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Full text of "Emblem"

EMBLEM FOR FIFTY THIiFE . 





CHICAGO TEACHERS COILECE esooMiiuvfflyt mco 



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The new philosophy at work. 
Project: Aviation. 



^ne f-^^adt ^.^ncl ^he f'^^reAent 



FORWARD 



The past and the present, the old and the new .... 
how irrevocably these are linked together. What a strong, firm 
foundation is made by the first. What creative changes and 
''f^itured-sighted" progress is made by the second! 

We future teachers know this truth. We appreci- 
ate it. We praise it. 

Founded in 1869, the Normal College dedicated 
itself to the perpetration, development and improvement of the 
then young American education through the training of intelli- 
gent, alert and sympathetic teachers. 

Today, 84 years later, CTC has a new name, neiv 
teachers and a new curriculum. But its purpose is the same, 
the training of teachers who will be of service to humanity. 

The successful accomplishment of this goal thv^ far 
is proof of a job well done. Congratulations CTC! May your 
futwe be as bright as your past and present. 

HELPING THE HANDICAPPED 



T — i? 




DEDICATION 



To Dr. Herold C. Hunt, General Superintendent of 
Schools, we dedicate this book. He has furnished dynamic lead- 
ership to public education in Chicago. . He has iwrked with great 
effectiveness to make good schools the concern of alh citizens, the 
heritage of all children. He has added dignity and .^tature to the 
profession of teaching. He has aided the Chicdgo Teachers 
College to grow in size, in function and in prestige. \ 

It is with a sense of personal loss that* we bid fare- 
well to so good a frieyid as Dr. Hunt. May his future career 
bring him every satisfaction. 



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CONTENTS 




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Administration 

Office Staff 

Faculty 

Students 

Departments 

Activities 

Athletics 




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RAYMOND M, COOK, Dean 
Chicago Teachers College 




DEAN COOK 



The head^^i teacher training institution has a dif- 
ficult job. Successful perinrmance denotes dedication to the 
principle of education and democracy combined wth a love for 
mankind. 

Dean Raymond M. Cook has distinguished himself 
in the performance of t/??s- duty. He has made the name of 
Chicago Teachers College a by-word among Illinois educators. 



ADMINISTRATION 






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WILLIAM L, KAISER, Assistant Dean. 



mis inena nas oeen inseparaDiy iinlced 

lo Ihis school for many years. Throughout this time 
it has been synonymous with friendliness, helpfulness 
and efficiency. 




EMMA FLEER MULLER, Registrar, 
is one of the most important cogs in this wheel of pro- 
gress, for iJ is through her office that young people 
come to this institution, adjust their difficulties and 
then leave to do their dedicated work. 



4^' 



JAMES I. SWEARINGEN, Director of Instruction, 
has one of the most harrov/ing jobs on the campus, yet 
remains calm, efficient and happy-go-lucky. To him, 
the school's thanks for a job well done. 



AN EXAMPLE TO FOLLOW 



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ADMINISTRATION 



OSCAR WALCHIRK, 
Assistant Registrar 



JOHN EMERSON, 
Director of Student Activities 

CLARA BERGHOEFER, 
Counselor 



LEANDER W. BINNA, 

Admissions Counselor and 
Education Instructor N.S.B. 





^a^^^ 



OFFICE 
STAFF 



GERALDINE BERRY, Assislani Dean's Office. 
MARY DEVINE, Registrar's Office, 



MARY DURKIN, Dean's Office. ROSEMARY KRAUTLEIN, Regis- 
trar's office. LENORE G. LARKIN, Office of ffie Director of Instruc- 
tion. ELIZABETH B. MURPHY, Registrar's Office. 



CATHERINE McCAHEY, General Office. ELLEN McGREAL, Gen- 
eral Office. LORETTA H. WALLACE, Registrar's Office. MERCE- 
DES C. WALSH, Bursar's Office. 









MURIEL BEUSCHLEIN, Sludenl Teaching. DONALD J. BLYTH, Induslrial Arts. FRED 

F. BRANOM, Chairman, Social Science. VERNON BRGCKMAN, Social Science. 

• 

MARGARET BROOKES, Home Economics. EDWIN BRYE, Chairman, Psychology. GEORGE 

E. BUTLER, Library Science. GERTRUDE BYRNE, Physical Education. 

• 

WILLIAM CARD, English. JOHN CARTER, English. JOSEPH CHADA, Social Science. 

LOUISE E. CHRISTENSEN, Physical Education. 




FACULTY 



EDWARD E. COLIN, Chairman, Science. PEARL DRUBECK, Education. RUTH DYRUD, 
An. HENRIETTA H. FERNITZ, Social Science. 
• 

MARION FISHER, Student Teaching. REALS FRENCH, Science. CURTIS J. GLENN, Edu- 
cation. RALPH C. GOODE, Science and Physician. 

• 

DAVID HELLER, Science. MABEL HEMINGTON, Kindergarten-Primary. ELIZABETH 

HENNESSEY, Music. COLEMAN HEWITT, Chairman, Industrial Arts. 



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LUCILLE HUBBARD, Mathematics. IVA 
HUME, Nurse. HERBERT LAMP, Science. 
PHILLIP LEWIS Chairman, Education. 



VIOLA LYNCH, Kindergarlen-Primary. UR- 
SULA MAETHNER, Physical Education. 



CHARLES R. MONROE, Social Science. PHIL- 
LIP McBAIN, Industrial Arts. 



RUTH M. OLIVER, Psychology. ELLEN M. 
OLSON, Kindergarten-Primary. 






FACULTY 



FACULTY 







3 



GEORGE PATE, Mathematics JOHN M. 



PFAU, Social Science. 



LOUISE ROBINSON, Physical Education. SEY- 
MOUR ROSOFSKY, Art. 



ROBERT ROTH, English. JAMES M. SAN- 
DERS, Science. 



JEROME SIEGEL, Science. LEONARD SI- 
MUTIS, Music. SHIRLEY STACK, Kinder- 
garten-Primary. GEORGE J. STEINER, Eng- 
lish. 



IRWIN SULOWAY, English. DAVID TEMKIN, Psy- 
chology. 

• 

JOSEPH J. URBANCEK, Chairman, Mathematics. 
FRITZ VEIT, Director of Libraries. 

• 

ROBERT WALKER, Speech, Dramatics. SYLVAN 
WARD, Music. 

• 

HORACE WILLISTON, English. JANET YOUNG, 
Mathematics. 



FACULTY 










GRADUATES 




CLASS OFFICERS 



JANUARY 



ANNE LUCILLE MATURI, 
President 

JAMES P. MALONEY, 
Vice-President 



ROBERTA HODNETT, 
Secretary 



FLORENCE STEIN, 
Treasurer 




THEODORE BESSER 
3400 W Cortland St. 

VINITA BUSCHLEIN 
6431 S Richmond St 

HAGOP BOROIAN 
11805 Lowe Ave 



HELEN BRENNAN 
7710 Euclid Ave. 

JEAN GATES 
1102 W, 59th St 



SHIRLEY COHEN 
3515 W. Medill Ave. 



DORIS COLLINS 
670 E. 38th St. 

JACK COOPER 

1957 S Springfield Ave. 

VIVIAN CORNELL 
9406 Michigan Ave. 



AUDREY DUDLEY 
9214 Wentworth Ave, 

MARK FRANK 
18 S. Central Ave. 

CHARLOTTE GLASS 
1442A N. Harlem Ave. 



DOLORES GREENSPUN 
4937 N. Troy St. 

ROBERTA HODNETT 
8249 Harper Ave. 

MARGARET KEEFE 
8552 S Peoria St. 



JANUARY SENIORS 



JANUARY SENIORS 



MARGARET KEEVERS 
5731 S, Hermitage Ave. 

MARION KRIK 
6730 Sangamon St. 

DOLORES KURENT 
6424 S. Richmond St. 



JOAN LILLIS 

4721 N. Deming Place 

JEAN MANN 

5254 Magnolia Ave. 

GEORGE MAREMA 
8604 Justine St. 



PATRICIA MARTIN 
5444 W. Adams St. 

ANNE LUCILLE MATURI 
4938 N. Rockwell St. 

MARY McDIVIT 
7236 Crandon Ave. 



RITA McGWIN 
9233 S. State St. 

AILEEN O'CONNELL 
1619 Highland Ave. 

DIANE OEHLBERG 
4614 N. LaVergne Ave. 



IRENE PATTERSON 
6061 W. Giddings St. 

FLORENCE STEIN 
4515 Lake Park Ave. 

CHARLES TAUCHMAN 
5126 S. Fairfield Ave. 



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JENNELLE TEMPLETON 
5219 N Spaulding Ave, 




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JONI ZUBER 

5419 S. Harper Ave, 


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BETTE BRIERTY 
4342 Wilcox Si, 


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JAMES P, MALONEY 
In Armed Forces 


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BETTY PETRONE 
6061 W, Giddings 


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HAROLD WINGFIELD 
748 Easl 45lh Si. 


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JANUARY SENIORS 



COMMENCEMENT 

Lelt: Dean Cook awaits his turn to 

speak. 
Right: Dr, Pfau at the speaker's 

stand. 
Bottom: The ceremony begins. 






The day of graduation is a momentous 
occassion, not only because it represents the 
completion of four years' work, but principal- 
ly because it marks the beginning of a career 
rich in personal satisfaction, interesting ex- 
periences and opportunity for service to man. 



COMMENCEMENT DAY 



Attendance at commencement exercises is a salistaclory ex- 
perience for all. The faculty is proud of a job well done, the graduates 
are looking forward to a happy and successful career and parents see 
their fondest dream come true. 





CLASS OFFICERS 

JUNE 



MARY CUNNEA, 
Vice President 



CAMILLE CARTER, 
Secretary 



SALLY GOLDBERG, 
Treasurer 



LOUISE CORTILETTI, 
President 




JOAN ABRAMS 
2010 Hopkins PI. 

JOHN ARKO 
318 W. llllh PI. 

JAMES BAILEY 
6450 S. Carpenter 



LAVINIA BAKER 
6403 Rhodes 

ANITA BALZWEIT 
8444 S. Elizabeth St. 



EVELYN BARNES 
4319 N. Wolcott Ave. 



EUGENE BEKTA 
3731 W. 57th Place 

CAROL BELL 
1060 W, Ainslie 



MARGARET KATHERINE BERTA 
7324 Lowe Ave. 



WILLIAM BORGSTROM 
1641 N. Meade 

JOAN BOZEMAN 
6740 Calumet 



ELIZABETH BRENZING 
122 E. SS Si. 



ROSE BRONIARCZYK 
6326 S. Talman Ave. 

JEROME BROWN 
7417 S. Rhodes Ave 



MARY THERESE BURKE 
10520 Calhoun Ave. 



JUNE SENIORS 



JUNE SENIORS 



DANIEL BYSTROWSKI 
2058 W^ 52nd Si. 

ELIZABETH CAGNEY 
1324 W. 72nd Pi. 

KARIN CARLSON 
1046 Barry 



MARJORIE CARLSON 
3835 N. Leavill St. 

CLAIRE CARMODY 
7525 N. Oakley Ave. 

CAJVILLE CARTER 
6232 S. Throop 



MAREA CHAVIS 
4934 S. Michigan Ave. 

GEORGIA CHEARS 
236 W. 60th PI. 

MARY CLEARY 
6831 S. Carpenter St. 



DOLORES CLYNE 
1141 W. 77!h St 

MAUREEN COGHLAN 
8204 S. Laflin 

DORIS COLEMAN 
5344 Maryland Ave. 



VERMA COLEMAN 
428 E. 40th St. 

VELMA COOPER 
6628 Parnell 

LOUISE CORTILETTI 
338 W. 29th PI. 





JOHN COSTELLO 
519 W. ^4lh PI, 

CONSUELO CRUMP 
5223 Calumel Ave. 

MARY CUNNEA 
3323 W. 62nd Si. 



CELINE CUNNINGHAM 
10761 S. Western 

MILLICENT DAHLSTROM 
5629 S. Marshlield Ave. 



CONRAD DePAUL 
9042 S. Justine Ave. 



FRANK DePAUL 
9042 S. Justine St. 

DIANE DEUTSCHMAN 
551 W. 87th St. 



MAURICE DICKMAN 
834 Sunnyside Ave. 



GERTRUDE DICKSON 
6409 S. Whipple St. 

SYRIL DONIGER 

2059 N. New England Ave. 

DELORES DOODY 
33 W. 78lh St. 



MARICLARE DOODY 
8233 Dante Ave. 

GERALDINE DORWICK 
3159 Diversey 

MARY DYRA 
3715 N. Paulina St. 



JUNE SENIORS 



NANCY DZIADKOWIEC 
5125 S. Hermitage Ave. 

ELINOR EKLUND 
10847 Maplewood 



JACQUELINE ELMORE 
3142 W. 15th Place 



RARBARA ENZENBACHER 
9748 S. Hamilton 

RITA EWERT 

5021 S. Elizabeth St. 



HERBERT FELDMAN 
1115 S. Spaulding 



LEE FIEFFER 
824 E. 88th St. 

ELEANOR FISCHER 
3857 N. St. Louis Ave. 



PATRICIA FISCELLA 
9020 Justine St. 



RICHARD FLANAGAN 
6911 Bennet Ave. 

DONNA FOX 
B633 S. Troy St. 



MARIAN FRANKLIN 
9117 Urban Ave. 



GENEVIEVE FRIEWER 
5510 N. Luna 

ANNE GADEIKIS 
10106 S. Perry Ave. 

PATRICIA GARY 
719 E. 90th St. 



JUNE SENIORS 





JUNE SENIORS 



SALLY GOLDBERG 
4759 S. Drexel 

ELIZABETH GONZALEZ 
2934 Wilcox St 

RUTH GOSSWEIN 
10615 Prospect Ave 



IRENE GREEN 
4942 N. Lawndale 

MATTIE GREEN 
4412 Prairie Ave. 



ALBERTA GRESH 
6217 S, Neenah 



RONALD HAMRGCK 
9835 Avenue L 

JAMES HANSON 
1425 Gregory St. 

CHARLES HAVERLY 
10412 S. Homan 



EVA HAWORTH 
10546 S. Racine Ave. 

PATRICIA HEAGNEY 
7641 S. Throop 

CLAIRE SMITH TICE 
6343 S. Koslner 



ANN HIGGINS 

7530 S. Vernon Ave. 

CAROLE HILLMAN 

12123 Richard Ave., Palos Hgts 

MABEL HINGER 
2632 N. Richmond 



SHIRLEY HOMER 
2916 S. Lowe Ave. 

JOYCE HOWLAND 
2666 E. 77th Si. 

JOSEPH HRON 
2455 S. Pulaski 



MYRTLE IVEY 
1444 S. Avers Ave 

GLORIA JACKSON 



REVA JAMES 
424 E. 49th St. 



JEANNE JOCHEIM 
7704 S. Throop St 

JOANNE JOCHEIM 
7704 S. Throop St. 

LUCY JOHNSON 
6218 S. California 



NANCY JONES 
8110 Clyde Ave. 

ELINGA JORGENSEN 
11118 Edbrooke Ave. 



IRENE JURKOVIC 
5213 S. Winchester 



LOUIS JUST 
6234 S. Whipple 

HELEN KALCHHRENNER 
1450 W. 72nd PI. 



CECELIA KEARNEY 
6744 S. Ada 



JUNE SENIORS 





DC) 




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JUNH SENIORS 


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MARION KESKE 
1637 N. Melvina Ave. 


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PAULINE KIRBY 
6917 Stony Island Ave. 


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ELIZABETH KLECKNER 

1913 S Linden Ave., Park Ridge 

• 


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MITCHELL KRAUSZOWSKI 
1759 W. I7th Si. 




JERRY KRUCHTEN 
3635 W 62nd PI. 

SHIRLEY KUBILIUS 
6641 S Komensky 


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• 




MAURA LACEY 
6835 S. Winchester 

VERLIE LEANER 
6704 S. Indiana 

LOIS RUSCO LEWIS 
6954 S. Paxlon 


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• 


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JAMES LILEK 
3438 W. 62nd PI. 

MARY LITTLE 
6606 S. Kostner Ave. 


l#r 


GENEVIVE LOBER 
11058 Avenue C 


#s 


• 

MARIE LONGHINI 
32 W. 115th St. 


iO 


CHARLENA LUTTRELL 
1123 W. 112th St. 


i-> 


MARY MADDEN 
9124 S. Justine 



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ALICE MAGNUSSON 
2735 N Artesian 

ROBERT MALINSKI 
915 W. 59lh St. 

KATHLEEN MALONE 
10302 S. Seeley 



DOROTHY MAREK 
3210 S. Kedvale Ave, 

ROSEMARY MARONEY 
2823 E 76lh St. 



DOLORES MASON 
2950 W. Walnut St. 



PAULINE MASTERSON 
8055 Luella 

LUCILLE MATCZAK 
8204 Marquette Ave. 

MILTON MAYER 
2425 S Lombard Ave. 



ELEANOR MICEK 
5336 S. Damen Ave. 

THERESE MILANOSKI 
2724 N. California Ave. 



MARILYN MILLER 
7222 S. Emerald 



ELAINE MOJZIS 
4565 N. Pulaski Rd. 

MARILYN MONROE 
6546 S. Keeler Ave. 



RICHARD MOORE 

3654 W. Irving Park Rd. 



JUNE SENIORS 





JUNE SENIORS 




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LORETTA MORYL 
2445 So. Homan 

BARBARA MUELLER 
4867 W. Homer 

SHARON MURRAY 
424 E. 82nd Si. 



PAULINE NADOVIC 
4756 S. Kedvale 



CHARLENE NASER 
7647 S. Maplewood Ave. 







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7 



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ANNIE NEIL 
4220 Evans Ave. 



DOROREW NOVAK 
6946 W. Barry 

LORETTA O'NEILL 
7551 S. Hermitage 



EDWARD ONGMAN 
6915 S. Vincennes 



MARY ORWIG 
9554 S. Damen Ave, 

JEAN OSWALD 
6345 S. Sacramento 



WARREN PIETSCH 
9843 S. Ingieside 



WALTER PILDITCH 
9537 S. Winston Ave. 

THOMAS PLAIN 
1553 W. 90th St. 



GRACIA PONTECORVO 
2405 S. Oakley Ave. 



JAMES PORTER 
1921 W. Ogden Ave. 

BARBARA PRICE 
4634 S. Michigan 



MARVIN RASKIN 
3616 W Douglas Blvd. 



BEVERLY RENEHAN 
148 W. 73rd St. 

BARBARA REYNOLDS 
4804 S. Wells 



DOLORES RICHER! 
10743 S. Drake 



LILLIAN ROGERS 
4556 S. Union Ave 

MURIEL ROSS 
4148 Mobile 



PATRICIA CLARE RYAN 
708 W. 55fh St. 



PATRICIA FRANCES RYAN 
3421 Beacle 

MORRIS SALARIO 
3525 W. Van Buren 

SOL SALARIO 
3525 W. Van Buren 



JOSEPH SAMPLES 
6603 S. Aberdeen 

ESTELLE SCHAEFER 
400 John St., McHenry, 



ELEANOR SCHNEIDER 
6726 So. Artesian 






JUNE SENIORS 





JUNE SENIORS 



MARY LOUISE SCOTT 
735 E^ G5th St. 



JOAN SERING 

2240 W. Garfield Blvd. 



LILLIAN SHAIN 
2852 N. Kedzie Ave. 



MARY SHANNON 
7818 S. Loomis St 



LOIS SHEA 

9101 S Loomis St. 



OLGA SIDORCHUK 
4224 Crystal St. 



LAURA SIEWERSKI 
7200 S. Prairie Ave. 

GRACE SINGER 
5126 Michigan Ave. 

DORIS SMITH 

6202 S. Racine Ave. 



HELEN STRINGHAM 
8342 S Wabash 

MARIAN SZULAKIEWICZ 
2439 W. 47th St. 



Mary Taylor 
7622 S. Wood 



HELEN THEISS 
5411 W Monroe 

CHARLOTTE TICE 
703 E. 50th PI. 



JOANNE TOOMEY 
8028 S Paulina 



JAMES TRACY 
7551 Yale 

RUTH TURNER 
4217 Ellis Ave. 



JANICE VALENTINE 
651 S. St. Louis Ave. 



VERA VAUGHNS 
7031 S Prairie Ave. 

BETTY VELEBIL 
2500 S. Millard Ave. 




JUNE SENIORS 



BEVERLY WARREN 
6116 S Kenwood 



MARLENE WEHRLE 
3239 N. Damen Ave, 



PHYLLIS WELLS 



HELEN WILLIAMS 
1300 S. Newberry 

JOYCE WILLIAMS 
5207 S. Princeton Ave. 

MARY WOODS 
7146 S. Winchester 

LORIS ZUBB 
2500 S. Sawyer 




THE PROM 



Time and custom trill never dull the thrill 
of attending a Senior Prom. This is the last biq 
dance before friends who have shared the greater 
part of every day scatter and are seldom seen again. 

It is a nostalgic occasion which holds a 
permanent place in the hearts of all students, past 
a)id present. 



The Prom Commillee at work. 
Louise Corlilelti asks, "What are 
Union Wages?" 





SENIOR B"s 



OFFICERS 



ARLENE O'DONNELL, 
President 



JOSEPHINE CANNATARO, 
Vice-President 



CATHERINE GALOTTA, 
Secretary 



EVA HAWORTH, 
Treasurer 



Mildred Alvino. Dorothy Baxter. Arlene Bayuk Louis H Bier Katherine Bogan 
Kovork Boqhosian. Stella Budz. Barbara Carlson. Natalie Coci. Jospehine Cannalaro 
Frances Curtin. Marilyn De Groot. Nancy Eisner. Jean Gade Zoe Ann Gadwood 
Catherine Galolta. Winifred Louis Gibson. Frances Guzion. Helen Hopkins. Marion Humes. 





Robert Korensky. Rose Leo Robert Nelson Arlene O'Donnell. Germaine Olsen 
Barbara Pulliam. Eslelle Rose. Dolores Stralhman. Floyd Wyrick. 



Cider and Donuts al 
the Point! 





SCHOOL 
LIFE 




OFFICERS 

RICHARD HIGGENS, 
President - Armed Forces 



PAT WATSON, 
Acting President 



JUNE GLICKAUF, 
Secretary 



SANDRA COGEN, 
Treasurer 



JUNIOR As 








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Donald Adair, Holly Adams, Doris Alfredson, Margaret Balla, Angela Batteasi. 
Grace Beavers, Jewel Beifuss, Joan Blackslone, Joan Bolger, Frances Bombino. 
Ronald Bordenaro, Joan Boscia, Connie Boudos, Robert Bradbury, Stella Brando. 
Barbara Brandt, Henry Brown, Marylou Buckley, Ronald Budil, Anthony Burke. 



43 



Rosemary Burke, Barbara Calhoun, Marie Cannizzo, Patricia Cavanaugh, Leland Cohen. 
Kalherine Collis, Ann Corlilel, Rose Ann Cortina, Shirley Daluga, Donna Lee Davis. 
Clarice Dawkins, Joan De Lacy, John Desmond, Marilyn Dickson, Mary Doherty. 
Lois Du Mais, Rila Eckstedl, Maida Edelstein, Shirley Ellis, Mary English. 



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Artisbia Ervin, Mary Fambro, Ed Farrell, Patricia Foley, Paul Fornatar. 
John Freeh, Virginia Frilsch, David Garcia, Maria Garcia, Nancy Glusack. 
Nicholas Golemis, Jilda Graham, Barbara Green, Barbara Griffin, Jessica Gromek. 
Dolores Harder, Joan Hash, Charles Hearnshaw, Leo Hennessey, Jeanne Herd. 




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Carole Hickey, Salley Mae Huberl, Wilma Huffman, Anne Hyland, Carol Jacobsen. 
Marlena Jarrells, Marilyn Johnson, Inez Jones, Lois Jones, Michael Jovovich. 
Joan Joyce, Rosemary Kamba, Elaine Katzman, Marlene Kendall, Marian Kerrigan. 
Joan Kingsland, Belly Knolh, Mary Korzeniewski, Leona Krause, William Krelz. 



Janel Kulezynski, Joan Kurowski, Carmen La Bianca, Margaret Leonard, Florence Lewis. 
Ellen Logan, Doris Loehr, Margaret Malmberg, Joan Manley, Merrie Jane March 
Joan Marquardt, Mary Massie, Rita Menotti, RoseMary Metros, Elaine Michenfelder, 
Marian Mitchell, John Moreschi, Harold Moody, Therese Morrison, Katie Motley. 




Delphine Musial, Yvonne McCabe, Barbara McCann, Patricia McFarland, Dolores McLenore. 
Mary McQuaid, Rena Naddeo, Edward Nicol, Joan O'Connell, Rita O'Donnell. 
Rita O'Leary, Dena Pantelis, Jacqueline Patterson, Joyce Penson, Almeda Peters. 
Marilyn Plank, Violet Radznik, Toby Raitzik, Virginia Reid, Margaret Riemer. 





Helmer Ringslrom, Marlene Rinker, Deloyce Roan, Nora Ross, Helene Russell. 
Dorothy Ryan, Maureen Ryan, Charlolle Samuels, Barbara Sandberg, Marie Santoro. 



Harold P. Sarnecki, Angelyn Scalzo, Elizabelh Scarpelli, Margaret Schmidt, Bernard 
Schwab. 



Donald Schwariz, Dianne Scott, Carol Seng, Margaret Ann Shannon, Lenora Sherman. 




Dorothy Small, Clarence E. Smith, Barbara Spears, Hazel Slahl, Margery Starnicky. 
Evelyn Staginski, Barbara Stolk, Alice Strusz, Joan Sullivan, Dorothy Tabor. 
Matthew Tarka, Arnold Teich, Anderson Thompson, Marilyn Tienstia, Marilynne Tindall. 
Marion Toomey, Philip Valaike, Lorraine Wainauskis, Laura Walker, Marianne Wall, 



50 



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mCNIC 
COMMITTEE 



Pictured are Ihe girls who have 
worked lo make the All-School Pic- 
nic a success. Top; Joan De Lacy, 
Lois Du Mais, Arlene Riebau. Bot- 
tom: Pat Watson, Martha Tragnilz. 



JUNE GLICKAUF 



Patricia Watson, Gwendolyn West, Lois Woelkers, Yvonne Yarmat, Clara 
Zanatta. 



Irving Zeman, Rudolph Zubb. 






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JUNIOR B ! 



OFFICERS 



BARTON GALLEGOS, 
President 



MARILYN DAVIDSON, 
Vice-President 



JOAN WALSH, 
Secretary 



DON BAYER, 
Treasurer 



Mary Barbalo, Donald Bayer, Yvonne Belin, Muriel Bell, Lois Butts 
Irene Carlson, Mary Ellen Cawley, John Coater, Sandy Cogen, Marilyn Davidson. 
Dorothy Dawson, Dorothy DePratl, Dianne Dusicka, Kenneth Ellis, Anita Lou Frank. 
Carol Frazier, Barton Gallegos, Cecile Goodman, Donna Guerrero, Yolanda Gulino. 












1 •- 



v^^ 








Anna Marie Harris, Carol Hudson, Bernice Jackson, Faye Kozemczak, Joan Kramer. 

Elaine Kramp, Lucille Lipinski, Betty Masa, Shirley McDonald, Sylvia McGee 

Gus Pantazes, Catherine Patterson, Jean Pearson, Barbara Pigford, Maxine Reames. 



Janice Samples, Jerry Schuyler, Sylvia Smith, Arlene Swierczek, Nancy Anne Totfen. 




THIS IS A TOUGH 
ASSIGNMENT 




NOW FOR SOME FUN 



Martha Tragnitz, Ruth Walter, Robert Ward, Marilyn Berg. 

Dorothy Carter, Louise Marie Creach, Anthony Filpovich, Sandra Strain. 






SOPHOMORE A' 




OFFICERS 


^ 


ROY SCHEID, 
President 


^ . 


M. JOAN SHAFFER, 
Vice-President 


ir 


• 

MARY HIGGINS, 
Secretary (not pictured) 

9 


%j 


EDNA EKSTROM, 
Treasurer 


/Ta 







Farron Anderson, Joan Buchanan, Dorothy Carruthers, Arlene Carter, Gloria De Forte. 
Ann Dyra, Edna Ekstrom, Dolores Flynn, Lillian Follan, Janice Foster. 
Sara Friedman, Judith Gitlerman, Gladys Heintz, Mary Higgins, Marie Huebner. 
Peggy Hutchinson, Marion Jaimeyiield, Leslie Johnson, Virginia Josey, Joyce Kawal. 



57 



Carol LundquisI, Ruth Markusic, Dore Morgan, Betty Morris, Jeannelle Mucha. 

Arlene Murphy, Ellen Murtaugh, Jayne McCarthy, Elizabeth McKenna, Geraldine McLindon 

Beatrice Nebel, Chalice Nugent, Narcissa Peteile, Janet Pilgrim, Verda Pradd 

Velma Randolph, Arlene Riebau, Colette Sara, Roy Scheid, Marian Schick. 




to 



\ 




Nancy Schwab, Marion Scurlock, Dorothy Sedivec, Marian Shatter, La Verne Sims. 
Marlene Smith, Monica Sloza, Dorothy Tassone, Dorothy Tiroy, Harrison Tyler. 
Judy Tyskling, Margaret Viktory, Geraldine Walsh, Francis J. Warren, Lois Whitmal. 
Grace Williams, Phyllis Wilson, Sue Wright, Gerry Burke, Charles Carroll. 



59 




We aie always glad to get back to school 



SOPHOMORE As 



Whal man in the closet? 



Don't look at me that way' 



Rudolph Ganz at the piano. 






SOPHOMORE B's 



OFFICERS 



SHIRLEY SERIG, 
President 



ROSE MUSACCHIO, 
Vice-President 



JOAN REICHERT, 
Secretary 



SHIRLEY NIEMAN, 
Treasurer 



Barbara Allen, Eleanore Augustyn, Leslie Baker, Sylvia Bartecki, Beverly Burz. 
Irma Jean Bell, Martha Brummit, Marion Burnell, Sylvia Byrd, Gwendolyn Canada. 
Caroline Cicen, Ann Conizlio, Mary Jean Crisler, John Curran, Jane Czerwinski. 
Mary Jo Daly, Marlene Dednick, Annabel Dixon, Patricia Dorsey, Inez Douglas. 



%^ -^ mm 






^ 




s::^ 

^ 





William Douglass, Shirley Eisner, Marie Louis Eve, Mary Fay, Veronica Pickling. 
Diane Frelk, Marion French, Rilza Delores Gaddis, Catherine Gibbons, Patricia Gray. 
Miriam Gums, Andrea Hollin, Kathryn Anita Harris, Nina Harris, Joan Harrison. 
Jeanne Harvey, Barbara Husband, Carol Klay, Eleanor Kober, Martha Ledfoed. 



64 



Celesta Manning, Rulh Michaels, Florence Miller, Rose Musacchio, Alfretla Norlon 
Jean Overstreet, Roxie Parker, Rosemary Pcdmolik, Shirley Nieman, Joan Reichert. 
Claire Sedlack, Shirley Serig, Lawrence Smith, Mary Stuart, Dorothy Warwick, 
Vera Jeanne Watkins, Robert Yanizas. 




FRESHMEN A « 




OFFICERS 



BOB SPALLINA, 
President 



SHIRLEY LEEBELT, 
Vice-President 



SHIRLEY WATERS, 
Secretary 



GERTRUDE PENDERGAST, 
Treasurer 



Alice Alexander, Beatrice Algee, Patrick Allen, Barbara Allman, Janet Bacon, Norma Bal 
Ion, Rosemary Baluk, Belty Barr. 



Anthony Bartolatta, Dorothy Baum, George Bayer, Jean Bell, Carole Bennema, Marion 
Bennett, Sheldon Berman, Elsie Billups, 








^'l^rf 





s h'/// 



Phyllis Bishop, Alicia Blaney, Marion Bolin, Lois Bowen, Nancy Bowman, Carolyn Brooks, 

Conchita Brown, Edward Brown. 



Marjorie Browning, Evelyn Burke, Jean Burke, Floreda Burnley, Le Voneia Canada, Rich- 
ard Carroll, Joan Casey, Isabelle Chelsea. 



Jewel Chilton, Kalhleen Claussen, Leonard Cohn, Cecelia Cole, Julie Creadon, Jean- 
ette Czyz, Madonna Daszkiewicz, Deloris Davis. 



Bernadette Diggins, Denise Dopke, Joan Doss, Mary Pat Dowling, Connie Dziedzic, Barbara 

Ferrandis, Eileen Flis, Mary Foerrer. 



&M-^mm 




9f.*?f£ft 








Ruth Foley, Humbert Fonfana, Ann Foster, Patricia Fox, Ann Franz, Angelo Gatto, Louis 
Glanton, Barbara Gornick. 



Patricia Grozan, Patricia Hackett, Patricia Hart, Lucille Heinrick, Elizabeth Hertman, Mau- 
reen Hiens, Gay Hockett, Mary Alice Holland. 



Marie Holl, Lillian Hubert, Kennelh Imlah, Elizabeth Jackson, Martha Jackson, Richard 
Jaquith, Mildred Johnson, Alice W. Jones. 



Lorrella Jones, William Keenan, Anne Keeney, Dorothy Jean Kelly, Thomas King, Joan 
Klenczewski, George Kopca, Elaine Koranza 







J4JI 



l>(^>'?mii^^ 







V AV 



[ 

% 



Claudia Krotf, Marilyn Kotl, Patricia Koveski, Agatha Kozlowski, Margaret Krikan, Lea- 
nore Krobth, Joan Langridge, Shirley Leebelt. 



Joan Lellos, Marilyn Leonard, Alberta Lesley, Betty Lesneski, Barbara Lewis, Fannie 

Lewis, Janice Lindeman, Lloyd Linklater. 




Mary Lowney, Laverne Lundgren, Robert Lyman, Norine Lynch, Marjorie Maher, Geraldine 
Malloy, Evelyn Mangerson, Patricia Merriweather. 



Walter Nezabilowski, Frank Michalek, Shirley Mikulecky, Joan Miller, Corine Mitchell, 
Sophie Mues, Joan Mulheria, Christine Muse. 








■P5&a> 



Diana Myers, Sarah McAfee, Carole McCabe, Jance McClelland, Marilyn McCromick, Mary 
Naughton, Alice Nolan, Kathleen O'Boyle. 



Barbara Oswald, Eldred Pearson, Gertrude Pendergast, Thelmanee Pentecoste, Mike Polani 
deck, Audry Pryor, Barbara Puchalski, Mary Lou Quinn. 



Lillian Radway, Jacqueline Robinson, Lorraine Rodak, Carole Roggenkamp, Katharine 
Rosecky, Laureen Rupp, Erline Sanford, Jane Sailas 



Marion Schefcsik, Joan Scholick, Annette Schreader, Leona Schreader, Rernadette Shannon, 
Maxine Simon, Angela Sims, Patricia Sims 



C'f© 




Shirley Singer, Bernadine Siwek, Kay Slater, Betty Smith, Dolores Smith, James Smith, 

Joan Snedeker, John Sojat. 



Robert Spallina, Lula Spiney, Rosemary Spatser, Don Staples, Laurine Stastny, Rubin Stein- 
berg, Lord Stuart, Leonettza Suggs. 



Wardeen Thomas, Beriha Thompkin, Jacqueline Tillman, Harry Tobinsky, Lydia Tocwisn, 
Lucille Toomey, Jim Tortorelli, Joanne Tracy. 



Mary Ann Tunek, Fanny Turner, Lillian Twine, Xenia Tysiak, Marlene Tysl, Alice Urba- 

niak, Lois Vaughn, Eleanor Wagner. 



^ f liE^£f ^ 







h \ 




MMPr 











Evelyn Waller, Cecelia Walsh, Barbara Ward, Enid Waters, Shirley Waters, Sue Weather- 
ford, Kenneth Webster, Marie Weher, 



Jean Marie Williams, Rebie Jo Williams, Fred Wolpe, Jr., Michael Was, Jean Yarber, Joan 
Yarber, Peter Zansitis, Jr., Kenneth Evans. 



72 



Hargneli Clyte 
Florence Hancock 
Rose Lidslrom 
Raymond Neslmann 




tM\ :* 



WITCHES FROLIC . . 





WORK 

and 
PLAY 



1 "^^ hI 


'^' ^ &^ 




^^•' •"> 


<^ m 



Two Kid Lit Books a Week ! 



A Soldier Comes Home - "See 
How They Run" 



FRESHMEN B s 



OFFICERS 



RALPH BONACORSI, 
President 



ALEN ZAK, 
Vice-Presidenl 



JOYCE BEALL, 
Secretary 



JOYCE JONES, 
Treasurer. 




Delores Andrews, Adolph Antonacci, Fayette Arnold, George Austin, Jean Autenrielh, Bar- 
bara Bailey, Bernice Baker, Joseph Banchak. 












Gladys Batchelor, Joyce Beall, Lucille Beckstrom, Blanche Bennett, Grace Berberian, Marie 

Birch, Dolores Blackmon, Nancy Blaka 



iPf ii£<v'^?5 



'ir 






%:\ 




Ralph Bonaccorsi, Elaine Borski, Harold Brailoo, Carol Sue Brake, Joyce Bregenzer, Dorothy 
Brown, William Browning, Barbara Buckley. 



Maxine Buechler, Janice Bullard, Wetona Butler, Sharon Burton, Joanne Carroll, Carroll 
Carter, Sylvia Check, Shirley Clark. 



Joyce Coleman, Maurice Collins, Carole Combs, Sylvia Cross, Nancy Cunningham, Carole 
Davis, Arevelyn Darden, Ruth Denlinger. 



Patricia Dillon, Judy Dubbeldeman, Carolyn Duffin, Joan Eklert, Dolores Ericson, Leona 
Fenlon, Muriel Pint, Carolyn Fitzgerald. 








Jessie Franklin, Gloria Garcia, Penny Gialamas, Martha Gilliam, Floyd Glover, Marion 

Guido, Marylyn Gutman, Laverne Hanson. 



Joseph Harris, Evelyn Hely, Mark Hewitt, Norma Jean Holly, Melba Ingram, Elizabeth Mae 

Johnson, Joyce Jones, Edward Kareiva. 



Barbara Keeler, Florine Kelley, Mildred Keyes, Donald Kimball, Beatrice Klepper, Marilyn 

Klonda, Renee KoUitz, Jerry Kownacki. 



June Lee, Florence Lester, Donald V Liebner, Elsie Lindquist, Kenneth Liveris, Aaron 

Love, Marcella Malone, Catherine Marton. 








Wanda Lupe Mason, Joan Meyer, Ernest A. Miller, Marguerite Miller, Harry Moderon, 
Carol Mueller, Vernice McCampbell, Melba McGruder. 



James McNeilly, John Ray Nata, Carmela Natella, Hortense Nettles, Evelyn Newell, Dianne 
Nichols, Janet Novitt, Joyce O'Connell. 



Mary O'Connell, Carol Oshinski, Bernice Parks, Richard A. Paschke, Malina Piele, Alvin 
Plait, Albert Popowils, Shirley Pryor. 



Donald Rae, Mildred Rushing, Frank R. Schuk, Charlene Schwartz, John F Sharahan, 
George Smith, Marian Smith, Mildren Spencer. 



||^4 '«►'»• M'^^ 




rJ 'v 






Caroline Springer, Barbara Stoats, Jaclin A. Staller, Delores St. Amant, Shirley Stanford, 
Barbara Stendahl, Robert Sterning, Virginia Sventek. 



Shirley Talbert, Elaine Taylor, Connie Thome, Judy Thomsen, Mildred Tiggens, Bennyo 

Tillman, Roger Tranchino, George Turk. 



June Vajae, Sacramento Valadez, Clarice Valchar, Joyce Wallace, Harry Wilkins, Lorraine 
Will, Lorraine Willhofl, Carol Wolaver. 






■^' i^^ ' I 



Hildred Young, Allen Zak, Nick Zeevas. 

r'-y i It 



We have learned to use it! 




NORTH SIDE 
BRANCH 









Anna Kummer, Science. Robert Rutherford, Englisli. 
Merle Silverzweiz, Clerk. Irwin Widen, Education. 



Elsworth Paris, Social Science. 

Raoul R. Hass, Director, North Side Branch. 



The Faculty has a Meeting. 




^^^^»H , 


m 




J. 


H^ K 






In a formal Pose — our North Side Friends 



Al an informal affair — music 
relaxaiion. 





OFFICERS 

N. S. B. 

CHESTER WIKTORSKI, 
President 



JAMES FOGARTY, 
Vice-Presidenl 



HARRIET KARLSEN, 
Secretary 



JERRY KOWNACKI, 
Treasurer 



Susie D. Barbato, Barbara Lucille Benford, Marjorie Benglson, Carole Ann Bergstrom, Mary 

Broderick, Mary Buiikus. 

• 

Roberta Czerniejewski, Shirley Dayton, Suzanne Dayton, Judith Deke, Beverly DiChristo- 

iano, Nancy Ann Fiedler. 



^MPWl^ 













^' 




Rosemary Flashing 
James Fogarty 

Eunice Goldberg 

Diane Goodman 



Louise Gross 

Nancy Grundei 

Philomena Guerra 

Joan Hahn 



Mary Handrigan 
Lorene Hansen 

Roberta Heydt 

Nancy Holm 



N. S. B. 



Patricia Janov/ick 
Lois Jossi 

Annette Jummati 
Geraldine Kalasa 



Harriett Karlsen 
Jean Kawa 

Beverly Keller 
Virginia Lakowski 



Ruby Lamer 

Georgia Lewis 
Shiiley Ann Lynge 

Arlene Macauley 



Eugenia Mattel 

Claudie Helene Mumme 
Joy Noble 

Ariene O'Brien 



Irene Pavlik 

Jacqueline Peters 
George Richter 
Florence Rogowski 



Geraldine Scarleski 
Suzanne Shalley 

Jean Snow 
Phyllis Sues 

N. S. B. 

Jayne Swiatek 

Josie Anne Szypulski 
Joanne Tafel 

Jacqueline Trybus 



Cele Urbanski 

Patricia Walsh 

Joan Ann Walter 

Patricia West 



Chester Wiktorski 

Virginia Zurad 









(^' ^ ^ 




C^ 










Mr. Paris points out 

medieval trade 

routes 



Mr. Emerson teaches 
the useful art of 
making posters 



Miss Kummer super- 
vises science ex- 
perience 




NORTH SIDE 
BRANCH 



NORTH SIDE BRANCH 



The branch of CTC housed in the Schurz High School exemplifies change and progress. This 
year it is a vital part of a living present, next year it will be part of the dead past. 

However, it will always have a secure place in the memories of all those who attended class- 
es there. It was here that many began their college life, new friendships and a new career. 



NSB crowns a Queen. 

How did I "volunteer" to be the victim? 

Preparing "The Twig" NSB's newspaper. 

Hail, Mighty One! Taking part in a dramatic scene. 



m 


M 


h 



1 





mHi 




An assignment in English - - delect- 
ing propaganda in magazines. 




The small, Iriendly atmosphere of all 
Ihe classes, social functions at the north side 
branch is one of its outstanding characleris- 



A student proves to the class she 
understands music fundamentals. 



Make-up lime for Christmas Program — "One Strange Night." 

A magic carpet lor the Swim Shov/. 

Is this what you would call "Walking on air?" 

Rudolph Ganz speaks to music department after an assembly. 

Wailing for the show. 





DEPARTMENTS 




r 



k 




^M 



Mr. Ward supervises an "inslrumental" class. 



MUSIC 



Music delinilely has its place in our schools; 
Ihe music department is working hard to re-enforce 
this idea. 

Through its methods courses, the department 
prepares students for actual classroom situations. A 
new course, Teaching Instrumental Music, aids stu- 
dents in learning to play the instrument of their choice. 



.« 




Instructors pose for the camera: Mr. Simutus, 
Mr. Dvorak, Mr. Ward, and Mrs. Hennessey. 



MATHEMATICS 



The Mathematics Department has a Math Club 
and an Honor Society which is chartered by the Na- 
tional Honor Society. 

They give an annual dinner and picnic lor mem- 
bers ot the faculty and of the club. 

The Mathematics department has great influ- 
ence on the curriculum of the elementary public 
schools of Chicago and takes the leadership in the Chic- 
ago Elementary Teachers Math Club. 



Learning the why and how of Arithmetic in the 
elementary school. 





ENGLISH 



MdcMillan conducts class 



The English Deparlmenl has two favorite tra- 
ditions. They rotate elective courses among the 
teachers and all the instructors eat their lunch in the 
department ofiice. 

In recent years, the department has welcomed 
many new teachers to the staff. As always, Ihey 
welcome all students into their office. 




SPEECH 



The Speech Department upholds the 
college's tradition of supplying the best for its 
students. It is here that they get the "extra" 
help which enables them to be better and 
more efficient teachers. 



Mr. Walker gives therapy. 



KINDERGARTEN PRIMARY 




The most important tradition of the Kindergarten-Primary 
Department is the student membership in ACE; students have attended 
state and national meetings tor twelve years 

Another tradition which is a favorite, is a parly given by the 
Senior Bs for the graduating seniors. 



Our purpose is to understand the primary school child 




Dr. Veil explains "hook-buy- 




LIBRARY 
SCIENCE 



One ol the youngest, hut most rapidly growing departments is that of 
Lihrary Science. Founded in 1946, this department has graduated, to 
date, three June classes of students for elementary school libraries. 

A little over a year ago, children's books were housed in the east 
end of the reserve book room of the library. A recent and invaluable in- 
novation has been the creation of the Materials Center in rooms 308-310. 



The Materials Center in use. 



I mmuii Mm 



EDUCATION 



Wilh progressive spirit, this department 
has been actively engaged in making known 
new techniques and in providing orientation 
in current devices that reinforce instruction 
for beginning teachers. To this end an in- 
tegrated Audio-visual Demonstration Center 
has been established. Utilization is stressed 
in the classroom, while check-out in opera- 
tional proficiency is done in the Library. 
A validated card is presented to each pre- 
practice student demonstrating suitable pro- 
hciency in manipulating selected projectors, 
recorders, and similar devices. 

In addition to this new project, the edu- 
cation department continues its invaluable 
and expert counseling of student teachers. 



Connie Crump and Louise Cortiletti work with 
the new equipment. 



Chicago Teachers College 
Audio -Visual Department 



Jayne McCarthy tries to fulfill requirements 
for the card illustrated above. 





Learning how the world revolves 
around the sun. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 



Discussing world affairs with the help of a globe 



The only tradition of the Social Science Department 
is presenting the Pan-American Day assembly which is 
given in collaboration with the choir and Physical Education 
Department. 

Friendliness and helping others is the department's 
main concern. It is a tradition for students to come into the 
office aot only for business but for friendly chats with their 
instructors. 





PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 



Learning to play what the child plays. 



In the past, PE students received PE training, 
but little else. Now the PE minor is qualified to teach 
both gym and regular classroom subjects. 

Relatively recent additions to the PE curriculum 
has been health education and first aid. 

Through the years there have been no significant 
changes in the PE training program because they have 
always strived to teach students activities which 
would develop well-rounded individuals and which 
are geared to the needs, interests and capacity of 
children. 

Because this department uses aptitude tests as a 
basis for selection of students, instead of tests for the 
elimination of same, PE minors have the reputation of 
being characteristically good-looking, healthy, and in- 
telligent. 



Knowing what to do in an emer- 
gency is an important part of a 
teacher's training. 





The PE's favorite course — "Cat Anatomy". 



SCIENCE 



Though all the natural sciences are included in the Science curriculum, the great- 
est emphasis is on the biological sciences. A main principle and practice is allowing 
students a chance to view living and preserved specimen at first hand through means of 
laboratory periods. 



Measuring the advancement of science through prac- 
tical invention. 





[NGINE 
EfFICIENCI 




ACTIVITIES 






101 



STUDENT 
COUNCIL 




MARIANNE WALL, 
President 




On our way io camp! 



CTC's student government has al- 
ways been known for getting im- 
portant issues settled and voicing 
student opinions accurately. 
This year, they are instrumental in 
the initiation of Camp Workshop and 
a new Freshman Orientation Pro- 
gram. 





Welcome, freshmen! 




Time out for fun. 
Teamwork is important. 



Ralph Harshorn of tiie 
NCCJ spealcs on the role of 
the student leader. 

We eat while we talk. 



We don't always agree. 
But sometimes we do! 



CAMP WORKSHOP 



A new, vigorous and highly effective organization is Camp Work- 
shop. Originating with the personnel department, the idea of an organ- 
ization of school leaders v/as eagerly taken up by the student body and 
efiiciently put into effect. 

Last September, the representatives of all the extra-curricular 
activities at CTC united at Druce Lake to discuss leadership, school spirit 
and any other subjects oi interest to college students. 



103 



Who Said We Don't •; "•;; " JurkoYic. Brando 
l\Vsch.o,Spirm =;»i' H.ad TEMPO '^^ 






„M.,Oi'K°" '"""'"' 



On the Soap Box iu^*! 

^ Bonaccorsi "^^ 

Head Freshmen B's 
ot KgP GOBS Sink 

5 AD^ rJrPUn. Teachers 

Chicago Loses Valuable ^^ (j^j^j q^ 
Head of Schools With Play 




^ 




John Carter, Sponsor 



TEMPO 



The people on the Tempo staff have 
printers ink instead of blood in their veins. 
In spite of the tears, heartaches connected 
with getting an issue to press, there is 
nothing like the satisfaction of hearing the 
student body comment, "swell issue." 




Editors and staff work cooperatively 
^ to "make up" the issue. 




The Editorial Board and Sponsor confer on the imporl- 
ant business of choosing the outstanding seniors. 



Time out for a good joke! 




IRENE JURKOVIC, 
Edilor-in-Chiel 




STELLA HRANDO, 
Managing Editor 




105 







JOHN CARTER, 
Sponsor 



EMBLEM 



The StaH strikes an old-iashioned 
pose inspired bv Emblem 1919. 




HOLLY ADAMS, 
Associate Editor 



ESTELLE ROSE, 
Associate Editor 




Through the years, each Emblem staff has kept in 
mind the important fact that the present becomes a 
living past in the pages of a yearbook. 

Emblem is concrete evidence of the spirit of pro- 
gress that guides every activity in the school. 



106 




STELLA BRANDO, 
Literary Editor 




Is this what they call being "Crazy, Man?" 




JIM BAILEY, 
Photography Editor 



JUNE GLICKAUF, 
Business Manager 



PAUL FORNATAR, 
Sports Editor 



Conferring on ?.n important matter — camera or no! 






Students who spoke at Chicago high schools in l\ 
Annual Recruitment Drive gathir in the foyer for 
conference. 



FUTURE 
TEACHERS 
of AMERICA 



The Frances W. Parker chapter of FTA 
is another of professional organizations which 
CTC is proud of. Its purpose has been, and 
still is, to acquaint future teachers with the 
history, ethics, and program of the organized 
leaching profession and through this organi- 
zation to be an integral part of the local, slate 
and national education associations. 

A traditional and large-scale activity of 
FTA is the Annual Recruitment Drive. CTC 
students visit the high schools in the Chic- 
ago area and speak to interested Seniors 
about the teaching profession in general and 
CTC training in particular. 

A major advantage in FTA membership 
is the automatic subscription to the Illinois 
Journal and the NEA Journal, professional 
magazines of invaluable worth to new teach- 
ers. 




FTA members receive Ihs 
NEA and Illinois Educatic 
Journals at the reguli 
meeting. Mr. Swearingei 
sponsor, look on. 




sponsor, 
members 



Miss Lynch, 

officers and members of 

ACE are happy with their 

jobs. 



ASSOCIATION FOR CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 



The CTC chapter of the Association for 
Childhood Education International is one of 
the most important professional organizations 
available to our students. 

At one time the membersip in ACE was 
traditionally composed of KGP minors. Re- 
cently, however, the membership has extend- 
ed to include upper elementary students. 

ACE has many well-ioved traditions. 
Their Christmas program, familiarly known 
as the "candlelighting ceremony" is one ex- 
ample. ACE has annually taken an active 
pari in both state and national ACEI conven- 
tions. 

Under the able sponsorship of Miss Willy 
and the entire KP department, ACE is known 
to present worthwhile programs v/ith out- 
standing speakers, whose topics are particul- 
arly pertinent for future teachers. 



The sponsor and officers 
look over plans for the 
next meeting of the Club. 




KAPPA MU 
EPSILON 





Members stop for refreshment at a Ctiristmas party. 



KME, a national honorary math fralernily, has many fav- 
orite traditions, one of the best of which is the Candlslighting 
initiation held every December. 

Every April sees the members at their annual banquet, 
talking ever the year's events and planning the next year's ac- 
tivities. 



The Art Club is not old enough to have established any decided customs, but the 
enthusiasm and good-will with which the organization is run prophesizes for them a perm- 
anent place in CTC activities. 



ART CLUB 




Members extend a hearty welcome 
to incomina freshmen. 




SOCIAL 

SCIENCE 

CLUB 



It is a trariilion for the Social 
Science Club to invite competent and 
well-informed speakers to lecture on 
subjects of interest to every think- 
ing person. 

It is also a custom to have =i 
Christmas Party af which all formal- 
ities are dropped and tun is the 
main interest. 



Christmas brings cocoa and cookies. 



Dr. Branom helps locate a point of interest. 





THEATRE 




^p/ 



ROBERT WALKLU, 
Director 



■/ 




A bus ride to an army camp 
— TW on lour! 




A Tipsy Snooper in "See 
How They Run." 



Nothing is so exciting as the tense moment beiore 
the curtain rises on a TW production. 

From the drama of "Escape" to the light momenls 
of "See How They Run" we know and appreciate Ihe 
fine work of this hard-working group. 




WORKSHOP 



A Foolish rasid, a disrobed preacher and a "happy" 
wife 

Thespians "made up" for the performance. 

Directors Wall<er, Buchley and Chelsea talk over pro- 
blems. 




The Stage Crew Sets the Stage for the Actors. 




THE CHOIR 



The Choir has always been an indispensable and popular part 
of life al CTC. Under Ihe direction of Leonard J. Simutis, it is sure !o 
take part in every important program presented al Ihe college. It has 
built, through the years, a reputation for presenting only the best music. 

In addition, it has recently made significant innovations in the 
kind and number of programs it presents. Besides the annual Christ- 
mas Assembly and Spring Concert, this year saw Ih? presentation of two 
student-sung operas, "The Medium" and "The Telephone". 



The choir performs at the commencement exercises. ■• »> ^ 



Y M ..r-' f ,r.. m ^ 





i 



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All eyes locus on Ihe diieclor. All voices 
blend in harmonious song. 



A favorite tradition — singing carols before 
the Christmas Tree. 



June Officers: Larry Smith, Jean Oswald, Bob 
Smith, Shirley Krejci. 




Members rehearse for a coming con- 
cert. 




PHI ALPHA 



CTC's music club is open to anyone who 
loves music. Its purpose is to bring more 
music and musical talent to the attention of 
the entire school. 

Every year Phi Alpha presents a Spring 
Concert which features the best in music and 
performers. This year's concert was a 
marked success. 




Officers and Sponsor, Mrs. Hennes- 
sey, pose for the Emblem camera 
man. 





JIM LECOS 



SOL SALARIO 




a ' 






^ 



COACH GEORGE W. BOYLE 



THE COLONELS 



/I; 




HELMER RINGSTROM 



I «^ 



MIKE PALANDECH 








HARRY TOBINSKI 



V 



JIM TRACY 



I I LEO HENNESSY 




BASKETBALL 



1^ OTARREL 



Since 1937, Mr. George V/ Royle, 
assuming his duties as coach of al' 
athletics, has watched many line 
teams in the past. Among the very 
finest was the 1950-51 team. 

This year's team, represented by 
only two regulars, compiled an un- 
impressive record of 8-9. This can 
be attested to the lack of seasoning 

Next season with the help of 
regulars, such talents as Rob Ly- 
man, Mike Palandech, Harry To- 
binski and others, will surely gain 
the experience needed for a winning 
team. 




PAUL FORNATAR KEN KLLIS 

Managers 



BASKETBALL 



Anolher Tracy leap. 



"Hook it, Swede!" 
"Come Boys! Lei's light. 
"Good Night" 




«dHl 


■ 


wm 


H 




P 


Bt^I 






m^ll 









TEAM RECORD 




1. CTC 




92 


Roosevell 


47 


2. CTC 




63 


Glenview 


57 


3^ CTC 




60 


Wheaton 


76 


4. CTC 




80 


Chicago 


58 


5. CTC 




67 


Great Lakes 


84 


6. CTC 




67 


St. Joseph 


73 


7. CTC 




lOG 


Roosevelt 


53 


8. CTC 




101 


Fournier 


91 


9. CTC 




70 


Illinois-Navy Pier 


72 


10. CTC 




70 


Chicago 


47 


11. CTC 




75 


Lewis 


93 


12. CTC 




69 


DeKalb 


76 


13. CTC 




96 


Fournier 


83 


14. CTC 




63 


Glenview 


70 


15. CTC 




72 


Lewis 


83 


16. CTC 




65 


Great Lakes 


83 


17. CTC 




66 
1282 


Alumni 


61 
1212 




Of 


ensive 


Delensive 


A. 8 wins. 


9 losses 






B. Best ofiensive 


record 


281. Average 75,6 




C. High To 


al for 


a Game 


106 points. 





R" 



PERSONAL RECORD 



^^m Miaa 


Pos. 


FG 


FT 


TP Cms. 


^^H w|imi 


F 


Helmer Ringstrom 


95 


64 


254 16 


^^H ^l^B 


G 


Eddie O'Farrell 


94 


56 


244 17 


^^m JHWi 


C 


Jim Tracy 


76 


86 


238 IS 


^■^ ^^BV Wf 


F 


Leon Moore 


64 


39 


167 12 


■i ^^^ ^ 


G 


Jack Shultz 


47 


23 


111 16 


.^^ ^w 


F 


Leo Hennessy 


29 


18 


76 10 


^^^ 


F 


Sol Solario 


12 


11 


35 13 




G 


Jim Lecos 


13 


6 


32 12 


Helmer Ringstrom, MVP of 1952-3 being pre- 


G 


Ray Stopa 


11 


5 


27 7 


sented trophy by Coach Boyle. 


F 


Jerry Donohue 


9 


7 


25 11 
23 8 




G 


John Moscato 


9 


5 




C 


Richard Dukelow 


5 


2 


12 4 




C 


Art Gilbert 


5 


2 


12 4 




G 


Bob Lyman 


3 


4 


10 5 




G 


Harry Tobinski 


4 


1 


9 3 




F 


Mike Palendech 


2 





4 2 




C 


Ron Budil 





2 


2 1 




F 


Bob Lemke 


1 





2 4 



Totals 



479 331 1282 



121 




LEO HENNESSY 
JACK SCHULTZ 



BASEBALL 



PHIL VALAIKA 
JIM WESEN 

CLAY CLAXTON 



Lack of males has always been the baseball 
jinks here al CTC. Last year the rain beat Ihe 
Colonels this year it was lack of experience. 

Even though the Colonels won a few games, all 
the men became better players and learned much 
about the game of baseball. 




JIM LILCK 



m 



V- 



fi* 



hmm 



JIM KUZEL, DAVID GARCIA, RICHARD BRAND 



I LYMAN 
KEN WEBSTER 

SACRAMENTO VALADEZ 
BOB KORENSKY 
JIM TOTORELLI 





KEN LIVERIS ^. Jfe- ■^^■ 




'''^^^. 



123 



Go lo i!, girls! 





CHEERLEADERS 



And a "howdie do" to you, loo. 

Dr. Brockman is happy in his sponsorship oi this group 
of liae looking girls. 



The "girls who cheer" are an indispensable pari of 
every basetball game. This year, this "corp" has 
grown to an unprecedented size and quality and have 
made themselves well known by their fine enthusias- 
tic work. 



Cheesecake, a la mode! 




SWIMMING 



Some restless iins. 
"Flower" girls. 




V 




'/m 



The Trilons, CTC's swimming club, is 
only a fev/ years old, but it has already dis- 
tinguished itseli by presenting an annual 
show. 

Characteristically colorful and well ex- 
ecuted, this event is one that is looked for- 
ward to by the entire student body. 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 



This organization is composed of all the women in the school and its activities, 
therefore, are as varied and plentiful as its membership. Every interest is satisfied, every 
moior skill is utilized. 

This organization is managed by an editorial board consisting of elected officers 
and the managers of the various activities which the organization sponsors. 



She'll miss it by a milel 




126 




Now that's no way to score! 



Wow, look at that form! 





WOMEN'S 
ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 



Despite the smiles on those faces, these wo- 
men play a mean game of tennis. 



There is hardly a limit to the activities offered by the WAA. 
Archery, Badminton, Bowling, Baseball, Basketball, Volleyball, Tennis, 
Swimming, Folk Dancing and any other activity for which the girls ex- 
press an interest are represented on the WAA schedule. 



W. A. A. 



Many of the specialized inleresis of the women 
originate in tfie general and comprehensive physical 
education required courses. Folk Dancing, popular 
dancing, physical fitness, all help to develop new skills 
which the givls are anxious to use. 

The WAA contributes its part to the overall pic- 
ture of extra-curricular activities at CTC by making 
the fruits of their labor known at special assemblies 
and exhibitions. 



Miss Christensen enjoys 
teaching the tango. Stu- 
dents enjoy watching. 




129 



HOMECOMING 




\ 



It is lilting thai Itiis book should close with a few 
words and pictures from the annual Homecoming. 

This, indeed, is the most important and the best 
attended afiair of the year. Nothing compares to the 
excitement and colorfulness of the Homecoming as- 
S3mbly, the election of the Homecoming Queen, Iha 
fierce playing and cheering at the game and the deco- 
rations and costumes at the Homecoming dance. 



The Charleston comes alive. 




Homecoming is a lot of work, loo! 



130 




The potential queens walk 
in, awaiting anxiously the 
announcement of the 
Queen's name. 



The Dean observes an old 
custom; Dancing with the 
queen. 



The others join in for an 
evening of music, dancing 
and fun. 




The Queen (center, froni) Reva James, and her court 
pay their respects to the Chicago Teachers College 
seal. 



Now we have come to the end of the book. Has il 
made you aware of the transient nature of time? 

We have been looking at the past and present .... 
now we must look lo the future .... 



Before the elections the candidates pose for the 
camera, each potentially a part of the school's perma- 
nent history. 




'S 



Fashions al Their BesI For Men and Women 

6433 S, Halsted Street 
CHICAGO 21 

ENglewood 4-7600 



Compliments of 

\mn RESTAURANT 

Home Cooking at its Best 
(i9th Street and Parnell Avenue 



ENglewood 4-7B75 



KASS CLOTHIERS 

6500 South Halsted Street 

SOUTHTOWN'S FINEST FAMILY CLOTHIERS 
Open Monday and Thursday Evenings 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

CHICACO TEACHERS 
COLEECE CAFETERIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



TEMPO 



133 




AB 4-2483 



CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE 1953 GRADUATES OF THE 
CHICAGO TEACHERS COLLEGE 

JO -JO 

BOOK Slot 



(Southwest Corner) 
Everything for the College Student 



401 W. 69th St. 



134 




CONGRATULATIONS i.9.'7.; GRADS. OF CTC! 

May ijou have a pleasa)it a)i(I cmixtructive ieadnufi caree)' in Clncaf/o. 

We also irisli to conc/iritulate the Maff of the 195.} Emblem for a line, crea- 
tive piece of irork. 

WERKMAN'S have served CTC students Mnce 19.JJ, with coUec/e text and 
snpphj need^. It lias been a pleasure to k)ioii' manij CTC students person- 
allij and to see tliew develop into professional teacliei's of Cliicofp) cliiUh'en. 

WERKMAN'S 

Book and Supply Store 

NE Corner Stewart and (i9th St. 




THE CHICAGO TEACHERS" UNION 

CONGRATULATES 

THE m^ GRADUATES 

OF THE 

CHICAGO TEACHERS COLLEGE 

AND WELCOMES THEM 

AS FELLOW TEACHERS 

INTO THE 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF CHICAGO 



136