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Full text of "Eleventh Annual Report of The National Farm School November 1908"

ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
o/ 



NOVEMBER 1908 
FARM SCHOOL, BUCKS CO., PA. 



Philada. New York 

Buffalo Brooklyn 



OPFENHEIM&LLINSa& 



THE EXCLUSIVE WOMENS' SHOP 
FOR DISTINCTIVE OUTERGARMENTS 



Five years ago we opened our doors to the Philadel- 
phia Public — the only women's shop devoting energy to 
the exclusive production of distinctive outergarments. * 

Our policy and principle inevitably right — Our ex- 
pectations exceeded; prompted the further opening of 
stores in Buffalo and Brooklyn in addition to our large 
New York establishment that women of discerning taste 
bid welcome eight years ago- 

The predominating factor in our progress has been 
the concentration of purchasing power, the economies due 
to specializing; and the largest distributors in America. 

Every conceivable pronouncement of fashion from 
Paris and European Centres is embodied in the Oppen- 
heim, Collins & Co. garments for the appreciative women 
of style. 

A notable showing in each Department of models 
from the foremost fashion designers and manufacturers 
in their respective lines. The embodiment of ail that is 
refined and beautiful and all characterized by their mod- 
eration in cost. 

Chestnut and 12th Sts, 



ELEVENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



of 



The National Farm School 



Farm School, Bucks County, Pa. 



NOVEMBER 1908 



Officers of the National Farm School 

1908—1909 



PRESIDENT, 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, 

4715 Pulaski Avenue, Germantown. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, TREASURER, 

HARRY B. HIRSH. ISAAC H. SILVERMAN 

SECRETARY, 
ISAAC LANDMAN, 
334 Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia. 

LOCAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, President. HARRY B. HIRSH, Vice-President. 

I. H. SIL\'ERMAN, Treasurer. ISAAC LANDMAN-, Secretary. 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

(Having served consf.cutively for ten years.) 

ADOEPH EICHHOEZ, HOWARD A. LOEB, I. H. SILVERMAN, 

MORRIS A. KAUFMANN. 

ELECTED MEMBERS 

ALBERT J. BAMBERGER, BENJ. FINBERG, ALFRED M. KLEIN, 

BARNARD BINSWANGER, SIMON FRIEDBERGER, ARNOLD KOHN, 

HvVRT BLUMENTHAL, S. GRABFELDER, LEON MERZ, 

W. ATLEE BURPEE, HARRY B. HIRSH, BARNEY SELIG, 

•HARRY FELIX, ABRAHAM ISRAEL, JOS. N. SNELLENBERG. 

NATIONAL AUXILIARY BOARD 

LOUIS I. AARON Pittsburg, Pa. 

JULIUS ADLER Portland, Ore. 

HENRY BEER New Orleans, La. 

I. W. BERNHEIM Louisville, Ky. 

HENRY FRANK ..".'.'.'.. Natchez, Miss. 

MAURICE FREIBERG Cincinnati, O. 

BERNARD GINSBURG Detroit, Mich. 

MRS. JACOB HECHT .Boston, Mass. 

A. HIRSHHEIMER LaCrosse, Wis. 

M. HORKHEIMER Wheeling, W. Va. 

ADOLPH LEWISOHN New York City. 

LEON MANDEL Chicago, 111. 

LOUIS NEWBURGER Indianapolis, Ind. 

E. RAAB Richmond, Va. 

EDW. E. RICHARDS Mobile, Ala. 

ALEX. SANGER Dallas, Tex. 

SIGMUND SONNEBORN Baltimore, Md. 

DAVID STERNBERG Memphis, Tenn. 

HARRIS WEINSTOCK Sacramento, Cal. 

FERD. WESTHEIMER St. Joseph, Mo. ■ 

A. YOUNKER Des Moines, Iowa. 



4 OFFICERS OF THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

THE FACULTY 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, D. D., President. 

JOHN HOSEA WASHBURN, Ph. D., (Gottingen), 

Director and Pi'ofessor of Agricultural Chemistry. 
WILLIAM H. BISHOP, B. Sc, (Mass. Agricultural College), 

Pi'ofessor of Agriculture, Superintendent of the Farms. 
E. MONROE BAKER, B. A., (Delaware College), 

Gvernor of the Dormitories and Instructor in Physics and Soils. 
WALTER F. FANCOURT (Kew Botanical Gardens, England), 

Professor of Horticulture. 
MICHAEL L. LANDMAN, M. D., 

Lecturer in Bacteria of the Soil and Hygiene. 
MRS. CHARLES NIGHTINGALE, Instructor in English. 
J. C. MICHENER, V. S., Professor of Veterinary Science and Farm Hygiene. 
MISS HETTY ABRAHAM, Matron. 
HARMAN KRAFT, Foreman, Home Farm. 
HOWARD F. YOUNG, Foreman, Schoenfeld Farm; No. 3. 

SPECIAL LECTURERS 1908-09 

(Subjects and Dates Announced on Page 31.) 

GROVE, W. B., Department of Orcharding, Agricultural Dept., State 

of Pennsylvania, York Springs, Pa. 
LEWIS, JOHN C, Forester, City of Philadelphia. 

LONSDALE, EDWIN, Professor of Horticulture, Girard College, Phila. 
SKIDELSKY, S. S., Practical Horticulturist, Philadelphia. 
SURFACE, H. A,, M. Sc, Economic Zoologist, Dept Agriculture, 

State Penna., Harrisburg, Pa. 

a\t:lliams, irvin c, 

Deputy Commissioner of Forestry, State of Penna., Hari'isburg, Pa. 

LADIES' EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Associated with the Local Board. 

Mrs. Alfred M. Klein, Chairman. Mrs. Joseph Guckenheimer, Treas. 

Miss Linda Strauss, Secretary. 
Mrs. A. J. Bamberger, Miss Frieda Jonas, 

Mrs. Hart Blumenthal, Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, 

Mrs. Adolph Eichholz, Mrs. M. F. Langfeld, 

Mrs. Simon Friedberger, Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, 

Mrs. Martha Fleisher, Mrs. R. B. Schoneman, 

Mrs. Harry B. Hirsh, Mrs. I. H. Silverman, 

Mrs. Meyer Sycle. 

Honorarv Surgeon to the School, M. L. Landman, M. D., 1900 N. 32d St, Phila. 

Honorary Dentist to the School, L. I. Bernstein, D. D. S., 1900 N. 32d St., Phila. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Seventh Graduation at the National 
Farm School 

May 31, 1908 

Over five hundred friends of The National Farm School trav- 
eled in a special train from Philadelphia to Farm School, Pa., to 
participate in the graduating exercises of the Seventh Class of The 
National Farm School and to consecrate memorial trees in memory 
of deceased benefactors of the school, on the school grounds. 

Two sessions were held over which Congressman J. Hampton 
Aloore, of Pennsylvania, presided. After the invocation by Rabbi 
J, Stern, of New York, father of one of the graduating class. Dr. 
Jos. Krauskopf, President of the School, introduced the Chairman 
of the day. Congressman J. Hampton Moore, of Pennsylvania. 

In taking the chair. Congressman Moore said that this was 
distinctly a farmer's occasion. The farmer\was strong by reason 
of his cultivation of the soil. When the millworker is idle the 
farmer goes into his cellar for the smoked meats he has stored 
away for the dull season. The farmer and the manufacturer are 
the two great bread-winning factors upon which our 85,000,000 
people must rely. The Congressman declared that the farmer was 
the mainstay of modern civilization. "The lawyer may deal with, 
his legal controversies ; the soldier may march out to battle, and 
the sailor may take his place on the high seas, but they are not 
producers." 

Mr. Moore then introduced the speaker of the day. State 
Treasurer, John O. Sheatz, Mr. Sheatz said that the State of 
Pennsylvania, instead of being interested in one such worthy in- 
stitution as The National Farm School, should' have, at least, six 
such schools, located in different sections of the State, and should 
appropriate sufficient funds to enable them to be carried on in a 
progressive, successful and satisfactory manner. 

"While the people of our State," he continued, "feel proud of 
their industries and her great manufacturing plants and the de- 
velopment of her natural resources — which are greater than those 
of any other State in the Union — still, when you look for the posi- 
tive, dependable and continuous revenue producing industry, we 
must turn to the farm, for the farming industry, established 
at the very beginning of the development of our magnificent coun- 
try, will continue when our natural resources are exhausted and 



6 SEVENTH GRADUATION AT THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

when every stick of timl:)cr has been cut from tlic timbcrlands and 
forests of our country."" 

Deputy Commissioner of Forestry, of Pennsylvania, Mr. Irvin 
C. Williams, spoke of the work of The National Farm School in 
training young' men in a practical knowledge of tree culture. 
Practical education of this nature would not only provide a career 
for the graduates of the school, but would prove of vast benefit 
to the State, as the forestry question was to-day of the liveliest 
interest to the Commonwealth and the Nation. !Mr. Williams 
made a plea for forest preserves as an aid to the inland waterway 
movement, and explained the efforts being made by the Pennsyl- 
vania Forestry Commission. Young men who are to be graduated 
from competent agricultural schools, where they are taught the 
correct principles and practices of scientific agriculture, have be- 
fore them boundless opportunities, and one of these principles is 
the rapid restoration of the State to a tree-covered condition on 
non-agricultural lands. 

j\lr. Adolph Eichholz, a member of the Board of Directors, 
since the founding of the school, then delivered an eloquent tribute 
to the departed friends and benefactors of the School, in whose 
memory trees were consecrated at the conclusion of the morning 
meeting. "Many phases of life," said Mr- Eichholz, "are represented 
by these friends whom I hav.e mentioned ; widely different were 
the environments in which they were born and reared, varied were 
their personal traits. And yet, there was one thing they had in 
common — for it may be truly said of all of them — wdthout excep- 
tion they were possessed with a kindly, and generous interest in 
their fellow beings." 

The Rev. Mr. William Armhold then recited ''The Kaddish," 
after which an excellent luncheon was served in a tent. The long 
tables were charmingly set, under the direction of the Ladies' 
Auxiliary Board, and were laden with the good things from the 
farm. 

At the afternoon session Prof. Morris Loeb, a member of the 
Board of the Jewish Agricultural Aid Society, of New York, was 
the first speaker. He addressed himself to both the audience, and 
the graduates and students seated upon the platform. He spoke 
of The National Farm School's purpose in endeavoring to culti- 
vate a tendency toward farming among the Jews. Prof, Loeb 
said in part: 

The promise that the school makes to these young men is, not ex- 
cessive wealth, not immunity from care and toil, not even Israel's undy- 
ing gratitude to them, as restorers of her agricultural fame. But j^ou 



SEVENTH GRADUATION AT THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



can assure them that with a fair degree of industry tliey are likely to 
become their own masters at a comparatively early period; that their 
annual income will be less subject to violent fluctuations and their ex- 
penses more readily controlled; that they ai^e less liable to use up their 
health and strength in confining and nerve-i'acking occupations, and be- 
come old and worn-out at fifty; that when they marry, their home will 
be their own and their children will grow up healthy and free from the 
danger of the streets; and they themselves, in their daily occupations, will 
have the opportunity of developing their own individuality, instead of be- 
coming mere cogs in the wheels of commerce and industry. There can 
be no doubt, too, that the average farmer plays a more important role in 
citizenship than the average city-dweller; that his opportunity for making 
himself i^espected is gi'eater. 

All these are no mean ai'guments. It is the duty of the Farm School 
to confirm those who have accepted them; first by properly instructing 
its students in the methods of husbandry; secondly, by sharpening their 
appreciation of the enjoyments to be obtained by the contact with nature; 
thirdly, by strengthening their character against the unsettling tendencies 
of our age the nervous scramble, the hurry to get money quickly and to 
<?pend it flashily, that fear of quiet wnicli almost parallels the child s scare 
in the dark. The Jewish people, rich and poor, with profit largely by a 
return of a larger percentage to the wholesome restraint of real country life. 

The future is for the farmer who is content to make a fair annual 
income, while building up the land as a permanent inheritance to his 
descendants for many generations. If I interpret the land-hunger of the 
Jew aright, this is the very spirit in which he acts, and the idea of the 
family, as interpreted by Jewish tradition, may yet be the salvation of 
American farming. Once let it be understood that the farm is to be a 
precious inheritance of unborn generations, and timber will no longer be 
ruthlessly cut down and the soil robbed, as if it were an orange to be 
thrown away, after it has been squeezed out. Let schools, such as yours, 
teach how the land can be rationally cultivated. Let the community en- 
courage its graduates and let us all do our proportionate duty in building 
up the prosperity of the future American. 

The diplomas and certificates to the eleven graduates were 
presented by Mr. Francis J. Torrance, President of the, Pennsyl- 
vania State Board of Charities. In his baccalaureate address, Mr. 
Torrance, turning to the graduates, said : 

Now consider the importance of your calling, from the point of view 
that you do your work scientifically, not in a haphazard way, having the 
co-operation of the brain and muscle, putting into actual practice the 
theories you have acquired, not in an experimental way and watching foi 
results, but knowilig absolutely from past experience what those results 
will be. Consider for a moment that $3,500,000,000 represents the agri- 
cultural capital of the United States and then consider that you are a 
part of it. It may be but a small part of it, an insignificant part, that you 
occupy. Nevertheless, your importance in it is largely left to your own 
effort. Take advantage of the knowledge you have acquired here. Be 
something. Have an object in life. Be busy. Be employed. Work. I 



8 SEVENTH GRADUATION AT THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



don't mean to be a drudge or to labor, ignoi'ing every other element in 
life, but be something in life. Make yourself felt and your reward of 
self satisfaction which, when rightly and honestly acquired, is the best 
reward one can have. 

Turning- to the audience and the officers of the School, Mr. 
Torrance, spoke of the many millions which the State of Pennsyl- 
vania contributes to its charities and penal institutions. "But how 
much better we would be,"" he continued, "if a larger appropriation 
went to the homes and teaching institutions, rather than to the 
prisons and asylums, where w.e find the results of idleness and 
crime. The National Farm School is performing a noble function, 
is, rendering a great service to the Commonwealth, in teaching in- 
dustry, making that class of citizens, whom we know to be desir- 
able." 

After the distribution of the the diplomas. Dr. Krauskopf an- 
nounced the following gifts to the School : 

Miss Eleanore Samuel, one-fourth of an estate, valued at from 
$80,000 to $100,000, will go into effect after death of brother; 

Mr. Isaac Sailer $500.00 

Mr. Solomon Blumenthal 250.00 

Mrs. Louis Eliel, in memory of Jos. Louchheim, for 

Prizes 250.00 

Mrs. Leah Bernheimer, Mobile, Ala 100.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Cohen, of Pittsburg, Prizes for gen- 
eral excellence, annually 20.00 

Dr. John H. Washburn, Director of the School, then distrib- 
uted the prizes. Mr. Gustav Bacharach paid a tribute to the mem- 
ory of Samuel Strauss, Jn, when the senior prizes for general 
scholarships were presented. Isaac Stern then delivered the vale- 
dictory in behalf of the graduating class after which the Buildings 
and Farms were inspected. 

THE GRADUATES 
Diplomas 
LOUIS CONDOR, S. S. RUDLEY, 

NATHAN FELDMAN, ALPHONSE SCHLES SINGER, 

MAX FLEISHER, HARRY SCHULMAN, 

WILLIAM LAUCHMAN, JULIUS STABINSKY, 

S. LOUIS LIEB, ISAAC STERN. 

Two Years' Certificate 

SAMUEL GALBLUM. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 




The L,ocb and Krauskopf Memorial Green houses 

Eleventh Pilgrimage and Annual Meeting 
at the National Farm School 

Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa., 
Odober 11, 1908 



Surrounded by a bounteous supply of farm products of the very 
best quality as a demonstration of what the pupils are doing in a 
practical way and in a Succah especially erected and decorated with 
cornstalks taken from fields cultivated by boy farmers, the Eleventh 
Annual Meeting of the National Farm School and the Succoth 
Pilgrimage was held, at the School, on Sunday, October ii, 1908. 

Senator Boise Penrose, of Pennsylvania, in the course of an 
introductory address, pledged th.e School his influence to aid in se- 
curing a substantial appropriation from the next session of the 
Legislature. He declared that the purposes of the farm school were 
most commendable and that any movement which sought to re- 
lieve the over-crowded and demoralizing condition of the ghettos 
and to induce the younger Jewish generation to take up scientific 
agriculture should have the substantial support of the State. The 
pilgrims, numbering over 500 and including men, women and chil- 
dren, arrived at the Farm School station shortly before noon, 
having left the Reading Terminal station, in Philadelphia, 
at 10 A. M. Many came in automoibles and by trolley. They 
were met by Senator Penrose and ex-Speaker of the House of 



10 ELEVENTH PILGRIMAGE AND ANNUAL MEETING 

Representatives Henry K. Walton. 

j\Ir. Adolpli iCichholz, an honorary member of the Local 
Board, presided. Hon. Henry M. Walton, ex-Speaker of the Legis- 
lature of Pennsylvania, introduced U. S. Senator Penrose, the 
senior Senator of Pennsylvania. Mr. W'^alton, in his introductory 
address, said that he had aided the School to obtain an appropria- 
tion, when he was in the Legislature, and that his chief regret was 
that the amount had not been larger. He said in part: 

This school is worthy of a much more liberal support. No doubt, with 
the united influence of men like our senior United States Senator, Rabbi 
Krauskopf and the Blums, you should find the next Legislature far more 
liberal. I shall certainly do all I can to help you, as I consider it the 
duty of the State to assist an institution of this nature. 

Farming is the noblest work a man can pursue. President 
Roosevelt b.elieves the farmer should be educated, and should pro- 
gress faster and should rise higher than the sphere in which he 
lives. I hope that before he gets out of office he may accomplish 
something along this line. I do not feel that the State appropriated 
money to The National Farm School it is giving money to charity, 
but t othe upbuilding and uplifting of the manhood of our State. 
It is the duty of the State to see that it receives a large amount of 
money so that this great work can be carried on. 

Senator Penrose began by congratulating the School upon its 
successful career. He said that the development of manual and 
agricultural training marked the most important advances in latter 
day education, and that in the large cities institutions established 
for the former branches were becoming more crowded than in 
colleges. He continued : 

We all recognize the fact that the prejudices of politics have limited 
the Jews of Europe to but few occupations, and that the holding of land 
has been held from them and other denominations. They have only natur- 
ally centred in the large cities and followed those occupations with which 
they are familiar. But in this great State, founded by William Penn as the 
land of religious liberty, we have different conditions than those abroad, 
and it is only fitting that the Legislature of Pennsylvania should encourage 
an institution of this nature, which adds to the agricultural interests of 
the State. 

Whatever influence I may possess at Harrisburg will always be exerted 
for liberal treatment to this institution. It does not conflict with any similar 
institution in the: State. No finer site for it could be secured and no more 
capable or zealous management could be in control. 

Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, the President of the School, then read 
his annual message, printed in full on pages 13 to 20 of this 



ELEVENTH PILGRIMAGE AND ANNUAL MEETING 11 

issue of the Y.ear Book. Dr. Krauskopf was followed by Mr. 
Arthur K. Kuhu, of New York City, who, in the absence of Mr. 
Isidore Strauss on account of illness, read his address on "Rural 
Happiness and. th.e Jewish Problem," also printed in full on 
pages 27 to 30. 

The audience was then addressed by Miss Lilliam Wald, head 
of the Henry Street Settlement, of New York City, who empha- 
sized th.e necessity for the removal of immigrants from the con- 
gested sections of large cities. Miss Wald paid a glowing tribute 
to the work that was being accomplished at The National Farm 
School. "Not enough emphasis," said Miss Wald, "lias been 
placed upon th.e great social obligations under which we lie to 
the farmer. The State is only doing its duty when it helps to 
dignify and enrich the work of making scientific and able farmers." 

After luncheon, served in a tent, under the direction of the 
Ladies' Auxiliary Committee, the students of the School drove the 
visitors over the four farms; of the institution, comprising nearly 
400 acres, 300 of which are in a state of cultivation. 

The afternoon session was held in Segal Hall. Here, the Di- 
rector, Dr. John H. Washburn, and the Treasurer, Mr. Isaac H. 
Silverman, submitted their reports, given in full on pages 21 to 26 
and 33 to 35. 

The following telegram from Judge Harry M. Goldfogel, who 
was to have been one of the speakers, was read by the Chairman : 

Conditions, suddenly arising during my campaign, imperatively require 
my presence in New Yoi^k to-morrow, Sunday. This, to my great regret, 
precludes me from' the pleasure of attending" the Farm School festival. I 
feel keenly disappointed in not being able to addi'ess the gathering. The 
practical study of agriculture ought to be encouraged. It serves to solve, 
In a large measure, the problem involved in the immigration question. Our 
great country holds out immense possibilities to those toiling to pursue 
farming and agricultural industries. I appreciate greatly your excellent 
work and the immense services the School renders to our immigrant co- 
religionists. I wish your institution continued success. 

At the election of officers, which followed. Rev. Dr. Joseph 
Krauskopf was re-elected presid,ent. Mr. Harry B. Hirsh was 
elected vice-president, succeeding Mr. Morris A. Kaufman, who, 
because of his ten years' continuous service on th.e Board of the 
School, became an honorary member of the Board. Two new mem- 
bers, Mr. Bernard Binswanger and Mr. Benjamin Finberg, were 
elected. Messrs. Harry Felix, Simon E. Friedberger, Harry B. 
Hirch and Leon Merz were re-elected for a term of three years. 

The pilgrims returned to Philadelphia on the special train at 4.30. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 13 



The President's Message. 



To the Members and Friends of the Natio^ial Farm School: 
Ladies and Gentlemen : 

Before presenting my Annual Report to you, the eleventh in 
the history of our institution, I desire to turn first, with feelings of 
profound gratitude, to Him from whom all our blessings flow, and 
Who has favored this institution with His kindness, more especially 
during the past year of our great financial and industrial depression. 

I must confess that we entered upon the eleventh year with 

considerable misgivings. Members began to fall off, support from 

sources which hitherto had never failed us, began to be 

rr 1 • 1 • -1 ' o A year of 

cut oft, and it looked as if we might never be able to financial 

weather the storm that threatened us. 277 members, hardships. 
pa3-ing from $5 to $25 yearly, their dues amounting in the aggre- 
gate to nearly $1500, declined to pay their subscriptions. Notwith- 
standing frequent appeals to them, we could elicit either no answer 
at all, or their regret that hard times necessitated their non-pay- 
ment. Our efforts to try to find others to take their place proved not 
onty an utter failure but of considerable expense besides. 

To make matters still worse, perhaps owing to the financial and 
industrial depression, applications for admission to our school poured 
in upon us as they had never before. Many of these 
were of a nature so urgent and so deserving that, not- crease in 
withstanding the crowded condition of our dormitory, students. 
notwithstanding decreased income, we were obliged to admit the 
largest number of students in the history of our institution, sixty- 
three in all; obliged to turn two of the farmhouses of the Schoenfeld 
Annex Farms into temporary dormitories ; obliged to take financial 
obligations upon us to meet which w^e have struggled hard, and the 
strain of which, we trust, may become easier with a return of pros- 
perity to our country. This anticipated prosperity may make it 
possible for us to admit the scores of others, whose applications we 
have been unable to act upon, and whose frequently repeated peti- 
tions for favorable consideration we are forced to decline, by reason 
of lack of funds in our treasury, and want of room in our dormitory. 

I am, however, happy to be able to report that, while the man- 
agers of this institution were obliged to wrestle with the financial 
problem, the faculty and students were in no wise permitted to be 



14 THE PRESIDEXT'S MESSAGE 

disturbed by it. The good work went on even more efficiently than 
usual, and the result to-day is more gratifying than ever. The report, 
which the Director of our school will submit to you, will acquaint 
you in detail with our achievements during the past year in school- 
room, on the fields, in the dairy, greenhouses, and in the manage- 
ment of the Schoenfeld Annex Farms. 

Some of our growth during the year you may see for yourselves 
in the Xew Green House, which the labor of our students has built, 

-ru o L. 1 aiid toward the erection of which Mr. Ferdinand Loeb 
The School 

continues to has contributed, in memory of his wife, the sum of 
grow. $1000, and all the cement used in the construction 

thereof. Unfortunately, we will not be able to make use of this 
beautiful structure this winter, because there are no means at our 
command to supply it with the necessary heating plant. Experts 
have strongly advised us to install one heating plant large enough 
to supply our three greenhouses with the requisite heat. This will 
involve an expenditure of a little more than $iooo, an expense which 
our empty treasury will not enable us to incur. 

Another sign of our growth during the past year is the lake, 
now in course of construction, and which, when completed, will not 
only realize a long-felt need, but will also, with its tree- 
A new Lake planted esplanade encircling it, greatly enhance the 
beauty of our plant. It is to be dedicated during our 
Graduation next spring, and is the donation of Mr. Henry Rosen- 
thal, in memory of his recently deceased brother, Anshel Rosenthal. 
The large wagon-shed, opposite our barn, now in course of 
construction, is another of the past year's additions to our plant, of 
Teach the which not only all its labor is that of our students, but 

iversi led ^^jg^ -^.g i^j^-^i^g,- jg largely from our own grove. It is 
needs of . 

farm life. thus that we give our boys opportunity for acquiring 

diversified knowledge in modern practical agriculture, acquainting 

them with all the needs of farm life, teaching them not only the 

theory and practice of raising crops, but also how to build their own 

greenhouses, construct their own barn and stable and do a certain 

amount of carpentry, masonry and cement-work. The upper half 

story of this shed could be used as a repair shop, if some friend of 

the institution were kindly to supply us with the necessary outfit. 

It is by reason of the practical side of farming given at our 

school that most of our graduates have given excellent account of 

themselves, either as managers of their own farms, or as employees 

on other men's farms, or when doing expert work in the Agricultural 

Department at Washington, or as instructors in State institutions or 



THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 15 

in agTicnltnral schools. 

Speaking- of other handicrafts in which we are, to some extent, 

initiating- our students, the time has come for giving this matter 

larger attention than has hitherto been given to it. The „ , , .^ 
° ° Rural Life 

main object of our institution is somewhat to relieve the and the 
congestion of our overcrowded and demoralizing- ghet- Handicrafts, 
toes, to induce more and more, especially of the younger generation, 
to take up the pursuit of agriculture, to train leaders of future agri- 
cultural colonies. But we must not leave out of sight that a colony 
needs mechanics as well as farmers, and that it is as much our duty 
to train the former as the latter. We need a mechanical building, in 
which young men might be trained, in the country, in handicrafts 
to be followed in country places. To train young men in handicrafts 
in the city is apt to attach them to the city, and keep them there. To 
have mechanics in the country, we must train them there, and since 
of country mechanics there is a great need, this institution would 
take a decided step forward if, besides giving to some students an 
agricultural training, it would give to others a training in the other 
handicrafts. These two callings are complementary to each other, 
and to provide the training for them would truly fulfil the mission of 
this institution. 

There is here a noble opportunity for a noble benefaction. The 
erection of such a building, and the endowing it with a sufficient 

fund for its maintenance, would mean a new epoch in ., , , 

' -^ Need of a 

the history of our work, and would afiford to young men Mechanical 
opportunities which, in course of time, would open a ^"''ding. 
yet wider path from the demoralizing, congested cities to the healthy 
and ennobling country. 

The hope that such a benefactor might arise in our midst brings 
vividly before us him who has proven himself our greatest bene- 
factor hitherto, Mr. Max Schoenfeld. In hearty sym- The Bene- 
pathy, from the first, with the ideas for which our ^^^*'J^"ax°^ 
institution stands, he came to our help when of decriers Schoenfeld. 
and doubters there were many, and of friends few, and gave us 
$10,000 with which to buy two farms adjoining our school farm, 
now known as Schoenfeld Annex Farms Nos. i and 2, and on 
which he desired graduates of our school to be given an opportunity 
to try independent farming, under the eye of our faculty, for a year 
or two, before going out into the world to engage in larger enter- 
prises of their own, or as managers for others. This gift he followed 
up, a year or two later, with an additional $1000, for the purchase 
of implements, and for the erection of our Silos. And to this princely 



16 



THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 




Chestnut Grove 



The Lake 



The Barns and Out Houses 



PxVNORAMIC VIEW OF THE SCHOOL FROM THE RAIEROAD 

munificence he added last 3'ear a third farm, of 163 acres, Hkewise 
adjoining our school, for which he paid the sum of $15,000. The 
Farm School entered upon the possession of that farm last March, 
equipped it at its own expense, with the necessary stock and imple- 
ments, made the absolutely necessary repairs on the buildings, in- 
volving an expenditure of $4251.19, which sum we were, of course, 
obliged to borrow. Some of this debt will be paid off this year 
from the sale of products raised on its grounds, after an allowance 
shall have been made for some more necessary repairs on the build- 
ings, and for additional farm equipments. 

Of our financial standing you will be fully informed by our 
Treasurer. But I cannot refrain from making special mention of the 

Mrs. Bertha splendid addition that was made to our Sinking Fund 

Rayner 

Frank's gift during the past year, by the gift of $10,000 by Mrs. 

ment Fund. Bertha Rayner Frank, in memory of her husband, Dr. 
Samuel L. Frank, and her father Wm. S.' Rayner, the former hav- 
ing been a member of the National Auxiliary Board of the Farm 
School from its beginning to the day of his death. This handsome 
donation is not only a noble tribute on the part of Mrs. Frank to 
the affection her lamented husband and father cherished for our 
institution, in the success of which they were deeply concerned, but 
it is also a splendid demonstration of her own appreciation of the 
noble cause for which our institution stands. 

What we have said of Mrs. Frank may likewise be said of Mr. 
Nathan Snellenburg, who has this year paid to the general fund of 

Mr. Nathan the school the first annual sum of $500, interest on the 

Snellen- 

burg's Trib- $io,ooo with which he has remembered the school in his 

School. "^^^^^- Such a graceful tribute to the school and its work 

gives additional inspiration to those who labor in its behalf. 

The school has also been remembered during the past year in 



THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 



17 




Moiiorial Trees Main BiiUding Green Houses R. R. Station Wind Mill 

PANORAMIC VIEW OF THU SCHOOIv FROM THF RAILROAD 

the will of Miss Eleanore Samuel, with one-fourth of the residue of 

her estate, subject to the life interest of Mr. T. Bumford ... 

■' _ •' Miss 

Samuel. It is estimated that our share will be $20,000. Samuels' 
$343.49 have already been paid in as the result of our l-egacy. 
share of the sale of Miss Samuel's personal property. 

Among other donors of one hundred dollars and upward, dur- 
ing the past year, we are pleased to mention the gift of Mrs. Louis 
Eliel, $250, interest of which is to be devoted to an annual Joseph A. 

Louchheim Prize. This prize was awarded at the ^ 

^ Donations 

last graduation. Estate of Moses H. Lichten, $500; of $100 and 

Estate of Marx Wineland, Frostburg, Md., $500; Dis- "Pwards. 
trict Grand Lodge No. 7, I. O. B. B., $150; M. Blumenfield, Wash- 
ington, D. C, $100; family of the late Angelo Myers, $100; Isador 
Newman, New Orleans, $100; Samuel Snellenburg, Philadelphia, 
$100; Hon. S. W. Rosendale, Albany, N. Y., $100; Mr. S. Lubin, 
Philadelphia, $100. 

We must make special mention of the personal interest taken 
in our school, during the past year, by Mr. S. Lubin. This gentle- 
man not only gave the school a new piano, and a mov- j^^ ^ |_^,fj. 
ing-picture machine for the entertainment of our stu- in's special 
dents, but has furnished monthly entertainments for the ^'^*^' 
boys during the winter season. In addition Mr. Lubin has taken a 
series of pictures exhibiting the daily life and work at the school 
and in the fields, which he has presented to the school, and which 
are to be used for propaganda purposes during the coming winter. 

The appreciation of the State of Pennsylvania of the work done 
by our school was shown not alone by the appropriation of $7500 

for maintenance, but by making the orchards of the National 

' -^ ^ Farm School 

Farm School an experimental station for Bucks and a state Ex- 

1 perimental 

Montgomery Counties. Our orchards were turned over station. 



18 THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

to the State for spraying and pruning-, in the presence of the fruit 

raisers of these two counties. Our students did the actual work. 

We have planted, for State experimental purposes as well as for the 

increase of our own efficiency in fruit culture, 1150 peach and 480 

apple trees on a fourteen acre stretch of land on Schoenfeld Farm 

No. 2. 

The State has held four institutes in Segal Hall for the purpose 

of giving the farmers of Bucks and ^Montgomery Counties the bene- 

,.,, ^ ^, fits of the experiments on our orchards, all of which 
What the ^ 

State might have proved very successful. It is to be hoped that the 
do for us. State, recognizing the excellence and usefulness of our 
work, will, at the coming assembly of the Legislature, appropriate 
the means for the much needed dormitory, a dining-hall to accom- 
modate the larger number of pupils, and a larger sum for mainte- 
nance. 

One of the aims of the school being the transferring of our 
people from the congested districts of the large cities to the country, 

^, ^ , it is natural for us to have a large enrollment from the 

The School ^ 

and New city of New York, and once more our register records a 

York City, j^rge number of students haiHng from that city, and 

our books also show the meagre financial support we receive from 

that metropolis. It is to be hoped that, with the return of prosperity, 

New York City will take upon itself the share that it should carry in 

the maintenance of our school. 

While the city of New York is not doing its duty by our school, 

we are pleased to be able to report that the Jewish Agricultural and 

Industrial Aid Society of New York has been of in- 

Aid for our valuable aid to us in assisting financiallv a number of 
Graduates. _ ^ 

our graduates to locate on independent farms, in differ- 
ent parts of our country. We are very grateful to this Society for 
its co-operation. We trust that the zeal and energy wath which 
our graduates enter upon their own farms, and the results they 
achieve, may constitute the Industrial Aid Society's truest reward, 
and warrant a continuance of its helpful aid to graduates of our 
school. 

It is painful to be obliged to turn from this pleasant incident 
in last year's history of our institution, to the great loss it has sus- 
. , tained in the sudden death of Mr. Isaac Herzberg. The 

Isaac deceased was a member of our Board of Managers for 

Herzberg. ^ number of years, and during a part of that time he 
served as Chairman of the Schoenfeld Alemorial Annex Farms, and 
devoted himself to that task with an earnestness and helpfulness that 



THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 19 

will be difficult to equal. Besides his efficient services, he endeared 

himself to the fellow members of the Board by his kindly disposition, 

and ever since his untimely death, his presence has been sadly missed 

at every meeting. 

In a measure, however, his loss has been compensated by the 

devoted services of his successor, as Chairman of the Schoenfeld 

Farms, Mr. Harry Felix, whose devoted manaeement .. ,, 

.'.-'.' ° Mr. Harry 

of his task gives promise that the farms under his spe- Felix his 

cial care will make an excellent showing for themselves, successor. 

in a very short time. 

Our by-laws, which require that Board Members who have 

served ten years shall be placed on the Honorary Board membership 

list, necessitate Mr. Morris A. Kaufman to retire from „ ^. 

Retirement 

the active Board. We trust, however, that he will of Mr. 
kindly consent to continue as Chairman of the Applica- Kaufman, 
tion Committee. That office is an arduous one, and, having served 
in that capacity for a number of years, he has acquired a mastery 
of the position which will be difficult for others to attain. 

In compliance with the by-laws, however, a new active Board 
Member must be elected by you, to-day. 

In our faculty, a change was made during the past year in the 

appointment of Mr. Walter F. Fancourt as horticulturist, succeeding 

Mr. W. B. Brierly. Mr. Fancourt has won for himself 

an enviable reputation as a thoroughly skilled and emi- Ciiange in 

. ^ . '^ -^ the Faculty. 

nently practical man in his profession, and the school 

may therefore look forward to great progress in its department of 

horticulture, fruit-raising and truck-gardening. 

We have also added to the faculty Dr. Michael L. Landman, 
who is to give alternate courses in Bacteria of the Soil and Hygiene. 
Dr. Landman is to make special experiments in the cul- n . ^ 
tivation of nitrogen-producing bacteria and practical man added 
demonstrations of their influence on the growth of *° *^ staff, 
crops, especially of Legumes. 

To the Federation of Jewish Charities of Philadelphia we desire 

to express our appreciation for its appropriation of $6400 to our 

funds, during the past year. That association is doing Charity, 

excellent work, and it would gladly be more liberal in ^ J[t^'°" 
' . . . Sina the 

its distribution of funds among the various societies School, 
constituting it, if the people at large were more generous in their 
support of it. There are still far too many in our midst who are not 
contributing their proportionate share towards the charities of 
Philadelphia, and quite a goodly number whose names do not yet 



20 THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

appear at all on the list of contributors to the Federation. It is to 
be hoped that a recognition of the goodly work it is helping to ac- 
complish on these grounds, and which is but an illustration of the 
kind of work it is doing in a dozen other institutions, will induce the 
public at large to be more mindful of its obligation to that noble 
organization. 

We also desire to express our gratitude to the Federation of 
Jewish Charities of the cities of Indianapolis, Toledo, Chattanooga, 
and Memphis for their annual contributions to our 
^^'^ ^^^^^ funds. It gives us great pleasure to express our thanks 
to the Director and the faculty for their efficient labors ; 
to the matron whose devoted management to the household is every- 
where manifest; to the secretary; to the Board of Managers, and 
especially to the Budget Committee, whose painstaking work has 
made it possible for us to weather the financial stress of the past 
year; to the members of the National Auxiliary Board; to the La- 
dies' Committee, who ably assisted the matron in the management of 
the household of the school ; to the Farm School Sewing Circle, that 
has contributed a large number of useful articles to the linen room; 
to our donors of implements and goods (tabulated account of which 
will be given in our Year Book) ; to the lecturers and speakers who 
have contributed to the intellectual progress of our faculty and stu- 
dents ; to the entertainers who have assisted in bringing cheerful 
evenings to the students during the winter months, and during the 
trying days of the summer months, and to all others who have held 
out an encouraging hand, and have given a cheering word. 

A number of times, appeals made at these annual meetings have 
been answered by those interested in our institution. Segal Hall, the 
A Consum- Laboratory, our dairy, the lake, are the results of such 
vout'lVwish- ^PP^^ls. To-day we ask for a heating-plant for our 
ed for. three greenhouses, for an additional dormitory, for a 

dining-hall, for larger means for the maintenance of the many stu- 
dents who are eager to enter our school, but to whom we are forced 
to refuse admission because of a lack of accommodations, and a 
want of means for their support. We hope, when we meet again, 
we will be able to report that some of the needs, for which we are 
appealing to-day, have been filled. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOS. KRAUSKOPF, 

President. 
Farm School, Pa., 

October ii, 1908. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 21 



The Diredor's Report 



In reporting- the progress of our School, I beg to state that 
there were eleven graduates last June. These, with one or two 
exceptions, received very satisfactory positions and 
have made good use of the training received at the Progress of 
Institution, in their positions, up to the present the School. 
time. In June we hope to graduate nine more men. 
Seventy-nine students received instruction during the past year; 
thirteen left the School after having received a partial course. 

The work done in the class-room is becoming more satisfac- 
tory each year. The class in Agricultural Mechanics made un- 
usual progress in their exercises in computing the amount of lum- 
ber necessary for certain buildings, and in the knowledge and care 
of farm tools, gasoline, steam and hot air engines, and other de- 
vices for lightening the work of the farmer. 

The new shed which is being built for the housing of our 
wagons will have, under the roof, a space for the making of a 
good shop, thirty by seventy feet, wdiich may be divided so that 
we can give instruction both in carpentering and in painting and 
repairing farm implements. I hope this practical course may be 
added to the instruction already given and be equipped with proper 
facilities. 

Another form of instruction which has been very popular dur- 
ing the past year, and which has been of mutual benefit to both our 
students and the community, is being given in the demonstration 
orchards under the care of Prof. H. A. Surface who has charge 
of the Entomological Division in the Department of Agriculture, 
at Harrisburg. This work has been under the immediate super- 
vision of Prof. E. L. Loux who has given public demonstrations 
at the Institution. He has also given addresses in evenings to our 
classes concerning the best methods of spraying and pruning, the 
making of fungicides and insecticides, and has taken the pupils 
of the Institution into the orchards to give them practical' demon- 
strations. 

At a public meeting, held on the afternoon of September 25th, 
Prof. Surface was here and gave to a goodly number of farmers 
demonstrations and explanations of the results of the year's spray- 
ing", and in the evening lectured to an appreciative audiei-^^e of 



22 THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 



Products 
raised oi 
Home Farm 



neighboring- farmers and students. I feel that this is an eminently 
practical and useful department of our instruction. Four of our 
orchards have been used as demonstration orchards by the State, — 
the large apple orchard near the station, the old peach orchard 
opposite, the new peach and apple orchard of fourteen acres which 
has just been set out this year, and the apple and pear orchard 
of th.e Schoenfeld Farm Number Three. 

^ ^ ;Jc 

The work of the farm and dairy during this last year has 

been very much the same as in the past with a 

slight addition in the amount of crops raised. The 
raised on , , i i .1 r 1 ^ 1 

crops harvested by the farm department for the 

year is as follows : 

133 tons of hay. 96 bushels of rye. 

160 bushels of oats. 100 bushels of mangles. 

260 bushels of turnips. 10 tons of sorgum. 

75 bushels of onions. 8 bushels of onion sets. 

20 bushels of pears. 150 bushels of apples. 

250 baskets of peaches. 450 bushels of potatoes. 

200 tons of silage. 856 bushels of corn. 

1700 bushels of tomatoes. 

We have in our poultry department about 300 chickens. 

Our swine have increased over fifty in number. 

Our Dairy has furnished the Boarding Department : 
15,550 quarts of milk. ' 592 quarts of cream. 

1,160 pounds of butter. 
10,113 pounds of skim milk, amounting in value to $1282.00. 

This department has sold for cash : 
3874 quarts of milk. 424 pounds of butter. 

777 quarts of cream. 
1589 pounds of skim milk, amounting to $487.06. 

The farm has furnished the Boarding Department : 
40 bushels of onions. 150 bushels of apples. 

600 bushels of potatoes. 194 pounds of chicken. 

143 pounds of fowl. 
423 dozen eggs, aggregating in value to $681.57. 

The Horticultural Department has also contributed a large 
share of its energies to the raising of material for our table. It 
has delivered from its kitchen gardens to the Boarding Department : 

222 pounds of rhubarb. 59 bunches of asparagus. 

165 bunches of radishes. 142 bunches of parsley. 

100 bunches of onions. 474 bunches of celery. 

24 egg plants. 10 bushels of salsify. 

10 bushels of parsnips. 37% bushels of carrots. 

1% bushels of peas. 29 1^ bushels of beet greens. 



THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 23 

69% bushels of beets. 27% bushels of string beans. 

28 bushels of lima beans. 4 barrels of summer squash. 

2% bushels of spinach. 9^/^ bushels of pickling cucumbers 

131/^ bushels of turnips. 80 bushels of tomatoes. 

30 baskets of peaches. 125 bushels of apples. 

14,313 ears of sweet corn, aggregating in value to $635.54. 

The facilities for instruction in both raising vegetables under 
glass for market and for giving object lessons in disposing of 
green-house produce has been materially increased with the mag- 
nificent new green-house which will now soon be completed. 

No branch of agriculture is giving to the farmer such rich 
pecuniary returns as that of orcharding and the raising of small 
fruits. In co-operation w'ith the Agricultural De- 
partment, at Harrisburg, we have increased our 
facilities for instruction in orcharding and feel that 
we are teaching to our students the very best 
methods that are known and practiced at the present time. 

Another feature of our instruction is that of the individual 
gardens where each student for two successive years must have 
his own little garden and raise over sixty different kinds of vege- 
tables and greens, learning thereby when, what and how to plant 
and care for a garden. The special advantage of the individual 
garden is that each student tills the whole of it from early Spring 
until late in Fall, learning every part of the care of the garden and 
its produce in a way that w^ould be impossible if he only helps in 
the care of our larger gardens. 

The crops that will be raised by our students for market dur- 
ing the coming winter are tomatoes, radishes and lettuce, together 
with carnations. 

We have already secured a donation for the starting of a 
nursery which will be a most helpful addition to our many branches 
of instruction and enable us to raise much of the material which 
we shall use in very large quantities in the next year or two in 
further beautifying our grounds, ,and for the landscape gardening 
around the new lake and that portion of the farm between the 
lake and the railroad. 

5j< >ji ^ 

The Faculty have labored most diligently and 
continuously to instruct and guide our young men The Faculty, 
in their work. 

Mr. W. G. Brierley, who for two years has been our Horticul- 



24 THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

turist, resigned early in August. His place has been filled by 
Mr. W. F. Fancourt who brings with him a rip.e knowledge and 
experience in care of green-houses, gardens, nurseries, and also 
much experience in practical landscape gardening. 

One of the most valuable additions in our instruction this 
year has been in Mrs. Charles Nightingale's department. She 
gives the young men a thorough drill in elementary English, gram- 
mar, composition, rhetoric, and .letter writing. 

The instruction in Veterinary was ably begun in the June 
Semester by Dr. J. C. Michen.er. He will finish his course of 
lectures during the winter. 

A course of lectures on horticultural subjects has been, ar- 
ranged for the next year to be given by th.e following men promi- 
nent in agricultural work : Prof. Surface, of the 
A Course of Department of Agriculture ; Prof. Loux, field agent 

for Bucks County ; Mr. Grove, one of Pennsyl- 
ures. -^ . . . 

vania's most successful practical horticulturists ; 
]\Ir. Edwin Lonsdale, Memb.er of theH State Board of Agriculture 
and head of the Horticultural Department of Girard College, and 
several other men successful in the practice of agriculture in the 
State of Penns3dvania. 

Schoenfeld Farm Number One has been occupied dur- 
ing the past year by a graduate of this year's class and a present 
Senior. They have been .farming to halves. They 

^ °®" ® have raised 200 bushels of potatoes, 2150 bushels of 

Farm Number 
Q tomatoes, 500 bushels of corn, 10 tons of hay, 10 

tons of corn-fodder, 20 tons of silage, 10 swine, and 

have delivered 7,000 quarts of milk. Their pecuniary success has 

been perfectly satisfactory and the additional instruction which 

they have received in being able to conduct and plan a farm for 

themselves will be of invaluable use to them. They both leave 

this next year to take a farm for themselves. No better proof of 

the immense value of the Schoenfeld Farms to our students crai 

be had than the fact that all the boys, with one exception, who 

have had charge of these farms are successfully conducting farms 

for themselves. 

When we received Schoenfeld Farm No. 2 a few years ago it 
was a very unproductive piece of land; but, by plowing in green 



THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 25 

crops and by constant tilling, it is now so much 

improved that in two or three years it will afford Schoen e 

^^ . ^ Farm Number 

a most generous income, ihis bpruig we set out ^ 

•= X o Two. 

on this farm 1150 peach trees, 480 apple trees, and 
7,000 aspargus plants. All of them are doing well. We have also 
raised ten acres of excellent crimson clover and have a very promis- 
ing corn crop on ten acres. Thirty young quince trees are doing 
well. These young fruit trees very greatly add to the value of 

the property. 

* * * 

Schoenfeld Farm Number Three was bought at an expense of 

$15,000. We took possession of it March first and had absolutely 

no funds with which to buy tools, hors.es, carts 

and machinery. Money had to be borrowed for Schoenfeld 

stocking the farm. For that reason the stock put ^, 

^ _ _ ^ Three. 

on the place, while not as high priced and as good 
quality as we hope to own in a little while, was the best we could 
get for the money we felt it would be wise to spend at that time. 
Sixteen cows were bought for the place and they were very or- 
dinary cows, rather poor. They have made; good money for what 
has been expended on them. 

Mr. Howard Young has been foreman of the farm and . has 
shown himself to be an unusually careful and patient worker as- 
sisting, teaching and helping the young men who have been sent 
to him in a very careful and kindly manner. 

The first year on every farm is always a precarious one. 
The man who makes a farm pay for the first year can make it 
pay richly during the second one. It was the middle of August 
before we had anything to sell from this farm. We have sent a 
team to market most every week since that time. The cash re- 
ceipts have amounted to $1280.00. W.e feel that this is an excel- 
lent showing under the conditions for seven months. It is un- 
derstood that the money we make on the farm will be used for' 
the improvement of its livestock and for the general betterment 
of the farm until we have a modern productive plant conducted in 
accordance with the best modern methods. 

We need books for our Library. The larger the School the 
more books we need. We need twenty elementary sets of carpen- 
ter's tools and some blacksmith tools for our in- 
struction in Agricultural Mechanics. We are sore Yhe Needs of 
in need of a small building, twenty feet by thirty the Institution. 
feet, in which we can have a ten horse-power boiler 



26 



THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT. 



where we can cook the food for the swine and poultry. Here 
we can make tlie thousands of gallons of the lime-sulphur 
fungicide for the spraying of our 2,000 trees in the Spring, and 
also cook the apple butter. All of this work is very objectionable 
around the dairy and should be removed from that building. We 
need $500.00 for the moving of the swine and poultry into proper 
quarters. We need $60.00 for putting up telephone poles and wire 
that w'e may take advantage of a very reasonable offer of the 
Telephone Company to connect up all of our outlying farms with 
the home farm, the railroad station and Doylestown on an inde- 
pendent line. We need an ice house that will store three hundred 
tons of ice; the increased use of ice being necessitated by our 
extended production of milk and its products. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. WASHBURN. 

Farm School, Pa., Oct. 11, 1908. 




the; new wagonshed and carpenter's shop 

Built of lumber taken from our forests by the students 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 27 



Rural Happiness and the Jewish Problem 

AN ADDRESS 

Read at the Eleventh Annual Meeting of The National Farm School 

at Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa., October 11,1 908 

■ By HON. ISIDOR STRAUS 

Aly presence here is not prompted as much by an}^ message 

that I bring as by a desir.e to see what you are doing and how 

you do it. Your school is making an effort to bring 

back to the soil some of our people in the hope that ^""^ '^ ^ 

, , ■ • n ,• , -11 • 1 ■ Jewish Prob- 

those whom it nirluences directly will, in their turn, , 

extend the influence to others. Any left'ort to take 

back our people to the soil must be of great interest to everyone 

who is interested in the Jewish question. Ignore it as we may, 

there is a Jewish question, yes, a Jewish problem. 

The Jew has for thousands of years been persecuted and has 

been driven from pillar to post. He could not feel secure for any 

extended period of time, in any one location. In 

consequence he was driven from agriculture, which, ^ ®^ 

driven from 
of all occupations, is the one that 3aelds its best . . ,. 

'^ ' ■' _ Agriculture, 

results only from patient and unswerving devotion 
over a long period of years. 

Necessity, said to be the mother of invention, is a stern task- 
master. It is not surprising that the J.ew, who had to depend 
for his livelihood upon his wits, developed his brain 

instead of his brawn. This in turn tended to drift depended upon 

, . . . r ,.,,11 - his wits for a 

hmi into occupations for which the development oi ,. ... . 

^ ^ livelihood, 

these attributes best fitted him. It would be as just 
to blame a bird for using its wings more than its legs as to con- 
demn the Jew for having flocked into callings which require more 
the exercise of brain than of muscle. 

The classical economist disseminated the view that wealth 
consisted only in the results of productive labor, and that the 
results from those otherwise employed added noth- 
ing to the wealth of nations. The illogical deduc- ^"^ ^'^^ 

. ^ , . , 1 , , damned as a 

tions from this dogma caused those who w.ere not . 

engaged in concretely productive labor to be re- 
garded as parasites in that they lived on the production of others 
and added nothing to economic wealth. This fallacy damned the 
Jew as a parasite. 

This is a glorious country, which offers to every human being 



28 RURAL HAPPINESS AND THE JEWISH PROBLEM 



the opportunity to develop his or her usefuhiess in any direction 

^ ,. .,. ^ which taste and capacity dictate. The Jew will be 
Activities of '■ -^ 

National Farm q^ick to take advantage of this opportunity and will 
School and in time seek such occupation as he regards best 

the anti-immi- suited to him. I hail with satisfaction the activities 
grationists. ^^ which this school is devoted. They awaken, fos- 

ter and encourage love for that healthful life which is one of the 
best antidotes for the over-crowding of the cities. It is this over- 
crowding which has furnished to the anti-immigrationists their 
most convincing arguments. Those anti-immigrationists have for 
a number of years been striving to shut out from our gates the 
oppressed and persecuted who fiee from countries that in this 
tW'Cntieth century are still living in the benighted atmosphere of 
the middle ages. 

New York City, the great gateway of this Western Hemi- 
sphere, harbors to-day within the borders of its five boroughs from 

eight hundred thousand to a million Jews. It is 
Congestion m certain that within a radius of twenty-five miles 

from City Hall, including Jersey City, Hoboken, 

Newark, Elizabeth, Rahway and Patterson, there 
are more than one million Jews. Prior to the 8o's, before the tre- 
mendous immigration from Russia and other far-Eastern European 
countries started, this same district did not contain over 100,000 
Jews. 

We cannot ignore the fact that this rapid influx has created 
a Jewish problem which nothing but distribution and diversifying 

of occupation can solve. Those of you wdio are 

blessed by the opportunities which are here offered 
Jewish Prob- . ^ , .^ , , 

free of charge, can, if you do your duty to your 

benefactors (the Jewish community at large) amply 

repay, and more than repay, your obligations. 

Jews are gregarious, and it requires special inducements to 

lure them away from the over-crowded cities. Centuries of Ghetto 

Tu: «.,-,„.,„■ bfe have engendered this taste for association with 
This gregari- ° 

ous habit will their fellows. If, therefore, any of you prove 
make for Jew- false to the trust which your free education 
ish Agricui- here imposes, by abandoning your vocation in- 

ura centers. stead of planting new Jewish centres in agricul- 
tural districts, you are almost guilty of a crime to your solemn 
obligation. You have taken upon yourselves this duty by accept- 
ing the opportunities which are here offered, gratis, through the 
generosity of those of your co-religionists who believe this insti- 



Created the 

Jew 

lem 



RURAL HAPPINESS AND THE JEWISH PROBLEM 29 



tution to be one of the many chann.els necessary to aid in solving 
the Jewish problem. 

The value of a dollar is not the same in every place. That 

depends on how far it will go to supply the necessities which are 

essential to a healthful existence. Five hundred 

dollars earned on a farm is capable of providing "'""^''^ s money 

r 1 1 1 1 T r ■ ■ '" farming; 

more comforts than double, 1 am sate in say nig . 

' . snci more — 

than treble, the amount can supply in a large city 

like New York. Therefore it is folly to compare dollar for dollar 

your earning power in the city and in the country. 

But there is another feature of equal importance which should 
not be lost sight of in contemplating farm life. In a country dis- 
trict every man who behav.es himself can become an ^^^ Farmer is 
equally important factor in the community. He is a^ individual- 
a personality, an individuality ; a citizen, not a mere ity, not a 
number or cipher. This to a man of proper self- cipher, 
esteem should prove an attraction sufficient to compensate for 
many imaginary ones of urban life, for they are in a large measure 
deceptive bubbles. Pleasure and happiness are conditions of the 
mind more than of the body. The sources to which we look for 
gratifying our desires are dependent upon our education and there- 
fore are to a great extent of our own making. L use the word 
.education not in its academic, but in the larger and broader sense 
of self-culture, the superstructure, wdiich, if lacking, renders the 
foundation laid in school or college as largely lost in its aims and 
purposes. 

If all the Jews in Russia could be scattered on farms in the 
forty-six states of the Union, I venture to say that ten years after 
such consummation there would not be a Jewish jg^jg^, p^ob- 
question or problem, and for the reason that there |em could be 
would be no congestion, and none of the evils in- solved in ten 
separable therefrom. years. 

While in every other calling of life conditions from time to 
time arise where the supply of labor exceeds the demand, the cul- 
tivator of the soil in a new and sparsely settled 
countr}^ like ours never needs fear such a contin- The Farmer Is 

gency. Here every man has the will and ambition * ^ "^°®* ^® 
° 1 1 1 1 • 1 1 reliant and in- 

to be his own master, can own the land which he dependent- 

may cultivate. Our Homestead laws are still opera- 
tive. Ten, twenty, or even fifty millions of immigrants would pro- 
portionately increase the wealth of the states. The products of 
this 'abor would find ready sale in the markets of the world with- 



30 



RURAL HAPPINESS AND THE JEWISH PROBLEM 



out disturbing- in the least the welfare or success of any existing 
interests of our country. It is the only field of production in which 
there has never been felt any need of trades unions, high tarifTs, 
or any artificial stimuli, or protection. It is at once the most self- 
reliant because it is the most independent of all occupations. 

The successful cultivators of the soil occupy a position of free- 
dom from care which no other calling offers. They have in all 
ages and in all countries constituted the highly 
honorable and distinctive class of the population 
which represents the best type of citizenship, the 
most reliable and most dependable reserve force, the 
real foundation on which the prosperity of a nation ultimately rests. 
Therefore, let me urge you to apply the knowledge which you 
here obtain by spreading the gospel of rural happiness : to instil 
into the minds of those with whom you come into 
contact an appreciation of the independence and 
freedom of thought and action which a farm life 
insures ; finally, by force of your example, to aid 
in establishing Jewish settlements throughout the length and 
breadth of the United States. 



The foundation 
of a nation's 
prosperity. 



Preacii tlie 
gospel of Rural 
Happiness. 




DORMITORY OX SCHOEXFELD FARM No. i. 
This old farm building was converted into a temporary dormitory to house twelve students. 



Ledure and Entertainment Course 



1908-1909 

In Segal Hall, at 7.30 P. M. 



^i^LECTURESvjy : 



December 4th: — •"The History and jMeaning of Forestry," 
Irvin C. Williams. 

December nth: — "IMiinicipal Parks," John C. Lewis, City 
Forester, Philadelphia. 

December i8th: — "The Commercial Side of Horticulture," 
S. S. Skidelsky, Philadelphia. 

January ,8th: — "Hybridization," Edwin Lonsdale. 

January 15th: — "Orchard Conditions and Outlook," W. E. 
Grove. 

January 226. : — "Forest Uses," Irvin C. Williams. 

January 29th: — "Planting and Care of Young Orchards," 
W. E. Grove. 

February 5th:— "Care of Old Orchards," W. E. Grove. 

February 26th: — "Practical Sylviculture and the Distribu- 
tion of Forests," Irvin C. Williams. 

March 26th: — "American Forestry, State and National," 
Irvin C. Williams. 



ENTERTAINMENTS 



November 6th: — Professional Talent and Moving Picures 
— Kindness of Mr. S. Lubin. 

December 19th: — Entertainment under direction of Amuse- 
ment Committee — Mr. Harry B. Hirsh, 
Chairman. 

February 12th: — Professional Talent and Moving Pictures 
— Kindness of Mr. S. Lubin. 

March 7th: — Entertainment under direction of Amuse- 

ment Committee — Mr. Harry B. Hirsh, 
Chairman. 

April 9th: — Professional Talent and Moving Pictures 

- — Kindness of Mr. S. Lubin. 

May ist : — Professional Talent and Moving Pictures 

— Kindness of ]Mr. S. Lubin. 




BENJAMIN BROWN (on the right) AND HIS HELPER 

Benjamin Brown (1907) was assisted by the Jewish Agricultural Society, of New 
York, to purchase his farm at Edison, Pa. 




Brown's Farm House and Out-buildings 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 33 

Report of the Treasurer of the National 
Farm School 

For the Year ending September 30, 1 908 



It will be noted in the Treasurer's Report that, whil.e our re- 
ceipts have remained practically the same, our expenditures have 
increased $1655.56. This increase is due to the fact that, whereas 
last year we had fifty students, we have this year sixty-three. No 
doubt that during the coming year, with improvement in the in- 
dustrial and commercial world, the school will find a proportionate 
increase in its income. 

Further, the report shows an increase of $14,199.84 in the 
endowment fund. It is practically an axiom that no institution is 
thoroughly grounded without a sinking fund. It is to be hoped, 
therefore, that by the end of next year, our endowment fund will 
have mounted to the hundred thousand dollar mark. A detailed 
statement is hereby attached. 

The Treasurer's report of Schoenfeld Farm No. 3, properly 
audited and approved, will be foun with the Schoenfeld Farms 
Committee Report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ISAAC SILVERMAN, Treasurer. 



GENERAL FUND 
Deficit September 30, 1907 $ 194.06 

RECEIPTS 

Dues and Donations, net receipts $10,219.50 

State of Pennsylvania 7,500.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities 6,400.00 

Interest on Investments 3,278.33 

Sale of Farm Products 1,504.96 

Received on Account of Students' Tuition and 

Board 482.50 

$29,385.29 

Cash in hands of Director $ 100.00 

Cash in Hands of Office 15.00 115.00 $29,500.29 



$29,306.23 



34 REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

EXPENDITURES 

Brooms and Brushes ? 20.45 

Conveyance 463.36 

Dry Goods 1,392.31 

Fuel 1,156.99 

Groceries 1,492.99 

Ice 7.31 

Lightning 902.13 

Painting 187.72 

Printing and Stationery (Including Propoganda) 454.94 

Plumbing 371.22 

Provisions 3,810.70 

Rent 162.50 

Repairs 1,853.28 

Supplies, Educational 609.87 

Farm 6,627.77 

Medical 191.94 

Salaries, Matron 600.00 

Officers 2,080.74 

Teachers 4,881.01 

Wages 2,558.09 

Sundries 950.24 

Commission 8.24 

Insurance 328.69 

Taxes 304.60 

?31,417.09 

Deficit, September 30, 1908 $ 2,110.86 

ENDOWMENT FUND ACCOUNT 

Balance invested as per previous report ? 1,251.80 

Received: 

Account Endowment Funds during 1908 14,203.59 



$15,455.39 
Amount Invested account of Endowment Fund 13,556.25 

Balance uninvested $ 1,899.14 

ENDOWMENT FUND INVESTMENTS 
1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 2317, 2319, 2321, 2323 York St., 

Phila $ 8,000.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 2414 Sedgeley Ave., Phila 1,500.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 322 N. 6th St., Phila 3,000.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 323 Washington Ave., and rear 

318 League St., Phila 2,500.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 1323 N. 7th St., Phila 3,000.00 

1st mortgage, 5 4-10 per cent., 611 Lombard St., Phila 2,000.00 

1st mortgage, 5 4-10 per cent., 1837 S. 7th St., Phila 1,500.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 2008-10 S. 10th St., Phila 4,000.00 

1st mortgage, 6 per cent., 224 North Ohio Ave., Atlantic 

City 3,500.00 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 35 

Endowment Fund Investments (^continued) 

1st mortgage, 6 per cent., 117 Florida Ave., Atlantic City 2,600.00 
1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 814-830 Moyamensing Avenue, 

Phila 8,400.00 

1st mortgage, 5 per cent., 775 South 3rd St., Phila 2,000.00 

1st mortgage, 514 per cent., 305 S. 6th St., Phila 2,700.00 

5,000 Market St. "L" 4's at 101 .' 5,050.00 

2,000 Philadelphia & Reading 4's at 4 per cent 1,920.00 

1st Mortgage, 51/2 per cent, 1619 S. 19th St., Phila 1,800.00 

1,000 Penna. Railroad Convertibles at ZYz per cent 917.50 

2,000 Penna. Railroad Convertibles at ZVz per cent 1,835.00 

1st mortgage, 1035 South St., 5 4-10 per cent 5,000.00 

1st Mortgage, 5 per cent., N. W. Cor. 32d & Berks St., 

Phila -4,000.00 

$65,222.50 



$67,121.64 

Report of the Flora Schoenfeld Memorial 
Farms Committee 

To Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, President, and the Board of Managers 
of The National Farm School. Gentlemen : 

Below, herewith, find appended an account cov.ering the Flora 
Schoenfeld Memorial Farms Nos. i, 2, and 3- 

As you will notice, the returns, as given us from the Flora 
Schoenfeld Memorial Farm No. i, more than exceed the expecta- 
tions of any person who has had anything whatso- 
ever to do with the farming industry. This farm Farm 
has been rented by The National Farm School to Number 1 
the tenants, William Lauchman, a 1908 graduate 
of our School,, and Israel Wallman, a s.enior in the school. We 
rent them the farm, in return for which we get one-half of the 
product. Naturally, we would ordinarily not expect a big return, 
especially from the fact that these boys have had absolutely no 
business experience; but it is, nevertheless, gratifying to see that, 
notwithstanding this fact, I believe it would be impossible for any 
experienced farmer to produce more satisfactory results, than have 
been produced by these two young men. 

FARM PRODUCTS FROM FARM NO. 1 TURNED OVER TO THE SCHOOL 

8 tons of Hay at $10 per Ton $ SO.OO 

34 bushels of Wheat, at $1.00 per bushel 34.00 

35 bushels of Oats, at 56c. a bushel 22.75 



36 REPORT OP SCHOENFELD MEMORIAL FARMS COMMITTEE 

100 bushels of Tomatoes, at 20c. a bushel 20.00 

100 bushels of Potatoes, at 50c. a bushel 50.00 

100 bushels of Corn, at 70c. a bushel 70.00 

?276.75 

As to the Florg, Schoen£eld Memorial Farm No. 2, you will 
notice the crop return has been exceptionally good. Further than 

this, 1,150 peach trees, 450 apple trees and a five- 
Farm Number acre asparagus bed have been planted, which will 
Two give us a splendid return, for the money invested, 

within the next three years. It has b.een 
deemed necessary to treat the Flora Schoenfeld Memorial Farm 
No. 2 in this manner, since there was quite a little ground, which 
it was inadvisable to use except for orchard purposes, and it was 
necessary that some definite result should be obtained therefrom 
in addition to the land we use for farming purposes, 

CROPS RAISED ON SCHOENFELD NO. 2 

6% tons of Clover Hay, at $10.00 per ton $ 65.00 

20 tons of Silage, at $3.00 per ton 60.00 

8 tons of Cora Fodder, at $9.00 per ton 72.00 

1,000 bushels of Turnips, at 10c. a bushel 10.00 

250 bushels of Corn, at 70c. a bushel 175.00 

20 Small Pigs, at $3.00 a piece 60.00 

35 hens, value 30.00 

$472.00 

Regarding the Flora Schoenfeld Memorial Farm No. 3: It 

gives me great pleasure to report to you, that, not- 

Farm Number withstanding the fact that we did not enter upon 

Three th.e tenancy of this farm until March ist, yet, by 

September 30th, we had sold $1,206.28 worth of 

products. 

I wish, at this time, to report to you the somewhat difficult 

position your chairman found himself in at the commencement of 

our incumbency of the farm. At the time when 

Its imperative -^^^ Schoenfeld turned the farm over to us the 

needs when buildings were not in a very good condition and 

acquired * . ^^ ^o iTtn 

absolutely necessary repairs cost us $568.51. When 

I say absolutely necessary repairs, I mean that such repairs as 
were necessary for the proper housing of our cattle and the proper 
housing of the manager of this farm. There was no live stock on 
the place; $1,640.10 was expended for this purpose. The improve- 
ments on the farm cost us $904.71 more. In the fields there were 
shocks of corn stalks, which ordinarily would have gone to waste, 
there being no silo. The erection of a silo cost us $325. 



REPORT OF SCHOENFELD MEMORIAL FARMS COMMITTEE 37 

You will see, therefore, in order to stock this farm, purchase 

the necessary improvements and make the necessary repairs, the 

expenditure of $3,438.32 was essential. Of course, 

with live stock on the farm, it was necessary to ^ '°^" ^°^ 

spend money for feed. Grain had to be purchased 

. needs. 

and implements were an imperative demand. In 
fact, on every hand, money had to be expended. Through the 
Chairman of the Finance Committee of The National Farm School, 
by permission of the Board, $5,000 was borrowed. The report ap- 
pended, however, shows that $5,265.08 has b.een expended ; but 
against this a return of $1,206.28, as before mentioned, has been 
made. 

By carefully perusing this report, therefore, you will note that 
the current expense has only been $1,626.76, while during the six 
weeks since harvest time and during which time we 
have had an opportunity to harvest some of our jhe products 
product, the return has already been made to us raised and sold 
of the above-mentioned sum, showing at the present 
time, that with all our products still on hand and natural increase 
of stock, it will still only be necessary for us to sell, approximately, 
$420 worth in order that this deficit can be wiped out, and we have 
another six months for selling, during which time, there is not the 
slightest doubt, that a very material and profitable increase will be 
shown. 

To give you an idea as to how much work/ has been accom- 
plished and what the future will show on this farm, I might say 
that we have, at this time : 

PRODUCTS ON HAND AT SCOENFELD FARM NO. 3 

60 tons of Hay, at $10.00 per ton $ 60.00 

35 tons of Corn Fodder, at $9.00 a ton 315.00 

90 tons of Silage, at $3.00 a ton 270.00 

1800 bushels of Corn, at 70c. a bushel 1,260.00 

200 bushels of Turnips,at 10c. a bushel 20.00 

8D0 bushels of Tomatoes, 20c. a bushel 160.00 

100 Geese, Hens, Chickens, at 75c. a piece 75.00 

$2,160.00 

It can, therefore, b.e seen that the first six months on this 
farm have shown us that it is possible to run a farm in conjunction 
with The National Farm School and produce results 
which can be compared favorably with the best Possibilities of 
farms in the country. "Of course, your chairman the future. 
feels, in this matter, that the exact condition of 
things can only be given at the end of February, 1909, when we 



38 REPORT OP SCHOENFELD MEMORIAL FARMS COMMITTEE 

shall have occupied this farm for twelve months; but, in the mean 
time, he has every reason to feel proud of the showing that has 
been made. With thankfulness for the past and with hope for 
"the future, this report is most respectfully submitted. 

HARRY FELIX, Chairman. 



TREASURER'S REPORT, FARM NO. 3 

Capital Account, Schoenfeld Farm No. 3 $15,000.00 

Stock, Implements and Repairs, account of money bor- 
rowed 5,000.00 

$20,000.00 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Purchase Price of Farm $15,000.00 

Live Stock 1,640.10 

Silo 325.00 

Implements 904.71 

Repairs 568.51 

Refunded, on Account of Money Borrowed 200.00 

$18,638.32 

Balance Unexpended $ 1,361.68 

RECEIPTS 

Farm Products: 

14,171 quarts of Milk $482.76 

749 quarts of Cream • ., 166.70 

11 Calves 95.15 

1,259 dozen Ears of Corn 212.76 

23 baskets of Pears 10.95 

12 baskets of Turnips 3.75 

306 baskets of Potatoes 149.96 

3 baskets of Peaches 3.00 

53 baskets of Apples 25.20 

85 pounds of Grapes 2.55 

47 bushels of Seed Wheat 53.50 

$1,206.28 

EXPENDITURES 

Interest, Account of Money Borrowed .$ 45.68 

Printing and Stationery 27.80 

Grain 339.53 

Bran 30.00 

Seed 

Sweet Corn 19-53 

Potatoes '. 69.00 

Clover 40.69 

Rudabagoes 1-25 

Timothy Seed ^ 36.80 



REPORT OF SCHOENFELD MEMORIAL FARMS COMMITTEE 39 

Corn Meal 8.75 

Fertilizer 476.62 

Chemical Supplies 3.70 

Insurance 2.35 

Salaries 350.00 

Wages 109.50 

Taxes 37.99 

Conveyance 1.02 

Expense, Account of Sale of Farm Products 26.55 

— $1,626.76 

Deficit, September 30, 1908 $ 420.48 

FLORA SCHOENFELD MEMORIAL FARMS 
Farms No. 1 and 2 

Balance unexpended, as per previous report $ 851.87 

Receipts: 

Insurance account of Schoenfeld Farm No. 2 461.12 

$1,312.99 
Disbursements: 

Account of Furnishings $ 15.90 

Improvements 993.27 

$1,009.17 

Balance on Hand $ 303.82 

INVESTMENT ACCOUNT 
Original Donation $10,000.00 

FARM No. 1 

Real Estate and Buildings $5,380.63 

Live Stock 713.64 

Tools and Implements 410.53 

Furniture and Furnishings 59.97 

$6,564.77 

FARM No. 2 

Real Estate and Buildings '. $2,406.97 

Live Stock 491.60 

Tools and Implements 190.00 

Furniture and Furnishings 42.84 

$3,131.41 

$9,696.18 
Balance unexpended 303.82 

Total, $10,000.00 



40 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

The Ladies' Auxiliary Committee's Report 

The Ladies' Auxiliary Committee of the National Farm School 
was organized for the purpose of looking into the management of 
the household, and has assisted the Executive Board materially, 
during the past two years, in running this important branch of 
the Farm School work. 

During the past season the committee has held regular monthly 
meetings. At least four ladies hav.e made it their duty to visit and 
inspect the school each month month and to bring in to the meet- 
ings criticisms, good or bad, of things as they found them. In this 
way a number of evils existing at the school have been corrected 
and a number of improvements made. 

The Ladies' Committee is sub-divided; into an Advisory Com- 
mittee, which investigates the household; a Domestic Committee, 
to furnish servants to the school ; a Purchasing Committee which 
does the buying of groceries for the kitchen and table; a Diet 
Committee for the purpose of regulating th.e menus furnished to 
the students ; a Sewing Committee, which manages the Farm 
School Sewing Circle, and keeps the linen room supplied with all 
its necessities. 

The entire Committee is composed of eighteen ladies, who are 
experienced in household matters, and are doing good work in 
giving the benefit of their experience to the matron and manage- 
ment of the Farm School. 

The Treasurer's report and report of Sewing Committee are appended. 

MRS. ALFRED M. KLEIN, Chairman. 
TREASURER'S REPORT 
1907 RECEIPTS 

Dec. 13. Balance, Mrs. Nathanson $ .82 

Dec. 31. Louis Loeb (in memory of wife) 25.00 

1908 
Jan. 21. Mrs. Ida Silberman (in memory of anniversary of 

husband's death) 25.00 

Jan. 21. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Sycle (in honor of 15th anni- 
versary of wedding 15.00 

Feb. 6. Dr. Krauskopf (in honor of 50th birthday) 25.00 

Feb. 12. Samuel Fabian (in memory of wife) 10.00 

Feb. 25. Mrs. Albert Bamberger 5.00 

Apr. 7. Mrs. Ida Silberman 25.00 

Apr. 22. Miss Lena Weigand 5.00 

1907 EXPENDITURE $135.82 

Dec. 31. Christmas Gifts $ 5 76 

1908 ■ 

Feb. 7. Wanamakers (notions, etc.) .74 

Feb. 26. Lighter and Tapers .' .' "40 

Jun, 29. N. Snellenburg & Co., (bill) ,[[[ 38*93 

Nov. 15. Balance on Hand 89.99 

$135.82 

MRS. J. GUCKENHEIMER, Treasurer. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 41 

THE FARM SCHOOL SEWING CIRCLE 

The Sewing Circle for the linen room, conducted under the 
direction of the Ladies' Auxiliary Board, met regularly during the 
year in Temple Keneseth Israel, every other Thursday, from No- 
vember I, 1907, to A^Iarch 12, 1908. 

During the year 1102 articles, itemized below, were sent to the 
Farm School and the linen room was well stocked with bed and 
table linens, bath, face, glass and roller towels, and covers for the 
students' tables. 

Donations in cash, amounting to $319.57, itemized below were 
received. Of this sum $32.18 is still on hand, unexpended, to begin 
next year's work on. 

Money Donations 

Basch, Mrs. M $ 2.50 

Berg, Mrs. J. M. 5.00 

Blumentlial, Mrs. Hart, iu memory of her son 10.00 

Dannenbaum, Mrs. H 5.00 

Davidson, Mrs. C. 6.00 

Donated through Mrs. A. Fleisher 13.00 

Fleisher, Mrs. A 15.00 

Fleisher, Mrs. H. C 5.00 

Goldstein, Mrs 2.00 

Guckenheimer, Mrs. J 10.00 

Jonas, Miss F., for 2 doz. Night Shirts 10.00 

Jonas, Miss F 5.00 

Jonas, Mrs. Henry 1.00 

Klein, Mrs. A. M 5.00 

Krauskopf, Dr. Jos., in honor of his 50th Birthday 25.00 

Krauskopf, Mrs. Jos 10.00 

Langfeld, Mrs. M 5.00 

Liveright, Mrs. I. A 5.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Ludwig 5.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Simon 2,00 

Marks, Mr. A 10.00 

Myers, Miss F. Carrie, in memory of her mother 10.00 

Newburger, Mrs. Frank 3.00 

Roseman, Miss 2.00 

Rosenthal, Mrs. H 10.00 

Silverman, Mrs. I 5.00 

Simon, Mrs. D 5.00 

Sycle, Mrs. M., 10.00 

Thalheimer, Mrs. L. S 2.50 

Turk, Miss E. L 5.00 

Weil, Mrs. S 1.00 

Blum, Mrs. G 1 piece of Muslin 

Levy, Mrs. S. M 1 piece of Cheese Cloth 

Nelke, Mrs. Harry, 1 piece of Toweling 



42 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL SEWING CIRCLE 

Schoneman, Mrs., 2 doz. Tea Spoons, 2 trays, etc., for Sewing Circle 

Snellenburg, Mrs. Nathan ... 1 piece Sheeting, 1 piece Denim & Sewing Silk 
From the Euchre 1 piece of Pillow Case Muslin 

Articles made and sent to the School 

150 Sheets, 274 Pillow Cases, 464 Towels, 108 Napkins, 11 Table Clothes, 
60 Bath Towels, 99 Night Shirts, 12 Dusters, 68 Roller Towels and 20 Table 
Covers, 

MRS. ROSA B. SCHONEMAN, Chairman. 



SUNDRY DONATIONS 

Abraham, Miss Hetty, Year's Subscription Renewed for "World's Work" 

and "McClure's." 

Abrahamson, Miss L., Philadelphia 1 Box Wrigley's Kleecatub 

Alburger, E. T., Philadelphia Plants for new greenhouse; value $25 

Ancker, Mrs. M. D., Phila., in memory of her parents 5 Large Pictures 

Arnold, Mrs. Phillip, Philadelphia Table Silveware 

Baum, Mr. Isidore, Philadelphia Whiskey for Medicinal Purposes 

Burpee, Mr. W. Atlee, Philadelphia $30.50 for Magazine Subscriptions 

Climax Dental Manufacturing Co., Philadelphia Dental Supplies 

Diligent Sewing Circle, Phila., through Mrs. H. J. Tichner 3 doz. Towels 

Felix, Mr. Harry, Phila Year's Subscription to Everybody's Magazine 

Goldsmith, Joseph & Co., Phila 1 doz. Waiters' Coats 

Guckenheimer, Mrs. J., Phila Sewing-Room, Sundries 

Jewish Publication Society, Phila 2 Volumes 

Kaufman, Mrs. Joseph, Phila 7 Pairs Lace Curtains 

Kaufman, M 2 Lounge Covers 

Keneseth Israel Swing Circle, Philadelphia 3 doz. Towels 

Manischewitz, B., Cincinnati, Ohio 125 lbs. Matzos 

Misch, Mrs. C. M., Providence, R. I., 12 copies, "Service for Day of Atonement" 

Mulford, H. K. & Co., Phila Quantity of Drugs 

Needlework Guild of America, Phila., Set of White China for Faculty Dining 

Room. 

Nixon, W. H Paper for this Book 

Oppenheimer, Stanley, in memory of his sister, Hulda 2 Pictures 

Pollitz, Kaufman & Lefort, Phila Magazines 

Price & Co., Thos. W Paper for Cover of this Book 

Rosenthal, Mrs. Henry, Phila. . . . Set of Carvers, Glasses and Oatmeal Bowls 

Schoenfeld, Max, Phila Curtain Scrim 

Schoneman, Mrs. R. B., Phila Sewing-Room Supplies 

Skidelsky, S. S., Phila., Pizes for Aptitude and Ability in Carnation Culture, 

$10.00. 
Skidelsky, S. S., Phila. .. 100 Canna Roots; 100 Assorted Carnation Cuttings 

Smith, Valentine H., Phila Quantity of Drugs 

Snellenburg, Joseph N., Phila Ice Chest 

Snyders, Philadelphia 10 Packages Tooh Ache Wax 

Spitz, Emanuel, Phila Mince Meat for Thanksgiving Pies 

Sycle, Mrs. Myer, Phila., Gas Lighter and Tapers 

Zessinger, Frank O., Girard College, Phila. . . Valuable Plants for Greenhouse 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 43 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

SENIOR CLASS 

BERG, HENRY Boston, Mass. 

FRIEDMAN, SAMUEL New York City, N. Y. 

OSTROLENK, LOUIS Gloversville, N. Y. 

RATNER, JOSEPH Norristown, Pa. 

WALLMAN, ISRAEL New York City, N. Y. 

JUNIOR CLASS 

AARONS, HARRY , Milwaukee Wis. 

BLACKMAN, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

COLTUN, MAX : Alliance, N. J. 

GLANTZ, EMANUEL New York City, N. Y. 

HORWICH, MORRIS Chicago, 111. 

LEVY, BENNETT ; Chester, Pa. 

MATOR, EDWARD New York City, N. Y. 

MARGOLIN, LOUIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

NAUM, HARRY Schenectady N. Y. 

ROSENSTEIN, LEONARD Milwaukee, Wis. 

SILVER, CHARLES Philadelphia, Pa. 

SNOWVICE, WM ' Philadelphia, Pa 

SOBEL, SOLOMON New York City. N. V. 

SOLOjMON, EMANUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

SPEYER, AARON Cleveland, Ohio 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

ATKATZ. JOSEPH New York City N. Y. 

EINSTEIN, SYLVAN Philadelphia, Pa. 

GRINSTEIN, BENT Dallas, Tex. 

HALBERT, MICHAEL Norma, N. J. 

HOUSMAN, SAMUEL New York City, N. Y. 

KAHAN, SAMUEL New York City, N. Y. 

KOTLIKOFF, SAMUEL Philadelphia Pa. 

LANDSMAN, HARRY New York City, N. Y. 

LEBESON, HYMAN Philadelphia Pa. 

LEFF, ISIDORE New York City, N. Y. 

LEISER, MONROE • • • • 'ir^l^^^^r'^^ ^^■ 

LENIK, BENJ New \ ork City, NY. 

MICHELSON. MOSES Indianapolis, Ind. 

MILI ER, TOSEPH • • ■ • •;/ -^^"sburg Pa. 

NADLEMAk, HARRY New ^^J-J Cj^^^jf • p^- 

SARNER, JOSEPH ■ ■ • • • \?X7^-tv N y" 

SILVERSTEIN HYMAN ^ew York Ci y NY 

SPARBERG, LOUIS Newark NT 

STECK, FRANK Newark, JN. J. 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

DAVIDSON, ISIDORE New Y°rk fUy N. Y. 

DIAMOND, HARRY Detroit Mich 

SguaiEl^,-BENj::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::New-W(^, N. ^ 

FINK, LOUIS PMadeMiia Pa 

PINKEL, ALBERT — ' Yo5k Ci y N y' 

GLATMAN NATHAN v:.\\::::v:. J^^S; ^. 

HOFFMAN. HARRY PSilirlelnhiV Pa 

KATZ, SIEGFRIED LitUe Falls N Y 

EARNER, DAVID Philadelohif 'Pa" 

LAZAAR, HARRY SdeSa' Pa 

LEBESON, HARRY • - • ■ ;f '^ '^°L^ P^'^ v" 

LUBIN, HARRY New \ ork City, N. \ 

LisMAN ISIDORE • ■ ■;••;;;;• •;;;.^-:. }.°.%-,^2url A: 

^^?R,'^S^'^::::::::::::::::::::::""-- ^'I^'\^ 

PUTTERMAN. NATHAN • : • -Detro't, Mich. 

REITZES, LOUIS ^%"hTadelphirPa' 

ROCKLIN, SAMUEL. ?E aSe S a' Pa' 

ROSENFELT, MAURICE S, !, 1 i"^- ' p!" 

RUBENSTEIN, HARRY bes Snes iowa 

SALINGER, MORRIS f ' " w 1 Momes, Iowa 

icHRIMER, WM Egg Harbor City, N. J. 

SCHLOSBERG. HARRY ■ ■ • • • • • 'X^'^f, ' ^^^• ^• 

SERIL, HYMAN New York City, N. Y. 

SEIDLIN, JOS Hurleyyille N. Y. 

STRAUS DAVID • •■ ■ • -L^Vi i^' ^l' 

WOLF, E. HAROLD • • Philadelphia, Pa. 






Scholarships and Prizes Endowed 



^■ 



Scholarships 



1908— "WM. S. RAYNER SCHOLARSHIP." The 
income of $5,000 contributed' ^ to the Endow- 
ment Fund by his daughter, Mrs. Bertha 
Rayner Frank. 

1908— "DR. SAMUEL L. FRANK SCHOLAR- 
SHIP." The income of $5,000 contributed 
to the Endowment Fund by his wife, Mrs. 
Bertha Rayner Frank. 



Pri 



zes 



igoy— "THE HERBERT T. HYMAN PRIZES." 
The interest of $150 donated by Mrs. Bernard 
Sluizer, in memory of her son. 

igo8— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the En- 
dowment Fund by Harry Louchheim, of New 
York, in memory of his fatner. 

1908— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the En- 
dowment Fund by Mrs. Louis S. EUel, in 
memory of her father. 



Z^«444^f44444i^^ 

J; .5 .3); .5 •>■ J •>■ ^;ff;:};^;■>^>^^j);■>^>^>^jiI:>^>^?>^>^>^>^>^>Vj)^>^>:^^>^> 



m 
m 


Prizes to Students 





The appeal made last year for friends of the 
school to contribute money prizes for efficiency in the 
various departments of the School, -was answered to so 
pleasing an extent that during the past year $280 in cash 
and $25 in books were awarded to the various students 
at the School for profficiency, effort and improvement, 
as shown below. The money and books for these prizes 
are contributed as follows : 

The Samuel Strauss, Jr., "Senior Pi'izes in General Scholar- 
ship," presented by friends, in memory of Samuel Strauss, Jr. 

"The Herbert T. Hyman Prizes." The interest of $150.00 
donated by Mrs. Bernard Sluizer, in memory of her son. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of $250.00 
contributed to the Endowment Fund by Harry Louchheim, of 
New York, in memory of his father. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest oB $250.00 
contributed to the Endowment Fund by Mrs. L. S. Eliel, of 
Philadelphia, in memory of her father. 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, (annual) . . . $25.00 

Mr. Joseph Potsdamer, (annual) 25.00 

Mr. Samuel Grabfelder, (annual) 25.00 

Mr. Louis Loeb, in memory of his wife, (annual) 25.00 

Members of Camp Arden, Philadelphia 25.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Cohen, Pittsburg, (annual) . 20.00 
Mr. and Mrs. Hart Blumenthal, Philadelphia, in 

memory of their son, Ralph, (annual) . . . 10.00 
Mrs. Jacob Cartun, Philadelphia, (annual) . . . 10.00 
Mr. Ralph Blum, Philadelphia, (annual) .... 10.00 
Mr. Moe Lieberman, Philadelphia, (annual) . . 10.00 
Mrs. Viola M. Strauss, Philadelphia, in memory of 

her husband 10.00 

Mr. I. L. Marks, Chicago, (annual) 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Sycle, Philadelphia .... 10.00 
Mr. I. H. Silverman, Philadelphia, (annual) . . . 5.00 
Mr. Samuel D. Lit, Philadelphia (annual) . . . 5.00 



Award of Prizes made at the Commencement 
May 31st, 1908 — 



Samuel Strauss, Jr., Senior Prizes in General Scholarship: 

1st Prize, Harry Schulman, . $15.00 in Books on Agriculture. 
2nd " A. Schlesinger, . 10.00 
Student Assistant to Faculty: 

Harry Schulman, $10.00 

Student Assistant in Farm Management: 

Isaac Stern, 5.00 

Harry Berg, 5.00 

General improvement in Agriculture: 

Harry Naum 5.00 

Endeavor in Agriculture: 

Joseph Atkatz, 5.00 

Leonard Rosenstein, 5.00 

In Horticulture: 

1st Prize, Max Fleisher, 10.00 

2nd " Samuel Rudley, 5.00 

In Dairying: 

1st Pri?;e, Wm. Lauchman, 10.00 

2nd " Julius Stabinsky, ' . . 5.00 

In Animal Husbandry: 

1st Herd, 1st Prize, Samuel Friedman, .... 10.00 

2nd " Benj. Lenik, 5.00 

2nd Herd, Joseph Miller, 10.00 

In Poultrying: 

1st Prize, Emanuel Solomon, 5.00 

2nd " Benj. Lenik, 2.50 

Punctuality at Barn Chores: 

1st Prize, A. Schlesinger, . . • 6.00 

2nd " Charles Silver . 5.00 

B. Glantz, 5.00 

Joseph Sarner, 5.00 

Morris Blackman, 5.00 

In Deportment: 

Jacob Kahan 5.00 

Most Efficient Head Waiter: 

Samuel Rudley, 5.00 

Most Efficient Office-Assistant: 

Harry Nadelman, 5.00 

For Keeping the Neatest Rooms in Segal Hall: 

Wm. Snowvice, . 3.00 

Samuel Rudley, 3.00 

H. Aarons, 2.00 

For Keeping Neatest Rooms in Main Building: 

Jos. Sarner 3.00 

Benj. Lenik, 3.00 

Harry Landsman, 2.00 



Award of Prizes made at the Annual Meeting 
October 11th, 1908 



Individual Garden Prizes: 

1st Sophomore Prize, Sylvan Einstein $5.00 

2nd " " Joseph Sarner 4.00 

3rd " " Moses Michelson 3.50 

1st Freshman Prize, Maurice Rosenfelt 5.00 

2nd " " Morris Salinger 4.00 

3rd " " Harry Lazaar 3.50 

General Faithfulness and Interest in Work: 

Max Coltun 4.00 

Improvement in General Agriculture: ^ 

E. Glantz 3.50 

Freshman Prizes for Faithfulness and Interest in Work: 

Nathan Putterman 2.50 

Benjamin Packer 2.50 

General Assistant: 

Morris Horwich 2.50 

Most Efficient Assistant in Superintending Barn Chores: 

Samuel Friedman 3.50 

Punctuality at Barn Chores: 

M. Halbert 2.50 

J. Kahan 2.50 

J. Atkatz 2.50 

H. Nadleman 2.50 

Agriculturaf Mechanics: 

1st Prize, Charles Silver . . . . ' 3.00 

2nd " Louis Sparberg 2.50 

Most Efficient Gardner: 

1st Prize, E. Solomon 4.00 

2nd " M. Leiser 3.00 

Most Skilful in Farm Administration: 

H. Berg 3.00 

Most Skilful' and Kindest Teamster: 

Wm. Snowvice 3.00 

Most Efficient Head Waiter: 

E. Solomon 3.00 




m 

If' 



|.®M5>. 















IF 






Farms Donated 



In memory of Flora Schoenfeld, 

by her husband, Max Schoenfeld, 

of Rorschach, Switzerland. 



I. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. i, 

40 acres, in the Spring of 1904. 

II. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 2, 

38 acres, in the Spring ' of 1905. 

III. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 3, 

163 acres, in the Fall of 1907. 



These farms all adjoin the original tract of 
Farm School land. 






BXIfSi. 

i 



I 



ff^lfS^ 








'2/J,lV9 



1 






fig 












Buildings Donated 



w 

Air* 

CT,Y/S 






I. Theresa Loeb Memorial Green House, 

In memory of Theresa Loeb, Ogontz, Pa., by her family. 
Erected 189S. 

II. Ida M. Block Memorial Chapel, 

In memory of Ida M. Bloch, Kansas City, Mo., by her t&TM 
husband and family. Erected 1899. 



III. Zadok M. Eisner Memorial Laboratory, 

In memory of Zadok M. Eisner, Philadelphia, Pa., by 
his wife. Erected 1899. 

IV. Rose Krauskopf Memorial Green House, 

In memory of Rose Krauskopf,' Philadelphia, Pa., by 
her children. Erected 1899. 

V. Dairy, by Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Aaron. 

Pittsburg, Pa. Erected 1899. 

VI. Adolph Segal Hall, 

Containing Library, Lecture Hall, Administration Of- 
fices and Dormitories, by Mr. Adolph Segal, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. Erected 1906. 

VII. Frances E. Loeb Vegetable Forcing 
Green House, 

In memory of Frances E. Loeb, by her husband. 



"I |vs1 

m 



m 



WT®'' 




The National Farm School 

AND 

The Federation of Jewish Charities 

^ 5^ of "Philadelphia Qi . =^ 

Abstt'ad frotn Dr. Krauskopf s Message^ Oct. nth, igo8 : 

To the Federation of Jewish Charities of Philadelphia 
we desire to express our appreciation for its appropriation 
of $6400 to our funds, during the past year. That associa- 
tion is doing excellent work, and it would gladly be more 
liberal in its distribution of funds among the various so- 
cieties constituting it, if the people at large were more gen- 
erous in their support of it. There are still far too many 
in our midst who are not contributing their proportionate 
share toward the charities of Philadelphia, and quite a 
goodly number whose names do not yet appear at all on 
the list of contributors to the Federation. It is to be hoped 
that a recognition of the goodly work it is helping to ac- 
complish on these grounds, and which is but an illustra- 
tion of the kind of work it is doing in a dozen other insti- 
tutions, will induce the public at large to be more mindful 
of its obligation to that noble organization. 

LEGACIES AND ENDOWMENTS 

TO THE FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITY OF 

PHILADELPHIA 
i9>02— MRS. CARRIE HAMBEJRG, in memory of her 

husband, Isaac Hamberg $ 100 00 

1902— CHILDREN OF DAVID ETTINGER, in mem- 
ory of their father 100 00 

1903— MRS. ALICE HAGEDORN, in memory of her 

husband, John J. Hagedorn S,ooo 00 

1903— HERMAN JONAS 7,500 00 

1903— MRS. CARRIE HAMBERG (additional) .... 100 00 

1903— ERNST KAUFMANN 2,00000 

1904— MRS. CARRIE HAMBERG (additional) .... 
1904— AUGUSTUS MARKS, in memory of his wife, 

Virginia Marks 

1904— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 

1905— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 

1905— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 

190S— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 

190S— SIGMUND ROEDELHEIM 

1905— MRS. CARRIE KRIEGER, in memory of her 

husband, Samuel Krieger 1,000 00 

1905 — WM. KRIEGER, in memory of his father, 

Samuel Krieger 100 00 

190S— HERMAN B. BLUMENTHAL 2,000 00 

1905— S. M. and M. S. FRIDENBERG, in memory 

of Esther, wife of S. M. Fridenberg 1,000 00 

1906— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 100 00 

1906— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 4000 

1908— MRS. FANNIE A. LEBERMAN 500 00 



100 


00 


5° 


00 


10 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


500 


00 



Legacies and Beque^s 



^- 



Money received in legacies and bequests is placed in the 

Endowment Fund. 
Estate of — 

1905 — Moses Lichten $500 00 

1906 — Marx Wineland, Frostberg, Md., .... 500 00 
1907 — Frances Seligman, Philadelphia, 

(For Bernard and Frances Seligman Library Alcove), . . 200 00 

— Fannie Houseman, Philadeplhia, 

(In memory of her son, Arthur Ballenberg Houseman), . . 100 00 

— Edward Popper, Greenville, T.exas, . . . loo oo 

— Samuel W. Goodman, Philadelphia, . . . 200 00 

— Fannie Simon, Philadelphia, 50 00 

— Isaac Sailer, Philadelphia, 500 00 

1908 — Leah Bernheimer, Mobile, Ala., 100 00 

" — Eleanore Samuel, Philadelphia, . . . . . 343 29 



Memorial Trees 



^■ 



Planted in Spring, 1908, in Memory of 



Leon Arnold 
Solomon Blumenthal 
Leah Bernheimer 
Jonas Bailey 
Leon Bailey 
Harry De Boer 
Sarah Eisner 
George Eisner 
Dora Ellerman 
Louis W. Ellerman 
Amelia H. Falk 
Simon Falk 



Bessie Garrettson 
Jerome W. Greenberg 
Minnie Harrison 
Isaac Herzberg 
Lena Huntsberry 
David Kohn 
Sarah Ann Leffman 
Blanche Loeb 
Nathan Lieberman 
Angelo Myers 
Samuel M. Melzer 
Fred Hirsh 



Edgar L. Mann 
Mollie Mayer 
Jacob Nadel 
Moses Rohrheimer 
Morris Rosenthal 
Isaac Sailer 
Eleanore Samuel 
Rose Strauss 
Isaac Strauss 
Samuel Strauss, Jr. 
Salamon Sugenheimer 
Joseph Sundheim 



52 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Life Members 



One payment of $100.00, one time, into the Endowment Fund. 



ALABAMA 
Mobile. 
Bernlieimer, Mrs. L. 
CALIFORNIA 
Bakersfield. 
Cohn, C. 

ENGLAND 
London. 
Meyer, Arthur 

ILLINOIS 
Champaign. 

Kuhn, Caroline L. 
Kuhn, Florence L. 
Chicago. 

Mandel, Leon 
Stettauer, Mrs. D. 
INDIANA 
Ligonier. 
Strauss, Ike 
Strauss, Jacob 
IOWA 
Waveriy 

A. Slimmer 
Sioux City 
Wise, Mrs. Chas. 
LOUISIANA 
New Orleans.' 
District Grand Lodge, 

No. 7, I. O. B. B. 
Newman, Isadore 
MARYLAND 
Baltimore. 

*Rayner, Wm. S. 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Boston. 
Hecht, Mrs. Lina 
Shuman, A. 

MISSISSIPPI 
Natchez. 
Frank, H. 

MISSOURI 
St. Louis. 
*Rice, Jonathan 
Stix, C. A. 

NEW YORK 
New York. 
Abraham, A. 
Blumenthal, Geo. 
Budge, Henry 
Guggenheimer, Wm. 
Krauskopf, Mary G. 
Lewisohn, Adolph 
Meyer, Wm. 
Silberberg, G. 
Sidenberg, G. 
•Deceased. 



Niagara Falls. 

Silverberg, Bertha 
Rochester. 
Lowenthal,, M. 
Silberberg, M. 
Silberberg, G. 
Silberberg, G. 
OHIO 
Cincinnati. 
Block, Samuel 
Lowman, Leo. J. 
Meis, Henry 
Columbus. 

B'nai Israel Sister- 
hood 
Lazarus, Fred'k 
Lazarus, Ralph 
Miller, Leopld 
Zion Lodge No. 62, 
L O. B. B. 
Youngstown. 

Theobald, Mrs. C. 
PENNSYLVANIA 
Allegheny. 

Rauh, Mrs. Rosalie 
Altoona. 

HeniT, S. Kline 
Langhorne. 

Branson, I. L. 
Philadelphia. 
Betz & Son 
Bloch, B. B. 
Blum, Ralph 
* Blumenthal, Herman 
Blumenthal, Sol. 
Byers, Jos. J. 
Federation Jewish 

Charities 
Fleisher, Martha S. 
Grant, Adolph 
Harrison, C. C. 
Hagedorn, Mrs. Alice 
*JoDas, Herman 
Kaas, Andrew 
Kaufman, Morris A. 
Kayser, Samuel 
Krauskopf, Harold 
Langfeld, A. M. 
Levy, Sol. 
Lit, S. D. 
*Merz, Daniel 
Merz, Mrs. Regina 
Muhr, Jacob 
*Pepper, Dr. Wm. 
*Pfaelzer, Simon 
Reform Congregation 



Keneseth Israel 
*Rorke, Allen B. 
Rosenberg, Grace 
Rosenberg, Walter J. 
Rosenberg, Walter I. 
Schloss, Mrs. Herman 
Schoch, Henry R. 
Silberman, Mrs. Ida 
Silverman, I. H. 
*Snellenberg, J. J. 
Snellenberg, Nathan 
Snellenberg, Samuel 
Sternberger, Samuel 
*Teller, Benj. F. 
Teller, Mrs. B. F. 
*Teller, Joseph R. 
Trautman, Dr. B. 
Wanamaker, John 
*Weiler, Herman 
Wolf, I., Jr. 
Pittsburg. 
Browarsky, Max 
Cohen, Aaron 
Cohen, Josiah 
Dreifus, C. 
*Frank, Samuel, by his 
son Ed. K. Frank 
Guckenheimer, Isaac 
Hamburger, Philip 
Hanauer, A. M. 
Kaufman Bros. 
Marcus, Aaron 
Solomon & Rubin 
Weil, A. Leo 
Weil, J. 
SWITZERLAND 
Rorschach. 
Schoenfeld, Max 
TEXAS 
Dallas. 

Sanger, Alexander 
Sanger, Mrs. Philip 
Silberstein, A. 
VIRGINIA 
Norfolk. 

Ladies' Hebrew Be- 
nevolent Asso. 
Richmond. 
Milheiser, Gustave 
Milheiser, Mrs. R. 
WEST VIRGINIA 
Wheeling. 

Horkheimer, Mrs. B. 
WASHINGTON 
Seattle. 

Galland, Mrs. C. K. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



53 



List of Members and Contributors 

For the Year Ending September 30, 1 908. 



ALABAMA. 

Alexander City 
Herzfeld, R $5.00 

Birmingham 

Adler, Morris 10.00 

Caheen Bros 5.00 

Congregation 

Emanu-Bl 5.00 

Lesser, Emil 5.00 

Gadsden 

Frank, Ferdinand.. 5.00 

Huntsville 

Damson & Abra- 
ham 5.00 

Ermann, Carrie & 
Gustav 5.00 

Goldsmith, Oscar .. 10.00 

Weil, Mrs. Emma 5.00 

Livingston 
Levy, M 5.00 

IVIobiie 

Council of Jewish 

Women of Mobile 5.00 
Forchheimer, M. . . 25.00 

Hess, Henry 5.00 

Shaari Shomayim 
Sabbath School . . 5.00 

Montgomery 

Bernheimer, L. ... 5.00 

Kahl, Montgomery 10.00 

Kahn, M 5.00 

Loeb, Jacques .... 5.00 

Sheffield 

Goldman, Mr. and 
Mrs. H 10.00 

Selma 
Levy, D 5.00 

Unlontown 

Ernst, A. E., for 
Israelites of town 5.00 

Meyer, F 5.00 

Pake, L. J 5.00 

Wetumpka 

Hohenberg, M. & Co. 10.00 

ARIZONA. 
Tucson 

Jacobs, M. Lionel. 5.00 

ARKANSAS. 

Fulton 

Rosenberg, Geo. .. 10.00 

Helena 

Solomon, Louis . . 2.00 



Hot Springs 

Fellheimer, H. ... 5.00 

Mendel, Albert ... 5.00 

Huntington 

Mayer, Herman . . 5.00 

Little Rock 

Abeles, Chas. T... 10.00 
B'uai Israel Con- 
gregation 10.00 

B'nai Israel Sunday 

School 5.00 

Cohen, A. D 10.00 

Cohen, M. M 10.00 

Kahn, Herman & Co. 10.00 

Lasker, Mrs. A. . . 5.00 

Mayer, Max 10.00 

Pfeifer, Albert ... 5.00 
Pfeifer, Jos., Cloth- 
ing Co 5.00 

Storthez L 10.00 

W o 1 s e y, Louis, 

Rabbi 5.00 

Newport 

Goldman, 1 10.00 

Pine Bluff 

Rosenberg, F. M. . 10.00 

Roth, L 5.00 

CALIFORNIA. 

Alameda 

Leffman, Mrs. L. D. 5.00 

Fresno 

Einstein, Louis & 

Co 10.00 

La Jolla 

Lieber, W. S 5.00 

Lieber, Mrs. W. S. E.OO 

Los Angeles 

Cohn, Kaspard 10.00 

Hecht, Rabbi S. (D.D.) 2.00 

Hoffman, Hugo .. 5.00 

Kalisher, Mrs. L. 5.00 

Meyer, Alex 5.00 

Newmark, Harris.. 10.00 

Sacramento 

Bonnheim, A 10.00 

Cohen, Isadore . . . 5.00 

Jaffee, M. S 5.00 

"Weinstock, Harris. 25.00 

San Francisco 

Hirschfelder, Dr. J. O. 5.00 

Levi, Jac, Sr 10.00 

Schwabacher, Abe. 6.00 

Sloss, Mrs. M. C... B.OO 



San Joaquin Co. 

Bruml, Juliette 2.50 

Santa Monica 
Davidson, Mrs. H. 1.00 

£ tockton 

Ellinger, Rev. Dr. 

Emil 8.50 

COLORADO. 

Colorado Springs 

Cahn, Isaac 5.00 

Hebrew Ben. Asso.. 5.00 

Denver 

Eisner, Dr. J 5.00 

Eppstein, A. M 5.00 

Kubitshek, Henry.. 10.00 

Mayer, L 5.00 

CONNECTICUT. 
Hartford 

Lyons, Bernhard... 5.00 

Meriden 

Weiss, Herman 2.00 

New Haven 

Adler, Max 5.00 

Friedman, L. H. .. 5.00 

Ullman, Isaac M... 5.00 

Stamford 

Stokes, Mrs. Rose 

Pastor 20.00 

Waterbury 
Chase, Isidor 5.00 

DELAWARE. 
Seaford 

Greenebaum, E. .. 5.00 

Van Leer, Chas. .. 5.00 
Wilmington 

Faber, Jacob 5.00 

Levy, Mrs. D. L. .. 5.00 

Levy, Mrs. D. L... 10.00 

Levy, Morris 10.00 

Moses Mooteflore 

Beneficial Society 10.00 

A. Rothschild .... 10.00 

DISTRICT OF COLUM- 
BIA. 

Washington, D. C. 

Augustine, Mrs. T. i.oo 

Behrend, Amnon . . 5.00 

Berlawski, A 2.00 

Berliner, Emil . . . 25.00 

Blout, Isaac L 5.00 

Blumenfeld, Mrs. M.. 5.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Edw.. 10.00 

Cohen, Max 5.00 

Council Jewish Wo- 
men 10.00 



54 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



Deborah Lodge ... 5.00 

Eisenmann, Jacob. 2.00 

Frledlander, H. .. B.OO 

Goldenberg, M. .. 5.00 

Goldsmith, C 5.00 

Hahn, Wm 5.00 

Hecht, Alex 10.00 

Herman, Mrs. Mon- 

nle 5.00 

Herman, Saml. ... 5.00 

Hillman, Joel 5.00 

Kahn, Sigmund .. 6.00 

Kaufman, Dr. H... 1.00 

Kaufman, Mrs. Marx 1.00 

Kaufman, D. J. ... 5.00 

Kohner, Max 5.00 

Lansburgh, Julius. 2.00 

Luchs, Mrs. Julia 2.00 

Luchs, Leopold . . . 5.00 

Marks, Mrs. A. D.. 2.00 

Oppenheimer, Sim'n 5.00 

Prince, A. D 5.00 

Rich, M 3.00 

Salamon, B 1.00 

Shiftman, Jos 2.00 

Sondheimer, J. . . 5.00 

Tobriner, L 5.00 

Wallerstein, Mrs. G. 1.00 
Washington Hebrew 

Congregation 5.00 

FLORIDA. 

Kissimmee 

Katz, M 5.00 

Miami 

Cohen, Isidore 5.00 

Pensacoia 

Hebrew Ladies' Ben. 

Society 5.00 

Council Jewish Wo- 
men 5.00 

Jacoby, M 5.00 

Falahassee 

Hirschberg, Julius. 10.00 

Warrington 

Hirshkovitz, David 5.00 

GEORGIA. 

Atlania 

Council Jewish Wo- 
men 10.00 

Hebrew Benevolent 

Cong 10.00 

Hebrew Ladies' Ben. 

Society 10.00 

Hirshberg, Isaac A. 5.00 

Albany 

Brown, S. B 10.00 



Dublin 

Weischselbaum S.&Co. 5.00 

Eastman 

Herrman, ?>Irs. J. 

D 5.00 

Macon 

Wolff, Edw 10.00 

Waxelbaum, E 5 00 

Randersville 

Cohen, Louis 5-00 

Savannah 

Cohen, Jacob 1.00 

Levy, B. H 5.00 

Solomons, J. A. . . 5.00 

West Point 

Hagedorn, J. J. .. 5.00 

Hagedorn, P 5.00 

Hagedorn, Z 5.00 

Herzfeld, Mrs. J...' 5.00 

Herzfeld, S 5.00 

Heyman, Lee 5.00 

IDAHO 

Boise 

Ladies' Judith 

Montifiore Soc 5.00 

ILLINOIS. 

Athens 

Salzenstein, C. S. . 5.00 
Chicago 

Adier, Mrs. D B.OO 

Alschuler, S 5.00 

Bauman, Edw 10.00 

Born & Co., M 10.00 

Davis, J ,^.00 

Despres, Samuel .. 5.00 

Eisenstadt, I 10.00 

Frank, Henry L... 10.00 

Friend, A. S 10.00 

Friedman, Mrs. Mina 5. no 

Gatzert, August .. 5.00 

Gimbel, C. A 10.00 

Goldman, Daisy . . 5.00 

Greenebaum, Ellas. 10.00 

Greenebaum Sons.. 5.00 

Harris, Mrs. S. H. 5.00 

Heyman, E. S 10.00 

Hartman, Jos 5.00 

Isaiah Sabbath School 10.00 

Katz, E 10.00 

Klee, Max 10.00 

Kohn, Isaac 5.00 

Lebolt, J. Y., mem- 
ory of Mr. and 

Mrs. L. E. Lebolt 10.00 

Mandel, Simon 5.00 

Meyer, Jacob 5.00 

Orschel, Mrs. I. . . 5.00 

Reltler, Chas 10.00 



Richter, Simon 5.00 

Rosenwald, M. S... 5.00 

Rosenthal, Mrs. J. 5.00 

Rubovitz, Toby ... 5.00 

Rothschild, M. L... 5.00 
Schanfarber, Rabbi T. 5.00 

Schlessinger, H. J. 10.00 

Schwabacher, M... 10.00 

Silberman, A 10.00 

Stein, A 10.00 

Stein, Ignatz 10.00 

Steele, H. B 5.00 

Stone, A. L 10.00 

Stolz, Rev. Dr. 

Jos 5.00 

Straus, A. S 5.00 

Subert, Mrs, B 5.00 

Weil, Julius E 5.00 

Wurmser, J 5.00 

Zalinger, B 5.00 

Galesburg 

Jev.'ish Aid Society 5.00 

Lincoln 

Griesheim, Meyer.. 3.00 

Lehrberger, Leo. . . 2.00 

Moljne 

Rosenstein, L. ... 2.50 

Peoria 

Anshal Emeth Sab- 
bath School 10.00 

Greenhut, J. B. .. 25.00 

Levi, Rev. Chas... 5.00 

Quincy 
Jewish L a d 1 e s' 

Bene Society 5.00 

Meyer, J 5.00 

Seeberger, Geo. . . 5.08 

Rock Island 

Kohn, Mrs. Mollie 5.00 

Simon, L 5.00 

Washburn 

Fink, Jacob 3.00 

INDIANA. 
Albion 

Stiefel Mrs. Louis 5.00 
Angela 

Stiefel, Mrs. L. C. 3.00 
Attica 

Lever, Levi L 2.50 

Columbia 
Ladies' Hebrew Ben. 

Society 5.00 

Fort Wayne 

Ackennan, Abe ... 10.00 

Baum, Jos 5.00 

Freiberger, Leopold 10.00 
Ladles' Hebrew Ben. 

Society 10.00 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1908 



55 



Goshen 

Salinger, Nathan . 5.00 

Hartford City 

"Weiler, Mrs. Amy.. 5.00 

Indianapolis 
Federation of Jewish 

Charities 200.00 

Jackson, J. W ]0.00 

Newberger, Louis. JO.OO 
Sommers, Chas.- B. 5.00 

Kendallviile 
Keller, Jacob 6.00 

Kokomo 
Levi, I. S 5.00 

Lafayette 

Indiana Wagon Co. 10.00 
Jewish L a d 1 e s' 

Aid Society 5.00 

Loeb, J. Louis 5.00 

LIgonier 

Strauss, Jacob .... 10.00 

Muncie 
Hene, M. 5.00 

Mt. Vernon 

Ro'senbaum, J & Lee 5.00 

Portland 

Weiler, Morris 5.00 

South Bend 

Cronbach, Abraham 

Rabbi, 4.00 

Summitville 

Wasner, Anna 10.00 

Jewish Ladies Aux- 
iliary of Summit- 
ville, Anderson 
and Elmwood .. 10.00 

Terre Haute 

Herz, A 5.00 

Wabash 

Hyman, Louis L.. 5.00 

INDIAN TY. 
Chelsea 

Cohen, Isaac 5.00 

IOWA. 

Charles City 
Hecht, J. B 10.00 

Des Moines 

Brody, F. 5.00 

Frankel A 5.00 

Frankel, Mrs. B. . . 10.00 

Friedlich 1 5.00 

Mandel N 5.00 

Scheuerman, L 10.00 

Weinstock A 5.00 

Weil, Jonas 5.00 

Younker, Isaac 5.00 

Yunker, M 5.00 

Decorah 

Baer B 5.OO 



Dubuque 

Levi, James 5.OO 

Keokuk 

Weil, I. B 5.00 

Oskaloosa 

Baldauf, Saml. ... lO.OO 

Rosenblatt, A. ... 5.00 
Sioux City 
Mt. Sinai Cong. 

Sabbath School.. 5.00 

KANSAS. 
Kansas City 

Holzmark Bros. . . 10.00 
Leavenworth 

Woolfe & Winnig.. 6.00 
Salena 

Stiefel, Moses 5.00 

Stlefel, S 5.00 

KENTUCKY 
Bowling Green 

Cristal, Sam 5.00 

Nahm, Sam 5.OO 

Danville 

Lyons, S. & H 5.00 

Henderson 

Baldauf, Morris ... 10.00 

Lexington 

Shane, Miss R 5.00 

Speyer & Sons 5.00 

Weil, Jonas 5.00 

Wolf, Simon 6.U0 

Louisville 

Barkhouse, Louis. 25.00 

Bernheim, B 25.00 

Bernheim, I. W 25.00 

Bernheim, E. Palmer 10.00 

Bernheim, M. U. . . 10.00 

Block, N. F 10.00 

Blum, S 5.00 

Brooks, Mrs. M. .. 5.00 
Council Jewish Wo- 
men 10.00 

Ehrman, H 5.00 

Flarsheim, M. H. .. 5.00 

Greenebaum, L. . . 3.00 

Haas, S 5.00 

Hyman, Jacob 5.00 

Kaufman, H 5.00 

Kohn, A 5.00 

Morgenroth, Mrs. H. 5.00 

Sabel & Sons, M... 10.00 

Sachs, Morris 10.00 

Sachs, Edw 5.OO 

Sloss, Stanley E... 5.00 

Straus, Benj 10.00 

Straus, Mrs. Sarah 5.00 

Trost Bros 5.OO 



Maysvilie 

Merz, Mrs. A. L... 5.00 

Merz, Eugene 5.00 

Merz, Millard ' 5.00 

Owensboro 

Hirsch, A lo.OO 

Rosenfeld, Mrs. A. 10.00 

f'aducah 

Benedict, Mrs. J... 5.00 

Dreyfus, Sol 5.00 

Pels, Mrs. J. E). .. 5.00 

Friedman, Herman 5.00 

Friedman, L. Jos... JO.OO 

Israel Temple S. S. 5.00 

Weil, Mrs. Jeanette 5.00 

Shelbyvilje 

Samuel Leopold ... 5.00 
Sallinger, J 5.09 

LOUISIANA 
Abbeville 

Wise, Solomon 5.00 

Alexandria 

Posner & Fried .. 5.00 

Simon Bros 5.00 

GInsburg, B 10.00 

Donaidsonville 
Netter & Co 25.00 

Jeannette 

Wormser, M. & Co. 5.00 

Monroe 

Gross, Mrs. Floren- 
tine 2.50 

New Orleans 

Abramson, S 5.00 

Adler, Julius 5.00 

Aschaffenburg, A... 5.00 
Association for Relief 

of Jewish Widows 

and Orphans 200.00 

Benjamin, E. V 10.00 

Bruenn, B 5. 00 

Council of Jewish 

Women 25.00 

Godchaux, Mrs. P. . 5.00 

Kohn, Jos 5.00 

Marks Ins. Agency. 5.00 
Newman, Isidore... 100.00 

Rosenthal Bros. . . 10.00 

Simon, Chas 10.00 

Stern, Maurice 25.00 

Trautman, Jac. & 

Co : 10.00 

Weinberger, Mrs. 

M 10.00 

Weis, Julius 25.00 

Plaquemlne 

Kern, Dave I.OO 

Levy, H. J 5.OO 

Wolf, Simon 1.00 



56 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



Rayville 

Titche, Chas 5.00 

St. Francisville 

Teutsch, R 5.00 

St. Gabriel 

Moyse, Simon 5.00 

Shreveport 

Heilperin, H. L... 5.00 

Phelps, E 5.00 

MARYLAND. 

Baltimore 

Adler, Chas 5.00 

Adler, Mrs. S. J... 2.00 

Adler, Simon C... 5.00 

Bamberger, Elkan. 5.00 

Burk, Chas 5.00 

Drey, Elkan 10.00 

Eisenberg, A 5.00 

Epstein, Jacob . . 5.00 
Frank, Dr. Sam- 
uel L., Scholar- 
ship, given by Mrs. 
Bertha R a y n e r 

Frank 200.00 

Frank, Solomon . . 5.00 

Gottshalk, Jos. .. 10.00 

Goldenberg, J 5.00 

Gottlieb, F. H 10.00 

Goldenberg, Mrs. R.M. 5.00 

Gutman, Mrs. Joel . 5.00 

Gutmacher, Rev. A. 5.00 

Gottschalk, Levi .. 5.00 

Hamburger, Ph. .. 5.00 

Hamberger, M. J... 5.00 

Hochschild, Max .. 5.00 

Kraus, Henry 5.00 

Levy, Wm 10.00 

Leopold, r 5.00 

Rayner, A 5.00 

Rayner, Wm. S., 
Scholarship given 
by his daughter, 
Mrs. Bertha Ray- 
ner Frank 200.00 

Rothholz, J. 5.00 

Sinsheimer F 5.00 

Skutch, Max 10.00 

Sonneborn, Henry. 25.00 

Sonneborn, Moses S. 5.00 

Sonneborn, Sig. B. 5.00 

Strouse, Isaac 5.00 

Strouse, Mrs. Ma- 
tilda 5.00 

Strouse, Mrs. Hennie 2.00 

Ulman, Nathan . . . 5.00 

Van Leer, Hannah 5.00 

Walter, Moses R. . 5.00 

Weinberg, Mrs. C. 5.00 

Westheimer, H. .. 10.00 



Cumberland 

Rosenbaum, Simon 5.00 
Rosenbaum, S u s- 

man 5.00 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Boston 

Baer, L 10.00 

Green, Jos 2.00 

Hecht, I. H 25.00 

Kaffenburgh, J. . . 5. 00 

Koshland, J 5.OO 

Levy, B 5.00 

Morse, Godfrey 5.00 

Ratsheskey, A. C. .. 5.00 

Rosenthal, Jacob . . 5.00 

Shuman, Saml. . . 5.00 

Schooner, Jos. Z... 5.00 

Ziegel, L 5. 00 

Brookline 

De Boer, David H. 5.00 

Roxbury 

Van Noorden, E... 5.00 

Waltham 

Bayard, H 5.00 

Worcester 

Coding, Jacob L... 5.00 

MICHIGAN. 
Alma 

Pollasky, M 5.0(J 

Au Sable 

Rosenthal, P 5. 00 

Bay City 

Kohn, Jos. B 5.00 

Greenberg, Karl . . 1.00 

Charlatte 

Vomberg, M 5.00 

Detroit 

Fechheimer, H. M.. 5.00 

Ginsburg, B 5.00 

Goldman, A 5.00 

Heinman, Sol. E. ... 5.00 

Rothman, E. M... 5.00 

Sloman, Eugene H. 10.00 

Schloss, Seligman.. 5.00 

Schloss, M. 1 5.00 

Van Baalen, I. ... 10.00 

Wineman, Mrs. L. . 5.00 

Wineman, L, 15.00 

Elk Rapids 

Alpern, H 5.00 

Grand Rapids 

Pressburg, H. L. .. 2.00 

Wolf, G. A 5.00 

Greenville 

Jacobson, David & 

Son 5.00 

Hawks 

Horwitz, Harris .. 5.00 



Kalamazoo 

Hebrew Ladies Be- 
nevolent Society. 5.00 
Wolverine 

]l,evis, Walter J.... 5.00 
MINNESOTA. 
Minneapolis 

Barnet, H. M 5.00 

Simon, D 5.OO 

Weil, I. ^ 10.00 

Duluth 

Hammel, Louis ... 5.00 

St. Paul 

Bergman, D 10.00 

Goodkind, Benj. .. 5.00 

Guiterman, A 5.00 

Hirschman & Co... 5.00 

Marx, B 5.00 

Recht, S. H 5.00 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Ashwood Sta. 
Cohen, Chas 2.00 

Brookhaven 

Cohn, David Z 10.00 

Cohn, Louis 10.00 

Canton 

Loeb, Jacob 2.00 

Duncansby 

Friedberg, I. & Bro. 2.50 

Lorman 
Cohn Bros 5.00 

Kosciusko 

Falk, Mrs. N. M. . . i.oo 

Frankel, Mose .... .50 

Lowenberg, Mrs. G. i.oo 

Lowenberg, Mr. G i.oo 

Lowenberg, Mrs. L. 1.00 

Meridian 

Moskovitz, A. 5.00 

Threefoot, H. M... 10 00 

Natchez 

Contributions thro' 

Henry Frank 100.00 

Frank, Henry 5.00 

Moses, Mrs. Simon 5.00 
Zerkowsky, Sam 5.00 

Port Gibson 

Bock, David 5.00 

Cahr, Wm 10.00 

Vicksburg 

Anshe Chesed Con- 
gregation 25.00 

Ladies' Hebrew 
Ben. Asso 10.00 

Religious School of 
Congregation An- 

che Chesed S-oo 

Yazoo City 

Wise, H 10.00 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1908 



57 



MISSOURI. 

Kansas City 

Bloch, Sol 10.00 

Bernheimer G. Bros. 

& Co 10.00 

Benjamin, Alfred.. B.OO 

Benjamin, H. L... 5.00 

Davidson, Julius... 5.00 

Hyman, A B.OO 

Levy. 1. A 5.00 

Rothenbergfe Schloss 10.00 

Sachs, Oscar 5.00 

Shane, M 5.00 

Kinglily 

Levi ,Sam'l 5.00 

Louisiana 

Michael Bros 5.00 

Lexington 

Sinauer, Henry ... 5.00 

St. Joseph 

Binswanger, Simon 5.00 

Block, Saml 2.00 

Feffer, J. A 1.00 

Felsenstein, David. 2.00 

Fishmon, H. 1.00 

Friedenberg, Mrs. 

M 5-00 

Hassenbusch, Sam'l 2.00 

Levy, Gus 5.00 

Lowenstein, Mrs. 

Walter 5-oo 

Phillip, Ben 5.00 

Schloss, Moses A.. 1.00 
Westheimer, David F. 5.00 

Westheimer, F. ... 25.00 
Westheimer, E u- 

gene 10.00 

' Westheimer, Saml. 5.00 

St. Louis 

Bettman, L. 10.00 

Bry, N & L 5.00 

Bowman, S 10.00 

Dobriner, C 5-0° 

Drey, Mrs. L. H... 5.00 

Eiseman, B 10.00 

Frohlichstein, S. H. 5.00 

Lippman, Jos. M... 5.00 

Littman, M 10.00 

Levis, Leo 10.00 

Rosenberg, G B.OO 

Sale, Lee 5.00 

ScharfC, A 5.00 

Scharff, S 5.00 

Seelig, S 5.00 

Shroder, S. W. ... 5.00 

Singer, J. W. 5.00 

Stix, E. W 5.00 

Stix, Wm 10.00 

Waldheimer, A. .. 5.00 

Weil, Saml 5.00 

Wolff, A. L 10.00 



Woolf, Morris 5.00 

Wolff, Mrs. Sig. ... 5.00 
Wolff, Wilson, Drug 

Co 10.00 

Tipton 

Cohn, L 5-00 

MONTANA. 

Great Falls 
Wertheim, N 10.00 

Missoula 

Leiser, Esther .... lo.oo 

NEBRASKA. 
Columbus 

Gluck, Israel 5.00 

Lincoln 

Cash i.oo 

Friend, Morris — 5.00 

Mayer Bros 10.00 

Weil, M 5.00 

Omaha 

Levy, M. 10.00 

Levi, 1 5.00 

Rosenthal, B. & H. 5.00 

Plattsmouth 

Pepperberg, J S-oo 

NEW JERSEY. 

Camden 
Blank, J. Z 5.00 

East Orange 

Back, Albert 5.00 

Jersey City 

Kauflman, Mrs. 

Herbert 10.00 

Montclair 

Hirsh, Mrs. Sam- 
son S-oo 

Newark 

Bamberger, L 10.00 

Foster, Rev. Sol... 5.00 

Fuld, Felix 25.00 

Goetz, Jos 5.00 

Lehman, L 5.00 

Mich.ael, Chas 5.00 

Michael, Oscar ... 5.00 

Plant, Moses 5.00 

Strause, Moses 5.00 

Scheuer, Simon . . . 5.00 

Stern, Mrs. C. S... 5.00 

Steiner, Jos 5.00 

Plainfield 
Newcorn. Wm 5.00 

Somerville 

Mack, Mrs. Louis C. 5.00 

Mack, Alex. W 5.00 

Mack, Adolph 5.00 

NEW MEXICO. 

R OS we 1 1 

Jaffa, Mrs. Nathan 5.00 



NORTH CAROLINA. 

Durham 

Kronheimer, B. F. 5.00 

Goldsboro 

Weil, Mrs. Henry.. 5.00 

Weil, Sol. 10.00 

Greensboro 

Cone, Julius W... 5.00 

Cone, Caesar 10.00 

Wilmington 

Solky, J. M 5.00 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Fargo 

Stern, Max 5.00 

NEW YORK. 

Albany 

Albany Congrega- 
tion Beth Emeth. 25.00 
Brillman, Isaac ... 5.00 
Hydeman, S. M.... 5.00 
Laventall, Mrs. J. 5.00 

Lesser, Wm 5.00 

Mann, Mrs. Dinah 

J 5.00 

Mann, B. A 5.00 

Rosendale, S. W. .. 100.00 
Sporborg, Mrs. H. 

J 6.00 

Waldman, Louis I. 10.00 

Brooklyn 

Blum, Edw. C 10.00 

Henriques, Edw. .. 10.00 

Joachim, Chas. — 10.00 

May, Moses 10.00 

Neuburger, Dr. J. B. 5.00 

Rothchild, S. F. .. 10.00 

Salit, M 5.00 

Werbelovsky, J. . . 5.00 

Buffalo 

Block, Adolph 5.00 

Block, Mrs. Jos 15.00 

Boasberg, E •')-00 

Fleishman, Simon. 5.00 

Jacobson, S 5.00 

Keiser, August ... 5.00 

Kaiser, L ^S-oo 

Meyers, L 5.00 

Rothschild, S 10.00 

Shrader, M 5.00 

Wile, Herman 5.00 

Binghampton 

Hirschman, Sig. J. 5.00 

Ellis Island 

Watchhorn Robert. 10.00 

Elmira 

Friendly, H 3.00 

Coiuncil of Jewish 

Women 5.00 



58 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



Herkimer 

Schermer, Benj. .. i.oo 

Mt. Vernon 

Samuels, Julius .. 5.00 

Samuels, Moritz .. B.OO 
Niagara Falls 

Elbe, Mrs. H 5.00 

Silberberg, Moses L. 5.00 

Glean 

Marcus, H. W 5.00 

Rochester 

Adler, A lo.oo 

Adler, I io.OO 

Adler, Simon 5.00 

Adler, Solomon . . 5.00 

Adler, Mrs. Lewis 5.00 

David, Marcus 5.00 

Garson, J. L 5.00 

Katz, A. J 10.00 

Kirstein, Mrs. E. 5.00 

Lowenthal, L, lo.oo 

Michaels, Jos lo.oo 

Present, Philip .. 10.00 

Rosenbloom, Max . . 5.00 

Solomon, S. L 5.00 

Stern, Morley A... lo.oo 

Weil, K. M 5.00 

Wile, Julius M.... 10.00 

Syracuse 

Eisner, Henry ... 5.00 

Jacobson, Dr. N... 5.00 

Mitchell, Mrs. S... 5.00 

Marshall, Jacob . . 5.00 

Rubin, M. D 10.00 

Tottenville 

Levinson, Henry . 5.00 

Warrensburgh 

Bauman, J. P 5.00 

New York City 

Adler, Abe 10.00 

Auerbach, Louis . . 10.00 

Alexander, Arthur . 5.00 

Bauer, Abram 5.00 

Benjamin, Geo 5.00 

Benjamin, N. W.. 10.00 

Bernheimer, Louis 5.00 
Bookman, Mrs. 

Jacob 5.00 

Brand, Herman .. 5.00 

Bljur, Nathan 10.00 

Blaustein, Dr. D.. S-OO 
Bloomingdale, Mrs. 

J. B 10.00 

Brown, Emil 5.00 

Bowsky, Louis .... 10.00 

Brill, I s.oo 

Buttenweiser, J. L. 10.00 

Clark, Louis, Jr... 5.00 

Cohn, Salo 5.00 

Cohen, A 25.00 

Centennial Lodge, 

No. 763, F. & A.M. 10.00 



Cohen, Jos. H. ... 10.00 

Conheim, H 10.00 

Danenbaum, C. .. 5.00 

Danenbaum, M. C. 5.00 

Einstein, I. D 10.00 

Emsheimer, Max . . 5.00 

Estricher, Henry.. 5.00 

Friedman, Sol. & Co. 10.00 

Flasher, B 10.00 

Fleisher, N'athan.. 5.00 

Goldenberg, S. L... 5.00 

Gottheil, Paul 5.00 

Grossman, Rev. Dr. 

Rudolph 5.00 

Guinzburg, Victor. 25.00 

Goodhart, Mrs.P. J. 20.00 

Gibb, W 5.00 

Goldman, M 5.00 

Goldsmith, Herman 5.00 
Collected by Rabbi 
Gustav N. Haus- 

mann 25.00 

Heavenrich, Julius. i.oo 

Hendricks, Mrs. C. 10.00 

Heidelbach, Louis. 5.00 

Holzman, Ascher.. 10.00 

Holzman, S. L 5.00 

Horkheimer, E. S.. 10.00 

Herman, Uriah ... 6.00 
Herman, Mrs. Esther 10.00 

Herman, Nathan . . 5.00 

Herzig, Leopold .. 5.00 

Jonas, Wm 25.00 

Kaufman, Jos. H. . 5.00 

Kaufman, Julius . . 10.00 

Klee, Benj lO.OO 

Kahn, Louis 5.00 

Kleinert, J. B 10.00 

Kohn, Emil W... 5.00 
Kohnstamm, Leo, 

Edw. & Jos 25.00 

Krauskopf, Nathan 100.00 
Krauskopf, Mrs. 

Henrietta 5. 00 

Ladenburger, Theo. 25.00 

Lang, G 5.00 

Lauterbach, Edw.. 25.00 

Levy, Morris 5.00 

Loeb, Maurice 5.00 

Loeb, Louis 5.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Louis.. 10.00 

Loeb, Emil 5.00 

Levi, Emil S 5.00 

Levi, Henlein 5.00 

Levi, Mrs. Leo N. 5.00 

Lewlsohn, Sam S.. 10.00 

Lowensteln, H. ... 5.00 

Mayer, Bernard . . 10.00 

Mendelson, Leon .. 10.00 

Mendelsohn, Lewis 5.00 

Mautner, Julius .. 10.00 

Morgenthau, H. . . 10.00 

Mack, Marx H 10.00 



Mack, Fred A 10.00 

Mayer, Otto L lO.OO 

Meyer Harrison D. 

(In memory of 

Sophie Meyer) . . 20.00 

Modey, 1 3. 00 

Moses, Rev. L S. .. 5.00 

Oberfelder, M 10.00 

Oppenheim, Mrs. 

L 5.00 

Pulaski, M. N 10.00 

Pulaski, Leon 10.00 

Rice, S. M 25.00 

Rosenwald, Sigmund 10.00 
Rothschild, M r s. 

Wm 5.00 

Sanger, Isaac 10.00 

Schoenfeld, Mrs. D. 5.00 

Sicher, Dudley D.. 5.00 

Sylvester, L. L. . . 5.00 

Steiner, Jos. & Bros. 10.00 

Steinhardt, Henry. 10.00 

Stern, Leopold 10.00 

Stern, Leopold 5.00 

Strasburger, Louis. 10.00 

Strasser, W. W... 5.00 

Schoenfeld, Max... 100.00 

Stroock, L. S 5.00 

Stroock, R. L. .. 5.00 

Sulzberger, Cyrus.. 5.00 

Schiff, Jacob H.... 100.00 

Schaffner, Abe 5.00 

Sinsheimer, Alice.. 5.00 

Scholle, Melville J. 5.00 

Sidenberg, Henry. . 5.00 

Sondheim, Max 5.00 

Solomon, Mrs. B. . . 5.00 

Speyer, James ... 10.00 

Stern, Benj 10.00 

Tannenbaum, Leon, 

Sr 10.00 

Toch, Henry M.... 5.00 

Untermeyer, Henry 5.00 

Veit, B 5,00 

Vollter, A 5.00 

Weinberg, A 10.00 

Weinman, IM i s s 

Jennie 5.00 

Werner, Prof. 

Adolph 10.00 

Wolf, Louis 10.00 

Younker, H 10.00 

Zeckendorf, Louis 5.00 

Zinke, I. L 10.00 

Zucker, Saml 5.00 

OKLAHOMA 

Levy, N 1.00 

OHIO. 

Akron 

Polsky, A 10.00 

The Akron Schwes- 

terbund 5.00 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1908 



59 



Archbold 

Hirsch, H 10.00 

Bellaire 

Blum, Henry B.OO 

Blum, Isaac B.OO 

Chillicothe 

Schachne, Moritz.. B.OO 

Cincinnati 

Ach, Samuel 6.00 

B e c k m a n, N. 

Henry B.OO 

Bettman, Levi 10.00 

Bing, J. & S 6.00 

Block, Abe 6.00 

Block, Leou B.OO 

Block, Jos. E B.OO 

Dreifus, David S.. B.OO 

Ezekiel, H. C B.OO 

Englander, I. ... B.OO 

Fletcher, Victor .. B.OO 

Fox, Henry B.OO 

Fox, Sol 10.00 

Frazer, Isidore ... 10.00 

Freiberg, Abr lO.OO 

Freiberg, B B.OO 

Freiberg, J. W 6.00 

Freiberg, Maurice .. 5.00 

Freiberg, Sig 10.00 

Fries, Gus R 5.00 

Grossman, Rev. Dr. 

L 5.00 

Greenbaum, Simon 5.00 

Guggenheim, Ell... 5.00 

Hahn, Henry 5.00 

Johnson, S. O. ... 5.00 

Jonas, H B.OO 

Kahn, Felix 5.00 

Krohn, Irwin M. .. s-oo 

Krohn, I^ouis .... 5.00 

Kaufman, EJli B.. 2.00 

Levi, Louis S 10.00 

Levy, Henry M 5.00 

Mayer, E 10.00 

Mayer, Simon 6.00 

Marx, Louis 10.00 

Meiss, Leon 5.00 

Mayer, Mrs. L B.OO 

Mendel, Henry 10.00 

Miller, E. L 5.00 

Mook & Weil 5.00 

Mack, M. J., 5.00 

Marcus M 5.00 

Marks, Leslie V... B.OO 

May Bros 5.00 

Meis, Nathan .... 5.00 

Meis, Harry 5.00 

Nusbaum, M 10.00 

Newburgh, Louis.. 5.00 

Offner, Alex 5.00 

Peyser, Sol. D 5.00 

Phillips, G. J 10.00 

Plant, A 5.00 



Pollak, E 10.00 

Pritz, Carl e; 5.C0 

Prltz, Benj 6.00 

Pritz, Sidney E B.OO 

Rheinstrom, Mrs. 

A s.oo 

Roth, Chas 10.00 

Rheinstrom, Sigmund 5.00 

Rothschild, Lester. 5.00 

Rosenthal, Saml... 10.00 

Seasongood, A 10.00 

Seinsheimer, Mrs.S. 5.00 

Silverglade, M lO.OO 

Stark, Dr. Sigmar. 10.00 

Sterne, E. M 5.00 

Shohl, Chas 5.00 

Sturm, Simon .... 5.00 

Trost, Carrie L 10.00 

Trost, S. W 10.00 

Ullman, Adolph .. 5.00 

Westheimer, T. F. 5.00 

Westheimer, Leo... 10.00 

"Westheimer, Morris 10.00 

"Wildberg, L 5.00 

Wyler, Isaac 5.00 

Wildberg, A 5.00 

Winkler, Eli 5.00 

Cleveland 

Black, Morris 10.00 

Cleveland Council 

of Jewish Women 15.00 
Daughters of Israel 

Lodge, No. 1 5.00 

Einstein, L 5.00 

Eisenman, Chas. .. 5.00 

Feiss, Paul L,., . . . 5.00 

Forchheimer, B. ... 5.00 

Gries, Rabbi, M. J. 10.00 

Gross, Sam'l S-oo 

Halle, Mrs. M 10.00 

Hays, Jos 5.00 

Hexter, K 5.00 

Hexter, Sol. M.... 5.00 

Hartman, Saml 5.00 

Joseph, Isaac 10.00 

Joseph, Sig 5.00 

Marks, Martin A... 5.00 

Peskind, Dr. J. A. 10.00 

Shlesin^er, S. .... 5.00 

Sands L 10.00 

Shlesinger, H 5.00 

Schwab, Mrs. Flora 5.00 

Stearn, Abraham.. 10.00 

Weil, Meyer 5.00 

Columbus 

Basch, Jos. 5.00 

Lazarus, Fred, Jr. 5.00 

Lazarus, Jeffery L. 3.00 

Lazarus, Robt. ... 3.00 

Lazarus Simon 5.00 

Rleser, Max H 5.00 

Crestline 

Reder, Jake 5.00 



Dayton 

Ach, F. J 10.00 

Daneman, Mrs. Jacob 1.00 
Stichler, P. K 1.00 

Gallon 

Gottdlener, H. ... B.OO 

Lima 

Michael, K'. L 5.00 

Marion 

Barrow, A. 5.00 

Council of Jewish 

Women 8.00 

Family Literary 

Club 1. 00 

Mt. Vernon 

Meyers, Mrs. Max. 5.00 
Piqua 
Anshe Emeth Cong. 5.00 

Plymouth 

Billstein, M 6.00 

Spear, Sol 6.00 

Portsmouth 

Horchow, S 5.00 

Mayer, Abe 3.00 

Sandusky 

Kaplan, Saml 5.00 

tpringfield 

Jewish Thimble 
Social 5.00 

Toledo 
Federation of Jewish 
Ch«rities 1 00.00 

Wyoming 

Pentlarge, Fred 6.00 

Youngstown 
Grossman, Dr. J. 5.00 
Guthman, Leo. ... 6.00 
Hirschberg, B. ... 5.00 

Strous, 1 5.00 

Weil, Mrs. Saml.. 5.00 
Youngstown Hebrew 
Ladies' Benevolent 
Society 5.00 

Zanesville 

Hebrew Relief So.- 

ciety 6.00 

Starr, A. E 5.00 

OREGON. 
Portland 

Lang, Edward .... 20.00 

Ostrow, M 5.00 

Ricen, Jos. M 10.00 

Rosenstein, A 10.00 

Selling, B 10.00 

Selling, Philip .... 10.00 

Sax, L 10.00 

Swett, Z 5.00 

Tilzer, Dr. A 10.00 



60 



LISTI OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

Allegheny 

Sunstein, A. J 10.00 

Sunstein, C 5.00 

Wertheimer, Saml. 10.00 

Allentown 

Feldman, Chas. .. 5.00 

Hess, Max 5.00 

Hess, Chas 5.00 

Individual Members 
of General lyOdge 
No. s6i, F. and 

A. M 20.00 

Kline, Chas 5.00 

Bethlehem 
Fritz, John 5.00 

Braddock 
Katz, Leo A 5.00 

Bradford 

Council of Jewish 

Women 5.00 

Greenwald, David.. 5.00 
Leon, H 10.00 

Carlisle 

Livingstone, Jacob 10.00 

Chester 
Levy, Moses 5.00 

Coatesville 

Braunstein, 1 5.00 

Ginns, J 5.00 

Easton 
Springer, E 5.00 

Erie 

Sobel, Isador 5.00 

Harrisburg 

Astrich, H. 10.00 

Friedman, Saml... 2.0U 

Jacobson, M. E 5.00 

Hazleton 

Friedlander, M 5.00 

Jenkintown 

Silberman, Max . . 5.00 

Johnstown 

Rothstein, M 5.00 

Kittanning 

Einstein, Jacob .. 5.00 

Lancaster 

Cohen, E. M 5.00 

Hecht, Mrs. H .5.00 

Moss, S. R 5.00 

Rich, Israel A 5.00 

Rosenthal, Morris.. 5.00 

Siesel, S 5.00 

Weill, H s.oo 

Langhorn 

Liberman, J. A. .. 10.00 

Luzerne 

Freedman, Max .. 5.00 



McKeesport 

Firestone, Henry .. 10.00 

Sunstein, 1 5.00 

New Castle 

Feuchtwanger, Mar- 
cus 5.00 

Pittsburg 

Aaron, Mrs. Mina. . 5.00 

Aaron, Chas. I. . . 5.00 

Aaron, Louis I. . . 10.00 

Aaron, Marcus 5.00 

Aronson, J. L 5.00 

DeRoy, Jos 5.00 

Dreifus, C 5.00 

Feuchtwanger, Jos. 10.00 

Floersheim, B 5.00 

Forst, Morris 5.00 

Frank, Isaac .... 10.00 
Frank, Sam ( i n 

memoriam) 5.00 

Goldsmit, Louis o.OO 

Gross, Isaac 5.00 

Guckenheimer, Mrs. 

A 10.00 

Gusky, Mary E. . . 25.00 

Gusky Orphanage . . 50.00 

Hanauer, Mrs. H. 5.00 

Kann, W. L 5.00 

Kaskell, Solomon . 10.00 

Kaufman, Henry .. 10.00 

Kaufmann, Morris. 25.00 

Klee, W. B 10.00 

Lehman, A. C. 5.00 

Oppenheimer, A. M. 10.00 

Oppenheimer, M... 10.00 

Oppenheimer, W. .. 10.00 

Raphael, Rudolph. 5.00 

Rauh, A. L 5.00 

Rauh, Enoch 5.00 

Rauh, Marcus 5.00 

Rosenberg, Hugo.. 5.00 

Rothchild, M. N... 5.00 

Stadfield, Jos 5.00 

Sidenberg, Hugo . . 25.00 
United Hebrew Re- 
lief Asso 100.00 

Weil, A. Leo 25.00 

V/ertheimer, E. . . 10.00 

Wertheimer, Isaac 10.00 

Wolf, Fred 5.00 

Weil, Jacques 5.00 

Pottstown 

Mosheim, S 1.00 

Weitzenkorn, A. . . 5.00 

Weitzenkorn, M 5.00 

Reading 

Bash, Wm 5.00 

Schweriner, S. S... 10.00 

Rochester 

Rapport, H. T 5.00 



Scranton 

Krotosky, Isidore.. 5.00 

Krotosky Bros 5.00 

Oettinger, Louis .. 5.00 

Roos, Dr. Ellas J.. 5.00 

Selin's Grove 
Weis, S 5.00 

Titusville 

Hershberg, H. L. . 10.00 

West Homestead 
Glueck, B 5.00 

Wilkes-Barre 

Liebson, Jos 5.00 

Long, Mrs. Dora. . 5.00 

Marks, L. W 5.00 

Strauss, S. J 5.00 

Stern, Henry F. ... 5.00 

Williamsport 

Goldenberg, C. ... 5.00 

York 

Lehmeyer, Is' 10.00 

Lebach, Mrs. L. .. Z.(A 
Philadelphia 

Federation of .Jewish 

Charities 6,400.00 

Abbott, George 5.00 

Acker, Finley 5.00 

Arnold, Lizzette .. 10.00 

Anonymous 1.00 

Baird, J. E 10.00 

Ballinger & Perrot 5.00 

Bash, H 20.00 

Baum, Saml 5.00 

Beckman, S 10.00 

Bernheim, Mrs. W. 
B., in honor ot 
birth of ''grand- 
child 5.00 

Blank, Mrs., in 
memory of her 
daughter Rose 

Blank 1. 00 

Delaney & Co 5.00 

Fabian Saml., 

(Memory of wife) 10.00 
Feustman, N. Maur- 

-ice 5.00 

Gans, Mrs. Jeanette 5.00 
Garretson, Mrs. M. 5.00 

Gelb, W. B 5.00 

Graves, N. Z 5.00 

Grieb, J. B 5.00 

Heebner, Saml 5.00 

Hensell, Colladay & 

Co 5.00 

Herzberg, Mrs. L. . E.OO 
Herzberg, Walter, 
in honor of birth 

of son 5.00 

Hilbronner, Fannie, 
in memory of 
mother's birthday i.oo 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1908 



61 



Himes, Mrs. R. .. 3Soo 
Hirsh, Mrs. Gab... 10.00 
Israel, A. S. Mrs. 5.00 
Jaquett, Saml. T.. 5.00 

Jessar, B. Z 5.00 

Kenesetli Israel Re- 
ligious School .. 10.00 

Lacey, Adln B B.OO 

Landman, Rabbi I. 
in memory of 
Sam'l Strauss, Jr. 5.00 
Lipper, M. W., (in 
honor of grand- 
son, Arthur Lip- 
per, Jr 23.00 

Loeb, Ferd L 25.00 

Lubin S 100.00 

Malish, Mr. and 
Mrs. (Library 

Fund) 10.00 

Mayer, Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank, in 
celebration o f 
their golden wed- 
ding 5.00 

McCreary, Geo. D.. 5.00 
Members of Camp 

Arden 50.00 

Moore and White.. 5.00 

Moss, Mary 5.00 

Meyers, Yette . . . 5.00 

Nachod, J 5.00 

Nelke, David £5.00 

Ostheimer, Wm. J. 5.00 
Paxson & Sons, J. W. 3.00 
Perrine & Son, J. .. 5.00 
Poth & Sons, F. A. 10.00 
Raff, A Raymond.. 5.00 

Rolph, Wm. T 5.00 

Rosenthal, Harry.. 10.00 
Rubin, Mrs. Jos. 
(in memory of 

mother) 10.00 

Rubin, Mrs. Jos. 
(in memory of 

father) lo.oo 

Schloss, Mrs. Louis 
Stern, Ida, and 
Harry L. (in 
memory of moth- 
er, Mrs. Lina 

Stern) 20.00 

Schwacke, J. H... 5.00 
Schwarz, Mrs. H., 
(In memory of 
Henry Schwarz). 50.00 

Sharp, S. S 10.00 

Showell, B. B 5.C0 

Smith & Co., E. B. 5.00 
Snellenburg, N. . . 500-00 
Snellenburg, Sam'l 100.00 
Solomon, Mrs. B. .. 5.00 

Soulas, G. A 5.00 

Stamm, Jos 5.00 



Steinhardt, Mrs. F. 3.00 

Warburton, B. H. .. 6.00 

Weil, E. H., (in 
memory of Hilda 

Oppenheimer . . . 5.00 

Wilson & Rich- 
ards 5.00 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Charleston 

Falk, B. David.... 10.00 
Hebrew Benelovent 

Society 5.00 

Florence 

Sulzbacher,' S. I... 5.00 

TENNESSEE. 

Columbia 

Lazarus, Benj 5.00 

Clarksville 

Adler, M 5.00 

Knoxville 

Finkelstein, Max... 2.00 

Rosenthol, D. A... 5.00 

Memphis 
Federation of Jewish 
Charities 100.00 

Nashville 

Loveman, Adolph.. 5.00 

TEXAS. 

Beaumont 

Block, r 5.00 

Deutser, B 5.00 

Levy, Mrs. L. R... 5.00 

Ladies' Bene. Soc'y 10.00 

Dallas 

Burk & Co 5.00 

Dreeben, 1 5.00 

Dysterback, S 5.00 

Friend, Alex. M. 5.00 

Hexter, "Victor 5.00 

Kahn, E. M 25.00 

Kahn, J 5.00 

Linz & Bro., J 5.00 

Linz, Albert 5.00 

Llnz, Simon 5.00 

Myers, Seymour .. 5.00 

Oppenheimer, L. .. 5.00 

Ortlieb, Max 7.50 

Sanger Bros 30.00 

Sigmund, Mayer . . 5.00 

Titche, Ed 5.00 

El Paso 

Aronstein, S 5.00 

Kohlberg. E 5.00 

Krupp, Harris 5.00 

Goodman, A 5.00 

Goodman, Ignatius 5.00 

Stolaroff, 1 5.00 

Ft. Worth 

Augiist. Mrs. Leo. . 5.00 

Bath, Felix P 5.00 

Council of Jewish 



Women 5.00 

Eppsteln, M. L. ... 5.00 

Gernsbacker Bros. . 5.00 

Levy, S B.OO 

Levy, Mrs. S 5.00 

Galveston 

Cohen, R. 1 5.00 

Mineola 

Bromberg, I. G. .. 5.00 

Midland 

Halff, Henry Mayer 5.00 

Palestine 

Maler, S 5.00 

Paris 

Frank, M 5.00 

San Antonio 

Cohen, A 10.00 

Halff, Mrs. M 25.00 

Halff, Mrs. Rachel. 5.00 

Halff, S 5.00 

Holzmark, Mrs. T. 5.00 

Joske, Alex 5.00 

Texarkana 

Schwartz, J 5.00 

Victoria 

Levi & Co., A 10.00 

Waco 

Sanger, A. S 5.00 

Sanger, L S-OO 

UTAH. 

Salt Lake City 
Barnett, Mrs. H... 5.00 
Jewish Relief So- 
ciety 5.00 

VIRGINIA. 

Alexandria 
Council of Jewish 

Women 10.00 

Harrisonburg 

Oestreicher, S 1.00 

Lynchburg 

Lazarus, L 5.00 

Guggenheimer, Mrs. 

M 100.00 

Norfolk 

Abramson, I. V 5.00 

Hecht, Jos. B 5.00 

Hecht, Jacob 5.00 

Hirschler, B 5.00 

Margolius, Ben. .. 10.00 

Seldner, A. B 5.00 

Richmond 

Binswanger, H. S. . 5.00 

Binswanger, Helen 5.00 

Binswanger, M. I.. 5.00 

Galeski, Dr. S ... 10.00 

Hutzler. H. S 5.00 

Kaufmann, 1 5.00 

Millhiser, Emanuel 5.00 

Millhiser, Mrs. C. . 5-00 

Raab, E 5.00 

Wallersteln, H. S. . . 5.00 



62 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



Staunton 

Strauss, L. G. 



5.00 



WASHINGTON. 
Everett 

Hockstader, B 5.00 

Tacoma 

Feist, Theo 5.00 

Gross, David 5.00 

Klaber, Herman.. 10.00 
Ladies' Montiflore 

Society 5.00 

WEST VIRGINIA. 
Biuefield 

Heller, Mrs. Flor- 
ence Simon .. 5.00 



Charleston 




Rice, S. M 


5.00 


Franlcenberger, M. 


5.00 


Sonneborn, M 


5.00 


Frankenberger, P.. 

Point Pleasant 
Friedman, J 


10.00 
10.00 


WISCONSIN. 
La Crosse 




Friedman, M 


6.00 


Hirshheimer, A. .. 


25.00 


Wheeling 




Milwaukee 




Bloch, Samuel S... 


5.00 


Aarons, Lehman . . 


5-00 


Baer, Henry 


5.00 


Cohen, Mrs. G 


5.00 


Emsheimer, Jos. ... 


5.00 


Heller, Simon 


S-oo 




5.00 


Miller, M 


5 00 


Hebrew Cong. Les- 


Milwaukee Feder- 




hem Shomayim .. 


10. CO 


ated Jewish Chari- 




Horkheimer, M. . . 


25.00 
5.00 


ties 


100.00 


Horkheimer, Louis 


Reichenbaum, Chas. 


10.00 


Isenberg, I 


5.00 


Schuster, Chas. . . . 


3.00 


Rice, A. M 


5.00 


Tabor, L. L 


5.00 



BENEVOLENT ORDERS 



Independent Order B'nai 

ALABAMA. GEORGIA. 

Birmingham Savannah 

Birmingham, No. Joseph, No. 76 5.00 

368 5.00 

n„^„„„,:, ILLINOIS. 
Demopolis 

Maringo, No. 283.. 10.00 Bloomington 

,, , ., Abraham Lincoln, 

Beth Zur, Noi. 84. ... 5.00 

Montgomery Chicago 

Ai X. ^r o„„ - „» Oriental, No. 189.. 10.00 

Alabama, No. 299. 5.00 „ , \^ „„ ,. .. 

•c 1 XT ,Ao ,- ^« Ramah, No. 33 — 10.00 

Emanuel, No. 103.. 5.00 

Lincoln 

ARKANSAS. Liberty, No. 294 .. 5.00 

Little Rock Springfield 

Little Rock. No. Ernes, No. 67 5.00 

158 10.00 

CONNECTICUT. INDIANA. 

D -J ^ J. Fort Wayne 

Bridgeport Emek Beracha, No. 

Abraham, No. 89.. 3.00 „. j^. .„ 

New^ Haven _ u + 

«°-^' ^°- '' '■'' ^oln^ilTlo. 110 10.00 

COLORADO. ,Q^^ 

Colorado Springs ^ ., . 

Colorado Springs, ^es Moines 

■NT irno ,. «« Des Moines, No. 

No. 523 5.00 

330 5.00 

Denver 

Denver, No. 171.... 10.00 KENTUCKY. 

DELAWARE. Lexington 

Wilmington Lexington, No. 289 5.00 

Wilmington, No. 470. 5.00 Paducah 

Harmony, No. 149.. 5.00 
DISTRICT OF COLUM- 
BIA. LOUISIANA. 
Washington New Orleans 
Argo Lodge, No. Crescent City, No. 
413 5.00 182 10.00 



Brith 



MICHIGAN. 
Kalamazoo 

Mishan, No. 247... 5.00 
MINNESOTA. 
Minneapolis 

Minneapolis, No. 271. 10.00 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Columbus 

Joachim, No. 181.. 

Jackson 

Manasah, No. 202 .. 

MISSOURI. 

St. Joseph 

Joseph, No. 73 

St. Louis 

Eben Ezra, No. 47 
Missouri, No. 22. . 

MONTANA. 

BL:tte 
Baron De Hirsh, 
No. 420 

NEW JERSEY. 

Trenton 

Trenton, No. 319. ... 

NEW YORK. 

Albany 

Gideon, No. 140. . . 

Rochester 

Zerubbabel, No. 53 



2.00 



3.00 



10.00 



10.00 
5.00 



5.00 



5.00 



10.00 



New York City. 

Be'er Schebba, No. 11 5.00 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1908 



63 



Hebron, No. 5 5.00 

Henry Jones, Noi. 79. 2.00 

Joel, No. ii8 .... 5.00 

Washington, No. 19 10.00 

Zion, No. 2 10.00 

OHIO. 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati, N'o. 4.. 30.00 
Cleveland 

Cleveland, No. 16.. 15.00 

Dayton 

Eschol, No. 55.... 10.00 

OREGON. 
Portland 

Theo. Herzel, No. 

314 10.00 

Portland, No. 416.. 10.00 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Allegheny 

Jericho, No. 44 10.00 



Saar Sholem, No. 

154 10.00 

Erie 

Erie, No. 620 5.00 

Philadelphia 

District Grand 
Lodge, N'o. 3 (for 
memorial trees) . 30.00 

Haj Sinai, No. 8.. 5.00 

Joshua, No. 23 ... 10.00 

Pittsburg 

Iron City, No. 324.. 5.00 

Pottsviile 

Union, No 124 .... 5.00 

Uniontown 

Uniontown, No. 471 10.00 

TENNESSEE. 

Memphis 

Memphis No. 35.. 10.00 



Nashville 

Maimonides, No. 46 5.00 

TEXAS 

Ft. Worth 

Elias Sanger, No. 519 10.00 

San Antonio 

Edar, No. 211 5.00 

UTAH. 

Salt Lake City 

B. F. Peixotto, No. 421 IO.Oq 

WASHINGTON. 
Seattle 
Hildesheimer, No. 503 5.00 

WISCONSIN. 

Milwaukee 

Gilead, No. 41 10.00 

Isaac, No. 87 5.00 



Independent Order B'rith Abraham 

CONNECTICUT, 



Norwich 

Norwich City, No. 62 

MINNESOTA. 

Minneapolis 

Minneapolis, No. 63 

NEW YORK. 

Buffalo 

Niagara Lodge. No. 



5.00 



5-00 



Elmira 

Elmira, No. 272.... 3.00 

New York City. 

American, No. 167 5.00 
Ben. Harrison, N'o. 9. 3.00 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
Philadelphia 

Liberty, No. 6 5.00 

Pittsburg 

Hope, No. 210 ... 2.00 



RHODE ISLAND. 

Providence 

Star of Rhode Is- 
land, No. 330.... 4.00 

TEXAS. 

Dallas 

Alex. Kohut, No. 247 5.00 

WISCONSIN. 

Milwaukee 

Wisconsin, No. 80. 10.00 



Independent Order Free Sons of Israel 



MICHIGAN. 

Detroit 

Montefiore, No. 12 .. 



5.00 



NEW YORK CITY. 

Gad, N'o. 11 5.00 

Standard, No. 30 .. 5.00 



WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee 

Cream City L,odge, 
No. 63 5.00 




Rabbi JOS. KRAUSKOPF. D. D. 



AN APPRECIATION 

The following letters, entirely unsolicited, attest the high 
character of all our work: 
"My Dear Mr. Gutekunst: 

"Please accept my sincere thanks for the photographs you 
have made of me, and which have just reached me. They are 
certainly magnificent likenesses, and well attest the fact that 
the hand that has delighted Philadelphia with its art for the 
past half century has not yet lost its cunning. 

"Trusting that kind Providence may spare you to us and 
to your art yet many a year in health and good cheer, I am 

Very appreciatively yours, "JOS. KRAUSKOPF." 

F. Gutekunst. Seattle, Washington, Jan. 27, 1907. 

Mv Dear Sir: — Your letter has reached me here — you may 
surely use my sainted wife's letter to you about my picture, if you 
wish, for I know how she loved it. It hung opposite her bed, and 
almost the last thing she did in life was to smile and wave her 
hand at it. You gave her such pleasure by sending the picture 
that there is nothing I can do in return which I would not most 
galdly do. Faithfully yours, JACOB A. RIIS. 



r. GUTEKUNST. 712 Arch St. and 1700 NortH Broad St. 



Stetson 



ais 



Retail Department 



1108 Chestnut St 



HOSKINS 



904-906 

CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



Printing Office Furniture 

Engraving Filing Devices 

Stationery Cutlery 

Blank Books Kodaks 

Loose Leaf Devices Leather Goods 

^ Largest and most Complete Stock in Philadelphia 
^ Fadtory and Printery on the Premises 



COMMERCIAL STATIONERS 
OFFICE OUTFITTERS 



AND 








I am a candle, whose 
splut'ring head, fur- 
nished the Hght to go 
to bed in the olden 
days, when my sickly 
rays would almost 
convince that darkness 
pays. Those were the 
times of long ago, 
back a hundred years 
or so, when the maids 
would spark in the 
semi - dark and say 
that gloom was a merry lark. 
But now there comes to take 
my place, the light of 
a hundred candles' 
grace. A cheering sight 
on a darksome night, are the 
rays of the wonderful Welsbach 
Light. Cheapness and goodness 
both combined— a master light from a master mind. From coast to 
coast and from sea to sea, a million candles a man might see— but 
nothing on earth is half so bright as the rays from a gf """>« ^^.7 
bach Light. On mantle box and on burner, too, is the Shield 
of Quality stamped for you— in case the dealer attempts a 
few of the tricks he really ought not do— and an imi- 
tation tries to sell, thinking it serves you just as well. 

All genuine Welsbach mantles have the Shield of Quality stamped 
onX box. Five kinds- 1 5. 20. 25. 30and 35 cents l""tatons. 
no mattei how <J»eap. aie expeoave. The Genut?ie for sale by 




WELSBACH STORE 
922 Chestnut Street 



PHILADELPHIA 



J. E. CALDWELL & CO. 

JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS 



Importers of Fine Watches and Clocks and 
European Objects of Decorative Art 

Sterling Silver for Weddings and Anniversaries 

New Art Room for the 

Display and Sale of the Artistic Productions 

of The Tiffany Studios 



902 CHESTNUT STREET 

iHE coiiOiEmiH !ii[[ mmm m iriisi mmi 

Northwest Corner Chestnut and Twelfth Streets 

CAPITAL, - - - $1,000,000 
SURPLUS, - - - 1,251,166, 

Insupes Titles Issues Seairehes 

{Receives Deposits Ltoans Money 

Executes Trusts Beeomes Surety 

flcts as H^SistFar of Stocks and Bonds 

Safe Deposit Boxes to Rent for $3.00 and upwards 

OFFICERS 

Dimner Beeber, President Charles K. Zug, Trust Officer 

Francis E. Brewster, First Vice-President Edmund B. McCarthy, Asst. Sec'y & Treai. 

Franklin L,. Lyle, Second Vice-President Robert J. Williams, Asst. Title Officer 

Henry M. Dechert Charles E. Fellows, Real Estate Officer 

Chairman of Board & Executive Committee, T. C. Jordan, Asst. Trust Officer 

James V. Ellison, Sec'y and Treas. R. F. Reaver, Safe Superintendent 
Andrew T. Kay, Title Officer 

' DIRECTORS 

Dimner Beeber Charles E. Ellis Edward A. Schmidt Frederick Sylvester 

Francis E. Brewster Bernard Gilpin E. Cooper Shapley John T. Windrim 

Charles Carver Franklin L. Eyle Henry R. Shoch Isaac D. Yocum 

Henry M. Dechert Joseph Savidge John H. Sloan 



LLOYD GARRETT COMPANY 
PHILADELPHIA 




Makers and Importers 
of 

LIGHTING FIXTURES 

MEMORIAL TABLETS 

BRONZES 



Salesrooms Factory 

S. E. Cor. i^th & Walnut Sts., 211^ Wood Street 




WHILE we are somewhat diffident 
about patting ourselves on the 
back, we can not help but tell 
you that the manner in which Philadel- 
phians have grasped the idea, the pur- 
pose and the advantages of the Store of 
Famous Shoes, has literally carried us 
off our feet. 

We have sold thousands of pairs of 
shoes already, and hundreds of new cus- 
tomers are coming in every day. Each 
one a permanent patron, too — because 
that's tlie kind of shoes we sell. 

Do you know the Store of Famous 
Shoes? Do you know that the best 
products of ELEVEN famous makers 
are shown here? Think of the assort- 
ments, the qualities, the fit and the 
values that means! 

GEUTING'S 

(pronounced Gyting) 
The Store of Famous Shoes 

1230 Market Street 



Telephone 5750 Spruce 

MAILHOT 

THE FRENCH FEATHER SHOP 

OSTRICH FEATHERS 

Made — Dyed — Cleansed 
and Curled 

1510 CHESTNUT STREET 

Philadelphia 



Handsome and Ap- 
propriate Gifts. 

Large Assortment of 
attradive Subjecfts. 

c 4 rfisuc Picture Framing 

Largest line and most ex- 
clusive mouldings at low- 
est prices. 

OttoScheibal/IE^Ji^ 



CITY&TROLLEYGUIDEforl909 

OF PHILADELPHIA 



-NOW READY - 



C. E. HOWE. 

Publisher Boyd's Directory 




Proper ^ 
Treatment \^ 

for j_Desl ff.| 

Hardwood 
Floors 



H EATON 
&WOOD 



Parquetry, Wood-Carpels and Grilles 

J 706 Chestnut Street 




/. 5. Cochran 

Land ^itle pudding 
, Philadelphia 




m 



omen s 



and Misses- Tailoring 

1732 CHESTNUT STREET 
Habits, Gowns, Top Coats 

Waists, Lingerie, Corsets 



WALNUT STREET 
AT THIRTEENTH 

If it is Artistic 

if it is Unusual 

If it is of Good Quality 

WE HAVE IT 

and moderately priced too. 
DIAMOND JEWELRY 
BIRTHSTONE JEWELRY 
SILVER NOVELTIES - 
ENGRAVED GLASSWARE 
ART METALS 



BOTH PHONES 




S)iamont)0 an^ Matcbce 

33 (Sl 35 So. Eighth St. 



OUR OTHER STORES 

149 N. Eighth St. 
819 S. Second 9t. 



Philadelphia 



Stanley V. Mastbaum Alfred W. Flelsher 

MiSIBAUMUUISHER 

REAL ESTATE 

733 "Walnut Street PH»lad«. 



asotb ^clcpboncs 

Z\)c HntlQue Sbops ot 
3, fiD, Mtntrob 
918^926 iptne Street 
ipbtlat)elpbla, pa, 

IRarc ©ID Ipieces, ©DDitics 
SWUfuUig IReproOuceO 



80-39=41 Saved 




Chocolates and Bon Bons 

FINLEY ACKER CO. 

Chestnut at 12lh Market at 12th 

8th above Arch 



Dyer Brothers 

HATTERS 

10I3 CHESTNUT STREET 
Philadelphia. Fa. 




U.S.Silk.Co 

534 Forrest Bldg. 

Philada.. Pa. 

Silk Hosiery 

The best Quality 
of Silk Hose at 
One Dollar 
per pair and guar- 
anteed perfect. 
Order by mail, or 

a postal will 
bring the salesman. 



p. & F. CORBIN 

N. W. Cor. 8th & ARCH STS. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Locks, Hinges, Door Checks, 

and a complete line of 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

MAIN OFFICE : 
NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 

WAREROOMS : 
NEW YORK PHILA. CHICAGO 





PENNSYLVANIA QUALITY 

Means Tempered 
Steel Cutting 
Blades and our 
specially designed 
bottom knife, 




^ L A WN 



producing 

Self 
Sharpening 

MOWERS >f 



What you save in Sharpening and Repair charges, pays 
for one of these machines in a few years 



For sale by Leading Seedsmen and Hardwau-e Stores wherever grass 
grows the world over. Write for Cata.log 

SUPPLEE HARDWARE COMPANY, Philadelphia 



DIXON'S 



American Graphite Pencils 
Graphite Auto Lubricants 
Graphite Axle Grease 
— Silica-Graphite paint 

all ^and absolutely for first quality. Try them. 

Joseph Dixon Crucible Co., 

1020 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Main Office, Jersey City, N. J. 



Joseph S. Keen, Jr. H. Bayard Hodge, 

President and General Manager. Secretary and Assistant Treas. 
George M. Bunting, Wm. H- Roth, 

Vice-President and Treasurer. Assistant Secretary. 



tu mirkm Pipe nidnufacturiifg eompany 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS FOR WATER WORKS 

112 IRortb JSroat) Street, pbtlaDelpbla 



J. W. LEDOUX. M. AM. SOC. C. E.. Chief Engineer. 

JAMES H. DAWES, General Supt. Construction Department. 
HAROLD PEROT KEB;N, General Supt. Operating Department. 

ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED ESTABLISHED 1888 



CARTER PAVING CO. 

REINFORCED CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION, 

CONTRACTORS FOR 

Brttficial Stone Jploors WitrtfteD 3Bricft anD 

anO ipavemcnts Bspbalt ipavtng 

FOUNDATIONS FOR MACHINERY. ETC. 

Office, 906 Franklin Bank Building, :: Philadelphia 

F. W. CARTER Bell and Keystone Phones 

CHARLES I. H.E.NT, President "WM. L. GUE.NTHER, Vice-President 
LEON ROSENBAUM. Treasurer and Secrotarx 

J. Jacob Shannon & Co. 

1744 Market Street, Philadelphia 

Mill, Mine, Railway, ^1744 A^ Hardwate 

Builders' & Contractors' ^ ^z j m 

Supplies and \^kmm%M Equipment 



J 



amaica 



ALAND that's many degrees cooler than Atlantic 
coast resorts' a land where mosquitoes, flies and 
fevers are unknown ; a land of beautiful tropical 
foliage, lofty mountains, interesting people, good hotels 
and modern transportation facilities. 

A DELIGHTFUL FALL OR WINTER TOUR 

on the magnificent appointed "ADMIRALS," the twin- 
screw U. S. Mail Steamers of the 

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY LINE 

Weekly sailings from Philadelphia and Boston. 
Special rates May to October. 

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY 

R. J. "WATSON. Manager 



FOR BOOKLET AND FULL INFORMATION ADDRESS 

F. S. JOPP, General Passenger Agent or S. B. WILLS, Division Passenger Agent 

Long Wharf, Bofton, Mass. Pier 5, North Wharves, Phila. 



1845 1908 

The Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Co. 

NEWARK, N. J. 

IV /fUTUAL BENEFIT Life and Endowment Policies contain 
special and peculiar advantages which are not combined in 
the policies of any other company 

FREDERICK FRELINGHUYSEN. President 



Paid Policy-Holders Since Organization in 1845 
$250,476,338.60 



James H. Glenn, 

522 WALNUT ST., PHILA., PA. 



General Agent for 
EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



SCHREIBER & KERR 

Ladies' Tailors and Habit Maimers 
1529 CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



Top Coats Smart Walking Co^umes Jackets 

Riding Habits Automobile Garments 



A. F. BORNOT BRO. CO. 

FRENCH SCOURERS 
=AND DYERS== 

Seventeenth Street and Fairmount Avenue 



BRANCHES: 
1535 Chestnut Street N. E. Cor, 1 2th and Walnut Streets 

1714 N. Broad Street S. W, Cor. Broad and Tasker Streete 

PHILDELPHIA 

1224 F St., WASHINGTON. D. C. 716 Market St.. WILMINGTON. DEL. 



Why not send us all your IMPORTANT CLEANING? 



THE SILK STORE 

Horton and Company 

129 South 13th Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

(2nd floor) 
SILK BY THE YARD. WAISTS. PETTICOATS. SUITS AND SKIRTS 




OUR STOCK IS FAMOUS 

For Its Magnitude and Magnificence. We 
carry tlie finest and richest line of 

HIGH CLASS 

DIAMOND JEWELRY 

Of any House in Philadelphia, All of our 
Productions are Thoroughly Smart 
and Distinctly Original. 



IM PORTER OF 

DIAMONDS 



E. J. HERTZ, 

13th Street bel. Chestnut Phila. 



CRANE'S 

Ice Cream, Cakes 
Pastry and Candies 



Have stood the test of the PURE FOOD LAW. 
The requirement of same have ALWAYS been 
observed, so their patrons can rely upon their 
continuance. 



Store & Tea Room -1331 Chestnut St. 



THEO. F. SIEFERT 



FURRIER 



RUSSIAN SABLES 

SEALSKIN 

GARMENTS 



BELL TELEPHONE 



FUR HATS 

REPAIRING 

A SPECIALTY 



1210 WALNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA 



Printers and Publishers 



218 South Fourth Street 



Eilimates Cheerfully Furnished »^ Both 'Phones 



MERCER TILES A SPECIALTY PHONE CONNECTIONS 

The Wilson Tile Company 

MOSAIC TILES AND MARBLE DECORATIONS 
MANTELS, GRATES AND FIREPLACES 

OrriCE AND SHOWROOMS 

414 PERRY BUILDING, 16TH AND CHESTNUT STREETS 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

J. SEliLERS PEHNOGK 

SaDitary Plombing and Heating 

S. E. Cor. Seventh and Filbert Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA 

ISfprfSftttatitif of 3pmialf 3lnalttuttnna unit Wtlsamsh in lift StvtiBif ^amt 
PublisKed ©very Friday, 

Svxbscription Price $3.00 Per Annum 
PHILADELPHIA OFFICE, 608 CHESTNUT STREET 

BALTIMORE OFFICE, 120 AISQUITH STREET 

Let Me Estimate on Your "Work: 

A. P. FRAIM 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER 
Office and Shop: 319 Market Street 
Jobbing promptly attended to 
Estinnates furniatied 

Bell F'lnon.e Keystone I*tion.e, 



GOLD SEAL BEER 

BREWED BY THE 

Continental Brewing Co. 

Made from the very finest 
qual ity of Malt, and the 
best growths of Hops = ° ° 

BREWERY 

21st Street and Washington Ave. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



WAMPOLE'S 

F O R M O L I D 

(Antiseptic Solution) 

A CONCENTRATED, BUT HARMLESS, ANTISEPTIC 



FORMOLID, properly diluted, may be used with perfect free- 
dom in the treatment of diseased or inflamed conditions of the 
mucous m.embrane of the mouth, nose, throat, etc., and as a lotion 
in the treatment of cuts or other abrasions of the skin. 

Excellent as a mouth-wash or gargle. 



PREPARED SOLELY BY 

Henry K. Wampole & Co. 

INCORPORATED 

MANUFACTURING PHARMACISTS 

PHILADBLPHIA, TJ. S. A. 



BEYOND COMPETITION 

BAILEY'S PURE RYE 

For the Use of Gentlemen who Can Appre- 
ciate a Perfed Flavor and 1 Aroma Combined 
with All the Requisites Necessary to Assi^ 
Convalescants When Recommended By a 
Physician Fully Matured and Bottled 



HUEY & CHRIST 

1209 MARKET STREET 



THEOBALD & OPPENHEIMER CO. 




nd 






-MAKERS OF— 



=riNE= 

CIGARS 






NEW YORK 



PHILADELPHIA 
LA TOCO. Clear Havana 

WM. PENN and ROYAL LANCER 
Seed and Havana 



Good 

BEER 

is 

Good 

Food 



^c^"^ 




There 
may be 
others 
as 
Good 



THERE'S NONE BETTER 



S. W. Cor. Fourth and Green Sts., Philadelphia 



Capital Stock, Full Paid, . . $500,000.00 
Surplus and Undivided Profits 846.607.16 
Deposits 3,303,539.24 



BANKING DEPARTMENT 

Receives money on deposit, subject to check 
Dn sight, allowing 2 per cent, interest. Rents 
boxes for safe keeping of valuables in burglar and 
fire-proof vaults, for $3.00 and upwards. Letters 
of Credit and International Cheques for Travelers 
issued, available everywhere. 

SAVING FUND DEPARTMENT 

Open from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. Mondays to 7 P. M. Saturdays to 1 P. M. 

3 per cent, interest allowed on deposits 

TITLE AND REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

Exsnnines and insures titles to real estate. Collects rents, dividends, interests, &c. 

Money loaned on mortgage and mortgages for sale. Attends to all details pertaining to 

buying, selling and conveying of real estate. 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 
Transacts all Trust Company business and acts in the capacity of executor, administrator, 
guardian or Trustee taking entire charge of estates. All valuables received for safe keeping. 
Wills receipted and kept in safe boxes without charge. 




OFFICERS 

President 

GEORGE KESSLER 

First Vice-President 

JOHN G. VOGLER 

Second Vice-President 

PHILIP SPAETER 

Secretary and Treasurer 

HERMAN WISCHMAN 

Trust Officer 
PHILIP E. GUCKES 



George Kessle 
Philip Doerr 
Frederick Orlemann 
Charles G. Berlinger 
Philip Spaeter 
Charles Mahler 
Wm. H. Rookstool 
Albert Hellwig 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Jno. G. Vogler 
John Greenwood 
Fred'k Gaeckler 
George Nass 
C. J. Preisendanz 
William Roesch 
Daniel W. Grafliy 
J. Edwin Rech 



August P. Kunzig 
Albert Schoenhut 
Charles W. Miller 
William G. Berlinger 
Charles Strickler 
Jacob Kramer 
[. P. Strittmatter, M. D. 



Die aSeamten sprecben Beutscb 



THE H. B. SMITH CO. 

728 ARCH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

nVTAlSrXJir'ACTXJRKRS OF 



BOILERS AND FiADIi^TORS 



for the heating of new or old buildings by any 
System of steam or Water 

WRITE FOli CATALOG 

Lawrence Gas Fixtures Mfg. Co. 



Designers and Manufacturers of 

Qas, Electric and Combination 
Fixtures 



129, 131, 133 and 135 North Twelfth Street 

Corner Cherry Street PHILADELPHIA 

DIEHL MANUFACTURING CO. 

EiLECTRic gi:ne:rators 

MOTORS 

EXHAUST WHEELS 
FANS. ETC. 

Phila. Office: 1305 RACE ST- 

W. Irwin Cheyney, Mgr. 




Bath Room Equipment 

SHOULD BE PERSONALLY SELECTED 



^5=3? 



i^fe^a. Our Exhibition ^ooms will Interest You 



1705 Chestnut Street 
^ HAYNES-THOMPSON COMPANY ^^ 

Established 1855. 

TKomas DelaKunty, 



• 




Marble 




Granite 


WorKs. 







3811 to 3819 Ridge Avenue. 

North Laurel Hill Cemetery. PHILADELPHIA. 

JOSEPH G. LYNCH JACOB A. LYNCH CALVIN Z. LYNCH 

Members of Master Builders' Exchange 

LYNCH BROTHERS 

Contractors and Builders 

612 to 615 LIPPINCOTT BUILDING 

46 N. Twelfth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Estimates Furnished Both Phones 



Joseph H. Parvin 

COTTON YARNS 



126 CHESTNUT STREET 



PHILADELPHIA 



TELEPHONES 



KEYSTONE, MAIN 390 



BELL, MARKET 409 



NATIONAL ANILINE & CHEMICAL CO. 

ANILINE COLORS, DYE STUFFS 
AND CHEMICALS 



109 NORTH Water Street 



PHILADELPHIA 



AGENTS FOR 

SCHOELLKOPF, HARTFORD & HANA CO. 

A. LEE COMPANY 



/. G. Grieb & Sons 

531 Market Street 


Ziegler Bros, 

119 North Fifth Street 


Atlas & Fisher 

S. W. cor. 7th & Sansom Sts. 


Pbiladelpbia 
manufacturers mutual 
Tire Insurance Company 

ARCADE BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA 

EDWIN I. ATLEE, President 


r. W. sparks 

121 Walnut St. 


iiMMiicuinoGo. 

Ask your Dealer and insist on having 

your Awnings made from 

Hoffman Gold Medal Brand Awning Stripes 

Largest Rope and Twine House in tha World. 
CONTRACTORS TO THE GOVERNMENT 
Philadelphia, New York, 
413 Market St. 55 White St. 



New York : 345-347 Broadway 

Boston : 67 Chauncy Street 

Chicago : 605 Medinah Temple 

CATLIN & CO. 


C. J. w. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 


YARNS 

128-130 CHESTNUT ST. 

Philadelphia 
COPS, SKEINS, CONES, TUBES, 

AND WARPS 


RICHARD A. BLYTHE 

Commission 

Merchant 

COTTON YARNS of Every 

Description 
114 Chestnut St., Phila,, Pa. 

BRANCHES: 

1018 Century BuildinK, Atlanta, Ga. 

W. H. HARRISS. Repre.entative 

HAWES BROS. & BLYTHE, 
Fall River, Mass. 


THE MUTUAL 

YARN 

COMMISSION 

COMPANY 

505-506 

MARINER and 
MERCHANT BUILDING 


C. SCHMIDT & SONS 
127 Edward St. 


BalllDger & Perrot 

1200 Chestnut Street 



"My What a Beautiful New 
Enameled Bathtub 
You Have!" 

That was the admiring exclama- 
tion of an observing lady visiting 
a friend's house. 

But it wasn't a new tub at all. 

Really, it was an old one — had 
been placed in the house some 
years ago. 

But it looked like new. 

Just as white as snow and with 
that perfect polish which only true 
enamel can give. 

The lady was soon informed why 
the bathtub looked so beautiful. 

Kleenatub 

had made the enamel look likenew. 

It will do the same thing for your 
enameled tub; for your kitchen 
sink; for your cut glass (no matter 
how fine;) for your mirrors; for 
your enameled or brass bed — for 
any metal you may have in the 
house. 
Why Not Try It! Only lOc. Any Dealer 

WRIGLEY MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
PHILADELPHIA 



Guarantee 
Raincoat Company 

Raincoats and Cravenettes 

SILK AUTOMOBILE COATS 
AND DUSTERS : FOR MEN 
WOMEN : AND : CHILDREN 

1326 S. Penn Sq., Philada. 

OPPOSITE WANAMAKER'S 



You may bring your own Materials 
We guarantee 2 Fittings, 

more if necessary 

Reliable Tailoring Co. 

LADIES' AND MISSES' 

Suits and Coats "^"^rder 

1225 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 
Bell Phone 



"Wear Klosfit Petticoats 

Made in Philadelphia 

Sold Everywhere" 




**Fits without a Wrinkle*' 




Stanton H. H< 

242 S. Second Street 

Chairs 
d Mission Furniture 



an 



fidam Seheidt Breuiing Go. 

IJOHHISTOWfl, Pfl. 

Bfeuiers of the Gelebpated 

Itotos Export and Standard Beer 

Also IWanafaeturefs of 

20th Gentary Gpeam Ale, Porter, Brooin 
Stout and all Garbonated Beverages 

PHlIiflOEIiPBlfl BHflNGH, 963-971 JlO. MU STREET 
THE VULCANITE PAVING COMPANY 

LAND TITLE BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA 



General Contractors for Reinforced Concrete Construction, Asphalt 
Mastic Water-proofing, Insulation, Belgian Block, 

Asphalt Block and Vitrified Brick Paving 
Asphalt Mastic and Cement Floors our Sp.ecialty. 

GEORGE L. SIPPS 

Carpenter, Builder and Contractor 

907 WALNUT STREET 

SHOP: 912 LOCUST STREET 
Both 'Phones 



^he Maule Seed Booh for 1909 

Contains everytKin^ old or ne-w, -wortK having in 



Seeds, Plants or Bulbs 



"Write to-day for it to 



WM. HENRY MAULE 



1711 Filbert Street 



PKiladelpbia, Pa. 



Owen Letter's Sons 

BEST COAL 

YARDS: 

Trenton Ave. and Westmoreland St. 

Coral St. and Lehiigh. Ave. 



DISINFECTANTS AND DISINFECTING APPLIANCES 

HOUSES SCIENTIFICALLY FUMIGATED 

WE ARE EXPERTS IN THE LINE 

WEST DISINFECTING CO., Inc. 

THE LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF DISI N FECTANTS AN D 
DISINFECTING APPLIANCES IN AMERICA 

MAIN OFFICE AND LABORATORY, NEW YORK 

PHILADELPHIA OFFICE, 262 NORTH 13th ST. 

CHARLES AUERBACH, MANAGER BOTH PHONES 



JOHN E. SJOSTROM Cabinetmaher 

All Kinds of Special Cabinet Work 




1719 N. 10th Street 



BANHandOrnCE 

PARTITIONS 



Moons Trees Grow 

Large trees for immediate effed. 
Send for illustrated descriptive Catalogue 

The Wm. H. Moon Co. 

Glenwood Nurseries 

Morrisville, Bucks Co., Pa. 

Landscape Dept. 



21 So. 12th St. 



Philadelphia 



Genuine Philadelphia Lawn Mowers 

Made by 
The 

Philadelphia Lawn Mower Co. 

3lst &, Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Send for Catalogue and Prices before ordering. 




Write (ot tample o( improved choice yellow gluten feed 



D. R. WORflAN, 

Sales Agent for Dealer in 

Choice Yellow Grain and Mill 
Gluten Feed :: Feed. 

BeA Milk Producer known 

ROOM 442. BOURSE BUILDING. 

Asent for Pure Choice Phila. Dried Brewer Grains. 



THE BEST 

SEEDS 

PLANTS 

BULBS 

Catalogues mailed free 

HENRY A. DREER 

7 1 4 Chestnut St. Philadelphia, Pa. 



LOCKWOOD 
FOLDING BOX CO., Limited 



Manufacturers of 



Folding Paper Boxes, Envelopes 
and Paper Specialties 

CHARLES L. LOCKWOOD, President 
251 S. THIRD ST. Philadelphia 



A. J. MARGOLIN 

532-34 South Fourth St. 




ARE RELIABLE 

Headquarters for... 
Bulbs, Plants, Garden Tools, 
Insect Destroyers, Fertilizers, 
Poultry Supplies and Farm Seeds. 
CATAJ^OGVE FREE. 

HENRY F.MICHELL CO. 

1018 and 518 Market St., Philadelphia. 



THE MANUFftCTURERS 
NATIONAL BANK 



Capital, $500,000. 

Surplus & Undivided Profits $368,096.14 



William H. Heisler, Tresident. 

Samuel Campbell, Cashier. 



PHILADELPHIA'S BEST BREAD 



%l^'^JL.(^£LO^^AA 



Bread CaKes Pies Macaroni Noodles 

e>6e FREIHOFER VIENNA BARING CO., 

Master St. 23rd to 24'th. 

Supplees' Alderney Dairy North ^twentn st. 

r^UR CiPECIALTIES: Certified Milk, Nursery Milk, Pure Alderney Milk, 
^*^ <^ Pasturized Milk, Delicious Cream, WhipDed Cream. 

FAMILY. HOTEL and RESTAURANT TRADE 

m ^ • 1 1 is Bottled in the Country and Delivered to Cuflomers without being opened. 
Our I V 1 1 I fC '* Inspected and Teiled at Our Own Plants in the Country before being 
* • ****». shipped to us. 



ESTABLISHED 1671 

THOS. CALLAHAN & SONS 

Wholesale Commission Merchants 

SPECIALTIES 

EGGS, POULTRY, 

CHEESE, BUI lER, 

356 North Front Street 

Telephone Connexions. 

PHILADELPHIA 


WM. r. SELLERS 

Practical ^r j^ 

j^ Ho rsesKoer 

6J4 and 6 J6 Jefferson Street, 

Philadelphia 

Horses Shod ^l^r^'i-fy^ture 

INTERFERING HORSESA SPECIAI,TY 

Particular attention paid to Road and 

Trotting Horses, Quarter Cracks, Corns, 
Contracted Feet, Etc. 


Arthur's Alderney Dairies 

The Better Kind of Milk 
Pasteurized Milk, Baby Milk, Whipping Cream. 


Keystone Phone, . 

M. HARRIS 

Dealer in B^URNITURE ' 

CARPETS and BEDDINQ 

712 PASSYUNK AVENUE 

Philadelphia, Pa. 


Table Cream. 
I330 Ogden Street 


R. R. W. W. 


FENNER 
DRUGS 

Broad and Columbia Avenue 


Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. 

S. W. Cor. 9th & Chestnut Sts. 

JOHN R. FOX, Supt. 


0. FURHMAN 

Vienna Ivadies' Tailor 

995 North Sixth Street 

PHILADELPHIA 



$1,000,000 

/C C I "^ patrons have more than the above amount 
"•^ * -^ on deposit here 

The Northwestern Trust Company 

RIDGE AND COLUMBIA AVENUES 

WILLIAM FREIHOFER. President 

It Costs Us Money 

V\^e don't mark your table linen or your pocket handker- 
chiefs ; ever notice that? It is our constant aim to 
look after the little details so conducive to the com- 
fort and amiability of the housewife. 

EXCELSIOR LAUNDRY COMPANY 

19tH and Montgomery Ave., PHila. 
W^ILL TREAT YOU RIGHT 

The CLASS & NACHOD BREWING GO. 

Solitaire Beer ^s good 

BOTTLING BEER 
A SPECIALTY 

1720-38 Mervine Street Philadelphia 

WILLS-JONES 

CERTIFIED MILK NURSERY MILK 

THOROUGHBRED DAIRIES 

MILK-CREAM 

THE CLEANEST DAIRY IN THE STATE 
office: 1202-04-06 MONTGOMERY AVENUE 

branch: 603 NORTH EIGHTH STREET 

We Distribute daily, Milk from Farm School "Herd." Try it 



Bell. Poplar 4^7-20 
*• 31-4-S A 



TELEPHONE.S 



tleystone. ParK 67-71 
'• 4-4-54-D 



NEVER CLOSED 



HA AG STABLE CO. Ltd. 

i6tti Street belowr Diamond 
PtLiladelptiia. 



UP-TO-DATE EQUIPAGES: 



OPERA BUSSES BRIDAL COACHES VICTORIAS 

CABRIOLETTE HANSOMS BROUGHAMS CUT-UNDERS 

COACHMEN IN FULL LIVERY 



ELECTRICAL WORK in all its branches ... We install and 
repair Electrical Incandescent Lights, Gas Lighting, Bells, Burglar 
Alarms, Motor, Telephones, Dynamos and Electrical Work of every 
description. 

ALBERT GENTEL 
j^ Electrical Contractor j^ 

1503 COLUMBIA AVE. 



Both Phone! 



Po^al or Phone Us 



Branch Store: 4466 Germantown Avenue 




Phone Tioga 7990 



S. Sehmltt 

High Grade 

Iiadies' Tailoping 

and 

Hiding Habits 

2139 iJorth Fifteenth Street 



A HINGED FEATHER MATTRESS 




This is distinctly a new departure in the construction of a bed. 

Its advantages are: 

It dresses the bed perfectly level and does away with the bulky appear- 
ance of a feather bed. 

The feathers being confined in their respective sections; they do no^ 
slip away from under you when in use. 

It does not require the exertion of beating up. 

It never spreads and becomes larger than the bed. 

It never wears into the uneveness which is oftimes the case with a 
mattress. 

It is softer than anything that can be produced. 

Though they are made entirely new, they can be made from a feather 
bed you no doubt have put away for the above reasons. 

^ UPHOLSTERING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES £> 

GEORGE D. PARKER 

MANUFACTURE-R OF MATCH-LESS BEDDING 

19tH CBL Colximbia Ave., PKiladelphia, Pa. 



The John Mawson 
Hair Cloth Co., 

KENSINGTON AVENUE, 
GLENWOOD AVENUE, 



and VENANGO STREET 



PHONES PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



When dissatisfied with 
your work try 

Forrest Laundry 

1221-23-25 Columbia Ave. 

Lace Curtains, 
Floor Linens 
a Specialty 

Both Phones 



D. V. BROWN 

Wholesale and Manufacturing 

Optician 

738 and 740 Sansom St. 
Philadelphia 

PRESCRIPTION WORK A SPECIALTY 
WHOLESALE ONLY 



NEW YORK BOSTON CHICAGO 

PHILADELPHIA SAN FRANCISCO 

siiiiy mm m co. 

AUTOMATIC AIR DUST 
REMOVING MACHINERY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Vacuum Systems, Compressed Air 
Systems, Combined Vacuum and 
Compressed Air Systems, Stationary 
Plants, Portable Apparatus 

Philadelphia Office : 5 1 9 Perry Building, 1 6th and 
Chestnut St». Factories: Philadelphia, Pa., 

Chicago, III., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones E. D. MENDELL, Resident Manager 



Manufacturers of all kinds of Hard Rubber, 
Elastic and Leather-Covered 

TRUSSES 

Sole Makers of the Celebrated 
DR. McINTOSH NATURAL UTERINE 
SUPPORTER 
For Home and Export Trade. 
Abdominal and Uterine Supporters. Shoul- 
der Braces, Crutches, Elastic Hoisery 
and Body Belts. 

912 Walnut St.. Philada., U. S. A. 



JUNGMANN'S 
Beef, Wine and Iron 



5 a 



FULL PINTS 
None Better 



Jungmann's Drug Store 

Fourth and Noble Streets 

and 220 Vine Street 




HARDWARE 
CUTLERY. TOOLS 

HousefurnisKing Goods 

Farming Tools 

211-213 MarKet St.. PHiladelpKia 

jfranK lb* Stewart 

lElectrtc Compani? 

ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

35 North Seventh Street 

Philadelphia 

HARRY R. RUST 

Store and Office Fixtures, Etc. 
Contractor, Carpenter & Builder 

ROLUNG STORE LADDERS 

Office and Mill 

724-26 LUDLOW STREET 
828 Filbert Street 

TelephoneB PHILADELPHIA 



BERGER BROS. CO. 

Tinners* Hard'w^are 
and Roofers* Svipplies 

No. 237 ARCH STREET 
Philadelphia 

HIGH-GRADE 
VARNISHES 

C.SCHRACK&CO. 

PAINT STORE 

152, 154," 156 & 158 N. 4th St. 
Established 1816 



Bell Phone 



Keystone Phone 



W. BODEK COMPANY 

Importers and Jobbers in 

HOSIERY, NOTIONS, 

UNDERWEAR, ETC. 

527 Market Street 



S. W. Goodman Co. 

Iptlnters 

116 North Third Street 

Philadelphia 



Jerome H. Sheip 

Sec'y and Treat. 



Aia W. Vandegrift 
President 



Local and Long Distance Telephone 

SHEIP & VANDEGRIFT,- 

Manufacturers of 

CIGAR BOXES 

LOCK CORNER BOXES 
814 to 832 N. Lawrence St. 817-21 N. 5th St. 

PHILADELPHrA 



DOUGHERTYS 

Faultless Bedding 

Brass and Enzmneled Bedsteads 

11th St. above Market St. 



F. BRECHT'S SONS 

CIGAR BOX 

Manufacturers 

109 and 111 North Orrianna Street 

Telephone Connection 



EZRA LEVINSON 

Wrapping Paper, Paper Bags, Wax 
Paper, Twines, Envelopes, Toilet 
Paper, Soda Straws, Oy^er Boxes 

26 South Fifth St., 



BOTH PHONES 



Philadelphia 



Wines and Liquors 



SUPERIOR QUALITY 
MODERATE PRICES 



J. CARTUN, 

401-3-5 South Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Corbin Cabinet Lock Company 

52 NORTH SIXTH ST. 
PHILADELPHIA 



Q Cabinet, Trunk, Suit Case and Pad Locks. 
fl Misc. Brass Goods, Keys and Blanks. 
^ Complete Po^ Office Equipments. 



MOSEBACH & SON 

RESTAURANT 

8th St. above Market St. 



CHRISTIAN PFAFF 

Wholesale Wine and 

Liquor Dealer 

S. E. Cor. Passyunk Ave. 

and Catharine St. 

Philadelphia 



Bucks County Trust Company 



Insures Titles 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Pays Interest on Deposits Executes Trusts 

HUGH B. EASTBURN. President and Trust Officer 

JOHN S. WILLIAMS, Vice-President 

T. 0. ATKINSON, Treasurer GEO. H. MILLER. Assistant Treasurer 

GEORGE WATSON, Assistant Trust Officer 



Hugh B. Eastburn 
John S. Williams 
Jacob Hagerty 
Thos. O. Atkinson 
Samuel J. Garner 



DIRECTORS 

B. F. Shearer 
George Watson 
Henry W. Watson 
Thomas Ross 
Howard I. James 



Henry G. Moyeb 
John S. Fretz 
Henry A. James 
T. Howard Atkinson 



WYNNE JAMES 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Room D, Hart Building, 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

ALL KINDS REAL 
ESTATE FOR SALE 
FIRE INSURANCE 
NOTARY PUBLIC 



Seth IV, Good 

211 W. Court St, 
T)oylestown, Pa. 



LOUIS BUCKMAN 



F. J. GERUTZK 



BUCKMAN &,CO. 

DOyLESTO\VN. PA. 

DEALERS IN 

LUMBER AND COAL 

BracKets, Mouldings, IDoore, 

'W^indo'w SasH, SHutters, Blinds, 

"Wlndo-w Frames, £to. 

Factory Work of All Kinds Done to Order. 
Cedar Posts and Shingles. 



R. C. CLYMER 

DEALER IN 

Dry Goods, Groceries, Notions 

AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



DOYLESTOWN. PA. 
Opposite P. & R. R. Depot 




BELL PHONC 20 Y 

A.S.HELLYER'S 
SONS CO. 

MERCHANTS 

COR. MAIN ST. AN D 

SHEWELL AVE. 
DoYLESTOWN Pa. 

6 Pair Hose 

Guciranleed for 

6 months. $1.50 

a box; 6 pair 

in a box. 



Henry S. Beidler 

DOYLESTOWN. PA. 



COAL, FLOUR. 

GRAIN, FEED, 
TIMOTHY AND 

CLOVFR SEED, 
LIME, FERTILIZERS, 



McGlade & Stultz 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 
ENGINEERS 

14 and 16 E. Oakland Avenue 
Doylestown, Pa. 
Both 'Phones. 



(Uitt. €. Ricbardson 

Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, 
Lumber, Cement, Seeds, 

Hay Press, Roofing Felt, Etc., Lad- 
ders, Doors, Sash & Shutters 
Bell 'Phone CHALFONT, Pa. 



Rotzel & Raike 

LUMBER, COAL and MILL WORK 

Headquarters for Red Cedar 

ESTIMATES FURNISHED 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Opposite Baptist Church 



C. Lo\iis Siegler, D. D.S. 

Opposite New Hart Building 
MAIN ST. DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Standard 'Phone: No. 55 A 



MILTON REED 

Dealer in 
Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, 

Cut Glass and Silverware. 
CASH paid for Old Gold and Silver 
Hart Building Doylestown, Pa. 



Both 'Phones 

THOS DREVER 

Successor to Thomas A. Lynch 

CARPENTER & BUILDER 

Jobbing Promptly Attended To 

1618 N. Carlisle Street, Phila., Pa. 



JAMES BARRETT 

Dealer and Wholesale Agent for 
IRON, STEEL, BUILDING and 

CARRIAGE HARDWARE 
Corner Main and Ashland Streets 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Telephone 

CONKLING -ARMSTRONG 

TERRA COTTA CO. 

Manufacturers of 
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 

WORKS: Philadelphia 
OFFICE: Builders' Exchange, Phila. 



WM. F. ELY 

Dealer in 

Ready-to-Wear Clothing for Men, 

Boys, Children; Gent's Furnishing 

Goods, Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes 

OPPOSITE P. & R. DEPOT 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Wm. R. Chapman & Sons 



B 



RICKLAYERS 
UILDERS 



1215 South Broad Street 

Philadelphia 



Hart Building Pharmacy, 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



CARNWATH, BELL & CO., 

STEAM 

Packing Box Manufacturers 

613 and 615 Cherry Street 
608 and 610 Quarry Street 

Telephone Philadelphia 



M. K. DUNGAN 

House Painter and Paper Decorator 
Paints, Oils, Glass, 

Picture Moulding, Etc. 
Latest Designs in Wall Paper 
45-7 W. State St., Doylestown, Pa. 



BRIEFLY 

Everything in PapCf 
C. S. GARRETT & SON CO. 

20 and 22 South Marshall St., Philadelphia, Pa. 




Sense in the head, cents in the pocket 

Keeping one's employees contented is 
surely good sense, just as surely does it 
mean cents in the pocket. 

Penn-Dar Steel Lockers 

help keep employees contented. The lockers 
last indefinitely, are easily cleaned and in- 
spected- 

Furnished handsomely finished and 
with hooks, shelf, lock and number plate. 

Made in units, rows, tiers or groups. 

ASK FOR CATALOG 

Edward Darby & Sons Co., Inc. 

237 Arch Street, Philadelphia 




WM. R. DOUGHERTY 

(^^ ARPENTER AND BUILDER 

1 604 to 1610 Sansom Street 

Jobbing Work of. All Kinds attended to. Philadelphia, Pa. 





1 

"Ask the man who owns onef 
Keystone Motor V^ar Company 

216-20 N. BROAD STREET 
Philadelphia 



Qaid the wife to her husband after dining with friends — 
^ "Did you notice the bread ? That was Mary's home 
made." "Yet good as it was it wasn't nearly so good 
as Kolh's 



PAN-DANDY 

It lacked that delicious bread flavor — it didn't have that 
creamy richness — and I don't believe that it would keep fresh 
and good-to-eat nearly so long." 

PAN-DANDY is made from a special recipe that calls 
for the very be^ flour — rich creamy milk and extra careful 
making. 

Most folks say it's the be^ bread they ever ta^ed. 

5/ the loaf at any grocer's. Be sure the Kolb's label 
is on it. 




The Reputation of a City 

The Kghter and brighter a city looks after dark, the 
more up-to-date it becomes — the greater its trade — the 
higher its reputation. 

The same thing is true of a store. 

There is just one artificial illuimnant which will 
successfully fulfill any and every lighting condition, which 
is both a lighting medium and an advertisement — ELEC' 
TRIG LIGHT. 

The economy of the new Tungsten and Nemsl 
Electric Lamps places Electricity within the reach of the 
smallest retail shop in Philadelphia. These lamps are 
today being used in the very largest and most representative 
stores of the city. 

For full details as to rates and wiring estimates consult 

The Philadelphia Electric Company 

Tenth and | Chestnut Streets