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Full text of "Emblem"




xi-^^^^:^^^ 















JEAN PEARSON ■ ■ MAXINE REAMES 
Editors 

B. BARTON GALLEGOS 
Literary Editor 

JOAN WALSH 
Art Editor 




19H 



Page One 



(SU^SCu.'^ 




CHIC/IGO 

mum 

COLLEGE 



uu STmiiT ^VEPF mim. Illinois 



photograph by george polka 



Page Three 




f 



The established motto indicative of our school's character is "Re- 
sponsibility". An inscribed bronze seal set in the floor of the main foyer 
proclaims this fact. 

The editors of Emblem 1954 have selected as its theme, the "Major 
Functions of Living", as an integral part of the new curriculum program ini- 
tiated by the Chicago Public Schools. This theme is also representative 
of the philosophy of Chicago Teachers College: a flexible program and a 
dynamic philosophy founded on the belief in our responsibilities, as educat- 
ors and citizens, to freedom and to ourselves. 



Page Four 



coiniis 




DEVELimO 
DEMOCIl^TIC 
IDEMS 




eUlLDI^C \ PHILOSOPHY OF EOUC^TIO^ 




,vi 









SOCIAL DHOUP 




TO THE 

CUSS 

OF 

1954 



It is a great pleasure to send cordial greetings to the members of the class of 1954. 
I congratulate you heartily upon this graduation and upon your choice of a vocation. You 
are becoming public servants in a great cause and in a most crucial period of our nation's 
history. It is also a period in which the demand for good teachers is overwhelming and in- 
creasing. 

Graduates of the Chicago Teachers College have a deserved reputation for excel- 
lence. Members of the staff who are constantly concerned with the problem of adequately 
staffing our schools will assist in every possibleway to moke teaching an attractive, exciting 
career for you. We welcome you to our ranks and feel every confidence that you will suc- 
ceed not only in the tasks you are called on to perform, but in achieving a life of happiness 
and satisfaction. 

All good wishes in your chosen work. 




Benjamin C. Willis 

General Superintendent of Schools 



•4 






DEPCmiC 
IDEALS 



^ 



"Ideals are like stars; you 
will not succeed in touching 
them with your hands. But like 
the seafaring man on the desert 
oi waters, you choose them as 
your guides, and following 
them you will reach your des- 
tiny." 

— Carl Schurz 





TO THE 

CUSS 

OF 

19S4 



College education is not standardized, routine or compulsory; 
rather, it is opportunity of many types and at many levels — an invitation 
to those who wish to learn. For each individual the invitation is also a 
challenge to select wisely, to learn from classes and clubs, books and 
people, seminars and sports, laboratory and library, all that the opportun- 
ity truly holds. 

This is the invitation extended by the Chicago Teachers College for 
more than four score years and to future generations yet unnumbered. 
To the members of the class of 1954, who have accepted the invitation, 
made wise use of their opportunities, and now face with confidence the 
challenges of the future, the College offers congratulations and the as- 
surance of continued interest in you all. 



Dean 

Chicago Teachers College 



Page Eight 




WILLIAM L KAISER, 
AssislanI Dean 



^^ 



JAMES 1 SWEARINGEN 
Direclor odnslruclion 




OFFICE 
STAFF 



GERALDINE BERRY, 

Assistant Dean's Office 
MARY DURKIN, 

Dean's Office 
CATHERINE McCAHEY, 

General Office. 
ELLEN McGREAL, 

General Office 
LENORE G. LARKIN, 

Office of file Director of 

Instruction. 
MERCEDES C. WALSH, 

Bursar's Office 




h^ i ,? .^1- 





PKucriciNi; AMEKicM mnmm 



Page Nine 





REGISTRAR'S OFFICE STAFF: 

Mary E. Devine, Rosemary Kraullein, Elizabelh B. Murphy, Helen Nerney, 
Lorella H. Wallace 





Clara M. Berghoefer, Counselor 



Archelose Olis, Record Office 



EMMA FLEER MULLER, Regis- 



OSCAR WALCHIRK, Assistant 
Registrar 



PHILIP TRIPP, Admissions 
Counselor 



MARIE TRUAX, Director ol 
Activities 



LOUISE TYLER, Director ol Ex- 
ams, (not pictured) 



David Kopel, Director of Grad- 
uate Study 





LORENE WRIGHT 

Library Assistant 
ELIZA GLEASON, 

Reierence Librarian 
ORA ANDERS. 

Periodical Librarian 
MARGARET MURRAY 

Acting Head Catalog Departmcnl 
MARY JANE RUDOLPH, 
Assistant, Catalog Department 




FRITZ VEIT, 
Director of Librari 




mm\ m\\ 






8TUD[IT HEALTH 
SEHVICE 




RALPH G. GOODE, IVA HUME, 

Physician Nurse 



AMY LOWERY, 
Matron 



PHYSICAL PLA^ 



JOHN J, HANLEY, Chief Engineer (nol pictured) 



Lunchroom Staff 



ESTHER HENDRICKS, Lunchroom Manage 




CHic^co scHiioLi; mwm 



Inherent to Chicago Teachers College is 
the CHICAGO SCHOOLS JOURNAL. The 
JOURNAL is edited entirely by members of the 
faculty and published by the Board of Educa- 
tion primarily for Chicago public school teach- 
ers. Since 1906, when it was started as the ED- 
UCATIONAL BI-MONTHLY, it has proven to be 
an extremely valuable service organ for the 
teachers of the Chicago public school system. 



The JOURNAL contains descriptions of 
work actually carried on in the schools, reviews 
of recent books, and articles on various trends 
in the field of education including curriculum 
subjects and advanced thought in cultural, 
social, and technical fields. To date, seven 
special area supplements listing teaching ma- 
terials have been published. 

Circulation includes a multitude of edu- 
cational institutions and libraries in every 
s:ate in the Union and approximately twenty- 
six foreign countries. 

Chicago Teacher College students have 
access to the JOURNAL regularly; sufficient 
copies are published so that each student may 
have one. Current issues as well as back 
numbers are always available in the Publica- 
tions Ofiice. 



LOUISE M JACOBS, Managing Editor 
JAkBEl THORN LULU Secretary 





ELLEN M^ OLSON, chairman, MABEL HEMINGTON, VIOLA LYNCH, ELINOR S, 
ECKLUND (not piclured) 

KIID[llGmEI-PlllllAliY 



ART 



RUTH DYRUD, JOHN EMERSON, MARY COLE, 
MAURICE YOCHIM 



FACULH 




Page Fourteen 




IIUSIC 



CATHERINE M TAHENY. Chairman, ELIZABETH 
HENNESSEY, LEONARD S'M'JTIS SYLVAN WARD 



PSKHfllOCy 



EDWIN BRYE, Chairman 
LORRAINE DeSOUSA 
LORAIN KITE 
BRUCE R, KIRK 
RUTH MAE 0. SECORD 
DAVID TEMKIN 




Page Fifleen 








EDWARD E. COLIN, chairman, DEALS E. FRENCH, RALPH G. 
GOODE, DAVID HELLER, JAMES SANDERS, HERBERT LAMP, 
DOROTHY V. PHIPPS, ARTHUR SCHARF, EARL E. SHERFF 



HHTHE^HTiCS 



JOSEPH J^ URBANCEK, chairman, GEORGE 
L, PATE, WILLIAM J. PURCELL, RUTH 
RASMUSEN, JEROME M. SACHS 





m\\[ mui 



FRED K BRANOM, chairman, VERNON BROCKMAN. JOSEPH 
CHADA, HENRIETTA M. FERNITZ, CHARLES MONROE, JOHN 
M. PFAU, FREDRICK BEREZIN, ELLSWORTH FARIS 



mmm 



LOUISE ROBINSON, chairman, GERTRUDE BYRNE. 
URSULA MAETHNER, LOUISE CHRISTENSEN, JOSEPH 
KRIPNER, GEORGE W BOYLE, chairman Athletics 
department. 



i^Wi 













HENRIETTA McMILLAN, chairman, ISABEL KINCHELOE, ROBERT RUTHERFORD, IRWIN SULO- 
WAY, ROBERT ROTH, GEORGE J. STEINER, JOHN CARTER, WILLIAM CARD, ELOISE THETFORD 
(not pictured), HORACE WILLISTON^ 



SPEECH 



CHRISTY SHERVANIAN, ROBERT J. WALKER 





PHILIP LEWIS, chairman, JOHN M BECK, DOROTHY SAUER, 
HELEN STONER, CURTIS J GLENN DAVID KOPEL, LOUISE 
TYLER (nol piclured) 



mUM HACHI^G 



MARIE L, TIERNEY, chairman, (nol piclured) 
MARIAN A FISCHER, MURIEL BEUSCHLEIN 





km 



COLEMAN HEWITT, chairman, FREDERICK ANDERSON, 
PAUL E. HARRISON 




[colonics 

PHYSICS 



MARY E. FREEMAN 



RALPH J. VESECKY 



uum MEl 




ELOISE RUE, GEORGE E. BUTLER 



CLASS 
JANUARY 19S1 



JOSEPHINE CANNATARO, president 
ANTHONY BURKE, vice-president 
CATHERINE GALOTTA, secretary 
WINIFRED GIBSON, treasurer 
LOUISE CHRISTENSEN, sponsor 



Page Twenly-( 




MILDRED ALVINO, ALICE ANDERSON, ANGELA BATTEAST, DOROTHEA BAX- 
TER, DONNA BESSEN 



LOUIS BIER, ANTHONY BURKE, CLAIRE BRADLEY, JOSEPHINE CANNATARO, 
EVA COCKRELL 



VINCENT CASTROGIOVANNI, NATALI COCI, DONALD LEE DAVIS, MARILYN 
De GROOT, MARY JANE FAMBRO 



LEONORE FOX, LAVERNE FREITAG, JEAN GADE, CATHERINE GALOTTA, WINI- 
FRED GIBSON 



Twenty-two 



SANDRA GORDON, FRANCES GUZIOR, WILMA HUFFMAN, MARIAN HUMES, 
YANKA JANCICH 



CONSTANCE JELKE, ROBERT KORENSKY, WILLIAM KRETZ, JOSEPH KROLNENT, 
THERESA LENGYEL 



MARIAN MORRIS, JEROME MULVIHILL, ARLENE O'DONNELL, BARBARA PULL- 
lAM, ETHEL SCOTT 



GENEVA STEPTO, SONDRA UTANOFF, FLOYD WYRICK 




,lJ 



'. ^ %: 



Hi 




\ 


1^^ Ji "^ 


y-^^W- 



















COIIII[ICEMEn 

JUIUARY 

1954 



mMh]\K Cim Mi 1954 



RITA O'LEARY, 

president 
MARTHA TRAGNITZ, 

vice-president 

LORETTA SMITH, 

secretary 
MARY KORZENIEWSKI, 

treasurer 




URSULA MAETHNER, 
sponsor 




As with most senior classes, one of the most import- 
ant and most anticipated events is the senior prom. The 
class of June, 1954 held their prom in the Breakers Room of 
the Sherry Hotel on April 23. Dick Long and his orchestra 
furnished the music for the evening. 

The class also entered a float in the Homecoming 
parade. The Senior A's had their first extended experiences 
in teaching as half-day instructors. 

The big day and culmination of four years at C.T.C. is 
commencement, June 15, 1954. 



Page Twcnly-five 







MARIE ABT, DONALD ADAIR, HOLLY ADAMS, DORIS ALFREDSON, MARGARET 
BALLA 



ROBERT BASSETT, MARILYN BASTIEN, GRACE BEAVERS, JEWEL BEIFUSS, JOAN 
BLACKSTONE 



DONALD BOLAND, FRANCES BOMBINO, ANNE BORUCKI, JOAN BOSCIA, CON- 
NIE BOUDOS 



ROBERT BRADBURRY, STELLA BRANDO, BARBARA BRANDT, HENRY BROWN, 
MARY LOU BUCKLEY 



Page Twenty-; 



LOIS BUTTS, DOLORES BUTLER, MARIE CANNIZZO, PATRICIA CAVANAUGH, 
MARY ELLEN CAWLEY 

MARY LOU CHEARS, LELAND COHEN, ROSE CORTUNA, LOUISE CREACH 
JOHN CRONIN 

SHELIA CUNNIFF, SHIRLEY DALUGA, DOROTHY DAWSON, JOAN DeLACEY, 
MARY DOHERTY 

LOIS DuMAIS, ROSEMARY DUNN, DIANE DUSICKA, RITA ECKSTEDT, MAIDA 
EDELSTEIN 









STANLEY EIKOOS, EUGENE ELLIS, SHIRLEY ELLIS, MARY ENGLISH, ARTISHIA 
ERVIN 



ANTHONY FILPOVICH, PATRICIA FOLEY, LILLIAN FOLTON, PAUL FORNATAR, 
MARIA GARCO 



ELIZABETH GLYNN, NICHOLAS GOLEHMIS, NANCY GORSKI, JOAN GOSS, 
JOAN GRAHAM 



BARBARA GREEN, BARBARA GRIFFIN, JESSICA GRONEK, DONNA GUERRERO, 
ANNA HARRIS 










JOAN HASH, LEO HENNESSY, CAROLE HICKEY, BEALA lACKSON, CAROL 

lACOBSEN 

MARILYN JOHNSON, LOIS JONES, JOAN JOYCE, ROSEMARY KAMBA, JAMES 

KASS 

BARBARA KAY, MARLENE KENDALL, BETTY KNOTT, JOSEPH KOCZANVWSKI, 

BARBARA MICHAELSON KOPULSKY 

MARY KORZENIEWSKI, ELAINE KRAMP, JANET KULCZYNSKI, JOAN KUROWSKl 
CARMEN La BIANCA 



Page Twenly-nine 




CAROLYN LAWSON, DORIS LEHN, MARILYNNE LINDALL, LUCILLE LIPINSKI 

MARGARET MALMBERG 

• 

JOAN MAROUARDT, RUTH MAYO, ROSEMARY METROS, ELAINE MICHENFEL- 

DER, JOHN MORESCHI 

» 

THERESE MORRISON, ELLEN MURTAUGH, DELPHINE MUSIAL, BARBARA Mc- 

CANN, JUDY McCarthy 

• 

FRANCES McCULLAGH, SHIRLEY McDONALD, PATRICIA McFARLAND, SYLVIA 

McGEE, DOLORES THERESA McLEMOXE 



Page Thirty 



MARY McOUAID, RINA NADDEO, ROBZRT NELSON, WILMA NORMAN, RITA 
O'DONNELL 

RITA O'LEARY, DENA PANTELIS, JACKIE PATTERSON, R. G. PATTERSON, AL- 
MEDA PETERS 

BARBARA PIGFORD, TOBY RAITZIK, HELMER RINGSTROM, MARLENE RINKEN, 
DELOYCE ROAN 

lACOUELINE ROBERTS, ARLENE RIEBAU ROSS, DOROTHY RYAN, MAUREEN 
RYAN, lANICE SAMPLES 




HAROLD SARNECKI, MARIE SANTARO, ANGELYN SCALZO, MARGARET 
SCHMIDT, HILDA SCHOEN 
• 

CLAUDETTE SCOTT, DIANE SCOTT, CAROL SENG, JUNE SHACKTER, MARGAR- 
ET SHANNON 
• 

DOROTHY SMALL, CLARENCE SMITH, LORETTA SMITH, NORBERT SMOLIN- 
SKI, BARBARA SPEARS 
• 

HAZEL STAHL, ALICE STRUSZ, JOANNE STUMPT, JOAN SULLIVAN, DOROTHY 
TABAR 





MATHEW TARKA, ANDERSON THOMPSON, LORRAINE WAINAUSKIS, MAR- 
ION TOOMEY, MARTHA TRAGNITZ 



N. TRAXLER, MARILYN TIENSTRA, LOIS WALKENS, RUTH WALTER, PAT WAT- 
SON 



JAMES WESEN, YVONNE YARMAT, CLAIRE ZANATTA 



Page Thirly-lhree 




bolographs by george polka 



SENIOR 
PROU 

1954 




CLASS OF mm\ 1955 




ALFRED WIESMEYER, president 

JEAN PEARSON, vice-president 

BETTY DORENBOS, secretary 
KEN ELLIS, treasurer 




GEORGE PATE, 



In December ol 1953 the Senior B class held a dinner 
at Le Petit Gourmet restaurant and lollowed it with a Christmas 
party. During the spring they participated in the Homecoming 
lestivities by constructing a Iloat depicting interplanetary 
travel. The class held an all-day picnic and evening square 
dance at the Jackson Park promontory in April. 

Their chief fund raising project was the selling of 
school decals during the fall and winter. 



Page Thirly-tive 



Mary Barbato, Pat Barron, Anthony Bartoletto, Donald Bayer, Carol Beck 
Yvonne Belin, Muriel Bell, Harold Bolotin, Betty Brown, Ruth Chopin 
John Coatar, Nelia Cunnea, William Cutt, Marilyn Davidson, Maria Davis 
Dorothy De Pratt, Betty Dorenbos, Joan Dowd, Anita Frank, Carol Frazier 
Dora Frazier, John Freeh, B. Barton Gallegos, Cecile Goodman, Olivia Griffen 





Yolanda Gulino, Marie Ann Harrison, Judy Hays, Laddie Hodges, John HoH 
Carol Hudson, Bernice Jackson, Barbara Johnson, Jean Johnson, Thelma Johnson 
Rosemarie Kehoe, Faye Kozemczak, Dolores Krandel, Margerite Maloney, Ruth Markusic 
Elizabeth Masa, Wanda Mason, Joan Meyer, Mary Helen McCann, Marilyn MeCree 
Virginia Newman, Mary O'Connell, Julia Pennington, Joyce Penson, Patricia Pine 



Page Thirty-seven 



Albert Popowits, Bertha Rada, Dorothy Raeth, Maxine Reames, Delores St. Anant 
Gerry Schuyler, Mildred Spencer, Lula Spivey, Matthew Stewart, Sandra Strain 
Hazel Stringer, Nancy Totten, George Turk, Laura Walker, Nollie Walker 
Joan Walsh, Edith Wetland, Verdelle Widegren, Alfred Wiesmeyer, Geraldine Willioras 
June Zajac, Nicholas Zervas 











CLASS OF JU^[ 
1955 



The Junior A class, sponsored by Dr. Ellsworth Paris, 
Jr., of the social science department, held their class party in 
the fall. They also gave a dinner at the Bit of Sweden restau- 
rant in the early spring. The final class activity was a weiner 
roast and splash party at Palos Park in May. 



DON BROHOLM, 
president 



ARLENE MURPHY, 
vice-president 



DOROTHY SEPINEC, 
secretary 



JUDY TYSKLING. 
treasurer 





^^ ELLSWORTH PARIS 
|V Jl^ ^^^1 sponsor 




Page Thirly-nine 



Beatrice Algee, Eleanor Augustyn, Connie Ausema, Evelyn Bailey, Juanita Bess 
Betty Bitter, Alice Blankman, Eleanor Boyle, Martha Brummit, Geraldine Burke 
Marion Burrell, Sylvia Byrd, Maiy Byrnes, Dorothy Carruthers, Arlene Carter 
Maureen Caulfield, Catherine Charles, Caroline Cicen, Clayton Claxton, Doris Clay 
Dian Cooper, Anne Coniglio, Barbara Cross, Roberta Czerniejewski, Mary Daly 



^ ^ ^ 





Greta Davis, Suzanne Dayton, Gloria De Fonte, Judith Deke, Thelma Dent 

Jessie Dickerson, Annabel Dixon, Marilyn Domikaitis, Jerry Donohue, William Douglass 

Ann Dyra, Theodore Efimore, Edna Ekstrom, Rosemary Flashing, Dolores Flynn 

Marge Foltan, Janice Foster, Frances Gardner, Dian Frelk, Eunice Goldberg 

Richard Gornick, Ruth Grangent, Louise Gross, James Harden, Nina Harris 





Gladys Heintz, Augusta Henderson, Margaret Higgins, Mary Higgins, Patricia Hockstad 

Joe Hoffman, Mary Holland, Eva Isaacs, Bette Knieps, Rose Jackson 

Leslie Johnson, Annette Jummati, Beverly Keller, Anne King, LaVerne Koonce 

Joyce Kowal, Virginia Lakowski, Eleanor Lambin, Michael Lemel, Shirley Lynge 

Catherine Maysak, Florence Miller, Betty Morris, Jeanette Mucha, Arlene Murphy 



Page Forty-two 



Marjorie Murphy, Thomas McElroy, Elizabeth McKenna, Geraldine McLendon, Beatrice Nebel 

Shirley Nieman, Alice Nolan, Patricia Novotny, Chalice Nugent, Frances Paul 

Irene Pavik, Verda Pradd, Irma Reed, Colette Sana, Marion Scnick 

Nancy Schwab, Marion Scurlock, Dorothy Sedinec, LaVern Simms, Constance Shea 

Henrietta Smith, Murlene Smith, Jean Snow, James Sebela, Charles Stepney 




Violet Street, Monica Stoga, Jayne Swiatek, Robert Szesny, Dorothy Terry 
Muriel Thigpen, Louise Tilley, Dolores Toler, Fanny Turner, Lillian Twine 
Judy Tysling, Lois Walker, Lois Whitmal, Chester Wiktorski, Clarence Wilson 
Phyllis Wilson, Alicia Woods, Sue Wright, Margaret Viktory, Virginia Zurad 







\ IPr, 


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mi 







ci^ss OF mm\ 

1950 



One of the highlights in the memories of members 
of the Sophomore A class is Homecoming. There, competing 
against numerous o'.her classes and clubs, their float, built 
in the shape of a rocket ship, was given first place honors. 
It was the only motor-driven float in the parade. 

Later in the semester, the class sponsored a picnic; 
they also initiated two well-attended socials after basketball 
games. 



MIRIAM GUMS, 
secretary 



ANDREA HOLLAND, 
treasurer 



JOHN M. PFAU, 
sponsor 



Page Forly-live 




Rose Mary Baluk, Sylvia Barticki, Beverly Barz, Lois Bowen, Yvonne Campbell 
Marlene Dedrick, Geraldine Dolon, Inez Douglas, Edith Edington, Dolores Ericsson 
Marie Eve, Nancy Franz, Marion French, Gwen Ganada, Diane Goodman 
Retza Gaddis, Patricia Gray, Anthony Greco, Betty Greene, Bernadette Guarini 
Philomena Guerra, Marion Guido, Miriam Gums, Harry Hague, Barbara Hawey 



Margaret Hunter, Barbara Husband, Ken Imlah, Hortense Irwin, Joe Jigonti 
Eleanor Kober, Rose Marie Kozlowski, Shirley Krejci, Rose Lindstrom, Eugenia MaHei 
Sophie Meers, Rose Musacchio, Alfretta Norton, Jean Overstreet, Joan Reichert. 
Laverne Robinson, Sonya Saxton, Claire Sedlack, Marie Slaughter, LaVergne Thomas. 
Ruth Turner, Bernice Whiteside. 




"1^ 11 





&1K 




. M 



cuss OF jy^E 1951) 




SHIRLEY LEEBELT, president 

LAUREEN RUPP, vice-president 

GERTRUDE PENDERGAST, secretary 

LUCILLE HENDRICH, treasurer 



VERNON BROCKMAN, 






PATRICK ALLEN, BARBARA ALLMAN, MARY 
ANN ALTIER, JJANITA ANDERSON, NORMA 
BALLON 



JEAN B'JRKE, BETTY BARR, DOROTHY HAUM, 
ALICE BEACH, JEAN BELL 



MARJORIE BENGSTON, VERNER BENDSEN, EL- 
SIE BILLUPS, MARION BOLIN, NICK BRAGA 



RICHARD BRAND, CAROLYN BROOKS, CONCHITA 
BROWN, NANCY BOWMAN, FLOREDA BURNLEY 



RUTH CALDWELL, LaVONEIA CANADA, RICH- 
ARD CARROLL, JOAN CASEY, ISABELLE CHEL- 
SEA 



SIDNEY CLARK, CECELIA COLE, CATHY COLLINS, 
MELBA COX, JULIE CREEDON 



JOHN CURRAN, ROMANA DaCORTE, CAROL DAN- 
IS, MADONNA DASZKIEWICZ, DELORES DAVIS 



MADONNA DEACY, BERNADETTE DIGGINS, JOAN 
DOSS, BARBARA DOTY, CAROL DRENTHE 











rx 



mm 










fM 




CAROLYN DUFFIN, CONNIE DZIEDZIC, JANET 
ECKLUND, PEARL ELLIS, EILEEN FILIS 



SWISS FOERNER, JAMES FOGARTY, RUTH 
FOLEY, MARY FOLLIARD, MARTHA LED FORD 



NATALIE FRANKEL, MAGGIE GANT, ANGELA 
GATTO, PATRICIA GAYNOR, RAYMOND GEBAUER 



LOUISE GLANTON, MARGARET GORMAN, BAR- 
BARA GORNICK, JESSIE GUY, GAY HOCKETT 



PAT HACKETT, JACQUELINE HARGRAVE, CLYTE 
HARGRETE, JOSEPH HARRIS, KATHRYN HARRIS 



BARBARA HART, LUCILLE HEINRICH, ELIZA- 
BETH HEITMAN, MAUREEN HINES, BARBARA 
HOBEN 



MARIE HOLT, LILLIAN HUBERT, ELIZABETH 
JACKSON, MYRNA JACKSON, RICHARD JAOUITH 



LOIS JOSSI, ALICE JONES, LORETTA JONES, 
ANNA JEFFERSON, La VERNE KABBE 



ANNE KEENEY, CATHIE KING, THOMAS KING, 
JOAN KLECZEWSKI, ROBERT KLEIN 



MARILYN KLONDA, LEROY KOHUT, GEORGE 
KO?CA, CLAUDIA KORFF, MARILYN KOTT 



PAT KOVESKI, MARGARET KRIKAU, LENORE 
KROOTH, AGATHA KUZLOWSKI, JOSEPH LAVIZ- 
ZO 



SHIRLEY LEEBELT, JOANN LELLOS, BARBARA 
LENINGTON, MARILYN LEONARD, BETTY LES- 
NESKI 



BARBARil LEWIS, FANNIE LEWIS, WAYNE LEY- 
DEN, JANICE LINDEMANN, MARY LOWERY 



LaVERNE LUNDGREN, ROBERT LYMAN, GERAL- 
DINE MALLOY, FELTON MAY, PATRICIA MER- 
RIWETHER 



FRflNK MICHALEK, JOHN MIKOLASKO, JOAN 
MILLER, SHIRLEY MILULECKY, LEONARD MOD- 
DER 



JOAN MULHERIN, JAMES MURRAY, CHRISTINE 
MUSE, DIANA MYERS, DONNA MYERS 



mm 





Hr'''^ 





m 









A C 






ffeviSS? 







a 








^^iff«!^ 



SARA McAFEE. CAROL McCABE, JANE McCLEL- 
LAND, JERRY McMORHIS, RAYMOND NESTMANN 



KATHLEEN BOYLE, JAMES O'DEA, SHIRLEY 
ORAM, BEVERLY OSBORNE, MICHAEL PALAN- 

DECK 



CATHERINE PAPPAS, BETTY PEACE, BETTY 
PENDELTON, GERTRUDE PENDERGAST, SHIRLEY 
PONDER 



SHIRLEY PRYOR, BARBARA PUCHALSKl, MARY 
QUINN, LILLIAN RADAVOY, RUTH RECORD 



DORIS RIDER, LAUREEN RUPP, JANE ROB! 
4t fl CHARLES ROCKWOOD, CAROLE ROGGENKAMP 



^1^1. 








KATHERINE ROSECKY, MARILYN RUBENSTEIN, 
^ M EARLINE SANDFORD, JANE SARLAS, CAROLE 
SCHAEFER 



MARION SCHEFCSIK, JOAN SCHOLICK, MARY 
SIMMONS, MAXINE SIMON, ANGELA SIM 



BERNADINE SIWEK, JOAN SNEDEKER, JOHN 
SOJAT, SHIRLEY SPEARS, DON STAPLES 



LORRAINE STASTNY, MARY STUART, VIVIAN 
TADIN, BENNYE TILLMAN, JACQUELINE TIL- 
MAN 



LYDIA TOCWISH, LUCILLE TOOMEY, JAMES 
TORTORELLI, JOANNE TRACEY, JACKIE TRY- 
BUS 



XENIA TYSIAK, MARLENE TYSL, ALICE UR- 
BANIAK, LOIS VAUGHN, DOROTHY VITT 



EVELYN WALLER, CECELIA WALSH, ALLAN 
WALTER, GERALD WASILEWSKI, BARBARA 
WARD 



ENID WATERS, SHIRLEY WATERS, SUE WEA- 
THERFORD, MARIE WEBER, ANNA WILLIAMS 



DONALD WILLIAMS, REBIE JO WILLIAMS, SADIE 
WILSON, ROXIE WHITAKER, SHIRLEY WITT 



DELPHINE WOLAK, JEAN WOODWARD, MICHAEL 
WOS, GWENDOLYN WRIGHT, ROSALEE WRIGHT 



THELMA WRIGHT, ALLEN ZAK, PETER ZAN- 
SITIS 



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p ^ f\ £| 




JOYCE BEALL, president 

MARGIE PORTAL, vice-president 

PENNY GIALAMOS, secretary 
LORRAINE WITT, treasurer (not pictured) 




BRUCE R. KIRK, 
sponsor 



The sale of key chains at basketball games and at 
Homecoming was the year's money-raising project for the Soph- 
omore B class. In the fall they sponsored a "Through the Look- 
ing Glass" party in the small gym for all students. They par- 
ticipated in the Homecoming festivities by making a float which 
was entered in the between-halves competition. In the spring 
another all-school social was promoted by this active group. 

CUSS OF mm\ mi 



Page Fifly-five 



JEAN AUTENRIETH, BERNICE BAKER, GLADYS 
BATCHELOR, JOYCE BEALL 



MARIE BIRCH, DOLORES BLACKMAN, BIRDIE 
BLUFF, RALPH BONACCORSI 



JOYCE BRODY, DOROTHY BROWN, MAXINE 
BUECHLER, GAYNELL BURRELL 



SHARON BURTON, JOANNE CARROLL, CARMELA 
NATELLA, SHIRLEY CLARK 



MAURICE COLLINS, THELMA CORNELIUS, LULA 
CRITE, ADELE DEVERA 



ORSOLA FELCO, MURIEL FINK, CAROLYN FITZ- 
GERALD, HELEN FORNISS 



PENNY GIALAMAS, FANNIE GILMORE, MARIET- 
TA GREEN, MARY HALEY 



MARK HEWITT, MAY JOHNSON, JOYCE JONES, 
ADELE JURGENS 






1^ 











k *, i 



•N 







a . 

^j^ 

g 







•Qmfi. 




AUDREY JURGENS, FLORENCE LESTER, ERNEST 
MILLER. MARGUERITE MILLER 



BDNITA McCALL. JANET NOVITT, ROBERT OF- 
FILL, NANCY OGLESBY 



JOHN O'KEEFE, BERNICE PARKS, 
PFEIFFER, ALVIN PLATT 



MARGE PORTAL, BARBARA POWERS. GLORIA 
PRICE, BLANCHE PULLIAM 



CHARLENE SCHWARTZ, MARY SIMMONS, GER 
ALDINE SMUHA. CAROLINE SPRINGER 



BARBARA STAATS. WILLIAM STAPLES. 
ERT STERNING. CONSTANCE THOME 



RONALD THOMPSON, BARBARA WELDON. HARRY 
WILKINS, LEE JEAN WILLIAMS 



JANICE YAUS, HILDRED YOUNG 






*§*'-*,. 




CLASS OF 



mm\ mi 





LORRAINE DeSOUSA, 
sponsor 




CHRIS GRANITZ, 
president 



ANN CAMPBELL, 
vice-president 



JOAN PIERCE, 
secretary 



GLORIA PALDO, 
"N treasurer 



The Freshman A class arranged four parties and 
one group enterprise during their first year at C.T.C. 
The first social afiair was a "Get-Acquainted" party 
for Frosh A's only. Following that, afternoon all-school 
socials were scheduled. A St. Patrick's Day "Sham- 
rock Sale" proved highly successful. 



BARBARA ABINGTON, ANGELA ALAGNA, ANNIE 
ALLEN, TERRI ALONSO, PAULINE ANAPOLIS 



DON AQUINO, RALPH ARKEMA, PHYLLIS ARON, 
JACQUELINE AUGUSTINE, ROSEMARIE AZNA- 
VOORIAN 



JOYCE BAKER, ROBERT BALDWIN, JOYCE BAL- 
LENTINE, ROSETTA BANKS, STACY BAPTIST 



DARLENE BARCH, JEAN BARKER, LILLIAN 
BARNETT, MARYANNE BARONE, JOSEPHINE 



NAOMI BAXTER, MARY BAZIL, VERA BEASLEY, 
HELEN BEND, PAT BENETIER 



JOHNNIE BERRY, JOSEPH BERRY, CAROL BER- 
TRAM, KANELA BERTSOS, THERESA BERTUCCI 



JUDY BILLIS, ALVIN BISCH, GENEVA BLACK, 
LESLIE BLACKWELL, MARTHA BLOODE 



LARRY BLOOM, LUCILLE BLOWE, YVONNE 
BOHNE, BERNICE BOLTON, CHARLES BOND 




t5L.lfia 







^^ 






3LIVER BONET. THOMAS BOOKER, SANDRA 
BOYD, SHIRLEY BOYLES, MILDRED BRANTLEY 



BERNADETTE BRENNAN, BURT BREZINSKY, 
CELESTA BROWN, JANE BROWN, JUNE B'JELOW 



ARLENE BUJNOWSKl, JOHN BURKE, WILLIAM 
BUROLLI, LESLIE ANN BUTCHER, ANN CAMP- 
BELL 



CAROL CAMPBELL, JUDITH CANTRALL, CECILIA 
CARTWRIGHT, ANNE CASE, BARBARA CASEY 



EDITH CASS, SYLVIA CHEEK, ARLENE CHERRY, 
BERTHA CHIPOKAS, BETTY CIRAN 



BARBARA CLARK, BARBARA CLEARY, LIDA 
C3ATES, GRACE COCONATE, NORMA COFFEY 



PAT CONLON, BEVERLY COPPLE, BARBARA 
CORTILET, LAURA COSTELLO, GEORGE CRAW 

LEY 



STEVE CUITANIC, JANET CULLEN, EMILY 
CUPPLES, GERALDINE CURCIONE, ELIJAH DAB- 

NEY 



PAT DALY, BARBARA DANIELS. MAGGIE DAN- 
IELS, DAVIDSON, ANNETTE DAVIS 



CALETHA DIVIS, JEAN De BICKERO, JACKY 
DELCOURT, GLORIA DETELIC, MARY Di MATTED 




CAROLYN DODD, JOYCE DOHERTY, SHIRLEY ^^ 
DONNELLY, HELENE DORSEY, MARY DRISCOLE 



MARYIRENE DUFFY, MARY DUNN, R, T. DNOW- 
INSKI, VICTORIA DUSANEK, KATIE EDWARDS 



PATRICIA ELLIS, CRYSTAL ERVIN, JOYCE 
EVANS, SANDRA EVANS, CLEOPATRA FARMER 



HELEN FIGURA, JOANNE FISNKE, GERRY FILI- 
PIAK, ANN FITZPATRICK, PATT FLEMING 



SHIRLEY FOGG, JOHN FOLEY, WILLIAM FOLEY, 
BETTIE FORD, BARBARA FREDERICK 



JOSEPH FURMANSKI, EILEEN GALLAGHER, 
MARY GALOTTA, NANCY GIBBONS, JUNE GLIDE- 
WELL 











r 



m^ 




Tr 

'Mm 






fS^^, 









EDITH GORDON, FLORIDA GORDON, MISSOURI 
GORDON, FLORIDA GORE, ROBERT GOSNELL 



RUTH GOSNELL, CHRIS GRANITZ, Ri^RBARA 
GRIFFIN, BERNARDINE GREMBLA, JOANNE 
GULJAS 



ELIZAB-TH GUTKOWSKI, DONNA HALE, VIRGIN- 
IA H\MBRICK, MAUREEN HANLEY. B\RB\RA 
HANSEN 



EUGENIA HARDAWAY, MARGARET HARDING, 
BETSY HARPER, VIRTIE HARRIS, DALE HART 



ROBERT HARTZEL, DOLORES HOTCH, JANET 
HATFIELD, RONALD HAYES, DOLORES HANEY 



JOAN HEFFERNAN, WALTER HEINZEL, BAR- 
BARA HELFERS, BERTHA HICKS, CHRISTINE 
HICKS 



EMMA HICKS, PATRICIA HILL, M. HINTZ, 
LEROY HISTLER, CONRAD HLACH 



EMILY HODNETT, La WANDA HOLDERNESS, 
ROSE HOLLEY, ARLENE HOLMES, DOLORES HOL- 
STINE 



BERTHA HOLT, DOROTHY HOOPER, EARCINE 
HOOPER, R. HUEBNER, BARBARA HYZY 



DON JACKSON, VERNEICE JACKSON, EARLINE 
JAMES, ELEANOR JAMES, CHARLES JARIS 



DOLORES JAVASHI, DOROTHY JESUIT, AMELIA 
JONES, DARLENE JONES, ELIZABETH JONES 



EVA JONES, MARILYN JONES, BARBARA JOHN- 
SON, FLORENCE JOHNSON, GAYNELL JOHNSON 



PHILIP JURCZEWSKI, MIKE KABALA, JUDY 
KAINE, RUTH KAMENSKY, JOHN KEATING 



JEANETTE KEITH, MYRTLE KELLY, BARBINA 
KING, MARILYN KIRKLAND, FLORENCE KIRK- 
PATRICK 



ROGER KOENIG, JOANN KOWALESIK, ANNE 
KRUZIC DOLORES KRUSZKA, ELIZABETH 
KJZNIAREK 



LORRAINE KWIATKOWSKI, BETTY LAGER- 
STROM, MARTHA LANDON, MARJIE LANG, 
JOSEPH LEE 












LARETEA LEE, JEAN LEMAY, HOWARD LEVIN, 
NANCY LlCATESl, KEN LILLE 



KATHLEEN LIPMAN, MAXINE LLOYD, BETTY 
LONG, DORIS LUDWIG, JOAN LUNDIN 



MARY LYNE, DON MANAHAN, JAMES MAN- 
fM GRUM, JAMES MANSON, JACK MAROUARDT 







^■f^^ 



MARGE MARRIN, OCTAVIA MARTIN, BETTY 
MOULTRY, ARLENE MOSCHIANO, JEAN MASHOS 



LATHA MATTHEWS, PAT MERWICK, BEVERLY 
MEYER, JOHN MILOS, JOYCE MONETTE 



DOROTHY MOODY, THELMA MOORE, ZENOUS 
MORGAN, CAROL MUELLER, JOAN MURPHY 



BARBARA MURRAY, BEVERLY McCLlNTON, 
YVONNE McCLURE, JEAN McCOURT, EILEEN 
McCUE 



THERESA McDADE, IRENE McDOWELL, MARC 
McFADDEN, PATRICA McGLONE, GAIL Mc- 
GREGOR 



MONIOUE McKAY, BILL McKILLOP, BARBARA 
McNAUGHTON, MARLENE NAGEL, LENORE NAVE 



ROSALEE NANCE, KENNETH NAPONIELLO, 
ESTHERLENE NEIL, DOLORES NESCI, KAROLIN 
NEYDER 



RICH NIEDVARES, AUDREY NDRTHRIP, SYLVIA 
NOWAK, EILEEN O'EPiEIN, GERALDINE OXON- 
NELL 



MARY OXONNELL, PATRICIA OXONNELL, 
YVONNE OFFORD, JOAN O'SULLIVAN, MARILYN 
OUTLAW 



MARY OWENS, GLORIA PALDO, ROSE PARKER, 
ROSEMARY PAYNE, LILIE PEOPLES 



ROSELLA PERRY, ERNESTINE PERSON, DORIS 
PERYNAM, ALETHA PETERS, DONN PETERSON 



JEAN PHIFER, JOAN PIERCE, RAYEVELYN 
PITTMAN, MARTHA PLUTZ, DARLENE RANDLE 



JOE RATHNAU, BARBARA REIMER, BETTY 
REID, MARY REUTER, RUTH REUTER 




mm0 




I<a.m t 








CORNIE RILEY, ANTOINETTE RISKE, CONSOLA 
ROBINSON, DOROTHY R3B1NS0N, NINA RODGERS 



CATHERINE RODNEY, JACQUELYN ROSS, NANCY 
?.>AJ ROSS, REVA R3YSE. CONNIE RUTKA 



JUNE SANDUSKY, PAT SCHREIER, ROBERT 
SCHWARTZ, SHIRLEY SCOTT, SONIA SEBAS- 
TIAN 



DARLENE SEWARD, CLARE SEXTON, JOAN 
SHANNON. JOYCE SHARP, JANE SHOLEEN 



WILLA SIMMONS, GERRY SKOVIE, VERDELL 
SMIATEK, BONNIE SMITH, CARLYNE SMITH 



JOAN SMITH, RITA SOFUS, KAY SOPKO, PHYL- 
LIS SPAIN, HARRIET SPIEVAK 



JESSIE SPURLIN, MARY STAFFORD, SHIRLEY 
STALLWORTH, NAOMI STANCIK, CAROL 
STASCHKE 



MAUDE STEPHENS, HAROLD STEWART, THERE- 
SA STEWART, OLLIE STOKES, EUGENE STOLL 



BARBARA STREET, RICHARD STROCKIS, DOLOR- 
ES SUNTER DORA TAYLOR, ELROY TAYLOR 



YVONNE TAYLOR, ANNYCE THORNTON, RUTH 
TODD, D3RA MAE TOLAN, VIVIAN TOMAN 



RON TOMASZIWSKI, CHRISTINE TOMCZAK, 
JOANN TUFO, JOAN TYKOWSKI, PAT WAGNER 



LORRAINE WALKER, CHARLENE WALSH, RUBY 
WARD, VIRGINIA WARNING, JOAN WATSON 



HELEN WAX, ELIZABETH WEBSTER, GEORGE 
WEID:NGER, CHARLENE WESLEY, PATRICIA 
WIKHER 



HELEN WILLIAMS, LEO BETTY WILLIAMS, 
MARY WILLIAMS, ROSSETTA WILLIAMS, SHIR- 
LEY WILLIAMS, EDNA WILSON 



EVELYNN WILSON, PATRICIA WINGARD, DON 
WITT, LORRAINE WITT, CARLE WOOLEY, GLORIA 
WRIGHT 



JEROME WUDYKA, PAT WUNDERLICH, ITOYO 
YANGA, CYRILLA ZAREK, EVELYN ZERHOOT, 
PHYLLIS ZIDRON 





Of 




I V: t: 








M'^m 




■o 



1%^\ 



^4 




RAOUL R. HASS, Director 



urn SIDE eRycH 

C. T. t. 



Since its relocation on the Wright Junior College campus, 
the North Side Branch has seen its enrollment increase nearly 
to the hundred mark with every indication that this figure may 
be doubled within a semester or two. The faculty now consists 
of three full time and twelve part time instructors, some of whom 
have been recruited from the Wright staff. 

The Branch now provides a program at the senior col- 
lege level for students preparing to teach at the Kindergarten- 
Primary or intermediate-upper grade levels. Students may 
complete their third and fourth years of college work at the 
Branch. Many more students are encouraged to continue 
working for their degrees because of the convenience of the 
location for North-siders. Extended day classes are also offered 
and provide an opportunity for in-service teachers to take ad- 
ditional courses or to work towards an advanced degree. 




Page Sixty-nine 



^..• 


n 


il^ 


ill 


, o. 




Wi 


^ '<%■ 

^ 


n 


4^ 


^ 

V 






I S. B. FACUin 



LESLIE LEWIS BRADLEY 

AGATHA CAVALLO, 
Spanish 

LEON GOLUB, 
Art 
MEYER HALUSHKA, 

Physical Education 

GEORGE M. HAYES, 
English 
MABEL HEMINGTON, 

Kindergarten-Primary 

KEITH HOOVER, 
Psychology 
ROBERT JOHNSON, 
English 



ANNA M. KUMMER, 
Science 
JOHN LINK, 
Speech 

CHARLES MORAN, 
Mathematics 
REUBEN SEGEL, 
Psychology 

MERLE F. SILVER, 
Ofiice 
MARVIN STEINBERG, 




Page Seventy 




Officers and members of executive board of Raoul R. Haas chapler of F.T.A. 
(1. to r.) Gloria Mazukelli, Fred Schuster, treasurer, Helen Kocjanowicz, vice- 
president, Sheldon Paull, Marshall Wolf, president, Ruth Heidemann, secretary, 
and Leslie Richardson 



Cecilia Adams, Ethel Adams, 
Joann Baker, John Bsvan, Mary 
Borziotis 

Lois Boyd, Alyce Brink, Rose 
Brown, Laverne Cuiro, Mary 
Louise Davis 

Genevieve Drobny, Edwin Dub- 
linski, Anita Einstein, Helen 
Eltgroth, Carol Pagan 

Dvora Foollik, Nathan Ginsburg, 
Dino Giovannin, Stepan Grys, 
Leon Harris 



Pat Harrison, Ruth Heidemann, 
Patricia Hermanson, Alma Horn- 
beck, Mary Jane Imrael 




DONNA LEE KANE 

ANGELO KARABATOS 
VIRGINIA KLINE 

HELEN KOCHANOWICZ 



JANICE KUNTZ 
INEZ LAMBERT 

EDWARD LARSON 
ANNA LINDBERG 



ARLENE MACAULEY 
EDWARD MACK 
DORIS MATSON 

GLORIA MAZUKELLl 



JOANNE MILLER 
ARLENE O'BRIEN 
DON OLSEN 

SHELDON PAULL 



CHARLES PEPP 

FRIEDA PERLSTEIN 
SANDRA PULLMAN 

LESLIE RICHARDSON 



MARLAN SCHREINER 
FRED SCHUSTER 

MARCIA SHAPIRO 
LUELLA STRONG 



MIRIAM SWEDE 
STEVE TARZON 

ROBERT THOMPSON 
ROSEMARY TURNER 



MARY VRETTOS 

ALLAN WALDMAN 
MARSHALL WOLF 
DOROTHY WRIGHT 




.M 

ii#» 






Mrs Heraing;on s rnyinms ana games classes Crowdsd 
condilions al N S B- have necessitated scheduling this 
class on the stage in the auditorium. 



KgP Arts and C:a!ts sludenls. 



The major organization at the Branch is the Raoul R. 
Haas chapter of Future Teachers of America, chartered on Jan- 
uary 6, 1954. During the year F.T.A. sponsored many activities 
— Mrs. Lillian Erzinger and Dr. Philip Lewis were featured 
speakers — and plans are now under way for a formal dance at 
the close of the semester, one of the traditions established when 
the Branch was located in the Schurz High School. Other 
activities included teas, parties, feature movies — such as "Pas- 
sion for Life" — and other special programs. 

Students at the North Side Branch also participated in 
the student-substitute program in April. 



Students in microbiology class 





8. 



B. 



Helen Kochanowicz, Dr. Lewis, and 
Dr. Haas during an F.T.A. meeting. 

Presentation of F.T.A. charter to Dr. 
Haas by Marshall Wolf, president. 

Leslie Richardson and Charles Pepp 
at F.T.A. St. Patrick's Day Party. 

Ruth Heidemann, Marshall Wolf and 
Helen Kochanowicz welcoming Dr. 
Lewis at F.T.A. meeting. 

Students doing the "Bunny Hop" at 
the St. Patrick's Day Party. 




HeUILDI^C HUM REl^TIOISHIPS 



"And step by step, since time began, 
I see the steady gain of man." 

— John Greenleaf Whittier 




Dean Cook and Dr. Sachs, Dr. McMillan, Dr. Brockman, Dr. Monroe, Dr. Lewis, and Dr. Chada 



FACULTY 



This staff group consists of members whose speci- 
fic purpose is to assist and advise the dean. Seven in- 
structors are elected from a total of fourteen nominated by- 
secret ballot. The Council discusses school policy and 
considers material brought to its attention by its members 
or by any faculty member. Council members are elected 
for one year terms and no person may serve more than 
two consecutive terms. 




Page Sevenly-six 




10^ 



< 



MARIE TRUAX, sponsor 



STODE^ 



Elected representatives of the student body compose 
Chicago Teachers College official student governing board. 
Working in behalf of the students, the Council co-operates v/ith 
the faculty and administration in planning activities and re- 
solving difficulties which arise. The Council supports individu- 
al class activities and acts as official spokesman for student 
views in matters concerning school life. 

Among the activities sponsored are Camp Workshop, all 
school dances such as the Hillbilly Hop, basketball socials, 
and, of course, Homecoming. 



Sludenl Council officers. 

ARLENE RIEHAU ROSS, vice-president, DOROTHY SMALL, president, PAT 
WATSON secretary, and MAXINE SIMON, treasurer 




Page Seventy-seven 




STUDENT 



Chicago Teachers College of- 
fers every opportunity for elected 
members as well as interested 
students to understand the meaning 
of representative government by as- 
suming some of the responsibility for 
Council activities. 

It is always striving to reach the 
highest degree of proficiency in pro- 
moting policies for the general wel- 
fare of the student body. 



am PRKSHOP 




Learning to run business and soc- 
ial meetings, to hold and plan discus- 
sions, and studying the qualifications 
of good school leaders and organizers 
are but a few of the projects undertak- 
en at Camp Workshop. 

Founded in 1952 under the auspic- 
es of Student Council, Camp Workshop 
was repeated in September of 1953 at 
Druce Lake, Illinois, and in the spring 
of 1954 at Des Plaines, Illinois. Dele- 
gates were selected from school organ- 
izations and spent two days at the 
camp exchanging ideas and re-defin- 
ing purposes in an atmosphere of en- 
thusiasm and genuine interest. 



FRESHM 
OR|[imiO^ 



During the week of freshman registration a special program is given to 
acquaint new students with various school services and organizations. After the 
assembly program a "coke and chip" party is held in the lunchroom for these in- 
coming students. 

In connection with this program Student Council publishes a Handbook 
containing helpful information about the school. 



Page Eighly 






WW) 



OF 
EDUCATION 



The primary concern of American 
education today is to cultivate in 
the largest number of our future 
citizens an appreciation both of 
the responsibilities and the bene- 
fits which come to them because 
they are American and free." 

— James Bryant Conant 



"■t^^&: 




USI^G TH[ TOOLS 
OF COHPIICilTIO^ 

1 




WILLIAM QUINLY 
Head of A-V Center 



These days it is important that future 
teachers be able to answer questions concern- 
ing TV, CinemaScope, 3D and flying saucers. 
The patient members of the Audio-Visual Cen- 
ter, while not specialists in the operation and 
maintainance of space machines, can help 
even the most un-mechanically minded student 
become a competent operator of movie projec- 
tors or similar devices. When trainees com- 
plete their work in the Center, they go forth 
adequately prepared to use modern materials 
of instruction to enrich and improve their teach- 
ing. 



DEAN COOK and SUPERINTENDENT WILLIS during 
receni visit to the A-V Materials Training Center, 



HUOIO-VISUIIL 
lll\T[llll\L$ 
Timill^G 
CE^ER 




demonstration of the potters wheel. 






r"^ ^ 





Students operating opaque projector. 



Although a major purpose of the Audio- 
Visual Center is to provide instruction in the 
operation of various equipments, provision is 
also made for recreational listening and pre- 
viewing of materials of all kinds. 



Demonstration of headphone plug-in provisions 
phonograph. 



New Electronic Mixer. 



Using the reading accelerator. 





'Fill in that hole," 

PETER ZANZITIS, JOAN PIERCE 



Needles this week." 
BARTON GALLEGOS, FRANCIS BOMBINO 




nupo 



IRWIN SULOWAY 

Faculty Advisor 



The disappointment of reporters wtien 
their stories are killed . . . the elation when 
a "clean" issue is printed . . . the constant 
struggle for news stories, for sport stories, 
for feature articles . . . the midnight "oil- 
burning" sessions on make-up day . . . 
controversies over editorials . . . banquets, 
parties . . . the friendships made . . . All of 
this is Tempo, the voice of the C.T.C. stu- 
dent body. 



Page Eighty-four 



npfl umm 





"This 



IS 



work?" 



[MBIEM 




%:4 



MAXINE REAMES, 
Editor 




PHILIP LEWIS, 

Faculty Advisor 



"The time has come, the walrus said, 

To talk of many things, 

Of picture schedules, layout plans, 

Of cabbages and kings. 

A)hI wliy a yearbook HAS to be, 

And whether editors have ivings." 

(With apologies lo Lewis Carroll) 



Page Eighly-six 




STAFF 



\\\\\m 



B. BARTON GALLEGOS 
JOAN PIERCE 
SALLY CUNNEA 
DOROTHY SEDINEC 
SHEILA CUNNIFF 



JOAN WALSH 
ARLENE MURPHY 
lOANN GULJAS 
OLIVER BONET 
BILL McKILLOP 



PHOTOy^l^H) 



GEORGE POLKA 
DON WITT 



LAIOUT 



DON BAYER 
LAUREEN RUPP 
CAROL FRAZIER 
ANITA FRANK 
BERNICE JACKSON 
DOLORES NESCI 



COHPOSITIO^ 
COURSES 



Efiective communication and self-expres- 
sion are necessary skills needed by a well- 
rounded individual. To facilitate the develop- 
ment of these skills, courses in written compos- 
ition are offered which aid the student in the 
utilization of research techniques and the form- 
al elements of writing. 



SPEECH 



The purpose of these courses is to de- 
velop self-expression and self-criticism; em- 
phasis is placed upon information, perception, 
and reason. Students are given special coach- 
ing to improve voice techniques. 





Page Eiglily-eight 




ASSEMBLl 



mmm 



Page Eighly-nine 



Molion pictures bring Alrica inio a C.T.C. classroom. 



DEVELOPING 

ECONOMIC 

COPETEICE 



It is a teacher's obligation to assist each pupil to 
develop a practical understanding of economic values. 
His continuous adjustment to community life depends 
on efficient use of natural and human resources. 

Competence in this area deals not only with con- 
servation, but with the production, distribution and con- 
sumption of goods and services. Courses in the fields 
of social studies and mathematics help prepare future 
teachers to assume such obligations. 




"Could you go through that 
once more, sir?" 




PHOnCTI^C 
LIFE m HEMTH 





"Ill-health, of body or oi mind is defeat. 
Health alone is victory. Let all men, if they 
can manage it, contrive to be healthy!" 

— Thomas Carlyle 









PHYSICAL 




Physical fitness is developed 
through self-testing activities, 
social games, and sports acti- 
vities such as archery, tennis, 
golf, swimming and badminton. 





'Now this is a tennis racket' 



'Fore! 





FIRST HID - HEALTH [DOCATIOI 



The purpose of this course is to equip students 
to care for persons who are injured or ill until trained 
medical help arrives. Since knowledge of what to 
do in an emergency is vital to teacher training, 
practical application of temporary aids, artificial 
respiration, and the various methods of bandaging 
are emphasized in class sessions. 

At the completion of the semester's work, 
trainees receive the American Red Cross card certi- 
fying completion of the standard course in first aid. 



The influence of the teacher in helping to es- 
tablish in children desirable habits of cleanliness, 
mental hygiene, and the presistent practices com- 
mon to daily living cannot be overemphasized. Pert- 
inent techniques, information and sources of instruc- 
tional materials are all carefully considered in this 
offering. 






VOmiO^HL 

RESPOISIBILITIES 



"If ever there was a cause, if ever there can 
be a cause, worthy to be upheld by all of toil or sacri- 
fice that the human heart can endure, it is the cause of 
education." 

— Horace Mann 




METHODS 

- - where the nor- 
mal trend of development is ac- 
celerated and one enters a pre- 
mature second childhood. Re- 
newing and once again suffer- 
ing all the pangs associated 
with learning new subjects, one 
relives the dim past of elemen- 
tary school life under the 
wavering direction of a nervous 
fellow student. 

Know what? I've been sub- 
tracting wrong for fourteen 
years. 



big bufialo hunt loday." 



Muriel in Australia. 



"That's a fraction. 






j 


(blcatecl SCdrnpered 

' pushed prdnced ^5^ 

^-"^d rusfiec/ \k ^ 
9"«sed . ^/onced ^M^ 


L*^i 


Z2/ 



There is more to leaching reading Ihan 
meels Ihe eye. 



LiF[ m BE um\m 




kllDERGHRTEl 

PHIWY 

DEPUTMEIT 



The establishment of a Kindergarten De- 
partment at C.T.C. dates back to 1878 when the 
college bore the name of the Cook County Nor- 
mal School. The Department was expanded 
into Kindergarten-Primary work in 1933 when 
increased enrollment and extended curriculum 
in the elementary school necessitated the 
change. 




Page Ninety-eight 






The KgP group, replete with skills 
and methods for development of the 
very young through use of handcraft, 
arts, and rhythms, prepare the begin- 
ing pupil for his educational future. 
Their active hands illustrate painting 
and silhouette cutting; models of real 
and imaginary animals grace their 
rooms. Marches, music and games 
suitable for six-year-olds are practiced 
with enthusiasm by our truly "young 
at heart" teachers. 






T[i\CHIIG 



Satisfying spiritual and aesthetic needs. 




Meeting vocational responsibilities. 



The student teaching program is designed 
to induct students gradually into the many activ- 
ities and responsibilities of a class-room situation. 



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11 




9 ^ 


ir 



Page One HundTed 





Enjoying wholesome leisure 
Building human relationships 




Our oH-campus program reaches out into several 
school districts and is formulated in the belief that student 
teaching is the most significant experience in the preparation 
of a teacher. 



One Hundred On 




Using the tools ol communicalion. 




^4 



Practicing American citizenship. 



Developing economic competence. 





PHYSICAL mmm 



Sludenls musi meet qualilicalions lor Ihis sequence. 



Taking noles on observation. 
No, 1 cat 

No. 2 



Courses dealing particularly with 
skills and methods of physical edu- 
cation are necessary in the training 
of all P.E. teachers. 




IPUSTRIHL 
ARTS 





This Department provides students with 
experiences in working with wood, metal, plas- 
tics, ceramics, graphic arts and electricity. The 
purpose of such experiences is to provide guid- 
ance and background for the teaching of crafts 
in the elementary school. 

The Department also functions in the In- 
dustrial Education curriculum as well as com- 
bining with the Home Economics Department 
in executing the Home Mechanics sequence. 







\ SOCIAL 
GROUP 



"It is one of the most beautiful 
compensations of this hfe that no 
man can sincerely try to help an- 
otherother without helping him- 
self." 

— John Greenleaf Whitter 




iPROvi^G mm u\m 






mmmi leisuhe 



"I hope succeeding generations will be able 
to be idle. I hope that nine-tenths of their time will 
be leisure time; that they may enjoy their days, and 
the earth, and the beauty of this beautiful world; that 
they may rest by the sea and dream, that they may 
dance and sing, and eat and drink." 

— Richard Jefferies 



^ 



# 




Dean Cook crowns Ihe Homecoming Queen, Arlene Riebau Ross. 





Action leading lo varsity victory over alumni. 



Homecoming — renewing and enrich- 
ing friendships in a warm glow of excite- 
ment. A moment ... an hour . . . destined 
to become part of the many poignant mem- 
ories of one's college life. Homecoming — 
a night to remember. 




BUSkETBALL 

"Hats off to thee, 



our 



dear C.T.C.!" 



Coach George W. Boyle 



Our 1953-54 team, one of the best in the history 
of the school, piled up an impressive record of 12 
wins and six losses. Congratulations to Coach 
Boyle, the team, and all who helped make this such 
a successful season. 



Ringstrom, Helmer C 

McCarthy, Bob G 

Schultz, Jack F 

Reilly, Ben G 

Jones, Willie F 

Moscato, John G 

OTarrell, Ed G 



Donohue, Jerry F 

Hewitt, Mark C 

Moore, Leon F 

Lecos, Jim F 

Hennessy, Leo F 

Bowers, Jim G 

Leyden, Wayne F 




nm mm 



CTC— 67 


versus 


Illinois-Navy Pier— 76 


1 f\ ^."^"C^ 


CTC~55 


versus 


Great Lakes — 65 




CTC— 95 


versus 


Fournier — 58 




CTC— 70 


versus 


Great Lakes— 79 




CTC— 77 


versus 


Illinois Tech— 56 




CTC— 78 


versus 


Glenview — 63 


fiH^ 


CTC— 72 


versus 


Concordia — 62 


CTC— 83 


versus 


McKendree — 67 


CTC— 91 


versus 


Fournier — 70 




CTC— 80 


versus 


Glenview— 73 




CTC— 97 


versus 


Uni. of Chicago — 65 




CTC— 79 


versus 


DeKalb— 80 




CTC— 79 


versus 


Concordia— 70 




CTC— 69 


versus 


Lewis— 79 




CTC-87 


versus 


Uni. of Chicago — 53 




CTC-78 


versus 


Illinois-Navy Pier— 62 




CTC-91 


versus 


Lewis— 79 




CTC— 68 


versus 


Illinois Tech— 72 


Hail to the 
Green and White 




TEilS ]m 











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DICK HARTENSTEIN, JOE GOLL BOB JOSEPH 
GENE SMITH, DON ADAIR^ 



BUSEBML 



Formal porlrail oi Ihe lean 



ms. 



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THE PLAiiHS 



CLAY CLAXTON 
LEON HENNESSY 
PHIL VALAIKA 
JOHN WALSH 
FRANK KROL 
JIM KUZCL 
JERRY LOBINSKI 
JIM TORTORELLI 
JOHN ALEXANDER 



RICHARD BRAND 

PHIL iur:zewski 

OLLIE BONET 
LAURY MEYER 
JACK MOSCATO 
JIM WERSEN 
JACK SCHULTZ 
HOWARD TRUE 
GENE ABINGTON 



M.A.A. OFFICERS: 

MIKE PALANDECH, presidenl 
JOHN CURRAN, secretary 
JAMES TORTORELLI, treasure 
JIM LECOS, vics-president 





M.A.A. is open to all the men of the col- 
lege. It sponsors intermural tournaments in 
football, basketball, tennis, table tennis, soft- 
ball and swimming. 



mn ATHLETIC unocinTioi 



Members receiving lable tennis trophies 



Intermural basketball finals. 





SCORE: 

Students 18 
Faculty 16 



mm] FACULTY 



One Hundred Seventeen 



ATHLETIC 
USSOCIHTIO^ 



} __ 

i ' c* f^ ^ o 





Varsity tennis team. 



SHIRLEY NIEMAN, president, spring semester, 
NANCY TOTTEN, president, fall semester. 



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W.A.A. Christmas party. 



One Hundred Eighteen 



Modern dancing. 





The purpose of the W.A.A. is to provide opportunities 
for all women students to engage in sports activities. Badmin- 
ton, bowling, volleyball, tennis, ping-pong, modern dance, syn- 
chronized swimming, archery, and softball are among the offer- 
ings each year. The students may earn awards for participa- 
tion in a specified number of recreational pursuits. 

The W.A.A. does not limit its work to sports, but ex- 
tends annual invitations to women students to attend welcom- 
ing teas for incoming students, Christmas Open House, and 
the Spring Award Banquet. 

An elected board, with the aid of faculty sponsors, co- 
ordinates the projects and informs the student body of schedul- 
ed events. 




nmE 



The Triton swim group is sponsored by the W.A.A., al- 
though it is co-educational. Each spring it gives a special show 
as a climax to a year's work. The Tritons is one of the school's 
most successful and active organizations. 




GAY HOCKETT, Manager 



Group with sponsor, Ursula Maelhner. 

"Ladies to lire center and form a star.' 





CHEEHLEADERS 





Veinon Brockman, sponsor 



The "girls in green and 
white" are on indispens- 
able part of every basket- 
ball game. Their en- 
thusiastic work lends that 
necessary bit of spark to 
this most important school 
activity. Our hats off to 
them! 




One Hundred Twenly-one 



BIOLOGICAL SCIEICE CLUB 



This young organization, initiated as Mu Beta Phi, had its beginning 
in October of 1952. Since its inception, the club has boasted of being the 
most active organization on campus. The meetings are open to the entire 
student body and membership is not limited to science students. Its objec- 
tive is to promote interest in the field of biological science and provide extra- 
curricular activities for students. 



The club has sponsored a 
Camp Sagawau, a trip behind the 
scenes at Brookfield Zoo, and visits 
to Lincoln Park Conservatory and the 
Chicago Academy of Science. They 
have also had many distinguished 
guests as well as faculty members 
and students speak at their monthly 
meetings. 



Wild-Life Weekend" camping trip at 




Group enjoying "Wild-Life Weekend" 




Exe:u:ive Commitlee: Cecile Goodman, 
Baity Dorenbos, Dolores Krandel, Donald 
Bayer. 




Sponsor Dr Lamp and members ol 
live commillee. 



Dr. Colin, South Africa, and ice cream bars. 





More Wild-Lile" 



Dr. Fernilz, sponsor. 

Katherine Higgins, Alfred Wiesmeyer, 

Nelia Cunnea and Arlene Swierzak, club 

officers. 




SOCIAL SCIENCE CLUB 



This organization is open to all students in the college. The club 
attempts to bring to the attention of the students a variety of programs on 
current events and social problems which are important to well informed 
citizens. This past year it has had programs given by J. F. Glenvill of the 
F.B.I. , Dr. Berezin, George Polka and Sandra Gordon. 




Dr. Berezin: "The Relationship of Drinking 
and Dating Among College Women." 



D:. Sachs presenling the KM E Iralernily 




um m m\m 



The purpose of the National Honorary Mathematics Fraternity is 
to further interest in mathematics and to provide a medium for exchange 
of ideas and aspirations concerned with this particular field. Qualifica- 
tions for admission to the organization are completion of nine credit hours 
in mathematics and a good scholastic average. A candle-lighting initia- 
tion for new members is held every December and is followed by an an- 
nual election in January. Favorite club traditions are the Halloween 
party and yearly banquet. 

The Organization meets monthly at which time members plan activities 
such as the recent field trip to l.B.M. 



K.M.E. officers and sponsor Jerome Sachs 
Treasurer, Gerry Schuyler 
Vice-president, Diane Frelk 
Secretary, Carol Frazicr 
Preiiden!, Jerry Donohue 





Annual candlelighling ceremony. Special banquet in honor ol Miss Willy. Professor of Sense and No-Sense. 



USSOCIHTIOI FOR 

CHILDHOOD 

EDUmiO^ 



A.C.E 


. OFFICERS AND SPONSORS 


Joan Reicherl, Viola Lynch, Ellen 


Olson, June 


Glickauf Shackler, Diane Scolt 






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The A.C.E. provides students and teach- 
ers with opportunities to exchange ideas and 
experiences m education. Anyone interested 
in children may join; at the moment member- 
ship exceeds one hundred. Ours is a branch 
of International A.C.E. A highlight of the past 
year was the annual convention in St. Paul, 
Minnesota, which was attended by seven 
students of C.T.C. 




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-:- -\ X 




huwM. 



miSFYIIG 

spiniTynL m 

AESTHETIC iEDS 



"Human hopes and human creeds 
Have their roots in human needs." 

— E. A. Ware 



One Hundred Twenly-eiphl 





In April of 1954, Chicago Teachers College was honor- 
ed by the appearance of Robert Frost, one of America's great- 
est poets. At an all-school assembly, Mr. Frost read favorite 
selections from his works. 



"I shall be telling this with a sigh 
Somewhere ages and ages hence: 
Two roads diverged in a wood, and 1 
I took the one less traveled by. 
And that has made all the difierence.' 



-Robert Frost 



One Hundred Twenly-nine 




HELLO 
LOWES 

MARY BARBATO 
YOLANDA GULINO 
FAY KOZEMCZAK 
ARLENE SWIERZAK 



STRINC 
OO^RTLT 

SYLVAN WARD 
ERNEST LIDEN 
DITER KOBER 
LORAIN HITE 




CHOIR 



"All right, we'll do it nineteen times." 

Every one in Choir knows that this means going over a passage 
until just the right efiect is achieved. The director, Leonard J. Simutis, 
and the students work hard to present the best music at their programs. 

The Choir participates in several annual functions of the school, 
the Christmas Assembly, Commencement, and the Spring Music Concert. 
The latter is the climax of the year's work and currently included the 
short opera, "The Telephone". 



One Hundred Thirty 



CHOIR 
OFFICER!; 



Secrelary, 

MARGARET KRIKAU 
Vice-presidenl, 

DOLORES HUTLER 
President, 

IRVING ZEMAN 
Treasurer, 

CONNIE BOUDOS 



Iniormal group gathering. 




The choir singing for gradualii 







THEATRE 

mmm 



The aim of Theatre Workshop is to en- 
able students to learn the techniques and be- 
come acquainted with the various facets of the 
world of drama. Such experience enhances 
the potentialities of any future teacher. Besides 
producing plays, T.W. presents variety shows, 
and sponsors theater parties to commercial 
plays. 




Scenes from "The Curious Savage" 




The major productions of the 
past season were "The Curious 
Savage" and "Dr. Faustus". 
Musical background and danc- 
ing were new innovations evi- 
dent in the presentation of the 
latter. 

The group also participated 
in the pageant "The Past is Pro- 
logue" for the one-hundredth 
birthday of the Illinois Educa- 
tion Association. The produc- 
tion of "Holiday" in May, their 
first experiment at theater in 
the round, was presented in the 
Co-Ed Lounge. 




ROBERT WUKER, mUU 





"The PasI is Prolouge 



NCKS? 



More "Fauslus," Comedy. 





ART 
CLUB 




"Art comes to you proposing frankly to 
give nothing but the highest quality to your 
moments as they pass." 

—Walter Pater 





An informal galhering around the piano 

Phi Alpha ofiicers wilh sponsor, Catherine Taheny 
Sscrelary and Treasurer, Yolanda Gulino 
Vice-president, Fay Kozemczak 
President, Thomas McElroy. 



ALPHA 




Under the sponsorship of Miss Catherine Taheny of 
the music department, Phi Alpha seeks to further the apprecia- 
tion of various kinds of music and to present the talent of the 
school to the school. The organization is composed of some 
twenty-five or thirty members and is open to all who love 
music. Meetings are held monthly, at which time business is 
discussed and entertainment of an instrumental or vocal nature 
is presented. Important events of the year are the Phi Alpha 
concert held in April and the combination Choir and Phi 
Alpha banquet. 



One Hundred Thirty-Hve 



EMBLEM 
19S4 



"The great thing in this world is not so much where we 
are, but in what direction we are moving." 

— O. W. Holmes 



One Hundred Thirty-six 



AUTOGRAPHS 




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