — 

—Dividends 225. 281. 519 

— Parks *575 

Ramona 52 

Grand Trunk Railway — 
— Sarnia Tunnel — 

— Electric Locomotives 306 

— Electrification 23 

Grand Valley Railway — 

— Description *177 

— Financial 97 

—Rolling Stock 60 

—Track and Roadway 55. 463 

Granger. Wash.. Track and Roadway.... 95 
Graphite. Lubricating. U. S. Graphite 

Co 137 

Gray's Harbor Railway & Light Co. — 

— Financial 249 

—Power Plant 368 

— Track and Roadway 367 

Grayson Electric Corporation, Track and 

Roadway 189 

Great Northern Railway. Power Plant... 248 

Green Engineering Co 371 

Green Fuel Economizer Co.. Economizer 

Practice 344 

Greenville & Carolina Railway — 

— Power Plant 582 

— Track and Roadway 581 

Griffin Double Tread Car Wheel Co 552 

Grimes. E. B.. Electric Railways and 

the General Public 118 

Grip Nut «227 

Gross. Arthur W.. Methods of Handling 

Claims by Electric Railways 512 

Guadalajara. Mexico — 

— Power Plant 635 

— Track and Roadway 309 

Guadalajara Railway Light & Power Co.. 

Power Plant 464 

Guelph Radial Railway. Track and Road- 
way 130 

Guthrie. Ira E., Classification of Operat- 
ing Expenses 40R 

H 

Habirshaw Wire Co 60 

Hagerman. Idaho, Power Plant 549 

Hagy. J. Milton, Waste Works, G. E. 

Motor Waste 611 

Hamilton Radial Electric Railway. Track 

and Roadway 162 

Hamilton Street Railway. Car Houses... 193 
Hancock. E. L.. Flat Spots on Car and 

Locomotive Wheels *242 

Hancock & Lake Linden Traction & 

Power Co.. Incorporated 220 

Hanford Electric Railroad. Track and 

Roadway 338 

Hanover & McSherrystown Street Rail- 
way. Hanover. Pa., Track and 

Roadway 95, 489, 606 

Hanover & York Railway — 

— Description *288 

— Track and Roadway 95 

Hardy, F.. Merit System of Discipline. 
Ft. Wayne & Wabash Valley Trac- 
tion Co 653 



Harlan. James S-, Jurisdiction of Inter- 
state Commerce Commission over 

Electric Railways 77 

Harrisburg. Pa.. Central Pennsylvania 

Traction Co.. Power Plant *455 

Harrisburg Traction Co., Dividends 225 

Harrison. F. P., Electric & Manufactur- 
ing Co 343 

Hartford & Springfield Street Railway, 

Financial 583 

Hartshorn, Stewart, Co 165 

Hattiesburg Traction Co. — 

— Power Plant 397 

— Track and Roadway 397 

Havana Electric Railway — 

— Dividends 399 

— Financial 311, 551 

Hazlehurst, Miss.. Track and Roadway.. 463 

Headlight. Arc, Trollev Supply Co *611 

Heaters. Smith *138 

Heath & Milligan Manufacturing Co 664 

Heating. Hot Water, Cost of 166 

Hecht, J. L.. Steam Turbines 125 

Heckel. G. B., Paint Tests 496 

Heron. Charles A.. Typical Traction Cars.*151 
Hicks Car & Locomotive Works. 193, 313. 342 
Hinstorff, D. C. Discription of Chicago 

& Southern Traction Co *352 

Holvoke Street Railway — 

— Dividends 28 

—Fares 364 

— Financial 59, 191 

Honolulu Rapid Transit & Land Co., 

Financial 551 

Hopkinton. R. I., Track and Roadway.. 189 
Hose Bridge, Philadelphia Rapid Transit 

Co *302 

Houghton County Street Railway — 

—Dividends •. 370 

—Earnings 164, 370, 609 

—Power Plant 368 

—Track & Roadway 309 

Hudson & Long Island Traction Co. — 

— Incorporated 462 

— Track and Roadway 548 

Hudson & Manhattan Railroad — 

— Hudson River Tunnels *240 

Signal Equipment 293 

Hudson Companies — 

—Financial 191, 399 

—Rolling Stock 192 

— Tunnel Under Hudson River 23 

Hudson Valley Railway, Financial 584 

Humphrey Trollev &- Manufacturing Co.. 610 

—Wobble Trollev Wheel *402 

Hunt, Robert W.. & Co 60. 193, 552 

Huron (S. D.) Gas & Electric Railway, 

Track and Roadway 581 

Hutchins. J. C, Indeterminate Fran- 
chises 376. t405 

I 

Idaho Oregon & Washington Electric 

Railway. Track and Roadway. 189. 431 
Idaho Washington & Oregon Traction 

Co.. Power Plant 607 

Illinois Central Electric Railway — 

—Rolling Stock 165. 281 

— Track and Roadway 309. 517. 606 

Illinois Traction Co. — 

—Financial 519 

— Track and Roadway 634 

Illinois Traction System — 

— Advertising Methods *626 

— Baggage and Express 546 

— Contract with U. S. Express Company 276 
—Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fare 

on Traffic 75 

— Employes' Club 114 

— Fares 430 

— Mail Service 187 

— Rates Between Springfield and Deca- 
tur. Ill 246 

—Rolling Stock 313. 371 

— Round-Trip Tickets 53 

— Terminals 165 

— Theater Car 336 

— Through Service. Danville to Spring- 
field 54 

—Track and Roadway 131, 248. 338. 397 

— Trainmen's Examination 275, 334 

Illinois Tunnel Co 93 

— Electric Locomotives for Chicago Tun- 
nel »495 

— Railway Connections 395 

Illinois Valley Railway. Rolling Stock 

281, 342 

Improved Automatic Air Brake Co 193 

Indiana. Annual Report on Electric Rail- 
roads 388 

Indiana County Traction Co.. Rolling 

Stock 165 

Indiana Engineering Society. Annual 

Convention 123 

Indiana Malleable Casting Corporation.. 193 
Indiana Union Traction Co. — 

— Advertising Methods 246 

— Crossing Sign Post *359 

—Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fare 

on Traffic 76 

— Financial 249. 311 

— Monthly Magazine 461 

— Passenger Station 193 

— Purchasing Ties 303 

— Recutting Pinions *451 



An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger indicates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Repair Shops. Anderson. Ind f64, *61 LOS 

It g Stock 29, 98, 192 

—Strike 23, 51, 128, 24 I 101 

Thermit Welding *447 

Through Trips Between I !hii ago and 

Indianapolis 633 

Indianapolis & C Trai I Ion " !o., Trai k 

and Roadway 26 

Indianapolis & Cincinnati Tract Co. — 

Financial 341 

—Ticket System *24l 

lis & Louisville Traction Co. — 

Financial 133 

Track and Roadway 56 

—Twelve Hundred- \ < ill System 380 

Indianapolis & South Bend Traction 
Co.— 

In orporated 221 

— Traek and Roadway 431, 634 

Indianapolis Cloverdale & Terre Haute 
Traction Co. — 

— Incorporated 488 

'1'iaek and Roadway 517. 661 

Indianapolis Columbus & Southern Trac- 
tion Co. — 

of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fare 

on Traffic 75 

— Power Plant 432 

—Traek and Roadway 278 

Indianapolis Crawfordsville & Western 
Traction Co. — 

— Description *617 

Effect of 2-Cenl Steam Railway Fare 

on Traffic 75 

— Traek and Roadway 548 

Indianapolis Frankfort Delphi & Chi- 

cago Traction Co., Incorporated.... 580 
Indianapolis Huntington Columbia City 
& Northwestern Traction Co. — 

— Financial 191 

— Track and Roadway 1SH 

Indianapolis Newcastle .^- Toledo Elec- 
tric Railway. Track and Roadway. 431 

Indianapolis Switch & Frog Co 313 

Indianapolis Traction & Terminal Co.. 

City Payments 93 

Inland Empire System — 

Advertising Cards *211 

— Fruit Growers' Special 461 

—Record Run 129 

Insulating Varnishes and Compounds.... 46 
Insulation. High -Tension Transmission 

Lines. By Francis S. Denneen *648 

Insulators — 

—Ohio Brass Trolley Section *136 

— Strain. Western Electric 195 

— Suspended T34 

Insurance, American Railway Insurance 

Co.. Organization 12S 

Interborough-Metropolitan Co.. Financial 

164. 249, 311. 519. 609 

Interborough-Metropolitan System. Chart 

Showing Controlled Companies. .. .»294 
Interborough Rapid Transit Co. — 

— Accident 159 

— Brooklyn Subway Extension Opened.. 578 

— Brooklyn Tunnel Opened 51 

— Dividends 342 

—Financial 191, 280, 341. 369. 434. 466. 551 

—Rolling Stock 250, 400 

—Subway Car. Arnold Report t255. *262 

— Track and Roadway 367 

Interlake Railroad. Chicago, 111.. Incor- 
porated 462 

Interlocking. Inspection of Plants Re- 
quired in Indiana 52 

Intermountain Railway. Track and Road- 
way 131 

International Railway (Buffalo) — 

— Car House *476 

—Cars. Pav-As-You-Enter Type *37, (53 

—Financial' 224. 663 

—Rolling Stock 400 

International Traction Co. (Buffalo) — 

— Depreciation ^472 

—Financial 399 

International Traction System (Buffalo). 

Annual Report 439 

Interstate Commerce Commission — 
— Accounting System — 

Action by Ohio Railroad Commission 588 

Co-operation with State Commissions 87 

Electrical and Gas Corporations. . . 

Indiana and Ohio Lines 529 

Michigan Railroad Commission Will 

Not Adopt -439 

New Hampshire Railroad Commis- 
sion's Attitude 474 

Petition on Behalf of New York State 

Association 591 

Resolution of New York State Asso- 
ciation 37S 

Revision of Classification of Operat- 
ing Expenses t614. 624 

Tentative Classification of Operating 

Expenses 266, 299. t347. 351. t375 

Replies t,, Circular 1374, 375, 37fi, 

377, 379, 108, 109, 419, 442, 144. 
471. 474, 513, f523, 525, 558, 572, 594 
— Electric Roads Under Federal Jurisdic- 
tion i 63 

—Fare Reduction. Omaha & Council 

Bluffs Street Railway 161 

—Interchange and Joint Rates Ordered.. 395 
— Jurisdiction over Electric Railways. 

By .lames S. Harlan 77 



, Cent Pare, i imaha & Council Blufl 

Kailwaj .v Bridge Co 614 

Through Routes and , il H ti 195, t438 

Interstate Consolidated Street Railway, 

Track and Roadway 581 

Interstate Electric Rallwa - I 

Roadway 248, 463 

Interstate Railways Co., Financial. ...59, 134 
inteistate Traction Co., Jersi City, 

N. J.. Incoi |,,-t a ted 

luiei'iirlian i ''instruction Co.. Track and 

Roadway 397 

Intel mi ban Express I ',,., Existen, e Ti i 

initiated 246 

Inlei - I'rhari Railway (Des Moin i 

—New Wage Scale 362 

—Track and Roadwaj IS!). 248 

Intel-urban Railway & Terminal Co. — 

—Financial 191 

—Power Plant 490 

— Rolling Stock 610 

Substation 

Interurban Road, Future of f286 

Iola Portland Cement Co 610 

Iowa & Illinois Railway — 
Effect of 2-Ceni si, -am Railway Fares 

on Traffic 124 

— Handling Fares *504 

Iowa ,v Northwestern Railway. Track and 

Roadway 3(19 

Iowa Railroad. Track and Roadway. .489, 661 

Irwin. Pa.. Track and Roadway 489 

Irwin & Herminle Street Railway. Incor- 
porated 366 

I wan Brothers 467 



.lacks. Machine for Testing *196 

Jackson. Mich.. Michigan United Rail; 

ways, Gatemen 326 

Jacksonville, Tex.. Track and Roadway.. 

338, 431 

Jacksonville Electric Co.— 

— Dividends 59 

—Earnings 133, 370. 609 

— Power Improvements 407 

— Remodeling Power Station *589 

Jacobs Welding Co.. Rolling Stock 98 

Janesville, Wis.. Track and Roadway. 414. 431 
Jeanette Montclair & Woodland Trac- 
tion Co., Track and Roadway. .",M 
Jefferson Interurban Railwa> — 

— Incorporated 366 

— Track and Roadway 277 

Jennings. William. Co 251 

Jersey Central Traction Co. — 

—Rolling Stock 610 

— Track and Roadway 489, 518 

Jersey City. N. J., No-Seat No-Fare Ordi- 
nance 23 

Jewett Car Co.— 

— Cars. Elevated. Brooklyn Rapid Transit 

Co *171 

— Cars. Pav-As-You-Enter *553 

—Orders 29, 98 

Johns-Manville. H. W.. Co 60. 165. 226. 585 

—Exhibit at Chicago Electrical Show.... 138 
Johnson. F. W.. Short Talks with the 

Claim Investigator 44S. 475. 536, 567 

Johnstown. Pa.. Track and Roadway.... 463 
Johnstown Passenger Railway — 

— Dividends 434 

— Track and Roadway 95, 277 

Joliet & Southern Traction Co., Track 

and Roadway 56, 277, 163 

Jones', J. M.. Sons 371 

.Toplin & Pittsburg Railway. Track and 

Roadwav 463, 489, 518. 661 

Journal Packing. Steel Wool *227 

.1,,-. ,, -i 'ii, Hand i'o. Machine for Testing 

Jacks *196 

Juniata Valley Electric Street Railway. 

Track and Roadway 606 



Kalamazoo Elkhart & South Bend Trac- 
tion Railroad. Track and Road- 
wav 131, 489 

Kalamazoo Railway Supply Co 193 

— Root Track Scraper *612 

Kansas City. Mo. — 

— Public Utilities Commision Proposed.. 159 

—Track and Roadway 432 

Kansas City & Bonner Springs Railway. 

Track and Roadway 634 

Kansas City & Kansas Southwestern 

Electric Railway. Incorporated 337 

Kansas City & Olathe Electric Railway. 

Track and Roadway 51s. 7.4v 

Kansas City .<- Southeastern Railroad. 

Track and R lway 432 

Kansas City Railway & Light Co 

—Dividends 250. 636 

— Earnings 28 L92 342, 584 

— Financial 191 

—Track and Roadway 548. 581 

Kansas City St. Joseph & Excelsior 
Springs Electric Railway. Track 

and Roadway 

Kansas City Springfield & Southern Rail- 
wax. Track and Roadwav. .56. 548, 606 
Kansas-Colorado Power & Railroad Co., 

Track and Roadway 581, 634 



Kansas Southern Electric Railway 

and Roadway 56 

Kansas 'i i Pracl tnd 



Ki-nora, i int.. Trai I and Ri . . . . lsa 

£ Ohio River Interurban 
Trai k and Roadway. . 132, 189, 606 
i i Railroad Co., 

Trai h an.i Roadway 131 

i Manufacturing ' '■>.. Steel Roll- 

D 166 

Know in,- Rallwa] & Light Co. 

Dividends 166 

gs 636 

R0 26 

i ...I oi 10 Frankfort & Terre I laute Ti a< 
i Ion ' ', i. 

Incor] ted 661 

221, 163 

Kokomo Marion & Westei n Ti 
Co 

De - Iption *560 

i .a, . i ol _ ' !ent st.-am Railway Fare 

on Traffic 75 

K uiii, m.iii, ' ; i ' , Cat ' !o. 

—Cars, Pay-As-You Entei International 

Railway ol Buffalo *87 

192, 313, 100, 520, 552 



Lackawanna & Wyoming Vallej Rail 

road. Third-Rail Sleet Brush »485 

,nna & Wyoming Valley Rapid 
Transit ' !o., Financial 

I ,:i, onia Cai I '>,.. I :i, ■■, ated I !a i - : Brook- 
lyn Rapid Transit Co »171 

I. a Crosse Cit\ Railway. Track and 

Roadway 432 

Lake City, la.. Track and Roadway 95 

l„ik,- Erie & Xoungstown Railway — 

Rolling stock 664 

Track and Roadway 581 

Lake Erie Bowling Green & Napoleon 

Railway, Track and Roadwav. 
Lake Shore Electric Railway — 

— Annual Report 169 

Reduced Fares Between Toledo and 

Cleveland 1S6 

—Track and Roadway 56, 131. 432 

Lake View Traction Co., Track and 

Roadwav 131, 278, "Is 

Lamps. Arc, for Car Interiors. f286. +31S, 'i:,:'. 

Lamps, Locking Socket for *402 

Lancaster & York Furnace Street Rail- 
way. Financial 280 

Lancaster County Railway & Light Co., 

Track and Roadway 26 

Laurel Railway, Incorporated 5 1 , 

Lawrence County Railroad. Rolling 

Stock 

Lawson, F. A.. & Co 343 

1. -,ii t\l- Simons 313 

Lawton Denton & Dallas Electric Rail- 
way. Track and Roadway 367 

Lederachville & Pennsburg Traction Co- 
Track and Roadway 167 

Lefebvre, A. II. . Single-Truck Cars 

Without Monitors *144 

Legal Derisions. Recent Electric Rail- 
way. Bv J. L. Rosenberger 

21. 49, 98, 243, 

304. 331. 392. 361, 158, 544, 577, 602, 629 
Legal Decisions. See Also Special De- 
partment of Index. 
Legislation — 

— District of Columbia 

US. 211 271, 363, 515, 545 

—Maryland is:,. 306, 12a 

Massachusetts 

127. U.S. 21 "'I. I"0 

New Jersey Us. 394, 421' 

New York. 90, 127. 218, 2 14. 274. 

306, 334. 363, 394, 129, 160, 186, 515, 545 

1 Mo,, 90, 158 is: 218, 240, 

306, 334, 364 394, 129, 160, 186, 515, 545 

—Ontario. Can 306 

— Virginia 127, 186, 27 1 

Lehigh Valley Transit Co. — 

—Financial 97, 370 

—Rolling Stock 167. 19 

Lewis, charl, s s ,\c Co 493 

Lewis. Myron H.. & Clifford B. Moore... 6., 
Lewiston Augusta & Waterville Street 
Railway — 

—Power Plant 

—Substations 96, 248 

Lexington & Interurban Railways Co.. 

Earnings 59, 

Lighting, Car. with Arc Lamps 

f286, ,318, 'ir.3 

Lightning Arrester. Clark *46S 

Lima & Honeoye Electric Light & Rail- 
road — 

1 'ower Plant 

—Track and Roadwav 309.548 

Lima & Toledo Traction Co.. Traek and 

Roadway 221, 309 

Limited Service— 

— Between Cincinnati and Dayton 129 

— Ohio Electric Railway '.'1 

Lincoln Traction Co., Dividends 119 

Lindsley Brothi 1- Co 165 

Little Falls. Minn. Track and Roadway 278 
Little Falls. N. V. Track and Roadwav. 131 
Little Rock & Hot Springs Electric Rail- 
wax-. Traek and Roadway 



•An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger indicates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Little Rock & Pine Bluff Traction Co.— 

— Rolling Stock 29 

—Track and Roadway 95 162 

Little Rock-Pine Bluff Transit Co.. 

Track and Roadway 489 

Little Rock Railway .v- Electric Co., 

Financial 492 

Locomotives — 

— Combination Freight and Switching, 

Los Angeles & Redondo Railway .. *446 

—Illinois Tunnel, i 'lii.ago »4'.if, 

Luganspuil \- South Bend Tract].. u >'.. 

Incorporated [88 

London Street Railway, Financial 312 

London Underground Electric Railways, 

Financial ,:,i 

Look Island Railroad— 

—Fares 116 

— Track and Roadway 662 

Lorain Steel Co 520 

Lord Electric Co 98,99,135 

Los Angeles, Cal. — 

— Pacific Electric Railway, Station at 

Monrovia *595 

Los Angeles & Port Orient Railway. 

Track and Roadway 54S 

Los Angeles & Redondo Railway— 

— Car Building * 4 4 r. 

Locomotive, Combination Freight and 

Switching *-l ttl 

—Rolling Stock 225 

Los Angeles & San Francisco Short Line 
Electric Railroad, Track and Road- 
way 463 

Los Angeles Pacific Co., Track and 

Roadway 162, 248 

Los Angeles Railway— 

— Power Distribution, Feeder Loop *543 

— Templet Marker *543 

— Track and Roadway 56, 367 

Louisiana Light Power .*;• Traction Co.. 

Louisiana. Mo 463 

Louisville & Eastern Railroad, Track and 

Roadway 463 

Louisville ,<• Interurban Railroad, Track 

and Roadway 26 

Louisville & Northern Railway & Light- 
ing Co. — 

- I hvi. lends 100 

—Station 493 

Louisville & Southern Indiana Traction 

Co., Rolling stock l::i 

Louisville Railway — 

— Annual Report 257 

— Financial 10 4. 250 

— 4-Cent Fares 160 

— Improvements in Service 54, 93 

—Power Plant 339 

—Strike-Breaking 184 

—Track and Roadway 338, 581 

Louisville Traction Co. — 

— Dividends 399 

— Financial 341 

Lowd. Mark. T-Rail Track Construction . *598 
Lowell & Fitchhurg Street Railway. 

Track and Roadway 222 

Lubricator, Sullivan *303 

Lucas. John, & Co 520 

Lufkin Rule Co 585 

—Plant «315 

Lumber, Barnes Hardwood Lumber Co.. 227 

Lumen Bearing Co 135, 165 

Lyall, W. R., Painting Poles Near 

Switches 640 

Lynchburg Traction & Light Co., Finan- 
cial 97 

M 

McCartv, Lewis P., Shop Practice, Tampa 

Electric Co *3'.io 

MacGovern, Archer ,v- Co 467 

McGuire-Cumminss Manufacturing Co... 520 
—Cars. Aurora Elgin & Chicago Rail- 
road *17S 

— Cars. Combination Passenger and Bag- 
gage, for Waterloo Cedar Falls & 

Northern Railway *425 

—Orders 98, 250. 371, 435 

McMinnville, Tenn.. Track and Roadway 367 
Macon Railway & Light Co.— 

— Financial 250 

— Power Plant 222 

— Track and Roadway 162 

Magnets and Solenoids. Porter Manufac- 
turing Co 253 

Mahoning & Shenango Railway & Light 
Co. — 

—Rolling Stock 192 

— Track and Roadway 4S9 

Mail Service. Illinois Traction System 187 

Manchester & Derry Street Railway, 

Financial 250 

Manchester (Ky.) Traction Co.. Track 

and Roadway 581 

Manchester (N. H.) Traction Light & 

Power Co.. Divi lends 466 

Manhattan Elevated Railway. Dividends. 370 
Mankato Electric Traction Co.. Track and 

Roadway 548, 606 

Manning, Maxwell & Moore 135 

Il.n.lershot Coupling *195 

Maps — 

— Atlantic City & Shore Railroad 41 

— Boise & Interurban Railway 320 

Chicago Lake Shore .V- Smith Bend 

Railway :,I2 



— Delaware & Hudson Co., Electric Rail- 
ways 4S3 

— Grand Valley Railway 177 

— Hanover & York Railway 288 

— Indianapolis Crawfordsville & "Western 

Traction Co 617 

—Interurban Railways, Central States.. 18 
— Kokomo Marion & Western Traction 

Co »560 

New Subway Route, New York City. 19, 52 

1 " egon El Railway 258 

— Washington Baltimore & Annapolis 

Electric Railway fl98 : 200 

Marion Bluffton & Eastern Traction Co., 

Rolling sto.k :,s:, 

Market Street Elevated Railway— 

— Financial 312 

— Signals t229 

Marlam Construction Co., Incorporated.. 366 
Marquette County Gas & Electric Co. — 

— Power Plant 131 

— Track and Roadway 489 

Marquette Negaunee & Ishpeming Inter- 
urban Railway. Track and Road- 
way 581, 034 

Marshall, R. W.. & Co 226. 520 

.Mir. land Elecl 1 ic Railwaj s Co.— 

— Financial -.224. 609 

—Track and Roadway 548 

Mary] I Railwaj & E led ric Supplj Co. 371 

Maryland Railwaj Supplj Co 135, 371 

Massachusetts — 

- Fares.. 53, 93, 94, 219, 237. (-256, 272. 307, 

335, 355, 364, 429, 130, | 137, 1ST. i 197, 605 

— Wrecking .lacks f555 

Massachusetts Chemical Co 135. 193, 226 

Massachusetts Electric Companies, Finan- 
cial 28 37ii 

Massillon <\\- Noil hern Railway, Track 

and Roadway 431 

Massillon Wooster & Mansfield Traction 
Co.— 

—Rolling Stock 226 

— Track and Roadway 131. 16" 131 

Matamoras & Santa Cruz Railway, Track 

and Roadway 278 

Mattoc ity Railway. Rolling Stock.... 225 

Mattoon Shell, will.- Pana & Hillsboro 
Traction Co.. Track and Roadway. 

489. 581 

Meade. Norman G.. Armature Repair 

Shop Methods *565 

Medical Air Lock *469 

Memphis Covington & Northern Rail- 
road, Track and Roadway 338 

Memphis Street Railway, Dividends 466 

Menominee & Marinette Light & Trac- 
tion Co. — 

— Financial 663 

— Power Plant 607 

Mentzel. H. F.. Shop Practice. Allegheny 

Valley Street Railway '. »io 

Metaline Rapid Transit Co.. Track and 

Roadway 33g 

Meters— 

— Victor Portable *61 

— Weston Electrical Instrument Co 254 

Metropolitan Street Railway (Kansas 

City). Service Investigation 219 

Metropolitan Street Railway (New 
York) — 

— Financial 224, 312, 399 

— Investigation. Grand Jury Report.'...."' 514 
Metropolitan West Side Elevated Railway 
(Chicago) — 

— Accidents 219 

— Annual Report 169 

— Automatic Interlock 4(1 

— Car Wiring *601 

— Employment of Trainmen 449 

— Financial 59, 663 

—Valves and Governors Under Seats....' |63 
Mexico — 

— Electrification of Railways 4114 

— Funeral Car Service 326 

— Sight-Seeing Car Service *326 

Mexico Electric Tramways Co.. •'Seeing 

Mexico" Parlor Car Service *47 

Mexico Santa Fe & Perry Traction Co., 

Track and Roadway 222. 338 463 

Mexico Street Railways. By T. J. Nich- 

oll *231 

Meyer. B. H. Public Service Laws of 

Wisconsin 559 

Mej-ers. William J., Indeterminate Fran- 
chises 474 

Meyersdale & Salisinir\ street Railway] 

Financial 164 

Michigan. Electric Railways. Report of 

Commission of Labor 603 

Michigan United Railways Co. — 

— Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fares 

on Traffic 121 

— Gatemen 326 

— Track and Roadway 489 

— Use of Pere Marquette Railroad Cars.. 516 
Middlesex & Boston Street Railway. 

Fares , , 31)7 

Mileage, Interurban Railroads in Indiana 18 
Milford & Uxbridge Street Railway. 

Fares 2::7 

Milk Traffic 

— Aurora Elgin & Chicago Railroad *296 

Philadelphia Rapid Transit Co r.su 

"'Miken Bros., Galvanized Steel Pole *34. r . 

Milloy Electric Co 467 



Milner & Northside Electric Railway, 

Track and Roadway 95 463 000 

Milwaukee, Wis., Track and Roadway.. 95 
Milwaukee & Fox River Vallev Railroad, 

Track and Roadway 278, 581, 634 

Milwaukee Coke & Gas Co., Rolling 

Stock 134 

Milwaukee Electric Railway & ' Light 
Co — 

—Dividends 9S. r,19 

111 '-il 101. 191 

Power Plant : ;,; s 

— Track and Road way 56 248 

Milwaukee Light Heat & Traction Co.— 

— Financial 154 

— Power Plant 582 

— Track and Roadway .'.'.' 606 

Milwaukee Northern Railway — 

— Rolling Stock 192 

— Track and Roadwav 518 

Minneapolis, Minn., Twin Citv Rapid 

Transit Co.. Annual Report 287 

Minneapolis St. Paul Rochester & Du- 
buque Traction Co., Track and 

Roadway 95, 489, 548 

Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Co 226 

Minnesota Construction Co., Track and 

Road way 634 

Mississippi River & Electric Power Co.. 635 
Mississippi Valley Interurban Railway— 

— Incorporated 188 

— Rolling Stock 467 

Missoula-Bitter Root Traction Co., Track 

and Roadway 56, 131 

Missouri & Kansas Interurban Railway, 

Track and Roadway 397 

Missouri Oklahoma & Gulf Railway, 

Track and Roadwav '. 131 

Mitshkun, M.. Co., Orders 192 

Mobile Light & Railroad Co.— 

— Improvements During 1907 88 

— Track and Roadway 278 

Mogollon, N. M., Track and Roadwav... 278 

Moline Incandescent Lamp Co 520 

Monitors. Single-Truck Cars Without, 

Black River Traction Co tl39 *144 

Monterey. Cal., Track and Roadway 26 

Monterey Railway Light & Power Co., 

Pay-As- You-Enter Cars *239 

Montgomery & Chester Electric Railway. 

Track and Roadway , 432 

Montgomery Electrical Co. — 

— Incorporated 337 

— Track and Roadway ,'. 489 

Montgomery Traction Co. — 

— Rolling Stock 281, 400 

— Track and Roadway 338 

Montreal * Southern Counties Electric- 
Railway, Track and Roadwav 489 

Montreal Street Railway — 

— Dividends 98 519 

—Earnings 433, 281. 46e! 584 

— Financial ■ 224 

— Rolling Stock 192 

Moorhead. Minn.. Track and Roadway!! 95 
Morgantown & Dunkard Vallev Electric 

Railway. Track and Roadwav 222 

Morrisburg Electric Railway. Track' and 

Roadway 397 

Motormen Admitted to Brotherhood of 

Locomotive Engineers 632 

Motor oil Cup Lid *328 

Motor Starter Boxes, Westinghouse *404 

Motors — 

— Brush-Holder Troubles f347 

— Series Repulsion »78. 84, S5, 86 

Mt. Hood Railway & Power Co.— 

— Rolling Stock 342 

— Power Plant 432 

—Track and Roadway 432, 463, 549 5.81 

Mt. McKay & Kakabeka Falls Railway 

Track and Roadway 56. 189. 463 

Mt. Mansfield Electric Railroad — 

— Financial 192 

— Track and Roadway ' ' 56 

Mt. Vernon Railway & Light Co., Finan- 

„ . olal 466 

Municipal Journal and Engineer 610 

Municipal ownership. San Francisco 245 

Municipal Traction Co. — 

— Power Plant 518 

—Rolling Stock 610, 637 

—Strike 578, 630. 660 

Muncie & Portland Traction Co., Effect 
of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fares on 

Traffic 175 

Mura.lt & Co 343 

Murdock. H. D.. Twelve Hundred-Volt 
System. Indianapolis & Louisville 

Traction Co 380 

Murphvsboro Electric Railway Light Heat 

& Power Co.. Rolling Stock 493 

Murphvsboro Street Railway Light Heat 
& Power Co., Track and Roadway 

489' 549 

Murray. W. S., New York New Haven 
& Hartford, Single-Phase Distribu- 
tion with Special Reference to Sec- 

tionalizatlon *80, 84. 86 

Murray. Utah. Track and Roadwav 489 

Muskogee. Okla., Track and Roadwav.. 463 
Muskogee (Okla.) Electric Traction Co., 

Track and Roadwav 278 

Myersdale Construction & Equipment Co. 

Incorporated 661 



*An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger indicates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



N 
Nanki Railwav of Japan. Rolling Stock.. 552 

Nanz Clock Co 585 

Nashville [nterurban Railroad, Track 

and Roadway 56, 96 

Nashville Railway & Light Co 

i >l\ Idends 134 

Power Plant 397, 132 

Tra.k and Roadway 163 

Nathan Manufacturing Co 371 

Natick a I '"■ till uati Street Rallwa - 

Fares ; ". 

National Brake ,x Ele. trie Co.— 

\ii Brakes for Chicago Railways Co.. 522 

Air Compressors '436 

Orders 520 

National Brake Co 610 

National I'nnstriK'tinu Co.. Power Plant.. I'.ih 

National Tube Co 

National Vacuum Cleaning Co.. Vacuum 

Method for Car Cleaning 468 

Nebraska Electrical Trades Exposition 



c, 



5211 



N.-rr. S. s . Ticket Methods Atlantic City 

& Shore Railroad *4t 

Nelson (B. CO Electric Tramway, Car 

Houses 562 

Nelsonville Athens & Glouster Traction 

i •,... Track and Roadwas '■'■"'■• 

New Bedford & Onset Street Railway, 

Rolling St..rk 281, 371 

New Doty Manufacturing Co 193 

New England Trolley Wheel Co 29 

New Jersej & Pennsylvania Traction Co., 

Power Plant 190, 518 

N<w Orleans & Seashore Air Line Rail- 
wa: 

— Incorporated 161 

— Track and Roadway 131 

Now Orleans Citj Railway, Dividends... 59 
New Orleans Railwaj & Light Co. 

Annual Report 199 

Financial 341, 192 

Rolling stock 281, 371 

Screw Pump 284 

Servii e 277 

—Transfer System 94, 129 

New York. N Y. 

—Accidents During April. 1!">8 632 

I: klvn Bridge Extension *154 

Electrical Show 186 

Fares 307 

Metropolitan Street Railway. Grand 

Jury Report on Investigation 514 

— Rapid Transit Law 91, 12. 

Subway 

127. 2lv. f317. ::■>:;. I2x. 15'.'. ■ 171. 186, >'•":: 

Capacity. Arnold Report 6.", I 

Cars. Arnold Report 1255, «262 

New Route *19, 52 

Signals. Arnold Report 355 

Track Improvements 90 

— Track and Roadway 662 

— Transportation Situation '14" 

New York & Long Island Railroad 90 

N.w Yo,k vv. North Shore Traction Co.. 

Track and Roadway 248 

New York Car & Truck Co 3*3 

New York Car Wheel Co 520 

New York Central & Hudson River Rail- 
road — 

— Electrification. Results Attained 300 

— Power Stations. Ventilation of *4'.»4 

New York Central Lines. Rolling Stock.. 400 
New York Citv Railway— 

—Action to Forfeit Charter 305. 333, 394 

—Car House 313, 637 

—Cars. Pa. -As- Yon-Enter. .359. t.373. 393. 583 
Contract with F.xpress Company Not 

Renewed 365 

—Financial..." 1 '. '.'7, 164, 192, 370, 399, J66, 192 

— Practical Motor Coil Making *627 

Receivers Protest Against Order of 

Commission Regarding Equipment. 51 
—Receivers Want Funds for Improve- 
ments 324 

—Rolling Stock 371, 

Substation 339 

-Transfer System 

. . .12f. 430, I 138, 187, 1 198, 596. 597, 632 
New York Edison Co.. Breakdown Serv- 
ice Charges f497 

New York New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road — 
— Branch Line Railroad Electrification. .t317 

— Electric Railways in Massachusetts t613 

—Financial 312. 399, 609 

— New York-Port Chester Electric Line II 

—Overhead Construction *S0. 84. v.; 

—Power Plant 432. 464 

—Rolling Stock 226, "71 

— Salaries Reduced 306 

—Single-Phase Equipment for Branch 

Line 52 

New York-Philadelphia Co.. Financial... 

192, 2x1. 134 

New York to Chicago by Trolley tint 

Newark. N. J. — 

— Public Service Railway — 

Cars. Pay-As- You-Enter Type *213 

Fare Receiver *4S4 

Pupils' Identification Cards *184 

Newark Martinsburg & Mt. Vernon Elec- 
tric Railwav. Track and Roadway. 549 

Newell street Railway. Rolling Stock 98 

Newspapers. Sale on Pav-As-You- Enter 

Cars in Chicago .347. 362. 428 



Newton & Boston Street Railway, Fares 

Increased 

Newton Street Railway. Fares Increased. 

Newtown Railway. Financial 

Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Rail- 

w .i i Ti ack and Roadwa ■> 

Niagara Transmission Line 

Nicholl. Franklyn M., Trucks foi 

Mot it Service 

Ni.hoii, ii. a . Kir, hi. Railway Progress 

ii. Central States 

Nicholl, T, J. 

. '.ii i..i Cit; Set -. Ice 

Mexico S i Railways ' 

ig and Funeral Car Service 



Mi 



i '.us \\ il h.Hit Monitors. .* 

Mies c.ir & Manufacturing Co 

— Cars — 

Combination Passenger, Smoking 

and Baggage. Buffalo LOCkpOrt & 

i.r Railway * 

. in. ago Lake Shore <v South Bend 

Railway * 

Intel-urban. CI taw Railway & 

Lighting < !o * 

i n.l. IS 1 

Nipissing Central Electric Railwav, Track 

Iway 

Norfolk & Portsmouth Traction Co. — 

—Earnings 98, 166, 192, 

— Financial 

— Substations 164, 

N,.ri is. il, il.. Address at Purdue Uni- 
versity 

North \niri ii .in Co., ' nnual Repot I 
North Coast Power Co., Power Plant. 549, 
North Jacksonville Street Railway Town 

& linprov niinit < !o., Financial 

North Midland Electric Railway, Track 
and Roadway 

North Yakima. Wash.. Track and Road- 
way 

Northampton Street Railway — 

— Dividends 

— Financial 

Northampton Traction Co.. Effect of 
2-i 'mt Steam Railway Fares on 
Traffic 

Northern Electric Co. — 

— Power Plant 

— Track and Roadway 

Northern Engineering Works ton, 

Electric Pillar Cranes ' 

Northern Ohio Traction & Light Co. — 

— Annual Report 

— Dividends 

—Earnings 134. 281. 

—Rolling Stock 98. 

Northern Power Co.. Power Plant 

Northern Texas Electric Co. — 

— Dividends 

— Earnings 

— Financial 

Northern Texas Traction Co. — 

— Earnings 134, 

— Financial 584, 

—Power Plant 190. 

Northern Traction Co. — 

— Power Plant 

— Track and Roadway 

Northwestern Elevated Railroad (Chi- 
cago) — 

—Cars 

— Compensation Payments of Union 
Loop 

— Evanston Extension Opened 

— Substation 

— Track and Roadway 

Northwestern Expanded Metal Co 

Northwestern Foundry & Supply Co 

Northwestern Interurhan Railway, Track 
and Roadway 

Northwestern Ohio Electric Railway, 
, Track and Roadway 

Northwestern Pacific Railroad — 

—Rolling Stock 

— Track and Roadway 

Nuttall R. D., Co., Sleet Scrapers and 
Wheels 



Oakland. Cal., Combination Platform 
Gate and Trap ' 

Oakland Traction Co. — 

— Car Wiring Cables ' 

— Cars. California Type ' 

—Crane. Air Lift Jib ' 

I.I -Gallon Water Car ' 

— Power Plant 

— Track and Roadway 56. 

— Truck for City Service 

Ocean Shore Railway. Track and Road- 
way 

l & Middletown Railway. Finan- 
cial 

Ohio & Southern Traction Co.. Colum- 
bus. O.. Track and Roadway 

i Hiio Brass Co 

— Trollev Section Insulator ' 

Ohio Electric Railway 

— Financial 221. 

— Limited Service 

— Substation 297. 

— Track and Roadway SMS. 367, is:>. 

Ohio Franchise Tax Bill 



162 



606 






. n.i.. Trad i. •" Co., Dividends 192, 585 

Ohmer. .John F.. Tickets as 

diuni foi Street and Interurhan 
Railwav Traffic «651 

'hi Engines, Testing 

OH Fill, i »426 

Okanogan Electric Railwav. Track and 
Roadway 

Goldl '. City Railwav 

and Roadway 

Oklahoma City & Shawnee [nterurban 

Ra iiwa > , Incorporated 

( Melanoma i 111 j I Celt I ilm Ra llroad [ni di 

porate I 

Oklahoma City Rapid Transit Railway. 

Trai i. and R I 

. iklahoma El Reno & Shaw nee Rapid 

Transit Co., Incorporated 633 

Oklahoma- El Reno Intel 

Co., Incorporated 580 

Oklahoma Race Separation Law 245, 27.". 

i Iklahoma Railwav — 

— Rolling Stock 467 

Track and Roadway 278 

old Colons' SI rcl Railwav. Financial... r.xl 
Oley Valley Railwav. Track and Road- 
way 

Olney, 111.. Track and Roadwaj 26. 222 

. ..11, ih, 1 & 1 founcll Bluffs Railw 

Bridge 1 ',,,. Fares .(ill 

Omaha & Council Bluffs Street Railwaj 

A. . i.lcnls. Avoiding fl39, 308 

—Car House 134 

—Claims. Methods of Handling 512 

Dividends 59, 166 

- Fare Redact s 161 

- Five-Cent Fare Between Council Bluffs 

and Omaha 

— Mirrors for the Motormen 

owl car Service 52 

—Rolling Stock 664 

Track and Roadway 

26, 56, IX'.', 338, 397, 190, 581 

Omaha ,V Nebraska Central Railway, 

Track and Roadway 56 

Oneida Railway. Trademarl *lx2 

Oneonta & Mohawk Valley Railroad— 

—Financial 37" 

Rolling Stork 610 

Ontario W r est Shore Electric Railwav, 

Track and Roadway 26. 162 i 

Operation — 

—Belt Line Service f639 

— Brooklyn Bridge Terminal 51. 211 

' 'an-.- foi Studv of v22l' 

— Chicago to New York bv Trolley I-- 

Meeting of Indiana Commission and 

Electric Railway Officials. .2::.",. : 255. 306 

— Mirrors for Motormen 

— New Y'ork to Chicago by Trollev fliil 

— Reducing Car Mileage t317 

— Reducing Dead Mileage fl97 

— Theater Train Service t33. 54 

— Through Routes on Chicago Elevated 

Roads 21 

Through Routes on Surface Lines in 

Chicago 

— Train-Indicating Device. Gibbs *521 

— Train Operation and Maintenance of 

Was- Rules in Indiana 

— Vigilance in Discipline F639 

—Welfare Work on Ft. Wayne .x.- Wabash 

Valley Traction Co 540 

— Wrecking Jacks in Massachusetts... 
Oregon Electric Railway — 

— Catenary Constitution and Bonds *252 

— Construction Plans 541 

— Description " : 255. *258 

—Financial 28, 551 

— New Line Opened 23 

—Substation 310 

—Track and Roadway 309, 267. 162.. 190 

Oregon Interurhan Railway. Track and 

Roadway 606, 634 

Oregon Rapid Transit & Power Co. — 

— Incorporated 366 

— Track and Roadway 463 

Oshkosh. Wis.. Track and Roadway 56 

Otis, Bonnell & Co 552 

Ottawa. Ont.. Track and Roadway 463 

Ottawa Electric Railway — 

—Financial 192 

—Rolling Stock 313 

— Track and Roadway 189 

— Wage Controversy 632 

Overhead Construction — 

— Oregon Electric Railwav *252 

— Sectionalization *80. 84. 86 

— Washington Baltimore >v_ Annapolis 

Electric Railway *205 

— With Bridges. Syracuse Lake Shore & 

Northern Railway .167, *17l 

— W r ith Improved Bracket tl67 

Overhead Section Insulator for Trolley. 

Ohio Brass Co *136 

Owl Car Service 

— Boston Elevated Railway 

— Des Moines 

— Omaha 52 

—Toledo 12 



Pacific Cast Railway. Track and Road- 
wax- ' 

Pacific Electric Railwav — 

—Financial 134 



s An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger indicates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



— Station at Monrovia, Cal *595 

—Trails and Roadway 26, 162, 338, 397 

Pacific Traction Co., Track and Road- 

waj 634 

Paducah Southern Electric Railroad, 

Track and Roadway 57, -i'.tn 

Paint Tests 198 

— By G. B. Heckel 196 

Pana Girard & Jacksonville Railway, 

Track and Roadway 397, 132 

Pantasote Co 135, 552 

Paris & Subiaco Traction Co. — 

— Incorporated 120 

Track and Roadway :!ii!i 

Paris Traction Co., Financial 519 

Parkersburg Bridge Co., Incorporated . 661 
Parks — 

— Grand Rapids Railway *r,7. r , 

Ramona 52 

South, in Michigan Railway. Near I 

rien .Springs 1 ,:: 

— Toronto Railway. Scarboro Beach *357 

Parlor Car Service, Mexico Electric 

Tramways Co *47 

Pasadena. Cal., Track and Roadway. .95, 162 
Patterson Tool & Supply Co., Gala Anti- 
Rattler I (evice *2S3 

Paul Smith's Railroad, Track and Road- 

way 26 

Raul's Valley, Okla., Track and Road- 

way 581 

Paving with Wood +347 

Pay-As- You- Kiit.-r Car Co 313, (93 

I '.iv -As- Yoi i- Knter Cars — 

— Chicago City Railway 264 

— Chicago Railways Co *265 

— Cleveland Electric Railway *424 

— Des Moines City Railway 572 

—For City Service. By T. J. Nicholl 35 

— International Railway (Buffalo) .. .*37. 453 

— Jewett Car Company Design *553 

— Monterey Railway Light & Power Co..*239 
—New York City Railway . .359. ,373, 393, 583 

— Proposed Design. By C. B. Price *273 

— Public Service Railway of New Jersey. *213 

Fare Receiver *4S4 

—Sale of Newspapers f347, 362, 428 

—Semi-Steel. Cincinnati Car Co *423 

Peekskill Lighting & Railroad Co.. Divi- 
dends 98 

Pen Dell. C. W.. Steam Turbine Plants. 120 
Pendleton. Ore., Track and Roadway. 518, 5S1 
Peninsular Railway. Track and Roadway _'7s 
Pennsylvania, Report on Electric Rail- 
roads 576 

Pennsylvania Railroad. Medical Air Lock 

Tunnels *469 

Pensacola Electric Co. — 

—Earnings 134. 370, 609 

— Wage Increase Asked 91 

—Strike 486, 545 

People's Railway. Track and Roadway.. 96 

Perfection Pipe Co 250 

Peru, Ind., Track and Roadway 26 

Petaluma & Santa Rosa Railway, Roll- 
ing Stock 281 

Philadelphia & Easton Electric Railway, 
Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway 

Fares on Traffic 176 

Philadelphia & Western Railroad. Rolling 

Stock 192 

Philadelphia I !o. I Pittsburg)— 

—Dividends 225, 466 

—Financial 192, 584, 609 

Philadelphia Rapid Transit Co. — 

— Accident 660 

— Controversy with Employes 23. 51, 92 

— Extra Charge for Transfers +556 

—Hose Bridge *302 

—Milk Traffic 580 

—Rolling Stock 342. 552,610 

— Sued for Electrolysis Damages 92 

— Track and Roadway 95. 367 

—Transfers 580, 633 

Philadelphia Traction Co.. Dividends 342 

Pinions — 

— "Grade F," General Electric Co 612 

— Scheme for Recutting *451 

Pipe Threading and Cutting Machine. 

Crane *638 

Pittsburg. Pa.— 

—Track and Roadway 189,397 

— Pay-As-You-Enter Experiments +1 

Pittsburg & Allegheny Valley Railway, 

Financial 551 

Pittsburg & Butler Street Railway — 

—Express Coinpanv Contract 94 

—Power Plant 368, 164 

—Rolling Stock 552, 585 

Pittsburg Automatic Vise & Tool Co.... 343 
Pittsburg Canonsliurg ,V Washington 
Electric Railway. Track and Road- 
way 278. 432 

Pittsburg Harmony Butler & New Castle 
Railway — 

Cars ...*254 

-Track and Roadway 26. 397 

Pittsburg Lisbon & Western Railroad, 

Track and Roadway 278. 338 

Pittsburg Railways Co. — 

Bridge Toils 159 

Double-Flow Steam Turbines. West- 

inghouse *642 

i es 25 

Rolling Slock 664 

—Transfer System 129, 161 



— Wage Controversy 

429, 460, 546. 579. 605. 631 

Pittsburg Underground Railway. Incor- 
porated 517 

Pittsiiell Street Railway. Track and 

Roadway 367 

Pleasantville Traction Co., Track and 

Roadway 549 

Plymouth Carver & Wareham Street 

Railway. Financial 519 

Poles— 

—Painting, Near Switches f587, 640 

— Railway. Telephone and Lighting 659 

—Steel, Milliken *345 

Porter. H. F., Failures of Reinforced 

Concrete 461 

Porter Manufacturing Co. — 

Electric Track Switch "315 

— Solenoids and Magnets 253 

Portland, Ore.. Track and Roadway 606 

Portland Eugene & Eastern Railway— 

—Power Plant 131 

—Track and Roadway 26. 96, 309 

Portland Railway Light & Power Co. — 

— Advertising Methods 576 

— Boarding Railroad's Incoming Cars by 

Passengers 219 

—Dividends 342 

— Fare Reduction Contested 336 

— Financial 584 

—Power Plant 607 

—Rolling Stock 281, 552, 664 

—Substation 490, 662 

—Track and Roadway 310, 367 

Portsmouth & Exeter Street Railway, 

Fares Advanced 395 

Potomac Valley Railway. Incorporated.. 462 
Pottstown & Reading Street Railway. 

Track and Roadway 367 

Pottsville Union Traction Co.. Track and 

Roadway 464 

Power Distribution, Feeder Loop. Los 

Angeles Railway *543 

Power Plants — 

— Automatic Synchronizing 329 

— Boiler Practice 176 

— Central Pennsylvania Traction Co....*455 

— Economizer. Green 344 

— High-Voltage. Design of 52 

— Preliminary Plans tl02 

— Remodeling. Jacksonville Electric Co..*589 

— United Railways of St. Louis *480 

—Utility of Second-Hand Machinery t588 

— With Turbines — 

By J. L. Hecht 125 

By C. W. Pen Dell 120 

Power Specialty Co 29, 165, 252 

Prairie State Traction Co., Track and 

Roadway 549 

Pressed Steel Car Co 

29, 135, 165. 250, 493, 520, 552 

Preston Car & Coach Co 60, 313, 342 

Price, Charles B., Proposed Design for 

Pay-As-You-Enter Car *273 

Price. Charles F., Promotion of Traffic. 115 
Priest Rapids Railway. Track and Road- 
way 56 

Promotion of Traffic tl39 

— Aurora Elgin & Chicago Railroad.... *14 

— Conestoga Traction Co *327 

Prosser Traction Co., Track and Road- 
way 131, 432, 464 

Protective Tread Co 343 

Public Relations t523 

—By E. B. Grimes 118 

— Public's Debt to the Public Service 

Corporation. By W. R. Putnam.. 88 
— Relations Between Banker and Engi- 
neer. By J. C. Kelsey 452, t472 

—United Railways & Electric Co. (Balti- 
more) 91. 276. t285, 362. 393, 578 

Public Service Commission for Chicago 

Proposed 90 

Public Service Corporation of New Jer- 
sey, Dividends 434 

Public Service Laws of Wisconsin. By 

B. H. Meyer 559 

Public Service Railway (Newark. N. J.) — 

— Cars, Pay-As-You-Enter Type *213 

Fare Receiver *484 

—Financial 399. 58 I 

— Pupils' Identification Cards 1st 

— Track and Roadway 309, 549 

Publicity, Value of t471 

Publicity Through Advertising fl40 

Pueblo & Arkansas Valley Electric Rail- 
way, Track and Roadway 96, 162 

Puget Sound Electric Railway — 

—Earnings 134. 342, 636 

— Parlor Car Service 336 

—Track and Roadway 222, 432, 549 

Puget Sound International Railway it- 
Power Co.. Track and Roadway... 24S 

Pullman Co.. Orders 371, 100, 193, ' 

Pump. Circulating. Allis-Chalmers L's I 

Pumping with Air Compressors *166 

Pumprey, Thomas. Broadway Car House. 

International Railway *476 

Purchasing, Value of Consulting Engi- 
neer in t613 

Purchasing. Value of Cost Data +614 

Putnam, W. R.. Public's Debt to the 

Public Service Corporation 88 

Putnam & Westchester Traction Co., 

Track and Roadway 162 



Q 

Quebec. Que.. Report on Cause of Bridge 

Failure 319 

Quebec & Saguenay Electric Railway, 

Track and Roadway 310 

Quincy, Cal., Track and Roadway 189 

Quincy Horse Railway & Carrying Co., 

Rolling Stock 281, 342 

Quincy, Manchester. Sargent < 'o 

250, 282, 493, 585 



Railroad Supply Co 493 

Rails. Guard 1588 

Railway Blue Book *377 

Railway Materials Co 585 

Railway Specialty & Supply Co 99, 251 

Railway Steel-Spring Co 343, 552 

Ralston & Le Baron 193 

Rapid Transit Co., Incorporated 633 

Rates, Freight — 

— Joint Steam and Electric Railways. 24. + 43S 

— Joint Steam and Electric. Chicago & 

Milwaukee Electric Railroad. .. .54, +64 
— United Traction Company of Albany... r.sn 

Raymond Concrete Pile Co 343 

Real Estate Improvement Co., Wattles 

Electric Floor Surfacer *403 

Receiverships — 

— And Foreclosures During 1907 8 

— Chicago-New Y'ork Air Line Railroad. 305 
— Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad 

17, 156 

Red Bud & Belleville Interurban Rail- 
way, Incorporated 130 

Redlands & Yucaipe Electric Railroad. 

Track and Roadway 549. 634 

Redlands Central Railway. Track and 

Roadway 189, 464 

Red Oak & Northwestern Interurban 

Promotion Co., Incorporated 547 

Refrigerator Car, Ft. Wavne & Spring- 
field Railway *330 

Registers — 
— Fare — 

Rooke Automatic 469, 495 

Tec «32 

Richmond & Chesapeake Bay Railway, 

Single-Phase Equipment *298 

Richmond & Winchester Interurban Rail- 
way. Track and Roadway 432 

Ridge Avenue Passenger Railway, Divi- 
dends 370 

Ridgway Dynamo & Engine Co 342, 371 

Roanoke Railway & Electric Co. — 

— Power Plant 250 

—Track and Roadway 310. 464 

Robertson, W., & Co.. Steel Wool Jour- 
nal Packing *227 

Robins Conveying Belt Co 343 

Rochester Corning & Elmira Traction 
Co.— 

—Track and Roadway 464, 549. 634 

— Financial 663 

Rochester Railway. Dividends 28, 399 

Rochester Railway & Light Co. — 

— Dividends 98. 281 

—Financial 98, 281, 519, 636 

Rochester Scottsville & Caledonia Elec- 
tric Railroad, Track and Roadway. 634 
Rochester Syracuse & Eastern Railroad — 

— Financial 341 

—Rolling Stock 192. 226. 342 

Rock Island Southern Railroad. Track 

and Roadway 222 

Roebling's. John A., Sons Co 251 

Rogers. S. C, Classification of Operating 

Expenses 558 

Rolling Stock — 

— Development in Design +2 

—Ordered in 1907 +3, 5 

Rome & Osceola Railroad. Track and 

Roadway 634 

Roofbestos Manufacturing Co 637 

Rooke Automatic Register Co.. Auto- 
matic Register and Fare Collector. 

469, 495 

Rosenberger, J. L.. Recent Electric Rail- 
way Legal Decisions. 21. 49. 89, 243, 
304, 331, 361. 392, 45S, r, II, r,77. 602, 629 

Rossiter, MacGovern & Co 193 

Royse, Daniel, Depreciation in Electric 

Railway Accounting 508 

Rural Electric Railway & Power Co.. In- 
corporated 396 

Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co., Orders... 192 
Rutland Railway Light & Power Co. — 

—Financial 370. 585 

—Rolling Stock 467 



s 

S-K. Missouri Cypress Co 165 

Safety Car Coupler Co 60 

Saginaw Owosso & Lansing Railway. 

Track and Roadway 490 

Saginaw Valley Traction Co.. Effect of 

2-Cent Steam Railway Fare on 

Traffic 76 

St. Charles Street Railroad, Dividends.. 59 
St. Francois County Electric Railway. 

Track and Roadway 131 

si Joseph & Stratford Radial Railway, 

Track and Roadway 248 



An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. +A dagger indicates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



si Joseph Railway Light Heat .\ Powei 
Co.— 

I lividends 

—Trail Car Operation +374, ' 

— Power Plant 

St. Joseph Valley Traction Co.. Track 

and Roadway 

St. Louis, Mo.— 

— Tax Ordinance Sustained 

— Track and Roadway 

- United Railways— 

Power Generating and Distributing 

Systems ' 

Traffic During L907 

St. Louis Car Co 

— Cars — 

Semi -Convertible, Utah Light & Rail- 

w;iy i '.i ' 

Pittsburg Harmony Butler & New 

Castle Railway ' 

— Orders 

134. 16.",. 192, 225. 313, 467, 585, 

St. Louis Electrical Show 

St. Louis Montesano >v Southern Rail- 
way — 

— Passenger station 

— Track and Roadway 248, 

St. Louis Surfacer & Paint Co 

St. Louis Torre Haute & Quinoy Traction 
Co., Track and Roadway 

St. Matthews. S. C, Track and Roadway 

St Paul City Railway, Rolling Stock.. 

st. rani Minneapolis & Seattle Electric 
Railway. Incorporated 

St. Petersburg, Russia — 

— Rolling Stock 

— Electrilication of street Railways 

St. Tammany & New Orleans Railway & 
Ferry Co.. Track and Roadw.n a;, 

Salem, (ire.. Track and Roadway 

Salisbury & Spencer Railway. Substa- 



ti, 



Salt Lak. ,v i >g,loii Railway. Track and 
Roadway 397. 549, 

San Angelo. Tex., Track and Roadway.. 

San Angelo Power & Traction Co.. In- 
corpora ted 

San Angelo Traction Co. — 

— Power Plant 

— Track and Roadway 

San Antonio 'reaction Co., Rolling Stock. 

San Bernardino Valley Traction Co., 
Power Plant 

San Diego, Cal.. Track and Roadway.. 

Sandusky Norwalk & Mansfield Electric 
Railway. Rolling Stock 

San Francisco. Cal. — 

— Ordinance to Regulate Service 

— Subway 

San Francisco & Bay Counties Railway. 
Incorporated 

San Francisco Oakland & San Jose Con- 
solidated Railway — 

—Rolling Stock 

— Track and Roadway 338, 

San Francisco Vallejo & Napa Valley 
Electric Railway, Track and Road- 
way 

Sander 

Sanderson & Porter 

San Jacinto. Cal.. Track and Roadway.. 

Santa Ana Tustin & Huntington Beach 
Railroad. Track and Roadway 

Sapulpa & Interurban Railway 

Sarnia Street Railway. Rolling Stock.... 

Savannah. Ga.. Schedules 

Savannah Electric Co.. Earnings. 134, 341. 

Schedules — 

— Boston & Worcester Street Railway... 

— Boston Elevated Railway ' 

— Savannah. Ga 

Schenectady Railway — 

— Financial 341, 

— Substation 

— Track and Roadway 

— Withdrawal of Commutation Tickets... 

Schmock, E. L., Classification of Operat- 
ing Expenses 

Schoch, Eugene P., Review of Timber 
Preservation t555, 

Schuylkill & Dauphin Traction Co.. Incor- 
porated 

Schuylkill Railway Co., Financial 

Scioto Valley Traction Co. — 

— Dividends 

—Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fares 
on Traffic 

— Financial 

Scranton Railway. Power Plant 

Seattle, Wash.— 

— Superintendent of Public Utilities 

— Track and Roadway 2fl, 

Seattle Electric Co. — 

— Dividends 

—Earnings 134. 22.".. 

—Financial 133. 

— Improvements During 1907 

— Power Plant 

—Rolling Stock 134, 

— Track and Roadway 338, 397. 607. 

Seattle Snohomish & Everett Railway — 

— Incorporated 

— Track and Roadway 

Seattle-Tacoma Short Line. Track and 
Roadway 



Securities, Improvement In the Bond 

Market t613 

37ii Seelov, Garrett 'I'.. South Side Kloyated 

3Xil Railroad Extensions •2tl!l 

490 Sellers. William. & CO. 

—Car \VI I Boring Mill "522 

189 — Universal Tool Grinder «430 

Service — 
630 —Betterment, Chicago Railways Co 220 

606 — Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. Ordered to 
Increase Service 94 

— Funeral Car Service in Mexico.... 326 

'480 — Interruptions f255 

186 — Limited, Between Cincinnati and Daj 

13.". ton 129 

— Live and Head Trailers +374 

— Louisville Railway 54 

I" : Metropolitan SI reel K.nlyy a , Kansas 

City 219 

'251 Mexico Street Railways *231 

—New Orleans Railway & Light Co 277 

664 — New York City. Improvement Ordered 25 
275 -Now York City Public Service Com 

mission Orders 307 

— New York Public Service Commission 

281 Investigation 130,516 

549 —Owl Car— 

60 Boston Elevated Railway "329 

Des Moines City Railway 54, 220 

367 Omaha & Council Bluffs Street Rail- 

397 wav 52 

250 Tole 10, 129. 336 

-Parlor Car, Paget Sound Electric Rail- 

94 way 336 

— San Francisco. Cal.. Ordinance 52 

131 -Sight-Seeing I'ars in Mexico »326 

151 — Theater Trains, Spokane & Inland Em- 
pire Railroad t33, 54 

5411 ■ — Through. Between Indianapolis and 

464 Louisville 499 

— Through, Indianapolis to Torre Haute... 128 

635 Shamokin & Mt. Carmel Transit Co.. 

Power Plant 397 

607 Shaw. James P., & Co 343 

222 Sheboygan Light Power ,V- Railway Co., 

Financial 585 

606 Sheffield Co.. Rolling Stock 610 

Shelby Steel Tube Co 99 

310 Sheridan. Wyo., Track and Roadway... 367 

310 Sherwin-Williams Co 552 

281 Shop Equipment, Expansion of +556 

Shop Practice — 

368 —Allegheny Valley Street Railway *10 

26 — Armature Banding Device *354 

— Armature Repair Shop Methods «565 

467 —Armature Truck *360 

— Car House Records and Terminal 

52 Cleaning 1406, »410 

18 — Economy t613 

— Plaster of Paris Models »297 

247 —Practical Hints. Bv H. P. Clarke *23S 

—Practical Motor Coil Making *627 

— Recutting Pinions, Indiana Union Trac- 

435 Hon Co *451 

432 — Repair Records, United Railways & 

Electric Co. (Baltimore) *526 

— Repair Work Record, United Railways 

131 & Electric Co. (Baltimore) '327 

+1 — Saving Oil and Brakeshoes .229 

251 —Small Roads tl 

490 —Track Lavout t497 

— Travel Hoists at Tampa. Fla *390 

367 — Trollev Wheel Arbor *303 

424 —Useful Schemes »533 

342 — Whitening Floors with Lime *474 

94 Shop Tools, Motor Driven t471 

636 Shops— 

— Arrangement of Tracks .437 

160 — Indiana Union Traction Co 105 

329 —Location of Motors U01 

94 — Repair, Indiana Union Traction Co., 

Anderson, Ind 164, *67 

466 — Repair. York Railways Co *440 

310 Shore Line Electric Railway. Track and 

581 Roadway 339 

335 Short Line Terminal Co.. Incorporated.. 396 

Shovel. Electric. Vulcan Iron Works. .. .f316 
408 Shreveport, La., Track and Roadway.... 96 

Shreveport Suburban Railway. Incorpo- 
568 rated 277 

Shreveport Traction Co., Transfer Litiga- 

547 tion 129. 170 

133 Shrewsbury, Pa.. Track and Roadway... 

189. 51S 

466 Sidney & Glace Bay Railway. Power 

Plant 131 

124 Signal System. Telegraph. Bv Cnauncey 

636 P. Button *117 

464 Signals— 

— Hudson & Manhattan Railroad Tunnels 293 
487 — Market Street Elevated Railway, Phil- 

248 adelphia t229 

— New York Subway, Arnold Report 355 

370 — Train-Indicating Device, Gibbs «521 

636 —With Oil Lights, Blake «284 

663 Signs. Painting Poles Near Switches. 1587. 640 
109 Single-Phase— 

339 — Construction Statistics f 285 

664 — Equipment for Branch Line of New 
662 York New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road 52 

547 —Hanover * York Railway *2S8 

607 — Railway Motors for Locomotives 

*75. 84. 85, 86 

662 — Richmond & Chesapeake "Ray Railway. *298 



Washington Baltimore & Annapolis 

Electric Railway U98, «200 

Sioux City, la.. Track and Roadway.... 549 
Sioux ('it. Traction Co., Track and 

Roadway 278 

Sistersville, \v. Va., Track and Roadv i 

Sleet Brush, Third-Rail »485 

Sleet Scrapers and Wheels. Nuttall '126 

hi E I > I'oyvet den 

Distributing Systems. United Rail- 
ways Company of St. Louis »480 

Smith ,y W'allae... i odors 

Smith. Peter. II.;, t, , l •,, 

— Heat.r Equipments *138 

Snohomish Valley Railway — 

—Rolling Stock 585 

Track ami Roadn a; 60 

Solenoids and Magnets, Porter Manufai 

turing Co 253 

Soni n Bend -Raymond Electrli I !o Ti ai I 

ami Roadway 96 

South Bethlehem .v.- Saucon Street Rail- 

yya- 

Rolling Stock 131 

— Track and Roadway 57 

Soul h Memphis 'reaction ,y Elect ra. Co., 

Track and Roadway 164 

South Morgantown Traction Co., Track 

.and Roadway 662 

South Richmond Railway. Track and 

Roadway 190 

South San Joaquin Improvm '.. 

Incorporated 488 

South Side Elevated Railroad (Chicago) — 

— Accident 460 

— Annual Report 142 

— Dividends 342 

— Extensions and Improvements 169 

—Financial 224. 312 

— Increased Expenses 1 6 . 

Southern Car Co 226 

Southern Colorado Power & Rnilua 
Co.— 

— Incorporated 

— Track and Roadway 131 

Southern Michigan Railwa] 

— Park Near Berrien Springs 153 

— Track and Roadway 96 

Southern Railway Supply Co 282 

Southern Street Railroad, Incorporated.. 94 
Southern Traction Co.. Track and Road- 
way 662 

Southern Wisconsin Railway, Bond Issue 

Approved 4." 

Southwestern Traction Co.. Rolling Stock 313 
Sparta-Melrose Electric Railway & 

Power Co., Track and Roadway.... 607 
Spokane. Wash.. Inland Empire System, 

Advertising Cards *211 

Spokane & Inland Empire Railway — 

—Financial 133. 399 

—Theater Trains t33. 54 

— Track and Roadway — 

222, 24S. 367. 432. 490. 585 

Spokane & Newport Electric Railway. 

Track and Roadway 26 

Spokane Traction Co., Rolling Stock 585 

Springfield Clear Lake & Rochester Elec- 
tric Railway. Track and Roadway 518 
Springfield Consolidated Railway, Sta- 
tion 664 

Springfield Railway & Light Co.. Divi- 
dends 399 

Springfield Street Railway — 

—Fares 93. 219.364 

—Financial 59. 98. 585 

— Freight and Express Service 220 

— Freight Cars of Steam Roads Operated 129 

— Power Improvements *359 

—Track and Roadway 57. 367 

Standard Paint Co 193. 552 

Standard Steel Tie Co 400 

Standardization. Clearance and Third 

Rails +33 

Star Brass Works 60 

Starr Brass Co.. Kalamazoo Trolley 

Wheels 401 

Stark. N. M.. Reinforced Concrete in 

Electric Railway Work all 

Starring. M. B.. Interstate Commerce 

Commission System of Accounting. 594 
Stations and Buildings — 
— Office Building. Duluth Street Rail- 
way *456 

— Pacific Electric Railway at Monrovia, 

Cal '595 

— Shelter Stations, Duluth Street Rail- 
way *292 

Statistics — 

—Canadian Electric Railways for 1907.. 104 
— Receiverships and Foreclosures Dur- 
ing 1907 8 

—Rolling Stock Ordered in 1907 .3. 

—Track Construction in 1907 f3 

Steam Railways — 

— Construction During 1907 17 

—Effect of 2-Cent Fare on Electric Rail- 
way Traffic +65. 75. 124. 176 

Sterling-Meaker Co 282 

Steuhenville * East Liverpool Railway & 
Light Co. — 

— New Construction 291 

—Track and Roadway 222. 634 

Stewart. John A., Electric Co 585 



'An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger indicates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Stillwater Power & Railway Co., Incor- 
porated 

Stone & Webster Companies — 

— Earnings and Expenses 

— Executive Offices * 

Stover Motor Car Co., Passenger Motor 



Car 



Strang Gas-Electric Car Co.. Motor Car. 

Stratford, Ont., Track and Roadway 

Street Railway Journal, Consolidation 
with Electric Railway Review 

Strike-Breaking, Louisville Railway Co. 

Strikes— 

— Chester Traction Co 

4S7. 515, 54.-,, 579. 

—Cleveland. 578, 630, 

— Indiana Union Traction Co 

23, 51. 128, 244, 

— Municipal Traction Co. (Cleveland).... 
578, 630, 

— Pensacola Electric Co 186, 

— Threatened, Chicago Railways Co 

— Wilmington City Railway 

Stroudsburg & Water Gap Street Rail- 
way — 

— Power Plant 

—Track and Roadway 190, 

Stuart- Ho wland Co 

Substations — 

— Feeding Portable 

— Portable, United Railways of St. Louis. 

Subways — 

—Brooklyn, N. Y 57S, 

—New York City 91, 127, 

218, t317, 393. 428, 459. 1 471. 486, 
Capacity. Arnold Report 

Cars, Arnold Report t255, 

New Route *19, 

Signals. Arnold Report 

Track Improvements 

— Proposed Between Philadelphia and 
Camden 

Sullivan, J. L. — 

— Home-Made Oil Filter 

— Lubricator 

— Repairing of Commutators 

Swallow Falls Electric Light & Power 
Co., Track and Roadway 

Swedish Railways. Electrification 

Swetland Publishing Co . 

Switzerland. High-Tension Direct-Cur- 
rent Railway 

Symington. T. H.. Co 400, 

Syracuse & Suburban Railroad. Rolling 
Stock 

Syracuse Lake Shore & Northern Rail- 
road. Overhead Construction, with 
Bridges tl67, 

Syracuse Rapid Transit Co. — 

—Dividends 28. 98, 

—Financial 133, 

— Trademark 

Synchronizing. Automatic 



22S 
'454 
190 



T-Rail Track Construction. Bv Mark 

Lowd *598 

Tacoma, Wash., Power Plant 163 

Tampa & Sulphur Springs Traction Co.. 

Track and Roadway 26 

Tampa Electric Co. — 

— Dividends 585 

—Earnings 134, 341, 609 

—Shop Practice *390 

Tariffs— 

— Local and Joint Freight. Toledo Urban 

& Interurban Railroad 187 

— Uniform System of Filing in Indiana. . 160 
Taunton & Pawtucket Street Railway. 

Fares 272 

Taxation — 

— Indiana Railways 516 

— Minnesota Electric Roads 307 

— Public. Bv Judge Dennis Dwver 119 

— St. Louis Tax Ordinance Sustained.... 630 

—United Railways Co. of St. Louis 394 

Taylor. R. C— 

Anderson Shops, Indiana Union Trac- 
tion Co *67 

—Fundamental Brake Rigging 114, fl39 

Taylor, Tex., Track and Roadway 464 

Taylor & Fenn Co 343 

Taylorville, 111., Track and Roadway 397 

Taylorville Electric Railway — 

— Incorporated 547 

-Track and Roadway 607 

Taylorville Street Railway Light Heat & 

Power Co.. Track and Roadway.... 397 

Telegraph Signal Co 313 

Templet Marker. Los Angeles Railway ... *543 
Tern Haute & Merom Traction Co., 

Track and Roadway 57 

Terre Haute Indianapolis & Eastern 
Traction Co. — 

ares 277 

— Power Plant 190 

— Through Service. Indianapolis to Terre 

Haute 128 

— Track and Roadway 190, 339, 582 

Terre Haute Robinson Olney & South- 
western Railway — 

— Incorporated 517 

— Track and Roadway 634 

Tone Haute Traction & Light Co.. Divi- 
dends 281 



Texas Portland Cement Co 

Texas Traction Co. — 

—Rolling Stock 

— Station 

— Track and Roadway 

r,7. 339. 397. 490, r.is, 

Texas Union Traction Co., Incorporated. 
Thermit Welding — 

— Chicago City Railway 

Indiana Union Traction Co ' 

Thermopolis. Wyo., Track and Roadway. 
Thief River Electric Railway. Incorpo- 
rated 

Third Avenue Railroad. New York — 

—Financial 28. 59, 192, 224, 312, 

—Rolling Stock 225, 250, 400. 

-Shops 

450. ;-4S 4S7 74 18. Hi- 596 S3' 

Third-Rail Sleet Brush ' 

Thorp. J. C. Steam Turbine Develop- 
ment ' 

Ticket Methods, Atlantic City & Shore 
Railroad t33. 

Tickets — 

—Duplex Hat Check. East St. Louis & 
Suburban Railway ' 

— Duplex, on Massachusetts Lines 

— Engraved. Protection in ■ 

-Fraudulent Use of 126, 

— Improved Forms 

— Indianapolis & Cincinnati Traction Co.' 

— Pupils' Identification Cards. Newark, 



N. J. 



— Street and Interurban Railways. By 
John F. Ohmer ' 

—Round-Trip, Illinois Traction System.. 

—Thefts of 

Tickets. See Also Fares. 

Ties — 

— Indiana Union Traction Co 

— Treated 

Timber Preservation — 

— Grading of Creosotes ' 

— Paving Blocks 

— Review of. By Eugene P. Schoch.t555. 

Titzel, C. Edgar, New Business Depart- 
ment of a Railway ' 

Toch Brothers 

Toledo, O., Owl Car Service 

Toledo & Chicago Interurban Railway, 
Financial 250. 

Toledo & Indiana Railway — 

— Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fare 
on Traffic 

—Financial 59, 312. 

Toledo Ann Arbor & Detroit Railroad, 
Financial 

Toledo Fostoria & Findlay Railway. 
Track and Roadway 

Toledo Ottawa Beach & Northern Rail- 
way, Track and Roadway 

Toledo Railways & Light Co. — 

— Annual Report 

— Earnings 

—Financial 133, 

— Owl Car Service 

Toledo Urban & Interurban — 

—Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fare 
on Traffic 

— Financial 

—Local and Joint Freight Tariffs 

—Rolling Stock 225, 

Tool Grinder. Motor-Driven 

Tools, Expansion of Shop Equipment....' 

Topeka Railway. Track and Roadway.... 

Topeka Southwestern Railway. Rolling 
Stock 

Toronto. Can.. Track and Roadway . .131. 

Toronto & York Radial Railway. Track 
and Roadway 

Toronto Railway — 

— Annual Report 

— Dividends 

— Financial 

—Rolling Stock 

— Scarboro Beach Park ' 

Toronto Suburban Railway, Track and 
Roadway 

Torrinaton & Winchester Street Railway, 
Power Plant 96, 

Track and Roadway — 

— Bonds, Oregon Electric Railway ' 

— Clearance Chart for Curves 

— Construction in 1901 

— Crossing Sign Post ' 

— Foundations for T-Rnils 1 

— Paving Blocks ' 

—Shelter Stations. Duluth Street Rail- 
way ' 

— Standard Clearance 

Substructures for Tracks in Streets. 
Bv H. L. Weber ' 

—T-Rail Construction « 

— T-Rail. Detroit United Railway 48, 

—T-Rail in El Paso i 

Track Elevation. Chicago & Oak Park 
Elevated Railroad 

Track Scraper. Root < 

Trademarks, Utica &- Mohawk Valley, 
Syracuse Rapid Transit and Oneida 
Railways * 

Traffic — 

— Development bv Advertising 

— Gatemen on Michigan United Railways 

—Interchange between Steam and Elec- 
tric Lines, Indiana 



—Milk— 

Aurora Elgin & Chicago Railroad. ... *296 

Philadelphia Rapid Transit Co 580 

— Promotion of fl39 

By C. F. Price 115 

Trailers, Live and Dead, in St. Joseph, 

Mo «386 

Transfers — 

— Abuses of |405 

— Birmingham. Ala 516 

— Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co 461 

— Extra Charge in Philadelphia |556 

— Form Used on Through Route in Chi- 
cago »325 

— Galveston Electric Co.. New System... 54 

-New York City Railway 

129. 430. t438, 487, f49S, 516, 596, 632 

— New Orleans Railway & Light Co... 94, 129 

—Philadelphia Rapid Transit Co 580, 633 

—Pittsburg Railways Co 129, 161 

—Richmond. Va 546 

— Shreveport, La 170 

— Shreveport Traction Co 129 

— United Railroads of San Francisco.... 336 
—United Railways & Electric Co. (Balti- 
more) *299 

—Washington (D. C.) Railway & Electric- 
Co 129, 187 

Transmission — 

— Galvanized Steel Poles for *345 

— Thury System t318, 331 

— United Railways of St. Louis *480 

Transmission Lines. Feeder Loop, Los 

Angeles Railway *543 

Transportation Equipment Co 29 

— Tec Registering Fare Box *32 

Traverse City, Mich., Track and Road- 
way 310 

Tri-City Railway & Light Co.. Daven- 
port, la., Dividends 466 

Trolley Retriever. Peerless *611 

Trolley Supply Co.. Arc Headlight and 

Trolley Retriever *611 

Trolley Wheel Arbor *303 

Trolley Wheels— 

—Humphrey *402 

—Kalamazoo ; . . . 401 

— Langen 293 

Trolley Wheels, Harps and Poles. By 

Adam Cole *385 

Tropico. Cat. Track and Roadway 635 

Troy Rensselaer & Pittsfield Street Rail- 
way, Track and Roadway 607 

Truck, with Motor Suspension *470 

Trucks— 

—Oakland City Traction Co *9 

—Electric Motor and Trailer *382 

— Electric Motor Service. By F. M. 

Nicholl 199 

— Electric Motor Service. Practical Views 

on. By C. Loomis Allen 103 

Tunnels — 
-Belmont Tunnel Under East River, New 

York 90 

— Boston, Washington Street, Engineer- 
ing Features 655 

— Brooklyn, opening of 51 

— Hudson & Manhattan Railroad Under 

Hudson River *240 

— Pennsylvania Railroad. Medical Air 

Lock *469 

— Sarnia, Ont. — 

Electric Locomotives 306 

Electrification 23 

Tupper, C. A., Growth of Kokomo Marion 

& Western Traction Co *560 

Turbines. Steam — 

—By J. L. Hecht 125 

—By C. W. Pen Dell 120 

— Curtis, Sales of 442 

— Development of. By J. C. Thorp *573 

— Double-Flow. Westinghouse. for Pitts- 
burg Railways Co *642 

Turbines. Westinghouse Business 372 

Tuttle. M. C, Surface Finish on Concrete 

Construction 265 

Tuttle. W. B.. Producer Gas for Engine 

Use ;."..".. 571 

Tweedy, Hood & Finley 637 

Twin City & Lake Superior Street Rail- 
way 

— Incorporated 606 

—Track and Roadwav 163.635 

Twin City General Electric Co., Track 

and Roadway 222 

Twin City Rapid Transit Co.— 

— Annual Report 287 

—Dividends 134. 342, 519 

—Earnings 28, 342, 584 

—Fares 246 

—Financial 225, 280 

— License Tags 128 

—Rolling Stock 226 

—Substation 432 

Track and Roadwav 26, 339 



u 



Underground Electric Railways, London. 

Financial 98, 492. 663 

Union Electric Co., Financial 585 

Union Railway. Financial 133, 164. 434 

Union Spring & Manufacturing Co 552 

Union Street Railway. Dividends 225. 585 

Union Traction Co.. Santa Cruz. Cal., 

Rolling Stock 520 



An asterisk indicate 



lips, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger indicates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



I |M> 



Ill-,] 



United Gas Machinery Co 372 

United in.l 1 j i :i t .-. i Kii.i.- « "■ • r.i:: 

United Railroads of San Francisco 

—Financial 225 ! 1 1 

—Power Plant 635, 66:; 

Transfer System 336 

United Railways (Jersej City), Incorpo- 
rated 366 

United Railways (Portland, Ore.). Track 

and Roadway ■'•.. 164 

United Railways & Electric Co. (Balti- 
more)— 

—Accident Frauds 128, 151 

— Annual Report 525 

—Car Defect Report 272 

— Car House at Electric Park *232 

—Coal, Monthly Statement »391 

— Crane Cars *658 

— Employment of Trainmen 515 

—Financial ...< 250, 192 

— Overcapitalization t524 

—Public Relations.. 91. 276, t285, 362, 393, 578 

— Repair Shop Records *526 

—Repair Work Record »3?7 

—Transfer Methods *299 

United Railways Co. of SI. Louis — 

— Annual Report 473 

—Dividends 28, 399 

—Earnings 98, 250, 370, 519, 663 

— Financial 225 

—Power Plants »4S0. 518 

—Substations. Portable *4S0 

— Transmission System *480 

—Traffic During 1907 186 

United Railways Investment Co. — 

— Annual Report 557 

—Financial 133. 551 

United states Graphite Co., Lubricating 

Graphite 137 

United Traction & Electric Co.. Divi- 
dends 342 

United Traction Co. (Albany)— 

— Fares 546 

—Financial 281, 312. 585 

—Freight Rates 580 

—Track and Roadway 368 

United Traction Co. (Reading) — 

— Power Station 27S 

— Track and Roadway 57, 278 

Utah Light \- Railway Co. 

—Car House 664 

—Cars. Semi -Convertible *403 

—Power Plant 9. 163 

— Track and Roadway 339 

Utica **t Mohawk Vallev Railway — 

— Dividends 28 

— Earnings 636 

—Financial ■ 370 

— Track and Roadway 368 

— Trademark *182 



Vacuum Cleaner Co 98, 135 

Vacuum Impregnating Manufacturing Co. 637 
Vaile it Kiems. Trolley Wheel and Bush- 
ing »385 

Vallejo & Northern Railway. Track and 

Roadway 464 

Valley Power Co. — 

— Incorporated 581 

— Power Plant 662 

Van Brunt Street & Eric Basin Railroad. 

Rolling Stock 192 

Van Valkenburgh. E. C. Advertising 

Methods 30 

Varnishes, Insulating 46 

Vauclain, A. C. Electric Motor and 

Trailer Trucks *3S2 

Veblen Traction Co.. Track and Roadway 36s 
Ventilation— 

--Cars f 167 

— Cars. Detroit United Railway 181 

— New York Central Power Stations *494 

Ventura Terminal Railway. Track and 

Roadway 96 

Vera Cruz, Mex.. Electric Railway Serv- 



ice 



Vera Cruz Electric Light Power & Trac- 
tion Co., Power Plant 

Vicksburg Railway & Light Co.. Finan- 
cial 

Vicksburg Traction Co.. Incorporated 

Vincennes Traction & Light Co. — 

— Financial 

-Track and Roadway 

Vincennes West Baden & Louisville Rail- 
road, Track and Roadway 

Virginia Passenger & Power Co. — 

— Power Plant 

— Substation 

— Transfers 

Visalia Electric Railroad 

— Track and Roadway 

Vordermark. H. E. Employes' Mutual 
Renetit Association, Ft. Wayne & 
Wabash Vallev Traction Co 

Vreeland. H. TT., Testimonial Dinner 

Vulcan Iron Works. Electric Shovel ' 

Vulcan Iron Works Co 

Vulcan Steam Shovel Co 



W 

Railroad, 



v\ abash \ allej Traction Co., Track and 

Roadway 635 

Wages 
Beavei \ allej Traction i !ompany in- 
creases 660 

Chicago Railways Co., Trainmen Ask 

Increase 

lies M s r\i\ Railway 1.9. 276, 334 

Inter-Urban Railwaj (Des Moines). 362 
Ottawa 1 1 int. i Electric Railway Con- 
troversy 632 

Pensacola Electric Co., Carmen Ask 

Increase 91 

Pittsburg Railways Co 

(29, 160, 546, 579, 6 11 

Washing! V- Canonsburg Railway In- 
creases 660 

Walla Walla Valley Traction Co., Roll- 
ing Stock 552. 664 

Wallis. R. N., Classification of operating 

Expenses n 

Warren. Herbert. Shelter Stations. I'n- 

luth Street Railway *292 

Warren-Bisbee Railway. Track and Road- 

waj 278, 164 

Warren Brookfield & Spencer Si reel 

Railway, Electrolysis Suit 306 

Warren Cortland X- Jefferson Traction 

Co., Track and Roadway .1111 

Warsaw. N. v.. Track and Roadway 163 

Washburn Steel Castings & Coupler Co. 135 

Washington, D. C. Transfers 187 

Washington & Canonsburg Railway — 

—Shops 98 

— Wages Increased 660 

Washington & Maryland Electric Rail- 
way. Incorporate! 337 

Washington Alexandria & Mt. Vernon 

Railway, Dividends 28 

Washington Arlington & Falls Church 

Railway. Track and Roadway 57 

Washington Baltimore & Annapolis Elec- 
tric Railway — 

—Description ,tl9S. *200 

— Terminal Station 193 

— Track and Roadway 57 

—Traffic 580 

Washington Frederick & Gettysburg 

Railway. Track and Roadway. .190. 222 
Washington Patuxent & Drum Point 

Railroad. Incorporated 462 

Washington Railway & Electric Co. — 

— Changes in Control 109 

— Financial 192, 551 

—Rolling Stock 520. 552.610 

Track and Roadway 248, 397, 51S 

—Transfer System 129 

Washington Traction Co.. Financial 636 

Washington Water Power Co. (Spokane) 464 

—Dividends 399 

Washington Westminster & Gettysburg 

Railroad, Track and Roadway 

57. 490, 582 

Wason Manufacturing Co., Orders 552 

Waste. G.E. Motor. Hagy Waste Works. 611 
Waterloo Cedar Falls & Northern Rail- 

— Cars. Combination Passenger and Bag- 
gage *425 

— Financial 551 

—Power Plant 248 

— Track and Roadway 24S. 397 

W T atertown, N. Y.. Black River Traction 
Co.. Single-Truck Cars Without 

Monitors *144 

Wausau Street Railroad. Power Plant... 278 
Waverlv Sayre & Athens Traction Co., 

Fares 580 

Weber, H. L.— 

— Construction Car. Ft. W T ayne & Wa- 
bash Vallev Traction Co *156 

— Structures for Tracks in Streets *1°1 

Weber Gas Engine Co 282. 343 

Webster Monessen Bellevernon & Fay- 
ette City Street Railway. Rolling 

Stock 134 

Weeks. II. E., Classification of Operating 

Expenses 442 

Welding. Thermit 

— Chicago City Railway *447 

— Indiana Union Traction Co *447 

WellSDUrg Bethany ,V- Washington Trac- 
tion Co., Track and Roadway i82 

Wendell & MacDuffie 552 

Westboro ,v- Hopkinton Streel Railway. 

Fares 301 

West Chester .V- Wilmington Electric 
Railway — 

— Car House 371 

— Incorporated 161 

—Power Plant 368 

-Track and Roadway 

-2-22. 368, 135. 164, 582, 607 

West Chester Kennett & Wilmington 

Electric Railway. Financial 312 

West Chester Street Railway. Financial. 133 
Westchester Traction Co — 

— Financial 370 

—Rolling Stock 98 

West End Street Railway— 

—Dividends 370 

—Financial 98. 225. 281. 312. 551 

West India Electric Co., Financial 399 

West Jersey & Seashore — 

— Annual Report 407 

— Financial 399 



West Penn Rail™ a >. s Co. — 

i <\\ Idends 134. 519 

Kile, t oi 2-i v,,i sti am Railway Fares 

on Traffic 

Powei Plan! 635 

Trai k and Roadwa ! 57, 222, 607 

Western Electric Co 

— Exhibit .it Chicago Electrical Show. 

Strain Insulators 195 

Western Illinois & Iowa Railroad 

porated L61 

Western New York & Pennsylvania Trac- 
tion Co., Trai I. and Roadwaj 164 
Western < >hio Raiiu a 

— Excursion with Steam Road 232 

—Financial 9i 11 

Western Pacific, Postpones Electrification 292 

Western Society of Engineers 

92, 159, 219. 245, 364 394, 129, 545, 604 

Western Tube Co '.is 99 

Western Wire Sales Co L'.'.l 

Westilivhonse Ail liral,.- CO 371 

— Air Compressors for Pumping *166 

Westinghouse, Church, Ken & Co., or- 
chis 192 

Westinghouse Companies 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing 

Co 226, 31 I. 193, 

— Electric Locomotives tor Chicago Sub 

ways 

—Electrically Heat Hue pot »2S4 

— Motor Starter Boxes *tm 

—Orders 226 

—Reorganization LOO, 135, 168 

Westinghouse Machine Co 

'"'. 343, 135 167, 610 

— Double-Flow Steam Turbines. Pitts- 
burg Railways Co *642 

— Gas Engines '553 

—Steam Turbine Development 372 

Weston. George. Report on Chicago Ele- 
vated Loop r.i :, 

Weston Electrical Instrument Co. — 

— Meters 254 

— Recording Milli- Voltmeter and Shunt 

Ammeter *31 

Westside Electric Street Railway. Roll- 
ing Stock 313 

Wetzel .X- Tyler Railway. Financial 636 

Whatcom County Railway & Light Co. — 

— Dividends 281 

—Earnings 134. 370. 584 

Wheatland Street Railway, Track and 

Roadway 222 

Wheel Boring Mill. Sellers *522 

Wheel Truing Brake Shoe Co 99 

Wheeler Condenser & Engineering Co. 313, 193 
Wheeling & Western Traction Co.. Incor- 
porated 581 

Wheels — 

—Flat Spots. By E. L. Hancock *242 

— Steel Versus Iron 170 

White. J. G. & Co 29. 493. 585 

Wichita Railroad & Light Co.. Track and 

Roadway 278 

Wight. C. L., Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission Statistics and Accounts... 513 
WiHiamsport Passenger Railway — 

—Car House 281 

—Shops 

Wilmington & Edgemoor Electric Rail- 
way. Financial 225 

Wilmington City Railway. Strike- 632 

Wilmington Railway ,V- Electric Co., An- 
nual Report 557 

Wilson, James G.. Manufacturing Co.... 585 

Wilson Co., The 552 

Winchester & Washington Railway. 

Power Plant 582 

Window Fixtures, Curtain Supply Co....»314 
Windows — 

—Anti-Rattler Device. Gaba *283 

— Compression Sash Fixture. Edwards. .*345 
Windsor Essex & Lake Shore Rapid 
Railway — 

— Financial 

—Track and Roadway 131. 397. 549 

Windsorville & East Hartford Street 

Railway. Track and Roadway 190 

Winnebago Traction Co. — 

— Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fare 

on Traffic " 

—Rolling Stock 192, 281,313 

—Track and Roadway 

Winnipeg Elec tri I iailwa; - 

—Annual Report 

—Dividends 370 

—Financial 225 

— Track and Roadway 222 

Winona Interurban Railway — 

—Financial 

Steam Railways Refusi to Interchange 

Traffic 

— Track and Roadway 

131, 163, 190 27S 

Wisconsin. Public- Service- Laws. By B. 

H. Meyer 559 

Wisconsin Engine Co 282, 313 

Wood. Charles N., Co 4K7 

Woo.] River East Alton & Bunker Hill 
Traction Co. — 

— Incorporated 606 

— Track and Roadway 607 

Woodman. R.. Manufacturing Co 313 

Woodstock & Svcamore Traction Co., In- 
corporated 488 



"An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. tA dagger indicates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



W Istock Marengo Genoa & Sycamore 

Electric Railway, Track and Road- 
wax- 190 

Worcester Consolidated Street Railway — 

— Electrolysis Suit , 306 

— Fares 237 

— Financial 2S 

Worcester Railway supply Co., Double- 

Acting Fenders *402 

Wrecking Jacks t555 

Wright, W. H. S., Supply Co l'l's 

Wyckoff Pipe ,v Creosoting Co (61 



Yakima Intervalley Electric Railroad — 

— Incorporated 220 

—Track and Roadway , 607 

Yakima Valley Transportation Co., Track 

and Roadway 26. 549, 582 

Yazoo City Light Water & Sewerage 

Plant. Rolling Stock 60 

Y'ork & Shrewsbury Electric Railway. 

Track and Roadway 368 

Y'ork Haven Water Power Co.. Power 

Plant 607 



Y'ork, Pa., Track and Roadway 464 

Y'ork Railways Co. — 

—Effect of 2-Cent Steam Railway Fares 

on Traffic 124 

— Hanoyer & York Single-Phase Railway. »228 

— Repair Shops *440 

—Track and Roadway 549, 635 

Y'oungstown & Ohio River Railroad, 

Track and Roadway 397 

Z 
Zelnieker Crayon Works 251, 435 



PERSONAL 



Abbott, Jack 58 

Ackerman. J. Waltei 

Ackerman. Martjn.27, 491 

Adams. H. H. . ,.»608, 635 

Ager, J. W 29 

Ahorn. H 163 

Allen, H. C 635 

Allen. John 223 

Anderson, A. A 132 

Anderson. Samuel . . 519 

Andrew, J. M 279 

Andrew, James D... 132 

Angus. S. F 280 

Apperson, R. D 97 

Arnold. R. M 132 

Atwood, W. B 51S 

Averill. E. S 313 

Avars, David P 635 

B 

Bailev, W. P L32 

Baldwin. C. 1' 97 

Baldwin. Waltei- H. .. 552 

Bangert, .1. J 608 

Barbour. F. F 310. 398 

Barnes. A. A 368 

Barr, Thomas Carson 280 

Barron. Adolph M «433 

Barton. Guv C 96. 132 

Belding. R. A 132 

Bennion. Lisle .' 163 

Benson. Fred M 279 

Bergdoll, Louis J 251 

Berry, Frederick S...*491 

Bibb. Judson 223 

Bieghler, E. B 132 

Bigelow. Horatio .... 519 

Bilbro, O. R 58 

Bimrose, A. S 491 

Bleecker. John S.223. 311 

Blondell, M. J 164 

Blowitt, T. F 163 

Boardman, William P. 662 

Boileau. W. E 223 

Botsforcl. Geis 132 

Bougher, Howard M.. 368 

Rougher. Josia K. 340. 368 

Bourne, Frederick G. 550 

Bo wen. A. P 250 

Bovdland. Miss R.... 519 

Bovnton. E. C 491 

Bramlette. J. M 249 

Brashears. John W.. 371 

Breckenridge. A. I 58 

Bremer. Eugene 96 

Brigger. G 249 

Brill, John Albert 

400, 127 

Brine. G. W. 163. 224. 279 

Bristol, William H... 493 

Brock way. W. B 369 

Brow. Henry W 550 

Brower, Joseph 60S 

Brown, A. J 96 

Brown. Frank H 223 

Brown. G. W 58 

Brown. R. W 51S 

Brush, Matthew C...*384 

Buchanan. C. B 340 

Buchanan. F. T..3ln. :;?,'i 

Buchanan, Grant ... 582 

Bullock, Rockw 1 II. :;::■< 

Burgess, Daniel E... 279 

Burkhardt. F. A 

368. *39S. 491 

Burns, C. F 608 

Busby, William *3R9 

Bush, S. S :,s 

Bush. Willard K.... 585 

Bushel, Henry :,N 

Butler, William M. .. "11 

Byrne, J. V 163 



Caklerwood. J. F. . . 133 

Calvert. Harrv S I'm, 

Cameron, D. W... 339 

Cannon. T>. B 662 

Carll. D. S 368. 39S 

Carothers, J. A 249 



Carpenter. F. L) "106 

Carr, C. E. A 583 

Carr. George R 371 

Cartwrigtit, James W.. 

Jr 608 

Cassidv, P. F 249 

Chambers, W. S 635 

Chaplin. James C. . . L'79 

Chapman, G. F 97 

Child. Arthur E 311 

Childs, T. M 465. 519 

Chubbuck, H. E 249 

Clark. A. T 635 

Clark. Harold A 371 

Clark. J. P 249, 279 

Clarke, H. J 27 

Clarke. H. P 369 

Cleary. John J 279 

Clemens, P 58 

Clift, P. E 339 

Coates. Frank R 282 

i -,,1,1.. Bernard C 519 

Coen, F. W 190 

Collins. George L 518 

Collins. J. F 465, 519 

Colvin, Joseph ...249, 339 

Compton, C. S 368 

Comstock. A. W 

5S2, 5S3. 60S 

Cooke. R. W 582 

Cooley. Frank 433 

Corrigan. Bernard . . . 190 

Cosper, W. P 135 

Crabbs. J. T 

Crafts. P. P. 491. *500. 550 

Crane. C. F 27, *5S 

Crawford, Alexander 

L 97 

Crawforl, C. M 518 

Crawford. W. C.339, *39S 

Crecelius, Lawrence.. 582 

Crillev. William 465 

Cushing, Louis E. .58, 96 

D 

Dalton. Charles H... 340 

Dalton, Henry C 223 

Dasent, Bury Irwin . . 635 

Davies, Henrv J 582 

Davis. W. E 662 

Deal, E. C 310 

Dee, William V *282 

Denman. C. A 27, 250 

Derr. William L 465 

Diebell, D. C 310 

Dimmick, E. S 58 

Dolan, Peter C..163. *224 

Donecker. H. C 27 

Donovan. Henry 519 

Downs. E. E *340 

Doyle. James J 27 

Dozier. Melville. Jr. 

465, »491 

Draper, N. C 635 

Duck, J. J 249 

Dunlap; A 368 

Dunlop. George Thomas 

190, 36S 

Dunston, W. J ?49 

du Pont. A. B 582 

Dutton. A. N 433 

Dwyer, William Dudley 

163 



163, 


I'lll 


Emerson. J. B 


552 


Emerv, Joseph 


■', 


Enright. J. M 


465 


F.uker. George W 


871 


Evans, A. Y' 


96 


Evans. Frederick . 


27 




223 



Filer, t 'harles 

Finigan. Thomas... 96. 

Fischer. L. E 

Fish, Williston 

Fisher. H. A 279. ' 

Fitts. D. H 

Fitzsimmons. Thomas 



Floy, Henry 

Flvnn. Simon R. . . 

Folsom. E. C 

Foster. E. C 

Foster, Horatio A. 
Fothergill. H. R. . 
Fowle. Frank F. . 
French, Lester G.. 



311 
635 

372 
664 
249 
519 
518 
520 
583 
371 
29S 



i lab-. Hubert 

Garrett. T 

Garton. W. R 

Gaver. -Herman 

Gaw, L. R 

Gennet. C. W., Jr. . . . 
Gerberich, Dennis G.. 
Gerhardt. P. W. .249, 

Gerke. Jacob 

Gibbs, W. A 

Gillespie. Henry F. . 

Gillette. A. L 

Gillette. J. C 

Gils, Arthur J 

Glenn. Thomas K.163, 

Glenn. W. H 163. 

Glover. Benjamin H. 

310. 

Golliday. L. M 

Gordon. D. A 

Goss. William F. M. 

Graham. James 

Graham. John R 

Grant, Howard F.... 

190. 465. 

Graves, C. E 

Greeley, John E 

Green, Francis C . . . . 

Green. H. C 

Green. Thomas 

Green, W. E 

Griffin. P. H 

Guthrie, Ira E 



Farmer. Thomas. Jr.. 60 

Farrington. H. K 279 

Fassett. Edgar S 310 

Felton, S. M 249 

Fielder. George 279 



Haigh. Henry A. 582. *608 

Haigh, Samuel 550 

Haldenwang, John M. 519 

Hallett, R. C 98, 135 

Hamilton. Charles . . 190 
Hamilton. Frank T.. 96 
Hamilton. George E. 368 

Hamilton, R. B 249 

Hammond, F. H 163 

Handlon. Joseph H.96. 97 

Hanna. J. B 190. 223 

Hansen. J. H 223 

Hapgood. Richard . . 223 

Harder. J. A 190 

Harding. C. F 223 

Harrington, Daniel K. 

368 

Harrington. L. W.... 58 

Harris. A. H 310 

Harris. R. W.163. 491, 550 

Harris. W. D 279 

Harrison. H. C 39S 

Havens. V. L 223 

Hawley, C. S 371 

Haves, R. R 96 

Havnes. L. C 433 

Havward. A. H 519 

Heim. J. J 190 

Heins. .1. L.223, 249, »280 
Hendersbot. E. W. . . 368 
Hendricks. Wavne . . 368 
Henrv. Frank R.*369. 398 

Herdicker. D. H 662 

Hewes, A. M 368 

Hewitt. C. F 433 

Hewlett. A. M 29, 60 

Hilton, George P 491 

Mine. Edwin Warren. "27 
Hippee. George B... 223 



Hiscoek. Albert K. . . 465 
Hiscock, Fldelio K.. 550 
Hodgkins, Edward W. 493 

Hoffman, F. D 249 

Holden, Willis 550 

Hoover, William H.. 340 
Hopkins, Marcellus . 58 
Hopple, George E... 164 
Horton, Walter H.465. 550 

lb in,k, Charles B 33:1 

Hough. Robert 433 

Howard. R. M 96 

Hubbard, W. S 433 

Hubbard, Ward 368 

Huff, S. W..249. 280. 340 
Huggins. Charles M. 339 
Humphrey. John .... 662 

Hunt. H. H 310 

Huntoon, J. G 583 

Huston. J. C 279 

Hutchinson. Frederick 

L 368 

Hyman. Edgar H 491 



Insull. Samuel 132 

Irwin. E. J 491 

Irwin, Joseph 1 132 

I vers. Harry B 608 



Jackson. Alexander 


311 


Johnson, James W.. 


435 


Johnston. J. F 


132 


Jones, William 


369 


Jordan. A. W 


*9'i 


K 






58 


Keegan. George 


279 


Keep. Charles Hallam 




465, 


518 


Keller, E. E 


493 


Kenworthv. Charles A. 




433, 


491 


Kephart, C. I 


96 


Keys, S. Butler 


60 


Kilman, W. O 


46b 


Kilpatrick, J. C 


96 


Kinch, Melvin J 


96 


King, R. W 249, 


339 


King, Thomas C 


868 


Kirby. J. F 


550 


Kirk, Edward B.310. 


840 


Kirkpatrick, E. F. . . 


98 


Kirkpatrick. W. E. . . 


190 


Kirkwood, M. W 


58 


Knox, George W 


96 


Kreidler, William A. 






467 



Lambert. H. M 

Lane. Horace H 

Larcey. W. P 

Lardner. James F.582. 

Larson. J. O 

Lavollo. J. T 

Lawless. Richard T.. 

Lawson. W. C 

League. James R . . . . 

Le Baron. A. T 

Lehman, J. S 

Leonhauser, H. A... 

Lewis, Myron H 

Lewis, William Thomas 
Ledvard, James R.190. 
Ligon, Robert E. .163, 

Lillie, E. E 

Lindall, John 

Linn, Arthur L., Jr. . 

310, 

Livermore, S. B 

Loeb. William, Jr.... 

Loftus. M. J 

Long, William ...550, 
Lord, Franklin B. . . . 

Lott, Frank M 

Low, Fenwick E 

Lucas. S. B 



Lugar. J. C 63,» 

Lukes. J. B 465, *518 

Lyall. Willard L -165 

M 

McAndrews, A. J 582 

McArthur. Robert ... 550 
McAulav. Murdock... 

132. 224 

McBroom, L. R 550 

McCalman, R 96 

McCarthy. E. C 310 

McCaulev. M 58 

McCloskey. Hugh. 279, 518 

McCIoud. W. F 310 

McColgin, Harry 368 

McCotter, F. L 163 

McCoy. Frank 279 

McCray. Lee H..368, 433 
McCredie, James .... 58 
McDermott, Allan L. 132 

McDonald, J. W 465 

McFarland, Louis.... 165 
Mcintosh, Frances A. 343 
Mclver, Alexander... 368 

McKeever. J. P 58 

McLean. A. R 662 

Macleod. George 58 

McWhirter. J. S 249 

McWhorter, W. A... 96 
MacGovern, Frank... 467 

Ma, -Wolff. J 550 

Madill, Thomas 435 

Magee, C 339 

Mahan, S. E 279 

Maher, Charles A.... 552 
Maher. Edward A.... 58 

Mains, Jefferson 279 

Maish, A. G 223 

Mann. Arthur H 163 

Manning, Lawrence.. 96 

Marsh, F. J 27 

Martin, Fred A 223 

Mathes, L. D "550 

Mayo, John C 279 

Meilor. John 662 

Meloon. W. G.279. 310. 465 
Mendenhall. B- W. . . 608 
Meredith. Wynn .... 251 
Middleswart. J. A . . 339 
Millen, Thomas . .340. 368 

Miller, G. E 96 

Miller. Hugh T 132 

Millspaugh. J. L.282. 550 

Mitchell. A. E 467 

Monell. J. E 132 

Moore, A. R 190, 279 

Moore, Clifford B 60 

Moore, G. F 310 

Mordock, Charles T.. 250 
Morgan, James W... 58 

Morrill, C. K 58 

Morrison, W. B 249 

Morse. George F 27 

Moser, A. G 27 

Mosser, George K... 58 
Mountney, Louis H.. 27 

Mulks. G. W 635 

Mullanev, Thomas F. 60S 

Monger, E. T 369 

Munroe, Thomas 223 

Munsell. Eugene 552 

Murdock, H. D 223 

Murphev. Charles A. 519 
Murphy', John Z 223 

N 

Nash. J. L 223 

Nathan, Clifford .... 371 
Neereamer. Albert L. 



.96, 
Nichols, Othniel F.. 

North. J. E 58, 

Nutt. H. W 



Ofverholm. Ivan 

Ogelby, A. C 

Olmstead, John B 

Osborne. H. C 

Ostenieier. George 



•433 
224 

•132 
193 



518 
518 
465 



"An asterisk indicates maps, portraits or other illustrations. 1A dagger indicates an editorial. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



p 

Pagan, IF W 58 

Palmer, C. E 223 

Pain er, L. H..., (65 

Parry, William C. 340 
Parsons, I Cosmer Buck 

Ingham 608 

Patten, Paul B...2S0, 193 

Patterson, William 11. 97 

Pawling, i ; ge !■'... Ml 

Paxson, Levi 27 

Peabody, Pram Is S. 368 

II G 16" 

Pettj I rerbert C... (137 

Pevear, J S 'I' 

Phill ire, W. I: 

Pien e, G C... 133 

Pitcher, William A 63i 

Polk ii ii i::' 
Folk. Jefferson S 

Pontius, D. w t;:i. r . 

Pope, J. R 58 

P -i E V 339 368 

Potter, E K 165, I . 

Potter, II S 27 

Power, William W 165 

Pratt, George E 610 

Price, .1. Boyle 518 

Price, William E 

Pruyn Robert C 193 

Q 

Quest. I [arry C 520 



Ra Irliffe, George 


Tj.. 


582 


Ralph, A. C 




:it; 


Ralston, C \ 




193 


Kauisav, Gordon 




(65 


Rankin, G ge S 




.,:: 


Rawson, .1. S. . . . 




635 


Redding, S, A. 




224 






: 1 


Rehner, A., E. . . . 




I'M, 


Reidhead, P, E, 


...... 


::i 1 


Rej nolds, A. E. . 




36H 


Reynolds, A. G.. 




; 


Rhlnes, K. K... 




98 


Richards, C. L. . 




i 


Richards, E. M 




163 


Ritz, H. B 




'•,'•1 


Roach, John Millard. 


Mill 


Roberts, T. C... 




55(1 


Robertson, Edwin 


w 






163, 




Rogei s, i !ha i le 


13 1 


Rohwer, Henrj 




1 II) 


Rolston, \\ llliam 


!•: 




Ros mbei ger, I. I 




B6 ' 


Ruby, Frederick 




310 


Rumsey, J. B. . . 




608 


Ruth, Isaac S.. 




mi 


S 






Sallee, .i- D... . 




58 


Sanville, 1 1 F 




611 


Sawtelle, Walter 


i. 


808 



Scam-It, ' Icm ge I : 

I'm. 279 

Schindler, A. I> 58 

Scl ibeli, G. \ 58 

Schoepf, \. k 

Scott, J. F 161 

Scullin, Terranci 

Shafei . I lanii I 193 

Shaw. George n ... 310 

siiau . James F ::n 

Shepar I. A rthur B. . . 

L93 

t. W. 

Shepherd, s . l; . L93 

Shinnick, G. S 
Shmi. F. A. , 635 

Slirvm k. i isborne '"3 

Sickler, A 

Simons .1 E 

Sims. C. S 310 

Sinclair, i' A. S 115 

Smith, Arthur i:.... nr, 

Smith. Vrlliur I.....S. "7a 
Smith. Byron L. . . 

Smith, C. A 163, •-':! 

Smith. Charles w. . . . 163 
Smith, Fred W 

Snow, Walter I > 610 

Spotts, Charles II 585 

Stark. John K.. 190 
Stangland, R. S. . . 1 13 

Steel, E. T 310 

Stephens, B. I; 27 

Stevens, A. K 96, 97 



Stitcher, R, B. "697, 662 

Stocking, A. II 368 

Stoddard, J. M 163 

Stover, I lanlel C 193 

Strehlau, R, R ... 491 

Sullivan, J. 1 279, 110 

Sunny, B. E I I 610 

Sutherland, W. I: . ... 96 

Symington, E. 1 1 :13 



Tarrant, w n 
Taylor, E. B 

T nai G rg B 

THton, i i 

Tot* " end, Watson ! 13 

Tri le, I i: . . 398 

Tripp, Gu i L90 

Tripp, 1 1, in y .... 371 

I',,, ker, Jo i<i> 163, I ' i 
Turner, Charles F 58 

Tit m i. w s 193 

Twyford, ll. B, 139 



L'nderw I, A w 



Venable, J, \ 



W 

Walcott, A. II... 

>\ ii!.. i I'.iv In \i . . 27 

Wallaci H ! i ..«279 

W attli I iurdon W. . 



I osepli i ilj 

::il 

I F :i7 

West, Arthur ... 

V. , 

Wesl m, i leoi ge ... 96 

u et mon i P I 

Whippli i 

White, Elmei .\i 

Whitl n 340 

Whitridge F w 58 

Hi. ii' 

Wilkinson, F A... 339 

Witt. John 190 

Woehnker, A. F 58 

Wolff, S. E... 16 

Wi.il... G, orgi H 

Woo i. Thomas 398 

Woodi in- \ I . . 433 
w Iward, w i i 191 



i'oung ... . . . I ■ ' 

I i i 635 

John T ^23 

Fount, -I. M 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY LEGAL DECISIONS 



B 

Car, Intending Passenger Run- 
ning After and Falling in Attempt- 
ing 544 

Brakes. Car Running 150 Feet Alter Ap- 
plication of 602 

Bumper, Passenger Riding on and Get- 
ting Caught in Rope 544 

C 

—Flying Up Of Trap Door 54-1 

None Having Passed in Fifteen Minutes 577 

— Ordinary Jolting or Jerking of 21 

— Ownership of Immaterial 22 

-Rights nt Pedestrian Crossing in Front 

• a a Standing at Curve 361 

Work, Use of Without Step 158 

Cars — 

— Cleaning and Repairing May be Del- 
egated 22 

— Liability for Injury in Alighting of Per- 
son Boarding Car "Not in Service" 243 
Liability from i iwnership of. Regard- 
less of Control of Railway 243 

— No Liability for Injury from Ordinary 

•and Usual Movements of 243 

— Reasonableness and Application of Or- 
dinance Requiring Sufficient to Give 
Seats 332 

Child— 

—Care Required of 602 

— Leaves Sidewalk and Starts for Tracks, 

Duty of Motorman Begins When.. 45S 

—Sitting on End of Crosstie 602 

City, Ne essarj Party for Settlement of 

Controversy Between Companies.-.. 19 

i 'ullision — 

— Evidence of Negligence 243 

Might of Motormnii When Xnt Appar- 
ent Danger of 4a 

Companies, City Necessarj Party for 

Sel i le aa in oi C i m .a sj Bel ween 19 

Company — 

- Aits of Conductor for Which It Must 

Provide with Reference to Objects 

Along the Track 361 

--Tracks Treated as Property of Com- 
pany Using Them 22 

lor — 

aid Inexperience of Moti ir- 
man May be Considered in Deter- 
mining Whether Car was at Full 
Stop or Not i 

\ i g Ml Wl.| I VI I I 

witl ■ long 

the Track 

1 luty of to Hold ' 'ii Stationai s Until 
ngi is are in Plai 

- Liability of Assault of 

Waiting tor Tran ight- 
ing 49 

i If Trailer, E ctini Ps nger Paying 

Fare "ii Motor I 'ar 89 

Passei Falling i iff 

' iiii-ii Beyond 
Destination and Injured \ 

I leaving Car with Advice ol 22 

Controller, Liability for Injuries from 
Motorman Leaving and Passenger 

Turning on Power 

Crossinj 

Motormen Most Keep Close Lookout 

ii ■■ Wai nine at 577 



True Rule with Regard to Rights of 

Vehicles at 304 

Curve. Rights of Pedestrian Crossing in 

Front of Standing Car at 361 

D 

I miiiicms. Verdict of $3, 7,00 Sustained.. i'l 

Dangers. Line of 458 

I lerrick, Risk from LTse of to Remove 

Motors Assumed 89 

Door. Passenger on Platform Falling Off 

After Opening of by Conductor... 392 

E 
Ejection— 

— By Conductor of Trailer, of Passenger 

Paying Fare on Motor Car 89 

— Requirement as to Stopping of Car Be- 
fore 304 

Electric Railway, Operation of Not to be 
Interfered with by Unusual Use of 
Street 361 

Employe, Alighting from Moving Car 

Where Snow is Banked 158 

Employes — 

— Kind of Required for Exercise of High- 
est Care 21 

— Risk from Third Rail Assumed by 

Painting Elevated Structure 629 

— Risk Not Assumed by S9 

Evidence — 

—Flying Up of Trap Door in Car 544 

No Error in Excluding When Having 

No Report of Accident 21 

i if Negligence. Collision as _' !:: 

— Sign of Car "Not in Service" Not Con- 
clusive 243 

— Testimony of Passenger as to Speed 

Admissible in 458 

''mm ill it ion of Neighboring 
Property Benefits from Improving 
street So That Railway Company 
Seeks 4H 

F 

Dut; to i '. i Noi Paj ing 544 

Fares — 

iv Held to Provision for Half 
Scl 1 Children lire- 
less of Constitutionality 331 

lion of Immaterial 22 

Mi.il alities Vol I ' .in 

Gr\ ing or Contracting for 
Fares for School ' 'Mil, Iron .... 629 

11 i A How others 

to Pay 

Firemen, Muni, ipalities Not i'i ■ ■■. 

.ii acting for 
6 

G 

Gate, Liability for Injury fr Defective. 50 

H 

if by Dusl ... .7.77 

Performance of i tuties In Respect 

to 

Horses — 

—Manifesting 1 right Imp. of Motorman 

< Ibserving 

— What Maj be Assumed by Motorman 

on Seeing I I 



Hon tfovini ■.' Uoi Ti lot Con- 

sistent will. ' .. pal Rights 



tion. Enforcement oi Oi 

quiring Stops Will Not be I 



Jerking — 

— Distinction with Regard to in Sti 

mi Cars 

—Starting Car with Severe While Pas- 
is Entering Door 



Looking ami Listening, Getting Down 
Backward from Vehicle at Sid< oi 
Track 544 

Lookout. Motormen Must Keep Close 
and Give Warning ai Crossings. ... 577 

M 

.Mail Carriers, Municipalities Not Pre- 
vented from i living or ' lonl rai ting 
for Free Transportation for.... 629 

Motorman — 

--Being inexperienced Not Negligi 304 

-Duty of Begins When Child Li 

Sidewalk and Starts for Tracks... 168 

— Duty of Observing a Horse or Team 

Manifesting Fright 50 

Duty of to Hold Car Stationary Until 
Passengers are in PI 

— Duty of to Man Stooping Over in Way 

of I 'ar to Unload Wagon 577 

inexperience of and Absen f Con- 
ductor Mav be Coiisi.hi.il in 1 1. 
termining Whether i at was al Full 
Stop or Not 19 

—Liability of for Injuries from Leaving 
Controller and 

mi Power 50 

-Liability of for Supposed Invol n 

Act 243 

Musi Kcp Close i i co 

Warning at I Irossings 

luld be 

Submitted to Jury 304 

— Requirements of 

i 'ar. Alighting from \\ hi re Snow 
nked 

N 

l..r Not i iuiltv Of V. ■ 
Passengers Signal 

from Platform to Step of 
ing Ca 
i 
of Si , i ,., , 

h ' 'i r I 'assing 

Man Si 

i fnload Wagon VI iking 
Guilty of 577 

.Mm, [nexperieni i d Not . . . 304 

—Not Anticipate .'ar.. 602 

-Not Every Increase of Speed or Sud- 
den Jerk Amounts to 

id Account of Motorman Should be 

Submitted to Jury 304 

Opi i .. i Not 

—Riding Upon Platform Not 392 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



— What Constitutes, in Manner of Stint- 
ing Cars 243 

Notice, Passenger Giving, or Failing to 

Give, of Intended Destination 22 



< irdinance — 

-—Enforcement of Requiring Stops Will 

Not be Enjoined 50 

— Reasonableness and Applicati if Re 

quiring Sutlirn m Cars to Ci\.- Seats. 332 
Restricting spiel Applies to Territory 

Added to Municipality 243 

Validity of City Prohibiting the Sale. 

Giving Awaj or Receiving of Tri 

i. -is 'i 



Painters, Assume Risk from Third Rail. B29 

: . ger — 

I - i instituting 243 

Care Required When Given Right to 

Ride mi Inner Running Board 458 

Carried Beyond Street and Injured 

Crossing Rough Track 629 

any Not Liable for Injuries to 
One Caused by Another Giving Sig- 
nal to Start 577 

— Duty of at Stations 577 

— Ejection of, Requirement as to Stopping 

of Car Before 304 

— Going from Platform to Step of Mov- 
ing Car Preparatory to Alighting.. 89 
-Intending, Falling in Running After 

Car 544 

Liability of Assault of Conductor on 
When Waiting for Transfer After 
Alighting : 49 

— Liability for Injury from Acceleration 

of Speed After Passenger Has Gone 
on Platform to Alight After Signal 21 

— Liability for Injuries from Motorman 

Leaving Controller and Passenger 

Turning on Power 50 

-Mav Refuse to Allow Another to Pay 

Fare 602 

— May Testify as to Speed 45S 

— Not Called Upon to Provide Against a 

Defective Appliance 50 

—On Platform Falling Off After Opening 

of Door by Conductor 392 

— Paving Fare on Motor Car. Ejected by 

Conductor of Trailer 89 

Killing on Bumper and Getting Caught 

in Rope 544 

— Rights of. Carried Beyond Destination 
and Injured After Leaving Car with 
Advice of Conductor 22 

—What Constitutes 544 

— Whether One Unimportant 392 

Passengers — 

—Duty to 243 

— Reasonable care Only Required as to 

on Running Board 630 

— Having Gotten on. Time and Manner 

Cars Mav be Started 304 

— When Relation of Terminates 629 

—When Several Signal to Stop Car 602 

Pedestrian — 

— Duty of Walking on Track 577 

— Rights of Crossing in Front of Stand- 
ing Car at Curve 361 

Pedestrians. Duty of Walking on or Near 
Tracks Owing to Obstruction in 
Streets 49 



Platform — 

— Liability for Injury to Person Going on 
Narrow Between Tracks to Take 
Car 392 

— Passenger on Falling Off After Open- 
ing of Door by Conductor 392 

Policemen, Municipalities Not Prevented 
from Giving or Contracting for Free 
Transportation for 629 



edv, tor i ', i formance of i uities in 

Respert to Highways 331 

Rope, Passenger Riding on Bumper ami 

Getting Caught in 544 

Rules. Unreasonableness of 89 

Running Board — 

— Care Required of Passenger Given Right 

to Ride on Inner 458 

— Reasonable Care Only is Required as 

to Passengers on 630 

Requirements of Conductor in Passing 

Along 

Woman Getting mi Does Not Justify 
Emergency Stop ■ 602 

S 

School Children, Company Held to Pro- 
visions for Half Fares for Regard- 
less of Constitutionality of Law ;::i 

Seats, Reasonableness and Application 
of Ordinance Requiring Sufficient 
Cars to Give 332 

Signal — 

— Companj Not Liable for Injuries to One 
Passenger Caused by Another Giv- 
ing Starting 577 

— Liability for Injury front Acceleration 
of Speed After Passenger Has Gone 
on Platform to Alight After -1 

— When Several Passengers Signal to 

Stop Car 602 

Snow, Alighting from Moving Car Where 

Banked 458 

Speed 

— Liability for Injury from Acceleration 
of After Passenger Has Gone on 
Platform to Alight After Signal... 21 

— More Cars at Moderate Recommended . 602 

— Not Every Increase of or Sudden Jerk- 
ing Amounts to Negligence 361 

— Ordinance Restricting Applies to Ter- 
ritory Added to Municipality 243 

— Passenger May Testify as to 458 

— Reasonableness 21 

— Regulation Distinction Between Steam 

and Electric Cars 304 

Starting — 

— Company Not Liable for Injuries to One 
Passenger Caused by Another Giv- 
ing Signal for 544 

— Time and Manner Cars May be Started 

After Passengers Have Gotten on.. 304 

— When Liable for Injuries from 243 

Statutes — 

— Constitutionality of Provision in for 

Half Fares for School Children... 331 

— Transfers Cannot be Limited to One 

Direction 458 

— When Authorizing Trip Between Any 
Two Points Transfers Cannot be 
Limited to One Direction 468 

Stations, Duty at 577 

Steam Roads. Speed Regulation Distinc- 
tion Between Steam and Electric 
Cars 30 1 



Step— 

— Going from Platform to Step of Moving 

Car Preparatory to Alighting 89 

—Use of Work Car Without 458 

— Woman Getting on Does Not Justify 

Emergency Stop 602 

Stopping — 

— Car Must be Stopped Before Ejection of 

Passenger 304 

— Distinction with Regard to Jerks 304 

-Enforcement of Ordinance Requiring 

Stops Will Not be Enjoined 50 

— Inexperience of Motorman and Absence 

of Conductor May be Considered in 

Determining Whether Car was at 

Full Stop or Not 49 

— No Reason for When Way Seems Clear 49 
— Woman Getting on Running Board or 

Step Does Not Justify Emergency. 602 
Street. .Moving of Cars Along Track in 

Not Consistent with Company's 

Right 361 

T 

Track. What Mav be Assumed mi Seeing 

Horse Standing Near 304 

Tracks — 
-Company's Possession of Presumed to 

be Exclusive 49 

-Dutj of Motorman Begins When Child 

Leaves Sidewalk and Starts for. . . : 45S 

— Duty of Pedestrian Walking on 577 

— Duty of Pedestrians Walking on or 
Near Owing to Obstructions in 

Streets 49 

— Getting Down Backward from Vehicle 

at Side of 544 

— Liability for Injury to Person Going on 
Narrow Platform Between to Take 

Car 392 

— Moving of House Along Track Not Con- 
sistent with Company's Rights.... 361 
— Passenger Injured Crossing Rough.... 629 
— Risk from Third Rail in Elevated As- 
sumed by Painters 629 

—Suddenly Turning Team to Cross 21 

— Treated as Property of Company Using 22 
Transfer. Liability for Assault of Con- 
ductor on Passenger Waiting for 

After Alighting 49 

Transfers — 

— Cannot be Limited to One Direction 
When Statutes Authorize Trip Be- 
tween Any Two Points 458 

— Dutv Owed to Person Tendering and 

Not Accepted 544 

—Sufficiently Requested 49 

— Validity of City Ordinance Prohibiting 
the Sale, Giving Awav or Receiv- 
ing of 21 

Trap Door. Flving Up of in Car 544 

Trespasser. Not a 392 

Trespassers. Dutv to Adult and Infant.. 602 
Trolley Pole Slipping Off Wire 544 

V 

Vehicle — 

— Getting Down Backward from at Side 

of Tracks 544 

-Injury to Man Stooping Oyer in Way 

of Car to Unload Wagon 577 

Vehicles. True Rule with Regard to 

Rights of at Crossings 304 

W 

Warning. Motormen Must Keep Close 

Lookout and Give at Crossings.... 577 



ADVERTISING LITERATURE 



A 

Aberthaw Construction Co 467 

Allis-l 'halmers Co 

. .99, T.i I. 283, 343, 101, 135, 107. 521, 586 

American Asphaltuio .V- Rubber Co 586 

Am in ''.Mi >,. Batters Co 29 

American Casting Co 372 

American Conduit Co 194 

\ii,m p .in Engi ring Co 107. 586 

American Spiral Pipe Works 252 

Arlington Manufacturing Co 99 

Arnold Co 30. 193 

\--si H i.ii i American i 'orl land ' Jement 

■ ..:n turers 586 

B 

Blake & Knowles Steam Pump Works... 136 

i Gear Works 252 

Boughton, .i. a mi 

Brill, The J G., Co 30, 136, 401 

Brown Hoisting Mini u mi > Co 467 

', .,. i ,M. . i.in, \ i i lo 586 

Brvant Zinc Co Inl 

1 •-n.il- A., Sons & Co 



C 

Callahan, George & Co 194 

| 'i, ..mi iers S Co 166 



Chicago Mica Co 167 

i Ileveland < 'ran.- & Car Co 135 

Coates Clipper Manufacturing Co 521 

Consolidated Car-Heating Co 136 

Cortright Metal Roofing Co 61 

Crocker-Wheeler Co r> 

Cutler-Hammm i Hutch Co 194 

D 
I >aj ton Manufacturing Co 29 

1 use Grade]- .V I'low CO 343 

I lixon, Jos, -pli , Crucil o .61, 194, 135 

E 

: ,. oi iranib Roofing I lo 166 

Ki.-i-tii.- Journal 194 

Expanded Metal & Corrugated Bar Co. 

343, 520, 637 

F 

ink:- Morse & Co 29 

Fibre Conduit Co 344 

G 

Garvin Machine Co 407 

General i lompi essed Air & Vacuum Ma- 
chinery Co 101 



General Electric Co 

,30, 194, 283, 314, 344, 372. 494, 586, 637 

' feneral Fireproofing Co : 404 

General Railway Supply Co 404 

General Storage Battery Co 494 

Goheen Manufacturing Co 29 

Goldschmidt Thermit Co ION. 552 

Green Fuel Economizer Co 344, 372 

Guli. k-Henlerson & Co 99 

H 

Hart Steel Co 372 

Hill. B. B., Manufacturing Co 520 

Hyatt Roller Bearing Co 552 

I 

Illinois Malleable Iron Co 610 

Inland Empire System 467 

J 

Jackson. ' leorge W 610 

Jai-kman. E S., & Co 521 

Johns. 11 W.-Manvillc Co 

135, 282, 101, 135, 520 586, 637 

K 

Kalamazoo Railway Supply Co 226 

Koehring Machine Co 401 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



L 

Lock< Cnsulatoi Manufacturing Co Ul 

M 

McConwaj & Toi li Co 

Mussarims.-tts Fan Co 99 

Uilburn, Alexander, Co 20 

Milwaukee I Manul icturing 

193 

H Metal Co "'21 

Munn .v Co 610 

Murraj [ron Works Co 99, 283 

N 

Nation: il ' '" "'' 

National Brake & Eli ctrio Co 9 

Nation: Co 586 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co Gl 

Niles Car « Manufai turing Co. . 

Northern Eli ctrii .1 Mar i Co.. 136 

Northw.st.ni Kxnnnded Mi tal Co 

i News 61 

O 

i ihio Brass 

Ohio Blower Co 

1"! 



Partridge, A 1 1 hui S 

Portland Rose Festival Assoi I: 

Purdue University 



Railroad Supply Co 

II.ulw i Hl.c-i i:ill\ \ Hil|.|.h ' ',i 

Railway - ' 'o 

Raj in i ' lorn rete Pile i o 

Refined Iron & Steel i !o 

Rock Island Lines 

i ■., 
Ballast Car i io 



52.1 
: 

344 
343 
194 



St. Louis Car Co 

San oi Cordagi Work! 

in John, Co 

i 

Sprague Electric Co 

: :,l Electric A.© 

Standard Steel Works 

Standard Varnish Works 435 

I " 1 1 . ■ , . .1 

.-i in i ant, B F., Co 

Symington, T. H., Co 



Topping I Irothers 

i i ■ ed i lonci ete Steel Co 
Tweedy, il I & Finlej 

U 
i ,,,i, i Feed Stokei Co ol \io 
United Electrii Car Co 
Universal I 'ortland ' !emen I Co 
ersal SI Ci 



!;'! Vote- Bi 



W 



136 Weber Gas Engine Co . 

'■''.' UVst.rn Klf.-triC Co. 

166 w i I ■ 

167 

283 n i 

136 \\ i i i, & Co 

ii in- Co 

■I-' 1 Wicki • Brol hers 

136 Wilson, James • ;.. Mahufacl irlng Co 

401 Woolley Electric Co 

22i; Wiii-i'i-si.-i- I'nlytechnii [nstituti 



Zelnicki i R 



January 4, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Westfrtcrhouse 



No. 92-A Railway Motor 

For City and Suburban Service 



For City Service a double equipment on cars not 
exceeding 30 feet over all, and weighing, without equip- 
ment, not over 15,000 pounds, will maintain a schedule 
on a level track of 10 to 13 1-2 miles per hour. 

For City and Suburban Service a quadruple 

equipment on double- truck cars not exceeding 40 feet 
over all, and weighing, without equipment, not over 
30,000 pounds, wil attain a maximum speed of 23 to 25 
miles per hour. 

Our Circular No. 1100 goes fully into 
particulars. Write for it. 




Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co. 



Atlanta 

Baltimore 

Boston 



Buffalo 
Chicago 
Cincinnati 



Cleveland 

Dallas 

Denver 



Detroit 
Kansas City 
Los Angeles 
Minneapolis 



New Orleans 
New York 
Philadelphia 



Pittsburg 
St. Louis 
Salt Lake City 



San Francisco 

Seattle 

Syracuse 



Canada: Canadian Westinghouse Co., Ltd.. Hamilton, Ontario Mexico: G. & O. Braniff & Co., City of Mexico 




«n Addition to the quick-recharge, quick-service, 
graduated-release, high-pressure emergency fea- 
tures of the 

Westinghouse "A M M " Automatic Brake 

A Straight-Air Release can be provided on 
the leading or operating car, the brake-cylinder 
exhaust being controlled at the brake valve, 
allowing the brakes on that car to be graduated 
off exactly as in straight-air operation. Under 
certain conditions this additional feature is of 
great advantage, as for instance in finishing a 
high-speed stop smoothly and accurately, or 
when holding a train on grade at a station or for 
signal. 

Phamplet T-5031 fully describes the A M M equipment 

Westinghouse Traction Brake Co. 

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 



The Roney Stoker 




Claims Recognition 

as the Stoker which has been developed to 
its present state of exceptional efficiency, by 
hard daily service, under the supervision of 
experienced men whose only aim was con- 
stant improvement. 

Over 1,000,000 H. P. in daily service 

The Westinghouse Machine Co. 

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



A' me White Lead & Color 

Works 

Advance Lumber Co L'6 

Allis-Chalmers Co 21 

Aluminum Co. of America. . .2't 
American Brake Shoe >>c Fdry. 

Co 33 

American Electrical Works 

American Frog *£ Switch Co... 
Anderson, Albert & J. M., 

Mfg. Co 28 

Armstrong Oiler Co 

Am. ild Company 30 

Atlas Anchor Co 18 

Babcock & Wilcox Co 13 

Baker, The Wm. C, Heating 

.V Supply Co -i 

Baldwin Locomotive "Works.. 18 

Barbour-Stockwell Co 

Barnes, G. H., Hardwood 

Lumber Co 26 

Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 

Co 

Beidler, Francis, & Co 

Bellamv Vestlette Mfg. Co... 23 

Bender. Matthew, & Co 30 

Berthold & Jennings 

Blake Signal & Mfg. Co 

Bliss, R.. Mfg. Co 28 

Bridgeort Brass Co 

Brill. The J. G., Co 34 

Brown, Harold P 11 

Brown Hoisting Machy. Co.. 26 

Buckeye Engine Co 29 

Burnham, Williams & Co.... 18 
Byllesby, H. M., & Co 30 

Central Inspection Bureau... 30 

Chase-Shawmut Co 11 

Churchill Cedar Co 26 

Cincinnati Car Co 31 

Cincinnati Frog & Switch Co.. 36 
Cleveland Armature Works.. 32 
Cleveland Frog & Cross. Co.. 24 

Collier. Barron G IS 

Columbia Construction Co 

Consolidated Car Fender Co..2S 
Consolidated Car-Heating Co. 26 
Contractors' Supply & Equip- 
ment Co 

Cooper Heater Co 27 

Crane Co 16 

Creaghead Engineering Co... 30 
Curtain Supply Co 23. 36 

Davis, The John, Co 21 

Detroit Graphite Co 32 



Dearborn Drug & Chemical 

Works 27 

Drouvg, The G., Co 

Drummond Detective Agency. 36 
Durkin Controller Handle Co. 21 

Earll, C. I 

Eclipse Railway Supply Co.. 23 
Electric Railway Equipment 

Co 25 

Electric Ry. Improvement Co.33 
Electric Service Supplies Co.... 

Engineering Agency. The 23 

Engineers and Contractors. .30 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co..* 

Ford, Bacon & Davis 

Galena-Signal Oil Co 11 

General Electric Co 35 

General Storage Battery Co. .23 

Gillette Chemical Co 19 

Goheen Mfg. Co 25 

Goldschmidt Thermit Co 25 

Green Engineering Co 28 

Green Fuel Economizer Co 

Griffin Wheel Co 27 

Grip Nut Co 33 

Hagy, J. Milton, Waste Wks. .12 

Hale & Kilburn Mfg. Co 

Harrison, F. P., Elec. Mfg. Co.12 

Hartshorn. Stewart. Co 29 

Heine Safety Boiler Co 13 

Henderson-Ames Co 23 

Hevwood Bros. & Wakefield 

Co 

Holman, D. F., Ry. Tracklayer 

Co 23 

Homer Commutator Co 

.Hooven-O wens-Ren tsehler Co.12 

Hope Webbing Co 

Humbird Lumber Co., Ltd 

Indestructible Fibre Co 

Jewett Car Co 17 

Johann. F. A 23 

Johns-Manville, H. W.. Co. .19 

Kalamazoo By. Supply Co... 19 
Kennicott Water Softener Co. 29 
Kinnear Manufacturing Co. . . .32 

Lindsev Bros. Co., The 26 

Lorain Steel Co 18 

Lufkin Rule Co 36 

Lumen Bearing Co 23 



Ma> alien Co 

McGuire-Cummings Ml^. Co... 
Marshall, R. W., & Co 23 

Massachusetts Chemical Co.. 12 

Meyers, Fred J., Mfg. Co 23 

Mnlilletown Car Works 31 

Miller Anchor Co 18 

Millov Electric Co.. The 29 

Model Stoker Co., The 30 

Morden Frog & Crossing Wks.. 

National Brake & Electric Co. 2 

National Carbon Co 

National Lock Washer Co.... 36 

Naugle Pole & Tie Co 26 

New York Switch & Crossing 

Co 24 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co 36 

Nuttall. R. D.. Co 

Ohio Brass Co 5 

Okonite Co., Ltd 13 

Pacific Coast Pole Co 26 

Pantasote Co 27 

Patten, Paul B 

Pay-As- You-Enter Car Co... 9 

Power Specialty Co 26 

Pressed Steel Car Co 31 

Queen & Co 28 

Rail Joint Co 26 

Railwav Speeialtv & Supply 

Co 26 

Railway Steel-Spring Co 30 

Recording Fare Register Co.. 27 

Reed. Francis, Co 

Register, A. L., & Co 30 

Reiter, G. C 23 

Ridlon. Frank, Co 19 

Roberts & Abbott Co 30 

Robertson, Wm., & Co 15 

Rodger Ballast Car Co 30 

Rooke Automatic Register Co. 24 
Rossiter, Mai Govern & Co. 

(Inc.) 23 

Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co.31 

S-E. Missouri Cypress Co 26 

St. Louis Car Co 7 

St. Louis Car Wheel Co 27 

St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 

Co 27 

Sanderson & Porter 30 

Saxton. E 30 

Schroeder Headlight Co 

Shimer & Chase Co 30 



Security Register & Mfg. Co... 

Sheaff & Jastaad 30 

Simmons, John, Co 18 

Smith, Peter, Heater Co 26 

Speer Carbon Co 

Standard Brake Shoe Co 30 

Standard Motor Truck Co.... 14 

Stan. lard Paint Co 29 

Standard Steel Works 18 

Standard Underground Cable 

Co 

Standard Varnish Works 23 

Star Brass Works 18 

Stone & Webster Engr. Corp. 30 

Stuart-Howland Co 36 

Symington, T. H., Co 17 

Telegraph Signal Co 16 

Trolley Supply Co 

Under-Feed Stoker Co 18 

United States Graphite Co., 
The 24 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co 30 

Van Dorn, W. T., Co 

Van Valkenburgh, E. C 28 

Waddell & Mahon 36 

Wallace Supply Co 

Wanted and For Sale Cards 

22. 23 

Washburn Steel Castings & 

Coupler Co 25 

Watson-Stillman Co 29 

Wendell & MaeDuffie 

Western Electric Co 11 

Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. 

Co 3 

Westinghouse Machine Co.... 3 
Westinghouse Traction Brake 

Co 3 

Weston Electrical Instrument 

Co 28 

Wharton. Wm., Jr., & Co 

Wheeler Condenser & Eng'g 

Co 30 

Wheel Truing Brake Shoe Co. 30 

White. J. G., & Co 30 

Whitmore Mfg. Co., The 27 

Wilson. J. G.. Mfg. Co 32 

Wood. Guilford S 12 

Woodman. R.. Mfg. & Supply- 
Co 23 

Worcester, C. H.. Co 26 

Zelnicker. Walter A.. Supply 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 



Advertising, Street Car. 
Collier, Barron G., Flat Iron 
Bldg., New York. 

Air Brakes — (See Brakes and 
Brake Parts). 

Air Compressors — (See Compres- 
sors, Air). 

Alloys and Bearing Metals. 

Brown, H. P., 120 Liberty St., 
New York. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. T. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Lumen Bearing Co., Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St.. Boston. 

Aluminum Wire, Etc. 

Aluminum Co. of America, 
Pittsburg. 

Anchors. 
Atlas Anchor Co., Cleveland, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Miller Anchor Co., Norwalk, O. 
Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Armatures and Colls, Winding 
and Repairing. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Armature Lifts. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 



Asbestos Materials. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 
Axles — (See Wheels and Axles). 

Babbitt Metals — (See Alloys and 
Bearing Metals). 

Badges and Buttons. 
Electric Service Supplies Co.. 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Recording Fare Register Co., 

New Haven, Conn. 

Ballast Cars — (See Cars, Bal- 
last). 

Ball Bearing. 
Symington, T. H.. Co., Balti- 
more, Md. 

Bases — (See Trolley Poles and 
Fittings). 

Batteries. 
General Storage Battery Co., 
42 Broadway, New York. 

Bearings. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Lumen Bearing Co. Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall. R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Nuttall, R. D., Co., Pittsburg. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Symington, T. H., Co.. Balti- 
more, Md. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co.. 
Cleveland, O. 

Bells and Gongs. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 



Bells and Gongs — Continued. 

Kuhlman. The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Reiter, G. C, Canton, O. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Black Lead. 
Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit, 

Mich. 
TJ. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw, 

Mich. 

Block System — (See Signals). 

Blowers — (See Mechanical Draft) 

Blue Printing Machines. 
Buckeye Engine Co., Salem, O. 

Boilers. 

Babcock & Wilcox Co., N. Y. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chi- 
cago. 

Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Heine Safety Boiler Co., 421 
Olive St., St. Louis. 

Rossiter, MacGovern & Co., 17 
Battery PI., New York. 

Boiler Cleaning Compound. 
Dearborn Drug & Chemical 

Works, Chicago. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 

Bonds, Rail. 

Brown, H. P., 120 Liberty St., 
New York. 

Chase-Shawmut Co., New- 
buryport, Mass. 

Electric Railway Improvement 
Co.. Cleveland, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 



Bonds, Rail — Continued. 
Goldschmidt Thermit Co., 43 

Exchange PI., New York. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 
Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Brackets and Cross Arms. 

Anderson, Albert & J. M., 
Mfg. Co., Boston. 

Creaghead Engineering Co., 
Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Railway Equipment 
Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Llndsley Bros. Co., Spokane, 
Wash. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Brakes and Brake Parts. 

Allis-Chalmers Co., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Kuhlman, The G. C Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

National Brake & Electric Co.. 
Milwaukee. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 
Mass. 

Westinghouse Traction Brake 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 



Brakeshoes. 
American Brake Shoe & Fdry. 

Co., Mahwah, N. J. 
American Car Co.. St. Louis. 
Barbour-Stockwell Co., Cam- 

bridgeport, Mass. 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



ONTH 



ElectricRailways MineHaulag 



A New .^ 

Year s Gift Bill 






For the General Manager 
Purchasing Agent 
Superintendent 
Electrical Engineer 
Master Mechanic 
and Storekeeper 



Hsu 



gtmmmmw 

MM 

K ^ fflll| ft](iK|Ti)llffi< fl!Ma ! 



The O. B. Co. Monthly Bulletin will be sent free 
to anyone connected with executive, purchasing or oper- 
ative department of an electric railway. Each issue 
contains timely information regarding new develop- 
ments in the railway line, descriptions of new devices, 
news of the trade, digest of current technical literature, 
want advertising department, etc. 

fl" If you do not already receive the 
Bulletin, kindly send in your name 
now, and mention this advertisement 



THE OHIO BRASS 
COMPANY 



Please enter 

my name for free 

subscription to the 

MONTHLY BULLETIN 



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Street and No 

City . 

Company 



( 'apacity with Co 

( Cut this out and return to us ) 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVEHTISERS-Contlnued. 



Brakeshoes — Continued. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C. Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Standard Brake Shoe Co., Au- 
rora, 111. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth. N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co., 

Philadelphia. 
Wheel Truing Brake Shoe Co., 

Detroit. 

Bridges, Bascule and Concrete. 
Wallace-Coates Engineering 

Co., Chicago. 
Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 

Bldg., St. Louis. 

Bridge Timbers. 
Beidler, Francis, & Co., Chgo. 

Brushes, Motors and Dyanmos. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

National Carbon Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Speer Carbon Co., St. Marys, 
Pa. 

Bumpers, Car. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. _ 

Kuhlman, The G C, Car Co.. 
Cleveland. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. „._»,., 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 
Mass. 

Car Cleaner. 
Gillette Chemical Co., 42 
Broadway, New York. 

Car House Doors. 

Kinnear Mfg. Co., Columbus, 

O. 
Wilson, J. G, Mfg. Co., New 

York. 

Car Replacers. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 

Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Car Roof Paint, Canvas. 

St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Car Seats. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. _ 

Hale & Kilburn Mfg. Co.. 
Philadelphia. 

Heywood Bros. & Wakefield 
Co., Wakefield, Mass. 

Kuhlman. The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Car Signs — (See Signs, Cars and 
Track). 

Car Steps. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg.. Chicago. 
Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Car Trimmings — (See Trim- 
mings, Car). 

Cars, Ballast. 

Rodger Ballast Car Co., Chgo. 

Cars, Dump. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co.. Chgo. 
Middletown Car Works. Mid- 

dletown, Pa. 
Rodger Ballast Car Co., Chgo. 
Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co., 

Rldgway, Pa. 

Cars, Passenger and Freight. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G. Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Cincinnati Car Co.. Cincinnati. 

Detroit Carbuilding & Equip- 
ment Co.. Detroit. Mich. 

Electric Railway Improvement 
Co., Cleveland. O. 



Cars, Passenger and Freight — 
Continued. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

Jewett Car Co., Newark, O. 

Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 
Bldg., St. Louis. 

Kuhlman, The G. C Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co., Niles, O. 

Pressed Steel Car Co., Pitts- 
burg. 

Rodger Ballast Car Co., Chgo. 

Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co., 
Rldgway, Pa. 

Standard Motor Truck Co., 
Pittsburg. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 



Cars, Pay-As-You- Enter. 

Pav-As-You-Enter Car Co., 26 
Cortlandt St., New York. 

Cars, Rebuilt. 
Detroit Carbuilding & Equip- 
ment Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Cars, Second-Hand. 

Detroit Carbuilding & Equip- 
ment Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Zelnicker, Walter A.. Supply 
Co., St. Louis. 

Cars, Steel. 

Middletown Car Works, Mid- 
dletown, Pa. 

Pressed Steel Car Co.. Pitts- 
burg. 

Standard Motor Truck Co., 
Pittsburg. 

Castings, Brass. 
Star Brass Works, Kalamazoo, 
Mich. 

Castings, Iron and Steel. 

American Brake Shoe & Foun- 
dry Co., Mahwah, N. J. 

Green Engineering Co., Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 

Lorain Steel Co., Johnstown, 

Pa- 
National Brake & Electric Co., 
Milwaukee. 



Cattle Guards. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co.. Chgo. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co.. Kalamazoo. Mich. 

Cements, Cable and Transformer. 
Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Circuit-Breakers. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Coal Handling Machinery — (See 
Conveyors). 

Coils — (See Armaturesand Coils) 

Commutators and Parts. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phlla. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Homer Commutator Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ohio Brass Co.. Mansfield. O. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Compressors, Air. 

Fairbanks. Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady. N. Y. 

National Brake & Electric Co.. 
Milwaukee. 

Westinghouse Traction Brake 
Co., Pittsburg. 

Concrete Mixers. 

Contractors' Supply & Equip. 
Co., Chicago. 

Condensers. 
Wheeler Con. & Eng. Co., New 
York. 

Conduits. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 



Contractors. 

Arnold Company, 1S1 La Salle 
St., Chicago. 

Byllesby, H. M., Co., Am. 
Trust Bldg., Chicago. 

Columbia Construction Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Creaghead Engineering Co., 
Cincinnati, O. 

Green Engineering Co., Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 

Register, A. L., & Co., 112 
N. Broad St., Philadelphia. 

Sanderson & Porter, 52 Will- 
lam St., New York. 

Saxton, E„ 841 Bladensburg 
R., Washington, D. C. 

Sheaff & Jaastad, 88 Broad 
St., Boston. 

Stone & Webster Engineering 
Corp., Boston. 

Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co., 
Philadelphia. 

White, J. G., & Co., 49 Ex- 
change PI., New York. 

Controllers and Attachments. 
Durkin Con. Handle Co., Ar- 
cade Bldg., Philadelphia. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
General Electric Co., Schenec- 

tadv, N. Y. 
Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 

South St., New York. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 
Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 

Liberty St., New York. 
Western Electric Co., Chicago. 
Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 

Co., Pittsburg. 

Conveyors and Coal Handling 

Machinery. 
Green Engineering Co., Com'l 

Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 
Northern Engineering Works, 

Detroit, Mich. 

Cord, Bell and Trolley. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co.. 
Cleveland. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Couplers, Car. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G. Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman. The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Van Dorn, W. T., Co., Pau- 
lina St.. Chicago. 

Wallace Supply Co.. Chicago. 

Washburn, E. C, Minneapolis. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 
Mass. 

Coverings, Pipe and Boiler. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co.. 
New York. 

Cranes, Hoists and Lifts. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Brown Hoisting Machinery 
Co., Cleveland, O. 

Kuhlman, Tl. O. C., Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

Northern Engineering Works, 
Detroit. Mich. 

Stephenson, Joi.i, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Van Dorn "" i-'Utton Co., 
Cleveland, C 

Wason Mfg. Co., ..j ringfield, 
Mass. 



Crossing Gates — (See Gates and 
Guards). 



Curtains, Fixtures and Materials. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G, Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Curtain Supply Co., 93 Ohio 
St., Chicago. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Hartshorn, Stewart, Co., East 
Newark. N. J. 



Curtains, Fixtures and Materials 

— Continued. 
Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 

Cleveland. 
Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 

Liberty St., New York. 
National Lock Washer Co., 

Newark, N. J. 
Pantasote Co., 11 Broadway, 

New York. 
Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 
Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 

Mass. 

Cylinder Oil. 
Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, N. Y. 

Derailing Devices. 
American Frog & Switch Co., 

Hamilton, O. 
Cincinnati Frog & Switch Co.. 

Cincinnati, O. 
Cleveland Frog & Crossing 

Co., Cleveland, O. 

Detective Agency. 
Drummond Detective Agency, 
New York. 

Diaphragms. 

Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Doors and Fixtures. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G, Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 
Mass. 

Doors, Steel Rolling. 
Kinnear Manufacturing Co.. 

Columbus, O. 
Wilson, J. G, Mfg. Co., New 

York. 

Draft, Mechanical — (See Me- 
chanical Draft). 

Draft Rigging. 
Van Dorn, W. T.. Co., Chgo 
Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Drills, Track. 

Brown, H. P., 120 Liberty St., 

New York. 
Electric Service Supplies Co.. 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 

Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 

Liberty St., New York. 
Reed, Francis, Co., Worcester, 

Ridlon,' Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Drying Appliances. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co.. 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Dynamos and Generators. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

National Brake & Electric 
Co.. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rossiter, MacGovern & Co., 
17 Battery PI., New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Economizers, Fuel. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co.. 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Electrical Instruments. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Western Electric Co.. Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 

Electric Railway Supplies, Gen- 
eral. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Creaghead Engineering Co., 
Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plvmouth Bldg.. Chicago. 



January 4, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



SHOOTS CAR e. 

ST. LOUIS MO. 




'*•< ""■_ "~ ' :*/ -"- *' '.I 



Guilders of 
Electric Cars 

of every kind in the larg- 
est and test equipped 
factory in the wx>rl(L>. 

lTic ail oxvs <& Drawing 

li c ati oiu 



Op e citic an otvs <& 

rurniirkea - on - a 



pp 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF* ADVERTISERS— Continued. 



Electric Railway Supplies, Gen- 
eral — Continued. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady. N. T. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 
169 South St., New York. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Enamels. 
Acme White Lead & Color 

Works, Detroit, Mich. 
St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Engine Apparatus. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Engineers and Contractors. 

Arnold Company, Chicago. 

Byllesby, H. M., & Co., Chgo. 

Columbia Construction Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Ford. Bacon & Davis, New 
York. 

Register, A. L., & Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Roberts & Abbott Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Sanderson & Porter, New York 

Saxton, E., Washington, D. C. 

Sheaff & Jaastad, Boston. 

Stone & Webster Eng. Cor- 
poration, Boston. 

White, J. G., & Co., New York. 

Engines, Gas and Oil. 
Buckeye Engine Co., Salem, O. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Westinghouse Machine Co., 
Pittsburg. 

Engines, Hoisting. 
Fairbanks. Morse & Co., Chgo. 

Engines, Steam. 
Buckeye Engine Co., Salem, O. 
Hooven-Owens-Rentschler Co., 

Hamilton, O. 
Rossiter, MacGovern & Co., 17 

Battery PI., New York. 
Westinghouse Machine Co., 

Pittsburg. 

Fans, Exhaust and Ventilating. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg. 

Fare Boxes — (See Electric Rail- 
way Supplies). 

Fare Registers and Register 

Fittings. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Recording Fare Register Co., 

New Haven, Conn. 
Rooke Automatic Register Co., 

Providence, R. I. 
Security Register & Mfg. Co.. 

42 Broadway, New York. 

Feedwater Apparatus. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 

Matteawan, N. Y. 
Wheeler Condenser & Eng'g 
Co., New York. 



Fenders and Guards. 
Consolidated Car Fender Co., 

Providence, R. I. 
Eclipse Railway Supply Co., 

Cleveland, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co.. 

1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 
McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 

Chicago. 
Marshall, R. W.. & Co., 95 

Liberty St.. New York. 

Flangers, Snow. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 

Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
UcGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 

Chicago. 
Ohio Brass Co.. Mansfield, O. 
Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 

Cleveland, O. 

Frogs — (See Switches, Frogs and 
Crossings). 



Fuses and Fuse Devices. 
Chase-Shawmut Co., New- 
buryport, Mass. 



Fuses and Fuse Devices — Con- 
tinued. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Manu- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 

Gaskets, Bronze. 
Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, New York. 

Gates and Guards. 
Bliss, R., Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, 

R. I. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
,Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Gear Cases. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Gears and Pinions. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Nuttall, R. D., Co., Pittsburg. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 
Cleveland, O. 

Generators — (See Dynamos). 
Gongs— (See Bells and Gongs). 
Graphite. 
Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit, 

Mich. 
U. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw, 
Mich. 

Graphite Paint— (See Paint). 

Grates, Chain. 
Green Engineering Co., Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 

Grease — (See Lubricants). 
Grinders. 
Brown. Harold P., 120 Liberty 
St., New York. 

Guy Anchors — (See Anchors). 

Harps, Trolley— (See Trolley 
Poles and Fittings). 

Headlights. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
200 Plymouth Bldg.. Chicago. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Schroeder Headlight Co., Ev- 
ansville, Ind. 

Stuart-Howland Co.. Boston. 

Trolley Supply Co., Canton, O. 

Headllnlngs, Passenger Car. 
Indestructible Fibre Co., 45 
Broadway, New York. 

Heaters, Car, Electric. 

Consolidated Car-Heating Co., 

Albany, N. Y. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Heaters. Car, Hot Water, and 
Stoves. 

Baker. The Wm. C. Heating 
& Sup. Co., New York. 

Cooper Heater Co., The, Day- 
ton, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Smith, Peter, Heater Co., De- 
troit, Mich. 

Heating and Ventilating Ap- 
paratus — (See Mech. Draft). 



landt St.. New York. 

Inspection. 

Central Inspection Bureau. 

Instruments, Measuring and 
Testing — (See Electrical In- 
struments). 



Insulating Tapes. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Insulations and Insulating Ma- 
terial. 

Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 
Co., Boston. 

Creaghead Engineering Co., 
Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Railway Equipment 
Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Macallen, The, Co., Boston. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Standard Paint Co., 100 Will- 
iam St., New York. 

Standard Varnish Works, New 
York. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 
Jacks. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Morden Frog & Crossing Co., 
Chicago. 

Security Register & Mfg. Co.. 
New York. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Watson-Stillman Co., 26 Cort- 
landt St., New York. 

Joints, Expansion — (See Steam 
Fittings). 

Joints, Rail. 

Goldschmidt Thermit Co., 43 

Exchange PI., New York. 
Rail Joint Co., 29 W. 34th St., 

New York. 

Joints, Welded— (See Rail Joints, 
Welded). 

Journal Boxes. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Symington, T. H.. Co., Balti- 
more, Md. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 
Mass. 

Journal Lubricators — (See Lu- 
bricants). 

Journal Packing, Steel Wool. 
Robertson, Wm., & Co., Great 
Northern Bldg., Chicago. 

Lamps, Arc and Incandescent. 

Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 
Co., Boston. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co.. 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg. Pa. 

Lamp Sockets. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Law Books. 
Bender, Matthew, & Co., Al- 
bany, N. Y. 

Lifts — (See Cranes, Hoist and 
Lift). 



Lightning Arresters. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 
Stuart-Howland Co., Bostc 
Western Electric Co., Chica 
Westinghouse Elec. & Mai.u- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 

Line Material. 
Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 

Co., Boston. 
Creaghead Engineering Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 
Electric Ry. Equipment Co.. 

Cincinnati, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 
Macallen, The, Co., Boston. 
Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 

Liberty St., New York. 
Recording Fare Register Co., 

New Haven, Conn. 
Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 
Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Lock and Nut Washers. 
Grip Nut Co., 152 Lake St.. 

Chicago. 
National Lock Washer Co., 
Newark, N. J. 

Lockers, Metal. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg.. Chicago. 

Locomotives. 
Baldwin Locomotive Works. 

Philadelphia. 
Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 

Bldg., St. Louis. 

Locomotives, Electric. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Baldwin Locomotive Works. 
Philadelphia. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Manu- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 

Locomotives, Gasoline. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

Lubricants. 

Dearborn Drug & Chemical 
Works, Chicago. 

Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit, 
Mich. 

Galena-Signal Oil Co., Frank- 
lin, Pa. 

U. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw, 
Mich. 

Whitmore Mfg. Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 



Lumber. 
Barnes, G. H., Hardwood 

Lumber Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Beidler, Francis, & Co., Chgo. 
Berthold & Jennings, St. 

Louis. 
Lindsley Bros. Co., Spokane, 

Wash. 
S-E. Missouri Cypress Co., 

Campbell, Mo. 

Lumber, Asbestos. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 



Malleable Iron. 
Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 
Co.. Beaver Dam. Wis. 



Measuring Tapes. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, 
Mich. 



Mechanical Draft. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Meters. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 
Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co.. Newark, N. J. 



January 4, 1908. ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Continued Successful Operation of 

Pay-As-You-Enter Cars 

has demonstrated that it is far better and more satisfactory 

to run more cars during rush hours 
to furnish a seat to practically every passenger 
-and to get a fare from every passenger 
before entering the car 

than to follow the old plan of running a smaller number 
of crowded cars, filled with dissatisfied passengers, a large 
percentage of whom have escaped the payment of fares. 

Add to these advantages the greatly increased safety of 
operation (because of the constant presence of the conductor 
on the rear platform) and the increased speed (because of the 
improved method of loading and unloading passengers) and 
you have the principal reasons why the 

PAY-AS-YOU-ENTER CAR 

is the greatest fare -collection improve- 
ment in the history of street railways. 

We license manufacturers and railways to build and use the 
Pay-As-You-Enter Car, the patents on which are owned by 

The Pay-As -You -Enter Car Company 

duncan Mcdonald 2 6 Cortlandt Street, New York ™os. w. casey, 

President Manager 



LO 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS Continued. 



Molded Goods. 
Massachusetts Chemical Co., 

Walpole, Mass. 
Wood, G. S., Great Northern 

Bldg., Chicago. 

Motors, Electric. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. T. 

National Brake & Electric Co., 
Milwaukee. 

Rossiter, MacGovern & Co., 17 
Battery PI., New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Manu- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 

Nut Locks. 
Grip Nut Co., 152 Lake St., 

Chicago. 
National Lock Washer Co., 

Newark, N. J. 

Nuts and Bolts. 
Grip Nut Co.. 152 Lake St., 

Chicago. 
Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 
National Lock Washer Co., 

Newark, N. J. 

Oilers. 
Armstrong Oiler Co., 31st and 
Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

Oils — (See Lubricants). 

Overhead Equipment — (See Elec- 
tric Railway Supplies). 

Packings. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 
Power Specialty Co., Ill 

Broadway, New York. 

Packing, Steel Wool Journal. 
Robertson, Wm., & Co., Gt. 
Northern Bldg., Chicago. 

Paints. 

Acme White Lead & Color 
Works, Detroit. 

Detroit Graphite Co.. Detroit. 

Goheen Mfg. Co., Canton, O. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Standard Paint Co., 100 Will- 
iam St., New York. 

St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

U. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw, 
Mich. 

Pay- As-You- Enter Cars. 

Pay-As- You-Enter Car Co., 26 
Cortlandt St., New York. 

Pipe Bends and Fittings — (See 
Steam Fittings). 

Plumbago. 
Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit, 

Mich. 
TJ. S. Graphite Co.. Saginaw, 

Mich. 

Poles, Metal. 
Creaghead Engineering Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 
Electric Railway Equipment 

Co., Cincinnati, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Poles and Ties, Wood. 

Advance Lumber Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Barnes, G. H., Hardwood 
Lumber Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Beidler, Francis, & Co., Chgo. 

Berthold & Jennings, St. Louis. 

Churchill Cedar Co., Spokane, 
Wash. 

Humbird Lumber Co., Sand 
Point, Idaho. 

Lindsley Bros. Co., Spokane, 
Wash. 

Naugle Pole & Tie Co., 226 
La Salle St., Chicago. 

Pacific Coast Pole Co., Spo- 
kane, Wash. 

S-E. Missouri Cypress Co., 
Campbell, Mo. 

Worcester. C. H., Co., Tribune 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Punches — (See Ticket Punches). 

Rail Benders. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Fairbanks. Morse & Co., Chgo. 

Kalamazoo Railway Supply 

Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 



Rail Bonds— (See Bonds, Rail). 

Rail Brackets. 
Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 
Co.. Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Rail Drills — (See Drills, Track). 

Rail Feed Wire — (See Wire and 
Cables). 

Rail Joints and Chairs — (See 
Joints, Rail). 

Rail Joints, Welded. 
Goldschmidt Thermit Co.. 43 

Exchange PI., New York. 
Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 

Ralls, New. 
Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 
New York Switch & Crossing 

Co., Hoboken, N. J. 
Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co., 

Philadelphia. 

Rails, Relaying. 
Zelnicker, Walter A., Supply 
Co., St. Louis. 

Railway Equipment. 
Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 
Bldg., St. Louis. 

Railway Velocipedes. 
Fairbanks Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Registers and Fittings — (See 
Fare Registers). 

Relays. 
Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 

Roofing. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Rubber Goods, Mechanical. 
Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Rubber Preservative. 
Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg.. Chicago. 

Sand Apparatus. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank. Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Sash Balances and Fixtures. 
National Lock Washer Co., 
Newark, N. J. 

Sash Operating Devices. 
Drouve, The G., Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Seats, Car— (See Car Seats). 

Shade Rollers — (See Curtains, 
Fixtures and Materials). 

Shutters, Steel Rolling. 
Kinnear Manufacturing Co., 
Columbus, O. 

Signals. 

Blake Signal & Manufactur- 
ing Co., Boston. 

Telegraph Signal Co.. Roches- 
ter, N. Y. 

Skylights. 
Drouve, The G., Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Snow Plows, Sweepers and 
Scrapers. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G.. Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

KuhJman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co., 
Ridgway, Pa. 



Snow Plows, Sweepers and 
Scrapers — Continued. 
Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 
Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Sockets, Waterproof. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Special Agents. 
Waddell & Mahon, 1133 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Splicing Compounds and Mate- 
rials. 
Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Springs. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Railway Steel Spring Co., 71 
Broadway, New York. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Sprinkling Cars. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth. N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Steam Apparatus. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Steam Fittings, Etc. 

Crane Co., Chicago. 

Davis, The John, Co., Chgo. 

Simmons, John, Co., 110 Cen- 
tre St., New York. 

Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, New York. 

Steel Cars. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co.. 
Cleveland. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 
Mass. 

Steel Tapes. 
Lufkin Rule Co.. Saginaw. 
Mich. 

Stokers. 

Babcock & Wilcox Co., 85 Lib- 
erty St., New York. 

Green Engineering Co., Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 

Model Stoker Co., Dayton, O. 

Under-Feed Stoker Co. of Am., 
Chicago. 

Westinghouse Machine Co., 
Pittsburg. 



"Strike- Breakers." 
Drummond Detective Agency, 

3 Ann St., New York. 
Waddell & Mahon, 1133 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Superheaters. 
Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, New York. 

Switches, Frogs and Crossings. 
American Frog & Switch Co.. 

Hamilton, O. 
Barbour-Stockwell Co., Cam- 

bridgeport, Mass. 
Cincinnati Frog & Switch Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 
Cleveland Frog & Crossing 

Co.. Cleveland, O. 
Fairbanks. Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 
Morden Frog & Crossing Co.. 

Rookery, Chicago. 
New York Switch & Crossing 

Co., Hoboken, N. J. 



Switches, Frogs and Crossings — 
Continued. 
Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co., 
Philadelphia. 

Switchboards and Switchboard 
Instruments. 

Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 
Co., Boston. 

Chase-Shawmut Co., New- 
buryport, Mass. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg. 

Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 

Tapes and Webbing. 

Hope Webbing Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Testing Instruments. 
Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 



Ticket Punches- 
Meyers, Fred J., Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton, O. 
Woodman Mfg. & Sup. Co., 
Boston. 

Tleplates. 
Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 
Co., Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Ties and Poles, Wood — (See 
Poles and Ties). 

Timber. 
Beidler, Francis, & Co., Chgo. 
Lindsley Bros. Co., Spokane, 

Wash. 
S-E. Missouri Cypress Co., 
Campbell, Mo. 

Tools, Pneumatic — (See Pneu- 
matic Tools). 

Track Cleaners and Scrapers. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kalamazoo Railway & Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 
Cleveland, O. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Track Drills— (See Drills, Track). 

Track Tools. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 

Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Trimmings, Car. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Curtain Supply Co., Park Row 
Bldg., New York. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

National Lock Washer Co., 
Newark, N. J. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Trolley Guards. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 



General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



11 



WESTERNIEHEe^RI^ 



1 G OM F>AN>n 



Start the Year 15)08 Right 

You can do this by using 
WESTERN ELECTRIC 



D. C. GENERATORS 





We make them in sizes large or small 
and can guarantee prompt deliveries. 
Write for Bulletin No. 3080-C today 



Galena-Signal 
Oil Company 

FRANKLIN, PA. 

THEIR SPECIALTIES 

STREET RAILWAY LUBRICATION igSSSSS. 

house equipment. 

Same skillful expert supervision given in this service as in 
steam railway service has produced very satisfactory results. 
The business of our Street Railway Department has increased 
beyond every expectation. In 1906 this department sold 
ten times the number of barrels of oil sold by the same de- 
partment in 1903. 

We are under contract with many of the largest street and 
interurban railways of the country. 

We guarantee cost per thousand miles in street railway 
service when conditions warrant it. 

Write to Franklin, Pennsylvania, for further particulars. 

STEAM RAILWAY LUBRICATION 5ft£-35£S3 

Galena Coach, En- 
gine and Car Oils for steam railway lubrication. Sibley's 
Perfection Valve Oil for cylinder lubrication, and Perfection 
Signal Oil for use in railway signal lanterns. 



GALENA RAILWAY SAFETY OIL SftSgfflfelSj 

cab, classification 
and tail lights, and for switch and semaphore lamps. Burns 
equally well with the long time as with the one-day burner; 
with or without chimney as the burner requires. Is pure 
water white in color; high fire test, low cold test, and 
splendid gravity. 

CHAS. MILLER. President 



93.3%* 

REDUCTION 



in the drop over a contact carrying 1 ,000 amperes was the 
result of a recent test made in a power house of the Com- 
monwealth Edison Company of Chicago, by the use of the 

HAROLD BROWN ALLOYS. 

Contacts amalgamated with these Alloys over ten years 
ago by the Metropolitan West Side Elevated Ry. Co. of 
Chicago are still as bright as when first applied. 

In October, 1897, the South Side Elevated R. R. Co. of 
Chicago amalgamated the terminals of the bonds used on 
the third rail and recent investigation showed the contacts 
to be perfectly free from oxide and as good as 
when first installed. 



It is of these Alloys that the 



Plastic Rail Bond 



The bond that will transmit 3,000 amperes 
without the slightest injury and show but 5 
per cent depreciation after eleven years' se- 
vere service. 

Consider these FACTS, or, better still, 

TRY IT. 



HAROLD P. BROWN, 



120 Liberty Street, 
NEW YORK. II 



SHAWMUT 

Railway Link Fuses 

ACCURATELY RATED 
CAREFULLY MADE 



WE CAN MAKE IMMEDIATE DELIV- 
ERY ON STANDARD CAPACITIES 
AND STANDARD CENTERS 

CAR HEATER FUSES 



Type A 

Have you Bulletins Nos. 27 and 100? 

CHASE-SHAWMUT CO. 

NEWBURYPORT, MASS. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OR ADVERTISERS C< 



Trolley Retrievers and Catchers. 

Earll, C. I., Bowling Green 
Bldg., New York. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 

Milloy Electric Co., Bucyrus.O. 

Ridlon, Prank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Trolley Supply Co.. Canton. O. 

Trolley Wagons. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Trolley Wheels — (See Trolley 
Poles and Fittings). 

Trolley Wire — (See Wire and 
Cables). 

Trolleys, Track. 
Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Trucks, Car. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Baldwin Locomotive Works, 
Philadelphia. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C. Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Standard Motor Truck Co.. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Standard Varnish Works, New 
York City. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 



Trucks, Car — Continued. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 

Cleveland, O. 
Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Mass. 

Turbines. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Hooven-Owens-Rentschler Co., 
Hamilton, O. 

Westinghouse Machine Co., 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Uniforms. 
Henderson-Ames Co., The, 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Valves — (See Steam Fittings). 

Varnish. 

Acme White Lead & Color 
Works, Detroit. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Milloy Electric Co., Bucyrus, O. 

Nuttall, R. D., Co., Pittsburg. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Standard Paint Co., 100 Will- 
iam St., New York. 

Star Brass Works, Kalama- 
zoo, Mich. 

Trolley Supply Co., Canton, O. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 



Ventilators. 
Drouvfe, The G., Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Vestlettes. 
Bellamy Vestlette Mfg. Co., 
Cleveland, O. 

Waste, Cotton and Wool. 
Hagv, J. Milton, Waste Wks., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Water Softening Apparatus. 
Dearborn Drug & Chemical 

Works, Chicago. 
Kennicott Water Softener Co., 

Chicago. 

Wheels and Axles. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Griffin Wheel Co., Chicago. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Railway Steel-Spring Co., 
New York. 

St. Louis Car Wheel Co., St. 
Louis. 

Standard Steel Works, Phila- 
delphia. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 
Wheel Grinders. 

Wheel Truing Brake Shoe Co., 
Detroit, Mich. 



Whitewashing Machines. 
Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Window Fixtures. 
Drouv#, The G., Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Wiping Rags. 
Hagv. J. Milton, Waste Wks., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wire, Aluminum. 
Aluminum Co. of America, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Wire, Insulated. 

Aluminum Co. of America, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

American Electrical Works, 
Providence, R. I. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Standard Underground Cable 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Wire and Cables. 

Aluminum Co. of America, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

American Electrical Works, 
Providence, R. I. 

Bridgeport Brass Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Standard Underground Cable 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 



Electric Railway Material 

of every description 

F. P. HARRISON ELECTRIC & MFG. CO. 

(Incorporated) 
169-170 South St. NEW YORK 



GUILFORD S. WOOD 



HIGH GRADE 



Mechanical Rubber Goods 

AIR BRAKE HOSE A SPECIALTY 

P. £ W. PRESERVATIVE FOR HOSE 

CAR FURNISHINGS 

GREAT NORTHERN BUILDING, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Ring in the Old 

Don't Buy the New 



Get a can of ARMALAC and go after that 
rotten or burned out armature according 
to directions — you will save money. 

Sample for the asking to street railways 
and manufacturing electric companies. 

SEND FOR OUB BOOKLET ANYWAY. 



MASSACHUSETTS CHEMICAL CO. 

Walpole, Mass. 



Waste for Electric Railway Service 

Motor Packing Waste 

Free from dirt and grit. Easy to pack. All long 
strands. Good absorber. One packing of the journal 
box will last longer than with the ordinary waste. 

WIPING WASTE 

White and colored sanitary cleaned wiping rags. 
Samples submitted. 

The J. Milton Hagy Waste Works 

433 Spruce St. incorporated Philadelphia 



Hamilton-Corliss Engines 

AWARDED GOLD MEDAL AT WORLD'S FAIR, ST. LOUIS 

Made in all sizes. We also build 
other types for all purposes. 
You are cordially invited to visit 
our factories and to send for catalog. 

The Hooven-Owens-Rentschler Co. 

Hamilton, Ohio, U. S. A. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 
ATLANTA. GA, Equitable Building. BOSTON, MASS., 
H. E. Kundlett. CHICAGO, ILL., Marquette Building. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C, A. H. Washburn. DENVER, COLO., Stearic It, ,dt Mfg. Co. Los AM. ELKS, CAL., 
Chas. O. Moore A Co. NEW TOKK, N. Y., XI Cortlandt St. 1'lTTSBUKli, 1'A., Machesnev Building. 
SAN FUANOISC", CAL.. Chas. C. Moore & Co. SEATTLE, WASH., Chas. C. Moore & Co. ST. LOUIS, 
MO., Chemical Hldg. ST. PAIL, MINN., It. B. Whitacro A Co. HONOLULU, S. I., Honolulu Iron 
Works. DALLAS, TKX. W. R. Haynie, Wilson Bldg. NEW ORLEANS, LA., 417 Hennen Bldg. 2 




January I. L908 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



1.". 




TRADE MARK 

Registered U. S. Patent Otiice 



The Standard for Rubber Insulation 

RAILWAY FEED WIRES insulated with OKONITE are unequaled for flexibility, durability 
and efficiency, and are in use by the leading Electric Street Railway Companies. OKONITE is 
preferred above any other insulation for Car Wiring, Telegraph and Telephone Purposes 

Okonite Wires, Okonite Tape, Manson Tape, Candee Weatherproof Wires 

SAMPLES AND ESTIMATES ON APPLICATION 

The Okonite Co., Ltd., 



WILLARD L. CANDEE, H. DURANT CHEEVER, Managers. 
GEORGE T. MANSON, Geu'l Supt. ; W. H. HODGINS, Secretary. 



253 Broadway, NEW YORK 



THE BABCOCK & WILCOX COMPANY 



Babcock. & Wilcox 



85 Liberty Street, New York 
■ Stirling =A & T Horizontal 



Cahall Vertical 



WATER TUBE STEAM BOILERS 



STEAM SUPERHEATERS 



Boston, Delta Bide 

Philadelphia, 1110-1112 North American Bldg. 

San Francisco, 63 First Street 

Pittsburgh, Farmers Deposit Nat. Bank Bldg. 

New Orleans, 343 liar St. 



Works: Bayonne, N.J. Barberton, Ohio. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

Denver, 410 Seventeenth St. 
Salt Lake City, 313 Atlas Block 
Washington, Colorado Building 
Chicago, Marquette Bide. 
Atlanta, Ga., 1132 Candler Bldg. 



MECHANICAL STOKERS 



Cleveland, 708 New England Bldg. 
Mexico City, 7 Avenida, Juarez 
Havana, Cuba, 116*4 Calle de la Habana 
Los Angeles, 321 Trust Bldg. 
Cincinnati, 0., Traction Bldg. 



HEINE Water Tube BOILERS 



THE KIND THAT ARE IMITATED 



ARE MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 



HEINE SAFETY BOILER COMPANY 

421 Olive Street, St. Louis, Mo. 



u 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



fz 



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January 1. 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



L5 



STEEL WOOL 

Journal Packing 

is used in the journal boxes of these 

and other cars of Chicago's South 

Side Elevated Railroad 




This perfect packing was not adopted until after 
the most severe service tests had been made. 
Continued use proves that Steel Wool Journal 
Packing saves oil, packing, labor and that it 
prevents hot boxes and excessive wear. 



You ought to try Steel Wool Journal Packing. 
Samples are free for the asking. 



Wm. Robertson & Company 

General Office: Great Northern Bldg., CHIC AGO 
Factory: 75 S. Jefferson St., Battle Creek, Mich. 



it; 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



Ten Seconds 
is Sufficient 

for your dispatcher to set 
a stop signal against any 
car or train approaching 
a meeting point — 



provided, 
of course, 
that your 
line is 
equipped 
with the 



Telegraph 

Signal 

System 




Dispatcher merely inserts plug in the 
little machine illustrated above — the sys- 
tem does the rest — and does it every time 

One Line Wire. Adoption Cost Extremely Low 
Write for Descriptive Literature 

Telegraph Signal Co. 

282 State Street, Rochester, N. Y. 





Improved 



Pipe Machines 

THE E. C. & B. pipe-cutting and 
threading machines, manufactured 
by Crane Co., have been on the market 
for many years and are unsurpassed for 
durability and for rapidity and economy 
of operation. The line is very complete, 
ranging from small hand-operated tools 
up to machines for handling 18-inch pipe. 

Machines are furnished either 
belt, engine or motor driven. 

The illustration shows the No. 3}4 tool, capacity 
2}4 to 6 inches, designed especially for rapid produc- 
tion. Of the quick grip and sliding die head type, 
it is very substantially and compactly built, there 
being practically but three pieces to the machine. 
The details which play such an important part in 
the operation of pipe machines have been carefully 
attended to. Among these may be mentioned: 

Pipe may be gripped or released without 
stopping the machine, by moving a lever, 
owing to the special construction of the 
gripping chuck. 

Pipe that is not perfectly round is gripped 
without slipping between the eight remov- 
able roller contact jaws. 
For centering or gripping long lengths of 
pipe, an independent three-jaw chuck is 
provided at the rear end of the spindle. 
Die head is provided with patented air 
cutting-off device, the most efficient 
means yet invented for cutting pipe. 
Changing dies is accomplished by dropping 
the hinged cover. 

Special catalogues of pipe machines sent upon request 

CRANE CO. 

CHICAGO 

ESTABLISHED I8S5 



January 1. 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Baltimore Center and Side Bearings 

FOR ELECTRIC TRUCKS 



Impossible 

to Clog 

Balls 




No 
Lubrication 
Necessary 



FLANGE WEAR 
SAVES:] RAIL WEAR 

TRUCK REPAIRS 



DURABILITY: UNDER 



BALTIMOR 



E THE T. H. SYMINGTON CO. 



HEAVIEST 
LOADS 



CHICAGO 

ILL. 



FOR SALE. FOR QUICK DELIVERY 


6 55 -ft. Passenger, Baggage 5 52 -ft. Passenger and 


and Smoking Car Bodies 


Smoking Car Bodies— End ble 


Main Compartment 26' 0" 


Seating Capacity, 60 


Smoking " 10' 6 n 




Baggage " 10' 0" 
Seating Capacity, 54 


3 52 -ft. Passenger and 


8 60-ft. Passenger, Baggage 
and Smoking Car Bodies 


Baggage Car Bodies -L° d ubIe 

Seating Capacity, 56 


Main Compartment 28' 6" 
Smoking " 11' 0" 


2 50-ft. Express Car Bodies 


Baggage " 8' 0" 
Seating Capacity, 58 


Write or mire us for further information. 


The Jewett Car Co. N hf o rk 



IS 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



CARADVERT/S/NG 




Almost Everywhere 

Fla t Iron Building, New York . 



THEY NEVER PULL UP 




LLER ANCHOR CO., Norwalk, Ohio 

ELECTRIC SERVICE SUPPLIES CO., Chicago Agents 




It's Great! 

Have you received a working 
model of the Atlas Anchor ? 

Ask for one — free. 
THE ATLAS ANCHOR CO., Cleveland, Ohio 






■L*"^"^^H 




H 


V# .•. %V\ 


^H 






■ 


M 




£ 


H 


■^■^■Mh^^^^k^kI 





BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

BURNHAM, WILLIAMS & CO., PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 

Bunder. LOCOMOTIVES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

Including ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVES and 

ELECTRIC TRUCKS 



STANDARD STEEL WORKS, 

SOLID FORGED ROLLED AND STEEL TIRED WHEELS 

mounted on axles and fitted with Motor Gears for Electric Railway Service 



HARRISON BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

ELLIPTIC AND 



COIL SPRINGS 




PIPE FITTINGS 

AND VALVES 

FOR THE 

iHEAIINGAND PLUMBING TRADE 



| el OHM §IMMON§ Go. 

! 104-110 Gentre street, new york 



The Lorain Steel Company 

Girder Rails and High Tee Rails 
High-Grade Special Track Work 



THE PENNSYLVANIA BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



January 4, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



19 







GILLETTE 

SANITARY 

SPRAY 



CLEANS EVERYTHING 

. BUT A GUILTY CONSCIENCE 

Car cleaning made easier and cars kept cleaner. 

Does away with the use of water, except in extreme 
cases, thereby preventing the opening of joints and 
rotting of timber caused by the use of water. 

Kills dust, prevents it from rising while sweeping 
floors, carpets and upholstery. 

It polishes woodwork, mirrors and windows, and 
preserves varnish and colors. 

Kills all germs, thoroughly disinfects and sanitizes 
the car. 

Requires less labor and less expense than any other 
method of cleaning cars. 

Is used in the principal hotels, residences, apart- 
ment houses and amusement places, as well as in 
daily use on the cars of the New York City Ry. Co. 

For particulars, address 

GILLETTE CHEMICAL CO. 

42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 



Trolley Catchers 



THE RIDLON No. 2 




Made 

a 

little 

stronger 

than 

the 

service 

requires 



Thoroughly up-to-date and embodying many 
exclusive advantages. Manufactured by skilled 
mechanics in our own factory, where every detail 
is given careful supervision. 

Catchers sent on .10 days' trial 

FRANK RIDLON COMPANY 

200 Summer St., Boston, Mass. 

Pacific Coast Representatives: 

THE H. M. ESTES CO. 

General Office, San Francisco, Cal. 
Los Angeles, Cal. Branch Offices : Portland, Ore. 




ASBESTOS WOOD 



AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR 
SLATE, MARBLE OR FIBRE 

is without an equal, because it is ab- 
solutely fire-proof and has an elec- 
trical resistance almost equal to sheet 
mica. Can be worked with ordinary 
wood-working tools — holds screws well 
and can be finished in any colors 
desired. 



AS A FIREPROOFING MATERIAL 

ASBESTOS WOOD is the best fire-proof sheathing 
known for electric cars. Its use is indicated wherever it is 
desirable to protect the electrical equipment from grounds 
and short circuits, and also to prevent danger of fire from 
the same causes. 

ASBESTOS WOOD can be used in almost all cases 
where wood, slate or marble are usually employed and 
where fire-proof construction is desired. 

WRITE NEAREST BRANCH FOR CATALOG. 

H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE CO. 




New York 


Philadelphia 


Kansas City 


Milwaukee 


St. Louis 


Los Angeles 


Chicago 


Pittsburg 


Minneapolis 


Boston 


Cleveland 


New Orleans 


Heattle 


Buffalo 


Dallas 


Baltimore 


San Francisco 


London 720 



ROOT 

Snow 
Scraper 



For any type of car, for any type of 
rail, for any condition of snow the 
Root Snow Scraper gives perfect results. 

It is the only Scraper made 
that cleans out the groove and 
prevents the wheel flange from 
compressing the snow into ice 
■ — a very import tint point. 

We guarantee both the Scraper and its results 

Kalamazoo Railway Supply Co. 

KALAMAZOO, MICH., U. S. A. 




20 ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW Vol. XIX, No l. 

Persistence in Advertising 

IONG AGO some one said in refer- 
^ ence to advertising, "Keeping 
everlastingly at it brings success." 
This is just as true today as it was 
yesterday and will be tomorrow. 

<IBut sometimes a manufacturer, who ^ Be fair! Do real advertising and then 

wouldn't expect a sales force to break in- give it a fair opportunity to make good ! 

to a new territory to any extent much 

under a year's time, expresses surprise ^Advertising will help sell your goods, 

because the first few insertions of some if rightly done Does it every Jay for 

new advertising do not produce imme- ot h er s— will do it for you, too. 

diate results. 

Q He is willing to give his salesmen ample <g You know electric railway men do not 

time to become acquainted, but seems to lj e awa ke nights figuring how many 

think the advertising ought to commence advertisements they can answer the next 

doing business instanter. day— but their minds are open to impres- 

(§ Probably he never read an advertise- sions through advertising — impressions 

ment that made him do immediately as that lead to sales. 

the advertiser desired, yet believes that 

his advertising ought to make the reader fl These impressions you can make only 

get busy at once. by "keeping everylastingly at it." 

If you say the word, we will gladly send a representative to 

discuss an advertising plan for your 

particular business. 



Electric Railway Review 



160 Harrison Street 
CHICAGO, U. S. A. 



January 4, IE 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Allis-Chalmers Company 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

IF you are using Christensen air brake equip- 
* merits, we suggest that you allow us to fill 
your orders for repair parts, as we have the sole 
right to manufacture under the Christensen 
patents and are naturally more interested than 
our competitors in the quality of material 
and workmanship of the parts furnished. 

A copy of our Bulletin No. 1509, giving the price list of 
repair parts, with catalogue numbers opposite each item 
for convenience in ordering, will be sent to you upon request 

Let us quote you prices on your next repair part order 



Save 




No. 3 


Your 
Armatures 


1 t* w '• V 

Regulator open 


Ball 
Check 


Durkin Controller Handle Co. 




Main Office, 1515 Sansom St. 
Treas. Office, 811 Arcade Bldg. 
PHILADELPHIA 




SOUTHERN AGENT 

UNIVERSAL RAILWAY SUPPLY COMPANY 

BALTIMORE 



"TWO GOOD THINGS" 




"Hughson" 

High Pressure 

Reducing 

Valve 



"Hochfeldt 

Eclipse" 

Back Pressure 

and 

Relief Valve 
"ARE THE BEST OF THEIR KIND" 

Manufactured by 

The JphnDms (ompan? 

Walter G. Ruggles Co., 54 High St., Boston, Mass., New England Agent 

Send for Catalogue and Prices 
We furnish material for power plants to sketch ready for erection 




ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

I Undisplaced advertisements are inserted under this heading at the uniform rate of one cent a word; minimum charge twenty-five cents. 

Replies directed to this office will be forwarded ivhen required to any address in the United States, Canada or Mexico without extra charge. 
Advertisements received at the Chicago office by 9 a, m. Thursday will appear in the issue for the same week. 



POSITIONS WANTED. 



POSITIONS WANTED. 



POSITIONS WANTED. 



BOOKS AND PUBLICATIONS. 



A young man, 27 years of age, 
with ten years' experience, 
wants position as engineer or 
electrician; unmarried; habits 
strictly temperate; high-class 
references. Address "No. 710," 
care Electric Railway Review, 
Chicago. 

Wanted — To make a change 
in the near future as manager 
or general superintendent of 
street railway by an experi- 
enced and successful general 
superintendent; correspondence 
solicited. Address "No. 517," 
care Electric Railway Review, 
Chicago. 

Position by a single man, 29 
years old, practical electrician 
and machinist, 10 years' ex- 
perience, familiar with electric 
car and locomotive repairs, 
power and substation practices. 
Non-union man. Address "No. 
630," care of Electric Railway 
Review, New York, N. T. 

A young man (29) with seven 
years' experience in every 
branch of the transportation de- 
partment desires a position with 
a street railway company any- 
where west. Best references as 
to experience and character. 
Address "No. 518," care Elec- 
tric Railway Review, Chicago. 

Position wanted as master 
mechanic or shop foreman by a 
competent man with extensive 
experience and splendid refer- 
ences. Understands city and 
interurban cars and equipments 
in every detail; an expert arma- 
ture winder, can handle men 
and repairs economically and 
successfully. Position as winder 
accepted if given advancement. 
Employed but desires change. 
Address "No. 522," care Electric 
Railway Review, Chicago. 



Auditor, experienced in elec- 
tric railway and lighting and 

construction accounting, wants 
position with fair-sized com- 
pany. Energetic and gbod sys- 
tematize!*. Best references. 
Address "No. 527," care of 
Electric Railway Review, Chi- 
cago. 

Graduate civil engineer, Cor- 
nell University 1902, experi- 
enced in field work and trade 
journalism, now engaged, de- 
sires work with technical jour- 
nal or publicity department of 
manufacturing. establishment. 
Address "No. 525," care of Elec- 
tric Railway Review, Chicago. 

Young man, 30 years of age, 
who has nearly completed a 
course of "Electric Lighting and 
Railway" in the International 
Correspondence Schools, desires 
position which will give him 
practical experience in power 
house and switchboard work. 
Willing to start at a nominal 
salary. Address "No. 526," care 
of Electric Railway Review, Chi- 
cago. 

Position wanted — Graduate 
electrical engineer of five years' 
experience in the construction 
and operation of electrical and 
steam power plant apparatus, 
its operation and maintenance; 
has held position of responsi- 
bility with large corporation; 
can handle mechanical and elec- 
trical engineering propositions of 
various kinds successfully; fa- 
miliar with machine shop prac- 
tice and the handling of all 
types of labor; expert on turbo- 
generator sets. Location no ob- 
ject; 28 years old; unmarried; 
habits strictly temperate. High- 
est class references. Address 
"No. 521," care Electric Railway 
Review, Chicago. 



Position wanted by young 
man (22), good habits, with in- 
terurban road; wishes to gain 
practical operating experience. 
No technical training. Good 
references. Address "No. 523," 
care Electric Railway Review, 
Chicago. 

Position wanted by a thor- 
ough practical engineer and ma- 
chinist; 16 years' experience 
with compound Corliss engines 
and turbines, A. C. and D. C. 
electrical apparatus. Age 35; 
efficient and reliable; refer- 
ences. Address "No. 520," care 
of Electric Railway Review, 
Chicago. 

Experienced and efficient engi- 
neer with power station experi- 
ence (both planning and con- 
struction, as chief engineer and 
as superintendent of construc- 
tion) desires position with 
operating company as engineer, 
assistant to manager or super- 
intendent. Address "No. 515," 
care the Electric Railway Re- 
view, Chicago. 

POSITIONS OPEN. 

Twelve offices, covering entire 
street railway and manufactur- 
ing world. 1,000 technical and 
office positions open. Confiden- 
tial service; write today, HAP- 
GOODS, 305 Broadway, New 
York, or 1010 Hartford Bldg., 
Chicago. 



jWISOELL\NE0^^ 

You can sell second-hand cars, 
machinery and material through 
advertising on this page. Ask 
about the special rates. Elec- 
tric Railway Review, 160 Harri- 
son Street, Chicago. 



Ask us about any book on 

electric railway and allied sub- 
jects. We publish some and sell 
all that are in print. The Wil- 
son Company, 160 Harrison 
Street, Chicago. 



We want your friends to read 
the Electric Railway Review. 
You will do them — and us — a 
favor by sending their addresses. 
We will gladly mail free sample 
copies. Electric Railway Review, 
160 Harrison Street, Chicago. 



If interested in any phase of 
steam transportation, you will 
find every development covered 
fully and accurately in The Rail- 
way Age. It is the leader and 
acknowledged authority in this 
field. Ask for free sample copies. 
The Railway Age, 160 Harrison 
Street, Chicago. 



A copy of "The Motorman and 
His Duties," the standard hand- 
book on the theory and practice 
of electric car operation, is 
worth many times its cost to 
every man interested in the sub- 
ject. Send for 16-page pamphlet 
of sample pages. The Wilson 
Company, 160 Harrison Street, 
Chicago. 



If you have copies of the 
Street Railway Review of Feb- 
ruary or June, 1906, or of the 
index for 1904, or of the Elec- 
tric Railway Review of Octo- 
ber, 1906, write us at once, stat- 
ing condition and naming price 
for each copy. Address "No. 
514," care Electric Railway Re- 
view, 160 Harrison street, Chi- 
cago. 



Wanted — 

A NEW YORK REPRESENTATIVE 

for the ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 

— a man thirty-two to thirty-five years old, energetic, resourceful, of pleasing address and staying 
qualities, who has a good record as a successful advertising salesman. 1 Our proposition includes more 
than mere space-selling, as we give advertisers a complete advertising service at the cost of white 
space. This means that our representative must know what good advertising is and how it is pro- 
duced, and be able to tell others who don't know but ought to. He must be able to co-operate 
intelligently with the advertiser in planning advertising campaigns that will help sell goods, though it 
is not imperative that he be capable of producing finished advertisements. Experience on technical or 
trade journals, while desirable, is not necessary. ^[ The man who can meet our exacting requirements 
will be offered an unusual opportunity. In replying, give an idea of salary expected. 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 




WHEN YOU WANT Surveyors, Civil, Mechan- 
ical or Electrical Engineers, Draughtsmen, 
Power and Sub-station Attendants — just write us. 

THE ENGINEERING AGENCY 

Monadnock Bldg., Chicago 



FOR SALE CHEAP! 

One 14i22 eight-wheel locomotive 
Ten 34-foot 60,000 capacity Hat cars 
Two Greenleat turntables 
70 bo) cars, 40 aid 50,000 capacity 
80 Good Second-hand Bridges 

Specifications and Blue Prints on application 
F. A. JOHANN 

1624 Pierce Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 






ROSSITER, MACGOVERN & CO. (inc.) 

90 West Street. New York 

FNfilNFS Boilers, Locomotives, Cars, 

W 5 GENERATORS M S? DC 

Transformers, Railway, A. C. & D. C. Mil 1 UK J 



THE CURTAIN SUPPLY CO. 

CAR CURTAINS 
CHICAGO. 85-98 Ohio Street 1819 Park Row Bldg., NEW YORK 



Gongs 



For Street Cars 

G. C. REITER, Canton, Ohio 



Bells 



TRACKLAYING BY MACHINERY 

SIMPLE, RAPID AND ECONOMICAL 

D. F. HOLMAN RAILWAY TRACKLAYER CO., 1102 Ellsworth Bldg., Chicago 





Bellamy Vestlette 

For Street Railway Conductors 

ABSOLUTELY SAFE. Money cannot be 

lost or stolen from these pockets 

OVER 130,000 IN USE 

Saves the price of a coat yearly. Conductor's 
uniform always presentable. Adopted as a part 
of the uniform by over 200 Street Railway Com- 
panies. Price $2.00, sent to any address prepaid, 
where we have no agent. Agents wanted on 
every line. 

The Bellamy Vestlette Mfg. Co., Cleveland, 0. 

Patented April 27, 18y7 and A. F. JURY, 265 Yonge St., Toronto, Canada 



Advertise 
in the 

Electric 
Railway 
Review 



To get an employe. 
To secure a job. 
To sell second-hand 
machinery, cars, etc. 



Want Ads cost only one cent 
a word per insertion. Special 
rates on "For Sale" Cards — 
ask about them. 




The Fred. J. Meyers 

Mf[>. Co. Hamilton, 0. 

Largest Manufacturers In the World of 
TICKET and CONDUCTORS' 
PUNCHES 
Send for catalog of 75 dif- 
ferent styles of punches 
with 10UO different dies. 
Write for special prices. 



TICKET PUNCHES 



Our Cast Steel Ticket Pu 



R. Woodman Mfg. & Supply C 

63 Oliver St., HUSTON, MASS., D. S. A 




40% SAVED 

BY USING 

Lumen Bronze Axle Bearings 

Cast in metal mold — require no machine finish 

Lumen Bearing Company 

BUFFALO — TORONTO 




Do you know about 
our Regulator? 

ASK US 

GENERAL 

STORAGE BATTERY CO 

Works, Boonton, N. J. Offices, 42 Broach* ,n . N . \ 




ECLIPSE 

Life Guard 

Manufactured by the 

ECLIPSE RAILWAY SUPPLY CO. 

Cleveland, Ohio 




High Grade Caps 

for street railway men. Our 
prices will interest all who 
wear caps. Send for Electric 
Railway Uniform catalog. 

The Henderson-Ames Co. 

Kalamazoo. Mich. 



24 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 

-?■■■■■■■■■■■ 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 




Orgy of the Growl Devils 

You can quiet the riot of the Growl Devils in fast-running 
electric car gears, save gear wear and power by using 

U. S. G Co's 

Graphited Wood Grease 

Incorporated with thoroughly graphited wood pulp (or 
fibre), this Grease reduces friction to a minimum and 
makes gears practically noiseless. It "stays put," is very 
adhesive and lasting, prevents "grinding," does not ooze 
out of boxes or require frequent application — a labor, 
power, trouble and money saver. 

Ask for booklet W-3. 



THE UNITED STATES GRAPHITE 

SAGINAW, MICH., U. S. A. 



C"C 




Every nickel collected is registered 
before reaching the conductor's hand 
when you use the 

Rooke Automatic 
Fare Collector 

The Rooke System is a revolution 
in fare-collecting methods, and as 
far superior to old systems as the 
trolley car is to the horse car. 

1 Why not ask us to prove it ? 

Rooke Automatic Register Co. 



PROVIDENCE 



RHODE ISLAND 



Special Work, both Girder 
and Tee Rail 




Porter Derailing Switches 



The Cleveland 



FrOg & CrOSSing CO., Cleveland 



Avoid 
Accidents 

By Using 
This 
Switch 



SPECIAL TRACK WORK OF 
EVERY DESCRIPTION 



Anti- Straddling or Anti- 
Kicking Tongue Switch 




New York Switch & Crossing Co. 



HOBOKEN, N. J 



It will not drive down at the 

heel, because it is held to either 

side with a spring tension and 

firmly down on its 

bed. A car can not 

straddle this tongue. 

WHITE FOR SPECIAL 
CIRCULAR 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



25 



TUBULAR POLES 

IRON OR STEE1/ 




Electric 

ElECTPvIC 

Lighting Coy 

/iGML) 
TELEPHO^r^ 

Telegraph) 

TRAK/ttU/ICW 
L I ^r E ^r 

A N X> 

Cate nary 

s/uyPE^ori O N 



ELECTRIcRAILVAYlQUIPi*VLNT& 

Gene/vi/ Office Cin ci n nati OU^A 
yjhops- Treading Fa -"Wheel in g"WV\ 



NOW 

is the time to save money 

We enable you to do this by 
repairing your broken steel 
motor cases at small expense 



ES 



E ARE prepared to undertake the repair 
of broken steel motor cases at our Jersey 
City Works. We are equipped with ex- 
ceptional facilities for doing this work 
quickly, efficiently and economically. Further- 
more, all work of this nature done at these 
shops will be guaranteed in every particular; in 
fact, we will REFUND THE ENTIRE VALUE 
OF THE MOTOR CASE in any instance where 
it is shown that under regular service conditions 
and within a period of one year from the time of 
making the repair, our weld did not hold and that 
the motor case broke again in the same place as 
the original fracture. 

Can we do more? 

Write for full details, shipping instructions and 
prices NOW, as this offer holds for only three 
months from date. 

Pamphlet No. 36-Q gives full information. 

GOLDSCHMIDT THERMIT CO. 

90 West Street, New York 

432-436 Folsom Street, San Francisco 



WASHBURN 
Traction Draft Rigging 

The highest development of its kind, so designed and con- 
structed that the draft rigging is always directly in the line 
of all pulling and buffing strains. In other words, the spring 
takes up all shocks without undue strains on the rigging. 

This is the draft rigging that enabled heavy internrban 
cars to be hauled on their own wheels in trains from St. 
Louis to Los Angeles without a breakage. 

Further comment on their strength is unnecessary. 

Ask for iieu- catalogue of traction devices. 

Washburn Steel Castings & Coupler Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Western Agents : Tweedy, Hood & Finlen, 20H Fisher Bids,'., Chicago Canadian Agent : John Taylor 





Carbonizing Coating 

preserves metal where all other paints fail. 
Durability and Economy Guaranteed. 

Manufactured exclusively by 

The Goheen Manufacturing Co. 

Canton, Ohio, I . S. A. 



Dock House, Billiter Street, London, E. C, England 



26 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX. No 1. 



SMITH improved NUTS 



THE PETER SMITH HEATER CO. 



The Pioneer Manufacturers of HOT WATER HEATERS 

for City and Interurban Cars. * 

OFFICE AND WORKS: DETROIT, MICH. 



FOSTER SUPERHEATERS 



INSTALLED IN ANY TYPE OF BOILER, Descriptive Catalogue on Request. 



POWER SPECIALTY COMPANY 
III Broadway, New York 




Rolled 
from 
Ml Best Quality 
Steel 




Catalogs at Agencies 

Baltimore. Mil. Portland, Ore. 

Boston. Mass. Seattle Wash. 

Chicago, 111. St. Paul, Minn. 

Denver, Colo. St. Louis. Mo. 

Pittsburg, Pa. Troy, N. Y. 



Londt 



Eng. 



Montreal, Can. 



CONTINUOUS JOI 



W'KBKK JOINT 



WOLHAUPTBB JOINT 



Additional safety and economy in Track Maintenance has been proved 
by the use of Continuous, Weber and Wolhaupter base-supported rail 
joints — after ten (10) years' service, having a record of over 25,000 
miles in use — the extent of which is evidence of their excellence. 



THE RAIL JOINT COMPANY 

General Offices: 29 West 34th Street, New York City 

Makers of Rail Joints for StaDdard and Special Rail Sections, also 
Girder, Step or Compromise, and Insulating Rail Joints, protected by 
patents in I'nited States and Foreign Countries. 



The Lindsley Brothers Company 



Producers and Shippers of 



WESTERN CEDAR POLES RED FIR CROSS ARMS 

Eastern Sales Office, Monadnock Blag., CHICAGO SPOKANE, WASHINGTON 



We have in our Chicago Yard avail- 
able for RUSH SHIPMENTS a SE- 
LECTED STOCK of POLES and TIES 

NAUGLE POLE AND TIE CO. 

Chicago Office, 226 La Salle Street 



We are Producers and Wholesale Dealers in Western 

CEDAR POLES 

Yards in Washington. Idaho, Montana 

and British Columbia 

WRITE US FOR DELIVERED PRICES 

CHURCHILL CEDAR CO., B„ s 1409, Spokane, Wash. 



Idaho Cedar Poles 



G. H. BARNES HAKDWOOD LUMBER CO. 

Office and Yard : Main and Warren Sts., ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Ties,CarOak,Poplar,Ash,Cherry,Plain and Quartered Oak 



PACIFIC COAST POLE CO. 



SPOKANE. WASH. 



ELECTRIC HEATERS o F f^s clases 

New York Consolidated Car-Heating Co. Chicago 



Complete Plants for the Rapid 
Handling of Material 

Every Sort of Hoisting Apparatus 

BROWN HOISTING MACHINERY CO. Cleveland, Ohio 



POLES and PILING 



20,000 35s and 40s 
Ready to Ship at Once 



S=E. Missouri Cypress Co., Campbell, Mo. 



C. H. WORCESTER CO. 



M ^ »7il :ll =!•] m yi 



PRODUCERS AND WHOLESALERS 

lulte 1710 Tribune Building - - CHICJ 



CHESTNUT f> O *~E S 


c 


edar, Oak and Chestnut Ties 




ftlOM OUR OWN TIMSER tANSS: 


THE 


ADVANCE LHJ'M BE R C O. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 



January 4, IS 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Dearborn Water Purifying Reagents 

Increase the efficiency and the years of service of steam boilers by keeping them in good con- 
dition internally. Gallon sample of the water required for analysis before preparing treatment. 



Dearborn Drug & Chemical Works 



WM. H. EDGAR, FOUNDER 



299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



Postal Telegraph bldg., CHICAGO 



THE MIGHTY 
MIDGET 



HOT WATER CAR HEATER 

Adapted for Large Electric Cars and Long Distance Lines. Exclusively used on Largest Electric Systems. Ask for Catalog 

THE WILLIAM C. BAKER HEATING & SUPPLY CO., 14a t JSSTnS aan 



RE-ENFORCED SPOKE WHEELS 

For City and Suburban Cars 
ST. LOUIS CAR WHEEL CO., St. Louis, Mo. 



GRIFFIN WHEEL CO. 

CHICAOO 
CHILLED IRON CAR WHEELS IRON OR STEEL AXLES 



The 

Recording 

Fare Register 

Company 




Coach and Car 



(Metal) 



Surfacer 



Elastic — Durable — Economical 



tLoui 
surfacer 

PEC I ALT I Ej 



ST. LOUIS SURFACER 
K & PAINT COMPANY 

St. Louis, U. S. A. 




It costs 
just two 5c fares 

to heat a car 24 hours if you 

use a COOPER HEATER 

Send for interesting pamphlet 



The Cooper Heater Co., Dayton, Ohio 



Whitmore's 
Gear Protective Composition 

will thoroughly lubricate the gears and pinions 
and make them noiseless, and perform what 
all other lubricants have failed to do. 

^ We shall be pleased to furnish, upon ap- 
plication, the names of roads that have been 
using our product for the past three years. 

The Whitmore Manufacturing Company 

Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A. 



The National Standard for Car Cur- 
tains and Car Upholstery. 



AGOSOTE HEADLINING 

The only headlining made in one solid piece. Will not 
separate, warp or blister. Waterproof and homogeneous. 



THE PANTASOTE COMPANY 



707 Fisher Building, Chicago, 111 



I 1 Broadway. New York 



ALUMINUM 

Railway Feeders 

wnas a o' r Electrical Conductors 



Aluminum Feeders are less than one-half the 
weight of copper feeders and are of equal con- 
ductivity and strength. If insulated wire or cable 
is required, high grade insulation is guaranteed. 

Write for prices and full information* 

Aluminum Company of America 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 
Formerly The Pittsburgh Reduction Company 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



Queen 


Testing Sets 


"The Recoonized igg 


M?0g£sgSm U. S. Stand- 


standard" \&~ 


g^ ard Testing 


Voltmeters fp 


|j§ Sets 


Ammeters H 


I ^I^L Rail Bond 


Switchboard Tj 


SSfiffljffiftjqjP BWfr., testers 


and Portable 


1 Galvanom- 


Alternating dfel 


I eters,etc.,etc. 


and Direct Wt 


Instruments for 


Current ~ 


^m&P^ All Purposes 


Q 


ueen Acme Testing Set 


QUEEN & CO., inc., Philadelphia, Pa. 




E. C. Van Valkenburgh 

Promotional Advertising 
for Electric Railways 
211/ West 102d St. 
CHICAGO 



A comprehensive plan based on local 
conditions in your territory and having 
for its object the systematic development of travel over your road- 
Copy that will bring to public attention, in a forceful manner, all 
the attractive features of your service and your territory- 
Careful attention to all matters of detail essential in obtaining 
satisfactory results from your advertising expenditure — 

These are some of the important features of the Van Valkeoburih 
Adterlisioi Service, a service that co-operates with your traffic depart- 
ment and insures timely advertising matter that will produce results. 
Let us submit a plan for your consideration. 



WESTON Electrical Instrument Co. 

Main Office and Works: 
WAVERLY PARK, NEWARK, N. 3. 

Illuminated 

Dial Station 

Instruments 




SEND FOR NEW CATALOGUE 



ston Standard II) 
Dial Station 

Model 11 



Berlin— European Weston Electrical Instru- 
ment Co., Rltterstrasse, No. 88 
nated Paris. France — E. H. Cadiot. 12 Rue St. Georges 
London— Audrey House. Ely Place, Holborn 
New York Office— 74 Cortlandt St. 



GREEN TRAVELING LINK GRATES 



Highest 
Capacity 




*.„*8~*."r^ 



GREEN ENGINEERING CO. 

Main Office: Commercial National Bank Bldg., Chicago, III. 

Branch Offices: Pittsburgh : St. Louis : St. Paul : Louisville 
General Foundry Work a Specialty 




"Not an 
Experiment" 

The Providence Fender has 
been in successful operation 
on hundreds of roads for 
1 3 years, and has proved 
itself reliable under all 
conditions of Street Rail- 
way service. 

CONSOLIDATED CAR FENDER COMPAQ 

OHice and Factory: PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
Branch Office : 110 E. Twenty-third St., New York 
European Agents : Comptoire d'Electricite, t>, Rue Boudri 



® 


Established 1877. 


© 


ALBERT & J. 


M. ANDERSON MFG. 


CO., 


ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES! 

SWITCHES, SWITCHBOARDS, 
TIME SWITCHES, LINE MATERIAL, 
COPPER CASTINGS (75^) CONDUCTIVITY. 
289-293 A ST., BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 


New York, 135 Broadway. 


Chicago, 175 Dearborn Street. 


Boston, Pertlngell-Andrew 
New York, R. W. Marshal 
& St. Louis, J. C. Wl 


s Co. San Francisco, Eccles & S 
& Co. Atlanta, Newcomer Manry 
ite. Denver, E. M. Messlter. 

onto, Ont., H. J. Surtees. 


mlth Co. 
Co. 




Over 46,500 of 

Wood's Car Gate 

Patented U. S. and Canada 

Equipments Now in Use 

Do not bother passengers. Easy to 
operate. Light, strong, serviceable. 
Simple to apply on all styles of cars. 

Ask for Prices 

R. BLISS MFG. CO., Pawtuckd,R.I.,U.S.A. 

New York Office, National Novelty Corporation, 826 Broadway 




January 4, 19US. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



29 



SOFT WATER 

for Power Plants 

Eliminates 
Boiler Troubles 

— does away with scale, corrosion or pitting, 
leaky flues, mud burning and all the attendant 
expensive evils. 

To get soft water 

— first, analyze the water and ascertain 
what harmful impurities it contains 

— then, remove the impurities before the 
water goes into the boiler. Do not try to 
make a water softener out of the boiler. 

The most successful water softener is the 
Kennicott. It is built upon the right lines and 
its operation is simple. The result is simple, 
too — just soft water fehat will not scale or 
corrode. 

Every Kennicott Water Softener is guaranteed to 
produce definite results before it is built. You know 
exactly what the machine will do and what it will 
cost to do it before you give your order. 

And the sale is conditioned solely upon the ful- 
fillment of our agreement in every particular. 

Write for full particulars of our fair and square 
proposition. 

Kennicott Water Softener Co. 



HARTSHORN'S SPRING SHADE ROLLERS 

Used the World Over Wherever Cars are Run 



y^j^0K^^3^ 



STEWART HARTSHORN CO. 

CAST NEWARK. N. J. 




BUCKEYE ENGINE CO. 

SALEM, OHIO 

Builders of High Class 
STEAM AND GAS ENGINES 

in powers from 25 to 10,000 H. P. 



Correspond with us before placing orders. 
Catalogues on application. 




Factory of The Milloy Electric Company 
Bucyrus, Ohio 

The Milloy Trolley Base 

built in our new and specially equipped 
factory, insures a quality which will give ex- 
cellent service under ordinary and extraor- 
dinary conditions. 

The Milloy Base is unusually low, has even 
tension on high or low wire. Has no ful- 
crum, no friction, no oil, no center post. 
Always efficient. Particulars on request. 

THE MILLOY ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Bucyrus, Ohio 



Hydraulic Jacks 



The different styles and sizes of 
Watson-Stillman Jacks number 400. 
No matter what your particular job 
may be, we have the hydraulic jack 
to handle it with greatest conve- 
nience, dispatch and economy. 

No matter whether the load is 
lighter or heavy, we have the tool. 
Every Watson-Stillman tool is guar- 
anteed. 

Send for Jack Catalogue and you 
will see a sure way out of your Jack 
troubles. 



THE WATSON-STILLMAN CO. 

Main Office, 26 Cortlandt Street, New York City 

Branch Office, 453 The Rookery, Chicago, 111. 




ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



The A rnold C ompany * 

ENGINEERS-CONSTRUCTORS 
ELECTRICAL — CIVIL- MECHANICAL 

ISI LASALLC STREET 

CH IC. AGO 



A. L. REGISTER & CO. 



Engineers and General Contractors— Elect 
112 North Broad St. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



i Railways 

Established 1889 



CENTRAL INSPECTION BUREAU 

Inspection of Rails, Ties, Cars, Motors, Bridges, Buildings, Etc. 
17 STATE STREET .... NEW YORK CITY 



H. JVl. Byllesby <S? Company 

Incorporated 

ENGINEERS 

American Trust Bldii.. Chicago 



Design, Construct and Operate 

Railway. Light. Power and 

Hydraulic Plants 



J. G. WHITE & COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

Engineers, Contractors 

43-49 Exchange Place, HJ»»... \/*~t, f\J V 

41-43 Wall Street NeW YOrk, N. Y. 

Principal Philippine Office: Manila, P. I. 



The Roberts & Abbott Co. 

E. P. ROBERTS ENGINEERS W.H.ABBOTT 

Electric Railways, Light and Power 



Complete Industrial Plants 
CLEVELAND Chicago 



Water Power Development 

Philadelphia Baltimore 



SANDERSON & PORTER 

EncineerswContractors 

Examinations - Reports - Designs-Specifications 

Construction-Equipment-Supervision shs Management 

tSE RAILWAY, LIGHT^POWER PROPERTIES! 

HYDRO -ELECTRIC * DEVELOPMENTS 

52 William Street New York 



Surface, Jet and Barometric Condensers 

Edwards Air Pumps Centrifugal Pumps 

Water Cooling Towers 

Wheeler Condenser & Engineering Company- 
West and Cedar Streets, New York Works, Carteret, N. J. 
Mouadnock Block, Chicago, III. 



SHIMER & CHASE CO. 

Experienced Promolors of Electrical Railway Projects 

Correspondence Solicited OMAHA. NEB. 



A 


U. Jaastad 


P. .1 


Harleman 


F. E. 


Greenwood 






SH EAFF 


& JAASTAD 








ENGINEERS 








Broad Exchange Building. 88 


Broad Street, 


BOSTON 


MASS. 



LIINE MATERIAL. 

ELECTRIC SUPPLIES FOR RAILWAYS, POWER PLANTS, ETC. 
THE CREAGHEAD ENGINEERING CO., 346 Main Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 



w ?c7 E MODEL STOKER COMPANY d £h]£ n 

for detailed information about the best 
AUTOMATIC SMOKELESS FURNACE: 



SPRINGS —TIRES— STEEL-TIRED W H EELS 

RAILWAY STEEL-SPRING CO. 

General Offices: 71 Broadway, New York 



St. Ry. Rep. 



Report the Street Railway Decisions with 

Notes of the State and Federal Courts. 

MATTHEW BENDER & CO. 

ALBANY, N. T. 



HART 



CONVERTIBLE 

BALLAST, CONDOLA 
AND CONSTRUCTION 



CAR 



RODGER BALLAST CAR CO., Railway Exchange, CHICAGO 



GEARS AND PINIONS 

FOR AUL TYPES OF MOTORS 
THE VAN DORN 4. DUTTON CO., Cleveland, Ohio 



WHEEL TRUING BRAKE SHOES 

Repair Crippled Wheels While Running 
THE WHEEL TRUING BRAKE SHOE CO., Detroit, Mich. 




•TrlSaMSTt 



BRAKESHOE COMPANY 



STONE & WEBSTER ENGINEERING 
CORPORATION 

CONSTRUCTING ENGINEERS 

147 MILK STREET, BOSTON 

ELECTRIC RAILWAY, LIGHT & POWER PLANTS 
WATER POWER DEVELOPMENTS 



E. SAXTON 

CONTRACTOR 

SPECIALTIES: 

CONDUIT ELECTRIC RAILWAYS 
TROLLEY LINES 

CONDUIT SYSTEMS, Etc. 



OFFICE, 841 BLADENSBURG ROAD, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Long Distance Telephone, East 887 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



31 




(end view) 
I Has adjustable steel noses — suitable for general 
urban and light interurban service. The most effi- 
cient low-priced electric snow-plow on the market. 

The Russell 
Pedestal Electric Snow -Plow No. 6 

Further information on request — also catalog Electric Snow Plows. 



RUSSELL CAR & SNOW-PLOW CO., Ridgway, Pa. 



Wendell & M 




Middletown Car Works, inc. 

MIDDLETOWN, PA., U. S. A. 
London Office: 6 Old Jewry, London, E. C. 

bteel r lame Cars have proven in steam service far 
superior to old fashioned Wood Frame Construction. 

We would be pleased to send you Photographs and Specifications. 

Manufacturers of All Kinds of 

Steel Frame Box Express Cars. Hopper Ash and Cinder Cars. 

Rail Laying Cars and Work Cars. 

WILLIAM B. DEMING, Export Agent . . 17 State Street, NEW YORK 
H. A. CLARK & CO., Domestic Agents . 17 State Street. NEW YORK 



CAR BODIES 

Of All Types 

TRUCKS 

To Suit 

CINCINNATI 
CAR COMPANY 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 




STANDARD SEMI-CONVERTIBLE — For Use All the Year 



Steel Passenger Cars and Trucks 

For Steam and Electric Railways 
Steel and Composite Freight Cars for all Classes of Service 

Pressed Steel Car Co. 

Offices: PITTSBURGH, NEW YORK, CHICAGO, ATLANTA, ST. LOUIS, MEXICO CITY. SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



32 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



POLE PAINTS 

that insure economy through 
exceptional durability. Let 
us send you a color card. 

Detroit Graphite Company 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Dept. S. 



Rolling' Doors 



FOR. 



BSfel «&J 



ROLLING DOORS 

In Steel, Wood or Bronze 

FOR CAR BARNS, FREIGHT SHEDS, ETC. 



JAS. G. WILSON MFG. CO. 

New York Office: 3 W. 29th Street 

ESTABLISHED 1876 Incorporated 1903 





Ml 


lis 1 ! 

Ill 


w^M 



Operate Easily, Speedily, Satisfactorily 
and are very durable. Write for Catalog . 

The Kinnear MairCgCo 



BOSTON 

85 WAT ERST. 



■NCAGO 

CLARK ST 



PHILADELPHIA 1 

iOI r CHESTNUT STv 



Save Money on Repairs and Parts 
for Railway Motors 



by patronizing our works 
—the largest of their kind 
in America— where we 

— make Armatures complete, re- 
shaft and rewind them 

— furnish Commutators complete, 
refilled and assembled 

— do all kinds of field work for 
nearly all different makes of 
Dynamos and Motors. 

We give the best of service. You can 
pay freight both ways (unless very far 
distant) and still save money. 

Cleveland Armature Works 

Cleveland, Ohio 




FlectriG R ailway Review 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY BY THE WILSON COMPANY, CHICAGO 

Entered as BeconCrclasa matter January 6, 1907, at the postoffice at Chicago, 111., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



lijii Harrison .street. Chicago v _, v , v 

150 Nassau Street New York Vo & X , IX CHICAGO, JANUARY 4, 1908. 

1".l".i Williamson Bldg.. Cleveland 



ption: Domestic 

For.-ii.-ii . 

Canada . 






The average master mechanic of a small road is a mechanical 
genius and the problems which he must solve vary so widely 

in character that his position would not be 
Small well filled if he were not able continually 

Roads and to advance new methods for saving time 

Shop Kinks. and money. The earnings of a small road 

do not permit it to equip shops with many 
of the tools considered economical in the repair work of larger 
roads; therefore, it devolves upon the master mechanic to 
improvise shop methods that will permit him to repair his 
cars as cheaply as possible, substituting home-made apparatus 
for expensive machinery. He observes in his work that the 
few equipments of a small road must be inspected as rigor- 
ously as those on the larger roads and, to show the highest 
profit from his work, they must be kept in an equally high 
state of repair. In this issue of the Electric Railway Review 
the shop practice of the Allegheny Valley Street Railway, a 
comparatively small interurban road in Pennsylvania, is de- 
scribed by H. P. Mentzel, master mechanic. This article 
presents an interesting description of the very thorough meth- 
ods of inspection practiced, and describes many shop prac- 
tices that have been found satisfactory. 



The plan of enforcing the pay-as-you-enter system of fare col- 
lection, without the use of cars especially built for the pur- 
pose, as attempted in Pittsburg last week, 
Pay-As-You-Enter does not seem to have been a startling suc- 
Experiments in cess. As reported in last week's issue of 
Pittsburg. the Electric Railway Review, the Pittsburg 

Railways Company on December 24 began 
to require the passengers to enter by the rear platform and 
leave by the front platform and to pay their fares as they 
entered the car. It was stated that the object was to enable 
the conductor to remain on the rear platform in order to 
lessen accidents. This practice lasted less than a week. 
Many of the passengers absolutely refused to comply with 
the company's wishes and did everything in their power to 
handicap the conductors, such as by requiring them to change 
bills and by purposely boarding the cars in crowds. In a 
short time the conductors were completely discouraged and 
notified the company that they could not enforce the order. 
On December 30 the order was rescinded. It is stated that 
the climax came when a woman with a baby and a number 
of packages entered a car holding her nickel in her mouth 
and swallowed it while explaining her predicament to the 
conductor. We are not advised whether the Pittsburg Rail- 
ways Company wished to make a test of the pay-as-you-enter 
idea before ordering special cars, or whether it hoped to make 
the plan succeed without the pay-as-you-enter cars, but in 
either case it seems extremely inadvisable to try such a plan 
without previous preparation of the conductors and the public. 
In Chicago, where the pay-as-you-enter cars have met with 
remarkable success since they were first put in service on 
November 24, the street railway company conducted an ex- 
tensive campaign of education before trying the new methods. 
The conductors were carefully coached at the car barns for 
three weeks and the benefits to be derived from the new 
plan were outlined at length in the newspapers and in folders 
distributed to the public before the cars were put in service. 



As a result every conductor and most of the passengers knew 
exactly what to do when the time came. It is to be regretted 
that the future success of such an important improvement in 
street railway transportation, conducive to the welfare of the 
companies and the public alike, should have been allowed to 
be prejudiced by these apparently ill-advised experiments. 



The decision to form a traffic association which shall be allied 
with the Central Electric Railway Association as a branch of 

that organization is of far-reaching impor- 
Decide to tance. It means that the companies will 

Form Traffic consider questions pertaining to traffic in 

Association. the thorough manner in which they have 

discussed subjects relating to operation, 
maintenance and engineering in the sessions of the associa- 
tion which it is now evident will have an allied body. The 
suggestion of the formation of a traffic organization has its 
foundation in the need for co-operation which actuated the 
steam railways in their establishment of similar organizations. 
As connections have been built between various interurban 
electric railways, the possibilities for local traffic have naturally 
and gradually opened the way for business affording longer 
hauls; and consolidation of the properties of various com- 
panies has increased the length of ride possible without 
change of cars. A traffic association will do more to facilitate 
and promote the movement of passengers and freight traffic 
between connecting interurban lines than traffic arrangements 
at random could accomplish. The new association will have 
abundant work laid out for it. Letters which have been pub- 
lished in the Electric Railway Review from some of those 
who are interested in the success of the organization indicate 
that it will be thought desirable to discuss means for the 
promotion of traffic at the various meetings. This is a sub- 
ject upon which many successful general managers could bo 
invited to address the association. The new association, if 
successfully started, will have an excellent opportunity to do 
valuable service for the interested roads. 



Last week we published in the Electric Railway Review, on 
page 9S1. a description of a special sand box, arranged to 

deliver the sand between the two wheels 
Snow of the truck. The experience with this car 

and Sand on tracks covered with snow shows that 

Boxes. such a method of delivering sand has two 

special advantages: First, with the de- 
livery pipe between the wheels of the truck the sand is placed 
on the head of the rail, no matter whether the car be on 
curved or straight track. Second, when the track is covered 
with snow the front car wheels serve to clean the rail so that 
the sand delivered behind these wheels may be used effectively. 
How well this sanding scheme works out in practice is de- 
scribed in a recent communication from John A. Buggy, super- 
intendent of the Delaware County & Philadelphia Electric 
Railway Company, who says: "It will, perhaps, be interest- 
ing to know that the sand car which we recently constructed 
and sent you a description of has been equipped with track 
scrapers for removing snow. During a recent storm we found 
the car very useful by reason of the fact that the scrapers in 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



front first removed nearly all of the snow; then the front 
wheels flattened down the small amount remaining on the 
track, so that the sand pipe distributed the sand on the rail 
and left a well-sanded rail for the rear wheels to take hold of. 
If we had used our earlier type of sand box and pipe con- 
struction the sand would have been thrown on the snow in 
front of the car and afterward swept away by the sweepers; 
or else, as we usually have done, we would have run into the 
drifts, removed part of the snow and then have applied sand 
in the rear of the car, backing the car to the rear for several 
feet upon the sanded rail, thus being able to get up speed 
and again run into the snow as far as possible, or until the 
wheels began to slip. Our experience with the car as re- 
modeled, however, has been that with snow up to a foot deep 
and on level track we can continue straight along. Through 
a recent storm the work done by this car during one night 
more than paid for the alterations made." 



THE YEAR'S PROGRESS IN ROLLING STOCK. 



A brief review of the electric railway rolling stock in 
operation at the close of the year 1907 shows no marked 
change in car design as a whole, but it does show that there 
have been put into general use improvements which clearly 
indicate a decided advancement in rolling stock construction. 

Considering first cars for city service, the most important 
development has been the widespread adoption of the pay-as- 
you-enter plan of fare collection. A change in body design 
from the earlier type of car used in heavy city service is re- 
quired for the new method of collecting fares. It is neces- 
sary to have platforms of greater length and to rearrange the 
doors in the end bulkheads, providing separate entrances and 
exits. Otherwise, with the exception of details such as guide 
railings and door operating mechanisms, no radical changes 
are required to adopt the pay-as-you-enter feature for city 
service. 

The past year has seen the continued introduction of all- 
steel cars for surface, elevated and interurban use. While 
riveted steel is yet new in this application, its satisfactory 
service in the steam railway field gives every assurance that 
the desired improvements in strength and maintenance costs 
of all-steel cars will be attained. Postered by the satisfactory 
service of all-steel cars there is a rapidly growing tendency 
for a more general use of steel in the under and side framing 
of all types of cars. The demands for higher speeds in turn 
require stronger cars and these can only be obtained within 
economical limits by reinforcements of steel or steel construc- 
tion. 

There has been a marked advancement during the past 
year in the construction and use of what may be called utility 
cars. Such equipments comprise special cars for erecting and 
maintaining overhead construction, transfer cars equipped 
with small chain blocks, for carrying materials in yards and 
between shops, and heavy crane cars equipped with large 
motors and high lifting capacity swinging boom cranes. The 
latter mentioned equipments, equipped either with motor- 
operated or hand-operated lifting tackle, are especially valuable 
for wrecking purposes, and, when used in city service, for han- 
dling special track work when repairs are made during the day. 

In principle trucks vary but little from those of a year 
ago, the improvements noted having been changes in details. 
For interurban service steel-tired or the forged and rolled steel 
wheels grow rapidly in favor; in fact, some of the more 
recently completed lines operate at such high speeds and use 
such heavy equipments that it would hardly be safe to use 
cast-iron wheels, because the flange thickness is so greatly 
restricted by city special work. 

Car designers and builders now have standard dimensions 
for axles and other truck parts, to which the American Street 
and Interurban Railway Association, the Engineering Asso- 



ciation and the Central Electric Railway Association have 
given their approval. These standards as recommended have 
been formulated only after a most thorough study by builders 
and purchasers. With these available it now remains for the 
manufacturers and purchasers of cars to adopt them if they 
would receive the benefits so long sought. 

The general appearance of interurban car bodies ap- 
proaches from year to year more closely that of the Pullman 
type. Few changes in body design have been made. Con- 
sidering rolling stock in a general way, the equipments have 
grown in size to meet the demands of increased interurban 
traffic. The growth in length has, of course, been attended by 
a proportionate increase in weight, requiring motive power 
equipments of greater capacity. Much credit is due the manu- 
facturers of railway motors for the improvements which they 
have made in the design of motors. With the very limited 
space available between the axles of a car a serious problem 
confronted the motor manufacturer when units of higher 
power were demanded for fast interurban schedules. These 
conditions have been met by refinements within the motor 
case, so that increased power is now available within the long 
since well-filled clearance space. 

Probably the most important advancement in motor de- 
sign, and one which has permitted the demands for motors of 
larger capacity to be met, is the use of commutating pole or 
interpole motors. Briefly, such motors differ in no way from 
the more familiar types, except that between each pair of field 
poles is a thin auxiliary pole, the field of which serves to 
assist in reversing the current in an armature coil as that coil 
passes under a brush. The result is a great improvement in 
commutation through a wide range of loading. 

Improvements of value have been made in control ap- 
paratus during the past year. These have been matters of 
detail rather than of principle. The most marked change in 
control work, other than these detail improvements, has been 
the more general use of the bridge form of transfer from series 
to parallel connection, which avoids the opening of the circuit 
of either motor during the transition and thereby continues 
the torque of both motors through acceleration. For high- 
speed equipments this refinement of control is especially de- 
sirable. On heavy city equipments, and especially those 
which haul trailers, the contactor or unit switch is finding a 
more general use in connection with platform controllers. 

Much attention has been paid during the past year to 
improving the insulation, as well as the commutation, of rail- 
way motors. These improvements are demanded by the grad- 
ual increase in the operating voltage. Interurban roads are now 
operating with trolley voltages of 11,000 and 6,600 alternating 
and 1,200 volts direct current. The control apparatus for the 
alternating-current motors feeds the motors at a maximum 
pressure of about 250 volts, but the tendency for heating and 
insulation breakdown is proportionately greater than with 
direct current. Therefore especial measures have been taken 
to improve insulation. With the 1,200-volt direct-current equip- 
ments the pairs of motors on each truck are connected in 
series, so that the insulation requirements vary in no way 
from those on 600-volt roads. 

For interurban work the automatic air brake is being 
quite generally installed on new equipments. The improved 
service offered by such brakes is required wherever cars are 
to be operated in multiple — and there are now few interurban 
roads which are not prepared or preparing to run their cars 
in trains. Several of the more recently built interurban 
roads have equipped their cars with controllers provided with 
"deadman" handles. These assure a quick stop should the 
motorman accidentally remove his hand from the controller 
handle. This improved controller detail comprises attach- 
ments which, on being released by the removal of the motor- 
man's hand, instantly and automatically cut off the current 
being fed to the motors and apply the emergency air. 

These few improvements mentioned do not complete the 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



record of rolling stock progress for 1907. They may be 
classed rather as general improvements applicable to either 
interurban or city cars as separate classes. In addition to 
the general improvements there has been carried on in the 
shops of the various roads much creditable work tending 
toward the betterment of the cars on individual systems by 
adding improvements and small changes in designs, which 
adapt the rolling stock more satisfactorily to local conditions. 



ROLLING STOCK ORDERED IN 1907. 



Following the practice established last year the Electric 
Railway Review presents in this issue a detailed statement 
of the rolling stock equipment ordered in 1907 by the street 
and interurban railways of North America. The statistics 
show that during the year 1907 orders were placed for 6.216 
cars and 95 electrical locomotives, a total of 6.311 equipments. 
Compared with the previous year this is an increase of 184 
equipments, which may be considered as quite satisfactory 
when it is remembered that the steam railroads ordered dur- 
ing the same period 1,741 less passenger cars and 158,604 less 
freight cars than they did during the year 1906. 

Rolling stock statistics recently compiled by The Railway 
Age show that during 1907 the steam railroads ordered a total 
■of 1,791 passenger cars. The electric railways during the 
same period, as shown by the table presented in this issue, 
ordered 4,810 passenger cars. In other words, the passenger 
equipment orders for electric railway service exceeded those 
for steam railway service by 3,019 cars. The statistics pre- 
sented in the Electric Railway Review on January 5, 1907, 
covering the year 1906, when compared with rolling stock 
statistics for steam railroad use, showed that during the year 
1906 the electric roads ordered 57.3 per cent more passenger 
•cars than the steam roads. Bearing this in mind it is quite 
remarkable that a similar comparison for this year shows 
that the electric roads have ordered during 1907 269 per cent 
of the number of passenger cars ordered by the steam rail- 
roads. 

Considering the totals of the electric railway cars ordered 
during the year 1907, as compared with the year 1906, we find 
that for city use there were ordered last year 3,483 equip- 
ments. These 3,483 equipments, compared with 3,730 in 1906, 
show a decrease of 247 in 1907 orders. For interurban passen- 
ger service there were ordered 927 cars during 1907, as com- 
pared with 1,204 for the year 1906, a decrease of 277. There 
were ordered in 1907 for passenger service on elevated-rail- 
ways 400 cars, an increase of 81 over the 319 cars ordered 
in 1906 for similar service. 

While the statistics of orders for passenger cars, with the 
exception of those for elevated service, show a slight decrease 
for 1907 as compared with 1906, the orders for freight equip- 
ment on street and interurban railways, on the other hand, 
indicate a remarkable growth in that field. During 1907 orders 
were placed for 1,406 freight cars, which, as compared with 
the orders for 851 placed during 1906, shows an increase of 
655 cars. In 1906 a total of 23 electric locomotives were or- 
dered, which number has been exceeded in the year just ended 
by 72. there having been 95 locomotives ordered in 1907 for 
electric railway freight service. 

It is indicative of the rapid growth of freight traffic on 
interurban roads that the orders placed for freight equipment 
aggregate close to 24 per cent of the total orders during 1907. 
The electric railway companies are becoming more active 
in car building. This year, out of a total of 6,311 cars ordered, 
772, or 12.2 per cent, are to be built in company shops. In the 
year 1906 10.4 per cent of the orders were placed with com- 
pany shops, which, compared with the figure earlier men- 
tioned, shows that the roads are gradually building a larger 
proportion of their rolling stock. 

Unfortunately there are not available figures showing the 
total number of rolling stock equipments in North America at 



the beginning of the year 1907. Considering, however, that 
the totals presented in American Street Railway Investments, 
compiled from reports gathered over a period of several 
months, may be assumed as correct for the close of the eai 
1906 there were in operation at the beginning of 1907 87,652 
street and interurban railway cars. The addition of 6,311 cars 
in 1907 represents an increase of 7.2 per cent and makes a 
total of 93.963 cars. A similar comparison made a year ago 
showed that the increase during the year 1906 was 7.4 per cent. 

At the beginning of 1907 the total street and interurban 
railway track mileage in the United States and Canada was 
estimated to be 38,082 miles. This total represents an in- 
crease of 3,976 iiiili-s in one year, and if a similar increase 
has taken place during 1907 there are today 42,058 miles of 
street and interurban railway track in the United States and 
Canada, with approximately 2.23 cars per mile of track. 

The electric railways at large are to be congratulated 
because of their remarkable growth during the past decade 
and it is especially gratifying at this time to learn that the 
rolling stock equipments ordered during 1907 show a con- 
siderable increase. 



NEW TRACK CONSTRUCTION IN 1907. 



While the year 1907 has been a prosperous one for the 
electric railways and a memorable one from many points of 
view, one of the most important and striking features of the 
development has been the amount of new construction com- 
pleted. Figures showing the total amount of new mileage for 
the year are unfortunately not yet available, but there are 
many indications that 1907 will equal if not surpass the record 
of any previous year in this respect. At the close of 1906 the 
electric railway mileage of the country was 36,212, having 
increased 3,695 miles, or 11.4 per cent during the year. The 
increase in steam railway mileage during 1906 was 6,100. The 
new track added by the steam roads during 1907 amounted to 
.", . s 7 4 miles, a slight decrease from the figures of the pre- 
ceding year. It is not believed, however, that electric railway 
construction has been affected by the same causes as the 
steam roads, and a total of close to 40,000 miles at the close 
of 1907 would not be surprising. 

While the weak condition of the money market, which 
has prevailed for the past three months, has undoubtedly 
lessened the amount of new construction to some extent, the 
effect has not been so great as might have been expected, or 
as it has been in the case of the steam roads. Its effect is 
more likely to manifest itself in the results for 1908. Most 
of the important new enterprises, which have been carried to 
completion during 1907, were financed during the prosperous 
times of 1906, and early 1907. They were thus so nearly com- 
pleted by the time the financial stringency began to be felt, 
that it was too late to stop work and it was necessary to 
complete the lines in order to protect the capital invested. 
Moreover, the business of the electric railways is in such 
small units that it is not so sharply affected by a financial 
stringency and there has not been the same occasion for 
curtailment as in the case of the steam roads. 

Although many smaller extensions have undoubtedly been 
postponed on account of the lack of currency the greatest 
effect of the panic has been on the embryo railroads, those 
which had secured right of way and franchises and were 
seeking to finance their projects. Most of these have been 
obliged to postpone their plans altogether until a more pros- 
perous period and as a panic affects the strong and weak 
alike the set-back will be evident when the mileage for 1908 
is compiled. 

While the increase in mileage applies generally through- 
out the United States, the new construction work has been 
most active in the far western states of Washington, Oregon 
and California, and in the central states Indiana. Ohio and 
Illinois. Figures for the state of Indiana, as compiled by the 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



state railroad commission, bring out the striking fact that the 
increase in electric interurban railway mileage in that state 
during 1907, 426 miles, is greater than the increase in steam 
railroad mileage in any state, Louisiana leading with 422 
miles. There are now 1,538.93 miles of electric railway in 
Indiana, not including street railways, as compared with 1,113 
in 1906 and with the steam mileage of 7,239.55. 

A large proportion of the new track put in service during 
1907 has been built by new companies, although the existing 
lines have been active in extending their properties by con- 
necting short lines in order to form through routes and by 
building feeders. The greatest development of the year is 
seen in the number of long interurban roads that have been 
put in operation. The city lines have made important exten- 
sions, but in general their greatest efforts have been con- 
centrated on betterments and improvements in power houses, 
rolling stock, etc., and in rebuilding their tracks. It is in the 
construction of long interurban roads, that is roads over 40 or 
50 miles in length, built according to the highest standards of 
steam railroad construction, and in many cases operated in 
direct competition with the steam railroads, that the year 
has made itself most memorable. Most of these have been 
described at length in the columns of the Electric Railway 
Review. 

The new lines in Indiana that have been opened during 
the year include four which are over 30 miles in length: the 
Indianapolis Crawfordsville & Western Traction Company 
from Indianapolis to Crawfordsville, 45 miles; the Lafayette- 
Logansport line of the Ft. Wayne & Wabash Valley Traction 
Company; the Indianapolis & Louisville Traction Company, 
which operates with 1,200-volt direct current from Seymour 
to Sellersburg, 41 miles, and by its connection with the 
Indianapolis Columbus & Southern and the Louisville & 
Northern completes a through route from Indianapolis to 
Louisville; and the Marion Bluff ton & Eastern Traction Com- 
pany, operating from Marion to Bluffton, 30 miles. In this 
connection it is worthy of note that the Terre Haute 
Indianapolis & Eastern Traction Company has completed a 
connection between the lines radiating from Indianapolis and 
the Terre Haute system, and now operates a total of 351 
miles. The Chicago Lake Shore & South Bend Railway has 
been under active construction since last spring, and will 
connect South Bend, Ind., with Chicago, III., a distance of 81 
miles. Much of the track has been laid and it is hoped to 
begin operation before summer. 

In Illinois the greater part of the new construction has 
been done by the Illinois Traction System, which has completed 
during 1907 a single-phase line from Peoria to Bloomington 
and lines from Clinton to Bloomington, Champaign to Decatur 
and Lincoln to Mackinaw. Preliminary work is now in 
progress for the long-talked-of extension to Chicago and active 
work is being done on the $2,500,000 bridge over the Mississippi 
river at St. Louis. The Elgin & Belvidere Electric Company, 
which completed its track in 1906, did not, however, begin 
operating its line from Elgin to Belvidere, 36 miles, until 
February, 1907. The Chicago & Southern Traction Company 
also laid most of the track for its extension from Harvey to 
Kankakee during 1906, but did not begin operation until 
November, 1907. 

Ohio was very completely served by electric lines at the 
close of 1906, with a total of approximately 2,600 miles. Con- 
sequently most of the new work during 1907 has been in the 
way of short links to complete the network. The Youngstown 
& Southern Railway has added 26 miles of new line from 
Youngstown to Leetonia, and with the completion of the 
Youngstown & Ohio River Railroad will offer through service 
from Youngstown to East Liverpool, about 45 miles. Other 
important enterprises now under way in Ohio are the Lima- 
Bellefontaine extension of the Ohio Electric Railway, 45 miles, 
the electrification of the Columbus & Lake Michigan line 
from Defiance to Lima, and the completion of the Lima & 
Toledo line, both by the same company, 



In Wisconsin the Milwaukee Northern Railway has com- 
pleted the first section of its line out of Milwaukee and 
expects to extend to Sheboygan and Fond du Lac. The Mil- 
waukee Electric Railway & Light Company has also completed 
a number of short extensions. 

The most interesting and important of the new additions 
to the electric railway map is doubtless the single-phase line 
of the Spokane & Inland Railway in Washington. This road 
is operated as a division of the Inland Empire System and 
extends south from Spokane to Spring Valley Junction, where 
it divides into two branches, one to Colfax, and the other to 
Palouse, a total distance of 116 miles. An extension to 
Moscow, Idaho, 16.5 miles, is now under construction and a 
line to Lewiston, Idaho, 43 miles farther, is contemplated. 
Much of the Spokane & Inland's track was laid during 1906, 
but the road was not put in operation until last year. 

Several important projects for new lines in Washington 
are well under way, but have not yet reached the stage of 
accomplishment. 

In Oregon the Oregon Electric Railway is now completing 
its line from Portland to Salem, 53 miles long, and it is 
announced that operation will begin this month. 

California also has an impressive amount of new track 
to its credit. The Ocean Shore Railway, which will connect 
San Francisco and Santa Cruz, a distance of 81 miles, has 
completed a large proportion of its construction, but was 
unexpectedly delayed in its work by the earthquake last 
spring. The Northern Electric Railway has opened several 
new lines during the year and when the lines now under 
construction and rapidly approaching completion are finished, 
will have a total of 165 miles of track. The Los Angeles- 
Interurban and Pacific Electric Railway system has also opened 
several extensions and now has a total of 550 miles of single 
track, besides 25 miles of side track. 

In the middle west the most important new line is the 
Ft. Dodge Des Moines & Southern Railroad, which began 
operating from Ft. Dodge to Des Moines, la., 85 Miles in 
November, using an electrified portion of the Newton & 
Northwestern steam road. 

In Pennsylvania, which like Ohio was already covered by 
a network of short lines, the greatest activity has been shown 
in short extensions of existing lines and although several 
ambitious enterprises have progressed during the year the 
only extensive new lines placed in operation are the single- 
phase line of the Pittsburg & Butler Street Railway and the 
line of the Philadelphia & Western, from a connection with 
the Philadelphia system to Wayne, 11.8 miles. 

In the south a large number of important projects are 
now being carried out which will add greatly to the transpor- 
tation facilities of that section. The Texas Traction Company 
of Dallas, while it has not laid much of its track, has finished 
the grading and bridge work for 65 miles of line, from Sher- 
man to Dallas, Tex., which will be operated by single-phase 
current. The Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation has 
extensive plans for the development of Texas, which will 
probably be delayed until the financial situation improves. 

In the east a large number of small connecting lines have 
been built although the construction has not been so active as 
in the newer localities of the west. The Washington Balti- 
more & Annapolis Electric Railway has practically completed 
its line from Baltimore to Annapolis, 36 miles. The especial 
features of interest in the east are the electrification of por- 
tions of four steam railroads, the New York Central, the New 
York New Haven & Hartford, the Erie, and the West Shore, 
all of which have been placed in operation during the year 
just past. 



The first car was operated over the new line of the Illi- 
nois Traction System from Lincoln to Mackinaw, 111., on De- 
cember 31. Regular service on a 2-hour headway was started 
on January 1. The distance is 27 miles. 



January 4, 1908. ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 

ELECTRIC RAILWAY ROLLING STOCK ORDERED IN 1907. 



A detailed statement of the electric railway rolling stock 
equipment ordered by the roads of North America during the 
year 1907 is presented herewith. One year ago. in the Electric 
Railway Review for January 5, 1907, there were published for 
the first time similar statistics covering the purchases during 
the year 1906. The figures here presented are compiled from 
official sources and from the regular weekly records of the 
Electric Railway Review. These statistics are as complete 
and accurate as it is possible to make them in the time avail- 
able for their compilation. The records as presented show 
equipment ordered from company shops as well as those for 
which orders were placed with car manufacturers. 

It is interesting to note that this year the grand total 
shows a healthy increase over that for 1906. The passenger 
car orders except for elevated service are less than a year 
ago, but orders for freight cars and electric locomotives for 
freight handling show a decided increase. The totals show 



orders for 3,483 cars for city passenger service, 927 for inter- 
urban passenger service, 400 for elevated service, 1,406 freight 
cars and 95 electric locomotives. These totals for 1907 com- 
pare with those for 1906 as shown by the following summary: 

1906. 1907. 

Passenger cars, city 3,730 3,483 

Passenger cars, interurban 1,204 927 

Passenger cars, elevated 319 400 

Freight cars 851 1,406 

Electric locomotives 23 95 

Total 6,127 6,311 

That the electric railway companies are rapidly increasing 

their car building facilities is evidenced by the statement that. 

772, or 12.2 per cent, of the equipments ordered in 1907 were 

to be built in company shops, as compared with 10.4 per cent 

for the year 1906. 



ROLLING STOCK EQUIPMENT ORDERED IN 1907. 



Purchaser. 



No. Class. Length. Serv. Trucks 



Albany & Hudson 
Alton Gr. & St. L. 

Trac. Co 

Amarillo St. Ry. . 
Anaconda Copper 

Mining Co 

Asheville Elec. Co. 
Atl. Shore Line. . . 



Auburn & Syrac. .. 

Aurora Elgin & 

Chicago 

Austin Elec. Hv. . 

Bangor Ry. & Elec. 

Co 



Baton Rouge Elec- 
tric & Gas Co.. 

Beaumont Trac- 
tion Co 

Bellaire-S.W.Trac 
Co 

Beloit Trac. Co. . . 

Belton & Temple 
Traction 

Benton & Fairfield 

Birm.R.L. & P. Co. 

Boise&Interurban 

Boston & Wore. 
St. Ry 

Boston Elev. Ry. . 

Brantford & Ham- 
ilton 

Bristol & Plainv. 
Tramwav Co ... . 

B. C. Elec. Ry... 



BurlingtonTrac.Co. 
Butler Pass. Rv. . . 
Cairo Elec. &Trac. 

Co 

Calumet Elec. St. 



Ry- 



Camden Interstate 

Ry 



Ced. Rap.& Marion 

City 4 

Cent. Pa. Trac. Co. 5 
Chambs. & Gettys. 
Elec. Ry 1 

Charl. Con. Rv.Gas 
& Elec. Co." 1 

Charlotte Elec. Ry. 
Lt. & Pwr. Co.. 6 



Comb 
Pass. 


43-0 
....40-0 


Pass 54-0 

Semiconv. 30-6 


Pass. 
Pass. 


& Bagg. 


Pass. 

Pass. 


48-0 

..52-10% 


Open 
Pass. 
Pass. 


30-4 
....32-6 
40-0 



City 
Citv 
Int. 
Int. 

Int. 
Int. 

Int. 
Int. 
City 

City 
City 
Int. 



Semiconv. .30-6 City 



Exp -..43-0 

Semiconv 

Coal 33-6 

Loco. ...30-7% 



Pass 31-0 

Pass 32-6 

Pass 43-4 

Pass 50-0 

Motor 35-0 

Flat 35-0 

Pass 



Int. 
Int. 
City 

City 

Int. 

Citv 
City 
Citv 
Int. 
Citv 
Citv 



Semiconv. 
Semiconv. 
Semiconv. 



Comb 51-8 

Exp 50-7 

Pass 38-0 

Pass 

Semiconv.. 30-0 

Pass 46-S 



48-0 
18-0 
48-0 

Closed 48-0 

Work 48-0 

48-0 



City 

Elev. 

Elev. 

City 

Int. 

Int. 

Int. 

Both 

City 

City 



Pass. 



Int. 
Int. 
Int. 
tat, 
Int. 
tat. 



Semiconv. 29-6 
Pass 42-S 



City 
Int. 



Semiconv. 31-0 fitv 

Open 41-0 Int. 

Frt 33-0 City 



D. T. 
S. T. 
D. T. 
D. T. 
D. T. 
D. T. 



. .St. Louis 

Brill 

Brill 

Brill 

Brill 

.Cincinnati 



D. T. McGulre-Cum. 

D. T Hicks 

Southern Car 



S. T. 
S. T. 
D. T. 



..Brill 
..Brill 
..Brill 



.Co. Shops 
Co. Shops 
. .St. Louis 
. St. Louis 



D. T Danville 

B. T Brill 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T Co. Shops 



D. T. 



.Brill 



S. T Wason 

S. T Co. Shops 

D. T Co. Shops 

P. T Co. Shops 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T Co. Shops 

Brill 



Brill 

D. T Laconia 

D. T Jewett 

D. T Jewett 

D. T Cincinnati 

D. T Niles 

D. T Niles 

D. T. ...Jones' Sons 
S. T Brill 

S. T. . .American Car 



D. T. 



.Kuhlman 



D. T Kuhlman 

D. T Niles 

D. T Jewett 

D. T Cincinnati 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T Cincinnati 



D T Cumberland 

Valley R. R. 



S. T Brill 

D. T. .Southern Car 
D. T.MofflttM.&M. Co. 



Purchaser. 



No. Class. Length. Serv. Trucks 



Charlotte Elec. Ry. 

Lt. & Pwr. Co. . . 1 
Chattanooga Rys.. 15 

Chatta. St. Rv 3 

Chester Trac. Co. 7 
5 
Chi. & Joliet Elec. 

Ry 4 

Chi. & Mil. Elec. 20 



10 

30 

Chicago City Ry. .300 

Chi. Elec. Trac.Co. 15 

10 

Chi. L. S. &S.Bend 15 



Chi.-N. T. Elec. 

Air Line 

Chi. So. Bend & 

Nor. Ind 

Chicago Un. Trac. 
Choctaw Ry. & Lt. 

Cinn. Georgetown 
& Ports 

Cincinnati Nor.. . . 

Cinn. Trac. Co 

Citizens' Light & 
Transit Co 

Citizens' Ry. 

(Lincoln, Neb.). 

Citizens' Ry. 
(Waco. Tex.). . . 

Citizens' R.&L.Co. 

(Ft. Worth. Tex.) 

City & Elm Grove. 

City Ry. (Dayton, 
O.) 

Claremont Ry. & 
Ltg. Co 

Clinton St. Rv 

Coal Belt Elec. Ry. 

Colo. Sp. feint.... 

Columbia Elec. St. 
Ry. L. & Pr. Co. . 

Col.Mag.Spr.feNo. 

Col. New Albany 

& Johnstown . . 

Columbus R. R. . . 

Col. Ry. & Lt. Co. 
Coney Is. & Brook. 
Conneaut & Erie. 
Connecticut Co... 



Coronado R. R... 

Cumb. & West- 

ernport 



Dallas Con. St. Ry. 6 

Danv. St. Rv. & Lt. 

Co 6 

Dayton & Troy ... 1 



City 
City 
City 
City 
fat. 



Pass. 



8-6 



Loco 

Loco 

Flat 

Gondola 

Pay-as-You- 

Enter ...48-3 
Semiconv 



City 
Int. 
Int. 
Int. 



Pass.&Sm.57-0 
Pass., Sm. & 

Bagg. ..57-0 Int. 
Exp 50-0 Int. 

Closed 49-6 Int. 



Pass 61-0 

Pass 41-0 

Pass 46-0 

Frt 35-0 



Int. 
City 
Int. 



Open 

Semiconv. 
Pass. . ..'. 



Pass. . . 


28-0 
...23-0 


Conv. . 
Conv. . 


...31-0 


Pass. . . 
Pass. . . 


30-0 
...30-0 




...30-0 


Frt. 
Pass. . 


, . ,40-0 
...43-0 



City 



City 
City 



City 
City 



30-8 

.87-0 

.42-0 



Pass 50-0 

Open 34-% 

Closed ...31-0 
Pass 42-0 



Int. 
City 
City 

City 



Comb 

Closed ...30-0 
Closed ...33-0 

Open 

Exp 44-0 

Pass 31-6 

Frt 42-6 

Ballast ..42-6 
Closed ...40-0 
Open 



Exp. ...41-1% 
Dump 25-0 



Int. 
City 
City 

City 



City 

Int. 
Int. 
Citv 

City 

Citv 
Int. 
Int. 



D 


T.MofflttM.&M. Co. 


S. 


T. ... 


. . . .Kuhlman 


s. 


T. .. 


Jewett 


1' 


T. .. 


Brill 



D. T Steph.-nson 

D. T Jewett 

General Electric 

Westinghouse 

Pullman 

Pullman 



D. T Brill 

D. T Kuhlman 

D. T St. Louis 

D. T Niles 



Niles 

.Cincinnati 
. .St. Louis 

Niles 

.Co. Shops 



Co. Shops 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 



.American Car 
Co. Shops 



Kuhlman 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T. .Southern Car 

S. T.Barney & Smith 



General Electric 

S. T. . .American Car 

St. Louis 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T.Am. C. & F. Co. 

S. T Kuhlman 

Brill 



D. T Jewett 

D. T Brill 

S. T Brill 

D. T Kulhman 

D. T Brill 

D. T..Am. C. & F. Co. 

D. T Wason 

D. T Wason 

D. T Wason 

D. T Wason 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T. .American Car 

D. T Brill 



Danville 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T Hicks 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



ROLLING STOCK EQUIPMENT ORDERED IN 1907— Continued. 



No. Class. Length. Serv. Trucks 



I taj ton & Troy 

1 layt'n Cov.&Piqua 



Denver & Int 4 



Denv. C. Tramw. 



Douglas St. Ry.. . 2 

Duluth St. Ry 15 

Eastern Pa. Ry.. 5 
East St. Louis. ... 6 
East St. Louis & 

Suburban 200 

East Shore & Sub. 2 
E. Ohio Trac. Co. 2 
Eastern Wisconsin 

Ry. & Lt. Co... 3 

Easton Trans. Co. 6 

8 

Elgin & Belvidere. 3 

Elmira Wat. Lt. & 

R. R I 

El Paso Elec. Rv. 4 
4 
Erie Trac. Co ... . 2 
Fairmont & 

Clarksburg 1 



Farmington St. Ry. 1 
Forest City Ry... 50 
Ft. Dodge Des 

Moines & So.. 1 
10 
2 
Fort Wavne & 

Springfield 1 

Ft. Wavne&Wab. 

Val. Trac. Co. . . 6 
Fres Mfg. & Pwr. 

Co 2 

Gaiesburg & Ke- 

wanee 3 

G"lesb"rg Ry. & 

Lt. Co 2 

g 
Gait Prest. & Hes. 4 

Gary St. & Int... 2 
Ga. Ry. & Elec. 

Co 40 

Grand Rapids Ry. 10 
Gray's Harb. Elec. 

Co 1 

3 
Gulfport & Miss. 

Coast Tr. Co... 3 

Hagerstown R.Co. 1 
Halifax Electric 

Tramway 4 

Hanover & Mc- 
Sherrystown Co. 1 



Havana Cent 

Holyoke St. Ry. . . 

Houston Elec. Co. 
Hudson Valley . . 
Hull Electric Co.. 

Humboldt Tr. Co. 
111. Trac. Sys 



III. Tunnel Co. 
111. Valley Ry. 



Ind. Col. & East. 

Ind. Union Trac. Co. 
Indpls. & Cinn. Tr. 
Indpls. & East 

tnd. & Louisv 



Interb. R. Tr. Co. 116 



Intern. Ry. Co. 



Pass 25-0 

Open ....42-0 

Fit 50-0 

Semi- 
corn 38-10^ 

Semi- 

conv. 4u-13 4 

Flat .22-0 



Trail 

Pass. 



Semiconv 

Tass. ..46-7% 

Semiconv 

Pass 30-0 



Coal 

48-0 

! 'ass 45-0 



City 

int. ' 

City 

I !itj 
Citv 
City 
City 
Int. 
City 
Int. 
Int. 

city 



Semiconv. . . . 
Semiconv. ..40-1 
Semiconv. .30-1 
49-6 

Closed 

Open 

Semiconv. 40-0 

Open 42-0 

Flat 36-0 

Exp 



Both 

lui 

Citv 

Int. 

City 
Int. 
Citj 

Citv 



Exp 50-0 

Semiconv. . . . 

Pass 30-1 

Semiconv. .32-0 

Pass 37-0 

Open 32-0 

Pass 55-0 

Loco 36-5 

Box 

31-8 



Int. 
Int. 

Int. 

Int. 
City 
City 

City 

Int. 
City 
Int. 



City 
City 



Semiconv. 36-4 
Trailer .40-4% 
Frt 36-0 

Open 



Exp 24-0 

Line 24-0 

Box 

Open 40-0 

Closed ...40-0 
Semiconv. II -6 

Pass 51-0 

Pass 29-0 

Semiconv. .41-6 

Pass 34-0 

Loco 



Exp. . . 
Exp. . . 
Etefrig. 
Pass. 



Cit J 
Int. 
Int. 



Citv 
Citv 
City 
Int. 
City 

r.ntii 

City 
Int. 
City 
Int. 
.Int. 
Int. 
Int. 
Citv 
Int. 
Int. 
.Int. 
Int. 



Loco 

Flat 

49-6 

Loco 31-4 

Frt 23-6 

Exp 32-0 

Pass 61-6 

Pass 55-0 

Exp 

Exp 



Comb 

Pass 50-4 

Frt 50-0 



57-8 

57-8 

Fit 50-0 

Pass. ...47-% 
Pass. ...41-V, 
St. Pass.. 51-% 



Int. 
Int. 
Int. 
Int. 

Int. 

Int. 
Int. 
Elev 
F'ev 
Sub, 



S. T.Barney & Smith 

D. T Wasnn 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T. .Woeber Bros. 

D. T rewetl 

S. T Co. Shops 

D. T. .Woeber Bros. 
D. T. .Woeber Bros. 

D. T Brill 

D. T Cincinnati 

D. T Cincinnati 

D. T Brill 

D. T. . .Am. Car. Co. 
D. T. Twin* 'ity Shops 

D. T Cincinnati 

D. T. .American Car 



Inter-State 
. . .St. Louis 
Niles 



D. T Cincinnati 

D. T Brill 

S. T Brill 

D. T Niles 



Kuhlman 

Kuhlman 

St. Louis 

Brill 

.Erie Car Wks. 



Brill 

lewett 

Brill 

. . . .Wason 

St. Louis 



D. T Niles 

D. T Niles 

D. T St. Louis 



.Co. Shops 
Cincinnati 



.Kuhlman 

. . I lanville 
. .Danville 
.. .Ottawa 
. . .Ottawa 
. .Danville 



D. T. 



D. T. .American Car 
D. T. .American Car 
D. T Co. Shops 

S. T Ottawa 

S. T Co. Shops 

S. T Co. Shops 

..McGuin -Cummings 

D. T Wason 

D. T Wason 

D. T St. Louis 

D. T Niles 

. .Ottawa 

. .Ottawa 

I [olman 

D. T Danville 

S. T Danville 

D. T..Am.C. & F. Co. 
D. T..Am.C. & F. Co. 
D. T..Am.C. & F. Co. 
D. T..Am.C. & F. Co. 
D. T.. American Car 

D. T Danville 

D. T Danville 

D. T Danville 

S. T Danville 

Jeffrey 

Westinghouse 

Bettendorf 

I>. T. .American Car 
.Co. Shops 
.Co. Shops 
.Co. Shops 
.Cincinnati 
.Cincinnati 
Co. Shops 
Cincinnati 
.Cincinnati 
.Cincinnati 

Niles 

Niles 



•D. T. 
D. T. 
D. T. 



D. T. 



D. T 

D. T Jewett 

D, T Jewett 

D T Jewett 

D. T St. Louis 

D. T Wason 

D. T. Am.C. & F. Co. 
Kuhlman 



Jacksonville Elec. 
Johnstown Pass.. 
Joplin & Pitts... 

Kan. City Ry.& Lt. 
Kenosha Elec. Rv. 
Key West Elec. Co. 
Laconia St. Ry. . . 
La Crosse i 'ity Ry. 
I.aFayette & Lo- 
gansport Trac. 

Lake Chas. St. Ry. 

Lerdo & Torreon 

Elec. Ry 



Lewiston Aug. & 

Waterv 

Lexington Ry. Co. 
Lima & Tol. Trac. 



Little Rock R. & 

Elec. Co 7 

Los.Ang.&Redondo 1 

1 
Louisville & East. . 2 
4 
Louisville & Nor. 4 
Louisville Ry. Co. 50 
Lynchburg Trac. 

& Lt. Co 4 

Mahoning & She- 
nango Ry. & Lt. 

Co 10 

Manch. & Derry 

St. Ry 6 

Mankato Elec. Co. 3 
Marquette Co. Gas 

& Elec. Co 2 

Mass. Elec. Co... 15 
12 
10 



Meadv. Conneaut 

Lake & Linesv.. 5 
Memphis St. Ry. . 15 
Meridian L. & Ry. 

Co 5 

Metropolitan St. 

Rv.(KansasCity) 25 
Met. West Side 

Elev 20 

Mexico Elec 25 

Michigan United 

Rvs. Co 10 

Miliord&Uxbridge 2 
Milwaukee Elec. 

Ry. & Lt 10 

Mineral WellsElec. 6 
Monterey Ry. Lt. 

& Power 20 

Mont. St. Ry 1 

10 
15 
Morris Co. Tr. Co. 6 
Niagara Gorge... 2 
Nashv.Rv.&Lt.Co. 15 
Nat'l City & Otay 4 
Newton & N. W. 10 
1 
N. T. Aub. & 

Lansing 10 

N. T. & Queen's 

County 40 

N. T. City Rv....l56 

120 



Norf. & So 

No. Ohio Trac. & 
Lt. Co 



Northern Elec. 



Oakland Traction 20 



Class. Length. Serv. Trucks. 



Open 
« Uosed 



City 
Int. 
City 



Semiconv 38-0 



37-8 

Open 35-0 

Close! ...30-0 

Pass. ... 

Frt 

Open 35-0 

Closed ...30-0 
30-0 



City 

Int. 
City 



Semiconv. 42-0 

Pass 55-0 

Semiconv. 21-0 



Pass 31-0 

Open 35-0 

Semiconv 

rass.&Ex.47-0 

Pass 47-u 

Motor 30-0 

Exp 



Int. 
Int. 

Citv 
Int. 
City 
Citv 



.31-6 

.46-3 



Comb, 
Box. 



Pass 36-0 

Pass 39-9 

Pass 40-9 

Pass 32-1 

Exp 39-4 

Coal 30-0 



St miconv. 40-2 
Semiconv 



Int. 

Both 
Both 
City 

Both 



Ctt>y 
Elev. 



Pav-As-You- 

Enter 

Pav-As-You- 
Enter .51-10 

Frt 33-0 

Frt 33-0 

Semiconv 

Semiconv 

Pass 42-0 

Pass 51-6 

Pass 53-0 

Exp 53-0 



City 

Both 

l'.oth 



City 
Int. 
Int. 
Int. 



Pav-as-You- 

Enter ..48-0 
Pass 

Semiconv. .30-8 

Comb 

Closed 

Frt 

Open 

Pass 45-5 



Conv 43-0 

Semiconv. 38-0 

Box 32-0 

Exp 50-0 

Pass 56-0 



Int. 
Ce- 
city 
Int. 
Int. 
Int. 
Int. 
Int. 
City 
Int. 



liuildei. 



Brill 

Kuhlman 

Jewett 

Jewett 

.... St. Louis 

Kuhlman 

Jewett 

Laconia 

.American Car 



... Cincinnati 
... Cincinnati 

.American Car 



Brill 
Brill 
Brill 
.Brill 



Brill 

Brill 

.Cincinnati 
.Cincinnati 
. .St. Louis 
..St. Louis 



St. Louis 

Co. Shops 

Co. Shops 

Co. Shops 

McGuire-Cum. 
Am.C. & F. Co. 
Am.C. & F. Co. 
St. Louis 



Brill 



. . .Jewett 
.Kuhlman 
. Kuhlman 
.Kuhlman 
. .Danville 
. . Laconia 



.Southern Car 
. . . . St. Louis 



D. T. 



.Toronto Ry. 



D. T Co. Shops 

D. T. Dom.C.& F. Co. 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T.Am. C. &F. Co. 

D. T Kuhlman 

D. T Brill 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T Niles 

D. T Niles 

D. T Jewett 

Am. C. & F. Co. 



30-0 

Semiconv. .30-0 
Trail ...47-1% 



City 
City 
Elev. 
Int. 



Comb 

Pass 

Calif 50-0 



T Brill 

T Brill 

T Brill 

T Brill 

T Brill 

T Brill 

T Kuhlman 

T Kuhlman 

T Kuhlman 

T Niles 

T Niles 

T St. Louis 

T Cincinnati 

T Co. Shops 

St. Louis 

..Am. C. & F. Co. 

T Brill 

T St. Louis 

T Kuhlman 

T.Am. C. & F. Co. 

T St. Louis 

T St. Louis 

St. Louis 

T Co. Shops 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 

ROLLING STOCK EQUIPMENT ORDERED IN 1907— Continued. 



Oakland Tractio 



Ogden R. T. C 
Okla. City Ry. 



Omaha Lincoln & 

Beatrice 1 

Ore. Elec. Ry 8 

Ottawa Elec. Ry. 12 



Co. 



Peeksklll Ltg. & 
R. R 

Penn .V- Franklin. 

Peoples St. Ry. Co. 

Petaluma & Santa 
Rosa 

Phila. Rap. Trans. 



, \i 



Pittsburg McKsp. 
& Greensb. Ry. . 

Pittsburg Rys 

Pitts. I hum. But- 
ler & N. Castle. 

Pittstield Elec. St. 
Ry 



Ponce Ry.& Lt.Co. 
Port Arthur Elec. 

Ry. Lt. & Tel. 

i !ommr 

Portland Ry. Lt. 

& Power Co 



Portland Ry. 



Calif 55-0 

Calif 

Coach 

Flat 

Pass Int. 

Pass City- 
Loco 



29-7% 

Motor ...59-8 

Loco 31-1 

Open 30-0 

Closed ...32-0 
Flat 

Pass 45-0 



City 
Int. 
Int. 
City 
City 



r.uiM.'i 




Pueblo & Sub. 

Trac. & Ltg. Co. 

Pugel Sd. Elec. Ry. 



Que. Rv. Lt. & 
Power Co 30 

Radford Water 
Power Co 1 

Raleigh Elee 3 

Rhode Island Co.. 30 

Richmond Lt. & 
R. R 20 

Roanoke Ry. & 
Elec. Co 2 

Rochester Syra- 
cuse & East 2 

Rockford & Int... 4 

Rockland Thomas- 
ton & Camden.. 2 

Sacramento Elec. 
Gas & Ry 44 

St. Jos. Rv. Lt. 

Ht. & Pwr.' 10 

10 

San Antonio Trac. 
Co 10 

San Bernardino 
Valley Trac 2 

San Diego Elec. 
Ry 12 

San Fran. Vallejo 
& Xapa Val 2 



Sangamon Val. Co. 1 
San .Tose & Santa 
Clara County. . . 12 

Sarnia St. Ry 1 

Savannah Elec. . . 4 
Schenectady Ry. . . 6 



Seattle-Everett 
Int. Ry 

Sea View R. R. . . 

Shawinigan Falls 
Ter. Ry 

Shebovgan Lt. 
Pow. & Ry. Co. 

Sherbrooke St. Ry. 
Sioux City Trac. 



Box 
Flat 
Flat 
Flat 



Klo 

Elec. 

Pass 



40-0 

41-0 

36-0 

41-0 

. . .Open 
....43-0 
Loco ... . 



.40-0 



Trail 50-0 

Parlor 55-0 



City 
City 

City 
City- 
City 
Int. 
Int. 
Int. 
Int. 



Semiconv. 
Semiconv. 

Pass 

Exp 



. .Co. Shops 

. .Co. Shops 

Co. Shops 

Co. Shops 

. St Louis 

.i'.i Shops 

Co. Shops 

Co. SliOpS 



St. Louis 

. I i • W i • 1 I 

.Gen. Elec. 

....( ittawa 

i ittawa 

Co. Shops 

. .Kuhlman 



.McGuire-Cummings 

St. Louis 

Brill 



Pi essed Si eel 



T Wason 

T Wason 

. . . .Co. Shops 



. i ittawa 



.... Co. Shops 

.... Interstate 

Hicks 

Hicks 

.American Car 
.American Car 
.Gen. Elec. Co. 

Co. Shops 

.American Car 
.American Car 



.Woeber Bros. 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 



. . Rathbun 

Brill 

. . Southern 

Wason 

. .Co. Shops 

. Stephenson 



..56-0 
..56-0 
..55-0 
..40-0 



Semiconv. 
Semiconv. 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 4 

Exp 

Pass 

Cable 

Cable 

Frt 



28-0 
45-6 
.30-0 



Int. 

Int. 
Int. 
Int. 



City 
City 
City 
City 



City 
Int. 
City 



D. T Kuhlman 



Xiles 

Niles 

Niles 

. . . .St. Louis 

. . . .St. Louis 

Ottawa 

...Co. Shops 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Jewett 

....St. Louis 
...Co. Shops 
. . .Co. Shops 
. . .Co. Shops 



.Can. Gen. Elec. Co. 

5. T Cincinnati 

D T Cincinnati 

J. T Ottawa 



Sioux City Trac. 

Co 4 

So. Chgo. City Ry. 4 
11 
Southwest Mo. . . 8 
Southwestern Trac. 

Co 6 

Spokane & Inland 

Empire 75 

14 

50 

80 

Spokane Trac. Co. 15 

Springfield Ry. & 



Springfield (Mo.) 
St. Ry 



Springfield Consol. 

Ry 5 

Steuben. & B. I.a 

Ry. & Light Co. 3 
Stroudsb'g ,V Wal. i 

Gap St. Ry 2 

Syracuse .\ Sub.. 1 
Syracuse L. S. & N. 7 
Syracuse R. T. Ry. 2.", 
Tacoma Ry. & 

Power Co 18 

1 
Tampa Elec. Co.. 12 

Tampa .V- Sulphur 
Springs Trac. . . 6 

Terre Haute Ind. 
& East 4 



Texas Trac. Co.. 15 



Toledo Fostoria & 
Findlay 1 

Tol. Pt. Clinton & 
Lakeside 5 

Toledo Urban & 
Int 

Topeka Ry 8 

Toronto Ry 100 

Toronto & York 



Class. Length. Serv. Trucks. 



City 

Int. 
Int. 



Pass. . 

Box . . . 
Loco. . 
Box . . . 

Flat . . 
Detroit 

Closed 
Open 



City 

Int. 

Int. 
Int. 
Int. 
City 



Pass. 
Loco. 
Pass. 



Int. 
Int. 
City 
City 

Both 



Semiconv 

53-0 

Box 36-0 

Caboose 

I -oco 



D. T. 



Co. Shops 

Indp.&Cin.Tr. 

Co. Shops 

Co. Shops 

Ottawa 



Seattle t'ai 

Westinghouse 

. .Fitz-Hugh, Luther 

Kit/. Hugh, Luthei 

D. T St. Louis 



S. T.. American Car 

D. T Kul 

D T Brill 

I>. T Co. Shops 

I .. T < Jincinnati 

D. T Kuhlman 

D. T lewett 

D. T Co. Shops 

D. T Brill 

S T. lewett 

MeGi ummings 

D. T lew el t 

D. T JeW't t 

S. T Cincinnati 

D. T Jewett 

D T Co. Shops 



S. T. 



.American Car 
.American Car 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Co. Shops 

Niles 

. . Georgia Car 

. . .Georgia Car 
Co. Shops 



32-0 

Pav-As-You- 
Enter 



Toronto Sub. Ry 



Trans-St. Mary's 

Trac. Co 2 

Tri-City Ry. Co.. 20 
Trinidad Elec. . . 1 

Twin City 70 

Union Elec. Co. . . 3 
LTnion Trac. Co. 

of Kansas 2 

Union Trac. Co. 

(Cal.) 5 

United Rys. (St. 

Louis* 100 

United Trac. Co.. 25 
Utah Lt. & Ry.. • 50 
3 
Va. Pass. & Power 

Co 20 

Visalia Elec. Rv. . 1 
Walla Walla \ 

Trac. . . .- 1 

Warren-Bisbee Ry. 6 
Wash. Baltimore & 

Annapolis 19 



Washington Ry. & 
Elec. Co 25 

Washington Water 
Power Co 1 



Wausau St. Ry. . . 

W. Chester St. Ry 

West Jersey & Sea 

Shore 10 



Western Ry. & Lt. 



Co. 



Pass. 
Frt. . 
Pass. 
Pass. 
Exp. 



.55-0 
.45-0 
.32-6 
.28-6 
.35-0 



Semiconv. II -9 

Pass 34-0 

Loco 30-0 

Pass. ..46-7% 
Box 30-0 



Int. 
Int. 
Int. 
Int. 
Int. 

City 
City 

Int. 
City 
City 



p. T Niles 

i i. T IlieksL.&C.Wk. 



T Co. Shops 

T Co. Shops 

T Co. Shops 

T.TorontoRy.C.Co. 

T Co. Shops 

T Co. Shops 

. T Brill 

T Co. Shops 

. T Co. Shops 

. T Co. Shops 

T Danville 

American Car 



City 
City 



Closed ...60-0 
Pass. & B.54-0 
Ex. & Sw.54-0 



Int. 
Int. 
Int. 



.30-0 
.32-0 
55-0 
.21-0 
.42-9 



City 
City 
Int. 
City 

Int. 

Int. 
Int. 

Int. 
Int. 



Frt 48-11 Int. 



Western Ohio . . 
Whatcom Co. Ry 

& Lt. Co 1 Loco 

1 I Fxp ..... 

2 Coach City 



. Co. Shops 
.Jones' Sons 
. . .St. Louis 
. . . Baldwin 



. . .Xiles 
...Xiles 
. . .Xiles 



S. T. McGuire-Cum. 
S T. McGuire-Cum. 
D. T. McGuire-Cum. 

S T Cincinnati 

D. T Brill 



.Am. C. &F. Co. 

Wason 

Wason 

Wason 



. . .Danville 
. . .Danville 
.Co. Shops 

Co. Shops 
Co. Shops 
. . . .Jewett 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



ROLLING STOCK EQUIPMENT ORDERED IN 1907— Con- 
tinued. 



No. Class. Length. Serv. 



Whatcom Co. Ry. 

& Light Co 3 

3 
Wheeling Trac. . . 1 
Wilkesbarre & Ha- 

zelton 1 

Willamette Valley 

Trac S 

Williamsport Pass. 

Ry 4 

Wind. Essex & L. 

Shore Rap. Ry. . 5 
Winnipeg Elec.Ry. 28 



Winona Int. Ry. 
Winona Rv. & Lt. 

Co 

Worcest. & Holden 

St. Ry. Co 

Worcester Consol. 



20 



St. Ry. 



York Rys. Co. 



Dump . . . 
Flat .... 
Semiconv. 



Pass. . 
Pass. . 
Pass. . 


..55-0 
..42-0 
..42-0 


Pass. . 


..28-0 


Flat . . 


..32-0 


Open . 
Closed 
Closed 
Exp. . . 


..46-0 
..41-0 
..45-0 



Int. 
City 
City 
Int. 



Citv 
City 
Int. 



Pass. 
Pass. 
Pass. 



.30-6 
.51-3 

.50-0 

.50-0 
.50-0 
.50-0 



.Oliver Mfg. Co. 

Co. Shops 

Kuhlman 



Co. Shops 
. . . Jewett 
Brill 



. . . .Ottawa 
.Co. Shops 

Ottawa 

. . . .Jewett 



S. T. McGui 



D. T. 
D. T. 



.Co. Shops 



D. T. 



Brill 

Brill 

Brill 

Wason 

D. T. McGuire-Cum. 

D. T..Am. C. & F. Co. 

S. T..Am. C. & F. Co. 

D. T Niles 

D. T Niles 



D. T. 



Niles 

Niles 

Niles 



RECEIVERSHIPS AND FORECLOSURES DURING 1907. 



The list of electric railways for which receivers were 
appointed in 1907 shows plainly the effect of the condition of 
the money market. Most of the companies which became 
involved in financial troubles were small, but they include 
both established systems and new lines under construction 
which found themselves unable to meet obligations because 
of the inability to raise capital to prosecute their plans as 
stringency in the money market became more acute. 

The most serious receivership proceedings inaugurated 
during the year were those involving the New York City 
Railway and the Metropolitan Street Railway of New York. 
As the investigations before the public service commission, 
first district, have disclosed, the difficulties of these com- 
panies were deep-seated. Although they culminated in the 
troublous times of last year, the causes were in nowise related 
to current conditions. The distress of these companies, fur- 
nishing urban transportation in one of the most densely 
settled passenger traffic territories in the world, had their 
foundation in abnormal overcapitalization and manipulation. 
While no one can say at this time how long the receivership 
of these properties will last, it is believed that the allied 
lines forming the other principal part of the Interborough- 
Metropolitan Company will not be involved in the drastic pro- 
ceedings to which resort has been had for the leading surface 
roads in the merger. 

It was anticipated that the receivership of the Chicago 
Union Traction Company, which has continued for nearly 
five years in the second largest city in the country, would be 
ended in 1907, but the difficulty of reconciling the various 
interests prevented the consummation of the reorganization 
of this property. Although the formal receivership may last 
for an indefinite time, complete arrangements have now been 
made for the reorganization of this property. 

The list of receiverships established in 1907 shows a total 
of 26 roads operating 972 miles of track and having outstand- 
ing $87,262,500 bonds and $86,525,195 stock, making an aggre- 
gate capitalization for all of the companies of $173,787,695. 
The companies follow: 

Receiverships Established in 1907. 

Miles 
Railway— of track. Stock. Bonds. 

Auburn & Turner Railroad, Lewis- 
ton, Me 9 $ 100,000 $ 5,000 

Vicksburg (Miss.) Railway & 

Light Company 9 500,000 325,000 



Southern Light & Traction Com- 
pany, Natchez, Miss 7 

Indianapolis Newcastle & Toledo 
Electric Ry.. Newcastle, Ind..l40 

Canyon City Florence & Royal 
Gorge Railroad, Canyon City, 
Colo 

Mineral Wells (Tex.) Electric 
System 6 

Missouri Water Light & Traction 
Company, Nevada. Mo 4 

Winnebago Traction Company, 
Oshkosh, Wis 38 

Mattoon (111.) City Railway— Cen- 
tral Illinois Traction Com- 
pany, Mattoon, 111 14 

North Jacksonville Street Railway 
Town & Improvement Com- 
pany, Jacksonville, Fla 6 

Atlantic City & Suburban Trac- 
tion Co., Pleasantville, N. J.. 15 

Catskill (N. Y.) Electric Railway 6 

Washington Traction Company, 
South Charleston. 14 

Mt. Mansfield Electric Railroad, 
Stowe, Vt 12 

Trenton Lakewood & Atlantic 
Railway, Trenton, N. J 40 

Conneaut & Erie Traction Com- 
pany, Erie, Pa 35 

Shelbyville & Ohio River Electric 
Railroad 

New York City Railway 517 

Metropolitan Street Railway, New 
York 

Wilmington New Castle & South- 
ern Railway 14 

Indianapolis Huntington Colum- 
bia City & Northwestern 
Railway, Indianapolis 

Washington Arlington & Falls 
Church Railway, Rosslyn, Va. 25 

Syracuse & South Bay Railway, 
Syracuse, N. Y 

Cleveland & Sharon Electric Ry.. 41 

Pittsburg & Allegheny Valley 
Railway, Pittsburg, Pa 20 



456,700 340,000 

3,500,000 4,500,000 



1,500,000 



50,000 



100,000 

650,000 966,000 

500,000 490,000 



750,000 
138,000 



75M, i 

132,000 



510 

80,000 

800,000 

150,000 
20,000,000 

52,000,000 

329,985 

1,500,000 

100,000 

120,000 
2,500,000 



200,000 



1,000,000 
1,761,000 

70,814,000 

300,000 

200,000 

350,000 

300,000 
2,500,000 



750,000 1,100,000 



Totals 972 $86,525,195 $87,262,500 

The difficulties of the Atlantic City & Suburban Traction 
Company were the result of too heavy a bonded debt and of 
competition. It is expected that the property will be sold 
under foreclosure in March and returned to its owners. The 
receivership of the Catskill Electric Railway followed fore- 
closure of the mortgage on the property. The Mt. Mansfield 
Electric Railroad was placed in the hands of a receiver early 
in the year, but was sold under foreclosure in December and 
will be reorganized and established anew. The Trenton 
Lakewood & Atlantic Railway, the Shelbyville & Ohio River 
Electric Railroad, the Indianapolis Newcastle & Toledo Elec- 
tric Railway, and the Indianapolis Huntington Columbia City 
& Northwestern Railway were under construction. The Au- 
burn & Turner Railroad has been in the hands of a receiver 
since May 16, 1907, and all bills since that time have been 
paid and the receivers have expended $1,500 on improve- 
ments and have had a considerable cash balance in the bank 
at all times. Nothing has been done toward disposing of the 
property by sale owing to conditions of the money market, but 
there are several possible buyers for the road. 

The receivership of the Vicksburg Railway & Light Com- 
pany was caused by the financial condition of the company 
and disagreement among those who controlled it. The South- 
ern Light & Traction Company of Natchez, Miss., was placed 
in the hands of a receiver on account of a decision of the 
Mississippi supreme court declaring that the company was 
operating in violation of the anti-trust law of that state. The 
property of the Rockland South Thomaston & Owl's Head 
Railway of Lewiston, Me., was sold at foreclosure, but the 
court refused to confirm the sale and no subsequent sale has 
been held. The Canyon City Florence & Royal Gorge Inter- 
urban Railway of Canyon City, Colo., was placed in the hands 
of a receiver in January. The property has not been sold at 



January 4, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



foreclosure or otherwise, but it is being purchased as needed 
and found useful by the Canyon City & Royal Gorge Railway. 
which is building an electric line from Canyon City to the 
top of the Royal Gorge, 25 miles. No assumption of the 
property of the old company is contemplated by the new com- 
pany. The Mineral Wells Electric System was not incor- 
porated and no stock or bonds were outstanding on the 
property. 

The receivership of the Mattoon City Railway and of the 
Central Illinois Traction Company resulted from the serious 
wreck on the interurban line between Mattoon and Charleston 
in August last. Plans are being made for the settlement of 
the difficulties of the company and it is probable that the lines 
will be restored to their owners before long. The Syracuse 
& South Bay Railway of Syracuse. X. V., went through fore- 
closure proceedings in February and the property was pur- 
chased by C. D. Beebe and transferred to the Syracuse & 
South Bay Electric Railroad. This company is now engaged 
in completing the road, which will be a double-track line from 
Syracuse to South Bay, a distance of 12 miles, and will, it is 
expected, be in operation on or before June 1, 190S. At the 
time of foreclosure only one track had been laid and it' was 
in an uncompleted condition. 

The number of foreclosure sales is much smaller than 
the list of receiverships. As conditions in the money market 
became more acute as the year progressed, there was less 
encouragement for roads which had sought the protection of 
the courts to re-establish their corporate positions than if all 
conditions had been favorable. The following shows the list 
of foreclosure sales in the year: 

Foreclosure Sales in 1907. 

Miles 

Railway — of track 

X'ewtown (Pa.) Electric Street 

Railway 28 

Hudson Pelham & Salem Electric 

Railway 29 

Henderson (Ky.) City Railway... 10 
Rockland South Thomaston & 

Owl's Head Railway -1 

Syracuse & South Bay Railway, 

Syracuse, X. Y 

Mr. .Mansfield Electric Railroad. 

Stowe, Vt 12 

Philadelphia & Easton Railway, 

Doylestown, Pa 33 

Chicago Electric Traction Co 31 

South Middlesex Street Railway, lri 
Chicago General Railway 21 

Totals 184 $4,660,510 $4,717,500 

The Newtown Electric Street Railway was acquired in 
the interest of the Newtown Langhorn & Bristol Street Rail- 
way and was afterward acquired by the new Bucks County 
Electric Railway, which acquired several connecting proper- 
ties in and near Newtown, Pa. The Hudson Pelham & Salem 
Electric Railway had been in the hands of a receiver since 
December 11, 1904. When the receiver was appointed the 
company had $365,000 bonds and a like amount of stock out- 
standing; but the property was sold at foreclosure on July 19. 
1907, and was purchased by the Hudson Pelham & Salem 
Street Railway Company, which with the same mileage has 
issued $200,000 bonds and $200,000 stock. The sale at fore- 
closure of the property of the Chicago Electric Traction Com- 
pany ended a receivership which had lasted since 1900. The 
property was acquired in the interest of the Chicago & South- 
ern Traction Company, which is building a line to Kankakee 
and had been operating over the tracks of the Chicago Elec- 
tric Traction Company in order to secure a Chicago entrance. 
The property of the Chicago General Railway had also been 
in the hands of a receiver since 1900. 



CLASS I TRUCK USED AT OAKLAND. 



;. Stock. 


Bonds. 


$ 300,000 


$ 300,000 


365,000 
250,000 


365,000 
150,000 




100,000 


120,000 


300,000 


510 


200,000 


1,025,000 

2,000,000 

100,000 

500,000 


825,000 

650,000 

100,000 

1,727,500 



A special type of truck known as the "Class I" truck is 
used on all city equipments of the Oakland Traction Com- 
pany at Oakland, Cal. From the illustration presented it 
will be noted that the principal side members of this de- 
sign of truck are channel iron sections cut out at the ends 
to saddle over the journal boxes. No springs are used in 
the truck except those nested between the truck bolster and 
the transom. The truck bolster is a single casting made 
to move vertically within the confines of the transom. It 




Oakland Traction Company — Class I Truck for City Service. 

is supported by seven coil springs mounted as shown in 
the illustration. This type of truck has an advantage in 
that a large proportion of its parts are structural steel sec- 
tions, which can be purchased in the open market and assem- 
bled with facility. These trucks as described and illustrated 
are built complete in the Emeryville shops of the Oakland 
Traction Company. Each truck carries two GE-70 motors. 



The Nashville Interurban Railway, which is building from 
Nashville to Franklin, Tenn., has closed a power contract 
with the Nashville Railway & Light Company. 



It is announced that the Vtah Light & Railway Company, 
Salt Lake City. Utah, will begin this summer the erection of 
a 10,000-horsepower power plant at the Devil's Gate, on prop- 
erty owned by the Harriman interests, and that its construc- 
tion will cost about $500,000. 



to 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



SHOP PRACTICE OF THE ALLEGHENY VALLEY STREET 
RAILWAY. 



BY II. V. MENTZEL, MASTER MECHANIC. 



The Allegheny Valley Street Railway Company operates an 
interurban line from Natrona to Aspinwall, Pa., 19 miles, and 
a local line from Natrona to New Kensington, 7.8 miles. These 



four local cars, but as the traffic is heavy on Saturday and Sun- 
day we sometimes need our entire equipment out on the road. 
On days of heavy travel, we couple our multiple-unit cars, 
running them in 2-car trains. Frequently three or four extra 
cars are required for special runs during the afternoon and 
evening. 

All our repair work is done in the daytime, so that the 
night shop men act only as inspectors, except for such light 




Allegheny Shop Practice— Changing Wheels from Single-Truck 
Car. 

are both single-track lines laid with 7-inch girder rail. The in- 
terurban division has a double overhead trolley, which con- 
struction required no switches at regular turnouts. Believing 
that some of the shop practices on this line may be of interest 
to those engaged in similar work on other lines, I shall 
describe in detail our methods of inspection and repair work. 

Rolling Stock. 
The equipment which is now operated includes ten 45-foot 
double-truck cars. Each of these cars is equipped with four 



Allegheny Shop Practice — View of Wheels Being Raised from 
Repair Pit. 

duties as oiling cars, changing trolley wheels and adjusting 
brakes. 

Car House Inspection — Night. 

Our night men do no armature changing or repairing, unless 
it is a trivial repair such as a burned-off motor lead or brush 
spring or a controller finger. 

As each car is taken off the road at night it is run over a 
pit by the inspectors and the brakes are adjusted, if necessary. 
Then the motors are inspected for armature clearance and all 




Allegheny Shop Practice — Method of Supporting Body and Truck When Changing Wheels on Interurban Equipment. 



Westinghouse 101-B motors. The control on eight of the cars 
is the Westinghouse electro-pneumatic type and on the other 
two cars the General Electric type M control is used. There 
are also ten 31-foot single-truck cars with Westinghouse No. 
68 m'otors and B-23 controllers and two 28-foot single-truck cars 
with Westinghouse 38-B motors and K-ll controllers. The 
voltage on the line is 550. 

The regular week-day schedule requires six interurban and 



bolts gone over and if car is equipped with air the pump motor 
is shut off and the air reservoir drained. We have a bulletin 
board placed in the shop, and if a car is found to have low 
armature bearings and bad shoes the inspector does not renew 
the shoes or inspect the car further. He runs it off the pit 
track and devotes his time to other cars. He then marks up 
the car on the bulletin board, thus: 

"Car No. 39 low armature bearings No. 2, motor, bad shoes. 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



11 



not inspected." This car remains marked up this way until re- 
paired, then is marked up, "Car No. 39, O. K." 

Starting Cars from Car House. 

All interurban cars are known by numbers and local cars 
by letters and a list is hung up in the crew room each morning, 
showing which car goes on any run, and where placed, 
thus: 

"Car No. 34, run No. 2, time 5:02 a. m., No. 4 track, operat- 
ing barn. 

"Car No. 17, run No. A, time 5:27 a. m.. No. 2 track, storage 
barn." 

No car washing is done at night. The cleaner sweeps all 
cars, keeping up fires and cleaning cuspidors. All cab win- 



A. V. St. Ry. Co. £j£w? 

INSPECTION CARD 

Time 7 P M 
Car No.O / Date /2-^J' / 



Mm ni; 

No. 4 



I ATTERIK' 

ANf> 

CONTROL 



it § 









7? ft - i 




19 lj 

(PiX elk***!!'* iri&<$. 

(L 




....A^..p£i./TvLAsw<y^ 



Allegheny Shop Practice — Car Inspection Report. 

dows in the car are cleaned first, the remaining time is then 
devoted to cleaning body windows. 

Inspection — Daylight. 

Inspection of cars with Westinghouse multiple control is 
made about every seven days. Each car is provided with hose 
connections for air and the inspector first blows out the motors 
and all the control apparatus. The brakes and trucks are in- 
spected next. Then armature clearance. 

The batteries for the control are next inspected and re- 
filled, if necessary, and every 30 days they are removed and re- 
charged as the charging given them by pump motors varies 
according to time the pump motor is operated. 

After this inspecting has been done, one man operates the 
control while another inspects the line switch, reverser and 
switch group. Any switches found coming in or dropping out 



of circuit slowly are removed and repaired. The fingers are 
adjusted and a drop light is held at back of the switches to 
facilitate the inspection of the contacts of the switches con- 
trolling the motor circuits. 

Next is the all inspectien. The supply pipe and train line 
are examined for leaks. Then the brake pipe is filled to 50 
pounds pressure and inspected. The brake valve is taken 
apart and oiled. The governor is inspected and its piston 
oiled, and if the governor is not cutting in and out properly, it 

is lest'! 

We have no printed forms for air brake shop tests. We 
use a typewritten form as illustrated. These are filled out and 
the records made when the air brake apparatus has had an 
overhauling. The blanks are kept for reference and also to 
encourage the repair man in doing good work. We have found 
that their use creates a rivalry among the men, each striving 
to have the best report on tight piping. We pay particular 
attention to the brake equipment. The illustration was made 
from actual report, and I think the report a good one. This 
test as reported was made after the pump had been cleaned 
with gasoline and filled with new oil. the brake cylinder had 
been oiled and cleaned and the piping inspected. 

Our air pumps and brake cylinders are taken from under 
the car every six months or as closely to that interval as pos- 
sible, cleaned and the necessary repairs made. Since equip- 
ping our cars we have changed the suction of the air pump and 



Allegheny Valley St. Ry. Co. 
Shop Test. Air Brakes. 

ir # J_£__ Date //'/?- 0/ Type 



^u^t . 



Pump ) Cut In b-5_ lbB . ) Pumped up from 

Covernor ) Cut out 75~ lbs ■ ) to £flbs . / MiygSee, 

Leaked from 76' Its. to 6>5~ lbs. 23 Ml. tyi? Sec. 

Brake pipe filled to SO lbs ■ Leaked to^-J/Mi . 17 Sen. 

Voltage Variation 500 v tbJ[25Y %f J'^y^rz^- 

— — — — • Inspector. 



Allegheny Shop Practice — Air Brake Inspection Report. 

piped it from the inside of the car. The suction pipe end is in 
a box S inches square having screened sides. This box is 
filled with curled hair and at each inspection the hair is re- 
moved and cleaned. 

After all control, motor and air apparatus has been in- 
spected and repaired, the oiling is done and an inspection card 
illustrated is filled out and given to the shop foreman. 

The inspection of G. E. type M control is made in the 
same manner. When two or three car trains are sent out 
from the shop, they are made up and the control is operated 
from each end of the train before being put into service. 

Changing Armatures. 

If an armature is to be removed it is secured to the upper 
half of the motor and lower half dropped. The armature is 
then removed with an armature jack. 

All our air equipped cars are provided with hose connec- 
tions. If we change an armature in a car not having air 
equipment, a hose is connected to any air car that may be 
handy so that all armatures when changed or fitted with new 
bearings may be blown out as well as the motors. 

We turn all our bearings to fit. When an armature shaft 
is badly worn it is turned off true with no attempt to standard- 
ize the sizes as we would not get enough of the same size to 
justify us in making special size mandrels. 

Changing Wheels. 

As the illustration shows, we have a section of our pit- 
track that is removable. We change the wheels on our double- 
truck cars without removing the trucks. Two long rack jacks 



12 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



are placed in the pit so that they will catch the axle inside 
of the gear wheels. 

On single-truck cars we place a timber across the trap and 
raise the motor off the axle with a turn-buckle. This puts the 
weight of the motor on the car body instead of on the truck. A 
jack is placed on each side of the car body and at the end 
where the wheels are to be changed. Then the body and the 
truck are raised until the weight is off the wheels. The pit 
jacks are then raised until the wheels are clear of the track, 
which is then removed. The old wheels are then dropped 
into the pit, rolled to one side and the new wheels are put in. 

It takes longer to remove gear cases, axle bearings and 
journal box bolts than it does to change wheels. Two men 
in our shop will change 3 pairs of wheels in 10 hours on the 
small cars. 

The wheels on large cars are changed in the same way, 
except that as the truck is not fastened to the body, as on our 
single-truck cars, we first lift the body clear of the truck. 
Then at one end we place barrels in the pit to support the 
truck, and at the other end a timber is placed across the end 
of the truck and supported on each side by jacks. We have 
had a great deal of trouble with chipped and broken flanges 






— #-1 


•0 


$i 






-^■3" 




£. 


1 





c&M>r/?>e tfofso //ass 2" '0/#M£ rs/? 



^L/rr ty/rs*£# 





them in conduit. The cross sills of cars, with the exception of 
end sills, are based for 1%-inch pipe conduit. We put three pipes 
lengthwise of the car, as shown by the sketch. The center pipe 
is used for the resistance leads and the two outer pipes contain 
the motor wires. These pipes are run within 8 inches of each 
end of the car body. From the end of the pipes the wires are 
carried to the controllers and resistances through the regular 
canvas hose. At the ends of the piping the wires are pro- 
tected with canvas hose to prevent chafing. 

The trolley ground wires are run under the car, the trol- 
ley connection on one side of the traps and the ground wire on 
the other. The wires of the different motors are put in in 



COI//V T£f 30^£0^ 



°C£/Vr£/P£D 

Allegheny Shop Practice — Scheme for Winding Heater Coils. 

from cast wheels and are changing to steel tired and rolled 
steel wheels as rapidly as possible. 

Car Washing. 

All car washing is done by daylight. Cars are placed on 
the washing track after having been swept out. Cars are 
washed roof and all with the hose. The body is washed 
with soap and rinsed and wiped dry with a chamois skin. The 
inside of car and cabs are washed in the same way, if neces- 
sary; the seats are removed and the dust is blown out with 
an air hose. 

Windows are cleaned last; we have been using "bon-ami" 
with success on windows. Cars are not washed at any stated 
time, the decision of the time being left to the barn foreman 
as cars are washed under his direction. 

Car Wiring. 

Our single-truck cars are all fitted with cross seats and no 
provision is made for running motor cables in the cars. For- 
merly we had considerable trouble with cable cutouts in wet 
weather, these being caused by water thrown by the wheels. 
To provide against the recurrence of such troubles, in fitting 
these cars for winter service we remove all cables and replace 




Allegheny Shop Practice — Arrangement of Conduits for Motor 
Wiring. 

separate pipes. We have neither had trouble from cables 
since making these changes nor do we expect any. 

Floors. 

Our cars have double floors and a special construction is 
used to make a satisfactory trap door of double thickness. An 
accompanying sketch shows our method of bolting together 
the two thicknesses in the trap doors. The underside of the 
upper flooring is grooved, % by 2 inches, 4 inches from the 
ends. In these grooves is placed an iron strap % by 2 inches 



4"xZ"//?af</ r 



£ "&!/?/?'*&£■ &0S- T 



Y 1 



/y^l. <?£>/?/ /V& 






W 





1 i i 

i i 


l ' ! I ' 




>©' ! 


i i ' r\ ' 

1 ' i Oi 




y\ \ \ 


! i ' 


l± 


f — k> ' 


1 !o| 


\ 


\ • ! 


! i ! 


i 


V! ; 


i 'i ! 


i 


:b! i 


1 ' i°! 


k : 


i i t > • 

^-r- i 



Allegheny Shop Practice — Details of Double Thickness Trap 
Doors. 

in section. Bolts, 3 by % inches, passing through the iron hold 
the double flooring together. A wood batten, 1 by 4 inches, is 
fastened underneath as shown. This construction affords a 
trap door that will not split lengthwise, a trouble often occur- 
ring in the usual form of trap. 

Rewinding Headlight Resistance. 

Accompanying sketches show our way of rewinding por- 
celain resistance tubes used in the resistance boxes of Crouse- 
Hinds arc headlights for 500-volt street railway circuits. One 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



L3 



block is removed, the tube put on, and the block replaced; 
the centering tube nuts are then drawn tight and the whole 
placed in a small lathe. Five minutes is all the time required 
to wind the wire on the tube. This scheme, while not original, 
is nevertheless handy. 

Trolley Wheels. 

We use Bayonet trolley harps only, and 6-inch felt-oiler 
trolley wheels made by the Detroit Trolley Wheel Company, 
When we receive new wheels, we put them in a tank filled with 
a light body oil, allowing them to remain there at least five 
hours. The tank is fitted with 24 hooks arranged along the 
side. When the wheels are lifted out of the oil a new axle pin 
is inserted in each one and they are then hung on the hooks 
until needed for a car. We always keep, in the storeroom. 
12 wheels fitted to their harps, so that when required for use 
all that it is necessary to do is to place one on d pole and fill the 
reservoir of the wheel with oil. We find that by soaking the 
wheels as described, we can wear 9 out of 10 wheels through 
and still have the bushings in good condition. The reason for 
this result is easily understood: When wheels are put in serv- 
ice without soaktag, the oil which is put in the reservoir is 
soaked up by the felt and none is left for future oiling, but if 
the wheels with felts in them are soaked first the oil finally 
put in is not taken up except to lubricate the bushing directly. 
This plan has given us excellent results. 



MEETING CALLED TO FORM CENTRAL ELECTRIC 
TRAFFIC ASSOCIATION. 



For the purpose of organizing a traffic association, a 
meeting of traffic officials of electric railways in the Central 
Electric territory will be held at the Algonquin hotel, Day- 
ton, 0., on January 22. The call for the meeting has been 
issued by F. D. Norveil, general passenger and freight agent 
of the Indiana Union Traction Company, Anderson, Ind. Mr. 
Norveil believes that the organization will be successfully 
established at this meeting and that it will prove to be of 
vast benefit to the electric railway interests in the territory 
which will be included, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, the southern 
part of Michigan and the northern part of Kentucky. Mr. Nor- 
veil's letter, an abstract of which follows, shows that the 
proposed traffic association will not only have the cordial 
support of the Central Electric Railway Association, but will 
be a part of that organization: 

Letter of F. D. Norveil. 

Pursuant to the call for a meeting for the purpose of 
forming a traffic organization, composed of the traffic officers 
of the various electric lines in Indiana, Ohio, part of Michigan, 
Illinois and Kentucky, comprising practically the same terri- 
tory as that which makes up the Central Passenger Associa- 
tion's territory, I would call your attention to the report of 
an impromptu meeting held at Indianapolis on November 20, 
1907. when the subject was informally discussed. In view of 
its favorable reception by the representatives of the lines 
present on that day. and the almost unanimous replies re- 
ceived from various other traction lines in the states named, 
in favor of such an organization, and with the consent of the 
president and officers of the Central Electric Railway Asso- 
ciation, we have set the day for the first meeting of the 
proposed traffic association. The meeting will be held at the 
Algonquin hotel, Dayton. O.. on Wednesday, January 22. 19us. 
As this is the day before the regular annual meeting of the 
Central Electric Railway Association, which will be held at 
the same point, we would be glad if you would arrange to 
come prepared to make a two days' stay, devoting Wednesday 
to the preliminary organization of the traffic association, and 
spending Thursday at the Central Electric Railway Associa- 
tion's meeting. A banquet will be held at the Algonquin 
hotel on Thursday night, which we would be glad to have you 
attend. We are sure that you will derive much pleasure, and 
certainly great benefit from such a meeting and it will result 
in good to the traction lines interested. 

In order that all electric railway organizations may 
remain closely allied, the president and officers of the Central 
Electric Railway Association, have consented to the formation 
of such an organization as a branch of that body. 



This meeting is therefore indorsed by the Central Electric 
Railway Association, as attested by the signature of the presi- 
dent hereto attached. 

Report of the Indianapolis Meeting. 

Tin' report of the meeting at Indianapolis on November 
20, which is signed by the secretary, J. F. Starkey, follows: 

On October 2, 1907, at a meeting called by the railway 
commission of Indiana for the purpose of adopting a uniform 
size of tariffs, and a system for filing same, Hie clerk of the 
commission appointed a committee of interurban traffic men for 
this purpose. On November 20, this committee invited all of 
the Indiana traffic officers to attend a meeting held at the 
Indiana state house to ratify the report of the committee. 

After the adjournment of the committee, members of the 
various Indiana lines suggested that a meeting be held for 
informal discussion regarding a permanent traffic organization. 
This meeting was held at the Terminal building, and following 
is a list of the officials present: 

F. D. Norveil, general passenger and freight agent Indi- 
ana Union Traction and Terre Haute Indianapolis & Eastern 
Traction companies. 

W. S. Whitney, general passenger and freight agent Ohio 
Electric Railway. 

J. 15. Crawford, superintendent transportation Ft. Wayne 
& Wabash Valley Traction Company. 

C. T. Price, passenger agent Western Ohio Railway. 

A. G. Kelley, auditor Ft. Wayne & Springfield Traction 
Company. 

C. G. Lohman, general superintendent Chicago South 
Bend & Northern Indiana Railway. 

J. W. Mettlen, general freight agent Indianapolis Craw- 
fordsville & Western Traction Company. 

R. J. Thompson, assistant secretary and treasurer Indian- 
apolis & Louisville Traction Company. 

M. E. Graston, division passenger and freight agent 
Indiana Union Traction Company. 

J. F. Starkey, division passenger and freight agent Indi- 
ana Union Traction Company. 

J. H. Crall, division passenger and freight agent Indiana 
Union Traction and Terre Haute Indianapolis & Eastern 
Traction companies. 

George S. Henry, traffic manager, Indianapolis & Cincin- 
nati Traction Company. 

After an informal, brief discussion on the matter of 
through freight rates and percentages, Mr. Norveil was ap- 
pointed chairman, and he called the meeting to order, appoint- 
ing Mr. Starkey secretary. 

The chairman stated briefly the object of the meeting, 
which was that we might discuss the idea of the formation 
of a traffic organization, as a branch of the Central Electric 
Railway Association, which would be composed of the mem- 
bers of the traffic departments of the several interurban lines, 
represented and interested, and whose duties would be to 
formulate and compile tariffs, and joint arrangements whereby 
through traffic might be secured on a basis that would be 
beneficial and satisfactory to all concerned. After some dis- 
cussion — in which all present seemed to be of one mind 
concerning such organization, that of the affirmative — the 
chairman stated that he thought it wise to have a committee 
appointed to formulate some sort of constitution for the pro- 
posed organization, such committee to present the constitution 
at the next meeting to be approved or modified, as deemed 
best at the meeting. Joint passenger and freight rates are 
to be in the hands of the association. The joint association 
was preferred at first, but if desirable, later on, a separation 
would be made, one association being formed for the passen- 
ger department, and another for the freight department. 

On motion by Mr. Lohman, seconded by Mr. Graston, for 
the appointment of a committee of five to formulate the con- 
stitution, Mr. Price suggested that nine be appointed instead 
of five, and this being agreed upon, the chairman appointed 
the following as a committee: 

W. S. Whitney, chairman, Columbus, O. 

Charles F. Price, Lima, O. 

George S. Henry, Indianapolis. Ind. 

R. J. Thompson, Louisville, Ky. 

A. G. Kelley, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

B. R. Stephens, Springfield, 111. 
George M. Parker, Detroit, Mich. 
F. D. Norveil, Indianapolis, Ind. 
J. O. Wilson, Cleveland, O. 

After a brief discussion as to the territory this organiza- 
tion should cover, it was decided to include Indiana. Ohio, 
lower Michigan, and a portion of Illinois, and the northern 
part of Kentucky. The matter of expense incident to the 
initial work of the organization was discussed, but no decision 
was reached. It was decided that the chairman, Mr. Norveil, 



14 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



should ask the various lines interested their opinions regard- 
ing the issuance of a joint interline passenger tariff looking 
to the furtherance of through traffic. 

At the meeting of the Central Electric Railway Associa- 
tion, referred to in the foregoing, the annual election of 
officers will be held. 



Advertising the aurora elgin & Chicago 
railroad. 



The Aurora Elgin & Chicago Railroad was successfully 
advertised in the summer traffic season of 1907. Small adver- 
tisements were published frequently in the daily newspapers 



attention of more purchasers of real estate to the district 
tributary to the road. He tried at first to interest people by 
working through different real estate firms, but did not find 
this method successful. When inquiries are received now by 
Mr. Breckinridge in response to his direct advertising, he 
refers the seekers after information to the principal real 
estate agents in Chicago or in the various towns who are 
posted concerning the particular class of property desired, 
believing that in this way he will accomplish much better 
results with people who are attracted by the country life and 
the unusual transportation facilities afforded by the road. 

Other car posters have been used successfully by Mr. 
Breckinridge. The one which advertises the "Panhandle 



LIMITED TRAIff S 



LEAVE FIFTH AVENUE TERMINAL AT 

8.15 ml 12.00 noon -615 p.m. 

AURORA. ELGIN & CHICAGO R. R. 

and ELGIN-BELVIDERE ELECTRIC CO. 

Connecting at Belvidere for RocUford, Frooport, Boloit, Janesvillo, and all points on 

ROCKFORD & INTER-URBAN RY. 



NO OUTING EQUAL TO OUR 

"PANHANDLE TRIP" 

110 MILES » BEAUTIFUL SUBURBAN, COUNTRY "° RIVER SCENERY '» $1.25 

WITH STOP-OVER PRIVILEGE AT 

AURORA and ELGIN 

AURORA. ELGIN & CHICAGO R. R. 



THE GREAT THIRD-RAIL ELECTRIC 



Advertising the Aurora Elgin & Chicago Railroad — Posters Placed in Cars. 



in Chicago to direct attention to the short trips offered by 
this company, both on its own lines and through connections 
with other railways. With the approach of winter weather 
the advertising of this character was discontinued and efforts 



Trip" has been effective in making famous that ride of 110- 
miles for $1.25 from Chicago to Aurora and Elgin and return 
to Chicago. If close connections are made the round trip can 
be completed in four hours and 25 minutes. This trip is 



(r 



A Day in the Country 

Will Do You Good 

Our new Ouiiti; Folder Will Tell You Where 
lo Go. 



Aurora, Elgin 
4 Chicago R.R. 

THE FOX RIVER VALLEY ROUTE 



Special Car Furnished at Reason- 
able Rates. 

Frequent Service. 
Down Town Terminal 
Union Loop, 5th Ave., 
near Jackson Boulvd. 

Trains now run direct lo 0»k_ Ridge and Ml. 
Cermel came eriei. with Funeral Service from 
an, station on Metropolitan Elevated. 

Phone Qarnson 5333. 




THE PLAC E 

WHEATON 
COUNTRY FAIR 

THE DAYS 

SEPTEMBER 12, 13, 14 



THE WAY 

AURORA, ELGIN & CHI- 
CAGO RAILROAD 

The Great Third Rail BUctrlc. 

Trains every half hour all day. Addi- 
tional express trains mornings and even- 
ings. SPECIAL RATE, 50c Round Trip. 
Terminal Fifth av.. n?ar Jackson Blvd. 
All trains stop for passengers at Marsh- 
field av., Fifty-Second av., and Desplalnes 
av. Information, Phone Harrison B3S8. 



Aurora, Elgin & 
Chicago Railroad 

The Fox River Valley Route 



Outing Suggestions 




To AURORA 

via Tnlrd Rail. Thence 
to OSWEGO or YORK- 
VILL,E via our For River 

Trolley. 

To BATAVIA 

via Third Rail. Thence 
to GENEVA. or ST. 
CHARLES via Pox Elver 

Trolley. 

To ELGIN 

vie Third Rail. Thence to DDNDBB or 
CARPENTEKSVILLB via (Fox River Trolley. 

"PANHANDLE" TRIP 

To AURORA or ELGIN via Third Rail, up 
or down the river bj trolley eud return to 
Chlcaeo. 

Frequent Service Fast Trams 

Seats for All Low Rates 

Terminal: FIFTH AV.. Near 
Jackson Boulevard 

Information Phone Harnson 5388 



Advertising the Aurora Elgin & Chicago Railroad — Samples of Newspaper Advertisements. 



are now being made to attract business to the lines o£ the road 
in other ways. Richard Breckinridge, the traffic agent, had 
posters printed urging people who contemplate the construc- 
tion of suburban homes to investigate the beautiful country 
along the Aurora Elgin & Chicago. These posters are car- 
ried in the cars of both the Aurora Elgin & Chicago road and 
the Metropolitan West Side Elevated Railway of Chicago, the 
tracks of which are used by the Aurora Elgin & Chicago in 
gaining entrance to the central business district of the city 
of Chicago. Mr. Breckinridge has advertised at numerous 
times within the last few years with the idea of attracting the 



made entirely on the lines of the Aurora Elgin & Chicago 

road. . . 

Daily Newspaper Advertising. 

The effect of the advertising in the Chicago daily news- 
papers was manifest in large traffic in innumerable instances 
during last summer. Samples of the advertisements which 
were published are given in this issue. Mr. Breckinridge 
found that publication of these advertisements, measuring 
about four inches or 56 lines of newspaper space, attracted 
sufficient people to make a perceptible difference in traffic on 
all the days when the weather was favorable. The copy for 



January t. liiiis 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



the advertisements was changed with nearly every insertion, 
but in most of them the trade-mark of the road appeared. 
When any special event was to take place at any point on 
the line it was advertised specially it' weather conditions 
appeared favorable. For instance, when Judge Ben is. Lind- 
sey, of the Denver juvenile court, spoke at the Aurora Chau- 
tauqua in Aurora, on Sunday, August 11, advertisements were 
published in the papers on August 10, calling attention briefly 
to the fact and to the frequent trains on the "greal third 
rail electric." 

During some of the hottest summer weather advertising 
was published on Saturday mornings. One week the adver 
tisement was headed "Every Daj is Cool on the Annua Elgin 
& Chicago." On another Saturday it was announced that the 
Annua Elgin & Chicago "Offers Outings for All Summer 
Long in Chicago's Greater Park, the Fox River Valley." 
After calling attention to the time of trains and the location 



Persons contemplating Suburban Homes would 
do well to investigate the beautiful country 

ALONG THE 



Aurora, Elgin & Chicago R.R. 

GOOD TOWNS -LOW RATES -FAST TRAINS 
REAL ESTATE AT REASONABLE PRICES 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL ON 



RICHARD BRECKINRIDGE, Traffic Agent 

FIFTH AVENUE TERMINAL, CHICAGO 



Advertising the Aurora Elgin & Chicago Railroad — Sample of 
Poster Placed in Cars. 

of the downtown terminal this advertisement added "High 
Speed Without Cinders, Dust or Smoke; Beautiful Scenery, 
Modern Cars, Low Rates." 

Rates of Fare. 
Other advertising issued by the road includes booklets 
with maps and half-tone pictures of scenes on the lines. The 
booklets also contain the rates of fare, which are as follows: 



Rates of fare subject to 
change without notice and 
distances between Fifth 
avenue terminal station. 
Chicago, and — 



May wood 11.0 

Bellewood 13.0 

South Elmhurst 16.0 

Lombard 20.5 

Glen Ellyn 23.0 

Wheaton 25.5 

Chicago Golf Grounds 26.5 

Warren ville 30.5 

Aurora 39.5 

Glen wood Park 39.5 

Batavia 40.0 

Wayne 34.8 

Elgin 42.0 



.10 


$0.20 $ 




$.... 


$ 


15 


.30 
.40 








.20 


•16% 


5.70 


6.30 


.25 


.50 


•20% 


6.00 


6.65 


30 


.55 


.25 


6.40 


7.10 


35 


.65 


.29 V« 


6.75 


7.50 


40 


.75 


.33% 


7.65 


8.50 


45 


.85 


•37% 


8.10 


9.00 


60 


1.10 


.50 


9.00 


10.00 


55 


1.00 


.45% 






55 


1.00 


.45% 


8.75 


9.70 


50 


.95 


•41% 


8.55 


9.50 


60 


1.10 


.50 


9.00 


10.00 



Tokio. Japan, has 90 miles of electric railways, exclusive 
of suburban lines, all under the management of one Japanese 
company. The 700 cars in daily use carry an average of 
300,000 passengers, and have already displaced more than 
half the jinricksaws. A 2%-cent fare and complete transfer 
system is in force, but as yet there are no unions. Wages 
are on a minimum basis of $6 per month for both conductor 
and motorman. The track is narrow gauge, owing to the 
narrow streets. All the cars, etc., are made in Japan from 
American and European ideas. — Exchange. 



A SUGGESTION TO ELIMINATE OVERCROWDING OF 
SURFACE CARS IN NEW YORK. 

The transit committee of the City Club of New York, 
which lias made extensive investigations of the city's trans- 
portation problems, on December l's sent to the public service 
c immisslon a letter protesting against the proposed ordinance 
to regulate the number of, passengers to be carried on the 
surface cars. In place of such a regulation, the committee 
proposes a plan ot requiring the company to operate cars 
providing a definite number of seats. The letter is as follows: 

The receivers of the Xew York Railway Company have 
submitted to your commission a draft of a regulation or ordi- 
nance, designed to limit to 65 the number of passengers thai 
tnaj ride on a street surface car al any one time. They ask 
your endorsement of ibis proposed measure. 

Believing you will welcome an expression of opinion from 
any citizens interested in and studying the transit problem 
of the city, we submit tor consideration our views on the 
proposed regulation. 

We believe it is an unwise measure for the following 
reasons: 

l 1 l Your commission appears to have ample power to so 
regulate the handling of cars as to furnish the greatest pos- 
sible convenience to the public. 

(2) li is inexpedient to attempt to regulate the number 
standing in cars by limiting the load, because (a) the Ameri- 
can public is unaccustomed to such restrictions, and would 
not readily adapt itself to this form of regulation; (b) the 
enforcement of such a regulation, if in the form of an ordi- 
nance, would necessarily rest in the hands of the police, and 
these officers would not be likely to enforce it. An ordinance 
has been on the books for many years, section 57, revised code 
of ordinances, which requires that no electric car in Brooklyn 
"shall carry more passengers than 50 per cent more than its 
seating capacity." There is no pretense of enforcing it. 
(c) Such a regulation becomes a dead letter through lack of 
enforcement, and the public, seeing overcrowding after its 
enactment as bad as before, would lose faith in all attempts at 
regulation, and would come to believe that overcrowding is an 
unavoidable evil. 

We desire to propose a form of regulation which we 
believe will do all that can wisely be done to equalize the load 
carried by each car. 

Where increased transit facilities were needed the com- 
mission has heretofore issued orders for an additional number 
of cars to be run between certain hours. This method has 
undoubtedly secured a larger number of cars, but has not 
secured the full number of seats needed or possible in general, 
since the cars in use are small, with but two longitudinal side 
seats, and are constructed to accommodate standing rather 
than sitting passengers. What is desired, we assume, is that 
such a type of car shall be used as will furnish the greatest 
possible number of seats in a given period. 

We therefore suggest that the commission periodically 
ascertain the traffic needs of every line and thereupon require 
the operating company to furnish during every 5-minute period 
a designated number of seats, rather than a stated number of 
cars. If the track capacity has been reached with the present 
type of cars, such order would make it necessary on the part 
of the operating company to increase the seating capacity 
of each car. 

This form of regulation has the following advantages: 

ill The enforcement remains in the hands of the com- 
mission. 

(2) It is definite and enforceable. 

(3) A would-be passenger may choose whether he desires 
to ride on a crowded car or to wait for other cars, which, 
under this regulation, he may be assured will speedily come. 

(41 It tends to induce the operating company to furnish 
cars with a maximum number of sittings rather than a 
maximum standing room as at present. It may cause them 
to experiment with larger cars or double-decked cars, or some 
type which will furnish the maximum number of seats per 
unit. 

We believe that regulation of the running of cars by the 
above method would not only secure to the public the best 
accommodation possible with the present type of cars, but 
would also tend to cause the operating companies to secure 
a type of car that would utilize the tracks to their fullest 
capacity. 



The Georgia Railway & Electric Company of Atlanta. Ga., 
announces that approximately 46,000,000 passengers were car- 
ried on its lines during the year 1907, an increase of 6,000,000, 
or 14 per cent over 1906. 



16 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



DEPRECIATION OF CARDIFF ELECTRIC TRAMWAY AND 
•LIGHTING UNDERTAKINGS.* 



In a report to the chairman and members of the "Elec- 
trical Lighting, and Tramway" committee, John Allcock, the 
Cardiff city treasurer and controller, deals with the question 
of depreciation in regard to both the tramways and lighting 
undertakings as follows: 

Tramways. 

I have recently given further attention to this question, 
and have been supplied by the city electrical engineer and 
manager with the rates of depreciation which he considers 
represent fair wear and tear, based upon his expert knowl- 
edge of the condition of the Cardiff plant, and the undertaking 
generally. I have extracted the expenditure of the various 
sections of the work as shown by the following table, and 
against such cost I have calculated the annual amount of 
depreciation which is necessary, and in a further column the 
sinking fund, which has been set aside to redeem the loans 
which have been raised on those parts of the undertaking 
which are subject to depreciation. 

Sinking fund 
Depreciation, instalment. 
Expen- Per 
Purpose — diture. cent. Amount. Years. Am't. 

Track and bonding £209,369 5 £10,468 30 £4,225 

Cars 79,602 10 7,960 15 4,202 

Buildings 115,365 2% 2,884 30 2,328 

Buildings 8,500' 2% 212 25 230 

Engines and generators 41,591 5 2,079 30 839 
Engines and generators 22,500 5 1,125 25 597 
Boilers, pumps, econo- 
mizers 15,544 5 777 30 313 

Boilers, pumps, econo- 
mizers 6,350 5 317 25 168 

Mechanical stokers and 

coal bunkers 1,736 5 86 30 35 

Mechanical stokers and 

coal bunkers 2,550 5 127 25 67 

Steam and other pipes. 8,485 5 424 30 171 
Steam and other pipes. 6,374 5 318 25 169 
Switchboards and instru- 
ments 5,933 .7V 2 444 30 119 

Tools, plants, etc 4,268 7% 320 30 86 

Conduits and cables.... 53,957 3 1,618 30 1,088 



£582,124 £29,159 £14,637 

In the foregoing calculations, nothing has been provided 
for the depreciation of the accumulators. The reason for this 
is that they are being maintained by the Tudor Accumulator 
Company for a period of ten years from July, 1901, and it does 
not appear necessary during the continuance of this contract 
that further provision should be made. 

If, however, the present conditions were altered, it would 
be necessary for me to submit a further report on this par- 
ticular expenditure. 

Annual depreciation as per foregoing table £29,159 

Annual charge for sinking fund £14,637 

Annual amount to be provided in addition to 

sinking fund £14,522 

Note. — Of this amount the committee has already ap- 
proved the provision of $5,500 as per resolution dated Febru- 
ary 22, 1907, leaving a further annual sum of £9,022 still to 
be provided. 

I do not think I need labor the point as to whether a pro- 
vision for depreciation is necessary — this, I feel, will be 
readily conceded. There is, however, a question as to how 
such depreciation should be calculated, and I recommend that 
the committee approve the principle of setting aside as a 
depreciation fund the difference between the actual deprecia- 
tion, based on the life of the several parts, and the sinking 
fund, which has been set aside in respect thereof. 

The argument has been advanced that the corporation, in 
addition to maintaining a sinking fund, should also provide 
for the full depreciation on their various undertakings, but 
I do not agree with this contention, as the outcome of such a 
practice would mean that the present generation would re- 
deem the loans, and at the end of the time an amount equal to 
the whole of the capital invested would be in hand in addition, 
in the shape of a depreciation fund, notwithstanding the fact 
that the undertaking had been kept up to date as far as this 
was possible out of revenue. To provide sinking fund and full 
depreciation would inflict a double burden upon the present 
generation which I do not think fair, and I feel that if a 

♦Prom Electrical Engineering (London) December 19, 1907. 



certain amount is set aside each year, based upon the differ- 
ence between the depreciation and the sinking fund, that the 
corporation will have done all that can reasonably be ex- 
pected. 

Some portion of the existing materials could be utilized 
when the track is reconstructed, and there may possibly be a 
sum in hand on this particular section which would exceed the 
actual amount required for reconstruction, calculated at 
£4,000 per mile, but the sum in hand would not exceed the 
balance of loan remaining due on the track, and which had 
not already been provided by means of a sinking fund. The 
question of obsolescence of plant may in the future operate on 
the subject of depreciation, but, as a matter of fact, it is 
impossible to state with any degree of definiteness the liability 
which might accrue under this heading as it entirely depends 
upon improvements in machinery and also the introduction of 
labor-saving appliances, etc. 

Electric Lighting. 

The city electrical engineer and manager has kindly sup- 
plied me with the various rates of depreaiation which, in his 
opinion, represents the annual fair wear and tear of the 
various portions of the electric light undertaking. In this 
case, also, I have extracted the expenditure of the various 
sections of the work which are subject to depreciation, and 
they are shown by the following table, with the annual amount 
of such depreciation and the annual charges for contribution 
to sinking fund. 

Sinking fund 
Depreciation, instalment. 
Expen- Per 

Purpose — diture. cent. Amount.Years. Am't. 

Buildings £ 20,342 2% £ 539 25 £ 539 

Machinery 41,980 5 2,099 25 1,114 

Mains and services 105,361 3 3,160 25 2,796 

Transformers, motors, 

etc 30,436 5 1,521 25 807 

Meters 10,800 7% 810 25 286 

Electrical instruments.. 4,660 7% 349 25 123 



£213,579 



£8,478 



£5,655 



A provision has not been made for accumulators, as the 
conditions are similar to those which obtain in the tramways 
department. 

From this it will be seen that the loan charges necessitate 
payments to the sinking fund amounting to £5,655 per annum. 
The period sanctioned for the loans does not represent the life 
of the various sections of the undertaking and the full depre- 
ciation works out at £8,478 per annum. The difference be- 
tween these two sums, namely, £2,823, is the amount which I 
recommend to be set aside in addition to the sinking fund, 
in order that when the effective life of the various portions of 
the plant and machinery comes to an end, due provision will 
have been made for the repayment of the original loan, viz., 
sinking fund in hand, plus depreciation fund. 

Generally. 

The rates of depreciation are based upon the supposition 
that they will operate in each case from the date of the 
opening of the works. This in the case of the tramways would 
be 1902. and electric light 1S95, and the committee may be 
met with the statement ha such depreciation should be pro- 
vided from these dates, calculated on the capital expenditure 
at the end of each financial year. I would, however, point out 
that there are no funds available for this purpose, and, under 
all the circumstances, I recommend that the first payment to 
the fund be dealt with in the current year's accounts, and 
that the future profits be also transferred to depreciation 
funds until such time as the amount standing to the credit 
thereof equals the amount which should be in the fund. If in 
any year the profits should be insufficient to meet the charges 
recommended for depreciation, I suggest that such liability 
should be the first charge on future profits. 

Arthur Ellis, city electrical engineer and manager, en- 
tirely agrees with the views expressed in this report. 

At a meeting of the committee the report was adopted. 



The Ohio Electric Railway Company is building a power 
house near Lewistown reservoir for the Bellefontaine-Lima 
line, now nearly completed, and is erecting a substation near 
West Liberty for the Bellefontaine-Springfield line, which has 
been in operation for about two years. When the new Lima 
line is opened, about April 1, it is stated that the company will 
open a pleasure resort at the Lewistown reservoir, which 
has been made a state park, and will arrange an hourly ff 
service in each direction between Bellefontaine and Lima and 
Springfield. 



January 4. L908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



17 



RECEIVERS APPOINTED, THEN DISCHARGED, FOR CHI- 
CAGO & MILWAUKEE ELECTRIC RAILROAD. 



On a petition of attorneys for the holder of 25 shares of 
stock, Judge Tuthill of the Cook county circuit court appointed 
receivers for the Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad on 
December 31. As this step was taken without notice to the 
road, all concerned took immediate measures to adjust the 
differences which precipitated the receivership, with the result 
that on January 3 attorneys for the principal interests in- 
volved appeared before the court and secured the discharge of 
the receivers. 

Charles G. Dawes, formerly comptroller of the currency 
and now president of the Central Trust Company, Chicago, ex- 
Mayor Carter H. Harrison of Chicago and Gordon A. Ramsay 
were named as receivers, but only Mr. Ramsay qualified. 

The bill on which the action of the court was based was 
filed by Tolman, Redfield & Sexton, representing Charles J. 
Monahan, the owner of the 25 shares of stock. The bill 
alleged manipulation of stocks and bonds by Albert C. Frost, 
president of the Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad, and 
charged that through "dummy" directors Mr. Frost had se- 
cured large, if not the controlling, interests in the following 
corporations: 
Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railway, an Illinois 

corporation, with capital of $1,000,000 

Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad, an Illinois 

corporation, with capital of 5,000,000 

Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad, a Wisconsin 

corporation, with a capital of 

Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railway, a Wisconsin 

corporation with a capital of 

Waukegan Fox Lake & Western Railway, an Illinois 

corporation, with a capital of 

Kenosha Electric Railway, a Wisconsin corporation, 

with a capital increased from $50,000 to 1,000,000 

Chicago & Milwaukee Power Company, an Illinois 

corporation, with a capital of 

Ravinia Park Company, an Illinois corporation, with 

a capital of 

The Racine Stone Company, a Wisconsin corpora- 
tion, with a capital of 

The Libertyville Trotting Association, an Illinois cor- 
poration (capital not given) 

The Alaska Central Railroad Company, a Washington 

corporation (capital not given) 

A. C. Frost & Co., a firm or copartnership 

Mr. Frost is said to have been connected in his dealings 
with the railroad company from 1897 to 1902 with "his client," 
whose name was not given. The "client" Is understood to 
have been George A. Ball, a glass manufacturer of Muncie, 
Ind., who announced promptly that he still has an interest in 
the companies and is satisfied with the management. 

The bill declared that when Mr. Frost announced to the 
directors that the business of the company required improve- 
ments in the line of the railroad from Evanston to Waukegan, 
a power plant at Highw 7 ood, reconstruction of trolley lines and 
a second line of track from Highland Park north, the work 
was done by the Republic Construction Company, of which Mr. 
Frost was president. 

Following the action of the court conferences were held 
all day on January 1 between two of the receivers, John S. 
Miller, representing Mr. Frost, and representatives of various 
other interests. It was impossible for the attorneys to reach 
an agreement on that day, but the fact was developed that 
larger interests than those divulged in the bill setting forth 
the rights of the holder of 25 shares of stock were involved. 
Among those who participated in the conferences were G. L. 
Francis, R. Cassels and Amelius Jarvis of Toronto, represent- 
ing large bondholders in Canada. 

The final result of the conferences, which lasted all day 
and until midnight on January 2, was the agreement to appear 
before the court on the morning of January 3 and ask for a 
termination of the receivership. Mr. Dawes issued the fol- 
lowing statement concerning the agreement which was signed 
by the various interests: 



300,000 
100,000 
100,000 



5,000,000 
200,000 
100,000 



In this connection I will say that this is the result of the 
negotiations among the parties in interest, lasting now contin- 
uously for two days and a night, in which, without exception, 
every difference has been sunk by all in their co-operation for 
what was believed to be for the common good. These con- 
cessions have not been small. They have been many and 
large. In view of the very great variety and extent, both 
direct and collateral, of the interests involved, not only here 
but abroad, the outcome is most satisfactory. It only indi- 
cates that among business men the spirit of co-operation for 
good in a common cause can yet be appealed to with confi- 
dence and safety. 

Mr. Tolman made a statement in which he said: 
None of our demands has been denied. Our charges of 
fraud and manipulation, however, fall of their own weight, and 
they are buried and forgotten. The whole trouble will now be 
smoothed out in a private and peaceable manner and not in 
court. All interests have been provided for in the stipulation 
of settlement. Trustees will be appointed in any cases where 
the situation demands. In this manner the rough edges will 
be ironed down and claims gradually but certainly met. 
Mr Frost has issued a statement as follows: 
Although the action taken was a most unfortunate one, 
especially as it was taken on the eve of the company's semi- 
annual payment of interest, the company's finances have not 
been affected. The January interest coupons, amounting to 
$250,000, are being paid as presented and the funds are pro- 
vided to meet all other obligations of the company, as well as 
the completion of the road into Milwaukee early this spring. 
For the purpose of having the charges in the bill, that stocks 
and bonds of this company have been used for building up 
other enterprises, proved to be absolutely false, I have exe- 
cuted a document by which Mr. Dawes will have the right to 
examine into this question, and if he finds that funds or 
securities of any kind have been used for the building up of 
other enterprises these funds and securities will be imme- 
diately placed in the possession of the company. The facts 
are that this company has issued no bonds or stocks for nearly 
three years, during which time nearly $500,000 has been ex- 
pended on its property for permanent improvements and bet- 
terments. I take this opportunity of stating that Mr. Dawes 
worked untiringly two days and a large part of one night in 
his effort to have the receivership dismissed and the property 
restored to the company for the good of the community and 
the large number of investors interested. 



STEAM RAILROAD CONSTRUCTION DURING 1907. 



Figures compiled by The Railway Age show the number 
of miles of new track built by the steam railroads during the 
calendar year 1907 in each state as follows: 



State— No. 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Dist. of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 



lines. 
14 

2 

1 
16 
14 

7 

1 
10 

9 

7 
11 

7 

4 

3 

9 
22 

1 

1 
13 
10 
19 
11 



Miles. 

185.60 

27.08 

26.66 

138.14 

253.46 

79.29 

6.90 

320.00 

157.99 

124.68 

106.47 

10S.32 

78.00 

16.70 

60.33 

422.41 

33.00 

.70 

66.08 

217.36 

261.59 

91.11 

175.90 



State — No. lines. Miles. 

Nebraska 4 40.70 

Nevada 9 189.21 

New Jersey 1 .56 

New Mexico 6 121.45 

New York 12 98.99 

North Carolina.. 12 155.77 

North Dakota . . 5 197.45 

Ohio 3 19.98 

Oklahoma 4 160.80 

Oregon 6 57.57 

Pennsylvania .. 27 147.67 

South Carolina.. 9 73.02 

South Dakota .. . 7 385.83 

Tennessee 12 40.79 

Texas 25 381.09 

Utah 4 36.10 

Vermont 1 5.09 

Virginia 13 206.45 

Washington 7 311.01 

West Virginia... 14 94.47 

Wisconsin 7 117.84 

Wyoming 3 74.64 



Total in 45 states and territories 374 5,874.25 

Note. — It will be noted that the total number of lines 
given is not the sum of those In each state because of the fact 
that several lines extend into two or more states. During 
1906 the steam roads built 6.100 miles of new track. The 
decrease for 1907 is therefore 226 miles. 



The Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company will reduce its line 
of $16,000,000 fire insurance with stock companies to $3,000,000. 
The rest of the risk will be carried directly by the company. 



is 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



INTERURBAN MAP OF THE CENTRAL STATES. 



(WITH 



Following the practice of the past two years we present 
herewith as a supplement to the first issue of the year a map 
showing the electric interurban railways of the central states, 
operating, under construction or projected. A comparison with 
the maps issued in January, 1906. by the Street Railway Review, 
and on January 5, 1907. by its successor, the Electric Rail- 
way Review, affords an interesting study of the progress of 
electric railway construction in the territory where the 
development of interurban roads has been most pronounced. 
The greater part of the new track has been laid as extensions 
of existing systems, although several important new roads 
have been built, especially in Indiana, where the increase in 
mileage during the year just past amounts to 426 miles. A 
detailed statement of the mileage of the Indiana lines appears 
below. 

This map, for which we are indebted to The Arnold Com- 
pany of Chicago, has been carefully brought up to date from 
official reports, and is believed to be very complete. However, 
if errors are observed, the Electric Railway Review will be 
grateful for any information that will assist in making its 
records more complete. 



INTERURBAN MILEAGE IN INDIANA. 

Statistics compiled by the Indiana railroad commission 
show that there are 1.53S.93 miles of interurban railroad in 
the state against 1.113 miles last year, an increase of 426 
miles. These statistics do not include street railways. There 
are 30 electric railway systems in operation in the state, the 
one of largest mileage being the Terre Haute Indianapolis & 
Eastern Traction Company, with 351.40 miles. The shortest 
line is the French Lick & West Baden, operated between those 
two towns, a distance of 1.9 miles. 

The following table exhibits the total and division mile- 
ages of the various companies, the letter A indicating that 
the road operates partly by steam power and the letter B 
that gasoline motor power is used: 

Total 
miles. 

3.75 

9.13 

2.50 
21.00 

16.87 
28.25 



Miles. 

Angola Railway & Power Company— 

Angola-James Lake 

Cincinnati Lawrenceburg & Aurora Electric 
Street Railway Company — 
State Line-Aurora 

Dayton & Western Traction Company — 

State Line-Richmond 

Evansville & Eastern Electric Railway — 

Xewburg-Rockport 

Evansville & Bit. Vernon Electric Railroad — 

Evansville-Mt. Vernon 

Evansville & Princeton Traction Company — 

Evansville-Priuceton 

Evansville Suburban & NewburgRailroad(A) — 

Evansville-Newburg 10.00 

Evansville Junction-Boonville 14.57 

French Lick & West Baden Railway Company- 
French Lick- West Baden 

Ft. Wavne & Wabash Valley Traction Company — 

Ft." Wayne-Bluffton 24.79 

Ft. Wavne-Logansport 76.00 

Lafayette-Battle Ground 909 

Logansport-Lafayette 38.10 

Ft. Wayne & Springfield Railroad — 

Ft. Wayne-Decatur 

Hammond Whiting & East Chicago Electric 
Railway Company — 
Hammond-Whiting-East Chicago 

Indiana Union Traction Company — 

Muncie-TJnion City 33.20 

Anderson-Middletown 9.61 

Muncie-Bluffton 41.80 

Kokomo-Peru 19.19 

Indianapolis-Muncie 56.55 

Indianapolis-Logansport 79.74 

Anderson-Wabash 52.94 

Alexandria-Tipton 20.00 



24.57 



Indianapolis & Cincinnati Traction Company — 

Indiauapolis-Shelbyville 28.86 

Shelbyville-Greensburg 21.07 

Indianapolis-Rushville 41.30 

Rushville-Connersville 16.93 

Indianapolis Columbus & Southern Traction 
Company — 

Indianapolis-Columbus 40.04 

Columbus-Seymour 22.35 

Indianapolis Crawfordsville & Western Trac- 
tion Company — 
Indianapolis-Crawfordsville 

Indianapolis & Louisville Traction Company — 

Seymour-Scottsburg-Sellersburg 

Kokomo Marion & Western Traction Company — 

Kokomo-Greentown-Marion 

Lebanon & Thorntowu Traction Company — 

Lebanon-Thorntown 

Lima & Toledo Traction Company 

Louisville & Northern Railway & Light Com- 
pany — 

Jeffersonville-Charlestown 13.68 

Watson-Sellersburg 4.15 

Louisville & Southern Indiana Traction Com- 
pany — 
New Albany-Jeffersonville 

Muncie & Portland Traction Company — 

Muncie-Dunkirk-Portland 

Marion Bluffton & Eastern Traction Company — 

Marion-Bluff ton 

Northern Indiana Railway Company — 

South Bend-Goshen 27.00 

South Bend-Lakes 6.30 

La Porte-Michigan City 14.00 

Southern Michigan Railway Company — 

South Bend-Indiana-Michigan Line 

St. Joseph Valley Traction Company (B) — 

La Grange-Middleburg 

St. Joseph Valley Railway Company (B) — 

La Grange-Angola 

Terre Haute Indianapolis & Eastern Traction 
Company — 

Indianapolis-Lebanon 28.29 

Lebanon-Frankfort-Lafayette 40.46 

Lebanon-Crawfordsville 23.50 

Indianapolis-Dublin 51.34 

Dunreith-New Castle 10.90 

Dublin-Richmond 17.32 

Cambridge City-Milton 2.07 

Indianapolis-Martinsville 30.64 

Indianapolis-Plainfield 14.23 

Indianapolis-Danville 20.10 

Plainfield-Harmony 39.31 

Terre Haute-Harmony 18.95 

Terre Haute-St. Marys-State Line 12.04 

Terre Haute-Sullivan 26.30 

Terre Haute-Clinton 15.95 

Toledo & Chicago Interurban Railway Com- 
pany— 

Ft. Wayne-Garrett-Auburn-Waterloo 25.00 

Garrett-Kendall ville 12.00 

Winona Interurban Railway Company — 

Warsaw-Goshen 25.14 

Warsaw-Winona Lake 2.00 

Peru-Chili 9.21 

Total mileage 



62.39 

45.00 

40.92 

27.95 

9.90 
20.73 

17.83 

6.00 
30.59 
31.57 



47.30 
5.86 
17.91 

26.77 



President W. H. Fledderjohann of the Ft. Wayne & 
Springfield Railway Company has asked the board of public 
works and the mayor of Ft. Wayne, Ind., to be allowed to run 
cars every three hours instead of every hour as provided in 
the franchise. Mr. Fledderjohann says that owing to the 
money stringency the operation of an hourly schedule will 
result in a financal loss to the company. 



It is reported that the question of a bond issue for the 
purpose of constructing a subway system will be placed before 
the people of San Francisco at an early election. A number 
of prominent business men are said to have been planning 
the enterprise for over a year and a petition to the board of 
supervisors asking for the issuance of $4,500,000 of bonds is 
now being prepared. Supervisors M. I. Sullivan and Isidor 
Jacobs are named among the supporters of the project. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE El 




; Sj P «4' j pox ° **% L V""*" 



i """aV^o^ 










MAP 

SHOWING 

ELECTRIC INTERURBAN RAILWAYS 

IN THE 

CENTRAL STATES 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW, JANUARY 4,1908. VOL. XIX -NO. 




MAP 

ELECTRIC INTERURBAN RAILWAYS 
CENTRAL STATES 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



1!) 



AMERICAN STREET AND INTERURBAN RAILWAY ASSO- 
CIATION. 

President C. G. Goodrich of the American Street and In- 
terurban Railway Association has issued a letter to the gen- 
eral managers of member companies, announcing the estab- 
lishment of a statistical bureau of information. The letter 
reads as follows: 

While necessarily much of the time of the secretary and 
his assistants during the past two years has been devoted to 
various matters incident to the general upbuilding of the or- 
ganization, considerable attention has been given to the estab- 
lishment of a statistical bureau of information at the associa- 
tion headquarters. 

Realizing the great value which such a central source of 
information may become to the member companies, your 
executive committee has recently made arrangements 
whereby the secretary will, from now on, be assisted by a 
statistician who has had several years of practical experience 
in this line of electric railway work. 

The association already has a valuable statistical library, 
and this will be enlarged from time to time so that eventually 
it will contain copies of practically all governmental, state 
and municipal laws, reports and documents of general value 
to our members, as well as copies of various books, pam- 
phlets, reports and other statistical data bearing upon the 
general subject of street and interurban railways. 

As fast as data are obtained they will be placed in bul- 
letin form and issued to the member companies. It is ex- 
pected that such bulletins will be issued monthly hereafter, 
and the first one, containing confidential information on wages 
of conductors and motormen, will be ready for distribution 
in January, 1908. 

While a number of lines of investigation are already well 
under way, there are undoubtedly many other subjects which 
might be investigated to great advantage to the member com- 
panies. . As the primary value of the association is to be of 
real service to all of its members, you will aid very materially 
in accomplishing its purpose if you will kindly address a 
letter to the secretary, informing him what investigations in 
your estimation might be carried on by the association to the 
best advantage, not only of the member companies in gen- 
eral, but of your own company in particular. There is no 
question but that the association work can be of value to 
your company, but to accomplish this result we must have 
your hearty co-operation. 

Bernard V. Swenson, secretary-treasurer of the associa- 
tion, has also issued two circular letters, under date of Janu- 
ary 2, 1908, to members and associate members, from which 
the following extracts are taken: 

Much has been accomplished by the committees of the 
various associations during the past year, probably the most 
important and far-reaching in value to the member companies 
being the work of the standardization committee of the En- 
gineering association, the classification committee of the Ac- 
countants' association and the insurance committee of the 
American association. 

The Atlantic City convention was the most successful one 
which has ever been held by the various associations and the 
several reports contain much that is of interest and value to 
the member companies. The proceedings of the Accountants' 
and Claim Agents' associations have already been distributed 
to the member companies in pamphlet form, and those of the 
American and Engineering associations will be completed and 
sent out within another week. The cloth bound volumes, 
containing the proceedings of all four associations, will be 
ready for distribution by January IS, which is exactly three 
months after the close of the convention. 

At the 1907 convention the executive committee was re- 
quested to take steps toward the organization of a fourth 
affiliated association which would take over all of the general 
work of the American association relating to transportation, 
traffic and operation, leaving the American association free 
to devote its time to executive matters and questions of broad 
policy. It is expected that this new association will be or- 
ganized in the near future and a communication relative to 
this matter will soon be sent to the member companies. 

Since the convention last October much important work 
has been done by the American and Accountants' associations 
in connection with the classification of accounts, which is 
soon to be adopted by the interstate commerce commission. 
A communication relative to this matter will be sent to each 
member company in the near future. 

The report of the treasurer for the year ending October 1, 
1907, showed total receipts of approximately $23,000 and ex- 
penditures of practically the same amount as the receipts. 



The expenditures during tin- year 1907-1908 will probably be 
somewhat more than those of the year 1906-1907, as the work 
of all of the associations is becoming broader and more com- 
prehensive. It is therefore quite essential that the old mem- 
ber companies continue in their support and that the mem- 
bership be increased during the coming year. During the 
year just past the membership increased approximately 15 
per cent, and it is expected that, with a more active campaign 
for membership, the increase during the coming year will be 
considerably greater. 

Considerable attention has been devoted to the question 
of a suitable badge to be worn by associate members and 
several designs have already been submitted to the secretary. 
It is expected that the executive committee will take some 
action in this matter at its January meeting. 



NEW SUBWAY ROUTE RECOMMENDED BY PUBLIC 
SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEW YORK CITY. 



Almost the last official act of the public service commis- 
sion of New York City in the first year of its existence was 




Subway Route Recommended by the Public Service Commis- 
sion of New York City. 

the recommendation of a new subway route to meet the re- 
quirements of the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. As 
shown on the accompanying sketch map. the new route starts 
from the Battery and closely parallels the existing subway, on 



2(1 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX. No 1. 



one side or the other of the latter, as far as Forty-second 
street. Instead of deflecting at this point the proposed new 
route continues straight ahead under Lexington avenue to 
the Harlem river. After passing underneath the river the 
route diverges, one line continuing in a general northeasterly 
direction toward Pelham Bay and Mamaroneck and the other 
proceeded in a general northerly direction to and underneath 
Jerome avenue. 

At Canal street branches will extend to the North and 
East rivers, at the latter point connecting with the approach 
of Manhattan bridge to Brooklyn. 

The estimated cost of the work is $60,000,000 and it is 
proposed to have the plans ready for inviting bids about 
March 1, 1908. 

As will be seen from inspection of the sketch, the route 
follows to a considerable extent the route of the proposed 
Lexington avenue subway, plans for which were prepared 
early last year and described in the Electric Railway Review 
of April 13, 1907, page 486. The former plans failed to meet 
the approval of the authorities and the matter has been held 
in abeyance up to the present time. 

Prepared as these plans will be, under the authority and 
with the approval of the commission in advance, it is prob- 
able that something tangible will result in the addition of 
transportation facilities for' the Bronx, which needs them so 
badly. At first glance it appears that the routes, so far as 
that borough is concerned, are well located to serve the needs 
of that extensive section without serious interference with 
existing routes of travel. So far as the downtown section of 
Manhattan is concerned, the proposed route is criticized in 
some quarters as following too closely the existing lines of 
travel. But the central avenue of downtown Manhattan is 
and probably always will be Broadway, and the distance from 
Broadway in each direction to the river and to the business 
establishments located in the intervening territory is so short 
that it appears that the greater number of passengers are 
served by locating the route in that vicinity. 

A feature that commends itself is the directness of the 
route. It is substantially a bee-line from the Battery to the 
Bronx. It is proposed to make it entirely independent of the 
existing subway, under which it will pass in the neighborhood 
of Twelfth street, and to make connection with the New York 
Central at Forty-second street and at Mott Haven' (One Hun- 
dred and Thirty-eighth street). It will run close to the Stein- 
way tunnel at Forty-second street and to the Blackwell's 
Island bridge at Fifty-ninth street. At the lower end by a 
swing to the west at City Hall it will pass close to the end 
of the Hudson Companies' tunnels and be sufficiently close 
for another connection at Ninth street. On the Brooklyn side, 
also, connection would be easy with the authorized Fourth 
avenue line. 

The commission expresses the view that by reason of 
these numerous possible connections the proposition will be 
an attractive one from the financial point of view. 



Malicious Destruction of Property. 



Vigorous steps should be taken to punish severely the 
men or boys who either through wanton mischief or with 
criminal intent take wire from transmission lines in lonely 
districts or destroy insulators by using them as a mark to 
shoot at. One instance is told by our Peoria correspondent: 
"The lightning storm of last week developed trouble on the 
Illinois Traction Company's high-tension tranmissiou line. 
The trouble was finally located, and was found to be caused 
by hunters shooting away the high-tension insulators. Twenty- 
two were found to be defective and all had to be replaced. 
The company has posted a notice offering a reward of $50 for 
information that will lead to the arrest and conviction of the 
guilty persons.'' This is no isolated case, nor is Illinois the 
only state in which these depredations are committed. We 



have heard of some very ingenious methods adopted to take 
wire from poles even when transmitting current at high poten- 
tial, but it would serve no useful purpose to set forth how 
this perverted cleverness is manifested. But the tampering 
with transmission circuits is a serious matter to power-gen- 
erating companies, particularly exasperating because usually 
there is no trace to the offenders. If existing laws are inade- 
quate, others more stringent should be enacted before the 
power companies resort to the last expedient of patroling 
their lines by armed guards. — The Western Electrician. 



GERMAN AIR CLEANING APPARATUS. 



The system of cleaning cars, residences and offices by 
compressed air is now being extensively employed in this 
country as well as in Europe, the vacuum air cleaning system 
being a modification which is also largely employed. With 
this apparatus dust suckers carry the dirt into receptacles 
provided for the purpose and exhausted by pumps. For car 
cleaning and the cleaning of depots and station offices, a 
portable, electrically driven vacuum pump or compressor is 
used. This pump is mounted on a truck with an electric 
cable coiled on a wheel for providing electric current from 
any nearby source. A hose connects the pump with a dust 
sucker. By simply moving this sucker over the car seats or 
the office furniture the dust is removed rapidly and effec- 
tively. 

In Germany the apparatus shown in the accompanying 
illustration is utilized extensively for cleaning the walls, 




Portable Vacuum Cleaning Outfit. 

drapery and furniture of many homes, apartment houses and 
flats. A permanent pipe is connected to the outside wall ol 
a building, with terminal hose connections near the windows. 
At the street level a terminal connection is provided to which 
may be attached a pipe from a portable vacuum pump. The 
motors, which are of small capacity, are operated from any 
lighting circuit. 



The following statistics, compiled by The Railway Age, 

give the number of locomotives and passenger and freight 

cars ordered by the steam railroads of the United States, 

Canada and Mexico during 1907 and the preceding six years: 

1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 

Locomotives 4,340 4.665 3,283 2,538 6,265 5,642 3. 482 

Passenger cars.. 2.S79 3,459 2,310 2.213 3.2S9 3,402 1.791 

Freight cars 193,439 195,248 108.936 136,561 341,315 310,315 151,711 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



21 



RECENT ELECTRIC RAILWAY LEGAL DECISIONS. 



BY J. L. ROSENBEIiGEK, I.I.. B., OF THE CHICAGO BAR. 



Suddenly Turning Team to Cross Track. 

Metropolitan Railway Company v. Fonville, 91 Pacific Re- 
porter, 902. — The supreme court of Oklahoma holds that a 
driver of a vehicle who suddenly turns his team to cross a 
street railway track without looking and listening for an ap- 
proaching car, and without taking the ordinary care and pre- 
cautions imperatively required of all who place themselves 
in a similar position of danger, is guilty of contributory negli- 
gence as a matter of law. 



No Error in Excluding Evidence of Having No Report of Acci- 
dents. 

Randazzo v. Brooklyn Heights Railroad Company, 106 
New York Supplement, 193. — The supreme court of New York, 
appellate division, second department, holds that in a personal 
injury case where there was no evidence that the defendant 
required, or that it was customary for reports of accidents 
to be made by its employes, there .was no error in excluding 
evidence that there was no report of the alleged accident in 
question on the files of the company, as such evidence could 
have no weight. 



Reasonableness of Speed. 
Smith v. Connecticut Railway & Lighting Company, 67 At- 
lantic Reporter, 888. — The supreme court of errors of Con- 
necticut says that the reasonableness of the speed at which a 
car is run is to be measured by the relation of that speed to 
the particular circumstances under which it is maintained. A 
speed of 20 miles an hour might not be unreasonable in the 
open country, where the view is unobstructed, and there are 
no travelers in sight. A speed of three or four miles an hour 
might be unreasonable in a crowded street, when other 
vehicles or pedestrians were on the tracks in front, or ob- 
viously on the point of crossing them. 



Liability for Injury from Acceleration of Speed After Passen- 
ger Has Gone on Platform to Alight After Signal. 

Ranous v. Seattle Electric Company, 92 Pacific Reporter, 
382. — The supreme court of Washington says that cases might 
be cited establishing: (1) That a street car passenger, who 
leaves his seat when the car is approaching his destination 
and goes to the platform for the purpose of alighting when 
the car comes to a stop, is not as a matter of law guilty of 
contributory negligence. (2) That a street railway company 
is not liable to such a passenger for injuries resulting from 
the ordinary jolting or jerking of the car, or the acceleration 
of its speed for the purpose of reaching its usual stopping 
place. 

But this case presented a different question. The plain- 
tiff was not injured by the ordinary jerking or jolting of the 
car in reaching its usual stopping place, nor by the accelera- 
tion of its speed for that purpose. The testimony on her part 
tended to show that at the time of paying her fare, or sur- 
rendering her transfer, she made known to the conductor in 
charge of the car her desire to alight at Sixth avenue, and 
between Seventh and Eighth avenues she made a like request. 
As the car passed Seventh avenue the conductor sounded the 
bell. As the car approached Sixth avenue at a slow rate of 
speed, she arose from her seat and proceeded to the back plat- 
form of the car, with the intention of alighting from the car 
when the same should come to a stop. As the car reached 
about the center of Sixth avenue its speed was suddenly 
accelerated, and the lurch caused by such acceleration threw 
the plaintiff from her position on the back platform of the 
car into the street. The evidence, the court holds, was suffi- 
cient to justify a verdict in her favor. 



As to the contention that the conductor and motorman 
did not know that the plaintiff was on the platform or in a 
place of danger, the court says that if the bell was sounded 
to stop the car at Sixth . avenue, as the plaintiff contended, 
the operators in charge of the car were bound to know that 
passengers might and constantly do act upon the warning thus 
given. 



Kind of Employes Required for Exercise of Highest Care — 
$3,500 Verdict Sustained. 

Connell v. Seattle Ren ton & Southern Railway Company, 
92 Pacific Reporter, 377. — The supreme court of Washington 
says that it seems almost axiomatic that only very careful, 
prudent and experienced operators of cars can exercise the 
highest degree of care. 

The plaintiff in this case, it appeared, was standing and 
holding to a strap in a car crowded full of passengers. The 
force of a collision with another car threw her violently in the 
mass of passengers, and she was much bruised about her side 
and injured about her ribs and spine. She was shown to be 
very nervous after the accident, although she was reasonably- 
strong and well before. For years she had worked and earned 
her own living expenses. At the time of the injuries she was 
employed in a store in the alteration of ladies tailor-made 
gowns; but after the accident she had been unable to follow 
that vocation, or any other. Under such evidence the court 
will not say that a verdict for $3,500 in her favor was exces- 
sive. 



Validity of City Ordinance Prohibiting the Sale, Giving Away 
or Receiving of Transfers. 

City of Chicago v. Openheim and others, 82 Northeastern 
Reporter, 294. — The supreme court of Illinois says that the 
defendants were arrested on a charge of violating a city or- 
dinance prohibiting any person from selling a street railway 
transfer ticket issued by a street railway company within the 
city, given to a passenger for the purpose of authorizing him 
to transfer from one car line to another without the payment 
of additional fare, as also prohibiting any person from giving 
away such transfer ticket for the purpose of enabling the per- 
son to whom given to use or offer it for passage upon any 
street railway car or cars, and further prohibiting any person 
from receiving any transfer ticket in the manner prohibited 
by the ordinance, and from using, attempting to use or offering 
the same for passage upon any street railway car or cars. 

Upon a hearing in the municipal court, without a jury, 
all of the parties were discharged. The supreme court holds 
that such disposition of the cases was erroneous, as the or- 
dinance was valid, contrary to the opinion of the lower court. 

The supreme court says that this ordinance was enacted 
for the benefit of passengers wishing to make a trip which 
necessitated the use of more than one line of the street rail- 
way company. It was not within the contemplation of the 
city council, in adopting the ordinance, that a person wishing 
to make a trip to a point reached by the initial line of passage 
should have the right to demand a transfer ticket for the pur- 
pose of selling it to someone else, to be used in making a trip 
over a connecting line of the street railway company. When 
a passenger pays his fare on the street railway he is entitled 
to a transfer ticket if in making his trip he desires to transfer 
from one line to another upon which transfers are issued, 
and such transfer is good upon the line over which it is 
issued if used at the place and within the time required. 
Limiting it to the use of the person to whom issued is not 
taking it away from him so that he is divested of his title 
and possession, and does not therefore deprive him of his 
property. 

Nor was the court's opinion changed by the argument that 
the ordinance prohibits the selling or giving away of street 
railway transfer tickets without any limitation or restriction 
and without any regard to tne place where issued or the time 



22 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



when issued, so that if a person to whom a transfer had been 
issued should sell or give it away at any time after the right 
to use it had expired, or at any place, however distant, from 
the place where it was authorized to be used, such person 
would be subject to the penalties provided by the ordinance 
for its violation. 



Tracks Treated as Property of Company Using Them — Owner- 
ship of Car and Division of Fares Immaterial — Car 
Cleaning and Repairing May be Delegated. 

Beckman . v. Meadville & Cambridge Springs Street Rail- 
way Company, 67 Atlantic Reporter, 983. — The supreme court 
of Pennsylvania says that the tracks at the point where the 
plaintiff's husband was killed were the property of the Mead- 
ville Traction Company, but were in joint use by that com- 
pany and the defendant under a traffic agreement. For the 
purposes of this case, therefore, they were to be considered 
as the property of each in turn while in use by it. 

Under the agreement the cars of the defendant were to be 
cleaned and repaired by the traction company. Two cars of 
the defendant had been delivered under this arrangement to 
the traction company, which dismantled one of them, attached 
it by chains to the other, and started both toward the car barn 
for cleaning and repair. On the way the coupling chains 
broke and the dismantled car ran on a down grade at increas- 
ing speed until it collided with the car of the defendant on a 
siding, in which latter car was the plaintiff's husband. 

The fact that the colliding car was the property of the 
defendant was immaterial. For the time being it was the 
property of the traction company, having been delivered to it 
for repair and not yet returned. Whether it was on its way 
to the car barn for further work or for storage or for delivery 
was not material. It had not been returned to the defendant, 
but was still in the hands and under the control of the trac- 
tion company, which for this purpose was an independent 
contractor. 

Cleaning and repairing cars was no part of the defendant's 
franchise which could not be delegated. It was the ordinary 
case of an independent mechanic receiving an article for re- 
pair, and while in custody of it so using it as to injure another 
person. If the traction company had hauled the car out to 
the other end of its road for the repairs and the accident had 
taken place there, where the defendant's cars did not run, no 
question would have arisen as to the defendant's liability. 
Yet the case was no different. Neither the ownership of the 
colliding car nor the place of the accident had any relevancy 
at all to the question of the defendant's liability. 

The negligence, if any, from which the accident resulted 
was, so far as the evidence showed, that of the workmen who 
attached the dismantled car to the one drawing it. They were 
the employes of the traction company. Some effort was made 
to show that the defendant paid for their services, but the 
evidence only went so far as to show that as between the 
two companies the traction company was to repair and clean 
the cars at cost, and that it therefore kept an account, among 
other things, of the wages paid for such services, and the 
defendant paid on that basis. The workmen themselves were 
employed, controlled and discharged by the traction company 
and were in no sense coemployes of the defendant. 

Another effort was made to hold the defendant liable on 
the ground that by the agreement it paid the traction company 
2% cents for every passenger it carried over the latter's lines, 
and therefore when the plaintiff's husband paid his fare there 
arose a joint obligation of both companies for his safe car- 
riage. But there was no basis for such claim. The defendant 
under the agreement was a lessee of running rights over the 
traction company's tracks, and the division of fares was only 
a method of estimating the rental to be paid. The traction 
company remained in the sole ownership and control of the 
road, and the defendant no more entered into a joint liability 
by that arrangement than any other tenant by an agreement 



to pay rent to his landlord. The class of cases arising from 
accidents caused by defective roadbed running regulations, 
etc., for which the joint users of the road are equally liable to 
their passengers, had no applicability to the facts of the pres- 
ent case. 

Summing up the whole case, briefly, it showed the de- 
fendant using what must be treated as its own track, lawfully 
and without negligence, and having its passenger killed by 
the act of a third party, over whom it had no control, and for 
whose action it was in no wise responsible. The presumption 
of negligence arising from the death of a passenger by col- 
lision having been fully rebutted, and there being no evidence 
to show negligence in fact, a verdict should have been di- 
rected for the defendant. 



Rights of Passenger Carried Beyond Destination and Injured 
After Leaving Car with Advice of Conductor. 

Stevens v. Kansas City Elevated Railway Company, 105 
Southwestern Reporter, 26. — The Kansas City court of appeals 
holds that if the plaintiff informed the conductor of the place 
where she wished to depart, the place thus designated being 
a regular station, it became the duty of the conductor to stop 
the car at that place, call its name or otherwise notify her 
that she had reached it, and to hold the car a reasonably suffi- 
cient time for her to leave it in safety. The relation of pas- 
senger and carrier does not cease until the carrier transports 
the passenger to his destination, and affords him a reasonable 
opportunity to alight in safety from the vehicle. 

Where the passenger is induced to forego the right to be 
carried to his destination by the representation that he can 
reach it in safety by following proffered directions, he is justi- 
fied in relying on the superior knowledge of the trainmen, and 
should not be held to have abandoned his contract right to be 
carried to his destination, and there permitted to alight in 
safety. Constructively he remains a passenger until he 
reaches that point, and is entitled to recover for any injuries 
he may sustain from following the negligent directions he re- 
ceived from the carrier's servants. The directions being 
given by the conductor in an attempt to perform the contract 
of the carrier are within the scope of his employment, and 
bind the carrier to answer in damages for the injuries caused 
by them. 

If. however, the plaintiff failed to give timely notice of 
her intended destination, and when the car stopped at that 
point to permit passengers to alight remained in her seat, she 
was not entitled to recover from the fact that the conductor 
afterward negligently directed her relative to the best way 
to reach her destination. The court does not agree with 
counsel for the defendant in the proposition that, when the 
car left that point, she had ceased to become a passenger, 
and the defendant owed her no contractual duty. The fare 
she paid entitled her to ride to the end of the line if she 
chose. On receiving timely notice from her, it was the duty 
of the defendant to stop at any regular station and give her a 
reasonable opportunity to alight. If she failed to give such 
notice and was carried past the point where she intended to 
stop, that was her fault, and, although she still continued to 
be a passenger until she left the car, the defendant owed her 
no duty to carry her back to her destination under the con- 
tract then in force. If she decided to leave the car at the 
next stopping place and return afoot, the defendant would be 
in no wise responsible for the consequences of such decision, 
and when it stopped the car and permitted her to alight it 
fully discharged its contractual duty, and, from the instant she 
stepped in safety to the street she ceased to be a passenger. 
In stepping to the street, under such an hypothesis of facts, 
the plaintiff voluntarily abandoned her status as passenger 
and thereafter she could follow the advice or directions the 
conductor had given her, or proceed in any other way, but in 
either event the defendant should not be held responsible 
for her future mishaps. 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



23 



News of the Week 



Car Operated Through Hoboken Tunnel. 

One of the new steel cars which will be operated through 
the Hudson Companies' tunnel under the Hudson river made 
the first complete trip from Morton street. Manhattan, to 
Hoboken. X. J., on December 28. E. M. Hedley. superin- 
tendent of the Hudson River Tunnel Company, acted as motor- 
man and a number of officials and engineers made up the 
party. 

Strike on the Local Lines of the Indiana Union Traction Com- 
pany. 

A strike was declared on January 1 by the motormen and 
conductors employed on the local lines of the Indiana Union 
Traction Company at Anderson and Muncie, Ind., who are 
members of the Amalgamated Association of Street and Elec- 
tric Railway Employes. From reports it seems that the men's 
reason for the strike is that the company on December 31 
signed a 3-year wage contract with the Brotherhood of Inter- 
urban Trainmen, of which most of the company's trainmen are 
members, instead of with the Amalgamated association. Mem- 
bers of the Amalgamated association presented an ultimatum 
to the company on Monday threatening a strike if the contract 
with their association was not signed by 6 p. m. The sched- 
ules provided for in the two contracts are said to be prac- 
tically the same. General Manager H. A. Nicholl replied that 
he had signed a contract with the brotherhood as representing 
the majority of the employes and that no reduction of wages 
for either interurban or local men was contemplated. 

Strikebreakers from Chicago were placed on the cars in 
Muncie and Anderson on Tuesday when the men walked out. 
This action was followed by a riot at Muncie on Tuesday 
afternoon. The men on the cars were attacked by a stone- 
throwing mob of strikers and sympathizers and retaliated by 
shooting. Two bystanders were shot, a street car was de- 
molished and an interurban car was badly damaged. Several 
persons received injuries. The rioting did not cease until 
every car was sent to the barns. 

On Thursday, when the company again attempted to run 
cars, the rioting was resumed and the cars had to be taken 
back to the barns. On Friday morning two cars were wrecked 
by the strikers. As we go to press we are advised by tele- 
graph that four companies of the Indiana militia are assem- 
bled at Indianapolis and four others are waiting outside of the 
city, having been summoned by Governor Hanly, who awaits 
word from Adjutant-General Perry before sending them to 
Muncie. Cars are running at Muncie under police protection, 
but the company has cars lined up at Indianapolis ready to 
transport the soldiers to Muncie at a moment's notice if neces- 
sary. 

To Discuss Form of Annual Report. — The Ontario Railway 
and Municipal Board has fixed January 21 as the date upon 
which it will receive a deputation of Ontario members of the 
Canadian Street Railway Association for the purpose of dis- 
cussing objections to the form of the annual reports required 
by the board. 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers. — A meeting of 
the Worcester Polytechnic Institute section of the American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers was held at Worcester, Mass., 
on January 3. J. A. Sandford, Jr., addressed the meeting on 
the subject of "Requirements, Manufacture and Present Good 
Usage of Porcelain Insulators for High-Voltage Lines." 

Recent Accidents. — About twenty persons are said to 
have been injured in a head-on collision on December 28, be- 
tween two cars of the Eastern Pennsylvania Railways Com- 
pany on the line between Tamaqua and Lansford. The 
accident occurred on a single-track line shortly after midnight 
during a heavy fog. which prevented the motormen from 
seeing the cars until too late. 

Railway Signal Association. — A regular meeting of the 
Railway Signal Association will be held at New York. N. Y. 
(Engineering Societies building. Room No. 6), on January 14, 
beginning at 10 a. m. The programme includes discussion of 
the reports of the committees on "Automatic Block Signals" 
and on "Electric Interlocking" and a paper by F. R. Cook on 
"Economical Operation of Electric Signals and Care and Main- 
tenance of Storage Batteries in Signal Work." 

New York Commission to Continue Investigation. — Chair- 
man Willcox of the New York public service commission has 
announced that the commission will continue at an early date 



its investigations into the financial affairs of the 
transit lines of the city. The commission al o propo 
turn its attention to the new East Side subway, the removal 
of the New York Central tracks from Eleventh avenue, the 
building of future subways and bearings on service orders. 

Decision Favors Dallas, Tex., Students. — Judge Tucker 
of the district court, at Dallas, Tex., has rendered a decision 
in favor of college' students, who brought suit to compel the 
Dallas Consolidated Electric Street Railway to issue half- 
Eare tickets. The court holds thai the act of the legi 
of 1903, requiring street railway companies to issue half- 
fare transportation in certain cases to students not ovet i i 
is still in force, and ili.H it was not repealed by 
the anti-free pass law of the thirtieth legislature. The court 
also holds that the word "grades," as used in the act of L903, 
refers to the students and not to the school. 

Electrification of Sarnia Tunnel Nearing Completion. — 
The power house, overhead construction, track bonding and 
practically all other work in connection with the electrification 
of the Sarnia-Port Huron tunnel of the Grand Trunk under 
the St. Clair river has been completed and three of the elec- 
tric locomotives have been received. A preliminary test of 
the electrical equipment was made during the latter part of 
last month and it is expected that regular operation of trains 
through the tunnel by electric locomotives will be commenced 
in a few weeks. The power station units are two 1.250-kilo- 
watt Parsons turbine generators to furnish single-phase cur- 
rent at 3,300 volts potential direct' to the trolley. 

No-Seat No-Fare Hearing. — Six cases selected by the coun- 
cil for the city of Jersey City. N. J., to test the no-seat no-fare 
ordinance recently upheld by the state supreme court were 
heard before a police justice on December 30. The North Jer- 
sey Street Railway, against which the cases were brought, was 
represented by Col. E. W. Hine. assistant to the president, and 
William D. Edwards, of counsel. Several witnesses for the 
city testified that they had boarded the company's cars, leav- 
ing the Pennsylvania ferry terminal, and refused to pay fare 
until given seats. They had been informed by the conductors 
that no seats were available, but that they must pay fare or 
leave the car. The cases were all postponed until the follow- 
ing day, when the court aquitted the company in one case 
and fined it $50 in another. 

Oregon Electric Railway's New Line Opened. — Regular 
service from Portland to Salem, Ore., was begun by this com- 
pany on January 1, with the operation of one car a day be- 
tween the terminals of the road. As rapidly as possible more 
equipment will be provided and it is expected that by Febru- 
ary 1 eight trains will be running in each direction daily. 
There are nine regular passenger and freight stations, located 
as follows: Portland. Multnomah, Tualatin. Tonquin, Wilson- 
ville. Donal. West Woodburn, Waconda and Salem. A tem- 
porary arrangement for fares based on the 3-cents-a-mile 
basis has been announced with round-trip, commutation and 
week-end tickets at reduced rates. The permanent schedule 
of fares will be arranged as soon as the details incident to the 
opening of the line have been worked out. Power for operat- 
ing the road is obtained from the Portland Railway Light & 
Power Company. The road, as completed, is 50 miles long. 
It is proposed, however, to build during the coming year a 
branch from Portland to Forest Grove, 26 miles long, and one 
from Salem to Albany and Eugene, Ore., 68 miles long. It is 
planned to have the Forest Grove branch completed by August 
1 of this year. 

Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company Refuses to Deal with 
Union. — The strike which the employes of the Philadelphia 
Rapid Transit Company threatened about two weeks ago has 
not yet been declared and the general opinion in Philadelphia 
seems to be that there will be no strike. Mayor Reyburn. at 
the request of the Central Labor Union, has attempted to ar- 
range for a conference between the officials of the company 
and the union to discuss the demands of the men for an in- 
crease in wages and better working conditions. The directors 
held a meeting on December 26 and passed resolutions, which 
were communicated by the mayor to the Central Labor Union, 
to the effect that fhey deemed any conferences between the 
company and the union inadvisable and unnecessary. The 
directors stated that "the company has already exceeded its 
abilities in remunerating its employes and any conference 
could not possibly result in any benefit or change other than 
enabling outside organizations to levy heavy contributions 
upon them with no possible benefit in return. President 
Mahon and other officers of the union have been in Phila- 
delphia, but have not announced any decision to declare a 
strike. A large number of strikebreakers in the employ of 
John Farley are still quartered at Willow Grove Park in an- 
ticipation of any trouble, but many of them have left the city. 



24 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



Traffic and Transportation 



Advertise Service in Chicago. 

Various electric railways in Chicago had advertisements 
calling attention to their service in the statistical issues of 
the daily newspapers published on December 31 or January 1. 
The Chicago City Railway published full-page advertisements 
headed "The city gets 55 per cent." Illustrations were given 
of the new pay-as-you-enter cars with the date 1908, of horse 
cars pulled through the snow in 1859 and of cable cars with 
the date 1882. The advertisement was a statement of the 
position of the company under its new ordinance and described 
the advantages of the pay-as-you-enter plan and the new sys- 
tem of car dispatching. The following shows the character 
of the advertisement: "The Chicago City Railway Company 
proposes to broad-base its future operations upon a degree of 
public confidence and co-operation impossible in the past. 
*.. * * The company holds that under its partnership agree- 
ment with the city an unjust claim enforced against it is on a 
par with the bogus judgment against the municipality. * * * 
The City Railway is bending every effort to render travel on 
its lines safe as well as comfortable. The life or limb of a 
patron is neither an achievement nor an asset. On the con- 
trary, it is a moral horror and a financial loss." 

The advertisement of the South Side Elevated Railroad 
contained a view of Kenwood junction. The Metropolitan 
West Side Elevated Railway . advertised its accessibility to 
factory sites. The Northwestern Elevated Railroad adver- 
tised "Nearly 600 trains each way every 24 hours. The ex- 
cellent transportation facilities offered by this line should 
appeal to every prospective purchaser of a home." 

Petition of Electric Railway for Joint Rates with Steam 
Roads Denied. 

The interstate commerce commission has rendered a 
decision, through Commissioner James S. Harlan, denying 
the petition of the Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad to 
have the Illinois Central Railroad and its controlled line, the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley Railroad, establish through routes 
and joint rates for the transportation of cabbages from points 
on the electric road to stations on the steam road. The 
report of the commission decides: 

"Notwithstanding the fact that the issue, as made on the 
pleadings, covers all points on the lines of both companies 
and calls for joint through rates on general traffic, the testi- 
mony on the hearing was directly solely to the need of the 
complainant for an outlet to southern markets for the cabbage 
product of that part of southern Wisconsin through which its 
line passes and which seems to be devoted largely, if not 
exclusively, to the production of cabbages. 

"The application is contested by the principal defendants, 
as well as by the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, which, on 
the stipulation of the parties, intervened after the hearing and 
became a party defendant, on the ground that the cabbage 
district in question is already served by reasonable and satis- 
factory through routes. 

"Although it does some local freight business between 
Evanston and Lake Bluff, the principal traffic enjoyed by the 
complainant between those points is such as pertains to any 
interurban street car company. But from Lake Bluff the 
petitioner has constructed a branch line to Rockefeller, which 
affords it a larger opportunity for conducting a general freight 
traffic. 

"The fact that the complainant has no refrigerator cars 
of its own in which to move cabbages, if the through routes 
desired are established by the commission, is not only ad- 
mitted by the petitioner, but it also confesses that the commis- 
sion would be unwarranted in compelling the establishment 
of joint rates and through routes unless the Illinois Central 
Railroad will voluntarily supply the necessary cars after the 
routes and rates have been established, or unless the com- 
plainant, as a matter of law, can compel it to do so. The 
record indicates the unwillingness of that defendant to supply 
the required empty cars to the complainant. And the com- 
plainant meets that situation by maintaining that after the 
through routes and joint rates have been established it will 
have further redress against that defendant on the ground 
that if the Illinois Central Railroad, notwithstanding the cus- 
tom which requires the carrier having the long haul to supply 
the cars, should refuse the complainant this privilege while 
supplying cars under similar conditions to other small carriers, 
its refusal would be an unjust and illegal discrimination that 
could and ought to be corrected by this commission. 

"The defendants insist that reasonable and satsifactory 
through routes now exist over which the cabbage product of 



the district described in the petition may readily and promptly 
find an outlet to the desired markets in the south. The 
complainant on the other hand denies that a reasonable and 
satisfactory through route exists; and in this connection its 
counsel puts an interpretation upon the provision of law under 
which the commission is authorized to act in such cases that 
has not heretofore been suggested. And counsel for the 
complainant insists that the contention of the defendants that 
'the territory through which the petitioner is operating is also 
served by the Chicago & Northwestern Railway and that rea- 
sonable and satisfactory rates (routes) now exist' is based 
upon 'a perverted reading of the proviso' of that clause. 
Counsel's own reading of it apparently is that there are no 
reasonable and satisfactory routes because 'there is no joint 
rate or through route from points on the petitioner's line to 
points upon the line of the Illinois Central.' In other words, 
his contention seems to be that it does not satisfy the require- 
ments of the law if the neighborhood or territory, in which 
the shipping community is and through which both lines run, 
is already served by a reasonable and satisfactory through 
route; but that the law means that if there are already no 
reasonable and satisfactory through routes to the markets in 
question from points on his line in that neighborhood or. 
territory the commission has the authority to and must estab- 
lish such through routes. 

"We are unable to perceive the force of this suggestion. 
It proceeds apparently on the theory that the sole object of 
the provision above quoted was to afford a means by which 
new lines, with the aid of the commission, may profitably 
force their way into shipping districts built up and already 
well and adequately served by older lines, and thus seize and 
divide with the latter such traffic as may be offered for move- 
ment. If that be the import of the clause in question, it is 
too well concealed to be readily discernible. With the 
development of the power of the commission to regulate rates 
and to protect the public interests by readjusting them when 
in excess of reasonableness and fairness, the need of compet- 
ing lines becomes less vital to shipping communities whose 
transportation facilities are already ample. And had the con- 
gress intended thus to interfere in the competitive struggles 
of carriers for traffic it cannot be doubted that its policy 
would have been announced in more definite language. We 
regard it as clear that the purpose of the clause was to afford 
relief to shipping communities, and not to aid carriers to 
acquire strategic advantages in their contests with one 
another. While it may not be doubted that a railroad com- 
pany is competent to file a complaint before us under the 
clause in question and to demand an order establishing 
through routes and joint rates with its connections, its right 
to such relief is to be tested by the needs of the community 
which it seeks thus to serve, and not by the fact that stations 
on its line in such communities have not been accorded such 
routes and rates by connecting lines. 

"The only question therefore that remains to be con- 
sidered is whether, in the language of the proviso, any 
'reasonable or satisfactory through route exists' from the cab- 
bage producing district described in the record to the southern 
markets which the complainant desires to reach. Under all 
the facts and circumstances disclosed upon this record, we 
must hold that the district in question already enjoys the 
advantages of reasonable and satisfactory through routes. A 
freight receiving station in an agricultural community that 
is close at hand to one farmer or producer must of necessity 
be farther away from his next neighbor. And unless it be 
that every farmer is entitled to have the rails run to his own 
door a farming community that is required to haul its prod- 
ucts no farther than three-quarters of a mile to a mile and a 
half, as shown in this record, in order to reach the freight 
receiving stations of well-established lines, must be held to 
be reasonably well served. That the shipping district here 
referred to has been well served by the Chicago & North- 
western Railway is shown by the fact that it has enjoyed a 
prosperity and growth beyond the average of concededly 
prosperous farming communities. 

"It is scarcely necessary to add that the apprehension of 
counsel that the merits of complainant's contention may be 
prejudiced or obscured by the fact that it is an electric line 
is without foundation. The act makes no distinction between 
railroads that are operated by electricity and those that use 
steam: nor has the commission thought at any time to make 
such distinction. Both are subject to the act when engaged 
in interstate transporattion and are entitled to equal consider- 
ation in any controversy before us. Moreover, progress in 
the science of electricity and the rapid increase of new 
devices for its application have led many practical railroad 
men to think that we may be measurably near its general use 
as the chief motive power in transportation. The complaint 
must be dismissed, and it will be so ordered." 



.January 4. 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Improvement in Service Ordered in New York. — The pub- 
lic service commission, first district, has ordered the New York 
City Railway to increase by 50 per cenl the number of cars 
operated in Eighth avenue after midnight, and by 20 to 25 
per cent the number at other hours. The New York City 
Intorborough Company has been ordered to re-establish service 
on the line in Aqueduct avenue, from One Hundred and Fifty- 
fifth street to Kingsbridge road. 

Change in Fares by Pittsburg Railways Company. — We 
are advised by an official of the Pittsburg Railways Company 
thai the change in fare on the night cars to Allegheny was 
caused by the merging of Allegheny into Pittsburg, making 
them one municipality. During the last year the Pennsyl- 
vania legislature enacted a law providing that the street 
railways in second-class cities should not charge over one 
fare. Heretofore the Pittsburg Railways Company had been 
charging double fare on night cars. This company is testing 
this law in the supreme court at present, but believes it is 
better policy to comply with the law than to have any dis- 
turbances on the cars, until the decision of the supreme court 
is rendered. 

Reduction in Fares by Atlanta Northern Railway. — A vol- 
untary reduction of 28.5 per cent in passenger fares has been 
announced by the Georgia Railway & Electric Company on 
the Atlanta Northern Railway, the subsidiary line which 
operates between Atlanta and Marietta. The reduction was 
effective as of January 1, 1908. Beginning that day family 
commutation tickets were placed on sale. The reduced rate, 
while not ordered, was submitted to the Georgia railroad 
commission and received its hearty approval. The officials of 
the company state that they put the rate into effect as an 
experiment and have the permission of the board to dis- 
continue it if in their opinion it is unsatisfactory. The 
Atlanta Northern road was put into operation in 1905, on a 
basis of two cents a mile, when the Western & Atlantic Rail- 
road was charging three cents a mile. Some time after the 
line was placed in regular operation a reduction in fares was 
made and individual tickets, good for fifty-four trips, were 
sold, making the fare between Marietta and Atlanta less than 
a cent a mile. In the meantime the regular single-trip fare 
remained the same. Now, however, the family commutation 
ticket will permit practically evry patron to ride at about a 
cent a mile. 

Low Rate to Amusement Park Not Discriminative. — The 
Indiana railroad commission has decided that the rates 
charged by the Indiana Union Traction Company between 
Indianapolis and Broad Ripple are not discriminative, as com- 
plained by citizens of the latter town. The company charges 
a 10-cent fare each way between Indianapolis and the town 
of Broad Ripple, and also sells round-trip tickets from Indian- 
apolis to the White City amusement park, located at Broad 
Ripple, for 10 cents, with an extra charge of 10 cents for 
admission to the park. The citizens claimed that it was dis- 
crimination to require them to pay 20 cents for a trip to 
Indianapolis and return while people from Indianapolis could 
ride to the park and back for 10 cents. The commission says 
"there is no well-founded objection to the round-trip fare 
from the city to Broad Ripple park. The purpose of this 
rate is to induce a flow of traffic from a city of over 200,000 
inhabitants to a place of amusement and recreation. Such 
a place well conducted is to be encouraged, as it furnishes an 
additional point for recreation and rest for the residents of 
congested districts in the city." 



Construction News 



Justice Davis of the New York supreme court has reserved 
decision on the application of the New York City Railway to 
vacate an order for the examination of its nine directors 
before a referee. The order was obtained by Attorney- 
General Jackson of New York state and the petition recited 
that the appointment of receivers by the federal court was 
brought about by collusion between the Pennsylvania Steel 
Company, the Degnon Contracting Company of New Jersey 
and the New York City Railway Company. In his argument 
before the court Samuel Untermyer said: "The attorney- 
general seeks to dissolve the corporation, upon the grounds 
that the corporation has been insolvent for at least one year. 
and he must show this to the satisfaction of the court. His 
complaint, has no bearing on the issue, and he seeks to exam- 
ine the directors on what we claim to be matters extraneous 
to the main issue, which is whether or not this company has 
been insolvent for more than a year." 



A concrete dam 50 feet high and 400 feet long, containing 
24,000 cubic yards of concrete, has just been completed for 
the La Crosse Water Power Company at Hatfield, Wis. There 
is to be installed a 16,000 horsepower electric transmission 
plant covering a radius of 90 miles of territory. 



FRANCHISES. 

Bloomfield, N. J. — The Public Service Corporation of New 
Jersey will soon make application for permission to double 
track its line from Glenwood avenue, in Orange, to Bloomfield 
Centre, N. J. The company also desires to extend its Orange 
& Passaic Valley line from the present terminus at Bay avenue 
to Brookdale and ultimately to Paterson, N. J. 

Defiance, O. — K. V. Haymaker of Defiance, has secured a 
25-year franchise for the operation of the proposed Detroit 
Defiance & Ft. Wayne and the Defiance Paulding & Ft. 
Wayne elctric lines through the city. The last-named road 
owns eight miles of the old Wabash & Erie canal bank 
and will be built from Detroit to Ft. Wayne by way of Wan- 
seon, Lyons, Defiance, Paulding and New Haven, Ind. The 
council also has granted a franchise to the Toledo Wabash & 
St. Louis Electric Railroad in which C. D. Whitney and others, 
of Toledo, O., are interested. 

Millville, N. J. — A franchise has been granted to a Buffalo 
syndicate for the construction of a 36-mile interurban railroad 
from Millville to Ocean City, N. J. Right of way is said to 
have been secured from the property owners along the pro- 
posed route and construction may be started in the spring. 
The names of those interested were not made public. 

Streator, III. — The Illinois Traction System has officially 
accepted the 50-year franchise granted by the city council 
about a week ago for the Chicago Peoria & Ottawa Railway, 
which is to be part of the system's line to Chicago. 

TRACK AND ROADWAY. 

Americus Railway & Light Company, Americus, Ga. — 
It is announced that construction work on this company's 
4-mile street railway system in Americus will be started some 
time this month. A. N. Walker, of the South Carolina Public 
Service Corporation, will superintend the work. (Mentioned 
September 28, 1907.) 

Atlanta, Ga. — Joel Hurt of Atlanta is said to be inter- 
ested in a proposed interurban railway which will connect 
Atlanta and Decatur, a suburb of Atlanta. The line will start 
from a point near Hurt park and reach the city limits of 
Atlanta over the extension of Ponce de Leon avenue. It is 
stated that no definite plans have been laid, but the build- 
ing of other lines by the new company radiating from Atlanta 
is probable. The promoters are residents along the route or 
are property owners in the vicinity of the proposed line. 

Aurora, Mo. — Surveys for an interurban railway which 
will connect Springfield and Joplin, Mo., have been made by 
Henry L. Davis, city surveyor. (New road.) 

Burlington, Ind. — It is reported that A. A. Newer of Bur- 
lington, Ind., and others are interested in a project to build 
an interurban line from Logansport to Frankfort, Ind., via 
Burlington. 

Charleston & Summerville Electric Railway, Charleston, 
S. C. — This company, which has completed considerable 
grading on its proposed line from Charleston to Summerville. 
S. C, 27 miles, has been reorganized with the following 
officers: President, Julius G. Hocke, 15 Whitehall street, 
New York; secretary and treasurer, George Tupper, Summer- 
ville; general counsel, St. Julien Grimke, Charleston. (Men- 
tioned December 14, 1907.) 

Clarkston, Wash. — A syndicate of Chicago men is said 
to be planning the construction of a 40-mile electric line in 
Washington, connecting Anatone, Asotin. Vineland, Clarkston 
and Lewiston. It is stated that the syndicate will invest 
about $1,500,000 and local capital is being sought to increase 
the amount to $2,000,000. Committees have been appointed to 
secure 25 per cent of the stock subscriptions from local 
capital, no payment being required until the road is built and 
in operation. Active construction work is promised as soon 
as the local stock has been subscribed and will be finished in 
two and one-half years. Surveys have been started from 
Asotin to Anatone. 14 miles, with an elevation of 2,200 feet. 
Frank McKean, chief engineer. (New road.) 

Denver & Interurban Railway, Denver, Colo. — Announce- 
ment is made of the formal opening of the Ft. Collins division 
of this road on December 2S. when a party of officials of the 
company and about 200 invited guests made the initial trip 
over the line. It is stated that cars will now be operated 
regularly over the four miles of city track now- completed in 
Ft. Collins. Current is supplied by the Northern Colorado 
Power Company at Lafayette, Colo. The road is owned by 



26 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



the Colorado & Southern Railroad. Numerous extensions are 
planned for 1908, among which are the equipping for electri- 
cal operation of the Eldorado Springs (steam) Railway and 
16*4 miles of extension from Denver to Louisville Junction, 
the grading for which has been completed. H. W. Cowan is 
chief engineer, Denver, Colo. 

Evansville Henderson & Uniontown Traction Company, 
Henderson, Ky. — It is reported that this company, which pro- 
poses to begin construction in the spring on a line from Evans- 
ville, Ind., to Henderson, Ky., has filed amended articles of 
incorporation increasing the capital stock from $10,000 to 
$100,000. 

Indianapolis & Cairo Traction Company, Indianapolis, 
Ind. — Charles McDermott, secretary of this company, writes 
that this line has been surveyed from Indianapolis to Sullivan, 
80 miles. Grading has been completed from near Robison to 
OIney, 16 miles. When completed, the road will connect 
Indianapolis and Cairo, 111., a total distance of 25S miles, and 
will serve the following intermediate towns: Sullivan and 
Robison, Ind., Olney, Fairfield, McLeansboro, Marion. Vienna, 
and Mound City, 111. A. L. Hassler, president, 411 State Life 
building, Indianapolis', Charles McDermott, secretary. (Men- 
tioned December 28, 1907.) 

Knoxville (Tenn.) Railway & Light Company. — Ford, 
Bacon & Davis of New York, who has been engaged for the 
past four years in rebuilding this company's entire system, 
have completed the work and removed the construction forces 
from the city. All of the track has been laid with 90-pound 
rails. 

Lake Erie Bowling Green & Napoleon Railway, Bowling 
Green, O. — It is stated that this company is planning to extend 
its line westward from Bowling Green to Tontogany, O. 

Lancaster County Railway & Light Company, Lancaster, 
Pa. — This company has installed a 1,500-horsepower engine 
in its power station at Hebron, Pa. 

Louisville & Interurban Railroad, Louisville. Ky. — Seven 
miles of new track on the extension out the Bardstown road 
from Louisville have been completed and placed in operation. 
The entire extension, which will be 14 miles long, is expected 
to be completed in the spring. 

Monterey, Cal. — It is stated that financial arrangements 
have been concluded for the construction of an electric rail- 
way from Monterey to Carmel-by-the-Sea. Surveys are being 
made by H. B. Fisher, chief engineer, San Jose, Cal. Frank 
Powers, of the Carmel Development Company, San Francisco, 
is interested in the new line. (New road.) 

Olney, III. — At a meeting held in Olney on December 24, 
a company was organized to build an electric line from Olney 
to Mt. Carmel and Evansville, crossing the Wabash river at 
Mt. Carmel. 

Omaha & Council Bluffs Street Railway, Omaha, Neb. — 
The extension of the Sherman avenue line of this company 
from Thirty-sixth street and Ames avenue was opened on 
December 24 to Forty-second street and Grand avenue. The 
extension from Forty-fifth and Grant streets to the Deaf and 
Dumb Institute was placed in operation on December 25. 

Ontario West Shore Electric Railway, Goderich, Ont. — 
This company which was formed to construct a railway 
between Goderich and Kincardine, Ont., has asked the city of 
Goderich to guarantee its bonds to the extent of $150,000. 
The company is empowered to issue bonds to the extent of 
$15,000 per mile of single track. — About 35 miles. 

Pacific Electric Railway, Los Angeles, Cal. — It is expected 
that the 8-mile extension which this company is building from 
Los Nietos southeast to La Habra, will be completed and in 
operation by June 1, 1908. 

Paul Smith's Railroad. — The first electric railroad to 
serve the Adirondacks region in New York state will be com- 
pleted, it is stated, in about ten days, when the line recently 
constructed between Clear Lake Junction and Paul Smith's 
will be opened for traffic. The road is seven miles long, with 
a grade of about 1 per cent, and lies through one of the finest 
forests in the state of New York. 

Peru, Ind. — Benjamin E. Wallace, James O. Cole, Jerome 
Herff and Harry Masters, all of Peru, Ind., who organized a 
company about two years ago for the construction of an 
electric line from Peru to South Bend, Ind., by way of Roches- 
ter, Argos and Plymouth, have interested Indianapolis capital- 
ists in a revival of the project and it is said the company 
will soon be incorporated. It is stated that the new line will 
operate in connection with the Indianapolis and Peru branch 
of the old Union Traction Company of Indiana line, now 
leased and operated by the Indiana Union Traction Company. 



Pittsburg Harmony Butler & Newcastle Railway, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. — This company's bridge over Connoquenessing 
Creek, near Ellwood City, Pa., which was under construction 
was destroyed by high water last week. The loss in estimated 
at $25,000. The destruction of the bridge will materially 
delay the completion of the line from Pittsburg to Newcastle, 
upon which work was well advanced. James Bryan, of Pitts- 
burg, is chief engineer. 

Portland Eugene & Eastern Railway, Portland, Ore. — 
A. Welch, chief engineer and manager of this proposed 82-mile 
electric line, writes that four miles of track have been laid 
and the overhead construction completed in Eugene, since 
January, 1907. The road traverses a very level country from 
Eugene to Salem, Ore., by way of Springfield Junction, Albany 
and Turner. Power for the operation of the completed por- 
tion is being purchased from the Willamette Valley Company 
at Eugene. A substation of 250-kilowatt capacity has been 
built. Surveys have been completed for the entire distance, 
82 miles, and grading will be started in the near future. J. O. 
Storey, president: A. Welch, manager and chief engineer, 
Portland, Ore. (Mentioned December 14, 1907.) 

San Diego, Cal. — Construction work has been started on 
the proposed electric railway from San Diego, to Delmar, Cal. 
It is stated that this will form part of an extension which 
the Pacific Electric Railway Company intends to build along 
the coast to San Diego. W. H. Keller and C. H. Kirchoff, of 
Los Angeles, obtained the franchise. (New road.) 

Seattle, Wash. — K. Allenbaugh, Seattle, Wash., is reported 
as saying that a new electric railway project is being con- 
sidered by Seattle capitalists. As now planned the new road 
is to be constructed from a point near Buckley, Wash., to the 
Cowlitz pass, a distance of 56 miles, describing a semi- 
circle around Mt. Rainier. The line will follow the course 
of the White river from Buckley until it reaches the highest 
point east of Mt. Rainier, from whence it will follow another 
stream to the coal fields of Cowlitz pass, serving a rich mineral 
and timber section. 

Spokane & Newport Electric Railway. — Engineers are 
surveying in this vicinity for this proposed road between 
Spokane and Newport, Wash. It is stated that financial 
backing has been secured and that construction work will be 
started the coming year. Power for the operation of the 
line will be obtained from Albani Falls, adjoining Newport 
on the east. (New road.) 

Tampa & Sulphur Springs Traction Company, Tampa, 
Fla. — Ties and other material have arrived and work was 
begun last week on the Michigan avenue extension of this 
company's line to West Tampa. 

Twin City Rapid Transit Company, Minneapolis, Minn. — 
It is announced that an extensive programme of improvements 
at Lake Minnetonka is now being planned, including the 
electrification of the Minneapolis & St. Louis leased line from 
Minneapolis to Tonka Bay. In order to complete the line a 
short stretch of track will have to be built from Excelsior to 
Manitou Junction. The grading is already completed. It is 
stated that an amusement park and new boat and railway 
terminals may be built at Tonka Bay. 

Yakima Valley Transportation Company, North Yakima, 
Wash. — The first car was operated over the line of this com- 
pany on December 24 when A. J. Splawn, president, with a 
party of officials and directors, made the run from West 
Yakima Valley to the end of the line, about six miles west of 
North Yakima, and return. Regular service on a half-hour 
schedule was started on Christmas day. (Mentioned Novem- 
ber 9, 1907.) 

POWER HOUSES AND SUBSTATIONS. 

Charleston (S. C.) Railway Gas & Electric Company. — 
This company has recently made a number of important im- 
provements at its Meetings street power plant, which supplies 
current for all the city and commercial lights of Charleston 
as well as the 41-mile railway line. An addition to the boiler 
room 125 by 80 feet in area has recently been built, and 
during the past month two additional 500-horsepower Bab- 
cock & Wilcox double-deck boilers have been installed. The 
boiler equipment now has a capacity of 7,500 horsepower and 
provision has been made for an additional 2.000 horsepower. 
A Deane duplex boiler feed pump has also been installed and 
a new boiler feed tank of 50,000 gallons capacity has recently 
been completed. The power house is favorably situated at 
present for the receiving of fuel and plans are being formu- 
lated for the installation of an automatic conveyor from the 
storage yard to the boiler room. 

Springfield (Mass.) Street Railway. — It is announced that 
this company expects to complete the installation of a 2,000- 
kilowatt generator and engine within the next few weeks. 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Personal Mention 



Mr. A. G. Moser, general manager and purchasing agent 
of the Ohillicothe (O.) Electric Railroad Light & Power Com- 
pany, has resigned, effective on January 15. 

Mr. Arthur .1. Gils, heretofore auditor of the Hudson 
Valley Railway Company, with headquarters at Troy, N. Y., 
has been elected assistant secretary-treasurer of the com- 
pany. 

Mr. Louis H. Mountney, superintendent of the Lewistown 
Milton & Watsontown Passenger Railway at Milton, Pa., has 
been appointed superintendent of the Carbon Street Railway, 
Mauch Chunk, Pa. 

Mr. Martin Ackerman has been appointed superintendent 
of the Youngstown & Ohio River Railroad Company, with 
headquarters at Salem, O. Mr. Ackerman formerly was train- 
master of the Lake Shore Electric Railway. 

Mr. James J. Doyle has resigned as general superintend- 
ent of the Eastern Ohio Traction Company at Gates Mills, O., 
and will be succeeded by Mr. Joseph Emery, with the title of. 
superintendent of the Cleveland & Eastern division. 

Mr. F. J. Marsh has been appointed superintendent of the 
Cleveland & Garrettsville division of the Eastern Ohio Trac- 
tion Company, with headquarters at Chagrin Falls, O., suc- 
ceeding Mr. C. A. Denman, resigned. Mr. Marsh heretofore 
has been dispatcher at Gates Mills. 

Mr. S. B. Lucas has been appointed master mechanic 
of the South Chicago City Railway and the Hammond Whiting 
& East Chicago Electric Railway, with headquarters at South 
Chicago, 111. Mr. Lucas formerly was division master mechanic 
of the Indiana Union Traction Company at Muncie, Ind. 

Mr. Levi Paxson, heretofore chief engineer of the Evans- 
ville Princeton & Vincennes Interurban Railway, with head- 
quarters at Ft. Branch, Ind., has been appointed electrical 
engineer of the Evansville & Southern Indiana Traction Com- 
pany at Evansville, Ind., with entire charge of power stations, 
substations and overhead construction of the city and inter- 
urban lines. 

The express auditing department of the Illinois Traction 
System was removed from Springfield to Champaign, III., on 
January 1 and the work of that department has been con- 
solidated with that of the general auditor's office. George 
Ostemeier, who has been in charge of the express auditing, 
has been appointed chief clerk to Traffic Manager B. R. 
Stephens at Springfield. 

Mr. Edwin M. Walker, formerly purchasing agent of the 
Columbus Railway Light & Power Company, Columbus, Miss., 
has been appointed general manager of the Citizens' Railway 
& Light Company, at Muscatine, la., succeeding Mr. H. J. 
Clarke, resigned. Mr. A. L. Gillette, of the St. Paul (Minn.) 
Gas & Electric Company, has been appointed general superin- 
tendent of the company. 

Mr. H. S. Potter, for the past three years superintendent 
of the El Paso Electric Railway at El Paso, Tex., has been 
appointed general superintendent in charge of both the rail- 
way and lighting departments. Mr. George F. Morse of 
Jacksonville, Fla., has been appointed to fill the new office 
of superintendent of transportation and will assume charge 
of the detail work hitherto looked after by Mr. Potter. 

Mr. F. C. Crane, passenger and freight agent of the 
Rochester & Eastern Rapid Railway, Rochester, N. Y., has 
been appointed general passenger agent of the Eastern Penn- 
sylvania Railway of Pottsville, Pa., under the operating man- 
agement of J. G. White & Co. Mr. Crane's duties will be 
particularly the improvement of summer resorts on the 
Eastern Pennsylvania Railway system in Schuylkill county, 
and the building up of the excursion business. 

Mr. William E. Rolston, who recently was appointed 
master mechanic of the Cleveland Southwestern & Columbus 
Railway, with headquarters at Elyria, O., was born on March 
23, 1870, at Toronto, Can., where he received a common school 
education. In 1884 he removed to Streator, 111., where he at- 
tended the high schools, finishing his technical education at 
the Armour Institute of Technology. Chicago. In 1898 he was 
appointed engineer in charge of the power station of the 
Chicago General Railway, where he remained until 1900. when 
he resigned to become chief engineer of the Dayton & Troy 
Electric Railway, Dayton, O. He remained with this company 
until 1906, serving successively as chief engineer, general 
superintendent and master mechanic until his appointment a 



few months later as superintendent of motive power for the 

Canton division of the Northern Ohio Traction & Light Com- 
pany. In November. I '.mm;, in- resigned to become division 
superintendent of the Buffalo & Lake Erie Traction Companj 
with headquarters at Fredonia. N. Y., where he has remained 
until his present appointment with the Cleveland Southwestern 
& Columbus Railway. 

Mr. II. C. Donecker has recently been appointed to the 
position of office manager of the American Street and Inter- 
urban Railway Association. Mr. Donecker has had a number 
of years of practical experience in various lines of street 
railway work. He was first associated with the Lorain Steel 
Company (then The Johnson Company) of Philadelphia and 
Johnstown. Pa., during the years 1890 to 1894. He then be- 
came connected with Hon. Tom L. Johnson, now mayor of 
Cleveland, and his brother, Mr. Albert L. Johnson, in the 
construction and operation of the Nassau Electric Railroad 
of Brooklyn, N. Y. Leaving there early in 1899, he went west 
with Mr. J. J. Coleman, who at that time assumed the general 
managership of the newly formed St. Louis Transit Company, 
Mr. Donecker remained with that company until late in 1900, 
when he became connected with Col. Giles S. Allison, of the 
Security Register Company of St. Louis, and remained 
engaged in that work until the first of the year 1906, at 
which time he entered the service of Ford, Bacon & Davis of 
New York City, where his work has been almost entirely of a 
statistical nature. Mr. Donecker's experience and his training 
as a statistician will undoubtedly be of great value to the 
association. 

Col. Edwin Warren Hine, whose portrait is presented 
herewith, on January 1 assumed the duties of secretary of 
the Public Service Corporation of New Jersey, Newark, N. J., 

succeeding Mr. Fred- 
erick Evans, resigned. 
He retains his present 
office as assistant to the 
president, with the 
especial function of 
treating with the public 
and meeting municipal 
bodies. Colonel Hine 
was born in Litchfield, 
Conn., on March 17. 
1854, and received his 
early education at Ma- 
honey Academy in Ohio. 
His education was com- 
pleted at the high school 
of Washington, D. C. 
After leaving school he 
was engaged for a short 
time in the stationery 
business, but in 1874 he 
located at Orange, N. J., 
and established a pros- 
perous flour and feed 
business. In 1S88 he 
Col. Edwin Warren Hine. became interested in 

the Harvey Steel Com- 
pany and in the following year was made a director of the 
company. From 187S to 1890 Colonel Hine actively engaged 
in the politics of his locality, serving for eight years on the 
Essex county board of chosen freeholders and for three years 
as a director. From 1S87 to 1S90 he was sheriff of his county. 
During the Spanish-American war he saw seven months of 
service with the Seventh army corps stationed at Jackson- 
ville, Fla., under the command of Maj.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. 
His connection with street railway interests dates from 1887, 
when he was one of the incorporators and directors of the 
Orange Crosstown Railroad Company, now the Orange & 
Passaic Valley Railway and a part of the Public Service Cor- 
poration of New Jersey. In 1897 he and his associates, 
Messrs. Chandler and Riker, organized the Westfield & Eliza- 
beth Street Railroad Company, incorporated to build an elec- 
tric line between Elizabeth and Plainfield, N. J., and opened 
for traffic in 1899. This property, with the Plainfield Street 
Railway, the Elizabeth Street Railway and the Rahway Elec- 
tric Street companies afterward was merged under the name 
of the Elizabeth Plainfield & Central Jersey Railway Com- 
pany, of which Colonel Hine was treasurer and managing 
director until its absorption by the Public Service Corpora- 
tion. In January, 1904, he was appointed assistant to the 
president of this company with supervision of the street rail- 
way department, since which time his energies have been 
successfully devoted to the harmonizing of the various depart- 
ments of the company; and it is to his personal popularity 
that the change in public sentiment from its former antagonis- 
tic spirit to the present favorable attitude is attributed. 




28 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



Financial News 



Blue Ridge Light & Power Company, Staunton, Va. — This 
company has given a trust deed to J. M. Perry as trustee to 
secure an issue of $100,000 of 10-year 6 per cent bonds. 

Boston Suburban Electric Companies. — Announcement is 
made that the trustees have voted to defer the declaration of 
the dividend usually paid in January on the preferred stock. 

Buffalo & Lake Erie Traction Company, Buffalo, N. Y. — 
This company has issued $250,000 additional first refunding 
mortagage bonds making a total outstanding of $4,755,000. 

Charleston & Summerville Electric Railway, Charleston, 
S. C. — A syndicate has acquired the holdings of A. J. Warner 
and Ogden Edwards, the president, and the following new 
officers have been elected: President, Julius G. Hoeke; secre- 
tary and treasurer, George Tupper: general counsel, Julien 
Grimke. The foregoing and F. S. Wright and W. O. Sprigg 
have been elected directors. 

Massachusetts Electric Companies, Boston. — Gordon Ab- 
bott, the president, in response to questions submitted by 
shareholders at the annual meeting in Boston on December 18, 
said that the trustees will not declare a scrip dividend repre- 
senting back dividends until the corporation is in a position 
to resume the payment of dividends at the regular rate of 4 
per cent annually. He added: "The Massachusetts Electric 
Companies in the last fiscal year received about $880,000 in 
dividends from its subsidiary companies. If the subsidiary 
companies had been able to sell an issue of $750,000 bonds 
authorized by the railroad commission the trustees would have 
been in a position to have declared a dividend on Massachu- 
setts Electric preferred shares this fall. As a sale of these 
bonds was impossible under the financial conditions then pre- 
vailing, the trustees thought it wise to loan the money re- 
ceived in dividends from subsidiary companies back to them. 
This money will of course come back to the holding company 
when the subsidiary companies are able to dispose of their 
bonds. The trustees had to decide whether to pay the divi- 
dends on Massachusetts Electric preferred stock or stop work 
on the additions and improvements on the subsidiary com- 
panies, and we choose to continue the improvement of our 
property and defer the resumption of dividends." 

Oregon Electric Railway. — The following new officers have 
been elected: President, George B. Moffatt of Moffatt & 
White, Xew York; vice-president and general manager, Guy 
W. Talbot: secretary, George F. Nevins, who will also be 
traffic manager and auditor: assistant secretary, A. E. God- 
dard; treasurer, H. W. Brower; assistant treasurer, Fred B. 
Reed; superintendent, C. A. Coolidge; general counsel, R. B. 
Moffatt. New York; counsel, Carey & Kerr, Portland; chief 
dispatcher, C. J. Phillipp; chief surgeon, Dr. Ernest Tucker; 
electrical engineer, H. Milliken; roadmaster, F. W. Prahl: 
master mechanic, W. O. Fragmeier. The following directors 
have been elected: Charles M. Pratt, A. C. Bedford, George 
Barclay Moffatt, William A. White and Sidney Z. Mitchell, all 
of New York, and Guy W. Talbot and B. Cookingham of Port- 
land. 

Third Avenue Railroad, New York. — Kuhn, Loeb & Co. of 
New York have offered to purchase at face value, from Janu- 
ary 2 to February 29, 1908, at the Central Trust Company, 
New York, the semi-annual interest coupons due on January 1, 
1908, from such of the first consolidated mortgage 4 per cent 
bonds as may be deposited with the Central Trust Company 
under the bondholders' agreement. In a letter dated Decem- 
ber 27, 1907, and addressed to J. N. Wallace, chairman of the 
bondholders' committee, Kuhn, Loeb & Co. say: "It is appar- 
ent that the Third Avenue Railroad Company is likely to de- 
fault in the payment of the interest due January 1 next upon 
its first consolidated mortgage 4 per cent gold bonds, and that 
the bondholders' committee, of which you are chairman, will 
not, by that date, have completed its examination of the affairs 
of the company, the results of which examination must be 
known before the bondholders can form an intelligent judg- 
ment as to the value of their security and before your commit- 
tee can consider any plan for the rehabilitation of the bonds. 
We have accordingly determined, inasmuch as most of the 
bonds of the above issue were placed by us — at a time when 
the bonds were universally considered to be investments of 
the highest rank — to offer to purchase at its face value the 
January 1, 1908, semi-annual interest coupon from all bonds 
deposited with your committee before the first day of March 
next. We are making this offer in order that bondholders 
may not suffer for lack of opportunity for full investigation 
and in order that through our purchase of the January coupon 
bondholders may receive their income until the condition of 



the property is ascertained by the examination now being 
made on behalf of your committee." There are outstanding 
$."7,560,000 of these bonds, which are part of an authorized 
issue of $50,000,000, the remaining $12,440,000 being reserved 
to take up various prior liens. In December, 1900, Kuhn, 
Loeb & Co. placed most of the bonds, which were sold at 104% 
and accrued interest. They have sold recently at 49%. At 
the time the bonds were brought out there was an equity be- 
hind them of $100,000,000, on the basis of market prices then 
ruling. In a letter addressed to the bankers at the time, H. H. 
Vreeland. president of the Third Avenue Railroad and the 
Metropolitan Street Railway, said in part: "It is estimated 
that after the completion of the electric equipment now in 
progress, and with the advantages and economies resulting 
from the close connection with the Metropolitan Street Rail- 
way, the annual net earnings of the Third Avenue company 
will be at least $3,000,000, which, together with the surplus 
earnings of the Metropolitan company (after deducting its own 
fixed charges), on the basis of the results of the last fiscal 
year, would provide net earnings of nearly $6,500,000 to meet 
fixed charges amounting to about $2,000,000 in all, inclusive 
of the issue of the new 4 per cent bonds. The Metropolitan 
Street Railway guarantees unconditionally by indorsement the 
principal and interest of the Third Avenue Railroad 4 per 
cent bonds." 

Worcester (Mass.) Consolidated Street Railway. — The 
Massachusetts railroad commission has been asked to rescind 
the orders issued October 25, 1901, and August 5, 1902, approv- 
ing the sale of $445,000 and $350,000 stock, respectively, at 
$116 per share, and to substitute a new order for the issue of 
a like amount at such reduced market price as the directors 
may determine. 

ELECTRIC RAILWAY EARNINGS. 

Kansas City Railway & Light Company. 

November— 1907. 1906. 

Gross earnings $518,423.98 $466,219.71 

Operating expenses 276,029.80 230,387.96 

Net earnings 242,394.18 235,831.75 

Interest and taxes 151,098.72 145,529.41 

Net income 91,295.46 90,302.34 

June 1 to November 30— 1907. 1906. 

Gross earnings $3,166,071.51 $2,872,989.32 

Operating expenses 1,620,217.65 1,414,619.95 

Net earnings 1,545,853.86 1,458,369.37 

Interest and taxes 924,564.83 869,723.83 

Net income 621,289.03 588,645.54 

Twin City Rapid Transit Company. 

November— 1907. 1906. 

Total earnings $497,428.50 $458,637.13 

Total operating expense 264,410.14 224,969.27 

Net earnings 233,018,36 233,667.86 

Total deductions 131,141.65 117,258.32 

Net income 101,876.71 116,409.54 

January 1 to November 30— 1907. 1906. 

Total earnings $5,552,879.02 $5,149,895.88 

Total operating expense 2,700,433.90 2,402,454.66 

Net earnings 2,852,445.12 2,747,441.22 

Total deductions 1,300,525.01 1,236,169.45 

Net income 1,551,920.11 1,511,271.77 

Dividends Declared. 

Aurora Elgin & Chicago, common, quarterly, three-fourths 
of 1 per cent; preferred quarterly, 1% per cent. 

Bangor (Me.) Railway & Electric Company, quarterly, 1% 
per cent. 

Boston & Worcester Electric Companies, preferred, $2.00. 

Capital Traction Company, Washington, D. C, quarterly, 
iy z per cent. 

Citizens' Electric Street Railway, Newburyport, Mass., 
2Y 2 per cent. 

City Railway, Dayton, O., common, quarterly, 1% per cent; 
preferred, quarterly, 1% per cent. 

Columbus Newark & Zanesville Electric Railway, Newark, 
O., preferred, quarterly, 1% per cent. 

Consolidated Traction Company, Newark, N. J., 2 per cent. 

Forest City Railway, Cleveland, O., quarterly, 1% per cent. 

Holyoke (Mass.) Street Railway, 4 per cent. 

Rochester (N. Y.) Railway, preferred, quarterly, 1*4 per 
cent. 

Syracuse (N. Y.) Rapid Transit Company, preferred, 
quarterly, 1% per cent. 

United Railways, St. Louis, preferred, quarterly, 1% per 
cent. 

Utica & Mohawk Valley Railway. Utica, N. Y., preferred, 
quarterly, 1% per cent. 

Washington Alexandria & Mt. Vernon Railway, Washing- 
ton, D. C, 1 per cent. 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



29 



Manufactures and Supplies 



ROLLING STOCK. 

Indiana Union Traction Company, Anderson, Intl.. is .said 
to be considering the purchase of six now cars. 

Little Rock & Pine Bluff Traction Company, Little Rock, 
Ark., has placed an order with the Jewett Car Company for 
six or eight interurban cars. 

SHOPS AND BUILDINGS. 

Belton & Temple Traction Company, Temple, Tex. — This 
company is doubling the capacity of its car house at Midway 
Park and is also building a shop and repair building. 

Joplin & Pittsburg Railway, Joplin, Mo. — This company 
will erect a brick car house, 63 by 293 feet, according to plans 
prepared by A. C. Michaelis, Miners' Bank building, Joplin. 
Fred Deiter has been awarded the contract. 

Louisville & Northern Railway & Lighting Company, New 
Albany, Ind. — The Vincennes street station is being torn down 
and a new one will be built by the company on Market street. 

Mobile (Ala.) Light & Railroad Company will build a fire- 
proof car house with a capacity for 75 cars. 

TRADE NOTES. 

Pressed Steel Car Company during 1907 received orders 
for 82 cars for elevated and subway service, 10 of which were 
for export. 

J. G. White & Co., Incorporated, New York, has declared 
the regular quarterly dividend of iy 2 per cent on the preferred 
stock, payable January 2. 

Carnegie Steel Company's district office in the Candler 
building. Atlanta, Ga.. on January 1. was removed to the 
Woodward building. Birmingham, Ala. F. A. Dilworth is 
manager of sales. 

Bayly Manufacturing Company, Milwaukee, Wis., has re- 
ceived the order for the heating, ventilating and drying ap- 
paratus to be installed in the Grand Trunk's new shops at 
Battle Creek, Mich. 

A. M. Hewlett, president of the Western Tube Company, 
Kewanee, 111., suffered a stroke of paralysis on December 18 
and died at his home in Kewanee on December 20. Mr. Hew- 
litt was about 55 years old and had been connected with the 
company for 20 years. 

Electric Storage Battery Company, Philadelphia, Pa., has 
declared a dividend of 1% per cent on both the preferred 
and common stocks of the company payable on January 2 to 
stockholders of record December 2S. 

American Locomotive Company, Xew York, has declared 
the regular quarterly dividend of 1% per cent on the pre- 
ferred stock, payable on January 21, and IVi per cent on the 
common stock, payable on February 26. 

New England Trolley Wheel Company, Chicopee, Mass., 
has been incorporated with a capital stock of $50,000. Louis 
J. Tetlow is president and Michael I. Shea treasurer and 
clerk, both of Chicopee Falls. 

Peter Smith Heater Company, Detroit, Mich., announces 
that the Electric Service Supplies Company will not repre- 
sent it after January 1, 1908. The sales department of the 
Smith company will be looked after in the future from the 
Detroit office. 

General Fireproofing Company, Youngstown, O.. reports 
the following as among the recent sales of Trussit: One for 
roofing the car houses of the Waterloo Cedar Falls & North- 
ern Railway at Cedar Falls. la., and one for the entire plant 
of the Rio de Janeiro Tramway Light & Power Company of 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The latter shipment will be erected 
by the Riter-Conley Manufacturing Company of Pittsburg. 

Transportation Equipment Company, 1133 Broadway. Xew 
York City, has recently been incorporated with a capital stock 
of $25,000 for the purpose of manufacturing the Tec register- 
ing fare box which is especially adapted for use on the pay- 
as-you-enter type of car. The president of the company is 
H. W. Brown, controller of the Xew York City Railway; 
secretary and treasurer. Robert C. Adams. The shops of the 
company are on West Twenty-seventh street. Xew York City. 

J. W. Ager, up to now electrical aide in the bureau of 
yards and docks. United States navy department, has resigned 
his government position to enter the employ of Muralt & Co., 



engineers, 111 Liberty street, New York, as manager of their 
southern office in the Title Cuarantee building, Birmingham, 
Ala. Mr. Ager is a graduate of Columbia, where he took the 
degree of M. E. in Bin::, and ot the Massachusetts institute of 
Technology, when- he obtained the K. K. degree in I'.t'il. He 
then was engineer with the Western Electric Company, New- 
York, during 1905 and 1906, and has been in the service of 
the United States navy department from 19m; until now. He 
was last identified with the engineering and construction work 
being carried out in connection with the movement to con- 
solidate the power plants in the various United States navy 
yards. Muralt & Co. have obtained several municipal and gov- 
ernment contracts in the southern territory and Mr. Ager will 
undoubtedly prove a very valuable acquisition for them. 

Power Specialty Company, 111 Broadway. Xew York, 
manufacturer of the Foster patented steam superheater, states 
that notwithstanding the business depression which has been 
experienced during the past few months, it has entered a 
large number of important contracts since the first of Sep- 
tember, and that its business for 1907 shows a very gratifying 
increase in volume over any previous year. Present indica- 
tions in the way of renewed inquiries and resumption of nego- 
tiations temporarily suspended, point to the closing of a large 
amount of business within the next few months. Among 
many contracts which have been secured since the date men- 
tioned the following are given: Alabama White Marble Com- 
pany, 600 horsepower in Wickes boilers; Babcock & Wilcox 
Company, for Pensacola navy yard, 1,600 horsepower in 
Babcock & Wilcox boilers; United Shoe Machinery Company, 
1,032 horsepower in Babcock & Wilcox boilers; Clark Thread 
Company, Newark, N. J., 2,500 horsepower in Stirling boilers; 
American Railway Company, 838 horsepower in Stirling 
boilers; Louisville & Eastern Railroad, 600 horsepower in 
Heine boilers; Schlitz Brewing Company, 2,000 horsepower 
in Edge Moor boilers; Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company, 
2,000 horsepower in Heine boilers; Tonawanda Board & Paper 
Company, 900 horsepower in return tubular boilers. 

Westinghouse Machine Company has made public the 
following plan whereby the receivership may be dissolved, 
and the business of the company restored to the stockholders: 
The company shall issue 3-year 6 per cent notes for its exist- 
ing indebtedness. These notes are to be secured by the com- 
pany's bonds at 85 per cent of their face value as collateral, 
and are to be in denominations of $500 or multiples thereof. 
Claims of less than $1,000 are to be paid in cash. On claims 
exceeding $1,000 the creditor will receive 3-year 6 per cent 
notes to the amount of the nearest multiple of $500 that is not 
in excess of the claim, the balance being paid in cash. It is 
further agreed that the company shall not pay a dividend to 
its stockholders until provision has been made for the payment 
of all the notes outstanding. A copy of the plan and agree- 
ment is being sent to each creditor, with a letter from the 
creditors' committee and from the receivers urging its accept- 
ance, and also a letter from George Westinghouse. president, 
signifying the Westinghouse Machine Company's concurrence 
and approval. There seems to be no doubt that the plan will 
be successful. Following are the members of the creditors' 
committee: Wilson A. Shaw, president Bank of Pittsburg; 
Robert Wardrop, president People's Xational Bank; H. C. 
Bughman. president Second Xational Bank: James C. Chaplin, 
vice-president Colonial Trust Company; B. B. Mellon, vice- 
president Mellon Xational Bank, all of Pittsburg; Horace E. 
Smith. Philadelphia: Frederick S. Moseley, Boston; Frederick 
D. Underwood and John F. Wallace, both of Xew York. 

ADVERTISING LITERATURE. 

Dayton Manufacturing Company, Dayton, O. — Catalogue 
Xo. 143 illustrates and describes Eckert water and dry car 
closets. 

Fairbanks. Morse & Co., Chicago, III. — An attractive little 
booklet in colors descriptive of Sheffield motor cars and gaso- 
line locomotives has just been issued. 

Goheen Manufacturing Company, Canton, O. — Zevy's en- 
gineers' contract book, a very useful and complete publication, 
is distributed with this company's compliments. 

McConway <£. Torley Company, Pittsburg, Pa. — A newly 
issued catalogue sets forth the advantages of the Janney 
M. C. B. coupler with radial movement for interurban and 
other electric cars. 

American Carbon & Battery Company, East St. Louis, 
III. — A handsome wall calendar with embossed art subject 
calls attention to this company's line of carbon products and 
porcelain insulators. 

A. Buch's Sons & Co.. Elizabethtown, Pa. — Catalogue G-6 
is descriptive of the Eagle steel park swings, manufactured 
by this company. These are now in use in many of the lead- 



30 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



ing parks of electric railways. Steel swings of other types 
are also described and illustrated in the pamphlet. Catalogue 
B-6 illustrates and describes the Keystone land roller, which is 
particularly designed for leveling parks, golf grounds, lawns, 
etc. 

The Arnold Company, Chicago, III. — One of a series of 
illustrated postcards shows the progress made to December 
in the construction of the Grand Trunk's locomotive repair 
shop at Battle Creek, Mich., which is under supervision of 
this company. 

The J. G. Brill Company, Philadelphia, Pa. — The last num- 
ber of Brill's Magazine has for its leading article an interesting 
description of the pay-as-you-enter cars for the New York 
City Railway Company. The article is illustrated by a num- 
ber of halftones. 

Niles Car & Manufacturing Company, Niles, Ohio. — A 
large and attractive catalogue of this company's most recent 
products has been issued by the sales agents, .1. A. Hanna 
Company, 312 Electric Building, Cleveland, O. A number of 
fine illustrations are used effectively, and the book is enclosed 
in handsome embossed covers. 

Technical Literature Company, 220 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y. — The monthly magazine of technical information here- 
tofore know-n as Technical Literature has been changed to 
the Engineering Digest. The change was made owing to a 
somewhat general misunderstanding by technical readers as 
to the nature of the contents. The policy of the magazine 
will not be altered. 

General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. — Recent 
publications include Bulletin No. 4550, which describes a num- 
ber of the company's well-known line of carbon break circuit- 
breakers. The bulletin also contains descriptions of auxiliary 
switches, automatic tripping devices, etc., to be used with the 
circuit-breakers, and gives complete data as to capacities, 
prices and dimensions of the devices shown. It contains 36 
pages and is conveniently arranged for reference. — Bulletin 
No. 4531 illustrates and describes various types of Thompson 
horizontal edgewise instruments for switchboard service, in- 
cluding ammeters, voltmeters, single-phase wattmeters, poly- 
phase, wattmeters, frequency indicators and power factor in- 
dicators. 



consumption, have now been lowered very near to the mini- 
mum, and giving due consideration to the large balance now 
in our favor in our commerce with foreign nations, and to the 
well-distributed revenues from our exceptionally large agri- 
cultural products, cannot fail to create an early demand for 
new machinery and auxiliary equipment. 

"The outlook is therefore distinctly encouraging." 



BUSINESS CONDITIONS. 



President W. H. Whiteside of the Allis-Chalmers Com- 
pany in a recent interview thus expressed his views of the 
present business conditions: "It is daily becoming more ap- 
parent that the general business of the country has not been 
so seriously injured by the recent sudden financial depression 
as the public has been inclined to believe. And I am firmly of 
the opinion that the thing now most necessary is to. loosen 
the chains of conservatism and give courage an opportunity 
to assert itself and make advances consistent with the gen- 
eral prosperous conditions and well-distributed resources of 
the country. As the production and use of basic machinery, 
such as prime movers for the generation of power, is a very 
potent and a leading factor in our commercial activities, very 
naturally it is one of the first lines of business to be affected 
when the pendulum swings from optimism to pessimism, and 
likewise the first to feel the effect when the change in senti- 
ment again manifests itself. The number and character of 
inquiries which our offices located in the principal commercial 
centers of the country have recently been receiving convinc- 
ingly demonstrate a return of confidence, and bear evidence 
that not only a diversified, but a large volume of business 
will be offering ere the middle of the first quarter of 190S has 
been passed. 

"Until within a few months manufacturers everywhere 
in the United States found themselves urgently in need of 
increased facilities for carrying on their own business, and 
when they are again called upon to supply the normal demands 
of business, and to replenish stocks in the hands of jobbers 
and retailers, many of which are now nearing the point of 
depletion, they must, of necessity, again work their plants to 
the full of their present capacities, and add increased machin- 
ery equipment, the plans for which in numerous instances are 
already well matured. 

"The railroads of the country, whose policy of retrench- 
ment has continued for approximately a year, notwithstanding 
the largest offerings of traffic, with resultant increased earn- 
ings, in their entire history, must shortly be compelled to 
again enter the market and make large expenditures for 
renewals, including train equipment, steel rails and general 
supplies. This, coupled with the approaching need for the 
renewal of stocks of metal employed in all branches of in- 
dustry, which, through shut downs of furnaces and smelters 
and the continued use of iron, steel and copper for current 



A MEANS FOR TRAFFIC DEVELOPMENT. 



In connection with the interest aroused in the promotion 
of traffic by the recent discussions before the various associa- 
tions of street and interurban railway men there is another 
subject which is closely related and which should receive 
careful attention. This is the subject of electric railway 
advertising. 

Aside from the wide field of activity of the energetic 
traffic manager, a field with which every electric railway man 
is more or less familiar there is a still wider field which may 
aptly be termed the "field of individual traffic," which in a 
great majority of cases has remained untouched or at best has 
been little more than scratched. It includes a class of traffic 
that it is impossible for the traffic department to reach through 
personal work, but which will respond readily to properly 
directed advertising and which is highly desirable and profit- 
able, since it can be handled very largely on regular cars and 
trains and at regular rates of fare. 

The methods to be adopted to reach and interest this 
class of travel will, of course, vary in individual cases, it 
being necessary to study operating and other local conditions, 
as well as the character of the territory served before the 
extent and character of the advertising to be undertaken can 
be determined. The fact remains, however, that there are few 
roads, either interurban or city, that could not be benefited by 
a judicious use of printer's ink. 

In the case of the interurban road a wide field for develop- 
ment is presented by the natural desire on the part of people 
living in the country to visit and take an ever-increasing part 
in the activities of the larger towns and cities, and the in- 
clination of the city dweller to spend more of his time in the 
woods and open country away from his usual haunts. The 
growth of the vacation habit and the increasing favor of the 
electric car for long-distance travel also open up wide possi- 
bilities for many roads. 

For the city system the problem and the method of treat- 
ment are necessarily somewhat different, but on every system 
there are some features of the service or attractions that will 
furnish a basis for profitable publicity, while in the larger 
cities, with their numerous lines and routes, there are oppor- 
tunities for the development of profitable traffic in getting the 
regular passenger "off his beat" on trips and excursions, and 
by placing the conveniences of the system before strangers 
and transients in an attractive manner. 

In this connection the announcement of E. C. Van Valken- 
burgh, 2117 West One Hundred and Second street, Chicago, 
who handles the advertising of electric railways exclusively, 
will be of interest. 

The service offered takes the place in the organization of 
the electric railway of an advertising manager, but with the 
advantage that by maintaining a separate organization it is 
possible to view the road and its service more from the stand- 
point of the passenger, without the danger of having the point 
of view biased by a too intimate contact with the perplexities 
of operation and management which necessarily engage the 
attention of exclusive employes and officials of the company. 
Then, again, by being in touch with a number of roads and 
their varying problems a wider range of ideas and methods of 
procedure is developed. 

Among the advantages this service affords may be men- 
tioned: (1) It provides a definite plan of action which has 
been formulated, after a careful study of all contributing 
factors, with a view to the building up of weak points as 
well as the traffic in general. (2) It insures attractive and 
timely copy for printed matter, since a close relation is main- 
tained with the traffic department and a close watch is kept 
for anything of a character to create or encourage travel. 
(3) Close attention to the matters of detail which are neces- 
sarily a part of the work, but which are always more or less 
of an annoyance to an official having other duties to attend to. 



For the purpose of reassuring purchasers, Allis-Chalmers 
company has adopted the policy of testing every turbine and 
generator in its works to a speed 20 per cent in excess of 
the rated speed, thus subjecting the material to stresses 44 
per cent above the normal. This overspeed test taxes the 
machine as it cannot be taxed in practice, for, even should 
the main governor fail to work, the safety governor will stop 
the turbine long before it reaches such a speed. 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



31 



THE NEW RECORDING MILLI-VOLTMETER AND SHUNT 
AMMETER. 

Electrical engineers have long felt the need for an ac- 
curate and sensitive recording milli-voltmeter which is 
adapted to practical every-day service as well as for labora- 
tory tests. There has also been a demand for a recording 
ammeter of the shunt type which can be connected by leads 
to the main busbar. The shunt system is especially econom- 
ical where heavy currents are to be indicated or recorded, as 
the instruments may be located at a considerable distance 
trom the main current, thus saving great expense in carrying 
the main conductors to the point where the instrument is 
located. The recorders illustrated herewith have been de- 
signed to meet these practical demands. 

The two most important fundamental features of these 
recorders are a sensitive electrical movement of special de- 
sign, made by the Weston Electrical Instrument Company, 
and a new recording system using a patented smoked chart, 
so arranged that there is no friction between the recording 
arm and the chart. 

These instruments are so sensitive that the recording 
arm will move over the whole scale for five milli-volts or less, 
making it possible to accurately record one ten-thousandth of 
one volt. The graduations on the chart are evenly propor- 
tioned over the entire range, the same as the Weston am- 
meter, so that even though there is only a small current 
flowing, the readings may be as readily taken as if the current 
was the maximum that the instrument would record. This 
feature will be greatly appreciated, as there are many places 
where it is important that the records be perfectly clear, even 
though the loads are very light when the outfit is first in- 
stalled. 

The records are made on a novel semi-transparent smoked 
chart, which is periodically brought into momentary contact 
with the end of the recording arm by means of a special 
vibrating device. In this way a series of white dots are made 
on the smoked surface. These form a continuous line and 
a record is thus made without causing any friction between 
the moving arm and the chart. The rate of vibration of the 
chart is timed to suit the frequency and range of the varia- 
tion in the current to be recorded. The usual period of vibra- 
tion of the chart is once in 10 seconds, but to obtain con- 
tinuous lines where the fluctuations of the current are quite 
rapid, the vibrating attachment is made to operate twice 
every second. When the record is completed the chart is 



direction of the current, as in many cases the direction of the 
current changes from negative to positive during the day. 

It is expected that by using a number of these instru- 
ments operating simultaneously at different points, stray 
currents in water and gas mains or in any underground struc- 
ture may be recorded, making it possible to discover the 
causes of trouble and how they may be eliminated. 

The recording ammeter is shown in Figure 3 connected 
to a standard Weston 10,000-ampere shunt, to which is also 
connected a Weston indicating station ammeter. This illus- 
tration shows that the recorder may be readily applied to any 




Figure 2 — Facsimile of Chart from Milli-Voltmeter. 

standard shunt which is already in service, without disturbing 
the indicating instrument at the switchboard. As illustrated 
here, leads of almost any desired length may be used to con- 
nect the indicating and recording instruments to the shunt on 
the main busbar. It is even possible to have the recording 
ammeter located in the superintendent's office at a great dis- 




Figure 1 — Recording Milli-Voltmeter. 



Figure 3 — Recording Instruments with Connections. 



dipped in a simple fixitive solution which makes the record 
permanent for filing. 

The recording milli-voltmeter is shown in Figure 1 and 
Figure 2 is a reduced photographic facsimile of a chart taken 
from one of these instruments in connection with electrolysis 
surveys of underground structures which are being conducted 
by the Electrical Testing Laboratories of Xew York City. 
The graduations of this chart are arbitrary. It was revolved 
once in 24 hours and was vibrated once every 10 seconds. 
The zero position of the recording arm was the middle of 
the scale, so that the record might be independent of the 



tance from the shunt and the indicating instrument located 
on the switchboard convenient for the observation of the 
operator. Such combination outfits could be furnished as 
units, with leads of the proper lengths to suit the individual 
cases. 

The recording shunt ammeter has been successfully ap- 
plied for taking continuous records of the current on a large 
trolley system, where the fluctuations are very rapid and 
varied as much as 4,000 amperes several times in a minute. 
The charts for such work as this are made to revolve once in 
one hour and the vibrator operates twice in one second. For 



32 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



preliminary tests, the recorders are provided with special 
fast vibrators for the smoked chart and with a clock move- 
ment to revolve the chart once in one hour, but for continuous 
daily records the standard 24-hour charts are recommended. 
These instruments are manufactured by William H. Bristol, 
45 Vesey street, New York City. 



THE TEC REGISTERING FARE BOX. 



When the pay-as-you-enter type of cars are put into opera- 
tion on the Madison avenue line of the New York City Rail- 
way they will be equipped with a new type of register known 
as the Tec registering fare box. This device was designed 
for and is peculiarly adapted to the collecting and registering 
of fares on the pay-as-you-enter car. It presents a number 
of very novel and practical features. The box registers 
fares automatically, being electrically operated by four dry 
cells of a special type. The chief object attained is that the 
conductor does not have access to the money until after the 
fare has been registered, but the box is so designed that im- 




inserting of a thin guard into the fare channel to keep any 
coins from passing the contact lever while it is withdrawn to 
permit the preceding coin to drop, and the shoving to one side 
of the last fare registered preparatory to receiving the next 
coin. 

After the fare has been dropped into the slot at the top of 
the box it is registered and exposed to the view of the con- 
ductor almost instantaneously. To enable the detection of 
bad coins the last three or four nickels registered always re- 
main in view of the conductor, so that it is possible for him 
to detect a bad coin not only immediately upon its registra- 
tion, but even after two or three more passengers have 
dropped nickels into the box. The coins thus exposed for 
inspection are pushed one at a time into a conductor's money 
drawer, to which the conductor has access for use in making 
change. 

Probably the most important feature of this register is 
that it is so constructed that the conductor cannot stop the 
collection of nickels, even should the mechanism of the ma- 
chine be fouled in any way. The fare register is so built that 
if the mechanism becomes inoperative from any cause the 
nickels, while dropped in the same slot, are caused auto- 
matically to fall through the inclosure at the left of the usual 
channel and into a locked receptacle to which the conductor 




The Tec Fare Box — Exterior. 



The Tec Fare Box — Interior. 



mediately after its registration the money is available for use 
as change. 

The height of the register is 18 inches. It is 6 inches 
wide at the bottom and 3 inches wide at the top. It will 
stand on a pedestal just inside the railing in front of the con- 
ductor. 

From the accompanying illustrations showing the details 
of construction a comprehensive idea of its operation may be 
obtained. The fare is dropped in a slot at the top of the box 
and passing down the inclosure strikes a balanced lever, 
which, being forced downward at the end protruding into the 
fare channel by the weight of the coin, causes the other end 
to rise and make a contact, thus completing an electric cir- 
cuit. At the moment the exterior end of the lever has risen 
to contact an L-shaped lever, by means of its pivotal connec- 
tion, drops under the contact lever and holds it in that posi- 
tion until a complete registration has been made. The circuit 
is next broken by means of a lug, permitting both levers to 
assume their natural positions. It will be noticed that as the 
current is thrown into use the magnet drawing its helper into 
place manipulates the various attachments fastened to the 
helper, which include connections to the register and bell, the 



has no access. This second receptable is accessible only to 
the inspector. Thus the registering mechanism may become 
damaged and yet there be no excuse for the conductor to 
take nickels direct from the passengers. 

To provide for another emergency it is within the power 
of the conductor to. operate the register by hand by unlocking 
his change drawer, and pulling it out an inch or two so that 
it will release the hand pull bar shown on the right-hand side 
of the fare box. 

In the view of the exterior of the registering fare box 
the three openings are shown on the front. These are acces- 
sible only by key. The upper receptacle contains the regis- 
tering mechanism, the middle opening is the money drawer 
and the lower drawer holds the batteries. On the right is 
shown the face of the register and the pull bar, while on .the 
left is a small opening for the use of the inspector. 

The Tec registering fare box. which is built by the 
Transportation Equipment Company, 1133 Broadway, New 
York City, has been given severe tests equal to more than a 
year's service resulting in practically no appreciable wear on 
any of its parts and with no apparent decrease in the 
efficiency of the batteries. 



January 4, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



33 




Use GRIP NUTS on track bolts 

and You Have a Better, Safer Track 



GRIP NUTS never let loose under any strain, 
jar or vibration unless bolts break. 



GRIP NUT COMPANY 



500 Fifth Avenue, NEW YORK 



152 Lake Street, CHICAGO 




Interchangeable ? 



Yes, it is the standard type selected by the 
A. S. & I. R. A. Standardization Committee. 

Its adoption on your road will bring not only 
uniformity, but economy as well. 

The facts in the case sent on your request 

American Brake Shoe & Foundry Co. 

New York Chicago Chattanooga MAHWAH, N. J. 




The M. C. B. Christie 

langi-d Steel Back Brake Shoe 

for use on wheels with 

3-inch tread and over. 



Bonding and rebonding are better done by this car 
because its two processes 

Electric Brazing 
^ Copper Welding 

insure perfect mechanical and 
electrical union between bond 
and rail. And it is the only 
method that does produce this 
result at moderate cost. 

Write us for further facts. 

The Electric Railway Improvement Co. 

6005 Carnegie Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 




84 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No 1. 



THE J. G. BRILL COMPANY, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

AMERICAN CAR COMPANY, ST. LOUIS, MO. main office: Philadelphia, pa 

' ' LONDON OFFICE110 CANNON ST.E.C. 

G. C. KUHLMAN CAR COMPANY, CLEVELAND, OHIO pacific coast agents: pierson 

_ _____ _ ROEDING & CO.. SAN FRANCISCO. 

JOHN STEPHENSON COMPANY, ELIZABETH, N. J. Australian agents: noyes 

WASON MANUFACTURING CO.SPRINGFIELD,MASS. ^1^^^^^ lonuon. 
CARS TRUCKS SEATS RATTAN SPRINGS SPECIALTIES SUPPLIES 



DERAILMENTS AT CURVES 

Most of the recent disasters to trains on steam roads while 
rounding curves at a high rate of speed have been caused, not 
by broken rails, but by the absence of cushioned side swing 
in the trucks. The average speed of electrically operated 
cars on interurban lines in the United States is higher than 
on steam roads while the average track conditions are much 
inferior and the curves more frequent and of shorter radii, yet 
the Brill No. 27-E Truck, which is used on the great major- 
ity of these electric lines, has never been derailed except in 
collisions. It is the only high-speed truck that has a cush- 
ioned side swing. The swing bolster used in "M. C. B." types 
and all other trucks, is uncushioned, and, therefore, when 
curves are taken at more than moderate speed, the swing 
stops with a jerk which drives the wheel flanges against the 
outer rail head with dangerous and sometimes fatal force. 




THE B R L L L NUMBER 2? -E T R U C K {P A T E N T E D) 



January 4, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



35 





Railway Motor Gears 

The Steel Foundry 












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General Eleetrir Company's Steel Foundry, 

where all castings for G. E. Gear-' are made. 




Split and solid Gear Castings removed 
from sand, showing large "risers.'' 




Sand-Blasting Geai Castings t<> remove nil 
foreign materials from surface of steel castings^ 



Every operation, from the 
pouring of the steel to the 
finishing cut, is subject to 
scrutiny and test by ex- 
perienced specialists in our 
own Foundry and Machine 
Shops. 

To insure homogeneous cast- 
ings and freedom from 
shrinkage cracks, heavy 
"risers" are employed. 

All Gear Castings are sand- 
blasted, to insure detection 
of faults. Imperfect cast- 
ings are scrapped before 
leaving the foundrv. 



"Original Equipment Quality" 

means 

"Original Equipment Service" 



Tht second advertisement of this series on General 

Electric Company Railway Motor Gears tiill 
appear in the January II issue of the Electric 
Railway Review anil will treat on the Machin e 

Shops. 



Chicago Office: 
Monadnock Bldg. 



Principal Office : 

Schenectady, N. Y. 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



vtm 



'36 



Pittsburgh fc, ELECTRIC RAILWAY review 



January 4, 190S. 



Stuart Howland Co. 

Everything Electrical 

BOSTON 




fi/FK/N 



MEASURING TAPES 

are the choice of expertelectrical engineers in all quarters 
of the globe. Absolute accuracy and the highest possible 
degree of durability make them especially adapted to 
Electric Railway Work. 

New York. 

London, Eng.' 

Windsor.Can. sacina iich., u. s. 



TH £/UFK/N f^UL£(?0. 



the national, lock washer co., 



NEWARK, 
N. J. 

Curtains — Curtain Fixtures — Sash Locks — Sash Balances — INut Locks 
CHICAGO OFFICE: 419 MONADNOCK BLOCK 



The Cincinnati frog & Switch Company, Cincinnati, Ohio 



FROGS, SWITCHES, CROSSINGS, CURVES, SWITCH STANDS 



RAIL BRACES AND SPECIAL TRACK WORK 




NILES CARS 

(The Electric Pullmans) 

LARGE, FAST INTERURBANS 
OUR SPECIALTY 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co. 

Works: NILES, OHIO 

Sales Office: J. A. HANNA CO. 

312 Electric Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio 



GAR CURTAINS 



t[ Did you ever stop to 
think how much is added 
to the appearance of your 
cars by tasteful window 
curtains? 

Let us give you an estimate 
upon new ones for those win- 
ter cars you are renovating. 



The Curtain Supply 

Company 

Main Office end Works. 

83-93 Ohio Street. CHICAGO. ILL. 

530 Mission Street 1819 Park Row Bldd. 

SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 



WADDELL& MAHON 

Special Agents 

PHILADELPHIA OFFICE BALTIMORE OFFICE 

Room 312 Lippincott Bldg. Room 40i! Baltimore American Bldg. 
Long Distance Telephone Long Distance Telephone 

2403 Walnut 5347 St. Paul 

BOSTON OFFICE 
Room 411 Post-Office Square Building 
Long Distance Telephone, 95 l J Fort Hill 

ALWAYS ON DUTY 



1133 BROADWAY 




Suite 1024 and 1026 St. James Building 




NEW VORK 




g Distance Telephone Night 
4582 Madison Sq. Telephones 


2805 Melrose 
2903 Melrose 



Have You Any Labor Troubles? 

Do You Anticipate Trouble? 
We Are Licensed Special Agents 

We are not a Detective Agency, but Special Agents 
who act for Corporations and Manufacturers in the 
termination of labor difficulties. We secure and 
furnish non-union mechanics in all trades, and 
skilled labor in all branches of industry, for service 
during strikes, and establishing the open shop. We 
also furnish Special Police Patrolmen, trained to 
their duties for the protection of non-union work- 
men and security of property. We establish, operate 
and maintain Commissaries for the maintenance 
of non-union workmen, performing Special Service 
during strikes and lockouts. 

We Are Not a Detective Agency 

We Are Successful 

We Get Results 



^rummond's^etective jfaency 

RAILWAYWORKA SPECIALTY ^"^ 

A.L.DRUMMOND, GENERAL MANAGER, EX-CHIEF U.S. SECRET SERVICE, NEW YORK. 



FteGtric Railway Review 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. 

160 Harrison Street. Chicago y 

IW Nussaii Street. New V..rk x 

1529 Williamson Bids., Cleveland 



FORMERLY THE STREET RAILWAY REVIEW. 



CHICAGO, JANUARY 11, 1908 



THE WILSON COMPANY, CHICAGO. 
Whole No Subscription: Domestic . ■ • • g 



Advertise 



to make your house and your goods well known among prospective 

customers 
to give your concern strong prestige and, eventually, pre=eminence 

in your field 
to smooth the way for your salesmen and cut down the time 

required to secure acquaintance 
to produce inquiries for your printed advertising matter from 

interested buyers 
to make those impressions upon the minds of prospective customers 

that turn doubt into belief and belief into orders 
to help, in a dozen different ways, sell your goods, and at far less 

cost than by any other method. 

Advertising is doing these things every day for others — perhaps 
for your competitors — and advertising will do them for you, too, 
if rightly handled. 

All you have guessed about advertising may not be right, so 
don't infer that advertising won't help your business, for it will, 
and we'll gladly show you how. 

Just ask us to have an advertising representative call. No 
obligation— no contract to sign unless you want to— just a straight 
business conference. 



Electric Railway Review 

160 Harrison Street, Chicago 



Alphabetical List of Advertisers. Page 4. 



Advertisers' Classified Directory. Pages 4-6-8-10. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



A Case of Strength 



and why it wins 



*(1 Unnecessary strength, if it means additional weight, is loss. Lyon 
Sheet Steel Gear Cases are as strong as cast cases and weigh from 
75 to 100 pounds less. They are heavily reinforced by rivets and 
extra sheets of steel at the brackets and where all strains come. 

^1 Provided it has the other requisites, common sense teaches that 
a gear case which will not break or crack when struck is 
superior to a cast case. 

^| When we say that Lyon Sheet Steel Gear Cases 

cost less than cast cases, with all other requisites of perfect 
gear protection, will we get your next order? 




Catalogue No. 34 will give more specific data 

Electric ServiceSuppmes Co. 



"Supplies for Every Electric Service* 



M4YER S*ENGLUND DEPT. 
PHILADELPHIA 



OARTON-DANIELS DEPT. 
KEOKUK 



— — BRANCHES - — 
NEW YORK PITTSBURG SAINT LOUIS 



PORTER & BERG DEPT 
CHICAGO 



ATLANTA 



National Air Brakes 







EMERGENCY VALVES WITH QUICK- 
RELEASE FEATURE. 



"National" Emergency Quick-Release Valve 



The new "National" Emergency Valve 
with quick- release feature combines with 
the straight air brake system the emergency 
quick-set and quick-release features of the 
automatic system. This is the most sim- 
plified type of emergency apparatus, re- 
quiring one-third less piping than any other 
emergency equipment. 

WRITE FOR DESCRIPTIVE BULLETIN. 



National Brake & Electric Co. 



NEW YORK: 111 Broadway 

PHILADELPHIA: 1722 Westmoreland St. Mi I w 'I I I L'fW IT ^ A 

BOSTON: F. E. Huntress. 131 State St. iUllWaUKCe, U . 2>. A 

General Sales Office: 519 First National Bank Building, Chicago 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.: W. F. Mc Kenny. 

526 Mission St. 
LONDON : 1 4 Great Smith St . .West minster 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Westin .jrhouse 



Interpole Railway Motors 

reduce maintenance costs — have perfect commutation — practically eliminate flashing 
— greatly diminish brush wear — and are cleanlier motors. 




We manufacture a complete line: 



No. 300 200 H 

No. 301 160 

No. 302 125 

No. 303 100 

No. 304 75 

No. 305 60 

No. 306 50 

No. 307 -40 



No. .100. 200 H. P. 



Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co. 



Atlanta 

Baltimore 

Boston 



Detroit 
Kansas City 
Los Angeles 
Minneapolis 
Canada: Canadian Westinghouse Co., Ltd.. Hamilton. Onta 



Buffalo 
Chicago 
Cincinnati 



Cleveland 

Dallas 

Denver 



New Orleans 
New York 
Philadelphia 



Pittsburg 
St. Louis 
Salt Lake City 



San Francisco 

Seattle 

Syracuse 



Mexico: G. & O. Braniff & Co., City of Mexico 




A Strictly Automatic System 



Any reduction in brake-pipe pressure resulting from a 
break in the piping, burst hose or parting of train, causes 
the brakes to apply immediately with full power. The 
"AMM" equipment combines the flexibility of the straight- 
air brake with the safety of the automatic, that is the 
motorman has complete control of the brakes at all times, 
yet in the emergencies before mentioned the brakes will 
act automatically. 

Pamphlet T-S031 fully describe! Hie equip* ■ 

Westinghouse Traction Brake Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 




Automatic Pressure Gas Producers 

When, in addition in supplying gas engines with a clean. c»>ol gas 
of uniform heat vain.', it is desired to use the gas for other pur- 
poses, the automatic pressure control feature of the Westinghouse 
producer recommends itself as a mean? of regulating the amount 
of gas made for any purpose. If the gas is intended for heating 
only, the producer may he installed without scrubbers, and tin- gas 
piped direct to the furnaces. 

Publit particulars. 

The Westinghouse Machine Co. 

For particulars address nearest sales office: 



New York, m Brfdg 
Boston, 131 State Street 
Cleveland. New England Building 
Chicago, 171 La - 

Cincinnati. Traction Building 
Atlanta. Candler Building 



B, Chemical Building 
Pittsburg, Westinghouse Bldg. 
Philadelphia. N. American Bldg. 
Denver, McPhee Building 
San Francisco. Hunt. Mirk & Co. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Acme White Lead & Color 

Works 

Advance Lumber Co 22 

Allis-Chalmers Co 21 

Aluminum Co. of America L9 
American Brake Shoe & Fdry. 

Co 27 

A rican Electrical Works 

American Frog & Switch Co... 
Anderson. Albert & J. M., 

Mfg. Co 19 

Armstrong Oiler Co 

Arnold Company 21 

Atlas Anchor Co 18 

Babcock & Wilcox Co 12 

Baker, The Wm. C, Heating 

& .Supply Co 21 

Baldwin Locomotive Works.. 18 

Barbour-Stockwell Co 15 

Barnes, G. H., Hardw I 

Lumber Co 22 

Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 

Co 26 

Beidler, Francis, & Co 22 

Bellamy Vestlette Mfg, Co 

Berthold & Jennings 22 

Blake Signal & Mfg. Co 15 

Bliss. R.. Mfg. Co 

Bridgeport Brass Co 30 

Brill. The J. G.. Co 28 

Brown, Harold P 

Brown Hoisting Machy. Co.. 14 

Buckeye Engine Co 

Burnham. Williams & Co 18 

Byllesby. H. M., & Co 24 

Central Inspection Bureau... 24 

Chase-Shawmut Co 5 

Churchill Cedar Co 22 

Cincinnati Car Co 

Cincinnati Frog & Switch Co, 
Cleveland Armature Works.. J, 
Cleveland Frog & Cross. <•,, 

Collier. Barron B 

Columbia Construction Co, 24 
Consolidated Car Fendei Co,.i!i 
Consolidated Car r Heating Co. 25 
Contractors' Supply & Equip- 
ment Co 2 1 

Cooper Heater Co 19 

crane Co 24 

Creaghead Engineering Co... 24 
Curtain Supply Co 24 

Davis, The John. Co 

Detroit Graphite Co 26 

Dearborn Drug & Chemical 
Works 2:: 



Drouve, The G., Co 14 

Drummond Detective Agency... 
Durkin Controller Handle Co... 

Earll, C. 1 25 

Eclipse Railway Supply Co.. 24 
Electric Railway Equipment 

Co :■ 

Electric Ry. Improvement Co. 26 
Electric Service Supplies Co.. 2 

Engineering Agency, The 

Engineers and Contractors. . .24 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co 25 

Ford, Bacon & Davis 24 

Galena-Signal Oil Co 11 

General Electric Co 29 

General Storage Lintterx Co.. 25 

Gillette Chemical Co 

Goheen Mfg. Co 

Goldschmidt Thermit Co 

Green Engineering Co 

Green Fuel Economizer Co... 22 

Griffin Wheel Co 25 

Grip Nut Co 27 

Hagy, J. Milton. Waste Wks. .12 

Hale & Kilburn Mfg. Co 

Harrison. F. P., Elec. Mfg. Co !3 

Hartshorn. Stewart, Co 

Heine Safety Boiler Co 22 

Henderson-Ames Co 25 

Hevwood Bros. & Wakefield 

Co 19 

Holman, D. F.. Ry. Tracklayer 

Co 25 

Hornet Commutator Co 

Hooven-Owens-Rentschler Co.. . 

Hope Webbing Co 23 

Humbird Lumber Co . Ltd 

Indestructible Fibre Co 

Jewett Car Co 13 

Johahn, F. A 21 

Jolms-Manville, H. W., Co... 5 

Kalamazoo Ry. Supply Co... 5 
Kennicott Water Softener Co... 
Kinnear Manufacturing Co 

Lindsley Bros. Co., The 22 

Lorain Steel Co 18 

Lufkin Rule Co 30 

Lumen Bearing Co 22 

Macallen Co 17 



McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co... 

Marshall, R. W.. & Co 21 

Massachusetts Chemical Co.. 12 

Meyers. Fred J., Mfg. Co 

Middletown Car Works 

Miller Anchor Co 18 

Millov Electric Co., The 1. 

Model Stoker Co., The 24 

Morden Frog & Crossing Wks.. 

National Brake & Electric Co. 2 

National Carbon Co 18 

National Lock Washer Co.... 25 

Naugle Pole & Tie Co 22 

New York Switch & Crossing 

Co 21 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co 21 

Northern Engineering Works. 26 
Nuttall. R. D., Co 

Ohio Brass Co 

Okonite Co.. Ltd 

Pacific Coast Pole Co 22 

I '.'Mll.lSote I ',, 

Patten. Paul B 2:; 

Pay-As- You-Enter Car Co.... 9 

Power Specialty Co 

Pressed Steel Car Co 13 

Queen & Co 2:: 

Rail Joint Co 25 

Railway Specialty •& Supply 

Co 

Railway Steel-Spring Co 2 1 

Recording Fare Register Co.. 25 

Reed. Francis, Co 

Register. A. L., & Co 24 

Reiter. G. C 24 

Ridlon, Frank. Co 

Roberts & Abbott Co 

Robertson. Wm.. & Co 19 

Rodger Ballast Car Co 13 

Rooke Automatic Register Co. 30 
Rossiter, MacGovern & Co. 

(Inc.) 21 

Russell Car & Snow-Pldw Co.23 

S-E. Missouri Cypress Co.. .22 

.St. Louis Car Co 7 

St. Louis Car Wheel Co 21 

St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 

Co 23 

Sanderson & Porter 

Saxton, E 

Sehroeder Headlight Co 

Shinier & Chase Co 25 



Security Register & Mfg. Co... 

Sheaff & Jastaad 

Simmons, John. Co 18 

Smith, Peter, Heater Co 25 

Speer Carbon Co 21 

Standard Brake Shoe Co 24 

Standard Motor Truck Co 

Standard Paint Co 23 

Standard Steel Works 18 

Standard Underground Cable 

Co 12 

Standard Varnish Works 

Star Brass Works is 

Stone & Webster Engr. Corp. 24 

Stuart-Howland Co 

Symington, T. H., Co 11 

Telegraph Signal Co 1 '.> 

Trolley Supply Co 17 

Under-Feed Stoker Co lv 

United States Graphite Co., 
The 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co 11 

Van Dorn, W. T., Co 30 

Van Valkenburgh, E. C 25 

Waddell & Mahon 30 

Wagenhorst, J. H., & Co 22 

Wallace Supply Co 14 

Wanted and For Sale Cards.. 21 
Washburn Steel Castings & 

Coupler Co 30 

Watson-Stillman Co 17 

Wendell & MacDuffie 

Western Electric Co 15 

Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. 

Co 3 

Westinghouse Machine Co.... 3 
Westinghouse Traction Brake 

Co 3 

Weston Electrical Instrument 

Whartcn Wm Jr & C: ii 

Wheeler Condenser & Eng'g 

Co 

Wheel Truing Brake Shoe Co. 24 

White, J. G., & Co 2 1 

Whitmore Mfg. Co., The 19 

Wilson. J. G.. Mfg. Co 

Wood. Guilford S 12 

Woodman, R., Mfg. & Supply- 
Co 

Worcester, C. H., Co 22 

Zelnieker, Walter A., Supply 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 



Advertising Service. 

Van Valkenburgh. 10. ('.. 21! 
West One Hundred and Sec 
ond St., Chicago. 

Advertising, Street Car. 

Collier, Barron G.. Flat Iroi 
Bldg.. New York. 



Air Compressors — (See Com- 
pressors, Air). 

Alloys and Bearing Metals. 

Brown, H. P., 120 Liberty St., 
New York. 

General Electric Co.. Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co.. 169 
South St., New York. 

Lumen Bearing Co., Buffalo. 
N. Y. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Aluminum Wire, Etc. 

Aluminum Co. of America, 
Pittsburg. 

Anchors. 

Atlas Anchor Co.. Cleveland. O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
2iio Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Miller Anchor Co.. Norwalk, O. 
Ohio Brass Co.. Mansfield. O. 

Armatures and Coils. Winding 
and Repairing. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady. N. Y. 

I larrison [•>■,■ \- Mfg. Co., 169 
South St.. New Y'ork. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St.. New York. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Stuart-Howland Co.. Boston. 



Armature Lifts. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg.. Chicago 
Asbestos Materials. 

John 



Ne 



Axles — (See Wheels and Axles). 



Badges and Buttons. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Recording Fare Register Co., 
New Haven, Conn. 
Ballast Cars — (See Cars, Bal- 
last). 
Ball Bearing. 

Symington. T. H.. Co., Balti- 
more, Md. 

Bases — (See Trolley Poles and 
Fittings). 

Batteries. 

General Storage Battery Co., 
42 Broadway, New York. 
Bearings. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Lumen Bearing Co., Buffalo. 
N. Y. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co.. 95 
Liberty St.. New York. 

Nuttall. R. D., Co., Pittsburg. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston 

Symington, T. H., Co., Balti- 
more, Md. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 
Cleveland, O. 

Bells and Gongs. 
American Car Co.. St. Louis. 
Brill. The J. G., Co.. Phila- 
delphia. 



Bells and Gongs — Continued. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Reiter. G. C, Canton, O. 

St. Louis Car Co.. St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Black Lead. 
Detroit Graphite Co.. Detroit, 

Mich. 
U. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw. 

Mich. 

Block System — (See Signals). 
Blowers — (See Mechanical Draft) 
Blue Printing Machines. 

Buckeye Engine Co., Salem, O. 
Boilers. 
Babcock & Wilcox Co., N. Y. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chi- 
cago. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 

Matteawan, N. Y. 
Heine Safety Boiler Co., 421 

Olive St., St. Louis. 
Rossiter. MacGovern & Co.. 17 
Battery PI., New Y'ork. 

Boiler Cleaning Compound. 
Dearborn Drug & Chemical 

Works, Chicago. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 

Bonds. Rail. 

Brown, H. P., 120 Liberty St., 

New York. 
Chase-Shawmut Co., New- 

buryport, Mass. 
Electric Railway Improvement 

Co., Cleveland, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg.. Chicago. 



Bonds, Rail — Continued. 
General Electric Co., Scheie , - 

tadv, N. Y. 
Goldschmidt Thermit Co., 43 

Exchange PI., New York. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New Y'ork. 
Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Brackets and Cross Arms. 

Anderson, Albert & J. M. 
Mfg. Co., Boston. 

Creaghead Engineering Co., 
Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Railway Equipment 
Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Lindsley Bros. Co., Spokane, 
Wash. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Brakes and Brake Parts. 

Allis-Chalmers Co., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric • Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co.. 
Chicago. 

National Brake & Electric Co., 
Milwaukee. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Westinghouse Traction Brake 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Brakeshoes. 
American Brake Shoe & Fdry. 

Co.. Mahwah, N. J. 
American Car Co., St. Louis. 
Barbour-Stockwell Co., Cam- 

bridgeport, Mass. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Shawmut 
Soldered Railbonds 

Are the Original Soldered Bonds 
8 YEARS of Service Under ALL 
Conditions Prove Their RE- 
LIABILITY. 




WHY Not Try a Proven Bond 

at Least 

SEND FOR OUR * PROPOSITION 

See Bulletin No. 29 

CHASE-SHAWMUT CO. 

Newburyport, Mass. 



The Root Snow 
Scraper T No. 5 




ASBESTOS WOOD 




will make you more money than any 
other scraper you ever bought. 

It cleans all the snow from the 
center to nine inches outside of each 
rail, and also cleans the groove. 

This scraper is worth the price 
every day that it snows. 

Kalamazoo Railway Supply Co. 

Kalamazoo. Mich., U. S. A. 



AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR 
SLATE, MARBLE OR FIBRE 

is without an equal, because it is ab- 
solutely fire-proof and has an elec- 
trical resistance almost equal to sheet 
mica. Can be worked with ordinary 
wood-working tools— holds screws well 
and can be finished in any colors 
desired. 



AS A FIREPROOFING MATERIAL 

ASBESTOS WOOD is the best fire-proof sheathing 
known for electric cars. Its use is indicated wherever it is 
desirable to protect the electrical equipment from grounds 
and short circuits, and also to prevent danger of fire from 
the same causes. 

ASBESTOS WOOD can be used in almost all cases 
where wood, slate or marble are usually employed and 
where fire-proof construction is desired. 

WRITE NEAREST BRANCH TOR CATALOG. 

H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE CO. 




New York 


Philadelphia 


Kansas City 




St. Louis 


Los Angeles 


Chicago 


Pittsburg 


Minneapolis 




Cleveland 


New Orleans 




Buffalo 


Dallas 


Baltimore 


San Francisco 


London 72 



TUBULAR POLES 

IRON OR STEEL 



'. 

t 



M 



Electric 
Raiewa^t 

Electric 
Lighting Coy 

/iGIAIy) 

Telephone^A 1 ; 
Telegraph) 

TRANJ?\U/jON 
L I N E ^T 

A T» X> 

Cate nary 
./uypEN^i ON 
E t :n :e ^r 



Electric RAiLWAYlQuipnt^NT& 

Geaeral Office. Cincin n ati O • \3J~k 
J^/iops- Heading Fa - "WheelingWVX 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS-Continued. 



Brakeshoes — Continued. 

Brill, The J. G., Co.. Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co.. 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis. 
Mo. 

Standard Brake Shoe Co., Au- 
rora, 111. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co., 

Philadelphia. 
Wheel Truing Brake Shoe Co.. 

Detroit. 

Bridges, Bascule and Concrete. 
Wallace-Coates Engineering 

Co., Chicago. 
Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 

Bldg.. St. Louis. 



Brushes, Motors and Dyanmos. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. T. 

National Carbon Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Speer Carbon Co.. St. Marys, 
Pa. 

Bumpers, Car. 

American Car Co.. St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. O, Car Co- 
Cleveland. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis. 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 
Car Cleaner. 

Gillette Chemical Co., 42 
Broadway, New York. 

Car House Doors. 

Kinnear Mfg. Co., Columbus, 

O. 
Wilson, J. G., Mfg. Co., New 
York. 
Car Replacers. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co.. Chgo. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 

Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 
Car Roof Paint, Canvas. 

St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Car Seats. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Hale & Kilburn Mfg. Co., 
Philadelphia. 

Heywood Bros. & Wakefield 
Co.. Wakefield, Mass. 

Kuhlman. The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis. 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co.. Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 
Car Signs — (See Signs, Cars and 

Track). 
Car Steps. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 
Car Trimmings — (See Trim- 
mings, Car). 
Cars, Ballast. 

Rodger Ballast Car Co.. Chgo. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis. 
Mo. 

Cars, Dump. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co.. Chgo. 

Middletown Car Works, Mid- 
dletown, Pa. 

Rodger Ballast Car Co., Chgo. 

Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co., 
Rldgway, Pa. 

Louis Car Co., St. Louis. 
Mo. 
Cars, Passenger and Freight. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Cincinnati Car Co.. Cincinnati. 

Detroit Carbuilding & Equip- 
ment Co., Detroit, Mich. 



Cars, Passenger and Freight — 
Continued. 

Electric Railwav Improvement 
Co.. Cleveland, O. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

Jewett Car Co., Newark, O. 

Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 
Bldg., St. Louis. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co.. 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co., Niles. O. 

Pressed Steel Car Co., Pitts- 
burg. 

Rodger Ballast Car Co., Chgo. 

Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co., 
Ridgway, Pa. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Standard Motor Truck Co., 
Pittsburg. 

Stephenson. John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Cars, Pay-As- You- Enter. 
Pay-As- You-Enter Car Co., 26 
Cortlandt St., New York. 

Cars, Rebuilt. 
Detroit Carbuilding & Equip- 
ment Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Cars, Second-Hand. 

Detroit Carbuilding & Equip- 
ment Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Zelnicker, Walter A., Supply 
Co., St. Louis. 

Cars, Steel. 

Middletown Car Works, Mid- 
dletown, Pa. 

Pressed Steel Car Co.. Pitts- 
burg. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis. 
Mo. 

Standard Motor Truck Co., 
Pittsburg. 

Castings, Brass. 
Star Brass Works, Kalamazoo, 
Mich. 

Castings, Iron and Steel. 

American Brake Shoe & Foun- 
dry Co., Mahwah, N. J. 

Green Engineering Co., Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 

Lorain Steel Co., Johnstown, 
Pa. 



Cattle Guards. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co.. Kalamazoo. Mich. 

Cements, Cable and Transformer. 
Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 
Circuit-Breakers. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 
Western Electric Co., Chicago. 
Coal Handling Machinery — (See 

Conveyors). 
Coils — (See Armaturesand Coils) 
Commutators and Parts. 
Cleveland Armature Works, 

Cleveland. 
Electric Service Supplies Co.. 

1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 
General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 
Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 

South St., New York. 
Homer Commutator Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 
Marshall, R. W., & Co.. 95 

Liberty St., New York. 
Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 
Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 
Compressors, Air. 
Fairbanks. Morse & Co., Chgo. 
General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 
National Brake & Electric Co.. 

Milwaukee. 
Westinghouse Traction Brake 
Co.. Pittsburg. 
Concrete Mixers. 
Contractors' Supply & Equip. 
Co., Chicago. 

Condensers. 
Wheeler Con. & Eng. Co.. New 
York. 
Conduits. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Western Electric Co.. Chicago. 



Contractors. 

Arnold Company, 1S1 La Salle 
St., Chicago. 

Byllesby. H. M., Co., Am. 
Trust Bldg., Chicago. 

Columbia Construction Co.. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Creaghead Engineering Co., 
Cincinnati, O. 

Green Engineering Co., Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 

Register, A. L., & Co., 112 
N. Broad St., Philadelphia. 

Sanderson & Porter, 52 Will- 
iam St., New York. 

Saxton. E., 841 Bladensburg 
R., Washington, D. C. 

Sheaflf & Jaastad, 88 Broad 
St., Boston. 

Stone & Webster Engineering 
Corp., Boston. 

Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co., 
Philadelphia. 

White, J. G., & Co., 49 Ex- 
change PI., New York. 

Controllers and Attachments. 

Durkin Con. Handle Co., Ar- 
cade Bldg., Philadelphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Marshall. R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Western Electric Co.. Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg. 
Conveyors and Coal Handling 
Machinery. 

Green Engineering Co.. Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. . 

Northern Engineering Works, 
Detroit, Mich. 
Cord, Bell and Trolley. 

American Car Co.. St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 

Kuhlman. The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Stuart-Howland Co.. Boston. 

Wason Mfg. Co.. Springfield. 
Mass. 
Couplers, Car. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman. The G C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co- 
Chicago. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Van Dorn, W. T., Co., Pau- 
lina St., Chicago. 

Wallace Supply Co.. Chicago. 

Washburn. E. C, Minneapolis. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Coverings, Pipe and Boiler. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 
Cranes, Hoists and Lifts. 
American Car Co., St. Louis. 
Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 
Brown Hoisting Machinery 

Co., Cleveland. O. 
Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 

Cleveland. 
Northern Engineering Works, 

Detroit, Mich. 
Railway Specialty & Supply 

Co., Chicago. 
Stephenson. John, Co.. Eliza- 
beth. X. J. 
Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 

Cleveland. O. 
Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Mass. 
Cross Arms — (See Brackets and 

Cross Arms). 
Crossing Gates — (See Gates and 

Guards). 



Curtains, Fixtures and Materials. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Curtain Supply Co., 93 Ohio 
St., Chicago. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 



Curtains, Fixtures and Material* 

— Continued. 
Hartshorn. Stewart. Co., East 

Newark, N. J. 
Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 

Cleveland. 
Marshall, R. W.. & Co., 95 

Liberty St., New York. 
National Lock Washer Co., 

Newark, N. J. 
Pantasote Co., 11 Broadway, 

New York. 
St. Louis Car Co.. St. Louis, 

Mo. 
Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 
Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 

Mass. 

Cylinder Oil. 
Power Specialty Co.. Ill 
Broadway, N. Y. 

Derailing Devices. 

American Frog & Switch Co.. 
Hamilton, O. 

Cincinnati Frog & Switch Co- 
Cincinnati, O. 

Cleveland Frog & Crossing 
Co., Cleveland, O. 

Detective Agency. 
Drummond Detective Agency. 
New York. 

Diaphragms. 
Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Doors and Fixtures. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis. 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Doors, Steel Rolling. 

Kinnear Manufacturing Co- 
Columbus, O. 

Wilson, J. G- Mfg. Co., New 
York. 

Draft, Mechanical — (See Me- 
chanical Draft). 

Draft Rigging. 
Van Dorn, W. T.. Co., Chgo. 
Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Drills, Track. 
Brown, H. P., 120 Liberty St., 

New York. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 

Co.. Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Marshall, R. W- & Co., 96 

Liberty St., New York. 
Reed, Francis, Co., Worcester, 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Drying Appliances. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Dynamos and Generators. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Fairbanks. Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

National Brake & Electric 
Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rossiter, MacGovern & Co.. 
17 Battery PI., New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Economizers, Fuel. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan. N. Y. 

Electrical Instruments. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg- Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Johns-Manville, H. W- Co„ 
New York. 

Queen & Co.. Philadelphia. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg. Pa. 

Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 

Electric Railway Supplies, Gen- 
eral. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Creaghead Engineering Co- 
Cincinnati, O. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 









ST.IOUIS CAR <S. 

ST. LOUIS MO. 




ibuilders of 
Electric Cars 

of every kind in the larg- 
est and best equipped 
factory in tkc^orldb, 

lTicaiioriky <& Drawing 

li c ati onj 



UpecincaTion^ & 
rurniLrkea * on - a 



pp 



* 




ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF* ADVERTISERS-Continued. 



Electric Railway Supplies, Gen- 
eral — Continued. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 
169 South St., New York. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Enamels. 
Acme White Lead & Color 

Works, Detroit, Mich. 
St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 

Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Engine Apparatus. 

Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Engineers and Contractors. 

Arnold Company, Chicago. 

Byllesby, H. M., & Co., Chgo. 

Columbia Construction Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Ford. Bacon & Davis,- New 
York. 

Register. A. L., & Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Roberts & Abbott Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Sanderson & Porter, New York 

Saxton, E., Washington, D. C. 

Sheaff & Jaastad, Boston. 

Stone & Webster Eng. Cor- 
poration, Boston. 

White, J. G., & Co., New York. 

Engines, Gas and Oil. 
Buckeye Engine Co., Salem, O. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Westinghouse Machine Co., 
Pittsburg. 



Engines, Steam. 
Buckeye Engine Co., Salem, O. 
Hooven-Owens-Rentschler Co., 

Hamilton, O. 
Rossiter, MacGovern & Co., 17 

Battery PI., New York. 
Westinghouse Machine Co., 

Pittsburg. 

Fans, Exhaust and Ventilating. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg. 

Fare Boxes — (See Electric Rail- 
way Supplies). 

Fare Registers and Register 

Fittings. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Recording Fare Register Co., 

Mew Haven, Conn. 
Rooke Automatic Register Co.. 

Providence, R. I. 
Security Register & Mfg. Co., 

42 Broadway, New York. 

Feedwater Apparatus. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 

Matteawan, N. Y. 
Wheeler Condenser & Eng'g 
Co., New York. 



Fenders and Guards. 
Consolidated Car Fender Co.. 

Providence, R. I. 
Eclipse Railway Supply Co., 

Cleveland, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co.. 

1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 
McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 

Chicago. 
Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 

Liberty St., New York. 

Flangers, Snow. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 

Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 

Chicago. 
Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 
Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 

Cleveland, O. 

Frogs — (See Switches, Frogs and 
Crossings). 

Fuel Economizers — (See Econo- 
mizers, Fuel). 

Fuses and Fuse Devices. 
Chase-Shawmut Co., New- 
buryport, Mass. 



Fuses and Fuse Devices — Con- 
tinued. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady. N. Y. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Manu- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 

Gaskets, Bronze. 
Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, New York. 

Gates and Guards. 

Bliss, R., Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, 

R. I. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo. Mich. 

Gear Cases. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St.. New York. 

Gears and Pinions. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Nuttall, R. D., Co., Pittsburg. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 
Cleveland, O. 

Generators — (See Dynamos). 

Gongs — (See Bells and Gongs). 

Graphite. 

Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit, 

Mich. 
U. S. Graphite Co.. Saginaw, 
Mich. 

Graphite Paint — (See Paint). 

Grates, Chain. 
Green Engineering Co., Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 

Grease — (See Lubricants). 

Grinders. 
Brown. Harold P., 120 Liberty 
St., New York. 

Guy Anchors — (See Anchors). 

Harps, Trolley — (See Trolley 
Poles and Fittings). 

Headlights. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Fairbanks. Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

St, Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Schroeder Headlight Co., Ev- 
ansville, Ind. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Trolley Supply Co., Canton, O. 

Headllnings, Passenger Car. 
Indestructible Fibre Co., 45 
Broadway, New York. 

Heaters, Car, Electric. 

Consolidated Car-Heating Co., 

Albany, N. Y. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Heaters, Car, Hot Water, and 
Stoves. 

Baker, The Wm. C, Heating 
& Sup. Co., New York. 

Cooper Heater Co., The, Day- 
ton, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Smith, Peter, Heater Co., De- 
troit, Mich. 



landt St.. New York. 



Instruments, Measuring and 
Testing — (See Electrical In- 
struments). 



Insulating Tapes. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St.. New York. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Insulations and Insulating Ma- 
terial. 

Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 
Co., Boston. 

Creaghead Engineering Co., 
Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Railway Equipment 
Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Macallen, The, Co., Boston. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Standard Paint Co., 100 Will- 
iam St., New York. 

Standard Varnish Works, New 
York. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Jacks. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co- 
Cleveland. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Morden Frog & Crossing Co., 
Chicago. 

Security Register & Mfg. Co., 
New York. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 

Watson- Stillman Co., 26 Cort- 
landt St., New York. 

Joints. Expansion — (See Steam 
Fittings). 

Joints, Rail. 
Goldschmidt Thermit Co., 43 

Exchange PI., New York. 
Rail Joint Co., 29 W. 34th St., 

New York. 

Joints, Welded — (See Rail Joints. 
Welded). 

Journal Boxes. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

St. Louis Car Co.. St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Symington, T. H., Co., Balti- 
more, Md. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Journal Lubricators — (See Lu- 
bricants). 

Journal Packing, Steel Wool. 
Robertson, Wm.. & Co., Great 
Northern Bldg., Chicago. 

Lamps, Arc and Incandescent. 

Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 
Co., Boston. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co.. 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Lamp Sockets. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 



Lightning Arresters. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Bostc. 

Western Electric Co., Chica 

Westinghouse Elec. & Mai.ii- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 

Line Material. 
Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 

Co., Boston. 
Creaghead Engineering Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 
Electric Ry. Equipment Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 
Macallen, The, Co., Boston. 
Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 

Liberty St., New York. 
Recording Fare Register Co., 

New Haven, Conn. 
Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 
Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Lock and Nut Washers. 
Grip Nut Co., 152 Lake St., 

Chicago. 
National Lock Washer Co., 

Newark, N. J. 

Lockers, Metal- 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg.. Chicago. 

Locomotives. 
Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

Philadelphia. 
Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 

Bldg., St. Louis. 

Locomotives, Electric. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Baldwin Locomotive Works, 
Philadelphia. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Kuhlman. The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co- 
Chicago. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Manu- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 



Lubricants. 

Dearborn Drug & Chemical 
Works. Chicago. 

Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit, 
Mich. 

Galena-Signal Oil Co., Frank- 
lin, Pa. 

U. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw, 
Mich. 

Whitmore Mfg. Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Lumber. 
Barnes. G. H., Hardwood 

Lumber Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Beidler, Francis, & Co., Chgo. 
Berthold & Jennings, St. 

Louis. 
Lindsley Bros. Co., Spokane, 

Wash. 
S-E. Missouri Cypress Co., 

Campbell, Mo. 

Lumber, Asbestos. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co- 
New York. 

Malleable Iron. 
Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 

Co.. Beaver Dam, Wis. 
St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 

Mo. 

Measuring Tapes. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, 
Mich. 

Mechanical Draft. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Meters. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co- 
New York. 
Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 



naryll, 1908. ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



You can reap the advantages of the pay-as-you- 
enter plan of fare collection in one way only — 

by operating specially designed 

Pay- As-You-Enter Cars 

built under licenses granted by the owners of 
the patents. 

Every attempt made in any other manner is 
doomed to failure. If favorably impressed with 
the pay-as-you-enter plan, you cannot afford to 
prejudice the public against it by making an 
experiment with ordinary cars that can have 
no other result than absolute failure. 



The success of the pay-as-you-enter plan has been established beyond 
question. The most recent example of successful operation is in Buffalo, 
where the new cars were enthusiastically received by the press and public 



We license manufacturers and railways to build and use the 
Pay- As-You-Enter Car, the patents on which are owned by 

The Pay-As-You-Enter Car Company 

DUNCAN McDONALD^^ 2 g Cortlandt Street> New York ™° S W CA ^ ager 



10 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS Continued. 



Molded Goods. 
Massachusetts Chemical Co., 

Walpole, Mass. 
Wood, G. S., Great Northern 

Bldg., Chicago. 

Motors, Electric. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. T. 

National Brake & Electric Co., 
Milwaukee. 

Rossiter, MacGovern & Co., 17 
Battery PI., New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Manu- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 

Nut Locks. 
Grip Nut Co., 152 Lake St., 

Chicago. 
National Lock Washer Co., 

Newark. N. J. 
Railway Specialty & Supply 

Co., Chicago. 
St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis-, 

Mo. 

Nuts and Bolts. 
Grip Nut Co., 152 Lake St., 

Chicago. 
Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 
National Lock Washer Co., 

Newark, N. J. 
Railway Specialty & Supply 

Co., Chicago. . 

Oilers. 

Armstrong Oiler Co., 31st and 
Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

Oils — (See Lubricants). 

Overhead Equipment — (See Elec- 
tric Railway Supplies). 

Packings. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New Tork. 

Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, New York. 

Packing, Steel Wool Journal. 
Robertson, Wm., & Co., Gt. 
Northern Bldg., Chicago. 

Paints. 

Acme White Lead & Color 
Works, Detroit. 

Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit. 

Goheen Mfg. Co., Canton, O. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Standard Paint Co., 100 Will- 
iam St., New York. 

St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

U. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw. 
Mich. 

Pay- As-You- Enter Cars. 
Pay-As- You-Enter Car Co., 26 
Cortlandt St., New York. 

Pipe Bends and Fittings — (See 
Steam Fittings). 

Plumbago. 

Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit. 

Mich. 
U. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw. 

Mich. 

Poles, Metal. 
Creaghead Engineering Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 
Electric Railway Equipment 

Co., Cincinnati, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Poles and Ties, Wood. 

Advance Lumber Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Barnes. G. H., Hardwood 
Lumber Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Beidler, Francis, & Co., Chgo. 

Berthold & Jennings, St. Louis. 

Churchill Cedar Co., Spokane. 
Wash. 

Humbird Lumber Co., Sand 
Point, Idaho. 

Lindsley Bros. Co., Spokane. 
Wash. 

Naugle Pole & Tie Co., 226 
La Salle St., Chicago. 

Pacific Coast Pole Co., Spo- 
kane, Wash. 

S-E. Missouri Cypress Co., 
Campbell, Mo. 

Worcester, C. H., Co., Tribune 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Punches — (See Ticket Punches). 

Rail Benders. 
Electric Service Supplies Co.. 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 

Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 



Rail Bonds — (See Bonds, Rail). 

Rail Brackets. 
Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 
Co., Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Rail Drills— (See Drills, Track). 

Rail Feed Wire — (See Wire and 
Cables). 

Rail Joints and Chairs — (See 
Joints, Rail). 

Rail Joints, Welded. 
Goldschmidt Thermit Co., 43 

Exchange PI., New York. 
Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 

Rails, New. 
Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 
New York Switch & Crossing 

Co., Hoboken, N. J. 
Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co., 

Philadelphia. 

Ralls, Relaying. 
Zehiicker, Walter A., Supply 
Co., St. Louis. 

Railway Equipment. 
Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 
Bldg., St. Louis. 

Railway Velocipedes. 
Fairbanks Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Registers and Fittings — (See 
Fare Registers). 

Relays. 

Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 

Roofing. 
Johns-Manville. H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Rubber Goods, Mechanical. 
Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Rubber Preservative. 
Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Sand Apparatus. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co.. 
Cleveland. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 



Sash Balances and Fixtures. 
National Lock Washer Co., 
Newark, N. J. 

Sash Operating Devices. 
Drouve, The G., Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Seats, Car — (See Car Seats). 

Shade Rollers — (See Curtains, 
Fixtures and Materials). 

Shutters, Steel Rolling. 
Kinnear Manufacturing Co., 
Columbus, O. 

Signals. 

Blake Signal & Manufactur- 
ing Co., Boston. 

Telegraph Signal Co., Roches- 
ter, N. Y. 

Signal Supplies. 

Railway Specialty & Supply 
Co., Chicago. 

Skylights. 
Drouve, The G., Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Snow Plows, Sweepers and 
Scrapers. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co., 
Ridgway, Pa. 



Snow Plows, Sweepers and 
Scrapers — Continued. 
Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 
Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 



Sockets, Waterproof. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Special Agents. 
Waddell & Mahon. 1133 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Splicing Compounds and Mate- 
rials. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Springs. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co.. 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 

Marshall, ' R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Railway Steel Spring Co., 71 
Broadway. New York. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis. 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 
Mass. 

Sprinkling Cars. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Steam Apparatus. 

Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Steam Fittings, Etc. 

Crane Co., Chicago. 

Davis, The John, Co., Chgo. 

Simmons, John, Co., 110 Cen- 
tre St., New York. 

Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, New York. 

Steel Cars. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G.. Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman. The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

Stephenson, John, Co.. Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co.. Springfield, 
Mass. 



Steel Tapes. 
Lufkin Rule Co., 
Mich. 



Stokers. 

Babcock & Wilcox Co., 85 Lib- 
erty St., New York. 

Green Engineering Co., Com'] 
Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 

Model Stoker Co., Dayton, O. 

Under-Feed Stoker Co. of Am., 
Chicago. 

Westinghouse Machine Co., 
Pittsburg. 

Storage Batteries — (See Bat- 
teries). 

"Strike- Breakers." 

Drummond Detective Agency, 
3 Ann St., New York. 

Waddell & Mahon, 1133 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Superheaters. 
Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, New York. 

Switches, Frogs and Crossings. 
American Frog & Switch Co., 

Hamilton, O. 
Barbour-Stockwell Co., Cam- 

bridgeport, Mass. 
Cincinnati Frog & Switch Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 
Cleveland Frog & Crossing 

Co., Cleveland. O. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 
Morden Frog & Crossing Co., 

Rookery, Chicago. 
New York Switch & Crossing 

Co., Hoboken, N. J. 
Railway Specialtv & Supply 

Co., Chicago. 



Switches, Frogs and Crossings — 
Continued. 
Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co., 
Philadelphia. 

Switchboards and Switchboard 
Instruments. 

Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 
Co., Boston. 

Chase-Shawmut Co., New- 
buryport, Mass. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg. 

Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 

Tapes and Webbing. 

Hope Webbing Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co.. 
New York. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co.. 
Walpole, Mass. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Testing Instruments. 

Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 

Ticket Choppers and Destroyers. 
Patten, Paul B., Salem, Mass. 

Ticket Punches. 
Meyers, Fred J., Mfg. Co.. 

Hamilton, O. 
Woodman Mfg. & Sup. Co.. 

Boston. 

Tieplates. 
Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 
Co., Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Ties and Poles, Wood — (See 
Poles and Ties). 

Timber. 
Beidler, Francis, & Co., Chgo. 
Lindsley Bros. Co., Spokane, 

Wash. 
S-E. Missouri Cypress Co.. 

Campbell, Mo. 



Track Cleaners and Scrapers. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kalamazoo Railway & Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ohio Brass Co., (Mansfield, O. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 
Cleveland, O. 

Wason Mfg. Co.. Springfield. 



Saginaw, Track Drills — (See Drills, Track). 

Tracklaying Machinery. 

Holman, D. F., Ry. Tracklaver 
Co., 1102 Ellsworth Bldg., 
Chicago. 



Track Tools. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Trimmings, Car. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Curtain Supply Co., Park Row 
Bldg., New York. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

National Lock Washer Co., 
Newark, N. J. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Trolley Guards. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Trolley Poles and Fittings. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co.. 
New York. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



11 



THE 



SYMINGTON JOURNAL BOX 

FOR ELECTRIC TRUCKS 

Now Standard on the Majority of Modern Electric Trucks of M. C. B. or Special Type 





Special Notice! 



WE ARE PREPARED TO FURNISH AT ONCE 

the STANDARD JOURNAL BOXES of 

THE AMERICAN STREET AND INTERURBAN RAILWAY ASSOCIATION 



BALTIMORE 

MD. 



THE T. H. SYMINGTON CO. 



CHICAGO 

ILL. 



THE 



Van Dorn & Dutton Co. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

GEARS and PINIONS 



<«* rr >V. 




For All Types of Motors 

HIGHEST QUALITY 



Galena-Signal 
Oil Company 

FRANKLIN, PA. 

THEIR SPECIALTIES 

STREET RAILWAY LUBRICATION EfiKS££ 

house equipment. 

Same skillful expert supt rvision given in t His service as in 
steam railway service has produced very satisfactory results. 
The business of our Street Railway Department has increased 
beyond every expectation. In WOO this department sold 
ten times the number of barrels of oil sold by the same de- 
partment in 1903. 

We are under contract with many of the largest street and 
interurban railways of the country. 

We guarantee cost per thousand miles in street railway 
service when conditions warrant it. 

Write to Franklin, Pennsylvania, for further particulars. 

STEAM RAILWAY LUBRICATION ^^SS 

< ;,ii, na < fa i 
gi ■•' and Oar Oils for steam railway lubrication. S 
'/'■ rfection Valm "'I for cylinder lubrication, and Perfection 
Signal Oil for use in railway signal lanterns, 

GALENA RAILWAY SAFETY OIL !^iKHSi!£ 

~ cab, classification 
and tail lights, and for switch and semaphore lamps. Burns 
equally well with the long time as with the one-day burner; 
with or without chimney as the burner requires. Is pure 
water white in color; high fire test, low cold test, and 
splendid gravitv. 

CHAS. MILLER, President 



11' 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS Continued. 



Trolley Retrievers and Catchers. 

Earll, C. I., Bowling Green 
Bldg., New York. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 

Milloy Electric Co., Bucyrus.O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Trolley Supply Co.. Canton, O. 

Trolley Wagons. 
Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Trolley Wheels — (See Trolley 
Poles and Fittings). 

Trolley Wire — (See Wire and 
Cables). 

Trolleys, Track. 

Cleveland Armature Works. 
Cleveland, O. 

Trucks, Car. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Baldwin Locomotive Works, 
Philadelphia. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co.. 
Chicago. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis. 
Mo. 

Standard Motor Truck Co., 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Standard Varnish Works, New 
York City. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 



Trucks, Car — Continued. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 

Cleveland, O. 
Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Mass. 

Turbines. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Hooven-Owens-Rentschler Co., 
Hamilton, O. 

Westinghouse Machine Co., 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Uniforms. 
Henderson-Ames Co.. The. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Valves — (See Steam Fittings). 

Varnish. 

Acme White Lead & Color 
Works, Detroit. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co.. 
Walpole, Mass. 

Milloy Electric Co., Bucyrus, O. 

Nuttall, R. D., Co., Pittsburg. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Standard Paint Co., 100 Will- 
iam St., New York. 

Star Brass Works, Kalama- 
zoo, Mich. 

Trolley Supply Co., Canton, O. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 



Ventilators. 

Drouvg, The G., Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Bellamy Vestlette Mfg. Co., 

Cleveland, O. 
Waste, Cotton and Wool. 
Hagy, J. Milton, Waste Wks.. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Railway Specialty & Supply 

Co., Chicago. 

Water Softening Apparatus. 
Dearborn Drug & Chemical 

Works, Chicago. 
Kennicott Water Softener Co., 
Chicago. 

Wheels and Axles. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Griffin Wheel Co., Chicago. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Railway Steel-Spring Co., 
New York. 

St. Louis Car Co.. St. Louis. 
Mo. 

St. Louis Car Wheel Co., St. 
Louis. 

Standard Steel Works, Phila- 
delphia. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 



Wheel Grinders. 
Wheel Truing Brake Shoe Co., 
Detroit, Mich. 



Bridge- 



America, 



America, 
Works, 



Window Fixtures. 
Drouve, The G., 
port, Conn. 
Wiping Rags. 
Hagy, J. Milton, Waste Wks., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Wire, Aluminum. 
Aluminum Co. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Wire, Insulated. 

Aluminum Co. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

American Electrical 
Providence, R. I. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Standard Underground Cable 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Wire and Cables. 

Aluminum Co. of America, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

American Electrical Works, 
Providence, R. I. 

Bridgeport Brass Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Standard Underground Cable 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 



TROLLEY WIRE, BARE COPPER CABLES 
WEATHERPROOF WIRE AND CABLES 



STANDARD UNDERGROUND CABLE CO. 

q Francisco Chicago 



PNEUMATIC TOOL 

AIR BRAKE 

and FIRE 



HOSE 



GUILFORD S. WOOD 

Great Northern Bldg., Chicago 



Ring in the Old 

Don't Buy the New 



Get a can of ARMALAC and go after that 
rotten or burned out armature according 
to directions — you will save money. 

Sample for the asking to street railways 
and manufacturing electric companies. 

SEND FOR OUR BOOKLET ANY W A V . 



MASSACHUSETTS CHEMICAL CO. 

Walpole, Mass. 



Motor Packing Waste 



4 It is free from dirt and grit, holds the oil better 
and is easier to pack than ordinary waste. 
^[ One packing of the journal box will last longer 
than with other waste. Used by leading traction 
companies and electric motor manufacturers. 

All grades of white and colored wiping waste, also 
sanitary cleaned wiping rags. Samples submitted. 

The J. Milton Hagy Waste Works 

433 Spruce St. incorporated Philadelphia 



THE BABCOCK & WILCOX COMPANY 



Babcock & Wilcox ■ 



85 Liberty Street, New York 
Stirling- A & T Horizontal 



Cahall Vertical 



WATER TUBE STEAM BOILERS 



STEAM SUPERHEATERS 



Boston, Delta Bldg. 

Philadelphia, 1110-1112 North American Bldg. 

San Francisco, 63 First Street 

Pittsburgh, Farmers Deposit Nat. Bank Bldg. 

Nbw Orleans, 343 Baronne St. 



Works: Bayonne, N.J. Barberton, Ohio. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

Denver, 410 Seventeenth St. 
Salt Lake City, 313 Atlas Block 
Washington, Colorado Building 
Chicago, Marquette Bldg. 
Atlanta, Ga., 1132 Candler Bldg. 



MECHANICAL STOKERS 



Cleveland, 706 New England Bldg. 
Mexico City, 7 Avenida, Juarez 
Havana, Cuba, 116(4 Calle de la Habana 
Los Angeles. 321 Trust Bldg. 
Cincinnati, O., Traction Bldg. 



January 11, 1! 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



L3 



Hart Convertible 

CONSTRUCTION/^ A *T% 
BALLAST V^/TLrV 




Steel Passenger Cars and Trucks 

For Steam and Electric Railways 
Steel and Composite Freight Cars for all Classes of Service 

Pressed Steel Car Co. 

Offices: PITTSBURGH, NEW YORK, CHICAGO, ATLANTA, ST. LOUIS, MEXICO CITY, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



FOR SALE. FOR QUICK DELIVERY 



6 55-ft. Passenger, Baggage 
and Smoking Car Bodies 

Main Compartment 26' 0" 

Smoking " 10' 6" 

Baggage " 10' 0" 

Seating Capacity, 54 

8 60-ft. Passenger, Baggage 
and Smoking Car Bodies 

Main Compartment 28' 6" 

Smoking " 11' 0" 

Baggage " 8' 0" 

Seating Capacity, 58 



5 52 -ft. Passenger and 
Smoking Car Bodies - End ble 

Seating- Capacity, 60 



3 52 -ft. Passenger and 
Baggage Car Bodies— e» 

Seating Capacity, 56 



Double 
d 



2 50-f t. Express Car Bodies 



Write or wire us for further information. 



The Jewett Car Co. N S> rk 



14 



€ 



¥ 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 




■P^LJ 



The "WALLACE" Double Door Fixture 

"The best thing that has yet been brought out for operating 
simultaneously two doors in opposite directions" 

flA traction man said this — and he knew just what he was talking about, for he had had experience with the 
"Wallace" and with others. flYou ought to know how satisfactory the "Wallace" Fixture is to passengers and to 
the management, ^]ust send for Bulletin No. 3, please. 

" c ;"w?s;; ,T Wallace supply company ,,t - j ssssr"- 




THE "ANTI-PLUVIUS" 

Smjr w | ■ f± |j Tp Lets in all the light. 
f\ I LSvln I Keeps out all rain and dust. 

It has so many points of superiority that one small space cannot 

tell of them all. 

Over 3,000,000 square feet in use is proof of goodness. 

We would like to have the opportunity of demonstrating our claims. 

°1§3) Anti-Pluvius Skylight as used iu Train Shed of new Hoboken Terminal. 

It is a pleasure to send catalogues and 
furnish estimates. Let us hear from you. 

G. DROUVE COMPANY, Br.d B ep.rt,Con„. 

Western Office, 40 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 



Brown Hoist Electric Locomotive 



CRANES 



DO valuable service in lifting around 

POWER STATIONS AND CAR HOUSES 




EVERY SORT OF. HOISTING APPARATUS IS SHOWN IN OUR CATALOGUE 

THE BROWN HOISTING MACHINERY CO. 

HAVEMEYER BLDG, NEW YORK CLEVELAND OHIO FRICK BLDG., PITTSBURG, PA. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



L5 




The Blake 

Signal 

System 

Increases Safety 
of Operation 



It is easy to change meeting points on high-speed 
interurban roads using the Blake Signals, and it is not 
possible for train crews to run by new meeting points 
(except through gross and inexcusable negligence) 

— because, after having given the order in the usual 
manner, the dispatcher sets a semaphore and red light 
at the meeting place. 

Another strong safety point is that the dispatcher 
can stop a train crew at any signal point they are 
approaching and give them orders. 

Economical to install and to operate. 
Ask for descriptive pamphlet, please. 

Blake Signal & Manufacturing 

2*6 Summer St. LlOlIlpany Boston, Mass. 



WiE^EsRNJELEGTR I C 



<=Z CZ>K/1 F=>>2<r>>4><~1 



INSURE YOUR LINES 

by using our guaranteed 

HIGH TENSION 

INSULATORS 




We make them in all sizes for all 
classes of service. 

Send for circulars and prices 



Special Work for Street Railways 



Switches 

Mates 

Frogs 




and Crossings 
with Hard 
Steel Centers 



Cast Weld Compromi>e Kail 



Barbour - StOckwell Co., 205 Broadway, Cambridgeport, Mass. 



" ' ■ ■ ■■ — » 



WHARTON SPECIAL TMCK WORK 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

FOR ALL CLASSES OF 



MANGANESE 

STEEL FOR A 

IS OUR SPECIALTY. incorporated. 

Philadelphia. Pa. Jenkintown.Pa. 



16 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, Xo. 



/T 




ii 



Every man who ought to know the difference between correct 
and incorrect operation of electric cars should have 



The Motorman 
and His Duties 



» 



LUDWIG GUTMANN 

CONSULTING ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 



SIXTH EDITION REVISED AND ENLARGED BY 

LAWRENCE E. GOULD 

EDITOR ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



l 



This is the standard handbook on 
the theory and practice of electric 
car operation. A glance at the 
contents, here shown, will give a 
slight idea of the comprehensive- 
ness of the work. 

The revised, enlarged and improved 
sixth edition is now ready. It has 
200 pages; 1 38 illustrations; three 
folding sheets of charts and dia- 
grams; cloth binding. 

Price, $1.50 per copy, prepaid. 



Send for 16-page pamphlet containing 
sample pages, etc. 



The Wilson Company 



CONTENTS 




CHAPTER 1 


page 




1 


CHAPTER II 




Principles of the Electric Motor 


10 


CHAPTER III 




Generating and Distributing 






23 


CHAPTER IV 


Overhead Circuit and Third Rail 


39 


CHAPTER V 




The Electric Railway Motor. ... 


52 


CHAPTER VI 




Car Wiring and Parts 


74 


CHAPTER VII 






92 


CHAPTER VIII 




Mcltiple-Unit Control 


. 116 


CHAPTER IX 




Operation of Controllers 


129 


CHAPTER X 




Brakes and Their Operation 


140 


CHAPTER XI 




How to Remedy Troubles 


. 175 




187 





160 Harrison Street 
Chicago 



J 



January n. L908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 




This is the Plain Arc Headlight 

Made in 14-inch. Ask about the Combination Arc 
and Incandescent Headlight. 



The Motorman 
Behind This Headlight 

can see a car approaching from the opposite direction 
much sooner than he would be able to see either 
the reflected or direct rays of an ordinary headlight. 

Reason : Because of the peculiar construction of the 
Climax Headlight a portion of the reflected rays of light is 
projected upward, while its most powerful light is thrown ahead. 

Result: Safer operation and a great reduction in the 
probability of accident. 



WRITE TODAY FOR CATALOG 



TROLLEY SUPPLY COMPANY 



Canton, Ohio 



Girder Rail Benders 



"PHIS rail bender is 
made in two sizes 
and will bend any sec- 
tion of rail now on the 
market. These tools 
are all portable and 
mounted on wheels. 



Our tools thoroughly guaranteed 




THE WATSON-STILLMAN CO. 

26 Cortlandt Street, New York City 

Branch Office, 453 The Rookery, Chicago, 111. 




Factory of The Milloy Kl 



The Milloy Trolley Base 

built in our new and specially equipped 
factory, insures a quality which will give ex- 
cellent service under ordinary and extraor- 
dinary conditions. 

The Milloy Base is unusually low, has even 
tension on high or low wire. Has no ful- 
crum, no friction, no oil, no center post. 
Always efficient. Particulars on request. 

THE MILLOY ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Bucyrus, Ohio 



The Macallen Company 

Formerly The W. T. C. Macallen Co. 

Electric Railway 
Material 

Brass Founders 





Foundry and Division Streets, BOSTON, MASS. 



18 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



WKXXOV'.N'- 






f*f\T TTTVfRT A CARBON BRUSHES wear smooth, take a 



high polish and will outlast any other long 



ife brushes made, with less wear on commutator. 



NATIONAL CARBON CO. Cleveland, Ohio 



THEY NEVER PULL UP" 




■ ■.L.ER ANCHOR CO., Norwalk, Ohio 

ELECTRIC SERVICE SUPPLIES CO., Chicago Agents 




Jobbers who publish 
a new catalogue should 
have one of our cuts. 

THE ATLAS ANCHOR CO., Cleveland, Ohio 












ml 












t ^fiR^ M 




^igg jj^ 



BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

BURNHAM, WILLIAMS & CO., PHILADELPHIA, PA.. U. S. A. 

Builders LOCOMOTIVES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

Including ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVES and 

ELECTRIC TRUCKS 



STAITOARD STEEL WORKS, 

SOLID FORGED ROLLED AND STEEL TIRED WHEELS elliptic and 



HARRISON BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



mounted on axles and fitted with Motor Gears for Electric Railway Service 



COIL SPRINGS 




PIPE FITTINGS 

AND VALVES 

FOR THE 

[HEATING AND PLUMBING TRADE 

TRADE <^§^ MARK 

I doHM Simmons Co. 

104-110 Centre Street, new york 



The Lorain Steel Company 

Girder Rails and High Tee Rails 
High-Grade Special Track Work 



THE PENNSYLVANIA BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



L9 



STEEL WOOL 
JOURNAL PACKING 

— saves one-half the packing 
— saves one-third the oil 
— saves labor and wear 
— prevents hot boxes positively 
No other packing you ever heard of can do these tilings ! 
\, ml today for fn • nampU 

ROBERTSON & COMPANY 



WM. 



Northern Bldg., Chii 100 
i St., Battle Creek, Mich. 



One road writes as follows: 

"All doubts that we had in the beginning 
about the merits of your 

Whitmore's 
Gear Protective Composition 

have been thoroughly removed. The re- 
sults from the use of this material are far 
beyond our expectations. You are en- 
titled to great success." 

We are in position to do the same thing f"i yon. 

The Whitmore Manufacturing Company 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. t. S. A. 1 



The Signal System 

that prevents accidents 
facilitates traffic and 
promotes adherence to 
schedules 

is made by the 

TELEGRAPH SIGNAL COMPANY 



282 State Street, 



Rochester, N. Y. 




10c per 



day 

will heat that car if you use 
1 a COOPER HEATER 

Ask for descriptive matter 
The Cooper Heater Co., Dayton, Ohio 




"Not an 
Experiment" 

The Providence Fender has 
been in successful operation 
on hundreds of roads for 
1 3 years, and has proved 
itself reliable under all 
conditions of Street Rail- 
way service. 



CONSOLIDATED CAR FENDER COMPANY 



European Agen 



:e and Factory: PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

h Office: 110 E. Twenty-third St.. New Ynr 
Cumptoire d'Eleetricite, ti, Rue Boudreau, 



© 



@ 



ALBERT & J. M. ANDERSON MFG. GO., 



Makers of 



ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES: 

SWITCHES, SWITCHBOARDS, 
TIME SWITCHES, LINE MATERIAL, 
COPPER CASTINGS(75^) CONDUCTIVITY. 
289-293 A ST., BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



Ne 



York, 185 Broadway. 



Chicago 
Agencies: 
i. San Francisc 



175 Dearborn Street. 



Boston, Pettlngell-Andi 
New York, R. W. Marshall &. Co. Atlanta, Newco 
St. Louis, J. C White. Denver, E. M. M 

Toronto, Ont., H. J. Surtees 



Eccles & Smith Co. 
■ner-Manry Co. 



ALUMINUM 

Railway Feeders 



Alnminum Feeders are less than one-half the 
weight of copper feeders and are of equal con- 
ductivity and strength. If insulated wire or cable 
is required, high grade insulation is guaranteed. 

Write for prices and full information. 

Aluminum Company of America 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 
Formerly The Pittsburgh Reduction Company 



WAKEFIELD CAR SEATS 

We make everything necessary to seat a car 
of any description. Our line includes Revers- 
ible seats of both the Slideover and Turnov 
types for Steam and Electric serv- 
ice, as well as the only practical 
Double Revolving seat on the 
market. 

Our Longitudinal Spring Seat- 
ing is unexcelled for superiority 
of workmanship and durability. 

We also carry a large variety 
of Rattan Chairs for Parlor and 
Observation Cars. 

Heywood Brothers & 
Wakefield Company 

New York, IS. Y. 




Wakefield. Ma 



20 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Undisplayed advertisements are inserted under this heading at the uniform rate of one cent a word; minimum, charge twenty-five cents. 
Replies directed to this office will be forwarded tohen required to any address in the United states, Canada or Mexico without extra charge. 
Advertisements received at the Chicago office by 9 a. m. Thursday will appear in the issue for the same meek. 



POSITIONS WANTED. 



A young man, 27 years of age, 
with ten years' experience, 
wants position as engineer or 
electrician; unmarried; habits 
strictly temperate; high-class 
references. Address "No. 710," 
care Electric Railway Review, 
Chicago. 

Position wanted by a young 
man (23) of good habits; have 
■been connected four years with 
the operating and purchasing 
•departments of an electric street 
railway company; can give good 
references. Address "No. .v_'x, 
care of Electric Railway Review. 
■Chicago. 

Position as chief electrician or 
superintendent; 16 years expe- 
rience lighting, power and trac- 
tion work, alternating and di- 
rect current; graduate of well- 
known school; excellent testi- 
monials; disengaged. Address 
"No. 529," Electric Railway Re- 
view, Chicago. 

Auditor, experienced in elec- 
tric railway and lighting and 

construction accounting, wants 
position with fair-sized com- 
pany. Energetic and good sys- 
tematize!-. Best references. 
Address "No. 527," care of 
Electric Railway Review, Chi- 
cago. 

Position by a single man, 29 
years old, practical electrician 
and machinist, 10 years' ex- 
perience, familiar with electric 
car and locomotive repairs, 
power and substation practices. 
Non-union man. Address "No. 
630," care of Electric Railway 
Review, New York, N. Y. 



POSITIONS WANTED. 



Graduate civil engineer, Cor- 
nell University 1902, experi- 
enced in field work and trade 
journalism, now engaged, de- 
sires work with technical jour- 
nal or publicity department of 
manufacturing establishment. 
Address "No. 525," care of Elec- 
tric Railway Review, Chicago. 



Experienced and efficient engi- 
neer with power station experi- 
ence (both planning and con- 
struction, as chief engineer and 
as superintendent of construc- 
tion) desires position with 
operating company as engineer, 
assistant to manager or super- 
intendent. Address "No. 515," 
care the Electric Railway Re- 
view. Chicago. 



Young man, 30 years of age, 
who has nearly completed a 
course of "Electric Lighting and 
Railway" in the International 
Correspondence Schools, desires 
position which will give him 
practical experience in power 
house and switchboard work. 
Willing to start at a nominal 
salary. Address "No. 526," care 
of Electric Railway Review, Chi- 
cago. 



MISCELLANEOUS WANTS. 



You can sell second-hand cars, 
machinery and material through 
advertising on this page. Ask 
about the special rates. Elec- 
tric Railway Review, 160 Harri- 
son Street, Chicago. 



POSITIONS OPEN. 



Superintendents, street rail- 
way, machine shop, car works, 
power house, engineers, elec- 
trical and mechanical, drafts- 
men, electrical and mechanical. 
Salaries, $800 to $5,000. Other 
positions open. Write, HAP- 
GOODS, 305 Broadway, New 
York, or 1010 Hartford Bldg., 
Chicago. 



BOOKS AND PUBLICATIONS. 



Ask us about any book on 
electric railway and allied sub- 
jects. We publish some and sell 
all that are in print. The Wil- 
son Company, 160 Harrison 
Street, Chicago. 

Wanted — Copy of the Electric 
Railway Review of January 12, 
1907, in gool condition. State 
price in your answer. Address 
"No. 530," care of Electric 
Railway Review. Chicago. 

We want your friends to read 
the Electric Railway Review. 
You will do them — and us — a 
favor by sending their addresses. 
We will- gladly mail free sample 
copies. Electric Railway Review, 
160 Harrison Street, Chicago. 



A copy of "The Motorman and 
His Duties," the standard hand- 
book on the theory and practice 
of electric car operation, is 
worth many times its cost to 
every man interested in the sub- 
ject. Send for 16-page pamphlet 
of sample pages. The Wilson 
Compan", 160 Harrison Street, 
Chicago. 



BOOKS AND PUBLICATIONS. 



If interested in any phase of 
steam transportation, you will 
find every development covered 
fully and accurately in The Rail- 
way Age. It is the leader and 
acknowledged authority in this 
field. Ask for free sample copies. 
The Railway Age, 160 Harrison 
Street, Chicago. 

If you have copies of the 
Street Railway Review of Feb- 
ruary or June, 1906, or of the 
index for 1904, or of the Elec- 
tric Railway Review of Octo- 
ber, 1906, write us at once, stat- 
ing condition and naming price 
for each copy. Address "No. 
514," care Electric Railway Re- 
view, 160 Harrison street, Chi- 
cago. 

National Legislation on Inter- 
state Commerce to July 1, 1906, 
is fully covered in our reference 
pamphlet. It contains the full- 
text of the act to regulate com- 
merce as amended, including the 
Elkins and Hepburn acts, and 
of the supplementary act relat- 
ing to the testimony of wit- 
nesses before the interstate 
commerce commission. It also 
contains the texts of the expedi- 
tion act, the anti-trust act of 
1890, the employers' liability act 
and the safety equipment laws. 
Difference in type shows the 
parts expunged from, and the 
parts added to, the interstate 
commerce and Elkins acts by 
the Hepburn act. This pamphlet 
is of special value to railway 
men and lawyers. Mailed pre- 
paid for 25 cents in stamps or 
coin. Special prices for quanti- 
ties. The Wilson Company, 160 
Harrison St.. Chicago. 



Two Kinds of 



Effective Advertising 

at Small Cost 



Want Ads 

Useful in securing a position, or a 
man to fill it, and for many other 
purposes. One cent a word per in- 
sertion — minimum charge, twenty- 
five cents. Replies forwarded with- 
out charge to points in the United 
States, Canada and Mexico. 



For Sale Cards 

Second-hand equipment, tools, ma- 
chinery, etc., are best brought to 
the attention of possible buyers by 
using "For Sale" cards. Rates are 
very low, ranging from 60 cents to 
$1.20 an inch per insertion, depend- 
ing upon amount used. 



More publicity for less money than from any other 



ediur, 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 

160 Harrison Street, Chicago 



January 1 1, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



•2\ 



RE- ENFORCED 

SPOKE WHEELS 

For City and Suburban Cars 




This wl I is being 

nl. in ir.nl iii place 
of the Old Style Plate 

Wl I because it does 

not rumble and roar 
when "" paved city 
streets. 

Tl iily spoke 

wheel for Heavy 
High Speed Serv- 



Stronger Spokes 

Stronger Flange 
Deep, Even Chill 
Greater Mileage 

Absolute Safety 



A Sample Order Will Prove Its Superiority Over the 
Old Style Spoke Wheel 

WRITE FOR BOOKLET ON WHEELS 

ST. LOUIS CAR WHEEL CO. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 







FOR SALE CHEAP! 

One 14l22 eight-wheel locomotive 
Ten 34-foot 50,000 capacity flat cars 
Two Greenleat turntables 
70 boi cars, 40 aid 50,000 capacity 
80 Good Second-hand Bridges 
Specifications and Blue Prints on application 
F. A. JOHANN 

1624 Pierce Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 



ROSSITER, MACGOVERN & CO. (inc.) 

90 West Street, New York 

FNfilNFS Boilers, Locomotives, Cars, 

B GENERATORS ™ 

Transformers, Railway, A. C. & D. C. MU 1 UK J 




THE MIGHTY 
MIDGET 



HOT WATER CAR HEATER 

Adapted for Large Electric Cars and Long Distance Lines. Exclusively used on Largest Electric Systems. Ask for Catalog 

THE WILLIAM C. BAKER HEATING & SUPPLY CO., 143 L i B E E w RT Y Y OR s K TREET 




NILES CARS 

(The Electric Pullmans) 

LARGE, FAST INTERURBANS 
OUR SPECIALTY 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co. 

Works: NOES, OHIO 

Sales Office : J. A. HANNA CO. 
312 Electric Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio 



Avoid 
Accidents 

By Using 
' This 
Switch 



SPECIAL TRACK WORK OF 
EVERY DESCRIPTION 



Anti- Straddling or Anti- 
Kicking Tongue Switch 




New York Switch & Crossing Co. 



HOBOKEX, X. J. 



It will not drive down at the 

heel, because it is held to either 

side with a spring tension and 

firmly down on its 

bed. A car can not 

straddle this tongue. 

WRITE FOR SPECIAL 
CIRCULAR 



22 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



The Lindsley Brothers Company 



Producers and Shippers of 



nd Manufacturers of 



WESTERN CEDAR POLES RED FIR CROSS ARMS 

Eastern Sales Office, Monadnock Bldg., CHICAGO SPOKANE, WASHINGTON 



ELECTRIC BLUE PRINTING MACHINES 



J. H. WAGENHORST & CO., Youngstown, Ohio 

Largest Manufacturers of Blue Printers in the World 

Write foe Circular "I" 



G. H. BARNES HARDWOOD LUMBER CO. 

Office and Yard: Main and Warren Sts., ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Ties, Car Oak, Poplar, Ash, Cherry, Plain and Quartered Oak 



C. H. WORCESTER CO. 



W J< »7ll r ■ =!•] m =*cj 



PRODUCERS AND WHOLESALERS 



Suite 1710 Tribune Building 



CHICAGO 



GREEN FUEL ECONOMIZER CO. 

Sole builders of the Green Fuel Economizer in the United 
States. Also Fans, Blowers and Exhausters St. -am H.-at- 
ing Coils and the Green .Air Heater. Heating, Ventilating 
and Mechanical Draft Apparatus. Send for Book "SV" 
on Fuel Economy and Fan Catalogue. 

GREEN FUEL ECONOMIZER CO., MaUeawan, N. Y. 



We have in our Chicago Yard avail- 
able for RUSH SHIPMENTS a SE- 
LECTED STOCK of POLES and TIES 

NAUGLE POLE AND TIE CO. 

Chicago Office, 226 La Salle Street 



We are Producers and Wholesale Dealers in Western 

CEDAR POLES 

Yards in Washington, Idaho, Montana 

and British Columbia 

WRITE US FOB DELIVERED PRICES 

CHURCHILL CEDAR CO., B« 1409. Spokane, Wash. 




HEINE SAFETY BOILER CO. 



CHESTNUT POLES 


Cedar, Oak and Chestnut Ties 


fHOM OUR OWN TIMBER tANOS 


THE ADVANCE LUMBER CO. 


CLEVELAND, OHIO 



40% SAVED 

BY USING 

Lumen Bronze Axle Bearings 

Cast in metal mold— require no-machine finish 

Lumen Bearing Company 

BUFFALO — TORONTO 



Idaho Cedar Poles 



PACIFIC COAST POLE CO. 



SPOKANE WASH. 



POLES and PILING 



20,000 35s and 40s 
Ready to Ship at Once 



S=E. Missouri Cypress Co., Campbell, Mo. 



1 WHITE 
CEDAR 


P 

o 


Large Stock 14 to 65 ft. 1 

Prompt 
Shipment 


P O L E S 


YARDS: 1 _■ 

1 Menominee, Mich, ^^^B^| 
1 Escanaba, Mich. ^^^^^H 
I Superior, Wis. ^L^^B 
1 Deer River, Minn, ^f* J 


FRANCIS 

BEIDLERl 

& CO. 

Chicago, III. 1 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



23 



THE BOILERS WILL BE OUT OF SERVICE 

a much shorter time for washing, thereby requiring very much less labor, to say nothing of the 
saving in fuel and the increased efficiency of the boilers, if the incrusting solids and other delete- 
rious salts in the water are acted upon by Dearborn Compounds and their injurious proper- 
ties destroyed. flSend us gallon sample of \our feed water for analysis. 



Dearborn Drug & Chemical Works 

WM. H. EDGAR. FOUNDER 
299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK POSTAL TELEGRAPH BLDG., CHICAGO 



WESTON Standard Portable Direct-Reading 

Voltmeters 
Millivolt meters 
Voltam meters 
Ammeters 
M ilia in in elcrs 
Ofammeters 
Ground Detectors 
and Circuit Testers 

Our STATION VOLTMETERS and 
AMMETERS are unsurpassed in 
point of extremB accuracy and low- 
est consumption of energy. 

WESTON ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT CO. 

Main Office and Works: Waverly Park. Newark. N . J. 
London Branch: Audrey House, Ely Place, Holborn. Port*. France: 
E. H. Cadiot, 12 Eue St. Georges. New York Office: 74 Cortlandt St. 
Berlin: European Weston Electrica! Instrument Co., Ritterstrasse, No. 88. 




Queen Testing Sets 



"Tlte Recognized 
Standard" 



U. S. Stand- 
ard Testing 
Sets 




Queen Acme Testing Set 



QUEEN & CO., inc.. Philadelphia, Pa. 



Coach and Car Roof Paint 

"Metal" Canvas Preserver — Priming Coat 
"Metal" Canvas Roof Paint— Other Coats 



TlOUI 
SURFACER 
PECIALTIEj 



ST. LOUIS SURFACER 
'"' & PAINT COMPANY 

St. Louis, U. S. A. 



HOPF TAPES AND 
iAUAiJ WEBBINGS 

AEE THE BEST 
WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES 

HOPE WEBBING CO., Providence, R. I. 




(End View) 

Has adjustable steel noses — suit- 
able for general urban and light. 
interurban service. The most 
efficient low priced electric 
Miow-plow on the market. 

The RUSSELL Pedestal 
Electric Snow-Plow No. 6 



RUSSELL CAR & SNOW-PLOW COMPANY, Ridgway, Pa. 

Wendell & MacDuffie. Cortlandt St., New York— Eastern Sales Agents; 
Robinsuu a Cary Co., St. Paul. Minn., C- A. Ralst-.n, Fisher Bldg . Chicago, 
111.— Western Sales Agents ; Dominion Supply Co., Winnipeg, Manitoba — 
Western Canada Sales Agents. 




PATTEN TICKET DESTROYER 

Don't burn your used tic 
avoid fraud. Remember, i 
tp destroy anything of valt 

Sell the old stock — it will soon pav for machine. 

In use on the Boston A Northern R. R..01d Colony 
St. Ry. Co., Brockton St. Ry. Co.. Waterbury El. Co., 
Bridgeport Traction Co., Buffalo Ry. and others. 

Write for circular. 



PAUL 

78 Lafayette Street 



PATTEN 

Salem, Mass., U.S. A. 




HELP 



of any kind is easily 
and quickly secured 
by advertising in the Electric Railway 
Review. One cent a word per insertion. 



Electric Railway Material 

of every description 

F. P. HARRISON ELECTRIC & MFG. CO. 

(Incorporated) 



169-170 South St. 



NEW YORK 



24 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



The A rnold C ompany - 

ENGINEERS -CONSTRUCTORS 
ELECTRICAL — CIVIL- MECHANICAL 



CH ICASO 



M. 2V1. Byllesfoy «St Company 

Incorporated 

ENGINEERS 

American Trust Bldg., Chicago 

Design. Construct and Operate 

Railway. Light, Power and 

Hydraulic Plants 



J. G. WHITE & COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

Engineers, Contractors 

43-49 Exchange Place, Sl*»««. V^uLr M V 

41-43 Wall Street NeW York, N. Y. 

Principal Philippine Office: Manila, P. I. 



jforfc, 38acon & Vwi$ f 


£nginem, 


115 BROADWAY, 


NEW YORK. 



COLUMBIA CONSTRUCTION CO. 

BUILDERS OF 

Electric Railways 

Colby and Abbot Building : Milwaukee, Wis. 



VALVES— FITTINGS-STEAM SPECIALTIES 

CRAN E CO. 

CHICAGO 

ESTABLISHED 1855 



STONE & WEBSTER ENGINEERING 
CORPORATION 

CONSTRUCTING ENGINEERS 

147 MILK STREET, BOSTON 

ELECTRIC RAILWAY, LIGHT & POWER PLANTS 
WATER POWER DEVELOPMENTS 



A. L. REGISTER & CO. 

Engineers and General Contractors— Electric Railways 
112 North Broad St. PHILADELPHIA, PA. Established 1889 



CENTRAL INSPECTION BUREAU 

Inspection of Ralls, Ties, Cars, Motors, Bridges, Buildings, Etc. 

17 State Street ... - new York City 



SMITH concrete: mixer 

does the work better, quicker, cheaper and lasts longer. 
CONTRACTORS' SUPPLY & EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Old Colony Building . Chicago 1711 Broadway . New York jj 



UIINE MATERIAL. 

ELECTRIC SUPPLIES FOR RAILWAYS, POWER PLANTS, ETC. 
THE CREAGHEAD ENGINEERING CO., 346 Main Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 



to iiiviitL 4ivni.ii vvmrHni ohio 

for detailed -'.niormation about the best 
AUTOMATIC SMOKELESS FURNACE 



SPRINGS— TIRES— STEEL-TIRED WHEELS 

RAILWAY STEEL-SPRING CO. 

General Offices: 71 Broadway, New York 



WHEEL TRUING BRAKE SHOES 

Repair Crippled Wheels While Running 
THE WHEEL TRUING BRAKE SHOE CO.. Detroit. Mich. 



vJOIlcllS G. G. REITER, Canton, Ohio Jj"lIlS 



THE CURTAIN SUPPLY CO. 

CAR CURTAINS 
CHICAGO. 85-93 Ohio Street 1819 Park Row Bldg., NEW YORK 





ECLIPSE 

Life Guard 

Manufactured by the 

ECLIPSE RAILWAY SUPPLY CO. 

Cleveland, Ohio 



ENGINEERS 



who wish to be numbered among the 
elect should be represented on this page 

The cost is small — ask us about it 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 

160 Harrison Street, Chicago 



Januarj 1 1. 1908 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Gasoline 



Motor Cars 
for Street 
Car Service 



fl Can be used advantageously 
for owl car service and On 
branch lines of large railroads 
where the passenger traffic does 
not warrant the maintenance 
of a regular train schedule. 

Address R. R. Dept. No. 757 MS 

Fairbanks, Morse 8k Co. 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 




THE 



EARLL 
RETRIEVERS 



Perfect in design and construction. 

Absolute protection to poles 

and overhead work. 

Easy to maintain and convenient 

to operate. 

Send for 20-Paye Catalogue. 

C. I. EARLL, Bowling Green Bldg, NEW YORK 



THE PETER SMITH HEATER CO. 



The Pioneer Manufacturers of HOT WATER HEATERS 
for City and Interurban Cars. 

OFFICE AND WORKS: DETROIT, MICH. 



THE NATIONAL LOCK WASHER CO., 



Curtains 



Curtain Fixtures — Sash Locks — Sash Balances — INut Locks 
CHICAGO OFFICE: 419 MONADNOCK BLOCK 



TRACKLAYING BY MACHINERY 

BIMPLB, RAPID AND ECONOMICAL 

D. F. HOLMAN RAILWAY TRACKLAYER CO.. 1103 Ellsworth Bldg., Chicago 





SHIMER & 


CHASE CO. 






Experienced Pr 


• motors of Electrical Railway 


Projec 


ts 


Corresponden 


ce Solic 


ited 




OMAHA. 


NEB. 



ELECTRIC HEATERS o^aVs 018863 
New York Consolidated Car-Heating Co. Chicago 



GRIFFIN WHEEL CO. 

CHICAGO 

CHILLED IRON CAR WHEELS IRON OR STEEL AXLES 




E. C. Van Valkenburgh 

Promotional Advertising 
for Electric Railways 
2117 West 102d St. 
CHICAGO 

te& by incr> Lisiuij /jour /."ss< i>>i> r it ,ibng<: 




Have you our feT^~» 

New Bulletin No. 8? 

ASK OS 

GENERAL 

STORAGE BATTERY CO 

General Offices : 42 Broadwaj. N.Y . 
Works: Boonlon. N. J. 





High Grade Caps 

for street railway men. Our 
prices will interest all who 
wear caps. Send for Electric 
Railway Uniform catalog. 

The Henderson-Ames Co. 

Kalamazoo. Mich. 



The 

Recording 

Fare Register 

Company 





Catalogs at Agencies 
Baltimore. Md. Portland. Ore. 

Boston, Mass. Seattle. Wash. 

Chicago, DJ. St. Paul. Min n. 

Denver, Colo. St. Lou i -..Mo. 

Pittsburg, Pa. Troy, N. Y. 



London, Eng. 



Montreal, Can. 



CONTINUOUS JOINT 



WKBEK JOINT 



WOLUAUI'TEK JOINT 



Higitf.st Awards— Paris, 1900) 

Buffalo, 1901 ; St. Louis, 1904 



Additional safety and economy in Track Maintenance has been proved 
by the use of Continuous, Weber and Wolhaupter base-supported rail 
joints — after ten (10) years' service, having a record of over 25,000 
miles in use — the extent of which is evidence of their excellence. 



THE RAIL JOINT COMPANY 

General Offices: 29 West 34th Street, New York City 

Makers of Rail Joints for Standard and Special Rail Sections, also 
Girder. Step or Compromise, and Insulating Kail Joints, protected by 
patents in United States and Foreign Countries. 



26 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



PAINTS FOR METAL SURFACES 

Elastic and water-proof. Will 
not crack or peel. Require no 
thinning. Prepared ready for 
application. Send for colorcard. 

Detroit Graphite Company 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Dept. P. 





ICRANESl 



Have you coal and 
ash handling problems? 
Let us help solve them. 
Let us also build your 
power station cranes. 

Catalogs free 

NORTHERN ENGINEERING WORKS. °S!J?"' 



USE 



BEAVER DAM 
MALLEABLE IRON 
TIE PLATES 

Best for all electric railways and so 
proven by years of service. 

Ask us to tell you why 

Beaver Dam Malleable Iron Co, 

BEAVER DAM, WISCONSIN 



Experience of many traction companies has proved that 
the average cost of rail bond installation with this car is 

12 Cents per Bond 

and that the saving in cost over 
installation by pressure is about 
$75.00 per mile. 

Furthermore, our Electric 
Brazed and Copper Welded 
bonds are better bonds, both 
mechanically and electrically. 

Don't believe it without 
proof — but ask us for that. 

The Electric Railway Improvement Co. 

6005 Carnegie Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 




Ptectric Railway Review 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY BY THE WILSON COMPANY. CHICAGO 

Entered as second-class matter January 5. 1907, at the postofflce at Chicago. 111., under the act of March 3. 1879. 



160 Harrison Street, Chicago v ,-,, .-.,■,,„ . ^^ , - . T » T . -p.-.* , ., - m „ 

1E0 Nassau Street. New York VO v » CHICAGO, JANUARY 11, 1908. 

1529 Williamson Bldg., Cleveland 



Subscription : I rtic 

Foreign . 

' . a da 



[nterurban roads connecting large cities with a number of 
smaller towns may receive a valuable suggestion of a means 
for promoting their traffic from the Spo- 
Theater kane & Inland Empire Railroad of Spokane. 

Train Wash. This company, whose enterprising 

Service. methods of advertising and excellent serv- 

ice have often been described, has for a 
year past been operating special Saturday night theater trains 
leaving Spokane at 11:20 p. m.. for all points on the Coeur 
d'Alene division. It took nearly a year to develop the traffic 
to make such a train pay, but the results have recently proved 
so satisfactory that on January 1 a similar service was insti- 
tuted on the Spokane & Inland division. The trains leave 
the Spokane terminal at 11:30 p. m., and stop at all points 
south on the Colfax and Palouse branches, whose terminals 
are each distant about 76 miles from Spokane. The new 
service was announced by large illustrated postal cards con- 
taining a programme of the principal attractions to be pre- 
sented at the Spokane theaters during the season. Reserva- 
tions for tickets to any theater in the city may be made 
through the station ticket agents. The luxurious parlor car 
equipment used in this service was illustrated in an article 
in the Electric Railway Review of December 28, 1907, page 977, 
by Charles E. Flagg, advertising agent of the company. 



Five or six years ago the third rail was heralded as the most 
satisfactory medium for distributing electric current to swiftly 

moving cars or trains. Now it has a 
Standardization, healthy rival, the high-voltage overhead 
Clearance and conductor. The growing sentiment for 

Third Rails. early electrification of steam trunk lines 

and their feeders continues the rivalry be- 
tween the two methods of current distribution. Such dis- 
cussions as occur between upholders of each of the two 
methods bring forth side lights on the art of railroading. The 
most recent discussion on "The Third-Rail Problem" is by 
A. D. Williams, Jr., in the Engineering Magazine for January. 
This article comprises the discussion of a list of disadvantages 
of the third rail and includes a terse summary of standardiza- 
tion conditions on steam roads. Our readers know how fre- 
quently these same standardization conditions apply to electric 
roads and how advisable it is to avoid them. In the article 
mentioned we read: "A peculiar fact in regard to many 
railroad standards ( ?) is the number of different standards, 
the same road having several standards for certain construc- 
tions, each in use on separate portions of the line and all out 
of harmony with one another. This is due to corporate con- 
solidations which have not as yet coalesced throughout. In 
many cases these out-of-date standards are blindly followed 
in absolutely new construction, where unbiased consideration 
and the ability to view matters with a broad perspective would 
show the futility of clinging to the past and the advantages in 
be gained by throwing dead wood overboard. Unfortunately, 
there is sometimes a certain lack of co-operation between the 
various departments of railroads, each department and sub- 
department striving for its own individual record without 
regard for others or for the ultimate result. When such de- 



partmental jealousies are rife the interests of the road suffer." 
As Mr. Williams points out. one of the most difficult problems 
a railroad about to electrify its track is called upon to solve 
is the adjustment of clearances. 



If tickets are used on a suburban or interurban line that also 
collects fares according to the zone system, the question of 
how to devise an adequate check on the 
The Use of tickets sold and collected without imposing 

Punching too much detail work on the conductor and 

Slips. auditor becomes a problem requiring care- 

ful consideration. A new method for ac- 
counting for the number of tickets and amount of cash 
collected by the conductor on an interurban run is described 
on another page of this issue by S. S. Neff, general superin- 
tendent of the Atlantic City & Shore Railroad. On this road 
the fares are collected by the zone system, either by a cash 
fare in each zone or by a ticket extending through one or 
more zones which must be punched in each. The conductor 
is provided with punching slips, one for cash and another 
for tickets, on which spaces for each zone are outlined, and 
as he collects a cash fare or punches a ticket he also punches 
a number in the corresponding zone on the slip, at the same 
time recording a fare on the register. The slips must be kept 
correctly so that they will check with the number of fares 
registered in each zone, and there is scarcely time in a round 
trip for a conductor to falsify his records, because he would 
have to count his tickets and cash in each zone. The fare 
registers are changed at the end of each zone and the con- 
ductor reports at the end of each round trip. 



The increase in fares just placed in effect on the Blue Hill 
Street Railway, near Boston, illustrates a tendency of the 

times which must soon be dealt with by 
Increase in many other companies operating in purely 

Railway suburban or rural territory. Every electric 

Fares. railway officer who follows expenditures in 

any department knows that in the last few- 
years expenses have mounted steadily higher. By the exten- 
sion of transfer privileges and provision of improved rolling 
stecK the service given to the public has been greatly enlarged 
and bettered and patrons of the companies receive far more 
for their money in comfortable and longer rides than they did 
five or six years ago. This has been brought about by the 
managements, often in the face of violent and ill-advised agita- 
tion. The politicians have very generally overlooked this 
phase of the situation, and have carefully refrained from tell- 
ing the public that the costs of electric railway, lighting and 
power service have been among the very few items lowered 
in the general cost of living in the last decade. Recent expe- 
rience on certain suburban and rural lines operating in sparsely 
settled territory shows that in the face of present costs of 
maintenance, labor and materials, fares must in some manner 
be adjusted to the new conditions if ultimate bankruptcy is to 
be avoided. 



34 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



The exact method of fare increase must obviously depend al- 
most entirely upon local conditions. Many roads may find it 
sufficient to omit six or seven tickets for 
Methods of a quarter, when such a tariff obtains. In 

Increasing other cases a shortening of the ride may be 

Fares. the best course, by the reduction of trans- 

fers or the actual cutting down of the 5-cent 
zone. Shortening the fare limit without raising the fare brings 
in more nickels per mile of track and avoids the annoyance of 
demanding an extra cent or two from the public. Where com- 
petition exists the problem is far more difficult and may re- 
quire some sort of informal or formal joint agreement before 
an effective raise can be brought about. There is little doubt 
that in the past some companies have received unduly hostile 
criticism because they doubled their rates at a single stroke, 
instead of increasing them by a cent or two. The convenience 
of the nickel is indisputable, but in sections of the country 
where copper coin is still in pretty general circulation there 
is little doubt that the average passenger would prefer to 
receive three or four cents in change to paying 10 cents for 
a trip which formerly cost five. In some cases the sale of 
four tickets for a quarter will solve the difficulty. In the in- 
troduction of higher fares a clear statement of where each 
part of the nickel goes at present will be helpful in satisfying 
the public if printed in the cars and also if presented in the 
newspapers. The necessity of the increase can be shown on 
a 5-cent basis better than in large totals. 



UNDERHUNG HIGH-TENSION INSULATORS. 



The transmission of electric currents over long distances 
and at high potentials is one phase of electrical engineering 
that recently has made most wonderful strides. It was but 
a few years ago when the installation of a 50-mile trans- 
mission line operating at 30,000 volts pressure was heralded 
as an important piece of engineering work. Lines having 
such characteristics are now common on nearly all interurban 
work, and current from nearly all the greater power under- 
takings is transmitted at pressures of 60,000 volts and higher. 

While it is true that the necessity for higher voltages is 
greater than it was five or six years ago it is also true that 
at that time such high transmission pressures could not be 
utilized. This was not from a lack of desire but because the 
art of transmission line construction was then not far enough 
advanced. Generating, transforming and receiving apparatus 
were to be had, but line insulators were not available which 
could offer a large enough factor of safety to warrant the 
utilization of the high voltages now employed. 

To those builders of transmission projects who would 
keep low the transmission losses, there was available suitable 
electrical machinery but not insulators designed and built 
with the same degree of scientific exactness. Today these 
limiting conditions do not hold. 

As explained by Walter T. Goddard in a recent paper, 
"High Voltage Insulator Manufacture," read before the Cana- 
dian Society of Civil Engineers on December 19, 1907, it is 
safe to say that insulators for the heaviest mechanical strains 
and for the highest electrical stresses can be manufactured 
at moderate cost. Therefore the limitation of transmitting 
voltages must at the present time be looked for in other direc- 
tions than in insulator design, porcelain insulator design in 
particular. This bold statement is only made possible by the 
development of the underhung type of the porcelain insulator 
so lately put into use. 

By way of explanation the underhung insulator comprises 
a number of double-petticoated porcelain insulators provided 
with metal eyes so that they may be suspended in series, one 
under another. 

The unit formation presents a positive advantage in the 
matter of breakage as well as insulation. After one shell of 



a pin type insulator becomes cracked or broken, the whole 
device is rendered worthless because it is utterly impossible 
to break apart the cement joint forming the bond between 
the nested shells of a built-up insulator. In contrast to this the 
breaking or cracking of one shell or one unit of a suspended 
type of insulator takes away the insulating value of but that 
one unit from the series. To illustrate: If one section of a 
5-unit 100,000-volt insulator is broken the total strength of the 
insulator is reduced by 20 per cent, in contrast with a prob- 
ably complete breakdown with the pin-supported type of 
insulator. 

The most important reason for using the suspended type 
of insulator is the flexibility of the unit formation. Should 
it be desired to raise the line voltage, or if on account of 
severe local conditions, such as salt fog or smoke from rail- 
way trains or factories, it becomes desirable to increase the 
leakage surface, additional units can be hung from the other 
sections already connected with the crossarms with no addi- 
tional investment except for the new sections. Were the pin- 
type insulator used the necessity of additional insulating quali- 
ties would require taking down the old insulators and replac- 
ing them with larger ones. 

The utilization of the underhung insulator requires a 
special form of pole-top construction, including crossarms of 
sufficient length to give assurance that the line wires may not 
swing against the pole or steel tower to which the crossarms 
are fastened. This will require an extra length of crossarm, 
but, due to the absence of twisting strains upon the arms, its 
design can be enough lighter to offset the added cost for 
length. Another advantage which has not been mentioned is 
that with the insulator hanging from below the crossarms 
the tops of the towers act as lighting rods and serve to relieve 
the line of much lightning stress. 

For these several reasons it is seen that the underhung 
system of high-tension conductor insulation works out with 
pleasing directness and simplicity. Added to these desirable 
attributes is the comparative cheapness with which it can be 
installed for high voltages and varying insulation conditions. 
These favorable characteristics should argue well for its 
consideration wherever high-voltage transmission lines are to 
be built. 



THE ABBREVIATED CLASSIFICATION OF OPERATING 
EXPENSES. 



Statements from representatives of state railway com- 
missions published elsewhere in this issue show a discrepancy 
in opinion as to the amount of gross earnings which should 
determine the use by electric railways of the abbreviated or 
the amplified classification of operating expense accounts pro- 
posed as part of the new uniform accounting system. As- 
shown by the accounts of the progress on the system pub- 
lished in the Electric Railway Review, it is proposed to adopt 
two classifications of operating expense accounts. The tenta- 
tive classification for larger roads, provided essential agree- 
ment with the steam railway classification is necessary, con- 
tains 116 primary accounts; but it is intended, with the 
approval of representatives of the interstate commerce com- 
mission and various state commissions, to abbreviate the 
classification into 21 primary accounts in order to meet also 
the requirements of small roads. There is no question as to 
the fairness and virtual necessity of an abbreviated classifica- 
tion if the amplified classification is to be adopted; the 
divergence of opinion is upon the amount of gross earnings 
which should mark the division line between those com- 
panies which use the small and those which use the large 
classification. 

At the conferences attended in Washington by repre- 
sentatives of many of the principal street and interurban rail- 
ways of the country and by representatives of several impor- 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



35 



taut public commissions, amounts ranging from $50,000 to 
$500,000 were suggested as the line of division. William O. 
Seymour, member of the Connecticut railroad commission, 
in the statement published on another page, believes that 
roads with gross earnings of less than $200,000 a year should 
use the abbreviated classification. Thomas Yapp, assistant 
secretary of the Minnesota railroad commission, believes that 
roads with gross earnings of over $75,000 annually should 
use the amplified classification. 

We believe that the public officials who are promoting the 
uniform accounting system should be liberal to the roads in 
this matter. It need not and should not impair the efficiency 
of accounts if a small road follows an abbreviated classifica- 
tion of operating expenses. A road with gross earnings of 
$75,000 annually cannot afford to conduct its accounting de- 
partment with the detail which the management of a large 
road would deem essential; the road with small capital in- 
vestment should not be compelled to bear the heavy expense 
which the amplified classification would entail. Where the 
auditing expense with the abbreviated classification might 
be say $2,400 a year for a road with gross earnings of 
$100,000, the additional yearly expense to such a road of 
maintaining the amplified classification is estimated at about 
$3,600, or an increase of 150 per cent, making a total of 
$6,000. The amplified classification on even a small road 
would require an additional clerk to represent the auditor 
in each of the following four departments: Maintenance of 
way, electric (line and power house), car house and store- 
room; and two extra clerks would probably be needed in the 
office of the auditor to carry the large number of accounts 
through the books. It would be unreasonable to expect any 
road to spend 6 per cent of its gross revenue for accounting 
expenses; the expenditure of this percentage of the gross 
revenue would mean that about 9 per cent of the total operat- 
ing expense would be absorbed by this department, which 
would be out of all proportion to the value of the labor to 
either the company or the public. 

As small roads are of great benefit to the communities 
through which they operate, they should be encouraged in 
every way. Many of the short lines are built largely in the 
hope of the earnings which future development of the terri- 
tory will assure, and if too serious a burden in accounting 
expense is laid upon these small roads a number of the com- 
panies will undoubtedly be unable to meet interest on the 
capital investment. 

The problem of making small roads profitable is a serious 
one. In the annual report of the Massachusetts railroad com- 
mission, which has just been issued, the important fact was 
brought out that many of the roads in that state, especially 
those serving sparsely settled communities, have reached the 
period when considerable sums of money are required for 
repairs and renewals. As many of these roads have not been 
able to pay dividends and also meet their operating expense 
and fixed charges, the problem in operation "for these, as well 
as for some of the larger roads, will be not only that of pay- 
ing dividends, but of making renewals of track and replace- 
ments of rolling stock without impairment of capital." 

Proper accounting methods are desirable, but liberality 
in the decisions of public officials respecting the use of abbre- 
viated classifications is highly desirable. It need not Impair 
in the slightest degree the efficiency or accuracy of accounts. 



Communications 



An international exposition devoted to the various applica- 
tions of electricity will be opened at Marseilles, France, on 
April 19, 190S, and will extend until October 31. The exposi- 
tion will be held at Pare du Rond-Point du Prado and will be 
under the patronage of the municipality and the chamber of 
commerce of Marseilles. 



CARS FOR CITY SERVICE. 



To the Editors: 

The Pittsburg Railways Company has made a signal mis- 
take in attempting to introduce the pay-as-you-enter system 
in that city, without first having made some kind of prepara- 
tion for it. Under such conditions how could any other result 
be expected? 1 have no interest in the pay-as-you-enter car 
beyond that of an ordinary citizen wishing to see more com- 
fortable service. This certainly can be done by the introduc- 
tion, perhaps not of the Montreal or Chicago form of car. bul 
of some form that will answer the same purpose — one that 
will neither make it necessary for the conductor to crowd 
himself among the people nor the people to jostle each other 
in boarding and alighting from cars. 

The reasons why the pay-as-you-enter car is a success 
are: First, because the cars are provided with an extra large 
platform upon which some people may stand while others are 
passing into the car; second, the cars are arranged so that a 
passenger can pass out of the car without interfering with 
those coming in; and, third, the forethought shown in Chicago 
in instructing conductors in advance how to handle the people 
and the cars. In Chicago the patrons were also told how they 
could assist in making the use of these cars a success. It 
undoubtedly was because of a lack of such preparation that our 
Pittsburg friends have failed. 

As early as 189S I introduced on the Rochester (X. Y.) 
street railway the system of entering cars by the rear plat- 
form and alighting from the front. The desire was to 
expedite the movement of traffic. The plan was a success, 
but, before putting the system in force, even in that city, I 
notified all interested that it would be done, both by posters 
inside the cars and by circulars instructing conductors and 
people how to act, and requesting their assistance. Several 
railway managers came to see how the plan worked, most of 
whom thought that we would have more accidents by reason 
of passengers leaving by the front platform. We did not, 
however, but. on the contrary, our step accidents were reduced, 
and the cars made better time, more comfortably. 

I am not sure, but, possibly, the Montreal people may 
have gotten their first idea from this practice in connection 
with the large platforms used at Detroit. 

Xew York, January 2, 190S. T. J. XICHOLL. 

[In explanation of the purpose of the Pittsburg Railways 
Company in carrying on its pay-as-you-enter experiments with- 
out specially constructed cars, we have received from John 
Murphy, general superintendent, a letter including the follow- 
ing information: "In reference to our experiments with the 
pay-as-you-enter idea I beg to state that in order to feel the 
pulse of the public as to how this plan would be received 
in this city, we experimented with it for two days on equip- 
ment which is not at all adapted to it; and we are convinced 
from this test that with the proper kind of car the pay-as-you- 
enter plan is perfectly practicable on some parts of our sys- 
tem; on others it is not." — Eds.] 



The Boston Elevated Railway has distributed to its em- 
ployes $60,000 in the shape of rewards of $15 each to those 
who during the past year have not been reported for delin- 
quency or misconduct. It is said that this year 85 per cent 
of the men received the rewards. This is the fifth time the 
company has made Xew Year gifts of this kind. 



The Peoria (111.) Railway has installed a set of manually 
operated block signals at four points on its city lines. 



President Theodore P. Shonts of the Interborough-Metro- 
politan Company, Xew York, has announced that negotiations 
are now in progress looking to the opening and operation of 
the Belmont tunnel under the East river at Forty-second 
street. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 




^Wra cf 




January 11, 1908. ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 

PAY-AS -YOU-ENTER CARS IN BUFFALO. 



37 



On Sunday, January 5, the International Railway Com- 
pany of Buffalo. X. Y., placed in service on its Xiagara-Grace 
and Niagara-O'Neill lines 35 pay-as-you-enter cars of the 
Stephenson semi-convertible type, built by the G. C. Kuhlman 
Oar Company of Cleveland. The full equipment of the new 



first company in the United States to make use of pay-as-you- 
enter cars, who is also vice-president of the international Rail- 
way Company, was in Buffalo on Sunday and Monday to wit- 
ness the first tests of the cars in that city. Mr. .Mitten in- 
forms us that their operation was successful from every 
standpoint and was enthusiastically received bj the press and 
the public. He is verj much pleased with the pay-as-you 




Pay-As-You-Enter Cars in Buffalo — Car Taking on Load in Shelton Square. 



cars is 30, all of which have been received and were at the 
disposal of the company for use during rush hours on the 
following day. From an operating standpoint the cars were 
entirely successful from the start. The first day's use demon- 
strated that it would be possible to reduce the running time 



system, and after having operated the new cars since Novem- 
ber 24 expresses surprise that the plan was not tried earlier. 

Special Preparations for the Service. 
Prior to the day set for opening the new service the Inter- 




Pay-As-You-Enter Cars in Buffalo — Side View of Car While Loading and Unloading. 



on the Niagara-O'Neill line, six miles long, by five minutes. 
On the following day, when the traffic was heavier than on 
Sunday, the facility of the system in handling rush-hour 
crowds was fully demonstrated. 

T. E. Mitten, president of the Chicago City Railway, the 



national Railway Company had made careful preparations, 
similar to those made by the Chicago City Railway, for the 
purpose of insuring a favorable reception by the public. The 
motormen and conductors were carefully coached in their 
duties at the car houses before being allowed to take out 



38 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



the new cars and were given a booklet ot instructions very 
much like that prepared by the Chicago company, which was 
described in the Electric Railway Review of November 16, 
1907, page 795. A small folder, illustrated by three photo- 
graphs of the cars and briefly describing the points of ad- 
vantage and the methods of operation of the new system, was 
also distributed to the public at Shelton square, the principal 
downtown starting point of traffic. A small booth, shown in 
one of the illustrations, was established at Shelton square, 
where change might be obtained, and an announcer was sta- 
tioned at Main and Niagara streets to tell passengers to have 
their fares ready. Switchmen were placed at junction points 
and starters at grade crossings with steam railways. 

Fare Box. 
As shown in the photograph of the rear platform, a fare 
box is located just inside of the conductor's railing. In gen- 
eral appearance the fare box is similar to the ticket chopper's 
box used in the New York subway and on several elevated 




Pay-As-You-Enter Cars in Buffalo — Change Booth in Shelton 
Square. 

roads. The upper part, or receiver, is of glass, so that the 
conductor has an opportunity to examine the coin. After the 
coin has been deposited the conductor pulls a lever that 
drops it into the cash box below. Passengers are required 
to deposit the exact cash fare or a ticket into the box. Trans- 
fers are to be handed to the conductor. The conductors are 
provided with $25 in change, instead of $9.00 as formerly, and 
will make change if necessary, but the passenger is required 
to drop the fare. The large amount of change supplied to 
the conductor is made necessary by the fact that the fares 
collected are not available for use as change. Conductors 
are not required to furnish change for bills of over $2.00. The 
fare box was designed by officials of the International Railway 
Company and, though in an experimental state, is believed to 
be a success and particularly well adapted for use on cars of 
the pay-as-you-enter type. 

The company was fortunate in the selection of a line hav- 
ing a downtown terminus at which probably 60 per cent of 
passengers bound for the residence section board the cars, and 
which is in the business center of Buffalo, where the methods 
of handling passengers could be seen by all passing through 
Shelton square. This enabled the general public to quickly 



become familiar with the cars and what was expected of them. 
In general the arrangement of the cars and their design 
are similar to those for the Chicago City Railway, described in 
the Electric Railway Review of September 21, 1907, page 332, 
and, as in the Chicago cars, smoking is permitted on the front 
platform. A few of the principal dimensions and some of the 
special equipment are as follows: 

Length 48 ft. 3 in. Width 8 ft. 7 in. 

Length of body ... 32 ft. 5 in. Height 12 ft. 3 in. 

Length of platforms. 7 ft. 9 in. 

Special Equipment. 

Brakes, air Heating system Con- 

. National Brake & Electric solidated Car-Heating Co. 



Brakes, hand Brill 

Controllers GE K-28-E 

Curtain fixtures 

Curtain Supply Co. 

Curtain material ..Pantasote 



Seats Hale & Kilburn 

Trucks Brill No. 27 

Trolley retrievers Earll 

Destination signs ....Hunter 



CENTRAL ELECTRIC RAILWAY ASSOCIATION. 

President H. A. Nicholl announces that the second annual 
meeting and banquet of the Central Electric Railway Associa- 
tion will be held at the Phillips house, Dayton, O., on Thurs- 
day, January 23. The business meeting will take place at the 
morning session, convening at 10:30 a. m., and the election 
of officers will take place at the afternoon session. 

The following programme is announced: 

Morning Session. 

President's annual address. 

"Promotion of Traffic." Paper by Charles P. Price, gen- 
eral passenger agent Western Ohio Railway, Lima, O. 

"Telegraph Signal System." Paper by Chauncey P. But- 
ton, general manager Telegraph Signal Company, Rochester. 
N. Y. 

Afternoon Session. 

"Can Electric Interurban Railways Profitably Carry Pas- 
sengers at the Present Rate of Fare?" Paper by P. W. Coen, 
general manager Lake Shore Electric Railway. Norwalk. O. 

Reports of Committees. 

"Report of Standardization Committee on Fundamental 
Brake Rigging." By R. C. Taylor, chairman. 

"Report of Committee on Traffic Organization." By F. D. 
Norviel, chairman. 

Election of officers. 

It is urgently requested that every member make a special 
effort to be present at this meeting, as it promises to be one 
of great importance to all operators of electric railways in the 
central territory. 

Traffic and executive officials of interurban railways in 
Indiana. Illinois, Ohio and parts of Michigan and Kentucky will 
meet at Dayton at this time for the purpose of organizing a 
traffic association as a branch of the Central Electric Railway 
Association and will remain over to attend the convention. 
This meeting will be held on Wednesday, January 22, at the 
Phillips house. As this is one of the important moves of the 
Central Electric Association, it is very essential that all roads 
in the states named shall be represented at this meeting. 

A cordial invitation is extended to all officers of inter- 
urban railway companies to bring their private cars to Day- 
ton on this occasion. Arrangements have been made through 
a special committee to take care of all private equipment. 
Parties intending to bring their cars are requested to corre- 
spond with T. J. Ferneding, superintendent Dayton & Xenia 
Transit Company, who will take charge of all such equipment 
while in Dayton. 

The after-dinner programme will be made a special fea- 
ture of entertainment. Many gentlemen of prominence, not 
only in railway but in municipal and state affairs, have been 
invited. E. C. Spring, the first president of the association, 
will be toastmaster and under his efficient direction an inter- 
esting and delightful programme is expected. 

The dinner will be served at 7:30 p. m. Every member 
of the association is at liberty to bring as many friends as 
he desires. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



:;<i 



ANNUAL REPORT OF MASSACHUSETTS RAILROAD COM- 
MISSION. 



The thirty-ninth annual report of the Massachusetts rail- 
road commission, containing returns of electric and steam 
railways, has been issued. An abstract of that part of the 
report which relates to street railways follows: 

Returns for the year ended September 30, 1907, were re- 
ceived from So street railway companies. By reason of con- 
solidations there were at the end of the year S2 existing com- 
panies. Of this number 62 operated their railways. IT were 
operated under lease or contract by other companies, and 3 
had organized and paid in a portion of their capital stock, but 
had not commenced the construction of their railways. 

There have been added during the year to the mileage of 
the Massachusetts companies 25.062 miles of street railway 
line and 7.500 miles of second track, making 32.562 miles of 
additional main track. There have also been added 4.515 
miles of sidetrack, making a total addition of 37.077 miles of 
track reckoned as single track. The Massachusetts companies 
now own 2,233.121 miles of street railway line, 427.624 miles 
of second main track and 157.130 miles of sidetrack, making 
a total length of track reckoned as single track owned, 
2,817.875 miles. This does not include the Woonsocket road 
(merged with the Rhode Island Company), which was in last 
year's return, which has 21.961 miles of main line, of which 
3.195 miles is in .Massachusetts and 0.S63 mile of sidetrack, of 
which 0.103 mile is in Massachusetts. All of the track owned 
is surface street railway track, with the exception of 8.660 
miles of elevated line and S.4S4 miles of elevated second track. 
Of the sidings all are surface track, with the exception of 3.592 
miles of elevated track. All the elevated track is located in 
Boston. Altogether 34.193 miles of main and second track are 
operated outside of the state. The total miles of main track 
(including trackage rights) operated is 2,745.266, an increase 
of 31.175 miles over the previous year. 

Assets, Capital Issues and Dividends. 

The gross assets of the companies on September 30, 1907, 
were $161,297,914, an increase of $5,3S3,160 over the previous 
year. Of the total $79,993,550 represented construction and 
$28,738,946 equipment. The gross liabilities on the same date, 
including capital stock, but not including sinking and other 
funds, were $153,847,903, an increase of $4,7S9,209. 

The aggregate capital stock of the 82 companies, on Sep- 
tember 30, 1907, was $73,280,155, a net increase of the same 
companies of $2,363,230 over the preceding year. 

The total amount of dividends declared in the year was 
$3,721,388.24, an increase of $167,315 over the preceding year. 
Thirty-six out of the 85 companies paid dividends ranging from 
1 to 10 per cent, and 49 companies declared or paid no divi- 
dends. One company paid 10 per cent, six companies paid 8 
per cent, one paid 8 per cent on preferred and 7 per cent on 
common, one paid 7.22 per cent, one paid 7.20 per cent, one 
paid 7 per cent, eight paid 6 per cent, one paid 5.5 per cent, 
seven paid 5 per cent, two paid 4 per cent, one paid 3.75 per 
<•> tir. one paid 3 per cent, one paid 2.5 per cent, three paid 2 
per cent, and one paid 1 per cent. 

The aggregate funded debt of the companies on Septem- 
ber 30. 1907, was $59,339,500, an increase of $1,323,500 over the 
preceding year. 

The amount of real estate mortgages outstanding on Sep- 
tember 30, 1907, was $84,S00, an increase of $10,400 over the 
preceding year. The total unfunded debt, including the mort- 
gages, was $21,22S,249, an increase of $1,102,479. 

The gross debt, funded and unfunded, was $80,567,749, an 
increase of $2,425,979. 

The net debt (the gross debt less $5,855,412 of cash and 
current assets) was $74,712,337, an increase of $7,012,201. In 
computing the net debt the sum of $7,960,720 returned as 
"miscellaneous assets," covering materials and supplies on 
hand, etc., is not included with cash and current assets in the 
deduction from gross debt. 

The total capital investment (capital stock and net debt) 
of the street railway companies of the state on September 30, 
1907. was $147,992,492, an increase of $9,375,431. 

The average cost of the street railways of the state, per 
mile of main track (including the cost but not the length of 
sidetrack), as returned by the companies September 30, 1907, 
was $30,064.34 for construction, $10,801.09 for equipment, and 
$14,563.32 for lands, buildings (including power plants) and 
other permanent property, making a total average cost of 
$55,428.75 per mile of main track. 

Income, Expenditures and Traffic. 

The total income of the companies from all sources for 
the year ending September 30. 1907, was $32,203,111.37, and the 
total expenditures (.including dividends declared) were $31,- 



799,31 1.56, making a net surplus of $403,796.81 to be added to 
the surplus of previous years. 

The total number of passengers carried during the last 
year on the railways in operation of the 85 companies making 
returns to the board was 600,695,816, an increase of 22.::i'7 04 I 
passengers over the previous year. 

The total number of miles run by street cars was 1 17,719,- 
203, an increase of 4,123,981 miles over the previous year. 

Operating expenses were 67.71 per cent of gross earnings, 
as compared with 67.49 per cent in the preceding year. In the 
last 10 years the average has been 67.92 per cent. 

Gross earnings per mile of track owned were $ll,l.v>, as 
compared with $11,156. Expenses of operation were $7.77t'.. as 
compared with $7,529. Net earnings were $3,709, as compared 
with $3,627. 

The car-mile results for three years past have been as 
follows: 

Average per car-mile. 
1905. 1906. 1907. 

Gross earnings 24.75 25.86 25.96 

Expenses of operation 16.72 17.46 17.58 

Net earnings 8.03 8.40 8.38 

Employes, Equipment and Accidents. 

The number of employes was 18,181, as compared with 
16,909 in the previous year. The number of motors was 15,626, 
the number of cars was 7,539 and the number of other cars 
and vehicles 2,900. 

The whole number of persons injured in connection with 
street railway operation, as returned by the companies for the 
year ending September 30, 1907, was 6,853, of whom 99 re- 
ceived fatal injuries, and 6,754 injuries not fatal. 

The number of passengers injured was 4,879, of whom 23 
were injured fatally. The injuries to employes were 321 in 
all, 13 of which were fatal. The number of injuries to trav- 
elers and others on the street was 1,653, of which 63 were 
fatcl. 

These figures include a very large number of injuries of a 
trivial character that have been returned by the companies. 

Twelve more passengers, 2 less employes, and 21 more 
travelers and other persons on the street received fatal in- 
juries than in 1906. Of those receiving injuries not fatal there 
were returned 291 less passengers, 42 less employes and 230 
more travelers and other persons on the street than in 1906. 

Altogether there appear to have been injured, fatally and 
otherwise, 279 less passengers, 44 less employes and 251 more 
travelers and other persons, making 72 less accidents returned 
by the companies as having occurred during the last than the 
preceding year. 

Electric Railroads. 

After careful inquiry and extended debates the legislature 
of 1906 passed an act, Chapter 516. authorizing a new type of 
transportation — electric railroads. Under the provisions of 
that act five different companies in process of formation peti- 
tioned the board for the issue of certificates that public con- 
venience and necessity required the construction of their 
lines. One of these petitions is now pending, one was held 
to await further study and development, two were dismissed 
for sufficient reasons and one certificate was issued. 

In rendering its decision the board stated its views as fol- 
lows: "The question to be decided under each petition is 
whether, upon the whole, the net results of the proposed 
undertaking promise public gain or public loss"; and, further, 
that "It surely cannot be said that public necessity and con- 
venience require the building of an additional railroad if the 
effect upon existing railroads is so disastrous that the service 
as a whole is impaired rather than improved." 

Heating and Ventilation of Cars. 

The board has recently changed its requirement with 
reference to the point of outside temperature at and below 
which companies are called upon to heat street cars, making 
that point 40 instead of 50 degrees above zero, the temperature 
to be then maintained to have a range that shall not be lower 
than 40 nor higher than 60 degrees. In making this radical 
change and certain other changes, the board has had in view 
a rule that companies will find it possible to obey, and that 
the district police can enforce under the statute which makes 
them responsible for its enforcement. 

Obviously an attempt to always satisfy every occupant of 
a street car with the atmospheric conditions must be futile. 
Even if passengers were of the same mind, it is impracticable 
to constantly maintain air of a given quality and the tem- 
perature at a specific point in a car that is one moment nearly 
empty and the next crowded to the limit; now stationary, then 
in motion; with doors continually opening and shutting, and 
with an outside temperature varying between zero and 40 
degrees above. 

The day of horse cars, with straw on the floor to keep the 



10 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



feet warm, and with no ventilation except that afforded 
through the doors, is within easy recollection. While today 
the electric heater exemplifies radical progress in heating, the 
ventilator commonly in use is about as crude as any device 
could be. It is true that a number of experiments have been 
made, that a ventilator of improved type is now found in the 
semi-convertible cars upon the Boston & Northern and upon 
the Boston Elevated lines, and that another device, which 
promises as good if not better results, is found in cars of the 
elevated trains; but that there has been, however, a too gen- 
eral indifference on the subject of ventilation cannot admit of 
question. 

After all is said, however, in support of theories and de- 
vices for heating and ventilating cars, present discomfort is 
due fully as much to the failure to properly use means at hand 
for keeping the air pure and warm as to imperfection in ap- 
paratus. There is no reason why, for example, a movable 
ventilating window should be kept entirely open or entirely 
shut, or in any one position throughout a long journey, in total 
disregard of the temperature outside and of the changing con- 
ditions inside the car. 

Street Car Fenders and Wheel Guards. 

The board deems it necessary to reiterate its views that 
no particular fender or wheel guard has yet been found the 
adoption of which can be recommended in preference to all 
others, and that the greatest safeguard in street railway opera- 
tion comes from having the cars at all times under such con- 
trol as to avoid striking a person, rather than depending upon 
any device to save him from harm after having been struck by 
a moving car. 

The board will continue to investigate and thoroughly 
test all meritorious fenders and wheel guards, and will insist 
upon the more general use of any device found to possess 
sufficient merit to warrant its adoption. 

To assist the board in determining the efficiency of these 
devices, it is expected that companies will keep a record of 
all tests through their use. 

Repairs and Renewals. 

The physical condition of street railways in Massachusetts 
shows a general improvement over the previous year, large 
sums having been expended for repairs and renewals, and 
some of the larger companies having bought many new cars 
and replaced with more commodious cars the equipment lost 
or worn out in service. 

Among the smaller companies, especially those serving 
sparsely settled communities, the period has arrived when 
considerable sums of money must be spent for repairs and 
renewals of property. Many have been unable to earn a suffi- 
cient sum above their operating expenses and fixed charges 
to place them in the dividend-paying class of roads, and the 
problem in operation for these as well as for some of the 
larger roads will be not only that of paying dividends, but of 
making renewals of track and replacements of rolling stock 
without impairment of capital. 

The public, now so generally dependent upon local inter- 
urban roads, should be ever mindful that, while it is essential 
that service should always be adequate, the ideal conditions 
can only be obtained through a fair return upon money in- 
vested. 

Whatever the solution of these difficulties, one thing is 
evident, that the conduct of street railway companies should 
be no different from that of other transportation or business 
corporations in the adoption of a far-seeing policy in the man- 
agement of properties, and an element always to be com- 
mended in such management is that of proper provision in the 
present for the inevitable needs of the future. 

Report of Bridge Engineer. 

The report contains a statement from George F. Swain, the 
bridge engineer, in which he says regarding street railway 
bridges : 

"The condition of steel bridges over steam railroads re- 
quires careful and frequent examination, as some such bridges 
which have been recently uncovered have shown great reduc- 
tion in strength, owing to the corrosive action of the smoke 
and steam from the locomotives. No paint is proof against 
this combination of chemical and mechanical action, and the 
only safe and permanent plan appears to be to encase the 
steel in a covering of concrete or plaster or some other ma- 
terial which will not corrode. 

"During the past year the different street railway com- 
panies have done considerable work in altering, strengthening 
and rebuilding bridges. A good deal of a minor character has 
been done, together with a good deal of work of magnitude. 
The most extensive strengthening that has been carried out 
during the year has perhaps been the rebuilding and strength- 
ening of the steel trestle on the Old Colony Street Railway at 



Raynham, 752 feet long. This work is an illustration of the 
short-sightedness with which some of our street railways have 
been constructed in the past. It was built only 10 years ago, 
but as the traffic increased and heavier cars were run it was 
soon found to be too light. Within 10 years from the time it 
was constructed it has been found necessary to largely re- 
build it. 

"The new bridges which are being constructed by street 
railways in the commonwealth are designed for heavy cars, 
and it is hoped and expected that they will prove to be more 
enduring." 

AUTOMATIC INTERLOCK TO PREVENT ACCIDENTS 
FROM MISPLACED AIR COCKS. 

On all large electric roads where heavy cars are in use, 
equipped with air brakes, and especially where trains of two 
or more cars have to be made up and moved about the yards 
and run into terminals, it very frequently happens that an 
employe will forget to cut-in the air cocks below the engi- 
neer's valve, the consequence being that when he attempts 
to apply the brakes they will not work and the train may run 
through a switch or crash into a train of cars standing on a 
siding or on the main track. 

One of the worst accidents in electric railroading was 
caused by a switchman pulling out of a siding with a 5-car 
train and running into a 5-car train loaded with passengers 
standing at the foot of a slight grade. When the debris of 
this wreck was cleared away the cocks under the engineer's 
valve were found to be closed. 

Where a road is operating a stub-end terminal a motorman 
changing ends occasionally forgets to close the cocks on the 
engineer's valve he has been operating, and, leaving the valve 
on release position, goes to the other end of the car or train 
and starts out with his brakes inoperative. Then when he 
attempts to stop he can only do so by reversing. Very fre- 
quently the reverser is stuck or the circuit-breaker blows, due 
to heavy rush of current, and then he is powerless to prevent 
an accident. 

A very simple device has been perfected and patent ap- 
plied for by E. T. Munger, A. H. Daus and H. A. Johnson of 
the Metropolitan West Side Elevated Railway Company of 
Chicago. The device is designed to positively prevent acci- 
dents caused by improper placing of the air cocks. The device 
is simple. It consists of a switch attached to the cut-out cock 
under the engineer's valve, to which is connected one of the 
control circuit wires. The protective apparatus can be applied 
to any control system. 

Following are statements of how this device will operate 
with different numbers of cars in a train: 

1. One car, cab in one end only; cut-out cocks under engi- 
neer's valve must be open before car can be moved. 

2. One car, cab in each end; cut-out cocks in operating 
cab must be open, in other cab closed, before train can be 
started. 

3. Two or more cars in train, one or more cabs in each 
car; cut-out cocks in operating cab must be open, and in all 
other cabs they must be closed, before power can be fed 
to motors. 

With the device installed, if a passenger opens a cut-out 
cock in some cab of a train in motion, the power will imme- 
diately be shut off. 

It is stated that the attachments necessary to afford these 
results can be installed on cars already operating for less than 
$5.00 per car for labor and material. The installation does 
not require any extra wires in the train line. On roads con- 
templating new equipment it can easily be installed at the 
time cars are wired. 

A number of cars on the Metropolitan West Side Elevated 
Railway are equipped with these devices, which are operating 
satisfactorily. 

On the Saturday before Christmas, December 21. the lines 
of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company, New York City, 
carried 1,649,752 passengers. Of these 961,114 were carried on 
the elevated lines and 688, 63S on the subway division. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



41 



TICKET METHODS OF THE ATLANTIC CITY & SHORE 
RAILROAD. 



BY S. S. NKKI', (1KNKHAI. SI I'KHI NTKXDE.NT. 



The Atlantic City & Shore Railroad, of Atlantic City, 
N. .T., has recently instituted on its Ocean City division a 
number of new ticket methods, which may be of interest, and 




Atlantic City & Shore Railroad — Map of System. 

of which we should appreciate criticisms from any member 
of the street railway fraternity. 

The Atlantic City & Shore Railroad at present consists of 
three divisions: First, the Central Passenger Railway, com- 
prising a loop in Atlantic City, on Virginia, Adriatic, and South 
Carolina avenues, touching the Boardwalk on the first and 
last named avenues; second, the Atlantic Avenue & Long- 
port division, between Inlet and Longport, with a boat line 
operating between Longport and Ocean City; third, the Ocean 
City division, a high-speed line between Atlantic City and 
Ocean City, which is operated in various parts by the third 
rail, catenary and ordinary overhead conductors. 

On August 25, 1906. the last named division was opened 
for traffic betw-een Atlantic City and Somers Point, and the 
following 5-cent fare zones were established: 
SOUTHBOUND. 

Atlantic City to Pleasantville Zone No. 1 

Pleasantville to Lin wood Zone No. 2 

Lin wood to Somers Point Zone No. 3 

NORTHBOUND. 

Somers Point to Lin wood Zone No. 4 

Lin wood to Pleasantville Zone No. 5 

Pleasantville to Atlantic City Zone No. 6 



On July 2, 1907, we opened for traffic an extension between 
Somers Point and Ocean City, making a continuous all-rail 
route between Atlantic City and Ocean City, and on account 
of the great cost of the bridge over the bay, the rate of fare 
in each direction between Somers Point and Ocean City was 
uiaib- in • ■ i ■ 1 1 1 . Ki'twecii ihe.se poini i the southbound zone 1- 
numbered "7," and the northbound numbered "8." In these 
zones in each direction the register is rung twice for each 
cash or ticket fare. 

When the line was opened a ticket system was adopted, 
using a separate coupon for each zone, and tickets were placed 
on sale in the hands of the conductors. For several obvious 
reasons, chiefly on account of the inconvenience to passengers 
caused by requiring them to tear off a coupon in each zone, 
this system was discarded and the .sale of tickets was taken 
out of the hands of conductors and given over to agents. At 
the same time a new style of ticket was adopted, of the form 
shown in the accompanying engravings. The new system 
consists of single and round trip 
tickets, printed separately for each 
station, good for a trip between 
terminals or between any two sta- 
tions on the line. Northbound tick- 
ets are printed on a blue back- 



CASH 



Form 26 



Issued by 




Good only from 

PLEASANTVILLE 



ATLANTIC CITY 

CENTRAL PASSENGER RY. CO. 






Atlantic City & Shore Railroad — Single- 
Trip Ticket. 




Sk^sSs^ss^m 



Good only fr 



SOMERS POINT to 
ATLANTIC CITY 



il ,.|| Hurt e,,ll|„Ml. Not KOl*l lO SlOl» Off. £> ; 

Acct. Central Passenger Ry. Co. P ; 



Round-Trip Ticket. 



t 75 R 3 



Badge No. 

Conductor's Punching 

Slip (Original 11(4 

by 2 Inches). 



ground and the southbound tickets 
on a yellow background. The price 
of each ticket is printed on one end. 

At the time the new style of 
tickets were placed in service, a 
question came up as to how to 

check the conductor, and at the same time give him a record 
which would allow him to correctly ring up in each zone the 
fares covered by through tickets or cash fares paid through 
any number of zones. This we have done very satisfactorily 
by the use of punching slips, one of which is reproduced 
herewith. 

The punching slips are of two forms, one, printed on a 



42 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



red card, for tickets and the other, on a yellow card, for cash. 
Each zone is represented by a rectangular space with its 



FHOI 








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Atlantic City & Shore Railroad — Obverse Conductor's Trip 
Report (Original ■\-\</4 by 9|^). 



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round trip, and on the completion of the trip the slips are 
hander to the receiver, who checks the register for the round 
trip. Double fare registers are used, recording both cash and 
tickets. 

As the conductor collects a ticket or a cash fare he 
punches the corresponding slip in the zone which the fare 
or ticket covers, and at the same time records a fare on the 
register. The registers are changed at the end of each zone. 
The slips must be kept correctly so that they will check with 
the number of fares registered in each zone, and any dis- 
crepancy will be promptly detected by the receivers at the 
end of the round trip. If a conductor attempted to make false 
returns by punching the slips incorrectly, hoping to be able 
to cover up his tracks in a round trip, he would be obliged 
to count his tickets and cash in each zone and the time is so 
limited that his hands are practically tied. 

A copy of our conductor's waybill, which we have pre- 
pared after a great deal of thought, is shown herewith. 



Atlantic City & Shore Railroad — Reverse of Conductor's Trip 
Report. 

corresponding zone number printed in large figures, and each 
space contains 100 numbers, from 1 to 100. One of each of 
these slips is given to the conductor at the beginning of each 



IMPROVEMENTS OF THE DENVER CITY TRAMWAY 
COMPANY. 

William G. Evans, president of the Denver City Tramway 
Company, in a letter to the Denver Republican under date of 
December 31, 1906, outlined the large amount of improvement 
work the company had carried on during the year and gave 
some figures showing the present extent of the company's 
system. The following figures, taken from Mr. Evans' letter, 
show the increase of business during 1907 over the previous 
year: 

1907. 1906. 

Total passengers carried 72,383,101 65,883,657 

Number passengers riding on free trans- 
fers 16,534,087 14,896,122 

Average earnings of the company per 

passenger, revenue and transfer 3.79 3.78 

Average distance of each 1-way car trip 

(in miles) 4.34 4.28 

Total car-miles 10,428,210 9,882,385 

Average car-miles per day. 28,570 27,076 

Average number passenger cars operated 

daily 200 180 

Of the passengers carried during 1907, 4,000 per day trav- 
eled upon half-fare tickets. 

On May 15, 1906, the company was granted a new fran- 
chise providing for a large amount of new extensions and 
much of the work was done in 1907. The following is a sum- 
mary of the construction work done and important better- 
ments made by the company, and amounts expended for same, 
since the adoption of the franchise of May 15, 1906: 

Miles of new track constructed 15.63 

Miles of cable track rebuilt 4.86 

Eighty-six new cars added at cost of $322,822.59 

Power plant electrical generating machinery 165,041.31 

Track construction . . 378.85S.36 

Total cost of improvements 866,722.26 

The following figures show the money expended by the 
company in Denver from May 15, 1906, to December 31, 1907, 
for labor on account of construction work, and for labor and 
wages on account of maintenance and operation of the com- 
pany's lines: 
Total amount of money expended in labor, wages, 

salaries, etc., on construction work $ 257,513.78 

Total amount of money expended in labor, wages, 

salaries, etc., on operation 1,411,613.77 

All tramway trainmen receive their pay for each day's 
service at the close of each day. 

The company now operates 172 miles of track within the 
city limits and 26 miles of interurban lines, and owns 375 
passenger cars. 

In addition to the work completed in 1907 the company 
has an extensive programme of improvements planned for 
1908, and, although funds which were expected to be available 
for the new work have been delayed by the financial situation, 
no long postponement of the plans is expected. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



43 



GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION OF RAILWAY ACCOUNTS. 1 



HV PROF. HENRY C. ADAMS, IN CHARGE OF STATISTICS WO Ainu vis. 
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION, 



The government has recently undertaken to do something 
quite different from that which it has ever undertaken to do 
before. It has undertaken to exercise a controlling influence 
upon the administration of railway properties, through the 
agency of their accounts. The interstate commerce law al- 
ways had in it a phrase, giving to the interstate commerce 
commission the right, within its discretion, of prescribing a 
uniform system of accounts, but it was not until the act 
which went into force a year ago last August that the com- 
mission was clothed with any effective power to exercise that 
right. The difficulty did not lie in the intent of congress, but 
in the fact that the law failed to provide the commission with 
adequate means of enforcing its desires in this regard. I have 
been with the interstate commerce commission since 1887. 
We have had three law suits in that time with the railways 
touching accounts. One of them had to do with the request 
for certain information which the railways did not care to 
furnish in their annual reports, and we were defeated. It 
was the care of congress, at the session before last, that this 
defect should be remedied. It is upon this amended act that 
the new activity of the government, referred to, is based. 

I assume that you will not take it amiss if I place some 
emphasis upon the political aspect of this new step which 
the government has seen fit to take — political not in its party 
sense, but in the broad sense of political science. What do 
these orders of the commission relative to accounts mean for 
our government? What do they mean as a form of control of 
aggregations of capital which, under present conditions, are 
a menace to the stability of this nation? And I further call 
attention in passing to the fact that the success of what the 
interstate commerce commission is undertaking in this regard, 
aiming, as I have remarked, at the control of railway adminis- 
tration through the supervision of railway accounts, will serve 
as a model, if it succeeds, for the control of all forms or 
agencies of consolidated capital, which endanger the perpetu- 
ation of the principles upon which our government rests. 

Operating Accounts and Balance Sheet. 

May I now ask your attention to the particular points held 
in mind in formulating the system of accounts which the com- 
mission has seen fit to promulgate? And of those, two are, I 
think, of paramount importance. 

First — It is absolutely essential that a carrier should show, 
month by month, and year by year, the true net revenue; and. 

Second — It is absolutely essential that the corporate 
assets and corporate liabilities shall be accurately, fully and 
clearly stated. 

The first of these, the determination of the net revenue, is 
the kernel of operating accounts, as they are termed; the 
latter, the correct determination of the assets, is the sig- 
nificant feature of the balance sheet. Speaking broadly, ac- 
counts divide themselves into these two parts: operating ac- 
counts and capital accounts. The commission, during the first 
year of the enforcement of this act, has prescribed the operat- 
ing accounts. It is these that went into effect beginning 
July 1. 

The capital accounts, that is, the classification of assets 
and liabilities essential for the determination of the correct 
balance sheet, is the constructive work that yet lies before 
the commission during the coming year. 

In what way do the operating accounts aim to secure a 
correct statement of the net revenue? This is done by the 
application of two principles, or rather by the application 
of a general principle in the operating accounts, and by 
setting up a separate classification of additions and better- 
ments. The present system of accounting differs from the 
system of accounting that existed prior to July 1, speak- 
ing generally, in two important particulars. There was, in 
the old system of accounts, no formal depreciation account, 
nor was there any formal classification of additions and bet- 
terments. Now, it is by means of these two, the depreciation 
account, which is a primary account in operating expenses 
on the one hand, and a strict definition of what is an addition 
and what is a betterment on the other, that it is hoped to 
guarantee to the investing public that the net revenue that is 
stated from time to time shall be the true net revenue. 

Depreciation. 
You will appreciate the significance of the depreciation 
account if I call your attention to the ease with which an 

♦Abstract of an address delivered before the Association 
of American Government Accountants, Washington. D. C. 
October 11, 1907. 



erroneous net revenue may be stated by a disregard of depre- 
ciation. Of course, the net revenue is the difference between 
the gross revenue and the operating expenses, the operating 
expenses being the technical name for what sometimes is 
called the cost of performing the service. Now, it is a well- 
established principle in manufacturing accounting, and, in- 
deed, in sound accounting everywhere, that the wear and tear 
of the plant during the time that it is producing revenue shall 
be included in the cost before arriving at the full cost of 
producing that revenue. The depreciation account, therefore, 
aims by an orderly, regular method, and by a method which 
separates the depreciation charges from all the other cl 
included in operating expenses, and further by a method that 
permits of easy test as to whether the charge is too great 
or too light — I say that this depreciation account insists that 
there shall be put into operating expenses, month by month, 
and year by year, an amount equal to the wear of the prop 
erty during that time. Suppose, for illustration, that in ordei 
to pay a dividend, or show a surplus, the management should 
refuse to set aside out of the earnings a fund to replace the 
cars which, during a month, had gone out of service, would 
that be correct accounting? The fact is that the value of all 
cars has disappeared up to the extent of the wear upon them, 
and to the extent of the wear, or to the extent of the value 
representing the wear, there should be carried into operating 
expenses a charge the purpose of which is to accumulate a 
fund with which to maintain the value of the original invest- 
ment. To declare a revenue, without regard to that wear 
and tear, is for a company to state that it has a surplus, when, 
in fact, it may have none. 

I know of a case which happened not long ago, of a man- 
ager who desired to make a good showing for a certain month. 
He found that the estimates of the earnings for the first week 
were below what he thought they should be, and if the month 
kept up in that way he was not going to be able to show as 
good a net earning as he expected. What did he do? He 
closed the shops and by what he saved in expense of main- 
taining his shops for a month he made a good showing. Of 
course, that is a wasteful method. But, what is worse, it is 
a dishonest method. The stockholders who receive dividends 
by methods of that sort simply had paid back to them a part 
of their capital. It was not a dividend at all. And the per- 
sons who bought that stock because of the payment of a 
dividend declared under such conditions bought the stock 
under false representations. 

Now, there is another way in which the net revenue may 
be misstated. It may be that in especially prosperous times 
the manager of a railway desires to make certain improve- 
ments, and yet does not care to show that those improvements 
are made, nor does he care to borrow the money with which 
to make them. He issues an order that those improvements 
be made and called operating expenses chargeable to mainte- 
nance. Now, they are not maintenance charges. Now, in 
order to guard against the understatement of the net revenue, 
which is just as bad as the overstatement of the net revenue, 
there is being worked out a careful classification of additions 
and betterments, the design being to draw a clean-cut line 
between what is the cost to operate and maintain the property 
and what does, in reality, better the property. It is not sug- 
gested that that betterment must be capitalized. That is a 
matter which certainly lies within the right of the board of 
directors to determine. There are conditions under which it 
is certainly wise, from a public point of view, as well as from 
the point of view of the stockholders, that improvements 
should be paid for out of current earnings; but, if they are 
paid for out of current earnings, it must be not in a blind 
charge to operating expenses; the carrier should not be at 
liberty to call an improvement a cost, which is a misstate- 
ment, but it must be charged to the income account. 

Supervisory Accounting. 

Now, before I go on to the next point, I want to make a 
remark in connection with the scope and purpose of super- 
visory accounting. We have heard a great deal and read a 
great deal lately as to the embarrassment of railway corpora- 
tions because they cannot borrow capital. It is true that 
the people seem temporarily to have lost confidence in the 
railway securities. The explanation of this loss of confidence 
by the railway management is that the state legislatures and 
congress are exercising too much supervision over the man- 
agement, but it is also possible that such things as we have 
read of in connection with the Alton case, and other similar 
cases, is the explanation of this lack of confidence. Now, if 
this be true, nothing can restore that confidence and enable 
the railroads to secure the money that it is necessary for them 
to have in order to carry out the schemes of improvement 
that they desire to carry out, more quickly and effectually 
than such a scheme of accounting supervision as I am de- 
scribing practically carried out. There is no reason in the 



44 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



nature of the case why the railway securities should not be 
made as stable as a government bond. They are like gov- 
ernment bonds in that they have the industry of the entire 
country back of them, and I hope that we may live to see the 
time when congress will permit the comptroller of the cur- 
rency to accept railway bonds as the basis for the issue of 
national bank notes; and the only practicable means of 
attaining this most desired end is, in my opinion, the per- 
fection of this scheme of accounting supervision upon which 
during the last year the interstate commerce commission has 
entered. • 

Joint Facilities. 

The American system of railways is a very complicated 
system in that no one railway owns all the facilities which it 
operates. The railway managers of this country endeavor to 
do things as economically as possible, and if one line between 
two points will serve the traffic, or if one interlocker at a 
point, or one bridge, will serve the purpose of two or more 
carriers, or if one terminal in a city will meet the require- 
ments of several roads, they say, let there be but one of 
these facilities of which all carriers may have joint use. Now, 
the debit and credit entries which are thus rendered necessary 
in accounting are the most difficult of the technical problems 
in the whole realm of railway accounting, a statement which 
will be readily appreciated when I say that the solution of the 
problem requires that three somewhat divergent results must 
be attained through the agency of a single set of operating 
expense accounts. 

It must, in the first place, be possible to combine the reve- 
nue and expense accounts of the several carriers without dan- 
ger of duplication or omission. It must, in the second place, 
be possible to determine the cost of maintaining the property 
represented by the capital investment of a carrier, quite 
independently of the question of the revenue that accrues from 
the operation of the property. It must, in the third place, be 
possible to assign to the traffic revenue of each carrier 
the expenses incurred for earning that revenue. Any one of 
these requirements could easily be met, but it is a difficult 
accounting problem to make use of the operating expense 
account in such a manner as to realize all three of these 
results. The interstate commerce commission accounting sys- 
tem aims to do this by means of joint facilities, debit and 
credit accounts, the principle of which is to permit the owning 
company to charge all expenses in its primary accounts, and 
to bill foreign carriers for their proportion of such charges. 
Instead, however, of crediting its primary accounts with the 
amount thus billed, which, on the other side, would require 
the foreign company to debit the same accounts with corre- 
sponding items (a practice which would result in a misstate- 
ment, so far as maintenance is concerned, of the accounts 
of both carriers), both companies are required to carry their 
debits and credits in specially provided accounts, called "joint 
facilities — dr." and "joint facilities — cr." By this means we 
arrive at a correct statement of maintenance expenses assign- 
able to capital, a correct statement of costs of transportation 
assignable to revenue, and a correct result when the reports 
of the several carriers are combined into a single statement. 

Balance Sheet and Capital Account. 
Permit me to add a word relative to the balance sheet and 
capital account, for the reason that they bear very directly 
upon a question which is likely to come before congress at the 
next session. It is as essential for the exercise of adminis- 
trative supervision over the carriers by the state and federal 
railway commission as for the determination of just and 
reasonable rates under existing rules laid down by the courts 
to know what the true value of railway property is. The 
balance sheet ought, and would, if it were properly kept, to 
tell what the true value of the property is, or, at least, it 
ought to be the key for determining that value. The balance 
sheet is the final record. It is the statement in which the 
corporate assets are put on the one side and the corporate 
liabilities on the other. It is the statement which gives the 
investor, in a definite figure, the result of the working of the 
corporation from the time that it first originated down to the 
time that the balance sheet is struck. Its theory is simple 
and its figures ought to be significant. But the query is, do 
they, in reality, convey any definite meaning? Among the 
assets we find against "cost of road," or "cost of equipment," 
so and so many millions of dollars. Do these figures mean 
what they say? In the majority of cases they do not. I 
would not be understood as implying that railway balance 
sheets are dishonest statements; what I mean is that the 
method of keeping the balance sheets according to current 
American practice is such that you cannot learn from the 
figures set up in the balance sheet against these captions I 
have named anything like a true measure of the cost of roads 
or the cost of equipment. It may not even be the original 
cost. It may be that if you take an inventory of the loco- 



motives and cars actually used in the operation of this 
road the value of the property will stand millions of dollars 
higher than the book entry upon the balance sheet, or it may 
be that it will stand millions of dollars below. In either 
case, you have an erroneous statement of profit and loss as 
a balance between assets and liabilities. 

This question of the balance sheet, as also the analysis 
of the property accounts, and the rules by which the property 
accounts should be kept, are the questions which will claim 
the attention of the interstate commerce commission during 
the current year. They are essentially different in character 
from the accounts that pertain to operating expenses and 
operating revenue. They pertain to the financial side of 
railway accounting. Such things as occurred in the Alton 
deal — I speak of that case because it is known by common 
report — probably would not have occurred, or, at least, could 
not have occurred so easily, had there been for 10 years prior 
to the time of this transaction a correct statement of the 
balance sheet. And now, I do not mean to say that there was 
any conscious error or conscious misdemeanor on the part of 
those who made that balance sheet, but I do mean to say that 
a great deal remains to be done before the balance sheets of 
the American railways are brought into such shape that they 
are capable of presenting with accuracy and sufficient detail 
the financial standing of railway properties, or furnish a 
true statement of the value of the property. 

Such a general statement as this will show the signifi- 
cance and importance of this part of the accounting scheme, 
and will, I am sure, emphasize what I said at the outset, that 
control over accounting does in fact permit the government 
to exercise a certain degree of supervision over the man- 
agement of railway property. Of course, the accounts them- 
selves would be of little use were it not for the fact that 
the law also provides for examiners whose duty it shall be 
to examine the accounts of the carriers and determine whether 
or not the prescribed rules of accounting are followed. 
Although the analogy is not quite accurate, the relation be- 
tween the interstate commerce commission and the carrier is 
something like the relation that exists now between the 
treasury department and the national banks. The purpose 
in both cases is administrative supervision over the corpora- 
tions concerned. 



NEW HAVEN'S PLANS FOR NEW YORK-PORT CHESTER 
ELECTRIC LINE. 



On January 2 President C. S. Mellen of the New York 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, in a communication to the 
board of estimate of New York City, stated that the New- 
Haven company owns the entire capital stock of the Mill- 
brook Company, which in turn controls the New York West- 
chester & Boston Railway and the New York & Port Chester 
Railroad. The communication was in reply to a resolution 
of the board asking the New Haven road to furnish informa- 
tion as to its relation to the Westchester and Port Chester 
companies and to state whether it proposed to proceed with 
the construction of the roads under the franchises. It is 
stated that the board has considered revoking the franchises 
on the ground that the required amount of construction work 
has not been completed. 

Mr. Mellen states that "it is the intention of the New York 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company to cause to be con- 
structed a railroad from the Harlem river to Port Chester, 
consisting of two tracks from the Harlem river to One Hun- 
dred and Seventy-seventh street, four tracks from One Hun- 
dred and Seventy-seventh street to the city line and two 
tracks from the city line to Port Chester, such road to be a 
high-speed electric railroad, in compliance with the provisions 
of the franchises heretofore granted by the city of New York 
to the Port Chester company and the Westchester company." 
He says further that the company desires to build the road 
according to the best available route and that it has no prefer- 
ence as to which charter shall be used, the company's only 
desire being to build under a charter that shall be free from 
legal question. 

The company has arranged for practically all of the right, 
of way between One Hundred and Seventy-seventh street and 
Port Chester and considerable construction work has been 
done, but little further progress can be made until litigation 
now pending can be settled. The Port Chester company has 



January n. 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



45 



been enjoined from crossing streets in the Rronx and the 
validity of the Westchester company's charter is now being 
attacked in the courts. As soon as possible it is the intention 
of the New Haven company to apply to the board of estimate 
and to the public service commission for permission to con- 
solidate the two companies. 



DECISION OF WISCONSIN RAILROAD COMMISSION ON 
ISSUE OF CAPITAL OBLIGATIONS. 



An abstract of the decision of the Wisconsin railroad com- 
mission approving the issue of $300,000 bonds by the Southern 
Wisconsin Railway of Madison. Wis., follows: 

The original application in this matter was made on July 
23, 1907. Various amendments which the commission con- 
sidered necessary in order to comply with the terms of Chap- 
ter 576 were made by the company at different subsequent 
dates. 

Application of the Company. 

The chief statements of the amended application read as 
follows: 

"The $30,000 bonds will be secured solely by the $450,000 
bonds owned by the Madison & Interurban Traction Com- 
pany. That company has for the purpose of assisting the 
Southern Wisconsin Railway, in effect, loaned these bonds to 
it and it will be provided, in the proposed trust agreement, 
that as the coupons on these bonds mature they shall be 
clipped and canceled by the trustee and returned to the com- 
pany. During the period of the trust and until the $300,000 
serial bonds are paid, both as to principal and interest, the 
Madison & Interurban Traction Company receives no income 
from its bonds so loaned to this company. The $300,000 serial 
bonds are not secured by mortgage and are no additional mort- 
gage lien and never can be, on the property of the Southern 
Wisconsin Railway. The expectation is that the earnings of 
the company for the next eight years will take care of this 
$300,000 bond issue, both principal and interest." 

"The bonds are issued for the following purposes: (a) 
Rebuilding the track and overhead system at certain points 
at an estimated cost of $159,000. (b) Extending the railway 
at an estimated cost of $3S,000. (c) Extending the railway by 
building along a private right of way to the Dane county fair 
grounds, at an estimated cost of $18,000. (d) The purchase 
of 10 new cars, at $3,500 each, (e) The erection and equip- 
ment of a power-generating plant, at an estimated cost of 
$137,660. (f) The payment of the floating debt of the com- 
pany. Igl The purchase of a road roller, a sprinkling car and 
a tower car. at a cost of $4,500 (the road roller has already 
been purchased, at a cost of $2,060)." 

The itemized list of improvements to be paid for out of 
the proceeds of the sale of the proposed bond issue was sub- 
sequently cut down so as to bring it within the limits of 
$300,000." 

History of Capital Issues. 

The history of recent capital issues is set forth as follows, 
by the officials of the applicant company in a statement re- 
ceived by the commission on September 4, 1907: 

"At the time the Madison & Interurban Traction Company 
purchased the property of the Madison Traction Company that 
company had outstanding $300,000 stock and an authorized 
bond issue of $300,000, of which $210,000 had been issued and 
were repurchased by the company at a premium of 10 per 
cent. 

"The Madison & Interurban company issued $6S5,000 
bonds and $30,000 stock, all of which was delivered to its 
predecessor company for property. The Madison Traction 
Company distributed the bonds thus received as part payment 
of its property to its stockholders. The stockholders sold the 
bonds to the Citizens' Savings & Trust Company of Cleve- 
land, O. The Madison & Interurban company afterward ex- 
pended upward of $200,000 in cash for which no additional 
bonds or stocks were issued, leaving the capitalization of the 
Madison & Interurban company, at the time of the sale of its 
property to the Southern Wisconsin Railway, with $6S5.0OO 
par value of first mortgage bonds and $500,000 of stock out- 
standing, or a total of $1.1S5,000. 

"The present company authorized an issue of $2,000,000 
liar value of general mortgage bonds and issued $1,185,000 of 
these bonds, as follows: Delivered to trustee, to be ex- 
changed for outstanding bonds of the Madison & Interurban 
company, $6S5,000; delivered to the Madison & Interurban 
company, for property purchased subject to the $685,000 bonds, 
(450,000; delivered to Southern Wisconsin Traction & Light 
Company, for property purchased from it. $50,000. 

"In addition the Southern Wisconsin company received all 
of the capital stock of the present company, $50,000. 



"Inasmuch as this company has only issued $1,185,000 of 
its authorized issue of $2,000,000 bonds, there remains in the 
hands of the trustee, authorized but not issued, $815,000 par 
value in bonds which the management of the company deems 
it unwise to draw upon for any purpose in the present condi- 
tion of the bond and money market. The company therefore 
proposes to issue its short-time bonds for $300,000, drawing a 
higher rate of interest and payable as to both principal and 
interest, out of earnings. 

"Since the old line was bought in 1905 it litis been largely 
rebuilt; the tracks, overhead work. equipmenUand many build- 
ings were in worn-out condition and it was bought with the 
expectation of making the same a first-class line of railway. 
Since September. 1905, the work of reconstruction has been 
going on, new buildings have been erected and the line to 
South Madison has been built, in addition to which 10 new 
cars have been purchased and others rebuilt. All these and 
other improvements have been made at a time when labor and 
material were enormously high, and the whole work has been 
very expensive. All the moneys for which notes were given 
have been expended for the legitimate business of the com- 
pany." 

Value of the Property. 

The tax commission and the railroad commission, jointly, 
have nearly completed a valuation of the Madison Street Rail- 
way property. When this valuation has been completed it will 
be possible to state definitely to what extent there is a misfit 
between the outstanding securities of the Southern Wisconsin 
Railway Company and the actual value of the property de- 
voted to the public service of the company. Without waiting 
for the exact figures of this valuation, on the basis of other 
data in the possession of the railroad commission it may be 
stated that the $685,000 par value of bonds held in trust by 
the Citizens' Savings & Trust Company of Cleveland, O.. more 
than represents the full value of the Madison street railway 
property; and that neither the $450,000 par value of bonds 
held by the Madison & Interurban company, nor the $50,000 
par value of bonds held by the Southern Wisconsin Traction & 
Light Company, represent any actual and necessary invest- 
ment in the present Madison Street Railway system, not to 
speak of the $815,000 of bonds, par value, authorized to be 
issued, but not yet issued by the Southern Wisconsin Railwaj 
Company. In other words, the authorized bond issue of the 
Southern Wisconsin Railway equals, approximately, five times 
the cost of reproduction new of the property upon which the 
bonds rest, while the outstanding stock may be regarded as a 
superbonus for the promoter. In round numbers, the bonded 
indebtedness at present outstanding amounts to $96,000 per 
mile; total bonds outstanding and authorized. $160,000 per 
mile; while the cost of reproduction new todav is less than 
$31,000 per mile. 

According to the statements filed with the commission by 
the Southern Wisconsin Railway Company the name of the 
company owning the Madison street railway system has been 
metamorphosed in the following order of succession since the 
year 1905: Madison Traction Company. Madison & Inter- 
urban Traction Company, Southern Wisconsin Traction & 
Light Company, Southern Wisconsin Railway Company. Each 
change of name was apparently accompanied by a fusion of 
some of the old and a dilution of the new securities represent- 
ing the property. 

The question of the reasonableness of the rates of fare 
charged by the Southern Wisconsin Railway is not before the 
commission at this time. Hence, the relation of the outstand- 
ing stocks and bonds to such rates of fare need not be dis- 
cussed in this place. 

Before a just and valid judgment can be expressed upon 
this question a different and much more comprehensive in- 
vestigation must be undertaken. 

Power of the Commission. 

We do not hesitate to say that if this commission had the 
right under the law to exercise the alternative power of grant- 
ing or refusing to grant any applications of this kind it would 
deny the present application, at least until after the Southern 
Wisconsin Railway had submitted to an adequate financial 
regenerative process. In our judgment the law confers no 
such power upon this commission. 

As we construe the act the function of this commission, in 
case stocks or evidences of indebtedness are to be issued for 
money only, is limited to ascertaining the facts essential to 
deti rmining the legality of the proposed issue and the finan- 
cial status of the applicant. We may ascertain whether the 
proposed issue is authorized either as to amount or character, 
whether, if an issue of stock, the same would result in the 
fictitious increase of the capital stock of the corporation, and 
any other fact bearing on the legality or illegality of the pro- 
posed issue: also whether the purposes for which the corpora- 
tion proposes the issue and the terms of the same are within 



II, 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



the statute or are authorized by law. For the purpose of ad- 
vising the public and investors of the value and security of 
the proposed issue we may inquire into the financial condi- 
tion and affairs of the corporation, both past and present. If 
the corporation complies with all the requirements of the 
commission by furnishing such statements and evidence as 
the commission "may deem pertinent to the inquiry," and the 
commission finds no illegality in the proposed issue of stocks, 
bonds or other evidences of indebtedness, it must issue to the 
corporation a certificate authorizing it to issue such stocks, 
bonds or other evidences of indebtedness to the amount, of 
the character, for the purposes and upon the terms proposed 
on the part of the corporation. Unless the proposed issue of 
stocks, bonds or other evidences of indebtedness are unauthor- 
ized or unlawful in any of the particulars above mentioned, 
the commission cannot deny the granting of the certificates. 
It may not impose limitations not authorized by the statute 
nor determine the purposes, terms or conditions upon which 
such stocks or evidences of indebtedness are to be issued. 

The law reduces the functions of this commission with 
respect to issues of securities of public service corporations 
to that of an information bureau and an automatic registering 
machine. This commission has not even the power to make 
the issuance of the $300,000 of serial bonds conditional on the 
retirement of the $450,000 par value of bonds held by the 
Madison & Interurban Traction Company and the $50,000 
par value of stock held by the Southern Wisconsin Traction & 
Light Company and the $815,000 par value of bonds which 
have been authorized and have not been issued by the South- 
ern Wisconsin Railway Company. 

The suggestion has been made that if this commission 
authorizes the present issue of $300,000 serial bonds it will 
thereby confirm all previous bond issues of the Southern 
Wisconsin Railway and its predecessors. This is true neither 
in fact nor in law. The legislature and not this commission 
authorizes the present issue. Inflation of the capital issues of 
the past, no matter how flagrant, is not recognized in the stock 
and bond' law and cannot govern this commission in perform- 
ing its duties under it. Although there is not a trace of au- 
thority for such an assumption in the law, in view of the fact 
that it has been contended that we would justify all previous 
bond issues on the part of the Southern Wisconsin Railway 
and its predecessors and place our official stamp of approval 
upon the same by issuing a certificate for the present issue, 
we desire expressly to state that such a construction of our 
present official act would do violence both to the fact and 
the law. 

INSULATING VARNISHES AND COMPOUNDS. 



H. S. Cooper, manager Galveston Electric Company, 
relates some interesting and valuable experiences with insulat- 
ing varnishes and compounds in the January issue of the Stone 
& Webster Public Service Journal. He says: 

About 10 years ago I made quite a number of experiments 
with insulating varnishes and materials for armature and field 
use for railway motors. These involved nearly all the gums, 
mineral, vegetable and animal, that could be used as insu- 
lators, and the results were in favor of the one animal insulat- 
ing gum "lac," which, in its commercial form of thin scales 
common called "shellac," is well known to all those having 
to do with armature and field work. The peculiar quality of 
shellac is that its insulation increases up to its melting point 
and decreases very slowly from there on until it comes to 
its carbonization point, at which, of course, it gives away 
entirely. This is true of no other gum used for insulation — 
all of them deteriorate very rapidly as the temperature in- 
creases, and nearly all of them have a much lower carboniza- 
tion or "breaking down" point than shellac. The result of 
these experiments determined me to use shellac entirely, and 
I have, therefore, done this for over 10 years with the best of 
results. There is (as in all other materials) shellac and 
shellac, and after determining the question of shellac I had to 
determine the question of the kind and quality to use. After 
a good many trials I found that it was best, in order to obtain 
known results, to mix our own shellac, as under no circum- 
stances could I obtain from any one a shellac that we could 
make standard. I have, therefore, since that time, bought 
shellac from the importers, buying next to the finest quality 
that is imported of fine orange shellac; and I dissolve five 
pounds of this to the gallon in from 95 to 98 per cent grain 
alcohol. I have tried all other solvents, including the wood 
and other alcohols, and find that grain alcohol is the one that 
will dissolve the most of the constituents of "lac," which, in 
its nature, is a gum of different constituents and has no one 
complete solvent that can be used to make a liquid for elec- 
trical work. This proportion of five pounds of shellac to the 
gallon of 95 to 98 per cent alcohol, gives a mixture thick 
enough for any purpose desired and which, at the same time, 



can be made as thin as is necessary for any purpose where a 
thin varnish is required, simply by the addition of more of the 
same alcohol. 

At the above time, also, I was looking for a thick paste 
which could be used for the filling in of holes in commutators, 
burned out places in armature bodies and body insulation and 
for such general insulating uses. After an experiment with all 
sorts of compounds, such as whiting, powdered pumice stone 
and various other powders, I tried the sawdust from the cut- 
ting of the compound mica sheets, such as are made by the 
Mica Insulator Company. These sheets are made by the plac- 
ing of very thin sheets of mica one upon the other, cementing 
with pure shellac as above, and these, when dried, are sawed 
into different shapes by small toothed saws, and the resulting 
fine "sawdust," when sifted, is a compound of very fine mica 
scales and shellac. By taking this dry powder and mixing it 
with the above shellac varnish to the consistency desired and 
thoroughly drying same in place, I found that I had something 
which adhered indefinitely to the substance to which it was 
attached, gave high insulation, and did not crumble, crack or 
disintegrate. 

I have wound fields of the old type GE-16 street car 
motors in which the copper in the fields had fused, and the 
insulation around the fusing and between the fields and the 
shellac was so perfect that we simply had to replace the 
portion of wire melted. I have also" used it in filling up large 
holes in commutators, in the bodies of armatures, etc., and 
at the present time am using it here absolutely, where our 
necessity for a good insulation is very great, and am having 
better results than 1 find are obtained elsewhere (under less 
exacting conditions and with other compounds). The only 
care that had to be taken in regard to the use of either the 
above shellac varnish or the mica dust paste is that the 
drying out must be very gradual. This is true of very nearly 
every kind of insulating compound, but it seems to be espe- 
cially true in regard to any compounds which contain water in 
themselves or in their solvent. If the drying of the armature 
or field is too sudden at first, that is to say, if the temperature 
is raised too quickly, the varnish will dry on the outside and 
make a hard shell almost impenetrable to the moisture inside, 
and the result will be that either the moisture is retained in 
the interior or, in drying out. it is forced to the surface in the 
form of steam and will puncture a small hole leading from the 
outside to the center, through which moisture, or some con- 
ductor like copper dust or carbon dust, may find its way. 
Where the baking is gradually done and the temperature 
allowed to increase very slowly, so that the outside of the 
armature or field is not at any time many degrees hotter than 
the inside, the moisture is allowed to thoroughly escape while 
the varnish or compound is somewhat soft all over and, in 
consequence, the aperture left by it in escaping is self-closed. 

My practice has been, in an ordinary street car armature, 
such for instance as either the GE-800 type or the 52, 54. 56 
and others, to give at least two weeks' baking, not allow- 
ing the temperature for the first week to get over 150 to 
200 degrees P. After this the temperature can be rapidly 
forced up to the point where the piece will give out a 
rather acrid smell, which is well known to those drying shellac 
varnish work, and which is the point at which the baking 
should be stopped. One advantage of the use of the shellac 
is that a slight overtaking, such as might easily happen, or a 
mistake in temperatures, or leaving it in the oven too long, 
cannot in any way injure it, unless it is carried very close 
to the carbonization point. 

I have tried every other make and kind of insulating var- 
nish, paint and compound for-over 15 years, and subject to the 
above conditions of quality, solution and baking I have found 
no other one or two or many varnishes or compounds that 
will give as good all-round results. This is true only of a 
fine quality of pure shellac dissolved in pure 95 to 98 per cent 
grain alcohol and treated properly in "baking out" when used. 



The Compania Electrica y Perrocarriles de Chihuahua 
will this month take over all the properties of the local street 
car company, the Chihuahua Mineral Railroad, of Chihuahua. 
Mexico, and the electrical department of the Compania Indus- 
trial Mexicana. This will include all the lights and electrical 
power in the city, the present street railway system now being 
converted into a trolley line, the narrow-gauge steam railroad 
to Santa Eulalia, which now runs four regular mixed trains a 
day, and the aerial tramways connecting the railroad and 
town of Santa Eulalia with various mines. The new corpora- 
tion will open offices in Chihuahua. For the present work will 
be confined to the city lines, but later the entire line of the 
Mineral railroad will be converted into a trolley system. The 
city lines are expected to carry freight and the company will 
probably build sidings to business houses and haul cars from 
the Central, Chihuahua & Pacific and Orient railroads direct 
to consignees. A. C. Nash will be general manager of the new 
corporation. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



47 



REPRESENTATIVES OF STATE COMMISSIONS EXPRESS 
VIEWS ON ACCOUNTING SYSTEM. 

In response to requests from the Electric Railway Review 

the following representatives of state railway commissions 

have expressed themselves regarding the uniform accounting 

system for electric railways, which is in course of prepara 

tion: 

William O. Seymour. 

William O. Seymour, member Connecticut railroad com- 
mission: "I think a system of classification of operating ex- 
pense accounts of electric railways, practically uniform with 
the system for steam railroads, can and will be devised, and 
so amplified as to be adaptable to both small and large roads, 
and the companies will soon become so familiar with its 
application as to use it with the same facility as the form 
heretofore used, the number of accounts to depend upon the 
extent and variety of the business of the company. Only 
certain essential accounts should be required of roads with 
gross earnings not exceeding $200,000 per annum, and the 
complete form should be applicable to all roads the earnings 
of which exceed that amount. The importance of practical 
uniformity in the system of accounting of steam and electric 
roads is emphasized by the fact that today many electric 
roads are doing precisely the same kind of business as the 
steam roads, and electrical operation is rapidly being extended 
over lines heretofore operated by steam. From the standpoint 
both of the public and the manager it should be made possible 
to intelligently compare the cost of the two methods of opera- 
tion. This cannot be done without a uniform system of operat- 
ing expense accounts." 

Thomas Yapp. 

Thomas Yapp, assistant secretary Minnesota railroad 
commission: "I consider that the tentative classification of 
operating expenses recommended by the committee, consist- 
ing of 116 main accounts, would be desirable for city or inter- 
urban electric railways — first, because it conforms closely to 
the classification for steam railroads; second, because the 
principles involved in the steam classification already adopted 
should apply to all transportation companies alike, uniformity 
being the desired end; third, in view of the rapid progress 
being made in electric and interurban lines in this country 
it is desirable to have as complete a system of accounting 
as possible. I do not think the adoption of the classifica- 
tion above referred to would work any hardship upon the 
electric railways, as it was stated at the conference held 
recently that some of the big electric systems had already 
operating accounts in excess of 116, being in the nature of 
subdivision accounts. It also developed at the conference 
that it would work a hardship on the electric lines doing a 
small business if they were compelled to keep 116 main ac- 
counts of operating expenses; and in view of this fact a 
second tentative classification was at once prepared which 
embodied 21 accounts instead of 116. The dividing line be- 
tween the small and large systems in my opinion should be 
based upon gross earnings, as follows: Roads earning $75,000 
or less per annum should use the smaller classification, and 
those earning in excess of the above figure should use the 
larger classification. Xo reforms were ever made without 
changing conditions, and I am free to state that it is the inten- 
tion of the interstate commerce commission as well as all 
state commissions to be absolutely fair to all parties inter- 
ested; and after the classifications have been promulgated 
and given a reasonable trial they could be somewhat modified 
on the showing that portions of them were unreasonable, but 
the principles involved must be followed out." 

William J. Meyers. 

William .1. Meyers, chief division of statistics and ac- 
counts. New York public service commission, second district: 
"This commission has not yet expressed itself more fully 
upon the point concerning which you inquire than to 
say that it considers it advisable that the classification of 
accounts for electric railways should conform as closely as 
practicable to that provided for steam railways. Under the 
circumstances you will recognize that I should not care to 
express any opinion upon a controverted point until after 
the commission itself has considered the matter. Xone of us 
is aware of any reason for thinking that such a system of 
accounting as is contemplated will work any hardship upon 
electric railways. Those who are actively engaged in the 
management of such properties must be relied upon to point 
out any objections of this character if such there are. With 
regard to the amount of gross earnings which should entitle 
an electric railway company to use the abbreviated classifica- 
tion of operating expense accounts agreed upon last month in 



Washington for submission for the purpose of getting the 
opinions of those concerned, it seems to me that the amount 
should be placed low. The cost of stationery for keeping the 
more detailed accounts is not excessive ami with very little 
thought and study given to the matter the person in charge 
of the accounts can readily apportion the cost of operation 
among the accounts proposed in the more ample schi 

A. F. Weber. 
A. F. Weber, chief statistician New York public 
commission, first district: "The commission for the lit 
trict has as yet taken no action in regard to the accounting 
of street railways, and, of course, no individual is in a position 
to say what its action will be. So long as the matter is under 
consideration it would be manifestly improper for me to dis- 
cuss its policy, and I can only say that so far as my own 
recommendations are concerned they will be given in favor 
of such a classification of accounts (for the fiscal year begin- 
ning July 1 next i as will be best adapted to the street railway 
situation in New York City. I do not consider the original 
tentative classification of the interstate commerce commission 
as having properly met this requirement, as it was too ■ 
patterned after the steam railroad classification." 



"SEEING MEXICO" PARLOR CAR SERVICE. 



For the accommodation of the large number of tourists who 
annually visit the City of Mexico and its surrounding points, the 
Mexico Electric Tramways Company, Limited, of Mexico City, 




Interior of Special Cars for "Seeing Mexico" Service. 

has established a special "Seeing Mexico" parlor car service. 
The cars used on these trips, one of which is illustrated here- 
with, were specially designed and constructed for the purpose, 
and in the elegance of their appointment and finish are said 
to be the handsomest street railway palace cars on the Ameri- 
can continent. 

The Mexico Electric Tramways system comprises upward 
of 200 miles of street railways, reaching every point within 
the jurisdiction of the federal district, and extending beyond 
the boundaries of the federal district out into the state of 
Mexico. Under these conditions it is possible to obtain a 
better idea of the city and its environs in the cars and special 
"Seeing Mexico" trains than by any other means. 

In these special trips each party will be accompanied by a 
competent guide, who, speaking both English and Spanish, will 
briefly give a descripiton of each interesting point passed by 
the car. 

Two trips are made daily, one in the morning and the 
other in the afternoon, starting from the Plaza de la Constitu- 
cion, the central point of the city, the time required to make 
each trip being a trifle more than three hours. These trips 
have been especially established with the endeavor of acquaint- 
ing visitors with all important points reached by the company's 
lines, and if taken advantage of will give an idea of the city, 
its varied industries, its people and architecture, impossible 
of attainment by any other means. Every foot of ground 



48 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 



covered in these trips is replete with a constantly changing 
panorama of historical interest, combined with pleasure and 
romance. 

Special cars may he chartered for sight-seeing or excur- 
sion trips on all days except Sundays and important national 
holidays. 

The service was started on January 2 and will continue 
during the tourist season, which usually lasts three or four 
months. Every effort possible has been made to make the 
trips attractive, interesting and instructive to visitors. 

The company has issued a booklet, printed in both English 
and Spanish, describing the new service and the more im- 
portant points of interest, which are illustrated by halftone 
engravings. 

Mr. Harro Harrsen is general manager of the Mexico 
Electric Tramways. 



DETROIT COUNCIL COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS TRAIL. 



The streets committee of the Detroit common council was 
recently appointed to visit a number of cities where T-rail 
is used by the street railway companies. This committee 
will advise the council in regard to the application of the 
Detroit United Railway for permission to reconstruct its tracks 
on Jefferson avenue, using T-rail in place of the grooved 
girder rail now required by ordinance. This committee after 
an inspection of the tracks in Grand Rapids, Milwaukee, St. 
Paul and Minneapolis, on December 27, submitted the follow- 
ing report, advising that the company be permitted to use 
the T-rail: 

In Grand Rapids the company operating the street railway 
system uses a 91-pound T-rail, laid on a gravel foundation, 
using a special grooved granite block, which takes the place 
of the iron groove in the rail used by the local company. In 
this instance the granite block is not laid under the head of 
the rail, but a cement mortar is placed against the web of 
the rail to take up the space under the head or top of rail, 
and the granite grooved block is then laid next to the mortar, 
which is done for the purpose of not disturbing the pavement 
should there occur a depression of the track. 

In Milwaukee the company operating the railway system 
uses a 97-pound T-rail, laid on a 6-inch concrete foundation. 
As to the pavement between the track the company uses an 
arched or circular section which gives a crown in the pave- 
ment nearly equal to the head or top of rail, which construc- 
tion in the judgment of your committee is undesirable. 

In St. Paul and Minneapolis the street railway systems 
are operated by one company, called the Twin City Rapid 
Transit Company. They use a 91-pound T-rail with a 6-inch 
base, 7 inches in depth, same as other cities visited. A gravel 
foundation is used throughout the entire systems, except in 
the central portions of each city, where a concrete foundation 
is used. Granite block is used almost entirely in both of 
said cities, but the same, while grooved, is laid against the 
web and under the head of rail instead of being laid away from 
rail as is done in Grand Rapids, using a flat section across 
tracks, so that the groove of the granite block takes the 
place of the steel groove of the rail used in our city. 

The sum and substance of the conditions in all cities are 
these: The companies use a 60-foot 7-inch T-rail, weighing 
from 91 to 97 pounds per yard. In Grand Rapids, Milwaukee, 
St. Paul and Minneapolis the companies use the cast welded 
joint, while in Grand Rapids they also use what is called a 
continuous joint. 

The cast welded joint is exceptionally well thought of in 
those cities, because of the smooth riding and continuity of 
the track, and also because the pavements have seldom, if 
ever, to be disturbed to bond the rails with copper wire for 
the conveyance of the electrical current and it is stated that 
less than 1 per cent of these joints require any further atten- 
tion. The continuous joint is also held in high regard, but 
your committee is of the opinion that, while both of the 
methods employed have given good results, neither one or 
the other should be specified. Inasmuch as the company 
has taken the initiative in this matter, we believe that they 
will use whichever joint is best adapted to local conditions, 
and we therefore recommend that the commissioner of public 
works grant said company permission to reconstruct the tracks 
on Jefferson avenue, from Woodward to Beaufait avenues, on 
the express condition that the company use a 60-foot 7-inch 
T-rail. weighing from 91 to 97 pounds, using granite block 
between tracks and IS inches outside. 



No action has yet been taken by the council on the report. 
The company is favorably impressed with the T-rail and 
wishes to make an experiment with it, believing that it 
possesses the following advantages over the grooved rail: 

1. It will reduce maintenance cost and require no atten- 
tion in keeping clean. 

2. It will reduce noise, the flanges having only one sur- 
face to grind against as opposed to two and in places three 
surfaces with the grooved rail. 

3. It will require less attention to paving because, with- 
the foundation material upon which the company has to 
build — a Canadian or blue clay of a plastic nature — it is hard 
to maintain the alignment even on the most solidly build 
subbed, and the slightest shifting causes cracks and seams or 
"bulges" in the paving material, requiring constant repairs. 

4. It will be less damaging to rolling stock because there 
is no groove to become clogged, causing jars by an uneven 
surface. 



DIRECTORY OF ELECTRIC RAILWAY ASSOCIATIONS. 



American Street and Interurban Railway Association. 
Secretary, Bernard V. Swenson, 29 West Thirty-ninth street, 
New York. 

American Street and Interurban Railway Accountants' 
Association. Secretary, Elmer M. White, 29 West Thirty- 
ninth street, New York. 

American Street and Interurban Railway Claim Agents' 
Association. Secretary, B. B. Davis, claim adjuster Columbus 
Railway & Light Company, Columbus, O. 

American Street and Interurban Railway Engineering As 
sociation. Secretary, J. W. Corning, electrical engineer Bos 
ton Elevated Railway, Boston, Mass. 

American Street and Interurban Railway Manufacturers 
Association. Secretary, George Keegan, 2321 Park Row build 
ing, New York, N. Y. 

California Electric Railway Association. Secretary 
L. E. W. Pioda, Oak and Broderick streets, San Francisco, Cal 

Canadian Street Railway Association. Secretary, Acton 
Burrows, 157 Bay street, Toronto, Ont. 

Central Electric Railway Association. Secretary, W. F. 
Milholland. secretary and treasurer Indianapolis Traction & 
Terminal Company, Indianapolis, Ind. Next meeting, Day- 
ton, O., January 23, 1908. 

Colorado Electric Light Power and Railway Association. 
Secretary, John F. Dostal, Denver Gas & Electric Company, 
Denver, Colo. 

Electric Railway Shop Foremen's Association. Secretary, 
J. R. Case, Public Service Corporation of New Jersey, Newark, 
N. J. 

Iowa Street and Interurban Railway Association. Secre- 
tary, L. D. Mathes, general manager Union Electric Company, 
Dubuque, la. 

Massachusetts Street Railway Association. Secretary, 
Charles S. Clark, 70 Kilby street, Boston, Mass. Meetings 
held in Boston on second Wednesday of each month, except 
July and August. 

Michigan Electrical Association. Secretary, A. C. Mar- 
shall, Port Huron, Mich. 

Missouri Electric Light Gas and Street Railway Associa- 
tion. Secretary, Charles Z. Pierson, St. Charles Electric Light 
& Power Company, St. Charles, Mo. 

National Amusement Park Association. Secretary, C. H. 
Oberheide, Trenton, N. J. Annual meetings, third Tuesday of 
each November. 

New England Street Railway Club. Secretary, John J. 
Lane, 12 Pearl street, Boston, Mass. Meetings held on fourth 
Thursday of every month. 

Northwestern Electrical Association. Secretary, R. N. 
Kimball, Kenosha, Wis. Annual meeting, Milwaukee, Wis. 
January 15 and 16, 1908. 

Oklahoma Electric Light, Railway and Gas Association 
Secretary, Charles W. Ford, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Pennsylvania Street Railway Association. Secretary 
Charles H. Smith, superintendent Lebanon Valley Street Rail 
way, Lebanon, Pa. 

Southwestern Electrical and Gas Association. Secretary 
R. B. Stichter, Dallas Tex. 

Street Railway Association of the State of New York 
Secretary, J. H. Pardee, 611 West One Hundred and Thirty 
seventh street, New York, N. Y. 

Wisconsin Electric and Interurban Railway Association. 
Secretary, Clement C. Smith, president Columbia Construction 
Company, Milwaukee, Wis. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



49 



RECENT ELECTRIC RAILWAY LEGAL DECISIONS. 



BY J. L. KOSESBERGER, I.L. B., OK THE CHICAGO lull. 



Transfer Sufficiently Requested. 
Sullivan v. Brooklyn Heights Railroad Company, 106 New 
York Supplement, 378. — The supreme court of New York, 
appellate division, second department, holds that a passenger 
adequately requested a transfer from the conductor at the time 
he paid his fare, where it appeared that he gave to the con- 
ductor a transfer he had. and held out his hand to receive 
another, when the conductor, muttering something, passed on. 



No Reason to Stop When Way Seemed Clear. 
Hess v. United Railways Company, 105 Southwestern Re- 
porter, 277. — The St. Louis court of appeals holds that there 
was no apparent danger of a collision which ought to have 
induced a motorman to stop, where the testimony went to show 
that as the car started to go by a wagon the pathway was 
clear, with nothing in the situation to suggest danger of a 
collision, and that the accident occurred by a sudden move- 
ment of the horse while the car was passing. 

Neighboring Property Benefits from Improving Street So That 
Street Railway Seeks Extension. 
In re Harvard Avenue North, 92 Pacific Reporter, 410. — 
The supreme court of Washington says that it was urged that 
the improvement for which an assessment had been approved 
was of little, if any, benefit to the property included within 
the assessment district, and that it would be of no practical 
benefit to any one except to the street railway company.' The 
Improvement, it was true, might afford the railway company 
more convenient facilities for the extension and construction 
of its line; but such fact did not establish that benefit did not 
accrue to the property in the district. The mere fact that a 
street is so improved that a street railway seeks to extend 
its line thereon may well be considered as an element of 
special benefit to the neighboring property. 



Liability for Assault of Conductor on Passenger Waiting for 
Transfer After Alighting. 
Blomsness v. Puget Sound Electric Railway, 92 Pacific Re- 
porter, 414. — The supreme court of Washington says that the 
testimony of the plaintiff was to the effect that at the time 
he paid his fare to the conductor he asked for a transfer and 
the conductor replied, saying: "I will give you that between 
Georgetown and Seattle;" that he did not see the conductor as 
he was issuing transfers; that he saw the conductor and 
asked him for a transfer just before the train stopped; that 
when it stopped the conductor told him to step to one side, and 
that another request for a transfer was followed with some 
words and the conductor struck him over the head with a 
lantern. The court thinks that, under all authority and in 
accordance with principles of right, the plaintiff should be 
deemed a passenger at the time of the assault and should be 
allowed to recover damages. 



for both man and car, whether there was any car which was 
liable to injure him. Not having exercised this ordinary cau- 
tion, the court thinks that the plaintiff, such a pedestrian, was 
undoubtedly guilty of contributory negligence, and that a judg- 
ment was properly entered in favor of the defendant. 



Duty of Pedestrians Walking on or Near Tracks Owing to 
Obstructions in Streets. 
Mey v. Seattle Electric Company, 92 Pacific Reporter, 
283. — The supreme court of Washington holds that where a 
street was more or less occupied by debris, but there was 
room for a pedestrian to step out of danger every few steps 
along such route, the motorman of a car going in the same 
direction might well be justified in concluding that he would 
step out of the way of the car, instead or remaining on the 
track, or so close to the track that he would be run down by 
it. It thinks that it was the plain duty of the pedestrian, 
while traveling in close proximity to the street railway track 
in a place where he knew that cars were passing at short 
intervals, to have exercised the ordinary caution of noticing, 
when he passed those points where there w r as not room enough 



City Necessary Party for Settlement of Controversy Between 
Companies. 
Tacoma Railway & Power Company v. Pacific Traction 
Company, 150 Federal Reporter, 259. — The United States cir- 
cuit court, in Washington, holds that in a controversy between 
two rival street railway companies as to the right to occupy 
with railway tracks the center of a public street the court 
cannot determine that controversy where there is an unsettled 
controversy between the city government and the complain- 
ant concerning the matter and the city is not made a party 
to the suit. 



Company's Possession of Tracks Presumed to be Exclusive. 
Jennings v. Brooklyn Heights Railroad Company, 106 New 
York Supplement, 279. — The supreme court of New York, ap- 
pellate division, second department says that the allegation of 
the complaint that the defendant had an electric railroad 
through Thirty-ninth street for the carrying of passengers 
having been admitted by the defendant's answer, the court 
could not presume that some other railroad company also ran 
its cars over the defendant's tracks. It was therefore not 
necessary for the plaintiff to show that the car that hurt him 
was the defendant's. That fact followed from the fact that 
the railroad tracks were the defendant's. If there was evi- 
dence of the cars of another company running over the 
defendant's tracks, the case might be different; but that fact 
was not to be presumed. The presumption was to the con- 
trary, namely, that the defendant's possession was exclusive. 
No other company could be running cars over the defendant's 
tracks except by its consent. Its right and possession must 
at first have been exclusive, and the presumption was of 
continuance, not of change. 



Inexperience of Motorman and Absence of Conductor May be 
Considered in Determining Whether Car was at Full 

Stop or Not. 
Shepherd v. Lincoln Traction Company, 113 Northwestern 
Reporter, 627. — The supreme court commissioners of Nebraska 
say that it was natural, therefore probable, that an inex- 
perienced motorman would be more likely to mismanage the 
car upon which the plaintiff was riding than one of much 
experience. His want of acquaintance with the route and the 
crossings where stops were to be made, especially on a dark 
night, would more likely lead to his confusion and inability to 
handle the car with the same degree of care as one of more 
experience. So, also, the presence of a conductor, whose 
business it was to direct the halting and starting of the car 
by signals given the motorman, would tend greatly to increase 
the probability of the car being -handled in the careful man- 
ner that would not otherwise obtain. This being so, these 
were circumstances which the court might properly direct 
the jury they were at liberty to consider in determining 
whether the witnesses for the plaintiff or defendant were most 
likely to be correct upon the question of whether the car 
had been brought to a halt at the time the plaintiff attempted 
to alight therefrom, and had been suddenly started while she 
was in the act of getting off. The probability that an in- 
experienced rnotorman, having no assistance from a conductor 
in the management of his car, would be likely to mismanage 
the same to the injury of some of the passengers, was a cir- 
cumstance which might properly be considered in support of 
those witnesses who testified to mismanagement, in opposition 
to those who testified that there was no mismanagement on 
the part of the motorman. There was a conflict which the 
jury had to determine. Any fact or circumstance which would 
aid them in that duty was relevant to the issue, and was for 



50 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



their consideration. Any circumstance which rendered more 
probable the fact testified to by one set of witnesses, when 
opposed to that of another set, was a relevant fact proper to be 
considered. 



Liability for Injury from Defective Gate as an Appliance. 

Stappers v. Interurban Street Railway Company, 106 New 
York Supplement, S54. — The city court of New York, trial 
term, holds that if a gate upon a surface street car is within 
the definition of "defective machinery, imperfect cars and 
other conditions endangering the success of the undertaking," 
it is within the rule requiring "the highest degree of care 
which human prudence and foresight can suggest." A gate on 
the side of an electric surface car is an appliance. It is a part 
of the car attached to it by hinges, and, when shut, fixed at 
the other end by a hook. It is part of the machinery "availed 
of for the operation of the railroad." When the car is crowded 
a defective gate may lead to most serious injury, and its im- 
proper maintenance cause "loss of life or limb to the traveling 
public." The condition of travel shown required the utmost 
care in the maintenance of the gates on the street cars of this 
city. A secure gate is "essential to safety of operation." 
Whether the company met this obligation was properly sub- 
' mitted to the jury. 

A passenger is not called upon to provide against a de- 
fective appliance, unless such defect is shown to have been 
known, or under the circumstances should have been observed, 
by him. The only precaution which could be taken against 
a concealed defect in an appliance would be to refrain from 
riding on the car. Lack of proof, therefore, that the plaintiff 
took precaution against negligent operation does not require 
that the complaint be dismissed, or that a verdict be directed 
for the defendant, where the cause of action is based upon 
the defendant's negligence in maintaining an appliance. The 
question for the jury was, as charged, whether the defendant 
exercised the skill, care and foresight in the maintenance of 
this appliance for the protection of its passengers required 
by law, and, if not. whether the plaintiff's injuries were caused 
solely by such careless maintenance. 



Liability for Injuries from Motorman Leaving Controller and 
Passenger Turning on Power. 

.Moouey v. Seattle, Renton & Southern Railway. 92 Pacific 
Reporter, 408. — The supreme court of Washington says that 
the defendant's car line between the city of Seattle and the 
town of Renton descends from Jackson street to Dearborn 
street, a distance of four blocks, at a grade of 11 per cent. At 
Dearborn street a switch turns the south-bound cars to the 
right-hand track as you go south, and from that point a double 
track is maintained. The plaintiff became a passenger on an 
outgoing car. The seats were all filled, and passengers were 
standing in the aisle and on the front and back platforms. 
The plaintiff occupied a standing position on the back platform 
near the car door. As the car passed Jackson street, the 
motorman set the brakes, turned off the power, and left his 
post at the controller to close a gate at the side of the car. 
While thus engaged, one of the passengers stepped up to the 
controller, released the brakes, and turned on the power. As 
he did so, the car shot ahead and soon attained a speed of 
from 25 to 30 miles per hour, and as it rounded the curve onto 
the switch at Dearborn street, the plaintiff was hurled from 
the car. 

At the time of the trial, some nine months after the acci- 
dent, the plaintiff was seriously crippled and unable to perform 
labor or follow his usual occupation, that of barbering. He 
recovered a judgment for $5,000 damages, from which the trial 
court required a remission of $1,500. The judgment for $3,500 
is here affirmed. 

In the supreme court's opinion, a motorman in charge of a 
car loaded with passengers, who sets his brakes, turns off his 
power, permits his car to descend an 11 per cent grade without 



a guiding hand, leaves his controller surrounded by passen- 
gers, any one of whom may release the brakes or turn on the 
power at will, and goes so far from his post of duty that he 
cannot return thereto until the car has sped a distance of four 
or five blocks, without some controlling necessity for such 
action on his part, is guilty of gross and inexcusable neglect; 
and the defendant could not be prejudiced by any charge the 
court might give on the question of its negligence. 



Duty of Motorman Observing a Horse or Team Manifesting 
Fright. 

Metropolitan Street Railway Company v. Fawcett, 92 Pa- 
cific Reporter, 543. — The supreme court of Kansas holds that 
in an action brought by the driver of a carriage against a 
street car company for personal injuries resulting from a col- 
lision between the carriage and a car, evidence is pertinent 
of the management of the car and of the conduct of the 
driver from the time the horse manifested such fear of the 
approaching car as should have attracted the attention of the 
motorman to the time of the collision. It says that it may be 
asserted as a general proposition of law that whenever a 
motorman in charge of a swiftly running car observes, and 
he must constantly watch, a horse or team which is being 
driven in close proximity to the car track and which mani- 
fests fright, it is his duty to reduce his speed preparatory to 
a sudden stop, if it becomes necessary. His precaution should 
be proportionate to the apparent danger. If it be generally 
true that a single driving horse, frightened by an object ap- 
proaching from the front, is more difficult to control than a 
double team, and more likely to wheel so suddenly around as 
to upset the carriage and its occupants, the motorman must 
recognize this fact and act accordingly. 



Enforcement of Ordinance Requiring Stops Will Not be En- 
joined. 

Georgia Railway & Electric Company v. Town of Oakland 
City, .j9 Southeastern Reporter, 296. — The supreme court of 
Georgia says that the municipal authorities passed an ordi- 
nance requiring street cars traversing a street named to be 
stopped at the points already in use (except one) and also at 
three additional points to receive passengers who might there 
seek to board such cars, and signal or give notice of their 
intention to do so. The company filed an equitable petition, 
seeking to enjoin the enforcement of the ordinance by frequent 
arrests and trials of its employes for violating it. The petition 
alleged that the ordinance was void on the grounds that it was 
unconstitutional, that the defendant had no power under its 
charter to enact the ordinance, and that such ordinance was 
unreasonable. It was claimed that to allow such arrests and 
prosecutions would cause a multiplicity of cases, would inter- 
fere with the running of its cars and schedules, and disarrange 
the schedules established by the company. The evidence was 
conflicting as to the necessity or convenience of making the 
stops at the fixed places.. 

Without determining whether the ordinance complained of 
was valid or not or whether it was in whole or in part unrea- 
sonable, the court says that the facts of this case were not such 
as to require the reversal of a judgment refusing an injunction. 
The general rule is that a court of equity has no jurisdiction to 
enjoin criminal prosecutions; and this rule is applicable to 
proceedings to punish for violations of municipal ordinances, 
which are quasi criminal in their nature. The cases in which 
proceedings to enforce such ordinances will be enjoined are 
exceptional in character. There was no effort to take away 
property or property rights, or to destroy or substantially 
impair a franchise. The ordinance was a police regulation of 
travel in the street of a municipality. It was not shown that 
any irreparable injury would result; but, at most, a small inter- 
ference with the schedules which the company desired to main- 
tain, while the cases made against its employes proceeded to 
trial when the validity of the ordinance could be tested. 



January 11. 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



51 



News of the Week 



Brooklyn Tunnel Opened. 

Tin- extension of the [nterborougb Rapid Transit subway 
under the East river from the Battery to the Borough hall in 
Brooklyn was opened for regular passenger traffic shortly 
after midnight on Thursday of this week. Trains had been 
run through the tunnel for several days to familiarize the 
trainmen with the situation and to allow the company's offi- 
Clals and prominent engineers to inspect the tunnel. The 
operation of the tunnel has been looked forward to by the 
residents of Brooklyn for several years and was received with 
great joy, as it is expected to relieve to a considerable extent 
the great congestion of traffic at the Brooklyn bridge. Plans 
have been made for a formal celebration of the event. Gen- 
eral Manager Frank Hedley of the [nterborough Rapid Transit 
Company has announced that all Lenox avenue and West 
Farms express trains will run through to Borough hall, while 
the Rroadway expresses will turn at the Batter} as formerly. 
Hut after the express trains are discontinued at night the 
Lenox avenue and West Farms locals will run to Brooklyn 
and the Broadway locals to the Battery only. When the ex- 
press i rains an' in operation all local trains will turn at the 
Citj hall loop. 

Improvements at the Brooklyn Bridge Terminal. 

Elevated trains on the Brooklyn bridge came 100 feet 
farther over Park row at the Manhattan end of the bridge on 
January 4 than ever before. The extension of the island plat- 
form was opened for the first time and the slips now extend 
across Park row. Work has been begun on new loop tracks 
at the Brooklyn end of the bridge and within a few days a 
new system of running trains and trolley cars across the 
bridge will be installed. 

The east end of the island platform at the Manhattan end 
is being cut off to make room for additional switches be- 
tween the island, incoming and outgoing platforms, and when 
the entire length of the extension across Park row is com- 
pleted there will be room in the slip for an additional car and 
6-car trains will be run over the bridge instead of 5-car trains. 

As soon as the new trolley tracks are laid at the Brooklyn 
end of the bridge a trolley service similar to that on the 
Williamsburg bridge will be installed. There will be bridge 
trolleys running at about 1-minute intervals, which will go 
only from one end of the bridge to the other and back. These 
will carry all local bridge passengers for a 2V&-cent fare. 

When the local trolleys are started there will be no more 
local elevated trains. All local passengers will be carried on 
the trolleys and all elevated trains will be through trains dur- 
ing the rush hours as at other hours of the day. 

New York City Railway Receivers Protest Against Order of 
Commission. 

Adrian H. Joline and Douglas Robinson, receivers for the 
New York City Railway, have sent a communication to the 
public service commission replying to the order of the com- 
mission that all of the company's cars shall be sent to the 
repair shops and completely overhauled at the rate of 10 a 
day. The letter states: 

"We do not concede the correctness of the recital of fact 
contained in your order to the effect that the equipment, ap- 
pliances and devices in question are unsafe or improper, or 
that the repairs directed by said order ought reasonably to 
be made to promote the security of the public, or that the 
time given within which to make such repairs is reasonable. 

"As stated in our letter to you of December 20, we have 
been engaged since our appointment in pushing as vigorously 
as possible, with all available means at our command, the 
work of repair and maintenance of the rolling stock operated 
by us. Although laboring under great disadvantages, we have 
made notable progress so that by the early part of December 
the number of cars disabled on the road had been reduced 
to less than half the number disabled under similar conditions 
immediately prior to the receivership. While admitting that 
for causes entirely beyond our control the rolling stock is in 
many respects inadequate, we take issue with the statement 
that it has been at any time during the receivership, or is now. 
unsafe either for the public or our employes. Our entire 
effort has been directed (and we think successfully) toward 
giving the best possible service to the public consistent with 
the physical facilities and money which we have had at our 
disposal. The equipment has been rehabilitated as rapidly as 
was possible under the circumstances, having due considera- 
tion to the necessities and conveniences of the traveling pub- 
lic. We cannot promise or undertake, with the facilities and 



resources at our command, a full and literal compliance with 
the provisions of your order." 

The receivers are also ordered to notify the commission 
daily of the number of cars repaired and the number of cars 
rim into I he shops for repairs. 

Philadelphia Strike Averted. 

The difference between the Philadelphia Rapid 
Company and its employes, who have recently organized a 
blanch of the carmen's union and have for several weeks been 
threatening a strike, were settled on Tuesday by the Inter 
vention of Mayor Reyburn. It is now stated that all possi- 
bility of a strike has been averted. The mayor, at the in 
stance of the Central Labor 1'nion, addressed a letter to .1 I: 
Parsons, president of the company, asking for the reinstate 
meiii of 65 men. said to have been discharged for joining the 
union. He also stated what the men considered their griev- 
ances and asked thai the companj arrange for a settlement 
of the difficulties in the interests of the public. Mr I' 
immediately replied to the mayor, agreeing to reinstall' Is ol the 
< ". . men. who, he said, bad been discharged for "neglecting the 
interests of the company for others which they deemed more 
important." The other 17 men were discharged for other 
causes and will not be reinstated. With regard to the othei 
grievances of the men Mr. Parsons' letter was as follows: 

"We never, in a proper sense, have refused to hear an 
appeal from our employes, and any suggestions which they 
make as to schedule will receive our careful considers 
tion. In order that this matter may be taken up regularly 
the company will fix one day a month, when any discharged 
employe or any employe with a grievance may appear before 
the general manager, either alone or accompanied by a com- 
mittee of, say, three of his coemployes, to present any appeal 
or suggestions touching their relations with the company. 
With regard, however, to an increase in wages, I have already 
explained to you that the present financial conditions of the 
company make it impossible." 

Strike on Local Lines of the Indiana Union Traction Company. 

The strike of the motormen and conductors employed on 
the local lines of the Indiana Union Traction Company, which 
was declared on January 1, as reported in last week's issue of 
the Electric Railway Review, has developed into such a 
serious situation as to require the use of the militia and prac- 
tically suspend business in Muncie. The most serious trouble 
has occurred at Muncie, but Anderson and Marion have also 
been affected by the strike. As previously stated, the diffi- 
culty has been caused by the company's signing a wage con- 
tract with the Brotherhood of Interurban Trainmen, of which 
the majority of its employes are members, instead of with the 
Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Railway Em- 
ployes, to which the local trainmen belong. The company's 
position is that it can recognize but one association and has 
consequently chosen the most representative. 

The developments of the first three days of the strike 
were reported in last week's issue. The places of the strikers 
in Anderson and Muncie were taken by professional strike- 
breakers from Chicago, whose presence so inflamed the mob 
of unemployed men at Muncie, where they are especially 
numerous, that the company found it impossible to run its 
cars. In the riots on Wednesday and Thursday of last week 
several cars were damaged and several persons were shot by 
the strike-breakers. It is noteworthy that the striking em- 
ployes have been little in evidence and that nearly all of the 
violence has been at the hands of irresponsible labor en- 
thusiasts and sympathizers. 

Late Friday afternoon, when the company attempted to 
run cars, a mob of nearly 3,000 collected and in spite of the 
efforts of the local police authorities, the rioting became so 
serious that several companies of the Indiana National Guard, 
who had been stationed at Indianapolis in readiness, were 
required to restore order. At noon on Saturday Governor 
Hanly proclaimed martial law in Muncie and vicinity and 
the mayor ordered the saloons closed. Five hundred business 
men were sworn in as special deputies. With their assistance 
the police and the soldiers were able to prevent any serious 
outbreaks and the company resumed the operation of its cars. 
On Sunday the imported strike-breakers were returned to Chi- 
cago and regular uniformed men were placed on the cars, some 
of them being local men and others out-of-town men. who are 
said to have been permanently employed. On Monday cars 
were operated until 10:30 at night. This week obstructions 
have frequently been placed on the tracks, but nothing more 
serious has happened. 

On Saturday 27 members of the union at Marion declared 
a strike, but their places were readily filled and the service 
was only slightly disturbed. At Anderson there has been no 
violence, the strike taking the form of a boycott. At the re- 
quest of the citizens the strike-breakers were sent away last 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



week. On Monday a citizens' committee, appointed for the 
purpose ot urging the company to arbitrate, called upon Presi- 
dent A. W. Brady of the company. Mr. Brady informed the 
committee that it would be impossible to arbitrate because of 
the contract with the brotherhood. 

The company's interurban service has not been affected 
by the strike. This week the authorities at Muncie have at- 
tempted to effect some sort of a settlement, as business has 
been partially suspended and the expense of enforcing order 
has been very great. On Monday A. L. Behner and Frederick 
Fay, officers of the Amalgamated association, were ordered to 
leave the city by the local authorities, who declared that the 
men stood in the way of a settlement and were interfering 
with the peace of the community. On Tuesday Governor 
Hanly arrived in Muncie to investigate the situation per- 
sonally and the question of withdrawing a part of the soldiers 
was discussed. 

W. D. Mahon, president of the Amalgamated association, 
arrived in Muncie on Tuesday to take charge of the strike. 
The state labor commissioners tried to arrange a compromise 
whereby the company should sign a contract for the local 
men with the Amalgamated association and apply the contract 
with the brotherhood to the interurban service. Mr. Mahon 
declined to consider a compromise. 

Design of High-Voltage Power Stations. — On Monday. Jan- 
uary 13, David P. Rushmore. Schenectady, N. Y., will present 
a paper on "The Design of High-Voltage Power Stations" be- 
fore the Philadelphia section of the American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers. 

New Depot Route Established in Chicago. — The Chicago 
Union Traction Company has obtained permission from the 
board of supervising engineers to operate its North State 
street cars as far south as the Polk street station of the Chi- 
cago & Western Indiana Railroad. The cars will run south 
on State street to Washington, west to Dearborn and south to 
Polk. Heretofore the cars have stopped at State and Lake 
streets. 

New Haven Road Adopts Single-Phase Equipment for 
Branch Line. — The New York New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road has decided to change the equipment of its New Canaan 
branch, running from Stamford to New Canaan, Conn., 7% 
miles, from 600-volt direct current to 11,000-volt single-phase. 
Two trains, each consisting of a 60-ton motor car equipped 
with four 125-horsepower motors and a 30-ton trail car, will 
be operated. 

British Association Considers Brakes. — A committee of 
the Tramways and Light Railways Association of Great Brit- 
ain, which has for nearly a year been considering the subject 
of brakes for electric cars, is reported to have completed its 
investigations and a final report may be expected in a short 
time. The committee has been co-operating with the board 
of trade in the matter and has inspected a large number of 
new types of brakes. 

International Electrical Exposition. — An international ex- 
position devoted to the various applications of electricity will 
be opened at Marseilles, France, on April 19, 1908, and will 
extend until October 31. The exposition will be held at Pare 
du Rond-Point du Prado and will be under the patronage of 
the municipality and the chamber of commerce of Marseilles, 
of the men received the rewards. This. is the fifth year the 
company has made a distribution of this kind. 

Amarillo (Tex.) Electric Line Opened. — A party composed 
of officials, Amarillo business men and newspaper representa- 
tives, made a trip over the line on January 2, in the first car 
to he operated since the road was completed. Eleven miles of 
track has been laid, all of which was found to be in excellent 
condition and, with the exception of one section which will use 
a crossing not yet completed under the Santa Fe tracks, was 
pronounced ready for the formal opening. This will take place 
during the Panhandle jubilee which will be held in that city 
on January 9, 10 and 11. 

Inspection of Interlocking Devices Required. — The Indiana 
railroad commission has adopted a new set of rules which 
require that all companies having charge of the maintenance 
and operation of interlocking devices shall inspect these 
plants monthly, and shall report to the commission not later 
than the first day of the succeeding month. The rules also 
provide that all steam and interurban companies interested 
in the operation of such interlocking devices, but not charged 
with their maintenance and operation, shall inspect the plants 
once every 60 days and report the result to the commission. 

Omaha Line May Have Owl Car Service. — The advisability 
of starting owl car service on several of the street railway 
lines of the Omaha & Council Bluffs Street Railway will be 



discussed at the annual meeting of stockholders to be held on 
January 13, next. If this practice is decided upon hourly 
service following the discontinuance of frequent traffic at 1 
o'clock probably will be maintained until regular day service 
is resumed at 5:30. The operation of owl cars is made pos- 
sible by the recent installation of power storage equipment 
at the new Lake street substation, which will permit closing 
down the main power house until the day traffic is resumed. 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Toledo Sec- 
tion. — The regular monthly meeting of the Toledo section of 
the American Institute of Electrical Engineers was held Friday 
evening, January 3, 1908, in the Builders' Exchange. Reports 
were submitted by H. B. Dorman for the membership commit- 
tee and by George E. Kirk as to the meetings. Officers of the 
section for the year were elected as follows: Chairman, C. R. 
McKay, electrical engineer Toledo Railways & Light Com- 
pany; vice-chairman of the section and chairman of the pro- 
gramme committee, M. W. Hanson; secretary, George E. Kirk; 
chairman of the membership committee. H. B. Dorman; treas- 
urer, Emil Gran. 

Chicago Federation of Labor Advocates Regulating Or- 
dinances. — The Chicago Federation of Labor at its meeting on 
January 5 adopted resolutions advocating two ordinances 
which are to be recommended to the local transportation com- 
mittee of the Chicago city council. The first proposed or- 
dinance would limit the number of passengers to be carried 
by a street car to the number of seats provided in the car and 
prohibit the admission of more than 100 persons at a time to 
the station platforms of the elevated roads. The second pro- 
vides that all lines operating under city franchises be com- 
pelled to furnish "delay checks" to passengers entitling them 
to transportation on another line in the event of any unfore- 
seen delay. 

Park Improvements at Grand Rapids. — The Grand Rapids 
Railway is planning a large number of improvements to be 
made before summer at Ramona park, located near Grand 
Rapids, Mich. Several new concessions will be let and it is 
planned to erect a "shoot the chutes." The principal improve- 
ments, however, will be made at Manhattan beach, across the 
lake from Ramona park, the terminal of the railway line. At 
this point a large pavilion will be erected which will contain 
a dance hall and other summer resort amusement features. 
Eighty new bathhouses will be erected for the use of men 
and 40 for women. The line of beach will be extended and 
new steamboat docks will be built. The company is also 
planning for improvements at North park, about three miles 
north of the city on Grand river. 

Recent Accidents. — A head-on collision occurred between 
a passenger and a freight car of the Evansville & Mt. Vernon 
Electric Railway at Ford's station, 10 miles east of Evansville, 
Ind., on January 4. One passenger was killed and several 
injured. The accident occurred on a single track at a point 
near where the cars had been ordered to meet. A heavy fog 
is said to have caused the accident. — Twenty-two persons 
were injured at Savannah, Ga., on January 4, in a rear-end 
collision on the West Savannah line of the Savannah Electric 
Company. The accident was caused by the slipping of a 
trolley wheel on the forward car, which put out the lights 
and rendered it invisible to a small car crowded with passen- 
gers that was rapidly following. The front end of this car 
was badly damaged. None of the passengers was seriously 
injured. 

Discussion on New York Subway Plans. — Comptroller Metz 
of New York City has announced his opposition to the plans 
of the public service commission for the Broadway-Lexing- 
ton avenue subway route, which was described in last week's 
issue of the Electric Railway Review. Mr. Metz says the city 
has no money to build any more subways at present and that 
new plans should not be considered until the Brooklyn Fourth 
avenue route, for which plans have been approved and money 
appropriated, has been built. Chairman Willcox of the com- 
mission states that the new route will in no way interfere 
with the Brooklyn subway; that the plans for the latter are 
being revised and bids will be asked for and contracts let as 
soon as the changes have been made. He says that as soon 
as the plans for the Broadway-Lexington route are prepared 
they will be submitted to the board of estimate for such action 
as it may see fit to take. 

Ordinance to Regulate San Francisco Service. — M. I. Sulli- 
van of the San Francisco board of supervisors has submitted 
to the board a draft of an ordinance to regulate the operation 
of street cars in the city. The proposed ordinance provides: 
That the company shall build a power house of sufficient 
capacity to insure power for the operation of sufficient cars to 
carry all passengers with speed and comfort; that no car shall 



January 11, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



53 



carry more standing than sitting passengers; that each car 
shall carry a destination sign at night which may be read 
at a distance of 300 feet and be equipped with fenders two 
inches above the tracks; that air brakes shall be inspected 
daily. Further provisions limit the speed of cars, fix a 
schedule showing the number of cars to be operated and pro- 
vide for universal transfer rules and complete monthly reports 
to the board, etc. 

Officials of Central Illinois Traction Company Reindicted 
for Charleston Wreck. — The grand jury at Mattoon, 111., that 
last. October indicted the directors and two employes of the 
Central Illinois Traction Company on account of the disastrous 
accident of August 30, met again on January 6 and reindicted 
those who were originally indicted. The indictments against 
the officials and directors were made more comprehensive 
than before by making them read for manslaughter and crim- 
inal negligence instead of for manslaughter alone. Those in- 
dicted are: Judge Peter S. Grosscup. .Marshall E. Sampsell, 
A. W. Underwood. F. M. Peabody and E. A. Potter of Chicago, 
and Fred Moore of Charleston. The two motormen were also 
indicted for manslaughter. The action of the grand jury has 
occasioned some surprise, as the various claims against the 
company were all settled last Saturday for $41,000. It is 
stated that physicians who attended the wreck victims will 
sue the company for claims aggregating $3,000. 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers. — A meeting of 
the American Institute of Electrical Engineers was held in the 
auditorium of the Engineering Societies building, 33 West 
Thirty-ninth street, New York City, on Friday, January 10. 
The programme as announced included the following papers: 
"The New Haven System of Single-Phase Distribution, with 
Special Reference to Sectionalization," by W. S. Murray, elec- 
trical engineer New York New Haven & Hartford Railroad; 
"A Single-Phase Railway Motor," by E. F. Alexanderson, elec- 
trical engineer General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 
A special meeting of the "institute will be held in the audi- 
torium of the Engineering Societies building, on Friday, 
January 24. At this-meeting the following papers will ba^'pre- 
sented for discussion: "Electrical Engineering Education," by 
Charles P. Steinmetz, chief electrician General Electric Com- 
pany. Schenectady, N. Y.: "The Best Engineering Education," 
by Charles F. Scott, consulting engineer Westinghouse Electric 
& Manufacturing Company, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Consider Chicago Loop Problem. — A meeting of the local 
transportation committee of the Chicago city council was held 
on Thursday of this week to consider steps to be taken to 
relieve the congestion on the Union elevated loop. It was 
decided to take action as soon as possible and to hold another 
meeting on February 1 to consider the plans of the railroad 
officials. President M. B. Starring of the Northwestern Ele- 
vated Railroad, President H. G. Hetzler of the Metropolitan 
West Side Elevated Railway and President Charles V. Weston 
of the South Side Elevated Railroad were present at the meet- 
ing. Mr. Starring explained that his office is working on a 
plan for the extension of the station platforms as one step 
toward solving the problem. The other officials said that 
their offices also were considering plans and that they would 
prefer to have several conferences before presenting a com- 
posite proposition to the aldermen. "Enabling legislation by 
the council is now all that is necessary to permit the station 
platforms to be extended around the loop," said Chairman 
Milton J. Foreman of the committee. "It is certain that the 
committee will not consent to any so-called solution of the loop 
problem which will necessitate the erection of other elevated 
structures in the downtown district." 

Burning Coal Smokelessly. — Bulletin Xo. 15 of the En- 
gineering Experiment Station, University of Illinois, "How to 
Burn Illinois Coal Without Smoke," by L. P. Breckenridge, 
director, has just been issued. A few pages are devoted to 
the principles of combustion and the losses due to smoking 
chimneys, but the larger part of the bulletin relates to the 
constructive features of those boiler settings and furnaces 
that have been found practically smokeless in operation at 
the power plant and in the experiment station at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. The leading dimensions of the settings 
and furnaces are given and sectioned cuts show the general 
character of the settings. With each cut is given a statement 
as to the range of capacity of each setting for smokeless 
operation. Especial emphasis is given to the importance of 
knowing the rate at which the coal is to be burned on each 
square foot of grate surface, together with the per cent of 
volatile combustible which the coal contains, and for which 
a suitable combustion space or chamber must be provided. 
While this bulletin discusses the smokeless burning of Illinois 
coals, the principles and methods explained apply equally well 
to the burning of all kinds of soft coal. Copies of this bul- 
letin may be obtained gratis upon application. 



Traffic and Transportation 



Chicago Elevated Road Traffic. 

The total number of passengers carried in December on 
the South Side Elevated Railroad, Chicago, was 3,713,415 as 
compared with 2,951,590 in December, 1906. 

The Metropolitan West Side Elevated Railway carried 
4,579,406 passengers in December as compared with 4,829,475 
in December, 1906. 

The Northwestern Elevated Railroad carried 3,284,711 pas- 
sengers in December as compared with 2,942,028 in December, 
1906. 

Fares Raised on Massachusetts Road. 

Stone & Webster, general managers of the Blue Hill Street 
Railway of Canton, Mass., have announced that in order to 
preserve the road from bankruptcy, it is necessary to increase 
the fares from 5 to 6 cents. The increase has therefore been 
ordered. "The step of raising the fares is the only one left 
open to us at this time," said A. H. Warren of Stone & 
Webster. "The road is at present running at a loss. And I 
may say, many roads in this state are in the same position. A 
few are showing a surplus, some break about even and more 
still show a yearly deficit. There is not enough business." 

The Blue Hill company operates an electric railway from 
Mattapan, where it connects with the Boston Elevated Rail- 
way, through Canton to Stoughton, where connection is made 
with the Bristol & Norfolk Street Railway and the Old Colony 
Street Railway. 

Round-Trip Tickets Sold at Stations by Illinois Traction 
System. 

B. R. Stephens, general traffic manager Illinois Traction 
System, has sent us the following in explanation of the change 
in the method of selling tickets: 

"Since the opening of our lines west of Champaign in 
August, 1904, we have followed the policy of selling tickets at 
the terminal stations and also at some of the larger stations 
on our line, the latter particularly the county seats, while for 
the intermediate stations and country stops round-trip tickets 
were sold by the conductors on the cars. Our business has 
gradually increased until it has reached such volume that we 
found it impossible for the conductors to collect all of the 
fares and still handle these round-trip tickets, consequently we 
have placed the tickets on sale at all of our stations, generally 
on a commission basis, and for the benefit of our rural patrons 
we sell a $5.00 fare book at $3.75 net, which gives the same rate 
of fare as the round-trip tickets. These books are issued only 
to individuals and are limited to six months. We also sell a 
$10 fare book for $7.50 net, which is unlimited as to time of 
use and is good for an entire family." 

New York City Railway Receivers Reply to Order for Increased 
Service. 

A. H. Joline and Douglas Robinson, receivers for the New 
\ovk City Railway, have sent a letter to the New York public 
service commission, first district, in reply to the order for an 
increase in the number of cars on the Eighth avenue line. The 
letter states: 

"Your attention is called, for example, to the fact that the 
specification numbered 3, provided for running on Sundays 
south from One Hundred and Forty-ninth street to Thirteenth 
street not less than 600 cars, increases the service to an extent 
far in excess of the actual requirements. It is a well-known 
fact to all familiar with street railway management that the 
volume of traffic varies extremely on Sundays. The difference 
between rainy and pleasant Sundays as regards the number of 
passengers carried is often as great as 75 per cent. Under 
these circumstances to order a fixed number of car-miles to be 
operated on that day is, in our judgment, wholly unjustifiable. 
The proper operation of the road demands a reasonable flexi- 
bility in the service, so that the number of cars can be varied 
to meet its changing requirements. 

"You will observe by reference to three blue prints sub- 
mitted to you at your request, and showing the comparison 
between the seating capacity and the number of passengers 
riding on the Eighth avenue cars on Sunday, December 15 
i which was a stormy day), that these records show that suffi- 
cient seating capacity was afforded substantially all day. Not- 
withstanding this fact the specification of your order above 
referred to would require that approximately 3,600 car-miles 
per day should be operated in excess of the car mileage oper- 
ated on the Sunday in question. On the basis of 18 cents per 
car-mile this would mean an expenditure of approximately 
$34,000 a year. Considering the average number of stormy 



54 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



Sundays it is evident that a substantial sum of money will be 
practically wasted. In view of the present financial condi- 
tions and the difficulties which we are having in an endeavor 
to properly accommodate the public with the means at our dis- 
posal, it seems to us that such a requirement as the one in 
question is neither just, reasonable nor proper." 

Explains New Transfer System in Galveston, Tex. 

H. S. Cooper, manager of the Galveston (Tex.) Electric 
Company, had a signed statement in the Galveston News on 
January 1, in explanation of the new system of transfers which 
went into effect on that date. The statement says: 

"The term 'universal transfer' does not mean that a pas- 
senger can get on a car and obtain a transfer to any and every 
other line at any place of intersection. The object of the 
transfer is to allow a passenger to ride from one portion of the 
city to another portion of the city — 'in one general direction 
only' — for one fare. Anything further than this would not be 
equitable to the company, as it would allow passengers to get 
on a car near their residences or places of business, ask for a 
transfer on some other line that ran close to their residence 
or place of business, get off at the transfer point nearest that 
to which they wanted to go, transact business there and return 
to their residence or place of business on the transfer — having 
virtually obtained two complete rides in different 'general 
directions' for one fare, a manifest injustice to the company 
and a right not due the public. 

"Neither is the transfer intended to give a patron the 
privilege of getting on a car close to his residence or place of 
business, obtaining a transfer to a. line only a block or two 
away and riding from 5 to 20 blocks unnecessarily before he 
gets the line that will take him to his destination. No street 
railway system on earth will permit everybody to get on a car 
in front of their doors and be carried to the front door of the 
place to which they desire to go; this can only be done by 
private conveyance — and generally costs more than 5 cents! 
The street railway, being limited by tracks and fixed routes, 
can only carry its passengers on those fixed routes, and any- 
one who does not live directly on its lines is compelled to 
walk to and from them. 

"The 'time limit' of the transfer has been made particu- 
larly liberal. On every line the limit of time in which the trans- 
fer must be used has been made such that the passenger will 
be certain to catch a car on the connecting line within the 
time limit of the transfer just issued to him. The time limit 
is also arranged to take care of any slight, ordinary delay 
in the schedule of the first car, and where the first car is de- 
layed so long as to cause the time limit on a transfer, already 
issued to a passenger, to run out, the conductor will, upon 
request, issue a new transfer with proper time limit. 

"Some few persons may live in such locations and desire 
to travel to such points that the new system may benefit them 
but little, but it is the belief of the company that that part 
of the public will be very small. The company has tried to 
arrange this system for the convenience and saving of money 
of the many and not of the few. It has not tried to specially 
please or accommodate any particular section or sections, but 
to do the best it could for the most people. It has not tried 
to please everybody — that would be an impossibility, and to try 
it would please no one. 

"The company would ask of its patrons a little forbear- 
ance and patience in the matter until they and its employes 
are familiar with the matter. The conductors are as new to 
this transfer — in actual practice — as is the public, and, being 
human, will be liable to make errors. A very little time and 
some patience on the part of the public will get the system 
into smooth running order, and the company thinks that its 
patrons will fully appreciate the time and labor and expense 
that have been given by the company in preparing this new 
year gift for its patrons, a gift which is an appreciation of the 
patronage bestowed on it and carries with it the wish for a 
'happy and prosperous New Year' for all its patrons." 

May Abolish Transfers Between Third Avenue and New 
York City Roads. — As a result of the appointment of an inde- 
pendent receiver for the Third Avenue Railroad of New York 
transfers between that road and other lines in the New York 
City Railway system may be abolished. 

Meeting of Traffic Officials. — In view of the proposed 
formation of a traffic association at Dayton, O., on January 22, 
the programme for the annual meeting of the Central Electric 
Railway Association at the same place on January 23 includes 
several matters of especial interest to traffic officials. The 
programme is published in another part of this issue. 

Large Increase in Service Ordered. — The New York public 
service commission, first district, has issued orders to the 
Richmond Light & Railroad Company and the Staten Island 
Midland Railroad to increase the service to the extent of about 
25 per cent, and particularly providing that not less than two 



cars should leave St. George within five minutes after the 
arrival of the ferry boats from Manhattan. It was also ordered 
that all cars designated to run to St. George should be actually 
run over the elevated structure to the entrance of the ferry 
and not stopped at Jay street. 

Will Appeal for Rehearing of Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission Case. — The Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad 
will make application to the interstate commerce commission 
for a rehearing on the petition filed by that company to compel 
the Illinois Central Railroad to make through routes and joint 
rates on cabbage from points on the electric line to points on 
the steam road in the south. 

Springfield (Mass.) Street Railway Reduces Service. — On 
account of a noticeable decrease in travel on all lines, the 
Springfield (Mass.) Street Railway Company has decided to 
make several changes in schedule. Patrons of the Chicopee- 
Longmeadow line, by way of Glenwood, and the Feeding Hills 
line will be principally affected by the changes. While the 
morning, noon and early evening travel is heavy, traffic during 
the day and late evening is considerably lighter. 

Loss on Owl Cars. — A. G. Maish, general manager of the 
Des Moines (la.) City Railway, is quoted as saying that the 
operation of the owl cars costs the company about $25 per 
day above the income from them. He says that the nightly 
average number of patrons on the owl cars is about 200. 
The largest number is carried on the 1 o'clock cars. On the 
Highland Park line, as few as six people have been carried 
in a night, Mr. Maish says. 

Theater Train Service on the Spokane & Inland. — The 
Spokane & Inland Empire Railroad has issued an illustrated 
post card announcing the establishment of a new Saturday 
night theater train service for the accommodation of patrons on 
the Spokane & Inland division. The theater train will leave 
the Spokane terminal every Saturday night at 11:30, stopping 
at all points south to Palouse and Colfax. The card contains 
a programme of the principal attractions to be presented at the 
Spokane theaters during the present season. Reservations at 
any Spokane theater may be made through the station ticket 
agents. 

Reduced Fares for Uniformed Employes to be Discon- 
tinued. — T. K. Glenn, vice-president of the Georgia Railway & 
Electric Company of Atlanta, Ga., complying with the anti- 
pass rule of the Georgia railroad commission, has notified the 
postmaster of Atlanta and the Atlanta Gas Light Company 
that existing contracts for reduced fares for uniformed em- 
ployes will not be renewed at expiration. Mail carriers and 
uniformed employes of the gas company have been permitted 
to ride upon the payment by the government and the gas- 
company of $3.00 per month per man to the electric company. 
The contract with the gas company expires on February 1, 
1908. The contract with the government expires on Septem- 
ber 1, 1908. In future there will be no reduction in rates un- 
less the contract is approved by the railroad commission. 

Improved Service Demanded in Louisville, Ky. — Mayor 
Grinstead and members of the general council of Louisville, 
Ky., have demanded that the Louisville Railway make improve- 
ments in its schedule and establish a universal transfer sys- 
tem. The city authorities demand sufficient cars to provide all 
passengers with seats, and that there be no greater interval 
between cars during the day than 10 minutes. The company 
was also urged to issue transfers to permit passengers, if 
tracks do not intersect, but are within two blocks of each 
other, to leave one line and ride on cars on the other without 
the payment of additional fare. T. J. Minary, president of the 
company, announced that the preparation of a new schedule 
will be begun at once, but told the city officials that the 
directors would have to be consulted before any promises con- 
cerning a universal transfer system could be made. 



In accordance with an ordinance recently passed by the 
city council of Youngstown, O., the Mahoning & Shenango 
Railway & Light Company is equipping its city cars with 
fenders. The company has requested permission to use pilots 
on its interurban cars on account of their greater stability. 



A new artesian well of water with medicinal qualities 
has been discovered on the Ft. Des Moines line of the Des 
Moines City Railway. The company has announced that a 
depot and buildings will be erected at that point and if the 
demand warrants it a sanitarium will be established. 



The Illinois Traction System on January 1 instituted 
through service from Danville to Springfield, 111., via Decatur. 
The cars, which are called the "Capital City Limiteds," are 
handsome chair cars and make the run in 4 hours and 45 

minutes. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



55 



Construction News 



FRANCHISES. 

Berkeley, Cal. — The San Francisco Oakland & San Jose 
Railway Company has filed application for a 50-year franchise 
to build an electric line along Sacramento street from the 
i lakland line to the north end of Berkeley, serving that section 
to the north which has been donated for the proposed capitol 
site. Work is to be started within six months and completed 
within two years from the date of the franchise. The exten- 
sion will cost approximately $3,000,000, including equipment, 
and will form part of an extensive system of lines serving the 
region from the Berkeley hills to the bay and reaching to 
Richmond and the Contra Costa towns. J. Q. Brown, assist- 
ant general manager and purchasing agent, Oakland, Cal. 

Chicago, III. — An ordinance has been presented to the city 
council granting to the Chicago City Railway Company the 
right to lay tracks in Western avenue, from Thirty-eighth 
street and Archer avenue to Twenty-sixth street. If built the 
line will form a connection with the lines of the Union Trac- 
tion Company. 

Dallas, Tex. — L. Fulton, Dallas, Tex., and associates, have 
applied for a franchise to construct an electric railway in 
Dallas from Jefferson street south on Madison street and from 
Jefferson street south by way of Adams or Jackson street. It 
is stated that the line will be about 2% or 3 miles long, in a 
section of the city at present without street railway facilities, 
and if built will develop a large tract of land for residence 
purposes. Power for operating the line will be purchased. 

Phoenix, Ariz. — Application for a franchise to build an 
electric railway between Phoenix and Mesa, Ariz., by way of 
Tempe, has been made by Redmond Toohey and Harry J. Ben- 
nett, the line to be completed within three years. One per 
cent of the gross income after five years of operation is 
offered to the county. 

Racine, Wis. — A conditional franchise has been granted 
to the Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Company to build 
a track on Second street, from Main street to Lake avenue. 
The company asked permission to lay track on two more 
blocks in order that it might haul coke from the gas plant 
which it owns in Racine to Milwaukee. This petition was re- 
fused. 

RECENT INCORPORATIONS. 

Ft. Smith Checotah & Shawnee Interurban Railway, Che- 
cotah, Okla. — Incorporated in Oklahoma to construct and 
operate an interurban railway from Ft. Smith, Ark., to Shaw- 
nee, Okla. The line when completed will be 160 miles long 
and will cost in the neighborhood of $1,280,000. Capital stock, 
$500,000. Incorporators: R. B. Hutchinson, R. G. Smith, L. F. 
Cain, R. D. Martin and W. M. Duffy, all of Checotah. 

Southern Colorado Power & Railway Company. — Incorpo- 
rated in Colorado to construct a series of power houses in 
Huerfano and Las Animas counties in the southern part of 
Colorado. Central plants will be erected in Walsenburg and 
Trinidad and it is stated that the Trinidad Electric Railroad 
will become a part of the new company's holdings. Eastern 
capitalists are interested in the project. Capital stock, $1,500,- 
000. Incorporators: W. F. Schuyler, K. C. Schuyler and C. 
Speiss, of Denver. 

TRACK AND ROADWAY. 

Accomac Traction & Power Company, Onancock, Va. — It is 
stated that this company has awarded the contract for build- 
ing its proposed electric line from Onancock, by way of Tasley 
and Accomac Courthouse, to Battle Point, to James D. Lalor & 
Co. Five per cent bonds to the amount of $175,000 will be 
sold, the proceeds of which are to be used for constructing the 
road. S. F. Rogers, president; T. W. Taylor, secretary. 

Albia Interurban Railway, Albia, la. — C. B. Judd, Des 
Moines, la., chief engineer of this company, writes that 3% 
miles of track from Albia to Hocking have been laid during 
the past year, and that surveys have been completed from 
Hiteman to Buxton, 16% miles. The cross-span type of over- 
head construction with No. 000 trolley is used within the city 
limits while on the 2% miles of 60-foot private right of way 
the bracket type is used. Power for operating the line will 
be obtained from the Albia Light & Power Company. Grad- 
ing from Hiteman to Buxton will be resumed in the spring. 
Sixty-pound rails with soldered bonds are used. There is a 
maximum grade of 3 per cent and a maximum curvature of 8 
degrees. The road was designed principally for passenger 
traffic, although with the opening of a new coal shaft about a 



mile from Albia, it will deliver about 400 tons of coal per 
month to the Albia Light & Power Company and whatever 
other coal traffic may develop for local use, will be handled 
by the company. J. C. Reese, Albia, la., is president; C. B. 
Judd, chief engineer; Calvin Manning, secretary and treas- 
urer. (Mentioned December 21, 1907.) 

Asheville & Hendersonville Railroad, Asheville, N. C. — 
The contract for the construction of this road from Asheville 
to Hendersonville, N. O, 22 miles, has been let to the Caro- 
lina Construction Company of Asheville. It is stated that a 
new survey will be made and that rails and other material 
will be ordered at once. The company will build its own 
power house and proposes to handle freight and passenger 
traffic. C. F. White of Skyland. N. C, is interested. C. E. 
Van Bibber, 60 Wall street, New York, is chief engineer. 
(Mentioned on November 2, 1907.) 

Boston Elevated Raiway. — The need for strengthening a 
bridge over the Boston & Maine Railroad tracks will dela 
the opening of the Boston Elevated Railwaj Company's newly 
constructed line for surface cars between the Sullivan square 
terminal and the Middlesex Falls reservation until the present 
year is far advanced. The bridge is the only thing that inter- 
venes between the elevated's present surface tracks in Alain 
street, Charlestown, and the beginning of the new tracks 
recently laid in Mystic avenue, Somerville. The structure is 
too weak to carry the new heavy semi-convertible cars now 
used by the Boston Elevated for suburban lines, and the com- 
pany will not, it is understood, care to incur the expense 
of rebuilding that part of the bridge that would be required 
for its tracks until money conditions are easier. 

Cincinnati Northern Traction Company, Hamilton, O. — 
Work on the reconstruction of the roadbed of this company's 
line between Hamilton and Cincinnati, O., the greater part 
of which has been done on recently acquired right of way, has 
been practically completed, and when a few gaps remaining 
have been closed up the roadbed and track covering the entire 
distance between these cities will have been entirely rebuilt. 
(Mentioned September 14, 1907.) 

City & Suburban Electric Railway, Brunswick, Ga. — Orders 
are said to have been placed for rails, poles etc., for the con- 
struction of this company's electric line in Brunswick. Ac- 
cording to the terms of the franchise work must have been 
started by January 1, 1908, and four miles be completed within 
the year. (Mentioned September 7, 1907.) 

Delaware Marion Mt. Gilead Mt. Vernon Newark & South- 
ern Coal Tramway Company. — Col. Albert E. Boone is pro- 
moting this new interurban project in Ohio, six divisions for 
which are stated to have been mapped out as follows: From 
Delaware to Centerburg; from Marion and Centerburg by way 
of Mt. Gilead; from Newark to Centerburg by way of Locks 
and Appleton; from Newark to Lexington by way of Mt. Perry 
and Sago; from Newark to Sago by way of Hanover, Gilbert 
and Adamsville; from Centerburg to Mt. Vernon. 

Eldorado Springs Tiffin Monegaw Springs & Lowry City 
Railroad, Tiffin, Mo. — Part of the right of way for this pro- 
posed 30-mile electric line, which will connect the towns 
named in the title, has been secured and the contract for the 
surveys will be let in the near future. Dr. C. A. Edgar, presi- 
dent, Eldorado Springs. J. S. Harrison, secretary. (Men- 
tioned December 14, 1907.) 

French Point Street Railway, Pittsburg, Pa. — Announce- 
ment is made that this company will extend its present line 
from Merchant and Wagner streets. Ambridge, Pa., to a point 
on the right of way of the Economy Belt Line Railway. The 
company recently increased its capital stock from $6,000 
to $31,200 for this purpose. James D. Callery, Pittsburg, 
president. (Mentioned November 9, 1907.) 

Fresno (Cal.) Traction Company. — This company is now 
engaged in laying about 4% miles of new track. 

Grand Valley Railway, Brantford, Ont. — This company 
proposes to rebuild its line from Brantford to Gait, Ont., 26 
miles, laying new 80-pound steel, and likewise to rebuild the 
Brantford Street Railway, which it controls, laying seven 
miles of additional track and to rehabilitate the Woodstock 
Thames Valley & Ingersoll Electric Railway. Extensions as 
follows are projected: From Brantford-Galt line, six miles to 
St. George; from Brantford, through the villages of Mt. Pleas- 
ant, Boston, Waterford, Bloomsburg and Simcoe to Port Dover 
on Lake Erie, 34.5 miles; from Brantford west through Mt. 
Vernon, Burford, Cathcart and Eastwood to Woodstock, 25 
miles, connecting at Woodstock with the Woodstock Thames 
Valley & Ingersoll, from Woodstock through Embro and 
Beachville to Ingersoll, 12 miles; from Ingersoll through 
Dorchester to London, 18 miles. New mileage is 90.5 and the 
mileage to be rebuilt 42. making a total of 132.5 miles. The 



56 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



contract for grading, masonry and timber work has been 
awarded to Joseph Gianini, Pittsburg, Pa. Contracts for 
rails and electrical equipment, including cars and locomotives, 
it is stated, will be awarded in the spring, when the electrical 
system is determined upon and the result of the vote now 
being polled in lower Ontario on a by-law authorizing the gov- 
ernment to construct electric transmission lines from Niagara 
Falls and sell power for lighting and other purposes to 
municipalities and corporations. The single-phase system is 
under favorable consideration and the Westinghouse Electric 
& Manufacturing Company and the Canadian General Electric 
Company have been asked to prepare recommendations and 
estimates on the power and other electrical equipment. The 
cars for interurban use, it is stated, will be about 52 feet long 
and the city cars about 23 feet long. A steel trestle about 
1,200 feet long will be required on the Port Dover extension. 
William P. Kellett, chief engineer, Brantford, Ont. Murry A. 
Verner, president. 

Indianapolis & Louisville Traction Company, Louisville, 
Ky. — John E. Greeley, vice-president of this company is 
quoted as saying that plans are being considered for the con- 
struction of an east and west line, one of which is proposed 
from Scottsburg to Madison, Ind., and on to Cincinnati, O. 
The Louisville & Northern Railway & Lighting Company also 
is said to be considering the construction of an extension 
from Charlestown to Madison, which will connect with the 
Indianapolis & Louisville line at the last named point. 

Joliet & Southern Traction Company, Joliet, III. — The new 
line from Joliet to New Lenox, 111., is now nearly completed 
and is expected to be opened for traffic within a few weeks. 

Kansas City Springfield & Southern Railway, Nevada, 
Mo. — This company has completed surveys for its proposed 
interurban railway between Nevada and Springfield, Mo., with 
a branch line to Carthage. The length of the line, including 
sidings, will be about 140 miles, and will be operated by 
current from its power station to be located at Areola, Mo. 
The company also will operate an amusement park near the 
Sac river. The capital stock is $3,750,000, later to be in- 
creased to $4,500,000. The officers are as follows: W. B. 
Forsyth, president; S. A. Wight, secretary; J. W. Creekman, 
treasurer; C. C. McFann, general manager. All communica- 
tions should be addressed to the general manager at Nevada, 
Mo. 

Kansas Southern Electric Railway. — F. V. Crouch, Pitts- 
burg, Kan., president of this proposed interurban electric 
road, is said to have announced that final arrangements for 
a loan of $5,000,000 have been concluded with French capi- 
talists and that construction work will be started in the 
spring. The road will start from Pittsburg, Kan., and pass 
through Girard, St. Paul, Erie, Chanute and Iola, Kan. Most 
of the right of way has been secured and several franchises 
lor crossing the county roads have been obtained. 

Lake Shore Electric Railway, Fremont, O. — This company 
is endeavoring to secure renewals of the options it holds on 
private right of way for its proposed line between Fremont 
and Genoa, O., parallel to the Lake Shore steam road. The 
new line when built will shorten the distance between Fre- 
mont and Toledo, O., about 13 miles, and will form part of 
the project to double-track the entire line between Cleveland 
and Toledo. 

Los Angeles Railway. — Regular service over the Boyle 
Heights and West Seventh street lines, covering two miles 
of city streets, was started on January 3. The cars now 
branch off at Fourth street continuing west to Western ave- 
nue and thence north to Melrose. 

Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Company, Milwaukee, 
Wis. — It is stated that this company is planning an extension 
of its interurban line from Watertown through Johnson Creek, 
Jefferson, Ft. Atkinson, Whitewater and Palmyra to East 
Troy, Wis., where it will connect with the company's exist- 
ing line at that point. Surveys for the route are now in 
progress. 

Missoula-Bitter Root Traction Company. — Surveys for this 
company's proposed route between Missoula, Stevensville, 
Corvallis and Hamilton, Mont., 42 miles, have been completed. 
More than 2S miles of right of way are said to have been 
donated and construction work will be started next year. 
Capital stock, $55,000. of which $40,000 is authorized and 
$15,000 issued. F. O. Lewis, Stevensville, Mont., secretary 
and treasurer. (Mentioned April 27, 1907.) 

Mt. McKay & Kakabeka Falls Railway, Ft. William, Ont. 
— This company will apply at the next session of the Ontario 
legislature for an extension of time to April 30, 1912, in which 
to complete its proposed line from Ft. William to Kakabeka 
Falls, about 30 miles. The company also will apply for an act 
defining the location of its route: giving it the right to build 



its line on either or both sides of the Kaministiquia river; 
authorizing it to use steam motive power during construction; 
confirming the Ft. William franchise for the operation of its 
cars in the streets of that city, and approving the by-law 
guaranteeing the company's bonds to the extent of $10,000 a 
mile for every mile constructed in the municipality of Nee- 
bring within five years from the date of its passage. W. F. 
Hogarth, Ft. William, Ont, is president. 

Mt. Mansfield Electric Railroad, Stowe, Vt. — It is reported 
that A. H. Soden of Boston, Mass., who recently purchased 
this property at a foreclosure sale, plans to extend the road 
from Stowe to Morrisville, a distance of eight miles. The line 
now connects Stowe and Waterbury, Vt., a distance of 10% 
miles. 

Nashville Interurban Railroad, Nashville, Tenn. — H. H. 
Mayberry, president of this company, which is building from 
Nashville to Franklin, Tenn., has announced that a contract 
has been made with the Nashville Railway & Light Company, 
whereby that company will furnish the power for operating 
the road. The company proposes to build from Nashville to 
Mt. Pleasant, Tenn., 67 miles; the first section, to Franklin, 
now under construction, is 20 miles long. Mr. Mayberry 
states that when the line is completed to Mt. Pleasant it will 
build its own power house. It is expected to complete the 
first section during the coming spring. A trackage arrange- 
ment has also been made with the Nashville Railway & Light 
Company whereby the interurban cars will enter the city of 
Nashville over the street railway tracks and use the central 
transfer station of the latter company as a terminal. An 
hourly schedule will be maintained. Specifications are now 
being prepared for the rolling stock. Twelve miles of the line 
have been graded and tracklaying will begin the latter part 
of January. 

Nipissing Central Electric Railway, Ottawa, Can. — F. R. 
Latchford, a director of this company, writes that contracts 
are to be let in May or June, 1908, for the proposed line from 
Cobalt to New Liskeard, Ont., 12 miles, via Argentite, North 
Cobalt and Haileyburg. A line from Latchford to Cobalt is 
also contemplated, but surveys have been completed only 
from Cobalt to New Liskeard. The right of way and munic- 
ipal franchises are now being negotiated for. John Fitz- 
patrick, Ottawa, is president. (Mentioned December 28, 1907.) 

Omaha & Council Bluffs Street Railway, Omaha, Neb. — 
This company on January S commenced active construction 
work on an extension of the South Tenth street car line from 
Bancroft street to Riverview park. The company expects to 
complete the greater part of the work by next spring and 
to have the entire line ready for traffic before the park season 
opens. 

Omaha <&. Nebraska Central Railway, Hastings, Neb. — 
Contracts for grading and track material will be awarded by 
this company in the spring and active construction work 
started as soon as possible. The line will be 159 miles long 
and will extend from Omaha to Hastings. The officers are: 
H. C. Long, president, 617 Fremont building, Boston, Mass.; 
A. Texter, vice-president, David City, Neb.; J. H. Rogers, 
secretary, Hastings; E. R. Long, treasurer, David City; J. C. 
Baker, general manager. Hastings. Neb. (Mentioned October 
12, 1907.) 

Oakland (Cal.) Traction Company. — This company expects 
to place contracts for the construction of 10 miles of new 
track during the present year. J. Q. Brown, assistant general 
manager and purchasing agent. 

Oshkosh, Wis. — It is stated that preliminary steps have 
been taken toward the construction of an interurban line from 
Oshkosh, by way of Buttes des Nortes, to Winnenconne, Wis., 
11 miles. It is planned to operate the road with an engine 
using either gasoline or crude oil. The cost is estimated at 
about $15,000 per mile. It is stated that Oshkosh capitalists 
are prepared to finance and build the road during the present 
year. 

Pacific Coast Railway, San Luis Obispo, Cal. — James An- 
derson, chief engineer, writes that this company has built dur- 
ing 1907 an extension 2.1 miles long, from Betabel to Bonetti, 
Cal. 

Priest Rapids Railway, Priest Rapids, Wash. — Construc- 
tion work on this proposed interurban line from the Waterville 
district along the Columbia river to Kennewick, will be started 
in the spring. The road has been projected principally as a 
feeder for the transcontinental steam lines and will be 
equipped to handle standard freight cars. The most impor- 
tant right of way has been secured and the remainder is 
being arranged for. The line will connect with the Northern 
Pacific, the Great Northern, the Chicago Milwaukee & St. 
Paul, the North Coast and the Portland & Seattle Railway, 
and, when completed, will be 136 miles long. The route as 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



57 



surveyed lies up the Columbia river valley from Kennewick to 
the new town of Hanford, where the Hanford Irrigation & 
Power Company's new plant is being constructed to furnish 
power for the operation of the line as well as for other com- 
mercial purposes. From Hanford it will cross the river at 
Priest Rapids and extend to the Waterville district, serving 
the wheat lands of Douglas county. \V. K. Rust, president; 
M. B. Ilaynes, vice-president; E. H. Guie, secretary; IT. K. 
Owens, chief engineer. 

Paducah Southern Electric Railroad, Paducah, Ky. — Sur- 
veys for iliis line from Paducah to Mayneld and Hickman, 
Ky., have been completed and maps and estimates are now 
being prepared. Two routes were surveyed, one of which 
parallels the Illinois Central Railway. It is stated that ar- 
rangements have been concluded for disposing of the bonds 
and that work will he started in the near future with the 
intention of having a portion of the line in operation this 
year. H. H. Loving of Paducah is interested. (Mentioned 
September 21, 1907.) 

Sistersville, W. Va. — It is stated that the Pittsburg Con- 
struction Company has offered to build an electric railway 
from Sistersville to Middlebourne 12% miles, provided local 
interests agree to take part of the bonds. E. L. Benton. Sis 
tersville, is engineer. (New road.) 

South Bethlehem & Saucon Street Railway, South Bethle- 
hem, Pa. — Official advice from this company states that track- 
laying has been completed from South Bethlehem to Colesville, 
Pa., 3% miles, and that grading will be started toward Centre 
Valley," the proposed terminus, about March 1, 1908. The over- 
head work, which is of the single-pole bracket type, with No. 
00 trolley wire, has been completed to Colesville. Power for 
the operation of the line is purchased. One mile of track in 
South Bethlehem is laid with 85-pound T-rails, the remaining 
2% miles with 70-pound rails. The company now operates 
two Brill semi-convertible double-truck passenger cars and one 
single-truck freight car. C. P. Hoffman, South Bethlehem, 
president; P. F. Cannon, secretary; Hugh E. Crilly, general 
manager and chief engineer, South Bethlehem. 

Springfield (Mass.) Street Railway. — It is reported that 
this company has decided to postpone all improvement work 
not absolutely necessary. However new 9-inch girder rails 
are to be laid on Main and State streets and some new special 
work will be installed. 

Terre Haute & Merom Traction Company, Terre Haute, 
Ind. — It is stated that the promoters of this line from Terre 
Haute to Merom, Ind., have decided to build the road by issu- 
ing scrip to pay the construction forces. A contract has 
been let to the United States Construction Company of Terre 
Haute, which has just been organized. Five townships 
through which the road is located have refused to vote subsi- 
dies in favor of the road, but it is stated that the merchants 
have promised to accept the scrip, which will be secured by 
a deposit of bonds. L. Brown, president; J. Caswell, chief 
engineer. (Mentioned on July 6, 1907.) 

Texas Traction Company, Dallas, Tex. — This company, 
which is building a 65-mile line from Sherman to Dallas, Tex., 
has completed tracklaying from McKinney to the east fork 
of the Trinity river, about four miles, and it is expected that 
the work will proceed at the rate of a mile a day until the 
road is completed. A construction train of 1 locomotive and 
15 cars is in use. Sufficient ties and rails are on the ground 
to keep the construction force busy for several weeks and 
as the contract calls for the delivery of the rest of the 
material within the next 60 days, it is believed that track- 
laying for the entire distance will be completed by next April. 
Theodore Stebbins, general manager. 

United Railways, Portland, Ore. — This company has now 
completed seven miles of its line in Portland, and since Decem- 
ber 31 has been in operation, delivering freight from the North 
Pacific Terminal Company and other roads entering the 
terminal grounds. Passenger service will not be started until 
several extensions are completed. The line also serves as 
an entrance to the city for the Portland-Salem line of the 
Oregon Electric Railway. Rails and other material for the 
interurban line from Portland to Hillsboro have been delivered 
and construction is to be started as soon as the weather 
permits. YV. L. Benham, president; L. B. Wickersham. chief 
engineer. 

United Traction Company, Reading, Pa. — It is reported 
that a contract has been let to A. W. Sykes of Sykesville, Pa., 
for building a 7-mile extension from Sykesville to Big Run. 
E. W. Hess of Du Bois, Pa., is chief engineer. 

Visalia Electric Railroad, Exeter, Cal. — James H. Cronett, 
Exeter, Cal.. chief engineer of this company, writes that 13 
miles of track have been laid since January 1, 1907, from 



Exeter to Lemon Cove, Cal. The entire length of the line 
from Lemon Cove to Lemoore is 54 miles. From Lemon Cove 
to Lemoore cars will be operated over a leased track of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. The following Intermediate sta- 
tions are served: Lemon Cove, Merryman, Exeter. Farmers- 
ville, Visalia, Goshen Junction, Hanford and Armona. There 
is a maximum grade of 1 per cent and no curve greater than 
10 degrees. Fifty and 75 pound steel rails are used. The 
overhead work, which is of the catenary single-pole bracket 
type, has been completed from Visalia to Lemon Cove, -I 
miles. Single-phase current at 3,300 volts potential will be 
used in the trolley. A main substation of the Westinghouse 
type has been completed at Exeter and two line transformer 
stations are under construction. The lino will be for passen- 
ger and freight service. The initial equipment will consist of 
six electric motor cars from the American Car Company and 
one electric locomotive from the Baldwin Locomotive Works. 
William Hammond, president: B. M. Maddux, vice-president, 
Visalia. Cal. 

Wabash Valley Railroad. — This company has been or- 
ganized and soon will be incorporated to build an Interurban 
electric line from Danville, 111., to Terre Haute, hid. As 
planned the line will follow the west bank of the Wabash 
river, passing through Clinton, Ind.. and a number of small 
towns in Illinois and Indiana. D. C. Johnson, president, Clin- 
ton, Ind. (New road.) 

Washington Arlington & Falls Church Railway, Rosslyn, 
Va. — Park Agnew and Charles Hine, receivers of the Wash- 
ington Arlington & Falls Church Railway Company, have se- 
cured deeds of right of way which will enable them to extend 
the line from Vienna, Md., to Herndon, Pa. It is understood 
that the right of way from Herndon to Chantilly has been 
assured, and that work on the extension of the line to this 
point will soon be commenced. 

Washington Baltimore <£. Annapolis Railway. Baltimore, 
Md. — This company completed on January 1, with the excep- 
tion of a few details, the construction of its line in Annapolis, 
Md., and it is said that cars will be running between Washing- 
ton and Annapolis on or about January 15. Work on the local 
line in Annapolis was started on October 28, 1907, and has 
been pushed to completion as rapidly as possible in order to 
comply with the terms of the $5,000 bond filed with the city, 
by which work was to be finished on January 1, 190S. The 
track as completed makes a loop in Annapolis 1% miles long. 
Connection from Annapolis to Baltimore will not be afforded 
for some time, considerable work yet remaining to be done 
on the Baltimore branch. 

Washington Westminster & Gettysburg Railroad. — This 
company proposes to build an electric railroad connecting 
Washington, D. C, and Gettysburg, Pa., via Sandy Springs, 
Laytonsville and Westminster, Md., about SO miles. Surveys 
have been made for most of the distance and it is stated that 
capitalists in New York, Philadelphia and Pittsburg are in- 
terested in the project. The officers are: President. J. B. 
Colgrove, Washington; first vice-president, E. P. Thomas of 
Sandy Springs, Md.; second vice-president, A. A. Chapin. 
Washington; treasurer, Robert N. Harper, Washington: chief 
engineer, Walter Atlee of Baltimore. (Mentioned on August 
10, 1907.) 

West Penn Railways. Pittsburg. Pa. — This company is 
said to be planning an extension between Hunkers. Scott 
Haven and West Newton, connecting at Scott Haven with the 
McKeesport-Scott Haven line and entering Hunkers over a 
bridge across the Youghiogheny river. 

POWER HOUSES AND SUBSTATIONS. 
Cincinnati Northern Traction Company, Hamilton, O. — 
This company has recently equipped a new central power sta- 
tion at Lindenwald, near Hamilton. O., from which power will 
be furnished for the operation of its line between Hamilton 
and Dayton. Substations will be located at College Hill, 
Trenton, Franklin and Dwyer, each of which will be equipped 
with two 300-kilowatt rotary converters with six 100-kilowatt 
33.000-volt transformers. 

Gulfport & Mississippi Coast Traction Company. Gulfport. 
Miss. — This company has recently purchased the following 
apparatus: One 1.500-kilowatt Westinghouse turbo-generator, 
one 450-horsepower Babcock & Wilcox boiler and two 500-kilo- 
watt Westinghouse rotaries. J. A. Jones, general manager. 

Lima & Honeoye Electric Light & Railroad, Lima, N. Y. — 
A power station to be located in the natural gas fields about 
four miles south of Lima, will be erected by this company 
during the present year. E. D. Watkins, general manager. 

Oakland (Cal.) Traction Company. — It is reported that this 
company proposes to erect a power house of 10,000 kilowatts 
capacity and new substations. 



58 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



Personal Mention 



Mr. A. I. Breckenridge has been appointed purchasing 
agent of the Waterloo Cedar Falls & Northern Railway, with 
headquarters at Waterloo, la.; effective on January 1. 

Mr. Charles F. Turner, chief engineer of the Columbus 
Delaware & Marion Railway, Delaware, O., has been appointed 
superintendent of motive power, effective on January 1. 

Mr. James McCredie, secretary and treasurer of the 
United Traction Company, Albany, N. Y., has been eected to 
a similar office with the Hudson Valley Railway Company. 

Mr. E. S. Dimniick, general superintendent of the Northern 
Electric Railway, Chico, Cal., has resigned and the duties of 
that office will be assumed by Mr. A. D. Schindler, general 
manager. 

Mr. Louis H. Cushing has resigned as superintendent of 
the Taunton & Pawtucket Street Railway at Attleboro, Mass., 
to become associated with the Dexter Machine Company of 
that city. 

Mr. M. W. Kirkwood, electrician and master mechanic 
of the Gait Preston & Hespeler Street Railway, has been ap- 
pointed superintendent of the company, succeeding Mr. P. 
Clemens, resigned. 

Mr. F. W. Whitridge, who has been appointed receiver 
for the Third Avenue Railroad, has appointed Mr. Edward 
A. Maher, president of the Union Railway Company, as mana- 
ger of the Third Avenue System. 

Mr. L. E. Fischer, general manager of the Illinois Traction 
System, with headquarters at Danville, 111., was presented with 
a gold watch and chain on Christmas day by the superin- 
tendents and heads of departments. 

Mr. George K. Mosser. of Noxen, Pa., has been elected 
president of the Slate Belt Electric Railway, of Bethlehem, 
Pa., succeeding Mr. G. A. Schneebeli. Mr. Dennis G. Gerberich 
has been elected general manager succeeding Mr. George H. 
Wolle. 

Mr. Jack Abbott, electrical engineer of the Jackson 
(Miss.) Railway & Light Company, has been appointed gen- 
eral manager. The duties of this office heretofore have been 
under the jurisdiction of Mr. S. S. Bush, vice-president of the 
company at Louisville, Ky. 

Mr. M. McCauley, heretofore assistant superintendent of 
the Detroit Monroe & Toledo Short Line Railway, has been 
appointed superintendent, effective at once, succeeding Mr. 
E. B. Taylor, resigned. Mr. McCauley's headquarters will be 
at Monroe as in the past. 

Mr. J. E. North, heretofore in charge of the electrical 
engineering department of the Ohio Electric Railway, central 
division, with headquarters at Springfield, O. has resigned. 
He will be succeeded by Mr. H. W. Pagan, electrical engineer 
of the eastern division of the company. 

Mr. L. W. Harrington, heretofore passenger and freight 
solicitor of the Columbus Delaware & Marion Railway, has 
resigned, effective on January 1. Henceforth he will devote 
his attention to the adjustment of claims, having had con- 
siderable experience along this line in the claim department 
of the Columbus Delaware & Marion Railway. With the 
resignation of Mr. Harrington the position of passenger and 
freight solicitor will be abolished and the matter of soliciting 
business will be looked after by the various agents of the 
company, each of whom will cover the business in his terri- 
tory. 

Mr. Paul H. Evans, for the past year chief engineer of 
the Mexico Electric Tramways, Limited, has resigned, and 
after traveling abroad for a few months will return to Mexico 
City to devote his time to private interests in that city. Mr. 
Evans has been connected with the Mexico Tramways Com- 
pany for some time and for two years was purchasing agent 
as well as chief engineer. Previously to his connection with 
this company he was chief engineer of the Mexican General 
Electric Company, with which he was connected for seven 
years. He also at one time was identified with the Atlanta, 
Ga., street railway lines. 

With the resignation of Mr. Arthur L. Smith, heretofore 
superintendent of transporation of the Central Kentucky 
Traction Company, Frankfort, Ky., this office will be abolished 
together with that of chief engineer of construction, and Mr. 
George Macleod, who heretofore has held the latter position, 
will have the title of superintendent of railways. Other 




appointments in the operating force are as follows: J. R. 
Pope, chief electrical and mechanical engineer; G. W. Brown, 
master mechanic; J. P. McKeever, superintendent of Lexing- 
ton power station; C. K. Morrill, superintendent light and gas 
departments; J. D. Sallee, superintendent of local lines, Frank- 
fort; Henry Bushel, superintendent of local lines, Lexington; 
J. H. Kearney, roadmaster. O. R. Bilbro has been appointed 
auditor and A. F. Woehnker, claim agent. 

Mr. C. F. Crane, whose portrait we present herewith, has 
been appointed general passenger agent of the Eastern Penn- 
sylvania Railways, under the operating management of J. G. 

White & Co., with head- 
quarters at Pottsville. 
Pa., as noted in the 
Electric Railway Re- 
view of January 4. Mr. 
Crane has been engaged 
in the electric railway 
business for the past 
eight years, having been 
associated with the 
Geneva Waterloo Sen- 
eca Falls & Cayuga 
Lake Traction Com- 
pany at Seneca Falls. 
X. Y.. the Rochester & 
Eastern Rapid Railway 
and more recently with 
the Rochester Railway 
Company at Rochester. 
N. Y. Mr. Crane's new 
duties will consist par- 
ticularly in the improve- 
ment of the summer 
resorts on the Eastern 
Pennsylvania Railway's 
C. F. Crane. system in Schuylkill 

county and the building 
up of the excursion business of the company. 

Mr. James W. Morgan has been appointed chief engineer 
of the Galesburg Railway & Light Company at Galesburg, 111., 
with charge of the extensive lighting and heating system 
which the company operates in connection with its electric 
lines. Mr. Morgan formerly was engineer of power station 
for the Springfield & Northeastern Traction Company at River- 
ton, 111. 

Mr. Charles V. Weston was elected president and gen- 
eral manager of the South Side Elevated Railroad, Chicago, 
at a meeting of the board of directors held on January 3, 
1908. He succeeds Mar- 
cellus Hopkins, who 
died on December 7. 
1907. Mr. Weston has 
served on the board of 
supervising engineers in 
charge of the rehabili- 
tation of the traction 
properties of Chicago 
since last May. when he 
was appointed by Mayor 
Busse as the third mem- 
ber to represent the city 
of Chicago. He is about 
50 years old and has 
been a civil engineer 
throughout his business 
career. His early expe- 
rience was obtained on 
the various railroads in 
Texas and Kansas and 
on the Chicago & North- 
western Railroad in the 
north. Many of the im- 
portant engineering un- 
dertakings of Chicago 
have been successfully 
completed under the supervision of Mr. Weston, among them 
being the building of the Lake View intake crib and water tun- 
nel, the completion of the Van Buren street tunnel for the West 
Chicago Street Railroad in 1894 and the construction of the 
Northwestern and Lake Street elevated roads and the Union 
Loop. Since 1903 and until last May, when he was appointed 
on the board of supervising engineers, he was chief engineer 
of the South Side Elevated road, in which capacity he planned 
the various feeders and reconstructed the main line for the 
installation of elevated express service on the south side. Mr. 
Weston is a member of the American Society of Civil En- 
gineers, the Western Society of Engineers and the American 
Railway Engineering and Maintenance of Way Association. 




Charles V. Weston. 



January 11. 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



59 



Financial News 



Boston Elevated Railway. — The pamphlet report for the 
year ended September 30, 1907. has been Issued. The prin- 
cipal figures nt the report were published in the Electric Rail- 
waj Revie-w of November 9, 1907, page 759. In his statement 
to shareholders William A. Bancroft, the president, says 
"Besides its ordinary taxes the company's contribution to 
i in public during the last fiscal year amounted to at least $489,- 
547.94. Since the last report the company has increased its 
power supplj by building additions to thr t its power sta- 
tions, to wit, to the Lincoln station on Battery street In Bos- 
ton, to the Charlestown station, and to the Harvard station in 
Cambridge. The 15 easy access' elevated cars, spoken of 
in the last report, have been received and are in service. 
Only a portion of the last 100 of the 150 'easy access' semi- 
convertible surface cars have been received, owing to the 
failure of the contracting builder to deliver as agreed. About 
60 indies are here, and 30 have been equipped and are in 
service. The company has maintained the excellent char- 
acter of its surface tracks, $562,757.85 having been spent 
t hit .on during the year in renewals and repairs. The total 
length of surface tracks controlled by the company is now 
145.897 miles. This, with the elevated mileage of 16.015 
miles, makes a total mileage of 461.912. The company has 
continued its liberal policy toward its employes in respect to 
their wages, as well as in other matters. Compensation for 
learners during the year amounted to $27,670.18. There was 
paid during the year ,$42,821.77 as a guaranteed minimum 
wage for new or extra men. There was also paid as increased 
compensation to long-service men $66,630.36. There was paid 
,n pensions $11,325.50. There was also paid in 'satisfactory 
service' money, in sums of $15 to each of the employes deemed 
worthy thereof. $55,320. The aggregate sum of increased pay- 
ments to employes, under the provisions adopted four years 
ago, amounted during the year to $203,767.81. The provisions 
of last year raising the rate of wages increase this amount 
by $97,726.35, making a total of $301,494.16. The company 
has designed extensions of its elevated station platforms for 
the future operation of Scar trains in place of 5-car trains, 
the longest trains which it can now use. These extensions 
have been approved by the public authorities, and their con- 
struction is about to be undertaken. In connection with the 
Washington street tunnel, the station platforms of which 
are also designed for the ultimate operation of 8-car trains. 
these extensions will admit of a very great increase in the 
carrying capacity of the elevated division." 

Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad. — The agreement 
between the various interests, as a result of which the re- 
ceivership was annulled, provides, it is stated, as follows: 
A claim for $50,000 on a note held by one of the creditors will 
be paid at once by interests allied with the company. Trus- 
tees will be appointed to conserve the funds involved in 
other claims aggregating $200,000, and the validity of the 
claims will be arbitrated out of court. Representatives of 
the Canadian bondholders advanced $250,000. with which the 
interest on the bonds was paid on January 3. The Canadian 
bondholders further pledged the raising of $500,000 to be used 
toward the completion of the railway from Racine to Mil- 
waukee. The control of the company will remain as at present. 

Holyoke (Mass.) Street Railway. — The Massachusetts 
railroad commission has authorized the issue of $93,600 addi- 
tional capital stock at $125 per share to provide for payment 
of outstanding bonds of the Amherst & Sunderland Street 
Railway which were assumed. 

Interstate Railways, Philadelphia. — Shareholders of record 
on December 5 have been given the privilege of subscribing 
at par pro rata for $500,000 new stock. The proceeds will be 
used for new cars, power house equipment and track: 

Metropolitan West Side Elevated Railway, Chicago. — To 
reimburse the treasury on account of the purchase of addi- 
tional cars and equipment, this company has made an issue 
of $100,000 of 6 per cent collateral trust bonds of which $50,000 
bonds are offered at par by the Chicago Savings Bank. The 
total issue is secured by deposit of $200,000 Metropolitan 
Elevated extension 4 per cent bonds. The $50,000 bonds 
which are offered for sale, will mature in 10 semi-annual in- 
stalments of $5,000 each from June 1, 1908, to December 1. 
1912. 

New York City Railway. — The quarterly rentals due on 
January 2 on the leased lines of the Metropolitan Street Rail- 
way system were not met at maturity. A few days later the 
receivers, having obtained sufficient funds, paid the quarterly 
dividends due as rental on the stocks of the Broadway iV- 



ii Avenue Railroad, the Sixth Avenue Railroad, the 
Eighth Avenue Railroad and the Ninth Avenue Railroad. — The 
January 1 coupons on the Third Avenue Railroad 4 per cent 
bonds are being paid by the Central Trust Company of New 
York on orders from Kuhn. I.oeb &• Co.. and the .human I 
coupons on the Third Avenue .. per cent bonds are 
paid by William A. Read & Co. In the case of the l per cent 
bonds it is necessary lor the holders, in order to get theil 
January l interest, to deposit their bonds under a form of 
agreement with the protective committee, of which J. N. 
Wallace, president of the Central Trust Company, is chair- 
man. No such stipulation is required by William A. Read & 
Co. in their payment of the coupons on the •"■ per cent bondl 

Springfield (Mass.) Street Railway. — Charles W. lios- 
worth has been elected a director to succeed William Skinner 

of Holyoke, Mass. 

Third Avenue Railroad, New York. — Judge Lacoml I the 

United States Circuit court. Xew York, appointed Frederick 
W Whitbridge, a lawyer, receiver lor this company on Janu- 
ary 6. upon application of the Central Trust Company of Xew 
York and of the committee representing the majority of the 
Third Avenue consolidated bonds. This action is the result 
of the failure of the receivers of the Xew York City Railwas 
and the Metropolitan Street Rallwaj to pay the interest on 
the Third Avenue bonds, due on January 1. Its effect is to 
take the Third Avenue road out of the Metropolitan system 
during the pendency of the receivership. The present re- 
ceivership is temporary, and theoretically is subject to the 
decision of a special master, whom Judge Lacombe has decided 
to appoint to investigate the question whether the Metro- 
politan receivers are able to pay the defaulted interest in the 
60 days of grace which the mortgage allows. A permanent 
receivership, however, was forecast by Judge Lacombe in his 
decision appointing the receiver, in which he said: "The 
bondholders under this large Third Avenue mortgage are 
entiled to the appointment of a temporary receiver, to I" 
made permanent when the time comes to declare the principal 
due and proceed with the foreclosure." 

Toledo & Indiana Railway. Toledo, O. — An official is 
quoted as follows regarding the interest due on January l mi 
the $1,500,000 of 5 per cent bonds, payment of which has been 
deferred: "We have not the money earned on hand for the 
payment. We have had serious and costly accidents during 
the past year, which have taken our money, and we do not 
feel, because of that and the present financial condition, that 
we should borrow money." 

ELECTRIC RAILWAY EARNINGS. 

Ft. Wayne & Wabash Valley Traction Company, Ft. Wayne, 
Ind. 

November— 1907. 1906. 

Gross earnings $115,089.50 $93,142.64 

Operating expenses 62,619.68 54,155.7'i 

Xet earnings 52.469.82 3S.986.87 

January 1 to November 30— 1907. 1906. 

Gross earnings $1,167,594.55 $991,427.03 

Operating expenses 683,503.41 602,562.60 

Net earnings 484,091.14 388,864.43 

Lexington & Interurban Railways Company, Lexington, Ky. 

November— 1907. 1906. 

Gross earnings $43,034.01 $4u,14S.l,s 

Operating expenses 27,702.64 24,633.05 

Net earnings 15,331.37 15,515.13 

January 1 to November 30— 1907. 1906. 

Gross earnings $516,355.02 $481,579.S3 

Operating expenses 325.46S.51 313,009. S5 

Xet earnings 190.SS6.51 16S.569.98 

Dividends Declared. 

Athens (Ga.) Electric Railway, common, 2% per cent; 
preferred. 3 per cent. 

Birmingham (Ala.) Railway Light & Power Company. 
preferred. 3 per cent. 

Brooklyn City Railroad, quarterly, 2% per cent. 

Cincinnati Newport & Covington Light & Traction Com- 
pany, Covington, Ky., common, quarterly % of 1 per cent; pre- 
ferred, quarterly. 1Y S per cent. 

Duluth-Superior Traction Company, Duluth, Minn., pre- 
ferred, quarterly, 1 per cent. 

Jacksonville (Fla.) Electric Company, common and pre- 
ferred, 3 per cent. 

New Orleans (La.) City Railway, common, 1 per cent; pre- 
ferred, 2% per cent. 

Northampton (Mass.) Street Railway, 3 per cent. 

Omaha & Council Bluffs Street Railway. Omaha. Neb., 
common, 2 per cent; preferred, quarterly. IVi per cent. 

St. Charles Street Railroad, Xew Orleans, La., 3 per cent. 



60 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



Manufactures and Supplies 



ROLLING STOCK. 

Yazoo City Light Water & Sewerage Plant, Yazoo City, 
Miss., which is owned by the city, it is reported will pur- 
chase four new cars in the near future. 

Denver & Interurban Railway, Denver, Colo., is in the 
market for 12 interurban cars. In the Electric Railway Re- 
view of March 9 it was reported that this company was 
preparing the preliminary specifications for a number of 
high-speed cars. 

Grand Valley Railway, Brantford, Ont., will probably 
place orders for several 23-foot city cars and a number of 
52-foot cars for use on projected extensions aggregating 90.5 
miles. Several electric locomotives may also be ordered. 
The road has recently changed hands. Murry A. Verner, 
Brantford, Ont., is president. 

Gary & Interurban Railway, Gary, Ind., has placed an 
order with the Danville Car Company for two double-truck 
closed cars for city service. Delivery is to be made before 
March 1. The cars will have a seating capacity of 44 passen- 
gers. The wheel base will be 4 feet 6 inches, the length over 
buffers 42 feet, and width, over all, 8 feet 4 inches. The 
height is to be 9 feet 1% inches. The body and underframe 
are to be of wood and metal. The cars will be equipped with 
Peacock hand brakes, Brill trucks and two GE-SO motors. 

TRADE NOTES. 

H. F. Sanville has resigned his connection with Dodge & 
Day. engineers, Philadelphia, to join the staff of Frank R. 
Gilbreth, general contractor, New York. 

Habirshaw Wire Company, 253 Broadway, New York, is 
the new name of the Indian Rubber & Gutta Percha Insulating 
Company. The company's works are at Yonkers. X. Y. 

Safety Car Coupler Company, Chattanooga, Tenn.. has 
been incorporated with a capital stock of $100,000 to manu- 
facture a patented safety car coupler. The incorporators 
include A. W. Boyd, M. A. Brown and John Shamotulskl. 

Dossert & Co., New York, have received an order from 
the American Car & Foundry Company, Berwick, Pa., for 
T2(i two-way solderless connectors for use on the electrically- 
lighted steel cars now being constructed for the Pennsylvania 
Railroad. 

St. Louis Surfacer & Paint Company, St. Louis. Mo., 
announces the appointment of H. N. Turner as manager of 
sales in the railroad department. Mr. Turner was formerly 
a representative of the Acme White Lead & Color Works. 
Detroit, Mich. 

Central Inspection Bureau, IT State street. New York 
City, has received an order from the Philadelphia Rapid Tran- 
sit Company for the inspection of 35,000 ties which will be 
furnished by the American Tie & Timber Company of 11 
Broadway. New York City. 

S. Butler Keys, who has been connected with the Con- 
solidated Car-Heating Company, 42 Broadway, Xew York, for 
the past six years, three years as manager of the eastern 
territory, has been appointed to a position in the railroad 
department of the H. W. Johns-Manville Companv of Xew 
York. 

Danville Car Company of Danville, 111., has just completed 
the first of a lot of 12 semi-steel, semi-convertible cars for 
the Danville Street Railway Company, purchase of which was 
noted in a previous issue of the Electric Railway Review. 
The cars are 22 feet long and the outsides are covered with 
steel instead of the usual wood sheathing. 

Thomas Farmer. Jr., has been appointed eastern repre- 
sentative of the Consolidated Car-Heating Company, 42 Broad- 
way. Xew York City, succeeding S. Butler Keys, whose resig- 
nation is announced in this issue of the Electric Railway 
Review. Mr. Farmer was formerly connected with the Con- 
solidated Car-Heating Company at Albany, X. Y. 

Myron H. Lewis and Clifford B. Moore, editors of Water- 
proofing, have opened offices in the St. James building. 1133 
Broadway, Xew York, where they will conduct a general con- 
sulting engineering business in waterproofing, foundations, 
hydraulics and reinforced concrete. Special attention will be 
given to making investigations, reports and tests and to the 
preparation of plans, estimates and specifications for water- 
proofing and dampproofing work of every description. Sam- 



ples of commercial waterproofing and dampproofing products 
and literature and information concerning every modern 
process will be kept on hand for the convenience of architects, 
engineers and builders. 

American Equipment Company has opened an office in the 
West End Trust building, Philadelphia, Pa., to deal in new and 
second-hand contractors' machinery and railway equipment. 
The company will make a specialty of renting road rollers, con- 
crete mixers, crushing plants, hoisting engines, steam shovels, 
etc. It will also purchase and dismantle plants, buying ma- 
chinery of every description. 

Star Brass Works, Kalamazoo, Mich., manufacturer of 
Kalamazoo trolley wheels and harps, reports that it has com- 
pleted more of its special machinery, increasing the capacity 
of its plant by half. The company now expects to be able to 
handle orders more promptly than has been the case during 
the past six months. The demand for the Kalamazoo product 
for the last year was larger than ever before and the pros- 
pects for this year are satisfactory. 

American Locomotive Company, 111 Broadway, Xew York, 
announces the following changes, effective on January 1: F. 
J. Cole, formerly mechanical engineer, has been appointed 
consulting engineer with headquarters at Schenectady. The 
office of mechanical engineer has been abolished and the duties 
heretofore performed by this officer will be included in the 
jurisdiction of William Dalton, chief engineer, with headquar- 
ters at Schenectady. Carl J. Mellin, formerly designing engi- 
neer, has been appointed consulting engineer with headquar- 
ters at Schenectady. , 

A. M. Hewlett, president of the Western Tube Company, 
Kewanee, 111., whose death from paralysis on December 20 
was reported in the Electric Railway Review of January 4, was 
57 years old. and had lived in Kewanee 33 years. Mr. Hewlett 
had been president of the Western Tube Company since 1904, 
having worked his way up from the position of bookkeeper. 
As the executive head of the company he was more than suc- 
cessful. He not only wisely directed the business policy, but 
gave much attention to the welfare of his employes. Mr. 
Hewlett suffered his first paralytic stroke on Wednesday, De- 
cember 18, but the fatal illness dated back many months. He 
leaves a widow and one son. 

Robert W. Hunt & Co., Chicago, inspecting and consult- 
ing engineers, have decided to establish a branch office and 
chemical laboratory at St. Louis, Mo. This representation will 
be under the charge of Charles W. Gennett, Jr., as noted in 
the Electric Railway Review of December 21. Mr. Gennett 
graduated with the degree of mechanical engineer from Cornell 
University in 1S98, following which he was employed in the 
drafting room of the Baldwin Locomotive Works, and later in 
the inspecting and testing department of the Southern Railway. 
During the latter part of his connection with that organiza- 
tion he was in charge of their inspection work in Pittsburg and 
the west. Since then, and up to the time of entering the 
service of Robert W. Hunt & Co., he has been the western 
sales agent of the Atha Steel Casting Company, with head- 
quarters in Chicago. 

Preston Car & Coach Company, Preston, Ont.. has com- 
pleted its temporary plant for the manufacture of passenger 
equipment for steam and electric lines and is rebuilding a num- 
ber of passenger cars for the Temiskaming & Xorthern On- 
tario. The company has 8 1-3 acres of land with spur tracks 
to the Grand Trunk and Canadian Pacific railways and has 
laid foundation for a 3-story L-shaped building with a frontage 
of 200 feet and a depth of 140 feet, the three floors to be used 
respectively as a blacksmith and machine shop, mill and cabi- 
net shop and by the upholstering and finishing departments. 
A car construction shop to be built in two sections each 37 
by 200 feet will also be erected. The permanent power house 
of reinforced concrete to conform to construction of the other 
permanent buildings is 40 by 60 feet and has been completed. 
The machinery thus far installed is new and of modern design. 
The temporary building now occupied is 80 by 260 feet and 
will be utilized for lumber sheds or other purposes when the 
plant is completed. In addition to the repair work now in 
hand for the Temiskaming & Xorthern Ontario the company 
has contracts for a number of new cars for passenger equip- 
ment for the same road and for several cars for electric lines. 
The directors of the company include Martin X. Todd, presi- 
dent and general manager of the Gait Preston & Hespeler 
Street Railway, who is also president of the company. Fred- 
erick Clair, vice-president of the company and mayor of Pres- 
ton; George Cliar, M. P.; George Pattinson, M. P.; C. Kloep- 
fer, ex-M. P., and C. R. Hanning, who is secretary and treasurer 
of the company. The active management is in the hands of 
Donald M. Campbell, who is general manager, and Charles S. 
Wright, general sales manager. 



January 11. 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



61 



ADVERTISING LITERATURE. 

Whitmore Manufacturing Company. Cleveland. O. — A les- 
son in gear protection and economy is shown in a recently is- 
sued foider. Illustrations demonstrate the difference in wear 
on gears used with and without Whitmores gear protective 
compound. 

Joseph Dixon Crucible Company, Jersey City. N. J. — A neat 
booklet recently issued has for its subject air brake lubrica- 
tion. It contains a description of the properties, uses and 
special advantages of Dixon's Ticonderoga graphite air brake 
and triple valve grease and Dixon's special graphite No. 635. 

Locke Insulator Manufacturing Company. Victor. N. Y. — A 
calendar bearing a most excellent reproduction of the famous 
painting "Nathalie." by Alfred Schwartz, is being distributed. 
Attached to the calendar is a brief description of the work of 
the artist who painted the original from which the reproduc- 
tion was made. 

Novelty News. Chicago, III. — A monthly publication, con- 
taining about 70 pages in 3-column makeup. It is full of 
novelty advertising suggestions, premium ideas and new plans 
to increase sales for manufacturer, jobber, merchant, salesman 
and agent. All the novelties of the month are shown, many 
of them illustrated. 

Cortright Metal Roofing Company. Philadelphia. Pa. — The 
January issue of the Cortright Metal Shingle Advocate is out 
in a new and attractive cover. The contents are interesting 
and well worth reading. They give practical suggestions that 
create new thoughts about roofing which are apt to be over- 
looked by those who are not giving their whole time to 
building. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Company, New York, N. Y. — An illus- 
trated description of what is probably the largest and heaviest 
metal planer ever built is contained in a recently issued pub- 
lication. The huge machine weighs 845,000 pounds, or 422*2 
tons, and requires motors with a total of 207 ^ horsepower for 
driving table, slotter bars. lift. etc. In general this machine is 
of the usual planer type, but it possesses a number of unusual 
features. 



with I -inch tongued and grooved yellow pine and from the 
arm rail down are covered with No. 14 sheet steel in panels. 
The interior sides of the car are made of No. 14 sheet steel, 
riveted together in one length, forming an interior truss. 
Each car is full vestibuled with folding doors. 

The interior finish is of cherry except the steel panels 
below the arm rail. All cars are equipped with Hale & Kil- 
burn walkover seats and Pantasote curtains, and are lighted by 
15 incandescent lamps. The cars are equipped with the 
Danville Car Company side vestibule sign, the Kirby-Neal 
headlight and are mounted on Brill No. 21-E trucks. 



VICTOR PORTABLE TESTING METER. 



By ordinary methods it requires considerable effort and 
more than one instrument to accurately measure the voltage, 
amperage and wattage of a lamp circuit. For this reason it 




SEMI-STEEL CARS FOR THE AMARILLO STREET 
RAILWAY. 



The Danville Car Company has recently built for the 
Amarillo Street Railway Company. Amarillo. Tex., four of its 




Semi-Steel Car — Amarillo Street Railway 

new semi-steel, semi-convertible cars. They have 22-foot car 
bodies. 32 feet 7 inches over all: the width of car bo<: 
feet 2 inches over all. 

Both side sills are of yellow pine, reinforced with steel 
plate between them. The subsidiary sills on each side for 
the truck are reinforced with steel angles. Body framing is 
made of ash. The sides of the car are covered longitudinally 



Victor Portable Testing Meter. 

is interesting to learn that a new type of direct-current 
meter which will simultaneously exhibit all three quantities 
has just been placed on the market. To test a lamp it is 
only necessary to connect the attachment plug and cord of 
the portable meter to any lamp circuit, insert the lamp and 
read volts, amperes and watts 
without computation. 

The movements are built on 
the familiar d'Arsonval pattern, 
and so placed with reference to 
each other and the scale as to 
render the energy- consumption 
directly readable at the intersec- 
tion of the volt and ampere 
indicator needles; the special 
feature being the design, which 
enables the operator to read at 
one glance the pressure, current 
and wattage on any lamp which 
may be inserted in a socket im- 
mediately above the meter. 

The instrument is equipped 
with three self-contained shunts, 
one of 150 amperes capacity, 
having conveniently arranged 
binding posts, and a 1.5 and 0.75 
ampere shunt, which is so con- 
nected within the base of the 
meter as to be readily thrown 
in circuit at will. 

The different shunts may 
easily be placed in circuit by 
the adjustment of a small screw- 
plug at the top and right of the 
instrument. The two smaller 
shunts have universal connec- 
tions. 

The voltmeter may have 
either a 150 or a 300 volt scale 
or both. The most valuable feature of this instrument is the 
fact that accurate wattage measurement may be taken on a 
fluctuating load, as it is required to observe but a single point 
for such readings. 

The instrument is entirely self-contained and weighs less 
than 15 pounds complete. It is being sold by the H. W. Johns- 
Man ville Company. 100 William street. New York. 



62 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2.. 



IMPROVED FORMS OF TICKETS. 



Many electric railway companies are now turning their 
attention to the more general use of some form of ticket sys- 
tem instead of cash fares. While the electric railways were 
principally extensions of city street car lines and the con- 
ductor simply had to collect an additional 5-cent fare upon 
reaching the city limits the cash fare system was sufficient. 
However, this practice has in many cases heen allowed to 
continue with the expansion of the road into a large number 
of zones until the burden on the conductor .and the incon- 
venience to the passenger are unduly increased unless some 
form of ticket is used. When the roads expand still further 
and come into the class of railroads, basing their charges on 
mileage, a ticket system is absolutely necessary. Many city 
lines also are now using tickets to a large extent, especially 
where fares are sold for a' reduced rate if purchased in quan- 
tities. 

The use of tickets is not only a convenience to the con- 
ductor and to the passengers but provides a check on the 
number of fares collected. However, to be an effective check, 
the ticket system must be of such a form as to prevent 
manipulation and be easily handled in the auditor's office. 

We present herewith illustrations of a number of im- 
proved forms of tickets and transfers which have been brought 
out by the Globe Ticket Company of Philadelphia. With its 
improved designs of machinery for the manufacture of tickets 
this company is able to furnish ticket forms which will com 
mend themselves at once as possessing unusual advantages 

One of the latest ticket forms put on the market by 
the company is a mileage book which is suited to the require 
ments of both steam and interurban roads. This book may 
be furnished in units of miles or amounts of fares paid, with 




■THI8RBMI RAILWAY CO. 

, mm , 

l*TcRU8?AK»AIUMYC8, 
7 iRTERURSAS Rill. WAY U. 




'imRuaiAssAiLWArcft. ^ 
3 | — 28J£5!_ 3 

» ; iTERURBAil RAILWAY CO. : 



UTER«SSAR RAILWAY 60. 

980 

j OTERflRBAJJ*«tJAY J#r 



Globe Ticket Forms — 
Package Ticket. 



Globe Ticket Forms — Strip 
from Mileage Book. 



500, 1,000, 1,500 or 2,000 miles to a book. An especial feature 
is that the mileage is in one continuous strip, with no paste 
except for fastening to the cover. The accompanying illustra- 
tions show the appearance of both the mileage strip and the 
5-cent zone strip, with the method of numbering. They aro 
printed in four colors with non-counterfeitable tints. The 
book is strongly bound, with tough cardboard covers. On the 
inside of the front cover is a strip of celluloid which forms a 
straightedge for detaching mileage. The books are standard 
size and the printing and appearance are of a high grade. 



The new package ticket shown herewith also presents a 
number of valuable features. It is furnished in strips con- 
taining any number of tickets from 6 to 24. Each ticket in 
the strip bears the same number instead of a number running 
consecutively through a sheet of tickets, a point that is of 
great value to the auditing department. These tickets are for 
both city and interurban use and have non-counterfeitable 
plate backs and tint faces. The tint face and the numbering 
may be of any color desired, the lettering being black. 

The day and night transfer, samples of which are illus- 
trated, is of an especially simple and convenient form and 
should commend itself at once to all managers. It gives the 
road an entirely different transfer for a. m. and p. m. use 
with no extra trouble to the conductors. As the transfers 
are issued for a. m. use without the coupon and for p. m. 
use with the coupon there is provided not only a different 
appearing transfer for the two parts of the day but also a 



gpce 

" r'ooKiifti' 



1 


999550 


240 


2 


IUTfBUR}»« f\i[M toMPIH/ 


239 


3 


llftPUSBAN FULWIT COMPANY 


238 


4 


MTEMIMM HI [*]•»..■ 

-jtaassa-. 


237 


5 


lnbulSiil n*iL*lV MKflliV 

n..J!L 9 Ai?JL d . 


236 


6 


^99550^ 


235 


7 


IIITERUEB1N RIIIWI1 COMPJUI 


234 


8 


i*!E(UBB»Pi MILW1I WMMM 


233 


a 


..99JSt.» 


232 


10 


IHTERUBSM M,L*«I CUHHH 


231 


11 


i«Ttm«ain MUM1 COWUI 


230 


12 


-M t-LREJN RMWAl L^MPiHY 


229 



- ■ < 



\<\ 



i ^\ I T "" lsttp 

Lu , 



8 15 

7 
8 IS 



10 If 



' i i"™' 



- 


CD |j! 

r — 1 5 j 




era : < 3 
05 j ; i 






3.- J.om . 



Globe Ticket Forms — Strip 
of 5-Cent Zone Checks. 



Globe Ticket Forms — Day 
and Night Transfer Slip. 



different length transfer, thus enabling the receiving con- 
ductor to tell at a glance if the right transfer is presented. 
The convenience in the auditing department is also apparent. 
By the system of duplicate numbering an indisputable record 
is kept. 

This form of transfer has been on the market but a short 
time, but it has already been adopted by about 60 roads, includ- 
ing the Interborough Rapid Transit Company, the Coney 
Island & Brooklyn Railroad and the Public Service Corpora- 
tion of New Jersey, and in the cities of Birmingham, Ala., 
Richmond, Va.. Minneapolis, Minn., Los Angeles, CaL, Spokane, 
Wash.. Tacoma, Wash., and South Chicago, 111. 



Burns & Co., Chicago, consulting corporation specialists, 
announce the perfecting of their organization with offices in 
the Isabella building. The company offers the services of 
associated experts in consultation and personal examination 
in all matters pertaining to the promotion and preliminary 
work of public service and industrial projects, steam and 
electric railways, and all engineering undertakings. The com- 
pany is fitted to give advice concerning any particular feature 
of the project from its organization to financing and final 
flotation, and during construction will give consultation service 
either with or without engineering advice. The staff of Burns 
& Co. has been brought together by J. J. Burns, manager, 
well known in the promotion and construction of steam and 
electric railroads; and affiliated financial, engineering and 
contracting connections will give clients every advantage con- 
sistent with a strictly consulting service. 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Use GRIP NUTS on track bolts 

and You Have a Better, Safer Track 

GRIP NUTS never let loose under any strain, 
jar or vibration unless bolts break. 

GRIP NUT COMPANY 

500 Fifth Avenue, NEW YORK 152 Lake Street, CHICAGO 





It Pays 



to buy this type of brake shoe — the 
kind approved by the A. S. & I. R. A. 
Standardization Committee. 

We would like to give you figures 
based on facts that prove it! Write 

American Brake Shoe & Foundry Co. 



New York Chicago Chattanooga 



MAHWAH, N. J. 




The Christie Type 
Steel Back Shoe 

Tread Wheels 



Motors and 



C A W x ,; 10Iors a 

v~ - rk * v v • Dynamos 



We claim for them the advantages of 
perfect commutation, coolness in opera- 
tion, high efficiency, substantial con- 
struction, interchangeable parts, high 
quality of insulation, perfect balance, 
and pleasing appearance. 



Ask, please, for booklet and information about 
our offer of a 30-day free test 

CLEVELAND ARMATURE WORKS, CLEVELAND, OHIO 

America s Greatest Armature Winding, Commutator and Field Works 




28 ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 2. 



THE J. G. BRILL COMPANY, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

AMERICAN CAR COMPANY, ST. LOUIS, MO. ^SSSSJSSSSShlS. 
G. C. KUHLMAN CAR COMPANY, CLEVELAND,OHIO ^™ c c ° a S a Sn 1 ^SSS! 

JOHN STEPHENSON COMPANY, ELIZABETH, N. J. Australian agents: noyes 

„ ,„,,__, ~ ,, . „,, BROTHERS, SYDNEY. CABLES: 

WASON MANUFACTURING CO.SPRINGFIELD,MASS. brill phila , axles london. 



^ARS^^^U?KS^^EATS^^AT^N^SP^INGSSPECIAL TIES SUPPLIES 

RATTAN SEAT COVERING 

Brill rattan seat covering is woven in all widths from eighteen 
to thirty-six inches, the standard sizes being twenty, twenty- 
four and twenty-six inches, and the standard length of a roll 
is two hundred and twenty-five feet. For use on seat cushions 
it is lined with canvas, but for seat backs the unlined woven 
cane is amply strong for the purpose. We use the best 
selected hard cane, which, while it costs a little more than 
the soft cane often used, is well worth the difference, for it 
retains its clean, glossy appearance and color and is much 
more durable. Soft cane has very much the appearance of 
hard cane when new, but it discolors quickly and wears badly. 
Our method of weaving cane produces uniformity of texture, 
and the material never fails to give complete satisfaction. 
We manufacture seats for all types of city and interurban cars. 



L°I N E D AND UNLINED TWILL WEAVE RATTAN 



January 11, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



29 



General Electric Company 



1 




Hpn 


Si 


£ 


^E£~*£l^ 


Syjjjfg 




^ 



Railway Motor Gears 

The Machine Shops 



The joint faces of both 
halves of split gears are 
milled simultaneously in 
the same jig and all bolt 
holes are drilled in a com- 
bination fixture which 
insures correct relation 
of holes in the two halves. 




Tvi I Machine Employed in Joint Milling of 

Split Gear Castings. 





i- Mounted in Gear Cutting Machi 

Roughing and Finishing Cutter 

Operating Simultaneously. 



Gear rims are machined on circular 
mill, in which operation the torque stress 
imposed on castings is more severe than 
is met in service. 



Combination roughing and finishing 
cutters are employed in cutting teeth, 
insuring greater accuracy in tooth di- 
mension than is obtainable by any other 
cutting method. 



"Original Equipment Quality" 

means 

"Original Equipment Service" 

Tin filial advi rtisi mi nl q) thil si iei in th Electric Railway />'■ vu w "ill appeal January 
18th, entitled tht "Inspection and Testing of General Electric Railway Woto 



Chicago Office: 
Monadnock Building 



Principal Office: 

Schenectady, N. Y. 



Sales Offices in 
All Large Cities 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



.January 11; 1908. 




Are you interested in trolley construction? 
Our "Red Booklet'' is a book of facts. It tells 
why "Phono-Electric" trolley wire is superior 
to hard drawn copper wire. Mailed free. 

BRIDGEPORT BRASS CO. 

Postal Telegraph Building 
Broadway and Murray Street, NEW YORK 




/UFK/N 



MEASURING TAPES 

are the choice of .-spert electrical engineers in all quarter* 
of the globe. Absolute accuracy and the highest possible 
degree of durability make them especially adapted to 
Electric Railway Work. 

New York. 
London, Eng 
Windsor, Can 



TH E/l/FK/N /?ULEfio. 

SAC I HAW MICH., U.S.A. 



For CABLE, ELECTRIC aud 
ELEVATED CARS 




VAN DORN AUTOMATIC 
COUPLERS 



J 



W. T. Yan Doen, Gen'l Manager 



The records go farthi-r than talk. 
Look up the records. 
Send for booklet of information on Couplings. 

W- T. VAN DORN COMPANY, 1076 S. Paulina Street, CHICAGO 



Washburn "M" Type Traction Coupler 



Strongest, Simplest and Cheapest 
Traction Coupler Ever Made 



Illustration shows two "M" Type couplers on 
a forty five degree curve and coupled with a 
short cast link as used on cars having a short 
wheel base. For longer cars a longer link cast- 
ing is furnished, giving any amount of distance 
between cars, and affording the desired clearance 
when traveling curves. 

Ask for new catalogue of traction devices. 
Washburn Steel Castings & Coupler Co. 

MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 





Every nickel collected is registered 
before reaching the conductor's hand 
when you use the 

Rooke Automatic 
Fare Collector 

The Rooke System is a revolution 
in fare-collecting methods, and as 
far superior to old systems as the 
trolley car is to the horse car. 

*(I Why not ask us to prove it ? 

Rooke Automatic Register Co. 



PROVIDENCE 



RHODE ISLAND 



WADDELL& MAHON 

Special Agents 

PHILADELPHIA OFFICE BALTIMORE OFFICE 

Room 312 Lippincott Bid;;. Room 406 Baltimore American Bldg. 
Long Distance Telephone Long Distance Telephone 

2403 Walnut 5347 St. Paul 

BOSTON OFFICE 
Room 411 Post-Ortice Square Building 
Long Distance Telephone, 959 Fort Hill 

ALWAYS ON DUTY 





1133 BROADWAY 






Suite 1024 and 103S St. James Building 






NEW YORK 




Long Distanc 
45S2 Madi 


? Telephone Night 
son Sq. Telephones 


2SO.i Melrose 
2903 Melrose 



Have You Any Labor Troubles? 

Do You Anticipate Trouble? 
We Are Licensed Special Agents 

We are not a Detective Agency, but Special Agents 
who act for Corporal inn- and .Manufacturers in the 
termination of labor diriieulties. We secure and 
furnish non-union mechanics in all trades, and 
skilled labor in all branches of industry, for service 
during strikes, and establishing the open shop. We 
also furnish Special Police Patrolmen, trained to 
their duties for the protection of non-union work- 
men and security of property. We establish, operate 
and maintain Commissaries for the maintenance 
of non-union workmen, performing Special Service 
during strikes and lockouts. 

We Are Not a Detective Agency 

We Are Successful 

We Get Results 



IN THIS ISSUE DESCRIPTION OF NEW SHOPS INDIANA UNION TRACTION COMPANY 

Ftectric Railway Review 



160 Harrison Street, Chicago 
l.V) Na-.-au Street. New York 
15'*.* Williamson Bid*;.. Cleveland 



CHICAGO, JANUARY 18, 1908 



Whole N o. Subscription : Domestic 



NOW 

is the time 
to patronize 
the optimist 



Advertisers: Remember, please, 
that the time to advertise is all 
the time you want to do business. 



You will find a large num- 
ber of him represented in 
the advertising pages of the 
Electric Railway Review 
These advertising optimists, 
you will note, cover every 
branch of the electric railway 
supply business. (Pessimists 
hardly ever or never adver- 
tise, you know). 

If everybody will buy goods 
of optimists — of the men 
who have faith in their 
country and their business, 
and prove it by persistent 
advertising — if you will buy 
goods of them, the return to 
normal business conditions 
which set in with the New 
Year will be greatly accel- 
erated. 

Make it a point to read the 
advertising pages in this 
and following issues of the 
Electric Railway Review 
Then place your orders with 
the men who are exerting 
every effort to make business 
what it ought to be and what 
it will be soon. 



Alphabetical List of Advertisers. Page 4. 



Advertisers' Classified Directory, Pages 4-6-8-10. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 



Queen 


Testing Sets 


"The Recognized /^g 
Standard" fBi 

Vn 

Voltmeters 1|B, 
Ammeters V§ 


■gSm3m3k U. S. Stand- 

^r^'.": ---'IjBb, ard Testing 

S*l Sets 
\± Mf§ffg£|« Rail Bond 


Switchboard t| 
and Portable 


^ngfl^l^ittfvfe^ 1 esters 
^^£335 i *sS§Sk Galvanom- 


Alternating $J| 

and Direct ^jj| 

Current ™ 

Q 


^■pSS)'. rA eters,etc.,etc. 
^Bj^js^isl^^p|^^g* Electrical 
E^Ta^i"^^ Instrument- for 
^^^^^ All Purposes 
ueeu Acme Testing Set 


QUEEN & CO., inc., Philadelphia, Pa. 



WESTON Electrical Instrument Co. 

Main Office and Works: 
WAVERLY PARK, NEWARK, N. J. 



Illuminated 

Dial Station 

Instruments 




SEND FOR NEW CATALOGUE 



Berlin— European Weston Electrical Instru- 
ment Co., Kitterstrasse, No. 88 
Weston Standard Illuminated Paris. France— E. H. Cadiot, 12 Rue St. Georges 
Dial Station Voltmeter London— Audrey House. Ely Place, Holbom 
Model 11 New York Office— 74 Cortlaudt St. 




(End View) 

Has adjustable steel noses — suit- 
able for general urban and light 
interurban service. The most 
efficient low priced electric 
snow-plow on the market. 

The RUSSELL Pedestal 
Electric Snow-Plow No. 6 



RUSSELL CAR & SNOW-PLOW COMPANY, Ridgway, Pa. 

Wendell & MacDutiie. Cortlandt St., New York— Eastern Sales Agents; 
Robinson & Cary Co., St. Paul. Minn.. C. A. Ralston, Fisher Bide . Chicago, 
111. — Western Sales Agents ; Dominion Supply Co., Winnipeg. Manitoba — 
Western Canada Sales Agents. 



Do away with the 

Hot Box Habit 

on your road 

by using Steel Wool Journal Pack- 
ing — the perfect packing that has 
accomplished this result on many roads 
Send now for a free sample and test it 

WM. ROBERTSON & COMPANY 

General Office : Great Northern Bldg., Chicago 
Factory: 75 S. Jefferson St., Battle Creek, Mich. 



National Air Brakes 




EMERGENCY VALVES WITH QUICK- 
RELEASE FEATURE. 



'National" Emergency Quick-Release Valve 



The new "National" Emergency Valve 
with quick- release feature combines with 
the straight air brake system the emergency 
quick-set and quick-release features of the 
automatic system. This is the most sim- 
plified type of emergency apparatus, re- 
quiring one-third less piping than any other 
emergency equipment. 

WRITE FOR DESCRIPTIVE BULLETIN. 



National Brake & Electric Co. 



NEW YORK: HI Broadway 

PHILADELPHIA: 1722 Westmoreland St. ty\ , I vx/Q , « Lpa IT C A 

BOSTON: F. E. Huntress. 131 State St. '""WdUKCC, U.O. /\. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.: W. F. McKenny, 

526 Mission St. 
LONDON : 1 4 Great Smith St. .Westminster 



General Sales Office: 519 First National Bank Building, Chicago 



January IS, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 




Protective Apparatus 

MAXIMUM PROTECTION AT MINIMUM COST 



Some Leading Types: 



T*VDe C Arrester Alternating current, range 500 
to 1250 volts. Has an instan- 



M. P. Arrester 



Types I and J 



Type T (Tank) 



taneous carrying capacity. 

Direct current for arc circuits up 
to 4000 volts. Type I mounted 
on marble base for station work. 
Type J enclosed in iron box for 
line use. 

Direct current railway and 
power station work. 500 to 750 
volts. The discharge path is 
through the water in the tank. 

Ask for Circulars Nos. 1126 and 1146. 



Low Equivalent 

Electrolytic 

Arresters 



Alternating and direct current, 
range 500 to 750 volts, for rail- 
way work. Has a freedom of 
discharge many times greater 
than other low voltage arresters. 

High tension alternating cur- 
rent. An advance overall other 
types in its particular field. 

High tension alternating cur- 
rent. The equivalent spark gap 
the lowest. Limits voltage to a 
certain critical value. 



Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co. 



Detroit 
Kansas City 
Los Angeles 
Minneapolis 
Canada: Canadian Westinghouse Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ontario. 



Atlanta 


Buffalo 


Cleveland 


Baltimore 


Chicago 


Dallas 


Boston 


Cincinnati 


Denver 



New Orleans 
New York 
Philadelphia 



Pittsburg 
St. Louis 
Salt Lake City 



San Francisco 

Seattle 

Syracuse 



Mexico: G. & O. Braniff & Co., City of Mexico. 




Westinghouse Steam Turbines 

Have No Secrets of Construction 

The simple method of blade mounting; the 
water sealed packing glands surrounding 
the shaft; the automatic speed limit; the 
automatically controlled secondary valve, 
allowing enormous overloads; the oil-cush- 
ioned journals, are all details well known to 
the power-using public. 

Steam Turbine Publication 7002 gives 
a detailed description; ask for it. 

The Westinghouse Machine Co. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Power Behind the Brake is 
the Air Compressor 

Prompt and efficient brake action absolutely depends upon its 
reliability. Furthermore, the compressor comprises over 50 per 
cent of the cost of the brake equipment. The greatest care should 
therefore be exercised in selecting this important piece of appa- 
ratus. YOU CAN RELY UPON WESTINGHOUSE COMPRESSORS 
they have stood the test of years in the hardest service. 




Compressor, showing accessibility of Commutator Brushes 

Westinghouse Traction Brake Co. 

General Offices; Pittsburg, Pa. 

New York. Chicago. St. Louis. 

Trinity Building. Ry. Exchange Building 1932 N. Broadway. 

For Canada: Canadian Westinghouse Co., Ltd.. Hamilton, Ont. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Acme White Lead & Color 
Works 

Advance Lumber Co 22 

Allis-Chalmers Co 

Aluminum Co. of America. . .2:; 

American Brake Shoe & Fdrv. 
Co 27 

American Electrical Works 

American Prog & Switch Co... 

Anderson, Albert & J. M.. 
Mfg. Co 19 

Armstrong Oiler Co 

Arnold Company _ 1 

Atlas Anchor Co IS 

Babeock & Wilcox Co 12 

Baker, The Wm. C, Heating 

& Supply Co 25 

Baldwin Locomotive Works. .18 

Barbour-Stockwell Co 

Barnes, G. H., Hardwood 

Lumber Co 22 

Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 

Co 

Beidler, Francis, & Co 

Bellamy Vestlette Mfg. Co 21 

Berthold & Jennings 

Blake Signal .V- Mfg. Co 

Bliss, R.. Mfg. Co 

Bridgeport Brass Co 

Brill, The J. G., Co 2S 

Brown, Harold P 15 

Brown Hoisting Machy. Co.. 24 

Buckeye Engine Co 

Burnham, Williams & Co IS 

Byllesby, H. M., & Co 24 

Central Inspection Bureau... 24 

Chase-Shawmut Co 11 

Churchill Cedar Co 22 

Cincinnati Car Co '.25 

Cincinnati Frog & Switch Co... 
Cleveland Armature Works.. 27 

Cleveland Frog & Cross. Co 

Collier, Barron G 18 

Columbia Construction Co 

Consolidated Car Fender Co.. 17 
Consolidated Car-Heating Co. 24 
Contractors' Supply & Equip- 
ment Co 

Cooper Heater Co 23 

Crane Co 24 

Creaghead Engineering Co... 24 
Curtain Supply Co 24 

Davis, The John, Co 

Dearborn Drug & Chemical 

Works 23 

Detroit Graphite Co 26 



Drouve. The G., Co 

Drummond Detective Agency... 
Durkin Controller Handle Co... 

Earll, C. I 

Eclipse R;>ilwa\ Supply Co.. 18 
Electric Railway Equipment 

Co 13 

Electric Ry. Improvement Co. 5 
Electric Service Supplies Co.... 

Engineering Agency, The 

Engineers and Contractors. . .24 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co 

Ford, Bacon & Davis 

Galena- Signal Oil Co 17 

General Electric Co 29 

General Storage Battery Co.. 21 

Gillette Chemical Co 

Goheen Mfg. Co 15 

Goldschmidt Thermit Co 17 

Green Engineering Co in 

Green Fuel Economizer Co 

Griffin Wheel Co 23 

Grip Nut Co 27 

Hagy, J. Milton, Waste Wks. .12 

Hale & Kilburn Mfg. Co 

Harrison. F. P.. Elec. Mfg. Co.30 

Hartshorn. Stewart. Co 23 

Heine Safety Boiler Co 24 

Hevwood Bros. & Wakefield 

Co 

Holman. D. F., Ry. Tracklayer 

Co 24 

Homer Commutator Co 

Hooven-Owens-Rentschler Co. 11 

Hope Webbing Co 

Humbird Lumber Co., Ltd 

Indestructible Fibre Co 

Jewett Car Co 25 

Johann, F. A 21 

Johns-Manville, H. W.. Co... 13 

Kennicott Water Softener Co... 
Kinnear Manufacturing Co... 26 

Lindsley Bros. Co., The 22 

Lorain Steel Co 18 

Lord & Burnham Co 17 

Lufkin Rule Co 30 

Lumen Bearing Co 30 

Macallen Co 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co... 



Marshall. R. W., & Co 21 

Massachusetts Chemical Co.. 12 

Meyers, Fred J., Mfg. Co 21 

Middletown Car Works 

Miller Anchor Co 

Milloy Electric Co., The 21 

Model Stoker Co., The 24 

Morden Frog & Crossing Wks.23 

National Brake & Electric Co. 2 

National Carbon Co 

National Lock Washer Co 19 

Naugle Pole & Tie Co 22 

New York Switch & Crossing 

Co 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co 25 

Northern Engineering Works... 
Nuttall, R. D., Co 13 

Ohio Brass Co 5 

Okonite Co., Ltd 11 

Pacific Coast Pole Co 22 

Pantasote Co 19 

Patten, Paul B 

Pay-As-You-Enter Car Co.... 9 

Power Specialty Co 22 

Pressed Steel Car Co 

Queen & Co 2 

Rail Joint Co 22 

Railway Specialty & Supply 

Co 22 

Railway Steel-Spring Co 24 

Recording Fare Register Co.. 21 

Reed, Francis, Co 

Register, A. L., & Co 24 

Reiter, G. C 24 

Ridlon, Frank, Co 

Roberts & Abbott Co 24 

Robertson. Wm., & Co 2 

Rodger Ballast Car Co 24 

Rooke Automatic Register Co.30 
Rossi I cr, MacGovern & Co. 

(Inc.) 21 

Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co. 2 

S-E. Missouri Cypress Co 22 

St. Louis Car Co 7 

St. Louis Car Wheel Co 24 

St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 

Co 12 

Sanderson & Porter 

Saxton, E 

Shinier & Chase Co 24 

Security Register & Mfg. Co.. 13 
Sheaff & Jastaad 



Simmons, John, Co 18 

Smith, Peter, Heater Co 22 

Speer Carbon Co 

Standard Brake Shoe Co 24 

Standard Motor Truck Co.... 14 

Standard Paint Co 21 

Standard Steel Works IS 

Standard Underground Cable 

Co 

Standard Varnish Works 21 

Star Brass Works IS 

Stone & Webster Engr. Corp. 24 

Stuart-Howland Co 

Symington, T. H., Co 26 

Telegraph Signal Co 30 

Trolley Supply Co 

Under-Feed Stoker Co IS 

United States Graphite Co.. 

The 

U. S. Metal & Mfg. Co L5 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co 24 

Van Dorn, W. T., Co 

Van Valkenburgh, E. C 19 

Waddell & Mahon 30 

Wagenhorst. J. H., & Co 22 

AYallace Supply Co 

Wanted and For Sale Cards.. 

211. 21 

Washburn Steel Castings & 

Coupler Co 15 

Watson-Stillman Co 17 

Wendell & MacDuffie 

Western Electric Co 19 

Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. 

Co 3 

Westinghouse Machine Co.... 3 
Westinghouse Traction Brake 

Co 3 

Weston Electrical Instrument 

Co 2 

Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co 

Wheeler Condenser & Eng'g 

Co 24 

Wheel Truing Brake Shoe Co. 24 

White, J. G.. & Co 24 

Whitmore Mfg. Co., The 19 

Wilson, J. G.. Mfg. Co 26 

Wood. Guilford S 12 

Woodman, R., Mfg. & Supply 

Co 

Worcester, C. H., Co 22 

Zelnicker, Walter A., Supply 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 



Advertising Service. 
Van Valkenburgh, E. C, 2117 
West One Hundred and Sec- 
ond St., Chicago. 

Advertising, Street Car. 
Collier, Barron G., Flat Iron 
Bldg., New York. 

Air Brakes — (See Brakes and 
Brake Parts). 

Air Compressors — (See Com- 
pressors, Air). 

Alloys and Bearing Metals. 

Brown, H. P., 120 Liberty St., 
New York. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Lumen Bearing Co., Buffalo. 
N. Y. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Aluminum Wire, Etc. 
Aluminum Co. of America, 
Pittsburg. 

Anchors. 

Atlas Anchor Co., Cleveland. O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Miller Anchor Co., Norwalk, O. 
Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Armatures and Coils, Winding 
and Repairing. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 160 
South St., New York. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Stuart-Howland Co.. Boston. 



Armature Lifts. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Asbestos Materials. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 
Axles — (See Wheels and Axles). 
Babbitt Metals — (See Alloys and 

Bearing Metals). 
Badges and Buttons. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Recording Fare Register Co., 
New Haven, Conn. 
Ballast Cars — (See Cars, Bal- 
last). 
Ball Bearing. 
Symington, T. H., Co., Balti- 
more, Md. 

Bases — (See Trolley Poles and 
Fittings). 

Batteries. 

General Storage Battery Co., 
42 Broadway, New York. 
Bearings. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Lumen Bearing Co., Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Nuttall, R. D., Co., Pittsburg. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Symington, T. H., Co., Balti- 
more, Md. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 
Cleveland, O. 

Bells and Gongs. 
American Car Co., St. Louis. 
Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 



Bells and Gongs — Continued. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 

1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 
Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 

Cleveland. 
McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 

Chicago. 
Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 
Reiter, G. C, Canton, O. 
St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 

Mo. 
Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 
Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 
Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Mass. 
Western Electric Co., Chicago. 
Black Lead. 
Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit, 

Mich. 
U. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw, 

Mich. 
Block System — (See Signals). 
Blowers — (See Mechanical Draft) 
Blue Printing Machines. 

Buckeye Engine Co., Salem, O. 
Boilers. 
Babeock & Wilcox Co., N. Y. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chi- 
cago. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 

Matteawan, N. Y. 
Heine Safety Boiler Co., 421 

Olive St., St. Louis. 
Lord & Burnham, Irvington- 

on-IIudson, New York. 
Rossiter, MacGovern & Co., 17 

Battery PI., New York. 
Boiler Cleaning Compound. 
Dearborn Drug & Chemical 

Works, Chicago. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 
Bonds, Rail. 
Brown, H. P., 120 Liberty St., 

New York. 
Chase-Shawmut Co., New- 

buryport, Mass. 
Electric Railway Improvement 

Co., Cleveland, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 



Bonds, Rail — Continued. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Goldschmidt Thermit Co., 43 
Exchange PI., New York. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Brackets and Cross Arms. 

Anderson, Albert & J. M., 
Mfg. Co., Boston. 

Creaghead Engineering Co., 
Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Railway Equipment 
Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Lindsley Bros. Co., Spokane, 
Wash. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Brakes and Brake Parts. 

Allis-Chalmers Co., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

National Brake & Electric Co., 
Milwaukee. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Westinghouse Traction Brake 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Brakeshoes. 
American Brake Shoe & Fdry. 

Co., Mahwah, N. J. 
American Car Co., St. Louis. 
Barbour-Stockwell Co., Cam- 

bridgeport, Mass. 



January 18, 1908. 




h 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 

Attractive Prices 

on Low- Voltage Porcelain Insu- 
lators for Telephone, Electric 
Light and Railway Feeder Work 




Pony Double Groove Insulator 
Cat. No. MOO 



We are quoting prices on low -tension insu- 
lators that you cannot afford to overlook 
{JOur insulators are of the highest quality and 
our factory facilities such that we are able to 
make immediate shipment on all standard types 

Write for full particulars and ask for INSULATOR CATALOGUE No. 1 



THE OHIO BRASS COMPANY 

MAIN OFFICE — MANSFIELD, OHIO WORKS 



New York: 43-49 Exchange Place D . — „ ., „_ r .. • D ... , St 

,-.. ■ .,-.. p. ■ c .° Burt uellatlv. 336 rourth Avenue, Pittsburg A . 

Chicago: 321 Dearborn Street " ■ A 



. Louis: 10 N. Fourth Street 
Atlanta: Peters Building 



One of the strongest points about this car 
for installing rail bonds by 

Electric Brazing 
and Copper Welding 

is its portability. 

It can be removed from the track in one 
minute when necessary to meet traffic condi- 
tions. And it can be replaced in equally short 
time. Its use has proved profitable, without 
serious interruption of service, on lines running 
under a 2^-minute headway. 

TVe would like to tell you some more facts 
— write us, please. 

The Electric Railway Improvement Co. 

6005 Carnegie Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 




ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS Continued. 



Brakeshoes — Continued. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Standard Brake Shoe Co., Au- 
rora, 111. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co., 

Philadelphia. 
Wheel Truing Brake Shoe Co., 

Detroit. 

Bridges. 
Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 
Bldg., St. Louis. 



Brushes, Motors and Dyanmos. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

National Carbon Co., Cleve- 
land. O. „„„ „ 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Speer Carbon Co., St. Marys, 
Pa. 
Bumpers, Car. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co.. Phila- 
delphia. _ _ _ 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co- 
Cleveland. _ x _ 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. „_,_.« 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 
Car Cleaner. 

Gillette Chemical Co., 42 
Broadway, New York. 

Car House Doors. 

Kinnear Mfg. Co., Columbus, 

Wilson, J. G., Mfg. Co., New 

York. 
Car Replacers. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 
TJ. S. Metal & Mfg. Co., 2o 

Broad St., New York. 

Car Roof Paint, Canvas. 

St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Car Seats. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Hale & Kilburn Mfg. Co- 
Philadelphia. >j 

Heywood Bros. & Wakefield 
Co., Wakefield, Mass. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co.. 
Cleveland. 

St. Louis Car Co.. St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Car Signs — (See Signs, Cars and 

Track). 
Car Steps. „ 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Car Trimmings — (See Trim- 
mings, Car). 
Cars, Ballast. 

Rodger Ballast Car Co., Chgo. 
St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis. 
Mo. 

Cars, Dump. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

Middletown Car Works, Mid- 
dletown, Pa. 

Rodger Ballast Car Co., Chgo. 

Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co., 
Ridgway, Pa. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 
Cars, Passenger and Freight. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Cincinnati Car Co.. Cincinnati. 

Detroit Carbuilding & Equip- 
ment Co., Detroit, Mich. 



Cars, Passenger and Freight — 
Continued. 

Electric Railway Improvement 
Co., Cleveland. O. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

Jewett Car Co., Newark, O. 

Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 
Bldg., St. Louis. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co- 
Chicago. 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co., Niles, O. 

Pressed Steel Car Co., Pitts- 
burg. 

Rodger Ballast Car Co., Chgo. 

Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co., 
Ridgway, Pa. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Standard Motor Truck Co- 
Pittsburg. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co.. Springfield. 
Mass. 

Cars, Pay-As-You-Enter. 
Pav-As- You- Enter Car Co., 26 
Cortlandt St., New York. 

Cars, Rebuilt. 

Detroit Carbuilding & Equip- 
ment Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Cars, Second-Hand. 

Detroit Carbuilding & Equip- 
ment Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Marshall, R. W- & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Zelnicker, Walter A- Supply 
Co., St. Louis. 

Middletown Car Works, Mid- 
dletown, Pa. 

Pressed Steel Car Co.. Pitts- 
burg. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Standard Motor Truck Co., 
Pittsburg. 

Castings, Brass. 
Star Brass Works, Kalamazoo, 
Mich. 

Castings, Iron and Steel. 

American Brake Shoe & Foun- 
dry Co., Mahwah, N. J. 

Green Engineering Co., Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg- Chicago. 

Lorain Steel Co., Johnstown, 
Pa. 

National Brake & Electric Co., 
Milwaukee. 



Cements, Cable and Transformer. 
Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 
Circuit-Breakers. 
Electric Service Supplies Co- 
200 Plymouth Bldg- Chicago. 
General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 
Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Coal Handling Machinery — (See 
Conveyors). 

Coils — (See Armaturesand Colls) 
Commutators and Parts. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
1020-24 Filbert St.. Phila. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Homer Commutator Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Marshall, R. W- & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ohio Brass Co.. Mansfield, O. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Compressors, Air. 
Fairbanks. Morse & Co., Chgo. 
General Electric Co., Schenec- 

tadv, N. Y. 
National Brake & Electric Co., 

Milwaukee. 
Westinghouse Traction Brake 

Co., Pittsburg. 

Concrete Mixers- 
Contractors' Supply & Equip. 
Co., Chicago. 

Condensers. 
Wheeler Con. & Eng. Co., New 
York. 

Conduits. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg- Chicago. 
Western Electric Co., Chicago. 



Contractors. 

Arnold Company, 181 La Salle 
St., Chicago. 

Byllesby, H. M- Co., Am. 
Trust Bldg- Chicago. 

Columbia Construction Co- 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Creaghead Engineering Co- 
Cincinnati, O. 

Green Engineering Co., Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg- Chicago. 

Register, A. L- & Co., 112 
N. Broad St., Philadelphia. 

Sanderson & Porter, 52 Will- 
iam St., New York. 

Saxton, E- 841 Bladensburg 
R., Washington, D. C. 

Sheaff & Jaastad, 88 Broad 
St., Boston. 

Stone & Webster Engineering 
Corp., Boston. 

Wharton, Wm- Jr., & Co., 
Philadelphia. 

White, J. G., & Co., 49 Ex- 
change PI- New York. 

Controllers and Attachments. 

Durkin Con. Handle Co., Ar- 
cade Bldg., Philadelphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg- Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Johns-Manville, H. W- Co., 
New York. 

Marshall, R. W- & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg. 

Conveyors and Coal Handling 

Machinery. 
Green Engineering Co., Com'l 

Nat. Bk. Bldg- Chicago. 
Northern Engineering Works, 

Detroit, Mich. 

Cord, Bell and Trolley. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G- Co.. Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 

Kuhlman, The G. C- Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Couplers, Car. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G- Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C- Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Van Dorn, W. T- Co., Pau- 
lina St., Chicago. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Washburn, E. C- Minneapolis. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 
Coverings, Pipe and Boiler. 

Johns-Manville, H. W- Co- 
New York. 

Cranes, Hoists and Lifts. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G- Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Brown Hoisting Machinery 
Co., Cleveland, O. 

Kuhlman. The G. C, Car Co- 
Cleveland. 

Northern Engineering Works, 
Detroit, Mich. 

Railway Specialty & Supply 
Co., Chicago. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co- 
Cleveland. O. 

Wason Mfg. Co.. Springfield, 
Mass. 
Cross Arms — (See Brackets and 
Cross Arms). 

Crossing Gates — (See Gates and 
Guards). 

Crossings, Track — (See 
Switches). 

Curtains, Fixtures and Materials. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G- Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Curtain Supply Co., 93 Ohio 
St., Chicago. 



Curtains, Fixtures and Materials 

— Continued. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg- Chicago. 
Hartshorn, Stewart, Co., East 

Newark. N. J. 
Kuhlman, The G. C- Car Co., 

Cleveland. 
Marshall, R. W- & Co., 95 

Liberty St., New York. 
National Lock Washer Co., 

Newark, N. J. 
Pantasote Co., 11 Broadway, 

New York. 
St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 

Mo. 
Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 
Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Mass. 

Cylinder Oil. 
Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, N. Y. 

Derailing Devices. 

American Frog & Switch Co., 
Hamilton, O. 

Cincinnati Frog & Switch Co- 
Cincinnati, O. 

Cleveland Frog & Crossing 
Co., Cleveland, O. 

Detective Agency. 
Drummond Detective Agency. 
New York. 

Diaphragms. 
Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg- Chicago. 

Doors and Fixtures. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G- Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C- Car Co- 
Cleveland. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wallace Supply Co- Chicago. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 
Mass. 

Doors, Steel Rolling. 
Kinnear Manufacturing Co., 

Columbus, O. 
Wilson, J. G- Mfg. Co., New 

York. 

Draft, Mechanical — (See Me- 
chanical Draft). 

Draft Rigging. 
Van Dorn, W. T- Co., Chgo. 
Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Drills, Track. 
Brown, H. P., 120 Liberty St., 

New York. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg- Chicago. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Marshall, R. W- & Co., 96 

Liberty St., New York. 
Reed, Francis, Co., Worcester, 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Drying Appliances. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Dynamos and Generators. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

National Brake & Electric 
Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rossiter, MacGovern & Co., 
17 Battery PI- New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Economizers, Fuel. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Electrical Instruments. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg- Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Johns-Manville, H. W- Co., 
New York. 

Queen & Co., Philadelphia. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 

Electric Railway Supplies, Gen- 
eral. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Creaghead Engineering Co., 
Cincinnati, O. 



January 18, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 






Ifil 



ST LOU IS CAR 6. 

ST. LOUIS MO. 



lii 




St. Louis Car Company M. C. B. Double Equalizer Type No. 62 Truck 

Details of Construction: 



TRUCK frames are made of wrought 
iron forged in one piece, with a 
heavy fillet in each corner, and 
planed to receive pedestal jaws and 
center frames of transoms. Pedes- 
tals are of wrought iron and the upper face 
of each is machined so as to lip on side frame. 
Wearing faces are machined and provided 
with oil grooves. Faces which engage the 
pedestal tie bars are also machined. 

Transoms are made of two 10" channels 
secured to frames by being bolted to 
machined cast steel side strut castings and 
bolted to side fpame with heavy steel gusset 
plates. 

Removable chafing plates are also provided 
on the transom channels. Bolsters are of 
cast steel and provided with end springs to 



limit side motion of car body. Bolsters also 
are provided with removable chafing plates. 

Equalizers are of wrought iron and forged 
with a lug to fit into recess in the journal 
boxes. Brakes are of the equalized type and 
arranged to suit cars operated around short 
curves. 

Brake rigging is provided with suitable 
safety hangers. Ends of hangers and hanger 
pins are case hardened to reduce the wear 
to a minimum and prevent rattling. 

All bolts used in assembling the trucks are 
taper finished, turned to a taper of ! " per 
foot, and all holes for bolts are reamed to 
templates. 

All parts of the truck when machined are 
made to template and all holes are drilled 
with a jig. 



Made in the largest and best equipped 
factory of its kind in the world. 



ill 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS Continued. 



Electric Railway Supplies, Gen- 
eral — Continued. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 
169 South St., New York. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Enamels. 
Acme White Lead & Color 

Works, Detroit, Mich. 
St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Engine Apparatus. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Engineers and Contractors. 

Arnold Company, Chicago. 

Byllesby, H. M., & Co., Chgo. 

Columbia Construction Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Ford, Bacon & Davis, New 
York. 

Register, A. L., & Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Roberts & Abbott Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Sanderson & Porter, New York 

Saxton, E., Washington, D. C. 

Sheaff & Jaastad, Boston. 

Stone & Webster Eng. Cor- 
poration, Boston. 

White, J. G., & Co., New York. 

Engines, Gas and Oil. 
Buckeye Engine Co., Salem, O. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Westinghouse Machine Co., 
Pittsburg. 



Engines, Steam. 
Buckeye Engine Co., Salem, O. 
Hooven-Owens-Rentschler Co., 

Hamilton, O. 
Rossiter, MacGovern & Co., 17 

Battery PI., New York. 
Westinghouse Machine Co., 

Pittsburg. 

Fans, Exhaust and Ventilating. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg. 

Fare Boxes — (See Electric Rail- 
way Supplies). 

Fare Registers and Register 

Fittings. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
Recording Fare Register Co., 

Mew Haven, Conn. 
Rooke Automatic Register Co.. 

Providence, R. I. 
Security Register & Mfg. Co.. 

42 Broadway, New York. 

Feedwater Apparatus. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 

Matteawan, N. Y. 
Wheeler Condenser & Eng'g 
Co., New York. 



Fenders and Guards. 
Consolidated Car Fender Co.. 

Providence, R. I. 
Eclipse Railway Supply Co., 

Cleveland, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 
McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 

Chicago. 
Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 

Liberty St., New York. 

Flangers, Snow. 
McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 

Chicago. 
Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 
Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 

Cleveland, O. 

Frogs — (See Switches, Frogs and 
Crossings). 

Fuel Economizers — (See Econo- 
mizers, Fuel). 

Fuses and Fuse Devices. 
Chaae-Shawmut Co., New- 
buryport, Mass. 



Fuses and Fuse Devices — Con- 
tinued. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Manu- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 

Gaskets, Bronze. 
Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, New York. 

Gates and Guards. 
Bliss, R., Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, 
R. I. 

Gear Cases. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St.. New York. 

Gears and Pinions. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Nuttall, R. D., Co., Pittsburg. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 
Cleveland, O. 

Generators — (See Dynamos). 

Gongs — (See Bells and Gongs). 

Graphite. 
Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit, 

Mich. 
U. S. Graphite Co.. Saginaw. 
Mich. 

Graphite Paint — (See Paint). 

Grates, Chain. 

Green Engineering Co., Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 

Grease — (See Lubricants). 

Grinders. 
Brown, Harold P., 120 Liberty 
St., New York. 

Guy Anchors — (See Anchors). 

Harps, Trolley — (See Trolley 
Poles and Fittings). 

Headlights. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stuart-Howland Co.. Boston. 

Trolley Supply Co., Canton, O. 

Headlinlngs, Passenger Car. 
Indestructible Fibre Co.. 45 
Broadway, New York. 

Heaters, Car, Electric. 

Consolidated Car-Heating Co., 

Albany, N. Y. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 

Heaters, Car, Hot Water, and 
Stoves. 

Baker, The Wm. C, Heating 
& Sup. Co., New York. 

Cooper Heater Co., The, Day- 
ton, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Smith, Peter, Heater Co., De- 
troit, Mich. 

Heating and Ventilating Ap- 
paratus — (See Mech. Draft). 



landt St., New York. 



Inspection Cars, Gasoline. 
Stover Motor Car Co., Free- 
port, 111. 

Instruments, Measuring and 
Testing — (See Electrical In- 
struments). 



Insulating Tapes. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Insulations and Insulating Ma- 
terial. 

Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 
Co., Boston. 

Creaghead Engineering Co., 
Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Railway Equipment 
Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Johns-Manville. H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Macallen, The, Co., Boston. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Standard Paint Co., 100 Will- 
iam St., New York. 

Standard Varnish Works, New 
York. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Jacks. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
200 Plymouth Bldg.. Chicago. 

Fairbanks. Morse & Co.. Chgo. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co- 
Cleveland. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Morden Frog & Crossing Co., 
Chicago. 

Security Register & Mfg. Co., 
New York. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Watson- Stillman Co., 26 Cort- 
landt St., New York. 

Joints, Expansion — (See Steam 
Fittings). 

Joints, Rail. 

Goldschmidt Thermit Co., 43 

Exchange PI., New York. 
Rail Joint Co., 29 W. 34th St.. 

New York. 

Joints, Welded— (See Rail Joints, 
Welded). 

Journal Boxes. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. • 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Symington, T. H., Co., Balti- 
more, Md. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Journal Lubricators — (See Lu- 
bricants). 

Journal Packing, Steel Wool. 
Robertson. Wm., & Co., Great 
Northern Bldg.. Chicago. 

Lamps, Arc and Incandescent. 

Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 
Co., Boston. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co.. 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Lamp Sockets. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 



Lightning Arresters. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 
Stuart-Howland Co., Bostc 
Western Electric Co., Chica 
Westinghouse Elec. & Mai u- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 

Line Material. 
Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 

Co., Boston. 
Creaghead Engineering Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 

New York. 
Electric Ry. Equipment Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 
General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 
Macallen, The, Co., Boston. 
Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 

Liberty St., New York. 
Recording Fare Register Co., 

New Haven, Conn. 
Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 
Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Lock and Nut Washers. 
Grip Nut Co., 152 Lake St., 

Chicago. 
National Lock Washer Co., 
Newark, N. J. 

Lockers, Metal. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg.. Chicago. 

Locomotives. 
Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

Philadelphia. 
Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 

Bldg., St. Louis. 

Locomotives, Electric. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Baldwin Locomotive Works, 
Philadelphia. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Manu- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 

Locomotives, Gasoline. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Stover Motor Car Co.. Free- 
port. 111. 

Lubricants. 

Dearborn Drug & Chemical 
Works, Chicago. 

Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit, 
Mich. 

Galena-Signal Oil Co., Frank- 
lin, Pa. 

U. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw, 
Mich. 

Whitmore Mfg. Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Lumber. 
Barnes, G. H., Hardwood 

Lumber Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Beidler, Francis, & Co., Chgo. 
Berthold & Jennings, St. 

Louis. 
Lindsley Bros. Co., Spokane, 

Wash. 
S-E. Missouri Cypress Co., 

Campbell, Mo. 

Lumber, Asbestos. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co- 
New York. 

Malleable Iron. 
Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 

Co.. Beaver Dam, Wis. 
St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 

Mo. 

Measuring Tapes. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, 

Mich. 

Mechanical Draft. 

Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Meters. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co- 
New York. 

Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 



January 18, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



An Ex-Straphanger's Views 
on Pay-As-You-Enter Cars 



Reprinted 
from the 
Chicago 
Daily 

News 



THOSE NEWEST CARS. 

Have you ridden on the new pay-as-you- 
enter cars yet? They're fine. For the 
last year I have had to stand up all the 
way downtown, but when I got on the 
car Monday morning there were plenty of 
seats and cars. I think these cars are a 
big success. Of course, some of those 
people who have been getting on around 
Van Buren street when going home from 
work will kick about them. But half of 
the people that get on the street cars of 
the Cottage Grove line around Van Buren 
street get home half of the time without 
paying their fares. I know one man who 
told me that he paid only about one fare 
a week when going home. With this new 
• system everybody will have to pay his 
fare, which is no more than just. The 
conductor was exceptionally polite to the 
passengers. I saw him direct several pas- 
sengers to seats up in the front which were 
not observable from the rear. When all 
the seats were filled he politely told those 
desiring to get on to "take the next car, 
please." Indiana avenue has been the 
star line for some time, but now Cottage 
Grove avenue has got them all beaten, 
and beaten good, 

EX-STRAPHANGER. 



"Ex-Straphanger" voices the sentiments of thou- 
sands of Chicago's street railway patrons -and 
those, too, of patrons in every city where Pay- 
As -You -Enter Cars are in operation. 

Comment is unnecessary. 

We license manufacturers and railways to build and use the 
Pay- As-You- Enter Car, the patents on which are owned by 

The Pay-As -You -Enter Car Company 



DUNCAN McDONALD^^ 2 g Cortlandt Street) New York 



THOS. W. CASEY 

Manager 



1(1 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS-Contlnued. 



Molded Goods. 
Massachusetts Chemical Co., 

Walpole, Mass. 
Wood, G. S., Great Northern 

Bldg., Chicago. 

Motor Cars, Gasoline. 
Stover Motor Car Co., Free- 
port, 111. 

Motors, Electric. 

Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. T. 

National Brake & Electric Co., 
Milwaukee. 

Rossiter, MacGovern & Co., 17 
Battery PI., New York. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Manu- 
facturing Co., Pittsburg. 

Nut Locks. 
Grip Nut Co., 152 Lake St., 

Chicago. 
National Lock Washer Co., 

Newark. N. J. 
Railway Specialty & Supply 

Co., Chicago. 
St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 

Mo. 
U. S. Metal & Mfg. Co., 25 

Broad St., New York. 

Nuts and Bolts. 
Grip Nut Co., 152 Lake St., 

Chicago. 
Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 
National Lock Washer Co.,. 

Newark. N. J. 
Railway Specialty & Supply 

Co., Chicago. 

Oilers. 

Armstrong Oiler Co., 31st and 
Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

Oils — (See Lubricants). 

Overhead Equipment — (See Elec- 
tric Railway Supplies). 

Packings. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, New York. 

Packing, Steel Wool Journal. 
Robertson, Wm., & Co., Gt. 
Northern Bldg., Chicago. 

Paints. 

Acme White Lead & Color 
Works, Detroit. 

Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit. 

Goheen Mfg. Co., Canton, O. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Standard Paint Co., 100 Will- 
lam St., New York. 

St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

U. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw, 
Mich. 

Pay-As-You-Enter Cars. 
Pay-As-You-Enter Car Co., 26 
Cortlandt St., New York. 

Pipe Bends and Fittings — (See 
Steam Fittings). 

Plumbago. 
Detroit Graphite Co., Detroit, 

Mich. 
U. S. Graphite Co., Saginaw, 

Mich. 

Poles, Metal. 
Creaghead Engineering Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 
Electric Railway Equipment 

Co., Cincinnati, O. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 

200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Poles and Ties, Wood. 

Advance Lumber Co., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Barnes, G. H., Hardwood 
Lumber Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Beidler, Francis, & Co., Chgo. 

Berthold & Jennings, St. Louis. 

Churchill Cedar Co., Spokane, 
Wash. 

Humbird Lumber Co., Sand 
Point, Idaho. 

Lindsley Bros. Co., Spokane, 
Wash. 

Naugle Pole & Tie Co., 226 
La Salle St., Chicago. 

Pacific Coast Pole Co., Spo- 
kane, Wash. 

S-E. Missouri Cypress Co., 
Campbell, Mo. 

Worcester, C. H., Co., Tribune 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Punches — (See Ticket Punches). 



Rail Benders. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg.. Chicago. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 

Rail Bonds — (See Bonds, Rail). 

Rail Brackets. 
Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 
Co., Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Rail Drills— (See Drills, Track). 

Rail Feed Wire — (See Wire and 
Cables). 



Rail Joints, Welded. 
Goldschmidt Thermit Co., 43 

Exchange PI., New York. 
Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 

Rails, New. 
Lorain Steel Co.. Philadelphia. 
New York Switch & Crossing 

Co., Hoboken, N. J. 
Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co., 

Philadelphia. 

Rails, Relaying. 
Zelnicker, Walter A., Supply 
Co., St. Louis. 

Railway Equipment. 
Johann, F. A., 1624 Pierce 
Bldg., St. Louis. 

Railway Velocipedes. 
Fairbanks Morse & Co., Chgo. 

Registers and Fittings — (See 
Fare Registers). 

Relays. 

Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 

Roofing. 
Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Rubber Goods, Mechanical. 
Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Rubber Preservative. 
Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Sand Apparatus. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St.. New York. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co.. Springfield, 
Mass. 

Sash Balances and Fixtures. 
National Lock Washer Co., 
Newark, N. J. 

Sash Operating Devices. 
Drouve, The G., Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Lord & Burnham. Irvington- 
on-Hudson, New York. 

Seats, Car— (See Car Seats). 

Shade Rollers — (See Curtains, 
Fixtures and Materials). 

Shutters, Steel Rolling. 
Kinnear Manufacturing Co., 
Columbus, O. 

Signals. 

Blake Signal & Manufactur- 
ing Co., Boston. 

Telegraph Signal Co., Roches- 
ter, N. Y. 

Signal Supplies. 
Railway Specialty & Supply 
Co., Chicago. 

Skylights. 

Drouve, The G., Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Lord & Burnham, Irving-on- 
Hudson, New York. 

Snow Plows, Sweepers and 
Scrapers. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill. The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kalamazoo Railway Supply 
Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 



Snow Plows, Sweepers and 
Scrapers — Continued. 

McGulre-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Russell Car & Snow-Plow Co., 
Ridgway, Pa. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Sockets, Waterproof. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Special Agents. 
Waddell & Mahon. 1133 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Splicing Compounds and Mate- 
rials. 
Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Springs. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall. R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Railway Steel Spring Co., 71 
Broadwav. New York. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 
Mass. 

Sprinkling Cars. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Steam Apparatus. 
Green Fuel Economizer Co., 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

Steam Fittings, Etc. 
Crane Co., Chicago. 
Davis, The John, Co., Chgo. 
Simmons, John, Co., 110 Cen- 
tre St., New York. 
Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, New York. 

Steel Cars. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Steel Tapes. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, 
Mich. 

Stokers. 

Babcock & Wilcox Co., 85 Lib- 
erty St., New York. 

Green Engineering Co., Com'l 
Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 

Model Stoker Co., Dayton, O. 

Under-Feed Stoker Co. of Am., 
Chicago. 

Westinghouse Machine Co., 
Pittsburg. 

Storage Batteries — (See Bat- 
teries). 

"Strike- Breakers." 

Drummond Detective Agency, 
3 Ann St., New York. 

Waddell & Mahon, 1133 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Superheaters. 
Power Specialty Co., Ill 
Broadway, New York. 

Switches, Frogs and Crossings. 
American Frog & Switch Co., 

Hamilton, O. 
Barbour-Stockwell Co., Cam- 

bridgeport, Mass. 
Cincinnati Frog & Switch Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 
Cleveland Frog & Crossing 

Co., Cleveland, O. 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chgo. 
Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 
Morden Frog & Crossing Co., 

Rookery, Chicago. 



Switches, Frogs and Crossing* — 
Continued. 

New York Switch & Crossing 

Co., Hoboken, N. J. 
Railway Specialty & Supply 

Co., Chicago. 
Wharton, Wm., Jr., & Co., 

Philadelphia. 

Switchboards and Switchboard 
Instruments. 

Anderson, A. & J. M., Mfg. 
Co., Boston. 

Chase-Shawmut Co., New- 
buryport, Mass. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Western Electric Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg. 

Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 

Tapes and Webbing. 

Hope Webbing Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Testing Instruments. 

Weston Electrical Instrument 
Co., Newark, N. J. 



Ticket Punches. 
Meyers, Fred J., Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton, O. 
Woodman Mfg. & Sup. Co., 

Boston. 

Tieplates. 
Beaver Dam Malleable Iron 
Co., Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Ties and Poles, Wood — (See 
Poles and Ties). 

Timber. 
Beidler, Francis, & Co., Chgo. 
Lindsley Bros. Co., Spokane, 

Wash. 
S-E. Missouri Cypress Co., 

Campbell, Mo. 



Track Cleaners and Scrapers. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Ohio Brass Co., Mansfield, O. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co., 
Cleveland, O. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Track Drills — (See Drills, Track). 

Tracklaying Machinery. 
Holman. D. F., Ry. Tracklayer 
Co., 1102 Ellsworth Bldg., 
Chicago. 

Track Tools. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Trimmings, Car. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Curtain Supply Co., Park Row 
Bldg., New York. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

National Lock Washer Co., 
Newark, N. J. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 

Wood, G. S., Great Northern 
Bldg., Chicago. 

Trolley Guards. 
Electric Service Supplies Co., 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Trolley Poles and Fittings. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Johns-Manville, H. W., Co., 
New York. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 



January 18, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



11 




TRADL MARK 

Registered U. S. Patent Office 

The Standard for Rubber Insulation 

RAILWAY FEED WIRES insulated with OKONITE are unequaled for flexibility, durability 
and efficiency, and are in use by the leading Electric Street Railway Companies. OKONITE is 
preferred above any other insulation for Car Wiring, Telegraph and Telephone Purposes 

Okonite Wires, Okonite Tape, Manson Tape, Candee Weatherproof Wires 

SAMPLES AND ESTIMATES ON APPLICATION 

The Okonite Co., Ltd., 



WILLARD L. CANDEE, H. DDRANT CHEEVER, Managers. 
GEORGE T. MANSON, Gen'l Supt. ; W. H. HODGINS, Secretary. 



253 Broadway, NEW YORK 




VERTICAL CROSS - COMPOUND ENGINES 

Awarded Gold Medal at World's Fair, St. Louis 

Made in all sizes. We also build other types 
for all purposes. 

A visit to our factories — which you are cor- 
dially invited to make — will prove interesting. 

Ask for catalog, please. 

The Hooven-Owens-Rentschler Co. 

HAMILTON, OHIO. V. S. A. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 
ATLANTA, GA., Equitable Bide BOSTON, MASS., H. E. Rundlett. 
CHICAGO, ILL., Marquette Bids. CHARLOTTE, N. ('., A. H. Wa.-h- 
burn. DENVER, COLO., Steams-Roger Mis. Co. LOS ANGELES, 
CAL., Chas. C. Moore & Co. NEW YORK, N. Y., 3!> Cortlandt St. 
PITTSBURG, PA., Machesney Bide. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., Chas. 
C. Moore & Co. SEATTLE, WASH.. Chas. C. Moore & Co. ST. LOUIS, 
MO, Chemical Bldg. ST. PAUL, MINN., R. B. Whitacre & Co. 

HONOLULU, S. I., Honolulu Iron Works. DALLAS, TEX., W. R. 
Hayuie, Wilson Bldg. N EW ORLEANS, LA., 417 Hennen Bldg. 1 



Shawmut 
Soldered Railbonds 

Are the Original Soldered Bonds 
8 YEARS of Service Under ALL 
Conditions Prove Their RE- 
LIABILITY. 




WHY Not Try a Proven Bond 

at Least 

SEND FOR OUR PROPOSITION 

See Bulletin No. 29 

CHASE-SHAWMUT CO. 

Newburyport, Mass. 



12 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS Continued. 



Trolley Retrievers and Catchers. 

Earll, C. I., Bowling Green 
Bldg., New York. 

Electric Service Supplies Co., 
1020-24 Filbert St., Phila. 

Milloy Electric Co., Bucyrus.O. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Trolley Supply Co., Canton, O. 

Trolley Wheels — (See Trolley 
Poles and Fittings). 

Trolley Wire — (See Wire and 
Cables). 

Trolleys, Track. 
Cleveland Armature Works, 
Cleveland, O. 

Trucks, Car. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Baldwin Locomotive Works, 
Philadelphia. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co., 
Chicago. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis. 
Mo. 

Standard Motor Truck Co., 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Standard Varnish Works, New 
York City. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co- 
Cleveland, O. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield. 
Mass. 



Turbines. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Hooven-Owens-Rentschler Co.. 
Hamilton, O. 

Westinghouse Machine Co., 
Pittsburg. Pa. 

Valves— (See Steam Fittings). 

Varnish. 

Acme White Lead & Color 
Works, Detroit. 

Electric Service Supplies Co.. 
200 Plymouth Bldg., Chicago. 

Harrison Elec. & Mfg. Co., 169 
South St., New York. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Milloy Electric Co., Bucyrus, O. 

Nuttall, R. D., Co., Pittsburg. 

Ridlon, Frank, Co., 200 Sum- 
mer St., Boston. 

Standard Paint Co., 100 Will- 
iam St., New York. 

Star Brass Works, Kalama- 
zoo, Mich. 

Trolley Supply Co., Canton, O. 

Wallace Supply Co., Chicago. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Ventilators. 

Drouvg, The G., Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Lord & Burnham. Irvington- 
on-Hudson, New York. 

Vestlettes. 
Bellamy Vestlette Mfg. Co., 
Cleveland, O. 



Waste, Cotton and Wool. 
Hagy, J. Milton, Waste Wks., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Railway Specialty & Supply 
Co., Chicago. 



Water Softening Apparatus. 
Dearborn Drug & Chemical 

Works, Chicago. 
Kennicott Water Softener Co., 
Chicago. 

Wheels and Axles. 

American Car Co., St. Louis. 

Brill, The J. G., Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

Griffin Wheel Co., Chicago. 

Kuhlman, The G. C, Car Co., 
Cleveland. 

Lorain Steel Co., Philadelphia. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co- 
Chicago. 

Marshall, R. W., & Co., 95 
Liberty St., New York. 

Railway Steel-Spring Co., 
New York. 

St. Louis Car Co., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

St. Louis Car Wheel Co., St. 
Louis. 

Standard Steel Works, Phila- 
delphia. 

Stephenson, John, Co., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Wason Mfg. Co., Springfield, 
Mass. 

Wheel Grinders. 
Wheel Truing Brake Shoe Co., 
Detroit. Mich. 



Window Fixtures. 
Drouve, The G., Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Wiping Rags. 
Hagy, J. Milton, Waste Wks., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Wire, Aluminum. 
Aluminum Co. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



of America, 



Wire, Insulated. 

Aluminum Co. of America, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

American Electrical Works, 
Providence, R. I. 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Standard Underground Cable 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Stuart-Howland Co., Boston. 

Wire and Cables. 

Aluminum Co. of America, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

American Electrical Works, 
Providence, R. I. 

Bridgeport Brass Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. - 

General Electric Co., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Okonite Co., Ltd., 253 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Standard Underground Cable 
Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 



METALSTEEL" PAINT 

Best Steel Protective and Rust 
Preventive for all Metal Surfaces. 




>TlOUI 

SURFA.CER 
PEC1ALTIE; 



ST. LOUIS SURFACER 

& PAINT COMPANY 

St. Louis, U. S. A. 

10 



Fire Extinguishers 
Fire Hos e Carts a nd Reels 

GUILFORD S. WOOD 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY 



necessities Great Northern Bldg., Chicago 




ARMALAC 

passed out of the experimental stage 
a great many years ago. 

Continued and increasing use has 
demonstrated it to be a permanent 
and plastic insulating compound of 
the highest efficiency. 

Send for booklet "How to 
Insulate an Armature" 



Massachusetts Chemical Co., Walpole, Mass. 

Operates Walpole Rather Works 
and Walpole Varnish Works 



f The Oasis in the Desert of Waste 99 

Motor Packing Waste 

No dirt or grit 
All long strands and satisfaction 

The J. Milton Hagy Waste Works 

433 Spruce Street, Philadelphia 



THE BABCOCK & WILCOX COMPANY 



Babcock & Wilcox : 



85 Liberty Street, New York 
Stirling = A & T Horizontal 



Cahall Vertical 



WATER TUBE STEAM BOILERS 



STEAM SUPERHEATERS 



Boston, Delta Bldg. 

Philadelphia, 1110-1112 North American Bldg. 

San Fbancisco, 63 First Street 

Pittsburgh, Farmers Deposit Nat. Bank Bldg. 

New Orleans, 343 Baronne St. 



Works: Bayonne, N.J. Barberton, Ohio. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

Denver, 410 Seventeenth St. 
Salt Laee City, 313 Atlas Block 
Washington, Colorado Building 
Chicago, Marquette Bldg. 
Atlanta, Qa., 1132 Candler Bldg. 



MECHANICAL STOKERS 



Cleveland, 706 New England Bldg. 
Mexico City, 7 Avenida, Juarez 
Havana, Cuba, 116!4 Calle de la Habana 
Los Angeles, 321 Trust Bldg. 
Cincinnati, O., Traction Bldg. 



January is, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



L3 




Double Recorder 



The Security Register 

is the only one, both double and 
single, that comprehends the sim- 
plicity of the present practice, giv- 
ing an absolute and legible record 
of results mechanically, and a uni- 
versal identification of employes 
connected with the operation of 
each car, or, in other words, a 
watchman's clock on every car. 
We make both double and single, 
giving absolutely indelible records and of unlimited 
capacity and with positive identification. 

Roth Universal T A /^TTC 
High-Pressure Ji\V/J\0 

For Street Cars, Railroads and every 
purpose where Jacks are used. 

The most 

powerful and 

economical 

Jack made. 

Ball-Bearing 

throughout. 

The One-Man 

Jack. 

Capacity unlimited. 

The SECURITY REGISTER & MFG. CO. 

For information write Gen. Office, 42 Broadway, New York 





r— Take It-It's Free^i 



Will you take ad- 
vantage of this oppor- 
tunity to learn, with- 
out any expense to you, 
of a Tape without 
lumps or pin holes, 
with the greatest in- 
sulating and adhesive 
qualities, and with ex- 
ceptional strength and 
durability? Then send 
to our nearest Branch 
and you will receive a 

liberal sample of Jomanco Friction Tape so that 
you can test it in competition with any other and 
satisfy yourself of its superiority. 

Write nearest branch for free sample 
and booklet D-423 

H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE CO. 





NEW YORK 


PITTSBURG 


MINNEAPOLIS 


MILWAUKEE 


CLEVELAND 


SAN FRANCISCO 


CHICAGO 


BUFFALO 


LOS ANGELES 


BOSTON 


BALTIMORE 


SEATTLE 




Sleet 



causes no uneasiness to the 
superintendent who keeps a 
supply of "Nuttall" sleet 
scrapers and trolley wheels 
on hand. They can be ap- 
plied in a minute. 

// in a hurry, wire us." 



ASK FOR CATALOGUE No. 10 

R. D. Nuttall Company 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
GEARS PINIONS TROLLEYS 



TUBULAR POLES 

IRON OR STEEL 



Electric 
Raiijwa^t 

Electric 
Lighting Coy 

^/IGjYAI^) 
TELEPHOrat^ 

Telegraph) 

Trajumixtion 

Li i* e J 

A It I> 

Cate n a ry 

^XlL/"PETST./~I O N 

E t :n :e >/* 



Electric RajlvayIquipmbnt& 

GeaemJ Office- Cincin nati O- UifA 
JV/o/J.y Reading Pa - Wheel 



14 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



p4 

O 

3 



O 



0) 



C/3 



*CJD 

a 



&4 









C3 * 



0) 





6fl 



O 



Q 

a 

H 




.January IS, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



L5 



U.SJetal&Mfg.Co. 

25 Broad Street, New York 
Pittsburg. 1509 Arrott Bldg. Chicago, 414 Railway Exchange 

Columbia Lock Nuts 




Columbia Lock Nut on Bolt 



It is effective and indispensable on locomotives, 
pitmans, wrists, king bolts, rail joints, fish plates, 
piston rods, cylinder heads, steam pumps, and, in 
fact, all kinds of machinery. It is also invaluable 
on railroad cars, carriages, wagons, automobiles, 
axles, steam pipes, flanges, etc. 



SEND FOR CATALOG AND PRICE LIST 



-93.3%' 

REDUCTION 



in the drop over a contact carrying 1,000 amperes was the 
result of a recent test made in a power house of the Com- 
monwealth Edison Company of Chicago, by the use of the 

HAROLD BROWN ALLOYS. 

Contacts amalgamated with these Alloys over ten years 
ago by the Metropolitan West Side Elevated Ry. Co. of 
Chicago are still as bright as when first applied. 

In October, 1897, the South Side Elevated R. R. Co. of 
Chicago amalgamated the terminals of the bonds used on 
the third rail and recent investigation showed the contacts 
to be perfectly free from oxide and as good as 
when first installed. 



of these Alloys that the 



Plastic Rail Bond 



The bond that will transmit 3,000 amperes 
without the slightest injury and show but 5 
per cent depreciation after eleven years' se- 
vere service. 

Consider these FACTS, or, better still, 

TRY IT. 



HAROLD P. BROWN, 



120 Liberty Street, 
NEW YORK. 




Carbonizing Coating 

preserves metal where all other paints fail. 
Durability and Economy Guaranteed. 

Manufactured exclusively by 

The Goheen Manufacturing Co. 

Canton. Ohio. U. S. A. 

Dock House, Billiter Street, London, E. C, England 



THE MAIN FEATURE of this coupler is its great 
strength and simplicity. In fact, it makes a coup- 
ling joint that is as strong as, if not stronger than, 
the cars themselves. It will be noted that the head 
has heavy coupling faces, and, with the great 
width of the link and heavy reinforcing ribs 
on the outside of the head, lateral breakage 
due to curvature strains is impossible. The 
heavy lock and its bearing both at the top an 
bottom gives the strongest 
kind of a locking device. 

Ash for new catalogue 
of traction devices. 

Washburn Steel Castings & Coupler Co 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



Washburn k Type 

Traction Coupler 




Western Agents: 

TWEEDY, HOOD & UNLKN, 2014 Fisher Bldg., Chicago 

Canadian Agent: JOHN TAYLOR, Montreal 



16 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 



Making 

Impressions 
That Lead 
To Sales 



VERY few of your customers, actual 
or prospective, will probably ever 
see you or your plant. They will 
never have that intimate personal knowl- 
edge that will enable them to judge you 
and your product at your actual worth 
to them. 

There are, however, a great many 
things they will see and hear that will 
influence them for or against you and 
your goods. You need not fear the pos- 
sible "knocks" of envious competitors, 
because the motive is so apparent that 
they fall of their own weight. 

But it is imperative that what you 
say and do be said and done in a manner 
calculated to impress the customer with 
the idea that doing business with your 
house will be more advantageous to him 
in one way or another or in many ways 
than patronizing one of your compet- 
itors. (Now, that's a pretty long sen- 
tence, so read it again and let it sink in). 

The effort you make to sell your goods 
is what the customer sees and hears most 
of; hence this effort is what requires a 
careful attention it oftentimes does not 
get. The way your salesmen talk and act, 
the way your correspondence is carried 
on, the manner in which your printed 
advertising matter is prepared and han- 
dled — all these are of prime importance, 
but perhaps most important of all is your 
advertising. 



In advertising you have the opportu- 
nity, if you will seize it, of making any 
kind of an impression you desire. Your 
plant may be small, yet you can so ad- 
vertise as to give customers an impres- 
sion of capacity equal to that of your big 
competitors. Don't misunderstand — 
it is not the idea that you should deceive 
or misrepresent, but you can advertise in 
a manner that will impress the customer 
with the idea that you are capable of 
handling his order as satisfactorily as 
your biggest competitor, whom he prob- 
ably knows far better than he knows you. 
No harm is done by impressive advertis- 
ing of this sort, provided you deliver the 
goods. 

Your advertising can be made to im- 
press the possible buyer with the idea of 
quality. You can make him believe, if 
you go about it in the right way, that 
your goods really are better than those 
of your competitors — but don't try this 
unless you can prove your claims. 

In fact, your advertising can be made 
to make many impressions and to do 
many things that will help sell your 
goods just as surely as you are reading 
these lines. And advertising (real, of 
course) will accomplish these results 
at far less cost than any other method. 



// you are sufficiently interested to drop 
us a line, we are enough interested to 
have a representative confer with you. 



FlectriG Railway Review 

160 Harrison Street, CHICAGO, U. S. A. 



January IS, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



17 




The Ventilation 

of your Shops, Foundries and Car-Barns 
is made especially effective by a speedy, 
positive and easily manipulated 

Sash Operating Apparatus 

which automatically lucks the sash at any 
position. Let «.■•■ send you our catalogu* 

LORD & BURNHAM COMPANY 

lr\ inyton-on-llud.son. N. T. 



Hydraulic Pumps 

\Y/E have just received from the print- 
ers Catalogue No. 7 1 , describing 
Hydraulic Pumps, which we are building. 
This replaces our former Catalogue No. 
56, and shows about 75 varieties of 
pumps for obtaining pressures from 300 
lbs. to 1 0,000 lbs. to the square inch. 
Operated by hand, belt, steam or electric 
power. It is a book of about 1 40 pages. Do you want a copy? 



THE WATSON-STILLMAN CO. 

26 Cortlandt Street, New York City 

Branch Office, 453 The Rookery, Chicago, 111. 





"Not an 
Experiment" 

The Providence Fender has 
been in successful operation 
on hundreds of roads for 
1 3 years, and has proved 
itself reliable under all 
conditions of Street Rail- 
way service. 

CONSOLIDATED CAR FENDER COMPANY 

Office and Factory: PROVIDFACE, R. I. 

Branch Office : 110 E. Twenty-third St.. New York 

European Agents : Comptoire d'Electricite, 6, Rue Boudreau. Paris, France 



NOW 

is the time to save money 

We enable you to do this by 
repairing your broken steel 
motor cases at small expense 



["■■"I 1' ARK prepared to undertake the repaii 
I W Wj of broken steel motor cases at our Jersey 
111 City Works. We are equipped with cx- 
^"" eeptional facilities tor doing this work 
quickly, efficiently and economically. Further- 
more, all work of this nature done at these 
shops will be guaranteed in every particular; in 
fact, we will REFUND THE ENTIRE VALUE 
OF THE MOTOR CASE in any instance where 
it is shown that under regular service conditions 
and within a period of one year from the time of 
making the repair, our weld did not hold and that 
the motor case broke again in the same place as 
the original fracture. 

Can we do more? 

Write for full details, shipping instructions and 
prices NOW, as this offer holds for only three 
months from date. 

Pamphlet No. 36-Q gives full information. 

GOLDSCHMIDT THERMIT CO. 

90 West Street, New York 

432-436 Folsom Street, San Francisco 



Galena-Signal 
Oil Company 

FRANKLIN, PA. 

THEIR SPECIALTIES 

STREET RAILWAY LUBRICATION ^^™ 

house equipment. 

Same skillful expert supervision given in this service as in 
steam railway service has produced very satisfactory results. 
The business of our Street Railway Oepartment has increased 
beyond every expectation. In 1906 this department sold 
ten times the number of barrels of oil sold by the same de- 
partment in 1903. 

We are under contract with many of the largest street and 
interurban railways of the country. 

We guarantee cost per thousand miles in street railway 
service when conditions warrant it. 

Write to Franklin, Pennsylvania, for further particulars. 

STEAM RAILWAY LUBRICATION ^grSKSH 

Galena Coach, En- 
gine and Car Oils for steam railway lubrication. Sibley's 
Perfection Valve Oil for cylinder lubrication, and Perfection 
Signal Oil for use in railway signal lanterns. 

GALENA RAILWAY SAFETY OIL ^ESSibS 

— cab, classification 
and tail lights, and for switch and semaphore lamps. Burns 
equally well with the long time as with the one-day burner; 
with or without chimney as the burner requires. Is pure 
water white in color; high fire test, low cold test, and 
splendid gravity. 

CHAS. MILLER. President 



IS ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW V 


ol. XIX, No. 3. 


Car Advfrt/s/mg — < 




} i 







ECLIPSE 

Life Guard 

Manufactured by the 

ECLIPSE RAILWAY SUPPLY CO. 





Eventually 
Atlas Anchors 

Why not now? 

THE ATLAS ANCHOR CO., Cleveland, Ohio 





I^^^^^^H 




1 


r * „■* M^ ft % l 


l 




ft^MiMMdfl 





BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

BURNHAM, WILLIAMS & CO., PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 

Bmjders LOCOMOTIVES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

Including ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVES and 

ELECTRIC TRUCKS 



STANDARD STEEL WORKS, 

SOLID FORGED ROLLED AND STEEL TIRED WHEELS 

mounted on axles and fitted with Motor Gears for Electric Railway Si 



HARRISON BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

ELLIPTIC AND 
COIL SPRINGS 




PIPEFITTINGS 

AND HALVES 

FOR THE 

HEATING AND PLUMBING TRADE 

TRADE <Q^^ MARK 

I eloM §IMMON§ CO. 
104-110 Centre Street, new york 



The Lorain Steel Company 

Girder Rails and High Tee Rails 
High-Grade Special Track Work 



THE PENNSYLVANIA BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



January 18, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



L9 




The National Standard for Car Cur- 
tains and Car Upholstery. 



AGOSOTE HEADLINING 

The only headlining made in one solid piece. Will not 
separate, warp or blister. Waterproof and homogeneous. 



THE PANTASOTE COMPANY 

71 Fisher Building, Chicago, 111. 1 1 Broadway. New York 



NATIONAL 

Curtain Fixtures 

Sash Locks Sash Balances 

and Nut Locks 



COMPLETE CURTAINS 



The National Lock Washer Co. 

NEWARK, N. J. 
CHICAGO OFFICE: 4111 Monadnock Block 




Your opportunities of 1907 
are gone. Your opportu- 
nity of 1908 is here. Use 
this opportunity 





to install a WESTERN ELECTRIC 

A. C. GENERATOR 

in your new power house. 
Send for Bulletin No. 5210-C today 



Another road writes as follows: 

"Answering your question of recent 
date. Your material is all that you 
claim for it. It is a perfect lubri- 
cant. The benefits derived are far 
in excess of any other material that 
we have used in the past. It is most 
excellent." 

The Whitmore Manufacturing Company 

Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A. 2 




E. C. Van Valkenburgh 

Promotional Advertising 
for Electric Railways 
2117 West I02d St. 
CHICAGO 

Everybody knows, in a general way, about the electric railways in 
their neighborhood. This know ledge bears about the same relation to 
the railways and their business as your knowledge of the dry goods or 
grocery stores of your city bears to the individual bu>iness of the 
various merchants in these lines. 

To secure all the business possible from the territory served it is 
as necessary that the patrons of an electric railway should be kept 
fully informed regarding the attractive features of its service as it is 
that the grocer or dry goods merchant should exploit its claim- to 
public favor. 

The Van Vnlk.Mihuriih Advertising Service will keep the public 
fully informed regarding your road, your service and your attract inn-. 

Will you let us outline a plan? 



GREEN TRAVELING LINK GRATES 




Labor Sa 
Cheap Fue 



GREEN ENGINEERING CO. 

Main Office: Commercial National Bank Bldg.. Chicago, III. 

Branch Offices: Pittsburgh : St. Louis : St. Paul : Louisville 
General Foundry Work a Specialty 



© 



ablished 1877. 



© 



ALBERT & J. M. ANDERSON MFG. CO., 

Makers of 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES: 

SWITCHES, SWITCHBOARDS, 
TIME SWITCHES, LINE MATERIAL, 
COPPER CASTINGS (75^) CONDUCTIVITY. 
289-293 A ST., BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



New York, 135 Broadway. 



Age 



Chicago, 175 Dearborn Street. 



5n, Pettlngell-Andrews Co. San Francisco, Eccles & Smith Co 

York, R. W. Marshall & Co. Atlanta, Newcomer Manry Co. 
St. Louis, J. C. White. Denver, E. M. Messiter. 

Toronto, Ont., H. J. Surtees. 



20 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

IUndisplayed advertisements are inserted under this heading at the uniform rate of one cent a word; minimum charge twenty-five cents. 
Replies directed to this office will be forwarded when required to any address in the United States, Canada or Mexico without extra charge. 
Advertisements received at the Chicago office by 9 a. m. Thursday will appear in the issue for the same week. 



POSITIONS WANTED. 



A young man, 27 years of age, 
with ten years' experience, 
wants position as engineer or 
electrician; unmarried; habits 
strictly temperate; high-class 
references. Address "No. 710," 
care Electric Railway Review, 
Chicago. 

Position wanted by a young 
man (23) of good habits; have 
been connected four years with 
the operating and purchasing 
departments of an electric street 
railway company; can give good 
references. Address "No. 528," 
care of Electric Railway Review, 
Chicago. 

Position as chief electrician or 
superintendent; 16 years' expe- 
rience lighting, power and trac- 
tion work, alternating and di- 
rect current; graduate of well- 
known school; excellent testi- 
monials; disengaged. Address 
"No. 529," Electric Railway Re- 
view, Chicago. 

Auditor, experienced in elec- 
tric railway and lighting and 
construction accounting, wants 
position with fair-sized com- 
pany. Energetic and good sys- 
tematizer. Best references. 
Address "No. 527," care of 
Electric Railway Review, Chi- 
cago. 

Position by a single man, 29 

years old, practical electrician 
and machinist, 10 years' ex- 
perience, familiar with electric 
car and locomotive repairs, 
power and substation practices. 
Non-union man. Address "No. 
630," care of Electric Railway 
Review, New York, N. T. 

Position of chief motorman or 
instructor by a first-class com- 
petent man who has had 12 
years' experience in that line. 
Thoroughly understands econ- 
omy in regard to use of power 
and care of rolling stock; fa- 
miliar with quadruple equip- 
ments and air brakes; highest 
references. Address "Chief 
Motorman," care of Electric 
Railway Review, Chicago. 



POSITIONS WANTED. 



Graduate civil engineer, Cor- 
nell University 1902, experi- 
enced in field work and trade 
journalism, now engaged, de- 
sires work with technical jour- 
nal or publicity department of 
manufacturing establishment. 
Address "No. 525," care of Elec- 
tric Railway Review, Chicago. 



Experienced and efficient englr 
neer with power station experi- 
ence (both planning and con- 
struction, as chief engineer and 
as superintendent of construc- 
tion) desires position with 
operating company as engineer, 
assistant to manager or super- 
intendent. Address "No. 515," 
care the Electric Railway Re- 
view, Chicago. 

Young man, 30 years of age, 
who has nearly completed a 
course of "Electric Lighting and 
Railway" in the International 
Correspondence Schools, desires 
position which will give him 
practical experience in power 
house and switchboard work. 
Willing to start at a nominal 
salary. Address "No. 526," care 
of Electric Railway Review, Chi- 
cago. 

Position wanted by unmarried 
man (23) with a city or inter- 
urban electric railway or with 
electric light and power com- 
pany. "Would prefer position in 
engineering, erection or operat- 
ing department. Technical elec- 
trical graduate. Two years' ex- 
perience with firm of contract- 
ing engineers in drafting room, 
shop work and erection work. 
Familiar with the design and 
erection of complete steam and 
electric plants. Am at present 
employed as erecting engineer 
by a small concern, but wish to 
make a change. Permanent 
position and good chances for 
advancement are of more im- 
portance than the question of 
salary. Best references fur- 
nished as to character and 
ability. Location anywhere. Ad- 
dress "No. 531," care of Electric 
Railway Review, Chicago. 



POSITIONS WANTED. 



Position wanted by first-class 
engineer and machinist with 16 
years' practical experience with 
compound Corliss engines, Allis- 
Chalmers and Westinghou.se 
steam turbines, surface con- 
densers, A. C. and D. C. elec- 
trical apparatus. Age 35. Al 
references. Address "No. 532," 
care of Electric Railway Review, 
Chicago. 



POSITIONS OPEN. 



Salesmen with technical knowl- 
edge, machinery and electrical 
installation, also auditors and 
accountants. Salaries $1,200 to 
$6.111111. Ambitious men write us, 
UAPGOODS, 305 Broadway. New 
Yi-rk, or 1010 Hartford Bldg., 
Chicago. 



MISCELLANEOUS WANTS. 



You can sell second-handcars, 
machinery and material through 
advertising on this page. Ask 
about the special rates. Elec- 
tric Railway Review, 160 Harri- 
son Street, Chicago. 



BOOKS AND PUBLICATIONS. 

If interested in any phase of 
steam transportation, you will 
find every development covered 
fully and accurately in The Rail- 
way Age. It is the leader and 
acknowledged authority in this 
field. Ask for free sample copies. 
The Railway Age, 160 Harrison 
Street, Chicago. 

A copy of "The Motorman and 
His Duties," the standard hand- 
book on the theory and practice 
of electric car operation, is 
worth many times its cost to 
every man interested in the sub- 
ject. Send for 16-page pamphlet 
of sample pages. The Wilson 
Corapan", 160 Harrison Street, 
Chicago. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES. 

WANTED— RAILWAY SPE- 
CIALTIES. WE HAVE OUR 
OWN MANUFACTURING AND 
SELLING ORGANIZATIONS, 
WITH FACILITIES FOR SELL- 
ING THE RAILWAY TRADE. 
WE DESIRE TO SECURE FOR 
MANUFACTURE AND SALE 
SOME GOOD RAILWAY SPE- 
CIALTIES. ADDRESS "H. M." 
CARE OF ELECTRIC RAIL- 
WAY REVIEW, CHICAGO. 

BOOKS AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Wanted — Copy of the Electric 
Railway Review of January 12, 
1907, in good condition. State 
price in your answer. Address 
"No. 530." care of Electric 
Railway Review, Chicago. 

We want your friends to read 
the Electric Railway Review. 
You will do them — and us — a 
favor by sending their addresses. 
We will gladly mail free sample 
copies. Electric Railway Review, 
160 Harrison Street, Chicago. 

National Legislation on Inter- 
state Commerce to July 1, 1906, 
is fully covered in our reference 
pamphlet. It contains the full 
text of the act to regulate com- 
merce as amended, including the 
Elkfns and Hepburn acts, and 
of the supplementary act relat- 
ing to the testimony of wit- 
nesses before the interstate 
commerce commission. It also 
contains the texts of the expedi- 
tion act, the anti-trust act of 
1890, the employers' liability act 
and the safety equipment laws. 
Difference in type shows the 
parts expunged from, and the 
parts added to, the interstate 
commerce and Elkins acts by 
the Hepburn act. This pamphlet 
is of special value to railway 
men and lawyers. Mailed pre- 
paid for 25 cents in stamps or 
coin. Special prices for quanti- 
ties. The Wilson Company, 160 
Harrison St., Chicago. 



The Man The Job 



-who wants a job- 



-that wants a man- 



can get together through the medium of a want ad in the 

Electric Railway Review 

The cost is small — only one cent a word per insertion, 
with a minimum charge of 25 cents. Replies may come 
in our care, if you like, to be forwarded without charge. 

Read the advertisements on this page. If you don't see what you want, ask for it! 



January IS. 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



21 




Our Engineers 
Can Help You 

ASK US 

GENERAL 




STORAGE BATTERY CO 

Works, Boonton, N. J. Offices, IL' Broadway, N.Y. 




The Fred. J. Meyers 

Mfg. Co. Hamilton, 0. 

Urges! Manufacturers In the World of 

TICKET and CONDUCTORS' 

PUNCHES 

Send for catalog of "5 dif- 
ferent styles of punches 
with 1000 different dies. 

Write for special prices. 



FOR INSULATING ARMATURE 
AND FIELD COILS 

l — mark Almost Every Big Electric Railway 
m the U. S. and Europe 11ses.it/ 

STANDARD VARNISH WORKS 



P&B 

INSULATING 
VARNISHES 


Possess the highest 
insulative efficiency. 
Meet every 


Send for 
Literature 
and prices. 


P&B 

ELECTRICAL 
COMPOUNDS 


requirement 

in electrical 

work. 


THE STANDARD 

100 WILLIAM S 

Philadelphia, 


PAINT COMPANY, 

T.. NEW YORK. 

St. Louis. Kansas City. 
Boston. New Orleans. 


P&B 

INSULATING 
TAPE 



$2 



pays for 52 
weekly issues 
and 6 daily 
issues of the 



Electric Railway Review 

Costs less than some 
and more than others 
but worth more than all 



Send us the names of 
your friends for sample 
copies, please. 

Electric Railway Review 

160 Harrison Street Chicago 



> and 97 Liberty St., New York 
Second-Hand Machinery and Equipment 

ELECTRIC RAILWAY MATERIALS 






FOR SALE CHEAP! 

One 14x22 eight-wheel locomotive 
Ten 34-foot 50,000 capacity flat cars 
Two Greenleaf turntables 
70 hoi cars, 40 aid 50,000 capacity 
80 Good Second-hand Bridges 

Specifications and Blue Prints on application 
F. A. JOHANN 

1624 Pierce Bids., St. Louis, Mo. 



ROSSITER, MACGOVERN & CO. (be.) 

QO West Street, New York 

FNfilNFS B°il ers > Locomotives, Cars, 

^GENERATORS 



Transformers, Railway, A. C. & D. C. 



MOTORS 



The 

Recording 

Fare Register 

Company 





Bellamy Vestlette 

For Street Railway Conductors 

ABSOLUTELY SAFE. Money cannot be 

lost or stolen from these pockets 

OVER 150,000 IN USE 

Saves the price of a coat yearly. Conductor's 
uniform always presentable. Adopted as a part 
of the uniform by over 200 Street Railway Com- 
panies. Price $2.00, sent to any address prepaid, 
where we have no agent. Agents wanted on 
every line. 

The Bellamy Vestletie Mfg. Co., Cleveland, 0. 

Patented April 27, 1897 and A. F. JURY, 266 Yonge St., Toronto, Canada 




The Milloy Trolley Base 

built in our new and specially equipped 
factory, insures a quality which will give ex- 
cellent service under ordinary and extraor- 
dinary conditions. 

The Milloy Base is unusually low, has even 
tension on high or low wire. Has no ful- 
crum, no friction, no oil, no center post. 
Always efficient. Particulars on request. 

THE MILLOY ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Bucyrus, Ohio 



22 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



The Lindsley Brothers Company 



Producers and Shippers off 



ad Manufacturers of 



WESTERN CEDAR POLES RED FIR CROSS ARMS 



Eastern Sales Office, Monadnock Bide., CHICAGO 



SPOKANE, WASHINGTON 



G. H. BARNES HAKDVVOOD LUMBER CO. 

Office and Yard: Main and Warren Sts.,ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Ties,CarOak,Poplar,Ash,Cherry,Plain and Quartered Oak 



For Sale 



Cards produce results in the 
Electric Railway Review 



C. H. WORCESTER CO. 

CEDAR POLES 

PRODUCERS AND WHOLESALERS 



Suite 1710 Tribune Building 



CHICAGO 



CHESTNyT F o L.E s 

Cedar, Oak and Chestnut Ties 

f MOM CUR OWN TIMBER CANOS 

THE ADVANCE LUMBER CO. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 



We have in our Chicago Yard avail- 
able for RUSH SHIPMENTS a SE- 
LECTED STOCK of POLES and TIES 

NAUGLE POLE AND TIE CO. 

Chicago Office, 226 La Salle Street 



POLES and PILING 



20,000 35s and 40s 
Ready to Ship at Once 



S=E. Missouri Cypress Co., Campbell, Mo. 



We are Producers and Wholesale Dealers in Western 

CEDAR POLES 

Yards in Washington, Idaho, Montana 

and British Columbia 

WRITE US FOR DELIVERED PRICES 

CHURCHILL CEDAR CO., Bo* 1409, Spokane, Wash. 



Idaho Cedar Poles 



PACIFIC COAST POLE CO. 



SPOKANE. WASH. 



FROGS and SWITCHES 



Great Northern Building 



THE PETER SMITH HEATER CO. 



The Pioneer Manufacturers of HOT WATER HEATERS 
for City and Interurban Cars. 

OFFICE AND WORKS: DETROIT, MICH. 



ELECTRIC BLUE PRINTING MACHINES 



J. H. WAGENH0RST & CO., Youngstown, Ohio 

Largest Manufacturers of Blue Printers in the World 

Write fob Circular "I" 



FOSTER SUPERHEATERS 

PREVENT CONDENSATION IN LONG STEAM PIPES. 



POWER SPECIALTY COMPANY 
III Broadway, New York 




Catalogs at Agencies 

Baltimore, Md. Portland, Ore. 

Boston, Mass. Seattle. Wash. 

Chicago, 111. St. Paul, Minn. 

Denver, Colo. St. Louis, Mo. 

Pittsburg, Pa. Troy, N. Y. 



London, Eng. 



Montreal, Can. 



CONTINUOUS JOINT 



\\ KHEK JOINT 



WOLHADPTEB JOINT 



Highest Awards— Paris, 1000; 
Buffalo, 1901 ; St. Louis, 1904 



Additional safety and economy in Track Maintenance has been proved 
by the use of Continuous, Weber and Wolhaupter base-supported rail 
joints — alter ten (10) years' service, having a record of over 25,000 
miles in use — the extent of which is evidence of their excellence. 



THE RAIL JOINT COMPANY 

General Offices: 29 West 34th Street, New York City 

Makers of Rail Joints for Standard and Special Rail Sections, also 
Girder, Step t»r Compromise, and Insulating Rail Joints, protected by 
patents in United States and Foreign Countries. 



January is, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



23 



Dearborn Water Purifying Reagents 

Increase the efficiency and the years of service of steam boilers by keeping them in good con- 
dition internally. Gallon sample of the water required for analysis before preparing treatment. 



Dearborn Drug & Chemical Works 

WM. H. EDGAR, FOUNDER 
299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK POSTAL TELEGRAPH BLDG., CHICAGO 




A Cooper Heater 



'**'-"■- _ will heat eight cars satisfactorily 

^J for the same cost of operating 
one car with the electric heater. 

| I ,. It pays for itself. 

t Ask us to prove it 

The Cooper Heater Co., Dayton, Ohio 



ALUMINUM 

Railway Feeders 

kiSds a o' f Electrical Conductors 



Aluminum Feeders are less than one-half the 
weight of copper feeders and are of equal con- 
ductivity and strength. If insulated wire or cable 
is required, high grade insulation is guaranteed. 

Write for prices and full information. 

Aluminum Company of America 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 
Formerly The Pittsburgh Reduction Company 



Specify the Genuine Roller, It is that Element that makes a Car Curtain a Success. Every Genuine Roller has the Name of Manufacturer 

STEWART HARTSHORN 




SEBlSgfiSHfgg 



fjbaa^ffjfTi 




■ IN SCRIPT ON LABEL- 



STEWART HARTSHORN CO. 

Office and Factory, E. Newark, N. J. 
New York, 382 Lafayette St. Chicago, 338-344 Wabash Ave. 



MORDEN FROG AND CROSSING WORKS 



MANl'FACTURERS OF 



618TheRootery,Chica,o | g^f fo^y SpeOal T^k WWli 



"UNION" Track Jacks, Switches, Frogs, Crossings, Rail Braces, Etc. 




mmm>mM> is 






24 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



The A rnold C ompany - 

ENGINEERS- CONSTRUCTORS 
ELECTRICAL — CIVIL- MECHANICAL 

161 l_A.SA.l_LE STREET 
CH ICASO 



M. AI. Byllesby & Company 




Incorporated 






ENGINEERS 






American Trust Bldil-. Chic 


alio 




Design, Construct and Operate 

Railway. Light, Power and 

Hydraulic Plants 


EXAMINATIONS 
HEPORTS 


AND 



J. G. WHITE & COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

Engineers, Contractors 

ESSES"* New York, N. Y. 

Principal Philippine Office: Manila, P. I. 



The Roberts & Abbott Co. 

E. P. ROBERTS ENGINEERS W.H.ABBOTT 

Electric Railways, Light and Power 

Complete Industrial Plants Water Power Development 

CLEVELAND Chicago Philadelphia Baltimore 



Surface, Jet and Barometric Condensers 

Edwards Air Pumps Centrifugal Pumps 

Water Cooling Towers 

Wheeler Condenser & Engineering Company 

West and Cedar Streets, New York Works, Carteret, N. J. 

Mouaduock Block, Chicago, III. 



Complete Plants for the Rapid 
Handling of Material 

Every Sort of Hoisting Apparatus 

BROWN HOISTING MACHINERY CO. Cleveland, Ohio 



STONE & WEBSTER ENGINEERING 
CORPORATION 

CONSTRUCTING ENGINEERS 

147 MILK STREET, BOSTON 

ELECTRIC RAILWAY, LIGHT & POWER PLANTS 
WATER POWER DEVELOPMENTS 



A. L. REGISTER & CO. 

Engineers and General Contractors— Electric Railway* 

112 North Broad St. PHILADELPHIA, PA. Established 1889 



CENTRAL INSPECTION BUREAU 

Inspection of Rails, Ties, Cars, Motors, Bridges, Bulldi-ags, Etc. 

17 State Street - new York City 



UIINE MATERIAL 

ELECTRIC SUPPLIES FOB RAILWAYS, POWER PLANTS, ETC. 
THE CREAGHEAD ENGINEERING CO., 346 Main Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 



w ?o TE MODEL STOKER COMPANY D ^ N 

for detailed mforroation about the best 
AUTOMATIC SMOKELESS FURNACE 



SPRINGS— TIRES— STEEL-TIRED WHEELS 

RAILWAY STEEL-SPRING CO. 

General Offices: 71 Broadway, New York 



WHEEL TRUING BRAKE SHOES 

Repair Crippled Wheels While Running 
THE WHEEL TRUING BRAKE SHOE CO.. Detroit, Mich. 



Gongs 



For Street Cars 

G. C. REITER, Canton, Ohio 



Bells 



THE CURTAIN SUPPLY CO. 

CAR CURTAINS 
CHICAGO, 85-93 Ohio Street 1819 Park Row Bldg., NEW YORK 



RRAKSSHOES 

^^^ M- ^ BRAKESHOE COMPANY -^*_l f^J 

__-^^ GtN'L OFFICES » WORKS - AU RORA.l LL. CHICACOOFFICE -15 RY. EXCH. ^^^ 



TRACKLAYING BY MACHINERY 

.SIMPLE, RAPID AND ECONOMICAL 

D. F. HOLHAN RAILWAY TRACKLAYER CO., 1102 Ellsworth Bldg., Chicago 



ELECTRIC HEATERS o F f°ca^ clases 
New York Consolidated Car-Heating Co. Chicago 



SHIMER & CHASE CO. 

Experienced Promotors of Electrical Railway Projects 

Correspondence Solicited OMAHA. NEB. 



GEARS AND PINIONS 



THE VAN DORN £ DUTTON CO., Clev 



RE-ENFORCED SPOKE WHEELS 

For City and Suburban Cars 
ST. LOUIS CAR WHEEL CO., St. Louis, Mo. 



HART =---- CAR 
■^* ■ ^ ■ AND CONSTRUCTION ^_-» *^» ■ » 

RODGER BALLAST CAR CO., Railway Exchange, CHICAGO 



HEINE SAFETY BOILER CO. 



January IS, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



■!.-, 



FOR SALE. FOR QUICK DELIVERY 



6 55-ft. Passenger, Baggage 
and Smoking Car Bodies 

Main Compartment 26' 0" 

Smoking " 10' 6" 

Baggage " 10' 0" 

Seating Capacity, 54 

8 60-ft. Passenger, Baggage 
and Smoking Car Bodies 

Main Compartment 28' 6" 

Smoking " 11" 0" 

Baggage " 8' 0" 

Seating Capacity, 58 



5 52 -ft. Passenger and 
Smoking Car Bodies - 

Seating Capacity, 60 



Double 
End 



3 52 -ft. Passenger and 
Baggage Car Bodies -E„°d uble 

Seating Capacity, 56 

2 50-ft. Express Car Bodies 

Write or wire us for further information. 



The Jewett Car Co, 



Newark 
Ohio 



HIKS? 1 "* HOT WATER. CAR HEATER 

Adapted for Large Electric Cars and Long Distance Lines. Exclusively used on Largest Electric Systems. Ask for Catalog 

THE WILLIAM C. BAKER HEATING & SUPPLY CO., 143 •jftwff™" 




NILES CARS 

(The Electric Pullmans) 

LARGE, FAST INTERURBANS 
OUR SPECIALTY 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co. 

Works: NILES, OHIO 

Sales Office : J. A. HANNA CO. 
312 Electric Kldg., Cleveland, Ohio 



CAR BODIES 

Of All Types 

TRUCKS 

To Suit 

CINCINNATI 
CAR COMPANY 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 




STANDARD SEMI-CONVERTIBLE — For Use All the Year 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX. No. 



How to Paint 
Canvas Car Roofs 



Let us send you simple direc- 
tions for waterproofing canvas. 
Economical and durable. 

Detroit Graphite Company 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Dept. S. 



ROLLING DOORS 

In Steel, Wood or Bronze 

FOR CAR BARNS; FREIGHT SHEDS, ETC. 



Made by the 



JAS. G. WILSON MFG. CO. 

New York Office: 3 W. 29th Street 

ESTABLISHED 1876 Incorporated 1903 



Kirmear 

Rolling" Doors 



M^L^a 




Operate Easily, Speedily, Satisfactorily 
and are very durable. Write for Catalog . 

The Kin-near Manfg. Co. 

CO L-U MB US. OHIO. 
BOSTON CHICAGO PHILADELPHIA 

85WATERST, I 12 CLARK ST. 101 I CHE5TNUT ST. 



Baltimore Center and Side Bearings 

FOR ELECTRIC TRUCKS 



Impossible 

to Clog 

Balls 




No 
Lubrication 
Necessary 



FLANGE WEAR 
SAVES: \ RAIL WEAR 

TRUCK REPAIRS 



PROVEN 



HEAVIEST 
LOADS 



BALTIMORE 

MD. 



THE T. H. SYMINGTON CO. 



CHICAGO 

ILL. 



FlectriG Railway Review 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY BY THE WILSON COMPANY, CHICAGO 

Enteral as second-clasa matter January 5. 190V, at the postofflce at Chicago, 111., under the act of March 8, 18J9. 



iSS^rsgSSftSgS n;,¥ x Chicago, January is, m 

1529 Williamson BldK., Cleveland ™°' ° 



Snbscri] Domestic ... $2 

Kc.r.-ik-n . 

Canada . . . $3.50 



In a letter to the Electric Railway Review, which is published 
in this issue. Commissioner James S. Harlan of the interstate 

commerce commission makes plain the atti- 
Electric Roads tude of that body with respect to electric 

Under Federal railways. The Hepburn act makes no dis- 

Jurisdiction. tinction between roads which rely upon 

electricity for their motive power and 
steam roads; and the commission has adopted this attitude in 
its informal correspondence concerning electric railways. Mr. 
Harlan gives further expression to the statement in the annual 
report of the commission, which has just been made to con- 
gress, that "according to the test of location of the physical 
property, not more than 20 per cent" of the electric urban 
and interurban lines comes within the jurisdiction of the 
commission. This statement is not clear, but Mr. Harlan ex- 
plains that 20 per cent of the entire mileage is regarded as 
under the commission's jurisdiction. As this is a rough esti- 
mate, the figures are open to question. As the position of 
the commission will undoubtedly be that the Hepburn act 
applies in all its phases to electric railways engaged in inter- 
state commerce, it is apparent that if the present designs of 
the commission are carried out the same strict supervision 
over accounting methods and rates that is exercised with 
steam railways will in time be extended also to electric rail- 
ways. Mr, Harlan's communication is one of the foremost 
authoritative expressions which has been issued concerning 
the attitude of this most important of public commissions 
toward electric railways. 



In accordance with a resolution passed at the Atlantic City 
convention of the American Street and Interurban Railway 
Association, the committee on organization 
Transportation has issued a call for a meeting to arrange 
Association for a fourth affiliated association to be 

to be Formed. devoted to the operating and traffic depart- 

ments of street and interurban railway 
properties. This action is probably the most important step 
taken by the association since the reorganization of the Street 
Railway Association in 1905. As previously stated in these 
columns, the object is to bring together the managers, super- 
intendents, traffic managers and advertising managers for the 
consideration of purely operating and traffic questions, and to 
turn over to the new association all of the general convention 
and committee work heretofore handled by the American asso- 
ciation, which should go to such an affiliated association. 
This will relieve the presidents, general managers and other 
executive officials, who it is desirable should be most active 
in the work of the parent association, of the consideration of 
details with which they are not especially familiar, leaving 
them free to take up general questions relating to national, 
state and municipal legislation, and questions of broad gen- 
eral policy, such as public relations, municipal ownership and 
depreciation. The natural result will be that most of the 
convention work of the American association in the future 
will be done in executive session, while the consideration of 
details properly relating to the operating department will 
be placed in the hands of those whose daily experience is with 
those details. And it may be expected that the discussions 



al future conventions on many operating subjects which have 
been too much neglected heretofore will be fuller and freer. 



The Metropolitan West Side Elevated Railway Company of 
Chicago has just equipped for operation some new motor cars 

for elevated service. The wiring details of 
Valves and these cars are especially well carried out 

Governors with a view to the prevention of electrical 

Under Seats. troubles and the localizing of any faults 

that might develop. One of the special fea- 
tures of the electrical equipment arrangement is that of utiliz- 
ing the space under the seats for several of the controlling 
valves and governors. Each of these cars has in its floor 
construction a Vs-inch steel plate completely covering the under 
side of the car. Above this plate is an insulating filler of 
asbestos wool and above this is the wooden floor. To provide 
for ready access the air compressor governor, motor cut-out, 
triple valve, feed valve and auxiliary storage battery charg- 
ing switch are each one placed under a seat cushion. On 
the deck rail above these seats are lettered in gold initials 
which will show a motorman the proper location of each of 
these pieces of apparatus, thus relieving him from the neces- 
sity of removing the cushions of the various seats until he 
finds the particular switch for which he may be looking. 
There is another desirable feature in connection with utiliz- 
ing the under-the-seat space for these valves and switches. It 
is that an electric heater may be confined within the same 
space under the seat and thereby serve in a large measure 
to prevent any possibility of the sluggish action of the device 
on account of cold weather affecting either oil or condensation 
that may be in the moving parts. 



An unusual condition exists in Detroit which is unlike that 
in any other large city in the country and which makes the 
adoption of the T-rail for street railway 
Use of use of more than ordinary importance. The 

T-Rail in soil is of an unstable character, which 

Detroit. makes it impossible to construct at reason- 

able cost a rigid subgrade such as is neces- 
sary to the satisfactory employment of the grooved girder 
rail where the paving material is laid flush with the head of 
the rail. The soil, a blue clay of a plastic nature, will not 
hold even a carefully constructed concrete bed in place 
through several years of heavy traffic and alternate freezing 
and thawing, so that where the grooved girder rail is used 
the paving after short use usually requires frequent repairs 
because of the slight lateral motion of the rail, which it is 
impossible to correct. With a view to lessening this difficulty 
the Detroit United Railway Company has determined upon 
the adoption of the Trail on one of its principal lines. The 
change in the type of rail promises to reduce the maintenance 
cost for the railway company and also to remove what has 
been considered a nuisance by the public, an unnecessary 
amount of noise from the cars. The grooved girder rail has 
always given an unusual amount of trouble by collecting and 
holding dirt, sweepings, snow and ice. which results in an 



64 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



uneven rail surface, but which it is believed will not be 
present at all with the T-rail. The defect has been noted in 
many places where the girder rail is used, but so far little 
general attention has been attracted to it and the generally 
accepted and traditionary advantages of the girder rail have 
many times weighed heavily against the more logical practice 
of using the T-rail. 



The Indiana Union Traction Company and those of its officials 
and employes who have to do with the construction, mainte- 
nance and repair of rolling stock are to be 
Indiana congratulated. This company has in excel- 

Union Trac- lent working condition a purely interurban 

tion Shops. repair shop of the highest type. We offer 

our congratulations because we believe that 
no other interurban railway system has yet been favored with 
such complete repair facilities. The new shops are well lo- 
cated at Anderson, Ind., the junction point of several of the 
Indiana Union Traction Company's important lines. This loca- 
tion was also thought desirable because the shop buildings 
could be built within a stone's throw of the large central 
generating station for the Union Traction Company's power 
transmission network. We feel certain that the benefits from 
this centralization will be realized in both shop and power 
station costs; the shops will have available a most economical 
supply of heat and power; -the generating station will have 
handy a fully equipped repair shop which can handle any and 
all of its emergency repair work. The general offices of 
the Indiana Union Traction Company are also in Anderson, 
so that it may safely be said that this town is the heart of 
the great interurban system which has been such a magnifi- 
cent example and model for interurban construction the world 
over. 



A RESULT FROM NON-STANDARD DUMPER HEIGHTS. 



An appellate division of the supreme court of New York 
recently rendered a decision with regard to the height of car 
bumpers, which should be of particular interest to roads 
operating both local and interurban cars over the same tracks. 
The court was called upon to decide whether or not a railroad 
company was furnishing suitable cars when its equipments 
were so constructed that in case of collision the bumper of 
one car would not strike that of another and would break or 
demolish the vestibule of one of the cars. 

The court held that it was a fair question for the jury 
whether the defendant was not negligent in furnishing its 
employes cars so constructed. The conclusion of the jury- 
was that the railroad company was negligent in furnishing 
cars having such a variation in the height of bumpers and 
that such negligence had been the cause of the death of the 
motorman, on account of which the electric railroad had been 
sued lor damages. 

The accident occurred at a siding where a local car was 
supposed to await the passage of a large interurban car. 
The interurban car, however, arrived, at the switch before 
the local car and stood partly covering the point of the 
switch, so that it obstructed the passage of the local car onto 
the sidetrack. The result was a head-on collision of the 
cars, causing the death of the motorman on the local car. 
The court did not hold the company liable for negligence in 
its servants placing the interurban car so that the local car 
would not clear it — this was the act of a fellow servant. But 
the question submitted to the jury tended to show negligence 
of the railroad company in the manner in which the bumpers 
of the two colliding cars were placed with reference to each 
other. 

The bumper of the interurban car was built around the 
ends of the car sills and was constructed of oak timber, 6 by 8 
inches in section, bound in heavy iron. The bumper of the 
local car was not so strongly built and did not stand so high 



above the rails. In case the cars were pushed against each 
other the bumpers would not meet; but that of the interur- 
ban car, on account of its greater height, would lap over the 
bumper of the local car and strike against the vestibule. 
This was the existing condition at the time of the collision 
and the bumper of the interurban car passed entirely over 
that of the local car. It broke through and crushed the vesti- 
bule and the controller at which the motorman was stationed. 
The interurban car was not damaged. 

A lesson in this regrettable case is that particular atten- 
tion should, in the future, be given the standardizing of 
bumper and coupler heights, as well as to other parts of roll- 
ing stock equipments which must be renewed on account of 
wear. 



DENIAL OF TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENT WITH STEAM 
ROADS. 



The denial by the interstate commerce commission of the 
petition of the Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad for 
through routes and joint rates with the Illinois Central Rail- 
road and its subsidiary does not settle the question of the 
right of electric roads to secure joint arrangements with 
steam railways. The decision, however, is unfortunate be- 
cause, unless the position of the commission shall be amended 
in this case or a more favorable position indicated in a deci- 
sion affecting another electric road, the ruling will discourage 
electric railways in their efforts to make traffic arrangements 
with steam roads. An abstract of the decision of the com- 
mission was published in the issue of the Electric Railway 
Review for January 4, page 24. 

It will be understood that the Chicago & Milwaukee Elec- 
tric Railroad runs within a short distance of and parallel to 
the Chicago & Northwestern Railway and the Chicago Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul Railway. The evidence makes it plain 
that these two steam railways influenced the Illinois Central 
road to withdraw traffic arrangements with the Chicago & 
Milwaukee Electric Railroad for the hauling of cabbages in 
carlots. The Chicago & Northwestern Railway, in interven- 
ing in the hearing before the commission, took the position 
that the territory was adequately served by the existing steam 
roads. Concerning the adequacy of the steam railway service 
there was marked disagreement in the evidence. Officials of 
the Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad claimed that the 
service afforded by the steam railroads was not adequate; 
officials of both of the steam railways testified that they fur- 
nished all the facilities which were required. Outside of this 
evidence the only testimony which was given on this point 
appears to have been that of William J. Hansche and August 
J. Piper, large shippers of cabbages, who were introduced as 
witnesses by the Chicago & Milwaukee Electric road. These 
shippers complained of the steam railway service and charged 
that the roads did not provide the proper equipment when 
requested and did not route the cars as asked. Mr. Hansche, 
who testified more at length than Mr. Piper, said that if he 
desired to ship to points in Texas he was often compelled 
by the Chicago & Northwestern road to ship via Omaha 
instead of by way of Chicago. He also declared that when 
he had cabbages loaded, for instance, in Illinois Central refrig- 
erator cars and wanted to ship them to Omaha, the Chicago & 
Northwestern line would not permit him to do so for the 
reason that Omaha is a competing point. 

The decision of the interstate commerce commission ap- 
pears to have been based largely on that clause of Section 
15 of the Hepburn act which provides that the commission 
may establish through routes and joint rates, "provided no 
reasonable or satisfactory through route exists." The con- 
tention of counsel for the electric road was that this clause 
meant that the commission might establish such routes 
and rates, provided no reasonable or satisfactory through 
route exists for the carrier which files a complaint; but the 



January IS, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



65 



commission Interprets this clause as assuming that the proviso 
applies to the existence of reasonable or satisfactory through 
routes so far as the neighborhood for which the through 
routes and rates are desired is concerned. If the neighbor- 
hood already had satisfactory through routes and rates, the 
commission, in accordance with its ruling, would afford no 
relief to an existing or a new carrier which desired to offer 
the same facilities as its competitors. 

Application for a rehearing will be made by the Chicago 
& Milwaukee Electric road, and it is desirable that complete 
evidence be introduced on the subject of the adequacy of the 
service afforded by the two steam roads. The question of 
joint arrangements between an electric road and a steam 
railway where the issue of the adequacy of steam railway 
service cannot be raised, is before the commission on the 
petition of the Cedar Rapids & Iowa City Railway of Cedar 
Rapids, la., for through routes and joint rates with the Chicago 
& Northwestern Railway. This electric road extends through 
a territory which is not served by any steam railway. 



TWO-CENT STEAM RAILWAY FARES. 



Elsewhere in this issue we publish letters from officials 
of a number of interurban electric railways concerning the 
effect of 2-cents-per-mile passenger fare laws upon their 
traffic. In states from which expressions of opinion and in- 
formation on this subject were requested by us the reduced 
passenger fare laws imposed upon steam railways have gone 
into effect. 

These letters show that in many instances reductions in 
steam railway fares have not caused perceptible declines in 
traffic and earnings of electric railways; but in numerous 
other cases the effect of cheaper rates and resultant changes 
in schedules on steam roads has been felt more or less 
sharply. One interurban road which parallels a steam rail- 
way charges 2 cents a mile for single-trip tickets, 1% cents 
per mile for round-trip tickets and 1% cents per mile for 
mileage books; but even with these rates this road feels the 
competition of the steam railway. That the existence of this 
competition is realized by the electric road is due to the fact 
that while the steam railway, prior to the adoption of 2-cent 
fares, did not stop its trains at points between the two 
terminals of the competing electric road, it now stops all 
trains at the intervening stations. 

It seems assured that steam railways will not find it per- 
manently profitable to make all the stops required to furnish 
a local service approaching the desirable service of competing 
electric railways. Many interurban roads withstood for years 
the severest competition which steam railways brought to. 
bear. The construction of electric roads which offered fares 
Hi two rents per mile or less was frequently met at the outset 
by corresponding or lower rates by steam roads; still the elec- 
tric railways secured and held the business because of ad- 
vantages which the steam railways could not offer — fre- 
quency of service, freedom from smoke, dust and cinders, and 
accessibility of terminals. With these factors interurban elec- 
tric railways have permanent claims upon public patronage. 

Electric railways which have experienced losses on ac- 
count of the narrower margin between their rates and those 
of competing steam lines may find that litigation started by 
the. steam railways will result in decisions by the courts that 
2-cent fare laws are unconstitutional. While the question is 
being tested in the courts electric roads which parallel steam 
roads should lay more stress than ever before on the posses- 
sion of advantages which it is impossible for the steam roads 
to afford. 

It seems inevitable that the obliteration of the margin 
between the fares of the two classes of roads will work some 
hardship. If electric railways lose in density of traffic, the 
natural result will be curtailment of service. The proper 
tendency of fares should be upward rather than to a lower 



level and it will be unfortunate if electric railways, already 
offering reduced rates, should experience now a decline in 
density of passenger traffic. 



MEETING CALLED TO FORM TRANSPORTATION ASSO- 
CIATION. 



The committee on organization of the American Street 
and Interurban Railway Association, acting in accordance 
with a resolution passed at the Atlantic City convention, on 
January 14 issued a circular letter to general managers an- 
nouncing a meeting of representatives of member companies 
to be held in New York on January 30, to organize a fourth 
affiliated association, for the operating and transporation 
departments. The letter reads as follows: 

At the Friday (October IS, 1907) session of the Atlantic 
City convention, the American Street and Interurban Railway 
Association unanimously adopted the following resolution : 

"Whereas, Experience has demonstrated the desirability 
and usefulness of our existing affiliated organizations, and 

"Whereas, It has appeared from discussion that another 
organization of similar character should be created, to which 
should be committed lines of work pertaining to transporta- 
tion, traffic and general operation. Now, therefore, be it 

"Resolved, That the executive committee be and hereby 
is requested to take such steps as it may deem desirable to 
encourage the formation of such an organization." 

The executive committee of the American Association at 
its meeting held in the city of New York, Saturday, October 
19, 1907, voted to proceed with the organization of a fourth 
affiliated association in accordance with the above resolution, 
and the undersigned committee on organization was appointed. 

The committee has given careful consideration to this 
entire matter and is of the opinion that the new association 
should bring together general managers, managers, passenger 
agents, advertising managers, superintendents and other oper- 
ating officials, for the consideration of problems of interest 
to those engaged in the actual operation of street and inter- 
urban railway properties. The exact name of the new associa- 
tion will be determined at the organization meeting. 

The annual meeting of the executive committee of the 
American association will be held on Friday, January 31, and 
it is the desire of the undersigned to have the organization 
of the new association completed, so that the action thus 
taken may be ratified at that meeting; including the adoption 
of the constitution and by-laws, the election of officers, the 
appointment of committees, and the general outline of the 
program for the 190S convention. 

We, therefore, give notice that a meeting for the purpose 
of organizing a fourth association to be affiliated with the 
American Street and Interurban Railway Association will be 
held at the office of the association, 29 West Thirty-ninth 
street. Engineering Societies building, New York City, on 
Thursday, January 30, 1908, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon. You 
are respectfully urged to have one or more representatives 
of your company present at this meeting, fully authorized 
to participate in the organization of such a fourth affiliated 
association. 

This is a very important meeting and a full attendance 
of representatives of member companies of the American 
association is earnestly requested. 

CALVIN G. GOODRICH (Chairman). 
W. CARYL ELY. 
JAMES F. SHAW. 

Committee on Organization. 



Secretary Swenson's office has just issued the annual 
report of the Engineering association meetings held at Atlantic 
City on October 14, 15 and It!. 1907. This issue of the Ameri- 
can Street and Interurban Railway Engineering Association 
annual exceeds its predecessors in the value of its contents 
and in the manner in which the vast amount of valuable 
matter has been compiled in book form. An excellent portrait 
of President H. H. Adams, superintendent of shops United 
Railways & Electric Company, Baltimore, Md.. appears as the 
frontispiece. Included in the reports of the "Standardization" 
committee are double-page inserts on firm paper bearing the 
accepted standards for electric railway equipment. A useful 
addition to this year's Engineering association annual is a 
summary index of previous reports detailing the references to 
imp6rtant events and papers of earlier conventions. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 




January IS, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



67 



ANDERSON SHOPS OF THE INDIANA UNION TRACTION 
COMPANY. 



my >;. i. TAYLoit, si !-ki:imi:n[h:m <>i muthk I'hwki:. 



In a former issue of the Electric Railway Review plans 
were shown of the Dew shops of the Indiana Union Traction 
Company. These shops have just been completed and it is 



system and as the company owned the property adjacent to 
the power house it was decided to locate the shops al this 
point. 

The site selected was of triangular shape, of ample size 
tor the shops, storage yards and tracks necessary to serve 
the shop requirements, with ample provisions for future ex- 
tensions. It will be observed from the accompanying plan 
thai the general outline includes a building practically under 




Anderson Shops Indiana Union Traction Company — North and West Elevation. 



now possible to present some interesting features of their 
construction. 

The lines of the Indiana Union Traction Company com- 
prise a group of divisions in Indiana: 

Indianapolis via Marion to Wabash, Ind. 

Indianapolis via Anderson to Muncie, Ind. 

Indianapolis via Kokomo to Peru. Ind. 

Indianapolis via Peru to Ft. Wayne. Ind. 

Muncie via Hartford City to Bluffton, Ind. 



one roof, but subdivided into various departments so as to 
form a series of adjoining buildings designed for various pur- 
poses. The buildings cover an area of 76,920 square feet. 

Track Arrangement. 

It will be noted on the plan that the track arrangement 
provides a combination of stub and through tracks in the 
various departments of the shop, each shop department being 




Anderson Shops Indiana Union Traction Company — South End. Exterior. 



Muncie via Winchester to Union City, Ind. 
Anderson to Middletown. 

Connecting lines from Alexandria via Elwood to Tipton. 
Ind. 

This company also operates the city lines of Anderson. 
Muncie, Marion, Elwood. Alexandria and Indianapolis to Broad 
Ripple. This group of divisions includes a system of 314 
miles of interurban track and 47 miles of city track, making 
a total mileage of 361. The total number of cars owned is 351. 

The main power house of the company is located at North 
Anderson. This is very nearly the geographical center of the 



provided with one or more through tracks. At the north end 
of the shop is a ladder track with necessary switches for the 
18 tracks entering the building. Thirteen of the tracks are 
stub tracks and five are through tracks. On the west side 
of the building is the main line double track of the Anderson 
and Wabash division. The north end ladder track is con- 
nected to this by two curves and a crossover, making it possi- 
ble for a car to enter or leave the yard on either track headed 
in either direction. 

The north end ladder track being located 102 feet from 
the building allows the longest interurban cars to be entirely 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



squared around, entering the buildings parallel with the track. 
The north end ladder track at the east end curves into a 
ladder track. Running diagonally along the east side of the 
property into this diagonal ladder track are the switches con- 
necting all the through tracks in the shops and also the 
switches for the storage tracks in the yard. Continuing, this 
diagonal track joins the southbound track of the Anderson and 
Wabash division at a point 400 feet south of the south end 
of the building. This arrangement of tracks permits a car to 
enter or leave the yards either at the north or south end of 
the buildings and has proved very' flexible and convenient. 
The special track work was furnished by the Buda Foundry 
& Manufacturing Company. 

Car Repair Shop. 
The car repair shop occupies a section of a room 140 feet 
6 inches by 192 feet 6 inches. In this room are located the 
car repair shop, armature room, machine shop and blacksmith 
shop. 

The car repair section is 60 feet by 192 feet 6 inches 
and has 12 tracks, the tracks in this section extending through 
the car repair shop, the "truck aisle" and into the machine 
shop. Each track in the car repair shop has a pit 67 feet 
long, 3 feet 11 inches wide and 4 feet 6 inches deep, provision 
being made for drainage at one end. The walls and floors 
of the pits are of concrete. The walls are 18 inches at the 
bottom and 12 inches at the top and reinforced by %-inch 
rods. The walls are capped by 10 by 12 inch pine stringers, 
held by anchor bolts embedded in the concrete. To these 
stringers are attached 60-pound rails. The pits on one side 
are recessed at intervals of 6 feet 8 
inches for pit lights: on the oppo- 
site wall 4 by 4 inch oak strips 10 
feet apart are embedded, to which 
are attached the heating coils. At 
each end of the pits are located iron 
steps. The floor of the car repair 
shops between pits is depressed 18 
inches below the rail to facilitate 
work on car trucks. Provision also 
is made for the drainage of this 
depression at one end and concrete 
steps are provided at each end of 
the depression. 

In the car repair shop section 
the roof trusses have been designed 
to safely sustain the weight of the 
largest interurban car body and the 
cars are raised off their trucks by 
two electric hoists which travel on 
12-inch I-beams supported on the 



lower chord of the roof trusses. One of the photographs 
shows an interurban car raised high enough so that the trucks 
may be rolled out clear 
of the pilot. Four of 
these electric hoists are 
provided and electric 
traveling bridges travel- 
ing at right angles to 
the car repair shop 
tracks serve to transfer 
the electric hoists to 
any of the 12 tracks. //M, 




January 18, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



69 




Anderson Shops Indiana Union Traction Company — Truck 
Aisle with Traveling Cranes. 



Anderson Shops Indiana Union Traction Company — Depressed 
Track Through Storeroom. 




Anderson Shops Indiana Union Traction Company-Paint Shop with Three Through Tracks, a Concrete Floor and a Generous 

Window Illumination. 



7ii 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 




January 18, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



71 



These electric hoists in connection with the bridges are also 
used as traveling cranes to do any work in the "truck aisle" 



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after the trucks have been removed from the cars. This 
•design provides a very convenient and flexible arrangement. 



permitting the use of the hoists on any of tin- 12 tracks or 
anywhere in the truck aisle with a range of movement of 
2,016 lineal feet. 

Truck Repair Aisle. 

The truck repair aisle, 16 feet by 192 feet 6 inches, as 
already indicated, is adjacent to and at right angles with the 
repair shop section. When trucks are removed from cars 
they may be repaired in this aisle, which is served by three 
5-ton 16-foot span traveling cranes, or they may be rolled out 
in the shop still further and come under the 15-ton traveling 
crane which covers the machine shop, armature room and 
blacksmith shop. 

Machine Shop. 

The section occupied by the machine shop, blacksmith 
shop and armature room is 60 feet by 192 feet 6 inches. In 
this section there are three separate sections of motor-driven 
line shafts arranged along two walls just under the traveling 
crane girder. As many of the tools as may be arranged are 
driven from these line shafts and the balance of the machine 
tools by individual motors. 

The machine tool equipment consists of: 

One 32 by 32 by 120 inch heavy Cincinnati planer, 12 
horsepower motor. 

One 36-inch by 10-foot Bradford lathe, belted. 

One 24-inch by S-foot Bradford lathe, belted. 

One 14 by 6 inch Lodge & Shipley lathe, belted. 

One 24-inch Cincinnati shaper. belted. 

One 42-inch Xiles wheel lathe, 12-horsepower. motor- 
driven. 

One 200 Xiles wheel press, belted. 

One 36-inch Xiles boring mill, belted. 

One 24-inch Cincinnati drill, belted. 

One 20-inch Cincinnati drill, belted. 

One Barr sensitive drill, belted. 

One Barnes sensitive drill, belted. 

One 2%-inch Acme bolt cutter, belted. 

One power metal saw, belted. 

One power hack saw, belted. 

One coil taping machine,, belted. 

One field taping machine, belted. 

One banding machine, belted. 
• One Beaudry power hammer, belted. 

One exhaust fan, belted. 

One blower, belted. 

Four Buffalo down draft forges, belted. 

One 15-ton traveling crane. 

Three 5-ton traveling cranes which were furnished by the 
Genera! Pneumatic Tool Company. Montour Falls, X. Y. 

The arrangement of several departments in one room 
under the range of traveling cranes has proved very satis- 
Eactory, as any part of an equipment may be readily trans- 
ferred to any department or to any of the tools of any depart- 
ment at the minimum cost. 

In a separate room. 16 by 80 feet, is provided a con- 
venience room for the employes of the main shop. This 
includes toilet facilities, washstands. shower baths and steel 
lockers. 

Cleaning and Inspection Room. 

This room is 60 by 70 feet in floor area and has three 
tracks. Two of the tracks have pits 60 feet long, of the same 
general dimensions and description as the pits in the car 
repair shop, with the exception that the rails in this room are 
laid directly on the concrete walls of the pits. This room was 
especially arranged for the cleaning and sterilizing of inter- 
urban cars and the care of the Anderson city cars. There is 
an installation of a combined air pressure and vacuum clean- 
ing device for cleaning the interior of cars, seats and cushions 
and for washing the exterior of cars. This installation was 
supplied by the General Compressed Air & Vacuum Machinery 
Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

Woodworking or Mill Room. 

The wood mill is 60 feet by 103 feet 6 inches and has a 
through track on one side from which lumber may be handled 
directly from the company's own cars or from steam railroad 
cars. The arrangement of woodworking tools has been care- 



72 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



fully laid out so that timbers of the longest dimensions may 
be handled on any of the machines without interference. In 
this room the following machines have been installed: 

One 8 by 24 inch 4-cylinder surfacer. 

One 4 by 8 inch molding machine. 

One 2-spindle shaper 

One 4-head tenoner. 

One combined mortising and boring machine. 

One combined jig saw and single-spindle shaper. 

One brand saw. 



storeroom. A loading platform also is arranged to facilitate 
the delivery of material to the storeroom by team. 

Car Construction Shop. 

This shop is 54 by 260 feet and has three through tracks, 
which pass directly from this shop to the paint shop in the 
same bay. This shop is arranged to accommodate 12 of the 
largest interurban cars. 

The paint shop is 221 by 54 feet and has three tracks. It 








B 



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0£.m/L OF UGH r FOCX'ZT 



Dcm/L -/?/vchok Sol r Dem/i -fff/jr 0a 5tk/p 
Anderson Shops Indiana Union Traction Company — Details of Repair Pits. 



Secr/o/v A3- 



One cross-cut saw. 
One rip saw. 

One universal woodworker. 
One wood lathe. 
One automatic knife grinder. 

These machines are driven by Westinghouse induction 
motor. 

Storeroom. 

The storeroom is divided into two rooms. One room, 80 
feet by 96 feet 6 inches, where general supplies are stored, 



is separated from the car construction shop by a brick fire 
wall, the openings being fitted with three self-closing Kinnear 
rolling doors. Special attention has been given to the light- 
ing of the paint shop, light being admitted from both sides and 
by saw-tooth monitors to the middle track. The interiors of 
all shops have been painted white, giving the benefit of the 
reflective effect of whited walls. 

A separate brick building, 15 by 60 feet, has been provided 
for the storage of inflammable fluids, the oil and paint storage 



ft 







Anderson Shops Indiana Union Traction Company — Details of Repair Pits. 



has a mezzanine gallery around its four sides for the storage 
of lighter material. This room is located adjacent to the car 
repair room and supplies are issued through one door on 
requisition only. The other storeroom, 81 feet 6 inches by 60 
feet, is adjacent to the main storeroom and is intended for 
the storage of heavy material, such as track and line material. 
A through track, depressed so that the floors of loaded cars 
are level with the storeroom floors, passes through this build- 
ing and supplies may be handled from this track to either 



rooms being separated by a solid fire wall. It is planned to 
transfer journal and motor oil from the oil house to the car 
repair shop by air pressure, so that oil may be tapped from 
faucets located in the car repair shops. 

Brass Foundry and Sandhouse. 

In a building separate from the main building is located 
the brass foundry and babbitt room, tinsmith shop and sand- 
house. The brass foundry has two furnaces and a full equip- 



January IS, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



73 



ment of brass foundry tools. The sandhouse is located with 
one through track on the west side and one stub track on the 



necessarily accumulate around a shop. Over this cast-iron 
pipe is placed a sand hopper which holds 2u yards of wet 




Anderson Shops Indiana Union Traction Company — Car Repair Shops, Showing Car Body Being Raised by Two Electric Hoists. 



east side, so that the wet sand may be handled from freight or 
work cars and dry sand furnished to the cars conveniently. 
The scheme of drying sand is very simple and inexpensive. A 
20-inch cast-iron pipe is arranged as a rubbish furnace for the 
purpose of burning up all refuse, chips and rubbish which 



sand. The refuse is fired in the inside of the cast-iron pipe 
and the sand is dried by the heat thus generated. 

At the northwest corner of the buildings a second story, 
54 by 64 feet, provides accommodation for six office rooms and 
an instruction room. The roof of this second story is of orna- 



71 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



mental tile, which adds to the architectural appearance of 
the buildings. The offices are occupied by the superintendent 
of power, division electrician, superintendent of motive power 
and master mechanic. The instruction room will be fitted 
with samples of the equipment used on the system, necessary 
charts, drawings, etc., for the proper instruction of trainmen 
regarding the important parts of an equipment handled by 
them in service. 

Heating System. 

The shops are heated by the Evans-Almirall system of 
hot-water heating. This system employs a forced circulation 
of hot water. The apparatus consists of a 20-horsepower in- 
duction motor directly connected to a centrifugal pump, a live 
steam heater and the pipe coils in the various buildings. The 
suction of the pump is connected to the return side of the 
system and the discharge of the pump to the pressure side. 
The reheater is connected on the circuit on the pressure side 
of the system. The pump and reheater are located in the 



pendent system of fire protection. The shops have been sur- 
rounded by a 6-inch water main with two and three way 
hydrants located at convenient points outside the building and 
a sufficient number of hose connections located in the various 
departments of the shops. Hydrants and hose connections 
are each furnished with a line of fire hose. Pressure is sup- 
plied by an underwriters' fire pump located in the power house. 
The design and construction of the shops were under the 
general supervision of H. A. Nicholl, general manager of the 
Indiana Union Traction Company, and carried out in detail by 
W. C. Sparks, superintendent of roadway and buildings, and 
R. C. Taylor, superintendent of motive power. 



CLEARANCE CHART FOR INTERURBAN CARS. 



A clearance table and explanatory diagram from which the 
accompanying illustration was prepared were used during the 
construction of the Ocean Shore Railway. This interesting 




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R 2 = 82.75 // 



/?// measurements /n fee? 



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6 22 


87.38 


85.88 


76.88 


88.97 


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96.09 


ZOO.59 


97.59 


'03.24 


2.62 


26.36 


5.87 


566 


30.00 


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60-o" 


„ 


2.45 


6.63 


80.30 


84.30 


75.80 


89.38 


2.08 


6.35 


95. 77 


99.67 


90-67 


703.60 


7.29 


27.80 


6.95 


6.58 


40.00 


70.00 




70-o" 


„ 


3.37 


7.0/ 


78.88 


83.38 


74.38 


89.76 


3.27 


6.69 


93.98 


98.48 


89.48 


703.94 


-.23 


29.56 


8.37 


7.77 


50.00 


/O.OO 




7o i o" 


9-a" 


3.S/ 


7.66 


79.24 


84.07 


74.40 


90.47 


2.96 


7.30 


94.79 


99.'2 


89.4S 


704.6J 


-.96 


30.75 


8.35 


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47.66 


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Ifog/ier 
5/eqoer 



Table and Sketch Showing Clearances and Overhangihgs of Two Cars on 90-Foot Center Radius Curve. 



power house, the water of condensation from the reheater 
being returned to the hot-water heater. It has been found 
that the pressure required to circulate the water in the sys- 
tem is 20 pounds and that the hot water loses but 20 degrees 
during the circuit in the coldest weather. 

Lighting. 

All departments of the shop with one exception are lighted 
with Cooper-Hewitt mercury-vapor lamps. These lamps are 
placed above the roof trusses in all rooms and give a soft, 
well-diffused light with very little shadow. They are arranged 
to burn six in series, on a 600-volt railway circuit, and thus 
arranged have given splendid service. Should any lamp in 
the circuit fail, the others may burn without loss of efficiency. 
On account of the rays in this light distorting colors the paint 
shop was lighted with incandescent arc lamps. 

Although the shops have been built almost entirely of fire- 
proof materials it was considered advisable to install an inde- 



double-track railway from San Francisco to Vera Cruz, Cal., 
was described in the Electric Railway Review on page 124 of 
the issue of August 3, 1907. The chart and table become espe- 
cially useful to construction engineers when the track work is 
complicated and close to permanent obstructions. It will be 
noted that this chart shows two cars on a double-track curve 
with a 90-foot center radius and 14-foot 6-inch track centers. 
The cars are placed in such a position that the clearance is at 
a minimum. The table includes the various assumed and 
desired dimensions of cars — 50, 60 and 70 feet long, and 9 feet 
and 9 feet S inches wide. 



Frank L. Dye, a conductor on the Springfield-East St. 
Louis line of the Illinois Traction System, is reported to have 
invented a new form of sleet cutter which was recently given 
a trial with good results. The device consists of an extra 
trolley wheel placed in front of the ordinary wheel and having 
a corrugated groove which engages the ice on the wire. 



January 18, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



i.j 



EFFECT OF 2-CENT PASSENGER FARE LAWS ON INTER- 
URBAN ELECTRIC TRAFFIC. 



The Electric Railway Review has received replies to let- 
ters addressed to officials of electric interurban railways 
inquiring about the effect upon their traffic of the introduction 
of 2-cents-per-mile passenger fares on steam roads. These 
replies follow: 

Ft. Wayne & Wabash Valley Traction Company. 

C. D. Emmons, general manager Ft. Wayne & Wabash 
Valley Traction Company, Ft. Wayne, Ind.: "We do not think 
that the 2-cents-per-mile passenger fare law will have any 
effect upon our traffic, as our competing roads have already 
made a rate of practically 1V6 cents per mile in their competi- 
tion with us, by placing on sale what is known as a twin 
ticket, which is good for two persons going in the same direc- 
tion, good for a round trip or for two single trips in the same 
direction. This ticket is purchased almost exclusively by 
those using the steam roads, so that their fare is constantly 
nominally 1% cents per mile where they compete with us. 
The more frequent service of the trolley, which passes through 
the business districts of the various towns and is dependable 
as to closeness of schedule, will keep the traffic with us." 

Kokomo Marion & Western Traction Company. 

Thomas C. McReynolds, secretary and treasurer Kokomo 
Marion t V- Western Traction Company, Kokomo, Ind.: "The 
effect the 2-cent passenger fare laws will have upon the pas- 
senger traffic of the electric railways very much depends upon 
the distance the steam and electric roads are in competition 
and the facilities afforded by such roads in the handling of 
passengers. We operate between Kokomo and Marion along- 
side the Toledo St. Louis & Western Railroad Company. The 
steam road has made a material reduction in the fares charged 
between these points. It may be possible that we lose a 
very few passengers who are convenient to the railroad sta- 
tion and ready to go when the train goes, but outside of this 
I do not believe that we have felt the effects of the reduction 
in fares by steam roads. If the distances were greater be- 
tween our two terminals and the service on the steam road 
superior to ours, we might feel the effect more. It is going 
to be difficult for the steam roads to attract much traffic from 
the interurbans so long as people can go and come at such 
frequent intervals as the service of the electric roads now 
permits." 

Indianapolis Crawfordsville & Western Traction Company. 

George E. Morine. general superintendent. Indianapolis 
Crawfordsville & Western Traction Company, Crawfordsville, 
Ind.: "The 2-cent fares on steam roads had been in operation 
some little time when we started to operate our road, conse- 
quently it would be nothing but guesswork on my part to try 
and say what effect the 2-cent rate had on our traffic. We 
are competing from Crawfordsville to Indianapolis with both 
the Cleveland Cincinnati Chicago & St. Louis Railway and 
the Northwestern branch of the Terre Haute Indianapolis & 
Eastern Traction Company, but in the face of this competition 
we are building up a very fine business. I do not think the 
decrease in steam railroad fares to two cents will cause any 
reduction in fares on interurban electric roads, as most roads 
are now selling round-trip tickets for less than two cents per 
mile." 

Indianapolis Columbus & Southern Traction Company. 

A. A. Anderson, general manager Indianapolis Columbus 
& Southern Traction Company, Seymour, Ind.: "In my judg- 
ment the adoption of the 2-cents-per-mile fares by steam rail- 
ways will affect the traffic of interurban roads on long hauls 
where the interurban rates are close to 2 cents per mile. 
but when rates of competing interurban roads average 1% 
cents per mile or less the local hauls will not be materially 
affected. I am quite sure the decrease in steam railroad 
fares to 2 cents per mile will not cause any reduction in 
the average fares of interurban electric roads." 

De Kalb-Sycamore & Interurban Traction Company. 

D. Thomson, general manager De Kalb-Sycamore & Inter- 
urban Traction Company, De Kalb, 111.: "I do not think the 
2-cent fare law will have any detrimental effect on our traffic 
whatever; we think it will help us because the increased 
traffic on the steam roads will bring in more people who can 
use our line to advantage. The writer is of the opinion that 
the 2-cent fare law will benefit interurban roads wherever it is 
adopted: (1) for the reasons mentioned above; (2) cheaper 
fares mean more passengers or that the same passengers will 
ride oftener. and the better the people become educated to 



ride (by steam or electric) the more benefit will the traction 
companies derive therefrom. With fares even between elec- 
tric roads and steam roads, the advantage to the passenger 
is decidedly in favor of electric roads, not only on account of 
the frequent service and the ability to take the car at nearly 
every street corner, btu principally on account of the lack of 
smoke, soot and cinders and because of the general cleanliness 
of the journey as compared with a trip on steam roads. Of 
course, this applies only to the electric roads that maintain 
good and frequent service and good speed. It is the writer's 
opinion that it is only a matter of time (and that time is very 
close at hand) when steam roads will be used for long-haul 
passengers entirely, the local business all passing to the elec- 
tric roads wherever they are in successful operation." 

Illinois Traction System. 

L. E. Fischer, vice-president and general manager Illinois 
Traction System, Springfield, 111.: "There is no doubt that 
the reduction of fare from three cents to two cents by com- 
peting steam railroad lines tends to decrease the earnings of 
interurban lines — how much we cannot now tell, because our 
properties have been generally increasing and therefore no 
1 comparison is possible. .The effect is probably at a maximum 
now, as the development of interurban traffic will lead to the 
establishing of service equal in all respects to steam railway 
service." 

Evansville Suburban & Newburg Railway. 

Gus. Mulhausen, manager Evansville Suburban & New- 
burg Railway, Evansville, Ind.: "As to the effect of the 2-cent 
rate law governing steam roads I am in a position to speak 
from experience, as we already have the 2-cent fare law lor 
steam railways in effect in this state. On July 3, 1900. this 
company began operating an electric line on an hourly schedule 
between Evansville and Boonville, 18 miles. The rate of fare 
was based, as on our other lines, at two cents per mile, and 
rather than use pennies the 1-way fare was put at 35 cents 
and the round-trip fare at 70 cents. A steam line operating 
three trains in each direction per day between Evansville and 
Boonville was at that time charging three cents per mile on 
a mileage of 17 miles, the 1-way fare being 51 cents. Of 
course, we secured practically all of the business between 
Evansville and Boonville. The steam line operates two local 
freight trains per day on its line and our road operates two 
electric express cars in each direction per day. The rates on 
freight are identical on both lines, still we are handling 85 
per cent of the less than car lot freight business between 
these points. When the new 2-cent rate law became effective 
the steam line, in order to conform with the same, changed 
its rate to 34 cents. We have never changed our rate and 
are still charging 35 cents, or one cent more than the steam 
line, and still continue to do practically all of the business 
between Evansville and Boonville. I do not believe that the 
2-cent law will greatly injure electric lines because of the fact 
of their frequent operation, cleanliness and the advantage of 
their usual downtown terminals. I believe, with courteous 
treatment and the proper energy on the part of the electric 
railways, together with the advantage they have over steam 
lines in the way of accommodation, that their receipts will not 
be greatly decreased on account of a 2-cent rate law. I as- 
sume, of course, that the electric lines will not charge more 
than two cents per mile." 

Cleveland Southwestern & Columbus Railway. 

C. N. Wilcoxon, general manager Cleveland Southwestern 
& Columbus Railway, Cleveland, O.: "We do not find that the 
2-cents-per-mile fare on steam roads has affected our earnings 
to any appreciable extent. We have made no changes in our 
rates of fare on account of the reduction in rates on the steam 
roads." 

Cambridge (O.) Power Light & Traction Company. 

D. W. Cameron, manager Cambridge (O.) Power Light & 
Traction Company: "The 2-cent fare law T has not affected 
our passenger traffic. We changed our rate to the 2-cent rate 
when the law went into effect. Our line is about one and one- 
half miles longer to the point we reach than the steam line is, 
but we take care of practically all the traffic with hourly 
service." 

Winnebago Traction Company. 

J. P. Pulliam, superintendent Winnebago Traction Com- 
pany, Oshkosh. Wis.: "The effect of the application of the 
2-cents-per-mile rate by the steam lines on interurban traffic, 
in my opinion, will be determined largely by the frequency of 
the service given by the steam lines. The success of interur- 
ban lines has been due to the frequency of the service, to- 
gether, of course, with the reduced rates as against the steam 
lines. The big factor, however, is the fact that interurban 



76 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



cars run usually every hour, and in a great many cases 
oftener, whereas the steam line service will consist of two to 
tour trains per day. With us one of our interurban roads has 
hard opposition from two steam roads which provide prac- 
tically a 2-hour service as against one hour on our part. The 
steam line, of course, covers the distance more quickly, and, as 
under the new law the rate is the same, we have noticed a 
small decrease in our business as a result thereof. A factor 
that favors interurban roads, however, is the opportunity 
that passengers have to board the cars on the main streets 
and the fact that with most lines passengers can transfer to 
city roads without additional expense. I do not believe our 
loss will be permanent; on the contrary, the reduced fare 
will tend to increase the general traffic and we will secure 
our portion. We are considering a slight reduction in our 
interurban fares, but not entirely as a result of the change 
with steam lines, as we have thought for some time that a 
reduction would be advisable. With the constantly improv- 
ing conditions surrounding the interurban service, the inter- 
urban road is the natural channel for local traffic, even if 
there is no difference in the rate." 

Cleveland Painesville & Eastern Railroad. 

J. Jordan, general manager Cleveland Painesville & East- 
ern Railroad, Willoughby, O.: "We have not noticed that 
2-cents-per-mile fares on steam roads have taken any of our 
business, as our increase in traffic has been as great since the 
2-cent law went into effect as it has been in years previous. 
The decrease in steam railway fares has not made any change 
in the fares on our road. We parallel the New York Chicago 
& St. Louis Railroad and the Lake Shore & Michigan South- 
ern Railway from Cleveland to Ashtabula, and have very 
strong competition; if the 2-cents-per-mile rate on steam roads 
affected the interurban roads it would certainly show very 
plainly on our traffic." 

Saginaw Valley Traction Company. 

S. E. Wolff, vice-president and general manager Saginaw 
Valley Traction Company, Saginaw, Mich.: "We do not an- 
ticipate any adverse effect from the 2-cent passenger fare laws 
recently enforced against steam roads." 

Detroit United Railway. 

P. W. Brooks, general manager Detroit (Mich.) United 
Railway: "I do not believe the effect of 2-cent passenger 
fare laws upon our traffic will be to our disadvantage, because 
we have been and are now charging lower fares, the average 
being about IVi cents per mile. The frequency of the electric 
service is a convenience to the public, and if the reduction of 
the rates of steam railroads to two cents per mile stimulates 
travel for them, it is likely also to stimulate travel for the 
electric railways. The wisdom of establishing such low rates 
for both steam and electric railways may be seriously ques- 
tioned in the years to come, because it may unnecessarily 
result in an impairment of the service." 

Cedar Rapids & Iowa City Railway. 

William G. Dows, president and general manager Cedar 
Rapids & Iowa City Railway, Cedar Rapids, la.: "I do not 
believe the 2-cent passenger fare law will affect our road in 
any other than a beneficial way. Under the statutes of Iowa 
electric interurban railroads are under exactly the same laws 
as the steam railroads. They report to the board of railroad 
commissioners, are assessed by the executive council, have 
the right of eminent domain and have the right to secure per- 
petual franchises in all cities and towns. The roads are classi- 
fied in this state according to their earnings per mile per 
year; those earning $4,000 and over are obliged to charge two 
cents per mile. By reason of the fact that our railroad serves 
a territory not served by any other railroad, we will not be 
affected by any competition. The distance from Iowa City to 
Cedar Rapids via the Chicago Rock Island & Pacific Railway 
by either route is eight miles farther than the distance by our 
line and passengers are obliged to change cars, so that on a 
2-cent basis we would still have the lowest fare. I do not 
believe that the decrease of steam railway fares to two cents 
per mile will cause any reduction in the earnings of electric 
railways. It is the frequency of service and the stopping to 
take on and off passengers almost anywhere that counts. The 
steam railroads would not be able to meet this condition, and 
consequently will not affect to an appreciable extent the traffic 
of electric railways." 

Toledo & Indiana Railway. 

H. C. Warren, general manager Toledo & Indiana Railway. 
Toledo, O.: "I can see no particular decrease in our earnings 
since the 2-cent fare law became effective. We parallel the 
air line division of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Rail- 



way the entire distance from Toledo to Bryan. I think that 
this law is a serious handicap to steam railroads, but on 
account of our hourly service and country stops we do not 
consider that the law is any particular detriment to us." 

Toledo Urban & Interurban Railway. 

Charles F. Smith, general manager Toledo Urban & Inter- 
urban Railway, Findlay, O.: "While 2-cents-per-mile fares have 
had some effect upon our through traffic, the effect is very 
slight for the reason that the service we give, namely, limited 
service every two hours and local service every hour, and the 
fact that people can go to and from Toledo considerably later 
in the night by electric roads than by steam roads, lead the 
travel to the electric lines." 

Alton Granite & St. Louis Traction Company. 

L. C. Haynes, president Alton Granite & St. Louis Trac- 
tion Company, East St. Louis, 111.: "I am not in a position 
to answer the question as to the possible effect of 2-cent fare 
laws for steam railways on interurban electric railway busi- 
ness from the point of view of actual experience, because our 
system will not be affected particularly one way or the other 
by the 2-cent steam rate. Only lines which are strictly inter- 
urban and operate for considerable distances will be affected, 
it seems to me, by this narrowing of margin between rates 
formerly charged by steam and electric lines. The accepted 
basis of local rates on interurban lines is, I think, very gen- 
erally two cents a mile, and it goes without saying that if the 
steam roads carry passengers at the same rate the advantages 
of electric service will not include a lower rate of fare. The 
frequent service of electric lines, affording in almost all cases 
not more than hourly intervals between trains, and the su- 
perior conveniences offered by electric cars, which traverse 
in all cases the central business and residence portion of 
cities and villages through which they pass, will, I think, con- 
tinue to give the bulk of local traffic, at least for distances 
inside of 50 miles, to the electric interurban lines, regardless 
of the fact that steam transportation may be had at the same 
price." 

Indiana Union Traction Company. 

H. A. Nicholl, general manager Indiana Union Traction 
Company, Anderson, Ind.: "We do not believe that the adop- 
tion of 2-cents-per-mile fares by steam railways will affect to 
any appreciable extent the traffic on electric railways. Elec- 
tric railways will not reduce their fares on account of the 
2-cent law; but, on the contrary, I believe that those charging 
under two cents per mile at the present time will increase 
their fares to as near two cents per mile as they consistently 
can." 

Galesburg & Kewanee Electric Railway. 

R. H. Hayward, general manager Galesburg & Kewanee 
Electric Railway, Kewanee, 111.: "Prior to July 1, 1907, we 
had charged 20 cents one way and 30 cents for the round trip 
on our 9-mile interurban road between Kewanee and Galva, 
paralleling the main line of the Chicago Burlington & Quincy 
Railroad. On July 1, when the Burlington put into effect the 
reduced 2-cents-per-mile rate, which made its fare between 
Kewanee and Galva 16 cents, instead of 25 cents, we reduced 
our 1-way rate from 20 to 18 cents and discontinued the 30- 
cent round-trip rate. Since July 1 we have therefore been 
charging 2 cents more than the steam railroad, whereas be- 
fore that time we had charged 5 cents less. Our earnings 
since July 1 have shown a normal increase and we believe that 
in our case, at least, the reduction in the steam railroad rate 
has had no appreciable effect on our earnings. We make 15 
round trips daily between Kewanee and Galva, whereas the 
Burlington has but three trains one way and two the other 
between these two points. Whatever inclination the public 
might have to patronize the steam road on account of a lower 
rate is overcome by the superior serviC3 which we offer. In 
cases where the steam road offers service more nearly equal to 
that of the electric line the result might be different." 

Grand Rapids Grand Haven & Muskegon Railway. 

W. K. Morley, vice-president and general manager Grard 
Rapids Grand Haven & Muskegon Railway, Grand Rapid;, 
Mich.: "I do not think the adoption of the 2-cents-per-mile 
rate by steam roads will affect to any appreciable extent the 
volume of traffic of electric railways; the frequent and con- 
venient service of the electric roads will enable them to hold 
the business." 

Dayton & Troy Electric Railway. 

C. M. Paxton, general manager Dayton & Troy Electric 
Railway, Tippecanoe City. O.: "In answering your questions 
I can give you the experience of our line only and am not 
prepared to say what the effect has been on electric railways 



January IS, 1908. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



77 



generally. Our line is paralleled for its entire length by the 
Cincinnati Hamilton & Dayton Railway, which operates six or 
seven passenger trains each way daily and caters particularly 
to local travel, nearly all of its trains making local stops. Our 
rates of fare were met by this railway a long time prior to 
the passage of the 2-cent law and we did not feel the effect 
of the law when it was passed as a line might feel it which 
had been competing with a steam railway having a 3-cent rate 
in effect. I understand that a number of electric railways 
have found it necessary to readjust fares on account of the 
cheaper rates by steam, but in our case our loss, if any, was 
due to the fact that the law had the effect of advertising, in a 
most effectual manner, the equalization of steam and electric 
rates, whereas in the past the electric railways have enjoyed 
the benefit of the assumption on the part of nearly all travelers 
that electric railway rates were universally less than the rates 
in effect on steam lines." 

Chicago & Joliet Electric Railway. 

J. R. Blackhall, general manager Chicago & Joliet Electric 
Railway, Joliet, 111.: '"I do not know what effect the 2-cent 
passenger fare law will have upon the traffic of interurban 
electric railways in other parts of the state. So far as our 
road is concerned, the new law has had no effect on our traffic, 
as the fare on our interurban line between Joliet and Chicago 
was so much lower than the railroad fare that reducing the 
latter fare to two cents per mile still leaves the steam rate be- 
tween Joliet and Chicago more than double our rate. Joliet 
is within the Chicago commutation zone, and the railroads 
have not changed the commutation rate since the new law 
went into effect, so we still have the same competition that 
we had in the past." 

NORTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL ASSOCIATION. 



Communications 



The sixteenth aunual convention of the Northwestern 
Electrical Association was held at the Hotel Pfister, Milwau- 
kee, Wis., on January 15 and 16. There were about 75 mem- 
bers and guests in attendance. A meeting of the Wisconsin 
Electric and Interurban Railway Association was called at 
the same time and place for the purpose of appointing a com- 
mittee to meet the railroad commissioners of the state of 
Wisconsin for a consideration of the subjects of a standard 
form of accounting and rate regulation. At this meeting a 
committee of two was also appointed to consider a revision 
of the constitution of the Wisconsin Interurban Railway Asso- 
ciation so that it might be united in its work with the North- 
w istern Electric Association. 

During the Wednesday afternoon session of the Electrical 
association the president appointed a committee of three to 
work with a similar committee of the Interurban association 
and the Wisconsin Gas Association in discussing with the 
state railroad commission the questions of uniform accounting 
and rate regulation. The other business of the association 
■was of a formal nature. 

The following papers and addresses were presented on 
Wednesday afternoon and Thursday: "Depreciation," by 
C. X. Duffy, comptroller Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light 
Company, Milwaukee, Wis.; "Central Station Load That Pays," 
by E. L. Callahan, electrical engineer, Chicago; "The Public's 
Debt to the Public Service Corporation," by W. R. Putnam, 
manager Red Wing Gas Light & Power Company, Red Wing. 
Minn.: "The Wisconsin Utility Law," by Neil Brown, member 
of the Wisconsin legislature; "Steam Notes on Small Turbine 
Plants," by J. L. Hetch. mechanical engineer North Shore 
Electric Company. Evanston, 111.; "Electrical Notes on Small 
Turbine Plants," by C. W. Pen Dell, electrical engineer North 
Shore Electric Company, Evanston, 111.: "Electric Lighting in 
Cities and Villages of 3,000 and Under." by Irving P. Lord, 
general manager Waupaca Electric Light & Railway Com- 
pany. Waupaca, Wis.; "Single-Phase Alternating-Current 
Motors," by F. L. Kaufman. 

Those of the papers of particular interest to the electric 
railway field are presented elsewhere in this issue. At the 
close of the Thursday afternoon session the members ad- 
journed to visit the electrical show which is now being held 
at the Coliseum in Chicago. 



JURISDICTION OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE COM- 
MISSION OVER ELECTRIC RAILWAYS. 



To the Editors: 

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, in which 
you make some inquiries touching the jurisdiction of the 
interstate commerce commission over the electric railway 
interurban mileage of the country and also as to the applica- 
tion of the act to such carriers. 

The act to regulate commerce as amended makes no dis- 
tinction between roads operated by electricity and those oper- 
ated by steam power. Nor has this commission at any time 
sought to make any such distinction. Section 1 of the act in 
express terms brings within its provisions all common carriers 
engaged in the interstate carriage of passengers or property 
by rail. And it has been uniformly the view of the commis 
sion that the act applies to electric roads as clearly and as 
fully as to those operated by steam when they are engaged 
in such interstate transportation. This question, in fact, came 
before the commission more than 10 years ago. In Willson v. 
Rock Creek Railway Company, decided on March 12, 1S97. 
and reported in 8 I. C. Rep., 83, you will find the question 
fully discussed. In that case the defendant railroad company 
was operated by electricity. Its line ran partly in the District 
of Columbia and partly in the state of Maryland. The record 
showed that it was essentially a street surface road for the 
conveyance of urban and suburban passengers. The commis- 
sion held, Commissioners Yeomans and Prouty dissenting, that 
it was subject to the provisions of the act to regulate com- 
merce. So far as I now recall the commission has never 
departed from the principles there announced. Since the act 
was amended on June 29, 1906, the question has come before 
us informally on the correspondence of the commission and 
the same view has again been expressed. I do not understand 
that under the amended act there is any difference of opinion 
in the commission as to our jurisdiction over such companies 
when they are engaged in the interstate transportation either 
of passengers or of property. 

The statement of your correspondent that the commis- 
sion has jurisdiction over only about 20 per cent of the electric 
mileage of the country is probably based upon a misunderstand- 
ing by him of what is said on page 14.2 of the annual report 
of the commission just made to the congress. [An abstract 
of that part of the report which relates to electric railways 
is published elsewhere in this issue. — Eds.] An examination 
of our records had been made in the division of statistics and 
accounts in order to arrive at a rough estimate of the mileage 
of electric railways, the lines of which lie in more than one 
state. It was thought that about 20 per cent of the entire 
mileage belonged to such companies. You will observe, how- 
ever, that the report at the point in question expressly states 
that the location of the physical property is not the final test 
of the jurisdiction of this commission. The test to be applied 
to electric railways in order to ascertain whether they are 
subject to the provisions of the act to regulate commerce 
differs in no respect from the test commonly applied to steam 
railroads in order to ascertain whether this commission has 
jurisdiction over them. Regardless of the physical location 
of either electric or steam railroads and whether their lines 
begin and end in the same state or not. if either is engaged 
in the transportation of property from a point in one state to 
a point in another wholly by rail or in connection with a 
water carrier under some arrangement for a continuous move- 
ment, the act applies in all its phases. That has been my 
view of the matter and 1 am quite confident that the same 
view is entertained by my colleagues. 

Many interesting and important questions have arisen 
touching the question of the jurisdiction of the commission 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 



over electric lines, all of which are having careful considera- 
tion. But the fact that the motive power is electricity has 
no relation to or any bearing upon the proper solution of these 
problems. Their solution will depend, as would be the case 
were the roads in question operated by steam, upon the man- 
ner in which the transportation is actually conducted and 
whether it is in fact interstate transportation within the 
meaning of the act. 

You make inquiries about the purpose of the commission 
with respect to prescribing a system of accounts for electric 
lines. The law contemplates that the commission will estab- 
lish accounting systems for all the agencies of interstate 
transportation. And it is the purpose of the commission to 
promulgate systems of accounts for electric railways, similar, 
so far as may be, to the system prescribed for the steam 
railways. A comparison of the reports of steam railways, 
electric railways, water carriers, express companies and other 
agencies for transporting the commerce of the country, so far 
as the commercial and special physical conditions surrounding 
each form of transportation will permit such comparison, can- 
not fail to be of value. The basis of such comparison would 
not be complete if electric lines were omitted from the gen- 
eral accounting scheme which the commission has in mind. 
This becomes more important in the case of electric railways 
because their tendency is more and more to serve and become 
branch lines or feeders of the trunk line railways. Two cases 
are now on the docket of the commission in which electric 
lines seek the aid of the commission to compel steam roads 
to join with them in establishing through routes and joint 
rates. Lines heretofore operated by steam are now being 
electrified. Many electric roads are carrying freight not only 
in carloads but in trainloads, and are otherwise conducting 
exactly the same kind of transportation that is done by steam 
railroads. Obviously an accounting system that affords a 
basis of comparison between lines operated by steam and lines 
operated by electricity ought to be available, and this cannot 
be done without a uniform system of expense accounts for the 
electric lines. 

JAMES S. HARLAN, 
Commissioner Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Washington, D. C, January 9, 1908. 



A SINGLE-PHASE RAILWAY MOTOR.* 



BY E. F. ALEXANDERSON, ELECTRICAL ENGINEER GENERAL ELECTRH 
COMPANY. 



Suggests Running Railroad Trains in New York Subways. 



In applying to the board of estimate for permission to 
increase the dimensions in the original plans for the Brooklyn 
Fourth avenue and the bridge loop subways, the New York 
public service commission suggests that the subways be 
built so as to accommodate the trains of the New York Central 
and New York New Haven & Hartford railroads, in case it 
should be found desirable to run such trains through the sub- 
ways at any time in the future. It is proposed to increase 
the headroom from 13 feet 6 inches to 14 feet and also to do 
away with several grades which exist in the original plans. It 
is thus evident that the commission has in mind the possibility 
of the railroads becoming bidders for subway routes in compe- 
tition with the Belmont interests, who are now the only logical 
bidders. The new T subway route on the east side which the 
commission proposes to build could easily be made to connect 
with the New- Haven road at Mott Haven, so that the latter's 
electric trains could be run over to Brooklyn or through the 
bridge loop to the Brooklyn bridge. 



On January 1 the Cape Fear Power Company began the 
distribution of'Vlectric power to Fayetteville, N. C, from its 
water power electrical plant at Buckhorn Falls, on the Cape 
Fear river, 35 miles distant. This plant represents an ex- 
penditure of about $500,000, and is prepared to furnish about 
4,000 horsepower, 3,000 of this being guaranteed for 24 hours 
every day of the year. It is stated that surveys of the river 
three miles below the present plant indicate a possible de- 
velopment of 18,000 horsepower. 



The various single-phase railway motors which have been 
developed during the past few years have been styled in gen- 
eral as either repulsion or as series motors. 

The most prominent types of single-phase railway motors 
which have found commercial application are: 

1. The compensated repulsion motor (Latour-Winter-Eich- 
berg). This motor has a short-circuited armature and an extra 
set of brushes for producing compensation, with a view to 
obtaining a higher power factor. 

2. The compensated series motor (Eickmeyer-Stanley- 
Lamme). 

3. The compensated series motor with shunt excited com- 
mutating poles (Milch-Richter). In this motor a commutating 
field is produced locally by coils in the stator. 

The motor to be discussed in this paper is neither a series 
nor a repulsion motor in the generally accepted sense, but em- 
bodies the best features of both. For lack of a better name 
it may be called a "series-repulsion" motor. The windings 
resemble those of a series motor and the armature and stator 
are permanently connected in series. A general diagram of 
the motor is shown in Figure 1. The terminal voltage of the 
series-repulsion motor can be selected with greater liberty 



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The Series-Repulsion Motor — Figure 1. 

than in a series motor, but not so arbitrarily as in the case 
of a repulsion motor. 

Its advantages over the straight compensated series motor 
are very marked. The commutation is so radically improved 
that resistance leads are unnecessary and it is feasible to build 
the motors in larger capacities. 

In its performance it resembles the series motors with 
commutating poles, but offers several distinct advantages over 
the same. Instead of producing a commutating flux locally 
by coils on the stator, the conductors in the armature are 
located in places where the desired flux will naturally exist. 
This arrangement simplifies the stator winding consider- 
ably. The compensating winding of the series motor is 
replaced by an inducing winding with twice as many turns, 
and the energy is introduced either in the stator alone or in 
the stator and rotor together. By this arrangement the start- 
ing torque is doubled for the same commutation and the same 
supply of current. 

In the compensated repulsion motor the commutating field 
becomes too strong as soon as the speed appreciably exceeds 
synchronism, unless special arrangements are made to sup- 
press this field locally. The motor under consideration is not 
limited by the synchronous speed, as the repulsion motor 
feature is reduced at the high speeds, and its action follows 
more closely the performance of a series motor; the number 
of poles can therefore be selected with the same liberty as 
in a series motor. This is of great importance for the motor 
characteristics, particularly in regard to weight and starting 

*Abstract of paper presented before the American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers, New York, January 10, 1908. 



January IS, 190S. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



79 



torque. Furthermore, no extra set of brushes, nor any series upon the inducing and exciting windings. The current flowing 



transformer, is required, which makes the motor equally well 
adapted for direct and alternating current. 

Starting. 

The starting of a single-phase motor is materially handi- 
capped by the fact that the alternating nature of the main 
field sets up currents in the armature coils which are short- 
circuited by the brushes. This same difficulty is experienced 
in all known types of single-phase commutator motors. Al- 
though the principle involved is the same in the motor under 
consideration, the practical result gained by the arrangement 
employed is a starting torque twice as high as would be possi- 
ble in a corresponding series motor for the same commutation 
and the same supply of current. 

This double starting torque is obtained by winding the 
stator with twice as many turns as the armature. The motor 
starts as a repulsion motor with the armature short-circuited, 
as shown in Figure 2. The current as it enters the stator has 
only half the strength of that in the rotor, owing to the ratio of 
stator to rotor turns. The short-circuiting switch of the rotor 




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Running 



The Series-Repulsion Motor — Figures 1 and 2. 

carries only half as much current as the rotor itself, because 
the current in the short-circuited connection is only the differ- 
ence between the stator and the rotor current. The inducing 
winding, the field and the armature are connected permanently 
in series; but with the connections shown the field is in series 
with the stator circuit at starting and with the rotor circuit 
when running. In starting the rotor carries twice as much 
current as when running, in order to give the same field 
strength — in this manner doubling the starting torque. 

Features of Operation. 

In regard to the practical application of the system it 
may be mentioned that several 4-motor equipments for alter- 
nating and direct current have been in operation for some 
time. The alternating-current control equipment has a total 
of seven contactors and a reversing switch. This gives four 
points on the controller, which seems quite satisfactory for 
motor car operation, though any number of steps can be added 
to take care of locomotive operating conditions. 

The preferred method of control is the one shown in 
Figures 2 and 3. In starting the armature is short-circuited 
and the full secondary voltage of the transformer is impressed 



through the stator continues through the armature, but due to 
the ratio of turns of inducing winding and armature winding, 
an additional current of equal strength to the stator current 
flows through the local circuit of the armature and the short- 
circuited connection. In the running connection pari of the 
power is introduced in the stator and part in the rotor, and the 
field winding carries the same current as the armature; that 
is, twice the stator current, thus giving a relatively greater 
field strength than in the starting condition, just as it would 
be produced by a series-multiple connection of the field wind 
ing. 

Although the total potential impressed upon the stator 
and rotor is the same for starting and running, the result of 
changing the connection so as to transfer the energy input 
from the stator to the rotor has the effect of increasing the 
resulting voltage of the motor. This is due to the ratio of 
transformation betw-een stator and rotor. In this manner a 
higher speed is obtained by impressing a higher resulting 
voltage, and the same change of connections makes the motor 
adapted for a higher speed by changing the ratio of series 
and repulsion motor action. 

The only motor that has an inherent claim on unity power 
factor is the direct-current motor. In every alternating-cur- 
rent motor a certain amount of wattless volt-amperes is con- 
sumed in magnetizing the field, and in leakage, so that the 
maximum torque is limited to a lower value than it is with 
the direct-current motors. An alternating-current motor with 
inherently good power factor is one with high overload capac- 
ity, and this must be due to a comparatively small proportion 
of volt-amperes being consumed for magnetization. There are, 
however, artificial methods of bringing the power factor of 
the alternating-current motor up to unity. 

Resistance Leads. 

The use of resistance leads, which has been so much 
discussed, has been found to be unnecessary in motors of the 
type described. Certain motors which have been operated 
for a considerable time as series motors, and then rewound so 
as to embody the features described in this paper, have shown 
an increased life of brushes and commutator up to the stand- 
ard of good direct-current practice. The improvement in com- 
mutation was so great that it was possible at the same time 
to increase the thickness of the brush and the output of the 
motor. 

Selection of Frequency. 

In regard to choice of frequency the series-repulsion motor 
again gives greater liberty. Whereas the starting torque can 
be doubled on either 15 or 25 cycles, it may be mentioned that 
a series motor which was almost inoperative at a certain load 
at 25 cycles, after rewinding, as described, was tested as a 
series-repulsion motor and found to give excellent commuta- 
tion at 40 cycles at the same load. It can therefore be said 
in general that 25 cycles is entirely satisfactory for all geared 
motor work; it is preferable in that the combination of motor 
and transformer weighs less at 25 than at 15 cycles. 

Economy of Material. 

The motor described can be built in larger capacities than 
the series motor. The principal reason for this is the inher- 
ently good commutation and increased starting torque which 
make resistance leads unnecessary, thereby eliminating the 
heat generated by the resistance leads, and also gaining space 
in the slots, which can be used for copper. Furthermore, it 
is possible to increase the flux per pole without impairing 
the commutation. 

The fractional pitch winding which is used primarily for 
the sake of commutation is also advantageous from the point 
of view of economy of material. The fact that the number 
of poles in the series-repulsion motor can be selected without 
regard to the synchronous speed is an important consideration. 

In summing up the preceding the particular advantages 
of the motor described may be claimed to be: 

1. Good commutation at all speeds without the use of 
resistance leads. 

2. Larger capacities possible than with the series motor. 

3. High tractive effort possible, due to the liberty of 
selecting the number of poles. 

4. Increased starting torque, possible because of the in- 
herent ratio of winding turns, without supplying an increased 
current from the main transformer. 

5. Simplicity of construction. The stator is the same as 
in the series motor, in fact easier to construct due to the 
greater liberty of placing the field winding in slots. The arma- 
ture is constructed according to standard direct-current prac- 
tice with the conductors soldered into the commutator bars. 

6. Equally applicable to direct and alternating current. 



80 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY REVIEW 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



THE NEW HAVEN SYSTEM OF SINGLE-PHASE DISTRIBU- 
TION WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO 
SECTION ALIZAT ION.* 



BY W. s. MURRAY, ELECTRICAL ENGINEER NEW York NEW HAVEN 
HARTFORD RAILWAY. 



The method and distance chosen for sectionalizing the 
high-tension wires supplying power for alternating-current 
traction is worthy of careful consideration. 

There is shown diagrammatically the actual scheme of 
single-phase distribution which was adopted and is now in 
service on the New York New Haven & Hartford Railroad. It 
comprises 11,000-volt three-phase generation transmission 
along the right of way at this voltage, only one phase being 
applied to all sectionalized trolley wires throughout the zone 
of electrification. The three phases are also carried through- 



polyphase power, it is difficult to escape the conclusion that it 
is a desirable and necessary adjunct to the system. In con- 
nection with its application to the New Haven electrification, it 
may be said that synchronous motors will be shortly substi- 
tuted for steam engines in one of our lighting plants. Such 
arrangements will bring about the centralization of power 
generation, and by proper field adjustment of the synchronous 
motors the general power factor of the single-phase system 
will be raised. 

Sectionalization. 

An examination of the electrical connections made in and 
on the power house, line and locomotives would bring out the 
strong similarity of the New Haven system to the well stand- 
ardized, direct-current (not alternating-current-direct-current) 
system. In either case the path is from one busbar of the 
station to the feeder and trolley, thence to the locomotive and 
from there to the rail and return to the other station busbar. 




New York New Haven & Hartford Single-Phase System — Anchor Bridge and Catenary Construction. 



out the electrification zone, and are at all points available for 
polyphase motors, such as would be used in railway machine 
shops and for the operation of motor-driven generators in 
local direct-current railway plants owned by the railroad com- 
pany. 

A modification of this arrangement which was considered 
may be mentioned; namely, 11,000-volt three-phase genera- 
tion, single-phase distribution for traction with step-down 
transformers distributed along the line, their secondaries fur- 
nishing 3,300 or 6,600 volts to the sectionalized trolleys. For 
the reason that the life hazard in using 11,000 volts was not 
considered to be greatly increased over that of 3,300 or 6,600 
volts, and in view of the higher efficiency, lesser currents to 
be collected by locomotive shoe contacts, greater reliability 
and the lower operating costs (no transformer substations), 
the advantages of the 11,000-volt direct transmission to the 
sectionalized trolleys was immediately apparent, and the prob- 
lem