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Full text of "The elementary spelling book; being an improvement on "The American spelling-book.""



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1ITHMETICAL SERIES 

Xiy O. I*. QXJAC KENBOH, ^V. >J. 

upox tdk uasis or tiiv: wou&s ov 
GEORGE R. PERKINS, LL.D. 



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PREFACE. 



In this revision of the Elementary Spelling-Book, the chief 
object aimed at is to bring its notation into a correspondence 
with that of the recently issued Quarto Dictionary in which a 
more extended system of orthoepical marks has been adopted 
for the purpose of exhibiting the nicer discriminations of 
vowel sounds. A few of the Tables, however, and a few single 
columns of words are left Without diacritical signs as exercises 
in notation, a familiarity witli which is important to all who 
consult the dictionary. A little attention to the Key to the 
Soutah of the merited Letters will aid both teacher and pupil in 
this interesting exercise. As it has been found inconvenient to 
insert the whole Key at the top of the page, as heretofore, 
frequent reference to the full explanation of the pointed letters 
on page 15 may be desirable. 

In Syllabication it has been thought best not to give the 
etymological division of the Quarto Dictionary, but to retain 
the old mode of Dr. Webster as best calculated to teach young 
scholars the true pronunciation of words. 

The plan of classification here executed is extended so as to 
comprehend every important variety of English words, and the 
classes are so arranged, with suitable directions for the pro- 
nunciation, that any pupil, who shall be master of these Ele- 
mentary TaUes, will find little difficulty in learning to form 
and pronounce any words that properly belong to our ver- 
nacular language. £" 



6 PREFACE 



1 



The Tables intended for Exercises in Spelling and forming 
words, contain the original words, with the terminations only 
of their derivatives. These Tables will answer the important 
purposes of teaching the manner of forming the various deriv- 
atives, and the distinctions of the parts of speech, and thus 
anticipate, in some degree, the knowledge of grammar ; at the 
same time, they bring into a small compass a much greater 
number of words than could be otherwise comprised in so 
small a book. 

The pronunciation here given is that which is sanctioned 
by the most general usage of educated people, both in the 
United States and in England. There are a few words in both 
countries whose pronunciation is not settled beyond dispute. 
In cases of this kind, the Editor has leaned to regular analogies 
as furnishing the best rule of decision. 

In orthography there are some classes of words in which 
usage is not uniform. No two English writers agree on this 
subject ; and what is worse, no lexicographer is consistent with 
himself, In this book, as in Dr. "Webster's dictionaries, that 
mode of spelling has been adopted which is the most simple 
and best authorized. The Editor has followed the rules that 
are held to be legitimate, and has rendered uniform all classes 
of words falling within them. If established rules and anal- 
ogies will not control the practice of writers, there is no au- 
thority by which uniformity can be produced. 

The reading lessons are adapted, as far as possible, to the 
capacities of children, and to their gradual progress in knowl- 
edge. These lessons will serve to substitute variety for the 
dull monotony of spelling, show the practical use of words in 
significant sentences, and thus enable the learner the better to 
understand them. The consideration -Of diversifying the 



PREFACE 



studies of the pupil has also had its influence in the arrange- 
ment of the lessons for spelling. It is useful to teach children 
the signification of words, as soon as they can comprehend 
them ; hut the understanding can hardly keep pace with the 
memory^ and the minds of children may well be employed in 
learning to spell and pronounce words whose signification is 
not within the reach of their capacities; for what they do 
not clearly comprehend at first, they will understand as their 
capacities are enlarged. 

The objects of a work of this kind being chiefly to teach 
orthography and pronunciation, it is judged most proper to 
adapt the various Tables to these specific objects, and omit 
extraneous matter, In short, this little book is so constructed 
as to condense into the smallest compass a complete System 
of Elements for teaching the language ; and however small 
such a book may appear, it may be considered as the most im- 
portant class-book, not of a religious character, which the 
youth of our country are destined to use. 

The modifications in this revision, although important, are 
not of a character to embarrass those teachers who use the old 
editions in the same classes, very few words having been sub- 
stituted for others, and those only to correct an obvious error, 
or to carry out some important analogy. 

In the revision of this work, the Editor has availed himself 
of the suggestions of experienced teachers and others com- 
petent to advise, and especially of Wm. A. Wkeelsr., Esq., 
whose Principles op Pronunciation add so much value to 
the new Illustrated Quarto Dictionary of Dr, "Webster, 

W. O- W 
Hew York, 1866. 



|8 _ THE ELEMENTARY 

ANALYSIS OF SOUNDS 

IJST THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

Language, or Speech, is the utterance of articulate 
sounds, rendered significant by usage, for the expres- 
sion and communication of thoughts. 

Articulate sounds are those which are formed by 
opening and closing the organs. The closing or ap- 
proximation of the organs is an articulation or joint- 
ing, as in eb, ed, et. The articulations are represented 
by the letters called consonants. The sounds made 
with the organs open, are called vowels, as a, e, o. A. 
union of two simple vowel sounds is called a diphthong , 
as ou in out, oi in noise. 

Sounds constitute the spoken language, addressed to 
the ear ; letters or characters, representing sounds, con- 
stitute written language, which is presented to the eye. 
The letters of a language, arranged in a certain or- 
der, compose what is called an Alphabet. 

The English Alphabet consists of twenty-six -letters. 
or single characters— a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, I, m, 
g o, p, q, r, s, t, -u, v, w, x, y, z. The combinations 
ch, sh, th, and ng are also used to represent distinct 
sounds ; and another sound is 'expressed by si, or z ; 
as, in brasier, azure, pronounced bra'zher, dzh'ur. 

Of the^ foregoing letters, a, e, o, are always simple 
vowels ; i and u are vowels (as in in, us), or diph- 
thongs (as in time, time) ; and y is either a vowel (as 
in any), a diphthong (as in my), or a consonant (as in ye). 
Each of the vowels has its regular long and short 
sounds which are most used ; and also certain occasional 
sounds which occur more rarely, as that of a in last, 
far, pre, fall, what; e in term, there, prey; i in firm, 
marine;^ o in dove, for, wolf, prove; and u in furl, rude 
and pull These will now be considered separately. 

A, The regular long sound of a is denoted by a hori- 
zontal mark over it ; as. an' eient, pro-f" 
regular short sound by a curve over 



denoted by a hori- I 
Dro-fane' ; and the I 
it ; as, -eat, par'ry. I 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



Occasional sounds. — The Italian sound is indicated 
by t\vo dots over it ; as, bar, fa'ther ; — the short sound 
of the Italian a, by a. single dot over it ; as, fast, last ; 
> — the broad sound, by two dots below it ; as, ball, 
stall ; — the short sound of broad a } by a single dot un- 
per it ; as, what, quad/rant ; — the sound of a before r 
tn certain words like care, fair, &c, is represented by" 
I sharp or pointed circumflex over the a, as, care, hair, 
fair, &c. 

E. The regular long sound of e is indicated by a 
horizontal mark over it ; as ; mete, se-rene'; the regular 
short sound, by a carve over it ; as, met, re-bel'. 
I Occasional sounds. — The sound of e like a in care is 
indicated by a pointed circumflex over the e, as in 
their, where ; and of short e before r in cases where it 
verges toward short u, by a rounded circumflex, or 
wavy line, over it ; as, her, pre-fer'. 
[ I, 0, U. The regular long and short sounds of i, o, 
and u are indicated like those of a and e by a hori- 
zontal mjH'k or a curve ; as, bind, bin ; dole, doll ; 
tune, tun. 

Occasional sounds. — When i has the sound of long e 
it is marked by two dots over it; as, fa-tigue', nia- 
iiine' ; — when o has the sound of short u, it is marked 
hj a single dot over it ; as, dove, son ; — when it has 
the sound of do, it is marked with two dots under it ; 
as, move, prove ; — when it has the sound of oo, it is 
marked with a single dot under it ; as, wolf, wolsey ; — 
when it has the sound of broad a, this is indicated by 
a pointed circumflex over the vowel ; as, north, sort ; 
■ — the two letters oo, with a horizontal mark over them, 
have the sound heard in the-words boom, loom ; — with 
a curve mark, they have a shorter form of the same 
sound ; as, book, good ; — when u is sounded like short 
oo } it has a single dot under it ; as, full, pull ; while 
its lengthened sound, as when preceded by ?", is indi- 
cated by two dots ; as in rude, m'ral, rub'y. 

I Note. — The long u in unaccented syllables lias, to a great 
""extent, the sound of short oo, preceded by y, as in educate, pro- 
nounced ed'ydb-kute ; nature, pronounced nat'yoor. 



10 THE ELEMENTARY 



The long sound of a in late, when shortened, coincides nearly 
with that of e in let; as, adequate, disconsolate, inveterate. 

The long e, when shortened, coincides nearly with the short 
i mpit; as, in feet, Jit. This short sound of i is that of y un- 
accented, at the end of* words ; as, in glory. 

The short sound of broad a in hall, is that of the short o in 
holly, and of a in what. 

The short sound of oo in pool, is that of u in pull, and oo in 
wool. 

The short sound of o in not, is somewhat lengthened before 
s, th, and ng ; as in cross, T/roth, belong. 

A combination of two letters used to express a single sound- 
is called a digraph ; as, ea in head, or th in oath. 

The pronunciation of the diphthongs oi and oy is the same 
and uniform ; as, in join, joy. 

The j3ronunciation of the diphthongs ou and ow is the same 
and uniform ; as, in sound, now. But in the termination ous, 
ou is not a diphthong^ and the pronunciation is us; as, in 
pious, glorious. 

The digraphs ai and ay, in words of one syllable, and in ac- 
cented syllables, have the sound of a long. In the unaccented 
syllables of a few words, the sound of a is nearly or quite lost ; 
as, in certain, curtain. The digraphs au and aio, have the sound 
of broad a, as in fall; ew, that of u long, as in new ; and ey, in 
unaccented syllables, that of y short, as in valley. 

When one vowel of a digraph is marked, the other has no 
sound ; as, in court, road, slow. 

The digraphs ea, ee, ei, ie, when not marked, have, in this 
work, the sound of e long ; as, in near, meet, seize, grieve. The 
vowels in Section 143 are exceptions. 

The digraph oa, unless marked, has the sound of o long. 

Vowels, in words of one syllable, followed by a single con- 
sonant and e final, are long ; as, in fate, mete, mite, note, mute, 
unless marked, as in dove, give. 

The articulations or sounds represented by the consonants 
are best apprehended by placing a vowel before them in pro- 
nunciation, and prolonging the second of the two elements \ 
thus, eb, ed, ef, eg, ek, el, em, en, ep, er, es, et, ev, ez. 

Those articulations which wholly stop the passage of the 
breath from the mouth, are cgjlied close, or mute, as b, d, g, k, 
p,t. f 

Those articulations which are formed either wholly or in 
part by the lips, are called labials; as, b, f, m, p, v. 

Those which are formed by the tip of the tongue and the 
teeth, or the gum covering the roots of the teeth, are called 
dentals ; as, d, t, th, (as in thin, this). 

Those which are formed by the flat surface of the tengue and 
the palate, are called palatals ; as, g, k, ng, sh. 

The letters s and z are called also sibilants, or hissing letters. 



■ ■■■■ii ni l ' i— — »—~»"«™«— i ' ■ uMi'in 

SPELLING-BOOK. H 



W (as in we) and y (as in ye) are sometimes called semi-vowels, 
as being intermediate between vowels and consonants, or par- 
taking of the nature of both. 

B and j.? represent one and the same articulation, or jointing 
of the lips ; but <p differs from b in being an utterance of the 
breath instead of the voice. 

D and t stand for one and the same articulation, which is a 
pressure of the tongue againfet the gum at the root of the upper 
front teeth ; but t stands for a whispered, and d for a spoken 
sound. 

F and v stand for one and the same articulation, the upper 
teeth placed on the under lip ; but/ indicates an expulsion of 
voiceless breath ; v, of vocalized breath, or tone. 

Th in thin and in this represent one and the same/articula- 
tion ; the former with breath ; the latter with voice. 

8 and z stand for one and the same articulation ; s being a 
hissing or whispered sound, and z a buzzing or vocal sound. 

Sh and zli have the same distinction as s and z, whispered 
and vocal ; but zh not occurring in English words, the. sound 
is represented by si or by other letters ; as, infusion, osier, azure. 

Ng represent the articulation of the body of the tongue 
with the roof of the mouth, and indicate a nasal sound, which 
is much shortened, if followed by the sound of h in the same 
syllable ; as in lank. 

B has one sound only, as in bite. After m, or before t, it is 
generally mute ; as in dumb, doubt. 

C has the sound of ~k before a, o, and u, as in cat, cot, cup ; 
and of s before e, i, and y, as in cell, cit, cycle. It may be con- 
sidered as mute before Tc ; as, in sick, thick. C, when followed 
by e or i before another vowel, unites with e or i to form the 
sound of sit. Thus, cetacmus, gracious, conscience, are pronounced 
ce-ta' situs, gra' situs, con' sltense. 

D has its proper sound, as in day, bid; when followed in the 
same syllable by a whispered or voiceless consonant, it uni- 
formly takes the sound of t, as in hissed (hist). 

F has one sound only ; as, in life, fever, except in of, in w T hich 
it has the sound of v. 

G before a, o, and u, is a close palatal articulation ; as, in 
gave, go, gun; before e, i, and y, it sometimes represents the 
same articulation, but generally indicates a compound sound, 
like that of j ; as in gem, gin, gyves. Before n in the same syl- 
lable it is silent ; as, in gnaio. - 

H is a mark of mere breathing or aspiration. After r it has 
no sound ; as, in rhetoric. 

I in certain words has the use of y consonant ; as, in million, 
pronounced mill'yim. Before r it has a sound nearly resembling 
that of short u, but more open ; as, in bird, flirt. 

J represents a compound sound, pretty nearly equivalent to 
that represented by dzh; as, in joy. 



12 THE ELEMENTARY 

K has one sound only ; as, in king. It is silent before n in 
in the same syllable ; as, in htiwe. 

L has one sound only ; as, in lame, mill. It is silent in many 
Words, especially before a final consonant ; as, in walk, mhn, 
calf, should. 

M has one sound only ; as, in man, flame It is silent before 
n in the same syllable ; as, in mnemonics, 

N has one sound only ; as, in not, sun_ It is silent after 
and m ; as, in kiln, hymn, solemn. 

P has one sound 'only ; as, in pit, lap. At the beginning of 
words, it is silent before n, s, and t ; as, in pneumatics, 'psalm, 
pshaw, ptarmigan. 

Q has precisely the power of k, but it is always followed by 
u y and tfease two letters are generally sounded like lew ; as, in 
question. 

R is sounded as in rip, trip, form, carol, mire, 

3 has its proper sound, as in send, less; or the sound of z, aa 
in rise. Followed by i preceding a vowel, it Unites with the 
vowel in forming the sound of sh ; as in mission, pronounced 
mish'un ; — or of its vocal correspondent zh ; as in osier, pro- 
nounced o'zher. When it has the latter sound, it is indicated 
in this book by a peculiar mark under it ; thus, s. 

T has its proper sound, as in turn, at the beginning of words 
and at the end of syllables. Before i, followed by another 
vowel, it unites with i to form the sound of sh, as in nation, 
partial, patience, pronounced na'shon, par'shal, pa'shense. But 
when s or x precedes t, this letter and the i following it pre- 
serve their own sounds ; as in bastion, christian, mixtion, pro-: 
nounced bast'yun, hrlst'yan, mikst'yun. T is silent in the ter- 
mination^ ten and tie after s ; as in fasten, often, gristle. 

V has one sound only ; as, in voice, live, and is never silent. 

W before r in the same syllable is silent, as in wring, wrong. 
In most words beginning with wh, the h precedes the w in ut- 
terance ; thus when is pronounced hicen. But if o follows this 
combination, the w is silent, as in whole, pronounced hole. 

X represents ks, as in wax ; but it is sometimes pronounced 
'ike gz; as, in exact. At the beginning of words, it is pro- 
nounced like z ; as, in Xenophon. 

Z has its p roper sound, which is that of the vocal s; as, in 
maze. 

Oh have very nearly the sound of tsh ; as, in church : or the 
sound of k ; as, in character : or of sh, as in machine. 

Oh are mute in every English word, both in the middle and 
at the end of words, except in the following : cough, chough, 
dough, enough, laugh, rough, slough, tough, trough, in which they 
have the sound of/; hough, lough, shough, in which they have 
the sound of 1c ; and hiccough, in which they have the sound of 
"p. At the beginning of a word, they are pronounced like g 
hard ; as in ghastly, ghost, gherkin, &c. ; so that they may be 



SPELLING-BOOK. 13 



said not to have a proper or regular sound in any English 
word. 

PTi have the sound of/, as in philosophy ; except in Stephen, 
pronounced Ste'vn. 

8h have one sound only ; as, in shall. 

Th have two sounds; whispered, as in think, both; and 
vocal, as in thou, Ms. When vocal, the th are marked thus, 
(th), as in fhou. 

Sc have the sound of sfr, before a, o, u, and r ; as, in scale, 
scoff, sculpture, scroll ; and the sound of s alone before e, i, and 
y ; as, in scene, scepter, science, Scythian, 

OP ACCENT, EMPHASIS, AND CADENCE, 

Accent is a forcible stress or effort of voice on a letter or 
syllable, distinguishing it from others in the same word, by a 
greater distinctness and loudness of pronunciation. 

The accented syllable of words is designated by the mark ('). 

The general principle by which accent is regulated, is, that 
the stress of voice falls on that syllable of a word, which ren- 
ders the articulations most easy to the speaker, and most agree- 
able to the hearer. By this rule has the accent of most words 
been imperceptibly established by a long and universal consent. 

When a "word consists of three or more syllables, the ease of 
speaking requires usually a secondary accent, of less forcible 
utterance than the primary, but clearly distinguishable from 
the pronunciation of unaccented syllables ; as in superfluity, 



In many compound words, the parts of which are important 
words of themselves, there is very little distinction of accent , 
as, ink-stand., church-yard, 

Emphasis is a particular force of utterance given to a par- 
ticular word in a sentence, on account of its importance. 

Cadence is a fall or modula^on of the voice in reading or 
speaking, especially at the end of a sentence.. 



KEY TO THE PRONUNCIATION, 

VOW ELS 
Regular Long and Short Sounds 

Long. — a, as in fame ; e, as in mete; I, as in fine; o, as 

m note ; u , as in mute ; j, as in fly, 
Short. — a, as in fat ; e, as in met; i, as in fin, o, as in 

not ; ii, as in but; y, as in nymph. 

See over. 



KEY TO THE PEONUNCIATION— Continued. 



— Occasional 



Sounds. 

KXAMPLE8. 



VOWELS 

&, as in care, . . 
a Italian, as in . . 
a, as in last, . . . 
a broad, as in all, . 
a, as in what, . . 
e like a, as in . . 
e, as in term, . . 
e like long a, as in 
i like long e, as in 
I, as in bird, . . . 
6 like short u, as in 
o like long oo, as in 
o like short oo, as in 
6 like broad a, as in 
oo, as in . , . . 
oo (s-hort oo\, as in 
u. preceded by r, as in 
11 like do, as in . . 
e. 

Regular Diphthongal Sounds. 
oi, or oy (unmarked), as in . oil, join, toy. 
ou, or ow (unmarked), as in out, owl, vowel 
CONSONANTS. . 



air, share, pair, bear, 
father, far, balm, path, 
ask, grass, dance, branch, 
call, talk, haul, swarm. 
wan, wanton, wallow, 
there, heir, where, ere. 
ermine, ve"rge, prefer, 
prey, they, eight, 
pique, machine, mien, 
firm, virgin, dirt, 
dove, son, done, won. 
prove, dp, move, tomb, 
bosom, wolf, woman, 
order, form, stork, 
moon, food, booty, 
foot, book, wool, good. 
ru.de, rumor, rural. 
bull, put, push, pull. 
% o (italic) mark a letter silent token, cousm, mason. 



c soft, like 5 sharp, as in 
€ hard, like h, as in . , : 
ch (unmarked), as in. ," ., 
ch soft, like sh, as in . . 
eh hard, like k, as in . . 
ghard, as in . . . . 
g soft, like /, as in . . 
s sharp (unmarked), as in 
§ soft, or vocal, like z, as in 
th sharp (unmarked), as in 
thflat or vocal, as in . . 
ng (unmarked), as in . . 

3i, as in 

x, like gz, as in . . . 

ph (unmarked), like/, as in sylph, 
wk (unmarked), like hw % as in. 



cede, mercy, 
call, -concur, 
child, choose, much, 
machine, chaise. 
chorus, epoch, 
get, begin, foggy, 
gentle, ginger, elegy, 
same, gas, dense, 
has., amuse, prison. 
thing, path, 
thine, their, wither. 
. sing, single. 

linger, link, uncle, 
exist, auxiliary. 

qu (unmarked), like Jew, as in queen, 
what, when, awhile. 





SPELLING-BOOK 15 




THE ALPHABET. 


ROMAN LETTERS. ITALIC. NAMES OF LETTERS. 


a 


A 


a A 


a 


b 


B 


b B 


be 


c 


C 


G G 


ce 


a 


D 


d D 


de 


e 


E 


e E 


e 


f 


•F 


f F 


ef 


g 
h 

i 


G 
H 
I 


g a 
h H 

i i 


aytch, 
i 


J 
k 


J 
K 


3 J 
h K 


ka 


1 


L 


I L 


el 


m 


M 


m M . 


em 


n 


N 


n N 


en 


o 





o 





P 

q 

r 


P 

Q 
R 


p P 

s Q 

r R 


pe 
cu 

ar 


s 


S 


s 8 


es 


t 


T 


t T 


te 


u 


U 


u U 


u 


V 


V 


v V 


ve 


w 


W 


w W 


double u 


X 


X 


x X 


eks 


1 

z 


Y 
Z 


y r 

z Z 


wi 

ze 


&* 




&* 


and 


E 


OUBLE LETTE 


RS. 




ff, ffl, fi, fl, ffi, £e, oe. 




* This is not a letter, but a character standing for and. 



L 



16 THE ELEMENTARY 



Bab, T.AsT, cabw, i alt., "what; iu~n, I'nijv, T:if;BB; g;:t; bTcp, .m.vuTnk; link; 



OLD ENGLISH. 

nbtlfttstjijklmnop 5^s 

SCRIPT. 

&f gg & m s & <g & 

of / @? ^e &/£ etf o 

& jf M Q? &7 W f& 

a ft c a e fa fo c f d / m ?i oft a 
% j £ a & -ict x u % 

f : .j» s 4 s tf ? £ j? ' & 



No. l.-I. 

ba be bi bo bu by 

€a ge ci €0 eu cy 

da de di do du dy 

fa fe fl fo fu m fj 

ga ge gi go gu gy 





i 


SPELLING 


-BOOK. 


17 


MOVE. SUN - , WOLF, FOOT, MOO>*, OR J KVLE, PPLL : EXIST J € = K ; 6 = 


=j; s=z; yu=su. 


go 


on. 


by me. 


it : 


IS. 


is he. 


go 


in. 


we go, 


to 


me. 


he is. 


go 


up. 


to us. 


to be. 


I am. 


an 


ox. 


do go. 
No. 2 - 


on 
-II. 


it, 


on us. 


ha 


he 


hi 


ho 


hu 


bj 


J a 


je 


ji 


jo 


J u 


JJ 


- ka 


ke 


ki 


ko 


ku 


kj 


la 


le 


• li 


lo 


lu 


lj 


ma 


me 


mi 


mo 


mu 


my 


na 


ne 


ni 


no 


nu 


W 


is 


tie in. 


do go 


on. 


is 


it on. 


he 


is in. 


I do go on. 


it: 


is on. 


is 


he np. 


is it so. 




is ] 


it in. 


he 


is up. 


it is so. 




it is in. 






No. 3.-III. 






pa 


pe 


pi 


po 


pu 


py 


ra 


re 


ri 


ro 


ru 


r y 


sa 


se 


si 


so 


su 


s 7 


ta 


te 


ti 


to 


tu 


ty 


va 


ve 


vi 


vo 


vu 


vy 


wa 


we 


wi 


wo 


wu 


wy 


is he to 


go. 


is it by 


us. 


we go to it. 


he is to 


go- 


it is by 


us. 


he 


is by me. 


am I to 


go. 


if he is in. 


so 


he is up. 


I am to 


go. 


go up to it. 


so 


I am up. 






No. 4- 


IV. 






ab 


eb 


ib 




ob 


ub 


ae 


ee 


ie 




oe 


U€ 


ad 


ed 


id 




od 


ud 


af 


ef 


if 




of 


uf 


ag 


eg 


ig 




g 


u g 



18 



THE ELEMENTARY 



HAH, LAST, <3AU1', FAI.I-, M'il.)' 



:b, 1'iiijY, there; gkt; bTki>, marink; link: 



am I 
I am 
is he 

he is 

ak 

al 

am 

an 

ap 

ar 
as 
at 
av 
ax 
az 

is he to 
he is to 
so I am 

he is to 



to go in. 
to go in. 
to go in. 
to go in. 

<y 

ek 

el 

em 

en 

ep 

er 

es 

et 

ev 

ex 

ez 



No. 



so he is to go 
is he to be by 
he is to be by 
I am to be by 

5.-V. 



No, 



ik 
i! 

im 
in 

ip 
6.- 

Ir 

is 

it 

iv 

ix 

iz 



VI, 



ok 

ol 

om 

on 

op 

or 

OS 

ot 
ov 
ox 
oz 



do so by me. it is to be by 
do so by me. by me it is to 
to be in. I am to be as 

go up by it. he is to be as 
No. 7.-VII. 



up. 
me. 
me. 
it. 

uk 

ul 

um 

un 

up 

XLY 

us 
ut 
uv 
ux 
uz 

me. 
be. 
he is. 
I am. 



bla 


ble • bli 


bio 


blu 


bly 


ela 


■ele €li 


€lo 


elu 


ely 


fla 


fie fli 


flo 


flu 


fly 


gla 


gle gli 


glo 


glu 


g ] 7 


pla 


pie pli 


plo 


plu 


pty 


sla 


sle sli 
No. 8- 


. slo 
-VIII. 


slu 


sly 


bra 


bre bri 


bro 


bru 


bry 


era 


•ere en 


«ro 


eru 


eiy 


dra 


dre^ dri 


dro 


dru 


dry 





SPELLING-BOOK, 


19 


MOVE, SON, WOLF, FOOT, fiOON. OR ; KVL* 


, PULL ; EXIST 


«=k ; g=j ; ^ 


-z; oh = sir. 


fra 


fre 


frl 


fro 


finer 


fry 


gra 


gre 


gri 
No. 9 


gro 
-IX. 


gru 


gry 


pra 


pre 


pri 


pro 


pru 


P 1 ? 


tra 


tre 


tri 


tro 


tru 


try 


wra 


wre 


wri 


wro 


wra 


wry 


. cha 


che 


chi 


cho 


chu 


chy 


sha 


she 


shi 


sho 


shu 


shy 


ska 


ske 


ski 


sko 


sku 


sky 


She fed the old hen. 


She put 


her hat 


on the 


The hen 


was fed 


by her. 


bed. 






See how the hen can 


Did you get my 


hat ? 


run. 






I did not get the hat. 


I met him in the lot. 


My hat 


is on the 


peg. 


The cow was in 


the lot. 


She may go and 


get my 


See how hot the 


sun is. 


hat, 






It is hot to-day. 




I will 


2;o and ! 


?ee the 


See the dog run 


to me. 


man. 






.She has 


a new hat. 


He sits 


on a tin box. 






No. 10.-X. 






pha 


phe 


phi 


pho 


phu 


pty 


"qua 


que 


qui 


quo 






spa 


spe 


spi 


spo 


spu 


s py 


sta 


ste 


sti 


sto 


stu 


sty 


sea 


sge 


syi 




seu 


s§y 


swa 


swe 


swi 


swo 


swu 


swy 






No. 11 


L.-XI. 






| spla 


sple 


spli 


splo 


splu 


sply 


sprii 


spre 


spri 


spro 


spru 


spry 


I slra 


stre 


stri 


stro 


stru 


stry 


I shr" 


shre 


shri 


shr 6 


^ shrii 


shry 



20 THE ELEMENTARY 



LAST, «AUK, ]-AU,, WHAT; Hf.K, IliKY, TUKKK J 60i lUKH, M A Kl.NK : LINK 



sera sere sen sero serii sery 
sela sele sell selo selil sely 

No. 12.-XII. 

eab fib gob eub sap lad bid cid 

dab gib hob dub rip mad hid god 

mab jib job sub nip pad did hod 

nab nib lob hub s©p sad lid sod 

tab rib mob lub bad led rid nod 

neb bob rob rub dad red pid odd 

web -eob sob tub gad sed kid pod 

bib fob bub lap had wed mid rod 

A new tab cap. I hid it in the box. 

A cob- web. Put on his new bib. 

He has got a new tub. Do not go in the mob. 
He is not a bad boy. She can rub off the dust. 
The lad had a new pen. She put my cap in the tub. 
He saw a mad dog. He had a new red cap. 
She led him to bed. I can do as I am bid. 









No. 13.- 


-XIII 








log 


eud 


fag 


tag 


pig 


dug 


pug 


kam 


dog 


mud 


hag 


rag 


fig 


hug 


rug 


lam 


bog 


bag 


fcg 


wag 


rig 


,Fg 


dam 


mam 


bud 


eag 


lag 


leg 


wig 


tug- 


ham 


ram 


rud 


sag 


nag 


keg 


bug 


mug 


jam 


yam 



She has a new bag for Do not let a bug get on 

me. the bed. 

I can tag the boy. I put the mug in my 

A big dog can run. new tin box. 

He has fed the pig. I can rub the ink off my j 
The mall can put on his pen on a rag. 

wig. r He may put the red jng 

My nag can run in the lot. in my new tin box. 







SPELLING.-BOOK. 


21 


A10VE, 1 


OX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OR; RtLH, PULL ; EXIST ; € = K ; G = J J S = Z J 


CIJ = SH. 






No. 14.-XIV 






hem 


gum 


dan ren men 


fin win 


gun 


gem 


hum 


fan ben pen 


hin con 


pun 


dim 


mum 


man den ten 


kin don 


run 


him 


rum 


pan fen wen 


pin bun 


sun 


rim 


sum 


ran hen bin 


sin dun 


tun 


dum 


ban 


tan ken din 
No. 15 -XV 


tin fun 


nun 


hap 


gap 


pip mop far 


fat vat 


net 


rap 


dip 


sip top tar 


rat bet 


wet 


map 


hip 


kip pop jar 


hat jet- 


pet 


lap 


rip 


nip sop mar 


mat get 


set 


pap 


tip 


fop lop par 


sat let 


yet 


tap 


lip 


hop bar bat 


pat met 


hag 






No. I6.-XVI 






bit 


pit 


jot got nut 


vex tox 


can 


lit 


sit 


lot wot ' rut 


fix wad 


cap 


fie 


wit 


not but lax 


mix wan 


eat 


lit 


bot 


pot cut tax 


pix war 


sap 


pit 


eot 


rot hut wax 


six wag 


glL 


nit 


dot 


so t jut sex 


box wat 


chit 


Arm 


can hem my cap. It is on my lap. 




She has a new fan. I will 


get a new map 


He hid in his den. A bat 


can fly. 




The 


pig is 1 


m his pen A cat 


can eat a rat 




I see ten men. I met 


the boy. 




He had a g 


un. He sat on my box. 




3 saw him run. Now the sun is set. 




ffhe 


map is 


wet. 1 met six men to-day, 


She 


will sit 


by me. Ten men sat by me 


i 


He has cut 


my pern T put 1 


the pia on my tin 


I ha 


d a nut to eat. box 






fan 


you fix 


my hat ? Let him get the tax. 



22 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAIl, LAST, €AUK, TAI.T,, AVilAT*, IIEIl, FJ1KY, THERE ; GET; m'ttU, MAEj'SB; LIVE ; 



babe 

cade 

fade 

jade 

lade 

made 

wade 

bide 

dike 

like 

pike 

tike 

coke 

joke 

poke 

woke 



ape 

cape 

tape 

nape 

rape 

pipe 



hide 

ride 

side 

tide 

wide 

ode 

bode 

code 

yoke 

duke 

luke 

puke 

ale 

bale 

cale 

gale 

ripe 

wipe 

type 

cope 

pope 

lope 



• No, 

mode 

lode 

node 

rode 

lobe 

robe 

cube 

tube 



17 -XV 1 1. 

ace bice 

dace dice 

face lice 

lace mice 

pace nice 

race rice 

mace vice 



ice 



age 



gage 
page 



sa°;e 
doge 
huge 
bake 



lake 

take 

make 

rake 

sake 

fake 

wake 

cake 



No. 13. 

dale 
male 
hale 
pale 



tale 
bile 
tile 



-XVIII 

mile 

nile 

pile 

tile 

vile 

wile 

bole 

cole 



No. 19 -XIX 

mope ore 

hope bore 

rope core 

mere fore 

here gore 

sere lore 



dole 

hole 

mole 

pole 

sole 

tole 

mule 

rule 



more 

sore 

tore 

yore 

cove 

rove 



game 

lame 

name 

same 

tame 



wove 

gaze 

haze 

maze 

raze. 

craze 







No. 20 


-XX. 






cure 


kine 


lane 


ate 


bite 


dose 


lure 


nine 


mane 


date 


cite 


bone 


pure 


pine 


pane 


gate 


kite 


cone 


dine 


sine- 


sane 


fate 


mite 


zone 


line 


wine 


cane 


hate 


rite 


none 


line 


vine 


wane 


late 


site 


tone 


mine 


bane 


base 


mate 


dive 


June 





• SPELLING--BOOK 




23 


MOVE, SOX, 1 


VOLF, FOOT, moon, or. ; r.lXK, 


pr%L ; ejist ; 


g=k ; g=j ; ^ 


= z ; on — sir. 


tine 


vane 


ease 


pate 


hive 


tune 


fane 


vase 


rate 
No. 21.- 


rive 
-XXI. 


fume 


sane 


. torn 


alps 


■eamp 


imp 


bump 


rump 


worn 


sealp 


lamp 


gimp 


dump 


erump 


sworn 


help 


elamp 


limp 


chump 


pump 


urn 


kelp 


ramp 


pimp 


jump 


trump 


burn 


yelp- 


cramp 


erimp 


lump 


earp 


churn 


gulp 


stamp 


shrimp 


elump 


scarp 


spurn 


pulp 


vamp 


pomp 


plump 


harp 


turn 


damp 


hemp 
No. 22- 


romp 
-XXII. 


mump 


sharp 


asp 


crisp 


chops 


piet 


raft 


weft 


;gasp 


wisp 


aet 


striet 


craft 


gift 


hasp 


dreg§ 


fact 


duet 


draft 


shift 


el asp 


tongg 


pact 


aft 


graft 


lift 


rasp 


lung§ 


taet 


baft 


waft 


rift 


grasp 


lens. 


traet 


haft 


heft 


drift 


i lisp 


gulf 


sect. 
No. 23.- 


shaft 
XXIII. 


left 


sift 


6ft 


pelt 


■eolt 


ant 


« 
scent 


dint 


[16ft 


welt 


dolt 


chant 


brent 


lint 


'SOft 


gilt 


jolt 


grant 


spent 


flint 


feft 


hilt 


volt 


slant 


rent 


splint 


.belt 


milt 


•cant 


bent 


sent 


mint 


ifelt 


spilt 


scant 


dent 


tent 


print 


jmelt 


tilt 


plant 


lent 


vent 


tint 


i smelt 


bolt 


rant 
No. 24.- 


pent 
-XXIV 


went 


stint 


brunt 


wept 


smart 


snort 


last 


zest 


/grunt 


swept 


part 


sort 


blast 


hest 


Jruut 


art 


tart 


tort 


mast 


chest 



24 


THE ELEMENTARY 




bXe, lAst, 


CAF.n, iv ; :.r., i 


\i i. ;.-;•; n~.n, v 


BEY, Tiiiiu!;; 


get; uTkd, mahlnb; link • 


apt 


eart 


start 


hurt 


past 


jest 


chapt 


dart 


pert 


shirt 


vast 


lest 


kept 


hart 


' vert 


flirt 


didst 


blest ' 


slept 


chart- 


wert 


cast 


midst 


nest 


€rept 


mart 


short 


fast 


best 


pest 




* 


No. 25. 


-XXV 






rest 


quest 


list 


cost 


thirst 


lust 


Crest 


west 


mist 


first 


bust 


must 


drest 


zest 


grist 


burst 


dust 


rust 


test 


cyst 


wist 


eiirst 


gust 


crust 


vest 


fist 


lost 


durst 


just 


trust- 



Fire will burn wood and coal. 

Coal and wood wil] make a fire, 

The world turns round in a day, 

Come and help me pin my frock, 

Do not sit on the damp ground. 

We burD oil in tin and glass lamps. 

The lame man limps on his lame leg. 

We make ropes of hemp and flax. 

A rude girl will romp in the street, 

The good girl may jump the rope, 

A duck is a plump fowl. 

The horse drinks at the pump, 

A pin has a sharp point. 

We take up a brand of fire with the tongs 

Good boys and girls will aci well. 

Test is a decisive trial. 

He came in haste, and left his book, 

Men grind corn and sift the meaL 

We love just and wise men. 

The wind will drive the dust in our eye*. 

Boys love to rob the nests of birds. 

Let us rest on the bed, and sleep, if we c 

Tin and brass will rust when the air is damp 



SPELLING-BOOK. 25 



MOVE, SOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOOS, OB ; RTJXE, POLL J EXIST J <? = K J G=J ; S = Z ; 0H=6tt. 



No. 26 -XXVI. 

WORDS OF TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST. 

ba/ ker tro ver so lar wo ful pa pal 

sha dy clo ver m po lar po era co pal 

la dy do nor lfi nar fo rum vl al 

t! dy va por so ber sa tan pe nal 

ho ly fa vor pa cer fil el ye nal 

li my na vor ra ger du el fi nal 

sli my sa vor gro cer era el 6 ral 

bo ny ha lo §i der gra el ho ral 

po ny so lo spi der pu pil mil ral 

po ker he ro wa fer la bel na gal 

ti ler ne gro -ea per li bel fa tal 

•efi per if ro tl.ger lo -eal na tal 

pa per bii bo ma ker fo -eal ru ral 

ta per sa go ta ker vo eal vi tal 

vi per tu lip ra ker le gal to tal 

bi ter ge dar se ton re gal o val 

fe ver bri er ru in di al pli ant 

6 ver fri ar hy men tii al gl ant 

Bakers bake bread and cakes. 

I like to play in the shady grove. 

Some fishes are very bony. 

I love the young lady that shows me hor to read, 

A pony is a- very little horse. 

We poke the fire with the poker. 

The best paper is made of linen rags. 

Vipers are bad snakes, and they bite men. 

An ox loves to eat clover. 

The tulip is very pretty, growing in the garden. 

A dial shows the hour of the day. 

Cedar trees grow in the woods. 

The black-berry grows on a brier. 



26 


THE ELEMENTARY 




bar, last, ca;:;-, tall, what; iieu, rr.Kv, tiikiie; get; bird, marine; li>'e; 




Cider is 


made of apples. 








A tiger i 


will kill and eat 


a man. 






A raker 


can rake hay. 








A vial is a little bottle. 








A giant 


is a very stout, tall man. 






The Holy Bible is the book of God. 






No. 27.-XXVII 






seab 


erib 


grub bled 


plod 


stag 


stab 


drib 


shrub bred 


trod 


scrag ; 


blab 


squib 


stub sped 


scud 


snag 


slab 


chub 


shad shred 


stud 


drag 


■erfib 


club 


clad shed 


slug- 


swag 


drab 


snub 


glad sled 


brag 


flag 


giib 


scrub 


brad shod 


erag 


sham i 


snib 


drub 


fled clod 


shag 


cram 


- 




ffo. 28.-XXVIII 


, 




«lam 


prim 


scan spin 


trap 


slip 


drain 


trim 


•elan grin 


scrap 


grip | 


slain 


swim 


plan twin 


strap 


scrip 


swam 


from 


span chap 


chip 


drip 


stein 


seu.ni 


bran clap 


ship 


trip 


skim 


plum 


glen flap 


skip 


strip 


brim 


gram 


chin slap 


clip 


frit 


grim 


drum 


skin snap 
No. 29.-XXIX. 


flip 


split 


chop 


char 


flat slit 


blot 


slut 


shop 


spar 


plat smit 


clot 


smut 


slop 


star 


spat spit 


plot 


glut 


crop 


stir 


brat split 


spot 


strut 


stop 


blur 


fret grit 


grot 


flax 


swop 


slur 


whet scot 


trot 


flux 


sear 


spur 


tret shot 


shut 


floss 







SPELLING--B00K. 


27 


MOVE, SON 


WOLF, FOOT, 


moon, 6e ; kttle, rrix ; exis* ; «• = k ; g=j ; 


p = z ; £ir=so. 


Ann can spin 


flax. 


He must not 


drink a 


A shad can swim. 


dram. 




He was glad to see me. 


He set a trap for a rat. 


The boy can 


ride on a 


Ships go to sea 


. 


sled. 






The boy can chop. 


A plum will hang by a 


The man shot a 


ball. 


stem 






I saw her skim 


the milk 


The boy had 


a drum. 


in a pan. 








No. 30 


-XXX. 




bulb 


bold 


band 


brand wend 


fond 


barb 


•cold 


hand 


end blend 


pond 


garb 


gold 


land 


bend bind 


fund 


Aerb 


fold 


rand 


fend find 


bard 


verb 


hold 


bland 


lend hind 


card 


curb 


mold 


grand 


mend kind 


hard 


child 


sold 


gland 


rend mind 


lard 


mild 


told 


sand 


send rind 


pard 


wild 


scold 


stand 


tend wind 


scarf 


old 


and 


strand 
No. 31 


vend bond 
-XXXI. 


bird 


herd 


surf 


such 


ianch bunch 


latch 


■eurd 


scurf 


filch 


blanch hunch 


match 


surd 


rich 


milch 


branch lunch 


patch 


turf 


much 


patch 


stanch punch 


snatch 


arch 


pouch 


crotch 


ditch switch 


crutch 


march 


crouch botch 


hitch twitch 


dutch 


starch 


torch 


blotch 


pitch sketch 


plush 


jharsh 


church itch 


stitch stretch 


flush 


jpQiirsh 


lurch 


bitch 


witch clutch 


crush 


To filch is to steal 


; we must not filch. 


A bird sits on a branch to sing. 





THE ELEMENTARY 



what: mi:, pbki 



tiikbe; gkt; biro, makixic; link; 





No. 32.- 


-XXXII. 




WORDS OF TWO SYLLABLE* 


3, ACCENTED 


OX THE SECOND. 


a base 


re claim 


un say 


ben zoin 


cle base 


pro elfrim 


as say 


a void 


in ease 


dis elaim 


a way 


de voir 


a bate 


ex elaim 


o bey 


a droit 


de bate 


de mean 


•eon vey 


ex ploit 


se date 


be moan 


pur vey 


de eoy 


ere ate 


re tain 


sur vey 


en joy 


ob late 


re main 


de fy 


al loy 


re late 


en gross 


affy 


em ploy 


in flate 


dis ereet 


de ny 


an noy 


eol late 


al lay 


de ery 


de stroy 


translate 


de lay 


re boil 


eon voy 


mis state 


re lay 


tur moil 


es pou§e 


re plete 


inlay 


de spoil 


•ea rouge 


€om plete 


mis lay 


em broil 


cle vour 


se erete 


way lay 


re -eoil 


re clout 


•eon erete 


dis play 


sub join 


de vout 


re cite 


de eay 


ad join 


a mount 


in cite 


dis may 


re join 


sur mount 


po lite 


de fray 


en join 


dis mount 


ig nite 


ar ray 


eon join 


re -eount 


re deem 


be tray 


dis join 


re nown 


es teem 


por tray 


mis join 


en dow ! 


de elaiin 


a stray 


pur loin 


avow 


Strong drink will deba 


se a man. 




Hard shells 


incase clams and oysters. 


Men inflate balloons wi 


ih gas, wl 


lich is lighter 


than common air. 






Teachers like to see their pupils 


polite to each 


other. 








Idle men often delay till to-morrow things that ( 


should be 


done to-day. 





SPELLING-BOO 



29 



MOVE, BON, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, 6r ; B^LE, PCXL ; EXIST ; €=K ; g=j ; g=z ; CH=SH. 



Good men obey the laws of God, 

I love to survey the starry heavens. 

Careless girls mislay their things. 

The robber waylays the traveler to rob him. 

The fowler decoys the birds into his net, 

Cats devour rats and mice. 

The adroit rope-dancer can leap and jump and 

perform as many exploits as a monkey. 
Wise men employ their time in doing good to all 

around them. 
In the time of war, ships have a convoy. 
Kings are men of high renown. 
Who fight, and strive to wear a crown, 
God created the heavens and the earth in six 

days, and all that was made was very good, 
God will destroy the wicked. 





No. 33-XXXIII, 






deed 


breed 


glee 


steel 


green 


sleek 


feed 


seed 


free 


deem 


seen 


peek 


heed 


weed 


tree 


seem 


teen 


reek 


bleed 


bee 


eel 


teem 


steen 


ereek 


meed 
need 


fee 

' see 


feel 
heel 


sheen 
keen 


queen 
ween 


greek 
seek 


speed 
reed 


lee 
flee 


peel 
reel 


spleen 
screen 


leek 
clieek 


week 
beef 




Uo. 34 -XX XIV 






deep 

sheep 

keep 


weep 

sweep 

beer 


leer 

fleer 

sneer 


lees 

bee§ 

beet 


meet 

greet 

street 


brood 

geese 
fleece 


sleep 


deer- 


peer 


feet 


sweet 


sleeve 


peep 


cheer 


seer 


sheet 


food 


reeve 


tjreep 


sheer 


steer 


fleet 


mood 


breeze 


steep 


jeer 


queer 


sleet 


rood 


freeze 



30 


THE ELEMENTARY 




BAB, LAST, 


6AEE, FALL, V 


•hat; iiee, PKgv, tiikkb; get; bTbd, marTn-e; link; 






No 35- 


-XXXV 






boom 


groom 


lob 


troop 


bobge 


rook 


€dbm 


boon 


€00 


stoop 


ch6b§e 


brook 


doom 


loon 


two 


swoop 


ndo§e 


crook 


loom 


moon 


€dbp 


boor 


eobk 


took 


bloom 


noon 


S€Obp 


moor 


hook 


wool 


gloom 


spoon 


loop 


poor 


look 


wood 


room 


soon 


sloop 


loose 


stdbk 


good 


broom 


swoon 


droop 


goose 


nook 


stood 


fool 


spool 


boot 


root 


proof 


son 


pool 


stool 


eobt 


roof 


blood 


won 


tool 


roost 


moot 


woof 


flood 


ton 



Plants grow in the ground from seeds. 
The man cuts down trees with his ax. 
Eels swim in the brook. 
Sharp tools are made of steel. 
The sun seems to rise and set each day. 
The ax has a keen edge and cuts well. 
In the spring the grass looks green and fresh, 
I have seen the full moon. 
A king and queen wear crowns of gold. 
I will kiss the babe on his cheek. 
We go to church on the first day of the week. 
The man put a curb round our deep well 
Wool makes the sheep warm. 
Men keep their pigs in pens. 
We lie down and sleep in beds. 
The new broom sweeps clean. 
The wild deer runs in the woods, 
The red beet is good to eat. 
If I meet him in the street I will greet him with 
a kind look and show him my new book. 





SPELLING-BOOK. 


31 


MOVE, SUN', 


SVOLV, FOOT, MOON, Oil J KVLI 


•, rru. ; exist 


€=k; 6=j; 


s=z ; cu=an. 






No. 36 - 


XXXVI 






back 


snack 


quack 


quick 


rick 


wick 


hack 


pack 


beck 


chick 


brick 


€ock 


jack 


rack 


deck 


elick 


erick 


-elock 


lack 


erack 


check 


kick 


prick 


lock 


black 


track 


neck 


lick 


trick 


block 


-clack 


sack 


peck 


slick 


sick 


hock 


slack 


tack 


speck 


nick 


tick 


shock 


smack 


stack 


reck 


pick 


stick 


flock 






No. 37.-: 


XXXVII. 




pock 


chuck 


stuck 


bulk 


elank 


prank 


rock 


luck 


elk 


hulk 


flank 


tank 


brock 


eliick 


welk 


skulk 


plank 


ink 


erock 


pluck 


yelk 


bank 


slank 


link 


frock 


muck 


ilk 


dank 


rank 


blink 


mock 


truck 


bilk 


hank 


•erank 


■elink 


sock 


struck 


silk 


shank 


drank 


slink 


buck 


suck 


milk 


lank 


frank 


sink 


duck 


tuck 


kilt 


blank 


shrank brink 




No. 38.-XXXVII1. 




prink 


drunk 


mark 


irk 


ask 


disk 


shrink 


trunk 


park 


dirk 


bask 


risk 


mink 


sunk 


spark 


kirk 


■cask 


brisk 


wink 


slunk 


stark 


quirk 


hask 


frisk 


drink 


ark 


jerk 


■e6rk 


flask 


busk 


pink 


lark 


-elerk 


fork 


mask 


dusk 


spunk 


dark 


smerk 


stork 


task 


husk 


junk 


hark 


perk 


lurk 


desk 


boss 


skunk 


shark 


chirk 


turk 


whisk 


tuft 




The smell of the pink is sweet. 





32 


THE ELEMENTARY 




BAH, LAST, €AEE, FALL 


what; her, prey, theee; 


get; b7ed, marTne; link; 






No. 39.- 


XXXIX 






busk 


snarl 


churl 


barm 


barn 


born 


miisk 


twirl 


purl 


farm 


yarn 


corn 


rusk 


whirl 


elm 


harm 


kern 


scorn 


tusk 


curl 


helm 


charm 


fern 


morn 


dusk 


furl 


film 


sperm 


stern 


lorn 


marl 


hurl 


arm 


term 


quern 


horn 






No. 40.-XL, 






gaff 


scoff 


puff 


call 


wall 


quell 


staff 


doff 


ruff 


fall 


thrall 


well 


quaff 


buff 


stuff 


gall 


small 


dwell 


skiff 


cuff 


add 


hall 


squall 


swell 


cliff 


huff 


odd 


mall 


smell 


ill 


tiff 


luff 


j a gg 


pall 


spell 


bill 


stiff 


bluff 


all 


tall 


sell 


egg 


off 


muff 


ball 
No. 41 


stall 
-XLI. 


tell 


ebb 


gill 


kill 


still 


roll 


dull 


inn 


gill 


skill 


quill 


scroll 


gull 


bin 


hill 


shrill 


squill 


droll 


hull 


wren 


mill 


spill 


will 


troll 


skull 


burr 


rill 


trill 


swill 


stroll 


lull 


purr 


drill 


sill 


boll 


toll 


mull 


bush 


frill 


fill 


poll 
No. 42. 


cull 
-XLII. 


trull 


push 


ass 


trass 


guess 


kiss 


moss 


truss 


bass 


brass 


less 


bliss 


cross 


bust 


I lass 


grass 


bless 


miss 


dross 


bur 


I glass 


cess 


mess 


swiss 


cost 


bull 


1 class 


dress 


eress 


boss 


buss 


full 


I mass 


press 


chess 


loss 


fuss 


puss 


1 pass 


stress 


tress 


gloss 


muss 


hurt || 







SPELLING-BOOK 


9 


33 


MOVE, SOX, 


WOLF, FOOT, 


hook, ok ; et;li?, 


PCLL J EXIST ; «: 


=k ; 6= j ; jg: 


=z; cn=sn. 






No. 43- 


-XLIII. 






SINGULAR. 


PLURAL. 


SINGULAR. 


PLURAL. 


SINGULAR. 


PL*RAL. 


stave 

cliff 

mill 


staves 

cliffs 

mills 


egg 
hall 

wall 


eggs 

halls 
walls 


quill 

poll 

skull 


quills 

polls 

skulls 


pill 
ball 


pills 

balls 


bill 
sill 


bills 
sills 


inn 
bell 


inns 
bells 



A skiff is a small row-boat. 

A cliff is a high steep rock. 

Leave off your bad tricks. 

Do not take much snuff. 

A ship has a tall mast. 

I like to see a good stone wall round a farm, 

A pear-tree grows from the seed of a pear. 

A good boy will try to spell and read well. 

Do not lose nor sell your books. 

A good son will help his father. 

I dwell in a new brick house. 

If you boil dry beans and peas they .will swell. 

A duck has a wide flat bill. 

One quart of milk will fill two pint cups. 

One pint cup will hold four gills. 

I saw a rill run down the hill. 

A brook will turn a mill. 

A bull has a stiff neck. 

The frost will kill the leaves on the trees. 

When the cock crows, he makes a shrill loud 

noise. 
A cat will kill and eat rats and mice. 
Hogs feed on swill and corn. 
The skull is the bone on the top of the head 
Puss likes to sit on your lap and purr. 
A gull is a large sea-fowl that feeds on fish. 
Some sea-bass are as large as shad. 



34 THE ELEMENTARY 

uXn, i.Ast, ei.EE, F,\ix, -\vii.)lt; jiki:, it.ky, there; get; bTi:d, mauT.nt; link 



Brass is made of zinc and copper. 

The rain will make the grass grow. 

Yon mnst keep your dress neat and clean. 

The moon is much less than the sun. 

I will try to get a mess of peas for dinner. 

Let me go and kiss that sweet young babe. 

Moss grows on trees in the woods. 

Fire will melt ores, and the metal will run off and 

leave the dross. • 
God will bless those who do his will. 

No. 44.-XLIV. 

WOKDS OF TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIBST. 



ban 7 quet 
gus set 
rus set 
pos set . 
civ et 
riv et 
vel vet 
Mb it 
rab bit 
or bit 
com fit 
prof it 
Inn it 
sum mit 
vom it 
her mit 
arm pit 
rtier it 
spir it 
■eul prit 
vis. it 



pot ash 
f II lip 
gos sip 
bish op 
gal lop 
slial lop 
trol lop 
beg gar 
vill gar 
ash lar 
eel lar 
pil lar 
col lar 
dol lar 
pop lar 
gram mar 
nee tar 
tar tar 
mor tar. 
jab ber 
rob ber 



pitch er 
butch er 
ush er 
witch craft 
tan gent 
pun gent 
ar gent 
ur gent 
tal ent 
frag ment 
seg ment 
fig ment 
pig ment 
par rot 
piv ot 
bal lot 
mar mot 
ram part 
mod est 
tern pest 
for est 



ban dy 
can dy 
hand y 
stiir dy 
stud y 
lack ey 
jock ey 
mon key 
turn key 
med ley 
al ley 
gal ley 
val ley 
vol ley 
pul ley 
bar ley 
pars ley 
mot ley 
kid ney 
hack ney 
chim ney 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



35 



MOVE, 60V, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OR ; RULE, PCXL ; EXIST ; € = K ; G = J ; S = Z ; CH=SIL 



Iran sit 
can to 
shiv er 
sil ver 
cov er 
sill pliur 
mur mur 
miif fler 
sam pier 
mel on 
ser mon 
drag on 
eou pon 
grand son 
lack er 
grot to 



liib ber 
blub ber 
am ber 
mem ber 
lim ber 
tim ber 
ilm ber 
€iim ber 
liim ber 
num. ber 
barb er 
mer cer 
■won der 
yon der 
gin ger 
chars; er 



kid nap trench er 



m quest 
con quest 
liar vest 
in most 
lit most 
Im post 
chest nut 
■eon test 
jack daw 
mil dew 
cur few 
ed dy 
giddy 
mud dy 
riid dy 
gen try 
sul try 



- hon ey 
mon ey 
jour ney 
cum frey 
lam prey 
jer §ey 
ker §ey 
cler gy 
tan §y 
ral ly 
sal ly 
tal ly 

jel ly 
sil ly 
folly 

©nly 



Cotton velvet is very soft to the feel. * 
Rabbits have large ears and eyes, that they may 

.hear quick, and see well in the dark. 
We like to have our friends visit us. 
Visitors should not make their visits too long. 
Silver spoons are not apt to rust. 
Beggars will beg rather than work. ' 
Cents are made of copper, and dollars, of silver. 
One hundred cents are worth a dollar. 
A dollar is worth a hundred cents. 
Dollars are our largest silver coins, and cents are 

the largest copper coins. 
Silver and copper ores are dug out of the ground, 

and melted in a very hot fire. 
A mercer is one who deals in silks. 
A grotto is a cavern or cave. 



36 



THE ELEMENTARY 



bar, lAst, €.vre, fall, what: ueb, very, thkrk; get; bTkd, marinb; m^jk; 



badge 
fadge 



sledge 
wedge 



No. 45. 

budge 
judge 



-XLV. 

swinge 
twinge 



edge midge grudge lounge 



hedge 
ledge 
pledge 
fledge 



house 

louse 

mouse 

souse 

curse 

purse 

parch 

perch 

scorch 



ridge hinge plunge 
bridge 



lodge 
pod 



ge 



fringe 
singe 



No. 



serge 
verge 
dirge 



gorge 

urge 

giirge 

purge 

surge 

germ 

copse 



rich 

belch 

birch - 

bench 

blench 

drench 

french 

tench 

trench 



46.-XLV 

quench 

stench 

wench 

inch 

•clinch 

finch 

flinch 

pinch 

winch 



niiinch 

gulch 

batch 

hatch 

eatch 

snatch 

scratch 

etch 

fetch 



parse 

erse 

terse 

verse 

eorse 

gorse 

m6rse 

ketch 

retch 

flitch 

notch 

potch 

hutch 

sylph 

lymph 

njrmph 



The razor has a sharp edge. 

A ledge is a large lay or mass of rocks. 

The farmer splits rails with a wedge. 

A judge must not be a bad man. 

Doors are hung on hinges. 

Birch wood will make a hot fire. 

If you go too near a hot fire it may singe or 

scorch your frock. 
The troops march to the sound of the drum. 
Six boys can sit on one long bench. 
The birds fly from branch to branch on the trees 

and clinch their claws fast to the limbs. 
The first joint of a man's thumb is one inchl 

long. | 

I wish I had a bunch of sweet grapes. ! 



SPELLING-BOOK 



37 



MOVE, BON, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OBJ EULE, PULL ; EXIST J € = X ; G = J ; S = Z ; ^H=6U. 



rise 


el6§e 


wise 


no§e 


gui^e 


ro§e 


chose 


proge 



A cat can catch rats and mice ; and a trap will 

catch a fox. 
A hen will sit on a nest of eggs and hatch 

chickens. 
The latch holds the door shnt. 
We can light the lamp with a match. 
Never snatch a book from a boy. 
A cross cat will scratch with her sharp nails. 

Wo. 47.-XLVII. 

u§e giade thyme 

fu§e guile shrine 

nmge quite sphere 

phra§e phleme grime 

A wise man will rise with the sun, or before it. 
The sun will set at the close of the day. 
Good boys will use their books with care. 
A man can guide a horse with a bridle. 
The earth is not quite round. It is not so long 
from north to south as it is from east to west. 
A sphere is a round body or globe. 
In the nose are the organs of smell. 
We love to hear a chime of bells. 
A shrine is a case or box. 
A great heat will fuse tin. 
Style not in verse is called prose. 
A phrase is a short form of speech. 

No. 48.-XLVIII. 

void spoil point noise hoist pound 

oil broil eoin poige joist round 

soil loin eoif moist ground 

toil join quoif bound sound 

oint groin quoit found wound 

joint quoin foist hound mound 



boil 
€oil 
foil 
roil 



38 


THE ELEMENTARY 




BAB, LAST, 


€ai;k, fall, what; heb, pkky, tiikee; get; bikd, makine; link; 






No. 49- 


XLIX. 






loud 


trout 


pouch 


flour 


mount clout \ 


proud 


chouse 


foul 


sour 


out 


flout 


cloud 


grouse 


owl 


count 


bout 


snout 


shroud 


spouge 


cowl 


fount 


scout 


pout 


ounce 


rouge 


prowl 


fowl 


gout 


spout 


bounce 


browge 


scowl 


howl 


shout 


sprout 


flounce 


touge 


stout 


growl 


lout 


choige 


pounce 


crown 


brown 


rout 


our 


voige 


grout 


frown 


clown 


■couch 


scour 


poige 


erout 


town 


gown 


slouch 


7iour 


noige 



We burn fish-oil in lamps. 

We boil beets with meat in a pot. 

Pears are choice fruit. 

When you can choose for yourself, try to make 

a good choice. 
The cat and mouse live in the house. • 
The owl has large eyes and can see in the night. 
One hand of a watch goes round once in an 

hour. 
Wheat flour will make good bread. 
Limes are sour fruit. 

A hog has a long snout to root up the ground. | 
A trout is a good fish to eat. 
An ox is a stout, tame beast. 
Fowls have wings to fly in the air. 
Wolves howl in the woo'ds in the night. 
A dog will growl and bark. 
The cold frost turns the leaves of the trees 

brown, and makes them fall to the ground. 
Rain will make the ground moist. 
You can broil a beefsteak over the coals of fire. 
We move our limbs at the joints. 



Spelling-book. 



39 



MOTE, SON, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ; F.TJLE, PCXL ; EXIST J € = K ; Q — J ; § = Z ; <gH=8H. 

Land that has a rich soil will bear large crops of 

grain and grass. 
A pin has a head and a point. 
A dime is a small coin worth ten cents. 
Men play on the base-viol. 
A great gun makes a loud noise. 
Men hoist goods from the hold of a ship with 

ropes. 
The beams of a wooden house are held up by posts 

and joists : these are parts of the frame. 
God makes the ground bring forth fruit for man 

and beast. 
The globe is nearly round like a ball. 
The dark cloud will shed its rain on the ground 

and make the grass grow. 







No. 


50.-L. 






sea 


read 


aid 


gourd 


peace 


heave 


pea 


goad 


laid 


source 


lease 


weave j 


flea 


load 


maid 


course 


praise 


leave 


plea 


road 


staid 


urease 


coarse 


blue 


bead 


toad 


board 


grease 


hoarse 


flue 


mead 


woad 


hoard 


cease 


breve 


glue 






No. 51.-LI. 






bye 


baize 


loaf 


each 


teach 


bleak 


lye 


raise 


fief 


beach 


coach 


fleak 


eye 


maize 


chief 


bleach 


roach 


speak 


ease 


sheaf 


lief 


peach 


broach 


peak 


tease 


leaf 


brief 


reach 


leash 


sneak 


seize 


neaf 


grief 


breach 


beak 


creak 


cheege oaf 


waif 


preach 


leak 


freak 


Few men 


l can afford to keep a coach. 



40 


THE ELEMENTARY 




BAB, LAST, €lRH, FALL, WHAT; IIEE, PRBY, THKKE ; GET; IHKD, MAkYnk; LINK; 






No. 52.- 


-III. 






break 


oak 


peal 


shoal 


nail 


tail 


steak 


croak 


seal 


ail 


snail 


vail 


streak 


soak 


veal 


bail 


pail 


quail 


screak 


beal 


weal 


fail 


rail 


wail 


squeak 


deal 


zeal 


hail 


frail 


bowl 


weak 


heal 


coal 


jail 


grail 


soul 


shriek 


meal 


foal 


flail 


trail 


beam 


tweak 


neal 


goal 
No. 53.- 


mail 
-XIII. 


sail 


dream 


fleam 


steam 


bean 


mien 


grain 


plain 


gleam 


foam 


dean 


moan 


brain 


slain 


ream 


loam 


lean 


loan 


strain 


main 


bream 


roam 


clean 


roan 


sprain pain 


cream 


aim 


glean 


groan 


chain 


rain 


stream 


claim. 


mean 


fain 


lain 


drain 


team 


maim 


wean 


gain 


blain 


train 



When the wind blows hard the sea roars, and its 

waves run high. 
We have green peas in the month of June. 
No man can make a good plea for a dram. 
Girls are fond of fine beads to wear round their 

necks. 

Girls and boys must learn to read and spell. 
Men load hay with a pitch-fork, 
A load of oak wood is worth more than'a load of 

pine wood. 
A toad will jump like a frog. 
A saw-mill will saw logs into boards. 
A gourd grows on a vine, like a squash. 
You can not teach a deaf and dumb boy to speak. 
The man who drinks rum may soon want a loaf 

of bread. 






SPELLING-BOOK. 



41 



MOTE, BOX, WQW, FtSOT, MOON, OR ; K^K, PCLL J EXIST ; €=K ; 6=J ; 9 = Z ; Cn=8H. 

The waves of the sea beat upon the beach. 

Bleach era bleach linen and thus make it white. 

The miller grinds corn into meal. 

The flesh of calves is called veal. 

Apples are more plenty than peaches. 

The preacher is to preach the gospel. 

Teachers teach their pupils, and pupils learn. 

A roach is a short thick flat fish. 

Men get their growth before they are thirty. 

The beak of a bird is its bill or the end of its bill. 

Greenland is a bleak, cold place. 

No. 54.-LIV. 

WORDS OF THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST, AND 
LEFT UNMARKED AS AN EXERCISE IN NOTATION. 



loot f a ny 
el e gy 
prod i gy 
efftgy 
eb o ny 
en er gy 
lit ur gy 
in fa my 
big a my 
bias phe my 
en e my 
tif fa ny 
vil lain y 
com pa ny 
lit a ny 
lar ce ny 
des ti' ny 
cal um ny 
tyr an ny 



fel o ny 
col o ny 
har mo ny 
bet o ny 
glut ton y 
can o py 
oc cu py 
quan ti ty 
sal a ry 
scam mo ny 
beg gar y 
bur gla ry 
gran a ry 
gloss a ry 
lac ta ry 
her aid ry 
hu§ band ry 
rob ber y 
chan ce ry 



sor cer y 
im age ry 
witch er y 
butch er y 
fish er y 
quack er y 
crock er y 
mock er y 
cook er y 
cut ler y 
gal ler y 
rar i ty 
em er y 
nun ner y 
frip per y 
fop per y 
or re ry 
ar te ry 
mas ter y 



42 



THE ELEMENTARY 



..s:, ©ARK, FALL, WHAT? HER, PBJJV, THKRRJ GKT; BIRD, MAUTnr; LINK; 



mys ter y 
bat ter y 
flat ter y 
lot ter y 
but ter y 
ev er y 
rev er y 



liv er y 
cav al ry 
rev el ry 
bot torn ry 
pil lo ry 
nieni o ry 
arm o ry 



fac to ry 
vie to ry 
his to ry 
black ber ry 
bar ber ry 
syni me try 
rib aid ry 



Botany is the science of plants. 
An elegy is a funeral song. 
A prodigy is something very wonderful. 
An e^gy is an image or likeness of a person. 
Blasphemy is contemptuous treatment of God 
Litany is a solemn service of prayer to God. 
Larceny is theft, and liable to be punished. 
Felony is a crime that may be punished with 

death. 
Salary is a stated yearly allowance for services. 
Husbandry is the tillage of the earth. 
We are delighted with the harmony of sounds. 
A glossary is used to explain obscure words. 
History is an account of past events. A great 

part of history is an account of men's crimes 

and wickedness. 



No. 55.-LV. 



blade 
shade 
glade 
spade 
grade 
trade 
braid 
jade 



chide 

glide 

slide 

bride 

pride 

stride 

crude 

prude 



globe 

probe 

glebe 

gibe 

bribe 

scribe 

tribe 

place 



space 

brace 

grace 

trace 

slice 

nilce 

spice 

price 



trice 

twice 

stage 

shake 

flake 

stake 

snake 

spake 



brake 

drake 

slake 

quake 

strike 

spike 

choke 

poke 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



43 



MOVK, SON, V.'OLF, KOOT, MOON, OB ; BTTLE, PCLL J EXIST J € = K ; 6 = J ; S = Z ; Cir=8lL 



broke 


smile 


shame 


slime 


spume 


spoke 


stile 


blame 


prime 


chine 


smoke 


spile 


clime 


crime 


swine 


stroke 


frame 


chime 


plume 


twine 



A blade of grass is a single stalk. The leaves of 
corn are also called blades. 

The shade of the earth makes the darkness of 
night. 

A glade is an opening among trees. 

A grade is a degree in rank. An officer may en- 
joy the grade of a captain or lieutenant. 

Trade is a dealing in the sale or exchange of 
goods. 

Smoke rises, because it is lighter than the air. 

A globe is a round body, like a ball. 

A bribe is that which is given to corrupt the 
judgment, or seduce from justice. 

A smile shows when we are pleased. 





No, 


56,-LVI. 




vrcmDS op 


TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON 


THE FERST. 


ban' ter 


mat ter 


lie tor 


tan ner 


can ter 


tat ter 


vie tor 


m ner 


cen ter 


let ter 


doc tor 


din ner 


en ter 


fet ter 


tin der 


tin ner 


win ter 


el der 


ped dler 


sm ner 


fes ter 


nev er 


til ler 


cor ner 


pes ter 


ev er 


siit ler 


ham per 


tes ter 


sev er 


ham mer 


pain per 


sis ter 


liv er 


ram mer 


tarn per 


fos ter 


riv er 


sum mer 


tern per 


bat ter 


man or 


lim ner 


ten ter 


hat ter 


ten or 


ban ner 


sim per 



44 THE ELEMENTARY 



bah, t.ast, «1«R, fall, wh^t; m~n, PRgv, thkiw:; gi:t; i;7i:i>, kakinb; link; 



clap per 


tun nel 


hov el 


pep per 


fun nel 


nov el 


dip per 


ker nel 


mar vel 


cop per 


gos pel 


pen cil 


hop per 


bar rel 


man ful 


up per 


sor rel 


sin ful 


sup per 


dor sal 


aw ful 


ves per 


nior sel 


per il 


reb el 


ves sel 


ton sil 


can 9el 


tm sel 


dos sil 


-earn el 


grav el 


fos sil 


pan nel 


bev el 


len til 


ken nel 


lev el 


cav il 


fen nel 


rev el 


91V il 



an vil 
bez el 
cor al 
bar ter 
car ter 
mas ter 
eas tor 
pas tor 
par lor 
gar ner 
Sir del 
art ful 
dar nel 
harp er 

We have snow and ice in the colfl winter. 

The little sister can knit a pair of garters. 

Never pester the little boys. 

Hatters make hats of fur and lambs' wool. 

Peaches may be better than apples. 

The rivers run into the great sea 

The doctor tries- to cure the sick. 

The new table stands in the parlor. 

A tin-peddler will sell tin vessels as he travels. 

The little boys can crack nuts with a hammer. 

The farmer eats his dinner at noon. 

I can dip the milk with a tin dipper. 

We eat bread and milk for supper. 

The farmer puts his cider in barrels. 

Vessels sail on the large rivers. 

My good little sister may have a slate and pencil; 

and she may make letters on her slate. 
That idle boy is a very lazy fellow. 
The farmer puts his bridle and saddle upon his 

horse. 





SPELLING 


r-BOOK 




45 


JOVE, BON', 1 


volf, foot, moon, or ; r.TTLE, 1'ull ; kxist ; e- 


=k; 6=j; s= 


z; cn=sn. 


Paper is made of linen and cotton rags. 


Spiders spin 


webs to catch flies. 








Ho. 57.- 


LVII. 






mourn 


grown 


heap 


fear 


spear 


oar 


borne 


vain 


cheap 


year 


rear 


hoar 


sliorn 


. wain 


leap 


hear 


drear 


roar 


own 


swain 


neap 


shear 


sear 


soar 


shown 


twain 


reap 


blear 


tear 


boar 


blown 


train 


soap 


clear 


wear 


pier 1 


flown 


stain 


ear 


smear 


swear 


tier 


sown 


lane 


dear 


near 


tear 


bier 






Ho. 58.-LVIII. 






air 


your 


stilts 


peat 


moat 


wait 


fair • 


tour 


chintz 


treat 


groat 


bruit ; 


hair 


eaves. 


eat 


seat 


eight 


fruit 


chair 


leave§ 


beat 


great 


freight 


suit 


lair 


greaveg 


feat 


oat 


weight 


milt 


pair 


paiug 


heat 


bloat 


bait 


bwilt 


stair 


shear§ 


bleat 


coat 


gait 


gmlt 


Mir 


guess 


meat 


goat 


plait 


court 


four 


guest 


neat 


float 


trait 


saint 






Ho. 59- 


-LIX. 






east 


waist 


elew 


spew 


yew 


mow 


beast 


dew 


flew 


crew 


bow 


row 


least 


few 


brew 


screw 


show 


snow 


feast 


hew 


slew 


drew 


low 


crow 


yeast 


chew 


mew 


grew 


blow 


grow 


boast 


jew 


new 


shrew 


flow 


strow 


roast 


view 


\shew 


strew 


glow 


sow 


toast 


blew 


-pew 


stew 


slow 


stow 


We 


mourn the loss of a good 


man. 




If 7 


ou do a bad trick 


: you should owe 


Lit. 



46 THE ELEM-ENTARY 1 


bab, last, cakk, tall, -vrii-yr; iiEr, rusv, there; get; bird, maeT.ve; 


LINK 1 



We do not like to see our own sins. 

I like to see a full blown rose. 

A vain girl is fond of fine things. 

The moon is in the wane from full to new moon 

A dog can leap over a fence. 

Much grain will make bread cheap. 

I like to see men reap grain. 

God made the ear, and he can hear. 

Men shear the wool from sheep. 

Flint-glass is white and clear. 

Fowls like to live near the house and barn. 

Can a boy cry and not shed a tear? 

Twelve months make one year. 

I love to eat a good ripe pear. 

The good boy will not tear his book. 

A wild-boar lives in the woods. 

The lark will soar up in the sky to look at the 

sun. 
The rain runs from the eaves of the house. 
The sun heats the air, and makes it hot. 
The old sheep bleats, and calls her lamb to her. 
I wish you to treat me with a new hat. 
A chair is a better seat to sit in than a stool. 
I will wear my great coat in a cold wet day. 
I have seen the ice float down the stream. 
Boys and girls are fond of fruit. 
The sun will rise in the east, and set in the west. 
A beast can not talk and think, as we do. 
We roast a piece of beef or a goose. 
A girl can toast a piece of bread. 
We chew our meat with our teeth. 
Live coals of fire glow with heat. 
A moat is a ditch round the rampart of a castle 

or other fortified place. 





SPELLING- 


BOOK. 


47 


KOVB, SOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON 


6e ; EFLE, rcLi 


-; ejibt; €=k; g= 


=j; s=z; ch=sh. 


daunt 


taunt' 


slant 


barge 1 


haunt 


vaunt 


large 


saZve 


flaunt 


grant 


charge 


searf 






No. 60- 


-LX. 




fraud 


squash 


awl 


yawl 


yawn 


broad 


wash 


bawl 


dawn 


dwarf 


sauce 


swash 


sprawl 


fawn 


watch 


€au§e 


quash 


brawl 


lawn 


vault 


gauze 


gawk 


€rawl 


pawn 


fault 


elauge 


hawk 


drawl 


spawn 


aught 


pau§e 


haul 


pawl 


brawn 


naught 


paunch 


maul 


waul 


drawn 


caught 






No. 61.— I XI. 




brine 


s-erape 


seope 


shave 


drive 


tine 


chape 


trope 


slave 


drove 


shone 


shape 


snore 


plate 


strove 


erone 


■erape 


slate 


prate 


grove 


drone 


. grape 


state 


quite 


elove 


prone 


snipe 


grate 


smite 


gloze 


stone 


gripe 


grave 


spite 


froze 


prune 


stripe 


brave 


sprite 


prize 


drupe 


tripe 


erave 


trite 


smote 



Forks have two, three, or four tines. 

We keep salt meat in brine. 

Grapes grow on vines in clusters. 

Smoke goes through the pipe of a stove. 

iThe boy loves ripe grapes. 

Bed-cords are long ropes. 

Nut-wood and coal will make a warm fire. 

phut the gate and keep the hogs out of the yard. 

plates are stone, and used to cover roofs of houses. 









48 


THE ELEMENTARY 


BAE, LAST, «AEK, FALL, WHAT; HER, l'KKY, TUKRE J 


get; bird, marYne; mjjk; 


We burn coal in a grate. 




I had some 


green corn in July, on a plate. 


Dig up the weeds and let the 


corn grow. 


Bees live in 


hives and collect 
No. 62.-LXII. 


honey. 


WORDS OF THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST. 


am' i ty 


6b lo quy 


dy nas ty 


jollity 


sin ew y 


gay e ty 


mil li ty 


gal ax y 


loy al ty 


pol i ty 


ped ant ry 


roy al ty 


en mi ty 


in fant ry 


u §u ry 


san i ty 


gal lant ry 


ra pi er 


van i ty 


big ot ry 


nau ti lus 


bal eo ny 


an ces try 


pau Qi ty 


len i ty 


tap es try 


moi e ty 


dig ni ty 


mm is try 


dys era sy 


dep u ty 


In dus try 


prel a 9y 


trin i ty 


pan so phy 


al i quot 


par i ty 


cent u. ry 


man i fest 


eom i ty 


mer -eu ry 


up per most 


ver i ty 


in ju ry 


ut ter most 


den si ty 


perjury 


■edn tra ry 


en ti iy 


pen u ry 


eel e ry 


cav i ty 


liix u ry 


pie na ry 


lev i ty 


her e sy 


sa li ent 


lax i ty 


em bas sy 


le ni ent 


pen al ty 


de i ty 


ve he ment 


\ nov el ty 


fe al ty 


bri e ry 


fae ul ty 


piety 


boun te oiis 


mod est y 


po e sy 


moun tain ous 


prob i ty 


cru el ty 


eoun ter feit 


am nes ty 


pu ri ty 


fraud u lent 


bot a ny 


nil di ty 


wa ter y 



SPELLING-BOOK 



49 



MOVE, 60S, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OB J F.TTLK, PU LL ; F-J1ST J €=K ; 6=J ; 8=Z ; CIt=SII. 

No. 63.-LXIII. 

WORDS OF THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND. 



a base ment 
al lure ment 
de base ment 
in £ite ment 
ex ?ite ment 
en slave ment 
a maze ment 
in qui ry 
un ea §y 
eon vey ance 
pur vey or 
sur vey or 
sur vey ing 



dis burse ment 
in dorse ment 
arch bish op 
ad vent ure 
dis fran chise 
en fran chise 
mis con strue 
de po§ it 
re po§ it 
at tiib ute 
im mod est 
un luck y 
ap pen dix 

No. 64.-LXIV, 



au turn nal 
how ev er 
em bar rass 
in stall ment 
in thrall ment 
hy draul ics 
enjoy ment 
em ploy ment 
a mass ment 
em bar go 
im prove ment 
at tor ney 
an noy ance 



WOKDS OF TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FERST, THE 
LAST TWO COLUMNS LEFT UNMARKED. 



blan'dish 
bran dish 
fur bish 
rub bish 
self ish 
churl ish 
fur nish 



blem ish 
skir mish 
van ish 
fin ish 
gar nish 
tar nish 
var nish 



bur nish 
pun ish 
elown ish 
snap pish 
par ish 
cher ish 
flour ish 



nour ish 
skit tish 
slut tish 
lav ish 
rav ish 
pub lish 
pot ash 



Vain persons are fond of the allurements of dress. 

Strong drink leads to the debasement of the mind and body. 

We look with amazement on the evils of strong drink. 

The gambler is uneasy when he is at home. 

An indorser indorses his name on the back of a note ; and his 

indorsement makes him liable to pay the note. 
An archbishop is a chief dignitary of the church. 
Merchants often deposit money in the bank for safe keeping. 



50 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAR, LAST, €AKE, FALL, WUAT;'iiEe, PREY, TIIKRE J GET J bTkD, MArTnk; LINK; 



Autumnal fruits are the fruits that ripen in autumn. 
The wicked know not the enjoyment of a good conscience. 
Parents should provide useful employments for their children. 
Men devoted to mere amusement misemploy their time. 
When unemployed, the mind seeks for amusement. 



horse back 
lamp black 
bar rack 
ran sack 
ham mock 
had dock 
pad lock 
wed lock 
fire lock 
hill ock 
bull ock 



No. 65.-LXV 

hem lock 
fet lock 
mat tock 
hobd wink 
bul wark 
pitch fork 
dam ask 
sym bol 
ver bal 
med al 
ver nal 



No. 



sen' ate 
in grate 
pal ate 
stel late 
in mate 
mess mate 



stag nate 
fil trate 
pros trate 
frus trate 
die tate 
tes tate 



66.-LXVI. 

«li mate 
prel ate 
vi brate 
pi rate 
■eu rate 
pri vate 



jour nal 
ras eal 
spi nal . 
con trite 
trlb iite- 
stat rite 
eon €ave 
«on elave 
6e tave 
res sue 
val iie 



f I nite 
post age 
plii mage 
tri umph 
state ment 
rai ment 



When an old house is pulled down, it is no small job to re- 
move the rubbish. 

Washington was not a selfish man, He labored for the good 
of his country more than for himself. 

Exercise will give us a relish for our food. 

Parents furnish their children with food and clothing, for this 
is their duty. 

In China, thousands sometimes famish with hunger. 

Riding on horseback is good exercise. 



SPELLING-BOOK. 51 

KOYF., BON, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, 6li ; KULK, PULL ; EXTST ; €=k ; G — J ; 5 = z ; <jii=6h; 

Lamp-black is a fine soot formed from the smoke of tar, pitch, 

or pine wood. 
[Tie Indians traffic with our people, and give furs for blankets. 
Jranite io a kind of stone which is yeiy strong, handsome, 
v and useful in building. 
[Tie Senate of the United States is called the Upper-House of 

congress. 
Vater will stagnate, and then it. is not good, 
leavy winds sometimes prostrate trees. 
Norway has a cold climate, 
ifedals are given as a reward at school. 
We punish bad men to prevent crimes. 
We pity the slavish drinkers of rum. 
rhe drunkard's face will publish his vice and his disgrace. 

No. 67.-LXVII. 

tfORDS OF FOUR SYLLABLES, THE PRIMARY ACCENT ON THE 
FIRST; THE LAST COLUMN LEFT UNMARKED. 

u ; mi na ry Ig no mi ny mer ce na ry 

ju li na ry cer. e mo ny mil li ner y 

no ment a ry al i mo ny or di na ry 

m ga to ry mat ri mo ny sem i na ry 

p mer a ry pat ri mo ny pul mo na ry 

>re vi a ry par si mo ny sub lu na ry 

if fi ea cy an ti mo ny lit er a ry 

lei i ea cy tes ti mo ny form u la ry 

q tri ca cy drom e da ry ar bi tra ry 

son tu ma cy preb end a ry ad ver sa ry 

>b sti na cy see ond a ry em is sa ry 

& cu ra cy ex em pla ry com mis sa ry 

<x i gen cy an ti qua ry cem e ter y 

x eel len cy tit ii la ry see re ta ry 

;6m pe ten cy eiis torn a ry mil i ta ry 

m po ten c,y Aon or a ry sol i ta ry 

nis eel la ny par ce na ry sed en ta ry 

lec es sa ry med ul la ry vol un ta ry 



52 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAE, LAST, <3AliE, FALL, WHAT; 1IKB, VJigY, THKr.KJ, GET; BIND, MAIiTnk; LINK', 



trib u ta ry 
sal u ta ry 
an oil la ry 
eap il la ry 
ax il la ry 
cor ol la ry 
max il la ry 
ad ver sa ry 
al a bas ter 
plan et a ry 
stat H a ry 
sanct 1i a ry 
sumpt u a ry 



dys en ter y 
pres by ter y 
prom is so ry 
pred a to ry 
pref a to ry 
pul sa to ry 
mm a to ry 
aud it o ry 
ex ere to ry 
jan i za ry 
mon as te ry 
al le go ry 
des ul to ry 



man da to ry 
pur ga to ry 
dil a to ry 
or a to ry 
dor mi to ry 
mon i to ry 
ter ri to ry 
tran si to ry 
in ven to ry 
con tro ver sy 
leg is la tive 
leg is lat ure 
leg is la tor 



The sun is the brightest luminary. 

The moon is the luminary of the night. 

The streets, houses, and shops in New York are illuminated bj 

gas lights. 
Potatoes and turnips are common culinary roots used in oxx 

kitchens. 
We admire the rose for the delicacy of its colors and its sweel 

fragrance. 
There is a near intimacy between drunkenness, poverty, anc 

ruin. 
The obstinate will should be subdued. 
Matrimony was instituted by God. 
Antimony is a hard mineral, and is used in making types foi 

printing. 
A witness must giye true testimony. 
A dromedary is a large quadruped. 
Worldly men make it their primary object to please them 

selves : duty holds but a secondary place in their esteem. 
It is customary for tipplers to visit taverns. 
Grammar is a difficult but ordinary study. 
A seminary means a place of instruction. 
Napoleon was an arbitrary emperor. He disposed of king 

doms as he chose. 
The devil is the great adversary of man. 



SPELLING-BOOK. 53 


movb, s6n, wolf, foot, moon, 6b ; Eyijs, pull ; e^ist ; €=k ; o= j ; 5=2 ; cn=sn. 


Food is necessary to animal life. 


Alabaster is a kind of marble or limestone. 


An emissary is a secret agent employed to give information to 


an enemy, or 


to act as a spy. 


The planetary 


worlds are those stars which go round the 


sun. 
A secretary is a 


writer, or a scribe. 


Our actions are 


voluntary, proceeding from tree will. 


The Ohio river 


has many large tributary streams which con. 


tribute to increase its waters. 


|Pure water and 


a good air are salutary. 


;A church is called a sanctuary or holy place. 


;The dysentery is a painful disease. 


A promissory note is a note by which a man promises to pay a 


sum of monej 




The remarks at the beginning of a discourse are called prefa- 


tory remarks. 


■ 


Dilatory people are such as delay t% do their work in its proper 


time. 




An orator makes orations; and oratory is the art of public 


speaking. 




The auditory is 


the company who attend as hearers of a dis- 


course. 


. 




No. 68.-LXVIII. 


WORDS OP THBEE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND. 


im mor' tal 


in fer nal re plev in 


pa rent al 


ma ter nal a ban don 


ae quit tal 


pa ter nal pi as ter 


en am el 


e ter nal pi las ter 


im pan el 


in ter nal as sev er 


ap par el 


di ur nal dis sev er 


ii ten sil 


no-e tur nal de liv er 


un 91 v il 


pro -e5n sul e lix ir 


tri umph al 


nn cer tain pre cep tor 


in f®rm al 


in eleni ent eom po§ ite 


bap ti§ mal 


de ter mine en am or 


hi ber nal 


as sas sin to Me -eo 



54 



THE ELEMENTARY 



bar, last, €aek, fatx, wiiat; nEn, prey, there; gkt; cTkh, marine; link-, 



61 l'de €0 

me men to 
pi men to 
mu lat to 
pal met to 
en vel op 
de vel op 
De gem ber 
Sep tem ber 
No vein ber 
en euro, ber 
eon sid er 
be wil der 
mis fort fine 
me an der 
en gen der 



sur ren der 
di§ or der 
nar eis sus 
eo los sus 
im per feet 
in ter pret 
in hab it 
eo hab it 
pro tub it 
dis ered it 
de erep it 
in her it 
de mer it 
pome gran ate 
al ter nate 
in tes tate 



a pos tate 
pro mill gate 
in ear nate 
vol ea no 
Oe to ber 
in elo §iire 
dis elo §ure 
eom po §ure 
ex po §ure 
fore elo §ure 
dis eov er 
dis eol or 
re eov er 
dis eom fit 
dig as ter 
re pass ing 



The soul is immortal ; it will never die. 

Our bodies are mortal ; they will soon die. 

Utensils are tools to work with. Plows, axes, and hoes are 
utensils for farming; needles and scissors are utensils for 
females. 

A formal meeting is one where the forms of ceremony are ob- 
served ; when people meet without attending to these for- 
malities it i s "called an informal meeting. 

Children are sometimes bewildered and lost in the woods. 

Sons and daughters inherit the estate and sometimes the in- 
firmities of their parents. 

The diurnal motion of the earth is its daily motion, and this 
gives us day and night. 

Tobacco is a native plant of America, 

Pimento is the plant whose berries we call allspice. 

Savage nations inhabit huts and wigwams. 

Paternal care and maternal love are great blessings to chil- 
dren, and should be repaid with their duty and affection. 

The blowing up of the " Fulton" at New York was a terrible 
disaster. 

Pomegranate is a fruit of about the size of an orange. 



SPELLING-BOOK 



55 



MOVE, BOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOOK, OR ; BVLE, PULL ; exist ; € = K : g=.j ; s = z ; CH=SK. 

No. 69.-LXIX. 

jay slay dray tray sway 

lay may fray stray prey 

elay nay gray say trey 

flay pay pray stay dey 

play ray spray way bey 



bay 
day 
fay 

hay 

boy 
eoy 
hoy 



No. 70.-LXX. 

joy toy haw -elaw raw saw 

eloy •eaw jaw flaw eraw law 

troy daw draw maw straw paw 

No. 71.-LXXI. 

swamp smalt swart port lire glove 

wasp spalt quart most eome work (wurfy 

salt pork doll some worst (iD&rtf) 

want fort loll dove shove 



wag 
halt 
malt 



wart sport give love monk 



No. 72.-LXXII. 



bow mow sow 

eow now vow 

how brow key 

plow prow ley 



worm (wurm) dirt squirt 

front flirt first 

wont shirt ward 

wort (wurt) skirt warm 



The fanner cuts his grass to make hay. 

Bricks are made of clay baked in a kiln. 

You may play on the mow of hay. 

A dray is a kind of low cart. 

When we eat we move the under jaw ; but the upper jaw of 
most animals is fixed. 

Little boys are fond of toys. 

The sting of a wasp is very painful. 

A swamp is wet, spongy land. 

A monk lives in retirement from the world. 

Law is a rule of action by which men in a state are to be gov- 
erned. 



56 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAB, LAST, €ARK, FAXL, WHAT? IIEE, PKSY, TI1EKE ; GET; BlllD, MAKIXK ; LIJJB \ 



Smalt is a blue glass of cobalt. 

Malt is barley steeped in water, fermented and dried in a kiln; 
of this are made ale and beer. 

No. 73-LXXIII. 



WOKJDS OF 


TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED 


ON THE FERST, 


lad 7 der 


she! ter 


chart er 


char nel 


Had der 


fit ter 


lob ster 


bar ren 


mad der 


mil ler 


lit ter 


flor in 


fod der 


chap ter 


mon ster 


rob in 


iil cer 


suf fer 


glis ter 


€6f fin 


€an cer 


pil fer 


chat ter 


muf fin 


ud der 


bad ger 


shat ter 


bod kin 


sMd der 


led ger 


eliit ter 


wel kin 


rud der 


bank er 


flut ter 


nap kin 


pud der 


•eank er 


plat ter 


pip kin 


gan der 


hank er 


smat ter 


bus kin 


pan der 


turn bier 


spat ter 
sniv er 


^gob lin 
me§ lin 


gen der 


sad dler 


slen der 


ant ler 


sliv er 


tiffin 


ren der 


skim mer 


quiv er 


bar on 


ten der 


glim mer 


£ul ver 


flag on 


9m der 


prop er 


tor por 


wag on 


nin der 


€lap per 


error 


fel on 


p5n der 


skip per 


ter ror 


gal Ion 


iin der 


slip per 


mir ror 


lem on 


blun der 


erop per 


hor ror 


gam mon 


pliin der 


as per 


cen sor 


mam mon 


thun der 


pros per 


spon sor 


€dm mon 


sun der 


less er 


se-e tor 


«an non 


6r der 


dress er 


sach el 


eft ron 


bor der 


aft er 


flan nel 


ten on 


mur der 


raft er 


chap el 


ean ton 


dif fer 


rant er 


grav el 


pis ton 



SPELLING-BOOK. 57 



MOVE, BOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOOK, OR ; KVVE, PtTLI, ; EXIST J €=K ; 6=J ; S=Z ; CH=SH. 



of fer proc tor trav el sex ton 

eof fer chan nel pom mel kim bo 

scof fer cud gel busk el stuc co 

prof fer hatch el chan eel dit to 

The farmer hatchels flax ; he sells com by the bushel, and 

butter by the firkin. 
Little boys and girls love to ride in a wagon. 
Four quarts make a gallon. A barrel is thirty gallons, more 

or less. 
Lemons grow on trees in warm climates. 
The robin is a pretty singing bird. 
A napkin is a kind of towel. 
Brass is a compound of copper and zinc. 
A cancer is a sore not easily cured. 
Firemen have ladders to climb upon houses 
The farmer fodders liis cattle in winter. 
The sailor steers a vessel with a rudder. 
A gander is white and a goose gray. 
Broom-corn grows with a long slender stalk. 
The eye is a very tender organ, and one of the most useful 

members of the body. 

No. 74.-LXXIV. 

WORDS OP TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST. 



brace let 


dri ver 


tu mor 


cri sis 


di et 


ma jor 


la bor 


gra ter 


qui et 


mi nor 


ta bor 


fo cus 


se cret 


stu por 


6 dor 


mu -cus 


po et 


ju ror 


co ion 


bo lus 


to phet 


pre tor 


de mon 


fla grant 


eye let 


tu tor 


1 ron (T urn) 


va grant 


tu mult 


pri or 


a pron 


ty rant 


bol ster 


ra zor 


dew lap 


de cent 


hoi ster 


tre mor 


cm et 


re 9ent 


gra ver 


hu mor 


ba sis 


no 9ent 


qua ver 


ru mor 


pha sis 


lii cent 



58 . THE ELEMENTARY 



BAB, LAST, SAKB, FALL, WHAT; HER, ritljY, TllKUKJ GET; BIU1), MMiV.VE; LrN'K ; 



tri dent va -eant need y ha zy 

pru dent flu ent ero ny la zy 

stil dent fre qufcnt pa ny do zy 

a gent se quent va ry slea zy 

re gent ii ot du ty jas per 

€6 gent pi lot na vy bar gain 

si lent bare foot gra vy -eap tain 

ease ment pre cept safe ty cer tain 

pave ment post seript sure ty mur rain 

move ment o vert glo ry vil lain 

mo ment ru by sto ry vi §or 

po nent spi qj -era zy slan der 

Ladies wear bracelets on their arm3. 

Watts was a very good poet ; he wroto good songs. 

Rabbits hide themselves in secret places. 

A bolster is put at the head of a bed. 

Men in old age love a quiet life. 

A graver is a tool for engraving. 

A holster is a case for carrying a pistol. 

The driver is one who drives a team. 

A minor is a young person not twenty-one years old. 

Miners work in mines under ground. 

A juror is one who sits to try causes and give a verdict accord- 
ing to the evidence. 

The rose emits a pleasant flavor. 

Labor makes us strong and healthy. 

You must stop at a colon whilst you can count one, two, three. 

A pastor of a church does not like to see vacant seats in his 
church. 

Girls wear aprons to keep their frocks clean. 

Nero "was a wicked tyrant. 

Every person should wear a decent dress. 

A major is an officer next above a captain. 

A vagrant is a wandering, lazy fellow. 

Cedar is the most durable species of wood. 

A jjostscript is something added to a letter. 

The streets of cities are covered with pavements. 






SPELLING-BOOK, 



59 



JIOVK, SON', WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OB J BULK, rJJU. \ EJtST J € = K J G=J ; S = Z ; CII=8II. 



WORDS OF THREE 

ar ri' val 

ap prov al 
€0 e val 
re fii §al 
re pri §al 
pe ru §al 
de -ere tal 
re 91 tal 
re qui tal 
pri me val 
un e qual 
eo e qual 
re new al 
1 de al 
il le gal 
de ni al 
de €ri al 
tri bii nal 
a eti men 
le gii men 
dis sei zin 
in 91 §or 
ere a tor 
spee ta tor 



No. 75.-LXXV. 

SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND. 

die ta tor 

tes ta tor 



dis fig lire 



en vi ron 
pa go da 
tor pe do 
bra va do 
tor 11a do 
lum ba go 
vi ra go 
far ra go 
pro vi §0 
po ta to 
oe ta vo 
sub sen ber 
re vi val 
en dan ger 
de 91 pher 
ma neu ver 
111 a tus 
qui e tus 
eon fess or 
ag gress or 

sue cess or 

> 

pre fig ure 



trans fig ure 
eon jeet ure 
de bent ure 
in dent ure 
en rapt lire 
eon text ure 
eom niixt ure 
eon tin ue 
for bid ding 
un er ring 
pro 9eed ing 
ex 9eed ing 
sub al tern 
es pou §al 
en eoun ter 
ren eoun ter 
a vow al 
ad vow §on 
dis loy al 
dis eoilr age 
en eoiir age 
mo las se§ 
de part ure 



We often wait for the arrival of the mail. 

Coeval signifies of the same age. 

Reprisal is a retaking. When an enemy takes a ship, the 

■ injured party retakes a ship or ships "by way of satisfaction, 

and this is reprisal. 
Our blood is often chilled at the recital of acts of cruelty. 
Requital is a recompense for some act. 
Primeval denotes what was first or original. 



60 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BXK, LAST, eiUK, FALL, WJTA.T: HER, VUffV, TJIKRK; GET; BfKO, MARINE; LI^K I 



A tribunal is a court for deciding causes. 
Acumen denotes quickness of perception. 
Illegal is the same as unlawful. It is illegal to steal fruit from 

another's orchard or garden. 
A virago is a turbulent masculine woman. No one loves a 

virago. 
Molasses is the syrup which drains from sugar when it is cooling. 
The potato is a native plant of America. 

No. 76.-LXXVI. 

WORDS OF THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE LAST. 



ap per tain 
su per vene 
in ter vene 
ini por tune 
op por time 
in se cure 
in ter fere 
pre ma ture 
iia ma ture 
ad ver ti§e 
re €om poge 
de -eom po§e 
in ter po§e 
pre dis poge 
re in state 
im po lite 
re u. nite 
dis u nite 
dis re piite 
in ter leave 
in ter weave 
mis be have 
un de ceive 



pre €on ceive 
o ver drive 
dis ap prove 
o ver reach 
o ver look 
dis in thrall 
re in stall 
dis es teem 
mis de mean 
un fore seen 
fore or dain 
o ver strain 
as cer tain 
en ter tain 
re ap pear 
dis in ter 
in ter sperse 
re im burse 
cir -euro, volve 
o ver hang 
o ver match 
dis em bark 
un dar sell 



dis af feet 
o ver whelm 
mis in form 
•eoun ter act 
in di rect 
in cor rect 
in ter sect 
■eon tra diet 
o ver set 
in ter mit 
rep re §ent 
dis con tent 
cir cum vent 
un der went 
o ver shoot 
in ter cept 
in ter rupt 
o ver top * 
re ap point 
un der go 
o ver leap 
o ver sleep 
dis ap pear 



SPELLING-BOOK 



61 



MOTB, 66N, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ; KTJLE, PULL ; EXIST J € = K ; G=J ; S=:Z J ^H=« 



moun tain eer 
en gin eer 
dom i neer 
mu ti neer 
pi o neer 
aue tion eer 
o yer seer 
pri va teer 
vol an teer 
#az et teer 



fin an cier o ver east 
brig a dier re in vest 
gren a dier eo ex 1st 
bom bar dier pre ex ist 
in ter mix 
o ver throw 



deb o nair 
re§ er voir 
o ver joy 
mis em ploy 
es pla nade 
in ex pert 



o ver flow 
o ver lay 
dis o bey 
dis al low 



Ho. 77.-L XXVII, 

WORDS OF TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST, 



at' las 
sue eor 
hon or 
ran <sor 
€an dor 
splen dor 
rig or 
vig or 
val or 
fer vor 
seulp tor 
€lam or 
ten nis 
elns sis 
ax is 
fan ,ey 
ben oy 



eop y 
hap py 
pop py 
pup py 
sun dry 
bel try 
fel ly 
ear ry 
mar ry 
par ry 
ber ry 
fer ry 
oher ry 
mer ry 
per ry 
sor ry 
eur ry 



hur ry 
tlur ry 
har py 
en try 
sen try 
dus ky 
pal try 
ves try 
pit y " 
sean ty 
plen ty 
tes ty 
bet ty 
pet ty 
jet ty 
dit ty 
Wit ty 



flab by 
shab by 
tab by 
1 6b by 
grit ty 
put ty 
levy 
bev y 
priv y 
en yy 
dox y 
prox y 
eol or 
wor ry 
par ty 
ar bor 
har bor 



An atlas is a book of maps. 

You must be good, or you can not be happy 

When you make letters, look at *your copy, 

The poppy is a large flowed 

The puppy barks, as well as the dog, 



62 THE ELEMENTARY 


BAE, LAST, €AEE, FALL, WHAT; HER, PKEY, TIIEEE ; 


get; bTrd, marine; link; 


The place where the bell hangs in the 


steeple is called the 


belfry. 






Horses carry men on 


their backs, 




"We cross the ferry in a boat. 




The cherry is an acid fruit. 




We. a re sorry when a 


good man dies 




Never do your work 


in a hurry. 




Boys like a warm fire 


s in a wintery day. . 


- 


The farmer likes to have a plenty of hay for his cattle, and 


oats for his horses 






The lily is a very pretty flower. 




Glass is made fast in 


the window with putty, 


No. 78-LXXVIIX. 


WOEDS OF THREE 


SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIEST e 


ban' ish merit 


pol y glot 


ten den cy 


blan dish merit 


ber ga mot 


pirn gen cy 


pun ish ment 


an te past 


elem en cy 


rav ish ment 


In ter est 


eur ren qj • 


ped i ment 


pen te eost 


sol ven cy 


sed i ment 


hal i but 


bank rupt cy 


al i ment 


fur be low 


sum ma ry 


•eom pliment 


bed fel low 


land la dy 


lin i ment 


9ie a trix 


rem e dy 
com e dy 


nier ri ment 


par a dox 


det ri ment 


sar do nyx 


per fi dy 


sen ti ment 


Sat ur day 


mel dy 


doe u ment 


hoi i day 


mon dy 


teg u ment 


rim a way 


par dy 


mon u ment 


ear a way 


pros dy 


in stru ment 


east a way 


eiis to dy 


eon ti nent 


leg a cy 


eru 9i fix 


eal a mint 


fal la cy 


di a leet 


id i ot 


pol i cy 


6 ri ent 


gal i ot - 


In fan 9 y 


a pri cot 


char i ot 


eon stan cy 


va ean 9y 





3PELLING-B00K, (33 


'•MOVE, SON, WQLF, TOOT, MOON, OS ; RULE, PULL ; EXIST 


; €=k; g = j ; b = z ; cii=sh. 


va gran qj 


pri va 9y 


6b lo quy 


lu na 9y 


po ten 9y 


di a ry 


de 9en 9y 


pli an 9y 


ro §a ry 


pa pa gy 


flu. en 9y 


no ta ry 


|. re gen qj 


mil ti ny 


vo ta ry 


pi ra 9y 


sera ti ny 


gro 9er y 


€6 gen 9y 


piony ' 


dra per y 


se ere 9y 


1 ron y 
No. 79-LXXIX 


1 vo ry 


WORDS OF FOtJR 


SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND 


a e' ri al 


no ta ri al 


in te ri or 


an nil i ty 


ma te ri al 


pos te ri or 


me mo ri al 


im pe ri al 


ex te ri or 


de mo ni a€ 


ar te ri al 


pro pri e tor 


am mo ni ae 


arm 6 ri al 


ex tra ne ous 


acTju di eate 


mer eu ri al 


spon ta ne oiis 


*e \vl 9i date 


em po ri um 


€u ta ne oiis 


im me di ate 


sen so ri um 


er ro ne oiis 


re pii di ate 


tra pe zi um 


ter ra que oiis 


:-eol le gi ate 


erl te ri on 


tar ta re oiis 


ex fo 2 ate 


9 en tii ri on 


€om mo di oiis 


in e bri ate, v, 


al lo di al 


fe lo ni ous 


ex -eo ri ate 


al lo di um 


har mo ni ous 


ap pro pri ate 


en €o mi um 


gra tu i tous 


in fa ri ate 


tra ge di an 


for tii i toiis 


al le vi ate 


eom e di an 


lux ii ri ant 


ab bre vi ate 


€ol le gi an 


e lii so ry 


an ni hi late 


9e ru le an 


il lii so ry 


ae eu mu late 


bar ba ri an 


€ol lii so ry 


$1 lti mi nate 


gram ma ri an 


so 91 e ty 


je nu mer ate 


in fe ri or 


im pii ri ty , 


ire mu ner ate 


su pe ri or 


se -eu. ri ty 


En €or po rate 


an te ri or 


ob S€u ri ty 



$4 THE ELEMENTARY 



BAR, LAST, €ARE, FALL, WHAT; HER, PKKY, THERE; SET; BIRD, MARIHB ; IXgKl 

All clouds float in the aerial regions. 

The aerial songsters are birds of the air. 

Grave-stones are placed by graves, as memorials ot the dead. 

They call to our remembrance our friends who are buried 

under them or near them. 
The blossoms of spring send forth an agreeable smell. 
There is an immediate communication between the heart and 

brain. 
Men who have been instructed in colleges are said to have a 

collegiate education 
Laudanum is given to alleviate pain 
The sun illuminates our world, 
Our bodies are material, and will return to dust ; out our souln 

are immaterial, and will not die. 
Arterial blood is that which flows from the heart, through the 

arteries. 
An actor of a, tragedy upon the stage is called a tragedian 
A collegian is a student at college. 
God has made two great lights for our world — the sun and the 

moon ; the sun is the superior light, and the moon is, the 

inferior, or lesser light. 
The exterior part, of a house, is the outside ; the interior, is 

that within, 

Ho. 80.-LXXX. 

WORDS OF TWO SYLLABLES. ACCENTED ON THE PIKSy. 

mils/ He eor ban eon gress ab jeef 

Iliick pin kitch en prog ress 6b jeer 

re§ in chick en for tress sub jeci 

ro§ in mar tin mis tress ver diet 

mat in slov en but tress re! iet 

sat in grif fon rick ets dis triet 

spav in ur chin spir its In stinct 

sav in dol phin non plus pre cinet 

we] kin pip pir> gram pus gib bet 

ten don har ness mys tie sher bet 

lat in wit ness brick bat dul cet 

€or doD in gress per feet Ian cet 





SPELLING-BOOK 

• 


65 


MOVE, SON, WOLF, 


FOOT, MOON, OB J BULE, 


PTTLL J EJIBT j € = K ; < 


}=j; s=z ; OH=8& 


buf fet 


buck et 


Ml let 


cor net 


fid get 


blank et 


fil let 


hor net 


brid get 


mar ket 


skil let 


bur net 


rack et 


bas ket 


mil let 


trum pet 


latch et 


eas ket 


col let 


lap pet 


fresh et 


bris ket 


gul let 


tip pet 


jack et 


mus ket 


mul let 


car pet 


plack et 


yal et 


cam let 


clar et 


brack et 


tab let 


ham let 


gar ret 


tick et 


trip let 


gim let 


fer ret 


crick et 


gob let 


in let 


tur ret ^ 


wick et 


corse let 


bon net 


off set 


dock et 


mal let 


. son net 


on set 


pock et 


pal let 


run net 


cor set 


sock et 


wal let 


gar mem 


bul let 



The old Romans used to write in the Latin language 

The linchpin secures the cart-wheel upon the cart. 

Satin, is a rich glossy silk, 

The falcon is a bird of the hawk kind. 

Ladies should know how to manage a kitchen 

The little chickens follow the hen. 

The martin builds its nest near the house. 

A witness must tell all the truth in court. 

Our Congress meets once a year to make laws 

The sloven seldom keeps his hands clean. 

The dolphin is a sea-fish, 

A boy can harness a horse in a wagon. 

We harness horses for the coach or gig, 

A good mistress will keep her house in orders 

The grampus is a large fish living in the sea. 

A relict is a woman whose husband is dead. 

Boys love to make a great racket. 

Brickbats are pieces of broken bricks. 

The doctor bleeds his patients with a lancet. 

When large hail-stones fall on the house they make a great 

racket. 
The little boy Ekes to have a new jacket. 



6G 



THE ELEMENTARY 



fe'ARE, FALL, WHAT; I1EE, PKIJY, THERE J GKT; mill), MARINE; LtfCK ; 



"WORDS OF THREE 
AND THE 

re venge ful 
for get ful 
e vent ful 
neg leet ful 
dis gust ful 
dis trust ful 
sue cess ful 
un skill ful 
^•eol leet ive 
pros pest ive 
per speet ive 
eor reet ive 
in vee tive 
vin die tive 
af fliet ive 
at tract ive 
dis tinet ive 
sub June tive 
■eon June tive 
in diiet ive 
pro duet ive 
de strue tive 
eon struct ive 
in gen tive 
re ten tive 
at ten tive 
pre vent ive 



Ho. 81.-LXXXI. 

SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND, 
LAST COLUMN LEFT UNMARKED. 

in ac tive 
de feet ive 
ef feet ive 
ob ject ive 
e lect ive 
ad he sive 
co he sive 
de ci sive 
cor ro sive 
a bu sive 
con clu sive 
ex clu sive 
in clu sive 
e lu sive 
de lu sive 
al lu sive 
il lu sive 
col lu sive 
ob tru sive 
in tru sive 
pro tru sive 
e va sive 
per sua sive 
as sua sive 
dis sua sive 
un fad ing 
un feel ing 



in vent ive 
per gep tive 
pre sump tive 
eon sump tive 
de gep tive 
as sert ive 
a bor tive 
di gest ive 
ex piil sive 
com piil sive 
im pul sive 
re pul sive 
de fen sive 
of fen sive 
sub ver sive 
dis eiir sive 
ex eur sive 
in eur sive 
sue gess ive 
ex gess ive 
pro gress ive 
op press ive 
ex press ive 
im press ive 
sub mis sive 
per mis sive 
trans mis sive 



"We are apt to live forgetful of our continual dependence on the 

will of God. 
We should not trust our lives to unskillful doctors or drunken 

sailors. 
Washington was a successful general. 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



67 



MOTE, SON, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OK ) Et"XE, PCXL ; EXIST ; € = K ; G = J ; §=Z ; £0: 



:3Hi 



A prospective view, means a view before us. 

Perspective glasses are such as we look through, to see things 

at a distance, Telescopes are perspective glasses. 
Rum, gin, brandy and whisky, are destructive enemies to 

mankind. They destroy more lives than wars, famine and 

pestilence. 
An attentive boy will improve in learning. 
Putrid bodies emit an offensive smell. 
The drunkard's course is progressive ; he begins by drinking a 

little, and shortens his life by drinking to excess, 
The sloth is an inactive, slow animal. 
The President of the United States is elective once every four 

.years. He is chosen by electors who are elected by people 

of the different States, 

No. 82-LXXXII, 

WORDS OF FOUR SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST* 



ju di ea tiire 
ex pli ea tive 
pal li a tive 
spee u la tive 
eop u la tive 
nom i na tive 
op er a tive 
fig u ra tive 
veg e ta tive 
im i ta tive 



spir it ii ous 
spir it u al 
lin e a ment 
vi§ ion a ry 
mis sion a ry 



ear i ea tiire 
tern per a tiire 
lit er a tiire 
ag ri eul tiire 
hor ti eul tfire 



die tion a ry pres by ter y 
sta tion a ry des ul to ry 



est ii a ry 
mer ce na ry 
mes en te ry 



prom on to ry 
per emp to ry 

ea§ u is try 



No. 83-LXXXIII 

WOPvDS OF THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FLRSTc 



rel a tive 
ab la tive 
nar ra tive 
lax a tive 
ex pie tive 
neo; a tive 



prim i tive 
pur ga tive 
ten i tive 
tran si tive 
sen si tive 
sub stan tive 



ad jee tive 
ob vi ous 
en vi ous 
per vi ous 
pat ii lous 
per il ous 



68 



THE ELEMENTARY* 



:kv, there; get; bTki>, mak'ink; i.tnk; 



scur ril ous 
mar vel oils 
friv o loiis 
fab u lous 
neb u lous 
glob ii lous 
cred u lous 



sed u loiis 
gland ii loils 
gran ti loils 
pend ii loils 
scrof ii loils 
em ti loils 
trem ii loils 



pop u lous 
oner u lous 
in fa moiis 
bias phe moiis 
de vi oils 
pre vi ous 
li bel oils 



No. 84.-LXXXIV. 

WORDS OF TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIEST. 



bon fire 
sain phire 
sap phire 
quag mire 
em pire 
urn pire 
wel fare 
hard ware 
wind pipe 
bag pipe 
horn pipe 
brim stone 
san gume 
pris tine 
tiib tine 
fort line 
land scape 
pam phlet 
prqph et 
■eon tract 



spend thrift 
sur feit 
des cant 
ped ant 
pend ant 
ver dant 
sol emn 
col unm 
vol fane 
an Bluer 
■eon qiiev 
cor sair 
grand eiir 
phyg ics 
•tac ti-es 
op ti-es 
■eal ends, 
for ward 
rich e§ 
ash eg 



€al dron 
clial dron 
saf fron 
m5d ern 
bick ern 
Ian tern 
91s tern 
pat tern 
slat tern 
bit tern 
tav ern 
gov ern 
stub born 
check er 
vie ar 
heYf er 
cham fer 
pars ley 
fWend ship 
hard ship 



wor ship, 
star light 
mid night 



up n 



ffht 



in sight 
for feit 
sur feit 
.11011 suit 
prig on 
gar den 
mer chant 
do ub let 
fore head 
vine yard 
cuck 6b 
cobp er 
wa ter 
mawk ish 
awk ward 
dwarf ish 



Brimstone is a mineral which is dug from the earth. 
Children should answer questions j)olitely. 
When the sun shines with clearness, it is the most splendid 
object that we can see. 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



69 



MOVE, SON, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ; ETLE, PULL J EXIST ; G = K ; U=J ; S = Z ; CII=SH- 

Pot and j)earl ashes are made from common ashes. 

Thirty-six bushels of coal make one chaldron. 

Saffron is a well-known garden plant. 

We put a candle in a lantern to keep the wind from blowing 

it out. 
A wooden cistern is not very durable. 
Many persons spend too much time at taverns. 
Mules are sometimes very stubborn animals. 
The cuckoo visits us early in the spring. 
Carrots have long tapering roots. 
At midnight we are on one side of the earth, and the sun is on 

the other side. 
A merchant is one who exports and imports goods, or who 

buys and sells goods by wholesale. 
Water flows along a descent by the force of gravity. 
God governs the world in infinite wisdom ; the Bible teaches 

us that it is our duty to worship him. 
; It is a solemn thing to die and appear before God. 

No. 85.-LXXXV. 

WORDS OP THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST, 



Cher' u bini. 
ser a phim 
mar tyr dom 
id i om 

draw ing room 
eat a plagm 
6s tra ci§m 
gal li cis.m 
skep ti cis_m 
syl lo gis.ni 
her o is.ni 
bar ba ris.m 
as ter ism 
aph o risni 
mag net is.m 



por en pine 
or i gin 
jav e lin 
rav e lin 
liar le qum 
myr mi don 
lex i -eon 
dee a gon 
6e ta gon 
pen ta gon 
hep ta gon 
hex a gon 
pol y gon 
cham pi on 
pom pi on 



seor pi on 
bar ris ter 
dul ci mer 
mar i ner 
•eor o ner 
€an is ter 
mm is ter 
sm is ter 
pres by ter 
quick sil ver 
met a phor 
bach e lor ' 
chan 9 el lor 
em per or 
€5n quev or 



70 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAR, LAST, €ARE, FALL, "WHAT; HER, PREV, THERE J ©ET; BIRD, MARINE; LI^K \ 



sen a tor ea pi as pow er ful 

or a tor ea ri e§ ea ve at 

eoun sel or a. ri e§ bay o net 

ed it or ii hi eorn roge ma ry 

ered it or por ti eo fruit er y 

mon i tor an dit or fool er y 

an ees tor al ma nae droll er y 

par a mom wa. ter fall straw ber ry 

e5p per as quad ra ture qual i ty 

pol i ties eov ert Tire Ian re ate 

hem or rhoidg wa ter man honse wife ry 

as ter oidg salt gel lar b^oy an ey 

re qni em e qui nox dent ist ry 

di a phra^m eoun ter poi§e soph ist ry 

chain ber lain eonn ter march por phy ry 

di a per eoun ter sign proph e cy 

me te or boun ti M off seour ing 

Clierubim is a Hebrew word in the plural number. 

We admire the heroism of the general, more than the rash 
ambition of the duelist. 

We ought to pity the mistakes of the ignorant, and try to cor- 
rect them c 

The porcupine can raise his sharp quills, in the same manner 
as a hog erects his bristles. 

All mankind have their origin from Adam. 

A lexicon is a dictionary explaining words, 

Goliath was the champion of the Philistines, 

iPompions are commonly called pumpkins. 

The sting of a scorpion is poisonous and fatal. 

Mariners are sailors who navigate ships on the high seaSc 

Weput tea in a canister to keep its flavor. 

Quicksilver is heavier than lead : and it flows like a liquid, but! 
without moisture. 

Abraham was the great ancestor of the Hebrews, 

Cicero was the most celebrated of the Roman orators, 

If John sells goods to James on credit, John is the creditor, 
and James is the debtor. 





SPELLING-BOOK. 


n 


MOVE, SOX, WOLF, 


FOOT, MOON, OF. ; F.FL1 


2, FtTLL J EXIST ; € = K 


; 6=J; S=z; CH=8H 3 




No. 86- 


LXXXVI. 




WOBD6 0*TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON 


THE SECOND. 


€om pel 


be get 


pro jeet, v 


o ex tinet 


dis pel 


for get 


tra jeet 


de funet 


ex pel 


re gret 


ob jeet, v. 


de eoet 


re pel 


be set 


sub jeet, v 


, de duet 


im pel 


un fit 


de jeet 


in duet 


pro pel 


sub mit 


de feet 


eon duet, v. 


fore tell 


ad mit 


af feet 


ob struet 


fill fill 


e mit. 


ef feet 


in struet 


dis till 


re mit 


in feet 


eon struet 


in still 


trans mit 


e leet 


re plant 


ex till 


€om mit 


se leet 


im plant 


ex tol 


per initio 


re fleet 


sup plant 


ja pan 


torn tit 


in fleet 


dis plant 


tre pan 


ae quit" 


neg leet 


trans plant 


rat an 


out wit 


eol leet ' 


le vant 


di van 


re aet 


eon neet 


de scent 


be gin 


en aet 


re speet 


'a ment 


with, in 


eom paet 


sus peet 


augment,^ 


un pin 


re fraet . 


e reet 


affix, v. 


here in 


in fraet 


eor reet 


pre fix, v 


a non 


sub traet 


di reet 


in fix 


up on 


de traet 


de teet 


trans fix 


per haps 


re traet 


pro teet 


pro lix 


re volt 


eon traet, v 


ad diet 


eom mix 


a du.lt 


pro traet 


pre diet 


ge ment, v. 


re suit 


ab straet, v 


af fliet 


eon sent 


in suit, v, 


dis traet 5 


in fliet 


fo ment 


eon suit 


ex traet, v a 


eon fliet, v 


fer ment 


de eant 


trans aet 


de piet 


dis sent 


re eant 


re jeet 


re striet 


in tent 


a bet 


e jeet 


sue cinet 


eon tent 


ea det 


in jeet 


dis tinet 


ex tent 



n 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAR, LAST, €AEE, FALL, WHAT J HER, I>REY, THERE J GET*. BIRD, MARINE; LINK; 



e vent 
re print 
pre text 
re lax 
per plex 
an nex 
de vour 
a loud 



eom plaint 
re straint 
-eon straint 
dis traint 
ae quaint 
ap point 
dis joint 
a noint 



ae count 
al low- 
en dow 
ba shaw 
be dew 
es chew 
re new 
fore show 



be low 
be stow 
af front 
eon front 
re prove 
dis prove 
ini prove 
re ply 



Heavy clouds foretell a shower of rain. 

The ratan is a long slender reed ; it grows in Java. 

Good children will submit to the will of their parents, 

The tomtit is a pretty little bird. 

We elect men to make our laws for us. 

Idle children neglect their books when young, and thus reject 

their advantages. 
The little busy bees collect honey from flowers ; they never 

neglect their employment. 
The neck connects the head with the body. 
Children should respect and obey their parents. 
Parents protect and instruct their children. 
Satan afflicted Job with sore boils. 
The lady instructs her pupils how to spell and read. 
Teachers should try to implant good ideas in the minds of their 

pupils. 
The kind mother laments the death of a dear infant. 
A bashaw is a title of honor among the Turks ; a governor. 

The word is often spelled Paclia. 
" If sinners entice thee, consent thou not," but withdraw from 

their company. 

No. 87.-LXXXVII. 

WORDS OF TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST, 



f is eal 
offal 
form al 
dis mal 
char coal 



pit coal 
mo-r al 
cen tral 
vas sal 
den tal 



men tal 
mor tal 
ves tal 
rev el 
gam brel 



tim brel 
mon grel 
quar rel 
squir rel 
mm strel 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



73 



MOVE, 80N, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ; BTTLE, PCLL ; EXIST ; €=K \ G=J ; B = Z ; £H=f 



hand sel 
chis. el 
dam §el 
trav ail 
ten dril 
ster lie 
nos tril 
tran quil 
hand bill 
wind mill 
gam bol 
sym bol 
foot sto~bl 
pis tol 
hand ful 
venge ful 
wish ful 
fcash ful 
skill ful 
help ful 
bliss ful 
fret ful 



hurt ful 
wist fill 
lust fill • 
mad am 
mill dam 
bed lam 
buck ram 
bal sam 
em blem 
prob lem 
sys tern 
pil grim 
king dom 
sel dom 
earl dom 
wis. dom 
ven om 
mush room 
tran som 
bios som 
phan torn 
symp torn 



cus torn 
bot torn 
plat form 
sar ca§m 
mi asm 
fan tas.ni 
soph i§m 
bap tis.m 
al um 
vel lum 
min im 
nos trum 
frus trum 
tur ban 
or gan 
or phan 
horse man 
■ear man 
pen man 
ger man 
church man 
work man 

(wurk man) 



kins, man 
hunts man 
foot man 
grog ram 
cap stan 
sil van 
tur ban 
fam me 
sar dine 
en gine 
mar line 
er mine 
ver min 
jas mine 
rap ine 
d5c trine 
des tine 
phal anx 
si ren 
in grain 
par boil 
breech ins 



Charcoal is wood charred, or burned to a coaL 
Pit coal is dug from the earth for fuel. 
Never quarrel with your playmates. 
A squirrel will climb a tree quicker than a boy, 
A ship is a vessel with three masts. 

The nose has two nostrils through which we breathe and smelL 
We sit on chairs and put our feet on a footstool. 
. The farmer sows his grain by handfuls. 
Children may be helpful to their parents. 
> Try to be a skillful workman. 
\ An artist is one who is skillful in some art, 
LA fox is said to be an artful animal. 
I Little boys and girls must not be fretful. 



74 THE ELEMENTARY 


BAB, LAST, €ABK, FALL, "WIIAT; BEE, rBHY, TnKEK ; SET 


; bTed, maeink; link; 


A kingdom is a 


country ruled by a king. 


A wise man will make a good use of his knowledge. 


A chill is a symptom of fever. 




The chewing of tobacco is a useless custom. 


Ho. 88.-LXXXVIII 


, 


WORDS OF TWO 


SYLLABLES, ACCENTED 


ON THE FIRST. 


boat swain 


fore top 


re gress 


pear main 


main top 


cy press 


chief tain 


cham ber 


fa mous 


neu. ter 


shoul der 


spi nous 


pew ter 


mold er 


vi nous 


bea ver 


ran ger 


se rous 


cleav er 


man ger 


po roiis 


weav er 


stran ger 


ni trous 


sew er 


dan ger 


griev ous 


lay er 


91 pher 


treat ment ! 


pray er 


twi light 


wain scot 


may or 


moon light 


main mast 


o yer 


day light 


hind most 


col ter 


sky light 


fore most 


mo hair 


fore sight 


sign post 


trai tor 


por trait 


by law 


home ward 


bow sprit 


rain bow 


out ward 


ti dings. 


fly blow 


wa ge§ 


do ingg 


ca lix 


breech e§ 


moor ings. 


phe nix 


cray on 


fire armg 


re flux 


a corn 


twee zerg 


week day 


home spun 


heed less 


Fri day 


snow drop 


e gress 


pay day 


The boatswain takes care of the ship's rigging, ! 


Pewter is made chiefly of tin and lead. 




The fur of the beaver makes the best hatSc 


The weaver weaves yam into cloth. 





SPELLING-BOOK. 75 



MOTE, 6OX, VTOLF, FOOT, 1IOOX, OR J Rjn*F., PCLL ; EXIST ; € = K ; G = J ; S = Z ; Cl'.=t 



Oak-trees produce acoms, and little animals eat them. 

Spring is the first season of the year. 

The planet Saturn has a bright ring around it. 

The mason puts a layer of mortar between bricks. 

The mayor of a city is the chief magistrate. 

Judas was a traitor : he betrayed his master : that is, he gave 

him up to his enemies. 
The hair that is over the forehead is called a foretop. 
The farmer feeds his horse in a manger. 
"We should be attentive and helpful to strangers. 
Fire-arms were not known a few hundred years ago. 
Intemperance is the grievous sin of our country. 
Parents deserve the kind treatment of children. 
The United States have a large extent of sea-coast. 
The rainbow is a token that the world will not be drowned 

again, but that the regular seasons will continue. 
A portrait is a picture bearing the likeness of a person. 
Mohair is made of camel's hair. 

Pay the laborer his wages when he has done his work. 
Prayer is a duty, but it is in vain to pray without a sincere 

desire of heart to obtain what we pray for ; to repeat the 

words of a prayer, without such desire, is solemn mockery. 



No. 89.-LXXXIX. 

WORDS OP TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND. 

du ress ca ress dis tress ro bust 

a mass ad dress as sess ad just 

re pass re dress pos sess un just 

sur pass ag gress a miss in trust 

cui rass trans gress re miss dis trust 

mo rass de press dis miss mis trust 

as cess re press em boss un mixt 

re cess im press a cross be twfxt 

ex cess op press ma tross a vert 

-eon fess sup press dis cuss sub vert 

un less ex press ac cost re vert 



76 THE ELEMENTARY 



v,kat; h£ij, pret, thkee; get; bTbd, maeixe; link; 



di vert irn port, v. eon trast, v. di vest 

eon vert, v. eom port a midst in vest 

pervert, v. sup port in fest be ques 

a lert trans port, v. sug gest re quest 

in ert re §6rt di gest, v. sub sist 

ex pert as sort be liest re gist 

de §ert de #>rt mo lest de sist 

in sert re tort ar rest in sist 

as sert eon tort de test eon sist 

es eort, v. dis tort eon test, v. per sist 

de port ex tort, v. pro test, v. as sist 

re port un hurt at test un twist 

The miser amasses riches, and keeps his money -where it will 

do no good. 
Confess your sins and forsake them. 
Unless you study you will not learn. 
The fond mother loves to caress her babe. 
Paul addressed Felix u£>on the subject of a future judgment. 
Bridges are made across rivers. 
An unjust judge may give a false judgment. 
William Tell was an expert archer. 
The fearful man will desert his post in battle. 
Wolves infest new countries and destroy the sheep. 
We detest robbers and pirates. 
Good children will not molest the little birds in their nest, nor 

steal their eggs. 
The wicked transgress the laws of God. 

No. 90.-XC. 

WORDS OF FOUR SYLLABLES, ACCENTED 0I\ THE SECOND. 

tri en ni al sep ten ni al lix iv i um 

lix iv i al sex ten ni al e ques tri an 

mil len ni al ter res tri al il lit er ate 

quad ren ni al e'ol lat er al a dul ter ate 

per en ni al de lir i um as sev er ate 



SPELLING-BOOK. 77 



MOVK, BOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OK ; RtTE, PULL ; EXIST ; € = K ; S=J J §> = Z ; ClI=6H. 



de gem vi rate e rad i eate ae eom mo date 

I e lab o rate cer tif i eate -eom men su rate 

eor rob o rate in del i eate in ves ti gate 

in vig or ate pre var i eate re tal i ate 

de lm e ate au then ti eate eon 91I i ate 

e vap o rate do mes ti -eate ea lum ni ate 

in ae eu rate prog nos ti eate de mon strative 

ea pag i tate in tox i eate de riv a tive 

re sus 9i tate re cip ro -eate eon serv a tive 

de bil i tate e quiv o eate de fin i tive 

fa cil i tate in val i date in fin i tive 

de eap i tate eon sol i date re trib ti tive 

>pre cip i tate in tun i date eon see u tive 

un def i nite di lap i date ex ee u tive 

• A triennial assembly is one which continues three years, or is 

held once in three years. 
The Parliament of Great Britain is septennial, that is, formed 

once in seven years. 
The sun and a dry wind will soon evaporate water on the 

ground. 

I It is difficult to eradicate vicious habits. 
Kever retaliate an injury, even on an enemy. 
Never equivocate nor prevaricate, but tell the plain truth. 
|'A definitive sentence is one that is final. 
.Liquors that intoxicate are to be avoided as poison. 
Love and friendship conciliate favor and esteem. 

Bo. 91.-XCI. 

WORDS OF TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND. 

Iae quire per spire re quire ex plore 

ad mire sus pire in quire re store 

as pire ex pfre es quire se eure 

L re spire de sue a dore pro eure 

I trans pire re tire be fore ob seure 

I in spire en tire de plore en dure 

eon spire at tire im plore ab jiire 



J.JJL i 



78 



THE ELEMENTARY 



ear, last, elKB, vall, -what; tier, tkev, there; get; bird, marTne; lutk; 



ad jure 
al lure 
de rnure 
ini mure 
ma niire 
in lire 
im pure 
as sure 
ma ture 
de cease 
de -erease 
re lease 
in €rease 
pre else 
■eon else 
mo rose 
jo -eose 
im brue 
dis eourse 
u nite 
ig nite 
in vite 
re mote 



pro mote 
de note 
re fate 
€on fute 
sa lute 
di lute 
pol lute 
vo lute 
per mute 
■eom pute 
de pute 
dis pute 
be have 
en slave 
for gave 
en grave 
de prave 
sub due 
in due 
a chieve 
ag grieve 
re prieve 
re trieve 



re 9eive 
per ceive 
de rive 
de prive 
ar rive 
eon tiive 
re vive 
sur vive 
un glue 
al -eove 
re bate 
un true 
re move 
be hoove 
ap prove 
a« -erue 
dis seize 
ap pri§e 
as size 
re lief 
be hoof 
aloof 
re proof 



im peach 
ap proaeh 
en eroach 
re proaeh 
be seech 
•eon geal 
re peal 
ap peal 
re veal 
gen teel 
as sail 
out sail 
de tail 
re tail 
en tail 
eur tail 
a vail 
pre vail 
be wail 
€oa trol 
en roll 
pa trol 
ob lige 



People admire the beautiful flowers of spring. 

The rainbow excites our admiration. 

Men acquire property by industry and economy ; but it i* 

more easy to acquire property than it is to keep it. 
Farmers put manure on their fields to enrich the land and 

obtain good crops. 
The light on this side of the moon, increases all the time, 

from new to full moon ; and then it decreases, till it be-^ 

comes new moon again; and sol continues increasing and ; 

decreasing. 
Wise farmers contrive to. procure a good living, by honest' 

labor, and commonly succeed. 
It is not honorable to dispute about trifles. 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



79 



MOVB, BOX, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OR; KVI.K, TL'LL ; EXIST J € = K ; G = J J § = Z ; Mr=8H. 

A field requires a good fence to secure the crops. 

The clouds often obscure the sky in the night, and deprive us 

of the light of the moon and stars. 
You must not try to deceive your parents. 
The buds of the trees survive the winter; and when the 

warm sun shines, in the spring, the leaves and blossoms 

come forth upon the trees, the grass revives, and springs up 

from the ground. 
Before you rise in the morning or retire at night, give thanks 

to God for his mercies, and implore the continuance of his 

protection. 



No. 92.- 

WORDS OF TWO SYLLABLES. 



be tween 
ea reen" 
earn pahm 
ar ran/n 
or dam 

! dis dain 
re gain 
eoni plain 

I ex plain 
a main 
de main 

. do main 
re frain 
re strain 
dis train V 
eon strain 

ieon tain 
ob tain 
de tain 

; per tain 

mi tain 
dis tain 



sus tain 
ea jole 
eon sole 
pis tole 
mis rule 
hu mane 
in sane 
ob scene 
gan. grene 
ter rene 
eon vene 
eom bine 
de fine 
re fine 
eon fine 
sa line 
de eline 
ea nine 
re pine 
su pine 
en shrine 
di vine 



-XCII. 

ACCENTED ON 

en twine 
post pone 
de throne 
en throne 
a tone 
je June 
tri line 
eom mune 
at tune 
es eape 
e lope 
de el are 
in snare 
de spair 
pre pare 
re pair 
eom pare 
im pair 
sin cere 
ad here 
eo here 
aus tere 



THE SECOND., 

re vere 
se vere 
eom peer 
ea reer 
bre vier 
bab 6bn 
buf fdbn 
dra goon 
rae eobu 
doub loon 
bal loon 
gal loon 
shal loon 
plat obn 
lam poem 
liar pobn 
mon soon 
bas soon 
fes toon 
pol trdbn 
dis. own 
un &nown 



SO THE ELEMENTARY 

BAB, LAST, €AIII', FALL, "VVIIAT; IlEn, VltKY, THERE J GET; BIUB, .V.U'.Vxe; LrjK ] 



nn sown 


a light 


a wait 


•eon tour 


a do 


de light 


de ceil 


be side§ 


out do 


a f i£&t 


■eon ceit 


re ceipt 


ago 


af fright 


a mour 


re lieve 



When tlie moon passes between the earth and the sun, we 
call it new ; but you must not think that it is more new at 
that time, than it was when it was full ; we mean, that it 
begins anew to show us the side on which the sun shines. 

" God ordained the sun to rule the day ; and the moon and 
stars to give light by night." 

The laws of nature are sustained by the immediate presence 
and agency of God. 

The heavens declare an Almighty power that made them. 

The science of astronomy explains the causes of day and night, 
and why the sun, and moon, and stars appear 'to change 
their places in the heavens. 

Air contains the vapors that rise from the earth ; and it sus- 
tains them, till they fall in dews, and in showers of rain, or 
in snow or hail. 

Grape-vines entwine their tendrils round the branches of trees. 

Laws are made to restrain the bad, and protect the good. 

Glue will make pieces of wood adhere. 

The careful ant prepares food for winter. 

We often compare childhood to the morning : morning is the 
first part of the day, and childhood is the first stage of hu- 
man life. 

Do not postpone till to-morrow what you should do to-day. 

A harpoon is an instrument for striking whales. 

Monsoon is a wind in the East Indies, that blows six months 
from one quarter, and then six months from another. 

Be careful to keep your house in good repair. 

Refrain from all evil ; keep no company with immoral men. 

Never complain of unavoidable calamities. 

Let all your words be sincere, and never deceive. 

A poltroon is. an arrant coward, and deseiwes the contempt of 
all brave men. 

Never practice deceit, for this is sinful. 

To revere a father, is to regard him with fear mingled with 
respect and affection. 

Brevier is a small kind of printing letter. 



SPELLING-BOOK 



81 



MOTH, BOX, tVOLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ; BT7LK, I>t7LL ; EXIST J € = K \ G=J ; s= ~ OH=8E> 



ffo. 83.-XCIII. 

WORDS OF FOUR SYLLA3LES, THE FULL ACCENT ON THE THIRD 
AND A WEAK ACCENT ON THE FIRST. 

mal e fae tor 
ben e fae tor 



an te ged 7 ent 
dis a gree ment 
gir eum ja 9ent 
re en forge ment 
pre en gage ment 
en ter tain ment 
in eo her ent 
in de 91 sive 
su per vi §or 
eon ser va tor 
des pe ra do 
bas ti na do 
brag ga do 9io 
mis de mean or 
ap pa ra tus 
af fi da vit 
ex ul ta tion 
ad a man tine 
man u faet ure 
su per struct ure 
per ad vent ure 
met a mor phose 
in nu en do 
su per ear go 
in ter nun 9k) 
ar ma dil lo 
man i fes to 
laz a ret to 
dis en eilm "ber 
pred e 9es sor 
in ter 9es sor 



met a phyg ies 
math e mat ies 
dis in her it 
ev a nes 9ent 
€on va les 9 ent 
ef flo res 9ent 
eor res pond ent 
in de pend ent 
re im burse ment 
dis eon tent ment 
om ni preg ent 
in ad vert ent 
pre ex 1st ent 
eo ex 1st ent 
in ter mit tent 
in ter mar ry 
6 ver shad 6w 
ae 9i dent al 
in ci dent al 
o ri ent al 
fun da ment al 
or na ment al 
sae ra ment al 
reg i ment al 
det ri ment al 
mon u ment al 
in stru ment al 
hor i zon tal 
dis a vow al 



>82 



THE ELEMENTARY 



bak, last, €ake, fall, v.-iiat; hbb, pbey, tiikee; get; bTed, mabine; link; 



Gage is a French word, and signifies to pledge. 

The banks engage to redeem their notes with specie, and they 
are obliged to fulfill their engagements. 

To pre-engage means to engage beforehand. 

I am not at liberty to purchase goods which are pre-engaged 
to another person. 

To disengage, is to free from a previous engagement. 

A mediator is a third person who interposes to adjust a dis- 
pute between parties at variance. 

How can a young man cleanse his way ! 

Oh, how love I thy law ! 

No. 94.-XCIV. 

WORDS OF THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST, 
LEFT UNMARKED FOR EXERCISE IN NOTATION. 



ADJECTIVES. 



cm na mon 
et y nion 
grid i roil 
and i ron 
skel e ton 
sim pie ton 
buf fa lo 
cap ri corn 
cat i co 
in di go 
ver ti go 
cal i ber 
bed chain ber 
cin na bar 
of fi.cer 
col an der 
lay en der 
prov en der 
cyl in der . 
in te ger 
scav en ger 
har bin ger 



por rm ger 
stom a cher 
ob se quies 
prom i ses 
com pass es 
in dex es 
am ber gris 
em pha sis 
di o cese 
o li o 
o ver plus 
pu is sauce 
nu cle us 
ra di us 
ter mi nus 
blun der buss 
syl la bus 
in cu bus 
sar di us 
sir i us 
cal a mus 
mit ti mus 



du te ous 
a que ous 
du bi ous 
te di ous 
o di ous 
stu di ous 
co pi ous 
ca ri ous 
se ri ous 
glo ri ous 
cu ri ous 
fu ri ous 
spu ri ous 
lu mi nous 
glu ti nous 
mu ti nous 
ru in ous 
lu di crous 
dan ger ous 
hid e ous 
in fa mous 
ster to rous 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



83 



MOVE, BOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ; BrLE, POLL J EXIST ; €- 



cn= sn. 



nu mer ous 
o dor ous 
hu mor ous 
ri ot ous 
trai tor ous 
per vi ous 
hid e ous 
haz ard ous 
pit e ous 
plen te ous 
im pi ous 
vil lain ous 
mem bra nous 



rav en ous 
om i nous 
res in ous 
glut ton ous 
bar ba rotis 
ul cer ous . 
slan der ous 
pon der ous 
mur der ous 
gen er ous 
pros per ous 
ran cor ous 



vig or ous 
val or ous 
am or ous 
clam or ous 
tim or ous 
sul phur ous 
vent ur ous 
rapt ur ous 
ar du ous 
mis chzev ou3 
stren u ous 
sin u ous 
tyr an nous 



No. 95.-XCV. 

WORDS OP TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND. 



ap peage 
dis plea$e 
dig ea$e 
e rase 
pre mige 
sur rnlge 
de splge 
a rfge 
com prige 
chas tige 
ad vige 
de vige 
re vige 
dis gwige 
fore cloge 
in cloge 
$is cloge 



re poge 
pro poge 
im poge 
com poge 
trans poge 
a buge, v. 
ac edge 
ex cuge, v. 
re fdge 
ef fiige 
dif fuge 
suf fuge 
in f age 
con fuge 
a miige 
re cruit 
de feat 



es cheat 
re peat 
en treat 
re treat 
un loose 
de bauch 
re call 
be fall 
with al 
fore stall 
fore warn 
de fault 
as sault 
pa paw 
with draw 
a sleep 
en dear 



re hear 
be smear 
ap pear 
tat too 
en trap 
in wrap 
un ship 
e quip 
en camp 
de camp 
un stop 
u. giirp 
un clasp 
de bar 
un bar 
a far 
ap plauge 



84 


THE ELEMENTARY 




B3.R, LAST, €ARE 


fall, wiiat: iier, prey, there; oet; bTri>, 


marine; link; 




No. 96.- 


-XCVI. 






MONOSYLLABLES IN TH. 




IN THE FOLLOWING "WORDS, th 


HAVE THE ASPIRATED SOUND, 




AS IN THINK, THIN. 




theme 


thole 


troth 


tilth 


three 


throe 


north 


smith 


thane 


throve 


sloth 


thrash 


thrice 


teeth 


thought 


thaw 


throne 


threw 


thorn 


thrall 


throw 


thrive 


thr5b 


thwart 


truth 


meath 


throng 


warmth 


youth 


thread 


thong 


swath 


heath 


thresh 


thing 


path 


ruth 


thrift 


think 


bath 


sheath 


thrust 


thin 


lath 


both 


thrum 


thank 


wrath 


oath 


depth 


thick 


hearth 


quoth 


width 


thrill 


tooth 


growth 


filth 


thumZ> 


birth 


biowth 


frith 


thump 


mirth 


forth 


plinth 


length 


third 


fourth 


spilth 


strength 


thirst 


thief 


thwack 


hath 


thirl 


thieve 


broth 


withe 


worth 


faith 


•eloth 


thatch 


month 


thigh 


froth 


thill 


south 


throat 


loth 


theft 


mouth 


doth 


moth 


thrush 


drouth 


IN THE FOLLOWING, THE NOUNS HAVE THE ASPIRATED, AND j 


THE VERBS THE VOCAL SOUND OF th 




NOTTS S. 


VERBS. 


NOUNS. 


VERBS. 


•cloth 


•clothe 


sheath 


sheathe 


bath 


bathe 


wreath 


wreathe 


mouth 


mouth 


swath 


swathe 


breath 


breathe 


teeth 


teeth 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



85 



MQYB, 66X, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OB J BtJLE, pull ; EXIST ; € = K ; 6=J ; s = z ; £B— SE. 



Cambric is a kind of thin muslin. 

A king may sit upon a throne. 

Many kings have been thrown clown from their thrones. 

A tiger has great strength, and is very ferocious. 

A pious youth will speak the truth. 

Keep your mouth clean, and save your teeth. 

The water in the canal has four feet of depth. 

A tooth-brush is good to brush your teeth. 

The length o*f a square figure is equal to its breadth. 

The breadth of an oblong square is less than its length. 

Plants will not thrive among thorns and weeds. 

The thresher threshes grain with a flail. 

A severe battle thins the ranks of an army. 

Youth may be thoughtful, but it is not very common. 

One good action is worth many good thoughts. 

A piece of cloth, if good, is worth what it will bring. 

Drunkards are worthless fellows, and despised. 

It is easier to speak the truth than to lie. 

Bathing-houses have baths to bathe in. 

"We breathe fresh air at every breath. 

Ho. 97.-XCVII. 

WOBDS OF TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED 0?T TUB FIBST. 



bal' last 
fll bert 
eon cert 
ef fort 
pur port 
tran script 
■eon script 
bank rapt 
eld est 
neph e¥ 
sin ew 
land tax 
syn tax 
in dex 



com plex 
ver tex 
vor tex 
con vex 
lar ynx 
afflux 
eon flux 
ef flux 
in flux 
con text 
bow line 
mid day 
Sun day 
Mon day 



Tue§ day 
Wedne§ day 
Thurg day 
mid way 
gang way 
path way 
es say 
eom fort 
eov ert 
bom bast 
eourt ship 
Aim §y 
cliim gy 
swel try 



ver y 
driz zly 
grig ly 
guilt y 
pan §y 
fren zy 
quia §y 
gip sy 
tip sy 
drop sy 
scrub by 
shrub by 
stub by 
nut meg 



86 



THE ELEMENTARY 



eau, last, ■CAiir:, r.'.LL, aviiat; dee, peey, tiiebe; get; eTke, maeixb; link; 



10* 



offing 
stuff ing 
brl ny 
nose gay 



hear say 
drear y 
we a ry 
que ry 



dai ly 
dai §y 
ea §y 
trea ty 



frail ty 
dain ty 
■earn brie 
shoul der 



No. 98.-XCVIII. 



IN THE FOLLOWING, THE OF THE DIGRAPH 010 HAS ITS 
FIRST OR LONG SOUND. 



bor' row 
el bow 
f el low 
fol low 
€al low 
mead ow 
shad ow 
hal low 
bel low 



bil low 
hoi low 
ar row 
far row 
liar row 
raal low 
pil low 
min now 
mar row 



har row 
spar row 
yar row 
y,el low 
tal low 
fal low 
shal low 
fur row 
wid ow 



win dow 
win now 
wil low 
mel low 
nior row 
sor row 
bur row 
swal low 
wal low 



Filberts are small nuts growing in hedges. 

A ship or boat must have ballast to prevent it from over- 
setting. 

The sinews are the tendons that move the joints of the body. 
The tendon of the heel is the main sinew that moves the 
foot. 

From the shoulder to the elbow there is only one bone in the 
arm, but from the elbow to the hand there are two bones. 

The light is on one side of the body, and the shadow on the 
other. 

In old times there was no glass for windows. 

The farmer winnows chaff from the grain. 

The callow youug means the young bird before it has feath- 
ers. 

Fallow ground i3 that which has lain without being plowed 
and sowed. 

A shallow river will not float ships. Some places in the Ohio 
are at times too shallow for large boats. 

Cattle in South America are hunted for their hides and 
tallow. 





SPELLING—BOOK. 


87 


MOTE, 60X, WOLF, 


foot, m(mjn, on ; r.r r. 


■:, i-:;r.L ; exist ; e=K 


; g=j ; s = z ; cu=s:i. 


Tallow is the fat of oxen, cows, and sheep. 




Apples and peaches are ripe when they are mellow, but hard 


apples keq) 


better than mellow ones. 




The Lull bellows and paws the ground. 




Friday is just 


as lucky a day 


as any other. 


' 




No. 99. 


-XCIX. 




WORDS OF 


TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST. 


rag iire 


wee Ytl 


mourn ful 


sports man 


seiz ure 


snow ball 


fear ful 


brain pan 


trea tise 


bride well 


cheer ful 


m5n ster 


like wi§e 


mole hill 


right ful 


free stone 


door ease 


fe rlne 


fruit ful 


mile stone 


stair ease 


mind fill 


boast ful 


grave stone 


sea horse 


peace ful 


aw ful 


hail stone 


bri dal 


hate fill 


law fill 


hy phen 


feu dal 


wake ful 


play day 


an tunm 


oat meal 


guile ful 


thrall dom 


au burn . 


spi ral 


dole ful 


watch man 


sauce pan 


no ral 


shame ful 


watch ful 


war fare 


neti tral 


bane ful 


free dom 


fac He 


plu. ral 


tune ful 


bo §om 


serv He 


port al 


hope ful 


hike warm 


dae tyl 


bra tal 


eare ful 


trl form 


due tile 


vi tal 


ire ful 


glow worm mis slle 


e qual 


dire ful 


de isni 


pan tile 


sur feit 


use ful 


oak urn 


rep tile 


an gel 


grate ful 


quo rum 


fer tile 


an cient 


spite ful 


stra turn 


hos tile 


wea gel 


waste ful 


sea man 


sex tile 


jew el 


faith fui 


free man 


flex lie 


new el 


yoilth ful 


fore man 


verd ure 


erew el 


gain ful 


yeo man 


orcl iire 


tew el 


pain ful 


sale§ man 


fig ure 


tre foil 


spoon ful 


states man 


in jure 



88 THE ELEMENTARY 



bab, last, €akk, fall, what; hEr, rcgY, tii£ee ; qet; dTbp, MAr.lXK; LTN'K; 



conjure fract tire mor tise leg ate 

per jure. cult tire prac tice frig ate 

pleas, ure fixt ure trav erse in grate 

meas. tire cain phor ad verse phyg ic 

treas. ure grand sire pack horse jon quil 

cen sure prom ise ref tise sub tile 

press ure an ise man date fer ule 

f is sure tur key ag ate €on dor 

A treatise is a written composition on some particular sub- 
ject. 

Oatmeal is the meal of oats, and is very good food. 

An egg is nearly oval in shape. 

A newel is the post round which winding stairs are formed. 

Crewel is a kind of yarn or twisted worsted. 

A jewel is often hung in the ear. The Jews formerly wore, 
and some nations still wear, jewels in the nose. 

Trefoil is a grass of three leaves. 

Weevils in grain are veiy destructive vermin. 

To be useful is more honorable than to be showy. 

A hyphen is a little mark between syllables or words, thus, 
book-case, co-operate. 

A spiral line winds and rises at the same time. 

It is a mean act to deface the figures on a mile-stone. 

No pleasure is equal to that of a quiet conscience. 

Let us lay up for ourselves treasures in heaven, where neither 
moth nor rust can corrupt. 



No. 


100- 


-c. 


WORDS OF FOUR SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND. 


ad vent tir ous 




pre cip i tous 


a non y mous 




ne ces si totis 


sy non y mous 




am phib i ous 


un gen e rotis 




mi rac u lous 


mag nan 1 mous 




a nal o gotis 


u nan i mous 




per fid i ous 


as par a gus 




fas tid i otis 









SPELLING-BOOK. 89 


MOVE, 60N, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OR ] ETJLI 


!, pull ; ejist ; €=k ; g=j ; s=z ; ch=sh. 


in sid i ous 


in tel li gent 


in vid i ous 


ma lev o lent 


€011 spie U OUS 


be nev o lent 


per spie u. ous 


pre die a ment 


pro mis eu ous 


dis par age ment 


as sid u ous 


en -eoiir age ment 


am big u ous 


en fran cEise ment 


eon tig u ous 


dis fran chise ment 


mel lif lu ous 


en tan gle ment 


su per flu ous 


ae knowl edg ment 


in gen 11 ous 


es tab lisli ment 


eon tin u ous 


em bel lish ment 


in eon. gru ous 


ae eom plish ment 


im pet u ous 


as ton ish ment 


tu mult u ous 


re lin quish ment 


vo lupt u. ous 


im ped i ment 


tem pest u. oils 


La bil i jnent 


sig nif i eant 


im pri§ on ment 


ex trav a gant 


em bar rass ment 


pre dom i nant 


in teg u ment 


in tol er ant 


e mol 11 ment 


1 tin er ant 


pre em i nent 


in hab it ant 


in eon ti nent 


•eon eom i taut 


im per ti nent 


ir rel e vant 


in dif fer ent 


be nef i gent 


ir rev er ent 


mag nif i cent 


om nip tent 


mu nif i gent 


mel lif lu ent 


eo in ci dent 


911* eum flu ei>t 


non re§ i dent 


ae eou ter ment 


im prov i dent 


eom mu. ni eant 


An anonymous author writes without signing his name to Ms 


composition. 




Synonymous words have the 


same signification. Very few 


words in English are exactly synonymous. 



90 THE ELEMENTARY 

BAR, LAST, t'AUr, FALL, WHAT; HEB, PBEY, TUKUKJ OCT; IlTi'.D, MABl'XEJ LI"K * 

Precipitous signifies steep ; tbe' East and West rocks in New 
Haven are jn-ecipitous. 

An amphibious animal can live in different elements. The 
frog lives in air, and for a long time can live in water. 

A miraculous event i3 one that can not take place according 
to the ordinary laws of nature ; it can take place only by 
the agency of divine power. 

Assiduous study will accomplish almost any thing that is with- 
in human power. 

An integument is a cover. The skin is the integument of ani- 
mal bodies. The bones also have integuments. 

Young persons are often improvident — far more improvident 
than the little ants. 

No. 101.-CI. 

WORDS OF FOUR SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON TIIE SECOND, 
AND LEFT UNMARKED. 

as per i ty do cil i ty e nor mi ty 

se ver i ty a gil i ty ur ban i ty 

pros per i ty fra gil i ty cu pid i ty 

aus ter i ty nijiil i ty tur gid i ty 

dex ter i ty hu mil i ty va lid i ty 

in teg ri ty ste ril i ty ca lid i ty 

ma jor i ty vi ril i ty so lid i ty 

pri or i ty scur ril i ty ti mid i ty 

mi nor i ty due til i ty hu mid i ty 

plu ral i ty gen til i ty ■ ra pid i ty 

fa tal i ty fer til i ty stu pid i ty 

vi tal i ty lios til i ty a rid i ty 

mo ral i ty tran quil li ty flo rid i ty 

mor tal i ty ser vil i ty fe cun di ty 

bru tal i ty pro pin qui ty ro tun di ty 

fi del i ty ca lam i ty com mod i ty 

sta bil i ty ex trem i ty ab surd i ty 

mo bil i ty sub lim i ty lo cal i ty 

no bil i ty prox im i ty vo cal i ty 

fa cil i ty con form i ty ras cal i ty 



SPELLING-BOOK 91 



MOVE, SOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OU ; ETT.E, rtTLL J EXIST ; € = K J G = .T ; S=Z ; 011 = 811. 



re al i ty de spond en cy hy poc ri sy 

le gal i ty e mer gen cy ti moc ra cy 

re gal i ty in clem en cy im pi e ty 

fru gal i ty con sist en cy va ri e ty 

for mal i ty in solv en cy e bri e ty 

car nal i ty de lin qnen cy so bri e ty 

neu tral i ty mo not o ny pro pri e ty 

as cend en cy a pos ta sy sa ti e ty 

The winters in Lapland are severe. The people of that coun- 
try dress in furs, to protect themselves from the severity of 
the cold. 

Major signifies more or greater ; minor means less. 

A majority is more than half; a minority is less than half. 

Plurality denotes two or more. 

In grammar, the plural number expresses more than one ; as, 
two men, ten dogs. 

A majority of votes means more than half of them. 

When we say a man has a plurality of votes, we mean he has 
more than any one else. 

Members of Congress and Assembly are often elected by a plu- 
rality of votes. 

Land is valued for its fertility and nearness to market. 

Many parts of the United States are noted for the fertility of 
the soil. 

The rapidity of a stream sometimes hinders its navigation. 

Consistency of character is a trait that commands esteem. 

Humility is the prime ornament of a Christian. 

No. 102 -CII. 

WCEDS OF FIVE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOINT). 

-co tern' po ra ry de clam a to ry 

ex tern po ra ry ex clam a to ry 

de rog a to ry in flam ma to ry 

ap pel la to ry ex plan a to ry 

-eon sol a to ry de clar a to ry 

de fam a to ry pre par a to ry 



92 THE ELEMENTARY 



bar, last, €Anr, fall, what; her, tekt, TnKnr. ; get; r.Tf.n, mar ink; li? 



dis pen sa to ry ob gerv a to ry 

' sub sid i a ry eon serv a to ry 

in cen di a ry pro liib it o ry 

sti pen di a ry pre mon i to ry 

e pis to la ry re po§ i to ry 

vo cab u la ry sup po§ i to ry 

im ag in a ry le git i ma cy 

pre lim i na ry in vet er a cy 

■eon fee tion er y sub serv i en cy 

un neg es sa ry de gen er a ey 

he red i ta ry con fed er a cy 

in vol un ta ry ef fern i na ey 

re §id u a ry in del i ca cy 

tu mult u a ry in hab it an cy 

vo ltipt u. a ry a-e -eom pa ni ment 

Addison and Pope were cotemporary authors, that is, bhefS 

lived at the same time. 
A love of trifling amusements is derogatory to the Christian 

character. 
Epistolary correspondence is carried on by letters,, 
Imaginary eyils make no small j)art of the troubles of life. 
Hereditary property is that which descends from ancestors 
The Muskingum is a subsidiary stream of the Ohio. 
A man who willfully sets fire to a house is an incendiary. 
An observatory is a nlace for observing the heavenly bodies 

with telescopes. 
An extemporary discourse is one spoken without notes or pre- 
meditation. 
Christian humility is never derogatory to character 
Inflame, signifies to heat, or to excite. 
Strong liquors inflame the blood and produce diseases,, 
The prudent good man will govern his passions, and not suffer 

them to be inflamed with anger. 
Intemperate people are exposed to inflammatory diseases. 
An obstructed perspiration produces an inflammatory state of 

the blood. 
A conservatory is a large green-house for the p reservation and 

culture of exotic plants. J 



SPELLING-BOOK 



93 



MOTE, SON, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OE J ETTLK, PULL ; EXIST ; € = K : G = J ; S= Z ; CU — SJi. 



No, 103.-CIII.. 

WORDS OP SIX SYLLABLES. ACCENTED ON THE FOURTH, OR AN- 
TEPENULT, 



ma te ri al' i ty 
i] lib er al i ty 
u ni ver sal i ty 
in hos pi tal i ty 
in stru ment al i 
spir itu al i ty 
im prob a bil i ty 
im pla 6a bil i ty 
mal le a bil i ty 
in flam ma bil i ty 
in ca pa bil i ty 
pen e tra bil i ty 
im mu ta bil i ty 
in ered i bil i ty 
3 leg i bil i ty 
re fran gi bil i ty 
in fal li bil i ty 
dl vis. i bil i ty 
in sen si bili ty 
im pos si bil i ty 



com press i bil i ty 
eom pat i bil i ty 
de struet i bil i ty 
per yep ti bil i ty 
ty re gist i bil i ty 

eom bus ti bil i ty 
in flex i bil i ty 
dis sim i laxity 
par tie u. lar i ty 
ir reg u lar i ty 
in fe ri or i ty 
su pe ri or i ty 
im pet ti os i ty 
gen er al is si mo 
dis 91' plin a ri an 
pre des ti na ri an 
an te di In vi an 
het e ro ge ne oils 
me di a to ri al 
in qui§ i to ri al 



No. 104.-CIV. 

WORDS OF THREE SYLLABLES. ACCENTED ON THE FIRST, 



ben' e fit 
al pha bet 
par a pet 
sum mer set 
min u et 
pol y pus 
Im pe tus 
eat a raet 



in tel le^t 
9ir eum spe^t 
pick pock et 
flow er et 
lev er et 
pen ny weight 
eat a pult 
men di ^ant 



sup pli eant 
per ma nent 
mis ere ant 
ter ma gant 
el e gant 
lit i gant 
ar ro gant 
el e pliant 



94 THE ELEMENTARY 


BAR, LAST, <3AEE, FALL, TV 


n.yr; hee, peey, tueue; gei 


; bTko, maeine; li$tk; 


sye o pliant 


in do lent 


sim i lar 


pet u lant 


turbu lent 


pop u lar 


ad a mant 


sue eu lent 


tab ti lar 


eov e nant 


fee u lent 


glob u lar 


eon so nant 


cs eu lent 


see u lar 


per.ti nent 


op u lent 


6e u lar 


tol er ant 


vir u lent 


joe u lai 


eor mo rant 


flat u lent 


9ir eu lar \ 


ig no rant 


lig a nienfc 


mus eu lar 


eon ver sant 


par lia ment 


reg u lar 


mil i tant 


fil a ment 


9el lu lar 


ad ju tant 


arm a ment 


an nu lar 


rel e yant 


sae ra ment 


seap u lar 


in no 9ent 


test a ment 


in su lar 


ae 9i dent 


man age ment 


eon su lar 


in 91 dent 


im pie ment 


eap su lar , 


dif fi dent 


€om pie ment 


tit u lar 


eon fi dent 


eom pli ment 


sub lu nai 


res. i dent 


bat tie ment 


9im e ter 


pres i dent 


set tie ment 


bag i lisk 


prov i dent 


ten e -ment 


eanni bal \ 


in di gent 


in ere ment 


eoch i neal 


neg li gent 


em bry 


mar tin gal 


am bi ent 


part ner ship 


hos pi tal 


prev a lent 


fel low ship 


ped es tal 


pes ti lent 


eal en dar 


tu bu lar 


ex 9el lent 


vin e gar 


ju gu lar 


red lent 


in su lar 
No. 105.-CV. 


fu ner al 


WORDS OF FIVE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED 


ON THE THIRD. 


am bi gu.' i 


ty im por tu ni ty 


eon ti gu. i 


ty op por tu ni ty 


eon tra, ri e 


ty per pe tu i ty 



SPELLING 


-BOOK. 95 


MOVH, 60N, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OR J BTTLK, PULL ] EXFST J € = K ; G = J ; § = Z ; ^H = 8H 


m per flu i ty 


punet 11 al i ty 


in ere du li ty 


mut u al i ty 


in se eu ri ty 


in ii del i ty 


im ma tu ri ty 


prob a bil i ty 


per spi eu i ty 


in a bil i ty 


as si du i ty 


du ra bil i ty 


eon ti nu i ty 


dis a bil i ty 


in ge nu i ty 


in sta bil i ty 


in eon gru i ty 


mu ta bil i ty 


fran gi bil i ty 


ered i bil i ty 


fal li bil i ty 


tan gi bil i ty 


fea §i bil i ty 


so cia bil i ty 


vi§ i bil i ty 


traet a bil i ty 


sen si bil i ty 


pla ea bil i ty 


pos si bil i ty 


in u til i ij 


plau §i bil i ty 


in ci vil i ty 


im be gil i ty 


u ni form i ty 


in do oil i ty 


non eon form i ty 


vol a til i ty 


eon san guin i ty 


ver sa til i ty 


sin gu lar i ty 


ea pa bil.i ty 


joe u lar i ty 


in si pid i ty 


reg u. lar i ty 


il le gal i ty 


pop u lar i ty 


prod i gal i ty 


me di 6e ri ty 


eor di al i ty 


in sin cer i ty 


per son al i ty 


sin u 6s i ty 


prin §i pal i ty 


eu ri 6s i ty 


lib er al i ty 


an i mos i ty 


gen er al i ty 


gen er 6s i ty 


im mo ral i ty 


flex i bil i ty 


hos pi tal i ty 


im mo bil i ty 


im mor tal i ty 


sol u bil i ty 


in e qual i ty 


vol u bil i ty 


sen sii al i ty 


mag na nim i ty 



96 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAB, LAST, €AEE, FALL, WHAT; HEE, TEET, TIl£i:F. ; GET; mRT>, MAIiTxs; LIVE ; 



u. na mm i ty 
in hu man i ty 
ar is toe ra gy 
in ad ver ten cy 



phra §e 61 o gy 
os te 61 o gy 
a er 61 o gy 
no to ri e ty 



No. 106.-CVI. 

WORDS OP THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND. 



ces sa/ tion 
ll ba tion 
pro ba tion 
va ea tion 
lo ea tion 
vo ea tion 
gra da tion 
foun da tion 
ere a tion 
ne ga tion 
pur ga tion 
mi gra tion 
ob la tion 
re la tion 
trans la tion 
for ma tion 
stag na tion 
dam na tion 
ear na tion 
vi bra tion 
nar ra tion 
pros tra tion 
du ra tion 
pul sa tion 
sen sa tion 
die ta tion 
91 ta tion 



plan ta tion 
no ta tion 
ro ta tion 
quo ta tion 
temp ta tion 
pri va tion 
sal va tion 
e qua tion 
vex a tion 
tax a tion 
sa na tion 
eom pie tion 
se ere tion a 
eon ere tion 
ex ere tion 
e mo tion 
pro mo tion 
de vo tion 
pro por tion 
ap por tion 
ab lil tion 
so lu tion 
pol lu. tion 
di lu tion 
at trae tion 
re frae tion 
sub trae tion 



de trae tion 
eon trae tion 
pro trae tion 
dis trae tion 
ex trae tion 
eon nee tion 
af fee tion 
eon fee tion 
per fee tion 
in fee tion 
sub jee tion 
de jee tion 
re jee tion 
in jee tion 
ob jee tion 
pro jee tion 
e lee tion 
se lee tion 
re flee tion 
eol lee tion 
in spee tion 
di ree tion 
eor ree tion 
dis see tion 
de tee tion 
af flie tion 
re strie tion 



J 



SPELLING-BOOK. 97 


irOTB, SOX, WOLF, FOOT, 


moon, or. ; ivtlk, vvht : r.xi.si 


; €=k ; g=j ; §=z ; <^u=su. 


€011 Vl€ tioil 


de pres sion 


re ten tion 


eom piil sion 


im pres sion 


eon ten tion 


ex pul sion 


op pres sion 


dis ten tion 


€on viil sion 


sup pres sion 


at ten tion 


ex pan sion 


ex pres sion 


in ven tion 


as 9 en sion 


pos ses sion 


eon ven tion 


de seen sion 


sub mis sion 


de cep tion 


di men sion 


ad mis sion 


re cep tion 


sus pen sion 


e mis sion 


eon cep tion 


dis sen sion 


re mis sion 


ex cep tion 


pre ten sion 


eom mis sion 


per cep tion 


sub mer sion 


o mis sion 


as erip tion 


e mer sion 


per mis sion 


de scrip tion 


im mer sion 


dis mis sion 


in scrip tion 


as per sion 


eon eiis sion 


pre scrip tion 


dis per sion 


dis eiis sion 


pro scrip tion 


a ver sion 


* re ae tion 


re deinp tion 


sub ver sion 


eon jime tion 


eon sump tion 


re ver sion 


in June tion 


a dop tion 


di ver sion 


eom piine tion 


ab sorp tion 


in ver sion 


de eoe tion 


e rug tion 


eon ver sion 


eon eoe tion 


eor rifp tion 


per ver sion 


in frae tion 


de §er tion 


■eom pas sion 


ab due tjon 


in ser tion 


ae ces sion 


de due tion 


as ser tion 


se ces sion 


re due tion 


ex er tion 


eon ces sion 


se due tion 


eon tor tion 


pro ces sion 


in due tion 


dis tor tion 


eon fes sion 


ob strue tion 


ex tine tion 


pro fes sion 


de strue tion 


ex ten sion 


ag gres sion 


in strue tion 


ex tor tion 


di gres sion 


eon strue tion 


ir rup tion 


pro gres sion 


de ten tion 


eom plex ion 


re gres sion 


in ten tion 


de flux ion 



98 



THE ELEMENTARY 



ba-h, last, *;a.kk, fatx, what; her, i»key, thkke; get; hTkd, mahYxk; lhjk; 



No. 107.-CVII. 

WORDS OF FOUR SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE THIRD. 



pub li ea/ tion 
rep li ea tion 
im pli -ea tion 
€om pli -ea tion 
ap pli ea tion 
sup pli ea tion 
ex pli ea tion 
rep ro ba tion 
ap pro ba tion 
per tur ba tion 
in -eu ba tion 
ab di -ea tien 
ded i ea tion 
nied i ta tion 
in di ea tion 
vin di -ea tion 
del e ga tion 
ob li ga tion 
al le ga tion 
ir ri ga tion 



lit i ga tion 
mit i ga tion 
in sti ga tion 
nav i ga tion 
pro mul ga tion* 
pro Ion ga tion 
ab ro ga tion 
sub ju ga tion 
fas gi na tion 
me di a tion 
pal li a tion 
ex pi a tion 
va ri a tion 
de vi a tion 
ex ha la tion 
■eon ge la tion 
rnu ti la tion 
in stal la tion 
ap pel la tion 
eon stel la tion 



dis til la tion 
per €0 la tion 
vi o la tion 
im mo la tion 
des o la tion 
eon so la tion 
■eon tern pla tion 
leg is la tion 
trib u la tion 
pee u la tion 
spee u la tion 
■eal eu la tion 
clr eu la tion 
mod ti la tion 
reg il la tion 
gran u. la tion 
stip u. la tion 
pop u* la tion 
grat u la tion 
re tar da tion 



Legislation is the enacting of laws, and a legislator is one who 
makes laws. 

God is the divine legislator. He proclaimed his ten command- 
ments from mount Sinai. 

In free governments the people choose their legislators. 

We have legislators for each State, who make laws for the 
State where they live. The town in which they meet to 
legislate, is called the seat of government. These legisla- 
tors, when they are assembled to make laws, are called the 
legislature. 

The people shoutd choose their best and wisest men for their 
legislators. 

It is the duty of every good man to inspect the moral conduct 



I SPELLING-BOOK. 99 


MOVF., BON, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OR J KFLF, PULL ; KXIST ; € = K ; G=J ; S = Z ; f,H = 8H. 


of the man who is offered as a legislator at our yearly elec- 


! tions. If the 


people wish for good 


laws, they may have 


them, by electing good men. 




The legislative councils of the United States should feel their ; 


dependence on 


l the will of a free and 


virtuous people. 


Our farmers, mechanics and merchants, 


compose the strength 


of our nation. 


Let them be wise and virtuous, and watch- ' 


ful of their liberties. Let them trust 


no man to legislate for 


them, if he liy( 


3S in the habitual violation of the laws of his j 


country. 








No. 108.-CVIII. 


WOBDS OF THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST. 


def i nite 


des ti tute 


mi ero secjpe 


ap po §ite 


in sti tute 


an te lope 


op po gite 


eon sti tute 


pro to type 


in fi nite 


pros ti tute 


hem is phere 


hyp erite 


pros e lyte 


at mos phere 


par a site 


bar be eiie 


€om mo dore 


6b so lete 


re§ i due 


sye a more 


ex pe elite 


ves ti biile 


vol a tile 


ree on dit'e 


rid i eule 


ver sa tile 


sat el lite 


miis -ea dine 


mer ean tile 


er e mite 


brig an tine 


in fan tile 


ap pe tite 


eal a mine 


dis ci pline 


an ee dote 


eel an dine 


mas eu line 


pros e eiite 


ser pen tine 


fern i nine 


per se elite 


tiir pen tine 


nee tar ine 


ex e eute 


]36r -eu pine 


gen ti ine 


ab so liite 


an dyne 


ber yl line 


dis so lute 


tel e seope 


fa vor ite 


sub sti tute 


hor seope 


pu er He 


An anecdote is a 


short story, or the relation of a particular in- 


cident. 






Ridicule is not often the test of truth. 





100 



THE ELEMENTARY 



bah, last, exr.T., f.uj,, what; iikk, mjky, there; get; bikt>, mak'i'xe; link; 

No. 109.-CIX. 

WOKDS OP TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON TIIE SECOND. 



€011 dense 
im mense 
de fense 
pre pense 
of fense 
dis pense 
pre tense 
col lapse 
im merse 
as perse 
dis perse 
a verse 
re verse 
in verse 
eon verse 
per verse 
trans verse 
in dorse 
re morse 
un horse 
dis burse 
de terge 
di verge 
mis give 
out live 
for give 
ab §6lve 



re. §6lve 
dig §olve 
e volve 
de volve 
re volve 
eon volve 
a bode 
un nerve 
ob §erve 
sub serve 
de §erve 
re §erve 
pre §erve 
€on serve 
her self 
my self 
at tach 
de tach 
en rich 
re trench 
in trench 
dis patch 
mis match 
a fresh 
re fresh 
de bark 
em bark 



re mark 
un mask 
ca bal 
re bel 
fare well 
un furl 
de form 
re form 
in form 
con form 
per form 
trans form 
con denm 
in ter 
a ver 
ab hor 
oc -eur 
in cur 
€on €ur 
re -eurj 
de mur 
a las 
a mend 
de fer 
re fer * 
pre fer 
in fer 



con fer 
trans fer 
se 9 era 
con 9 era 
de §ert 
sub orn 
a dora 
f©r lorn 
ad joura 
re turn 
fore run 
€ra vat 
eo quet 
a baft 
be set 
a ioft 
un apt 
con tempt 
at tempt 
a dopt 
ab rupt 
cor rupt 
a part 
de part 
im part 
a mong 
be long 



The fixed stars are at immense distances from us : they are so 
distant that we can not measure the number of miles. 

When fogs and vapors rise from the earth, and ascend one or 
two miles high, they come to a cold part of the air. The 



SPELLING-BOOK. 101 



MOVE, BOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOOS, OR ; F.VLE, IH'LL J EXIST J € = K J G = J ; S = Z ; CiI = SIi. 

cold there condenses these vapors into thick clouds, which 

fall in showers of rain. 
Noah and his family outlived all the people who lived before 

the flood. 
The brave sailors embark on board of ships, and sail over the 
• great and deep sea. 
The time will soon come when we must bid a last farewell to 

this world. 
The bright stars without number adorn the skies. 
When our friends die, they will never return to us ; but we 

must soon follow them. 
God will forgive those who repent of their sins, and live a 

holy life. 
Thy testimonies, O Lord, are very sure ; holiness becometh 

thine house for ever. 
Do not attempt to deceive God ; nor to mock him with solemn 

words, whilst your heart is set to do evil. 
A holy life will disarm death of its sting. 
God will impart grace to the humble penitent. 



No. 110.-CX. 

W r 01lDS OF THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND. 

de mean or re tire merit 

re main der ac quire ment 

en tlce ment im peach ment 

en force ment en croach ment 

di vorce ment con ceal ment 

in duee ment con geal ment 

a gree ment at tain ment 

en gage ment de po nent 

de file ment op po nent 

in cite, ment com po nent 

ex cite ment ad ia cent 

re fine ment in de cent 

con fine ment vice go rent 

e lope ment en roll ment 







|l02 THE ELEMENTARY 


— ~~ z 

bau, lAst, <!aiu:, fall, what; BIB, pjiky 


, tiikkk; get; hulk, maijTne; lint ; 


im pru dent 


de part meat 


in her ent 


ad just meiit 


ad her ent 


in vest ment 


€0 her ent 


a but ment 


at tend ant 


as sist ant 


as gend ant 


in ges sant 


de fend ant 


re liie tant 


in tes tines 


im por tant 


pro bos gis 


as sist ant 


el lip sis 


in con stant 


syn op sis 


in ciim bent 


-eom mand rnent 


pu tres gent 


a mend ment 


trans gend ent 


bom bard ment 


de pend ent 


en hange ment 


in did orent 

o 


ad vange ment 


re ful gent 


a merge ment 


ef ful gent 


in fringe ment 


e mul gent 


de tach ment 


as strm gent 


at tach ment 


re strm gent 


in trench ment 


e mer gent 


re trench ment 


de ter gent 


re fresh ment 


ab hor rent 


dis gern merit 


con citr rent 


pre fer ment 


con sist ent 


a mass ment 


re §6lv ent 


al lot ment 


de lin quent 


a part ment 


re cum bent 


Demeanor signifies behavior 


or deportment. 


Remainder is that which remains or is left. 


An enticement is that which allures. 


Divorcement signifies an entire separation. 


Elopement is a running away or private departure. 


Impeachment signifies accusation. 


Retirement is a withdrawing 


from company. 







SPELLING-BOOK. 



103 



MOVB, 66N,"WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OR ; RFLE, PCLL ; EXIST J € = K *, G — J ] § = Z ; *JH=6H. 



JA deponent is one who makes oath to any thing. 

A vicegerent is one who governs in place of another. 

A proboscis is a long member from the mouth or jaw. 

An ellipsis is an omission of a word. 

Amercement is a penalty imposed for a wrong done, not a 
fixed fine, but at the mercy of the court. 

iA synopsis is a collective view of things. 

^Refulgent is applied to things that shine. 

A contingent event is that which happens, or which is not ex- 
pected in the common course of things. 

Ho. 111.-CXI. 

.WORDS OP THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST, WITH 
A SLIGHT ACCENT ON THE THIRD, WHEN MARKED LONG. 



$es 7 o late, v. 
[ad vo eate, v. 
ven ti late 
felt il late 
sgin til lafce 
;per eo late 
;im mo late 
;spe-e u late 
ial -eu late 
clr eu late 
|mod u late 
Teg 11 late 
>un du late 
em ti late 
stim u late 
gran u late 
stip ti late 
;€op ti late 
•pop ti late 
[eon su late 
[stib li mate, v. 
an i mate, v. 



in ti mate, v. 
es ti mate, v. 
fas ci nate 
or di nate 
ful mi nate 
nom i nate 
ger mi nate 
per son ate 
pas *sion ate 
fort ti nate 
dis si pate 
sep a rate, v. 
eel e brate 
des e erate 
€on se €rate 
ex e erate 
ver ber ate 
til 9er ate 
mod er ate, v. 
ag gre gate 
ver te brate 
gen er ate 



ven er ate 
tern per ate 
op er ate 
as per ate 
des per ate 
it er ate 
em i grate 
trans mi grate 
as pi rate, v. 
de€ o rate 
per fo rate 
eor po rate 
pen e trate 
per pe trate 
ar bi trate 
ae eu rate 
lam i nate 
in du rate 
sat ti rate 
sus ci tate 
med i tate 
1m i tate 



104 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAK, LAST, €ABE, FALL, WHAT; HER, PEEY, TIIKKB J GET ; BIUI», MAlflNEJ LINK; 



ir ri tate 
he§ i tate 
grav i tate 
am pu tate 
ex ea vate 
ag gra vate 
jgrad u ate 



sal i vate 
ciil ti vate 
cap ti vate 
ren o vate 
in no vate 
ad e quate 
flti^t u ate 



sit il ate 
est 11 ate 
ex pi ate 
de vi ate 
vi o late 
ru mi nate 
lu en brate 



An advocate is one who defends the cause or opinions of an- 
other, or who maintains a party in oj)position to another. 

Ardent spirits stimulate the system for a time, but leave it 
more languid. 

Men often toil all their lives to get property, which their chil- 
dren dissipate and waste. 

We should emulate the virtuous actions of great and good" 
men. 

Moderate passions are most conducive to happiness, and mod* 
erate gains are most likely to be durable. 

Abusive words irritate the passions, but a " soft answer turn- 
eth away wrath." 

Discontent aggravates the evils of calamity. 

Violent anger makes one unhappy, but a temperate state of the 
mind is pleasant. 

No. 112.-CXII. 

WOBDS OF TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST. 



chil' blain 
vil lain 
mort main 
plant ain 
ver vain 
eiir tain m 
dol phin 
some tlme§ 
tress e§ 
trap ping§ 



an nal§ 
en trailg 
mit tens, 
siim mon§ 
for ceps 
pinch erg. 
glan der§ 
jaun dice 
sniif fer§ 
stag gerg 



man ner§ 
nip per§ 
sci§ §or§ 
■ear eass 
eilt lass 
com pass 
mat rass 
mat tress 
ab §cess 
lar gess 



end less 
zeal oils 
jeal oils 
pomp oils 
won droiis 
lep roiis 
mon stroiis 
nerv oils 
tor ment 
vest ment 



SPELLING-BOOK. 105 



MOVE, SOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OP. ; F.TJLE, VVLh ; EXIST J € = K ; G^J ; S = Z ; CH = SIT. 



ser pent 


solv ent 


fag ot 


red hot 


tor rent 


con vent 


mag got ' 


zeal ot 


cur rent 


fer ment 


big ot 


tap ro"bt 


ab sent 


sim burnt 


spig ot 


grass plot 


pre§ ent 


ab bot 


in got 


buck et 


ad vent 


tur bot 


blood shot 


bfi gloss 



Chilblains are sores caused by cold. 

A curtain is used to bide something from the view. 

The colors of the dolphin in the water are very -beautiful. 

The ladies^idorn their heads and necks with tresses. 

A matrass is a chemical vessel ; but a mattress is a quilted 

bed. 
Annals are history in the order of years. 
A cutlass is a broad curving sword. 
A largess is a donation or gift. 
A bigot is one who is too strongly attached to some religion, 

or opinion. 
An abscess is a collection of matter under the skin. 
Good manners are always becoming ; ill manners are evidence 

of low breeding. 
A solvent is that which dissolves something. Warm tea and 

coffee are solvents of sugar. 
Solvent, an adjective, signifies able to pay all debts. 
A summons is a notice or citation to appear. 

No. 113— CXI 1 1. 

WORDS OF THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED OX THE FIRST. 

caT o mel al co hoi gar ni ture 

clt a del vit ri ol fur ni ture 

in fi del par a sol sop ul ture 

sen ti nel si ne cure par a dlse 

mack er el ep i eure rner chan dlge 

cock er el Kg a ture en ter prige 

■eod i oil sig na ture hand ker chief 

doni i cile eur va ture sem i breve 

daf fo dil for feit tire per i wig 



106 



THE ELEMENTARY 



bar, last, ekr.v., r.'.i.i,, WI14.T: iter, prijy, there; get; bird, marine; Liyx; 



an ti pocle 
rec om pense 
hoi ly hock 
al ka ll 
hem i sticA 
au to graph 
par a graph 
ep i taph 
av e nue 
rev e nue 
ret i nue 
des pot ism 
par ox y§in 
mi -ero cosm 
mm i mum 
pend u. lum 
max i mum 
tym pa num. 
pel i can 
guiir di an 



styg i an* 
hort u Ian 
hug band man 
gen tie man 
mils sul man 
al der man 
jour ney man 
bish op ric 
cler gy man 
•eoim try man 
vet er an 
al co ran 
won der ful 
sor row ful 
an a gram 
ep i gram 
mon o gram 
di a gram 
u ni verse 
sea far ing 



way far ing 
fu gi tlve 
pu. ni tive 
nu. tri tive 
e go ti§m 
pro to col 
du pli cate 
ro §e ate 
fu mi gate 
me 4i '~ l te, v. 
me di urn 
o di um 
o pi um 
pre mi nm 
spo li ate 
6 pi ate 
6 vert ure 
ju. ry man 
pu ri tan 
phi lo mel 



Calomel is a preparation of mercury made by sublimation, that 
is, by being raised into vapor by heat and then condensed. 

A citadel is a fortress to defend a city or town. 

A codicil is a supplement or addition to a will. 

An infidel is one who disbelieves revelation. 

An epicure is one who indulges his appetite to excess, and is 
fond of delicacies. 

Alcohol is spirit highly refined by distillation. 

Despotism is tyranny or oppressive government. 

The despotism of government can often be overthrown ; but 
for the despotism of fashion there is no remedy. 

A domicile is the place of a man's residence. 

Mackerel signifies spotted. A mackerel is a spotted fish, 

The glanders is a disease of horses. 

The jaundice is a disease characterized by % yellow skin. 

A loquacious companion is sometimes a great torment 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



107 



l MOVE, SON, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OR ; RrLE, PULL ; EJIST ; € = K J G = J ; S = Z ; f!H=BH. 

No. 114.-CXIV. 

THE FOLLOWING HAVE THE BROAD SOUND OF a IN all OB IcTiat. 



!au' thor 
pan cy 
(gaud y 
taw ny 
taw dry 
fault y 
pau per 
squad rou 
sau cer 



squan der 
plaud it 
brawn y 
quar ry 
flaw y 
saw pit 
law suit 
wa ter 
dainyZ^ ter 



si&ngh ter 
al ter 
M ter 
quar ter 
law yer 
saw yer 
haw thorn 
seal lop 
wal lop 



wan der . 
draw ers 
wal nut 
can §ey 
pal try 
draw back 
al most 
want ing 
war ren 



The saucy stubborn clind displeases his parents. 

The peacock is a gaudy, vain and noisy fowl. 

[The skin of the Indians is of a tawny color. 

[Paupers are poor people who are supported by a public tax. 

Twenty-five cents are equal to one quarter of a dollar. 

fit is the business of a lawyer to give counsel on questions of 

law, and to manage lawsuits. 
["Walnuts are the seeds of walnut-trees. 
[The Tartars wander from place to place without any settled 

habitation. 

No. 115.-CXV. 

WORDS OF TWO SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST. 



mis' sive 
cap tive 
fes tive 
c5s tive 
mag pie 
some thing 
stock ing 
mid dling 
world ling 



sprmk ling 
twink ling 
shil ling 
sap ling 
strip ling 
dump ling 
dar ling 
star ling 
ster liner 



go§ ling 
nurs ling 
fat' ling 
bant ling 
scant ling 
nest ling 
her ring 
6b long ' 
head long 



108 


THE ELEMENTARY 


bXb, lAst, ca.ee, fau 


., war.yr: iiee, teet, there; 


get; bTbd, mae'/xe; up; 


fur long 


parch ment 


plain tive 


head aehe 


plea§ ant 


mo tive 


tooth aehe 


pea§ ant. 


sport Ive 


heart aehe 


dis tant 


hire ling 


6s trich 


in stant 


year ling 


gal lant 


eon stant 


day spring 


dor mant 


ex tant 


tri umph 


ten ant 


sex tant 


tri glyph 


preg nant 


lam bent 


tru ant 


rem nant 


ae cent 


ar dent 


pen nant 


ad vent 


mas sive 


flip pant 


eres cent 


pas sive 


quad rant 


ser aph 


stat tie 


ar rant 


sta tive 


stat ute 


war rant 


na tive 


virt tie 




Ho. 116.-CXVI 




WORDS OP TWO 


SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE FIRSTc 


mo / tion 


frae tion 


une tion 


no tion 


trae tion 


fune tion 
june tion 


16 tion 


men tion 


po tion 


pen sion 


sue tion 


por tion 


ces sion 


spon sion 


na tion 


ten sion 


tor tion 


ra tion 


mer sion 


.mis sion 


sta tion 


ver sion 


cap tion 


man sion 


ses sion 


op tion 


pas sion 


lee tion 


flee tion 


f ae tion 


die tion 


aue tion 


ae tion 


fie tion 


eau tion 


Lection is a reading, and lecture is a 


discourse. 


Lectures on chemistry are delivered 


in our colleges 


A lotion is a washing or a liquid preparation. j 


A ration is an 


allowance daily for a 


soldier. j , 



SPELLING-BOOK 



109 



MOVE, BON, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ; F.IJLE, PULL ; EJI6T ; € = K ; 4~J ] 8 — Z ; CH~ Mfc 

A mansion is a place of residence, or dwelling. 
A fraction is a part of a whole number. 
Fiction is a creature of the imagination. 
Caution is prudence in the avoidance of evil. 
Auction is a sale of goods by outcry to the highest bidder. 
Option is choice, It is at our option to make ourselves re- 
spectable or contemptible„ 

ITo. 117 -CX VII, 

WORDS OF FOUR SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND 

€om piil so ry pro lix i ty 

un cer tain ty 
im mod est y 



su prem a $y . 
the oe ra ey 
de moe ra cy 
€oii spir a ey 
ge 6g ra phy 
bi 6g ra phy 
eos niog ra ph y 
ste nog ra phy 
20 6g ra phy 
to pog ra phy 
ty pog ra phy 
hy dr 6g ra phy 
phi 16s o phy 
a ead e my 

e eon o mv 

•J 

a nat o my 
|o 6t o my 
e piph a ny 
ph! Ian thro py 
tnis an thro py 
pe rmh e ry 

A J. ** 

ar til le ry 
hy drop a thy 
de liv er y 
dis eoy er y 



ol fae to ry 
re frae to ry 
re fee to ry 
di ree to ry 
eon sis to ry 
I dol a try 
ge 6m e try 
im men si ty 
pro pen si ty 
ver bos i ty 
ad yer si ty 
di yer si ty 
ne ces si ty 
f den ti ty 
eon eay i ty 
de prav i ty 
(on gev i ty 
ae eliy i ty 
na try i ty 
ae tiy i ty 
eap tiv i ty 
fes tiv i ty 



dig Aon est y 
so 111 o quy 
hu man i ty 
a men i ty 
se ren i ty 
vi cm i ty 
af fin i ty 
di vin i ty 
in dem ni ty 
so lem ni ty 
fra ter ni ty 
e ter ni ty 
bar bar i ty 
yul gar i ty 
dis par i ty 
ce leb ri ty 
a lae ri ty 
sin cer i ty 
ge ler i ty 
te mer i ty 



per plex i ty in teg ri ty 
eoD vex i ty dis til ler y 



HO TUB ELEMENTARY 



islB, lAst, €aek, fall, W114.T: nSn, 1'kkv, tiikek ; get ; p.'fp.D, mar'ixk; lin-k; 

Theocracy is government by God himself. The government 
of the Jews was a theocracy. 

Democracy is a government by the people. 

Hydropathy, or water-cure, is a mode of treating diseases by 
f he copious use of pure water. 

Geography is a description of the earth. 

Biography is a history of a person's life. 

Cosmography is a description of the world. 

Stenography is the art of writing in short-hana. 

Zoography is a description of animals; but zoology meou? die 
same thing, and is generally used. 

Topography is the description of a particular place. 

Typography is the art of printing with types. 

Hydrography is the description of seas and other waters, or 
the art of forming charts. 

Philanthropy is the love of mankind ; but misanthropy signi- 
fies a hatred of mankind. 

The olfactory nerves are the organs of smell. 

Idolatry is the worship of idols. Pagans worship goas of 
wood and stone. These are their idols. But among Chris- 
tians many persons worship other sorts of idols. Some wor- 
ship a gay and splendid, dress, consisting of silks and mus- 
lins, gauze and ribbons ; some worship pearls and diamonds : 
but all excessive fondness for temporal things is idolatry 

No. 118.-CXVIIL 

WOKDS OF FOTJH SYLLABLES, ACCENTED OS THE SECOJST 

ju rid/ i eal fa nat i cism ob liv i oh 

eon viv i al ex or di urn in eog ni to 

di ag o nal mil len ni um eo part ner ship 

pen tag o nal re pub He an dis sim i lar 

tra di tion al me rid i an ver nae u lar 

in ten tion al un nat u ral o rae u lar 

per pet u al eon jeet ur al or bie u lar 

ha bit ti al 9en trip e tal par tie u lai 

e vent u al eon tin u al ir reg ti lar 

in mer ci fill ef feet il al vi valv ti lar 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



Ill 



MOVE, 60X, YTQLF, FOOT, MOON, OS J ErLE, rtTLL J EJIST j 



=j; s=z; cn=i 



un pop u lar 
trl an gu lar 
pa rish ton er 
di am e ter 
ad mm is ter 
em bas sa dor 
pro gen i tor 
eom pos. i tor 
me trop o lis 
e phem e ris 



a nal y sis 
de lir i ous 
in dus tri ou& 
il his tri ous 
las civ i ous 
ob liv i oils 
a nom a loua 
e pit o mize 
a pos ta tize 
im mor tal Ize 

No, 119.-CXIX, 



ex tern po re 
en tab la ture 
dis eom fit ure 
pro eon sul ship 
dis eon so late 
a pos to late 
ob se qui ous 
oe ea §ion al 
pro por tion al 
neb dom a dal 



WORDS OF FOUR SYLLABLES, HAYING THE ACCENT ON THE 
SECOND, WITH A SLIGHT ACCENT ON THE FOURTH WHEN 
MARKED LONG. 



as sim / i late 
prog n5s tie ate 
per am bu late 
e jae u late 
im niae u late 
ma trie u late 
ges tie u late 
in 6e u late 
eo ag u late 
de pop u late 
eon grat u late 
ea pit u late 
ex p5st u late 
a mal ga mate 
ex hil a rate 
le git i- mate, % 
ap prox i mate 
eon eat e nate 
sub or di nate, tr. 
o rig i nate 



eon tarn i nate 
dis sem i nate 
re erim i nate 
a bom i nate 
pre dom i nate 
in tern per ate 
re gen er ate, v 
eo op er ate 
ex as per ate 
com mi§ er ate 
in vet er ate 
re it er ate 
ob lit er ate 
e vae u ate 
at ten u ate, i 
ex ten u. ate 
in ad e quale 
ef feet u ate 
per pet u ate 
as sas sin ate 



112 



THE ELEMENTARY 



bae, last, care, fall, wuat; iieb, pe§t. tiieee; get; bied, marine; liitk; 



pro eras ti nate 
pre des ti nate, v. 
eom pas sion ate, v, 
dis pas sion ate 
af fee tion ate 
an fort u nate 
e man ci pate 
de lib er ate, v. 
in ear cer ate 
eon fed er ate, v< 
eon sid er ate 
pre pon der ate 
im mod er ate 
ae eel er ate 



in die a tive 
pre rog a tive 
ir rel a tive 
ap pel la tive 
eon tern pla tive 
su per la tive 
al ter na tive 
de elar a tive 
eom par a tive 
im per a tive 
in dem ni fy 
per son i fy 
re stor a tive 
dis qua! i fy 



No. 120,— C XX. 

WORDS OF FOUR SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE 8ECOSL-: 



al lu' vi on 
pe tro le um 
ce ru le an 
le vi a than 
li bra ri an 
a gra ri an 
pre ea ri oils 
vi ea- ri ous 
ne fa ri oils 
gre ga ri oils 
o vd ri oils 
op pro bri ous 



sa \u bri oils 
im pe ri oils 
mys te ri otis 
la bo ri ous 
in glo ri ous 
9en so ri ous 
vie to ri oils 
no to ri oils 
ux 6 ri oils 
in ju. ri ©iis 
pe nu. ri ous 
u su ri oils 



lux u ri oils 
vo lu. mi nous. 
o be di ent 
ex pe di ent 
in gre di ent 
im mu ni ty 
eom mu ni ty 
im pii ni ty 
eom pla een cy 
in de cen cjr 
di plo ma cy 
trans par en cj 



A library is a collection of books. 
A librarian is a person who has charge of a library. 
The laborious bee is a pattern of industry. 
That is precarious which is uncertain : life and health are pre- 
carious. 



SPELLING-BOOK. 113 



MOVE, BON, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OR *, BTTLE, PULL ; EXIST J €=K ; 6= J ; S = Z J OI = SH. 



Vicarious punishment is that which one person suffers in the 

place of another. 
Gregarious animals are such as herd together, as sheep and 

goats. 
Salubrious air is favorable to health. 
A covetous man is called penurious. 
To escape from punishment is impunity. 
Do nothing that is injurious to religion, to morals, or to the 

interest of others. 

No. 121.-CXXI. 

WORDS OF SEVEN SYLLABLES, HAVESO THE ACCENT ON THE 
FIFTH. 

im ma te ri al ; i ty im pen e tra bil i ty 

in di vi§ i bil i ty in el i gi bil i ty 

in di vid u al i ty im mal le a bil i ty 

in €om pat i bil i ty per pen die u lar i ty 

in de struet i bil i ty in eom press i bil i ty 

im per cep ti bil i ty in de fen si bil i ty 

ir re gist i bil i ty val e tu di na ri an 

in eom bus ti bil i ty an ti trin i ta ri an 

WORDS OP EIGHT SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SIXTH. 

un in tel li gi bil' i ty in €om pre hen si biF i ty 

The immateriality of the soul has rarely been disputed. 

The indivisibility of matter is supposed to be demonstrably 
false. 

It was once a practice in France to divorce husband and wife 
for incompatibility of tempers ; a practice soon found to be 
incompatible with social order. 

The incompressibility of water has been disproved. 

We can not doubt the incomprehensibility of the divine attri- 
butes. 

Stones are remarkable for their immalleability. 

The indestructibility of matter is generally admitted, 

Asbestus is noted for its incombustibility. 

The irresistibility of divine grace is disputed, 

A valetudinarian is a sickly person. 



114 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAB, LAST, €\ 



an, fall, what; hef, pbev, there; get; eiri>, maiune; link; 



No. 122 -C XXII. 

WORDS IN WHICH til HAVE THEIR ASPIRATED SOUND. 



e' ther 
ja' cinth 
the' sis 
ze' nitli 
thick', et 
thun' der 
this' tie 
thros' tie 
throt' tie 
thirst' y 
thrift' y 
length' wise 
length' y 
threat' en ing 
au' thor 
au' thor Tze 
au thor' i ty 
author'i tative 
meth' od 
an' them 
diph' thong 
eth' ies 
pan' ther 
sab' bath 
thlni' He 
Thurs/ day 
iriph' thong 
in thrall' 
a thwart 
be trdth' 
thir' ty 



thor' ough 
thir' teen 
thou' §and 
a' the i§m 
the' o ry 
the' o rem 
hy' a §inth 
eath' o lie 
ap' o thegm 
thim' der bolt 
ep' i thet 
lab' y rinth 
leth' ar gy 
pleth' o ry 
pleth' o rie . 
sym' pa thy 
am' a ranth 
am' e thyst 
ap' a thy 
ean' the rus 
thir' ti eth 
syn' the sis 
pan the' on 
e the' re al 
■ean' tha ris 
ea the' dral 
ti re' thra 
au then' tie 
pa thet' ie 



syn 
a ean' 



thet' ie 
thus 



ath let' ie 
me theg' lin 
ea thar' tie 
a the 1st' ie 
the o ret' ie al 
niQ thod' ie al 
math e mat' ies 
le vl' a than 
en thu' §i a§ni 
an tip' a thy 
a nth' me tie 
an tith' e sis 
mis an' thro py 
phi Ian' thro py 
ean thar' i deg 
the 6e' ra gy 
the 61' o gy 
the 6d' o lite 
ther mom' e ter 
ea thol' i eon 
my thol' o gy 
or thog' ra phy 
hy poth' e sis 
li thog' ra phy 
li thot' o my 
a poth' e ea ry 
ap o the' o sis 
poi' y the igm 
bib li o the' eal 
ieh thy 61' o gy 
or ni thol' o gy 



SPELLIXG-BOOK. 



MOTE. fic'.X, WOLF, FOOT, MOOK, OR : r.I'I.:' Per I ■ FYrsT' r~ i- ■ *• ' ~~" 

. i .. , » ■-■,, f.At&i , < -._ t. ; t# — j . g =z . rir=si 

No. 123-CXXIII. 

WORDS IN WHICH th HAVE THEIR VOCAL SOUND. 

either nether brother 

nei ther wet h er wor thy ( w 6r ay) 

hea then prith ee moth er 

©loth ier bur then smof h er 

rath er south ern 6£h er 

fath om tefh er with erg 

gafh er thifh er be neath' 

hith er with er be queath 

fur ther lath er with draw 7 

breth ren fa ther an 6th' er 

whith er rar thing to gefh' er 

whet h er fur thest there with aK 

leafh er poth er nev er the less 7 

feath er broth el 

The heathen are those people who worship idols, or who 
know not the true God. 

Those who enjoy the light of the gospel, and neglect to ob- 
serve its precepts, are more criminal than the heathen. 

All mankind are brethren, descendants of common parents 
How unnatural and wicked it is to make war on our breth- 
ren, to conquer them, or to plunder and destroy them. 

It is every man's duty to bequeath to his children a rich inher- 

; itance of pious precepts. 

No. 124— C XX IV. 

; WORDS OF THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND. 

ae e6W plish di mm ish ex tin guish 

es tab lish ad mon ish re lnfquish 

em bel lish pre mon ish ex efil pate 

a bol ish as ton ish eon Mb ute' 

:e plen ish dis tin guish re mon strange 



116 



THE ELEMENTARY 



LAST, SARK, FALL, WHAT? HEK, PRS?, TI1KKB ; OUT', bTbD, MAuTyg; LIgK; 



mo ment ous tri umph ant 

por tent oils as sail ant 

a bun dant so no rolls 

re dun dant a ce tous 

dis eor dant eon ea vous 



em broid er 
re join der 

ADJKCTIVKS. 

e nor moils 
di§ as. trous 

A' man who saves the fragments of time, will accomplish a 

great deal in the course of his life. 
The most refined education does not embellish the human 

character like piety. 
Laws are abolished by the same power that made them. 
Wars generally prove disastrous to all parties. 
We are usually favored with abundant harvests. 
Most persons are ready to exculpate themselves from blame. 
Discordant sounds are harsh, and offend the ear. 



No. 125- 

WOEDS OF FIVE SYLLABLES, 

in ter me' di ate 
dis pro por tion ate 
cer e mo ni al 
mat ri mo ni al 
pat ri mo ni al 
an ti mo ni al 
tes ti mo ni al 
im ma te ri al 
mag is te ri al 
min is te ri. al 
im me mo ri al 
sen a to ri al 
die ta to ri al 
e qua to ri al 
in ar tie u late 
il le git i mate 
in de term in ate 



cxxv. 

ACCENTED ON THE THIRD. 

e qui pon der ate 
par ti cip i al 
in di-vid u al 
in ef feet u al 
in tel leet u al 
pu sil Ian i mous 
dis in gen u ous 
in sig nif i eant 
e qui pon der ant 
cir eum am bi ent 
an ni yer sa ry 
par lia ment a ry 
tes ta ment a ry 
al i ment a ry 
sup pie ment a ry 
el e ment a ry 
sat is f a<3 to ry 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



117 



MOVE, BON, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ; RTTLE, PULL ; EXI8T ; € = K ; 6=J ; 8 = Z ; CU=l 



eon tra die to ry 
val e die to ry 
in tro due to ry 
trig onome try 
a re 6m e try 
mis eel la ne ous 
sub ter ra ne ous 
sue ce da ne ous 
si mul ta ne ous 
in stan ta ne ous 



horn o ge ne ous 
eon tu me li ous 
ae ri mo ni ous 
par si mo ni ous 
del e te ri ous 
mer i to ri ous 
dis o be di ent 
in ex pe di ent 
eon ti nu i ty 
im pro pri e ty 



Senate originally signified a council of elders ; for men, before 
their minds were perverted and corrupted, committed the 
public concerns to men of age and experience. The maxim 
cf wise men was — old men for counsel, young men for war. 
But in modern times the senatorial dignity is not always 
connected with age. 

The bat is the intermediate link between quadrupeds and 
fowls, The orang-outang is intermediate between man 
and quadrupeds. 

Bodies of the same kind or nature are called homogeneous. 

Reproachful language is contumelious. 

Bitter and sarcastic language is acrimonious. 

Simultaneous acts are those which happen at the same time* 

Many things are lawful which are not expedient. 



No, 126 -C XX VI. 

delve eash smash pish 

twelve dash rash wish 

nerve gash erash gush 

eurve hash trash hush 

elf lash flesh blush 

shelf flash mesh erush 

self plash fresh frush 

pelf slash dish tush 

ash mash fish next 



text 
twixt 

mini 

sphinx 

change 

o 

mange 
range 
grange 
forge 



118 



THE ELEMENTARY 



,st. <-..r.r., kali., ■WU4.I 



tiikke; get; bibd, marine; ixijk; 



baste 

chaste 

baste 

waste 

kite 

the 

thoge 

this 

that 

thine 



flute 

mute 

brute 

fight 

hlght 



light 

blight 

plight 

sight 

slight 



night 

wight 

right 

tight 

blowze 



MONOSYLLABLES WITH til VOCAL. 

thy fhem tithe 

then thence lithe 

thus than writhe 

thou blithe scythe 

thee hithe though 



frounce 

rounce 

trounce 

c/ifigm. 

prism 

smooth 
soothe 

there 
their 



THE FOLLOWING, WHEN NOUNS, HAVE THE ASriBATED SOUND 
OF-th IN THE SINGULAR NUMBER, AND THE VOCAL IN THE 
PLURAL. 

bath bath$ swath swaths, mouth mouthg 
lath lath$ cloth cloths, wreath wreathg 
path paths, moth moths, sheath sheathg 

The number twelve forms a dozen. 

To delve is to dig in the ground. 

When the nerves are affected the hands shake. 

Turf is a clod of earth held together by the roots of grass. 

Surf is the swell of the sea breaking on the shore. 

Cash is properly a chest, but it now signifies money. 

An elf is a being of the fancy. 

A flash of lightning sometimes hurts the eyes. 

Flesh is the soft part of animal bodies. 

Blushes often manifest modesty, sometimes shame. 

Great and sudden changes sometimes do hurt. 

A grange is a farm and farm-house. 

A forge is a place where iron is hammered. 

A rounce is the handle of a printing-press. 

To frounce is to curl or frizzle, as the hair. 

Great haste often makes waste. 

It is no more right to steal apples or water-melons from an 
other's garden or orchard, than it is to steal money from 
his desk. Besides, it is the meanest of all low tricks to 
creep into a man's inclosure to take his property. How 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



119 



MOVE, BON, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ; BrLE, PCXL ; EXIST ; €=K ; G= J J 6 = Z ; CU=8H. 

' much more manly is it to ask a friend for cherries, peaches, 
pears or melons, than it is to sneak privately into his or- 
chard and steal them. How must a boy, and much more a 
man, blush to be detected in so mean a trick ! 



No, 127.-CXXVII. 

fil THE FOLLOWING WORDS, h is PRONOUNCED BEFORE W / 

thus whale is pronounced liwale ; when, Jiwen, 



whale 

wheat 

wharf 

what 

wheel 

wheeze 

whee' die 

whine 

while 

white 

[whi' ten 

; white wash 

;whi tish 

[whi ting 

;why 



whet 

which 

whilk 

whiff 

whig 

whim 

whin 

whip 

whelm 

whelp 

when 

whence 

whisk 

whist 

whit 



whiz 
where 
whey 
whe^ ry 
wheth er 
whet stone 
whif fle 
whig gish 
whig gi§m 
whim per 
whin ny 
whin yard 
whip cord 
whip graft 
whip saw 



whip stock 
whis per 
whis ky 
whis ker 
whis tie 
whif h er 
whit low 
whit tie 
whirl 
whirl pool 
whirl wind 
whirl bat 
whirl i gig 
wharf age 
* wharfinger 



IN THE FOLLOWING WORDS, 



IS SILENT, 



who 

whom 

whose 

whole 

who~bp 



who ev er 
who so ev er 
whom so ev er 
whole sale 
whole some 



Whales are the largest of marine animals. They afford us oil 

for lamps and other purposes. 
'Wheat is a species of grain that grows in most climates, and 

its flour makes our finest bread. 



120 THE ELEMENTARY 

bar, last, €ir.!% fall, what; n£n, rr.^Y, th£ek ; gkt ; i:Tr.i>, m.yimve ; li$k; I 

The two longest wharves in this country are in New Haven! 

and Boston. 
Wheels are most admirable instruments of conveyance , carts,: 

wagons, gigs, and coaches run on wheels. 
Whey is the thin watery part of milk. 
Bad boys sometimes know what a whip is by their feelings. 

This is a kind of knowledge which good boys dispense with. 
White is not so- properly a color as a want of all color. 
One of the first things a little boy tries to get is a penknife, 

that he may whittle with it. If he asks for a knife and it is 

refused, he is pretty apt to whimper. 
The love of whisky has brought many a stout fellow to the 

whipping-post. 
Large bushy whiskers require a good deal of nursing and trim- 
ming. 



No, 128,-CXXVIII. 

EN THE FOLLOWING WORDS. Z PASSES INTO THE SOUND OF gz a 

e? aet' e£ ag ger ate . e? or' di um 

e£ alt' e? am' me e? 6t' ie 

e^ empt' e^ am' pie e? em' plar 

e^ ert' e% an' i mate e?' em pla ry 

ei haust' e% as' per ate e? em' pli fy 

e£ hort' e? eV u tive e% emp' tion 

e? ile' * e^ e-e' u tor e? on' er ate 

e% 1st' e^ ee' u trix e? or' bi tance 

eg ult" e£ hiV it e^ or' bi tant 

e£ hale" e^ 1st' ence e% u' ber ant 

The word exact is an adjective signifying nice, accurate, or 
precise ; it is also a verb signifying to demand, require, ori 
compel to yield. 

Astronomers can, by calculating, foretell the exact time of an 
eclipse, or of the rising and setting of the sun. 

It is useful to keep very exact accounts. 

A king or a legislature must have power to exact taxes or du- 
ties to support the government. 

An exordium is a preface or preamble. 



SPELLING-BOOK. 121 



MOVE, SON, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OE J ErLE, PULL ; EXIST ; € = K J G=J ; 6 = 2; CF=9E> 



" Take away your exactions from my people." Ez. 14. 

To exist signifies to be or to have life. Immortal souls will 

never cease to exist. 
We must not exalt ourselves, nor exult over a fallen rival. 
It is our duty to exert our talents in doing good. 
We are not to expect to be exempt from evils. 
Exhort one another to the practice of virtue* 
Water is exhaled from the earth in vapor, and in time the 

ground is exhausted of water. 
An exile is one who is banished from his country. 
In telling a story be careful not to exaggerate. 
Examine the Scriptures daily and carefully, and set an example 

of good works. 
An executor is one appointed by a will to settle an estate after 

the death of the testator who makes the will. 
The President of the United States is the chief executive officer 

of the government, 
Officers should not exact exorbitant fees for their services. 
Charitable societies exhibit proofs of much benevolence. 
The earth often produces exuberant crops. 
Everv man wishes to be exonerated from burdensome services. 

No. 129 -CX XI A. 

IN THE FOLLOWING WORDS, tian AND tion ARE PRONOUNCED 
NEARLY Chun. 

bas / tion ad us 7 tion in di ges' tion 

=€hris tian eon ges tion ex haus tion 

mix tion di ges tion ex us tion 

ques tion ad mix tion sug ges tion 

fus tian eom bus tion in ges tion 

IN THE FOLLOWING WORDS, i IN AN UNACCENTED SYLLABLE 
AND FOLLOWED BY A VOWEL, HAS A LIQUID SOUND, * LIKE 

y consonant; thus al ten, is pronounced al yen, and 
elofh ier ; -elofb. yer. 

al ien sav ior sen ior 

€ourt ier pav ior bil ious 

€io Ch ier jun ior bill ion 



122 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAB, LAST, SAKE, FALL, WHAT; HER, I'I'.KY, THERE ; SET ; BIRI>, MArYnEJ LINK; 



bill iard§ 
£ull ion 
mill ion 
mm ion 
mm ious 
pill ion 
pin ion 
runn ion 
seull ion 
trill ion 
triinn ion 
brill iant 
fil ial 
eon ier 
pann ier 
pon iard 



val iant 
on ion 
bull ion 
al 7 ien ate 
bil 7 ia ry 
brill 7 ian cy 
brill 7 iant ly 
mil 7 ia ry 
val 7 iant ly 
val 7 iant ness 
•eom mun 7 ion 
ver mil 7 ion 
pa viF ion 
pos tilF ion 
fa mil 7 iar 
bat tal 7 ion 

No. 130.-CXXX. 



€om pan ion 
ras eal 7 ion 
do mm' ion 
mo dill 7 ion 
o pin* ion 
re bell 7 ion 
re bell 7 ious 
91 vil 7 ian 
dis tin 7 ion 
be hav 7 ior 
pe euY iar 
in ta#l 7 io 
se ra</l 7 io 
fa mil 7 iar Ize 
o pin 7 ion ist 
o pin 7 ion a ted 



IN THE FOLLOWING WORDS, THE SYLLABLES Sl&r AND Zier ARE 

pronounced zher or zhur, sion are pronounced zliun, and 

Sia ARE PRONOUNCED zha. 



bra 7 gier 


pro fu 7 §ion 


il lu 7 §ion 


gla zier 


a bra 7 §ion 


in fu 7 §ion 


gra zier 


■eol lu 7 §ion 


in va 7 §ion 


ho gier 


€011 -elii 7 §ion 


suf fii 7 gion 


6 gier 


•eon fii 7 §ion 


dis sua 7 gion 


■ero gier 


•eor ro 7 §ion. 


per sua 7 gion 


fu §ion 


0€ £a 7 §ion 


am bro 7 gia 


af fu 7 §ion 


per va 7 §ion 


am bro 7 sial 


€0 he 7 §ion 


e lti 7 §ion 


ob tru 7 sion 


ad he 7 §ion 


dif fu 7 §ion 


de tru 7 gion 


de lu 7 §ion 


dis plo 7 §ion 


in tru 7 gion 


e ro 7 §ion 


ex plo 7 §ion 


pro tru 7 gion 


e va 7 gion 


ef f u 7 §ion 


ex tru 7 gion 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



MOVE, 80X, WOLF, FOOT, MOOK, OB J ErXK, rPLL ; EXIST \ ■G = K ; 6 = J ; § = Z ; ^U = 5il 

IN SOME OF THE FOLLOWING WORDS THE TERMINATING SYL- 
LABLE IS PRONOUNCED zllWt, AND IN OTHERS THE YOWEL 
i MAY BE© CONSIDERED TO HAYE THE SOUND OF y. 



ab scis/ §ion pro vig ion 
eol lig ion re vis. ion 



de 91s. ion 
de ri§ ion 
e li§ ion 
pre ci§ ion 



re sci§ ion 
€on 913 ion 
ex §ig ion 
di vi§ ion 

No. 131 -C XXXI. 



in ci§ ion 
mis pris ian 
pre vi§ ion 
e ly§ ian 
cir euni cis/ ion 
sub di vi§' ion 



WORDS IN WHICH o' BEFORE h HAS ' THE SOUND OF k 



Christ 
ehyle 
seheme 
aehe 
eha§m 
ehris.ni 
ehord 
ehyme 
loeh 
sehdbl 
ehoir 
dio' rus 
eho ral 
ar ehives. 
eha os 
a ehor 
ep oeh 
1 ehor 
o eher 
tro ehee 
an ehor 



eheni ist 
-Ghrist rnas 
-Chris tian 
mas tieh 
eeh o 
ehron ie 
sehed tile 
pas ehal 
ehlo rite 
eh.61 er 
eho rist 
sehol ar 
mon areh 
stom aeh ■ 
an 7 ar ehy 
ehrys' o lite 
ehar' ae ter 
eat' e ehis.ni 
pen 7 ta tetteh 
sep' ul eher 
teeh' nie al 



an 7 eho ret 
areh' i teet 
areh' i trave 
areh' e type 
hep' tar ehy 
maeh' i nate 
€Jhris' ten dom 
braeh' i al 
laeh' ry mal 
sae' eha rme 
syn' ehro nism 
niieh' ael mas 
ehor' is ter 
ehron' i ele 
or' ehes tra 
6eV i my 
pa' tri areh 
eti' eha rist 
ehi me' ra 
pa ro' ehi ai 
eha me' le on 



124 THE ELEMENTARY 

BAE, LAST, CAKE, FA IX, WHAT; HER, TRET, THERE- J GET; bTrP, MAbTiTB; LT^K J 

ehro mat 7 ie syn eV do ehe the 6m 7 a ehy 

me ehan' ie mo nareh/ ie al meT^n ehol y 

eha 6t' ie bron ehot' o my pa 7 tri areh y 

seho las 7 tie ehro nol' o gy hi 7 er areh y 

ea ehex 7 y e hi rog' ra phy 6l 7 i gar ehy 

eha lyb 7 e ate eho rog 7 ra phy eat e ehet' ie al 

a naeh/ro ni§rn ehro nom 7 e ter ieh thy ol 7 o gy , 

Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in. no, 
other. 

Chyle is the milky fluid separated from food by digestion, and ■ 
from this are formed blood and nutriment for the support of 
animal life. 

An epoch is a fixed point of time from which years are reck- 
oned. The departure of the Israelites from Egypt is a re- 
markable epoch in their history. 

A patriarch is the father of a family. Abraham was the great 
patriarch of the Israelites. 

Sound striking against an object and returned, is an echo, 

The stomach is the great laboratory of animal bodies, in which 
food is digested and prepared for entering the proper ves- 
sels, and nourishing the body. If the stomach js impaired 
and does not perform its proper functions, the whole body 
suffers. 

ffo. 132 .— C XXXII, 

WOltDS m which g HAS its hard or close sound before 



gear 

geese 

geld 

gift 

give 

fig 

gild 
gimp 
gird 
girth 



e, % 


and y. 




eager 


er&g ged 


gib hems 


mea ger 


dig ger 


gld dy 


gew gaw 


dig ging 


gig gle 


ti ger 


rig gmg 


gig gling 


to ged 


rig ged 


gig let 


big gin 


rig ger 


giz zarci 


brag ger 


flag ging 


gim let 


dag ger 


flaggy 


girl ish 


erag gy 


S 6g gy 


jag ged 


buggy 


gib ber 


jag gy 



SPELLING-BOOK 



MOVE, 60X, WOLF, TOOT, moon, or. ; r.rr.i:, TVLL ; exist ; -e = K ; g = j ; s=Z ; CH=SK. 

leg ged twig ged nog gin gag ging 

leg gin twig gen tar get brag ged 

pig gin twiggy flogged bragging 

quag gy wag ging flog ging bag ging 

rag ged wag gish gift ed geld ing 

trig ger au ger hug ged gild ing 

serag ged bog gy Lug ging gild ed 

serag gy fog gy shrug ged gild er 

shag gy -elog ged shrug ging swag ger 

shagged elog ging rugged swag gy 

slug gish elog gy tug ged gird le 

lug ger -eog ged tug ging gird er 

snag ged eog ger lug ged be gin' 

snaggy dogged lugging wag' ged 

sprig gy doggish mug_gy wag^gery 

sprig ged jog ged fagged loggerhead 

stag ger jog ging fag ging or gil' loiis 

stag gerg jog ger gag ged to geth' er 

No. 133-CXXXIIi. 

LN THE FOLLOWING, C ACCENTED, OR ENDING A SYLLABLE, HAS 

THE SOUND OF 8, AND ff THAT OF j. 

mag' ie 
trag' is 
ag' lie 
ac/ id 
dig' it 
f ac/ lie 
frag' lie 
frig' id 
rig' id 
plac/ id 

S12:' il 



tac/ it 
ag' i tate 
leg' i ble 


pac/ i fy 
pag' i nal 
reg' i cide 


vig' i lant 


reg' i men 


reg' i ment 


reg' is ter 


prec/ e dent 


spec' i fy 


prec' i pice 
rec' i pe 
dec'i mal 
dec' i mate 
lac' er ate 


may' er ate 
mag' is trate 
mag' is tra cy 
trag' e dy 
vie' i page 



126 


THE ELEMENTARY 


bXk, lAst, ei.BE, f.u.l, wh^t: her, peky, tiikue; 


G kt ; ii!:: i : , m .-. : ;'.' : ; r. ; link ; 


yeg' e tate 


par tig' i pate 


au then tig' i ty 


veg' e ta ble 


sim plig^ i ty 


e las tig' i ty 


log' ie 


me dig' i nal 


du o deg' i mo 


proc' ess 


so lie/ i tude 


in ca pag' i tate 


eog' i tate 


tri pile/ i ty 


ab o rig 7 i nal 


prog' e ny 


ver tlg'i ty 


ec gen trig' i ty 


ii lig' it ^ 


rus tig'i ty 


mu gilag'inoii.- 


im pile/ it 


ex ag' ger ate 


mul ti plig' i ty 


e lie' it 


mor dag' i ty 


per spi cag'i ty 


ex pile' it 


nu gag[ i ty 


per ti nag 7 i ty 


so lie' it * 


o pag' i ty 


tag i tur' ni ty 


im ag' me 


ra pag' i ty 


mag is te'ri al 


au dag' i ty 


sa gag' i ty 


a trog' i ty 


ca pag' i ty 


bel lig'er ent 


fe r5g'i ty 


jfu gag'i ty 


o rig' i nal 


ve log' i ty 


I to quae/ i ty 


ar img' er ous 


rhi nog' e ros 


| men dac' i ty 


ver tig' i nous 


reg i prog' i ty 


il leg 7 i ble 


re frig' er ate 


im ag in a' tion. 


o rig' i nate 


reg i ta' tion 


ex ag ger a' tioD 


so lie/ i tor 


veg e ta' tion 


re frig er a' tion 


ie lie/ i ty 


ag i ta/ tion 


so lig i ta' tion 


inn me/ i pal 


cog i ta' tion 


fe lig i ta' tion 


jan tig' ipate 


o le' ag' i nous 


leg er de rnain' 


j 


No, 131-CXXXIY. 


words m which ce, ci, ti and si, are 


PRONOUNCED AS $h< 


Gre' cian 


con' science 


niip' tial 


gra cious 


cap tious 


par tial 


spa cious 


f ac tious 


es sen' tial 


spe cious 


fie tious 


po ten tial 


spe cie§ 


lus cious 


pro vm cial 


so cial 


frac tious 


pru den tial 


gen tiau 


•eau tious 


com mer cial 


ter tian 


c<5n scious 


im par tial 





SPELLING-BOOK. 127 


MOVE, BOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OR; P.rLE, PULL ; T.XJST ; € = K \ G = J ; s = z ; CII=SH. 


sub stan 7 tial 


fe ro 7 cioiis 


li cen 7 tlous 


€011 fi den 7 tial 


lo qua cioiis 


in eau tioiis 


pen i ten tial 


ra pa cioiis 


ef fi ea 7 cioiis 


prov i den tia 


sa ga cioiis 


os ten ta tioiis 


rev e ren tial 


te na cioiis 


per spi ea cioiis 


e qui noe tial 


vex a tioiis 


per ti n a cioiis 


in flu en tial 


vi va cioiis 


eon sci en tioiis 


pes ti len tial 


vo ra cioiis 


pa' tient 


au da/ cioiis 


ve ra cioiis 


quo tient 


ea pa cioiis 


crus ta ceoiis 


an cient 


fa ce tioiis 


eon ten tioiis 


tran sient 


fal la cioiis 


in fee tioiis 


par tial 7 i ty 


a tro cioiis 


sen ten tioiis 


im par tial 7 i ty 


No. 135.-CXXXV. . 


words in which ci 


AND U ARE PRONOUNCED AS s7l, AND ARE 


UNITED 


TO THE PRECEDING 


SYLLABLE. 


pre 7 eious 


mo n! 7 tion 


ma gi 7 cian 


spe 7 cial 


mu ni 7 tion 


ma li 7 cioiis 


vi 7 cioiis 


con tri 7 tion - 


mi li 7 tia 


ad di' tion 


at tri 7 tion 


mu s.1 7 cian 


am bi' tioiis 


nu tri 7 tion 


of f I 7 cioiis 


aus pi 7 cioiis 


cog ni 7 tion 


pa tri 7 cian 


of fi 7 cioiis 


ig ni 7 tion 


par ti 7 tion 


ea pri 7 cioiis 


con di 7 tion 


per di 7 tion 


nu tri 7 tioiis 


de fi 7 cient 


per ni 7 cioiis 


de li 7 cioiis 


de li 7 cioiis 


pe ti 7 tion 


am bi 7 tioiis 


dis ere 7 tion 


pro fi 7 cient 


fac ti 7 tioiis 


e di 7 tion . 


phy §i 7 cian 


fie tf tioiis 


ef f I 7 cient 


po §I 7 tion 


den ti 7 tion 


fia gi 7 tioiis 


pro pi 7 tioiis 


fru i 7 tion 


fru I 7 tion 


se di 7 tion 


es pe 7 cial 


ju di 7 cial 


se di 7 tioiis 


op ti 7 cian 


lo gi 7 cian 


sol sti 7 tial 



T7 



128 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAR, I.'ART, €ARK, KATX, -WHAT', HER, 1'EEY, THERE; GET; BIUD, MARINE; LINK J 



suf f f cient 



sus pi cious: 
vo If tion 
ab o If tion 
ae qui gf tion 
ad ino iii 7 tion 



av n it eiou* 



ir.i au spi cious 
ben e ft 7 ciaJ 
eo a If tiob 
eom pe tf tion 
eon) po sf tion 



ap po gi tion 
eb ul If tion 
er u df tion 
ex hi bf tion 
im po sf tion 
op po sf tion 
ad ven tf tious prej u df ciaJ def i nf tion 
am mu nf tion pol i tf cian dem o If tion 
pre mo nf tion prep o sf tion dep o §f tion 
dis qui sf tion prop o sf tion dis po sf tion 
in qui sf tion pro hi bf tion prae tf tion er 
su per fi 7 cial arith me tf cian 
six per stf tion ae a de mf cian 
sup po sf tion ge om e trf ciaii 
sur rep ti 7 tious in ju df cious 
mer e trf cious de ff cien ev 



rep e tf tion 



in hi bf tion 
ex po sf tion 
ap pa rf tion 
ar ti ff cial 

No. 136 -C XXX VI* 

IN THE FOLLOWING WORDS, d AND ti ARE PRONOUNCED 

like s7ii, as associate (as so sin ate). 

as so 7 ci ate 
ap pre 7 ci ate 



ne go 7 ti ate 
in sa 7 ti ate 
an nun 7 ci ate 



ex eru ci ate 
:/ ti ate 



de pre 



-/ 



ci ate 



e ma 7 ci ate 



pro pi 

e nun'" ci ate 
li gen 7 ti ate de nun 7 ci ate 
sub stan 7 ti ate dis so' ci ate 



ex pa ti ate 
in gra 



:/ ti ate 



no vi ti ate 
of fi 7 ci ate 



sa ti ate 
vi 7 ti ate 



No, 13? -C XXXVII 



THE FOLLOWING WORDS, ENDING IN U, MAY HAVE, AND SOME 
OF THEM OFTEN DO HAVE, THE SYLLABLE al ADDED AFTER 

ic, as comic, comical; and the adverbs rs ly derived 

FROM THESE WORDS ALWAYS HAVE ol, AS IN clctSS'r diy. 
THE ACCENT IS ON THE SYLLABLE NEXT PRECEDING ic 

erit if eth ie 

t^u bie eth nie 
cyn ie 



eau 7 stie 


elm ie 


9 en trie 


eom ie 


elas sic 


eon ie 






SPELLING-BOOK. 120 



.', wolf, foot, moojj, or; ]:vli:, 1'cli. ; kxist ; € = k ; u-=.t ; s=z ; Ch=sh, 



1\t ie op tie stat ie fcrag ie 

mag ie ^>7it7u§ ie sto ie typ ie 

mti §ie skep tie styp tie fas tie 

mys tie spher ie top ie graph ie 

WORDS OF THREE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE SECOND. 
THESE MAY RECEIVE TIIE TERMINATION ill FOR TEE ADJEC- 
TIVE, AND TO THAT MAY BE ADDED llj TO FORM TEE AD- 
VERB ; as, agrevt'C, agrestical, agrestically 



ab bat ie 


ge ner ie 


pla ton ie 


a eron ie 


gym lias tie 


pneii mat ie I 


a gres tie 


liar mon ie 


po lem ie 


al eliem ie 


lie bra ie 


prag mat ie 


as yet ie 


her met ie 


pro lif ie ; 


ath lot ie 


hys ter ie 


pro phet ie 


an then tie 


1 den tie 


r/^ap sod ie 


bar bar ie 


in trin sie 


ro man tie 


bo tan ie 


la eon ie 


ru bif ie 


ea tbar tie 


hi cif ie 


sa tir ie 


el as sii ie 


lu erif ie 


sc7ii§ mat ie 


eos met ie 


mag net ie 


selio las tie 


di due tie 


mag nif ie 


seor bii tie 


do mes tie 


ma jes tie 


so phis tie 


dog mat ie 


me ehaii ie 


sper mat ie 


dra mat ie 


mo njis tie 


sta Lie tie 


dru id ie 


mor bif ie 


stig mat ie 


dy$ pep tie 


nu mer ie 


svni met lie 


ee cen trie 


ob stet rie 


syn 6d ie 


ee lee tie 


or gaii ie 


ter rif ie 


ee stat ie 


os sif ie 


the ist ie 


e lee trie 


pa cif ie 


ty ran nie 


cm pir ie 


pa thet ie 


vi vif ie 


er rat ie 


pe daiit ie 


e las tie 


fa nat ie 


phleg mat ie 


bom bast ie 


fo re a sie 


plire net ie 


sta tist ie 



130 THE ELEMENTARY 



SAK, LAST, CAlli:, FALL, WHAT", HEP., PREY, THERE J GET; B1KD, MAllV.YE; LINK I 



WORDS OP FOUR SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON THE THIRD. 

ae a clem/ ie dol o rif ie par a lyt ie 

al eh em ist ie em blern at ie par a phrast ie 

al plia bet ie en er get ie par a sit ie 

ap o plee tie e nig mat ie par en thet ie 

an a log ie ep i lep tie par a bol ie 

an a lyt ie ep i dem ie path o log ie 

an a torn ie ep i sod ie pe ri 6d ie 

ap os tol ie er e hi it ie phil o log ie 

ar ith met ie eu. elia rist ie phil o soph ie 

as tro log ie ex e get ie phil an throp ie 

as tro nom ie frig or if ie phar i sii ie 

a the ist ie ge o log ie prob lem at ie 

at mos pher ie ge o met rie pu ri tan ie 

bar o met rie. hem is pher ie pyr a mid ie 

be a tif ie his tri on ie pyr o tee^ nie 

bi o graph ie hyp o erit ie sgi en tif ie 

eab a list ie hy per bol ie * sye o pliant ie 

eal vin 1st ie hy po stat ie syl lo gis tie 

ea§ u ist ie hy po thet ie sym pa thet ie 

eat e ehet ie id i ot ie sys tern at ie 

eat e gor ie in e last ie tal i§ man ie 

ehro no log ie jae o bin ie the o log ie 

eol or if ie lap i dif ie the o erat ie 

eo§ mo graph ie math e mat ie the o ret ie 

dem o erat ie met a phor ie to po graph ie 

di a bol ie met a phy§ ie ty po graph ie 

dl a lee tie myth o log ie zo o graph ie 

dip lo mat ie ne o ter ie zo o log ie 

di a met rie or tho graph ie un pre lat ie 

di ti ret ie pan the 1st ie ge o gen trie 

Thermornetrical observations snow the temperature of the air 
in winter and summer. 



THE ELEMENTARY 



131 



Bab, last, care, fall, tviiat; iiee, prey, there; get; dcd, marine; link; 
WORDS OF FIVE SYLLABLES, ACCENTED ON TEE FOURTH, 



an ti seor bu' ti-e 
ar is to erat ie 
ehar ae ter is tie 
ee ele gi as tie 
en thu §i as tie 
en to mo log ic 
ep i gram mat ie 



gen e a log ie 
lex i eo graph ie 
mon o syl lab ie 
or ni tho log ie 
os te o log ie 
phys. i o log ie 
ieh thy o log ie 



THE FOLLOWING WORDS RARELY OR NEVER TAKE THE 
TERMINATION al a 



bi quad rat' ie gal' lie 



eath' o lie 
^e phal' ie 
eha 6t' ie 
eon cen' trie 
e le' gi ae 
ee stat' ie 
ep' ie 
ex 6t' ie 



goth' ie 
hfm nie 
i tal' ie 
me dal' lie 
me te or' ie 
me tal' lie 
o lym' pie 
par e gor' ie 



plas' tie 
pub' lie 
pu' nie 
re pub' lie 

tae' tie 
are' tie 
pep' tie 
fas' tie 
cys' tie . 



il log' ie al 



THE FOLLOWING USUALLY OR ALWAYS END IN «?. 

bib' li eal 
ea non' ie al 
ehi mer 7 ie al 
eler' ie al 



m 1m 1 eal 
me thod' ie 
far' ci eal 



al 



eos.' mi eal med' i eal 



e5m' ie al 
met' ri eal 
phj^s/ ie al 
prae' ti eal 
rad' i eal 
ver' ti. eal 
vor'.ti eal. 
whim' §i eal 

THE FOLLOWING NEVER TARE THE TERMINATION al. 

ap o strop h'ie pleth' o rie tal mud' ie 

bi§' muth ie splen' e tie the or' ie 

eh 61' er ie sii' ber ie tiir' mer ie 

Id' na tie sul phfi' rie e met' ie 



eor' ti eal 
do mm' i eal 
fin' i'eal 



trop' ie al 
top' ie al 
drop' si eal 



132 THE ELEMENTARY 



bab, lAst, €A.r.r;, falx viiat* nffis, prst, theee* get'biup maeixe; i.tnk; 

WOLDS ENDING IN an, €11, OR Oil, IN WHICH THE TOWEL IS 
MUTE OB SLIGHTLY PIIONOUNCED. 

art 7 i gan her 7 is son or 7 i gon 

ben' i gon gar' ri son par' ti gan 

■ea par' i son cit 7 i zen u 7 ni son 

€om par 7 i son den 7 i zen ven 7 i gon 

eoiir 7 te gan jet 7 ti son 

WORDS ENDING IN 18171, RETAINING THE ACCENT OF THEIR 
PRIMITIVES. 

mo nas 7 ti gis.ni per i pa tet 7 i cigm 

ne 6l 7 o gis.rn pro vin 7 cial igm 

at 7 ti cigm an 7 gii cism 

goth 7 i cigm van 7 clal igrn 

pa.ral 7 o gis.ni gal 7 li cigm 



A raer 7 i can igra ped 7 a gog igm 

ep 7 i cii rigm pii 7 ri tan igm 

Jeg 7 u it igm Preg by te 7 ri an igm 

lib 7 er tin igm par 7 a sit igm 

ma te 7 ri al igm par 7 al lei igm 

inon 7 o the igm sa 7 bi an igm 

nat 7 ii ral igm hu 7 lo the igm 

pa 7 tri ot igm fa 7 vor^it igm 

p61 7 y the igm so gin 7 i an igm 

pros 7 e lyt igm pa rae,V ro nigra 

phar' i sa igm re pub 7 lie an igm 

Prot 7 est ant igm see ta 7 ri an igm 

prop 7 a gand igm seho las 7 ti cigm 

Ho, 138.-CXXXVIII. 

WORDS ENDING IN ize, ACCENTED ON THE FIRST SYLLABLE. 

au 7 thor Ize nior' al Ize mag 7 net Ize 

bas 7 tard ize dram 7 a tize mod 7 ern ize 

civ il Ize em 7 pha size ag 7 o nlze 

can 7 on Ize gal 7 van Ize pul' ver Ize 

le 7 gal Ize her 7 bo rlze ster 7 il Ize 




SPELLING-BOOK 



move, sox, v,-olf, foot, moon, or. ; r.rLE, pi;ll : exist : 



■K ; c-=J ; s=z ; cu=sil 



sub 7 si dlze 
tyr 7 an nize 
sys 7 tern Ize 
meth 7 ocl Ize 
jour 7 nal Ize 
bru 7 tal ize 



o nize 
en 7 er glze * 
e 7 qual ize 
gar 7 ga rize 
hu 7 man ize 
Ju' da ize 



or gan ize 
pat 7 ron ize 
sat 7 ir ize 
tan 7 tal ize 
tar 7 tar ize 
vo 7 -eal ize 
■eau 7 ter ize 
bar 7 bar ize 
bot 7 a nize 
das 7 tard ize 
det 7 o nize 
dog 7 ma tize 

Ho, 139 -C XX XIX. 



dram' a tize 
fer 7 til Tze 
gen 7 til Ize 
I 7 dol Ize 
nieT o dlze 
nies/ mer Ize 
po 7 lar Ize 
re 7 al Ize 
the 7 o rize 
trail 7 quil Ize 
tern 7 po rize 
Bo 7 man Ize 



WORDS OF FOUR AND FIYE SYLLABLES, RETAINING THE ACCENT 
OF THEIR PRIMITIVES. 

al 7 eo hoi Ize lib 7 er al Ize prod 7 i gal Ize 

al 7 le go rize ma te 7 ri al Ize pros 7 e lyt Ize 

a nath 7 e ma tize me mo 7 ri al Ize pu 7 li tan Ize 

an 7 i mal Ize mm 7 er al Ize pro verb 7 i al Ize 

e pis 7 to llze mo nop 7 o lize re pub 7 lie an ize 

bes' ti al Ize hy 7 dro gen Ize sanet 7 u a rize 

gar 7 di nal Ize nat 7 u ral Ize see 7 u lar Ize 



me te or Ize 



sen 7 



su al Ize 
•ehar 7 a-e ter Ize ox 7 y gen Ize spir 7 it ii al Ize 
Qit 7 i zen Ize par tre 7 u lar ize sye 7 o phant Ize 
e the 7 re al Ize pan 7 e gyr Ize vit 7 ri ol Ize 



fl' 



ger a tm Ize 
ge\Y er al Ize 



pe €u 7 liar Ize 
pop 7 11 lar Ize 

No. 140.-CXL. 



vol' a til ize 
cheV er il Ize 



THE COMBINATION HQ REPRESENTS, IN SOME WORDS, A SIMPLE 
ELEMENTARY SOUND, AS HEARD EN" Sing, singer, long / IN 
OTHER WORDS. IT REPRESENTS THE SAME ELEMENTARY 



THE ELEMENTARY 



134 

~BAR, Li.8T.lARR, FALL, WHAT? HBR, PREY, TUKRK ; PET", BIRD, MARINE ', Ug» j 



SOUND FOLLOWED BY THAT OF g HARD (HEARD IN ffO, get) 

AS in finger, linger, longer. 

THE FOLLOWING HATE THE SIMPLE SOUND. 
J 



among 

bang 

bring . 

bring 7 ing 

bung 

elang 

elmg 

eling 7 ing 

elung 

dung 

fang 

fling 

fling 7 er 

fling 7 ing 

flung 

■gang 

hang 

bang 7 ed 



hang 7 er sing' ing 
hang 7 man song 
hang: 7 ing§ sung 
slang 
sling 
sling 7 er 



hung 

king 

ling 

long 

lungs 

pang 

prong 

rang 

ring 



slung 
spring 
sprang 
spring 7 er 
spring 7 ing 
sting 



strung 
string 7 ing 
strong 
strong 7 ly 
swing 
swing 7 er 
swing 7 ing 
swung . 
tang 
thing 
thong 
tongue 



sting 7 er twang 



ring 
rung 
sang 
sing 
sing 7 er 



let sting 7 ing 



stung 



string 
string 7 ed 
string 7 er 



wang 
wring 
luring' er 
wning 7 ing 
tvrong 



tS THE FOLLOWING WORDS, U ALONE REPRESENTS THE SOUND 
OF 7ig % AND IS MARKED THUS. n. 



an ger 
an 7 giy 
an 7 gle. 
an 7 gler 
an 7 gli ean 
an 7 gli cigfli 
an 7 gli cize 
an 7 guish 
an 7 gu lar 
bran 7 gle 
bun 7 gle 



elan 7 gor 
eon 7 go 
dan 7 gle 
dm 7 gle 
fan 7 gle 
fin 7 ger 
fun 7 gus 
hun/ ger 
him 7 gry 
m 7 gle ■ 
jan 7 gle 



jan 7 gler 
jan 7 gling 



jin 7 gle 




Ian' guid 




Ian' guish, 


Ion' ger 




Ion' gest 




man 7 gle 




man' gler 




man 7 go 




mm 7 gle 




\ 


» 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



135 



UOVK, SON, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OP. ; RTTLE, PULL J EXIST ; € = K ; G=J ; 8 = Z ; CH- SO. 



mon ger 
mon' grel 
sprm 7 gle 
stron 7 e'er 



e Ion 7 gate 
e ryn 7 go 
sy rin' ga 
stran 7 gu ry 



stron 7 gest 
tan 7 gle 
tin 7 gle 
wran 7 gle 

No. 141 -C XL I 



m THE FOLLOWING WORDS THE d, t AND U, PREFERABLY TAKE 

their regular sounds; as in capture, verdure^ pro- 
many SPEAKERS, FOW= 



nounced kapt'yoor, vercl'yoor„ 
ever, say kap'choor. ver'jur. 



€apt 7 iire 
glnei ure 
great tire 
€iilt lire 
feat lire 
fraet iire 
fut ure 
joint iire 
jilnet ure 
leet ure 
mlxt iire 



moist ure 
nat tire 
nurt iire 
ord ure 
past iire 
piet ure 
post ure 
piinet ure 
rapt ure 
nipt lire 
Script ure 



s-eulpt ure 
stat tire 
stat ute 
striet iire 
struct iire 
siit iire 
text ure 
tinet iire 
tort iire 
vent iire 
verd iire 



The lungs are the organs of respiration. If any substance, 
except air, is inhaled and comes in contact with the lungs, 
we instantly cough, This cough is an effort of nature bcj 
free the lungs, 

A finger signifies a taker, as does fang„ - We take or catch 
things with the fingers, and fowls and rapacious quadrupeds 
seize other animals with their fangs c 

A pang is a severe pain ; anguish is violent distress. 

A lecture is a discourse read or pronounced on any subject ; h 
is also a formal reproof, 

The errors of a young man are the ruin of business. 

Discourage cunning in a child : cunning is the ape of wisdoo 



rso 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BA.JI, LAST, €AUE, FAIX, WHAT; ll/;i:, l'l'.KY, TUKEEJ gkt; UU'.U, M-VUINH; LINK; 

Whatever is wrong is a deviation from right, or from the laws • 

of God or man. 
Anger is a tormenting passion, and so are envy and jealousy. 

IY> be doomed to suffer these £>assions long, would be as se- 

irere a punishment as confinement in the State's prison. 
An anglicism is a peculiar mode of speech among the English, 
Love is an agreeable passion, and love is sometimes stronger 

than death. 
How happy men would be if they would always love what is 

right and hate what is wrong. 





Ko. 1I2.-CXLII. 




g and h 


BEFOBE 71 ABE ALWAYS SILENT 


gnar 


knav 7 ish 


knock ©2 


gnarl 


knaV ish ly 


knoll 


gnash 


knav 7 ish ness 


knot 


gnat 


knead 


knot 7 grass 


gnaw 


knee 


kndt 7 ted 


gno 7 mon 


kneel 


knot' ty 


gnos 7 ties 


knife 


knot 7 ti lj 


gnos 7 ti cign 


knight 


knot 7 ti nest 


knab 


knight er 7 rant 


knot 7 less 


knack 


knight 7 hood 


knout 


knag 


knight 7 ly 


know 


knag gy 


knit 


know 7 a blc 


knap 


knit 7 ter 


know 7 er 


knap 7 sack 


knit 7 ting 


know 7 ing 


knap' weed 


knob 


know 7 ing ly 


knur 


knob 7 bea 


knowY edge • 


knave 


knob 7 by 


knuck 7 \e 


.knav' er y* 


knock 


knurl 



it is very aseful to bread to knead it well. 

the original signification of knave was a boy; but the word 

now signifies a dishonest person. 
k knout is an instrument of punishment, consisting of a nar= 

row strap of leather which inflicts severe torture. 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



137 



MOVE, BON, WOLF, FOOT, MOOK. OF. ; HTLE, PCLL ; EaIST ; € = K; G = J J S = Z ; *MT — 3H. 

No. 143.-CXLIII. 

IN THE FOLLOWING WORDS, ch HAYE THE SOUND OP sh, AND 



IN MANY OF THEM 



THE SOUND OF 6 LONG. 



9ha made' 
9ham pai^n' 
9I11 cane' 
9hev a Her' 
9hrV al ry 
9han de lier' 
9he mige' 
9han / ere 



cap u. qhin' 
mag a ziW 
sub ma rine' 
trans ma line' 
bom ba gin' 
brig a dier' 
can non ier' 
cap a pie' 
ear bin ieV 

Ho, 144.-CXLIV 



eav a lier' 
eor de lier 
man da rio' 
cash ier' 
ma rine' 
der nier/ 
po lice' 
fas giner 
fron tier 



: following words, the vowel a m the digraph ta, 

OB. PRONOUNCED 

dearth, are pro- 



has NO SOUND, AND e IS EITHER SHORT, 

ldze e in term; thus, dread, tread, earth, 
nounced bred, tred, erth, dertK 



bread 

dead 

head 

tread 

dread 

stead 

thread 

spread 

breast 

breadth 

breath 

earth 

dearth 

threat 

sweat 

search 



health 

wealth 

stealth 

elean§e 

earl 

pearl 

earn* 

learn 

yearn 

meant 

dreamt 

realm 

ear ly 

earn est 

re search 

clean \j 



heav en 
leav en 
heav y 
read y 
health y 
wealth y 
f eath er 
leafh er 
leafh em 
tread le 
jeal oils 
jeal ous y 
zeal ous 
zeal ous ly 
zeal ot 
pleas, ant 



peas, ant 
pleag ore 

mea§ ure 
tre as lire 
treach e r \ 
en dear or 
re hearse 
threat en 
break fasi 
stead fast 
mead 6w 
pearl ash 
stealth y 
stead y 
stealth iu 
health i'u ! 



138 



THE ELEMENTARY 



>AS, LAST, SIRE, FALL, AVUAT; 1IKR, PKKT, THERE ; GET; uTkO. MARINE; LINK ; 

No. 145.-CXLV. 

IN THE FOLLOWING, ff IS SILENT. 

p. stands for past tense; ppr. for participle of the present tens6. 



PPE. AGENT 



PPB. AGE^T 



sign ed ing er 

as sign ed ing er 

eon sign ed ing er 

de sign ed ing er 

ma lign ed ing er 



re §Ign ed ing er 
im pugn ed ing er 
op pugn ed ing er 
im pregn ed ing 
eoun/ ter sign ed ing 



eon dign in dign 
be nign 



ADJECTIVES AND NOUNS. 

for' 



ma lign 



eign en sign 
sov'e reign en' sign vj 



IN THE FOLLOWING, THE SOUND OF $ IS RESUMED. 

im preg' na ble 
op pug 7 nan cy 



as sig oa 



tion 
les i£ na' tion in dW nant 



in dig' ni ty 



re§ ig na tion 
be nig' nant 
be nig' ni ty 
ma lig' ni ty 
ma fe'nant 



dig' ni ty 
dig' ni fy 
preg' nant 
preg' nan qj 



re pug nant 
re pug' nan 9j 
sig' ni f y 
sig ni n ea tion 



im preg' nate sig nif i eant 



No, 14S.-CXLVI, 



WORDS IN WHICH €, ^, AND 0, BEFORE 11, ARE MUTE. THOSE 
WITH V ANNEXED, ARE, OR MAT BE USED AS VERBS. ADMIT- 
TING ed FOR THE PAST TIME, AND inn FOR THE PARTICIPLE. 



ba eon 

bi-a' eon 
beech' en 
ba' -sin 
beat' en 
bit' ten 
bla zon 



bra' zen 
bro' ken 
black' en, i? 
bat' ten, v 
beck' on, p. 
bur' den, v 
bur' then, v. 



bid' den 
box' en 
bound' ei 
but' ton. v 
broad' en. m 
eho' s.en 
elo' ven 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



130 



MOVE, 60N, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OR J KTTLE, POLL; EXIST ; € = K ; G"-J ; 8 = Z ; Cn=BH, 



No. 147.-CZLVII. 




THE DOG, 



He is active, strong, and used as a 



This dog is the mastiff, 
watch-dog, Ke has a large head and pendent ears. He is 
not very apt to bite ; but he will sometimes take down a man 
and hold him down, Three mastiffs once had a combat with 
a lion, and the lion was compelled to save himself by flight, 




THE STAG. 

fhe stag is the male of the red deer. He is a mild and 
harmless animal, bearing a noble attire of horns, which are 
jilied, and renewed every year. His form is light and elegant, 
£&d he runs with great rapidity. The female is called a hind: 
and the fawn or young deer, when his horns appear, is called 
a pricket or. brocket. 



140 



THE ELEMENTARY 




THE SQUIRREL. 

The squirrel is a beautiful little animal.- The gray and 
black squirrels live in the forest and make a nest of leaves and 
sticks on the high branches. It is amusing to see the nimbi o 

! squirrel spring from branch to branch, or run up and down 
the stem of a tree, and dart behind it to escape from sight. 
Little ground squirrels burrow in the earth. They subsist on 

j nuts, which they hold in their paws, using them as little boys 
use their hands. 




OP THE BOY THAT STOLE APPLES. 

An old man found a rude boy upon one of his trees steal- 
ing apples, and desired him to come down ; but the young 
sauce-box told him plainly he would not. " Won't you '." said 



SPELLING-BOOK, 



141 



MOVE, BON, WOLF, FOOT, SIOO^, OS ; F.rLE, FULL ; EXIST J € = K ! 



s=z; £n=SH : 



the old man, " then I will fetch you down ;" so he pulled up 
some turf or grass and threw at him ; but this only made the 
youngster laugh, to think the old man should pretend to beat 
him down from the tree with grass only. 

M Well, well," said the old man, " if neither words nor grass 
will do, I must try what virtue there is in stones;" so the old 
man pelted him heartily with stones, which soon made the 
young chap haste down from the tree and beg the old man's 
pardon^ 

MOB AL. 

If good words and gentle means will not reclaim the wicked, 
they must oe dealt with in a more severe manner. 



FABLE II 




S2^ 
THE COUNTRY MAID AND HER MILK-PAIL. 

"When men suffer their imagination to amuse them with 
the prospect of distant and uncertain improvements of their 
condition, they frequently sustain real losses, by their inatten- 
tion td those affairs in which they are immediately concerned, 

A country maid was walking very deliberately with a pail 
of milk upon her head, when she fell into the following train 
of reflections : " The money for which I shall sell this milk, will 
enable me to- increase my stock of egg3 to three hundred. 
These eggs, allowing for what may prove addle, and what 
may be destroyed by vermin, will produce at least two hun= 
clred and fifty chickens. The chickens will be fit to carry to 
market about Christmas, when poultry always bears a good 



142 



THE ELEMENTARY 



bab, tlsT, €Ai:r., fat-l, what; liar., test, tiikee; get; died, makistk; link: 



price ; bo that by May-day I can not fail of having money 
enough to purchase a new gown. Green ! — let me consider — 
yes, green becomes my complexion best, and green it shall be. 
In this dress I will go to the fair, where all the young fellows 
will strive to have me for a partner ; but I shall perhaps re- 
fuse every one of them, and, with, an air of disdain, toss from 
them." Transported with this triumphant thought, she could 
not forbear acting with her head what thus passed in her im- 
agination, when down came the pail of milk, and with it all her 
imaginary happiness. 



FABLE III 




THE TWO DOGS, 

Hasty and inconsiderate connections are generally attended 
with great disadvantages ; and much of every man's good or 
ill fortune, depends upon the choice he makes of his friends, 

A good-natured Spaniel overtook a surly Mastiff, as he was 
traveling upon the high road. Tray, although an entire 
stranger to Tiger, very civilly accosted him ; and if it would 
be no interruption, he said, he should be glad to bear him 
company on his way. Tiger, who happened not to be alto- 
gether in so growling a mood as usual, accepted the proposal j 
and they very amicably pursued their journey together. In 
the midst of their conversation, they arrived at the next vil- 
• iage, where Tiger began to display his malignant disposition, 
by an unprovoked attack upon every dog he met. The vil- 
lagers immediately sallied forth with great indignation to res- 
cue their respective favorites ; and falling upon our two 
friends, without distinction or mercy, poor Tray was most 
cruelly treated, for no other reason but his being found in bad 
company. 



SPELLIXG-BOOK. 



143 



MOVE, BOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OK J I'.VLK, FULL ; EXIST J € = K \ G=J ; B=Z ; CH=BH, 



FABLE IV. 




T1TE PABTIAL JUDGE. 

A farmer came to a neighboring lawyer, expressing great 
concern for an accident which he said had just happened. 
" One of your oxen," continued he, " has been gored by an un- 
lucky bull of mine, and I should be glad to know how I am to 
make you reparation." " Thou art a very honest fellow," replied 
the lawyer, " and wilt not think it unreasonable that I expect 
one of thy oxen in return." " It is no more than justice," quoth 
the farmer, " to be sure ; but what did I say ?— I mistake — it is 
your bull that has killed one of my oxen." " Indeed !" says the 
lawyer, "that alters the case: I must inquire into the affair ; 
and if— " "And if!" said the farmer; "the business I find 
would have been concluded without an if had you been as 
ready to do justice to others as to exact it from them " 



FABLE V. 

THE CAT AND THE RA1. 

A certain cat had made such unmerciful havoc among the 
vermin of her neighborhood, that not a single rat or mouse 
dared venture to appear abroad. Puss was soon convinced 
that if affairs remained in their present state, she must ere long 
starve. After mature deliberation, therefore, she resolved to 
have recourse to stratagem. For this purpose, she suspended 
herself from a hook with her head downward, pretending to be 
dead. The rats and mice, as they peeped from their holes, ob- 
serving her in this dangling attitude, concluded she was hang- 
ing for some misdemeanor, and with great joy -immediately 
sallied forth in quest of their prey. Puss, as soon as a sufficient 
number were collected together, quitting her hold, dropped 
into the midst of them ; and very few had the fortune to make 



144 



THE ELEMENTARY 



bab, lXst, €aee, f v \ll, what; nEn, prey, tii£bz; get; uTr.D, matuxe; msr; 




good tlieir retreat. This artifice having succeeded so well, she 
was encouraged to try the event of a second. Accordingly, 
she whitened her coat all over by rolling herself in a heap of 
of flour, and m this disguise she lay concealed in the bottom 
of a meal tub. This stratagem was executed in general with 
the same effect as the former. But an old experienced rat, al- 
together as cunning as his adversary, was not so easily insnared. 
" I don't quite like," said he, " that white heap yonder. Some- 
thing whispera me there is mischief concealed under it. 'Tis 
true, it may be meal, but it may likewise be something that I 
should not relish quite as well. There can be no harm at least 
in keeping at a proper distance; for caution, I am sure, is the 
parent of safety. +++ 

FABLE VI. 




^f/j'i^^J5gg 



THE FOX AND THE BSA3IBLB. 



A fox, closely pursued by a pack of dogs, took shelter under 
the covert of a bramble. He rejoiced in this asylum, and for 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



145 



move, s6x, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ; kt:le, rcxL ; EXIST ; €=K ; 6=J ; s=z ; CI 



a while, was very happy ; but soon found that if he attempted 
to stir, he was wounded by the thorns and prickles on every 
side. However, making a virtue of necessity, he forebore to 
complain, and comforted himself with reflecting that no bliss 
is perfect ; that good and evil are mixed, and flow from the 
same fountain. These briers, indeed, said he, will tear my 
skin a little, yet they keep off the dogs. For the sake of the 
good, then, let me bear the evil with patience ; each bitter has 
its sweet ; and these brambles, though they wound my flesh, 
preserve my life from danger. 



FABLE VII 




THE BEAK AND THE TWO FRIENDS. 

Two friends, setting out together upon a journey which led 
through a dangerous forest, mutually promised to assist each 
other, if they should happen to be assaulted. They had not 
proceeded far, before they perceived a bear making toward 
them with great rage. 

There were no hopes in flight ; but one of them, being very 
active, sprang up into a tree ; upon which the other, throwing 
himself flat on the ground, held his breath and pretended to 
be dead; remembering to have heard it asserted that this 
creature will not prey upon a dead carcass. The bear came 
up and after smelling to him some time, left him and went on. 
When he was fairly out of sight and hearing, the hero from 
the tree called out, — Well, my friend, what said the bear ? 
He seemed to whisper you very closely. He did bo, replied 
the other, and gave me this good advice, never to associate 
with a wretch, who, in the hour of danger, will desert his friend. 



146 THE ELEMENTARY 



BAB, LAST, €ARE, FAIX, "WIIATJ HER, PRKY, THERE", GET; bTi'.D, MARJ! 



" Henry, tell me the number of days in a year." " Three hun- 
dred and sixty-five." " How many weeks in a year ?" " Fifty- 
two." " How many days in a week ?" " Seven." "What are they 
called ?" " Sabbath or Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Thursday, Friday, Saturday." The Sabbath is a day of rest, and 
called the Lord's day, because God has commanded us to keep it 
holy. On that day we are to omit labor and worldly employ- 
ments, and devote the time to religious duties, and the gaining 
of religious knowledge. 

" How many hours are there in a day or day and night ?" 
" Twenty-four." " How many minutes in an hour ?" " Sixty." 
" How many seconds in a minute ?" " Sixty." Time is measured 
by clocks and watches ; or by dials and glasses. 

The light of the sun makes the day, and the shade of the 
earth makes the night. The earth revolves from west to east 
once in twenty-four hours. The sun is fixed or stationary ; 
but the earth turns every part of its surface to the sun once 
in twenty-four hours. The day is for labor, and the night 
is for sleep and repose. Children should go to bed early 
in the evening, and all persons, who expect to thrive in the 
world, should rise early in the morning. 



Fo. 148.-CXLVIII. 

WOKDS NEARLY, BUT NOT EXACTLY, ALIKE IN PRONUNCIATION. 

Ac eept, to take. al low ed, admitted, granted, 

ex cept, to take out. a loud, with a great voice, 

af feet, to impress. er rand, a message. 

ef feet, what is produced er rant, wandering. 
ae cede, to agree. ad di tion, something added 

ex ceed, to surpass. e di tion, publication. 

a ere, a piece of land. bal lad, a song. 

a chor, a scald head. bal let, a dance. 

ac cess, approach. bal lot, a ball for voting, or a vote, 
ex cess, superfluity. >hron i cal, of long continuance. 

al lu sion, hint, reference. chron i cle, a history 

il lu sion, deception. clothes, garments. 

e lu sion, evasion. dose, conclusion, 
acts, deeds. con sort, husband or wife 

ax, a utensil for cutting. con cert, harmony. 

as say, trial of metals. de scent, a felling, a slope, 

es say, attempt, a writing. dis sent, a differing, 
af fu sion, a pouring on. de cease, death, 

ef fu sion, a pouring out. dis ease, sickness. 



SPELLING-BOOK. 147 


5TOTK, SOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OK ; ] 


:rr.i:. rrr.t. ; exist ; «=k ; &— j ; s=z ; ch=sh. 


| dost 2d per, of do. 


moss, of a tree. 


dust, fine powder. 


line, extension in length. 


e lie' it, to call forth. 


loin, part of an animal. 


il lie' it, unlawful. 


loom, a frame for weaving. 


ini merge, to plunge. 


loam, a soft loose earth. 


e merge, to come forth. 


med al, an ancient coin. 


fat, fleshy. 


med dk, to interpose. 


vat. a tub or cistern. 


pint, half a quart. 


gest ure. motion. 


point, a sharp end. 


jest er, one who jests. 


rad ish, a root. 


i die, not employed. 


red dish, somewhat red. 


i dol, an image. 


since, at a later time. 


im pos tor, a deceiver. 


sense, faculty of perceiving. 


im post ure, deception. 


ten or, course continued. 


naugh ty, bad. 


ten ure, a holding. 


knot ty, full of knots. 


tal ents, ability. 


in gen u ous, frank. 


tal ons, claws. 


in ge ni ous, skillful. 


val ley, low land. 


morse, the sea-horse. 


val ue, worth. 


WORDS OF TELE SAME ORTHOGRAPHY, BUT DIFFERENTLY PB0NOTTNCED, 


Au gust, the month 


live, having life. 


au gust', grand. 


mow, a pile of hay. 


j bow, to bend. 


mow, to cut with a scythe. 


bow, for shooting arrows. 


read, to utter printed words. 


jbass, a tree, a fish. 


read [red], past teuse of read. 


bass, lowest part in music. 


re' pent, creeping. 


con jure, to entreat. 


re pent', to feel sorrow. 


con' jure, to use magic art. 


rec' ol lect, to call to mind. 


dove, past tense of dive. 


re col lect', to collect again. 


dove, a pigeon. 


re form', to amend. 


gal lant, brave, gay. 


re' form, to make anew. 


gal lant', a gay fellow. 


rec' re ate, to refresh. 


gill, the fourth of a pint. 


ro' ere ate, to create anew. 


gill, part of a fish. 


slough, a place of mud. 


hin der, to stop. 


slough [stuff], a cast skin. 


hind er, further behind. 


tar ry, like tar. 


in' va lid, one not in Health. 


tar ry, to delay. 


in val' id, not firm or binding. 


tears, waters of the eyes. 


low er, to be dark. 


tedrs, [he] rends. 


low er, not so high, 


wind, air in motion. 


B live, to be or dwell 


wind, to turn or twist. 


|! WORDS PRONOUNCED ALIKE, 


BUT DIFFERENT IN ORTHOGRAPHY. 


1 ail, to be iu trouble. 


al tar, a place for offerings. 


1 ale, malt liquor. 


al ter, to change. 


I air, the atmosphere. 


ant, a little insect. 


| Aeir, one who inherits. 


awnt, a sister to a parent. 


1 all, the whole. 


ark, a vessel. 


I awl, an instrument. 


arc, part of a circle. 



148 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAB, LAST, e.UW, FA1 



at; n£E, pr.gy, thkee; get; bTkd, maeTne; link; 



as cent, steepness. 
as sent, agreement. 

au ger, a tool. 

au gur, one who foretells, 
bail,, suretv. 
bale, a pack of goods. 

ball, a sphere. 

bawl, to cry aloud, 
base, low, vile, 
bass or base, in music. 

beer, a liquor. 

bier, to cany dead bodies, 
bin, a box. 
been, participle of be. 

ber ry, a little fruit. 

bu ry, to inter, 
beat, to strike, 
beet, a root. 

blew, did blow. 

blue, a dark color. 
boar, a male swine, 
bore, to make a hole. 

bow, to bend the body. 

bough, a branch. 
bell, to ring, 
belle, a fine lady. 

beau, a gay gentleman. 

bow, to shoot with, 
bread, a kind of food, 
bred, educated. 

bur row, for rabbits. 

bor ough, an incorporated town, 
by, near at hand, 
bwy, to purchase, 
bye, a dwelling. 

bay, an inlet of water. 

bey, a Turkish governor, 
be, to exist, 
bee, an insect. 

beach, sea-shore. 

beech, a tree, 
boll, a pod of plants, 
bowl, an earthen vessel 
bole, a kind of clay. 

but, a conjunction. 

butt, two hogsheads, 
brake, a weed, 
break, to part asunder. 

Cain, a man's name. 

cane, a shrub or staff, 
call, to cry out, or name. 



caul, a net inclosing the bowels, 
can non, a largo gun. 
can on, a law of the church, 
ces sion, a grant. 
' ses sion, the sitting of a court, 
can vas, coarse cloth, 
can vass, to examine, 
ceil, to make a ceiling, 
seal, to fasten a letter, 
seal ing, setting a seal. 
ceil ing, of a room, 
cens er, an incense pan. 
cen sor, a critic. 

course, way, direction, 
coarse, not fine, 
cote, a sheep-fold, 
coat, a garment, 
core, the heart, 
corps, a body of soldiers, 
cell, a hut. 
sell, to dispose of. 
cen tu ry, a hundred years, 
cen tau ry, a plant, 
chol er, wrath, 
col lar, for the neck, 
cord, a small rope. 
chord, a line. 
cite, to summon, 
site, situation, 
sight, the sense of seeing, 
com pie ment, a full number. 
com pli ment, act of politeness, 
cous in, a relation, 
coz en, to cheat, 
cur rant, a berry, 
cur rent, a stream, 
deer, a wild animal, 
dear, costly. 

cask, a vessel for liquids, 
casque, a helmet, 
ce dar, a kind of wood, 
ce der, one who cedes, 
cede, to give up. 
seed, fruit, offspring, 
cent, the hundredth part of a dollar, 
sent, ordered away, 
scent, a smell, 
eel lar, the lowest room. . 
sell er, one who sells, 
clime, a region, 
climb, to ascend. 






SPELLING-BOOK. 



149 



MOVK, 6(")K, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ", ET7LE, PULL ; EXIST J € = K J G = j; S=Z; CH=SH. 



coun cil, an assembly. 
coun sel, advice. 

sym bol, a type. 

cym bal, a musical instrument 
col or, hue. 
cul ler, one who selects. 

dam, to stop water. 
, danm, to condemn, 
dew, falling vapors. 
due, owing. 

die, to expire. 

dye, to color. 
doe, a female deer. 
dough, bread not baked. 

fane, a temple. 

feign, to dissemble, 
dire, horrid, 
dy er, one who colors. 



hale, healthy. 

hart, a beast. 

heart, the seat of life, 
hare, an animal, 
hair, the fur of animals. 

here, in this place. 

hear, to hearken, 
hew, to cut. 
hue, color. 

him, objective of he. 

hymn, a sacred song. t 

hire, wages. 
high er, more high. 

heel, the hinder part of the foot. 

heal, to cure, 
haul to drag. — 

hall, a large room. 

I, myself. 



dun, to urge for money. 


eye, organ of sight. 


duu, a brown color. 


isle, an island. 


done, performed. 


aisle, of a church. 


dram, a drink of spirit 


in, within. 


drachm, a small weight' 


inn, a tavern. 


e lis ion, the act of cutting off. 


in dite, to compose. 


e lys ian, a place of joy. 


in diet, to prosecute. 


you, second person. 


kill, to slay. 


yew, a tree. 


kil/i, for burning bricks. 


ewe, a female sheep. 


£nap, a protuberance. 


fair, handsome. 


nap, a short sleep. 


fare, customary duty. 


knave, a rogue. 


feat, an exploit 


nave, of a wheel. 


feet, plural of foot. 


£nead, to work dough. 


freeze, to congeal. 


need, necessit. 


frieze, in a building. 


kneel, to bend the knee. 


hie, to hasten. 


neah- to heat. 


high, elevated, lofty. 


A*new, did know. 


flea, an insect 


new, fresh, not old. 


flee, to run away. 


know, to understand. 


flour, of rye or wheat. 


no, not 


flow er, a blossom. 


ftnight, a title. 


forth, abroad. 


night, darkness. 


fourth, in number. 


knot, a tie. 


fouL filthy. 


not, no, denying. 


fowl, a bird. 


lade, to fill, to dip. 


gilt, with gold. 


laid, placed. 


guilt, crime. 


lain, did he. 


grate, iron bars. 


lane, a narrow street 


great, large. 


leek, a root. 


grown, increased. 


leak, to run out. 


groan, an expression of pain. 


less on, a reading. 


hail, to call, or frozen rain. 


les sen, to diminish. 









150 THE 


ELEMENTARY 


bXb, lAst, «ark, f.\i.l, \ni4.T 


HER, 1 


key, tiiere; get; uTed, maeike; lijjk; 


li ar, one who tells lies. 




aught, any thing. 


li er, one who lies in wait. 




ought, bound. 


lyre, a harp. 




oar, a paddle. 


I led, did lead. 




ore, of metal. 


lead, a heavy metal 




one, a single thing. 


lie, an untruth. 




won, did win. 


lye, water drained through 


ashes, 


oh, alas. 


lo, behold. 




owe, to be indebted. 


low, humble 




our, belonging to us 


lac, a gum. 




hour, sixty minutes. 


lack, want. 




plum, a fruit. 


' lea, an inclosed field. 




plum&, a lead and line. 1 


lee, opposite the wind* 




pale, without color. I 


leaf, of a plant. 




pail, a vessel. * 


lief, willingly. 




pain, distress. k 


lone, solitary. 




pane, a square of glass. 


loan, that is lent. 




pal ate, part of the mouth. 


lore, learning. 




pal let, a painter's board, a 


low er, more low. 




bed. 


lock, a catch to a door. 




pleas, pleadings. 


, loch, a lake. 




please, to give pleasure. 


main, ocean, the chief 




pole, a long stick. 


mane, of a horse. 




poll, the head. 


made, finished. 




peel, to pare off the rind* f 


maid, an unmarried woman 


peal, sounds. t 


male, the he kind. 




pair, a couple. 


mail, armor, or the bag for letters. 


pare, to cut off the rind. 


man ner, mode of action. 




pear, a fruit. 


man or, lands of a lord. 




plain, even or level. 


meet, to come together. 




plane, to make smooth 


meat, flesh, food. 




pray, to implore. 


mete, measure. 




prey, a booty, plunder. 


mien, countenance. 




prin' ci pal, chief. 


mean, low, humble. 




prin' ci pie, rule of action. 


mewl, to cry. 




proph et, a foreteller. 


mule, a beast. 




profit, advantage. 


mi ner, one who works in a mine. 


peace, quietude. 


mi nor, less, or one under 


age, 


piece, a part. 


moan, to grieve. 




pan el, a square in a door. 


mown, cut down. 




pan nel, a kind of saddle.. 


moat, a ditch. 




raise, to lift. 


mote, a speck. 




raze, to demolish. 


more, a greater portion. 




rain, water falling from clouds. 


mow er, one who mows* 




rei<ra, to rule. 


mite, an insect. 




rap, to strike. 


. might, strength. 




wrap, to fold together. 


met al, gold or silver. 




read, to peruse. 


met tie, briskness. 




reed, a plant. 


nit, egg of an insect. 




red, a color. 


Anit, to join with needles 




read, did read. 


nay, no. 


. 


reek, to emit steam. ' 


neigh, as a horse. 




wreak, to revenge. 



SPELLING-BOOK. 151 


- 

MOVE, SOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OE ; ETTLE 


pdll ; ejist ; •e=K ; g=j ; s=z ; cu=sh. 


rest, to take ease. 


sum, the whole. 


wrest, to take by force 


some, a part. 


rice, a sort of grain. 


sun, the fountain of light 


rise, source, beginning. 


son, a male child. 


rye, a sort of grain. 


stare, to gaze, 


wry, crooked. 


stair, a step. 


ring, to sound, a circle. 


steel, hard metal. 


wring, to twist. 


steal, to take by theft. 


; rite, ceremony. 


sue cor, help. 


right, just. 


suck er, a young twig. 


write, to make letters with a 


sleight, dexterity. 


pen. 


slight, to despise 


wright, a workman. 


sole, of the foot. 


rode, did ride. 


soul, the spirit. 


\ road, the highway, 


slay, to kill. 


rear, to raise. 


sley, a weaver's reed. 


rear, the hind part. 


sleigh, a carriage on runners* 


i rig ger, one who rig3 vessels. 


sloe, a fruit. 


' rig or, severity. 


slow, not swift. 


rout, a confused quarrel. 


stake, a post. 


route, reut, a way or course, 


steak, a slice of meat. 


rough, not smooth. 


stile, steps over a fence. 


1 ruff, a neck-cloth. 


style, fashion, diction. 


rote, repetition of worda 


tacks, small nails. 


wrote, did write. 


tax, a rate, tribute. 


'■ roe, a female deer. 


throw, to cast away. 


row, a rank. 


throe, pain of travail 


roar, to sound loudly. 


tear, to rend. 


row er, one who rows. 


tare, a w r eed, allowance of weight 


rab bet, to join. 


tear, water from the eyes. 


rab bit, a quadruped. 


tier, a row.' 


sail, the canvas of a ship. 


team, of cattle. 


sale, the act of selling. 


teem, to produce. 


sea, a large body of water. 


tide, flux of the sea. 


i see, to behold. 


tied, fastened. 


sa ver, one who saves, 


their, belonging to them, 


sa vor, taste or. odor. 


there, in this place. 


seen, beheld. 


the, definite adjective. 


scene, part of a play. 


thee, objective case of thou. 


seine, a fish net 


too, likewise. 


sen ior, older. 


two, twice one. 


seign ior, a Turkish king. 


tow, to drag. 


1 seam, where the edges join 


toe, extremity of the foot 


seem, to appear. 


vail, a covering. 


shear, to cut with shears, 


vale, a valley. 


sheer, clear, unmixed. 


vial, a little bottle. 


sent, ordered away. 


viol, a fiddle. 


scent, smell. 


vein, for the blood. ^ 


shore, sea : coast. 


vane, to show which way the 


shore, a prop. 


wind blows. 


so, in such a manner. 


vice, sin. 


sow, to scatter seed. 


vise, a screw. 


"™ ■■■■■■■■■■■• 





152 



THE ELEMENTARY 



Bar, last, €ake, fall, what: hkk, pbby, thkeb; get; bTbd, .maiJ.vk; lhtk; 



wait, to tarry. 

weight, heaviness, 
wear, to carry, as clothes, 
ware, merchandise. 

waste, to spread. 

waist, a part of the body, 
way, road, course. 

What ails the child ? 

Ale is a fermented liquor, made 
from malt. 

The awl is a tool used by shoemak- 
ers and harness-makers. 

All quadrupeds which walk and not 
leap, walk upon four legs. 

The Prince of Wales is heir to the 
crow nofEn gland. We breathe air. 

The moon alters its appearance ev- 
ery night. 

The Jews burned sacrifices upon an 
altar of stone. 

Cruel horsemen beat their horses. 

Some people make molasses from 
beets. 

A fine beau wears fine clothes. 

The rainbow is caused by the sun's 
shining upon the falling rain. 

Beer is an excellent drink for the 
table. 

A bier, is a hand-barrow on which 
dead bodies are carried. 

The great bell in Moscow, weighs 
two hundred and twenty tons. 

The belles and the beaux are fond of 
fine shows. 

Black berries and raspberries grow 
on briers. 

The farmer when he plants seeds, 
buries them in the ground. 

Wheat is a better grain than rye. 

One who lays a wager is a bettor. 

The wind bleio. The color of the 
sky is blue. 

A father's or mother's sister is an 
aunt. The little ants make hil- 
locks. 

Carpenters bore holes with an au- 
ger. An augur foretells. 

Boys love to play ball. Children 
bawl for trifles. 

Bears live in the woods. An oak 
bears acorns. 



weigh, to find the weight 

week, seven days. 

weak, not strong, 
wood, timber, 
would, past time of will. 

weather, state of the air. 

wether, a sheep. 

We bear evils. Trees bare of leaves. 

Beech wood makes a good fire ; the 
waves beat ou the beach. 

A wild boar is a savage beast. 

Miners bore holes in rocks, and 
burst them with powder. 

The boll of plants is a seed vessel. 

The turner makes bowls. 

The planks of our national vessels 
are fastened with copper bolts. 

Millers separate the bran from the 
flour by large sieves called bolts. 

The breech of a gun is its butt or 
club end. A ram butts with his 
head, and we import butts of 
spirits. 

Brakes are useless weeds. We 
break flax and hemp in dressing. 

Well bred people do not always eat 
wheat bread. 

A butt contains two hogsheads; but 
a barrel, 30 or 32 gallons. 

We judge of people's motives by 
their actions. 

We can not buy a seat in heaven 
with our money. 

Clothiers smooth their clothes with 
calenders. 

Almanac makers publish new calen- 
dars every year. 

Sails are made of canvas. Inspect- 
ors canvass votes. 

The courts of Xew York hold their 
sessions in the City Hall. 

Since the cession of Florida, the 
United States have been bounded 
on the south by the Gulf of Mex- 
ico. 

We call the membrane that covers 
the bowels a caul. 

Live fish are kept in the water, near 
our fish markets, in caufs. 

Consumptive people are afflicted 
with bad coughs. 



PELLING-BOOK. 



153 



HOVE, SOX, WflLP, FOOT, MOON, ok ; r.rr.rc, PULL, ; EXIST \ € = K ; (i=J ; s = z ; ru=SK. 



Brass cannon are more costly than 

iron. Church laws are canons. 
Farmers are sellers of apples and 

cider, which fill our cellars. 
A liar is not believed. 
The lyre is a musical instrument. 
Galileo made the telescope. 
Virginia was a handsome maid. 
The Missouri is the main branch of 

the Mississippi. 
A horse's mane grows on his neck. 
The male bird has a more beautiful 

plumage than the female. 
The mail is opened at the post-of- 
fice. 
Children should imitate themanners 

of polite people. 
The farms of the English nobility 

are called manors. 
A mite is an insect of little might. 
Mead is a pleasant innocent drink. 
Lying is a mean practice. 
"We mean to study grammar. 
The Hudson and East rivers 'meet 

at the Battery. 
Salt will preserve meat. 
Miners work in mines. 
Minors are not allowed to vote. 
David moaned the loss of Absalom. 
"When grass is mown and dried we 

call it hay. 
Forts are surrounded by a moat. 
Mote is an atom. 
A brigade of soldiers is more than a 

regiment. 
Mowers mow grass. 
Brass is a compound metal. 
A lively horse is a horse of mettle. 
Fishes are caught in a net. 
Clear profits are called net gain. 
Boats are rowed with oars. 
Ores are melted to separate the 

metal from the dross. 
A bird flew over the house. 
The smoke ascends in the/?//?. 
Gums ooze through the pores of 

wood. 
The tanner puts his hides into ooze. 
We carry water in pails. 
Gardens are sometimes surrounded 

by a pale fence. 
Sick people look pale. 



Panes of glass are cut in oblong 

squares. 
Pains are distressing. 
Shoes are sold by pairs. 
People pare apples to make pies. 
Pears are not so common as apples. 
A person who has 'lost his palate 

can not speak plain. 
The fine painter holds his pallet in 

his hand. 
The child sleeps on a paUet. 
The comma is the shortest pause in 

reading. 
Bears seize their prey with their 

paws. 
Good people love to live in peace. 
Our largest piece of silver coin is a 

dollar. 
The peak of Teneriffe is fifteen 

thousand feet high. 
The Jews had a pique or ill will 

against the Samaritans. 
On the fourth of July, the bells ring 

a loud peal 
The farmer peels the bark from trees 

for the tanner. 
The British Parliament is a legisla- 
tive assembly, consisting of the 

House of Peers and the House of 

Commons. 
Our vessels lie near the piers in our 

harbor. 
The carpenter planes boards with 

his plane. 
The essential principles of religion 

are written in plain language. 
Babylon stood upon an extended 

plam. 
Polite p e oplep fcasetheircom pan ions. 
The courts of common pleas are 

held in the court-houses. 
The builder uses the plumb and 

line to set his walls perpendicular. 
One dollar is one hundred cents. 
The worst gambler won the monoy. 
Plums grow on trees. 
The cat preys upon mice. 
We should pray for our enemies. 
The student pores over his books. 
The Xiagara river pjours down a 

precipiee of a hundred and fifty 

feet. 



154 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAB, LAST, CABE, I'AI-T., WHAT; HKK, I'SKT, THKBE J GET ; BIBP, M.VI'.iXE; I.IK1 



"We sweat through the_pores. 
The Hudson is the principal river 

of New York. 
A man of good, principles merits our 
' esteem. 

There is no profit in profane swear- 
ing. 
The prophet Daniel was a prisoner 

in Babylon. 
Panel doors are more expensive 

than batten doors. 
The court impanel jurors to judge 

causes in court. 
God sends his rain on the just and 

unjust 
Horses are guided by the reins of 

the bridle. 
Queen Victoria reigns over Great 

Britain. 
The barber shaves with a razor. 
Farmers are raisers of grain. 
TheLaplander wraps himself in furs 

in the winter. 
"When we wish to enter a house, we 

rap at the door. 
Reeds grow in swamps. 
"We should read the Bible with seri- 
ousness. 
We should often think upon what 

we have read. 
A hyacinth is a large red flower. 
Nero wreaked his malice upon the 

Christians. 
Brutus held up the dagger reeking 

with the blood of Lucretia. 
We rest on beds. 
The English wrested Gibraltar from 

the Spaniards. 
Rice grows in warm climates. 
The rise of the Missouri is in the 

Rocky Mountains. 
Ladies are fond of gold rings. 
The bell rings for church. 
Washerwomen wring clothes. 
Riggers rig vessels. 
Hannibal crossed the Alps in the 

rigor of winter. 
Baptism is a rite of the Christian 

church. 
It is not right to pilfer. 
Wheelwrights make carts and wag- 
ons. 



Cumberland road leads from Balti 

more to Wheeling. 
King David rode upon a mule. 
Watt Tyler made a great rout in 

England. 
The Israelites took their route 

through the wilderness of Arabia. 
Children often learn the alphabet by 

rote before they know the letters 
Oliver Goldsmith wrote several good 

histories. 
Paste is made of rye flour. 
Children make wry faces when they 

eat sour grapes. 
A roe deer has no horns. 
Corn is planted in rows. 
Oarsmen row boats with oars. 
The joiner rabbets boards. 
Rabbits are lively animals. 
The riv.er Danube runs into the 

Black sea. 
Owls can not see well when the sun 

shines. 
&ea&arecaughtinthesouthernseas. 
We seal letters with wafers and 

sealing-wax. 
Masons ceil with lime -mortar. 
A plastered ceiling looks better than 

a ceiling made of boards. 
We have never seen a more daz- 
zling object than the sun. 
A thunder-storm is a sublime scene. 
Fishermen catch shad in seines. 
The city of Paris stands on the river 

Seine. 
John Smith, Senior, is father to 

John Smith, Junior. 
The Grand Seignior of Turkey is an 

absolute monarch. 
The sun seems to rise and set. 
Neat sewers make handsome seams. 
Sheep-shearers shear the sheep. 
When the wolf sees the sheep well 

guarded he sheers off. . 
Waves dash against the shore. 
When ship-builders build vessels 

they shore them up with props. 
The writer signs his name. 
Heavy clouds are signs of rain. 
Mankind slay each other in cruel 

wars. 
A sleigh runs on snow and ice. 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



155 



BtOVK, BON, VTQLF, FOOT, MOON, OB J EFLE, PtJXL J EXIST J €=K J G=J ; 8=Z ; CH=£ 



Children should never sKg^ their 

parents. 
Indians live in very slight buildings. 
Some have a good sleight at work. 
A sloe is a black wild plum. 
The sloth is slow in moving. 
The lark soars into the sky. 
A. boil is a sore swelling. 
A sower sows his seeds. 
We have all some knowledge. 
The sum of four and five is nine,, 
The sole of a shoe is the bottom. 
The sun is the sole cause of day. 
Our souls are immortal. 
Tents are fastened with stakes. 
Beef-steaks are good food. 
"A wise son makes a glad father.''' 
Without the sun all animals and 

vegetables would die. 
The Jews were not permitted to 

have stairs to -their altars. 
The owl stares at the moon. 
Let not children stare at strangers. 
Stiles are steps over fences. 
G-oldsmith wrote in a plain style,, 
Saul threw his javelin at David. 
The Israelites went through the sea,. 
Tares grow among wheat. 
Grocers subtract the tare from the 

gross weight. 
Never tear your clothes. 
The plumb-line hangs straight to- 
ward the center of the earth. 
The straits of Gibraltar separate 

Spain from Morocco. 
Succor a man in distress. 
Suckers sprout from the root of an 

old stock. 
Shoemakers drive lacks into the 

heels of shoes. 
People pay a heavy tax. 
Lions have long bushy tails. 
The tale of Eobinson Crusoe is a 

celebrated romanee. 



Ladies wear sashes round the waist. 
Foolish children waste their time in 

idleness. 
Time waits for no one 
Butter is sold by weight. 
Earthen ware is baked in furnaces. 
A Turk wears a turban instead of a 

. hat - 

Sickness makes the body wea'n 
Seven days constitute one week. 
We weigh gold and silver by Troy 

weight. 
The way of a good man is plain. 
The weather is colder in America 
- than in the- same latitudes in Eu- 
rope. 
Wether sheep make the best mut- 
ton. 
Men have a great toe on each foot- 
Horses tow the canal boats. 
Tow is hatch eled from flax. 
Good scholars love their books. 
There are no tides in the Baltic sea. 
Women wear vails. 
The valley of the Mississippi is the 
largest vale in the United States, 
The vane shows which way the 

wind blows. 
Arteries convey the blood from the 

heart and veins. 
A vial of laudanum. 
A hase-viol is a large fiddle, and a 

violin is a small one. 
We shed tears of sorrow when we 

lose our friends. 
Ships often carry two tiers of guns. 
A team of horses will travel faster 

than a team of oxen. 
Farmers rejoice when their farm3 

teem with fruits. 
The tide is caused by the attraction 

of the sun and moon. 
A black ribbon tied on the left arm 
is a badge of mourning;, 



Many things are possible which are not practicable. That is 
possible which can be performed by any means ; that is 
practicable which can be performed by the means which are^ 
in our power. 

Bank notes are redeemable in cash. 



'156 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAR, LAST, €ARE, PALL, "WHAT; HEB, PEEY, THERE; GET; BIRD, MAEINE, Ug K ; 

Ho. 149.-CXLIX. 

WORDS OF IRREGULAR ORTHOGRAPHY. 



any 

many 

de mesne 

ba teau 

beau 

beaux 

bu reau 

been 

bury 

bu ri a! 

busy 

isle 

Is land 

does 

says 

said 

lieu 

a dieu 



PRONOUNCED, .WBITTEN. PRONOUNCED. WRITTEN. PBONOCNOED. 

en' ny 



girl 

men ny firm 
demeen' ghost 



bato' 

bo 

boze 

bu'ro 

bin 

ber' ry 

ber'eal once 



corps 

ache 

half 

calf 

calve 

one 



gerl 

ferm 

gost 

kore 

ake 

haf 

kaf 

kav 

wun 



biz' zy 
He 

iland 

duz 

sez 

sed 

lu 

adti 



done 
gone 
folks 
rati 
va iise 
o cean 
could 
would 



should 
debt 
phlegm 
croup 
tomb 
womb 
wolf 
yacht 
dough 
wunce neigh 
dun sleigh 
gaun weigh 
fokes gauge 
ra 7 sho bough 
valece slough 
o' shun doubt 
kdbd is sue 
wood tissue 



shood 

det 

flem 

krdbp 

toom 

wdbm 

wdblf 

yot 

do 

na 

sla 

wa 

gage 

bou 

slou 

dout 

ish' shu 

tish'shu 



bus i ness 
bus i ly 
co lo nel 
haut boy 
masque 
sou, sous 
guit ar 
pur lieu 
su gar 
vis count 
ap ro pos 



PRONOUNCED, 

biz' ness 
biz' i ly 
kiir' nel 
ho' boy 
mask 
soo 
git ar 7 
pur' lu 
shdbg ar 
vi' kount 
ap ro po 



flam beau 
right eous 
car touch 
in veigh 
sur tout 
ron deau 
wo men 
bis cuit 
cir cuit 
sal mon 
isth mus 



PRONOUNCED 

flam' bo 
ri chus 
kar tdbch' 
in vay 
sur toot' 
ron do' 
wim' en 
bis' kit 
sir' kit 
sam' on 
is' mus 



spelling-book:. 



157 



MOVE, 60JT, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OK ; KTTLE, FCXL ; EXIST ; €=] 



r = j; S = Z; CH=gH, 



neigh bor 
piq uant 
piq uan cy 
ptis an 
phthis ic 
sol dier 
vict uals 
ca tarrh 
pty a lism 
bru nette 
ga zette 
in debt ed 
lieu ten ant 
qua drille 
pneu mat ic 



PEONOtrXCED. 

na 7 bor 
pik 7 ant 
pik 7 an cy 
tiz 7 an 
tiz 7 ik 
sol 7 jer 
vit 7 tl§ 
ka tar 7 
ti 7 a li§m 
bru net' 
ga zet 7 • 
in det 7 ed 
lu ten 7 ant 
ka dril 7 
nu mat 7 ik 



WBITTEX. 

mort gage 
sei^n ior 
se ragl io 
asth ma 
beau ty 
beau te ous 
bdel Hum 
ca noe 
plaid 
schism 
feoff ment 
hal cy on 
mis tie toe 
psal mo dy 
bal sam ic 



IN THE FOLLOWING 



PEONOTOTCEn. 

mor 7 gaje 
seen yur 
se ral 7 yo 
as 7 ma 
bu 7 ty 
bu 7 te us 
del 7 yum 
ka nob 7 
plad 
sizm 

f ef 7 ment 
hal 7 se on 
miz 7 zl to 
sal 7 mo dy 
bal sam 7 it 



balk 
calk 



chalk 
stalk 



, I IS SILENT. 

talk 
walk 



THE FOLLOWING END WITH THE SOUND OF /. 

chough rough cough [cauf] 

clough slough trough [trauf] 

e nough laugh [laf ] 



hough 



rheum 



lb AFTER r IS SILENT. 

rhu 7 barb 



rheu mat 7 ic 
rheu 7 ma tigm 
rhyme 



rhet 7 o ric 
rhap 7 so dy 
rhi no 9/ e ros 



g IS SILENT BEFORE 11. 

deign ed ing 

ed ing poign' ant 



reign 



ed 



rug 



feign 



158 THE ELEMENTARY 


BAE, LAST, «Ai:i!, I'AT.L, 


what; nicn, rngY, thuhj: 


; get; dTkd, mak'ixe; link; 


I BEFORE 


m IS SILENT IN THE FOLLOWING. 


calm 


balm y 


psalm 


calm ly 


em balm 


qualm 


calin ness 


alm§ 


qualm ish 


be ealm 


alm§ house 


psalm ist 


balm 


alms, giv ing 


holm 


IN THE FOLLOWING 


geon and gion are . 


PRONOUNCED AS jun ; 


eon, as un ; ctieon y as chun ; geous 


AND gi0U8, AS JUS. 


blud 7 geon 


sur' geon 


pro di 7 gious 


dud 7 geon 


sur 7 geon cy 


pun 7 cheon 


gud 7 geon 


dun 7 geon 


trun 7 cheon 


bur 7 geon 


pig 7 eon 


scutch 7 eon j 


stur 7 geon 


wid 7 geon 


es cutch 7 eon 


le 7 gion 


run 7 cheon 


cur mud 7 geon 


re 7 gion 


eon ta 7 gious 


gor 7 geous 1 


con ta 7 gion 


e gre 7 gious 


sac ri le 7 gious 1 


re li 7 gion 


re li 7 gious 


ir re li 7 gious 


IN THE FOLLOWING, 


OU AND ClU ARE PRONOUNCED AS CllO, AND 




gh ARE MUTE. 




bought 


ought 


wrought j 


brought 


sought 


naught 


fought 


thought 


fraught 


IN THE FOLLOWING, 


UG AT THE END OF 
ARE SILENT. 


THE PRIMITIVE WORD ] 


plague 


vogue 


pique 


vague 


tongue 


har angue 7 


league 


mosque 


ap 7 o logue 


teague 


in trigue 7 


■cat 7 a logue i 


brogue 


o paque 7 


di 7 a logue 


rogue 


u nique 7 


ee 7 logue 



SPELLING-BOOK. 159 



MOTE, SON, WQLF, FOOT, MOON, OB ; P.rT.E, PULL ; EXLST ; € = K ; G = J ; S = Z ; CTI=8U. 



No. 150.-CL 

Regular verbs form the past tense, and participle of the past, by talcing ed, 
and tlie participle of the present tense by taking ing ; as, called, calling, 
from call. The Idler p. stands for past tense ; ppr. for participle of the 
present tense ; and a. for agent. 

p. ppr. p. ppr. p. ppr. 



c*a 


ed 


ing 


pray 


ed 


ing 


al low 


ed 


ing 


turn 


ed 


ing 


cloy 


ed 


mg 


a void 


ed 


mg 


burn 


ed 


ing 


jest 


ed 


ing 


em ploy 


ed 


mg 


plow 


ed 


mg 


a bound 


ed 


mg 


pur loin 


ed 


ing 


30W 


ed 


ing 


ab scond 


ed 


ing 


rep re sent 


ed 


mg 


plant 


ed 


mg 


al lay 


ed 


ing 


an noy 


ed 


mg 



Monosyllabic verbs ending in a single consonant after a single vowel, and 
other verbs ending in a single accented consonant after a single vowel, 
double the final consonant in the derivatives. Thus, abet, abetted, abet- 
ting, abettor. 

p. ppr. a. p. ppr. a. p. ppr. a. 

a bet ted ting tor wed ded ding tre pan ned ning ner 

fret ted ting ter bar red ring de fer red ring 

man ned ning expel led ling ler abhor red ring rer t 

plan ned ning ner re bel led ling ler in cur red ring 

Verbs having a digraph, diphthong, or long vowel sound before the last 
consonant, do not double that consonant. 



seal 


p. ppr. a. 
ed ing er 


p. ppr. a. 
claim ed ing er 


re coil 


ed 


ppr. a: 
ing 


heal 


ed ing er 


cool ed ing er 


ve neer 


ed 


mg 


oil 
hail 


ed ing er 
ed ing er 


ap pear ed ing er 
re peat ed ing er 


avail 
re strain 


ed 

ed 


ing 
ing er 




Verbs ending 


in two consonants, do not double tJtc last. 




gild 
long 
watch 


p. ppr. a. 
ed ing er 
ed ing 
ed ing er 


p. ppr. a. 
dress ed ing er 
paint ed ing er 
charm ed ing er 


•re sist 
con vert 
disturb 


V 

ed 
ed 
ed 


ppr: a. 
ing er 
ing er 
ing er 



Verbs ending in a single consonant, preceded by a single vowel, the last 
consonant or syllable not being accented, ought not to double the last con- 
sonant in the derivatives. 



p- 


ppr 




P- 


ppr. 




P- 


ppr. 


bi as ed 


mg. 


lev ei 


ed 


mg 


grav el 


ed 


mg 


bev el ed 


mg 


coun sel 


ed 


mg 


grov el 


ed 


mg 


can eel ed 


ing 


cud gel 


ed 


mg 


haud sel 


ed 


rag 


car ol ed 


ing 


driv el 


ed 


mg 


jew el 


ed 


mg 


cav il ed 


mg 


du el 


ed 


mg 


kern el 


ed 


mg 


chan nel ed 


mg 


e qual 


ed 


ing 


label 


ed 


ing 


chis el ed 


mg 


gam bol 


ed 


ing 


lau rel 


ed 


ing 



160 




THE ELEMENTARY 






r/ln, Lis 


t, c.'.i 


:::, i\vll, -wii.^t; iikk, n:£Y, 


th£m: 


GET ; EICD, JIAHJ 


xe; li 


UK; 


lev el 


ed 


ing 


ri val ed 


ing 


mod el 


ed 


ing 


libel 


ed 


infjf 


row el ed 


mg 


wag on 


ed 


mg 
ing 


mar sliai 


ed 


fog 


shov el ed 


mg 


clos et 


ed 


par col 


ed 


mg 


shriv el ed 


mg 


riv et 


ed 


ing 


pen cil 


ed 


tag 


trammel ed 


mg 


lim it 


ed 


mg 


pommel 


ed 


mg 


trav el ed 


mg 


ben e fit 


ed 


ing 


quar rel 


ed 


ing 


tun nel ed 


mg 


prof it 


ed 


ing 


rev el 


ed 


mg 


wor ship ed 


mg 


buffet 


ed 


ing 



d 


ing- 


cor rode 


d 


ing 


d 


mg 


de ludo 


d 


mg 


d 


mg 


in trude 


d 


ing 


d 


mg 


ex plode 


d 


ing 


d 


mg 


de ride 


d 


mg 



The name oftlie agent, when the verb admits of it, is formed in likcmanner, 
without doubling the last consonant, as, caviler, worshiper, duelist, 
libelor, traveler. So also adjectives are formed from these verbs without 
doubling the last consonant, as, libelous, marvelous. 

W7ien verbs end in e after d and t, the final e in the past tense and parti- 
ciple of the perfect tense, unites with d and forms an additional syllable, 
but it is dropped before ing. Thus, abate, abated, abating. 

ab di cate d ing de grade 

ded i cate d ing suf fo cate 

med i tate d ing ed u cate 

im pro cate d ing in vade 

vin di cate d ing con cede 

In verbs ending in e after any other consonant than d and t, the past tense 
is formed by the addition of d, and this letter with the final o may form 
a distinct syllable; but usually the e is dropped and d is blended with the 
last syllable of the verb. Thus abridged, is pronounced abridjd; abased, 
abasto. Before ing, e is dropped. 

a base d ing 

a bridge d ing 

con fine d ing 

com pose d ing 

re fuse d ing 

Note. Although ed in the past tense and participle is thus blended with the 
last syllable oftlie verb, yet when a noun is formed by adding ness to such 
participles, the ed becomes a distinct syllable. Thus blessed may be pro~ 
nounced in one syllable ; but blessedness must be in three. 
Verbs ending in ay, 07, ow, ew, and ey, have regular derivatives 
in ed and mg. 



pro nounce 


d 


ing 


crit i cise 


d 


ing 


man age 


d 


ing 


em bezzle 


d 


mg 


re joice 


d 


mg 


disoblige 


d 


mg 


cat e cbise 


d 


mg 


dis fig ure 


d 


mg 


com pro mise 


d 


mg 


un der val ue d 


mg 



ar ray 


ed 


ing 


al loy 


ed 


ing 


re new 


ed 


mg 


al lay 


ed 


mg 


em ploy 


ed 


mg 


con vey 


ed 


mg 


pray 


ed 


mg 


de stroy 


ed 


ing 


fol low 


ed 


mg 


stray 


ed 


mg 


an noy 


ed 


mg 


be stow 


ed 


mg 


de lay 


ed 


mg 


en dow 


ed 


mg 


con vey 


ed 


mg 



A few monosyllables, as pay, say, and lay, change y into i, as 

paid, said, laid. 

Verbs ending in y, change y into i in the past tense and participle of the 

perfect, but retain it in the participle of the present tense. 
cry cried cry ing dry dried drying 

de fy de fied de fy ing car ry car ried car ry ing 

ed i fy ed i fled ed i fy ing mar ry mar ried mar ry ing 



SPELLING-BOOK. 1G1 



MOTE, BOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OE J F.rLP;, TULL ; T.XIST ; € = K ] C1 = J 5 § = Z ] 



Verbs ending in y change this letter toxin the second and third persons, 

and in the name of the agent. Thus : 

Solemn Style. Familiar Style. Agent. 

I cry thou criest be crieth he cries crier 

I try thou triest he trieth he tries trier 

Past tense. 
I cried thou criedst he we ye they cried 

I tried thou triedst he we ye they tried 

Verbs ending in ie are thus formed. pp r 

I die thou die3t he dieth or dies dying 

I lie thou liest he lieth or lies lying 

I tie thou tiest he tieth or tie3 tying 

I hie thou hiest he hieth or hies hying 

I vie thou viest he vieth or vies vying 

The past tense 1 and participle of the present, are regular. 

died lied tied hied vied 

Formation of the plural number of nouns. 

The regular plural of nouns is farmed by the addition of s to the singular, 

which letter unites with most consonants in the same syllabic, but sounds 

Wee z after all the consonants except f, p, q, t, k, or c with the sound ofk. 



sing. 


plu. 


sing. 


plu. 


sing. 


plu. 


slab 


slabs 


roll 


rolls 


strait 


straits 


lad 


lads 


ham 


hams 


post 


posts 


chief 


chiefs 


chain 


chains 


port 


ports 


bag 


bags 


crop 


crops 


sight 


sights 


back 


backs 


tear 


tears 


sign 


signs 



WJicn the noun ends in e, if s will coalesce with the preceding consonant, 

it forms no distiyici syllable. 

bride brides knave knaves bone bones 

blade blades date dates cake cakes 

smile smiles note notes flame flames 

If s will not coalesce with the preceding consonant, it unites with e, and 

forms an additional syllable. 

grace graces maze mazes pledge pledges 

spice spices fleece fleeces stage stages 

When nouns end in ch, sh, ss, and x, the plural is formed by the 
addition of es. 
church churches bush bushes dress dresses 

poach peaches glass glasses fox foxes 

Nouns ending in y after a consonant, form the plural by the changing of y 
into i, and the addition ofes ; the termination ies being pronounced ize, 
in monosyllables, and iz in most other words. 
fly flies du ty du ties fu ry fu ries 

cry cries glo ry glo ries ber ry ber ries 

sky skies ru by ru bies mer cy mer cies 

cit y cit iea la dy la dies va can cy va can cies 



1(52 THE ELEMENTARY 



BAR, LAST, €AHK, FALL, WHAT; HEP., PREY, TIIKKE ; ©ET ; BIRD, MAR1KE; LINK; 



Nouns ending in ay, ey, oy, ow, ew, taken only to form the plural. 
day days val ley val leys boy boys 

way ways mon ey mon eys bow bows 

bay bays at tor ney at tor nej's vow vows 

de lay do lays sur vey sur veys clew clews 

Nouns ending in a vowel take s or es. 
sea seas boe boes woe woes pie pies 

Tfhen the singular ends in f, the plural is usually formed by changing f 
into v, with es. 
life lives loaf loaves calf calves 

wife wives leaf leaves half halves 

knife knives shelf shelves sheaf sheaves 

beef beeves wharf wharves thief thieves 

Adjectives formed from nouns by the addition of y. 

n a n a n a n a 

bulk y silk y pith y rain y 

flesh y milk y meal y hill y 

Some nouns when they take y, lose e final 
flake flaky scale scaly stone stony 

plume plumy smoke smoky bone bony 

Adjectives formed from nouns by ly. 

n a n a n a n a 

friend ly love ly man ly earth ly 

home ly time ly cost ly lord ly 

Nouns formed from adjectives in y, by changing y into i and taking ness. 

an an an an 

hap py i ness la zy i ness drow sy i ness sha dy i ness 
loft y i ness emp ty i ness diz zy i ness chil ly i ness 

Adverbs formed from adjectives in y, by a change of y into i, and the 
addition of ly. 
a ad a ad a ad a ad 

crafty i ly lucky i ly lofty i ly gloomy i ly 

Adverbs formed from adjectives by the addition oflj. 
a ad a ad a ad 

fer vent ly brill iant ly em i nent ly 

pa tient ly op u lent ly per ma nent ly 

Nouns formed from adjectives by ness. 
an an an 

au da cious ness of fl cious ness ra pa cious ness 

ca pa cious ness li cen tious ness in ge ni ous ness 

Adjectives formed from nouns by less, adverbs by ly, and nouns I 
bound less ly ness blame less ly ness 

fear less ly ness need less ly ness 

hope less ly ness faith less ly ness 



SPELLING-BOOK, 163 



MOVE, BOX, WOLF, FOOT, MOON, OR J EELIS, TCLL ; EXIST J € = K J G=J J S = Z ; Cn=rSH. 



Adjectives formed from nouns by ful, /ram. wfo'eft adverbs are formed by 

ly and nouns by ness. 
n a ad n n a ad n n a ad n 

irt tul ly ness pain ful ly ness skill ful ly ness 
jafe ful ly ness grace ful ly ness peace fill ly ness 

Tlie termination ist added to ivords denotes an agent 
art ist form a list loy al ist or gan ist du el ist hu mor ist 

In some words, y is changed into i. 

zo ol o gy zo ol o gist or ni thol o gy or ni thol o gist 

The prefix ante denotes before. 

date ante-date chamber ante-chamber diluvian ante-diluvian 
past ante-past penult ante-penult nuptial ante-nuptial 

The prefix anti usually denotes opposition or against. 

Christ anti-christ Christian anti-chri3tian febrile anti-febrile 

Ee, a prefix, denotes nearness or intensity. 

daub be-daub dew be-dew friend be-friend labor be-labor 
siege be-siege moan be-moan speak be-speak sprinkle be-sprinkle 

The prefix con, or co, deno tes with or against ; coats clianged into col 
before 1. 

co-equaJ co-exist co-habit con-form 

eo-eval co-extend con-firm con-join 

The prefix counter denotes against or opposition, 
balance counter-balance act counter-act evidence counter-evidence 
plead counter-plead work counter-work part counter-part 

TJie prefix de denotes from or down. 

base de-base' bar de-bar compose de-compose cry de-cry 

form de-form fame de-fame face de-face garnish de garniah 

Dis denotes separation, departure, and hence gives to words a negative sense. 

able dis-able agree dis-agree allow dis-allow belief dis-belief 
credit dis-credit esteem dis-esteem grace dis-grace honor dis-honor 

Fore denotes before in time, sometimes in place. 

bode fore-bode father fore-father know fore-know noon fore-noon 
tell fore-tell taste fore-taste warn fore-warn run fore-run 

In, which is sometimes changed into il, im, and ir, denotes on, upon, or 
against ; hence it often gives to a word a negative sense ; sometimes it 
only gives more strength to the sense of a word ; as, bank, imbank, 
brown, imbrown; bitter, imbitter. 

In the following, it gives a negative sense. 
material im-material moderate im-moderate mutable im-mutable 



164 THE ELEMENTARY 



BAE, LAST, •GAItK, FALL, WHAT; KBIT, PHJ5T, THBJ1E J GETJ MBP, M. 



pure im-pure active in-active applicable in-applicable 

articulate in-articulate attention in-attention cautious in-cautious 

defensible in-defensible discreet in-discreet distinct in-distinct 

religious ir-religious reverent ir-reverent revocable ir-revocable 

Non is used as a prefix, giving to words a negative sense. 

appearance non-appearance compliance non-compliance 

conformist non-conformist resident non-resident 

. Out, as a prefix, denotes beyond, abroad, or at a distance. 
leap out-leap live out-live venom out-venom weigh out-weigh 

Over, as a prefix, denotes above, beyond, excess, too much, 
balance over-balance bold over-bold burden over-burden 

charge over-charge drive over-drive feed over-feed 

flow over-flow load over-load pay over-pay 

Trans, a prefix, signifies beyond, across or over. 

plant trans-plant Atlantic trans-atlantic 

Pre, as a prefix, denotes before, in time or rank. 

caution pre-caution determine pre-determine eminent pre-eminent 
mature pre-mature occupy pre-occupy suppose pro-suppose 
conceive pre-conceive concert pre-concert exist pro-exist 

Re, a prefix, denotes again or repetition. 

assert re-assert assure re-assure bound re-bound « 

dissolve re-dissolve embark re-embark enter re-enter 

assume re-assume capture re-capture collect re-collect 

commence re-commence conquer ' re-conquer examine re-examine 

export re-export pay re-pay people re-people 

Un, a prefix, denotes not, and gives to words a negative sense. 

abashed un-abashed abated un-abated abolished un-abolished 
acceptable un-acceptable adjusted un-adjusted attainable un-attainable 
biased un-biased conscious un-couscious equaled un-equaled 
graceful un-graceful lawful un-lawful supported un-supported 

Super, supra,' and sur, denote above, beyond, or excess, 

abound super-abound eminent super-eminent 

mundane supra-mundane charge sur-ckarge 

He seldom lives frugally, who lives by chance. 

"Without frugality, none can be rich; and with it, few would bo poor. 
The most necessary part of learning is, to unlearn our errors. 
Small parties make up in diligence what they want in numbers. 
Some talk of subjects which they do not understand; others praise 

virtue, who do not practice it. 
The path of duty, is always the path of safety. 
Be very cautious in believing ill of your neighbor ; but more cautious 

in reporting it 



'■"■■■" 




SPELLING-BOOK. 


165 


MOVE, SON, WOLF, FOOT, 


moon, 6e ; rule, pull ; exist ; e 


=k; g=j; s=z; ch=bh. 






OP NUMBERS. 




FIGURES. 


LETTERS. 


XAME8. NUMERAL ADJECTIVES, 


1 


I 


one I 


first 


2 


II 


two 11 t 


second 


3 


III 


three III 


third 


4 


IV 


four II II 


fourth 


5 


V 


five IIIII 


.fifth 


6 


VI 


six- IIIIII 


sixth 


T 


VII 


seven IIIIIII 


seventh 


8 


VIII 


eight IIIIIIII 


eighth • 


9 


IX 


- nine IIIIIIIII 


ninth 


10 


X 


ten IIIIIIIIII 


tenth 


11 


XI 


eleven 


eleventh 


12 


XII 


twelve 


twelfth 


13 


XIII 


thirteen 


thirteenth 


14 


XIV 


fourteen 


fourteenth 


15 


XV 


fifteen 


fifteenth 


16 


XVI 


sixteen 


sixteenth 


n 


XVII 


seventeen 


seventeenth 


18 


XVIII 


eighteen 


eighteenth 


19 


XIX 


nineteen 


nineteenth 


20 


XX 


twenty 


twentieth 


30 


XXX 


thirty 


thirtieth 


40 


XL 


forty 


fortieth 


50 


L 


fifty 


fiftieth 


60 


LX 


sixty 


sixtieth 


10 


LXX 


seventy 


seventieth 


80 


LXXX 


eighty 


eightieth 


90 


XC 


ninety 


ninetieth 


100 


c 


one hundred 


one hundredth 


200 


cc 


two hundred 


two hundredth 


300 


ccc 


three hundred 


three hundredth 


400 


cccc 


four hundred 


four hundredth 


500 


D 


five hundred 


five hundredth 


600 


DC 


six hundred 


six hundredth 


TOO 


DCC 


seven hundred 


seven hundredth 


800 


DCCC 


eight hundred 


eight hundredth 


* 900 


DCCCC 


nine hundred 


.nine hundredth 


1000 


M 


one thousand, &c. 


one thousandth 


1829 


MDCCCXXIX one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine 


\ one talf 


| one sixth 


f V one tenth. 


1,1 




1,11111 


1,111111111 


^ one third. 


\ one seventh, 


| two fifths. 


1,11 




1,111111 


11,111 


■ { one fourth 


-| one eighth, 


f four fifths, 


1,111 


1,1111111 . 


1111,1 


\ one fifth. 


i one ninth. 


X nine tenths, 


P 1,1111 


1,11111111 


111111111,1 



166 



THE ELEMENTARY 



BAR, LAS 



.L, what; iikr, prey, tiikre; get; thru, marine; lijk; 



WORDS AND PHRASES FROM FOREIGN LANGUAGES, FREQUENTLY 

OCCURRING IN ENGLISH BOOKS, RENDERED INTO ENGLISH. 

L. stands for Latin, F. for French, S. for Spanish. 

Fille de charnbre, F. a chamber- 
maid, [acting. 

Fortitor in re, L. with firmness in 

Gens d'armes, F. armed police. 

Habeas corpus, L. that you have 
the body; a writ for delivering a 
person from prison. 

Hie jacet, L. hero lies. 

Iloni soit qui mal y pensc, F. shame 
be to him that evil thinks. ! 

Hotel dieu, F. a hospital, [study. 

Impromptu, L. without previous 

In statu quo, L. in the former state. 

In toto, L. in the whole. 

Ipse dixit, L. he said. 

Ipso facto, L. in fact. 

Jet-d'eau, F. a water-spout. 



Ad captandum vulgus, L. to capti- 
vato the populaco. 

Ad finera, L. to the end. 

Ad hominom, L. to the man. 

Ad infinitum, L. to endless extent. 

Ad libitum, L. at pleasure. 

Ad referendum, L. for further co: • 
sidoration. [valu . 

Ad valorem, L. according to the 

Alma mater, L. acherishing mother. 

A mensa et toro, L. from bed and 
board. [lish manner. 

Anglice, L. in English, or the En* 1 

Avalanche, F. a snow-slip; a vast 
body of snow that slides down a 
mountain's side. 

Auto da fe, S. act of faith, a sen- 
tence of the Inquisition for the Jeu d'esprit, F. a play of wit. 



punishment of heresy. 

, Beau monde, F. the gay world. 

Bona fide, L. in good faith. 

Bon mot, F. a witty repartee. 

Cap-a-pie, F. from head to foot. 

Caput mortuum, L. the worthless 
remains. 

Carte blanche, F. blank paper ; per- 
mission without restraint. 

Ohef d'eeuvre, F. a master-piece. 
Time il faut, F. as it should be. 
inpos mentis, L. of sound mind. 

x>up de main, F. sudden enter 
prise or effort. 

Dernier ressort, F. the last resort. 

Dieu et mon droit, F. God and my 

Ennui, weariness, lassitude, [right. 

E pluribus unum, L. one out of, c? 
composed of, many ; the motto f 
ike United States. 

Ex, L. out ; as, ex-minister, a minis- 
ter out of office. 

Excelsior, L. more elevated ; motto 
of the Slate of New York. 

Ex officio, L. by virtue of office. 

Ex parte, L. on one side only. 

Ex post facto, L. after the fact, or 
after the commission of a crime. 

Extempore, L. without premedita- 
tion. 

Fac simile, L. a close imitation. 



Lex talionis, L. the law of retalia 

tion; as, an eye for an eye. 
Literatim, L. letter for letter. 
Locum tonens, L. a substitute. 
Magna charta, L. the great charter. 
Maximum, L. the greatest, [death. 
Memento mori, L. be mindful of 
Minimum, L. the smallest. 
Mirabile dictu, L. wonderful to tell. 
Multum in parvo, L. much in a 

small compass. [mously. 

Nem. con., or nem. dis., L. unani- 
Ne plus ultra, L.the utmost extent 
Nolens volens, ti. whether he will 

or not. 
Norn de plume, F. a literary title. 
Non compos mentis, L. not of a 

sound mind. [of brothers. 

Par nobile fratrum, L. a noble pair 
Paterpatrise, L. the fatherof hiscoun- 
Per annum, L. by the year. [try. 
Per diem, L. by the day. 
Per cent, L. by the hundred. 
Per contra, L. contrariwise. 
Per se, L. by itself considered. 
Prima facie, L, at the first view. 
Primum mobile, L. first cause of 

motion. [good- 

Pro bono publico, L. for the public 
Pro et con., L. for and against 
Pro patria, L. for my country. 











SPELLING- 


BOOK. 








167 


MOVE, 


BON 


WQLF, 


FOOT 


moon, or.; etjle, pull 


; exist ; €=k 


G = 


= J 


, s=z; 


Ch=sh. 



Pro tempore, L. for the time. 

Pro re nata, L. as occasion requires; 
for a special emergency. 

Pugnis et calcibus, L. with fists and 
feet, with all the might. 

Quantum, L. how much. 

Quantum sufiicit, L. a sufficient 
quantity. 

Qui trans! ulit sustinet, L. he who 
has borne them, sustains them, 

Quid nunc, L. a newsmonger. 

Re infecta, L. the thing not done. 

Sanctum Sanctorum, L. the Holy of 
Holies. [ference. 

Sang froid, P. in cold blood, indif- 

Sans souci, F. free and easy; with- 
out care. [art. 

Secundum artcm, L. according to 

Sic transit gloria mundi, L. thus 
passes away the glory of the world. 

Sine die, L. without a day specified. 



Sine quanon, L. that without which 
a thing can not be done. 

Soi disant, P. self-styled. 

Suaviter in modo, L. agreeable in 
manner. 

Sub judice, L. under consideration. 

Sub rosa, L. under the rose, pri- 
vately. 

Summumbonum, L. the chief good. 

Toties quotie3, L. as often as. . 

To to ccelo, L. wholly, as far as pos- 
sible, [agreeable. 

Utile dulci, L. the useful with the 

Vade mecum, L. a convenient com- 
panion, [conquered. 

Yeni, vidi, vici, L. I came, I saw, I 

Versus, L. against. 

Via, L. by the way of. 

Vice versa, L. the terms being ex- 
changed. 

Viva voce, L. with the voice. 



ABBREVIATIONS EXPLAINED. 



A. or Ans. Answer. 
A. A. S. Fellow of the 

American Academy. 
A. B. Bachelor of Arts. 
Abp. Archbishop. 
Abr. Abridged. 
Acct. Account. 
A. D. Anno Domini, the 

year of our Lord, 
Adm. Admiral. 
Ala. Alabama. 

A. M. Master of Arts ; 
before noon ; in the 
year of the world. 

Apr. April. 
Ark. Arkansas. 
Atty. Attorney. 
Aug. August. 
Bart. Baronet. 

B. C. Before Christ. 

B. D. Bachelor of Di- 
vinity. 

Bbl. Barrel. 
Gal. California. 

C. Centum, a hundred. 
Cant. Canticles. 
Capt. Captain. 
Chap. Chapter. 



Col. Colonel. 

Co. Company. 

Com. Commissioner, 
Commodore. 

Cr. Credit. 

Cwt. Hundred weight. 

Chron. Chronicles. 

Cor. Corinthian.?. 

Conn. Con. or Ct. Con- 
necticut. 

C. S. Keeper of the 
Seal. 

C. P. S. Keeper of the 
Privy Seal. 

CI. Clerk, Clergyman. 
Cong. Congress. 
Cons. Constable. 
Cts. Cents. 

D.D. Doctorof Divinity. 
Dea. Deacon. 
Dec. December. 
Del. Delaware. 
Dept. Deputy. 
Deut. Deuteronomy. 
Do. Ditto, the same. 
Dr. Doctor, or Debtor. 

D. V. Deo volente, God 
willing. 



E. East. 

Eccl. Ecclesiasticus, 

Ed. Edition, Editor. 

E. G. for example. 
Eng. England, English. 
Eph. Ephesians. 

Esa. Esaias. 
Ep. Epistle. 

Esq. Esquire, [castera. 
Etc. and so forth, et 
Ex. Exodus, Example. 
Exr. Executor. 
Feb. February. 
Flor. Florida. 
Fr. France, French, 
Frances. 

F. R. S. Fellow of the 
Royal Society [Eng.] 

Gal. Galatians. 
Gen. General. 
Gent. Gentleman. 
Geo. George, Georgia. 
Gov. Governor. 
Heb. Hebrews. 
Hon. Honorable. 
Hund. Hundred. 
H. B. M. His or Her 
Britannic Majesty. 



^ 



168 


THE ELEMENTARY 






EAR, LAST, €AHK, I\ 


ll. v.-.:.yr; hEe, pc£Y, Tnf.r.n; g::t; r.7;::>, M* 


;-.i :,-;-■. 


; u**; 



Hhd. Hogshead. 

Ibid. In the sameplaoe, 

i. e. that is [id est]. 

id, the same. 

111. Illinois. 

Ind. Indiana. 

Inst. Instant. 

Io. Iowa. 

Is. Isaiah. 

Jan. January. 

Ja. James. 

Jac. Jacob. 

Josh. Joshua 

Jun. Junior. 

K. King. 

Kan. Kansas. 



Md. Maryland. Q. Question, Queen. 

Me. Maine. q. d. as if he should say. 

Mich. Michigan. q. 1. as much as you 

Mr. Master, Sir. please. [tity. 

Messrs. Gentlemen, Sirs. q. s. a sufficient quan- 



Minn. Minnesota. 
Miss. Mississippi. 
MS. Manuscript. 
MSS. Manuscripts. 
Mrs. Mistress. 
1ST. North. 
N. B. Take notice 
N. C. North Carolina. 



Regr. Register. 
Rep. Representative. 
Rov. Reverend, Reve- 
lation, [able. 
RtJJon. Right Honor- 
R. I. Rhode Island. 
S. South, Shilling. 
S. C. South Carolina. 



N. H. New Hampshire. St. Saint. 
N. J. New Jersey Sect. Section, 

No. Number. 



Ken. orKy. Kentucky. Nov. November. 
Km. Kingdom. N.S. New Style. 

Kt. Knight. N. W. T. North West- 

JK. C. B. Knight Com- ern Territory. 
I mander of the Order N. Y. New York 
" of the Bath. 0. Ohio. 

'K. G. C. Knight of the Obj. Objection. 
Grand Cross. [Garter. Obt. Obedient. 
K. G. Knight of the Oct. October. 
L. or Ld. Lord or Lady. Or. Oregon 



Lev. Leviticus. 
Lieut. Lieutenant. 
Loud. London. 
Lon. Longitude. 
Vlp. Lordship. 

\ Latitude. 

A. or La. Louisiana. 
Mi. D. Doctor of Laws 
lbs. Pounds. 



0. S. Old Style. 



Sen. Senator, Senior. 

Sept. September 

Servt. Servant 

S. T. P. Professor of 
Sacred Theology. 

S. T. D. Doctor of Di- 
vinity. 

ss. to wit, namely 

Surg. Surgeon. 

Tenn. Tennessee. 

Tex. Texas. 

Theo. Theophilus. 



Pari. Parliament, [nia. Thess. Thessalonians. 

Pa. Penn. Pennsylva- Tho. Thomas, [month. 

per, by ; as, per yard, Ult. the last, or the last 

by the yard. [dred. U. S. A. United States 
Per Cent. By the hun- of America. 
Pot. Peter. [plans. V. Yide, See. 

Phil. Philip. Philip- Ya. Virginia. 
Phiiom. Aloverof learn- viz. to wit, namely. 

ing. [ternoon. Yt. Yermont. 

P. M. Post Master, Af- Wt. Weight. 



L. S. Place of the Seal 

M. Marquis, Meridian 

Maj. Major. P. 0. Post Office. Win. William. 

Mass. Massachusetts. P. S. Postscript. Wp. Worship. 

Math. Mathematics. Pa Psalm. Yd. Yard. 

Mat. Matthew, [cine. Pres. President. &. And. 

M. D. Doctor of Medi- Prof. Professor. &c. And so forth. 

PUNCTUATION. 

Punctuation is the division of a composition into sentences or parts, 
of a 'sentence by points, to mark the pauses to bo observed in reading, 
and show the connection of the several parts or clauses. 

The comma (, ) indicates a pause of the length of a monosyllable, or 
the time of pronouncing one. The semicolon ( ; ) iudicates a pause of 
two monosyllables; a colon (: ) of three; a period (. ) four. The period 
is placed at the close of a sentence. [do you see t 

The interrogation point (?) denotes that a question is asked, as, what 



SPELLING-BOOK. 169 

move, sox, wolf, foot, nobs, on ; ki;lh, ffll ; exist ; €-=k ; 6=J ; E=Z ; CH = BH. 



An exclamation point (!) denotes wonder, astonishment, or other 
emotion, cxpre.->-ed by the foregoing words. 

A parenthesis ( ) includes words not necessary in the sentence, and 
which are to be uttered in a lower tone of voice. 

Brackets or hooks [ ] are sometimes used for nearly the same purpose 
as the parenthesis, or to include some explanation. 

A dash ( — ) denotes a sudden stop, or a change of subject, and re- 
quires a pause, but of no definite length. 

the 

A caret ( A ) shows the omission of a word or letter, thus, give me book. 

A 

An apostrophe ( ' ) denotes the omission of a lefter or letters, thus, 
lov'd, tho't. 

A quotation is indicated by these points " " placed at the beginning 
and end of the passage. 

The index (£§T°) points to a passage which is to beparticularly noticed. 

The paragraph ( ^f ) denotes the beginning of a new subject. 

The star or asterisk ( * ), the dagger ( f ), and other marks, ( %, §, \ ), 
and sometimes letters and fi^^s, are used to refer the reader to note3 
in the margin. ^|v- 

The diaresis ( "') denotestnat the vowel under it is not connected 
With the preceding voweL 

CAPITAL LETTERS. 

A capital letter should be used at the beginning of a V- 30k, chapter, 
section, sentence, and note. Itshould begin all proper nam;- of persons, 
cities, towns, villages, seas, rivers, mountains, lakes, ship- v &c. It should 
begin every line of poetry, a quotation, and often an important word. 

The n ame or appellation of God, Jehovah, Christ, Messiah 
should bepPwith a capital. 

The pronoun I and interjection are always in capitals. 

No. 150.-CL. 

THE LETTER q IS EQUIVALENT TO l\ 

aq / ue duct in iq' ui toils lie/ uid ate 

aq' ui line liq' uid liq uid a' tion 

an tiq' ui ty liq' uid ness liq' uid ness 

eq' ui ty liq 7 uor ob liq' ui ty 

eq' ui ta ble liq' ue fy u biq' ui ty 

eq' ui ta ble ness liq ue faV tion piq' uant 

eq' ui ta bly liq' ue fi a ble req' ui gite 

in iq' ui ty liq' ue fy ing req ui gi' tion 

EX THE FOLLOWING WORDS, t IS NOT PRONOUNCED. 

chas ten glis' ten moist' en 

has ten fast' en 6ft' en 

elms ten list' en soft' en 



i 



170 

Bl*::, last. clur, r,ux, w 



Z 



THE ELEMENTARY 



:n, piigv, tiiurk ; gkt; bird, marine; linxj 



The letters «i and ie occur in several words with the sail 
? sound, that of long e, but persons are often at a loss to recol- 
ii lectnvhich of these letters stands first. I have therefore ar- 
ranged the principal words of these classes in two distinct 
tables, that pupils may commit them to memory, so that the 
order may be made as familiar as letters of the alphabet. 





WORDS IN WHICH 


THE LETTER e ST 


ANDS BEFORE v. 




ceil 
gelling 

conceit 


disseizee 
disseizin 
either 


receive 
receipt 
seignior 




conceive 

deceit 

deceive 


inveigle 
leisure 
neither We? 


seme 
seize 
seizin 




perceive 
disseize 


obeisance 
obeisant 


seizure 
teil 




WORDS IN WHICH 


THE LETTER Z STANDS BEFORE 6 


Lieu, 
Lour] 
Lon. 
\dp. 


achieve 
-.-. grieve 
* x grievance 
l grievous 


lief 
liege 
lien 
mien 


relievo 
retrieve 
shield 
shieling 


/ 

/ 
I 
I 


/aggrieve 

belief 

believe 


niece 
piece 
pier 


shriek 

siege 

thief 


) 


brief 
chief 


pierce 

priest 


thieve 
tier 


1 


fief 
field 


relief 
relieve 


tierce 
wield 




fiend 
brigadier 


reprieve 
bombardier 


yield 
financier 




brevier 


grenadier 


•cavalier 




fierce 


cannonier 


chevalier 

i 




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xcels all others in defining scientific terms. 



[Horace Mann.] 
[John G. Whittier.] 

[President Hitchcock.] 

Remarkable compendium of human knowledge. 
[W. S. Clark, Pres't Ag. College.] 
A necessity for every intelligent family, student, teacher and professional 
man. What Library is complete without the best English Dictionary ? 

More valuable than Treasury Notes.— How that old cynic. Sam John- 
son, would have revelled through Webster's massive new Unabridged ! How 
he would have gloated over its magnificent letter-press and its illustrations, 
beautiful a^,- n ^w Treasury Notes, and much more valuable to the student/ V 
by far the greatest literary work of the age.— Baltimore American. 

ALSO / 

WEBSTER'S NATIONAL PICTORIAL DICTIONKr,. I 

1040 Pages Octavo. 600 Engravings. Price $5. 

The work is really a gem of a Dictionary, just the thing for the million.— 
American Educational Monthly. 

Published by G. & C. MERRIAM, Springfield, Mass. 

Sold by all Booksellers. 

.hoo:- 

WEBSTER'S SCHOOL DICTIONARIES. 

Webster's Primary School Dictionary, 204 Engravings. 
" Common School " 274- 

High School " 297 " 

Academic " 34-4 

" Counting House " with numerous illustra- 

tions and many valuable tables not to be found elsewhere. 
Published by IVISON, BLAKEMAN, TAYLOR & CO., New York, and J 
B. LIPPINCOTT & CO., Philadelphia. 

In many states copies of Webster's Unabridged have been purchased for 
supplying all the schools. 
What better investment can be made for Schools ? 

More than ten times as many are sold of Webster's Dictionaries, as of any 
other Series in this country. 

At least four-fifths of all the School-Books published in this country ownWeb- 
9ter as their standard, and of the remainder, few acknowledge any standard.