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Full text of "Elon College Academic Catalog, 1994-1998"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/eloncollege105108elon 




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Elon College 
1994-1995 



Elon College 

North Carolina 27244 

910/584-9711 



Elon Vol. 105-September 1994 (UPS 076-160) Published annually at Elon 

College, NC 27244-2010. Elon College does not discriminate on the basis of 

race, color, sex, handicap and national or ethnic origin in the recruitment and 

admission of students, the recruitment and employment of faculty and staff or 

the operation of any of its programs. The college's Section 504 Coordinator is 

Priscilla Haworth, Associate Director of Academic Advising, Alamance 101. 



Elon College reserves the right to add or drop programs and courses, to 

institute new requirements when such changes are desirable, and to change 

the calendar that has been published. Every effort will be made to minimize 

the inconvenience such changes might create for students. 



CONTENTS 




ontents 



Communications with Elon College 3 

Calendar 4 

Introduction 5 

The Mission of Elon College 5 

History 6 

Students 7 

Faculty 7 

Programs 7 

Academic Calendar 8 

Accreditation 8 

Campus and Facilities 9 

Location 9 

Campus 9 

Facilities 10 

Athletic Facilities 12 

Visitor Information 14 

Travel Information 14 

Academic Program 15 

Degrees and Major Fields 

of Concentration 15 

Minor Fields of Concentration 15 

General Studies 16 

The Martha and Spencer Love 

School of Business 16 

Professional Programs 17 

Preprofessional Programs 17 

Special Academic Programs 18 

Evening School 19 

Transitional Program 19 

Free Peer Tutoring 19 

Writing Program 19 

Elon 101 19 

High School Credit Bank Program 19 

Leaders for the Twenty-First 

Century Programs 20 

Enrichment Programs 22 

Studies Abroad 23 

Independent Study and Research 24 

Military 24 

Career Services 24 

Academic Support Services 25 



Student Life 27 1 

student Service 27 

Room Reservation and Security Deposits 28 

New Student Orientation 29 

The Student Government Association 29 

ludicial System 29 

Campus Security 29 

Cultural Life 30 

The Student Union Board 30 

The Campus Center 31 

The Back Door 31 

Religious Life 31 

Leadership Development 31 

Service Learning 32 

Honor Societies 32 

Student Organizations 33 

Communications Media 34 

Who's Who 35 

Campus Recreation 35 

Wellness 36 

Intercollegiate Athletics 36 

Traditional Events 36 

Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid ... 39 

Application Procedures 39 

Admission Requirements 39 

All Resident Students 40 

All Commuter Students 40 

Entrance Examinations 40 

The Early Decision Plan 40 

Transfer Admission 41 

Special Students 41 

International Students 42 

Acceptance 42 

College-Level Examination 

Program (CLEP) 42 

Department Examination 43 

Transfer Credit 43 

Credit for Veterans 43 

General Costs 43 

Costs Covered by Tuition 43 

The Meal Plan 44 



E L N COLLEGE 



Book Expenses 44 

Room Change Charge 44 

Expenses for the 1994-95 

Academic Year 45 

Part-Time Enrollment/Day Students 

and All Evening School! 45 

Graduate Programs 45 

Summer School 1995 46 

Special 'Optional Fees 46 

Graduation Fees 46 

Miscellaneous 46 

Relunds 47 

2 Financial Aid 48 

Payment Options 53 

Endowed Scholarships 53 

Leaders for the Twenty-First 

Centun,' Scholarships 57 

Presidential Scholarships 57 

Scholarship Awards in Athletics 58 

Endowment and Sources of Income 58 

General Academic Regulations 61 

Registration and Courses 61 

Course Load 61 

Course Registration 61 

Auditing Courses 62 

Changes in Class and Schedule 62 

Credit by Examination (Course Challenge) .... 62 

Dropping Courses 62 

Independent Study 63 

Overload 63 

Pass/Fail Elective Courses 63 

Repeat Courses 63 

Attendance 63 

Absence From Tests and Examinations 63 

Grades and Reports 64 

Grade Point Average (GPA) 65 

Grade Reports 65 

Dean's List 65 

Graduation With Honors 65 

Access to Student Educational Records 66 

Transcripts of Student Records 66 

Work at Other Institutions 66 

Academic Standards and Withdrawal 66 

Dismissal 67 

Withdrawal 67 

Academic Regulations 69 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements 69 

Bachelor's Degree Requirements 70 

The Major 71 

The Minor 72 

Courses 73 

Accounting 73 

African/African-American Studies 76 

Art 77 



Biology and Allied Health 79 

Business Administration 86 

Chemistry 91 

Communications 95 

Computing Sciences 96 

Cooperative Education 99 

Dance 100 

Drama 102 

Economics 102 

Education 105 

English 113 

Environmental Studies 122 

Fine Arts 124 

Foreign Languages 125 

General Studies 128 

Geography 129 

Health, Physical Education and Leisure 130 

History 142 

Human Services 147 

International Studies 150 

Journalism and Communications 150 

Leisure/Sport Management 155 

Mathematics 155 

Medical Technology 160 

Military Science 160 

Music 163 

Music Theatre 169 

Philosophy 170 

Physical Education 173 

Physics 173 

Political Science 176 

Psychology 180 

Public Administration 183 

Religious Studies 185 

Science Education 188 

Social Science 191 

Sociology 193 

Sports Medicine 197 

Theatre Arts 198 

Women's Studies 201 

Graduate Degree Requirements 203 

Degrees and Major Fields 203 

Master of Business 

Administration (MBA) 203 

Admission Policy 203 

Basic Requirements 203 

Degree Requirements 203 

Master of Education (M.Ed.) 205 

Directory & Appendices 209 

Faculty, 1993-94 210 

Visiting Faculty, 1993-94 223 

Administrative Officers 
and Staff 223 



COMMUNICATIONS 



This bulletin contains pertinent information about the college, its philosophy, 
programs, policies, regulations and course offerings. All students and prospective 
students are urged to read it carefully and completely. Please direct correspon- 
dence to the appropriate individuals, listed below: 



President 

• General information 

Provost 

• Administrative and 
student affairs policies 

• Long-range plans 

Vice President for 
Academic Affairs 

• Academic program 

• Academic work of 
students in college 

• Faculty positions 

• Special programs 

Dean of Admissions and 
Financial Planning 

• Admissions 

• Requests for applications, 
catalogs or bulletins 

• Scholarships, student loans and 
student employment 

Dean of Student Affairs 

• Housing 

• Student affairs 



Vice President for 
Business and Finance 

• Administrative sei'vices 

• Payment of student accounts 

• Inquiries concerning expenses 

Vice President for Development 

• Public relations 

• Contributions, gifts or bequests 

• Estate planning 

Director of Placement 

• Career options for students 

• Employment of seniors 
and alumni 

Registrar 

• Requests for transcripts 

• Evaluation of transfer credits 

• Student educational records 

Director of Alumni 
and Parent Relations 

• Alumni affairs 

• Parent relations 

Director of Academic Advising 

• Course scheduling 

• Academic counseling 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



Calendar 



Fall Semester 1994 

August 24 (Wed) 
August 25 (Thu) 
August 26 (Fri) 
August 27 (Sat) 
August 29 (Mon) 
September 1 (Thu) 
October 7 (Fri) 
October 12 (Wed) 
October 20 (Thu) 
October 24 (Mon) 
November 9 (Wed) 
November 22 (Tue) 
November 28 (Mon) 
December 6 (Tue) 
December 7 (Wed) 
December 8-13 (Thu-Tue) 
December 15 (Thu) 

Winter Term 1995 

januan,' 3 (Tue) 
January 4 (Wed) 
January 5 (Thu) 
January 13 (Fri) 
January 23 (Mon) 
January 24 (Tue) 
lanuary 25 (Wed) 

Spring Semester 1995 

January 30 (Mon) 
January 31 (Tue) 
February 1 (Wed) 
February 7 (Tue) 
March 22 (Wed) 
March 24 (Fri) 
April 3 (Mon) 
April 13 (Thu) 
April 17 (Mon) 
May 9 (Tue) 
May 1 (Wed) 
May 11-16 (Thu-TUe) 
May 1 7 (Wed) 
May 19 (Fri) 
May 20 (Sat) 

Summer School 1995 

TBA 



Orientation 

Orientation; Evening School Registration 

Registration 

Drop-Add Day 

Classes Begin 

Last Day for Late Registration 

Mid-Semester Reports Due; Fall Break Begins at 2:20 p.m. 

Fall Break Ends at 8:00 a.m. 

Last Day for Dropping Course w^ith "W" 

Last Day to Remove Incomplete ("1") and "NR" Grades 

Preregistration Begins for Winter Term and Spring Semester 1995 

Thanksgiving Holiday Begins Following Evening Classes 

Thanksgiving Holiday Ends at 8:00 a.m. 

Classes End 

Reading Day (Evening Exams Begin) 

Examinations 

Grades Due at 10:00 a.m. 



Registration 

Classes Begin 

Last Day for Late Registration 

Last Day for Dropping Course with "W" 

Classes End 

Examinations 

Grades Due at 3:00 p.m. 

Registration 

Drop-Add Day; Evening Classes Begin (5:30 p.m. and later) 

Day Classes Begin 

Last Day for Late Registration 

Last Day for Dropping Course with "W" 

Mid-Semester Reports Due; Spring Break Begins at 2:20 p.m. 

Spring Break Ends at 8:00 a.m. 

Last Day to Remove Incomplete ("I") and "NR" Grades 

Preregistration Begins for Summer and Fall 1995 

Classes End 

Reading Day (Evening Exams Begin) 

Examinations 

Senior Grades Due By 9:00 a.m. 

Grades Due at 10:00 a.m. 

Commencement; Last Day of School 



INTRODUCTION 



ntmdu 




Elon College is a coeducational, residential, church-related college 
situated on a spacious campus in the heart of the Piedmont near Burlington, 
North Carolina. Named for the Hebrew word for "oak," the college is located 
in what was once an oak forest, and many of these majestic trees still grace 
Elon's campus. 

The fourth largest of the 37 private colleges and universities in North Carolina, 
Elon offers a wide range of choices in academics and campus activities, yet is 
small enough to allow students to feel a sense of personal involvement and 
interaction with faculty members and fellow students. 

The Mission of Elon College 

Motivated by the beliefs and spiritual values that have grown out of its 
founding by the historic Christian Church, Elon offers men and women a liberal 
arts education that enriches them as human beings, prepares them for the choice 
of a profession and for service to their communities. Within this context, Elon 
College also offers selected career-oriented majors and graduate programs to 
facilitate professional development. 

In accordance with the provisions of the charter, Elon College aims to provide 
its students the opportunity to develop: 

• a personal philosophy of life which will be reflected in a sense of integrity, 
high ethical standards, and significant religious insights and practice; 

• an understanding of their responsibilities and rights as citizens in a democratic 
society, and a recognition of the intrinsic worth of all individuals; 

• an informed respect for the differences among cultures as well as an under- 
standing of the interdependence of world conditions and of the need for 
individual and collective responsibility for the environment; 

• a love of learning and sensitivity to aesthetic values sufficient to stimulate 
continued intellectual and cultural growth; 

• the ability to gather information, to think critically, logically, and creatively, 
and to communicate effectively; 

• a basic knowledge of the humanities, natural sciences and social sciences, 
and an appreciation of their interrelationships; 

• a level of competence in at least one field of knowledge sufficient to provide 
depth of intellectual perspective and preparation for graduate study or profes- 
sional activity; 



E L N COLLEGE 

• an understanding of the principles of mental and physical health essential for 
developing a lifestyle of wholeness and well-being; 

• an appreciation of the potential for lifelong personal growth and professional 
development which their own distinct abilities and aptitudes provide. 

In keeping with these educational objectives, Elon College recognizes its 
broader responsibilities as an institution of higher learning. The college supports 
scholarly and artistic expression by providing the couditions for serious intellec- 
tual work by both students and faculty. It furthermore promotes open and honest 
inquirv, respect for persons of all circumstances, sensitivity to diverse cultural 
traditions, an understanding of the economic environment, an appreciation for 
the value of work and habits of democratic citizenship. As participants in a 
community of learners, all members of the college are expected to enact the 
ideals of personal integrity and public responsibility. 

History 

Elon College was founded by the Christian Church (now United Church 
of Christ) in 1889. Two schools were forerunners of Elon College: The Graham 
College, established in 1851 in Graham, North Carolina; and the Suffolk Collegiate 
Institute, established in 1872 in Suffolk, Virginia. In 1888, the Southern Christian 
Convention, now a part of the United Church of Christ, voted to establish Elon 
College. Since its founding, seven presidents have provided the leadership 
essential for progress. 

The site of the new college was known as Mill Point, located four miles west 
of Burlington, North Carolina. In its early years, Elon survived many difficulties. 
The student body population was severely reduced during World War I, and a 
major fire in 1923 destroyed most of the campus buildings. Within three years, 
a new campus emerged from the ruins: The five central buildings, including 
Alamance, were built at this time. The Great Depression and World War II also 
created challenges for the college. 

The decades following World War II brought physical growth and academic 
development. As enrollment increased, new buildings went up and the college 
expanded beyond its brick walls. Students from half of the states in the Union, 
as well as from foreign countries, gave the college a regional complexion. 

Elon experienced a decade of unprecedented growth during the 1980s. During 
this time, applications doubled and enrollment increased 35 percent, making Elon 
one of the fastest growing colleges in the region. Dozens of academic and student 
life programs were added to enrich the quality of an Elon education. Special 
classes and volunteer programs were developed to provide students with leader- 
ship and service opportunities. In fall 1984, the college began offering a master 
of business administration degree, and in the fall 1986, a master of education 
degree. The college physical plant grew during the 1980s as well. Total campus 
acreage doubled, and square footage of buildings increased 73 percent. The 
college also made major investments in computer and library technology and 
equipment for the sciences and communications. 



INTRODUCTION 

During this time, financial support for tlie college was strong, with annual 
revenues increasing more than 200 percent. Counted among Elon's most loyal 
benefactors are the alumni: 38 percent make a gift to the college each year, 
placing Elon among the top of private colleges and universities in alumni 
participation. 

Elon's forward momentum has continued in the 1990s. In an effort to further 
enhance teaching and academic excellence, the college has recently revised the 
General Studies curriculum and converted to a four semester-hour structure. An 
$18 million fund-raising campaign is near completion, and renovation of Alumni 
Gymnasium and construction of a fitness center is complete. A new 74,000 
square-foot campus center will be completed in 1994. 

As a result of Elon's accomplishments, Elon was ranked in the top quartile 
of southern regional colleges and universities by U.S. News & World Report's 
"1994 College Guide." 

Although there have been many changes through the years, Elon remains 
church-related rather than church controlled. It embraces general Christian 
principles and values as an appropriate foundation for the development of 
human personality and social order. 

Students 

From its initial enrollment of 108 students, Elon's student body has grown 
steadily. Elon's 3,141 undergraduate and 138 graduate students come from 37 
states and 21 foreign countries. In 1993, 38 percent of Elon students were from 
North Carolina and 62 percent were from out-of-state. Slightly more than half of 
the students are women, and the student body includes several racial and socio- 
economic groups. Elon College admits students of any race, color, sex, national 
or ethnic origin and handicapped without discrimination. This diversity enriches 
the life of the community and reflects the nature of American society itself. 

Faculty 

Elon students benefit from a dedicated staff and an outstanding faculty whose 
primary concern is teaching. Faculty members have been chosen because of their 
academic preparation, individual initiative and commitment to excellence in 
teaching. Approximately 75 percent hold the highest degree in their fields. Many 
of Elon's faculty demonstrate their satisfaction with the college with long years 
of service. With a student to faculty ratio of 17:1, Elon chooses to remain small so 
that the relationship between faculty and students is friendly, informal and lasting. 

Programs 

Elon College believes that the study of liberal arts prepares students for 
rewarding, meaningful lives. Its programs are designed to challenge students to 
excel intellectually, to pursue self-fulfillment and to learn the meaning of service 
to others. 

The academic program provides opportunities for each student to develop 
a mature proficiency in the use of the English language, an awareness of history 



E L N COLLEGE 

and an appreciation of cultural, social and scientific achievements. The General 
Studies courses give students the breadth and background needed for mature 
intellectual development and a lifetime of learning and leadership. The upper- 
level courses allovi' students to concentrate in areas of special interest and in 
professional and career-oriented branches of learning. To meet such individual 
needs, the academic program includes such features as independent study, study 
abroad opportunities, internships and cooperative education. 

Elon College complements the classroom through a broad range of activities 
and student life programs that encourage students to find their personal identi- 
ties, refine their social skills, broaden their perspectives and create lifetime 
8 friendships. 

Academic Calendar 

The college's academic year is divided into a 4-1-4 calendar. The fall semester 
is a four-month term, ending before Christmas holidays, followed by a one-month 
winter term and a four-month spring semester. The one-month term offers 
opportunities for travel, study abroad, internships and service programs in 
addition to specialized courses on campus. Evening classes and a summer 
session are held each year. 

The calendar is designed to meet the needs of: (1) full-time students who 
plan to complete degree requirements within four years, (2) part-time students, 

(3) high school seniors who wish to take one or two college-level courses, 

(4) members of the community who desire further educational work in day or 
evening classes, and (5) those who seek a graduate degree in business (MBA) 
or education (M.Ed.). Summer school serves the same groups and, in addition, 
provides an opportunity for new students or students enrolled in other colleges 
to more quickly complete their degree requirements. 

Accreditation 

Elon College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools to award bachelor's and master's degrees. 

The college is a member of the following associations: 

• The American Council of Education 

• The Association of American Colleges 

• The American Association of University Women 

• The North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities 

• The North Carolina Association of Independent Colleges and Universities 

• Independent College Fund of North Carolina 

• The Council for Higher Education of the United Church of Christ 

• National Commission on Accrediting 

• The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business 

• The Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs 



CAMPUS AND FACILITIES 




amms and Facilities 



Location 

Fifteen miles west of Elon College, along Interstate 85/40, is the thriving city 
of Greensboro. To the east is Research Triangle Park, internationally known for 
its intellectual resources and for scientific research conducted by companies and 
organizations in the fields of computer technology, genetic engineering and other 
areas. Near Research Triangle Park are Duke University at Durham, the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University at Raleigh. Rich 
cultural resources affiliated with four larger cities and 12 colleges are within an 
hour's drive of the campus. Thus, the Elon College community enjoys the lifestyle 
of a relatively small institution yet benefits from being centrally located close to 
major institutional and urban resources. 

Campus 

Elon's historic campus is beautiful, spacious and rich in trees and stately 
brick buildings. The campus is adjacent to the business district of the town of Elon 
College and is bounded by residential areas. The college is designed and equipped 
to serve its living and learning community with 24 academic and administrative 
buildings and 20 residence halls. The current living and dining facilities serve 
approximately 1 ,800 students who live on campus. 

Extensive building and improvement projects have been completed in recent 
years, including six fraternity and sorority houses on north campus in 1989, six 
apartment complexes on east campus in 1989, four residence halls in 1982 and 
1984, and a new fountain and plaza area in 1982. Buildings housing the class- 
rooms and laboratories have been extensively renovated, and new equipment and 
furniture have been provided, significantly enhancing the learning environment. 

Elon's 75,000-square-foot Fine Arts Building opened in 1987 to house the fine 
arts and communications programs. In addition to providing classroom and studio 
space, the building has become the center of the college's cultural program series. 
Facilities include an auditorium, a recital hall and gallery space. 

A major renovation and addition to the newly named Koury Center will unite 
Alumni Memorial Gymnasium, Alumni Gym, Jordan Gym, Beck Pool and the new 
state-of-the-art fitness center, creating a visual whole. 

A new campus center with 74,000 square feet is under construction, sched- 
uled for completion in 1994. The center will include space for student organiza- 
tions, a dining facility, the campus bookstore, student mail services and a multi- 
purpose meeting area and auditorium. A TV lounge, "varsity" room, gazebo and 
outdoor terrace will be part of the student commons area. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Facilities 

Administrative and Classroom Buildings 

• Alamance Building houses administrative offices and classrooms. Citizens of 
Alamance County contributed the money to build this structure in 1925 after 
the old administration building was destroyed by fire in 1923. The Alamance 
Building was extensively renovated in 1981. The area in front of Alamance 
Building is called Scott Plaza and is the gift of Ralph H. Scott, former State 
Senator and a former member of the Elon College Board of Trustees, in memory 
of his wife, Hazeleene Tate Scott. In the center of the plaza is Fonville Fountain, 
a gift of Rudy M. and Frances (Turner) Fonville '28. The fountain and plaza were 
completed in 1982. 

• Carlton Building was the gift of three trustees of the college: P.J. Carlton, H.A. 
Carlton and I.E. Carlton, and their sister, IVlrs. J. Dolph Long. The Carlton 
Building was built in 1925 and extensively renovated in 1991. This structure 
houses three large lecture halls, state-of-the-art multi-media equipment, 
classrooms, faculty offices, publication facilities and the Academic 
Computing Center. 

• Duke Science Building has modern scientific equipment and laboratory appara- 
tus. It houses the Departments of Biology and Chemistry. In memory of their 
mother, Mrs. Artelia Roney Duke, J.B. Duke and B.N. Duke contributed to the 
cost of erecting this building, dedicated in 1927. Classroom and laboratoiy 
space underwent renovations in 1988 and 1993. 

• Tlie Fine Arts Building was opened for the 1987-88 academic year. In addition to 
classroom and office facilities for the art, music, drama, communications and 
dance programs, the 75,000-square-foot facility features a 600-seat theater and 
a 125-seat recital hall. 

• Haggard Avenue House, a turn-of-the-century residence, was built by 
Walter P. Lawrence, first dean of the college and a member of the North 
Carolina General Assembly. The facility was purchased by the college in 1984 
and has undergone extensive renovations. Located here are the offices of the 
chaplain, Elon Volunteers!, the Elon College Honors Program and the Isabella 
Cannon Leadership Program. 

• Holland House is the former residence of the college president. Constructed 
in 1963, it is located at 301 East Haggard Avenue. It was named in memory 
of Shirley T. Holland, a longtime college trustee, by Mrs. Holland and their 
sons, The facility currently houses the Development, Alumni and Parent 
Relations offices. 

• Mooney Building was donated to Elon in 1926 by M. Orban jr., in memory 

of his father-in-law, the Reverend Issac Mooney. This building houses faculty 
offices, classrooms, the LaRose Resources Center, computer labs and the 
Curriculum Resources Center. 

• The Caroline Powell Building, named in honor of Miss Caroline Powell, was 
completed in 1970. In 1 99 1 with a bequest from Harvey Mebane Allen, major 



CAMPUS AND FACILITIES 

renovations were made to the first floor, creating the Admissions Center. The 
second and third floors contain classrooms, physics labs and faculty offices. 

• Whitley Memorial Auditorium , first used for Commencement in 1924, has 

a seating capacity of approximately 500. Faculty and administrative offices 
are located on the north end of the building. 

Residence Halls 

• John Barney Hall houses 48 students. This three-stoiy brick building was 
dedicated in 1966 and named in memory of John W. Barney, who was a member 

of the Elon College faculty for 33 years. ^ ^ 

• Ned F. Brannock Hall, housing 48 students, is a three-story brick structure 
named in memory of Dr. Ned F. Brannock, a member of the Elon College faculty 
for more than 50 years. It was dedicated in 1966. 

• Carolina Hall , built in 1956, houses 126 students. Congregational Christian 
Churches in North Carolina pledged the funds for this three-story brick building. 

• Chandler Hall houses 92 students. It was constructed in 1982 in honor of 
Wallace L Chandler '49, a trustee of Elon College and senior vice president 
of Universal Leaf Tobacco Company, Inc., of Richmond, Virginia. 

• Colclough Hall is designed to house either men or women. Constructed 
in 1 982, it has a capacity of 96 persons. It was named in memory of 
George D. Colclough '26, through a gift by Royall H. Spence Jr. '42, and 
his wife, Luvene Holmes Spence '43. Mr. Spence is a trustee emeritus 

of Elon College. Mr. Colclough was a trustee of Elon College and a well-known 
business leader in Burlington. 

• East Campus Apartments, completed in 1989, consist of six buildings each, 
housing 32 students. Reserved for upper-classmen, the facility offers an 
alternative to traditional residence hall accommodations. 

• Fraternities and Sororities are housed in several residences owned by the 
college, in residence hall suites and in a fraternity/sorority court of six 
buildings completed in 1989. 

• A.L Hook Hall, housing 32 students, was named for Dr. A.L. Hook who was 
a member of the Elon College faculty for more than 50 years. Built in 1966, 
it is a three-story brick residence hall. 

• The Jordan Complex is named in honor of John M. Jordan, Alamance County 
businessman. Built in 1980 and 1984, the complex houses 272 male and female 
students in two-room suites. The complex also contains a commons building 
with study, lounge and laundry facilities. 

• Maynard Hall is a residence hall for 131 students. Constructed in 1982, it was 
named in honor of Reid and Grace Maynard. Mr. Maynard was a trustee of 
Elon College and chairman of the board of Tower Hosiery Mills, Burlington, 
North Carolina. 

• North Hall, located near the Harper Center, houses male students. 



E L N COLLEGE 

• Sloan Hall, a three-story brick structure, built in I960 and housing 94 
students, was named in honor of Dr. W.W. Sloan and Bessie Pickett Sloan, 
members of the Elon College faculty for 25 years. 

• Leon Edgar Smith Hall is a three-story residence hall built in 1957 to house 
126 students. The building was named for Dr. LE. Smith, former President 
of the college. 

• Staley Hall, Moffilt Hall, Harper Center and Harden Dining Hall were completed 
in 1968. Staley Hall houses 200 students and Moffitt Hall, 100 students. The 
two residence halls are joined by Harper Center, which contains a lounge, the 
college radio station, a recreation area. The Back Door (a nonalcoholic pub) 

12 and Harden Dining Hall. These buildings were named in memory of Dr. W.W. 

Staley, Dr. E.L. Moffitt and Dr. W.A. Harper, three past presidents of Elon 
College. They are located on North Campus. 

• Virginia Hall, a three-story brick structure built in 1956, houses 90 students. 
Congregational Christian Churches in Virginia pledged the money to pay for 
this residence hall. 

• West Hall is a three-story brick structure adjacent to the Carlton Building. 

The first floor contains faculty offices and a large lounge. Seventy-two students 
are housed on the second and third floors. 

Athletic Facilities 

Koury Center 

Named for the Koury family of Burlington, the Koury Center encompasses 
Alumni Memorial gymnasium, Jordan Gymnasium, Beck Pool, a fitness center and 
classrooms and offices for faculty and athletic staff. A sunlit, two-story concourse 
connects Alumni Memorial Gymnasium with Jordan Gymnasium, Beck Pool and 
the fitness center. 

• The Alumni Memorial Gymnasium was built in 1 949 as a memorial to Elon 
alumni who lost their lives in the two World Wars. The gymnasium, which seats 
1,900 for sporting events was extensively renovated in 1993 and will seat 2,500 
for college convocations. 

• Fitness Center - Completed in 1994, the 54,000 square-foot fitness center 
includes racquetball courts, weight rooms, aerobic dance studios and 

a human performance lab, as well as locker rooms, classrooms and a commons 
area. 

• Beck Pool - Built in 1970, the seven-lane, Olympic-size, indoor swimming pool 
was named in honor of A. Vance Beck. 

• Jordan Gymnasium - Named for Sen. B. Everett Jordan, Jordan Gymnasium 
is used primarily for teaching and recreation. It was built in 1970. 

• Athletic Fields include 50 acres of practice and playing fields, situated around 
the campus. There is adequate space for all sports. 

• Bakatsias Soccer Field, provided in 1984 by George, Terry and Johnny Bakatsias 
in honor of their parents, is one of the finest soccer facilities in the area. 



CAMPUS AND FACILITIES 

• The John Koury Field House was constructed in 1 980 through the generosity 
of Ernest and Maurice Koury in memory of their father. The building provides 
dressing facilities for Elon's football and baseball teams as well as a modern 
training room, laundry and coaches' dressing room. 

• Newsome Field is a modern baseball stadium donated in 1977 by Webb 
Newsome '37, and his wife, Jessie Cobb Newsome '36, A member of the Elon 
College Sports Hall of Fame, Webb Newsome was outstanding in baseball, 
football and boxing while at Elon. 

• The Jimmy Powell Tennis Center, a 12-court, championship tennis complex 
was built in 1988 and is one of the finest small-college tennis complexes 
in the nation, 

• Rudd Field, a multipurpose athletic field named for Clyde Rudd Sr. '37, is used 
for football, Softball and intramural sports. 

Recreational Areas 

• Lake Maiy Nell, a five-acre lake near the center of campus, was named 

in honor of Mary Nell Jennings, daughter of Elon College Trustee Maurice 
Jennings and Patricia Gabriel. 

• The Elon College Lodge and Botanical Preserve was acquired by the college 
in 1984. Located one mile from the campus, the 25-acre tract is a natural 
habitat and outdoor laboratory for botany, zoology and ecology students. 
In addition to the lodge building, there is a picnic shelter and a building 
that is used as a field classroom. 

Support Facilities 

• LaRose Resources Center was named in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar H. LaRose 
and Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Hettel, parents of Elon Trustee Robert E. LaRose and 
his wife, Gail Hettel LaRose. Located in Mooney Building, the center provides 
instructional support to faculty, tutorial services to students, audiovisual 
materials and equipment, computer equipment and software, and satellite 

TV services. 

• East Building was acquired by the college in 1978. It is used for maintenance 
storage and central receiving. It also houses the offices of the director of the 
physical plant and the director of mail services, A gymnasium and dance studio 
are located in the facility. 

• The R.N. Ellington Health Center provides health services for students and 
includes multiple examination rooms and offices for the professional staff. 

• William S. Long Student Center, constructed in 1966, houses the campus 
shop, the Varsity Grille, lounges, meeting rooms, student government offices, 

a listening room, a photography lab and a game room. The building was named 
in memory of William S. Long, first president of the college. 

• Maynard House is the residence of the college president. It is located a short 
distance from campus. The home was bequeathed to the college through the 
estate of Reid and Grace Maynard in 1988. 



E L N COLLEGE 

• McEwen Memorial Dining Hall, completed in 1956, was built as a memorial 
to james H. McEwen, an industrial and civic leader in Burlington, North 
Carolina. The first floor accommodates more than 250 students in a modern 
and attractive cafeteria and also contains a smaller dining room for special 
luncheon meetings, On the second floor is an additional dining hall/banquet 
room large enough to accommodate 300 persons. 

• Iris Holt McEwen Library, completed in the summer of 1968, is fully air condi- 
tioned and carpeted. Open stacks contain a well-rounded collection 

of more than 300,000 volume equivalents including extensive audio visual and 
microform holdings. Approximately 60,000 government documents have been 
14 added to the collection since the library became a government depository in 

1971. The state-of-the-art on line card catalog system, called IRIS (Information 
Retrieval In Seconds), allows students to use one of 12 computer terminals in 
the library or any of the college's VAX-connected terminals on campus to gain 
instant access to six Piedmont-area college libraries. 

• The Spence Collection, formerly the Stratford College Library, was given to 
the college in 1975 in honor of Royall H. Spence Sr. by Mrs. Spence and their 
children, Mary Spence Boxley, Dolly Spence Dowdy and Royall H. Spence Jr. 

• Power Plant provides heat for the entire college. 

Some Elon College buildings, rooms, and facilities are named for individuals 
who contributed outstanding service to the institution. Facilities are usually 
marked with a brass plaque giving the date, the name of the facility, and in some 
cases, the donor of the facility. As buildings and other facilities become obsolete 
or the needs of the college change, the brass plaques are added to 
the college archives, preserving in perpetuity the memory of those honored. 

Visitor Information 

Visitors to the college are welcome at all times. The administrative offices are 
open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. The admissions office 
is also open Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until noon. Administrative officers and 
members of the faculty are available at other times by appointment made in 
advance. 

Travel Information 

Elon College is in the town of Elon College, North Carolina, a community 
adjacent to Burlington, 15 miles east of Greensboro, 64 miles west of Raleigh, 
close to Interstate 85/40. It is accessible to airline services in Greensboro. The 
telegraph address is Burlington and the college is served by the Burlington 
telephone exchange. The number at the main switchboard is 910-584-971 1 
and the FAX number is 910-538-3986. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



The academic program at Elon College prepares qualified students to enter 
graduate and professional schools or readies students to begin work in such 
fields as business, communications, teaching, public service and allied health. 
The bachelor's degree consists of a major field of concentration in the liberal 
arts or in a professional or pre-professional area, a general studies program 
and elective courses. 



Degrees and Major Fields of Concentration 

Elon offers courses leading to the graduate degrees of Master of Business 
Administration and Master of Education and the undergraduate degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Science. 

The Master of Business Administration program requires 36 semester hours 
of graduate credit. Students are encouraged to apply regardless of undergraduate 
major. The Master of Education program requires 30 semester hours of graduate 
credit in Elementary Grades or Middle Grades. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is awarded in the following fields: Art, Biology, 
Chemistry, Communications (Broadcast and Corporate), Computer Science, 
Economics, Education (Elementary, Middle Grades, Secondary— various subject 
areas), English, French, History, Human Services, journalism. Mathematics, Music, 
Music Performance, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Public 
Administration, Religious Studies, Science Education, Social Science Education, 
Sociology, Spanish and Theatre Arts. 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is awarded in the following field: Music Theatre 

The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded in the following fields: Accounting, 
Biology, Business Administration (Management, Finance, Marketing, International 
Management and Management Information Systems), Chemistry, Environmental 
Studies, Health Education, Leisure/Sport Management, Mathematics, Medical 
Technology, Music Education, Physical Education, Physics and Sports Medicine. 

Minor Fields of Concentration 

Candidates for the bachelor's degree may elect a minor concentration consist- 
ing of at least 1 6 semester hours. 



E L N COLLEGE 

The following minor fields are available: Accounting, African/African- 
American Studies, Anthropology, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, 
Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Dance, Economics, English, 
French, Geography, History, Human Services, International Studies, Journalism/ 
Communications, Leisure/Sport Management, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, 
Physical Education, Physical Education (Coaching), Physics, Political Science, 
Psychology, Public Administration, Religious Studies, Sociology, Spanish, Sports 
Medicine (Athletic Training, Exercise/Sports Science), Studio Art, Theatre Arts, 
and Women's Studies. 

16 General Studies 

General Studies at Elon College provide students the opportunity to acquire 
the skills, the experiences and the knovi^ledge needed to obtain the broad philo- 
sophical, aesthetic, historical and scientific bases for understanding and evaluat- 
ing human experience. The college offers all students a broad range of experience 
in four areas: 

The First-Year Core helps the student develop the ability to (I) think clearly 
and critically, (2) write clear, correct English prose, (3) evaluate quantitative 
information, improve mathematical reasoning skills, and enhance appreciation 
of the value of mathematics, (4) develop an understanding of personal well-being 
and lifelong diversity and the possibilities for human communication and coop- 
eration. 

The Experiential Learning requirement encourages students to engage the 
world about them actively and to reflect insightfully about those observations. 
It is the most visible recognition in the General Studies program of the wholeness 
of a liberal education. 

The Liberal Studies area emphasizes that an important goal of an under- 
graduate education is adaptability since the future will include not only evident 
problems but the unforeseen. The four sub-areas in Liberal Studies (expression, 
civilization, society, and science/analysis) reflect a broad and diversified curricu- 
lum designed to prepare students for a future of continued intellectual growth. 

The Advanced Studies courses give breadth in upper-level courses. The 
Interdisciplinary Seminar, which explores subjects from multiple viewpoints, 
is an appropriate capstone of a General Studies curriculum that promotes both 
breadth and depth of learning. 

General Studies are by nature cumulative and developmental. Thus Elon 
College students will revisit these themes throughout their college years from 
initial enrollment to graduation. 

The Martha and Spencer Love School of Business 

Established in 1985, the Love School of Business is an outgrowth of an 
endowment gift to Elon College from the Martha and Spencer Love Foundation. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

The Love School of Business builds upon the liberal arts tradition of Elon 
College and provides undergraduate and graduate students the educational 
opportunities that will prepare them for business careers and civic leadership. 

The Business School offers undergraduate-level majors in accounting and 
business administration (concentrations in management, marketing, finance, 
international management and management information systems) and a 
graduate degree in business administration (MBA). 

Specific requirements for Love School programs in Business Administration 
and Accounting are listed under Courses of Instruction. 

Professional Programs 

Elon College offers professional programs in Accounting, Business 
Administration, Communications, Computer Science, Education, Human 
Services, journalism. Music, Public Administration and Medical Technology. 
These programs prepare graduates entering beginning-level professional posi- 
tions. Qualified graduates may wish to continue their studies in graduate school. 

Preprofessional Programs 

Elon College offers programs that prepare students for professional studies 
in such fields as dentistry, engineering, law, medicine and theology. Students 
entering any pre-professional program should plan carefully, using the catalog 
of the professional school they wish to enter as a specific guide to choosing 
courses at Elon College. In addition to the preparation students receive through 
the regular academic curriculum, Elon offers a preprofessional advising program 
that emphasizes careful academic advising, special programs and workshops and 
assistance in the graduate application process. The Academic Advising Center 
staff is available to assist students in this planning. 

Pre-engineering 

Elon offers a pre-engineering program that allows students to undertake a 
sequence of courses emphasizing math, physics and chemistry. 

Students may transfer to an engineering school after two years. While there is 
the potential for a qualified student to transfer to any engineering school, the pre- 
engineering program at Elon College has been approved by the Subcommittee on 
Engineering Transfer for transfer to the engineering programs at North Carolina 
A&T State University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte. Qualified students completing Elon's program receive 
preferential consideration for transfer to any of these engineering schools. 

A three-year pre-engineering program is available for those students who 
have strong potential for pursuing an engineering degree but who do not have the 
math preparation necessary to take calculus. First-year students may take college 
algebra in the fall semester and calculus in the spring semester. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Prelaw 

The Association of Law Schools embraces two educational objectives for 
undergraduate law students: First, the student should learn to reason logically; 
second, the student should learn to express thoughts clearly and concisely both 
orally and in writing. While law schools do not require a specific undergraduate 
major, several majors at Elon prepare students for admission to law school. Elon 
faculty members help students choose specific courses and curriculum tracks that 
increase students' chances for acceptance into law school, and advise students in 
selection of law schools, preparation for the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) 
and the application procedure. 

Through programs offered by the Prelaw Society, students discuss career 
opportunities with attorneys, judges and law enforcement officers. The Prelaw 
Society also arranges visits to area law schools and offers programs on taking 
the LSAT and applying to law school. 

Premedical and Predental 

Elon's premedical program prepares students for entry into schools of den- 
tistry, medicine, optometiy, osteopathy, pharmacy, podiatry, veterinary medicine 
and other health-related professions. 

Elon's Pre-Medical Student Evaluation Committee is designed to guide and 
advise students who are interested in pursuing medical and health-related 
professions. The committee is composed of faculty members from Elon, Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine and the Duke University Medical Center. The committee 
monitors each student's academic progress and offers helpful advice on choosing 
medical professions and applying to graduate and medical schools. It assists 
students with the application process and provides letters of recommendation. 

Students interested in a medically related career should meet with the 
premedical advisor and plan the course of study as soon as possible. Although a 
concentration of the student's academic work will be in the sciences, medical and 
professional schools seek students with well-rounded academic experiences and 
well-developed critical thinking skills. 

Preministerial 

(Any Full-time Christian Vocation) 

The educational program at Elon College provides opportunities for students 
to prepare for the various aspects of Christian ministry. Although no particular 
major is required, many courses and other educational and service experiences 
permit students to explore their interest in and fitness for religious vocations. 
In general, for church-related vocations, students may major in Religious Studies 
or any of the liberal arts areas. 

Special Academic Programs 

Elon College offers various programs for those with special needs and 
qualifications. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Evening School 

Undergraduate and graduate-level courses are also offered during the 
evening. While any student may enroll in courses at these times, evening 
courses are especially convenient for students who work during the day. By 
attending classes solely at night, students may earn the Master of Business 
Administration, the Master of Education and undergraduate majors in business 
administration and accounting. Students may earn other undergraduate majors 
through a combination of day and evening classes. 

Transitional Program ^9 

The Transitional Program helps students make the transition from high school 
to college by providing special advising and special courses in the basic concepts 
of mathematics and communication skills. The program offers individual assis- 
tance by tutors and self-paced programs through the LaRose Resources Center. 

Free Peer Tutoring 

Free peer tutoring is offered to all students in most subjects through the 
LaRose Resources Center. 

Writing Program 

Elon College has a campus Writing Program and a Writing Center. The 
program and the center work concurrently to support and enhance student 
writing at all levels and in all areas of the college's academic program through 
sponsorship of writing contests and other activities. Students who are just 
beginning a paper or who have a rough draft can visit the Writing Center Sunday 
through Friday for advice and guidance from the trained student staff. 

Elon 101 

Elon 101 is a specially designed academic advising course/program that 
introduces first semester students to college life. Among topics discussed are time 
management, study skills and how to become involved in campus activities. An 
intent of the course is an extended orientation to college. The course is co-taught 
by the students' academic advisor plus a student teaching assistant. The class is 
limited in size to 15 students. The course meets weekly during the first semester 
and offers one semester hour of general college credit upon successful comple- 
tion. Grading for this course is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. 

High School Credit Bank Program 

This program allows students to earn college credit before entering college 
through the completion of two summer session courses at Elon, and two courses 
at Elon during each semester of the high school senior year. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Leaders for the Twenty-First Century Programs 

The North Carolina Teaching Fellows Program 

Elon College is one of only two private colleges selected by the North Carolina 
Teaching Fellows Commission to offer a Teaching Fellows program, and one of 
only 15 institutions throughout the state. North Carolina Teaching Fellows are 
selected by the Public School Forum of North Carolina, which awards approxi- 
mately 400 fellowships annually. North Carolina high school students interested in 
the teaching profession apply to the North Carolina Teaching Fellows Commission 
and are awarded grants through a selective interview process. 

20 The Teaching Fellows' experience takes place in the context of Elon's highly 

successful teacher education program. Faculty work closely with students as 
mentors and academic advisors. In their junior and senior years. Teaching Fellows 
put their skills into practice by serving as peer advisors for entering education 
majors. All Teaching Fellows are allowed to participate in the Elon Honors 
program and receive Honors designation upon graduation provided they complete 
all requirements. 

The Teaching Fellows experience at Elon is a four-year program requiring 
participation in the following: 

• Specially designed leadership courses 

• Internships 

• Study/travel to major U.S. metropolitan areas 

• A semester of study in London 

• Special field trip, lecture series 

• Capstone seminar examining local, state and national issues and their 
effect on education 

• Development of Elon Experiences Transcript 

For more information on the North Carolina Teaching Fellows Program, 
see page 50. 

The Honors Program 

The Honors Program assists academically superior students to attain greater 
breadth and depth in their General Education studies. 

Honors Fellows can enroll in challenging courses that emphasize writing, 
critical analysis, problem solving and independent research taught by innovative 
faculty. Class size is generally limited to 20. Since the program is collegewide in 
scope, most Honors courses are taken in disciplines differing from one's major. 

Other features of the program include: Early preregistration privileges, off- 
campus retreats. Honors housing arrangements, and opportunities to attend 
Honors conferences and present research. Honors graduates often pursue 
further study or graduate training. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Most Students are selected to enter the program as freshmen, but one can 
apply for admission as a continuing student by seeing the Honors Director. 
Students may also be referred by professors. Honors awards are renewable 
for up to four years, providing the recipient successfully completes a minimum 
course load of 30 semester hours for each academic year, maintains a cumula- 
tive grade point average of 3.2 or above and satisfies the requirements of the 
Honors program. 

To receive Honors Program recognition at graduation, a student must com- 
plete a minimum of 25 hours of Honors experience, as listed below, and achieve 
a 3.2 grade point average overall and in all Honors courses taken. 

Students who fail to maintain an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.2 
or better are subject to dismissal from the program and all benefits associated 
with it. 

Honors Experiences Required for Graduation with Honors Program Recognition 

Category I: Students are required to take 9 semester hours from the following 
courses: 

(1) Honors Elon 101 (1 sh) 

(2) Honors GS 110: Global Experience (4 sh) 

(3) One 100-200 level Honors course (4 sh) 

Categoiy 11. Students are required to take 12 semester hours chosen from the 
following course: 

(1) 300-400 level Honors courses 

(2) 300-400 level non-Honors courses taken for Honors credit. (This may 
include scheduled department or General Studies courses, internships, 
independent study. Plans must be submitted in writing and approved by 
Director before the course is taken. See Director for details.) 

(3) Study abroad 

Semester program participation (4 hours Honors credit) 
Winter/Summer Term (2 hours Honors credit) 

(4) Experiential Honors credit 

Students may receive Honors credit (but not academic credit) for participat- 
ing in some of the many Honors Program Activities. See Director for details. 
(A maximum of 4 semester hours may be used in this manner.) 

Category III. Students are required to take 4 semester hours from the following: 

Honors General Studies Seminar 

Senior (Junior, in some cases) Honors students would take an Honors section of 
the required upper-level General Studies Seminar or other approved upper-level 
general Studies Seminar. 

For information about Honors Scholarships, see page 50. 



E L N COLLEGE 

The Isabella Cannon Leadership Program 

Emerging Leaders - All new Elon students have the opportunity to participate 
in the Emerging Leaders Program. Participants take leadership development 
workshops, attend cultural programs on campus, volunteer in the community 
and join at least one campus organization. 

Isabella Cannon Leadership Fellows - Students who successfully complete 
the Emerging Leaders Program may apply to become Isabella Cannon Leadership 
Fellows. Fellows study and practice leadership, participate in a series of seminars, 
lead off-carnpus sei"vice projects through the Volunteer Program, actively lead 
on campus through campus organizations and mentoring experiences, and have 
22 the opportunity to participate in studies abroad and internship programs. The 

program strives to foster leadership for students during the college years that 
can be extended to the future workplace and living community. 

Enrichment Programs 

The Elon Experiences Transcript 

The Elon Experiences Transcript provides a co-curricular transcript that 
enhances job and graduate school opportunities. The transcript documents 
leadership development, service learning, international and multi-cultural 
exposure and internship/co-op experiences during the college career. Elon 
Experiences help develop informed, productive, responsible and caring citizens- 
individuals equipped with an education that enriches personal lives and enhances 
professional careers. 

Leadership Development 

Special courses, service projects, organizational leadership and internships 
help students develop the characteristics that identify a leader in any field: strong 
character, good communications skills, self-confidence, the ability to make 
decisions, motivate others, solve problems and take risks. Leadership develop- 
ment programs are described more fully in the Student Life sections. 

Service Learning 

Acting on the college's commitment to civic responsibility and leadership, 
Elon Volunteers! assist programs and projects ranging from Habitat for Humanity 
to Meals on Wheels. Campus organizations participate in a variety of support and 
fund-raising programs, such as the Adopt-A- Highway clean-up program, CROP 
Walk, American Red Cross Blood Drive, Special Olympics and Oxfam America. 

International and Multicultural Exposure 

Examples of recent international experiences listed on Elon Experiences 
Transcripts include: semester programs in London, Japan, Spain; Winter Term 
in London, Costa Rica, Guadeloupe, Ireland, Belgium, France, Germany, Belize, 
Europe and Middle East; and summer study and travel in Europe, China and India. 
Multicultural experiences include: working with Habitat for Humanity to build a 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

house in Appalachia, spending Winter Term worl^ing with a service project in a 
Native American community and participating in a sociological study in an inner- 
city environment. 

Internship and Co-op Opportunities 

Through internships and co-op opportunities, Elon helps students to under- 
stand the values of productive work, develop the knowledge and skills to compete 
and progress in a meaningful job or earn money to meet financial obligations. 
Elon assists its students in meaningful career planning and preparation, and 
provides the resources and support needed for successful job placement and 
competitive career advancement after graduation. Over 54 percent of 1993 Elon 23 
graduates participated in internships and co-ops. 

Studies Abroad 

studies abroad programs enhance the academic program and give students an 
opportunity to learn firsthand from other countries and cultures. Over 28 percent 
of 1993 Elon graduates participated in studies abroad activities. The college offers 
a variety of such opportunities. 

Students may elect to spend a semester, either fall or spring, in London. By 
selecting from the broad range of courses offered, most of which are taught by 
British faculty, students can fulfill General Studies. Through internships and field 
research projects, students experience many dimensions of British culture. 
Students have access to the University of London's library and student union 
facilities. Fall and spring breaks permit extensive European travel. 

During the winter term the college offers a study/travel opportunity to 
England. This program allows students to spend approximately three weeks 
housed in London with opportunities for numerous excursions to historical and 
cultural sites in Great Britain. The college also offers other study/travel programs 
to various locations that vary from year to year. Some have spent the winter term 
in Costa Rica studying its language, history and culture, and in Belize, enrolled in 
a course that examines the country's unique histoiy and culture. European studies 
include a course devoted to the unification of Europe and a course on World War 
11 with visits to Belgium, France, Germany, and the Netherlands. All programs 
offer a wide range of course credit. 

Summer terms provide still other studies abroad possibilities. The college 
offers language study in a number of countries through local universities. An 
arrangement with Southeast University in Nanjing, China, allows students to 
spend five weeks in language and cultural studies there. Students may choose to 
explore the culture of India through one of Elon's summer programs. These 
programs allow the student the option of maximum free time during the remain- 
der of the summer or the opportunity to attend an additional session of summer 
school. Elon students may spend a semester or a year in japan at Nagasaki 
Wesleyan College or Kansai Gaidai Center for International Education, two 
settings for the study of Japanese language and culture. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Independent Study and Research 

Independent study and research is an integral part of tiie educational program 
at Elon College. With the assistance of faculty members, students get the chance 
to develop hypotheses and think creatively. Those vi^ho plan to attend graduate 
school benefit from the research experience. By providing an atmosphere for one- 
on-one learning with their professors, Elon gives students a unique opportunity to 
discover the experience of being a professional in their chosen field. Elon students 
have showcased their research efforts in the Student Undergraduate Research 
Forum (SURF) in which the participants gave a presentation of their research 
projects and then responded to questions from the audience. Students also have 
24 presented research papers off campus. 

Military 

ROTC 

The Resewes Officers Training Corps program offers a military science 
curriculum leading to commission in the U.S. Army upon graduation. This 
course offers built-in financial assistance and special scholarship programs. 

Credit for Veterans 

This program offers military personnel on active duty the opportunity to 
submit CLEP credit by contacting their Education Officers or USAFI in Madison, 
Wisconsin, for testing. Credit for work completed may be transferred to other 
accredited post-secondary institutions, and service experience is accepted for 
physical education requirements. 

Career Services 

The following Career Services Programs are available to help students plan 
their futures, explore careers and become adept at finding employment. 

Career Planning 

Awareness of personal values, interests, skills and occupational information is 
necessary to make academic and career decisions. Professional career counselors 
assist students with their major and career choices by providing individualized 
career counseling, assessment inventories, computerized career guidance and 
information systems, occupational/educational information, career preview 
programs and workshadowing opportunities. COE 1 10 "Choosing a Career/ 
Major," a one-hour elective credit course, is for students exploring major and 
career options. Catalogs, a computerized graduate school locator and computer- 
ized study guides for ORE and GMAT are available to help students make deci- 
sions about postgraduate education. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Placement Services 

Placement Services assist students who have identified their career direction 
and who are finalizing their career search. Services for upper-class and graduate 
students include classes in job search skills (COE 310 "Securing A Job"), resume 
referral to employers, on-campus interviews, individual counseling, job vacancy 
lists, a credentials file with options for inclusion of academic transcripts resumes 
and references. Workshops on resume writing, job interviewing, and other special 
career topics are offered. Additional resources and programs include occupational 
and employer information, career fairs, specialty work showing experiences and 
mentoring programs. 

Internships or Co-ops 

Elon College strongly supports programs that allow students to relate their 
classroom learning to work experience. Active cooperative education and 
internship programs provide opportunities throughout the academic year and 
during summers for students to explore careers, to integrate theory with practice 
and to examine future job possibilities. In each learning experience, the student's 
academic or career-related work assignment is supervised and evaluated by Elon 
faculty. Internships are directly related to majors or minors, may be full- or part- 
time and paid or unpaid. Most departments offer internship credits. Co-ops offer 
pay, may be full- or part-time, may be repeated and count toward elective credit. 
The class COE 310 "Securing A Job" is required of co-op students. 

Eligibility Requirements. Students must be a junior or senior, have a 2.0 
minimum (GPA), have completed departmental prerequisites and have approval 
from the Faculty Sponsor/Experiential Education Director. Those participating in 
co-ops must enroll in the COE 310 class. 

Academic Support Services 

Elon College seeks to meet the individual academic needs of all students. In 
order to accomplish this, the college places emphasis on a variety of academic 
support services. 

Academic Advising Center 

Students are assigned faculty advisors before they enter Elon College. An 
important part of the Academic Advising Center's service is pre-major advising, 
providing selected faculty advisors to counsel students whose major field of 
study is undecided. At some time during the freshman or sophomore year, 
students choose majors and are assigned faculty advisors within their major 
departments or programs. Special advising assistance is available for students 
in preprofessional programs such as prelaw, premedical and pre-engineering. 

Closely associated with the Academic Advising Center is the Career Services 
Center. Testing programs, an extensive careers library and personal counseling 



25 



26 



E L N COLLEGE 

help the student explore career opportunities and correlate academic course work 
with career objective. 

Special Needs Students 

Although Elon has no formal program for students with learning or other 
disabilities, the college does attempt to make reasonable classroom accommoda- 
tions for students with special needs. Students who wish to discuss such needs 
should contact Priscilla Ha worth, Section 504 Coordinator, in Alamance 101. 

LaRose Resources Center 

Located in IVlooney Building, the LaRose Resources Center is designed 
to meet the learning needs of a wide variety of students. Services provided 
include: tutorial assistance for most academic areas, computer-assisted 
instruction, microcomputer stations, study carrels for group study, videotaping 
equipment and viewing room, a television production studio and an extensive 
variety of audiovisual equipment and materials. 

Library 

The McEwen Library contains a well-rounded collection of approximately 
180,000 volumes, 1,700 periodical subscriptions, 60,000 government documents 
and extensive audiovisual and microform holdings. The IRIS (Information 
Retrieval In Seconds) online catalog is now accessible through any campus 
computer terminal that is linked to Elon's VAX mainframe. The catalogs of six 
Piedmont-area college libraries are now available on-line. The Library seats 
approximately 400. 

Computer Facilities 

Elon's academic computer resources include a VAX 8350 two Novell networks. 
The five PC computer labs located in IVlooney, Carlton and Alamance buildings 
have well over 140 microcomputer workstations that are connected to the VAX, 
the on-line library catalog and the Novell networks. There is also an Apple 
IVlacintosh lab in the Fine Arts Building and an Apple 11 lab in Mooney. Available 
languages and software applications include Pascal, Ada, C, Lisp, APL, Prolog, 
Forth, Fortran, COBOL, BASIC, Lotus 1-2-3, dBase III plus, WordPerfect, and the 
statistical packages SAS and SPSS. Access to the internet is available. Academic 
computing facilities are open to all students at no additional charge. 



STUDENT LIFE 



Student life is more than classrooms, laboratories, study desks and libraries. 
Elon's goal is to educate the whole person, and students have many opportunities 
to achieve that goal. Experiences in the residence halls, campus organizations, 
Student Government, spontaneous social groups, Greek organizations, and on 
athletic and intramural teams are critically important in the student's total 
development. 

By choosing to participate in those co-curricular activities that interest them 
or are complementary to their academic programs, students can develop impor- 
tant insights about genuine communication, self-government, freedom, trust, 
honor and critical judgment. Programs designed by well-qualified faculty, staff 
and students provide opportunities for the student to develop a meaningful 
concept, a sense of career, a philosophy of life, and sound ethical and moral 
principles. 

Student Service 

Personal Counseling 

Under the direction of the Director of Counseling Services, a counselor and 
the counseling support staff are available to provide help to Elon students. 
Support groups and therapy groups, composed of students concerned about the 
same issues, are available for those interested. In each of the two campus areas- 
Main and North— there is an Area Director, a master's-level staff member trained 
in counseling or a related field. In addition, within each residence hall there is a 
staff of specially-trained community development coordinator, usually one per 
floor. CACs live on the hall and help students learn more about Elon College, 
themselves and other students. Supporting the residence hall staffs are personnel 
associated with the Office of Student Affairs. 

Health Service 

The college maintains a health service, which is open from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. each class day. A health service fee covers all routine health and nursing 
services and treatment by the college physicians. This fee does not cover cases 
requiring a physician other than a college physician, emergency treatment at a 
local hospital or laboratory tests conducted off campus. 

All students must present evidence that they are covered by health insurance 
before they can enroll in classes. All undergraduate and graduate students taking 



E L N COLLEGE 

six or more credit hours may purchase a health insurance policy through 
the college. 

Campus Living 

There are 20 residence halls on campus with a variety of living arrangements. 
Each room is furnished with beds, bureaus, desks, blinds and chairs. The student 
brings pillows, blankets, bedspreads, bed linens, towels and other articles such as 
wastebaskets, rugs and lamps. Residence halls open at 2:00 p.m. the day before 
registration each semester. They are closed during Thanksgiving, Christmas, 
spring and summer vacations, except for those residence halls occupied during 
28 summer school. Rooms will be vacated and residence halls locked no later than 

noon on the day following the last night of exams. 

Provided on-campus housing space is available, all first-year students must 
live in the residence halls unless they are living with their parents, relatives or 
spouse. All residence life policies and procedures for living on campus are 
presented in the License Agreement, which the student receives and acknowl- 
edges when applying for campus housing. The college helps students find off- 
campus housing, but does not serve as an intermediary in any way between the 
student and his/her landlord. 

Students have access to coin-operated laundry facilities on campus. 

Meals are served in the college dining halls, which open for the evening meal 
before the first day of registration, and close after the noon meal on the last day 
of final examinations. For vacation periods, college dining halls close after the 
noon meal of the last day of classes, and open for the evening meal the day 
before classes resume. 

Room Reservation and Security Deposits 

New Students 

Please refer to the Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid section 
of this catalog. 

Continuing Resident Students 

Students wishing to return to the residence halls for the fall semester must 
submit a $100 reservation fee during the spring housing selection period an- 
nounced by the Residence Life office during the spring semester. Students wishing 
to cancel their housing assignment must follow the procedures presented in the 
License Agreement they received when they applied for housing. The refund of 
the reservation fee and security deposit are covered in this agreement also. Any 
questions can be directed to the Residence Life office. 

Commuter Students 

Programs that meet the particular needs of commuter students are offered 
through the Office of Campus Activities. The college encourages commuters to 



STUDENT LIFE 

become involved in campus functions and organizations. A commuter lounge 
is located on the first floor of the Campus Center along with lockers, and TV 
lounge. Commuter students may purchase meal plans or the Elon Card for dining 
on campus, and may buy a parking permit if they wish to park on campus. 

New Student Orientation 

New Student Orientation is held just before the fall term begins. All entering 
students participate in the program, which is designed to prepare them for the 
college experience. Orientation includes small group activities as well as aca- 
demic advising, testing, registration, lectures and social activities. A modified 
orientation program is offered for students entering in winter and spring terms. 

In addition the Admissions Office sponsors another orientation program 
every April for those students accepted by Elon who plan to attend the following 
fall. At that time, students may preregister, choose a room and select a roommate. 

The Student Government Association 

The Student Government Association (SGA) represents the interests of the 
Elon student body. The faculty and staff of the college fully support and cooperate 
with the SGA. Projects and proposals dealing with social, cultural and academic 
life are promoted by the SGA President and the Student Senate. 

Students play a direct role in academic and social policy-making through 
voting membership on numerous college committees. 

Judicial System 

The judicial System is a code of student living under which all students should 
conduct themselves as responsible members of the college community. It is 
intended to be a code of justice and of education for students. For complete 
details about the Judicial System at Elon, see the Student Handbook. 

Campus Security 

Campus Security is maintained by a professional security staff with student 
support working under the direct supervision of the Director of Campus Security. 
The system works in close cooperation with the Public Safety Office of the Town 
of Elon College and the staff of the Office of Student Affairs. Student security 
guards are carefully selected and trained by the Director of Campus Security. 

Emergency telephones are located in the rear gym "R" parking lot behind 
the campus powerhouse; in the Harper Center parking lot next to the sidewalk 
leading to the Greek houses; in the Jordan Center parking lot; at the Bakatsias 
Soccer Field (running track); at East Building near the tennis center; the Hook, 
Brannock, and Barney parking lot; the Whitley parking lot; the colonnades 
between the LRC and Duke; the colonnades between Cariton and Whitley; the 
first floor stairwell landing of Duke; and the first floor southside stairwell of 



29 



30 



E L N COLLEGE 

Powell. The phones in the parking areas are designed to be accessible from an 
automobile without leaving one's vehicle. 

The Office of Campus Security provides an escort service 24 hours a day. 
Students on campus call extension 2407 for this service; those off campus who 
need an escort upon returning to campus should dial 584-2407. 

In accordance with the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990, 
complete information regarding campus security policies and programs and 
campus crime statistics is available upon request from the Director of Public 
Information, 2600 Campus Box. 

Cultural Life 

Each year a variety of programs is offered for the cultural and intellectual 
enrichment of campus life. 

The Liberal Arts Forum, sponsored by the Student Government Association, 
schedules a number of lectures on current issues. 

The Black Cultural Society brings speakers, musical groups and dance 
ensembles to Elon each year. 

The Lyceum Series brings outstanding artists and performers to the campus 
during the year. 

The Classical Soiree Series, presented in the Yeager Recital Hall, brings 
outstanding artists to campus, often combining residency activities with a formal 
recital. Admission is free to the college community. 

The James H. McEwen Jr. Visual Arts Series, named in honor of a former 
Trustee and lifelong supporter of the arts, sponsors a number of visual art exhibits 
each year including fiber art, photography, sculpture, linocuts, watercolors, oil 
paintings and multimedia abstract compositions. 

The Davidson Contemporary Print Exhibition, sponsored by Elon for four 
years, is a national juried exhibition showcasing the current directions in 
printmaking in the United States. 

A number of distinguished scholars in various fields are invited to the campus 
each year to give lectures and seminars for the enrichment of the academic 
program. There are also recitals in the Fine Arts Building presented by members 
of the Fine Arts Department faculty and advanced students in music. Several band 
and orchestra concerts are scheduled. Plays and musicals presented by Elon 
students and by visiting drama groups are also a feature of the college's cultural 
offerings. 

The Student Union Board 

Social activities at the college are largely planned and coordinated by the 
Student Union Board, which is advised by the Director of Student Activities. 



STUDENT LIFE 

An extensive program of social, recreational, club and special-interest activities 
is carried out during the year. Among these are movies, trips and expeditions, 
special theme parties, concerts, comedians, special events and other social 
activities. 

The Campus Center 

The William S. Long Student Center houses areas where students relax and 
gather, including a large lounge, a gameroom, a television lounge, a snack bar 
called the Varsity Grille and the Campus Shop. The Student Center also has 
facilities for group meetings. The offices of the Student Union Board and the ^^ 

Student Government Association are also located here. 

A new campus center with 74,000 square feet of space is under construction 
and will open in 1994. The center will include space for student organizations, a 
dining facility, the campus bookstore, mail services, a lounge and a multipurpose 
meeting area and auditorium. 

The Back Door 

A favorite gathering place for pizza, sandwiches and such entertainment 
as pinball, the Back Door, Elon's nonalcoholic pub, is open during evening hours 
and is located in the Haiper Center. 

Religious Life 

Responsibility for college religious life rests with the Chaplain, who co- 
ordinates all on-campus religious programs. Voluntary religious services are 
held during the academic year. The Elon College Community Church, located 
just off the campus, is affiliated with the United Church of Christ and is open 
to all students for worship. Many denominations are represented on campus in 
the form of student organizations and adjunct clergy. Most denominations have 
churches within a few miles of the campus. Groups meet regularly for discussions, 
social activities and service projects such as Habitat for Humanity. 

Leadership Development 

Elon offers all students leadership skills and opportunities to exercise civic 
responsibility. The Emerging Leaders Program is open to all students wishing to 
refine and further develop their leadership skills. After successful completion of 
the Emerging Leaders Program students may apply to become an Isabella Cannon 
Leadership fellow. The Leadership Fellows Program offers students opportunities 
to study and practice leadership, participate in a series of seminars, lead semce 
projects, actively lead on campus through campus organizations and mentoring 
experiences, and have the opportunity to participate in studies abroad and 
internship programs. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Service Learning 

students have the opportunity to participate in diverse volunteer experiences 
through a student-run program called "Elon Volunteers!" Elon Volunteers! 
coordinates over 15 service programs in the local community. In addition to 
these on-going programs, EV! sponsors a wide variety of one-time special events 
and service break trips. The mission on EV! is to provide all members of the Elon 
College campus the opportunity to develop an ethic of service by connecting 
campus and community through volunteer experiences. The Center for Service 
Learning will help faculty integrate service into their courses offering more 
students the opportunity to serve and learn at Elon. 
32 

Honor Societies 

• Alpha Chi 

Membership in this national scholastic society is one of the highest honors an 
Elon student can attain for academic excellence. To be eligible for membership, 
a student must be a junior or senior, must be in good standing, and must have 
distinguished himself/herself through academic accomplishment. 

• Alpha Epsilon Rlio 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the journalism and communications 
programs 

• Alpha Psi Omega 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the theatre arts programs 

• Beta Beta Beta 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the biology program 

• Epsilon Beta Epsilon 

Recognizes scholastic achievement by majors in economics and business 
courses 

• Kappa Delta Pi 

Recognizes scholastic achievement by majors in education 

• Kappa Mil Epsilon 

Recognizes achievement by majors in mathematics 

• Lambda Pi Eta 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the field of communications 

• Omicron Delta Epsilon 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the field of economics. 

• Omicron Delta Kappa 

Recognizes students, faculty, alumni and outstanding citizens for exemplary 
character, service and leadership in campus life, and good citizenship within 
the academic and larger community 

• Phi Alpha Theta 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the history program 

• Pi Gamma Mu 

The North Carolina Alpha chapter of Pi Gamma Mu, national social science 



STUDENT LIFE 

honor society, was chartered in 1929. Students and faculty members who 
attain distinction in the social sciences at Elon are eligible for nomination 
into membership 

• PsiChi 

Recognizes achievement by majors in psychology 

• Sigma Delta Pi 

Recognizes achievement by majors in foreign languages 

• Sigma Tau Delta 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in English 

• Theta Alpha Kappa 33 
Recognizes students and faculty for scholastic achievement in the field 

of religious studies 

Student Organizations 

Elon College offers students opportunities to become involved in numerous 
activities and organizations on campus. The range of these activities is consider- 
able. Students are encouraged to work with the Director of Student Activities to 
start new organizations. 

Departmental 

Accounting Society; Alpha Kappa Psi; Association of Computing Machinery; 
Health, Physical Education and Leisure Club; College Bowl; Human Services Club; 
Mathematics Club; Prelaw Society; Psychology Club; Student North Carolina Asso- 
ciation of Educators and Women in Communications. 

Greek 

There are 19 social fraternities and sororities at Elon. Fraternities include: 
Alpha Kappa Lambda, Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Kappa 
Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Sigma Chi, Sigma Phi Epsilon and 
Sigma Pi. Sororities include: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Omicron Pi, Alpha Sigma 
Alpha, Alpha Xi Delta, Delta Sigma Theta, Phi Mu, Sigma Sigma Sigma, Zeta Phi 
Beta and Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Music 

Chamber Singers, Concert Choir, Elan, Emanons, Orchestra, Pep Band, 
Percussion Ensemble, Student Chapter of Music Educators National Conference 
and Symphonic Winds. 

Religious 

Baptist Student Union, Catholic Campus Ministry, Elon College Gospel Choir, 
Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship and the 
Elon Hillel. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Service 

BACCHUS and GAMMA (alcohol awareness), Circle K (College Chapter of 
Kiwanis), Elon Volunteers!, EN-ACT (environmental action), Epsilon Sigma Alpha 
and Elon College Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. 

Sports 

Achilles, Aikido Club, Billiards Club, Men's and Women's Lacrosse Club and 
Outing Society 

34 Cultural and Special Interest 

Black Cultural Society, College Bowl, College Democrats, Elon College Dance 
Organization, Elon College Republicans, Elon's Finest, Intercultural Relations, 
Liberal Arts Forum, Minority Student Alliance, Residence Hall Association (RHA), 
Model UN, North Carolina Student Legislature, Pershing Rifles, Students for Peace 
and Justice, Student Government Association and Student Union Board. 

Communications Media 

Media Board 

The Board is composed of students and members of the faculty and adminis- 
tration. It advises, guides and encourages all student media on campus. 

ECTV 

ECTV is a student operated TV station providing experience for students 
interested in all areas of communications. 

Colonnades 

The college literary magazine is published by students interested in creative 
expression, both verse and prose. 

The Pendulum 

The college newspaper. The Pendulum, is published weekly by a student staff. 

Phi Psi Cli 

The college yearbook is edited by members of the student body, its name, 
Phi Psi Cli, commemorates three former literary societies. 

Radio Station 

WSOE-FM, the campus radio station, operates each day and is staffed 
primarily by students. 



STUDENT LIFE 

Who's Who 

Each year a committee composed of members of the faculty, administration and 
student body elects students to be listed in the national publication Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities. Students are selected on the basis of scholar- 
ship, participation and leadership in academic and extracurricular activities, 
citizenship and service to the college and promise of future usefulness. 

Campus Recreation 

The Campus Recreation Office is a service-oriented organization. As such, 
the philosophy is based on providing maximum recreational opportunities for 35 

students, faculty and staff at Elon College. From playing tlag football, white water 
rafting, participating in an aerobics class, or taking swim lessons, the campus 
recreation program provides the opportunity for you to participate in a safe and 
enjoyable environment. 

The variety of programs we offer range from formal structured leagues to 
informal activities. Participation in these activities gives a person the opportunity 
to develop friendships and learn important lessons of sportsmanship, team 
building, cooperation, personal development and self-actualization. We value 
wellness and the lifelong importance of the wise use of leisure time. 

The Campus Recreation office is also student-development oriented. The 
office strives to provide an opportunity for students to transfer classroom theories 
into practical work experiences. Student leaders coordinate and manage all of the 
Campus Recreation programs. 

Aquatics 

The aquatics program consists of open swim times, scheduled swim times, 
a variety of aqua-fitness programs and swim lessons for all ages. 

Fitness 

The state-of-the-art fitness center and free-weight room allow for both 
unstructured and structured fitness programming. The college offers a diverse 
aerobics program. 

Intramurals 

Intramurals events are a variety of sport leagues and tournaments. Different 
divisions ranging from informal to competitive are available to meet the diverse 
levels of competition. In addition, co-rec leagues are available in all sports. 

Outdoor Programs 

Elon Outdoors consists of adventure trips, equipment check-out, and 
a resource information center. Individuals can participate in trips or utilize 
the resources and equipment available to plan their own trips. 



36 



E L N COLLEGE 

Open Recreation 

A variety of free-play time is available for those who prefer unstructured 
recreation pursuits. Three gyms, five racquetball courts, a pool, fitness center, 
commons areas, and several outdoor facilities are available for open recreation. 
In addition, a variety of equipment is available for check-out. 

Sports Clubs 

Sports Clubs are variety of self-administered clubs that are based on students 
who share a common interest. Clubs may range from informal to competitive 
depending on the clubs' participants. New clubs are welcome to join existing 
clubs such as Aikido and Lacrosse. 

Special Events 

A variety of short-term recreational and educational events are planned. 
Some of the events are the corporate sponsored theme weeks, Turkey trot. 
Sports Trivia and Tour de Elon. 

Wellness 

To endorse the Wellness Model of Elon College the Campus Recreation office 
offers the Natural High Program. This program consists of wellness awareness 
programs, as well as a peer health education program. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

A member of the National College Athletic Association Division II, Elon's 
men's teams compete with other colleges in football, basketball, baseball, tennis, 
golf, track, soccer and cross-country. Elon's women's teams compete in volley- 
ball, basketball, softball, soccer, tennis and cross-country. 

Traditional Events 

Fall Convocation 

The entire college community is invited to gather outside to hear a prominent 
speaker, the opening keynote for the academic year. 

Greek Week 

A time for relaxation, competition and fun is sponsored each spring by Greek 
organizations. Contests of various kinds— tug of war, potato sack races, chariot 
races, dance competition and skits— are presented with prizes awarded to the 
winners of each category. 



STUDENT LIFE 

Homecoming 

Homecoming takes place in the fall, bringing back to the campus many former 
students. Entertainment includes: golf and tennis tournaments, a football game, 
the Alumni Banquet and the Homecoming dance. 

Family Weel<end 

In the fall, parents and other family members are invited to visit the campus 
and participate in several events planned especially for them. 

Spring Fling ^J 

A week of activities which includes student competitions, concerts and 
other programs. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 



Application Procedures 

Elon College admission packets are available from many high school guidance 
offices or directly from the Admissions Office of the college. Completed applica- 
tions should be returned with a nonrefundable $25 application fee, official SAT 
or ACT scores and transcripts of all high school credits and any post-secondary 
work attempted. 

Students who send applications to Elon are mailed a postcard to notify 
them that the application has been received. Elon College operates on a 
modified rolling admission plan; applicants will hear from the Admissions 
Office four to six weeks after the application is received. 

Admission Requirements 

Freshman admission is based on the high school record and class rank, 
SAT or ACT scores and recommendations if submitted. 

Degree candidates and special students must demonstrate intellectual 
promise and readiness for college. 

Applicants must prove their successful performance in a college preparatoiy 
curriculum. The following distribution of courses is recommended: 

English 4 units 

Math 3 or more units 

(Algebra I and II or Algebra I and Geometry are required) 

Science 2 or more units 

(including at least one lab science) 

Social Studies 2 or more units 

(including U.S. History) 

Foreign Language 2 or more units 

(of the same language) 

Students who have not had two years of one foreign language in high school 
must make up this deficiency by taking a first level 1 10 foreign language course. 
The course taken to remove this deficiency will not satisfy the General Studies 
requirements. 



39 



E L N COLLEGE 

All Resident Students 

To complete acceptance and reserve a room, an enrollment deposit of $200 
is requested within one month of acceptance. This deposit is credited to the 
student's account. 

Refund Policy: 

For the fall semester, the enrollment deposit may be refunded in full by 
notifying the Office of Admissions in writing prior to May 1 . After that date, 
$50 will be refunded until August 1 . For the spring semester, the full amount is 
refundable until December 15. No refunds will be made after the deadline dates 
40 unless a physical disability prohibits the student from attending either semester; 

a doctor's statement would then be required. Exception to this policy must be 
authorized by the Dean of Admissions and Financial Planning. 

All Commuter Students 

To complete acceptance, an enrollment deposit of $50 is requested within one 
month of acceptance. It is not refundable after May 1 for the fall semester or after 
December 15 for the spring semester, except upon a doctor's statement of the 
applicant's inability to enroll. 

Entrance Examinations 

Applicants for admission to Elon College should have taken either the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board or 
the American College Test of the American College Testing Program. 

Application blanks, lists of testing centers, dates and rules for applications, 
fees, reporting and the conduct of testing are available in most high school 
guidance centers in the United States. For either test, students should have 
their test scores sent directly to Elon College. 

The Early Decision Plan 

Well-qualified high school students who decide at the close of their junior 
year that Elon College is their first choice may take advantage of the Early 
Decision Plan. 

To be considered for Early Decision, a student can apply anytime after 
completion of the junior year, but application must be completed no later 
than December 1 of the senior year. The application must be sent with the 
high school record, scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Tests and/or ACT and 
a signed Early Decision agreement. 

Students accepted under the Early Decision Plan have several advantages: 
(1) notification of the admissions decision within two weeks of the receipt of the 
completed application package, beginning September 15; (2) the opportunity to 
attend the first Spring Orientation Weekend; (3) priority status for housing and 
registration; and (4) an early financial aid estimate. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 

Accepted students must submit a nonrefundable $200 deposit by January 15 
and withdraw applications from all other colleges at that time. 

Transfer Admission 

Transfer students are admitted at all class levels based on their academic 
record at the institution from which they are transferring, in order to graduate, 
one full academic year of study (at least 33 semester hours) must be completed 
at Elon, including the last term before graduation. 

To be admitted for advanced standing, the student is expected to have at least 
an overall "C" average on work attempted at other institutions, to be eligible to 41 

return to the last institution attended, and to be recommended by college officials. 

An applicant having less than 24 semester hours of transferable college credit 
at the time of application must also meet freshman admission requirements. 

In order to be considered for transfer admission a student must: 

1 . Have transcripts sent from all two-year or four-year colleges attended. 

2. Have a dean's evaluation form completed by the dean of the last college 
attended verifying eligibility. This form is not required if the student has 
received an associate degree. 

3. Have high school transcript and SAT or ACT scores sent. The SAT/ACT 
requirement may be waived for some advanced students or older students 
who did not take the test while in high school. 

Speciai Students 

The college admits a limited number of special students who are not working 
toward degrees at Elon College. Special students include: 

• Persons taking only private music instruction in the Department of Fine Arts. 
Such applicants are admitted if instructors are able to schedule lessons for 
them 

• High school graduates taking classes of special interest. Persons out of high 
school less than two years may be required to submit a copy of their high 
school transcript and SAT/ ACT scores 

• Visiting students from other colleges attending summer and winter terms 

• College graduates interested in further study at Elon. Such applicants are 
admitted if they fulfill requirements for admission to the desired courses 

• College graduates working toward teacher certification or recertification 

• High school students taking classes on the Elon campus during their senior 
year. Credit for this work is generally transferable to other institutions. 
(Credit Bank Application required) 

Special students may register for no more than eight hours per semester 
without approval of the Dean of Academic Affairs. 



E L N COLLEGE 

International Students 

International admission packets are available from the Office of International 
Admissions. Students must submit the International Admission application with 
a nonrefundable $25 application fee, translated transcripts from all secondary 
and postsecondary schools attended, and a completed certificate 
of financial responsibility. 

Proof of a minimum score of 500 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) is also required, unless English is the student's native language or the 
language of instruction. 

42 International students should submit applications and documentation as early 

as possible because it may take several months to receive and process forms from 
abroad. The Office of International Admissions can be contacted by calling 910- 
584-2370 or 800-334-8448 (toll free in USA); FAX is 910-538-3986. 

Acceptance on Condition 

students who have graduated from a secondary school but who do not meet 
the requirements in subject matter areas and units may be accepted on condition. 
Any deficiency must be eliminated before beginning the sophomore year at Elon. 
A student entering with a deficiency may not be able to complete degree require- 
ments in eight regular semesters. 

Students whose deficiencies indicate a need for special work may be required 
to participate in the Transitional Program. Upon successful completion of this 
work and recommendation by the Transitional Program Coordinator, the student 
may proceed with regular course work. 

Advanced Placement Examination 

Students earning a score of three or better in the Advanced Placement Tests 
of the College Entrance Examination Board taken in high school may receive 
credit in the following fields: art, biology, chemistry, computer science, econom- 
ics, English, French, German, history, mathematics, music, physics, political 
science, psychology and Spanish. Scores should be sent to the Office of Admis- 
sions for approval by the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Board 
enables students to earn college credit by examination. Students desiring credit 
by examination must earn a scaled score of 500 on the General Examinations 
and/or a score of 50 on the Subject Area Examinations. Credit may be awarded 
in the following areas: composition and literature, foreign language, history and 
social sciences, science and mathematics. Adult students interested in receiving 
credit through CLEP should contact the Admissions Office for information. 
Scores should be sent to the Admissions Office for approval by the Dean of 
Academic Affairs. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 

Department Examination 

students may contact the Dean of Academic Affairs for details concerning 
the process of credit through examination by departments at Elon in areas not 
covered above. The cost for each examination is $185. 

Transfer Credit 

students earn credit for courses taken through college parallel programs 
at accredited junior colleges or community colleges and for courses taken at 
accredited four-year colleges and universities. Transcripts are evaluated and 
credit is awarded on a course-by-course basis after the student has been 43 

accepted for admission. 

No more than 65-semester hours of credit will be allowed from two-year 
institutions. No credit is allowed for a course with a grade below "C-." Credit 
will not be given for classes taken while a student is under academic suspension. 

Credit for Veterans 

Veterans entering Elon may transfer certified credits from various areas: 

• Military personnel on active duty who wish to submit CLEP credits should 
see their Education Officers concerning CLEP tests or write to USAFI, 
Madison, Wisconsin. 

• Work from other accredited post-secondary institutions may be accepted. 

• Students with one year of active duty in military service will receive credit for 
the Physical Education requirement by bringing a copy of their DD-214 Form 
to the Registrar's Office for verification. 

General Costs 

The cost of attending Elon College is purposely held at a reasonable level. 
The chart on page 45 gives the particular charges for resident and commuter 
students. Please note that there are special tuition rates for part-time students. 

Student Government Association and health service fees are collected from 
all students enrolled for nine or more semester hours during registration. 

Costs Covered by Tuition 

Included in the tuition fees are costs of registration, use of the library and 
recreational facilities, admission to home athletic events, student publications, 
post office box for college housing, regular laboratory fees and 12 to 18 semester 
hours of work, inclusive each semester. 

The tuition, fees and estimated book expenses do not include fees for special 
courses and special laboratory work which depend on the course of study 
undertaken. Personal expenses vary with the individual student. For the student 
who must earn money toward his/her college expenses, a number of work 



E L N COLLEGE 

opportunities are available through the Career Services Center and the Human 
Resources Office. 

The Meal Plan 

All resident students are required to participate in the meal plan in the college 
dining halls. The cost of the meal plan is subject to change without notice. Double 
charge is made for special diets. Upper-class resident students may select a five- 
day meal plan. Students living off campus may purchase a semester meal ticket, 
use the Elon Card (a debit card for use in dining halls and the Campus Shop) or 
AA purchase individual meals. 

Book Expenses 

The estimated cost of textbooks is $450 for the academic year, including $225 
needed for purchases from the campus bookstore at the opening of fall semester. 

Room Change Charge 

students changing rooms without permission of the Dean of Students are 
charged for both rooms. 



ADMISSIONS. FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 



Expenses for the 1994-95 Academic Year 

Full-Time Enrollment/Day Students (12-18 hours) 



Tuition 

Room (Double) 
(Single) 
(Double as single)" 

Board** (Winter Term billed with Fall Semester) 

19 Meal Plan 

15 Meal Plan 

Student Government 

Health Service 

Overload*** 



Fall 

Semester 


Winter 
Term* 


Spring 
Semester 


$4,550 


$185/hour 


$4,550 


886 
1,150 
1275 


243 
303 
340 


886 
1,150 
1275 


1,170 


239 


931 


1,140"" 


213 


927"" 


50 




50 


25 




25 


185/hour 




185/hour 



45 



Damage Deposit (refundable, applies to residence hall students only) 



100 



* Residence hall students enrolled full-time fall semester not attending winter term will be 
eligible for a credit for winter term board. Students enrolled full time for either fall or spring 
semester (within the same academic school year) are not charged for winter term room and 
tuition if no overload exists in winter term. 

** After the beginning of a semester, a $20 administrative fee will be charged to change 
meal plans. 

*** More than 18 hours in fall or spring; more than four hours in winter. 

" Provided space is available and approval given by Residence Life Office 

** Includes $100 Elon card balance for food purchases 

Part-Time EnrolimentlDay Students and All Evening School 

Tuition 1-8 hours $185/hour 

9- 1 1 hourst $285/hour 

t Day students enrolled for 9-1 1 hours must pay SGA and health fees. 
Evening students can enroll in no more than four semester hours in the day program. 

Graduate Programs 

MBA Tuition $195/hour 

M.Ed. Tuition $165/hour 



46 



E L N COLLEGE 

Summer School 1995 

Tuition per semester hour $185 

College enrollment fee including SGA of $1 10 

Room per summer session (double) 225 

(single) 325 

Board per summer session 415 

Auditing per course 125 

SpeciallOptional Fees (No Refund After Drop/Add Deadline) 

Applied music lessons: 

Each one semester hour credit or audit for non-music majors $185 

Each one semester hour credit or audit for music majors 

taking second or additional lessons 185 

Auditing per course 125 

Charges for other courses with special fees are listed in the catalog and/or the course schedule. 

Graduation Fees 

Bachelor's Degree $40 

Master's Degree 50 

Miscellaneous 

Late registration/Re-enrolIment during term $25 

Late payment 30 

Adding a course after Drop/Add Day 10 

Transcripts 5 

Security deposit (residence hall damage and key) 

refundable upon completion of housing contract) 100 

Examination for course credit 185 

Automobile registration 

Resident Students 45 

Commuter Students 35 

Replace I.D. card/meal ticket 30 

Returned check fine 25 

A student's grade or graduate's diploma and transcripts will be withheld until his/her 
financial obligations to the college are settled. A student cannot register for further course 
work until financial obligations to the college are settled. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 

Refunds 

Academic Year- 
Fall and Spring Semester* 

Tuition, fees, room cliarges and board are refunded under two different 
policies as follows: 

• Students receiving Title IV financial aid and attending Elon College for the first 
time will receive refunds according to the policy listed below. 

—Refunds will be made to students who (a) do not register for the semester for 
which Title IV financial aid was intended, or (b) withdraw and do not complete 
the period of enrollment for which the Title IV assistance was intended. 47 

Refunds (except for board charges) will not be made after 60 percent of the 
semester for which the student has been charged has passed. 

—The portion of the semester for which a student can receive a refund is 
computed by dividing the time (in weeks) remaining in the semester by the 
total time (in weeks) of the semester and rounded downward to the nearest 
10 percent. 

—Any unpaid charges owed by the student will be deducted from the calculated 
refund amount. 

—An administrative fee equal to the lesser of 5 percent of the total charges 
assessed to the student or $100 will be charged for refunds made upon with- 
drawal. 

—Students who withdraw after 60 percent of the semester has passed will 
receive a refund of board charges on a pro rata basis. 

—Refunds under Title IV programs will be made on a pro rata basis to the student, 
and any payers based on the percentage of charges paid by each source. 

• All other students receive refunds on a pro rata basis during the first five weeks 
of the semester. Following is a table of pro rata charges: 

1st week pro rata charge 5% 

2nd week pro rata charge 20% 

3rd week pro rata charge 40% 

4th week pro rata charge 60% 

5th week pro rata charge 80% 

6th week — no refund 

* Upon withdrawal, meal ticket refunds are prorated. 

Winter Term and Summer School* 

Students who end enrollment during the second or third day of classes of 
winter term or summer school will receive a 90 percent refund of tuition and 
room charges. Students who end enrollment during the fourth or fifth day of 
classes of winter term or summer school v/ill receive a 50 percent refund of 
tuition and room charges. There will be no refunds after the fifth day of classes. 

* Upon withdrawal, meal ticket refunds are prorated. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Notice of Withdrawal 

In order to be eligible for a refund upon withdrawal a student must notify 
the Dean of Student Affairs in writing of his/her intentions. The student must also 
check out with the Financial Planning and Cashier offices. Refunds are calculated 
as of the date of withdrawal specified by the Dean of Student Affairs. 

Financial Aid 

Elon College believes that no student should be denied a college education 
because of limited funds. To the extent possible, eligible students receive aid 
An through careful planning and various forms of financial assistance. 

In order to receive any type of college, state or federal aid, students must 
demonstrate satisfactory academic progress toward the completion of degree 
requirements. No financial aid is offered until an applicant has been accepted 
for admission to Elon College. 

Financial aid programs vary by source, eligibility criteria and application 
procedures. While every effort is made to meet each student's full needs, that is not 
always possible, due to a limited amount of aid available. Students will be offered a 
financial aid "package" which is an award consisting of one or more of the follow- 
ing types of aid: scholarships, grants, low-interest loans and campus employment. 
Scholarships and grants are "gift assistance" which do not have to be repaid while 
loans and work are referred to as "self help." Financial aid packages may consist 
of all self help or a combination of self help and gift assistance. Applying early for 
financial aid improves your chances for getting the maximum aid for which you are 
eligible. Unless the student is a continuing student, no aid is awarded until the 
student has been accepted for admission. 

Types of Financial Aid Based on Need 

There are a variety of need-based financial aid programs. The federal govern- 
ment, some states (including North Carolina) and the college itself offer grant, 
loan and work-study programs. Grants are funds which do not have to be repaid, 
loans to students are generally repayable only after the student is no longer 
enrolled, and work-study funds are earned through employment on campus. 
Many students use work-study funds to meet their personal financial needs 
during the school year. 

All need-based financial aid is renewable up to four years provided the same 
level of need is demonstrated each year, the student maintains satisfactory 
academic progress as defined by the college for financial aid purposes and the 
funds remain available. Renewal cannot be assured to those students whose 
financial aid application files are completed after April 1 of any year. 

Federal Programs 
Federal Pell Grant 

For students with a high need. Pell Grants provide from $400 to $2,300 annually. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants 

Federal funds given to and awarded by the college to students demonstrating 
high need. Amounts vary. 

Federal Stafford Student Loans (Subsidized) 

Moderate interest loans awarded directly to students which are available 
through many state agencies and private lenders. Freshmen may borrow up to 
$2,625 annually, sophomores up to $3,500 annually, and juniors and seniors up to 
$5,500 annually. These loans are federally guaranteed and no interest accrues, 
nor is any payment due, until six months after the student ceases to be at least a 
half-time student. Separate application required. 49 

Federal Perkins Loans 

Federal funds given to and awarded by the college to students demonstrating 
high need. No interest accrues and no payment is due while the student is 
enrolled at least half-time. Repayment begins nine months after the student 
ceases to be at least a half-time student. Amounts vary. 

Federal College Work-Study 

Awarded to students with need who work on campus and who are paid 
according to hours worked. Awards vary based on amount of need. Work-study 
earnings are not paid in advance so they cannot be used to pay the direct costs 
(tuition, room, board, books, etc.) of the semester in which they are awarded. 

State Programs 

North Carolina Contractual Scholarship Fund 

State funds given to and awarded by the college to North Carolina residents 
with need. Amounts vary. 

North Carolina Student Incentive Grant 

Awards of up to $1,500 annually for North Carolina residents. 

Pennsylvania and Vermont State Grants 

For students who are residents of these states. Amounts vary. 

Elon College Programs 

In addition to the numerous federal and state programs, the college offers its 
own need-based assistance. Funds for these programs are provided directly by the 
college as well as through donations and gifts to the college by many individuals, 
businesses and foundations. All students who apply for need-based aid and who 
demonstrate need are automatically considered for these funds. No separate 
application is required. 

Institutional Grants 

College grants based solely on demonstrated need. Amounts vary in accor- 
dance with need. 



50 



E L N COLLEGE 

Need-based Endowed Scholarships 

Awarded to students who demonstrate need and who meet certain other 
criteria as established by the donors. The college identifies eligible students and 
awards these funds accordingly. No separate application is required. 

Financial Assistance Not Based on Need 

There is help available for students and families who do not qualify for need- 
based aid. This help is in the form of scholarships, grants, loans and work-study. 
Listed below are some of the opportunities available from Elon, state and federal 
governments and outside sources. 

North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grant 

Eveiy North Carolina resident who attends Elon as a full-time undergraduate 
student automatically receives a Legislative Tuition Grant of approximately $1,150 
from the North Carolina General Assembly. The exact amount of the grant is set 
annually by the General Assembly. A brief application must be completed at 
registration to show legal residency. 

UCC Ministerial Discount 

$600 per year ($300 per semester) to full-time students who are legal depen- 
dents of full-time ministers in the United Church of Christ. Documentation of 
eligibility is required. 

Merit Scholarships 

Based on talent or performance rather than need. 

North Carolina Teaching Fellows 

Full cost of tuition, room and board, plus air fare to London for one semester. 
Elon is one of two private colleges in North Carolina selected to offer the presti- 
gious North Carolina Teaching Fellows program. The Fellows are selected by the 
North Carolina Teaching Fellows Commission which provides scholarships of 
approximately $5,000 a year for four years on the condition that Fellows teach 
for four years in North Carolina public schools after graduation. 

Elon enrolls approximately 20 Teaching Fellows each year and supplements 
the Teaching Fellows scholarship to provide for the full cost of tuition, room and 
board for four years, plus air fare for a semester in London. 

Honors Fellows 

$1,500 to $5,000 annually plus one $500 travel grant. Elon enrolls approxi- 
mately 65 Honors Fellows each year who receive scholarships ranging from 
$1,500 to $5,000 a year. Honors Fellows are selected on the basis of high school 
record and standardized test scores. 

Leadership Fellows 

$1,000 or $1,500 annually. Elon enrolls approximately 100 Leadership Fellows 
each year selected on the basis of successful high school performance, above 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 

average standardized test scores and demonstrated leadership ability. No separate 
application, Applicants for admission who meet the criteria are awarded the 
scholarship. 

Presidential Scholarships 

$500 to $1,000 annually. Presidential Scholarships are awarded on the basis of 
superior academic performance and SAT or ACT scores. Applicants for admission 
who qualify are automatically awarded this scholarship. 

Fine Arts Scholarships 

The Department of Fine Arts awards scholarships to outstanding freshmen 51 

in the fields of music and theatre on the basis of audition. The scholarships range 
from $ 200 to $1,500 annually. Contact the Fine Arts department. 

Athletic Scholarships 

In compliance with NCAA Division II regulations, athletic scholarships are 
awarded by the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics in each sport offered at 
Elon. The awards are based on performance and the amount varies. Contact the 
Athletics Department. 

Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) 

The United States Army offers four-year scholarships which cover the cost of 
tuition and books for four years, plus $100 per month for personal expenses. Elon 
provides room and board at no cost to all four-year ROTC scholarship winners. 
The Army also offers some two-year scholarships for which students in the Elon 
ROTC program may compete. 

Private Scholarships 

Foundations, service clubs, churches and corporations give away millions of 
dollars of scholarships each year to worthy students. Many Elon students receive 
this type of scholarship help in addition to other types of help they may be 
receiving. 

Students generally seek these scholarships on their own. A good place to start 
is by asking your high school guidance office about community and other scholar- 
ships with which they may be familiar. Then ask about the availability of scholar- 
ships at places where family members are employed, through your church and 
through any organizations to which family members belong. Finally go to the 
public library for guidebooks to scholarships from foundations, corporations 
and government agencies. 

Campus Employment 

Many Elon students assist with college living expenses by working a part-time 
job, either on or off campus. The opportunities for campus employment at Elon are 
available both to students who qualify for need and to students who do not. 

Students in part-time jobs get valuable experience, learn time-management 



E L N COLLEGE 

skills, build friendships with the office personnel and, in certain cases with the 
approval of the Director of Experiential Education, receive internship credit. 

Loan Options That Are Not Based on Need 

Several sources of long-term loan funds are available that are based on credit 
worthiness rather than "need." 

Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) 

Parents may borrow up to the cost of education (at Elon, $15,400 for 1994-95) 
less any other aid per academic year for each dependent enrolled at least half- 
time. Interest rate is variable and is based on the 52-week T-bill rate plus 3.1 
percent with a cap of 10 percent. 

Federal Stafford Student Loans (unsubsidized) 

Available to all students regardless of need. Loan amounts are the same as for 
the need-based subsidized program. However, under this program, borrowers do 
not qualify for federal interest subsidy payments, thus interest accrues while the 
student is in school. Repayment of principal begins six months after the student is 
no longer enrolled half-time. The interest rate is variable, capped at 9 percent and 
is based on the 91 -day T-bill rate plus 3.1 percent. Separate application required. 
Note: Students must file an application for need-based financial aid to be consid- 
ered for one of these loans, A determination must first be made that the student is 
not eligible for a need-based subsidized loan. (See "How to Apply for Need-Based 
Financial Aid.") 

How To Apply for Need-Based Financial Aid 

• Students must be accepted for admission to Elon before financial aid will 
be awarded. However, do not wait until you are notified of your acceptance 
before starting the financial aid application process. The sooner you complete 
the aid application process, the better chance you have of receiving maximum 
awards. Continuing students must be making satisfactory academic progress as 
defined by the college for financial aid purposes. 

• As soon after January 1, 1994, as possible, complete a Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid and, if you wish to be considered for all aid programs 
(not just federal programs), a Financial Aid Form (FAF) and send the forms 
and requested fees to the designated processors. The Federal Free Form and 
FAF are scheduled to be available in late November. If you file only the Federal 
Free Form, the college will not receive the results unless you send them to us. 
If you file the FAF and remit the proper fees, the college will receive directly 
from CSS the results of both the Federal Free Form and the FAF. NOTE: No 
form is perfect and sometimes special situations or circumstances cannot be 
adequately addressed when filling one out. If this is the case, Elon encourages 
families and students to call or write the Financial Planning Office. Adjustments 
can sometimes be made to reflect these special circumstances. 

• Submit an Elon Aid Application to the Financial Planning Office. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 

• If the Student previously attended a college or university other than Elon, 
request a Financial Aid Transcript from each school. Financial Aid Transcripts 
are required whether or not the student received any aid at the other institutions. 

• Notify the Financial Planning Office of any scholarships, grants or loans you will 
be receiving from any source other than Elon College. 

• Elon College's priority deadline for awarding financial aid is April 1. Be sure to 
begin the filing process early enough so that your file is complete by that date. 

Payment Options 

VISA/MasterCard 

Elon College accepts these charge cards for payment of tuition and fees. 

Ten-Month Payment Plan 

Charges for the entire academic year, minus financial aid, are divided by 
10 for monthly payments from June 1 through March 1 . This plan is administered 
by a third party. 



53 



Endowed Scholarships 

The following scholarships are awarded to students who have completed 
the application procedures described for need-based aid. Awards are made at 
the direction of the Office of Admissions and Financial Planning according to the 
guidelines of the individual scholarships. A booklet containing more information 
about these endowments, which are established through the generosity of private 
donors, is available in the Office of Development. 



Alamance Caswell County Medical 
Auxiliary Scholarship 

Edward M. Albright Memorial Fund 

Simeon Lee Allen Scholarship 

Nina and Dickie Andrews 
Scholarship 

The Rev. J, Frank Apple Memorial 
Scholarship 

Asheville-Charlotte A. Hebard 
Scholarship 

J. 0. Atkinson Memorial Scholarship 

Barrett-Harward Scholarship 

Mrs. Louise T. Barringer Scholarship 

Thomas L. and Kitty Rook Bass 
Scholarship 



Walter H. Bass III and Barbara Day 
Bass Scholarship 

Robert C. Baxter Scholarship 

A. Vance Beck, Sr. Scholarship 

Robert Charles Beisinger Scholarship 

Jennie Willis Atkinson Bradford 
Scholarship 

Ned F. Brannock Scholarship 

Dr. and Mrs. R. E. Brittle Scholarship 

Trudie K. Bueschel Christian 
Education Scholarship 

Burlington Business and Profes- 
sional Women's Club Scholarship 

Burlington Handbags Scholarship 



E L N COLLEGE 



William E. "Buster" Butler, Jr. and 
Mary Griffin Butler Scholarship 

Byrd Scholarship 

Caddell Memorial Scholarship 

John L. Cameron Scholarship 

The Pauline Nina Taylor Cammack 
Memorial Scholarship 

Isabella Walton Cannon Scholarship 
Endowment Fund 

The Dr. George L. Carrington 
Scholarship 

Fanny Pearle Castor and Frank 
Stevens Castor Endowment Fund 

Caswell-Alamance Scholarship 

Philip Vance Gates Memorial 
Scholarship 

The Z. Vance and Philip Vance Gates 
Scholarship 

Wallace L. Chandler Scholarship 

Frederica Olsson and Constant 
Woodman Chase, Jr. Scholarship 

Cheek Scholarship 

Glass of 1925 Scholarship 

Glass of 1930 Scholarship 

Glass of 1940 Scholarship 

Class of 1941 Scholarship 

Community Congregational Church 
Scholarship 

George D. Colclough Scholarship 

Carl and Betty Coley Scholarship 

Alyse Smith Cooper Music 
Scholarship 

Janie E. Council Scholarship 

Billy Crocker Jazz Scholarship 

Alan Wheeler Crosby Memorial 
Scholarship 

Verona Daniels Danieley Scholarship 

T. B. Dawson Scholarship 



Dewey Hobson Dofflemyer 
Scholarship 

W. Clifton Elder Scholarship 

Ellington Scholarship 

Elon College Community Church 
Scholarship 

First Christian Church, Portsmouth, 
Va. Memorial Scholarship 

Clyde Lee and Bertie S. Fields 
Memorial Scholarship 

First Union Bank Scholarship 

A. J, Fletcher Music Scholarship 

H. Terry and Nonnie B. Floyd 
Scholarship 

Lacy R. Fogleman Scholarship 
of St. Mark's Reformed Church 

Rudy M. and Frances Turner Fonville 
Scholarship 

Franklin Congregational Christian 
Church Scholarship 

E. E. Funderburk, Jr. MD Scholarship 

The Charles A. Frueauff Foundation 
Scholarship 

Allen Erwin Gant Scholarship 

The John L. Georgeo Scholarship 

Glaxo Women in Science Scholars 
Endowment 

Glen Raven Mills Educational Award 

The Mills E. and Katherine B. Godwin 
Scholarship 

Judge Eugene A. Gordon Scholarship 

John S. Graves Scholarship 

Griswold-Watts Scholarship 

Mable M. Haith Scholarship 

Jewell Presnell and Carl C. Hall 
Memorial Scholarship 

Robert Kelley and Pearle J. Hancock 
Scholarship 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 



Dr. Howard S. Hardcastle Memorial 
Scholarship 

Ollie Clemmons Hedrick and Leah 
Margaret Tickel Hedrick Scholarship 

Edward Everett Holland Scholarship 

Howard Braxton Holmes 
Memorial Fund 

Vitus Reid Holt Scholarship 

A. L, Hook Scholarship 

Bernice and Doris Home Scholarship 

Kenneth K. Hughes Scholarship 

Edward, Rena Maude, and Allen 
Iseley Scholarship 

Archie and Adelaide Israel 
Scholarship 

Laura and Nelson Jackson 
Scholarship 

Mr. and Mrs. Burney Jennings 
Scholarship 

Dr. I. W. Johnson Scholarship 

Ada Smith Johnston Scholarship 

Charles D. Johnston Scholarship 

Effie Wicker Johnston 
Music Scholarship 

Rebecca Johnston Music Scholarship 

Virginia Somers Jones Scholarship 

John M. Jordan Scholarship 

Lecy Martin Kernodle Scholarship 

Virginia Beale Kernodle Scholarship 

Lucian and Lelia King Scholarship 

Sherri Sparrow King Scholarship 

Ralph F. and Florance Kirkpatrick 
Scholarship 

Hosea D. and Minnie Trollinger 
Lambeth Scholarship 

The Lester Scholarship 

Edward W, W. Lewis Scholarship 

Max Lieberman Scholarship 

Asa Liggett Lincoln Scholarship 



Jack R, and Dorothy C. Lindley 
Scholarship 

The Luther Alexander Lineberger, jr. 
Scholarship 

Claude V. and Alva Lee Currin Long 
Scholarship 

Wilkes Estes Lowe, Jr. Scholarship 

Zebulon and Alma Lynch 
Scholarship 

Lynnhaven Colony Congregational 55 
Church (UCC) Scholarship 

Sue Boddie Macon Memorial Fund 

Winona Morris Madren Scholarship 

W. L. and Beulah McNeill Maness 
Scholarship 

William Raymond Massey 
Scholarship 

J. Mark and Kate Strader McAdams 
Scholarship 

John Z. and Mildred W. McBrayer 
Scholarship 

John A. and Iris McEwen McCrary 
Scholarship 

Robert Rodgers Miskelly 
Memorial Scholarship 

The Jane Belk Moncure Scholarship 

Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Moser 
Scholarship 

Niagara Church Scholarship 

Francis Asbury Palmer Scholarship 

Annie Ruth Webb Parker Scholarship 

The Vivian Wrenn Pell Scholarship 

Wayne H. and Mabel B. Perrine 
Memorial Scholarship 

The Donald W. and Shirley M. Perry 
Scholarship 

Paul C. and Margaret S. Plybon 
Scholarship 

Rex and Jna Mae Powell Scholarship 

0. D. Poythress Scholarship 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



The Rev. Lacy M. Presnell 
Memorial Scholarship 

Presser Scholarship 

Emmett H. and Katherine R. Rawles 
Scholarship 

Japheth E. Rawls, Jr. and Virginia R. 
Rawls Endowment Fund 

Paul Reddish Scholarship 

David L. Rice Memorial Scholarship 

Howard R. and Virginia E. 
Richardson Scholarship 

Richmond Almuni Chapter 
Scholarship 

Bessie Holmes and George B. 
Robbins Scholarship 

Arthur H. and Trudy B. Rogers 
Scholarship 

Viola V. and Amos Thornton Rollings 
Scholarship 

The Royster Scholarship Fund 

Albert Oscar and Mary Susan Rudd 
Scholarship 

William Lee and Ruth Crosby Rudd 
Scholarship and Loan Fund 

Sanders-Myers 
Memorial Scholarship 

Renold 0. Schilke 
Trumpet Scholarship 

The Zondal Myers Sechrest 
Scholarship 

John Duncan Shaw Scholarship 

Nancy Gordon Sheffield Scholarship 

Dr. Charles E. Shelton Memorial 
Scholarship 

John L. Sills, Jr. Scholarship 

W. W. and Bessie Pickett Sloan 
Scholarship 

Oscar F. Smith Memorial 
Foundation Scholarship 



Annie Ross Somers Scholarship 

John and Helene Sparks Scholarship 

Stadler's Country Hams, Inc. Scholar- 
ship 

William Wesley Staley Scholarship 

Mary Frances Stamey 
Memorial Scholarship 

Sigmund Sternberger Scholarships 

Alda June Jones Stevens 
Memorial Scholarship 

Elwood E. Stone, Sr. Scholarship 

William H. and Marguerite R. 
Stratford Scholarship 

Theo Strum Scholarship 

St. Mark's Reformed Church 
Scholarship 

Suffolk Christian Church Scholarshi 

Algernon Sydney Sullivan and Man 
Mildred Sullivan Scholarships 

Taylor Scholarship 

Times-News Publishing 
Company, Inc. Scholarship 

Wallace Lincoln Tuck Scholarship 

Arline Lindsay Tweed Scholarship 

Union United Church of Christ 
Scholarship 

C. James Velie Memorial 
Music Scholarship 

Thyra Wright Vestal Scholarship 

Robert R. Wagner Memorial 
Scholarship 

Wake Chapel Scholarship 

Catherine N. Walker Scholarship 

Cynthia Nicole Ward Education 
Endowment 

William I. Ward, Sr. and David 
Samuel Ward Scholarship 

Judge Thurman Warren and Allie 
Brower Warren Scholarship 



ADMISSIONS, 



FINANCES 



AND 



FINANCIAL 



A I D 



Dudley Ray Watson Memorial 
Scholarship 

L. V. and L. B. Watson Scholarship 

Watterson-Troxler 
History Scholarship 

The Floyd E. West Scholarship 

Colonel Henry E. White Scholarship 

Margaret Delilah Bobbitt White 
Scholarship 



Nellie Glenn White Scholarship 

Jeanne Freeman Williams Scholarship 

Minnie Johnston Wilson Scholarship 

Youth Friends Scholarship 

James R. and Nina B. Young 
Endowment Fund 

John F. Youngblood Scholarship 

Youth Friends Scholarship 



57 



Leaders for the Twenty-First Century Scholarships 

The following endowed scholarships, which are provided through the gener- 
osity of private donors, are awarded to the students who meet the criteria for the 
North Carolina Teaching, Honors and Leadership Fellows. 

• Frederick Wharton Beazley • Juanita Wheeler Keeton Scholarship 
Scholarship , Esther Cole and John Robert 

• Carol Grotnes Belk Endowment Kernodle Endowment 



Brannon-Sugg Scholarship 

Class of 1938 Centennial Scholarship 

J. E. Danieley Scholarship 

Thad Eure Scholarship 

Mary Ruth and Archiable F. 
Fleming, Jr. Scholarship 

The Frederick K. Gilliam, Sr. 
Scholarship 

Don S. and Margaret M. Holt 
Scholarship 

Margaret Plonk and S. Carlysle Isley 
Scholarship 



Luther A. and Georgia V. Lineberger 
Memorial Scholarship 

C. Almon "Mon" Mclver 
Centennial Scholarship 

Virginia Green Miles, W. Bennett 
Miles, and Ellen Miles Dumville 
Memorial Fund 

Hurley D. Rogers 
Memorial Scholarship 

Bertha Paschall Shipp Scholarship 

Southern Bell Fellow Scholarship 

Thomas R. "Bud" and Doris Ward 
Stadler Scholarship 



Presidential Scholarships 

Eton's past presidents are honored with Presidential Scholarships which are 
awarded to freshmen. 



William S. Long, founder and 
first president, 1889-94 

William Wesley Staley, 1894-1905 

Emmett Leonidas Moffitt, 
1905-11 



William Allen Harper, 1911-31 
Leon Edgar Smith, 1931-47 
James Earl Danieley, 1947-73 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



Scholarship Awards in Athletics 

Endowments for grants-in-aid in athletics are administered through the Department 
of Athletics in accordance with NCAA and Conference guidelines. These endow- 
ments are made possible through the generosity of private donors. 

William R. "Bill" Miller 
Basketball Scholarship 



58 



Frank Andrews Golf Scholarship 

R, H. Barringer Distribution Co., Inc. 
Tennis Endowment 

C. V. "Lefty" Briggs Athletic 
Scholarship 

Luther Byrd Scholarship 

The Comer Golf Scholarship 

Dwight L. Dillon Athletic Scholarship 

John L. Frye Scholarship 

Chester Huey Scholarship 

Clyde Johnston Golf Scholarship 

Cameron Little Memorial Scholarship 

Graham "Doc" Mathis Athletic 
Scholarship 

Florence and L. G. Matkins 
Scholarship 



L. J. "Hap" Perry 
Athletic Scholarship 

Tom Sawyer-Huck Finn Tennis 
Scholarship 

James C. Scott Golf Scholarship 

William Brown Terrell Scholarship 

Sid Varney Scholarship 

D. C. "Peahead" Walker Scholarship 

Clyde T. and Esther Ward 
Golf Scholarship 

Max Ward Scholarship 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Hunt Ward 
Golf Scholarship 

S. S. "Red" Wilson 
Football Scholarship 



Endowment and Sources of Income 

The income from tuition and fees constitutes only a part of the income of the 
college. Other sources of income include the annual gifts from the churches of the 
Southern Conference of the United Church of Christ; a share of the contributions 
received by the Independent College of North Carolina; earnings from the perma- 
nent endowment funds of the College; and, the contributions of individuals, 
foundations, businesses and industries. 

In addition to the general endowment funds of the College, special endow- 
ment funds have been established for specific purposes. 



• John W. Barney Memorial Award 

• Biomedical Reference 
Laboratory Program 

• Boone Memorial Fund 

• James H. R. Booth Fund 

• Kathleen Price and Joseph M. Bryan 
Family Foundation Endowment 

for Faculty Development 



• Isabella Cannon Leadership 
Program Endowment Fund 

• George R. Chandler 
Endowment Fund 

• Thomas W. and Mary Watson 
Chandler Endowment Fund 

• Civil War Collection 
Endowment Fund 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 



The Daniels-Danieley Award 

Dwight Merrimon Davidson Endow- 
ment Fund 

Elbert and Esther Fertig 
DeCoursey Fund 

Milton A. and Naomi F. 
Dofflemyer Fund 

Elon College Community 
Orchestra Endowment Fund 

George Joseph Fertig Fund 

A. J. Fletcher Professorship 
in Communications 

D. R. Fonville Sr. Fund 

Ford Foundation Grant 

Ella V, Gray Memorial Fund 

George W. Harden Trust 

The G. Thomas Holmes and Gladys 
Wright Holmes Endowment 
for Chemistry 

The Jefferson-Pilot Distinguished 
Professorship 

J. L. Kernodle Foundation 

John T. Kernodle Memorial Fund 

Peter Jefferson Kernodle and Louise 
Nurney Kernodle Memorial Fund 

Virginia Beale Kernodle 
Memorial Fund 

Literature, Languages and 
Communications Endowment 

Marjorie L. Long Lecture Series 



The Martha and Spencer Love 
School of Business Fund 

iris Holt McEwen Community 
Service Award 

The James H. McEwen Jr. 
Endowment Fund 

Sarah M. Moize Endowment Fund 

Mulholland Library Endowment 
Fund 

NCNB Corporation Endowment 
for Field Studies 

The Rex and Ina Mae Powell 
Lecture Series 

Sophia Maude Sharpe Powell 
Professorship 

The Thomas Edward Powell Jr. 
Professorship of Biology 

The Religion Scholar Award 

Ferris E. Reynolds Lectureship 

George Shackley Award 

Ella Brunk Smith Award 

Spence Endowment Fund 

Stokes Endowment 

James T. Toney Endowment Fund 

L.L. Vaughan Chemistry Fund 

Drusilla Dofflemeyer Voorhees Fund 

Wachovia Fund for Excellence 

The Walter and Dorothy Westafer 
Fund for the Fine Arts 

Milton G. Wicker Endowment Fund 



59 




^:^^ig**s:^w sCsk:::^ 







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GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



General Academic 
Reflations 

Registration and Courses 61 

Classification 

Classifications are made at the beginning of the college year in September. 

• Freshman 

1-27 semester hours completed 

• Sophomore 

28-61 semester hours completed 

• Junior 

62-95 semester hours completed 

• Senior 

96 or more semester hours completed 

Course Load 

Sixteen hours of college work per semester is considered the normal student 
load. Students who are on academic probation are limited to a maximum load of 
13 semester hours in fall and spring semesters. 

During the one-month winter term, four hours of college work is the normal 
load for all students, 

Maximum load for any one semester is as follows: 

• Fall and Spring Semesters, 18 semester hours 

• Winter Term, 4 semester hours 

• Summer Term, 8 semester hours 

Any exception to this policy is the responsibility of the Academic 
Dean's Office. 

Course Registration 

Students are expected to register for themselves on the designated days 
in August, January and February. Registration information is available to 
all students. Registration includes academic advising, selection of courses 
and payment of fees. Before preregistration or registration, each student 
should consult with his/her academic advisor on course selection. General 
Studies requirements, major requirements and other degree requirements. 



E L N COLLEGE 

However, it is the responsibility of the student, not the academic advisor, 
to ensure that all college graduation requirements are met. 

Registration is for an entire course, and a student who begins a course must 
complete it except in unusual circumstances. Unless the student and his/her 
advisor consider it essential, a student should not change his/her schedule 
after registration. 

Auditing Courses 

Persons wishing to attend certain courses regularly without doing the as- 
g2 signed preparation or receiving credit may do so with the approval of the Regis- 

trar. The cost is $125 for each course. 

Changes in Class and Schedule 

The college reserves the right to cancel or discontinue any course because 
of small enrollment or for other reasons deemed necessary. In order to assure 
quality instruction, the college reserves the right to close registration when the 
maximum enrollment has been reached. The college reserves the right to make 
changes in schedule and/or faculty when necessary. 

Credit by Examination (Course Challenge) 

A student may receive credit for a course not taken by demonstrating mastery 
of its subject matter. To challenge a course, a student must have the approval of 
the Dean of Academic Affairs, the chair of the department in which the course 
is offered and the professor who will test the student's masteiy of the subject 
matter. Whenever possible, the student should consult the professor far enough 
in advance of the term in which the examination will be taken to determine 
course requirements and standards and to begin to make independent prepara- 
tions. However, the student should expect no assistance from the professor other 
than being informed of the material to be covered on the examination. Under no 
circumstances shall a student be allowed to attend classes of the course being 
challenged. The cost for each examination is $185. 

Dropping Courses 

A student may officially drop any class with a "W" (withdraw without penalty) 
through half of the term— this includes the week of examinations. The withdrawal 
period applies to the regular semesters, winter term and the summer sessions. 
After that date no class may be dropped. Any exception to this policy 
is the responsibility of the Academic Dean's office. 

A student who withdraws from the college for any reason (except for a 
medical reason) receives grades of "W" if the withdrawal is before the designated 
half-term time period. After this time a student will receive a "W" or "F" depending 
on his/her grades at the time of withdrawal. A student who withdraws from the 
college with a medical withdrawal will receive a "WD," 



GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Independent Study 

Students may engage in independent study of catalog courses, special topics 
and research projects. Independent Study is limited to honors students, juniors 
and seniors. A course may not be repeated by Independent Study. Details con- 
cerning the procedure for developing an Independent Study proposal may be 
obtained in the Registrar's Office. 

Overload 

A student whose cumulative grade point average is less than 3.0 may not 
register for overload hours in any term. See previous page on course load. 

Pass/Fail Elective Courses 

A student may take two one-semester courses outside the major, minor and 
General Studies requirements on a pass/fail basis. The pass/fail option encour- 
ages students to enrich their educational experience in subjects outside their 
major/minor fields and General Studies requirements in which they may feel 
unable to maintain a desirable grade point average. The decision to take a 
course pass/fail must be made at registration before the first class period. 

Repeat Courses 

Courses repeated within four semesters of attendance (excluding winter and 
summer sessions) following the first enrollment in the course count only once 
in computing the cumulative grade point average. In such cases the most recent 
grade is counted rather than any previous grade(s) received. However, a course 
repeated more than once will count in the cumulative grade point average each 
time it is repeated. (Students receiving Veterans' benefits should consult the V.A. 
representative.) 

Attendance 

Since students must attend classes regularly in order to derive maximum 
benefit from their courses, the college strictly and fairly enforces policies govern- 
ing classes, and students are responsible for knowing attendance regulations. 
Each department establishes its own attendance policy. If unwarranted absences 
occur, the Dean of Academic Affairs may suspend the student from the class or 
from the college. 

Absence From Tests and Examinations 

Students who miss scheduled tests and examinations without excusable 
reasons may not make up such assignments. Authorization to make up tests 
missed for excusable reasons is obtained from the professor of the class. Authori- 
zation to make up final examinations missed for excusable reasons is obtained 
from the Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs. 



63 



E L N COLLEGE 

Grades and Reports 

Grading System and Quality Points 

Graduation is dependent upon quality as well as upon quantity of work done. 

A student earns quality points as well as semester hours if his/her level of 
performance does not fall below that of a "D." 

Letter grades are used. They are interpreted in the table below, with the 
quality points for each hour of credit shown at right. 

Grade Quality Points 

64 A 4.0 

A- 3.7 

B+ 3.3 

B 3.0 

B- 2.7 

C+ 2.3 

C 2.0 

C- 1.7 

D+ 1.3 

D 1.0 

D- 0.7 

F 0.0 

I Incomplete 0.0 

P Passing (not counted in cumulative average) 0.0 

S Satisfactory (not counted in cumulative average) 0.0 

U Unsatisfactory (counted in cumulative average) 0.0 

WD Medical withdrawal 0.0 

W Withdrawal 0.0 

NR No Report 0.0 

A grade in the "A" range indicates distinguished performance in a course. 

A grade in the "B" range indicates an above-average performance in class. 

A grade in the "C" range indicates an average performance in which a basic 
understanding of the subject has been demonstrated. 

A grade in the "D" range indicates a passing performance despite some 
deficiencies. 

A grade of "F" indicates failure. 

Grades of "A" through "F" are permanent grades and may not be changed 
except in case of error. After an instructor has certified a grade to the Registrar, 



GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

he/she may change it before the end of the next regular grading period. The change 
must be made in writing and have the written approval of the department chair. 

An "1" grade signifies incomplete work because of illness, emergency, extreme 
hardship or self-paced courses. It is not given for a student missing the final 
examination unless excused by the Dean of Academic Affairs upon communica- 
tion from the student. The student receiving a grade of "I" completes all work no 
later than nine class days after mid-semester grades are due during the following 
semester. A final grade is submitted to the Registrar by the instructor the follow- 
ing Monday. After this date the "I" grade automatically changes to "F" unless an 
extension is granted by the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

Grade Point Average (GPA) 

The grade point average is computed by dividing the total quality points on 
work attempted at Elon College by the number of hours attempted except for 
courses with grades of "P," "S," "WD," or "W." 

Grade Reports 

Students are graded at mid-semester as well as at the end of each semester. 
Mid-semester grades serve as progress reports and are not entered on students' 
permanent records. 

Dean's List 

The Dean's List recognizes and encourages excellence in academic work. A 
student who has no grade below a "B-" and a grade point average of at least 3.4 
in a minimum of 12 semester hours in any semester is placed on the Dean's List 
for the following semester. Those students who have no grade below an "A-" in 
a minimum of 12 semester hours in any semester are placed on the Dean's A list. 
Classes passed on a Pass/Fail basis or classes with grades of "S," "WD," or "W" 
are not included in Dean's List eligibility. 

Graduation With Honors 

Students completing at least 66 credit hours at Elon College may be graduated 
with honors. Candidates for graduation with an average of 3.9 or above are 
graduated summa cum laude; those with 3.7 or above, magna cum laude; and 
those with 3.4 or above, cum laude. In computing eligibility for honors, only work 
attempted at Elon College will be used. 

Elon College provides a comprehensive Honors Program for all students of all 
majors. Emphasis is placed on honors courses, special academic advising, prepara- 
tion for graduate school and special activities. Honors Program students who 
complete a minimum of twenty-five hours of honors experience and maintain 
a cumulative GPA of 3.2 will receive "Honors Fellow" recognition at graduation. 



65 



66 



E L N COLLEGE 

Access to Student Educational Records 

Elon College complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 
1974. This Act protects the privacy of educational records, establishes the right 
of students to inspect and review their educational records and provides guide- 
lines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and 
formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures 
by the institution to comply with the Act. 

Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be 
referred to the Office of the Registrar. 

Transcripts of Student Records 

Requests for copies of a student's record should be made to the Office of 
the Registrar. All transcripts reflect the student's complete academic record. 
No transcripts are issued without the written authorization of the student. No 
transcript is issued for a student who has a financial obligation to the college. 

Work at Other Institutions 

Students who plan to take courses at other institutions during summer 
sessions must have the prior written permission of the Registrar. Currently 
enrolled students must have a minimum 2.0 GPA in order to transfer course 
credit from another institution to Elon College. After completion of such 
courses, the student presents anofficial transcript of his record to the Registrar. 

Academic Standards and Withdrawal 

Academic Standing 

Academic standing is determined by the earned grade point average for any 
one semester of attendance and for cumulative work. A student whose cumula- 
tive grade point average falls below 2.0 is reviewed by the Academic Standing 
Committee and placed on academic probation or academic suspension. 

Probation 

Students are notified that their grade point average is below 2.0, that they 
are limited to a maximum load of 14 semester hours, and that three consecutive 
semesters on probation will result in suspension. 

Suspension 

Students are separated from Elon College and one academic semester must 
elapse before they are eligible for readmission. 



GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

In order to continue at the College a student must earn a minimum grade 
point average each semester of 1 .0 and at the end of spring semester have: 

• Freshman 

1-27 semester hours completed, 1.6 grade point average 

• Sophomore 

28-61 semester hours completed, 1.7 grade point average 

• Junior 

62-95 semester hours completed, 1.8 grade point average 

• Senior 

96 semester hours completed, 2.0 grade point average 57 

Any student failing to meet these guidelines will be academically ineligible for 
the next semester and suspended from the college. During the suspension period 
which includes fall or spring semester, the student may apply for readmission 
and, if readmitted, will be placed on academic probation. A student who is 
suspended a second time for academic reasons is normally not readmitted 
to the college. 

Dismissal 

The college reserves the right to suspend or dismiss any student(s) when 
it believes that such action is in the best interest of the institution and/or the 
student(s). This action will take place only after careful consideration with the 
student(s) in question and all other parties with information pertinent to the 
matter at hand. 

Withdrawal 

If for any reason a student concludes that he/she must leave the college on 
a temporary or long-term basis, he/she must confer with the Office of the Dean 
of Student Affairs and the Dean of Academic Affairs to formalize plans. Faculty 
will be requested to report student progress in class at the time of withdrawal by 
indicating either a "W" or "F" grade. A student withdrawing with medical reasons 
will receive grades of "WD." The official record of the student cannot be cleared 
until the withdrawal is complete. 




^x 



w; 




ACADEMIC 



REGULATIONS 



Undergraduate Degree Requirements 

Degrees and Major Fields 
Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 



Art 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Communications 

(Broadcast and Corporate) 
Computer Science 
Economics 
Education 

Elementary (K-6) 

Middle Grades (6-9) 

Secondary Certification 
English 
French 
History 
Human Sei'vices 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) 



Journalism 

Mathematics 

Music 

Music Performance 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Public Administration 

Religious Studies 

Science Education 

Social Science Education 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Theatre Arts 



69 



Music Theatre 



Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 



Accounting 

Biology 

Business Administration 
(Management, Finance, 
Marketing, International 
Management and Management 
Information Systems) 

Chemistry 

Environmental Studies 



Health Education 
Leisure/Sport Management 
Mathematics 
Medical Technology 
Music Education 
Physical Education 
Physics 
Sports Medicine 



For Graduate programs see pages 203-208 and/or the Graduate Catalog. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Bachelor's Degree Requirements 

Elon College offers an academic program consisting of a minimum of 132 
semester hours of credit for the Bachelor's degree. The degree consists of a major 
field of concentration in the liberal arts or in a professional or preprofessional 
area, a General Studies program and elective courses. To earn a baccalaureate 
degree the student completes the academic program below: 

1 . Satisfactory work in one major subject 

2. Completion of General Studies as follows: 

a. First-Year Core 

(1) General Studies 1 10 The Global Experience 4 

(2) General Studies/English 110 4 

(3) General Studies/IMathematics (MTH 1 10 or higher) 4 

(4) General Studies/ HE 1 10 Wellness 3 

b. Experiential Learning (one unit) 

c. Liberal Studies 

(1) Expression 8 

Eight hours chosen from at least two of the following: literature 
(in English or foreign languages), philosophy, and fine arts 
(art, dance, fine arts, music, music theatre, and theatre arts). 
At least one course must be literature. 

(2) Civilization 8 

Eight hours chosen from at least two of the following: history, 
foreign languages, and religion. Or eight hours chosen 
from foreign languages. 

(3) Society 8 

Eight hours chosen from at least two of the following: economics, 
geography, political science, psychology, and sociology 

(4) Science/Analysis 8 

Eight hours chosen from one or more of the following: mathe- 
matics, science, and computer science. At least one course 
must be a physical or biological laboratory science. 

d. Advanced Studies 12 

Eight hours of junior/senior level courses outside the major 
field chosen from at least two of the four areas listed under 
Liberal Studies (8sh) 

One General Studies Interdisciplinary Seminar (4sh) 
Total hours 59 



ACADEMIC REGULATION. 

3. Electives 

4. Satisfactory completion of General Studies competency assessments 
in the freshman and sophomore years 

5. Satisfactory completion of a comprehensive evaluation in the major 
field of study 

6. A minimum of 36 semester hours of junior/senior level work 

7. One full academic year of study at Elon (33 semester hours or more), 
including the last term before graduation 

8. Twice as many quality points as credit hours attempted must be earned 

9. Participation in commencement exercises 

Students must demonstrate competence in English and Mathematics or 
successfully complete English 100 and Mathematics 100 before beginning 
English 1 10 and the mathematics requirement in the First-Year Core. 

Students who have not passed Algebra II should make up this deficiency 
by taking Mathematics 100 during the freshman year. 

Students who have not had two years of one foreign language in high 
school must make up this deficiency by taking a first level 110 foreign language 
course. Courses taken to remove this deficiency will not satisfy the General 
Studies requirements. 

A maximum of 15 semester hours of internship/cooperative education 
credit may be applied to the 132 semester hours required for the A.B., B.S. 
and B.F.A. degrees. 

Students must apply for graduation by the dates published by the Registrar. 

A student may graduate under the provisions of the catalog published the 
year of first enrollment, provided the course of study is completed within five 
years. After the interval of five years, a student's credits will be subject to review 
by the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

Students who qualify for more than one major must select the primary major 
for which they will receive a Bachelor's degree. No student will be awarded two 
degrees at commencement. 

It is the student's responsibility to be familiar with the preceding requirements 
for graduation. 

The Major 

A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in the requirements for the major is 
required for graduation. The student may elect to complete more than one major. 
No later than the beginning of the junior year, each candidate for a Bachelor's 
degree must select a major field. Requirements for each major are listed with 
the courses of instruction. 



71 



E L N COLLEGE 



The Minor 

A candidate for the Bachelor's degree may elect a field (or fields) of minor 
concentration, consisting of at least 16 semester hours with a minimum grade 
point average of 2.0. 




ACCOUNTING 




The departments of instruction are organized into four general divisions. 
These include areas of learning arranged as follows: 

Division of Arts and Humanities: Art, Communication, Dance, English, Fine Arts, 73 
French, Journalism, Music, Music Theatre, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Spanish, 
and Theatre Arts. 

Division of Sciences and Mathematics: Biology, Chemistry, Computing Sciences, 
Environmental Studies, Mathematics, Medical Technology and Physics. 

Division of Social Sciences: Accounting, African/African-American Studies, 
Business Administration, Cooperative Education, Economics, Geography, History, 
Human Services, Political Science, Psychology, Public Administration, Sociology, 
and Women's Studies. 

Division of Education and Health, Physical Education and Leisure/ Sport 
Management: Education, Health Education, Leisure/Sport Management, Military 
Science, Physical Education, and Sports Medicine. 

Courses numbered 100-199 are on the freshman level, 200-299 on the 
sophomore level and 300 and above on the junior/senior level. 

ACCOUNTING 

The Martha and Spencer Love School of Business 

chair, Department of Accounting: Associate Professor McGregor 
Assistant Professors: Caldwell, Cox, Gibney, Hall 

Accounting involves measuring business activities and communicating this 
information to investors, creditors and other decision makers, who use it to make 
sound, informed financial decisions. This practice serves to encourage investment 
activity, which in turn creates jobs and helps the economy to grow. 

Elon's program leading to the B.S. in accounting includes the central topics of 
financial and managerial accounting plus an introduction to taxation, auditing and 
commercial law. The accounting program prepares the graduate to be a professional 
staff accountant in public accounting, industry and not-for-profit organizations. This 
degree can also serve as a basis for graduate study in accounting and other fields, 
including business administration and law. 

A student must be admitted to the Love School of Business before taking certain 
upper level courses required for the major. Most students can qualify for admission 
to the Love School of Business when they have completed their sophomore year. 

To be admitted to the Love School of Business, an accounting major must - ; 

(1) Attain junior status and satisfy College standards for continued enrollment; I 



ACCOUNTING 



74 



(2) Complete the following courses with an average of at least 2.0 within this 
group of courses: 

MTH 116 Applied Mathematics with Calculus 4 sh or 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

Principles of Economics 4 sh 

Statistics for Economics and Business 4 sh 

Principles of Financial Accounting 4 sh 

Principles of Management Accounting 4 sh 

Microcomputer Applications 4 sh 



MTH 


121 


ECO 


201 


ECO 


202 


ACC 


201 


ACC 


212 


IS 


116 



TOTAL 



24 sh 



In addition to admission to the Love School of Business a major in 
Accounting requires the following courses: 



ACC 


331 


ACC 


332 


ACC 


336 


ACC 


341 


ACC 


442 


ACC 


451 


ACC 


456 


BA 


221 


BA 


323 


BA 


343 


BA 


418 



Intermediate Accounting I 

Intermediate Accounting II 

Cost Accounting 

Fundamentals of Income Taxation 

Advanced Taxation 

Advanced Financial Accounting 

Auditing 

Business Law 

Principles of Management 

Managerial Finance 

Commercial Law 



4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
2sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 



TOTAL 42 sh 

A minor in Accounting requires the following courses: 

ACC 201 Principles of Financial Accounting 4 sh 

ACC 212 Principles of Management Accounting 4 sh 

ACC 331 Intermediate Accounting I 4 sh 

Two additional Accounting courses 8 sh 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



ACC 201. PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL 
ACCOUNTING 

In this introduction to the financial 
reporting process, study emphasizes 
the accrual basis of accounting and 
students learn to prepare and interpret 
^ income statements and balance sheets 
analyze business transactions and 
determine the effects of transactions 
on assets and equities. 



ACC 202. BASICS OF MANAGEMENT 
sh ACCOUNTING 2 sh 

Students gain an overview of the ways 
accounting information helps managers 
as they plan, carry out control proce- 
dures and make decisions for their 
organizations. The course also covers 
the concepts of cost behavior, cost- 
volume-profit analysis and the prepara- 
tion of budgets. Prerequisite: ACC 201. 
Credit will not be given for both ACC 
202,212. 



ACCOUNTING 



ACC 212. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 

ACCOUNTING 4 sh 

This course introduces the preparation 
and analysis of accounting information 
for use by managers within an organi- 
zation. Study emphasizes the concepts 
of cost and cost behavior, including 
manufacturing costs, relevant costs, 
cost-volume-profit relationships, 
special pricing decisions and budgeting. 
Prerequisites: ACC 201, IS 1 16. Credit 
will not be given for both ACC 202, 212. 

ACC 331. INTERMEDIATE 

ACCOUNTING I 4 sh 

Intermediate Accounting begins an 
in-depth study of generally accepted 
accounting principles and their theoreti- 
cal basis. Students explore the contents 
of and interrelationships among the 
balance sheet, income statement, and 
statement of cash flows, along with 
techniques for analyzing and correcting 
errors. Some of the more important 
accounting standards of the Financial 
Accounting Standards Board are 
included. Prerequisites: ACC 201, 212. 

ACC 332. INTERMEDIATE 

ACCOUNTING II 4 sh 

This continuation of the in-depth study 
of financial accounting (begun in ACC 
331) emphasizes long-term liabilities 
and stockholder's equity, accounting 
for leases, pensions and other post- 
employment benefits and deferred 
income taxes. Prerequisite: ACC 331. 

ACC 336. COST ACCOUNTING 4 sh 

in cost accounting, students examine 
methods for gathering and analyzing 
production cost data, which managers 
use to plan, budget and set prices for 
their products, with emphasis on the 
job order costing, process costing and 
standard costing methods and the 
interpretation of data produced by 
each system. Prerequisite: ACC 212. 

ACC 341. FUNDAMENTALS 

OF INCOME TAXATION 4 sh 

This introduction to the structure of the 
Federal income tax system emphasizes 



the theories, procedures and rationale 
associated with the taxation of indi- 
viduals. Prerequisite: admission to Love 
School of Business. Fall semester only. 



ACC 365. ACCOUNTING 
APPLICATIONS 

Topics vary yearly in this study of 
practical uses of accounting in 
various business functions. Prerequi- 
site: admission to Love School of 
Business or permission of instructor. 
Winter term only. 



sh 



sh 



ACC 442. ADVANCED TAXATION 

With advanced study of taxation, 
including the income taxation of 
corporations, partnerships and estates 
students will learn to locate relevant 
information in regulations, revenue 
rulings and court cases. They will report 
their findings in the form of written 
reports and memoranda. Prerequisites: 
admission to Love School of Business; 
ACC 341 . Spring semester only. 

ACC 451. ADVANCED FINANCIAL 

ACCOUNTING 4 sh 

Continuing the in-depth study of financial 
accounting that began in Intermediate 
Accounting (ACC 331, 332), this course 
includes accounting for business 
combinations, with special emphasis 
on preparing consolidated financial 
statements for parent and subsidiary 
coiporations. Accounting for governmen- 
tal units and other not-for-profit organi- 
zations is also introduced. Prerequisites: 
admission to Love School of Business; 
ACC 331 and 332, or ACC 331 and 
concurrent enrollment in ACC 332. 

ACC 456. AUDITING 4 sh 

Study of auditing covers both theory 
and practice, including ethics, generally 
accepted auditing standards, internal 
accounting controls, auditors working 
papers, the components of audit risk, 
compliance testing and substantive 
testing. Prerequisites: admission to 
Love School of Business and ACC 332. 
Spring semester only. 



75 



76 



ACCOUNTING 

ACC 471. SEMINAR: conducted by departmental faculty or 

SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4 sh other resource persons. Prerequisite: 

This upper level seminar, an advanced permission of instructor, may vary 

study requiring active participation by with topic, 

students, consists of readings, ^^C 481. INTERNSHIP IN 
problems, reports, discussions of ACCOUNTING 1-8 sh 

current topics, or preparation for 

professional examinations. May be ACC 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 sh 



AFRICANIAFRICAN'AMERICAN STUDIES 

Coordinator: Assistant Professor Boyd 

African/African American Studies takes an interdisciplinary approach to study two 
cultures and connect the past with the present. The program, developed in 1994, allows 
the student to select from a current group of courses approved by an advisory group. 
Through connected study the student not only takes a fresh approach to learning but 
also develops an individualized study plan. 

This program is highly recommended for those persons in education and programs 
leading to multi-cultural relations. The minor consists of a minimum of 20 credit hours 
including a capstone course. 

A minor in African/African-American Studies requires the following: 
Twenty semester hours selected from the following: 

ENG 238 African-American Literature pre- 1945 4 sh 
African-American Literature since 1945 ' 4 sh 

African-American Novels 4 sh 
Literature and Culture; India, Africa, 

& West Indies 4 sh 

Modern Africa 4 sh 

History of Southern Africa 4 sh 

African-American History, 1850-Present 4sh 

African Politics 4 sh 

Ethnic and Race Relations 4 sh 

Seminars in African/African-American Studies 4 sh 

Independent Study 4 sh 

20 sh 

SEMINARS IN AFRICAN/ African-American Studies. Topics vary 

AFRICAN -AMERICAN according to course theme. 



ENG 


239 


ENG 


359 


ENG 


363 


HST 


313 


HST 


314 


HST 


363 


PS 


367 


SOC 


341 


AA 


361- 


AA 


491 


TOTAL 


AA 361-369. 


SEMI 



STUDIES 4 sh 

linary seminars focus or 
modern scholarship in African and 



, , .. , r AA491. INDEPENDENT 

Interdisciplmary semmars focus on study / 4 ^h 



ART 

ART 

Chair, Department of Fine Mis-. Professor Myers 

Assistant Professor: Sanford 

Part-time Instructors: K. Hassell, J. Hendricks 

The Department of Art provides students with many opportunities to develop 
their visual awareness, engage in creative activity and to understand and critique 
their visual heritage. The major and minor in art are designed to develop a strong 
background in the language of design, drawing and art history. Students select a 
particular medium for further study and exploration. Courses in drawing, ceramics, 
photography and painting are available at advanced levels and are supported by 
well-equipped studio facilities. jj 

An active exhibition program in the campus galleries consistently exposes students 
to works by regional, national and international artists. Many of them also visit our 
campus to meet and work with art students. The many outstanding museums in the 
area and winter term travel courses expand the opportunities for students to come 
into contact with the world's great art and the contemporary scene. 

The B.A. in art builds on Elon's strong liberal arts program to produce creative 
thinkers who are prepared for professional and educational challenges. 

A major in Art requires the following courses: 

ART 1 12 Fundamentals of Design 4 sh 

ART 201 Drawing! 4 sh 

ART 310 Art History I 4 sh 

ART 311 Art History II 4 sh 

ART 495 Senior Seminar 2 sh 

Three courses in a studio sequence 12 sh 

Three electives one of which must be at the 300-400 level 12 sh 

TOTAL 42 sh 

A minor in Art requires the following courses: 

ART 1 12 Fundamentals of Design 4 sh 

ART 201 Drawing! 4 sh 

ART 310 Art History! 4 sh 

ART 3!! Art History!! 4 sh 
Eight semester hours which includes the completion 

of a two-course sequence 8 sh 

TOTAL 24 sh 

!t is recommended that Art ! 12 and Art 201 be taken before the elective courses 
in sequence. 

auTiin iMTPnnitrTinNT ART 1 1 1 . INTRODUCTION TO 

ART 110. INTRODUCTION xur Anciiai auTC A ch 

TO STUDIO ART 4sil , THE VISUAL ARTS 4 sh 

This course explores basic vocabulary ^^'^ course mtroduces the general 

^„ . „,^^„^^^ f . A- f u ■ ■ concepts, themes and maior movements 

and processes of studio art, emphasizmg r , J ,-. . c-J a , i 

^_^,- , , _ , . J ft ^ of art and architecture. Students also 

creative problem-solving and craftsman- , ,, u- . • , . ^•.• 

^, • ;„ ^- „ • , ■ , exp ore these historica traditions 

ship in using various materials. ^ 



ART 



78 



through hands-on activities in a variety 
of media. 

ART 112. FUNDAMENTALS 

OF DESIGN 4sh 

This introduction to the fundamental 
principles and processes of two- 
dimensional and three-dimensional 
design uses a variety of media. Empha- 
sis is placed on problem-solving, 
craftsmanship, creative exploration 
and effective use of the language of art. 
Material fee: $15. 

ART 200. CERAMICS I 4 sh 

This introduction to principles and 
processes of working with clay and 
glazes emphasizes basic construction 
techniques and kiln firing. Course study 
also explores the relationship between 
surface and form. Material fee: $15. 

ART 201. DRAWING I 4 sh 

Students learn the fundamentals of 
drawing and composition using various 
media. Material fee: $15. 

ART 202. PAINTING I 4sh 

Painting I introduces the techniques of 
painting and composition in oils, with 
additional emphasis on color theoiy and 
creative exploration of the medium. 
Material fee: $15. 

ART 203. WATERCOLOR I 4 sh 

Course work studies various techniques 
of painting and composition with 
watercolor, emphasizing color theory 
and creative exploration of the medium. 
Material fee: $15. 

ART 204. PRINTMAKING I 4 sh 

Students become familiar with the basic 
processes of printmaking, with emphasis 
on the technical processes, design 
elements and the terms and concepts of 
the medium. Material fee: $15. 

ART 205. PHOTOGRAPHY I 4 sh 

Photography I introduces students to the 
techniques, processes and language of 
photography. Emphasis is placed on the 
expressive qualities of the medium by 



making pictures that communicate 
individual experiences and ideas. 
Laboratoty experience included. No prior 
experience necessary; students must 
provide a 35mm camera. Lab fee: $50. 

ART 300. CERAMICS II 4 sh 

Students continue from ART 200, with 
emphasis on wheel thrown forms, glaze 
mixing, kiln firing and studio manage- 
ment. Prerequisite: ART 200. Material 
fee: $15. 

ART 301. DRAWING II 4 sh 

A continuation of ART 201, this course 
emphasizes composition, critical 
analysis and productive exploration 
through more extended studies in a 
variety of media. Prerequisite: ART 201. 
Material fee: $15. 

ART 302. PAINTING II 4 sh 

A continuation of ART 202, this class 
emphasizes individual development, 
advanced critical analysis of visual 
images and productive exploration 
of the medium. Prerequisite: ART 202. 
Material fee: $15. 

ART 305. PHOTOGRAPHY II 4 sh 

A continuation of ART 205, this course 
builds on the ideas and information in 
Photography I. More advanced tech- 
niques and a deeper understanding of 
the qualities and history of photography 
provide greater control over how 
photographs look and what they state. 
Prerequisite: ART 205. Lab fee: $50. 

ART 3 1 0. ART HISTORY I 4 sh 

Course study surveys major visual arts 
from pre-histoi7 through the Middle 
Ages, emphasizing artistic styles, their 
origin and development, major works 
of art and their creators. 

ART 3 1 1 . ART HISTORY II 4 sh 

This historical survey of the major visual 
arts from the Renaissance to the present 
emphasizes artistic styles, their origin 
and development, major works of art 
and their creators. 



I L G Y AND ALLIED HEALTH 



ART 3 12. STUDIES IN ART HISTORY 4 sh 

In-depth study in this topically oriented 
class covers a particular period, style 
or theme in art history, 

ART 400. CERAMICS III 4 sh 

A continuation of ART 300, emphasis in 
this course is on increased individual 
exploration of a single form-making 
process, glaze calculation and kiln firing. 
Prerequisite: ART 300. Material fee: $15. 

ART 402. PAINTING III 4 sh 

This continuation of ART 302 empha- 
sizes increased individual exploration of 
the medium and the development of a 
focused body of work. Prerequisite: ART 
302. Material fee: $15. 

ART 405. PHOTOGRAPHY III 4 sh 

This course continues ART 305 with a 
semester-long project proposed and 
developed by each student, concluding 
in a portfolio. Course emphasis is on 
individual participation through class 
presentations on techniques and issues 
in contemporary photography. Prerequi- 
site: ART 305. Lab fee: $50. 



ART 46 1 . SENIOR SEMINAR 2 sh 

This course requires the student to 
assemble a portfolio, produce a critical 
artistic statement and plan an exhibition 
of her/his art work. All activities are 
done in consultation with a departmen- 
tal advisor. This course should be taken 
during the final semester and should 
include the most current work produced 
by the student. 

ART 48 1 . INTERNSHIP IN ART 4 sh 

This course for art majors and minors 
may only be taken with the permission 
of the department head and supervising 
instructor. 

ART 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDIO 2-4 sh 

Art majors and minors may pursue a 
program of advanced study and 
individual exploration in a selected 
medium. Proposals for independent 
studio should be prepared and submitted 
in the semester prior to enrollment. The 
instructor may require class attendance. 
Maximum 8 s.h. credit, by permission of 
art faculty only. 



79 



BIOLOGY AND ALLIED HEALTH 

Chair, Department of Biology and Allied Health: Associate Professor Mason 

Professors: H. House, Rao 

Associate Professors: N. Harris 

Assistant Professors: Gallucci, Kingston, Ulrich 

Part-time Instructors: Claar, Davidson 

Biology is the study of life in all its diverse forms. As a species, we have always 
been deeply fascinated by other living creatures. Early man's dependence on other 
animals and plants for food, medicine, and shelter fostered an appreciation for life's 
interconnectedness. Modern society has rediscovered these relationships in the face 
of such challenges as global warming, rain forest destruction, AIDS, rising cancer 
rates and industrial pollution. 

Our approach to biology at Elon College stresses hands-on experiences in the 
classroom, laboratory and field. The course of study includes off-campus experiential 
opportunities and research seminars that encourage creative approaches to biological 
problems. The focus is on science as a process, not a collection of established facts. 

The faculty strives to provide students with a high quality program that enables 
them to (I) develop critical thinking and problem solving skills to better understand 
and meet present and future biological challenges; (2) develop competency in 
information retrieval, use and analysis; (3) develop an understanding of the latest 



BIOLOGY AND ALLIED HEALTH 

technologies utilized in biological investigation; (4) acquire broad-based knowledge of 
biological concepts from molecules to ecosystems; and (5) acquire an experiential 
learning opportunity through either research, internship or laboratory assistantship. 

The medical technology curriculum involves undergraduate preparation at Elon 
College and completion of the clinical curriculum at Moses H. Cone Memorial 
Hospital, where the affiliated hospital-based program is located. Admission to the 
affiliated program is competitive and based on overall GPA, evaluation by faculty and 
personal interviews. 

In any of Elon's biology offerings, students receive a strong foundation in biology 
that prepares them for graduate studies, medical and other allied health related 
PQ professional schools, teaching and industry. 

The Department of Biology and Allied Health offers programs leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Biology, the Bachelor 
of Science degree with a major in Medical Technology, and a minor concentration in 
Biology for students majoring in another discipline. 

The department of Biology has divided its laboratory course offerings that serve 
as electives into three functional categories to assist students in the development of a 
broad based major with the necessary fundamental biological concepts while at the 
same time providing the student the flexibility to build a program that meets their 
individual interests and needs. 

Molecular/Cellular Biology Organismal Biology Supraorganismal Biology 

BIO 322 BIO 312 BIO 341 BIO 335 

BIO 345 BIO 321 BIO 342 BIO 452 

BIO 351 BIO 325 

Both the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees in Biology 

require the following Core Courses: 



BIO 1 1 1 


Intro Cell Biology 




3sh 


BIO 112 


Intro Population Biology 




3sh 


BIO 113 


Cell Biology Lab 




Ish 


BIO 114 


Population Biology Lab 




Ish 


BIO 22 1 


General Zoology 




4sh 


BIO 222 


General Botany 




4sh 


BIO 261 


Introductory Seminar 




2sh 


BIO 322 


Molecular and Cellular Biology 




4sh 


One course : 


selected from the Organismal Biology ( 


:ategory 


4sh 


BIO 312 


Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 






BIO 321 


Microbiology 






BIO 325 


Human Histology 






BIO 34 1 


Animal Physiology 






BIO 342 


Plant Physiology 






One course : 


selected from the Supraorganismal 






Biology category: 




4sh 


BIO 335 


Field Biology 






BIO 452 


General Ecology 







BIOLOGY AND ALLIED HEALTH 

Eight semester hours of electives selected 
from the following: 8 sh 

Organismal Biology category 
Supraorganismal Biology category 
Molecular/Cellular Biology category 
BIO 345 Genetics 
BIO 351 Biochemistry 
This may include a maximum of two 2-semester hour 
special topics seminars. 

BIO 462 Senior Seminar 2 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 

A Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology requires the following courses: 
Core Courses in Biology 40 sh 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 1 12 General Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 1 13 General Chemistry I Lab I sh 

CHM 1 14 General Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

In addition, an experiential component selected from 

(a) internship 

(b) research 

(c) laboratory assistantship is required. 

TOTAL 48 sh 

A Bachelor of Science degree in Biology requires the following courses: 

Core Courses in Biology 40 sh 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 112 General Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 1 13 General Chemistry 1 Lab 1 sh 

CHM 1 14 General Chemistry II Lab I sh 

CHM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 2 1 2 Organic Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 213 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 214 Organic Chemistry II Lab I sh 

PHY 1 1 1 General Physics I 4 sh 

PHY 1 12 General Physics II 4 sh 

MTHII4 Elementary Statistics ° 4 sh 

In addition, an experiential component selected from 

(a) internship 

(b) research 

(c) laboratory assistantship is required. 

TOTAL 68 sh 



81 



I L G Y AND ALLIED HEALTH 



82 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Medical Technology requires 49 semester hours of 
course work at Elon College and completion of the clinical curriculum at Moses 
Cone Memorial Hospital. 

BIO 1 11 Intro Cell Biology 3 sh 

BIO 1 12 Intro Population Biology 3 sh 

BIO 113 Cell Biology Lab 1 sh 

BIO 1 14 Population Biology Lab 1 sh 

BIO 321 Microbiology 4 sh 

BIO 345 Genetics 4 sh 

BIO 351 Biochemistry 3 sh 

BIO 352 Biochemistry Lab I sh 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chemistiy I 3 sh 

CHM112 General Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 1 13 General Chemistry 1 Lab 1 sh 

CHM 114 General Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

CHM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 212 Organic Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 213 Organic Chemistry I Lab , 1 sh 

CHM 214 Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

PHY 1 1 1 General Physics I 4 sh 

PHY 1 12 General Physics II 4 sh 

MTHI14 Elementary Statistics 4 sh or 

IS 1 16 Microcomputer Applications 4 sh 

A course in immunology I-3sh 
Completion of the clinical curriculum at Moses H. Cone 
Memorial Hospital 

TOTAL 49-51 sh 

A Minor in Biology requires the following courses: 

BIO 1 1 1 Intro Cell Biology 3 sh 

BIO 113 Cell Biology Lab 1 sh 

Sixteen semester hours chosen from the following 1 6 sh 
BIO 1 12 Intro Population Biology 
BIO 114 Population Biology Lab 
Biology courses at the 200-400 level 

TOTAL 



BIO 101. TOPICS IN GENERAL 

BIOLOGY 3 sh 

This topical approach to the founda- 
tional concepts of biology examines 
theories and issues in biology as they 
relate to varying special topics selected 
by the instructor. For general studies 
laboratory science requirement the BIO 
102 laboratory should be taken concur- 



20 sh 

rently. No credit to students with prior 
credit for BIO 1 1 1 . No credit toward 
biology major or minor. 

BIO 102. GENERAL BIOLOGY 

LABORATORY 1 sh 

This two-hour laboratory provides 
experiences to complement selected 
foundational concepts from BIO 101. 



I L G Y AND ALLIED HEALTH 



To satisfy the general studies laboratory 
science requirement, BIO 101 and 102 
should be taken concurrently. No credit 
to students with prior credit for BIO 1 13. 
No credit toward biology major or minor. 

BIO 105. CURRENT ISSUES 

IN BIOLOGY 4 sh 

Designed for non-science majors, this 
course focuses on reading, interpreting 
and evaluating facts behind biological 
issues and exploring the implications 
for science and human society. Students 
conduct library research, present oral 
reports, discuss and write papers on 
these issues. No credit toward biology 
major or minor. Satisfies General Studies 
non-laboratory science requirement. 

BIO 110. INTRODUCTION TO 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 4 sh 

This course explores the fundamental 
principles of the biological and physical 
sciences behind natural ecosystems. 
Central focus is an investigation of the 
root causes of the global environmental 
crisis: overpopulation, natural resources 
depletion and pollution. Students 
consider different world views and the 
development of solutions. Satisfies the 
non-laboratory science requirement for 
General Studies. (BIO 1 10 is the same 
course as ES 1 10.) 

BIO 111. INTRODUCTORY 

CELL BIOLOGY 3 sh 

In this introduction to organization and 
function at the cellular level, topics of 
study include basic cell chemistry and 
structure, transport, energetics and 
reproduction. Required for biology 
majors/minors. Corequisite: BIO 1 13. 

BIO 112. INTRODUCTORY 

POPULATION BIOLOGY 3 sh 

Topics of study in this introduction 
to organization and function at the 
population level include reproduction 
and transmission genetics, patterns 
and mechanics of evolutionary change 
and basic concepts of ecology. Required 
for biology majors/minors. Corequisite: 
BIO 114. 



BIO 113. CELL BIOLOGY 

LABORATORY / sh 

Students have three hours of laboratory 
experience per week with topics 
complementing concurrent study in 
BIO 111. Required for biology majors/ 
minors. Corequisite; BIO 111. 

BIO 114. POPULATION BIOLOGY 

LABORATORY 1 sh 

Students have three hours of laboratory 
experience per week with topics 
complementing concurrent study in 
BIO 1 12. Required for biology majors/ 
minors. Corequisite: BIO 1 12. 

BIO 121. BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY 4 sh 

This course exposes the non-science 
major to the diversity of form 
and function through lectures and 
demonstrations, emphasizing the 
relationship of specific organisms 
and diversity in general to human 
society. No credit toward major/minor. 
Satisfies General Studies non-laboratory 
science requirement. 

BIO 161. HUMAN ANATOMY 4 sh 

This course explores human anatomy, 
concentrating on skeletal, muscular, 
nervous, endocrine, heart, blood, 
respiratory, digestive and urinary 
aspects. Three class hours, one 
laboratory per week. No credit 
toward BIO major/minor. 

BIO 162. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY 4 sh 

This study of human physiology 
emphasizes skeletal, muscular, 
nervous, endocrine, heart, blood, 
respiratory, digestive and urinary 
aspects. Three class hours, one 
laboratory per week. No credit 
toward BIO major/minor. 

BIO 181. BIOLOGY LABORATORY 

TECHNIQUES 2 sh 

Skills taught in this training course for 
prospective laboratory assistants include 
laboratory procedures, materials 
preparation and grading procedures. 



83 



I L G Y AND ALLIED HEALTH 



BIO 215. ORGANISMAL BIOLOGY 

AND FIELD TECHNIQUES 4 sh 

This course examines the basic concepts 
of plant and animal form and function 
and the fundamentals of plant and 
animal systematics, with a focus on 
herbaceous and woody plants, soil and 
aquatic invertebrates. Students investi- 
gate the natural history of local plant 
and animal species and their role in 
community dynamics. Laboratory 
84 experiences emphasize keying and 
identification, field methodologies of 
specimen collection and preservation, 
sampling techniques, and population 
estimation procedures for terrestrial 
and aquatic ecosystems. Satisfies the 
General Studies lab science requirement. 
No credit toward the major or minor. 
Prerequisites: ES/BIO 110, BIO 112, 1 14. 
(BIO 215 is the same course as ES 215.) 

BIO 221. GENERAL ZOOLOGY 4 sh 

Students survey the animal kingdom 
(emphasizing selected vertebrates and 
invertebrates), investigating basic 
concepts of morphology anatomy, 
physiology and taxonomy as they affect 
the ecology of the animal. Three class 
hours, one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO 1 1 1, 1 12, 1 13, 1 14. 

BIO 222. GENERAL BOTANY 4 sb 

This survey of the plant kingdom 
(emphasizing vascular plants) includes 
general morphology, anatomy physiology 
of metabolism and growth, economic 
importance and identification. Three 
class hours, one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO 11 1, 112, 1 13, 114. 

BIO 261. INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR 2 sh 

Students learn to use primary informa- 
tion sources and gain practice in manual 
and computer information retrieval, read 
and interpret research and review 
papers, write abstracts and present 
scientific information orally. Recom- 
mended for sophomore year. Offered 
each spring. 

BIO 271. SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINAR 2 sh 

Study focuses on one biological topic per 



seminar in this non-laboratory discussion 
course for biology majors. Topics are 
determined by student and faculty 
interest. Must have instructor's consent. 

BIO 301. ENVIRONMENTAL 

CONSERVATION 4 sh 

In this non-laboratory interdisciplinary 
study of relationships between people 
and their environment, students study 
social, economic, ethical and political 
aspects of the human impact on environ- 
ment. Prerequisite: A previous laboratory 
science course. Satisfies General Studies 
non-laboratory science requirement. No 
credit toward biology major. 

BIO 312. COMPARATIVE 

VERTEBRATE ANATOMY 4 sh 

Lower chordates and vertebrates are 
dissected and studied in this compre- 
hensive, comparative study of chordate 
anatomy, which emphasizes system 
evolution and morphology. Three class 
hours, one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO III, 112, 113, 
and 114. 

BIO 321. MICROBIOLOGY 4sh 

In a general survey of microorganisms, 
study emphasizes bacteria, their 
cytophysiological characteristics 
and classification, viruses, microbial 
diseases and immunity and the role of 
microorganisms in human affairs. Three 
class hours, one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO 1 1 1, 1 13, CHM III, 
112, 113, 114. 

BIO 322. MOLECULAR AND 

CELLULAR BIOLOGY 4 sh 

This course is a study of the structure 
and function of prokaryotic and eukary- 
otic cells at the molecular level. It 
examines in depth specific biochemical 
pathways and processes essential to life. 
Topics include considerable coverage of 
the principles, techniques and applica- 
tions of molecular genetics. Three class 
hours and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO 1 1 1,1 12, 1 13, and 1 14; 
CHM III, 112, 113, 114. 



I L G Y AND ALLIED HEALTH 



BIO 325. HUMAN HISTOLOGY 4 sh 

Students survey human body tissues 
(especially of the cardiovascular, 
alimentaiy, respiratory, urinaiy and 
reproductive systems), stressing tissue 
identification and the relationship of 
microanatomy to physiology of the 
human body. Three class hours, one 
laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 

111, 113. Offered alternate years. 

BIO 335. FIELD BIOLOGY 4 sh 

In this field-oriented course, restricted 
to selected natural taxa, environments or 
biological phenomena, in-depth field 
study may include identification, classifi- 
cation, life histories and relationships 
among organisms. Winter and/or summer 
term. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

BIO 341. ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY 4 sh 

Study emphasizes the functions, 
regulatory processes and responses 
occurring in animal organ systems. 
Three class hours, one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisites: BIO 22 1 ; CHM III, 

1 12, 1 13, 1 14. Offered alternate years. 

BIO 342. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 4 sh 

Topics in this study of the life processes 
of plants include photosynthesis, 
mineral nutrients, movement of 
materials, plant growth substances 
and senescence. Three class hours, 
one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 
BIO 222; CHM 111, 112, 113, 114. 

BIO 345. GENETICS 4 sh 

Students are introduced to Mendelian 
and molecular principles of genetics 
and the applications of these principles 
to the modern world. Three class hours, 
one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 
BIO 111, 112, 113,and 114;CHM 111, 
112, 113, and 114. 

BIO 351. BIOCHEMISTRY 4 sh 

In this sui-vey of biochemistry as it relates 
to the physiology of organisms, study 
includes biochemical methodology, 
buffers, proteins (structure, function, and 
synthesis), enzymes, bioenergetics, 
anabolism and catabolism of carbohy- 



drates and lipids, and metabolic regula- 
tion. Three class hours, one laboratory 
per week. Prerequisites: CHM 111, 112, 
113, 114,211,212,213, and 214. (BIO 
35 1 is the same as CHM 35 1 .) 

BIO 352. BIOCHEMISTRY 

LABORATORY i sh 

Experiments in this study of laboratory 
techniques and principles of biochemis- 
try as it relates to the physiology of 
organisms include biochemical qc 

methodology, buffers, proteins (struc- 
ture, function and synthesis), enzymes, 
bioenergetics, anabolism and catabolism 
of carbohydrates and lipids, and 
metabolic regulation. Corequisite: BIO 
351. (BIO 352 is the same as CHM 352.) 

BIO 371. SPECIAL TOPICS 

SEMINAR 2-4sh 

Each seminar - a non-laboratory 
discussion course for biology majors - 
focuses on one biological topic deter- 
mined by student and faculty interest. 
Must have instructor consent. 

BIO 442. AQUATIC BIOLOGY: THE 

STUDY OF INLAND WATERS 4 sh 

Aquatic Biology considers the chemical, 
physical and biological properties of 
freshwater ecosystems including 
streams, rivers, ponds and lakes. Topics 
include the geomorphology of inland 
waters, thermal stratification, nutrient 
cycles, community metabolism, plankton 
community dynamics, seasonal succes- 
sion and eutrophication resulting from 
human activities. Weekly laboratory 
meetings provide hands-on experience 
with the field techniques of freshwater 
scientists. Prerequisites: CHM 111, 112, 
113, 1 14; BIO 221, 222 or 112, 114,215. 

BIO 452. GENERAL ECOLOGY 4sh 

Students explore ecological principles 
at population, community, and ecosystem 
levels in this study of the interrelation- 
ships of organisms with their biotic and 
abiotic environments. Three lecture 
hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
sites: BIO 221, 222 and junior/senior 
standing. 



U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION 



86 



BIO 462. SENIOR SEMINAR 2 sh 

This study requires a research or review 
paper and formal oral presentation of a 
focused biological topic to a peer and 
faculty audience. Recommended for 
senior year. Offered each fall. 

BIO 471. SPECIAL TOPICS 

SEMINAR 2-4sh 

Each seminar - a non-laboratory 
discussion course for biology majors - 
focuses on one biological topic deter- 
mined by student and faculty interest. 
Must have instmctor's consent. 



BIO 481. INTERNSHIP 

IN BIOLOGY l-4sh 

Advanced level work experience in a 
biological field is offered on an indi- 
vidual basis when suitable opportunities 
can be arranged. Prerequisite; permis- 
sion of department. 

BIO 491. RESEARCH 1 ^ 4 sh 

Students from all levels conduct 
laboratory and/or field research under 
the direction of the Biology faculty. 
Maximum eight semester hours total 
credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
Biology faculty. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The Martha and Spencer Love School of Business 

Professor: Weavil 

Associate Professors: Baxter, Behrman, Guffey, McClellan, Paul, Synn 

Assistant Professors: O'Mara, Peterson, Strempek 

The Business Administration program at Elon College provides the student an 
education sought by both profit and not-for-profit organizations and companies in 
every sector of global society. In addition to core courses in accounting, finance, 
management, marketing and operations, the student concentrates in one of either 
finance, management, marketing, international management or management informa- 
tion systems. Students may qualify for entry as a business major during the junior year. 

With business study and the general studies program blended together, the student 
obtains a well rounded education most sought after by recruiters from industry, 
government and other organizations for a professional career. 

Students with a degree in Business Administration are among the best prepared 
for most of the top 20 careers of the future as defined recently by Business Week. The 
business faculty's style of instruction is practical, based on theories presented in text 
books. That style is possible because the faculty has extensive industry experience in 
addition to post-graduate qualification in the field in which they teach. Students are 
exposed to use of the computer in analysis and presentation, case analyses and group 
projects which are meant to reflect real situations as much as possible. 

Graduates in business administration are ready to begin professional careers in 
every facet of American organizations requiring business skills. The approximation 
of business problems in the classroom gives the student an understanding of possible 
situation types faced in a career. The sound preparation in liberal studies and business 
administration makes the Elon business major a good investment for professional 
success. 

To major in Business Administration a student must be admitted to the Love 
School of Business, generally after the sophomore year. Admission is required before 
most 300-400 level Business Administration courses or Economics 301 can be taken. 
To be admitted, a business administration major must: (1) attain junior status and 



MTH 


116 


MTH 


121 


ECO 


201 


ECO 


202 


ACC 


201 


ACC 


202 


ACC 


212 


IS 


116 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

satisfy college standards for continued enrollment; (2) complete the following courses 
with an average of 2.0 within this group of courses: 

Applied Mathematics with Calculus 4 sh or 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1 4 sh 

Principles of Economics 4 sh 

Statistics for Economics and Business 4 sh 

Principles of Financial Accounting 4 sh 

Basics of Management Accounting 2 sh or 

Principles of Management Accounting 4 sh 

Microcomputer Applications 4 sh 

TOTAL 22-24 sh 

In addition to the requirements for admission to the Love School of Business, 
a major in Business Administration requires the following courses: 

Business Law 2 sh 

Business Communications 4 sh 

Principles of Marketing 4 sh 

Principles of Management 4 sh 

Managerial Finance 4 sh 

Principles of Decision Science 4 sh 

Business Policy 4 sh 

ECO 301 Business Economics 4 sh 

Twelve - sixteen semester hours of a concentration 1 2- 1 6 sh 

TOTAL 42-46 sh 

Concentrations: 

Finance 12 sh 

BA 413 Advanced Managerial Finance 

BA421 Investment Principles 

One 300 or 400 level ACC, BA, or ECO course 
Marketing 12 sh 

Three courses from: 

BA 4 1 4 Marketing Research 

BA415 Advertising 

BA 4 1 7 Marketing Channels 

BA 4 1 9 Sales Management 

BA 420 Marketing Strategy 

One 300 or 400 level ACC, BA, or ECO course 
Management 12 sh 

BA 425 Personnel Administration 

BA 426 Production and Operations Management 

One 300 or 400 level ACC, BA, or ECO course 



BA 


221 


BA 


302 


BA 


311 


BA 


323 


BA 


343 


BA 


360 


BA 


465 



87 



U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION 



88 



International Management 16 sh 

ECO 314 International Trade and Finance or 

ECO 372 International Economic Development 

BA 430 International Business Management 
Eight semester hours of one foreign language: (Students who choose to continue 
with a foreign language previously studied must take the 210-310 courses in that 
language. Students who choose a language not previously studied must take the 
110-210 courses in that language.) 

Management Information Systems 12 sh 

IS 2 1 6 Advanced Microcomputer Applications 

IS 330 Systems Analysis and Design 

IS 340 Systems Implementation 



A minor in Business Administration requires the following courses: 



BA 


311 


BA 


303 


BA 


323 


ACC 


201 


ACC 


202 


ACC 


212 


ECO 


201 



Principles of Marketing 
Introduction to Managing 
Principles of Management 
Principles of Financial Accounting 
Basics of Management Accounting 
Principles of Management Accounting 
Principles of Economics 



4sh 
4 sh or 

4sh 
4sh 
2 shor 
4sh 
4sh 



TOTAL 



18-20 sh 



BA221. BUSINESS LAW 2sh 

This course introduces the law as it 
applies to businesses, including law 
and the courts, administrative agencies, 
contracts, personal property commercial 
paper, agency, employment, partner- 
ships and corporations. 

BA 302. BUSINESS 

COMMUNICATIONS 4 sh 

In addition to studying the theory and 
principles of good oral and written 
communications, students practice 
making oral presentations and 
writing business reports, letters 
and memoranda. 

BA 303. INTRODUCTION 

TO MANAGING 4 sh 

Primarily for non-majors, this introduc- 
tory course examines universal business 
processes — such as goal setting, 
planning, decision making, motivation, 
human resource management, control — 
which are applied by both not-for-profit 



and government organizations. No 
credit for both BA 303 and 323. 

BA31I. PRINCIPLES 

OF MARKETING 4 sh 

This study of the marketing and 
distribution of goods and services 
includes buyer behavior, the marketing 
functions, commodity and industrial 
markets, merchandising considerations, 
price policies and governmental 
regulation of competition. Prerequisite: 
ECO 201. 

BA 323. PRINCIPLES 

OF MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

Principles of Management introduces 
the classical, scientific and behavioral 
approaches to management, with 
particular emphasis on organization 
and qualitative decision theory. No 
credit for both BA 303 and 323. 



BA 343. MANAGERIAL FINANCE 4 

The study of corporate managerial 
functions from the finance perspective 



sh 



U S I N E 5 S ADMINISTRATION 



covers the principle elements of financial 
management, including financial analysis 
and control, working capital administra- 
tion, capital budgeting, valuation theory, 
capital structure and leverage, and debt 
and equity instruments. Prerequisite: 
admission to Love School of Business 
or permission of instructor. 

BA351. FUNDAMENTALS 

OF REAL ESTATE 4 sh 

Students survey practices, issues and 
analyses from several perspectives — 
economics, finance, marketing and law 
— as they relate to the use of land and 
buildings. Prerequisites: ACC 201 and 
ECO 201 or permission of instructor. 

BA 360. PRINCIPLES OF 

DECISION SCIENCE 4 sh 

This course focuses on the application 
of quantitative methods to business 
decision making, especially production 
and operations decisions. Prerequisite: 
admission to Love School of Business 
or permission of instructor. 

BA 365. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

Topics vary yearly in the study of 
applications of business administration 
principles and theories in various 
business situations. Primarily offered 
in winter term. 

BA 366. FIELD EXPERIENCE 

IN BUSINESS 4 sh 

This travel course revolves around visits 
to diverse businesses, domestically or 
abroad, and analyses of the businesses 
visited. Prerequisite: permission of 
instructor. Winter term only. 

BA 4 1 3. ADVANCED MANAGERIAL 

FINANCE 4 sh 

The in-depth study of financial manage- 
ment from the perspective of valuative 
theory involves discussions of topics 
such as security evaluation and capital 
budgeting within the framework of the 
Capital Asset Pricing Model. Study relates 
cost of capital, capital structure and 
leverage to valuation concepts. Examina- 



tion of long-term financing includes 
studies of leasing as well as warrants, 
convertibles and options. Valuation 
impacts of mergers and reorganizations 
are also covered. Prerequisite: BA 343. 
Spring semester only. 

BA 4 1 4 . MARKETING RESEARCH 4 sh 

Students apply various research 
methods used in business to gather and 
analyze marketing data. Possible effects 
and implications of the analyses are qq 

discussed in terms of the marketing 
and decision-making processes of 
businesses. Prerequisite: BA 311. Fall 
semester only. 

BA4I5. ADVERTISING 4 sh 

In an examination of the creative 
process of advertising — an integral 
part of marketing — students develop 
a comprehensive advertising and 
promotion program, from strategy to 
execution, including media plans, 
advertising and promotion materials, 
and methods of campaign evaluation. 
Prerequisite: BA 311. 

BA4I6. FUNDAMENTALS 

OF INSURANCE 4 sh 

This course provides a study of the basic 
principles of insurance contracts and the 
scope of coverage under the several 
divisions of insurance, including life, 
fire, casualty, marine, bond and 
automobile insurance. 

BA 4 1 7. MARKETING CHANNELS 4 sh 

Course study explores the relationships, 
problems and interfaces between 
manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers, 
emphasizing channel management, 
performance and strategy. Prerequisite: 
BA 311 . Spring semester only. 

BA4I8. COMMERCIAL LAW 4sh 

Commercial Law, a technical study of 
the American legal system, includes 
examination of Uniform Commercial 
Code provisions governing contracts, 
sales and commercial paper, creditors 
rights and the law of wills and trust. 
Prerequisite: BA22I. 



U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION 



BA 419. SALES MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

The sales management course is an 
analysis of professional selling practices 
with emphasis on the selling process 
and sales management, including the 
development of territories, determining 
potentials and forecasts, and setting 
sales quotas. Prerequisite: BA 31 1. 

BA 420. MARKETING STRATEGY 4 sh 

This advanced course gives the student 
QQ an opportunity to combine knowledge of 
marketing principles with that of other 
disciplines (accounting, economics, 
finance, and statistics) in solving 
marketing-related problems. Prerequi- 
site: Grade of C- or better in BA 3 1 1 . 

BA 42 1 . INVESTMENT PRINCIPLES 4 sh 

Study centers on managing investment 
funds according to a predetermined goal, 
emphasizing safety, income and market- 
ability, diversification and vigilance, and 
analysis of company management and 
industry trends to determine the value 
of securities. Prerequisite: BA 343. Fall 
semester only. 

BA 422. BUSINESS AND SOCIETY 4 sh 

Business and society explores the 
relationship of an organization to its 
social and legal environment; the 
interaction of firms, customers and 
agencies of the federal, state and local 
governments; the environmental effects 
on individuals and the economy; and 
the firm as a citizen. Prerequisite: BA 
303 or 323. 

BA 425. PERSONNEL 

ADMINISTRATION 4 sh 

In this study of basic personnel prac- 
tices, objectives, functions and organi- 
zation of personnel programs, topics 
include job evaluation, selection, 
placement, testing, promotion, compen- 
sation, training, safety, health and 
employee relationships. Prerequisite: 
BA 303 or 323. 



BA 426. PRODUCTION AND 

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

This course covers the principles of 
management as applied to production 
systems and emphasizes production 
capacity planning, job design, standards 
and work measurements, scheduling, 
quality control and inventory manage- 
ment. Prerequisite: BA 360. 

BA 430. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

This course covers business manage- 
ment from the perspective of the current 
global business environment. Students 
examine the overall nature of interna- 
tional business, the foreign environ- 
ments that international business face 
and the unique situations associated 
with doing business across international 
borders. Prerequisite: admission to Love 
School of Business or permission of 
instructor. 

BA 445. SECURITY ANALYSIS AND 

PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

This course teaches the application 
of tools and techniques for appraising 
the economy, specific industries and 
companies, emphasizing securities 
markets from the perspectives of 
institutional portfolio managers or 
personal investors. Prerequisite: BA 343. 

BA 465. BUSINESS POLICY 4 sh 

This capstone course integrates the 
students experiences and previous 
study through case studies and simu- 
lated business decision exercises. 
Prerequisites: BA 31 1, 323, 343, 360 
and senior status. 

BA 4 7 1 . SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS 4 sh 

This advanced study consists of readings 
and discussion of special topics and 
involves participation by students, 
faculty and other resource persons. 

BA 48 1 . INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION }-6sh 



BA 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 1 -4 sh 



CHEMISTRY 

CHEMISTRY 

Chaii; Department ofChemistiy: Associate Professor Gooch 
Professors: Danieley, E. Grimley 
Associate Professor: Agnew 
Assistant Professors: ]. Grimley, Wright 
Part-time Instructor: D. Davis 

The Department of Chemistry offers courses of study leading to either a Bachelor 
of Arts degree (requiring 45 semester hours credit), the Bachelor of Science degree 
(62 semester hours credit) or a minor in Chemistry (24 semester hours credit). 

Students who major in Chemistry are qualified for many pursuits. They may 
choose to: work in chemical industry; continue advanced studies in chemistry; take 91 

professional training in medicine, dentistry or other health-related fields; prepare to 
teach at the secondary level; or pursue opportunities in related fields (environmental 
science, forensics, business and industry). 

One of the components of Elon's chemistry program is the opportunity for 
students to engage with faculty in undergraduate research during the junior and 
senior years. The results of the research projects are presented at local, regional 
and national scientific meetings. 

Another key feature of the program is the introduction and use of instrumentation 
in the first-year general chemistry sequence and its continued emphasis throughout 
the chemistry curriculum. Student participation in assisting in laboratory instruction 
is strongly advised. 

A Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry requires the following courses: 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chemistry 1 3 sh 

CHM 112 General Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 1 13 General Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 1 14 General Chemistty II Lab I sh 

CHM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 2 1 2 Organic Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 213 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 214 Organic Chemistry II Lab I sh 

CHM 232 Principles of Chemical Separations 4 sh 

CHM 31 1 Quantitative Analysis 4 sh 

CHM 332 Physical Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 333 Physical Chemistry I Lab I sh 

CHM 421 Instrumental Analysis 4 sh or 

CHM 431 Advanced Inorganic Chemistiy 4 sh 

CHM 461 Seminar 1 sh 

MTH 121 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

PHY 1 1 1 General Physics I 4 sh 

PHY 112 General Physics II 4 sh 
(Physics 1 13 and 114 may be substituted for Physics 111 and 112.) 

TOTAL 45 sh 



92 



C H 


E M 1 S T R Y 




A Bache 




CHM 1 1 1 




CHM 112 




CHM 113 




CHM 114 




CHM 211 




CHM 212 




CHM 213 




CHM 214 




CHM 232 




CHM 311 




CHM 332 




CHM 333 




CHM 412 




CHM 421 




CHM 431 




CHM 461 



A Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry requires the following courses: 

General Chemistry I 3 sh 

General Chemistry II 3 sh 

General Chemistry 1 Lab 1 sh 

General Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

Organic Chemistry I 3 sh 

Organic Chemistry II 3 sh 

Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

Principles of Chemical Separations 4 sh 

Quantitative Analysis 4 sh 

Physical Chemistry 1 3 sh 

Physical Chemistry I Lab I sh 

Physical Chemistry II ■ 3 sh 

Instrumental Analysis 4 sh 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 sh 

Seminar 1 sh 

Choose one of the following two options: 6 sh 
(i) Chemistry 341 Introduction to Research (1 sh) 

Chemistry 491 Research 

Chemistry 492 Thesis (1 sh) 
(ii) Chemistry 351 Biochemistry (3 sh) - and/or 

courses from Chemistry 471-79 Special Topics (3 sh) 



MTH 121 


Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 


4sh 


MTH221 


Calculus & Analytic Geometry II 


4sh 


PHY 1 1 1 


General Physics I 


4sh 


PHY 112 


General Physics 11 


4sh 


(Physics 1 13 and 114 may be substituted for Physics 1 1 1 and 1 12.) 


TOTAL 




62 sh 


A minor in Chemistry requires the following courses: 




CHM 1 1 1 


General Chemistry 1 


3sh 


CHM 112 


General Chemistry 11 


3sh 


CHM 113 


General Chemistry I Lab 


I sh 


CHM 114 


General Chemistry II Lab 


I sh 


CHM 211 


Organic Chemistry I 


3sh 


CHM 212 


Organic Chemistry II 


3sh 


CHM 213 


Organic Chemistry 1 Lab 


1 sh 


CHM 214 


Organic Chemistry II Lab 


ish 


Eight additional semester hours selected from 


8sh 


CHM 23: 


I Principles of Chemical Separations 




CHM 31 


Quantitative Analysis 




CHM 35 


Biochemistry (3 sh) and 




CHM 35: 


I Biochemistry Lab (1 sh) 





TOTAL 24 sh 



CHEMISTRY 



CHM 101. BASIC CONCEPTS 

IN CHEMISTRY 3 sh 

The course is designed to meet the 
math/science general studies require- 
ment for non-science majors. The 
material covered includes atomic 
structure, radiochemistry, chemical 
changes, descriptive chemistry of 
selected elements, introduction to 
organic chemistry, and how chemistry 
applies to consumer products and the 
environment. No credit given to 
students with prior credit for CHM 111. 
No credit for major/minor. Corequisite: 
CHM 102. 

CHM 102. BASIC CONCEPTS IN 

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY / sh 

Laboratory exercises are based upon 
selected foundational concepts covered 
in CHM 101. No credit for students with 
prior credit for CHM 113. No credit for 
major/minor. Corequisite: CHM 101. 

CHM III. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 3 sh 

This course introduces fundamental 
principles of chemistry with special 
emphasis on developing skills in 
quantitative reasoning. Topics include 
stoichiometry, nomenclature, gases, 
atomic structure and periodicity, and 
thermochemistry. Prerequisite: High 
school chemistry. Corequisite: CHM 1 13. 

CHM 1 12. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 3 sh 

The study of fundamental chemical 
principles continues with chemical 
kinetics, liquid/solid states, chemical 
equilibrium (gas phase and acid/base), 
nuclear chemistry and electrochemistry. 
Prerequisite: CHM 111. Corequisite: 
CHM 114. 

CHM 1 13. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 

LABORATORY / sh 

The experiments offered familiarize 
students with basic laboratory tech- 
niques and complement topics discussed 
in CHM 111. Corequisite: CHM HI. 



CHM 1 14. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 

LABORATORY / sh 

This course involves laboratory applica- 
tions of concepts and principles 
discussed in CHM 1 12. Prerequisites: 
CHM 111,113. Corequisite: CHM 1 12. 

CHM 211. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 3 sh 

Organic Chemistry introduces students 
to the chemistry of carbon compounds, 
including nomenclature, the influence of 
structure on physical/chemical proper- q« 
ties, reaction mechanisms, stereochemis- 
try, conformational analysis, synthesis 
and characteristic reactions of different 
organic compounds. Prerequisites: CHM 

111, 112, 113, 114. Corequisite: CHM 213. 

CHM 212. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 3 sh 

Continuing the study of organic chemistry, 
this course emphasizes compounds 
containing oxygen or nitrogen and 
culminates with a survey of lipids, 
carbohydrates and proteins. Prerequisites: 
CHM 211,213. Corequisite: CHM 214. 

CHM 213. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 

LABORATORY / sh 

Laboratory work includes determination 
of physical properties, separation of 
mixtures, some structure identificati 
on and synthesis of selected organic 
compounds. Prerequisites: CHM 111, 

112, 113, 114. Corequisite: CHM 211. 

CHM 214. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 

LABORATORY 1 sh 

Procedures include microscale 
synthetic methods, synthesis using 
air-sensitive compounds and qualitative 
organic analysis. Prerequisites: CHM 
211,213. Corequisite: CHM 212. 

CHM 232. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL 

SEPARATIONS 4 sh 

This course deals with the theory and 
practice of separation techniques 
including crystallization, distillation, 
gas and liquid chromatography, electro- 
phoretic techniques, solvent extraction, 
complexation and solubility equilibria. 
Prerequisites: CHM 211. 



CHEMISTRY 



94 



CHM 301. SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY 4 sh 

Scientific Inquiiy is about scientific 
literacy, ways of knowing science and the 
mission of scientists. It covers ways of 
tliinking that are essential for all citizens 
in a world shaped by science and 
technology. No credit toward general 
studies laboratoty science requirement. 
No credit for major. Prerequisite: 
A previous laboratoiy science. 

CHM 305. ENVIRONMENTAL 

CHEMISTRY 4 sh 

Environmental Chemistiy provides a 
survey of chemical topics applying to 
selected pollutants in the air, water and 
soil. Such topics include production and 
diffusion, photochemical processes, 
techniques for analysis, acid-base and 
redox chemistry, environmental and 
biological effects. Laboratory work 
includes acid/base and buffer chemistry 
anaylsis of heavy metal pollutants, 
sampling techniques and resistance of 
selected materials to certain pollutants. 
Satisfies the laboratoiy science require- 
ment for General Studies. No credit 
toward major/minor. Prerequisites: CHM 
111, 112, 113, 114,211,213. 

CHM 311. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 4 sh 

This course introduces chemical 
methods of quantitative analysis, 
including classical volumetric and 
selected instrumental methods, a 
discussion of error and uncertainty in 
measurements and elementaiy statistics. 
Discussion also covers the underlying 
physical and chemical theories and laws, 
with emphasis on chemical equilibrium. 
Prerequisites: CHM 111, 112. 

CHM 332. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 3 sh 

The application of mathematical 
methods to the physical principles to 
chemistry is the main theme of this 
sequence. Considerable time is spent on 
the energy content of systems, work and 
the physical and chemical properties of 
matter. Specific topics include thermody- 



namics, colligative properties of 
solutions, equilibrium and electrochem- 
istry and phase equilibria. Prerequisites: 
CHM 111, 112;MTH 121; PHY 11 1/112 or 
113/114. Corequisite: CHM 333. 

CHM 333. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 

LABORATORY / sh 

The experiments complement concepts 
discussed in the lecture, including 
studies of phase relationships, gas laws 
and calorimetry. Prerequisites: CHM 
111, 112;MTH 121; and PHY 11 1/1 12 or 
113/114. Corequisite: CHM 332. 

CHM 341. INTRODUCTION 

TO RESEARCH / sh 

This course is designed to introduce 
students to chemical research, use of 
chemical literature, computerized 
literature searching, research proposal 
and report writing. The students selects 
a faculty research advisor. Emphasis is 
placed on the student developing and 
making progress on an independent 
chemical research problem. Prerequi- 
sites: CHM 111, 112, 21 1,212, 232; MTH 
121; and PHY 11 1/1 12 or 113/114. 
Corequisite: CHM 311. 

CHM 35 1 . BIOCHEMISTRY 3 sh 

This is a survey of biochemistry as it 
relates to the physiology of organisms. 
Topics include biochemical methodol- 
ogy, buffers, proteins (structure, 
function and synthesis), enzymes, 
bioenergetics, anabolism and catabo- 
lism of carbohydrates and lipids, and 
metabolic regulation. Prerequisites: 
CHM211,212,213,214. (CHM 351 is 
the same as BIO 351.) 

CHM 352. BIOCHEMISTRY 

LABORATORY / sh 

This laboratoiy investigates the rates of 
enzyme-catalyzed reactions, including 
the effect of enzyme inhibitors, the 
isolation/purification/analysis of 
proteins, lipids and carbohydrates and 
some analytical techniques used in 
clinical chemistry laboratories. Tech- 



CHEMISTRY 



niques employed include affinity chroma- 
tography electrophoresis, gas chroma- 
tography UV-visible spectrometry and 
polarimetiy. Prerequisites: CHM 211,212, 
213, 214.Corequisite:CHM351. (CHM 
352 is the same as BIO 352.) 

CHM 412. PHYSICAL 

CHEMISTRY II 3 sh 

Physical Chemistry applies the concepts 
of quantum mechanics to explain the 
basic structure of atoms, molecules and 
ions. Group theory, molecular spectros- 
copy and kinetics are also covered. 
Prerequisites: CHM 232, 311, 332, 333; 
MTH 221; and PHY 111/112 or 113/114. 

CHM 42 1 . INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 4 sh 

Instrumental Analysis offers theoiy and 
practice of instrumental methods, with 
emphasis placed on spectroscopic (UV/ 
Vis, IR, NMR, AA), mass spectrometric 
and radiochemical methods of analysis. 
Prerequisites: CHM 11 1, 1 12, 21 1, 212, 
311,332,333. 

CHM 431. ADVANCED INORGANIC 

CHEMISTRY 4 sh 

This course surveys the structures, 
physical properties and reactions of 
the elements and their compounds, 
with emphasis on periodic table 
relationships. Topics include chemical 
bonding, organometallic chemistry, 
acid-base theories, the chemistry of 
complexes, nuclear chemistry and 
magnetic properties of matter. Prerequi- 
sites: CHM 111, 112,211,212,332,333. 



CHM 461. SEMINAR 1 sh 

Students make presentations after 
they do individual library or laboratory 
research. Student seminars are supple- 
mented with seminars by practicing 
scientists. All chemistry-oriented 
students are encouraged to attend. 
Credit for senior majors only or by 
permission of the instructor. 

CHM 471-479. SPECIAL TOPICS 

IN CHEMISTRY 3 sh 

Possible advanced topics offered 
to meet the needs and interests of 
students include methods in nuclear 
chemistry, nuclear magnetic resonance, 
advanced organic or polymer chemistry. 
Prerequisites: CHM 1 1 1, 1 12, 21 1, 212, 
311,332. 

CHM 481. INTERNSHIP 1 - 4 sh 

Students gain advanced level work 
experience in a chemical field. Intern- 
ships are offered on an individual basis 
when suitable opportunities can be 
arranged. Prerequisite: permission 
of department. 

CHM 491. RESEARCH l-3sh 

In collaboration with a chemistry faculty 
member, students undertake experi- 
mental or theoretical investigations. 
Prerequisite: CHM 34 1. 

CHM 492. THESIS / sh 

The thesis focuses on the formal 
writing process related to results 
of the experimental and/or theoretical 
research conducted by the student. 
Emphasis is placed on the style of 
scientific writing. Majors only. 
Prerequisite: CHM 491. 



95 



COMMUNICATIONS 

See Journalism and Communications 



COMPUTING SCIENCES 



COMPUTING SCIENCES 

chair, Department of Computing Sciences: Associate Professor Carpenter 

Professor: W. Hightower 

Associate Professor: Plumblee 

Assistant Professors: V. Hightower, Murphy 

Part-time Instructor: Hudson 

The Computing Sciences Department of Elon College offers a major and minor 
in Computer Science and a minor in Computer Science and in Computer Information 
Systems. A concentration area in Management Information Systems is also an option 
under the Business Administration major (See Business Administration for more 
95 information on this concentration.). 

The study of computer science emphasizes problem-solving techniques which 
translate well into the work force in this and other disciplines. Since the computer 
field is constantly changing, students must learn to communicate effectively and 
be able to adapt to new concepts and changing technology. 

Computing sciences students at Elon have excellent access to both faculty and 
equipment. Opportunities for various work and independent learning experiences 
which complement classroom training are also available. Other opportunities for 
involvement include the student chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery 
(ACM), participation in regional and local programming contests and independent 
study. Graduates pursue employment in many areas of industry and business as 
well as graduate study. 

A major in Computer Science requires the following courses: 

Computational Programming 4 sh 

Algorithm Development 4 sh 

Algorithm Analysis 4 sh 

Theory of Computation 4 sh 

Computer Organization 4 sh 

Computer Architecture and Operating Systems 4 sh 

Programming Languages/Paradigms 4 sh 

Compiler Design and Implementation 4 sh 

Functions with Applications (or competency) 4 sh 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1 4 sh 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 sh 

Two courses from the following: 8 sh 

A probability and/or statistics course 

MTH31I Linear Algebra 

MTH 32 1 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 

MTH/CS 4 1 5 Numerical Analysis 

MTH 42 1 Differential Equations 



cs 


130 


cs 


230 


cs 


331 


cs 


351 


cs 


342 


cs 


441 


cs 


435 


cs 


451 


MTH 


119 


MTH 


121 


MTH 


221 



TOTAL 



52 sh 



A minor in Computer Science requires the following courses: 
CS 130 Computational Programming 4 sh 

CS 230 Algorithm Development 4 sh 



COMPUTING SCIENCES 



Eight semester hours of 300-400 level Computer 
Science (CS) courses 

One additional course from CS or IS at the 
200 level or above 



8sh 
4sh 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



A minor in Computer Information Systems requires the following courses: 
IS 2 1 6 Advanced Microcomputer Applications 4 sh 

Eight semester hours of IS or CS at any level 8 sh 

Eight additional semester hours of 300-400 level 
Information Systems (IS) courses 



TOTAL 



Ssh 
20 sh 



97 



COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

IS 116. MICROCOMPUTER 

APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

This course provides the fundamental 
background necessary to be able to 
adapt to new and changing computer 
technology as well as an understanding 
of the scope of that technology. The 
student gains basic proficiency and 
experience with selected widely used 
computer-based productivity tools 
(e.g. word processors, spreadsheets, 
database management systems, e-mail) 
and operating environments (e.g. DOS, 
Windows). The student begins the 
practice of making appropriate use of 
computer technology by working in a 
project setting and will be exposed to 
presentation management and multime- 
dia hypertext tools and the Internet. 

IS 2 1 6. ADVANCED MICROCOMPUTER 

APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

This course addresses advanced features 
of electronic spreadsheet and database 
management software and emphasizes 
writing spreadsheet macros and 
database command files to solve 
problems. Students design and present 
group and individual projects incorpo- 
rating these tools. Prerequisite: IS 1 16 or 
permission of the instructor. 

IS 220. COMPUTERS AND TEACHING 3sh 

Students planning teaching careers 
explore current trends of computing at 



the elementary, middle, and secondaiy 
levels. Topics cover microcomputer 
hardware, operational techniques, and 
techniques for selecting, evaluating, and 
implementing computer programs for 
educational use. Hands-on experience 
and projects expose students to computer 
assisted instruction, computer managed 
instruction, application software and 
programming languages appropriate for 
various grade levels and subject areas. 
Prerequisite: EDU 211. 

IS 250. SAS FOR PROGRAMMERS 2-4 sh 

This lab course uses the statistical 
package SAS on the VAX and covers 
data step, print, sort, freq, plot, means, 
chart, format and programming tech- 
niques to restructure data sets. Other 
study includes file work (input, output, 
use of cards, text files vs. SAS data sets), 
SAS LOG and its use in debugging, SAS 
graphics package and SAS procedure 
SQL. Prerequisite: Experience with a 
programming language. 

IS 330. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS 

AND DESIGN 4 sh 

This in-depth study of standard tech- 
niques for analyzing and designing 
information systems emphasizes 
effective written and oral communication 
as students analyze a system in a local 
company, actively participaUng in each 
phase and making on-site visits. During 
the design phase, students maintain 



COMPUTING SCIENCES 



contacts with real users and develop a 
product for implementation. Prerequisite: 
IS 216. 

IS 340 SYSTEMS IMPLEMENTATION 4sh 

As students continue the work begun 
in IS 330, they use decision support 
software tools such as VP Expert, GURU 
or Paradox to design a front-end; they 
run simulations on-line which model 
the typical working environment; and 
no they build an interface to test, debug 

and implement the system. Prerequisite: 
IS 330. 

IS 37 1 . SPECIAL TOPICS / -4 sh 

Topics such as decision support and 
expert systems, data communications 
and networks, and COBOL programming 
are offered when demand is sufficient. 

IS 481. INTERNSHIP IN 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 1 4 sh 

Advanced work experiences in computer 
information systems are offered on an 
individual basis when suitable oppor- 
tunities can be arranged. Prerequisites: 
IS 340 and permission of instructor. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

CS 130. COMPUTATIONAL 

PROGRAMMING 4 sh 

This introduction to programming and 
problem solving emphasizes applica- 
tions from quantitative disciplines and 
incorporates weekly group lab experi- 
ences. Prerequisite: MTH 1 1 1 or its 
exemption. 

CS 1 7 1 . SPECIAL TOPICS / 4 sh 

Students study specialized pieces of 
software and programming languages. 
Prerequisite: CS 130. 

CS 230. ALGORITHM DEVELOPMENT 4 sh 

This course continues the study of the 
development of algorithms and provides 
an introduction to the analysis of time 
and space complexity. Topics include 
program correctness, recursion, elemen- 
tary data structures, modularization and 
program structure. Prerequisite: CS 130. 



CS 331. ALGORITHM ANALYSIS 4 sh 

Students analyze structures and appro- 
priate algorithms for sorting, merging 
and searching in the contexts of mass 
storage devices, internal main memory 
and artificial intelligence applications. 
Topics include graph algorithms, dynamic 
storage allocation and garbage collec- 
tion. Prerequisite: CS 230. 

CS342. COMPUTER ORGANIZATION 4 sh 

Topics cover architectural levels, 
systems organization, digital logic, 
machine level, instruction formats, 
representation of data and computer 
arithmetic, assembly, linking and loading 
and architectural alternatives. Prerequi- 
site: CS 230. 

CS351. THEORY OF COMPUTATION 4sh 

In this introduction to theoretical 
computer science and analysis of 
discrete mathematical structures which 
find application in computer science, 
topics may include predicate calculus, 
groups, coding theory, graphs, trees, 
formal languages, grammars, finite state 
automata, Turing machines, complexity 
theory. CS 351 is the same as MTH 351. 
Prerequisites: CS 130, MTH 121. 
Corequisite: CS 230. 

CS 3 7 1 . SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4 sh 

Topics such as computer graphics, 
artificial intelligence, design of data base 
management systems, robotics, simula- 
tion and high performance computing are 
offered when demand is sufficient. 

CS 415. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 4 sh 

(Same course as described in MTH 415.) 

CS 435. PROGRAMMING 

LANGUAGES/PARADIGMS 4 sh 

This course provides an introduction to 
language definition structure, data types 
and structures, control structures and 
data flow, run-time characteristics and 
lexical analysis and parsing. Program- 
ming assignments involve the use of 
several languages. Prerequisite: CS 331. 
Corequisite: CS 351. 



COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 



CS 44 1 . COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE 

AND OPERATING SYSTEMS 4 sh 

Students study the fundamental concepts 
of operating systems and their relation- 
ship to computer architecture, including 
such topics as concurrent programming, 
interrupt processing, memory manage- 
ment, and resource allocation. Prerequi- 
sites: CS 331 and 342. 



CS 45 1 . COMPILER DESIGN 

AND IMPLEMENTATION 4 sh 

This introduction to basic techniques 
of compiler design and implementation 
includes specification of syntax and 
semantics, lexical analysis, parsing 
and semantic processing. Prerequisite: 
CS 435. 



COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

Director of Experiential Education: Assistant Professor P Brumbaugh 
Director of Placement: Assistant Professor Thompson 

The Career Services Office offers courses designed to acquaint Elon students 
with the career decision-making process, to assist them in career exploration and 
to prepare them for the job search. 



99 



COE 110. CHOOSING A 

CAREER/MAJOR / sh 

These group career counseling sessions 
assist students in choosing a college 
major and exploring career options. 
Topics include career decision-making 
skills, personal values and needs, interest 
and skill assessments, senior student 
panel discussions and workshadowing. 
Recommended for freshmen and 
sophomores. 

COE 3 1 0. SECURING A JOB / sh 

This course helps students prepare for 
internships, co-ops, summer jobs and 
permanent employment. Students 
develop strategies for achieving career 
goals, investigate critical issues in the 
workplace, develop a resume, establish 
job contacts and learn how to interview 
effectively. Required of co-op students 
and recommended for sophomores, 
juniors and seniors. 

The Cooperative Education Work 
Experience Program enables qualified 
students to combine classroom theory 
with professional work experience 
while completing their degrees. The 
student may work full-time or part- 
time with an employer selected and/ 



or approved by the College. Credit 
hours are based on the number of 
hours worked during the term— a 
maximum of 15 semester hours of 
internship/Cooperative Education 
credits may be applied to the 126 
semester hours required for the A.B. 
and B.S. degrees. Evaluation is based 
on reported job performance and 
student reflection on that performance 
through papers, journals, seminars, 
class presentations and readings. 
Contact the Director of Experiential 
Education for more information. 

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 

Junior or senior standing, mini- 
mum 2.0 GPA, approval of faculty/ 
Experiential Education Director. COE 
310 class required. 

COE 381-386. CO-OP WORK 

EXPERIENCE 1-15 sh 

This series of courses involves careful 
monitoring of students in either a part- 
time or full-time work experience. 
Students apply classroom theoiy in a 
job related to their major/minor career 
objecfives. Prerequisite: admission to 
the program. 



DANCE 



DANCE 



100 



Chair, Department of Fine Aris: Professor Myers 
Assistant Professor: Wellford 
Part-time Instructor: Howard 

The primary goal of this program is to foster a love and understanding of dance 
in all its forms. Therefore, students minoring in Dance will spend time learning both 
in and out of the studio. 

Studio technique classes range from beginning to advanced level and include Ballet, 
Modern, Jazz and Tap. Students in the minor program are required to complete at 
least the beginning level in three of these areas and at least an intermediate level 
in two areas. 

Students round out their training with History of Dance and Choreography classes. 
Numerous performance opportunities are also available through Elon Dancers 
(student dance organization), choreographic showings, major dance concerts, 
musicals and various other events. 

A minor in Dance requires the following courses: 
DAN 301 History of Dance 4 sh 

DAN 430 Dance Choreography 4 sh 

In addition, each minor must complete the following: 

(a) six studio technique classes in three of the 

following: Ballet, jazz. Modern, or Tap 6 sh 

(b) electives selected from dance offerings 6 sh 
(At least 2 sh at the 300-400 level) 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



DAN 1 1 . INTRODUCTION TO DANCE 4 sh 

Students explore dance history, creative 
processes of dance and basic dance 
movement vocabulary. 

DAN 104. BEGINNING 

MODERN DANCE i sh 

Students with little or no previous 
experience in modern dance learn the 
basic movement vocabulary of modern 
dance while working on style, musical- 
ity, strength, flexibility and correct 
alignment. A student must master 
the competencies of Beginning Modern 
Dance as outlined in departmental 
syllabus before advancing to DAN 204. 
May be repeated for credit. 

DAN 105. BEGINNING TAP / sh 

Students with little or no previous dance 
experience learn the basic movement 
vocabulary of tap while working on 
speed, rhythm, coordination and style. 



DAN 106. BEGINNING BALLET 1 sh 

Students with little or no previous 
experience in ballet learn the basic 
movement vocabulary of modern 
dance while working on style, musical- 
ity, strength, flexibility and correct 
alignment. A student must master the 
competencies of Beginning Ballet as 
outlined in departmental syllabus before 
advancing to DAN 206. May be repeated 
for credit. 

DAN 107. BEGINNING JAZZ / sh 

Students with little or no previous dance 
experience learn the basic movement 
vocabulary of jazz while working on 
style, musicality, strength, flexibility and 
correct alignment. A student must master 
the competencies of Beginning Jazz as 
outlined in departmental syllabus before 
advancing to DAN 207. 



DANCE 



DAN 115. FOLK, SQUARE AND 

SOCIAL DANCE / sh 

This course introduces the student to 
various folk, square and social dance 
forms through analysis, demonstration 
and practice, with the objective being 
knowledge of the characteristics of each 
form and ability to participate in each. 

DAN 204. INTERMEDIATE 

MODERN DANCE / sh 

Students who have mastered the 
competencies of Beginning Modern 
Dance further develop and refine 
technique and increase strength 
and flexibility in this class. Enhanced 
musicality and creative expression are 
stressed. A student must master the 
competencies of Intermediate Modern 
Dance as outlined in departmental 
syllabus before moving to DAN 304. 
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 
DAN 104 or permission of instructor. 

DAN 205. INTERMEDIATE TAP / sh 

Students with two or more years of dance 
training continue work on clarity, speed, 
rhythm and style while mastering more 
complex and intricate footwork. May be 
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: DAN 106 
or permission of instructor. 

DAN 206. INTERMEDIATE BALLET I sh 

Students who have mastered the 
competencies of Beginning Ballet 
further develop and refine technique 
and increase strength and flexibility 
in this class. Enhanced musicality and 
creative expression are stressed. May 
be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: DAN 
104 or permission of instructor. 

DAN 207. INTERMEDIATE JAZZ I sh 

Students with two or more years of 
dance training further develop and 
refine technique and increase strength 
and flexibility in this class. Enhanced 
musicality and creative expression 
are important elements of the course. 
A student must master the competencies 
of Intermediate Jazz as outlined in 
departmental syllabus before moving 



to DAN 307. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisite: DAN 105 or permission 
of instructor. 

DAN 223. DANCE ENSEMBLE 1 sh 

Students accepted into this course will 
perform in departmental dance activities 
and must be co-registered in a technique 
class, preferably at the intermediate or 
advanced level. Admission by audition 
only. 

DAN 30 1 . HISTORY OF DANCE 4 sh 

Students explore the evolution of dance 
as an art from its pre-historical roots 
to the contemporary, post-modern form. 
The course pays particular attention 
to historical context and performance 
conditions. Students are required to 
complete a major research assignment. 

DAN 304. ADVANCED MODERN DANCE 1 sh 

Students who have mastered the 
competencies of Intermediate Modern 
Dance further develop and refine skills 
in this class. Enhanced physical strength 
and flexibility are combined with stress 
upon musicality and creative expression. 
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 
DAN 204 or permission of instructor. 

DAN 307. ADVANCED JAZZ / sh 

Students who have mastered the 
competencies of Intermediate jazz 
further develop and refine technical 
skills in this class. May be repeated for 
credit. Prerequisite: DAN 207 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

DAN 306. DANCE FOR MUSICAL STAGE 1 sh 

As they become familiar with various 
music theatre styles from selected 
historical periods, students also 
learn dance audition and performance 
methods for music theatre. Prerequisite: 
DAN 105, 106 or permission 
of instructor. 

DAN 310. ADVANCED PROJECTS 

IN DANCE 2-4 sh 

For this in-depth study of a special topic, 
the advanced dancer may be given a 
performance assignment to demonstrate 



101 



DANCE 



advanced proficiency in the field (i.e., 
dance captain for a tiieatre production, 
major ciioreographic duties in depart- 
ment productions, major role in guest 
choreographer's concert piece, internship 
at local dance studio culminating in both 
performance and choreographic work, 
or an independent research project). 
Prerequisite: advance permission of 
instructor. 

DAN 320. SPECIAL TOPICS 

IN DANCE 4 sh 

Topics for this in-depth study vary each 
semester it is offered and may include: 



Black Theatre & Dance, Dance in 
Worship, etc. May be repeated for credit. 

DAN 430. DANCE CHOREOGRAPHY 4 sh 

Students explore the tools used to create 
dance, namely movement, time, space, 
shape, design, dynamics sound, text 
properties and visual effects. This course 
is designed for students with previous 
dance experience. Not open to freshmen 
except in unusual circumstances. 
Prerequisite: at least two dance technique 
classes or permission of instructor. 



DRAMA 

See Theatre Arts 



ECONOMICS 

The Martha and Spencer Love School of Business 

chair, Department of Economics: Associate Professor Barbour 

Professor: Tiemann 

Associate Professor: Baxter 

Assistant Professors: Hart, Holt, Larson, Lilly 

Economics explores a broad range of questions about society and uses a wide 
variety of methods to answer those questions. The courses offered by the Economics 
Department are designed to help students develop economic reasoning — a particular 
way of looking at the world that is useful in government service, business, the law and 
many other fields. 

Economics students at Elon develop their ability to use economic reasoning by 
finding costs and benefits and by making decisions based on those costs and benefits. 
The goal of the economic faculty is to teach students to apply what they know about 
how the world works in making decisions about what the government, a business or 
a citizen should do. 

Elon's Economics Department is particularly strong in experimental economics, 
public policy and heterodox economics. 

A major in Economics requires the following courses: 



MTH 116 Applied Mathematics with Calculus 

MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 

ECO 20 1 Principles of Economics 

ECO 202 Statistics for Economics and Business 

ECO 301 Business Economics 

ECO 302 Money and Banking 

ECO 310 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 



4 shor 

4sh 

4sh 

4sh 

4sh 

4sh 

4sh 



ECONOMICS 



ECO 31 1 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 

ECO 461 Senior Project 

"HA^elve hours ECO electives at the 300-400 level 



TOTAL 

A Minor in Economics requires the following courses: 

ECO 20 1 Principles of Economics 

ECO 310 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 

ECO 301 Business Economics 

ECO 31 1 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 

ECO 202 Statistics for Economics and Business 

MTH 1 14 Elementary Statistics 

SS 285 Research Methods 

Four hours ECO elective at the 300-400 level 



4sh 
2sh 
12 sh 



42 sh 



4sh 
4sh 
4 sh or 
4sh 
4 shor 
4 sh or 
4sh 
4sh 



103 



TOTAL 



20sli 



ECO 201. PRINCIPLES 

OF ECONOMICS 4 sh 

This principles course introduces the 
fundamentals of macroeconomics and 
microeconomics. Topics include supply 
and demand, macroeconomic equilibrium, 
unemployment and inflation, consumer 
theory, theory of the firm, general 
equilibrium and economic methodology. 
Prerequisite: MTH 1 10 or higher. 

ECO 202. STATISTICS FOR ECONOMICS 

AND BUSINESS 4 sh 

Statistics for Economics and Business 
focuses on the collection, presentation, 
analysis and interpretation of statistical 
data. Among the topics covered are: 
descriptive tools for frequency distribu- 
tions, central tendency and dispersion; 
sampling theory and sampling distribu- 
tions; and techniques for statistical 
inference, including estimation and 
hypothesis testing and linear regression. 
Prerequisite: MTH 116 or 121. No credit 
for both MTH 1 14 and ECO 202. 



ECO 271. SEMINAR: 

ECONOMIC ISSUES 



1-4 sh 



ECO 30 1 . BUSINESS ECONOMICS 4 sh 

Business Economics focuses on where 
firms fit in the analysis of market activity, 
how economists see the problem of 



organizing economic activity, under- 
standing when markets solve that 
problem and why they sometimes do not, 
and how businesses have emerged as a 
response to the organization problem. 
Prerequisites: ECO 201 and 202. 

ECO 302. MONEY AND BANKING 4 sh 

Students examine the history, structure, 
and function of money and our banking 
system, with the assumption that both 
money and the banking system are 
evolving institutions that share the 
same purpose: to help people adapt in 
an uncertain world where information 
is imperfect and costly. Prerequisites: 
ECO 201 and 202. 

ECO 310. INTERMEDIATE 

MACROECONOMIC THEORY 4 sh 

This course covers the theory of 
aggregate demand and supply, sector 
demand functions (consumption, 
investment, money), disequilibrium 
models, economic growth, infiation, 
unemployment and expectations, 
stabilization and control. Prerequisites: 
ECO 201 and MTH 121 or 116. 

ECO 311. INTERMEDIATE 

MICROECONOMIC THEORY 4 sh 

With this study of how individual agents, 
both firms and households, interact in 



ECONOMICS 



various kinds of markets, students gain 
a better understanding of household 
economic behavior, firm behavior and 
the conditions under w/hich prices can 
most effectively allocate scarce re- 
sources. Prerequisites: ECO 201 and 202; 
MTH 121 or 116. 

ECO 312. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC 

SYSTEMS 4 sh 

Study in Comparative Economic Systems 
includes capitalism, Marxian theory and 
theoretical socialism. Prerequisite: 
ECO 201. 

ECO 314. INTERNATIONAL 

TRADE AND FINANCE 4 sh 

The fundamental subjects of interna- 
tional economics include the economic 
basis for international specialization and 
trade, economic gains from trade, 
balance of international payments, 
problems of international finance and 
international investments. Prerequisite: 
ECO 201. 

ECO 3 1 5. U.S. ECONOMIC HISTORY 4 sh 

This course introduces and analyzes 
the growth and development of the 
U.S. economy and its institutions from 
Colonial times to the 20th century. Study 
emphasizes the "new" economic history; 
explicit models and quantitative methods 
of analyzing historical phenomena, 
including slavery and the South; the 
industrial economy and its labor force; 
the transportation revolutions; and 
government's role in economic change. 
Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

ECO 317. THE ECONOMICS 

OF WOMEN 4 sh 

Students investigate the economic status 
of women in the U.S. and the factors 
affecting changes in women's economic 
status over time. Topics include eco- 
nomic theories of discrimination, pay 
equity, occupational segregation, 
accounfing for women's work, resource 
ownership, the feminization of poverty, 
gender and race, public policy toward 
women, and the global economic status 
of women. 



ECO 332. PUBLIC FINANCE 4 sh 

Study in public finance takes a positive 
and normative approach to the role of 
government in the economy. Public 
expenditures are discussed in light of 
pure theory, the theory of social choice 
and practical application. Prerequisite: 
ECO 201. 

ECO 335. THE ECONOMICS OF 

ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES 4 sh 

This course explores the interactions 
of economic forces and policies with 
environmental issues. What are the 
costs of pollution and what are we 
buying for those costs? Who bears the 
burden of environmental damage? How 
might we reduce environmental impact 
and how do we decide how much 
damage is appropriate? Prerequisite: 
ECO 201. 

ECO 347. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 4 sh 

Students examine applications of 
statistical techniques for analyzing 
variance and covariance, chi-square, 
simple and multiple correlation and 
regression, interpretation of standard 
designs used in scientific research, non- 
parametric tests, time series analysis 
and decision theory. Prerequisite: ECO 
202 or MTH 114. 

ECO 365. ECONOMICS APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

This course focuses on practical uses of 
economics in various business and 
public policy situations. Topics vary 
yearly. Prerequisites vary with topic. 
Winter term only. 

ECO 366. FIELD ECONOMICS 4 sh 

Students travel to observe economic 
policy making both domestically and 
abroad. Topics vary yearly. Prerequisites 
vary with topic. Winter term only. 



ECO 371. SEMINAR: 

SPECIAL TOPICS 



1-4 sh 



ECO 372. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC 

DEVELOPMENT 4 sh 

International Economic Development 
provides an in-depth study of the 



EDUCATION 



meaning, measurement and analysis 
of economic growtii and development, 
with particular emphasis on the 
developing economies of Africa, Asia 
and Latin America. Topics include trade, 
finance, industrialization, rural/urban 
migration, agricultural development, 
women's role in development, employ- 
ment problems, population growth, 
education and poverty alleviation. 
Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

ECO 41 1. DEVELOPMENT OF 

ECONOMIC THOUGHT 4 sh 

Students survey the evolution of 
economic thought from antiquity 
to the present and learn to identify 
and critically evaluate various schools 
of economic thought. Prerequisite: ECO 
3 1 or 3 11 or permission of instructor. 

ECO 4 1 3. LABOR ECONOMICS 4 sh 

This course integrates labor theory with 
observed behavior of firms and house- 
holds, examining the household supply 
of effort to the labor market in both the 
short and long run, the firm's demand for 
labor, various types of labor markets and 
causes of wage differentials. Prerequisite: 
ECO 310 or 311. 



ECO 44 1 . ECONOMIC REGULATION 4 sh 

Students examine the economic 
regulation of American business, 
including the economic rationale 
and the basic laws concerning 
antitrust regulation, public utility 
regulation, and social regulation of 
business. Prerequisite: ECO 301 or 311. 

ECO 46 1 . SENIOR PROJECT 2 sh 

For this project, economics majors work 
individually with a professor to build on 
work done in previous courses, culmi- 
nating in a project of presentation 
quality. Prerequisites: ECO 310, 311, 
and eight additional hours of economics 
numbered 300 or above; senior econom- 
ics major. 

ECO 4 7 1 . SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS 4 sh 



ECO 481. INTERNSHIP 

IN ECONOMICS i 

A maximum of four semester hours 
are applicable to a major or minor 
in economics. 



sh 



ECO 491. INDEPENDENT 
STUDY 



l~4sh 



105 



EDUCATION 

Chan; Department of Education: Professor Dillashaw 
Professors: Hooks, Simon 
Associate Professors: Speas, Wooten 
Assistant Professors: Beamon, Howard 

Eton's education program prepares teachers for careers in the elementary, middle 
and high school grades. To do this, study emphasizes practical hands-on experience 
as well as educational theory and methods classes on campus. Yearly field experi- 
ences in public school classrooms begin the first year and culminate with a semester 
of full-time teaching in the student's preferred licensure area. 

Elon is widely recognized for the success of its teacher education program, which 
is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, and is 
one of only two private colleges in the state selected to offer the prestigious N.C. 
Teaching Fellows Program. 

Elon College offers programs leading to N.C. licensure in Elementary Education, 
Middle Grades Education, special subject areas for grades K-12 and in seven areas at 
the secondary level. The goal of the undergraduate program in Education is to foster 
in the student: 



106 



EDUCATION 



the knowledge of the purposes of education and the role of the school in our 
democratic society 

the understanding of the role of the teacher as decision maker 

the knowledge and skills required for developing competence in the various 
teacher roles 

a belief in the dignity and worth of each individual 

the knowledge of the process of human growth and development 

the knowledge of planning for instruction utilizing various teaching methodologies, 
materials and organizational patterns 

knowledge of the subject matter in school curriculum 

competence in evaluating student learning 

the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain a- classroom environment that 
facilitates learning and to accommodate the learning needs of exceptional and 
culturally diverse students 

• a desire for professional affiliation, lifelong learning and continuing professional 
growth and development 

The student who successfully completes any of the teacher education programs 
at Elon College will be eligible for licensure to teach in North Carolina. The State of 
North Carolina is party to the Interstate Certification Compact which qualifies Elon 
College graduates also to be licensed in all states party to this Compact. 

Currently there are 26 states which have entered into this reciprocity agreement. 
Any student planning to teach in a state not a part of the Interstate Certification 
Compact should obtain a copy of the licensure requirements for a public school 
teacher from the State Superintendent of Education of the state in which the student 
plans to teach. 

Before being admitted into the Teacher Education Program, the student must 
make application to the program, be recommended by the appropriate major depart- 
ment, be interviewed and approved by the Teacher Education Committee and meet 
minimum score requirements on the tests of General Knowledge and Communication 
Skills of the National Teacher's Examination.* North Carolina requires the following 
minimum scores: GK-645, CS-646, and a GPA of 2.5 for all coursework completed at 
the time of admission. After admission, failure to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5 
will result in dismissal from the program. 

In all cases, approval for admission to the program is subject to the discretion 
of the Teacher Education Committee, which bases its decision not only on the above 
factors, but also on satisfactory command of standard English usage (written and oral) 
and mental, physical, moral and emotional acceptability for teaching. The Teacher 
Education Committee may, at its discretion, dismiss a student from the Teacher 
Education Program. 

Application forms for the Teacher Education Program are available in the office 
of the Department of Education and must be filed by September 15 or February 15 of 
the semester immediately prior to the beginning of the student's junior year. A student 
must be unconditionally admitted to the program before being permitted to take 
education courses beyond the 200 level. 

To be recommended for teacher licensure, a student must meet all academic 
requirements and have a GPA minimum of 2.5. A student must also meet the mini- 



EDUCATION 

mum score on the Test of Professional Knowledge (North Carolina requires a mini- 
mum score of 646) and the Specialty Area Test (minimum scores for this test vary 
with content area) and have a recommendation from the school system in which 
student teaching was completed. 

All students who are education majors or who already hold a Bachelor's degree 
and are seeking only licensure are subject to the decisions and regulations of the N.C. 
State Board of Education. These decisions and regulations are binding on the student 
on the date and time specified by the Board. 

* All students planning to teach in a state other than North Carolina must contact 
the appropriate state's Department of Public Instruction and secure its standards 
for scores on the NTE. 

At Elon College, the teacher education programs are fully approved by the N.C. State 
Board of Education. While a student ordinarily may graduate and be licensed under the 
catalog requirements in effect at the time the student is admitted to the Teacher 
Education Program, the Board may mandate changes in standards of approved 
teacher education programs, requiring students to modify or add to their original 
degree programs to be eligible for licensure upon completion of graduation require- 
ments. Students should consult their advisor about current program requirements. 

A major in Elementary Education requires the following courses: 



107 



ENG 


250 


Inteipretations of Literature 


4sh 


ENG 


398 


Children's Literature 


4sh 


ECO 


201 


Principles of Economics 


4sh 


FA 


369 


Fine Arts in the Public Schools 


4sh 


HE 


362 


Healthful Living in the Elementary School 


3sh 


HST 


112 


Europe and the Mediterranean World since 1660 


4sh 


HST 


122 


United States History since 1865 


4sh 


HST 


361 


North Carolina in the Nation 


4sh 


GEO 


131 


The World's Regions 


4sh 


PS 


III 


American Government 


4sh 


BIO 


101 


Topics in General Biology 


3sh 


BIO 


102 


General Biology Lab 


ish 


CHM 101/102 Basic Concepts in Chemistry/Lab 


4 shor 


PHY 


110 


Energy and the Environment 


4sh 


PHY 


102 


Introduction to Astronomy 


4 shor 


PHY 


103 


Introduction to Geology 


4sh 


PSY 


321 


Educational Psychology 


4sh 


MTH 


210 


Mathematics for Elementary and 








Middle Grades Teachers 


4sh 






(GS Math requirement is a prerequisite) 




IS 


220 


Computers and Teaching 


3sh 


EDU 


211 


Introduction to Education with Practicum 


4sh 


EDU 


321 


Reading in the Elementary School 


4sh 


EDU 


361 


Communication Skills Methods 





and Materials for Elementary Teachers 4 sh 

EDU 363 Social Studies Methods and Materials 

for Elementary Teachers 4 sh 



EDUCATION 

EDU 430 Foundations of Education 3 sh 

EDU 450 Meeting Special Learning Needs of Children 3 sh 
EDU 465 Mathematics Methods and Materials 

for Elementary Teachers 4 sh 
EDU 467 Science Methods and Materials 

for Elementary Teachers 4 sh 

EDU 480 Student Teaching Seminar 2 sh 

EDU 481 Supervised Observation and Student Teaching lOsh 

TOTAL 104 sh 

In addition to the required courses, Elementary Education majors must achieve 
a satisfactory score on the departmental Grammar Competency Exam. 

A major in Middle Grades Education consists of the courses necessary to 
meet the requirements for Middle Grades (6-9) licensure in the public schools of 
North Carolina. The following Core Courses are required of all Middle Grades Majors; 

Fine Arts in the Public Schools 4 sh 

Computers and Teaching 3 sh 

Educational Psychology 4 sh 

Introduction to Education with Practicum 4 sh 

Reading in the Content Areas 2 sh 

Foundations of Education 3 sh 

Curriculum and Instruction in the Middle Grades 3 sh 

Meeting Special Learning Needs of Children 3 sh 

Student Teaching Seminar 2 sh 

Supervised Observation and Student Teaching 1 sh 

Two subject area concentrations 54-60 sh 

TOTAL 92-98 sh 

In addition to the Core Courses, a student majoring in Middle Grades 
Education must select two subject area concentrations from the following: 

Communication Skills Concentration: 

ENG 205 English Grammar 4 sh 

American Literature II 4 sh 

Interpretations of Literature 4 sh 

Writing Center Workshop 4 sh 

Young Adult Literature 4 sh 

Communication Skills Methods and Materials 
for Middle Grades Teachers 4 sh 

One course from the following: 4 sh 

ENG 238 African-American Literature before 1945 

ENG 239 African-American Literature since 1945 

ENG 359 African-American Novels 

ENG 363 Literature and Culture: India, Africa & West Indies 

TOTAL 28 sh 



FA 


369 


IS 


220 


PSY 


321 


EDU 


211 


EDU 


322 


EDU 


430 


EDU 


441 


EDU 


450 


EDU 


480 


EDU 


481 



ENG 


224 


ENG 


250 


ENG 


319 


ENG 


399 


EDU 


362 



GEO 


131 


HST 


112 


HST 


122 


HST 


221 


HST 


361 


PS 


111 


EDU 


364 



Social Studies Concentration: 

ECO 201 Principles of Economics 
The World's Regions 

Europe and the Mediterranean World since 1660 
United States History since 1865 
The World in the Twentieth Century 
North Carolina in the Nation 
American Government 
Social Studies Methods and Materials 
for Middle Grades Teachers 4 sh 

TOTAL 32 sh 

Mathematics Concentration: 

Functions with Applications 4 sh 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 sh 

Mathematical Reasoning 2 sh 

Mathematics for Elementary and 

Middle Grades Teachers 4 sh 

Elementary Statistics 4 sh 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Middle 

Grades and Secondary Mathematics 4 sh 

TOTAL 26 sh 

Science Concentration: 



MTH 


119 


MTH 


121 


MTH 


221 


MTH 


231 


MTH 


210 


MTH 


114 


EDU 


422 



E D U C A T I 


1 N 


4sh 




4sh 




4sh 




4sh 




4sh 




4sh 




4sh 





BIO 


101 


Topics in General Biology 


3sh 


BIO 


102 


General Biology Lab 


1 sh 


BIO 


121 


Biological Diversity 


4sh 


CHM 


111 


General Chemistry 1 


3sh 


CHM 


113 


General Chemistry Lab 


1 sh 


PHY 


110 


Energy and the Environment 


4sh 


PHY 


102 


Introduction to Astronomy 


4sh 


PHY 


103 


Introduction to Geology 


4sh 


EDU 


424 


Materials and Methods of Teaching 








Middle Grades and Secondary Science 


4sh 



109 



TOTAL 28 sh 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The student planning to teach at the high school level completes a major in a 
discipline and the necessary Professional Studies courses for teacher licensure at 
the secondary level (grades 9 - 12). Secondary Education Licensure is available in 
Biology, Chemistry, Comprehensive Science, English, History, Mathematics, Secondary 
Science, and Social Studies. Specific requirements for each program are listed with the 
appropriate department in this catalog. In general, the following Professional Studies 



EDU4 


EDU 


430 


EDU 


450 


EDU 


480 


EDU 


481 


IS 


220 



EDUCATION 

courses must be satisfactorily completed: 

EDU 211 Introduction to Education with Practicum 4 sh 

EDU 322 Reading in the Content Areas 2 sh 

Choose an appropriate methods course: 4 sh 

EDU 421 Materials and Methods of Teaching High School English 

EDU 422 Materials and Methods of Teaching Middle Grades 

and Secondary Mathematics 
EDU 424 Materials and Methods of Teaching Middle Grades 
and Secondaiy Science 

Materials and Methods of Teaching High School Social Studies 
'■O EDU 430 Foundations of Education 3 sh 

Meeting Special Learning Needs of Children 3 sh 

Student Teaching Seminar 2 sh 

Supervised Observation and Student Teaching 10 sh 

Computers and Teaching 3 sh 

(Not required for Mathematics Education majors) 
PSY 32 1 Educational Psychology 4 sh 

TOTAL 35 sh 

SPECIAL SUBJECT AREAS (K-12) 

Programs leading to licensure in special subject areas at the K-12 level are 
available in French, Health Education, Music Education, Physical Education, and 
Spanish. Specific requirements for these programs are listed with the appropriate 
department in this catalog. In general, the following Professional Studies courses 
must be satisfactorily completed: 

EDU 21 1 Introduction to Education with Practicum 4 sh 

EDU 322 Reading in the Content Areas 2 sh 

One of the following courses: 4 sh 
EDU 423 Materials and Methods of Teaching Physical Education 
EDU 427 Materials and Methods of Teaching Health and Safety 

EDU 428 Materials and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages 
MUS 461 Music Education in the Public Schools 

EDU 430 Foundations of Education 3 sh 

EDU 450 Meeting Special Learning Needs of Children 3 sh 
(Not required for Physical Education majors) 

Student Teaching Seminar 2 sh 

Supervised Observation and Student Teaching 10 sh 

Computers and Teaching 3 sh 
(Not required for Physical Education majors) 

PSY 321 Educational Psychology 4 sh 

EDU 211. INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION of classroom instruction and practical 

WITH PRACTICUM 4 sh experiences. Prospective teachers gain 

This introduction to the concepts of greater understanding of the teaching 

teaching and the teacher's role as a profession and develop an awareness 

decision maker uses a combination of students' characteristics and needs. 



EDU 


480 


EDU 


481 


IS 


220 



EDUCATION 



EDU321. READING IN THE 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4 sh 

Study focuses on developing the philo- 
sophical framework, knowledge, and 
methodology necessary for planning 
learning experiences to enhance students' 
language development. Key course 
components include theory and process, 
pedagogy, assessment, the learner and 
professional development. Prerequisites: 
EDU211,PSY321. 

EDU 322. READING IN THE 

CONTENT AREAS 2 sh 

The focus of this course is on reading 
strategies to guide middle school and 
high school instruction. Prospective 
teachers apply readability formulas 
to content area readings and design 
activities to promote vocabulary 
development, comprehension, study 
skills and writing to learn. Prerequisites: 
EDU 211, PSY 321. 

EDU 361. COMMUNICATION SKILLS, 

METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR 
ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 4 sh 

Students learn how to investigate, 
evaluate, and select content, methods 
and materials used in organizing and 
teaching communication skills in 
elementary school. A concurrent 
practicum offers opportunities to apply 
concepts and skills learned in this 
course. Prerequisites: EDU 211, PSY 321. 

EDU 362. COMMUNICATION SKILLS 

METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR 
MIDDLE GRADES TEACHERS 4 sh 

This course enables students to investi- 
gate, evaluate and select content, 
methods and materials used in organiz- 
ing and teaching communication skills 
in middle school. A concurrent practicum 
offers opportunities to apply concepts 
and skills learned in this course. Prereq- 
uisites: EDU 21 1, PSY 321. 

EDU 363. SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS 
AND MATERIALS FOR 
ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 4 sh 

This course enables students to investi- 
gate, evaluate and select content, 



methods and materials used in organiz- 
ing and teaching social studies in 
elementary school. A concurrent 
practicum offers opportunities to apply 
concepts and skills learned in this 
course. Prerequisites: EDU 211, PSY 321. 

EDU 364. SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS AND 
MATERIALS FOR MIDDLE 
GRADES TEACHERS 4 sh 

This course enables students to investi^ 
gate, evaluate, and select content, 
methods and materials used in organizing 
and teaching social studies in middle 
school. A concurrent practicum offers 
opportunities to apply concepts and skills 
learned in this course. Prerequisites: EDU 
211, PSY 321. 

EDU 421. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING HIGH 
SCHOOL ENGLISH 4 sh 

In this study of the content and organiza- 
tion of the English curriculum with 
emphasis on methods and materials used 
in teaching literature, language skills, and 
composition, students review print and 
non-print media, create lesson and unit 
plans, lead classroom discussions and 
conduct teaching demonstrations. Public 
school classroom observation and 
assistance are required. Prerequisites: 
EDU 2 11 , PSY 32 1 . Fall semester only. 

EDU 422. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING MIDDLE 
GRADES AND SECONDARY 
MATHEMATICS 4 sh 

Students study the objectives and content 
of the mathematics curriculum in grades 
6-12, including the materials, techniques, 
and methods of evaluation used in 
teaching mathematics in middle and 
high school grades. A practicum in the 
public schools is required. Prerequisites: 
EDU21I,PSY321. 

EDU 423. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 4 sh 

This course covers the methods, 
materials, and techniques of teaching 
physical education, including organiza- 



EDUCATION 



tion and planning of the total curriculum 
and daily programs. Students also 
observe and conduct activity classes. 
Public school practicum required. 
Prerequisites: EDU 2 11 , PSY 32 1 . 

EDU 424. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF 
TEACHING MIDDLE GRADES 
AND SECONDARY SCIENCE 4 sh 

Students develop, select and evaluate 
content, methods and materials used in 
^ -_ teaching science at the middle or high 

■ '^ school level. Study examines current 
trends in teaching the natural sciences 
and addresses safety concerns. Observa- 
tions and practicum in middle and/or 
high schools required. Prerequisites: 
EDU 211, PSY 321. 

EDU 425. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING HIGH SCHOOL 
SOCIAL STUDIES 4 sh 

A study of the materials and methods 
of teaching social studies, emphasizing 
planning, organization, objectives and 
evaluation. Public school practicum 
required. Prerequisite: EDU 211, PSY 32 1 . 

EDU 427. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING HEALTH 
AND SAFETY 4 sll 

This course emphasizes methods of 
curriculum planning, analyzing and 
developing content area, unit plans and 
teaching approaches for all levels of 
school (K-12). Public school practicum 
required. Prerequisites: 
EDU 211, PSY 321. 

EDU 428. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING FOREIGN 
LANGUAGES 4 sh 

This study of the content and organiza- 
tion of the foreign language curriculum in 
the public schools emphasizes methods 
and materials used in teaching at all 
levels (K-12) and covers how teaching 
the four basic skills and the target culture 
varies at each level. Students discuss 
theories of planning, instruction, choice 
of materials and evaluation and gain 
practical experience by participating in 
a public school classroom. Prerequisites: 
EDU 211, PSY 321. 



EDU 430. FOUNDATIONS OF 

EDUCATION 3 sh 

This foundations course is a study of the 
historical development and philosophical 
basis for public education in the U.S., 
including the role and influence of schools 
in society and the teachers role as it has 
emerged from the philosophies, practices 
and policies of public education. 

EDU 441. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 
IN THE MIDDLE GRADES 3 sh 

This study of historical and contempo- 
rary curricula and instruction in middle 
and junior high schools, emphasizes the 
special curricular and instructional 
needs of the pre- and early adolescent 
and explores various programs to teach 
1 1- to 14-year-olds academic and 
personal skills and concepts. Prerequi- 
site: EDU 211. 

EDU 450. MEETING SPECIAL LEARNING 

NEEDS OF CHILDREN 3 sh 

This course prepares teachers for using 
individualized programs for students 
\N\ih special learning needs. Students 
survey the literature related to instruc- 
tion of these students, including 
assessing individual needs and modes 
of learning with implications for 
mainstreamed classroom teaching. 

EDU 465. MATHEMATICS METHODS 
AND MATERIALS FOR 
ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 4 sh 

This course enables students to investi- 
gate, evaluate and select content, 
methods and materials used in organizing 
and teaching mathematics in elementary 
school. A concurrent practicum offers 
opportunities to apply concepts and skills 
learned in this course. Prerequisites: EDU 
211, PSY 321. 

EDU 467. SCIENCE METHODS AND 

MATERIALS FOR ELEMENTARY 
TEACHERS 4 sh 

This course enables students to investi- 
gate, evaluate and select content, 
methods and materials used in organiz- 
ing and teaching science in elementary 
school. A concurrent practicum offers 



ENGLISH 



opportunities to apply concepts and skills 
learned in this course. Prerequisites: EDU 
211,PSY321. 

EDU 480. STUDENT TEACHING 

SEMINAR 2 sh 

This seminar focuses on classroom 
management strategies, legal aspects of 
teaching, the teacher as decision maker 
and creating a professional development 
plan. Must be taken concurrently with 
EDU 481. 



EDU 481. SUPERVISED OBSERVATION AND 
STUDENT TEACHING iOsh 

Students experience the classroom full- 
time for one semester, with periodic 
conferences with the college supervisor(s) 
and the classroom teacher(s). The student 
becomes acquainted with the duties and 
observes the methods and activities of an 
experienced teacher, with gradual 
induction into full-time teaching responsi- 
bilities. Corequisite: EDU 480. Prerequi- 
sites: EDU 2 II , 430 and grade of C- or 
better in appropriate methods course (s). 



113 



ENGLISH 



chair, Department of English: Associate Professor Haskell 

Professors: Angyal, Blake, Bland, Gill 

Associate Professors: Braye, Lyday-Lee, Mackay 

Assistant Professors: Boyd, Boyle, Butler, Cassebaum, Chapman, Gordon, R. House, 

Herold, Schwind, Warman 

The field of English studies is quite diverse. It involves the theoretical study 
of literature, language and writing, as well as the practice of literary criticism and 
analysis, creative writing, and other kinds of writing. 

The English Department, therefore, provides a balanced curriculum that 
includes all these elements. The department also offers a major in English with 
teacher certification for those wishing to teach at the secondary level. Minors in 
literature and creative writing, along with an interdisciplinary minor in professional 
writing, are additional options. 

A group of six core courses in literature, language study and writing beyond 
the freshman level, ensures that English majors have experience in the three principal 
areas of the discipline. The English curriculum also encourages majors to follow their 
own talents and interests further by requiring, in addition to the common core, one 
of four distinct concentrations: literature, writing, creative writing or English teacher 
certification. 

A major in English requires 40-42 semester hours. The core requirements, 
above ENG 1 10, are: 



An ENG 200-level literature course 
(English Education majors must take ENG 221, 
British Literature I or ENG 222, British Literature II) 

An ENG 200-level or above writing course 
(English Education majors must take ENG 319, 
Writing Center Workshop) 

An ENG 200-level or above language course 
(English Education majors must take ENG 205, Grammar) 

Three ENG 300-400 level literature courses: 
One historical studies 
One cultural studies 



4sh 



4sh 



4sh 



4sh 
4sh 



ENGLISH 



114 



One author course 4 sh 
(English Education majors must tal<e ENG 321, Classical 
Literature to fulfill the historical period requirement.) 

Students must also complete one of the following concentrations: 
Literature Concentration 

One additional historical studies course 4 sh 

Two additional 300-400 level English electives 8 sh 

ENG 495, Senior Seminar 4 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 

Writing Concentration 

Two additional 300-400 level writing courses 8 sh 

ENG 304 Rhetorical Theory 4 sh 

ENG 495 Senior Seminar 4 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 

Teacher Certification Concentration 

ENG 302 History of the English Language 4 sh 

ENG 223 American Literature 1 4 sh or 

ENG 224 American Literature II 4 sh 

A 300-400 level literature elective 4 sh 

JC210 Public Speaking 2 sh 

ENG 495 Senior Seminar 4 sh 

TOTAL 42 sh 

Creative Writing Concentration 

Three Creative Writing Courses or 

Two Creative Writing and one English elective 12 sh 
(If students choose a creative writing course to meet their core writing 
requirement, they will be required to take only 8 sh of further creative 
writing courses. They may then substitute one 4 sh English elective 
for the third Creative Writing course.) 

ENG 495 Senior Seminar 4 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 

A minor in English requires the following courses above ENG 1 10. Students may 
choose either a literature minor or one of the writing minors. 

Literature Minor 

ENG 250 Interpretations of Literature 4 sh 

One language course, or one writing course 

beyond English 110 4 sh 

Three literature courses, at least two of which should be 

at the 300— 400 level 12 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 



ENGLISH 

Writing Minors 

The writing minors are tailored to meet students' career plans and interests. 
The minor consists of twenty hours. Of that twenty hours, at least twelve must 
be from performance courses. In performance courses, the fundamental objective 
is the development of students' writing abilities. Theory courses focus on the 
theoretical study of some aspect of language and language use rather than on 
actual writing practice. 

Creative Writing Minor 

Three or more of the following: 12-20 sh 

ENG 213 Introduction to Creative Writing 

ENG 214 Introduction to Creative Writing (Winter Term) 

ENG 315 Advanced Nonfiction Writing 

ENG 316 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry 

ENG 317 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction 

JC 326 Feature Writing 

TH 330 Playwriting 
Zero to two of the following courses: 0-8 sh 

Any English literature or foreign literature course 
beyond the general studies requirement 

TOTAL 20 sh 

Professional Writing Minor 

Please note: This is an Interdisciplinary Minor, jointly administered by the 
English Department and the Interdisciplinary Writing Committee. Questions 
should be referred to the Chair of the Interdisciplinary Writing Committee. 

All students are encouraged to take part in shaping this minor themselves 
with their advisors. 

Students may like to note that, if they are planning a career in the law, courses 
such as Philosophy 1 13, Critical Thinking, and English 304, Rhetorical Theory, will 
be particularly useful. Pre-law students should also work with advisors to arrange 
internships and practicums in law offices to gain further experience in the kinds 
of writing that will help them in their legal careers. 

Three or more of the following "performance" courses: 12-20 sh 

ENG 282 Writing Practicum 

ENG 381 Writing Internship 

jC 227 Corporate Publishing 

BA 302 Business Writing 

ENG 313 Writing for the Professions 
Zero to two of the following "theory" courses: 0-8 sh 

ENG 3 1 9 Writing Center Workshop 

ENG 304 Rhetorical Theory 

ENG 205 Grammar 

PHL1I3 Critical Thinking 

TOTAL 20 sh 



ENGLISH 



ENG 100. INTRODUCTION 

TO COLLEGE WRITING 4 sh 

This is a writing worksliop focusing on 
invention, organization, revision and 
editing skills. A grade of "C-" or better 
required for admission to ENG 110. 
Elective credit only. 

ENG 106. ANALYTICAL READING 3 sh 

Analytical reading is a course designed 
to help students understand, analyze 
and retain college level reading material. 
Elective credit only. 

ENG 1 10. COLLEGE WRITING 4 sh 

In this first-year course emphasizing 
invention, peer response, revising and 
editing, students learn to develop and 
make assertions, support them with 
appropriate evidence, and present them 
in public form. Students also learn that 
the style and content of their writing 
will affect their success in influencing 
audiences. A grade of "C-" or better 
required for graduation. 

ENG 205. GRAMMAR 4 sh 

This study of the English language 
includes the evolution of prescriptive 
and descriptive grammars, terminology, 
parts of speech and function, grammati- 
cal structures, and correct usage of 
standard written English. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. 

ENG 207. STUDIES IN THE 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 4 sh 

As an overview of various areas of 
language study in our society, topics 
in this course include; defining standard 
English and the role of grammar as 
each is taught, as well as its importance, 
impact, and messages; regional and social 
varieties; prejudicial and manipulative 
forms; slang and jargon; cultural differ- 
ences; and the importance of a world/ 
universal language. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 2 1 3. CREATIVE WRITING 4 sh 

For this workshop, students interested in 
writing poems and short stories may be 
assigned additional texts for discussion of 
technique or form. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 



ENG 214. CREATIVE WRITING POETRY: 

READING/WRITING 4 sh 

Along with readings of 20th century 
British, Irish and American poetry, 
students from all levels spend equal 
amounts of time discussing their own 
and others' poems. Study also includes 
reading quizzes, writing journals and 
poetry assignments. Prerequisite: ENG 
1 10. Winter term only. 

ENG 22 1 . BRITISH LITERATURE I 4 sh 

This study of British literature in its 
social and cultural contexts emphasizes 
the close reading of texts from the 
Anglo-Saxon, Medieval and Renaissance 
periods through the Enlightenment. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 222. BRITISH LITERATURE II 4 sh 

This study of British literature in 
its social and cultural contexts— 
from the Romantic, Victorian and 
Modernist periods through the present- 
emphasizes the close reading of texts 
representing the diversity of modern 
British literary expression. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. 

ENG 223. AMERICAN LITERATURE I 4 sh 

This study of American literature in 
its social and cultural contexts— from 
Colonial and Revolutionary periods 
through the Romantic period— empha- 
sizes the close reading of texts to 
examine American literary culture from 
its origins to the post-Civil War era. 
Prerequiste: ENGllO 

ENG 224. AMERICAN LITERATURE II 4 sh 

This study of American literature in its 
social and cultural contexts— from the 
post-Civil War era. Progressive and 
Modernist periods up to the present- 
involves close reading of selected texts 
to stress the expansion of the American 
literary canon. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 23 1 . WORLD LITERATURE 4 sh 

World Literature provides a study of 
English translations of selected master- 
pieces from Continental, Asian and 
African literature as reflected against 



ENGLISH 



their literary, historical and cultural 
backgrounds. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 238. AFRICAN-AMERICAN 

LITERATURE PRE- 1 945 4 sh 

This course traces the development of 
the themes of protest, accommodation 
and escapism found in fiction, poetry 
and drama of African-American writers 
before 1945. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 239. AFRICAN-AMERICAN 

LITERATURE SINCE 1945 4 sh 

An examination of works by major 
African- American writers since 1945 
focuses on making connections between 
writers. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 250. INTERPRETATIONS 

OF LITERATURE 4 sh 

Interpretations of Literature employs 
different critical approaches to interpret 
and evaluate poetry, drama and fiction 
from a variety of cultures. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. 

ENG 251. ENGLISH STUDIES 

IN BRITAIN 4 sh 

A Study-tour based in London empha- 
sizes the theatre and places of literaiy 
and cultural importance. The course 
includes excursions to such places as 
Stratford-upon-Avon, Stonehenge and 
Canterbury. Winter term only. No credit 
toward English minor. 

ENG 282. PRACTICUM IN ENGLISH 1 -3 sh 

This course provides opportunities for 
students to observe and record different 
types of writing produced in an office or 
business. Prerequisite: ENG 110, 
permission of instructor and advance 
arrangement. No credit toward General 
Studies requirements. 

LANGUAGE STUDY: GROUP I 

This selection of courses centers on 
studies in the structure and historical 
development of the English language 
and in the theory of rhetoric and 
composition. 



ENG 302. HISTORY OF THE 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 4 sh 

This study traces the historical develop- 
ment of the English language from its 
Indo-European origins to the present. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 303. LINGUISTICS 4 sh 

Linguistics is the study of the systems 
of language, including the phonology, 
morphology, semantics and varieties 
(social and regional) of the English 
language. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 304. RHETORICAL THEORY 4 sh 

In this study of the theories and philoso- 
phies underlying rhetoric and composi- 
tion, ranging from classical rhetoric to 
contemporary composition theory, 
students become familiar with major 
rhetorical and composition theorists, 
theories and the impact of these theories 
on writing and thinking. Theorists may 
include Aristotle, Quintilian, Ramus, 
Burke, Bakhtin, Shaughnessy and 
Kristeva. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 305. AMERICAN ENGLISH 4 sh 

This course examines the development 
of American English — from the 16th- 
century influences of Jamestown and 
Massachusetts settlers to Creoles 
developing along the Mexican border 
and in Florida. Study includes regional 
and social varieties of English, phonetics 
and literature that employs dialects. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1 10 

ADVANCED WRITING: GROUP II 

Courses in this group are specifically 
designed to provide practice in different 
kinds of writing beyond the introductory 
level. 



ENG 313. WRITING FOR THE 

PROFESSIONS 4 

Students study professional writing 
through problem solving. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. 



117 



sh 



ENGLISH 



118 



ENG 315. ADVANCED NONFICTION 

WRITING (Selected Focus) 4 sh 

In this writing workshop, students develop 
a specific aspect of writing ability (e.g., 
voice, stylistics) or practice a particular 
type of writing (e.g., essay, biography, 
travel writing). Focus changes each 
semester. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 316. ADVANCED CREATIVE 

WRITING: POETRY 4 sh 

This advanced workshop, centered 
around students' poems, also includes 
study of 20th century poetry (occasion- 
ally earlier) to learn poetic techniques 
and to recognize the many possibilities 
of poetic forms, subjects and voices. 
Prerequisite: ENG 2 1 3 or 2 1 4, or 
permission of instructor. 

ENG 317. ADVANCED CREATIVE 

WRITING: FICTION 4 sh 

This advanced workshop, centered 
around students' stories, also includes 
study of 20th century fiction (occasion- 
ally earlier) to learn techniques and to 
recognize possibilities for point of view, 
characterization, structure and diction. 
Prerequisite: ENG 213 or 214, or 
permission of instructor. 

ENG 319. WRITING CENTER 

WORKSHOP 4 sh 

The Writing Center Workshop enhances 
students' writing ability while they learn 
to tutor writing. Students are required 
to tutor four hours each week in Elon's 
Writing Center. Strong writing abilities 
and inteipersonal skills recommended. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

HISTORICAL STUDIES: GROUP III 

Courses in this group explore literature 
in historical, interdisciplinary and cross- 
cultural contexts. 

ENG 32 1 . CLASSICAL LITERATURE 4 sh 

This study of ancient Greek and Roman 
literature and culture includes authors 
such as Homer, Plato, Sophocles, Ovid 
and Virgil, with readings from mythol- 
ogy, the great epics of the Trojan War, 



drama, philosophy and lyric in modern 
translations. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 322. MEDIEVAL LITERATURE 4 sh 

This study of literature and culture of the 
European Middle Ages includes authors 
such as Dante, Chretien de Troyes, 
Chaucer and Malory, with readings from 
modern translations of epics such as 
Beowulf or The Song of Roland, poetry 
about love or religious experience such 
as The Divine Comedy, or narratives 
about adventure and chivalry, such as 
legends of King Arthur. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. 

ENG 323. RENAISSANCE LITERATURE 4 sh 

This study of British and Continental 
literature and culture of the 1 6th and early 
1 7th centuries includes authors such as 
Sidney, Marlowe, Montaigne, Shakespeare 
and Cervantes. Readings in Renaissance 
English from Elizabethan and lacobean 
drama, sonnet sequences, lyric and 
narrative poems and precursors of the 
modern novel, such as Don Quixote. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 324. ENLIGHTENMENT 4sh 

This study focuses on the great works 
of British, Continental and American 
literature during an age of reason and 
sensibility marked by industrial, 
scientific and political revolutions. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110, 

ENG 325. ROMANTICISM 4 sh 

Romanticism provides an interdiscipli- 
nary study of British, American and 
Continental Romantic literature in the 
context of art, music (especially opera), 
cultural life and intellectual history. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 326. REALISM AND THE 

LATER 19TH CENTURY 4 sh 

This study involves an interdisciplinary 
look at British, American and Continen- 
tal literary movements (realism, 
naturalism, symbolism and aestheti- 
cism), including reading selected 
masterworks in context of the intellec- 
tual and cultural life of the period. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 



ENGLISH 



ENG327. 17TH CENTURY 

LITERATURE 4 sh 

This study of "The Centuiy of Genius" 
includes worlcs by British and Continen- 
tal authors who ushered in the modern 
world. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 328. MODERNISM 4 sh 

This interdisciplinary study of modern- 
ism as a dominant intellectual move- 
ment of the 20th century explores 
topics such as alienation, the artist's 
role, the primitive, consciousness and 
the unconscious, human rights and the 
post modern. The literature is supple- 
mented by art, music and philosophical 
texts. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

CULTURAL STUDIES: GROUP IV 

Courses in this group emphasize 
the study of literature in its cultural 
context, often from the perspective 
of a particular social group. Regional, 
gender, ethnic and class issues are all 
possible concentrations. 

ENG 330. APPALACHIAN LITERATURE 4 sh 

Appalachian Literature involves a survey 
of 19th and 20th century Appalachian 
poetry, short and long fiction, drama, 
music, film and culture. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. 

ENG 332. LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH 4 sh 

Emphasis is given to major 20th century 
writers in this study of Southern 
literature, its background and themes. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 333. WOMEN IN LITERATURE: 

FEMINIST APPROACHES 4 sh 

Women In Literature studies modern and 
traditional works of literature interpreted 
or reinterpreted from the perspective of 
feminist literary theories. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. 

ENG 334. NATIVE AMERICAN 

LITERATURE 4 sh 

In an introduction to American Indian 
literature from the 18th century through 
the present, study includes special 



emphasis on contemporary writers 
of the Native American Renaissance. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 335. STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY 

LITERATURE 4 sh 

A Study of contemporary literature 
includes such topics as the French anti- 
novel, absurdist drama, metafiction and 
"magic realism." Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 336. HEMINGWAY AND 

THE EXPATRIATES 4 sh 

Emphasis in this centers on a study 
on the life and work of expatriates in 
Paris immediately after World War 1. 
Particular emphasis is given to Ernest 
Hemingway. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 337. ANGLO-IRISH LITERATURE 4 sh 

A study of major Anglo-Irish writers 
and their affinities with Irish histoiy, 
mythology, folklore and nationalism 
includes J. M. Synge, W. B. Yeats, Lady 
Gregory, James Joyce, Seamus J^eaney 
and others. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

AUTHOR COURSES: GROUP V 

Courses in this group focus on the works 
of individual authors who have captured 
and continue to hold the imaginations 
of readers. Typical offerings include 
Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Hardy, 
Dickinson, Gather, Faulkner and 
those listed below. 

ENG 340. DANTE ALIGHIERI 4 sh 

This close study covers Dante's major 
works in the context of their historical, 
cultural, religious and intellectual 
background in the Middle Ages, 
including Vita Nuova and The Divine 
Comedy. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 341. CHAUCER 4 sh 

A close study of Chaucer's major works 
in the context of their medieval intellec- 
tual and cultural background includes 
the greater portion of The Canterbuiy 
Tales, the dream visions, and Troilus 
and Criseyde. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 



119 



ENGLISH 



120 



ENG 342. SHAKESPEARE: 

THE TRAGEDIES 4 sh 

This study of Shakespeare's tragedies 
examines representative works within 
their intellectual, cultural and theatrical 
contexts. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 343. SHAKESPEARE: 

THE COMEDIES 4 sh 

This study of Shakespeare's comedies 
examines representative works in their 
intellectual, cultural and theatrical 
contexts. Prerequisite; ENG 110. 

ENG 344. ROBERT FROST 4 sh 

This study of Frost's early development 
as a lyric poet focuses on the close 
reading of his poetiy, criticism and 
masques in the context of New England 
regionalism and the emergence of 
Modernism in American letters. Prereq- 
uisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 345. JANE AUSTEN 4 sh 

Background study of 18th- and 19th- 
century England and the development 
of the novel are part of this examination 
of the life and writings of Austen. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 347. WILLIAM FAULKNER 4 sh 

This study of the short stories, novels 
and screenplays of one of America's 
(and the South's) most inventive and 
brilliant writers includes readings from 
As I Lay Dyhig; Go Down, Moses ; 
Sanctumy; Absalom, Absalom!; and 
The Hamlet. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 349. D. H. LAWRENCE 4 sh 

Study of the life and works of this 20th 
century master includes a special focus 
on how he turned his experiences into 
novels and poems. Lawrence's contro- 
versial ideas are viewed as his critical 
response to Modernism and the 
industrial civilization of his time. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

GENRE COURSES: GROUP VI 

These courses offer studies in specific 
types of literature, such as poetry, 



drama, the novel, the essay and the 
short story. Courses in genre include 
"kinds" of literature which cut across 
the more traditional genre labels. 

ENG 351. THE NOVEL 4 sh 

Focus and content vary in this course, 
which examines representative novels 
from different countries and ages. 
Typical emphases include the American, 
the British, the picaresque and the 
political novels and the Bildungsroman. 
This course sometimes carries an 
emphasis on gender. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. 

ENG 352. DRAMA 4 sh 

In a study of western drama from 
ancient Greece to the present, 
representative texts are examined in 
their historical and cultural contexts. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 353. POETRY 4 sh 

Examination of representative poetry 
from different cultures and ages includes 
at least one epic, shorter narratives, 
dramatic and lyric poetry. Each student 
selects one culture, historical period or 
type of poetry as the focus of an 
individual research project. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. 

ENG 354. THE SHORT STORY 4 sh 

Study of the short stoiy as a literary form 
spans from its origins and development 
by Poe, Chekhov and others to experi- 
mental contemporary writers. Typically, 
five or six collections by writers from a 
variety of cultures are read, with some 
attention to the problem of film adapta- 
tion. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 355. LAUGHTER 

AND COMEDY 4sh 

Students study the psychology of 
laughter and the philosophy of comedy. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 356. THE NOVEL: BRITISH 

WOMEN WRITERS 4 sh 

This study of novels by past and present 
British women writers, using feminist 



ENGLISH 



literary theories, also covers the 
development of the novel as a form and 
the expression of vi^omen's experience 
in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG357-IS. THE LONDON THEATRE 4sh 

Students see productions of Shakes- 
pearean and other classic dramas and 
experience more modern and contempo- 
rary plays - both fringe and mainstream 
- in this study of drama in the London 
Theatre. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Studies 
Abroad students only. 

ENG 358. MODERN POETRY: BRITISH 

AND AMERICAN 4 sh 

This study of British and American 
poetry from the first half of the 20th 
century includes close readings of Yeats, 
Auden, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Moore, 
H. D., Eliot and Pound. The course also 
addresses cultural context and radical 
changes in poetic forms during this 
period. Each student completes an 
extensive project (research, original 
interpretation, written and oral presen- 
tation) on a Modern poet not studied 
in class. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 359. AFRICAN-AMERICAN 

NOVELS 4 sh 

This study of novels by such writers 
as Baldwin, Ellison, Hurston, Walker, 
Wright, and Morrison gives attention 
to gender, place, alienation and the 
changes in forms of protest. Prerequi- 
site: ENG 110. 

GROUP VII SENIOR SEMINAR 

ENG 495. SENIOR SEMINAR 4 sh 

This course provides a synthesis of 
studies in the major with additional 
work on theory. Students participate 
in assessment of their major work, 
write an independent paper and 
conduct a class session on their chosen 
topic. Required for all ENG majors in the 
senior fall semester. Prerequisite: majors 
only or permission of instructor. 



SPECIAL TOPICS 

Special Topics courses involve studies of 
various topics, some of which fall outside 
the boundaries of traditional literary study. 
In addition to the courses listed below, 
offerings may include Literature of the 
Supernatural, Literature of Nonviolence, 
Alternate Languages. 

ENG 361. GENDER ISSUES 

IN CINEMA 4 sh 

This course explores how well film reveals «|2^ 
gender differences between men and 
women. Time is spent studying gender 
stereotyping, the psychological accuracy 
of film's representations of gender and 
gendered behavior of film directors. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 362. FILM CRITICISM 4 sh 

Film Criticism emphasizes how to 
interpret cinema critically, using films 
that illustrate cultural differences, 
periods and types of filmmaking and 
achievements in techniques and ideas of 
the greatest directors. Prerequisite: ENG 
1 10. (ENG 362 is the same as JC 362). 

ENG 363. LITERATURE AND CULTURE: 
INDIA, AFRICA AND 
WEST INDIES 4 sh 

This course examines ways in which 
works produced by some 20th-century 
Indian, African and West Indian (Carib- 
bean) writers embody the social, 
political and economic concerns of 
their emerging post-colonial cultures. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 365. LITERATURE AND THEOLOGY 4 sh 

Literature and Theology is an interdisci- 
plinary study focusing on relationships 
between literary and theological 
disciplines with special attention to 
literature illustrating various approaches 
to religious questions. Prerequisite: ENG 
1 10. (ENG 365 is the same as REL 365.) 

ENG 367. THE ARTHURIAN LEGEND 4 sh 

Course study traces the development 
of stories of King Arthur and the Round 
Table from their appearance in the early 



ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 



Middle Ages through the present. Genres 
include chronicle, poetry, fiction and 
cinema. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 38 1 . ENGLISH INTERNSHIP 4 sh 

Students have an opportunity to apply 
their writing skills in a business office. 
Pre- or co-requisite: ENG 313. No credit 
toward General Studies requirements. 

ENG 398. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 4 sh 

Children's literature examines the fields 
of children's and folk literature to 
discover material which satisfies 
educational requirements for children 
in elementary grades. No credit toward 
English major/minor. Prerequisites: EDU 
211, ENG no. 



ENG 399. YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 4 sh 

In this study of contemporary literature 
for young adult readers, students read 
texts appropriate to the adolescent, 
examine common themes, and apply 
critical approaches suitable for middle 
grades and secondary classrooms. 
Authors may include Judy Blume, Robert 
Cormier, S. E. Hinton, Madeleine L'Engle, 
Gary Paulsen, Katherine Patterson and 
Cynthia Voigt. Credit toward English 
teacher certification. No credit toward 
English major/minor. Prerequisites: 
EDU 211, ENG 110. 



ENG 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 sh 



ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

Coordinator: Associate Professor Mason 

Advisory Committee: Professors: Brumbaugh, Chase, R Harris 

Associate Professors: Arcaro, Barbour, Gooch, Weston 

Assistant Professor: Kingston 

Environmental Studies is a broad field in which environmental issues and problems 
are best examined using applications from the social sciences, life and physical sciences 
and humanities. Elon College offers a B.S. in environmental studies with a concentra- 
tion in either environmental policy or field science. The program is truly interdiscipli- 
nary, since environmental concerns are investigated from a holistic perspective. 

A healthy environment is critical to the world's future. Overpopulation, pollution 
and natural resources depletion affect everyone. As our awareness of the problem 
grows, so does our need to find effective long-lasting solutions. The environmental 
studies professional must have a fundamental understanding of the sciences (especially 
biology and chemistry), economics, law, ethics and public policy. 

The program— purposeful and well-balanced with a strong core— enables students 
to focus their personal preferences through upper-level courses emphasizing policy or 
field investigation. However, the curriculum does concentrate on the essential scientific 
knowledge needed to create realistic solutions to environmental problems. 

The goals of the environmental studies program are: (1) to provide students 
with a broad interdisciplinary foundation for understanding natural resources issues; 
(2) to develop students' understanding of economic activities and their role in natural 
resources management and the decision-making process regarding environmental 
issues; (3) to enhance students' decision-making capabilities in the area of environ- 
mental conservation and citizen advocacy for balance between economic develop- 
ment and environmental protection; (4) to build students' knowledge of the basic 
scientific concepts that govern the operation of natural ecosystems; (5) to adequately 
prepare students for employment in responsible professional positions in environmen- 
tal policy and environmental risk assessment in the public and private sectors; and 
(6) to prepare students for successful tenures in graduate school programs in environ- 
mental policy and science curricula. 



ENVIRONMENTAL 



STUDIES 



A Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Environmental 
Studies requires the following: 

Energy and the Enviornment 4 sh 

Introduction to Environmental Science 4 sh 

Introduction to Population Biology 3 sh 

Population Biology Lab 1 sh 

Organismal Biology and Field Techniques 4 sh 

General Ecology 4 sh 

General Chemistry 1 3 sh 

General Chemistry II 3 sh 

General Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

General Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

Principles of Economics 4 sh 

Introduction to American Government 4 sh 

Internship 2 sh 

Senior Seminar 4 sh 

Choose one course from the following: 4 sh 

PHL 348 Environmental Ethics 

REL 348 Environmental Ethics 

Choose one course from the following: 4 sh 

MTH 1 14 Elementary Statistics 

ECO 202 Statistics for Economics and Business 



PHY 


110 


ES 


110 


BIO 


112 


BIO 


114 


ES 


215 


BIO 


452 


CHM 


III 


CHM 


112 


CHM 


113 


CHM 


114 


ECO 


201 


PS 


III 


ES 


381 


ES 


461 



TOTAL 

Select one of the following two concentrations: 

Science Concentration 

CHM 211 Organic Chemistry I 
CHM 2 1 3 Organic Chemistry I Lab 
CHM 305 Environmental Chemistry 
PHY 103 Basics Concepts in Geology 
Choose one course from the following: 
BIO 422 Aquatic Biology 
CHM 3 1 1 Quantitative Analysis 



TOTAL 

Policy Concentration 

PS 328 Public Policy 

ECO 335 Economics of Environmental Issues 

PS 428 Environmental Politics & Legislation 

Choose one course from the following: 

SOC 332 Contemporary Environmental Issues 
PS 431 Policy Analysis & Program Evaluation 



50 sh 



3sh 
I sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 



16 sh 



4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 



123 



TOTAL 



16 sh 



FINE ARTS 

ES 1 1 0. INTRODUCTION TO 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 4 sh 

This course explores the fundamental 
principles of the biological and physical 
sciences behind natural ecosystems. 
Central focus is an investigation of the 
root causes of the global environmental 
crisis: overpopulation, natural resources 
depletion and pollution. Students 
consider different u'orld views and 
the development of solutions. Satisfies 
124 the non-laboratory science requirement 
for General Studies. (ES 110 is the same 
course as BIO 1 10.) 

ES 2 1 5. ORGANISMAL BIOLOGY 

AND FIELD TECHNIQUES 4 sh 

This course examines the basic concepts 
of plant and animal form and function 
and the fundamentals of plant and 
animal systematics, with a focus on 
herbaceous and woody plants, soil and 
aquatic invertebrates. Students investi- 
gate the natural history of local plant 
and animal species and their role in 
community dynamics. Laboratory 
experiences emphasize keying and 
identification, field methodologies of 

FINE ARTS 



specimen collection and preservation, 
sampling techniques, and population 
estimation procedures for terrestrial 
and aquatic ecosystems. Satisfies the 
General Studies lab science requirement. 
No credit toward the major or minor. 
Prerequisites: ES/BIO 110, BIO 112, 114. 
(ES 215 is the same course as BIO 215.) 

ES 38 1 . INTERNSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL 
SCIENCE 2^4sh 

An internship provides work experience 
at an advanced level in an environmental 
science field. Prerequisite: junior/senior 
standing as an ES major. 

ES461. SEMINAR: ENVIRONMENTAL 
IMPACT ASSESSMENT AND 
POLICY DEVELOPMENT 4 sh 

Students cooperate in a semester-long 
project, conducting a complete field 
investigation of a land/water develop- 
ment proposal. The course provides an 
opportunity for the students to apply 
their knowledge, analytical and prob- 
lem-solving skills and ethical perspec- 
tives in the creation of a report that 
could be used by a municipal or regional 
planning organization. Prerequisite: 
senior standing as an ES major. 



Chah] Department of Fine Ai'ts: Professor Myers 
Assistant Professor: Rubeck 
Part-time Instructor: Hassell 



FA 211. INTRODUCTION 

TO FINE ARTS 4 sh 

This comparative study of the major 
artistic forms involves readings, 
exhibitions, cultural events, lectures 
and workshops with visiting artists, 
through which students discover 
works of art, their uses, purposes 
and aesthetic values. 

FA 25 1 . FINE ARTS STUDIES 

IN ENGLAND 4 sh 

A study-tour of London emphasizes 
theatres, concerts and places of cultural 
importance. Winter only. 



FA 313. BRITISH ART AND 

ARCHITECTURE 4 sh 

Field trips to museums and historically 
relevant sites complement classroom 
study of the art and architecture of 
England from the Anglo-Saxon and 
Roman periods to the 19th century. 

FA 369. FINE ARTS IN THE 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Early childhood and elementary 
education majors become familiar with 
current approaches to teaching the arts 
with emphasis placed on incorporating 
the arts into daily instruction. Prerequi- 
sites: junior standing and acceptance 
to the education department. 



sh 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Chair, Department of Foreign Languages: Associate Professor Romer 

Associate Professors: Lunsford, Rodriguez, Wilson 

Assistant Professor: Cobos 

Part-time Assistant Professor: Willcinson 

Part-time Instructor: Vitti 

Students preparing for the twenty-first century will encounter a global economy 
and a world shrinking due to advances in communication technology. Thus, the study 
of foreign languages is more essential than ever. 

The Department of Foreign Languages offers courses in seven languages and 
programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in French or in Spanish. 125 
The student majoring in French or Spanish may also choose to complete the program 
leading to teacher certification. 

In the French and Spanish programs, the course offerings are balanced between 
literary, cultural, and linguistic study. Emphasis is put on practical use of the language, 
and classroom learning is enhanced by video and computer technology and study 
abroad opportunities. 

A major in French requires the following courses; 

FR321 Conversation 4 sh 

FR 322 Advanced Conversation and Composition 4 sh 

FR 331 Introduction to French Literature I 4 sh 

FR 332 Introduction to French Literature II 4 sh 

FR34I Francophone Literature 4 sh 

FR36I French Civilization 4 sh 

FR 362 Francophone Cultures Outside France 4 sh 

FR401 French Linguistics 4 sh 

Two additional electives at the 300-400 level 8 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 

Study abroad is strongly recommended. Credits earned in an approved study 
abroad program will substitute for requirements for the major. 

A minor in French requires 20 hours, eight of which must be above the 310 level. 
A winter term abroad is encouraged. 

A major in Spanish requires the following courses: 

SPN 32 1 Conversation 4 sh 

SPN 322 Advanced Conversation and Composition 4 sh 

SPN 331 Spanish Literature I 4 sh 

SPN 332 Spanish Literature II 4 sh 

SPN 341 Latin American Literature 4 sh 

SPN 361 Spanish Civilization 4 sh 

SPN 362 Latin American Civilization 4 sh 

; SPN 401 Spanish Linguistics 4 sh 

' Two additional electives at the 300-400 level 8 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 



FOREIGN 



LANGUAGES 



Study abroad is strongly recommended. Credits earned in an approved study 
abroad program will substitute for requirements for the major. 

A minor in Spanisli requires 20 hours, eight of which must be above the 310 
level. A winter term abroad is encouraged. 

A major in French or Spanish with Secondary Teacher Certification 

requires the above 40 semester hours plus 35 semester hours professional studies 
courses in Education and Psychology. 



CHINESE 

CHN 1 1 0. ELEMENTARY CHINESE 4 sh 

126 The introductoiy course in Chinese 
language and culture emphasizes 
practical use of the language. 

CHN 2 1 0. INTERMEDIATE CHINESE 4 sh 

Intermediate study involves systematic 
language review in a cultural context. 
Prerequisite: CHN 1 10. 

CHN 3 1 0. ADVANCED CHINESE 4 sh 

This course further develops speaking 
and writing skills within a cultural 
context. Prerequisite: CHN 210. 

FRENCH 

PR 110. ELEMENTARY FRENCH 4 sh 

Introductory study in French language 
and culture emphasizes practical use 
of the language. 

FR 2 1 0. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 4 sh 

A continuation of systematic language 
review in a cultural context. Prerequi- 
site: FR 1 10 or 2 years of high school 
French. 

FR 3 1 0. ADVANCED FRENCH 4 sh 

The advanced course is designed to 
further develop speaking and writing 
skills in a cultural context. Prerequisite: 
FR 2 1 or 3+ years of high school 
French. 

FR321. CONVERSATION 4 sh 

Conversational study develops abilities 
in everyday spoken communication with 
emphasis on building vocabulary and 
speaking proficiency. Prerequisite: FR 
310 or 4+ years of high school French 
or permission of instructor. 



FR 322. ADVANCED CONVERSATION 

AND COMPOSITION 4 sh 

Students focus on refinements in 
structure, oral and written communica- 
tion for specific purposes. Prerequisite: 
FR 3 1 or permission of instructor. 

FR33I. INTRODUCTION TO 

FRENCH LITERATURE I 4 sh 

Major texts of literature of France from 
the Middle Ages through the 18th 
century are taught in their historical, 
social and cultural context. Prerequisite: 
FR 3 1 or permission of instructor. 

FR 332. INTRODUCTION TO 

FRENCH LITERATURE II 4 sh 

Major French literary texts (since the 
time of Napoleon) are taught in their 
historical, social and cultural context. 
Prerequisite: FR 310 or permission of 
instructor. 

FR341, FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE 4 sh 

This study covers the major texts of 
French expression from Africa, the 
Antilles and Canada. Prerequisite: 
FR 310 or permission of instructor. 

FR 36 1 . FRENCH CIVILIZATION 4 sh 

Study of the history, geography, people 
and institutions of France from prehis- 
toric times to the present emphasizes 
France's many contributions to Western 
civilization. Prerequisite: FR 310 or 
permission of instructor. 

FR 362. FRANCOPHONE CULTURES 

OUTSIDE FRANCE 4 sh 

This course studies regional cultures 
around the world influenced by France, 
notably Africa, the Antilles and Canada. 
Prerequisite: FR 310 or permission of 
instructor. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



FR 37 1 . SPECIAL TOPICS 4 sh 

Topics may include advanced study 
of cinema, selected literaiy authors, 
periods, genres or regions. Prerequisite: 
FR 31 or permission of instructor. 

FR 40 1 . FRENCH LINGUISTICS 4 sh 

Practice in phonetic transcriptions and 
sound discrimination is part of this study 
of the French language system, includ- 
ing phonology, morphology and 
semantics. Prerequisite: FR 310 or 
permission of instructor. 

FR481. INTERNSHIP 2-4 sh 

For majors/minors only. 

FR 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 2-4 sh 

GERMAN 

GER 1 1 0. ELEMENTARY GERMAN 4 sh 

An introduction to German language 
and culture emphasizes practical use 
of the language. 

GER 2 1 0. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 4 sh 

Intermediate study is a systematic 
language review in a cultural context. 
Prerequisite: GER 110 or 2 years of high 
school German. 

GER 3 1 0. ADVANCED GERMAN 4 sh 

The advanced course is designed to 
further develop speaking and writing 
skills in a cultural context. Prerequisite: 
GER 2 1 or 3+ years of high school 
German. 

GREEK 

GRK 1 10. ELEMENTARY GREEK 4 sh 

This intensive study covers Hellenistic 
Greek grammar and vocabulary. 

GRK 2 1 0. INTERMEDIATE GREEK 4 sh 

Intermediate study includes readings in 
Greek from the First Letter of John and 
the Gospel of Mark in the Greek New 
Testament to improve grammar and 
vocabulary. 

GRK 3 1 0. ADVANCED GREEK 4 sh 

Readings include the letters of Paul 
in the Greek New Testament to reach 
advanced levels of grammar and 
vocabulary. 



ITALIAN 

ITLIIO. ELEMENTARY ITALIAN 4 sh 

An introduction to Italian language and 
culture emphasizes practical use of the 
language. 

ITL2I0. INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN 4 sh 

Intermediate study is a systematic 
language review in a cultural context. 
Prerequisite: ITL 1 10 or 2 years of high 
school Italian. 

ITL 310. ADVANCED ITALIAN 4 sh 

The advanced course is designed to 
further develop speaking and writing 
skills in a cultural context. Prerequisite: 
ITL 2 1 or 3+ years of high school 
Italian. 

JAPANESE 

JPNIIO. ELEMENTARY JAPANESE 4 sh 

An introduction to Japanese language 
and culture emphasizes practical use 
of the language. 

JPN2I0. INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE 4 sh 

Intermediate study is a systematic 
language review in a cultural context. 
Prerequisite: JPN 110 or two years of 
high school lapanese. 

JPN 310. ADVANCED JAPANESE 4 sh 

Advanced Japanese further develops 
speaking and writing skills in a cultural 
context. Prerequisite: JPN 210 or 3+ 
years of high school Japanese. 

SPANISH 

SPN 110. ELEMENTARY SPANISH 4 sh 

An introduction to Spanish language 
and culture emphasizes practical use 
of the language. 

SPN 2 1 0. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 4 sh 

Intermediate study is a systematic 
language review in a cultural context. 
Prerequisite: SPN 1 10 or 2 years of high 
school Spanish. 

SPN 310. ADVANCED SPANISH 4 sh 

The advanced course further develops 
speaking and writing skills in a cultural 
context. Prerequisite: SPN 210 or 3+ 
years of high school Spanish. 



127 



GENERAL 



STUDIES 



128 



SPN 32 1 . CONVERSATION 4 sh 

Conversational Spanish involves 
intensive practice in everyday communi- 
cation situations with emphasis on 
vocabulary and speaking proficiency. 
Prerequisite: SPN 310 or permission of 
instructor. 

SPN 322. ADVANCED CONVERSATION 

AND COMPOSITION 4 sh 

Intensive practice in oral and written 
expression focuses on refinements in 
structure, conversation and writing for 
specific purposes. Prerequisite: SPN 310 
or permission of instructor. 

SPN 33 1 . SPANISH LITERATURE I 4 sh 

Study surveys the development of 
Spanish literature from its beginnings in 
the Middle Ages through the Renais- 
sance and the Golden Age. Prerequisite: 
SPN 310 or permission of instructor. 

SPN 332. SPANISH LITERATURE II 4 sh 

Study continues a survey of Spanish 
literature during the 18th, 19th and 20th 
centuries. Prerequisite: SPN 310 or 
permission of instructor. 

SPN 341. LATIN AMERICAN 

LITERATURE 4 sh 

This survey covers the literature of the 
Spanish-speaking countries of Latin 
America from the discovery to the 
present. Prerequisite: SPN 310 or 
permission of instructor. 



SPN 36 1 . SPANISH CIVILIZATION 4 sh 

A study of the history geography and 
people of Spain— from prehistoric times 
to the present— emphasizes Spain's 
many contributions to Western civiliza- 
tion. Prerequisite: SPN 310 or permission 
of instructor. 



sh 



SPN 362. LATIN AMERICAN 
CIVILIZATION 

This course examines Latin American 
geography history, art, architecture, 
music, government, economy ethnicity, 
languages and culture, including a study 
of each country. Prerequisite: SPN 310 or 
permission of instructor. 

SPN 3 7 1 . SPECIAL TOPICS 4 sh 

Topics may include advanced study of 
language, cinema, selected literary 
authors, periods, genres or regions. 
Prerequisite: SPN 310 or permission of 
instructor. 

SPN 401. SPANISH LINGUISTICS 4 sh 

Study of the Spanish language system — 
phonology, morphology and semantics — 
includes practice in phonetic transcrip- 
tions and sound discrimination. Prerequi- 
site: SPN 310 or permission of instructor. 



SPN 481. INTERNSHIP 

For majors/minors only. 

SPN 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 



2^4 sh 



2A sh 



GENERAL STUDIES 

The General Studies program gives breadth as well as depth to a college educa- 
tion. It provides students with opportunities to see the broad view of human civiliza- 
tion, experience great ideas and art, and learn the science and math skills that no 
contemporary leader or individual thinker can be without. 

Through training in writing and other communication skills as well as in learning 
to work independently, to think critically and constructively, to handle quantitative 
data, to respect cultures world wide, and to develop habits of responsible leadership, 
this program develops the whole person. It is a major focus of a college career from 
beginning to end-challenging students, preparing them for both leadership and 
independent thought, and, most of all, deepening and enriching their lives. 



GEOGRAPHY 



GS 1 10. THE GLOBAL EXPERIENCE 4 sh 

This first-year seminar examines 
public responsibility in a global context. 
It explores some of the implications 
created by cultural and natural diversity 
and the possibilities for human commu- 
nication and cooperation within this 
diversity. The course emphasizes 
student and faculty creativity through 
active and collaborative learning. 
The seminar is writing intensive. 

GS 300-499. ADVANCED INTERDISCI- 
PLINARY SEMINARS 4 sh 

These upper-level interdisciplinary 
seminars for juniors and seniors 
continue the emphasis upon integration 
of disciplines and skills that was begun 
in The Global Experience and other 
first year core classes. The topics of 
the seminars are flexible, reflecting 
the interests and experiences of the 



faculty facilitator. The seminars are 
writing intensive. 

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING 1 unit 

The Experiential Learning Requirement 
asks students to practice close 
observation of the world around them 
and to reflect insightfully about those 
observations. Exposure to diversity 
helps students see the interrelationships 
between academic studies and other 
experiences. The requirement may 
be met in one of four ways: 1) in field- 
based courses like internships, study 
abroad, practicums, co-ops, and student 
teaching; 2) through 40 hours of service 
or volunteer activities; 3) through 
a leadership role; and 4) through 
a different activity that will allow 
the student to observe and reflect 
an his or her experience. 



129 



GEOGRAPHY 

Coordinator: Assistant Professor Gates 

A minor in Geography requires the following courses; 
GEO 121 Earth Science 4 sh 

GEO 131 The World's Regions 4 sh 

One course from 4 sh 

BIO 301 Environmental Conservation 

PHY 103 Introduction to Geology 

PS 241 International Relations 
Four semester hours of GEO elective 4 sh 

Four additional semester hours chosen from 4 sh 

GEO elective 

BIO 301 Environmental Conservation 

PHY 103 Introduction to Geology 

PS 241 International Relations 

(courses may not be counted twice) 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



GEO 121. EARTH SCIENCE 4 sh 

Earth science involves study of the 
natural environment, its elements and 
its processes, including environmental 



degradation and protection. Students 
learn to use both traditional and 
electronic data sources, atlases 
and methods of data presentation. 



HEALTH 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND LEISURE 



130 



GEO 131. THE WORLD'S 

REGIONS 4 sh 

This survey of the regions of the world 
emphasizes place names and environ- 
mental and human characteristics 
which provide both the common traits 
and the distinctive characteristics of 
different places. Students analyze 
change, problems, potentials and 
alternative futures and use traditional 
and electronic data sources, atlases and 
methods of data presentation. 

GEO 311. GEOGRAPHY 

OF NORTH AMERICA 4 sh 

In studying the United States, Canada 
and Mexico, students focus on place 
names, regional differences in environ- 
mental and human characteristics, print 
and electronic atlases and information 
sources and mapping methods for 
spatial data. 



GEO 321. GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE 4 sh 

Study of Europe, including the European 
CIS countries, emphasizes place names, 
regional variation in environmental and 
human characteristics, print and 
electronic atlases and information 
sources and mapping methods for 
spatial data. 

GEO 331. GEOGRAPHY 

OF NORTH CAROLINA 4 sh 

In studying North Carolina and its 
regions, students concentrate on place 
names, regional variation in environ- 
mental and human characteristics, print 
and electronic atlases and information 
sources and mapping methods for 
spatial data. 

GEO 481. INTERNSHIP 

IN GEOGRAPHY 1-4 sh 

Internship is limited to 4 semester hours 
credit toward geography minor. 
Prerequisite: GEO 121, 131 and permis- 
sion of instructor. 



GEO 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 



-4sh 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND LEISURE 

Chat, Department of Health, Physical Education and Leisure: Professor Brown 

Professors: Beedle, A. White 

Associate Professors: Calhoun, Drummond, Parham 

Assistant Professors: Baker, Brewer, Hart, Leonard, Ross, Simons, Waters, Wellford 

Instructors: Best, Brodowicz, Staton 

The Department of Health, Physical Education and Leisure offers majors in Health 
Education, Leisure/Sport Management, Physical Education and Sports Medicine. 



HEALTH EDUCATION 

The Health Education curriculum is designed to prepare teachers of health and 
safety education (kindergarten through senior high school) in both public and private 
school systems. The program of study incorporates school goals and objectives for 
establishing and maintaining quality health education programs that are planned, 
comprehensive, personalized, practical, sequential and oriented toward mental, social 
and physical well-being. 

This is accomplished through a wide range of specialized theory courses and 
many opportunities to apply, evaluate and refine necessary skills in laboratory 
settings. Studies in health education explore ways to educate students and the public 



HE 


281 


HE 


321 


HE 


324 


HE 


325 


HE 


326 


HE 


421 


PE 


305 


PE 


411 


BIO 


161 


BIO 


162 


EDU 


427 



HEALTH EDUCATION 

about contemporary health issues such as personal safety, nutrition, substance abuse, 
disease prevention and human sexuality. 

A major in Health Education requires the following courses: 

HE 220 First Aid 2 sh 

Practicum in Health Education 2 sh 

Health Services and Consumerism 4 sh 

Nutrition 4 sh 

Substance Abuse and Human Behavior 4 sh 

Human Sexuality 4 sh 

Health of the Body Systems 4 sh -2«i 

Legal Aspects in HPEL 2 sh 

Measurement and Evaluation 4 sh 

Human Anatomy 4 sh 

Human Physiology 4 sh 
Materials and Methods of Teaching 

Health and Safety 4 sh 

TOTAL 42 sh 

Students desiring teacher certification should also take the professional studies 
requirements listed for Special Subjects areas (K-I2) in the Department of Education. 

Physical Education endorsement for the Health Education major 
requires the following courses: 

EDU 423 Materials and Methods 

of Teaching Physical Education 4 sh 

Sixteen additional hours chosen from the following courses: 16 sh 

History/Foundations of Sport/Physical Education 
Motor Learning Theory for Teaching and Coaching 
Kinesiology 

Theory of Coaching (2 sh) 
Elementary and Adapted Physical Education (K-6) 
Administration and Leadership including the 
following courses of which there is a 
maximum limit of four courses 

Tennis (1 sh) 

Recreational Sports (I sh) 

Golf (1 sh) 

Beginning Swimming and Emergency Water Safety (I sh) 

Lifeguard Training (2 sh) 

Basketball (1 sh) 

Conditioning/Weight Training (1 sh) 

Softball (I sh) 

Aerobic Conditioning (I sh) 

TOTAL 20 sh 



PE2II 


PE310 


PE32I 


PE34I 


PE360 


PE4I0 


PE 100 


PE 103 


PE 105 


PE 106 


PE 107 


PE 108 


PE 109 


PE 110 


PE III 



HEALTH EDUCATION 



132 



A minor in Health Education requires the following courses: 

HE 321 Health Services and Consumerism 4 sh 

HE 324 Nutrition 4 sh 

HE 325 Substance Abuse and Human Behavior 4 sh 

HE 326 Human Sexuality 4 sh 

Four semester hours chosen from additional courses 

required for the Health Education major. 



TOTAL 

HE 110. WELLNESS 3 sli 

Students study the components of a 
lifestyle of wholeness and well-being 
and develop a lifelong personal wellness 
program based on the physiological and 
psychological principles of wellness/ 
fitness and personal decision-making. 

HE 120. CONTEMPORARY HEALTH 3 sh 

A Study of contemporaiy health prob- 
lems and issues, including such topics 
as mental health, drug abuse, human 
sexuality, physical fitness, nutrition and 
diseases. 

HE 220. FIRST AID 2 sh 

Emphasizes preparing individuals to 
act responsibly in emergency situations; 
includes requirements for standard first 
aid and community CPR. 

HE 28 1 . PRACTICUM IN HEALTH 

EDUCATION 2 sh 

This course introduces health education 
majors to the health professions through 
interviews, observations and shadowing 
of community health practitioners in 
the workplace. Students are supervised 
and evaluated by faculty. Arrangements 
with professors should be made prior 
to the semester taken. Prerequisite; 
for majors only. 

HE 321. HEALTH SERVICES 

AND CONSUMERISM 4 sh 

This introduction to comprehensive 
health education emphasizes health 
trends, objectives, products, services 
and factors that influence personal 
choice in the health marketplace. 
Students study methods of identifying 
and managing major health risk 
behaviors and investigate health 



20 sh 

education in the school and community, 
health services, resources, networking 
and health promotion. Experiential 
hours in a community health agency 
required. 

HE 324. NUTRITION 4 sh 

A comprehensive study of nutrient 
basics, digestion, metabolism., vitamins, 
minerals, supplements, steroids, weight 
management, eating disorders, nutri- 
tional deficiencies and imbalances. 
Emphasizes practical application of 
nutrition concepts throughout the life 
cycle and investigates food technology 
and food safety. 

HE 325. SUBSTANCE ABUSE 

AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR 4 sh 

Students study the interactions among 
personality, psychoactive agents, and 
societal and psychological motivations. 
Drug abuse is examined from the 
perspectives of pharmacology, 
psychosocial impact, prevention 
strategies and rehabilitation. 

HE 326. HUMAN SEXUALITY 4 sh 

A comprehensive study of biological and 
psychosocial sexuality throughout the 
life cycle, including male and female 
physiology, contraception, pregnancy, 
childbirth, sexually transmitted diseases, 
gender roles, intimate relationships, 
parenting and deviant sexual behavior. 

HE 362. HEALTHFUL LIVING IN THE 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 sh 

Provides a study of health, safety and 
physical education needs of elementary 
children (including content and method- 
ology) and the integration of those 
needs with the curriculum. 



LEISURE/ SPORT 



MANAGEMENT 



HE 421. HEALTH OF THE 

BODY SYSTEMS 4 sh 

Students study the interdependency of 
body systems and diseases and condi- 
tions that affect human health and well 
being. Topics include the historical 
foundation of health professions, 
immunology, pathophysiology of 
prominent acute and chronic diseases, 
sociocultural factors that influence 
health, and consequences and preven- 
tion of major health risk behaviors. 
Methods of health appraisal and 



screening are also investigated. 
Prerequisites: BIO 161, 162 

HE 481. INTERNSHIP IN 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

(for non-teaching majors only) 4 sh 

This course provides health education 
majors with practical work experience 
in a health care organization or health 
service agency. Students should make 
arrangements with their professors the 
semester before taking the internship. 
Prerequisite: permission of department. 



HE 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1^4 sh 



LEISURE/SPORT MANAGEMENT 

Study in Eton's Leisure/Sport Management program offers excellent preparation 
for those wishing to enhance quality of life for themselves and others through leisure 
opportunity. Specifically, students develop a philosophical foundation in leisure and 
sport, acquire a knowledge base in business administration, study inteipersonal skills 
applicable to the leisure setting and learn by active participation. 

A major in Leisure/Sport Management requires the following courses: 

LSM212 Introduction to Leisure/Sport Management 4 sh 

LSM 326 Planning and Maintenance Management 4 sh 

LSM 327 Leisure/Sport Programming 4 sh 

LSM 425 Leisure and the Environment 2 sh 

LSM 461 Senior Seminar 2 sh 

LSM 48! Internship in Leisure/Sport Management 6 sh 

PE 305 Legal Aspects in HPEL 2 sh 

PE 410 Administration and Leadership 4 sh 

HE 220 First Aid 2 sh 

SM4I5 Research Methods 4 sh 

ACC 201 Introduction to Financial Accounting 4 sh 

BA 302 Business Communications 4 sh 

BA3I1 Principles of Marketing 4 sh 

PA 231 Introduction to Public Administration 4 sh 

ECO 201 Principles of Economics 4 sh 



TOTAL 



54 sh 



A minor in Leisure/Sport Management requires the following courses: 
LSM 212 Introduction to Leisure/Sport Management 4 sh 

LSM 326 Planning and Maintenance Management 4 sh 

LSM 327 Leisure/Sport Programming 4 sh 

LSM 425 Leisure and the Environment 2 sh 

LSM 471 Senior Seminar 2 sh 



TOTAL 



16 sh 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



LSM 212. INTRODUCTION TO LEISURE/ 

SPORT MANAGEMENT 4 sll 

An introduction to leisure/sport 
management fundamentals emphasizing 
the role and relevance of each to society. 
Students study terminology, philoso- 
phies and evolution of leisure, internal 
and external recreation factors, leisure 
concepts and contemporaiy issues. 

LSM 325. LEISURE AND AGING 3 sh 

Students examine the leisure needs and 
characteristics of older adults, focusing 
on problems inherent in leisure service 
delivery systems for aging clientele. 
(LSM 325 is the same as HUS 325.) 

LSM 326. FACILITY PLANNING 
AND MAINTENANCE 
MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

This study focuses on area and facility 
planning and maintenance principles in 
leisure settings, including developing a 
master plan, and analyzing the relation- 
ship of maintenance and planning to risk 
management, visitor control, vandalism 
and law enforcement. 

LSM 327. LEISURE/SPORT LEADERSHIP 

AND PROGRAMMING 4 sh 

Students study the principles of leader- 
ship and group dynamics as they apply 
to leisure activity programming and 
learn to identify, develop and apply 
component skills such as needs assess- 
ment, inventory, evaluation, etc. 



LSM 425. LEISURE AND 

THE ENVIRONMENT 2 sh 

This course examines relationships 
between outdoor recreation and the 
natural environment, including such 
topics as spiritual relationships of 
recreation to nature, social and psycho- 
logical aspects of the outdoor experi- 
ence and resource policies. 

LSM 46 1 . SENIOR SEMINAR 2 sh 

Students review their major work and 
education and demonstrate ability to 
analyze contemporary issues/problems 
in leisure and sport management. 

LSM 481. INTERNSHIP IN LEISURE/ 

SPORT MANAGEMENT 6sh 

This course provides students with 240 
supervised hours (agency/college) of 
experiential exposure in the area of their 
vocational interest. Students demon- 
strate knowledge, skills, abilities and 
competencies in the areas of: organiza- 
tion and administration, leadership 
techniques, program planning and 
implementation, fiscal administration, 
personnel development and supervision, 
public and political relations and area/ 
facility planning, development and 
maintenance. Students will submit the 
following to the academic supervisor: 
learning objectives; weekly reports; and 
an agency survey showing comprehen- 
sive knowledge of the agency. Arrange- 
ments with a professor should be made 
prior to the semester in which the 
internship is taken. Prerequisite: for 
majors only. 



LSM 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 



-4sh 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Physical Education curriculum is designed to prepare students to become 
teachers. The program is broad-based and includes evaluating and improving the 
student's psychomotor and cognitive skills through a wide range of activity courses, 
specialized theory courses and continued opportunity for applying these skills and 
concepts in laboratory settings. 

Through this study students gain knowledge of the concepts and skills related 
to sport and physical activity. Graduates in this major are successful teachers and 
coaches and many pursue graduate degrees. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



A major in Physical Education requires the following courses: 

DAN 115 Folk, Square and Social Dance 1 sh 

PE 102 Gymnastics 1 sh 

Four courses chosen from 4 sh 



PE 100 


Tennis 




PE 101 


Raquetball 




PE 103 


Recreational Sports 




PE 104 


Dance 




PE 105 


Golf 




PE 106 


Beginning Swimming and Emergency Water Safety 


PE 108 


Basketball 




PE 109 


Conditioning/Weight Training 




PE 110 


Softball 




PE 111 


Aerobic Conditioning 




PE 112 


Soccer 




PE 113 


Volleyball 




PE 211 


History/Foundations of Sport/Physical Education 


4sh 


PE 305 


Legal Aspects of HPEL 


2sh 


PE 310 


Motor Learning Theory for Teaching and Coaching 


4sh 


PE 321 


Kinesiology 


4sh 


PE 341 


Theory of Coaching 


2sh 


PE 360 


Elementary and Adapted Physical Education (K-6) 


4sh 


PE 410 


Administration and Leadership 


4sh 


PE 411 


Measurement and Evaluation 


4sh 


HE 220 


First Aid 


2sh 


SM 422 


Physiology of Exercise 


4sh 


BIO 161 


Human Anatomy 


4sh 


BIO 162 


Human Physiology 


4 sh 



TOTAL 48 sh 

Students desiring teacher certification should also take the professional studies 
requirements listed for Special Subjects areas (K-12) in the Department of Educa- 
tion. (EDU 450 not required). 

Health Education endorsement for persons with PE certification requires the 
following courses: 

EDU 427 Materials and Methods 

of Teaching Health and Safety 4 sh 

Fourteen hours chosen from the following courses: 14 sh 

HE 220 First Aid 

HE 321 Health Services and Consumerism 

HE 324 Nutrition 

HE 325 Substance Abuse and Human Behavior 

HE 326 Human Sexuality 

HE 42 1 Health of the Body Systems 

TOTAL 18 sh 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



A minor in Physical Education requires the following courses: 

Four courses chosen from one-hour skills classes 4 sh 

PE 310 Motor Learning Theory for Teaching 

and Coaching 4 sh 

PE 360 Elementary and Adapted 

Physical Education (K-6) 4 sh 

EDU 423 Materials and Methods of Teaching 

Physical Education 4 sh 

One course from 

PE 342 Methods of Coaching Football 2 sh 

PE 343 Methods of Coaching Basketball 2 sh 

PE 344 Methods of Coaching Track and Field 

and Baseball 2 sh 

PE 345 Methods of Coaching Soccer and Volleyball 2 sh 



TOTAL 

PE 100. TENNIS / sh 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of tennis. 

PEIOI. RACQUETBALL 1 sh 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of racquetball. 

PE 102. GYMNASTICS 1 sh 

Students learn a variety of floor and 
apparatus gymnastics skills. 

PE 103. RECREATIONAL SPORTS / sh 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy of 
a variety of recreational sports, including 
archery, badminton and paddle tennis. 

PE 105. GOLF 

(Beginning and Intermediate) / sh 
Special fee: $25. Students learn rules, 
skill and strategy of golf. 

PE 106. BEGINNING SWIMMING AND 

EMERGENCY WATER SAFETY / sh 

An introduction to basic swimming 
techniques and general water safety 
instruction, including how to respond 
effectively in a water emergency. The 
goal is to create an awareness of causes 
and prevention of water accidents. 
(Beginning Swimming and Emergency 
Water Safety certificate given.) 

PE 107. LIFEGUARD TRAINING 2 sh 

Students gain knowledge and skills for 



ISsli 

aquatic safety and non-surf life guarding 
and receive Red Cross certification upon 
completion. Prerequisites: strong 
swimming skills, current Red Cross 
Standard First Aid. 

PE 108. BASKETBALL 1 sh 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of basketball. 

PE 109. CONDITIONING/WEIGHT 

TRAINING / sh 

Progressive development of physiologi- 
cal fitness designed to meet the needs 
of the individual student, including 
weight and cardiorespiratory training. 

PEllO. SOFTBALL I sh 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of Softball. 

PElll. AEROBIC 

CONDITIONING / sh 

Students have the opportunity to 
improve their physical fitness level 
through aerobic activities using correct 
techniques. 

PE112. SOCCER Ish 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of soccer. 

PE113 VOLLEYBALL 1 sh 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of volleyball. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



PE 1 1 5. LIFEGUARD TRAINING 

INSTRUCTOR I sh 

Students learn methods and materials 
of teaching Red Cross aquatics safety 
courses from Basic Water Safety 
through Lifeguard Training. Prerequisite; 
Lifeguard training certification. 

PEI16. OUTWARD BOUND 

EXPERIENCE 1-3 sh 

This is a course in wilderness survival, 
including physical survival skills, fitness, 
cognitive and emotional skills and study 
of the natural world. Offered as person- 
nel is available. 

PE117. EQUITATION I 1 sh 

Equitation 1 covers basic horsemanship 
and riding skills — walk, trot, canter, 
first level dressage and introduction to 
jumping. Students must furnish their 
own transportation. Special fee: $200.00 

PE 118. EQUITATION II 1 sh 

Equitation II focuses on developing 
riding skills on the flat, intermediate 
dressage and jumping skills with 
gymnastics and course work. Prerequi- 
site: HPEL 11 7 or permission of instruc- 
tor. Students must furnish their own 
transportation. Special fee: $200.00 

PE1I9. EQUITATION III 1 sh 

Students develop as riders and competi- 
tors in the show ring and jumping 
courses. Prerequisite: HPEL 118 or 
permission of the instructor. Students 
must furnish their own transportation. 
Special fee: $200.00. 

PE 208. WATER SAFETY 

INSTRUCTORS 3 sh 

Detailed study of methods and materials 
used to teach Red Cross swimming and 
aquatics safety courses. Successful 
completion qualifies WSIs to teach infant 
and preschool aquatics, progressive 
swimming courses, basic water safety 
and emergency water safety. Prerequi- 
sites: 1 7 years old, current certificafion 
for Emergency Water Safety or Lifeguard 
Training; CPR and First Aid recommended. 



PE 209. SKIN AND BASIC 

SCUBA DIVING 2 sh 

Students learn the art of skin and scuba 
diving, including the physics, physiology 
and mechanics of diving; safe diving 
practices; marine life and environment; 
dive planning and various aspects of 
sport diving. Prerequisites: 15 years old, 
pass a swimming test, medical exam 
and payment of special fees before 
scuba work begins. Special fee: $175.00. 

PE 2 1 1 . HISTORY/FOUNDATIONS 
OF SPORT/PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 4 sh 

An introduction to the philosophical, 
psychological and sociological founda- 
tions and the history of physical 
education, including current issues 
and trends and the economic impact 
of sport and fitness on society. 

PE 265. OFFICIATING 2 sh 

Provides a thorough study of rules and 
mechanics of sport officiating. Practical 
experience in officiating may be 
provided at the community, little league, 
middle school and junior varsity levels. 

PE 305. LEGAL ASPECTS IN HPEL 2 sh 

A study of the legal environment of 
leisure, sport, health and school organi- 
zations, emphasizing applications of tort, 
criminal, employment, contract, property 
and constitutional law. Students learn the 
principles of risk management and 
relevant applications and discuss current 
legislation affecting the field. 

PE 3 1 0. MOTOR LEARNING THEORY FOR 
TEACHING AND COACHING 4 sh 

This course provides physical education 
teachers and coaches knowledge and 
understanding of how learning and 
optimum performance of motor skills 
occur. Study of the characteristics and 
interactions between student/athlete, 
teacher/coach and the learning environ- 
ment coupled with systhesis of recent 
research, experimentation and analysis 
enables participants to teach motor 
skills efficiently. 



SPORTS 



MEDICINE 



138 



PE321. KINESIOLOGY 4sh 

Students study the musculo-skeletal 
system and biomechanics for physical 
fitness activities, exercise/sports injuries 
and sports skills. Prerequisite; B!0 161. 

PE 34 1 . THEORY OF COACHING 2 sh 

Provides a thorough study of the role of 
coaches in the school and community, 
including coaching philosophy, ethics, 
relationships, motivation and responsi- 
bilities. 

PE 342. METHODS OF COACHING 

FOOTBALL 2 sh 

A Study of appropriate terms, drills, 
methods and strategy for coaching 
football. 

PE 343. METHODS OF COACHING 

BASKETBALL 2 sh 

A Study of appropriate terms, drills, 
methods and strategy for coaching 
basketball. 

PE 344. METHODS OF COACHING 
TRACK AND FIELD 
AND BASEBALL 2 sh 

A study of appropriate terms, drills, 
methods and strategy for coaching 
track and field and baseball. 

PE 345. METHODS OF COACHING 

SOCCER AND VOLLEYBALL 2 sh 

A Study of appropriate terms, drills, 
methods and strategy for coaching 
soccer and volleyball. 

PE 360. ELEMENTARY AND ADAPTED 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (K-6) 4 sh 

Students learn to integrate the psycho- 
motor, cognitive and affective domains 



in school settings, emphasizing move- 
ment education and basic skills teaching 
for students at all levels, including the 
student with special needs. Current 
legislation and appropriate application 
is also studied. 

PE 36 1 . MIDDLE SCHOOL PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION (6-9) 3 sh 

A study of various teaching methods 
for middle school physical education 
teachers, including a movement 
approach for teaching basic skills 
and specific sports skills. Opportunity 
is given for laboratory experience. 

PE410. ADMINISTRATION 

AND LEADERSHIP 4'sh 

A study of the organizational and 
administrative techniques needed to 
design and implement programs in 
leisure, sport and physical education 
settings, including organizational 
structure and theories, leadership styles, 
decision-making, finance management, 
purchasing, public relations and 
tournament organization. 

PE 4 11 . MEASUREMENT AND 

EVALUATION 4 sh 

Students learn to organize and interpret 
data from tests with and without the use 
of software packages. Also includes the 
study and administration of youth and 
adult physical fitness tests, sports skill 
tests and an overview of psychosocial 
testing. 



PE 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 



sh 



SPORTS MEDICINE 

Study in sports medicine at Elon College combines the scientific and the practical 
aspects of the prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries and includes the 
study of the effects of physical activity on the human body. 

The sports medicine major prepares graduates for careers in athletic training, cardiac 
rehabilitation, exercise physiology, corporate wellness and other related careers. After 
taking a series of core courses, the student chooses a concentration in either athletic 
training or exercise/sports science. 



SPORTS 



MEDICINE 



The athletic training concentration includes 1,500 hands-on clinical hours and 
qualifies the graduate to take the National Athletic Training Association certification 
exam. 

The exercise/sports science concentration includes a practicum and internship 
experience. Students who wish to pursue graduate degrees may go on to physical 
therapy, exercise physiology and other areas of study. 

A major in Sports Medicine requires the following core courses: 

Research Methods 4 sh 

Physiology of Exercise 4 sh 

Legal Aspects in HPEL 2 sh 

Kinesiology 4 sh 

Nutrition 4 sh 

fiealth of the Body Systems 4 sh 

Human Anatomy 4 sh 

Human Physiology 4 sh 

General Chemistry I 3 sh 

General Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

Completion of Exercise/Sports Science track 

or Athletic Training track 1 2- 1 8 sh 



SM 


415 


SM 


422 


PE 


305 


PE 


321 


HE 


324 


HE 


421 


BIO 


161 


BIO 


162 


CHM 


111 


CHM 


113 



TOTAL 



46-52 sh 



Exercise/Sports Science track requires the following courses: 

SM 281 Practicum in Sports Medicine/ 

Exercise/Sports Science 2 sh 

SM 324 Exercise Motivation 2 sh 

SM 424 Exercise Programming 2 sh 

SM 482 Internship in Exercise/Sport Science 4 sh 

HE 220 First Aid 2 sh 



TOTAL 



12 sh 



Athletic Training track requires the following courses: 

SM221 

SM312 

SM329 

SM414 

SM481 

PE410 



Athletic Training I 
Athletic Training II 
Assessment of Athletic Injuries 
Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries 
Internship in Sports Medicine 
Administration and Leadership 



2sh 
2sh 
4sh 
2sh 
4sh 
4sh 



TOTAL 

Completion of 1,500 clinical hours 



18 sh 



SPORTS 



MEDICINE 



140 



A minor in the Athletic Training track requires the following courses: 

SM 221 Athletic Training I 2 sh 

SM 312 Athletic Training 11 2 sh 

SM 329 Assessment of Athletic Injuries 4 sh 

PE 321 Kinesiology 4 sh or 

SM 422 Physiology of Exercise 4 sh 

BIO 161 Human Anatomy 4 sh 

BIO 1 62 Human Physiology 4 sh 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



A minor in the Exercise/Sport Science track requires the following courses; 

SM 422 Physiology of Exercise 4 sh 

Nutrition 4 sh 

Kinesiology 4 sh 

Human Anatomy 4 sh 

Human Physiology 4 sh 



HE 


324 


PE 


321 


BIO 


161 


BIO 


162 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



SM221. ATHLETIC TRAINING I 2sh 

This course introduces the student to 
the profession and principles of athletic 
training, including topics such as sports 
medicine organizations, emergency care 
of specific injuries, tissue repair and 
healing, transportation and transfer 
of catastrophic injuries, methods of 
bandaging and dressing wounds and 
adhesive taping. 

SM281. PRACTICUM IN SPORTS 
MEDICINE/EXERCISE/ 
SPORTS SCIENCE 2 sh 

The practicum introduces the student 
to professions in sports medicine and 
health-related fields. Students must 
choose three different agencies to work 
in, with about 27 hours at each agency. 
Students must turn in weekly, typed 
reports including a brief discussion of 
the experience, reflections and a critique 
of the experience/agency. Students will 
engage in problem solving assignments 
and perform research on some particular 
topic. Students may also assist with 
patient/client care and/or training and 
shadow their supervisor. Students must 



make arrangements with their professor 
the semester before taking the practicum. 
Prerequisite: For majors only. 

SM312. ATHLETIC TRAINING II 2 sh 

Students learn advanced skills and 
techniques, including application of 
protective and supportive devices, 
equipment fit, physical examination 
and fitness testing, training room 
administration and advanced techniques 
of taping and wrapping. Prerequisite: 
SM 221 or permission of instructor. 

SM324. EXERCISE MOTIVATION 2sh 

Students examine the underlying 
motivations for why people do and do 
not exercise and methods to change 
negative behaviors to positive ones. 
Topics include Kenyons theory, psycho- 
logical effects of exercise, exercise and 
personality, exercise and self-concept 
and anorexia. 

SM 329. ASSESSMENT OF ATHLETIC 

INJURIES 4 sh 

This course familiarizes students with 
the principles of assessing sport injuries, 
including injury history, palpation, range 



SPORTS 



MEDICINE 



of motion tests, muscle function tests, 
joint stability and specific anatomical 
features. Prerequisite; SM 221 

SM414. REHABILITATION OF 

ATHLETIC INJURIES 2 sh 

This course introduces students to the 
principles of rehabilitating sports 
injuries, including drugs and medica- 
tions, modality applications and exercise 
rehabilitation, 

SM415. RESEARCH METHODS 4 sh 

Students become familiar with basic 
research terminology and concepts, 
including statistics, developing a 
research problem, developing the 
research proposal, using computer 
software and measurement concepts. A 
research paper is required. 

SM422. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE 4 sh 

Students examine the immediate and 
long-term effects of exercise on the 
body, including the integration of 
various bodily systems as a result of 
exercise and the role of nutrition and 
exercise in weight management. 
Laboratory activities include aerobic 
capacity testing, blood lipid and 
metabolic profiles, determination 
of body composition and adult fitness 
testing. This course requires a three- 
hour lab. Prerequisite: BIO 162. 

SM 424. EXERCISE PROGRAMMING 2 sh 

Students gain applied knowledge to 
supervise and direct exercise programs 
for both healthy and special populations. 
Topics include basic terminology, risk 
identification, types of fitness tests, 
indications and contraindications to 
exercise testing, program administration 
and personnel. Prerequisite: SM 422. 

SM48I. INTERNSHIP IN 

SPORTS MEDICINE 

(ATHLETIC TRAINING) 4 sh 

In this course, upper level majors have 
opportunities to apply classroom 



knowledge and skills to real world 

problems under the supervision of a 

faculty member and a certified athletic 

trainer. Settings may include a sports 

medicine clinic, professional sports 

team, college or university training 

room, corporate setting, etc. Students 

must keep a daily journal of their 

experiences, which are discussed in 

conferences with the faculty supervisor. 

The student must also complete a 

project benefitting the internship facility, 141 

but which would not have been possible 

without the student. Student evaluations 

are based on these assignments. 

Students should make arrangements 

with their professors the semester prior 

to taking the internship. Prerequisite: 

junior/senior majors only, permission 

of department. 

SM482. INTERNSHIP IN 

EXERCISE/SPORT SCIENCE 4 sh 

Upper-class exercise/sports science 
majors select a sports medicine or 
health-related agency for their intern- 
ship, a capstone experience. For each 
semester hour credit, the student serves 
40 hours at the agency. Students must 
turn in weekly reports including a brief 
discussion of the experience, reflections 
and a critique of the experience/agency. 
Students may engage in problem solving 
assignments and perform research on 
some particular topic. Students may also 
assist with patient/client care and/or 
training and shadow their supervisor. 
A research paper is due near the end 
of the experience. Students should make 
arrangements with their professors the 
semester prior to taking the internship. 
Prerequisite: SM 281. 



HISTORY 

HISTORY 

Chair, Department of History: Associate Professor Midgette 
Professors: Crowe, C. Troxler, G. Troxler 
Associate Professor: Digre 
Assistant Professors: Bissett, Festle 
Instructor: Hoffman 

The study of history centers on exploration of various economic, social, political, 
military and religious forces that have transformed the face of the world. It combines 
analytical thinking and writing with a detailed grasp of the many influences that have 
brought about historical change. 

142 History is a discipline that explores the dynamics of change from humanistic and 

social scientific perspectives. Because of the breadth and depth of historical investiga- 
tion, students who choose to major or minor in history at Elon College find themselves 
well prepared for careers that require interaction with people and the ability to write 
and think analytically. 

A major in History requires the following courses: 
HST 1 1 1 Europe and the iVlediterranean World to 1660 4 sh 

HST 1 12 Europe and the Mediterranean World since 1660 4 sh 
Choose one course from 4 sh 

HST 1 2 1 United States History through 1 865 or 
HST 122 United States History since 1865 
Eight hours History electives 8 sh 

Twenty hours Histoiy electives at the 300-400 level 20 sh 

One History seminar course including completion 
of a Senior Thesis 4 sh 

TOTAL 44 sh 

It is strongly recommended that History majors, in consultation with their 
advisor, select a topical or regional concentration of 12 semester hours at the 300 
level and above. Concentration courses will be chosen from among the required 28 
elective hours. With the approval of the department chair, four hours from outside 
the history department may be applied toward the concentration and the elective 
history hour requirement. 

History majors receiving teacher certification must complete 
the following courses: 

HST 1 1 1 Europe and the Mediterranean World to 1 660 4 sh 
HST 1 12 Europe and the Mediterranean World since 1660 4 sh 

HST 121 United States History through 1865 4 sh 

HST 122 United States History since 1865 4 sh 

HST 361 North Carolina in the Nation 4 sh 

One History seminar course 4 sh 
Sixteen hours HST electives at the 300-400 level chosen 

from each of the following areas 16 sh 

1) United States 

2) Europe 



HISTORY 



3) Developing World (Africa, Asia) 

4) Minority History (African Americans and Women) 

GEO 131 The World's Regions 4 sh 

PS 111 American Government 4 sh 

Set of Professional education courses 35 sh 

TOTAL 83 sh 

A minor in History requires the following: 

Four semester hours chosen from 4 sh 

HST 1 1 1 Europe and the Mediterranean World to 1 660 

HST 1 12 Europe and the Mediterranean World since 1660 

HST 22 1 The World in the Twentieth Century 
Four semester hours chosen from 4 sh 

HST 1 2 1 United States History through 1 865 

HST 122 United States Histoty since 1865 

Twelve semester hours of History electives 

at the 300-400 level 12 sh 



TOTAL 

HST 111. EUROPE AND THE 
MEDITERRANEAN 
WORLD TO 1660. 4 sh 

This survey of major developments in 
the Mediterranean world begins with 
ancient Mesopotamian and Egyptian 
civilizations. Students also explore the 
evolution of the great formative cultures 
of the Western world (Greece and Rome) 
and the Middle East and look at their 
interaction during the Middle Ages, the 
Renaissance, the Reformation and the 
beginnings of early modern Europe. 

HST 112. EUROPE AND THE 
MEDITERRANEAN 
WORLD SINCE 1660 4 sh 

In a survey of major developments in 
the Mediterranean world from 1660 
to the present, study covers the rise of 
the major European powers during the 
period and discuss their interaction 
with one another and the Middle East 
and North Africa, particularly in the 19th 
and 20th centuries. 

HST 121. UNITED STATES HISTORY 

THROUGH 1865 4 sh 

This survey of early U.S. history includes 
the major political, social, economic and 



20 sh 

intellectual developments in the U.S. 
from the first explorations of the 
continent through 1865 and considers 
the implications of these events and 
developments on the American experi- 
ence after 1865. 

HST 122. UNITED STATES 

HISTORY SINCE 1865 4sh 

Study of U.S. history continues with the 
major political, social, economic and 
intellectual developments in the U.S. 
from the Civil War to the present and 
examines how events and developments 
which occurred prior to 1865 influenced 
the nations evolution after the Civil War. 

HST 221. THE WORLD IN THE 

20TH CENTURY 4 sh 

This survey of contemporary history 
examines critical events, ideologies and 
movements that have shaped our world. 
Students gain an understanding of the 
historical context of current global 
issues by examining developments in 
Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and 
the Middle East. 

HST 251. HISTORY STUDIES ABROAD 4 sh 

A specialized study for those participat- 
ing in abroad programs. 



HISTORY 



AFRICA 

HST 3 1 3. MODERN AFRICA 4 sh 

This survey course explores develop- 
ments in Africa during the past century 
(especially regions south of the Sahara) 
and examines African responses to 
European imperialism, African indepen- 
dence and the problems faced by the 
new African states. 

HST 314. A HISTORY OF 

SOUTHERN AFRICA 4 sh 

This course examines the forces that 
have shaped the history of South Africa 
and its neighbors in the 19th and 20th 
centuries, focusing on the effects of 
apartheid on modern South African 
society. 

RUSSIA 

HST 316. THE HISTORY OF IMPERIAL 

RUSSIA TO 1917 4 sh 

This course explores the major develop- 
ments in the history of the Russian state 
from its origin in the 9th century to the 
collapse of the tsarist system in 1917. 
Topics include Kievan Rus and the 
Mongols, the rise of Moscow, the 
westernization efforts of Peter and 
Catherine the Great and the gradual 
transformation of Russia from its wars 
with Napoleon through the overthrow 
of the Romanov Dynasty. 

HST 317. RUSSIA AND THE SOVIET 

UNION SINCE 1917 4 sh 

This study of modern Russian history 
explores the Bolshevik communist 
system, considers the transformation of 
the Soviet state under Lenin and Stalin 
and studies Russia's role in World War 11 
and its impact on the USSR afterwards. 
Topics include the emergence of the 
Soviet Union as a world power under 
Stalin, Khruschev, and Brezhnev; Soviet 
domestic events under all three men; 
and the impact of Mikhail Gorbachev, 
Boris Yeltsin, and other recent Russian 
leaders. 



ASIA 

HST 3 1 8. CHINA SINCE 1 644 4 sh 

Major domestic and international 
developments in Chinese history from 
1644 until the present are the focus of 
this course. Topics of study explore the 
Qing Empire and the impact of the West 
on its Manchu rulers, examine the Qing 
collapse in 1912, and consider China 
under the Nationalists until 1949 and 
under Mao Ze-dongs communist system 
afterward. The course also covers recent 
developments, particularly the reform 
era of Deng Xiao-ping. 

HST 319. HISTORY OF JAPAN, 

1600-1945 4sh 

This course explores the evolution of 
Japanese history from the Tokugawa 
Shogunate through the end of World War 
II. Topics of discussion include tradi- 
tional Japanese values, the Meiji 
Restoration of 1868, the experiment with 
constitutional reform and parliamentary 
democracy through 1931 and Japan's 
emergence as a competitive Asian 
power. Discussions place these develop- 
ments into the context of Japan's role in 
World War II. 

BRITISH ISLES 

HST 323. THE MAKING OF THE ENGLISH 
NATION TO C. 1660 4 sh 

A Study of English customs, church, 
common law system, monarchy and 
national identity and the migration of 
these features to America. The course 
spans the development of an English 
people (Celtic, Roman, Anglo-Saxon, 
Viking and Norman French) and the 
ruptures which produced civil war and 
an English Republic — episodes 
formative of American political values. 

HST 324. ENGLAND WITHIN THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE: 17TH 
CENTURY TO THE 
PRESENT 4 sh 

This course examines the social, religious 
and constitutional conflicts of the 1640s 
and the 1680s and their impact on 



HISTORY 



Colonial America. Study also traces later 
changes in the English society, economy 
and form of government, the United 
Kingdom's changing role in Europe and 
the world, and changes in social roles 
and attitudes, particularly regarding 
class, gender and race. 

HST326, 327. HISTORY OF 

IRELAND/HISTORY 
OF SCOTLAND 2 sh each 
The first half of the semester centers 
on Scotland for two semester hours 
credit; the second half of the semester 
will center on Ireland for two semester 
hours credit. Students choose one or 
both segments. Materials for the course 
draw from various Celtic folkways, 
histories, literature, music, customs, 
tales, art and daily usage. Discussions 
also consider Wales and the Isle of Man, 
the Western Isles, the Orkney, Shetland 
and Channel Islands, and Brittany and 
Galicia on the continent. 

EUROPE 

HST 335. I9TH CENTURY EUROPE, 

1789-1914 4sh 

Study includes the major political, social, 
• and international developments that 
affected Europe from the outbreak of the 
French Revolution through the begin- 
ning of World War I. Discussion explores 
events that resulted in the creation of 
Italy and Germany, and the impact of 
revolution on the major countries in 
Europe. Topics also include the Indus- 
trial Revolution, capitalism and Euro- 
pean expansion in Africa and Asia. 

HST 336. EUROPE, 1 9 1 4- 1 945 4 sh 

This course provides a study of Euro- 
pean history focusing on the two World 
Wars, the search for stability in the inter- 
war years and the rise of totalitarianism. 

HST 337. EUROPE, 1945 TO 

THE PRESENT 4 sh 

Discussions in this course cover the Cold 
War, the end of colonial rule, the rise of 
the European Community, social and 
intellectual trends, the collapse of 



communism and the reawakening of 
nationalism in Eastern Europe. 

HST 339. A HISTORY OF THE 

HOLOCAUST 4 sh 

History of the Holocaust explores the 
roots of this event, beginning with 
historical anti-Semitism and the impact 
of this tradition on Adolph Hitler and the 
Nazis. Topics also include Hitler's racial 
policies between 1933-1938, their spread 
throughout Nazi Europe between 1939- 
1941, the evolution of the Final Solution 
from 1941-45, and post-World War II 
Holocaust developments and questions. 

WESTERN HEMISPHERE 

HST 351,352. HISTORY OF 

MEXICO/HISTORY 

OF CANADA 2 sh each 

The first half of the semester will center 
on Mexico for two semester hours credit; 
the second half of the semester will 
center on Canada for two semester 
hours credit. Students choose one or 
both segments. These courses focus on 
the distinctive national identities and 
the themes shared by Mexico and 
Canada, including relationships with the 
U.S., popular perceptions of Americans, 
native peoples and their role in national 
identity and the role of myth-making in 
a nation's identity and perceptions of 
neighboring peoples. 

HST 356. EARLY NATIONAL PERIOD, 
(1787-1840): FORCES THAT 
SHAPED THE NATION 4 sh 

A Study of the thought that produced 
the American Constitution and the 
implementation of that national 
government during the administration 
of its first seven presidents. Topics 
examine political, social and economic 
forces that affected national decisions 
and development. 

HST 357. THE UNITED STATES FROM 1877 
TO 1918: INDUSTRIALIZATION 
AND ITS EFFECTS 4 sh 

This course covers important events 
from the end of Reconstruction to 



HISTORY 



146 



American involvement in World War I 
and places them into the context of the 
rise of industrial capitalism as the 
nation's economic system. 

HST 358. THE UNITED STATES 
FROM 1919 TO 1945: 
THE DEMANDS OF POWER 4 sh 

Discussions in this course examine a 
time when the nation's status as the 
world's military and economic power 
demanded global involvement and the 
effects of the nation's choices. Eventu- 
ally, despite strong support for isolation- 
ism, the nation became involved in 
World War II. 

HST 359. THE UNITED STATES SINCE 
1945: RECENT AMERICAN 
HISTORY 4 sh 

Discussions of recent American history 
include important developments in the 
U.S., beginning with the American 
commitment to fight communism at 
home and abroad following World War 
II, and trace important political, eco- 
nomic and social changes. 

HST 361. NORTH CAROLINA 

IN THE NATION 4 sh 

Study traces N.C. history from the first 
European contact to the present in the 
wider context of U.S. history. Topics 
include: N.C. as a microcosm of the 
region and nation; Reconstruction and 
The New Deal; and N.C. political, 
economic, social and geographical 
features as related to national trends. 
Discussion also covers how family and 
community history are preserved and 
how the study of local history can 
enhance public understanding of 
national events. 

HST 362. THE SOUTH IN AMERICAN 
HISTORY: REGIONAL 
SUBCULTURAL PERSISTENCE 4 sh 

This course examines the South 
(especially post-Civil War) as a distinc- 
tive region of the U.S., including reasons 
for such distinctiveness and its impact 
on the nation's history. 



HST 363. AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 
1850-PRESENT 4 sh 

Beginning with the slave system in the 
mid- 19th century, this course examines 
recurring issues and problems in 
African-American history through 
the post-civil rights era. Study focuses 
on three themes: the similarity and 
differences of African-American 
experiences; the extent to which they 
were oppressed yet also had choices; 
and their strategies to cope with their 
social and political situations. 

HST 364. HISTORY OF WOMEN 

IN THE U.S. 4 sh 

This course surveys the experiences of 
women in the U.S. from the colonial era 
through the 20th century, emphasizing 
their changing political and economic 
status and gender role expectations, 
Topics focus on the historical factors- 
politics, war, social movements, technol- 
ogy, ideology— that caused such changes, 
strategies women utilized to change or 
cope with their situations and differences 
among women. 

HST 365. SOCIAL MOVEMENTS 
IN POST-CIVIL WAR 
AMERICA 4 sh 

This course covers organized efforts to 
change American society since Recon- 
struction, including social movements 
from Populism in the late 1800s to the 
Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, 
and the responses to these movements. 

HST 366. U.S. POPULAR CULTURE, 

1890S-PRESENT 4 sh 

This study of popular culture of the U.S. 
in the modern era focuses on leisure 
activities since the development of 
a mass culture. Discussion analyzes 
sports, amusement parks, drinking, 
drugs, movies and music. 

HST 367. AMERICAN MILITARY 

HISTORY 4 sh 

Topics concentrate on the role of U.S. 
armed forces in the development of the 
nation and in the evolution of the U.S. 
as a major world power. Discussions 



HUMAN 



SERVICES 



explore the impact of U.S. military 
capability on foreign policy and the ways 
foreign policy affects U.S. armed forces. 
Topics also include causes of American 
military conflicts, the strategy and tactics 
of military campaigns and the impact of 
the resolution of these conflicts. 

HST 460-469. SEMINAR: SPECIAL 

TOPICS 4 sh 

A capstone experience for majors, this 
course offers students practical experi- 
ence in researching, writing and 
presenting a senior thesis. Past topics 
have included American Civil War, 
England in the Age of Henry the Eighth, 
Russia, The Holocaust, Modern Africa, 



and American Social Movements. 
Prerequisites: junior/senior major 
or permission of instructor. 

HST 481. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORY 2 4 sh 

Designed to provide students with 
practical experience in history-related 
professions, activities included in the 
internship enable students to explore 
careers in archives, record management, 
historic sites, museum administration, 
etc. Prerequisite: 18 semester hours of 
histoiy. 

HST 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 2'4sh 

Open to junior/senior majors/minors 
or others with permission of instructor. 



HUMAN SERVICES 

Chair, Department of Human Seivices: Assistant Professor Kiser 
Professor: Granowsky 
Associate Professor: Higgs 

The Human Services major prepares students to work as practitioners in a variety 
of professional service settings such as social services, mental health, family services, 
corrections, child care, youth programs, group homes and many others. The Human 
Services curriculum guides the student through gaining the knowledge, skills and 
experience necessary to work effectively with a variety of populations. 

Students learn to critically examine a range of human and societal problems and 
the programs and services designed to address those problems. Students develop an 
understanding of the societal, cultural and personal variables which contribute to the 
development of human problems and to their solution. 

The Human Services major draws upon knowledge in the social sciences, espe- 
cially psychology and sociology, and emphasizes the application of this knowledge 
to the improvement of human life and society. In order to apply this knowledge 
effectively, students develop a variety of skills including those involved in oral and 
written communication, problem solving, developing a professional helping relation- 
ship and organization and administration. 

A major in Human Services requires the following courses: 
HUS211 Principles and Methods in Human Services 4 sh 

HUS381 Practicum in Human Services 4 sh 

HUS 4 1 1 Administration of Human Service Agencies 4 sh 

HUS412 Professional Communication 4 sh 

HUS 461 Senior Seminar 4 sh 

HUS 481 Internship in Human Services 8 sh 

Choose one course from the following: 4 sh 

HUS 321 Group Dynamics and Leadership 

HUS 33 1 Principles of Counseling 

HUS 34 1 Family Counseling 



148 



HUMAN SERVICES 

Choose one course from the following: 4 sh 

Four elective hours of Human Services 

MTH 1 14 Elementary Statistics 

SS 285 Research Methods 
Eight semester hours from Psychology and/or Sociology 8 sh 

Eight semester hours of 300-400 level Psychology 
and/or Sociology 8 sh 

TOTAL 48 sh 

Prior to taking Human Services 381 students must be approved by the Human 
Services Department. Applications for the Practicum are available in the office of the 
department chair and must be submitted no later than October 1 . A minimum grade 
point average of 2.1 is required to be eligible for Practicum. 

Most other major requirements must be completed prior to taking Human Service 
481 . Students who enroll in Human Services 481 may not take any courses other than 
the prescribed block courses. Applications for taking the Internship must be submitted 
no later than March 1. A minimum grade point average of 2.2 is required to be eligible 
for Internship. 

A concentration in Social Work requires the following courses: 
HUS 321 Group Dynamics and Leadership 4 sh 

HUS331 Principles of Counseling 4 sh 

HUS 341 Family Counseling 4 sh 

HUS 38 1 Practicum in Human Services or HUS 48 1 , 

Internship in Human Services, must be 

taken in a social work setting. 

A concentration in Gerontology requires the following courses: 
HUS 324 Perspectives and Issues in Aging 4 sh 

HUS 325 Leisure and Aging 4 sh 

HUS 381 Practicum in Human Services or HUS 481, 

internship in Human Services, must be taken 

in a facility or program for the elderly. 

A minor in Human Services requires the following courses: 
HUS 211 Principles and Methods in Human Services 4 sh 

HUS 381 Practicum in Human Services 4 sh 

Choose one couse from the following: 4 sh 

PSY 1 1 1 General Psychology 

SOC 1 1 1 Introductory Sociology 
Choose one course from the following: 4 sh 

HUS 32 1 Group Dynamics and Leadership 

HUS 331 Principles of Counseling 

HUS 341 Family Counseling 
Four semester hours Human Services course 4 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 



HUMAN 



SERVICES 



HUS 101. LEADERSHIP 2 sh 

This course combines study and practical 
experience to increase knowledge and 
skills in leadership development and is 
appropriate for both emerging and 
established leaders. No credit toward 
Human Services major. 

HUS 102. PEER COUNSELING 2sh 

In this study/practical experience course 
students develop skills m interpersonal 
relations, gain an understanding of 
personal and community problems and 
learn to view the residence hall as a 
community. Required of all Resident 
Assistants. (No credit toward Human 
Ser\'ices major) 

HUS 21 1. PRINCIPLES AND METHODS 

IN HUMAN SERVICES 4 sh 

This course explores the history and 
values of the profession, the worker- 
client relationship and the helping 
process, emphasizing interviewing 
and counseling skills and the character- 
istics and skills of effective helpers. A 
minimum of 40 hours of field work in 
an approved human services setting. 

HUS 225. SPECIAL POPULATIONS 

IN HUMAN SERVICES 4 sh 

This course explores specific popula- 
tions of human services clients and the 
programs and services available to those 
populations and encourages critical 
reflection on issues, concerns and 
controversies related to the populations 
under study. 

HUS 321. GROUP DYNAMICS 

AND LEADERSHIP 4 sh 

Students explore group dynamics, group 
structure, leadership and the group 
worker role and are encouraged to 
examine and retlne their own group 
communication skills. 

HUS 324. PERSPECTrVES AND 

ISSUES IN AGING 4 sh 

This introduction to gerontology 
explores the biological, sociological 
and psychological aspects of aging and 
presents cultural, economic and political 



issues related to aging such as ageism, 
retirement, living environments and 
the social security and health care 
movements. 

HUS 325. LEISURE AND AGING 4 sh 

In this overview of psychological, 
sociological and physiological aspects 
of aging in a leisure context, students 
discuss concepts such as the work ethic 
and retirement, quality of life and 
physical fitness and examine common 
characteristics of the older adult and 
leisure opportunities that might be 
provided for an aging population. 

HUS 331. PRINCIPLES OF 

COUNSELING 4 sh 

This course focuses on the theories and 
methods used in counseling individuals. 
The course is designed for persons who 
will work in the helping professions and 
includes role playing, videotaping and 
working with case material. Prerequi- 
sites: HUS 211 or Psychology 111. 

HUS 34 1 . FAMILY COUNSELING 4 sh 

This course focuses on family assess- 
ment and intervention using systems 
theory as the primary conceptual model 
and emphasizes the use of family 
counseling concepts to understand 
family dynamics and relationships. 
Students make extensive use of case 
material and role play to apply theory 
to practice. 

HUS 37 1 -3. SPECIAL TOPICS IN 

HUMAN SERVICES 4 sh 

Students examine special topics in 
human services, which might include 
such topics as substance abuse, criminal 
justice, developmental disabilities, 
mental health issues and services, etc. 

HUS 381. PRACTICUMIN 

HUMAN SERVICES 4 sh 

Students gain field experience in a 
human services organization full-time 
for at least three weeks, observing and 
learning the roles, tasks, skills and 
methods of human services profession- 
als in the assigned setting and becoming 



149 



JOURNALISM 



AND 



C 



MUNICATIONS 



150 



familiar with administrative processes in 
the organization. Conferences with the 
supervising faculty member and the 
agency supervisor, assigned readings 
and journal writing provide further 
learning opportunities. Prerequisites: 
HUS 21 1 and junior/senior status as 
major/minor. Winter Term only. 

HUS 411. ADMINISTRATION OF HUMAN 

SERVICES AGENCIES 4 sh 

This ovei"view of principles and tech- 
niques of leadership and management 
in human service agencies exposes 
students to planning, organizing, staffing 
and financing a project or an agency and 
working with a board of directors and 
the community. (Senior Block Course) 
Prerequisites: HUS 211, 381. 

HUS 412. PROFESSIONAL 

COMMUNICATION 4 sh 

An in-depth study of interpersonal 
communication skills and writing skills 
essential to the human services worker, 
emphasizing the further development of 
written and oral communication skills. 



(Senior Block Course) Prerequisites: 
HUS211,381. 

HUS 46 1 . SENIOR SEMINAR 4 sh 

In this capstone course, students 
analyze their personal and professional 
development during their college 
experience and are required to research, 
write and present a scholarly paper. 
Senior majors only. Fall only. 

HUS 481. INTERNSHIP IN 

HUMAN SERVICES 8 sh 

Students participate in full-time field 
based experience in a human service 
agency for seven and a half to eight 
weeks, observing and practicing the 
roles, tasks and skills of human services 
professionals under the supervision of a 
faculty member and an agency supervi- 
sor. Conferences with both supervisors 
and assigned papers and readings 
enhance learning as the student makes 
the transition into full-time professional 
responsibility. Senior majors only. 
Prerequisite: HUS 381. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

See Political Science 



JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Chair, Department of journalism and Communications: 

Associate Professor G. Padgett 

Assistant Professors: Fulkerson, Gibson, Grady, R. Johnson, Merron, Swanson 

instructor: Sen at 

Part-time Instructor: Hamm 

Students who choose majors in Journalism/Communications prepare for exciting 
careers in newspapers, magazines, radio, television, cable, public relations, advertis- 
ing and corporate relations. Separate majors are offered in Journalism (directed 
toward career opportunities in print related fields) and Communications (offering 
emphases in broadcast communications encompassing all electronic media and 
corporate communications. 

Majors complete a range of courses offering study in the theory, history, law 
and ethics of communications, as well as practical hands-on experience in modern 
computer labs, a state-of-the-art television studio and well-equipped audio and video 
editino labs. 



JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Students complement in-class work with involvement in various campus media 
from the award-winning campus newspaper The Pendulum, to WSOE radio station, 
to weekly cable television newscasts and talk shows through departmental program- 
ming and Elon College Television. 

All majors are required to complete the following prerequisite courses with a 
grade point average of at least 2.2 prior to admission to the Journalism/Communi- 
cations program and before taking other courses in the major: 

ENG 110 College Writing 

JC 215 Intro to Journalism and Communications 

JC 218 Writing & Information Gathering 



A major 


in Journalism requires the following 


courses: 




JC 215 


Intro to Journalism and Communications 


4sh 


JC 218 


Writing & Information Gathering 




4sh 


JC 225 


Reporting & Newswriting 




4sh 


JC 325 


Editing & Layout 




4.sh 


jC 425 


Advanced Reporting 




4.sh 


JC 315 


Media & Society 




4sh 


JC 360 


Media History 




4sh 


JC 465 


Media Law & Ethics 




4sh 


JC 495 


Senior Seminar 




4sh 


Twelve semester hours of JC elective at the 200-400 level 




(no more 


han 4 sh at the 200 level) 




12 sh 



TOTAL 48 sh 

A major in Communications with Broadcast Emphasis requires 
the following courses: 

Public & Presentational Speaking 4 sh or 

Broadcast Performance 4 sh 

Intro to Journalism and Communications 4 sh 

Writing & Information Gathering 4 sh 

Television Production 4 sh 

Writing for Electronic Media 4 sh 

Media & Society 4 sh 

Media History 4 sh 

Media Law and Ethics 4 sh 

Senior Seminar 4 sh 
Twelve semester hours of JC elective at the 200-400 level 

(no more than 4 sh at the 200 level) 12 sh 

TOTAL 48 sh 

A major in Communications with Corporate Emphasis requires 
the following courses: 

JC 211 Public & Presentational Speaking 4 sh 

JC 215 Intro to Journalism and Communications 4 sh 



JC 


211 


JC 


212 


JC 


215 


JC 


218 


]C 


240 


JC 


335 


JC 


315 


JC 


360 


JC 


465 


JC 


495 



151 



JOURNALISM 



AND 



COMMUNICATIONS 



152 



Writing & Information Gathering 

Organizational Communications 

Public Relations 

Television Production 

Corporate Publishing/Writing 

Corporate Video 

Media Law & Ethics 

Senior Seminar 
Eight semester hours of ]C elective at the 200-400 level 
Eight semester hours of 200-400 level electives in jC 
from the disciplines of the Love School of Business. 
At least 4 semester hours must be in BA, ECO or ACC 



JC 


218 


]C 


318 


JC 


333 


JC 


240 


JC 


327 


JC 


352 


JC 


465 


JC 


495 



TOTAL 



4sh 

4sh 

4sh 

4sh 

4shor 

4sh 

4sh 

4sh 

8sh 

or 

8sh 



52 sh 



A minor in Journalism/Communications requires the following courses: 
JC 211 Public & Presentational Speaking 4 sh 

JC 215 Intro to Journalism & Communications 4 sh 

JC 218 Writing & Information Gathering 4 sh 

Four semester hours of JC elective at the 200-400 level 4 sh 

Eight semester hours of JC elective at the 300-400 level 8 sh 



TOTAL 



24 sh 



JC 2 1 0. PUBLIC SPEAKING 2 sh 

Study covers the fundamentals of public 
speaking, particularly principles and 
organization of oral and nonverbal 
communications with actual practice 
in delivery of ideas. 

JC21I. PUBLIC AND 

PRESENTATIONAL SPEAKING 4 sh 

This study of oral and nonverbal 
communication in public and corporate 
settings emphasizes audio/visual and 
other support materials. Students gain 
classroom practice in the organization 
and delivery of ideas, use of language 
and supporting evidence, reasoning and 
emotional appeals, diction and pronun- 
ciation. 

JC 212. BROADCAST PERFORMANCE 4 sh 

To help students become more effective 
communicators and performers in 
electronic media, this course empha- 
sizes communication of ideas on radio 
and television, particularly vocal and 



visual presentation, voice and diction, 
pronunciation, appearance, gestures 
and movement. Prerequisite: admission 
to department, 

JC 2 1 5. INTRO TO JOURNALISM 

AND COMMUNICATIONS 4 sh 

This introduction to the communication 
process and mass communications 
media surveys the history of newspa- 
pers, magazines, books, film, radio, 
television and cable in public and 
corporate communications. Study 
emphasizes the function and operation 
of contemporary mass media. 

JC218. WRITING AND 

INFORMATION GATHERING 4 sh 

Study helps students develop the ability 
to think and write critically as they 
research, analyze and write about 
significant issues. The course also 
introduces information gathering 
processes (including interviewing 
techniques and database search) 
and styles of media writing. 



JOURNALISM 



AND 



COMMUNICATIONS 



JC 225. REPORTING AND 

NEWSWRITING 4 sh 

By studying the basic types of news 
articles for the mass media, students 
learn to gather information and report it 
in standard journalistic style. Focus is on 
writing leads, interviewing techniques 
and editing copy. Word processing ability 
necessary. Prerequisite: ]C 215. 

JC 230. AUDIO PRODUCTION 4 sh 

This course introduces audio as one 
element of mass communications. 
Course work familiarizes students with 
basic production techniques applicable 
in radio, television and film. Students 
also learn basic studio operation, 
producing, writing and performing, with 
a focus on experience through exercises 
and production assignments. 

JC 240. TELEVISION PRODUCTION 4 sh 

This introduction to basic principles, 
techniques and technologies of televi- 
sion production emphasizes video while 
using audio to enhance the visual image. 
Students learn through field news and 
production assignments, editing and 
studio production. 



JC25I, 



COMMUNICATIONS 
STUDIES ABROAD 



4sh 



JC 3 1 5. MEDIA & SOCIETY 4 sh 

This study of the role of mass communi- 
cations media in society examines the 
structure, function and interaction of 
mass media, with consideration to 
media constraints and effects on society. 

JC318. ORGANIZATIONAL 

COMMUNICATIONS 4 sh 

As an introduction to process and 
patterns of communications within 
organizations, the course covers 
techniques of information dissemination 
and the application of various media 
and methods. Prerequisite: admission 
to department. 

JC 325. EDITING AND LAYOUT 4 sh 

Students study and practice in design 
and makeup of the modern newspaper, 



including copy editing, headline writing, 
scaling and cropping of photographs, 
caption writing, page layout, and use 
of art and graphics. Prerequisite: jC 225. 

JC 326. FEATURE WRITING 4 sh 

The study of basic types of feature 
articles for newspapers and magazines 
emphasizes applying techniques of 
fiction (narrative, characterization, 
dialogue, scenes) to nonfiction writing. 
Prerequisite: admission to department. 

JC 327. CORPORATE PUBLISHING 4 sh 

This introduction to print and other non- 
broadcast media used in corporate and 
institutional settings to communicate 
with internal and external publics 
includes basic design and layout using 
desktop publishing and presentational 
software and emphasizes writing for 
corporate purposes. Prerequisite: 
admission to department. 

JC 330. BROADCAST JOURNALISM 4 sh 

In this critical approach to the gathering, 
reporting and production of radio and 
television news, students discuss and 
evaluate news, commentary and sports 
features. Each student creates and 
produces documentary and feature 
programs. Prerequisites: JC 240 and 
admission to the department. 

JC 333. PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC 

RELATIONS 4 sh 

A combined survey of intermediate level 
courses covering basic public relations 
objectives and problems, this course 
emphasizes research, use of communi- 
cation tools, and use of the media to 
reach various publics. Prerequisite: 
JC318. 

JC 335. WRITING FOR 

ELECTRONIC MEDIA 4 sh 

This general course acquaints students 
with the style, forms and content 
approaches used in writing for radio, 
television and other audio/visual 
presentations. Prerequisite: admission 
to department. 



153 



JOURNALISM 



AND 



COMMUNICATIONS 



154 



JC 337. THE DOCUMENTARY 4 sh 

Students trace the origins of the docu- 
mentaiy subsequent developments and 
its current status in this survey course. 

JC 345. ADVANCED AUDIO 

PRODUCTION 4 sh 

The advanced study of audio production 
techniques (editing, music and sound 
effects, signal processing and multi- 
channel production) includes announc- 
ing, commercials, news and documen- 
tary production. Prerequisites: JC 240 
and admission to department. 

JC 352. CORPORATE VIDEO 

PRODUCTION 4 sh 

As they learn to research, write, rewrite 
and produce video productions for 
internal and external corporate presen- 
tations, students use studio and remote 
production equipment to produce 
projects. Course work emphasizes 
achieving an organizations goals 
through the video medium by informing, 
persuading and entertaining. Prerequi- 
site; admission to department. 

JC 355. ADVANCED VIDEO 

PRODUCTION 4 sh 

As an advanced study of video produc- 
tion techniques for use in television 
broadcasting and other video media, 
this course concentrates on electronic 
field production and emphasizes the 
aesthetics of teleproduction. Students 
research, write and produce public 
service announcements, commercials 
and newscasts. Prerequisite: JC 240. 

JC 360. MEDIA HISTORY 4 sh 

By examining major trends, important 
personalities, technological advance- 
ments and the historical impact of 
mass communications, students gain an 
understanding of how various media are 
interrelated and the interaction between 
media and society. 

JC361. DEVELOPMENT 

OF CINEMA 4sh 

To gain an appreciation of the historical 
development of film as an art form. 



students view significant films and study 
the contributions of important directors. 

JC 362. A STUDY OF FILMS 4 sh 

(Same course as ENG 362. See ENG 362 
for description.) 

JC371. SEMINAR: 

SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4 sh 

Recent studies in seminars have included 
magazine journalism, propaganda and 
mass media, rock music and mass media. 

JC 380. MEDIA WORKSHOP ; sh 

In an on-campus practicum in radio or 
television production or broadcasting, 
newspaper publishing or public rela- 
tions, students must arrange a learning 
contract with the instructor at the 
beginning of each term. Maximum 3 sh 
credit toward major. Prerequisites: 
JC 325 or 240, junior/senior status, 
permission of instructor. 

JC 38 1 . JOURNALISM INTERNSHIP I -4 sh 

An off-campus, advanced level work 
experience in journalism is offered 
on an individual basis when suitable 
opportunities can be arranged. Prerequi- 
sites: JC 225, 325, junior/senior status, 
permission of instructor. 

JC382. BROADCAST INTERNSHIP 1-4 sh 

An off-campus, advanced level work 
experience in broadcasting is offered 
on an individual basis when suitable 
opportunities can be arranged. Prerequi- 
sites: JC 240, junior/senior status, 
permission of instructor 

JC383. CORPORATE INTERNSHIP 1-4 sh 

An off-campus, advanced level work 
experience in corporate communications 
is offered on an individual basis when 
suitable opportunities can be arranged. 
Prerequisites: JC 240 or 325, junior/ 
senior status, permission of instructor. 

JC 425. ADVANCED REPORTING 4 sh 

This study of sophisticated reporting 
techniques includes investigative 
reporting techniques and the editors 
role in covering community news. 
The campus newspaper. The Pendulum, 



MATHEMATICS 



serves as a lab. Prerequisites: }C 325, 
admission to department. 

JC 430. TV NEWS REPORTING 4 sh 

In an advanced study of electronic 
news gathering, students analyze 
current examples of news and public 
affairs programming as well as research, 
write, edit and produce television news 
packages to be assembled into television 
newscasts. Prerequisites: JC 330, 
admission to department. 

JC 460. INTERNATIONAL 

COMMUNICATIONS 4 sh 

Students examine the media systems 
of many countries, stressing the chief 
problem of communications across 
cultural, economic, sociological and 
political barriers. 

JC 462. POLITICS IN MASS MEDIA 4 sh 

This course examines the effects of mass 
media on the American political system 
and traces the evolution of media impact 
from print journalism through radio and 
television. 



JC 463. THE AUTEUR DIRECTOR 4 

The auteur theory proposes that the 
greatest moves are dominated by the 
personal vision of one person, the 
director. This course examines the 
career of a specific director, emphasiz 
ing his/her auteur characteristics. 



sh 



Students view selected films from the 
directors filmography and prepare a 
paper on a particular auteur characteris- 
tic. Prerequisite: JC 361. 

JC 465. MEDIA LAW & ETHICS 4 sh 

Study covers law and ethics in print 
journalism and broadcasting with parti- 
cular emphasis on libel laws, invasion 
of privacy, free press, fair trial, obscenity 
and pornography, censorship and federal 
regulations of broadcasting content. 

JC 490. RESEARCH METHODS 4 sh 

This course presents the theoretical and 
methodological knowledge necessary to 
conduct mass communication research, 
political polling, marketing research and 
the reporting of research. Prerequisite: 
admission to department. 



JC 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 sh 
4sh 



JC 495. SENIOR SEMINAR 

This capstone course for majors 
examines current issues and research 
in journalism, broadcast communica- 
tions and corporate communications. 
Students demonstrate competence in 
areas (such as communication theory, 
history and law) through projects and 
examinations. Prerequisite: senior or 
major. (Students entering college since 
1991 must pass this course with a grade 
of "C-" or better.) 



155 



LEISURE /SPORT MANAGEMENT 

See Health, Physical Education and Leisure 



MATHEMATICS 

Chair, Department of Mathematics: Professor Reichard 
Professors: Francis, Haworth, W. Hightower 
Associate Professors: Barbee, Richardson, Speas 
Assistant Professors: Clark, Gersdorff, Johnson, Nawrocki 
Instructors: Dyer, C. Holt 
Part-time Instructor: Walton 

The Department of Mathematics offers programs leading to the A.B. or B.S. degree 
with a major in mathematics. A minor concentration is available for students majoring 
in another discipline. 



MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics is an excellent major for the student whose immediate objective is 
to acquire a good liberal arts education. Students who complete a bachelor's degree 
in mathematics may choose several post-graduate alternatives, including an advanced 
degree in either mathematics or another closely related field (computer science, 
biometiy, information science, statistics, operations research). 

Students who combine mathematics with another discipline that uses mathemat- 
ics can also pursue graduate work in the second discipline. These areas include 
biology, chemistry, economics, medicine, physics and many of the social science 
disciplines. In addition, mathematics majors may teach at the secondary level or work 
in business, industry or government positions which emphasize analytical reasoning. 

^cc The Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees in Mathematics 

require the following Core Courses: 

MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

MTH221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 sh 

MTH 231 Mathematical Reasoning 2 sh 

MTH 31 1 Linear Algebra 4 sh 

MTH 312 Abstract Algebra 4 sh 

MTH 32 1 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 sh 

MTH 425 Analysis 4 sh 

MTH 361 Seminar I 2 sh 

MTH 461 Seminar II 2 sh 

TOTAL 30 sh 

A Bachelor of Arts Degree in Mathematics requires the following courses: 
Core Courses in Mathematics 30 sh 

One course selected from 4 sh 

MTH 331 Modern Geometry 
MTH 34 1 Probability & Statistics 
MTH 35 1 Theory of Computation 
MTH 4 1 5 Numerical Analysis 
MTH 421 Differential Equations 

MTH elective(s) at the 300-400 level (excluding MTH 48 1 ) 4 sh 

CS 130 Computational Programming 4 sh 

PHY 1 1 3 Physics W/Calculus 1 4 sh 

TOTAL 46 sh 

A Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics requires the following courses: 
Core Courses in Mathematics 30 sh 

Two courses selected from 8 sh 

MTH 331 Modern Geometry 

MTH 34 1 Probability & Statistics 

MTH 35 1 Theory of Computation 

MTH 415 Numerical Analysis 

MTH 421 Differential Equations 



MATHEMATICS 



CS 130 Computational Programming 

One CS course numbered above 130 
PHY 113 Physics W/ Calculus I 
PHY 114 Physics W/ Calculus 11 



4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 



Secondary Teaching Certification in Mathematics 

Students planning to teach Mathematics at the secondary level must complete 
a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics and include MTH 
331 and 341 among the Mathematics requirements, in addition to the required 
professional education courses (see professional education course requirements 
listed under Education Department.) 

A minor in Mathematics requires the following courses: 
MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1 
MTH 221 Calculus 11 
MTH 231 Mathematical Reasoning 
MTH 311 Linear Algebra 
Electives from Mathematics courses numbered 200 
or above (excluding MTH 210 and MTH 481) 
Computer Science courses, or Economics 202 



4sh 
4sh 
2sh 
4sh 



sh 



18 sh 

19, and/or 121 by demonstrating 



TOTAL 

A Student may exempt Mathematics 1 1 
proficiency. 

Once a student has received credit, including transfer credit for a course, credit 
may not be received for any course with material that is equivalent to it or is a 
prerequesite for it, without permission of the Mathematics Department. 



157 



MTH 100. INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4 sh 

This course strengthens fundamentals 
such as exponents, factoring, equation 
solving, rational expressions, radicals, 
quadratic equations and graphing of 
first-degree equations. MTH 100 or 
demonstrated competence is required 
of all students. Must be completed with 
"C"- or better before taking any other 
mathematics course. Does not satisfy 
general studies requirement in Math- 
ematics. No credit to students having 
passed MTH 1 1 1 , or a course with MTH 
1 1 1 prerequisite. 

MTH 110. THE NATURE OF 

MATHEMATICS 4 sh 

Study provides insight into the nature 
of mathematics, emphasizing reasoning, 
communicating mathematical ideas, 
applications and quantitative skills. 



Topics may include mathematical 
reasoning, probability, counting tech- 
niques, statistics, financial management, 
trigonometry and systems of numera- 
tion. A scientific calculator is required. 
Prerequisite: MTH 100 or placement 
exemption. No credit to students with 
prior credit for MTH 1 14 or higher. 

MTH 111. COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

WITH APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

This course provides a study of algebraic 
and geometric models of various 
functions and relations using a 
graphing calculator and traditional 
methods. Application to "real world" 
problems is emphasized. Topics include 
real numbers, exponents, equations, 
systems of equations, inequalities, 
relations, functions and graphs. A 
graphing calculator is required. Prerequi- 
site: MTH 100 or placement exemption. 



MATHEMATICS 



MTH 114. ELEMENTARY STATISTICS 4 sh 

Students needing a general overview 
of modern statistics study topics such 
as organization of data, probability, 
measures of central tendency and 
variability, binomial and normal 
distributions, sampling, tests of 
hypothesis, estimation, correlation, 
regression and chi-square. A graphing 
calculator is required. Prerequisite: MTH 

110 or 1 1 1 or placement exemption. No 
158 credit for both ECO 202 and MTH 114. 

MTH 116. APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

WITH CALCULUS 4 sh 

This introduction to linear systems and 
differential calculus emphasizes 
applications to problem-solving in 
business and economics. Students gain 
enhanced ability to analyze a problem 
mathematically and study topics such as 
systems of linear equations, matrices, 
functions, limits, derivatives and 
applications of derivatives. No credit for 
students with MTH 121 or its exemp- 
tion. Prerequisite: MTH 1 1 1 or place- 
ment exemption. 

MTH 119. FUNCTIONS WITH 

APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

Topics of study include basic trigonomet- 
ric, exponential, logarithmic and inverse 
functions and their applications. Study 
also covers conic sections and the polar 
form of complex numbers. A graphing 
calculator is required. Prerequisite: MTH 

1 11 or placement exemption. 

MTH 121. CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC 

GEOMETRY I 4 sh 

Students are introduced to analytic 
geometry, functions, limits and continu- 
ity, differentiation of algebraic functions 
with applications, the definite integral 
and the fundamental theorem of 
integral calculus. A graphing calculator 
is required. Prerequisite: MTH 11 1 or 
placement exemption. 

MTH 210. MATHEMATICS FOR 

ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE 
GRADES TEACHERS 4 sh 



This course is open only to students 
majoring in elementary education or 
middle grades education with a 
concentration in mathematics. Topics 
include problem solving, numeration 
systems, set theory, rational and 
irrational numbers (concepts, opera- 
tions, properties, and algorithms), 
geometry, measurement and selected 
topics in probability and statistics. 
Prerequisite: general studies mathemat- 
ics requirement 

MTH 221. CALCULUS AND 

ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II 4 sh 

Students explore applications of the 
definite integral, differentiation and 
integration of transcendental functions, 
techniques of integration, indeterminate 
forms, improper integrals, plane curves 
and polar coordinates. A graphing 
calculator is required. Prerequisites: 
MTH 119 and 121. 

MTH 231. MATHEMATICAL 

REASONING 2 sh 

This study of proof techniques and 
reasoning skills introduces the student 
to another side of mathematics, namely 
proof. The student's preceding courses 
(e.g. precalculus and calculus) usually 
focus on calculations. Topics include 
mathematical logic, sets, mathematical 
induction, combinatorics, relations and 
countability arguments. Prerequisite: 
MTH 121. 

MTH 311. LINEAR ALGEBRA 4 sh 

This introductory course in linear algebra 
includes systems of linear equations, 
matrices, determinants, vector spaces, 
eigenvalues, eigenvectors, orthogonality, 
and linear transformations. Proofs of the 
major theorems and a variety of applica- 
tions are also covered. Prerequisites: MTH 
221 and 231. 

MTH 312. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 4 sh 

Students who have had an introduction 
to the rules of logic and proof-construc- 
tion are introduced to abstract algebra, 
including topics such as functions, 



MATHEMATICS 



groups (cyclic, permutation, normal, 
and quotient), properties of groups, 
rings, fields, homomorphisms, isomor- 
phisms, real and complex numbers and 
polynomials. Usually spring semester 
only. Prerequisites; MTH 231 and 31 1. 

MTH321. CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC 

GEOMETRY III 4 sh 

This course provides a study of advanced 
techniques of differential and integral 
calculus, including infinite sequences 
and series, 3-dimensional analytic 
geometry including vectors, differentia- 
tion and integration of multivariable 
functions, applications. A graphing 
calculator is required. Usually fall 
semester only. Prerequisite: MTH 221 . 

MTH 331. MODERN GEOMETRY 4 sh 

This rigorous treatment of axiomatic 
foundations of Euclidean geometry 
through Hilbert's axioms includes the 
role and independence of the parallel 
postulate (revealed through models 
and neutral geometry), straightedge 
and compass constructions, historical 
and philosophical implications of the 
discovery of non^Euclidean geometiy, 
with an introduction to both hyperbolic 
and elliptic geometry. Prerequisite: 
MTH 231. 

MTH 341. PROBABILITY THEORY 

AND STATISTICS 4 sh 

Topics include axiomatic probability, 
counting principles, discrete and 
continuous random variables and their 
distributions, sampling distributions, 
central limit theorem, confidence 
intervals and hypothesis testing. 
Prerequisites: MTH 221 and 231. 

MTH 351. THEORY OF COMPUTATION 4 sh 

(Same course as CS 35 1 . See CS 35 1 
for description.) 

MTH 361. SEMINAR I 2sh 

This course prepares mathematics majors 
for Seminar II, the capstone seminar, by 
instruction and experience in library 
research and formal oral presentations 
on advanced mathematical topics 



selected by the instmctor and students. 
Usually spring semester only. Prerequi- 
site: junior/senior standing or permission 
of the mathematics department. 

MTH 371. SPECIAL TOPICS 2^4 sh 

Topics are selected to meet the needs 
and interests of students. 

MTH 415. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 4 sh 

This introduction to numerical analysis 
includes floating point arithmetic, 
interpolation, approximation, numerical 
integration and differentiation, nonlinear 
equations and linear systems of equa- 
tions. Prerequisites: CS 130, MTH 31 1 
and 32 1 , or permission of the instructor. 
(CS 415 is the same as MTH 415.) 

MTH 421. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 4 sh 

Topics in this in-depth study of methods 
of solution and applications of ordinary 
differential equations include first order 
differential equations (linear and 
nonlinear), linear differential equations 
of higher order, mathematical models 
using second order equations, systems 
of differential equations and numerical 
techniques including Euler, Improved 
Euler and the Runge-Kutta method. 
Computers or programmable calculators 
may be used. Prerequisite: MTH 321. 

MTH 425. ANALYSIS 4 sh 

This course provides in-depth study of 
topics introduced in the 3-course calculus 
sequence, including sequences and 
series, continuity and differentiation 
of functions of a single variable, the 
Riemann integral, and the fundamental 
theorem of calculus. Usually fall semester 
only. Prerequisites: MTH 312 and 321. 

MTH 461. SEMINAR II 2sh 

In this capstone experience for senior 
mathematics majors, students conduct 
extensive research on a mathematical 
topic and formally present their work in 
writing and orally. Course requirements 
include a satisfactory score on the ETS 
major field achievement test. Prerequisite: 
MTH 361 and junior/senior standing, 
or permission of the department. 



159 



MILITARY SCIENCE 

MTH 471. SPECIAL TOPICS 2-4sh individual basis when suitable opportu- 

Topics are selected to meet the needs nities can be arranged. Prerequisite: 

and interests of the students. Permission of the department. 

MTH 481. INTERNSHIP IN MTH 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1 -4sh 

MATHEMATICS 1 - 4 sh Prerequisite: Permission of the depart- 

The internship provides advanced work ment. May be repeated with different 

experiences in some aspect of math- topics for up to a total of eight semester 

ematical sciences and is offered on an hours. 



^gO MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

See Biology 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

chair, Department ofMilitaiy Science: Mittelstaedt 
Instructor: Davis 

Elon College, in cooperative agreement with North Carolina A&T State University, 
offers an Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) program. 

The Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps program provides a viable elective 
program for both male and female students. The program is divided into a basic course 
and an advanced course. These are normally completed during a four-year period. 
However, it is possible for veterans and other students who elect to undergo special 
training to complete the program in two years. 

Programs of Instruction 

Programs of instruction for the Army ROTC include a four-year program and a 
two-year program. The four-year program consists of a two-year basic course, a two- 
year advanced course and the advanced ROTC Summer Camp. The two-year program 
encompasses a basic ROTC Summer Camp, a two-year advanced course and the 
advanced ROTC Summer Camp. 

Basic Course 

The basic course is normally taken during the freshman and sophomore years. 
The purpose of this instruction is to introduce the student to basic military subjects: 
branches of the Army, familiarization with basic weapons, equipment and techniques, 
military organization and functions and the techniques of leadership and command. It 
is from the students who successfully complete this instruction that the best qualified 
are selected for the advanced course which leads to an officer's commission. 

Credit for the basic course can be obtained by successful completion of the 
following courses: 

MS 111. Introduction of Citizen/Soldier 1 sh 

MS 112. Introduction to U.S. Military Forces 1 sh 

MS 141,142. Leadership Laboratory 1 sh/ea 

MS 2 1 1 . Development of Professional Military Skills I 1 sh 

MS 212. Development of Professional Military Skills II I sh 

MS 241,242. Leadership Labortory I sh/ea 

TOTAL 8 sh 



MILITARY 



SCIENCE 



Successful completion of Military Science 251, or prior service in the Armed 
Forces, can be used to obtain appropriate credit for the basic course. 

Advanced Course 

students who receive appropriate credit for the basic course and meet eligibility 
standards are admitted to the advanced course on a best qualified basis. Successful 
completion of the advanced course qualifies the student for a commission as a 
Second Lieutenant in one of the branches of the United States Army, Army 
Reserves or Army National Guard. The following courses are required for 
completion of the advanced course: 

MS 311. Leadership Training 2 sh 

MS 312. Introduction to Military Team Theory 2 sh 

MS 341,342. Leadership Laboratory I sh/ea 

MS 35 1 . Army ROTC Advance Camp 4 sh 

MS 4 1 1 . Seminars in Leadership and 

Professional Development 2 sh 

MS 412. Leadership, Law and Ethics 2 sh 

MS 441,442. Leadership Laboratory 1 sh/ea 



161 



TOTAL 



16 sh 



Two- Year Program 

This program is designed for junior college students or sophomores at four-year 
institutions who have not taken ROTC. A basic six week summer training period after 
the sophomore year takes the place of the basic course required of students in the 
traditional four-year program. When a student with two years of college has success- 
fully completed the basic summer training, he/she is eligible for the advanced ROTC 
course in his/her junior and senior years. The advanced course, which leads to an 
officer commission, is the same for students in either the two-year program or the 
four-year programs. 



MS 111. 



INTRODUCTION OF 
CITIZEN/SOLDIER 



Ish 



MS 1 12. INTRODUCTION TO U.S. 

MILITARY FORCES / sh 

Introduction to U.S. Military Forces 
provides an introduction to and fosters 
the early development of leadership and 
soldier skills. Topics of training include 
leadership, drill and ceremonies, first 
aid and general military subjects. 

MS 141,142. LEADERSHIP 

LABORATORY 1 sb 

(each semester) 
Hands-on, practical training is the focus 
of the Leadership Laboratory. Students 
become proficient in basic military 



skills, drill and ceremonies, first aid 
and conducting inspections. Attention 
is also given to individual arms and 
marksmanship techniques. 

MS 211. DEVELOPMENT OF 
PROFESSIONAL 
MILITARY SKILLS I / sh 

This course continues the development 
of cadet leadership and critical skills. 
Training is basic in scope and includes 
leadership, written and oral communi- 
cations, physical fitness and general 
militar}/ subjects. 

MS 212. DEVELOPMENT OF 
PROFESSIONAL 
MILITARY SKILLS II / sh 

Instruction in the second part of this 



MILITARY 



SCIENCE 



162 



sequence expands the students' frame 
of reference to include an understanding 
of roles and responsibilities and fosters 
internalization of the Professional Army 
Ethic. Training is basic in scope and 
includes written and oral communica- 
tion, military skills, professional 
knowledge subjects and physical fitness. 

MS 241, 242. LEADERSHIP 

LABORATORY 1 sh 

(each semeslerj 
This Leadership Laboratory serves as a 
learning laboratory for hands-on 
practical experiences. Training includes 
instruction on operations, tactics, land 
navigation, first aid and general military 
subjects. Key course components 
emphasize the functions, duties and 
responsibilities of junior noncommis- 
sioned officers. The primary focus is 
the continued development of leader- 
ship potential through practical 
experience. The APFT is given to assess 
the state of physical development. 

MS 251. ARMY ROTC BASIC CAMP 4 sh 

Basic Camp is six weeks of training 
at Fort Knox, KY, consisting of Army 
history, role and mission, map reading/ 
land navigation, rifie marksmanship, 
basic leadership techniques, physical 
training/marches, individual and unit 
tactics, communications. This course 
can be taken by rising juniors to 
substitute for MS 111, 122, 141, 142, 
211,212,241,242. Prerequisite: 
qualificafion tests. 

MS 311. LEADERSHIP TRAINING 2 sh 

Designed to prepare cadets for the full 
range of responsibilities associated with 
Advanced Camp, Leadership Training 
refines the leader development process. 
Instruction is supplementary in scope 
and includes leadership, written and 
oral communications, operations, 
tactics and general military subjects. 

MS 312. INTRODUCTION TO 

MILITARY TEAM THEORY 2 sh 

This course emphasizes the develop- 



ment of intermediate level cadet leader 
skills in preparation for Advanced 
Camp. Training is supplementary in 
scope and includes leadership, written 
and oral communications, operafions, 
tactics, land navigafion, weapons and 
general military subjects. 

MS 341, 342. LEADERSHIP 

LABORATORY / sh 

(each semester) 
In this learning laboratory for hands-on 
practical experiences, the focus is on 
soldier team development at a squad/ 
patrol level and supplementary training 
includes land navigation and weapons. 
Emphasis is also placed on the develop- 
ment of intermediate leader skills in a 
field environment. The APFT is adminis- 
tered to assess physical development. 

MS 351. ARMY ROTC 

ADVANCED CAMP 4 sh 

Normally taken the summer following 
the junior year, the six-week Advanced 
Camp training/internship is conducted 
at designated U.S. Army installations. 
Prerequisite: MS 312. 

MS 4 1 1 . SEMINARS IN LEADERSHIP 
AND PROFESSIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT 2 sh 

Cadets develop leadership, technical 
and tactical skills through performance 
as a trainer/supervisor. Supplementary 
training includes leadership, written 
and oral communications, operations 
and tactics, physical fitness, training 
management and general military 
subjects. The focus gradually shifts 
to familiarize the student with future 
assignments as an officer. 

MS 412. LEADERSHIP, LAW 

AND ETHICS 2 sh 

Leadership, Law and Ethics continues 
the development of critical leadership 
skills. Training includes leadership, 
ethics, professionalism, law, written and 
oral communications, operations, tactics 
and general military subjects. The course 
culminates with instruction on making 
the transition to the Officer Corps. 



MUSIC 



MS 441,442. LEADERSHIP 

LABORATORY / sh 

(each semester) 
Hands-on practical experiences 
reinforce cadet training, which is 
designed to solidify the commitment 
to officership, reinforce individual 
competencies and afford maximum 
practical officer leadership experiences. 
The laboratory emphasizes the func- 
tions, duties and responsibilities of 
junior Army officers, with special 
attention directed to developing 
advanced leadership skills through 



active participation in planning and 
conducting military drills, ceremonies 
and field training. 

MS 451. AIRBORNE TRAINING 3 sll 

Three weeks of intensive airborne 
training includes physical conditioning, 
landing techniques, parachute safety, 
simulated jumps, procedures in and 
around aircraft and five combat jumps 
from Air Force aircraft at 1 ,250 feet. 
Selection for this opportunity is highly 
competitive. Only a few cadets nation- 
wide are accepted. 



163 



MUSIC 



Chair, Department of Music: Professor Bragg 

Assistant Professors: Erdmann, Fischer, Green, McNeela 

Part-tin]e Professor: Artley 

Part-time Instructors: Beerman, Cykert, Dula, Johnson, King, LaRocco, McMillian, 

Metzger, Novine-Whitaker, Reed, Sullivan, Tektonidis 

The Department of Music at Elon College offers three music degrees. The B.S. in 
Music Education is for those students who wish to teach in elementary, middle or high 
school music programs. The program is a collaborative effort between the Music 
Department and the education department. The B.A. in Music Performance is for those 
students who wish to emphasize the study of instrumental or vocal music. Students in 
this program will be expected to become accomplished performers while developing a 
solid base in theory, composition and history. The B.A. in Music is primarily for those 
students who do not wish to concentrate on a performance area or who wish to 
double major in another liberal arts department. Students in this program will have a 
continuing background in musical performance through participation in ensembles of 
their choice and private lessons. 

The major in Music requires the following courses: 

HST 1 12 History of Western Civilization 4 sh 

MUS 111 The Materials of Music 1 3 sh 

MUS 112 The Materials of Music II 3 sh 

MUS 211 The Materials of Music III 3 sh 

MUS 212 The Materials of Music IV 3 sh 

MUS 154 Piano Class I 1 sh 

MUS 155 Piano Class II I sh 

MUS 315 The Music of Ancient Times Through 1 750 4 sh 

MUS 316 Classic and Romantic Music 4 sh 

MUS 495 Senior Seminar 2-4 sh 
In addition, each music major must complete: 

(a) Eight semester hours Music electives at 300-400 level 8 sh 



MUSIC 



164 



(b) Four semesters of applied music lessons 4-8 sh 

(c) Ensembles 4 sh 

TOTAL 44-50 sh 
A major in Music Education requires the following courses: 



HST 112 


History of Western Civilization 


4sh 


MUS 1 1 1 


The Materials of Music I 


3sh 


MUS 112 


The Materials of Music 11 


3sh 


MUS 113 


Aural Skills 1 


1 sh 


MUS 114 


Aural Skills II 


1 sh 


MUS 211 


The Materials of Music III 


3sh 


MUS 212 


The Materials of Music IV 


3sh 


MUS 213 


Aural Skills 111 


1 sh 


MUS 214 


Aural Skills IV 


1 sh 


MUS 315 


The Music of Ancient Times Through 1750 


4sh 


MUS 316 


Classic and Romantic Music 


4sh 


MUS317 


Music of the Twentieth Century 


4sh 


MUS 361 
MUS 362 
MUS 363 
MUS 364 
MUS 366 


Percussion Techniques 
Brass Techniques 
Woodwind Techniques 
String Techniques 
Conducting 


1 sh 
1 sh 
1 sh 
1 sh 
2sh 


MUS 411 


Instrumental and Choral Conducting 


2sh 


MUS 461 


Music Education in the Public Schools 


4sh 


In addition, each Music Education major must complete: 
(a) Applied music lessons, at least 
one semester at 300 level 


6-12 sh 


(b) Half-recital accepted by music faculty 

(c) Ensemble from Music 101, 102, 103, and 105 (8 sh) 

(d) Keyboard proficiency 

(e) Concert attendance as outlined in the Music Student Handbook. 



TOTAL 58-64 sh 

In addition, vocal majors must take MUS 258, Diction for Singers. 

The music student must also complete the required professional education courses 
and observe the requirements for the teacher education program as outlined under 
Education, 

The major in Music Performance requires the following courses: 
HST 1 12 History of Western Civilization 4 sh 

MUS 111 The Materials of Music 1 3 sh 

MUS 112 The Materials of Music II 3 sh 

MUS 113 Aural Skills I 1 sh 

MUS 114 Aural Skills II I sh 



MUSIC 

MUS 211 The Materials of Music III 3 sh 

MUS212 The Materials of Music IV 3 sh 

MUS 213 Aural Skills 111 1 sh 

MUS 214 Aural Skills IV 1 sh 

MUS 315 The Music of Ancient Times Through 1 750 4 sh 

MUS 316 Classic and Romantic Music 4 sh 

MUS 3 1 7 Music of the Twentieth Century 4 sh 

A choice of one of the following: 2 sh 

MUS 366 Conducting 

MUS 369 Methods and Materials of Piano Pedagogy 

MUS 41 1 Instrumental and Choral Arranging 
In addition, each Music Performance major must complete: 

(a) Applied music lessons, at least one semester 

at the 400 level 7-14 sh 

(b) Formal solo recital accepted by music faculty 

(c) Ensemble from Music 101, 102, 103, and 105 (8 sh) 

(d) Keyboard proficiency 

(e) Concert attendance as outlined in the Music Student Handbook. 

TOTAL 49-56 sh 

In addition, vocal majors must take MUS 258, Diction for Singers. 

A minor in Music requires 20 semester hours. Students lacking functional 
knowledge of the keyboard must accumulate two semester hours in piano either 
prior to, or simultaneously with their enrollment in Music 1 1 1 and 1 12. 

The following courses are required: 
MUS 111 The Materials of Music 1 3 sh 

MUS 112 The Materials of Music II 3 sh 

A choice of one of the following: 4 sh 

MUS 303 Music History for the Liberal Arts Student 

MUS 3 1 5 The Music of Ancient Times Through 1 750 

MUS 316 Classic and Romantic Music 

MUS 3 1 9 History of American Music 
In addition, each Music Minor must complete: 

(a) One medium of applied music instruction 6 sh 

(b) Ensemble from MUS 1 1 , 1 02, 1 03, and 1 05 4 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 

APPLIED MUSIC-INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP INSTRUCTION 

Music majors/minors register for the appropriate level and area of applied music 
study as determined by audition and consultation with their advisor or the department 
chair. With permission of the department, the general college student may register for 
any course in applied music. Weekly 30-minute lesson: 1 sh credit. Weekly 60-minute 
lesson: 2 sh credit. 



165 



MUSIC 



APPLIED MUSIC: INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION 



166 



Piano: 120,220,320,420 
Organ: 121,221,321,421 
Voice: 122,222,322,422 
Tmmpet: 123,223,323,423 
French Horn: 124,224,324,424 
Trombone: 125, 225, 325, 425 
Baritone (Euphonium): 126, 
226, 326, 426 
Tuba: 127, 227, 327, 427 
Flute: 128,228,328,428 



Oboe: 129,229,329,429 

Clarinet: 130,230,330,430 

Bassoon: 131,231,331,431 

Saxophone: 132, 232, 332, 432 

Violin: 133, 233, 333, 433 

Viola: 134,234,334,444 

Cello: 135,235,335,435 

String Bass (Electric Bass): 136, 236, 336, 436 

Guitar: 137,237,337,437 

Percussion: 138,238,338,438 



APPLIED MUSIC CLASSES: 
GROUP INSTRUCTION 

MUS 152,153. VOICE CLASS I&II I sh 

Group voice instruction ranges from 
beginning to intermediate. 

MUS 154-157. PIANO CLASS I-IV I sh 

Group piano instruction ranges from 
beginner to intermediate. 

MUS 158. GUITAR CLASS I sh 

Beginners develop musical skills with 
the guitar - simple chords, melodies and 
songs - using elements of classical 
guitar techniques as a foundation. 

MUS 258. DICTION FOR SINGERS 2 sh 

Students learn to use the International 
Phonetic Alphabet and are introduced 
to the pronunciation of English, Latin, 
Italian, French and German as it applies 
to vocal literature. Required of voice 
majors. 

MUSIC MATERIALS, STRUCTURES 
AND TECHNIQUES 

MUS 111,112. THE MATERIALS 

OF MUSIC 3 sh 

A Study of the fundamentals of music, 
diatonic harmony and elementary voice- 
leading and part-writing includes an 
introduction to harmonic-melodic form, 
analysis and synthesis of harmonic 
practices through secondary seventh 
chords. 

MUS 113,114. AURAL SKILLS I & II / sh 

Study emphasizes melodic-harmonic- 



rhythmic dictation, sight singing and 
keyboard study. Corequisite: MUS 
111,112. 

MUS 21 1, 212. THE MATERIALS 

OF MUSIC III & IV 3sh 

A continuation of Music 1 12 on an 
advanced level includes complex 
chromatic harmonies and emphasizes 
analysis and composition of standard 
musical forms. Prerequisite: MUS 112. 
Prerequisite for 212: MUS 211. 

MUS 213, 214. AURAL SKILLS III & IV I sh 

These courses provide advanced study 
in melodic-harmonic-rhythmic dictation, 
sight singing and keyboard study. 
Corequisite: MUS 21 1,212. 

MUS 254, 255. JAZZ IMPROVISATION 

I & II Ish 

Instrumentalists or vocalists develop 
skills in improvisational jazz perfor- 
mance techniques. 

MUS 311. COUNTERPOINT 4 sh 

Analysis and composition of period 
works are part of the study of counter- 
point from the I6th to 20th centuries 
with applications to various vocal and 
instrumental writings. 

MUS 411. INSTRUMENTAL AND 

CHORAL ARRANGING 2 sh 

Students explore technical possibilities 
and limitations of individual instruments 
and voices. Study also covers arranging 
and transcribing for various combinations 
of instruments and voices. 



MUSIC 



MUS 265-465. COMPOSITION I sh 

Students write compositions integrating 
techniques of studied repertoire as they 
explore musical composition in weekly 
individual meetings with an instructor. 
Prerequisite: MUS 112 or permission 
of instructor. 

LITERATURE AND HISTORY 

MUS 216. THE STUFF OF MUSIC 4 sh 

Through a series of exercises, readings, 
outside class activities and class 
participation, students become familiar 
with the materials which form the basis 
of music, including instruments, 
notation and terminology. Hands-on 
application includes basic performance 
on rhythm instruments and composing 
simple music compositions. 

MUS 217. WORLD MUSIC 4 sh 

Text readings, listening, research, 
writing and class presentation are part 
of an introduction to the music of Asia, 
Eastern Europe, Africa, and Central and 
South America. Students gain increased 
awareness of the art and music of other 
cultures, make connections with their 
own art and folk traditions and search 
for shared meanings of all musical 
expression. 

MUS 303. MUSIC HISTORY FOR 

THE LIBERAL ARTS STUDENT^ sh 

Non-music majors gain improved skills to 
enhance musical enjoyment, basic 
knowledge of music styles and events, 
and focus on placing this knowledge in 
the context of world events and trends. 
Study covers selected personalities and 
works in music through substantial 
reading, listening, research and writing. 

MUS 315. THE MUSIC OF 
ANCIENT TIMES 
THROUGH 1750 4 sh 

This survey of music through the 
Baroque period emphasizes Renaissance 
and Baroque counterpoint through 



reading, listening, analysis, research and 
writing. Students also explore counter- 
point through original compositional 
exercises. 

MUS 316. CLASSIC AND 

ROMANTIC MUSIC 4 sh 

By reading, listening, research and 
writing, students explore the relation- 
ship of 18th- and 19th-centui7 music to 
the world - as the expression of artists 
responding to political, social and 
philosophical environments. The course 
also emphasizes the progressive study of 
formal analysis, from smaller forms to 
the large single and multi-movement 
genres of the period. 

MUS 317. MUSIC OF THE 

20TH CENTURY 4 sh 

Students explore 20th-centui'y music 
(especially Western art music) histori- 
cally and analytically, including its 
source, purposes, and intluences. Study 
involves reading, listening, writing, 
research and analysis of scores aug- 
mented by compositional exercises in 
20th-century styles. 

MUS 318. HISTORY OF JAZZ 4 sh 

This overview of jazz music from about 
1900 to the present is designed for the 
liberal arts major. Topics include jazz 
styles, individual musicians and the 
development and progress of jazz 
through the 20th century. 

MUS 319. HISTORY OF 

AMERICAN MUSIC 4 sh 

Study of American music from 1620 to 
the present focuses on elements of 
various musical cultures (i.e. Western 
and Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin 
America) that have influenced the 
American style of music. 



167 



MUSIC 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

The following technique courses are required for music majors seeking music 
teacher certification. 



MUS 36 1 . PERCUSSION TECHNIQUES 

MUS 362. BRASS TECHNIQUES 

MUS 363. WOODWIND TECHNIQUES 

MUS 364. STRING TECHNIQUES 

MUS 366. CONDUCTING 



I sh 
1 sh 
1 sh 
1 sh 
2sh 



Students develop skill in baton and rehearsal techniques and interpretation in 
168 training and leading various ensembles of instruments and voices. 

MUS 461. MUSIC EDUCATION IN 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 4 sh 

A Study of the methods and materials 
suitable for teaching at all levels covers 
the administration of band, orchestra and 
choral programs in the public schools with 
additional emphasis on marching band 
techniques. 



ENSEMBLES 

MUS 101. WIND ENSEMBLE 1 sh 

Open to all students. 

MUS 102. CHOIR Ish 

Open to all students. 

MUS 103. ORCHESTRA 1 sh 

By audition only. 

MUS 104. JAZZ ENSEMBLE 1 sh 

By audition only. 

MUS 105. CHAMBER SINGERS I sh 

By audition only. 

MUS 106. CHAMBER ENSEMBLE Ish 

By audition only. 

MUS 107. ELAN Ish 

By audition only. 

MUS 108. PERCUSSION 

ENSEMBLE 1 sh 

By audition only. 



OTHER OFFERINGS 

MUS 369. METHODS & MATERIALS 

OF PIANO PEDAGOGY 2 sh 

Students interested in teaching piano in 
a private studio explore group and 
individual instructional techniques for 
beginning and intermediate students, 
suitable repertoire, basic keyboard 
musicianship and pupil psychology. 

MUS 471. SEMINAR: 

SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4 sh 

Small groups study under the guidance 
of a member of the staff. 

MUS 491. INDEPENDENT 

STUDY 1-4 sh 

MUS 495. SENIOR SEMINAR 2-4 sh 

This capstone experience for music, 
music theatre and theatre arts majors 
includes a comprehensive evaluation of 
the student's previous education in the 
major field, a major project to demon- 
strate proficiency in the student's major 
area of interest or emphasis, and 
preparation of materials necessary for 
enrollment in graduate school or the 
profession. 



M U S 



THEATRE 



MUSIC THEATRE 

Chair, Department of Fine Arts: Professor Myers 

Professor: Bragg 

Assistant Professors: Green, McNeela, Rubeck, Wellford 

The Department of Performing Arts offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Music 
Theatre, a degree geared toward the student who wishes to pursue a career in 
performance or graduate studies following graduation. Admission to the program 
requires an audition demonstrating initial talent. 

Coursework within this major is designed to train students in the three essential skill 
areas for music theatre: music, acting and dance. Students take studio dance classes 
in Ballet, Jazz, Modern and Tap, studio voice lessons, music theory and a minimum of 
four semesters of acting. Further study includes the literature and history of music 
theatre. 

Practical application of all aspects of study are expected through participation in 
department stage productions, concerts and recitals. Outreach to the professional 
world occurs throughout the course of study through participation in vocal, dance and 
theatre festivals, conventions, auditions and competitions. The final result is an artist 
prepared for entry to the world of professional performance. 

A major in Music Theatre requires the following courses: 



MT301 

MT302 

MT321 

MT322 

MT495 

MUS 111 

MUS 

MUS 

MUS 

MUS 

TH 120 

TH220 

TH221 

DAN 306 



History of Music Theatre 
Music Theatre Literature 
Performance in Music Theatre 
Music Theatre & Opera Scene Study 
Senior Seminar 
Materials of Music I 
Materials of Music II 
Aural Skills I 
Aural Skills II 
Piano Class 
Voice & Movement 
Performance Skills I 
Performance Skills II 
Dance for the Musical Stage 
In addition, each major must complete the following: 

(a) six semesters of private voice at appropriate level 

(b) six semesters of studio technique courses in dance 
with a minimum of one credit in each of the following: 
Ballet, jazz, Modern and Tap 

(c) electives selected from Music Theatre, Theatre Arts, 
Dance or Music 



4sh 


4sh 


4sh 


4sh 


4sh 


3sh 


3sh 


I sh 


I sh 


I sh 


2sh 


4sh 


4sh 


1 sh 


12 sh 


6sh 



169 



10 sh 



TOTAL 



68 sh 



PHILOSOPHY 



170 



MT301. HISTORY OF MUSIC 

THEATRE 4 sh 

This course, open to all students, 
explores the origins and development of 
music theatre, its theatrical conventions 
and major elements from the mid- 18th 
century to the present, 

MT302. MUSIC THEATRE 

LITERATURE 4 sh 

The purpose of this course is to expose 
the student to the staples of the music 
theatre literature, to develop a critical 
sensitivity to the medium and to be able 
to analyze music, plots, characters and 
situations in contemporary music 
theatre, Prerequisite: MUS 111, 113, 

MT321. PERFORMANCE 

IN MUSIC THEATRE 4 sh 

This performance-oriented course 
provides a systematic approach to 
achieving a high level of singing-acting 



skills. Students also receive training and 
practice in selecting, preparing and 
presenting audition material. Prerequi- 
sites: MUS 122 A or B, MT 120, 220. 

MT322. MUSIC THEATRE AND 

OPERA SCENE STUDY 4 sh 

This performance-oriented course 
integrates music and theatre perfor- 
mance skills through the selection, 
development and presentation of 
partnered scenes from music theatre 
and opera repertoire. Prerequisites: two 
semesters of MUS 122 A or B or 
permission of instructor. 



MT495. SENIOR SEMINAR < 

This capstone experience for senior 
majors centers on a practical project 
which demonstrates proficiency in 
performance skills and preparation for 
graduate study or entry into the profes- 
sion. Prerequisite: senior majors only 



sh 



PHILOSOPHY 

Chan; Department of Philosophy: Assistant Professor Batchelor 
Powell Professor of Philosophy: Sullivan 
Associate Professor: Weston 
Assistant Professor: Lubling 

Philosophy— the very name means "love of wisdom"— lies at the heart of a 
liberal arts education. Philosophy at Elon has both a wisdom orientation for exploring 
enduring human concerns and a radical intent to enhance our life together and our 
care for the earth. 

Philosophical study focuses on three sets of skills: 1) critical and constructive 
thinking— aiding students in identifying, analyzing and offering solutions to problems; 
2) ethical practice— exploring ways to act wisely and effectively in our life with others, 
and 3) interpretive understanding— allowing students to bridge the meaning and value 
systems of diverse individuals, cultures and epochs. 

Such skills are valuable for law and leadership, ministry and the helping profes- 
sions, citizenship and service, and for deepening the quality of our lives. At 36 
semester hours, the philosophy major is designed to allow room for a double major 
or a career-related minor. 

A major in Philosophy requires the following courses: 

PHL 1 13 Critical Thinking 4 sh 

PHL115 Ethical Practice 4 sh 

PHL 331 Ancient Philosophy 4 sh 

PHL 333 Modern Philosophy 4 sh 



PHILOSOPHY 



One course from among the following: 
PHL 431 Contemporary Philosophy 
PHL 432 American Philosophy 
PHL 433 Marx, Darwin, Freud 
PHL 461 Integrative Tutorial 



4sh 



4sh 



TOTAL 36 sh 

A minor in Philosophy requires the following courses: 

PHL 113 Critical Thinking 4 sh 

PHL 115 Ethical Practice 4 sh 

PHL 331 Ancient Philosophy 4 sh or 

PHL 333 Modern Philosophy 4 sh 
Two courses chosen from any additional philosophy offerings 8 sh 



Total 

PHL 1 13. CRITICAL THINKING 4 sh 

This foundation course in logic intro- 
duces critical reading and listening 
skills, argument analysis and evaluation, 
and creative problem-solving methods. 
Such skills are valuable throughout life, 
from making effective presentations to 
promoting independent thinking. 

PHL 115. ETHICAL PRACTICE 4 sh 

Ethical practice is a foundation course 
exploring ways to act wisely and 
effectively in our life with others. 
Drawing on the philosophical tradition 
and on critical examination of life 
situations, students engage such topics 
as personal integrity, sensitivity and 
fairness to others, and conditions for 
collaborative and respectful living. 

PHL 33 1 . ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY 4 sh 

This study of the origins of Western 
philosophy concentrates on the Golden 
Age of Greece, including such topics as 
Socrates, his predecessors, and his great 
successors, Plato and Aristotle. Students 
consider what it means to live a human 
life in a humane and liberating commu- 
nal context. 

PHL 332. MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY 4 sh 

This study focuses on 12th and 13th 
century European intellectual develop- 
ments, showing how Platonic and 



20 sh 

Aristotelian strands blend with lewish. 
Christian and Islamic elements. Special 
topics include Bernard and Abelard, 
Averroes and Maimonides, Hildegard 
and Mechtild, Aquinas and Bonaventure, 
Dante and Eckhart. 

PHL 333. MODERN PHILOSOPHY 4 sh 

Discussion centers on crucial intellectual 
developments in the 17th and 18th 
centuries when the modern western 
worid view arose. Specific attention 
is given to far-reaching changes in 
philosophical methods, theory of 
knowledge, new senses of self and 
worid, and thinkers such as Descartes, 
Hume and Kant. 

PHL 334. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 4 sh 

Political Philosophy is a study of the 
roots of modern political thought, 
including such key 17th and 18th 
century developments as the case for 
sovereignty in the modern nation state, 
the rise of individual rights and the 
rationale for modern democracy. Major 
thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke and 
Rousseau are studied against the 
background of their turbulent times. 

PHL 34 1 . PHILOSOPHY OF LAW 4 sh 

This basic examination of the nature, 
function and limits of law gives attention 
to human rights and natural justice, law 



171 



PHILOSOPHY 



172 



and morality, theories of punishment 
and questions of legal responsibility. 
The course is of particular interest to 
pre-law, business and political science 
students. 

PHL 342. PHILOSOPHY AND SOCIETY 4 sh 

This course pursues a philosophical 
approach to the relation of individuals 
and social institutions. Topics consid- 
ered may include the nature and 
possibility of the social sciences, 
philosophy of technology and the 
nature of community. 

PHL 343. AGES AND STAGES OF LIFE 4 sh 

In an archetypal approach to the stages 
of life, this course draws from trans- 
personal psychology/philosophy and 
from myths and stories of the first and 
second halves of life. The study seeks 
practical insights from developmental 
psychology and various spiritual 
teachings to help students deal with 
crucial life issues. 

PHL 344. PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE 4 sh 

Course study promotes the intelligent, 
critical assimilation of scientific informa- 
tion by developing a general framework 
for analyzing scienfific claims. Topics 
include the structure of scientific 
reasoning, science in its cultural 
context, and the logical and other 
elements shaping scientific change. 
PHL 1 13 and some background in 
science recommended. 

PHL 345. FEMINIST PHILOSOPHY 4 sh 

This survey and application of feminist 
philosophies examines feminism as a 
liberative movement with distinct ethical 
and political arguments; feminism as a 
revaluation of much that is overlooked 
and dismissed in traditional culture; 
and other forms of feminism. 

PHL 348. ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS 4 sh 

Students explore the bearing of philo- 
sophical and religious ethics upon 
practical problems regarding the natural 
environment. This course also considers 



the possible need for new ethical 
frameworks to address the environmen- 
tal crisis we now face. (Same course as 
REL348.) 

PHL 352. EASTERN PHILOSOPHY 4 sh 

Eastern Philosophy centers first on 
ancient China, exploring the Book of 
Changes and the thought of Lao Tzu 
and Confucius. The course continues 
with investigation of Buddha's insight, 
following Mahayana Buddhism into 
China, where it becomes Zen. Finally, 
the course examines the spirit of Zen 
and its infiuence on Japanese arts 
and culture. 

PHL 355. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 4 sh 

This course explores Eastern and 
Western approaches to religious experi- 
ence and notes differences between 
the literal, moralistic (exoteric) and the 
symbolic, mystical (esoteric) understand- 
ings of any religion. Students examine 
parable, teaching story, paradox, and the 
problem of religious language and 
consider ways of assessing religious 
claims, communities and personal 
practices. (PHL 355 is the same as 
REL 355.) 

PHL 371-379. SPECIAL TOPICS 4 sh 

Special topics are variable courses 
of timely and enduring interest. Past 
offerings have included Philosophy 
of Love, Philosophy and the Holocaust, 
Philosophy of Art, Death and Dying, 
Dante's journey. 

PHL 431. CONTEMPORARY 

PHILOSOPHY 4 sh 

Students become acquainted with 
philosophical trends in the 20th century 
and develop appropriate skills of inquiry. 
The course surveys the changing 
landscape of philosophy in this volatile 
century and introduces students to key 
figures who have shaped that landscape. 

PHL 432. AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY 4 sh 

Focusing on the rich heritage of 19th 
and 20th century American thought 



PHYSICS 



from such figures as Emerson, Thoreau, 
Pierce, James, Dewey, and others, this 
course emphasizes the originality of 
American philosophy and its continuing 
relevance. 

PHL 433. MARX, DARWIN, FREUD 4 sh 

These revolutionary makers of the 
modern mind— Marx, Darwin and Freud 
—have had enduring influence on 
subsequent thought in such diverse 
fields as philosophy and politics, biology 
and religion, sociology and psychology. 
This course examines their work in light 
of more recent attempts to incorporate, 
reform and extend their insights. 



PHL 46 1 . INTEGRATIVE TUTORIAL 4 sh 

(generally, 2 sh in Fall, 2 sh in Spring) 

This intensive, individualized program 
of discussions, readings, writing and 
activities is designed to ensure that 
graduating majors have achieved 
competency in critical, ethical and 
interpretive skills. A philosophic 
mentorship provides opportunities 
to build on strengths and remedy 
weaknesses through a jointly designed 
project. For majors only; taken in the 
last two semesters before graduation. 

PHL 4 7 1 . SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS 4 sh 



173 



PHL 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1^4 sh 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

See Health, Physical Education and Leisure 



PHYSICS 



Chair, Department of Physics: Professor F. Harris 
Associate Professor: Agnew 
Assistant Professor: Das 

Physics is the great intellectual web that underlies our understanding of the 
universe in which we live. In the Physics Department, the faculty seeks to elucidate 
that web of theory and experiment, studying not only its broad outlines and appealing 
symmetries, but also its delicate subtleties and elegant construction. 

With faculty in both theoretical and experimental physics, Elon's program 
offers a wide variety of courses for science and non-science majors, including 
service courses for biology, chemistry, and mathematics as well as calculus-based 
Introductory Physics for the pre-engineer. 

Our major and minor curricula begin with a three-semester introduction to the 
field and encompass focused courses that explore the major aspects of physics. Strong 
grounding in the "Classical" study of the mechanical and electrodynamic world is 
established before emphasis moves on to dynamical systems and field theoty. 

All of our courses integrate laboratory and use of the computer beginning with 
introductory courses, in which students work collaboratively and incorporate their 
experimental and problem-solving work. At higher levels, experiments ranging from 
gamma ray spectroscopy to computational simulation are integrated into each course. 
Advanced students also study the theories of quantum mechanics and relativity and 
those pursuing the B.S. degree conduct an individual research project. 

Physics is a rich and complete program which prepares graduates for a variety 
of scientific careers, engineering, teaching or for any field in which critical thinking 
and problem-solving are crucial. 



PHYSICS 



174 



The Department of Physics offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree 
with a major in Physics, the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Physics, and 
a minor concentration in Physics for students majoring in another discipline. 

A Bachelor of Arts Degree in Physics requires the following courses: 

PHY 113 General Physics I With Calculus 4 sh 

PHY 1 14 General Physics II With Calculus 4 sh 

PHY 213 Introduction to Modern Physics 4 sh 

PHY 301 Classical Mechanics and Dynamical Systems 4 sh 

PHY 31 1 Classical Electrodynamics 4 sh 

PHY 312 Electricity, Magnetism, and Field Theory 4 sh 

PHY 411 Quantum Mechanics 4 sh 

MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

MTH 22 1 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 sh 

MTH 321 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 

A Bachelor of Science Degree in Physics requires the following courses: 

PHY 1 13 General Physics I With Calculus 4 sh 

PHY 1 14 General Physics II With Calculus 4 sh 

PHY 213 Introduction to Modern Physics 4 sh 

PHY 301 Classical Mechanics and Dynamical Systems 4 sh 

PHY 311 Classical Electrodynamics 4 sh 

PHY 312 Electricity, Magnetism, and Field Theory 4 sh 

PHY 41 1 Quantum Mechanics 4 sh 

MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1 4 sh 

MTH 22 1 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 sh 

MTH 32 1 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 sh 

PHY 491 Research 1 sh 

Choose one course from the following 4 sh 

PHY 302 Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics 

PHY 4 1 2 Relativity and Cosmology 

PHY 471 Special Topics in Physics 
Competence in computer programming must be demonstrated. 

TOTAL 45 sh 

A minor in Physics requires the following courses: 

PHY 1 13 General Physics I With Calculus 4 sh 

PHY 1 14 General Physics II With Calculus 4 sh 

PHY 213 Introduction to Modern Physics 4 sh 

Select two Physics courses at the 300-400 level 8 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 



PHYSICS 



PHY 102. INTRODUCTION TO 

ASTRONOMY 4 sh 

Astronomy examines the nature of 
light, astronomical instruments and 
our attempts to understand the origin 
of our solar system and its constituents: 
the Sun, the planets, asteroids, comets, 
and meteors. Laboratory included. 

PHY 103. INTRODUCTION TO 

GEOLOGY 4 sh 

This geology course includes a study 
of the nature and origin of rocks and 
minerals, evolution of the landscape, 
plate tectonics, coastal dynamics and 
geologic time. Laboratory included. 

PHY 110. ENERGY AND THE 

ENVIRONMENT 4 sh 

This course provides an introduction 
to energy concepts and the basic modes 
of energy production and use, focusing 
on environmental problems that are a 
consequence of such activities. Labora- 
tory included. 

PHY 1 1 1, 1 12. GENERAL PHYSICS 

I AND II 4 sh 

each semester 
Designed for students majoring in the 
biological and/or health-related 
sciences, this survey of classical and 
modern physics includes mechanics, 
waves, heat, electricity, magnetism, 
optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. 
Labs included. Prerequisite: MTH 1 1 1 
or placement exemption. 

PHY 1 13, 1 14. GENERAL PHYSICS I AND II 
WITH CALCULUS 4 sh 

each semester 
This survey of topics in classical physics 
is designed for students majoring in 
math, physics or chemistry, or planning 
to transfer into an engineering program. 
Topics include kinematics, dynamics, 
thermodynamics, electrostatics, 
electrodynamics and waves. Labs 
included. Corequisite: MTH 121. 



PHY 201. STELLAR ASTRONOMY 4 

Stellar astronomy involves study of 
the universe beyond the solar system, 



sh 



including stars, clusters, stellar evolu- 
tion, variable stars, Milky Way and 
other galaxies, quasars and cosmologi- 
cal models. Laboratory included. 

PHY 213. INTRODUCTION TO 

MODERN PHYSICS 4 sh 

A continuation of 113 and 1 14, this 
course provides further study of wave 
dynamics, special relativity, early 
quantum mechanics, wave mechanics 
and an introduction to solid state and 
nuclear physics. Laboratory included. 
Prerequisite: MTH 221. 

PHY 301. CLASSICAL MECHANICS 

AND DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS 4 sh 

In this introduction to Lagrangian and 
Hamiltonian treatments of classical 
mechanics students explore variational 
principles, conservation laws, contempo- 
raiy approaches to dynamical systems and 
topics in chaos theoiy. Laboratory 
included. Prerequisite: PHY 1 14. 

PHY 302. STATISTICAL MECHANICS 

AND THERMODYNAMICS 4 sh 

Study covers statistical methods, the 
concept of the ensemble and statistical 
averages and explore thermodynamics 
using a theoretical progression from 
statistical analysis to thermodynamic 
variables. In depth studies include 
conservation laws and thermodynamical 
variables such as entropy and free 
energy. Laboratory included. Prerequi- 
site: PHY 30 1. 

PHY 31 1. CLASSICAL 

ELECTRODYNAMICS 4 sh 

Classical electrodynamics involves the 
study of electrostatics (including image 
methods and electric fields in the 
presence of dielectric media), vector 
analysis, continuity conditions for field 
quantities at interfaces and magnetism 
and magnetostatics. Laboratory 
included. Prerequisite: PHY 213. 

PHY 312. ELECTRICITY, MAGNETISM 

AND FIELD THEORY 4 sh 

This course includes Maxwell's equations 
and continuation of electrodynamics and 



175 



POLITICAL 



SCIENCE 



176 



explores the natural connection of field 
theory and electrodynamics and basic 
mathematical tools, including tensor 
analysis. By experiments and numerical 
simulation, students investigate electro- 
magnetic radiation and fields. Laboratory 
included. Prerequisite: PHY 31 1. 

PHY 4 1 1 . QUANTUM MECHANICS 4 sh 

Study of quantum mechanics includes 
basic mathematical underpinnings of 
quantum formalisms and treats several 
basic problems, including Hydrogen-like 
atoms and lasers, in depth. Laboratory 
included. Prerequisite: PHY 301. 

PHY 412. RELATIVITY AND 

COSMOLOGY 4 sh 

This course begins by examining 
fundamentally electrodynamical prob- 
lems out of vi/hich special relativity was 
born. Students read Einstein's original 
paper and study the classical paradoxes 
in depth. Discussion of cosmological 
problems includes black holes, galactic 



red shift and early universe theory. Some 
aspects of the general theory of relativity 
are also introduced. Prerequisites: PHY 
311 and 312. 

PHY 471. SPECIAL TOPICS 

IN PHYSICS 4sh 

These contemporary topics include, 
but are not limited to, chaos theory 
and nonlinear dynamics, solid state 
and condensed matter physics, optics, 
advanced quantum mechanics, and 
particle physics. Prerequisite: permission 
of the instructor. 

PHY 491. RESEARCH 1 sh 

This semester-long supervised research 
project involves experimental, numerical 
or theoretical investigation of a single 
problem, culminating in a detailed report 
describing the methods, results and 
analysis performed, including a "publica- 
tion style" abstract of the research. 
Senior majors only. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Chair, Department of Political Science and Public Administration: Professor Taylor 
Professors: C. Brumbaugh, Zarzar 
Associate Professor: Anderson 
Assistant Professor: Helvey 
Part-time Instructors: Colbert, Craig 

Political Science seeks to understand the ideas, individuals and institutions 
engaged in making public policies that influence the lives of people in communities 
ranging from local to global. Courses investigate current issues and opinions, the 
process by which voters or leaders make decisions, the behavior of organized groups 
and governmental agencies, the relationships between nations and classic questions 
of how societies balance freedom, social justice, order and efficiency. 

Students in this discipline are encouraged to: develop critical reading, writing 
and research skills (often using computer programs); participate in role-playing simula- 
tions of local governments, legislatures, the United Nations and international relafions; 
work as interns at the local and state level in government agencies, election campaigns 
and law firms; and spend a semester in Washington, D.C., working in executive and 
judicial agencies, the U.S. Congress, interest groups and international organizations. 

The department offers majors in Political Science and Public Administration as 
well as minors in these fields and in International Studies. Students can concentrate 
their course work in one or more sub-fields: American Government, International 
Relations, Comparative Politics, Public Administration and Political Theory. These 
programs help prepare students to enter graduate and law school, and pursue a wide 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

range of careers in legislative, executive and judicial agencies, business, teaching, 
journalism, interest group advocacy, campaign management and international public 
service. 

A major in Political Science requires the following courses: 
PS 1 11 American Government 4 sh 

PS 461 Senior Seminar in Political Science 4 sh 

SS 285 Research Methods 4 sh 

One course chosen from the following: 4 sh 

PS 241 International Relations 

PS 261 Comparative Politics 
One course selected from the following: 4 sh 

PS 300 Introduction to Political Thought 

PS 301 Modern Political Thought 

PS 303 Democratic Theory 
One course selected from the following: 4 sh 

ECO 20 1 Principles of Economics 

GEO 131 The World's Regions 

HST 1 2 1 United States History through 1 865 

HST 122 United States History since 1865 

HST 22 1 The World in the T\ventieth Century 
Twenty additional hours in Political Science 20 sh 

TOTAL 44 sh 

A minor in Political Science requires the following: 
PS 1 1 1 American Government 4 sh 

Sixteen semester hours in Political Science 16 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 

A minor in International Studies requires the following: 
PS 241 International Relations 4 sh 

HST 22 1 The World in the T\ventieth Century 4 sh 

Twelve semester hours selected from the following: 12 sh 

ECO 3 1 4 International Trade and Finance 

ECO 372 International Economic Development 

GEO 131 The World's Regions 

PS 261 Comparative Politics 

PS 342 U.S. Foreign Policy Since 1939 

PS 343 International Law and Organization 

SOC 2 1 2 Cultural Anthropology 

SOC 261 Sociological Theory 
Any 1 9th or 20th century non-United States history course at the 300-400 level 
Foreign language at the 200 level or above 
Studies abroad experience 

TOTAL 20 sh 



177 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



178 



PS 1 1 1 . AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 4 sh 

American Government serves as an 
introduction to the national political 
system, including the legislative, 
executive and judicial branches, the 
Constitution, political parties, interest 
groups, public opinion and public 
policy issues. 

PS 112. NORTH CAROLINA 

STUDENT LEGISLATURE / sh 

This is an experiential course which 
promotes active participation in the 
NCSL, debate of public issues and 
organizational involvement at the 
college and state-wide level. 

PS 1 14. MODEL UNITED NATIONS / sh 

Through experiential learning activities, 
students gain insight into the workings 
of the United Nations, diplomacy and 
international politics. 

PS 222. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 
AND POLITICS 4 sh 

This study focuses on the structure 
and functioning of the state and local 
government and their roles within the 
American federal system. 

PS 23 1 . INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 4 sll 

(Same course as PA 231. See PA 231 
for description.) 

PS 241. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 4 sb 

International relations gives students 
a basic appreciation for our world and 
examines political issues, such as the 
role of power and international law in 
the international system and economic, 
social and cultural features of the world. 

PS 261. COMPARATIVE POLITICS 4 sh 

This introduction to the central concepts 
of comparative politics and to the major 
types of contemporary political systems 
may include Britain, Germany, Japan, 
Africa, China, Mexico and the post- 
Soviet independent states of Eurasia. 



PS 300. INTRODUCTION TO 

POLITICAL THOUGHT 4 sh 

In a critical introduction to the great 
political thinkers, discussion spans from 
Plato to Rousseau. 

PS 30 1 . MODERN POLITICAL 

THOUGHT 4 sh 

Modern political thought provides a 
critical introduction to and analysis of 
great political thinkers from Marx to 
Marcuse. 

PS 303. DEMOCRATIC THEORY 4 sh 

Democratic theory examines concep- 
tions, models and themes of democracy 
around the world using a comparative 
approach, with special emphasis on 
models of democracy as they developed 
in the U.S. 

PS 323. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I 2 sh 

Using a case study approach, this 
course focuses on American Constitu- 
tional structures: separation of powers, 
judicial review, and federalism. 
Prerequisite: PS III. 

PS 324. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II 2 sh 

Continuing the case study examination 
begun in PS 323, the focus of this course 
is on individual rights guaranteed by 
American Constitutional structures: 
civil rights and civil liberties. Prerequi- 
site: PS 111. 

PS 325. THE PRESIDENCY 4 sh 

A Study of the contemporary presidency 
emphasizes the organization of the 
office, its relationship to other structures 
in American politics and its role in the 
policy-making process. 

PS 326. THE CONGRESS 4 sh 

Topics of study cover the policy-making 
process in Congress, focusing on party 
leadership, the committee system and 
the relationship between the Congress 
and the presidency, interest groups and 
the executive branch. Discussion also 
includes congressional reform proposals. 



POLITICAL 



SCIENCE 



PS 328. PUBLIC POLICY 4 sh 

(Same course as PA 328. See PA 328 
for description.) 

PS 329. POLITICAL BEHAVIOR 4 sh 

This course focuses on political life 
from a micro perspective by examining 
how political attitudes and behavior are 
learned and affect our political choices, 
especially in regard to political socializa- 
tion and electoral behavior. 

PS 342. U.S. FOREIGN POLICY 

SINCE 1939 4sh 

Study covers the foreign relations, 
foreign policy and international politics 
of the United States since 1 939. 

PS 343. INTERNATIONAL LAW 

AND ORGANIZATION 4 sh 

This course focuses on the role of 
international law and organizations in 
determining patterns of international 
behavior, with special attention to the 
United Nations. 

PS 359. POLITICAL 

COMMUNICATION 4 sh 

This examination of political communi- 
cations processes uses a comparative 
perspective and emphasizes the role of 
media in the U.S., Europe, Eurasia and 
developing countries. 

PS 363. POLITICS OF ASIA 4 sh 

In this exploration of the politics of 
Asia after World War II, study analyzes 
political and economic processes in 
the cases of japan, China and newly 
industrializing countries, among others. 

PS 364. POLITICS OF EUROPE 4 sh 

This course explores the politics of East 
and West Europe since World War I. 

PS 365. POLITICS OF EURASIA 4 sh 

Politics of Eurasia analyzes the rise 
and fall of the Soviet Union as a political 
entity and studies the newly indepen- 
dent countries of the former Soviet 
Union in some depth. 



PS 366. MIDDLE EAST POLITICS 4 sh 

A Study of Middle Eastern political 
dynamics and institutions considers 
contemporary issues and problems 
of selected Middle Eastern and North 
African countries. 

PS 367. POLITICS OF AFRICA 4 sh 

Study centers around nation-building and 
major factors influencing contemporaty 
politics in selected African states. 
Discussion emphasizes the legacy 
of colonialism/independence struggles; 
the importance of traditional loyalties; 
the political/social/economic origins of 
conflict/coalitions/coups; the problems 
of political participation; institutionaliza- 
tion/control; the destabilizing intluences 
of class/ethnic/elitist/racial differences; 
and the position of African states in the 
world order. 

PS 368. LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS 4 sh 

Central America and Mexico receive 
emphasis in this study of the political 
dynamics, governmental structures 
and contemporary issues of selected 
countries of Latin America. 

PS 371. TOPICS IN 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 4 sh 

This advanced course explores signifi- 
cant contemporary issues or develop- 
ments within the discipline. Prerequisite: 
PS 11 1 or permission of the instructor. 



PS 375. POLITICAL SCIENCE 
IN LONDON 



sh 



PS 376. WASHINGTON CENTER 

SEMINAR l~3sh 

Students learn first-hand from speakers, 
on-site visits and other experiential 
opportunities in Washington, D.C., and 
other locations through the Washington 
Center. Course requirements include 
readings, writing assignments and 
collaborative work dealing with 
leadership, foreign policy, partisan 
politics or other topics. Offered Winter 
and Summer terms. Prerequisite: 
Permission of department. 



179 



PSYCHOLOGY 



PS 420. CAMPAIGN WORKSHOP 4 sh 

This course provides a practical study 
of how to run an election campaign, 
with attention to setting up, staffing and 
financing a campaign office, organizing 
events, media relations, campaign 
technology, polling, advertising and 
getting out the vote. Students must 
spend significant time as an intern for 
a candidate or a political party of their 
choice and then reflect on their experi- 
180 ence. Normally offered Fall semester of 
election years. Prerequisite; PS 131 and 
an additional course in American 
politics, or permission of instructor. 

PS 428. ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS 
AND NATURAL RESOURCE 
LEGISLATION 4 sh 

This course explores the legislative 
process as it relates to the development 
of environmental law and policy, with 
emphasis on the manner in which 
environmental issues are addressed by 
political processes. The course surveys 
the dynamics of international cooperation 
on global environmental problems and 
enables students to become familiar with 
landmark environmental legislation in 
the U.S. Prerequisite: PS 131. 

PS 43 1 . POLICY ANALYSIS AND 

PROGRAM EVALUATION 4 sh 

(Same course as PA 431. See PA 431 for 
description.) 

PS 433. TOPICS IN URBAN POLITICS 4 sh 

(Same course as PA 433. See PA 433 
for description.) 



PS 46 1 . SENIOR SEMINAR IN 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 4 sh 

The capstone experience for senior 
political science majors involves close 
review of the discipline's conceptual 
approaches to the study of political 
behavior and ideas, discussion and 
development of research strategies. 
Students must also present a work 
of original scholarship. Prerequisite: 
senior majors only. 

PS 481. INTERNSHIP IN 

POLITICAL SCIENCE l-4sh 

The internship provides work experience 
in a partisan, nonprofit business, 
governmental or legal setting and 
requires students to establish experien- 
tial goals and to reflect on the learning 
experience. Offered on an individual 
basis when suitable opportunities can 
be arranged. Prerequisite: PS 1 11, an 
additional course in Political Science 
and permission of department. 

PS 485. WASHINGTON INTERNSHIP 

IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1-12 sh 
in this work experience in a partisan, 
nonprofit business, governmental or 
legal setting in the Washington, D.C., 
area, students must establish experien- 
tial goals and reflect on the learning 
experience. Offered on an individual 
basis when suitable opportunities can 
be arranged. Prerequisite: PS 11 1 , an 
additional course in Political Science 
and permission of the department. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Chan; Department of Psychology: Associate Professor Fromson 
Professor: Granowsky 

Associate Professors: Higgs, McClearn, Pickens, Pullium 
Assistant Professors: Green, King 

The psychology major at Elon College presents the principles, methods and 
research findings of the field of psychology. Students in the major learn and practice 
sound research methods and are given many opportunities for exploring the breadth 
of the content areas in psychology. In each psychology course, students are involved 
in writing and speaking in the discipline. Interested students may engage in internship 



PSYCHOLOGY 

experiences in industrial/organizational settings, group homes, social seii/ice agencies, 
psychiatric wards and special education placements. ' 

Students with a Bachelor's degree in psychology have many career options. Some 
students enter fields such as law enforcement, court counseling, daycare, group home 
counseling, YMCA program work, personnel and entry level positions in mental 
health. Others opt to go on to graduate school in a variety of programs, including: 
clinical, counseling or school psychology; social work; special education; law and 
many others. Psychology majors receive both a liberal arts education and practice in 
the skills of research, professional writing and speaking, and are therefore prepared 
for a variety of careers. 

A major in Psychology requires the following courses; 
PSY 1 1 1 General Psychology 4 sh 

PSY 201 Research Methods I 4 sh 

PSY 202 Research Methods I! 4 sh 

PSY 461 Senior Seminar 4 sh 

Two courses chosen from the following: 8 sh 

PSY 212 Learning and Memoiy 

PSY 22 1 Biological Bases of Behavior 

PSY 233 Life-Span Human Development 
Two courses chosen from the following: 8 sh 

PSY 312 Cognitive Psychology 

PSY 323 Social Psychology 

PSY 343 Psychology of Personality and Individual Differences 
Twelve additional semester hours in Psychology 12 sh 

TOTAL 44 sh 

A minor in Psychology requires the following courses: 

PSY 1 1 1 General Psychology 4 sh 

PSY 201 Research Methods I 4 sh 

Twelve semester hours of Psychology electives 12 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 



181 



PSY 1 11 . GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 sh 

General psychology surveys central 
topics in the field, including research 
methodology, learning and memory 
processes, social psychology, psycho- 
logical disorders and personality. 

PSY 20 1 . RESEARCH METHODS 1 4 sh 

Students begin learning how to conduct 
and report psychological research. Study 
focuses on how to frame psychological 
questions, how to answer them using 
research designs and complementary 
data analysis techniques and the basics 
of writing research reports. Prerequisite: 
PSY 111 . 



PSY 202. RESEARCH METHODS II 4 sh 

Exploration continues with more 
complex research designs and data 
analysis techniques, giving in-depth 
attention to the written and oral 
presentation of research findings. 
Prerequisite: PSY 111, PSY 201. 

PSY 212. LEARNING & MEMORY 4 sh 

Learning and memory addresses models 
of knowledge acquisition (including 
classical and operant conditioning and 
cognitive processes), encoding and 
storage of information, memory retrieval 
and forgetting. Prerequisite: PSY 111. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



182 



PSY 221. BIOLOGICAL BASES 

OF BEHAVIOR 4 sh 

This course explores the biological 
foundations of such psychological 
processes as learning and memory, 
movement, sleep and emotions, as 
well as such abnormal conditions 
as schizophrenia and depression. 
Prerequisite: PSY 111. 

PSY 233. LIFE-SPAN HUMAN 

DEVELOPMENT 4 sll 

An exploration of human development 
across the entire life-span includes 
consideration of cognitive, social and 
emotional development as a complex 
interaction between individuals and 
their social and cultural environments. 
Prerequisite: PSY 111. 

PSY 312. COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 4 sh 

Cognitive psychology studies how 
humans represent and process informa- 
tion about the environment in their role 
as thinkers, planners, language users 
and problem solvers. Prerequisite: PSY 
111 & PSY 201. 

PSY 315. PSYCHOLOGY OF 

SEX AND GENDER 4 sh 

This course focuses on the psychology 
of sex and gender from a feminist 
perspective and is organized around 
four themes: gender as a social con- 
struction, the importance of language 
and the power to name, class and 
cultural diversity, and knowledge 
as a source of social change. 

PSY 32 1. EDUCATIONAL 

PSYCHOLOGY 4 sh 

Students gain an overview of research 
and theory in educational psychology 
and explore their applications to 
teaching and learning. 

PSY 323. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 sh 

Topics in social psychology explore how 
people think about, influence and relate 
to one another, including affiliation, 
aggression, altruism, attitude formation 
and change, attribution, compliance. 



conformity and persuasion. Prerequisite: 
PSY 111 and PSY 201. 

PSY 332. PSYCHOLOGY OF 

EXCEPTIONALITY 4 sh 

Students learn the measures and 
procedures used to evaluate exceptional 
children and techniques for educational 
intervention and remediation as they 
study the origins, symptoms and 
characteristics of exceptional children. 
Study covers those children who are 
emotionally, physically or mentally 
disabled, as well as those who are gifted 
and talented. Prerequisite: PSY 111. 

PSY 333. ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR 4 sh 

In this overview of major psychological 
disturbances (anxiety, affective, person- 
ality, sexual and schizophrenic disor- 
ders), students examine the role of 
different theories, diagnostic tests and 
procedures in understanding illness and 
learn the basics of therapeutic intei"ven- 
tions. Prerequisite: PSY III. 

PSY 343. PSYCHOLOGY OF 
PERSONALITY 
AND INDIVIDUAL 
DIFFERENCES 4 sh 

This course covers major modern 
perspectives in personality psychology, 
including: dispositional, biological, 
psychodynamic, self and social-cognitive 
theories. Students are also introduced 
to issues and techniques of personality 
testing and assessment. Prerequisite: 
PSY III and PSY 201. 

PSY 355. HUMAN PERCEPTION 4 sh 

Study in human perception includes 
research and theory on the structural 
and functional characteristics of various 
perceptual systems, on perceptual 
phenomena such as depth and color 
perception, and on other related topics. 
Prerequisite: PSY III. 

PSY 361. ANIMAL BEHAVIOR 4 sh 

An investigation of animal behavior 
takes into account physiology, develop- 
ment, evolution and adaptation. Studies 
emphasize specialized structures and 



PUBLIC 



ADMINISTRATION 



abilities which may or may not be 
present in humans and which confer 
selective advantages upon their 
possessors. Prerequisite: PSY 111. 

PSY363. INDUSTRIAL AND 
ORGANIZATIONAL 
PSYCHOLOGY 4 sh 

Psychological applications in the 
workplace are the focus of this course. 
Topics include personnel selection, 
leadership and motivation, job satisfac- 
tion and work performance. Prerequi- 
site: PSY 111. 

PSY 366. PSYCHOLOGY IN 

CULTURAL CONTEXT 4 sh 

Issues in the related fields of cultural 
and cross-cultural psychology are 
considered in depth as students 
investigate basic psychological pro- 
cesses le.g., motivation, cognition, 
emotionl in the context of how cultural 
world views and implicit value assump- 
tions influence the development and 
functioning of human behavior and 
social interaction. Prerequisite: PSY 111. 



PSY 371. 



SPECIAL TOPICS IN 
PSYCHOLOGY 



PSY 391. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 sh 

Prerequisite: junior/senior status and 
permission of instructor. 

PSY 461. SENIOR SEMINAR 4sh 

Each seminar focuses on a particular 
topic (motivation, aggression, expert 
performance, social cognition, etc.) 
and students become familiar with its 
theoretical perspectives. Working as a 
research team under faculty direction, 
students devise, implement and report 
an original empirical investigation of a 
question related to the selected area of 
concern. Prerequisites: PSY 202 and 
senior status in the major. 

PSY 481. INTERNSHIP IN 

PSYCHOLOGY l-4sh 

Upper-level majors apply psychological 
theories and techniques to actual 
experiences in the field. Maximum 4 sh 
toward major. Prerequisite: majors only 
with faculty approval, 

PSY 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 sh 

Prerequisite: senior status and permis- 
sion of the instructor. 



183 



■sh 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Chair, Department of Political Science and Public Administration: Professor Taylor 
Professor: C. Brumbaugh 
Associate Professor: Anderson 
Part-time histructor: Colbert 

A major in Public Administration requires the following courses: 

Introduction to Public Administration 4 sh 

Public Policy 4 sh 

Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation 4 sh 

Seminar in Public Administration 4 sh 

American Government 4 sh 

State and Local Government and Politics 4 sh 

Research Methods 4 sh 

Principles of Financial Accounting 4 sh 

Principles of Economics 4 sh 

Twelve hours selected from the following courses: 12 sh 
IS 116 Microcomputer Applications 



PA 


231 


PA 


328 


PA 


431 


PA 


461 


PS 


111 


PS 


222 


SS 


285 


ACC 


201 


ECO 


201 



PUBLIC 



ADMINISTRATION 



184 



ECO 332 Public Finance 

ECO 4 1 3 Labor Economics 

BA 303 Introduction to Managing or 

BA 323 Principles of Management 

BA 425 Personnel Administration 

L/SM 327 Leisure/Sport Programming 

L/SM 425 Leisure and the Environment 

PS 325 The Presidency 

PS 326 The Congress 

PS 420 Campaign Workshop 
Any other Public Administration course 



TOTAL 



48 sh 



A minor in Public Administration requires the following courses: 
PA 231 Introduction to Public Administration 4 sh 

PA 431 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation 4 sh 

PS 1 II American Government 4 sh 

SS 285 Research Methods 4 sh 

Four semester hours from the following courses: 4 sh 

PS 222 State and Local Government 

PS 325 The Presidency 

PS 326 The Congress 

BA 303 Introduction to Managing 

BA 323 Principles of Management 

BA 425 Personnel Administration 



TOTAL 

PA 23 1 . INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 4 sh 

This course introduces the student to the 
complexities of administering govern- 
ment activities and emphasizes the basic 
principles of organizations, decision- 
making, fiscal management, personnel 
management and other forms of action 
in the public sector. 

PA 328. PUBLIC POLICY 4 sh 

This study of public policy making 
emphasizes policy content and focuses 
on the stages and options in the process, 
especially the complex relationships 
between the branches and levels of 
government within the structure of 
federalism. Students trace the develop- 
ment of selected public policy positions 



20 sh 

and focus on options available 
to contemporary decision makers. 

PA 43 1 . POLICY ANALYSIS AND 

PROGRAM EVALUATION 4 sh 

Two aspects of the public policy 
process are covered in this course. 
Policy analysis focuses on the formula- 
tion stage of the policy and attempts 
to isolate both the intended and many 
unintended affects. Program evaluation 
determines the degree to which a 
program is meeting its objectives and 
considers problems and side effects. 

PA 433. TOPICS IN URBAN POLITICS 4 sh 

Advanced study in areas of the urban 
politics field centers on varying topics 
to be decided by the instructor. Selec- 
tions might include urban management, 



RELIGIOUS 



STUDIES 



urban public policy, urban problems, etc. 
Prerequisite: PS 222 or permission of 
instructor. 

PA 461. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 4 sh 

The capstone experience for senior 
public administration majors involves 
review of the discipline's conceptual 
approaches and ideas, discussion and 
development of research strategies. 
Students must present a work of 
original scholarship. Prerequisite: 
senior majors only. 



PA 48 1 . INTERNSHIP IN PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 1-4 sb 

Work experience in a nonprofit, busi- 
ness, governmental or legal setting 
requires students to establish experien- 
tial goals and to reflect on the learning 
experience. Internships are offered 
on an individual basis when suitable 
opportunities can be arranged. 
Prerequisite: PA 211, an additional 
PA/PS course and permission of 
the instructor. 



185 



PA 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 sh 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

Chair, Department of Religious Studies: Associate Professor Pugh 

Professors: Chase, Pace 

Associate Professor: Wilson 

Assistant Professors: Chakrabarti, McBride 

Religious studies courses and the religious studies major and minor are designed 
to help students learn about one of the most basic and universal aspects of human 
existence. Knowing about religion helps us all to better understand ourselves and 
the beliefs of others. 

The series of courses required for the major gives students a taste of three 
major subdivisions within the discipline of religion. The members of the religion 
faculty seek to foster in students a love of learning, informed values and a spirit of 
tolerance. In keeping with Elon's liberal arts objectives, the program and the faculty 
also seek to develop the students' ability to think critically and communicate effec- 
tively, both in the discipline and in other areas of life. 

A major in Religious Studies requires the following courses: 

REL 1 1 1 Introduction to the Old Testament 4 sh or 

REL 1 12 Introduction to the New Testament 4 sh 

REL 121 World Religions 4 sh 

REL 134 Introduction to Religious Studies 4 sh 

REL 492 Senior Seminar 2 sh 

An additional 6 courses, five at the 300-400 level 24 sh 

I course in Biblical Studies 

I course in Eastern and Islamic Studies 

1 course in Theological and Ethical Studies 

3 electives 

(Greek 1 10, 210 are recommended for all Religious Studies 

majors and Greek 310 may be substituted for a Religious 

Studies course in the Biblical Studies area.) 



TOTAL 



38 sh 



RELIGIOUS 



STUDIES 



A minor in Religious Studies requires the following courses: 
Eight semester hours of Religious Studies at the junior/senior levels 
Twelve semester hours of Religious Studies courses at any level 
Courses must be taken from at least 2 major areas 



TOTAL 

REL 1 1 1. INTRODUCTION TO 

THE OLD TESTAMENT 4 sh 

Students are introduced to the histoiy, 
literature and religion of the Israelite 
186 people in context of ancient Near 
Eastern culture. 

REL 112. INTRODUCTION TO 

THE NEW TESTAMENT 4 sll 

New Testament studies the rise and 
development of Christianity and its 
literature. 

REL 121. WORLD RELIGIONS 4 sh 

The origin, historical development and 
beliefs of selected religious traditions 
are the focus of this course. 

REL 134. INTRODUCTION TO 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 4 sh 

Religious Studies considers the human 
religious experience and its impact 
throughout history and in the contempo- 
rary world. 

REL 181. INTERNSHIP IN 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES / sh 

An optional internship may occasionally 
be offered in conjunction with "Introduc- 
tion to Religious Studies." 

REL 251. RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

ABROAD 4 sh 

Religious study tours are offered 
to England, India and/or the IVliddle 
East (Israel, Egypt and Jordan). Winter 
Term only. 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

REL 321. ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE 

ANCIENT NEAR EAST 4 sh 

This study surveys major archeological 
research as it relates to the Near East, 
with particular emphasis on Egypt, 
Palestine and Mesopotamia, 



20 sh 

REL 322. OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS 4 sh 

The background, personal characteris- 
tics, function, message and present 
significance of the Hebrew prophets 
is the focus of this course. 

REL 324. JOB 4 sh 

Study of the Old Testament Book of Job 
includes its contents, literary structure, 
impact on modern literature and drama 
and its message about senseless tragedy 
for today's world. 

REL 325. REVELATION AND OTHER 

APOCALYPTIC LITERATURE 4 sh 

The course examines the origins of 
apocalyptic thought in early Jewish 
and Christian history. While half of 
the course is a very close and detailed 
reading of Revelation, some Old 
Testament and intertestamental 
apocalyptic literature is also read. 

REL 326. LIFE AND THOUGHT 

OF PAUL 4 sh 

This study analyzes major motifs of 
Paul's theology by interpreting his 
New Testament writings. 

REL 329. JESUS AND THE GOSPELS 4 sh 

The course is a close reading and 
comparison of Matthew, Mark, and Luke 
in parallel columns, along with the non- 
canonical Gospel of Thomas. John will 
be read separately toward the end of 
the course. 

THEOLOGICAL AND ETHICAL STUDIES 

REL 334. MODERN RELIGIOUS 

THINKERS 4 sh 

Course study consists of an examination 
of the theologies of selected major 
thinkers in the Judeo-Christian tradition. 



RELIGIOUS 



STUDIES 



REL 336. LIFE AND THOUGHT OF 

THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 4 sh 

This course considers the influence of 
Christianity in a sociocultural and 
theological perspective and examines 
church personalities, controversies and 
decisions from Jewish antecedents to the 
present day. 

REL 338. CONTEMPORARY THEOLOGY 4 sh 

Beginning with background in historical 
theology, the class will study different 
theological perspectives and develop- 
ments of the modern world. 

REL 341. CHRISTIAN ETHICS 4 sh 

Special attention is given to analyzing 
selected personal and social ethical 
issues in a systematic and biblically 
based study of the types and principles 
of Christian ethical theoiy 

^L345. A THEOLOGY OF 

HUMAN LIBERATION 4 sh 

This study analyzes contemporary types 
of liberation theology — Third World 
liberation. Black liberation, women's 
liberation — through studying significant 
representative writings and biographies. 

IEL347. WOMEN AND RELIGION 4 sh 

The course considers the influence 
of religion on women in home, church 
and society through the years and the 
impact of women past and present on 
religion, religious thinking and religious 
institutions. 

IEL348. ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS 4 sh 

In an exploration of the moral dimen- 
sions of the environmental crisis, 
students examine the roles which 
religious and philosophical ethics play 
in providing frameworks for understand- 
ing environmental issues and developing 
guidelines for addressing specific 
contemporary problems. (REL 348 
is the same course as PHL 348.) 

EL 355. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 4 sh 

(Same course as PHL 355. See PHL 355 
for description.) 



EASTERN AND ISLAMIC STUDIES 
REL 353. BUDDHISM 4 sh 

This course gives students a critical 
understanding of basic concepts and 
doctrines of Buddhism, considering 
the similarities and contrasts between 
different major schools of Buddhism 
as well as Buddhism's relationship 
to Taoism and Confucianism. 

REL 356. HINDUISM 4 sh 

This study of the history, scripture, and 
beliefs of this major religion of India 
includes topics such as the doctrine 
of creation, karma, reincarnation and 
the problem of evil. 

REL 357. ISLAM 4sh 

Study of the history, scripture and beliefs 
of Islam gives attention to Islam as an 
influential force in the contemporary 
world. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

REL 365. LITERATURE AND 

THEOLOGY 4 sh 

(Same course as ENG 365. See ENG 365 
for description.) 

REL 380. RELIGION IN 

CONTEMPORARY BRITAIN 4 sh 

The focus of this travel course centers 
on a study of the beliefs and practices 
of various faith communities in a multi- 
cultural and plural society, specifically 
modern-day Britain. 

REL 471. SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS 1^4 sh 

REL 481. INTERNSHIP IN 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1-4 sh 

This course provides opportunities for 
upper-level students to apply concepts 
and information gained in the religious 
studies classroom to actual experiences 
in local community and church agencies 
or as teaching assistants in freshman 
level classes. Max. 4 sh toward major. 
Prerequisite: junior/senior majors only, 
faculty approval. 



187 



188 



SCIENCE EDUCATION 

REL491. INDEPENDENT STUDY / 4s/i REL 492. SENIOR SEMINAR 2 s 

Upper-class majors (or others by In this capstone course, the student 

instructor consent) may complete and the department evaluate perfor- 

individual study in an area of special mance over the student's past years 

interest with the guidance of a member of study. Required of all majors during 

of the department. Max. 6 sh credit. senior year. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Coordinator: Associate Professor Agnew 

The Departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics in cooperation with the 
Department of Education offer programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Science 
Education with Secondary Science Comprehensive Certification and with Secondary 
Science Certification in the areas of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree with Secondary Science Comprehensive 
Certification requires the following courses: 

Professional Studies Courses in Education, Psychology, 

and Information Systems 35 sh 

PHY 102 Astronomy 4 sh 

PHY 103 Geology 4 sh 

All courses in one of the concentrations listed below 40 sh 

Eight semester hours in science courses from each of the 

other two listed areas 4- 1 6 sh 

TOTAL 87-99 sh 

Concentrations 

Biology concentration: 

BIO II 1 Introductory Cell Biology 3 sh 

BIO 1 12 Introductory Population Biology 3 sh 

BIO 113 Cell Biology Lab 1 sh 

BIO 114 Population Biology Lab 1 sh 

BIO 221 Zoology 4 sh 

BIO 222 Botany 4 sh 

BIO 322 Molecular/Cellular Biology 4 sh 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 1 12 General Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 1 13 General Chemistry 1 Lab I sh 

CHM 1 14 General Chemistry II Lab I sh 

CHM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 213 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

• Select one course from: 4 sh 

BIO 312 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 

BIO 32 1 Microbiology 

BIO 325 Human Histology 

BIO 335 Field Biology 



SCIENCE EDUCATION 

BIO 341 Animal Physiology 
BIO 342 Plant Physiology 
BIO 452 General Ecology 

Select one course from: 4 sh 
CHM 2 1 2 & 2 1 4 Organic Chemist^ II & Lab 
CHM 232 Chemical Separations 
CHM332&333 Physical Chemistry I & Lab 

TOTAL 40 sh 

Chemistry concentration: 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 1 12 General Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 1 13 General Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 114 General Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

CHM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 2 1 2 Organic Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 2 1 3 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 214 Organic Chemistry II Lab I sh 

CHM 232 Principles of Chemical Separation 4 sh or 

CHM 311 Quantitative Analysis 4 sh 

CHM 332 Physical Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 333 Physical Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

BIO 1 1 1 Introductory Cell Biology 3 sh 

BIO 1 13 Introductory Cell Biology Lab 1 sh 

PHY 1 13 General Physics W/Calculus I 4 sh 

PHY 1 14 General Physics W/Calculus II 4 sh 
(Physics 1 1 1 and 1 12 may be substituted for Physics 1 13 and 1 14) 

MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 

Physics concentration: 

PHY 1 13 General Physics W/Calculus I 4 sh 

PHY 1 14 General Physics W/Calculus II 4 sh 
(Physics 1 1 1 and 1 12 may be selected to satisfy 8 sh 
in Physics for Biology or Chemistry concentration.) 

PHY 213 Modern Physics 4 sh 

PHY 301 Classical Mechanics and Dynamical Systems 4 sh 

PHY 311 Classical Electrodynamics 4 sh 

PHY 312 Electricity, Magnetism, and Field Theory 4 sh 

MTH 1 19 Functions with Applications 4 sh 

MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

MTH 22 1 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 sh 

MTH 32 1 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 



189 



SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Secondary Science Certification 

The Bachelor of Arts degree with Secondary Science Certification requires the 
following courses: 

Professional Studies Courses in Education and Psychology 35 sh 

PHY 102 Astronomy 4 sh 

PHY 103 Geology 4 sh 

All courses in one of the concentrations listed below 40 sh 
Twelve semester hours in science courses from one 

of the other two listed areas 0- 1 2 sh 

190 TOTAL 83-95 sh 

Concentrations 

Biology concentration: 



BIO 1 1 1 


Introductory Cell Biology 


3sh 


BIO 112 


Introductory Population Biology 


3sh 


BIO 113 


Cell Biology Lab 


1 sh 


BIO 114 


Population Biology Lab 


1 sh 


BIO 221 


Zoology 


4sh 


BIO 222 


Botany 


4sh 


BIO 322 


Molecular/Cellular Biology 


4sh 


Select one course from: 


4sh 


BIO 312 


Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 




BIO 32 1 


Microbiology 




BIO 325 


Human Histology 




BIO 335 


Field Biology 




BIO 341 


Animal Physiology 




BIO 342 


Plant Physiology 




BIO 452 


General Ecology 




CHM 111 


General Chemistry I 


3sh 


CHM 112 


General Chemistry 11 


3sh 


CHM 113 


General Chemistry I Lab 


1 sh 


CHM 114 


General Chemistry 11 Lab 


1 sh 


CHM 2 11 


Organic Chemistry 1 


3sh 


CHM 213 


Organic Chemistry I Lab 


1 sh 


Select one course from: 


4sh 


CHM 212/214 Organic Chemistiy II & Lab 




CHM 23: 


I Principles of Chemical Separation 




CHM 332/333 Physical Chemistry I & Lab 


4sh 



TOTAL 40 sh 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Chemistry concentration: 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chemistry 1 3 sh 

CHM112 General Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 1 13 General Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 1 14 General Chemistiy II Lab I sh 

CHM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 212 Organic Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 213 Organic Chemistry I Lab I sh 

CHM 214 Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

CHM 232 Principles of Chemical Separation 4 sh or 191 

CHM 31 1 Quantitative Analysis 4 sh 

CHM 332 Physical Chemistry 1 3 sh 

CHM 333 Physical Chemistry I Lab I sh 

BIO 1 1 1 Introductory Cell Biology 3 sh 

BIO 1 13 Introductory Cell Biology Lab I sh 

PHY 1 13 General Physics W/Calculus 1 4 sh 

PHY 1 14 General Physics W/Calculus II 4 sh 
(Physics 111 & 112 may be substituted for Physics 1 13 and 1 14) 

MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 

Physics Concentration: 

PHY 1 13 General Physics W/Calculus I 4 sh 

PHY 1 14 General Physics W/Calculus II 4 sh 

PHY 213 Modern Physics 4 sh 

PHY 301 Classical Mechanics and Dynamical Systems 4 sh 

PHY 311 Classical Electrodynamics 4 sh 

PHY 312 Electricity, Magnetism, and Field Theory 4 sh 

MTH 119 Functions with Applications 4 sh 

MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

MTH 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 sh 

MTH 32 1 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Chair, Department of Sociology: Professor T. Henricks 
Coordinator: Assistant Professor Curry 

Social science education, designed for prospective secondary school social studies 
teachers, is an integrated, multi-disciplinary study of interactions among people in 
diverse cultural and geophysical environments. It examines political institutions, 
economic processes, historical events and social forces which influence human 
behavior and produce continually changing relationships and ideas. 



192 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

The social science education program helps students understand major social, 
economic, political and environmental issues in both historical and contemporary 
settings. The program also focuses on the relationship between the person and 
the larger society. In that context, students are encouraged to reflect upon their 
own values and behavior. Part of this process emphasizes the development of 
analytical and communication skills which help people solve problems and make 
decisions rationally. 

Elon's social science education program provides students with an opportunity 
to master the competencies required by the North Carolina State Department of 
Public Instruction, including the ability to: I) formulate objectives; 2) identify and 
use available resources; 3) read and interpret data; 4) select and create teaching 
strategies; 5) use facts, develop concepts and formulate generalizations; 6) design 
and use assessment and evaluation techniques; 7) use democratic classroom 
methods; 8) recognize and deal with sensitive and controversial issues; and 
9) use computer technology relevant to the social sciences. 

A major in Social Science Education requires the following courses: 

ECO 201 Principles of Economics 4 sh 

GEO 131 The World's Regions 4 sh 

One course selected from the following: 4 sh 

GEO 3 1 1 Geography of North America 

GEO 32 1 Geography of Europe 

SOC 1 1 1 Introductory Sociology 4 sh 

SOC 1 12 Introduction to Anthropology 4 sh 

PS 1 1 1 American Government 4 sh 

PS 261 Comparative Politics 4 sh 

PSY 1 1 1 General Psychology 4 sh 
HST 1 12 Europe and the Mediterranean World Since 1660 4 sh 

HST 1 2 1 United States History through 1 865 4 sh 

HST 122 United States History since 1865 4 sh 

HST 22 1 The World in the TAventieth Century 4 sh 

HST 361 North Carolina in the Nation 4 sh 
Thirty-five semester hours professional education 

and psychology courses 35 sh 

TOTAL 87 sh 

SS 285. RESEARCH METHODS 4 sh methods, scale construction and data 

Students examine basic scientific generation, explanation and prediction 

methods, including the philosophy of and analyze research problems suscep- 

science, problem definition, concept tible to the use of quantitative data, 
formation, hypothesis testing, sampling 



SOCIOLOGY 



SOCIOLOGY 

Chair, Department of Sociology: Professor T. Henricks 

Professor: Basirico 

Associate Professors-. Arcaro, Bolin 

Assistant Professor-. Curr)' 

Sociology and anthropology provide the student with an exceptional understanding 
of the world by developing an awareness of how society and culture shape our lives and 
perspectives. Studying sociology and anthropology is more like a journey in which we 
learn to stand outside ourselves to see our world with new eyes. 

Sociologists and anthropologists study all forms and dimensions of human social 
and cultural behavior from the institutional to the interpersonal. For example: How 
do people select a mate?" How are people organized into groups such as sororities, 
fraternities and sports teams? How do institutions such as the family, economy, 
government, religion and health care develop and affect our lives?" 

With their wide scope, sociology and anthropology are linked to all the disciplines 
and are complementary to any major found at Elon. The U.S. is a culturally diverse 
society and solutions to our interpersonal, community, national and international 
problems demand an understanding of society and culture. 

The socio-cultural perspective students develop through sociology and anthropol- 
ogy is an asset not only in their personal lives, but also in business, politics, econom- 
ics, health care, education, health and fitness, social services, the mental health field, 
urban planning, family planning and many other professions. 

A major in Sociology requires the following courses: 
SOC 1 1 1 Introductory Sociology 
SOC 1 12 Introduction to Anthropology 
SOC 115 Sociocultural Inquiry 
SOC 261 Sociological Theory 
One course selected from the following: 

SOC 361 Readings in Sociology 

SOC 362 Readings in Anthropology 
SOC 451 Comprehensive Review in Sociology 
SOC 461 Senior Seminar in Sociology 
SS 285 Research Methods 

Fourteen semester hours of electives in Sociology courses 
and/or Mathematics 1 14 (Elementary Statistics) 



4sh 
4sh 
2sh 
4sh 
4sh 



2sh 
4sh 
4sh 



TOTAL 

A minor in Sociology requires the following courses: 
SOC 1 1 1 Introductory Sociology 
SOC 1 15 Sociocultural Inquiry 
Fourteen semester hours selected from Sociology courses 

TOTAL 



14 sh 
42 sh 

4sh 
2sh 
14 sh 

20 sh 



193 



SOCIOLOGY 



194 



A minor in Anthropology requires the following courses: 
SOC 1 12 Introduction to Anthropology 4 sh 

SOC 1 15 Sociocultural Inquiry 2 sh 

Fourteen semester hours selected from 14 sh 

SOC 322 Ethnography 

SOC 323 Issues in Culture and Psychology (2 sh) 

SOC 324 Anthropology of Sex 

SOC 325 Culture and Health 

SOC 326 Culture of the Corporation 

SOC 327 Native American World Views (2 sh) 

SOC 345 Sociocultural Perspectives on Gender 

SOC 362 Readings in Anthropology 

SOC 481 Internship in Sociology (1-4 sh) 

ENG 303 Linguistics 



TOTAL 



20sll 



SOC 1 1 1 INTRODUCTORY 

SOCIOLOGY 4 sh 

An introduction to basic theoretical 
principles and research methods of 
modern sociology, including such 
issues as the relationship between 
culture, personality and society; the 
fundamental forms of social structure; 
social institutions such as religion and 
the family; and social processes such 
as deviance and social change. 

SOC 1 12. INTRODUCTION TO 

ANTHROPOLOGY 4 sh 

Students explore the meaning of human 
nature as it has developed over time and 
is given expression in human cultures. 
Study emphasizes bio-cultural evolution 
of the human species, methods used 
to study both physical and cultural 
evolution and the diversity and 
development of human language. 

SOC 1 1 5. SOCIOCULTURAL INQUIRY 2 sh 

Students gain an understanding of the 
ways sociologists and anthropologists 
inquire about society, use socio-cultural 
perspectives and theories to frame 
researchable questions and discuss 
ways of collecting and analyzing 
information. Special emphasis is 



given to techniques of library research 
and basic field work procedures. 
Prerequisite: SOC 1 1 1 or 1 12. 

SOC 212. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 4 sh 

This introduction to the study of 
human cultures focuses on the concept 
of culture, and presents theories and 
methods used by anthropologists 
studying peoples across the globe, 
including ourselves. Topics include 
social organization, marriage, making 
a living, religion and political organiza- 
tion, among others. Prerequisite: SOC 
III or 112. 

SOC 241. SOCIAL ISSUES 

AND PROBLEMS 4 sh 

Students investigate social issues 
pertaining to institutions and use a 
sociological framework to discover 
the interconnections between national 
and global problems. Study focuses on 
causes, consequences and policies 
concerning such problems as racism, 
sexism, poverty, war, overpopulation, 
and issues pertaining to institutions 
of the family, economy, government, 
medicine, religion and others. 
Prerequisite: SOC III. 



SOCIOLOGY 



SOC 26 1 . SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY 4 sh 

In sociological theory, students explore 
conceptualization and model-building 
in modern sociology and consider the 
emergence of sociological traditions 
or perspectives. Topics concentrate 
on underlying assumptions, historical 
and intellectual background and logical 
consequences of these positions. This 
course is a Writing Intensive Course in 
the department, meaning at least 70 
percent of the grade comes from writing 
assignments during the course. Prereq- 
uisite: SOC 111. 

SOC 311. THE FAMILY 4 sh 

An investigation of the family as an 
institution in societies, focusing on the 
development and current patterns of the 
American family. Specific topics include 
social class differences, racial and ethnic 
variations, premarital patterns, marital 
interaction, family problems and the 
future prospects for the family. Prerequi- 
site: SOC 11 1 . 

SOC 322. ETHNOGRAPHY 4sh 

This course teaches the methods 
anthropologists use to gain access, 
develop rapport, collect and analyze 
data and interpret findings when 
studying human cultures. Students also 
read selected ethnographies (first hand 
accounts by anthropologists who have 
lived among peoples of various cultures 
throughout the globe, including our- 
selves). Prerequisite: SOC 1 11 or 112 
or permission of instructor. 

SOC 323. ISSUES IN CULTURE 

AND PSYCHOLOGY 2 sh 

Exploration of developments in psycho- 
logical anthropology emphasizes recent 
trends, including culture and mental 
illness, altered states of consciousness 
and the relationship of culture and 
emotion. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or 
1 12 or permission of instructor. 

SOC 324. ANTHROPOLOGY OF SEX 4 sh 

This course examines human sexuality 
from a bio-cultural perspective, exploring 



the physiology of human sexuality 
and the cross-cultural context of sexual 
expression. Themes include alternative 
sexual lifestyles, sexual dysfunction, 
the symbolic dimensions of sexuality 
and AIDS. Prerequisite: SOC 1 1 1 or 1 12 
or permission of instaictor. 

SOC 325. CULTURE AND HEALTH 4 sh 

This study of the bio-cultural basis 
of health and disease over time and 
across cultures examines the importance 
of culture in the experience of illness, 
diagnosis and treatments. Topics include 
the cultural implications of food and 
food habits, health care practices, the 
relationship of healers and patients, 
alternative health care practices and 
the relationship of mind and body in 
illness and recovery. Prerequisite: SOC 
1 1 1 or 1 12 or permission of instructor. 

SOC 326. CULTURE OF THE 

CORPORATION 4 sh 

This course investigates culture as found 
in corporations, compares the organiza- 
tion of work in corporate settings to 
work experience in other cultures, and 
analyzes companies in terms of organi- 
zational cultures including management 
strategies, the company gestalt, rituals, 
formal and informal roles, subcultures, 
etc. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or 112 or 
permission of instructor. 

SOC 327. NATIVE AMERICAN 

WORLD VIEWS 2 sh 

Students gain understanding of non- 
western views of the world by studying 
with a Native American healer. This 
course emphasizes the power of the 
oral tradition as a learning tool and 
explores the continuities and diversities 
of the Native American belief systems. 

SOC 33 1 . THE SELF AND SOCIETY 4 sh 

Self and society involves the ways 
individuals are influenced by social 
interaction with others, with attention 
to the interaction processes of social- 
ization, developing an identity, 
and individual identities affecting 
interactions. Other topics include the 



195 



SOCIOLOGY 



impact of social change, increased 
technological developments in everyday 
life, and post-modernism on the self 
and the sociological perspectives of 
symbolic interactionism and drama- 
turgy. Prerequisite: SOC 111. 

SOC 332. CONTEMPORARY 

ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES 

AND HUMAN VALUES 4 sh 

This course has three distinct but 
ioc interrelated components and focuses on 

■•'" the interaction between environmental 
concerns and human cultural systems. 
One section of study centers upon 
historical and macro-theoretical 
perspectives on environmental issues. 
Another specific focus is on understand- 
ing the American culture and how our 
particular values and priorities have 
manifested themselves vis-a-vis the 
natural environment. A third component 
focuses on the growing need for 
environmental planning on all levels 
from local to global. 

SOC 333. SOCIAL STRATIFICATION 4 sh 

This study of societal patterns of 
inequality includes consideration of 
differences in wealth, power, prestige 
and knowledge. Students examine the 
access levels groups have to these 
resources and the subsequent effects 
of their access level on educational 
opportunity, housing, health care, 
justice before the law, self esteem 
and life satisfaction. The stratification 
systems of the different societies are 
studied, but the primary focus is on 
institutionalized inequality in the U.S. 
Prerequisite: SOC 111. 

SOC 341. ETHNIC AND RACE 

RELATIONS 4 sh 

Students examine the meaning of 
minority group status in terms of the 
general patterns and problems confront- 
ing all minorities as well as the specific 
issues facing individual minority groups, 
such as African- Americans, jews, 
European-Americans, and Asian- 
Americans. Discussion emphasizes 



the nature of prejudice and discrimina- 
tion, the structure of minority-majority 
relations and strategies toward social 
equality. Prerequisite; SOC 111. 

SOC 342. DEVIANCE AND CRIME 4 sh 

This course analyzes deviance and 
social control mechanisms, focusing on 
the social factors which lead to deviant 
acts becoming recognized as crimes. 
Students examine the criminal justice 
system in terms of its structure and 
function and consider in detail acts of 
deviance by individuals and institutions 
(e.g., corporations or governments). 
The course involves some cross-cultural 
analysis of crime and deviance. Prereq- 
uisite: SOC 111. 

SOC 343. SOCIAL AND 

CULTURAL CHANGE 4 sh 

Concern for the nature and direction of 
modernization provides a foundation in 
this course as students analyze patterns 
of social and cultural change (especially 
in technologically advanced societies 
such as the U.S.). Topics include 
innovation, diffusion, evolution, 
revolution, collective behavior and 
social movements, with emphasis on 
the causes of patterns and their effects 
on individual and public life. Prerequi- 
site: SOC ill. 

SOC 345. SOCIOCULTURAL 
PERSPECTIVES 
ON GENDER 4 sh 

Students use sociological and anthropo- 
logical perspectives, theories and 
concepts to analyze the meaning of 
being female and male in American 
society. Discussion emphasizes the 
inequities based upon gender, particu- 
larly the problems faced by women. 
Prerequisite: SOC 111 or 112. 

SOC 347. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION 

AND DEVELOPMENT 4 sh 

Students explore characteristics of the 
changing pattern of community life by 
examining community organizations 
and analyzing the effect of change 



SOCIOLOGY 



on community integration and develop- 
ment. The course emphasizes the 
types of relationships which people 
and organizations enter or form by 
clustering in the same location. Demo- 
cratic processes in community action 
and principles of organization are also 
examined. Prerequisite: SOC 111. 

SOC 36 1 . READINGS IN SOCIOLOGY 4 sh 

In this colloquium of significant readings 
in sociology, students explore specific 
substantive topics, key theoretical issues 
and new developments in the discipline. 
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, 
SOC 1 1 1 or 112, or permission of 
instructor. 

SOC 362. READINGS IN 

ANTHROPOLOGY 4 sh 

in this colloquium of significant 
readings in anthropology, students 
explore specific substantive topics, 
key theoretical issues and new develop- 
ments in the discipline. Prerequisite: 
junior or senior standing, SOC 111 or 
112, or permission of instructor. 

SOC 370-379. SPECIAL TOPICS 

IN SOCIOLOGY 2-4sh 

A series of courses reflecting new 
contributions in sociology or sociologi- 
cal issues. Prerequisite: To be deter- 
mined by instructor. 

SOC 380-389. SPECIAL TOPICS IN 

ANTHROPOLOGY 2 - 4 sh 
A series of courses reflecting new 
contributions in anthropology or 
anthropological issues. Prerequisite: 
To be determined by instructor. 

SOC 451. COMPREHENSIVE 

REVIEW IN SOCIOLOGY 2 sh 

Students review the major theories, 
principles and concepts in sociology 



as preparation for major evaluation. 
This course is intended primarily for 
senior sociology majors and sociology 
minors. Students from other areas who 
seek a review of the field also may take 
this course. Offered in the Fall. Prerequi- 
site: Must be sociology major, minor, or 
have permission of the instructor and be 
at least a junior. 

SOC 461. SENIOR SEMINAR 

IN SOCIOLOGY 4 sh 

This capstone course reviews major 
areas of sociology and provides further 
opportunity to share research on these 
topics. Students conduct research 
ranging from how sociological knowl- 
edge can be applied occupationally 
and politically to more basic, academic 
topics. Prerequisite: Senior Sociology 
major or permission of instructor. 



SOC 471. SEMINAR: 

SPECIAL TOPICS 



2-4sh 



SOC 481. INTERNSHIP IN 

SOCIOLOGY l-4sh 

Teaching, research, service and occupa- 
tional internships are offered. Limited 
to 4 semester hours credit applicable to 
Sociology major or minor. Prerequisite: 
Department permission and must be at 
least a sophomore. 

SOC 482. INTERNSHIP IN 

ANTHROPOLOGY 1-4 sh 

Teaching, research, service and occupa- 
tional internships are offered. Limited 
to 4 semester hours credit applicable to 
Sociology major or minor, or Anthropol- 
ogy minor. Prerequisite: Department 
permission and must be at least a 
sophomore. 



197 



SOC 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 sh 



SPORTS MEDICINE 

See Health, Physical Education and Leisure 



THEATRE ARTS 

THEATRE ARTS 

chair, Department of Fine Arts: Professor Myers 
Assistant Professors: Foster, McNeela, Rubeck 

The study of Theatre Arts can be a vital part of a liberal arts education. 
Creativity, teamwork, problem-solving, communication skills and critical thinking 
are all enhanced by this study, regardless of the student's eventual career goals. 

The Department of Performing Arts offers both a Bachelor of Arts degree and 
a minor in Theatre Arts. Students who major in this field are prepared for graduate 
studies in Theatre or related fields or possible entry into the professional world. 

The course of study within this major emphasizes a thorough grounding in all 
areas of the Theatre Arts (performance, production, design and directing), Theatre 
History & Literature and a student-selected upper level emphasis. To provide practical 
application of coursework, students are expected to participate actively in department 
production. For those interested in a career in theatre, regular opportunities exist for 
contact with the professional world through regional and national conferences, 
conventions, auditions and competitions. 

The minor in Theatre Arts is designed for the general theatre enthusiast. Students 
complete a study of the base level skills in performance, production and theory, 
followed by advanced study in a selected area. The purpose of this study is to 
create more informed audience members and avocational participants. 

A major in Theatre Arts requires the following courses: 

TH 120 Voice & Movement 2 sh 

TH210 Technical Production in Theatre 4 sh 

TH 220 Performance Skills I 4 sh 

TH 230 Playscript Analysis 4 sh 

TH301 Theatre History & Literature 1 4 sh 

TH 302 Theatre History & Literature II 4 sh 

TH 340 Theatre Design 4 sh 

TH 430 Play Direction 4 sh 

TH 495 Senior Seminar 4 sh 

Twelve semester hours (at least 8 sh at 300-400 level) 

selected from: 12 sh 

(a) electives in TH or MT 

(b) dramatic literature courses (ENG 342, 343, 352, or any course 

in English or Foreign Language which focuses on dramatic literature.) 

TOTAL 46 sh 

A minor in Theatre Arts requires the following courses: 

TH 101 Theatre & Society 4 sh 

TH 123 Acting for Non-Majors 4 sh 

TH210 Technical Production 4 sh 

Eight hours TH electives at the 300-400 level 8 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 



THEATRE 



ARTS 



TH 1 1 . THEATRE & SOCIETY 4 sh 

Students explore the nature of theatre, 
how it is created and how it functions 
in society. Primary study covers the 
diversity of the art form, basic terminol- 
ogy and the event/audience relation- 
ship. Performance reaction papers, 
creative projects and lab hours 
are required. 

THllO. THEATRE WORKSHOP 2^4 sb 

Students work with a professor to earn 
credit for hands-on experiences in 
theatrical production. Max. 4 sh credit. 

TH 120. VOICE & MOVEMENT 2 sh 

Students learn to free and expand their 
physical and vocal instruments, remov- 
ing tension and inhibitions to become 
flexible, creative and expressive 
performers. Prerequisite: theatre 
arts/music theatre majors, or 
permission of instructor. 

TH 125. ACTING FOR NON-MAJORS 4 sh 

Designed to meet the interests of the 
non-major. With this course's dual focus, 
students gain experience in acting and 
examine topics such as the art of acting, 
leading to a more informed audience 
respondent. Performance reaction 
papers and lab hours are required. 

TH 2 1 0. TECHNICAL PRODUCTION 

IN THEATRE 4 sh 

Students learn the basics of theatrical 
production in scenery and lighting, 
including fundamental drafting skills. 
A heavy hands on lab is required. 

TH 220. PERFORMANCE SKILLS I 4 sh 

Students work toward more effective 
communication by developing physical, 
vocal, and imaginative acting skills. 
Character development and improvisa- 
tion create the core work leading to 
deeper understanding of actors' working 
methods. Performance reaction papers, 
lab hours and department audition 
participation is required. Prerequisite: 
TH 120. 



TH 22 1 . PERFORMANCE SKILLS II 4 sh 

Students prepare scenework exercises 
to continue developing acting skills, 
with focus on realistic drama ap- 
proached through a Stanislavski-based 
methodology. Performance reaction 
papers, lab hours and department 
audition participation are required. 
Prerequisite: TH 220. 

TH 222. FUNDAMENTALS OF MAKE-UP 

DESIGN AND APPLICATION 2 sh 

Students learn the basic art of 2- and 3- 
dimensional stage make-up design and 
application, including corrective, age, 
fantasy and prosthetics. Students must 
purchase a make-up kit and serve on 
make-up crew for current department 
productions. 

TH 223. THEATRE ENSEMBLE / sh 

Students earn credit for performing in 
department productions. This course 
is repeatable. Prerequisite: Admission 
by audition only. 

TH 225. VOCAL PRODUCTION 

AND DICTION 4 sh 

Students study correct speaking voice 
production and diction for the standard 
American dialect, including the mechan- 
ics of speech, identification and correc- 
tion of vocal problems, the International 
Phonetics Alphabet and standard 
production of vowel and consonant 
phonemes. Voice reaction papers and 
in-class presentations are required. 

TH 230. PLAYSCRIPT ANALYSIS 4 sh 

Students learn various methods of 
analyzing playscripts as a basis for 
interpretation for all theatre artists. 
Performance reaction papers and lab 
hours are required. 

TH 30 1 . THEATRE HISTORY 

AND LITERATURE I 4 sh 

Students explore the origins of the art 
form and its development through the 
1 7th century, emphasizing understand- 
ing the historical context of the text and 



199 



THEATRE 



ARTS 



200 



its performance conditions and methods 
by studying representative plays of each 
period. A major research assignment 
is required. 

TH 302. THEATRE HISTORY 

AND LITERATURE II 4 sh 

Students further explore the evolution 
of the art form from the 1 7th century 
to the present with emphasis on 
understanding the historical context of 
the text and its performance conditions 
and methods by studying representative 
plays of each period. A major research 
assignment is required. 

TH 310. ADVANCED PROJECTS 

IN THEATRE 2-4 sh 

Advanced, experienced theatre students 
earn credit for assuming major responsi- 
bilities in department productions. May 
be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 
permission of instructor, availability 
of projects. 

TH 320. SPECIAL TOPICS 

IN PERFORMANCE 4 sh 

In this course for advanced performers, 
each semester examines a different 
topic, such as audition techniques, 
stage dialects, acting for the camera 
and period style. Performance reaction 
papers and lab hours are required. 
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 
TH 220, 22 1 , majors only. 

TH 330. PLAYWRITING 4 sh 

Students learn the skills, working 
methods and processes of theatrical 
playwriting by studying playscripts and 
known playwrights and by strenuous 
writing assignments. Study culminates 
in a completed one^act script. 



TH 340. THEATRE DESIGN 4 sh 

As students learn to interpret text into 
visual design in scenery, costumes, and 
lighting, study focuses on decision- 
making, conceptualization, manipulat- 
ing the elements and principles of 
design, communicating the design, 
and coordinating production design. 
Production reaction papers and lab 
hours are required. Prerequisites: TH 
210,230. 

TH 430. PLAY DIRECTION 4 sh 

Working methods of the stage director— 
from analysis through rehearsal— are the 
focus of this study, which culminates in 
the production by each student of a one- 
act play. Discussion emphasizes 
decision-making and communicating 
with actors. Production reaction papers 
and lab hours are required. Prerequi- 
sites: TH 220, 230. 

TH 440. SPECIAL TOPICS IN THEATRE 

PRODUCTION & DESIGN 4 sh 

Students conduct an in-depth examina- 
tion of a different topic each semester, 
such as scenic design, lighting design, 
costume design, production stage 
management and technical direction. 
Production reaction papers and lab 
hours are required. May be repeated for 
credit. Prerequisites: TH 210, 230, 340. 



TH 495. SENIOR SEMINAR 

This capstone experience for senior 
theatre arts majors concentrates on 
two areas: a practical project demon- 
strating proficiency in the field and 
preparation for graduate study or work 
in the profession. Prerequisite: senior 
majors only. 



sh 



WOMEN'S STUDIES 

WOMEN'S STUDIES 

Coordinator: Professor Granowsky 

Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program begun nationally in the 1970s— at 
Elon in 1988— with the goal of rethinking academic disciplines from the perspective of 
women's experience. This endeavor has challenged theoretical and empirical under- 
standings of women and men and produced a wealth of new scholarship. Students 
report that the study of women's issues and gender questions helps them think 
critically, analyze material from diverse perspectives and make informed decisions 
about their lives both before and after they graduate. 

A minor in Women's Studies requires the following: 
Sixteen semester hours chosen from these courses: 

ECO 317 The Economics of Women 4 sh 

ENG 333 Women in Literature: Feminist Approaches 4 sh 

ENG 356 British Women Novelists 4 sh 

HST 364 History of Women in the United States 4 sh 

PHL 345 Feminist Philosophy 4 sh 

PSY 3 1 5 Psychology of Sex and Gender 4 sh 

REL 347 Women and Religion 4 sh 

SOC 324 Anthropology of Sex 4 sh 

SOC 345 Sociocultural Perspectives on Gender 4 sh 

WS 371-379 Special Topics in Women's Studies 4 sh 

A Women's Studies seminar at the 400 level 4 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 

Other courses cross-listed with disciplines will be offered from time to 
time, with a suffix "WS" indicating that they may be used to fulfill Women's 
Studies requirements. 

WS 37 1 -379. SPECIAL TOPICS IN WS 48 1 . INTERNSHIP IN 

WOMEN'S STUDIES 4 sh WOMEN'S STUDIES 1-4 sh 



WS 461-469. SEMINARS ON 

VARIOUS TOPICS 



Work experience in an agency meeting 
^ ^^ the needs of women. Prerequisite: two 

This interdisciphna'ryVeminar combines "^^""'f Studies courses and permis- 

two or more approaches in feminist ^'°" °^ coordmator. 

scholarship, with varying concentrations 
on significant topics. Prerequisites: 
junior standing and two Women's 
Studies courses. 



201 




I 






s*< 











GRADUATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 




Degrees and Major Fields 

Master of Business Administration (MBA) 203 

Master of Education (M.Ed, in Elementary Grades or Middle Grades) 

Master of Business Administration (MBA) 

Elon College offers an opportunity for individuals to earn a Master of Business 
Administration (MBA) degree while continuing their careers. All courses are 
taught in the evenings (fall, spring and summer). During fall and spring semesters, 
students may take from one to four courses. 

Admission Policy 

The MBA admissions policy encourages the selection of students who have 
demonstrated both academic ability and managerial promise. Each application 
is considered in the light of all completed academic work, the Graduate Manage- 
ment Admission Test score, evidence of leadership and motivation, work history, 
level of responsibility and letters of recommendation. 

Undergraduates are not permitted to register for graduate courses. 

Basic Requirements 

• Earned baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university 

• Strong undergraduate record 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and any graduate studies undertaken 

• Test score from GMAT taken within last five years 

• Grade Point Average (GPA) and the Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT) score are used in the admissions process by combining them through 
the following formula: (GPA x 200) + GMAT. To be considered for admission, 
the applicant must have a minimum index score of 950, a minimum GPA of 

[;■ 2.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and a minimum GMAT score of 400 

P • Three letters of reference 

Degree Requirements 

• Completion of prerequisite courses specified under foundation studies 

• Overall minimum grade point average of 3.0 in graduate studies 

• Completion of 36 graduate hours (12 courses) within six calendar years 



204 



E L N COLLEGE 

• Completion of the last six semester hours at Elon College 

• Application for graduation by the dates published by the Registrar 

• Participation in Commencement exercises, except for those completing 
requirements during summer school 

Program of Study 

Core Curriculum 

The Core Curriculum, required of all MBA students, consists of the following 
eight 500-level courses: 

ACC514 Managerial Accounting 3 sh 

BA 512 Quantitative Decision Methods 3 sh 

BA515 Financial Management 3 sh 

BA516 Marketing Management 3 sh 

BA 523 Business Communications 3 sh 

ECO 511 Managerial Statistics 3 sh 

ECO 513 Managerial Economics 3 sh 

BA 565 Business Policy 3 sh 
(Capstone course taken after successful completion of all core courses.) 

Electives 

Electives comprise the remainder of a student's program of study. Four must 
be selected from the 500-level courses offered. These courses vary, including 
courses such as: 

ACC 574 Financial Statement Interpretation and Analysis 3 sh 

BA521 Organizational Behavior 3 sh 

BA 522 Organizational Development and Theory 3 sh 

BA 524 Operations Management 3 sh 

BA 525 Management Information Systems 3 sh 

BA 526 Business and Society 3 sh 

BA 527 Legal Environment of Business 3 sh 

BA 528 International Business 3 sh 

BA53I Managing Small Businesses 3 sh 

BA571 Special Topics 3 sh 

BA 572 Marketing and the Law 3 sh 

BA 573 Advertising Strategy 3 sh 

BA 574 Managerial Decision Making 3 sh 

BA 575 Personnel Administration 3 sh 

BA 577 Investment Management 3 sh 

BA 578 Productivity Improvement 3 sh 

BA 579 Marketing Research Methods 3 sh 

BA 585 International Financial Management 3 sh 

BA 587 Seminar in Finance 3 sh 



GRADUATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Program Guidelines 

• Required foundation courses should be completed prior to beginning graduate 
couses. 

• Core courses-ACC 514; BA 512, 515, 516, 523; and ECO 51 1, 513-should 
be scheduled early in the program 

• The latter stages of the program should be heavily weighted with electives 

• Business Policy (BA 565) should be taken after successful completion 
of all core courses 

Course Load 205 

Students may enroll in one to four courses during fall and spring semesters. 
It is recommended that students who are employed full-time enroll in no more 
than two courses during a semester. At least two courses will be scheduled 
during each of the two summer sessions; a student may enroll in one course each 
session. No MBA courses are scheduled during the three-week winter term. 

Students normally begin the program in August, but entry during spring 
semester or summer school is an option. While it is possible to complete the 
requirements in one and one-half years, most students will take two or three 
years; six calendar years are allowed for completion of the MBA degree. 

Course Schedules 

During the fall and spring semesters, 500 level courses are scheduled during 
evening periods as follows: 

Period One Period Two Period Three Period Four 

6:00-7:20 p.m. 7:30-8:50 p.m. 6:00-8:50 p.m. 6:00-8:50 p.m. 

Monday and Monday and Tuesday Wednesday 

Thursday Thursday 

Courses in the core curriculum and certain electives meet twice a week in 
periods one or two. Other electives and the capstone course meet once a week 
in periods three or four. 

For an application, an MBA catalog or more information about the MBA 
program, please contact the Elon College Office of Graduate Admissions. 

Master of Education (M.Ed.) 

Elon College offers an opportunity for individuals to earn a Master of 
Education (M.Ed.) degree while continuing their careers. All courses are 
taught in the evenings during fall and spring semesters and in the daytime 
during summer school. 

Admissions Policy 

The M.Ed, admissions policy is designed to select students who have 
demonstrated both academic competence and teaching ability. Each 
application is considered in light of all completed academic work, scores 
from either the Graduate Record Examinations or the Miller Analogies Test, 



E L N COLLEGE 

evidence of leadership and motivation, possession of a recognized teaching 
credential and letters of recommendation. 

Undergraduates are not permitted to register for graduate courses. 

Basic Requirements 

• A bachelor's degree from a college or university accredited by the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools or a comparable accrediting association 

• A 2.5 GPA overall for undergraduate work or 3.0 GPA for the last 60 semester 
hours or in the major courses 

206 • Official transcripts of all undergraduate and any graduate studies undertaken 

• A recognized teaching certificate or commitment to achieving certification. 
Candidates must have met undergraduate requirements for a North Carolina 
Initial Certification or higher before being recommended for graduate certification 

• A minimum Miller Analogies Test score of 30 or a preferred verbal and quanti- 
tative score of 800 on the Graduate Record Examinations taken within five 
years prior to application for admission 

• Three written references 

• A written statement of educational and professional goals 

Degree Requirements 

• Completion of courses specified under the Core Curriculum and specialty 
area— Elementary or Middle Grades Education 

• Overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher 

• Completion of 30 graduate hours (10 courses) within six calendar years 

• Satisfactory performance on a written comprehensive examination taken 
during or after the last semester of enrollment 

• Completion of the last six semester hours at Elon College 

• Application for graduation by the dates published by the Registrar 

• Participation in Commencement exercises, except for those completing 
requirements during summer school 

Programs of Study 

All students are required to take the courses in the Core Curriculum. 

Elementary Education 

In addition to the Core Curriculum, students are required to complete 
Education 521, 530 and three courses from: Education 522, 540, 550, 560, 591; 
Mathematics 521, 523; Science 560, 561, 562; Social Studies 531, 541, 546. 

Middle Grades Education 

In addition to the Core Curriculum, students are required to complete 
Education 524, 525 and three courses from the following subject areas in which 



GRADUATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

the Student has, or seeks, a concentration(s) for Middle Grades certification: 
IVlathematics 521, 522, 523; Science 560, 561, 562; Social Studies 531, 541, 546, 
and Education 560; Communication Skills— Education 530, 540, 551. Education 
550 is an additional elective. 

Core Curriculum— Elementary and Middle Grades 

EDU 51 1 Advanced Foundational Studies: Philosophical, 

Sociological and Historical Perspectives 3 sh 

EDU 515 Educational Testing and Measurement 3 sh 

EDU 516 Educational Research 3 sh 

PSY515 Advanced Psychological Theory in the Classroom 3 sh 

Capstone Course 

EDU 581 Clinical Supervision: Theory and Practice 3 sh 

Additional Requirements Elementary Education (K-6) 

EDU 52 1 Survey of Elementary Curriculum: 

Development and Content 3 sh 

EDU 530 Diagnosis and Remediation in Language Arts 3 sh 

Elect! ves: Select three courses 

EDU 522 Communication Skills in the Elementary School 3 sh 

EDU 540 Literature for Children and Youth: 

Analysis and Application 3 sh 

EDU 550 Meeting Special Learning Needs of Children 3 sh 

EDU 560 Trends in Teaching Social Studies (K-9) 3 sh 

EDU 591 Independent Study 3 sh 

MTH 52 1 Math Concepts for the Elementaiy and Middle 

Grades School Teacher 3 sh 

MTH 523 Computers in the Elementary and 

Middle Grades Classroom 3 sh 

SCI 560 Advanced Physical Science for Elementary 

and Middle Grades Teachers 3 sh 

SCI 561 Advanced Earth-Science for Elemental^ 

and Middle Grades Teachers 3 sh 

SCI 562 Advanced Biological Science for Elementary 

and Middle Grades Teachers 3 sh 

SST531 Advanced Studies in American Government 3 sh 

SST541 Special Topics in Economics 3 sh 

SST 546 North Carolina in the Nation 3 sh 

Additional Requirements Middle Grades Education (6-9) 

EDU 524 Preadolescent Development: Implications 

for Education 3 sh 

EDU 525 Effective Middle Grades Teaching 3 sh 



207 



208 



E L N COLLEGE 

Electives: Select three courses, at least two from the same concentration area 

MTH 521 Mathematical Concepts for the Elementary 

and Middle Grades School Teacher 3 sh 

MTH 522 Geometry for the Middle Grades School Teacher 3 sh 
MTH 523 Computers in the Elementary and 

Middle Grades Classroom 3 sh 
SCI 560 Advanced Physical Science for Elementary 

and Middle Grades Teacher3 sh 
SCI 561 Advanced Earth-Space Science for Elementary 

and Middle Grades Teachers 3 sh 
SCI 562 Advanced Biological Science for Elementary 

and Middle Grades Teachers 3 sh 

SST531 Advanced Studies in American Government 3 sh 

SST541 Special Topics in Economics 3 sh 

SST 546 North Carolina in the Nation 3 sh 

EDU 530 Diagnosis and Remediation in Language Arts 3 sh 
EDU 540 Literature for Children and Youth; Analysis 

and Application 3 sh 

EDU 550 Meeting Special Learning Needs of Children 3 sh 

EDU 551 Enhancing Oral and Written Communication 3 sh 

EDU 560 Trends in Teaching Social Studies (K-9) 3 sh 

EDU 591 Independent Study 3 sh 

Course Load 

Students may enroll in a maximum of three courses during fall and spring 
semesters. It is recommended that students who are employed full-time register 
for no more than two courses during a semester. Courses are scheduled during 
the summer months; no M.Ed, courses are scheduled during the college's three- 
week winter term. 

Six calendar years are allowed for completion of the M.Ed, program. 

Course Schedules 

During the fall and spring semesters classes are scheduled Monday, Tuesday 
and Wednesday from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Each class meets one evening per week. 

Summer school terms are planned to accommodate the working schedules 
of public school teachers. Classes meet during the day. 

For an application, M.Ed, catalog or more information about the M.Ed, 
program, please contact the Elon College Office of Graduate Admissions. 



DIRECTORY 



APPENDICES 



Officers of the Corporation 

Rev. G. Melvin Palmer, 

Ed.D, Chairman of the Board 

L.M. Baker, Jr., Vice Chairman 

J. Fred Young, Ed D , 

President of the College 

Thomas E. Powell III, M D , Secretary 

Gerald O. Whittington, Treasurer 

Gerald L. Francis, Ph.D., Assistant 
Secretary and Assistant Treasurer 

Terms Expiring May 31, 1994 

Noel Lee Allen, J.D., Raleigh, N.C. 

Barbara Day Bass, Richmond, Va. 
Iris McEwen Coupland, Burlington, N.C. 
Walter L. Floyd, M.D., Durham, N.C. 
Sherrill G. Hall, Greensboro, N.C. 
William A. Hawks, Burlington, N.C. 
Maurice Jennings, Greensboro, N.C. 
Frank R. Lyon III, New Canaan, Conn. 
Carter M. Smith, Raleigh, N.C. 

Terms Expiring May 31, 1995 

L.M. Baker Jr., Winston-Salem, N.C. 

April D. Craft, Welcome, N.C. 

G. Thomas Holmes Jr., Pinehurst, N C 

Robert Model, New York, N.Y. 

Thomas E. Powell III, M D , 

Burlington, N.C. 

William D. Rippy, M.D., Burlington, N.C. 

Rev. W. Millard Stevens, D D , 

Burlington, N.C. 

Zachary T. Walker III, Greensboro, N.C. 



Terms Expiring May 31, 1996 

Hon. Elmon T. Gray, Waverly, Va. 

Shelly S. Hazel, Broad Run, Va. ^"^ 

Hon. Richard J. Holland, Windsor, Va 

R. Leroy Howell, D.D.S., Suffolk, Va. 
Robert E. LaRose, Clifton, Va. 
W.E. Love Jr., Burlington, N.C. 
James W. Maynard, Burlington, N.C. 
James B. Powell, M.D., Burlington, N.C. 
A.G. Thompson, Lincolnton, N.C. 

Terms Expiring May 31, 1997 

Wallace L. Chandler, Richmond, Va. 

John Robert Kemodle, M D , 

Burlington, N.C. 

Ernest A. Koury Sr., Burlington, N.C. 
Rev. Ervin E. Milton, Greensboro, N.C. 

Rev. G. Melvin Palmer, Ed D , 

Greensboro, N.C. 

David E. Pardue Jr., Burlington, N.C. 
C. Carl Woods Jr., Durham, N.C. 
Shannon L. Moody, Raleigh, N C. 

Ex Officio Members 

Thomas H. and Elizabeth S. Campbell, 

Co-Presidents of Parents Council 

Rev. Winston E. Waugh, 

President of the Southern Conference 

Rollin O. Russell, D IVlin , 
Conference Minister, Southern Conference 

Demus L. Thompson, 

President of Alumni Association 

J. Fred Young, Ed D , 

President of the College 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



210 



Trustees Emeritus 

Hon. Mills E. Godwin Jr., LL B , 

Trustee Emeritus 

J. Harold Smith, Trustee Emeritus 

Royall H. Spence Jr., DCS, 
Trustee Emeritus 

Frances C. Wilkins, Trustee Emeritus 



FACULTY, 1993-94 

Jimmie D. Agnew, 1 985 

Associate Professor of Science Education 
B.A., George Washington University; 
M.S. ST., Ph.D., The American 
University 

Aqueil Ahmad, 1991 
Part-time Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Aligarh Muslim 
University, Aligarh, India. 

Mark R. Albertson, 1 980 

Assistant Professor; Registrar 
B.B.A., Fort Lauderdale University 

J. Wesley Alexander, 1 96 1 

Associate Professor of Matliematics 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; 
M.S., New Mexico State University 

Robert G. Anderson Jr., 1984 
Associate Professor of Political Science 
B.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian College; 
M.A., Ph.D., candidate. The American 
University 

Andrew J. Angyal, 1976 
Professor of English 
B.A., Queens College, CUNY; M.A., 
Yale University; Ph.D., Duke University 

Thomas E. Arcaro, 1985 
Associate Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Ohio State University; 
M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 

MalvinN. Artley, 1963 
Part-time Professor of Music 
B.Mus., Shenandoah Conservatory 
of Music; M.Mus., Cincinnati 
Conservatory; D.F.A., Chicago Musical 
College; Roosevelt University 



Martin H. Baker, 1980 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
and Health; Athletic Trainer 
B.S., SUNY at Brockport; 
M.S., Indiana State University 

William H. Barbee, 1970 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Wofford College; M.Math., Univer- 
sity of Tennessee; 
Graduate Studies, University of Georgia 

James L. Barbour, 1 990 

Associate Professor of Economics 
B.B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Kentucky 

Robert W. Barrett, 1991 

Part- tim e Assis tan t Professor 
in Education 

A.B., High Point College; M.Ed., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Laurence A. Basirico, 1 983 

Associate Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Hofstra University; M.A., Ph.D., 
SUNY- Stony Brook 

T. Nim Batchelor, 1990 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Texas Tech University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Nebraska 

Robert C. Baxter, 1959 
Associate Professor of Business Law; 
College Attorney 
A.B., Elon College; J.D., Duke University 

Judith L. Beall, 1991 
Instructor in History 
B.A., M.A., University of California 
at Berkeley 

Glenda W. Beamon, 1989 
Assistant Professor of Education; Director 
of M.Ed. Program 
B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D, University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro 

Lucille B. Bearon, 1993 
Part-time Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., 
University of Pennsylvania; 
Ph.D., Duke University 



DIRECTORY 



APPENDICES 



Barry B. Beedle, 1978 
Associate Professor of Health, 
Physical Education and Leisure/Sport 
Management 

B.S., M.S., Mississippi State University; 
Ed.D., University of Mississippi 

Robert E. Beerman, 1991 
Part-time Instructor in Music 
B.A., University of Soutln Carolina 
at Conway 

Richard H. Behrman, 1987 
Associate Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration; Director of M.B.A. Program 
B.B.A., iona College; M.B.A. , New York 
University 

W. Jennings Berry Jr., 1957 
Associate Professor of English; 
Director of Academic Advising 
A.B. Elon College; M.A., University 
of North Carolina 

William N. Best, Jr., 1993 
Assistant Professor of Health, 
Physical Education and Leisure Sport/ 
Medicine; Head Baseball Coach 
B.S., M.A., East Carolina University 

James S. Bissett, 1990 
Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., Oklahoma Baptist University; 
M.A., Western Carolina University; 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Robert G. Blake, 1968 
William S. Long Professor of English 
A.B., Harvard University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 

R. Lamar Bland, 1967 
Professor of English 
B.A., Wake Forest University; 
M.A., University of North Carolina; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Warren L. Board, 1986 
Professor of Social Science, Provost 
and Senior Vice President 
B.A., University of Idaho; 
M.A., University of Denver; 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 



Anne Bolin, 1 988 

Associate Professor of Sociology 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Colorado, Boulder 

K. Wilhelmina Boyd, 1987 
Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Bennett College; M.A., 
North Carolina Central University 

Kevin B. Boyle, 1 992 

Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania; 
M.A., Boston University; 
M.F.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Barry A. Bradberry, 1975 
Assistant Professor; Associate Dean 
of Admissions and Financial Planning 
A. A., Chowan College; A.B., Elon 
College; M.Ed., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 

Girard W. Bradshaw, 1993 
Instructor in Economics 
B.A., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute & State University 

David A. Bragg, 1 970 

Professor of Music 

B.S., Concord College; 

M.M.E., Ph.D., Florida State University 

Stephen E. Braye, 1 989 

Assistant Professor of English, 
Associate Director of Writing Program 
B.S., M.A. University of Nebraska at 
Lincoln; Ph.D., State University of New 
York at Binghamton 

Robert A. Brewer, 1989 
Assistant Professor of Health, 
Physical Education and Leisure/Sport 
Management; Men's and Women's 
Soccer Coach 
B.A., Lynchburg College; 
M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Mikael N. Broadway, 1993 
Part-time Assistant Professor of Religion 
B.A., Baylor University; 
M.Div., Golden Gate Baptist Theological 
Seminaiy; Ph.D., Duke University 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



Michael S. Brodowicz, 1 993 

Instructor in Health and Physical 
Education; Assistant Football 
Coach/Head Track Coach 
B.S. Elon College; M.Ed., University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Janie P. Brown, 1967 
Professor of Health, Education and 
Leisure/Sport Management; Chair, 
Department of Health, Education 
and Leisure/Sport Management 
212 B.S. , Wake Forest University; 

M.A,, East Carolina University; 
Ed.D., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Chalmers S. Brumbaugh, 1 986 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

B.A., College of Wooster; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Pamela P. Brumbaugh, 1 986 

Assistant Professor; Director 
of Experiential Education 
B.S., College of Wooster; 
M.S., University of Wisconsin 

Robert]. Burton Jr., 1986 
Assistant Professor of Health, Education 
and Leisure/Sport Management; 
Men's Basketball Coach 
B.A., Emory and Henry College; 
M.S., Virginia Tech 

Anns. Butler, 1979 
Assistant Professor of English 
A.B., M.Ed., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Deborah W. Caldwell, 1988 
Assistant Professor of Accounting 
B.S., University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro; M.S., C.P.A., University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Michael L. Calhoun, 1985 
Associate Professor of Health, Education 
and Leisure/Sport Management 
B.S., Hardin-Simmons University; 
M.S., Ed.D., Brigham Young University 



J. Albert Carpenter, 1983 
Associate Professor of Computing 
Information Science and Mathematics; 
Chair, Department of Computing Sciences 
A. A., Montgomery College; B.S., 
University of Maryland; M.S., Graduate 
Studies, University of Tennessee 

Anne C. Cassebaum, 1 985 

Assistant Professor of English, 
Director of Transitional Program 
B.A., Cornell University; 
M.A., Columbia University 

D. Brooks Cates, 1964 
Assistant Professor of Geography; 
Coordinator of Institutional Research 
A.B., University of North Carolina; 
M.A. East Carolina University; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Chandana Chakrabarti, 1990 
Assistant Professor of Religion 
B.A., M.A., Calcutta University; 
Ph.D., State University of New York 
at Buffalo 

IrisT. Chapman, 1992 
Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., North Carolina Central University; 
M.Ed., Ph.D., University of South 
Carolina 

Carole F. Chase, 1976 
Professor of Religious Studies; Chair, 
Department of Religious Studies 
A.B., College of William and Mary; 
M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 
Education; Ph.D., Duke University 

EricR. Childress, 1989 
Assistant Professor, Special 
Materials Cataloger 

B.A., M.L.S., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Maxine A. Claar, 1992 
Part-time Instructor in Biology 
A.B., Elon College; M.Ed., University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro; Ed.S., 
Appalachian State University 

Jeffrey W. Clark, 1992 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 



DIRECTORY 



APPENDICES 



UlrikeS. Cobos, 1993 
Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., The University of Akron, Ohio; 
IVl.F.S., Auburn University; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill 

M. Jeffrey Colbert, 1990 
Part-time Instructor in Political Science 
B.A., M.P.A., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Patty J. Cox, 1987 
Assistant Professor of Accounting 
B.S., M.S., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro, C.P.A. 

Robert D. Craig, 1 990 

Part-time Assistant Professor 
of Political Science 
A.B., Elon College; 
J.D., Samford University 

David M. Crowe Jr., 1977 
Professor of History; Chair, 
Department of History 
B.A., Southeastern Louisiana College; 
M.A., Mississippi State University; 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Bernard J. Curry, 1991 
Instructor in Sociology 
B.A., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University 

Linda Cykert, 1989 
Part-time Instructor in Music 
B.S.N., Valparaiso University; 
B.M., Graduate Studies, University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 

J. Earl Danieley, 1 946 

Thomas E. Powell Jr. Professor of 
Chemistty; President Emeritus 
A.B., Elon College; M.A., Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina; Postdoctoral 
Study, John Hopkins University; 
Sc.D., Catawba College; 
LL.D., Campbell University 

Pranab K. Das, 1 993 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Reed College; Ph.D., University 

of Texas at Austin 



Deborah Davidson, 1 992 

Part-time Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.A., M.S., Towson State University; 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State University 

Dwaine M. Davis, 1993 
Part-time Assistant Professor 
ofChemistiy 

B.S., Radford University; M.S., 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Lynne M. Davis, 1993 
Part-time Instructor in Mathematics 
B.A., Elon College; M.A., University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Paul J. DeLoca, 1993 
Instructor in Physical Education 
B.A., St. Francis College; 
M.A., New York University 

Robert W. Delp, 1968 
Part-time Professor ofHistoiy 
B.S., Davidson College; 
B.D., Lancaster Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D., George Washington 
University; Duke University 

Brian Digre, 1990 
Assistant Professor ofHistoiy 
B.A., University of California, 
Berkeley; M.A., Ph.D., George 
University 

Gerald F. Dillashaw, 1992 
Professor of Education; Dean of Division 
of Education, Health, Physical Education 
and Leisure/Sport Management; 
Chair, Department of Education 
B.S., Furman University; 
M.A.T., Converse College; 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Kathleen M. Driskell, 1993 
Part-time Instructor in English 
B.A., The University of Louisville; 
M.F.A., The University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 

James P. Drummond, 1987 
Associate Professor of Health, Education 
and Leisure/Sport Management 
B.S., M.R.PA., Clemson University; 
Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State University 



213 



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214 



Vivian M. Dula, 1986 
Part-time Instructor in Piano 
B.M., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Cynthia A. Dyer, 1990 
Part-time Instructor in Matliematics 
B.S., Western Carolina University; 
M.A.T., Winthrop College 

Diana E. Engel, 1991 
Assistant Professor: Reference 
Bibliograpliic Instruction Librarian 
B.A., M.S.L.S., University of 
Tennessee at Knoxville 

Thomas R. Erdmann, 1 989 

Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M., B.M.E., State University of New 
York at Fredonia; M.M., Illinois State 
University; D.M.A., University of Illinois 

Mary Jo Festle, 1 993 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Knox College; 

M.A., Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Victoria Fischer, 1990 

Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M., Centenaiy College of Louisiana; 
M.M., University of Texas at Austin; 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill; D.M.A., University 
of Texas at Austin 

Frank Foster, 1 993 

Assistant Professor ofTlieatre 
B.A., Averett College; M.F.A., 
Virginia Commonwealth University 

J. Mark Fox, 1 990 

Part-time Instructor in Communications 
B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill; M.Div., Luther Rice 
Seminary 

Gerald L. Francis, 1974 
Professor of Mathematics and 
Computing Sciences; Vice President 
and Dean of Academic Affairs 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State 
University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State University 



Paul M, Fromson, 1 986 

Associate Professor of Psycliology 
B.A., Amherst College; M.S., Ph.D., 
George Peabody College for Teachers 
at Vanderbilt University 

Christopher D. Fulkerson, 1982 
Assistant Professor of Communications, 
Associate Director of Learning Resources 
B.A., St. John Fisher College; 
M.F.A., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Kathleen K. Gallucci, 1 984 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Le Moyne College; 

M.S., University of North Carolina 

Graham S. Gersdorff, 1 99 1 

Assistant Professor of Matliematics 
B.S., University of Toronto, Canada; 
M.S., Ph.D., Emory University 

Daniel J. Gibney, 1986 
Assistant Professor of Accounting 
and Business Administration 
B.S., Robert Morris College; M.B.A., 
West Virginia University; C.RA., C.M.A 

Gerald M. Gibson, (19791, 1988 
Assistant Professor of Communications 
B.A., North Carolina State University; 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Russell B. Gill, 1976 
Professor of English 
A.B., College of William and Mary; 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

E. Eugene Gooch, 1988 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Carson-Newman; Ph.D., University 
of Tennessee, Knoxville 

Barbara L, Gordon, 1987 
Assistant Professor of English; Director 
of Writing Program 
B.A., State University College 
at Oswego, New York; 
Ed.M., Ph.D., State University at Buffalo 



* Year of first appointment 



DIRECTORY 



APPENDICES 



Don A. Grady, 1985 
Assistant Professor of Communications; 
Chair, Department of Communications 
B.A., North Carolina State University; 
M.A., University of North Carolina; 
Ph.D. University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill 

Seena A. Granowsky, 1975 
Professor of Psycliology and 
Human Seivices; Chair Department 
of Psychology 

B.S., Tufts University; M.S., Vassar 
College; Ed.D., Duke University 

Jonathan D. Green, 1 99 1 

Instructor in Music 

B.M., State University College, Fredonia; 
M.M., University of Massachusetts; 
D.M.A., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Thomas D. Green, 1990 

Assistant Professor of Psycliology 
B.S., M.S., East Tennessee State 
University; Ph.D., University 
of Nebraska 

Mary Gayle Greene, 1 993 

Part-time Instructor in Music 

B.S., M.M., University of Tennessee 

Eugene B. Grimley, 1987 
T.E. Powell Jr Professor of Chemistiy; 
Chair, Department ofCiiemistiy 
B.A., Olivet College; 
Ph.D., University of Iowa 

JoM. Grimley, 1988 
Assistant Professor of Chemistiy 
B.S., Florida Southern College; 
M.S., Michigan State University 

Robert W. Guffey, 1992 
Associate Professor of Business 
Administration; Dean of the Martha and 
Spencer Love School of Business; Chair, 
Department of Business Administration 
B.S.I.E., North Carolina State University; 
M.S.B.A., University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State University 

Sheila H. Hall, 1992 
Assistant Professor of Accounting 
B.S., Clemson University; M.B.A., 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 



Bradley Hamm, 1989 
Instructor in Journalism 
and Communications 
B.A., Catawba College; 
M.A., University of South Carolina 

R. Andrew Hare Jr., 1993 
Part-time Instructor in Business 
Administration 

B.S., University of Minnesota; 
M.B.A., University of Notre Dame 

E. Franklin Harris, 1967 
Professor of Physics; 
Chair, Department of Physics 
A.B., Elon College;' 
M.A., Wake Forest University; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Nancy E. Harris, 1981 
Associate Professor of Biology 
B.S., University of North Carolina; B.S., 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Leon R. Hart, 1 989 

Assistant Professor of Health, 
Physical Education and Leisure/Sport 
Management: Head Football Coach 
B.A, Maryville College; 
M.A., Eastern Kentucky University 

Thomas P. Hart, 1 990 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.A., The American University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 

Rosemary A. Haskell, 1 985 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A., University of Durham, England; 

M.A., Clark University; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Kenneth J. Hassell, 1990 
Part-time Instructor in Fine Arts 
B.F.A., M.F.A., University of Wisconsin 

Betty C. Hatch, 1990 
Part-time Instructor in Communications 
B.S., University of Arkansas; 
M.Ed., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Priscilla L. Haworth, 1981 
Assistant Professor, Associate 
Director of Academic Advising 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



216 



Richard C. Haworth, 1974 
Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Wake Forest University; 
IVl.A.T., Duke University; 
M.A., Appalachian State University; 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State University 

Laura R. Helvey, 1993 
Assistant Professor ofPoiitical Science 
B.A., Emoty University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Judys. Henricks, 1977 
Part-time Instructor in Ait 
B.A., University of Illinois; 
M.F.A., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Thomas S. Henricks, 1977 
Professor of Sociology; 
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs; Ciiair, 
Department of Sociology 
B.A., North Central College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

John C. Herold, 1985 
Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Harpur College; 
M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., 
State University of New York at Buffalo 

Wayne W. Hicks, 1989 
Instructor in Health, Physical Education 
and Leisure/Sport Management; Assistant 
Football Coach 

B.S., Jacksonville State University; 
M.S., Eastern Kentucky University 

Howard R. Higgs, 1977 
Associate Professor of Human 
Seivices and Psychology 
B.A., Greensboro College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Rebecca Highsmith, 1 989 

Assistant Professor; 
Director of Career Planning 
B.S., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill; M.A., North Carolina 
Central University 

Vicki V. Hightower, (1984*), 1986 
Assistant Professor of Computing Sciences 
B.S., M.A.T., Michigan State University; 
M.S., University of Evansville 

* Year of first appointment 



WiUiam L. Hightower, ( 1 98 1 *) , 1 986 

Professor of Computing Sciences 
B.A., Kalamazoo College; 
M.S., Ph.D., Graduate Studies, 
Michigan State University 

Katherine C. Hodgin, 1 993 

Part-time Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Guilford College'; 

M.A., Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Joseph P. Hoffman, 1992 
Part-time Instructor in History 
B.A., Elon College; 
M.A., Wake Forest University 

Cheryl T. Holt, 1976 
Instructor in Mathematics 
A.B., Elon College 

Richard RF. Holt, 1991 
Assistant Professor of Economics 
A.B., Occidental College; 
Ph.D., University of Utah; 
Post-doctoral studies; 
University of California at Berkeley 

AlvinR. Hooks, 1990 
Professor of Education 
B.S., M.A., Appalachian 
State University; 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Herbert W. House Jr., 1977 
Professor of Biology 
B.S., Wake Forest University; 
M.S., Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Rebecca O. House, 1978 
Assistant Professor of English; 
Coordinator of Tutorial Seivices 
B.A., Meredith College; 
M.Ed., University of North Carolina 

Judith B. Howard, 1993 
Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill; M.Ed., Tulane University; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill 

Rosemary Howard, 1 990 

Part-time Instructor in Fine Ai'ts 
B.A., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill; M.FA. (in progress), 
University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 



DIRECTORY 



APPENDICES 



Michael P. Hudson Jr., 1982 
Part-time Instructor 
in Computing Sciences 
A.B., Elon College; M.B.A., University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Janell H. Johnson, 1987 
Part-time Instructor in Music 
B.A., Elon College; M.M., University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Terri Anne Johnson, 1 992 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Ball State University; 
M.S., University of South Carolina; 
Ph.D., Clemson University 

William Ray Johnson, 1 984 

Assistant Professor of Communications; 
Coordinator of Television Services 
B.A., Appalachian State University; 
M.Ed., M.F.A., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 

Plummer Alston Jones Jr., 1982 

Assistant Professor; Head Librarian 
and Director of Learning Resources 
B.Mus. East Carolina University; 
M.S., Drexel University; Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Connie L. Keller, 1980 
Assistant Professor; 
Technical Services Librarian 
B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University; 
M.A.L.S., University of lovi/a 

Carol R. Keesee, 1993 
Part-time Instructor in Communications 
B.A., M.FA., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

James F. Kennedy, 1 993 

Part-time Assistant 
Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Arizona; 
M.A., California State University; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill 

Catherine A. King, 1 993 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of California; 
M.A., Northwestern University; 
Ph.D., University of California 



Robert Bums King, 1981 
Part-time Instructor in Organ; 
College Organist 

B.A., Furman University; M.S.M., 
Union Seminary in New York; 
Graduate Studies, University of North 
Carolina; Study with Michael Schneider, 
Hochschule fur Musik, Cologne, 
Germany, Prix de Virtuosite, Schola 
Cantorum, Paris 

Michael B. Kingston, 1991 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.S., Southampton College; 
M.S., University of California; 
Ph.D., Duke University 

N, Patricia Kinney, 1986 
Assistant Professor of Communications 
B.A., Converse College, 
M.A., University of Georgia 

Helen S. Kirchen, (1979*), 1988 
Assistant Professor of Computing Sciences; 
Director Academic Computing 
B.S., Columbia University; 
M.S.L.S., University of North Carolina 

Cassandra L. Kircher, 1 993 

Part-time Instructor in English 
B.A., Macalester College; 
M.A., University of Colorado 

Pamela M. Kiser, 1981 
Assistant Professor of Human Seivices 
and Psycholog}/; Chair, Department 
of Human Seivices 
B.A., Wake Forest University; 
M.S., University of North Carolina 

Ronald A. Klepcyk, 1978 
Assistant Professor; 
Director of Human Resources 
B.S., M.Ed., Kent State University 

Robin M. Kube, 1992 
Part-time Instructor in English 
B.A. Louisiana State University; M.A., 
University of Southwestern Louisiana 

Karen Kucharski, 1 99 1 

Assistant Professor of Fine Arts 
B.A., State University of New York; 
M.F.A., Syracuse University 

Sharon LaRocco, 1 989 

Part-time Instnictor in Music 

B.A., North Carolina School of the Arts 



217 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



KathrynH. Urson, 1987 
Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.S., University of Wisconsin; 
M.A,, Columbia University; 
Ph.D. candidate, Iowa State University 

Susan E. Leonard, 1988 
Assistant Professor in Health, 
Physical Education and Leisure/Sport 
Management; Women 's Volleyball 
and Softball Coach 
B.S., M.S.Ed., James Madison University 

Teresa LePors, 1981 
Assistant Professor; Public Services/ 
Reference Librarian 
B.A., M.S.L.S., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Gregory A. Lilly, 1990 
Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.A., Washington and Lee University; 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Yoram Lubling, 1991 
Part-time Assistant Professor 
in Philosophy 

B.A., Long Island University; 
M.A., New York University; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Nebraska at Lincoln 

Ernest J. Lunsford, 1981 
Associate Professor of Spanish; Chair, 
Department of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Duke University; M.A., Middlebury 
College; Ph.D., University of Florida 

KathyJ. Lyday-Lee, 1982 
Associate Professor of English; 
Director of Academic Honors Program 
B.A., M.A., Tennessee Technological 
University; Ph.D., University of 
Tennessee 

DebinMa, 1993 
Part-time Instructor in Economics 
M.A., University of Texas at Arlington 

Helen H. Mackay, 1976 
Associate Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 

Jan A. Maher, 1 992 

Part-time Instructor in Fine Ai'ts 
B.F.A., M.F.A., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 



Phillip J. Mason, 1 993 

Associate Professor of Biology; 
Chair, Department of Biology 
B.S., University of Massachusetts; 
M.S., Ph.D., Auburn University 

Richard W. McBride, 1 984 

Assistant Professor of Religion; 
College Chaplain 
B.S.Ed., University of Virginia; 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary, 
New York; Th.M., Duke University 

Duane G. McCleam, 1986 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Colorado 

RobieW. McClellan, 1980 

Associate Professor of Business 

Administration 

B.A., University of North Carolina; 

M.B.A., Ed.D., University of North 

Carolina at Greensboro 

Audrey M. McCrory, 1 993 

Part-time Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.S., Marquette University; 
M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Calvert C. McGregor, 1990 
Associate Professor of Accounting 
B.S., M.A., University of South Carolina; 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and 
State University 

Catherine McNeela, 1990 
Assistant Professor of Fine Ai'ts 
B.M., M.M., University of Michigan 

Carol K. Melton, 1991 
Part-time Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., Guilford College; 
M.A., Wake Forest University; 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Jeffrey L. Merron, 1 992 

Assistant Professor of journalism/ 

Communications 

B.A., Bennington College; 

M.A., University of Wisconsin; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

at Chapel Hill 



DIRECTORY 



APPENDICES 



Mary M. Mertz, 1993 
Instructor in Education 
B.F.A., University of Nortii 
Carolina at Chapel Hill; 
B.S., Appalachian State University; 
M.Ed., Georgia State University 

CM. Metcalf, 1993 
Associate Professor of Business 
Administration; Director of the Elon 
College Family Business Forum 
B.A., Oglethorpe University; 
M.B.A., University of South Carolina; 
J.D., Wake Forest University 

Jon Metzger, 1990 
Part-time Instructor in Music 
B.M., Graduate Studies, University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Nancys. Midgette, 1986 
Associate Professor of History; 
Director, Leadership Program 
B.A., M.A., North Carolina State 
University; Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Martin V. Minner, 1993 
Part-time Instructor in Religious Studies 
B.A., Seton Hall University; 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill 

Joel A. Mittelstaedt, 1993 
Assistant Professor oflVIilitaiy Science 
B.A., Eastern Washington University 

T. William Momingstar Jr., 1972 
Assistant Professor of Health, 
Physical Education and Leisure/Sport 
Management; Golf Coach; Director 
of Athletic Fundraising 
A.B., Elon College; 
M.A., Lynchburg College 

James L. Murphy, 1 984 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
and Computing Sciences 
B.S., Campbell College; 
M.S., University of Evansville 

Clair F. Myers, 1988 
Professor of Fine Arts; 
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs; 
Chair, Department of Fine Arts 
B.A., Ohio Northern University; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 



Jacqueline M, Myers, 1985 
Assistant Professor of Health, Physical 
Education and Leisure/Sport Manage- 
ment; Women's Basketball Coach 
B.S., Elon College; 
M.A., Tennessee State University 

David B. Nawrocki, 1992 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Albright College; Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Virginia Novine-Whittaker, 1991 
Part-time Instructor in Music 
MM., Arizona State University 

Kevin J. O'Mara, 1988 
Assistant Professor of 
Business Administration 
B.A., University of Texas at Austin; 
M.B.A., University of Houston; 
Ph.D. candidate. University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill; CM. A. 

Frances M. O'Roark, 1991 
Instructor in English 
B.A., Wake Forest University; 
M.F.A., University of Massachusetts 

James H. Pace, 1973 
Professor of Religious Studies 
A.B., Birmingham-Southern College; 
M.Div., Ph.D., Emory University 

George E. Padgett, 1991 
Associate Professor of Communications 
B.A., M.A., Murray State University; 
Ph.D., Ohio University 

Valerie R. Padgett, 1991 
Part-time Assistant Professor 
of Psychology 

B.A., M.A., The University of Texas; 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

E. Thomas Parham, 1985 
Associate Professor of Health, 
Physical Education and Leisure/Sport 
Management; Assistant Athletic 
Director; Tennis Coach 
B.S., Atlantic Christian College; 
M.Ed., University of North Carolina 

JohnN. Patterson, 1990 
Instructor in Health, Physical Education 
and Leisure/Sport Management; Assistant 
Football Coach 
B.A., Guilford College; 
M.A.Ed., East Carolina University 



219 



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220 



Kenneth E. Paul, 1993 
Associate Professor of 
Business Administration 
B.S., University of Alabama 

Betty B. Pelley, 1989 
Part-time Instructor in Dance 
B.A., Colorado College 

Nan P. Perkins, 1976 
Assistant Professor: Dean of Admissions 
and Financial Planning 
B.A., Atlantic Christian College; 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Charles E. Peterson, 1 988 

Assistant Professor of 

Business Administration 

B.M.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; 

B.S., U.S. Naval Postgraduate School; 

M.S., George Washington University; 

Graduate Studies, University of North 

Carolina at Chapel Hill 

James D. Pickens, 1985 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Ohio State University; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Barbara T. Plumblee, 1 978 

Assistant Professor of Computing Sciences 
A.B., Elon College; 
M.S., University of North Carolina; 
M.S., University of Evansville 

Jeffrey C. Pugh, 1986 
Associate Professor of Religious Studies 
B.S., Ferrum College; 
M.Div., Wesley Theological Seminary; 
M.Phil., Ph.D., Drew University 

RitaM. PuUium, 1988 
Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University 
of the Phillippines 

R.D. Rao, 1969 
Professor of Biology 
B.S., Osmania University; M.S, Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University 

Randy Reed, 1990 
Part-time Instructor in Music 
B.M., Florida State University; 
M.M., Southern Methodist University 



Rosalind R. Reichard, 1984 
Professor of Mathematics, 
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs; 
Chair Department of Mathematics 
B.A., Harpur College, New York; 
M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Lela FayeRich, 1977 
Assistant Professor of History; 
Director of Pre-Major Advising 
B.A., Wake Forest University; 
M.A.T., Duke University 

William G. Rich, 1977 
Professor of Religious Studies; 
Director of General Studies; 
Director of Studies Abroad; 
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs 
B.A., Wake Forest University; B.D., 
Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Emory University 

Janice Little Richardson, 1 983 

Associate Professor of Mathematics; 
Associate Director of North Carolina 
Teaching Fellows Program 
B.A., University of North Carolina; 
M.A., Wake Forest University 

Gerardo Rodriguez, 1 982 

Associate Professor of Spanish 
M.A., Normal Superior Benavente, 
Puebia, Mexico; Ph.D., University 
of Madrid, Spain 

Jane W. Romer, 1986 
Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., East Carolina College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

William G. Ross, 1993 
Assistant Professor of Health, 
Physical Education and Leisure/ 
Sport Management 
B.S., Keene State College; 
M.A., Adelphi University 

Fredrick J. Rubeck, 1988 
Assistant Professor of Fine Ai'ts 
B.F.A., Illinois Wesleyan University; 
M.F.A., University of Nebraska, Lincoln 



DIRECTORY 



APPENDICES 



A. Leonard Rhyne, 1 993 

Part-time Assistant Professor 

of Economics 

B.S., University of North Carolina 

at Greensboro; 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Michael E. Sanford, 1988 
Assistant Professor of Fine Arts 
B.A., Guilford College; M.F.A., University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 

JeanSchwind, 1990 
Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., St. Olaf College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Patricia W. Scotten, 1991 
Part-time Instructor in Human Setvices 
B.A., M.S., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill 

Joey Senat, 1993 
Instructor in Communications 
B.A., Louisiana State University; 
M.A., Memphis State University 

Susan M. Sigmon, 1 99 1 

Assistant Professor; Assistant Registrar 
B.S„ Campbell College 

Lawrence H, Simon, 1976 
Professor of Education; Director of North 
Carolina Teaching Fellows Program 
A.B., M.A.T., University of North 
Carolina; Ed.D., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 

Mark A. Simons, 1 993 

Assistant Professor of Health, 
Physical Education, and Leisure/Sport 
Management; Men's Basketball Coach 
B.S. Aquinus College; 
M.S., Michigan State University 

Martha S. Smith, (1964*), 1970 
Professor of English; Chair, Department 
of English; Director of Women's Studies 
A.B., Winthrop College; 
M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 
Education; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina 



Joyce E. Speas, 1978 
Associate Professor of 
Mathematics and Education 
B.A., Mars Hill College; 
M.Ed., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro; 
Doctoral Studies, University of Georgia 

Wendell R. Staton, 1993 
Instructor in Health and 
Pliysical Education; 
Assistant Men's Basketball Coach 
B.A., St. Andrew/s Presbyterian College; 
M.Ed., Georgia College 

Thomas M. Stogsdill, 1991 
Assistant Professor; 
Vice President/Campaign Director 
B.A., Oklahoma Baptist University; 
M.M., M.R.E., Southwestern Baptist 
Theological Seminary 

JohnG. Sullivan, 1970 
Maude Sharpe Powell 
Professor of Philosophy; 
Chan; Department of Philosophy 
B.A., M.A., Catholic University; 
J. CD., Lateran University; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Patrick O. Sullivan, 1983 
Part-time Instructor in Music 
A. A., Rockingham Community College 

Gary E. Swanson, 1 992 

Assistant Professor 

of journalism/Communications 

B.S., M.S., University 

of Illinois at Urbana 

WonhiJ. Synn, 1989 

Associate Professor 

of Business Administration 

B.A., Seoul National University; M.B.A., 

University of Nev\/ Orleans; Ph.D., State 

University of New York at Buffalo 

Barbara M. Tapscott, 1992 
Part-time Professor of Education 
A.B., Elon College; 
M.Ed., Ed.D., The University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



221 



* Year of first appointment 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



George A. Taylor, 1979 
Professor of Political Science 
and Public Administration; 
Chair Department of Political 
Science and Public Administration 
B.S., Baptist College of Charleston; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Karen S. Thompson, 1 985 

Assistant Professor; Director of Placement 
B.S., M.A. Western Carolina University 

Thomas K. Tiemann, 1 984 

Jefferson Pilot Professor of Economics 
A.B., Dartmouth College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University; 
Post-doctoral Study, University of Kansas 
at Lawrence 

Carole W. Troxler, 1971 
Professor of History 
A.B., University of Georgia; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

George W. Troxler, 1971 
Professor ofHistoiy; 
Coordinator of Cultural Programs 
A.B., Guilford College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina 

Michael J. Ulrich, 1993 
Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.A., University of low/a; 
Ph.D., Washington University 

Paul J. Utterback, 1993 
Instructor in Science; Chemical 
Hygiene Officer and Lab Technician 
B.S., State University of New York 
at Albany; M.S., University of 
Southwestern Louisiana 

Ann J. Vickers, 1 966 

Assistant Professor; Catalog Librarian 
A.B., Elon College; M.L.S., University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Alicia H. Vitti, 1991 
Part-time Instructor 
in Foreign Languages 
B.A., Salem College; 
M.A., (in progress), University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 

Helen F.Walton, 1984 
Part-time Instructor in Mathematics 
B.S., University of Richmond 



Janet L. Warman, 1 990 

Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Emory and Henry College; M.Ed., 
Virginia Commonwealth University; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Cheryl D. Warren, 1993 
Part-time Instructor in Geography 
B.A., Wright State University; 
M.A., Miami University 

Rexford A. Waters, 1990 
Assistant Professor of Health, Physical 
Education and Leisure/Sport Manage- 
ment; Assistant Dean of Student Affairs 
B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State University 

LindaT. Weavil, 1973 

Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., M.A., East Carolina University; 
Ed.D., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Jane C. Wellford, 1 976 

Part-time Instructor in Physical 

Education and Fine Arts 

B.F.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian College; 

M.F.A., University of North Carolina at 

Greensboro 

Anthony Weston, 1992 
Associate Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Macalester College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Charles S. Whiffin, 1990 
Part-time Instructor in Mathematics 
B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan College; 
M.S., Virginia Tech 

Alan J. White, (1964*), 1974 
Professor of Health, Physical Education 
and Leisure/Sport Managemenf 
Athletic Director 
B.S., Wake Forest University; 
M.Ed., University of North Carolina; 
Ed.D., Mississippi State University 

Gerald O. Whittington, 1 992 

Assistant Professor; Vice President 
for Business and Finance 
B.A., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill; M.B.A., Duke University 



RECTORY 



APPENDICES 



Jo W. Williams, 1969 
Professor of Education; 
Vice President for Development 
A.B., Elon College; 
M.Ed., Ed.D., University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 

]. Chris Wilkinson, 1991 

Part-time Assistant Professor 

of Foreign Languages 

B.A., M.A., University of South Florida; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill 

Lucindy Willis, 1991 
Part-time Instructor in Englisli 
B.A., Louisiana State University; 
M.A., North Carolina State University; 
Ph.D. (in progress), University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 

J. Christian Wilson, 1986 
Associate Professor of Religious Studies 
A.B.,M.Div.,'Th.M., Ph.D., Duke 
University 

Ann M. Wooten, 1984 
Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., M.A., East Carolina University; 
Ed.D., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

Daniel W. Wright, 1 990 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S,, Stonehill College; 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Scott D.Yost, 1991 
Part-time Instructor in Pliilosopliy 
B.A., Duke University; 
M.A., Ph.D. (in progress). University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

James Fred Young, 1 973 

Professor of Education; President 
A.A., Mars Hill Junior College; 
B.S., Wake Forest University; 
M.A., University of North Carolina; 
Ed.D., Columbia University; 
Graduate Studies, Appalachian State 
University; East Carolina University; 
University of Virginia 

Rudolf T. Zarzar, 1967 
Professor of Political Science 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina 



VISITING FACULTY, 1993-94 

Carmen Cantarin, 1 993 

Instructor in Foreign Languages; 
Assistant to the Director 
of International Programs 

Oscar E. Lansen, 1988 
Part-time Assistant Professor of History , 
B.A., B.Ed., Het Mollerinstituut, Tilburg, 
M.A., M.Ed., Drs., Katholieke Universiteit 
Nijmegen 

Akiko Yagyu, 1992 
Instructor in Foreign Language 
B.A., Kansai University 
of Foreign Studies 

SixiongXu, 1993 
Professor of Foreign Language 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
AND STAFF 

James Fred Young, President 

Evelyn Campbell, Secretaiy 
to the Office of the President 

Gerald L. Francis, Provost 

Carol W. Oakley, 

Secretaiy to the Provost 

Jo Watts Williams, Vice President 
for Development 

Louise G. Newton, Secretaiy 
to the Vice President for Development 

Richard W. McBride, College Chaplain 

Susan C. Klopman, B A , 

Assistant to the President 

Robert C. Baxter, College Attorney 
Academic Affairs 

Clair F. Myers, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 
Interim Vice President and Dean 
of Academic Affairs 

William G. Rich, B.A., B.D., Ph.D., 
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs 

Martha H. Tingen, Administrative 
Assistant to the Vice President 
and Dean of Academic Affairs 



223 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



224 



Cindy K. Duke, Secretary 
to the Academic Dean 's Office 

F. Gerald Dillashaw, Dean of Division 
of Education, Heaith, Physical Education 
and Leisure/Sport Management 

Richard H. Behrman, B B A , MBA, 
Interim Dean of Love School of Business 

Thomas S. Henricks, B A , MA, Ph D , 

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs 

Rosalind R. Reichard, B A , MS, Ph D , 

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs 

George W, Troxler, A.B,, M.A., Ph.D., 
Coordinator of Cultural Programs 

D. Brooks Gates, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., 
Coordinator of institutional Research 

Lela Faye Rich, B.A., M.A.T., 
Director of Premajor Advising and 
Coordinator of Career Planning 

Priscilla Haworth, B S , MA, 

Associate Director of Academic Advising 

Joyce J. Guffey, B.S., Assistant Director 
of Academic Advising 

Leslie Pegg, Secretary to the Academic 
Advising Center 

Betty M. Covington, A. A., Secretary 
to the Academic Advising Center 

Karen S. Thompson, B.S , MA, 

Director of Placement 

Pamela P. Brumbaugh, B S , MS., 
Director of Experiential Education 

Deborah H. Wade, A A S , 

Student Employment Assistant 

Kathy Cowan, Secretary to Career Services 

Kathy Lyday-Lee, B.A,, M.A., Ph.D., 
Director of Academic Honors Program 

Anne C. Cassebaum, B.A., M.A., Director 
of the Transitional Program 

Edie Alexander, Secretary to Leadership 
Program, Volunteer Services, Chaplain 

Barbara L. Gordon, B.A., Ed.M., Ph.D., 
Director of Writing Program 

W. Ray Johnson, B A , M Ed , 

Coordinator of Television Services 



Helen S. Kirchen, B.S , M S L S , 

Director of Academic Computing Services 

Stephanie F. Henly, B.A., M.B.A., Assistant 
Director of Academic Computing Services 

Duane Neese, Computer Electronics 
Technician 

S. Kay Carroll, Secretary 
to Academic Computing Services 

Brenda J. Cooper, Secretary 
to the Office of Cultural Programs 

Carol Pace, A. A., B.A., M.C.E., 
Faculty Secretary 

Janice Walker, Faculty Secretary 

Linda Martindale, A S , A B , 

Faculty Secretary 

RaDonna Smith, Faculty Secretary 
Phyllis Phillips, Faculty Secretary 
Debbie Perry, Faculty Secretary 
Pat Long, Faculty Secretary 
Carolynn Whitley, Faculty Secretary 

LibrarylLearning Resources 

Plummer Alston Jones Jr., B Mus., MS, 
Ph.D., Head Librarian/Director of Learning 
Resources 

Teresa W. LePors, B A , M S L S , 

Public Services/Reference Librarian 

Christopher D. Fulkerson, B A., M.F.A , 
Associate Director of Learning Resources 

Connie L. Keller, B A , M A L S , 

Technical Services Librarian 

Laura M. Filing, B A , MLS, 
Serials/Government Documents Librarian 

Ann J. Vickers, B A , MLS, 
Catalog Librarian 

Diana E. Engel, B A , M S L S , 

Reference/Bibliographic 
Instruction Librarian 

Eric R. Childress, B A , MLS., 
Special Materials Cataloger 



Margaret B. Jobe, B S , IV 

Public Services Assistant 



.R.E. 



DIRECTORY 



APPENDICES 



Margaret M. Zang, B S , 

Technical Seivices Assistant 

Diane B. Gill, B A , MA, 

Special Collections Assistant 

William L. Jolly, A A , AS, B A , 

Media Technician 

Mary Ann Inabnit, B S , 

Public Sen/ices Clerk 

Sandra B. Kilpatrick, 

Technical Services Clerk 

Nira W. Carter, Technical Services Clerk 
Judy M. Loy, Technical Services Clerk 

Peggy K. Eliason, 

LRC Public Services Clerk 

Jane M, Ferrell, Public Services Clerk 
Sherley M. White, Public Services Clerk 

Student Life 

G. Smith Jackson, B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Dean 
of Student Life 

Jana Lynn Fields Patterson, B A , M Ed , 

Associate Dean of Student Life 

Janice Ratliff, Secretary to the Dean 
and Associate Dean of Student Life 

Robert D. Pelley, A A , B S , MS, 

Assistant Dean of Student Life 

Janet Cooper, Secretaiy 
to Residence Life and Housing 

Rex Waters, B.S., M.S., 
Assistant Dean of Student Life 

Amanda Harless, B A , MA, 

Director of Greek Life and Special 
Programs 

Barbara Hanke, B.A., MA, 
Director of Student Activities 

Felicia F. Massey, A B , 

Adnninistrative Assistant to the Assistant 
Dean of Student Life 

Beth Ann Rosko, B A , M Ed , 

Area Director 

Alice Ledford, B S , M Ed , 

Area Director 



John Bamhill, MS, 

Director of Leadership and Semce 
Learning 

Jennifer Schneider, B S , 

Assistant to the Director of Service 
Learning 

Jennifer R. de Vries, A A., B.S , MS., 
Director of Campus Recreation 

Ruth H. Pugh, B.A., M.S.W., C.C.S.W., 
Director of Counseling Seivices 

Ann C.E. Skillington, B S , M A.Ed., 
College Counselor 

Robert N. Ellington, M D., 

College Physician 

Mary Jane Salter, R N , 

Director of Health Services 

Judy Prevette, Secretaiy to 
Health Seivices 

Joanmarie Blessington, Receptionist for 
Student Health 

Joette Boone, R N , 

Nurse 

Kit Ross, Secretaiy 
to Campus Recreation 

Admissions and Financial 
Planning 

Nan P. Perkins, B.A., M.A., Dean of 
Admissions and Financial Planning 

Barry A. Bradbeny, A B , M Ed , 

Associate Dean of Admissions and 
Financial Planning 

Joel T. Speckhard, B S , J D , 

Associate Dean of Admissions 
and Financial Planning 

Alice N. Essen, B.S., MBA, Director of 
Graduate and International Admissions 
and Nontraditional Students 

L'Tanya T. Burch, A B , 

Associate Director of Admissions, 
Director of Minority Student Affairs 

Catherine B. Williams, B.S , 

Associate Director of Admissions, 
Transfer Admissions Coordinator 



E L N COLLEGE 



226 



Susan S. Semonite, A.B , 

Associate Director Admissions 

Greg Zaiser, B.S , 

Associate Director of Admissions 

Susan Anders, B S , 

Associate Director of Financial Planning 

Clay Hassard, B.S., M.B.A., 
Associate Director of Admissions, 
Assistant Athletic Director 

Robyn C. Evers, B S., 

Assistant Director of Admissions 

Thomas Earl Stewart III, A B , 

Assistant Director of Admissions 

Charmin W. Britt, AB, 

Admissions Counselor 

M. Phillips Powell, A B , 

Admissions Counselor 

Ellen F. Gagnon, Assistant to the Dean 
of Admissions and Financial Planning 

Marsha A. Boone, Coordinator 
of Office Operations/Secretary 
for Graduate and International 
Admissions and Minority Recruiting 

Gwynne G. Warren, A. A., Secretaty 
to the Dean of Admissions and Financial 
Planning Staff Secretary/Bookkeeper 

Penny Davis, Receptionist/Secretary 
for Undergraduate Admissions 

Dianne G. Curtis, 

Admissions Records Manager 

Jayne Gilliam, 

Financial Planning Specialist 

Yvette T. Slade, 

Coordinator of Data Processing 

Nancy Ward, Admissions Records 
Processor/Financial Planning Assistant 

Julia H. Tabor, Admissions Receptionist 
Registrar's Office 

Mark R. Albertson, B.B.A., Registrar 

Susan M. Sigmon, B S., 

Assistant Registrar 

Kathy Gribble, A.S., Secretary 
to the Registrar 



Jane T. Fowler, Assistant to the 
Registrar for Statistical Analysis 

Cheryl W. Whitesell 

Registration-Graduation Coordinator 

Sandy L. Smith, A B., 

Records Coordinator 

Paula M. Stevens, B S., 

Computer Operations Coordinator 

Deveiopment Office 

Thomas M. Stogsdill, B.A., M.M„ M.R.E,, 
Vice President/Campaign Director 

Phillip M. Motley, B.S., Director of 
Development for Alamance County 

J. Earl Danieley, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Sc.D., 
LL.D., President Emeritus 

Raymond P. Covington, A B, M.Ed., 
Development Officer 

Helen A. Ellington, B.A., Development 
Officer and Coordinator of Special Events 

Drew Van Horn, B. A., M.Ed., Director 
of Developmen t-Alumni/Paren ts 

Frances Perkins, Director 
of Development for Guilford, Forsyth, 
Randolph, and Rockingham Counties 

Sara P. Peterson, B A , M.L.S., 
Director of Foundation Relations 
and Prospect Research 

Frances T. McKenzie, Coordinator 
of Donor Relations and Annual Giving 

Cindy B. Sykes, AB, 

Coordinator of Gift Records 

Shirley B. Crawford, Secretary 
for Alumni and Parent Relations 

Pam Baker, Secretary to the Director 
of Development for Alamance County 
and President Emeritus 

Sandra W. Heckman, Secretary 
for Vice President/Campaign Director 

Business and Finance 

Gerald O. Whittington, B A , MBA, 
Vice President for Business and Finance 

James F. Johnson, B S , CPE, 
Director of Administrative Seivices 



DIRECTORY 



APPENDICES 



Valerie P. Cheek, B.S., Secretary 

Terry D. Creech, 

Director of Campus Security 

James DeBerry, B.S., Traffic Coordinator 
Kevin Fansler, Campus Security Officer 
Steve McGilvray, Campus Security Officer 
Mark Garland, Campus Security Officer 

Accounting 

Kenneth M. Mullen, B A , MBA, 
Comptroller 

Lorraine M. Allen, A B , MBA., 
Director of Accounting 

Angela M. May, B.S., M.B.A., Accountant 

Melissa M. Mann, B.S., Accountant 

Patrick Murphy, B S., Bursar 

Karen L. Hughes, Cashier 

Marilyn E. Collins, Assistant Cashier 

Kay M. Riddle, A.B., Assistant Cashier 

Kathy M. Ball, Payroll Clerk 

Margaret G. Clapp, 

Accounts Payable Clerk 

Carolyn W. Moore, 

Accounts Payable Data Entty Clerk 

Betty S. Maffeo, Loan Collections 

Gail B. Key, Secretary to Accounting 
and Accounts Payable Clerk 

Auxiliary Services 

Barbara F. Cox, Print Shop Manager 

Jason Slade, Print Shop and Mail 
Room Clerk 

Doris W. Barr, Switchboard Operator 

Charles H. Sparks Jr., B A , 

Mail Services Manager 

Judith W. McAdams, 

Lead Mail Seivlces Clerk 

Sharon R. Justice, Mail Seivices Clerk 
Duane Cowan, Mail Services Clerk 
Mike Kennedy, B.A., Mail Services Clerk 



Information Systems 

W. David Wall, B.A., Network Manager 

Rhonda A, Belton, B A S , MBA, 
Director of Telecommunications 
Systems and Programs 

Sheila S. Johnson, A A S , 

Director of Administrative Computing 

R. Douglas Mclntyre, B.S., Programmer 

Stephen D. Holt, 

Telecommunications Seivice Manager 

Human Resources 

Ronald A. Klepcyk, B S , M Ed , 

Director of Human Resources 

Carol M. McBane, 

Manager of Administration Benefits 

Faye D. Conally, Secretaiy 

Physical Plant 

W. Stanley Greeson, 

Director of Maintenance 

Paul C. Holt, Electrical Seivices 
Supervisor and Assistant Director 
of Maintenance 

C. Ray Brown, Carpentry SeiMices 
Supervisor 

C. Andrew Carroll, 

Environmental Seivices Supeivisor 

Keith R. Dimont, 

Automotive Seivices Supeivisor 

Fred Feudale, 

Landscaping and Grounds Supeivisor 

James E. Graves, 

Painting Seivices Supeivisor 

Paul J. Utterback, B S , M S , 

Chemical Hygiene Officer 

Susan Minton, Secretaiy 
Paul Nance, Business Manager 

Purchasing 

Vickie S. Somers, B.S , 

Purchasing Manager 

Nancy V. Isley, Purchasing Clerk 



227 



E L N COLLEGE 



Athletic Affairs 

Alan J. White, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., 
Director of Athletics 

E. Thomas Parham, B S , M.Ed , 
Associate Director of Atiiletics; 
Head Men's Tennis Coacli; 
Director of Fightin' Christian Club 

T. William Momingstar, A B , M A., 

Golf Coach; Assistant Director 
of Fightin' Christian Club 

228 Martin H. Baker, B.S , MS,, 

Athletic Trainer 

Kyle D. Wills, A B , 

Athletics Business Manager 

David Hibbard, A B , 

Sports Information Director 

Leon Hart, B.A., M.Ed., 
Head Football Coach 

Leonardo W. Barker, B S , 

Assistant Football Coach 

Larry F. Stephens, B.A., M.S., Assistant 
Football Coach; Defensive Coordinator 

Michael S. Brodowicz, B.S , M Ed., 
Assistant Football Coach/Head 
Track Coach 

Wayne W. Hicks, B.S., M.S., Assistant 
Football Coach; Assistant Track Coach 

John N. Patterson, B A , M Ed , 

Assistant Football Coach, Offensive Line 

R. Clay Hassard, B S , MBA., 
Assistant Director of Athletics; 
Associate Director of Admissions 

Jacquelyn M. Myers, B S., MA, 

Women 's Basketball and Tennis Coach 

Mark A. Simons, B S , MS, 

Head Basketball Coach 

Wendell R. Staton, B. A, E.Ed., 
Assistant Men's Basketball Coach 

Susan E. Leonard, B S , MS, 

Women 's Volleyball and Softball Coach 

Robert A. Brewer, B S , MS, 

Men's and Women's Soccer Coach 

William N. Best, jr , B S., MA., 
Head Baseball Coach 



Andrea H. Albertson, 

Secretaiy to the Athletic Department 

Martha Lou Harper, 

Secretaiy to the Athletic Department 

Publications 

N. Patricia Kinney, B.A., M.A., Director 
of Publications and Public Information 

Donna F. Bearden, B.A., 

Assistant Director of Public Information 

Carolyn N. Messick, B.S. A., M.V.D., 
Assistant Director of Publications 

Scott E. Engle, B.A., Graphic Designer and 
Photography Specialist 



Retired Faculty 
and Administration 

J. Wesley Alexander, B S , 

Professor of Mathematics 

Ralph V. Anderson, B S , ^ 

Professor of Economics 

Malvin N. Artley, B.Mus. M 
Professor of Music 



A., Associate 



.S.,B.D.,Ph.D., 



.Mus., D.F.A., 



Richard H. Behrman, B B A , MBA, 
Associate Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration; Director of M.B.A. Program 

W. Jennings Berry Jr., A B , MA, 

Associate Professor of English; 
Director of Academic Advising 

Edith R. Brannock, A B , M.A., 
Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

Eugene Brooks, A.B, M.B.A. , Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of Accounting 

Marydell R. Bright, A B , M Ed , 

Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid 

Wesley G. Brogan, A.B., M.Div., M.Ed., 
Ph.D., Professor of Education 
and Human Seivices, Associate Dean 
of Academic Affairs 

W.E. Butler, A.B., C.PM., Business 
Manager and Treaurer 

Mattie Lee S. Lee Byrd, A B , 

Assistant Librarian 

Paul H. Cheek, B.S., Ph.D., LL 

Vaughn Professor of Chemistry ■ 



DIRECTORY 



APPENDICES 



Ruth L. Cheek, A B , MA, 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Edwin L. Daniel, A.B., B.F.A., M.F.A., 
Associate Professor of Art 

Robert W. Delp, B.S., B.D., M.A., Ph.D., 
Professor of History 

Helen H, Euliss, B.S., Professor of English 

Daniel Feinberg, B.B.S., M.A., Ph.D., 
Professor of Business Administration 

Hugh Fields, B.S., M.S., 
Associate Professor of Biology 

Betty K. Gerow, A.B., M.A., 
Associate Professor of English 

Rachel Y. Holt, A.B., M.Ed., M.A., 
Assistant Professor of History 

Alfred W. Hurst, A.B., M.A., B.D., D.D., 
Assistant Professor of Religion 

S. Carlysle Isley, A B , 

Special Assistant to the President 

Donald J. Kelly, A.B., M.A., Associate 
Professor of Physical Education; Associate 
Football Coach 

William G. Long, B.A., M.A., M.Div., 
Associate Professor of Political Science 

Frances C. Longest, A B , M Ed , 

Associate Professor of Business Education 

June M. Looney, A B , MA, 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Jacqueline P. Matlock, 

Assistant Director of Admissions 

John F. Mitchell, A.B., M.B.A., Associate 
Professor of Business Administration 

Eleanor W. Moffett, A.B., M.Ed., Ph.D., 
Professor of English 

James A. Moncure, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 
Professor of History, Vice President 
of Academic and Student Affairs 

C. Fletcher Moore, A.B., M.A., D.Litt., 
Professor of Piano and Organ 

Voigt F. Morgan, A.B., MA, 
Associate Professor of Biology 

Whitney P. Mullen, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., D.Ed., 
Associate Professor of Science Education 



E. Eugene Oliver, A.B., M.B.A., Ed.D., 
Associate Professor of Accounting 

James H. Overton, A B , B D , Ph D , 

Professor of Religion 

T.E. Perkins, B.S., M.Div., M.Ed., 
B.S., M.S. in L.S., Librarian 

Mary Ellen Priestley, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., 
Professor of English and Communications 

S.E. Gerard Priestley, B S , S T M , B S , 

M.A., Ph.D., M.S.Sc, W.A. Harper 
Professor of History and Political Science 

Brank Proffitt, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Director 
of Deferred Giving and Estate Planning 

George A. Rasmussen, B S , Ed M , 

Associate Professor of Communications 

Allen B. Sanders, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., 
CM. A., Professor of Business 
Administration and Accounting 

Martin L, Shotzberger, B S B A , 

M.S.B.A., Ph.D., ll.D., lefferson-Pilot 
Professor of Business Administration 

Martha S. Smith, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., 
Professor of English; Chair, Department 
of English, A.B., Winthrop College; 
M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 
Education; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina 

Lucile C. Stone, A B , M Ed , 

Associate Professor of Education 

Arnold C. Strauch, B S , MA, Ed D , 

Professor of Education 

James T. Toney, B A , MA., 
Associate Professor of Economics 

Frederic T. Watts Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 
Professor of Political Science 

Walter Westafer, B.Mus., M.Mus., Ph.D., 
Professor of Music 

Jack O. White, B.S., M.Ed., D.A„ 
Professor of Music 

Jeanne F. Williams, B.S., M.S., Associate 
Professor of Statistics and Mathematics 



229 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



Index 



Absence From Tests and Examinations 63 

Academic Standards and Withdrawal 66 

Academic Calendar 8 

Academic Program 15 

Academic Support Services 25 

23Q Academic Regulations 69 

Acceptance 42 

Access to Student Educational Records 66 

Accreditation 8 

Administrative Officers and Staff 223 

Admission Requirements 39 

Admission Policy 203 

Admission Requirements 

Commuter Students 40 

Admission Requirements 

Resident Students 40 

Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid ....39 

AP College-Level Examination 42 

Application Procedures 39 

Athletic Facilities 12 

Attendance 63 

Auditing Courses 62 

Bachelor^s Degree Requirements 70 

Back Door, The 31 

Basic Requirements 203 

Book Expenses 44 

Calendar 4 

Campus Center, The 31 

Campus Recreation 35 

Campus Security 29 

Campus and Facilities 9 

Career Services 24 

Century Programs 20 

Changes in Class and Schedule 62 

CLEP 42 

Communications Media 34 

Communications with Elon College 3 

Costs Covered by Tuition 43 

Course Registration 61 

Course Load 61 

Courses 73 

Accounting 73 



African/African-American Studies 76 

Art 77 

Biology and Allied Health 79 

Business Administration 86 

Chemistry 91 

Communications 95 

Computing Sciences 96 

Cooperative Education 99 

Dance 100 

Drama 102 

Economics 102 

Education 105 

English 1 13 

Environmental Studies 122 

Fine Arts 124 

Foreign Languages 125 

General Studies 128 

Geography 129 

Health, Physical Education and Leisure 130 

History 142 

Human Services 147 

International Studies 150 

journalism and Communications 150 

Leisure/Sport Management 155 

Mathematics 155 

Medical Technology 160 

Military Science 160 

Music 163 

Music Theatre 169 

Philosophy 170 

Physical Education 173 

Physics 173 

Political Science 176 

Psychology 180 

Public Administration 183 

Religious Studies 185 

Science Education 188 

Social Science 191 

Sociology 193 

Sports Medicine 197 

Theatre Arts 198 

Women's Studies 201 

Credit by Examination (Course Challenge) . 62 

Credit for Veterans 43 

Cultural Life 30 

Dean's List 65 



Degree Requirements 203 

Degrees and Major Fields of 

Concentration 15,203 

Department Examination 43 

Directory & Appendices 209 

Dismissal 67 

Dropping Courses 62 

Early Decision Plan 40 

Elon 101 19 

Endowed Scholarships 53 

Endowment and Sources of Income 58 

Enrichment Programs 22 

Entrance Examinations 40 

Evening School 19 

Expenses for the 1994-95 Academic Year .. 45 

Facilities 10 

Faculty 7,210 

Financial Aid 48 

Free Peer Tutoring 19 

General Studies 16 

General Academic Regulations 61 

General Costs 43 

Grade Point Average (GPA) 65 

Grade Reports 65 

Grades and Reports 64 

Graduate Programs 45 

Graduate Degree Requirements 203 

Graduation Fees 46 

Graduation With Honors 65 

High School Credit Bank Program 19 

History 6 

Honor Societies 32 

Independent Study and Research 24, 63 

Intercollegiate Athletics 36 

International Students 42 

Introduction 5 

Judicial System 29 

Leaders for the Twenty-First Century ... 3! , 57 

' Location 9 

I Major 71 

Master of Business Administration (MBA) 203 

I Master of Education (M.Ed.) 205 

i Meal Plan 44 

Military 24 

|Minor Fields of Concentration 15 

iMinor 72 



Miscellaneous 46 

Mission of Elon College 5 

New Student Orientation 29 

Overload 63 

Part-Time Enrollment/Day Students and All 

Evening School 45 

Pass/Fail Elective Courses 63 

Payment Options 53 

Preprofessional Programs 17 

Presidential Scholarships 57 

Professional Programs 17 231 

Programs 7 

Refunds 47 

Registration and Courses 61 

Religious Life 31 

Repeat Courses 63 

Room Change Charge 44 

Room Reservation and Security Deposits ..28 
Scholarship Awards in Athletics 58 

School of Business, 

The Martha and Spencer Love 16 

Service Learning 32 

Special/Optional Fees 46 

Special Academic Programs 18 

Special Students 41 

Student Service 27 

Student Life 27 

Student Organizations 33 

Students 7 

Student Government Association 29 

Student Union Board 30 

Studies Abroad 23 

Summer School 1995 46 

Traditional Events 36 

Transcripts of Student Records 66 

Transfer Credit 43 

Transfer Admission 41 

Transitional Program 19 

Travel Information 14 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements 69 

Visiting Faculty 223 

Visitor Information 14 

Wellness 36 

Who's Who 35 

Withdrawal 67 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



Elon College 
1995-1996 



Elon College 

North Carolina 27244 

910/584-9711 



Elon Vol. 106— September 1995 (UPS 076-160) Published annually at Elon 
College, NC 27244-2010. Elon College does not discriminate on the basis of 
race, color, sex, handicap and national or ethnic origin in the recruitment and 
admission of students, the recruitment and employment of faculty and staff or 
the operation of any of its programs. The college's Section 504 Coordinator is 
Priscilla Haworth, Associate Director of Academic Advising, Alamance 101. 



Elon College reserves the right to add or drop programs and courses, to 
institute new requirements when such changes are desirable, and to change 
the calendar that has been published. Every effort will be made to minimize 
the inconvenience such changes might create for students. 



CONTENTS 




ontents 



Communications with Elon College .... 3 
Calendar 4 

Introduction 5 

The Mission of Elon College 5 

History 6 

Students 7 

Faculty 7 

Programs 7 

Academic Calendar 8 

Accreditation 8 

Campus and Facilities 9 

Location 9 

Campus 9 

Facilities 10 

Athletic Facilities 12 

Support Facilities 13 

Visitor Information 15 

Travel Information 15 

Academic Program 17 

Degrees and Major Fields 

of Concentration 17 

Minor Fields of Concentration 1 7 

General Studies 18 

The Martha and Spencer Love 

School of Business 18 

Professional Programs 19 

Preprofessional Programs 19 

Evening School 21 

Transitional Program 21 

Free Peer Tutoring 21 

Writing Program 21 

Elon 101 21 

High School Credit Bank Program 21 

Leaders for the Twenty-First 

Century Programs 22 

Enrichment Programs 24 

Study Abroad 25 

Independent Study and Research 26 

Military 26 

Career Services 26 

Academic Support Services 27 



Student Life 29 1 

Student Service 29 

Room Reservation and Security Deposits 30 

New Student Orientation 31 

The Student Government Association 31 

Judicial System 31 

Campus Security 31 

Cultural Life 32 

The Student Union Board 32 

Moseley Center 33 

Religious Life 33 

Leadership Development 33 

Service Learning 33 

Honor Societies 34 

Student Organizations and Activities 35 

Communications Media 36 

Who's Who 36 

Campus Recreation 36 

Wellness 38 

Intercollegiate Athletics 38 

Traditional Events 38 

Admissions, Finances 

and Financial Aid 39 

Application Procedures 39 

Admission Requirements 39 

All Resident Students 40 

All Commuter Students 40 

Entrance Examinations 40 

The Early Decision Plan 40 

Transfer Admission 41 

Special Students 41 

International Students 42 

Acceptance on Condition 42 

Advanced Placement Examination 42 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) .,,,42 

Department Examination 43 

Transfer Credit 43 

Credit for Veterans 43 

General Costs 43 

Costs Covered by Tuition 43 

The Meal Plan 44 

Book Expenses 44 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



Room Change Charge 44 

Expenses for the 1995-96 

Academic Year 45 

Part-Time Enrollment/Day Students 

and All Evening School 45 

Graduate Programs 45 

Summer School 1996 46 

Special/Optional Fees 46 

Graduation Fees 46 

Miscellaneous 46 

Refunds 47 

Financial Aid 48 

Payment Options 53 

Endowed Scholarships 53 

Leaders for the Twenty-First 

Century Scholarships 57 

Presidential Scholarships 57 

Endowed Athletics Scholarships 58 

Endowment and Sources of Income 58 

General Academic Regulations 6 

Registration and Courses 6 

Classification 6 

Course Load 6 

Course Registration 6 

Auditing Courses 62 

Changes in Class and Schedule 62 

Credit by Examination (Course Challenge) .... 62 

Dropping Courses 62 

Independent Study 63 

Overload 63 

Pass/Fail Elective Courses 63 

Repeat Courses 63 

Attendance 63 

Absence From Tests and Examinations 63 

Grades and Reports 64 

Grading System and Quality Points 64 

Grade Point Average (GPA) 65 

Grade Reports 65 

Dean's List 65 

Graduation With Honors 65 

Access to Student Educational Records 66 

Transcripts of Student Records 66 

Work at Other Institutions 66 

Academic Standards and Withdrawal 66 

Academic Standing 66 

Probation 66 

Suspension 66 

Dismissal 67 

Withdrawal 67 

Academic Regulations 69 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements 69 

Bachelor's Degree Requirements 70 

The Major 71 

The Minor 72 



Courses 73 

Accounting 73 

African/ African-American Studies 76 

Art 77 

Biology and Allied Health 79 

Business Administration 86 

Chemistry 91 

Communications 95 

Computing Science 96 

Cooperative Education 99 

Dance 100 

Drama 102 

Economics 102 

Education 105 

English 1 15 

Environmental Studies 124 

Fine Arts 126 

Foreign Languages 127 

General Studies 130 

Geography 131 

Health. Physical Education and Leisure 132 

History 143 

Human Services 149 

International Studies 152 

Journalism and Communications 154 

Leisure/Sport Management 160 

Mathematics 160 

Medical Technology 165 

Military Science 165 

Music 168 

Music Theatre 173 

Philosophy 175 

Physical Education 177 

Physics 178 

Political Science 181 

Psychology 185 

Public Administration 188 

Religious Studies 189 

Science Education 192 

Social Science 196 

Sociology 197 

Sports Medicine 202 

Theatre Arts 202 

Women's Studies 205 

Graduate Degree Requirements 207 

Degrees and Major Fields 207 

Master of Business Administration (MBA) ... 207 
Master of Education (M.Ed.) 209 

Directory & Appendices 2i3 

Faculty, 1994-95 214 

Visiting Faculty, 1994-95 227 

Administrative Officers and Staff 227 



COMMUNICATIONS 



Commurii 
with Elon C 



This bulletin contains pertinent information about the college, its philosophy, 
programs, policies, regulations and course offerings. All students and prospective 
students are urged to read it carefully and completely Please direct correspon- 
dence to the appropriate individuals, listed below: 



President 

• General information 

Provost 

• Administrative and 
student life policies 

• Long-range plans 

Vice President for 
Academic Affairs 

• Academic program 

• Academic work of 
students in college 

• Faculty positions 

• Special programs 

Dean of Admissions and 
Financial Planning 

• Admissions 

• Requests for applications, 
catalogs or bulletins 

• Scholarships, student loans and 
student employment 

Dean of Student Life 

• Housing 

• Student life 



Vice President for 
Business and Finance 

• Administrative services 

• Payment of student accounts 

• Inquiries concerning expenses 

Vice President for 
Institutional Advancement 

• Public relations 

• Contributions, gifts or bequests 

• Estate planning 

Director of Placement 

• Career options for students 

• Employment of seniors 
and alumni 

Registrar 

• Requests for transcripts 

• Evaluation of transfer credits 

• Student educational records 

Director of Alumni 
and Parent Relations 

• Alumni affairs 

• Parent relations 

Director of Academic Advising 

• Course scheduling 

• Academic counseling 



E L N COLLEGE 






Fall Semester 1995 

August 22 (Tue) 
August 23 (Wed) 
August 24 (Thu) 
August 25 (Fri) 
August 28 (Mon) 
August 31 (Thu) 
October 13(Fri) 
October 18 (Wed) 
October 19 (Thu) 
October 30 (Mon) 
November 8 (Wed) 
November 21 (Tue) 
November 27 (Mon) 
December 5 (Tue) 
December 6 (Wed) 
December 7-12 (Thu-Tue) 
December 14 (Thu) 

Winter Term 1996 

January 2 (Tue) 
January 3 (Wed) 
January 4 (Thu) 
January 12 (Fri) 
January 22 (Mon) 
January 23 (Tue) 
January 24 (Wed) 

Sprmg Semester 1996 

January 29 (Mon) 
January 30 (Tue) 
January 31 (Wed) 
February 6 (Tue) 
March 15 (Fri) 
March 25 (Mon) 
March 27 (Wed) 
April 4 (Thu) 
April 8 (Mon) 
May 7 (Tue) 
May 8 (Wed) 
May 9-14 (Thu-Tue) 
May 15 (Wed) 
May 1 7 (Fri) 
May 18 (Sat) 

Summer School 1996 

TBA 



Orientation 

Orientation; Evening School Registration 

Registration 

Drop-Add Day 

Classes Begin 

Last Day for Late Registration 

Mid-Semester Reports Due; Fall Break Begins at 2:20 p.m. 

Fall Break Ends at 8:00 a.m. 

Last Day for Dropping Course with "W" 

Last Day to Remove Incomplete "I" and "NR" Grades 

Preregistration Begins for Winter Term and Spring Semester 1996 

Thanksgiving Holiday Begins Following Evening Classes 

Thanksgiving Holiday Ends at 8:00 a.m. 

Classes End 

Reading Day (Evening Exams Begin) 

Examinations 

Grades Due at 10:00 a.m. 



Registration 

Classes Begin 

Last Day for Late Registration 

Last Day for Dropping Course with "W" 

Classes End 

Examinations 

Grades Due at 3:00 p.m. 

Registration 

Drop-Add Day; Evening Classes Begin (5:30 p.m. and later) 

Day Classes Begin 

Last Day for Late Registration 

Mid-Semester Reports Due; Spring Break Begins at 2:20 p.m. 

Spring Break Ends at 8:00 a.m. 

Last Day for Dropping Course with "W" 

Last Day to Remove Incomplete "1" and "NR" Grades 

Preregistration Begins for Summer and Fall 1996 

Classes End 

Reading Day (Evening Exams Begin) 

Examinations 

Senior Grades Due By 9:00 a.m. 

Grades Due at 10:00 a.m. 

Commencement; Last Day of School 



INTRODUCTION 



Introduction 

Elon College is a coeducational, residential, church-related college 
i situated on a spacious campus in the heart of the Piedmont near Burlington, 
North Carolina. Named for the Hebrew word for "oak," the college is located 
in what was once an oak forest, and many of these majestic trees still grace 
Elon's campus. 

The fourth largest of the 37 private colleges and universities in North Carolina, 
Elon offers a wide range of choices in academics and campus activities, yet is 
small enough to allow students to feel a sense of personal involvement and 
interaction with faculty members and fellow students. 

The Mission of Elon College 

Motivated by the beliefs and spiritual values that have grown out of its 
founding by the historic Christian Church, Elon offers men and women a liberal 
arts education that enriches them as human beings, prepares them for the choice 
of a profession and for service to their communities. Within this context, Elon 
College also offers selected career-oriented majors and graduate programs to 
facilitate professional development. 

In accordance with the provisions of the charter, Elon College aims to provide 
its students the opportunity to develop: 

• a personal philosophy of life which will be reflected In a sense of integrity 
high ethical standards, and significant religious insights and practice; 

• an understanding of their responsibilities and rights as citizens in a democratic 
;: society, and a recognition of the intrinsic worth of all individuals; 

• an informed respect for the differences among cultures as well as an under- 
standing of the interdependence of world conditions and of the need for 
individual and collective responsibility for the environment; 

• a love of learning and sensitivity to aesthetic values sufficient to stimulate 
continued intellectual and cultural growth; 

• the ability to gather information, to think critically logically, and creatively, 
and to communicate effectively; 

• a basic knowledge of the humanities, natural sciences and social sciences, 
and an appreciation of their interrelationships; 

• a level of competence in at least one field of knowledge sufficient to provide 
depth of intellectual perspective and preparation for graduate study or 
professional activity; 



E L N C L L E G E 

• an understanding of the principles of mental and physical health essential for 
developing a lifestyle of wholeness and well-being; 

• an appreciation of the potential for lifelong personal growth and professional 
development which their own distinct abilities and aptitudes provide. 

In keeping with these educational objectives, Elon College recognizes its 
broader responsibilities as an institution of higher learning. The college supports 
scholarly and artistic expression by providing the conditions for serious intellec- 
tual work by both students and faculty. It furthermore promotes open and honest 
inquiry, respect for persons of all circumstances, sensitivity to diverse cultural 
traditions, an understanding of the economic environment, an appreciation for 
the value of work and habits of democratic citizenship. As participants in a 
community of learners, all members of the college are expected to enact the 
ideals of personal integrity and public responsibility 

History 

Elon College was founded by the Christian Church (now United Church 
of Christ) in 1889. Two schools were forerunners of Elon College: The Graham 
College, established in 1851 in Graham, North Carolina; and the Suffolk Collegiate 
Institute, established in 1872 in Suffolk, Virginia. In 1888, the Southern Christian 
Convention, now a part of the United Church of Christ, voted to establish Elon 
College. Since its founding, seven presidents have provided the leadership 
essential for progress. 

The site of the new college was known as Mill Point, located four m.iles west 
of Burlington, North Carolina. In its early years, Elon survived many difficulties. 
The student body population was severely reduced during World War I, and a 
major fire in 1923 destroyed most of the campus buildings. Within three years, 
a new campus emerged from the ruins: The five central buildings, including 
Alamance, were built at this time. The Great Depression and World War II also 
created challenges for the college. 

The decades following World War II brought physical growth and academic 
development. As enrollment increased, new buildings went up and the college 
expanded beyond its brick walls. Students from half of the states in the Union, 
as well as from foreign countries, gave the college a regional complexion. 

Elon experienced a decade of unprecedented growth during the 1 980s. During 
this time, applications doubled and enrollment increased 35 percent, making Elon 
one of the fastest growing colleges in the region. Dozens of academic and student 
life programs were added to enrich the quality of an Elon education. Special 
classes and volunteer programs were developed to provide students with leader- 
ship and service opportunities. In fall 1984, the college began offering a master 
of business administration degree, and in the fall 1986, a master of education 
degree. The college physical plant grew during the 1980s as well. Total campus 
acreage doubled, and square footage of buildings increased 73 percent. The 
college also made major investments in computer and library technology and 
equipment for the sciences and communications. 

During this time, financial support for the college was strong, with annual 
revenues increasing more than 200 percent. Counted among Elon's most loyal 



INTRODUCTION 



benefactors are the alumni: 39 percent make a gift to the college each year, placing 
Elon among the top of private colleges and universities in alumni participation. 

Elon's forward momentum has continued in the 1990s. In an effort to further 
enhance teaching and academic excellence, the college has recently revised the 
I General Studies curriculum and converted to a four semester-hour structure. A 
I $21 million fund-raising campaign was recently completed — $3 million over the 
I original goal. Koury Center's Alumni Memorial Gymnasium was renovated, and 
',, Stewart Fitness Center opened in spring 1994. Moseley Center, a new 74,000 
f' square-foot campus center, opened in January 1995. 

As a result of Elon's accomplishments, Elon was ranked in the top quartile 
: of southern regional colleges and universities by U.S. News & World Report's 
"1994 College Guide." 

Although there have been many changes through the years, Elon remains 
church-related rather than church controlled. It embraces general Christian 
principles and values as an appropriate foundation for the development of 
human personality and social order. 

Students 

From its initial enrollment of 108 students, Elon's student body has grown 
steadily. Elon's 3,316 undergraduate and 180 graduate students come from 38 
states and 20 foreign countries. In 1994, 35 percent of Elon students were from 
North Carolina and 65 percent were from out-of-state. Slightly more than half of 
the students are women, and the student body includes several racial and socio- 
economic groups. Elon College admits students of any race, color, sex, national 
or ethnic origin and handicapped without discrimination. This diversity enriches 
the life of the community and reflects the nature of American society itself. 

Faculty 

Elon students benefit from a dedicated staff and an outstanding faculty whose 
primary concern is teaching. Faculty members have been chosen because of their 
academic preparation, individual initiative and commitment to excellence in 
teaching. Approximately 76 percent hold the highest degree in their fields. Many 
of Elon's faculty demonstrate their satisfaction with the college with long years 
of service. With a student to faculty ratio of 1 7: 1 , Elon chooses to remain small so 
that the relationship between faculty and students is friendly informal and lasting. 

Programs 

Elon College believes that the study of liberal arts prepares students for 
rewarding, meaningful lives. Its programs are designed to challenge students to 
excel intellectually to pursue self-fulfillment and to learn the meaning of service 
to others. 

The academic program provides opportunities for each student to develop 
a mature proficiency in the use of the English language, an awareness of history 
and an appreciation of cultural, social and scientific achievements. The General 
Studies courses give students the breadth and background needed for mature 
intellectual development and a lifetime of learning and leadership. The upper- 



E L N COLLEGE 

level courses allow students to concentrate in areas of special interest and in 
professional and career-oriented branches of learning. To meet such individual 
needs, the academic program includes such features as independent study, study 
abroad opportunities, internships and cooperative education. 

Elon College complements the classroom through a broad range of activities 
and student life programs that encourage students to find their personal identities, 
refine their social skills, broaden their perspectives and create lifetime friendships. 

Academic Calendar 

The college's academic year is divided into a 4-1-4 calendar. The fall semester 
8 is a four-month term, ending before Christmas holidays, followed by a one-month 

winter term and a four-month spring semester. The one-month winter term offers 
opportunities for study abroad, internships and service programs in addition to 
specialized courses on campus. Evening classes are offered and a summer 
session is held each year. 

The calendar is designed to meet the needs of: (1) full-time students who 
plan to complete degree requirements within four years, (2) part-time students, 

(3) high school seniors who wish to take one or two college-level courses, 

(4) members of the community who desire further educational work in day or 
evening classes, and (5) those who seek a graduate degree in business (MBA) 
or education (M.Ed.). Summer school serves the same groups and, in addition, 
provides an opportunity for new students or students enrolled in other colleges 
to more quickly complete their degree requirements. 

Accreditation 

Elon College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools to award bachelor's and master's degrees. 

Elon's education program is accredited by the National Council for Accredita- 
tion of Teacher Education and by the North Carolina State Department of Public 
Instruction. 

The college is a member of the following associations: 

• The American Council of Education 

• The American Association for Higher Education 

• The Association of American Colleges 

• The North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities 

• The North Carolina Association of Independent Colleges and Universities 

• The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities 

• Independent College Fund of North Carolina 

• The Council of Independent Colleges 

• The Council for Higher Education of the United Church of Christ 

• The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business 

• The Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs 



CAMPUS AND FACILITIES 




I -f T~f *"f * 4 * 



Location 

Fifteen miles west of Elon College, along Interstate 85/40, is the thriving city 
of Greensboro. To the east is Research Triangle Park, internationally known for 

; its intellectual resources and for scientific research conducted by companies and 
organizations in the fields of computer technology genetic engineering and other 

I areas. Near Research Triangle Park are Duke University in Durham, the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University in Raleigh. 
Rich cultural resources affiliated with four larger cities and 12 colleges are within 
an hour's drive of the campus. Thus, the Elon College community enjoys the 
lifestyle of a relatively small institution yet benefits from being centrally located 
close to major institutional and urban resources. 

Campus 

Elon's historic campus is beautiful, spacious and rich in trees and stately 
brick buildings. The campus is adjacent to the business district of the town of Elon 
College and is bounded by residential areas. The college is designed and equipped 
to serve its living and learning community with 24 academic and administrative 
buildings and 20 residence halls. The current living and dining facilities serve 
approximately 1 ,800 students who live on campus. 

Extensive building and improvement projects have been completed in recent 
years, including six fraternity and sorority houses on north campus in 1989, six 
apartment complexes on east campus in 1989, four residence halls in 1982 and 
1984, and a new fountain and plaza area in 1982. Buildings housing the class- 
rooms and laboratories have been extensively renovated, and new equipment and 
furniture have been provided, significantly enhancing the learning environment. 

Elon's 70,000 square-foot Faith Rockefeller Model Center for the Arts opened 
in 1987 to house the fine arts and communications programs. In addition to 
providing classroom and studio space, the building has become the center of the 
college's cultural program series. Facilities include an auditorium, a recital hall 
and gallery space. 

A major renovation and addition to the newly named Koury Center unites 
Alumni Memorial Gymnasium, Alumni Gym, Jordan Gym, Beck Pool and the new 
state-of-the-art fitness center, creating a visual whole. 

The new Moseley Center with 74,000 square feet was completed in January 
1995. The center includes space for student organizations, a dining facility the 
campus bookstore, student mail services and a multi-purpose meeting area and 
auditorium. A TV lounge, "varsity" room, and outdoor terrace are part of the 
student commons area. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Facilities 

Administrative and Classroom Buildings 

• Alamance Building houses administrative offices and classrooms. Citizens of 
Alamance County contributed the money to build this structure in 1925 after 
the old administration building was destroyed by fire in 1 923. The Alamance 
Building was extensively renovated in 1 98 1 . The area in front of Alamance 
Building is called Scott Plaza and is the gift of Ralph H. Scott, former State 
Senator and a former member of the Elon College Board of Trustees, in memory 
of his wife, Hazeleene Tate Scott. In the center of the plaza is Fonville Fountain, 
a gift of Rudy M. and Frances (Turner) Fonville '28. The fountain and plaza were 

10 completed in 1982. 

• Carlton Building \Mas the gift of three trustees of the college: RJ. Carlton, H.A. 
Carlton and L.E. Carlton, and their sister, Mrs. J. Dolph Long. The Carlton Building 
was built in 1925 and extensively renovated in 1991 . This structure houses three 
large lecture halls, state-of-the-art multi-media equipment, classrooms, faculty 
offices, and the Academic Computing Center. 

• Di/ice Science Building has modern scientific equipment and laboratory appara- 
tus. It houses the Departments of Biology and Chemistry. In memory of their 
mother, Mrs. Artelia Roney Duke, j.B. Duke and B.N. Duke contributed to the 
cost of erecting this building, dedicated in 1927. Classroom and laboratory 
space underwent renovations in 1988 and 1993. 

• Faith Rockefeller Model Center for theAi'ts was opened for the 1987-88 academic 
year. In addition to classroom and office facilities for the art, music, drama, 
communications and dance programs, the 70,000 square-foot facility features 
a theater, a recital hall and a fully equipped television studio. This facility was 
named in honor of the mother of Elon alumnus and trustee Bob Model '67. 

• John A. and Iris McEwen McCrary Theatre is a 600-seat theatre that has played 
host to such performers as Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Shanghai Acrobats and 
Dance Theatre, New Vic Theatre of London, Reynolds Price, American Reper- 
tory Ballet Company and many student productions. 

• Frances Council Yeager Recital Hall seats 125, offering a more intimate setting 
for student, faculty and guest recitals as well as lectures and panel discussions. 

• Haggard Avenue House, a turn-of-the-century residence, was built by Walter R 
Lawrence, first dean of the college and a member of the North Carolina General 
Assembly The facility was purchased by the college in 1984 and has undergone 
extensive renovations. Located here are the offices of the President Emeritus, 
Special Assistant to the President, the Elon College Honors Program, the 
Director of General Studies and Counseling Services. 

• Holland House is the former residence of the college president. Constructed 
in 1963, it is located at 301 East Haggard Avenue. It was named in memory 

of Shirley T Holland, a longtime college trustee, by Mrs. Holland and their sons. 
The facility currently houses the Institutional Advancement, Development, 
Alumni and Parent Relations offices. 

• William S. Long Building houses the Martha and Spencer Love School of 
Business. Renovated in 1995, it features an economics computer lab. 



CAMPUS AND FACILITIES 

classrooms, a student/faculty lounge and offices for accounting, business and 
economics faculty. Constructed in 1966, the building was named in memory of 
William S. Long, first president of the college. 

• Mooney Building v^as donated to Elon in 1926 by M. Orban jr., in memory of his 
father-in-law, the Reverend Issac Mooney This building houses faculty offices, 
classrooms, the LaRose Resources Center, computer labs and the Curriculum 
Resources Center. 

• The Caroline Powell Building, named in honor of Miss Caroline Powell, was 
completed in 1970. In 1991 with a bequest from Harvey Mebane Allen, major 
renovations were made to the first fioor, creating the Admissions Center. The 
second and third fioors contain classrooms, physics labs and faculty offices. 

• Whitley Memorial Auditorium, first used for Commencement in 1924, has 

a seating capacity of approximately 500. Faculty and administrative offices 
are located on the north end of the building. 

Residence Halls 

• John Barney Hall houses 48 students. This three-story brick building was 
dedicated in 1966 and named in memory of John W. Barney, who was a 
member of the Elon College faculty for 33 years. 

• Ned F. Brannock Hall, housing 48 students, is a three-story brick structure 
named in memory of Dr. Ned F. Brannock, a member of the Elon College 
faculty for more than 50 years. It was dedicated in 1966. 

• Carolina Hall, built in 1956, houses 126 students. Congregational Christian 
Churches in North Carolina pledged the funds for this three-story brick building. 

• Chandler Hall houses 93 students. It was constructed in 1982 in honor of 
Wallace L. Chandler '49, a trustee of Elon College and senior vice president 
of Universal Leaf Tobacco Company, Inc., of Richmond, Virginia. 

• Colclough Hall is designed to house either men or women. Constructed 
in 1982, it has a capacity of 109 persons. It was named in memory of 
George D. Colclough '26, through a gift by Royall H. Spence Jr '42, and 
his wife, Luvene Holmes Spence '43. Mr. Spence is a trustee emeritus 

of Elon College. Mr. Colclough was a trustee of Elon College and a well-known 
business leader in Burlington. 

• East Campus Apartments, completed in 1989, consist of six buildings, housing 
32 students each. Reserved for upper-classmen, the facility offers an alternative 
to traditional residence hall accommodations. 

• Fraternities and Sororities are housed in several residences owned by the 
college, in residence hall suites and in a fraternity/sorority court of six 
buildings completed in 1989. 

• A.L Hook Hall, housing 32 students, was named for Dr. A.L. Hook who was 
a member of the Elon College faculty for more than 50 years. Built in 1966, 
it is a three-story brick residence hall. 

• The Jordan Complex is named in honor of John M. Jordan, Alamance County 
businessman. Built in 1980 and 1984, the complex houses 268 male and female 



11 



12 



E L N COLLEGE 

Students in two-room suites. The complex also contains a commons building 
with study, lounge and laundry facilities. 

• Maynard Hall is a residence hall for 1 16 students. Constructed in 1982, it was 
named in honor of Reid and Grace Maynard. Mr. Maynard was a trustee of 
Elon College and chairman of the board of Tower Hosiery Mills, Burlington, 
North Carolina. 

• North Hall located near the Harper Center, houses 32 male students. 

• Sloan Hall, a three-story brick structure, built in 1960 and housing 94 students, 
was named in honor of Dr. W.W. Sloan and Bessie Pickett Sloan, members of 
the Elon College faculty for 25 years. 

• Leon Edgar Smith Hall is a three-story residence hall built in 1957 to house 126 
students. The building was named for Dr LE. Smith, former President of the college. 

• Staley Hall, Moffitt Hall, Harper Center and Harden Dining Hall were completed in 
1968. Staley Hall houses 200 students and Moffitt Hall, 104 students. The two 
residence halls are joined by Harper Center, which contains Harden Dining Hall 
and lounge. These buildings were named in memory of Dr. W.W. Staley Dr. E.L. 
Moffitt and Dr. W.A. Harper, three past presidents of Elon College. They are 
located on North Campus. 

• Virginia Hall, a three-story brick structure built in 1 956, houses 86 students. 
Congregational Christian Churches in Virginia pledged the money to pay for 
this residence hall. 

• West Hall is a three-story brick structure adjacent to the Carlton Building. 
The oldest building on Elon's campus, it houses 94 female students. 

Athletic Facilities 

Koury Center 

Named for the Koury family of Burlington, the Koury Center encompasses 
Alumni Memorial Gymnasium, Jordan Gymnasium, Beck Pool, Stewart Fitness 
Center and classrooms and offices for faculty and athletic staff. A sunlit, two-story 
concourse connects Alumni Memorial Gymnasium with Jordan Gymnasium, 
the pool and the fitness center. 

• Alumni Memorial Gymnasium was built in 1949 as a memorial to Elon alumni 
who lost their lives in the two World Wars. The gymnasium, which seats 1,900 
for sporting events, was extensively renovated in 1993 and will seat 2,500 for 
college convocations. 

• Stewart Fitness Center- Completed in 1994, the 54,000 square-foot fitness center 
includes racquetball courts, weight rooms, aerobic dance studios and a human 
performance lab, as well as locker rooms, classrooms and a commons area. 

• Beck Pool - Built in 1 970, the seven-lane, Olympic-size, indoor swimming pool 
was named in honor of A. Vance Beck. 

• Jordan Gymnasium - Named for Sen. B. Everett Jordan, Jordan Gymnasium is 
used primarily for teaching and recreation. It was built in 1970. 



CAMPUS AND FACILITIES 

Athletic Fields include 50 acres of practice and playing fields, situated around the 
campus. There is adequate space for all sports. 

Bakatsias Soccer Field, provided in 1984 by George, Terry and Johnny Bakatsias 
in honor of their parents, is one of the finest soccer facilities in the area. 

John Koury Field House was constructed in 1980 through the generosity 
of Ernest and Maurice Koury in memory of their father. The building provides 
! dressing facilities for Elon's football and baseball teams as well as a modern 
: training room, laundry and coaches' dressing room. 

Newsome Field is a modern baseball stadium donated in 1977 by Webb Newsome 
'37, and his wife, Jessie Cobb Newsome '36. A member of the Elon College Sports 13 
Hall of Fame, Webb Newsome was outstanding in baseball, football and boxing 
while at Elon. 

Jimmy Powell Tennis Center, a 12-court, championship tennis complex, 
was built in 1988 and is one of the finest small-college tennis complexes 
in the nation. 

Rudd Field, a multipurpose athletic field named for Clyde Rudd Sr. '37, is used 
for football, softball and intramural sports. 

Recreational Areas 

• Lake Mary Nell, a five-acre lake near the center of campus, was named in honor 
of Mary Nell Jennings, daughter of Elon College Trustee Maurice Jennings and 
Patricia Gabriel. 

• Elon College Lodge and Botanical Preserve was acquired by the college 

in 1984. Located one mile from the campus, the 25-acre tract is a natural 
habitat and outdoor laboratory for botany zoology and ecology students. 
In addition to the lodge building, there is a picnic shelter and a building 
that is used as a field classroom. 

Support Facilities 

LaRose Resources Center was named in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar H. LaRose 

and Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Hettel, parents of Elon trustee Robert E. LaRose 

;- and his wife, Gail Hettel LaRose. Located in Mooney Building, the center provides 

' instructional support to faculty tutorial services to students, audiovisual materials 

and equipment, computer equipment and software and satellite TV services. 

East Building was acquired by the college in 1978. it is used for maintenance 
storage and central receiving. It also houses the office of the Director of Facilities 
Management. A gymnasium and dance studio are located in the facility 

R.N. Ellington Health Center provides health services for students and includes 
multiple examination rooms and offices for the professional staff. 

Maynard House is the residence of the college president. It is located a short 
distance from campus. The home was bequeathed to the college through the 
estate of Reid and Grace Maynard in 1988. 



E L N COLLEGE 

McEwen Memorial Dining Hall, completed in 1956, was built as a memorial 
to James H. McEwen, an industrial and civic leader in Burlington, North Carolina. 
The first floor accommodates more than 250 students in a modern and attractive 
cafeteria and also contains a smaller dining room for special luncheon meetings. 
On the second floor is an additional dining hall/banquet room large enough to 
accommodate 300 people. 

Iris Holt McEwen Library was completed in the summer of 1968. Open stacks 
contain a well-rounded collection of more than 300,000 volume equivalents 
including extensive audio visual and microform holdings. Approximately 60,000 
government documents have been added to the collection since the library 
14 became a government depository in 1971 . The state-of-the-art computerized 

catalog system, called IRIS (Information Retrieval In Seconds), allows students 
to use one of 12 computer terminals in the library or any of the college's VAX- 
connected terminals on campus to gain instant access to six Piedmont-area 
college libraries. 

Power Plant provides heat for the entire college. 

Moseley Center 

Moseley Center is named in honor of Elon alumnus Furman Moseley and his wife, 
Susan. The 74,000 square-foot campus center, which opened January 1995, is a 
place where students can relax and gather with friends. It features office space 
for student organizations as well as two large resource rooms. Mail services, the 
campus bookstore, a bank machine, the Octagon Cafe and a large multi-purpose 
auditorium are also located in the center. For entertainment, students can watch 
television on a large screen in one of four lounges, relax in front of the fireplace 
or visit the game room. 

• Resources for student organizations — Moseley Center houses the Student 
Government Association and Student Union Board offices as well as the offices 
for other student organizations such as Tlie Pendulum (newspaper), WSOE 
(radio station) and Elon Volunteers! In addition, students can use two large 
resource work rooms that feature two small conference rooms, large tables 
and file space. 

• McKinnon Hall, named in honor of Elon trustee and alumnus Bob McKinnon '62 
and his wife, Delia, is a 500-seat auditorium that can be divided into as many 
as four smaller meeting rooms. 

• Octogon Cafe offers a variety of food, including salads, hot and cold sand- 
wiches, pizza, snacks and desserts. Students can choose to eat inside or 
outside on the brick terrace. 

Some Elon College buildings, rooms, and facilities are named for individuals 
who contributed outstanding service to the institution. Facilities are usually 
marked with a brass plaque giving the date, the name of the facility, and in some 
cases, the donor of the facility. As buildings and other facilities become obsolete 
or the needs of the college change, the brass plaques are added to the college 
archives, preserving in perpetuity the memory of those honored. 



CAMPUS AND FACILITIES 

Visitor Information 

visitors to the college are welcome at all times. The administrative offices 
are open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. The admissions 
office is also open Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until noon. Administrative officers 
and members of the faculty are available at other times by appointment made 
I in advance. 

Travel Information 

Elon College is in the town of Elon College, North Carolina, a community 
adjacent to Burlington, 1 5 miles east of Greensboro, 64 miles west of Raleigh, 1 5 

close to Interstate 85/40. It is accessible to airline services in Greensboro and 
Raleigh/Durham. The telegraph address is Burlington, and the college is served 
by the Burlington telephone exchange. The number at the main switchboard is 
910-584-971 1, and the FAX number for admissions is 910-538-3986. 




0. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



Academic Program 

The academic program at Elon College prepares qualified students to enter 
\ graduate and professional schools or readies students to begin work in such 
I fields as business, communications, teaching, public service and allied health. 
I The bachelor's degree consists of a major field of concentration in the liberal 
I arts or in a professional or pre -professional area, a general studies program 
i and elective courses. 



Degrees and Major Fields of Concentration 

Elon offers courses leading to the graduate degrees of Master of Business 
Administration and Master of Education and the undergraduate degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Science. 

The Master of Business Administration program requires 36 semester hours 
of graduate credit. Students are encouraged to apply regardless of undergraduate 
major. The Master of Education program requires 30 semester hours of graduate 
credit in Elementary Grades or Special Education. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is awarded in the following fields: Art, Biology 
Chemistry, Communications (Broadcast and Corporate), Computer Science, 
Economics, Education (Elementary, Middle, Secondary— various subject areas, 
Special Education/Learning Disabilities), English, French, History, Human 
Services, International Studies, Journalism, Mathematics, Music, Music Perfor- 
mance, Philosophy Physics, Political Science, Psychology Public Administration, 
i Religious Studies, Science Education, Social Science Education, Sociology 
Spanish and Theatre Arts. 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is awarded in the following field: Music Theatre 

The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded in the following fields: Accounting, 
Biology Business Administration (Management, Finance, Marketing, International 
Management and Management Information Systems), Chemistry Environmental 
Studies, Health Education, Leisure/Sport Management, Mathematics, Medical 
Technology, Music Education, Physical Education, Physics and Sports Medicine. 

Minor Fields of Concentration 

Candidates for the bachelor's degree may elect a minor concentration 
consisting of at least 16 semester hours. 



17 



E L N C L L E G E 

The following minor fields are available: Accounting, African/African- 
American Studies, Anthropology, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, 
Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Dance, Economics, English, 
Film Studies, French, Geography, History, Human Services, International Studies, 
Journalism/Communications, Leisure/Sport Management, Mathematics, Music, 
Philosophy, Physical Education, Physical Education (Coaching), Physics, Political 
Science, Psychology, Public Administration, Religious Studies, Sociology Spanish, 
Sports Medicine (Athletic Training, Exercise/Sports Science), Studio Art, Theatre 
Arts and Women's Studies. 

18 General Studies 

General Studies courses at Elon College provide students the opportunity 
to acquire the skills, experiences and knowledge needed to obtain the broad 
philosophical, aesthetic, historical and scientific bases for understanding and 
evaluating human experience. The college offers all students a broad range of 
experience in four areas: 

The First-Year Core helps students develop the ability to (1) think clearly and 
critically, (2) write clear, correct English prose, (3) evaluate quantitative informa- 
tion, improve mathematical reasoning skills and enhance appreciation of the value 
of mathematics, and (4) develop an understanding of personal well-being and 
lifelong diversity and the possibilities for human communication and cooperation. 

The Experiential Learning requirement encourages students to engage the 
world about them actively and to reflect insightfully about those observations. 
It is the most visible recognition in the General Studies program of the wholeness 
of a liberal education. 

The Liberal Studies area emphasizes that an important goal of an under- 
graduate education is adaptability since the future will include not only evident 
problems but the unforeseen. The four sub-areas in Liberal Studies (expression, 
civilization, society and science/analysis) reflect a broad and diversified curricu- 
lum designed to prepare students for a future of continued intellectual growth. 

The Advanced Studies courses give breadth in upper-level courses. The 
Interdisciplinary Seminar, which explores subjects from multiple viewpoints, 
is an appropriate capstone of a General Studies curriculum that promotes both 
breadth and depth of learning. 

General Studies are by nature cumulative and developmental. Thus Elon 
College students will revisit these themes throughout their college years from 
initial enrollment to graduation. 

The Martha and Spencer Love School of Business 

Established in 1985, the Love School of Business is an outgrowth of an 
endowment gift to Elon College from the Martha and Spencer Love Foundation. 

The Love School of Business builds upon the liberal arts tradition of Elon 
College and provides undergraduate and graduate students the educational 
opportunities that will prepare them for business careers and civic leadership. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

The Business School offers undergraduate-level majors in Accounting, 
Business Administration (concentrations in Management, Marketing, Finance, 
International Management and Management Information Systems), Economics 
and a graduate degree in Business Administration (MBA). 

Specific requirements for Accounting, Business Administration and Economics 
are listed under Courses of Instruction. 

Professional Programs 

Elon College offers professional programs in Accounting, Business 
Administration, Communications, Computer Science, Education, Human 19 

Services, Journalism, Music, Public Administration and Medical Technology. 
These programs prepare graduates entering beginning-level professional posi- 
tions. Qualified graduates may wish to continue their studies in graduate school. 

Preprofessional Programs 

Elon College offers programs that prepare students for professional studies 
in such fields as dentistry, engineering, lav^, medicine and theology. Students 
entering any pre-professional program should plan carefully using the catalog 
of the professional school they v^^ish to enter as a specific guide to choosing 
courses at Elon College. In addition to the preparation students receive through 
the regular academic curriculum, Elon offers a preprofessional advising program 
that emphasizes careful academic advising, special programs and workshops and 
assistance in the graduate application process. The Academic Advising Center 
staff is available to assist students in this planning. 

Pre-engineering 

Elon offers a pre-engineering program that allows students to undertake 
a sequence of courses emphasizing math, physics and chemistry. 

Students may transfer to an engineering school after two years. While there is 
the potential for a qualified student to transfer to any engineering school, the pre- 
engineering program at Elon College has been approved by the Subcommittee on 
Engineering Transfer for transfer to the engineering programs at North Carolina 
A&T State University, North Carolina State University and the University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte. Qualified students completing Elon's program receive 
preferential consideration for transfer to any of these engineering schools. 

A three-year pre-engineering program is available for those students who 
have strong potential for pursuing an engineering degree but who do not have 
the math preparation necessary to take calculus. First-year students may take 
college algebra in the fall semester and calculus in the spring semester 

Prelaw 

The Association of Law Schools embraces two educational objectives for 
undergraduate law students: First, the student should learn to reason logically; 



E L N COLLEGE 

second, the student should learn to express thoughts clearly and concisely both 
orally and in writing. While law schools do not require a specific undergraduate 
major, several majors at Elon prepare students for admission to law school. Eton 
faculty members help students choose specific courses and curriculum tracks that 
increase students' chances for acceptance into law school. They also advise 
students in the selection of law schools, preparation for the Law School 
Admissions Test (LSAT) and the application procedure. 

Through programs offered by the Prelaw Society, students discuss career 
opportunities with attorneys, judges and law enforcement officers. The Prelaw 
Society also arranges visits to area law schools and offers programs on taking 
20 the LSAT and applying to law school. 

Premedicai and Predental 

Elon's premedicai program prepares students for entry into schools of 
dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathy pharmacy podiatry, veterinary 
medicine and other health-related professions. 

Elon's Premedicai Student Evaluation Committee is designed to guide 
and advise students who are interested in pursuing medical and health-related 
professions. The committee is composed of faculty members from Elon, Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine and Duke University Medical Center. The committee 
monitors each student's academic progress and offers helpful advice on choosing 
medical professions and applying to graduate and medical schools, it assists 
students with the application process and provides letters of recommendation 
and a practice interview session. 

Students interested in a medically related career should meet with the 
premedicai advisor and plan the course of study as soon as possible. Although 
a concentration of the student's academic work will be in the sciences, medical 
and professional schools seek students with well-rounded academic experiences 
and well-developed critical thinking skills. 

Scholarships assisting premedicai students are available through the 
Elon Science Fellows Program. Students are encouraged to join and actively 
participate in the Lincoln Premedicai Society Meetings of the Society are held 
monthly, except during Winter Term. Numerous medical professionals are chosen 
and invited by the Society's Executive Committee to present programs of interest 
at the meetings. 

Preministerial 

(Any Full-time Christian Vocation) 

The educational program at Elon College provides opportunities for students 
to prepare for the various aspects of Christian ministry. Although no particular 
major is required, many courses and other educational and service experiences 
permit students to explore their interest in and fitness for religious vocations. 
In general, for church-related vocations, students may major in Religious Studies 
or any of the liberal arts areas. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Evening School 

Undergraduate and graduate-level courses are also offered during the evening. 
While any student may enroll in courses at these times, evening courses are 
especially convenient for students who work during the day By attending classes 
solely at night, students may earn the Master of Business Administration, the 
Master of Education and undergraduate majors in business administration and 
accounting. Students may earn other undergraduate majors through a combination 
of day and evening classes. 

Transitional Program 21 

The Transitional Program helps students make the transition from high school 
to college by providing special advising and special courses in the basic concepts 
of mathematics and communication skills. The program offers individual assis- 
tance by tutors and self-paced programs through the LaRose Resources Center 

Free Peer Tutoring 

Free peer tutoring is offered to all students in most subjects through the 
LaRose Resources Center. 

Writing Program 

Elon College has a campus Writing Program and a Writing Center The 
program and the center work concurrently to support and enhance student 
writing at all levels and in all areas of the college's academic program through 
sponsorship of writing contests and other activities. Students who are just 
beginning a paper or who have a rough draft can visit the Writing Center 
Sunday through Friday for advice and guidance from the trained student staff 

Elon 101 

Elon 101 is a specially designed academic advising course/program that 
introduces first semester students to college life. Among topics discussed are 
time management, study skills and how to become involved in campus activities. 
An extended orientation to college, the course is co-taught by the students' 
academic advisor plus a student teaching assistant. The class is limited in size 
to 15 students. The course meets weekly during the first semester and offers one 
semester hour of general college credit upon successful completion. Grading for 
this course is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. 

High School Credit Bank Program 

This program allows students to earn college credit before entering college 
through the completion of two summer session courses at Elon, and two courses 
at Elon during each semester of the high school senior year. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Leaders for the Twenty-First Century Programs 

The North Carolina Teaching Fellows Program 

Elon College is one of only two private colleges selected by the North Carolina 
Teaching Fellows Commission to offer a Teaching Fellows program, and one of 
only 15 institutions throughout the state. North Carolina Teaching Fellows are 
selected by the Public School Forum of North Carolina, which awards approxi- 
mately 400 fellowships annually North Carolina high school students interested in 
the teaching profession apply to the North Carolina Teaching Fellows Commission 
and are awarded grants through a selective interview process. 

22 The Teaching Fellows' experience takes place in the context of Elon's highly 

successful teacher education program. Faculty work closely with students as 
mentors and academic advisors. In their junior and senior years, Teaching Fellows 
put their skills into practice by serving as peer advisors for entering education 
majors. All Teaching Fellows are allowed to participate in the Elon Honors 
program and receive Honors designation upon graduation provided they complete 
all requirements. 

The Teaching Fellows experience at Elon is a four-year program requiring 
participation in the following: 

• Specially designed leadership courses 

• Internships 

• Study/travel to major U.S. metropolitan areas 

• A semester of study in London 

• Special field trip, lecture series 

• Capstone seminar examining local, state and national issues and their 
effect on education 

• Elon Experiences Transcript 

For more information on the North Carolina Teaching Fellows Program, 
see page 50. 

The Honors Program 

The Honors Program assists academically superior students to attain greater 
breadth and depth in their General Education studies. 

Honors Fellows can enroll in challenging courses that emphasize writing, 
critical analysis, problem solving and independent research taught by innovative 
faculty Class size is generally limited to 20. Since the program is collegewide in 
scope, most Honors courses are taken in disciplines differing from one's major. 

Other features of the program include: Early preregistration privileges, 
off-campus retreats. Honors housing arrangements and opportunities to attend 
Honors conferences and present research. Honors graduates often pursue further 
study or graduate training. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Most Students are selected to enter the program as freshmen, but one can apply 
for admission as a continuing student by seeing the Honors Director Students may 
also be referred by professors. Honors awards are renewable for up to four years, 
providing the recipient successfully completes a minimum course load of 30 
semester hours for each academic year, maintains a cumulative grade point 
average of 3.2 or above and satisfies the requirements of the Honors program. 

To receive Honors Program recognition at graduation, students must complete 
a minimum of 25 hours of Honors experience, as listed below, and achieve a 3.2 
grade point average overall and in all Honors courses taken. 

Students who fail to maintain an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.2 
or better are subject to dismissal from the program and all benefits associated 
with it. 

Requirements for Honors Program Recognition 

Category 1: Students are required to take 9 semester hours from the following 
courses: 

(1) Honors Elon 101 (1 sh) 

(2) Honors GS 1 10: Global Experience (4 sh) 

(3) One 100-200 level Honors course (4 sh) 

Category II: Students are required to take 12 semester hours chosen from the 
following courses: 

(1) 200-400 level Honors courses 

(A maximum of 4 semester hours from the 200 level) 

(2) 300-400 level non-Honors courses taken for Honors credit. (This may 
include scheduled department or General Studies courses, internships, 
independent study Plans must be submitted in writing and approved by 
Director before the course is taken. See Director for details.) 

(A maximum of 4 semester hours may be used in this manner) 

(3) Study abroad semester program participation (4 hours Honors credit) 
Winter/summer term (2 hours Honors credit) 

(A maximum of 4 semester hours may be used in this manner) 

(4) Experiential Honors credit 

Students may receive Honors credit (but not academic credit) for participat- 
ing in some of the many Honors Program Activities. See Director for details. 
(A maximum of 4 semester hours may be used in this manner) 

Category III: Students are required to take 4 semester hours from the following: 

Honors General Studies Seminar 

Senior (Junior, in some cases) Honors students would take an Honors section of 
the required upper-level General Studies Seminar or other approved upper-level 
General Studies Seminar. 

For information about Honors Scholarships, see page 50. 



23 



E L N COLLEGE 

The Isabella Cannon Leadership Program 

Emerging Leaders - All new Elon students have the opportunity to participate 
in the Emerging Leaders Program. Participants take leadership development 
workshops, attend cultural programs on campus, volunteer in the community, 
shadow a campus leader and join at least one campus organization. 

Isabella Cannon Leadership Fellows - Students who successfully complete 
the Emerging Leaders Program may apply to become Isabella Cannon Leadership 
Fellows. Fellows study and practice leadership, participate in a series of seminars, 
lead off-campus service projects through the Center for Service Learning, actively 
lead on campus through campus organizations and mentoring experiences, and 
24 have the opportunity to participate in studies abroad and internship programs. 

The program strives to foster leadership for students during the college years 
that can be extended to the future workplace and living community 

Enrichment Programs 

The Elon Experiences Transcript 

The Elon Experiences Transcript provides a co-curricular transcript that 
enhances job and graduate school opportunities. The transcript documents 
leadership development, service learning, international and multi-cultural 
exposure and internship/co-op experiences during the college career. Elon 
Experiences help develop informed, productive, responsible and caring citizens- 
individuals equipped with an education that enriches personal lives and enhances 
professional careers. 

Leadership Development 

Special courses, service projects, organizational leadership and internships 
help students develop the characteristics that identify a leader in any field: strong 
character, good communications skills, self-confidence, the ability to make 
decisions, motivate others, solve problems and take risks. Leadership develop- 
ment programs are described more fully in the Student Life sections. 

Service Learning 

Acting on the college's commitment to civic responsibility and leadership, 
the Center for Service Learning and Elon Volunteers! offer programs and projects 
ranging from Habitat for Humanity to Study Buddies. Campus organizations 
participate in a variety of support and fund-raising programs, such as the Adopt- 
A-Highway clean-up program, CROP Walk, American Red Cross Blood Drive, 
Special Olympics and Oxfam America. 

International and Multicultural Exposure 

Examples of recent international experiences listed on Elon Experiences 
Transcripts include: semester programs in London, Japan, Spain; winter term 
in London, Costa Rica, Guadeloupe, Ireland, Belgium, France, Germany, Belize, 
Europe and Middle East; and summer study and travel in Europe, China and India. 
Multicultural experiences include: working with Habitat for Humanity to build 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

a house in Appalachia, spending winter term working with a service project 
in a Native American community and participating in a sociological study in 
an inner-city environment. 

Internship and Co-op Opportunities 

Through internships and co-op opportunities, Elon helps students to under- 
stand the values of productive work, develop the knowledge and skills to compete 
and progress in a meaningful job or earn money to meet financial obligations. 
Elon assists its students in meaningful career planning and preparation, and 
provides the resources and support needed for successful job placement and 
competitive career advancement after graduation. Over 54 percent of 1993 25 

Elon graduates participated in internships and co-ops. 

Study Abroad 

study abroad programs enhance the academic program and give students an 
opportunity to learn firsthand from other countries and cultures. Over 32 percent 
of 1994 Elon graduates participated in study abroad activities. The college offers 
a variety of such opportunities. 

Students may elect to spend a semester, either fall or spring, in London. By 
selecting from the broad range of courses offered, most of which are taught by 
British faculty, students can fulfill General Studies requirements. Through intern- 
ships and field research projects, students experience many dimensions of British 
culture. Students have access to the University of London's library and student 
union facilities. Fall and spring breaks permit extensive European travel. Elon 
students may spend a semester or a year in Japan at Nagasaki Wesleyan College 
or Kansai Gaidai Center for International Education, two settings for the study 
of Japanese language and culture. 

During the winter term the college offers a study/travel opportunity to 
England. This program allows students to spend approximately three weeks 
housed in London with opportunities for numerous excursions to historical and 
cultural sites in Great Britain. The college also offers other study/travel programs 
to various locations that vary from year to year. Some have spent the winter term 
in Costa Rica studying its language, history and culture, and in Belize, enrolled in 
a course that examines the country's unique history and culture. European studies 
include a course devoted to the unification of Europe and a course on World War 
11 with visits to Belgium, France, Germany, and the Netherlands. Other study 
abroad sites include Jamaica, Italy and Australia. All programs offer a wide range 
of course credit. 

Summer terms provide still other study abroad possibilities. The college offers 
language study in a number of countries through local universities. An arrangement 
with Southeast University in Nanjing, China, allows students to spend five weeks 
in language and cultural studies there. Students may choose to explore the culture 
of India through one of Elon's summer programs. These programs allow students 
the option of maximum free time during the remainder of the summer or the 
opportunity to attend an additional session of summer school. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Independent Study and Research 

Independent study and research is an integral part of the educational program 
at Elon College. With the assistance of faculty members, students get the chance 
to develop hypotheses and think creatively Those who plan to attend graduate 
school benefit from the research experience. By providing an atmosphere for one- 
on-one learning with their professors, Elon gives students a unique opportunity to 
discover the experience of being a professional in their chosen field. Elon students 
have showcased their research efforts in the Student Undergraduate Research 
Forum (SURF) in which the participants gave a presentation of their research 
projects and then responded to questions from the audience. Students also 
26 have presented research papers off campus. 

Military 

ROTC 

The Reserves Officers Training Corps program offers a military science 
curriculum leading to commission in the U.S. Army upon graduation. This 
course offers built-in financial assistance and special scholarship programs. 

Credit for Veterans 

This program offers military personnel on active duty the opportunity to 
submit CLEP credit by contacting their Education Officers or USAFl in Madison, 
Wisconsin, for testing. Credit for work completed may be transferred to other 
accredited post-secondary institutions, and service experience is accepted for 
physical education requirements. 

Career Services 

The following Career Services programs are available to help students plan 
their futures, explore careers and become adept at finding employment. 

Career Planning 

Awareness of personal values, interests, skills and occupational information is 
necessary to make academic and career decisions. Professional career counselors 
assist students with their major and career choices by providing individualized 
career counseling, assessment inventories, computerized career guidance and 
information systems, occupational/educational information, career preview 
programs and workshadowing opportunities. COE 110 "Choosing a Career/ 
Major," a one-hour elective credit course, is for students exploring major and 
career options. Catalogs, a computerized graduate school locator and computer- 
ized study guides for ORE and GMAT are available to help students make deci- 
sions about postgraduate education. 

Placement Services 

Placement Services assist students who have identified their career direction and 
who are finalizing their career search. Services for upper-class and graduate 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Students include classes in job search skills (COE 310 "Securing A Job"), resume 
referral to employers, on-campus interviews, individual counseling, job vacancy 
lists, a credentials file mih options for inclusion of academic transcripts, resumes 
and references. Workshops on resume writing, job interviewing and other special 
career topics are offered. Additional resources and programs include occupational 
and employer information, career fairs, specialty work showing experiences and 
mentoring programs. 

Internships or Co-ops 

Elon College strongly supports programs that allow students to relate their 
classroom learning to work experience. Active cooperative education and 27 

internship programs provide opportunities throughout the academic year 
and during summers for students to explore careers, to integrate theory with 
practice and to examine future job possibilities. In each learning experience, 
the student's academic or career-related work assignment is supervised and 
evaluated by Elon faculty. Internships are directly related to majors or minors, 
may be full- or part-time and paid or unpaid. Most departments offer internship 
credits. Co-ops offer pay, may be full- or part-time, may be repeated and count 
toward elective credit. The class COE 310 "Securing A Job" is required of 
co-op students. 

Eligibility Requirements: Students must be a junior or senior, have a 2.0 
minimum GPA, have completed departmental prerequisites and have approval 
;' from the Faculty Sponsor/Experiential Education Director Those participating 
in co-ops must enroll in the COE 310 class. 

Acddem/c Support Services 

Elon College seeks to meet the individual academic needs of all students. 
In order to accomplish this, the college places emphasis on a variety of academic 
support services. 

Academic Advising Center 

Students are assigned faculty advisors before they enter Elon College. An 
important part of the Academic Advising Center's service is Elon 101 , a freshman 
advising course. Freshmen not enrolling in Elon 101 are assigned advisors based 
on whether or not they have expressed an interest in a major Students without 
clear career goals may be counseled in selecting a major and are assigned 
advisors within the major departments. Special advising assistance is also 
available for students in preprofessional programs such as prelaw, premedical 
and pre-engineering. Transfer students are assigned an academic advisor 
in the department of their majors at the time they enter 

Closely associated with the Academic Advising Center is the Career Services 
Center. Testing programs, an extensive careers library and career counseling help 
students explore career opportunities and correlate academic course work with 
career objectives. 



28 



E L N COLLEGE 

Special Needs Students 

Although Elon has no formal program for students with learning or other 
disabilities, the college does attempt to make reasonable classroom accommoda- 
tions for students with special needs. Students who wish to discuss such needs 
should contact Priscilla Haworth, Section 504 Coordinator, in Alamance 101. 

LaRose Resources Center 

Located in Mooney Building, the LaRose Resources Center is designed 
to meet the learning needs of a wide variety of students. Services provided 
include: tutorial assistance for most academic areas, computer-assisted instruc- 
tion, microcomputer stations, a non-print media production facility videotaping 
equipment and viewing room, a television production studio and an extensive 
variety of audiovisual equipment and materials. 

Library 

McEwen Library contains a well-rounded collection of approximately 180,000 
volumes, 1,700 periodical subscriptions, 60,000 government documents and 
extensive audiovisual and microform holdings. The IRIS (Information Retrieval 
In Seconds) on-line catalog is accessible through any campus computer terminal 
that is linked to Elon's VAX mainframe. The catalogs of six Piedmont-area college 
libraries are available on-line. The library seats approximately 400. 

Computer Facilities 

Elon's academic computer resources include two Hewlett Packard 9000's and 
two Novell networks. The five PC computer labs located in Mooney Carlton and 
Alamance buildings have 120 microcomputer workstations that are connected 
to the HP's, the on-line library catalog and the Novell networks. There is also 
an Apple Macintosh lab in the Faith Rockefeller Model Center for the Arts and 
an Apple 11 lab in Mooney. Available languages and software applications include 
Pascal, C, Lisp, APL, Prolog, Forth, Fortran, Microsoft Office Professional, Lotus, 
dBase IV, WordPerfect, and the statistical packages SAS and SPSS. Access to the 
Internet is available. Academic computing facilities are open to all students at no 
additional charge. 



STUDENT LIFE 



Student Life 




student life is more than classrooms, laboratories, study desks and libraries. 29 

Elon's goal is to educate the whole person, and students have many opportunities to 
f, achieve this goal. Experiences in the residence halls, campus organizations, student 
government, spontaneous social groups, Greek organizations, and on athletic and 
intramural teams are critically important in a student's total development. 

By participating in those co-curricular activities that interest them or are 
complementary to their academic programs, students can develop important 
insights about genuine communication, self-government, freedom, trust, honor 
and critical judgment. Programs designed by well-qualified faculty staff and 
students provide opportunities for students to develop a meaningful concept, 
a sense of career, a philosophy of life, and sound ethical and moral principles. 

Student Service 

Personal Counseling 

Under the direction of the Director of Counseling Services, counselors and 
the counseling support staff are available to provide help to Elon students. 
' Support groups and therapy groups, composed of students concerned about the 
, same issues, are available for those interested. In each of the two campus areas— 
I Main and North— there is an Area Director, a master's-level staff member trained 
5 in counseling or a related field. In addition, within each residence hall there is a 
I staff of specially-trained community development coordinators, usually one per 
,;• floor. CDCs live on the hall and help students learn more about Elon College, 
> themselves and other students. Supporting the residence hall staffs are personnel 
associated with the Division of Student Life. 

Health Service 

The college maintains a health service, which is open from 8:00 a.m. to noon and 
1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. each class day A health service fee covers most routine health 
and nursing services and treatment by the college physicians. This fee does not cover 
cases requiring a physician other than a college physician, emergency treatment at a 
local hospital, laboratory tests or procedures conducted off campus and medications. 

All students must present evidence that they are covered by health insurance 
before they can enroll in classes. All undergraduate and graduate students taking 
six or more credit hours may purchase a health insurance policy through the 
college. All students must submit a campus health form and immunization records. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Campus Living 

There are 2 1 residence halls, 2 theme houses, 8 fraternity and sorority houses 
and an apartment complex on campus with a variety of living arrangements. Each 
room is furnished with beds, bureaus, desks, blinds and chairs. The student brings 
pillows, blankets, bedspreads, bed linens, towels and other articles such as 
wastebaskets, rugs and lamps. Residence halls open at 2:00 p.m. the day before 
registration each semester. They are closed during Thanksgiving, Christmas, 
spring and summer vacations, except for those residence halls occupied during 
summer school. Rooms will be vacated and residence halls locked no later than 
noon on the day following the last night of exams. 

30 Provided on-campus housing space is available, all first-year students must live 

in the residence halls unless they are living with their parents, relatives or spouse. 
All residence life policies and procedures for living on campus are presented in the 
License Agreement, which the student receives and acknowledges when applying 
for campus housing. The college helps students find off-campus housing, but does 
not serve as an intermediary in any way between the student and his/her landlord. 

Students have access to coin-operated laundry facilities on campus. 

Meals are served in the college dining halls, which open for the evening meal 
before the first day of registration, and close after the noon meal on the last day 
of final examinations. For vacation periods, college dining halls close after the 
noon meal of the last day of classes and open for the evening meal the day before 
classes resume. 

Room Reservation and Security Deposits 

New Students 

Please refer to the Admissions, Finances and Financial Aid section 
of this catalog. 

Continuing Resident Students 

Students wishing to return to the residence halls for the fall semester must 
submit a $100 reservation fee during the spring housing selection period an- 
nounced by the Office of Residence and Greek Life during the spring semester 
Students wishing to cancel their housing assignment must follow the procedures 
presented in the License Agreement they received when they applied for housing. 
The refund of the reservation fee and security deposit are covered in this agreement 
also. Any questions can be directed to the Office of Residence and Greek Life. 

Commuter Students 

Programs that meet the particular needs of commuter students are offered 
through the Office of Student Life. The college encourages commuters to become 
involved in campus functions and organizations. Student lounges and a TV room 
are located on the first floor of Moseley Center along with lockers. Commuter 
students may purchase meal plans or the Elon Card for dining on campus and 
may buy a parking permit if they wish to park on campus. 



STUDENT LIFE 

New Student Orientation 

New Student Orientation is held just before the fall term begins. All entering 
students participate in the program, which is designed to prepare them for the 
i college experience. Orientation includes small group activities as well as aca- 
:: demic advising, testing, registration, lectures and social activities. A modified 
; orientation program is offered for students entering in winter and spring terms. 

J In addition, the admissions office sponsors another orientation program every 

; April for those students accepted by Elon who plan to attend the following fall. At 

;. that time, students may preregister, apply for on campus housing and select a 

f roommate. 

rhe Student Government Association 

The Student Government Association (SGA) represents the interests of the 
' Elon student body. The faculty and staff of the college fully support and cooperate 

with the SGA. Projects and proposals dealing with social, cultural and academic 
'■ life are promoted by the SGA President and the Student Senate. 

Students play a direct role in academic and social policy-making through 
voting membership on numerous college committees. The SGA Office is in 
'; Moseley Center. SGA is advised by the Director of Student Activities. 

Judicial System 

The Judicial System is a code of student living under which all students 
should conduct themselves as responsible members of the college community 
It is intended to be a code of integrity for students. For complete details about 
the Judicial System at Elon, see the Student Handbook. 

Campus Security 

, ; Campus Security is maintained by a professional security staff with student 

support working under the direct supervision of the Director of Campus Security 
The system works in close cooperation with the Public Safety Office of the Town 
of Elon College and the staff of the Division of Student Life. Student security 
guards are carefully selected and trained by the Director of Campus Security 

Emergency telephones are located in the rear gym "R" parking lot behind 
the campus powerhouse, in the Harper Center parking lot next to the sidewalk 
leading to the Greek houses, in the Jordan Center parking lot, at the Bakatsias 
Soccer Field (running track), at East Building near the tennis center, the Hook, 
Brannock and Barney parking lot, the Whitley parking lot, the colonnades 
between the LRC and Duke, the colonnades between Carlton and Whitley, 
the first fioor stairwell landing of Duke and the first floor southside stairwell 
of Powell. The phones in the parking areas are designed to be accessible from 
an automobile without leaving one's vehicle. 



31 



E L N COLLEGE 

The Office of Campus Security provides an escort service 24 hours a day. 
Students on campus call extension 2407 for this service; those off campus v\/ho 
need an escort upon returning to campus should dial 584-2407. 

In accordance with the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990, 
complete information regarding campus security policies and programs and 
campus crime statistics is available upon request from the Director of Public 
Information, 2600 Campus Box. 

Cultural Life 

32 Each year a variety of programs is offered for the cultural and intellectual 

enrichment of campus life. 

The Liberal Arts Forum, sponsored by the Student Government Association, 
schedules a number of lectures on current issues. 

The Black Cultural Society brings speakers, musical groups and dance 
ensembles to Elon each year. 

The Lyceum Series brings outstanding artists and performers to the campus 
during the year. 

The Young Artist Series brings up-and-coming artists to campus. 

The Classical Soiree Series, presented in the Yeager Recital Hall, brings 
outstanding artists to campus, often combining residency activities with a 
formal recital. Admission is free to the college community 

The James H. McEwen Jr. Visual Arts Series, named in honor of a former 
trustee and lifelong supporter of the arts, sponsors a number of visual art 
exhibits each year including fiber art, photography sculpture, linocuts, 
watercolors, oil paintings and multimedia abstract compositions. 

The Davidson Contemporary Print Exhibition, sponsored by Elon since 1990, 
is a national juried exhibition showcasing the current directions in printmaking 
in the United States. 

A number of distinguished scholars in various fields are invited to the campus 
each year to give lectures and seminars for the enrichment of the academic 
program. There are also recitals in the Faith Rockefeller Model Center for the Arts 
presented by members of the Fine Arts Department faculty and advanced students 
in music. Several band and orchestra concerts are scheduled. Plays and musicals 
presented by Elon students and by visiting drama groups are also a feature of the 
college's cultural offerings. 

The Student Union Board 

Social activities at the college are largely planned and coordinated by the 
Student Union Board, which is advised by the Director of Student Activities. 
An extensive program of social, club and special-interest activities is carried out 
during the year. Among these are movies, spring break trips, concerts, comedians,' 
special events and many other social activities. 



STUDENT LIFE 

Wose/ey Center 

Moseley Center is the center of college community life for the campus. This 
74,000 square-foot campus center was opened in fall 1994. Included in the facility 
are: the campus information desk and switchboard, two informal lounges, a 
television lounge, an art lounge, the campus post office, commuter lockers, a 
gameroom, the Campus Shop, the Octagon Cafe, the African-American Resource 
Room, several meeting rooms, a large multi-purpose auditorium with a stage, the 
student media, student offices for campus organizations and the Student Life staff 
offices. Also in the Moseley Center is a large resource room for all student 
organizations; the room contains a message center, file cabinets, art tables, 
conference areas and computers connected to the campus network. 33 

Religious Life 

Responsibility for college religious life rests with the Chaplain, who co- 
ordinates all on-campus religious programs. Voluntary religious services are 
held during the academic year. The Elon College Community Church, located 
just off the campus, is affiliated with the United Church of Christ and is open 
to all students for worship. Many denominations are represented on campus in 
the form of student organizations and adjunct clergy Most denominations have 
churches within a few miles of the campus. Groups meet regularly for discussions, 
social activities and service projects such as Habitat for Humanity The Chaplain's 
office is located in Moseley Center. 

leadership Development 

Elon offers all students leadership skills and opportunities to exercise civic 
responsibility. The Emerging Leaders Program is open to all students wishing to 
refine and further develop their leadership skills. After successful completion of 
the Emerging Leaders Program students may apply to become an Isabella Cannon 
Leadership Fellow. The Leadership Fellows Program offers students opportunities 
to study and practice leadership, participate in a series of seminars, lead service 
projects, actively lead on campus through campus organizations and mentoring 
experiences, and have the opportunity to participate in studies abroad and 
internship programs. 

Service Learning 

students have the opportunity to participate in diverse volunteer experiences 
through a student-run program called "Elon Volunteers!" Elon Volunteers! 
coordinates over 15 service programs in the local community In addition to these 
on-going programs, EV! sponsors a wide variety of one-time special events and 
service break trips. The mission of EV! is to provide all members of the Elon 
College campus the opportunity to develop an ethic of service by connecting 
campus and community through volunteer experiences. 

The Center for Service Learning is located in Moseley Center and provides 
resources for faculty to integrate service into their courses giving students the 
opportunity to serve and learn at Elon. 



E L N COLLEGE 



Honor Societies 

• Alpha Chi 
Membership in this national scholastic society is one of the highest honors an 
Elon student can attain for academic excellence. To be eligible for membership, 
a student must be a junior or senior, must be in good standing, and must have 
distinguished himself/herself through academic accomplishment. 

Alpha Epsilon Rho 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the journalism and communications 

programs 

Alpha Psi Omega 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the theatre arts programs 

Beta Beta Beta 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the biology program 

Epsilon Beta Epsilon 

Recognizes scholastic achievement by majors in economics and business courses 

Kappa Delta Pi 

Recognizes scholastic achievement by majors in education 

Kappa Mu Epsilon 

Recognizes achievement by majors in mathematics 

Lambda Pi Eta 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the field of communications 

Omicron Delta Epsilon 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the field of economics 

Omicron Delta Kappa 

Recognizes students, faculty alumni and outstanding citizens for exemplary 
character, service and leadership in campus life, and good citizenship within 
the academic and larger community 

Order of Omega 

Recognizes students, faculty staff and alumni for outstanding leadership, 

promotion of interfraternalism and service to the college and surrounding 

community 

Phi Alpha Theta 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in the history program 

Pi Gamma Mu 

The North Carolina Alpha chapter of Pi Gamma Mu, national social science honor 
society was chartered in 1929. Students and faculty members who attain distinc- 
tion in the social sciences at Elon are eligible for nomination into membership 

Psi Chi 

Recognizes achievement by majors in psychology 

Sigma Delta Pi , 

Recognizes achievement by majors in foreign languages 

Sigma Tau Delta 

Recognizes scholastic achievement in English 

Theta Alpha Kappa 

Recognizes students and faculty for scholastic achievement in the field 

of religious studies 



I' STUDENT LIFE 

Student Organizations and Activities 

Elon College offers students opportunities to become involved in numerous 
activities and organizations on campus. The range of these activities is consider- 
able. Students are encouraged to work with the Director of Student Activities to 
J start new organizations. Refer to the student handbook for a listing of all campus 
organizations and process for starting a new organization. 

Departmental 

Accounting Society, Alpha Kappa Psi, Association of Computing Machinery, 
;■ Health, Physical Education and Leisure Club, College Bowl, Human Services Club, 

Mathematics Association of America, Prelaw Society, Psychology Club, Society 
I of Professional Journalists, Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society 

Student North Carolina Association of Educators and Women in Communications. 

Greek 

There are 19 general fraternities and sororities at Elon. Fraternities include: 
Alpha Kappa Lambda, Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha order, Kappa Alpha Psi, 
'i Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Sigma Chi, Sigma Phi Epsilon 
and Sigma Pi. Sororities include: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Omicron Pi, Alpha 
Sigma Alpha, Alpha Xi Delta, Delta Sigma Theta, Phi Mu, Sigma Sigma Sigma, 
Zeta Phi Beta and Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Music 

Chamber Singers, Concert Choir, Elan, Emanons, Orchestra, Pep Band, 
'i Percussion Ensemble, Student Chapter of Music Educators National Conference 
and Symphonic Winds. 

Religious 

Baptist Student Union, Catholic Campus Ministry Elon College Gospel Choir, 
, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship and the Elon Hillel. 

Service 

BACCHUS (Boost Alcohol Conscientiousness Concerning the Health of 
University Students) and GAMMA (Greeks Advocating the Mature Management 
of Alcohol), Circle K (College Chapter of Kiwanis), Elon Volunteers!, EN- ACT 
!:;' (environmental action), Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Elon College Chapter of Habitat 
for Humanity and Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education (S.C.A.LE.). 

Sports 

Aikido Club, Men's Lacrosse Club, Elon Outdoor Extreme and Campus Recreation 

Cultural and Special Interest 

Black Cultural Society, College Bowl, Elon College Democrats, Elon Dance 
Organization, Elon College Republicans, Elon's Finest, Intercultural Relations, 



35 



E L N COLLEGE 



36 



Liberal Arts Forum, Residence Hall Association (RHA), Model UN, North Carolina 
Student Legislature, Students for Peace and Justice, Student Government Associa- 
tion and Student Union Board. 



Communications Media 

Media Board 

The Board is composed of students and members of the faculty and adminis- 
tration. It advises, guides and encourages all student media on campus. 

ECTV 

ECTV is a student operated TV station providing experience for students 
interested in all areas of communications. 

Colonnades 

The college literary magazine is published by students interested in creative 
expression, both verse and prose. 

The Pendulum 

The college newspaper, The Pendulum, is published weekly by a student staff. 

Phi Psi Cli 

The college yearbook is edited by members of the student body Its name. 
Phi Psi Cli, commemorates three former literary societies. 

Radio Station 

WSOE-FM, the campus radio station, operates each day and is staffed 
primarily by students. 

Wlio's Who 

Each year a committee composed of members of the faculty administration 
and student body elects students to be listed in the national publication Who's 
Who in American Colleges and Universities. Students are selected on the basis of 
scholarship, participation and leadership in academic and extracurricular activi- 
ties, citizenship and service to the college and promise of future usefulness. 

Campus Recreation 

The Office of Campus Recreation is service-oriented with a philosophy based 
on providing maximum recreational opportunities for students, faculty and staff at 
Elon College. From playing flag football, white water rafting, participating in an 
aerobics class, taking swim lessons, or special programs such as Adventures in 



STUDENT LIFE 

Leadership, the campus recreation program provides the opportunity for students 
to participate in a safe and enjoyable environment. 

The variety of programs range from formal structured leagues to informal 
activities. Participation in these activities gives students the opportunity to 
develop friendships and learn important lessons of sportsmanship, team building, 
cooperation, personal development and self-actualization. Elon values wellness 
and the lifelong importance of the wise use of leisure time. 

The Office of Campus Recreation is also student-development oriented and 
strives to provide an opportunity for students to transfer classroom theories into 
practical work experiences. Student leaders coordinate and manage all of the 
Campus Recreation programs. 

Aquatics 

The aquatics program consists of open swim times, scheduled swim times, 
a variety of aqua-fitness programs and swim lessons for all ages. 

Fitness 

The state-of-the-art fitness center and free-weight room allow for both 
unstructured and structured fitness programming. The college offers a diverse 
aerobics program. 

Intramurals 

Intramural events offer a variety of sport leagues and tournaments. Different 
divisions ranging from informal to competitive are available to meet the diverse 
levels of competition. In addition, co-rec leagues are available in all sports. 

Outdoor Programs 

Elon Outdoors consists of adventure trips, equipment check-out, and a 
resource information center. Individuals can participate in trips or utilize the 
resources and equipment available to plan their own trips. 

Open Recreation 

A variety of free-play time is available for those who prefer unstructured 
recreation pursuits. Three gyms, five racquetball courts, a pool, fitness center, 
commons areas, and several outdoor facilities are available for open recreation. 
In addition, a variety of equipment is available for check-out. 

Sports Clubs 

Sports Clubs are a variety of self-administered clubs that are based on 
students who share a common interest. Clubs may range from informal to 
competitive depending on the clubs' participants. New clubs are welcome 
to join existing clubs such as Aikido and Lacrosse. 



37 



38 



E L N COLLEGE 

Special Events 

A variety of short-term recreational and educational events are planned. 
Some of the events are the corporate sponsored theme weeks: Tlirkey Trot, 
Sports Trivia and Tour de Elon. 

Wellness 

To endorse the Wellness Model of Elon College the Office of Campus Recreation 
offers the Natural High Program. This program consists of wellness awareness 
programs as well as a peer health education program. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

A member of the National College Athletic Association Division II, Elon's 
men's teams compete with other colleges in football, basketball, baseball, tennis, 
golf, track, soccer and cross-country. Elon's women's teams compete in volley- 
ball, basketball, Softball, soccer, tennis and cross-country. 

Traditional Events 

Fall Convocation 

Each fall semester a prominent educator or civic leader is invited to speak 
to the student body and faculty 

New Student Convocation 

Each fall, as part of the new student orientation, all new students, parents 
and faculty gather in Koury Center for a convocation. 

Greek Week 

A time for relaxation, competition and fun is sponsored each spring by the 
Panhellenic and Interfraternity Councils. Contests of various kinds— tug of war, 
chariot races, dance competition and skits— as well as a service and an educa- 
tional speaker provide a well-rounded experience to promote Greek life. 

Homecoming 

Homecoming takes place in the fall, bringing back to the campus many former 
students. Entertainment includes: golf and tennis tournaments, a football game, 
the Alumni Banquet and the Homecoming dance. 

Family Weekend 

In the fall, parents and other family members are invited to visit the campus 
and participate in several events planned especially for them. Activities include 
a golf tournament, a college football game, as well as evening entertainment 
and excellent food. It is a great time for families to meet Elon faculty and 
administrators. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 



Admissions, Finances 
and Financial Aid 

Application Procedures 

Elon College admission packets are available from many high school guidance 
offices or directly from the Admissions Office of the college. Completed applica- 
tions should be returned with a nonrefundable $25 application fee, official SAT 
or ACT scores and transcripts of all high school credits and any post-secondary 
work attempted. 

Students who send applications to Elon are mailed a postcard to notify 
them that the application has been received. Elon operates on a modified rolling 
admission plan; applicants will hear from the Admissions Office four to six weeks 
after the application is received. Priority deadline is April 1. 

Admission Requirements 

Freshman admission is based on the high school record and class rank, 
SAT or ACT scores and recommendations if submitted. 

Degree candidates and special students must demonstrate intellectual 
promise and readiness for college. 

Applicants must prove their successful performance in a college preparatory 
curriculum. The following distribution of courses is recommended: 

English 4 units 

Math 3 or more units 

(Algebra I and II or Algebra I and Geometry are required) 

Science 2 or more units 

(including at least one lab science) 

Social Studies 2 or more units 

(including U.S. History) 

Foreign Language 2 or more units 

(of the same language) 

Students who have not had two years of one foreign language in high school 
must make up this deficiency by taking a first level 1 10 foreign language course. 
The course taken to remove this deficiency will not satisfy the General Studies 
requirements. 



39 



E L N COLLEGE 

All Resident Students 

To complete acceptance and reserve a room, an enrollment deposit of $200 
is requested within one month of acceptance. This deposit is credited to the 
student's account. 

Refund Policy 

For the fall semester, the enrollment deposit may be refunded in full by 
notifying the Office of Admissions in writing prior to May 1 . After that date, 
$50 will be refunded until August 1 . For the spring semester, the full amount is 
refundable until December 15. No refunds will be made after the deadline dates 
40 unless a physical disability prohibits the student from attending either semester; 

a doctor's statement would then be required. Exception to this policy must be 
authorized by the Dean of Admissions and Financial Planning. 

All Commuter Students 

To complete acceptance, an enrollment deposit of $50 is requested within one 
month of acceptance. It is not refundable after May 1 for the fall semester or after 
December 15 for the spring semester, except upon a doctor's statement of the 
applicant's inability to enroll. 

Entrance Examinations 

Applicants for admission to Elon College should have taken either the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board or 
the American College Test of the American College Testing Program. 

Application blanks, lists of testing centers, dates and rules for applications, 
fees, reporting and the conduct of testing are available in most high school 
guidance centers in the United States. For either test, students should have 
their test scores sent directly to Elon College. 

The Early Decision Plan 

Well-qualified high school students who decide at the close of their junior 
year that Elon College is their first choice may take advantage of the Early 
Decision Plan. 

To be considered for Early Decision, a student can apply any time after 
completion of the junior year, but the application must be completed no later than 
December 1 of the senior year. The application must be sent with the high school 
record, scores on the SAT and/or ACT and a signed Early Decision agreement. 

Students accepted under the Early Decision Plan have several advantages: 
(1) notification of the admissions decision within two weeks of the receipt of the 
completed application package, beginning September 15; (2) the opportunity to 
attend the first Spring Orientation Weekend; (3) priority status for housing and 
registration; and (4) an early financial aid estimate. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 

Accepted students must submit a nonrefundable $200 deposit by January 15 
and withdraw applications from all other colleges at that time. 

Transfer Admission 

Transfer students are admitted at all class levels based on their academic 
record at the institution from which they are transferring. In order to graduate, 
one full academic year of study (at least 33 semester hours) must be completed 
at Elon, including the last term before graduation. 

To be admitted for advanced standing, the student is expected to have at least 
an overall "C" average on work attempted at other institutions, to be eligible to 41 
return to the last institution attended, and to be recommended by college officials. 

An applicant having less than 24 semester hours of transferable college credit 
at the time of application must also meet freshman admission requirements. 

In order to be considered for transfer admission a student must: 

1 . Have transcripts sent from all two-year or four-year colleges attended. 

2. Have a dean's evaluation form completed by the dean of the last college 
attended verifying eligibility This form is not required if the student has 
received an associate degree. 

3. Have high school transcript and SAT or ACT scores sent. The SAT/ACT 
requirement may be waived for some advanced students or nontraditional 
students who did not take the test while in high school. 

Speciai Students 

The college admits a limited number of special students who are not working 
toward degrees at Elon College. Special students include: 

• Persons taking only private music instruction in the Department of Fine 
Arts. Such applicants are admitted if instructors are able to schedule lessons 
for them. 

• High school graduates taking classes of special interest. Persons out of high 
school less than two years may be required to submit a copy of their high 
school transcript and SAT/ ACT scores. 

• Visiting students from other colleges attending summer and winter terms 

• College graduates interested in further study at Elon. Such applicants are 
admitted if they fulfill requirements for admission to the desired courses. 

• College graduates working toward teacher liscensure or reliscensure. 

• High school students taking classes on the Elon campus during their senior 
year. Credit for this work is generally transferable to other institutions. 
(Credit Bank Application required) 

Special students may register for no more than eight hours per semester 
without approval of the Dean of Academic Affairs. 



E L N C L L E G E 

International Students 

International admission packets are available from the Office of International 
Admissions. Students must submit the International Admission application with 
a nonrefundable $25 application fee, translated transcripts from all secondary 
and postsecondary schools attended, and a completed certificate of financial 
responsibility. 

Proof of a minimum score of 500 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) is also required, unless English is the student's native language or the 
language of instruction. 

42 International students should submit applications and documentation as 

early as possible because it may take several months to receive and process 
forms from abroad. The Office of International Admissions can be contacted 
by calling 910-584-2370 or 800-334-8448 (toll free in USA); FAX is 910-538-3986. 

Acceptance on Condition 

students who have graduated from a secondary school but who do not meet 
the requirements in subject matter areas and units may be accepted on condition. 
Any deficiency must be eliminated before beginning the sophomore year at Elon. 
A student entering with a deficiency may not be able to complete degree require- 
ments in eight regular semesters. 

Students whose deficiencies indicate a need for special work may be required 
to participate in the Transitional Program. Upon successful completion of this 
work and recommendation by the Transitional Program Coordinator, the student 
may proceed with regular course work. 

Advanced Placement Examination 

students earning a score of three or better in the Advanced Placement Tests 
of the College Entrance Examination Board taken in high school may receive 
credit in the following fields: art, biology chemistry, computer science, econom- 
ics, English, French, German, history, mathematics, music, physics, political 
science, psychology and Spanish. Scores should be sent to the Office of Admis- 
sions for approval by the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Board 
enables students to earn college credit by examination. Students desiring credit 
by examination must earn a scaled score of 500 on the General Examinations 
and/or a score of 50 on the Subject Area Examinations. Credit may be awarded 
in the following areas: composition and literature, foreign language, history and 
social sciences, science and mathematics. Adult students interested in receiving 
credit through CLEP should contact the Admissions Office for information. 
Scores should be sent to the Admissions Office for approval by the Dean 
of Academic Affairs. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 

Department Examination 

students may contact the Dean of Academic Affairs for details concerning 
the process of credit through examination by departments at Elon in areas not 
;• covered above. The cost for each examination is $185. 

Transfer Credit 

students earn credit for courses taken through college parallel programs 
;; at accredited junior colleges or community colleges and for courses taken at 
;'■ accredited four-year colleges and universities. Transcripts are evaluated and 
I credit is awarded on a course-by-course basis after the student has been 43 

accepted for admission. 

No more than 65-semester hours of credit will be allowed from two-year 
institutions. No credit is allowed for a course with a grade below "C-." Credit 
will not be given for classes taken while a student is under academic suspension. 

Credit for Veterans 

Veterans entering Elon may transfer certified credits from various areas: 

• Military personnel on active duty who wish to submit CLEP credits should 
see their Education Officers concerning CLEP tests or write to USAFI, 
Madison, Wisconsin. 

• Work from other accredited post-secondary institutions may be accepted. 

• Students with one year of active duty in military service will receive credit 
for the Physical Education requirement by bringing a copy of their DD-214 
Form to the Registrar's Office for verification. 

General Costs 

The cost of attending Elon College is purposely held at a reasonable level. 
The chart on page 45 gives the particular charges for resident and commuter 
; students. Please note that there are special tuition rates for part-time students. 

■ Student Government Association and health service fees are collected fi'om 

:; all students enrolled for nine or more semester hours during registration. 

Costs Covered by Tuition 

Included in the tuition fees are costs of registration, use of the library and 
: recreational facilities, admission to home athletic events, student publications, 
,: post office box for college housing, regular laboratory fees and 12 to 18 semester 
hours of work, inclusive each semester. 

The tuition, fees and estimated book expenses do not include fees for special 
courses and special laboratory work which depend on the course of study 
undertaken. Personal expenses vary with the individual student. For the student 
who must earn money toward his/her college expenses, a number of work 



E L N C L L E G E 

opportunities are available through the Career Services Center and the Hun^an 
Resources Office. 

The Meal Plan 

All resident students are required to participate in the meal plans in the 
college dining halls. The cost of the meal plans are subject to change without 
notice. Double charge is made for special diets. Students living off campus may 
purchase a semester meal ticket, use the Elon Card (a debit card for use in dining 
halls and the Campus Shop) or purchase individual meals. Freshmen must choose 
AM either the 19 or 15 meal plan for the first semester. 

Book Expenses 

The estimated cost of textbooks is $450 for the academic year, including $225 
needed for purchases from the campus bookstore at the opening of fall semester 

Room Change Charge 

students changing rooms without permission of the Dean of Students are 
charged for both rooms. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 



'xpenses for the 1995-96 Academic Year 

Full-Time Enrollment/Day Students (12-18 hours) 



Fall 
Semester 



Winter 
Term* 



Spring 
Semester 



Tuition 
Room 



$4,875.00 $198.00/hour $4,875.00 



255.00 
318.00 
355.00 



(Double) 930.50 

(Single) 1,207.50 

(Double as single)^ 1,325.00 

Board** (Winter Term billed 

with Fall Semester) 1,240.00 253.00 

***(19, 15 and 10 meals per week Plans) 
Student Government 55.00 

Health Service 25.00 

Overload**** 198.00/hour 

Security Deposit (refundable, applies to residence hall students only) 



930.50 
1,207.50 
1,325.00 

987.00 

55.00 

25.00 

198.00/hour 

100.00 



* Residence hall students enrolled full-time fall semester not attending winter term will be 
eligible for a credit for winter term board. Students enrolled full time for either fall or spring 
semester (within the same academic school year) are not charged for winter term room and 
tuition if no overload exists in winter term. 

** Meal plans may be changed during the first two weeks of Fall and Spring semesters. 

*** 19 Meal Plan - 19 dining hall meals per week and $20 Elon Card balance each semester 
(Fall and Spring) and $10 Elon Card balance Winter Term. 

15 Meal Plan - 15 dining hall meals per week and $90 Elon Card balance each semester 
(Fall and Spring) and $20 Elon Card balance Winter Term. 

10 Meal Plan - 10 dining hall meals per week and $120 Elon Card balance each semester 
(Fall and Spring) and $35 Elon Card balance Winter Term. 

**** More than 18 hours in fall or spring; more than four hours in winter. 

* Provided space is available and approval given by Residence Life Office 

Part-Time Enrollment/Day Students and All Evening School 

Tuition 1-8 hours $198/hour 

9- 1 1 hourst $305/hour 

^ Day students enrolled for 9- 1 1 hours must pay SGA and health fees. 
Evening students can enroll in no more than four semester hours in the day program. 

Graduate Programs 

MBA Tuition $209/hour 

M.Ed. Tuition $177/hour 



45 



E L N C L L E G E 

Summer School 1996 

Tuition per semester hour $198 

College enrollment fee 10 

Room (double) 355 

(single) 512 

Board 660 

Auditing per course 125 

^6 Special/Optional Fees (No Refund After Drop/Add Deadline) 

Applied music lessons: 

Each one semester hour credit or audit for non-music majors $198 

Each one semester hour credit or audit for music majors 

taking second or additional lessons 198 

Auditing per course 125 

Charges for other courses with special fees are listed in the catalog and/or the course schedule. 

Graduation Fees 

Bachelor's Degree $40 

Master's Degree 50 

Miscellaneous 

Late registration/Re-enrollment during term $25 

Late payment 30 

Adding a course after Drop/Add Day 10 

Transcripts 5 

Security deposit (residence hall damage and key return) 

refundable upon completion of housing contract 100 

Examination for course credit 198 

Automobile registration 

Resident students 50 

Commuter students 40 

Replace I.D. card/meal ticket 30 

Returned check fine 20 

A student's grade or graduate's diploma and transcripts will be withheld until his/her 
financial obligations to the college are settled. A student cannot register for further course 
work until financial obligations to the college are settled. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 

Refunds 

Academic Year- 
Fall and Spring Semester* 

Tuition, fees, room charges and board are refunded under two different 
policies as follows: 

• Students receiving Title IV financial aid and attending Elon College for the first 
time will receive refunds according to the policy listed below. 

—Refunds will be made to students who (a) do not register for the semester for 
which Title IV financial aid was intended, or (b) withdraw and do not complete 
the period of enrollment for which the Title IV assistance was intended. 47 

Refunds (except for board charges) will not be made after 60 percent of the 
semester for which the student has been charged has passed. 

—The portion of the semester for which a student can receive a refund is 
computed by dividing the time (in weeks) remaining in the semester by the 
total time (in weeks) of the semester and rounded downward to the nearest 
10 percent. 

—Any unpaid charges owed by the student will be deducted from the calculated 
refund amount. 

—An administrative fee equal to the lesser of 5 percent of the total charges 
assessed to the student or $100 will be charged for refunds made upon withdrawal. 

—Students who withdraw after 60 percent of the semester has passed will 
receive a refund of board charges on a pro rata basis. 

—Refunds under Title IV programs will be made on a pro rata basis to the student 
and any payers based on the percentage of charges paid by each source. 

• All other students receive refunds on a pro rata basis during the first five weeks 
of the semester. Following is a table of pro rata charges: 

1st week pro rata charge 5% 

2nd week pro rata charge 20% 

3rd week pro rata charge 40% 

4th week pro rata charge 60% 

5th week pro rata charge 80% 

; 6th week — no refund 

* Upon withdrawal, meal ticket refunds are prorated. 

Winter Term and Summer School* 

Students who end enrollment during the second or third day of classes of 
winter term or summer school will receive a 90 percent refund of tuition and 
room charges. Students who end enrollment during the fourth or fifth day of 
classes of winter term or summer school will receive a 50 percent refund of 
tuition and room charges. There will be no refunds after the fifth day of classes. 

* Upon withdrawal, meal ticket refunds are prorated. 



48 



ELON COLLEGE 

Notice of Withdrawal 

In order to be eligible for a refund upon withdrawal a student must notify the 
Dean of Student Life in writing of his/her intentions. The student must also check 
out with the Financial Planning and Bursar's offices. Refunds are calculated as of 
the date of withdrawal specified by the Dean of Student Life. 

Financial Aid 

Elon College believes that no student should be denied a college education 
because of limited funds. To the extent possible, eligible students receive aid 
through careful planning and various forms of financial assistance. 

In order to receive any type of college, state or federal aid, students must 
demonstrate satisfactory academic progress toward the completion of degree 
requirements. No financial aid is offered until an applicant has been accepted 
for admission to Elon College. 

Financial aid programs vary by source, eligibility criteria and application 
procedures. While every effort is made to meet each student's full needs, that 
is not always possible, due to a limited amount of aid available. Students will 
be offered a financial aid "package" which is an award consisting of one or more 
of the following types of aid: scholarships, grants, low-interest loans and campus 
employment. Scholarships and grants are "gift assistance" which do not have 
to be repaid while loans and work are referred to as "self help." Financial aid 
packages may consist of all self help or a combination of self help and gift 
assistance. Applying early for financial aid improves your chances for getting 
the maximum aid for which you are eligible. Unless the student is a continuing 
student, no aid is awarded until the student has been accepted for admission. 

TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID BASED ON NEED 

There are a variety of need-based financial aid programs. The federal govern- 
ment, some states (including North Carolina) and the college itself offer grant, loan 
and work-study programs. Grants are funds which do not have to be repaid, loans 
to students are generally repayable only after the student is no longer enrolled, and 
work-study funds are earned through employment on campus. Many students use 
work-study funds to meet their personal financial needs during the school year 

All need-based financial aid is renewable up to four years provided the same 
level of need is demonstrated each year, the student maintains satisfactory 
academic progress as defined by the college for financial aid purposes and the 
funds remain available. Renewal cannot be assured to those students whose 
financial aid application files are completed after April 1 of any year 

Federal Programs 
Federal Pell Grant 

For students with a high need, Pell Grants provide from $400 to $2,340 annually 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants 

Federal funds given to and awarded by the college to students demonstrating 
high need. Amounts vary. 

Federal Stafford Student Loans (Subsidized) 

Moderate interest loans awarded directly to students which are available 
through many state agencies and private lenders. Freshmen may borrow up to 
$2,625 annually sophomores up to $3,500 annually and juniors and seniors up 
to $5,500 annually These loans are federally guaranteed and no interest accrues, 
nor is any payment due, until six months after the student ceases to be at least a 
half-time student. Separate application required. 49 

Federal Perkins Loans 

Federal funds given to and awarded by the college to students demonstrating 
high need. No interest accrues and no payment is due while the student is 
enrolled at least half-time. Repayment begins nine months after the student 
ceases to be at least a half-time student. Amounts vary. 

Federal College Work-Study 

Awarded to students with need who work on campus and who are paid 
according to hours worked. Awards vary based on amount of need. Work-study 
earnings are not paid in advance so they cannot be used to pay the direct costs 
(tuition, room, board, books, etc.) of the semester in which they are awarded. 

State Programs 

North Carolina Contractual Scholarship Fund 

State funds given to and awarded by the college to North Carolina residents 
with need. Amounts vary. 

North Carolina Student Incentive Grant 

Awards of up to $1 ,500 annually for North Carolina residents. 

Pennsylvania and Vermont State Grants 

For students who are residents of these states. Amounts vary. 

Elon College Programs 

In addition to the numerous federal and state programs, the college offers its 
own need-based assistance. Funds for these programs are provided directly by the 
college as well as through donations and gifts to the college by many individuals, 
businesses and foundations. All students who apply for need-based aid and who 
demonstrate need are automatically considered for these funds. No separate 
application is required. 



50 



E L N COLLEGE 

Institutional Grants 

College grants based solely on demonstrated need. Amounts vary in accor- 
dance with need. 

Need-based Endowed Scholarships 

Awarded to students who demonstrate need and who meet certain other 
criteria as established by the donors. The college identifies eligible students 
and awards these funds accordingly. No separate application is required. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE NOT BASED ON NEED 

There is help available for students and families who do not qualify for need- 
based aid. This help is in the form of scholarships, grants, loans and work-study 
Listed below are some of the opportunities available from Elon, state and federal 
governments and outside sources. 

North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grant 

Every North Carolina resident who attends Elon as a full-time undergraduate 
student automatically receives a Legislative Tuition Grant of approximately $1,250 
from the North Carolina General Assembly. The exact amount of the grant is set 
annually by the General Assembly A brief application must be completed at 
registration to show legal residency. 

UCC Ministerial Discount 

$600 per year ($300 per semester) to full-time students who are legal depen- 
dents of full-time ministers in the United Church of Christ. Documentation of 
eligibility is required. 

Merit Scholarships 

Based on talent or performance rather than need. 

North Carolina Teaching Fellows 

Full cost of tuition, room and board, plus air fare to London for one semester 
Elon is one of two private colleges in North Carolina selected to offer the presti- 
gious North Carolina Teaching Fellows program. The Fellows are selected by the 
North Carolina Teaching Fellows Commission which provides scholarships of 
approximately $5,000 a year for four years on the condition that Fellows teach 
for four years in North Carolina public schools after graduation. 

Elon enrolls approximately 20 Teaching Fellows each year and supplements 
the Teaching Fellows scholarship to provide for the full cost of tuition, room and 
board for four years, plus air fare for a semester in London. 

Honors Fellows 

$1 ,500 to $6,000 annually plus one $500 travel grant. Elon enrolls approxi- 
mately 80 Honors Fellows each year who receive scholarships on the basis of 
outstanding academic achievement, standardized test scores and Scholarship 
Day competition results. 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 

Science Fellows 

$2,000 annually. Science Fellows are selected on the basis of high school 
record and standardized test scores. Winners must intend to major in Biology, 
Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics or Physics. In addition to the scholar- 
ship. Science Fellows participate in an academic enrichment program. 

Leadership Fellows 

$1,000 or $1,500 annually Elon enrolls approximately 60 Leadership Fellows each 
year selected on the basis of successful high school performance, above average 
standardized test scores and demonstrated leadership ability No separate application. 
Applicants for admission who meet the criteria are awarded the scholarship. 5^ 

Presidential Scholarships 

$500 to $1,000 annually Presidential Scholarships are awarded on the basis of 
superior academic performance and SAT or ACT scores. Applicants for admission 
who qualify are automatically awarded this scholarship. 

Fine Arts Scholarships 

The Department of Fine Arts awards scholarships to outstanding freshmen 
in the fields of music and theatre on the basis of audition. The scholarships range 
from $200 to $7,500 annually Contact the Fine Arts Department. 

Athletic Scholarships 

In compliance with NCAA Division II regulations, athletic scholarships are awarded 
by the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics in each sport offered at Elon. The awards 
are based on performance and the amount varies. Contact the Athletics Department. 

Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) 

The United States Army offers four-year scholarships which cover the cost of 
tuition and books for four years, plus $100 per month for personal expenses. Elon 
provides room and board at no cost to all four-year ROTC scholarship winners. 
The Army also offers some two-year scholarships for which students in the Elon 
ROTC program may compete. 

Private Scholarships 

Foundations, service clubs, churches and corporations give away millions 
of dollars of scholarships each year to worthy students. Many Elon students 
receive this type of scholarship help in addition to other types of help they 
may be receiving. 

Students generally seek these scholarships on their own. A good place to start 
is by asking your high school guidance office about community and other scholar- 
ships with which they may be familiar. Then ask about the availability of scholar- 
ships at places where family members are employed, through your church and 
through any organizations to which family members belong. Finally go to the 
public library for guidebooks to scholarships from foundations, corporations 
and government agencies. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Campus Employment j 

Many Elon students assist with college living expenses by working a part- 
time job, either on or off campus. The opportunities for campus employment 
at Elon are available both to students who qualify for need and to students j 
who do not. | 

Students in part-time jobs get valuable experience, learn time-management j 
skills, build friendships with the office personnel and, in certain cases with the I 
approval of the Director of Experiential Education, receive internship credit. \ 

-2 Loan Options That Are Not Based on Need 

Several sources of long-term loan funds are available that are based on credit 
worthiness rather than "need." j 

Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) i 

Parents may borrow up to the cost of education (at Elon, $16,400 for 1995-96) 
less any other aid per academic year for each dependent enrolled at least half- 
time. Interest rate is variable and is based on the 52 -week T-bill rate plus 3.1 , 
percent with a cap of 10 percent. \ 

Federal Stafford Student Loans (unsubsidized) 

Available to all students regardless of need. Loan amounts are the same as for 
the need-based subsidized program. However, under this program, borrowers do 
not qualify for federal interest subsidy payments, thus interest accrues while the 
student is in school. Repayment of principal begins six months after the student is 
no longer enrolled half-time. The interest rate is variable, capped at 9 percent and 
is based on the 91 -day T-bill rate plus 3.1 percent. Separate application required. 
Note: Students must file an application for need-based financial aid to be consid- 
ered for one of these loans. A determination must first be made that the student is 
not eligible for a need-based subsidized loan. (See "How to Apply for Need-Based 
Financial Aid.") 

How To Apply for Need-Based Financial Aid 

• Students must be accepted for admission to Elon before financial aid will 
be awarded. However, do not wait until you are notified of your acceptance 
before starting the financial aid application process. The sooner you complete 
the aid application process, the better chance you have of receiving maximum 
awards. Continuing students must be making satisfactory academic progress 
as defined by the college for financial aid purposes. 

• As soon after January 1, 1996, as possible, complete a Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid and, if you wish to be considered for all aid programs 
(not just federal programs), a Financial Aid Form (FAF) and send the forms 
and requested fees to the designated processors. The Federal Free Form and 
FAF are scheduled to be available in late November. If you file only the Federal 
Free Form, the college will not receive the results unless you send them to 

us. If you file the FAF and remit the proper fees, the college will receive 



ADMISSIONS, 



FINANCES 



AND 



FINANCIAL 



A I D 



directly from CSS the results of both the Federal Free Form and the FAF. 
NOTE: No form is perfect and sometimes special situations or circumstances 
cannot be adequately addressed when filling one out. If this is the case, Elon 
encourages families and students to call or write the Financial Planning Office. 
Adjustments can sometimes be made to reflect these special circumstances. 

• Submit an Elon Aid Application to the Financial Planning Office. 

• If the student previously attended a college or university other than Elon, 
request a Financial Aid Transcript from each school. Financial Aid Transcripts 
are required whether or not the student received any aid at the other institutions. 

• Notify the Financial Planning Office of any scholarships, grants or loans you will 
be receiving from any source other than Elon College. 

• Elon College's priority deadline for awarding financial aid is April 1 . Be sure to 
begin the filing process early enough so that your file is complete by that date. 

Payment Options 

VISA/MasterCard 

Elon College accepts these charge cards for payment of tuition and fees. 

Ten-Month Payment Plan 

Charges for the entire academic year, minus financial aid, are divided by 
10 for monthly payments from June I through March 1. This plan is administered 
by a third party. 



53 



Endowed Scholarships 

The following scholarships are awarded to students who have completed 
the application procedures described for need-based aid. Awards are made at 
the direction of the Office of Admissions and Financial Planning according to the 
guidelines of the individual scholarships. A booklet containing more information 
about these endowments, which are established through the generosity of private 
donors, is available in the Office of Institutional Advancement. 



• Alamance Caswell County Medical 
Auxiliary Scholarship 

• Edward M. Albright Memorial Fund 

• Simeon Lee Allen Scholarship 

• Nina and Dickie Andrews 
Scholarship 

• The Rev. J. Frank Apple Memorial 
Scholarship 

• Asheville-Charlotte A. Hebard 
Scholarship 

• j. 0. Atkinson Memorial Scholarship 



Barrett-Harward Scholarship 

Mrs. Louise T. Barringer Scholarship 

Thomas L. and Kitty Rook Bass 
Scholarship 

Walter H. Bass III and Barbara Day 
Bass Scholarship 

Robert C. Baxter Scholarship 

A. Vance Beck, Sr. Scholarship 

Robert Charles Beisinger Scholarship 

Representative Fred Bowman 
Scholarship 



E L N COLLEGE 



Barry and Martha Bradberry Scholarship 

Jennie Willis Atkinson Bradford 
Scholarship 

Ned F. Brannock Scholarship 

Dr. and Mrs. R. E. Brittle Scholarship 

Trudie K. Bueschel Christian 
Education Scholarship 

Burlington Business and Profes- 
sional Women's Club Scholarship 

Burlington Handbags Scholarship 

William E. "Buster" Butler, Jr. and 
Mary Griffin Butler Scholarship 

Byrd Scholarship 

Caddell Memorial Scholarship 

John L. Cameron Scholarship 

The Pauline Nina Taylor Cammack 
Memorial Scholarship 

Isabella Walton Cannon Scholarship 
Endowment Fund 

The Dr. George L. Carrington 
Scholarship 

Fanny Pearle Castor and Frank 
Stevens Castor Endowment Fund 

Caswell-Alamance Scholarship 

Philip Vance Gates Memorial 
Scholarship 

The Z. Vance and Philip Vance Gates 
Scholarship 

Wallace L. Chandler Scholarship 

Frederica Olsson and Constant 
Woodman Chase, Jr. Scholarship 

Cheek Scholarship 

Class of 1925 Scholarship 

Class of 1 930 Scholarship 

Class of 1940 Scholarship 

Class of 1941 Scholarship 

Community Congregational Church, 
Southern Pines, NC, Scholarship 

George D. Colclough Scholarship 



Carl and Betty Coley Scholarship 

Alyse Smith Cooper Music 
Scholarship 

Janie E. Council Scholarship 

Billy Crocker Jazz Scholarship 

Alan Wheeler Crosby Memorial 
Scholarship 

Verona Daniels Danieley Scholarship 

T B. Dawson Scholarship 

Dewey Hobson Dofflemyer 
Scholarship 

W. Clifton Elder Scholarship 

Ellington Scholarship 

Elon College Community Church 
Scholarship 

First Christian Church, Portsmouth, 
Va. Memorial Scholarship 

Clyde Lee and Bertie S. Fields 
Memorial Scholarship 

First Union Bank Scholarship 

A. J. Fletcher Music Scholarship 

H. Terry and Nonnie B. Floyd 
Scholarship 

Lacy R. Fogleman Scholarship 
of St. Mark's Reformed Church 

Lacy R. Fogleman, Jr. and Laura Ann 
Fogleman Music Scholarship 

Rudy M. and Frances Turner Fonville 
Scholarship 

Franklin Congregational Christian 
Church Scholarship 

E. E. Funderburk, Jr. MD Scholarship 

The Charles A. Frueauff Foundation 
Scholarship 

Allen Erwin Gant Scholarship 

The John L. Georgeo Scholarship 

Glaxo Women in Science Scholars 
Endowment 

Glen Raven Mills Educational Award 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 



The Mills E. and Katherine B. Godwin 
Scholarship 

Judge Eugene A. Gordon Scholarship 

John S. Graves Scholarship 

Griswold-Watts Scholarship 

Mable M. Haith Scholarship 

Jewell Presnell and Carl C. Hall 
Memorial Scholarship 

Robert Kelley and Pearle J. Hancock 
Scholarship 

Dr. Howard S. Hardcastle Memorial 
Scholarship 

Ollie Clemmons Hedrick and Leah 
Margaret Tickel Hedrick Scholarship 

Edward Everett Holland Scholarship 

Howard Braxton Holmes 
Memorial Fund 

Vitus Reid Holt Scholarship 

A. L. Hook Scholarship 

Dewey S. Hooper Scholarship 

Bernice and Doris Home Scholarship 

Kenneth K. and Lucy Caddell Hughes 
Scholarship 

William Pressley Ingram Scholarship 

Edward, Rena Maude, and Allen 
Iseley Scholarship 

Archie and Adelaide Israel 
Scholarship 

Laura and Nelson Jackson 
Scholarship 

Mr. and Mrs. Burney Jennings 
Scholarship 

Dr. I. W. Johnson Scholarship 

Ada Smith Johnston Scholarship 

Charles D. Johnston Scholarship 

Effie Wicker Johnston 
Music Scholarship 

Rebecca Johnston Music Scholarship 

Virginia Somers Jones Scholarship 

John M. Jordan Scholarship 



Lecy Martin Kernodle Scholarship 

Virginia Beale Kernodle Scholarship 

Neill L. Key Scholarship 

Lucian and Lelia King Scholarship 

Sherri Sparrow King Scholarship 

Ralph E and Florance Kirkpatrick 
Scholarship 

Tami and Ernest Koury Scholarship 

Hosea D. and Minnie Trollinger 
Lambeth Scholarship 

The Lester Scholarship 

Edward W. W. Lewis Scholarship 

Max Lieberman Scholarship 

Asa Liggett Lincoln Scholarship 

Jack R. and Dorothy C. Lindley 
Scholarship 

The Luther Alexander Lineberger, Jr. 
Scholarship 

Claude V. and Alva Lee Currin Long 
Scholarship 

Wilkes Estes Lowe, Jr. Scholarship 

Zebulon and Alma Lynch 
Scholarship 

Lynnhaven Colony Congregational 
Church (UCC) Scholarship 

Sue Boddie Macon Memorial Fund 

Winona Morris Madren Scholarship 

W. L. and Beulah McNeill Maness 
Scholarship 

William Raymond Massey 
Scholarship 

J. Mark and Kate Strader McAdams 
Scholarship 

John Z. and Mildred W. McBrayer 
Scholarship 

John A. and Iris McEwen McCrary 
Scholarship 

Robert Rodgers Miskelly 
Memorial Scholarship 

The Jane Belk Moncure Scholarship 

Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Moser 
Scholarship 



55 



E L N 



COLLEGE 



Niagara Church Scholarship 

Francis Asbury Palmer Scholarship 

Annie Ruth Webb Parker Scholarship 

Mable Somers Peeler Scholarship 

The Vivian Wrenn Pell Scholarship 

Wayne H. and Mabel B. Perrine 
Memorial Scholarship 

The Donald W. and Shirley M. Perry 
Scholarship 

Paul C. and Margaret S. Plybon 
Scholarship 

Rex and Ina Mae Powell Scholarship 

0. D. Poythress Scholarship 

The Rev. Lacy M. Presnell 
Memorial Scholarship 

Presser Scholarship 

Emmett H. and Katherine R. Rawles 
Scholarship 

Japheth E. Rawls, Jr. and Virginia R. 
Rawls Endowment Fund 

Paul Reddish Scholarship 

David L. Rice Memorial Scholarship 

Howard R. and Virginia E. 
Richardson Scholarship 

Richmond Almuni Chapter 
Scholarship 

Bessie Holmes and George B. 
Robbins Scholarship 

Arthur H. and Trudy B. Rogers 
Scholarship 

Viola V. and Amos Thornton Rollings 
Scholarship 

The Royster Scholarship Fund 

Albert Oscar and Mary Susan Rudd 
Scholarship 

William Lee and Ruth Crosby Rudd 
Scholarship and Loan Fund 

Sanders-Myers 
Memorial Scholarship 

Renold 0. Schilke 
Trumpet Scholarship 



The Zondal Myers Sechrest 
Scholarship 

John Duncan Shaw Scholarship 

Nancy Gordon Sheffield Scholarship 

Dr. Charles E. Shelton Memorial 
Scholarship 

John L. Sills, Jr. Scholarship 

W. W. and Bessie Pickett Sloan 
Scholarship 

Oscar ¥. Smith Memorial 
Foundation Scholarship 

Annie Ross Somers Scholarship 

John and Helene Sparks Scholarship 

Stadler's Country Hams, Inc. 
Scholarship 

William Wesley Staley Scholarship 

Mary Frances Stamey 
Memorial Scholarship 

Sigmund Sternberger Scholarships 

Alda June Jones Stevens 
Memorial Scholarship 

Elwood E. Stone, Sr. Scholarship 

William H. and Marguerite R. 
Stratford Scholarship 

Theo Strum Scholarship 

St. Mark's Reformed Church 
Scholarship 

Suffolk Christian Church Scholarship 

Algernon Sydney Sullivan and Mary 
Mildred Sullivan Scholarships 

Taylor Scholarship 

Times-News Publishing -, 

Company, Inc. Scholarship ' 

Wallace Lincoln Tuck Scholarship 

Arline Lindsay Tweed Scholarship 

Union United Church of Christ 
Scholarship 

C. James Velie Memorial 
Music Scholarship 

Elizabeth B. Vernon Scholarship 

Thyra Wright Vestal Scholarship 



ADMISSIONS. 



FINANCES 



AND 



FINANCIAL 



A I D 



Robert R. Wagner Memorial 
Scholarship 

Wake Chapel Scholarship 

Catherine N. Walker Scholarship 

Cynthia Nicole Ward Education 
Endowment 

William I. Ward, Sr. and David 
Samuel Ward Scholarship 

judge Thurman Warren and Allie 
Brower Warren Scholarship 

Dudley Ray Watson Memorial 
Scholarship 

L. V. and L. B. Watson Scholarship 

Watterson-Troxler 
History Scholarship 



Watts Scholarship in Biology 

The Floyd E. West Scholarship 

Colonel Henry E. White Scholarship 

Margaret Delilah Bobbitt White 
Scholarship 

Nellie Glenn White Scholarship 

Jeanne Freeman Williams Scholarship 

Minnie Johnston Wilson Scholarship 

Youth Friends Scholarship 

James R. and Nina B. Young 
Endowment Fund 

John F. Youngblood Scholarship 

Youth Friends Scholarship 



Leaders for the Twenty-First Century Scholarships 

The following endowed scholarships, which are provided through the gener- 
osity of private donors, are awarded to the students who meet the criteria for the 
North Carolina Teaching, Honors and Leadership Fellows. 



Frederick Wharton Beazley 
Scholarship 

Carol Grotnes Belk Endowment 

Brannon-Sugg Scholarship 

Class of 1938 Centennial Scholarship 

J. E. Danieley Scholarship 

Thad Eure Scholarship 

Mary Ruth and Archiable E 
Fleming, Jr. Scholarship 

The Frederick K. Gilliam, Sr. 
Scholarship 

Don S. and Margaret M. Holt 
Scholarship 

Margaret Plonk and S. Carlysle Isley 
Scholarship 



Juanita Wheeler Keeton Scholarship 

Esther Cole and John Robert 
Kernodle Endowment 

Luther A. and Georgia V. Lineberger 
Memorial Scholarship 

C. Almon "Mon" Mclver 
Centennial Scholarship 

Virginia Green Miles, W. Bennett 
Miles, and Ellen Miles Dumville 
Memorial Fund 

Hurley D. Rogers 
Memorial Scholarship 

Bertha Paschall Shipp Scholarship 

Southern Bell Fellow Scholarship 

Thomas R. "Bud" and Doris Ward 
Stadler Scholarship 



Presidential Scholarships 

Elon's past presidents are honored with Presidential Scholarships which are 
awarded to freshmen. 



57 



William S. Long, founder and 
first president, 1889-94 



William Wesley Staley 1894-1905 



E L N COLLEGE 



Emmett Leonidas Moffitt, 1905-1 1 
William Allen Harper, 1911-31 



• Leon Edgar Smith, 1931-57 

• James Earl Danieley, 1957-73 



Endowed Athletics Scholarships I 

Endowments for grants-in-aid in athletics are administered through the Department 
of Athletics in accordance with NCAA, Conference and institutional guidelines. 
These endowments are made possible through the generosity of private donors. 



58 



A. Frank Andrews Golf Scholarship 

Kimberly Ann Barkman Memorial 
Scholarship 

R. H. Barringer Distribution Co., Inc. 
Tennis Endowment 

C. V. "Lefty" Briggs Athletic 
Scholarship 

Luther Byrd Scholarship 

The Comer Golf Scholarship 

Dwight L. Dillon Athletic Scholarship 

John L. Frye Scholarship 

Chester Huey Scholarship 

Clyde Johnston Golf Scholarship 

Cameron Little Memorial Scholarship 

Graham "Doc" Mathis Athletic 
Scholarship 

Florence and L. G. Matkins 
Scholarship 

William R. "Bill" Miller 
Basketball Scholarship 



L. J. "Hap" Perry 
Athletic Scholarship 

Tom Sawyer-Huck Finn Tennis 
Scholarship 

William Brown "Bill" Terrell 
Scholarship 

Sid Varney Scholarship 

D. C. "Peahead" Walker Scholarship 

Clyde T. and Esther Ward 
Golf Scholarship 

Max Ward Scholarship 

Rachel and Bethany Ward 
Scholarship 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Hunt Ward 
Golf Scholarship 

Charles Lewis Wilburn and Verna 
Wilburn Lee Basketball Scholarship 

S. S. "Red" Wilson 
Football Scholarship 

C. Carl Woods Athletic Scholarship 



Endowment and Sources of Income 



I 



The income from tuition and fees constitutes only a part of the income of the 
college. Other sources of income include the annual gifts from the churches of the 
Southern Conference of the United Church of Christ; a share of the contributions 
received by the Independent College of North Carolina; earnings from the perma- 
nent endowment funds of the college; and, the contributions of individuals, | 
foundations, businesses and industries. j 

In addition to the general endowment funds of the college, special 
endowment funds have been established for specific purposes. 

• John W. Barney Memorial Award • Boone Memorial Fund 

• Biomedical Reference • James H. R. Booth Fund 
Laboratory Program 



ADMISSIONS, FINANCES AND FINANCIAL AID 



Kathleen Price and Joseph M. Bryan 
Family Foundation Endowment 
for Faculty Development 

Isabella Cannon Leadership Program 
Endowment Fund 

George R. Chandler 
Endowment Fund 

Thomas W. and Mary Watson 
Chandler Endowment Fund 

Civil War Collection 
Endowment Fund 

The Daniels-Danieley Award 

Dwight Merrimon Davidson 
Endowment Fund 

Elbert and Esther Fertig 
DeCoursey Fund 

Milton A. and Naomi F 
Dofflemyer Fund 

James P Elder jr. Lectureship 

Elon College Community 
Orchestra Endowment Fund 

George Joseph Fertig Fund 

A. J. Fletcher Professorship 
in Communications 

D. R. Fonville Sr. Fund 

Ford Foundation Grant 

Ella V. Gray Memorial Fund 

George W. Harden Trust 

The G. Thomas Holmes and Gladys 
Wright Holmes Endowment 
for Chemistry 

The Jefferson-Pilot Distinguished 
Professorship 

J. L. Kernodle Foundation 

John T. Kernodle Memorial Fund 

Peter Jefferson Kernodle and Louise 
Nurney Kernodle Memorial Fund 



Virginia Beale Kernodle 
Memorial Fund 

Literature, Languages and 
Communications Endowment 

Marjorie L. Long Lecture Series 

The Martha and Spencer Love 
School of Business Fund 

Iris Holt McEwen Community 
Service Award 

The James H. McEwen Jr. 
Endowment Fund 

Sarah M. Moize Endowment Fund 

Mulholland Library Endowment Fund 

NCNB Corporation Endowment 
for Field Studies 

The Rex and Ina Mae Powell 
Lecture Series 

Sophia Maude Sharpe Powell 
Professorship 

The Thomas Edward Powell Jr. 
Professorship of Biology 

The Religion Scholar Award 

Ferris E. Reynolds Lectureship 

George Shackley Award 

Ella Brunk Smith Award 

Spence Endowment Fund 

Stokes Endowment 

William J. Story Sr. Professorship 

James T Toney Endowment Fund 

L.L. Vaughan Chemistry Fund 

Drusilla Dofflemeyer Voorhees Fund 

Wachovia Fund for Excellence 

Watts/Thompson Endowed Chair 

The Walter and Dorothy Westafer 
Fund for the Fine Arts 

Milton G. Wicker Endowment Fund 



59 




Wi^' ■^: 




V 



aU^'i v!' — 



GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



General Academic 
Regulations 

Registration and Courses g<i 

Classification 

Classifications are made at the beginning of the college year in September 

• Freshman 

1-27 semester hours completed 

• Sophomore 

28-61 semester hours completed 

• Junior 

62-95 semester hours completed 

• Senior 

96 or more semester hours completed 

Course Load 

Sixteen hours of college work per semester is considered the normal student 
load. Students who are on academic probation are limited to a maximum load of 
12 semester hours in fall and spring semesters. 

During the one-month winter term, four hours of college work is the normal 
load for all students. 

Maximum load for any one semester is as follows: 

• Fall and Spring Semesters, 18 semester hours 

• Winter Term, 4 semester hours 

• Summer Term, 8 semester hours 

Any exception to this policy is the responsibility of the Academic Dean's Office. 

Course Registration 

Students are expected to register for themselves on the designated days 
in August, January and February. Registration information is available to all 
students. Registration includes academic advising, selection of courses and 
payment of fees. Before preregistration or registration, each student should 
consult with his/her academic advisor on course selection. General Studies 
requirements, major requirements and other degree requirements. However, 
it is the responsibility of the student, not the academic advisor, to ensure that 
all college graduation requirements are met. 



62 



E L N COLLEGE 

Registration is for an entire course, and a student who begins a course must 
complete it except in unusual circumstances. Unless the student and his/her 
advisor consider it essential, a student should not change his/her schedule 
after registration. 

Auditing Courses 

Persons wishing to attend certain courses regularly without doing the 
assigned preparation or receiving credit may do so with the approval of 
the Registrar. The cost is $125 for each course. 

Changes in Class and Schedule 

The college reserves the right to cancel or discontinue any course because 
of small enrollment or for other reasons deemed necessary. In order to assure 
quality instruction, the college reserves the right to close registration when the 
maximum enrollment has been reached. The college reserves the right to make 
changes in schedule and/or faculty when necessary. 

I 

Credit by Examination (Course Challenge) 

A student may receive credit for a course not taken by demonstrating mastery 
of its subject matter. To challenge a course, a student must have the approval of 
the Dean of Academic Affairs, the chair of the department in which the course is 
offered and the professor who will test the student's mastery of the subject 
matter. Whenever possible, the student should consult the professor far enough 
in advance of the term in which the examination will be taken to determine | 
course requirements and standards and to begin to make independent prepara- 
tions. However, the student should expect no assistance from the professor other 
than being informed of the material to be covered on the examination. Under no 
circumstances shall a student be allowed to attend classes of the course being 
challenged. The cost for each examination is $198. 

Dropping Courses 

A student may officially drop any class with a "W" (withdraw without 
penalty) through half of the term— this includes the week of examinations. 
The withdrawal period applies to the regular semesters, classes taught for one 
half semester, winter term and the summer sessions. After that date no class 
may be dropped. Any exception to this policy is the responsibility of the 
Academic Dean's office. 

A student who withdraws from the college for any reason (except for a 
medical reason) receives grades of "W" if the withdrawal is before the designated 
half-term time period. After this time a student will receive a "W" or "F" depending 
on his/her grades at the time of withdrawal. A student who withdraws from the 
college with a medical withdrawal will receive a "WD." 



GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Independent Study 

Students may engage in independent study of catalog courses, special 
topics and research projects. Independent Study is limited to honors students, 
juniors and seniors. A course may not be repeated by Independent Study 
Details concerning the procedure for developing an Independent Study 
proposal may be obtained in the Registrar's Office. 

Overload 

A student whose cumulative grade point average is less than 3.0 may not 
register for overload hours in any term. See page 61 on course load. 

Pass/Fail Elective Courses 

A Student may take two one-semester courses outside the major, minor 
and General Studies requirements on a pass/fail basis. The pass/fail option 
encourages students to enrich their educational experience in subjects outside 
their major/minor fields and General Studies requirements in which they may 
feel unable to maintain a desirable grade point average. The decision to take 
a course pass/fail must be made at registration before the first class period. 

Repeat Courses 

Courses repeated within four semesters of attendance (excluding winter 
and summer sessions) following the first enrollment in the course count only 
once in computing the cumulative grade point average. In such cases the most 
recent grade is counted rather than any previous grade(s) received. However, a 
course repeated more than once will count in the cumulative grade point average 
each time it is repeated. (Students receiving Veterans' benefits should consult the 
V.A. representative.) 

Attendance 

Since students must attend classes regularly in order to derive maximum 
benefit from their courses, the college strictly and fairly enforces policies govern- 
ing classes, and students are responsible for knowing attendance regulations. 
Each department establishes its own attendance policy If unwarranted absences 
occur, the Dean of Academic Affairs may suspend the student from the class or 
from the college. 

Absence From Tests and Examinations 

Students who miss scheduled tests and examinations without excusable 
reasons may not make up such assignments. Authorization to make up tests 
missed for excusable reasons is obtained from the professor of the class. 
Authorization to make up final examinations missed for excusable reasons 
is obtained from the Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs. 



63 



E L N COLLEGE 

Grades and Reports 

Grading System and Quality Points 

Graduation is dependent upon quality as well as upon quantity of work done. 

A student earns quality points as well as semester hours if his/her level of 
performance does not fall below that of a "D-." 

Letter grades are used. They are interpreted in the table below, with the 
quality points for each hour of credit shown at right. 

Grade Quality Points 

64 A 4.0 

A- 3.7 

B+ 3.3 

B 3.0 

B- 2.7 

C+ 2.3 

C 2.0 

C- 1.7 

D+ 1.3 

D 1.0 

D- 0.7 

F 0.0 

I Incomplete 0.0 

P Passing (not counted in cumulative average) 0.0 

S Satisfactory (not counted in cumulative average) 0.0 

U Unsatisfactory (counted in cumulative average) 0.0 

WD Medical withdrawal 0.0 

W Withdrawal 0.0 

NR No Report 0.0 

A grade in the "A" range indicates distinguished performance in a course. 

A grade in the "B" range indicates an above-average performance in class. 

A grade in the "C" range indicates an average performance in which a basic 
understanding of the subject has been demonstrated. 

A grade in the "D" range indicates a passing performance despite some 
deficiencies. 

A grade of "F" indicates failure. 

Grades of "A" through "F" are permanent grades and may not be changed 
except in case of error. After an instructor has certified a grade to the Registrar, 



GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

he/she may change it before the end of the next regular grading period. 
The change must be made in writing and have the written approval of the 
department chair. 

An "I" grade signifies incomplete work because of illness, emergency, extreme 
hardship or self-paced courses. It is not given for a student missing the final 
examination unless excused by the Dean of Academic Affairs upon communica- 
tion from the student. The student receiving a grade of "1" completes all work no 
later than nine class days after mid-semester grades are due during the following 
semester. A final grade is submitted to the Registrar by the instructor the follow- 
ing Monday After this date the "1" grade automatically changes to "F" unless an 
extension is granted by the Dean of Academic Affairs. 65 

Grade Point Average (GPA) 

The grade point average is computed by dividing the total quality points 
on work attempted at Elon College by the number of hours attempted except 
for courses with grades of "P," "S," "WD," or "W." 

Grade Reports 

Students are graded at mid-semester as well as at the end of each semester 
Mid-semester grades serve as progress reports and are not entered on students' 
permanent records. 

Dean's List 

The Dean's List recognizes and encourages excellence in academic work. 
A student who has no grade below a "B-" and a grade point average of at least 
3.4 in a minimum of 12 semester hours in any semester is placed on the Dean's 
List for the following semester. Those students who have no grade below 
an "A-" in a minimum of 12 semester hours in any semester are placed on 
the President's List. Classes passed on a Pass/Fail basis or classes with grades 
of "S," "WD" or "W" are not included in Dean's List eligibility 

Graduation With Honors 

Students completing at least 66 credit hours at Elon College may be graduated 
with honors. Candidates for graduation with an average of 3.9 or above are 
graduated summa cum laude; those with 3.7 or above, magna cum laude; and 
those with 3.4 or above, cum laude. In computing eligibility for honors, only 
work attempted at Elon College will be used. 

Elon College provides a comprehensive Honors Program for all students 
of all majors. Emphasis is placed on honors courses, special academic advising, 
preparation for graduate school and special activities. Honors Program students 
who complete a minimum of 25 hours of honors experience and maintain a 
cumulative GPA of 3.2 will receive "Honors Fellow" recognition 
at graduation. 



66 



E L N COLLEGE 



Access to Student Educational Records 

Elon College complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
of 1974. This Act protects the privacy of educational records, establishes the 
right of students to inspect and review their educational records and provides 
guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal 
and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the 
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged 
failures by the institution to comply with the Act. 

Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may 
be referred to the Office of the Registrar. 

Transcripts of Student Records 

Requests for copies of a student's record should be made to the Office of 
the Registrar. All transcripts reflect the student's complete academic record. 
No transcripts are issued without the written authorization of the student. No 
transcript is issued for a student who has a financial obligation to the college. 

Work at Other Institutions 

Students who plan to take courses at other institutions must have the prior 
written permission of the Registrar. Currently enrolled students must have a 
minimum 2.0 GPA in order to transfer course credit from another institution to 
Elon College. After completion of such courses, the student presents an official 
transcript of his/her record to the Registrar. 

Academic Standards and Withdrawal 

Academic Standing 

Academic standing is determined by the earned grade point average for any 
one semester of attendance and for cumulative work. A student whose cumula- 
tive grade point average falls below 2.0 is reviewed by the Academic Standing 
Committee and placed on academic probation or academic suspension. 

Probation 

Students are notified that their grade point average is below 2.0, that they 
are limited to a maximum load of 12 semester hours, and that three consecutive 
semesters on probation will result in suspension. 

Suspension 

Students are separated from Elon College and one academic semester must 
elapse before they are eligible for readmission. 



GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

In order to continue at the college a student must earn a minimum grade 
point average each semester of 1.0 and at the end of spring semester have: 

• Freshman 

1-27 semester hours completed, 1.6 grade point average 

• Sophomore 

28-61 semester hours completed, 1.7 grade point average 

• Junior 

62-95 semester hours completed, 1 .8 grade point average 

• Senior 

96 semester hours completed, 2.0 grade point average g7 

Any student failing to meet these guidelines will be academically ineligible 
for the next semester and suspended from the college. During the suspension 
period which includes fall or spring semester, the student may apply for re- 
admission and, if readmitted, will be placed on academic probation. A student 
who is suspended a second time for academic reasons is normally not readmitted 
to the college. 

Dismissal 

The college reserves the right to suspend or dismiss any student(s) when 
it believes that such action is in the best interest of the institution and/or the 
student(s). This action will take place only after careful consideration with the 
student(s) in question and all other parties with information pertinent to the 
matter at hand. 

Withdrawal 

If for any reason a student concludes that he/she must leave the college on 
a temporary or long-term basis, he/she must confer with the Office of the Dean 
of Student Life and the Dean of Academic Affairs to formalize plans. Faculty will 
be requested to report student progress in class at the time of withdrawal by 
indicating either a "W" or "¥" grade. A student withdrawing with medical reasons 
will receive grades of "WD." The official record of the student cannot be cleared 
until the withdrawal is complete. 



1 




ACADEMIC 



REGULATIONS 



Academic Regulations 

Jndergraduate Degree Requirements 

Degrees and Major Fields 
Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 



Art 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Communications 

(Broadcast and Corporate) 

Computer Science 

Economics 

Education 

Elementary (K-6) 

Middle Grades (6-9) 

Secondary Certification (9-12) 

Special Education/LD (K-12) 

English 

French 

History 

Human Services 

International Studies 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) 



Music Theatre 



Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 



Accounting 

Biology 

Business Administration 
(Management, Finance, 
Marketing, International 
Management and Management 
Information Systems) 

Chemistry 

Environmental Studies 



69 



Journalism 

Mathematics 

Music 

Music Performance 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Public Administration 

Religious Studies 

Science Education 

Social Science Education 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Theatre Arts 



Health Education 
Leisure/Sport Management 
Mathematics 
Medical Technology 
Music Education 
Physical Education 
Physics 
Sports Medicine 



For Graduate programs see pages 207-212 and/or the Graduate Catalog. 



E L N COLLEGE 

Bachelor's Degree Requirements 

Elon College offers an academic program consisting of a minimum of 132 
semester hours of credit for the Bachelor's degree. The degree consists of a major 
field of concentration in the liberal arts or in a professional or preprofessional 
area, a General Studies program and elective courses. To earn a baccalaureate 
degree the student completes the academic program below: 

1 . Satisfactory work in one major subject 

2. Completion of General Studies as follows: 

a. First-Year Core 
'" (1) General Studies 110 The Global Experience 4 

(2) General Studies/English 110 4 

(3) General Studies/Mathematics (MTH 1 10 or higher) 4 

(4) General Studies/ HE 1 10 Wellness 3 

b. Experiential Learning (one unit) 

c. Liberal Studies 

(1) Expression 8 

Eight hours chosen from at least two of the following: literature 
(in English or foreign languages), philosophy and fine arts 
(art, dance, fine arts, music, music theatre and theatre arts). 
At least one course must be literature. 

(2) Civilization 8 

Eight hours chosen from at least two of the following: history 
foreign languages and religion. Or eight hours chosen 
from foreign languages. 

(3) Society 8 

Eight hours chosen from at least two of the following: economics, 
geography political science, psychology and sociology 

(4) Science/Analysis 8 

Eight hours chosen from one or more of the following: mathe- 
matics, science and computer science. At least one course 
must be a physical or biological laboratory science. 

d. Advanced Studies 12 

Eight hours of junior/senior level courses outside the major 
field chosen from at least two of the four areas listed under 
Liberal Studies (8sh) 

One General Studies Interdisciplinary Seminar (4sh) 
Total hours 59 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

3. Electives 

4. Satisfactory completion of General Studies competency assessments 
in the freshman and sophomore years 

5. Satisfactory completion of a comprehensive evaluation in the major 
field of study 

6. A minimum of 36 semester hours of junior/senior level work 

f; 7. One full academic year of study at Elon (33 semester hours or more), 
j; including the last term before graduation 

■' 8. Twice as many quality points as credit hours attempted must be earned 

,; 9. Participation in commencement exercises 

V Students must demonstrate competence in English and Mathematics or 

■ successfully complete English 100 and Mathematics 100 before beginning 
English 1 10 and the mathematics requirement in the First-Year Core. 

Students who have not passed Algebra II should make up this deficiency 
by taking Mathematics 100 during the freshman year. 

Students who have not had two years of one foreign language in high 
school must make up this deficiency by taking a first level 110 foreign language 
course. Courses taken to remove this deficiency will not satisfy the General 
Studies requirements. 

A maximum of 15 semester hours of internship/cooperative education 
credit may be applied to the 132 semester hours required for the A.B., B.S. 
and B.F.A. degrees. 

Students must apply for graduation by the dates published by the Registrar 

A student may graduate under the provisions of the catalog published the 
' year of first enrollment, provided the course of study is completed within five 
years. After the interval of five years, a student's credits will be subject to review 
by the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

Students who qualify for more than one major must select the primary major 
f for which they will receive a Bachelor's degree. No student will be awarded two 
degrees at commencement. 

It is the student's responsibility to be familiar with the preceding requirements 
for graduation. 

The Major 

A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in the requirements for the major is 
required for graduation. Bachelor of Arts majors require 32-52 semester hours 
of credit. Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Fine Arts majors require 32-68 
semester hours of credit. The student may elect to complete more than one 
; major. No later than the beginning of the junior year, each candidate for a 



71 



E L N COLLEGE 

Bachelor's degree must select a major field. Requirements for each major 
are listed with the courses of instruction. 

The Minor 

A candidate for the Bachelor's degree may elect a field (or fields) of minor 1 
concentration, consisting of 16-24 semester hours with a minimum grade point 
average of 2.0. 



72 



ACCOUNTING 




ourses 



■]. The departments of instruction are organized into four general divisions. 

f These include areas of learning arranged as follows: 

:' Division of Arts and Humanities: Art, Communication, Dance, English, Film 73 

i studies. Fine Arts, French, Journalism, Music, Music Theatre, Philosophy, Religious 
'■ Studies, Spanish, and Theatre Arts. 

Division of Sciences and Mathematics: Biology, Chemistry, Computing Sciences, 
Environmental Studies, Mathematics, Medical Technology and Physics. 

Division of Social Sciences: Accounting, African/African-American Studies, 
; Anthropology, Business Administration, Cooperative Education, Economics, 
Geography, History, Human Services, International Studies, Political Science, 
Psychology, Public Administration, Sociology, and Women's Studies. 

Division of Education and Health, Physical Education and Leisure/ Sport 
Management: Education, Health Education, Leisure/Sport Management, Military 
Science, Physical Education, and Sports Medicine. 

Courses numbered 100-199 are on the freshman level, 200-299 on the 
sophomore level and 300 and above on the junior/senior level. 

ACCOUNTING 

The Martha and Spencer Love School of Business 

:, Interim Dean of Love School of Business: Associate Professor Behrman 
•. Chair, Department of Accounting: Associate Professor McGregor 
,: Assistant Professors: Caldwell, Cox, Gibney, Hall 

J Accounting involves measuring business activities and communicating this 

■,' information to investors, creditors and other decision makers, who use it to make 

^ sound, informed financial decisions. This practice serves to encourage investment 

I activity, which in turn creates jobs and helps the economy to grow. 

'I Elon's program leading to the B.S. in accounting includes the central topics of 

ii financial and managerial accounting plus an introduction to taxation, auditing and 
;; commercial law. The accounting program prepares the graduate to be a professional 
:; staff accountant in public accounting, industry and not-for-profit organizations. This 
; degree can also serve as a basis for graduate study in accounting and other fields, 
including business administration and law. 

A student must be admitted to the Love School of Business before taking certain 
upper level courses required for the major. Most students can qualify for admission 
to the Love School of Business when they have completed their sophomore year. 

To be admitted to the Love School of Business, an accounting major must — 
(1) Attain junior status and satisfy College standards for continued enrollment; 



ACCOUNTING 



74 



(2) Complete the following courses with an average of at least 2.0 within this 
group of courses: 

MTH 116 Applied Mathematics with Calculus 4shor 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

Principles of Economics 4 sh 

Statistics for Economics and Business 4 sh 

Principles of Financial Accounting 4 sh 

Principles of Management Accounting 4 sh 

Microcomputer Applications 4 sh 



MTH 


121 


ECO 


201 


ECO 


202 


ACC 


201 


ACC 


212 


IS 


116 



TOTAL 



24 sh 



In addition to admission to the Love School of Business a major in 
Accounting requires the following courses: 

ACC 331 Intermediate Accounting I 4 sh 

Intermediate Accounting II 4 sh 

Cost Accounting 4 sh 

Fundamentals of income Taxation 4 sh 

Advanced Taxation 4 sh 

Advanced Financial Accounting 4 sh 

Auditing 4 sh 

Business Law 2 sh 

Principles of Management 4 sh 

Managerial Finance 4 sh 

Commercial Law 4 sh 

TOTAL 42 sh 

A minor in Accounting requires the following courses: 

ACC 201 Principles of Financial Accounting 4 sh 

ACC 212 Principles of Management Accounting 4 sh 

ACC 331 Intermediate Accounting I 4 sh 

Two additional Accounting courses 8 sh 



ACC 


332 


ACC 


336 


ACC 


341 


ACC 


442 


ACC 


451 


ACC 


456 


BA 


221 


BA 


323 


BA 


343 


BA 


418 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



ACC 201. PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL 

ACCOUNTING 4 sh 

In this introduction to the financial 
reporting process, study emphasizes 
the accrual basis of accounting. Students 
learn to prepare and interpret income 
statements and balance sheets, analyze 
business transactions and determine 
the effects of transactions on assets 
and equities. Offered fall and spring. 



ACC 202. BASICS OF MANAGEMENT 

ACCOUNTING 2sh 

Students gain an overview of the ways 
accounting information helps managers 
as they plan, develop control procedures 
and make decisions for their organiza- 
tions. The course also covers the concepts 
of cost behavior, cost-volume-profit 
analysis and the preparation of budgets. 
Prerequisite: ACC 201 . Credit will not be 
given for both ACC 202, 212. Offered fall 
and spring. 



ACCOUNTING 



\CC 212. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 
ACCOUNTING 4 sh 

This course introduces the preparation 
and analysis of accounting information 
for use by managers within an organi- 
zation. Study emphasizes the concepts 
of cost and cost behavior, including 
manufacturing costs, relevant costs, 
cost-volume-profit relationships, 
special pricing decisions and budgeting. 
Prerequisites: ACC 201, IS 116. Credit 
will not be given for both ACC 202, 212. 
Offered fall and spring. 

\CC331. INTERMEDIATE 

ACCOUNTING I 4 sh 

Intermediate Accounting begins an 
in-depth study of generally accepted 
accounting principles and their theoretical 
basis. Students explore the contents of 
and interrelationships among the balance 
sheet, income statement, and statement 
of cash flows, along with techniques for 
analyzing and correcting errors. Some of 
the more important accounting standards 
of the Financial Accounting Standards 
Board are included. Prerequisites: ACC 
201, 212. Offered fall and spring. 

\CC 332. INTERMEDIATE 

ACCOUNTING II 4 sh 

This continuation of the in-depth study of 
financial accounting (begun in ACC 331) 
emphasizes long-term liabilities and 
stockholder's equity, accounting for 
leases, pensions and other post-employ- 
ment benefits and deferred income taxes. 
Prerequisite: ACC 331 . Offered spring. 

\CC 336. COST ACCOUNTING 4 sh 

In cost accounting, students examine 
methods for gathering and analyzing 
production cost data, which managers 
use to plan, budget and set prices for their 
products, with emphasis on the job order 
costing, process costing and standard 
costing methods and the interpretation 
of data produced by each system. 
Prerequisite: ACC 212. Offered spring. 

\CC341. FUNDAMENTALS 

OF INCOME TAXATION 4 sh 

This introduction to the structure of the 



Federal income tax system emphasizes 
the theories, procedures and rationale 
associated with the taxation of indi- 
viduals. Prerequisite: admission to 
Love School of Business. Offered fall. 

ACC 365. ACCOUNTING 

APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

Topics vary yearly in this study of 
practical uses of accounting in various 
business functions. Prerequisite: 
admission to Love School of Business or 
permission of instructor. Offered winter. 

ACC 442. ADVANCED TAXATION 4 sh 

With advanced study of taxation, 
including the income taxation of 
corporations, partnerships and estates 
students will learn to locate relevant 
information in regulations, revenue 
rulings and court cases. They will report 
their findings in the form of written 
reports and memoranda. Prerequisites: 
admission to Love School of Business; 
ACC 34 1 . Offered spring. 

ACC 451. ADVANCED FINANCIAL 

ACCOUNTING 4 sh 

Continuing the in-depth study of 
financial accounting that began in 
Intermediate Accounting (ACC 331, 
332), this course includes accounting 
for business combinations, with special 
emphasis on preparing consolidated 
financial statements for parent and 
subsidiary corporations. Accounting 
for governmental units and other not- 
for-profit organizations is also intro- 
duced. Prerequisites: admission to Love 
School of Business; ACC 331 and 332, 
or ACC 331 and concurrent enrollment 
in ACC 332. Offered fall. 

ACC 456. AUDITING 4 sh 

Study of auditing covers both theory 
and practice, including ethics, generally 
accepted auditing standards, internal 
accounting controls, auditors working 
papers, the components of audit risk, 
compliance testing and substantive 
testing. Prerequisites: admission to 
Love School of Business and ACC 332. 
Offered spring. 



75 



ACCOUNTING 



ACC471. SEMINAR: 

SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4 sh 

This upper level seminar, an advanced 
study requiring active participation 
by students, consists of readings, 
problems, reports, discussions of 
current topics, or preparation for 
professional examinations. May be 



conducted by departmental faculty or 
other resource persons. Prerequisite: 
permission of instructor, may vary 
with topic. « 

ACC481. INTERNSHIP IN 

ACCOUNTING 1-8 sh 



ACC 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 sh 



76 



AFRICANIAFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES 

Coordinator: Assistant Professor Boyd i 

African/African American Studies takes an interdisciplinary approach to study 
two cultures and connect the past with the present. The program, developed in 1994, 
allows the student to select from a current group of courses approved by an advisory 
group. Through connected study the student not only takes a fresh approach to s 
learning but also develops an individualized study plan. 

This program is highly recommended for those persons in education and program: 
leading to multi-cultural relations. The minor consists of a minimum of 20 credit houn 
including a capstone course. 

A minor in African/ African-American Studies requires the following: \ 

Twenty semester hours selected from the following: 
ENG 238 African-American Literature pre- 1945 4 sh j 

ENG 239 African-American Literature since 1945 4 sh j 

ENG 359 African-American Novels 4 sh . ! 

ENG 363 Literature and Culture; India, Africa, 'j 

& West Indies 

Modern Africa 

History of Southern Africa 

African-American History, 1 850-Present 

African Politics 

Ethnic and Race Relations 



HST 

HST 

HST 

PS 

SOC 

AA 

AA 



313 

314 

363 

367 

341 

361-9 Seminars in African/African- American Studies 

491 Independent Study 



4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



AA 361-369. SEMINARS IN AFRICAN/ 
AFRICAN-AMERICAN 
STUDIES 

Interdisciplinary seminars focus on 
modern scholarship in African and 



sh 



African-American Studies. Topics vary 
according to course theme. 



AA491. 



INDEPENDENT 
STUDY 



1-4 sh 



ART 

ART 

chair, Department of Visual Arts: Associate Professor Sanford 

Assistant Professor: Simpkins 

Part-time Instructors: K. Hassell, J. Henricks 

The Department of Art provides students with many opportunities to develop 
their visual awareness, engage in creative activity and to understand and critique 
their visual heritage. The major and minor in art are designed to develop a strong 
background in the language of design, drawing and art history. Students select a 
particular medium for further study and exploration. Courses in drawing, ceramics, 
photography and painting are available at advanced levels and are supported by 
well-equipped studio facilities. jj 

An active exhibition program in the campus galleries consistently exposes 
students to works by regional, national and international artists. Many of them also 
visit our campus to meet and work with art students. The many outstanding museums 
in the area and winter term travel courses expand the opportunities for students to 
come into contact with the world's great art and the contemporary scene. 

The B.A. in art builds on Elon's strong liberal arts program to produce creative 
thinkers who are prepared for further professional and educational challenges. 

; A major in Art requires the following courses: 

ART 112 Fundamentals of Design 4 sh 

ART 201 Drawing 1 4 sh 

ART 310 Art History I 4 sh 

ART 311 Art History II 4 sh 

ART 495 Senior Seminar 2 sh 

;; Three courses in a studio sequence 12 sh 

Three electives in Art, one of which must be at the 300-400 level 12 sh 

TOTAL 42 sh 

',■ A minor in Art requires the following courses: 

ART 112 Fundamentals of Design 4 sh 

; ART 201 Drawing I 4 sh 

{ ART 310 Art History I 4 sh 

V ART 311 Art History II 4 sh 

Eight semester hours which includes the completion 

of a two-course sequence 8 sh 

TOTAL 24 sh 

It is recommended that Art 1 12 and Art 201 be taken before the elective courses 
in sequence. 

ART 1 10. INTRODUCTION ART 1 1 1. INTRODUCTION TO 

TO STUDIO ART 4sh THE VISUAL ARTS 4sh 

This course explores basic vocabulary This course introduces the general 

and processes of studio art, emphasizing concepts, themes and major movements 

creative problem-solving and craftsman- of art and architecture. Students also 

ship in using various materials. explore these historical traditions 



ART 



through hands-on activities in a variety 
of media. 

ART 112. FUNDAMENTALS 

OF DESIGN 4 sh 

This introduction to the fundamental 
principles and processes of two- 
dimensional and three-dimensional 
design uses a variety of media. Empha- 
sis is placed on problem-solving, 
craftsmanship, creative exploration 
-Q and effective use of the language of art. 
Material fee: $30. Offered fall and spring. 

ART 200. CERAMICS I 4 sh 

This introduction to principles and 
processes of v\/orking with clay and 
glazes emphasizes basic construction 
techniques and kiln firing. Course study 
also explores the relationship between 
surface and form. Material fee: $30. 
Offered fall and spring. 

ART 201. DRAWING I 4sh 

Students learn the fundamentals of 
drawing and composition using various 
media. Material fee: $30. Offered fall 
and spring. 

ART 202. PAINTING I 4 sh 

Painting I introduces the techniques of 
painting and composition in oils, with 
additional emphasis on color theory and 
creative exploration of the medium. 
Material fee: $50. Offered fall . 

ART 203. WATERCOLOR I 4 sh 

Course work studies various techniques 
of painting and composition with 
watercolor, emphasizing color theory 
and creative exploration of the medium. 
Material fee: $30. 

ART 204. PRINTMAKING I 4 sh 

Students become familiar with the basic 
processes of printmaking, with emphasis 
on the technical processes, design 
elements and the terms and concepts 
of the medium. Material fee: $30. 
Offered spring. 



ART 205. PHOTOGRAPHY I 4 sh 

Photography I introduces students to the 
techniques, processes and language of 
photography. Emphasis is placed on the 
expressive qualities of the medium by 
making pictures that communicate | 
individual experiences and ideas. 
Laboratory experience included. No prior 
experience necessary; students must 
provide a 35mm camera. Lab fee: $50. 
Offered fall and spring. 

ART 300. CERAMICS II 4 sh 

Students continue from ART 200, with 
emphasis on wheel thrown forms, glaze 
mixing, kiln firing and studio manage- 
ment. Prerequisite: ART 200. Material 
fee: $30. 

ART 301. DRAWING II 4sh 

A continuation of ART 201 , this course 
emphasizes composition, critical 
analysis and productive exploration i 
through more extended studies in a 
variety of media. Prerequisite: ART 20 L 
Material fee: $30. 

ART 302. PAINTING II 4 sh 

A continuation of ART 202, this class 
emphasizes individual development, a 
advanced critical analysis of visual 
images and productive exploration j 
of the medium. Prerequisite: ART 202. 
Material fee: $50. Offered fall. 

ART 305. PHOTOGRAPHY II 4 sh 

A continuation of ART 205, this course 
builds on the ideas and information in 
Photography L More advanced tech- 
niques and a deeper understanding of 
the qualities and history of photography 
provide greater control over how 
photographs look and what they state. 
Prerequisite: ART 205. Lab fee: $50. 

ART 3 1 0. ART HISTORY I 4 sh 

Course study surveys major visual arts 
from pre-history through the Middle 
Ages, emphasizing artistic styles, their 
origin and development, major works 
of art and their creators. Offered fall 



I 



BIOLOGY AND ALLIED HEALTH 



\RT 31 1. ART HISTORY II 4 sh 

This historical survey of the major visual 
arts from the Renaissance to the present 
emphasizes artistic styles, their origin 
and development, major works of art 
and their creators. Offered spring. 

IVRT 3 1 2. STUDIES IN ART HISTORY 4 sh 

In-depth study in this topically oriented 
class covers a particular period, style 
or theme in art history. 

/VRT 400. CERAMICS III 4 sh 

A continuation of ART 300, emphasis in 
this course is on increased individual 
exploration of a single form-making 
process, glaze calculation and kiln firing. 
Prerequisite: ART 300. Material fee: $30. 

ART 402. PAINTING III 4 sh 

This continuation of ART 302 empha- 
sizes increased individual exploration 
of the medium and the development of 
a focused body of work. Prerequisite: 
ART 302. Material fee: $50. Offered fall. 

ART 405. PHOTOGRAPHY III 4 sh 

This course continues ART 305 with 
a semester-long project proposed and 
developed by each student, concluding 
in a portfolio. Course emphasis is on 
individual participation through class 



presentations on techniques and 
issues in contemporary photography. 
Prerequisite: ART 305. Lab fee: $50. 

ART 46 1 . SENIOR SEMINAR 2 sh 

This course requires the student to 
assemble a portfolio, produce a critical 
artistic statement and plan an exhibition 
of her/his art work. All activities are 
done in consultation with a departmen- 
tal advisor. This course should be taken 
during the final semester and should 
include the most current work produced 
by the student. 

ART 48 1 . INTERNSHIP IN ART 4sh 

This course for art majors and minors 
may only be taken with the permission 
of the department head and supervising 
instructor. 

ART 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDIO 2^4 sh 

Art majors and minors may pursue 
a program of advanced study and 
individual exploration in a selected 
medium. Proposals for independent 
studio should be prepared and submitted 
in the semester prior to enrollment. The 
instructor may require class attendance. 
Maximum 8 s.h. credit, by permission of 
art faculty only. 



79 



BIOLOGY AND ALLIED HEALTH 

Chair, Department of Biology and Allied Health: Associate Professor Mason 
' Professors: H. House, Rao 
Associate Professors: N. Harris 
Assistant Professors: Gallucci, Kingston, Ulrich, Vick 
Part-time Instructors: Claar, Davidson 

Biology is the study of life in all its diverse forms. As a species, we have always 
been deeply fascinated by other living creatures. Early man's dependence on other 
animals and plants for food, medicine, and shelter fostered an appreciation for life's 
interconnectedness. Modern society has rediscovered these relationships in the face 
of such challenges as global warming, rain forest destruction, AIDS, rising cancer 
rates and industrial pollution. 

Our approach to biology at Elon College stresses hands-on experiences in the 
classroom, laboratory and field. The course of study includes off-campus experiential 
opportunities and research seminars that encourage creative approaches to biological 
problems. The focus is on science as a process, not a collection of established facts. 



80 



I L G Y AND ALLIED HEALTH 

The faculty strives to provide students with a high quality program that enables 
them to (1) develop critical thinking and problem solving skills to better understand 
and meet present and future biological challenges; (2) develop competency in 
information retrieval, use and analysis; (3) develop an understanding of the latest 
technologies utilized in biological investigation; (4) acquire broad-based knowledge 
of biological concepts from molecules to ecosystems; and (5) acquire an experiential 
learning opportunity through either research, internship or laboratory assistantship. 

The medical technology curriculum involves undergraduate preparation at Elon 
College and completion of the clinical curriculum at Moses H. Cone Memorial 
Hospital, where the affiliated hospital-based program is located. Admission to the 
affiliated program is competitive and based on overall GPA, evaluation by faculty and 
personal interviews. 

In any of Elon's biology offerings, students receive a strong foundation in biology 
that prepares them for graduate studies, medical and other allied health related 
professional schools, teaching and industry. 

The Department of Biology and Allied Health offers programs leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Biology, the Bachelor 
of Science degree with a major in Medical Technology, and a minor concentration in 
Biology for students majoring in another discipline. 

The department of Biology has divided its laboratory course offerings that serve 
as electives into three functional categories to assist students in the development of 
a broad based major with the necessary fundamental biological concepts while at the 
same time providing the student the flexibility to build a program that meets their 
individual interests and needs. 

Molecular/Cellular Biology Organismal Biology Supraorganismal Biology 

BIO 322 BIO 312 BIO 34 1 BIO 335 

BIO 345 BIO 32 1 BIO 342 BIO 452 I 

BIO 351 BIO 325 BIO 452 | 

Both the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees in Biology 

require the following Core Courses: 

BIO 1 11 Intro Cell Biology 3 sh 

BIO 112 Intro Population Biology 3 sh 

BIO 113 Cell Biology Lab 1 sh 

BIO 1 14 Population Biology Lab 1 sh 

BIO 221 General Zoology 4sh 

BIO 222 General Botany 4 sh 

BIO 261 Introductory Seminar 2sh 

BIO 322 Molecular and Cellular Biology 4 sh 

One course selected from the Organismal Biology category 4 sh 

BIO 3 1 2 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 

BIO 321 Microbiology 

BIO 325 Human Histology 

BIO 341 Animal Physiology 

BIO 342 Plant Physiology 



BIOLOGY AND ALLIED HEALTH 

One course selected from the Supraorganismal 
Biology category: 4 sh 

BIO 335 Field Biology 
BIO 442 Aquatic Biology 
BIO 452 General Ecology 

Eight semester hours of electives selected 
from the following: 8 sh 

Organismal Biology category 
Supraorganismal Biology category 
Molecular/Cellular Biology category 
BIO 345 Genetics 

BIO 351 Biochemistry 81 

This may include a maximum of two 2-semester hour 
special topics seminars. 

BIO 462 Senior Seminar 2 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 

A Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology requires the following courses: 
Core Courses in Biology 40 sh 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHMII2 General Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 113 General Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 1 14 General Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

In addition, an experiential component selected from 

(a) internship 

(b) research 

(c) an approved laboratory assistantship is required. 

TOTAL 48 sh 

A Bachelor of Science degree in Biology requires the following courses: 
Core Courses in Biology 40 sh 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chem 
CHM 112 General Chem 
CHM 113 General Chem 
CHM 114 General Chem 
CHM 21 1 Organic Chem 
CHM 212 Organic Chem 
CHM 213 Organic Chem 
CHM 214 Organic Chem 



stry I 3 sh 

stry II 3 sh 

stry I Lab I sh 

stry II Lab I sh 

stry I 3 sh 

stry II 3 sh 

stry I Lab I sh 

stry II Lab I sh 

PHY 1 1 1 General Physics I 4 sh 

PHY 1 12 General Physics II 4 sh 

MTHII4 Elementary Statistics 4 sh 
In addition, an experiential component selected from 

(a) internship 

(b) research 

(c) an approved laboratory assistantship is required. 

TOTAL 68 sh 



I L G Y AND ALLIED HEALTH 



82 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Medical Technology requires 49 semester 
hours of course work at Elon College and completion of the clinical curriculum at 
Moses Cone Memorial Hospital. 

BIO 1 11 Intro Cell Biology 3 sh 

BIO 1 12 Intro Population Biology 3 sh 

BIO 113 Cell Biology Lab 1 sh 

BIO 1 14 Population Biology Lab 1 sh 

BIO 321 Microbiology 4sh 

BIO 345 Genetics 4 sh 

BIO 351 Biochemistry 3 sh 

BIO 352 Biochemistry Lab 1 sh 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM1I2 General Chemistry II 3sh 

CHM 1 13 General Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 1 14 General Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

CHM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 212 Organic Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 213 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 214 Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

PHY 1 1 1 General Physics I 4 sh 

PHY 112 General Physics II 4sh 

MTH 114 Elementary Statistics 4 sh or 

IS 1 16 Microcomputer Applications 4 sh 

A course in immunology 1-3 sh 
Completion of the clinical curriculum at Moses H. Cone 
Memorial Hospital 

TOTAL 49-51 sh 

A Minor in Biology requires the following courses: 

BIO 1 1 1 Intro Cell Biology 3 sh 

BIO 113 Cell Biology Lab 1 sh 

Sixteen semester hours chosen from the following 1 6 sh 
BIO 1 12 Intro Population Biology 
BIO 1 14 Population Biology Lab 
Biology courses at the 200-400 level 

TOTAL 



BIO 101. TOPICS IN GENERAL 

BIOLOGY 3 sh 

This topical approach to the foundational 
concepts of biology examines theories 
and issues in biology as they relate to 
varying special topics selected by the 



20 sh 

instructor. For general studies laboratory 
science requirement the BIO 102 
laboratory should be taken concurrently. 
No credit to students with prior credit for 
BIO 1 1 1 . No credit toward biology major 
or minor. Offered fall and spring. 



I L C Y AND ALLIED HEALTH 



BIO 102. GENERAL BIOLOGY 

LABORATORY I sh 

This two-hour laboratory provides 
experiences to complement selected 
foundational concepts from BIO 101. 
To satisfy the general studies laboratory 
science requirement, BIO 101 and 102 
should be taken concurrently. No credit 
to students with prior credit for BIO 1 13. 
No credit toward biology major or minor. 
Offered fall and spring. 

810 105. CURRENT ISSUES 

IN BIOLOGY 4 sh 

Designed for non-science majors, this 
course focuses on reading, interpreting 
and evaluating facts behind biological 
issues and exploring the implications 
for science and human society. Students 
conduct library research, present oral 
reports, discuss and write papers on 
these issues. No credit toward biology 
major or minor. Satisfies General Studies 
non-laboratory science requirement. 
Offered winter. 

510 110. INTRODUCTION TO 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 4 sh 

This course explores the fundamental 
principles of the biological and physical 
sciences behind natural ecosystems. 
Central focus is an investigation of the 
root causes of the global environmental 
crisis: overpopulation, natural resources 
depletion and pollution. Students 
consider different world views and 
the development of solutions. Satisfies 
the non-laboratory science requirement 
for General Studies. (BIO 110 is the 
same course as ES 110.) Offered fall 
and spring. 

BIO 111. INTRODUCTORY 

CELL BIOLOGY 3 sh 

In this introduction to organization and 
function at the cellular level, topics of 
study include basic cell chemistry and 
structure, transport, energetics and 
reproduction. Required for biology 
majors/minors. Corequisite: BIO 113. 
Offered fall and spring. 



BIO 112. INTRODUCTORY 

POPULATION BIOLOGY 3 sh 

Topics of study in this introduction 
to organization and function at the 
population level include reproduction 
and transmission genetics, patterns 
and mechanics of evolutionary change 
and basic concepts of ecology. Required 
for biology majors/minors. Corequisite: 
BIO 1 14. Offered fall and spring. 

BIO 113. CELL BIOLOGY 

LABORATORY I sh 

Students have three hours of laboratory 
experience per week with topics 
complementing concurrent study in 
BIO 111. Required for biology majors/ 
minors. Corequisite: BIO III. Offered 
fall and spring. 

BIO 114. POPULATION BIOLOGY 

LABORATORY I sh 

Students have three hours of laboratory 
experience per week with topics 
complementing concurrent study in 
BIO 112. Required for biology majors/ 
minors. Corequisite; BIO 112. 
Offered fall and spring. 

BIO 121. BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY 4sh 

This course exposes the non-science 
major to the diversity of form 
and function through lectures and 
demonstrations, emphasizing the 
relationship of specific organisms 
and diversity in general to human 
society. No credit toward major/minor. 
Satisfies General Studies non-laboratory 
science requirement. 

BIO 1 6 1 . HUMAN ANATOMY 4 sh 

This course explores human anatomy, 
concentrating on skeletal, muscular, 
nervous, endocrine, heart, blood, 
respiratory, digestive and urinary aspects. 
Three class hours, one laboratory per 
week. No credit toward BIO major/ 
minor. Offered fall and spring. 

BIO 162. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY 4 sh 

This study of human physiology empha- 
sizes skeletal, muscular, nervous, endo- 



83 



I L G Y AND ALLIED HEALTH 



84 



crine, heart, blood, respiratory, digestive 
and urinary aspects. Three class hours, one 
laboratory per week. No credit toward BIO 
major/minor. Offered fall and spring. 

BIO 181. BIOLOGY LABORATORY 

TECHNIQUES 2sh 

Skills taught in this training course 
for prospective laboratory assistants 
include laboratory procedures, materials 
preparation and grading procedures. 
Offered spring. 

BIO 215. ORGANISMAL BIOLOGY 

AND FIELD TECHNIQUES 4 sh 

This course examines the basic concepts 
of plant and animal form and function 
and the fundamentals of plant and 
animal systematics, with a focus on 
herbaceous and woody plants, soil and 
aquatic invertebrates. Students investi- 
gate the natural history of local plant and 
animal species and their role in commu- 
nity dynamics. Laboratory experiences 
emphasize keying and identification, field 
methodologies of specimen collection 
and preservation, sampling techniques, 
and population estimation procedures 
for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. 
Satisfies the General Studies lab science 
requirement. No credit toward the major 
or minor. Prerequisites: ES/BIO 110, BIO 
112, 114. (BIO 215 is the same course as 
ES 215.) Offered fall. 

BIO 221. GENERAL ZOOLOGY 4sh 

Students survey the animal kingdom 
(emphasizing selected vertebrates and 
invertebrates), investigating basic 
concepts of morphology, anatomy, 
physiology and taxonomy as they affect 
the ecology of the animal. Three class 
hours, one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO 1 1 1, 112, 113, 114. 
Offered fall and spring. 

BIO 222. GENERAL BOTANY 4sh 

This survey of the plant kingdom 
(emphasizing vascular plants) includes 
general morphology, anatomy, phy- 
siology of metabolism and growth, 
economic importance and identification. 



Three class hours, one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisites: BIO 1 1 1, 1 12, 113, 
114. Offered fall and spring. 

BIO 261. INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR 2sh 

Students learn to use primary informa- 
tion sources and gain practice in manual 
and computer information retrieval, read 
and interpret research and review papers, 
write abstracts and present scientific 
information orally. Recommended for i 
sophomore year. Offered spring. 

BIO 271. SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINAR 2sh 

Study focuses on one biological topic per 
seminar in this non-laboratory discussion 
course for biology majors. Topics are 
determined by student and faculty 
interest. Must have instructor's consent. 



sh 



BIO 312. COMPARATIVE 

VERTEBRATE ANATOMY 

Lower chordates and vertebrates are 
dissected and studied in this comprehen- 
sive, comparative study of chordate ■ 
anatomy, which emphasizes system 
evolution and morphology. Three class 
hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
sites: BIO 1 1 1, 1 12, 1 13, and 1 14. Offered 
spring of odd-numbered years. | 

BIO 321. MICROBIOLOGY 4sh 

In a general survey of microorganisms, 
study emphasizes bacteria, their 
cytophysiological characteristics 
and classification, viruses, microbial 
diseases and immunity and the role 
of microorganisms in human affairs. 
Three class hours, one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisites: BIO III, 113, 
CHM 111, 112, 113, 1 14. Junior standing 
or consent of instructor. Offered spring 
of even-numbered years. 



BIO 322. MOLECULAR AND 

CELLULAR BIOLOGY 4 sh 

This course is a study of the structure 
and function of prokaryotic and 
eukaryotic cells at the molecular level. 
It examines in depth specific biochemi- 
cal pathways and processes essential 
to life. Topics include considerable 
coverage of the principles, techniques 



I L G Y AND ALLIED HEALTH 



and applications of molecular genetics. 
Three class hours and one laboratory 
per week. Prerequisites; BIO 111,112, 

113, and 114;CHM 111, 112, 113, 114. 
Offered fall. 

BIO 325. HUMAN HISTOLOGY 4sh 

Students survey human body tissues 
(especially of the cardiovascular, alimen- 
tary, respiratory, urinary and reproductive 
systems), stressing tissue identification 
and the relationship of microanatomy 
to physiology of the human body. Three 
class hours, one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO 1 1 1, 1 13. Offered fall 
of odd-numbered years. 

BIO 335. FIELD BIOLOGY 4sh 

In this field-oriented course, restricted 
to selected natural taxa, environments 
or biological phenomena, in-depth field 
study may include identification, classifi- 
cation, life histories and relationships 
among organisms. Winter and/or 
summer term. Prerequisite: Consent of 
instructor. Offered winter or summer. 

BIO 341. ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY 4sh 

Study emphasizes the functions, regula- 
tory processes and responses occurring in 
animal organ systems. Three class hours, 
one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 
BIO 221; CHM 111, 112, 113, 114. Offered 
fall of odd-numbered years. 

BIO 342. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 4sh 

Topics in this study of the life processes of 
plants include photosynthesis, mineral 
nutrients, movement of materials, plant 
growth substances and senescence. 
Three class hours, one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO 222; CHM 1 1 1 , 1 12, 1 13, 

1 14. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 

BIO 345. GENETICS 4sh 

Students are introduced to Mendelian 
and molecular principles of genetics 
and the applications of these principles 
to the modern world. Three class hours, 
one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 
BIO 111, 112, 113, and 114; CHM III, 
1 12, 1 13, and 1 14. Offered spring of 
even-numbered years. 



BIO 351. BIOCHEMISTRY 4sh 

In this survey of biochemistry as it relates 
to the physiology of organisms, study 
includes biochemical methodology, 
buffers, proteins (structure, function, 
and synthesis), enzymes, bioenergetics, 
anabolism and catabolism of carbohy- 
drates and lipids, and metabolic regula- 
tion. Three class hours, one laboratory 
per week. Prerequisites: CHM 111, 112, 
113, 114,211, 212, 213,and214. (BIO 
35 1 is the same as CHM 35 1 .) Offered fall 85 
of alternate years. 

BIO 352. BIOCHEMISTRY 

LABORATORY 1 sh 

Experiments in this study of laboratory 
techniques and principles of biochemis- 
try as it relates to the physiology of 
organisms include biochemical 
methodology, buffers, proteins (struc- 
ture, function and synthesis), enzymes, 
bioenergetics, anabolism and catabolism 
of carbohydrates and lipids, and 
metabolic regulation. Corequisite: BIO 
351. (BIO 352 is the same as CHM 352.) 
Offered fall of alternate years. 

BIO 371. SPECIAL TOPICS 

SEMINAR 2-4sh 

Each seminar - a non-laboratory 
discussion course for biology majors - 
focuses on one biological topic 
determined by student and faculty 
interest. Must have instructor consent. 

BIO 442. AQUATIC BIOLOGY: THE 

STUDY OF INLAND WATERS 4sh 

Aquatic Biology considers the chemical, 
physical and biological properties of 
freshwater ecosystems including streams, 
rivers, ponds and lakes. Topics include the 
geomorphology of inland waters, thermal 
strafification, nutrient cycles, community 
metabolism, plankton community 
dynamics, seasonal succession and 
eutrophication resulting from human 
activities. Weekly laboratory meetings 
provide hands-on experience with the 
field techniques of freshwater scientists. 
Prerequisites for Biology major: BIO 221 , 
222; CHM 1 1 1, 1 13, 1 12, 1 14. Prerequisites 



U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION 



86 



for Environmental Studies major: BIO 1 12, 
114,215;CHM 111,113, 112, 114. Junior 
standing or consent of instructor. Offered 
spring of even-numbered years. 

BIO 452. GENERAL ECOLOGY 4sh 

Students explore ecological principles 
at population, community, and ecosystem 
levels in this study of the interrelation- 
ships of organisms with their biotic and 
abiotic environments. Three lecture 
hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
sites for Biology major: BIO 22 1 , 222; 
CHM 111, 113, 112, 114. Prerequisites 
for Environmental Studies major: BIO 
112, 114,215; CHM 111,113, 112, 114. 
Junior standing or consent of instructor. 
Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 

BIO 462. SENIOR SEMINAR 2sh 

This study requires a research or review 
paper and formal oral presentation of a 
focused biological topic to a peer and 
faculty audience. Recommended for 
senior year. Offered fall. 



BIO 471. SPECIAL TOPICS 

SEMINAR 2-4sh 

Each seminar - a non-laboratory 
discussion course for biology majors - j 
focuses on one biological topic deter- 
mined by student and faculty interest. 
Must have instructor's consent. 

BIO 481. INTERNSHIP 

IN BIOLOGY l-4sh 

Advanced level work experience in a 
biological field is offered on an individual 
basis when suitable opportunities can be 
arranged. Prerequisite: permission of 
department. i 

BIO 491. RESEARCH l-4sh 

Students from all levels conduct 
laboratory and/or field research under 
the direction of the Biology faculty. 
Maximum eight semester hours total 
credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
Biology faculty. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The Martha and Spencer Love School of Business 

Interim Dean of Love School of Business: Associate Professor Behrman 

Chair, Depariment of Business Administration: Associate Professor Synn 

Professor: Weavil 

Associate Professors: Baxter, Guffey, McClellan, Paul 

Assistant Professors: O'Mara, Peterson, Strempek 

The Business Administration program at Elon College provides the student an 
education sought by both profit and not-for-profit organizations and companies in every 
sector of global society. In addition to core courses in accounting, finance, management, 
marketing and operations, the student concentrates in one of either finance, manage- 
ment, marketing, international management or management information systems. 
Students may qualify for entry as a business major at the end of the sophomore year. 

With business study and the general studies program blended together, the 
student obtains a well-rounded education most sought after by recruiters from 
industry, government and other organizations for a professional career. 

Students with a degree in Business Administration are among the best prepared 
for most of the top 20 careers of the future as defined recently by Business Weei:. The 
business faculty's style of instruction is practical, based on theories presented in text 
books. That style is possible because the faculty has extensive industry experience in 
addition to post-graduate qualification in the field in which they teach. Students are 
encouraged to use the computer in analysis and presentation, case analyses and 
group projects which are meant to reflect real situations as much as possible. 



MTH 


121 


ECO 


201 


ECO 


202 


ACC 


201 


ACC 


202 


ACC 


212 


IS 


116 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Graduates in business administration are ready to begin professional careers in every 
facet of American organizations requiring business skills. The approximation of business 
problems in the classroom gives the student an understanding of possible situation types 
faced in a career. The sound preparation in liberal studies and business administration 
makes the Elon business major a good investment for professional success. 

To major in Business Administration a student must be admitted to the Love 
School of Business, generally after the sophomore year. Admission is required before 
most 300-400 level Business Administration courses or Economics 301 can be taken. 
To be admitted, a business administration major must: (1) attain junior status and 
satisfy college standards for continued enrollment; (2) complete the following courses 
with an average of 2.0 within this group of courses: 

MTH 116 Applied Mathematics with Calculus 4 sh or 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1 4 sh 

Principles of Economics 4 sh 

Statistics for Economics and Business 4 sh 

Principles of Financial Accounting 4 sh 

Basics of Management Accounting 2 sh or 

Principles of Management Accounting 4 sh 

Microcomputer Applications 4 sh 

TOTAL 22-24 sh 

In addition to the requirements for admission to the Love School of Business, 
a major in Business Administration requires the following courses: 

BA 22 1 Business Law 2 sh 

Business Communications 4 sh 

Principles of Marketing 4 sh 

Principles of Management 4 sh 

Managerial Finance 4 sh 

Principles of Decision Science 4 sh 

Business Policy 4 sh 

Business Economics 4 sh 

Twelve - sixteen semester hours of a concentration 1 2- 1 6 sh 

TOTAL 42-46 sh 

Concentrations: 

Finance 12 sh 

BA 413 Advanced Managerial Finance 

BA421 Investment Principles 

One 300 or 400 level ACC, BA, or ECO course 
Marketing 12 sh 

Three courses from: 

BA 4 1 4 Marketing Research 

BA415 Advertising 

BA 4 1 7 Marketing Channels 

BA 4 1 9 Sales Management 

BA 420 Marketing Strategy 

One 300 or 400 level ACC, BA, or ECO course 



BA 


302 


BA 


311 


BA 


323 


BA 


343 


BA 


360 


BA 


465 


ECO 


301 



U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION 



88 



Management 12 sh ',i 

BA 425 Personnel Administration '{ 

BA 426 Production and Operations Management I 

One 300 or 400 level ACC, BA, or ECO course i 

International Management 16 sh 1 

ECO 314 International Trade and Finance or ■ 

ECO 372 International Economic Development '[ 

BA 430 International Business Management 

Eight semester hours of one foreign language: (Students who choose to continue 

with a foreign language previously studied must take the 210-310 courses in that 

language. Students who choose a language not previously studied must take the 

110-210 courses in that language.) 

Management Information Systems 12 sh 

IS 216 Advanced Microcomputer Applications : 

IS 330 Systems Analysis and Design ' 

IS 340 Systems Implementation 

A minor in Business Administration requires the following courses: 



BA 


311 


BA 


303 


BA 


323 


ACC 


201 


ACC 


202 


ACC 


212 


ECO 


201 



Principles of Marketing 
Introduction to Managing 
Principles of Management 
Principles of Financial Accounting 
Basics of Management Accounting 
Principles of Management Accounting 
Principles of Economics 



4sh 

4 shor 

4sh 

4sh 

2 shor 

4sh 

4sh 



TOTAL 



2sh 



BA221. BUSINESS LAW 

This course introduces the law as it 
applies to businesses, including law and 
the courts, administrative agencies, 
contracts, personal property commercial 
paper, agency, employment, partnerships 
and corporations. Offered fall and spring. 

BA302. BUSINESS 

COMMUNICATIONS 4 sh 

In addition to studying the theory and 
principles of good oral and written 
communications, students practice 
making oral presentations and writing 
business reports, letters and memo- 
randa. Offered fall and spring. 

BA 303. INTRODUCTION 

TO MANAGING 4sh 

Primarily for non-majors, this introduc- 
tory course examines universal business 
processes — such as goal setting, 
plan-ning, decision making, motivation, 
human resource management, control — 



18-20 sh ' 

which are applied by both not-for-profit 
and government organizations. 
No credit for both BA 303 and 323. I 
Offered fall and spring. '} 

BA311. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 4sh 

This study of the marketing and . 

distribution of goods and services ^ 

includes buyer behavior, the marketing 
functions, commodity and industrial 
markets, merchandising considerations, 
price policies and governmental 
regulation of competition. Prerequisite; 
ECO 201. Offered fall and spring. 

BA 323. PRINCIPLES 

OF MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

Principles of Management introduces 
the classical, scientific and behavioral 
approaches to management, with 
particular emphasis on organization j 
and qualitative decision theory. 
No credit for both BA 303 and 323. 
Offered fall and spring. 



U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION 



BA343. MANAGERIAL FINANCE 4sh 

The study of corporate managerial 
functions from the finance perspective 
covers the principle elements of 
financial management, including 
financial analysis and control, v^orking 
capital administration, capital budgeting, 
valuation theory, capital structure and 
leverage, and debt and equity instru- 
ments. Prerequisite: admission to Love 
School of Business or permission of 
instructor. Offered fall and spring. 

BA351. FUNDAMENTALS 

OF REAL ESTATE 4 sh 

Students survey practices, issues and 
analyses from several perspectives — 
economics, finance, marketing and law 
— as they relate to the use of land and 
buildings. Prerequisites: ACC 201 and 
ECO 201 or permission of instructor. 

BA 360. PRINCIPLES OF 

DECISION SCIENCE 4sh 

This course focuses on the application 
of quantitative methods to business 
decision making, especially production 
and operations decisions. Prerequisite: 
admission to Love School of Business 
or permission of instructor. Offered fall 
and spring. 

BA 365. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

Topics vary yearly in the study of 
applications of business administration 
principles and theories in various 
business situations. Primarily offered 
in winter term. 

BA366. FIELD EXPERIENCE 

IN BUSINESS 4 sh 

This travel course revolves around visits 
to diverse businesses, domestically or 
abroad, and analyses of the businesses 
visited. Prerequisite: permission of 
instructor. Offered winter. 

BA 4 1 3. ADVANCED MANAGERIAL 

FINANCE 4 sh 

The in-depth study of financial manage- 
ment from the perspective of valuative 
theory involves discussions of topics 



such as security evaluation and capital 
budgeting within the framework of the 
Capital Asset Pricing Model. Study 
relates cost of capital, capital structure 
and leverage to valuation concepts. 
Examination of long-term financing 
includes studies of leasing as well as 
warrants, convertibles and options. 
Valuation impacts of mergers and 
reorganizations are also covered. 
Prerequisite: BA 343. Offered spring. 

BA 4 1 4. MARKETING RESEARCH 4 sh 

Students apply various research methods 
used in business to gather and analyze 
marketing data. Possible effects and 
implications of the analyses are discussed 
in terms of the marketing and decision- 
making processes of businesses. 
Prerequisite: BA 3n . Offered fall. 

BA415. ADVERTISING 4sh 

In an examination of the creative 
process of advertising — an integral 
part of marketing — students develop 
a comprehensive advertising and 
promotion program, from strategy 
to execution, including media plans, 
advertising and promotion materials, 
and methods of campaign evaluation. 
Prerequisite: BA3n. 

BA4I6. FUNDAMENTALS 

OF INSURANCE 4 sh 

This course provides a study of the 
basic principles of insurance contracts 
and the scope of coverage under the 
several divisions of insurance, including 
life, fire, casualty, marine, bond and 
automobile insurance. 

BA417. MARKETING CHANNELS 4sh 

Course study explores the relationships, 
problems and interfaces between 
manufacturers, wholesalers and 
retailers, emphasizing channel 
management, performance and strategy. 
Prerequisite: BA 31 1 . Offered spring. 

BA 4 1 8. COMMERCIAL LAW 4 sh 

Commercial Law, a technical study of the 
American legal system, includes exami- 
nation of Uniform Commercial Code 



89 



U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION 



provisions governing contracts, sales and 
commercial paper, creditors rights and 
the law of wills and trust. Prerequisite: 
BA 221. Offered fall and spring. 

BA419. SALES MANAGEMENT 4sh 

The sales management course is an 
analysis of professional selling practices 
with emphasis on the selling process 
and sales management, including the 
development of territories, determining 
gn potentials and forecasts, and setting 
sales quotas. Prerequisite: BA 31 1. 

BA 420. MARKETING STRATEGY 4 sh 

This advanced course gives the student 
an opportunity to combine knowledge of 
marketing principles with that of other 
disciplines (accounting, economics, 
finance, and statistics) in solving 
marketing-related problems. Prerequisite: 
Grade of C- or better in BA 3 11 . 

BA421. INVESTMENT PRINCIPLES 4sh 

Study centers on managing investment 
funds according to a predetermined 
goal, emphasizing safety, income and 
marketability, diversification and 
vigilance, and analysis of company 
management and industry trends to 
determine the value of securities. 
Prerequisite: BA 343. Offered fall. 

BA422. BUSINESS AND SOCIETY 4 sh 

Business and society explores the 
relationship of an organization to its social 
and legal environment; the interaction of 
firms, customers and agencies of the 
federal, state and local governments; the 
environmental effects on individuals and 
the economy; and the firm as a cifizen. 
Prerequisite: BA 303 or 323. 

BA425. PERSONNEL 

ADMINISTRATION 4sh 

in this study of basic personnel practices, 
objectives, functions and organization 
of personnel programs, topics include 
job evaluation, selection, placement, 
testing, promotion, compensation, 
training, safety, health and employee 
relationships. Prerequisite: BA 303 or 
323. Offered spring. 



BA426. PRODUCTION AND 

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

This course covers the principles of 
management as applied to production 
systems and emphasizes production 
capacity planning, job design, standards 
and work measurements, scheduling, 
quality control and inventory manage- 
ment. Prerequisite: BA 360. Offered fall. 

BA 430. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

This course covers business management 
from the perspective of the current global 
business environment. Students examine 
the overall nature of international 
business, the foreign environments i 
that international business face and the 
unique situations associated with doing 
business across international borders. 
Prerequisite: admission to Love School 
of Business or permission of instructor. 

BA445. SECURITY ANALYSIS AND 1 

PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

This course teaches the application 
of tools and techniques for appraising 
the economy, specific industries and 
companies, emphasizing securities 1 
markets from the perspectives of | 

institutional portfolio managers or 
personal investors. Prerequisite: BA 343. 

BA465. BUSINESS POLICY 4sh 

This capstone course integrates the 
students experiences and previous ■ 
study through case studies and 
simulated business decision exercises. 
Prerequisites: BA 311, 323, 343, 360 and 
senior status. Offered fall and spring. 

BA471. SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS 4sh 

This advanced study consists of readings 
and discussion of special topics and 
involves participation by students, 
faculty and other resource persons. I 

BA 48 1 . INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 1-6 sh 



BA 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 sh 



CHEMISTRY 

'HEMISTRY 

chair, Department of Chemistry: Associate Professor Gooch 
Professors: Danieley, T.E. Powell jr., E. Grimley 
Associate Professor: Agnew 
Assistant Professors: J. Grimley, Wright 
Part-time Instructor: D. Davis 

The Department of Chemistry offers courses of study leading to either a Bachelor 
of Arts degree (requiring 45 semester hours credit), the Bachelor of Science degree 
(62 semester hours credit) or a minor in Chemistry (24 semester hours credit). 

Students who major in Chemistry are qualified for many pursuits. They may 
choose to: work in chemical industry; continue advanced studies in chemistry; take 91 

professional training in medicine, dentistry or other health-related fields; prepare to 
teach at the secondary level; or pursue opportunities in related fields (environmental 
science, forensics, business and industry). 

One of the components of Elon's chemistry program is the opportunity for 
students to engage with faculty in undergraduate research during the junior and 
senior years. The results of the research projects are presented at local, regional 
and national scientific meetings. 

Another key feature of the program is the introduction and use of instrumentation 
in the first-year general chemistry sequence and its continued emphasis throughout 
the chemistry curriculum. Student participation in assisting in laboratory instruction 
is strongly advised. 

A Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry requires the following courses: 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 1 12 General Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 1 13 General Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 1 14 General Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

CHM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 2 1 2 Organic Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 2 1 3 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 214 Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

CHM 232 Principles of Chemical Separations 4 sh 

CHM 311 Quantitative Analysis 4 sh 

CHM 332 Physical Chemistry I 3sh 

CHM 333 Physical Chemistry I Lab I sh 

CHM 42 1 Instrumental Analysis 4 sh or 

CHM 431 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 sh 

CHM 461 Seminar 1 sh 

i MTH 121 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 4sh 

PHY 1 1 1 General Physics I 4 sh 

PHY 112 General Physics II 4 sh 

(Physics 1 13 and 1 14 may be substituted for Physics I II and 1 12.) 

TOTAL 45 sh 



92 



C H I 


: M 1 S T R Y 




A Bach 




CHM 1 1 1 




CHM 112 




CHM 113 




CHM 114 




CHM 211 




CHM 212 




CHM 213 




CHM 214 




CHM 232 




CHM 311 




CHM 332 




CHM 333 




CHM 412 




CHM 421 




CHM 431 




CHM 461 



A Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry requires the following courses: 

General Chemistry 1 3 sh 

General Chemistry II 3 sh 

General Chemistry IL^b 1 sh 

General Chemistry II L^b 1 sh 

Organic Chemistry I 3 sh 

Organic Chemistry 11 3 sh 

Organic Chemistry 1 Lab 1 sh 

Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

Principles of Chemical Separations 4 sh 

Quantitative Analysis 4 sh 

Physical Chemistry 1 3 sh 

Physical Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

Physical Chemistry II 3 sh 

Instrumental Analysis 4 sh 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 sh 

Seminar 1 sh 

Choose one of the follov^ing two options: 6 sh 
(i) Chemistry 341 Introduction to Research (1 sh) 

Chemistry 491 Research 

Chemistry 492 Thesis (1 sh) 
(ii) Chemistry 351 Biochemistry (3 sh) - and/or 

courses from Chemistry 471-79 Special Topics (3 sh) 

MTH 1 2 1 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

MTH 22 1 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II 4 sh 

PHY 1 1 1 General Physics I 4 sh 

PHY 1 12 General Physics II 4 sh 
(Physics 1 13 and 1 14 may be substituted for Physics 1 1 1 and 1 12.) 

TOTAL 62 sh 

A minor in Chemistry requires the following courses: 

CHM 1 1 1 General Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 112 General Chemistry II 3sh 

CHM 1 13 General Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 1 14 General Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

CHM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry I 3 sh 

CHM 2 1 2 Organic Chemistry II 3 sh 

CHM 2 1 3 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

CHM 2 1 4 Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 sh 

Eight additional semester hours selected from 8 sh 

CHM 232 Principles of Chemical Separations 

CHM 311 Quantitative Analysis 

CHM 351 Biochemistry (3 sh) and 

CHM 352 Biochemistry Lab (1 sh) 

TOTAL 24 sh 



CHEMISTRY 



;HM 101. BASIC CONCEPTS 

IN CHEMISTRY 3 sh 

The course is designed to meet the math/ 
science general studies requirement for 
non-science majors. The material covered 
includes atomic structure, radiochemistry, 
chemical changes, descriptive chemistry 
of selected elements, introduction to 
organic chemistry, and how chemistry 
applies to consumer products and the 
environment. No credit given to students 
with prior credit for CHM 1 1 1 . No credit 
for major/minor. Corequisite: CHM 102. 
Offered fall, winter, spring. 

:HM 102. BASIC CONCEPTS IN 

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY / sh 

Laboratory exercises are based upon 
selected foundational concepts covered 
in CHM 101. No credit for students with 
prior credit for CHM 113. No credit for 
major/minor. Corequisite: CHM 101. 
Offered fall, winter, spring. 

:HM 1 1 1 . GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 3 sh 

This course introduces fundamental 
principles of chemistry with special 
emphasis on developing skills in 
quantitative reasoning. Topics include 
stoichiometry, nomenclature, gases, 
atomic structure and periodicity, and 
thermochemistry. Prerequisite: High 
school chemistry. Corequisites: 
MTH II 1 or higher and CHM 1 13. 
Offered fall and spring. 

:HM 1 12. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 3 sh 

The study of fundamental chemical 
principles continues with chemical 
kinetics, liquid/solid states, chemical 
equilibrium (gas phase and acid/base), 
nuclear chemistry and electrochemistry. 
Prerequisite: CHM 111. Corequisite: 
CHM 114. Offered spring. 

:HM 1 13. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 

LABORATORY / sh 

The experiments offered familiarize 
students with basic laboratory tech- 
niques and complement topics discussed 
in CHM HI. Corequisite: CHM 111. 
Offered fall and spring. 



CHM 114. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 

LABORATORY 1 sh 

This course involves laboratory 
applications of concepts and principles 
discussed in CHM 112. Prerequisites: 
CHM 111,113. Corequisite: CHM 1 12. 
Offered spring. 

CHM 211. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 3 sh 

Organic Chemistry introduces students 
to the chemistry of carbon compounds, 
including nomenclature, the influence of q^ 
structure on physical/chemical proper- 
ties, reaction mechanisms, stereochem- 
istry, conformational analysis, synthesis 
and characteristic reactions of different 
organic compounds. Prerequisites: 
CHM 111, 112, 113, 114. Corequisite: 
CHM 213. Offered fall. 

CHM 212. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 3 sh 

Continuing the study of organic 
chemistry, this course emphasizes 
compounds containing oxygen or 
nitrogen and culminates with a 
survey of lipids, carbohydrates and 
proteins. Prerequisites: CHM 211,213. 
Corequisite; CHM 214. Offered spring. 

CHM 213. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 

LABORATORY / sh 

Laboratory work includes determination 
of physical properties, separation of 
mixtures, some structure identification 
and synthesis of selected organic 
compounds. Prerequisites: CHM 111, 
112, 113, 114. Corequisite: CHM 211. 
Offered fall. 

CHM 214. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 

LABORATORY 1 sh 

Procedures include microscale synthetic 
methods, synthesis using air-sensitive 
compounds and qualitative organic 
analysis. Prerequisites: CHM 21 1, 213. 
Corequisite: CHM 212. Offered spring. 

CHM 232. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL 

SEPARATIONS 4 sh 

This course deals with the theory 
and practice of separation techniques 
including crystallization, distillation, 
gas and liquid chromatography, electro- 



CHEMISTRY 



phoretic techniques, solvent extraction, 
complexation and solubility equilibria. 
Prerequisites: CHM 211. Offered spring. 

CHM 30 1 . SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY 4 sh 

Scientific Inquiry is about scientific 
literacy, ways of knowing science and 
the mission of scientists, it covers ways 
of thinking that are essential for all 
citizens in a world shaped by science 
and technology. No credit toward 
qy, general studies laboratory science 
requirement. No credit for major. 
Prerequisite: A previous laboratory 
science. Offered fall, every other year. 

CHM 305. ENVIRONMENTAL 

CHEMISTRY 4sh 

Environmental Chemistry provides a 
survey of chemical topics applying to 
selected pollutants in the air, water and 
soil. Such topics include production 
and diffusion, photochemical processes, 
techniques for analysis, acid-base and 
redox chemistry, environmental and 
biological effects. Laboratory work 
includes acid/base and buffer chemistry, 
anaylsis of heavy metal pollutants, 
sampling techniques and resistance of 
selected materials to certain pollutants. 
Satisfies the laboratory science require- 
ment for General Studies. No credit 
toward major/minor. Prerequisites: 
CHM 111, 112, 113, 114,211,213. 
Offered spring, every other year. 

CHM 311. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 4 sh 

This course introduces chemical 
methods of quantitative analysis, 
including classical volumetric and 
selected instrumental methods, a 
discussion of error and uncertainty in 
measurements and elementary statistics. 
Discussion also covers the underlying 
physical and chemical theories and laws, 
with emphasis on chemical equilibrium. 
Prerequisites: CHM 111,112. Offered fall. 

CHM 332. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 3 sh 

The application of mathematical methods 
to the physical principles to chemistry is 
the main theme of this sequence. 



Considerable time is spent on the energy 
content of systems, work and the physical 
and chemical properties of matter. 
Specific topics include thermodynamics, 
colligative properties of solutions, 
equilibrium and electrochemistry and 
phase equilibria. Prerequisites: CHM 111, 
112;MTH 121; PHY 11 1/1 12 or 113/114. 
Corequisite: CHM 333. Offered spring. 

CHM 333. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 

LABORATORY 1 sh 

The experiments complement concepts 
discussed in the lecture, including studies 
of phase relationships, gas laws and 
calorimetry. Prerequisites: CHM 111, 112; 
MTH 121; and PHY 11 1/1 12 or 113/114. 
Corequisite: CHM 332. Offered spring. 

CHM 341. INTRODUCTION 

TO RESEARCH 1 sh 

This course is designed to introduce 
students to chemical research, use of 
chemical literature, computerized 
literature searching, research proposal 
and report writing. The student selects 
a faculty research advisor. Emphasis is 
placed on the student developing and 
making progress on an independent 
chemical research problem. Prerequi- 
sites: CHM 111, 112,211,212,232; 
MTH 121; andPHY 111/112 or 113/114. 
Corequisite: CHM 311. Offered fall. 

CHM 35 1 . BIOCHEMISTRY 3 sh 

This is a survey of biochemistry as it 
relates to the physiology of organisms. 
Topics include biochemical methodology, 
buffers, proteins (structure, function and 
synthesis), enzymes, bioenergetics, 
anabolism and catabolism of carbohy- 
drates and lipids, and metabolic regula- 
tion. Prerequisites: CHM 21 1, 212, 213, 
214. (CHM 351 is the same as BIO 351.) 
Offered fall, of alternate years. 

CHM 352. BIOCHEMISTRY 

LABORATORY 1 sh 

This laboratory investigates the rates of 
enzyme-catalyzed reactions, including 
the effect of enzyme inhibitors, the 
isolation/purification/analysis of 



CHEMISTRY 



proteins, lipids and carbohydrates and 
some analytical techniques used in 
clinical chemistry laboratories. Tech- 
niques employed include affinity 
chromatography, electrophoresis, gas 
chromatography, UV-visible spectrom- 
etry and polarimetry. Prerequisites: 
CHM 211, 212, 213, 214. Corequisite: 
CHM 351 . (CHM 352 is the same as 
BIO 352.) Offered fall. 

:HM 4 1 2. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II 3 sh 

Physical Chemistry applies the concepts 
of quantum mechanics to explain the 
basic structure of atoms, molecules and 
ions. Group theory, molecular spectros- 
copy and kinetics are also covered. 
Prerequisites: CHM 232, 311, 332, 333; 
MTH 221; and PHY 11 1/1 12 or 113/114. 
Offered fall. 

;HM 42 1 . INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 4 sh 

Instrumental Analysis offers theory and 
practice of instrumental methods, with 
emphasis placed on spectroscopic (UV/ 
Vis, IR, NMR, AA), mass spectrometric 
and radiochemical methods of analysis. 
Prerequisites: CHM III, 112, 211, 212, 
311, 332, 333. Offered spring. 

HM 431. ADVANCED INORGANIC 

CHEMISTRY 4 sh 

This course surveys the structures, 
physical properties and reactions of 
the elements and their compounds, 
with emphasis on periodic table 
relationships. Topics include chemical 
bonding, organometallic chemistry, 
acid-base theories, the chemistry 
of complexes, nuclear chemistry 
and magnetic properties of matter. 
Prerequisites: CHM 111, 112, 211, 212, 
332, 333. Offered spring. 



CHM 461. SEMINAR 1 sh 

Students make presentations after 
they do individual library or laboratory 
research. Student seminars are supple- 
mented with seminars by practicing 
scientists. All chemistry-oriented 
students are encouraged to attend. Credit 
for senior majors only or by permission of 
the instructor. Offered fall and spring. 

CHM 471-479. SPECIAL TOPICS 

IN CHEMISTRY 3 sh 

Possible advanced topics offered to 
meet the needs and interests of students 
include methods in nuclear chemistry, 
nuclear magnetic resonance, advanced 
organic or polymer chemistry. Prerequi- 
sites: CHM 111, 112,211,212,311,332. 

CHM 481. INTERNSHIP l-4sh 

Students gain advanced level work 
experience in a chemical field. Intern- 
ships are offered on an individual basis 
when suitable opportunities can be 
arranged. Prerequisite: permission 
of department. 

CHM 491. RESEARCH }-3sh 

In collaboration with a chemistry 
faculty member, students undertake 
experimental or theoretical investiga- 
tions. Prerequisite: CHM 341. Offered 
fall, winter, spring. 

CHM 492. THESIS / sh 

The thesis focuses on the formal 
writing process related to results 
of the experimental and/or theoretical 
research conducted by the student. 
Emphasis is placed on the style 
of scientific writing. Majors only. 
Prerequisite: CHM 491. Offered fall, 
winter, spring. 



95 



COMMUNICATIONS 

See Journalism and Communications 



COMPUTING SCIENCES 

COMPUTING SCIENCES 

chair, Department of Computing Sciences: Associate Professor Carpenter 

Professor: W. Hightower 

Associate Professor: Plumblee 

Assistant Professors: V. Hightower, Murphy 

Part-time Instructor: Hudson 

The Computing Sciences Department of Elon College offers a major and minor 
in Computer Science and in Computer Information Systems. A concentration area in 
Management Information Systems is also an option under the Business Administra- 
tion major (See Business Administration for more information on this concentration.) 

96 The study of computer science emphasizes problem-solving techniques which 

translate well into the work force in this and other disciplines. Since the computer 
field is constantly changing, students must learn to communicate effectively and ! 
be able to adapt to new concepts and changing technology. 

Computing sciences students at Elon have excellent access to both faculty and 
equipment. Opportunities for various work and independent learning experiences 
which complement classroom training are also available. Other opportunities for 
involvement include the student chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery 
(ACM), participation in regional and local programming contests and independent 
study. Graduates pursue employment in many areas of industry and business as 
well as graduate study. 

A major in Computer Science requires the following courses: 

Computational Programming 4 sh 

Algorithm Development 4 sh 

Algorithm Analysis 4 sh 

Theory of Computation 4 sh 

Computer Organization 4 sh ' 

Computer Architecture and Operating Systems 4 sh 

Programming Languages/Paradigms 4 sh 

Compiler Design and Implementation 4 sh 

Functions with Applications (or competency) 4 sh ; 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 sh 

Two courses from the following: 8 sh 

A probability and/or statistics course 

MTH311 Linear Algebra 

MTH 32 1 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 

MTH/CS 4 1 5 Numerical Analysis 

MTH 42 1 Differential Equations 

TOTAL 52 sh 

A minor in Computer Science requires the following courses: 
CS 130 Computational Programming 4 sh 

CS 230 Algorithm Development 4 sh 



CS 


130 


CS 


230 


CS 


331 


CS 


351 


CS 


342 


CS 


441 


CS 


435 


CS 


451 


MTH 


119 


MTH 


121 


MTH 


221 



COMPUTING SCIENCES 



Eight semester hours of 300-400 level Computer 
Science (CS) courses 

One additional course from CS or IS at the 
200 level or above 



8sh 

4sh 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



A minor in Computer Information Systems requires the following courses: 
IS 2 1 6 Advanced Microcomputer Applications 4 sh 

Eight semester hours of IS or CS at any level 8 sh 

Eight additional semester hours of 300-400 level 
Information Systems (IS) courses 8 sh 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



97 



:OMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

5 116. MICROCOMPUTER 

APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

This course provides the fundamental 
background necessary to be able to adapt 
to new and changing computer technol- 
ogy as well as an understanding of the 
scope of that technology. The student 
gains basic proficiency and experience 
with selected widely used computer-based 
productivity tools (e.g. word processors, 
spreadsheets, database management 
systems, e-mail) and operating environ- 
ments (e.g.DOS, Windows). The student 
begins the practice of making appropriate 
use of computer technology by working in 
a project setting and will be exposed to 
presentation management and multime- 
dia hypertext tools and the Internet. 
Offered fall and spring. 

5 216. ADVANCED MICROCOMPUTER 

APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

This course addresses advanced features 
of electronic spreadsheet and database 
management software and emphasizes 
writing spreadsheet macros and database 
command files to solve problems. 
Students design and present group and 
individual projects incorporating these 
tools. Prerequisite: IS 1 16 or permission 
of the instmctor. Offered fall and spring. 

S 220. COMPUTERS AND TEACHING 3 sh 

Students planning teaching careers 
explore current trends of computing 
at the elementary, middle, and second- 



ary levels. Topics cover microcomputer 
hardware, operational techniques, and 
techniques for selecting, evaluating, and 
implementing computer programs for 
educational use. Hands-on experience 
and projects expose students to com- 
puter assisted instruction, computer 
managed instruction, application 
software and programming languages 
appropriate for various grade levels and 
subject areas. Prerequisite: EDU 211. 
Offered fall, winter, and spring. 

IS 250. SAS FOR PROGRAMMERS 2-4 sh 

This lab course uses the statistical 
package SAS on the VAX and covers 
data step, print, sort, freq, plot, means, 
chart, format and programming tech- 
niques to restructure data sets. Other 
study includes file work (input, output, 
use of cards, text files vs. SAS data sets), 
SAS LOG and its use in debugging, SAS 
graphics package and SAS procedure 
SQL. Prerequisite: Experience with a 
programming language. 

IS 330. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS 

AND DESIGN 4 sh 

This in-depth study of standard tech- 
niques for analyzing and designing 
information systems emphasizes 
effective written and oral communica- 
tion as students analyze a system in a 
local company, actively participating 
in each phase and making on-site visits. 
During the design phase, students 
maintain contacts with real users and 



COMPUTING SCIENCES 



develop a product for implementation. 
Prerequisite: IS 216. Offered fall. 

IS 340 SYSTEMS IMPLEMENTATION 4 sh 

As students continue the work begun 
in IS 330, they use decision support 
software tools such as VP Expert, GURU 
or Paradox to design a front-end; they 
run simulations on-line which model 
the typical working environment; and 
they build an interface to test, debug 
QQ and implement the system. Prerequisite: 
IS 330. Offered spring. 

IS 37 1 . SPECIAL TOPICS I -4 sh 

Topics such as decision support and 
expert systems, data communications 
and networks, and COBOL programming 
are offered when demand is sufficient. 

IS 481. INTERNSHIP IN 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS / -4 sh 

Advanced work experiences in computer 
information systems are offered on an 
individual basis when suitable oppor- 
tunities can be arranged. Prerequisites: 
IS 340 and permission of instructor. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

CS 130. COMPUTATIONAL 

PROGRAMMING 4 sh 

This introduction to programming and 
problem solving emphasizes applica- 
tions from quantitative disciplines and 
incorporates weekly group lab experi- 
ences. Prerequisite: MTH 1 1 1 or its 
exemption. Offered fall and spring. 

CS 1 7 1 . SPECIAL TOPICS 1 -4 sh 

Students study specialized pieces of 
software and programming languages. 
Prerequisite: CS 130. 

CS230. ALGORITHM DEVELOPMENT 4sh 

This course continues the study of the 
development of algorithms and provides 
an introduction to the analysis of time 
and space complexity. Topics include 
program correctness, recursion, elemen- 
tary data structures, modularization and 
program structure. Prerequisite: CS 130. 
Offered fall and spring. 



CS 33 1 . ALGORITHM ANALYSIS 4 sh 

Students analyze structures and appro- 
priate algorithms for sorting, merging 
and searching in the contexts of mass 
storage devices, internal main memory 
and artificial intelligence applications. 
Topics include graph algorithms, dynamic 
storage allocation and garbage collec- 
tion. Prerequisite: CS 230. Offered spring. 

CS342. COMPUTER ORGANIZATION 4sh 

Topics cover architectural levels, systems 
organization, digital logic, machine level, 
instruction formats, representation of data 
and computer arithmetic, assembly linking 
and loading and architectural alternatives. 
Prerequisite: CS 230. Offered fall. 

CS351. THEORY OF COMPUTATION 4sh 

In this introduction to theoretical 
computer science and analysis of 
discrete mathematical structures which 
find application in computer science, 
topics may include predicate calculus, 
groups, coding theory, graphs, trees, 
formal languages, grammars, finite state 
automata, Turing machines, complexity 
theory. CS 351 is the same as MTH 351. 
Prerequisites: CS 130, MTH 121. 
Corequisite: CS 230. Offered fall. 

CS 3 7 1 . SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4 sh 

Topics such as computer graphics, 
artificial intelligence, design of data base 
management systems, robotics, simula- 
tion and high performance computing an 
offered when demand is sufficient. 

CS 4 1 5. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 4 sh 

(Same course as described in MTH 415.) 

CS 435. PROGRAMMING 

LANGUAGES/PARADIGMS 4 sh 

This course provides an introduction to 
language definition structure, data types 
and structures, control structures and 
data fiow, run-time characteristics and 
lexical analysis and parsing. Program- 
ming assignments involve the use of 
several languages. Prerequisite: CS 331. 
Corequisite: CS 351. Offered fall. 



COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 



CS 44 1 . COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE 

AND OPERATING SYSTEMS 4 sh 

Students study the fundamental concepts 
of operating systems and their relation- 
ship to computer architecture, including 
such topics as concurrent programming, 
interrupt processing, memory manage- 
ment, and resource allocation. Prerequi- 
sites: CS 331 and 342. Offered spring. 



CS 45 1 . COMPILER DESIGN 

AND IMPLEMENTATION 4 sh 

This introduction to basic techniques 
of compiler design and implementation 
includes specification of syntax and 
semantics, lexical analysis, parsing 
and semantic processing. Prerequisite: 
CS 435. Offered spring. 



COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

Director of Experiential Education: Assistant Professor P Brumbaugh 

The Career Services Office offers courses designed to acquaint Elon students 
with the career decision-making process, to assist them in career exploration and 
to prepare them for the job search. 



99 



COE 110. CHOOSING A 

CAREER/MAJOR / sh 

These group career counseling sessions 
assist students in choosing a college 
major and exploring career options. 
Topics include career decision-making 
skills, personal values and needs, interest 
and skill assessments, senior student 
panel discussions and workshadowing. 
Recommended for freshmen and 
sophomores. Offered fall and spring. 

COE 3 1 0. SECURING A JOB / sh 

This course helps students prepare 
for internships, co-ops, summer jobs 
and permanent employment. Students 
develop strategies for achieving career 
goals, investigate critical issues in the 
workplace, develop a resume, establish 
job contacts and learn how to interview 
effectively. Required of co-op students 
and recommended for sophomores, 
juniors and seniors. Offered fall 
and spring. 

The Cooperative Education Work 
Experience Program enables qualified 
students to combine classroom theory 
with professional work experience 
while completing their degrees. 
The student may work full-time or 
part-time with an employer selected 



and/or approved by the College. 
Credit hours are based on the number 
of hours worked during the term— 
a maximum of 15 semester hours 
of internship/Cooperative Education 
credits may be applied to the 132 
semester hours required for the A.B. 
and B.S. degrees. Evaluation is based 
on reported job performance and 
student reflection on that performance 
through papers, journals, seminars, 
class presentations and readings. 
Contact the Director of Experiential 
Education for more information. 

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 

Junior or senior standing, mini- 
mum 2.0 GPA, approval of faculty/ 
Experiential Education Director. 
COE 310 class required. 

COE 381-386. CO-OP WORK 

EXPERIENCE 1-15 sh 

This series of courses involves careful 
monitoring of students in either a part- 
time or full-time work experience. 
Students apply classroom theory 
in a job related to their major/minor 
career objectives. Prerequisite: 
admission to the program. 



DANCE 



DANCE 



Chair, Department of Performing Arts: Assistant Professor McNeela 
Assistant Professor Wellford 
Part-time Instructor: Howard 

The primary goal of this program is to foster a love and understanding of dance 
in all its forms. Therefore, students minoring in Dance will spend time learning both 
in and out of the studio. 

Studio technique classes range from beginning to advanced level and include Ballet, 
Modern, jazz and Tap. Students in the minor program are required to complete at 
least the beginning level in three of these areas and at least an intermediate level 
in two areas. 

Students round out their training with History of Dance and Choreography classes. 
Numerous performance opportunities are also available through Elon Dancers 
(student dance organization), choreographic showings, major dance concerts, 
musicals and various other events. 

A minor in Dance requires the following courses: 
DAN 301 History of Dance 4 sh 

DAN 430 Dance Choreography 4 sh 

In addition, each minor must complete the following: 

(a) six studio technique classes in three of the 

following: Ballet, Jazz, Modern, or Tap 6 sh 

(b) electives selected from dance offerings 6 sh 
(At least 2 sh at the 300-400 level) 



TOTAL 

DAN 1 1 . INTRODUCTION TO DANCE 4 sh 

Students explore dance history, creative 
processes of dance and basic dance 
movement vocabulary. Offered fall 
or spring. 

DAN 104. BEGINNING MODERN DANCE 1 sh 

Students with little or no previous 
experience in modern dance learn the 
basic movement vocabulary of modem 
dance while working on style, musicality, 
strength, flexibility and correct alignment. 
A student must master the competencies 
of Beginning Modem Dance as outlined 
in departmental syllabus before advanc- 
ing to DAN 204. May be repeated for 
credit. Offered fall or spring. 

DAN 105. BEGINNING TAP ; sh 

Students with little or no previous dance 
experience learn the basic movement 
vocabulary of tap while working on 
speed, rhythm, coordination and style. 
A student must master the competence 



20 sh 

of Beginning Tap as outlined in depart- 
mental syllabus before advancing to 
DAN 205. May be repeated for credit. 
Offered fall or spring. 

DAN 106. BEGINNING BALLET / sh 

Students with little or no previous 
experience in ballet learn the basic 
movement vocabulary of modem 
ballet while working on style, musicality, 
strength, flexibility and correct align- 
ment. A student must master the 
competencies of Beginning Ballet as 
outlined in departmental syllabus before 
advancing to DAN 206. May be repeated 
for credit. Offered fall or spring. 

DAN 1 07. BEGINNING JAZZ / sh 

Students with little or no previous dance 
experience learn the basic movement 
vocabulary of jazz while working on style, 
musicality, strength, flexibility and correct 
alignment.A student must master the 
competencies of Beginning jazz as 



DANCE 



outlined in departmental syllabus before 
advancing to DAN 207. It is recommended 
that a beginning student complete DAN 
104 and DAN 106 before taking DAN 107. 
May be repeated for credit. Offered fall 
or spring. 

DAN 1 15. FOLK, SQUARE AND 

SOCIAL DANCE i sh 

This course introduces the student to 
various folk, square and social dance 
forms through analysis, demonstration 
and practice, with the objective being 
knowledge of the characteristics of each 
form and ability to participate in each. 

DAN 204. INTERMEDIATE 

MODERN DANCE 1 sh 

Students who have mastered the compe- 
tencies of Beginning Modem Dance 
further develop and refine technique and 
increase strength and flexibility in this 
class. Enhanced musicality and creative 
expression are stressed. A student must 
master the competencies of Intermediate 
Modem Dance as outlined in departmen- 
tal syllabus before moving to DAN 304. 
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 
DAN 104 or permission of instmctor. 
Offered fall or spring. 

DAN 205. INTERMEDIATE TAP I sh 

Students with two or more years of 
dance training continue work on clarity, 
speed, rhythm and style while mastering 
more complex and intricate footwork. 
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 
DAN 105 or permission of instructor. 
Offered fall or spring. 

DAN 206. INTERMEDIATE BALLET 1 sh 

Students who have mastered the compe- 
tencies of Beginning Ballet further develop 
and refine technique and increase strength 
and flexibility in this class. Enhanced 
musicality and creative expression are 
stressed. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisite: DAN 106 or permission of 
instmctor. Offered fall or spring. 

DAN 207. INTERMEDIATE JAZZ 1 sh 

Students with two or more years of dance 
training further develop and refine tech- 
nique and increase strength and flexibility 



in this class. Enhanced musicality and 
creative expression are important elements 
of the course. A student must master the 
competencies of Intermediate Jazz as 
outlined in departmental syllabus before 
moving to DAN 307. May be repeated for 
credit. Prerequisite: DAN 107 or permission 
of instmctor. Offered fall or spring. 

DAN 223. DANCE ENSEMBLE I sh 

Students accepted into this course will 
perform in departmental dance activities 
and must be co-registered in a technique 
class, preferably at the intermediate or 
advanced level. Admission by audition 
only Offered fall and spring. 

DAN 30 1 . HISTORY OF DANCE 4 sh 

Students explore the evolution of dance 
as an art from its pre-historical roots 
to the contemporary, post-modern form. 
The course pays particular attention 
to historical context and performance 
conditions. Students are required to 
complete a major research assignment. 
Offered fall or spring. 

DAN 304. ADVANCED MODERN DANCE 1 sh 

Students who have mastered the compe- 
tencies of Intermediate Modem Dance 
further develop and refine skills in this 
class. Enhanced physical strength and 
flexibility are combined with stress upon 
musicality and creative expression. May 
be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: DAN 
204 and permission of instmctor. Offered 
fall and/or spring, alternate years. 

DAN 307. ADVANCED JAZZ 1 sh 

Students who have mastered the 
competencies of Intermediate Jazz 
further develop and refine technical skills 
in this class. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisite: DAN 207 and permission 
of instmctor. Offered alternate years. 

DAN 306. DANCE FOR MUSICAL STAGE 1 sh 

As they become familiar with various 
music theatre styles from selected 
historical periods, students also learn 
dance audition and performance methods 
for music theatre. Prerequisite: DAN 105, 
107 and permission of instmctor. Offered 
fall or spring. 



ECONOMICS 

DAN 310. ADVANCED PROJECTS 

IN DANCE 2-4 sh 

For this in-depth study of a special topic, 
the advanced dancer may be given a 
performance assignment to demonstrate 
advanced proficiency in the field (i.e., 
dance captain for a theatre production, 
major choreographic duties in depart- 
ment productions, major role in guest 
choreographer's concert piece, intern- 
ship at local dance studio culminating 
in both performance and choreographic 
work, or an independent research 
project). Prerequisite: advance permis- 
sion of instructor. 



DRAMA 

See Theatre Arts 



DAN 320. SPECIAL TOPICS IN DANCE 4 sh 

Topics for this in-depth study vary each 
semester it is offered and may include: 
Black Theatre & Dance, Dance in 
Worship, etc. May be repeated for credit. 

DAN 430. DANCE CHOREOGRAPHY 4 sh 

Students explore the tools used to create 
dance, namely movement, time, space, 
shape, design, dynamics sound, text 
properties and visual effects. This 
course is designed for students with 
previous dance experience. Not open 
to freshmen except in unusual circum- 
stances. Prerequisite: at least two dance 
technique classes or permission of 
instructor. Offered fall or spring. 



ECONOMICS 

The Martha and Spencer Love School of Business 

Interim Dean of Love School of Business: Associate Professor Behrman 

Chair, Department of Economics: Associate Professor Barbour 

Professor: Tiemann 

Associate Professor: Baxter 

Assistant Professors: Holt, Larson, Lilly 

Economics explores a broad range of questions about society and uses a wide 
variety of methods to answer those questions. The courses offered by the Economics 
Department are designed to help students develop economic reasoning — a particular 
way of looking at the world that is useful in government service, business, the law and 
many other fields. 

Economics students at Elon develop their ability to use economic reasoning by 
finding costs and benefits and by making decisions based on those costs and benefits. 
The goal of the economic faculty is to teach students to apply what they know about 
how the world works in making decisions about what the government, a business or 
a citizen should do. 

Elon's Economics Department is particularly strong in experimental economics, 
public policy and heterodox economics. 

A major in Economics requires the following courses: 

MTH116 Applied Mathematics with Calculus 4 sh or 

MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1 4 sh 

ECO 201 Principles of Economics 4 sh 

ECO 202 Statistics for Economics and Business 4 sh 

ECO 301 Business Economics 4 sh 

ECO 302 Money and Banking 4 sh 

ECO 310 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 4 sh 



ECONOMICS 



ECO 31 1 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 

ECO 461 Senior Project 

Twelve hours ECO electives at the 300-400 level 



4sh 
2sh 
12 sh 



TOTAL 

A Minor in Economics requires the following courses: 

ECO 20 1 Principles of Economics 

ECO 310 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 

ECO 301 Business Economics 

ECO 31 1 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 

ECO 202 Statistics for Economics and Business 

MTH 1 14 Elementary Statistics 

SS 285 Research Methods 

Four hours ECO elective at the 300-400 level 



42 sh 



4sh 
4sh 
4 shor 
4sh 
4 shor 
4 shor 
4sh 
4sh 



TOTAL 

ECO 201. PRINCIPLES 

OF ECONOMICS 4 sh 

This principles course introduces the 
fundamentals of macroeconomics and 
microeconomics. Topics include supply 
and demand, macroeconomic equilib- 
rium, unemployment and inflation, 
consumer theory, theory of the firm, 
general equilibrium and economic 
methodology. Prerequisite: MTH 1 10 or 
higher. Offered fall, spring and summer. 

ECO 202. STATISTICS FOR ECONOMICS 

AND BUSINESS 4 sh 

Statistics for Economics and Business 
focuses on the collection, presentation, 
analysis and interpretation of statistical 
data. Among the topics covered are: 
descriptive tools for frequency distribu- 
tions, central tendency and dispersion; 
sampling theory and sampling distribu- 
tions; and techniques for statistical 
inference, including estimation and 
hypothesis testing and linear regression. 
Prerequisite: MTH 1 16 or 121. No credit 
for both MTH 1 14 and ECO 202. Offered 
fall, spring and summer. 

ECO 271. SEMINAR: 

ECONOMIC ISSUES 1-4 sh 

ECO 30 1 . BUSINESS ECONOMICS 4 sh 

Business Economics focuses on where 
firms fit in the analysis of market 
activity, how economists see the 



20 sh 

problem of organizing economic activity, 
understanding when markets solve that 
problem and why they sometimes do 
not, and how businesses have emerged 
as a response to the organization 
problem. Prerequisites: ECO 201 and 
202. Offered fall, spring and summer. 

ECO 302. MONEY AND BANKING 4 sh 

Students examine the history, structure, 
and function of money and our banking 
system, with the assumption that both 
money and the banking system are 
evolving institutions that share the 
same purpose: to help people adapt in 
an uncertain world where information 
is imperfect and costly. Prerequisites: 
ECO 201 and 202. 

ECO 310. INTERMEDIATE 

MACROECONOMIC THEORY 4sh 

This course covers the theory of 
aggregate demand and supply, sector 
demand functions (consumption, 
investment, money), disequilibrium 
models, economic growth, inflation, 
unemployment and expectations, 
stabilization and control. Prerequisites: 
ECO 201 and MTH 121 or 116. 

ECO 311. INTERMEDIATE 

MICROECONOMIC THEORY 4 sh 

With this study of how individual agents, 
both firms and households, interact in 
various kinds of markets, students gain 



ECONOMICS 



a better understanding of household 
economic behavior, firm behavior 
and the conditions under which prices 
can most effectively allocate scarce 
resources. Prerequisites: ECO 201 and 
202; MTH 121 or 116. 

ECO 312. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC 

SYSTEMS 4 sh 

Study in Comparative Economic Systems 
includes capitalism, Marxian theory and 
theoretical socialism. Prerequisite: 
ECO 201. 

ECO 314. INTERNATIONAL 

TRADE AND FINANCE 4 sh 

The fundamental subjects of internafional 
economics include the economic basis 
for internafional specialization and trade, 
economic gains from trade, balance of 
international payments, problems of 
internafional finance and internafional 
investments. Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

ECO 3 1 5. U.S. ECONOMIC HISTORY 4 sh 

This course introduces and analyzes 
the growth and development of the 
U.S. economy and its institutions from 
Colonial fimes to the 20th century. 
Study emphasizes the "new" economic 
history; explicit models and quanfitative 
methods of analyzing historical 
phenomena, including slavery and the 
South; the industrial economy and its 
labor force; the transportation revolu- 
fions; and government's role in eco- 
nomic change. Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

ECO 317. THE ECONOMICS 

OF WOMEN 4 sh 

Students investigate the economic status 
of women in the U.S. and the factors 
affecting changes in women's economic 
status over fime. Topics include economic 
theories of discrimination, pay equity, 
occupafional segregation, accounting for 
women's work, resource ownership, the 
feminization of poverty, gender and race, 
public policy toward women, and the 
global economic status of women. 

ECO 332. PUBLIC FINANCE 4 sh 

Study in public finance takes a positive 



and normative approach to the role of 
government in the economy. Public 
expenditures are discussed in light of 
pure theory, the theory of social choice 
and practical application. Prerequisite: 
ECO 201. . 

ECO 335. THE ECONOMICS OF 

ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES 4 sh 

This course explores the interacfions - 

of economic forces and policies with 
environmental issues. What are the costs 
of pollution and what are we buying for 
those costs? Who bears the burden of 
environmental damage? How might we 
reduce environmental impact and how .^ 
do we decide how much damage is 
appropriate? Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

ECO 347. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 4 sh 

Students examine applications of 
statisfical techniques for analyzing 
variance and covariance, chi-square, 
simple and mulfiple correlafion and 
regression, interpretation of standard 
designs used in scienfific research, non- 
parametric tests, time series analysis 
and decision theory. Prerequisite: ECO 
202 or MTH 114. 

ECO 365. ECONOMICS APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

This course focuses on practical uses of 
economics in various business and 
public policy situafions. Topics vary 
yearly. Prerequisites vary with topic. 
Offered winter. 

ECO 366. FIELD ECONOMICS 4 sh 

Students travel to observe economic 
policy making both domestically and 
abroad. Topics vary yearly. Prerequisites 
vary with topic. Offered winter. 



ECO 371. SEMINAR: 

SPECIAL TOPICS 



1-4 sh 



ECO 372. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC 

DEVELOPMENT 4 sh 

Internafional Economic Development 
provides an in-depth study of the 
meaning, measurement and analysis 
of economic growth and development, 
with parficular emphasis on the 



EDUCATION 



developing economies of Africa, Asia 
and Latin America. Topics include trade, 
finance, industrialization, rural/urban 
migration, agricultural development, 
women's role in development, employ- 
ment problems, population growth, 
education and poverty alleviation. 
Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

ECO 41 1. DEVELOPMENT OF 

ECONOMIC THOUGHT 4 sh 

Students survey the evolution of 
economic thought from antiquity 
to the present and learn to identify 
and critically evaluate various schools 
of economic thought. Prerequisite: ECO 
310 or 311 or permission of instructor. 

ECO 4 1 3. LABOR ECONOMICS 4 sh 

This course integrates labor theory with 
observed behavior of firms and house- 
holds, examining the household supply 
of effort to the labor market in both the 
short and long run, the firm's demand 
for labor, various types of labor markets 
and causes of wage differentials. 
Prerequisite: ECO 310 or 311. 



ECO 44 1 . ECONOMIC REGULATION 4 sh 

Students examine the economic 
regulation of American business, 
including the economic rationale 
and the basic laws concerning 
antitrust regulation, public utility 
regulation, and social regulation of 
business. Prerequisite: ECO 301 or 311. 

ECO 46 1 . SENIOR PROJECT 2 sh 

For this project, economics majors work 
individually with a professor to build on 
work done in previous courses, culminat- 
ing in a project of presentation quality 
Prerequisites: ECO 310, 31 1, and eight 
additional hours of economics numbered 
300 or above; senior economics major. 

ECO 4 7 1 . SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS 4 sh 

ECO 481. INTERNSHIP 

IN ECONOMICS 1-4 sh 

A maximum of four semester hours 
are applicable to a major or minor 
in economics. 



ECO 491. INDEPENDENT 
STUDY 



1-4 sh 



EDUCATION 

chair, Department ofEducatior]: Professor Dillashaw 
Professors: Hooks, Simon 
Associate Professors: Bass, Wooten 
Assistant Professors: Beamon, Howard 

Elon's education program prepares teachers for careers in the elementary, middle 
and high school grades. To do this, study emphasizes practical hands-on experience 
as well as educational theory and methods classes on campus. Yearly field experi- 
ences in public school classrooms begin the first year and culminate with a semester 
of full-time teaching in the student's preferred licensure area. 

Elon is widely recognized for the success of its teacher education program, which 
is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, and is 
one of only two private colleges in the state selected to offer the prestigious N.C. 
Teaching Fellows Program. 

Elon College offers programs leading to N.C. licensure in Elementary Education, 
Middle Grades Education, Special Education (Specific Learning Disabilities) special 
subject areas for grades K-12 and in seven areas at the secondary level. The goal of 
the undergraduate program in Education is to foster in the student: 
• the knowledge of the purposes of education and the role of the school in our 
democratic society 



EDUCATION 

• the understanding of the role of the teacher as decision maker 

• the knowledge and skills required for developing competence in the various teacher roles 

• a belief in the dignity and worth of each individual 

• the knowledge of the process of human growth and development 

• the knowledge of planning for instruction utilizing various teaching methodologies, 
materials and organizational patterns 

• knowledge of the subject matter in school curriculum 

• competence in evaluating student learning 

• the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain a classroom environment that 
facilitates learning and to accommodate the learning needs of exceptional and 
culturally diverse students 

• a desire for professional affiliation, lifelong learning and continuing professional 
growth and development 

The student who successfully completes any of the teacher education programs 
at Elon College will be eligible for licensure to teach in North Carolina. The State of 
North Carolina is party to the Interstate Certification Compact which qualifies Elon 
College graduates also to be licensed in all states party to this Compact. 

Currently there are 26 states which have entered into this reciprocity agreement. 
Any student planning to teach in a state not a part of the Interstate Certification Compact 
should obtain a copy of the licensure requirements for a public school teacher from the 
State Superintendent of Education of the state in which the student plans to teach. 

Before being admitted into the Teacher Education Program, the student must 
make application to the program, be recommended by the appropriate major depart- 
ment, be interviewed and approved by the Teacher Education Committee and meet 
minimum score requirements on the Pre-Professional Skills Tests. *North Carolina 
requires the following minimum scores: PPST Reading- 1 76; PPST Mathematics- 1 73; 
and PPST Writing- 1 73 and a GPA of 2.5 for all coursework completed at the time of 
admission. After admission, failure to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5 
will result in dismissal from the program. 

In all cases, approval for admission to the program is subject to the discretion 
of the Teacher Education Committee, which bases its decision not only on the above 
factors, but also on satisfactory command of standard English usage (written and oral) 
and mental, physical, moral and emotional acceptability for teaching. The Teacher 
Education Committee may, at its discretion, dismiss a student from the Teacher 
Education Program. 

Application forms for the Teacher Education Program are available in the office 
of the Department of Education and must be filed by September 15 or February 15 of 
the semester immediately prior to the beginning of the student's junior year. A student 
must be unconditionally admitted to the program before being permitted to take 
education courses beyond the 200 level. 

To be recommended for teacher licensure, a student must meet all academic 
requirements and have a GPA minimum of 2.5. A student must also meet the mini- 
mum score on the Test of Professional Knowledge (North Carolina requires a mini- 
mum score of 646) and the Specialty Area Test (minimum scores for this test vary 
with content area) and have a recommendation from the school system in which 
student teaching was completed. 



EDUCATION 

All Students who are education majors or who already hold a Bachelor's degree 
and are seeking only licensure are subject to the decisions and regulations of the N.C. 
State Board of Education. These decisions and regulations are binding on the student 
on the date and time specified by the Board. 

* All students planning to teach in a state other than North Carolina must contact 
the appropriate state's Department of Public Instruction and secure its standards 
for appropriate test requirements. 

At Elon College, the teacher education programs are fully approved by the N.C. 
State Board of Education. While a student ordinarily may graduate and be licensed 
under the catalog requirements in effect at the time the student is admitted to 
the Teacher Education Program, the Board may mandate changes in standards 
of approved teacher education programs, requiring students to modify or add 
to their original degree programs to be eligible for licensure upon completion 
of graduation requirements. Students should consult their advisor about current 
program requirements. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

A major in Elementary Education consists of the courses necessary to meet the 
requirements for Elementary Education (K-6) licensure in the public schools of North 
Carolina. The following courses are required of al Elementary Education majors. 

Interpretations of Literature 4 sh 

Children's Literature 4 sh 

Fine Arts in the Public Schools 4 sh 

Healthful Living in the Elementary School 3 sh 
Europe and the Mediterranean World since 1660 4 sh 

TheU.S. and N.C. since 1865 4 sh 

The World's Regions 4 sh 

American Government 4 sh 

Topics in General Biology 3 sh 

General Biology Lab 1 sh 

CHM 101/102 Basic Concepts in Chemistry/Lab 4 sh or 

Energy and the Environment 4 sh 

Introduction to Astronomy 4 sh or 

Introduction to Geology 4 sh 

Educational Psychology 4 sh 
Mathematics for Elementary and 

Middle Grades Teachers 4 sh 
(GS Math requirement is a prerequisite) 

Computers and Teaching 3 sh 

Introduction to Education with Practicum 4 sh 

Reading in the Elementary School 4 sh 
Communication Skills Methods 

and Materials for Elementary Teachers 4 sh 

EDU 363 Social Studies Methods and Materials 

for Elementary Teachers 4 sh 

EDU 430 Foundations of Education 3 sh 



107 



i ENG 


250 


ENG 


398 


■ FA 


369 


HE 


362 


HST 


112 


HST 


123 


GEO 


131 


^ PS 


111 


BIO 


lOI 


BIO 


102 


CHM lOI/I 


' PHY 


110 


PHY 


102 


PHY 


103 


; PSY 


321 


' MTH 


210 


IS 


220 


] EDU 


211 


EDU 


321 


EDU 


361 



EDUCATION 

EDU 450 Meeting Special Learning Needs of Children 3 sh 
EDU 465 Mathematics Methods and Materials 

for Elementary Teachers 4 sh 
EDU 467 Science Methods and Materials 

for Elementary Teachers 4 sh 

EDU 480 Student Teaching Seminar 2 sh 

EDU 481 Supervised Observation and Student Teaching 10 sh 

TOTAL 96 sh 

In addition to the required courses, Elementary Education majors must achieve 
a satisfactory score on the departmental Grammar Competency Exam. 

MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 

A major in Middle Grades Education consists of the courses necessary to 
meet the requirements for Middle Grades (6-9) licensure in the public schools of 
North Carolina. The following Core Courses are required of all Middle Grades 
Majors: 

Fine Arts in the Public Schools 4 sh 

Computers and Teaching 3 sh 

Educational Psychology 4 sh 

Introduction to Education with Practicum 4 sh 

Reading in the Content Areas 2 sh 

Foundations of Education 3 sh 

Curriculum and Instruction in the Middle Grades 3 sh 

Meeting Special Learning Needs of Children 3 sh 

Student Teaching Seminar 2 sh 

Supervised Observation and Student Teaching 10 sh 

Two subject area concentrations 54-60 sh 

TOTAL 92-98 sh 

In addition to the Core Courses, a student majoring in Middle Grades 
Education must select two subject area concentrations from the following: 

Communication Skills Concentration: 

ENG 205 English Grammar 4 sh 

American Literature II 4 sh 

Interpretations of Literature 4 sh 

Writing Center Workshop 4 sh 

Young Adult Literature 4 sh 

Communication Skills Methods and Materials 
for Middle Grades Teachers 4 sh 

One course from the following: 4 sh 

ENG 238 African-American Literature before 1945 

ENG 239 African-American Literature since 1945 

ENG 359 African-American Novels 

ENG 363 Literature and Culture: India, Africa & West Indies 

TOTAL 28 sh 



FA 


369 


IS 


220 


PSY 


321 


EDU 


211 


EDU 


322 


EDU 


430 


EDU 


441 


EDU 


450 


EDU 


480 


EDU 


481 



ENG 


224 


ENG 


250 


ENG 


319 


ENG 


399 


EDU 


362 



EDUCATION 



GEO 


131 


HST 


112 


HST 


122 


HST 


221 


HST 


361 


PS 


111 


EDU 


364 



Social Studies Concentration: 

ECO 201 Principles of Economics 4 sh 

The World's Regions 4 sh 
Europe and the Mediterranean World since 1660 4 sh 

United States History since 1865 4 sh 

The World in the Twentieth Century 4 sh 

North Carolina in the Nation 4 sh 

American Government 4 sh 
Social Studies Methods and Materials 

for Middle Grades Teachers 4 sh 

TOTAL 32 sh 

Mathematics Concentration: 

MTH 119 Functions with Applications 4 sh 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 sh 

Mathematical Reasoning 2 sh 
Mathematics for Elementary and 

Middle Grades Teachers 4 sh 

Elementary Statistics 4 sh 
Materials and Methods of Teaching Middle 

Grades and Secondary Mathematics 4 sh 



121 


221 


231 


210 


114 


422 



TOTAL 




26 sh 


Science Concentration: 




BIO 101 


Topics in General Biology 


3sh 


BIO 102 


General Biology Lab 


I sh 


BIO 121 


Biological Diversity 


4sh 


CHM 111 


General Chemistry 1 


3sh 


CHM 113 


General Chemistry Lab 


1 sh 


PHY 110 


Energy and the Environment 


4sh 


PHY 102 


Introduction to Astronomy 


4sh 


PHY 103 


Introduction to Geology 


4sh 


EDU 424 


Materials and Methods of Teaching 






Middle Grades and Secondary Science 


4sh 



TOTAL 28 sh 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

A major in Special Education (Specific Learning Disabilities) consists of the 
courses necessary to meet the requirements for Special Education (K-12) licensure 
in the public schools of North Carolina. The following courses are required of all 
Special Education majors. 

ENG 250 Interpretations of Literature 4 sh 

ENG 398 Children's Literature 4 sh 

FA 369 Fine Arts in the Public Schools 4 sh 



E D L 


J C A T 


/ N 




HE 


362 




HST 


112 




HST 


122 




HST 


361 




GEO 


131 




PS 


111 




BIO 


101 




BIO 


102 




CHM 101/102 




PHY 


110 




PHY 


102 




PHY 


103 




PSY 


321 




MTH 


210 




IS 


220 




EDU 


211 




EDU 


321 




EDU 


342 




EDU 


345 




EDU 


347 




EDU 


361 




EDU 


430 




EDU 


435 




EDU 


443 




EDU 


465 




EDU 


480 




EDU 


481 



Healthful Living in the Elementary School 3 sh 

Europe and the Mediterranean World since 1660 4 sh 

United States History since 1865 4 sh 

North Carolina in the Nation 4 sh 

The World's Regions 4 sh 

American Government 4 sh 

Topics in General Biology 3 sh 

General Biology Lab 1 sh 

Basic Concepts in Chemistry/Lab 4 sh or 

Energy and the Environment 4 sh 

Introduction to Astronomy 4 sh or 

Introduction to Geology 4 sh 

Educational Psychology 4 sh 
Mathematics for Elementary and 

Middle Grades Teachers 4 sh 
(GS Math requirement is a prerequisite) 

Computers and Teaching 3 sh 

Introduction to Education with Practicum 4 sh 

Reading in the Elementary School 4 sh 
Historical, Legal, and Educational Aspects 

of Special Education 3 sh 
Planning and Managing the Learning Environment 3 sh 
Nature/Needs of Students with Learning Disabilities 3 sh 
Communication Skills Methods 

and Materials for Elementary Teachers 4 sh 

Foundations of Education 3 sh 

Assessment Methods, Use and Interpretations 3 sh 

Specialized Instructional Methods and Materials 3 sh 
Mathematics Methods and Materials 

for Elementary Teachers 4 sh 

Student Teaching Seminar 2 sh 

Supervised Observation and Student Teaching 10 sh 



TOTAL 



104 sh 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The student planning to teach at the high school level completes a major in a 
discipline and the necessary Professional Studies courses for teacher licensure at 
the secondary level (grades 9 - 12). Secondary Education Licensure is available in 
Biology, Chemistry, Comprehensive Science, English, History, Mathematics, Physics, 
and Social Studies. Specific requirements for each program are listed with the 
appropriate department in this catalog. In general, the following Professional 
Studies courses must be satisfactorily completed: 

EDU 211 Introduction to Education with Practicum 4sh 

EDU 322 Reading in the Content Areas 2 sh 

Choose an appropriate methods course: 4 sh 

EDU 42 1 Materials and Methods of Teaching High School English 



EDUCATION 



EDU 422 



EDU 424 



EDU 4 


EDU 


430 


EDU 


450 


EDU 


480 


EDU 


481 


IS 


220 



Materials and Methods of Teaching Middle Grades 

and Secondary Mathematics 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Middle Grades 

and Secondary Science 

Materials and Methods of Teaching High School Social Studies 



PSY 321 



Foundations of Education 3 sh 

Meeting Special Learning Needs of Children 3 sh 

Student Teaching Seminar 2 sh 

Supervised Observation and Student Teaching 1 sh 

Computers and Teaching 3 sh 
(Not required for Mathematics Education majors) 

Educational Psychology 4 sh 



TOTAL 



35 sh 



SPECIAL SUBJECT AREAS (K-12) 

Programs leading to licensure in special subject areas at the K-12 level are 
available in French, Health Education, Music Education, Physical Education, and 
Spanish. Specific requirements for these programs are listed with the appropriate 
department in this catalog. In general, the following Professional Studies courses 
must be satisfactorily completed: 

EDU 2 1 1 Introduction to Education with Practicum 4 sh 

EDU 322 Reading in the Content Areas 2 sh 

One of the following courses: 4 sh 

EDU 423 Materials and Methods of Teaching Physical Education 
EDU 427 Materials and Methods of Teaching Health and Safety 
EDU 428 Materials and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages 
MUS 461 Music Education in the Public Schools 
EDU 430 Foundations of Education 3 sh 

EDU 450 Meeting Special Learning Needs of Children 3 sh 

(Not required for Physical Education majors) 
Student Teaching Seminar 2 sh 

Supervised Observation and Student Teaching 10 sh 

Computers and Teaching 3 sh 

(Not required for Physical Education majors) 
PSY 321 Educational Psychology 



EDU 
EDU 
IS 



480 



220 



EDU 21 1. INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION 
WITH PRACTICUM 4 sh 

This introduction to the concepts of 
teaching and the teacher's role as a 
decision maker uses a combination 
of classroom instruction and practical 
experiences. Prospective teachers gain 
greater understanding of the teaching 
profession and develop an awareness 
of students' characteristics and needs. 
Offered fall, winter and spring. 



4sh 

EDU 321. READING IN THE 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4 sh 

Study focuses on developing the philo- 
sophical framework, knowledge, and 
methodology necessary for planning 
learning experiences to enhance students' 
language development. Key course 
components include theory and process, 
pedagogy, assessment, the learner and 
professional development. Prerequisites: 
EDU 2 1 1 , PSY 32 1 . Offered fall and spring. 



EDUCATION 



EDU 322. READING IN THE 

CONTENT AREAS 2 sh 

The focus of this course is on reading 
strategies to guide middle school and 
high school instruction. Prospective 
teachers apply readability formulas 
to content area readings and design 
activities to promote vocabulary develop- 
ment, comprehension, study skills and 
writing to learn. Prerequisites: EDU 211, 
PSY 321 . Offered fall and spring. 

EDU 342 HISTORICAL, LEGAL, EDUCA- 
TIONAL ASPECTS OF SPECIAL 
EDUCATION 3 sh 

This course will address the importance 
of the historical evolution of the field of 
special education, including philosophi- 
cal foundations, legal underpinnings, 
and current trends. The learning and 
behavioral characteristics of the various 
categories of exceptionality will be 
identified, and issues in definition 
and identification procedures will 
be explored. Major theories will be 
examined in terms of their educational 
implications for exceptional children. 
Offered fall. 

EDU 345 PLANNING AND MANAGING THE 
LEARNING ENVIRONMENT 3 sh 

This course will review basic classroom 
management theories, methods and 
techniques for students with exceptional 
learning needs. Attention will be given 
to ways of applying behavioral modifica- 
tion programs appropriately in order to 
manage individual and group behavior. 
Strategies for establishing a positive and 
supportive learning environment will be 
explored along with skills for integrating 
special students in various settings. 
Offered spring. 

EDU 347 NATURE AND NEEDS OF 

STUDENTS WITH LEARNING 
DISABILITIES 3 sh 

A course designed to consider the specific 
area of disability in depth, including 
etiology, prevalence and characteristics. 
This course will review and analyze 
current practice and research on issues 



relating to the education of students with 
learning disabilities. Historical and legal 
aspects pertaining to the particular area of 
disability will be reviewed as well. Offered 
winter. 

EDU 361. COMMUNICATION SKILLS, 
METHODS AND MATERIALS 
FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 4sh 

Students learn how to investigate, 
evaluate, and select content, methods 
and materials used in organizing and 
teaching communication skills in 
elementary school. A concurrent 
practicum offers opportunities to 
apply concepts and skills learned 
in this course. Prerequisites: EDU 21 1, 
PSY 32 1 . Offered fall and spring. 

EDU 362. COMMUNICATION SKILLS 

METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR 
MIDDLE GRADES TEACHERS 4 sh 

This course enables students to investi- 
gate, evaluate and select content, 
methods and materials used in organiz- 
ing and teaching communication skills 
in middle school. A concurrent practicum 
offers opportunities to apply concepts 
and skills learned in this course. Prereq- 
uisites: EDU 211, PSY 321. 
Offered fall and spring. 

EDU 363. SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS 
AND MATERIALS FOR 
ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 4 sh 

This course enables students to 
investigate, evaluate and select content, 
methods and materials used in organiz- 
ing and teaching social studies in 
elementary school. A concurrent 
practicum offers opportunities to 
apply concepts and skills learned in this 
course. Prerequisites: EDU 211, PSY 321. 
Offered fall and spring. 

EDU 364. SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS AND 
MATERIALS FOR MIDDLE 
GRADES TEACHERS 4 sh 

This course enables students to 
investigate, evaluate, and select content, 
methods and materials used in organiz- 
ing and teaching social studies in middle 



EDUCATION 



school. A concurrent practicum offers 
opportunities to apply concepts and 
skills learned in this course. Prerequi- 
sites: EDU 2 11 , PSY 32 1 . Offered fall 
and spring. 

EDU 421. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING HIGH 
SCHOOL ENGLISH 4 sh 

In this study of the content and organiza- 
tion of the English curriculum with 
emphasis on methods and materials used 
in teaching literature, language skills, and 
composition, students review print and 
non-print media, create lesson and unit 
plans, lead classroom discussions and 
conduct teaching demonstrations. Public 
school classroom observation and 
assistance are required. Prerequisites; 
EDU 211, PSY 321. Offered fall semester. 

EDU 422. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING MIDDLE 
GRADES AND SECONDARY 
MATHEMATICS* 4 sh 

Students study the objectives and content 
of the mathematics curriculum in grades 
6-12, including the materials, techniques, 
and methods of evaluation used in 
teaching mathematics in middle and high 
school grades. A practicum in the public 
schools is required. Prerequisites: EDU 
2 1 1 , PSY 32 1 . Offered fall semester. 

EDU 423. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 4 sh 

This course covers the methods, materi- 
als, and techniques of teaching physical 
education, including organization and 
planning of the total curriculum and daily 
programs. Students also observe and 
conduct activity classes. Public school 
practicum required. Prerequisites: EDU 
2 1 1 , PSY 32 1 . Offered fall semester. 

EDU 424. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF 
TEACHING MIDDLE GRADES 
AND SECONDARY SCIENCE 4 sh 

Students develop, select and evaluate 
content, methods and materials used 
in teaching science at the middle or high 
school level. Study examines current 



trends in teaching the natural sciences 
and addresses safety concerns. Observa- 
tions and practicum in middle and/or 
high schools required. Prerequisites: 
EDU 2 1 1 , PSY 32 1 . Offered fall semester. 

EDU 425. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING HIGH SCHOOL 
SOCIAL STUDIES 4 sh 

A Study of the materials and methods 
of teaching social studies, emphasizing 
planning, organization, objectives and 
evaluation. Public school practicum 
required. Prerequisite: EDU 211, PSY 
32 1 . Offered fall semester. 

EDU 427. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING HEALTH 
AND SAFETY 4 sh 

This course emphasizes methods of 
curriculum planning, analyzing and 
developing content area, unit plans 
and teaching approaches for all levels 
of school (K-12). Public school practicum 
required. Prerequisites: EDU 211, 
PSY 32 1 . Offered fall semester. 

EDU 428. MATERIALS AND METHODS 
OF TEACHING FOREIGN 
LANGUAGES 4 sh 

This study of the content and organiza- 
tion of the foreign language curriculum in 
the public schools emphasizes methods 
and materials used in teaching at all 
levels (K-12) and covers how teaching 
the four basic skills and the target culture 
varies at each level. Students discuss 
theories of planning, instruction, choice 
of materials and evaluation and gain 
practical experience by participating in 
a public school classroom. Prerequisites: 
EDU 2 1 1 , PSY 32 1 . Offered fall semester. 

EDU 430. FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 3 sh 

This foundations course is a study of the 
historical development and philosophical 
basis for public education in the U.S., 
including the role and influence of 
schools in society and the teachers role 
as it has emerged from the philosophies, 
practices and policies of public educa- 
tion. Offered fall and spring. 



EDUCATION 



EDU 435 ASSESSMENT METHODS, 

USE AND INTERPRETATION 3sh 

This course will concentrate on the 
assessment and evaluation of special 
needs students. The different purposes of 
assessment will be explored through both 
formal and informal measures. Skills will 
include developing and administering a 
variety of instruments, interpreting and 
using assessment data in instructional 
planning and recognizing the limitations 
1 14 of test instruments, especially as related 
to cultural and linguistic issues. Current 
methodologies will be explored, including 
a variety of authentic assessment 
procedures. Offered fall. 

EDU 441. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 
IN THE MIDDLE GRADES 3 sh 

This study of historical and contempo- 
rary curricula and instruction in middle 
and junior high schools, emphasizes the 
special curricular and instructional 
needs of the pre- and early adolescent 
and explores various programs to teach 
11- to 14-year-olds academic and 
personal skills and concepts. Prerequi- 
site: EDU 211. Offered fall semester. 

EDU 443 SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTIONAL 

METHODS AND MATERIALS 3 sh 

Current literature on effective instruc- 
tional practice will be used as the basis 
for developing advanced skills necessary 
to plan and implement instruction for 
special needs students. Materials will 
be examined and evaluated in terms 
of their usefulness for exceptional 
students. Ways to adapt materials and 
modify curriculum will be investigated. 
An emphasis will be placed on the 
utilization of assessment results in 
planning instruction. Offered spring. 

EDU 450. MEETING SPECIAL LEARNING 

NEEDS OF CHILDREN 3 sh 

This course prepares teachers for using 
individualized programs for students with 
special learning needs. Students survey 
the literature related to instruction of these 
students, including assessing individual 



needs and modes of learning with 
implications for mainstreamed classroom 
teaching. Offered fall and spring. 

EDU 465. MATHEMATICS METHODS 
AND MATERIALS FOR 
ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 4 sh 

This course enables students to investi- 
gate, evaluate and select content, 
methods and materials used in organizing 
and teaching mathematics in elementary 
school. A concurrent practicum offers 
opportunities to apply concepts and skills 
learned in this course. Prerequisites: EDU 
2 11 , PSY 32 1 . Offered fall and spring. 

EDU 467. SCIENCE METHODS AND 

MATERIALS FOR ELEMENTARY 
TEACHERS 4 sh 

This course enables students to investi- 
gate, evaluate and select content, 
methods and materials used in organiz- 
ing and teaching science in elementary 
school. A concurrent practicum offers 
opportunities to apply concepts and skills 
learned in this course. Prerequisites: EDU 
2 11 , PSY 32 1 . Offered fall and spring. 

EDU 480. STUDENT TEACHING 

SEMINAR 2 sh 

This seminar focuses on classroom 
management strategies, legal aspects of 
teaching, the teacher as decision maker 
and creating a professional development 
plan. Must be taken concurrently with 
EDU 481. Offered fall and spring. 

EDU 481. SUPERVISED OBSERVATION AND 
STUDENT TEACHING lOsh 

Students experience the classroom full- 
time for one semester, with periodic 
conferences with the college supervisor(s) 
and the classroom teacher (s). The student 
becomes acquainted with the duties and 
observes the methods and activities of 
an experienced teacher, with gradual 
induction into full-time teaching responsi- 
bilities. Corequisite: EDU 480. Prerequi- 
sites: EDU 2 11 , 430 and grade of C or 
better in appropriate methods course (s). 
Offered fall and spring. 



ENGLISH 

ENGLISH 

^ Chair, Department of English: Associate Professor Haskell 

t Professors: Angyal, Blake, Bland, Gill, Gordon 

^. Associate Professors: Braye, Lyday-Lee, Mackay 

;,; Assistant Professors: Boyd, Boyle, Butler, Cassebaum, Chapman, Herold, R. House, 

! Schwind, Warman 

I The field of English studies is quite diverse. It involves the theoretical study 

*^ of literature, language and writing, as well as the practice of literary criticism and 
[ analysis, creative writing, and other kinds of writing. 

■ The English Department, therefore, provides a balanced curriculum that 

includes all these elements. The department also offers a major in English with 115 

teacher certification for those wishing to teach at the secondary level. Minors in 
literature and creative writing, along with an interdisciplinary minor in professional 
writing, are additional options. 

A group of six core courses in literature, language study and writing beyond 
the freshman level, ensures that English majors have experience in the three principal 
areas of the discipline. The English curriculum also encourages majors to follow their 
own talents and interests further by requiring, in addition to the common core, one 
of four distinct concentrations: literature, writing, creative writing or English teacher 
certification. 

A major in English requires 40-42 semester hours. The core requirements, 
above ENG 110, are: 

An ENG 200-level literature course 4 sh 

(English Education majors must take ENG 22 1 , 

British Literature I or ENG 222, British Literature II) 

An ENG 200-level or above writing course 4 sh 

(English Education majors must take ENG 319, 

Writing Center Workshop) 

An ENG 200-level or above language course 4 sh 

(English Education majors must take ENG 205, Grammar) 

Three ENG 300-400 level literature courses: 

One historical studies 4 sh 

One cultural studies 4 sh 

One author course 4 sh 

(English Education majors must take ENG 321, Classical 

Literature to fulfill the historical period requirement.) 

Students must also complete one of the following concentrations: 
Literature Concentration 

'• One additional historical studies course 4 sh 

I Two additional 300-400 level English electives 8 sh 

'. ENG 495, Senior Seminar 4 sh 

I 

I TOTAL 40 sh 

\ 

i Wnting Concentration 

[; Two additional 300-400 level writing courses 8 sh 



ENGLISH 



ENG 304 Rhetorical Theory 4 sh 

ENG 495 Senior Seminar 4 sh 

Note: ENG 304 must be taken in addition to the ENG 200-level or above language 

course required by the core. 

TOTAL 40 sh 

Teacher Certification Concentration 

ENG 302 History of the English Language 4 sh 

ENG 223 American Literature I 4 sh or 

ENG 224 American Literature II 4 sh 

A 300-400 level literature elective 4 sh 

JC2I0 Public Speaking 2sh 

ENG 495 Senior Seminar 4 sh 

TOTAL 42 sh 

Creative Writing Concentration 

Three Creative Writing Courses or 

Two Creative Writing and one English elective 12 sh 

(If students choose a creative writing course to meet their core 

writing requirement, they vi^ill be required to take only 8 sh of 

further creative writing courses. They may then substitute one 

4 sh English elective for the third Creative Writing course.) 

ENG 495 Senior Seminar 4 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 

A minor in English requires the following courses above ENG 1 10. 
Students may choose either a literature minor or one of the writing minors. 

Literature Minor 

ENG 250 Interpretations of Literature 4 sh 

One ENG language course, or one ENG writing course 

beyond English 110 4sh 

Three literature courses, at least two of which should be 

at the 300— 400 level 12 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 

Writing Minors 

The writing minors are tailored to meet students' career plans and interests. 
The minor consists of twenty hours. Of that twenty hours, at least twelve must 
be from performance courses. In performance courses, the fundamental objective is the 
development of students' writing abilities. Theory courses focus on the theoretical study 
of some aspect of language and language use rather than on actual writing practice. 

Creative Writing Minor 

Three or more of the following: 12-20 sh 

ENG 2 1 3 Introduction to Creative Writing 
ENG 214 Introduction to Creative Writing (Winter Term) 



ENGLISH 



ENG 315 Advanced Nonfiction Writing 

ENG 316 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry 

ENG 317 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction 

JC 326 Feature Writing 

TH 330 Playwriting 
Zero to two of the following courses: 0-8 sh 

Any English literature or foreign literature course 
beyond the general studies requirement 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



Professional Writing Minor 

Please note: This is an Interdisciplinary Minor, jointly administered by the 
English Department and the Interdisciplinary Writing Committee. Questions 
should be referred to the Chair of the Interdisciplinary Writing Committee. 

All students are encouraged to take part in shaping this minor themselves 
with their advisors. 

Students may like to note that, if they are planning a career in the law, courses 
such as Philosophy 1 13, Critical Thinking, and English 304, Rhetorical Theory, will 
be particularly useful. Pre-law students should also work with advisors to arrange 
internships and practicums in law offices to gain further experience in the kinds 
of writing that will help them in their legal careers. 

Three or more of the following "performance" courses: 12-20 sh 

ENG 282 Writing Practicum 

ENG 381 Writing Internship 

JC 227 Corporate Publishing 

BA 302 Business Writing 

ENG 313 Writing for the Professions 
Zero to two of the following "theory" courses: 0-8 sh 

ENG 3 1 9 Writing Center Workshop 

ENG 304 Rhetorical Theory 

ENG 205 Grammar 

PHL113 Critical Thinking 



TOTAL 

ENG 100. INTRODUCTION 

TO COLLEGE WRITING 4 sh 

This is a writing workshop focusing on 
invention, organization, revision and 
editing skills. A grade of "C-" or better 
required for admission to ENG 1 10. 
Elective credit only. Offered fall. 

ENG 106. ANALYTICAL READING 3 sh 

Analytical reading is a course designed 
to help students understand, analyze 
and retain college level reading material. 
Elective credit only. Offered fall. 



20 sh 

ENG 1 1 0. COLLEGE WRITING 4 sh 

In this first-year course emphasizing 
invention, peer response, revising and 
editing, students learn to develop and 
make assertions, support them with 
appropriate evidence, and present 
them in public form. Students also 
learn that the style and content of 
their writing will affect their success 
in influencing audiences. A grade 
of "C-" or better required for graduation. 
Offered fall and spring. 



ENGLISH 



ENG 205. GRAMMAR 4 sh 

This study of the English language 
includes the evolution of prescriptive 
and descriptive grammars, terminology, 
parts of speech and function, grammati- 
cal structures, and correct usage of 
standard written English. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. Offered fall. 

ENG 207. STUDIES IN THE 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 4 sh 

As an overview of various areas of 
language study in our society, topics 
in this course include: defining standard 
English and the role of grammar as 
each is taught, as well as its importance, 
impact, and messages; regional and social 
varieties; prejudicial and manipulative 
forms; slang and jargon; cultural differ- 
ences; and the importance of a world/ 
universal language. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 2 1 3. CREATIVE WRITING 4 sh 

For this workshop, students interested in 
writing poems and short stories may be 
assigned additional texts for discussion 
of technique or form. Prerequisite: ENG 
1 10. Offered fall and spring. 

ENG 214. CREATIVE WRITING POETRY: 

READING/WRITING 4 sh 

Along with readings of 20th century British, 
Irish and American poetry, students from 
all levels spend equal amounts of time 
discussing their own and others' poems. 
Study also includes reading quizzes, 
writing journals and poetry assignments. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered winter. 

ENG 22 1 . BRITISH LITERATURE I 4 sh 

This study of British literature in its social 
and cultural contexts emphasizes the 
close reading of texts from, the Anglo- 
Saxon, Medieval and Renaissance periods 
through the Enlightenment. Prerequisite: 
ENG 1 10. Offered fall and spring. 

ENG 222. BRITISH LITERATURE II 4 sh 

This study of British literature in 
its social and cultural contexts— 
from the Romantic, Victorian and 
Modernist periods through the present- 
emphasizes the close reading of texts 
representing the diversity of modern 



British literary expression. Prerequisite: 
ENG 1 10. Offered fall and spring. 

ENG 223. AMERICAN LITERATURE I 4 sh 

This study of American literature in 
its social and cultural contexts— from 
Colonial and Revolutionary periods 
through the Romantic period— empha- j 
sizes the close reading of texts to 
examine American literary culture from 
its origins to the post-Civil War era. , 
Prerequiste: ENG 1 1 0. Offered fall and 
spring. \ 

ENG 224. AMERICAN LITERATURE II 4 sh 

This study of American literature in its 
social and cultural contexts— from the 
post-Civil War era. Progressive and 
Modernist periods up to the present- 
involves close reading of selected texts 
to stress the expansion of the American 
literary canon. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 
Offered fall and spring. 

ENG 23 1 . WORLD LITERATURE 4 sh 

World Literature provides a study of 
English translations of selected master- 
pieces from Continental, Asian and 
African literature as reflected against 
their literary, historical and cultural 
backgrounds. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 
Offered spring of alternate years. 

ENG 238. AFRICAN-AMERICAN 

LITERATURE PRE- 1 945 4 sh 

This course traces the development of 
the themes of protest, accommodation 
and escapism found in fiction, poetry 
and drama of African-American writers 
before 1945. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 
Offered fall of alternate years. 

ENG 239. AFRICAN-AMERICAN 

LITERATURE SINCE 1945 4 sh 

An examination of works by major 
African-American writers since 1945 
focuses on making connections between 
writers. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. Offered 
spring of alternate years. 

ENG 250. INTERPRETATIONS 

OF LITERATURE 4 sh 

Interpretations of Literature employs 
different critical approaches to interpret 



ENGLISH 



and evaluate poetry, drama and fiction 
from a variety of cultures. Prerequisite: 
ENG 1 10. Offered fall and spring. 

ENG 251. ENGLISH STUDIES 

IN BRITAIN 4 sh 

A Study-tour based in London empha- 
sizes the theatre and places of literary 
and cultural importance. The course 
includes excursions to such places as 
Stratford-upon-Avon, Stonehenge and 
Canterbury. Winter term only. No credit 
toward English minor. 

ENG 282. PRACTICUM IN ENGLISH 1-3 sh 

This course provides opportunities for 
students to observe and record different 
types of writing produced in an office or 
business. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10, permission 
of instructor and advance arrangement. No 
credit toward General Studies requirements. 

LANGUAGE STUDY: GROUP I 

This selection of courses centers on 
studies in the structure and historical 
development of the English language 
and in the theory of rhetoric and 
composition. 

ENG 302. HISTORY OF THE 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 4 sh 

This study traces the historical develop- 
ment of the English language from its 
Indo-European origins to the present. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered fall. 

ENG 303. LINGUISTICS 4 sh 

Linguistics is the study of the systems 
of language, including the phonology, 
morphology, semantics and varieties 
(social and regional) of the English 
language. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 304. RHETORICAL THEORY 4 sh 

In this study of the theories and philoso- 
phies underlying rhetoric and composition, 
ranging from classical rhetoric to contem- 
porary composition theory, students 
become familiar with major rhetorical 
and composition theorists, theories and 
the impact of these theories on writing and 
thinking. Theorists may include Aristotle, 
Quintilian, Ramus, Burke, Bakhtin, 



Shaughnessy and Kristeva. Prerequisite: 
ENG no. Offered fall. 

ENG 305. AMERICAN ENGLISH 4 sh 

This course examines the development 
of American English — from the 1 6th- 
century influences of Jamestown and 
Massachusetts settlers to Creoles 
developing along the Mexican border 
and in Florida. Study includes regional 
and social varieties of English, phonetics 
and literature that employs dialects. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ADVANCED WRITING: GROUP II 

Courses in this group are specifically 
designed to provide practice in different 
kinds of writing beyond the introductory 
level. 

ENG 313. WRITING FOR THE 

PROFESSIONS 4 sh 

Students study professional writing 
through problem solving. Prerequisite: 
ENG 1 10. Offered spring of alternate years. 

ENG 315. ADVANCED NONFICTION 

WRITING (Selected Focus) 4 sh 

In this writing workshop, students 
develop a specific aspect of writing 
ability (e.g., voice, stylistics) or practice 
a particular type of writing (e.g., essay, 
biography travel writing). Focus changes 
each semester. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 
Offered spring of alternate years. 

ENG 316. ADVANCED CREATIVE 

WRITING: POETRY 4 sh 

This advanced workshop, centered 
around students' poems, also includes 
study of 20th century poetry (occasion- 
ally earlier) to learn poetic techniques 
and to recognize the many possibilities 
of poetic forms, subjects and voices. 
Prerequisite: ENG 213 or 214, or 
permission of instructor. Offered fall. 

ENG 317. ADVANCED CREATIVE 

WRITING: FICTION 4 sh 

This advanced workshop, centered 
around students' stories, also includes 
study of 20th century fiction (occasion- 
ally eariier) to learn techniques and to 



ENGLISH 



recognize possibilities for point of view, 
characterization, structure and diction. 
Prerequisite: ENG 213 or 214, or 
permission of instructor. Offered spring. 

ENG 319. WRITING CENTER 

WORKSHOP 4sh 

The Writing Center Workshop enhances 
students' writing ability while they learn 
to tutor writing. Students are required 
to tutor four hours each week in Elon's 
Writing Center. Strong writing abilities 
and interpersonal skills recommended. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered fall 
and spring. 

HISTORICAL STUDIES: GROUP III 

Courses in this group explore literature 
in historical, interdisciplinary and cross- 
cultural contexts. 

ENG 32 1 . CLASSICAL LITERATURE 4 sh 

This study of ancient Greek and Roman 
literature and culture includes authors 
such as Homer, Plato, Sophocles, Ovid 
and Virgil, with readings from mythology, 
the great epics of the Trojan War, drama, 
philosophy and \yr\c in modern transla- 
tions. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. Offered fall. 

ENG 322. MEDIEVAL LITERATURE 4 sh 

This study of literature and culture of the 
European Middle Ages includes authors 
such as Dante, Chretien de Troyes, 
Chaucer and Maloty, with readings from 
modem translations of epics such as 
Beowulf or The Song of Roland, poetry 
about love or religious experience such 
as The Divine Comedy, or narratives about 
adventure and chivalry, such as legends 
of King Arthur. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 323. RENAISSANCE LITERATURE 4 sh 

This study of British and Continental 
literature and culture of the 16th and 
early 1 7th centuries includes authors 
such as Sidney, Marlowe, Montaigne, 
Shakespeare and Cervantes. Readings 
in Renaissance English from Elizabethan 
and Jacobean drama, sonnet sequences, 
lyric and narrative poems and precur- 



sors of the modern novel, such as Don 
Quixote. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 324. ENLIGHTENMENT 4 sh 

This study focuses on the great works 
of British, Continental and American 
literature during an age of reason and 
sensibility marked by industrial, j 

scientific and political revolutions. | 

Prerequisite: ENG 110. ' 

ENG 325. ROMANTICISM 4 sh 

Romanticism provides an interdiscipli- 
nary study of British, American and 
Continental Romantic literature in the -^ 
context of art, music (especially opera), 
cultural life and intellectual history. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. j 

ENG 326. REALISM AND THE 

LATER I9TH CENTURY 4 sh 

This study involves an interdisciplinary 
look at British, American and Continen- 
tal literary movements (realism, 
naturalism, symbolism and aestheti- | 
cism), including reading selected 
masterworks in context of the intellec- 
tual and cultural life of the period. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 327. 1 7TH CENTURY 

LITERATURE 4 sh 

This study of "The Century of Genius" 
includes works by British and Continen- 
tal authors who ushered in the modern 
world. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 328. MODERNISM 4 sh 

This interdisciplinary study of modern- 
ism as a dominant intellectual move- 
ment of the 20th century explores 
topics such as alienation, the artist's 
role, the primitive, consciousness and 
the unconscious, human rights and the 
post modern. The literature is supple- 
mented by art, music and philosophical 
texts. Prerequisite: ENG 110. ; 

CULTURAL STUDIES: GROUP IV 

Courses in this group emphasize 
the study of literature in its cultural 
context, often from the perspective 



ENGLISH 



of a particular social group. Regional, 
gender, ethnic and class issues are all 
possible concentrations. 

ENG 330. APPALACHIAN LITERATURE 4 sh 

Appalachian Literature involves a survey of 
19th and 20th century Appalachian poetry, 
short and long fiction, drama, music, film 
and culture. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 332. LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH 4 sh 

Emphasis is given to major 20th century 
writers in this study of Southern 
literature, its background and themes. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 333. WOMEN IN LITERATURE: 

FEMINIST APPROACHES 4 sh 

Women In Literature studies modern and 
traditional works of literature interpreted 
or reinterpreted from the perspective of 
feminist literary theories. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. 

ENG 334. NATIVE AMERICAN 

LITERATURE 4 sh 

In an introduction to American Indian 
literature from the 1 8th century through 
the present, study includes special 
emphasis on contemporary writers 
of the Native American Renaissance. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 335. STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY 

LITERATURE 4 sh 

A Study of contemporary literature 
includes such topics as the French anti- 
novel, absurdist drama, metafiction and 
"magic realism." Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 336. HEMINGWAY AND 

THE EXPATRIATES 4 sh 

Emphasis in this centers on a study 
on the life and work of expatriates in 
Paris immediately after World War I. 
Particular emphasis is given to Ernest 
Hemingway. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 337. ANGLO-IRISH LITERATURE 4 sh 

A study of major Anglo-Irish writers 
and their affinities with Irish history, 
mythology, folklore and nationalism 
includes J. M. Synge, W. B. Yeats, Lady 
Gregory, James Joyce, Seamus Heaney 
and others. Prerequisite; ENG 1 10. 



AUTHOR COURSES: GROUP V 

Courses in this group focus on the works 
of individual authors who have captured 
and continue to hold the imaginations 
of readers. Typical offerings include 
Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Hardy, 
Dickinson, Gather, Faulkner and 
those listed below. 

ENG 340. DANTE ALIGHIERI 4 sh 

This close study covers Dante's major 
works in the context of their historical, 
cultural, religious and intellectual 
background in the Middle Ages, 
including Vita Nuova and The Divine 
Comedy. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 341. CHAUCER 4sh 

A close study of Chaucer's major works 
in the context of their medieval intellec- 
tual and cultural background includes 
the greater portion of The Canterbury 
Tales, the dream visions, and Troilus 
and Criseyde. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 342. SHAKESPEARE: 

THE TRAGEDIES 4 sh 

This study of Shakespeare's tragedies 
examines representative works within 
their intellectual, cultural and theatrical 
contexts. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 343. SHAKESPEARE: 

THE COMEDIES 4 sh 

This study of Shakespeare's comedies 
examines representative works in their 
intellectual, cultural and theatrical 
contexts. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 344. ROBERT FROST 4 sh 

This study of Frost's early development as 
a lyric poet focuses on the close reading of 
his poetry, criticism and masques in the 
context of New England regionalism and 
the emergence of Modernism in American 
letters. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 345. JANE AUSTEN 4 sh 

Background study of 18th- and 19th- 
century England and the development 
of the novel are part of this examination 
of the life and writings of Austen. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 



ENGLISH 



ENG 347. WILLIAM FAULKNER 4 sh 

This study of the short stories, novels 
and screenplays of one of America's 
(and the South's) most inventive and 
brilliant writers includes readings from 
As / Lay Dying; Go Down, Moses; 
Sanctuary; Absalom, Absalom!; and 
The Hamlet. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 349. D. H. LAWRENCE 4 sh 

Study of the life and works of this 20th 
^22 century master includes a special focus 
on how he turned his experiences into 
novels and poems. Lawrence's contro- 
versial ideas are viewed as his critical 
response to Modernism and the 
industrial civilization of his time. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

GENRE COURSES: GROUP VI 

These courses offer studies in specific 
types of literature, such as poetry, 
drama, the novel, the essay and the 
short story. Courses in genre include 
"kinds" of literature which cut across 
the more traditional genre labels. 

ENG 351. THE NOVEL 4 sh 

Focus and content vary in this course, 
which examines representative novels 
from different countries and ages. Typical 
emphases include the American, the 
British, the picaresque and the political 
novels and the Bildungsroman. This 
course sometimes carries an emphasis 
on gender. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 352. DRAMA 4 sh 

In a study of western drama from ancient 
Greece to the present, representative texts 
are examined in their historical and 
cultural contexts. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 353. POETRY 4 sh 

Examination of representative poetry 
from different cultures and ages 
includes at least one epic, shorter 
narratives, dramatic and lyric poetry. 
Each student selects one culture, 
historical period or type of poetry as 
the focus of an individual research 
project. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 



ENG 354. THE SHORT STORY 4 sh 

Study of the short story as a literary form 
spans from its origins and development 
by Poe, Chekhov and others to experi- 
mental contemporary writers. Typically, 
five or six collections by writers from a 
variety of cultures are read, with some 
attention to the problem of film adapta- 
tion. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 355. LAUGHTER 

AND COMEDY 4 sh 

Students study the psychology of 
laughter and the philosophy of comedy. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 356. THE NOVEL: BRITISH 

WOMEN WRITERS 4 sh 

This study of novels by past and present 
British women writers, using feminist ; 
literary theories, also covers the ] 

development of the novel as a form j 
and the expression of women's experi- 
ence in the 18th, 19th and 20th centu- 
ries. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG357-IS. THE LONDON THEATRE 4sh 

Students see productions of Shakes- 
pearean and other classic dramas and 
experience more modern and contempo- 
rary plays - both fringe and mainstream 
- in this study of drama in the London 
Theatre. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Studies 
Abroad students only. 

ENG 358. MODERN POETRY: BRITISH 

AND AMERICAN 4 sh 

This study of British and American 
poetry from the first half of the 20th 
century includes close readings of Yeats, 
Auden, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Moore, 
H. D., Eliot and Pound. The course also 
addresses cultural context and radical 
changes in poetic forms during this j 
period. Each student completes an 
extensive project (research, original 
interpretation, written and oral presen- 
tation) on a Modern poet not studied 
in class. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 359. AFRICAN-AMERICAN NOVELS 4 sh 

This study of novels by such writers 
as Baldwin, Ellison, Hurston, Walker, 



ENGLISH 



Wright, and Morrison gives attention 
to gender, place, alienation and the 
changes in forms of protest. Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. Offered fall of alternating years. 



GROUP VII SENIOR SEMINAR 



sh 



ENG 495. SENIOR SEMINAR 

This course provides a synthesis of 
studies in the major with additional 
work on theory. Students participate in 
assessment of their major work, write an 
independent paper and conduct a class 
session on their chosen topic. Required 
for all ENG majors in the senior fall 
semester. Prerequisite: majors only 
or permission of instructor. Offered fall. 

SPECIAL TOPICS 

Special Topics courses involve studies 
of various topics, some of which fall 
outside the boundaries of traditional 
literary study. In addition to the courses 
listed below, offerings may include 
Literature of the Supernatural, Literature 
of Nonviolence, Alternate Languages. 

ENG 361. GENDER ISSUES 

IN CINEMA 4 sh 

This course explores how well film 
reveals gender differences between men 
and women. Time is spent studying 
gender stereotyping, the psychological 
accuracy of film's representations of 
gender and gendered behavior of film 
directors. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 362. FILM CRITICISM 4 sh 

Film Criticism emphasizes how to 
interpret cinema critically, using films 
that illustrate cultural differences, 
periods and types of filmmaking and 
achievements in techniques and ideas of 
the greatest directors. Prerequisite: ENG 
110. (ENG 362 is the same as JC 362). 

ENG 363. LITERATURE AND CULTURE: 
INDIA, AFRICA AND 
WEST INDIES 4 sh 

This course examines ways in which 
works produced by some 20th-century 
Indian, African and West Indian (Carib- 



bean) writers embody the social, 
political and economic concerns of 
their emerging post-colonial cultures. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 365. LITERATURE AND THEOLOGY 4 sh 

Literature and Theology is an interdisci- 
plinary study focusing on relationships 
between literary and theological 
disciplines with special attention to 
literature illustrating various approaches 
to religious questions. Prerequisite: ENG 
110. (ENG 365 is the same as REL 365.) 

ENG 367. THE ARTHURIAN LEGEND 4 sh 

Course study traces the development 
of stories of King Arthur and the Round 
Table from their appearance in the early 
Middle Ages through the present. Genres 
include chronicle, poetry, fiction and 
cinema. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 38 1 . ENGLISH INTERNSHIP 4 sh 

Students have an opportunity to apply 
their writing skills in a business office. 
Pre- or co-requisite: ENG 313. No credit 
toward General Studies requirements. 

ENG 398. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 4 sh 

Children's literature examines the fields 
of children's and folk literature to 
discover material which satisfies 
educational requirements for children 
in elementary grades. No credit toward 
English major/minor. Prerequisites: 
EDU211,ENG 110. 

ENG 399. YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 4 sh 

In this study of contemporary literature 
for young adult readers, students read 
texts appropriate to the adolescent, 
examine common themes, and apply 
critical approaches suitable for middle 
grades and secondary classrooms. 
Authors may include Judy Blume, Robert 
Cormier, S. E. Hinton, Madeleine L'Engle, 
Gary Paulsen, Katherine Patterson and 
Cynthia Voigt. Credit toward English 
teacher certification. No credit toward 
English major/minor. Prerequisites: 
EDU211,ENG 110. 

ENG 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY / -4 sh 



ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

Coordinator: Associate Professor Mason 

Advisory Committee: Professors: Brumbaugh, Chase, F. Harris 

Associate Professors: Arcaro, Barbour, Gooch, Weston , 

Assistant Professor: Kingston 

Environmental Studies is a broad field in which environmental issues and problems 
are best examined using applications from the social sciences, life and physical sciences 
and humanities. Elon College offers a B.S. in environmental studies with a concentra- 
tion in either environmental policy or field science. The program is truly interdiscipli- 
nary, since environmental concerns are investigated from a holistic perspective. 

A healthy environment is critical to the world's future. Overpopulation, pollution 
and natural resources depletion affect everyone. As our awareness of the problem 
grows, so does our need to find effective long-lasting solutions. The environmental 
studies professional must have a fundamental understanding of the sciences 
(especially biology and chemistry), economics, law, ethics and public policy. 

The program— purposeful and well-balanced with a strong core— enables students 
to focus their personal preferences through upper-level courses emphasizing policy or 
field investigation. However, the curriculum does concentrate on the essential 
scientific knowledge needed to create realistic solutions to environmental problems. 

The goals of the environmental studies program are: (1) to provide students 
with a broad interdisciplinary foundation for understanding natural resources issues; 
(2) to develop students' understanding of economic activities and their role in natural 
resources management and the decision-making process regarding environmental 
issues; (3) to enhance students' decision-making capabilities in the area of environ- 
mental conservation and citizen advocacy for balance between economic develop- 
ment and environmental protection; (4) to build students' knowledge of the basic 
scientific concepts that govern the operation of natural ecosystems; (5) to adequately 
prepare students for employment in responsible professional positions in environmen- 
tal policy and environmental risk assessment in the public and private sectors; 
and (6) to prepare students for successful tenures in graduate school programs 
in environmental policy and science curricula. 

A Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Environmental Studies 

requires the following: 



PHY 


110 


Energy and the Environment 


4sh 


ES 


110 


Introduction to Environmental Science 


4sh 


BIO 


112 


Introduction to Population Biology 


3sh 


BIO 


114 


Population Biology Lab 


Ish 


ES 


215 


Organismal Biology and Field Techniques 


4sh 


BIO 


452 


General Ecology 


4sh 


CHM 


111 


General Chemistry I 


3sh 


CHM 


112 


General Chemistry II 


3sh 


CHM 


113 


General Chemistry I Lab 


Ish 


CHM 


114 


General Chemistry II Lab 


Ish 


ECO 


201 


Principles of Economics 


4sh 


PS 


111 


Introduction to American Government 


4sh 


ES 


381 


Internship 


2sh 


ES 


461 


Senior Seminar 


4sh 



ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 



Choose one course from the following: 4 sh 

PHL 348 Environmental Ethics 

REL 348 Environmental Ethics 
Choose one course from the following: 4 sh 

MTH 1 14 Elementary Statistics 

ECO 202 Statistics for Economics and Business 



TOTAL 

Select one of the following two concentrations: 
Science Concentration 

CHM 2 1 1 Organic Chemistry I 
CHM 2 1 3 Organic Chemistry I I^b 
CHM 305 Environmental Chemistry 
PHY 103 Basic Concepts in Geology 
Choose one course from the following: 
BIO 422 Aquatic Biology 
CHM 31 1 Quantitative Analysis 



TOTAL 

ESllO. INTRODUCTION TO 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 4 sh 

This course explores the fundamental 
principles of the biological and physical 
sciences behind natural ecosystems. 
Central focus is an investigation of the 
root causes of the global environmental 
crisis: overpopulation, natural resources 
depletion and pollution. Students consider 
different world views and the development 
of solutions. Satisfies the non-laboratory 
science requirement for General Studies. 
(ES 1 10 is the same course as BIO 1 10.) 
Offered fall and spring. 



50 sh 



3sh 
1 sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 



TOTAL 16 sh 

Policy Concentration 

PS 328 Public Policy 4 sh 

ECO 335 Economics of Environmental Issues 4 sh 

PS 428 Environmental Politics & Legislation 4 sh 

Choose one course from the following: 4 sh 

SOC 332 Contemporary Environmental Issues 
PS 431 Policy Analysis & Program Evaluation 



16 sh 

ES 2 1 5. ORGANISMAL BIOLOGY 

AND FIELD TECHNIQUES 4 sh 

This course examines the basic concepts 
of plant and animal form and function 
and the fundamentals of plant and 
animal systematics, with a focus on 
herbaceous and woody plants, soil and 
aquatic invertebrates. Students investi- 
gate the natural history of local plant 
and animal species and their role in 
community dynamics. Laboratory 
experiences emphasize keying and 
identification, field methodologies of 
specimen collection and preservation, 
sampling techniques, and population 
estimation procedures for terrestrial 



FINE ARTS 



and aquatic ecosystems. Satisfies tlie 
General Studies lab science requirement. 
No credit toward the major or minor. 
Prerequisites: ES/BIO 1 10, BIO 1 12, 1 14. 
(ES 215 is the same course as BIO 215.) 
Offered fall. 

ES381. INTERNSHIP IN 

ENVIRONMENTAL 

SCIENCE 2-4sh 

An internship provides work experience 
at an advanced level in an environmental 
science field. Prerequisite; junior/senior 
standing as an ES major. Offered fall, 
winter, spring or summer. 



ES 46 1 . SEMINAR: ENVIRONMENTAL 
IMPACT ASSESSMENT AND 
POLICY DEVELOPMENT 4 sh 

Students cooperate in a semester-long 
project, conducting a complete field 
investigation of a land/water develop- 
ment proposal. The course provides an 
opportunity for the students to apply 
their knowledge, analytical and 
problem-solving skills and ethical 
perspectives in the creation of a report 
that could be used by a municipal or 
regional planning organization. 
Prerequisite: senior standing as an 
ES major. Offered spring. 



FINE ARTS 

Chair, Department of Visual Arts: Professor Sanford 
Assistant Professor: Erdmann, Rubeck, Wellford 
Part-time Instructor: Hassell 



FA 211. INTRODUCTION 

TO FINE ARTS 4 sh 

This comparative study of the major 
artistic forms involves readings, 
exhibitions, cultural events, lectures and 
workshops with visiting artists, through 
which students discover works of art, 
their uses, purposes and aesthetic 
values. Offered fall and spring. 

FA 25 1 . FINE ARTS STUDIES 

IN ENGLAND 4 sh 

A study-tour of London emphasizes 
theatres, concerts and places of cultural 
importance. Winter only. 



FA 313. BRITISH ART AND 

ARCHITECTURE 4 sh 

Field trips to museums and historically 
relevant sites complement classroom 
study of the art and architecture of 
England from the Anglo-Saxon and 
Roman periods to the 19th century. 
Offered fall and spring. 

FA 369. FINE ARTS IN THE 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS 4 sh 

Early childhood and elementary 
education majors become familiar with 
current approaches to teaching the arts, 
with emphasis placed on incorporating 
the arts into daily instruction. Prerequi- 
sites: junior standing and acceptance 
to the education department. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Chair, Department of Foreign Languages: Associate Professor Romer 
;; Associate Professors: Lunsford, Rodriguez, Wilson 
;■' Assistant Professor: Cobos 
j; Part-time Assistant Professor: Wilkinson 
I Part-time Instructor: Vitti 

I': Students preparing for the twenty-first century will encounter a global economy 

I and a world shrinking due to advances in communication technology. Thus, the study 
of foreign languages is more essential than ever. 

,', The Department of Foreign Languages offers courses in seven languages and 

programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in French or in Spanish. 127 
The student majoring in French or Spanish may also choose to complete the program 
leading to teacher certification. 

In the French and Spanish programs, the course offerings are balanced between 
literary, cultural, and linguistic study. Emphasis is put on practical use of the language, 
> and classroom learning is enhanced by video and computer technology and study 
abroad opportunities. 

A major in French requires the following courses: 

FR 32 1 Conversation 4 sh 

J FR 322 Advanced Conversation and Composition 4 sh 

FR 331 Introduction to French Literature 1 4 sh 

FR 332 Introduction to French Literature II 4 sh 

FR 34 1 Francophone Literature 4 sh 

FR361 French Civilization 4 sh 

i FR 362 Francophone Cultures Outside France 4 sh 

FR401 French Linguistics 4 sh 

Two additional electives at the 300-400 level 8 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 

i 

f Study abroad is strongly recommended. Credits earned in an approved study 

abroad program will substitute for requirements for the major. 

A mmor in French requires 20 hours, eight of which must be above the 310 level. 
A winter term abroad is encouraged. 

A major in Spanish requires the following courses: 

SPN321 Conversation 4 sh 

SPN 322 Advanced Conversation and Composition 4 sh 

SPN331 Spanish Literature I 4 sh 

SPN 332 Spanish Literature II 4 sh 

SPN 341 Latin American Literature 4 sh 

SPN 361 Spanish Civilization 4 sh 

SPN 362 Latin American Civilization 4 sh 

SPN 401 Spanish Linguistics 4 sh 

Two additional electives at the 300-400 level 8 sh 

TOTAL 40 sh 



FOREIGN 



LANGUAGES 



Study abroad is strongly recommended. Credits earned in an approved study 
abroad program will substitute for requirements for the major. 

A minor in Spanish requires 20 hours, eight of which must be above the 310 
level. A winter term abroad is encouraged. 

A major in French or Spanish with Secondary Teacher Certification 

requires the above 40 semester hours plus 35 semester hours professional studies 
courses in Education and Psychology. 



CHINESE 

CHN 1 10. ELEMENTARY CHINESE 4 sh 

The introductory course in Chinese 
language and culture emphasizes 
practical use of the language. Offered fall. 

CHN 2 1 0. INTERMEDIATE CHINESE 4 sh 

Intermediate study involves systematic 
language review in a cultural context. 
Prerequisite: CHN 1 10. Offered spring. 

CHN 3 1 0. ADVANCED CHINESE 4 sh 

This course further develops speaking 
and writing skills within a cultural 
context. Prerequisite: CHN 210. 

FRENCH 

FRIIO. ELEMENTARY FRENCH 4 sh 

Introductory study in French language 
and culture emphasizes practical use 
of the language. Offered fall and spring. 

FR 2 1 0. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 4 sh 

A continuation of systematic language 
review in a cultural context. Prerequi- 
site: FR 1 10 or 2 years of high school 
French. Offered fall and spring. 

FR3I0. ADVANCED FRENCH 4sh 

The advanced course is designed to 
further develop speaking and writing 
skills in a cultural context. Prerequisite: 
FR 210 or 3+ years of high school French. 

FR 32 1 . CONVERSATION 4 sh 

Conversational study develops abilities in 
everyday spoken communication with 
emphasis on building vocabulary and 
speaking proficiency Prerequisite: FR 310 or 
4+ years of high school French or permis- 
sion of instmctor. Offered every third year. 

FR 322. ADVANCED CONVERSATION 

AND COMPOSITION 4 sh 

Students focus on refinements in 



structure, oral and written communica- 
tion for specific purposes. Prerequisite: 
FR 310 or permission of instructor. 
Offered every third year. 

FR 33 1 . INTRODUCTION TO 

FRENCH LITERATURE I 4 sh 

Major texts of literature of France 
from the Middle Ages through the 1 8th 
century are taught in their historical, 
social and cultural context. Prerequisite: 
FR 310 or permission of instructor. 
Offered every third year. 

FR 332. INTRODUCTION TO 

FRENCH LITERATURE II 4 sh 

Major French literary texts (since the 
time of Napoleon) are taught in their 
historical, social and cultural context. 
Prerequisite: FR 310 or permission of 
instructor. Offered every third year. 

FR 34 1 . FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE 4 sh 

This study covers the major texts of 
French expression from Africa, the 
Antilles and Canada. Prerequisite: 
FR 310 or permission of instructor. 
Offered every third year. 

FR 36 1 . FRENCH CIVILIZATION 4 sh 

Study of the history, geography, people 
and institutions of France from prehis- 
toric times to the present emphasizes 
France's many contributions to Western 
civilization. Prerequisite: FR 310 or 
permission of instructor. Offered every 
third year. 

FR 362. FRANCOPHONE CULTURES 

OUTSIDE FRANCE 4 sh 

This course studies regional cultures 
around the world influenced by France, 
notably Africa, the Antilles and Canada. 
Prerequisite: FR 310 or permission of 
instructor. Offered every third year. 



FOREIGN 



LANGUAGES 



FR 3 7 1 . SPECIAL TOPICS 4 sh 

Topics may include advanced study 
of cinema, selected literary authors, 
periods, genres or regions. Prerequisite: 
FR 310 or permission of instructor. 

FR 40 1 . FRENCH LINGUISTICS 4 sh 

Practice in phonetic transcriptions 
and sound discrimination is part of this 
study of the French language system, 
including phonology, morphology and 
semantics. Prerequisite: FR 310 or 
permission of instructor. Offered every 
third year. 

FR48I. INTERNSHIP 1-4 sh 

Work experience at advanced level 
using French language skills. Project 
must be approved by the department. 
For majors/minors only. 

FR 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 2-4 sh 

GERMAN 

GER 1 10. ELEMENTARY GERMAN 4 sh 

An introduction to German language 
and culture emphasizes practical use 
of the language. Offered fall. 

GER 2 1 0. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 4 sh 

Intermediate study is a systematic 
language reviev^ in a cultural context. 
Prerequisite: GER 110 or 2 years of high 
school German. Offered spring. 

GER 3 1 0. ADVANCED GERMAN 4 sh 

The advanced course is designed to 
further develop speaking and writing 
skills in a cultural context. Prerequisite: 
GER 2 1 or 3+ years of high school 
German. 

GREEK 

GRK 1 1 0. ELEMENTARY GREEK 4 sh 

This intensive study covers Hellenistic 
Greek grammar and vocabulary. 

GRK 2 1 0. INTERMEDIATE GREEK 4 sh 

Intermediate study includes readings in 
Greek from the First Letter of John and 
the Gospel of Mark in the Greek New 
Testament to improve grammar and 
vocabulary. 



GRK 3 1 0. ADVANCED GREEK 4 sh 

Readings include the letters of Paul 
in the Greek New Testament to reach 
advanced levels of grammar and 
vocabulary. 

ITALIAN 

ITLIIO. ELEMENTARY ITALIAN 4 sh 

An introduction to Italian language and 
culture emphasizes practical use of the 
language. Offered fall. 

ITL2I0. INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN 4 sh 

Intermediate study is a systematic 
language review in a cultural context. 
Prerequisite: ITL 1 10 or 2 years of high 
school Italian. Offered spring. 

ITL 310. ADVANCED ITALIAN 4 sh 

The advanced course is designed to 
further develop speaking and writing 
skills in a cultural context. Prerequisite: 
ITL 2 1 or 3+ years of high school Italian. 

JAPANESE 

JPN no. ELEMENTARY JAPANESE 4sh 

An introduction to Japanese language 
and culture emphasizes practical use 
of the language. Offered fall. 

JPN 210. INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE 4 sh 

Intermediate study is a systematic 
language review in a cultural context. 
Prerequisite: JPN 110 or two years of 
high school Japanese. Offered spring. 

JPN 310. ADVANCED JAPANESE 4 sh 

Advanced Japanese further develops 
speaking and writing skills in a cultural 
context. Prerequisite: JPN 210 or 3+ 
years of high school Japanese. 

SPANISH 

SPN 1 10. ELEMENTARY SPANISH 4 sh 

An introduction to Spanish language 
and culture emphasizes practical use 
of the language. Offered fall and spring. 

SPN 2 1 0. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 4 sh 

Intermediate study is a systematic 
language review in a cultural context. 
Prerequisite: SPN 1 10 or 2 years of high 
school Spanish. Offered fall and spring. 



GENERAL 



STUDIES 



SPN 3 1 0. ADVANCED SPANISH 4 sh 

The advanced course further develops 
speaking and writing skills in a cultural 
context. Prerequisite: SPN 210 or 3+ 
years of high school Spanish. 

SPN 32 1 . CONVERSATION 4 sh 

Conversational Spanish involves 
intensive practice in everyday communi- 
cation situations with emphasis on 
vocabulary and speaking proficiency. 
Prerequisite: SPN 310 or permission 
of instructor. Offered every third year. 

SPN 322. ADVANCED CONVERSATION 

AND COMPOSITION 4 sh 

Intensive practice in oral and written 
expression focuses on refinements in 
structure, conversation and writing for 
specific purposes. Prerequisite: SPN 310 
or permission of instructor. Offered 
every third year. 

SPN 33 1 . SPANISH LITERATURE I 4 sh 

Study surveys the development of 
Spanish literature from its beginnings 
in the Middle Ages through the Renais- 
sance and the Golden Age. Prerequisite: 
SPN 310 or permission of instructor. 
Offered every third year. 

SPN 332. SPANISH LITERATURE II 4 sh 

Study continues a survey of Spanish 
literature during the 18th, 19th and 20th 
centuries. Prerequisite: SPN 310 or 
permission of instructor. Offered every 
third year. 

SPN 341. LATIN AMERICAN 

LITERATURE 4 sh 

This survey covers the literature of the 
Spanish-speaking countries of L^tin 



America from the discovery to the present. 
Prerequisite: SPN 310 or permission of 
instructor. Offered every third year. 

SPN 36 1 . SPANISH CIVILIZATION 4 sh 

A Study of the history, geography and 
people of Spain— from prehistoric times 
to the present— emphasizes Spain's 
many contributions to Western civiliza- 
tion. Prerequisite: SPN 310 or permission 
of instructor. Offered every third year. 

SPN 362. LATIN AMERICAN 

CIVILIZATION 4 sh 

This course examines Latin American 
geography, history, art, architecture, 
music, government, economy, ethnicity, 
languages and culture, including a study 
of each country. Prerequisite: SPN 310 or 
permission of instructor. Offered every 
third year. 

SPN 37 1 . SPECIAL TOPICS 4 sh 

Topics may include advanced study 
of language, cinema, selected literary 
authors, periods, genres or regions. 
Prerequisite: SPN 310 or permission 
of instructor. 

SPN 40 1 . SPANISH LINGUISTICS 4 sh 

Study of the Spanish language system — 
phonology, morphology and semantics — 
includes practice in phonetic transcrip- 
tions and sound discrimination. Prerequi- 
site: SPN 310 or permission of instructor. 

SPN 481. INTERNSHIP l-4sh 

Work experience at advanced level using 
Spanish language skills. Project must be 
approved by the department. For 
majors/minors only. 

SPN 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 2-4 sh 



GENERAL STUDIES 

The General Studies program gives breadth as well as depth to a college educa- 
tion. It provides students with opportunities to see the broad view of human civiliza- 
tion, experience great ideas and art, and learn the science and math skills that no 
contemporary leader or individual thinker can be without. 

Through training in writing and other communication skills as well as in learning 
to work independently, to think critically and constructively, to handle quantitative 



GEOGRAPHY 



data, to respect cultures world wide, and to develop habits of responsible leadership, 
this program develops the whole person. It is a major focus of a college career from 
beginning to end — challenging students, preparing them for both leadership and 
independent thought, and, most of all, deepening and enriching their lives. 



GS 1 10. THE GLOBAL EXPERIENCE 4 sh 

This first-year seminar examines 
public responsibility in a global context. 
It explores some of the implications 
created by cultural and natural diversity 
and the possibilities for human commu- 
nication and cooperation within this 
diversity. The course emphasizes student 
and faculty creativity through active and 
collaborative learning. The seminar is 
writing intensive. Limited to first-year 
students. Offered fall and spring. 

GS 300-499. ADVANCED INTERDISCI- 
PLINARY SEMINARS 4 sh 

These upper-level interdisciplinary 
seminars for juniors and seniors continue 
the emphasis upon integration of 
disciplines and skills that was begun in 
The Global Experience and other first-year 
core classes. The topics of the seminars 



are flexible, reflecting the interests and 
experiences of the faculty facilitator. 
The seminars are writing intensive. 

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING 1 unit 

The Experiential Learning Requirement 
asks students to practice close observa- 
tion of the world around them and to 
reflect insightfully on those observa- 
tions. Exposure to diversity helps 
students see the interrelationships 
between academic studies and other 
experiences. The requirement may be 
met in one of four ways: 1) in field-based 
courses like internships, study abroad, 
practicums, co-ops, and student 
teaching; 2) through 40 hours of service 
or volunteer activities; 3) through 
a leadership role; and 4) through a 
different activity that will allow the 
student to observe and refiect 
on his or her experience. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Coordinator: Assistant Professor Gates 
Part-time instructor: Warren 

A minor in Geography requires the following courses: 
GEO 121 Earth Science 
GEO 131 The World's Regions 
One course from 

BIO 301 Environmental Conservation 
PHY 103 Introduction to Geology 
PS 241 International Relations 
Four semester hours of GEO elective 
Four additional semester hours chosen from 
GEO elective 

BIO 301 Environmental Conservation 
PHY 103 Introduction to Geology 
PS 241 International Relations 

(courses may not be counted twice) 



4sh 
4sh 
4sh 



4sh 
4sh 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND LEISURE 



GEO 1 2 1 . EARTH SCIENCE 4 sh 

Earth science involves study of the natural 
environment, its elements and its 
processes, including environmental 
degradation and protection. Students 
learn to use both traditional and electronic 
data sources, atlases and methods of data 
presentation. Offered fall or spring. 

GEO 131. THE WORLD'S 

REGIONS 4 sh 

This survey of the regions of the world 
emphasizes place names and environ- 
mental and human characteristics which 
provide both the common traits and the 
distinctive characteristics of different 
places. Students analyze change, 
problems, potentials and alternative 
futures and use traditional and electronic 
data sources, atlases and methods of 
data presentation. Offered fall and spring. 

GEO 311. GEOGRAPHY 

OF NORTH AMERICA 4 sb 

In studying the United States, Canada 
and Mexico, students focus on place 
names, regional differences in environ- 
mental and human characteristics, print 
and electronic atlases and information 



sources and mapping methods for 
spatial data. Offered every other year. 

GEO 321. GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE 4sh 

Study of Europe, including the European 
CIS countries, emphasizes place names, 
regional variation in environmental and 
human characteristics, print and 
electronic atlases and information 
sources and mapping methods for 
spatial data. Offered every other year. 

GEO 331. GEOGRAPHY 

OF NORTH CAROLINA 4 sh 

In studying North Carolina and its 
regions, students concentrate on place 
names, regional variation in environ- 
mental and human characteristics, print 
and electronic atlases and information 
sources and mapping methods for 
spatial data. Offered every other year. 

GEO 481. INTERNSHIP 

IN GEOGRAPHY 1-4 sh 

Internship is limited to 4 semester hours 
credit toward geography minor. Prereq- 
uisite: GEO 121, 131 and permission of 
instructor. 



GEO 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 sh 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND LEISURE 

chair, Department of Health, Physical Education and Leisure: Professor Brown 

Professors: Beedle, A. White 

Associate Professors: Calhoun, Drummond, Parham 

Assistant Professors: Baker, Brewer, Hart, Leonard, Messerole, Ross, Simons, 

Waters, Wellford 
Instructors: Best, Brodowicz, Hicks, Lashley, Musselman, Patterson, Paul, Staton 

The Department of Health, Physical Education and Leisure offers majors in Health 
Education, Leisure/Sport Management, Physical Education and Sports Medicine. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

The Health Education curriculum is designed to prepare teachers of health and 
safety education (kindergarten through senior high school) in both public and private 
school systems. The program of study incorporates school goals and objectives for 
establishing and maintaining quality health education programs that are planned, 
comprehensive, personalized, practical, sequential and oriented toward mental, 
social and physical well-being. 

This is accomplished through a wide range of specialized theory courses and 
many opportunities to apply, evaluate and refine necessary skills in laboratory 



HEALTH EDUCATION 



settings. Studies in health education explore ways to educate students and the public 
about contemporary health issues such as personal safety, nutrition, substance abuse, 
disease prevention and human sexuality. 

A major in Health Education requires the following courses: 



HE 


220 


First Aid 


2sh 


HE 


321 


Health Services and Consumerism 


4sh 


HE 


324 


Nutrition 


4sh 


HE 


325 


Substance Abuse and Human Behavior 


4sh 


HE 


326 


Human Sexuality 


4sh 


HE 


421 


Health of the Body Systems 


4sh 


PE 


305 


Legal Aspects in HPEL 


2sh 


PE 


411 


Measurement and Evaluation 


4sh 


BIO 


161 


Human Anatomy 


4sh 


BIO 


162 


Human Physiology 


4sh 


EDU 


427 


Materials and Methods of Teaching 








Health and Safety 


4sh 


Completion of Teacher Licensure requirements 





133 



TOTAL 40 sh 

Students also take the professional studies requirements listed for Special 
Subjects areas (K-I2) in the Department of Education. 

Physical Education endorsement for the Health Education major 

requires the following courses; 

EDU 423 Materials and Methods 

of Teaching Physical Education 4 sh 

Sixteen additional hours chosen from the following courses: 16 sh 

History/Foundations of Sport/Physical Education 

Motor Learning Theory for Teaching and Coaching 

Kinesiology 

Theory of Coaching (2 sh) 

Elementary and Adapted Physical Education (K-6) 

Administration and Leadership including the 

following courses of which there is a 

maximum limit of four courses 

Tennis (I sh) 

Recreational Sports (I sh) 

Golf(l sh) 

Beginning Swimming and Emergency Water Safety (1 sh) 

Lifeguard Training (2 sh) 

Basketball (I sh) 

Conditioning/Weight Training (1 sh) 

Softball (I sh) 

Aerobic Conditioning (1 sh) 

TOTAL 20 sh 



PE211 


PE310 


PE321 


PE341 


PE360 


PE4I0 


PE 100 


PE 103 


PE 105 


PE 106 


PE 107 


PE 108 


PE 109 


PE 110 


PE III 



HEALTH EDUCATION 



A minor in Health Education requires the following courses: 
HE 32 1 Health Services and Consumerism 4 sh 

HE 324 Nutrition 4 sh 

HE 325 Substance Abuse and Human Behavior 4 sh 

HE 326 Human Sexuality 4 sh 

Four semester hours chosen from additional courses 
required for the Health Education major. 



TOTAL 

HE 110. WELLNESS 3sh 

Students study the components of a 
lifestyle of wholeness and well-being 
and develop a lifelong personal wellness 
program based on the physiological and 
psychological principles of wellness/ 
fitness and personal decision-making. 
Offered fall and spring. 

HE 220. FIRST AID 2sh 

Emphasizes preparing individuals to 
act responsibly in emergency situations; 
includes requirements for standard first 
aid and community CPR. Fee: $3.00 for 
certification. Offered fall, winter and 
spring. 

HE 32 1 . HEALTH SERVICES 

AND CONSUMERISM 4 sh 

This introduction to comprehensive 
health education emphasizes health 
trends, objectives, products, services 
and factors that influence personal 
choice in the health marketplace. 
Students study methods of identifying 
and managing major health risk 
behaviors and investigate health 
education in the school and community, 
health services, resources, networking 
and health promotion. Experiential 
hours in a community health agency 
required. Offered spring of even- 
numbered years. 

HE 324. NUTRITION 4 sh 

A comprehensive study of nutrient 
basics, digestion, metabolism, vitamins, 
minerals, supplements, steroids, weight 
management, eating disorders, nutri- 
tional deficiencies and imbalances. 
Emphasizes practical application of 



20 sh 

nutrition concepts throughout the life 
cycle and investigates food technology 
and food safety. Offered fall and spring. 

HE 325. SUBSTANCE ABUSE 

AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR 4 sh 

Students study the interactions among 
personality, psychoactive agents, and 
societal and psychological motiva- 
tions. Drug abuse is examined from 
the perspectives of pharmacology, 
psychosocial impact, prevention 
strategies and rehabilitation. 
Offered fall of even-numbered years. , 

HE 326. HUMAN SEXUALITY 4 sh 

A comprehensive study of biological and 
psychosocial sexuality throughout the 
life cycle, including male and female 
physiology, contraception, pregnancy, 
childbirth, sexually transmitted diseases, 
gender roles, intimate relationships, 
parenting and deviant sexual behavior. 
Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 

HE 362. HEALTHFUL LIVING IN THE 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 sh 

Provides a study of health, safety and 
physical education needs of elementary 
children (including content and method- 
ology) and the integration of those 
needs with the curriculum. Offered fall 
and spring. 

HE 421. HEALTH OF THE 

BODY SYSTEMS 4 sh 

Students study the interdependency of 
body systems and diseases and condi- 
tions that affect human health and well 
being. Topics include the historical 
foundation of health professions, 
immunology, pathophysiology of 



LEISURE/ SPORT MANAGEMENT 



prominent acute and chronic diseases, 
sociocultural factors that influence 
health, and consequences and prevention 
of major health risk behaviors. Methods 



of health appraisal and screening are also 
investigated. Prerequisites: BIO 161, 162 
Offered spring. 



HE 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 sh 



LEISURE/SPORT MANAGEMENT 

Study in Elon's Leisure/Sport Management program offers excellent preparation 
for those wishing to enhance quality of life for themselves and others through leisure 
opportunity. Specifically, students develop a philosophical foundation in leisure and 
sport, acquire a knowledge base in business administration, study interpersonal skills 
applicable to the leisure setting and learn by active participation. 

A major in Leisure/Sport Management requires the following courses: 

Introduction to Leisure/Sport Management 4 sh 

Planning and Maintenance Management 4 sh 

Leisure/Sport Programming 4 sh 

Leisure and the Environment 2 sh 

Senior Seminar 2 sh 

Internship in Leisure/Sport Management 6 sh 

Legal Aspects in HPEL 2 sh 

Administration and Leadership 4 sh 

First Aid 2 sh 

Research Methods 4 sh 

Introduction to Financial Accounting 4 sh 

Business Communications 4 sh 

Principles of Marketing 4 sh 

Introduction to Public Administration 4 sh 

Principles of Economics 4 sh 



LSM 


212 


LSM 


326 


LSM 


327 


LSM 


425 


LSM 


461 


LSM 


481 


PE 


305 


PE 


410 


HE 


220 


SM 


415 


ACC 


201 


BA 


302 


BA 


311 


PA 


231 


ECO 


201 



TOTAL 



54 sh 



A minor in Leisure/Sport Management requires the following courses: 
Introduction to Leisure/Sport Management 4 sh 

Planning and Maintenance Management 4 sh 

Leisure/Sport Programming 4 sh 

Leisure and the Environment 2 sh 

Senior Seminar 2 sh 



LSM 


212 


LSM 


326 


LSM 


327 


LSM 


425 


LSM 


471 



TOTAL 

LSM 212. INTRODUCTION TO LEISURE/ 

SPORT MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

An introduction to leisure/sport 
management fundamentals emphasizing 
the role and relevance of each to society. 
Students study terminology, philoso- 
phies and evolution of leisure, internal 
and external recreation factors, leisure 



16 sh 

concepts and contemporary issues. 
Offered fall and spring. 

LSM 325. LEISURE AND AGING 3 sh 

Students examine the leisure needs and 
characteristics of older adults, focusing 
on problems inherent in leisure service 
delivery systems for aging clientele. 
(LSM 325 is the same as HUS 325.) 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



LSM 326. FACILITY PLANNING 
AND MAINTENANCE 
MANAGEMENT 4 sh 

This Study focuses on area and facility 
planning and maintenance principles in 
leisure settings, including developing a 
master plan, and analyzing the relation- 
ship of maintenance and planning to risk 
management, visitor control, vandalism 
and law enforcement. Offered fall. 

LSM 327. LEISURE/SPORT LEADERSHIP 

AND PROGRAMMING 4 sh 

Students study the principles of leader- 
ship and group dynamics as they apply to 
leisure activity programming and learn to 
identify, develop and apply component 
skills such as needs assessment, 
inventory, evaluation, etc. Offered fall. 

LSM 425. LEISURE AND 

THE ENVIRONMENT 2 sh 

This course examines relationships 
between outdoor recreation and the 
natural environment, including such 
topics as spiritual relationships of 
recreation to nature, social and psycho- 
logical aspects of the outdoor experience 
and resource policies. Offered spring. 



LSM 46 1 . SENIOR SEMINAR 2 sh 

Students review their major work and 
education and demonstrate ability to 
analyze contemporary issues/problems 
in leisure and sport management. 
Offered spring. 

LSM 481. INTERNSHIP IN LEISURE/ 

SPORT MANAGEMENT 6sh 

This course provides students with 240 
supervised hours (agency/college) of 
experiential exposure in the area of their 
vocational interest. Students demonstrate 
knowledge, skills, abilities and competen- 
cies in the areas of: organization and 
administration, leadership techniques, 
program planning and implementation, 
fiscal administration, personnel develop- 
ment and supervision, public and political 
relations and area/facility planning, 
development and maintenance. Students 
will submit the following to the academic 
supervisor: learning objectives; weekly 
reports; and an agency survey showing 
comprehensive knowledge of the agency. 
Arrangements with a professor should be 
made prior to the semester in which the 
internship is taken. Prerequisite: for 
majors only. Offered fall and spring. 



LSM 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 sh 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Physical Education curriculum is designed to prepare students to become 
teachers. The program is broad-based and includes evaluating and improving the 
student's psychomotor and cognitive skills through a wide range of activity courses, 
specialized theory courses and continued opportunity for applying these skills and 
concepts in laboratory settings. 

Through this study students gain knowledge of the concepts and skills related 
to sport and physical activity. Graduates in this major are successful teachers and 
coaches and many pursue graduate degrees. 

A major in Physical Education requires the following courses: 
DAN 1 15 Folk, Square and Social Dance 1 sh 

PE 102 Gymnastics 1 sh 

Four courses chosen from 4 sh 

PE 100 Tennis 

PE 101 Raquetball 

PE 103 Recreational Sports 

PE 104 Dance 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



PE 105 


Golf 




PE 106 


Beginning Swimming and Emergency Water Safety 


PE 108 


Basketball 




PE 109 


Conditioning/Weight Training 




PE 110 


Softball 




PE 111 


Aerobic Conditioning 




PE 112 


Soccer 




PE113 


Volleyball 




PE 211 


History/Foundations of Sport/Physical Education 


4sh 


PE 305 


Legal Aspects of HPEL 


2sh 


PE 310 


Motor Learning Theory for Teaching and Coaching 


4sh 


PE 321 


Kinesiology 


4sh 


PE 341 


Theory of Coaching 


2sh 


PE 360 


Elementary and Adapted Physical Education (K-6) 


4sh 


PE 410 


Administration and Leadership 


4sh 


PE 411 


Measurement and Evaluation 


4sh 


HE 220 


First Aid 


2sh 


SM 422 


Physiology of Exercise 


4sh 


BIO 161 


Human Anatomy 


4sh 


BIO 162 


Human Physiology 


4sh 



137 



TOTAL 48 sh 

Students desiring teacher certification should also take the professional studies 
requirements listed for Special Subjects areas (K-12) in the Department of Educa- 
tion. (EDU 450 not required). 

Health Education endorsement for persons with PE certification requires the 
following courses: 

EDU 427 Materials and Methods 

of Teaching Health and Safety 4 sh 

Fourteen hours chosen from the following courses: 14 sh 

HE 220 First Aid 

HE 32 1 Health Services and Consumerism 

HE 324 Nutrition 

HE 325 Substance Abuse and Human Behavior 

HE 326 Human Sexuality 

HE 42 1 Health of the Body Systems 

TOTAL 18 sh 

A minor in Physical Education requires the following courses: 
Four courses chosen from one-hour skills classes 4 sh 

PE 310 Motor Learning Theory for Teaching 

and Coaching 4 sh 

PE 360 Elementary and Adapted 

Physical Education (K-6) 4 sh 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



EDU 423 Materials and Methods of Teaching 

Physical Education 
One course from 

PE 342 Methods of Coaching Football 
Methods of Coaching Basketball 
Methods of Coaching Track and Field 
and Baseball 
Methods of Coaching Soccer and Volleyball 



4sh 
2sh 



PE343 
PE344 

PE345 



TOTAL 

PE 100. TENNIS Ish 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of tennis. Offered fall and spring. 

PE 101. RACQUETBALL 1 sh 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of racquetball. Offered fall and spring. 

PE 102. GYMNASTICS I sh 

Students learn a variety of floor and 
apparatus gymnastics skills. Offered 
alternating years. 

PE 103. RECREATIONAL SPORTS i sh 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy of 
a variety of recreational sports, including 
archery, badminton and paddle tennis. 
Offered alternating years. 

PE 105. GOLF 

(Beginning and Intermediate) 1 sh 
Special fee: $25. Students learn rules, 
skill and strategy of golf. Offered fall 
and spring. 

PE 106. BEGINNING SWIMMING AND 

EMERGENCY WATER SAFETY 1 sh 

An introduction to basic swimming 
techniques and general water safety 
instruction, including how to respond 
effectively in a water emergency. The goal 
is to create an awareness of causes and 
prevention of water accidents. (Beginning 
Swimming and Emergency Water Safety 
certificate given.) Offered fall. 

PE 107. LIFEGUARD TRAINING 2 sh 

Students gain knowledge and skills for 
aquatic safety and non-surf life guarding 
and receive Red Cross certification upon 
completion. Prerequisites: strong 
swimming skills, current Red Cross 
Standard First Aid. Offered spring. 



18 sh 

PE 108. BASKETBALL Ish 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of basketball. Offered alternating years. 

PE 109. CONDITIONING/WEIGHT 

TRAINING 1 sh 

Progressive development of physiologi- 
cal fitness designed to meet the needs 
of the individual student, including 
weight and cardiorespiratory training. 
Offered fall and spring. 

PEllO. SOFTBALL Ish 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of Softball. Offered alternating years. 

PElll. AEROBIC 

CONDITIONING 1 sh 

Students have the opportunity to 
improve their physical fitness level 
through aerobic activities using correct 
techniques. Offered fall and spring. 

PE112. SOCCER Ish 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of soccer. Offered alternating years. 

PE113 VOLLEYBALL Ish 

Students learn rules, skill and strategy 
of volleyball. Offered alternating years. 

PE116. OUTWARD BOUND 

EXPERIENCE 1-3 sh 

This is a course in wilderness survival, 
including physical survival skills, fitness, 
cognitive and emotional skills and study 
of the natural worid. Offered as person- 
nel is available. 

PE 208. WATER SAFETY 

INSTRUCTORS 3 sh 

Detailed study of methods and materials 
used to teach Red Cross swimming and 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



aquatics safety courses. Successful 
completion qualifies WSIs to teach infant 
and preschool aquatics, progressive 
swimming courses, basic water safety 
and emergency water safety. Prerequi- 
sites: 1 7 years old, current certification 
for Emergency Water Safety or Lifeguard 
Training; CPR and First Aid recom- 
mended. Offered spring. 

PE 209. SKIN AND BASIC 

SCUBA DIVING 2sh 

Students learn the art of skin and scuba 
diving, including the physics, physiology 
and mechanics of diving; safe diving 
practices; marine life and environment; 
dive planning and various aspects of 
sport diving. Prerequisites: 15 years old, 
pass a swimming test, medical exam 
and payment of special fees before 
scuba work begins. Special fee: $175.00. 

PE 2 1 1 . HISTORY/FOUNDATIONS 
OF SPORT/PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 4 sh 

An introduction to the philosophical, 
psychological and sociological founda- 
tions and the history of physical 
education, including current issues and 
trends and the economic impact of sport 
and fitness on society. Offered spring. 

PE 265. OFFICIATING 2 sh 

Provides a thorough study of rules and 
mechanics of sport officiating. Practical 
experience in officiating may be 
provided at the community, little league, 
middle school and junior varsity levels. 
Offered fall and spring. 

PE 305. LEGAL ASPECTS IN HPEL 2 sh 

A Study of the legal environment of 
leisure, sport, health and school 
organizations, emphasizing applications 
of tort, criminal, employment, contract, 
property and constitutional law. 
Students learn the principles of risk 
management and relevant applications 
and discuss current legislation affecting 
the field. Offered fall and spring. 



PE 3 1 0. MOTOR LEARNING THEORY FOR 
TEACHING AND COACHING 4 sh 

This course provides physical education 
teachers and coaches knowledge and 
understanding of how learning and 
optimum performance of motor skills 
occur. Study of the characteristics and 
interactions between student/athlete, 
teacher/coach and the learning environ- 
ment coupled with synthesis of recent 
research, experimentation and analysis 
enables participants to teach motor 
skills efficiently. Offered spring. 

PE32I. KINESIOLOGY 4 sh 

Students study the musculo-skeletal 
system and biomechanics for physical 
fitness activities, exercise/sports injuries 
and sports skills. Prerequisite: BIO 161. 
Offered fall and spring. 

PE 34 1 . THEORY OF COACHING 2 sh 

Provides a thorough study of the role of 
coaches in the school and community, 
including coaching philosophy, ethics, 
relationships, motivation and responsi- 
bilities. Offered fall. 

PE 342. METHODS OF COACHING 

FOOTBALL 2 sh 

A study of appropriate terms, drills, 
methods and strategy for coaching 
football. Offered fall. 

PE 343. METHODS OF COACHING 

BASKETBALL 2 sh 

A study of appropriate terms, drills, 
methods and strategy for coaching 
basketball. Offered spring. 

PE 344. METHODS OF COACHING 
TRACK AND FIELD 
AND BASEBALL 2 sh 

A Study of appropriate terms, drills, 
methods and strategy for coaching track 
and field and baseball. 

PE 345. METHODS OF COACHING 

SOCCER AND VOLLEYBALL 2 sh 

A Study of appropriate terms, drills, 
methods and strategy for coaching 
soccer and volleyball. 



SPORTS 



MEDICINE 



PE 360. ELEMENTARY AND ADAPTED 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (K-6) 4 sh 

Students learn to integrate the psycho- 
motor, cognitive and affective domains 
in school settings, emphasizing move- 
ment education and basic skills teaching 
for students at all levels, including the 
student with special needs. Current 
legislation and appropriate application 
is also studied. Offered fall. 



PE 410. ADMINISTRATION 
AND LEADERSHIP 

A Study of the organizational and 
administrative techniques needed to 
design and implement programs in 
leisure, sport and physical education 



sh 



settings, including organizational 
structure and theories, leadership styles, 
decision-making, finance management, 
purchasing, public relations and tourna- 
ment organization. Offered fall and spring. 

PE 4 1 1 . MEASUREMENT AND 

EVALUATION 4 sh 

Students learn to organize and interpret 
data from tests with and without the use 
of software packages. Also includes the 
study and administration of youth and 
adult physical fitness tests, sports skill 
tests and an overview of psychosocial 
testing. Offered spring. 



PE 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 sh 



SPORTS MEDICINE 

Study in sports medicine at Elon College combines the scientific and the practical 
aspects of the prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries and includes the 
study of the effects of physical activity on the human body. 

The sports medicine major prepares graduates for careers in athletic training, 
cardiac rehabilitation, exercise physiology, corporate wellness and other related 
careers. After taking a series of core courses, the student chooses a concentration 
in either athletic training or exercise/sports science. 

The athlefic training concentrafion includes 1 ,500 hands-on clinical hours and qualifies 
the graduate to take the National Athletic Training Association certification exam. 

The exercise/sports science concentration includes a practicum and internship 
experience. Students who wish to pursue graduate degrees may go on to physical 
therapy, exercise physiology and other areas of study. 

A major in Sports Medicine requires the following core courses: 

Research Methods 4 sh 

Physiology of Exercise 4 sh 

Legal Aspects in HPEL 2 sh 

Kinesiology 4 sh 

Nutrition 4 sh 

Health of the Body Systems 4 sh 

Human Anatomy 4 sh 

Human Physiology 4 sh 

General Chemistry I 3 sh 

General Chemistry I Lab 1 sh 

Completion of Exercise/Sports Science track 

or Athletic Training track 12-20 sh 



SM 


415 


SM 


422 


PE 


305 


PE 


321 


HE 


324 


HE 


421 


BIO 


161 


BIO 


162 


CHM 


III 


CHM 


113 



TOTAL 



46-52 sh 



SPORTS MEDICINE 

Exercise/Sports Science track requires the following courses: 

SM281 Practicum in Sports Medicine/ 

Exercise/Sports Science 2 sh 

SM 324 Exercise Motivation 2 sh 

SM 424 Exercise Programming 2 sh 

SM 482 Internship in Exercise/Sport Science 4 sh 

HE 220 First Aid 2 sh 

TOTAL 12 sh 

Athletic Training track requires the following courses: 

SM 1 12 Athletic Training I 4 sh 

SM212 Athletic Training II 2 sh 

SM 329 Assessment of Athletic Injuries 4 sh 

SM 414 Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries 2 sh 

SM481 Internship in Sports Medicine 4 sh 

FE 410 Administration and Leadership 4 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 

Completion of 1 ,500 clinical hours 

A minor in the Athletic Training track requires the following courses: 



SM 


112 


Athletic Training I 


4sh 


SM 


212 


Athletic Training II 


2sh 


SM 


329 


Assessment of Athletic Injuries 


4sh 


PE 


321 


Kinesiology 


4 sh or 


SM 


422 


Physiology of Exercise 


4sh 


BIO 


161 


Human Anatomy (prerequisite for PE 32 1 ) 


4sh 


BIO 


162 


Human Physiology (prerequisite for SM 422) 


4sh 



TOTAL 20 sh 

A minor in the Exercise/Sport Science track requires the following courses: 
SM 422 Physiology of Exercise 4 sh 

Nutrition 4 sh 

Kinesiology 4 sh 

Human Anatomy 4 sh 

Human Physiology 4 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 

SM 1 12. ATHLETIC TRAINING 1 4sh of specific injuries, tissue repair and 

This course introduces the student to healing, transportation and transfer 

the profession and principles of athletic of catastrophic injuries, methods of 

training, including topics such as sports bandaging and dressing wounds and 

medicine organizations, emergency care adhesive taping. Offered fall and spring. 



HE 


324 


PE 


321 


BIO 


161 


BIO 


162 



SPORTS 



MEDICINE 



SM281. PRACTICUM IN SPORTS 
MEDICINE/EXERCISE/ 
SPORTS SCIENCE 2 sh 

The practicum introduces the student 
to professions in sports medicine and 
health-related fields. Students must 
choose three different agencies to work 
in, with about 27 hours at each agency. 
Students must turn in weekly, typed 
reports including a brief discussion of the 
experience, reflections and a critique of 
142 the experience/agency. Students will 
engage in problem solving assignments 
and perform research on some particular 
topic. Students may also assist with 
patient/client care and/or training and 
shadow their supervisor. Students must 
make arrangements with their professor 
the semester before taking the practicum. 
Prerequisite: For majors only. Offered fall, 
winter and spring. 

SM212. ATHLETIC TRAINING II 2sh 

Students learn advanced skills and 
techniques, including application of 
protective and supportive devices, 
equipment fit, physical examination and 
fitness testing, training room adminis- 
tration and advanced techniques of 
taping and wrapping. Prerequisite: 
SM 11 2 , BIO 1 6 1 , BIO 1 62 or permission 
of instructor. Offered spring. 

SM324. EXERCISE MOTIVATION 2sh 

Students examine the underlying 
motivations for why people do and do 
not exercise and methods to change 
negative behaviors to positive ones. 
Topics include Kenyons theory, psycho- 
logical effects of exercise, exercise and 
personality, exercise and self-concept 
and anorexia. Offered spring. 

SM 329. ASSESSMENT OF ATHLETIC 

INJURIES 4 sh 

This course familiarizes students with the 
principles of assessing sport injuries, 
including injury history, palpation, range 
of mofion tests, muscle function tests, 
joint stability and specific anatomical 
features. Prerequisite: SM 1 12. Offered fall. 



SM414. REHABILITATION OF 

ATHLETIC INJURIES 2sh 

This course introduces students to 
the principles of rehabilitating sports 
injuries, including drugs and medica- 
tions, modality applications and exercise 
rehabilitation. Prerequisites: SM 112, 
212. Offered spring. 

SM415. RESEARCH METHODS 4sh 

Students become familiar with basic 
research terminology and concepts, 
including statistics, developing a 
research problem, developing the 
research proposal, using computer 
software and measurement concepts. A 
research paper is required. Prerequisites: 
Senior standing; L/SM 212, for L/SM 
majors; SM 422, for Exercise/Sport 
Science majors; SM 329, for Athletic 
Training majors. Offered fall and spring. 

SM422. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE 4sh 

Students examine the immediate and 
long-term effects of exercise on the 
body, including the integration of 
various bodily systems as a result 
of exercise and the role of nutrition 
and exercise in weight management. 
Laboratory activities include aerobic 
capacity testing, blood lipid and 
metabolic profiles, determination of 
body composition and adult fitness 
testing. This course requires a three- 
hour lab. Prerequisite: BIO 162. 
Offered fall and spring. 

SM424. EXERCISE PROGRAMMING 2sh 

Students gain applied knowledge to 
supervise and direct exercise programs 
for both healthy and special populations. 
Topics include basic terminology, risk 
identification, types of fitness tests, 
indications and contraindications to 
exercise testing, program administration 
and personnel. Prerequisite: SM 422. 
Offered spring. 

SM 48 1 . INTERNSHIP IN SPORTS MEDICINE 
(ATHLETIC TRAINING) 4 sh 

In this course, upper level majors have 
opportunities to apply classroom 



knowledge and skills to real world 
problems under the supervision of a 
faculty member and a certified athletic 
trainer. Settings may include a sports 
medicine clinic, professional sports 
team, college or university training 
room, corporate setting, etc. Students 
must keep a daily journal of their 
experiences, which are discussed in 
conferences with the faculty supervisor. 
The student must also complete a 
project benefitting the internship facility, 
but which would not have been possible 
without the student. Student evaluations 
are based on these assignments. 
Students should make arrangements 
with their professors the semester prior 
to taking the internship. Prerequisite: 
junior/senior majors only, permission 
of department. Offered fall and spring. 



HISTORY 



HISTORY 

SM482. INTERNSHIP IN 

EXERCISE/SPORT SCIENCE 4 sh 

Upper-class exercise/sports science 
majors select a sports medicine or health- 
related agency for their internship, a 
capstone experience. For each semester 
hour credit, the student serves 40 hours at 
the agency. Students must turn in weekly 
reports including a brief discussion of the 
experience, reflections and a critique of 
the experience/agency. Students may 
engage in problem solving assignments 
and perform research on some particular 
topic. Students may also assist with 
patient/client care and/or training and 
shadow their supervisor. A research paper 
is due near the end of the experience. 
Students should make arrangements with 
their professors the semester prior to 
taking the internship. Prerequisite: SM 
281. Offered fall and spring. 



Chair, Department of History: Associate Professor Midgette 

Professors: Crowe, C. Troxler, G. Troxler 

Associate Professor: Digre 

Assistant Professors: Bissett, Ellis, Festle 

Instructor: Brown 

The study of history centers on exploration of various economic, social, political, 
military and religious forces that have transformed the face of the world. It combines 
analytical thinking and writing with a detailed grasp of the many influences that have 
brought about historical change. 

History is a discipline that explores the dynamics of change from humanistic and 
social scientific perspectives. Because of the breadth and depth of historical investiga- 
tion, students who choose to major or minor in history at Elon College find themselves 
well prepared for careers that require interaction with people and the ability to write 
and think analytically. 

A major in History requires the following courses: 
HST 1 1 1 Europe and the Mediterranean World to 1660 4 sh 

HST 112 Europe and the Mediterranean World since 1660 4 sh 
Choose one course from 4 sh 

HST 1 2 1 United States History through 1 865 or 
HST 122 United States History since 1865 
Eight hours History electives 8 sh 

Twenty hours History electives at the 300-400 level 20 sh 

One History seminar course including completion 
of a Senior Thesis 4 sh 



TOTAL 



44 sh 



HISTORY 



It is Strongly recommended that History majors, in consultation with their 
advisor, select a topical or regional concentration of 12 semester hours at the 300 
level and above. Concentration courses will be chosen from among the required 28 
elective hours. With the approval of the department chair, four hours from outside 
the history department may be applied toward the concentration and the elective 
history hour requirement. 

History majors receiving teacher certification must complete the following courses: 

HST 1 1 1 Europe and the Mediterranean World to 1 660 4 sh 

HST 1 12 Europe and the Mediterranean World since 1660 4 sh 

HST 121 United States History through 1865 4 sh 

HST 122 United States History since 1865 4 sh 

HST 361 North Carolina in the Nation 4 sh 

One History seminar course 4 sh 
Sixteen hours HST electives at the 300-400 level chosen 

from each of the following areas 16 sh 

1) United States 

2) Europe 

3) Developing World (Africa, Asia) 

4) Minority History (African Americans and Women) 
131 The World's Regions 4 sh 
1 1 1 American Government 4 sh 



GEO 

PS 

Set of Professional education courses 



35 sh 



TOTAL 83 sh 

A minor in History requires the following: 

Four semester hours chosen from 4 sh 

HST 1 1 1 Europe and the Mediterranean World to 1660 

HST 1 12 Europe and the Mediterranean World since 1660 

HST 22 1 The World in the Twentieth Century 
Four semester hours chosen from 4 sh 

HST 1 2 1 United States History through 1 865 

HST 122 United States History since 1865 

Twelve semester hours of History electives 

at the 300-400 level 12 sh 



TOTAL 



20 sh 



HST 111. EUROPE AND THE 
MEDITERRANEAN 
WORLD TO 1660 4sb 

This survey of major developments in 
the Mediterranean world begins with 
ancient Mesopotamian and Egyptian 
civilizations. Students also explore the 
evolution of the great formative cultures 
of the Western world (Greece and Rome) 
and the Middle East and look at their 



interaction during the Middle Ages, the 
Renaissance, the Reformation and the 
beginnings of early modern Europe. 
Offered fall and spring. 



HST 1 12. EUROPE AND THE 
MEDITERRANEAN 
WORLD SINCE 1660 

In a survey of major developments in 
the Mediterranean world from 1 660 



sh 



HISTORY 



to the present, study covers the rise of 
the major European powers during the 
period and discuss their interaction with 
one another and the Middle East and 
North Africa, particularly in the 19th and 
20th centuries. Offered fall and spring. 

HST 121. UNITED STATES HISTORY 

THROUGH 1865 4sh 

This survey of early U.S. history includes 
the major political, social, economic and 
intellectual developments in the U.S. 
from the first explorations of the 
continent through 1865 and considers 
the implications of these events and 
developments on the American experi- 
ence after 1865, Offered fall and spring. 

HST 122. UNITED STATES 

HISTORY SINCE 1865 4 sh 

Study of U.S. history continues with the 
major political, social, economic and 
intellectual developments in the U.S. 
from the Civil War to the present and 
examines how events and developments 
which occurred prior to 1865 influenced 
the nations evolution after the Civil War. 
Offered fall and spring. No credit for 
students with prior credit for HST 123. 

HST 123. THE UNITED STATES AND NORTH 
CAROLINA SINCE 1865 4 sh 

Study of U.S. history with a focus on 
N.C. as part of national development; 
examines major political, social, 
economic and intellectual trends from 
the Civil War to the present; includes 
an understanding of how events and 
developments prior to 1865 influenced 
the nation and the state after 1865. No 
credit for students with prior credit for 
HST 122. 

HST 221. THE WORLD IN THE 

20TH CENTURY 4 sh 

This survey of contemporary history 
examines critical events, ideologies and 
movements that have shaped our world. 
Students gain an understanding of the 
historical context of current global 
issues by examining developments in 
Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and 
the Middle East. Offered spring. 



HST 25 1 . HISTORY STUDIES ABROAD 4 sh 

A specialized study for those participat- 
ing in abroad programs. Offered winter. 

AFRICA 

HST 3 1 3. MODERN AFRICA 4 sh 

This survey course explores develop- 
ments in Africa during the past century 
(especially regions south of the Sahara) 
and examines African responses to 
European imperialism, African indepen- 
dence and the problems faced by the 
new African states. Offered fall of even- 
numbered years. 

HST 314. A HISTORY OF 

SOUTHERN AFRICA 4 sh 

This course examines the forces that have 
shaped the history of South Africa and its 
neighbors in the 1 9th and 20th centuries, 
focusing on the effects of apartheid on 
modem South African society. Offered 
spring of odd-numbered years. 

RUSSIA 

HST 316. THE HISTORY OF IMPERIAL 

RUSSIA TO 1917 4sh 

This course explores the major develop- 
ments in the history of the Russian state 
from its origin in the 9th century to the 
collapse of the tsarist system in 1917. 
Topics include Kievan Rus and the 
Mongols, the rise of Moscow, the 
westernization efforts of Peter and 
Catherine the Great and the gradual 
transformation of Russia from its wars 
with Napoleon through the overthrow 
of the Romanov Dynasty. Offered fall 
of even-numbered years. 

HST 317. RUSSIA AND THE SOVIET 

UNION SINCE 1917 4sh 

This study of modern Russian history 
explores the Bolshevik communist 
system, considers the transformation of 
the Soviet state under Lenin and Stalin 
and studies Russia's role in World War II 
and its impact on the USSR afterwards. 
Topics include the emergence of the 
Soviet Union as a world power under 
Stalin, Khruschev, and Brezhnev; Soviet 



HISTORY 



domestic events under all three men; and 
the impact of Mild^ail Gorbachev, Boris 
Yeltsin, and other recent Russian leaders. 
Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 



ASIA 



sh 



HST318. CHINA SINCE 1644 

Major domestic and international 
developments in Chinese history from 
1644 until the present are the focus of 
lAC '•'^'^ course. Topics of study explore the 
■^^ Qing Empire and the impact of the West 
on its Manchu rulers, examine the Qing 
collapse in 1912, and consider China 
under the Nationalists until 1949 and 
under Mao Ze-dongs communist system 
afterward. The course also covers recent 
developments, particularly the reform 
era of Deng Xiao-ping. Offered spring 
of even-numbered years. 

HST 319. HISTORY OF JAPAN, 

1600-1945 4sh 

This course explores the evolution of 
Japanese history from the Tokugav^a 
Shogunate through the end of World War 
II. Topics of discussion include traditional 
Japanese values, the Meiji Restoration of 
1868, the experiment with constitutional 
reform and parliamentary democracy 
through 1931 and Japan's emergence as 
a competitive Asian power. Discussions 
place these developments into the 
context of Japan's role in World War II. 
Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 

BRITISH ISLES 

HST 323. THE MAKING OF THE ENGLISH 
NATION TO C. 1660 4sh 

A Study of English customs, church, 
common law system, monarchy and 
national identity and the migration of 
these features to America. The course 
spans the development of an English 
people (Celtic, Roman, Anglo-Saxon, 
Viking and Norman French) and the 
ruptures which produced civil war 
and an English Republic — episodes 
formative of American political values. 
Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 



HST 324. ENGLAND WITHIN THE 
BRITISH EMPIRE: 17TH 
CENTURY TO THE 
PRESENT 4 sh 

This course examines the social, religious 
and constitutional conflicts of the 1640s 
and the 1680s and their impact on 
Colonial America. Study also traces later 
changes in the English society, economy 
and form of government, the United 
Kingdom's changing role in Europe and 
the world, and changes in social roles 
and attitudes, particularly regarding 
class, gender and race. Offered spring 
of even-numbered years. 

HST 326, 327. HISTORY OF 

IRELAND/HISTORY 

OF SCOTLAND 2sh€ach 

The first half of the semester centers 
on Scotland for two semester hours 
credit; the second half of the semester 
will center on Ireland for two semester 
hours credit. Students choose one or 
both segments. Materials for the course 
draw from various Celtic folkways, 
histories, literature, music, customs, 
tales, art and daily usage. Discussions 
also consider Wales and the Isle of Man, 
the Western Isles, the Orkney, Shetland 
and Channel Islands, and Brittany and 
Galicia on the continent. Offered fall of 
even-numbered years. 

EUROPE 

HST 335. 19TH CENTURY EUROPE, 

1789-1914 4sh 

Study includes the major political, social, 
and international developments that 
affected Europe from the outbreak of the 
French Revolution through the begin- 
ning of World War I. Discussion explores 
events that resulted in the creation of 
Italy and Germany, and the impact 
of revolution on the major countries 
in Europe. Topics also include the 
Industrial Revolution, capitalism and 
European expansion in Africa and Asia. 
Offered fall of even-numbered years. 



HISTORY 



HST 336. EUROPE, 1914-1945 4sh 

This course provides a study of Euro- 
pean history focusing on the two World 
Wars, the search for stability in the inter- 
war years and the rise of totalitarianism. 
Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 

HST 337. EUROPE, 1945 TO 

THE PRESENT 4 sh 

Discussions in this course cover the 
Cold War, the end of colonial rule, the 
rise of the European Community, social 
and intellectual trends, the collapse of 
communism and the reawakening of 
nationalism in Eastern Europe. Offered 
spring of even-numbered years. 

HST 339. A HISTORY OF THE 

HOLOCAUST 4 sh 

History of the Holocaust explores the 
roots of this event, beginning with 
historical anti-Semitism and the impact 
of this tradition on Adolph Hitler and the 
Nazis. Topics also include Hitler's racial 
policies between 1933-1938, their spread 
throughout Nazi Europe between 1939- 
1 94 1 , the evolution of the Final Solution 
from 1941-45, and post-World War II 
Holocaust developments and questions. 
Offered winter. 

WESTERN HEMISPHERE 

HST 351,352. HISTORY OF 

MEXICO/HISTORY 
OF CANADA 2 sh each 

The first half of the semester will center 
on Mexico for two semester hours credit; 
the second half of the semester will 
center on Canada for two semester 
hours credit. Students choose one or 
both segments. These courses focus 
on the distinctive national identities 
and the themes shared by Mexico and 
Canada, including relationships with the 
U.S., popular perceptions of Americans, 
native peoples and their role in national 
identity and the role of myth-making in 
a nation's identity and perceptions of 
neighboring peoples. Offered spring 
of odd-numbered years. 



HST 356. EARLY NATIONAL PERIOD, 
(1787-1840): FORCES THAT 
SHAPED THE NATION 4 sh 

A study of the thought that produced 
the American Constitution and the 
implementation of that national 
government during the administration 
of its first seven presidents. Topics 
examine political, social and economic 
forces that affected national decisions 
and development. Offere fall of odd- 
numbered years. 

HST 357. THE UNITED STATES FROM 1877 
TO 1918: INDUSTRIALIZATION 
AND ITS EFFECTS 4 sh 

This course covers important events 
from the end of Reconstruction to 
American involvement in World War I 
and places them into the context of 
the rise of industrial capitalism as the 
nation's economic system, 

HST 358. THE UNITED STATES 
FROM 1919 TO 1945: 
THE DEMANDS OF POWER 4 sh 

Discussions in this course examine a 
time when the nation's status as the 
world's military and economic power 
demanded global involvement and the 
effects of the nation's choices. Eventu- 
ally, despite strong support for isolation- 
ism, the nation became involved in 
World War II. Offered spring of odd- 
numbered years. 

HST 359. THE UNITED STATES SINCE 
1945: RECENT AMERICAN 
HISTORY 4 sh 

Discussions of recent American history 
include important developments in the 
U.S., beginning with the American 
commitment to fight communism at 
home and abroad following World War II, 
and trace important political, economic 
and social changes. 

HST 361. NORTH CAROLINA 

IN THE NATION 4 sh 

Study traces N.C. history from the first 
European contact to the present in the 
wider context of U.S. history. Topics 
include: N.C. as a microcosm of the 



HISTORY 



region and nation; Reconstruction 
and The New Deal; and N.C. political, 
economic, social and geographical 
features as related to national trends. 
Discussion also covers how family and 
community history are preserved and 
how the study of local history can 
enhance public understanding of 
national events. Offered fall and spring. 

HST 362. THE SOUTH IN AMERICAN 
HISTORY: REGIONAL 
SUBCULTURAL PERSISTENCE 4 sh 

This course examines the South 
(especially post-Civil War) as a distinc- 
tive region of the U.S., including reasons 
for such distinctiveness and its impact 
on the nation's history. Offered spring of 
odd-numbered years. 

HST 363. AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 
I850-PRESENT 4sh 

Beginning with the slave system in the 
mid- 19th century, this course examines 
recurring issues and problems in 
African-American history through 
the post-civil rights era. Study focuses 
on three themes; the similarity and 
differences of African-American 
experiences; the extent to which they 
were oppressed yet also had choices; 
and their strategies to cope with their 
social and political situations. Offered 
fall of odd-numbered years. 

HST 364. HISTORY OF WOMEN 

IN THE U.S. 4 sh 

This course surveys the experiences of 
women in the U.S. from the colonial era 
through the 20th century, emphasizing 
their changing political and economic 
status and gender role expectations. 
Topics focus on the historical factors- 
politics, war, social movements, 
technology, ideology— that caused such 
changes, strategies women utilized to 
change or cope with their situations and 
differences among women. Offered 
spring of even-numbered years. 



HST 365. SOCIAL MOVEMENTS 

IN POST-CIVIL WAR 

AMERICA 4 sh 

This course covers organized efforts to 
change American society since Recon- 
struction, including social movements 
from Populism in the late 1 800s to the 
Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, 
and the responses to these movements. 

HST 366. U.S. POPULAR CULTURE, 

1890-PRESENT 4sh 

This study of popular culture of the U.S. 
in the modern era focuses on leisure 
activities since the development of 
a mass culture. Discussion analyzes 
sports, amusement parks, drinking, 
drugs, movies and music. 

HST 367. AMERICAN MILITARY 

HISTORY 4 sh 

Topics concentrate on the role of U.S. 
armed forces in the development of the 
nation and in the evolution of the U.S. 
as a major world power. Discussions 
explore the impact of U.S. military 
capability on foreign policy and the ways 
foreign policy affects U.S. armed forces. 
Topics also include causes of American 
military conflicts, the strategy and tactics 
of military campaigns and the impact of 
the resolution of these conflicts. Offered 
fall of odd-numbered years. 

HST 460-469. SEMINAR: SPECIAL 

TOPICS 4 sh 

A capstone experience for majors, this 
course offers students practical experi- 
ence in researching, writing and 
presenting a senior thesis. Past topics 
have included American Civil War, 
England in the Age of Henry the Eighth, 
Russia, The Holocaust, Modern Africa, 
and American Social Movements. 
Prerequisites: junior/senior major 
or permission of instructor. Offered fall 
and spring. 



HUMAN 



SERVICES 



HST 481 . INTERNSHIP IN HISTORY 2-4sh 
Designed to provide students with 
practical experience in history-related 
professions, activities included in the 
internship enable students to explore 
careers in archives, record management. 



historic sites, museum administration, etc. 
Prerequisite: 18 semester hours of history. 

HST 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 2-4sh 
Open to junior/senior majors/minors 
or others with permission of instructor. 



HUMAN SERVICES 

Chair, Department of Human Services: Associate Professor Kiser 
Professor: Granowsky 
Associate Professor: Higgs 
Assistant Professor: Baily 

The Human Services major prepares students to work as practitioners in a variety 
of professional service settings such as social services, mental health, family services, 
corrections, child care, youth programs, group homes and many others. The Human 
Services curriculum guides the student through gaining the knowledge, skills and 
experience necessary to work effectively with a variety of populations. 

Students learn to critically examine a range of human and societal problems and 
the programs and services designed to address those problems. Students develop an 
understanding of the societal, cultural and personal variables which contribute to the 
development of human problems and to their solution. 

The Human Services major draws upon knowledge in the social sciences, espe- 
cially psychology and sociology, and emphasizes the application of this knowledge 
to the improvement of human life and society. In order to apply this knowledge 
effectively, students develop a variety of skills including those involved in oral and 
written communication, problem solving, developing a professional helping relation- 
ship, organization and administration. 

A major in Human Services requires the following courses: 
HUS211 Principles and Methods in Human Services 4 sh 

HUS381 Practicum in Human Services 4 sh 



HUS 4 1 1 Administration of Human Service Agencies 

HUS 412 Professional Communication 

HUS 461 Senior Seminar 

HUS 481 Internship in Human Services 

Choose one course from the following: 

HUS 32 1 Group Dynamics and Leadership 

HUS 33 1 Principles of Counseling 

HUS 34 1 Family Counseling 
Choose one course from the following: 

Four elective hours of Human Services 

MTH 1 14 Elementary Statistics 

SS 285 Research Methods 



4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
8sh 
4sh 



4sh 



HUMAN SERVICES 

Eight semester hours from Psychology and/or Sociology 8 sh 

Eight semester hours of 300-400 level Psychology 

and/or Sociology 8 sh 

TOTAL 52 sh 

Prior to taking Human Services 381 students must be approved by the Human 
Services Department. Applications for the Practicum are available in the office of the 
department chair and must be submitted no later than October 1 . A minimum grade 
point average of 2.1 is required to be eligible for Practicum. 

Most other major requirements must be completed prior to taking Human Service 
481 . Students who enroll in Human Services 481 may not take any courses other than 
the prescribed block courses. Applications for taking the Internship must be submitted 
no later than March 1 . A minimum grade point average of 2.2 is required to be eligible 
for Internship. 

A concentration in Social Work requires the following courses: 
HUS 32 1 Group Dynamics and Leadership 4 sh 

HUS 331 Principles of Counseling 4 sh 

HUS 341 Family Counseling 4 sh 

HUS 38 1 Practicum in Human Services or HUS 48 1 , 

Internship in Human Services, must be 

taken in a social work setting. 

A concentration in Gerontology requires the following courses: 
HUS 324 Perspectives and Issues in Aging 4 sh 

HUS 325 Leisure and Aging 4 sh 

HUS 381 Practicum in Human Services or HUS 481, 

Internship in Human Services, must be taken 

in a facility or program for the elderly. 

A minor in Human Services requires the following courses: 
HUS 2 1 1 Principles and Methods in Human Services 4 sh 

HUS 381 Practicum in Human Services 4 sh 

Choose one couse from the following: 4 sh 

PSY 1 1 1 General Psychology 

SOC 1 1 1 Introductory Sociology 
Choose one course from the following: 4 sh 

HUS 321 Group Dynamics and Leadership 

HUS 33 1 Principles of Counseling 

HUS 341 Family Counseling 
Four semester hours Human Services course 4 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 



HUMAN 



SERVICES 



HUS 101. LEADERSHIP 2sh 

This course combines study and practical 
experience to increase knowledge and 
skills in leadership development and 
is appropriate for both emerging and 
established leaders. No credit toward 
Human Services major. Offered fall 
and spring. 

HUS 102. PEER COUNSELING 2 sh 

In this study/practical experience course 
students develop skills in interpersonal 
relations, gain an understanding of 
personal and community problems 
and learn to view the residence hall 
as a community. Required of all Resident 
Assistants. (No credit toward Human 
Services major) Offered fall and spring. 

HUS 211. PRINCIPLES AND METHODS 

IN HUMAN SERVICES 4 sh 

This course explores the history and 
values of the profession, the worker- 
client relationship and the helping 
process, emphasizing interviewing 
and counseling skills and the character- 
istics and skills of effective helpers. A 
minimum of 40 hours of field work in 
an approved human services setting is 
required. Offered fall and spring. 

HUS 225. SPECIAL POPULATIONS 

IN HUMAN SERVICES 4 sh 

This course explores specific populations 
of human services clients and the 
programs and services available to those 
populations. Encourages critical reflection 
on issues, concerns and controversies 
related to the populations under study. 

HUS 321. GROUP DYNAMICS 

AND LEADERSHIP 4 sh 

Students explore group dynamics, group 
structure, leadership and the group 
worker role and are encouraged to 
examine and refine their own group 
communication skills. Offered every 
third semester. 



HUS 324. PERSPECTIVES AND 
ISSUES IN AGING 

This introduction to gerontology 
explores the biological, sociological 



sh 



and psychological aspects of aging and 
presents cultural, economic and political 
issues related to aging such as ageism, 
retirement, living environments and 
the social security and health care 
movements. Offered spring. 

HUS 325. LEISURE AND AGING 4 sh 

In this overview of psychological, 
sociological and physiological aspects 
of aging in a leisure context, students 
discuss concepts such as the work ethic 
and retirement, quality of life and 
physical fitness and examine common 
characteristics of the older adult and 
leisure opportunities that might be 
provided for an aging population. 
Offered fall. 

HUS 331. PRINCIPLES OF 

COUNSELING 4 sh 

This course focuses on the theories and 
methods used in counseling individuals. 
The course is designed for persons who 
will work in the helping professions and 
includes role playing, videotaping and 
working with case material. Prerequi- 
sites: HUS 2 1 1 or Psychology III. 
Offered every third semester. 

HUS 34 1 . FAMILY COUNSELING 4 sh 

This course focuses on family assess- 
ment and intervention using systems 
theory as the primary conceptual model 
and emphasizes the use of family 
counseling concepts to understand 
family dynamics and relationships. 
Students make extensive use of case 
material and role play to apply theory 
to practice. Offered every third semester. 

HUS 37 1 -3. SPECIAL TOPICS IN 

HUMAN SERVICES 4 sh 

Students examine special topics in 
human services, which might include 
such topics as substance abuse, criminal 
justice, developmental disabilities, 
mental health issues and services, etc. 

HUS 381. PRACTICUMIN 

HUMAN SERVICES 4 sh 

Students gain field experience in a 
human services organization full-time 



INTERNATIONAL 



STUDIES 



for at least three weeks, observing and 
learning the roles, tasks, skills and 
methods of human services profession- 
als in the assigned setting and becoming 
familiar with administrative processes in 
the organization. Conferences with the 
supervising faculty member and the 
agency supervisor, assigned readings 
and journal writing provide further 
learning opportunities. Prerequisites; 
HUS 211, junior/senior status as major/ 
minor and approval of application for 
practicum. Offered winter. 

HUS 41 1. ADMINISTRATION OF HUMAN 

SERVICES AGENCIES 4 sh 

This overview of principles and tech- 
niques of leadership and management 
in human service agencies exposes 
students to planning, organizing, 
staffing and financing a project or an 
agency and working with a board of 
directors and the community. (Senior 
Block Course) Prerequisites: HUS 211, 
381. Offered spring. 

HUS 412. PROFESSIONAL 

COMMUNICATION 4 sh 

An in-depth study of interpersonal 
communication skills and writing skills 



essential to the human services worker, 
emphasizing the further development of 
written and oral communication skills. 
(Senior Block Course) Prerequisites: 
HUS 211, 381. Offered spring. 

HUS 46 1 . SENIOR SEMINAR 4 sh 

In this capstone course, students 
analyze their personal and professional 
development during their college 
experience and are required to research, 
write and present a scholarly paper. 
Senior majors only. Offered fall. 

HUS 481. INTERNSHIP IN 

HUMAN SERVICES 8sh 

Students participate in full-time field 
based experience in a human service 
agency for seven and a half to eight 
weeks, observing and practicing the 
roles, tasks and skills of human services 
professionals under the supervision of a 
faculty member and an agency supervi- 
sor. Conferences with both supervisors 
and assigned papers and readings 
enhance learning as the student makes 
the transition into full-time professional 
responsibility. Senior majors only. 
Prerequisite: HUS 381. Offered spring. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Coordinator: Associate Professor Digre 

The new International Studies major provides students with an interdisciplinary 
program through which they can gain a broad knowledge of international affairs as 
well as expertise on one of the world's regions. Study abroad experiences and foreign 
language study form integral parts of the program. Students, with the support of their 
advisers, have considerable freedom in designing their own program of study. 

The major may form an attractive double major for students from a variety of 
disciplines, such as political science, history and foreign languages. It also might 
be profitable combined with a business minor. It should provide an educational 
background for those seeking international affairs careers in government, 
non-governmental organizations (development/humanitarian), travel and business. 

Students are strongly encouraged to include a study abroad experience in their 
programs. Under specified provisions of the program, up to 16 credit hours of foreign 
study can be included. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

A major in International Studies requires 44 semester hours. 
These requirements are specified as follows: 

Foundation Courses 8 sh 

PS/INTL241 International Relations 
HST/INTL 221 World in the "Mentieth Century 
Foreign Language Study 8 sh 

Study in one foreign language at any level. (Students should 
choose a language relevant to the regional concentration. See below.) 

Global Studies 12 sh 

Students must take courses from at least two of the following five areas: ^53 

Politics and Economics 

BA 430 International Business Management 

ECO 312 Comparative Economic Systems 

ECO 314 International Trade and Finance 

PS 1 14 Model United Nations 

PS 261 Comparative Politics 

PS 342 U.S. Foreign Policy since 1939 

PS 343 International Law and Organizations 
History and Geography 

GEO 131 The World's Regions 

HST 1 12 Europe and the Mediterranean World Since 1660 
Literature and Foreign Language 

ENG23I World Literature 

Foreign languages 310, 321, 322 revelant to student's regional concentration 
Society and Culture 

PSY 366 Psychology in Cultural Context 

REL 121 World Religions 

SOC 212 Cultural Anthropology 
Study Abroad 

Students who have study abroad experience that cannot be counted 

under Foreign Language Study or Regional concentration may count 

4 semester hours under this category. 

Regional Concentration 12 sh 

At least three courses taken on one geographic region. Courses should 
be chosen from at least two disciplines. Study abroad courses, as approved 
by the program coordinator, may be included under the regional concentration. 

Approved course lists for regional concentrations in Africa, Asia, and Europe 
may be obtained from the program coordinator. In addition, special area concentra- 
tions, designed by student and adviser, may be approved by the program coordinator. 

Senior Seminar 4 sh 

INTL 461 or a History, Political Science or General Studies seminar 
with an international focus as approved by program coordinator. 

TOTAL 44 sh 



154 



JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS 

A minor in International Studies requires the following: 
PS 241 International Relations 4sh 

HST 22 1 The World in the Twentieth Century 4 sh 

Twelve semester hours selected from the following: 12 sh 

ECO 314 International Trade and Finance 

ECO 372 International Economic Development 

GEO 131 The World's Regions 

PS 261 Comparative Politics 

PS 342 U.S. Foreign Policy Since 1 939 

PS 343 International Law and Organization 

SOC2I2 Cultural Anthropology 

SOC 261 Sociological Theory 

Any 1 9th or 20th century non-United States history course 
at the 300-400 level 

Foreign language at the 200 level or above 

Studies abroad experience 

Additional courses as approved by the program coordinator 

TOTAL 20 sh 

INTL 22 1 . THE WORLD IN THE INTL 461. SENIOR SEMINAR 4 sh 

TWENTIETH CENTURY 4 sh The senior seminar is a capstone 

(Same course as HST 22 1 . See HST 22 1 experience designed for majors. This 

for description.) course offers practical experience in 

INTL 24I.INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 4sh researching, writing^and presenting a 

„^ ^ , , ^ „^ ^ , , senior thesis which builds on previous 

Sarne course as PS 241. See PS 241 ^^^^ .^ ^^^^^ ^^^^j^^ ^^^ the regional 

for description.) concentration. 



JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Chair, Department of Journalism and Communications: Associate Professor G. Padgett 

Associate Professor: Wolfe 

Assistant Professors: Fulkerson, Gibson, Grady, Hamm, R. Johnson 

Instructors: Gardner, Senat 

Students who choose majors in journalism/Communications prepare for exciting 
careers in newspapers, magazines, radio, television, cable, public relations, advertis- 
ing and corporate relations. Separate majors are offered in Journalism (directed 
toward career opportunities in print related fields) and Communications (offering 
emphases in broadcast communications encompassing all electronic media and 
corporate communications. 



JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Majors complete a range of courses offering study in the theory, history, law 
and ethics of communications, as well as practical hands-on experience in modern 
computer labs, a state-of-the-art television studio and well-equipped audio and video 
editing labs. 

Students complement in-class work with involvement in various campus media 
from the award-winning campus newspaper The Pendulum, to WSOE radio station, 
to weekly cable television newscasts and talk shows through departmental program- 
ming and Elon College Television. 

All majors are required to complete the following prerequisite courses with a 
grade point average of at least 2.2 prior to admission to the journalism/Communi- 
cations program and before taking other courses in the major: 

ENG 110 College Writing 

JC 215 Intro to Journalism and Communications 

JC 218 Writing & Information Gathering 

A major in Journalism requires the following courses: 



JC 215 


Intro to Journalism and Communications 


4sh 


JC 218 


Writing & Information Gathering 


4sh 


JC 225 


Reporting & Newswriting 


4sh 


JC 325 


Editing & Layout 


4.sh 


JC 425 


Advanced Reporting 


4.sh 


JC 315 


Media & Society 


4sh 


JC 360 


Media History 


4sh 


JC 465 


Media Law & Ethics 


4sh 


JC 495 


Senior Seminar 


4sh 


Twelve semester hours of JC elective at the 200-400 level 




(no more than 4 sh at the 200 level) 


12 sh 



TOTAL 48 sh 

A major in Communications with Broadcast Emphasis requires 
the following courses: 

JC 211 Public & Presentational Speaking 4 sh or 

Broadcast Performance 4 sh 

Intro to Journalism and Communications 4 sh 

Writing & Information Gathering 4 sh 

Television Production 4 sh 

Writing for Electronic Media 4 sh 

Media & Society 4 sh 

Media History 4 sh 

Media Law and Ethics 4 sh 

Senior Seminar 4 sh 
Twelve semester hours of JC elective at the 200-400 level 

(no more than 4 sh at the 200 level) 12 sh 

TOTAL 48 sh 



JC 


212 


JC 


215 


JC 


218 


JC 


240 


JC 


335 


JC 


315 


JC 


360 


JC 


465 


JC 


495 



]C 


215 


JC 


218 


JC 


318 


JC 


333 


JC 


240 


JC 


327 


JC 


352 


JC 


465 


JC 


495 



JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS 

A major in Communications with Corporate Emphasis requires 
the following courses: 

JC 211 Public & Presentational Speaking 4 sh 

Intro to Journalism and Communications 4 sh 

Writing & Information Gathering 4 sh 

Organizational Communications 4 sh 

Public Relations 4 sh 

Television Production 4 sh 

Corporate Publishing/Writing 4 sh or 

Corporate Video 4 sh 

Media Law & Ethics 4 sh 

Senior Seminar 4 sh 

Eight semester hours of JC elective at the 200-400 level 8 sh 

Eight semester hours of 200-400 level electives in JC or 

from the disciplines of the Love School of Business. 

At least 4 semester hours must be in BA, ECO or ACC 8 sh 

TOTAL 52 sh 

A minor in Journalism/Communications requires the following courses: 
JC 211 Public & Presentational Speaking 4 sh 

JC 215 Intro to Journalism & Communications 4sh 

JC 218 Writing & Information Gathering 4 sh 

Four semester hours of JC elective at the 200-400 level 4 sh 

Eight semester hours of JC elective at the 300-400 level 8 sh 

TOTAL 24 sh 

FILM STUDIES 

Coordinator: Assistant Professor Johnson 

Film Studies is a program designed to coordinate, facilitate and encourage the 
study of cinema. During the past seventy-five years, the study of film has grown from 
an academic curiosity to a legitimate scholarly pursuit at most colleges and universi- 
ties in the United States. Film is now established as one of the preeminent art forms 
of the twentieth century. Unfortuately most Americans possess only a superficial 
understanding of the art of the Cinema. Film studies courses encourage critical 
thinking and detailed examination of cinematic history, theory, criticism and 
aesthetics. This contributes to a better understanding and appreciation of the film art. 

A minor in Film Studies requires the following: 

Twenty semester hours selected from the following: 
Course Requirements: 
JC 361 Development of Cinema 4 sh 

Choose an additional 16 hours from the following: 

ENG/JC 362 Film Criticism 4 sh 

GS 349 The South in American Film 4 sh 



JOURNALISM 



AND 



COMMUNICATIONS 



}C 463 The Auteur Director 

jC 337 The Documentary 

JC 378 Film Censorship 

ENG/WS 361 Gender Issues in Cinema 

jC 384 Internship in Film Production 

JC491 Independent Study in Film 



4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
1-4 sh 
1-4 sh 



Additional electives as approved by the film studies coordinator may be chosen 
from occasional offerings in other disciplines. 



JC 2 1 0. PUBLIC SPEAKING 2 sh 

Study covers the fundamentals of public 
speaking, particularly principles and 
organization of oral and nonverbal 
communications with actual practice 
in delivery of ideas. Offered fall and spring. 

JC211. PUBLIC AND 

PRESENTATIONAL SPEAKING 4 sh 

This study of oral and nonverbal 
communication in public and corporate 
settings emphasizes audio/visual and 
other support materials. Students gain 
classroom practice in the organization 
and deliver/ of ideas, use of language 
and supporting evidence, reasoning and 
emotional appeals, diction and pronun- 
ciation. Offered fall and spring. 

JC 2 1 2. BROADCAST PERFORMANCE 4 sh 

To help students become more effective 
communicators and performers in 
electronic media, this course empha- 
sizes communication of ideas on radio 
and television, particularly vocal and 
visual presentation, voice and diction, 
pronunciation, appearance, gestures 
and movement. Prerequisite: admission 
to department. Offered spring. 

JC 2 1 5. INTRO TO JOURNALISM 

AND COMMUNICATIONS 4 sh 

This introduction to the communication 
process and mass communications 
media surveys the history of newspa- 
pers, magazines, books, film, radio, 
television and cable in public and 
corporate communications. Study 
emphasizes the function and operation 
of contemporary mass media. Offered 
fall and spring. 



JC2I8. WRITING AND 

INFORMATION GATHERING 4 sh 

Study helps students develop the ability to 
think and write critically as they research, 
analyze and write about significant issues. 
The course also introduces information 
gathering processes (including interview- 
ing techniques and database search) 
and styles of media writing. Offered fall 
and spring. 

JC 225. REPORTING AND 

NEWSWRITING 4 sh 

By studying the basic types of news 
articles for the mass media, students 
learn to gather information and report it 
in standard journalistic style. Focus is on 
writing leads, interviewing techniques 
and editing copy. Word processing ability 
necessary. Prerequisite: admission to 
department. Offered fall. 

JC 230. AUDIO PRODUCTION 4 sh 

This course introduces audio as one 
element of mass communications. 
Course work familiarizes students with 
basic production techniques applicable in 
radio, television and film. Students also 
learn basic studio operation, producing, 
writing and performing, with a focus on 
experience through exercises and 
production assignments. Offered fall. 

JC 240. TELEVISION PRODUCTION 4 sh 

This introduction to basic principles, 
techniques and technologies of television 
production emphasizes video while using 
audio to enhance the visual image. 
Students learn through field news and 
production assignments, editing and 
studio production. Offered fall and spring. 



JOURNALISM 



AND 



COMMUNICATIONS 



JC 25 1 . COMMUNICATIONS 
STUDIES ABROAD 



4sh 



JC 315. MEDIA & SOCIETY 4 sh 

This study of the role of mass communi- 
cations media in society examines the 
structure, function and interaction of 
mass media, with consideration to 
media constraints and effects on society. 
Offered fall and spring. 

JC318. ORGANIZATIONAL 

COMMUNICATIONS 4sh 

As an introduction to process and 
patterns of communications within 
organizations, the course covers 
techniques of information dissemination 
and the application of various media 
and methods. Prerequisite: admission 
to department. Offered fall and spring. 

JC 325. EDITING AND LAYOUT 4 sh 

Students study and practice in design 
and makeup of the modern newspaper, 
including copy editing, headline writing, 
scaling and cropping of photographs, 
caption writing, page layout, and use 
of art and graphics. Prerequisite: JC 225. 
Offered fall and spring. 

JC 326. FEATURE WRITING 4 sh 

The study of basic types of feature 
articles for newspapers and magazines 
emphasizes applying techniques of 
fiction (narrative, characterization, 
dialogue, scenes) to nonfiction writing. 

JC 327. CORPORATE PUBLISHING 4 sh 

This introduction to print and other non- 
broadcast media used in corporate and 
institutional settings to communicate with 
internal and external publics includes 
basic design and layout using desktop 
publishing and presentational software 
and emphasizes writing for corporate 
purposes. Prerequisite: admission to 
department. Offered fall and spring. 

JC 330. BROADCAST JOURNALISM 4 sh 

In this critical approach to the gathering, 
reporting and production of radio and 
television news, students discuss and 
evaluate news, commentary and sports 



features. Each student creates and 
produces documentary and feature 
programs. Prerequisites: JC 240 and 
admission to the department. 

JC 333. PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC 

RELATIONS 4 sh 

A combined survey of intermediate level 
courses covering basic public relations 
objectives and problems, this course 
emphasizes research, use of communi- 
cation tools, and use of the media to 
reach various publics. Prerequisite: 
JC 318. Offered fall and spring. 

JC 335. WRITING FOR 

ELECTRONIC MEDIA 4 sh 

This general course acquaints students 
with the style, forms and content 
approaches used in writing for radio, 
television and other audio/visual 
presentations. Prerequisite: admission 
to department. Offered fall and spring. 

JC 337. THE DOCUMENTARY 4 sh 

Students trace the origins of the docu- 
mentary, subsequent developments and 
its current status in this survey course. 

JC 345. ADVANCED AUDIO 

PRODUCTION 4 sh 

The advanced study of audio production 
techniques (editing, music and sound 
effects, signal processing and multi- 
channel production) includes announc- 
ing, commercials, news and documen- 
tary production. Prerequisites: JC 240 
and admission to department. 

JC 352. CORPORATE VIDEO 

PRODUCTION 4 sh 

As they learn to research, write, rewrite 
and produce video productions for 
internal and external corporate presen- 
tations, students use studio and remote 
production equipment to produce 
projects. Course work emphasizes 
achieving an organizations goals 
through the video medium by informing, 
persuading and entertaining. Prerequi- 
site: JC 240 and admission to depart- 
ment. Offered spring. 



JOURNALISM 



AND 



COMMUNICATIONS 



]C 355. ADVANCED VIDEO 

PRODUCTION 4 sh 

As an advanced study of video produc- 
tion techniques for use in television 
broadcasting and other video media, 
this course concentrates on electronic 
field production and emphasizes the 
aesthetics of teleproduction. Students 
research, write and produce public 
service announcements, commercials 
and newscasts. Prerequisite: JC 240. 
Offered fall and spring. 

JC 360. MEDIA HISTORY 4 sh 

By examining major trends, important 
personalities, technological advancements 
and the historical impact of mass 
communications, students gain an 
understanding of how various media are 
interrelated and the interaction between 
media and society. Offered fall and spring. 

JC 36 1 . DEVELOPMENT OF CINEMA 4 sh 

To gain an appreciation of the historical 
development of film as an art form, 
students view significant films and study 
the contributions of important directors. 

JC 362. A STUDY OF FILMS 4 sh 

(Same course as ENG 362. See ENG 362 
for description.) 

JC371. SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS 1^4 sh 

Recent studies in seminars have 
included magazine journalism, propa- 
ganda and mass media, rock music and 
mass media. 

JC 380. MEDIA WORKSHOP / sh 

In an on-campus practicum in radio or 
television production or broadcasting, 
newspaper publishing or public rela- 
tions, students must arrange a learning 
contract with the instructor at the 
beginning of each term. Maximum 3 sh 
credit toward major. Prerequisites: 
]C 325 or 240, junior/senior status, 
permission of instructor. 

JC381. JOURNALISM INTERNSHIP 1-4 sh 

An off-campus, advanced level work 
experience in journalism is offered 
on an individual basis when suitable 
opportunities can be arranged. Prerequi- 



sites: JC 225, 325, junior/senior status, 
permission of instructor. Offered fall 
and spring. 

JC382. BROADCAST INTERNSHIP 1-4 sh 

An off-campus, advanced level work 
experience in broadcasting is offered on an 
individual basis when suitable opportuni- 
ties can be arranged. Prerequisites: JC 240, 
junior/senior status, permission of 
instmctor. Offered fall and spring. 

JC383. CORPORATE INTERNSHIP h4sh 

An off-campus, advanced level work 
experience in corporate communications 
is offered on an individual basis when 
suitable opportunities can be arranged. 
Prerequisites: JC 240 or 325, junior/ 
senior status, permission of instructor. 
Offered fall and spring. 

JC 425. ADVANCED REPORTING 4 sh 

This study of sophisticated reporting 
techniques includes investigative 
reporting techniques and the editor's 
role in covering community news. 
The campus newspaper. The Pendulum, 
serves as a lab. Prerequisites: JC 225, 
admission to department. Offered fall. 

JC 430. TV NEWS REPORTING 4 sh 

In an advanced study of electronic 
news gathering, students analyze 
current examples of news and public 
affairs programming as well as research, 
write, edit and produce television news 
packages to be assembled into television 
newscasts. Prerequisites: JC 330, 
admission to department. 

JC 460. INTERNATIONAL 

COMMUNICATIONS 4 sh 

Students examine the media systems 
of many countries, stressing the chief 
problem of communications across 
cultural, economic, sociological and 
political barriers. 

JC 462. POLITICS IN MASS MEDIA 4 sh 

This course examines the effects of mass 
media on the American political system 
and traces the evolution of media impact 
from print journalism through radio and 
television. 



MATHEMATICS 



JC 463. THE AUTEUR DIRECTOR 4 sh 

The auteur theory proposes that the 
greatest moves are dominated by the 
personal vision of one person, the 
director. This course examines the career 
of a specific director, emphasizing his/ 
her auteur characteristics. Students 
view selected films from the directors 
filmography and prepare a paper on 
a particular auteur characteristic. 

JC 465. MEDIA LAW & ETHICS 4 sh 

Study covers law and ethics in print 
journalism and broadcasting with 
particular emphasis on libel laws, 
invasion of privacy, free press, fair trial, 
obscenity and pornography, censorship 
and federal regulations of broadcasting 
content. Offered fall and spring. 



JC 490. RESEARCH METHODS 4 sh 

This course presents the theoretical and 
methodological knowledge necessary to 
conduct mass communication research, 
political polling, marketing research and 
the reporting of research. Prerequisite: 
admission to department. 



JC 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 sh 
4sh 



JC 495. SENIOR SEMINAR 

This capstone course for majors 
examines current issues and research 
in journalism, broadcast communica- 
tions and corporate communications. 
Students demonstrate competence in 
areas (such as communication theory, 
history and law) through projects and 
examinations. Prerequisite: senior or 
major. (Students entering college since 
1991 must pass this course with a grade 
of "C-" or better.) Offered fall and spring 



LEISURE/SPORT MANAGEMENT 

See Health, Physical Education and Leisure 



MATHEMATICS 

Chan; Department of Mathematics: Assistant Professor Clark 

Professors: Francis, Haworth, W. Hightower, Reichard 

Associate Professors: Barbee, Richardson 

Assistant Professors: Johnson, Nawrocki 

Instructor: C. Holt 

Part-time Instructors: Dyer, Walton 

The Department of Mathematics offers programs leading to the A.B. or B.S. degree 
with a major in mathematics. A minor in mathematics is available for students 
majoring in another discipline. 

Mathematics is an excellent major for the student whose immediate objective is 
to acquire a good liberal arts education. Students who complete a bachelor's degree 
in mathematics may choose several post-graduate alternatives, including an advanced 
degree in either mathematics or another closely related field (computer science, 
biometry, information science, statistics, operations research). 

Students who combine mathematics with another discipline that uses mathemat- 
ics can also pursue graduate work in the second discipline. These areas include 
biology, chemistry, economics, medicine, physics and many of the social science 
disciplines. In addition, mathematics majors may teach at the secondary level or work 
in business, industry or government positions which emphasize analytical reasoning. 



MATHEMATICS 

The Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees 
in Mathematics require the following Core Courses: 

MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

MTH 22 1 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 sh 

MTH 231 Mathematical Reasoning 2 sh 

MTH 311 Linear Algebra 4 sh 

MTH 312 Abstract Algebra 4 sh 

MTH 32 1 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 sh 

MTH 425 Analysis 4 sh 

MTH 361 Seminar I 2 sh 

MTH 461 Seminar II 2 sh 

TOTAL 30 sh 

A Bachelor of Arts Degree in Mathematics requires the following courses: 
Core Courses in Mathematics 30 sh 

One course selected from 4 sh 

MTH 331 Modern Geometry 

MTH 34 1 Probability & Statistics 

MTH 35 1 Theory of Computation 

MTH 415 Numerical Analysis 

MTH 421 Differential Equations 
MTH elective(s) at the 300-400 level (excluding MTH 481) 4 sh 

CS 130 Computational Programming 4 sh 

PHY 1 1 3 Physics W/Calculus I 4 sh 

TOTAL 46 sh 

A Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics requires the following courses: 
Core Courses in Mathematics 30 sh 

Two courses selected from 8 sh 

MTH 331 Modern Geometry 

MTH 34 1 Probability & Statistics 

MTH 35 1 Theory of Computation 

MTH 415 Numerical Analysis 

MTH 42 1 Differential Equations 
CS 130 Computational Programming 4 sh 

One CS course numbered above 130 4 sh 

PHY 1 1 3 Physics W/ Calculus I 4 sh 

PHY 1 14 Physics W/ Calculus II 4 sh 

Secondary Teaching Certification in Mathematics 

Students planning to teach Mathematics at the secondary level must complete 
a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics and include MTH 
331 and 341 among the Mathematics requirements, in addition to the required 
professional education courses (see professional education course requirements 
listed under Education Department). 



161 



MATHEMATICS 

A minor in Mathematics requires the following courses: 
MTH 121 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 sh 

MTH221 Calculus II 4sh 

MTH 231 Mathematical Reasoning 2sh 

MTH 311 Linear Algebra 4sh 

Elective (s) from Mathematics courses numbered 200 
or above (excluding MTH 210 and MTH 481) 
Computer Science courses, or Economics 202 4 sh 

TOTAL 18 sh 

A Student may exempt Mathematics III, 119, and/or 121 by demonstrating proficiency 

Once a student has received credit, including transfer credit for a course, credit 
may not be received for any course with material that is equivalent to it or is a 
prerequisite for it, without permission of the Mathematics Department. 



MTH 100. INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4 sh 

This course strengthens fundamentals 
such as exponents, factoring, equation 
solving, rational expressions, radicals, 
quadratic equations and graphing of 
first-degree equations. MTH 100 or 
demonstrated competence is required 
of all students. Must be completed with 
"C-" or better before taking any other 
mathematics course. Does not satisfy 
general studies requirement in Math- 
ematics. A graphing calculator is 
required. No credit to students having 
passed MTH 1 1 1 , or a course with MTH 
1 1 1 prerequisite. Offered fall and spring. 

MTH 110. THE NATURE OF 

MATHEMATICS 4 sh 

Study provides insight into the nature 
of mathematics, emphasizing reasoning, 
communicating mathematical ideas, 
applications and quantitative skills. Topics 
may include mathematical reasoning, 
probability counting techniques, statistics, 
financial management, trigonometry and 
systems of numeration. A graphing 
calculator is required. Prerequisite: MTH 
100 or placement exemption. No credit to 
students with prior credit for MTH 1 14 or 
higher. Offered fall, winter and spring. 

MTH 111. COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

WITH APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

This course provides a study of algebraic 
and geometric models of various 



functions and relations using a 
graphing calculator and traditional 
methods. Application to "real world" 
problems is emphasized. Topics include 
real numbers, exponents, equations, 
systems of equations, inequalities, 
relations, functions and graphs. A 
graphing calculator is required. Prereq- 
uisite: MTH 100 or placement exemp- 
tion. Offered fall, winter and spring. 

MTH 114. ELEMENTARY STATISTICS 4sh 

Students needing a general overview 
of modern statistics study topics such 
as organization of data, probability, 
measures of central tendency and 
variability, binomial and normal 
distributions, sampling, tests of hypoth- 
esis, estimation, correlation, regression 
and chi-square. A graphing calculator is 
required. Prerequisite: MTH 1 10 or 1 1 1 
or placement exemption. No credit for 
both ECO 202 and MTH 1 14. Offered fall, 
winter and spring. 

MTH 116. APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

WITH CALCULUS 4sh 

This introduction to linear systems and 
differential calculus emphasizes applica- 
tions to problem-solving in business and 
economics. Students gain enhanced 
ability to analyze a problem mathemati- 
cally and study topics such as systems 
of linear equations, matrices, functions, 
limits, derivatives and applications 



MATHEMATICS 



of derivatives. No credit for students with 
MTH 121 or its exemption. Prerequisite: 
MTH 1 1 1 or placement exemption. 
Offered fall, winter and spring. 

MTH 119. FUNCTIONS WITH 

APPLICATIONS 4 sh 

Topics of study include basic trigonomet- 
ric, exponential, logarithmic and inverse 
functions and their applications. Study 
also covers conic sections and the polar 
form of complex numbers. A graphing 
calculator is required. Prerequisite: MTH 
1 11 or placement exemption. Offered fall 
and winter. 

MTH 121. CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC 

GEOMETRY I 4 sh 

Students are introduced to analytic 
geometry, functions, limits and continuity, 
differentiation of algebraic functions with 
applications, the definite integral and the 
fundamental theorem of integral calculus. 
A graphing calculator is required. 
Prerequisite: MTH 1 19 or placement 
exemption. Offered fall and spring. 

MTH 210. MATHEMATICS FOR 

ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE 
GRADES TEACHERS 4 sh 

This course is open only to students 
majoring in elementary education or 
middle grades education with a concen- 
tration in mathematics. Topics include 
problem solving, numeration systems, 
set theory, rational and irrational 
numbers (concepts, operations, proper- 
ties, and algorithms), geometry, mea- 
surement and selected topics in 
probability and statistics. Prerequisite: 
general studies mathematics require- 
ment. Offered fall and spring. 

MTH 221. CALCULUS AND 

ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II 4 sh 

Students explore applications of the 
definite integral, differentiation and 
integration of transcendental functions, 
techniques of integration, indeterminate 
forms, improper integrals, plane curves 
and polar coordinates. A graphing 
calculator is required. Prerequisite: MTH 
121. Offered fall and spring. 



MTH 231. MATHEMATICAL 

REASONING 2sh 

This study of proof techniques and 
reasoning skills introduces the student 
to another side of mathematics, namely 
proof. The student's preceding courses 
(e.g. precalculus and calculus) usually 
focus on calculations. Topics include 
mathematical logic, sets, mathematical 
induction, combinatorics, relations and 
countability arguments. Prerequisite: 
MTH 121. Offered fall and spring. 

MTH 311. LINEAR ALGEBRA 4sh 

This introductory course in linear 
algebra includes systems of linear 
equations, matrices, determinants, 
vector spaces, eigenvalues, eigenvec- 
tors, orthogonality, and linear transfor- 
mations. Proofs of the major theorems 
and a variety of applications are also 
covered. Prerequisites: MTH 221 and 
231. Offered fall and spring. 

MTH 312. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 4 sh 

Students who have had an introduction 
to the rules of logic and proof-construc- 
tion are introduced to abstract algebra, 
including topics such as functions, 
groups (cyclic, permutation, normal, and 
quotient), properties of groups, rings, 
fields, homomorphisms, isomorphisms, 
real and complex numbers and polyno- 
mials. Prerequisites: MTH 231 and 311. 
Offered spring. 

MTH 321. CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC 

GEOMETRY III 4 sh 

This course provides a study of ad- 
vanced techniques of differential and 
integral calculus, including infinite 
sequences and series, 3-dimensional 
analytic geometry including vectors, 
differentiation and integration of 
multivariable functions, applications. A 
graphing calculator is required. Prereq- 
uisite: MTH 221. Offered fall. 

MTH 331. MODERN GEOMETRY 4 sh 

This rigorous treatment of axiomatic 
foundations of Euclidean geometry 
through Hilbert's axioms includes the role 
and independence of the parallel postulate 



MATHEMATICS 



(revealed through models and neutral 
geometry), straightedge and compass 
constructions, historical and philosophical 
implications of the discovery of non- 
Euclidean geometry, with an introduction 
to both hyperbolic and elliptic geometry. 
Prerequisite: MTH 231. Offered fall of odd- 
numbered years. 

MTH 341. PROBABILITY THEORY 

AND STATISTICS 4 sh 

Topics include axiomatic probability, 
counting principles, discrete and 
continuous random variables and their 
distributions, sampling distributions, 
central limit theorem, confidence 
intervals and hypothesis testing. 
Prerequisites: MTH 221 and 231. 
Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 

MTH 351. THEORY OF COMPUTATION 4 sh 

(Same course as CS 351 . See CS 351 
for description.) 

MTH 361. SEMINAR I 2sh 

This course prepares mathematics 
majors for Seminar II, the capstone 
seminar, by instruction and experience 
in library research and formal oral 
presentations on advanced mathemati- 
cal topics selected by the instructor and 
students. Prerequisite: junior/senior 
standing or permission of the mathemat- 
ics department. Offered spring. 

MTH 371. SPECIAL TOPICS 2-4 sh 

Topics are selected to meet the needs 
and interests of students. 

MTH 415. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 4 sh 

This introduction to numerical analysis 
includes floating point arithmetic, 
interpolation, approximation, numerical 
integration and differentiation, nonlinear 
equations and linear systems of equa- 
tions. Prerequisites: CS 130, MTH 31 1 
and 32 1 , or permission of the instructor. 
(CS 415 is the same as MTH 415.) Offered 
spring of even numbered years. 

MTH 421. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 4sh 

Topics in this in-depth study of methods 
of solution and applications of ordinary 



differential equations include first 
order differential equations (linear and 
nonlinear), linear differential equations 
of higher order, mathematical models 
using second order equations, systems 
of differential equations and numerical 
techniques including Euler, Improved 
Euler and the Runge-Kutta method. 
Computers or programmable calculators 
may be used. Prerequisite: MTH 321. 
Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 

MTH 425. ANALYSIS 4sh 

This course provides in-depth study of 
topics introduced in the 3-course 
calculus sequence, including sequences 
and series, continuity and differentiation 
of functions of a single variable, the 
Riemann integral, and the fundamental 
theorem of calculus. Prerequisites: MTH 
312 and 321. Offered fall. 

MTH 461. SEMINAR II 2sh 

In this capstone experience for senior 
mathematics majors, students conduct 
extensive research on a mathematical 
topic and formally present their work in 
writing and orally. Course requirements 
include a satisfactory score on the 
ETS major field achievement test. 
Prerequisite: MTH 361 and junior/ 
senior standing, or permission 
of the department. Offered fall. 

MTH 471. SPECIAL TOPICS 2-4sh 

Topics are selected to meet the needs 
and interests of the students. • 

MTH 481. INTERNSHIP IN 

MATHEMATICS l-4sh 

The internship provides advanced work 
experiences in some aspect of math- 
ematical sciences and is offered on an 
individual basis when suitable opportu- 
nities can be arranged. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the department. 

MTH 49 1 . INDEPENDENT STUDY l-4sh 
Prerequisite: Permission of the depart- 
ment. May be repeated with different 
topics for up to a total of eight semester 
hours. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 

I 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

J. See Biology 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

Elon College, in cooperative agreement with North Carolina A&T State University, 
j. offers an Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) program. 

I The Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps program provides a viable elective 

( program for both male and female students. The program is divided into a basic 

i course and an advanced course. These are normally completed during a four-year 

[ period. However, it is possible for veterans and other students who elect to undergo 

:; special training to complete the program in two years. 

PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 

^ Programs of instruction for the Army ROTC include a four-year program and a 

) two-year program. The four-year program consists of a two-year basic course, a two- 
,;. year advanced course and the advanced ROTC Summer Camp. The two-year program 
( encompasses a basic ROTC Summer Camp, a two-year advanced course and the 
:! advanced ROTC Summer Camp. 

BASIC COURSE 

The basic course is normally taken during the freshman and sophomore years. 
'^ The purpose of this instruction is to introduce the student to basic military subjects: 
; branches of the Army, familiarization with basic weapons, equipment and techniques, 
military organization and functions and the techniques of leadership and command. It 
I* . is from the students who successfully complete this instruction that the best qualified 
I' are selected for the advanced course which leads to an officer's commission. 

■ Credit for the basic course can be obtained by successful completion of the 

following courses: 

r MS 1 11 Introduction of Citizen/Soldier 1 sh 

',' MS 1 12 Introduction to U.S. Military Forces 1 sh 

MS 141, 142 Leadership Laboratory 1 sh/ea 

f MS 21 1 Development of Professional Military Skills I 1 sh 

'j. MS 212 Development of Professional Military Skills II 1 sh 

( MS 241, 242 Leadership Labortory 1 sh/ea 

Total 8 sh 

Successful completion of Military Science 251, or prior service in the Armed 
Forces, can be used to obtain appropriate credit for the basic course. 

ADVANCED COURSE 

Students who receive appropriate credit for the basic course and meet eligibility 
standards are admitted to the advanced course on a best qualified basis. Successful 
completion of the advanced course qualifies the student for a commission as a 
Second Lieutenant in one of the branches of the United States Army, Army 
Reserves or Army National Guard. The following courses are required for 
completion of the advanced course: 

MS 31 1 Leadership Training 2 sh 

MS 312 Introduction to Military Team Theory 2 sh 

MS 341, 342 Leadership Laboratory 1 sh/ea 



MILITARY 



SCIENCE 



MS 35 1 Army ROTC Advanced Camp 
MS 4 1 1 Seminars in Leadership and 

Professional Development 
MS 4 1 2 Leadership, Law and Ethics 
MS 44 1 , 442 Leadership Laboratory 



4sh 

2sh 

2sh 

1 sh/ea 



Total 



16 sh 



TWO-YEAR PROGRAM 

This program is designed for junior college students or sophomores at four-year 
institutions who have not taken ROTC. A basic six week summer training period after 
the sophomore year takes the place of the basic course required of students in the 
traditional four-year program. When a student with two years of college has success- 
fully completed the basic summer training, he/she is eligible for the advanced ROTC 
course in his/her junior and senior years. The advanced course, which leads to an 
officer commission, is the same for students in either the two-year program or the 
four-year programs. 



MS 111. INTRODUCTION OF 
CITIZEN/SOLDIER 



Ish 



MS 1 12. INTRODUCTION TO U.S. 

MILITARY FORCES 1 sh 

Introduction to U.S. Military Forces 
provides an introduction to and fosters 
the early development of leadership and 
soldier skills. Topics of training include 
leadership, drill and ceremonies, first aid 
and general military subjects. 

MS 1 4 1 , 1 42. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY 

(each semester) I sh 

Hands-on, practical training is the focus 
of the Leadership Laboratory. Students 
become proficient in basic military 
skills, drill and ceremonies, first aid 
and conducting inspections. Attention 
is also given to individual arms and 
marksmanship techniques. 

MS 2 1 1 . DEVELOPMENT OF PROFESSIONAL 
MIUTARY SKILLS I / sh 

This course continues the development 
of cadet leadership and critical skills. 
Training is basic in scope and includes 
leadership, written and oral communica- 
tions, physical fitness and general 
military subjects. 

MS 2 12. DEVELOPMENT OF PROFESSIONAL 
MILITARY SKILLS II / sh 

Instruction in the second part of this 
sequence expands the students' frame 



of reference to include an understanding 
of roles and responsibilities and fosters 
internalization of the Professional Army 
Ethic. Training is basic in scope and 
includes written and oral communica- 
tion, military skills, professional 
knowledge subjects and physical fitness. 

MS 241, 242. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY 

(each semester) 1 sh 
This Leadership Laboratory serves 
as a learning laboratory for hands-on 
practical experiences. Training includes 
instruction on operations, tactics, land 
navigation, first aid and general military 
subjects. Key course components 
emphasize the functions, duties and 
responsibilities of junior noncommis- ■' 
sioned officers. The primary focus is 
the continued development of leadership 
potential through practical experience. 
The APFT is given to assess the state 
of physical development. 

MS 251. ARMY ROTC BASIC CAMP 4sh 

Basic Camp is six weeks of training 
at Fort Knox, KY, consisting of Army 
history, role and mission, map reading/ 
land navigation, rifie marksmanship, 
basic leadership techniques, physical 
training/marches, individual and unit 
tactics, communications. This course 
can be taken by rising juniors to 



MILITARY 



SCIENCE 



substitute for MS 111, 112, 141, 
211,212,241,242. Prerequisite: 
qualification tests. 



142, 



MS 311. LEADERSHIP TRAINING 2sh 

Designed to prepare cadets for the full 
range of responsibilities associated with 
Advanced Camp, Leadership Training 
refines the leader development process. 
Instruction is supplementary in scope 
and includes leadership, written and oral 
communications, operations, tactics and 
general military subjects. 

MS 312. INTRODUCTION TO 

MILITARY TEAM THEORY 2 sh 

This course emphasizes the develop- 
ment of intermediate level cadet leader 
skills in preparation for Advanced Camp. 
Training is supplementary in scope and 
includes leadership, written and oral 
communications, operations, tactics, 
land navigation, weapons and general 
military subjects. 

MS 341, 342.LEADERSHIP LABORATORY 

(each semester) I sh 
In this learning laboratory for hands-on 
practical experiences, the focus is on 
soldier team development at a squad/ 
patrol level and supplementary training 
includes land navigation and weapons. 
Emphasis is also placed on the develop- 
ment of intermediate leader skills in a 
field environment. The APFT is adminis- 
tered to assess physical development. 

MS 351. ARMYROTC 

ADVANCED CAMP 4 sh 

Normally taken the summer following 
the junior year, the six-week Advanced 
Camp training/internship is conducted 
at designated U.S. Army installations. 
Prerequisite: MS 312. 

MS 4 1 1 . SEMINARS IN LEADERSHIP 
AND PROFESSIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT 2 sh 

Cadets develop leadership, technical 
and tactical skills through performance 
as a trainer/supervisor. Supplementary 
training includes leadership, written 
and oral communications, operations 



and tactics, physical fitness, training 
management and general military 
subjects. The focus gradually shifts 
to familiarize the student with future 
assignments as an officer. 

MS 412. LEADERSHIP, LAW 

AND ETHICS 2sh 

Leadership, Law and Ethics continues the 
development of critical leadership skills. 
Training includes leadership, ethics, 
professionalism, law, written and oral 
communications, operations, tactics and 
general military subjects. The course 
culminates with instruction on making 
the transition to the Officer Corps. 

MS 441,442. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY 

(each semester) 1 sh 
Hands-on practical experiences reinforce 
cadet training, which is designed to 
solidify the commitment to officership, 
reinforce individual competencies and 
afford maximum practical officer 
leadership experiences. The laboratory 
emphasizes the functions, duties and 
responsibilities of junior Army officers, 
with special attention directed to 
developing advanced leadership skills 
through active participation in planning 
and conducting militaiy drills, ceremo- 
nies and field training. 

MS 451. AIRBORNE TRAINING 3sh 

Three weeks of intensive airborne 
training includes physical conditioning, 
landing techniques, parachute safety, 
simulated jumps, procedures in and 
around aircraft and five combat jumps 
from Air Force aircraft at 1 ,250 feet. 
Selection for this opportunity is highly 
competitive. Only a few cadets nation- 
wide are accepted. 



MUSIC 

MUSIC 

chair, Department of Music: Professor Bragg 

Professors: Erdmann, Fischer 

Assistant Professors: Green, McNeela 

Part-time Professor: Artley 

Part-time Instructors: Beerman, Cykert, Dula, Johnson, King, LaRocco, Lee, McMillian, 

Metzger, Novine-Whitaker, Payne, Reed, Sullivan 

The Department of Music at Elon College offers three music degrees. The B.S. 
in Music Education is for those students who wish to teach in elementary, middle or 
high school music programs. The program is a collaborative effort between the Music 
Department and the education department. The B.A. in Music Performance is for those 
students who wish to emphasize the study of instrumental or vocal music. Students 
in this program will be expected to become accomplished performers while develop- 
ing a solid base in theory, composition and history. The B.A. in Music is primarily for 
those students who do not wish to concentrate on a performance area or who wish 
to double major in another liberal arts department. Students in this program will have 
a continuing background in musical performance through participation in ensembles 
of their choice and private lessons. ^ 

The major in Music requires the following courses: ;! 

HST 112 History of Western Civilization 4sh 

MUS 111 The Materials of Music 1 3 sh i 

MUS 112 The Materials of Music II 3 sh ; 

MUS 2 II The Materials of Music III 3sh ' 

MUS 212 The Materials of Music IV 3sh I 

MUS 154 Piano Class I 1 sh ; 

MUS 155 Piano Class II 1 sh 

MUS 315 The Music of Ancient Times Through 1 750 4 sh ! 

MUS 316 Classic and Romantic Music 4sh ; 

MUS 495 Senior Seminar 2-4 sh j 
In addition, each music major must complete: 

(a) Eight semester hours Music electives at 300-400 level 8 sh 

(b) Four semesters of applied music lessons 4-8 sh 

(c) Ensembles 4 sh 

TOTAL 44-50 sh 

The major in Music Education requires the following courses: 

HST 1 12 History of Western Civilization 4 sh 

MUS 111 The Materials of Music I 3 sh 

MUS 112 The Materials of Music II 3 sh 

MUS 113 Aural Skills I 1 sh 

MUS 114 Aural Skills II 1 sh 

MUS 211 The Materials of Music III 3 sh 

MUS 212 The Materials of Music IV 3 sh 

MUS 213 Aural Skills III 1 sh 

MUS 214 Aural Skills IV 1 sh 



MUSIC 

MUS 315 The Music of Ancient Times Through 1 750 4 sh 

MUS316 Classic and Romantic Music 4 sh 

MUS 3 1 7 Music of the Twentieth Century 4 sh 

MUS 361 Percussion Techniques 1 sh 

MUS 362 Brass Techniques 1 sh 

MUS 363 Woodwind Techniques 1 sh 

MUS 364 String Techniques 1 sh 

MUS 366 Conducting 2 sh 

MUS 411 Instrumental and Choral Arranging 2 sh 

MUS 461 Music Education in the Public Schools 4 sh 
In addition, each Music Education major must complete: 

(a) Applied music lessons, at least one semester at 300 level 6-12 sh 

(b) Half-recital accepted by music faculty 

(c) Ensemble from Music 101, 102, 103, and 105 8 sh 

(d) Keyboard proficiency 

(e) Concert attendance as outlined in the Music Student Handbook. 

TOTAL 58-64 sh 

In addition, vocal majors must take MUS 258, Diction for Singers. 

The music student must also complete the required professional education courses 

and observe the requirements for the teacher education program as outlined under 
Education. 

The major in Music Performance requires the following courses: 

HST 1 12 History of Western Civilization 4 sh 

MUS 111 The Materials of Music I 3 sh 

MUS 112 The Materials of Music II 3 sh 

MUS 113 Aural Skills I 1 sh 

MUS 114 Aural Skills II 1 sh 

MUS 211 The Materials of Music III 3 sh 

MUS 212 The Materials of Music IV 3 sh 

MUS 213 Aural Skills III 1 sh 

MUS 214 Aural Skills IV 1 sh 

MUS 315 The Music of Ancient Times Through 1 750 4 sh 

MUS 316 Classic and Romantic Music 4 sh 

MUS 3 1 7 Music of the Twentieth Century 4 sh 

A choice of one of the following: 2 sh 

MUS 366 Conducting 

MUS 369 Methods and Materials of Piano Pedagogy 

MUS 41 1 Instrumental and Choral Arranging 
In addition, each Music Performance major must complete: 

(a) Applied music lessons, at least one semester 

at the 400 level 7-14 sh 

(b) Half solo recital at the 300 level 

(c) Full solo recital at the 400 level 



169 



170 



MUSIC 

(d) Ensemble from Music 101, 102, 103, and 105 (8 sh) 

(e) Keyboard proficiency 

(f) Concert attendance as outlined in the Music Student Handbook. 

TOTAL 49-56 sh 

In addition, vocal majors must take MUS 258, Diction for Singers. 

A minor in Music requires 20 semester hours. Students lacking functional 
knowledge of the keyboard must accumulate two semester hours in piano either 
prior to, or simultaneously with their enrollment in Music 1 1 1 and 1 12. 

The following courses are required: 
MUS 111 The Materials of Music I 3 sh 

MUS 112 The Materials of Music II 3 sh 

A choice of one of the following: 4 sh 

MUS 303 Music History for the Liberal Arts Student 

MUS 315 The Music of Ancient Times Through 1 750 

MUS 316 Classic and Romantic Music 

MUS 3 1 9 History of American Music 
In addition, each Music Minor must complete: 

(a) One medium of applied music instruction 6 sh 

(b) Ensemble from MUS 101, 102, 103, and 105 4 sh 

TOTAL 20 sh 

APPLIED MUSIC-INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP INSTRUaiON 

Music majors/minors register for the appropriate level and area of applied music 
study as determined by audition and consultation with their advisor or the department 
chair. With permission of the department, the general college student may register for 
any course in applied music. Weekly 30-minute lesson: 1 sh credit. Weekly 60-minute 
lesson: 2 sh credit. 

APPLIED MUSIC: INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION 



Piano: 120, 220, 320, 420 Clarinet: 130, 230, 330, 430 

Organ: 121, 221, 321, 421 Bassoon: 131, 231, 331, 431 

Voice: 122, 222, 322, 422 Saxophone: 132, 232, 332, 432 

Trumpet: 123, 223, 323, 423 Violin: 133, 233, 333, 433 

French Horn: 124, 224, 324, 424 Viola: 134, 234, 334, 444 

Trombone: 125, 225, 325, 425 Cello: 135, 235, 335, 435 

Baritone (Euphonium): String Bass (Electric Bass): 

126,226,326,426 136,236,336,436 

Tuba: 127, 227, 327, 427 Guitar: 137, 237, 337, 437 

Flute: 128, 228, 328, 428 Percussion: 138,238,338,438 
Oboe: 129, 229, 329, 429 



MUSIC 



APPLIED MUSIC CLASSES: 
GROUP INSTRUCTION 

MUS 152, 153. VOICE CLASS l&ll 1 sh 

Group voice instruction ranges from 
beginning to intermediate. 

MUS 154-157. PIANO CLASS I-IV I sh 

Group piano instruction ranges from 
beginner to intermediate. 

MUS 158. GUITAR CLASS } sh 

Beginners develop musical skills with 
the guitar— simple chords, melodies 
and songs— using elements of classical 
guitar techniques as a foundation. 

MUS 258. DICTION FOR SINGERS 2sh 

Students learn to use the International 
Phonetic Alphabet and are introduced 
to the pronunciation of English, Latin, 
Italian, French and German as it applies to 
vocal literature. Required of voice majors. 

MUSIC MATERIALS, STRUCTURES 
AND TECHNIQUES 

MUS 111, 111 THE MATERIALS OF MUSIC 3 sh 

A Study of the fundamentals of music, 
diatonic harmony and elementary voice- 
leading and part-writing includes an 
introduction to harmonic-melodic form, 
analysis and synthesis of harmonic 
practices through secondary seventh 
chords. Offered fall and spring. 

MUS 113, 114. AURAL SKILLS I & II 1 sh 

Study emphasizes melodic-harmonic- 
rhythmic dictation, sight singing and 
keyboard study. Corequisite: MUS 
111,112. Offered fall and spring. 

MUS 211, 212. THE MATERIALS 

OF MUSIC III & IV 3 sh 

A continuation of Music 1 12 on an 
advanced level includes complex 
chromatic harmonies and emphasizes 
analysis and composition of standard 
musical forms. Prerequisite: MUS 112. 
Prerequisite for 212: MUS 211. Offered 
fall and spring. 

MUS 213, 214. AURAL SKILLS III & IV 1 sh 

These courses provide advanced study 
in melodic-harmonic-rhythmic dictation. 



sight singing and keyboard study. 
Corequisite: MUS 211,212. Offered fall 
and spring. 

MUS 254, 255. JAZZ IMPROVISATION 

I & II Ish 

Instrumentalists or vocalists develop 
skills in improvisational jazz perfor- 
mance techniques. 

MUS 311. COUNTERPOINT 4 sh 

Analysis and composition of period 
works are part of the study of counter- 
point from the 1 6th to 20th centuries 
with applications to various vocal and 
instrumental writings. 

MUS 411. INSTRUMENTAL AND 

CHORAL ARRANGING 2 sh 

Students explore technical possibilities 
and limitations of individual instruments 
and voices. Study also covers arranging 
and transcribing for various combina- 
tions of instruments and voices. 

MUS 265-465. COMPOSITION 1 sh 

Students write compositions integrating 
techniques of studied repertoire as they 
explore musical composition in weekly 
individual meetings with an instructor. 
Prerequisite: MUS 1 12 or permission 
of instructor. 

LITERATURE AND HISTORY 

MUS 216. THE STUFF OF MUSIC 4 sh 

Through a series of exercises, readings, 
outside class activities and class 
participation, students become familiar 
with the materials which form the basis 
of music, including instruments, 
notation and terminology. Hands-on 
application includes basic performance 
on rhythm instruments and composing 
simple music compositions. 

MUS 217. WORLD MUSIC 4 sh 

Text readings, listening, research, 
writing and class presentation are part 
of an introduction to the music of Asia, 
Eastern Europe, Africa, and Central and 
South America. Students gain increased 
awareness of the art and music of other 
cultures, make connections with their 



MUSIC 



own art and folk traditions and search 
for shared meanings of all musical 
expression. 

MUS 303. MUSIC HISTORY FOR 

THE LIBERAL ARTS STUDENT4 sh 

Non-music majors gain improved skills 
to enhance musical enjoyment, basic 
knowledge of music styles and events, 
and focus on placing this knowledge in 
the context of world events and trends. 
Study covers selected personalities and 
works in music through substantial 
reading, listening, research and writing. 

MUS 315. THE MUSIC OF ANCIENT 

TIMES THROUGH 1750 4sh 

This survey of music through the 
Baroque period emphasizes Renaissance 
and Baroque counterpoint through 
reading, listening, analysis, research and 
writing. Students also explore counter- 
point through original compositional 
exercises. Offered fall of alternate years. 

MUS 316. CLASSIC AND 

ROMANTIC MUSIC 4 sh 

By reading, listening, research and writing, 
students explore the relationship of 18th- 
and 19th-century music to the world - as 
the expression of artists responding to 
political, social and philosophical environ- 
ments. The course also emphasizes the 



progressive study of formal analysis, from 
smaller forms to the large single and multi- 
movement genres of the period. Offered 
spring of alternate years. 

MUS 317. MUSIC OF THE 

20TH CENTURY 4 sh 

Students explore 20th-century music 
(especially Western art music) histori- 
cally and analytically, including its 
source, purposes, and influences. Study 
involves reading, listening, writing, 
research and analysis of scores aug- 
mented by compositional exercises in 
20th-century styles. Offered fall of 
alternate years. 

MUS 318. HISTORY OF JAZZ 4sh 

This overview of jazz music from about 
1900 to the present is designed for the 
liberal arts major. Topics include jazz 
styles, individual musicians and the 
development and progress of jazz 
through the 20th century. 

MUS 319. HISTORY OF 

AMERICAN MUSIC 4 sh 

Study of American music from 1620 to 
the present focuses on elements of 
various musical cultures (i.e. Western 
and Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin 
America) that have influenced the 
American style of music. 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

The following technique courses are required for music majors seeking music 
teacher certification. 



MUS 361 Percusssion Techniques 

MUS 362 Brass Techniques 

MUS 363 Woodwind Techniques 

MUS 364 String Techniques 

MUS 366 Conducting 



Ish 
Ish 
Ish 
Ish 

2sh 



Students develop skill in baton and rehearsal techniques and interpretation in 
training and leading various ensembles of instruments and voices. 



MUS 461. MUSIC EDUCATION IN 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 4 sh 

A study of the methods and materials 
suitable for teaching at all levels covers 



the administration of band, orchestra 
and choral programs in the public 
schools with additional emphasis on 
marching band techniques. Offered