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Full text of "Encyclopedia of Massachusetts, biographical--genealogical;"

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Encydapebia gf Massachusetts 



Biographical — Genealogical 



Compiled with the Assistance of a 



Capable Corps of Advisers and Contributors 



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ILLUSTRATED 



THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY (Inc.) 

NEW YORK PUBLISHERS CHICAGO 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, Lt^f^" ^^'^ 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

R 1928 L 



Both justice and decency require that we should bestow on our forefathers 
an honorable remembrance — Thucydides 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



SHERWOOD, Samuel Dibble 

From a very old Colonial family dat- 
ing back to 1634 in this country and 
traced still further back in England, came 
Samuel Dibble Sherwood, for many years 
one of Springfield's leading insurance 
men, and a member of the firm of Cone 
& Sherwood, general insurance agents, 
and a man prominent in civic and polit- 
ical affairs in Springfield. The immi- 
grant ancestor of the Sherwood family 
in America was Thomas Sherwood, of 
further mention, and the line of descent 
from this pioneer ancestor to Malcolm 
Clarke Sherwood, son of Samuel Dibble 
Sherwood, is as follows: 

(•I) Thomas Sherwood, immigrant an- 
cestor, born in England, 1586, came to 
this country in April, 1634, with his wife, 
Alice, and four children, one of whom 
was Thomas, of further mention. The 
pioneer family settled in Fairfield, Con- 
necticut, in 1650, and there, in 1655, the 
father died. 

(II) Thomas (2) Sherwood, son of 
Thomas (i) and Alice Sherwood, was 
born in England, in 1624. He married 
Elizabeth Cable, widow of John Cable, 
Jr., of Fairfield, Connecticut, and died in 
Fairfield, in 1697. They had children, 
among whom was Isaac, of further 
mention. 

(III) Isaac Sherwood, son of Thomas 
(2) and Elizabeth (Cable) Sherwood, 
born 1684-85, died in 1748. He lived in 

Norwalk. He married Mary . 

They had children, among whom a son, 
John, of further mention. 

(IV) John Sherwood, son of Isaac and 
Mary Sherwood, married Hannah More- 



house, and they had a son, John, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(V) John (2) Sherwood, son of John 
(i) and Hannah (Morehouse) Sherwood, 
was born before 1748, died 1826. He 
married Abigail Lobdell, of Newbury- 
port, and among their children was a son, 
Samuel, of further mention. 

(VI) Samuel Sherwood, son of John 
(2) and Abigail (Lobdell) Sherwood, was 
born March 24, 1779. He married Esther 
Goodsell, a descendant of the first Pres- 
byterian minister who settled at Green- 
field. Her brother served in the War of 
1812, and was wounded in the battle of 
Lundy's Lane. They had children, 
among whom Moses, of further mention. 

(VII) Moses Sherwood, son of Samuel 
and Esther (Goodsell) Sherwood, was 
born August 10, 1810. He was a farmer, 
born and reared in Redding Ridge, Con- 
necticut, where he lived and died, having 
filled at various times all the local offices 
of the neighborhood. His wife, Eliza- 
beth Taylor (Dibble) Sherwood, was a 
native of Bethel, born July 2, 1825. She 
was the daughter of Timothy Dibble, 
and her grandfather on the maternal side 
was Joshua Taylor, who served for seven 
years in the Revolutionary War, and was 
with General Washington at Valley 
Forge. The ancestors of the Taylors 
were among the earliest settlers of New 
Haven and Danbury. Moses and Eliza- 
beth Taylor (Dibble) Sherwood had 
children, among whom was Samuel Dib- 
ble, of further mention. 

(VIII) Samuel Dibble Sherwood, son 
of Moses and Elizabeth Taylor (Dibble) 
Sherwood, was born at Redding Ridge. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Fairfield county, Connecticut, November 
26, 1853, and died at Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, May 5, 1920. He attended the 
public and private schools of Redding 
Ridge, and then took a supplemental 
course at Redding Institute, after which, 
at the age of sixteen, he began teaching 
school. He taught for six years, at the 
same time preparing himself for college. 
In 1878 he entered Wesleyan University, 
at Middletown, Connecticut, and gradu- 
ated with honors in the class of 1881, re- 
ceiving the degree of Ph. B. On leaving 
the University, he again engaged in 
teaching, holding positions at Ansonia 
and Derby, Connecticut, and Irvington- 
on-Hudson, New York, in the last named 
place serving as principal of the Union 
Free School for three years, and resign- 
ing that position in 1886, to accept an 
appointment to the principalship of the 
Worthington Street Graded School, of 
Springfield, Massachusetts. He held this 
latter position from September, 1886, un- 
til June, 1890, when he resigned to be- 
come general agent for the Hartford Life 
and Annuity Insurance Company. In this 
new work he was as successful as he had 
been in the teaching profession, and so 
valuable were his services to the com- 
pany that advancement was rapid at the 
end of two years. He formed a partner- 
ship with William A. Cone, under the 
firm name of Cone & Sherwood, and they 
later moved to No. 244 Main street, and 
this association was retained until Mr. 
Cone sold out to Mr. Sherwood in Jan- 
uary, 1916. Mr. Sherwood's son, Mal- 
colm C, who had been in the office for 
some time, was taken into the firm, upon 
his return from service in the World 
War, and Norman A. Brainard, of Long- 
meadow, also became a member of the 
firm in 1919, thus bringing new blood 
into the concern. This continued with 
Samuel D. Sherwood as the head of the 



firm until his death, and since then it 
has been carried on by his son and Mr. 
Brainard and known as Cone & Sher- 
wood. 

Mr. Sherwood was very active in civic 
afifairs. He was elected to the Board of 
Aldermen from Ward Five for 1891 and 
1892; served on the city property and 
educational committees, where his wide 
experience was invaluable ; was also 
chairman of the police committee; and 
served on the Democratic State Central 
Committee for a time. In all these offices 
of trust, his liberal education and his 
wide experience enabled him to render 
service of a high order which was greatly 
appreciated by his fellow-citizens. He 
was a director of the Cooperative Bank, 
and a member of the security committee ; 
was at one time superintendent of the 
Christian Industrial School, also a trustee 
and member of the educational commit- 
tee of this school. He was a candidate 
for mayor in 1896. 

Known and loved for his ability, integ- 
rity, and for his personal qualities in all 
these various associations, he was equally 
active and very highly regarded in the 
Masonic order, and for more than thirty 
years he was prominent in its various 
branches. He was raised in Roswell Lee 
Lodge, Springfield, June 21, 1890; was 
master of that lodge in 1894, and in De- 
cember, 1896, was appointed district dep- 
uty grand master for the sixteenth Ma- 
sonic district. He was exalted in Morn- 
ing Star Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
April 3, 1891. Received the Cryptic de- 
grees in Springfield Council, Royal and 
Select Masters, October 25, 1893. He 
was knighted in Springfield Commandery, 
Knights Templar, September 21, 1891, 
and was its commander in 1898 and 1899. 
In October, 1905, he was appointed grand 
warden of this Grand Commandery, later 
serving through the line, and becoming- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



grand commander in October, 1916. He 
filled the various offices in the Grand 
Commandery with ability and great de- 
votion to its interests. In the Scottish 
Rite he was a member of the four bodies 
meeting in Springfield. He had been ac- 
tive in the bodies of this rite and had pre- 
sided over the first three. He was cre- 
ated sublime prince of the Royal Secret, 
thirty-second degree, in Massachusetts 
Consistory, Boston, and was made an 
honorary member, thirty-third degree, of 
the Supreme Council, September 19, 191 1. 
In recognition of the sterling worth of 
Samuel D. Sherwood and in appreciation 
of his services to the fraternal order, a 
Masonic lodge has been organized since 
his death and is known as the Samuel D. 
Sherwood Lodge. Mr. Sherwood was a 
communicant of the Episcopal church. 

Mr. Sherwood married, August 31, 
1886, Ada Clarke, of New York City, and 
they became the parents of two children : 
Elizabeth Taylor, born November 26, 
1888, resides at home ; Malcolm Clarke, 
of further mention. 

(IX) Malcolm Clarke Sherwood, son 
of Samuel Dibble and Ada (Clarke) Sher- 
wood, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, October i, 1891. He received 
his early education in the local schools 
of his native city, and then entered Wil- 
liams College, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1914. He entered the office of 
Cone & Sherwood, where he remained 
until the entrance of the United States 
into the World War, He then enlisted 
in the navy, June 14, 1917, and served 
until December 14, 1918, when he was 
released from service. He returned to 
the office of Cone & Sherwood, of which 
organization he is now trustee and secre- 
tary. Energetic, persevering, and capa- 
ble, he is contributing to the growth of 
the business into which his father put so 
much of his rare ability. 



Along with business responsibilities, 
Mr. Sherwood finds time for fraternal, 
social, and religious affiliations. He is a 
member of Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons; a member of the 
Springfield Boys' Club; the Springfield 
Country Club ; the Winthrop Club ; and 
the Nayasset Club. He is also a member 
of the South Congregational Church. 

On July 2, 191 7, Mr. Sherwood mar- 
ried Eleanor Woods, daughter of George 
H. and Catherine (Scott) Woods, of 
Springfield, Massachusetts. 



GIBBS, Ralph Bemis 

Among those citizens of Springfield 
whose active business careers were short- 
ened by an early death was Ralph Bemis 
Gibbs, who from 1905 to the time of his 
death was identified with the Library 
Bureau of New York City. 

Mr. Gibbs was a descendant of a very 
old family which was prominent in Eng- 
land long before the emigration of the 
Puritans to this country. His ancestor, 
William Gibbs, was born in Lenham, 
Yorkshire, England, and received from 
the King of England, for distinguished 
service, a grant of land four miles square 
and located in the center of the town of 
Lenham. He was the father of Matthew 
Gibbs, of further mention. 

(I) Matthew Gibbs, son of William 
Gibbs, mentioned above, came from Len- 
ham, Yorkshire, England, with a group 
of early settlers to Charlestown, !*klassa- 
chusetts, where he was a planter. He 
sold his house there in 1654, and in 1659 
received a grant east of his house at 
Lundham. In 1661 he bought of Thomas 
Reed, Senior, one-third of a farm for- 
merly owned by Rev. Edmund Brown, 
near Doeskin Hill, and in 1665 he was on 
a committee of the town of Sudbury. In 
1673 and 1678 he purchased other parts 
of the same farm at Doeskin Hill ; in 1670 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



he received a grant of land lying- on the 
east side of a brook near his house ; and 
in 1681 he purchased of Samuel Howe 
ten acres. He died previous to 1697. He 
married Mary Bradish, of Cambridge, 
daughter of Robert Bradish. She died 
about 1659. Their children w^ere: Mat- 
thew; John, of further mention; Eliza- 
beth ; Hannah ; Mary ; Thomas, who died 
young; and Thomas. 

(II) John Gibbs, son of Matthew and 
Mary (Bradish) Gibbs, married (first), 
in 1688, Anna Gleason, of Sudbury, Mas- 
sachusetts. She died and he married 
(second) Sarah Cutler, of Reading, Mas- 
sachusetts. He died April 2, 1718, in Sud- 
bury, leaving an estate valued at six 
hundred and twenty-seven pounds, three 
shillings. Children of the second mar- 
riage were : Sarah ; Nathaniel ; Isaac ; 
Jacob ; Israel, of further mention ; and 
Ephraim. 

(III) Deacon Israel Gibbs, son of John 
and Sarah (Cutler) Gibbs, was born in 
Sudbury, Massachusetts, July 11, 1706. 
He joined the "Scotch-Irish Company," 
which was at the time preparing to start 
for a place in the wilderness, and became 
one of the founders of the town of Glas- 
gow, now Blandford, Massachusetts, in 
1745. The farms were selected by lot 
and to him fell one of the farms on the 
west side of the street. The farm on 
which he settled was still in the posses- 
sion of his lineal descendants a century 
after the settlement of Glasgow. It is 
said that the word "Gibbsey," used to in- 
dicate anything that is awkward and ill 
adapted to the purpose for which it is 
used, originated with the very primitive 
method which these settlers, especially 
Israel Gibbs, used for harvesting hay in 
the "North Meadows," a straight stick 
answering the three-fold purpose of 
swath, rake, and fork. He was an ener- 
getic, hard-working, and progressive 



man, and took an active part in the af- 
fairs of the town, serving in 1759 on the 
committee for hiring a "school dame" and 
dispersing the money raised to defray the 
charges of schooling, and to "employ a 
school master when they think it will be 
best for the town." The records show 
that Israel Gibbs was a leader in the 
church. He married, in 1727, Mary Ham- 
bleton, and their children were : Mary ; 
John, of further mention; Rebecca; Is- 
rael ; Ephraim ; Isaac ; Elizabeth ; and 
Sarah. 

(IV) John (2) Gibbs, eldest son of 
Israel and Mary (Hambleton) Gibbs, 
went with his parents to the new wilder- 
ness home in Glasgow, now Blandford, 
Massachusetts, and lived there during the 
entire remainder of his more than four- 
score years of life, as did all of his father's 
children except Elizabeth. He was the 
father of four children : Israel ; Samuel, 
of further mention ; Mary ; and Ellen. 

(V) Samuel Gibbs, second son of John 
(2) Gibbs, was born in Blandford, Mas- 
sachusetts, and resided there throughout 
his life. He owned a good farm in the 
northern part of the town, which he dili- 
gently cultivated, and upon which the 
closing years of his life were spent. In 
the seating of a church in Blandford, in 
1797, the names of Samuel, Levi, Eph- 
raim, Israel, Isaac, Silas, and Abner Gibbs 
appear, and in the same account is re- 
corded that in 1791 Isaac G. Gibbs bought 
the first single wagon in the town, an 
object of great curiosity, which fright- 
ened the horses along the way when its 
owner drove to church. The children of 
Samuel Gibbs were : Lyman Elam, of 
whom further; Olive; Foster E. ; and 
Jane. 

(VI) Lyman Elam Gibbs, eldest son 
of Samuel Gibbs, was born in Blandford, 
Massachusetts, and reared on a farm, 
where he spent his life, and died there at 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the age of fifty-eight years. He followed 
farming as an occupation, and dealt in 
horses. He married Polly Boies, daughter 
of David Boies, a farmer of Blandford, 
and their children were : Julia ; Jarvis 
Watson, of further mention ; Samuel ; 
David ; Isabella ; Maria ; Russell ; Ed- 
ward; and Edson. 

(VII) Jarvis Watson Gibbs, son of Ly- 
man Elam and Polly (Boies) Gibbs, was 
born December 9, 1820, in Blandford, 
Massachusetts, and died March 18, 1895. 
He attended the public schools of his dis- 
trict, and at the age of twenty began 
teaching in Blandford, where he received 
a salary of fifteen dollars a month and 
"boarded round," as was the custom in 
those days. Later, he taught in Chester, 
in both of these positions teaching only 
during the winter months, but still later 
he took charge of a school in New Jer- 
sey, in which he taught for the full school 
year. When he was twenty-four years 
of age he returned to Massachusetts, lo- 
cating in Russell, where he opened a gen- 
eral store, which he successfully con- 
ducted for several years. After several 
years of business experience, he sold his 
store and retired, but wearying of too 
much leisure, bought another store and 
again engaged in business, this time for 
about a year, at the end of which time he 
again sold out and lived retired to the 
time of his death. He was active in town 
affairs, served as a member of the town 
committee, and for four years, 1889-1893, 
was postmaster at Russell. Fraternally, 
he was affiliated with Mount Moriah 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. Po- 
litically, he was a Republican, and his 
religious affiliation was with the Method- 
ist Episcopal church. He married (first), 
April, 1845, Tryphena Mann, daughter of 
Ashley and Janet (Cannon) Mann, who 
was born in Chester, and died in 1854, 
leaving one child, Howard Ashley, of 



further mention. Jarvis Watson Gibbs 
married (second), in 1857, Olive C. Parks, 
daughter of Roland and Mary (Culver) 
Parks. She was born in Blandford, died 
June, 1887, leaving one child, Mary T. 
He married (third), June 27, 1889, Sarah 
Sophronia Combs, born in Middlefield, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Ebenezer and 
Jane (Hazelton) Combs. 

(VIII) Howard Ashley Gibbs, only 
son of Jarvis Watson and Tryphena 
(Mann) Gibbs, was born in Huntington, 
Massachusetts, and died July 19, 1899. 
He received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of Russell, and when he was 
sixteen years of age began his busi- 
ness career as a clerk in the employ of 
N. G. Gibbs, at Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, later becoming proprietor of the 
business, which was then conducted un- 
der the name of Howard A. Gibbs. For 
a quarter of a century he dealt in shoes, 
and then, six years before his death, 
bought out B. F, Nichols, of Holyoke, 
manufacturer of belting, and under the 
name of the Holyoke Belting Company, 
continued that business to the time of his 
death. He was an able, energetic man, 
interested in the public affairs of his com- 
munity, voted the Republican ticket, and 
was a member of the Springfield City 
Council in 1894-1895. Fraternally, he 
was affiliated with the Masonic order, in 
which he had attained the degree of 
Knight Templar. He married, October 
23, 1872, Kate Chapin Bemis, born in 
Springfield, May 30, 1846, daughter of 
Stephen C. and Julia Emeline (Skeele) 
Bemis, and they were the parents of two 
children : Ralph Bemis. of further men- 
tion; Edith, who married, September 18, 
1902, Walter Cockrill Carroll, of the 
United States Steel Company, and has 
four children : Walter Cockrill and Flor- 
ence Carroll (twins), born June 30, 1903; 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Mary Carroll, born June 25, 1906; and 
Florence, born September 7, 1908. 

(IX) Ralph Bemis Gibbs, son of 
Howard Ashley and Kate Chapin (Bemis) 
Gibbs, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, December 26, 1875, and died in 
New York City, August 20, 1917. He 
received his preparatory education in the 
public schools of Springfield, and after 
his graduation from high school entered 
Amherst College, from which he was 
graduated in 1898. After the completion 
of his college course, he was associated 
with his father for a time in Holyoke. 
Massachusetts, and upon the death of his 
father became identified with the Rice & 
Lockwood Lumber Company, of Spring- 
field. Later, he severed his connection 
with the latter concern and for a time 
was employed in a bank in the same city. 
In 1905 he went to New York City and 
became associated with the Library Bu- 
reau, the business house which inaugu- 
rated the "science of business systems," 
and which put upon the market the first 
filing system. The concern deals in all 
sorts of highly specialized efficiency de- 
vices and systems, and is one of the lead- 
ing establishments of its kind in the 
country. Mr. Gibbs represented the 
Library Bureau in New York, Long Is- 
land, and New Jersey, and was actively 
engaged in this business to the time of 
his death. During his high school and 
college years, Mr. Gibbs took an active 
part in athletics. He was a member of 
the track team, in which connection he 
won a number of medals, and he was also 
a member of the 'varsity football eleven. 
He was a member of Chi Phi college fra- 
ternity, and in Springfield was a member 
of the Winthrop Club and of the Country 
Club. His religious affiliation was with 
the First Congregational Church of 
Springfield, and later with the Congrega- 



tional church of Upper Montclair, New 
Jersey. 

On December i, 1907, Ralph B. Gibbs 
married Harriet Belle Lane, daughter of 
Hiram B. and Maria J. (Hitchcock) Lane 
(see Lane VI), and they are the parents 
of two children : Harriet Lane, born in 
Brooklyn, New York, November 9, 1910; 
and Ralph Howard, born in Brooklyn, 
New York, November 20, 1914. 

Harriet B. (Lane) Gibbs was born 
January 2.^, 1875. After receiving her 
early and preparatory education in the 
schools of Springfield, she entered Smith 
College, from which she was graduated 
in 1899. She was a member of the Smith 
Club in New York, and of the Woman's 
University Club of New York, until her 
return to Springfield upon the death of 
Mr. Gibbs. She is affiliated with the 
Springfield College Club and Springfield 
Women's Club, and a member of the 
South Church. 

(The Lane Line). 

(I) Robert Lane, of Derbyshire, Eng- 
land, settled in Killingworth, Connecti- 
cut, later coming to Stratford, Connec- 
ticut, in 1655. His town lot, a plot of 
two acres, was number sixty-two in the 
allotment, and in 1699 he was given 
fourteen acres in the division of the com- 
monage. In 1675 Robert Lane was 
chosen to serve as fence viewer, and in 
1686 he was elected to represent his dis- 
trict in the General Court. He married 
(first) Sarah Pickett, a native of England, 
and after her death he married (second) 
Lydia Kelsy. His children were: Joseph ; 
Hurd; Hannah; Daniel; John, of further 
mention ; Elizabeth ; Margaret ; Rebecca ; 
Jonathan; and Mary. 

(II) John Lane, fifth child of Robert 
and Sarah (Pickett) Lane, was a lieu- 
tenant in the 7th Regiment, in which he 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



enlisted March ly, 1775. On June 12, 
1775, he enlisted in Captain Jonathan 
Johnson's company of the Wadsworth 
brigade, from which he was discharged 
November 16, 1775. He was taken pris- 
oner at Fort Washington. He reenhsted 
under Captain Daniel Allen, in Colonel 
Samuel Wylles' 3rd regiment of the Con- 
tinental line, and was transferred to the 
Georgia battalion in August, 1777. At 
the time of the East Haven alarm, July 7, 
1779, he w^as a soldier under Captain 
Bezaleel Bristol. He enlisted again, July 
I, and was discharged December 13, un- 
der Colonel Herman Swift in the 17th 
Regiment, they being the short levies in 
Connecticut in 1780. On September 16, 
1789, he was promoted to the rank of cor- 
poral and served for several years in 
Captain Abraham Pierson's 7th Connec- 
ticut regiment. While drilling his com- 
mand on the square in Killingworth, he 
was accidentally killed. He married Ex- 
perience Edgarton, and their children 
were : John ; Jedediah ; Samuel, of fur- 
ther mention ; Hezekiah ; and Elisha. 

(III) Samuel Lane, third son of Cap- 
tain John and Experience (Edgarton) 
Lane, lived in Salisbury, Connecticut. 
He married Abigail Norton, July 3, 1757, 
and their children were: Samuel; Elisha, 
of further mention ; Abigail ; Electa ; 
Polly ; and Salome. 

(IV) Elisha Lane, second son of Sam- 
uel and Abigail (Norton) Lane, was 
born in Salisbury, Connecticut. From 
Salisbury, he removed to Burlington, 
Vermont, where he lived upon the farm 
above the high bridge on the interv^ale, 
afterwards owned by the Loomis family. 
He married Charity Jacobs, and their 
children were: Lovey, who died young; 
Laura ; Seymour, of further mention ; 
Burrill; Harry; Elisha; Charity; Mariah ; 
Calista; Hyman and Hiram (twins) ; and 
Horace. 



(V) Seymour Lane, third child of 
Elisha and Charity (Jacobs) Lane, was 
born in Newport, February, 1788. He 
was one of the organizers of the Congre- 
gational church at Newport, and was 
clerk of the same from 1831 to 1864. He 
was selectman, 1828-29. He married, 
January i, 1815, Hetty Robinson, and 
their children were: George; Henry; 
Harriet; Cephas; Hiram B., of further 
mention ; Augustus ; and Elisha. 

(VI) Hiram B. Lane, fifth child of 
Seymour and Hetty (Robinson) Lane, 
was born in Newport, August 17, 1824, 
and died in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
November 15, 1901. He was an active, 
able man, prominent in the affairs of the 
town, and served as selectman and post- 
master of Newport. In 1864 he removed 
to Springfield and engaged in the whole- 
sale produce business, which he con- 
ducted successfully until he retired. He 
was a member of the Massachusetts Leg- 
islature for three years, and also served 
for a number of years on the Board of 
Public Works. He married (first) Elea- 
nor Bowley, born June 20, 1822, died 
September 4, 1862, daughter of Samuel 
Bowley; (second) Maria J. Hitchcock, 
born March 15, 1834. The children of the 
first marriage were : Marietta, born July 
24, 1844; Elma, born October 31, 1848; 
Olin H., born February 21, 1855. Chil- 
dren of the second marriage were : Harry 
P., born September 13, 1865 5 Harriet Belle, 
born January 27, 1875, married Ralph 
Bemis Gibbs (see Gibbs IX). 



STOWE, Luke Steams 

Among the veteran business men of 
Springfield who after a long and success- 
ful career have retired and are enjoying 
a well earned period of leisure, is Luke 
Stearns Stowe, treasurer and former 
president of the Easthampton Rubber 
Thread Company, of Easthampton, Mas- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



sachusetts, who for nearly forty years 
was engaged in the jewelry business in 
this city. 

(I) Mr. Stowe is descended from a 
very old Colonial family which traces its 
ancestry to one John Stow, immigrant 
ancestor, who came to this country in 

1634, bringing with him his wife and six 
children. The little family came with one 
of John Winthrop's companies, arriving 
on the 17th of May, and settling in Rox- 
bury, Massachusetts, where John Stow 
was made a freeman during the same 
year. In 1638 he was admitted a free- 
man of the Ancient and Honorable Ar- 
tillery Company, and in 1639 he was dep- 
uty to the General Court. He married 
Elizabeth Biggs, daughter of Mrs. Ra- 
chel Biggs, who came to Dorchester in 

1635, with her daughter, Foster. 

Elizabeth (Biggs) Stow died in 1638, the 
mother of five children, all born in Eng- 
land : Thomas, of whom further ; Eliza- 
beth, married Henry Archer; Nathaniel, 
born in 1622, settled at Ipswich ; Samuel, 
who graduated from Harvard College, in 
1645, with the second class graduated 
from that institution, and was a minister 
at Middletown, Connecticut ; Thankful, 
who married John Pierpont. 

(II) Thomas Stow, son of John and 
Elizabeth (Biggs) Stow, was born in 
England, in Middlesex county, where the 
family of Stow (or Stowe) were numer- 
ous about 1610. He came to America 
with his parents in 1634, and was living 
in Concord, Massachusetts, before 1640. 
He and his brother owned 600 acres of 
land between Fair Haven pond and Sud- 
bury line, but Thomas sold his rights in 
this tract to Thomas Gobble and David 
Dam in 1660, he having removed to Con- 
necticut. The town of Stowe, Massachu- 
setts, near Marlboro and Sudbury, where 
the tract was located, was probably 



named for some member of the family, 
though the history of the town, incorpor- 
ated in May, 1683, does not record that 
any member of the Stow family had any 
part in the establishment of the town. 
Thomas Stow probably left Concord 
about 1650, and moved to Middletown, 
then part of Hartford, Connecticut, at 
which time all of the representatives of 
the Stow name seem to have been in 
Connecticut, none of them appearing in 
the town of Stowe until much later. The 
children of Thomas Stow were : Samuel, 
of whom further ; Nathaniel ; and Thomas, 
born about 1650, settled in Middletown, 
Connecticut. 

(Ill) Samuel Stowe (or Stow), son of 
Thomas Stow, was born in Concord, Mas- 
sachusetts, probably about 1648. He was 
a soldier in King Philip's War, and at the 
close of the war became interested in the 
establishment of a new settlement at 
Marlboro. He was one of the signers of 
a petition for the plantation in 1677, ^"^ 
was doubtless located there some months 
before that time. In 1684 he purchased 
of Waban and James Atchuit, two Indi- 
ans of Natick, Massachusetts, for six 
pounds of money and six pounds of corn, 
twenty acres of land in Marlboro. He 
was also one of the proprietors of the 
Ockoocangansett plantation purchased by 
the Indians, and was one of the promi- 
nent citizens of the town of Marlboro. 
He married and became the father of six 
children: Samuel, born May 2, 1680, 
married, December 19, 1704, Sarah Snow; 
Thomas, of whom further ; Mary, born 
July 18, 1685, married, June 13, 1706, Jon- 
athan Morse; Thankful, born October 8, 
1687, married, March 29, 1710, Samuel 
Stevem ; Rachel, born February 21, 
1690, married, December 14, 1713, Luke 
Rice; John, born March 30, 1696, mar- 
ried, April 25, 1722, Elizabeth Brigham. 



10 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



All three sons left large families and have 
numerous descendants in Marlboro and 
in Central Massachusetts. 

(IV) Thomas (2) Stowe, son of Sam- 
uel Stowe (or Stow), was born at Marl- 
boro, Massachusetts, December 27, 1682, 
He married, January 20, 1713, Hannah 
Johnson, daughter of William and Mary 
Johnson. He died June 15, 1789, and she 
died August 28, 1765. His will, proved 
October 8, 1765, mentions sons, Benja- 
min, Thomas, Samuel, Stephen, David, 
also Experience Newton, deceased, and a 
son Josiah, who is required to provide 
for the support of his mother, Hannah. 
Their children were : Comfort ; Thomas, 
died young; Benjamin; David; Thomas; 
Charles, died young; Samuel; Stephen, 
of whom further ; Josiah, died young ; 
Hannah, died young ; Experience ; David ; 
Hannah ; Sabella, died at the age of 
twenty years; and Silas. 

(V) Stephen Stowe, son of Thomas 
(2) and Hannah (Johnson) Stowe, was 
born at Marlboro, Massachusetts, De- 
cember 15, 1724. He married. May 23, 
1753, Abigail Smith, and two of their 
children were born at Marlboro, the rest 
being born at Stowe, Massachusetts, 
where the parents removed about 1758, 
and where for several generations their 
descendants lived. The children were : 
Lydia, born March 24, 1754; Silas, born 
April 26, 1756; Ichabod, born on the 
homestead at Stowe, Massachusetts, 
where doubtless other children, not re- 
corded, were born. 

(VI) Ichabod Stowe, son of Stephen 
and Abigail (Smith) Stowe, was born in 
Stowe, Massachusetts, in 1759. He lived 
and died in the place of his birth from 
which he enlisted as a soldier in the Rev- 
olutionary War. He married, November 
29, 1781, Ruth Whitney, and they were 
the parents of six sons and one daughter : 



Stephen ; Abraham ; Ichabod ; Luke, of 
whom further; Levi; Moses; and Sally. 

(VII) Luke Stowe, son of Ichabod and 
Ruth (Whitney) Stowe, was born in 
Stowe, Massachusetts, in 1796, and died 
at Lancaster, Massachusetts, in August, 
1845, aged forty-nine years. He received 
his education in the public schools of his 
native district, and then engaged in 
farming, spending his life largely in Lan- 
caster, Massachusetts, where he took an 
active part in public afifairs, serving as 
highway surveyor, and holding various 
local ofifices. He married Abigail Hol- 
ton, of Bolton, Massachusetts, who was 
born in 1797, and died in February, 1846, 
daughter of Simon (who did service in 
the Revolutionary War) and Martha 
(Stearns) Holton, and they were the par- 
ents of three children : Asa Holton ; Abi- 
gail ; and Luke Stearns, of whom further, 
he the only one living. 

(VIII) Luke Stearns Stowe, son of 
Luke and Abigail (Holton) Stowe, was 
born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, Au- 
gust 9, 1834. He received his education 
in the public schools of Lancaster and' 
Bolton, and then went to Clinton, Mas- 
sachusetts, where he learned the trade of 
jeweler. For three years he continued 
to work at his trade there, and at the end 
of that period removed to Gardner, Mas- 
sachusetts, where in 1855 he engaged in 
the jewelry business for himself. He 
conducted his establishment there until 
1864, and then decided to make a change. 
He came to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
and under the name of L. S. Stowe & 
Company established a jewelry concern 
which was soon doing an extensive busi- 
ness, both wholesale and retail. His re- 
tail store was located at No. 408 Main 
street, where the True Brothers are now 
(1923) established, and several men were 
kept constantly on the road selling jew- 



II 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



eiry at wholesale. He soon built up a 
large and increasingly successful busi- 
ness, which he maintained until 1900, 
when he sold out and retired. He has 
traveled extensively in Europe. In ad- 
dition to his responsibilities as the pro- 
prietor of an extensive wholesale and 
retail jewelry concern, he was interested 
in other business affairs. He was presi- 
dent and treasurer of the Easthampton 
Rubber Thread Company, which last 
named office he still holds, and he was 
also a director of the City Bank in Spring- 
field, later sold to the Union Trust 
Company. 

He has always taken an active interest 
in public affairs. He has served as di- 
rector of the Westfield Street Railway 
Company; been president of the Repub- 
lican county committee ; was elected to 
represent his district in the Massachu- 
setts State Legislature in 1904-05-06, and 
was a member of the State Senate in 1912. 
During his term as representative, he 
served on the committee of public serv- 
ice, on the committee of taxation, and 
on the committee of ways and means ; 
and in the Senate he served and was 
chairman of the committee on insurance, 
and banks and banking, and was chair- 
man of the committee on the State House 
and Library. Mr. Stowe has always 
been ready to serve his community by 
aiding the various civic and philanthropic 
activities which he judged to be well 
planned for the good of the city, and he 
is still president of the Home for Aged 
Men, of Springfield. Fraternally he is 
affiliated with Springfield Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, has passed through 
some of the bodies, and is an honorary 
member of the Ineffable Degree. He is 
also a member of the Winthrop Club, and 
of the George Washington Chapter, Sons 
of the American Revolution, of which 
organization he is vice-president of the 



State society. He obtained the charter 
and gave that chapter its name. His re- 
ligious affiliation is with the North 
Church, of which he has been a member 
for fifty-three years, and which he is now 
serving and has served for fifty-three 
years as senior deacon. 

On September 15, 1857, Luke Stearns 
Stowe married (first) Mary Howe, of 
Bolton, Massachusetts, daughter of 
Moses and Eunice (Dodman) Howe. He 
married( second), in January, 1913, Helen 
P. Emery, of Bangor, Maine, who for fif- 
teen years was associated with the may- 
or's office in Springfield. To the first 
marriage was born one daughter, Lena 
Stowe, who married Albert V. Reopell, 
of Springfield, who is engaged in the auto- 
mobile business. 



HATCH, Frank Seldon 

Frank Seldon Hatch, assistant treas- 
urer and director of the Moore Drop 
Forging Company, of Springfield, and of 
the Hampden Grinding Wheel Company, 
who began his career as bookkeeper and 
public accountant, has risen to his pres- 
ent position by hard work and close at- 
tention to business. 

The surname Hatch is of ancient Eng- 
lish origin, is common in all parts of Eng- 
land, and was very early represented in 
the colonies of New England, no less than 
six pioneers of the name having come to 
Massachusetts before 1650. Nathaniel 
Hatch came to this country from Eng- 
land in 1635 and settled at Falmouth, 
Massachusetts ; John Hatch was of Sci- 
tuate as early as January 3, 1636; Jona- 
than Hatch, of Plymouth, served against 
the Narragansett Indians in 1645, ^^^ set- 
tled at Barnstable ; and William Hatch, 
who came from Sandwich, England, 
settled at Scituate, was elder of the 
church and lieutenant in the military 
company. Many descendants of these 



12 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



early pioneers have remained in New 
England, scattering from Massachusetts 
to adjacent States, and always they have 
contributed a valuable share to the life 
of the region. 

(I) Among those who settled in that 
part of Massachusetts which later became 
the State of Maine was Elias Hatch, who 
was born in Wales, Maine, and is buried 
in Dexter, in the same State. He was a 
farmer. He was the father of a family 
of children : Forest, of further mention ; 
Jacob, Noah, Nehemiah, Lucy, Allie, and 
Mehitable. 

(II) Rev. Forest Hatch, son of Elias 
Hatch, was born in Cambridge, Maine, 
in 1776, and died in 1834. He was a Bap- 
tist preacher, also followed farming, and 
was a very influential member of his 
community. He married Sally Leighton, 
born June 13, 1799, died 1834, she being 
the first white child born in Harmony, 
Maine. Children: Elias, died in infancy ; 
Elias Seldon, of whom further ; Betsy, 
married Royal Grant ; Fannie ; and Jacob. 

(HI) Elias Seldon Hatch, son of Rev. 
Forest and Sally (Leighton) Hatch, was 
born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, June 
14, 1822, and died January 27, 1887. He 
was a farmer. He married Lois Jane 
Leavitt, born in Parkman, Maine, March 
31, 1832, died March 8, 1904, and they 
were the parents of eight children : Ada, 
deceased, married Henry E. Hutchin- 
son; Adelia J., died in childhood; Joseph 
F., deceased; Dennis J., of whom further; 
Seldon Leavitt; Charles W., deceased; 
Ernest W., died in 1916; and Herbert L., 
who died in July, 1921. 

(IV) Dennis Jacob Hatch, son of Elias 
Seldon and Lois Jane (Leavitt) Hatch, 
was born in Cambridge, Somers county, 
Maine, October 25, 1861. He attended 
the public schools of Cambridge and of 
Moscow, Maine. When seventeen years 
of age he went to work in the Maine 



woods as a lumberman, but later took up 
farming, which he followed until 1892, 
when he came to Ayer.and later to Har- 
vard, Massachusetts, remaining with the 
Shakers at the latter place for some time. 
From Harvard he went to Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts, and there he engaged in team- 
ing, which line of work he followed for 
some twenty years. At various times he 
removed to several new locations, in- 
cluding New Hampshire, where he re- 
mained for a period of three years ; Deer- 
field and Brookfield, in Massachusetts, 
for a short time ; but finally returned to 
Maine again, remaining for a year and a 
half for the benefit of his health. He 
finally removed to Longmeadow, Massa- 
chusetts, where for the past two years, 
to 1923, he has been living retired. Fra- 
ternally, he was for many years a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He married, October i, 1887, 
Marietta Ball, who was born in Castle 
Hill, Maine, daughter of Franklin and 
Caroline E. (Roberts) Ball, and grand- 
daughter of Freeman Ball, of Corinth, 
Vermont, and of Mary (Bradford) Ball, 
the latter a descendant of Governor Brad- 
ford. Freeman Ball was a son of Rufus 
Ball, who was a descendant of one of 
three brothers who came to America at 
an early date. Children of Dennis Jacob 
and Marietta (Ball) Hatch: Frank Sel- 
don, of further mention ; Alice A. ; Earl 
Roberts ; and Lois C, who is a trained 
nurse at the Walter Reed General Hos- 
pital, in Washington, D. C. 

(V) Frank Seldon Hatch, son of Den- 
nis Jacob and Marietta (Ball) Hatch, 
was born in Easton, Maine, June 29, 
1888, and came to Boston with his par- 
ents when he was four years of age. He 
received his schooling in the public 
schools of that city and in the Somerville 
and Saugus schools, and then entered 
Burdett Business College, in which he 



13 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



completed a course in 1907. His first 
employment was with Chamberlain & 
Company, of Boston, where he held the 
position of bookkeeper for a period of 
three and a half years. At the end of 
that time, he secured employment with 
the American Felt Company, of Boston, 
as bookkeeper, and remained for three 
years. He then associated himself with 
Scovell & Wellington, public account- 
ants. For seven years he remained with 
this company, handling accounts for 
them both in Boston and Springfield. In 
May, 1920, he came to the Moore Drop 
Forging Company, of Springfield, and 
was elected assistant treasurer and a 
member of the board of directors, which 
positions he still (1923) holds. He is 
also a member of the board of directors 
and assistant treasurer and secretary of 
the Hampden Grinding Wheel Company, 
and a director of the R. R. Hunting Com- 
pany, and the Chamber of Commerce. 

Along with his business responsibili- 
ties, Mr. Hatch has found time for fra- 
ternal and club associations. He is a 
member of Springfield Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, and has taken all the 
degrees of Scottish Rite Masonry, in- 
cluding the thirty-second, and is also a 
member of Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He 
is well known in club circles, being a 
member of the Nayasset, Country, and 
Kiwanis clubs, and also holds member- 
ship in the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation. He and his family are members 
of the South Congregational Church. 

On June 5, 1915, Frank Seldon Hatch 
married Marion G. Heuser, born in Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, daughter of Charles 
A. and Bertha I. (Knauber) Heuser. 



BELLOWS, Harold Adams 

Harold Adams Bellows, treasurer of 
the C. P. Chase Lumber Company, of 



Springfield, Massachusetts, is one of the 
substantial business men of the city. He 
is vice-president of the Hampden Coop- 
erative Bank, and is well known in fra- 
ternal and club circles. 

(I) Mr. Bellows is a descendant of 
one of the very early settlers of Massa- 
chusetts, tracing his ancestry to John 
Bellows, who came from England in 1625 
in the ship "Hopewell," he then being 
but twelve years of age. His ancestors 
in England were of ancient lineage, and 
entitled to bear arms. He became a 
resident of Concord and of Marlboro, 
Massachusetts, where he reared a family, 
founding a line which has served well 
the interests of the country. He mar- 
ried. May 9, 1655, Mary Wood, and they 
were the parents of ten children, among 
whom was Benjamin, of further mention. 

(II) Benjamin Bellows, son of John 
and Mary (Wood) Bellows, was born 
January 18, 1677, in Concord, Massachu- 
setts. He married Dorcas (Cutler) Wil- 
lard, by whom he became the father of 
four children, one of whom was Benja- 
min (2), of further mention. 

(III) Benjamin (2) Bellows, son of 
Benjamin (i) and Dorcas (Cutler-Wil- 
lard) Bellows, was born May 26, 1712, 
and died in 1777, in Lancaster, Massa- 
chusetts. He was a prominent man in 
his community, and is known in history 
as the founder of Walpole, New Hamp- 
shire. He married (first) Abigail Stearns, 
and (second) Mary Hubbard. He was 
the father of twelve children, among 
whom was Joseph, of further mention. 

(IV) Colonel Joseph Bellows, son of 
Benjamin (2) and Abigail (Stearns) Bel- 
lows, was born in Lunenburg, Massa- 
chusetts, May 26, 1744, and died in Lang- 
don, New Hampshire, in 1817. He mar- 
ried, October 3, 1764, Lois Whitney, and 
they were the parents of fourteen chil- 



14 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



dren, among whom was Joseph (2), of 
further mention. 

(V) Joseph (2) Bellows, son of Col- 
onel Joseph (i) and Lois (Whitney) 
Bellows, was born in Lunenburg, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1770, and died in Walpole, 
New Hampshire, in 1821. He was a 
major in the New Hampshire militia. 
He was twice married, (first) to Deborah 
Wright, and (second) to Mary Adams. 
Among his children was William J., of 
further mention. 

(VI) William J. Bellows, son of Joseph 
(2) Bellows, was born in Rockingham, 
Vermont, July 3, 1817, and removed to 
Littleton, New Hampshire, about 1831. 
After receiving a practical education in 
the public school, he began his active 
career as a clerk in a store in Springfield, 
Vermont, where he remained for about 
three years. In 1834 he became a sales- 
man in a wholesale dry goods house in 
Boston, Massachusetts, and this connec- 
tion he maintained until 1841, when he 
returned to Littleton and began the 
study of law with his brother, Henry A. 
Bellows. He was admitted to the Graf- 
ton county (New Hampshire) bar in 
1844, and from 1845 to 1850 was engaged 
in practice in association with his brother, 
under the firm name of H. A. & W. J. 
Bellows. In 1850 he removed to Con- 
cord, New Hampshire, where he was en- 
gaged in practice alone until 1854, in 
which year he formed a partnership with 
John Farr, continuing that connection 
until 1861. From 1861 to 1868 he was 
postmaster of Littleton, New Hampshire, 
and from 1861 to 1864 was also editor of 
the "People's Journal," a weekly publi- 
cation which was popular in the town- 
ship. He was president of the Board of 
Education of the Union School district 
for several years between 1868 and 1884. 
He was a member of the firm of Henry L. 
Tilton & Company from 1868 to 1870, 
and from 1870 to 1872 was engaged in 



the general merchandise business in as- 
sociation with Mr. Brackett, under the 
firm name of Bellows, Brackett & Com- 
pany. In July, 1872, he formed a part- 
nership with his son, William H., and 
engaged in the clothing and house fur- 
nishing business, under the firm name of 
Bellows & Son, which business he con- 
tinued during the remainder of his active 
life. He was active in the New Hamp- 
shire militia and was promoted to the 
rank of major in 1845. 

On August 12, 1847, in Littleton, New 
Hampshire, William J. Bellows married 
Caroline Ivah Bullard, who was born 
April 9, 1821, in Concord, Massachusetts, 
and died in Littleton, July 22, 1890, 
daughter of Sampson and Ivah (Patter- 
son) Bullard. Mr. and Mrs. Bellows be- 
came the parents of three children : Mary 
Ivah Patterson; William Henry, of fur- 
ther mention ; and George Sampson. 

(VII) William Henry Bellows, son of 
William J. and Caroline Ivah (Bullard) 
Bellows, was born in Littleton, New 
Hampshire, August 5, 1852. He received 
his education in the public schools of his 
native town, where he has always re- 
sided. W^hen he was twenty-one years 
of age he engaged in business with his 
father, under the name of Bellows & Son, 
dealing in clothing and house furnishing 
goods. They did a large business in that 
line among the hotels in the mountains, 
dealing in all kinds of supplies used by 
them, and having traveling representa- 
tives who took orders, at times fitting up 
an entire hotel with furniture and all 
kinds of dishes, glassware, silverware, 
etc. That business he has continued to 
the present time (1923), remaining in 
the same store up to 1905, when they 
moved the business to a new store, and 
the business greatly expanded during the 
years that have passed since its estab- 
lishment. Finally the different lines were 
taken over by men who had been for 



15 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



many years associated with Mr. Bellows, 
and now they handle mostly clothing and 
gents' furnishings. Honest business 
methods and efficiency in management, 
together with courtesy and promptness 
in attending to the needs of patrons, have 
brought success, and the firm is one of 
the substantial and well established con- 
cerns of the city. Along with his respon- 
sibilities in connection with the concern 
known as Bellows & Son, Mr. Bellows is 
interested in other business and financial 
organizations and also takes an active 
part in the public affairs of the commu- 
nity in which he lives. He has served as 
auditor of the Littleton Savings Bank for 
many years, and is now a trustee and 
president of this. He was also a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the Little- 
ton National Bank. He was for some 
years a member of the firm known as the 
Littleton View Company, organized in 
1883 by his brother and father, for the 
purpose of manufacturing stereoscopic 
views. This was discontinued in 1910. 
In 1896 he was elected to represent the 
Littleton district in the New Hampshire 
Legislature, and has always been highly 
esteemed by his fellow-citizens both for 
his sagacity and for the integrity of his 
character. He married, December 9, 1880, 
Lucia Emma Baldwin, who was born in 
Stratford, New Hampshire, April 21, 
1858, daughter of Jedediah Miller and 
Sarah Cutler (Bennett) Baldwin, and 
they are the parents of three children, 
born in Littleton, New Hampshire: i. 
Edith Marion, born May 28, 1884. 2. 
Harold Adams, of further mention. 3. 
Raymond Adams, born June 3, 1898; he 
is associated with the Waldorf Lunch 
System, being manager of the lunch room 
at Troy, New York; married August 28, 
1922, Pauline Sherburn, of Littleton, New 
Hampshire. 

16 



(VIII) Harold Adams Bellows, son of 
William Henry and Lucia Emma (Bald- 
win) Bellows, was born in Littleton, New 
Hampshire, June 20, 1890. He received 
his early education in the public schools 
of his native city. He then entered Dart- 
mouth College, from which he graduated 
in 1912, then took up a course in busi- 
ness administration and finance in the 
Amos Tuck department, from which he 
was graduated in 1913. After the com- 
pletion of his college course, he went to 
Boston, where he became associated with 
C. W. Whittier and brother in the real 
estate and brokerage business. This con- 
nection he maintained until November, 
1918, when he removed to Springfield 
and identified himself with the C. P. 
Chase Lumber Company, of which con- 
cern he was elected to fill the position of 
treasurer. He is also a member of the 
board of directors, both of which official 
positions he has continued to hold to the 
present time (1923). He is president of 
the Springfield Retail Credit Association, 
also vice-president of the Hampden Co- 
operative Bank. He is well known in 
fraternal and club circles, being a mem- 
ber of Springfield Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons ; of Delta Tau Delta col- 
lege fraternity ; of the Nayasset Club, 
Springfield Country Club, Kiwanis Club, 
Publicity Club, and secretary of this, 
Springfield Automobile Club, and direc- 
tor of the Springfield Chamber of Com- 
merce. His religious affiliation is with 
Faith Congregational Church. 

On October 10, 1914, Harold A. Bel- 
lows married Rachel Adams Chase, of 
Springfield, daughter of C. P. and Jean 
E. (Bush) Chase (see Vol. VII, Massa- 
chusetts Biography), and they are the 
parents of two children : Charles Chase, 
born April 2, 1916; and Lawrence Wil- 
liam, born May 19, 1922. 






\S^ 



^W^ 



.c-.-^'^A 











7//^^-^/ ^i/'C^^x^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



WELCKER, Rudolph 

Among the civil engineers of Massa- 
chusetts who have had a wide and varied 
experience is Rudolph Welcker, consult- 
ing engineer, who after serving under 
various governments and engaging in 
construction work in Holland, Persia, 
India, and Egypt, and in several parts of 
the United States, is residing in Spring- 
field, where he is following the profession 
in which he is a recognized authority. 

John William Welcker, father of Ru- 
dolph Welcker, was born in Arnhem, 
Holland, in 1845, ^^^ ^^^^ i" December, 
1918. He attended the public schools of 
his native city and then studied civil engi- 
neering, passing the State examinations 
in Holland, where he became chief of 
government engineers, which position he 
held for many years. When President 
Roosevelt was planning that gigantic 
piece of construction work which was to 
be of world-wide importance, the Panama 
Canal, he sought, for the accomplish- 
ment of the project, the best engineer- 
ing skill to be found, irrespective of na- 
tionality or of place of residence. Thus 
it was that, from a world-wide field, John 
William Welcker was appointed one of 
the consulting engineers for this great 
engineering feat. He was as such a mem- 
ber of the board of consulting engineers 
which decided, among other great prob- 
lems, whether the canal should be a sea 
level or a lock level one. This was his 
last great work, a fitting climax to a life 
of notable achievement. He retired at 
the age of sixty-five years. Politically, 
he was a Liberal, and his religious affil- 
iation was with the Dutch Reformed 
church. He married Clara DeWit, who 
was born in Holland, where she still re- 
sides (1923). John W. and Clara (De- 
Wit) Welcker were the parents of five 
children : Louisa ; Rudolph, of further 

Mass — 12 — 2 



mention; Clara J.; Albertus ; John Her- 
man. 

Rudolph Welcker, son of John William 
and Clara (DeWit) Welcker, was born 
at The Hague, Holland, October 21, 1880. 
His education was received in various 
schools situated in different places in 
Holland, as his father's official duties re- 
quired frequent changes of residence and 
the family usually accompanied him. In 
the public schools of the various towns 
and cities in Holland he received prelimi- 
nary schooling and then entered the In- 
stitute of Technology, in Delft, Holland. 
After graduation he rose so rapidly in his 
profession that in 1903 he was made as- 
sistant engineer in the municipal service 
of The Hague. After gaining valuable 
experience in the discharge of the duties 
of this position, he entered the service of 
the Persian Government, with two other 
Dutch engineers, for the purpose of mak- 
ing surveys, and submitting plans for 
an extensive irrigation system in Arabi- 
stan. He remained in the service of the 
Persian Government for six months and 
then went to British India, locating at 
Bombay for a time, after which he was 
appointed assistant engineer in the public 
works department in Cairo, Egypt. He 
was one of a board of three engineers 
appointed by the Egyptian Government 
for the construction of three bridges 
across the Nile. Upon the completion of 
this work he was appointed superintend- 
ent of the Delta Light railways and held 
this position until 1906. In that year Mr. 
Welcker came to America, locating in 
New York City, where for six years he 
was actively engaged as designing engi- 
neer on the various subways. His first 
work in New York City was as an in- 
spector of the Pennsylvania railroad tun- 
nels. He was then placed in charge of 
the making of the plans for the Queens- 
borough subway for the New York & 



17 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Long Island railroad, which is now a 
part of the Interborough Rapid Transit 
System, and was a passenger on the first 
electric car that entered Manhattan from 
Long Island by sub-aqueous route. He 
also designed various sections of the new 
subway systems in lower Manhattan for 
the State of New York. He was subse- 
quently engaged as consulting engineer 
and had an office in New York City until 
1913. In that year he removed to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, where he opened an 
office and engaged in business as a con- 
sulting engineer, and there he has since 
continued to make his home. During the 
World War, in 1917, he was appointed 
supervising engineer in the United States 
Navy for the district of Baltimore, Mary- 
land, and in 1918 was also appointed su- 
pervising plant engineer for dry docks 
and marine railways on the Atlantic 
coast, under the jurisdiction of the United 
States Shipping Board. In that position 
he had general supervision of construc- 
tion of all drydocks, marine railways, and 
repair plants located at various ports 
from Portland, Maine, to Galveston, 
Texas. After the armistice he resigned 
this position, in 1919, and returned to his 
personal business as consulting engineer, 
with headquarters in Springfield. 

In addition to his skill and his expert 
knowledge in his special line. Mr. 
Welcker has large executive and admin- 
istrative ability, and has been active in 
the organization of various enterprises, 
having many diversified interests. In 
1919 he went abroad on business and 
since that time has continued to keep in 
personal touch with a variety of projects 
abroad, in addition to conducting a most 
successful business of his own in Amer- 
ica. With all his exacting responsibili- 
ties, Mr. Welcker is a member of the 
Nayasset Club, of Springfield; the Real- 
ity Club, of Springfield ; and of the Royal 



Society of Engineers, in Holland ; and 
has held office under several different 
governments. His religious affiliation is 
with the Unitarian church. 

Rudolph Welcker married, on August 
24, 1907, Adelaide Hammond Crowley, of 
Cuttingsville, Vermont, daughter of Jed- 
ediah and Helen (Foster) Crowley, and 
they are the parents of two children : 
John William, who was born in Yonkers, 
New York, January 3, 1910; and Helen 
Clara, who was born in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, February 4, 1914. 



LEEDS, Alfred 

Among the business men of Spring- 
field is Alfred Leeds, president of the 
Becker Paper Company, who is also a 
director in the United Electric Light 
Company, and in the Bircham Bend 
Power Company, and treasurer of the 
company which owns and controls the 
Hotel Worthey. 

(I) Mr. Leeds is a descendant of old 
Colonial stock, tracing his ancestry in 
this country to Richard Leeds, born in 
England in 1605, died in Dorchester, 
Massachusetts, March 18, 1693, who 
came to America in 1637, locating in Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts, April 12, of that 
year. He married, in Great Yarmouth, 
England, July 18, 1634, Joan Nichols, 
who was born in England in 1614, and 
died in Dorchester, Massachusetts, Feb- 
ruary 9, 1682. They were the parents of 
children, among whom was Joseph, of 
further mention. 

(II) Joseph Leeds, son of Richard and 
Joan (Nichols) Leeds, was born in Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts, July 14, 1637, and 
died in that place, January 28, 1715. He 
married, in Northampton, Massachusetts, 
November 8, 1661, Miriam Cosk, who 
was baptized in Windsor, Connecticut, 
March 12, 1642, and died in Dorchester, 
Massachusetts, August 23, 1720. Among 



18 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



their children was Joseph (2), of further 
mention. 

(III) Joseph (2) Leeds, son of Joseph 
(i) and Miriam (Cosk) Leeds, was born 
in Northampton, Massachusetts, May 6, 
1665, and died in Dorchester, Massachu- 
setts, December 27, 1747. He married 

Mary , who was born in 1768, and 

died in Dorchester, Massachusetts, March 
9, 1750. Among their children was Hope- 
still, of further mention. 

(IV) Hopestill Leeds, son of Joseph 
(2) and Mary Leeds, was born in Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts, June 11, 1702, 
and died there, January 14, 1795. He 
married, in Dorchester, Massachusetts, 
in 1736, Sarah Clapp, who was born in 
Dorchester, May 11, 1714, and died in 
Dorchester, Massachusetts, June 13, 1768. 
They reared a family of children, among 
whom was Daniel, of further mention. 

(V) Daniel Leeds, son of Hopestill 
and Sarah (Clapp) Leeds, was born in 
Dorchester, Massachusetts, May 28, 1739, 
and died there, June 7, 1790. He mar- 
ried, in 1763, Abigail Gore, who was born 
in Roxbury, Massachusetts, September 
29, 1743, and died in Dorchester, Massa- 
chusetts, July 16, 1816. Among their 
children was Samuel, of further mention, 

(VI) Samuel Leeds, son of Daniel and 
Abigail (Gore) Leeds, was born in Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts, October 6, 1765, 
and died April 20, 1845. He married, 
June 3, 1793, Mary Ingersoll, who was 
born February 23, 1775, and died Decem- 
ber 15, 1853. Among their children was 
Samuel, of further mention. 

(VII) Samuel (2) Leeds, son of Sam- 
uel (i) and Mary (Ingersoll) Leeds, was 
born in Milton, Massachusetts, May 11, 
1796, and died in New York City, Sep- 
tember 22, 1868. He was engaged in the 
manufacture of straw hats in New York 
City. He married, in New York City, 
November 12, 1833, Mary Warren Mel- 



len, who was born in Pittsfield, Massa- 
chusetts, September 3, 1800, and died in 
New York City, January 31, 1878. They 
were the parents of seven children : Sam- 
uel P., Daniel W., William; Charles 
Henry, of further mention ; Russel ; Rob- 
ert ; and Mary, who married William H. 
Van Kleeck. 

(VIII) Charles Henry Leeds, son of 
Samuel (2) and Mary W. (Mellen) 
Leeds, was born in New York City, Jan- 
uary 9, 1834, and died at Atlantic City, 
New Jersey, November 6, 1914. He re- 
ceived his early education in the public 
schools of his native city, and then en- 
tered Yale College, from which he grad- 
uated in 1854. He succeeded his father 
in the business of manufacturing straw 
hats, and lived in Stamford, Connecticut, 
for a time, where he took a keen interest 
in public afifairs and which community he 
served as its first mayor. He married, 
in New York City, December 21, 1865, 
Sarah Ruby Lambert, and they were the 
parents of seven children : Edward L. ; 
Alfred, of whom further ; Ellen, who mar- 
ried John S. George ; Norman ; Mary 
Warren, who married Harry F. Devens; 
Howard, deceased ; and Arthur Russel. 

(IX) Alfred Leeds, son of Charles 
Henry and Sarah R. (Lambert) Leeds, 
was born in New York City, October 20, 
1867. He received his preparatory edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native 
city, and in the Polytechnic Institute, of 
Brooklyn, New York, and then entered 
Yale College, from which he graduated 
in 1887. Upon the completion of his col- 
lege course he engaged in the paper man- 
ufacturing business, in association with 
the American Writing Paper Company, 
which connection he maintained for a 
period of nineteen years, during which 
time he rose to the positions of sales man- 
ager, assistant manager, general man- 
ager, and finally was made vice-president. 



19 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



In 1917 he became associated with the 
Worthey Paper Company, as treasurer, 
and when the Becker Paper Company 
was organized in 1921, Mr. Leeds was 
made vice-president of the company, Mr. 
Leeds is also a director in the United 
Electric Light Company, and in the Bir- 
cham Bend Power Company, and is 
treasurer of the company which owns and 
controls the Worthey Hotel. Mr. Leeds 
is president of the Nayasset Club, and in 
1912 was president of the Springfield 
Country Club. 

On October 24, 1894, Alfred Leeds mar- 
ried Louise Chapin Morgan, of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, daughter of Elisha 
(2) and Sara G. (Grant) Morgan (see 
Morgan IX), and they are the parents of 
three children: Sally, born in 1896; Mary, 
born in 1898; and Helen, born in 1904. 

(The Morgan Line). 

The genealogy of the Morgan family is 
exceptional in that sixteen generations 
of Morgan ancestors of Miles Morgan, 
immigrant ancestor of the branch to 
which Mrs. Leeds belongs, have been 
traced, and the connection between the 
English and American genealogies 
clearly established. George T. Clark, 
antiquary, has traced the line to remote 
Welsh ancestors, successfully establish- 
ing all the links in the long line from 
Cadivor-Fawr to present members of the 
American family. The line herein fol- 
lowed begins with the immigrant ancestor. 

(I) Miles Morgan, immigrant ancestor 
of the American branch of the family 
herein traced, was born, probably in 
Llandorff, Glamorgan county, Wales, in 
1616. He was named, perhaps, after 
Miles Morgan, captain in the British 
army, who perished with Sir Humphrey 
Gilbert, half-brother of Sir Walter 
Raleigh. He removed to Bristol a few 
years before he came to America, and 



arrived in Boston, Massachusetts, in 
April, 1636, with his two brothers. The 
eldest brother, James, settled in New 
London, Connecticut; John went to Vir- 
ginia ; and Miles joined the New Eng- 
land colonists and became one of the 
founders of Springfield, Massachusetts. 
Next to Colonel Pynchon, he was the 
most prominent and useful man in the 
colony at Springfield, and though he was 
the youngest in the colony, he was made 
second in command. He was a wise 
counsellor and a sturdy tiller of the soil, 
and in 1679 ^ handsome monument was 
erected at Springfield as an expression of 
appreciation of the services rendered by 
Miles Morgan in settling the town, gov- 
erning the colony, and fighting the Indi- 
ans in 1675, when Springfield was sacked 
and burned and many of the residents 
killed. He died May 28, 1699, aged 
eighty-four years. He married (first), 
about 1643, Prudence Gilbert, who died 
November 14, 1660; (second), February 
15, 1669, Elizabeth Bliss. Children: 
Mary, Jonathan, David, Peletiah, Isaac, 
Lydia, Hannah, Mercy. Child of the 
second marriage : Nathaniel. 

(II) David Morgan, second son of 
Miles and Prudence (Gilbert) Morgan, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
July 23, 1648. He married Mary Clark, 
January 16, 1672, and died May 30, 1731. 
Children, all born in Springfield, were : 
Prudence, Peletiah, David, Abigail, John, 
Jonathan, Mercy, or Mary, Ebenezer, 
Benjamin. 

(III) Deacon David (2) Morgan, sec- 
ond son of David (i) and Mary (Clark) 
Morgan, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, February 18, 1679. He was one 
of the twenty citizens of Springfield who 
petitioned Governor Stoughton, Febru- 
ary 12, 1700-01, for more lands in order 
that posterity might have sufficient space 
for expansion. Governor Stoughton 



20 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



granted this petition, and with the con- 
sent of his counsel, laid out a new town 
(Agawam) in 1636. Here, in 1787, the 
town of Brimfield was founded. A meet- 
ing house was built, and when completed 
the distribution of seats occurred, Sep- 
tember 12, 1727. David Morgan was 
given the first seat in the deacons' pew, 
the first on the men's side of the house, 
and Isaac Morgan was seated in the elev- 
enth pew, Jonathan, Daniel, Stephen, 
John, and Reuben being placed in the 
fourteenth, eighteenth, twentieth, and 
twenty-second, respectively. His wife 
was allotted the pew next the pulpit on 
the east side thereof at the same time. 
Deacon David Morgan married, in 1703, 
Deborah Colton, daughter of Ephraim 
Colton, and he died September 11, 1760. 
The children were: David; Joseph, of 
further mention ; Mary, married Leonard 
Hoar; Elizabeth, married Phineas Sher- 
man; Jonathan; Deborah, married Na- 
thaniel Collins; Mercy, died young; and 
Isaac. 

(IV) Joseph Morgan, second son of 
Deacon David (2) and Deborah (Colton) 
Morgan, was born in Brimfield, Massa- 
chusetts, August 19, 1705. He married 
(first), December 25, 1729, Margaret 
Cooley, who died July 17, 1754; (second), 
August II, 1757, Rachel Dada, who died 
March 27, 1810. The children of Joseph 
and Margaret (Cooley) Morgan, all born 
in Brimfield, were: Margaret, married 
John Mighell ; Joseph ; Mary, married 
Captain Ebenezer Hitchcock ; Benjamin ; 
Mariam ; David ; Keziah, married Benja- 
min Cody; Aaron, married Abigail Sher- 
man ; Noah, of further mention. Chil- 
dren of second marriage: Elijah, mar- 
ried Patty Hitchcock ; Enoch, married 
Mercy Bates. 

(V) Noah Morgan, son of Joseph and 
Margaret (Cooley) Morgan, was born 
about 1741. He married (first) Mercy King, 



April I, 1762, and they were the parents 
of six children : Lovina, married Daniel 
Brooks, of Greenfield ; Apollos ; Mary, 
married Levi Merriman ; Noah, of fur- 
ther mention; Candice ; Samuel, married 
Sarah Kellogg. Mercy (King) Morgan 
died December, 1776, aged forty years, 
and Noah Morgan married (second) 
Mary Robbins, widow of Aaron Rob- 
bins, July 18, 1782. Children of sec- 
ond marriage were: Fannie E., married 
Jeremiah Pratt; Aaron, born December 
8, 1785, died August 31, 1803. 

(VI) Noah (2) Morgan, second son and 
fourth child of Noah (i) and Mercy 
(King) Morgan, was baptized in North- 
field, Massachusetts, June 11, 1769. His 
homestead, Northfield Farms, was lo- 
cated about five miles from the center of 
the town, and there he conducted a gen- 
eral store and managed a large and val- 
uable farm. He married and reared a 
family of nine children, among whom 
was Elisha, of further mention. 

(VII) Elisha Morgan, seventh child of 
Noah (2) Morgan, was born in North- 
field, Massachusetts, June 16, 1793. After 
receiving his school training in the public 
school of his district, he was employed in 
the office of the railroad company as 
clerk, retaining that position until he be- 
came bookkeeper in the office of the Con- 
necticut River Railroad Company at 
Greenfield, subsequently being trans- 
ferred to the Holyoke office, where he 
remained for six months, and then went 
to Springfield as paymaster at the gen- 
eral offices. In 1816 he was promoted to 
the position of general freight agent, two 
years later to general passenger agent, 
which position he held for twenty-eight 
years, resigning in 1846, after a service of 
more than thirty-five years with one 
company. He died in Northfield, Massa- 
chusetts, October 30, 1856, aged sixty- 
three years. He married, January i, 1818, 



21 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Harriet Ruggles, born January 28, 1797, 
and they were the parents of ten children : 
Minerva, died young; Louisa, married 
Harlow Humes ; Minerva, married James 
Dewing; Mary H., married Ovres Lucy; 
Jeremiah, married Eliza Adams; Mar- 
shal M., married Alice Dike; Julia P., 
died when about fourteen years of age ; 
Elisha, of further mention; Harriet J.; 
and Fidelia. 

(VIII) Elisha (2) Morgan, third son 
and eighth child of Elisha (i) and Har- 
riet (Ruggles) Morgan, was born in 
Northfield, Masachusetts, September 7, 
1833. He received his education in the 
public schools of Springfield, and then 
became general ticket agent at Spring- 
field for the Boston & Maine Railroad 
Company, holding that office until 1864, 
when he resigned to established the firm 
of E. Morgan & Company, for the pur- 
pose of manufacturing envelopes. The 
other member of the firm was Chester W. 
Chapin, then president of the Boston & 
Albany railroad, and he remained with 
the firm for eight years. E. Morgan & 
Company were the pioneer manufacturers 
of stationery put up in fancy boxes con- 
taining one quire of paper and accom- 
panying envelopes, first known as pape- 
teries. They were also the first to con- 
tract with the Government for the manu- 
facture of postal cards. When in March, 
1872, the business was incorporated as a 
joint stock company, Mr. Morgan was 
treasurer of the corporation, and man- 
aging head of the concern. The business 
thus began attained gigantic proportions, 
and became known throughout the busi- 
ness world as one of the largest concerns 
of its kind in the country. Besides man- 
aging this extensive business, Mr. Mor- 
gan is a director in the Massasoit Paper 
Company of Holyoke; of the Chester 
Paper Company of Huntington ; of the 
Hartford Manila Company of East Hart- 



ford ; of the John Hancock National Bank 
of Boston ; and of the Springfield Print- 
ing and Binding Company. He was pres- 
ident of the United Electric Light Com- 
pany, and acting president of the Amer- 
ican Writing Paper Company. In addi- 
tion to all these interests, he also had 
large real estate holdings in the vicinity 
of Dwight and Hillman streets in Spring- 
field, which section was greatly improved 
by him. During the administrations of 
Governors Russel and Wolcott, 1887-90, 
he was a member of the executive council 
of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
and Republican elector from Massachu- 
setts in the electoral college of 1889, vot- 
ing for Harrison and Morton, who were 
elected. 

He married, June 18, 1862, Sara G. 
Grant, daughter of Sidney and Mary (Mc- 
Kinney) Grant, of Manchester, Connec- 
ticut, and they were the parents of nine 
children: i. Miles, born April 25, 1864, 
died in infancy. 2. Helen, born May 3, 
1865, married Frank L. Worthy. 3. 
Roger, born February 18, 1867. 4. Louise 
Chapin, of further mention. 5. Fanny, 
born July 3, 1870, died in infancy. 6. 
Rachel, born October 6, 1876, died in in- 
fancy. 7. Sally, died in infancy. 8. Dan- 
iel Harries, born January 14, 1879. 9- 
Stewart Chase, born August 30, 1880, 
died May 15, 1888. Mr. Morgan died in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, February i, 
1903. 

(IX) Louise Chapin Morgan, daugh- 
ter of Elisha (2) and Sara G. (Grant) 
Morgan, was born February 15, 1869. 
She married Alfred Leeds (see Leeds 
IX). 



TURNER, Arthur Henry 

Among those who have done much to 
enrich the life of Springfield is Arthur H. 
Turner, organist of Trinity Methodist 
Church, who for more than twenty years 



22 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



has been a leader in musical life of the 
city, presiding at the municipal organ, 
and conducting the music at a large num- 
ber of public gatherings in Springfield, 
also conducting singing societies and 
choral organizations, and giving instruc- 
tion in both vocal and instrumental music. 

Henry Kitson Turner, father of Arthur 
H. Turner, was born in Sheffield, Eng- 
land, in 1842, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, in 191 1. He was a well 
educated man, a skilled silversmith by 
trade, who, being able and energetic, and 
feeling that opportunity for advancement 
and for freedom were greater in the 
newer land to the westward than in his 
native country, came to America after 
the close of the Civil War, settling in 
Meriden, Connecticut, where he engaged 
in cutlery work. From the year of his 
arrival, 1866, to the time of his retire- 
ment he was associated with the Wilcox 
Silver Plate Company, which later be- 
came the American International Silver- 
smith Company, his skill at his trade be- 
ing so marked that his equals in that field 
were few. Mr. Turner was one of four 
sons, the other three being Joseph, Wil- 
liam, and Albert. He married Ellen 
Fletcher, who was born in Sheffield, Eng- 
land, daughter of Jarvis and Mary 
Fletcher, and they were the parents of 
three children : Ada Ellen, who married 
John Vincent; Arthur Henry, of further 
mention ; and Frank Jarvis, deceased. 

Arthur Henry Turner, son of Henry K. 
and Ellen (Fletcher) Turner, was born 
in Meriden, Connecticut, February 6, 
1873. He received his education in the 
public schools of Meriden, and when 
fourteen years of age learned the art of 
steel engraving. Two years later, when 
he was eighteen years of age, he began 
the study of music, his work at steel 
engraving supplying the funds for in- 
struction. Possessed of a genuine gift 



and loving music, he continued to work 
at his tiade for five years more, seven in 
all, the last four of which were spent in 
the employ of the Parker Gun Company. 
His first remunerative work in the mu- 
sical field was at the All Saints' Episcopal 
Church in Meriden, he giving up a five 
dollar a day position in order to accept a 
ten dollar a week position as organist of 
this church. Thoroughly happy in his 
new position, he studied and worked dil- 
igently, adding to the natural ability the 
training which he knew to be essential to 
success. In 1900 he was called to Spring- 
field as the organist of the Church of the 
Unity, and that position he held for 
twelve years, constantly broadening his 
experience and training. At the end of 
that period he became associated with 
Trinity Methodist Church as organist, 
and that position he still holds (1922). 
In addition to his church work, he con- 
ducts singing societies and choral organ- 
izations, and gives instruction in both 
vocal and instrumental music. He has 
been the head of the Turner School of 
Music for the past fourteen years. Here 
a number of teachers are employed and 
all branches of music are taught. From 
this school have been graduated many 
pupils who have taken high rank among 
the leading musicians, more particularly 
pianists of the country. He is one of 
those men of genius who are always 
learners, and to the present time has con- 
tinued to work and to study, constantly 
deepening, enlarging, and broadening his 
knowledge and his skill in his chosen 
field. He studied for some time with 
Professor William C. Hammon, of Hol- 
yoke, Massachusetts, and in 1903 went to 
Paris to continue his studies. He has 
since traveled extensively abroad, visit- 
ing Scotland, England, France, Denmark, 
and Sweden, and together with his work 
in the musical field has made an inter- 



23 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



esting collection of scenes of his travels, 
photographed by himself. In 1921 he 
went to Edinburgh, Scotland, as delegate 
to the Rotary Convention held there in 
that year, and he w^as the only American 
honored w^ith the privilege of giving a re- 
cital at that convocation. Besides his 
church work, and his activities as in- 
structor and as conductor, Mr. Turner is 
peculiarly associated with the musical 
life of the city through the fact that he 
was chosen to preside at the municipal 
organ in the city auditorium, and through 
his concerts on this instrument he reaches 
great numbers of people, helping to cul- 
tivate a taste for good music and giv- 
ing pleasure to thousands of the music 
loving residents of Springfield. He has 
conducted the music at a large num- 
ber of public gatherings in Springfield, 
and has taken an active part in all civic 
work. Possessed of a winning manner 
and a sincere interest in "folks" as well 
as in music, Mr. Turner is not only a 
"good mixer," but he is a good influence 
in the community to which he has con- 
tributed so much along musical lines. In 
1922 Mr. Turner organized the great 
Municipal Orchestra of seventy well 
chosen musicians of this city, and as its 
leader has given four of the finest con- 
certs ever given in the city, and this great 
orchestra bids fair to make Springfield 
famous from an orchestral standpoint. 

With all his many and varied activities 
in the musical field, Mr. Turner has found 
time for fraternal and social affiliations, 
in which he has always been ready to 
contribute his musical skill and ability. 
He is a member of Hampden Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons; of Hampden 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows ; and of the American Guild of Or- 
ganists ; and in 1917 he was chosen vice- 
president of the National Association of 
Organists. 



On January i, 1896, Mr. Turner mar- 
ried Elizabeth Anker, who was born in 
Koing, Sweden, daughter of John and 
Natalie (Ingred) Anker, and they are the 
parents of three children: i. Mabel Ar- 
line, born November 22, 1896; married 
Carlisle Knowlton. 2. Clarence Rich- 
mond, born October 3, 1898; married 
Hazel Joselyn, of Utah ; he is a musician, 
a skilled violoncellist, now associated 
with a company, in which capacity he 
has made three trips to the coast. In 1917 
he enlisted for service in the World War, 
and served as a member of the 104th Reg- 
iment Band of the Yankee Division, that 
band being the first to be decorated for 
distinguished service. Clarence R. Tur- 
ner was also personally decorated foi 
meritorious service; he played the saxo- 
phone, and acted as band master with 
the rank of sergeant. 3. Eleanor Mar- 
guerite, born April 23, 1904; she is a 
graduate of Central High School, class of 
1920; a skilled musician, she makes a 
specialty of the piano, and is well known 
and prominent in musical circles ; she 
married Gustavo La Zazzera, son of Gen- 
naro La Zazzera, of Italy. 



WHITNEY, Howard Rogers 

Thorough preparation and experience 
have well fitted Howard Rogers Whitney 
for his present position, assistant to the 
president of the Springfield Street Rail- 
way Company. Previous to coming to 
Springfield he was an instructor in mathe- 
matics in Tufts College, also assistant 
engineer on the Northern Pacific railroad, 
and held other important positions. 

Mr. Whitney is a descendant of a very 
old family which originally was De Whit- 
ney. The first De Whitney of whom we 
have knowledge was Eustace De Whit- 
ney, of Flemish descent, whose mother, 
Agnes, is on record in the Domesday 



24 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Book, 1081-1087. Whitney as a surname 
owes its origin to the ancient but obscure 
parish of Whitney, on the western con- 
fines of Herefordshire, near the borders of 
Wales. The name appears in ancient rec- 
ords as Whiteny, Whyteneye, Witenie, 
etc., and the parish lies in the valley of 
the river Wye. The river in that section 
of its course is a mountain torrent sub- 
ject to sudden and destructive periods of 
tempestuous flow, when it runs white and 
foaming. This fact probably explains the 
origin of the name, the Anglo-Saxon 
words "hwit-ey" meaning "white water," 
from which the name Whitney doubtless 
is derived. According to the record in 
the Domesday Book, when Anglo-Saxon 
lands were distributed among the follow- 
ers of Willam the Conqueror, the parish 
of Whitney went to Turstin the Fleming, 
who besides his possessions in Hereford- 
shire also held lands in Hampshire, Dor- 
setshire, Berkshire, Somersetshire, Devon- 
shire, Gloucestershire, Buckinghamshire, 
and Wiltshire. He married Agnes, daugh- 
ter of Alured de Merleberge, and his son. 
Sir Eustace, was called Lord of Whitney 
and became the founder of the family of 
de Whitney. The '"de" was gradually 
dropped, in some cases as early as the 
twelfth century, and has long since dis- 
appeared. Henr}' Melville has printed in 
exquisite form an illustrated volume trac- 
ing the English ancestry of John Whit- 
ney, the immigrant ancestor, and few 
American families have their English his- 
tory in such well authenticated and satis- 
factory form. The following is an ab- 
stract of the English ancestry as given in 
that publication : 

(I) Turstin the Fleming, or Turstin de 
Wigmore, was a follower of William the 
Conqueror. He married Ag^es, daughter 
of Alured de Merleberge, a Xorman baron 
of Ewias Castle, in the Marches of Wales. 



(II) Eustace, son of Turstin. was a 
benefactor of the monastery of St. Peter 
in Gloucester. He took the surname of 
de Whitney, from Whitney of Wye, in 
the Marches of Wales, where his principal 
castle was located. The castle, which has 
entirely disappeared, is believed to be in 
ruins under the Wye, which has changed 
its course. 

(III) Sir Robert de Whitney, a direct 
descendant of Eustace, was living in 1242. 

(IV) Sir Eustace de Whitney son of 
Sir Robert de Whitney, gave deed to the 
monastery of St. Peter in 1280. He was 
Lord of Pencombe, Little Cowarn, and 
Whitney, in 1281. 

(V) Sir Eustace de Whitney, son of 
Sir Eustace de Whitney, was knighted by 
Edward I in 1306, and was a member of 
the Parliament for Hereford in 1313 and 
in 1352. 

(VI) Sir Robert de Whitney, son of 
Sir Eustace de Whitney, was one of two 
hundred gentlemen who went to Milan 
in the retinue of the Duke of Clarence on 
the occasion of the latter's marriage in 
1368. He was a member of Parliament 
for Herefordshire in 1377, 1379 and 13S0, 
and sheriff in 1377. 

(VII) Sir Robert Whitney, son of Sir 
Robert de Whitney, was sent abroad to 
negotiate a treaty with the Count of 
Flanders in 1388 ; member of Parliament 
for Herefordshire in 1391. He was sent 
to France to deliver the town and Castle 
of Cherbourg to the King of Navarre in 
1393 ; was knight-marshal in the court of 
Richard II; sent on King's business to 
Ireland in 1394; and was killed, with his 
brother and most of his relatives, at the 
battle of Pilleth, 1402. 

(VIII) Sir Robert Whitney, son of Sir 
Robert Whitney, was granted the Castle 
of Clifford and lordships of Clifford and 
Glasbur}' by Henry IV in 1404, by virtue 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ot the services of his father. He was 
sheriff of Herefordshire in 1413-28-33-37, 
member of Parliament, 1416-22 ; fought in 
the French War under Henr}^ V, and was 
captain of the castle and town of Vire in 
1420. He died March 12, 1441. 

(IX) Sir Eustace de Whitney, son of 
Sir Robert Whitney, was born in 141 1. 
He was head of a commission sent to 
Wales by Henry VI in 1455, and was a 
member of the Parliament for Hereford- 
shire in 1468. He married (first) Jenett 
Russell; (second) Jane Clifford. 

(X) Robert Whitney, son of Sir Eus- 
tace de Whitney, was probably a knight, 
took an active part in the War of the 
Roses, and was attained as a Yorkist in 
1459. He was probably at the battle of 
Mortimer's Cross in 1461, and was the 
subject of a poem by Lewis Glyn Cothi, 
on the occasion of his marriage to Alice, 
the great-granddaughter of Sir David 
Gam. He married (first) Alice Vaughan, 
daughter of Thomas Vaughan ; (second) 
Constance Touchett, a descendant of Wil- 
liam the Conqueror through the second 
wife of Edward I. King, of England. The 
latter was the mother of his sons. 

(XI) James Whitney, son of Robert 
and Constance (Touchett) Whitney, was 
appointed receiver of Newport, part of 
the estate of the Duke of Buckingham, 
confiscated by Henry VII in 1522. He 
married Blanche Milbourne, daughter and 
an heir of Simon Milbourne. 

(XII) Robert Whitney, son of James 
and Blanche (Milbourne) Whitney, was 
of Icomb, and in charge of other confis- 
cated estates. He was sheriff of Glouces- 
tershire, 1527-28-29-30, and was nomi- 
nated Knight of the Bath by Henry VIII 
at the coronation of Anne Boleyn in 1531 ; 
was granted part of the income of the 
monastery of Brewern in 1535; furnished 
forty men to put down rebellion in 1536, 



and was named to attend upon the King's 
person. He died in 1541. He married 
Margaret Wye. 

(XIII) Sir Robert Whitney, son of 
Robert and Margaret (Wye) Whitney, 
was knighted the day after Queen Mary's 
coronation, in October, 1553, and was 
summoned before the privy council in 
1555 and 1559. He was a member of Par- 
liament for Herefordshire in 1559, and 
died August 5, 1567. He married Sybil 
Baskerville, a descendant of William the 
Conqueror through the first wife of Ed- 
ward I. 

(XIV) Robert Whitney, son of Sir 
Robert and Sybil (Baskerville) Whitney, 
was mentioned in the will of his father, 
and also in an inquisition taken after his 
father's death. He married Elizabeth 
Guillims, daughter of Morgan Guillims, 
or Duglim. 

(XV) Thomas Whitney, son of Rob- 
ert Whitney, was of Westminster, Gen- 
tleman, and was buried at St. Margaret's, 
April 14, 1637. He married Mary Bray, 
daughter of John Bray, of Westminster, 
who was also buried at St. Margaret's, 
September 25, 1629. Children : John, the 
American immigrant, settled at Water- 
town, Massachusetts ; Nicholas ; Wil- 
liam ; Richard ; Margaret, and Ann. 

(The American Line). 

(I) The first of the name in America 
was John Whitney, son of Thomas Whit- 
ney, and grandson of Robert Whitney, 
mentioned above. He was born in 1589 
and baptized in St. Margaret's Church, 
London, July 20, 1592. He received his 
education in the famous Westminster 
school, now St. Peter's College, and on 
February 22, 1607, when fourteen years 
of age, was apprenticed to William Pring, 
of the Old Bailey, London, a freeman of 
the Merchant Tailors' Company, then the 



26 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



most prosperous of the great trade guilds. 
On March 13, 1614, he became a member 
of that company, and soon afterward he 
married, settling at Isleworth-on-the- 
Thames, near Westminster, where three 
of his children were born and baptized. 
In 1635, with his wife Elinor and five 
children he embarked on the ship "Eliza- 
beth and Ann," Roger Cooper, master, and 
sailed for America. They settled in Wa- 
tertown, Massachusetts Colony, in June, 
1635, where their son Joshua was born on 
the 15th of the following July, and where 
he continued to reside during the re- 
mainder of his life. He was admitted 
freeman there, March 3, 1636, and in 1637 
was chosen as selectman, an office which 
he held until 1655. In the latter year he 
was elected town clerk, and on June i, 
1641, was appointed by the General Court 
held in Boston to serve as constable at 
Watertown. As incumbent of that office 
he was required to collect the taxes of 
the town and the levies of the General 
Court ; to pay the debts of the colony to 
individuals in their respective towns ; to 
supply the town with sealed weights and 
measures ; and to perform many other 
important duties. As a badge of his office 
he carried a black staff five or five and a 
half feet long, with a tip, or head, five or 
six inches long. He was granted eight 
lots, amounting to 212 acres, in Water- 
town, in 1673. His wife Elinor, mother of 
all his children, died in Watertown, May 
II, 1659, aged about sixty years, and he 
married (second) Judah (Judith) Clem- 
ent, who died before her husband. Chil- 
dren of the first marriage: Mary, died 
young; John; Richard; Nathaniel; all 
born in England ; and Joshua ; Caleb ; 
and Benjamin, of whom further; all born 
in Watertown. 

(II) Benjamin Whitney, son of John 
and Elinor Whitney, was born in Water- 



town, Massachusetts, June 6, 1643, and 
died in 1723. He settled in York, Maine, 
at which place he is on record, 1662-C6-68, 
and was at Cocheco, Maine, near Dover, 
in 1667-68, and on April 13, 1674. The 
selectmen of York granted him ten acres 
of upland, but the father desired him to 
return to Watertown, promising him his 
house and barn and seventeen acres of 
land if he would do so. The property was 
deeded to Benjamin Whitney, April 5, 

1670, but the following year, March 9, 

1671, with the consent of his father, Ben- 
jamin sold to his brother Joshua, for forty 
pounds, his right in this estate. He mar- 
ried Jane , who died November 14, 

1690. After the death of his first wife, he 
left his young children with relatives of 
their mother, and returned to Watertown, 
locating at Sherborn, near the Natick 
town line. He married (second) in Marl- 
boro, April II, 1695, Mary Poor. Chil- 
dren of the first marriage : Jane, Timo- 
thy, John, Nathaniel, of whom further ; 
Benjamin, and Joshua. To the second 
marriage were born Mark and Isaac. 

(III) Nathaniel Whitney, son of Ben- 
jamin and Jane W^hitney, was born in 
York, Maine, April 14, 1680, and died in 
Gorham, Maine. He was a weaver by 
trade. He was a member of the military 
company of York in 1703. In 1708 he 
purchased salt marsh and thatch ground, 
known as the Sunken Marsh, which he 
sold in 1715. Two years later, he pur- 
chased twenty acres and a small orchard 
on the southeast side of the York river. 
He married Sarah Ford, born in York, 
daughter of John Ford, of Kittery, and 
they were the parents of the following 
named children: Lydia, died young; 
Lydia ; Naham ; Nathaniel, of whom fur- 
ther; Abel; Sarah; Isaac; Amos, and 
Joanna. 

(IV) Elder Nathaniel (2) Whitney, 



27 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



son of Nathaniel (I) and Sarah (Ford) 
Whitney, was born in York, Maine, De- 
cember 12, 1709, and died in 1804. He 
was one of the first settlers of Gorham, an 
elder in the church there, and a prominent 
and influential citizen, very active in town 
affairs, and a leader in religious matters. 
During the Revolutionary period, he was 
a member of important committees, and 
his integrity was unquestioned in the 
community. He married Molly Day, and 
they were the parents of six children : 
Moses, Nathan, Josiah, Aaron, Asa, and 
Abel, of whom further. 

(V) Abel Whitney, son of Deacon Na- 
thaniel and Molly (Day) Whitney, was 
born in Gorham, Maine, and was a resi- 
dent of Standish, Maine. He married 
Thankful Morton, and they were the par- 
ents of Nathaniel (3). 

(VI) Nathaniel (3) Whitney, son of 
Abel and Thankful (Morton) Whitney, 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, 
and belonged to the artillery service. He 
resided in Gorham and in Standish, Maine, 
and was the father of Reuben. 

(VII) Reuben Whitney, son of Na- 
thaniel (3) Whitney, was born in Stan- 
dish, Maine, in 1764, and died at Litch- 
field, Maine, February 13, 1836. He was 
a wheelwright by trade. He married, at 
Litchfield, Maine, in 1797, Mercy Baker, 
born in Dresden, Maine, in 1778, died at 
East Pittston, Maine, March, 1840. Chil- 
dren : Levi, of whom further ; Simeon ; 
Otis ; Gorham ; Reuben ; Abel ; Sally, 
and Rebecca. 

(VIII) Levi Whitney, son of Reuben 
and Mercy (Baker) Whitney, was born 
in Litchfield, Maine, November 27, 1800, 
and died in Richmond, Virginia, February 
20, 1881. He was a cooper by trade. He 
married (first) at Litchfield, Maine, Han- 
nah Whitney; (second) in 1885, at Bow- 
doinham, Maine, Mary Hutchings, born 



April 25, 1815. Children of the first mar- 
riage : Nancy, Otis, Isaac Smith, Na- 
thaniel and Jane Allen. Children of the 
second marriage ; William Hutchings, 
Hannah E., Levi L., Gorham Horatio 
Babson, of whom further ; Mary Frances ; 
Elizabeth H. ; John H.; Ira Scott; Har- 
riet A. ; and Winfield L. 

(IX) Gorham Horatio Babson Whit- 
ney, son of Levi and Mary (Hutchings) 
Whitney, was born in Richmond, Maine, 
June I, 1843. He was a carpenter of the 
firm of L. and D. H. Whitney, Boston, 
and was engaged in important structural 
work, including the erection of the great 
Houghton & Dutton stores, Young's 
Hotel, the Boston Storage Warehouse, 
and many other extensive building opera- 
tions. He was killed by a fall from one 
of his buildings, October 22, 1888, at the 
age of forty-five years. During the Civil 
War he served with a Maine regiment. 
He married at Bowdoinham, Maine, Jan- 
uary 5, 1864, Henrietta Rogers, who was 
born November 18, 1847, and died in 1917, 
and they were the parents of six children : 
Mary Elizabeth, who married A. B. Flint; 
Ada Florence ; Henrietta Gorham, who 
married Carl Webster; Gorham H., pres- 
ident of the Bay State Dredging & Con- 
tracting Company of Boston ; Howard 
Rogers, of whom further ; and Frederick 
Percy, who is associated with the Otis 
Elevator Company of Pittsfield, Massa- 
chusetts. 

(X) Howard Rogers Whitney, son of 
Gorham H. B. and Henrietta (Rogers) 
Whitney, was born in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, February 10, 1883. He received his 
early education in the schools of his native 
city, graduating from Boston English 
High School in 1900. He then entered 
Tufts College, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1905. Upon the completion of his 
college course, he began his business 



28 



LIBRARY 



i A3TOR, LENOX AND 
TTLpXN ••UNDATIONS 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



career as transit man in the employ of 
Stone & Webster, later for a short time 
with the Boston Electric Car Line, and 
the following year he was appointed in- 
structor in mathematics in Tufts College. 
His next position was with the Missouri 
Pacific Railway Company, with whom he 
was associated until 1912, whenhe became 
resident engineer of the construction of 
the Southern New England extension into 
Providence, Rhode Island, of the Grand 
Trunk Railroad Company. One year 
later he was ofifered and accepted a posi- 
tion as resident engineer of the Boston 
& Maine railroad, and during the time of 
his incumbency in that office he resided 
in Boston. Later, he was engaged in 
engineering and contracting work in New 
Hampshire, and in 1914 he came to 
Springfield as engineer of maintenance of 
way of the Springfield Street railway, 
holding that position until 1916, then was 
appointed special assistant, the duties of 
which position he filled until 1920, when he 
was made assistant to the president of the 
company, which position he has continued 
to hold to the present time. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers and Engineering Society of West- 
ern Massachusetts, also a member of the 
American Electric Railway Association, 
and the Longmeadow Country Club. 

On October 12, 1908, Howard R. Whit- 
ney married Mary Perry, born in Allston, 
Massachusetts, but resided most of her 
life in Somerville, daughter of William 
and Angie (Payson) Perry, and they are 
the parents of two children : Payson 
Rogers, born in St. Louis, Missouri, Octo- 
ber 28, 1909; and William Elmer, born in 
Somerville, Massachusetts, December 28, 
1914. 



LESTER, William Mason 

Among the native sons of Springfield is 
William Mason Lester, vice-president and 



manager of the Loring Axtell Company, 
engaged in high grade printing, who, with 
the exception of a few years spent in 
Cleveland, Ohio, during his boyhood, has 
passed his entire life in his native city. 
Mr. Lester is descended from an ancient 
English family, which derived its name 
from Leicester, and was originally of Lei- 
cestershire. Many representatives of the 
name have distinguished themselves in 
the various fields of human endeavor, and 
the name was early represented in the his- 
tory of New England. 

(I) The immigrant ancestor of the 
branch of the family to which William 
Mason Lester belongs was Francis Les- 
ter, born in England, who died in Green- 
field, Massachusetts, November 23, 1832, 
aged ninety-four years. He served in the 
War of the Revolution, and took an active 
part in the life of his times. He married 

Elizabeth , who died May 3, 181 5, 

aged seventy-two years, and they were 
the parents of children, among whom was 
Stewart, of further mention. 

(II) Stewart Lester, son of Francis and 
Elizabeth Lester, was born in Greenfield, 
Massachusetts, from which place he re- 
moved to Becket, Massachusetts. He 
married, September 8, 1795, Abigail 

, who died May 29, 1808, and they 

were the parents of seven children : Polly, 
born August 6, 1796; Marianne, born 
March 18, 1798; Orpha, born February 
26, 1800; Lucretia, born January 21, 1802; 
James Mason, of further mention ; Sally 
Stewart, born November 30, 1806; and 
John Watson, born January 22, 1808. 

(III) James Mason Lester, son of Stew- 
art and Abigail Lester, was born March 
I, 1804, and died November 19, 1861. He 
was a farmer, and lived in Becket, Massa- 
chusetts. He married Abigail Joy, born 
September 28, 1819, died December 21, 
1890, and they were the parents of five 
children: Abby E., born July 8, 1840, 



29 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



died in 1843; John S., born Augfust 23, 
1842; James Watson, of further mention; 
Abby M., born November 25, 1845 ! ^"d 
Marah M., born August 30, 1850, married 
Henry J. Turner. 

(IV) James Watson Lester, who later 
changed his name to Watson James Les- 
ter, son of James Mason and Abigail 
(Joy) Lester, was born in Becket, Massa- 
chusetts, November 23, 1843. He received 
his education in the schools of his native 
district, and when the Civil War broke 
out, enlisted, July 16, 1862, in Com- 
pany B, 37th Massachusetts Volunteers, 
under General Oliver Edwards. He was 
wounded in the battle of Chancellorsville, 
May 3, 1863, and was later sent to Wash- 
ington, where he served in Captain Rich- 
ard Goebel's company, loth Regiment, 
Veterans' Reserve Corps, until he re- 
ceived his honorable discharge in June, 
1865. He was in Washington when Gen- 
eral Early came to capture Washington, 
and like other veterans enjoys recount- 
ing how General Early "didn't take it." 
While in Washington, he was delegated 
to the office of General Angus to do cleri- 
cal work, which was writing discharges, 
and there he remained until the close of 
the war, enjoying all the privileges of a 
civilian. He wrote his own discharge, 
which was signed by General Oliver Ed- 
wards. He was at Ford's Theatre the 
night President Lincoln was shot, saw 
Booth, the assassinj enter the box in 
which the President was seated, and being 
intimately acquainted with the Lincoln 
family, he went to the White House after 
the President was carried into the house 
across the way from the theatre, remain- 
ing all night with the President's son, 
Tad Lincoln, who was then a boy between 
fourteen and fifteen years of age. Mr. 
Lester received the bulletins as they came 
to the White House from the bedside of 



the dying President, and was still with 
the lad when the announcement of the 
death of President Lincoln was received. 
After the war Mr. Lester returned to 
Becket, Massachusetts, where he remained 
until 1866, when he came to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and for a short time was 
associated with James Kirkham, who was 
engaged in the jewelry business. In 1868 
he went to Cleveland, Ohio, and engaged 
in the wholesale boot and shoe business, 
remaining until 1875, when he returned to 
New England, locating in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, where he has since con- 
tinued to reside. For a number of years 
he traveled on the road representing the 
Belcher and Taylor Agricultural Tool 
Company, manufacturers of agricultural 
implements, whose plant was located at 
Chicopee Falls. His territory included 
Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, 
and this large territory he continued to 
actively and efficiently cover until ill 
health made it advisable that he retire. 

Mr. Lester has been active in the work 
of his community, contributing to the ad- 
vancement of ideals through established 
fraternal and religious agencies. Fra- 
ternally he is a member of Hampden 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows ; and his religious affiliation is with 
the Highland Baptist Church. He was a 
charter member of this church, and was 
one of the first teachers in its Sabbath 
school, also serving on its board of direc- 
tors, rendering in all these offices valuable 
and efficient service. 

On July 12, 1865, Watson J. Lester 
married Sarah Elizabeth Early, of Bell- 
vale, Orange county. New York, daughter 
of William and Almeda (Smith) Early, 
and they are the parents of one son, Wil- 
liam Mason, of further mention. 

(V) William Mason Lester, son of 
James W. (or Watson J.) and Sarah 



30 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Elizabeth (Early) Lester, was born in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, December 28, 
1866. He received his first school instruc- 
tion in Cleveland, Ohio, to which place his 
parents removed when he was a small 
child. In 1875, when his parents returned 
to the East and settled in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, he entered the public 
schools of that city, graduating from the 
high school in 1886. During the four 
years in high school he was associated 
with the G. & C. Merriam Company, pub- 
lishers of Webster's Dictionary, working 
for them afternoons and during vacations. 
After his graduation from high school, he 
continued this connection until 1904. In 
October of that year the Loring Axtell 
Company was organized by him to take 
over the business of Loring & Axtell, 
because of the death of John A. Loring, 
and Mr. Lester was made vice-president 
and manager, a position which he still 
holds (1923). The Loring Axtell Com- 
pany is engaged in high grade printing, 
and are large employers of labor, occupy- 
ing an extensive plant located at No. 338 
Worthington street, Springfield, and send- 
ing their product to all parts of the East. 
Mr. Lester has always taken an active 
interest in public affairs, serving in vari- 
ous local offices in all of which he has 
rendered valuable service. He was a 
member of the police commission from 
1908 to 191 1, during which time he was 
largely instrumental in bringing about the 
erection of the new police headquarters. 
This commission appointed the present 
head of the police department. Chief Wil- 
liam J. Quity. Mr. Lester was also sec- 
retary of the Republican City Committee 
for five years. In fraternal and club cir- 
cles he is well known, being a past grand 
of Hampden Lodge, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows ; Roswell Lee Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons ; Springfield 



Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Springfield 
Council, Royal and Select Masters ; and 
of Lodge of Perfection and Princes of 
Jerusalem, Scottish Rite. He is also a 
member of the Royal Arcanum, and of 
the following clubs : Nayasset, Rotary, 
Springfield Publicity, Springfield Auto- 
mobile and the Oxford Country. His reli- 
gious affiliation is with the South Congre- 
gational Church. 

On June 3, 1891, William Mason Les- 
ter married Agnes Isbel Newell, of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, daughter of Horace 
Sessions and Cornelia (Smith) Newell 
(see Newell IX). Mr. and Mrs. Lester 
are the parents of one daughter, Mar- 
guerite Newell, who was born May 13, 
1895, and is a graduate of Miss Porter's 
School, Springfield. 

(The Newell Line). 

(I) Abraham Newell, immigrant ances- 
tor of the line herein traced, sailed from 
Ipswich, England, in the ship "Francis," 
of which John Cutting was master, and 
came to Massachusetts, settling in Rox- 
bury, in 1634. He was fifty years old at 
the time, and the records of the custom 
house show that he was accompanied by 
his wife Frances, forty years old, and chil- 
dren as follows: Faith, fourteen years 
old ; Grace, thirteen ; Abraham, eight ; 
John, five ; "Isacke," two ; and Jacob, 
born during the passage over. Abraham 
Newell was made a freeman, March 14, 
1635. He died June 13, 1672, and was 
buried June 15, 1672, aged, according to 
the records, ninety-one years. His wife, 
Frances Newell, died January 13, 1683, 
aged one hundred, according to the rec- 
ords. Edward Porter and Abraham New- 
ell were the original proprietors of 
the homesteads and orchards afterwards 
known as the "Maccarty farm," a tract of 
sixty acres lying between Hawthorne 



31 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



street and Walnut avenue, on both sides 
of Washington street, extending from 
Cedar on the north to Marsella street on 
the south. In a deed from Abraham 
Newell to his sons, Isaac and Jacob, he 
is described as a "tayler." 

(II) Isaac Newell, third son of Abra- 
ham and Frances Newell, was brought 
from England to Roxbury, Massachu- 
setts, by his father in 1634, at the age of 
two years, and he died December 8, 1707, 
aged seventy-five years. His name is 
signed to a deed of land from the Indians 
to William Stoughton and Joseph Dud- 
ley, 1682. Savage says that he married, 
December 14, 1658, Elizabeth Curtis, 
daughter of William Curtis, though the 
record calls the father John. The chil- 
dren of Isaac and Elizabeth (Curtis) 
Newell were: Isaac, of further mention; 
Josiah, died young; Sarah; Abraham, 
died young; Elizabeth; Hannah; Ebene- 
zer; Experience; and Josiah. 

(III) Isaac (2) Newell, son of Isaac 
(i) and Elizabeth (Curtis) Newell, was 
born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, Decem- 
ber II, 1660. He was surveyor of the 
highways, March 4, 1717, and his wife's 
given name was Sarah. Children of Isaac 
(2) and Sarah Newell were: Isaac; 
Philip ; Mehitable ; Abigail ; Jonathan ; 
Benjamin, of further mention ; and Sarah. 

(IV) Benjamin Newell, youngest son 
of Isaac (2) and Sarah Newell, was born 
January 20, 1703, in Roxbury, ]\Iassachu- 
setts, and resided in Dudley. He married, 
May 4, 1726, Sarah Folly, and they were 
the parents of children : Sarah ; Benja- 
min ; Abijah, of further mention ; Han- 
nah ; Stephen ; John ; Caleb ; and Amy. 

(V) Abijah Newell, son of Benjamin 
and Sarah (Folly) Newell, was born Jan- 
uary 9, 1731, and lived in Dudley, Massa- 
chusetts. He married, December 6, 1753, 



Hepzibah (or Hepsibeth) Curtis, who died 
September 22, 1834, aged, according to 
the records, one hundred years and twelve 
days. She lived to see many descendants, 
some of whom were in the fifth genera- 
tion from her. Their children were: 
Amy ; Stephen, of further mention ; Hep- 
zibah ; Abigail ; Chloe ; Margaret ; Har- 
mon; Jared; and Polly. 

(VI) Stephen Newell, eldest son of 
Abijah and Hepzibah (Curtis) Newell, 
was born in Dudley, Massachusetts, June 
7, 1758, and died in 1848, aged ninety 
years. He was a resident of Monson, 
Massachusetts. He married, January 12, 
1781, Louisa (or Lois) Sikes, who died 
aged sixty-six years, and they were the 
parents of eight children : Louisa (or 
Lois) ; Katherine ; Betsy ; Clarissa ; Cyrus, 
of further mention ; John ; Susannah ; and 
Persis. 

(VII) Cyrus Newell, son of Stephen 
and Louisa (Sikes) Newell, was born in 
Monson, Massachusetts, April 30, 1790, 
and died in Longmeadow, October 21, 
1865. He removed to Longmeadow about 
1834, and was engaged in farming. He 
married (first) Polly Jones, of Wilbra- 
ham ; (second) Celina Sessions, of Wil- 
braham, born August 6, 1789, died in 
Longmeadow, 1887. To the first mar- 
riage four children were born, all of whom 
died in infancy. To the second marriage 
were born : Samuel Ruggles, Nelson Cy- 
rus, Horace Sessions, of further mention ; 
and Charles Sikes. 

(VIII) Horace Sessions Newell, son of 
Cyrus and Celina (Sessions) Newell, mar- 
ried Cornelia Smith, and among their chil- 
dren was Agnes Isbel, of further mention. 

(IX) Agnes Isbel Newell, daughter of 
Horace Sessions and Cornelia (Smith) 
Newell, married William ?kIason Lester 
(see Lester V). 



32 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



BLAIR, John McDonald 

John McDonald Blair, manager of the 
W. J. Woods Company store, has been 
filling that position in Springfield since 
1906, and has been associated with his 
present employers for twenty-three years, 
during which time he has won the con- 
fidence and esteem not only of his em- 
ployers, but of a large patronage as well. 

About 1825 a large and expensive 
monument was erected in the city of Lon- 
donderry, in the North of Ireland, to the 
memory of the brave men and boys who 
defended that city during the siege in 
the years 1688 and 1689. On this monu- 
ment is engraved the name of Colonel 
Robert Blair, with a large number of 
others of the most brave. This Robert 
Blair belonged to the Blairs of Blair- 
athol, in Scotland. 

(I) His son of the same name, Col- 
onel Robert Blair, came to North Amer- 
ica with his regiment, bringing with him 
his wife and family, and later settling in 
Worcester, Massachusetts, where he 
spent the remainder of his life, and where 
he died in the year 1774, aged ninety-one 
years, having survived his wife, who died 
in 1765, at the age of eighty-two years. 
Colonel Robert Blair and his wife were 
the parents of seven sons: Matthew, 
James, Joseph, John, Davis ; William, of 
further mention ; and Francis. 

(II) Captain William Blair, son of 
Colonel Robert Blair, was born in 1716, 
died August 4, 1791. He came to Nova 
Scotia on military duty in the year 1758, 
to assist in the war with the French and 
in the capture of Louisburg. He re- 
returned to England, and after being re- 
lieved from military duty, went again to 
Nova Scotia, taking with him his wife and 
family, in the company of other first set- 
tlers who founded Truro in the spring of 
1760. They settled on the farm that was 
afterward owned by his son John, and a 

Mass — 12 — 3 



few years later obtained a grant of the 
township of Onslow. Captain William 
Blair married, in New England, about 
1740, Jane Barns. They were the par- 
ents of children, among whom were : 
Susan, the eldest daughter, born in 1741, 
married, June 10, 1763, Isaac Farrell ; 
and William, of further mention. 

(III) William (2) Blair, son of Cap- 
tain William (i) and Jane (Barns) Blair, 
was born in New England, in 1750, and 
was taken by his parents to Nova Scotia 
when he was ten years old. After his 
marriage he settled on a farm, after- 
wards owned by his two sons, up the 
North river, and there spent the remain- 
der of his life. He married, November 
26, 1772, Mary Downing, daughter of 
James and Janet (Montgomery) Down- 
ing, and they were the parents of a nu- 
merous family, among whom was Oliver, 
of further mention. The father died in 
November, 1817, aged sixty-seven years. 

(IV) Oliver Blair, son of William (2) 
and Mary (Downing) Blair, was born 
October i, 1794, and died November 23, 
1871, aged seventy-seven years. He in- 
herited one-half of his father's farm, in 
Onslow, Nova Scotia, and there he lived 
during his entire life. He married Mary 
Smith, who died July, 1869, in the seven- 
tieth year of her age, daughter of John 
and Jane (Cock) Smith, and they were 
the parents of children, among whom was 
Ebenezer, of further mention. 

(V) Ebenezer Blair, son of Oliver and 
Mary (Smith) Blair, was born December 
15, 1820, and died in Natick, Massachu- 
setts, in June, 1898. He was a building 
mover in Truro, Nova Scotia, but later 
removed to Boston, Massachusetts, where 
he was associated with his brother, John 
S. Blair, who was also a mover of build- 
ings, in the capacity of foreman. The 
brother, John S., was a member of the 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 



33 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



pany. Ebenezer Blair married, January 
15, 1843, Mary King, who died in 1885, 
and they were the parents of eight chil- 
dren : Tryphena, born November 22, 
1844, died August 22, 1862, aged eighteen 
years ; Mary Jane, born October 29, 1847 5 
Caroline, December 15, 1850; Sarah, born 
March 22, 1853; Jessie Ellen, born May 
22, 1855; Nancy, born September i, 1857, 
died March 18, 1859; Emma, born Sep- 
tember 4, 1859; and John McDonald, of 
further mention. 

(VI) John McDonald Blair, son of 
Ebenezer and Mary (King) Blair, was 
born in Truro, Nova Scotia, January 29, 
1863. He received his education in the 
schools of Boston, Hawes Hall Primary, 
Bigelow Grammar, and Boston Business 
School. When his school training was 
completed, in 1878, he went to Natick, 
Massachusetts, where he began his busi- 
ness career in the employ of A. W. Pal- 
mer, who conducted a clothing store. 
This connection he maintained for a 
period of ten years, at the end of which 
time he removed to Worcester, Massa- 
chusetts, where for a time he was asso- 
ciated with Whidden, Burdett & Young, 
clothiers. In 1899 he became identified 
with the Woods Company, engaged in 
the clothing business, and that connec- 
tion he has maintained to the present 
time (1923), a period of more than twenty 
years. In 1906 he was transferred to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, as manager 
of the W. J. Woods Company store there, 
and that position he has since efificiently 
filled. Fraternally, Mr. Blair is affiliated 
with Meridian Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Natick; of Parker Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons ; and Hiram Council, 
Royal and Select Masters, of Worcester, 
Massachusetts. He is also a member of 
DeSoto Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, of Springfield, and his 
religious afifiliation is with All Saints' 
Church. 



Mr. Blair married (first) in Washing- 
ton, D. C, October 20, 1892, Tabitha E. 
Chew, of Washington, who died in 1894, 
daughter of Christopher Columbus and 
Mary (Miller) Chew. Mr, and Mrs. Blair 
were the parents of one daughter, Ruth 
Chew, born in Worcester, Massachusetts, 
September 2, 1893. Mr. Blair married 
(second), April 19, 1904, Mrs. Charlotte 
S. Thomas, daughter of Walter and Mary 
(Thacker) Smith. 



CHAPIN, WUliam Henry 

William Henry Chapin, senior mem- 
ber of the firm of Chapin & Neal, well 
known patent attorneys, comes of old 
Colonial stock, tracing his ancestry to 
Samuel Chapin, of the Massachusetts 
Bay Colony. 

The name Chapin is found in various 
forms in the early records of England and 
America, Chapin, Chapun, Chapinne, 
Chalpin, etc., and several explanations of 
the origin of the name have been given. 
One authority states that the name Chap- 
man was one of the oldest and best names 
in France, dating back to the time of the 
Carolingian kings, at least as early as the 
tenth century. One story of the prob- 
able origin of the name is of quaint, his- 
torical interest. It is said that in some 
feudal conflict of the middle ages, one 
who had distinguished himself received a 
sword cut across the head, laying open 
his helmet or head-piece. For this ex- 
ploit he was knighted on the field and 
dubbed Capinatus, which means "dec- 
orated with a hat," the word being the 
participle of the Latin capino. By the 
softening processes of French speech 
this, in time, became Chapin, the root 
being the same as that from which the 
word caput is derived. It is said that the 
coat-of-arms was originally a hat with a 
slash in it. 

(I) Deacon Samuel Chapin came to 



34 



^^^^ 






ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Massachusetts Bay Colony from Devon- 
shire, England, previous to 1642, as is evi- 
denced by the fact that his name was 
among the subscribers to the oath of alle- 
giance made before the General Court, 
June 2, 1641. He brought with him his wife 
Cicely and children, born in England. By 
deed dated March 9, 1666, John Pynchon 
conveyed to Samuel Chapin the greater 
part of the land lying in the valley be- 
tween Chicopee river and Williamasett 
brook, and by deed dated April 16, 1673, 
Samuel Chapin conveyed this tract to his 
son, Japhet Chapin. Japhet Chapin also 
owned one-half of his father's premises 
known as the home lot situated next 
south of the ministry lot in the center of 
the village of Springfield, where Deacon 
Samuel Chapin died November 11, 1675. 
In 1667 Japhet Chapin sold his half of the 
property to Deacon John Hitchcock, 
husband of Hannah Hitchcock. The 
widow, Cicely Chapin, died February 8, 
1682. Children of Samuel and Cicely 
Chapin, who came to Springfield (known 
as Agawam until 1640) were: Japhet, of 
further mention ; Henry, married, Decem- 
ber 5, 1664, Bethea Cooley, daughter of 
Benjamin and Sarah Cooley, of Long 
Meadow ; Catherine, married (first) Na- 
thaniel Bliss, (second) Thomas Gilberts, 
(third) Samuel Marshfield, who died in 
1692, and the thrice widowed Catherine 
died February 4, 1712, having given birth 
to ten children ; David, who married 
Lydia Crump, and had seven children, all 
born in Springfield ; Josiah, died Septem- 
ber 10, 1726; Sarah, died August 5, 1684; 
Hannah, born in Springfield. 

(II) Japhet Chapin, son of Deacon 
Samuel and Cicely Chapin, was born in 
1642. He resided for a time in Milford, 
in the Connecticut colony, as is evidenced 
by a deed made by "Worshipful Captain 
John Pynchon of Springfield" conveying 



to "Japhet Chapin, of Milford, Connecti- 
cut Colony," a small strip of land near 
the Connecticut river in Springfield, 
bound east by Deacon Chapin's land, the 
deed being dated November 16, 1669. He 
built a house, however, at the upper end 
of Chicopee street, on the land deeded to 
him by his father, April 16, 1673. He was 
present at the fight with the Indians at 
Turner's Falls, May 18, 1673, ^s is stated 
in a memorandum made in his own hand- 
writing on the outside leaf of an old 
account book belonging to him, which 
reads: "I went out as volunteer against 
Indians in 17 May, 1676, and we engaged 
in battle 19 May in the morning before 
sunrise, and made great spoil upon the 
enemy and came off the same day with 
the loss of thirty-seven men and the cap- 
tain Turner, and came home the twen- 
tieth of May." (The original spelling is 
not used in this copy). He married 
(first), July 22, 1664, Abilenah Cooley, 
who died November 17, 1710; (second). 
May 31, 171 1, Dorothy Root, of Enfield, 
Connecticut. The children, all of the first 
marriage were: i. Samuel, born July 4, 
1665 ; married, December 24, 1690, Han- 
nah Sheldon ; was the father of ten chil- 
dren ; died in Springfield, October 19, 
1729. 2. Sarah, born March 16, 1668; 
married, March 24, 1690, Nathaniel Munn. 
3. Thomas, of further mention. 4. John, 
born May 14, 1674; married Sarah Bridg- 
man. 5. Ebenezer, born June 26, 1677; 
married Ruth Janes, of Northampton, 
Massachusetts ; died in Enfield, Decem- 
ber 13, 1772. 6. Hannah, born June 21, 
1679, died July 7, 1679. 7. Hannah, born 
July 18, 1680; married, December 3, 
1703, John Sheldon, of Deerfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and three months after her 
marriage was captured during an attack 
made upon the town by the Indians, and 
taken, with other captives, to Canada. 



35 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Her husband probably followed the re- 
treating party, for after more than a year 
he succeeded in obtaining her release and 
brought her home. Tradition relates 
that her mother advised her, when mak- 
ing a dress before her marriage, to make 
it so that it would do to wear into cap- 
tivity. 8. David, born November i6, 
1682; married (first), November 21, 1705, 
Sarah Stebbins, (second) Mindwell Hol- 
ton, of Northampton. His twelve chil- 
dren were all born of the first marriage. 
9. Jonathan, born February 20, 1685, died 
March i, 1686. 10. Jonathan, born Sep- 
tember 2;^, 1688; married, April 21, 1710, 
Elizabeth Burt, of Long Meadow, and 
was the father of eleven children. 

(Ill) Thomas Chapin, second son and 
third child of Japhet and Abilenah 
(Cooley) Chapin, was born May 10, 1671, 
probably in Milford, Connecticut, and 
died August 27, 1755, his wddow, Sarah 
(Wright) Chapin, surviving him until 
July 26, 1770, when she died at the age 
of ninety-eight years. Their children 
were: i. Thomas, married Jerusha Jones, 
of Sunderland, and died in Belchertown, 
in 1781. 2. Japhet, married (first) Thank- 
ful Dickerson, of Hatfield, (second), Oc- 
tober 28, 1778, Lydia Belding, widow of 
Rev. Benjamin Doolittle, of Northfield, 
Massachusetts. The first wife died 
March 17, 1773, and when his second wife 
was eighty years old, he was eighty-two. 
In that year the pair made a journey on 
horseback from their residence on Chic- 
opee street, Springfield, to Northfield, a 
distance of more than forty miles, in one 
day, each on a separate horse, and tradi- 
tion has it that each sat as upright and 
enjoyed the ride as well as in their 
younger days. 3. Abel, born January 28, 
1700; married, January 9, 1720, Hannah 
Hitchcock, daughter of Luther and Eliz- 
abeth Hitchcock; was the father of six 
children; died May 3, 1772. 4. Shem, 



born February 3, 1702; married Anna 
Clark, of Uxbridge, widow of Mr. Clark, 
of Springfield (Chicopee). 5 and 6. Mar- 
tha and Esther (twins), born December 
5, 1704; Martha married, October 20, 
1740, Samuel Wills, of Hatfield, and died 
July 8, 1801; Esther married (first), Oc- 
tober 22, 1747, Noah Cook, of Hadley, 
(second) Deacon Nathaniel Horton, of 
Somers, Connecticut. 7. Sarah, born 
February 18, 1708; married. May 17, 
1753, Luke Parsons, of Somers, Connec- 
ticut. 8. Nathaniel, of further mention. 
9. Bathsheba, born December 19, 1713; 
married (first) April 2, 1745, Jacob Hitch- 
cock, and (second) Dr. Lamberton 
Cooper, of Agawam (Springfield). 10. 
Jabez, born April 3, 1716, died April 20, 
1716. II. Deborah, born October 31, 
1719; married, April 30, 1746, Eleon 
Frary, of Hatfield. 

(IV) Nathaniel Chapin, fifth son and 
eighth child of Thomas and Sarah 
(Wright) Chapin, was born August 9, 
171 1. He married Sarah Abbee, daugh- 
ter of Thomas Abbee, of Enfield, where 
they lived, and where their three chil- 
dren were born. Captain Nathaniel 
Chapin died at Cape Breton, and because 
of this fact it is probable that he was 
with the famous expedition against 
Louisburg, which caused the surrender 
of the city to British and Colonial troops,. 
June 16, 1745. His widow married Cap- 
tain Hezekiah Parsons, of Enfield, Con- 
necticut. The children of Nathaniel and 
Sarah (Abbee) Chapin were: i. Nathan- 
iel (2), of further mention. 2. Eliphalet, 
born March 2, 1741 ; married Azuba 
Pease, and was the father of nine chil- 
dren. 3. Jabez. 

(V) Nathaniel (2) Chapin, son of Na- 
thaniel (i) and Sarah (Abbee) Chapin, 
was born in Enfield, Connecticut, Decem- 
ber 31, 1738, and died there February 11, 
1831. He married (first) Sibyl Terry and 



36 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(second) Leviah Parsons. The children 
of the first marriage were: i. Nathaniel, 
of further mention. 2. Jabez, married a 
Miss Dwight, of Long Meadow, Massa- 
chusetts, removed to Ohio, where he 
reared a family of six children, and where 
he died. 3. Simeon, died in Enfield, Con- 
necticut. 4. Sibyl, married Thomas Met- 
calf. 5. Esther, married Moses Allen. 6. 
Betsy. 

(VI) Rev. Nathaniel (3) Chapin, eld- 
est child of Nathaniel (2) and Sibyl 
(Terry) Chapin, was a Methodist clergy- 
man. He married (first) Cynthia Per- 
kins, and (second) Lovisa Sexton. His 
children were: i. Henry, died at the age 
of two years. 2. Lovisa. 3. Henry, of 
further mention. 4. Charlotte, married 
Samuel Corbin, of Union, Connecticut. 
5. Sibyl, married Levi Moody, and lived 
in Windsor, Connecticut. 6. Charles, 
died at three years of age. 7. Miranda. 
8. Charles, married, but had no issue. 9. 
Eliza, married Colonel Henry Holkins, of 
Windsor, lived at Warehouse Point, Con- 
necticut, and had children. 10. Nathan- 
iel, married Olive Van Horn, daughter of 
God Van Horn, of Chicopee, Massachu- 
setts ; removed to Jenksville, Massachu- 
setts, and then to Springfield, Illinois. 
Has six children. 

(VII) Henry Chapin, born 1789, son 
of Rev. Nathaniel (3) and Cynthia (Per- 
kins) Chapin, was born in 1789, died in 
Monson, Massachusetts, aged ninety-five 
years. He married Elizabeth Wilson, 
and was a resident of Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, where he was deacon of the 
Pynchon Street Methodist Church. Henry 
and Elizabeth (Wilson) Chapin were the 
parents of seven children: i. Elizabeth, 
bom January 30, 1821. 2. Lovisa, born 
August 21, 1824. 3. Henry Augustus, of 
further mention. 4. Ellen, born October 
18, 1828, died October 12, 1846. 5. Lucy 
A., born October 23, 1830. 6. Miranda, 



born April 9, 1835. 7. Susan C, born 
July 5, 1839. 

(VIII) Henry Augustus Chapin, eld- 
est son of Henry and Elizabeth (Wilson) 
Chapin, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, August 29, 1826. He married, 
November 21, 1850, Sarah E. Stevens, 
daughter of Isaac Stevens, and their chil- 
dren were born in Springfield. He after- 
ward removed to Bridgeport, Connecti- 
cut, where he was associated with the 
Winchester Arms Company. The chil- 
dren of Henry Augustus and Sarah E. 
(Stevens) Chapin are: i. Elizabeth 
Maria, born July 17, 1854. 2. William 
Henry, of further mention. 3. Emma S., 
born October 13, 1858. 4. Ellen Olney, 
born 1864. 

(IX) William Henry Chapin, son of 
Henry Augustus and Sarah E. (Stevens) 
Chapin, was born June 26, 1856, in 
Springfield, Massachusetts. He received 
his education in the public schools of his 
native city and of Bridgeport, Connec- 
ticut, and then went abroad, continuing 
his studies in Europe for several years. 
He then returned to Springfield, where 
in association with his father he began 
practice as patent attorney, the business 
having been established by Mr. Chapin, 
Sr., several years previous to this time. 
In this he has since continued and has a 
large and successful clientele. He has 
defended a large number of patent cases 
and has been the successful prosecuting 
attorney in many important patent in- 
fringement cases. He spent much of the 
winter of 1922-23 in Europe upon a pat- 
ent case of international interest. Nearly 
fifty years of successful legal practice has 
placed Mr. Chapin in a prominent posi- 
tion in the profession and has won for 
him many warm friends both among his 
professional associates and his clients. 
He is highly esteemed among a host of 
those who knew him as friend and ac- 



37 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



quaintance as well as a professional man. 
He has taken an active interest in the 
public affairs of Springfield. He married, 
June 24, 1886, Charlotte E. Scott, of To- 
ledo, Ohio, daughter of Maurice A. and 
Mary B. (Messinger) Scott, and they are 
the parents of three children: i. Maur- 
ice Scott, of further mention. 2. Henry, 
of further mention. 3. Stuart, of further 
mention. 

(X) Maurice Scott Chapin, son of Wil- 
liam Henry and Charlotte E. (Scott) 
Chapin, was born in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, April 17, 1887. He received 
his education in the public schools of 
Springfield, and in the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, in Boston, grad- 
uating from the latter in 1910. After his 
graduation, he engaged in industrial en- 
gineering for a time, and then turned his 
attention to manufacturing for a period 
of two years. During the World War he 
was in the Ordnance Department at 
Washington, where he served for two 
years, attaining the rank of first lieuten- 
ant. After the close of the war, he re- 
turned to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he became associated with the A. 
C. Dutton Lumber Company, of Spring- 
field, a concern which is engaged in the 
wholesale lumber business, and this con- 
nection he has maintained to the present 
time (1923). Along with his business 
responsibilities, Mr. Chapin finds time 
for social affiliations, being a member of 
various clubs and other organizations. 
On May 19, 1917, Maurice S. Chapin mar- 
ried Edith Howard Dutton, of Spring- 
field, daughter of A. C. and Rose (Gar- 
land) Dutton, and they are the parents 
of three children: i. Maurice S., Jr., born 
April 27, 1918. 2. David Dutton, born 
December 13, 1919. 3. John Garland, 
born October 27, 1921. 

(X) Henry Chapin, son of William 
Henry and Charlotte E. (Scott) Chapin, 



was born November 17, 1893, in Toledo, 
Ohib, and at present (1923) has charge 
of a book store at Princeton, having 
graduated from Princeton in 1917. He 
enlisted during the World War and was 
sent to the officers' training camp at 
Plattsburg, New York, where he was 
made a captain of infantry, and was sent 
to various camps in the South for the pur- 
pose of training troops. He married 
Paula Van Dyke, of Princeton, New Jer- 
sey, and has a daughter, Charlotte, born 
in September, 1921. 

(X) Stuart Chapin, son of William 
Henry and Charlotte E. (Scott) Chapin, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
January 29, 1897. He graduated from 
Princeton, in the class of 1920, and is at 
present (1923) instructor in English, at 
the Gunnery School, Washington, Con- 
necticut. During the World War he en- 
listed and was sent overseas with Bat- 
tery A, loist Field Artillery, 26th Divi- 
sion, remaining in active service until af- 
ter the signing of the armistice. 



CHAPIN, Charles Lyman 

Charles Lyman Chapin, president of the 
firm of Chapin & Gould, manufacturers of 
fine writing papers, is well known in 
Springfield. As organist in various city 
churches throughout his life up to the 
year 192 1, and as president of the Mu- 
sical Festival Association, his services 
have been of especial value. 

(I) Deacon Samuel Chapin was the im- 
migrant ancestor of the family in this coun- 
try, and an account of him appears in the 
preceding biography. 

(II) Henry Chapin, son of Deacon 
Samuel and Cicely Chapin (q. v.), set- 
tled in Springfield, Massachusetts, about 
1659, and there became one of the promi- 
nent citizens of the town. He was chosen 
deputy to the General Court in 1689. He 
built his house on the south side of the 



38 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Chicopee river in what is now the village 
of Chicopee. on Ferry street, facing south 
on West street, near the large elm tree, 
and a few feet east of the house formerly 
owned and occupied by William Chapin. 
The house was burned in 1762. He died 
August 15, 1718. He married Bethea 
Cooley, daughter of Benjamin and Sarah 
Cooley, of Longmeadow, and they were 
the parents of five children, among whom 
was Henr\', of further mention. 

(III) Henry (2) Chapin, son of Henr)- 
(i) and Bethiah (Cooley) Chapin, was 
born March 19, 1679, and died September 
15, 1754. He married (first), February 
19, 1702, Mary Gurnsey, of Milford, who 
died May 2, 1715; (second), May 10, 
1716, Esther Bliss, daughter of Samuel 
Bliss. Among the children of the second 
marriage was William, of further mention. 

(IV) William Chapin, son of Henry 
(2) and Esther (Bliss) Chapin, was born 
April 19, 1729, and died November 10, 
1777. He married, February 21, 1754, 
Margaret Chapin, who died May 10, 1775, 
aged forty-two, daughter of Japhet and 
Thankful Chapin. Among their children 
was Japhet, of further mention. 

(V) Japhet Chapin, son of William and 
Margaret (Chapin) Chapin, was born 
AugHJst 8, 1760, and died October 6, 1822. 
He was a farmer and a lumber manufac- 
turer and dealer, and lived in what is 
now Chicopee Center. He married (in- 
tentions dated October 25. 1783), Lovina 
Wright, of Wilbraham, born August 6, 
1764, died September 19. 1834, and they 
were the parents of ten children, among 
whom was Whitfield, of further mention. 

(VI) Whitfield Chapin, son of Japhet 
and Lovina (Wright) Chapin, was born 
May 4, 1787. He received his education 
in the local schools of his native district. 
He later engaged in the lumber business, 
establishing yards near the corner of 
Water and Bridge streets, becoming, in 



1828. an inspector of lumber. Prominent 
in the affairs of the town, he was chosen 
to ser\e as selectman, and was active in 
most of the projects formed for the ad- 
vancement of the public interest and wel- 
fare. One of his somewhat spectacular 
services to the communit)' was the cap- 
ture, with the assistance of Elijah Blake, 
of the noted criminals, George Ball and 
Marcus R. Stephenson, who had, during 
the winter of 1828-29, committed several 
burglaries in the town. The capture was 
made one Sunday morning, when Mr. 
Chapin and Mr. Blake were walking 
through the woods which lies between 
the Morgan road and the Chicopee Falls 
road. The culprits were later tried, con- 
victed and sentenced to State prison for 
life. After serving twelve years, how- 
ever, they were pardoned and liberated. 
Mr. Chapin married (first), November 30, 
1809, Luna Chapin, daughter of Colonel 
Silas Chapin, born October 29, 1789, died 
March 6, 1819, and they were the parents 
of two sons and one daughter. He mar- 
ried (second) Meba Chapin, born Febru- 
ary 21, 1795, died May 5, 1849, sister of 
his first wife, and they were the parents 
of two sons and three daughters. 

(VII) Charles Otis Chapin, son of 
Whitfield Chapin, one of the five children 
of the second marriage, was born in the 
house which stood on the east side of 
Main street near Bridge. When he was 
a few months old the family removed to 
the comer of Water and Bridge streets, 
Springfield, where they lived for some 
twelve years, and then removed to the 
corner of Water and Bliss streets in that 
city. He was an earnest, eager boy, and 
received his education in the public 
schools, where he made so good a record 
for himself that when Principal Lowton 
was asked by G. C. Merriman, of Web- 
ster Dictionary fame, to recommend a 
clerk, it was young Chapin who was 



39 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



named for the position. His father's 
death made the lad, in a measure, the 
head of the household at an early age, 
and the responsibilities that thus de- 
volved upon him he met with character- 
istic faithfulness and efficiency. He re- 
mained as clerk with Mr. Merriman for a 
period of six years, and then engaged in 
the book business under the firm name 
of Merriman & Chapin, he having entire 
management of the book store. Later 
Mr. Merriman sold his interests in that 
concern to Mr. Brookman, and it was 
then operated under the firm name of 
Chapin & Brookman. In the spring of 
1858, Mr. Chapin formed a partnership 
with H, A. Gould, under the firm name of 
Chapin & Gould, and they later pur- 
chased the Crescent Mills at Russell, and 
since that time these mills have been 
engaged in the manufacture of fine writ- 
ing paper. They were very successful, 
but during the business depression which 
came at the beginning of the Civil War, 
in 1861, they were closed down for a 
period of eight months, after which they 
were in operation again. Mr. Chapin 
also had the management of the Collins 
Mill, at North Wilbraham, for a few 
years, a trust which he relinquished some 
two months before his death. 

His force and good judgment, as well 
as his thorough knowledge of the busi- 
ness in which he was engaged, led the 
American Paper Makers' Association to 
elect him superintendent, and in the exer- 
cise of powers thus granted him he be- 
came widely and favorably known in 
Washington, D. C, and in other large 
cities, as the most excellent and efficient 
representative of a great industrial enter- 
prise. "There was no better paper maker 
in the country than Charles O. Chapin," 
said a prominent out-of-town manufac- 
turer, and this expresses the conviction 
of those who knew him best. As secre- 



tary of the Paper Makers' Association, he 
prepared a statement of the paper mak- 
ers' views, which he read at the meeting 
of the Board of Commissioners at Chi- 
cago, and which was printed in full in the 
"Paper Trade Journal" some two weeks 
later. He was interested in the use of 
the fibrous residue from sugar cane and 
sorghum in the manufacture of paper, 
and only a few days before his death ob- 
tained from the mills in West Springfield 
a sample of this fibre with which he ex- 
perimented and obtained improved 
results. 

Mr. Chapin always took an active 
interest in the welfare of the city in 
which he lived, and rendered valuable 
service in civic affairs as well as in the 
field of his business. Politically, he was 
a Whig in earlier life, but during the 
Civil War and for the remainder of his 
life was a staunch Republican. In 1870 
he was nominated to fill the office of 
mayor, but was defeated by the Demo- 
cratic candidate. Though urged to ac- 
cept nomination several times since, he 
persistently refused, preferring to render 
service in other ways. The greatest di- 
rect service which he performed for 
Springfield was the building of the reser- 
voir. As chairman of the Water Com- 
missioners from 1873 to 1880, he was 
elected to take the place of Horace Smith 
just as the plans for the building of the 
reservoir were taking shape, and he con- 
tributed a large share to the completion 
of the plans and the execution of the 
project. He continued as head of this 
board after the reservoir was built and 
until that board was reorganized and 
brought more definitely under the con- 
trol of the city government. He was, at 
the time of his death, president of the 
Springfield and Longmeadow Railroad 
Company, a member of the board of di- 
rectors of the Massachusetts Mutual In- 



40 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



surance Company and of the Agawam 
Bank, and a trustee of the Hampden Sav- 
ings Bank. His service for several years 
as a member of the prison commission 
was especially notable, and it was dur- 
ing attendance upon the meeting of this 
commission that his death occurred, in 
November, 1882. The full extent of the 
service rendered by Mr. Chapin can 
never be fully known. His was a robust, 
vigorous character which with all its 
strength combined a breadth of sympathy 
and a tactfulness which exerted a lasting 
influence in the various fields in which 
he was active. 

In May, 1854, Charles O. Chapin mar- 
ried Mrs. Norman Peck, and they were 
the parents of three children, a daughter 
and two sons: i. Harriet G., born in 
1855. 2. Charles Lyman, of further men- 
tion. 3. Henry G., born January 3, i860, 
died May 31, 1917; married Susie B. 
Russell, who became the mother of two 
children, Catherine Howard, and Russell. 

(VIII) Charles Lyman Chapin, son of 
Charles O. and Mrs. Norman (Peck) 
Chapin, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, December 4, 1856. He received 
his education in the public schools of the 
city. When his studies were completed, 
he became associated with his father in 
business, and traveled as salesman for 
Chapin & Gould until the death of his 
father, when he and his brother took over 
the business of Chapin & Gould, later 
incorporating with Charles Lyman Cha- 
pin as president, and Henry G. Chapin 
as treasurer. The former office Mr. 
Chapin still holds (1923), and the latter 
was held by Henry G. Chapin to the 
time of his death. The business has con- 
tinued to grow and prosper under the 
direction of Mr. Chapin and is steadily 
expanding. It is not as a manufacturer 
and a business man alone, however, that 
Mr. Charles Lyman Chapin is best 



known. Throughout the years of his ac- 
tive life until 1921, he was well known 
as a musician and was organist in vari- 
ous city churches, holding that position 
in Christ Episcopal Church for many 
years, with the North Church for fifteen 
years, and with Unity Church for twenty 
years. He is also president of the Musical 
Festival Association, and in that capac- 
ity is exceedingly influential in shaping 
the policies and the direction of the in- 
terest of various activities in the musical 
field. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
Masonic order, and his clubs are the Nay- 
asset, the Colony, and the Country. 

On August I, 1881, Charles Lyman 
Chapin married (first) Lucy Shumway, 
who died March 27, 1909. They were the 
parents of six children: i. Harriet Shum- 
way, who married Temple Chapman, and 
has two children, Lucy and Robert Tem- 
ple. 2. Annie M. 3. Elizabeth, who mar- 
ried Ray D. Murphy, and has children, 
Chapin, Lambert, Elizabeth, and Ray 
Bradford. 4. Julia Bliss, who died Feb- 
ruary 27, 1920; married Lewis C. Jami- 
son. 5. Lucy Chapin, died September 28, 
1918. 6. Charles Otis, died November 
2T, 1918. Charles Lyman Chapin mar- 
ried (second), February 28, 191 7, Emily 
Bliss Bryant, of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, daughter of Andrew Symnes and 
Sarah E. (Birnie) Bryant (see Bryant 
VI). 

(The Bryant Line). 

(I) Miller Bryant, born 1643-45, died 
1697. He married (first) Hannah Gil- 
lett. She died in 1690. He married (sec- 
ond) Hannah Diseter, widow. 

(II) John Bryant, son of Miller Bry- 
ant, was born in 1689. He married, in 
1712, Katherine Knoakes (Knox), and 
they were the parents of children, among 
whom was John, of further mention. 

(III) John (2) Bryant, son of John (i) 
and Katherine (Knoakes) Bryant, was 



41 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



born in 1718, and died in 1758. He mar- 
ried, in 1741, Lois Brown, born in 1722, 
who survived her husband and married 
(second) Jonathan Boshwell. They 
were the parents of John (3), of further 
mention. 

(IV) John (3) Bryant, known as Cap- 
tain John Bryant, son of John (2) and 
Lois (Brown) Bryant, was born in Bos- 
ton, in 1743, and died in 1816. He mar- 
ried Hannah Mason, born in Boston, 
1757, died in 1830. 

(V) Captain William Bryant, son of 
Captain John (3) and Hannah (Mason) 
Bryant, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, December 25, 1798, and died in 
the same city in 1857. He made his 
first sea voyage in 1821, sailing in August 
from Boston bound for the East Indies, 
and afterward made several voyages as 
master. He was a member of Bryant, 
Sturgis & Company, of Boston, promi- 
nent merchants engaged in the East India 
trade. In 1833 he retired from the sea 
and settled in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where in 1834 he formed a co-partnership 
with Theodore Bliss under the firm name 
of Bryant & Bliss, and engaged in the 
grocery business, first on the northeast 
corner of Main and Sanford streets, and 
afterward in the block built by James 
Byers on the corner of Main and Elm 
streets, where now stands the Chicopee 
National Bank. When the Chicopee 
Bank was organized in 1836 he was 
chosen one of the first of nine directors, 
and throughout his active life he took a 
prominent part in the life of the commu- 
nity. In December, 1830, he married 
Emily Bliss, daughter of General Jacob 
Bliss, born March 3, 1801, died February 
6, 1881, at the age of seventy-nine years, 
eleven months. Captain Bryant died 
August 22, 1857, aged fifty-eight years 
and eight months. They were the par- 
ents of two sons and one daughter, the 



surviving one being Andrew Symnes, of 
further mention. 

(VI) Andrew Symnes Bryant, son of 
Captain William and Emily (Bliss) Bry- 
ant, was born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, March 3, 1841, in the residence 
located near the corner of Mulberry and 
Maple streets. He received a practical 
education in the public schools of Spring- 
field, and then became associated with 
the Agawam Bank, where he remained 
until the outbreak of the Civil War, when 
he enlisted, September 15, 1862, in Com- 
pany A, 46th Massachusetts Regiment, 
with which he served for a period of nine 
months, this regiment being one of those 
comprising the Army of the Potomac. 
On May 23, 1863, while serving as ser- 
geant in command of an outpost detail 
of sixteen men guarding the road over 
Batchelor's Creek, North Carolina, this 
road being one of the main arteries of 
transportation for Union troops, he and 
his sixteen men were attacked by a body 
of Confederate troops estimated to num- 
ber about 3,000 men. Breastworks were 
hurriedly thrown up to protect Mr. Bry- 
ant's men, and although exposed to heavy 
artillery and rifle fire and against heavy 
odds the little band held off the enemy 
for forty-five minutes, until reinforce- 
ments from Company A, 46th Massachu- 
setts Regiment, arrived. For this act of 
courage he was made a sergeant-major 
and was awarded a Medal of Honor by 
Congress for meritorious conduct while 
in action. Upon the expiration of his 
term of service, Mr. Bry-ant returned to 
Springfield, and became identified with 
the Boston & Albany Railroad Company, 
as cashier, which office he held for forty- 
one consecutive years, retiring in 1904. 
In September, 1921, he went to Wash- 
ington, D. C, to attend the burial serv- 
ices of "The Unknown Soldier." Fra- 
ternally, he is a member of Springfield 



42 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
his clubs are the Winthrop and the Fish 
and Game. He is a member of the Sons 
of the Revolution, and of Wilcox Post, 
No. i6, Grand Army of the Republic, of 
which organization he was adjutant for 
three years. His religious affiliation is 
with Unity Church. 

On June 12, 1865, Mr. Bryant married 
Sarah E. Birnie, born at Hastings-on-the- 
Hudson, New York, June 2, 1844, died 
April 19, 1904, daughter of Alexander 
and Mary (x\dams) Birnie, and they be- 
came the parents of four children : Emily 
Bliss, who married Charles L. Chapin 
(see Chapin VIII) ; William, who died in 
1892 ; Harry, who is teller in the Chicopee 
National Bank, married Florence Hub- 
bard; and Annie. 



GREGG, Lewis Andrew 

Among the well known business men 
of Springfield is Lewis Andrew Gregg, 
vice-president, general manager, and a 
member of the board of directors of the 
Charles Hall Company, which owns one 
of the finest china and cut glass estab- 
lishments in Western Massachusetts. 
Mr, Gregg is of Scotch ancestry, tracing 
his descent in this country to Robert 
Gregg, from whom the line of descent is 
as follows : 

(I) Robert Gregg, son of Robert and 
Christiana (Wallace) Gregg, was born 
at Weymas, Fife, Scotland, September i, 
1795, and died in Vermont, December 2, 
1858. In 1850, accompanied by his wife 
and all of his children, he came to Amer- 
ica, settling in Newbury, Vermont. He 
was an able, industrious and thrifty 
farmer, highly esteemed by his fellow- 
citizens, and a devoted member of the 
Reformed Presbyterian church of South 
Ryegate, Vermont. His wife survived 
him nearly twenty years, her death occur- 
ring June 30, 1878, in Brattleboro, Ver- 



mont. He married, November 12, 1824, 
in Scotland, Euphemia Mackie, of Mar- 
kinch, Fife, Scotland, and they were the 
parents of four children, all born in Scot- 
land: Nancy, who married Thomas 
Wright ; Robert ; Andrew R. ; and James 
W., of further mention, 

(II) Dr. James Wallace Gregg, son of 
Robert and Euphemia (Mackie) Gregg, 
was born in Buckhaven, Scotland, March 
20, 1843, ^"d died in Brattleboro, Ver- 
mont, February 2, 1916. He came to 
America with his parents when he was a 
child of seven years, and received his 
early education in the public schools of 
Newbury, where his parents settled. He 
attended Eastman's Business College, 
Poughkeepsie, New York, in 1860-61, and 
the following year, he then being a lad of 
eighteen, began teaching, and at the same 
time continued his studies as a student 
of Newbury Seminary. He taught pen- 
manship, and began the study of medi- 
cine with Dr. Watson, of Newbury, and 
later with Dr. Flanders, of East Corinth, 
attending lectures at Burlington, Ver- 
mont, and then entered the Medical 
School of Dartmouth University, from 
which he was graduated in 1866 with the 
degree of M. D. He began practice im- 
mediately, locating first in East Corinth, 
where he remained for a year. At the 
end of that time he made a change and 
began practice in South Ryegate, where 
he remained for eight years, from 1867 to 
1875, not only building up a large prac- 
tice, but being twice elected superintend- 
ent of the schools of Ryegate during that 
time. In 1875 he removed to Brattleboro, 
Vermont, where he operated a drug 
store, and continued to engage in med- 
ical practice. In 1884 he broadened his 
knowledge of materia medica by a post- 
graduate course in New York City, upon 
the completion of which he returned to 
Brattleboro, and continued to engage in 



43 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



general practice to the time of his death. 
He made a specialty of blood pressure, 
and in 191 1 invented a new instrument 
for testing it. He was a member of the 
Windham County Medical Association, 
and of the Vermont Medical Society, and 
was highly esteemed among his profes- 
sional associates. 

James Wallace Gregg married, at Rye- 
gate, Vermont, April 30, 1867, Luthera 
Cochran, who was born in Ryegate, May 
14, 1843, daughter of Robert and Jane 
(Park) Cochran (see Cochran III). The 
children of Dr. and Mrs. Gregg are : 
Emma J., born November 14, 1868; Lewis 
Andrew, of further mention ; Madeline A., 
born August 21, 1872; and Robert C, 
born February 24, 1877. 

(Ill) Lewis Andrew Gregg, son of Dr. 
James Wallace and Luthera (Cochran) 
Gregg, was born in Ryegate, Vermont, 
December 2, 1870. He removed to Brat- 
tleboro with his parents when he was five 
years of age. He received his education 
in the public schools of Brattleboro, and 
then began his business career in the 
employ of a candy establishment. Later, 
he became interested in the crockery and 
chinaware business, and entered the em- 
ploy of merchants engaged in that field, 
both in Brattleboro, Vermont, and in 
Greenfield, Massachusetts. In 1905 he 
came to Springfield, Massachusetts, and 
entered the employ of Charles Hall, Inc., 
whose store is one of the finest establish- 
ments of its kind in Western Massachu- 
setts. Here he steadily advanced until 
he was finally made a member of the 
company, of which he is now vice-presi- 
dent, general manager, and a member of 
the board of directors. During the sev- 
enteen years of his residence in Spring- 
field, Mr. Gregg has been closely iden- 
tified with its business interests. He is 
a member of the Chamber of Commerce, 
a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and a member of the Win- 



throp Club, the Automobile Club, and 
the Publicity Club. His religious affil- 
iation is with Christ Church. 

On October 21, 1896, Mr. Gregg mar- 
ried Eleanor Burke, of Brooklyn, New 
York, daughter of William and Eugenia 
(Babcock) Burke, and they are the par- 
ents of one daughter, Eleanor, who mar- 
ried Ariel H. McCarthy, and has a son, 
Lewis Gregg McCarthy, born June 26, 
1921. 

(The Cochran Line). 

(I) Alexander Cochran was born in 
Scotland, in 1776, and came to America 
in 1802, settling in Ryegate, Vermont. 
He married, August 19, 1806, Ann (Neil- 
son) Pedin, daughter of James Neilson, 
of Erskine, Scotland, and widow of John 
Pedin, of Paisley, Scotland, and they were 
the parents of the following children : 
Janet ; Robert, of further mention ; Eliz- 
abeth. Alexander Cochran died March 5, 
181 5, and his wife's death occurred May 
14, 1842. 

(II) Robert Cochran, son of Alexander 
and Ann (Neilson-Pedin) Cochran, was 
born in Ryegate, Vermont, January 5, 
1812, and died November 20, 1876. He 
married (first), March 2'/, 1834, Jane 
Park, born September 8, 1810, died Octo- 
ber 28, 1862, daughter of Archibald Park ; 
(second), December 2, 1871, Janet Wal- 
lace Nelson, born May i, 1825, died in 
1888, daughter of William Nelson. Chil- 
dren, all of the first marriage were : Alex- 
ander, Archibald, Margaret Ann, Jane R., 
George ; Luthera, of further mention ; 
Silas Wright, Lewis Robert, and John 
Nelson. 

(HI) Luthera Cochran, daughter of 
Robert and Jane (Park) Cochran, mar- 
ried Dr. James W. Gregg (see Gregg II). 



McINTYRE, William G. 

Few citizens of Springfield have been 
more highly respected and more deeply 
and sincerely mourned than was William 



44 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



G. Mclntyre, city auditor, whose passing 
on March 14, 1920, left a vacancy hard to 
fill and a sense of loss keenly felt by his 
fellow-citizens in general and by his as- 
sociate officials in particular. During 
his seven years of office as city auditor 
he brought the financial accounting sys- 
tem of the city to so high a state of effi- 
ciency that commissions from other mu- 
nicipalities came to inquire into and to 
profit by his system and methods, and by 
his personal loyalty and courtesy he won 
a place of high esteem and tender regard 
in the hearts of a host of those with whom 
he was brought in contact. 

Mr. Mclntyre was born in Manchester, 
England, December 24, 1851, and came to 
this country when he was nine years of 
age, sailing on a packet ship which after 
a stormy passage of about ten weeks fin- 
ally succeeded in making the port of 
New York, an achievement which had 
been many times despaired of during the 
perilous passage. The family remained 
in New York for a very short time, and 
William G. attended school there, but 
later they removed to Willimantic, Con- 
necticut, and there in the public schools 
his education was completed. As a young 
man he entered the employ of a book 
binding company in Northampton, re- 
maining for five years, then entered the 
employ of the Collins Manufacturing 
Company of North Wilbraham, and there 
remained as an accountant for several 
years. He was then appointed auditor 
for the Connecticut River Railroad Com- 
pany, and after a number of years spent 
in that position he resigned in order that 
he might take charge of certain business 
interests for A. B. Harris, president of 
that company. During this time he was 
located in New York City, but in 1892 
he removed to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
and served as auditor of that city for a 
period of two years. He then accepted 



the position of treasurer of the Hamp- 
den Trust Company, serving for a like 
period of time, after which he became 
associated with the American La France 
Engine Company, of Elmira, New York, 
with which concern he remained for eight 
years, then returned to Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, and was appointed auditor 
for the second time, the appointment be- 
ing made by Mayor Dennison to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of William 
C. Marsh. From that time until his 
death he held the position continuously, 
being successively appointed by each 
mayor who came into office. In 1919, at 
Mr. Mclntyre's request, the office of dep- 
uty city auditor was created in order that 
he might be relieved of some of the duties 
of his position, and Clifford E. Cook was 
appointed to fill that position. 

The following are a few of the many 
testimonials regarding the high standing 
of Mr. Mclntyre and the esteem in which 
he was held in the city and by his many 
friends: "More than almost any other 
official," says the Springfield "Repub- 
lican," of March 16, 1920, "Mr. Mclntyre 
has the respect and friendship of city 
hall officials. Very conscientious, he did 
the most efficient and important work in 
a quiet way. He always had a friendly 
word of greeting for every one. His ad- 
vice was often sought by Mayor Adams, 
especially in the tasks presented by the 
annual budget." Officials on every side 
bore testimony to both the high quality 
of the work done and to the sterling qual- 
ities of character which endeared him to 
the hearts of those with whom he came 
in contact and won the highest admira- 
tion of his colleagues. "The city has lost 
one of its best men," said City Clerk 
Newell. "Mr. Mclntyre was always 
thorough and careful in his work, and 
patient under all provocations. He was 
an extraordinarily competent auditor." 



45 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



It is interesting to note that the budget 
of 1920, which Mr. Mclntyre had spent 
most of his last active days in preparing, 
was passed by the City Council two 
days after his death, unaltered. During 
the later years of his successful career, 
Mr. Mclntyre liked to recall the days of 
his boyhood in Willimantic, when, em- 
ployed in a general store which was also 
the post office, he acted as telegraph op- 
erator for the town and in spare moments 
sorted the mail, worked as express agent, 
and waited on customers. Incidentally, 
he would sweep the store each morning 
and prepare it for the business of the day. 
A quiet, modest, home-loving man, averse 
to display or publicity, Mr. Mclntyre 
quietly went about his duties, perform- 
ing them with exceeding proficiency and 
never losing the human touch. His pass- 
ing has left a sense of loss that will long 
be felt. He was a member of Hampden 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
also a Knight Templar. 

On April 21, 1881, Mr. Mclntyre mar- 
ried Delia Arnold, of Mayfield, Ohio, but 
who resided most of her life in Connec- 
ticut, daughter of Charles A. Arnold, a 
native of Haddam, Connecticut, and of 
Ann M. (Cutler) Arnold, and grand- 
daughter of Chauncy Arnold, of Haddam, 
Connecticut. 



SHATTUCK, Arthur Ellis 

Arthur Ellis Shattuck, assistant treas- 
urer and member of the board of directors 
of the Strathmore Paper Company, of 
West Springfield, Massachusetts, began 
his association with that company, as 
bookkeeper, in 1897. 

(I) The branch of the Shattuck fam- 
ily to which Mr. Shattuck belongs traces 
its ancestry to William Shattuck, born 
in England, in 1621-22, one of the pro- 
prietors of Watertown, Massachusetts, 



where he resided for about thirty years, 
his name appearing upon a list made 
about 1642. He was granted land, "An 
homestall of one acre by estimation" and 
"three acres of upland, by estimation," 
and to this he made large additions by 
subsequent grants and purchases. The 
records state that among other parcels 
of land, he purchased, July 4, 1654, of his 
neighbor, John Clough, his home garden 
and thirty acres of land situated on Com- 
mon Hill near his own estate and bounded 
east by William Payne and E. G. Gofife. 
west by the highway, north by Joseph 
Morse, and "south by the highway to the 
pond ;" also twenty-five acres upland, 
three acres of swampland, and a one- 
third part of twelve acres of meadow- 
land. He also bought a farm at Stony 
Brook, near the present bounds of Wes- 
ton ; four acres of meadow in Pond 
Meadow, and a dwelling house and a large 
farm of Edward Sanderson. His resi- 
dence was on Common Hill, overlooking 
Boston, and the estate was occupied by 
his descendants for about a century. Ag- 
riculture was his principal employment, 
but he was also a weaver. Industrious 
and economical, he acquired a large prop- 
erty for those times, inventoried at 434 
pounds, 19 shillings, and 11 3^ pence, of 
which 200 pounds was represented by 
real estate. As an honest, upright, and 
worthy citizen, he held a high place in 
the esteem of his fellow-citizens. He 
died in Watertown, August 14, 1672, aged 
fifty years, and was buried in the old 
burying ground on the road leading from 
Cambridge to Watertown, west of Mount 
Auburn. 

He married, in 1642, Susanna , 

who survived him and married (second), 
November 18, 1673, Richard Norcross, 
who survived her. Children of William 
and Susanna Shattuck, all born in Water- 
town : Susanna, Mary ; John, of whom 



46 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



further; Philip, Joanna, William, Re- 
becca, Abigail, Benjamin, and Samuel. 

(II) John Shattuck, son of William 
and Susanna Shattuck, was born in Wa- 
tertown, Massachusetts, February ii, 
1647, and was drowned while passing 
over Charlestown Ferry, September 14, 
1675. He was a carpenter and resided, 
principally, in Watertown, where in 
1669 he was appointed to keep the town 
mill. During King Philip's War he 
ser\-ed as sergeant under Captain Rich- 
ard Beers. He married, January 20, 1664, 
when eighteen years of age, Ruth Whit- 
ney, born in Watertown, April 15, 1645, 
daughter of John Whitney, and they were 
the parents of four children : John, born 
in 1666, married Mary Blood ; Ruth, born 
in 1668; William, of whom further; and 
Samuel, a full account of whom appears 
in the following sketch. 

(III) William (2) Shattuck, son of 
John and Ruth (Whitney) Shattuck, was 
born in Watertown, Massachusetts, Sep- 
tember II, 1670, and died in Groton, 
Massachusetts, in 1744. He married 
(first), March 19, 1688, in Watertown, 
Hannah Underwood, he being then of 
Groton and she of Watertown. She died 
about 1717, and he married (second), in 
Groton, March 24, 1719, Deliverance 
Pease, who survived him. The children 
of the first marriage were : William, who 
married (first) A. Shattuck, (second) M. 
Lund; Hannah, who married Nathaniel 
Blood; Daniel, of whom further; Ruth, 
who married Ebenezer Nuthey ; and John. 
who married Silence Allen. 

(IV) Captain Daniel Shattuck, son of 
William (2) and Hannah (Underwood^ 
Shattuck, was born in Watertown, Mas- 
sachusetts, in 1692, and died in Hinsdale. 
New Hampshire, March 17, 1760. He 
lived in Groton during the greater part 
of his minority, removed to Worcester in 
1719, to Northfield in 1723, and to Hins- 



dale (now of New Hampshire), in 1736. 
He was a wealthy farmer and a large 
landholder. In the division of Northfield 
Commons, he received 215 acres, and his 
dwelling house was about 100 rods east 
of the Connecticut river and one mile 
south of Fort Hinsdale. He built two 
houses, one on either side of a brook, the 
upper parts of which contained posts for 
sentinels and holes to fire through. The 
whole structure was enclosed with a 
palisade and was known as Shattuck's 
Fort. During the wars of 1745 all the 
people of the surrounding neighborhood 
came to live there. Both Captain Dan- 
iel Shattuck and his son, Captain Daniel 
(2) Shattuck, were large, athletic men of 
more than six feet height, whom the In- 
dians regarded with fear, love, and ven- 
eration, as superhuman beings. On 
March 30, 1747, however, thirty or forty 
Indians came silently at night, "with 
fagots of dried spruce with the ends 
dipped in brimstone," and set the fort on 
fire. The part of the fort on one side of 
the brook was burned, but the wind be- 
ing in such a direction as to carry the 
flames away, the part on the other side 
was saved. It was thought that the In- 
dians in thus attacking the fort and 
dwelling house of the men they vener- 
ated, were not intending to kill the Shat- 
tucks, but to capture them and make 
them leaders and chiefs among their own 
people. Captain Daniel Shattuck mar- 
ried, at Marlboro, April 16, 1719. Mar- 
tha Serjeant, of Westborough. Connec- 
ticut, daughter of Digory Serjeant. She 
died in 1722, and he married (second) 
Rebecca Boltwood, who was born Au- 
gust I, 1691, daughter of Sergeant Samuel 
and Sarah (Lewis) Boltwood, of Hadley, 
Massachusetts. To the first marriage 
was born Sarah, who was unmarried and 
lived in Westborough. To the second 
marriage were born : Martha, who mar- 



47 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ried Daniel Rider ; Daniel, of whom fur- 
ther ; Phebe ; Gideon. 

(V) Captain Daniel (2) Shattuck, son 
of Captain Daniel (i) and Rebecca (Bolt- 
wood) Shattuck, was born in Northfield, 
Massachusetts, April 11, 1727, and died 
in Hinsdale, New Hampshire, April 7, 
1809. He was a large landholder, a man 
of property, distinction, and influence in 
the town, who farmed the old paternal 
estate in Hinsdale. He was somewhat of 
a sportsman, and because of his great 
success in capturing and killing bears, cat- 
amounts, etc., was known as "The Great 
Hunter." He was in command of a group 
of men in the battle of Stillwater, in which 
engagement his horse was shot from un- 
der him, he, however, escaping. He mar- 
ried (first), in 1753, Mary Smith, of Am- 
herst, Massachusetts, daughter of Stephen 
Smith. She died September 3, 1888, and 
he married (second) Lucy (Clapp) 
Smith, born November 10, 1737, daughter 
of Preserved Clapp and widow of Mar- 
tin Smith. Children of the first marriage : 
Cyrus, married Tirza Evans ; Makepeace, 
married Lydia Grandy; Mary, married 
Elijah Barrett ; Gideon, of whom further ; 
Phena, who died in infancy; and Thena 
(twins). 

(VI) Gideon Shattuck, son of Captain 
Daniel (2) and Mary (Smith) Shattuck, 
was born August o.j, 1761, and died at 
Ticonderoga, New York, August 6, 1838. 
He settled as a farmer in Hinsdale, but 
in 1795 removed to Ticonderoga, Essex 
county, New York, where he was one of 
the original settlers who lived in a log 
cabin and cleared the land. He married, 
September 29, 1785, Experience Ingra- 
ham, born November i, 1761, died Sep- 
tember 12, 1837, daughter of Philip Ingra- 
ham, of Amherst, Massachusetts, and 
they were the parents of the following 
children: Chester, married L. Hendrick; 
Mindwell; Stephen, married Abigail 



Newton; Austin; George, married Electa 
Belden; Arad, of whom further; Samuel, 
married Polly Ward ; and a daughter who 
died in infancy. 

(VII) Arad Shattuck, daughter of Gid- 
eon and Experience (Ingraham) Shat- 
tuck, was born in Ticonderoga, New 
York, March 22, 1798, and died in 1882. 
He was a farmer. He married, April 10, 
1828, in Pawlings, Dutchess county. New 
York, Hester Brill, born May 16, 1809, 
daughter of Joseph and Hannah (Wood- 
en) Brill, and they were the parents of 
children: Albert Arad, of whom further; 
Mary, Roswell, Sylvester, Samuel, Jo- 
seph, William Henry, Lury, Jane, Orphy, 
Sophia. 

(VIII) Albert Arad Shattuck, son of 
Arad and Hester (Brill) Shattuck, was 
born in Pawlings, Dutchess county. New 
York, April 18, 1829, and died in Ticon- 
deroga, New York, April 5, 1912. He 
was engaged in farming during the 
greater part of his life, and was most 
highly esteemed by his neighbors and 
associates. A man of exemplary char- 
acter, and a devoted member of the Meth- 
odist church, he was a strong influence 
for morality and fair dealing and served 
his community faithfully and well. He 
married, in i860, Cornelia Doolittle, of 
Ticonderoga, New York, born January 3, 
1838, died February 5, 1921, daughter of 
Edward and Roxanna (Marsh) Doolittle, 
and they were the parents of six chil- 
dren: Eva, died young; Ervin, died 
young; Zetta, married William Good- 
spell, of Crown Point, New York ; Leroy, 
died at the age of twenty-two years ; Al- 
bert, resides in Ticonderoga and has 
three children, Joyce, Helen, and Ruth ; 
Arthur Ellis, of whom further. 

(IX) Arthur Ellis Shattuck, son of Al- 
bert Arad and Cornelia (Doolittle) 
Shattuck, was born in Ticonderoga, New 
York, January 23, 1875. He received his 



48 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



education in the public schools of his 
native town and at Eastman's Business 
College, Poughkeepsie, New York. When 
his college course was completed, he be- 
gan teaching and for five years continued 
in that profession. In 1897, however, he 
made a change. Coming to West Spring- 
field, he entered the employ of the 
Strathmore Paper Company, as book- 
keeper, and during the quarter of a cen- 
tury which has elapsed since that time he 
has maintained his connection with the 
company. He has advanced through vari- 
ous promotions until at the present time 
(1923) he is assistant treasurer and a 
member of the board of directors of the 
company. He is a member of the Ki- 
wanis Club, and his religious affiliation is 
with the Congregational church, which 
he serves as a member of the prudential 
committee. 

On September 10, 1902, Arthur E. 
Shattuck married Mary Davis, of Hadley, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Warren and 
Catherine (Boyce) Davis (see Davis IX), 
and they are the parents of two children : 
Barbara, and Gordon, 

(The Davis Line). 

(I) Dolor Davis was born in Kent, 
England, came to America in 1634, and 
died in Barnstable, Massachusetts, in 
1673. He was the father of Samuel, of 
whom further. 

(II) Samuel Davis, son of Dolor Davis, 
married Mary Meads, and among their 
children was Simon, of whom further. 

(III) Lieutenant Simon Davis, son of 
Samuel and Mary (Meads) Davis, was 
born in 1663, and died in 1763. He mar- 
ried Dorothy Hale, and they were the 
parents of Israel, of whom further. 

(IV) Israel Davis, son of Lieutenant 
Simon and Dorothy (Hale) Davis, was 
born in 1717, and died in 1791. He mar- 
ried Mary Hurburt, and among their chil- 
dren was Israel (2), of whom further. 

Mass — 12 — 4 49 



(V) Captain Israel (2) Davis, son of 
Israel (i) and Mary (Hurburt) Davis, 
was a soldier of the Revolutionary War. 
He married Rebecca Hubbard, and they 
were the parents of Benjamin, of whom 
further. 

(VI) Benjamin Davis, son of Captain 
Israel (2) and Rebecca (Hubbard) Davis, 
married Olive Warren, and among their 
children was John, of whom further. 

(VII) John Davis, son of Benjamin 
and Olive (Warren) Davis, married Mary 
Gray, and they were the parents of War- 
ren, of whom further. 

(VIII) Warren Davis, son of John and 
Mary (Gray) Davis, married Catherine 
Boyce, and they were the parents of 
Mary, of whom further. 

(IX) Mary Davis, daughter of War- 
ren and Catherine (Boyce) Davis, mar- 
ried Arthur E. Shattuck (see Shattuck 
IX). 



SHATTUCK, Frank Herbert 

An experience of many years on the 
road selling hardware, fifteen years with 
one concern, three years with another, 
and three years with still another firm 
engaged in the same line, constitutes a 
most thorough education in that field 
and a most excellent preparation for offi- 
cial and executive position. Such has 
been the experience of Frank Herbert 
Shattuck, president and treasurer of the 
Springfield Hardware and Iron Corpor- 
ation. Mr. Shattuck comes of a very old 
family, the branch to which he belongs 
tracing its ancestry to William Shattuck, 
a full account of whom and his son, John 
Shattuck, through whom this line is 
traced, appearing in the preceding sketch. 

(Ill) Samuel Shattuck. son of John 
and Ruth (Whitney) Shattuck (q. v.), 
was born in Watertown, in 1673, and died 
at Groton, July 22, 1758, aged eighty-five 
years. He married Elizabeth Blood, born 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



April 27, 1675, died October 20, 1759, 
daughter of James and Elizabeth (Lang- 
ley) Blood, and they were the parents of 
ten children : Samuel ; James, of whom 
further; Jeremiah, Elizabeth, Ruth, John, 
David, Sarah, Rachel, and Joseph. 

(IV) James Shattuck, son of Samuel 
and Elizabeth (Blood) Shattuck, was 
born in Groton, Massachusetts, February 
9, 1700, and died in Pepperell, Massachu- 
setts, May I, 1769, aged sixty-nine years 
and two months. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native 
district, and then engaged in farming in 
Pepperell. He married, November 22, 
1726, Sarah Chamberlain, born August 
14, 1709, died August 3, 1781, daughter 
of Thomas C. Chamberlain. Their chil- 
dren were : Sarah, James, Ruth, Thomas, 
Jemima, Reuben, Abigail, Joseph ; and 
Moses, of whom further. 

(V) Moses Shattuck, son of James and 
Sarah (Chamberlain) Shattuck, was born 
in Pepperell, Massachusetts, January 24, 
1752, and died in Pepperell, July 24, 1830. 
He engaged in farming and also taught 
school. He took an active interest in 
the public afifairs of the community and 
served in various public positions, in- 
cluding that of tax collector and select- 
man. He held a prominent social posi- 
tion in the town and was highly esteemed 
and respected. He married, in 1778, Abi- 
gail Wood, born February 25, 1756, died 
February 12, 1840, aged eighty-four years, 
daughter of Isaac and Tryphena (Par- 
ker) Wood, and they were the parents 
of eleven children: Abigail, Rebecca, 
Tryphena, Moses, Sarah, Isaac; Aaron, of 
whom further; Amey, Diodama, Mind- 
well H., and Thomas B. 

(VI) Aaron Shattuck, son of Moses 
and Abigail (Wood) Shattuck, was born 
December 13, 1792. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native 
district. He learned the mason's trade, 



which he followed in Pepperell. On No- 
vember 6, 1814, he married Nancy Shat- 
tuck, who was born October 6, 1795, and 
they were the parents of five children : 
Nancy Augusta, born in 181 5, married 
James Lovejoy ; Josiah, of whom further ; 
Charles Nichols, born in 1825; Mary Mi- 
randa, born in 1827, married James S. 
Walton ; and Clara Ann, born in 1833, 
married John W. Loring, of Newark, New 
Jersey; all deceased. 

(VII) Josiah Shattuck, son of Aaron 
and Nancy (Shattuck) Shattuck, was 
born March 13, 1822, and died in Brook- 
line, New Hampshire, in 1858. He kept 
a tavern in Brookline. On October 20, 
1846, he married Catherine Lydia Tar- 
bell, born June 2.2, 1822, daughter of 
Thomas Tarbell, and they were the par- 
ents of three children : Samuel Stearns ; 
Mary Catherine, married Alvin G. Davis ; 
and Frank Herbert, of whom further. 

(VIII) Frank Herbert Shattuck, son 
of Josiah and Catherine Lydia (Tarbell) 
Shattuck, was born in Brookline, New 
Hampshire, June 12, 1855. He attended 
the public schools of Fitchburg and of 
Ashby, Massachusetts, until he was four- 
teen years of age, and then went to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, where for a 
period of three years he was employed 
in a drug store. At the end of that time 
he left the drug business and became 
identified with Graves, Wallace & Shar- 
rocks, proprietors of a hardware store. 
This connection he maintained until Sep- 
tember, 1880, when he became associated 
with Homer Foote, also engaged in the 
hardware business, and traveled on the 
road for many years, selling hardware. 
He was with Homer Foote for fifteen 
years ; then with Baldwin & Robbins, of 
Boston, for three years ; then for three 
years with Chapman & Brooks, which 
firm was later purchased by and known 
as the Bigelow & Dowse Company, up 



PTl 



tf-STOR, LENOX AND 
»l.D»N "^UNDATIONS 







Jaicl)art) M. I^ouston 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



to 1922, when he became associated with 
the Springfield Hardware and Iron Cor- 
poration, of which he was made presi- 
dent and treasurer, and of which he is 
also a member of the board of directors. 
He is well known in Springfield as a suc- 
cessful business man. His religious affil- 
iation was for some years with the First 
Congregational Church, later with the 
Hope Congregational Church. 

In January, 1888, Frank H. Shattuck 
married Luella Brewster, who was born 
in Syracuse, New York, and died October 
4, 1912, daughter of John and Martha 
Emma (Whitney) Brewster, Their 
children were : Raymond Brewster, a 
sketch of whom follows ; and Doris Cath- 
erine, who married Henry Lafayette 
Miller, and has one son, Brewster Shat- 
tuck, born May 11, 1919. 



SHATTUCK, Raymond Brewster 

After a diversified experience in the 
shipping department of a large paper 
manufacturing concern and in the real 
estate business, Raymond Brewster Shat- 
tuck took over the business of Alexander 
Grant & Son, Inc., engaged in the roofing 
contracting business, and of that corpor- 
ation he is now president and treasurer. 
His ancestry is given at length in the 
preceding sketches. 

(IX) Raymond Brewster Shattuck, son 
of Frank Herbert and Luella (Brewster) 
Shattuck, was born in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, October 22, 1889. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools 
of Springfield, graduating from the Com- 
mercial High School and from the Tech- 
nical School. When his formal school 
training was completed, he began his bus- 
iness career with the Powers Paper Com- 
pany, of Holyoke, Massachusetts, first in 
the shipping room and later in the office. 
This connection he maintained for about 
four years. In 1913 he engaged in the 



real estate business, in which line he con- 
tinued for some three years, at the end 
of which time he purchased the roofing 
contracting business of Alexander Grant 
& Son, Inc. To the business of this con- 
cern he has since that time devoted his 
entire time and attention. He is presi- 
dent and treasurer of the corporation, 
and it is to his energ>' and ability that 
much of the success and prosperity of the 
business is due. 

In addition to the time and attention 
given to his business interests, Mr. Shat- 
tuck is active in public affairs and in clul) 
circles. He is now serving his third 
year as a member of the Board of Alder- 
men, and previously served one year as 
a member of the City Council. He has 
also for three years been a member of the 
Board of Supervisors of the Street Engi- 
neering Department. During the World 
War he served from August 7, 1918, to 
February 12, 1919, as inspector of camps 
and buildings, visited some nineteen dif- 
ferent camps in official capacity, ranking 
as first lieutenant. He is a member of 
the Winthrop Club, of which he was 
treasurer for three years ; of the Rotary 
Club, the Country Club, and the Man- 
choris Club. 

On September 9, 1914, Raymond B. 
Shattuck married Helen Daphne Wright, 
of Springfield, daughter of Herbert W. 
and Annie (Robinson) Wright, and they 
are the parents of two children : Anna 
Robinson, born July 11, 1916"; and Bar- 
bara Brewster, born March 27, 1918. 



HOUSTON, Richard Kimball 

For more than thirty ears Richard 
Kimball Houston was at the head of the 
Holyoke Roll Cover Company, and later 
was the head of the Thorndike Roll Cover 
Company, of Three Rivers, Massachu- 
setts. He was widely known and highly 
esteemed, not only as a successful busi- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ness man, but as a progressive citizen 
and a worthy friend and associate. He 
had, at the time of his death, been a resi- 
dent of Springfield for fifteen years, and 
for some years had been retired from 
active business. 

(I) The branch of the Houston family 
to which Richard K. Houston belonged 
traces its ancestry to Samuel Houston, a 
native of Londonderry, Province of Ul- 
ster, Ireland, Samuel Houston being of 
Scotch ancestry and a devoted Presby- 
terian in his religious belief and affilia- 
tion. About 1718 he came to this coun- 
try with a group of Scotch-Irish who 
were asked to locate in New England by 
no less a personage than Governor Shute, 
of Massachusetts. A lot of sixty acres 
bordering on Beaver pond, in Nutfield 
(Londonderry), New Hampshire, in the 
English Range, was laid out for him in 
1720, and recorded April 6, 1725. To 
this farm he added, June 25, 1729, one 
hundred and forty-four acres, recorded 
January 24, 1730, situated in the High 
Range, bordering on Bear meadow in 
Londonderry. He was a prosperous 
farmer, highly respected, and influential 
in his section of the colony. Among his 
children was John, of further mention. 

(II) Rev. John Houston, son of Sam- 
uel Houston, was born in Londonderry, 
New Hampshire, April 4, 1732. After at- 
tending the schools of his native district, 
he prepared for the ministry under the 
tuition of the Rev. David MacGregor, the 
famous minister of the Londonderry 
Presbyterian Church. He later entered 
Princeton College, from which he was 
graduated in 1753. During this time he 
had preached in various localities, and on 
August 5, 1756, was called to become pas- 
tor of the Presbyterian church at Bed- 
ford, New Hampshire, a town founded by 
the Londonderry pioneers, and there he 
was ordained September 28, 1757. The 



land set aside for the first minister of the 
town and a salary of forty pounds repre- 
sented his compensation, but it was stip- 
ulated that he was to preach only at such 
times as the town by vote requested him 
to do so. Thus it was that a large por- 
tion of his time was spent in preaching 
in nearby places where there was no 
Presbyterian church. At the time of the 
Revolutionary War, however, he was not 
in sympathy with the action taken by 
the colonists in separating from the 
Mother Country, and on June 15, 1776, 
was restrained from further preaching. 
From that time on he was engaged in 
teaching private pupils and in agricul- 
tural pursuits. He was noted for his 
classical learning and is described as "tall, 
solemn, stern, and dignified." He mar- 
ried Anna Peebles, daughter of Robert 
and Sarah Peebles, who were also Scotch- 
Irish pioneers of New Hampshire, and 
they were the parents of eight children: 
Samuel, who was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary War ; Robert ; John, of further 
mention ; Anna, married Hugh Riddle ; 
Sarah, married the Hon. John Orr; Wil- 
liam, served in the Revolutionary War ; 
James ; Joseph. Three of the sons were 
graduates of Yale College. Rev, John 
Houston died in Bedford, February 3, 
1798, aged seventy-five years, his wife 
surviving him until July 4, of the same 
year, when she died at the age of seventy- 
two years. 

(Ill) John (2) Houston, son of Rev. 
John (i) and Anna (Peebles) Houston, 
was born in Bedford, New Hampshire, in 
1760, and died in September, 1857. He 
spent his entire life in that town. He 
was a successful farmer and a highly es- 
teemed member of the community. He 
married and reared a family of children: 
Robert, died at Bedford, December 12, 
1869; John; William E., of further men- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



tion; and James, who died at Bedford, 
March 21, 1871. 

(IV) William E. Houston, son of John 
(2) Houston, was born in Bedford, New 
Hampshire, April 12, 1801, and died in 
Holyoke, Massachusetts, July 30, 1879. 
He received a practical education in the 
local schools, and then engaged in farm- 
ing in Bedford and in Goffstown, New 
Hampshire. Removing to Haverhill, 
New Hampshire, he resided there for a 
period of eight years, engaged in farm- 
ing and in conducting a sawmill of which 
he was the owner, and then went to 
Nashua, New Hampshire, where for five 
years he followed carpentering, which 
trade he had learned when a young man. 
In 1850 he removed to Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, and engaged in farming at 
Smiths Ferry, now known as the Abbott 
property. Earnest, upright, industrious, 
and capable, he was highly esteemed and 
known as a progressive citizen and a 
Christian gentleman. He was a member 
of the Baptist church of Holyoke, in the 
work of which he took an active part. 
Politically, he gave his allegiance to the 
Whig party during his early years, and 
later supported the Republican party. 
Mr. Houston married, December 20, 1825, 
at GofTstown, New Hampshire, Sarah 
Kimball, of that town, born December 
19, 1800, died January 12, 1888, daughter 
of Richard and Margaret (Ferrin) Kim- 
ball, and a descendant of Richard Kim- 
ball, one of the early English pioneers of 
Massachusetts. They were the parents 
of seven children: i. Ann Margaret, born 
September 2, 1826, died August 10, 1895 ; 
married John Roby Webster. 2. Nancy 
Melissa, born January i, 1828, died Au- 
gust 25, 1883 ; married Ebenezer A. John- 
son, a brother of Mrs. Richard Kimball 
Houston. 3. Richard Kimball, of further 
mention. 4. Sarah Amanda, born March 
3, 1834, died December 3, 1834. 5. Wil- 



liam E., Jr., born January 3, 1836. 6. 
Sarah Amanda, born April 26, 1840, died 
February 25, 1868; married Edward A. 
Johnson. 7. Joseph Edgar, born April 4, 
1842. All of these children are now 
deceased. 

(V) Richard Kimball Houston, son of 
William E. and Sarah (Kimball) Hous- 
ton, was born in Goffstown, New Hamp- 
shire, November 28, 1829, and died in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, January 22, 
1909. He attended the public schools of 
his native town, and when his school 
training was completed began his busi- 
ness career by learning the trade of belt 
maker. After continuing in this line for 
some time, he went to Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, where he was engaged in mak- 
ing roll covers in company with Joel Rus- 
sell, for a number of years. Then he 
sold out and purchased a farm in War- 
ren, which he conducted for three years, 
then sold and came to Springfield to 
make his residence in that city, opening 
a shop in Thorndike, a village in the town 
of Palmer, and later organizing what 
was known as the Thorndike Roll Cover 
Company, and covering rolls for the mills 
in Thorndike, Ware, Three Rivers, and 
the surrounding towns. In this busi- 
ness he continued up to 1889, when he 
retired. For the first three years of this 
time, up to 1874, he resided in Spring- 
field, but in that year moved to Thorn- 
dike, where he resided until 1889, when 
he again removed to Springfield, where 
he spent the remainder of his life. He 
was a member of Hampden Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Widely known as a most successful 
business man, and highly regarded for his 
sterling qualities of character, as well as 
for his winning personality, the death of 
Mr. Houston caused the deepest sorrow 
among his very large circle of business 
and social associates, as well as among 



53 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



those who knew him best in the closer 
relationships of life. 

Mr. Houston married, February 14, 
i860, Emeline Edna Johnson, daughter 
of Josiah and Lorena Johnson, of Way- 
land, Massachusetts, and they are the 
parents of three daughters: i. Emma 
Josephine, married M. S. Boies, and they 
have an adopted daughter, Gladys Mar- 
jorie, who married James Barnes and 
they have three children : James, Mar- 
jorie and Monroe Edgar. 2. Marion 
Edna, married Fred Leach, and they have 
two sons, Willard Kimball, married Mil- 
dred Van Stone, and O. William. 3. 
Mabelle Lorena. 



JAMES, Charles WUliam 

Charles William James is of English 
ancestry, his father, William James, hav- 
ing come from Gloucestershire, England, 
in 1829. 

(I) Benjamin James, father of Wil- 
liam James, and grandfather of Charles 
William James, lived and died in Eng- 
land. He was a stone cutter by trade. 
As was the custom in those days, the 
trade of the father became that of the son, 
so for several generations the sons of the 
family were stone cutters. Benjamin 
James married Ann Scuse, and among 
their children was William, of further 
mention. 

(II) William James, son of Benjamin 
and Ann (Scuse) James, was born at 
Frampton Cotterell, Gloucestershire, near 
Bristol, England, June 27, 1829. He 
received his education in the local schools, 
and then learned the stone cutter's trade 
with his father, beginning his apprentice- 
ship at the age of fifteen years and work- 
ing at that trade in England until 1848, 
when, having decided that opportunity 
was greater in the new world to the west- 
ward, he with his wife set sail for Amer- 
ica, arriving in New York in the spring 



of the year. For a week they remained 
in what was destined to be the largest 
city of the western hemisphere, and then 
joined a cousin in Newburyport, Massa- 
chusetts, who found him temporary em- 
ployment, sewing shoes. During the 
summer he worked at his trade, but as 
winter came on work grew scarce and 
he went into the Bartlett Cotton Mills 
to "tide over" the slack season in his own 
work. When summer came he again, 
for a short time, secured some work at 
stone cutting, but the demand for that 
kind of work was insufficient to warrant 
its continuance in that neighborhood. 
He must either change his occupation or 
change his place of residence. He chose 
to do the latter, and with his family re- 
moved to Boston, Massachusetts. Here 
he was employed by Mr. Meaney and 
afterward by Mr. Carew on Tremont 
street, where monument and gravestone 
lettering was a specialty. Constant use 
of his eyes in the delicate work of chis- 
elling impaired his eyesight, and he was 
obliged to give up that part of the work. 
He then came to Springfield, where he 
secured a position as foreman in the es- 
tablishment of Dwelly & Stone, marble 
and stone cutters. In 1874 he formed a 
partnership with Peter Marra, and went 
into business for himself, building up an 
increasingly successful business in which 
he continued until the time of his death, 
August 28, 1891, the partnership being 
retained after his death by his widow 
until 1908. The firm filled large con- 
tracts, sending stone from their East 
Longmeadow quarries to all parts of the 
country, and shipping from their stone 
yard on Franklin street some of the hand- 
somest specimens of workmanship ever 
sent from Springfield. 

William James married, August 14, 
1848, Ellen Hollister, of Frampton Cot- 
terell, Gloucestershire, England, daughter 



54 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of Richard and Mary (Bryant) Hollister, 
of Frampton, where her father was a 
shoemaker. Ellen Hollister was born 
March 29, 1827, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, August 31, 1919. After 
the death of her husband, she conducted 
the business until 1908, when she sold 
out her interests. The children of Wil- 
liam and Ellen (Hollister) James were: 
Sarah, married Robert Clelland, died No- 
vember 16, 1922; Elizabeth, married 
Frank Chaffee; Emily, married (first) 
Charles Wesley Bates, (second) William 
J. Thompson ; George, died in infancy ; 
Charles William, of further mention ; 
Mary, deceased wife of Edwin Seaver ; 
William, deceased; Benjamin; Ellen, 
deceased ; Walter, a biography of whom 
appears on following pages. 

(Ill) Charles William James, son of 
William and Ellen (Hollister) James, 
was born in Boston, Massachusetts, De- 
cember 29, 1856. He attended school in 
his native city until about 1865, when his 
parents removed to Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, after which time he attended 
the schools of Springfield until, like his 
father before him, he began to learn the 
stone cutter's trade with his father. He 
remained in this business until the death 
of William James, and then took charge 
of the quarries for his mother until she 
sold out her interests in 1908. He then 
worked for the Street Railway Company 
for a time, and left their employ to en- 
gage in gun making for the Federal Gov- 
ernment. Two and a half years later, he 
entered the employ of the Stevens Arms 
and Tool Company, where he remained 
for six years, making guns. For five and 
a half years more he was with the Stevens 
Duryea Automobile Company, at the end 
of which time he went with the Smith & 
Wesson Company, making revolvers, and 
there he is employed at the present time. 
Politically, Mr, James is a Republican. 



Fraternally, he is affiliated with Hamp- 
den Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; 
and with Hampden Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. and Mrs. 
James are members of All Saints Episco- 
pal Church, 

On December 24, 1877, Charles Wil- 
liam James married Mary Elizabeth 
Clayton, of New York, daughter of 
James Harding and Mary A. (Terry) 
Clayton, James Harding Clayton was 
born in Birmingham, England, in 1835 ; 
later he came to America, landed in New 
York City, from whence he removed to 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1856, 
He was a gun maker by trade, and was in 
the employ of the Federal Government at 
the United States Armory in Springfield 
for half a century, up to the age of eighty- 
three years, and is now (1922) living in 
Springfield. On April 2, 1857, he mar- 
ried Mary A. Terry, born in Birming- 
ham, England, but was brought to Amer- 
ica in infancy, and was reared and re- 
sided in New York City, a daughter of 
Benjamin and Eva Elizabeth (King- 
wall) Terry. Children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Clayton: Mary Elizabeth, aforemen- 
tioned ; Sarah Francis, Ella Josephine, 
Emma Geneva, Charles Edward, William 
H.; Alice C. Charles W. and Mary E. 
(Clayton) James became the parents of 
three children : Charles William, Jr., a 
sketch of whom follows; Bertha Eliza- 
beth, married George C. Bradford ; ]\Iay- 
belle Clayton, a teacher. 



JAMES, Charles William, Jr, 

(IV) Charles William James, Jr., son 
of Charles William and Mary Elizabeth 
(Clayton) James (q. v.), was born in 
Springfield, Massachusetts. January 8. 
1879. He received his education in the 
local schools, graduating from the high 
school in 1897. After his graduation he 
entered the employ of Forbes & Wallace, 



55 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of Springfield, where he remained for 
four years, and then became associated 
with the Charles E. Brown Company, 
wholesale grocers, of Springfield, which 
concern he continued to represent most 
efficiently for a period of nineteen years. 
At the present time (1922) he is with 
the William Boardman & Sons Company, 
of Hartford, Connecticut, wholesale gro- 
cers, having charge of the Springfield 
territory and vicinity. Mr. James resides 
in West Springfield, where in 1920 he 
built a fine residence. He is a member of 
Hampden Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Springfield ; Morning Star Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons ; Springfield 
Council, Royal and Select Masters ; 
Springfield Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar; and of Melha Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He also holds membership in the 
Eastern Star, of which he is past patron ; 
member of Adelphi Chapter, and in May, 
1920, he was elected to the highest office 
in that order, grand patron, and held that 
office until May, 1921. He is a member 
of the Congregational church. 

On September 18, 1901, he married 
Alice May Phelps, of East Granby, Con- 
necticut, daughter of Clinton and Mary 
Jane (Rising) Phelps, and they have one 
daughter, Eleanor Elizabeth, born in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, September 
24, 1908, now (1922) a junior in the high 
school. 



JAMES, Walter 

Walter James, proprietor and manager 
of the meat and grocery business con- 
ducted under the name of the James Mar- 
ket, at No. 825 Main street, Springfield, 
is one of the native sons of Springfield, 
who has spent his entire life in the city 
of his birth. Mr. James is of English 
ancestry, which is given at length in a 
preceding sketch. 



(Ill) Walter James, son of William 
and Ellen (Hollister) James (q. v.), was 
born in Springfield, Massachusetts, Sep- 
tember 2, 1868. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native 
city, and at the age of thirteen entered 
the employ of F. J. Richards, who was 
engaged in the meat and grocery busi- 
ness on Franklin street. This connection 
he remained until he reached his twenty- 
first year when he bought the business 
and conducted it for three years. At the 
end of that time he sold out and entered 
the employ of the Government in the 
Springfield armory, remaining there for 
a period of eight years. He then decided 
to make a change and, being able, versa- 
tile, and resourceful, entered an entirely 
new line. He became a contractor, do- 
ing cement construction work, and was 
as successful in this line as he had been 
in his earlier undertakings. For eight 
years he conducted a successful business 
as contractor for cement work. He then 
formed a partnership with F. C. Newton 
and again engaged in the meat and gro- 
cery business under the firm name of 
James & Newton, locating at No. 825 
Main street, Springfield, where he is still 
(1922) conducting a successful business. 
This partnership continued until August 
I, 1921, since which time Mr. James has 
been alone, conducting business under the 
name of the James Market. Mr. James 
is a public-spirited citizen, interested in 
the welfare of his community, and giving 
his support to many philanthropic and 
benevolent activities and organizations. 
He was a member of Hampden Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
his religious affiliation is with the Episco- 
pal church. 

On September 25, 1889, Mr. James 
married Minnie Wood, who was born at 
Burton-on-Trent, England, daughter of 
Arthur Chambers and Fannie (Richard- 



56 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



son) Wood, who came to America with 
her mother when she was twelve years of 
age. Mr. and Mrs. James are the parents 
of five children, all born in Springfield: 
Marion Helen, born June 30, 1890, mar- 
ried Charles Clifford Humberston, and 
has two children, Dorothy and Ruth ; 
Raymond Walter, born August 25, 1891, 
married Ella Combs, and has one daugh- 
ter, Eleanor; George, died at the age of 
three months ; Frederick Arthur, born 
April I, 1896; and Ralph Howard, born 
May 26, 1897. Ralph Howard James 
served in the navy for two years and ten 
months during the World War, crossing 
to France seven times during that period. 
He has also been to South America, 
crossing the equator to visit the more 
southerly regions of the continent. 



BROCKETT, Oswin Benajah 

Among those citizens of Springfield 
who hold unusual records for long public 
service is Oswin B. Brockett, who is just 
completing a half century as messenger 
of the Superior Court of the county of 
Hampden, Massachusetts. Mr. Brockett 
comes of very old Colonial stock, which 
traces its ancestry in England far back 
into the early days of the history of that 
country. 

(I) The immigrant ancestor in this 
country was John Brockett, born in Eng- 
land in 1619, son of Sir John Brockett, 
of Brockett Hall. Disinherited by his 
father because of his adherence to the 
views of the Puritans, he came to America 
in 1637, became prominent in the New 
Haven Colony and in New Jersey, and 
died at Wallingford, Connecticut, March 
12, 1690. He was chosen deputy to the 
General Court of Connecticut in 1671-78- 
80-82-85 ; had a widely extended reputa- 
tion as a civil engineer and surveyor; was 
chosen to lay out the square of New 



Haven, and appointed by the governor of 
New Jersey to lay out the town of Eliza- 
beth, for which purpose he removed to 
New Jersey, remaining for a time. He was 
representative in the House of Burgesses, 
in the first General Assembly of New 
Jersey, in 1668, and served in the capacity 
of surgeon in King Philip's War, in 1676. 
He married, before 1642, and was the 
father of eleven children, among whom 
was John, of further mention. 

(II) John (2) Brockett, son of John 
(i) Brockett, was born in 1642, and died 
in November, 1720. He received his edu- 
cation in the schools of England, and in 
Oxford University, where he received a 
medical education. As a young man he 
practiced his profession in New Haven, 
Connecticut, for a time, later removing 
to North Haven, situated between New 
Haven and Wallingford, where he built 
up a very large practice. He was the 
owner of a large and valuable medical 
library which at his death he gave to 
Yale College. He married Elizabeth 
Doolittle, daughter of Abraham Doo- 
little, who was born April 12, 1652, and 
died in March, 1731, and they were the 
parents of nine children, among whom 
was Samuel, of further mention. 

(HI) Samuel Brockett, son of John 
(2) and Elizabeth (Doolittle) Brockett, 
was born at North Haven, Connecticut, 
November 8, 1691, and died March 3, 
1775. He married, August 5, 171 2, Me- 
hitable Hill, daughter of John Hill, and 
they became the parents of ten children, 
among whom was John, of further 
mention. 

(IV) John (3) Brockett, son of Sam- 
uel and Mehitable (Hill) Brockett, was 
born May 2^, 1714. He married Abigail 

, who died in 1786, and they were 

the parents of four children, among whom 
was John, of further mention. John 
Brockett and his wife were members of 



57 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the First Congregational Church in New 
Haven, in 1760. 

(V) John (4) Brockett, son of John 
(3) and Abigail Brockett, was born about 
1755, in North Haven, Connecticut, and 
died about 1832, in Little River, West- 
field. He served in the Revolutionary 
War, receiving his discharge from the 
army in 1783. He was a farmer, and 
added to his agricultural pursuits the 
trade of shoemaker, and made good stout 
shoes for the people of Blandford and 
Westfield. He married (first), Decem- 
ber 26, 1785, Sarah Smith; (second), Feb- 
ruary 23, 1818, Maria Smith. His chil- 
dren, all of the second marriage, were: 
Benajah Smith, of further mention ; Julia, 
married Lyman Smith ; Frank Jude. 

(VI) Benajah Smith Brockett, son of 
John (4) and Maria (Smith) Brockett, 
was born in Blandford, Massachusetts, 
in April, 1819, and died in Suffield, Con- 
necticut, July 16, 1890. He received his 
education in the public schools of his dis- 
trict, and then engaged in farming and 
lumbering. He bought wood lots, and 
set up sawmills, where he converted his 
standing trees into lumber, marketing 
the product of his mills throughout a wide 
territory. During the greater part of his 
life he lived in Blandford, Massachusetts, 
but in his later years he removed to Suf- 
field, where he engaged in farming until 
the time of his death. He married (first) 
Sally Noble, who died February 23, 1843 ; 
married (second), September 25, 1844, 
Elizabeth Todd Russell, who was born 
in Russell, Massachusetts, October 4, 
1823, and died January 9, 1910, daughter 
of Thomas and Phebe (Todd) Russell. 
His children, both of the second mar- 
riage, were: Oswin Benajah, of whom 
further; and Marion S., married Waldo 
S. Knox, of Suffield, Connecticut, and 
became the mother of a daughter, Carrie 
Knox, who died in 1882, aged ten vears. 



(VII) Oswin Benajah Brockett, son 
of Benajah Smith and Elizabeth Todd 
(Russell) Brockett, was born in Bland- 
ford, Massachusetts, September 23, 1847. 
He received his early education in the 
public schools of Blandford, and in Wil- 
braham Academy, and after completing 
his studies engaged in farming with his 
father in Suffield, Connecticut. On De- 
cember 12, 1871, he came to Springfield. 
Massachusetts, and on January i, of the 
following year, through the interest of 
county commissioners, George W. Town- 
ley, James S. Loomis, and William M. 
Loomis, was appointed court messenger. 
These commissioners were deeply inter- 
ested in the removal of the courts to the 
new building on Elm street, and sixteen 
months after his appointment Mr. Brock- 
ett rang for the last time the bell on the 
old court house, and had the honor of 
opening for the first time for the county, 
court in the new building. With him 
there entered the new building Robert O. 
Morris, clerk of courts; Samuel B. 
Spooner, register of probate; M. Wells 
Bridge, county treasurer ; and James E. 
Russell, register of deeds; of these, Rob- 
ert O. Morris is the only one in addition 
to Mr. Brockett still in service, dividing 
with Mr. Brockett the honors of a half 
century of service. 

Since the present court building on Elm 
street was opened in 1873, the structure 
has been greatly enlarged, the Hall of 
Records adjoining having been completed 
in recent years, and the force under the 
direction of the messenger also has been 
multiplied many times, but during the 
fifty years of his service Messenger 
Brockett has been absent from duty only 
eleven months. His excellent service 
early won for him the unqualified and 
even enthusiastic commendation of the 
County Board, and that excellence of 
service has continued through all the 



58 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



years of his service. Mr. Brockett is un- 
usually active for a man of his age, as is 
evidenced by a little incident which oc- 
curred recently (1922) : "How old are 
you?" asked a friend, meeting Mr. Brock- 
ett outside the court building. "I'm more 
than seventy years young," was the reply, 
as Messenger Brockett dashed up the 
stairs two steps at a time to answer a 
call from the Superior Court. Mr. Brock- 
ett has been a member of Roswell Lee 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Springfield, since 1877, and his religious 
affiliation is with the Congregational 
church. 

On February 15, 1882 Oswin B. Brock- 
ett married Augusta Martinson, of Terry- 
ville, Connecticut, and they are the par- 
ents of one son, Ralph Waldo, born in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, September 
28, 1892. He received his education in 
the public schools of Springfield, and is 
now associated with the Chapin National 
Bank, of Springfield, as teller. During 
the World War he enlisted and was sent 
to a camp in Florida, later being trans- 
ferred and assigned to the work of driv- 
ing trucks loaded with supplies, over 
the Lincoln Highway from Detroit to 
Baltimore. 



WOODWARD, Arthur Hadley 

Among the representative citizens of 
Springfield is Arthur Hadley Woodward, 
deputy superintendent of streets, who has 
been connected with that department of 
the municipal service for thirty-five years, 
and who has filled the position which he 
now holds since 1913. 

The surname Woodward is derived 
from the old English custom of having a 
man known as a warden to guard the for- 
ests, the name being a combination of 
"wood" and "ward," meaning a guardian 
of the wood. The name Le Wodeward 
appears in the Hundred Rolls in 1273, 



and the family lived in Bedfordshire and 
Upton, County of Buckingham, Eng- 
land. The arms of the family are as 
follows : 

Arms — Barry of six, azure and argent; over all 
three harts' heads cabossed or ; on a chief of the 
third a wolf passant gules, between two annulets 
sable. 

Crest — A wolf's head argent between an acorn 
branch and a branch of fern proper. 

Similar arms with a crest were granted 
to a Buckinghamshire family in 1527, and 
also to families of the name in Gloucester 
and London, England. 

The first of the family of whom we 
have definite knowledge is Thomas 
Woodward, son of Hugh Woodward, 
born in 1531. He married Elizabeth 
Tyson, in Childwell Parish, Lancaster, 
England, May 23, 1592, and they were 
the parents of five children, two of whom 
emigrated to America — John, born April 
10, 1594, and Henry, born in England, 
March 22, 1607. Henry came to America 
with the company that followed Rev. 
Richard Mather, landing at Dorchester 
from the ship "James," August 16, 1635. 
He remained in Dorchester until 1660, 
and then went to Northampton at the 
time the church was founded there. 
Among his children was one son, John. 
John, brother of Henry, was also promi- 
nent in the early history of New Eng- 
land. Besides these two brothers there 
were other early immigrants of the 
Woodward name : Richard, born in Eng- 
land in 1590, sailed in the ship "Eliza- 
beth," arriving April 30, 1635, with his 
wife Rose and children George and John. 
He settled at Watertown, Massachusetts, 
where he was admitted freeman, Sep- 
tember 2, 1635. He was a miller and 
bought a windmill located at Boston, 
which he sold in 1648. Descendants of 
these early pioneers scattered throughout 
the states of New England, and among- 



59 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



these were the ancestors of Arthur Had- 
ley Woodward. 

(I) Solomon Woodward, great-grand- 
father of Arthur H. Woodward, was born 
about 1783, and died July 10, 1833, aged 
fifty years. He married and reared a 
family of children, among whom was 
Erastus, of further mention. 

(II) Erastus Woodward, son of Solo- 
mon Woodward, was born about 181 1, 
and died December 2, 1872, aged sixty- 
one years. He is thought to have been 
born in Springfield, where he was en- 
gaged in the meat business. On June 3, 
1835, ^^ married Sarah M. Baker, born 
September 23, 181 1, and they were the 
parents of six children: i. Henry E., 
born February 12, 1836. 2. Sarah E., 
born May 23, 1837, died March 19, 1838. 
3. William Baker, of further mention. 4. 
Ellen J., born September 24, 1840, died 
November 21, 1917; married B. Frank 
Hannum, born October 7, 1837, died No- 
vember ID, 191 5; their daughter, Cora D. 
Hannum, born August 2, 1868, died No- 
vember 16, 1905. 5. Mary E., born Octo- 
ber 22, 1842, died April 15, 1847. 6. 
Fidelia, born September 2, 1844, died Oc- 
tober 30, 1864. 

(III) William Baker Woodward, son of 
Erastus and Sarah M. (Baker) Wood- 
ward, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, December 5, 1838, and died May 
I, 1894. He received his education in the 
public schools of Springfield, and when 
his school training was completed, en- 
tered the employ of the Federal Govern- 
ment in the armory at Springfield. He 
continued in this work throughout the 
period of the Civil War, and then en- 
gaged in trucking. He was a very able 
and intelligent man, and in later years 
sold stove linings for several years. As 
a successful business man, a public-spir- 
ited citizen, and a good neighbor, he stood 
high in the esteem of his associates. He 



married (first), October 6, 1868, Abbie 
Hadley, of Ashburnham, Massachusetts, 
born August 3, 1842, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Abigail Hadley. She died 
January 4, 1882, aged thirty-nine years. 
He married (second), January 28, 1883. 
Martha Thomas, born May 27, 1838, died 
June 25, 1897. The children, all of the 
first marriage, were: i. Arthur Hadley, 
of further mention. 2. Frank E., born 
January 10, 1872, died August i, 1873. 3. 
Albert Baker, born October 6, 1875 ; was 
employed by the city as foreman of road 
construction up to the year 1913, then 
was appointed superintendent of road 
construction ; married, January 5, 1898, 
Catherine Gulley, of Worcester, Massa- 
chusetts, born May i, 1876, and they are 
the parents of three children : i. Marjorie 
H., born August 3, 1898; graduate of 
Brown University, then went abroad for 
the French Government, and upon her 
return to Springfield she took up the 
teaching of French, which line of work 
she is following at the present time. ii. 
William Hadley, born November 8, 1899; 
attended Michigan University, having 
previously had four years of practical 
work on the streets of Springfield ; he is 
now doing laboratory work for the street 
department, the laboratory being owned 
by the street department, iii. Arthur B., 
born June 6, 1902 ; now attending Spring- 
field College. 4. William, born June 10, 
1878, died May 19, 1879. 

(IV) Arthur Hadley Woodward, son of 
William B. and Abbie (Hadley) Wood- 
ward, was born in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, January 31, 1870. He at- 
tended the public schools of Springfield 
until he was eighteen years of age, and 
then began his business career in the 
employ of the F. G. Jenson Candy Manu- 
facturing Company, with whom he re- 
mained for a period of three years. He 
then entered the service of the city of 



60 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Springfield as a laborer, continuing in 
this capacity for a year, at the end of 
which time he was made a foreman. In 
1901 he was appointed assistant superin- 
tendent of streets, which position he 
efficiently and faithfully filled for a 
period of twenty-two years. In 191 3 
he was appointed deputy superintend- 
ent of streets, and that office he con- 
tinues to fill at the present time 
(1923). He has the oversight of all the 
streets of the city, a task which is by no 
means either a small or easy one, but the 
fact that he has given satisfaction to the 
citizens of Springfield as well as to his 
superior officers is evidenced by a term 
of service in the department which is now 
rounding out the thirty-fifth year. Mr. 
Woodward is a member of Hampden 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
has taken all the York Rites and is a 
member of Springfield Commandery, 
Knights Templar; and of Melha Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of 
DeSoto Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and he holds membership 
in the Fish and Game Club and the Man- 
chonis Club, of Wilbraham. His relig- 
ious affiliation is with the Highland Bap- 
tist Church. 

On May 30, 1894, Arthur H. Wood- 
ward married Mary Gulley, of Worces- 
ter, Massachusetts, wife of Albert Baker 
Woodward, his brother ; she is a daugh- 
ter of John and Margaret (White) Gul- 
ley. Mr. Woodward has always taken 
his vacation in the woods, hunting and 
fishing, going to Maine and New Bruns- 
wick alternate seasons. 



DAY, Francis Adams 

Throughout the entire period of his 
active career, to the present time (1923), 
Francis A. Day has been identified with 
the business of manufacturing stationery. 



He is now assistant manager and super- 
intendent of the Morgan Stationery Com- 
pany, division of the United States En- 
velope Company, and in that capacity his 
executive and administrative ability are 
important factors in the smooth-running 
and efficient management of that division 
of the concern. 

(I) Mr. Day traces his ancestry in this 
country back to early Colonial times, the 
immigrant ancestor of the branch of the 
Day family to which he belongs being 
Anthony Day, who came to this country 
prior to 1645, ^"^ i^i that year settled in 
Gloucester, Massachusetts. He did not 
settle permanently in Gloucester, how- 
ever, until 1657, when he purchased a 
house and lands in the town. He died 
there April 23, 1707, aged ninety-one 
years. He married Susanna Machet, who 
was born in 1623, and died December 10, 
1717, at the age of ninety-four years, and 
they were the parents of the following 
children : Thomas ; Timothy, of further 
mention ; John, Ezekiel, Nathaniel, Eliz- 
abeth, Samuel, and Joseph. 

(II) Timothy Day, second son of An- 
thony and Susanna (Machet) Day, was 
born in 1653, and was still living in 1721. 
His house was on the west side of Annis- 
quam river, where some of his descend- 
ants continued to live for many years 
after his death. He married, July 24, 
1679, Phebe Wilder, and they were the 
parents of ten children : Timothy, Jr., 
John, Anthony, John, Jonathan, Susanna, 
Priscilla, Elizabeth, Benjamin ; and Eben- 
ezer, of further mention. 

(III) Ebenezer Day, son of Timothy 
and Phebe (Wilder) Day, was born in 
1697. He married Hannah Downing, 
December 3, 1719, and they were the par- 
ents of six children : Jonathan, Lucy, Job, 
Jerusha, David ; and James, of further 
mention. 

(IV) James Day, son of Ebenezer and 



61 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Hannah (Downing) Day, was born De- 
cember 6, 1738. He married, July 11, 
1767, Elizabeth Bradstreet, and they were 
the parents of two sons : George, of fur- 
ther mention; and Benjamin Bradstreet. 

(V) George Day, son of James and 
Elizabeth (Bradstreet) Day, was born 
March 27, 1769, and died January 17, 
1850. He was in government employ as 
a lighthouse keeper in Gloucester. He 
married, June 20, 1796, Judith Phipps, 
and they were the parents of the follow- 
ing children : David, of further mention ; 
Judith, Betsy B., George, Sophronia Ann, 
and Amos P. 

(VI) David Day, son of George and 
Judith (Phipps) Day, was born Septem- 
ber 27, 1797, in Gloucester, Massachu- 
setts, and died in Charlestown, Massa- 
chusetts, November 3, 1870. He was a 
resident of Gloucester, and owned a fleet 
of barges in which he carried sand from 
Gloucester to Boston. He married 
Martha Davis, who was a descendant in 
the seventh generation of John Davis. 
They were the parents of twelve chil- 
dren : Francis, Caroline, George, Ellen. 
Eliza, Jane, Adams, Anna, Augusta ; 
Howard, of further mention ; Frederick, 
and Marcellus. 

(VII) Howard Day, son of David and 
Martha (Davis) Day, was born in Glou- 
cester, Massachusetts, October 6, 1830, 
and died in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, in 
1900. He received his education in the 
public schools of his native district, and 
when he was a young man of nineteen 
years joined the procession of gold seek- 
ers who journeyed to the Pacific coast in 
1849. For a time he was employed in a 
hardware store in San Francisco, and 
during the period between 1850 and 1862 
he was engaged in the hardware business 
in different cities, including Denver, Col- 
orado, and Chicago, Illinois. Eventually, 
he returned to New England and settled 



in Boston, Massachusetts, where for 
twenty-two years he conducted a grocery 
store at No. 22 Bromfield street. At the 
end of that time he opened a store in 
Waverly, Massachusetts, but later re- 
moved to Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 
where he conducted a stationery store to 
the time of his death. He married, De- 
cember II, 1872, Mary A. Dodge, of 
South Dedham, Massachusetts, daughter 
of John and Sarah (Pedrick) Dodge, and 
granddaughter of Antipas and Sally 
(Brown) Dodge, of Hillsboro, New 
Hampshire. Howard and Mary A. 
(Dodge) Day became the parents of 
three children : Howard Bradstreet, who 
died at the age of seven years ; Francis 
Adams, of further mention ; and Florence. 
(VIII) Francis Adams Day, son of 
Howard and Mary A. (Dodge) Day, was 
born in Charlestown, Massachusetts, May 
I, 1878. He received his early school 
training in the public schools of Charles- 
town and Fitchburg, Massachusetts, hav- 
ing removed to the latter place with his 
parents when he was six years of age, and 
graduated from the Fitchburg High 
School in 1896. Upon the completion of 
his High School course he entered the 
employ of the Adams Express Company, 
which connection he maintained for one 
year. He then entered Tufts College, 
where he completed the course, graduat- 
ing with the class of 1901. In that same 
year he went to Springfield and entered 
the employ of the United States Envel- 
ope Company as assistant to the manager 
of the papeterie department. He was 
later made assistant manager of the Mor- 
gan Stationery Company division of the 
United States Envelope Company, and in 
1910 was also made superintendent of 
that division. These important and re- 
sponsible positions he is still (1923) effi- 
ciently filling, and his long experience in 
that line is contributing to the success 



62 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



and prosperity of the business. Mr. Day- 
is a member of Springfield Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and was a mem- 
ber of the Winthrop Club. His religious 
affiliation is with the First Congrega- 
tional Church. 

On June ii, 1907, Francis A. Day mar- 
ried Lena Shaw, of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, daughter of G. Frank and Eliz- 
abeth (Brown) Shaw, and they are the 
parents of three children : Marjorie 
Dodge, born June 28, 1909; Donald Shaw, 
born March 9, 1910; Russell Bradstreet, 
born April 3, 191 1. 



PERKINS, Frank Billings 

Frank Billings Perkins, clerk, assistant 
treasurer, and a member of the board of 
directors of the Henry J. Perkins Com- 
pany, Inc., who are engaged in the whole- 
sale business, handling fruit and pro- 
duce, comes of a very old Colonial fam- 
ily which was founded in this country 
by Abraham Perkins, of further mention. 

The name Perkins is derived originally 
from the name Peterkin, and variously 
spelled, Parkins, Perkings, Peterkins, etc. 
Several of the name were located in the 
neighborhood of Newent, Gloucester 
county, England, at any early date, and 
the first known record of the Perkins 
name is that of "Peter Morley, Esq., alias 
Perkins," who lived in the time of Rich- 
ard II, about 1300. The branch of the 
family to which Henry J. Perkins belongs 
is descended from Abraham Perkins, the 
line of descent being traced as follows : 

(I) Abraham Perkins, born about 1613, 
in England, was among the early resi- 
dents of Hampton, New Hampshire, 
where he had a house lot of five acres and 
was admitted freeman. May 13, 1640. In 
the previous January he had received a 
grant of eighty acres, and in 1646 was 
owner of three shares in the commons. 
He was locally noted as a fine penman, 



and was prominent in the affairs of the 
colony, holding various local offices, in- 
cluding that of marshal in 1654. He 
died August 31, 1683, and his wife, Mary, 
who was born about 1618, survived him 
for more than a quarter of a century, her 
death occurring May 20, 1706, Among 
their children was Luke, of whom further. 

(II) Luke Perkins, son of Abraham 
and Mary Perkins, was born in 1641, and 
settled in Charlestown, Massachusetts, 
where he died March 20, 1710. He was 
a shoemaker by trade. He married, 
March 9, 1663, Hannah Cookery, who 
was admitted to the Charlestown Church, 
March 29, 1668, and died November 16, 
1715. They were the parents of children, 
among whom was Luke (2), of whom 
further. 

(HI) Luke (2) Perkins, son of Luke 
(i) and Hannah (Cookery) Perkins, was 
baptized in Charlestown, Massachusetts, 
March 24, 1667. He was a blacksmith, 
followed his trade, and resided succes- 
sively in Beverly, Ipswich, Marblehead, 
Wenham, and Plympton, Massachusetts, 
finally settling in the last named place 
about 1714. There he died, December 27, 
1748. He married. May 31, 1688, Martha 
Conant, born August 15, 1664, died Janu- 
ary 2, 1754, third daughter of Lot and 
Elizabeth (Walton) Conant, and grand- 
daughter of Roger and Sarah (Horton) 
Conant, Roger Conant was descended 
from John Conant of East Budleigh, 
Devonshire, England, whose son, Rich- 
ard, was born about 1548. Richard Con- 
ant married Anne Clark, and they were 
the parents of Roger Conant, baptized 
April 9, 1592, the immigrant American 
ancestor of numerous descendants. 
Among the children of Luke (2) and 
Martha (Conant) Perkins was Mark, of 
whom further. 

(IV) Mark Perkins, son of Luke (2) 
and Martha (Conant) Perkins, was bap- 



63 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



tized at the First Church of Beverly, 
April 30, 1699, and resided for a time in 
Ipswich, whence he removed to North 
Bridgewater, in 1741. Like his father he 
was a blacksmith. He died December 20, 
1756, in Bridgewater, now Brockton. He 
married (intentions published in Ips- 
wich, June 4, 1721) Dorothy Whipple, 
daughter of Matthew Whipple, of that 
town, and they were the parents of eleven 
children: Dorothy, who married Jacob 
Packard ; Matthew ; Sarah, married Eben- 
ezer Packard ; Josiah ; Jonathan ; Isaac ; 
Martha, married Nathan Packard ; Eben- 
ezer ; Jemima ; Mary ; and Jesse, of whom 
further. 

(V) Captain Jesse Perkins, son of 
Mark and Dorothy (Whipple) Perkins, 
was born December 6, 1742, at North 
Bridgewater, now Brockton, Massachu- 
setts, and died January 27, 1826, aged 
eighty-four years. He married (first), in 
June, 1769, Susanna Field, daughter of 
Dr. Daniel Field. She died June 30, 1789, 
and he married (second), November 12, 
1789, Bliss Phinney, daughter of Peletiah 
Phinney. The children of the first mar- 
riage were: Susanna; Zadock, of whom 
further; Rachel, married Shepherd Per- 
kins; Jesse, born June 13, 1777, died April 
22, 1780. To the second marriage there 
was one child, Jesse, born January 3, 
1791. 

(VI) Zadock Perkins, son of Captain 
Jesse and Susanna (Field) Perkins, was 
born in North Bridgewater, Massachu- 
setts, November 21, 1771, and died April 
16, 1804. He married, December 15, 1796, 
Hannah Packard, who survived him and, 
married (second) William Edson. She 
died February i, 1852. The children of 
Zadock and Hannah (Packard) Perkins 
were: Ansel, of whom further; Sidney, 
born June 15, 1799. 

(VII) Ansel Perkins, son of Zadock 
and Hannah (Packard) Perkins, was born 



in North Bridgewater, Massachusetts, 
October 4, 1797, and died November 4, 
1850. A shoemaker by trade, he made 
good stout shoes for the men, women and 
children of his neighborhood, and asked 
an honest price, receiving often instead 
of money "goods in kind" as payment. 
He was a man who took an active inter- 
est in all the affairs of his town, and was 
highly respected by his fellow-citizens. 
He married (first). May 13, 1819, Doro- 
thy Battles, a descendant of Thomas Bat- 
tles, who was in Dedham, Massachusetts, 
as early as 1642, was a freeman in 1654, 
at Sudbury in 1664, and again at Dedham 
in 1674, his death occurring there, Feb- 
ruary 8, 1706. Dorothy (Battles) Per- 
kins died December 13, 1826, and Ansel 
Perkins married (second), September 16, 
1827, Sarah B. Leach, daughter of Apol- 
los Leach, of Scotland. To the first mar- 
riage two children were born : Jason B., 
of whom further; and Isaac, born Novem- 
ber 17, 1826. The children of the second 
marriage were: Ansel Franklin, born 
October 8, 1828; Apollos Leach, born 
December 13, 1830; Sarah O., who mar- 
ried Hiram Kendrick ; and Mary. 

(VIII) Jason B. Perkins, son of Ansel 
and Dorothy (Battles) Perkins, was born 
in Brockton (formerly North Bridge- 
water), Massachusetts, April 25, 1823. 
He received his education in the local 
schools, and then learned the carpenter's 
trade. Engaged in the work of his trade, 
he early realized that the greater oppor- 
tunities come to the contractor and 
builder, rather than to the carpenter busy 
with his day's work, and as soon as he 
had saved enough of his earnings he en- 
gaged in contracting and building for 
himself. By careful study, observation, 
and practice, he became skillful as an 
architect, and was engaged in this until 
1861, when he went to Northampton. 
Massachusetts, where he remained for 



64 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



some time, then came to Springfield and 
some years was engaged as carpenter, 
contractor and builder, then gave this up 
and followed his profession as an archi- 
tect until the time of his death. He was 
instrumental in the designing and build- 
ing of some of the finest blocks and resi- 
dences in the city, building, during the 
years of his activity, the Madden block, 
the Kinsman block, the Steiger block, the 
George B. Holbrook residence, also the 
George R. Holbrook residence, the Good- 
hue residence, Dr. Corcoran's residence, 
and many others. Mr. Perkins was a 
member of the Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Brockton. 

Jason B. Perkins married, October lo, 
1853, Jerusha Blackmer Holmes, of Mid- 
dleboro, Massachusetts, daughter ol 
Jesse and Mary (Burbank) Holmes, the 
latter of whom died December 19, 1904. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jason B. Perkins were the 
parents of eight children : Anna, born 
November 14, 1854; Mary, born March 
7, 1857, who married Charles W. Hardy. 
Jr., of Newtonville, Massachusetts ; Henry 
Jason, born November 29, 1859; Lyman 
Holmes, born May 29, 1864; Jessie, born 
September 14, 1866, who married Frank 
W. Ellis, of Des Moines, Iowa ; Frank 
Billings, of whom further; Emma Grace, 
born August 18, 1871, who married Er- 
nest F. Young, of Springfield ; and Alfred 
Burbank, born June 9, 1874, married, and 
is the father of one child, Philip. 

(IX) Frank Billings Perkins, son of 
Jason B. and Jerusha Blackmer (Holmes) 
Perkins, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, April 29, 1869. He received his 
education in the public schools of his 
native city, and when school days were 
over, learned the carpenter's trade with 
George M. Burnham, contractor and 
builder. In order that he might more 
fully master the art of constructing resi- 
dences and other buildings, he later 

Mass — 12 — 5 ( 



studied architecture, and for several 
years engaged in architectural work in 
Massachusetts, after which he spent two 
years in the same line in South Carolina. 
When he returned from the South, he 
made a decided change, giving up his 
usual work, and entering the employ of 
his brother, Henry J. Perkins, who was 
engaged in the retail butter and egg busi- 
ness. After a time he severed his con- 
nection with his brother and went on the 
road, assisting in constructing for the 
Richards Company and traveled in Mas- 
sachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania. 
For some three or four years he con- 
tinued this work, until the Henry J. Per- 
kins Company was incorporated, in 1904, 
at which time he was made clerk of the 
corporation, assistant treasurer, and a 
member of the board of directors. Since 
that time he has devoted his whole time 
to the interests of that concern, which is 
engaged in the wholesale handling of 
fruit and produce. This concern is one 
of the largest of its kind in Western 
Massachusetts. Mr. Perkins is well 
known in Springffield Masonry, where he 
is a member of Springfield Lodge, and in 
the Scottish Rite has taken twenty-eight 
degrees. He is also affiliated with the 
Nayasset club and with the Longmeadow 
Country Club. 

Mr. Perkins married (first) Mary Hol- 
comb, of Springfield, (second) Mabel 
Choate, of Newburyport, daughter of 
Horace Choate. 



SMITH, Henry Martin 

Among the business men of Springfield 
who have completed a long and success- 
ful career in the busy marts of produc- 
tion and trade and then, after enjoying a 
brief period of leisure in retirement, 
have passed on to the larger life beyond, 
is the late Henry Martin Smith, whose 
death occurred January 2, 1922. For 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



more than half a century Mr. Smith was 
an official of the R. H. Smith Company, 
of which firm he became a member in 
1874, was elected vice-president a few 
years later, and which he served as pres- 
ident from 1908 to the time of his re- 
tirement in 1920. 

Mr. Smith was a descendant of old 
Colonial ancestry, tracing his descent 
from Ephraim Smith, of further mention. 
The surname Smith is found in various 
forms, as Smith, Smythe, Smyth, Smythie, 
etc., and like many of the Anglo-Saxon 
names indicates the occupation of the fam- 
ily. It was in frequent use in England, 
and among the first of the name to arrive 
in this country we find the famous Cap- 
tain John Smith, of the Virginia settle- 
ment. The descent of Henry Martin 
Smith from Ephraim Smith, immigrant 
ancestor, is traced as follows : 

(I) Ephraim Smith came to New Eng- 
land at an early date. He removed from 
Boxford, Massachusetts, to Shrewsbury, 
Massachusetts, early in the seventeenth 
century, and there reared a family of chil- 
dren, among whom was Aaron, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(II) Aaron Smith, son of Ephraim 
Smith, was a bridge builder, an active, 
intelligent man, and a loyal citizen, who 
served in the struggle known as Shay's 
Rebellion, and as one of the soldiers of 
the Revolution participated in the battle 
of Bunker Hill. He married and reared 
a family of children, among whom was 
Martin, of further mention. 

(III) Martin Smith, son of Aaron 
Smith, died in Shewsbury, Massachusetts, 
September 10, 1808. He was the propri- 
etor of a country store. He married 
Mary Harrington. Among their children 
was Martin, of further mention. 

(IV) Martin (2) Smith, son of Martin 
(i) and Mary (Harrington) Smith, was 
born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, July 



29, 1798, and died in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1870. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native 
town, but as his father died when he was 
ten years of age, he left school when he 
was fourteen years old and was appren- 
ticed to a gunsmith. When his appren- 
ticeship was ended he went to Greenfield, 
Massachusetts, where he worked at gun- 
making until 1837, when the business de- 
pression of the period following Andrew 
Jackson's wrecking of the United States 
Bank caused him serious loss. He had 
worked hard and faithfully, and was suc- 
ceeding most satisfactorily, when the fail- 
ure of a house to which he had shipped 
goods caused him to make an assign- 
ment. He had built a residence in Green- 
field, and this the bank took, owing to 
the fact that he could not pay because of 
the failure of the house in New York to 
pay for the goods. He removed to North- 
ampton, locating in the village of Lord- 
ville, where he made guns for a time, 
and then entered the employ of the Ames 
Manufacturing Company, of Chicopee 
Falls, where he remained for several 
years. Recovery from the disasters of 
the panic of 1837 was exceedingly slow 
for many of those who were most injured, 
and for Mr. Smith the loss came at a 
time and under circumstances which in a 
way crippled his business career. He 
was employed in the Springfield Armory 
for a time, under Colonel Ripley, and 
then opened a shop of his own in Spring- 
field, where he did custom work and took 
orders for guns. Here he remained ac- 
tively at work to the time of his death, 
which occurred on the same day as that 
of Colonel Ripley, both also being buried 
on the same day. 

Mr. Smith was an ardent advocate of 
the anti-slavery movement, and aided 
the cause of the Union in every way pos- 
sible during the Civil War, serving as a 



66 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



military officer, and also using his influ- 
ence among his associates. He was an 
able, intelligent, public-spirited citizen, 
highly esteemed for his unswerving ad- 
herence to the highest ideals of Christian 
conduct, and during the earlier years of 
his life was a strongly orthodox church- 
man. Experience, however, somewhat 
softened and mellowed the rigidness of 
his views, and in later life he became 
much more liberal. 

He married Melissa Clapp, of West- 
hampton, Massachusetts, who was born 
December 30, 1810, and died February 9, 
1892, daughter of Elisha B. and Sally 
(Hale) Clapp, who was a descendant of 
Captain Roger Clapp through Reserved 
Clapp, Samuel Clapp, Samuel (2) Clapp, 
Timothy Clapp, Elisha B. Clapp, who 
married Sally Hale, Melissa Clapp, who 
married Martin Smith. The children of 
Martin and Melissa (Clapp) Smith were: 
I. Emeline, born about 1832, died Sep- 
tember 16, 1918, aged eighty-six years ; 
married Hobart McCall. 2. Charles, died 
at the age of twenty-one years. 3. Mary 
Harrington, born in 1835, ^^^^ ^^ 1855. 

4. Sarah Hale, born in 1837, died in 1839. 

5, Henry Martin, of whom further. 6. 
Richard Hale, born March 25, 1845, ^^^^ 
May 12, 1908. 7. Ellen Melissa, born 
July 24, 1849, 

(V) Henry Martin Smith, son of Mar- 
tin and Melissa (Clapp) Smith, was born 
in Northampton, Massachusetts, October 
21, 1840. He received his education in 
the public schools of Chicopee, including 
the high school of that place, where he 
completed his studies in 1854, in the same 
class with Governor George D. Robin- 
son, When school days were over he 
learned the gunsmith's trade with his 
father, who was a gunsmith at Greenfield 
at that time, and then went to Windsor, 
Vermont, where he became associated 
with the Robbins & Lawrence Gun Man- 



ufacturing Company. Here he remained 
until September, 1856, when he made a 
change and entered the employ of Tilly 
Haynes, remaining with him for a time. 
Still later he was associated with his 
father again for a time, and then asso- 
ciated himself with the Ames Manufac- 
turing Company of Chicopee. At the 
outbreak of the Civil War he went to 
Yonkers, New York, where he entered 
the employ of the Star Arms Company, 
but in 1862 he enlisted in the navy and 
was assigned to the United States Steam- 
ship "Connecticut," a dispatch boat 
charged with the duty of carrying pro- 
visions to blockaded districts and deliv- 
ering dispatches. He was also on the 
United States Steamship "Sonoma," and 
the "D. Golden Murphy." After two 
years of naval service, Mr. Smith left the 
navy, his term of enlistment having ex- 
pired, and joined the army, enlisting in 
Company A of the 8th Massachusetts In- 
fantry, from Chicopee, for a period of 
one hundred days. He was sent to Bal- 
timore on provost duty, where he served 
as an aide on the officer's staff. After the 
close of the war, Mr. Smith again entered 
the employ of the Ames Manufacturing 
Company, in 1866, where he remained for 
a short time in the gun producing depart- 
ment. From 1868 to 1872 he was asso- 
ciated with the Florence Sewing Machine 
Company, as head adjuster, and it was 
during this period that he was sent to 
represent the interests of the Florence 
Sewing Machine Company in South 
America, He went to Lima, Peru, where 
he was engaged in establishing agencies, 
and there he remained for a period of two 
years. In 1874 he returned to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and in partnership 
with his brother, Richard H. Smith, en- 
gaged in the manufacture of rubber 
stamps under the firm name of R. H. 
Smith & Company, that concern being 



67 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the first in Springfield or vicinity to en- 
gage in that Hne of manufacture. Rich- 
ard H. Smith had previously been con- 
nected with the B. B. Hill Rubber Stamp 
Company of Philadelphia. The venture 
was successful, and in 1882 the company 
was incorporated, Richard H. Smith hold- 
ing the office of president, and Henry M. 
Smith serving as vice-president. Upon 
the death of the former in 1908, Henry M. 
Smith was elected president, which office 
he filled until 1920, when, on October 21, 
his eightieth birthday, he retired. The 
R. H. Smith & Company's business has 
won a constantly increasing success in 
the manufacture and sale of rubber 
stamps, Henry M. Smith's experience in 
South America having furnished just the 
kind of experience needed to insure suc- 
cess in that line, and the ability of both 
partners contributing to the efficient man- 
agement which has enabled the firm to 
become a large employer of labor and 
made the R. H, Smith products known all 
over the world. 

Not only as a successful business man, 
but as an energetic, progressive citizen 
always interested in the welfare of the 
community, a loyal friend, and a Chris- 
tian gentleman, Mr. Smith was known 
and loved by a host of friends and deeply 
respected by a still larger group of those 
who were associated with him in busi- 
ness and in other activities. His passing 
left a sense of loss and caused deep sor- 
row, but his long and active life will still 
continue to exert an influence for good, 
and he will live in the memory of those 
with whom he was associated, even 
though he has passed on before them into 
the "next room." 

Politically Mr. Smith supported the 
Republican party, taking an active inter- 
est in its work. He was a member of the 
Republican Club; of the E. K. Wilcox 
Post, Grand Army of the Republic, which 



he twice served as commander ; and of 
Harmony Council, United Order of 
American Men. His religious affiliation 
was with the Memorial Church, which he 
served as a member of the parish 
committee. 

On May 9, 1888, Henry Martin Smith 
married Estelle J. Dickinson, of Amherst, 
Massachusetts, daughter of D wight B. 
and Maria L. (Russell) Dickinson, and 
they are the parents of two children : 
Edith Russell, born October i, 1889, who 
married John Samuel Fox, business man- 
ager of the Springfield Gas Light Com- 
pany; and Gertrude Estelle, born in 1891, 
died in 1892. 



BENSON, Oscar Herman 

Among those who have made valuable 
contributions to the life of the nation is 
Oscar Herman Benson, originator of the 
"one period cold pack" process of can- 
ning, who after managing a farm, ren- 
dering valuable service as a superintend- 
ent of schools, and successfully organiz- 
ing and conducting the boys and girls 
extension work in the United States 
Department of Agriculture, is now doing 
a splendid work as director of the Boys 
and Girls Achievement Bureau of the 
Eastern States League. 

Mr. Benson is of Swedish extraction, 
his parents, Percy C. and Celia (Ortberg) 
Benson, having been born in Sweden. 
The father was a well educated man, man- 
ager of a large brick and tile concern, 
who traveled extensively and transacted 
business in France, Germany, and Den- 
mark. In 1865 he came to America and 
located in Chicago, Illinois, where he be- 
came manager of a brick and tile concern, 
later going to Delhi, Delaware county, 
New York, where he followed farming to 
the time of his death. He was an able, 
energetic, public-spirited man, who took 
an active interest in public afifairs, and 



68 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



was a warm friend of Senator Allison, of 
Iowa, and of Colonel Henderson, of the 
Third Congressional District. He was 
an active member of the grange and of 
the Modern Woodmen of America, also 
of the Masonic order, and his religious 
affiliation was with the Swedish Luth- 
eran church, which he served as deacon 
for a number of years. The children of 
Percy C. and Celia (Ortberg) Benson 
were : Oscar Herman, of further men- 
tion ; Estelle Matilda ; Harriet Emily, 
who married John E. Coonley ; and Clar- 
ence Theodore. 

Oscar Herman Benson was born in 
Delhi, Delaware county. New York, July 
8, 1875. He received his early education 
in the county and village schools, and 
then became his mother's partner in the 
management of the combination farm, in 
which general farming and fruit raising 
were leading projects, later entering 
Junior College, at Epworth, Iowa, from 
which he was graduated in 1898, still 
later pursuing his studies in the Iowa 
State Teachers' College, the Iowa State 
University, State College of Agriculture, 
Ames, Iowa, and in the Chicago Univer- 
sity. The experiences which were largely 
to become the shaping forces of his ma- 
ture years, however, came while, as a 
lad, he was assisting his mother in the 
management of the home farm. One day 
in the early "nineties" the lad of sixteen 
sat down in a blackberry patch, with two 
discouraging telegrams in his hand, try- 
ing to find a way to solve a difficult prob- 
lem. One hundred and fifty berry pick- 
ers were at work in the field and must be 
paid, but the telegrams said "Market 
glutted. Do not send berries." One 
came from Sioux City, the other from 
Des Moines, both signed by commission 
men. The mortgage on the farm ren- 
dered such a situation almost tragic. 
Within an hour the lad had sounded the 



market in Chicago. Two commission 
men there had refused his fruit, but a 
third had sent ticking over the wires the 
hopeful response: "Will take all you 
have." Sixty cases of perfect berries, 
picked in the late afternoon and kept in 
cold storage over night, were shipped to 
Chicago early next morning, but the 
hopes of the producers were somewhat 
dashed when the astounding announce- 
ment was received that a bill was owing 
to the commission merchant for a part 
of the express on the berries. The boy's 
quick "That's a lie" expressed the convic- 
tion of both partners, and they demanded 
that the merchant return the berries at 
their own expense. Receiving no answer, 
the lad again telegraphed for his sixty 
cases of fruit, which the commission man 
claimed had arrived in softened condi- 
tion, and this time the commission man 
found a way out of his difficulty with the 
aid of an imaginary wine merchant who 
had "just happened along" and would 
give forty cents a case for the berries. 
Young Benson's answer was another de- 
mand for the return of the berries at his 
expense. This raised the mythical wine 
merchant's offer to seventy-five cents a 
case, which offer was finally accepted. 

While assisting his mother in the can- 
ning of some tomatoes and berries for 
which there was no market, young Oscar 
H. Benson began to realize that the can- 
ning methods then known to the average 
housewife were inadequate, and he felt 
that if he but had some knowledge of 
the chemistry of foods, he could devise 
much better methods. This thought in- 
terested him and made him desire to ob- 
tain a college education, which from that 
time on became his aim. There was a 
widowed mother — her farm mortgaged — 
and three members of the family younger 
than Oscar H. to be provided for. At 
eighteen, however, by working sixteen 



69 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



hours a day and sometimes more in the 
winter months, and by giving all of his 
time to the farm in the summer, he had 
succeeded both in holding the place to- 
gether and in getting credit for four 
years' work accomplished in three years 
at the "academy" at Epworth, Iowa. But 
now, when his goal was almost in sight, 
disaster came. Working in a near-by 
sawmill to obtain the first cash toward 
the meeting of his college expenses, his 
right hand was caught in the saw and he 
lost two fingers and part of the palm. 
The days of his leadership in the berry 
picking and in the ball game were gone, 
and a good sized doctor's bill loomed 
large across the path of the attainment 
of his desire. When, discouraged and 
temporarily disheartened by this misfor- 
tune, the lad lay in his home, nursing 
bitter thoughts, there came filing into the 
room a group of neighbors, frugal, grey- 
haired men, former friends of his father's, 
who presented him with a purse contain- 
ing forty-eight gold dollars. Heartened 
by the kindly feeling which had prompted 
the gift, as well as by the substantial 
value of the contents of the purse, young 
Benson invested thirty-eight dollars of 
the precious fund in a small stock of 
books and school supplies. With five 
dollars of the remaining ten, he bought 
a ticket to a city in which he was entirely 
unknown, and there sold his stock. When 
his first supply was sold, he re-invested, 
and by the beginning of the next school 
year had enough funds to carry him 
through his first term in college. Later, 
by teaching in village and rural schools in 
Iowa one year and going to college the 
next, he was able to spend a year at the 
State University of Iowa, a year at the 
Iowa State Teachers' College, two terms 
at Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa, and 
a year at the University of Chicago. He 
was eighteen years of age when he began 



teaching, and by this and other means he 
not only succeeded in paying the ex- 
penses of his education, but helped his 
mother pay her bills as well. He taught 
country schools for two years, was prin- 
cipal of village schools for five years, 
principal of city high schools for four 
years, and for a period of five years was 
superintendent of schools in Delaware 
and Wright counties, in the Third Con- 
gressional District of Iowa. 

His work in these various positions 
was markedly successful, and in 1909, 
when the United States Department of 
Agriculture was looking for a man to 
employ the time of thousands of boys and 
girls by interesting them in the possibil- 
ities of better farming methods, it was to 
Oscar H. Benson that the officials of the 
department turned for aid. He went to 
Washington, D. C, in March, 1910, as 
head of the boys and girls extension 
work in the United States Department 
of Agriculture. The club idea and its 
possibilities are so familiar to-day that 
we take it for granted. It was not so 
well known in 1910, but Mr. Benson 
knew boys and girls, was thoroughly ac- 
quainted with their powers and their en- 
thusiasms as well as their social instincts 
and their love of competition. Thus it 
was that he began the department's work 
in the South by organizing corn clubs, 
canning clubs, pig clubs, and garden clubs 
for boys and girls. The practical value 
of the movement may be seen in the fact 
that in a year's time 251,032 of these 
young club members produced foodstuflfs 
valued at $6,019,092, this being accom- 
plished at a total production cost, allow- 
ing the boys and girls ten cents an hour 
for their labor, of $2,447,313. Thus the 
nation realized in a twelvemonth, on the 
work of a fraction of its children, a profit 
of more than $3,500,000. But this prac- 
tical material result was the smallest part 



70 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of the real achievement of the movement. 
The value of the stirring of new interests 
and new aims, as well as the gain of new 
knowledge and new skill for the 250,000 
young lives whose efforts produced these 
results cannot be estimated. Neither can 
the increased efficiency and consequently 
enriched opportunities of those "grown 
ups," who probably could have been 
taught in no other way than through 
these voluntary demonstrations of their 
own children, to change their methods 
and adopt scientific and efficient methods 
of agriculture. 

The clubs grew with amazing rapidity 
and prospered at an astounding rate, so 
much so that their very success involved 
a serious problem. The quantities of 
fruit and vegetables raised by the boys 
and girls with such untiring enthusiasm 
were too large for immediate consump- 
tion at home and there was no market 
for them in near-by villages. Southern 
homes had no cellars and no facilities for 
cold storage, and when Mr. Benson saw 
vast quantities of garden products, which 
later would be greatly needed, rotting 
where they grew, he knew that this new 
problem must be solved or the whole 
project would fail to accomplish its great- 
est work. The old question of his boy- 
hood, the one which had first inspired his 
desire for a college education, rose with 
insistence demanding now its answer. 
The canning operations of the average 
American housewife were extremely lim- 
ited, confined to tomatoes and a few 
fruits. This must necessarily remain 
true until some less difficult and clumsy 
methods of conserving surplus crops 
could be devised. The only answer to 
the question seemed to him to be a quick 
and easy as well as simple and infallible 
method of canning. Thus it was that the 
basement of Mr. Benson's home became, 
by degrees, a laboratory. It was hard to 



find time for his experiments, so he took 
the hours from sleep, working usually far 
into the night. It was also difficult out 
of his salary of $2,000 to purchase equip- 
ment and material for his experiments, 
but after three years of constant en- 
deavor, Mr. Benson perfected for the 
Department of Agriculture and for the 
homes of America a method of canning 
which has since become famous as the 
"one period cold pack" method, which 
makes it possible for the housewife to 
can any food product known, in her own 
kitchen, with ordinary kitchen equip- 
ment, and with a minimum of time, fuel, 
and labor. Even yet, however, it was 
not at once received by all the depart- 
ment officials. Finally, however, he 
proved to Secretary Wilson that his 
method was right ; the "one period cold 
pack" process was adopted by the United 
States Department of Agriculture, and 
Mr. Benson was told to go ahead. That 
was in the latter part of 191 2, and Mr. 
Benson promptly launched a nation-wide 
program of thrift and food conser\'ation, 
such as had never before been under- 
taken. Many community groups coop- 
erated in the purchase of a fifty dollar 
canning outfit, with a capacity of 1,000 
quarts a day, and canning days became 
picnics for the children and holidays for 
the village and rural housewives. City 
women, too, became interested, and even 
in New York City a Broadway theatre 
was filled to capacity twice a day when 
Mr. Benson talked and demonstrated 
canning there. His text was "Canned 
peas, beans, carrots, parsnips, spinach, 
corn, or tomatoes, are as staple as wheat, 
cotton, or smoked meats,'' and most effec- 
tually he preached the evangel of a simple 
method of food conservation. There was 
opposition from various sources in the 
country, of course, and Mr. Benson met 
their opposition with the same quiet, un- 



71 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



moved smile with which he was accus- 
tomed to meet opposition in the Depart- 
ment and elsewhere. 

The nation was aroused, and O. H, 
Benson and his work were known from 
coast to coast. While he was organizing 
and directing the work of the country 
boys and girls throughout the nation, a 
group of men in the East was watching 
the progress of his great constructive en- 
terprise. This was the executive commit- 
tee of the Eastern States League, an or- 
ganization of bankers, manufacturers, 
merchants, and farmers, formed for the 
purpose of promoting industrial and agri- 
cultural interests in the Northeastern 
States. They felt that the child in the 
congested industrial center was in just 
as much need of leadership as was the 
child on the farm, and they wanted to 
see boys and girls of the Eastern cities 
receiving the benefits of constructive 
work such as had been accomplished 
for the boys and girls of the rural dis- 
tricts. During the year ending June 30, 
1919, 2,500,000 children in this country 
were reached by clubs organized by Mr. 
Benson and his associates in the United 
States Department of Agriculture. Mr. 
Vail and Mr. Moses, of the Eastern 
States League, went to Washington with 
the argument that Mr. Benson's work for 
the Department of Agriculture was now 
sufficiently well organized to be left to 
others, and asked him to undertake the 
forming of a program of work adapted 
to the needs of some 10,000,000 children 
of the North Atlantic States, the most of 
whom were living in cities. Mr. Benson 
replied that if he undertook the new 
work proposed he must be allowed to 
name the conditions. To the prompt 
"Name them," which was the response 
to his statement, Mr. Benson asked for 
provision for a program extending over 
five years, for $50,000 to be available for 



the work for the first year, and for an 
increasing budget for each of the suc- 
ceeding four years. Then he added, quite 
modestly, that we should have at the end 
of five years a $2,000,000 endowment 
fund with which to carry on the work on 
a permanent basis. With this he filed a 
detailed program of work and plans for 
the practical education of boys and girls 
for their outside of school hour activities. 
Wlien Mr. Moses and Mr. Vail had con- 
sulted with their associates, after read- 
ing the conditions, "Come ahead" was 
flashed over the wires. The result is the 
Junior Achievement Bureau of the East- 
ern States League, with headquarters at 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and Mr. O. H. 
Benson in charge as director, assisted by 
an able corps of trained workers who 
are ably assisting in training America 
and its youth to love work. Sixty cities 
are now receiving the benefit of this 
training and work. 

The activities of the Junior Achieve- 
ment Bureau, though the country child is 
included in its activities, is planned pri- 
marily for city boys and girls. For ten 
years the Government, both Federal and 
State, has engaged in the work of edu- 
cating country boys and girls for the 
farm. The country child is reared in 
close contact with the work of the farm, 
but the city child has no contact with his 
father's work in shop, store, or factory. 
His need of leadership in constructive 
work is even greater than that of the 
country child. In recognition of the fact 
that the training of the child along these 
lines should fit his environment, ]\Ir. 
Benson, since 1919, has been organizing 
the boys and girls of the cities of the 
Northeastern section and leading them in 
activities which reflect the economic life 
about them. Groups of boys in the shoe 
manufacturing districts are taught the 
various processes by which a hide be- 



72 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



comes a shoe, also shoe repairing, and 
later, how to conduct a retail store and 
how to sell shoes. In a papei; mill town, 
achievement clubs of boys and girls learn 
the processes connected with the manu- 
facture, handling, and sale of paper. In 
Springfield, the Junior Achievement Me- 
chanical Club has been fascinated with 
the business of salvaging thousands of 
tin cans. They have learned where to 
get the cans; how to handle them with- 
out infection or injury ; how to grade and 
classify them on the basis of kind and 
quality of tin ; desoldering methods, or 
taking to pieces and flattening with 
wooden mallets ; and finally, baling. The 
children have roofed chicken houses, 
made bird houses, and innumerable other 
articles from these salvaged materials, 
bringing to them not a little economic 
gain as well as the joy of achievement, 
and the acquisition of skill and of knowl- 
edge. In a single one of these clubs in 
Springfield, boys of eleven nationalities 
are working side by side. Places of 
meeting, Mr. Benson says, are "any old 
place where the gang congregates," any 
familiar, likeable place. All sorts of ex- 
isting agencies are called upon to aid, 
schools, scout troops, the library. The 
Bureau aims to reach rural children in 
the North Atlantic States, as well as city 
children, and during the first year it has 
devoted about one-third of its time and 
funds to the children living in the country. 
It has been said that Mr. Benson's 
value to his generation lies in the fact 
that he has taught a whole generation to 
love its work. The tenets of his prac- 
tical philosophy, as stated by Selene Arm- 
strong Harmon in his little pamphlet en- 
titled "Why Theodore Vail Backed O. H. 
Benson," are worth recording: i. Let 
the child take part in the business of pro- 
duction in his home community, whether 
this business be industry, trade, com- 



merce, or agriculture. 2. Do not let the 
child leave home to earn and own his 
first property. Give him a leadership 
that will teach him how to work and 
earn money at home, and that will then 
direct him in the investment of his 
home earnings. 3. Teach the child to 
love his work while he is yet a child by 
infusing into that work the spirit of con- 
test, challenge, and enthusiasm that 
comes from group effort. 4. Make the 
child's out-of-school hours and vacation 
periods an opportunity for the business of 
production. Salvage the city child's idle 
hours and you salvage the child. 

Those beliefs of Mr. Benson's, backed 
by hard work, enthusiasm, common 
sense, and ability, have placed Mr. Ben- 
son in a position of national leadership 
and have enabled him to render a service, 
the value of which can never be reckoned. 
Still young, full of enthusiasm, and de- 
voted to his work, he inspires faith and 
courage in all with whom he is brought 
in contact, and his friends feel that the 
major part of his achievement is still be- 
fore him. He is active in all National 
movements pertaining to his chosen 
work, bringing to each a store of energy 
and enthusiasm which is in itself a large 
contribution, but which when backed by 
constructive ability and the power to 
work steadily and strongly, becomes a 
vital force to be seriously reckoned with. 
He is president of the Home Canners' 
Association of America ; president of the 
Iowa State Teachers' Association ; treas- 
urer and secretary of the Iowa Chautau- 
qua Alliance ; is himself a Chautauqua 
lecturer ; is a member of the advisory 
board of "Modern Priscilla," published in 
Boston ; and a member of the National 
Educational Conference for Junior Ex- 
tension Teaching, of which he was the 
first president. He is also a member of 
the National Educational Association, be- 



73 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



fore which he has spoken in some fifty 
diflferent meetings. With all these man- 
ifold activities, Mr. Benson is the author 
of numerous works written for boys and 
girls and for "grown-ups," including the 
following: "Agriculture," central edi- 
tion, 1915, general edition, 1915; "Agri- 
culture and the Farming Business," 191 5 ; 
"Food Conservation ;" "Home Manage- 
ment and Home Making;" a series of 
pamphlets covering twenty-four topics on 
boys' and girls' extension work, and in- 
structions for the "one period cold pack" 
method of home canning; and contribu- 
tions to two sets of reference books on 
agriculture and child training. Besides 
these he has also written several books 
on food conservation, food thrift, and sev- 
eral copies of an "achievement series" of 
books for the boy and girl libraries. Mr. 
Benson has been prominent in many other 
educational lines. He was the organizer 
and founder of the Iowa Chautauqua Al- 
liance, prominent in State and National 
educational associations, and in 1921 was 
president of the Home Canners' Associa- 
tion of America, also serving in the same 
capacity in 1923. During the years 1922- 
1923 he holds membership in the Na- 
tional Junior Chautauqua Council, and 
has lectured widely all over America. 
That he should be widely "written up" 
has been unavoidable, considering the 
public character of his work. "Who's 
Who in Agriculture," "Who's Who in 
North American Authors," "Who's Who 
and Why," "After the War Education," 
and "Who's Who in America," all give 
to the public some information concern- 
ing the man who has been so large a 
factor in the lives of the boys and girls of 
the nation. 

On July 30, 1902, Oscar H. Benson 
married Sarah J. Jackson, who was born 
in Epworth, Iowa, daughter of Dr. Eph- 
raim (2) and Adeline (Scripture) Jack- 
son (see Jackson VIII), and they are the 



parents of three children : Donald Dean, 
born June 5, 1903 ; Margaret Irene, born 
September 11, 1912; Stella Elizabeth, 
born August 26, 1913. 

(The Jackson Line). 

(I) Edward Jackson was born in Lon- 
don, England, in 1602. He came to 
America at an early date, and reared a 
family of children, among whom was 
Sebas, of further mention. 

(II) Sebas Jackson, son of Edward 
Jackson, was sometimes called Seaborn, 
and is thought to have been born during 
the voyage from England to this coun- 
try. He married Sarah Baker, and among 
their children was Edward (2), of fur- 
ther mention. 

(III) Edward (2) Jackson, son of Se- 
bas and Sarah (Baker) Jackson, was 
born September 12, 1672. He married 

Mary , and among their children 

was Edward (3), of further mention. 

(IV) Edward (3) Jackson, son of Ed- 
ward (2) and Mary Jackson, was born 
October i, 1698. He married Abigail 
Gale, and they were the parents of Sam- 
uel, of further mention. 

(V) Samuel Jackson, son of Edward 
(3) and Abigail (Gale) Jackson, was 
born April 16, 1737. He married Lois 
Woodward, and among their children was 
Ephraim, of further mention. 

(VI) Ephraim Jackson, son of Sam- 
uel and Lois (Woodward) Jackson, was 
born February 3, 1780. He married 
(first) Betsy Cheney; (second) Abigail 
Park. One of his sons was Ephraim (2), 
of further mention. 

(VII) Dr. Ephraim (2) Jackson, son 
of Ephraim (i) Jackson, married Adeline 
Scripture, and among their children was 
a daughter, Sarah J., of further mention. 

(VIII) Sarah J. Jackson, daughter of 
Dr. Ephraim (2) and Adeline (Scripture) 
Jackson, married Oscar Herman Benson 
(see Benson). 



74 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



NAYLOR, Emmett Hay 

Emmett Hay Naylor conies of early 
Colonial stock, being a descendant of 
William Naylor, the first Quaker of his 
name to come to the city of Philadelphia. 
The line of descent is traced as follows : 

(I) William Naylor lived in Green- 
wich, England, where his father was the 
royal astronomer. He came to this coun- 
try, settling in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was the first of his name. 
He was an ardent Quaker, and among his 
children was William (2), of further 
mention. 

(II) William (2) Naylor, son of Wil- 
liam (i) Naylor, was born in Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, and went to Ohio, 
where he was engaged in the iron busi- 
ness. He lived in Ironton and in Wor- 
cester, Ohio, and later went to Berlin, 
Wisconsin, where he purchased and de- 
veloped extensive timber tracts and cop- 
per mines. He remained there through- 
out the rest of his life, and is buried there. 
He married Margaret McPhail, who was 
born in Inverness, Scotland. 

(III) William Alexander Naylor, son 
of William (2) and Margaret (McPhail) 
Naylor, was born in Worcester, Ohio, in 
1848, and died in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, February 19, 1921, aged nearly 
seventy-four years. He received his 
early education in private schools, and 
then entered West Point. Before his 
course there was finished, the Civil War 
broke out and he enlisted, serving 
throughout the period of the war and 
taking part in some of the major engage- 
ments. He graduated from West Point 
with the class of 1869, and was then sent 
as an ofificer in the United States Cavalry 
to guard the United States mails as car- 
ried by the Pony Express across the 
plains; this later was the Union Pacific 
railroad. In this way he became inter- 
ested in the express business and devel- 



oped the Merchants' Union Express, 
which was later merged with the Amer- 
ican Express Company. For forty-six 
years Mr. Naylor continued his identifi- 
cation as an official with and a director 
of that company. For twenty years he 
was vice-president and general manager 
of all the western interests, with head- 
quarters in Chicago and later in New- 
York City. This position he resigned 
three years before his death, but continued 
to live in New York City until about six 
months before his decease, when he came 
to Springfield and purchased the Maple 
street home, so as to be near his country 
place in Cummington. For twenty-six 
years he lived in St. Paul, Minnesota, and 
in addition to his interest in the American 
Express Company, had large lumber and 
iron interests in the West. Widely 
known and highly esteemed among a 
host of friends and acquaintances, Mr. 
Naylor lived an eminently active and 
successful life. His religious affiliation 
was with the First Presbyterian Church, 
of St. Paul, Minnesota, which he served 
as an elder for many years. 

William A. Naylor married Genevieve 
Hay, of Virginia, who died in 1919, aged 
sixty-seven years, daughter of Alexander 
D. Hay, one of the South's prominent 
bankers before the Civil War. She is a 
cousin of John Hay, former Secretary of 
State, descendant of Daniel Hay, who 
settled in Virginia early in the seven- 
teenth century. The children of William 
A. and Genevieve (Hay) Naylor are: i. 
Alexander D., who lives in New York, 
and is in charge of his father's estate ; 
he married Charlotte Shepard, and has 
three children, Shepard Alexander, Mar- 
ianne, and Emmett Keith. 2. Brigadier 
General William Keith Naylor, a gradu- 
ate of West Point, who is on the general 
staff in Washington, D. C. ; he served 
during the Spanish-American War, went 



75 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



to the Philippines twice, and served in 
China at the time of the Boxer uprising; 
during the World War he was chief of 
staff of the 9th Army Corps, and in rec- 
ognition of his services was promoted to 
the rank of general, being the youngest 
in the service to hold that honor; he has 
been knighted by the King of England 
and by the King of Italy, was given the 
Order of Leopold by the King of Bel- 
gium, is an officer of the Legion of Honor 
of France, and awarded a medal of honor 
by the Congress of the United States ; he 
has nineteen distinguished service medals 
and ribbons, and special honors were con- 
ferred upon him by the Japanese govern- 
ment; he has also written a book on mil- 
itary strategy, the theories of which were 
put into practice during the World War ; 
he married Margaret Howard Wagner, 
daughter of General Arthur Wagner and 
Anna (Howard) Wagner, of Pittsburgh, 
and they are the parents of three chil- 
dren : Margaret Howard, William Keith, 
Jr., and Alexander Hay. 3. Emmett Hay, 
of whom further. 

(IV) Emmett Hay Nay lor, son of Wil- 
liam Alexander and Genevieve (Hay) 
Naylor, was born at St. Paul, Minnesota, 
September 13, 1885. He received his 
preparatory education in private schools 
of his native city and in Evanston, Illi- 
nois. He then entered Dartmouth Col- 
lege, graduating in 1909, after which he 
studied law in Columbia Law School and 
at Harvard University. He was gradu- 
ated from Columbia Law School in 191 1, 
and received the degree of Master of Arts 
from Harvard in 191 2, the year follow- 
ing his admittance to the New York 
State bar. After being admitted to the 
New York State bar in 191 1, he engaged 
in practice in New York City, making a 
specialty of trade associations. He is 
secretary of the Writing Paper Manu- 
facturers' Association, of New York, 



which was founded in 1861 by Zenas 
Crane, and is the oldest organization of 
its kind in the United States, and along 
with his various other business connec- 
tions has been active in the councils of 
the Springfield Chamber of Commerce, 
which he has served as secretary. He is 
president of the American Association of 
Trade Executives, and in 1920 published 
a book on "Trade Associations, Their 
Principles and Management," which is 
now in its third edition and is used as a 
reference work by the Supreme Court of 
the United States, 

Fraternally Mr. Naylor is a member of 
Springfield Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and of several college fraterni- 
ties, being the national secretary of Psi 
Upsilon. He is a son of the American 
Revolution, and of the War of 1812 
(Massachusetts Chapter). His religious 
affiliation is with the Presbyterian 
church, he being a member of the Mad- 
ison Avenue Presbyterian Church of 
New York City, and an attendant of the 
South Congregational Church of Spring- 
field. He is a member of the Nay- 
asset Club of Springfield, the Union 
League, University and Harvard clubs 
of New York City. Mr. Naylor is a 
resident of New York City and spends 
his summers at the family country place 
in Cummington, up in the Berkshire hills. 

On January 17, 1914, Emmett H. Nay- 
lor married Ruth Houston Caldwell, of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, daughter of 
Winford and Fannie (Houston) Cald- 
well, and a descendant of Miles Morgan, 
a founder of Springfield. They are the 
parents of three children : Genevieve 
Hay, born February 12, 1915; Winford 
Caldwell, born February i, 1917; and 
Cynthia Morgan, born February 9, 1922. 
The Caldwell family, of which Mrs. Nay- 
lor is a representative, has been published 
in a former volume of this work. 



76 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



SMITH, Hinsdale 

Among the many families that can 
boast of long and honorable connection 
with the history of the New England 
States, especially Massachusetts, none is 
more worthy of mention than the Smith 
family. The name has appeared conspic- 
uously in association with public and pri- 
vate affairs through more than three 
centuries. 

(I) Richard Smith, immigrant ances- 
tor, was born in England, in 1617. He 
testified in September, 1684, that he was 
sixty-seven years old, that he came from 
Martha's Vineyard with his vessels, and 
did some work for his brother-in-law, 
Matthias Treat. He was admitted a free- 
man in Wethersfield in 1669. He received 
the gift of a home lot from Richard Treat 
in October, 1649; owned land in New 
London in 1652; was collector in 1667; 
had a grant of land in Nayaug in 1672; 
was a contributor to the fund for the 
building of the meeting house; and was 
a soldier in King Philip's War. He mar- 
ried Rebecca Treat, and they were the 
parents of eight children, as follows : 
Richard ; Esther, became the wife of 
John Strickland; Beriah, became the wife 
of Richard Fox ; Bethia, became the wife 
of Joshua Stoddard ; Jonathan ; Samuel ; 
Joseph, of whom further; and Benjamin. 

(H) Joseph Smith, fourth son of Rich- 
ard and Rebecca (Treat) Smith, resided 
for two or three years in Middletown. 
Connecticut, prior to 1654-55. He had a 
homestead recorded to him in Wethers- 
field in 1665, 3-"d later removed to Rocky 
Hill, where he was one of the first set- 
tlers. He received lands by the river 
side from the town. He married, about 
1653, Lydia Wright, daughter of Thomas 
Wright. They were the parents of four 
children, as follows: Lydia, born 1654, 

became the wife of Cole: Joseph, 

of whom further ; Jonathan, born in Au- 



gust, 1663; Samuel, born in z\ugust, 1667 
Joseph Smith died in 1673, and the inver.- 
tory of his estate was taken November 
25' 1673, amounting to four hundred and 
forty-one pounds, seven shillings, six 
pence. His wife was granted administr.i- 
tion of the estate. Prior to the year 1687. 
Lydia (Wright) Smith became the wife 

of Harris. 

(HI) Sergeant Joseph (2) Smith, eld- 
est son of Joseph (i ) and Lydia (Wright) 
Smith, was born in March, 1657-58, and 
died October i, 1733, aged seventy-six 
years. He removed to Hadley, Massa- 
chusetts, about 1680, and was admitted 
a freeman in 1690. He had charge of the 
grist mill at ^lill river, and he or his sons 
tended the mill most of the time during 
the Indian wars. It was a lonely spot, 
three miles north of the village, and it 
does not appear that he or his familv 
spent the nights there until after the per- 
manent peace with the Indians in 1726. 
After that he and his son, Benjamin 
Smith, each built a small house there. 
He was a cooper by trade. In 1696 he 
was appointed sealer of weights and 
measures, which position he filled until 
his death ; in the same year he was ap- 
pointed meat packer and ganger of casks ; 
in 1681 he was among those taxed for the 
building of the Fort river bridge ; he kept 
an inn in Hadley in 1696; served as select- 
man in 1696-1707-10, and a member of the 
school committee in 1720. Sergeant 
Smith married, February 11, 1681, Re- 
becca Dickinson, daughter of John Dick- 
inson. She died February 16, 1731, aged 
seventy-three years. Eight children were 
born of this marriage, namely: i. Joseph, 
of whom further. 2. John, born October 
24, 1684, died August 27, 1686. 3. John, 
born Januar\^ 5, 1687. 4. Rebecca, born 
June II, 1689; married, in Februar}^ 
1712, Joseph Smith. 5. Jonathan, born 
October 28, 1691. 6. Lydia, born Sep- 



17 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



tember 15, 1693; married, December 26, 

1720, Joseph Chamberlain. 7. Benjamin, 
born January 22, 1696; married Eliza- 
beth Crafts; died July i, 1780. 8. Eliz- 
abeth, born December 22, 1701, died Feb- 
ruary 15, 1728. 

(IV) Joseph (3) Smith, eldest son of 
Sergeant Joseph (2) and Rebecca (Dick- 
inson) Smith, was born in Hadley, Mas- 
sachusetts, November 8, 1681, and died 
October 21, 1767. He lived on the home- 
stead, and gave his attention to the con- 
duct of the grist mill. He succeeded his 
father as sealer of u^eights and measures, 
meat packer, and ganger of casks. He 
w^as also a cooper by trade. He partici- 
pated in the fight with the Indians in 
Deerfield meadows, February 29, 1704. 
He served as selectman of Hadley in 
1735-37. He married, in 1715, Sarah 
Alexander, who died January 31, 1768. 
Their children were as follows: i. Alex- 
ander, of whom further. 2. Edward, born 
March 26, 1719. 3. Reuben, born April 2, 

1721. 4. Sarah, born November 9, 1722; 
married, December 3, 1747, Windsor 
Smith; died September i, 1772. 5. 
Thomas, born December 6, 1725. 

(V) Alexander Smith, eldest son of 
Joseph (3) and Sarah (Alexander) Smith, 
was born in Hadley, Massachusetts, Oc- 
tober II, 1717, in the section of the town 
which later became Amherst. He was the 
proprietor of a tavern on West street, 
south of the meeting house, from 1758 to 
1783. His estate was among the largest 
in Amherst. He was elected surveyor 
at the first town meeting, and served in 
that capacity for many years. He was 
an active participant in the Indian War 
in 1754. Mr. Smith married, in 1743, Re- 
becca Warner, of Westfield, who died 
November 26, 1801, aged eighty-seven 
years. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Smith : 
I. Nathaniel Alexander, born February 
22, 1744. 2. Hannah, born January 12, 



1746, became the wife of Oliver Lovell. 
3. Joseph, born January 4, 1748, died Jan- 
uary 22, 1748. 4. Joseph, of whom fur- 
ther. 5. Rebecca, born March 4, 1751, 
died March 10, 1752. 6. Rebecca, born 
December 3, 1753, died August 29, 1809; 
married (first) Lemuel Childs, (second) 
Martin Cooley. 7. Elias, born February 
II, 1756. 8. Samuel, born September 4, 
1758. Alexander Smith died September 
21, 1787. 

(VI) Joseph (4) Smith, third son of 
Alexander and Rebecca (Warner) Smith, 
was born April 11, 1750. He married 
Eunice Goodman, daughter of Nathan 
Goodman, of Hatfield, Massachusetts. 
Their children were as follows: i. Na- 
than, born December 4, 1776. 2. Sereno, 
of whom further. 3. Docia, born Septem- 
ber 16, 1783. 4. Parks, born September 
2, 1788. 5. Chester, born October 12, 
1791. 6. Joseph, born February 12, 1796. 

(VII) Sereno Smith, second son of 
Joseph (4) and Eunice (Goodman) 
Smith, was born March 27, 1779, and died 
January 22, 1852. He served in the 
capacity of selectman of Hadley, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1841. He married, January 
29, 1807, Betsey Stockbridge, daughter 
of David Stockbridge. Seven children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith, as fol- 
lows: I. Edmund, born December 19, 
1808. 2. Theodocia, born May 26, 1810; 
married George Allen. 3. Chester, born 
March 22, 181 1. 4. Maria, born Febru- 
ary 19, 1813 ; married Francis Forward. 
5. Elizabeth, born in May, 1816, died June 
16, 1819. 6. Hinsdale, of whom further. 
7. Rufus, died aged four months. 

(VIII) Hinsdale Smith, third son of 
Sereno and Betsey (Stockbridge) Smith, 
was born in Hadley, Massachusetts, 
March 2, 1819, and died September 29, 
1893. He received his education in Hop- 
kins Academy, and when eighteen years 
of age went into the store of Harvey 



78 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Root, of Feeding Hills, as clerk, and three 
years later was admitted into partner- 
ship. Shortly after this, he began the 
business of packing leaf tobacco. A cor- 
poration was formed under the name of 
Smith, Palmer & Company, with offices 
in New York. In 1868 he took up his 
residence in Springfield, where he had a 
packing house on Hampden street, and 
during this part of his business career, up 
to the year 1874, had as a partner James 
A. Bidwell, whose career is reviewed 
elsewhere in this work. He also owned 
a large farm in Feeding Hills. At the 
time of his death he was senior member 
of the firm of Hinsdale Smith & Com- 
pany, of Hampden street, Springfield, and 
No. 125 Maiden Lane, New York City. 
At one time Mr. Smith was quite active 
in political affairs; he was elected State 
Senator in 1866, and in 1880 was a mem- 
ber of the House of Representatives, rep- 
resenting the Fourth Hampden District. 
He was a member of the North Church. 
Mr. Smith married, July 27, 1843, 
Lucy C. Root, of Feeding Hills, Massa- 
chusetts. She died September 13, 1865. 
Mr. Smith married (second) Pamela C. 
Eastman, born October i, 1831, died 1875, 
daughter of Charles Eastman. Children 
of first wife: i. Julia R., born August 8, 
1844, died in June, 1901. 2. Albert Pal- 
mer, born October 22, 1846, died Decem- 
ber 3, 1846. 3. Lucy M., born October 26, 
1848 ; became the wife of Francis H. Stod- 
dard, professor in the New York Univer- 
sity. 4. Edmond Harvey, an account of 
whom appears in the following sketch. 
5. Frank Stockbridge, of whom see fol- 
lowing pages. 6. Claribel Hinsdale, born 
December 11, 1863; attorney and librarian 
of Law Library, at Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. Children of second wife: 7. 
Arthur Parks, a sketch of whom appears 
on a following page. 8. Hinsdale, Jr. (see 
biography on a following page). 9. Bes- 



sie, died aged seven years. 10. Harry, 
died in infancy. 



SMITH, Edmond Harvey 

(IX) Edmond Harvey Smith, son of 
Hinsdale and Lucy C. (Root) Smith 
(q. v.), was born in Feeding Hills, Mas- 
sachusetts, September 16, 185 1. He re- 
ceived his preliminary education in pri- 
vate schools and then studied in Ger- 
many, When his studies were completed, 
he became associated with his father as 
a partner in the firm of Hinsdale Smith 
& Company, leaf tobacco packers. New 
York and Springfield, and after his fa- 
ther's death he continued the business 
in partnership with Enos Smith, his 
cousin. Politically he is a Republican. 

Mr. Smith married, April 26, 1882, Annie 
M. L. Parker, born December 19, 1861, 
died March 30, 1896, daughter of James 
Parker. He married (second), March 9, 
1898, Cora W. Atkinson, born October 
27, 1869, daughter of William Atkinson. 
The children of the first marriage are : 

1. Rachel, died at the age of fifteen years. 

2. Bradford Palmer, a biography of whom 
appears on following pages. 3. Theodore 
Ripley, born July 17, 1885 ; graduate of 
Dartmouth College, class of 1910. 4. 
James Parker, a sketch of whom appears 
on a following page. 5. Rodney Law- 
rence, born April 14, 1888; graduate of 
Colgate University, class of 1912. 6. 
Edmond Harvey, Jr., born March 30, 1896, 
died August 31, 1896. To the second 
marriage one child was born. 7. Julia 
Edmond, born January 25, 1902. 



SMITH, Frank Stockbridge 

(IX) Frank Stockbridge Smith, son of 
Hinsdale and Lucy C. (Root) Smith 
(q. v.), was born at Feeding Hills, Mas- 
sachusetts, September 10, 1853, ^"^ ^^^^ 
December 24, 1899. He attended the pri- 



79 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



vate school at Round Hill, Northampton, 
and then entered Amherst Agricultural 
College, from which he was graduated in 
1873. The following year he went to 
Hampden, Massachusetts, where he be- 
came, as bookkeeper, associated with the 
Lacousic Woolen Company, which was 
owned by his father, Hinsdale Smith, and 
Elam Stockbridge. He was later made a 
partner in this company, and here he 
remained until 1885, when he went to 
Albany, Wisconsin, and purchased the 
interests of the Albany Woolen Com- 
pany. This business he conducted until 
1887, when he sold out and went to 
Cleveland, Ohio. Here he formed a part- 
nership with Elam Allen under the firm 
name of E. S. Allen & Company. Later 
this was dissolved and Mr. Smith started 
the firm of F. S. Smith & Company. This 
was an eminently successful venture, and 
he continued to be actively engaged in 
this line to the time of his death in 1899. 
Mr. Smith, in addition to his business 
responsibilities, took an active interest in 
public affairs and was always ready to 
assist in every way possible the advance- 
ment of his community. While living in 
Hampden, Massachusetts, he served as 
selectman of the town, and was highly 
esteemed as a progressive citizen. He 
was a member of the Colonial Club, in 
Cleveland, and an attendant of the Pres- 
byterian church. 

On October 22, 1879, ^^ married Fran- 
ces Louise Olmsted, of New York, daugh- 
ter of Isaac P. and Frances (Morris) 
Olmsted, and they became the parents of 
three children: i. Raymond Stockbridge, 
born December 24, 1881, who is associated 
with the Smith Springfield Auto Body 
Company; married Louise R. McClean, 
of Springfield, Massachusetts, daughter 
of Dr. George C. and Vrylena (Froth- 
ingham) McClean, and has two children, 
Elizabeth IMcClean Smith, born Febru- 



ary 18, 1916, and Alexander Frothingham 
Smith, born June 15, 1919. 2. Hinsdale 
Stockbridge, born June 28, 1883, died 
June 9, 1897. 3. Harvey Olmsted, born 
December 20, 1892, who is associated 
with the Smith Springfield Auto Body 
Company. 



SMITH, Arthur Parks 

(IX) Arthur Parks Smith, son of Hins- 
dale and Pamela C. (Eastman) Smith 
(q. v.), was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, May 24, 1868. He received his 
preliminary education in the public 
schools of Springfield, including the high 
school, and after completing his studies 
there entered the Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute, from which he was graduated 
as a civil engineer. To further supple- 
ment the knowledge thus obtained, and 
to gain practical experience, he then 
went into the office of the city engineer, 
of Cleveland, Ohio, with whom he re- 
mained for a year. At the end of that 
time, he entered the employ of Bartlett & 
Heywood, of Baltimore, Maryland, where 
his excellent preparation for his work 
enabled him to render valuable service. 
He had charge of many large contracts, 
among them the contract for the Congres- 
sional Library at Washington, D. C. 
W^ishing to broaden and diversify his ex- 
perience and his grasp of his profession, 
Mr. Smith later went to Trenton, New 
Jersey, where for a year he was in the 
employ of the New Jersey Steel & Iron 
Company, of that city. 

In 1893 he came to Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and for a year or more served 
as engineer for the Springfield Iron 
Works. He then became associated with 
the Street Railway Company, and during 
this connection he designed the power 
station on Margaret street. He later 
resigned and associated himself with the 
Hawkins Bridge Works, in Springfield, 



80 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



where he remained until 1898. He then 
organized the Springfield Cornice Works, 
under which firm name he engaged in 
the manufacture of sheet metal and struc- 
tural steel, continuing in this line until 
1904. In the meantime, the automobile 
had been introduced and was promising 
to open up vast new fields of business 
enterprise, and Mr. Smith had early rec- 
ognized its possibilities. In 1901 he en- 
gaged in the automobile manufacturing 
business in association with his brother, 
Hinsdale Smith, Jr., serving as treasurer. 
They first made bodies for others, but 
later entered automobile manufacturing 
and made bodies for their own cars. They 
built a factory at Brightwood, which they 
later sold to parties in New York City. In 
1904 Mr. Smith organized the Spring- 
field Metal Body Company in association 
with his brother, Hinsdale, Jr., he being 
treasurer of the company. This business 
was sold in 1916, and three years later, 
in 1919, the Smith Springfield Body 
Company was incorporated, and Arthur 
Parks Smith was made treasurer, which 
ofifice he held up to August, 1922, when 
this plant was sold. During the World 
War he was actively engaged as an offi- 
cer in the Ordnance Department in 
Washington, D. C, where he served for 
two years, being promoted to the rank 
of major. Mr. Smith is a resident of 
Granby, Massachusetts, where he is well 
known and highly esteemed. Fraternally 
he is affiliated with Springfield Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons. He is also a 
member of the Colony Club and of the 
Realty Club, of Springfield. 

Mr. Smith married, June 7, 1895, Jen- 
nie D. Dey, of Trenton, New Jersey, 
daughter of Franklin Dey, who was sec- 
retary of the State Board of Agriculture 
of the State of New Jersey for thirty 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are the par- 
ents of two children: i. Eastman, born 
Mass — 12 — 6 81 



March 2, 1897 ; received his education in 
the schools of Springfield, and then en- 
tered Harvard University, where he was 
a student when the United States en- 
tered the World War. He enlisted and 
went overseas as a member of the med- 
ical corps, serving as ward master in a 
base hospital in Orleans, France, and 
also further assisted by driving an ambu- 
lance. After his discharge from service 
at the end of the war, he went to the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
from which he graduated in 1922, receiv- 
ing the degree of Bachelor of Science. 2. 
Bodine, born April 7, 1900; attended 
Smith College and Bryn Mawr College. 



SMITH, Hinsdale, Jr. 

(IX) Hinsdale Smith, Jr., son of Hins- 
dale (i) and Pamela C. (Eastman) Smith, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
September 10, 1869. He attended the 
public schools of his native city, includ- 
ing the high school, and thus acquired a 
practical education. Upon the comple- 
tion of his studies, he secured employ- 
ment in the Chester Paper Company, in 
Huntington, Massachusetts, and remained 
in their employ for five years. He then 
accepted a position in the firm of Hins- 
dale Smith & Company, leaf tobacco 
business, conducted by his father, brother 
and cousin, and continued in their em- 
ploy for another five years. At the be- 
ginning of the automobile industry Mr. 
Smith, in company with a brother, 
formed the Auto Motor Company for the 
manufacture of automobiles, of which 
Hinsdale Smith, Jr., was the president. 
In 1904 they sold out this business and 
organized the Springfield Metal Body 
Company for the manufacture of auto- 
mobile bodies, of which Hinsdale Smith, 
Jr., was also president. They disposed 
of this business in 1915. During the 
World War, Mr. Smith served in the 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



capacity of general manager of the Aero- 
Marine, Plane and Motor Company, of 
Keysport, New Jersey, continuing until 
1918, or after the close of the war. In 
the following year, 1919, The Smith 
Springfield Body Company was organized 
for the manufacture of high-grade auto- 
mobile bodies, with Mr. Smith as presi- 
dent. Mr. Smith sold his interest in 1922. 
An extensive new plant was erected in 
West Springfield, equipped with every 
modern device for the prosecution of 
their business, and they gave employment 
to about 150 people. Mr. Smith is a resi- 
dent of South Hadley. He attends the 
Congregational church, and is a member 
of the Sons of the Revolution, and the 
Colony Club. 

Mr. Smith married, in October, 1900, 
Mary Evelyn Bosworth, daughter of 
Homer L. Bosworth, whose biography 
also appears in this work. Two children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith : 
Hinsdale (3), born September 17, 1901 ; 
Evelyn, born January 7, 1907. 



SMITH, Bradford Palmer 

(X) Bradford Palmer Smith, son of 
Edmond Harvey and Annie M. L. (Par- 
ker) Smith (q. v.), was born in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, May 20. 1884. He 
attended public schools in his native city 
and then entered Betts Academy, at Stam- 
ford, Connecticut, where he prepared for 
college, and from which he went to Col- 
gate University, at Hamilton, New York, 
graduating in 1908 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. After the completion 
of his studies, he became associated with 
the Springfield Metal Body Company, of 
Springfield, which connection he retained 
for two years. He then went to Seattle, 
Washington, where he managed an apple 
ranch for two years, 1910 and 191 1. Re- 
turning to Massachusetts, he became as- 
sistant treasurer of the Cuba Connecticut 



Tobacco Company, of Feeding Hills, 
Massachusetts, which position he filled 
for a period of three years. He was also 
made a director of that company, an office 
which he still holds. This company owns 
some 300 acres of land upon which it 
raises tobacco, keeping it constantly un- 
der cultivation and renewing the land by 
the most modern and scientific methods. 
Since 1915 Mr. Smith has been associated 
with his father, Edmond H. Smith, and 
his two brothers, Theodore R. and Rod- 
ney L., who are part owners in the Hins- 
dale Smith & Company, which concern is 
engaged in the importing and packing of 
tobacco. Mr. Smith is a member of sev- 
eral college fraternities ; of the D. K. E. 
Club of New York City ; and of the 
Country Club of Springfield. His reli- 
gious affiliation is with the South Church. 
On September 19, 1917, Bradford P. 
Smith married Dorothy Pierce, of Troy, 
New York, daughter of William S. and 
Lulu (Abercrombie) Pierce, and they are 
the parents of three children : Jean Pal- 
mer, born June 3. 1918; Susanna Pierce, 
born September 22, 1919; and William 
Bradford, born November 10, 1920. 



SMITH, James Parker 

(X) James Parker Smith, son of Ed- 
mond Harvey and Annie M. L. (Parker) 
Smith (q. v.), was born at Springfield, 
Massachusetts, September 17, 1886. He 
received his early education in the public 
schools of his native city, and then en- 
tered Colgate University, at Hamilton, 
New York, from which he was graduated 
in 191 1. After his graduation he en- 
gaged in the building and construction 
business for himself, taking contracts 
until the beginning of the World War. 
In 1917 he enlisted in the construction 
division, and was later promoted to the 
rank of first lieutenant. Engaged in the 
construction of aeroplane and gas plants, 



82 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



he served at various camps located in 
many sections of the country, including 
Texas, continuing- in the service until the 
close of the war. After the close of the 
war, Mr. Smith was associated with the 
Ernest F. Carlson Company, contractors 
and builders, as architect, until January 
I, 1923, when he took his present posi- 
tion as treasurer of the Howard S. Groves 
Company, Inc. Mr. Smith is a member 
of the Colony Club and of the Country 
Club, both of Springfield. 

In May, 1916, James Parker Smith mar- 
ried Helen Osborne Harris, of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, daughter of Fred- 
erick and Emily (Osborne) Harris (see 
Harris X). They are the parents of 
three children : Helen Osborne, born 
March 23, 1917; James Parker, Jr., born 
November, 1919; Martha, born Novem- 
ber 22, 1921, 

(The Harris Line). 

(I) Mrs. Smith comes of a very old 
Colonial family which traces its ances- 
try to Thomas Harris, who was born in 
Deal, Kent county, England, and died in 
Providence, Rhode Island, June 7, 1686. 
He came to America with his brother 
William in the ship "Lion," sailing from 
Bristol, England, December i, 1630, and 
in 1637 went with twelve others to Prov- 
idence, Rhode Island. He was a forceful 
man, active in the afifairs of the colony, 
and a man of deep religious convictions. 
He held at various times most of the pub- 
lic offices in the gift of the people, includ- 
ing that of deputy to the General Court 
in 1664-66-67 and 1670-72-73, and was a 
most active and prominent man in the 

colony. He married Elizabeth , 

who died in Providence, Rhode Island, 
and their children were: Thomas, Wil- 
liam, of further mention ; Mary, and 
Martha. 

(II) William Harris, son of Thomas 



and Elizabeth Harris, resided at various 
times in Charlestown, Rowley, and Mid- 
dletown. He married (first) Edith 

, who died August 5, 1685, and he 

married (second) Lydia Smith, widow of 
Joseph Smith. His children were: Han- 
nah, Mary, Martha, Elizabeth, and 
Patience. 

(III) John Harris, supposed to be the 
son of William and Lydia (Smith) Har- 
ris, lived in Charlestown. He married 
Amy Hills, daughter of Joseph Hills, and 
their children were : Samuel ; John ; 
Thomas, died young; Thomas; and 
Joseph. 

(IV) Thomas (2) Harris, fourth son 
of John and Amy (Hills) Harris, was 
born March 18, 1664, and died October 5. 
1747. He married (first) February 25, 
1686, Hepsibah Crosswell, daughter of 
Thomas and Priscilla (Upham) Cross- 
well. She died December 3, 1718 (or 
1717), and he married (second), August 
26, 1719, Eleanor Miller, who died Sep- 
tember 8, 1734. He married (third) in- 
tention published March 2.2, 1735, Mary 
Dana, who married (second). 1748, John 
Brewster. Children of Thomas (2) Har- 
ris were: Thomas, Hepsibah; William, 
died young; Silence, Ebenezer, William, 
John, Abigail, Rachel, and Elizabeth. 

(V) Thomas (3) Harris, eldest child 
of Thomas (2) and Hepsibah (Cross- 
well) Harris, was born in Charlestown, 
Massachusetts, November 13, 1686, and 
died about 1768. He married, June 3, 
1708, Mary Dowse, born in Charlestown, 
April 17, 1686, daughter of Deacon Sam- 
uel and Faith (Jewett) Dowse. Their 
children were : Martha, Mary, Thomas, 
Anna, John, and Jonathan. 

(VI) John (2) Harris, second son of 
Thomas (3) and Mary (Dowse) Harris, 
was baptized June i, 1718, in Charles- 
town, Massachusetts, and died Novem- 
ber I, 1780. He was a potter by trade. 



83 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



and owned considerable land along the 
Charles river. He married (first), June 
12, 1740, Millicent Rand, born June 3, 
1721, daughter of Jonathan and Millicent 
(Esterbrook) Rand, of Charlestown. She 
died in 1775. He married (second), 
March 19, 1778, Elizabeth Miller, of 
Medford, widow of Captain John Miller, 
of Charlestown. She married (third) 
Richard Devens, and died November i, 
1780. Children of John (2.) Harris were: 
Millicent; Mary, died young; Mary, John, 
Thomas, Jonathan, and Hannah, all born 
to the first marriage. 

(VH) Captain Thomas (4) Harris, son 
of John (2) and Millicent (Rand) Harris, 
was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts, 
October 15, 1749, and died in Boston, 
June 14 or 15, 1814. He was a sea cap- 
tain, and he and his wife and five children 
are included in the census of 1789. He 
married, August 18, 1776, Mary Froth- 
ingham, who was baptized in Charles- 
town, July 14, 1754, daughter of Nathan- 
iel and Mary (Whittemore) Frothing- 
ham. Their children were : Mary, died 
young; Thomas, died young; Thomas, 
John, Mary, Eliza, Sarah, George, and 
Harriet. 

(Vni) Captain Thomas (5) Harris, 
second son of Captain Thomas (4) and 
Mary (Frothingham) Harris, was born 
in Boston, Massachusetts, May 14, 1779, 
and died in Brattleboro, Vermont, Au- 
gust 18, 1840. He was a sea captain and 
made many long voyages. After quit- 
ting the sea. he was sent by certain 
marine insurance companies, in 1835, ^^ 
their agent, to take care of and repair 
vessels damaged by storms, collisions, 
etc. He resided in Cowes, Isle of Wight. 
This position he retained until the panic 
of 1837, when he returned to this country 
and settled at Brattleboro, Vermont, 
where he died. He married (first) 
Lucinda Smith Fales, as oubl'shed Decem- 



ber 2, 1804; (second) Abigail Chapin, 
who was born in Orange, Massachusetts, 
July 2, 1789, and died in Jeffrey, New 
Hampshire, August 1870, daughter of 
Oliver and Mary (Jones) Chapin, of 
Brattleboro, Vermont. Children of the 
second marriage were : George Oliver, 
Charles Chapin, Thomas Edwin, Mary 
Chapin, Frederick Harper, Julia Jones, 
Frank Orne, Sophia Orne. 

(IX) Frederick Harper Harris, fourth 
son of Captain Thomas (5) and Abigail 
(Chapin) Harris, was born in Charles- 
town, Massachusetts, June 22, 1823. He 
attended the public schools of his native 
city, and then went with his parents to 
Cowes, Isle of Wight. From there he 
was sent to Hamburg, Germany, where 
he studied for two and a half years, and 
acquired a practical knowledge of the 
German language. Upon his return to 
America he entered the employ of the old 
Springfield Bank, which position he re- 
tained for six years, leaving it to become 
cashier of the Pynchon Bank. When the 
Third National Bank of Springfield was 
opened, he became its cashier, and 
throughout his life he retained his con- 
nection with that institution. For more 
than seventy years he was connected 
with the banking business, and became 
one of the best known bankers in the 
State of Massachusetts. He married, 
January 26, 1846, Martha Asenath Bliss, 
born April i, 1825, died January 22, 1890, 
daughter of Theodore and Juliet H. 
(Mann) Bliss, of Springfield, and they 
were the parents of two children: i. 
Mary Chapin, born in Springfield, March 
19, 1847, d^^^ ^" Florence, Italy, Janu- 
ary 28, 1900; married (first), February 
18, 1873, Edward Whitney Lambert, who 
died March 25, 1874; (second), Septem- 
ber 26, 1877. Charles Theodore Farlow, 
who died in Florence, Italy, February 7, 
1900. 2. Frederick, of whom further. 



84 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(X) Frederick Harris, son of Freder- 
ick Harper and Martha Asenath (Bliss) 
Harris, was born September 26, 1853. He 
married, September 3, 1879, Emily Os- 
borne, daughter of David M. and Eliza 
(Wright) Osborne, and their children 
are: Florence Osborne; Helen Osborne, 
married James P. Smith (see Smith X). 



NAPIER, Alexander Worthington 

Among the retired business men of 
Springfield is Alexander Worthington 
Napier, who for some ten years has been 
a resident of this city. Mr. Napier is of 
Scotch extraction, but represents the 
third generation in this country, his 
grandfather, John Napier, having come 
to America during the War of 1812. 

John Napier, grandfather of Alexander 
W. Napier, was born in Bernie, Scotland, 
November 5, 1788, and died in Brooklyn, 
New York, in 1879, aged ninety-one 
years. He came to America during the 
period of the second war with Great Brit- 
ain, between 1812 and 1814, and settled 
in New York, where he conducted a dry 
goods business for many years. He was 
capable, honest, and thrifty, and made a 
success of the business in which he 
engaged. He married Sarah Hand, who 
was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1798, 
and died in 1878, and they were the par- 
ents of six children : Alexander Dal- 
rymple, of whom further ; Margaret, Amy, 
Mary, Harkort, and Allan. 

Alexander Dalrymple Napier, son of 
John and Sarah (Hand) Napier, was born 
in Brooklyn, New York, January 10, 1826, 
and died there March 13, 1913. He re- 
ceived his preliminary education in the 
public schools of his native city, where 
he early attracted attention as an unusu- 
ally gifted student. When he was six- 
teen years of age he went to Leipsic, 
Germany, to continue his studies. After 
a period of study there, he returned to 



New York City and, though a very young 
man. engaged in the wholesale dry goods 
business under the firm name of A. D. 
Napier & Company. He was eminently 
successful as a business man, and rapidly 
built up a large and profitable trade, im- 
porting large quantities of goods, and 
selling to a constantly increasing num- 
ber of retail concerns. He continued to 
conduct this business with efficiency and 
energy until some ten years before his 
death, when he retired and passed the 
remainder of his days in well-earned 
leisure. He married Laura Dwight, of 
Richmond, Massachusetts, who was born 
March 27, 1833, and died in Brooklyn, 
New York, March 8, 19 14, daughter of 
Rev. Welles and Mary (Sherrell) Dwight. 
Mr. and Mrs. Napier were the parents of 
four children: Arthur Howe, deceased; 
Dr. Charles Dwight, of Brooklyn, New 
York ; Laura Howe, who married Dr. 
Dwight, of Sea View, Massachusetts ; 
and Alexander Worthington, of whom 
further. 

Alexander Worthington Napier, son 
of Alexander Dalrymple and Laura 
(Dwight) Napier, was born in Brooklyn, 
New York, September 7, 1872. He at- 
tended the public schools of his native 
city, and then entered the Brooklyn Latin 
School, from which he entered the Poly- 
technic Institute, of Brooklyn. WHien 
his studies were completed, he went to 
Chester, Massachusetts, where for a 
period of eight years he was associated 
with the Hamilton Emery Company of 
that town. He was able and efficient as 
well as energetic, and discharged the 
duties of his position faithfully, render- 
ing valuable service to the concern with 
which he was identified. About 1913 he 
came to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he has since continued to reside, 
passing the years of his retirement in 
quiet, well-earned leisure. He is afifili- 



8q 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ated with the Nayasset Club, of Spring- 
field, and is a member of St. Andrew's 
Society, which is a Scotch society of New 
York. His religious affiliation is with 
All Saints' Episcopal Church, which he 
serves as vestryman. 

In April, 1904, Alexander Worthing- 
ton Napier married Lorania Morton 
Charnley, who was born in Chicago, 
daughter of William and Amy (Morton) 
Charnley, and they are the parents of 
three children : Laura Dwight Howe, 
Amy Morton, and Alexander William. 



LEETE, Bradford White 

Through nine generations the name 
Leete has been a prominent one in New 
England, Bradford W. Leete of the ninth 
generation tracing his descent from Gov- 
ernor William Leete, of whom it was 
written : "He was bred to the law and 
served for a considerable time in the 
Bishop's Court at Cambridge, where, ob- 
serving the oppressions and cruelties 
then practiced on the conscientious and 
virtuous Puritans, he was led to examine 
more thoroughly their doctrines and prac- 
tice, and eventually to become a Puritan 
himself and to give up his office." 

William Leete came to New England 
with Rev. William Whitefield's company, 
and was one of the signers of the Plan- 
tation Covenant on shipboard, June i, 
1639, arriving at New Haven, Connecti- 
cut, about July 10 following. W^hen they 
agreed upon Guilford as a place to settle 
he was one of six chosen to buy the lands 
of the Indians in trust for the plantation 
until their organization was effected. He 
figured prominently in Connecticut pub- 
lic life, and from 1669 until his death in 
1683 was deputy governor of Connecti- 
cut. Upon his election as governor he 
moved from Guilford to Hartford, where 
his tomb may be seen in the burial 
ground in the rear of the First Church. 



Of Governor Leete Dr. Trumbull, the his- 
torian, wrote : "During the term of forty 
years he was magistrate, deputy gover- 
nor or governor of one or the other of the 
colonies. In both colonies he presided 
in times of greatest difficulty, yet always 
conducted himself with such integrity 
and wisdom as to meet the public appro- 
bation." Although thrice married, all of 
Governor Leete's children were born of 
his first marriage, which was consum- 
mated in England, August i, 1636, his 
bride, Anne, the daughter of Rev. John 
Paine. She died in Connecticut, Sep- 
tember I, 1668. The seal used by Gover- 
nor Leete bearing the coat-of-arms here- 
after described has been preserved by hi? 
descendants. 

Anns — Argent, on a fesse gules between two 
rolls of matches sable, fired proper, a martlet or. 

Crest — On a ducal coronet or, an antique lamp 
or, fired proper. 

From Governor Leete the line is thus 
traced: His eldest son, John Leete, born 
in 1639, and his wife, Mary (Chittenden) 
Leete ; their son, Deacon Peletiah Leete, 
deacon of the Fourth Church of Guil- 
ford, and his wife, Abigail (Fowler) 
Leete, who lived a married life of sixty- 
three years ; their son, Daniel Leete, and 
his wife, Roda (Stone) Leete; their son, 
Deacon Ambrose Leete, and his wife, 
Miranda (Chittenden) Leete; their son. 
Miner Leete, and his wife, Lucinda (Wat- 
son) Leete ; their son. Rev. Theodore A. 
Leete, and his wife, Mary Cooley 
(White) Leete; their son, Theodore 
Woolsey Leete, and his wife, Annie Brad- 
ford (Coomes) Leete ; their son, Bradford 
White Leete. 

Rev. Theodore A. Leete was a minister 
of the Gospel, and during his ministerial 
career served the churches at Blanford, 
Rockville, Orange, Windsor, Connecti- 
cut; Three Rivers, Florence, and Long- 



86 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



meadow, Massachusetts, dying at the 
last-named place, April 28, 1886, aged 
seventy-two years. He married Mary 
Cooley White, and they were the par- 
ents of a daughter, Ella Louise, married 
Edward Forest Chapman, of New York ; 
and of two sons. Rev. William White 
Leete, field secretary of the Congrega- 
tional Church Building Society, and 
Theodore Woolsey Leete. 

Theodore Woolsey Leete, youngest 
son of Rev. Theodore A. Leete, was born 
in the brick parsonage at Windsor, Con- 
necticut, November 4, 1856, his father at 
that time being pastor of a Windsor 
church. He died in Longmeadow, Mas- 
sachusetts, November 14, 1918. He was 
educated in the schools of Monson, Mas- 
sachusetts, and at Eastman's Business 
College, Poughkeepsie, New York, and 
prior to entering upon his business career 
spent several years upon an Iowa farm. 
His first business experience was gained 
in a Chicago insurance office, and in 1883 
he came to Longmeadow, his parents 
having recently settled there in the G. O. 
Bliss homestead close to the house in 
which his mother, Mary Cooley (White) 
Leete, was born. 

In Springfield Mr. Leete was first 
with the Newell Button Factory, and 
later conducted the button business of 
the Leete-Pudan Company. For ten 
years he was leasing agent for the 
Dwight, now the Worthington, building. 
While serving on the committee of the 
Board of Trade appointed to bring new 
enterprises to Springfield, Mr. Leete in- 
duced L. Prang & Company, of Boston, 
and the New Bedford Paper Company to 
unite and locate in Springfield, this being 
known as the Tabor-Prang Company. 
On the failure of the united companies he 
was appointed receiver, June 21, 1899, 
and in two years placed it upon a paying 
basis. He was then made treasurer and 



general manager of the company ; he was 
also president of the National Art Asso- 
ciation, which offices he held until his 
death. He was also for a time vice-pres- 
ident of the Barney and Berry Company. 
In 1895 Mr. Leete was treasurer of the 
Duryea Motor Car Company, and accom- 
panied to Chicago the carriage that won 
a famous race — one of the earliest of 
automobile races — and gave a great boom 
to the Springfield industry. For three 
consecutive years, 1898 to 1900, Mr. Leete 
was president of the Board of Trade, a 
longer period of service than that with 
which the board up to that time had hon- 
ored any man, and a period which only 
one president since has exceeded. He 
was first in everything in Longmeadow, 
and in active business in Springfield, a 
member and president of the old Board 
of Trade, treasurer and general manager 
of the Taylor-Prang Art Company, presi- 
dent and treasurer of the International 
Screw Company of Springfield, promi- 
nent in the Hampden County Improve- 
ment League. He worked tremendously 
at everything which he undertook and 
the fact that his boundless energy would 
never allow him to take a vacation may 
have helped to produce the condition 
which led to his death. 

As time went on Mr. Leete became 
more and more interested in city and sub- 
urban improvements ; his real estate ven- 
ture in South Park Terrace added a very 
attractive group of residences to the 
south part of the city. His business 
sagacity and leadership did much to fur- 
nish Longmeadow with its water and 
lighting system and also its trolley line. 
Since 1915 the International Screw Com- 
pany has made many improvements, and 
under Mr. Leete's management has been 
giving promise of a decided success. For 
about seven years Mr. Leete had been 
treasurer and manager of the Smith- 



87 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Worthington Company of Hartford, Con- 
necticut, a concern that boomed during 
the World War. At the time of Everett 
H. Barney's death he was appointed one 
of the three trustees of the Barney estate. 
At one time director of the Second 
National Bank, he was at that time 
a trustee of the Hampden Savings 
Bank. He was the trustee of several 
estates, including that of Emerick and 
Oliver Colton, chairman of the trans- 
portation and good roads commission 
of the Board of Trade, and a leader 
in the Hill towns transit association. 
He had promoted the extension of 
the trolleys to the western part of Mas- 
sachusetts, helping to secure notably 
the Lee-Huntington line. Chairman of 
the executive committee of the Hampden 
Covmty Improvement League, and giv- 
ing his strength freely in many kinds of 
special service, he accepted the appoint- 
ment with H. A. Moses as food admin- 
istrator for Hampden county during the 
war. In Longmeadow he was a member 
of the Storrs Library Association, presi- 
dent of the Longmeadow Street Improve- 
ment Association, custodian for the Long- 
meadow Historical Society, and promi- 
nent in all affairs of the church and the 
town. He was a leader of the Long- 
meadow faction in the long battle in the 
State Legislature for separation from 
East Longmeadow, which was won in 
1895. Since then his attachment to Long- 
meadow has been deep and true. When 
the old soldiers have rallied every Memo- 
rial Day they have seen at the head of 
each comrade's grave a geranium put 
there by Mr. Leete's loyal hand. It is 
hard to realize that a man so full of 
energy and resourcefulness has so quickly 
ceased to labor among his fellowmen. 
Mr. Leete was positive and persistent, 
but always business-like. He was a lover 
of men, made friends easily, and always 



held their truest regard. He was loyal 
to the church, and served it well. His 
funeral, held in the old Longmeadow 
church was one of the most largely at- 
tended in that church. Burial was in 
Longmeadow Cemetery. 

Theodore W. Leete married, October 
17, 1888, Annie Bradford Coomes, of 
Longmeadow, who survives him, daugh- 
ter of William and Lucretia (Clark) 
Coomes. They were the parents of two 
sons: I. Theodore Coomes, for some ten 
years connected with the Tabor-Prang 
Company, then with the Barney and 
Berry Company as assistant purchasing 
agent up to the breaking out of the World 
War, when he entered the service ; after 
the war he was with Post & Lester, then 
with Doty Flint, of Waterbury, and is 
now with Hall Thompson Company of 
Hartford ; he married Georgia Olive 
Ames, and they are the parents of two 
children, Theodore Bradford and Helen 
Ames. 2. Bradford White, of further 
mention. 

Bradford White Leete, youngest son 
of Theodore W. and Annie Bradford 
(Coomes) Leete, was born in Long- 
meadow, Massachusetts, August 20, 1891. 
After finishing the courses of Long- 
meadow public school he was a student 
at Phillips Exeter Academy at Exeter, 
New Hampshire, and at Bay Path Insti- 
tute, Springfield, completing his school 
years at the last named institution. He 
began business life with the Tabor-Prang 
Company, with whom he spent several 
vacations; then became associated with 
the E. W. Oakley Company of Spring- 
field ; the Aetna Life Insurance Company, 
with whom he remained for two years ; 
and with P. J. Murphy, who was engaged 
in the real estate business. In 1918 Mr. 
Leete devoted himself to his private real 
estate business, with offices in Springfield. 
He is in charge of the settlement and 



88 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



management of the large estate left by 
his father, which includes several hun- 
dred acres of valuable land. Since 1920 
he has been connected with Gilbert & 
Barker. He succeeded his father as pres- 
ident and treasurer of the International 
Machine and Screw Company ; is secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Longmeadow 
Historical Society, taking his father's 
place at the time of the latter's death. 
He has taken an active part in church 
work, and was secretary and treasurer of 
the Sunday school connected with the 
Longmeadow Congregational Church. 

Mr. Leete married, August 22, 1914, 
Florence Webster, of Hartford, Connec- 
ticut, daughter of Charles M. and Lucy 
(Fox) Webster. Mr. and Mrs. Leete are 
the parents of two daughters and a son : 
Virginia Webster, born March 17, 1915; 
Margaret Lucia, born June 19, 1917; Fred 
W., born January 21, 1920. The family 
home is No. 21 Hopkins place, Long- 
meadow. 



WARREN, Edmund Merrill 

The name Warren is a very old one, 
the earliest record of the name being that 
of a Danish knight in the Norman army 
of 912. The first recorded English War- 
ren was William, Earl of Warren, re- 
corded in 1066 as among those to whom 
land had been awarded after the Norman 
conquest of England by William the Con- 
queror. The immigrant ancestor of the 
branch of this family in America to which 
Edmund Merrill Warren belongs was 
James Warren, and the line is traced as 
follows : 

(I) James Warren, born in Berwick, 
Scotland, but of English descent, was a 
farmer and a man of prominence in Kit- 
tery, Maine, before 1656, and there held 
various offices including that of select- 
man, which he held for several years. He 
spent his last years and died there in 



1702. He married Margaret , a 

native of Ireland, and they were the par- 
ents of five children, among whom was 
James (2), of further mention. 

(II) James (2) Warren, son of James 
(i) and Margaret Warren, was born in 
1658, and, like his father, was a promi- 
nent farmer, and took an active part in 
the affairs of the town of Kittery, Maine. 
He was selectman, 1701-02-03, and sur- 
veyor in 1719. In 1691 he married Mary 
Foss, daughter of John and Elizabeth 
Foss, of Dover, New Hampshire, and 
they became the parents of six children, 
among whom was John, of further 
mention. 

(III) John Warren, son of James (2) 
and Mary (Foss) Warren, was born De- 
cember 16, 1705. He spent his entire life 
in Kittery, and died there February 24, 
1769. He served on the grand jury, held 
offices at Berwick, and acquired consid- 
erable property. He married Mary 
Heard, daughter of Tristram and Abigail 
Heard, and granddaughter of John Heard, 
the immigrant, of Dover, New Hamp- 
shire. They were the parents of eight 
children, among whom was Tristram, of 
further mention. 

(IV) Tristram Warren, son of John 
and Mary (Heard) Warren, was born in 
1732. He was a soldier in the French and 
Indian wars, and removed from Berwick 
to Bucktown, Maine, after 1784. He mar- 
ried Mary Neal, and they became the 
parents of nine children, among whom 
was Edmund, of further mention. 

(V) Edmund Warren, son of Tris- 
tram and Mary (Neal) Warren, was born 
March 31, 1773. He married Lydia 
Glover, and they were the parents of five 
children : Nathaniel S., Cyrus, Lydia, 
Janet; and Dominicus R., of further 
mention. 

(VT) Dominicus R. Warren, son of 
Edmund and Lydia (Glover) Warren, 



89 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



was born in Massachusetts, June lo, 1810. 
He married Remember Record, and they 
were the parents of four children : Cyrus, 
who went to California in 1849 and be- 
came a judge there ; Edmund ; William 
Dennis, of further mention ; Jane, went to 
California. 

(VII) William Dennis Warren, son of 
Dominicus R. and Remember (Record) 
Warren, was born in Buckfield, Maine, 
in 1835, and died in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, in 1919, aged eighty-four years. He 
was a farmer and a shoemaker, making 
custom shoes in the early days. As a boy 
he lived in Searsport and in Stockton, 
Maine, and spent some time in Auburn, 
Maine, but the greater part of his life 
was passed in Island Falls, Maine, where 
he followed general farming. He held 
various town offices, among them that of 
town treasurer, which office he held for 
many years, and was highly esteemed by 
all who knew him. He was a member 
of the Congregational church. He mar- 
ried Sarah M. Merrill, and they were the 
parents of three children : William, who 
died young; Edmund Merrill, of further 
mention ; and Annie, deceased, who mar- 
ried Wicks. 

(VIII) Edmund Merrill Warren, son 
of William Dennis and Sarah M. (Mer- 
rill) Warren, was born at Island Falls, 
Maine, April 27, 1868. He received his 
education in the schools of Island Falls 
and Auburn, Maine. As a boy he lived 
on a farm, and when he was sixteen years 
of age he went to South Dakota and 
worked in the wheat fields, remaining 
two years, at the end of which time he 
returned to Island Falls, and engaged in 
farming until he was twenty-one years 
of age. He then went to Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, and entered the employ 
of the Harvard Dry Plate Company, with 
whom he remained for some time as fore- 
man in charge of a department. He later 



severed his connection with that concern 
and entered the employ of the Blair Cam- 
era Company, of Boston, Massachusetts, 
in the dry plate department, and was in 
charge of this department. During the 
term of his employment with this com- 
pany, a portion of his time was devoted to 
the making of machines for coating dry 
plates and making machines and perfect- 
ing methods for manufacturing roll films 
which was later used extensively. When 
he severed his connection with this com- 
pany he accepted a position as salesman 
with a real estate concern in Boston, 
Massachusetts, and afterwards engaged 
in the business of buying tracts of land, 
subdividing the same into building lots 
and selling the lots on the installment 
plan. 

During the year 1896 he purchased 
land for development and opened an office 
in Lewiston, Maine, and was at this time 
a pioneer in the State of Maine in the 
business of subdividing land into build- 
ing lots and selling the same on the in- 
stallment plan, and since that time he has 
opened offices, organized corporations 
and real estate trusts, and purchased and 
developed property in nearly all of the 
largest cities and towns in New England, 
and at one time had an office and owned, 
developed and sold property in Utica, 
New York. More recently he has taken 
up the work of building small residences 
in connection with the work of subdivid- 
ing and selling land into building lots. 
These residences are sold upon terms 
which make the owning of a home with- 
in the reach of all. 

At the present time (1922), he has of- 
fices in Boston, Worcester, and Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, also Manchester, 
New Hampshire, and resides at Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, but has a farm at 
North Grafton, Massachusetts. 



90 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



PORTER, Edwin 

Among those worthy and highly es- 
teemed citizens of Springfield who have 
passed out of the life of the community 
leaving a deep and long felt sense of loss 
is Edwin Porter, who was a resident of 
Springfield throughout his entire life, and 
was for nearly half a century associated 
with Kibbe Brothers, manufacturers of 
confectionery. 

Mr. Porter came of a very old family, 
one branch of which traces its ancestry 
far back into the days of the Norman 
Conquest when William de la Grande 
came over to England with William the 
Conqueror, in 1066, and was assigned 
lands at, or near, Kennilworth, in War- 
wickshire. His son, Ralph or Roger, be- 
came grand porteur to Henry I, continu- 
ing from 1 120 to 1 140. and from Ralph or 
Roger le Porteur is derived the surname 
Porter. The family bore a coat-of-arms 
described as follows : 

Anns — Argent, on a fesse sable between two or 
three church bells of the first. 

Crest — A portcullis argent chained. 
Motto — Vigilantia ct virtuti. 

Through the centuries that have passed 
since the days of Ralph or Roger le Por- 
teur, the name has been borne by many 
distinguished members of the family, and 
when the Colonial movement from old 
England to New England began, several 
representatives of the Porter family were 
among the earliest groups. Few names 
in New England can boast so many early 
American ancestors as the Porter name, 
no less than eight men bearing that name 
having emigrated to America before 1653, 
and all of these except one having arrived 
by 1640, or earlier. Richard Porter set- 
tled at Weymouth, Massachusetts, in 
1653. John Porter was at Hingham, three 
miles distant, the same year, and it is 
thought that they were brothers. John 



Porter settled at Windsor, Connecticut,, 
in 1638, previous to which time he is 
said to have been in Worcester, Massa- 
chusetts. Robert and Thomas Porter, 
brothers, were among the eighty-four 
proprietors of Farmington, Connecticut, 
in 1640, and this branch of the family has 
been especially noted, Robert Porter be- 
ing ancestor of President Noah Porter of 
Yale College, and of the latter's distin- 
guished sister, Miss Sarah Porter, who 
for many years conducted in her home at 
Farmington, the most noted private 
school for girls in the country. There 
was also a Daniel Porter, surgeon, who 
was in Farmington before 1653. Abel 
Porter was admitted to the church in 
Boston, January 23, 1641. John Porter 
was made freeman in Roxbury, Massa- 
chusetts, November 5, 1633, and being a 
follower of Rev. John Wheelwright and 
Ann Hutchinson, was compelled to move 
to Rhode Island. The David Porter fam- 
ily, of whom five generations served in 
the navy, reached its highest point of dis- 
tinction in Admiral David Dixon Porter, 
of Civil War fame, who received the 
thanks of Congress for "opening the Mis- 
sissippi." Of these various immigrant an- 
cestors bearing the Porter name, it is 
John Porter, of Windsor, Connecticut, 
whose ancestry has been traced through 
sixteen generations to William de la 
Grande, the Norman knight mentioned 
above. 

Daniel Porter, grandfather of Edwin 
Porter, came from Windsor, Connecticut, 
to Massachusetts and died in East Long- 
meadow in 1843. He married Amy Blod- 
gett, and they became the parents of five 
children : Daniel, Amy, Polly, Amelia, 
John, and Wardsworth. 

John Porter, son of Daniel and Amy 
(Blodgett) Porter, was born in East 
Longmeadow, Massachusetts, in 1810, 
and died there in July, 1878. He married 



91 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Mary Ann Cleveland, who died in March, 
1879, aged sixty-eight years, daughter of 
John and Polly (Ellis) Cleveland, and 
their children were : Edwin, of whom 
further; Sarah, who married Carlos Hois- 
ington ; Adelaide, who married Charles 
Bowers; Emma; Ida; Hyland ; Ellis. 

Edwin Porter, son of John and Mary 
Ann (Cleveland) Porter, was born in 
East Longmeadow, Massachusetts, Sep- 
tember 9, 1831, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, February 12, 191 1. He 
received his education in the schools of 
East Longmeadow, and assisted on the 
farm during vacations. After completing 
his studies, he engaged in farming for a 
time, and then came to Springfield, where 
in 1855 he entered the employ of Kibbe 
Brothers, manufacturers of confectionery. 
Here he found his opportunity, and for 
forty-five years, which represented the en- 
tire remainder of his active life, he con- 
tinued the connection, rendering invalu- 
able service to his employers and most 
successfully discharging the duties of his 
position. For many years he drove one 
of the famous Kibbe Brothers teams de- 
livering wholesale orders to retail dealers 
throughout Connecticut and in other 
states of New England. Later, as he 
became advanced in years, he was given 
positions requiring less strenuous activ- 
ity, the duties of which he continued to 
fill with ability and faithfulness until 
some ten years prior to his death, when, 
a man of seventy years, he retired and 
enjoyed the remainder of his life in the 
residence which he had built in Spring- 
field, on Lincoln street, some thirty years 
before. 

A man of sound principles, faithful in 
the discharge of duty, and able and re- 
sourceful in meeting the exigencies of a 
situation, he was greatly loved and re- 
spected by friends and associates and 
held a high place in the esteem of his 



fellow-citizens. Politically he gave his 
support to the Republican party, and his 
religious affiliation was with the Baptist 
church. 

On January 5, i860, Mr. Porter married 
Lorinda 'M. Kibbe, of East Longmeadow, 
daughter of Luke and Lovina (Hall) 
Kibbe. Her father was engaged in the 
quarry business in East Longmeadow. 
The children of Edwin and Lovina 
(Kibbe) Porter are: i. Frank, who re- 
sides in Amostown, West Springfield ; 
he has been employed by the firm of 
Kibbe Brothers for forty-three years, in 
much the same positions as his father, 
father and son covering a period of over 
fifty years' association with this one firm ; 
married (first) Charlotte Nason, and they 
were the parents of one child, now de- 
ceased ; married (second) Bessie Howes.- 
2. Edna, at home with her mother. 3. 
William, married Jennie Roberts, and 
they are the parents of two children, 
Harold and Helen. 



ADAMS, Nelson 

At the age of eighty-seven. Nelson 
Adams, a pioneer stock dealer and the 
well known historian of the Elijah Adams 
branch of the Henry Adams family, 
passed from mortal view, leaving a rec- 
ord of great activity extending over seven 
decades of life, passed in seven cities of 
New England. The Adams family have 
been represented in all of the struggles 
attending the life of the Colony of Massa- 
chusetts and the Nation, and the name 
has been made illustrious by Samuel and 
John Adams, of Revolutionary fame. 

(I) Henry Adams, immigrant ancestor, 
was born in England, and came from 
Braintree, England, to Braintree, Massa- 
chusetts, about 1632-33. He was allotted 
forty acres of land for the ten persons in 
his family, February 24, 1639-40. Presi- 
dent John Adams, a descendant, believed 



92 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



that Henry Adams came from Devon- 
shire, and erected a monument to him in 
the old burying ground at Braintree, now 
Quincy, with this inscription : "In mem- 
ory of Henry Adams, who took flight 
from the Dragon persecution in Devon- 
shire, England, and alighted with eight 
sons near Mount Wollaston. One of the 
sons returned to England, and after tak- 
ing time to explore the country, four re- 
moved to Medfield, and two to Chelms- 
ford. One only, Joseph, who lies here at 
his left hand, remained here — an original 
proprietor in the township of Braintree." 
The monument commemorates the "piety, 
humility, simplicity, prudence, patience, 
temperance, frugality, industry, and per- 
severance" of the Adams ancestors. Pres- 
ident John Quincy Adams, however, dis- 
sented from the conclusion of his father 
that Henry Adams was of Devonshire. 
Savage agrees with the younger Adams 
that the immigrant was of Braintree, 
County Essex, England. It is generally 
believed that the wife of Henry Adams 
returned to England with her daughter, 
Ursula, and died there. Henry Adams 
died at Braintree, Massachusetts, Octo- 
ber 6, 1646, and was buried two days 
later. Children: i. Henry, born 1604; 
married, in Braintree, November 17, 1643, 
Elizabeth Paine; settled in Medfield. 2. 
Thomas, born 1612, died July 20, 1688; 
married Mary Blackmore. 3. Samuel, 
born 1617, held the rank of captain. 4. 
Jonathan, born 1619; married Elizabeth 
Fussell; settled in Medfield. 5. Peter, 

born 1622; married Rachel ; settled 

in Medfield. 6. John, born 1624; settled 
in Cambridge. 7. Joseph, born in 1626. 
8. Edward, of further mention. 9. Ur- 
sula, mentioned in her father's will. 

(II) Ensign Edward Adams, youngest 
son of Henry Adams, was born in Eng- 
land, and about 1630 came to New Eng- 
land with his parents. He settled in 



Medfield, Massachusetts. He served as 
ensign, selectman, and deputy to the Gen- 
eral Court in 1689-92 and 1702. He mar- 
ried (first), in 1652, Lydia Rockwood, 
daughter of Richard and Agnes (Bick- 
nell) Rockwood. She died March 3, 1676. 
He married (second), in 1678, Abigail 
(Craft) Ruggles, widow. She died in 
1707. He married (third), January 6, 
1709-10, Sarah Taylor. Children, all by 
first wife: i. Lydia, born July 12, 1653, 
died December 26, 1731 ; married (first) 
James Allen, (second) Joseph Daniel. 2. 
Jonathan, born April 4, 1655, died Jan- 
uary 24, 1718; married (first) Mary Ellis, 
(second) Mehitable Cheney, widow. 3. 
John, of further mention. 4. Eliashib, 
born February 18, 1658-59, died 1698; 
married Mehitable Gary. 5. Sarah, born 
May 29, 1660; married John Turner. 6. 
James, born January 4, 1661-62, died 

1733; married Mary . 7. Henry, 

born October 29, 1663, died June 28, 1749; 
married (first) Patience Ellis, (second) 
Ruth Ellis, (third) Mrs. Hannah Adams. 
8. Mehitable, born March 30, 1665, died 
March i, 1753; married Josiah Faxon. 9. 
Elisha, born August 25, 1666; married 
Mehitable Gary. 10. Edward, born June 
28, 1668; married Elizabeth Walley. 11. 
Bethia, born April 12, 1670, died 1672. 
12. Bethia, born August 18, 1672, died 
young. 13. Abigail, born June 25, 1675, 
died young. 14. Miriam, born February 
26, 1676, died young. Edward Adams 
died in Medfield, November 12, 1716, "the 
last of the original settlers." 

(Ill) John Adams, second son of Ed- 
ward and Lydia (Rockwood) Adams, 
was born in Medfield, Massachusetts. 
February 18, 1657, and died March i. 
1751. He resided in his native town, on 
the homestead. He married (first) Del)- 
orah Partridge, born 1662, died before 
1695, daughter of John and Magdalen 
(Bullard) Partridge. He married (sec- 



93 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ond) Susanna Breck, born in Sherborn, 
Massachusetts, May lo, 1667, daughter 
of Thomas and Mary (Hill) Breck. 
Medway record says: "Susanna, second 
wife of John, senior, died 28 May, 1744." 
Among his children was Obadiah, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(IV) Obadiah Adams, son of John 
Adams, was born in Medway, Massachu- 
setts, January 20, 1689, died November 
2.2, 1765. He married, April 24, 1716, 
Christian Sanford, of Mendon, Massa- 
chusetts, daughter of Deacon Thomas 
Sanford. She died July 21, 1777. Among 
their children was Nathan, of further 
mention. 

(V) Nathan Adams, son of Obadiah 
and Christian (Sanford) Adams, was 
born in Medway, Massachusetts, Decem- 
ber 3, 1723, died January 26, 1800. He 
inherited the homestead in West Med- 
way, one-half mile south of the home- 
stead of Abadiah Adams. He made his 
will, November, 1794, and it was proved. 
March 4, 1800. He married. May 9, 1750, 
Kezia Thompson, born November 17, 
1730, daughter of Eleazer and Hannah 
(Daniel) Thompson. Among their chil- 
dren was Elijah, of further mention. 

(VI) Elijah Adams, son of Nathan 
and Kezia (Thompson) Adams, was born 
in West Medway, Massachusetts, Jan- 
uary 7, 1753, died in Hubbardston, Mas- 
sachusetts, December 17, 1817, having 
settled there in 1774. He was a soldier of 
the Revolution and drew a pension for 
services in same. He married, April 14, 
1774, Lizzie Morse, born October 8, 1753, 
died December 31, 1833, daughter of 
Ezekiel and Rebecca (Cousins) Morse, 
of Holliston, Massachusetts. Children : 
I. Abner, born in Hubbardston, Decem- 
ber 29, 1774, died in West Brattleboro, 
Vermont, August 10, 1856; married 
(first) Molly Underwood, who died in 
West Brattleboro, March 12, 1819; mar- 



ried (second) Rhoda Rheeves, who died 
October 28, 1877. 2. Lizzie, born in Hub- 
bardston, March 12, 1777, died October 
12, 1785. 3. Lydia, born in Hubbardston, 
March 31, 1779, died June 25, 1823; mar- 
ried Thomas Lazelle. 4. Elijah, born in 
Hubbardston, March 27, 1781, died Oc- 
tober 22, 1785. 5. David, born in Hub- 
bardston, April I, 1783, died October 28, 
1785. 6. Azubah, born in Hubbardston, 
June 16, 1785, died October 22, 1798. 7. 
Elisha, of further mention. 8. Isabel, 
born in Hubbardston, December 23, 1789, 
died March 4, 1865 ; married Josephus 
Clifford, who died October 15, 1876. 9. 
Rhoda, born in Hubbardston, March 22, 
1792, died October 23, 1875 ; married Wil- 
lard Earle, of Worcester, who died June 
17, 185 1. 10. Rebecca, born in Hubbards- 
ton, February 13, 1795, died October i, 
1798. 

(VII) Elisha Adams, son of Elijah 
and Lizzie (Morse) Adams, was born in 
Hubbardston, Massachusetts, August 16, 
1787, died there, July 14, 1868. He mar- 
ried, October 12, 1808, Betsey Parmenter 
Dean, daughter of Richard and Grace 
(Parmenter) Dean, of Oakham, Massa- 
chusetts ; she died May 26, 1859, aged 
seventy years. Children: i. Abner Sum- 
ner, born in Hubbardston, October 4, 
1809; he removed to Virginia and was en- 
gaged in quarrying in the James river 
section ; there has been no information 
concerning him since 1861. 2. Elisha 
Edson, born in Hubbardston, July 18, 
1812, died in Peoria, Illinois, unmarried. 
3. Mary, born in Hubbardston, Septem- 
ber 7, 1814, died in Gardner, September 
22, 1895 ; married, June 16, 1842, Abial 
G. Thomas, of Rutland, who died in 
Springfield, March 28, 1892. 4. Elijah, 
born in Hubbardston, May 14, 1818, died 
March 18, 1842. 5. Silas, born in Hub- 
bardston, August 31, 1820, died August 
16, 1884, in Gardner; married (first). 



94 



;-^?>ro2 



'^''^/D 



tj^, 



'^Tio 



^>i^-- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



April i8, 1845, Roxa Hunting, who died 
June 21, i860; married (second), March 
10, 1863, PameHa A. Temple, born Au- 
gust 22, 1832, daughter of Jesse and Bet- 
sey E. Temple, of Gilsum, New Hamp- 
shire. 6. Rhoda Elizabeth, born in Hub- 
bardston, June 12, 1823, died in Fitch- 
burg, October 6, 1856; married, Novem- 
ber 20, 1849, George W. Plummer, who 
died in Manchester, New Hampshire, Oc- 
tober 21, 1895. 7. Nelson, of further 
mention. 

(VIII) Nelson Adams, son of Elisha 
and Betsey Parmenter (Dean) Adams, 
was born in Hubbardston, Massachusetts, 
July 6, 1831. He attended the district 
school, but at an early age left home, 
going to Fitchburg, where he learned 
chair making with Alonzo Davis. He 
soon, however, found more congenial 
occupation with John Lowe, a stock 
dealer, specializing in cattle, sheep and 
Morgan horses. He continued thus em- 
ployed for several years, and during the 
summer months drove the stock from as 
far north as Rindge, New Hampshire, 
where Mr. Lowe had farm interests, to 
the Brighton Market near Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts. During the winter months, 
he was employed in Boston packing 
houses and there became familiar with 
the cattle business and the buying and 
marketing of the live stock. He early 
decided that he would ultimately engage 
in the same business that Mr. Lowe 
handled so profitably, and he carefully 
conserved his resources so that he might 
be prepared when "opportunity knocked." 
His chance came when a small by-prod- 
ucts plant was ofTered for sale in Leo- 
minster, Massachusetts. He purchased 
the plant, moved it to Fitchburg, Massa- 
chusetts, and there conducted it with suc- 
cess until 1857, w^hen he sold out and left 
Fitchburg, his first established business 
location. During this time he had ac- 



quired a pair of fine Morgan horses, and 
with these he drove to New Haven, Con- 
necticut, a city which was long his home. 
His first move there was the purchase of 
a small by-products plant in Fair Haven, 
which he moved to Goflf street, New 
Haven, leasing a site from Alfred Todd, 
a New Haven marketman with whom he 
made his home. His business rapidly 
increased, and having the practical mo- 
nopoly of the by-products business of 
New Haven county, he moved to a mod- 
ern factory which he erected at Beaver 
pond. Prosperity came to him in pro- 
portion to his well-directed efforts, he 
being an energetic, intelligent worker, 
and finally a warehouse for the finished 
products of his factory became a neces- 
sity. This was built in Fair Haven, 
and w'ith the New Haven county by-prod- 
ucts business well in hand, he sought 
other fields of operation. His next plant 
was in Bridgeport, where his New Haven 
success was repeated, and he later pur- 
chased a plant located in Waterbury, 
Connecticut, also had plants in New 
York City, Hartford, Connecticut, and 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and in each 
of these cities he operated with partners, 
he having the buying and selling and 
traveling up and down the Atlantic coast. 
The New York City plant, located at No. 
383 West Forty-sixth street, was entirely 
devoted to wholesale dealing in the vari- 
ous products of the plants in the other 
cities. For over forty years Mr. Adams 
continued the active head of the busi- 
ness he founded and developed, then 
changing conditions rendered a with- 
drawal highly necessary. Mr. Adams 
saw these changes coming, and with rare 
foresight and business skill prepared for 
it. He had for some time closely ob- 
served the inevitable concentration of 
packing interests and realized that a pri- 
vate manufacturer could not hope to suc- 



95 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



cessfully compete with the great packing 
houses, so he sold his plants one by one 
and finally discontinued the business en- 
tirely. 

In 1897 Mr. Adams located in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, where he invested in 
manufacturing and in real estate. He 
purchased from D. B. Wesson, with 
whom he was well acquainted in a busi- 
ness way, an estate in the Forest Park 
district, and "Fountain Side," with its 
woods and springs was a great joy to him, 
for he loved nature, and his seven gen- 
erations of New England agricultural an- 
cestors had bred in him a love of the soil. 
He continued to deal in Springfield real 
estate until the end of his active career, 
and was instrumental during this time in 
having upper Belmont avenue, where he 
resided, developed into a residential cen- 
ter. Here he spent his last years and 
died August 20, 1919. His remains were 
interred in Evergreen Cemetery, New 
Haven. 

While a resident of Springfield, he built 
two brick houses on Whaley avenue, 
Nos. 139 and 143, which were at that time 
among the finest in the city. They were 
the first houses to be built of smooth or 
patent brick, which was known as Tren- 
ton brick. His residence was No. 143, 
and being a lover of his home he had this 
house built especially to suit his taste. 
Blue birds were represented in the fres- 
coing of the ceilings, and a special design 
of carpet was made into which figures 
representing pond lilies were woven. 

A friend of his fellowmen, Mr. Adams 
was a member of several societies look- 
ing toward the betterment of conditions, 
namely: The American Humane Asso- 
ciation, the Connecticut Humane Society, 
the Connecticut Equal Sufifrage League, 
and the Seaman's Friend Society, all of 
which appealed to him, and he took an 
active interest in the work these societies 



were doing. He was one of the early 
members of the Springfield Ethical Union, 
and he held membership in the Connec- 
ticut Valley Historical Society, and in 
the New England Historic and Gene- 
alogical Society of Boston. His own 
writings included a genealogy of his 
branch of the Adams family, published in 
1910, entitled: "The Elijah Adams Fam- 
ily of Hubbardston, Massachusetts, and 
a Retrospect of Activities in Seven Cities 
in Seven Decades." He was a man of 
many interests, his large and well selected 
library revealing how deeply he thought 
and read upon subjects entirely over- 
looked by the average business man. His- 
tory, genealogy, biography and phrenol- 
ogy were studies and subjects of the 
deepest interest to him. His nature was 
broad and sympathetic, and led him to a 
close connection with humanitarian 
movements, and among his many ac- 
quaintances and friends was Peter 
Cooper, the great philanthropist of New 
York City. He was a most pleasant and 
congenial man, and was greatly esteemed 
by all who knew him. 

Mr. Adams married, October 6, 1868, 
Jennie Edgerton Dickerman, daughter 
of Thomas P. and Sarah M. (Parsons) 
Dickerman, of New Haven, Connecticut. 
Mrs. Adams died October 13, 1913, and 
was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, New 
Haven. They were the parents of three 
children, namely: i. Burton Sumner, born 
in New Haven, August 17, 1869, died Jan- 
uary 27, 1878. 2. Grace Elizabeth, born 
in New Haven, September 23, 1872 ; mar- 
ried there, April 3, 1895, Frank Seaman 
Valentine, and she resides at No. 338 East 
Broadway, Milford, Connecticut ; chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Valentine: i. Cora 
Mildred, born in Springfield, March 22, 
1897; married. May i, 1919, Leon Kelso, 
of Indiana, a contractor, naturalist, and 
interested in the raising and care of bees : 



96 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Mr. Kelso has an orange grove in St. 
Petersburg, Florida, and there his win- 
ters are spent; he enlisted, July 22, 1918, 
served in the medical department, was on 
duty in Allentown Hospital, New Haven, 
and was honorably discharged, August 
29, 1919. ii. Ruby Louise, born in Spring- 
field, January 31, 1904. 3. Mary Louise. 
born in New Haven, June 2, 1874. died in 
Southington, Connecticut, October 4, 
1874, buried in the family plot in Ever- 
green Cemetery, New Haven. 



MARSH, Harry Cooley 

Harry C. Marsh, purchasing agent for 
the water department of Springfield, has 
filled that position since 1914. The sur- 
name Marsh is a very old one, dating 
back to the earliest times in which sur- 
names were generally used in England, 
and is a place name. Sir Thomas Marsh, 
who lived in 1660, bore the following 
arms, which, with slight variations, were 
borne by many families of the name : 

Arms — Gules, a horse's head couped between 
three crosses botonnie fitchee argent. 

(I) John Marsh, immigrant ancestor, 
came to this country at a very early date, 
and settled in Boston, Massachusetts. 

He married Sarah , and among 

their children was Joseph, of whom 
further. 

(II) Joseph Marsh, son of John and 
Sarah Marsh, was born February 3, 1670. 
He married Anna Thourogood, and they 
were the parents of children, among 
whom was Joseph (2), of whom further. 

(III) Joseph (2) Marsh, son of Joseph 
(i) and Anna (Thourogood) Marsh, was 
born December 21, 1694. He married 
Sarah Partridge, and they were the par- 
ents of: Thomas; Eli; and Asa, of whom 
further. 

(IV) Asa Marsh, son of Joseph (2) 
and Sarah (Partridge) Marsh, was born 

Mass — 12 — 7 97 



in Medfield, Massachusetts, August 31, 
1729. He married Millicent Woodstock, 
and their children were : Amos, of whom 
further ; Asa, Jr. ; Abijah ; and Sarah. 

(V) Amos Marsh, son of Asa and Mil- 
licent (Woodstock) Marsh, married, in 
1777, Elizabeth Jefferson, and they were 
the parents of twelve children : Benja- 
min ; Calvin, of whom further; Thomas, 
Amos, Rufus, Elizabeth, Sarah, Sophia, 
Electa, Asa, Millicent, and Sarah. 

(VI) Calvin Marsh, son of Amos and 
Elizabeth (Jefferson) Marsh, was born 
October 31, 1780, and died January 5, 
1858. He was a farmer, and lived in Hat- 
field and Hadley, Massachusetts. He 
married, October 7. 1800, Anna Smith, 
daughter of Elihu and Anna Smith, and 
they were the parents of nine children : 
Orsamus, Hiram, Chapman, Calvin B.. 
Oliver, Elizabeth, Anna B. ; Elihu, of 
whom further ; and Merriam. 

(VII) Elihu Marsh, son of Calvin and 
Anna (Smith) Marsh, was born in 1821, 
and died January 17, 1891. He was a suc- 
cessful farmer and spent most of his life 
in Hatfield, Massachusetts. He married 
(first), July 25, 1845, Mary Ann Warren. 
She died October 16, 1850, and he mar- 
ried (second) Elvira Elwell, who died 
December 16, 1865. He married (third) 
Adeline Noyes Eaton, who was born in 
1832, and died in 1896. His children were : 
Henry Elihu, of whom further; Gertrude. 
Albert H., Myron N., and Charles W. 

(VIII) Henry Elihu Marsh, son of 
Elihu and Mary Ann (Warren) Marsh, 
was born in Hatfield, Massachusetts, 
May 6, 1846. He received his education 
in the public schools of Hatfield and in 
Wilbraham Academy, and when school 
days were over entered the employ of 
Mr. Cooley, proprietor of the Cooley 
Hotel. For a period of fifteen years he 
rendered valuable service in this connec- 
tion, and at the end of that time was 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



made a partner in the firm of J. M. Cooley 
& Company. Later he leased the hotel 
for a period of ten years, and in 1890 pur- 
chased the entire hotel property, of which 
he became sole proprietor, and the busi- 
ness of which he successfully conducted 
alone until 1914. In that year he sold 
out and since that time has lived in re- 
tirement. Mr. Marsh was one of the six 
men who founded the New England Ho- 
tel Men's Association, of which he was 
president for a year, and of which he is 
now an honorary member, and which he 
served as a member of its board of direc- 
tors until the time of his retirement from 
business. He was a member of the board 
of trustees of the Hampden Savings 
Bank for a number of years. He is a 
member of the Realty Club, the Winthrop 
Club, the Nayasset Club ; Springfield 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, in 
which order he holds the thirty-second 
degree, and Melha Temple, Ancient Ara- 
bic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
His religious afifiliation is with the Me- 
morial Church, which he serves as a 
member of the parish committee. 

On October 26, 1870, Mr. Marsh mar- 
ried Mary L. Fisher, of Danielson, Con- 
necticut, born January 7, 185 1, daughter 
of David and Lucinda (Allen) Fisher 
(see Fisher IV), and they were the par- 
ents of three children : Edward Fisher, 
born August 3, 1871, died October 16, 
1894; Philip Allen, born January 24, 1879, 
died October, 1913; and Harry Cooley, 
of whom further. 

(IX) Harry Cooley Marsh, son of 
Henry Elihu and Mary L. (Fisher) 
Marsh, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, June 14, 1884. He received his 
education in the public schools of Spring- 
field, including the high school, and when 
his scholastic training was completed, 
entered the employ of his father, assisting 
in the management of Hotel Cooley. 



This connection he maintained for a 
period of ten years, until the retirement 
of his father from active business and the 
sale of the hotel property, in 1914. In 
that same year he received an appoint- 
ment as purchasing agent of the water 
department for the city of Springfield, 
and that office he has continued to fill to 
the present time (1923). 

On April 30, 1910, Harry C. Marsh mar- 
ried Alice Brown, of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, daughter of Charles Edwin and 
Mary Elizabeth (Crane) Brow^n (see 
Brown VII), and they are the parents of 
one daughter, Lucinda, who was born 
September 23, 1920. 

(The Fisher Line). 

(I) Barzellai Fisher was born January 
16. 1730, and died January 21, 1873. He 
married Lydia Dexter, and they were the 
parents of children, the four eldest sons 
of whom served in the Revolutionary 
War. One of these was John, of whom 
further. 

(II) John Fisher, son of Barzellai and 
Lydia (Dexter) Fisher, was born Decem- 
ber 29, 1755, and died June 9, 1843. He 
served in the Revolutionary War. He 
married Elizabeth Marcy, and among 
their children was David, of whom 
further. 

(III) David Fisher, son of John and 
Elizabeth (Marcy) Fisher, was bom May 
18, 1788, and died September 12. 1862. 
He served in the W^ar of 18 12. He mar- 
ried Lucinda Allen. Among their chil- 
dren was Mary L., of whom further. 

(IV) Mary L. Fisher, daughter of 
David and Lucinda (Allen) Fisher, was 
born January 7, 1851. She married 
Henry Elihu Marsh (see Marsh VIII). 

(The Brown Line). 

The armorial bearings of the Brown 
family were as follows: 



98 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Anns — Sable, three mallets argent; quartering; 
party per bend. 

Anns — Argent and sable in bend three mascles 
bendways, counterchanged. 

Arms — Or, on a fesse gules three crosses pattee 
argent. 

Anns — Argent, on a bend sable a bezant in chief. 

Crest — On a wreath argent and sable a demi- 
stork, its neck nowed gules and wings displayed 
argent. In its beak a scroll bearing the motto, 
Apprendre a vwurir. 

(I) John Brown was born in England 
in 1631, and came to this country, settling 
in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He re- 
moved to Marlboro, Massachusetts, in 
1662, and in 1678 sold his farm to Thomas 
Rice, soon afterward removing to Fal- 
mouth, which was then in Massachusetts, 
but is now in Maine. Still later he re- 
moved to Watertown, Massachusetts. 
He married Esther Makepeace, of Bos- 
ton, and their children were : Joseph, 
Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary, John, Hester, 
Thomas, Daniel, Deborah, Abigail; and 
Joseph, of whom further. 

(II) Joseph Brown, son of John and 
Esther (Makepeace) Brown, was born in 
Marlboro, Massachusetts, in 1667, and 
died in Lexington. He married Ruhamah 
Wellington, who died in 1772. ninety 
years of age, and they were the parents 
of eight children : Ruhamah, Daniel, 
Joseph ; Jonas, of whom further ; James, 
Josiah, Benjamin, and William. 

(III) Jonas Brown, son of Joseph and 
Ruhamah (Wellington) Brown, was 
born in Watertown, Massachusetts, May 
20, 171 1, and died in Sutton, Massachu- 
setts, to which town he removed early in 
life. He was a merchant, and served as 
postmaster for many years. He married 
Hannah Munroe, daughter of William 
and Mary (Cutler) Munroe, of Lexing- 
ton, and their children were : Hannah, 
Jonas, Josiah, William, Ruhamah, Wil- 
liam ; Ebenezer, of whom further ; and 
Susannah. 



(IV) Ebenezer Brown, son of Jonas 
and Hannah (Munroe) Brown, was born 
April 10, 1749, in Sutton, Massachusetts, 
and died in Hubbardston, same State, 
May 18, 1824, the greater part of his life 
being spent in the latter town. He mar- 
ried (first) Rebecca Witt. She died 
April 30, 1816, and he married (second) 
Lydia Coggswell. Children, all of the 
first marriage : Oliver, John, Polly, Char- 
lotte, Rebecca ; Ebenezer, of whom fur- 
ther; Sewell, Clarissa, Clark, Harriett, 
Shepherd, Foster, Melinda, Dexter, and 
Russell. 

(V) Ebenezer (2) Brown, son of Eben- 
ezer (i) and Rebecca (Witt) Brown, 
was born in Hubbardston, IMassachu- 
setts, in 1786, and died there October 22, 
1871. He married (first) Lois Metcalf, 
(second) Lydia Harwood, (third) Vida 
Underwood, of Barre, Massachusetts. 
Children : Edwin, of whom further ; Aus- 
tin : and Louisa. 

(VI) Edwin Brown, eldest son of 
Ebenezer (2) and Lois (Metcalf) Brown, 
was born in Hubbardston, Massachusetts, 
November 14, 1810, and removed to 
Springfield, Massachusetts. He married 
Sally Witt, April 10, 1834, and they were 
the parents of three children : Lois E. ; 
George A. ; and Charles Edwin, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(VII) Charles Edwin Brown, son of 
Edwin and Sally (Witt) Brown, was 
born at Hubbardston, Massachusetts, 
December 19, 1842. In December, 1859, 
he came to Springfield and for a time 
attended school on Court street. He then 
began his business career in the employ 
of J, W. Hale & Company, retail grocers, 
where he remained until September i, 
1863, when he engaged in the grocery 
btisiness for himself, in partnership with 
W. H. Pinney, under the firm name of 
Brown & Pinney. This connection was 
maintained for a period of five year^, dur- 



99 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ing which time Brown & Pinney erected 
the Lincoln Hall block. In 1868 Mr. 
Brown withdrew from the business and 
began traveling for West, Stone & Com- 
pany, wholesale grocers, and some time 
later was made a partner in that firm. In 
1901 the partnership was dissolved, Mr. 
Brown and his son Fred taking the whole- 
sale grocery business under the firm 
name of C. E. Brown & Company, and 
in 1907 the business was moved into the 
fine new building on Lyman street. For 
forty years Mr. Brown was prominently 
identified with the business, social, and 
religious interests of Springfield. Mr. 
Brown was active in the public affairs of 
the city, serving as councilman, 1887-88, 
and as alderman, 1897-98. During his 
term in the latter office he was chairman 
of the committee which built the Forest 
Park School. He was for years a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the Young 
Men's Christian Association, and was 
chairman of the building committee that 
erected the Central Young Men's Christ- 
ian Association building in 1894. He was 
one of the organizers of the Grasse River 
Club, a member of the Board of Trade, 
of the Masonic order and of the Royal 
Arcanum. It was in 1878, during a series 
of Evangelistic services held by Dwight 
L. Moody, that Mr. Brown united with 
the First Church, and the splendid work 
done in connection with his famous Sun- 
day school class was begun soon after- 
ward. His class was widely known, rank- 
ing second, it is said, to John Wana- 
maker's class in size. In 1883 he was 
elected deacon, and for many years served 
as treasurer of the deacon's parish fund ; 
was a member of the parish committee 
for twenty-five years, and throughout his 
active life rendered most valuable service, 
giving freely of his means as well as of 
his time and ability. Few men have been 
more honored or more sincerely loved 



than was Mr. Brown, and those who 
knew him best realized that a large part 
of his rare success with his class was due 
to his own example, his sincerity, and his 
sympathy. 

Mr. Brown married Mary Elizabeth 
Crane, of Springfield, daughter of Sam- 
uel R. and Mary (Butler) Crane, both 
natives of Berkshire county, Massachu- 
setts, and their children were: i. Fred, 
married Isabella Little, of Connecticut, 
and has two children, Dorcas and Kath- 
leen. 2. Alice, who married Harry 
Cooley Marsh (see Marsh IX). 



LINNELL, Herbert Prescott 

Herbert Prescott Linnell is one of the 
representative citizens of Springfield who 
comes of a very old English family, trac- 
ing his ancestry in this country to Rob- 
ert Linnell, who, so far as is known, is 
the ancestor of all the Linnells in 
America. 

(I) Robert Linnell was born in Lon- 
don, England, of an ancient English 
family, as early as 1584, and came to this 
country, in 1638, bearing a letter of dis- 
mission from the church in London, 
which he presented to the church in Scit- 
uate, September 16, 1638, Rev. John 
Lothrop, his brother-in-law, being pastor. 
He took the oath of allegiance to the 
King and of fidelity to the Colony, Feb- 
ruary I, 1639, and was admitted a free- 
man, December 3 of the same year. On 
October 11, 1639, when Rev. John Loth- 
rop, with part of his congregation, re- 
moved to Barnstable, Massachusetts, 
Robert Linnell was one of those who ac- 
companied him. He was a grantee of 
land at Sippecan, January, 1639; served 
on the grand jury in June of the same 
year, and was a man of high social posi- 
tion as is evidenced by the use of the 
title "Mr." used in the public records, 
and though he had considerable property 



IOC 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



when he left England, he died compara- 
tively poor. His will made January 23, 
1662, bequeathed to wife, to son David, 
to daughters, Abigail and Bethiah, and 
to John Davis. His widow Peninna pe- 
titioned the court, October 29, 1669, to 
recover for her the house her husband 
had left her from the hands of his son, 
David Linnell, she being the second wife. 
The name of the first wife is unknown. 
Children of the first marriage : Sarah, 
married (first) Thomas Ewer; (second) 
Thomas Lothrop ; David, of further men- 
tion ; Hannah, married John Davis ; Mary, 
married Richard Childs ; Abigail, married 
Joshua Lombard ; Shubael, or Samuel. 
Robert Linnell married (second) Pen- 
inna Howse, daughter of Rev. John 
Howse, and to this second marriage was 
born one child, Bethiah, baptized in Barn- 
stable, February 7, 1641. 

(II) David Linnell, son of Robert 
Linnell, was born in England as early as 
1627, and came to this country from Lon- 
don, with his father. He inherited his 
father's homestead at Barnstable, and all 
the Linnells in the country are descended 
from him. He did not join the church 
until the year before his death, and his 
wife never became a member, the reason 
for the delay on the part of one and the 
continued refusal on the part of the other 
being largely the result of persecution 
endured by both at the time of their mar- 
riage. The old Puritan law "That if any 
man shall make any motion of marriage 
to any man's daughter or maybe servant 
not having first obtained leave and con- 
sent of the parents or master so to doe. 
shall be punished either by fine or cor- 
poral punishment or both at the discre- 
tion of the bench" was broken by the pair, 
when, contrary to the laws of the Puri- 
tans, on March 9, 1653, he married Han- 
nah Shelley, then in her sixteenth year, 
daughter of Robert and Judith (Garnett) 



Shelley, of Barnstable. David and Han- 
nah Linnell were punished both by 
church and court for violating the above 
quoted law. Hannah was never recon- 
ciled with the authorities and died with- 
out joining the church, while David be- 
came a member in 1688. His will, dated 
November 14, 1688, was proved March 
9, following. Children, born at Barn- 
stable : Samuel ; Elisha ; Hannah, mar- 
ried Dolor Davis ; Mary, married John 
Sergeant; Abigail, married Ralph Jones; 
Experience, married Jabez Davis ; Jona- 
than, of further mention ; John ; Susan- 
nah, married Ebenezer Phinney. 

(III) Jonathan Linnell, son of David 
and Hannah (Shelley) Linnell, was born 
in Barnstable, Massachusetts, in 1669, and 
died at Eastham, same State, September 

8, 1726. He married Elizabeth , 

who was born in 1666, and died at East- 
ham, July 26, 1725, and they were the par- 
ents of children, among whom was Tho- 
mas, of whom further. 

(IV) Thomas Linnell, son of Jonathan 
and Elizabeth Linnell, was born at East- 
ham, Massachusetts, October 12, 1703, 
and died between July i and August 31, 
1727. He married, at Harwich, October 
6, 1726, Thankful Hopkins, who was born 
at Harwich, in April, 1700, daughter of 
Stephen and Sarah (Howes) Hopkins, 
and a descendant of Stephen Hopkins, of 
the "Mayflower." 

(V) Jonathan (2) Linnell, son of Thomas 
and Thankful (Hopkins) Linnell, was 
born in Eastham, Massachusetts, April 
23, 1729, and died in 1799. He was 
prominent in the local affairs of the 
town, and served as selectman for East- 
ham in 1780. On January 9, 1752, he 
married Priscilla Gould, born at Har- 
wich, April II, 1731, died at Orleans, in 
1812, daughter of Nathaniel and Grace 
(Hurd) Gould. They were the parents 



lOI 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of children, among whom was Benjamin, 
of whom further. 

(VI) Benjamin Linnell, son of Jona- 
than (2) and Priscilla (Gould) Linnell, 
was born at Eastham, Massachusetts, 
May 3, 1770, and died at Orleans, June 
17, 1844. He was an ensign during the 
War of 1812. He married Deborah Cros- 
by, who was born in Eastham, December 
27, 1769, and died at Orleans, February 
12, i860, daughter of Joshua and Thank- 
ful (Cole) Crosby, and they were the par- 
ents of children, among whom was Ben- 
jamin (2), of whom further. 

(VII) Benjamin (2) Linnell, son of 
Benjamin (i) and Deborah (Crosby) 
Linnell, was born at Eastham, Massa- 
chusetts, May 14, 1790, and died at Or- 
leans, Massachusetts, December 23, 1827. 
He served in the War of 1812. He mar- 
ried, at Orleans, in February, 1813, Mercy 
Paine Snow, who was born at Eastham, 
Massachusetts, in May, 1792, and died at 
Orleans, March 13, 1833, daughter of 
Stephen, Jr. and Martha (Smith) Snow. 
Among their children was Francis, of 
whom further. 

(VIII) Francis Linnell, son of Benja- 
min (2) and Mercy Paine (Snow) Linnell, 
was born at Orleans, Massachusetts, Au- 
gust I, 1815, and died at Orleans, June 14, 
1842. He married, January 25, 1838, 
Polly H. Baker, born at Boylston, Massa- 
chusetts, October 10, 1819, daughter of 
Obadiah and Polly (Higgins) Baker, and 
they were the parents of children, among 
whom was Benjamin Francis, of whom 
further. 

(IX) Benjamin Francis Linnell, son 
of Francis and Polly H. (Baker) Linnell, 
was born in Orleans, Massachusetts, May 
6, 1841, and died in 1914. He married, at 
Worcester, Massachusetts, November 30. 
1865, Sybil Bates Wheeler, who was born 
in Upton, in 1845, and died in Worcester, 
Massachusetts, September i, 1889, daugh- 



ter of Avery and Adeline (Bates) 
Wheeler, and they were the parents of 
two children: i. Walter Francis, born in 
Worcester, Massachusetts, January 7, 
1867, died September 28, 1891. 2. Her- 
bert Prescott, of whom further. 

(X) Herbert Prescott Linnell, son of 
Benjamin Francis and Sybil Bates 
(Wheeler) Linnell, was born in Worces- 
ter, Massachusetts, January 8, 1874. He 
is a graduate of the Worcester Polytech- 
nic Institute, receiving the degree of civil 
engineer, and he has followed his pro- 
fession in various parts of the United 
States and other countries. He was en- 
gaged for a time on the Panama Canal, 
and also was responsible for the most im- 
portant engineering works in the Philip- 
pine Islands. During the World War he 
served in a civilian capacity, in charge of 
the shipyards in the Fifth District. He 
is a member of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers. 

Mr. Linnell married, October 12, 1897, 
Josie Ada Harrington, daughter of Dan- 
iel and Jennie (Speers) Harrington, of 
Worcester, Massachusetts. They are the 
parents of three children: i. Herbert 
Harrington, born July 10, 1898. 2. Philip 
A., born April 14, 1900. 3. Gladys Jean- 
ette, born July 8, 1909. During the 
World War both of the sons received 
commissions in the United States Infan- 
try and are now members of the Reserve 
Corps. 



BELDEN, Frank Henry, Jr. 

After a wide and varied business ex- 
perience, Frank Henry Belden, Jr., of 
Springfield, is utilizing his skill and his 
ability in the management of the Mutual 
Magazine Agency, of which he is the 
proprietor. 

The Belden family is of ancient Eng- 
lish origin, the surname being derived 
from Bayldon or Baildon Common, a 



102 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



chapelry situated in the West Riding of 
Yorkshire, in the present township of 
Otley, Wapentake of Skyrack, overlook- 
ing the river Aire. The chapel stands on 
a hill about three hundred feet above the 
river, and the name is derived from terms 
meaning "Hill of the Beacon." Although 
the name and the town date back to about 
the year looo A. D., the Manor House 
called Baildon Hall appears to have been 
built in the year 1553, and is still in a 
good state of preservation. Some altera- 
tions were made in 1660 by Francis Bail- 
don, cousin of the American immigrant, 
and the cornice of the drawing room still 
bears his initials. The name was vari- 
ously spelled Bayldon, Baildon, Belding, 
Belden, etc., and the coat-of-arms of the 
Baildons of Baildon is as follows: Argent, 
a fesse between three fleurs-de-lis sable. 
These arms are still inscribed on a win- 
dow of Methley Hall, Yorkshire. It is 
interesting to note that Baildon was in 
the old Angle kingdom of Deira (550), 
whence came the immortal youth seen by 
Gragory at Rome, and has been the seat 
of the family of that name since the time 
of King John. The line of descent from 
Osmund, who died about the time of the 
Norman invasion of England, is traced 
as follows : 

(I) Osmund, died about 1066. 

(II) Gamel, son of Osmund, was liv- 
ing in 1086, and was, before the Conquest, 
owner of Bradford Manor, besides two 
others in Hazlewood, and was the owner 
of Thornhill Manor during the reign of 
King Edward. He was the King's thane 
at Kilnslet-on-Craven. 

(III) Ulf, son of Gamel, living in 1086, 
held two manors in Hazlewood before 
the Conquest, and succeeded Gamel as 
King's thane. 

(IV) Essulf-Fitz-Ulf, born about 1080, 
died about 1159, was an extensive land 
owner in West Riding, as is evidenced 



by the Domesday Book. He married 

Maude , and they were the parents 

of three children : Peter, born about 1105, 
died about 1159; John, born between 
1 120 and 1 130, living in 1184; and Rich- 
ard, of whom further. 

(V) Richard Fitz-Ulf, born between 
1 120 and 1 130, living in 1194, died about 
1200. He gave part of Baildon to his son 
Hugh, and was fined thirty-three shil- 
lings six pence for participating in the 
massacre of the Jews at York. He mar- 
ried Maude , and they were the 

parents of three children : Richard, 
Maude ; and Hugh, of whom further. 

(VI) Hugh de Baildon, son of Rich- 
ard and Maude Fitz-Ulf, was born about 
1 1 55. He married Margaret de Poole, of 
Farnley, daughter of Sorlo de Poole, and 
they were the parents of five children : 
Symon, of whom further; Sorlo, who \vas 
crushed by a mill wheel in 1231 ; Alan, 
who was chaplain at Baildon ; Richard ; 
and Hugh. 

(VII) Symon de Baildon. son of Hugh 
and Margaret (de Poole) de Baildon, was 
born between 1180 and 1195. His chil- 
dren were : Hugh ; William, of whom 
further; Joan; and Eleanor. 

(VIII) William de Baildon. called 
"The Forester," was born in 1212. and 
died in 1278. He married Agnes Blande, 
of Allerton, and they were the parents of 
three children : William, of whom fur- 
ther; Michael; and one other. 

(IX) William (2) de Baildon. called 
"The Provost," son of William (i) and 
Agnes (Blande) de Baildon. was born in 
1233. His children were: Henry, of 
whom further; William; and John. 

(X) Henry de Baildon, son of Wil- 
liam (2) de Baildon, "The Provost," was 
born in 1260, and died in 1328. He mar- 
ried Alice de Rodo, daughter of Adam 
de Rodo. and they were the parents of 
four children: William, born in 1284; 



103 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Adam, of whom further ; John ; and Wal- 
ter. The first four mentioned served in 
the Earl of Lancaster's Rebellion. 

(XI) Adam de Baildon, son of Henry 
and Alice (de Rodo) de Baildon, born in 
1285, died in the siege of Calais, in 1347. 
He was with the Earl of Lancaster in the 
Rebellion of Ighten Hill, in 1322; was a 
sergeant at Otley Manor in 1323-24; in 
1346 was granted land in Bolton Priory. 
His children were: John, of whom fur- 
ther; Richard, born in 1322; and Robert. 

(XII) John de Baildon, son of Adam 
de Baildon, was born in 1320, and died 
in 1366. He was an attorney in 1343, 
and his name appears on three army rolls 
in 1336, on a list of garrison, in France ; 
as an archer in Castle Poyelle ; and on 
the muster roll of Sir John de Beau- 
champ-. He married a daughter of Wil- 
liam Vavasour, and they were the par- 
ents of seven children : W^illiam, of whom 
further; Elizabeth; Robert; Richard; 
Adam, who was vicar of Yedyngham in 
1392; Mauger, Prior of the Order of St. 
Mary, at Carmel York, 1387; and John. 

(XIII) William (3) de Baildon, son of 

John and (Vavasour) de Baildon, 

was born between 1335 and 1340. and 
died in 1417. He was a Franklin, that is, 
a freeholder of large holdings and eligi- 
ble to large dignities, 1378-79. He mar- 
ried (first) Margaret de Thorner; (sec- 
ond) Isabel . His children were: 

Nicholas, of whom further ; Alice ; Henry ; 
and Isabel. 

(XIV) Nicholas de Baildon, son of 
William (3) and Margaret (de Thorner) 
de Baildon, was born betw-een the years 
1365 and 1370, and died about January, 
1437. He was collector for West Rid- 
ing in 1421. He married Joan Plumpton. 
daughter of Sir Robert Plumpton, and 
they were the parents of two children : 
Nicholas, of whom further; and William. 

(XV) Nicholas (2) de Baildon, son of 



Nicholas (i) and Joan (Plumpton) de 
Baildon, was born in 1396. In 1440 he 
was attached to Henry, Earl of Northum- 
berland. He married Harriet Janet 

, and they were the parents of three 

children : Richard, born in 1420, died in 
1438 ; Robert, of whom further ; and John. 

(XVI) Robert Baildon, son of Nicholas 
(2) and Harriet Janet ( ) de Bail- 
don, was born in 1427, and died in 1472. 
He married Anice Calverly, daughter of 
Walter Calverly, in 1446, and they were 
the parents of four children : Walter, of 
whom further; Robert; Thomas; Alice, 
who married Nicholas Fitzwilliam, of 
Bentley. 

(XVII) Walter Baildon, son of Rob- 
ert and Anice (Calverly) Baildon, was 
born in 1448, and died about 151 1. He 
married a daughter of Thomas Cargreave, 
and they were the parents of four chil- 
dren : John, of whom further ; William ; 
Richard ; Ann, who married William 
Threepland. 

(XVIII) John (2) Baildon, son of 

Walter and (Cargreave) Baildon, 

was born in 1468-69, and died at Don- 
caster, December 22, 1526. He was a 
juror at the Inquisition at York Castle 
in 1490, and at Knaresborough in 1496; 
attorney at Knaresborough in 1505-06; 
collector of Lay Subsidy at East Riding 
in 1512; and was admitted a member of 
the Guild of Corpus Christi, at York, in 
1517. He was mayor of Doncaster in 
1521. He married (first), in 1490, a 
daughter of John Haldenby, of County 
York ; (second) Mary Copley, daughter of 
Edward Copley, of Doncaster, October 
15, 1515; (third) a daughter of Sir Tho- 
mas Mauleveror. Children : John ; Rob- 
ert, of whom further ; Thomas ; Edward, 
born in 1516; Richard; Edith; Jennett. 

(XIX) Robert (2) Baildon. son of 
John (2) Baildon, was born in 1496, and 
died about 1558. He served King Henry 



104 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



as Groom of the Chamber, 15 18-19; was 
attendant to King Henry and Queen 
Catherine at the interview with Francis 
I of France on the Field of the Cloth of 
Gold, at Guisnos, in 1520; was inquisitor 
at York Castle, 1529-30; and was an 
archer, horsed and harnessed at Wyke, in 
1539. He married, about 1518, Margaret 
Mirfield, and they were the parents of 
two children: Nicholas, born about 1519, 
married Sybil Waterhouse ; George, of 
whom further. 

(XX) George Baildon, son of Robert 
(2) and Margaret (Mirfield) Baildon, was 
born in 1520, and died at Kippax, York- 
shire, in 1588. He lived at Methley in 
1567, and at Hardwick in 1574. He mar- 
ried Anne Folkingham, who died Decem- 
ber 17, 1577, and they were the parents 
of four children : Francis, of whom fur- 
ther; Hillary; Richard; Anne. 

(XXI) Sir Francis Baildon, son of 
George and Anne (Folkingham) Baildon, 
was born in 1560, and died June 20, 1622, 
at Monck Priston. He was Reeve (bail- 
iff) of Kippax in 1558, and was knighted 
by King James I at the coronation at 
Whitehall, July 23, 1603. He married 
(first) Frances Johnson, daughter of 
Henry of Leathley. She died May 21, 
1587, and he married (second) Margaret 
Goodrich, daughter of Richard Good- 
rich, of Ripston. She died September 22, 
1598, and he married (third) Isabel Tyr- 
whit. She died March 9, 1619, and he 
married (fourth) Anne Colby, who sur- 
vived him. Child of the first marriage : 
Francis, died March 9, 1612. Children of 
the second marriage : William, baptized 
January 4, 1580; Richard, of whom fur- 
ther; Cuthbert, born February 26, 1592, 
who was a lieutenant of the 67th Troop 
of Horse, under Cromwell ; Martin, born 
March 28, 1594, who was a major; Henry, 
born May 11, 1595; Thomas, baptized 
September 26, 1596; Muriel, born Sep- 



tember 30, 1598, married Edmund Chat- 
terton ; and Clare, married Lawrence 
Kighley. 

(XXII) Richard Baildon, immigrant 
ancestor, later known as Richard Belden. 

(The Family in America). 

(I) Richard Belden, son of Sir Francis 
and Margaret (Goodrich) Baildon, was 
baptized at Kippax, Yorkshire, May 26, 
1 591, He came to Wethersfield, Connec- 
ticut, in 1641, and died there in 1655. He 
took the oath of allegiance to the King, 
March 26, 1613, and served under Sir 
George Blundell at the siege of Breda, 
Holland. His name is signed to the oath 
of allegiance as Richard Bayldonn, with 
an extra "n" and a flourish. He was in- 
volved in controversies over the settling 
of his father's estate in 1624, after which 
his name disappears from English records, 
appearing in Wethersfield, Connecticut, 
records in 1641, where his name is spelled 
Baylden, and where he is on record as 
acquiring and disposing of land, and duly 
taking his part in the affairs of the com- 
munity until his death in 1635, when he 
left his family a considerable landed es- 
tate. The rapier, or gentleman's sword, 
mentioned among his effects was doubt- 
less a relic of his earlier days. He mar- 
ried, in England, and his children were : 
William, born in 1622, at Kippax, York- 
shire ; Samuel ; and John, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(II) John Belden, youngest son of 
Richard Belden, was born February 4, 
1630. He was admitted freeman in 1657, 
and enlisted as a trooper under Captain 
John Mason. He was active in town af- 
fairs, a merchant, and perhaps a tavern 
keeper, and when he died, June 27, 1675, 
at the early age of forty-six, he left an 
estate of £911. He wrote his name John 
Belden, and the names of his eight chil- 
dren are duly recorded. He married, 



105 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



April 24, 1657, Susanna (some records 
give Lydia) Standish, daughter of Tho- 
mas and Susanna Standish, and they were 
the parents of nine children: John, of 
whom further; Jonathan, Joseph, Samuel, 
Sarah, Daniel, Ebenezer, Margaret, and 
Lydia. 

(III) John (2) Belden, son of John (i) 
and Susanna (Standish) Belden, was 
born June 12, 1658, and died January 10, 
1714. He married, June 15, 1682, Dor- 
othy Willard, daughter of Josiah Willard, 
and her death occurred February 28, 
1754, at the age of ninety -one years. 
Their children were : Josiah ; John ; Ben- 
jamin ; Lidia, died young ; Hannah ; Lidia ; 
Stephen ; Ezra, of whom further ; and 
Dorothy. 

(IV) Ezra Belden, son of John (2) 
and Dorothy (Willard) Belden, was born 
November 27, 1699. He married, Febru- 
ary 13, 1721, Elizabeth Belden, daughter 
of Deacon Jonathan Belden, granddaugh- 
ter of John (2) Belden, and great-grand- 
daughter of Richard Belden, and they 
were the parents of seven children : Ezra ; 
Aaron, died young; Elizabeth; Aaron, of 
whom further ; Eunice ; Elizabeth ; and 
Lois. 

(V) Aaron Belden, son of Ezra and 
Elizabeth (Belden) Belden. was born in 
1731, and died December 9, 1816. In 1775 
he owned the mill at Rocky Hill, Connec- 
ticut, and on the site of the old mill his 
grandsons, Asahel and Leonard, erected 
a new mill in 1824. He married, Febru- 
ary 5, 1755, Mercy Belden, daughter of 
Matthew Belden, and she died December 
27, 1807, at the age of sevent)^-eight 
years. Their children were : Moses, born 
August 14, 1756; Benjamin, born October 
25. 1757; Asahel, born September 18, 
1759; Silas, born December 28, 1761 ; Ros- 
well, born January 21, 1763, died 181 7; 
Justus, of whom further ; Aaron, Jr., born 



September 14, 1771, died 1772; and 
Elizabeth. 

(VI) Justus Belden, son of Aaron and 
Mercy (Belden) Belden, was born in 
1767, and died October 19, 1846. He mar- 
ried (first) April 17, 1792, Mercy Riley. 
She died November 25, 1792. He mar- 
ried (second), December 3, 1797, Hannah 
Morton, who died October 17, 1854, aged 
seventy-seven years. To the first mar- 
riage was born a son, who died July 22, 
1797. To the second marriage were born 
seven children : Mary ; Solomon, bap- 
tized December 6, 1801 ; Thomas Morton ; 
Lucy, baptized May 4, 1806; Mercy, bap- 
tized September 18, 1808; Betsy, baptized 
November 18, 1809; and Aaron, of whom 
further. 

(VII) Aaron (2) Beldon, son of Jus- 
tus and Hannah (Morton) Belden, was 
baptized August 14, 1814, and died in 
New Haven, Connecticut, November 15, 
1893, aged eighty years. He was a black- 
smith by trade, but later worked in the 
shipping department of the Shoninger 
Piano Company, of New Haven, for sev- 
eral years. He was one of the first four 
policemen of the city of New Haven, 
serving on night duty for some time, and 
retired from active life about two years 
prior to his death. He was a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
and his religious affiliation was with the 
Episcopal Church of St. Thomas, parish 

of New Haven. He married (first) 

Fisher; (second) Harriet Macomber, who 
was born March 8, 1806, and died July 
15, 1888. Children: Gertrude; Francis; 
Virginia; Henry Francis, of whom fur- 
ther; and Watson. 

(VIII) Henry Francis Belden (later 
known as Frank H.), son of Aaron (2) 
Belden, was born in New Haven, Con- 
necticut, January 14, 1848. He received 
his education in the schools of New 
Haven, and when his formal school train- 



106 



ENC\'CLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ing' was completed, engaged in the paint 
business, continuing with one firm for a 
period of twenty' -one years. In 1884, in 
association with Frank J. Thompson, Mr. 
Belden established a paint business in 
New Haven, under the firm name of 
Thompson & Belden. The venture was 
successful, and in 191 1 was incorporated. 
Mr. Belden being at that time made treas- 
urer and later president. The latter of- 
ficial position he held until the liquida- 
tion of the company in 1914. at which 
time he retired from active life. He is a 
member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows; of the American Order oi 
United Workmen : of the Improved Order 
of Red Men ; the Republican League ; the 
Xew Haven Colony Historical Society ; 
and of the Quinipiac Club. He is also a 
member of the Dwight Place Congrega- 
tional Church, which he has served as 
treasurer for sixteen years. On May 26. 
1869, he married Minerva Jacobs, of Fair 
Haven. Connecticut, and they are the 
parents 01 two children : Frank Henry. 
Jr.. of whom further : and Arthur Glen- 
ney, born April i, 18S0, married, August 
II. 1918. Elizabeth Blight. 

(IX) Frank Henry Belden. Jr.. son of 
Henry Francis (later known as Frank 
H.) and Minerva (Jacobs) Belden. was 
born in Xew Haven. Connecticut. Janu- 
ary 8, 1871. He received his education in 
the public schools of Xew Haven, attend- 
ing the Hillhouse School and had the 
same principal as his father. He gradu- 
ated from the high school in 18SS. At 
the age of seventeen he began his busi- 
ness career as bookkeeper in the employ 
of Thompson & Belden. In 1898 he be- 
gan traveling for the firm, doing a job- 
bing business, and this he continued for 
a period of two and a half years. At the 
end of that time he went to Xewark, Xew 
Jersey, as store manager for the S. E. M. 
Rice Company, paint manufacturers, job- 



bers, and retailers, and this connection 
he maintained for three and a half years, 
and then returned to Xew Haven, where 
he was placed in charge of credits and 
collections for the firm of Thompson & 
Belden. On July 31, 1909. he again made 
a change, going to Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, as treasurer and manager of the 
D. W. Mellin Company, at that time 
wholesale and retail paint dealers. He 
was a member of the board of directors 
of the company, and remained with them 
until their liquidation in 1914. During 
1916 and 1917 he traveled in Connecticut 
and Western Massachusetts, introducing 
a special waterproofing material. During" 
the participation of the United States in 
the World War, he was for about a year 
and a half associated with the Credit Bu- 
reau of the Holyoke Chamber of Com- 
merce, and also serv-ed as secretary' and 
treasurer of the Western Massachusetts 
Association of Credit Men, of which he 
was one of the organizers. Later he be- 
came identified with the Fisk Rubber 
Company, and at the present time he is 
head of a large magazine agency, known 
as the Mutual Magazine Agency, located 
at Xo. 2SS Main street. Springrfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, and operating throughout 
Western Massachusetts. 

Politically Mr. Belden gives his allegi- 
ance to the Republican party, and has al- 
ways taken an active interest in the wel- 
fare of the communities in which he has 
lived. In Xew Haven he served on the 
Board of Aldermen for two years, and no 
appeal for support of any movement 
wisely planned for the public good failed 
to secure his hearth' cooperation. He was 
a member of the Westville Congrega- 
tional Church in Xew Haven, where he 
took an active part in the work of the 
organization, serv'ing as treasurer and as 
a member of the board of trustees. In 
X'ewark, Xew Jersey, he was a member 



10: 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of the First Congregational Church, in 
which he contributed a valuable share as 
president of the Christian Endeavor So- 
ciety and member of the board of deacons. 
He is now actively supporting the work 
of Faith Congregational Church, of 
Springfield, and rendering excellent serv- 
ice as a member of the board of deacons 
and superintendent of the Sunday school. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with Spring- 
field Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. 
On April ii, 1894, Mr. Belden mar- 
ried Lillian May Fenn, of Ansonia, Con- 
necticut, daughter of Lafayette and Har- 
riet (Mitchell) Fenn, and they are the 
parents of two children : Norwood Fenn, 
born in Newark, New Jersey, December 
18, 1901, and now associated with his 
father in the Mutual Magazine Agency ; 
and Carolyn, born in New Haven, Con- 
necticut, January 6, 1907. 



SMITH, Warren Algernon 

Warren Algernon Smith, manager of 
the warehouse of the E. O. Smith Com- 
pany, wholesale grocers, and a resident of 
Springfield since 1915, comes of very old 
Colonial stock, tracing his ancestry in 
this country to William Smith, who was 
in Connecticut as early as 1644. Numer- 
ous Smith families came to Connecticut 
at a very early date, and among the first 
settlers was a family of four brothers and 
a sister who settled in Hartford and vi- 
cinity. They were Mary, who married 
William Partridge; Christopher, who re- 
sided at Northampton and died without 
issue; Simon, of whom nothing further 
is known; Joseph, who settled in Hart- 
ford and was the father of fifteen chil- 
dren ; and William, immigrant ancestor 
of Warren Algernon Smith. There is no 
record of the parents of this group having 
come to America. The line of descent of 
the branch to which Mr. Smith belongs 
is traced as follows : 



(I) William Smith was born in Eng- 
land, and was among the first settlers in 
Connecticut, He married, in August, 
1644, Elizabeth Starling, and resided in 
Wethersfield, Farmington, and Middle- 
town, Connecticut. He died in January. 
1670, the father of nine children, among 
whom was Benjamin, of further mention. 

(II) Benjamin Smith, son of William 
and Elizabeth (Starling) Smith, was 
born in Farmington, Connecticut, in 1658, 
and became the progenitor of one of the 
prominent families of West Springfield. 
He bought a tract of land there Septem- 
ber 7, 1688, of John Pynchon, the present 
site of West Springfield, being then 
known as Pauquetuck. For several years 
he cultivated his farm there, but lived in 
Westfield near Joseph Mosely, Indian 
hostility making it unsafe to live in iso- 
lated farmhouses. Later he built his 
house on the farm, and at the brookside 
built a sawmill which is still preserved. 
He died in 1738, aged eighty years. He 
married Ruth Loomis, of Westfield, and 
their children were : William ; Ruth, mar- 
ried Samuel Taylor ; Samuel ; Elizabeth, 
married Ebenezer Miller; Rachel, married 
Samuel Morgan ; Jonathan, of further 
mention ; Job ; Mary, married Ebenezer 
Day. 

(III) Jonathan Smith, son of Benja- 
min and Ruth (Loomis) Smith, was born 
in 1697, at West Springfield, Massachu- 
setts. His home was built on an emi- 
nence at the junction of the two roads, 
east of the brook. He was a pious and 
strict Puritan, and a prominent citizen 
who took an active part in the affairs of 
his community. He died February 9. 
1772, in his seventy-fifth years, and the 
epitaph on his gravestone reads : "The 
virtuous father of a numerous offspring 
to whom he gave an example of piety and 
prudence." He married Margaret Ball, 
daughter of Samuel Ball, and they were 



108 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the })arents of seven children, all born at 
West Springfield: Jonathan, of further 
mention ; David, who resided at Pauque- 
tuck ; Solomon, who resided at West 
Springfield ; Caleb, who removed to Ver- 
mont ; Daniel, who lived on his father's 
homestead ; Margaret, who married Ste- 
phen Miller; and Simeon, who settled at 
New Lebanon Springs. 

(IV) Jonathan (2) Smith, son of Jon- 
athan (i) and Margaret (Ball) Smith, 
was born about 1725, and died in 1815. 
He inherited the Ball homestead, at West 

Springfield. He married Mercy , 

and became the father of seven children, 
among whom was Samuel, of further 
mention. 

(V) Samuel Smith, son of Jonathan 
(2) and Mercy Smith, was born March 
3, 1756, and died October 18, 1828. He 
married, November 28, 1780, Eunice Tay- 
lor, born July 31, 1760, died November 6, 
1822, and they were the parents of five 
children: Chester, Aretus, Lotan, Sam- 
uel ; and Algernon Sidney, of further 
mention. 

(VI) Algernon Sidney Smith, son of 
Samuel and Eunice (Taylor) Smith, was 
born in West Springfield, Massachusetts, 
March 21, 1796, and died November 27, 

i860. He married (first) Clarissa , 

who died April 5, 1832; he married (sec- 
ond) Abigail Sadert. To the first mar- 
riage five children were born : Joseph, 
born October 15, 1823, died November 

16, 1823; Jane Sheldon, born January 19, 
1825, died September 29. 1839; Ralph, 
born September 18. 1826; Colbridge 
Jerry, born July 25, 1828; and Josephus 
Jerry, born September 12, 1830. To the 
second marriage three children were 
born : Algernon Sidney, Jr., of further 
mention ; Daniel Webster, born August 

17, 1838; and Lucy Jane, born October i, 
1841. 

''VII) Algernon Sidney Smith, Jr., son 



of Algernon Sidney and Abigail (Sadert) 
Smith, was born in West Springfield, 
Massachusetts, November 20, 1833, and 
died April 12, 1903, in Westfield, Massa- 
chusetts. He received his education in 
the local public schools and at Wilbra- 
ham Academy. When the Civil War 
broke out he enlisted. May 31, 1861, in 
Company I, Tenth Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Volunteers, in which company he 
was a corporal. He was afterward trans- 
ferred to the Sixty-first Massachusetts 
Infantry, with which he served at City 
Point, Virginia, being allotted to the En- 
gineering Corps. After the close of the 
war, he removed to Feeding Hills, Mas- 
sachusetts, where he engaged in cigar 
making for a time, later removing to 
West Springfield. Here he conducted a 
retail milk route, delivering to the resi- 
dents of Springfield and West Spring- 
field. As he advanced in years, however. 
he decided to again make a change, and 
in 1892 went to Westfield and engaged in 
farming. Throughout the remainder of 
his life he was a resident of Westfield, 
and he continued to engage in farming 
until his retirement from active life. An 
energetic, capable man, he was highly es- 
teemed as a public-spirited citizen and 
was highly regarded by a large circle of 
friends and acquaintances. Fraternally 
he was affiliated with Hampden Lodge. 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; and 
with the Royal Arcanum. He was an 
active member of A. K. Wilcox Post, 
Grand Army of the Republic, and was an 
attendant of the Methodist church. 

Mr. Smith married (first) Cordelia 
Sibly, daughter of Samuel and Sophia 
(Upson) Sibly; (second) Edith Fay, of 
Wethersfield, Vermont, who died Febru- 
ary 23, 1907, daughter of Samuel and 
Louise (Herrick) Fay, Louise Herrick 
being the daughter of Ebenezer Herrick. 
The children of Algernon Sidney, Jr. and 



109 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Edith (Fay) Smith were: Louise E. ; 
Alice C. ; Bertha F. ; and Warren Alger- 
non, of further mention. 

(VIII) Warren Algernon Smith, son 
of Algernon Sidney, Jr. and Edith (Fay) 
Smith, was born in West Springfield, 
Massachusetts, August 2, 1886. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools 
of Westfield, attending the grammar 
schools and graduating from the high 
school. After completing his studies, he 
entered the employ of the Lane Trap 
Rock Company, in their branch quarries, 
continuing this occupation until Decem- 
ber, 1905, a period of six months. Feel- 
ing that larger opportunity was to be 
found elsewhere, he severed his connec- 
tion with the Lane Trap Rock Company 
and associated himself with the Pope 
Manufacturing Company, manufacturers 
of bicycles. Here he remained until Au- 
gust, 1906, when the Pope Manufacturing 
Company failed, and he was again obliged 
to make a change. For a short time he 
was employed in the store of Cooley 
Brothers, in Westfield, Massachusetts, 
and then he went to Southbridge, Massa- 
chusetts, where for a year and a half he 
was associated with the American Optical 
Company of that place. At the end of 
that time he again returned to Westfield, 
where he entered the employ of O. B. 
Parks as clerk in his store, which position 
he held for three years, subsequently be- 
ing employed for a few months in the 
store of R. P. Carrier, of Westfield. In 
191 3 he entered the employ of the Gov- 
ernment as distributing clerk in the mail- 
ing department of the Springfield Post 
Office. Here he remained for seven years, 
discharging the duties of his position with 
efficiency and faithfulness until 1920, 
when he became associated with E. O. 
Smith & Company, wholesale grocers, 
as manager of the warehouse, which posi- 
tion he still holds. 



Mr. Smith has resided in Springfield 
since 1915, and is known and esteemed 
among a large group of friends and asso- 
ciates. His fraternal affiliation is v»-ith 
Mount Moriah Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and he is also a member of the 
Orpheus Club, of Springfield. His relig- 
ious affiliation is with the Asbury Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, of which he is a 
steward, and in the work of which he is 
actively interested. He is also superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school. 

On October 12, 191 5, Mr. Smith mar- 
ried Margaret Forbes, of Dalton, Massa- 
chusetts, daughter of George and Sarah 
(Wilson) Forbes. 



WILLIAMS, Edwin Lester 

Edwin Lester Williams, of the F. K. 
Williams Company, printers, has been a 
resident of Springfield since he was four 
years of age, and has been identified with 
the printing business in that city since 
the completion of his school training. 
Mr. Williams comes of very old Colonial 
stock. The Williams patronymic is de- 
rived from the Belgia "Guild-helm," 
meaning "harnessed with gilded helmet." 
or, as other authorities assert, from "Wil- 
helm," the shield or defense of many. 
The family has been one of the most dis- 
tinguished in the history of Wales. 
Roger Williams, who founded Rhode 
Island, was one of its most illustrious 
members, and was the American pro- 
genitor of a large and widely distributed 
family. His descendants have taken a 
conspicuous part in the development of 
the New World. One of his grandsons. 
Rev. Elisha Williams, was the third presi- 
dent of Yale College ; W' illiams College 
was founded and named for another de- 
scendant ; and another, Hon. William 
Williams, was a famous general and a 
confidant of George Washington. The 
name has been conspicuous on the pages 



no 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of American history. There is a tradi- 
tion in the family that one of the progen- 
itors in America was a relative of Oliver 
Cromw^ell, and that he changed his name 
to Williams, emigrating to this country 
about the time of the English revolution. 
At any rate the place which he settled 
was called Cromwell and later Upper 
Middletown, Connecticut, from which 
line several settlers in various New Eng- 
land States were descended. 

Roger Williams, founder of the Rhode 
Island Colony, and of the notable Rhode 
Island family of the name, was born in 
England in 1609, and died in Rhode Is- 
land in 1683, son of James and Alice 
(Pemberton) Williams, the former a mer- 
chant tailor in London, where he died in 
162 1. Roger Williams was employed in 
some capacity by the great lawyer, Sir 
Edward Coke, who placed him at the 
Charterhouse School in 1621, and after- 
ward at Pembroke College, Cambridge, 
where he took a degree. He was ad- 
mitted to orders in the Church of Eng- 
land, but later became a friend and com- 
panion of John Cotton and Thomas 
Hooker, and adopting the most advanced 
views of the Puritans, prepared to leave 
England and come to the American col- 
onies. On December i. 1630, he em- 
barked at Bristol, on the ship "Lion," ac- 
companied by his wife Mary, and on 
February 5, 1631, arrived at Boston. 
Massachusetts. He was invited by the 
church at Salem to become the assist- 
ant of Pastor Skelton, but his radical 
views soon brought him into disfavor 
with the authorities, and in August, 163 1, 
he was installed as assistant pastor to 
Ralph Smith, of the Plymouth Colony 
Church. About this time, however, he 
was suspected of the "heresy of Anabap- 
tism." In 1633 he returned to Salem, ac- 
companied by several devoted members 
of his Plymouth congregation, and was 



soon settled as pastor of the church of 
Salem. He again came into disfavor by 
denying the validity of the charter 
granted by Charles I to the Company of 
Massachusetts Bay in 1629, claiming that 
the Indians and not the King owned the 
land and therefore had the right to give 
it away. He also maintained that neither 
church nor state, bishop nor king, nor 
any other human power had a right to 
interfere in matters of conscience. "Man 
is responsible to God alone," he said, antl 
denounced the law requiring every man 
to contribute to the support of the church. 
He was censured by the ministers of the 
colony, including his friends, Cotton and 
Hooker, but he denied their right to ex- 
ercise "soul jurisdiction." In July, 1635, 
he was summoned before the General 
Court to answer to charges of heresy, 
and in October of the same year ordered 
to leave the colony. The story of the 
founding of the colony of Rhode Island 
is too familiar to need repetition. Hav- 
ing been granted a tract of land on the 
Seekonk river by Massasoit, chief of the 
Pokanoket Indians, he was joined by his 
group from Salem in the spring of 1636, 
and they began to build. In order to 
avoid complications with the Plymouth 
Colony, however, they removed to the 
site of Providence, where they made their 
first settlement in June, 1636. This terri- 
tory was purchased by Roger Williams 
from the Narragansett chiefs, Canonicus 
and Miantonomi. In 1643 he went to 
England and obtained the charter for 
the Rhode Island and Providence settle- 
ments, which bears the date, March 14, 
1644. Through his executors a treaty 
was made with the Narragansetts, August 
4, 1645, and in 165 1 he again went to 
England on business pertaining to the 
government of the island of Rhode 
Island and Connecticut. Returning to 
Providence in 1654, he took part in the 



III 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



reorganization of the Colonial govern- 
ment in that year. On September 12, 
1654. he was chosen president of the 
Colony, which office he held until May, 
1658. During this time he secured toler- 
ation for the Quakers, who were begin- 
ning to come into New England, and this 
again brought him into conflict with the 
Massachusetts government. On July 8, 
1663, a new charter was granted to Rhode 
Island, under which Benedict Arnold 
was the first governor and Roger Wil- 
liams one of the assistants. In 1663 Mr. 
Williams was appointed commissioner 
for settling the eastern boundary, long 
in dispute between Plymouth and Massa- 
chusetts, and for the next fourteen years 
he was, for the greater part of the time, 
either a representative or an assistant, 
and in 1672 he was engaged in the famous 
controversy with the Quakers, of whose 
doctrines and manners he strongly dis- 
approved, though he steadfastly refused 
to persecute them. In King Philip's W^ar 
he accepted a commission as captain of 
the militia, though his advanced age pre- 
vented his taking the field. Little is 
known of the closing years of Roger Wil- 
liams' life. He survived most of his con- 
temporaries, dying at the advanced age 
of eighty-four, the precise date not being 
known. It must have occurred early in 
1683, for Mr. John Thornton, of Provi- 
dence, writing to Rev. Samuel Hubbard, 
of Boston, under date of May 10, of that 
year, says : "The Lord hath arrested by 
death our ancient and approved friend, 
Mr. Roger Williams, with divers others 
here." "Pie was buried under arms, with 
all the solemnity the colony was able to 
show," says Callender, but it is known 
that he passed his later years in poverty. 
He was a prolific writer, putting himself 
without reserve into his writings, in 
which those who wish may still become 
acquainted with the real man, Roger Wil- 



liams. The children born to Roger and 
Mary Williams were : Mary, Freeborn, 
Providence, Mercy, Daniel, and Joseph. 

Descendants of Roger Williams scat- 
tered throughout the New England States 
and into other parts of the country, and 
among them was another Roger Wil- 
liams, ancestor of Edwin Lester Williams. 

(I) Roger Williams was born in 1775, 
and died in West Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, June 8, 1850. He married Jennie 
Jones, who died May 28, 1850, and they 
were the parents of five children : Lester, 
of whom further; Nancy, born October 
30, 1798, died April, 1803 ; Theodorus, 
born October 14, 1800, died August, 1803 ; 
Theodorus, born August 19, 1803; and 
Nancy, born October 8, 1804. 

(II) Lester Williams, son of Roger 
and Jennie (Jones) Williams, was born in 
West Springfield, Massachusetts, July 18, 
1797, and died in 1880. He lived in what 
was known as the Rev. A. Joseph Lath- 
rop parsonage, supposed to have been 
erected about 1700, which he later razed, 
making way for the erection of a new 
residence on the old site in 1849. This 
site is now occupied by the West Spring- 
field High School. Lester Williams re- 
ceived his education in the public school 
of his district, and then became an ap- 
prentice to James Kent, with whom he 
learned the hatter's trade, and in which 
line he proved to be the most skilful of 
the several apprentices then working with 
Mr. Kent, later purchasing the establish- 
ment which he conducted as late as 1840, 
running a "shop" on the common. He 
was active in the public afifairs of the 
town, and held several local offices. He 
was made the ninth postmaster of the 
town, his commission being dated Au- 
gust 31, 1847, and he served four differ- 
ent terms in the Legislature, 1829, 1840, 
1849, and 1869. He was selectman from 
1836 to 1844, and town clerk and treas- 



112 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



urer from 1835 ^o 1847, and from 1843 to 
1847 served as treasurer alone. In 1844 
and again in 1871 he served as moderator 
of the town meeting, and he was also 
chairman of the Board of Assessors, and 
justice of the peace. Politically he was 
a staunch Jacksonian Democrat. He mar- 
ried, in September, 1820, Cynthia Becker, 
who died in West Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, February 25, 1895, aged ninety-four 
years, daughter of John Becker, who 
came to this country to fight with the 
Hessians in the War of the Revolution, 
he then being a lad of seventeen years and 
hired by the English Government. The 
children of Lester and Cynthia (Becker) 
Williams were: Cordelia Maria, born 
August 17, 182 1 ; Lester (2), of whom 
further ; Joseph Sprague, born December 
17, 1825; George, born August 21, 183 1 : 
Arthur B., a prominent lawyer of W^ash- 
ington, D. C, who was connected with 
the famous Star Route cases; Ellen 
Louise, born January 25, 1838; and Henry 
M., born January 21, 1841. 

(Ill) Rev. Lester (2) Williams, son 
of Lester (i) and Cynthia (Becker) Wil- 
liams, was born in West Springfield, 
Massachusetts, July 24, 1823, and died 
October 20, 1885. He received his early 
education in the public schools of West 
Springfield, and after preparing for col- 
lege under the tuition of the late Sanford 
Lawton entered Amherst College, from 
which he was graduated in 1844. He 
then studied law with the late E. D. 
Beach, in Springfield, and in 1846 was 
admitted to the Massachusetts State bar, 
going at once to Knoxville, Tennessee, 
where he was successfully engaged in 
practice until 1848. He was successful 
from the beginning, but feeling that he 
was called to use his talents in preaching 
the Gospel of the Christian religion, 
rather than in the legal profession, he 
gave up his practice in Knoxville, re- 
Mass — 12 — 8 I 



turned to Massachusetts, and after com- 
pleting a course in theology, in Newton 
Seminary, was ordained a Baptist min- 
ister, in Russell, Massachusetts, in Au- 
gust, 1851. Here he remained for three 
years, at the end of which time he took 
charge of the Baptist church in West 
Townsend, where for a period of six 
years he ministered to the people there, 
faithfully and ably, winning the devotion 
of his congregation and rendering a 
rarely sympathetic and valuable service. 
He then went to Holden, Massachusetts, 
where he spent six years more, going at 
the end of that period to Oswego, New- 
York, where he labored for several years, 
finally being called to the church in Fre- 
donia. New York, in 1873, where he re- 
mained until 1880. From the latter date 
to the time of his death he was a resident 
of West Springfield, Massachusetts. Dur- 
ing the Civil War he ser\^ed for some 
three years in the South. In 1865 he was 
superintendent of the Colored Refugee's 
Home, at Camp Nelson, Kentucky, and 
he was chaplain of the Mississippi Con- 
stitutional Convention in 1868. After re- 
tiring from the ministry, Mr. Williams 
did not cease to serve his fellowmen. For 
four years he was an influential member 
of the West Springfield School Commit- 
tee, serving as chairman of the board. In 
the spring of 1885 he was appointed 
chaplain of the jail, and the duties of that 
office he faithfully performed to the time 
of his death, which was a sad accident 
and brought deep sorrow to the entire 
community. While crossing a dry bridge, 
on his way to the school house, he was 
knocked to the street below by a switch 
engine which he did not hear until it was 
too late to do more than step aside. He 
survived the injury for eight days, his 
death occurring August 24, iSS^. He was 
greatly loved by his people while he was 
engaged in the ministry, and during the 

13 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



five years of his residence in West Spring- 
field won the love and esteem of a large 
number of friends and associates. He 
was a man of vigorous mind, original 
thought, and effective address, and in the 
pulpit he always found some fresh and 
helpful way of presenting the old mes- 
sages of the Gospel. The purity of his 
life, his thorough and conscientious hon- 
esty, love of peace, and his unostenta- 
tious charity and good will to men had 
won for him the affectionate regard of 
the community in which the closing years 
of his life were passed and had through- 
out his ministry been a powerful influ- 
ence for good. The resolutions adopted 
by the church of Fredonia most truly ex- 
press the esteem in which Mr. Williams 
was held not only in Fredonia, but in all 
the communities in which he lived and 
worked : 

Whereas, The sad news has reached us of the 
sudden death of Rev. Lester Williams, for seven 
years pastor of the Fredonia Baptist Church, we, 
the members thereof, do adopt the following : 

Resolved, That we most sincerely mourn our 
beloved brother and ex-pastor as one who was a 
true and steadfast friend, a wise and valued coun- 
sellor, a sympathetic and faithful spiritual guide 
and instructor ; and whose broad catholic im- 
pulses, whose ready and constant charities, and 
whose pure and consistent life had won the respect 
and love of this entire church and community. 

Resolved, That in his church and official labors, 
there was ever shown an unswerving loyalty to the 
distinctive principles of our faith, a fearless and 
untiring advocacy of the great reforms of our 
times, and a profound and conscientious devotion 
to the special work of the sacred office to which 
he was called, and that in this bereavement we 
believe that the Baptist ministry and denomination 
sustain a great loss. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
forwarded to the family of the deceased as an ex- 
pression of our regard in this, their hour of trial 
and deep affliction. 

Mr. Williams married (first) Frances 
L Clough, daughter of William Clough. 
She died in 1861. He married (second) 



in 1862, Anne E. Warren, of Holden, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Waterman 
Goulding Warren. To the first marriage 
two children were born : Francis Kellogg, 
of whom further; and Ned, who died 
young. To the second marriage one child, 
Waterman Lester, was born. 

(IV) Francis Kellogg Williams, son 
of Rev. Lester (2) and Frances L. 
(Clough) Williams, was born in Russell, 
Massachusetts, March 29, 1852. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools 
of West Springfield. When school days 
were over, he learned the printer's trade 
in Adams, New York, and later went to 
Oswego, New York, where he was asso- 
ciated with the Oswego "Press." From 
there he came to Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, associating himself with the Spring- 
field "Republican," leaving the latter con- 
nection to become editor of the old West- 
field "Newsletter." After a time he aban- 
doned the editorial field, and returning 
to Springfield opened a printing office, 
the business of which has grown and ex- 
panded as the years have passed. This 
concern is now known as the F. K. Wil- 
liams Company, and they manufacture 
abrasive wheel labels ; also manufacture 
paper gaskets used by machinery manu- 
facturers, sending these to all parts of the 
United States. Mr. W^illiams does com- 
mercial printing, labels, pads, etc., and is 
a large employer of labor, sending his 
product to all parts of the United States 
and Canada, Germany, Australia, and 
other European countries. Fraternally 
Mr. Williams is a member of the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, and his relig- 
ious affiliation is with the Baptist church. 

On July 9, 1874, Mr. Williams married 
Sarah Catherine Leonard, who was born 
in West Springfield, Massachusetts, 
March 25, 1852, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, June 30, 1920, daughter 
of Edwin and Rachel (Hughes) Leonard. 

14 



THE NEW YORK 
'PUBLIC LIBlURvl 







Qc^^/^ii^ r^ l^yisA^y-^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Edwin Leonard served as an officer in the 
Civil War. The children of Francis K. 
and Sarah C. (Leonard) Williams were: 
I. Mabel Ellen, born March 20, 1875; 
married, September 12, 1913, Carl C. 
Newcomb, a farmer in Ludlow, Massa- 
chusetts, and has one child, Madeline 
Frances, born February 7, 1915. 2. Edwin 
Lester, of whom further. 3. Rachel 
Frances, born August 9, 1886; married, 
March i, 191 1, James F. McGee, engaged 
in the automobile business, and has one 
child, Bettina Frances, born June 26, 

1913- 

(V) Ed\yin Lester Williams, son of 
Francis Kellogg and Sarah Catherine 
(Leonard) Williams, was born in West 
Springfield, Massachusetts, February 24, 
1881, and came to Springfield with his 
parents when he was four years of age. 
He attended the public schools of the lat- 
ter city, and then entered Bay Path 
Business Institute. Upon the completion 
of his course in the latter institution, he 
began his business career in association 
with his father, who was engaged in the 
printing business. This connection has 
been maintained to the present time, Mr. 
Williams being made a partner in the 
business in 1914, which is conducted un- 
der the name of the F. K. Williams Com- 
pany. Mr. Williams is well known in 
Springfield, both as a successful business 
man and as a public-spirited citizen. He 
is a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons, having been raised in Esoteric 
Lodge, of Springfield, in 1922. He is a 
member of the Automobile Club, and his 
religious affiliation is with St. James 
Methodist Church. 

On June 22, 191 5, Edwin Lester Wil- 
liams married Ruby Gertrude Stratton, 
born in Worcester, Massachusetts, but a 
resident of Springfield, Massachusetts, 
daughter of George L. Stratton, and they 
are the parents of one child, Arthur Les- 
ter, born May 20, 1920. 



NICHOLS, Elijah 

Among those business men of Spring- 
field who have completed their work and 
passed on to a well earned reward is 
Elijah Nichols, formerly of the firm of 
Taylor, Nichols & Company, stationery 
manufacturers, who was a resident of this 
city for nearly a quarter of a century, and 
who during that period, both as a suc- 
cessful business man and as an earnest, 
helpful Christian character, contributed 
a valuable share to the life of his com- 
munity. 

The Nichols family has from very early 
times been prominently identified with 
the history of New England, representa- 
tives of the family having been among 
the first settlers of Massachusetts, Con- 
necticut, and Rhode Island, from which 
colonies their descendants have scattered 
throughout New England and into almost 
every State in the Union. An Enos 
Nichols settled in the mountains of Vir- 
ginia, from which place he was driven by 
hostile Indians, losing his lands and prop- 
erty. He then located in Connecticut, 
near the New York State line, and later 
drifted to Milton, Connecticut, where he 
died, after rearing a family of children 
which included three sons. A Thomas 
Nichols settled in the town of Cambridge 
before 1638, at which time he removed 
to Hingham, Massachusetts. Another 
Thomas Nichols came to Massachusetts 
before 1655, and settling in Maiden, 
Massachusetts, reared a family of eight 
children, seven of whom were sons. Jos- 
eph Nichols, probably a brother of Thom- 
as Nichols, was married in April, 1660, to 
Mary Felt, daughter of George Felt, at 
Maiden, Massachusetts. Thomas Nichols, 
of Maiden, married Mary Moulton, and 
removed to Amesbury, Massachusetts, 
where he had a seat in the meeting house 
in 1667; belonged to the train band in 
1680; and died in 1720. Another immi- 

15 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



grant ancestor of the name was Sergeant 
Francis Nichols, born in England, who 
was among the first settlers of Stratford, 
Connecticut, where he was living as early 
as 1639. He had a military training and 
belonged to the Horse Guards of London, 
it is believed. He was closely related to 
Colonel Richard Nicholls, the first Eng- 
lish governor of New York, owned land in 
Southold, Long Island, and was twice 
married, his second wife being Anne, 
daughter of Barnabas Wines, of Southold. 
His children included three sons, Isaac, 
Caleb, and John. 

(I) Elijah Nichols, great-grandfather 
of Elijah Nichols, of Springfield, was one 
of the descendants of the early repre- 
sentatives of the family who settled in 
Connecticut. He married and reared a 
family of five children : Faxon, of whom 
further; Schuyler; George; Franklin; 
and Emeline, who married Rams- 
dell. 

(II) Faxon Nichols, son of Elijah 
Nichols, was born in Connecticut, about 
1790, and died in i860, aged seventy 
years. He was a farmer. He married 
Salome Eddy, of Ware, Massachusetts, 
who became the mother of two children : 
Asbury; and Elijah, of whom further. 

(III) Elijah Nichols, son of Faxon 
and Salome (Eddy) Nichols, was born in 
West Thompson, Connecticut, in 1824, 
and died in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
January 17, 1892. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native 
city. Soon after 1847 he removed to 
Webster, Massachusetts, and became as- 
sociated with a hardware business. In 
1859 he removed to Putnam, Connecticut, 
where he remained until 1869, and then 
went to Palmer, Massachusetts. In 1870 
he came to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
and formed a connection with the firm of 
P. P. Kellogg & Company, envelope man- 



ufacturers. This connection he main- 
tained for some years, at the end of which 
period he became associated with the 
Springfield Envelope Company. Four or 
five years later he associated himself with 
the Powers Paper Company and it was he 
who gave their papeterie industry its first 
start. For a time he was also associated 
with the Union Ink and Paper Company. 
In 1882 he became a member of the firm 
of Taylor, Nichols & Company, station- 
ery manufacturers, of which firm he later 
became senior partner, with his son, 
Franklin Nichols, and John A. Murphy 
as associates. 

Mr. Nichols was a successful business 
man and an indefatigable worker. While 
modest and retiring in his habits, he was 
exceedingly generous and found great 
pleasure in giving. The churches and 
charitable institutions of the city owed 
much to his quiet benevolence, and the 
church with which he was connected at 
Thompson, Connecticut, was the regular 
recipient of his generous support. Two 
or three days before Christmas and be- 
fore Thanksgiving it was his habit to visit 
the markets and instruct the shop keep- 
ers to send turkeys to any needy families 
they might happen to know of and send 
the bill to him. He was also a valued 
friend and adviser to many of the young 
men of his acquaintance. 

In 1847, Mr. Nichols married Sarah 
Leach, of Killingly, Connecticut, who was 
born in 1827, and died in March, 1899, 
daughter of Lyman and Lois (Trusdale) 
Leach, and they were the parents of three 
children: Franklin, of whom further; 
Mary I., of whom further; and John A., 
of whom further. 

(IV) Franklin Nichols, son of Elijah 

and Sarah (Leach) Nichols, was born 

in Thompson, Connecticut, November 18, 

1847, ^nd di^d '" Springfield, Massachu- 

16 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



setts, March 24. 1908. Pie received his 
education in the local schools of his native 
district, and when yet a boy went to Pal- 
mer, Massachusetts, where he entered 
government employ as clerk in the post 
office. In 1870 he came to Springfield 
and first entered the employ of the Old 
Springfield Envelope Company. After a 
time he severed his connection with that 
company and became associated with the 
Powers Paper Company, still later going 
to the Union Ink &: Paper Company. 
With his father, he then became identified 
with the firm of Taylor, Nichols & Com- 
pany, of which concern he and his 
brother, John A. Xichols, became man- 
agers. He continued to conduct this sta- 
tionery manufacturing business until 
1901, when he sold his interests to Mur- 
phy & Sonther, and retired from busi- 
ness. P'or thirty years he was promi- 
nently identified with the business inter- 
ests of the city, and both as an upright, 
successful business man and as a pro- 
gressive citizen and a loyal friend, he 
made for himself a large place in the es- 
teem of his associates. He early identi- 
fied himself with Grace Church, to which 
he freely gave both economic support and 
the more valuable contribution of per- 
sonal service. As a member of its board 
of trustees, he served for many years, 
giving of his business experience and 
ability in full measure, and he also served 
as treasurer during a long period. A man 
of upright life, squaring his conduct by 
those Christian ideals which make for 
strength and stability of character, his 
passing left a sense of loss, long and 
deeply felt. 

On November 13, 1871, Mr. Xichols 
married Mary Hancock, of Suffield, Con- 
necticut, and she resides in Springfield, 
Massachusetts. They were the parents 
of two sons: i. Faxon E., born Novem- 



ber 30, 1873; a resident of Springfield; 
was with Taylor, Xichols & Company for 
some years, later with the Springfield 
Fire and Marine Insurance Company for 
fourteen years, then retired ; married, 
August 7, 1895, Ellen A. Stowell, and 
they are the parents of two children : Lois, 
born April 14, 1902, and Ruth, born Feb- 
ruary 3, 1904. 2. Frank I., born May 27, 
1878; was a resident of White Plains, 
New York, now of New York City ; mar- 
ried Mattie Laing, and they are the par- 
ents of one child, Salome, born April 25, 
1902. 

(IV) Mary I. Nichols, the only sur- 
vivor of the family of Elijah Nichols, 
resides in the family home. X'o. in Euclid 
avenue, Springfield. 

(IV) John A. Nichols, son of Elijah 
and Sarah (Leach) Nichols, was born 
in Palmer, Massachusetts, September 27, 
1865, and died April 3. 1921, in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts. He removed to 
Springfield with his parents when a child 
three years of age, and in the public 
schools of that city he received his educa- 
tion. After his graduation from the Cen- 
tral High School, he became identified 
with the firm of Taylor, Nichols & Com- 
pany, manufacturers of stationery, whose 
business was housed in a factory on Cross 
street, where a part of the plant of the 
Milton Bradley Company is now located. 
This large and successful business was 
organized by his father, and after the 
death of the latter, John A., with his 
brother Franklin, continued to direct the 
management of the business until they 
both retired. 



CARLSON, Ernest Frederick 

Ernest Frederick Carlson, of the Ernest 
F. Carlson Company, contractors and 
builders, has erected many important 
structures in Springfield and vicinity, in- 



17 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



eluding the new buildings of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College at Amherst, 
and the Massachusetts State buildings at 
the Eastern States Exposition grounds. 

John Frederick Carlson, father of Mr. 
Carlson, was born in Sweden, and died in 
New Haven, Connecticut, in May, 1912, 
aged forty years. He attended school in 
Sweden, but was to a large extent self- 
educated, since he left school at an early 
age and throughout his life continued to 
read and study. In 1890, when a lad of 
about eighteen years, he came to America 
and went to East Longmeadow, Massa- 
chusetts, where he first found employ- 
ment chopping wood at seventy-five cents 
a day. Later he was employed in a 
machine shop at New Haven and still 
later was employed in machine shops 
in New Haven and in New Britain, 
Connecticut. For a time he was as- 
sociated with the H. G. Thompson Com- 
pany, engaged in the manufacture of 
metal saws, and he was also identified 
with the Straus Adler Company and the 
Ulman Company, engaged in the manu- 
facture of corsets. In all of these con- 
nections he improved every opportunity 
for increasing his skill and his fund of 
general information, and he also steadily 
and thriftily saved a fair proportion of his 
earnings. Eventually, he worked his way 
into larger and more congenial lines, and 
finally became identified with the Scandia 
Mutual Insurance Company, of Chicago. 
He was made general agent for that com- 
pany in New England, with headquarters 
at New Haven, and had built up a large 
and successful business, when death 
terminated his career at the early age of 
forty years. He was naturally a great 
student, and he made himself thoroughly 
familiar not only with the political system 
of this country but with its history as 
well. He early became a naturalized citi- 



zen and always took an active interest in 
the political affairs of the country. He 
was a natural leader of men, and exerted 
a political influence in local affairs which 
made itself felt in the interests of civic 
righteousness. He was intimately ac- 
quainted with Governor Lake, Governor 
Lilly, ex-Congressman Butterworth, and 
many other men of prominence, and he 
was most highly esteemed among a host 
of friends and associates. He was regis- 
ter of voters in New Haven, and was well 
known in fraternal circles, being a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and several other fraternal or- 
ders, in all of which he was an active 
worker. His religious affiliation was with 
the Swedish Lutheran church, w4iich he 
served as treasurer. His early passing 
was deeply mourned by a very large cir- 
cle of associates who felt that his early 
death represented a real loss to the com- 
munity in which he had lived and in 
which he had worked so effectively and 
so helpfully. He married, in Sweden, Jo- 
hanna Larson, who w^as born in Sweden, 
and they were the parents of four chil- 
dren : Carl, who died in infancy ; Ernest 
Frederick, of whom further ; George Wal- 
fred ; and Carl Edwin. 

Ernest Frederick Carlson, son of John 
Frederick and Johanna (Larson) Carlson, 
was born in New Haven, Connecticut, 
July 5, 1894. He attended the public 
schools of New Haven until he was four- 
teen years of age, and then left school and 
was for a short time employed in the Sar- 
gent hardware store in New Haven. He 
then returned to his studies in school, and 
after a time began the study of mechan- 
ical drafting, continuing to w-ork in the 
latter line until he had mastered its prin- 
ciples. He was employed in a plumbing 
supply house for a year, and then became 
identified with the Sperry Engineering 
18 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Company as draughtsman. This connec- 
tion he maintained for a period of three 
years, from 1909 to 1912, and at the end 
of that time severed his connection with 
the Sperry Engineering Company and 
came to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he became associated with the 
Fred T. Ley Company, a big contracting 
concern. He remained here for about a 
year, then went with the Casper Ranger 
Construction Company, of Holyoke, as 
general manager of their vSpringfield office. 
By 1914 he felt that the time had come 
to engage in business for himself, and in 
that year, under the name of Ernest F. 
Carlson Company, contractors and build- 
ers, he began the construction of import- 
ant buildings. He was successful from 
the beginning, and since that time has 
completed many large and important con- 
tracts, including, besides the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College buildings al- 
ready mentioned, the Pontoosuc School 
building at Pittsfield, the mortuar)^ chapel 
at the Green River cemetery, Greenfield; 
the Massachusetts State building at the 
Eastern States Exposition grounds ; the 
Smith Springfield Body plants at West 
Springfield ; the F. M. West Box Com- 
pany's shop ; the Westinghouse plant ; the 
Torrington Needle Company, of Spring- 
field ; the C. F. Church Manufacturing 
Company in Williamansett ; the Kalstead 
Taylor Company's plant at Brattleboro, 
Vermont ; three large blocks in West- 
field ; also the plant of the Westfield 
Manufacturing Company. During the 
World War, the Ernest F. Carlson Com- 
pany did some thirty jobs at the Spring- 
field Armory, also erected the Harley 
plant in East Springfield ; the Duckworth 
Chain plant in Mill street; the Philips 
Theatre at the "X"; the Strand The- 
atre on Eastern avenue ; the new West 
Spring^eld Trust Company building in 



West Springfield ; and the Monitor stores 
adjoining the Trust Company building, 
as well as innumerable garages. He built 
a hospital at Ticonderoga, New York, also 
four stone buildings for the Southworth 
Paper Company, of Woronoco, also 
erected buildings for F. W. Woolworth, 
of Springfield and Holyoke, and a large 
number of other buildings of equal im- 
portance. Mr. Carlson is well known in 
Springfield both as a successful business 
man and as a highly esteemed friend and 
associate. He is a member of Springfield 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; of 
Morning Star Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons ; of Springfield Council, Royal 
and Select Masters ; of Springfield Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar ; and Melha 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine ; and of Bela Grotto. 
He is also a member of the Winthrop 
Club and of the Nayasset Club. 

On October 23, 1914, Mr. Carlson mar- 
ried Anna Lillian Seaholm, who was born 
in Hartford, Connecticut, daughter of 
Walford Seaholm, a native of Germany. 
and they are the parents of two children r 
Janice, born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, April 12, 1918; and Ernest Freder- 
ick, Jr.. born January 28. 192 1. 



CLAPP, Charles Malcolm 

Charles Malcolm Clapp, of Springfield, 
comes of very old Colonial stock, the im- 
migrant ancestor of his branch of the 
family having come from England to 
Dorchester in 1633. The surname Clapp 
goes far back to the days of King Canute 
for its origin, to Osgood Clapa, one of 
Canute's Danish courtiers who flourished 
between the years 1007 and 1036, and 
from whose name the present form 
"Clapp" is derived. This worthy noble 
of those far away days had a country 
place known as Clapham, in County Sur- 



119 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



rey, England, after the Danish invasion, 
and as the centuries passed the ancient 
seat of the family in England was located 
at Salconbe, in Devonshire, where im- 
portant estates were owned for many cen- 
turies by this family. They were of noble 
rank, and various coats-of-arms were 
borne by different branches of the family, 
those of the branch to which Charles Mal- 
colm Clapp belongs being: First and 
fourth three battle axes, second sable a 
griffin passant argent, third sable and 
eagle with two heads displayed with a 
border engrailed argent. The American 
family is descended from six immigrants 
— Edward and Captain Roger Clapp, sons 
of William Clapp, and John, Nicholas, 
Thomas, and Ambrose, sons of Nicholas 
Clapp, of Venn Ottery, the fathers, Wil- 
liam and Nicholas, being brothers. These 
six cousins all came to Dorchester, Mas- 
sachusetts, where they became one of the 
most prominent and influential family 
groups in the community. They started 
for America in the "Speedwell" and 
would have landed ahead of the "May- 
flower," but the vessel sprung a leak and 
had to put back for repairs. Charles 
Malcolm Clapp is descended from 
Nicholas Clapp, son of Nicholas Clapp, 
the line of descent being traced as fol- 
lows : 

(I) Nicholas (2) Clapp, son of Nicholas 
(i) Clapp, of Venn Ottery, Devonshire, 
England, was born at Dorchester, Eng- 
land, in 1612, and later removed with his 
parents to Venn Ottery. Arrived at the 
age when he might choose for himself his 
course in life, he decided to try his for- 
tune in the new land of promise which at 
that time was stirring the imagination 
and the hopes of courageous spirits. He 
married his cousin, Sarah Clapp, daughter 
of his uncle, William Clapp, and with her 
set sail for America, arriving in Dor- 



chester, Massachusetts, in 1633. An able 
and energetic man, he soon became 
prominent in the affairs of the town, and 
was chosen to fill various town offices; 
was juror in 1653; and was a deacon in 
the church. Their early life in America 
was not without its keen sorrows, how- 
ever, for in this new land of great oppor- 
tunity his wife, Sarah (Clapp) Clapp, 
died. He later married (second) Abigail 
Sharp, widow of Robert Sharp, of Brook- 
line, Massachusetts. He lived in the north 
part of Dorchester, on the west side of 
what is now Boston street, south of the 
Five Corners, and died there suddenly 
on November 24, 1679. His children 
were: i. Sarah, born December 31, 1637, 
died young. 2. Nathaniel, of further men- 
tion. 3. Ebenezer, born 1643, died in Mil- 
ton, July 31, 1712. 4. Hannah, born 1646, 
married, October 14, 1668, Ebenezer 
Strong, of Northampton. 5. Noah, born 
July 15, 1647, removed to Sudbury, mar- 
ried (first), July 26, 1690, Mary Wright; 
(second) Mary . 

(II) Nathaniel Clapp, son of Nicholas 
(2) Clapp, was born September 15, 1640, 
at Dorchester, and died there May 16, 
1707. He was highly respected, and 
greatly trusted by his fellov/ townsmen, 
was one of the two town constables in 
1671, and lived during most of his life 
at Five Corners. He married, March 31, 
1668, Elizabeth Smith, died September 19, 
1722, daughter of Lawrence Smith, and 
they were the parents of six children, 
among whom was Ebenezer, of further 
mention. 

(III) Ebenezer Clapp, son of Nathan- 
iel and Elizabeth (Smith) Clapp, was 
born at Dorchester, Massachusetts, Octo- 
ber 25, 1678, died May 20, 1750. He was 
a worthy, useful, and active citizen, 
owned a large estate at the north angle 
of Five Corners, Dorchester, and in vari- 



120 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ous sections of the town, at Blue Hills, 
and in Stoughton. He married (first) 
Hannah Clapp, born September 13, 1681, 
died August 9, 1747, daughter of Elder 
Samuel Clapp, and granddaughter of 
Roger Clapp, one of the pioneers of Dor- 
chester. He married (second) November 
13, 1749, Hannah Eddy, of Boston. Eight 
children were born to the first marriage, 
among whom was Roger, of further men- 
tion. 

(IV) Roger Clapp, son of Ebenezer 
and Hannah (Clapp) Clapp, was born in 
Dorchester, Massachusetts, April 28, 1721, 
and died August i, 1807. He married, 
about 1748, Susanna Wales, of Dorches- 
ter, Massachusetts, and they were the 
parents of children, among whom was 
Nathaniel, of further mention. 

(V) Nathaniel (2) Clapp, son of Roger 
and Susanna (Wales) Clapp, was born 
July 13, 1761, and died March 27, 1826. 
He married, November 24, 1791, Hannah 
Glover, who died February 25, 1829, and 
they were the parents of children, among 
whom was Enos, of further mention. 

(VI) Enos Clapp, son of Nathaniel (2) 
and Hannah (Glover) Clapp, was born 
May 31, 1794, and died in the fall of 1877. 
He married, July 18. 1834, Adaline Cas- 
sell, of Dorchester, who died October 3, 
1868, aged fifty-four years. Among their 
children was Alexander, of further men- 
tion, 

(VII) Alexander Clapp, son of Enos 
and Adaline (Cassell) Clapp, was born 
in Dorchester, IMassachusetts, December 
29, 1838. He was courageous and enter- 
prising, and after engaging in the boot 
and shoe business in Boston for a time 
went to Chile, South America, in 1862. 
He was then a young man of twenty-four 
years. Only once did he return to his 
native place, at which time he remained 
about a month, then went to New York. 



where he took passage for .South America, 
and was never heard of again. He mar- 
ried Mary Parker Grant, born in Woburn, 
Massachusetts, and they became the par- 
ents of one child, Frederick Howard, of 
further mention. 

(VIII) Frederick Howard Clapp, son 
of Alexander and Mary Parker (Grant) 
Clapp, was born in Stoughton, Massachu- 
setts, November 3, 1858. He attended 
the schools of his district, and then went 
to work in a grocery store in Auburndale, 
Massachusetts. Steady, dependable, and 
thrifty, his business career has demon- 
strated the truth that these qualities are 
the most valuable assets for the young 
and ambitious man to possess. He held 
that position for ten years and then 
bought out the business. As owner and 
manager, he then continued the business 
for ten years more, at the end of which 
time he sold out and went to farming at 
Norfolk, Massachusetts. Several years 
later he gave up farming for a time and 
went to Atlantic, Massachusetts, where 
he did carpenter work for the Telephone 
Company and for others. The lure of 
the land has always been felt strongly by 
Frederick H. Clapp, however, and of late 
years he has gone back to the soil, engag- 
ing in farming at Center Barnstead, New 
Hampshire. He married, in 1879, Char- 
lotte Jane Sumner, of Milton. Massachu- 
setts, daughter of Edmund and Jane 
(Davenport) Sumner, and they are the 
parents of five children: i. Mary Flor- 
ence, who married Oswald Greenfield, 
and has a son, Charles Howard, born July 
21, 1912. 2. Frederick Roger, married 
Amy Florence Terrell, and has a son, 
Kenneth Lawrence, born July 15, 1912. 

3. Charles Malcolm, of further mention. 

4. Philip Howard. 5. Marion Sidney, 
married Theodore S. Dahlquist. and has 



121 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



one son, Theodore George, born June 22, 

1912. 

(IX) Charles Malcolm Clapp, son of 
Frederick Howard and Charlotte Jane 
(Sumner) Clapp, was born in Auburn- 
dale, Massachusetts, December 14, 1887. 
He received his education in the schools 
of Newton, Massachusetts, and since that 
time has had a wide and varied business 
experience. Upon leaving school, he fol- 
lowed farming for a few years and then, 
at the age of eighteen, went to Atlantic, 
Massachusetts. Here he became associ- 
ated with the maintenance department of 
the New England Telephone Company, 
his work being the assembling of tele- 
phones and switchboards. Capable and 
eflficient, he worked up to the position of 
foreman, with headquarters in Boston. 
For five years he remained with this com- 
pany, and then went to New Castle, New 
Hampshire, where he engaged in the oc- 
cupation of gardening, in the employ of 
the Hotel Wentworth. After a short time 
spent in this way, he again entered a new 
field, this time entering the employ of the 
General Vehicle Company, of Long Is- 
land City, with headquarters in Boston. 
After seven years' experience in this 
work, he decided to try business for him- 
self, and opened an electric garage in 
Providence, Rhode Island, which he con- 
ducted for two years. He then came to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, where for 
three and a half years he gained a still 
wider experience in association with the 
Electric Vehicle Company, acting as fore- 
man. He then felt ready to make his sec- 
ond venture in business for himself, and 
opened a garage for electric automobile 
service. This he conducted for a time, 
then accepted a position with Ranch & 
Lang, builders of electric automobiles, in 
charge of their battery department. Here 
he remained until December 25, 1922, 



when he resigned. On June i, 1923, he 
removed to Center Barnstead, New 
Hampshire, where he had purchased a 
farm of twelve acres and has since been 
engaged in farming. Politically he votes 
independently. 

On November 21, 1909, Mr. Clapp mar- 
ried Ann Leona Bradlee, of Woburn, 
Massachusetts, daughter of John Edward 
and Mary Pauline (Bowe) Bradlee. Mr. 
and Mrs. Clapp have an adopted son, 
Philip Joseph Raymond Clapp, born De- 
cember 17, 1918. 



CHASE, Edward Sibley 

Numbered among the prominent busi- 
ness men of Springfield is Edward Sibley 
Chase, of the E. S. Chase & Company 
concern, engaged in selling bonds and 
securities throughout Western Massa- 
chusetts, who is also a director in the 
West Virginia Utilities Company, and 
the Southern Cities Utilities Company, 
and has been a resident of Springfield 
during the greater part of the past twelve 
years. 

Mr. Chase is a descendant of a very 
old English family which traces its an- 
cestry far back to the early years of Eng- 
lish history, and is said to have come into 
England from Normandy. It is sug- 
gested that the name was propably La 
Chasse, as in the old English records it is 
spelled Chaace and Chaase, which in the 
fifteenth and sixteenth centuries was 
modified to the form which is now most 
commonly used — Chase. A long search 
has established beyond a reasonable doubt 
the fact that Aquila (2) Chase, the Amer- 
ican immigrant ancestor, was from Ches- 
ham, in Buckinghamshire, some thirty 
miles northwest of London, through 
which runs a rapidly flowing river, the 
Chess, which gives the place its name. 
The ancestry of Aquila (2) Chase is 
22 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



traced back seven generations in Eng- 
land, and the Chase coat-of-arms is re- 
corded as follows : Gules four crosses 
patence argent (two and two), on a can- 
ton azure a lion rampant or. The Eng- 
lish and American lines of descent are 
traced as follows : 

(I) Thomas Chase, of Chesham, was 
the descendant of a family already ancient 
and for a long time seated at that place. 
He married and reared a family of chil- 
dren, among whom was John, of further 
mention. 

(II) John Chase, son of Thomas Chase, 
was also a resident of Chesham, and he 
also married and reared a family, among 
whom was Matthew, of further mention. 

(III) Matthew Chase, son of John 
Chase, was born in Chesham, in which 
place he continued to reside. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Bould, daughter of Rich- 
ard Bould, and they were the parents of 
the following children : Richard, mar- 
ried Mary Roberts ; Francis ; John ; Mat- 
thew ; Thomas, of further mention ; 
Ralph ; William ; and Bridget. 

(IV) Thomas (2) Chase, son of Mat- 
thew and Elizabeth (Bould) Chase, was 
a resident of the Hundrich parish, in 
Chesham. He married and reared a fam- 
ily of children, all born at Hundrich : 
John, baptized November 30, 1540; Rich- 
ard, of further mention ; Agnes, baptized 
January 9, 1551 ; William ; and Christian. 

(V) Richard Chase, son of Thomas 
(2) Chase, was born in Hundrich, Ches- 
ham, England, where he was baptized 
August 3, 1542. He married, April 16, 
1564, Joan Bishop, and they were tlie 
parents of the following children, born at 
Hundrich, and baptized on the dates fol- 
lowing: Robert, September 2, 1565; 
Henry, August 10, 1567; Lydia, October 
4, 1573; Ezekiel, April 2, 1575; Dorcas, 
March 2, 1578; Aquila, of further men- 
tion; Jason, January 13, 1585; Thomas. 



July 18, 1586; Abigail, January 12, 1588: 
and Mordecai, July 31, 1591. 

(VI) Aquila Chase, son of Richard 
and Joan (Bishop) Chase, was baptized 
at Hundrich, Chesham, England, August 
14, 1580. He married and reared a fam- 
ily of two children: Thomas; Aquila (2),. 
of further mention. 

(VII) Aquila (2) Chase, son of Aquila 
(i ) Chase, and immigrant ancestor of the 
family in this country, was born in 1618. 
He was a mariner, probably employed by 
his uncle or his brother, Thomas Chase, 
who was in 1626 part owner of the ship 
"John and Francis." He was a resident 
of Hampton, New Hampshire, as early 
as 1640, from w-hich place he removed to 
Newbury, Massachusetts, in 1646, when 
he was granted four acres of land for a 
house lot, and six acres of marsh, on con- 
dition that he go to sea and serve the 
town with his boat for a period of four 
years. He was a ship master. He died 
December 27, 1670, aged fifty-two years, 
his will being dated September 19, 1670. 
He married Anne Wheeler, daughter of 
John Wheeler, and she married (second). 
June 14, 1672, Daniel Mussiloway. She 
died in May, 1688. Children of Aquila 
(2) and Anne (Wheeler) Chase: Sarah,, 
married Charles Annis ; Anna, born July 
6, 1647; Priscilla, March 14. 1649; Mary. 
February 3, 1651 ; Thomas, July 25. 1654: 
John, November 2, 1655 I Elizabeth, Sep- 
tember 13, 1657; Ruth. March 18, 1660: 
Daniel, December 9, 1661 ; Moses, of 
further mention. 

(VIII) Moses Chase, son of Aquila (2) 
and Anne (Wheeler) Chase, was born 
December 24, 1663. He married (first), 
November 10, 1684, Ann Follansbee ; 
(second), December 13, 1713. Sarah Ja- 
cobs. Children of first marriage : Moses 
(twin), born September 20, 1685, died 
young; Daniel (twin), born September 
20, 1685 ; Moses, of further mention ; 



123 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Samuel, born May 13, 1690; Elizabeth, 
born September 25, 1693; Stephen, born 
August 29, 1696; Hannah, born Septem- 
ber 13, 1699; Joseph, born September 9, 
1703 ; and Benoni. 

(IX) Moses (2) Chase, son of Moses 
(i) and Ann (Follansbee) Chase, was 
born January 20, 1688. He married and 
reared a family of children, among whom 
was Seth, of further mention. 

(X) Seth Chase, son of Moses (2) 
Chase, married (first) Elizabeth Bartlett, 
who died July 22, 1787. Married (sec- 
ond), March 17, 1788, Mrs. Abigail Marsh, 
who was the first white child born in 
Sutton, Massachusetts. Children, all of 
the first marriage, were : Joshua ; Brad- 
ford, of further mention ; Seth, Elizabeth, 
Josiah, Rebeckah, and Rachel. 

(XI) Bradford Chase, son of Seth and 
Elizabeth (Bartlett) Chase, was born 
August 8, 1741. He married, June 21, 
1763, Abigail Sibley, and they were the 
parents of eight children : Nathan, of 
further mention ; Elizabeth. Elias. Abi- 
gail, Huldah, Peter, Samuel, and Luke. 

(XII) Nathan Chase, son of Bradford 
and Abigail (Sibley) Chase, was born 
April 18. 1764. He married, December 
II, 1788, Mehitable Goldthwaite, of 
Northbridge, Massachusetts, and their 
children were: Huldah. born in 1790; 
Lois, born 1792; Nabby, born 1794; 
Charles, born 1796; Ruth, born 1801 ; 
Luke, born 1802; Elias. of further 
mention. 

(XIII) Elias Chase, son of Nathan and 
Mehitable (Goldthwaite) Chase, was 
born May 13, 1805. He married. April 9, 
1829, Adeline Aldrich, and among their 
children was a son. Sibley, of further 
mention. 

(XIV) Sibley Chase, son of Elias and 
Adeline (Aldrich) Chase, was born in 
Sutton, Massachusetts, May 30, 1834, and 
died August 27, 1908. He was a farmer 



of Northbridge Center, Massachusetts, 
an able, successful man, who took an 
active part in the affairs of his commu- 
nity, and was highly esteemed by his as- 
sociates. He married (first) Sarah A. 
Seaver; (second) Susan F. Day. His 
children were: Delano E., of further 
mention ; Daniel S., Susan A., George 
C, Sarah F., and Elmer E. 

(XV) Delano E. Chase, son of Sibley 
Chase, was born in Northbridge, Massa- 
chusetts, February 28, 1839. He received 
his education in the public schools of his 
native district, and then engaged in the 
general store business, which for forty 
years he successfully conducted, fifteen 
years in Northwood Center, Massachu- 
setts, and the last twenty-five years at 
Whiting Station or Lynnwood. During 
the past ten years he has been in Gov- 
ernment employ as postmaster at Whit- 
ing Station (Lynnwood). Fraternally he 
is a member of the Masonic order and of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
associated with the lodge of Whitings- 
ville. He is an attendant of the Baptist 
church. On November 23, 1880, he mar- 
ried Emma Louise Batcheller, of North- 
bridge, Massachusetts, who was born 
June 17, i860, daughter of Edward 
Forbes and Louise (Southwick) Batch- 
eller, and who traces her descent from 
Joseph Batcheller, who came to this coun- 
try in 1636. The children of Delano E. 
and Emma Louise (Batcheller) Chase 
are : Edward Sibley, of further mention ; 
and Mabel, who married Arthur M. Ross, 
of Worcester, formerly of Providence, 
Rhode Island. 

(XVI) Edward Sibley Chase, son of 
Delano E. and Emma Louise (Batchel- 
ler) Chase, was born at Northbridge Cen- 
ter, Massachusetts, January 6, 1885. He 
received his early education in the public 
schools of his native town and in the Ux- 
bridge High School, and then entered 



124 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Oberlin College, where he continued his 
studies for three years. Upon the termi- 
nation of his college course, he engaged 
in the work of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association, becoming associated 
with the branch located at the Brooklyn 
Navy Yard, as social secretary, a respon- 
sible position which he efficiently filled 
for a year, and then went to Pennsyl- 
vania, as general secretary of the local 
branch, remaining there for a year and 
gaining valuable experience as well as 
rendering worthy service. At the end of 
that period he left Pennsylvania and 
went to Dalton, Massachusetts, as general 
secretary of the Young Men's Christian 
Association of that place, maintaining 
that connection for a period of two years. 
In 1910 he decided to make a change, and 
coming to Springfield, Massachusetts, en- 
gaged in social work for the Young Men's 
Christian Association, continuing for a 
year and a half, at the end of which time 
he entered a new field, associating him- 
self with the Columbia Insurance Com- 
pany and with the Travelers' Insurance 
Company, as selling agent. Later he be- 
came identified with the bond house of 
E. F. Pitman & Company, continuing for 
a time, and in 1914 w^ent into business 
for himself, selling bonds and securities. 
In March, 1920, he incorporated under the 
name of E. S. Chase & Company, and 
since that time has been doing an exten- 
sive business throughout Western Mas- 
sachusetts. In addition to the responsi- 
bilities of his own business concern, Mr. 
Chase is also a director in the West Vir- 
ginia Utilities Company, also the South- 
ern Cities Utilities Company. He is a 
member of Esoteric Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, all the York Rite bodies, 
and also Lodge of Perfection of the Scot- 
tish Rite bodies, and the Shrine. He is a 
member of the Business Men's Club, the 



Fish and Game Club, Springfield Country 
Club, the Automobile Club, and retains 
his interest in his first field of work by 
membership in the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association, where he renders valu- 
able service. He is also a member of the 
tennis committee of the Springfield Coun- 
try Club, and his religious affiliation is 
with Faith Church. 

On May 19, 191 1, Edward Sibley Chase 
married Dora Dolby, who was born in 
England, daughter of Edward Bertram 
and Elizabeth (Weston) Dolby, and they 
are the parents of two children : Edward 
D., born March 2, 1912; and Philip Batch- 
eller, born March 6, 1916. 



SELBY, Howard Williams 

Howard William Selby, general man- 
ager of the Eastern States Farmers' Ex- 
change, comes of an old Virginia family. 

(I) James Shelby (as the name was 
spelled in early days), grandfather of 
Howard W. Selby, was born in Vir- 
ginia, on the East Shore, about 1830, 
and died in 1920, at the advanced 
age of ninety years. He was a 
farmer, was also known as an ex- 
cellent hunter and fisherman, and was 
highly esteemed among a large group of 
friends and acquaintances. He married a 
Mrs. Phillips, and they were the parents 
of eleven children : William J. ; Joseph 
Wilson, of whom further ; Wesley T. ; 
Harvey ; Arthur ; Kate ; Eliza ; Ida ; Mary, 
deceased ; Margaret, deceased ; and one 
who died in infancy. 

(II) Joseph Wilson Selby, son of 

James and (Phillips) Shelby, was 

born in Sharpsburg, Maryland, in 1868, 
and at the present time (1922) is a resi- 
dent of Rhodesdale, Maryland. He re- 
ceived a practical education in the public 
schools of his native district, and when 
his school training was completed en- 



125 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



"gaged in farming for a time. Later he 
realized that the greater profits go to the 
man who sells rather than to the man who 
produces ; accordingly he gave up farming 
and entered the wholesale produce busi- 
ness as a commission merchant in Phila- 
delphia. For twenty years he conducted 
a large and prosperous business in that 
line, remaining in Philadelphia through- 
out that period. At the end of that time 
he returned to the occupation of his first 
active years and again became a farmer, 
which line of work he followed to the 
time of his retirement. Mr. Selby is a 
member of a Methodist Episcopal church 
In Philadelphia, which he serves as a 
member of the board of trustees, and has 
served in various official capacities. He 
married Alice Williams, of Galestown, 
Maryland, daughter of William H. Wil- 
liams, and they are the parents of two 
children : Howard Williams, of whom 
further; and Carl Wilson, deceased. 

(Ill) Howard Williams Selby, son of 
Joseph Wilson and Alice (Williams) 
Selby, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 28, 1891. He received his 
early education in the public schools of 
his native city, graduating from the high 
school of that city. He then entered Dick- 
inson College, at Carlisle. Pennsylvania, 
from which he was graduated in 1913 
with the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of his college course, 
he began his business career as secretary 
and treasurer of the Starkey Produce 
Company of Philadelphia, which connec- 
tion he maintained until 1917, when he 
came to Springfield, Massachusetts, as 
general manager of the Eastern States 
Farmers' Exchange, of which he was one 
of the organizers. This organization has 
been a very important one in the agricul- 
tural sections of the East, and represents 
a constructive eflfort to bring into closer 



relations and place upon a more equitable 
foundation the interests of producer and 
distributor. The organization includes 
the six New England States and New 
York, New Jersey, and Delaware. The 
object of the organization is agricultural 
improvement, and this object it seeks to 
attain through cooperative buying and 
marketing. Mr. Selby organized the Penn- 
sylvania Vegetable Growers' Association, 
of which he is a past president, and from 
1916 to 1919 he was president of the 
Vegetable Growers' Association of x'\mer- 
ica. The latter organization represented 
an investment of half a billion of dollars 
in greenhouses and out-of-door market 
gardens, and was the medium through 
which much of the more advanced ideas 
and methods of vegetable culture was 
transmitted to a great number of individ- 
uals and concerns. Mr.- Selby has been 
deeply interested in the standardization of 
cooperative organization in the United 
States and Europe, and through extensive 
contributions to farm journals has 
reached large numbers of agriculturists 
with helpful ideas and suggestions. 

Mr. Selby is a member of University 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Philadelphia, in which order he holds the 
thirty-second degree, Scottish Rite, and 
is also a member of Melha Temple, Anci- 
ent Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, of Springfield, Massachusetts. 
Lie is a member of Alpha Chi Rho college 
fraternity, and is well known in club cir- 
cles, being a member of the Rotary Club, 
of which he is a director and secretary, 
and from which he was a delegate to the 
convention held in Edinburgh, Scotland, 
in 1921 ; member of the Nayasset Club, 
of Springfield ; of the City Club, of New 
York; Poor Richard Club, of Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania ; and Boston City 
Club, of Boston, Massachusetts. His re- 



126 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ligious affiliation is with Trinity Metho- 
dist Church, of which he is a local 
preacher and which he serves as a mem- 
ber of the official board. He is also chair- 
man of the finance committee, and was a 
delegate to the World Conference held 
in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1920. 

On January i, 1916, Howard Williams 
Selby married Ethel Wagg, of Collins- 
wood, New Jersey, daughter of Alfred 
Wagg, D.D., and of Sarah (Jefifries) 
Wagg. Mr. and Mrs. Selby are the par- 
ents of four children : Howard Williams, 
Jr., born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
February 7, 1918; John Horace, born 
November 11, 1919; and two others who 
died in infancy. 



BILL, Raymond Russell 

Among the well known and successful 
business men of Springfield is Raymond 
Russell Bill, secretary and treasurer of 
the Raymond R. Bill Company, engaged 
in the installation of heating plants and 
ventilating systems, and in mill repair- 
ing. Mr. Bill is well known in Masonic 
circles, and is highly esteemed among a 
very large group of business associates 
and personal friends. 

The Bill family is a very old one, trac- 
ing its origin to very early times in Eng- 
land, the name being derived from a kind 
of battle-ax known as a "bill," and first 
used to designate an early ancestor who 
was skillful in the use of that weapon. 
The family originally came from Den- 
mark, and located in Shropshire, Eng- 
land, where for some five centuries it has 
been numerous and prominent, also in 
Wiltshire and Staffordshire. Dr. Thomas 
Bill, born 1490, was an attendant of Prin- 
cess Elizabeth, also of Henry VIII and 
Edward VI. 

His son, William Bill, LL.D., was born 
in Hertfordshire about 1515. Many hon- 



orary degrees were conferred upon him. 
In June, 1560, he was installed the first 
dean of Westminster, and was the only 
person who ever held at the same time the 
three important positions of Master of 
Trinity, Provost of Eton, and Dean of 
Westminster. He died in July, 1561, and 
was interred in Westminster Abbey, where 
to-day his altar and tomb can be found, 
and an inscribed tablet to his memory. 

(I) John Bill, born 1576, was a well 
known publisher of London, "publisher to 
King James First, Most Excellent Majes- 
tic" in 1613. He published a collection 
of the works of the King himself, of which 
only one copy now exists in this country, 
and it can be seen in the New York City 
Library. He printed Bibles and Prayer 
Books, and copies of the New Testament. 
A number of these Bibles can be found in 
the American Bible House in New York 
City, carefully preserved in a private 
room, under lock and key. John Bill mar- 
ried (first) Anne Mountford, authoress of 
a book entitled "Mirror of Modestie," 
published in 1621. She died May 3, 1621, 
aged thirty-three years. He married (sec- 
ond) Joan Franklin, of Throwley, County 
Kent. Children of first marriage were: 
John, of further mention ; Anne ; Charles, 
who succeeded his father in the publish- 
ing business ; Henry ; and Mary. The 
Bill coat-of-arms is as follows : 

Amis — Ermine, two wood bills (battle-axes) 
sable with long handles proper in saltire, a chief 
azure, a pale or, charged with a rose gules be- 
tween two pelicans' heads erased at the neck 
argent. 

(II) John (2) Bill, son of John (i) and 
Anne (Mountford) Bill, came to this 
country with his wife Dorothy before 
1635, and their children, John and Marie, 
came in 1635, John coming in the ship 
"Hopewell" and Marie in the ship 
"Planter." John Bill died in 1638. Chil- 



127 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



dren : James, born in England in 1615; 
Thomas, born about 1618; Philip, of fur- 
ther mention ; John, born in 1622 ; and 
Mary (or Marie), born in 1624. 

(III) Philip Bill, son of John (2) and 
Dorothy Bill, was born in England about 
1620, and died July 8, 1689. He came to 
America while still a young lad, and re- 
sided first at Pulling Point in Boston, 
later going to Ipswich, from which place 
he removed, late in 1667 or early in 1668, 
to "Pequot on the Little Fresh River" 
(later New London). He became the 
owner of a large amount of real estate. 
He died July 8, 1689. He married Han- 
nah . Children of Philip and Han- 
nah Bill: Philip, Mary, Margaret, Samuel, 
John, Elizabeth, Jonathan, and Joshua, 
of further mention. 

(IV) Joshua Bill, son of Philip and 
Hannah Bill, was born October 6, 1675, 
in the section of New London then known 
as Groton, and which in 1736 was a part 
of Ledyard, and died in 1735. He was a 
very prominent man in Groton, and it was 
said of him that there was "scarce a 
single public transaction or record in 
which he was not a prominent actor nor 
could a half dozen pages be turned in 
earlier records of Groton without his 
name appearing." He was, apparently, 
unusually well educated, and besides be- 
ing an extensive landowner and farmer, 
learned the blacksmith's trade. During 
the middle and later years of his life his 
time was devoted mostly to the duties of 
public office. He married (first) Novem- 
ber I, 1699, Joanna Potts, who was born 
in May, 1679, and died March 3, 1718, 
daughter of William Potts, of New Lon- 
don. He married (second) October 4, 
1719, Hannah Swodel, daughter of Wil- 
liam Swodel, of Groton. Children of the 
first marriage were : An infant ; Joshua ; 
Edward Benajah ; Mary ; Phineas, of fur- 



ther mention ; Naomi ; Orpah ; Hannah ; 
Sarah; Esther; Joanna; and Phebe. 

(V) Phineas Bill, son of Joshua and 
Joanna (Potts) Bill, was born in that part 
of Groton now within Ledyard, Connecti- 
cut, September 3, 1720, and died in Febru- 
ary, 1780. He was a cooper by trade, and 
lived in the "Phineas Bill House." He 
was placed under the guardianship of B. 
Davis upon the death of his father, when 
he was a lad of fifteen years, and grew up 
to be an honorable and industrious citi- 
zen, enjoying the respect and confidence 
of his neighbors in a high degree. He 
married Mehitable Woodworth, and they 
were the parents of seven children : Phin- 
eas, Mehitable, Mary, Benajah, of further 
mention ; Joshua ; Gurdon ; and a daugh- 
ter who died in infancy. 

(VI) Benajah Bill, son of Phineas and 
Mehitable (Woodworth) Bill, was born 
in Groton, Connecticut, June 29, 1760, and 
died at Lyme, May 22, 1842. In earlier 
life he resided on Meeting House Hill, in 
the present town of Ledyard (then Gro- 
ton), but later removed to Lyme, Con- 
necticut, where he was engaged in farm- 
ing. He was also a cooper by trade and 
followed that occupation for a time in 
earlier years. He married, January 17,. 
1782, Content Park, who was born Feb- 
ruary 4, 1761, and died May 27, 1845, and 
they were the parents of ten children : 
Polly, Lodowick, of further mention ; 
Eunice Park ; Alexander Tullius Frank- 
lin ; Sarah ; Elisha Satterlee ; Nelson Ho- 
ratius ; Park Allyn ; Lyman Edgecomb ; 
and an infant. 

(VII) Judge Lodowick Bill, son of 
Benajah and Content (Park) Bill, was 
born October 9, 1784, and after 1805 re- 
moved to Lyme, Connecticut, where he 
resided for over eighty years. His frugal 
and industrious habits, his uprightness 
and fidelity in business transactions, with 

28 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



his practical common sense and his social 
talents, won him a high place in the con- 
fidence and esteem of his associates. Be- 
ginning life under somewhat adverse cir- 
cumstances, he became a prominent citi- 
zen, serving as deputy sheriff, justice of 
the peace, and finally as judge of probate, 
which last named office he retained until 
disqualified by age. He gave his support 
to the Republican party, and represented 
his district in the State Legislature. With 
all his public duties, he was a successful 
farmer and an extensive dealer in wool. 
He married, October 20, 1805, Betsy Geer, 
of Ledyard, Connecticut, a descendant of 
the Rev. John Wright, and they were the 
parents of ten children : Elizabeth ; Julia 
Ann ; Polly ; Hiram Geer ; John Wright ; 
Benajah Park ; James Alexander, of fur- 
ther mention ; Ellen Jane ; Lucy Stark ; 
and Gilbert Lafayette. 

(VIII) Captain James Alexander Bill, 
son of Judge Lodowick and Betsy (Geer) 
Bill, was born in Lyme, Connecticut, 
March 30, 1817. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools. At twenty 
years of age he engaged in the book busi- 
ness, traveling through the West with 
great success, and in 1842 established 
himself in Philadelphia as a book pub- 
lisher. The enterprise met with marked 
success, as did practically all of his un- 
dertakings, and in this line he continued 
for twenty years. During the greater 
part of that time he was also engaged in 
agricultural activities, to which he 
brought the same zeal and enthusiasm 
that were characteristic of his business 
career in Philadelphia. He was early 
made an officer of the Connecticut State 
Board of Agriculture, and was a large 
exhibitor at the State fairs, where his 
droves of Devon cattle, and his flocks of 
Spanish Merino and South Downs sheep 
won a country wide reputation. He was 
Mass — 12 — 9 



a leading officer in the County Agricul- 
tural Society from its beginning, and was 
one of the most influential agriculturists 
in the State. In 1849 he was elected to 
represent the Lyme district in the State 
Legislature, by the Democratic party ; in 
1852 he was elected to represent his dis- 
trict in the State Senate ; and in 1867 he 
was again elected to represent the Lyme 
district in the House. He was never a 
candidate that he did not win the election, 
and in political life as in other fields of 
activity, there seemed for him to be "no 
such word as fail." In early life he was a 
captain in the State Militia, and had com- 
mand of the local military organization. 
He married, August 26, 1839, Ann S. 
Lord, who was born April 7, 1820, daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Phebe (Burnham) Lord, 
of Lyme, and they were the parents of 
twelve children: Elizabeth; Geer; Phebe 
Burnham; Mary Jane; Prudence Ann; 
Rebecca Lord ; Lodowick ; James Alex- 
ander, Jr., of further mention ; Kansas Ne- 
braska ; Lecompton Constitution ; Wil- 
liam Warren ; and Jefferson Davis. 

(IX) James Alexander Bill, Jr., son of 
Captain James Alexander and Ann S. 
(Lord) Bill, for more than a quarter of a 
century prominently identified with the 
business, social, political, and educational 
life of Springfield, Massachusetts, was born 
April 16. 1852, at Lyme, Connecticut. He 
died at his home in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, July 15, 1909. He was reared in 
his native town and received his early 
education in the public school which he 
supplemented by much home reading and 
study. He had a strong desire to study 
law and would have done so had he been 
able. Beside law and history, he was 
much interested in finance and began the 
study of bookkeeping as a home study. 
This was the beginning of his becoming 
an expert accountant in later years. 
129 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



His home influence and surroundings 
tended toward frugality, honesty and self- 
reliance. To stimulate these, the father 
gave the boy, in early life, hard manual 
tasks to perform on the farm, obliging 
him to assume considerable responsibility 
in directing and leading the men in his 
employ. In this way the youth early 
learned habits of industry, faithfulness to 
duty, tactfulness in dealing with men, 
and the value of money in its use. The 
father strongly believed in giving the 
growing boy regular tasks to perform, in- 
creasing in responsibility with his years, 
and also encouraging the habit of self- 
reliance in the matter of providing his 
own spending money. 

When nineteen years of age, he was en- 
gaged as clerk and purser on a freight 
and passenger steamer plying daily on 
the Connecticut river between Hartford 
and Saybrook Point. He continued this 
for four summer seasons, thus earning the 
money to enable him to attend Pough- 
keepsie Business College, from which he 
graduated in the spring of 1874. The fol- 
lowing year Mr. Bill came to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, as freight agent of the 
Connecticut Central railroad at the time 
the road was opened to traffic. A year 
later he entered the employ of the Union 
Envelope Company as bookkeeper. When 
the Union Envelope Company was con- 
solidated in 1878 with the National Pape- 
terie Company Mr. Bill became book- 
keeper of the combined companies. He 
was a man of marked persistency and ex- 
ceptional business ability. Consequently 
he gradually rose to a position of im- 
portance in the company. 

AVhen P. P. Kellogg retired from the 
firm, Mr. Bill was made a member of the 
firm, and later became treasurer and man- 
ager of the corporation when it removed 
to its present location at Orleans and 



Quincy streets. Later, Mr. Bill sold his 
interests in the National Papeterie Com- 
pany with the intention of retiring from 
business, but he could not reconcile him- 
self to inactivity, and he became inter- 
ested in the Springfield Knitting Com- 
pany, holding the offices of secretary, 
treasurer and manager at the time of his 
death. He was also secretary of the Blake 
Manufacturing Company, and was inter- 
ested in the Rush Cutlery Company until 
it was dissolved. 

Mr. Bill was an ardent worker in the 
Royal Arcanum, being a member of Pyn- 
chon Council, of Springfield, but as a 
whole he was not a club man and prefer- 
red to make his home his club. In poli- 
tics he was a Democrat and one always 
in accord with the best interests of his 
party; a conservative rather than a radi- 
cal. He was unanimously indorsed for 
the Common Council from Ward 2 by 
Democrats and Republicans, and held a 
seat in the Council for five consecutive 
years. During his term of service, he was 
the means of the City Government appro- 
priating money to make the use of the 
City Library free to all residents. He was 
offered the mayoralty nomination of his 
party several times, as he was offered 
other offices, but declined. He was a 
member of the Fire Commission for three 
years, and was for three years on the 
School Board. He was a tireless worker 
in everything he undertook. 

j\Ir. Bill was a member of the Soldiers' 
and Sailors' x\id Committee, organized at 
the time of the Spanish-American War for 
the purpose of collecting and distributing 
money and needed supplies for the use of 
the Second Regiment on their return from 
the war, and while in temporary encamp- 
ment at Montauk Point. Mr. Bill spent 
several days with the soldiers, doing all 
in his power to relieve the sickness and 



130 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



suffering among them. Upon their return 
he also cared for them and their families, 
when necessary. Mr. Bill was an attend- 
ant of the State Street Baptist Church, 
giving freely of his time and means, and 
was frequently one of the teachers of the 
young men's Bible class, in addition to 
teaching a class of his own. 

Mr. Bill married, October 2, 1879, Ella 
Beckwith, daughter of Alfred P. and 
Sarah C. Beckwith, of Lyme, Connecti- 
cut, and granddaughter of Andrew and 
Nancy (Hudson) Beckwith, also of Lyme. 
They were the parents of one son, Ray- 
mond Russell, of further mention. 

The Beckwith family originated in 
Scotland by the marriage of Sir Hercules 
de Malabisse, a descendant of one of the 
Norman followers of William the Con- 
queror, and Lady Dame Beckwith Bruce, 
daughter of Sir William Bruce, who in- 
herited a title and lands from his ances- 
tor, Sir Robert Bruce, the progenitor of 
the royal Bruces of Scotland, Lady Beck- 
with Bruce inherited an estate called 
"Beckwith" and because of a desire to 
perpetuate this name, the husband was 
obliged to change his name for it, by a 
marriage contract dated 1226. Mathew 
Beckwith came to this country in 1635, 
and settled at Saybrook Point, at the 
mouth of the Connecticut river. Mrs. Bill 
descended from this line, direct. 

In summarizing Mr. Bill's business and 
political career, sagacity was manifest in 
all concerns in which he was called to act 
a part. In speaking of Mr. Bill, his wife 
said : "Upon his death, there was a pass- 
age of Scripture which fastened itself 
upon my mind, as a thoroughly fitting 
eulogy, namely: 

I have fought a good fight, 
I have finished my course, 
I have kept the faith." 



(X) Raymond Russell Bill, son of 
James Alexander, Jr. and Ella (Beckwith) 
Bill, was born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, February 24, 1888. He received his 
early education in the public schools of 
his native city. Upon the completion of 
his course in the local schools, he became 
a student in the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, and continued his studies there 
until 1908, when he became associated 
with his father in the knitting business 
under the firm name of the Springfield 
Knitting Company. After the death of his 
father, in 1909, he took charge of the busi- 
ness as office manager, retaining that posi- 
tion for a year, at the end of which time 
he was incapacitated by typhoid fever and 
pneumonia. The effects of his illness un- 
fitted him for business for a year, and 
when he was again able to engage in active 
life he took a position as bookkeeper for 
the Milner Manufacturing Company. In 
1913 he organized the Raymond R. Bill 
Company, of which he was made secre- 
tary and treasurer, and those official posi- 
tions he has continued to hold to the 
present time (1923). The company in- 
stalls all kinds of heating plants and ven- 
tilating systems, and is also engaged in 
mill repair work. The enterprise has met 
with marked success, and there is every 
prospect of an increasingly prosperous 
future. 

Mr. Bill is well known in Masonic 
circles, being a member of Springfield 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
which he is a past master; Morning Star 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Springfield 
Council, Royal and Select Masters ; 
Springfield Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar; and all the Scottish Rite bodies up 
to and including the thirty-second degree ; 
also Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Or- 
der Nobles of the Mystic Shrine ; and of 
Bela Grotto. He is also a member of the 



131 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Sons of the American Revolution ; the 
Exchange Club ; the College Alumni As- 
sociation ; and is a charter member of the 
Luther Burbank Historical Society and 
of the Publicity Club. His religious af- 
filiation is with the Highland Baptist 
Church. 

On December i, 1914, Raymond Rus- 
sell Bill married Euretta Bixby, of Under- 
bill, Vermont, daughter of George H. 
Bixby, 



WRIGHT, Arthur Creed 

Arthur Creed Wright, president and 
treasurer of the Eldridge Electric Manu- 
facturing Company of Springfield, comes 
of an English family. 

(I) Harry Wright, grandfather of Ar- 
thur C. Wright, was born in England 
about 1800, and died in 1867. He was a 
man of ability, a mechanical engineer, 
who for many years was associated with 
the Bolton & Watts Company as chief 
engineer, that concern being among the 
first to build the walking beam en- 
gine. He married Croft, and they 

were the parents of ten children : Elias ; 
Harry, of further mention ; Joseph ; Eliz- 
abeth, who married Thomas Stephenson ; 
John; William; Emma; Henry; Isaac; 
and Patrick. 

(II) Harry (2) Wright, son of Harry 

(i) and (Croft) Wright, was 

born in Handsworth, Stafifordshire, Eng- 
land, in 1836, and died in Norwich, Con- 
necticut, in 1906. He received his educa- 
tion in the national schools of his native 
district, and then learned the trade of 
die sinker and tool maker. In 1881 he 
came to America, and locating in Worces- 
ter, Massachusetts, became associated 
with the Forehand & Wadsworth Mach- 
ine Company, which connection he main- 
tained for twenty-five years. He became 
a naturalized citizen of the United States, 



and always took a keen interest in the 
public affairs of the nation of his adop- 
tion, though he neither sought nor held 
any public office. As a loyal citizen, a 
skilled mechanic, and a highly esteemed 
friend and associate, he contributed to 
the community in which he lived those 
sterling qualities of character which are 
the truest wealth of a nation. A short 
time before his death, he removed to Nor- 
wich, Connecticut, and there his last days 
were spent. He was a member of the 
Episcopal church. Mr. Wright married 
Ruth Hills, who was born in Withyham, 
Sussex, England, in 1836, daughter of 
Jonathan and Ruth Hills, and their chil- 
dren were : Arthur Creed, of further men- 
tion ; Elizabeth Jane, who married Henry 
Smith, deceased ; and Harry Croft, de- 
ceased. 

(HI) Arthur Creed Wright, son of 
Harry (2) and Ruth (Hills) Wright, was 
born in Enfield Lock, Middlesexshire, 
England, March 3, 1863. He received his 
education in the public schools of his 
native town, and then became an appren- 
tice to a tool maker and die sinker. Be- 
fore he had completed his apprenticeship, 
he came to America and located in Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island, where he completed 
his apprenticeship, remaining there two 
years. At the end of that period he went 
to Worcester, Massachusetts, where he 
became associated with the Forehand 
Arms Company, and there he remained 
for a quarter of a century, rising through 
various promotions to the position of 
general superintendent. After twenty- 
five years of faithful and efficient service, 
he severed his connection with the Fore- 
hand Arms Company and became identi- 
fied with the Hopkins & Allen Arms Com- 
pany, of Norwich, Connecticut, as gen- 
eral superintendent. In 191 1 he went to 
New South Wales, Australia, as chief 



132 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



engineer for the Pratt & Whitney Com- 
pany, of Hartford, Connecticut, and in- 
stalled at Lithagovv, New South Wales, 
the Federal government factory for the 
manufacture of small arms, of which for 
a period of three years he was general 
manager. In order that he might pro- 
ceed with his work, it was necessary to 
get certain papers from the English Gov- 
ernment, this making the trip much 
longer, he covering some 1700 miles to 
reach his destination. In 1915 he returned 
to this country and located at Springfield, 
Massachusetts, where for four years he 
was associated with the Westinghouse 
Company as consulting engineer, during 
which time he founded the East Spring- 
field branch of that company. In 1920 he 
became connected with the Eldridge Elec- 
tric Manufacturing Company, engaged in 
the manufacture of electric specialties, 
and at the present time (1923) he is the 
efficient president and treasurer of that 
company. His wide and varied experi- 
ence has most thoroughly equipped him 
for the responsible position which he is 
filling. Mr. Wright is a thirty-second de- 
gree Mason, being a member of Morning 
Star Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, 
of Worcester, Massachusetts, in which he 
has taken all Scottish and York Rite de- 
grees ; of Columbian Commandery, Knights 
Templar, of Norwich, Connecticut ; and of 
Norwich Consistory, of Norwich, Connec- 
ticut. He is also a member of the Spring- 
field Country Club, and is a member of 
St. Peter's Episcopal Church. 

On February 4, 1892, Arthur C. Wright 
married Anna Maria Dean, of Hardwick, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Edward and 
Almira (Wheeler) Dean (see Dean VIII), 
and they are the parents of four children : 
Ruth Almira, born in Worcester, Massa- 
chusetts, December 17, 1895 ; Elizabeth, 
born May 24, 1897, married Norman Elli- 



son, one child, Richard Wright; Kather- 
ine, born in October, 1898, died at the age 
of two years ; and Marjorie Wheeler, born 
July 18, 1900. 

(The Dean Line). 

It is claimed by those who have made a 
study of patronymics that the surname 
Deen or Dean is derived originally from 
the Latin term decaniis, which was the 
title of a Roman military officer of rank 
commanding a force of men, and its Eng- 
lish equivalent Dean was long ago 
adopted as an ecclesiastical title, next in 
dignity to that of bishop. The name is 
also written Dean in Spanish ; in old 
French it is written both Dean and Dien ; 
and in both Norman .and English it is 
nearly always written Dean. In England 
the name has existed from the time of 
Alfred the Great (tenth century) who 
was the first English sovereign to encour- 
age the use of surnames. 

(I) Walter Dean, immigrant, son of 
William Dean, of Chard, was born in 
Chard, between 1615 and 1620. He came 
with his brother to New England, settled 
in Taunton, Alassachusetts, became a 
prominent man in the Colony, and died 
there about 1693. He was selectman for 
eight years, held various town offices, and 
was by trade a tanner. He was also active 
in church affairs, and filled the office of 
deacon for many years. He married 
Eleanor Strong, daughter of Richard 
Strong, of Taunton, England, who came 
to New England with her brother, Elder 
John Strong, in the ship "Mary and John" 
in 1630, and they were the parents of 
four children : Joseph, who was a cord- 
wainer in Taunton ; Ezra, of further men- 
tion ; Benjamin, who settled in Taunton ; 
and Abigail. 

(II) Ezra Dean, son of Deacon Walter 
and Eleanor (Strong) Dean, settled in 



133 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Taunton, Massachusetts, where he died 
February 15, 1732. He married, Decem- 
ber 17, 1676, Bethiah Edson, daughter of 
Deacon Samuel and Susanna (Orcutt) 
Edson. Deacon Edson was one of the 
first settlers of Bridgewater, Massachu- 
setts, and built and owned the first mill 
there. The children of Ezra and Bethiah 
(Edson) Dean were: Bethiah; Ezra; 
Samuel; Seth, of whom further; Mar- 
garet ; and Ephraim. 

(III) Seth Dean, son of Ezra and 
Bethiah (Edson) Dean, lived at Taunton. 
He was the ancestor of Rev. Paul Dean, 
of Boston and of Easton, Massachusetts, 
who published a course of lectures on the 
"Final Restoration of All Men;" and also 
of Amos Dean, of Albany, New York, 
author of "Philosophy of Human Life" 
and other works. Among the children 
of Seth Dean was Paul, of further men- 
tion. 

(IV) Paul Dean, son of Seth Dean, 
married Mary Whitcomb, and among their 
children was Paul (2), of further mention. 

(V) Paul (2) Dean, son of Paul (i) 
and Mary (Whitcomb) Dean, married 
Elizabeth Ruggles, and among their chil- 
dren was John, of further mention. 

(VI) John Dean, son of Paul (2) and 
Elizabeth (Ruggles) Dean, married Mary 
Penniman, and they were the parents of 
children, among whom was Edward, of 
further mention. 

(VII) Edward Dean, son of John and 
Mary (Penniman) Dean, married Almira 
Wheeler, and among their children was 
Anna Maria, of further mention. 

(VIII) Anna Maria Dean, daughter of 
Edward and Almira (Wheeler) Dean, 
married Arthur Creed Wright (see 
Wright III). 



PEASE, Austin Howard 

Among the representative business 
men of Springfield, is Austin Howard 



Pease, secretary and assistant treasurer of 
the Wason Manufacturing Company, who 
for half a century has been a resident of 
this city, and who has been connected 
with the Wason Manufacturing Company 
for two decades. Mr. Pease comes from 
very old Colonial stock, and bears a name 
which is traced far back into the early 
years of English history. 

(I) Robert Pease, immigrant ancestor 
of the branch of the family to which Ar- 
thur H. Pease belongs, came to New Eng- 
land in the ship "Francis," sailing from 
Ipswich, England, the last of April, 1634, 
and landing in Boston, Massachusetts. 
He was accompanied by his brother John 
and his eldest son Robert, his wife Marie 
and other children probably coming at a 
later date. He settled in Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, where in January, 1637, both he 
and his brother had grants of land. Mar- 
garet Pease, widow, who died in Salem, 
and whose will, dated September i, 1642, 
was proved January i, 1645, was the 
mother of Robert and John. Robert Pease 
was admitted to the Salem Church, Oc- 
tober I, 1643, ^^^<^ two weeks later three 
of his children were baptized. The inven- 
tory of his estate was filed, August 27, 

1644. He married Marie , and their 

children were : Robert ; John, of further 
mention ; Nathaniel ; Sarah, married John 
Sampson, of Beverly ; Mary, married 
Hugh Pasco; and perhaps another child, 
Isaac. 

(II) John Pease, son of Robert and 
]\Iarie Pease, was born in England, about 
1630, and came to this country when a 
boy. He settled in that part of Salem 
called Northfields, where he had a farm, 
and was admitted a freeman, April 29, 
1668, joining the First Church of Salem, 
July 4, 1667. He and his wife were dis- 
missed from that church to the church at 
Springfield, October 6, 1681, and he soon 
afterward removed with his family to the 



134 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



part of Springfield which afterward be- 
came Enfield, Connecticut. He was an 
able man, active in the work of the 
church, and prominent in his community. 
He died July 8, 1689. Pie married (first) 
Mary Goodell, daughter of Robert and 
Catherine Goodell, who died January 5, 
1669. He married (second) December 8, 
1669, Ann Cummings, who died at Enfield, 
June 29, 1689, daughter of Isaac Cum- 
mings. To the first marriage five chil- 
dren were born : John, of whom further ; 
Robert, born May 14, 1656; Mary, born 
October 8, 1658; Abraham, born June 5, 
1662; Jonathan, born January 2, 1669. 
The children of the second marriage were : 
James, born December 23, 1670; Isaac, 
born July 15, 1672; Abigail, born Decem- 
ber 15, 1675. 

(III) John (2) Pease, son of John (i) 
and Mary (Goodell) Pease, was born in 
Salem, Massachusetts, May 30, 1654, and 
died at Enfield, Connecticut, in 1734, aged 
eighty years. He was an able, energetic 
man who took an active part in the affairs 
of his community, and was prominently 
identified with the history of Enfield. He 
married Margaret Adams, of Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, January 30, 1677, ^"^ they 
were the parents of seven children : James, 
of whom further ; Margaret ; Jonathan ; 
Ann ; Mary ; Sarah ; Joseph. 

(IV) James Pease, son of John (2) and 
Margaret (Adams) Pease, was born in 
Salem, Massachusetts, in 1679, and re- 
moved with his parents to Enfield, Con- 
necticut, while he was still an infant. 
After his marriage he settled in Somers, 
Connecticut, where he was one of the 
pioneer settlers of the place and very 
prominent in its public affairs. He mar- 
ried, November 15, 1710, Mary Abbe, 
daughter of John and Hannah Abbe, and 
they were the parents of six children : 
Mary; James; Margaret; Richard, of 
whom further : Hannah ; and John. 



(V) Richard Pease, son of James and 
Mary (Abbe) Pease, was born in Enfield, 
Connecticut, September 22, 1717. He 
married, November i, 1753, Elizabeth 
Parsons, and they were the parents of 
three children : Keturah ; Samuel ; and 
Richard, of whom further. 

(VI) Captain Richard (2) Pease, son 
of Richard (i) and Elizabeth (Parsons) 
Pease, was born in Somers, Connecticut, 
October 20, 1758. He was one of the sev- 
enty men who at the beginning of hostili- 
ties between the colonists and the British 
forces marched, at the first alarm, from 
Somers to Boston, under the leadership 
of Captain Emery Pease, and continued 
actively in service throughout the period 
of the Revolutionary War. A man of 
strict integrity and sound judgment, he 
was highly esteemed among his associ- 
ates, and took an active part in the life 
of the community. He married Souvier 
Parsons, and their children were: Rich- 
ard ; Luke ; Walter, of whom further ; Or- 
rin ; Alpheus ; Souvier; Austin; Azariah; 
and Abigail. 

(VII) Walter Pease, son of Captain 
Richard (2) and Souvier (Parsons) Pease, 
was born in Somers, Connecticut, July 4, 
1795, and died November 8, 1864. He 
married, January 26, 1826, Louise Spencer 
and they Avere the parents of: Newton 
W., of whom further ; Edwin S. ; Luman 
S. ; and Sanford C. 

(VIII) Newton W. Pease, son of Wal- 
ter and Louise (Spencer) Pease, was born 
in Somers, Connecticut. November 12, 
1830, and died in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, August 16, 1896. He received his 
education in the public schools of his 
native district, and in early life engaged 
in farming, first in Springfield and later 
in Granby, Massachusetts, where for a 
period of two or three years he took 
charge of the Birme Farm, which he man- 
aged most efficiently and successfully. In 

135 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



1873 ^"'e removed from Granby to Spring- 
field, and was employed in the Wason 
car shops. A quiet, home-loving man, he 
was greatly beloved by all who knew him. 
He married (first) December 9, 1855, 
Augusta M. Lull ; (second) October 26, 
1863, Harriet E. Russel, of Wallingford, 
Connecticut, who died in March, 1910. 
To the first marriage one son, Frank, was 
born. The children of the second mar- 
riage were : Austin Howard, of whom fur- 
ther; and Kittie, deceased. 

(IX ) Austin Howard Pease, son of 
Newton W. and Harriet E. (Russel) 
Pease, was born in Granby, Massachu- 
setts, August 26, 1866, and came to Spring- 
field with his parents when he was a child 
six years of age. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Springfield, 
including the high school, and when he 
was seventeen years of age began his 
business career in the office of Bemis & 
Call, manufacturers, where by energy and 
application he was promoted to the posi- 
tion of sales manager. In 1902 he severed 
his connection with that company, and 
entered the office of the Wason car shops 
ia Springfield as assistant treasurer, later 
being promoted to the office of secretary 
and assistant treasurer, which positions 
he holds at the present time (1923). Mr. 
Pease is a member of Roswell Lee Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, and of all the 
York Rite bodies, and of Melha Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine ; of Hampden Lodge, Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows ; Agawam En- 
campment, same order ; and of the Nay- 
asset Club. He is an attendant of the Uni- 
versalist church. 

On July 3, 1894, Austin H. Pease mar- 
ried Nellie Lillian Pearson, of Hinsdale, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Henry and 
Alice (Cook) Pearson. 

Henry Pearson, son of William Henry 



and Emma (Cross) Pearson, was born at 
Stockport, England, September 14, 1852. 
He attended the public schools in Eng- 
land until he was eleven years old, and 
then entered the office of George Fernley 
& Company, of whose woolen mills his 
father was superintendent. Beginning 
as office boy, he worked his way up, 
finally being placed in charge of the loom 
products of the mill office. Meantime, in 
1865, his father, William H. Pearson, had 
severed his connection with the George 
Fernley Company and sailed for Ameri- 
ca. In the following year Henry Pear- 
son followed him, and secured a posi- 
tion in the finishing department of a 
woolen mill in Ashuelot, New Hampshire, 
where he remained for about a year, re- 
moving thence to Hinsdale, New Hamp- 
shire, where after being employed for a 
time in the weaving room of Haile, Frost 
& Company's woolen mill, he became as- 
sociated with the machine shop of Hol- 
man & Merriman, where he learned the 
machinist's trade. For fourteen years, 
with the exception of an interval of six 
months, during which he was inspector at 
the Miller's Falls Manufacturing Works, 
he maintained his association with this 
firm, gaining a wide reputation as a clever 
mechanic. At the end of that period, he 
spent a year in the Harris Corliss Engine 
Works, at Providence, Rhode Island. At 
the end of that year he was offered a posi- 
tion at the head of the machine depart- 
men of the Wason Manufacturing Com- 
pany, at Brightwood. This offer he ac- 
cepted, entering upon his new duties in 
the spring of 1881. The following year he 
was promoted to the position of assistant 
superintendent, and in 1883 was made me- 
chanical superintendent, which position 
he held until he was elected vice-presi- 
dent, and finally president of the Wason 
Company. He was president of the Mu- 



136 





7 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



tual Insurance Company, composed ex- 
clusively of employees of the Wason 
Manufacturing Company. In 1872, at 
Hinsdale, New Hampshire, Mr. Pearson 
married Alice Cook, daughter of Chaun- 
cey P. Cook, a prominent manufacturer 
of cutlery in that town, and they were the 
parents of one daughter, Nellie Lillian, 
who married Austin H. Pease, of Spring- 
field. 



FAY, Charles Pease 

For nearly thirty years Charles Pease 
Fay has been identified with important 
business interests in Western Massachu- 
setts. As vice-president and general 
manager of the Stevens Arms and Tool 
Company of Chicopee, and as general 
manager of the Stevens-Duryea Company 
during the early years of its career, and 
in various other connections, he has been 
closely identified with the development 
of two important concerns. 

Mr. Fay comes of old Colonial stock, 
and bears a name which investigation 
shows to be of a very ancient origin, 
tracing back even to the days of heathen 
mythology. Sir W. Ousley derives the 
name from the Hebrew word for peer, 
while D. Herbelot is of the opinion that 
it comes from the Persian word for fairy 
(peri). In the middle ages there was in 
use a Latin verb fatara, derived from 
fata, to enchant. In the French it be- 
came, according to the analogy of the lan- 
guage, Facr, fcer, and of this verb the 
past participle is fae or fee. Morse 
claims that since 1173 the name has been 
written (in England) Fay and Foy. 
Thomas Spooner says : "The Fays were 
of French origin, and during the perse- 
cution of the Huguenots they fled to 
Wales, and from Wales the ancestor of 
the American family came to the col- 
onies." The branch of the family of 



which Fred M. Fay belongs went to Eng- 
land at some time prior to the emigration 
of John Fay, American immigrant ances- 
tor of this line. 

(I) John Fay was born in England 
about 1648, and died at Marlboro, 
Massachusetts, December 5, 1690. He 
embarked. May 30, 1656, at Gravesend, 
England, on the ship "Speedwell," Rob- 
ert Locke, master, and arrived at Boston, 
June 27 following, accompanied by other 
young lads who were related to various 
settlers already in Sudbury, Massachu- 
setts. The group of lads included 
Thomas Barnes, aged twenty; Shadrach 
Hapgood, aged fourteen; Thomas Good- 
now, twenty; Nathaniel Goodnow, six- 
teen ; and John Fay, youngest of all, aged 
eight years. The Rev. Abner Morse con- 
cluded that he came to join his father, 
David Fay, then of Sudbury, and that 
Peter Bent was a relative. John Fay 
removed to Marlboro, which was set- 
tled by Sudbury men, and when admitted 
a freeman there in 1669 had a wife and 
one child. His name first appears in 
the town records of Marlboro in 1671, 
when he is recorded as one of the peti- 
tioners for a grant of lanxi. In 1675 he 
was one of the proprietors of Worcester, 
and was assigned a lot in the eastern 
squadron, lying next to the county road 
to Boston. During King Philip's War, 
he, with others, went to Watertown for 
protection, and he was one of those who, 
kfter the war in 1678, attempted to re- 
habilitate the town. While there his first 
wife died and he married again. He mar- 
ried (first) Mary Brigham, daughter of 
Thomas and Mercy (Hurd) Brigham. 
The Fay and Brigham families have been 
closely related by numerous intermar- 
riages ever since that time. John Fay 
married (second) Susannah (Shattuck) 
Morse, widow of Joseph Morse, and 

37 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



daughter of William Shattuck, the pio- 
neer. While in Watertown John Fay 
was made a trustee of the estate of Rey- 
nold Bush, of Cambridge, who was about 
to marry Susanna Lowell, of Beverly, 
Wiltshire, England. After the war, when 
John Fay settled in Marlboro again, 
he located in that section which was later 
known as Southborough. The children 
of the first marriage were : John, Jr., born 
November 30, 1669; David, born October 
15, 1671, died young; Samuel, of further 
mention ; Mary, born February 10, 1675. 
To the second marriage were born : David, 
born April 23, 1679; Gershom, born Oc- 
tober 19, 1681, married Mary Brigham ; 
Ruth, born July 15, 1684, married, June 
28, 1706, Increase Ward, Jr. ; Deliverance, 
born October 7, 1686, died 171 1, married, 
February 20, 1706, Benjamin Shattuck. 

(II) Samuel Fay, son of John and 
Mary (Brigham) Fay, was born in Marl- 
borough, Massachusetts, October 11, 
1673, and died in Westborough, Massa- 
chusetts, November 10, 1732. He was a 
surveyor, 1718-20; tithingman, 1721 ; 
town clerk; and from 1728 to 1730 was 
sealer of leather. He married, May 16, 
1699, Tabitha Ward, daughter of Increase 
and Record Ward, and they were the par- 
ents of six children : Rebecca ; Tabitha ; 
Samuel ; Abigail ; Ebenezer, of whom 
further; and Mary. 

(III) Ebenezer Fay, son of Samuel 
and Tabitha (Ward) Fay, was born 
in Marlboro, Massachusetts, April 12, 
1713, and died October 13, 1790. He set- 
tled in Sturbridge, near Attome pond, 
at a point which took the name "Fay's 
Cove," and afterward built a house on a 
portion of his large tract of land, near the 
residence of Cyrus and John Fay. He 
was fond of fishing and often traveled on 
horseback to a favorite fishing ground, 
bringing home his saddlebags filled with 
fish. He married (first) in 1738, Abigail 



, who died in 1738; (second), Sep- 
tember 19, 1739, Thankful Hyde; (third), 
in 1765, Mary Mason. Children of the 
second and third marriages were : Abi- 
gail, Jonathan, Elijah, Uriah, Joel; Jude, 
of whom further; Cyrus, Thomas, Levi, 
Thankful, Jabez, Sally, Sylvanus, Ben- 
ejah, Polly, Beneth, and Levinah. The 
first eleven were of the second marriage. 

(IV) Jude Fay, son of Ebenezer and 
Thankful (Hyde) Fay, was born in Brim- 
field, Massachusetts, April 6, 1748, and 
died June 20, 1831. He resided in Brim- 
field, and is recorded in "Massachusetts 
Soldiers and Sailors in the Revolution," 
Volume V, page 578, as "Jude Fay, Pri- 
vate." He married, in 1778, Sally Fair- 
banks, born in Brookfield, Massachusetts, 
April 6, 1757, died at Monson, Massachu- 
setts, July 12, 1840, and they were the 
parents of eleven children : Betsy, Sally, 
Ruth ; Rufus, of whom further ; Patty, 
Nancy, William B., Otis, Charles P., El- 
thina, and Matilda. 

(V) Rufus Fay, son of Jude and Sally 
(Fairbanks) Fay, was born in Brimfield, 
Massachusetts, August 18, 1789, and died 
March 31, 1864. He was a thrifty farmer, 
and owned a farm bordering on the town 
of Palmer, Massachusetts. He was be- 
loved as a good neighbor, and a kind 
friend, and in 1859 he and his wife cele- 
brated their fiftieth wedding anniversary. 
He married, September 14, 1809, Rachel 
Taft, who died January 7, 1865, and they 
were the parents of nine children : Ham- 
ilton, Louisa, Rufus F., Martha Burt, 
Sally Taft; William B., of whom fur- 
ther; Eli, Elthina, and Frank B. 

(VI) William B. Fay, son of Rufus 
and Rachel (Taft) Fay, was born in Pal- 
mer, Massachusetts, February 10, 1820. 
He was engaged in farming in the west- 
ern part of Brimfield, Massachusetts, and 
in addition to his agricultural activities 
was also a tool maker and for a time was 

138 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGR-\PHY 



engaged in manufacturing. In the last 
named line oi business activity he was 
associated with Joshua Stevens, who later 
formed the Stevens Arms and Tool Com- 
pany of Springfield. William B. Fay 
married Abigail Russel Nichols, and they 
were the parents of eight children : Anna 
B., born September i6, 1846, deceased; 
Isabella, born September 15, 1851, de- 
ceased; Lottie H., bom November 17, 
1852, died in 1922; William F., born Jan- 
uary 16, 1856, deceased; Charles Pease, 
of further mention ; Louisa A., born May 
17, 1861 ; Alice Gertrude, born November 
26, 1863, deceased; and Florence, born 
April 17, 1867. 

(VII) Charles Pease Fay, son of Wil- 
liam B. and Abigail Russel (Nichols) 
Fay, was born in Chicopee Falls, Massa- 
chusetts. ]March 22, 1859. He received 
his early education in the public schools 
of Chicopee, and then attended a prepar- 
atory school in East Greenwich, Massa- 
chusetts. When school days were over, 
he learned the toolmaker's trade and en- 
gaged in that work in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, and later in Athol, ]\Iassachu- 
setts, where he took the position of 
mechanical engineer for the L. S. Star- 
rett Tool Company, and while in this 
position took out over twenty patents for 
his invention. After the death of his 
father he became associated with the 
Stevens Arms and Tool Company, of 
Chicopee Falls, and in that connection 
rose to the position of vice-president and 
general manager of the company. Those 
official and executive positions he con- 
tinued to hold for a period of twenty- 
three years, when, in 1917, the business 
was sold to the Westinghouse Company. 
Later, the concern engaged in the manu- 
facture of automobiles under the firm 
name of the Stevens-Durv-ea Company, 
and for some time he was general man- 
ager of the latter organization. With all 



his business responsibilities, he has found 
time for and taken an interest in frater- 
nal and social organizations. He is a 
member of Belcher Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Chicopee Falls, and he 
was also affiliated with the Colonial and 
Nayasset clubs, of Springfield. 

Mr. Fay married Ella Josephine Keyes, 
of Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts, and 
they are the parents of nine children: i. 
An infant, died young. 2. Laurence C, 
who married Elsie Johnson. 3. Gertrude, 
who married ^Marcus Lathrop, and has 
one child. Fay Lathrop. 4. Fred Mer- 
ritt, a sketch of whom follows. 5. Wil- 
liam B., who married Donna Betts, and 
has a son, William B., Jr. 6. Charles 
Lemuel, who married (first) Gertrude 
]\Iitchell ; (second) Dorothy Golden; to 
the first marriage was born one son, 
Charles. 7. Russel Nichols Brown, who 
was a professor of English in New York 
Cit}', but is now a bond salesman for 
Hayden Stone & Company, in New York 
City. 8. Caroline Josephine, who gradu- 
ated from \'as=ar College, in 1922, and is 
now engaged in publicity work in New 
York City with the Rockefeller Founda- 
tion. 9. Dorothy Gladys, who married 
Gustavus Walker, of the Fisk Rubber 
Company. 

FAY, Fred Merritt 

Among the successful business men of 
Springfield is Fred M. Fay, formerly vice- 
president and treasurer of the Fay Rub- 
ber Company, but now engaged in the 
wholesale druggist supply business un- 
der his own name. 

(Y'lID Fred Merritt Fay, son of 
Charles Pease and Ella Josephine CKeyes) 
Fay, was born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts. October 27, 1886. He received his 
education in the public schools of Chico- 
pee, and in Williston Seminary, and when 
his studies in school were completed went 

139 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



to New York City, where for two years 
he was associated with the Stevens-Dur- 
yea Automobile Company, as a member 
of the selling force. At the end of that 
time he removed to Boston, Massachu- 
setts, where he engaged in business for 
himself, under the firm name of the Fay 
Manufacturing Company, in the acetylene 
welding business. A year and a half later 
he sold this business and associated him- 
self with the Stevens Arms and Tool Com- 
pany, as traveling salesman, representing 
that concern in Canada, Newfoundland, 
and the United States for a period of five 
years, after which he was associated with 
his brother, Laurence C. Fay, for a year 
and a half in the contracting business, 
under the firm name of L. C. Fay & Com- 
pany. 

When war was declared, in April, 1917, 
Mr. Fay was in the reserve corps. He was 
called for active service, and as first lieu- 
tenant was sent to Plattsburg, New York, 
as an instructor and also for additional 
training. On August 14, 1917, he was 
ordered to France and upon his arrival 
there was sent to Southern France for 
training, and later was assigned to the 
26th Division, 103rd Machine Gun Bat- 
talion, with which unit he was in active 
service in various engagements, including 
the second Battle of the Marne, and with 
which he remained until recalled to the 
United States. Upon his arrival in this 
country he was assigned to the 35th 
Machine Gun Battalion, 12th Division, 
and was at Camp Dix, Wrightstown, 
New Jersey, until sent to Camp Devens, 
Ayer, Massachusetts, September 30, 1918. 
On February 2, 1919, he was retired with 
the title of captain, and he is now a mem- 
ber of the reserve corps. After his re- 
tirement, he spent two months in Cali- 
fornia. He then returned to ^Massachu- 
setts, and in April, 1920, organized the 



Fay Rubber Company, of which he is 
vice-president and treasurer. At the pres- 
ent time (1923) he is engaged in business 
for himself under his own name, Fred M. 
Fay, conducting a wholesale business in 
drug sundries. He is a member of Bel- 
cher Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, 
of Chicopee, Massachusetts ; of Unity 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Springfield 
Council, Royal and Select Masters ; 
Springfield Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar; and of all the Scottish Rites bodies 
up to and including the consistory, in 
which he holds the thirty-second degree. 
He is also a member of Melha Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine. He has been a member of the 
Nayasset and Colony clubs, and is affili- 
ated with the American Legion and with 
the Officers of the World War. 

On October 9, 1916, Mr. Fay married 
Florence S. Shortsleeve, of Chicopee Falls, 
Massachusetts, daughter of William H. 
and Helen Charlotte (Reynolds) Short- 
sleeve. 



ASHTON, George Archibald 

Among the worthy citizens of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, is George A. Ash- 
ton, manager of the Springfield Milk 
Dealers' Exchange, who for twenty years 
sold milk in Springfield, and has spent 
practically his entire life in that city. 

Mr. Ashton is of English extraction, 
and comes of a family which has given 
many worthy and valuable citizens to the 
English nation, and which is now contrib- 
uting its full share to the development of 
this nation. Representatives of the name 
have come to America at various times, 
some at early dates and some more re- 
cently. 

(I) Robert Ashton, grandfather of 
George Archibald Ashton, came to this 
country from England, and settled in 

140 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Belchertown, Massachusetts, later went 
to Ludlow, then called Jenksville, where 
he died at the age of thirty-five years. He 
married Lucinda Lemon, and among their 
children was a son, George Anthony, of 
whom further mention. 

(II) George Anthony Ashton, son of 
Robert and Lucinda (Lemon) Ashton, 
was born in Belchertown, Massachusetts, 
August 3, 1841, and died at Xew Salem, 
Massachusetts, September 13, 1904. He 
received his education in the public 
schools of his native district, and when 
the Civil War broke out enlisted, serving 
in the permanent department of the 
mounted service from 1861 to 1865, car- 
rying dispatches and also acting as a spy. 
He was an energetic, resourceful man. 
and after the close of the war became a 
contractor and builder, in which line he 
was eminently successful. He resided in 
Ludlow, Massachusetts, during a portion 
of the period of his active business life, 
the remaining years being passed in 
Springfield. ^Massachusetts, where he was 
employed by the Springfield Lumber 
Company. As an upright, efficient busi- 
ness man. a worthy citizen and a highly 
esteemed friend and associate, he filled 
an important place in the life of his com- 
munity. His religious affiliation was with 
Trinity Church. He married Olive M. 
Mason, who was born at Three Rivers, 
Massachusetts, February 25, 1844, and 
died at Springfield, IMassachusetts, Oc- 
tober 24, 1917, daughter of Abraham and 
Julia (Bramon) Mason (see Mason VII). 
Mr. and Mrs. Ashton were the parents of 
two children: i. Herbert Ashton, born 
August I, 1866, in Stafford Springs; was 
educated in Springfield, graduate of high 
school, later went to Boston and gradu- 
ated from a school there, now in the South 
estimating cost of large contracts for a 
firm there ; married and has two sons. 



Harold Dudley and Donald McKechnie; 
the latter was a lieutenant in the United 
States army during the World War. 2. 
George Archibald, of whom further. 

(Ill) George Archibald Ashton, son of 
George Anthony and Olive M. (Mason) 
Ashton, was born at Ludlow, Massachu- 
setts, August 2, 1868. He received his 
education in the public schools of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and when school 
days were over engaged in the milk busi- 
ness. Faithful, dependable, and effici- 
ent, he continued in this business for 
some twenty years, giving a square 
deal to both patrons and employees, 
and building up a large and prosper- 
ous business. At the end of that period, 
however, ill health made it necessary that 
he should give up that line of work. After 
recuperating for a time, he engaged in 
various lighter activities until returning 
health warranted the undertaking of more 
strenuous responsibilities, when he be- 
came manager of the Springfield Milk 
Dealers' Exchange, which position he has 
filled with faithfulness and efficiency for 
the past six years (1923). Mr. Ashton is 
well known among a large number of the 
citizens of Springfield as an upright, con- 
scientious executive, and a loyal friend, 
as well as a progressive, public-spirited 
member of his community. He is affili- 
ated with DeSoto Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of Springfield, 

On September 13, 1889, George A. Ash- 
ton married Lillian St. Peters, who was 
born in North Brookfield, Massachusetts, 
daughter of Abraham and Ella M. (Baker) 
St. Peters, and they are the parents of 
one son, Raymond Eugene, who was born 
in Springfield, Massachusetts, January 4, 
1898. He was educated in the public 
schools of Springfield, including the Tech- 
nical High School, and during the World 
War was in the chemical service at Wash- 



141 



ENCYCXOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ington, District of Columbia, engaged in one of those whose life work was just at 



making gases until the signing of the 
armistice. He is now an overseer in a 
jute mill in Ludlow, Massachusetts, with 
over two hundred men working under his 
direction. He married, January i, 1921, 
Anita Clark, of Granby, Connecticut. 
They have one daughter, Phylis Ruth, 
born October 7, 1921. They reside in 
Ludlow. 

(I) Mrs. Ashton traces her ancestry to 
Sampson Mason, immigrant, from whom 
the line of descent is traced through his 
son, Isaac, of whom further. 

(II) Isaac Mason, son of Sampson 
Mason, reared a family, among whom was 
Nathan, of whom further. 

(III) Nathan Mason, son of Isaac 
Mason, had children, among whom, Levi, 
of whom further. 

(IV) Levi Mason, son of Nathan Ma- 
son, had children, among whom, Levi 
(2), of whom further. 

(V) Levi (2) Mason, son of Levi (i) 
Mason, had children, among whom was 
Abraham, of whom further. 

(VI) Abraham Mason, son of Levi (2) 
Mason, was born in South Belchertown, 
Massachusetts, January i, 1821, and died 
January 22, 1888. He married, June 26, 
1842, Julia Bramon, born February 19, 
1820, died September 22, 1898, and their 
children were : Olive M., John L., Charles 
A., Ella J., Herbert W., William Henry, 
Oliver B. 

(VII) Olive M. Mason, daughter of 
Abraham and Julia (Bramon) Mason, 
married George A. Ashton, father of 
George Archibald Ashton (see Ashton 
II). 



STUDLEY, Robert Converse 

Robert Converse Studley, former vice- 
president and general manager of the 
Fred T. Ley Construction Company, is 



its prime when death terminated his ca- 
reer. Known and most highly esteemed 
by a host of friends and business associ- 
ates, his passing was deeply felt, and rep- 
resented a distinct loss to the community 
in which he lived. 

I\Ir. Studley came of a very old English 
family which had its seat in County Kent 
and in Yorkshire, the latter branch being 
of Studley Park, near the ruins of the 
famous Fountain Abbey, The Studley 
coat-of-arms as given by Barry in his 
"History of Hanover, Massachusetts" is : 

Arms — Argent, a fesse vert between three stags' 
heads cabossed or. 

Crest — A stag's head cabossed or, pierced through 
the scalp with an arrow in bend sinister, vert, 
feathered argent, headed sable. 

Two branches of the English family 
located in New England, one in Boston, 
the other in Sandwich, Massachusetts, 
and descendants of both lived in the town 
of Hanover and vicinity. John Studley, 
the immigrant ancestor, was living in 
Boston as early as 1639; he was a pro- 
prietor of Gloucester in 1650. As follow- 
ing the sea was the exclusive occupation 
of the men of Gloucester, he was doubt- 
less a seaman. He married Elizabeth 

, and they were the parents of two 

sons, John, born December 8, 1659; and 
Benjamin, born in Boston, May 23, 1661. 

Benjamin (2) Studley, in the fourth 
generation from John Studley, the immi- 
grant ancestor, through son Benjamin, 
was one of those who marched in response 
to the Lexington alarm, his name appear- 
ing on the roll of Captain Robert Ellis' 
company, of South Hanover, under the 
direction of fiteld officers of the Second 
Plymouth County Regiment, which 
marched on the "alarm" April 19, 1775, 
from Hanover to Marshfield, Massachu- 
setts, and served three days. He was also 



142 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGBLaPHY 



first lieutenant of Captain Nathaniel Win- 
slow's company, Colonel Barry's regi- 
ment, commissioned February 21, 1776; 
and first lieutenant of Captain Joseph 
Stetson's company, Colonel Dike's regi- 
ment, in the service from December i, 
1766 to March i, 1777, stationed at Dor- 
chester Heights during the siege of Bos- 
ton. 

Freeman Studley, great-grandfather of 
Robert C. Studley, was born in Mans- 
field, Connecticut, about 1790, his broth- 
ers and sisters being: Ebenezer, born in 
1788, served in the militia during the 
War of 1812; Orrin, Levi, Elizabeth, 
Electa, and ]\Iarion. Freeman Studley 
was a private in the 37th Connecticut 
Infantry during the War of 1812. He 
married, in Mansfield, Connecticut, in 
1814, Charlotte Jacobs, who was born in 
1792, and they were the parents of five 
children: Warren Amasa, Ashley D., of 
whom further; Ashbel Burnham, L'rsula 
L., and Charles A. 

Ashley Dunham Studley, son of Free- 
man and Charlotte (Jacobs) Studley, was 
born in ]\Iansfield, Connecticut, and died 
in Springfield, Massachusetts, in April, 
1900, aged seventy-three years. In early 
life he was a superintendent in a mill, 
but later had charge of the dyeing in the 
Haydenville Mills, at Haydenville, Mas- 
sachusetts, but in later years was en- 
gaged in farming. He married Emelina 
Eunice Severy, and they were the parents 
of Orrilus Winslow, of whom further. 

Orrilus Winslow Studley, son of Ash- 
ley Dunham and Emelina E. (Severy) 
Studley, was born in Rockville, Connecti- 
cut, November 16, 1850, and died in Pal- 
mer, Massachusetts, May 30, 1914. He 
received his education in the public 
schools of his native town, and later re- 
moved to Palmer, Massachusetts, where 
he was engaged in the meat business. He 
took an active part in public affairs, serv- 



ing as assessor for many years, also as 
deputy sheriff and court officer. He was 
highly esteemed by a very large number 
of personal friends as well as by his busi- 
ness associates. 

Mr. Studley was a member of Thomas 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Palmer, Massachusetts, and was an at- 
tendant of the First Congregational 
Church. He married Mary W. Converse, 
of Palmer, who died in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, December 2^, 1918, daughter 
of Deacon Hiram and Jeannette P. (Wash- 
burn) Converse (see Converse IX), and 
they were the parents of two children : 
Flora Converse, who married Raymond 
Garfield Patterson (see following sketch), 
and Robert Converse, of whom further. 

Robert Converse Studley, son of Or- 
rilus Winslow and !Mary (Converse) 
Studley, was born in Palmer, Massachu- 
setts, May 19, 1878, and died in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, June 25, 1921, aged 
forty-three years. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Palmer, 
and after graduating from the Palmer 
High School, entered Fairfield Millitary 
Academy, at Fairfield, New York, where 
he completed his formal school training. 
\\'hen school days were over he began his 
business career in association with the 
Fred T. Ley Construction Company, as a 
foreman on a street railway project in the 
Berkshires, in 1900. This connection he 
maintained throughout his active life, ad- 
vancing rapidly until he was made gen- 
eral superintendent, later, northern man- 
ager, in charge of all building operations 
in this section, and still later, in 1919, was 
made vice-president of the company, all 
of which positions he held at the time of 
his death. Throughout the twenty-one 
years of his connection with the Fred T. 
Ley Construction Company, Mr. Studley 
devoted much attention to concrete build- 
ing, both as a business specialty and as a 

143 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



hobby, and he soon came to be generally 
recognized as an authority on that sub- 
ject and an expert in that field. During 
the World War he was placed in charge 
of the concrete shipbuilding operations at 
Mobile, Alabama, and two concrete ships, 
embodying new and unique features in 
the shipbuilding industry, were completed 
under his direction. A third ship was un- 
der construction at the time of the sign- 
ing of the armistice. Another notable 
achievement was the building of the town 
of Harriman, a complete model town in 
Pennsylvania. The Fred T. Ley Con- 
struction Company had contracts for both 
of these projects, Mr. Studley acting as 
general superintendent. Widely known 
and highly esteemed by a host of personal 
friends and business associates, Mr. Stud- 
ley's was a brief but notably active and 
efficient life. 

Mr. Studley was a member of Spring- 
field Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, 
and was a member of all the Scottish Rite 
bodies up to and including the thirty- 
second degree, and was also a member of 
Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was a 
member of the Loyal Legion, and of the 
Nayasset, Winthrop, and Masonic clubs, 
and his religious affiliation was with the 
First Congregational Church. 

On January lo, 1906, Robert C. Stud- 
ley married Amy Buck, born in Lenox, 
but resided in Stockbridge, Massachu- 
setts, daughter of Anson and Laura Eliz- 
abeth (Parker) Buck, and they are the 
parents of three children : Victor Con- 
verse, born November 11, 1907; Robert 
Anson, born March 2, 1909 ; and Doris 
Elizabeth, born February 8, 1915. 

(The Converse Line). 

The Converse family is said by some 
authorities to have had its origin in Na- 



varre, France, from which place Roger de 
Coigniers emigrated to England near the 
end of the reign of William- the Con- 
queror and to whom the Bishop of Dur- 
ham gave the constableship of Durham. 
The lineage traced by William G. Hill 
in the "Family Record of Deacons James 
W. and Elisha S. Converse," however, 
has been proven by recent research not 
to be correct as to the immediate ances- 
tors of the immigrant ancestor, Edward 
Converse, of Maiden, Massachusetts. The 
name is spelled Combers in some of the 
old records, but Convers was the correct 
spelling as early as 1430, and the family 
was numerous at Navestock and West- 
ham, County Essex, in the fifteenth and 
sixteenth centuries. 

(I) Deacon Edward Converse, son of 
Allen and Joanna Convers (as the name 
was then spelled), was baptized at Nave- 
stock, County Essex, England, February 
23. 1588, and was one of the group of 
Puritans who came from England to this 
country in the fleet with Winthrop, whose 
ship, the "Arabella," preceding the other 
vessels of the fleet, arrived at Salem, June 
12, 1630. With him were his wife Sarah, 
and children, Josiah, James, and Mary. 
They first settled at Charlestown, Mas- 
sachusetts, and were among the first 
members of the church there. Edward 
Converse was admitted a freeman May 
18, 1631, being among the first to be ad- 
mitted in New England. He established 
the first ferry between Charlestown and 
Boston, under the vote of the General 
Court, November 9, 1630, and June 14, 
1 63 1, and was authorized to charge ferri- 
age, "two pence for every single person, 
and one penny a piece if there be two or 
more." This lease was renewed Novem- 
ber 9, 1637, for a period of three years, 
Converse paying forty pounds a year for 
the privilege. The ferry crossed where 



144 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the old Charlestown bridge crosses now, 
and was called the Great Ferry to 
distinguish it from the ferry between 
Charlestown and Winnisimmet. Edward 
Convers held the lease until October 7, 
1640, when it was granted for the support 
of Harvard College. He was prominent 
in the affairs of the town, held many 
local offices, and built the first house and 
the first mill in Woburn. He married 

Sarah , and their children were: 

Deacon Josiah, Lieutenant James, John, 
Mary, Sarah, and Sergeant Samuel, of 
further mention. 

(II) Sergeant Samuel Converse, son of 
Deacon Edward and Sarah Converse, was 
baptized March 12, 1638, in the First 
Church of Charlestown, and died Febru- 
ary 20, 1669. He married, June 8, 1660, 
Judith Carter, daughter of Rev. Thomas 
and Mary (Parkhurst) Carter. Her father 
was the first minister of Woburn, where 
he was in charge for forty-two years. 
Children of Sergeant Samuel and Judith 
(Carter) Converse were: Samuel (2), of 
further mention ; and Abigail, born in 
Woburn, died July 14, 1689. 

(III) Samuel (2) Converse, son of Ser- 
geant Samuel and Judith (Carter) Con- 
verse, was born in Woburn, Massachu- 
setts, April 4, 1662, and died in Thomp- 
son Parish, Killingly, Connecticut, in 

1732. He married Dorcas -, prior 

to 1694, and in 1710 removed to Thomp- 
son Parish, where he was the first settler. 
Children : Samuel, Ensign Edward, of 
whom further; Thomas, Dorcas, Pain, 
and Josiah. 

(IV) Ensign Edward (2) Converse, 
son of Samuel (2) and Dorcas Converse, 
was born in Woburn, Massachusetts, Sep- 
tember 25, 1696, and died July 9, 1784, 
When he was fourteen years of age, he 
removed with his parents to Thompson. 
He was an able man, prominent in public 

Mass— 12— 10 145 



affairs, and served in many local offices, 
being chosen to repair bridges, help sur- 
vey doubtful bounds, collect, reserve and 
distribute school money, etc. He married, 
August 6, 1717, Elizabeth Cooper, who 
died February 19, 1776, daughter of John 
and Elizabeth Cooper, and they were the 
parents of : Ensign James, of whom fur- 
ther ; Captain Edward, Jonathan, Lieuten- 
ant Jacob, Asa, Jesse, Elizabeth, and Su- 
sannah. 

(V) Ensign James Converse, son of 
Ensign Edward (2) and Elizabeth (Coop- 
er) Converse, was baptized September 
2'j, 1719, and died December 13, 1753. He 
married, February 18, 1740, Mary Lea- 
vens, and among their children was Cap- 
tain Alpheus, of whom further. 

(VI) Captain Alpheus Converse, son 
of Ensign James and Mary (Leavens) 
Converse, was born September i, 1752, 
and died May 8, 1825. He was a soldier 
in the American army during the War of 
the Revolution. He married, March 17, 
1774, Jerusha Elliot, who died March 5, 
1817, and they were the parents of chil- 
dren, among whom was Deacon Benjamin 
Converse, of whom further. 

(VII) Deacon Benjamin Converse, son 
of Captain Alpheus and Jerusha (Elliot) 
Converse, was born March 9, 1779, and 
died May 18, 1859. He married, October 
15, 1801, Margaret Brainard, and among 
their children was Deacon Hiram, of 
whom further. 

(VIII) Deacon Hiram Converse, son 
of Deacon Benjamin and Margaret 
(Brainard) Converse, was born March 
24, 1807, and died December 14, 1885. He 
married (first) January 30, 1838, Mona 
Scott Sedgwick, and they had a son, John, 
who lived in Michigan ; (second) Jean- 
nette P. Washburn. Among the children 
of the second marriage was Mary Wash- 
burn, of whom further. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(IX) Mary Washburn Converse, 
daughter of Deacon Hiram and Jeannette 
P. (Washburn) Converse, was born De- 
cember 21, 1852. She married, October 
9, 1873, Orrilus Winslow Studley (see 
Studley). 



PATTERSON, Raymond Garfield 

Among those who are contributing a 
valuable share to the development of the 
country is Raymond Garfield Patterson, 
at present, 1923, instructor of history and 
English in the State Normal School at 
Westfield, Massachusetts. 

The Patterson family is of Scotch ori- 
gin, most of the families of that name in 
New England, New York, and Pennsyl- 
vania being descendants of one or the 
other of the two immigrant ancestors, 
James Patterson and Andrew Patterson. 
James Patterson was a soldier in the 
Scotch army of Charles I, of England, 
which was defeated by Cromwell at the 
battle of Worcester. He was one of the 
prisoners of war transported to New Eng- 
land to be sold as servants for a term of 
years. Sailing from London in the ship 
"John and Sarah" about November ii, 
1651, he arrived at Charlestown, Massa- 
chusetts, before May, 1652. In 1658 he 
received a grant of land in the town of 
Billerica, and between that date and 1685 
received sixteen other grants. In 1661 
his name appears on the town record as 
a vote of one of the proprietors, and he 
was admitted a freeman, April 18, 1690. 
During King Philip's War his house was 
garrisoned, and for services rendered, his 
son James received a grant of land in Nar- 
ragansett No. 6, now Templeton, Massa- 
chusetts. The father was also in the ex- 
pedition to Canada in 1690, and his son 
James, by virtue of his father's services, 
was a prpprietor of Sudbury, Canada, 
granted in 1741, in Maine, and comprising 



the present towns of Jay and Canton. 
James Patterson married, March 29, 1662, 
Rebecca Stevenson, daughter of Andrew 
and Jane Stevenson, of Cambridge, and 
his children were : Mary, James, Andrew, 
John, Joseph, Rebecca, James, and Jon- 
athan. 

Andrew Patterson, the other immigrant 
ancestor, came from Hamilton, Scotland, 
and settled in Stratford, Connecticut. 
With eleven other Scotchmen he came in 
the ship "Henry and Francis," in 1685, 
landing at Perth Amboy, New Jersey, 
they all having left their homes in Scot- 
land because of the persecution of the 
Scotch Covenanters by the English Gov- 
ernment. McEwen, one of the group, 
states in his journal "that he took part in 
the battle at Bothwell Bridge a few days 
before sailing, and notes the day of the 
sailing, September 5, and landing, Decem- 
ber 18, 1685. They reached Stratford after 
a weary journey from New Jersey, on 
foot, February 15, 1686, and there they 
made their home." Children, born in 
Stratford: Sarah, Charles, William, Eliz- 
abeth, Hannah, Mary, and John. 

From the sons of these two immigrants, 
James Patterson and Andrew Patterson, 
have descended a numerous progeny, 
members of which settled in various parts 
of New England, where they were active- 
ly identified with the early history of 
many of the early colonies and of the 
original Northeastern States. From New 
England they went westward into New 
York State, and from New York into 
Pennsylvania. Among those who went 
into the then wild regions of the West, 
Pennsylvania, were the ancestors of Ray- 
mond Garfield Patterson. 

Jesse Patterson, great-grandfather of 
Raymond Garfield Patterson, was an able, 
energetic farmer, and lived at Standing 
Stone, Bradford, Pennsylvania. He mar- 



146 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ried Elizabeth Shoemaker, and they were 
the parents of Francis, of whom further, 

Francis Patterson, son of Jesse and 
Elizabeth (Shoemaker) Patterson, was 
born in 1807, at Standing Stone, Brad- 
ford, Pennsylvania, and died in Decem- 
ber, 1899, aged ninety-two years. He was 
an active, intelligent man, with a very 
keen mind, and was for many years en- 
gaged in the lumber business, in his early 
years acting as a pilot on the lumber rafts 
sent down the Susquehanna river. He 
married Mary Ely, and their children 
were: Joseph Hazard; William; Emma, 
who married Benjamin Farnham ; George 
Byington, of whom further; and Eunice, 
who married Jerome B. Cornell. 

George Byington Patterson, son of 
Francis and Mary (Ely) Patterson, was 
born in Lemon, Pennsylvania, in 1852, 
and is now (1922) a resident of Factory- 
ville, Pennsylvania. In early life he was 
engaged in farming, cultivating the land 
cleared by his father, but in later years 
he has been engaged in handling farm 
machinery in Factoryville. He has al- 
ways taken an active interest in public 
aflfairs, and has served in many public 
ofifices, including that of tax collector. 
For many years he was a member of the 
school board, and in all of the numerous 
public offices which he was chosen to fill 
he rendered faithful and efficient service. 
He is highly respected among his fellow- 
townsmen, and is still taking an active 
interest in many phases of community 
life. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Free and Accepted Masons; the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows ; and of the 
Sons of America. He married Alice Dora 
Sherwood, of Wyoming county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and they are the parents of five 
children: i. Madge, who married Charles 
Rodda. 2. Raymond G., of whom further. 
3. Vivian, who married Ralph Watkins. 



4. Lee, who married Marguerite Miller, of 
New Jersey. 5. Dora, who married Odel 
Wallace, of Salem, Oregon. 

Raymond Garfield Patterson, son of 
George B. and Alice Dora (Sherwood) 
Patterson, was born in Lemon, Pennsyl- 
vania, June 4, 1881. He received his 
earliest school training in the public 
school at Lemon, Pennsylvania, and then 
went to Tunkharmock, Pennsylvania, 
and later to the Wilkes Barre High 
School, from which he was graduated. 
From high school he went to the State 
Normal School, at Mansfield, Pennsyl- 
vania, and then became a student in Syra- 
cuse University, at Syracuse, New York, 
where he received his degrees, and later 
attended the Chicago University, and still 
later Yale University. 

Mr. Patterson has held many executive 
and administrative positions in the edu- 
cational field. For two years he was 
principal of the graded school at Chin- 
chilla, Pennsylvania. He then resumed 
his studies for a year in Syracuse College, 
then held a position in California, later 
substituted for a time in the Pennsyl- 
vania State Normal School, leaving that 
institution to accept a position in May- 
ville. North Dakota, where he accepted 
a position as instructor of history and 
economics, which connection he main- 
tained for a period of two years, from 
1906 to 1908. He then taught in the 
Normal School at Stevens Point, Wiscon- 
sin, where he remained for five years, 
from 1909 to 1914, and in the latter year 
became instructor in history and civics in 
the New Haven High School, at New 
Haven. Connecticut, which position he 
continued to efficiently fill until 1920, 
when he came to Westfield, Massachu- 
setts, as instructor in history and Eng- 
lish in the State Normal School there. 
This position he has continued to hold to 



147 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the present time (1923). Mr. Patterson's 
wide experience, as well as his thorough 
preparation for the profession of teaching, 
has made his work peculiarly valuable. 
He has the intellectual energy' and the 
inquiring spirit which are the distinguish- 
ing marks of the real student, and because 
he has remained a student he has been 
able to keep in close touch with his 
classes. While he was in high school, 
during his early years, he studied law in 
the office of his uncle, and he has found 
that to the instructor of history and eco- 
nomics, all lines of study and research are 
valuable. 

Fraternally, Mr. Patterson is a mem- 
ber of Mt. Moriah Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Westfield, Massachu- 
setts. He takes an active part in the 
church and community life of Westfield, 
thus broadening his influence and greatly 
adding to his usefulness among the young 
people of the town. He is a member of 
the Second Congregational Church ; and 
of the Men's Club, the Get Together Club, 
and also the Historical Association, and 
in addition to these is rendering invalu- 
able service as superintendent of the Sun- 
day school. 

Mr. Patterson married, on June 29, 
1912, Flora Converse Studley, daughter 
of Orrilus Winslow and Mary W. (Con- 
verse) Studley (see Studley and Converse 
lines in preceding sketch of Robert C. 
Studley). Mr. and Mrs. Patterson are the 
parents of two children : Alary Alice, born 
October 4, 1914 ; and Jean, born March 25, 
1917. 



WYMAN, Charles Merritt 

Charles Alerritt Wyman, president of 
the East Harbor Fertilizer Company, has 
been a resident of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, since 1908. Mr. Wyman comes of 
an old English family, which traces its 



origin to a remote German origin in the 
family of Weymann, whose descendants 
crossed over into England with the Sax- 
ons, taking the various names of Wiman, 
Wimant, Ymond, and Wymond, as well 
as Wyman, the latter being the form 
adopted by nearly all of the American 
families of the name. The American fam- 
ilies are descended from English stock of 
ancient pedigree. The first of whom rec- 
ord is found is Francis Wyman, a resi- 
dent of Westmill, Hertfordshire, Eng- 
land. He married (first) at Westmill, 
May 2, 1617, Elizabeth Richardson. She 
was buried June 22, 1630, and he married 

(second) Jane , who was buried in 

July, 1656. Francis Wyman was buried 
September 19, 1658. To the first marriage 
five children were born: i. Thomas, 
baptized at Westmill, April 5, 1618, 
married Ann Godfrey, settled in New 
England. 2. Francis (2), baptized Febru- 
ary 24, 1619, settled in New England. 
3. John, baptized February 3, 1621, 4. 
Richard, born March 14, 1623. 5. Wil- 
liam, born August 31, 1628, buried in July, 
1630. 

The sons, Francis (2) and John Wy- 
man, were among the earliest settlers of 
Woburn, Massachusetts, then called 
Charlestown Village. They lived first in 
Charlestown, where John is recorded as a 
subscriber to town orders for Woburn in 
December, 1640. He was taxed at Wo- 
burn, September 8, 1645. Twenty years 
later, in 1665, Francis (2) and John Wy- 
man, of Woburn, purchased for fifty 
pounds of Joseph Rock the Coytmore 
grant of five hundred acres, which with a 
large adjoining farm they owned, made 
them the largest proprietors of land in the 
town. The land was in the westerly and 
northwesterly parts of what is now Bur- 
lington. John and Francis (2) Wyman 
were tanners, and tradition says that their 



148 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGR.\PHY 



tan-yard was in Wyman lane. During 
King Philip's War (1675-76), Woburn 
taxes were at one time paid in shoes man- 
ufactured from leather prepared by the 
Wymans. 

Francis (2) Wyman married (first) 
Judith Peirce ; (second) Abigail Reed, and 
among the twelve children born to the 
second marriage, there were nine sons : 
Francis, William, Timothy, Joseph, Na- 
thaniel, Samuel, Thomas, Benjamin, and 
Stephen. Francis (2) Wyman died No- 
vember 30, 1699, aged eighty-two years. 
John Wyman, brother of Francis (2) Wy- 
man, married Sarah Nutt, and among 
their children were five sons, who lived 
to maturity: John, Jr., Solomon, David, 
Jonathan, and Seth. Descendants of these 
two groups of sons scattered throughout 
the New England States and to other sec- 
tions of the country. Among those who 
were born in Vermont were the ancestors 
of Charles M. Wyman, whose grand- 
father, John Wyman, was born in that 
State, October 4, 1800, and died August 
7, 1888. 

John Wyman was a woolen manufac- 
turer, and during the greater part of his 
life was a resident of White Creek, New 
York. He married (first) November 15, 
1827, Caroline Heath. She died, and he 
married (second) February 25, 1846, 
Laura Heath, sister of his first wife (see 
Heath VHI). The children of John and 
Caroline (Heath) Wyman were : Eliza J., 
born July 26, 1829; Charles Merritt, of 
whom further ; Laura B., born July 6, 
1833 ; Lydia M., born May 22, 1835 ; and 
Walter E., born July 17, 1838. 

Charles Merritt Wyman, son of John 
and Caroline (Heath) Wyman, was born 
at White Creek, New York, October 9, 
1831, and died at Hoosick Falls, New 
York, in 1920. He received his education 
in the public schools of his native district, 



and then learned the trade of machinist. 
He managed his father's business, that of 
woolen manufacturing, for a time, and 
later came to Hoosick Falls, where he 
was engaged in mechanical work until he 
reached the advanced age of seventy-five, 
at which time he retired and spent the 
remaining fourteen years of his life in 
well-earned leisure. He was a member of 
the Methodist church, and was actively 
interested both in the work of his church 
and in public affairs in general. He mar- 
ried Ann Hawthorne, who was born in 
Hoosick Falls, and died in 1913, daughter 
of John and Polly (Smith) Hawthorne, 
and they were the parents of nine chil- 
dren : Henry, deceased ; Louis, deceased ; 
Flora, deceased ; ]\Iary, deceased, married 
Elmer Filkins; Bertha, married Frank 
Hewett ; Jennie ; John ; Fannie, married 
Harry Bissell ; and Charles Merritt (2), 
of whom further. 

Charles Merritt (2) Wyman, son of 
Charles Merritt and Ann (Hawthorne) 
Wyman, was born at Hoosick Falls, New 
York, May 3, 1881. He received his early 
training in the public schools of Hoosick 
Falls, and then entered the Troy Confer- 
ence Seminary, at Poultney, Vermont, 
where he continued his studies until he 
was nineteen years of age. He began his 
business career as a book salesman, and 
then engaged in the laundry business for 
a time. When he was twenty-one years 
of age he engaged in business for himself 
as a promoter, in which field he has been 
very successful. By the sale of stock he 
has financed many mills, corporations, 
and enterprises of various sorts, and his 
success in these undertakings has caused 
his services to be much in demand. He 
organized the East Harbor Fertilizer 
Company, of Provincetown, Massachu- 
setts, of which concern he is president, 
and among the corporations and enter- 
149 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



prises which he has financed are : The 
Potter Knitting Company, of Springfield, 
and several large lumber companies. He 
has also sold stock for numerous com- 
panies which were already established, 
and his operations have covered a wide 
territory. Since 1908 Mr. Wyman has 
made his home in Springfield, where his 
business headquarters are located. He is 
a member of the Knights of Pythias, of 
Bennington, Vermont, and his religious 
affiliation is with Christ Disciples Church 
of Springfield. 

Mr. Wyman married (first) in 1901, 
Anna Holton, of Troy, New York. She 
was the mother of one child, born Septem- 
ber 15, 1902. Mrs. Holton died in 1904. 
On November i, 1905, Mr. Wyman mar- 
ried Flora Holton, sister of his first wife, 
both being natives of Massachusetts, and 
daughters of John and Mary (Gendron) 
Holton. John Holton was born in Eng- 
land, and served in the Civil War, as a 
member of the Second Connecticut Regi- 
ment. There was born to the second 
marriage of Mr. Wyman one daughter, 
Olive, November 19, 1906. 

(The Heath Line). 

(I) W^illiam Heath, immigrant ances- 
tor, came to this country from England, 
sailing in the ship "Lion" which arrived 
in Boston, Massachusetts, September 16, 
1632. He was accompanied by his wife 
Mary and five children. He settled in 
Roxbury, Massachusetts, where he was 
admitted a freeman March 4, 1633. He 
served as a deputy to the General Court 
in 1634-37-39-40-41 and 42, and in 
1645 represented Dover. William Heath 
died May 29, 1652. His wife Mary 
(second wife), died December 15, 1659. 
The entry made after his name on the 
church records, by the Apostle Eliot 
reads : "An able, faithful, and Godly 
brother." Children: i. Mary Spear. 2. 



Isaac, of further mention. 3. Hannah. 4. 
Mary. 5. Peleg, married Susanna King, 
died in November, 1671. 

(II) Isaac Heath, son of William 
Heath, was born in England and came 
with his father to America. He was ad- 
mitted a freeman in 1652. He married, 
December 16, 1650, Mary Davis, and his 
death occurred December 29, 1694. The 
children of Isaac and Mary (Davis) 
Heath were: i. Child, died January 2, 
1652, before baptism. 2. Mary, born March 

1, 1653, died 1668. 3. Isaac (2), of fur- 
ther mention. 4, Elizabeth, born July 26, 
1656. 5. Abigail, born August 26, 1660. 
6. Ebenezer, born March 15, 1663. 7. 
Peleg, born June 25, 1665. 8. Joseph, 
born July 25, 1669. 

(HI) Isaac (2) Heath, son of Isaac 
and Mary (Davis) Heath, was born at 
Roxbury, May 10, 1655, ^^^ baptized July 

2, following. He inherited the home- 
stead in Roxbury, and also land in Brook- 
line from his father. His will was dated 
December 19, 1684. He married, Febru- 
ary 2, 1681, Ann Fisher, born June 22, 
1661, daughter of Cornelius and Leah 
Fisher. Children of Isaac (2) and Ann 
(Fisher) Wyman: i. Ann, born Novem- 
ber 12, 1681, died November 17, 1681. 2, 
Isaac (3), of further mention. 

(IV) Isaac (3) Heath, son of Isaac (2) 
and Ann (Fisher) Heath, was born in 
Roxbury, July 23, 1683. In 1705 he set- 
tled in Framingham. He was dismissed 
from the Framingham church to the 
church at Coventry, Connecticut, May 

19, 1723. He married Rachel , and 

they were the parents of seven children, 
all born at Framingham: i. Isaac (4), 
born July 24, 1705, married Elizabeth 
. 2. Ebenezer, of further mention, 

3, Ann, born September 16, 1709. 4. 
Rachel, born March 10, 1715, married 
William Beal, 5, Thankful, born July 3, 
1717. 6. Benjamin, born April 21, 1720, 



150 






S^^ 



ASTop 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



died September i6, 1807. 7. Joseph, born 
July 20, 1723. 

(V) Ebenezer Heath, son of Isaac (3) 
and Rachel Heath, was born May 31, 1707. 
He married (first) at Coventry, Connecti- 
cut, September 18, 1728, Lydia Utley. She 
died, and he married (second) November 
5> 1753, Dorcas Shavighter. Children: 
William, of further mention; Eleazer; 
Ann ; and Dorcas. 

(VI) William Heath, son of Ebenezer 
and Dorcas (Shaughter) Heath, was born 
September 27, 1758, and died June 29, 
1850. He was a farmer at Tyringham, 
and married Catherine Robbins, born in 
1 761, died at Tyringham, June 2, 1848, at 
the age of eighty-seven years. Children 
of this marriage were: William (2), of 
further mention ; Catherine, born March 
3, 1783; Abner, born July 8, 1785, died 
August 31, 1786; Esther, born July 8, 
1785, died young; Amos, born October 25, 
1790; Hannah, born February 19, 1793, 
died young; Ezra, born July 25, 1795; 
Linas, born August 23, 1797; Lucinda, 
born February 24, 1800; Cyrus, born Sep- 
tember 20, 1802, married Clara Cheney, 
and died March 22, 1876. 

(VII) William (2) Heath, son of Wil- 
liam and Catherine (Robbins) Heath, 
married, and was the father of twelve 
children : Ransom, Alvin, Lucien, Ira, 
Philena, William, Russell, Samantha ; 
Caroline, of whom further ; Heman ; 
Laura, of whom further ; and Thetis. 

(VIII) Caroline Heath, daughter of 
William (2) Heath, married John Wy- 
man (see Wyman). 

(VIII) Laura Heath, daughter of Wil- 
liam (2) Heath, married, after the death 
of her sister Caroline, John Wyman. 



RIGA, Joseph Giles 

Among the business men of Springfield 
who have come to this country from other 



lands is Joseph Giles Riga, president of 
the J. G. Riga & Sons Company, dealers 
in automobile supplies and accessories, 
who is also engaged in the importing busi- 
ness, carrying on an especially large trade 
in gun and rifle barrels and gun stocks, 
which he imports and sells to the leading 
gun manufactories in America. 

(I) Mr. Riga was born in Belgium, of 
Belgian parentage, his grandfather being 
Martin Riga, who lived in Nessouvaux, 
Province of Liege, Belgium. Martin Riga 
married Catherine Halet, and their chil- 
dren were : James ; Giles Joseph, of whom 
further; Peter; Martin; Martine; Anne; 
Joseph ; and Agnes. 

(II) Giles Joseph Riga, son of Martin 
and Catherine (Halet) Riga, was born in 
Nessouvaux, Province of Liege, Belgium, 
January i, 1833, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, May 14, 1890. He was 
a self-educated man, of large ability, who 
made a point of doing most thoroughly 
whatever task he undertook. He learned 
the trade of gun-barrel maker and became 
an expert in the making of same, which he 
forged from Damascus steel. In 1877 ^^ 
came to America, locating at Webster, 
Massachusetts, where for a year he work- 
ed in a mill for a daily wage of seventy 
cents. He then went to Worcester, Mas- 
sachusetts, where he secured employment 
in the Washburn, Moen Wire Alill, as a 
maker of dies. He retained this position 
for a period of five years, from 1878 to 
1883, and then removed to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, where he continued to re- 
side to the time of his death. While liv- 
ing in Worcester and employed in the 
wire mill, he had established a business 
of his own, having begun the importing 
of gun barrels, which he sold to all the 
leading gun makers of the country, and 
when he removed to Springfield, this 
business had grown to such proportions 



151 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



that he was compelled to devote his en- 
tire time to it, and on account of his close 
attention the business constantly in- 
creased. 

Along with his extensive business in- 
terests, however, Mr. Riga found time to 
be actively interested in public afifairs, 
and in order that he might do so he, in 
1884, while living in Worcester, became 
a naturalized citizen of the United States. 
His religious affiliation was with the 
French Protestant church, in the afifairs 
of which he took an interest and in which 
he was an active participant. He married 
Marie Pirotte, who was born in 1840, in 
Cornesse, Province of Liege, Belgium, 
and died in 1873, and their children were: 
Martin Joseph ; Elizabeth, who married 
Gustave Pannier; Joseph Giles, of further 
mention ; Marie Jeanne, who married 
William E. Lyon ; and Victoria, who mar- 
ried S. N. Benoit. 

(Ill) Joseph Giles Riga, son of Giles 
Joseph and Marie (Pirrotte) Riga, was 
born in Nessouvaux, Province of Liege, 
Belgium, December 28, 1865. He re- 
ceived his early education in the schools 
of his native land, where he studied 
French, and after coming to America with 
his parents in 1877, completed his studies 
in the schools of Webster and Worcester, 
Massachusetts. In Belgium, as a boy, 
he had worked in a woolen mill, and his 
evenings had been employed in boring 
gun barrels. In Worcester, he used the 
time not spent in school in a wire mill, 
where he learned to draw fine wire, and 
when his parents removed to Springfield, 
in 1886, he found employment in the 
Prentiss Wire Mill, of Holyoke, which 
employment he followed until 1889. In 
that year he began to learn the machinist 
trade, and followed this for one year, af- 
ter which he returned to Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, where he again took a position 



with the Prentiss Wire Mill, with which 
concern he remained until 1899. In 1890 
the death of his father occurred, and Mr. 
Riga, with his brother, M. J. Riga, took 
over the importing business of the father, 
which they conducted under the firm 
name of M. J. & J. G. Riga until 1896, 
in which year Mr. Riga purchased his 
brother's interests, and since that time 
he has successfully conducted the busi- 
ness alone. He also held his position with 
the Prentiss Wire Mill, at Holyoke, until 
1899, ^s aforementioned. Since that time 
he has devoted his entire time to the im- 
porting business, making three trips 
abroad for the purpose of increasing his 
trade, and has by energy and ability 
built up a prosperous business, engaging 
extensively in the importation of gun and 
rifle barrels which are sold to the gun 
manufactories of America. 

In 1912 Mr. Riga organized the J. G. 
Riga &; Sons Company, a corporation 
formed for the purpose of selling automo- 
bile supplies and accessories, and of this 
company he is president, the business of 
the corporation being largely conducted 
by his sons, Joseph C. and Harley M. 
Mr. Riga is a public-spirited citizen and 
is well known and highly esteemed among 
a large circle of friends and associates. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with Roswell 
Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, in 
which order he is a member of all the 
Scottish and York rites, in the former 
having received the thirty-second degree, 
and is also a member of Melha Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine, and a member of Bela Grotto. 
He is also a member of the Springfield 
Automobile Club, of which he was treas- 
urer; and of the Publicity Club and the 
Rotary Club. 

On August 26, 1890, Joseph Giles Riga 
married Annie Rose Harley, of North- 



152 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ampton, Massachusetts, daughter of Cor- 
nelius Harley (of mention elsewhere in 
this work) and Celina (Marcil) Harley, 
and they are the parents of two children : 
I. Joseph Cornelius, born May 26, 1891 ; 
received his education in the Technical 
High School of Springfield, and in the 
Wharton School of Finance and Com- 
merce, of the University of Pennsylvania ; 
he is treasurer of the J. G. Riga & Sons 
Company ; he married Ruth Miller, of 
Springfield, daughter of Edward P. and 
Josephine (Parkhurst) Miller (Edward 
P, Miller fully mentioned elsewhere in 
this work), and they are the parents of 
two children : Joseph C. Jr., and Donald 
Edward. 2. Harley Martin, born May 15, 
1892; received his education in the public 
schools of Springfield and in the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, and is 
now secretary of the J. G. Riga & Sons 
Company ; he married Thelma Cram, 
daughter of Charles and Ora (Osborne) 
Cram ; one son, Harley Bradford, was born 
March 20, 1922. Both these sons, like 
their father, are members of all the 
Masonic bodies, in the York Rite affiliat- 
ing with Blue Lodge, Royal Arch Chap- 
ter, Royal and Select Masters, and 
Knights Templar, and in the Scottish 
Rite affiliating with Lodge of Perfection, 
Princes of Jerusalem, Rose Croix, and 
Consistory, up to the thirty-second de- 
gree. 



BAKER, Robert Elza 

Among the native citizens of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, is Robert Elza 
Baker, traveling representative of the 
Citizens' Supply Company, of Columbus, 
Ohio, who throughout his life has been a 
resident of Springfield. Mr. Baker is 
descended from very old Colonial stock, 
tracing his ancestry to Francis Baker, 
who came to America in 1635, ^^^^ ^i^^^ o^ 
descent being traced as follows : 



(I) Francis Baker, born in England in 
161 1, came to America in 1635, sailing in 
the ship "Planter" from Great St. Albans, 
Hertfordshire, England. He settled on 
Cape Cod in a part of the town of Yar- 
mouth, which is now Dennis, and married 
Isabel Twining, their marriage being the 
first to be celebrated by white persons on 
Cape Cod. Francis Baker died in Yar- 
mouth, July 23, 1696, aged eighty-five 
years. He and his wafe, Isabel (Twining) 
Baker, were the parents of eight children, 
among them John, of further mention. 

(II) John Baker, the second son of 
Francis and Isabel (Twnning) Baker, 
reared a family of children, among whom 
was John, Jr., of further mention. 

(III) John Baker, Jr., son of John 
Baker, was the father of Peter Baker, of 
further mention. 

(IV) Peter Baker, son of John Baker, 
Jr., married and reared children, among 
whom was Seth, of further mention. 

(V) Seth Baker, son of Peter Baker, 
was born May i, 1746, and died July 15, 
181 1, He married and reared children, 
among whom was Seth Baker, Jr., of 
further mention. 

(VI) Seth Baker, Jr., son of Seth 
Baker, was born in Hyannis, IMassachu- 
setts, March 3, 1797, and died December 
24, 1847. He was a merchant and ship- 
owner, and for a time followed the sea. 
He married Sophia Lovell, and they were 
the parents of six children : Henry ; Wil- 
liam ; Cyrus Alger, of further mention ; 
Rebecca; Sophia; and Seth. 

(VII) Captain Cyrus Alger Baker, 
son of Seth, Jr., and Sophia (Lovell) 
Baker, was born in Hyannis, Massachu- 
setts, in 1839, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, November 30, 1917. He 
received his education in the local schools 
of his district, and when school days were 
over went to sea. During the period of the 
Civil War he was in the transport service 

53 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in the South, under Admiral Farragut, 
and so efficiently did he discharge the 
duties of his post that he was promoted 
several times, finally receiving the rank 
of captain. In 1870 he left the sea and 
came to Springfield, Massachusetts, where 
he went into business for himself, buying 
and selling kindling wood. For ten years 
he conducted a successful kindling wood 
concern, and at the end of that time, in 
1880, made a change, associating himself 
with the Springfield Gas Company, as 
foreman, which connection he maintained 
for several years. He then made another 
change, this time engaging in the express 
business, in which he remained active to 
the time of his death. He was an ener- 
getic, able man, highly esteemed by a 
large circle of friends and associates. His 
religious affiliation was with St. Paul's 
Universalist Church. 

Captain Baker was twice married. He 
married (first) Leonora Norris, of Hyan- 
nis, daughter of Robert and Love (Lewis) 
Norris. She died in 1876, and he mar- 
ried (second) in February, 1879, Ellen 
Josephine Myrick. To the first marriage 
four children were born : Chester W. ; 
Leonora Norris, who married Henry E. 
Johnson, deceased, and has two children : 
Robert Irving, and Irving Chester ; Rob- 
ert Elza, of further mention ; and Cyrus Al- 
ger, Jr., deceased. The children of the 
second marriage were : Clifton L. ; Seth 
William, a sketch of whom follows ; Al- 
ger C. ; Ralph Clayton ; Orlando, de- 
ceased ; Herbert, deceased ; and Edmund, 
deceased. 

(VIII) Robert Elza Baker, son of Cap- 
tain Cyrus A. and Leonora (Norris) 
Baker, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, July I, 1873. He received his 
education in the public schools of Spring- 
field, and when his studies were com- 
pleted, entered the employ of W. G. 



Baker, a dealer in tea and cofiFee, in the 
capacity of traveling representative. An 
alert, capable young man, he was emi- 
nently successful in this line of work, and 
for twenty years continued to sell tea and 
cofifee, covering a wide territory and 
building up a very large patronage. For 
a brief time he was employed in the 
United States water shops, and for an- 
other short period he associated himself 
with the H. L. Handy Company, but soon 
returned to the business with which an 
experience of twenty years had made 
him thoroughly familiar. About the time 
of the beginning of the World War he 
engaged in the tea and cofifee business for 
himself, conducting a prosperous estab- 
lishment, which he continued until 1920, 
when he sold out and again resumed the 
life of the traveling representative, this 
time associating himself with the Citi- 
zens' Wholesale Supply Company, of 
Columbus, Ohio, which connection he 
still (1922) maintains. An expert in his 
line, and widely known throughout the 
territory which he covers, he sells great 
quantities of supplies, and the advantage 
of quality goods at fair prices adds to 
his constantly increasing patronage. 

Mr. Baker is well known in fraternal 
circles, being a member of Hampden 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and is also affiliated with Spring- 
field Lodge, Knights of Pythias. He is 
an attendant of the Universalist church, 
and is known not only as a successful 
business man, but as a public-spirited citi- 
zen and a loyal friend, who is highly es- 
teemed by hosts of friends and associates. 

Robert Elza Baker married, on March 
23, 1904, Mary Ardell Gilmore, of Stock- 
bridge, Massachusetts, daughter of 
Charles A. and Mary (Darby) Gilmore, 
and they are the parents of four children : 
Chester William, born May 8, 1905 ; Mar- 



154 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



jorie Leonora, born January 7, 1907 ; 
Robert E., Jr., born August 2, 1909; and 
Dorcas Louise, born October 18, 191 5. 



BAKER, Seth William 

Among the business men of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, is Seth William Baker, 
who is engaged in the automobile express 
business, to which he has devoted his 
entire time during the last few years, 

Seth William Baker, son of Captain 
Cyrus Alger and Ellen Josephine (My- 
rick) Baker, and half-brother of Robert 
Elza Baker (see preceding sketch) was 
born in Springfield, ^Massachusetts, Janu- 
ary 20, 1883. He received his education 
in the public schools of his native city, 
and in 1902 enlisted in the navy for a 
four-year term, and during his term of 
service he visited many of the different 
countries of the world. After his dis- 
charge from the navy, upon the comple- 
tion of his term of service, he became as- 
sociated with the Bay State and Central 
Storage Warehouses, in Springfield, for a 
time, and then engaged in the automobile 
express business, to which he has devoted 
his entire time for the last several years. 

Mr. Baker married, in November, 1907, 
Clita I. Wincapaw, of Thomaston, Alaine, 
daughter of George and Agnes Wincapaw, 
and they are the parents of one son, Har- 
old William, born in September, 1908. 



ABBE, Frederick Alden 

First in the grain business, and then in 
the coal and wood business, in which he is 
still engaged, Mr. Abbe has established a 
reputation as one of the successful busi- 
ness men of his native city of Springfield. 
Though primarily a business man, he 
takes an active interest in public affairs 
and is always ready to do his part in any 
manner to promote the betterment of 
community conditions. 



The name Abbe, or Abbey, spelled also 
in various other ways, had its origin in 
the fact of one of the family having lived 
near an abbey. It is probable that, in the 
course of time, the patronymic was super- 
seded by the appellation derived from the 
place of abode. The escutcheon of the 
family is as follows : 

Arms — Gules, five fusils in fesse between three 
scallop shells. 

Crest — On a wreath of three colors of the shield 
(gules and argent) an eagle's head erased or. 

(I) John Abbe was born about 161 3, in 
England, in Northamptonshire, the coun- 
ty of Norfolk, He came to America in 
1637 and settled in Salem, Massachusetts, 
and was allotted an acre of land. In 1642 
he was granted more land, probably in 
the part of the town which later became 
Wenham. He was a man of prominence 
in the community, and in 1669 filled the 
office of constable. His first wife, whose 
name was Mary, died in 1672, and he 
married (second) in 1674, Mary Gold- 
smith. John Abbe died at Wenham about 
1690. 

(II) Samuel Abbe, son of John and 
Mary Abbe, was born about 1646, at 
Wenham, and later lived for a time at 
Salem. In 1690 he was made a freeman 
of Salem Village, and in 1697 he removed 
to Windham, It is gratifying to know 
that he was one of those men whose en- 
lightenment of humanity and clear vision 
caused them to oppose the fanaticism of 
the witchcraft delusion. He married, in 
1672, Mary Knowlton, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Elizabeth Knowlton. The death 
of Samuel /\bbe occurred in March, 1698. 

(III) Ebenezer Abbe, son of Samuel 
and Mary (Knowlton) Abbe, was born 
July 31, 1683. in Salem Village, and in 
1705 moved to Norwich, Connecticut. He 
settled at what is now North Windham 
and in later life, at Mansfield. He took 



155 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



an interest in religious matters and in 
1725 became a member of Hampton 
Church. He married, in 1707, Mary Al- 
len, daughter of Joshua and Mary Allen, 
early settlers of Mansfield. Ebenezer 
Abbe died at Windham, December 5, 

1758. 

(IV) Ebenezer (2) Abbe, son of Ebe- 
nezer and Mary (Allen) Abbe, was born 
July 27, 1708, and was of that part of 
Windham called North Windham. He 
married, in 1730, Abigail Cary, a daugh- 
ter of Joseph Cary, Jr. 

(V) Isaac Abbe, son of Ebenezer (2) 
and Abigail (Cary) Abbe, was born July 
25, 1733, at Windham, and married, April 
5, 1753, Eunice Church. His death oc- 
curred in April, 1788. 

(VI) Abner Abbe, son of Isaac and 
Eunice (Church) Abbe, was born Novem- 
ber 5, 1758, in North Windham, and 
served as a soldier in the Revolutionary 
War. He lived in Stafford, Connecticut, 
and also owned land in Wilbraham, Long- 
meadow and Granby, Massachusetts. He 
married, in 1782, Sarah Swetland, daugh- 
ter of John, Jr., and Abi (Deming) Swet- 
land, of Hartford, Connecticut, and died 
in Granby, December 13, 1803. 

(VII) John Swetland Abbe, son of 
Abner and Sarah (Swetland) Abbe, was 
born September 26, 1787, in Longmeadow, 
Massachusetts, and was a farmer and a 
large owner of real estate. He married, 
in 1813, Electa (Chapin) Warner, daugh- 
ter of Colonel Abel and Dorcas (Chapin) 
Chapin, and widow of Dr. Pearly War- 
ner, by whom she had four children. John 
Swetland Abbe died in Springfield, May 
9, 1862. 

(VIII) John Alden Abbe, son of John 
Swetland and Electa (Chapin-Warner) 
Abbe, was born August 13, 1817, in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and followed 
the life of a farmer on his father's home- 



stead, which, after his father's death, be- 
came his by inheritance. He married, in 
1846, Caroline Pease, daughter of James 
Cleeland and Malinda (Booth) Pease, and 
they were the parents of John Edgar, of 
further mention. John Alden Abbe's 
death occurred in Springfield, March 26, 
1900. 

(IX) John Edgar Abbe, son of John 
Alden and Caroline (Pease) Abbe, was 
born February 2, 1849, at Chicopee, Mas- 
sachusetts, and now lives in Springfield, 
where he is engaged in business as a car- 
penter and builder. He married, in 1874, 
Emma Jane, daughter of Amos and Laura 
E. (]\Iixter) Whittaker, the wedding tak- 
ing place on January 8th, a date famous 
in American history as that of the vic- 
tory of New Orleans. Mrs. Abbe was 
born January 18, 1856, at Hartford, Con- 
necticut. Mr. Abbe, who had been edu- 
cated in the schools of Chicopee and Chic- 
opee Falls, was, at the time of his mar- 
riage, successfully following the carpen- 
ter's trade and has always pursued the 
same line of industry. For a number of 
years he was employed by Mr. Shattuck, 
and for fifteen years has been in business 
for himself, contracting, building and do- 
ing repairing. Mr. and Mrs. Abbe are 
the parents of the following children : 
Bessie E., deceased ; Charles E. ; Freder- 
ick Alden, of further mention ; Hattie M., 
deceased ; Daisy Estelle, wife of Edward 
Rathborne; Mildred C, wife of Clifford 
Smith ; and Robert, deceased. 

(X) Frederick Alden Abbe, son of John 
Edgar and Emma Jane (Whittaker) 
Abbe, was born October 5, 1880, in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native 
city. On completing his course of study 
he entered the service of Smith & Wes- 
son, with whom he remained six years, 
becoming, during that time, thoroughly 



156 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



familiar with the manufacture of fire- 



arms. 



In 1906 Mr. Abbe, in association with 
his brother, Charles E. Abbe, established 
himself in the grain business on Mill 
street, under the firm name of C. E. and 
F. A. Abbe. After ten years of success- 
ful operation along this line the partners 
disposed of their interests and in 1916 en- 
gaged in the coal and wood business, re- 
taining the same firm name and having 
their establishment on Allen street. To 
the development of this enterprise Mr. 
Abbe now devotes his entire time, and as 
a result of his able management the busi- 
ness has continuously prospered, being 
now in a very flourishing condition. 

Mr. Abbe married, July 3, 1905, Isa- 
belle Tebeau, daughter of John and Anas- 
tasia Tebeau. Mrs. Abbe is a native of 
Canada. Mr. and Mrs. Abbe are the par- 
ents of one son : Dayton Frederick Abbe, 
born June 12, 1913. Mr. Abbe is in the 
prime of life, and his career, successful as 
it has thus far been, promises for the 
future a record still richer in results. 



STEDMAN, Howard Sumner 

Among the successful business men of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, who have re- 
cently come to the city is Howard Sum- 
ner Stedman, director and vice-president 
of the Dentists' and Surgeons' Supply 
Company, who is of English parentage, 
his father having come to this country 
about 1879. 

The grandfather of Mr. Stedman was 
a resident of London, England, through- 
out his life, and well known as a teacher 
and educator and a well-to-do man. He 
married and reared a family of children, 
among whom was Alfred Gordon Sted- 
man, father of Howard Sumner Stedman. 

Alfred Gordon Stedman was born in 
London, England, in 1856, and died in 



Boston, Massachusetts, May 31, 1918. 
He was a college student at the time of 
his father's death, soon after which event 
he left England and came to Halifax, 
Nova Scotia, whence, after remaining but 
a short time, he came to this country in 
1879 or 1880, locating in Boston. He be- 
came a confectioner and caterer, and as 
manager of the Tiffen Club Lunch, at 
No. 114 State street, Boston, he con- 
ducted a thriving and prosperous busi- 
ness, devoting to the preparation and 
serving of food a business ability, which, 
combined with artistic taste and know- 
ledge of the customs of good society in 
England, made the Tiffen Club Lunch 
famous and extremely popular among the 
aristocratic circles in Boston. To the time 
of his death, Mr. Stedman remained ac- 
tively in charge of this well known and 
artistic establishment, the patronage of 
which greatly increased during the term 
of his efficient management. He married 
Sarah Louise Ingle, who was born in 
Montgomeryshire, Wales, December 21, 
1861, daughter of George and Elizabeth 
(Thomas) Ingle, and besides Howard 
Sumner they were the parents of six 
other children, as follows: Alfred G., of 
Framingham, Massachusetts, who mar- 
ried Grace G. Clark, and has a daughter, 
Virginia ; Herbert D., who married Helen 
Ingalls, and has a son, Gordon ; Ernest 
L., of Medford, Massachusetts, who mar- 
ried Olive Reeves, and has a son, Eugene; 
Philip R. ; Alice G., who married Harold 
P. Whitcher, of Strafford, New Hamp- 
shire, and has a son, Robert; Ralph S., 
who married Edith L. Higgins, and has 
one daughter, Beverly. Mrs. Alfred Gor- 
don Stedman is now a matron at the Aus- 
tin Academy at Strafiford, New Hamp- 
shire. 

Howard Sumner Stedrhan, son of Al- 
fred Gordon and Sarah Louise (Ingle) 

f57 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Stedman, was born in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, February 4, 1889, and received his 
education in the schools of Everett, Mas- 
sachusetts. When school days were over, 
he entered the employ of a photographer 
in Boston, where he remained for a year 
and a half, going from there to the seed 
store of the Joseph Breck Company, in 
Boston, where he remained for about a 
year. In 1910 he went to Medford, Mas- 
sachusetts, and in 1912 he again made a 
change, this time going to Melrose, Mas- 
sachusetts, where he engaged in the gro- 
cery business. After a time, he returned 
to Boston, entering the employ of the S. 
S. White Dental Manufacturing Com- 
pany, which connection he maintained 
until March, 1918. In April, 1918, he 
came to Springfield, Massachusetts, where 
he became associated with the Dentists' 
and Surgeons' Supply Company, in the 
capacity of traveling representative. A 
year later, in 1919, he was transferred to 
the office as manager, and in April, 1920, 
was made a director and vice-president 
of the company. His varied experience 
in different lines of work and in different 
cities has been of great value, both in lay- 
ing the foundations for a well-planned 
system of management, and in adding 
greatly to his lists of acquaintances and 
connections in various cities. That the 
company has made no mistake in choos- 
ing Mr. Stedman to fill these responsible 
positions is clearly evidenced by the in- 
creasing prosperity of the business, and 
by the high esteem in which he is held 
by his associates. 

With all his business responsibilities, 
Mr. Stedman finds time for fraternal and 
other affiliations. He is a member of 
Mount Hermon Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Medford, Massachu- 
setts ; and De Soto Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of Springfield. He 



is also a member of the United Commer- 
cial Travelers' Association ; and his re- 
ligious affiliation is with the Baptist 
church. 

Howard Sumner Stedman married, on 
September 27, 1919, Marion M. Miller, of 
Amesbury, Massachusetts, daughter of 
John and Janet (Wardrop) Miller, and 
they are the parents of one child, Barbara 
Stedman, born September 13, 1920. 



GARDNER, Charles Henry 

Among the well known business men 
of Springfield, Massachusetts, is Charles 
Henry Gardner, president of the Hall 
Hardware Company, who is also a direc- 
tor of the Co-operative Bank, and has 
been a resident of this city for sixteen 
years. 

(I) Mr. Gardner is a descendant of a 
very old family, tracing his ancestry to 
John Gardner, immigrant ancestor, who 
came to this country from Scotland at an 
early date, and located in New Hamp- 
shire. He was a tailor by trade, skilled at 
his business, and an able, efficient man- 
ager. He married and reared a family of 
children, among whom was Benjamin. 

(II) Benjamin Gardner, son of John 
Gardner, lived and died in Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. He was a farmer by 
occupation, and reared a family of chil- 
dren : Andrew, of whom further ; Eliza, 
John, Edward, and Daniel. 

(III) Andrew Gardner, son of Ben- 
jamin Gardner, was born in Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, January 9, 1806, and 
died there in 1895, aged eighty-nine years. 
He was a capable farmer, owning a tract 
of some four hundred acres, and a very 
active member of the Methodist church, 
of which he was a trustee. He married 
Almira Lang, who was born in Rye, New 
Hampshire, in April, 1813, and died Janu- 
ary 28, 1899, ^^^ they were the parents of 



158 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



children : Charles Wesley, deceased, who 
was editor of the Portsmouth "Chron- 
icle ;" John Edward ; Andrew Milton, of 
whom further ; Joseph William, deceased ; 
and Benjamin Franklin. 

(IV) Andrew Milton Gardner, son of 
Andrew and Almira (Lang) Gardner, was 
born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
October 30, 1841. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native 
city, and then engaged in farming until 
the attainment of his majority. He then 
retailed milk in Portsmouth up to 1886, 
when he became identified with an ice 
company in Portsmouth, which connec- 
tion he maintained for a period of about 
twelve years. Mr. Gardner also took an 
active interest in public affairs, and for 
some ten years served as street commis- 
sioner, having charge of all the street 
work of the city. For the past ten years 
he has been an attendant in the Ports- 
mouth Navy Yard, being attached to the 
officers' quarters, under the lieutenant 
commander, where he was actively en- 
gaged up to September, 1922, when he 
retired. 

Fraternally, Mr. Gardner is affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and with the Knights of Pythias, 
and his religious affiliation is with the 
Methodist church, of which he has been 
a member of the official board for many 
years. 

On July 5, 1870, Mr. Gardner married 
Sarah Ellen Lamb, of Westbrook, Maine, 
born October 19, 1841, daughter of Sam- 
uel and Sarah (Larrabee) Lamb, and they 
were the parents of the following chil- 
dren : Charles H., of whom further; Al- 
mira Larrabee, who married Harvey Boz- 
arth, of Springfield, and has two children : 
Ruth, and John. 

(V) Charles Henry Gardner, son of 
Andrew Milton and Sarah Ellen (Lamb) 



Gardner, was born in Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, July 14, 1873. He attended 
the public schools of Portsmouth, and 
then entered the high school, where he 
continued his studies for three years, and 
then went to Tilton Seminary, at Tilton, 
New Hampshire, in 1887-88. Here he 
prepared for college, and at the end of his 
preparatory course he returned home, but 
instead of entering college, associated 
himself with a hardware store in order 
that he might learn the business, entering 
the employ of Bayor & Matthews, as a 
clerk, and receiving a weekly salary of 
three dollars. Thus starting at the low- 
est round of t4ie ladder, he thoroughly 
learned the hardware business, holding 
the above position for a period of five 
years. He then worked for a year in the 
cutting room of a shoe factory, and then, 
in 1894, went to Worcester, Massachu- 
setts, where for seven years he was asso- 
ciated with the Duncan & Goodell Com- 
pany, as clerk in their hardware store. In 
1901 he again made a change, this time 
going to Holyoke, Massachusetts, where 
he entered the employ of G. E. Russell, 
hardware dealer, as clerk, remaining with 
him for five years. In 1906 he came to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and became 
identified with the hardware business of 

0. C. Alderman, in the capacity of clerk, 
which connection he maintained for 
twelve years. Mr. Gardner had been 
steadily accumulating knowledge and ex- 
perience during these years of service in 
various localities. — and he had also been 
accumulating capital for the establish- 
ment of a business of his own. On July 

1, 1919, he purchased an interest in the 
Hall's Hardware, Incorporated, at Win- 
chester square, and that business he is 
still (1923) successfully conducting. His 
long and varied experience has well fitted 
him for the conduct of this business, and 



f59 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the growth of the patronage during the 
years he has been associated with it has 
demonstrated the thoroughness of his 
preparation. The business is carried on 
under the corporate name, Hall's Hard- 
ware, Inc., of which corporation he is now 
president. His ability and integrity caused 
him to be sought as a charter member of 
the Co-operative Bank, and he was at 
once elected a director, and that respon- 
sible ofifice he still (1923) holds. 

Mr, Gardner is a member of Indian Or- 
chard Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
of Bay Path Lodge, No. 234, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows; and of Ouinsiga- 
mond Lodge, No. 7, Improved Order of 
Red Men, of Worcester, in which he has 
passed all of the chairs to the great coun- 
cil. His religious affiliation is with Hope 
Congregational Church, which he has 
served as trustee for a number of years. 

Charles Henry Gardner married, on 
October 18, 1904, Edna Burton Solomon, 
formerly of Lacon, Illinois, but later a 
resident of Worcester, Massachusetts, 
daughter of Demis and Fannie Louise 
(Burton) Solomon, and they are the par- 
ents of seven children : Charles Milton, 
born October 17, 1906, died in infancy ; 
Everett Burton, born October 11, 1907; 
Charles Wesley, born July 24, 1909 ; Ber- 
tram Andrew, born June 14, 1914; Ralph 
Cleveland, born March 25, 1917; Pearl 
Louise, born June 12, 1920; and Grace 
Marion, born July 31, 1922. 



JOHNSON, Frank Henry 

Frank Henry Johnson, formerly vice- 
president of the West Box Company and 
now superintendent of the plant of the 
New England Box Company, has been 
identified with the box manufacturing 
business for nearly half a century and has 
been a resident of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, for more than sixty years. 



Many families bearing the name of 
Johnson came to New England at a very 
early date, among the earliest being three 
brothers, Edward, William, and John, 
sons of William Johnson, of Heme Hill, 
near Canterbury, England. They came 
in the fleet with Winthrop in 1630, and 
Solomon Johnson and another John John- 
son, likewise from Heme Hill, are also 
recorded as having come during that 
same year. Edward Johnson was one of 
the founders of Woburn, Massachusetts ; 
William settled in Charlestown ;and John, 
in Roxbury. Isaac Johnson, of Clipsham, 
also came in the fleet with Winthrop in 
1630, his wife, Arabella, being the daugh- 
ter of Thomas, fourteenth earl of Lincoln. 
He was the richest man in the colony, 
but both he and his wife died in the same 
year that they emigrated. Edward John- 
son and his brothers were evidently of the 
landed gentry, since Edward left a large 
estate in England. He is best known as 
the author of "History of New England 
of Wonder W^orking Providence of Zion's 
Savior in New England," published in 
London in 1654. He returned to England 
in 1636 and brought back his wife, seven 
children, and three servants. John John- 
son, brother of Edward, and son of Wil- 
liam Johnson, of Heme Hill, England, 
brought with him his wife Margery and 
five children. From these several immi- 
grant ancestors, who doubtless were re- 
lated to each other, many descendants 
were scattered throughout New England 
and to other parts of the country. Among 
these, a generation later, was Ebenezer 
Johnson, born in New England, May 9, 
1760, who went to sea at an early age 
and was in the privateer service during 
the greater part of the period of the Rev- 
olutionary War, although for a part of 
the time he acted as deputy commissary 
for land forces. He took part in sixteen 



160 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



actions at sea and was taken prisoner 
seven times. For three months he was 
confined on the prison ship "Jersey," 
where the prisoners were so starved and 
ill-treated that only a few survived. On 
one occasion during that period of im- 
prisonment, Johnson secured a light, made 
his way to the powder magazine, and 
threatened to blow up the ship unless the 
officers would pledge him on their honor 
that they would grant the prisoners re- 
lief. The officers must have understood 
that Ebenezer Johnson meant business, 
for his request was granted. He was one 
of the defenders of New London when it 
was attacked by the British under Bene- 
dict Arnold, September 6, 1781, and he 
narrowly escaped the massacre of Fort 
Griswold, at Groton. While retreating, 
he, with seven companions, was fired up- 
on and all of his companions killed, he 
escaping with seven bullet holes in his 
clothing. He was several times ship- 
wrecked, once in the West Indies, when 
his ship and all of his crew except one 
were lost, and he, with the one other sur- 
vivor, traveled for eighty miles, bare- 
footed and almost naked, before a human 
habitation was found. On another occa- 
sion, he was dug out of a snow bank, un- 
conscious and almost lifeless. After the 
Revolution he abandoned the sea and 
settled in Wells, Vermont, from there re- 
moving in 1794 to Utica, New York, and 
in 1795 to Cazenovia, where he built a 
large house in the public square, the first 
tavern in the village. It was known as 
the Johnson House. About 1816 he re- 
moved to Chautauqua county, and later 
to Buffalo. He married, August 13, 1783, 
Deborah Lathrop, daughter of Rev. Sam- 
uel Lathrop, of Wells, Vermont, and lived 
to be eighty-one years of age, his death 
occurring February 8, 1841, the death of 
his wife having occurred seven years ear- 



lier, of cholera, in Buffalo. His children, 
Elisha, Ebenezer (2), William, and Sam- 
uel, were all born at Wells, Vermont, 
while the younger ones, Lucy, Hiram, 
Marlin, Lathrop, Caroline, Amanda, and 
Palmester, were born after the removal 
to Cazenovia. Descendants of these sons 
have continued to live in Vermont, New 
York, and in other sections of the country, 
each generation contributing citizens as 
stalwart and as able as the adventurous 
Ebenezer (i), whose stirring adventures 
and hair-breadth escapes have furnished 
thrills for many younger generations of 
that branch of the family. 

Elijah Johnson was born in Vermont, 
in 1794, and died at Schroon, New York, 
in 1884, aged ninety years. He came to 
Schroon, New York as a pioneer, cleared 
land, and built a log house, which he later 
replaced with a substantial frame dwell- 
ing-place, the first of its kind erected in 
that section of the country. He was a 
successful farmer and stock raiser, an ex- 
pert in breeding and rearing blooded 
horses. He married Submit Fuller, who 
was born in Andover, Vermont, June 3, 
1800, daughter of Joseph and Eunice 
(Holt) Fuller, and they were the parents 
of six children : Ovey, Walker, Cleony ; 
Joseph Fuller, of whom further; Serena; 
and Martha. 

Joseph Fuller Johnson, son of Elijah 
and Submit (Fuller) Johnson, was born 
in Schroon, New York, October 27, 1827, 
and died in Chicopee, Massachusetts, Oc- 
tober 3, 1899. He received his education 
in the public schools of his native district, 
and then was engaged in farming in New 
York State until 1862, when he came to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and engaged 
in the teaming business. In this line he 
built up an extensive business, which he 
continued to successfully conduct until 
the time of his death. He was an ener- 



Mass — 12 — 11 



161 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



getic and capable man, highly esteemed 
by his associates. Fraternally he was 
affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. On October 31, 1853, ^^ 
married Mary Emily Baker, who was 
born in White Plains, New York, Febru- 
ary 25, 1832, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, November 6, 1905, daugh- 
ter of Oliver and Mary (Martin) Baker. 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson became the par- 
ents of five children : Eliza Submit, who 
married Elisha N. Brigham ; Frank Henry, 
of whom further ; Louise, who married 
Fred Heathcote ; Walter E. ; and Joseph 
W. 

Frank Henry Johnson, son of Joseph 
Fuller and Mary Emily (Baker) Johnson, 
was born in Schroon, New York, Septem- 
ber 27, 1855, and came to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, with his parents when he 
was five years of age. He received his 
education in the public schools of Spring- 
field, and when his school training was 
completed, learned the trade of the cab- 
inet-maker and the carpenter, combining 
with these the business of the undertaker. 
After a time, he became interested in box- 
making, and secured a position with Rog- 
ers & West, later leaving them to associ- 
ate himself with A. D. Cutler, and still 
later, when he was offered a position with 
Cutler & West, he accepted, remaining 
with that concern until the West Box 
Company was organized, of which Mr. 
Johnson was made vice-president. This 
ofifice he continued to hold until 1920, 
when the West Box Company sold out to 
the New England Box Company, and Mr. 
Johnson was made superintendent of the 
plant, which position he has continued to 
hold to the present time. Thus for forty- 
eight years Mr. Johnson has been associ- 
ated with the box-making business, and 
during that nearly half-century of active 
and varied experience in the field he has 



become an expert, thoroughly acquainted 
with all departments of the business, both 
in the manufacturing and executive lines. 
He is a recognized authority in the field, 
and as superintendent of the large con- 
cern now known as the New England 
Box Company, he is rendering valuable 
service. Mr. Johnson is well known in 
Springfield, and is highly esteemed among 
a very large group of associates. Frater- 
nally he is affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and was for a 
number of years a member of the United 
Workmen of America. He also holds 
membership in the Trinity Methodist 
Church. 

Frank Henry Johnson married, on Oc- 
tober 31, 1878, Mary A. Brett, of Lanca- 
shire, England, daughter of Robert A. and 
Susan (Noble) Brett, and they are the 
parents of two children: i. Carrie Lou- 
ise, who married ^^'illard Rocket, of 
Springfield, a printer, and has two chil- 
dren : Malcolm W., who is a student in 
the University of Pennsylvania, and Ro- 
land. 2. Emily, who married George R. 
Booth, of Springfield, who is in the whole- 
sale confectionery business in that city. 



TAIT Ancestry 

George Tait, grandfather of the four 
Tait brothers, whose activities are out- 
lined in the following pages, was born in 
Paisley, Scotland, about 1795, and was 
among those who left the rugged hills of 
their beloved land to try their fortune in 
the newer land beyond the sea. He was 
a tailor, and settled in Montreal, Canada, 
where he followed his trade. After a time, 
however, he removed to Terrebonne 
county, Canada, where he gratified his de- 
sire for active outdoor work by engaging 
in farming, and in this occupation he con- 
tinued during the remainder of his active 
life, his death occurring there in 1878, at 



162 






■'-DUN -^-r 





O/ 



'yt/zi^ • v^VV^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGR.\PHY 



the age of eighty-three years. George 
Tait and his wife, Isabella, were the par- 
ents of seven children : Gilbert, Anna, 
Belle, Jennie, Maggie, George C. ; and 
James, of whom further. 

James Tait, son of George and Isabella 
Tait, was born in St. Sophia, Terrebonne 
county, Canada, in 1839, and died in chic- 
opee. Massachusetts, January 22, 1880, at 
the early age of forty-one years. A car- 
penter by trade, he came to the United 
States about 1862, during the early 
months of the Civil War, and settled first 
in Lowell, Massachusetts, where he lived 
for a time, then removed to Chicopee, 
where he passed the remainder of his life. 
For a time he engaged in the milk busi- 
ness, but this he later sold out to George 
C. Tait, his brother, then became associ- 
ated with a Mr. Reed, in building opera- 
tions. Still later, he sold milk at retail 
in Holyoke, Massachusetts, for a period of 
two years, and finally engaged in the rais- 
ing of fruit and vegetables, in which occu- 
pation he continued during the remainder 
of his life. He was a devoted member of 
the Presbyterian church, and was highly 
respected and esteemed by all w^ho knew 
him. 

James Tait married Mary Laurentine 
Decatur, of Lowell, Massachusetts, who 
was born in 1845, and died in 1906, daugh- 
ter of Joshua and Mary (Hill) Decatur, 
and they were the parents of five sons, one 
of whom died in childhood, the other four 
comprising the present firm of Tait 
Brothers, known throughout New Eng- 
land as proprietors of the largest milk 
and ice cream business in this section of 
the country. The five sons were : Harry 
Joshua (q. v.) ; Frank Decatur (q. v.) ; 
George Gilbert (q. v.) ; Alexander, born 
in 1874, died in 1882; and James Charles 
(q. v.). 



TAIT Brothers 

The largest concern in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and one of the largest in 
the country, in the milk, cream, con- 
densed milk, and ice cream business, is 
the one conducted by Tait Brothers, of 
that city, and the story of the develop- 
ment of that business from its first mod- 
est beginning is a practical illustration of 
wiiat determination to command success 
will accomplish. The business of Tait 
Brothers, whose name and products are 
familiar throughout every part of New 
England and beyond, is that of a concern 
in which the most profitable capital in- 
vested by its heads are the Scotch charac- 
teristics of energy, thrift, and industry, 
bequeathed to them by their paternal 
forebears. 

The milk business, which was begun 
by the father of the Tait Brothers and 
later sold by him to his brother, George 
C. Tait, and still later purchased by 
George G. and Frank D. Tait, in April, 
1893, was the foundation of the great or- 
ganization of to-day. Early in the course 
of its operations, Harry J. and James C. 
Tait became identified therewith, and they 
added several more routes to the business. 
The following year, 1894, they opened a 
small plant on Greenwood street, still con- 
tinuing the retailing of milk. That year 
brought such an increase in their business 
that in 1895 additional milk routes were 
purchased and the wholesaling of milk 
and cream was added to the retail line, 
nine delivery wagons being required to 
operate the establishment. 

In 1898 Tait Brothers began the manu- 
facture of ice cream, locating on Dwight 
street, at the corner of Harrison avenue, 
and a year later, in 1899, they built on 
Vinton street, moving the ice cream plant 
to that location. There they remained 
until 1913, when they built and moved 
163 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



into their present plant on Cass street, 
near the corner of Linden street. This 
plant is forty by one hundred and sixty 
feet, and three stories in height, and in 
1922 was duplicated by a building which 
doubled the capacity of the present 
Springfield plant. From a working force 
of two or three men, the number of em- 
ployees in Springfield alone has increased 
to one hundred and fifty, and the business 
has branches in Holyoke, Northampton, 
Fitchburg, Worcester, New Bedford, and 
New London, in addition to an interest in 
an establishment in Bridgeport, Connecti- 
cut. They also have a branch in Willi- 
mantic, Connecticut, and a selling agency 
in Boston, Massachusetts, besides a large 
factory in Bangor, New York, for the 
manufacture of condensed milk. They 
make butter, cream cheese, and evapo- 
rated milk, and use 415,000,000 quarts of 
inilk annually in the manufacture of ice 
cream. The magnitude of the business is 
indicated by the fact that one million gal- 
lons of ice cream represents the output 
from the various plants during the best 
periods of the season, 400,000 gallons be- 
ing made by the Springfield plant alone. 
On July 4, 1921, the output of the Spring- 
field plant for the day was 6,430 gallons. 
The Tait Brothers give employment to 
some two hundred and fifty people the 
year round. 

The manufacture of ice cream has 
proved to be one of the most profitable 
of the various activities of the four broth- 
ers, and the sanitary conditions under 
which it is made, together with the use 
of ingredients of the highest quality and 
exact scientific methods of mixing and 
freezing, have produced a delicious, 
wholesome article which has created for 
itself an ever-increasing market. The 
principal source from which the milk and 
cream used in making the ice cream 



comes is Hoosick, New York, and it is 
clarified and pasteurized just as is the 
milk for retailing. After having been 
kept at a temperature of one hundred and 
forty-five degrees for half an hour, it is 
reduced to a winter temperature, or about 
forty degrees, by cold water and brine- 
filled coils, then passed to the great enam- 
eled tank-shaped kettles, where the flavor- 
ing, the eggs, and the solidifying ingredi- 
ents are added ; the estimated mixture 
for Tait ice cream containing twelve per 
cent, butter fats and thirty-eight per cent, 
of total solids. Bristol's recording ther- 
mometers take the temperature of the 
mixture as it passes through the various 
tanks in such a manner that from the 
start to finish an automatic chart record 
of temperature, marked in red ink, shows 
the temperature each minute and each 
second between given hours. The freez- 
ing machines are arranged in battery 
formation in the freezing room, some of 
them containing ten gallons of mixture 
and some twenty-five. The process of 
freezing requires about eighteen minutes, 
being accomplished by means of the brine 
system, combined with agitating paddles 
in the interior of the freezers. When the 
mixture is frozen to the proper consist- 
ency it is drawn ofiF into cans of desig- 
nated size and form, where later it is cut 
up into pint and quart bricks as desired 
and sent out to delight the palates of, and 
furnish a most delicious nourishment for, 
men, women, and children all over New 
England and for many beyond the bor- 
ders of this region. 

The Springfield plant is a most modern 
and scientifically equipped establishment, 
and all the processes of handling and of 
manufacture are conducted in a strictly 
regulated and sanitary manner. The 
floors of the three-story structure are all 
cemented, the machinery and devices for 



164 




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ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



handling are the most modern and effici- 
ent, and from the milking of the cows and 
the care of the pails in the country dairy 
to the last bit of bottling and the final 
washing of the used bottles, every pre- 
caution is taken to insure absolute clean- 
liness and sanitation. Preceding the milk- 
ing, the cows are carefully groomed and 
fed. Immediately after the milking, the 
filled cans are placed in ice-water in a 
temperature below fifty degrees, trucked 
to the depot, and shipped. The cleaning 
of the bottles is done by a hydraulic 
washer. Into this mechanism several 
cases of bottles are inverted and carried 
through the various washing compart- 
ments by an overhead chainless belt, and 
into the mouth of each bottle spraying 
tubes throw hot water of a temperature 
of about one hundred and ten degrees, 
from which the cases of bottles pass on- 
ward through an alkali bath which 
cleanses them of all sour sediments. The 
temperature rises to one hundred and 
seventy degrees as the bottles pass on 
their appointed course, a germicide bath 
still further cleanses, and the bottles pass 
on to a final process where by hot water 
and steam the temperature is increased to 
on hundred and eighty degrees. The 
case of bottles is then removed to a chute- 
like table, and then to another room 
Vv'here they are stored for refilling. These 
processes give some idea of the care and 
attention to detail, and of the scientific 
thoroughness that is given the business 
by Tait Brothers, and this has made their 
business one of the largest of its kind in 
the New England region. Energy, ability, 
and a conscientious supervision have built 
surely and wisely, and on these founda- 
tions one retail milk route has been built 
into a large organization of leading im- 
portance in its field. 

The increasing scope of the Tait Broth- 
ers' operations necessitated the use not 



only of more horse-drawn vehicles of 
various kinds, but created a demand for 
motor trucks. It is characteristic of the 
thoroughness and resourcefulness with 
which this big business has been built up 
and is being conducted that as the number 
of trucks needed increased, the Tait 
Brothers decided to manufacture their 
own. For use in the milk trade, they still 
maintain many horse-drawn vehicles, but 
the many automobile trucks required in 
their immense ice cream business they 
manufacture at their Cass street plant in 
Springfield. From a milk-dealing busi- 
ness, owning one team, to a great organ- 
ization ranking as the largest of its kind 
in Western Massachusetts and one of the 
largest in the country, owning hundreds 
of teams and making motor trucks for 
its own use, is a long stride, but the 
achievements possible to initiative, deter- 
mination, ability and thrift are unlimited. 
At the present time the Tait Brothers 
own, besides their Springfield plant and 
ten branches and selling offices, the Frank- 
lin County Condensed Milk Company, of 
North Bangor, New York, the creamery 
at Fort Coventry, New York, and a part 
interest in the Huber Ice Cream Com- 
pany. They also owned for a time the 
Orange County (New York) Milk Com- 
pany. The business of Tait Brothers 
was incorporated January i, 1922, with a 
capitalization of $1,500,000, under the firm 
name of Tait Brothers, of which organiza- 
tion Harry J. Tait is president, Frank D. 
Tait, treasurer, George G. Tait, vice- 
president, and James C. Tait, clerk. 



TAIT, Harry Joshua 

Harry Joshua Tait, eldest son of James 
and Mary Laurentine (Decatur) Tait, 
was born in Chicopee, Massachusetts, 
August 27, 1867. He attended the schools 
of Chicopee and then continued his stud- 
ies in Westford Academy for a year. 



165 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



School days being- over, he engaged in 
farming for a while and also in market- 
gardening, but did not find either entirely 
satisfactory or congenial. Shortly after 
his father sold his milk business to his 
brother, George C. Tait, Harry Joshua 
entered the employ of Mr. Tait, selling 
milk to private families. Many lads have 
sold milk to the retail trade, but few have 
found in that occupation the open door to 
a great success and the building up of a 
large business concern, such as is now 
operated by Tait Brothers, described at 
length in the preceding sketch. Frater- 
nally, Mr. Tait is affiliated with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, in which 
order he is also a member of the Encamp- 
ment. 

Harry J. Tait married, March 3, 1897, 
Susan Blanche Hare, of Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, daughter of Richard Hare, 
and they are the parents of five children : 
Richard Hare, born March 10, 1898 ; Paul- 
ine Frank, born December 26, 1899 ; Ray- 
mond George, born July 16, 1902 ; Harry 
J., Jr., born October 25, 1904; and Don- 
ald Winthrop, born April 12, 1912. The 
eldest son, Richard Hare, served in the 
United States army during the World 
War, being stationed first at a camp in 
Gettysburg, from April to July, 1918, and 
then at Camp Tobyhanna, Pennsylvania, 
from July to September. He was then 
sent overseas, attached to the 302nd Bat- 
talion, Heavy Tank Corps, and was made 
a corporal in the Motor Transport Corps, 
doing convoy duty all over France, and 
was honorably discharged July 13, 1919, 
since which time he has been connected 
with Tait Brothers, and is now president 
of the concern. 



TAIT, Frank Decatur 

Frank Decatur Tait, second son of 
James and Mary Laurentine (Decatur) 



Tait, was born in Chicopee, Massachu- 
setts, Janauary 9, 1871. He received his 
education in the grammar and high 
schools of Chicopee, graduating from the 
latter in 1887, at the age of sixteen years. 
An active, energetic lad, in whom the 
traits of his Scotch forebears were re- 
markably well balanced and most happily 
combined with the versatile resourceful- 
ness that is typically American, he lost no 
time in beginning his business career. 
Having made most excellent use of the 
opportunities oflFered in the schools he at- 
tended, he went, after graduation, to 
Springfield, where for five years he was 
employed as clerk in the office of the 
Springfield Street Railway Company. The 
energy and ability which had enabled him 
to graduate from high school at the age 
of sixteen were revealed in the modest 
beginning of his business career. He 
saved a remarkably large proportion of 
his earnings, and at the end of five years, 
being then twenty-one years of age, he 
went to Chicago, Illinois, and engaged in 
the real estate business. A year later he 
returned to Springfield and in 1893, with 
his brother George G., started what final- 
ly developed in the great and growing 
business, Tait Brothers, and of which he 
is now treasurer. 

In addition to extensive business in- 
terests, Mr. Tait finds time for social and 
fraternal affiliations. He is a member of 
Amity Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, in which order he is also a mem- 
ber of Agawam Encampment and Spring- 
field Canton. 

Frank D. Tait married, April 3, 1894, 
Pauline Julia Heubisch, of New Haven, 
Connecticut, but born in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, daughter of Paul and Wil- 
helmina (George) Heubisch. They are 
the parents of six children: i. Jean Wil- 
helmina, born April 10, 1895, a graduate 
:66 



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ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of Smith College; she married Dr. John 
Horn Robertson, of Binghamton, New 
York. 2. Blanche Amelia, born July 24, 
1896, also a graduate of Smith College; 
she married, October 6, 1921, Irving L. 
Chidsey, of East Haven, Connecticut, 
but now living in Springfield, where he 
is a salesman for Tait Brothers. 3. Mil- 
dred Emma, born September 20, 1898; 
she attended Smith College, later spent 
two years in Worcester, after which she 
went to New York and took special 
courses, graduating from the Scudder 
School. She married Donald T. Peck, 
son of Frederick W. Peck, of East Haven, 
Connecticut. Mr. Peck is engaged in 
business in New Haven, where they make 
their home. 4. Eunice, born March 12, 
1904,' also a graduate of Smith College. 

5. Paul George, born December 25, 1906. 

6. Marjorie Edith, born June 20, 1912. 



TAIT, George Gilbert 

George Gilbert Tait, third son of James 
and Mary Laurentine (Decatur) Tait, 
was born in Chicopee, Massachusetts, 
November 5, 1872, and received his edu- 
cation in the schools of his native city, 
graduating from the grammar school and 
attending the high school for three years. 
Upon the completion of his studies he en- 
tered the employ of his uncle, George C. 
Tait, a milk dealer, with whom his broth- 
er, Harry J., was already employed, and 
he is now connected with the business of 
Tait Brothers, mentioned at length on 
preceding pages, of which he is now 
vice-president. 

With all his large and exacting prac- 
tical responsibilities, Mr. Tait is a public- 
spirited citizen and takes an active part 
in political affairs. He is a supporter of 
the Republican party, keeping in close 
touch with all its work and giving effici- 
ent aid in its councils as well as in the 



carrying out of its projects. For the past 
seven years he has served on the board of 
licensed commissioners and this offfce he 
still held in 1922. He is also well known 
in fraternal and club circles, and is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and the Nayasset Club. 
Mr. Tait is deservedly popular among a 
large circle of friends and associates who 
hold him in high esteem as a capable 
business man, a progressive citizen, a 
good comrade, and a loyal friend. 

Mr. Tait married, November 7, 1921, 
Julia W. Dowd, daughter of John J. 
Dowd, deceased, and Sarah K. Dowd, of 
Springfield. Julia W. (Dowd) Tait was 
born in Springfield, and educated in Cen- 
tral Street School. Immediately after 
graduation, she entered the employ of 
R. G. Dun, where she remained about 
eight years, then became associated with 
-the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance 
Company. Mrs. George G. Tait died 
July 7, 1923, leaving besides her husband 
a sister and three brothers. 



TAIT, James C. 

James Charles Tait, fifth son of James 
and Mary Laurentine (Decatur) Tait, was 
born in Chicopee, Massachusetts, April 
19, 1877, and received his education in 
Chicopee and Springfield schools. Upon 
the completion of his studies he became 
associated with his brothers in the milk 
business, and is now connected with Tait 
Brothers (previously mentioned), holding 
the office of clerk. 

James C. Tait is also well known in 
fraternal and club circles. He is a mem- 
ber of Esoteric Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Springfield ; Springfield Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar; and all the 
Scottish Rite bodies ; also Melha Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mys- 



167 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



tic Shrine. He is also affiliated with 
Amity Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of Springfield, a member of Aga- 
wam Encampment; and with Cabot 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of Holyoke, 
Massachusetts. 

James C. Tait married, October lo, 1897, 
Mary Emma Dana, of Springfield, daugh- 
ter of Moses and Mary (Tilton) Dana, 
and they are the parents of three children : 
Maud Irvin, born July 10, 1898; Beatrice 
Grace, born February 10, 1904; and Bar- 
bara, born October 20, 1907. 



MERRIMAN, John Jetson 

Since the completion of his course in 
the Hartford Business College, John Jet- 
son Merriman, treasurer of the Federal 
Land Bank of Springfield, has always 
been identified with the banking business. 
For eighteen years he was with the Aetna 
National Bank of Hartford, Connecticut, 
then went to Porto Rico, as auditor of 
the American Colonial Bank of San Juan, 
and was later made assistant cashier, and 
also one of the directors of the Porto Rico 
Fruit Exchange, remaining here until 
1920, when he came to the Federal Land 
Bank of Springfield. 

The Merriman family is an old one, 
and since early Colonial times has been 
contributing worthy citizens to the nation. 
The name is also written Merriam and 
Meriam, and has been borne by many 
who have won distinction in various 
lines of achievement. 

(I) The branch of the family to which 
John Jetson Merriman belongs traces its 
descent from Nathaniel ^Merriman, who 
was born in England in 1613, and died 
in Wallingford, Connecticut, February 
13' 1693. He was one of the original 
settlers of Wallingford in 1670, and 
received as his allotment there lots 
numbered i and 2. on the north, west, 



and east corners of South Cross street, 
and also lot No. 2, adjoining the west lot. 
These lots were in later years owned by 
Peter Whittlesey and Rev. Edgar J. Doo- 
little, and the home of Nathaniel Merri- 
man was built a short distance west of 
the Whittlesey house. Nathaniel Merri- 
man was in Boston in 1632, and was one 
of those who served in the Pequot War. 
He was an ensign in a militia company in 
New Haven, Connecticut ; lieutenant in 
Wallingford, same State ; and was ap- 
pointed captain to raise troops for service 
in King Philip's War in 1675. He took an 
active and prominent part in the public 
affairs of Wallingford, serving for a 
period of eight years as town clerk, and 
as deputy to the General Court of the 
colony of Connecticut for nine terms. 
His wife, Joan, was born in 1628, and 
died December 8, 1709, and they were the 
parents of eleven children : Nathaniel ; 
John ; Hannah ; Abigail ; Mary ; John, of 
further mention ; Daniel ; Caleb ; twin 
sons, who died early ; and Elizabeth. 

(II) John Merriman, son of Nathaniel 
and Joan Merriman, was born in New 
Haven, Connecticut, February 29, 1659, 
and died in Wallingford, Connecticut, in 
1741. He was three times married: (first) 
to Hannah Lines ; (second) to Elizabeth 
Rick ; and (third) to Elizabeth Brown 
Street. The children of the first marriage 
were : Esther, Abigail, and George. To the 
second marriage seven children were born : 
John ; Israel, of further mention ; Sarah ; 
Elizabeth ; Mary ; Caleb ; and Susannah. 

(HI) Israel ^Merriman. son of John and 
Elizabeth (Rick) Merriman, was born in 
Wallingford, Connecticut, January 23, 
1694, and died on a date subsequent to 
1753. In 1734 he sold real estate in Wal- 
lingford, and removed to Harwinton, Con- 
necticut, where, three years later, in 1737, 
he served as selectman. In 1714 he mar- 

68 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ried Comfort Benham, and they were the 
parents of six children : Joseph, of further 
mention; Comfort; John; Elizabeth; 
Sarah ; and Israel. 

(IV) Joseph Merriman, son of Israel 
and Comfort (Benham) Merriman, was 
born in Wallingford, Connecticut, August 
28, 1716, and received his education in the 
public schools of his native district. He 
removed to Harwinton, Connecticut, in 
1735, and ten years later, in 1745, mar- 
ried. His children were: Joseph, of fur- 
ther mention ; George ; and William. 

(V) Joseph (2) Merriman, son of Jos- 
eph Merriman, was born in Harwinton, 
Connecticut, May 9, 1746, and met his 
death by accidental drowning, October 
21, 1775. He married Rachel Culver, 
daughter of Zebulon and Eleanor (Tay- 
lor) Culver, and they were the parents of 
two children : Joseph ; and Silas, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(VI) Silas Merriman, son of Joseph 
(2) and Rachel (Culver) Merriman, was 
born in Litchfield, Connecticut, in 1774, 
and died at a date subsequent to 1805. 
He married and reared a family of chil- 
dren, among whom was John A., of fur- 
ther mention. 

(VII) John A. Merriman, son of Silas 
Merriman, was born in Litchfield, Con- 
necticut, in 1801, and died there in 1874. 
He was the father of twelve children, 
among whom was John A., of further 
mention. 

(VIII) John A. (2) Merriman, son of 
John A. Merriman, was born in Litch- 
field, Connecticut, in 1832, and died in 
Unionville, Connecticut, in 1916. After 
receiving a good practical education in 
the public schools of his native district, 
he learned the trade of butcher, and in 
addition to that line of business was also 
a farmer and a cattle dealer. He was an 
able, intelligent, and energetic man and 



took an active part in public afTairs both 
in Unionville and in Torrington, Connec- 
ticut, serving as selectman in the former 
community, and representing the latter 
in the State Legislature. He also served 
as town treasurer. Fraternally he was a 
member of the Masonic order, and his 
religious affiliation was with the Meth- 
odist church. He and his wife Sarah were 
the parents of the following children : 
Gains Aretus, of further mention ; Flor- 
ence, who married Henry W. Akerman ; 
and Eva, who married George M. Dun- 
ham. 

(IX) Gaius Aretus Merriman, son of 
John A. (2) and Sarah Merriman, was 
born at Avon, Connecticut, in 1855, and 
died in Bridgeport in 1915. He received 
a practical education in the public schools 
and then engaged in the meat business, 
both wholesale and retail. He later was 
engaged in the oil business, and still later 
entered the employ of Swift & Company, 
with whom he was associated for a period 
of ten years. His next venture was in 
the shoe business, in which he remained 
for two years, then went back into the 
meat business, in Bridgeport, in which 
business he remained until his death. 
Mr. Merriman was well known in frater- 
nal circles, being a member of Unionville 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of New Britain, Connecticut ; and he was 
highly esteemed among a very large num- 
ber of those who knew him best. He was 
a member of the Episcopal church. Gaius 
A. Merriman married Flora Tirrell, of 
Cummington, ]\Iassachusetts, and they 
are the parents of one son : John Jetson, 
of further mention. 

(X) John Jetson Merriman, son of 
Gaius A. and Flora (Tirrell) Merriman, 
was born at Unionville, Connecticut, Feb- 
ruary 19, 1879, and received his earliest 



169 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



education in the public schools of Union- 
ville. He then became a student in the 
Hartford High School, and when his high 
school course was completed he finished 
his preparation for an active career by 
taking a course in the Hartford Business 
College. He found his first employment 
as stenographer in the Aetna National 
Bank, of Hartford, Connecticut, and his 
connection with that institution was main- 
tained until 1918, during which time he 
rose through various promotions to the 
position of head paying teller. In 1918 
he went to Porto Rico and was an audi- 
tor for eight months for the American ' 
Colonial Bank, when he was made assist- 
ant cashier. During the first year of his 
stay in Porto Rico he became interested 
in the fruit business, and managed his 
own orange and grape fruit groves. He 
identified himself with the Porto Rico 
Fruit Exchange, as director, and was 
made a member of the board of directors 
and treasurer of the Fruit Products Cor- 
poration. He was a member of the Union 
Church and on the ministers board. Here 
he remained until 1920, when he removed 
to Springfield, Massachusetts, and accept- 
ed the position of treasurer of the Federal 
Land Bank of that city, as above noted, 
which position he is still filling with effici- 
ency and faithfulness. Along with his 
business interests, Mr. Merriman has al- 
ways taken an active part in the work of 
the church. He was a member of the 
board of deacons of the First Baptist 
Church, of Hartford, and for a number of 
years was a member of the finance com- 
mittee. He is now affiliated w^ith the 
Park Memorial Church, of Springfield, 
which he serves as a member of the board 
of deacons and chairman of the finance 
committee. Fraternally he is affiliated 
with St. John's Lodge, No. 4, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Hartford, Connec- 



ticut; he took a part of his degrees in 
Bounguen Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
of San Juan, Porto Rico, and his last de- 
gree in this order in Morning Star Chap- 
ter, of Springfield, of which he is now a 
member. Mr. Merriman has a host of 
friends in Hartford, in Porto Rico, and 
Springfield, and is well known as one of 
the progressive citizens of the city in 
which he now resides. 

John J. Merriman married, on October 
9, 1907, Ethel L. Penfield, of Bristol, 
Connecticut, daughter of Charles and Eva 
(Warner) Penfield. 



LUKES, Harry, D. V. S. 

One of the well known citizens of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, is Dr. Harry 
Lukes, veterinary surgeon, whose prac- 
tice extends over a wide area, including 
a large part of Western Massachusetts, 
and portions of Eastern Connecticut. 

The name of Lukes is a very ancient 
one which has been in use in England 
since about 1200, when members of the 
Norman Lukes' family crossed from Nor- 
mandy to England. During the genera- 
tions which have passed since that early 
date, many worthy and distinguished rep- 
resentatives of the name have made their 
contributions to the life of their times, 
both in England and in this country, and 
the family is still giving worthy and use- 
ful lives to both nations. Being of a 
vigorous and enterprising stock, it was 
natural that when the New World beyond 
the seas was ofiFering unlimited opportun- 
ity to the strong, members of the Lukes' 
family should try their fortune in the vast 
British Dominion in North America. 
Among those staunch Englishmen who 
came at a later date was the grandfather 
of Dr. Harry Lukes, who was a miller in 
England, living in the County of Corn- 
wall. He recognized the possibilities of 



170 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the great Canadian wheat fields and the 
fertile soil of that vast land, and came to 
Canada, where he continued to engage in 
the milling business. He had children : 
William ; Thomas Henry, of whom fur- 
ther ; John, Luke, Joseph, Samuel, Eden, 
Mary, and Jennie, and in the new country 
several of the sons became millers. 

Thomas Henry Lukes, father of Dr. 
Harry Lukes, was born in Cornwall, Eng- 
land, and died there in August, 1899. He 
received a good, practical education in 
the public schools of his district, and dur- 
ing the earlier years of his business ca- 
reer was a merchant. Later in life he be- 
came proprietor of a hotel in St. Austill, 
Cornwall, and this business he followed 
to the time of his death. A man of fine 
physique, his resemblance to King Ed- 
ward frequently attracted attention, being 
especially noted by strangers who saw 
him for the first time. He was prominent 
in public aftairs, served in various public 
offices, including that of chairman of the 
urban board, and was a most popular 
man, looked up to and admired by great 
numbers of friends and associates and es- 
pecially revered by those of his fellow- 
citizens w^ho in times of trouble and diffi- 
culty had learned by personal experience 
that the heart of Thomas Henry Lukes 
was even bigger than his splendid, big 
body. Open-hearted and generous, he 
was ever ready to help the poor and the 
oppressed, and his open, genial manner 
and friendly smile made friends for him 
wherever he went. Thomas Henry Lukes 
married (first) Mary Pearce White. She 
died in 1873. and he married (second) 
Olive Carharet, who died in 1918. Of the 
children born to the first marriage, three 
died in infancy, and the others were : Ada 
Amie, who married William J. Trechim- 
ick, of Plymouth, England ; Thomas, who 
died in 1Q06; Harry, of whom further; 



and Rose, deceased, who married Walter 
Ridgeman. The children of the second 
marriage were : John, Olive, and Marion. 
Harry Lukes, son of Thomas Henry 
and Mary Pearce (White) Lukes, was 
born in Cornw^all, England, April 9, 1866. 
He received his early education in the 
schools of Cornwall and of Devon, Eng- 
land, and then entered the Royal Veter- 
inary College in London, from which he 
was graduated in 1887. Being a man of 
ability, energy, and enterprise, he felt that 
larger opportunity might be found in 
America than in the land of his birth, and 
two years after his graduation set sail for 
the Xew World, and upon arriving de- 
cided to come to Xew England. He lo- 
cated in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 
1888, and with characteristic energy be- 
gan to build up for himself a practice. He 
was skillful, faithful, and well trained, 
and early clients not only came to him but 
spread abroad the fact that in Springfield 
there was a veterinary surgeon who knew 
his profession and w^as conscientious in 
his work. His practice grew steadily, and 
soon his services were required by those 
living outside the city, and by the resi- 
dents of other cities. As success brought 
a constantly increasing patronage, the 
territory in which he served was steadily 
enlarged until at the present time (1922) 
he gives professional services to a large 
portion of Western Massachusetts, in- 
cluding Greenfield, Pittsfield, and A\'or- 
cester, and also receives calls for service 
from many parts of Eastern Connecticut. 
Dr. Lukes holds a position of prominence 
in his profession in New England, and is 
greatly respected by his professional as- 
sociates. He is a member of the Ameri- 
can Veterinary Association and of the 
Massachusetts Veterinary Association, 
and keeps closely in touch with all the 
improvements, inventions, and discover- 

71 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ies of his profession, often leading the 
way to the introduction of new methods, 
devices, and remedies. 

In addition to his professional activi- 
ties, and in connection with them. Dr. 
Lukes has been prominent in public af- 
fairs, especially in those matters which 
concern the welfare of his dumb patients 
who cannot protect themselves. He is 
State inspector of meats and provisions, 
inspector of animals, and inspector of 
slaughter houses. He is also well known 
in club circles, being a member of the 
Kiwanis Club, and of the Automobile 
Club, and a former member of the Nay- 
asset Club, His religious affiliation is 
with the Holy Name Roman Catholic 
Church. 

On February i, 1893, Harry Lukes 
married Margaret Cooney, who was born 
in County Clare, Ireland, daughter of 
Patrick and Mary (Duggan) Cooney, who 
came to America in 1880. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lukes are the parents of one daughter : 
Mary Ruth Lukes, born in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, November 24, 1893. 



PIKE, George Willis 

George Willis Pike, manager for West- 
ern Massachusetts, representing Hayden, 
Stone & Company, one of the largest and 
most substantial banking houses in New 
England, has been identified with that 
concern since 1913, and is well known in 
business and social circles in Springfield. 

Mr. Pike comes of a very old family, the 
history of which, in England, dates back 
to the period following the Norman Con- 
quest, the surname being found in the 
records of the twelfth century. Robert 
Pike was bishop of Litchfield in 1127, 
and Richard Pike was bishop of Coven- 
try in 1 162. The coat-of-arms to which 
the American branch of the family is en- 
titled by inheritance is described as fol- 
lows : 



Arms — Argent, a chevron gules between three 
crescents vert. 

Crest — Three pikes proper, one erect, the two 
slantwise. 

Motto — L'amour, la vertu et la paix. 

John Pike, the American ancestor of 
the Pike family, son of Stephen Pike, was 
baptized November i, 1572, at Bridge- 
water, Somersetshire, England (parish 
register), and came to this country from 
Langford, England, in the ship "James" 
in 1635. After a short stay at Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, he settled at Newbury, 
Massachusetts. He finally settled at Salis- 
bury, where he died May 26, 1654. He 
married Sarah Washington, whose grand- 
father, Robert Washington, was an an- 
cestor of George Washington (see records 
of the Pike Family Association, pages 20- 
22), and they were the parents of the 
following children: i. John (2), known 
as Captain John, who lived in Newbury, 
Massachusetts, and in Woodbridge, New 
Jersey. He was deputy of the Massachu- 
setts General Court in 1657 and 1658, and 
in i56i resided for a time in Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, but about 1669 removed 
to New Jersey, where he was one of the 
first settlers of Woodbridge, and in 1671 
its first president. He was for many years 
a magistrate, and took an active part in 
affairs of the town. He died in January, 

1689. He married Mary , and they 

were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Joseph; John, died young; Han- 
nah; Mary; John, born March 30, 1650; 
Ruth ; Sarah ; Thomas ; and Samuel. Cap- 
tain John Pike was the ancestor of Colo- 
nel Zebulon Pike, of Revolutionary fame, 
and of his son, General Zebulon Mont- 
gomery Pike, the explorer who discov- 
ered Pike's Peak. 2. ^lajor Robert, com- 
mander of the Colonial forces and one 
of the leading military men of Colonial 
days, assistant, 1682-1692, and member of 
the council. He was of Newbury from 



172 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



1635 to 1638. His name with that of his 
wife appears first on the list of members 
of the Salisbury Church in 1687, and he 
was the prominent man of the town there 
during the last half of the seventeenth 
century. He married (first) in Salisbury, 
April 3, 1641, Sarah Sanders, born about 
1622, died November i, 1679; (second) in 
Salisbury, October 30, 1684, Martha 
(Moyce) Goldwyer, widow of George 
Goldwyer. Children : Sarah ; Mary, died 
young; Dorothy, Mary, Elizabeth, John, 
Robert, and Moses. 

From the children of John and Robert 
Pike have descended many worthy and 
noted citizens. Representatives of the 
Pike name are scattered throughout New 
England, and many of them remained in 
Massachusetts. Among the latter were 
the ancestors of George Willis Pike. 

Simon Pike, great-grandfather of 
George Willis Pike, was a resident of 
Petersham, Massachusetts, where he fol- 
lowed farming. He married Hannah New- 
ell, and they were the parents of four chil- 
dren : Amos, who lived in Worcester ; 
Jefiferson ; Wendell ; and Ezekiel, of whom 
further. 

Ezekiel Pike, son of Simon and Han- 
nah (Newell) Pike, was born in Peters- 
ham, Massachusetts, June 3, 1830, and 
died in Marlboro, New Hampshire, No- 
vember 8, 1907. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native 
district, and during his mature years was 
engaged in various lines of business. He 
manufactured palm leaf hats in Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts, for a time, later was em- 
ployed at plumbing in Boston, and then 
engaged in business for himself at Revere, 
Massachusetts. He was of an inventive 
turn of mind, and among the various de- 
vices which he contrived was a ventilator, 
which he patented. In his later years he 
went to North Carolina, where he lived 



at Pine Bluff, but after a time he decided 
to return North, and came to Alarlboro, 
New Hampshire, and here he continued 
to reside to the time of his death. Pie 
married Sophia Foster Whitcomb, who 
was born in Marlboro, New Hampshire, 
February 16, 1828, and died April 2, 1910, 
daughter of Dexter Whitcomb, born June 
2^, 1798, and Rebecca (Griffin) Whit- 
comb, born December 13, 1801. Children: 
Edgar E., born July 2, 1850; Willis Eze- 
kiel, of whom further ; Frank C, born 
December 6, 1855, deceased; Fred W., 
born August 25, 1862, deceased; and 
Florence M., an adopted daughter, born 
October 15, 1875. 

Willis Ezekiel Pike, son of Ezekiel and 
Sophia Foster (Whitcomb) Pike, was 
born in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, July 
II, 1853, and died in Buckfield, Maine, in 
1900. He attended the public schools of 
his native district and when school days 
were over, learned the tailor's trade. 
Later, he removed to Buckfield, Maine, 
where he was station agent, express 
agent, and passenger agent for the Rum- 
ford Falls railroad, which was later ac- 
quired by the Maine Central railroad. 
With the exception of eighteen months, 
when he was in Rumford Falls in charge 
of the freight department of the road 
there, he held the above positions until 
the time of his death. He was highly re- 
garded by a large circle of friends and 
associates. He was a member of the Con- 
gregational church, but an attendant of 
the Baptist church. He married Georgia 
Anna Storer, of Buckfield, Maine, daugh- 
ter of Nathaniel Oakes and Elizabeth 
(Fletcher) Storer, and they were the par- 
ents of one son, George Willis, of whom 
further. 

George Willis Pike, son of Willis Eze- 
kiel and Georgia A. (Storer) Pike, was 
born in Buckfield, Maine, September 30, 

73 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



1877, ^"<i received his early education in 
the public schools of his native district, 
later entering Hebron Academy, at He- 
bron, Maine. At the age of eleven years 
he began learning telegraphy, working at 
this during his vacation, and as soon as 
he became acquainted with the principles 
of this business, he entered the employ of 
the Western Union Telegraph Company, 
on the Rumford Falls railroad, this road 
being later acquired by the Maine Central 
railroad. Later he took charge of the 
railroad station at Rumford Falls, Maine, 
as passenger agent and manager of the 
Western Union Telegraph ofifice. This 
connection he maintained for a year and 
a half, and then, with four other men, 
he became associated with the Postal 
Telegraph Company, being stationed suc- 
cessively at Augusta, Maine ; Taunton, 
Massachusetts ; Norwich, Connecticut ; 
and Middletown, Connecticut, being oc- 
cupied with the work of building up the 
business at these places. At the end of 
four years he severed his connection 
with the Postal Telegraph Company and 
became identified with the firm of Arm- 
strong, Schirmer & Company, and this 
business was later acquired by Malcolm 
&; Cooms, with whom he remained until 
1913. In that year he became identified 
with Hayden, Stone & Company, one of 
the largest brokerage houses in New Eng- 
land, and this connection he has main- 
tained to the present time. Mr. Pike is 
manager for the territory of Western 
Massachusetts. He has made his home in 
Springfield since 1901. He is a member 
of the Springfield Country Club, Long 
Meadow Country Club, of the Nayasset 
Club, and of the Rotary Club, and his 
religious affiliation is with the First Con- 
gregational Church, which he has served 
as chairman of the parish committee. 
On October 20, 1904, George Willis 



Pike married Hazel Sanderson Day, of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, daughter of 
William O. and Carrie P. (Sanderson) 
Day (see Day X), and they are the par- 
ents of one child, Hazel Elizabeth, born 
July 6, 1911. 

(The Day Line). 

(I) Robert Day, immigrant ancestor of 
this family, was born in England about 
1604, and came to this country in the 
ship "Hopewell," in April, 1635. He was 
admitted a freeman May 6, 1635, and went 
with his brother-in-law, Edward Steb- 
bins, in Rev. Mr. Hooker's company, 
which founded Hartford in 1636. His 
children were : Thomas ; Sarah ; Mary ; 
and John, of further mention. 

(II) John Day, son of Robert Day, 
married Sarah Maynard, of Hartford, and 
they were the parents of eight children : 
Joseph ; John, of further mention ; Thom- 
as ; Mary ; Maynard ; Sarah ; William ; and 
Joseph. 

(III) John (2) Day, son of John and 
Sarah (^Maynard) Day, was born in 1677, 
and died November 4, 1752. He removed 
to Colchester, Connecticut, about 1702. 
He married (first) January 21, 1696, 
Grace Spencer, of Hartford, who died 
May 12, 1714, in Colchester. Children: 
Lydia ; Mary; John; Joseph; Benjamin; 
Editha ; Daniel, died young ; David ; Abra- 
ham, of further mention; Isaac; and Dan- 
iel. 

(IV) Abraham Day, son of John (2) 
and Grace (Spencer) Day, was born in 
Colchester, Connecticut, March 17, 1712, 
and died March 18, 1792. He married, 
November 20, 1740, Irene Foot, who died 
August 7, 1809, and they were the parents 
of ten children: Ephraim; Ezra; Nehe- 
miah, of further mention ; Abraham ; 
Elisha ; Lucy, married William Brainard ; 
Elijah ; Irene, married David Yeomans ; 

174 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGR.\PHY 



Sarah, married Samuel Xortham ; and 
Oliver. 

(\') Xehemiah Day, son of Abraham 
and Irene (Foot) Day, was born in Col- 
chester, March 5, 1745. He fought in the 
Revolutionary War. in the Second Com- 
pany, under Captain George Pitkin, of 
Hartford, in Colonel Hinman's regiment, 
and answered the Lexington Alarm, April 
19, 1775. He was also in Captain Simon's 
company. Colonel Erastus Wolcott's regi- 
ment, in 1776. After the Revolution, he 
removed to Dalton, Massachusetts. He 
married. August 21, 1766, Dimmis Kil- 
born, of Colchester, and they were the 
parents of six children : Amasa ; Heze- 
kiah ; Abraham ; X'ehemiah. of further 
mention; Diadema ; and Elijah. 

(VI) Nehemiah (2) Day, son of X'ehe- 
miah and Dimmis (Kilborn) Day, was 
born in Colchester, March 5, 1772, and in 
later years removed to South Hadley, 
Massachusetts. He married, August 16, 
1792, Thirza Alvord, of South Hadley, 
who died August 5, 1837, and they were 
the parents of eight children : AValter ; 
Porter; Abigail; ^lajor, of further men- 
tion; Minerva, married Ebenezer Gold- 
thwait : ^lelancthon ; Franklin ; and Al- 
onzo. 

(VII) Major Day. son of X'ehemiah 
(2) and Thirza (Alvord) Day, was born 
February 16. 1799, at South Hadley, 
where he died, October i, 1830. He mar- 
ried. Tune 26, 1824, I\Ialetha ]\Iandeville, 
of South Hadley, and they were the par- 
ents of one child, William Waite, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(VIII) William Waite Day, son of 
Major and Maletha (Mandeville) Day, 
was born at South Hadley, July 7, 1825. 
When a young man he went to Spring- 
field, ^lassachusetts, where he learned the 
trade of machinist, and finally became a 
member of the firm of Russell & Day. 



machinists, of Hampden street. He mar- 
ried Eunice Emeline Russell, and they 
were the parents of four children : Rob- 
ert Wolcott ; Clara, who married Joseph 
Berry; William Otis, of further mention; 
and Edward Hooker. 

(IX) William Otis Day, son of Wil- 
liam Waite and Eunice Emeline (Rus- 
sell) Day, w^as born at Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, November 5, 1857, and received 
his education in the public and high 
schools of his native city. He began his 
business career in the employ of the Mor- 
gan Envelope Company, of Springfield, 
as ofifice boy, and from 1871 to the close 
of his active career he was associated with 
that concern. In 1891 he became a direc- 
tor and later treasurer of the corporation, 
and when the Morgan Envelope Com- 
pany became a part of the United States 
Envelope Company in 1901, he was cho- 
sen treasurer of the concern. IMr. Day's 
religious affiliation is with the First Con- 
gregational Church, which he has served 
for many years as a member of the par- 
ish committee. He is a member of the 
X'ayasset and Country clubs. He married, 
April 2, 1879, Carrie Parsons Sanderson, 
daughter of John S. Sanderson, and they 
are the parents of one child, Hazel San- 
derson, of whom further. 

(X) Hazel Sanderson Day, daughter 
of William O. and Carrie P. (Sanderson) 
Day. married, October 20, 1904, George 
Willis Pike (see Pike). 



SPRING, William Clayton 

^^'illiam Clayton Spring since 1917 
has been engaged in contract painting in 
the city of Springfield, and is well known 
in that citj'. 

Mr. Spring comes of old Colonial stock, 
tracing his ancestry to John Spring, of 
Watertown, ^Massachusetts, from whom 
are descended nearly all of the families 



175 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of that name in the country, and certainly- 
all of the name in New England. The line 
of descent for the branch of the family to 
which William Clayton Spring belongs 
is traced as follows : 

(I) John Spring, immigrant ancestor, 
was born in England in 1589. He came 
to New England in the ship "Elizabeth," 
of Ipswich, April 30, 1634, bringing with 
him his wife Elinor, aged forty-six, and 
his two sons, John, aged four, and Wil- 
liam, aged six months. His name appears 
on the earliest list of proprietors of Water- 
town, 1636-37. He took the oath of allegi- 
ance in 1652, and on March 21, 1656-57, 
executed a deed of gift to his son Henry 
of his house and land in Watertown, re- 
serving to himself during his lifetime the 
north end of the house, which upon his 
decease was also to go to Henry. There 
was also a stipulation that Henry should 
pay his father an annuity, and that after 
the death of the father Henry should pay 
John Spring, Jr., thirty pounds of lawful 
money. John Spring married (second) 
Grace Hatch, widow of Thomas Hatch, of 
Scituate. Children, all born to the first 
marriage, were : Mary, born in 1623 ; 
Henry, born in 1628; John, of whom fur- 
ther; and William, born in 1633. All of 
these were born in England. 

(II) Lieutenant John (2) Spring, son 
of John and Elinor Spring, was born in 
England in 1630, and came to New Eng- 
land with his parents when but four years 
of age. He settled in Cambridge about 
the time the first minister was ordained 
there, and built his house on the north- 
west side of Dedham road, opposite the 
old burial place. He also built the first 
grist mill in Newton, on Smelt brook, 
near the center of the town. He was 
prominent in the afifairs of the town, 
served as selectman for eight years from 
1686; was deputy for three years; sealer 



of weights and measures ; poundkeeper ; 
tithingman; and lieutenant. He is sup- 
posed to have given the land for the sec- 
ond meeting house in 1696, and the town 
later reconveyed it to his son John. He 
died May 18, 1717. He married, in 1656, 
Hannah Barsham, who died August 18, 
1710, daughter of William and Anable 
Barsham, of Watertown, and they were 
the parents of ten children : Hannah, 
born October i, 1657; Mary, born June 

10, 1659; , born April 16, 1661 ; 

Sarah, born in 1662; Rebecca, born Feb- 
ruary 10, 1664; Abigail, born February 
12, 1666; Susanna, born August 18, 1670, 
died young; Mary, born February 19, 
1672 ; Elizabeth, born April 7, 1675 ; and 
John, of further mention. 

(III) Ensign John (3) Spring, son of 
Lieutenant John (2) and Hannah (Bar- 
sham) Spring, was born in 1678, and died 
May 5, 1754. He was a soldier of the 
Revolutionary W^ar, serving from August 
23, 1776, to September 26, 1777, as a cor- 
poral in Lieutenant Joel Hay's company. 
Eighteenth Connecticut regiment, taking 
part in the first campaigns in New York. 
He also served as selectman for twelve 
years. He married, March 8, 1703, Joan- 
na Richards, of Dedham, and lived on 
the homestead. Children : William, born 
December 24, 1704; Ephraim, of whom 
further; Mary, born November 20, 1709; 
Hannah, born February 2, 1712; Deborah, 
born February 29, 1714; Nathaniel, born 
August 26, 1715; and Samuel, born June 
17, 1723. 

(IV) Ephraim Spring, son of Ensign 
John (3) and Joanna (Richards) Spring, 
was born May 30, 1708. He graduated 
from Harvard College, and was a resident 
of Rehoboth, Massachusetts. He married 
Mary Bowen, and among their children 
was Thomas, of whom further. 

(V) Thomas Spring, son of Ephraim 

76 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



and Alary (Bowen) Spring, was born in 
Rehoboth, June 3, 1737, and removed to 
Simsbury, now Granby, Connecticut, 
where, according to the first Federal cen- 
sus, he was residing in 1790, his family 
at that time consisting of three males 
over sixteen years of age, two under six- 
teen, and four females. His son, Sylves- 
ter, also had a family in 1790. Thomas 
Spring was a carpenter by trade, and 
died March 24, 1825, He married (first) 
April 30, 1761, Mary Gossard, born in 
Simsbury, now Granby, Connecticut, Oc- 
tober I, 1739, died April 6, 1789. He mar- 
ried (second) in December, 1789, Abigail 
Hawley, who died in Ohio. Children, all 
born in Simsbury, to the first marriage : 
Mary, born February i, 1762; Ephraim ; 
Thomas, of whom further; Sylvester, 
Dorn June 26, 1767 ; Sarah, born December 
15, 1769; Amelia, born September 2, 1774; 
Ciriel, born September 11, 1776; and Sam- 
uel, born June 5, 1780. 

(VI) Thomas (2) Spring, son of 
Thomas and Mary (Gossard) Spring, was 
born at Simsbury, Massachusetts, now 
Granby, Connecticut, October 15, 1765, 
and died in Granby, Connecticut, January 
6, 1849. He married, July 9, 1795, Jerusha 
Pomeroy, born in Sufiield, Connecticut, 
February 5, 1776, died in Granby, Con- 
necticut, December 19, 1849, ^^^ among 
their children was a son, Thomas (3), of 
whom further. 

(VII) Thomas (3) Spring, son of 
Thomas (2) and Jerusha (Pomeroy) 
Spring, was born in Granby, Connecticut, 
May 13, 1798, and died in Bristol, Con- 
necticut. June 5, 1869. He later removed 
to Collinsville, Connecticut. He was a 
builder and contractor. He married, Feb- 
ruary 4, 1824, Candace Holcomb, born in 
Simsbury, Connecticut, died in Bristol, 
Connecticut, January 25, 1869. Children: 
Henry, Jerusha, Solomon, Jennie E., Em- 
Mass — 12 — 12 177 



ma, Nancy, Andrew J., Edwin and Ed- 
ward (twins), and George A. The daugh- 
ter, Jennie E., married Warren S. Frost. 

(VIII) Edwin Spring, son of Thomas 
(3) and Candace (Holcomb) Spring, was 
born in Canton, Connecticut, February 
29, 1840, and died in Simsbury, Connecti- 
cut, February 28, 1905. He was engaged 
in the clock business and was a member 
of the firm of Welch, Spring & Company, 
which later became the E. N. Welch Com- 
pany, with Mr. Spring holding the posi- 
tion of general manager, which connec- 
tion he maintained until his retirement 
from active life. Politically he supported 
the principles and the candidates of the 
Republican party, taking an active part 
in its local affairs. He was also deeply 
interested in the cause of prohibition. 
Fraternally he was a member of Bristol 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Alasons, and of 
the chapter of that order. He was also 
a member of the American Order of 
United Workmen. He was a member of 
the Business Men's Club, and his religi- 
ous afifiliation was with the Baptist 
church, in the work of which he took an 
active part, serving various ofificial posi- 
tions. Highly esteemed and honored by 
a host of friends and associates, his life 
was a worthy one, both as a citizen inter- 
ested in the public welfare and as an ac- 
tive promoter of the religious and moral 
advancement of the community. He mar- 
ried, November 7, 1866, Lucy E. Brockett, 
born September 24, 1837, died April 24, 
1910. They were the parents of one son, 
William Clayton Spring, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(IX) William Clayton Spring, son of 
Edwin and Lucy E. (Brockett) Spring, 
was born in Bristol, Connecticut, Novem- 
ber 29, 1869. He received his education 
in the public schools of Bristol, and when 
his education was completed, began his 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



business career in a doctor's office. After 
a time he entered the employ of a drug- 
gist, where he remained for a period of 
four or five years. Eventually, he gave 
up the drug business with its long hours 
and confinement to engage in the growing 
of tobacco for the Connecticut Tobacco 
Company. This connection he maintained 
for a time and then associated himself 
with the Hinsdale Smith Company, and 
engaged in the production of shade grown 
tobacco. Later he became assistant man- 
ager of the Shaker farms, where shade 
grown tobacco was made a specialty. In 
1917 he came to Springfield, where for a 
time he was employed at the Westing- 
house plant, in charge of a group of men, 
until, having gained a wide and varied 
experience, and saved the necessary funds, 
he engaged in business for himself, as a 
contracting painter. In this field he has 
built up a successful and lucrative busi- 
ness, which he is still conducting (1922). 
Mr. Spring and family attend the Episco- 
pal church. 

On November 9, 1893, William C. 
Spring married Mary Jones, of Hartford, 
Connecticut, daughter of Almiran and 
Mary (Martin) Jones, and they are the 
parents of one son, Edwin Brockett 
Spring, of whom further. 

(X) Edwin Brockett Spring, son of 
William C. and Mary (Jones) Spring, 
was born in Hartford, Connecticut, No- 
vember 27, 1894. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native 
city and of Springfield, graduating from 
the Springfield Technical High School in 
1915. Upon the entrance of the United 
States into the World War, he enlisted, 
and was sent to Wentworth Institute in 
Boston, where he was in training from 
May I to July I, 1918, taking a special 
electrical course. In July, 1918, he was 
sent to Camp Mills, Long Island, and 



from there to France, where he was de- 
tailed to go to the front with the ammu- 
nition train of the 90th Division of the 
315th Army Train. Later, he served as 
an interne at Bordeaux, France, until the 
signing of the armistice, when he went to 
Germany with the Army of Occupation, 
remaining until June, 1919. Upon his 
return to civilian life he entered the em- 
ploy of the Turner's Falls Electrical Com- 
pany, and at present (1923) he is a sta- 
tion operator at the Agawam sub-station. 
He is a member of Mt. Orthodox Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of West 
Springfield, and of Bela Grotto, of Spring- 
field, also of the Masonic Club. His re- 
ligious affiliation is with the Wesleyan 
Methodist Church. 



COWLES, Raymond Morgan 

For more than thirty-five years Ray- 
mond Morgan Cowles has been engaged 
in the insurance business in the city of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, but he has 
not given his entire time tQ that field of 
activity. During the earlier years of his 
career he was employed in the Johnson 
organ factory, and still later he conducted 
a music store for several years. The 
ability which won for him success in the 
earlier undertakings has enabled him to 
achieve a steadily increasing success in 
the business in which he has continued 
and in which he is engaged at the present 
time. 

The Cowles names is an old one in 
New England. John Cole, or Cowles, hav- 
ing been one of the first settlers of Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. Soon after 1640 he re- 
moved to Farmington. Connecticut, and 
in 1652 was one of the organizers of the 
church there. He bought land on the 
corner of the north end of Farmington 
village, known afterwards as the Dr. 
Thompson and Bodwell places, but after- 



178 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



wards sold this and bought three lots 
just south of the present meeting house, 
where he built his home. In order to 
avoid confusion arising from the fact that 
there was another man of the same name 
in the same place, he changed his name 
from Cole to Cowles, and from that time 
the descendants of the eldest son, Samuel, 
have spelled the name Cowles, while 
those of the youngest son, John, have, 
until the beginning of the nineteenth cen- 
tury, spelled the name Cowls. John 
Cowles was a farmer, and prominent in the 
public affairs of his community. He was 
deputy to the General Court, from Farm- 
ington, in 1653-54, but later, in 1662, re- 
moved to that part of Hadley, Massachu- 
setts, now known as Hatfield, where he 

died in 1675. He married Hannah , 

who after his death lived with her son-in- 
law, Caleb Stanley, of Hartford, where 
she died March 6, 1683, aged about sev- 
enty. Children : Samuel, born about 1639, 
married Abigail Stanley; John, born in 
1641 ; Hannah, born in 1644, married 
Caleb Stanley, of Hartford ; Sarah, mar- 
ried Nathaniel Goodwin ; Esther, married 
Thomas Bull ; Elizabeth, married Rich- 
ard Lyman ; Mary, married Nehemiah 
Dickinson. Descendants of these have 
been numerous and have made valuable 
contributions to the life of the country, 
especially to the New England region, in 
many different fields of endeavor. 

Thomas Cowles was born in Westfield, 
Massachusetts, about 1820, and died in 
1902, aged eighty-two years. He received 
his education in the local schools, and was 
a farmer and a stone mason, who per- 
formed his work with notable efficiency 
and was always ready to assist with any 
project which promised to forward the 
public welfare. He was an earnest, ac- 
tive member of the Methodist church, and 
was one of those who helped in the build- 



ing of the church edifice. For fifty years 
he was a class leader, and for twenty-five 
years he was superintendent of the Sun- 
day school, during which time he ren- 
dered a service the value of which cannot 
be estimated. As an earnest, sincere and 
loyal Christian man his influence was 
large, and he was most highly esteemed 
among a very large group of friends and 
associates. He married (first) Marietta 
Rising, of Southwick, Massachusetts, and 
they were the parents of five children : 
Thomas Milton, Orrin L., Orphia M., 
Joseph v., Raymond M., of whom fur- 
ther ; he married (second) Mrs. Lydia 
White, they were the parents of one child, 
William M. 

Raymond Morgan Cowles, son of 
Thomas and Marietta (Rising) Cowles, 
was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, 
April 28, 1854, and received his educa- 
tion in the Westfield public schools, in- 
cluding the high school, and in Wilbra- 
ham Academy. When his course in the 
academy was completed, he began his 
business career as an employee in the 
Johnson organ factory in Westfield, and 
there he remained for a number of years. 
Later, he engaged in business for himself, 
and for a few years conducted a music 
store. In 1887 he came to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and became associated 
with his brother, Orrin L., engaged in the 
insurance business, a general line, includ- 
ing fire, life, and automobile insurance. 
This continued for a period of ten years, 
until January, 1912, at the end of which 
time Mr. Cowles took the business and 
since then has continued it alone. He has 
been successful, and is known as one of 
the dependable insurance men of Spring- 
field, in which city he has a wide acquaint- 
ance. His religious affiliation is with the 
Methodist church, and he has been a 



179 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



member of the board of trustees in Grace 
Methodist Church for a number of years. 
On December 2y, 1876, Raymond M. 
Cowles married (first) Izernia Lewis, of 
Westfield, Massachusetts, daughter of 
Philander and Elizabeth (Cowles) Lewis, 
and they were the parents of three chil- 
dren : I. Frederick Raymond, who is 
identified with the Victor Sporting Goods 
Company, of Springfield. He married 
Grace Mallory, and they have three chil- 
dren : Stuart F. ; Ruth E., died at two 
years of age ; and Doris G. 2. Esther (de- 
ceased), married Albert Walker, and left 
four children : Howard C, Herbert M,, 
Richard C, and Donald. 3. Thomas Lewis, 
chief engineer for the Stevens-Duryea 
Automobile Company, who married Ruby 
Hinkley, and has three children : Dor- 
othy ; Raymond Hinkley ; and Warren 
Thomas. Mrs. Cowles died in October, 
1919. Mr. Cowles married (second) Mrs. 
Laura G. (Fuller) Craig, daughter of Ed- 
ward Fuller, of Ludlow. 



BEAMAN, WilUam Webster 

Nine generations of Beamans have al- 
ready added to the history of Massachu- 
setts, the record of their lives and deeds 
beginning with Gamaliel Beaman, who 
came from England in the year 1635, and 
continuing until \\'illiam Webster Bea- 
man, of Springfield, Massachusetts, of 
the ninth generation, his son William 
Webster, Jr., now making the tenth gen- 
eration. Dorchester, Lancaster, Sterling, 
Winchendon and Springfield have been 
the family homes, the last two genera- 
tions in this branch making their home in 
Springfield. 

(I) Gamaliel Beaman, at the age of 
twelve years, embarked, May 8, 1635, on 
the ship "Elizabeth and Ann" from Eng- 
land, there being no other of his name on 
board. He found a home in Dorchester, 



Massachusetts, where he resided until 
May 23, 1659, when he removed to Lan- 
caster, and May 31, 1659, ^^ signed the 
covenant as one of the fifty-five original 
proprietors of the town. He brought with 
him a large sum of money for those days, 
two hundred and ten pounds, and when 
the meadow land was divided he received 
twenty-two lots in addition to his home 
lot, owning in all two hundred and thirty- 
six acres. In 1676 the Indians burned 
every house in Lancaster, and the Bea- 
mans returned to Dorchester. In 1680, 
the settlers began to come back to Lan- 
caster, Gamaliel Beaman among them. 
He built a new house on his land and 
there resided until the year 1707, when, at 
the age of eighty-four, he passed away. 
He married, in Dorchester, Sarah Clark, 
daughter of William Clark. Children : 
John Clark, of further mention ; Joseph, 
born in 1651 ; Gamaliel, Jr., born in 1653, 
died Alarch 23, 1678; Thomas, born in 
1654; Mary, born in 1656; Sarah, born 
January 19, 1658; Noah, born April 3, 
1660; Thankful, born April 16, 1663; Me- 
hitable, born May 26, 1667. 

(II) John Clark Beaman, eldest son of 
Gamaliel and Sarah (Clark) Beaman, was 
born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 
1649, and died January 15, 1739. He set- 
tled in Taunton, Massachusetts, but re- 
moved to Boston, returning later to Taun- 
ton. He was a probationer of the Dor- 
chester church, but took a letter from 
Taunton, later settling in Lancaster, 
where he was received into the church as 
"Father Beaman from Taunton." In 1704 
he was a member of a garrison estab- 
lished in his father's house, and in 171 1 
his own house was a garrison. A large 
slate stone marks his grave in the old 
burial ground in Lancaster. He married, 
about the year 1674, Priscilla Thornton, 
born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1656, 



180 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



died in Lancaster, August 6, 1729, daugh- 
ter of Robert Thornton. Children : Mary, 
John, Zippora, Sarah ; Gamaliel, of fur- 
ther mention ; Ebenezer, Jonathan, Pris- 
cilla, Judith, Eunice and Jabez. 

(III) Gamaliel (2) Beaman, third son 
of John Clark and Priscilla (Thornton) 
Beaman, was born in Lancaster, Massa- 
chusetts, February 29, 1684-85, and died 
in Sterling, Massachusetts, October 26, 
1745. He was the first settler in the town 
of Sterling. He took an active part in 
town and church affairs, and was one of 
the strong advocates of a church in that 
part of the town, which was built in 1742. 
He married Mary Houghton, daughter 
of Jonas and Mary (Berbeane) Houghton, 
of Lancaster, and granddaughter of John 
Houghton, who came from England in 
the ship "Abigail" in 1635, "being then a 
mere boy." In 1723, after the death of 
Jonas Houghton, Mary (Houghton) Bea- 
man sold her share of her father's estate 
to her brother Stephen for fifty pounds. 
Children : Mary, Eunice, Elizabeth ; Phin- 
eas Houghton, of further mention ; Zeriah, 
Lois, and Dinah. 

(IV) Phineas Houghton Beaman, only 
son of Gamaliel (2) and Mary (Hough- 
ton) Beaman, was born in 1718. He built 
the first frame house that succeeded the 
original log house in Sterling, Massachu- 
setts. Here his death occurred, March 
16, 1803. He married, in 1740, Joanna 
White, born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, 
September 20, 1721, died in 1799, daugh- 
ter of Josiah and Abigail (Whitcomb) 
White. Her great-grandfather, John 
White, was one of the original proprietors 
of Lancaster, coming from Salem, bring- 
ing with him three hundred and eighty 
pounds in money. Abigail (Whitcomb) 
White was the daughter of Josiah and 
Rebecca (Waters) Whitcomb, and grand- 
daughter of John Whitcomb, one of the 



early proprietors. Phineas H. and Joan- 
na (White) Beaman were the parents of 
fifteen children : Joanna, Phineas, Josiah, 
Elizabeth, Lemuel, Silence ; Gamaliel 
White, of further mention ; Jonas, Josiah, 
Benjamin, Alary, Elisha, David, Abigail, 
and Gideon. The first child was born 
April 4, 1741, the last child, July 12, 1763. 

(V) Gamaliel White Beaman, fourth 
son of Phineas Houghton and Joanna 
(White) Beaman, was born in Sterling, 
Massachusetts, December 4, 1748, and 
died during his service in the Revolution- 
ary army in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in 
1777. He fought at Lexington in Captain 
Daniel Robbins' company, Colonel Asa 
Whitcomb's regiment. He married (in- 
tentions published October 10, 1775) Pru- 
dence Wilder, who was living in 1815, 
daughter of Abner and Eunice (Osgood) 
Wilder. His widow married (second) in 
1790, Captain Nathaniel Carter, of Leo- 
minster. Gamaliel White and Prudence 
(Wilder) Beaman were the parents of an 
only child, David Wilder, of further men- 
tion, 

(VI) David Wilder Beaman, son of 
Gamaliel White and Prudence (Wilder) 
Beaman, was born August 21, 1776, and 
died in Winchendon, Massachusetts, July 
8, 1840. After his marriage he settled on 
a farm in Winchendon, which is owned by 
his descendants at the present time 
(1921). He married, April 14, 1798, Pol- 
ly Carter, born March 14, 1777, died Feb- 
ruary 8, 1852, daughter of Jude and Pol- 
ly (Turner) Carter. They were the par- 
ents of ten children : Gamaliel Carter, 
Elisha, Polly Turner, David Wilder, 
Midas, Mary Ann, Prudence White, Har- 
riet, Eliza ; and William, of further men- 
tion. 

(VII) William Beaman, youngest son 
of David Wilder and Polly (Carter) Bea- 
man, was born in Winchendon, Massa- 



181 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



chusetts, September ii, 1818, and died 
there, August 11, 1893, He married, Feb- 
ruary 2'j, 1848, Eliza Caroline Whitney, 
born in Winchendon, June 11, 1830, 
daughter of Webster and Eliza P. (Whit- 
man) Whitney. Mr. and Mrs. Beaman 
were the parents of five children : Will- 
iam Davis, born July 17, 185 1, married 
Mary J. Hyde ; John Webster, born Sep- 
tember 18, 1855, married Alice C. Wood; 
Edward A., born July 18, 1857, died Oc- 
tober 10, 1861 ; Charles Frederick, of fur- 
ther mention ; and Caroline E., born June 
I, 1866. 

(VIII) Charles Frederick Beaman, 
fourth son of William and Eliza Caroline 
(Whitney) Beaman, was born in Win- 
chendon, Massachusetts, December 8, 
1859, and died in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, December 22, 191 1. He learned the 
trade of painter and interior decorator, 
and after his marriage settled in Spring- 
field, where he was actively engaged in 
business on his own account until his 
death. He married, June 26, 1883, Mar- 
garet Elizabeth Atkinson, born in Lanca- 
shire, England, in 1862, daughter of 
James and Delia (Walsh) Atkinson. Mr. 
and Mrs. Beaman were the parents of five 
children : Charles Atkinson, born July 
30, 1886 ; William Webster, of further 
mention; Baxter Whitman, born in May, 
1893; Margaret, born July 7, 1894, be- 
came the wife of Olney Woodward ; and 
Gertrude Ellen, born October 3, 1900. 

(IX) William Webster Beaman, sec- 
ond son of Charles Frederick and Mar- 
garet Elizabeth (Atkinson) Beaman, was 
born in Springfield, Massachusetts, Feb- 
ruary 18, 1891. He completed the public 
school courses of study with graduation 
from the high school, class of 1909, then 
began an apprenticeship to the trade of 
painter under the tuition of his father. 
From that time as an apprentice and 



journeyman he has followed that line of 
business in Springfield. After the death 
of his father he continued in the business 
for a time under the name of Beaman & 
Company. He then sold out, but still 
(1922) follows the same line of business. 
He married, April 6, 191 5, Mary Fortin, 
born in Saginaw, Michigan, daughter of 
Charles and Elizabeth (Benwaw) For- 
tin. Mr. and Mrs. Beaman are the par- 
ents of two children : Alice May, born 
April 12, 1916; William Webster, Jr., 
born October 28, 1918. 



PARKER, John Wilder 

Among those citizens of Springfield 
who have been identified with the growth 
and upbuilding of the city is John Wilder 
Parker, who came to this city when he 
was twenty years of age, and has, with 
the exception of some five or six years, 
resided here continuously. 

Mr. Parker bears a name the origin of 
which is found far back in the early his- 
tory of England. The name is derived 
from the Latin parcarius, a park-keeper, 
or shepherd. Danes, Saxons, and Nor- 
mans in England, all seem to have made 
use of the name at an early date. Par- 
cum and de Parco are found in the 
Domesday Book, and as early as 900-925, 
in the reign of Edward I., a Geoffrey 
Parker is mentioned, even before the use 
of surnames had been generally adopted 
in England. The Brownsholme family of 
Parker, the pedigree of which is traced 
to William le Parker, of Extwistle, Lan- 
cashire, before 1400, and from which sev- 
eral of the American families of the name 
are descended, bears the following coat- 
of-arms : 

Arms — Vert, a chevron between three stags' 
heads cabossed or. 

Crest — A leopard's head affrontee, erased, or, 
ducally gorged gules. 

Motto — Dare to be just. 



182 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGR-\PHY 



This coat-of-arms descended through 
Park Hall and Staffordshire lines, and is 
similar to the earlier coat-of-arms of the 
Parker family of Extwistle, doubtless be- 
ing a modification of that design. Nu- 
merous branches of the Parker family 
bear arms more or less similar to the 
above, the chevron between three heads ap- 
pearing very frequently, but the heads be- 
ing sometimes those of a stag and some- 
times a leopard or other animal. Repre- 
sentatives of the name came to this coun- 
try at a very early date, and have taken an 
active part in the growth and develop- 
ment of various regions, including New 
England, where James Parker was settled 
before 1640, and was a taxpayer in Wo- 
burn, Massachusetts, in 1645. Other im- 
migrant ancestors of the name settled in 
other parts of Xew England, and at the 
present time, many worthy representa- 
tives of these pioneers are contributing to 
the economic, political, and moral devel- 
opment of the nation. 

Among the descendants of these was 
John Parker, who died in Enfield, Con- 
necticut. He married Love Billings, and 
they were the parents of six children : 
Stoddard, John, Orrin ; Wilder, of whom 

further; Elsie, who married King; 

and Miranda, who married Albert Gowdy. 

Wilder Parker, son of John and Love 
(Billings) Parker, was born in Enfield, 
Connecticut, in 181 1, and died in 1867, 
aged fifty-six years. He married Rhoda 
Lauretta Pease, who was born in Decem- 
ber, 1808, and died in September, 1891, 
daughter of Walter Pease, and they w-ere 
the parents of five children : Ellen Eliza- 
beth ; Wesley ; Charles W. : Stephen Olin, 
of whom further ; and Emma Augusta, 
who married George Osborn, of South 
Dakota, and had four children, three now- 
living: George W., Loretta, and Walter. 

Stephen Olin Parker, son of Wilder 



and Rhoda Lauretta (Pease) Parker, was 
born in Enfield, Connecticut, June i, 1846, 
and died July 26. 1906, in Springfield, 
Massachusetts. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his district, 
and then engaged in farming on his 
father's farm. At the time of his father's 
death Stephen O. Parker bought out the 
other heirs and continued on the farm 
until he came to Springfield. For a time 
he was employed in a general store, but 
after being employed as clerk for a brief 
period, he entered the Smith & Wesson 
factory, in Springfield. Later he took 
charge of the Wesson farm, which posi- 
tion he continued to fill until he became 
agent for Mrs. Meekin, taking entire 
charge of her large real estate interests, 
and remaining here until retiring on ac- 
count of ill health. Capable, energetic, 
and faithful, he discharged the duties of 
this last position with exceptional ability. 

Mr. Parker was an intelligent, public- 
spirited citizen, interested in the affairs 
of his community, and always ready to 
assist in promoting the public welfare. 
Politically he gave his support to the 
Democratic party, and his religious affilia- 
tion was with the Second Advent Church. 

On May 15, 1870, 'Sir. Parker married 
Isadore Frances Gardner, born in Somer- 
ville, Connecticut, daughter of Francis 
and July (Gaylord) Gardner, and they 
were the parents of six children: i. John 
W., of whom further. 2. Olena May, who 
married Norman S. Chapman. 3. Charles 
Olin, who resides in Longmeadow, and 
has been connected with the advertising 
department of the Springfield '"Cnion" 
for many years, also operates in real es- 
tate. He married Elizabeth Brome, of 
Suffield, Connecticut, and they were the 
parents of four children : Bradford Olin ; 
Russell : Barbara, deceased : and Eloise. 
4. Alice Emma. 5. Nellie Isola, who mar- 



^83 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ried Irving M. Goodell, of East Long- 
meadow. They were the parents of a son, 
Lawrence. She died in 1907, at the age 
of thirty-one years. The sixth child died 
in infancy. 

John Wilder Parker, son of Stephen 
Olin and Isadore Frances (Gardner) Par- 
ker, was born in Enfield, Connecticut, 
June 25, 1871. He attended the public 
schools of Enfield, assisting his father on 
the farm when not in school, and after 
his studies were completed, engaged in 
farming with his father until he was 
eighteen years of age. He then went to 
Somerville, Connecticut, where he was for 
for a time employed in a store. In 1891 
he came to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
he then being twenty years of age, and 
took a position as clerk in a store. Here 
he remained for three years, and at the 
end of this time he bought the business 
of C. M. Hibbard, and began business for 
himself, conducting same for two 
years and then sold out and re- 
moved to Enfield, Connecticut, where 
he remained for about seven years, 
engaged in farming. In 1903 he 
returned to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
and became associated with the Royal 
Candy Company, which connection he 
maintained for about two years, at the 
end of which time he succeeded his father 
as agent for Mrs. Meekin, in the care and 
management of her extensive real estate 
interests. For the past sixteen years Mr. 
Parker has faithfully looked after the 
interests of the Meekin properties, and as 
the years have passed he has bought land 
and built houses, which in turn he has 
sold and then bought more land and built 
again. Thus he has accumulated consid- 
erable real estate, and is one of the sub- 
stantial men of the city. He is a member 
of the First Baptist Church, which he has 
served in the capacity of deacon, and he 



takes an active interest in its various 
activities. 

John Wilder Parker married, on June 
13, 1894, Emma Louise Cady, of Enfield, 
Connecticut, daughter of Dwight H. and 
Fluvia A. (Higley) Cady, and they are 
the parents of two children : i. Wallace 
Cady, who was born in Enfield, Connecti- 
cut, March 2"], 1895. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Springfield 
and in the Springfield College, and is now 
physical director in the State Normal 
School, at Mount Pleasant, Michigan. 
He served in the Medical Corps during 
the World War, and was located at Camp 
Slocum, where he was promoted to the 
rank of sergeant. He married Olive Bos- 
worth, and they are the parents of two 
daughters: Marjorie Louise, born in 
Courve, Michigan, July 13, 1920; and Bar- 
bara Eunice. 2. Stephen Dwight, born in 
Enfield, Connecticut, June 2, 1902 ; he 
served in the World War, in the United 
States Boys' Working Reserve, and is 
now (1923) a student in the Ohio State 
University, at Columbus, studying op- 
tometry, class of 1924. 



FULLER, Willard Collins 

The name Fuller belongs to the list of 
occupative surnames, dates back to the 
twelfth century, or earlier, and signifies, 
"one who thickens and whitens cloth." 
Many individuals bearing the name have 
won distinction both in this country and 
in England, among whom may be men- 
tioned: Nicholas Fuller, born in 1557, a 
distinguished Oriental scholar ; Isaac Ful- 
ler, who died in 1672, the noted painter; 
Thomas Fuller, the English divine and 
author, born in 1608, chaplain extraordin- 
ary to Charles II, and cited by a high 
authority as "the least prejudiced great 
man of his age ;" Sarah Margaret Fuller, 
born in 1810, prominent teacher, editor. 



184 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGR-\PHY 



and author ; and Meh-ille W. Fuller, emi- 
nent jurist and Chief Justice of the Su- 
preme Court of the United States. 

The immigrant ancestor of the branch 
of the family to which Willard Collins 
Fuller belongs, was Edward Fuller, 
whose name appears as the twentj'-third 
on the Compact signed in the cabin of 
the '"Mayflower" just before the landing 
of the Pilgrims on Cape Cod, November, 
1620. and the line of descent from this 
passenger of the '"Mayflower" to Willard 
Collins Fuller is as follows : 

(I) Edward Fuller, the '•Ma}-flower" 
immigrant, son of Robert Fuller, butcher. 
was baptized September 4. 1575. in Parish 
of Redenhall, Count}- of Norfolk, Eng- 
land, and died at Plymouth, bet^veen Jan- 
uary- II and April 10, 1621. He probably 
joined the Pilgrims who came from Hol- 
land in the "Speedwell'' after their arrival 
at Southampton, England; signed the 
Compact drawn up in the cabin of the 
"Ma^-flower" before landing, t«-enty-third 
name, and a few months after landing 
both he and his wife, name unknown but 
sometimes called Ann. died as a result of 
the privations and sufferings of pioneer 
conditions. She died early in 1621. after 
Januan.- nth. Governor Bradford says: 
""Edward Fuller and his wife died soon 
after they came on shore." They left one 
child. Samuel, of further mention. 

(II) Samuel Fuller, only son of Ed- 
ward Fuller, was bom about 1612, in 
England, died October 31, (O. S.^ or 
November 10, 1683, at Barnstable, Massa- 
chusetts. He came to Plymouth with his 
parents, was left an orphan when about 
nine years of age. and was reared by his 
uncle, Dr. Samuel Fuller, of Phinouth, 
also a '"Ma^-flower" Pilgrim. He was as- 
signed three acres at the division of land 
in 1623, was made a freeman in 1634, and 
settled in Scituate. His letter from the 



church of Plymouth was received by the 
church at Scituate, of which he became 
a member November 7, 1636, and in the 
same year he built the fifteenth house in 
Scituate, on Greenfield street, the first lot 
abutting on Kent street. He had twenty 
acres of land, probably granted by the 
town of Scituate. He removed to Barn- 
stable between 1641 and 1650, conveying 
to Peter Colh-more, March 25, 1650, O. S., 
'"one dwelling house and a barn and cow 
house with sixteen acres of upland and 
two parcels of marsh land containing 
twelve acres."' He bought land in Barn- 
stable, and was constable of Scituate, and 
v.as the only one of the '"^laj-flower" pas- 
sengers who settled permanently at Barn- 
stable, and one of the latest 5ur\-ivor5 of 
that company. His ^^-ill, dated 'the nine 
and twent}-eth Day of October in the year 
of our Lord one thousand six hundred 
and eighty-three," was proven June 5, 
1684, and his inventor)' dated November 
14. 1683. amounted to 116 pounds. 5 shil- 
lings, nine pence, '"the land and housing 
not prised." Samuel Fuller was married, 
in Scituate, by Captain Miles Standish, 
magistrate, '"on ye fourthe daye of ye 
weeke" April S-18, 1635. to Jane, daughter 
of Rev. John Lathrop. of Scituate, and 
(after 16391 Barnstable. She was bap- 
tized in England, September 29. 1614, died 
between 1658 and 1683. Children : Sam- 
uel, of whom further ; Hannah : Eliz- 
abeth ; Sarah (died young) ; Mary ; Thom- 
as : Sarah ; John ; and an infant. 

( nil Samuel (2) Fuller, eldest son of 
Samuel and Jane fLathrop) Fuller, was 
baptized Februar\- 11. 1637, at Scituate, 
died some time before December 2S, 1691. 
There is no Barnstable record of his fam- 
ily, but an inventor)- of his estate was 
taken on the above date from which 
it appears that he had been dead for some 
time and that his -w-ife had recently died, 
8^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



her estate being settled on the thirtieth 
of the same month. On an agreement 
made at that time, December 30, 1691, the 
names of his children appear. He mar- 
ried Anna Fuller, daughter of Matthew 
Fuller. Children, all born at Barnstable : 
Barnabas ; Joseph ; Matthew, of further 
mention; Benjamin; Desire; and Sarah. 

(IV) Matthew Fuller, third son of 
Samuel (2) and Anna (Fuller) Fuller, 
was born in 1664, at Barnstable, and died 
at Colchester before 1744. He settled in 
Colchester about 1712, and was baptized 
in the First Church there. He married, 
February 25, 1692-3, Patience Young, 
daughter of George and Hannah (Pinson) 
Young, of Scituate, who was born about 
1670, and died June 25, 1746, at Colches- 
ter, leaving a will, dated February 3, 1743- 
4, in which she is described as a widow. 
Children: Anna; Jonathan; Content; 
Jean ; David ; Young, of further mention ; 
Cornelius; and Hannah. 

(V) Young Fuller, third son of Mat- 
thew and Patience (Young) Fuller, was 
born in Barnstable, in 1708, and died 
June 17, 1796, at Ludlow, Massachusetts; 
married, April 23, 1730, at Colchester, 
Connecticut, Jerusha Beebe, daughter of 
Jonathan and Bridget (Brockway) Beebe, 
of East Haddam, Connecticut. In 1747 
he removed to Ellington, Connecticut, 
and in 1767 again moved, this time to 
Ludlow, Massachusetts, where he died. 
Children : Joshua, of whom further ; Da- 
vid ; Caleb ; Jerusha ; Lydia ; and Anne. 

(VI) Joshua Fuller, eldest son of 
Young and Jerusha (Beebe) Fuller, was 
born in Colchester, Connecticut, Septem- 
ber 9, 1731, died October 6, 1810, in Mon- 
son, Massachusetts. He removed from 
Colchester to Ellington with his father 
when a boy of sixteen, and on March 11, 
1754, his father deeded him a house and 
farm there. In 1767 he removed to Lud- 



low, Massachusetts, then a part of Spring- 
field, where he was a pioneer and one of 
the leading men. The last years of his 
life were spent with his son, Benjamin. 
He married, January, 1753, Mercy Lath- 
rop, born October i, 1736, died January 
15, 1827, daughter of Solomon and Susan- 
na Lathrop, of Tolland. Children, the first 
six born in Ellington : Elisha, of whom 
further ; Solomon ; Lathrop ; Ezekiel ; 
Sarah; Lydia; Benjamin; Jonathan 
Beebe ; Mariana ; and Olive. 

(VII) EHsha Fuller, eldest son of 
Joshua and Mercy (Lathrop) Fuller, was 
born in Ellington, Connecticut, and died 
in Ludlow, Massachusetts. He married 
(first) Rebecca Waterman, who died 
August 19, 1796, daughter of Isaac and 
Mercy (Hall) Waterman. In 1797 he 
married (second) Sarah Cleveland, who 
died July 18, 1862. He kept a store in 
Ludlow Center for fifty years, and served 
in the Revolutionary War, taking part 
in the siege of Ticonderoga, 1776-77, be- 
ing a member of Captain Nathan Row- 
ley's company, in Colonel Robinson's 
Hampshire County (Massachusetts) regi- 
ment. Children : John ; Isaac, of whom 
further ; Joshua ; Susannah ; Ely ; Joel ; an 
infant ; Asenath ; Samuel ; Martha ; Wat- 
erman ; Henry Seymour; and Zera. 

(VIII) Isaac Fuller, son of Elisha and 
Rebecca (Waterman) Fuller, was born 
October 30, 1776, in Ludlow, Massachu- 
setts, died April 4, 1865, at Somers, Con- 
necticut ; married Eleanor Jones, of Som- 
ers, Connecticut, August 11, 1796. She 
died July 30, 1871. Isaac Fuller removed 
to Somers in 1795, was generally known 
as Captain Isaac ; and served in Captain 
Mill's company. Eighth Regiment, Con- 
necticut State Troops, in 1796. Children : 
Horace; Eleanor; an infant; Philo, of 
whom further ; Emeline ; Otis ; and El- 
vira. 



186 



,;MUrtVlUC^O 




-^$/Ue^^^ ^J^J^^j/^^ 



/> 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(IX) Philo Fuller, son of Isaac and 
Eleanor (Jones) Fuller, was born March 
27, 1810, in Monson, Massachusetts, and 
died in December, 1895, in Somers, Con- 
necticut ; married, May 14, 1840, Amelia 
Field, of Springfield, Massachusetts, born 
in 1820, died September 14, 1888. He was 
known as Captain Philo Fuller, and dealt 
extensively in cattle and horses. Politi- 
cally he was a Republican, and he at- 
tended the Congregational church. He 
had one child, Willard Philo Fuller, of 
whom further. 

(X) Willard Philo Fuller, son of Philo 
and Amelia (Field) Fuller, was born in 
Somers, Connecticut, November 30, 1850. 
He received his education in his native 
town and in Wilbraham Academy, and 
then became a clerk in one of the stores 
in Somers, Connecticut, where he remain- 
ed for two years. At the end of that time 
he went into mercantile business for him- 
self in Somers, and for thirty years car- 
ried on a successful business there. In 
1907 he came to Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, and became identified with the Col- 
umbia Creamery Company, of which he 
became treasurer, and with the Chapman 
Brooks Hardware Company. For the last 
five years he has been at the head of the 
Vermont Creamery Company, and he is 
also president of and a director in the 
Fuller Bugbee Company, of Somers, Con- 
necticut. He served as chairman of the 
Republican Town Committee, of Somers, 
Connecticut, and represented that town 
in the State Legislature in 1886, serving 
on the Committee on Fisheries, of which 
committee he was clerk. He is a member 
of Faith Church, and affiliated with the 
Men's Club of that church. Willard Philo 
Fuller married (first) in 1876, Belle Pease, 
daughter of Amos and ]Mary Etta 
(Moore) Pease, of Somers, Connecticut. 
She died in 1884, and he married (second) 
in 1886, Ella Collins, daughter of Guy P. 



and Mary Annette (More) Collins, of El- 
lington, Connecticut. Children of the first 
marriage: i. Etta, who married Raymond 
Bugbee, of Somers, Connecticut, and has 
four children : Marguerite, Emily, Isa- 
belle, and Charles Willard. 2. Herbert, 
deceased. 3. Belle, married Clarence E. 
Moore, professor of mathematics in Mas- 
sachusetts School of Technology, and 
they have one child. Hazel. To the sec- 
ond marriage was born one son, Willard 
Collins Fuller, of whom further. 

(XI) Willard Collins Fuller, son of 
Willard Philo and Ella (Collins) Fuller, 
was born in Somers, Connecticut, April 
8, 1889. He received his education in the 
local schools of Somers, in Enfield High 
School, and in the Thompsonville School. 
He then went into the hardware store of 
Chapman & Brooks, of Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, later becoming vice-president 
and secretary of the company, which of- 
fices he held as long as the corporation 
remained in business. The Chapman & 
Brooks Company was succeeded by the 
Bigelow & Dowse Company, wholesale 
dealers in hardware, cutlery, and automo- 
bile accessories, of which LIr. Fuller is 
at present the purchasing agent. Mr, 
Fuller is also treasurer of the Somers 
Land Company, dealing in property in 
North Dakota. He is a member of Faith 
Church and of the Men's Club of that 
church. 

Mr. Fuller married, on September 2^, 
19 14, ]\Iarjorie Wallace Brainard, daugh- 
ter of Horace K. and Fannie (Bright) 
Brainard, of Thompsonville, Connecticut, 
and they are the parents of two daugh- 
ters : Barbara, born June 8, 1916; and 
Eleanor Collins, born January 9, 1922. 



HYDE, Charles Addison 

Charles Addison Hyde, late manager 
of the Boston and Montana mining prop- 
erties, came of a ver)" old family, long 



187 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



prominent in England, and represented 
in the colonies from very early times. In 
England, Sir Nicholas Hyde was a chief 
justice of the King's Bench. Edward 
Hyde, earl of Clarendon, was lord chan- 
cellor at the time of the Restoration of 
Charles II to the throne of England, in 
1660, and was grandfather of two Queens 
in the English succession, Mary, the sec- 
ond, and Anne. The enterprise, courage, 
and resourcefulness of the family early 
brought some of its members to the great 
land of opportunity opened up for settle- 
ment across the seas, and the vigor of 
the stock, together with certain pro- 
nounced characteristics, have given many 
able men and women to the upbuilding of 
the nation, some of whom have borne the 
family name and many of whom, though 
of the family blood, bear other names. 
All of the professions, as well as nearly 
every field of business and political activ- 
ity, have been enriched by the lives of 
some of the representatives of this family, 
and their names are recorded on the rolls 
of Williams College, of which Rev. Allen 
Hyde, D.D., was trustee for more than 
thirty years and vice-president for twenty 
years ; and his son, Alexander, a graduate 
in 1834 of Yale College, of which Dr. 
Francis Dana Hyde was a graduate ; and 
of various other institutions of learning, 
including those of this country and some 
abroad. In political life, they have served 
in the Legislatures, both State and Na- 
tional, and have been extremely active 
and useful in local offices. In law, in the 
ministry, and in medical fields they are 
well represented. Among those of the 
blood but not of the name are: Hon. 
Matthew Griswold, chief justice and gov- 
ernor of Connecticut; Hon. John M. Niles, 
United States Senator and Postmaster- 
General in Van Buren's administration ; 
Rev. Edward Duran Griffin, president of 



Williams College; and Hon. William 
Woodbridge, United States Senator and 
governor of Michigan. 

William Hyde came to this country 
from England about 1633, and lived for a 
time at Newton, Massachusetts. It is 
supposed that he was a follower of Rev. 
Thomas Hooker, and went with that cler- 
gyman across the wilds of Connecticut, 
settling at Saybrook in 1636. He was one 
of the original proprietors of Norwich, 
Connecticut, in 1660, and was frequently 
elected to public office. He died at Nor- 
wich, January 6, 1681, leaving a son, Sam- 
uel, to perpetuate the name. From this 
son are descended many branches of the 
Hyde family. As time passed, and the 
settlements of the East grew, the hardy 
pioneer spirit of many of the first settlers 
prompted them to leave the more thickly- 
settled sections of their first choice and 
follow the irregular line of the wilderness 
as it moved westward, repeating their 
pioneer experiences sometimes three, 
four, or even five times in a generation. 
So it was that members of this sturdy, 
enterprising family of Hyde followed the 
westward exodus, and it is from one of 
these western branches of the family that 
Charles Addison Hyde, late manager of 
the Boston and Montana mining proper- 
ties, traces his descent. 

Charles Addison Hyde, son of Addison 
and Mary (Goss) Hyde, was born in 
Cleveland, Ohio, in 1861, and died in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, June 20, 1920. 
He was a lad of exceptional ability, pos- 
sessing an unusually fine mind, quick, dis- 
cerning, and' resourceful. True to New 
England traditions, which had persisted 
even though the place of residence was 
far removed from the homes of their early 
ancestors, the parents of Charles Addison 
Hyde, who were prosperous, saw to it 
that their gifted son received an excellent 



188 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



education. Alert, active, and enterpris- 
ing, he early engaged in business as a 
broker and salesman, operating for a time 
in Chicago, Illinois, and in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. From the life of these 
busy sections of the middle West, where 
large operations and gigantic undertak- 
ings challenge the powers of the finest 
minds, he gained valuable experience. 
And then, as do so many of the sons of 
New England, whose ancestors have left 
the home region, he came back to the 
East, established his headquarters at 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and engaged 
in the business of handling the Boston 
and Montana mining properties. Know- 
ing his field thoroughly, and having gain- 
ed a wide experience in different sections, 
he was remarkably successful and con- 
ducted a large and increasingly success- 
ful business, which he continued up to 
the time of his death. 

Versatile, and talented, the large busi- 
ness interests he handled represented but 
one side of his rich and varied personality. 
He was a fine musician, finding in "the 
harmony of sweet sounds" a source of ex- 
quisite pleasure and of high inspiration. 
He was also a scholar, delving deeply 
into such subjects as claimed his interest, 
and finding great happiness in the com- 
panionship of the "master minds of the 
ages." 

On January 17, 1897, Charles Addison 
Hyde married Arabelle Perry Brewster, 
of Boston, widow of John Brewster, and 
daughter of James and Mary (Sherman) 
Norris, she being, on the maternal side, a 
descendant of Commodore Perry, of 
"don't give up the ship" fame. Her 
father's grandfather was an admiral in 
the British navy. Her father was the sec- 
ond of nine sons and he lived retired in 
Providence, Rhode Island, for a time, and 
later in Somerset. Mrs. Hyde was born 



in Dighton, Massachusetts, her mother's 
father being one of the early settlers, and 
gave land for the Baptist church and ceme- 
tery, also gave the Baptist church there. 

Norris Arms — Argent, on a chevron gules, be- 
tween three falcons' heads erased sable a mullet or. 
Crest — A falcon's head erased or. 
Motto — Ubique patriam reviintsci. 

Sherman Arms — Or, a lion rampant sable be- 
tween three oak leaves vert. 

Crest — A sea lion sejant sable, charged on the 
shoulder with three bezants, two and one. 



BAILEY, Russell Arthur 

Among the eminently successful busi- 
ness men of Springfield, Massachusetts, 
was Russell Arthur Bailey, late treasurer 
and general manager of the Springfield 
Brick Company, who for nearly a quarter 
of a century was engaged in making ex- 
cellent brick for the builders of Spring- 
field and vicinity, and who passed away 
January 11, 1923. 

The Bailey family was represented in 
the Colonial history of this country at a 
very early date, the name being recorded 
as early as 1635. Both in Europe and in 
America the name has been variously 
spelled, and it is found in France and in 
Scotland, as well as in England. In France 
it is spelled Bailly, in Scotland, Baillie, 
and in England and America, Bailly, Bai- 
ley, and Bayley. Of the three best known 
immigrants who came to this country dur- 
ing the first half of the seventeenth cen- 
tury, John Bailey came first, being one of 
the passengers in the ship which was 
wrecked at Pemaquid (now Bristol), 
Maine, during a severe storm which 
swept the New England coast in August, 
1635. He came from Chippenham, Eng- 
land, and was a weaver by trade. He was 
one of the early planters of Newbury, but 
in 1637 went into the country beyond the 
Merrimac, near the mouth of the Powow 



189 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(Pawaw) river, and there built a log cab- 
in and began to cultivate the land, and 
also to catch the fish, which were abun- 
dant in the river. In 1639 the settlement 
of Colchester, afterward Salisbury, was 
begun, and in 1640 he shared in the first 
division of land there, receiving other 
grants in 1642 and 1643. His son, John, 
and his daughter, Johanna, came to Amer- 
ica with him. He died November 3, 1651. 

(I) John Bailey, mentioned above, was 
a resident of Marblehead, Massachusetts. 
He and his wife, Elizabeth, had among 
their children a son, John, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(II) John (2) Bailey, son of John and 
Elizabeth Bailey, was born in Marble- 
head, Massachusetts, July 9, 1761, and 
died April 22, 1828. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native 
district, and became a seafaring man. As 
he grew older, he left the sea, and con- 
ducted a general store in Marblehead, 
where he built his residence in 1806. He 
married, February 13, 1783, Mary Huling, 
born in 1761, died May 13, 1840, and they 
were the parents of four children : John ; 
Nabby ; Mary ; and Russell, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(III) Russell Bailey, son of John (2) 
and Mary (Huling) Bailey, was born in 
Marblehead, Massachusetts, May 16, 1804, 
and died October 20, 1848. He attended 
the district school and then entered the 
employ of the railroad, as station agent 
at Marblehead. He married, December 
25, 1827, Hannah Andrews, and they were 
the parents of two children : Benjamin 
Andrews, of whom further ; and Hannah 
Russell. 

(IV) Benjamin Andrews Bailey, son of 
Russell and Hannah (Andrews) Bailey, 
was born in Marblehead, Massachusetts, 
in 1828, and died in Danielson, Connecti- 
cut, in 1896. He received his education 



in the public schools of the district in 
which he was born, and when he was fif- 
teen years of age became an apprentice 
to a machinist. While still a young man 
he went to Maine, locating at Saco, where 
he became identified with the Saco Water 
Power Company, later going into the 
Biddeford mills, and still later identifying 
himself with the Androscoggin mills, at 
Lewiston. In 1875 he went to Danielson, 
Connecticut, where he was associated 
with the Quinnebaug mills, owned by the 
same company which owned and operated 
the Maine mills. This connection he main- 
tained to the time of his death. He was a 
mill man and a cotton manufacturer all his 
life, and as an upright citizen and a wor- 
thy friend and associate was highly es- 
teemed by his fellow-citizens. Politically 
he gave his support to the candidates and 
the principles of the Republican party, in 
the affairs of which he took an active part. 
He was active in the campaign which re- 
sulted in the election of Hon. William P. 
Frye, of Maine, to the Twenty-eighth Con- 
gress, and served as alderman in the Lew- 
iston (Maine) city government. His re- 
ligious afifiliation was with the Congrega- 
tional church. He married Emily Bur- 
bank, of Fryeburg, Maine, daughter of 
Arthur Burbank, and they were the par- 
ents of five children : Russell Arthur, of 
whom further; Frank G. ; Benjamin; 
Mary ; and Milton. 

(V) Russell Arthur Bailey, son of Ben- 
jamin Andrews and Emily (Burbank) 
Bailey, was born in Saco, a village in the 
town of Biddeford, Maine, September 6, 
1857. He received his education in the 
public schools of Saco, and Lewiston, 
Maine; and of Danielson, Connecticut, 
where he graduated from the high school. 
When school days were over he engaged 
in the cotton manufacturing business, in 
his father's cotton mill at Danielson, Con- 



190 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



necticut. Here he rose to be assistant 
superintendent of the mills, which posi- 
tion he held from 1875 to 1886, and dur- 
ing that time he acquired experience and 
skill in the management of men and in the 
handling of factory products. For a time 
later he took charge of a brick plant of 
his father's, but in 1886 he decided to en- 
gage in business for himself. He began 
the manufacture of brick, first, in Daniel- 
son, and later, in Hartford, Connecticut, 
continuing alone until 1899, when he 
came to Springfield, Massachusetts, and 
became a member of the Springfield Brick 
Company. Of this concern Mr. Bailey 
was superintendent for many years and 
was also treasurer and general manager 
for seventeen years. He was actively con- 
nected with this company up to his de- 
cease in 1923, and the business constantly 
grew. The plants are located at Carew 
street and at Forest Park, and at times 
employ as many as two hundred and 
twenty-five hands. The product of these 
large plants is used largely in Spring- 
field and suburbs, the nearness of the mar- 
ket to the point of manufacture being an 
advantage to both producer and con- 
sumer. Politically, Mr. Bailey was a Re- 
publican. He was a member of the Nay- 
asset Club, the Rotary Club, the Win- 
throp Club, the Springfield Country Club, 
and of the Fish and Game Club ; and his 
religious affiliation was with Faith Con- 
gregational Church. 

On May 23, 1885, Russell A. Bailey 
married Harriet E. Sweet, of Killingly, 
Connecticut, daughter of Samuel and Al- 
mira (Williams) Sweet. About 1870 her 
father contributed much to the upbuilding 
of Topeka, Kansas. He was at that 
time a prominent business man of 
that city. Mrs. Bailey died November 
23, 1921. Mr. and Mrs. Bailey became 
the parents of four children: i. Helen C, 



a graduate of Simmons College, who is a 
teacher. 2. Ruth J., a graduate of the 
New England Conservatory of Music, at 
Boston, and is engaged in teaching music. 
3. Bernice L., a graduate of Wellesley 
College, who married Ralph R. Day, of 
Long Island, a construction and electri- 
cal engineer, and they have one child, 
Russell Roscoe Day, born in Pittsfield, 
Massachusetts, September 3, 1919. 4. 
Leila S., who is a graduate of the New 
York University. 



HUSSEY, Merritt BufTum 

The Hussey name is an old one in the 
history of New England, being traced to 
one Hugh Hoese, who came to England 
from Normandy with William the Con- 
queror in 1066, the name in French being 
De Hosey, through a series of transitions 
anglicized to Hussey. Christopher Hus- 
sey, said to have come from Dorking, 
Surrey, England, to Lynn, Massachusetts, 
in 1630, was probably the first of the name 
in America, he being recorded as one of 
the original grantees and settlers of 
Hampton, New Hampshire. His brother, 
Captain Joseph Hussey, was also of 
Hampton, which he represented in the 
Legislature in 1672. Robert Hussey was 
taxed in Dover in 1659. Other settlers 
of this name were in New England at an 
early date and many of them were kins- 
men, but the records fail to show what, 
if any, relation any of them bore to Rich- 
ard Hussey, the first known ancestor of 
the following line, to which Merritt Buf- 
fum Hussey belongs. 

(I) Richard Hussey, with his wife, set- 
tled in Dover, New Hampshire, about 
1690. On June 20, 1696, he is recorded as 
having sold his interest in a certain thirty- 
acre tract of upland, adjoining the Great 
Bay, in Dover, and is designated in the 
deed as a weaver. On February 25, 1710, 



191 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



he sold a tract of thirty acres. He had a 
grant of land in the Great Bay, below the 
present city of Dover, and died previous 
to August 21, 1733, at which time his son 
Richard was appointed administrator of 
Jane Hussey's estate. He and his wife 
Jane were the parents of the following 
children : Richard ; Job ; Robert ; Mary ; 
Joseph ; Elizabeth ; Eleanor ; Abigail ; 
Jane; William, of further mention; Mar- 
garet; and Benjamin. 

(II) William Hussey, tenth child and 
fifth son of Richard and Jane Hussey, was 
born March 24, 171 1, died January 22, 
1778. He was a Friend, and in a deed is 
designated as a "taylor," but in his will 
describes himself as "a husbandman." He 
married, about 1730, Hannah Robinson, 
born November 21, 1707, died April 20, 
1793, daughter of Timothy and Mary 
(Roberts) Robinson. Mary Roberts was 
the daughter of John and Abigail (Hut- 
ter) Roberts, and Abigail Hutter was the 
daughter of Hatevil and Anne Hutter. 
Children mentioned in records: Paul; 
Mercy; William; Mary; Abigail; Timo- 
thy; and Stephen, of further mention. 

(III) Stephen Hussey, son of W^illiam 
and Hannah (Robinson) Hussey, was 
born January 21, 1750, and died at Ber- 
wick, Maine, in 1828; married, in Dover, 
New Hampshire, October 5, 1774, Pris- 
cilla Hanson, daughter of Stephen and 
Mary (Austin) Hanson. Children: Lydia; 
Mary ; Hannah ; Stephen ; Hanson ; Tim- 
othy, of further mention ; Mercy ; Mary ; 
Miriam; Sibyl; and Elijah. 

(IV) Timothy Hussey, son of Stephen 
and Priscilla (Hanson) Hussey, was born 
in Berwick, Maine, May 13, 1787, died 
April 22, 1858; married Abigail Buflfum, 
born November 9, 1787, daughter of Sam- 
uel and Hannah Bufifum. He removed to 
China, Maine, where he was one of the 
pioneers, and lived in a log house, in 



which all the children were born. Chil- 
dren : Cynthia ; Hannah ; John A. ; George 
BufTum, of further mention ; Elmira ; 
Mercy ; Austos ; and Samuel Bufifum. 

(V) George Bufifum Hussey, son of 
Timothy and Abigail (Bufifum) Hussey, 
was born at Albion, Maine, December 22, 
1820, died March 30, 1886, in Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts. He engaged in farming dur- 
ing the early part of his life, then taught 
school for a time, and later came to Salem, 
where he bought two hacks and engaged 
in the hacking business, carrying the elite 
of the town, old retired sea captains and 
their wives, pleasure riding and also ran 
a conveyance from the Essex House to 
the depot. After a time he bought a mar- 
ket, near the Naumkeag Mills, in Salem, 
Massachusetts, where he sold meat and 
provisions. He lived in Salem some twen- 
ty years, his mother's uncle, James N. 
Bufifum, being mayor of that city, and 
then removed to Lynn, Massachusetts. 
Here he conducted a grocery business for 
several years, at the end of which time 
he became employed as a carpenter by 
his brother, Samuel B., who was a large 
contractor. Mr. Hussey continued ac- 
tively engaged at his trade to within a 
short time of his death. The family were 
of Quaker faith. George B. Hussey mar- 
ried, November 25, 1847, Betsy Taylor, of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, born in China, 
Maine, January 18, 1830, died April 13, 
1915. Children: George Wesley ; Alonzo 
Taylor, of further mention ; George Ray- 
mond ; and Everett E. 

(VI) Alonzo Taylor Hussey, son of 
George B. and Betsy (Taylor) Hussey, 
was born in South Danvers (now Pea- 
body), Massachusetts, May 25, 1851. He 
received his early education in the local 
schools of Salem, then entered the high 
school, where he remained for a year and 
then studied in Lynn High School for a 



192 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



year. When through school he was em- 
ployed in his father's store for a time. In 
the fall of 1873 he came to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, where, for a short time, 
he worked in the grocery store of Hub- 
bard Brothers, on the corner of State and 
Market streets, then the finest store in 
the city. He later was employed in the 
factory of Milton Bradley, then located 
at the corner of Harrison avenue and 
Dwight street, for a short time, and then 
went into the old armory grocery store 
where he worked for two and a half years. 
For six and a half years he was in the em- 
ploy of A. O. Brooks, grocer, on State 
street, and for the same length of time 
he worked in the grocery store of Charles 
P. Alexander, at Winchester square. Tn 
1888 Mr. Hussey took the civil service ex- 
amination for the office of water inspector 
for the city of Springfield, which he pass- 
ed successfully, receiving his appointment 
in June of the same year, and during the 
thirty-four years which have passed since 
that time he has most faithfully and effici- 
ently discharged the duties of that office, 
and is now (1922) the oldest employee of 
the city. 

Mr. Hussey is a member of the Bay 
Path Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows ; of Roswell Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; and was a member of the 
American Order of United Workmen. He 
is also a member of the Wesley Methodist 
Church. Mr. Hussey was married, Sep- 
tember 12, 1878, to Catherine McGuire, 
born in Sunderland, Massachusetts, 
daughter of William and Sophia (Davis) 
McGuire, and they are the parents of 
three children : Merritt Bufifum, of fur- 
ther mention ; Merrill McGuire, born 
March 10, 1887, died March 15, 1887; and 
Harold Taylor, born August 10, 1888, died 
August II, 1888. 

(VII) Merritt Bufifum Hussey, son of 
Mass — 12 — 13 193 



Alonzo and Catherine (McGuire) Hus- 
sey, was born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, March 22, 1882. He received his 
education in the grammar and high 
schools of Springfield, and since attaining 
his majority has been in the employ of 
the government, connected with the 
United States Armory. In addition to his 
work as government official, Mr. Hussey 
in association with his brother-in-law, 
Lucius G. Cressman, under the firm name 
of the C. & H. Prompt Printery, carries 
on an extensive business in the line of 
catalogue and commercial printing and 
job work. He is also a notary public and 
justice of the peace. 

Politically, Mr. Hussey votes indepen- 
dently. He is a member of the Bay Path 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows ; and is an active member of the 
Emanuel Congregational Church, and is 
treasurer of the Benevolent Society of 
that organization. 

On October 8, 1907, Mr. Hussey mar- 
ried Bessie Harriett Cressman, born in 
Rocky Hill, Connecticut, May 6, 1883, 
later of Middletown, Connecticut, and 
still later residing in Springfield. She is 
a daughter of Julian Cressman, born in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Mary 
(Lamb) Cressman, born in England. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hussey are the parents of one 
son, Russell Bufifum Hussey, born in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, August 30, 
1909. 



SHAW, Charles Richard 

Among the well known citizens of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, is Charles 
Richard Shaw, who since boyhood has 
lived in Springfield, and for a time was 
engaged in market-gardening, but later 
entered the retail milk business in that 
city. 

The name Shaw is a very old English 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



surname, used also as a termination. It is bank, Sheffield, England, in 1804, and died 



derived from the Anglo-Saxon Scua, 
meaning a shade or place shadowed or 
sheltered by trees. Several parishes and 
places bear the name, and from these the 
families of Shaw doubtless took their sur- 
names. The name is also found used in 
combination, as in Abershaw, Bagshaw, 
Cockshaw, Henshaw, Bradshaw, Long- 
shaw, and Eldershaw, and when thus 
used indicates the name of a special wood 
or sheltered place, as the Abershaws 
doubtless were orginally a family living 
in the shelter of the Aber "shaw" or wood. 
The coat-of-arms of the Shaw family of 
Kilmarnock, Scotland, is : 

Arms — Azure, three covered cups, two and one 
or; on a chief argent a merchant's ship under sail 
proper, a canton gules charged with the mace of 
the city of London surmounted by a sword in 
saltire, also proper pommel and hilt of the second. 

Crest — A demi-savage aflfrontee, wreathed about 
the head and waist proper, in the dexter hand a 
key or, the sinister resting on a club reversed, also 
proper. 

Supporters — Dexter, a savage wreathed about 
the head and waist with laurel, his exterior hand 
resting on a club, all proper (emblematical of 
Fortitude) the sinister hand presenting an escroll, 
thereon inscribed, "The King's Warrant of Prece- 
dence;" sinister, an emblematical figure of the city 
of London, the dexter arm supporting the shield, 
the sinister extended to receive the escroll pre- 
sented by the other supporter. 

Motto — I mean well. 

The other armorials of the Shaw fam- 
ilies of Scotland are the same, or similar, 
in design. Representatives of the Shaw 
family were in New England before 1627, 
John Shaw being one of the sharers in the 
division of cattle made at Plymouth in 
that year, but Richard Shaw, grandfather 
of Charles Richard Shaw, lived and died 
in England. He married Ann Guest, and 
among their children was Charles Shaw, 
of whom further. 

Charles Shaw, son of Richard and Ann 
(Guest) Shaw, was born in Wencken- 



in Springfield, Massachusetts, February 
13, 1893, aged eighty-nine years. In Eng- 
land he was actively interested in public 
affairs, and like many others who held 
pronounced views during those troublous 
times when Parliament and the King 
were battling for power, he decided that 
it was the part of wisdom and discretion 
to try his fortune in the New World. He 
came to America in 1845, and went West, 
where he remained for a time and then 
came back East and located in Albany, 
New York. In 1865 he came to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and purchased a 
farm containing about one hundred acres 
of land, situated between what is now 
Eastern avenue and St. James avenue. 
Here he engaged in farming and market- 
gardening, finding a ready sale for his 
fruits and vegetables in the rapidly grow- 
ing city of Springfield. The farm proved 
to be a most excellent investment, for as 
the city grew it surrounded the Shaw 
farm which is now in the center of the 
city, and is therefore vastly increased in 
value, much of its acreage being devel- 
oped and built upon. Charles Shaw mar- 
ried Mary Ann (Miller), who was born 
in Scotland, and died in Springfield, in 
1891, aged sixty-three years, and their 
children were : Charles Richard, of whom 
further; Annie M., deceased; Jeannette 
E. ; Benjamin J.; Dewitt C, deceased, 
who was a physician ; Ruth M. ; Dr. Jos- 
eph Wesley, who is a dentist in Spring- 
field ; Wallace F., who is practicing den- 
tistry in Westfield, Massachusetts ; and 
Lottie M., who married Frank H. Leek. 
Charles Richard Shaw, son of Charles 
and Mary Ann (Miller) Shaw, was born 
in Watervliet, Albany county. New York, 
May 3, 1852, and is a typical "self-made" 
man. When he was a boy of nine years, 
he was peddling market-garden produce 



194 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in Albany, and when his father removed 
to Springfield, he was a thirteen-year old 
lad. Here he worked with his father at 
market-gardening during the summers, 
and during the winters he traveled for the 
E. M. Lyman Seed Company, selling gar- 
den seed. For thirty years he remained 
with his father, raising large quantities of 
produce, for which he built up a large and 
prosperous market. The growing city 
offered a constantly enlarging opportun- 
ity for expansion of market, and as it 
crept closer and closer around the big 
farm, it brought consumer and producer 
nearer and nearer to each other, and final- 
ly began to encroach upon the source of 
supply by transforming garden acres into 
home lots. Thus both the price of vege- 
tables and the value of the land increased, 
and the Shaws prospered. 

After his marriage, Charles Richard 
Shaw engaged in market-gardening for 
himself, and also conducted a retail milk 
route successfully for some years. Mr. 
Shaw now (1923) lives retired on the old 
homestead, in the house which was built 
by his father in 1872. Mrs. Shaw also 
owns a farm in Ludlow, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Shaw was twice married. In 1882 
he married (first) Cora M. Kibbe, of 
North Somers, Connecticut, daughter of 
Orrin and Delia (Calkins) Kibbe. She 
died in 1885, and he married (second) 
January 6, 1890, Mary Isabelle Piper, who 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
daughter of Lewis E. and Maria Louisa 
(Warner) Piper. To the first marriage 
was born one daughter, Marian Kibbe, 
who is a teacher in a private school, also 
teacher of instrumental and vocal music. 
To the second marriage three children 
have been born: i. Lewis E., born Janu- 
ary 13, 1891. He served as a private in 
the World War, receiving his training at 
Camp Devens, and serving in France for 



a year, being wounded in the next to the 
last battle of the war. 2. Dorothy E., who 
married Raymond C. Gates, and has one 
son, Raymond C, Jr. 3. Walter, born 
August 14, 1903, who is a master-mechanic 
at the United States Armory. 



KIBBE, Clifford Pease 

Among those who are actively engaged 
in building operations in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, is Clifford Pease Kibbe, for- 
merly of the Vaughan & Kibbe Company, 
who is engaged in heavy foundation and 
concrete work. 

(I) Mr. Kibbe comes of old Colonial 
stock, tracing his ancestry to Edward 
Kibbe, progenitor of the American family. 
Edward Kibbe, who lived at Exeter, Eng- 
land, married Deborah , and they 

were the parents of Edward (2), of whom 
further. 

(II) Edward (2) Kibbe, son of Edward 
and Deborah Kibbe, was born in Exeter, 
England, in May, 161 1. He came to New 
England in 1639, settling in Muddy Riv- 
er, Boston, now the town of Brookline. 
He was a sawyer by trade, and owned a 
saw mill at Brookline as early as 1640. 
He married Mary Partridge, of Exeter, 
England, who was admitted to the church 
in Boston, November 29, 1645, and they 
were the parents of seven children : Mary, 
born in April, 1640; James, born in May, 
1642; Elisha, of further mention; Debor- 
ah, baptized November 7, 1647; John, bap- 
tized July 27, 1649; Reuben, born and 
died 1652 ; and Elizabeth, born at Rox- 
bury, January 27, 1654. 

(III) Elisha Kibbe, son of Edward (2) 
and Mary (Partridge) Kibbe, was born 
in Boston, Massachusetts, in January, 
1644, and baptized with the elder children, 
November 30, 1645. He came to Enfield, 
Connecticut, in 1682, with his wife, and 
died there April 3, 1735, his age being 



195 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



given as ninety-two on the Enfield rec- 
ords. He married, May 7, 1667, Rachel 
Cook, who died September 10, 1740, aged 
ninety-six years, ten months, and they 
were the parents of children : Edward, of 
whom further; John, who had a lot ad- 
joining his father's and later removed to 
Stafiford; James, born in 1680; Isaac, born 
in 1683; and Rachel, born in 1688. 

(IV) Edward (3) Kibbe, son of Elisha 
and Rachel (Cook) Kibbe, was the first 
settler on the second lot north of the Som- 
ers road, and in 1713 removed to what is 
now Somers, Connecticut, where he died. 
He married and reared children : Edward, 
of whom further; Elisha, Jacob, Israel, 
and Rachel. 

(V) Edward (4) Kibbe, son of Edward 
(3) Kibbe, married and reared children, 
among whom was Daniel, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(VI) Daniel Kibbe, son of Edward (4) 
Kibbe, was born in 1717, and died Decem- 
ber 15, 1810. He took an active interest 
in all affairs of his day and time, and his 
patriotism is shown by the fact that he 
served in the Revolutionary War. He 
married Mary Pratt, and they were the 
parents of a son, Lemuel, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(VII) Lemuel Kibbe, son of Daniel 
and Mary (Pratt) Kibbe, was born in 
1752, and died in 1827. He married Love 
Pomeroy, and among their children was 
Erastus, of whom further. 

(VIII) Erastus Kibbe, son of Lemuel 
and Love (Pomeroy) Kibbe, was born in 
Somers, Connecticut, in 1777, and died 
August II, 1848. He was a farmer by 
occupation, and followed that all his life. 
He married Esther Kibbe, born in 1784, 
died in 1853, daughter of Peter Kibbe, Jr., 
and descendant of Edward (3) Kibbe, 
through Elisha, his son Peter Kibbe, Sr., 
his son Peter Kibbe, Jr. The children of 



Erastus and Esther (Kibbe) Kibbe were : 
Erastus ; Norman, of whom further ; Os- 
car, Harmon, Lorey, and Dorothy. 

(IX) Norman Kibbe, son of Erastus 
and Esther (Kibbe) Kibbe, was born at 
Somers, Connecticut, in 181 1, and died at 
North Somers, now Kibbe, Connecticut. 
He was a farmer by occupation, living of! 
and cultivating the homestead farm, and 
taking an active interest in the public af- 
fairs of his community. He married Maria 
Roxanna Pease, of Monson, Massachu- 
setts, and they were the parents of the 
following children : Homer Norman ; Clif- 
ford P., of whom further; Elbert W., de- 
ceased ; Hattie, deceased ; and Corwin L. 

(X) Clifford Pease Kibbe, son of Nor- 
man and Maria R. (Pease) Kibbe, was 
born in Somers, Connecticut, December 
16, 1857. He received his education in 
the public schools of Somers, including 
the high school, and from the time he was 
thirteen years of age until his twentieth 
year was completed was engaged in farm- 
ing. In 1877 he came to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and engaged in the meat 
business, opening a market on Main street 
where the Russell Hotel is now located. 
This business he successfully conducted 
for thirty years, until 1907, when he sold 
out and entered a new field. In partner- 
ship with a Mr. Vaughan, under the firm 
name of Vaughan & Kibbe, he engaged in 
the contracting business, doing heavy 
foundation work, and concrete construc- 
tion work. The connection with Mr. 
Vaughan was maintained until 1920, when 
the partnership was dissolved and Mr. 
Kibbe continued the business alone. He 
has been successfvil, and has built up a 
large business, employing many men and 
teams. His work is mostly confined to 
Springfield. 

Mr. Kibbe has taken an interest in pub- 
lic affairs. He was a member of the City 



196 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Council for three years, serving in 1899, 
and in 1900-1901. He is also a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce ; also of 
DeSoto Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows ; and of the Springfield Au- 
tomobile Club. 

On June 20, 1885, Mr. Kibbe married 
Annette M. Pinney, of Brookfield, Massa- 
chusetts, daughter of Albert and Augusta 
Ruby Pinney, and they became the par- 
ents of seven children: i. Harold W., 
deceased, 2. Ruby Corinne, born March 
19, 1891; married, September 25, 1920, 
Rollin Keeney, and has one son, Clifford 
Emerson Keeney, born July 17, 1921. 3, 
Norman, who died in infancy. 4. Donald 
Clifford, born May 8, 1893 5 ^^ received 
his education in the public schools of 
Springfield, and at Staunton Military 
Academy, in Virginia, from which he was 
graduated in 1916. He enlisted in the 
World War in 1917, and after serving for 
three months in the Springfield arsenal, 
was transferred to the Medical Corps of 
the 104th Massachusetts Infantry, with 
which unit he went to France in Septem- 
ber, 1917, serving as stretcher-bearer in 
the trenches for nine months, and in that 
capacity participating in all the engage- 
ments of his sector, with the exception of 
the battle of the Argonne. Suffering 
from shell-shock, he was sent to a hos- 
pital for a time, and then returned to ac- 
tive duty, serving, in all, for twenty-three 
months and two weeks, at the end of 
which time he was honorably discharged, 
in August, 1919, he holding at that time 
the rank of sergeant. He is a member of 
the American Legion ; of the Yankee Div- 
ision Club, of Boston ; and of Springfield 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. He 
is associated with his father in business 
at the present time (1923). He married, 
September i, 1919, Charlena Bemis. 5. 
Dorothy Annette, born November 15, 



1898; married Carlton H. Garinger, and 
has one child, Frances Elizabeth, born in 
August, 192 1. 6. and 7. Stewart Allen 
and Stanley Johnson (twins), born Au- 
gust 30, 1900. 



DUNLEAVY, James Edward 

Among the men of Springfield who 
have made for themselves a name and a 
place in the legal profession was the late 
James Edward Dunleavy, known as a 
criminal lawyer of ability and resource- 
fulness, and who was also prominent in 
the Democratic political organizations of 
the city and of the State. 

(I) Mr. Dunleavy was descended from 
a family recounted by tradition to have 
emigrated from Spain to the North of 
Ireland at a very early date, where the 
branch of the family to which Mr. Dun- 
leavy belonged remained until the time 
of his grandfather, James Dunleavy, who 
was born in Ireland, and accompanied his 
son Mortimer to this country in 1847, 
during the famous potato famine of that 
year. After spending a year in St. Johns, 
New Brunswick, Canada, he came to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, where he 
spent the remainder of his life, and died 
in i860, aged eighty-nine years. He mar- 
ried Alary Higgins, and they were the 
parents of three children : Mortimer, of 
whom further ; Hugh ; and Katherine. 

(II) Alortimer Dunleavy, son of James 
and Mary (Higgins) Dunleavy, was born 
in County Sligo, Ireland, in 1828, and died 
in Springfield, IMassachusetts, in 1893. ^^ 
received a good education in the national 
schools of Ireland, and in 1847 came to 
America, bringing with him his father, 
mother and brother Hugh. He went first 
to St. John, New Brunswick, Canada, 
but after a year spent in that region, 
came to Springfield, Massachusetts, where 
he continued to reside during the re- 



197 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



mainder of his life. For some thirty- 
years he was associated with W. L. & J. 
P. Wilcox, stove dealers, as teamster and 
salesman, and during the last ten years 
of his life lived retired, enjoying a well 
earned leisure at the close of a busy life. 
He married Bridget O'Brien, of County 
Sligo, Ireland, daughter of Martin and 
Annie O'Brien, and they were the parents 
of ten children, only three of whom lived 
to maturity. The three were : Mary E., 
John H., and James Edward, of whom 
further. 

(Ill) James Edward Dunleavy, son of 
Mortimer and Bridget (O'Brien) Dun- 
leavy, was born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, April 19, i860, and died there, Au- 
gust 18, 1921, aged sixty-one years. He 
received his education in the public 
schools of his native city, graduating 
from Central High School in 1878. He 
was interested in athletics, was catcher 
on high school baseball team, while a 
student, and later held the same position 
on the Mutual Amateurs, a crack baseball 
team. He was also prominent as an oars- 
man and was a member of the Atlanta 
Boat Qub. He began the study of law 
in the office of the late E. B. Lothrop, 
and was admitted to the bar, July 5, 1881. 
A man of large ability, keen wit and great 
presence of mind, he made a specialty of 
police court cases, and his professional 
associates speak in the highest terms of 
his ability as a criminal lawyer. He was 
very resourceful and quick in seizing the 
vital points of a case, and he was an ex- 
pert cross-examiner. His office was at 
No. 475 Main street, and here he practiced 
until his death, over a period of forty 
years. Though he did considerable office 
business and engaged' to some extent in 
real estate practice, representing the late 
Bishop Beaven, head of the Catholic 
church, in some large transactions, never- 



theless it was criminal practice that fasci- 
nated him and claimed his best energy. 
In that field he had but few equals. He 
always practiced alone, and made a spec- 
ialty of police court work, having a very 
large majority of the cases for the de- 
fense for many years. During his earlier 
years he was prominent in the councils of 
the Democratic party, having served two 
terms in the Common Council ; was chair- 
man of the Democratic City Committee ; 
and was prominently mentioned as a can- 
didate for mayor of the city. He was 
affiliated with the old guard of the Demo- 
cratic party, with such men as James 
O'Keefe and David Power, and was an at- 
tendant of many conventions during the 
period of the old delegate system. After 
serving as chairman of the Democratic 
City Committee for two years, he was 
elected to the Common Council from 
Ward Three in 1887 and 1888, during 
which time he rendered efficient service. 
He was among the first of those appointed 
to serve as fire commissioner, and in this 
department of city service he took a keen 
interest. While watchful for the interests 
of the city, he advocated the development 
of the fire department to keep pace with 
the growth of the city, and he was always 
watchful of the interests of the firemen. 
He was a charter member of the Home 
City Council, Knights of Columbus, and 
served successively as deputy grand, dis- 
trict deputy, and grand knight, finally 
rising to the office of State advocate, a 
position which he held for many years. 

Mr. Dunleavy married, June 27, 1895, 
Hannah Agnes Sullivan, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Thomas and 
Margaret (O'Brien) Sullivan, and they 
were the parents of three children : Anna 
Mary, born June 16, 1896; James T., of 
further mention ; and John E., born Au- 
gust 22, 1900. 



198 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(IV) James T. Dunleavy, son of James 
Edward and Hannah Agnes (Sullivan) 
Dunleavy, was born in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, August 9, 1898. He received 
his early education in the public schools 
of his native city, and then entered Har- 
vard College, from which he graduated 
in 1920. He then entered Harvard Law 
School, where he is preparing for a legal 
career, and will graduate in 1924. During 
the World War he enlisted and was at 
Camp Lee, receiving training for service 
as an officer, and continuing until the 
armistice was signed and he was released 
from further service. 



SPALDING, John William 

John William Spalding, who was the 
manager of the Springfield district for 
the New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, up to May i, 1923, has 
been identified with that concern from the 
beginning of his active career, and is 
thoroughly familiar with every depart- 
ment of the business. On the above date 
he was transferred to Providence, Rhode 
Island, where he has since been in charge 
of the Providence division of that com- 
pany. 

Mr. Spalding is a descendant of a very 
old English family, which has been dis- 
tinguished in civil and in military life 
for many generations, both in Europe 
and in America. The name is derived from 
a market town in Lincolnshire, England, 
and was early represented in this country, 
a family of that name having settled in 
Virginia as early as 1619. It is from 
this pioneer who settled there that John 
William Spalding is descended, the line 
being traced as follows : 

(I) Edward Spalding and Edmund 
Spalding came from England together, 
with Sir George Yeardley, in 1619, and 
settled at Jamestown, Virginia. In the 



"Virginia Colonial Record," the names 
of Edward Spalding, his wife, a son and 
a daughter, appear upon the "List of the 
Living," February 16, 1623. After the 
massacre of the English by the Indians 
in March, 1662, Edward Spalding left 
the Virginia colony, and went to Brain- 
tree, Massachusetts, where he was made 
a freeman, May 13, 1640. On October i, 
1645, ^^^y with nineteen others, petitioned 
for a grant of 10,000 acres of land, which 
request was granted by the General Court. 
He was one of the twenty petitioners 
for the right to settle the town of Chelms- 
ford, in 1652, and was one of the first 
settlers of that place. He served on the 
first board of selectmen in 1654, again in 
1656, and 1660-61, and on the first divi- 
sion of land, February 4, 1661, was grant- 
ed twenty-eight acres. He served as 
surveyor of highways and was one of 
the original proprietors of Newfield, of 
which he was one of the surveyors, and 
he was also one of the surveyors of North 
Chelmsford. He died February 26, 1670. 
His first wife, Margaret, died at Brain- 
tree, in August, 1640. His second wife, 
Rachel, died before April 5, 1670. The 
children of the first marriage were : John, 
Edward, and Grace ; of the second mar- 
riage: Benjamin, Joseph, Dinah; and An- 
drew, of further mention. 

(II) Andrew Spalding, son of Edward 
and Rachel Spalding, was born Novem- 
ber 19, 1652, and died May 5, 1713. He 
inherited his father's estate, and was a 
deacon of the church at the time of his 
death. He married, April 30, 1674, Han- 
nah Jefes, who died January 21, 1790, 
daughter of Henry Jefes, of Billerica, 
Massachusetts, and they were the parents 
of nine children: Hannah, Andrew; Hen- 
ry, of further mention; John, Rachel, 
William, Joanna, Benoni, and Mary. 

(III) Henry Spalding, son of Andrew 



199 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



and Hannah (Jefes) Spalding, was born 
in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, November 
2, 1680, and died April 4, 1720. He mar- 
ried, about 1703, Elizabeth Lund, born 
September 29, 1684, daughter of Thomas 
Lund (Lunn, Lun), one of the first set- 
tlers and a proprietor of Dunstable, New 
Hampshire, later known as Nashua, New 
Hampshire. Their children were : Henry 
(2), of further mention; Thomas, Wil- 
liam, Leonard, Eleazer, Timothy, and 
David, all born in Chelmsford. 

(IV) Henry (2) Spalding, son of Hen- 
ry and Elizabeth (Lvmd) Spalding, was 
born in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, No- 
vember 22, 1704, and died April 29, 1792, 
aged eighty-eight years. He was a mem- 
ber of Captain Robert Richardson's Snoe 
Shoe company, in 1824, and was known 
as Colonel Henry Spalding. He served 
in the Colonial-Indian wars. He mar- 
ried (first) February 21, 1725, Lucy Proc- 
tor, descendant of Robert Proctor. She 
died June i, 1742, and he married (sec- 
ond) April 27, 1743, Marah Adams, des- 
cendant of Henry Adams, ancestor of the 
Presidents of that name. Five children 
were born to each marriage, all born in 
Chelmsford, and all settled there, except 
two: Samuel, of further mention, and 
David, both of whom settled in Merri- 
mack, New Hampshire. 

(V) Samuel Spalding, son of Henry 
(2) and Lucy (Proctor) Spalding, was 
born in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Jan- 
uary 31, 1727, and died in Merrimack, 
New Hampshire, September 11, 1797, in 
his seventy-first year. He was one of 
the first settlers in Merrimack, New 
Hampshire, where he owned large tracts 
of land, from which he gave farms to 
several of his sons. He cleared a piece 
of land and built a house there before 
he married. He was a large man, and 
noted for his very strong voice, which. 



according to tradition, could be distinctly 
heard at a distance of two miles. His 
mark for his cattle and sheep, a slit in the 
right ear and a half penny on the under 
side of the same, is recorded in the town 
book of Merrimack, under date of De- 
cember 23, 1772. He served as a lieuten- 
ant in the Revolutionary War, and took 
part in the battle of White Plains, Oc- 
tober 28, 1776, receiving his discharge in 
December of the same year. He married, 
May 3, 1753, Sarah Woods, daughter of 
Samuel and Mary (Parker) Woods, of 
Chelmsford, and they were the parents 
of eight children, all born in Merrimack, 
New Hampshire : Samuel, Abijah, Sarah, 
Henry, Oliver ; Isaac, of further mention ; 
Silas, and Asa. 

(VI) Captain Isaac Spalding, son of 
Samuel and Sarah (Woods) Spalding, 
was born in Merrimack, New Hampshire, 
August 20, 1765, and died June 2, 1830. 
His father planned that he should have a 
liberal education, and he was prepared for 
college under the tuition of Rev. Mr. 
Fisher, of Wilton, but the fortunes of the 
family changed and he learned the tan- 
ner's trade with a Mr. Farley of Hollis, 
New Hampshire. He served his time as 
an apprentice diligently and faithfully, 
and then engaged in business in associa- 
tion with Jeremiah Pritchard, of New 
Ipswich, New Hampshire. He lived in 
the latter place until after the birth of 
his first three children, and then removed 
to Wilton, New Hampshire, where he re- 
mained to the time of his death. He was 
a man of marked ability, and was de- 
voted to his home. His house was al- 
ways open to his friends, and though he 
had dealings with almost every man in 
town, he never had a disputed account. 
His education and his good judgment 
made him a most useful citizen of his 
community and won for him the highest 



200 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



esteem of his associates. lie married 
(first) April 9, 1795, Mary Ritter. She 
died April 29, 1808, and he married (sec- 
ond) November 2, 1809, in Mason, New 
Hampshire, ]\Irs. Mary (Flynn) Colburn, 
of Milford. Children : Isaac ; Moses, of 
further mention ; Charles ; Harvey ; a son 
who died young; Lyman; Mary; Emma; 
and Orpha. 

(VII) Moses Spalding, son of Captain 
Isaac and Mary (Ritter) Spalding, was 
born in New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 
March 10, 1797, and died in Wilton, New 
Hampshire, in 1879. He married. May 
29, 1823, Anna Hunt Kimball, daughter 
of John Kimball, and they were the par- 
ents of four children : Edward Henry ; 
Isaac Kimball ; William Ritter, of fur- 
ther mention ; and John Augustine. 

(VIII) William Ritter Spalding, son 
of Moses and Anna Hunt (Kimball) 
Spalding, was born in Wilton, New 
Hampshire, April 8, 1828, and died De- 
cember 29, 1891. He settled in Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, in 1846, and there he be- 
came a prominent merchant. He was 
treasurer of the Lawrence Savings Bank; 
a member of the board of directors of the 
Pemberton Bank ; and a member of the 
board of directors of the Concord Rail- 
road Company. He married Alary Abby 
Ham, and their children, all born in Law- 
rence, were : William Walter, of further 
mention; Anna Elizabeth; Abbie Kim- 
ball, deceased ; Mary Ritter, deceased ; 
Charles Edward, deceased ; and Joseph- 
ine Mabel. 

(IX) William Walter Spalding, son of 
William Ritter and Mary Abby (Ham) 
Spalding, was born in Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, December 29, 1853, and died in 
1908. He was vice-president of the Ar- 
lington National Bank up to a few years 
before his death, and was treasurer of the 
Lawrence Savings Bank. He married, 



November 13, 1878, Etta Lizzie Leach, 
of Bradford, New Hampshire, where she 
was born in i860; she died April 5, 1923. 
She was the daughter of Walter S. and 
Lucy (Durrell) Leach. After the d^ath 
of her husband she lived in Denver for 
six years, but came back East to reside, 
and died shortly after. Mr. and Mrs. 
Spalding were the parents of three chil- 
dren : Helen Durrell, who married Fred- 
erick William Struby, of Denver, Color- 
ado, and has one child, Frederick Francis 
Struby ; John William, of further men- 
tion ; and Abby Elizabeth, who died 
young. This family for several genera- 
tions has been members of the Unitarian 
church. 

(X) John William Spalding, son of 
W^illiam Walter and Etta Lizzie (Leach) 
Spalding, was born in Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts, April 9, 1883. He received his 
early education in the public schools of 
Lawrence, and then became a student in 
Phillips-Andover Academy. When his 
academic course was completed, he be- 
gan his active career in the employ of 
the New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, in 1904, and that con- 
nection he has continuously maintained 
to the present time. He began in Boston, 
in the traffic department, and was trans- 
ferred to the engineering department, 
later being stationed successively in 
Taunton and in Fall River. In 1920 he 
was transferred to Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, where he was made manager of the 
Springfield district. That important posi- 
tion he efficiently filled until May i. 1923, 
when he was transferred to Providence, 
Rhode Island, where he has since been in 
charge of the Providence division, being 
advanced another round up the ladder 
of success, this being a much larger office 
than the one in Springfield. Politically, 
Mr. Spalding gives his support to the Re- 



201 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



publican party. While a resident of 
Springfield he was a member of the 
Springfield Chamber of Commerce, and 
well known in club circles, being a mem- 
ber' of the Nayasset Club, Springfield 
Automobile Club, and the Kiwanis Club, 
and of the latter he has been vice-presi- 
dent, and is now a director. His religious 
affiliation is with the Unitarian Church. 
On November 4, 1914, John William 
Spalding married Louise E. Oesting, who 
was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, 
daughter of F. William and Viola (Cor- 
nell) Oesting. 



NICHOLS, La Roy 

Among the citizens of Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, who have been actively en- 
gaged in the development of the city is 
La Roy Nichols, builder and contractor, 
and he is also interested in real estate 
in that city. 

The members of the Nichols family 
have been identified with the history of 
Massachusetts from very early times, 
several representatives of the family hav- 
ing settled there in Colonial days. One 
of these, Thomas Nichols, settled in the 
town of Cambridge before 1638, at which 
time he removed to Hingham, Massachu- 
setts. Another Thomas Nichols came 
before 1655, and settling in Maiden, Mas- 
sachusetts, reared a family of eight chil- 
dren, seven of whom were sons. Joseph 
Nichols, probably a brother of Thomas, 
was married in April, 1660, at Maiden, to 
Mary Felt, daughter of George Felt. 
Thomas Nichols, of Maiden, married 
Mary Moulton, and removed to Ames- 
bury, Massachusetts, where he had a seat 
in the meeting house in 1667; belonged 
to the train band in 1680, and died in 1720. 

For many generations Sturbridge, Mas- 
sachusetts, was the home of the branch 
of the family to which La Roy Nichols 



belongs, Samuel Nichols, his grandfather, 
having been born there in 1788, lived 
there throughout his life, and there died, 
July 30, 1844. He married Sarah Walker, 
who was born in 1792, and died in 1862, 
and they were the parents of six children : 
Fannie, born in 1814, died in 1830; Eliz- 
abeth ; Jane ; Merrick, of further men- 
tion ; Merrill ; and Samuel. 

Merrick Nichols, eldest son of Samuel 
and Sarah (Walker) Nichols, was born 
in Sturbridge, Massachusetts, in 1824, and 
died in Indian Orchard (Springfield), 
Massachusetts, in 1900. Throughout the 
active years of his life he followed the 
occupations of farming and shoe-making, 
achieving success as the result of effort 
well directed. His residence at Indian 
Orchard was begun in 1890, ten years 
before his death. He was twice married, 
(first) to Cornelia Smith, who was born 
in 1827, and died in 1859; (second) to 
Mary Stockwell. To the first marriage 
five children were born : Jennie (de- 
ceased), who was the wife of Edson Lau- 
rel ; Alfred, deceased ; Albert W., de- 
ceased ; La Roy, of whom further ; and 
Arthur Merrick. 

La Roy Nichols, son of Merrick and 
Cornelia (Smith) Nichols, was born in 
Sturbridge, Massachusetts, November 6, 
1859. He received his education in the 
public schools of his district, and was 
engaged in farming with his father until 
he was twenty-two years of age. He 
then learned the carpenter's trade, and 
since that time has been engaged in con- 
tracting and building. In 1888 he came to 
Springfield, and at once took an active 
part in the building and construction 
work of the city. He has been instru- 
mental in the erection of a large number 
of the residences and business blocks 
of Springfield, and is the owner of a con- 
siderable amount of valuable real estate. 



202 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



besides the beautiful residence which he 
owns and occupies on Jefferson avenue. 
He is well known among a large group of 
friends and associates as a successful 
business man and a progressive citizen, 
who is contributing his full share to the 
development of the community of which 
he is a member. Fraternally he is affili- 
ated with the Henry S. Lee Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, and he is also a mem- 
ber of the Brotherhood Club of Hope 
Church. 

On March 29, 1888, Mr. Nichols mar- 
ried Sarah Byers, daughter of Robert By- 
ers, a native of Ireland, and they are the 
parents of two children : Walter L., born 
in Springfield, Massachusetts, who is a 
carpenter by trade, and served in the 
Spruce Division, in Vancouver, British 
Columbia, during the World War; and 
Herbert George, born in Springfield, who 
is employed in the office of Rice & Lock- 
wood, of Springfield, as billing clerk. 



PRESTON, George Sumner 

Among the well known citizens of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, is George 
Sumner Preston, whose ancestry dates 
back to early Colonial times, John Pres- 
ton, earliest known American ancestor 
having been in this country before 1678, 
in "which year he married Sarah Gardner. 
Their son, John (2) Preston, removed to 
South Hadley, Massachusetts, where he 
died in 1728, having married, December 
2, 1714, Mary Smith, daughter of Luke 
Smith, Four of their seven children were 
sons, Samuel, John, Jonathan, and Ben- 
oni, and one of these was the father of 
Sumner Preston, great-grandfather of 
George Sumner Preston. 

Sumner Preston, grandson of John (2) 
Preston, and great-grandfather of George 
Sumner Preston, was born in South Had- 
ley, Massachusetts, in the latter years of 



the eighteenth century. A man of large 
ability and sterling character, he was a 
successful carpenter, contractor, and 
builder, and did much for the up-building 
of South Hadley in the early days, not 
only by conscientiously keeping his con- 
tracts and erecting substantial buildings, 
but by assisting those who wished to 
build houses for themselves and were un- 
able to raise the funds without the aid 
of a well established credit. In those 
days it was customary for men to engage 
in more than one occupation, and being 
carpenter as well as contractor and build- 
er, Sumner Preston carried on a flourish- 
ing business. Generous and anxious to 
help others, however, he lost heavily 
through endorsing notes which reverted 
to him for payment, and after meeting 
the obligations thus incurred, he went to 
Evansville, Wisconsin, where he died. He 
was the father of children : Cyrus ; Oliver ; 
Lucius, of whom further; Rachel, who 
married a Mr. Jay ; and Julia, who mar- 
ried a Mr. Ivin. 

Lucius Preston, son of Sumner Pres- 
ton, was born in South Hadley, Massa- 
chusetts, September 6, 1820, and died in 
Easthampton, Massachusetts, in 1892. He 
received his education in the local schools 
and then learned the trade of merchant 
tailor in South Hadley. He tried his for- 
tune for a time in Chicopee, and then lo- 
cated in Easthampton, where he followed 
his trade, furnishing the goods and mak- 
ing clothes for most of the best citizens 
of that place. Interested in public affairs, 
and possessed of keen intelligence and 
much ability, he was greatly trusted by 
his fellow-townsmen, who made him town 
treasurer, which position he held for 
many years. An actively interested mem- 
ber of the Congregational church, he 
aided its work in various ways, and was 
for many years treasurer of the Church 



203 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Society, Politically he supported the Re- 
publican party, and fraternally he was 
affiliated with Ionic Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Easthampton. 

In March, 1842, Mr. Preston married 
Laura Moody, of Granby, Massachusetts, 
born May 2, 1821, died in 1888, daughter 
of Elisha and Elizabeth (Canfield) 
Moody, and their children were : Ellen 
Moody, now of East Hampton, who mar- 
ried George Austin ; Lucius Monroe, of 
whom further ; and Delbert Turner, who 
died in infancy. 

Lucius Monroe Preston, son of Lucius 
and Laura (Moody) Preston, was born 
in Easthampton, Massachusetts, October 
3, 1848. He received a practical educa- 
tion in the public schools of Easthamp- 
ton and at Williston Seminary and then 
learned the trade of merchant tailor with 
his father. Expert at his trade, and pos- 
sessed of a good business sense quick to 
perceive larger possibilities, he combined 
enterprise with caution, continued at 
his trade, which offered a sure return, and 
opened a men's furnishing store which 
he ably conducted in connection with his 
work as merchant tailor until a few years 
ago, when he practically retired. Like 
his father before him he was respected 
and trusted by his fellow-townsmen, 
whom he served as tax collector for many 
years. He was a member of the Congre- 
gational church, and for several years 
was treasurer of the church and of the 
Church Society. He supported the Re- 
publican party, and was a member of 
Ionic Lodge, Free and Accepted IMasons ; 
and of the Pascommuck Club. 

Mr. Preston married, August 31, 1870, 
Mary Moore, born December 23, 1848, in 
Champlain, St. Lawrence county. New 
York, daughter of James and Martha 
(Taylor) Moore, and they became the 
parents of two children : Ada Marion, 



who died at the age of five years ; and 
George Sumner, of whom further, 

George Sumner Preston, one of Spring- 
field's enterprising and successful men- 
of-affairs, was born in Easthampton, 
Massachusetts, June 4, 1874. He attended 
the public schools of his native city, and 
then entered Childs' Business College, of 
Springfield, where he received a practical 
training. He then entered his father's 
store, men's furnishing, where he re- 
mained for two years. In 1896 Mr, Sum- 
ner came to Springfield, where he was for 
a time employed in the United States Ar- 
mory, Energetic, able, and thrifty, he 
saw to it that at whatever work he was 
employed, something should be saved for 
future use. After a time he left the ar- 
mory and went with the Tabor Prang 
Art Company, leaving there to enter the 
employ of the Springfield Street Railway 
Company. Interested in real estate and 
the possibilities of increasing value which 
it offers, he early began to invest as the 
chance of increasing value seemed to him 
good. Leaving the Street Railway Com- 
pany, he entered the employ of the Ameri- 
can Bosch Magneto Company, where he 
remained until his investments in real 
estate yielded him a financial independ- 
ence, then resigned in order to give his 
full time to his real estate holdings. Thus 
the young man who came to Springfield 
to make his way in the world has suc- 
ceeded in building for himself a success- 
ful business career, and has become one 
of the prominent and esteemed citizens 
of the city of his adoption. 

Mr. Preston is a member of Ionic 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Easthampton, of which his grandfather 
was a member, and with which his father 
is still affiliated. In this connection, it 
is interesting to note that it was Mr. 
Preston's father who "raised" him on his 



204 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



birthday. Mr. Preston is also a member 
of De Soto Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, No. 155, of Springfield; and 
of Agawam Encampment. His church 
membership is with the Park Congrega- 
tional. 

On June 5, 1895, George Sumner Pres- 
ton married Juliette Edna Chilson, of 
Goshen, Massachusetts, daughter of Wil- 
liam Wallace and Sarah Elizabeth (Lud- 
den) Chilson. William Wallace Chilson 
was the son of John and Clarissa Butler 
Chilson, John Chilson having come from 
Scotland and located in Buckland, Massa- 
chusetts, where he resided until his death. 
The children of George Sumner and Juli- 
ette Edna (Chilson) Preston are: i. Ray- 
mond IMoody, born in Easthampton, Mas- 
sachusetts, April 6, i8g6; he is a graduate 
of the Springfield Technical High School. 
During the World War he enlisted in the 
aviation service, and was located at Mine- 
ola. Long Island, preparing to go over- 
seas, when the armistice was signed. He 
is now president and general manager of 
the Springfield Air Service Corporation, 
organized for the making of maps of 
cities from the air, and for making sur- 
veys. The company owns several planes 
and is building up a large and successful 
business. 2.-3. Leonard Haynes and Laura 
Elizabeth (twins), born in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, June 15, 1904. 



EGBERT, Rev. John L. 

Having spent the active years of his 
life meeting the responsibilities of vari- 
ous pastorates. Rev. John L. Egbert pass- 
ed the last years of his life in Springfield, 
Massachusetts. 

The Egbert family is a very old one, 
tracing its descent from King Egbert, of 
England, who flourished during the sixth 
century. The first Egberts to settle in 
this country located in Virginia, later re- 



moving to Missouri and finally to Ken- 
tucky. 

Rev. John L. Egbert was born in Lib- 
erty, Missouri, son of John S. and Jane 
(Haslett) Egbert, and died in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, September 24, 1905. 
He received his early education in the 
local schools of his district and then en- 
tered Kenyon College, at Gambier, Ohio, 
where he studied law. After his admis- 
sion to the bar, he engaged in general 
practice in Chicago, Illinois, and was ac- 
tively following his profession there at 
the time of the great fire in 1873. He 
later studied theology in the General 
Theological School of New York City, 
was ordained a minister of the gospel, 
and came to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he became assistant to Dr. Bur- 
gess, of Christ Church. He later took 
charge of a church in West Springfield, 
and from there went to Bainbridge, New 
York, thence to Vineland, New Jersey. 
He later returned to Massachusetts and 
was settled for a time in Lynn, and at the 
end of his pastorate went then to Marble- 
head, Massachusetts. He then retired 
and eventually came to Springfield, where 
he lived retired to the time of his death. 
Although he had not been in charge of a 
pastorate for many years prior to his 
death, and the last four years of his life 
were passed as an invalid, he left many 
friends in Springfield, both among those 
who learned to know and love him when, 
as a young assistant pastor, he shared the 
labors of Rev. Alexander Burgess in 
Christ Church, and among those who 
knew him and were honored with his 
friendship during the years of his retire- 
ment. The long years of his various 
pastorates had yielded him a rich experi- 
ence and ripened a character of strength 
and beauty which endeared him to all 
who knew him. 



205 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Rev. John L. Egbert married, April i8, 
1877, Ellen Watkinson Adams, daughter 
of Nathan (2) and Ellen (Watkinson) 
Adams, who was born in Canterbury, 
Connecticut, February 6, 1844, and died in 
California, December 31, 1917. (See 
Adams IX). The children of Rev. and 
Mrs. John L. Egbert were: i. Nathan 
Adams, born in Bainbridge, New York, 
February 15, 1878 ; he was graduated from 
Harvard University, with the degree of 
A. B., 1900, later graduating from Colum- 
bia Law School. He practiced law in 
New York City until his death, which oc- 
curred in August, 1913. 2. Ellen Watkin- 
son, born at Bainbridge, New York ; she 
now resides in Springfield, and has had 
the engravings of her father. Rev. John 
L. Egbert, and her maternal grandfather, 
Dr. Nathan Adams, placed in this work, 
3. William Wallace, born in Vineland, 
New Jersey, August 10, 1882, and died at 
the age of nineteen years. 4. John Leight- 
ner, born in Vineland, New Jersey, Oc- 
tober 20, 1884, now deceased. He mar- 
ried and became the father of a daugh- 
ter, Catherine Ellen. 

(The Adams Line). 

The Adams family traces its ancestry 
to Ap Adam, the father of John or Lord 
Ap Adam, who was a member of Parlia- 
ment during the reign of Edward I, and 
baron of the Realm from 1296 to 1307. 
The lineage includes Kings of England and 
France, and goes back to Charlemagne. 
President John Adams believed that Hen- 
ry Adams, immigrant ancestor of this 
branch of the family, came from Devon- 
shire, England, and settled in Braintree, 
where he caused to be erected to his mem- 
ory in the old burying-ground at Brain- 
tree a monument inscribed: "In memory 
of Henry Adams, who took flight from 
the Dragon persecution in Devonshire, 
England, and alighted with eight sons 



near Mount Wollaston, near Braintree. 
One of the sons returned to England, and 
after taking time to explore the country, 
four removed to Medfield, and two to 
Chelmsford. One only, Joseph, who lies 
here at his left hand, remained here — an 
original proprietor in the township of 
Braintree." The inscription commemo- 
rates the "piety, humility, simplicity, pru- 
dence, patience, temperance, frugality, in- 
dustry, and perseverance" of the Adams 
ancestors. 

(I) Henry Adams came to Braintree, 
Massachusetts, about 1632, and was allot- 
ted forty acres of land for the ten persons 
in his family, February 24, 1639-40. He 
died at Braintree, October 6, 1646, and 
his will was proved June 8, 1647. ^^is 
children were: i. Lieutenant Henry, born 
in 1604, married Elizabeth Paine, and 
settled in Medfield. 2. Lieutenant Thom- 
as, of further mention. 3. Captain Sam- 
uel, born in 1617. 4. Deacon Jonathan, 
born in 1619, married Elizabeth Pussell, 
and settled in Medfield. 5. Peter, born 
in 1622, married Rachel , and set- 
tled in Aledfield. 6. John, born in 1624, 
settled in Cambridge. 7. Joseph, born in 
1626. 8, Ensign Edward, born about 1630, 
died in Medfield, November 12, 1716; 
married (first) in 1652, Lydia Rockwood, 
who died March 3, 1676; (second) in 1678, 
Abigail (Craft) Ruggles, widow. 9. Ur- 
sula, mentioned in her father's will. 

(II) Lieutenant Thomas Adams, son of 
Henry Adams, was born in England about 
1612, and died in Chelmsford, Massachu- 
setts, July 20, 1688. He removed from 
Braintree, and thence to Chelmsford. He 
served as town clerk, selectman, and dep- 
uty to the General Court, and his will, 
dated March 28, 1688, was proved, Oc- 
tober 7, 1690. He married, in Braintree, 
in 1644, Alary Blackmore, and they were 
the parents of eleven children : Mary, 



206 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



died young; Jonathan and Peletiah, 
(twins) ; Timothy ; George ; Samuel ; 
Edith; Rebecca; Elizabeth, died young; 
Thomas ; and Mary. 

(III) Samuel Adams, son of Lieuten- 
ant Thomas and Mary (Blackmore) 
Adams, was born in Chelmsford about 
1652, and died November 26, 1727. He 
was a millwright by trade, and finally set- 
tled in Canterbury, Connecticut, where 
he was a prominent citizen, and a mem- 
ber of the first board of selectmen in 1699. 
His wife Mary died March 28, 1718, and 
their children were: Abigail; Captain 
Joseph, of further mention ; Thomas ; 
Samuel ; Susanna ; Katherine ; Margaret ; 
and Rebecca. 

(IV) Captain Joseph Adams, son of 
Samuel and Mary Adams, was born in 
Chelmsford, about 1682, and died March 
3, 1752. He was a first settler, owned and 
dealt in land, and was active in the affairs 
of the town. He married (first) Eunice 
Spalding, who died April 5, 1726; (sec- 
ond) April 4, 1728, Mrs. Susanna (Wood- 
w^ard) Adams, born in 1693, died April 
29, 1790, daughter of Daniel and Eliz- 
abeth (Dana) Woodward. To the first 
marriage six children were born : Jos- 
eph ; Captain Samuel, of further mention; 
Eunice ; Lieutenant Joseph ; Mary ; and 
Parker. To the second marriage three 
children were born : Susanna, Elihu, and 
Captain Thomas. 

(V) Captain Samuel (2) Adams, son 
of Captain Joseph and Eunice (Spalding) 
Adams, was born in Canterbury, Connec- 
ticut, September 4, 1710, and died there 
December 2y, 1760. He married (first) 
in 1731, Sarah Cady ; (second) in 1739, 
Abigail Adams, born November 12, 1712, 
died August 21, 1809, daughter of Sam- 
uel and Mary (Cady) Adams. To the 
first marriage two children were born : 
Captain Samuel (3) ; and Anna. To the 



second marriage were born seven' chil- 
dren : Gideon; Eunice; Nathan, of fur- 
ther mention ; Abigail ; Sarah ; Alice ; and 
Joseph. 

(VI) Lieutenant Nathan Adams, son of 
Captain Samuel (2) and Abigail (Adams) 
Adams, was born in Canterbury, Connec- 
ticut, December 31, 1748, and died Febru- 
ary 4, 1837. He owned a farm upon which 
was a grist mill, located one mile south 
of the village, and a house in the village, 
in which he lived during the closing years 
of his life. He was appointed lieutenant 
in command of a garrison at Black Rock, 
Fairfield, Connecticut, and was prominent 
in the affairs of the town. He married 
(first) April 4, 1771, Phebe Ensworth, 
born August i, 1749, died July 12, 1800; 
(second) Mrs. Mary (Wright) Hale, who 
died December 22, 1808; (third) Anna 
Boswell, of Norwich, Connecticut. Chil- 
dren of the first marriage were : Mehit- 
able ; and Rufus, of further mention. 

(VII) Hon. Rufus Adams, son of Lieu- 
tenant Nathan and Phebe (Ensworth) 
Adams, was born in Canterbury, Connec- 
ticut, May 6, 1774, and died December 21, 
1840. He received his early education in 
the public schools of his district, and 
then prepared for Yale College, from 
which he was graduated in 1795. He was 
a member of the Legislature and judge 
of the court in 1829, in New York City, 
to which place he had removed. He mar- 
ried, November 26, 1807, Joanna Byers, 
and their seven children were all born in 
Canterbury, They were : Mehitable ; 
Mary ; Dr. Nathan, of further mention ; 
Mary (2) Smith ; Phebe Ensworth ; James 
Byers ; and Rufus. 

(VIII) Dr. Nathan (2) Adams, son of 
Hon. Rufus and Joanna (Byers) Adams, 
was born in Canterbury, Connecticut, 
May 6, 1813, and died while visiting his 
daughter in Marblehead, Massachusetts, 



207 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



October 2, it 



He received his early Episcopal church, especially the one at 



education in the public schools of his 
native district, and after two years of 
preparatory work at a school in Hartford, 
entered Yale College, graduating from the 
Medical School with honors in 1836. He 
then spent six years in Bellevue Hospital, 
in New York City, after which he en- 
gaged in general practice in the State of 
Connecticut. In 1843 ^^ came to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and there he built 
up a large and successful practice, gain- 
ing the confidence and affection of his cli- 
entele, and the respect and esteem of his 
professional associates. He was finally 
obliged to give up his practice, however, 
because of the effects of an accident which 
occurred on an extremely cold night in 
January, 1865, when he was thrown from 
his carriage, and so badly injured that 
even after his recovery from the immedi- 
ate effects, he deemed himself unfitted 
for the responsible duties of the medical 
profession. He sold his Springfield prop- 
erty and removed to New Haven, Con- 
necticut, where for five years he lived a 
secluded life. He then traveled for five 
years, and in 1876 returned to Springfield, 
where, in 1886, he bought a house on 
Worthington street. Shortly afterward, 
he purchased the McKnight place at In- 
gersoll Grove, but he did not live to en- 
joy his beautiful new home for long, his 
death occurring October 2, 1888, while 
visiting his daughter, Mrs. Ellen W. 
(Adams) Egbert, of Marblehead. 

During his first period of residence in 
Springfield, Dr. Adams took an active 
interest in town affairs, and in 1856 repre- 
sented Ward Three in the City Covmcil. 
He was a man of strong character, gener- 
ous, and benevolent, and gave his services 
most willingly even when there was no 
probability of the patient being able to 
pay the fee. He was interested in the 



Vineland, New Jersey, of which his son- 
in-law. Rev. John L. Egbert, was rector, 
and gave liberally towards its support. 

Mr. Adams married, May 11, 1843, 
Ellen Watkinson, born September 18, 
1817, daughter of Robert and Maria 
(Champion) Watkinson, and they were 
the parents of three children : Ellen Wat- 
kinson, of further mention ; Nathan, born 
July 12, 1845 ; <^^^ William Rufus, born 
January 3, 1853, died March 7, 1854. 

(IX) Ellen Watkinson Adams, daugh- 
ter of Dr. Nathan (2) and Ellen (Watkin- 
son) Adams, was born February 6, 1844. 
She married, April 18, 1877, Rev. John L. 
Egbert (see Egbert). 



PRATT, George Dwight 

Among those who have given of time, 
thought, and energy to the development 
of the city of Springfield, Massachusetts, 
none have more richly earned the lasting 
gratitude of the residents of the city than 
has George Dwight Pratt, who for the 
past twenty-one years has devoted his 
time, without remuneration, to civic and 
local enterprises furthering the welfare 
of the city which was the home of his 
maternal forebears. 

Mr. Pratt comes of a very old family 
which traces its ancestry in England back 
to the year 1200, records of the family 
being accessible before the year 1200, 
which indicate that the Pratt family is of 
Norman origin. 

(I) John Pratt, son of Rev. William and 
Elizabeth Pratt, was baptized November 
9, 1620, at Stevenage, near Hertfordshire, 
England, probably an adult at the time ; 
was in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as 
early as 1633, and received a grant of two 
acres of land there in the following year. 
In 1635 he owned a house on the north 
side of the present Mt. Auburn street, 



208 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



between Brighton street and Brattle 
square, and was made freeman May 14, 
1634. In 1636 he accompanied Rev, 
Thomas Hooker to New Haven, Connec- 
ticut, and shortly after settled in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, where he was one of 
the landed proprietors of the town ; was 
elected representative, January 14, 1640, 
and served on various important commit- 
tees. He was a carpenter by trade, and 
purchased two house lots on Main street, 
north of Asylum street, the present Pratt 
street being named in his honor. He 
married Elizabeth Spencer, and they were 
the parents of three children: John (2), 
of whom further ; Daniel ; and Hannah. 

(II) John (2) Pratt, son of John and 
Elizabeth (Spencer) Pratt, was born 
about 1638, in Hartford, Connecticut, and 
was made freeman February 26, 1656. He 
was prominent in the affairs of the town, 
serving in various public offices, and died 
November 23, 1689. He married (first) 
Hannah Boosey, born in 1641, daughter of 
Lieutenant James and Alice Boosey ; (sec- 
ond) Hepsibah Wyatt, daughter of John 
Wyatt. To the second marriage eight 
children were born: Hannah; John (3), 
of whom further ; Elizabeth ; Sarah ; Jos- 
eph ; Ruth ; Susannah ; and Jonathan. 

(HI) John (3) Pratt, son of John (2) 
and Hepsibah (Wyatt) Pratt, was born 
May 17, 1661, in Hartford, Connecticut. 
He married Hannah Sanford, daughter of 
Robert Sanford, and they were the par- 
ents of four children : John (4) ; William, 
of whom further; Hannah; and Esther. 

(IV) William Pratt, son of John (3) 
and Hannah (Sanford) Pratt, was born 
in 1691. He married (first) Mary (thought 
to be Cadwell) ; and (second) Amy Pin- 
ney, born October 6. 1704. To the first 
marriage three children were born : Mary; 
Mabel ; and Zachariah, of whom further. 
To the second marriage six children were 

Mass — 12 — 14 209 



born : Hannah, Esther, William, Martha, 
Susannah, and Joseph. 

(V) Zachariah Pratt, son of William 
and Mary Pratt, was baptized February 
25, 1726, and died October i, 1805. He 
was an active man-of-affairs and was 
commissioned an ensign in the First Com- 
pany of the train band of Hartford, Con- 
necticut. He married Abigail Cook, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Marsh) 
Cook, and they were the parents of five 
children: Timothy; John and James 
(twins), the latter of further mention; 
George ; and Abigail. 

(VI) James Pratt, son of Zachariah and 
Abigail (Cook) Pratt, was born in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, October 12, 1753, and 
died January 3, 1820. He was a soldier 
in the American Revolution. He married, 
in 1771, Mary Burr, daughter of Thomas, 
Jr., and Sarah (King) Burr. They were 
the parents of four children: An infant; 
Betsey ; Abigail ; and Harry, of whom 
further. 

(VII) Harry Pratt, son of James and 
Mary (Burr) Pratt, was born in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, June 9, 1778, and died 
December 31, 1853, in Rochester, New 
York. He was an energetic, active man, 
and a successful merchant. He married 
Susan Cleveland, born in Norwich, Con- 
necticut, September 26, 1784, daughter of 
Rev. Aaron and Abiah (Hyde) Cleveland, 
and they were the parents of thirteen chil- 
dren : George Walter ; Mary Burr ; Susan 
Cleveland ; Julia Dodge ; Henry Zachar- 
iah, of whom further; Abigail Cook; 
James Hyde ; Lucy Coit Huntington ; 
Sarah Elizabeth ; John Morrison ; Car- 
oline A. and Carline E. (twins) ; and 
Charles Dexter. 

(VIII) Henry Zachariah Pratt, son of 
Harry and Susan (Cleveland) Pratt, was 
born March 6, 181 3, in Hartford, Connec- 
ticut, and died there August 31, 1863. ^^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



was an able, successful business man, a 
book publisher, being a member of the 
firm of Harper Brothers, and was also 
vice-president of the Aetna Fire Insur- 
ance Company. He married, August i8, 
1835, in Hartford, Lucy Elizabeth Brace, 
who was born July 5, 1814, and died Feb- 
ruary I, 1866, daughter of Hon. Thomas 
Kimberly and Lucy M. (Lee) Brace, and 
they were the parents of nine children : 
Henry Cleveland, born September 8, 
1836; Thomas Brace, born March 21, 
1838; George Walter, of whom further; 
William Hall, born October 16, 1842 ; 
Lucy Brace, born February 27, 1846; 
Charles Cleveland, born August 19, 1848; 
Emily, born November 17, 1850; Susan 
Cleveland, born October 13, 1855 ; and 
Edward Lee, born August i, 1861. 

(IX) George Walter Pratt, son of Hen- 
ry Zachariah and Lucy E. (Brace) Pratt, 
was born February 13, 1840, in Brooklyn, 
New York, and died in Rochester, New 
York, November i, 1867. He received his 
education in the schools of his local dis- 
trict, and later engaged in the paper busi- 
ness, covering an extensive territory as 
traveling representative. Though his 
business headquarters were located in 
New York, he made his home in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, where he died when 
his son, George Dwight, was three years 
of age. He married, June 4, 1862, in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, Lucinda How- 
ard Orne, who was born in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, October 8, 1840, and died 
December 29, 1895, daughter of William 
Wetmore and Lucy Gassett (Dwight) 
Orne. Mrs. Pratt was a descendant of 
very old Colonial stock on both the pater- 
nal and the maternal sides, both the 
Dwight and the Orne lines (q. v.) being 
traced from very early settlers in this 
country. She married (second) Dwight 
Holland, of whom further on a following 



page : Children of George Walter and Lu- 
cinda Howard (Orne) Pratt: George 
Dwight, of whom further ; and Lucy Orne, 
born April 23, 1866, who married Freder- 
ick W. Matthison, Jr., and has four chil- 
dren: Frederick William (3), George 
Dwight, Lucy Orne, and Frederick Otto. 
(X) George Dwight Pratt, son of 
George Walter and Lucinda Howard 
(Orne) Pratt, was born in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, October i, 1864. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools 
of Springfield, completing his studies in 
the high school in 1882. When school 
days were over, he entered the employ of 
the Holyoke & Westfield Railroad Com- 
pany for a year and then entered the of- 
fice of the Massachusetts Mutual Life In- 
surance Company as cashier, which office 
he held for eighteen years, retiring in 1901. 
Since his retirement, Mr. Pratt has de- 
voted his time to public service, without 
remuneration, giving of his time, his abil- 
ity, and his means for the promotion of 
the welfare of the city of Springfield, for 
which he has a deep and abiding afifec- 
tion, it being the home of his maternal 
ancestors. As president of the board of 
trustees of the Springfield Hospital, he 
has rendered most valuable service, serv- 
ing for ten years, during which time the 
capacity of the institution has been in- 
creased from four hundred patients a year 
to three thousand who annually receive 
the benefits of that modern, scientifically 
equipped and efficiently managed institu- 
tion. The Chapin Memorial is the result 
of his suggestion and of his planning, a 
project for the realization of which he 
personally raised the sum of $75,000. One 
of the most highly appreciated services 
rendered by Mr. Pratt to the city of 
Springfield was in connection with his 
work as chairman of the building commis- 
sion, in charge of the erection of the mu- 



210 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



nicipal group, and when the long-planned 
for and enthusiastically worked-for group 
of buildings were at last completed, the 
work of Mr. Pratt was officially recog- 
nized by both boards of the City Council, 
which, as a testimonial, presented him 
with the resolutions of the City Council, 
passed December 29, 1913, handsomely 
engrossed in book form. The presenta- 
tion was made by the late Mayor Stacy, 
who stated that the mayor's duties were 
of great variety and that now he was 
called upon to "prefer charges against 
George Dwight Pratt." When Mr. Pratt 
had been duly escorted to the desk, the 
mayor proceeded to explain that the 
charges had to do with the seven years 
during which Mr. Pratt had served with 
such fidelity and faithfulness in erecting 
the beautiful buildings that had so added 
to the renown of the city of Springfield. 
The resolutions were signed by the may- 
or and the members of the City Council. 
The municipal buildings are indeed a 
distinctive group, and stand as a monu- 
ment to the ability, energy, devotion, and 
perseverence of Mr. Pratt. He, with the 
late Samuel Bowles and Newry D. Win- 
ter, raised the money for the extension of 
Court square to the river, which is now a 
beautiful park, and while this move was 
hotly contested, owing to the energy put 
forth, it was finally accomplished and 
$140,543 collected. Mr. Pratt was also 
one of the founders and promoters, as 
well as the organizer, of the Colony Club 
of Springfield, which is one of the finest 
organizations of its kind in the country. 
He is a director of the Third National 
Bank of Springfield; a trustee of the 
Springfield Institute for Savings ; and a 
director of the Holyoke Water Power 
Company ; of the Phoenix Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, of Hartford ; of 
Mount Holyoke College ; of the Spring- 



field Young Men's Christian Association 
College; the Springfield Hospital; the 
City Library; and of the Hampden Coun- 
ty chapter of the Red Cross, of which he 
was chairman for thirteen years. He is 
also a member of the board of governors 
of the Colony Club, and of the finance 
committee of the Home for Aged Women. 
He is a member of the Winthrop Club, 
the Colony Club, Springfield Country 
Club, the Woods Hole Golf Club ; and the 
Longmeadow Golf Club ; and for ten 
years he promoted and conducted the as- 
semblies at which were held the Harvard 
and Yale balls. He has served the South 
Congregational Church as treasurer, dur- 
ing which time the funds rose from $6,000 
to $48,000. He has traveled extensively, 
crossing the Continent several times, vis- 
iting Alaska three times, and making two 
trips to Europe. 

On June 19, 1895, George Dwight Pratt 
married Marian Kellogg, born in Palmer, 
Massachusetts, January 6, 1864, but re- 
sided in Springfield, daughter of Philo 
Pratt and Seraph Caroline (Henshaw) 
Kellogg. Philo P. Kellogg was the first 
envelope manufacturer in New England. 
George D. and Marian (Kellogg) Pratt 
are the parents of one daughter, Carolyn, 
born in Springfield, Massachusetts, Sep- 
tember 28, 1900. 

(The Dwight Line). 

(I) The Dwight family have been noted 
for their love of liberty and their readi- 
ness to adopt progressive ideas, especially 
those which point toward the advance- 
ment of humanity and of civilization. 
They are an old Colonial family, tracing 
their descent from John Dwight, who 
came to this country from Dedham, Eng- 
land, in the latter part of 1634 or in the 
beginning of 1635, bringing with him his 
wife Hannah, a daughter Hannah, and 



211 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



two sons, Timothy and John. The Ded- 
ham records, begun September i, 1635, on 
the day the first town meeting was held, 
show that twelve persons were at that 
time assembled, one of them being John 
Dwight, from whom it is believed that 
nearly all of the name in New England 
are descended. He was one of the forty- 
one persons who February i, 1644-5, in 
town meeting assembled, voted that a free 
school, supported by a town tax be estab- 
lished, this being the first measure of its 
kind adopted in America, and he was also 
one of the three in that assembly who be- 
came ancestors of future college presi- 
dents. Dr. Wheelock, of Dartmouth, Pres- 
ident Dwight, of Yale, and Edward Ever- 
ett, of Harvard. He was one of the five 
trustees to whom the management of the 
school was entrusted. He was admitted 
a freeman. May 2, 1638, and is described 
in the town records as "having been pub- 
licly useful" and "a great peacemaker." 
He was selectman for sixteen years, 1639- 
55, and was one of the founders of the 
Church of Christ, formed in Dedham in 
1638. His wife Hannah died September 
5, 1656, and he married (second) Mrs. 
Elizabeth (Thaxter) Ripley, widow of 
William Ripley, and previously widow of 
Thomas Thaxter, January 20, 1658. The 
children of the first marriage were : Han- 
nah ; Captain Timothy, of whom further ; 
John, Mary, and Sarah. 

(II) Captain Timothy Dwight, eldest 
son of John and Hannah Dwight, was 
born in England in 1629, and died in Ded- 
ham, Massachusetts, January 31, 1718. 
He came to this country with his father 
when five years of age, was admitted free- 
man in 1655, and took an active part in 
the Indian wars, being cornet of a troop 
in his younger days and later captain of 
horse. He was active in public affairs, 
and negotiated a treaty with King Philip. 



He married six times: (first) in 1651, 
Sarah Sibley, who died in 1652; (second) 
in May, 1653, Sarah Powell, who died 
June 27, 1664; (third) January 9, 1665, 
Anna Flynt, who died January 29, 1686; 
(fourth) January 7, 1687, Mary Edwind, 
widow, of Reading; (fifth) July 31, 1690, 
Esther Fisher, died January 30, 1O91 ; 
(sixth) February i, 1692, Bethiah Moss, 
died February 6, 1718, and was, accord- 
ing to repeated and positive tradition, 
buried the same day that her husband 
was interred. Captain Dwight was the 
father of fourteen children. To the sec- 
ond marriage were born : Timothy ; 
Sarah, died young; John; Sarah, died 
young. To the third marriage : Josiah, 
died young; Nathaniel; Samuel, died 
young; Josiah; Seth ; Anna, died young; 
Captain Henry, of whom further; Mich- 
ael; Daniel; and Jabez, died young. 

(Ill) Captain Henry Dwight, son of 
Captain Timothy and Anna (Flynt) 
Dwight, was born in Dedham, December 
19, 1676, and died in Hatfield, Massachu- 
setts, March 26, 1732. He removed to 
Hatfield, in Western Massachusetts, as 
the result of an order of the General 
Court, which gave to the town of Dedham 
eight thousand acres of land, to be located 
anywhere within the jurisdiction of the 
court, in exchange for two thousand 
acres granted by that town to the Natick 
Indians converted under the teaching of 
John Eliot. Captain Henry Dwight was 
active in the subsequent purchase of the 
territory, and settled there upon land 
which he individually purchased. He was 
a man of wealth, a trader and a farmer, in 
Hatfield, and the communion service now 
used by the Congregational church of that 
place is said to have been given to it by 
Captain Henry Dwight nearly two hun- 
dred years ago. The Dwights were famous 
as jurists in Western Massachusetts, five 



212 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of them, all closely related, sitting as jus- 
tices of the Court of Common Pleas of 
Hampshire county, Captain Henry 
Dwight, of Hatfield, holding that office 
for five years, from 1727 to 1731. Captain 
Henry Dwight married, August 2"], 1702, 
Lydia Hawley, born July 7, 1680, died 
April 27, 1748, daughter of Captain Jos- 
eph and Lydia (Marshall) Hawley, and 
they were the parents of ten children : 
Joseph ; Seth ; Dorothy ; Lydia ; Anna, 
died young; Josiah ; Captain Edmund, of 
whom further; Simeon; Elisha ; and An- 
na. 

(IV) Captain Edmund Dwight, son of 
Captain Henry and Lydia (Hawley) 
Dwight, was born January 19, 1717. He 
was a merchant in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, and in Halifax, Nova Scotia, where 
he died October 28, 1755. He was an en- 
terprising, vigorous man, a captain in his 
majesty's service, and was an ensign in 
his company at the taking of Louisburg, 
June 4, 1745. He married, August 23, 
1742, Elizabeth Scutt, daughter of Cap- 
tain James Scutt, who died in 1764. Their 
children were : Jonathan, of further men- 
tion ; James Scutt ; Edmund ; Elizabeth 
Jane ; Sarah ; and Henry. 

(V) Jonathan Dwight, son of Captain 
Edmund and Elizabeth (Scutt) Dwight, 
was born in Boston, June 16, 1743, and 
died at Springfield, September 5, 1831. 
He was sent to live with his uncle, Josiah 
Dwight, of Springfield, where he was 
kindly received and employed as clerk in 
his uncle's store. During the period of 
the Revolution, his Loyalist sentiments 
made him so unpopular with the Whigs 
that he was obliged to retire from busi- 
ness, until after the war, when he resumed 
business and was in a measure restored 
to popular favor. He was an upright and 
honorable merchant, of much enterprise 
and energy. He built the church occupied 



in recent times by the Second Congrega- 
tional Society of the First Parish, and be- 
fore his death divided his estate among 
his children. He married (first) October 
29, 1766, Margaret Ashley, of Westfield, 
born September 3, 1745, daughter of Dr. 
Israel and Margaret Moseley Ashley. She 
died February 8, 1789, and he married 
(second) March 29, 1790, Margaret Van 
Veghten Vanderspregel, of New Haven. 
She died July 25, 1793, and he married 
(third) October 13, 1796, Hannah Buck, 
of Brookfield, who died May 26, 1824, 
aged seventy-nine. Children : Lucinda, of 
further mention ; James Scutt, of further 
mention ; Margaret ; Jonathan, Jr. ; Ed- 
mund, died young; Sophia; Edmund; and 
Henry. 

(VI) James Scutt Dwight, son of Jon- 
athan and Margaret (Ashley) Dwight, 
was born July 5, 1769, and died March 18, 
1822. He married Mary Sanford, and 
among their children was Lucy Gassett 
Dwight, of whom further. 

(VII) Lucy Gassett Dwight, daughter 
of James Scutt and Mary (Sanford) 
Dwight, married William Wetmore Orne, 
and among their children was Lucinda 
Howard Orne, of whom further. 

(VIII) Lucinda Howard Orne, daugh- 
ter of William Wetmore and Lucy Gas- 
sett (Dwight) Orne, married George 
Walter Pratt, and among their children 
was George Dwight Pratt. Lucinda How- 
ard Orne was a descendant of John 
Dwight on both the maternal and paternal 
sides, William Wetmore Orne, her father, 
being in the eighth generation, while her 
mother, Lucy Gassett (Dwight) Orne, 
was of the seventh, the lines diverging in 
the sixth generation, as follow's : 

(VI) Lucinda Dwight, daughter of 
Jonathan and Margaret (Ashley) Dwight, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
September 10, 1767. She married, Decem- 

!I3 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ber 19, 1785, Rev. Bezaleel Howard, D. 
D., who was born November 22, 1753, 
son of Nathan Howard, of Bridgewater, 
Massachusetts ; was a graduate of Har- 
vard College in 1781, and was a tutor 
there from 1783 to 1785 ; was installed 
pastor of the Congregational church of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and preached 
from 1785 to 1803, joining the Unitarian 
forces in 1819. They were the parents of 
one daughter, Lucinda Dwight Howard, 
of whom further, 

(VII) Lucinda Dwight Howard, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Bezaleel and Lucinda 
(Dwight) Howard, was born at Spring- 
field, August 27, 1786, and died October 
17, 1828. She married, May 4, 1809, Sam- 
uel Orne, born August 27, 1786, died July 
28, 1830. He was a graduate of Harvard 
College in 1804, and was a prominent law- 
yer of Springfield, who amassed a large 
estate. Children: Sophia Dwight Orne, 
born March 6, 1810, married Dr. Charles 
Chapin ; and William Wetmore Orne, of 
further mention. 

(VIII) William Wetmore Orne, son of 
Samuel and Lucinda Dwight (Howard) 
Orne, and grandson of Captain William 
Orne, of Salem, descendant of the famous 
Orne family of Essex county, was born 
at Springfield, June 27, 181 1, and died 
April 28, 1852. He married. May 6, 1834, 
Lucy Gassett Dwight, born January 20, 
1817, daughter of James Scutt and Mary 
(Sanford) Dwight, and they were the 
parents of three children : William Wet- 
more Orne, born February 14, 1835, mer- 
chant in New York, died unmarried, Au- 
gust 8, 1862, aged twenty-seven years ; 
James Dwight Orne, September 11, 1836, 
participated in thirty-six engagements in 
the Civil War, captain and provost mar- 
shal, wool manufacturer of Philadelphia ; 
Lucinda Howard Orne, of further men- 
tion. 



(IX) Lucinda Howard Orne, daughter 
of William Wetmore and Lucy Gassett 
(Dwight) Orne, was born October 8, 
1840; married (first) George Walter 
Pratt (q. v.) ; (second) Dwight Holland, 
of whom further. Children of George 
Walter and Lucinda Howard (Orne) 
Pratt: George Dwight Pratt (q. v.) ; and 
Lucy Orne Pratt. 

Dwight Holland was born in Pittsfield, 
Massachusetts, December 30, 1842, son of 
John M. and Elizabeth L. Holland, and 
was the last survivor of a family of four 
brothers and four sisters. He received 
his education in the public schools of 
Pittsfield, and in his youthful years was 
renowned as an athlete. He on one occa- 
sion swam the length of Pontoosuc Lake 
three times, and at various times won 
prizes for fancy skating in the days when 
the old rocker skates were in use. When 
the Civil W^ar broke out, he enlisted with 
the Allen guards of Pittsfield, who be- 
came Company K of the 8th Massachu- 
setts Regiment, leaving the State on April 
18, 1861, for the defense of Washington, 
and holding the rank of sergeant through- 
out his period of service. At the close of 
the war he came to Springfield and be- 
came associated with the Powers Paper 
Company, then located on Lyman street, 
as cashier, which position he held for 
eighteen years. In 1890 he engaged in 
business for himself, organizing, wath 
James C. Pratt, of Hartford, the West 
Ware Paper Company, which had a mill 
at West Ware, and of which Mr. Holland 
was treasurer and manager. This con- 
cern he successfully conducted until April 
14, 1905, when the mill was destroyed by 
fire. The mill was at that time running 
at full capacity and on a high grade of 
paper, and the fact that it was found to 
be impossible to rebuild the plant and 
continue the business was a keen disap- 



214 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



pointment to Mr. Holland, as he had not 
only been conducting a successful and 
growing business, but had taken a deep 
interest in the welfare of his workmen, 
building for them a small church that they 
might have a comfortable meeting place 
and in many ways seeking to improve 
their living conditions. Mr. Holland was 
a man of kindly nature and a sunny dis- 
position, deeply sympathetic and ever 
ready to lend a helping hand, and his 
thoughtfulness for others was one of the 
characteristic traits which endeared him 
to a host of friends. He was a member 
and a devoted attendant of the Church of 
the Unity, taking an active part in its 
work. He was also a member of the Win- 
throp Club, where he found much pleas- 
ure in meeting a group of older men, his 
long-time associates, whose companion- 
ship he greatly enjoyed. 

On March 30, 1871, Mr. Holland mar- 
ried Lucinda Howard (Orne) Pratt, who 
died December 20, 1895. Mr. Holland is 
survived by his step-son, George Dwight 
Pratt (see Pratt), and by several neph- 
ews and nieces. 



OVERLANDER, John Eliot, M. D. 

Among the successful and exception- 
ally well prepared physicians of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, is Dr. John E. Over- 
lander, who prepared for his medical 
studies by a three-year course in Shef- 
field Scientific School, of Yale University, 
and supplemented four years of study in 
Harvard Medical School with six years of 
hospital practice, before beginning his 
work as general practitioner, in this city. 

The name Overlander is a very old one 
in German history, and was originally 
spelled Oberlinder, some branches of the 
family later using the form Overlander. 
John Overlander, grandfather of John 
Eliot Overlander, was born in Pennsyl- 



vania. His father came, with three of 
his brothers, to America at an early date, 
settling in Pennsylvania. Later, John 
followed the westward trend of the 
pioneer movement and went to Illinois, 
where he died in the fall of 185 1. He was 
a sturdy, thrifty farmer, possessing the 
characteristic traits of energy, persever- 
ance, thoroughness, and frugal thrift. He 
married Sarah N. Hays, who was born 
in Pennsylvania, and died in the autumn 
of 1893, and they were the parents of 
nine children, seven of whom were sons. 
The children were : Samuel ; Amos ; 
Mary; Franklin; George Washington; 
the only one living, he a resident of High- 
land Kansas; Jacob; Rufus B., of whom 
further; Angeline and Jefferson. 

Rufus B. Overlander, son of John and 
Sarah N. (Hays) Overlander, was born 
in Galva, Knox county, Illinois, October 
7, 1844, and died in Hiawatha, Kansas, 
January 15, 1919. As a young man he 
was engaged in freighting across the 
plains with ox teams, carrying butter, 
bacon, eggs, cloth, and other articles for 
household use, and traveling over the 
northern route through Iowa, Dakota, 
Montana, and Washington, through Ore- 
gon to San Francisco, the trip taking 
from three to six months. This difficult 
and dangerous business he followed until 
after the close of the Civil War. In 186P 
he crossed the Isthmus of Panama, com- 
ing from California, and went to New 
York, where he remained for a short time, 
then moved during the same year, first 
to Illinois, and then, in 1870, to Kansas. 
Here he became the possessor of a stock 
farm of two hundred acres, to which he 
later added one hundred and sixty more, 
having in all some three hundred and 
sixty acres, which he continued to man- 
age to the time of his death. He married 
(first) in 1869, Sina Elizabeth Matthew- 



215 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



son, who was born in Holt county, Mis- 
souri, and died in June, i88i ; (second) 
Ellen Miller. To the first marriage eight 
children were born: Samuel Wilbert; 
Rufus Melvin, who is an attorney in New 
York City; Charles Leonard, of Boston, 
Massachusetts ; Jacob Alpheus, an attor- 
ney in New York City ; one died an in- 
fant ; Elizabeth Ellen ; Jesse Lloyd ; and 
John Eliot. To the second marriage one 
daughter was born, who died at an early 
age. 

Dr. John Eliot Overlander, son of 
Rufus B. and Sina Elizabeth (Matthew- 
son) Overlander, was born in Leona, 
Doniphan county, Kansas, August 24, 
1880. He received his early education 
in the public schools of Leona, and in 
Washburn College Academy, at Topeka, 
Kansas, and then entered Sheffield Scien- 
tific School, of Yale University, from 
which he was graduated in 1905, He 
then entered Harvard Medical School, 
from which he was graduated in 1909 
with the degree of M. D. After his grad- 
uation he spent six years in hospital work, 
gaining a wide and varied experience, 
which furnished a most excellent and un- 
usually complete preparation for his work 
as general practitioner. Two years of 
his hospital experience were passed in 
Channing Sanitorium, of Brookline, Mas- 
sachusetts ; three years in the Boston 
Muncipal Hospital for Tuberculosis ; and 
he also spent some time in the Boston 
State Hospital, and in the Presbyterian 
Hospital, of New York City, where he 
was located for two years. In Novem- 
ber, 1916, he came to Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and engaged in general practice, 
and here he has built up a large and suc- 
cessful clientele. His unusually thorough 
preparation, together with his natural abil- 
ity, and those traits of thoroughness and 
patient attention to detail which are the 



marks of the scientist, have made his 
patients his grateful advocates, and his 
practice is constantly increasing. 

Dr. Overlander keeps thoroughly in 
touch with all the discoveries and inven- 
tions of his profession, as well as of the 
general progress in methods and theories 
of materia medica, and is a member of all 
the medical societies and associations. 
National, State, and county. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Medical Association, 
Massachusetts Medical Society, Spring- 
field Medical Association, Hampden Dis- 
trict Medical Association ; and the Physi- 
cians Club. Fraternally he is a member 
of Esoteric Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Springfield ; also of Morning 
Star Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Spring- 
field Council, Royal and Select Masters ; 
of Springfield Commandery, Knights 
Templar; and of Melha Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. 

On August 2"], 1918, Dr. Overlander 
married Pauline Isabelle MacDonell, born 
in North Adams, Massachusetts, daugh- 
ter of Angus Alexander, born in Aletcalf, 
Ontario, and Margaret (Young) Mac- 
Donell, who was born in Edinburgh, 
Scotland. 



MEACHAM, Edward Alonzo 

Among those who have materially as- 
sisted in the development of the city of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and have left 
behind them enduring records of their 
ability and skill is Edward Alonzo Meach- 
am. Contractor and builder, who from 
early manhood to within three years of 
his death was actively engaged in erect- 
ing substantial homes and other struc- 
tures in Springfield. 

(I) The Meacham family is of very old 
English origin, the immigrant ancestor 
of the line to which Edward A. Meacham 



Ji6 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



belongs being Jeremiah Meacham, who 
was born in Somersetshire, England, in 
1613, and came to this country in early 
Colonial times, being a resident of Salem, 
Massachusetts, prior to 1660. He married 
and was the father of a family of children, 
among whom was Captain Isaac, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(II) Captain Isaac Meacham, son of 
Jeremiah Meacham, was born in 1654, and 
died in 1751. He was one of the first set- 
tlers in Enfield, Connecticut, where he 
reared a family of children, among whom 
was Ichabod, of further mention. 

(III) Ichabod ^^leacham, son of Cap- 
tain Isaac Meacham, was born in 1679, 
and died in 1766. He and his wife Eliz- 
abeth were the parents of John, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(I\*) John Meacham, son of Ichabod 
and Elizabeth Meacham, was born in 1728. 
He married Lucia Parsons, and among 
their children was Isaac (2), of further 
mention. 

(V) Isaac (2) Meacham, son of John 
and Lucia (Parsons) Meacham, was born 
in 1774. He married Betsy Prior, and 
they became the parents of children, 
among whom was Isaac (3), of further 
mention. 

(VI) Isaac (3) Meacham, son of Isaac 
(2) and Betsy (Prior) Meacham, was 
born in Enfield, Connecticut, in 1810, and 
died in Springfield, Massachusetts, No- 
vember 7, 1893. He married Harriet Hart- 
ung, of Springfield. Massachusetts, and 
they were the parents of six children : 
Henry. Ellen, Harriet. Tames. George B., 
and Edward Alonzo, of further mention. 

(VII) Edward Alonzo Meacham, son 
of Isaac (3) and Harriet (Hartung) 
Meacham, was born in Somers, Connecti- 
cut, August 27, 1853, ^nd died in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, August 9, 1917. He 
received his education in the public 



schools of Somers, and as a youth was 
employed on his father's farm. While still 
a young man, however, he resolved to 
seek larger opportunity and greater finan- 
cial return for his labor in the city of 
Springfield, where he engaged in the con- 
tracting and building business. He was 
notably successful in this field of activity. 
Reliable, honest, and a skilled workman, 
as well as a man of artistic taste, he built 
good houses and made a point of keeping 
his agreements concerning the time of 
completing work for which he was under 
contract. This alone brought him much 
custom and made his services greatly 
in demand, and as his reputation grew, his 
business continued to increase. ^Many 
residents who own well-built, comfortable 
houses in the city of Springfield owe the 
durability, the pleasing proportions and 
the excellence of workmanship to the abil- 
ity and skill of Mr. Meacham. His part 
in the building up of the city was most 
worthily done, but it is not only as a busi- 
ness man and a builder of homes that he 
is known and remembered. He was a 
public-spirited citizen, a loyal friend, and 
a much-loved associate, and was known 
and esteemed in fraternal circles. He was 
a member of Hampden Lodge, Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, and of the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, and his religi- 
ous affiliation was with the Baptist 
church, in all of which connections he was 
highly esteemed. His death left a sense 
of loss and a sincere grief which only 
time and the knowledge that much of the 
influence and work of the man must live 
on could assuage, and in the more closely 
intimate circles of his friends, the sense 
of loss was profound. 

Mr. Meacham married (first) May i, 
1878, Rosella Stiles, born September 19, 
i860, died August 4, 1901 ; he married 
(second) January 21, 1903, Ellen Frances 



217 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Willard, of Providence, Rhode Island, 
daughter of Charles Henry and Ellen 
(Wright) Willard. To the first marriage 
three children were born: i. Lewis E., 
born June 23, 1880, in Rockville, Connec- 
ticut; married, August 4, 1904, Mrs. El- 
mer B. Wright, of Providence, Rhode Is- 
land, who before her marriage to Mr, 
Wright was Ella Elizabeth Pray. Mr. 
and Mrs. Meacham have two daughters : 
Florence Elizabeth, born July 4, 1908 ; and 
Clarice Pray, born November 28, 191 5. 
Mr. Meacham is in the insurance business 
in Springfield. He is a member of DeSota 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, 2. Walter L., born in Springfield, 
July 23, 1884. He is a lithographer by 
occupation, carrying on his business in 
Springfield. He married, June 17, 1908, 
Agnes Edna Bellows, and they are the 
parents of one son, Leonard Walter, born 
December 11, 1909. Mr. Meacham is a 
member of DeSota Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Improved Or- 
der of Red Men ; and the Knights of Mal- 
ta. 3, Ethel R., born September 7, 1897. 



DAY, Clarence Edward 

Among the well known business men 
of West Springfield and Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, is Clarence Edward Day, 
president and treasurer of the C. E. Day 
Lumber Company, of Springfield, which 
concern he has built up from its inception 
to its present prominent place in the lum- 
ber world, Mr. Day, who resides in West 
Springfield, is also a director of the West 
Springfield Trust Company and president 
of the West Springfield Chamber of 
Commerce. 

The Day family is an old and honored 
one in this country and in England. It 
originated in Wales, the name being de- 
rived from dee meaning dark, a name 
applied to a river in Wales. In Colonial 



days there were in America at least nine 
Day families, not known to be related to 
each other, the respective immigrant an- 
cestors being: Wentworth, of Boston, 
1630; Robert, of Cambridge and Hart- 
ford, 1634-5 ; Robert, of Ipswich, 1635 ; 
Emanuel, of Manchester (Massachusetts), 
1635; Nathaniel, of Ipswich, 1637; Step- 
hen, of Cambridge, 1639 ; Matthew, of 
Cambridge, 1645 ; Ralph, of Dedham, 
1645 5 ^^^ Anthony, of Gloucester, 1645. 
The name also appears in the early his- 
tory of Virginia. Some of the latter went 
to Virginia from New England, but others 
settled there directly from England. De- 
scendants of these numerous immigrant 
ancestors scattered throughout New Eng- 
land and other parts of the country. 

John Day, grandfather of Clarence Ed- 
ward Day, is thought to have been born 
in Massachusetts, but for many years he 
lived in the South, where he was a planter 
and a slave owner, and where he died 
some years before the birth of Clarence 
E. Day. John Day married Mercy Ham- 
mock, and they were the parents of three 
children: Margaret, who married E. B. 
Tillston ; Stella ; and Edward John, of 
whom further, 

Edward John Day was born at Bull 
Run, Virginia, December 11, 1850, and 
died in Norwich, Connecticut, July 12, 
19 13. Owing to the early death of his 
father and the loss of his property, the 
education of Edward John was limited to 
that which could be had in the common 
schools. At the close of the Civil War, 
he came North. In 1869, then being 
a lad of nineteen years, he located at Nor- 
wich, Connecticut, where he learned the 
trade of machinist. He also studied mu- 
sic and became an exceptionally fine clar- 
inet player. He played in the noted 
Reeves Band, of Providence, Rhode Is- 
land, also with Miller's Orchestra, and 



218 



^y#S»' 







ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



with that organization he was connected 
for many years. He also was a member 
of Tubbs' Band, and was actively engaged 
both at his trade and in musical activities 
until within about three years of his 
death. Fraternally he was a member of 
Somerset Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Norwich, and his religious affili- 
ation was with the Episcopal church. On 
November 29, 1877, Edward John Day 
married Lucy Adele Greene, born Janu- 
ary 4, 1853, daughter of Dr. Sheffield Wells 
and Keziah (Noble) Greene (see Greene 
VIII and Noble IV), and they became the 
parents of five children : Clarence Ed- 
ward, of whom further; Ruble Adele, de- 
ceased, who married William Goerwitz ; 
Mabel Elizabeth ; Ernest Herbert, de- 
ceased ; and Edna. 

Clarence Edward Day, son of Ed- 
ward John and Lucy Adele (Greene) 
Day, was born in Norwich, Connecti- 
cut, September 30, 1878. He received 
his education in the public schools 
of Norwich, and when school days 
were over entered the employ of H. 
F. and A. J. Dawley, engaged in the 
lumber business. This connection he 
maintained for a period of two years, and 
then went with the Davenport Fire Arms 
Manufacturing Company, of Norwich, 
Connecticut, where he was superintend- 
ent of the shipping department for a peri- 
od of five years, to 1901. In the latter 
year he came to Massachusetts, and locat- 
ing at Chicopee Falls, entered the employ 
of the Stevens Arms and Tool Company 
there. Here he remained for another 
five years, at the end of which time he 
became associated with the Coburn Trol- 
ley Track Manufacturing Company. 
Three years later he made another change 
associating himself with the Holyoke Box 
and Lumber Company, where he remain- 
ed for four years. 



In 1913 Mr. Day decided to engage in 
business for himself. He organized the 
C. E. Day Lumber Company, of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, of which he is presi- 
dent and treasurer, and since that time 
has successfully conducted a large and 
prosperous business. The firm buys, sells, 
and manufactures lumber, and the wide 
and varied experience of Mr. Day in dif- 
ferent lines of manufacturing previous to 
the time of his engaging in business for 
himself has been of great value to him in 
the successful management of his own 
concern. In addition to his various in- 
terests and responsibilities Mr. Day has 
assumed connections which entail much 
of responsibility. He is a member of the 
board of directors of the West Springfield 
Trust Company ; was a member of the 
Sinking Fund Commission ; president of 
the Chamber of Commerce of W^est 
Springfield, 1921-22; and chairman of the 
special Water Commission of West 
Springfield, 

Fraternally Mr. Day is a member of 
Belcher Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Chicopee Falls. He has also 
taken all of the Scottish Rite degrees, 
including the thirty-second, and is also a 
member of all the York Rite bodies, 
namely, Morning Star Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons ; Springfield Council, Royal 
and Select Masters ; Springfield Com- 
mandery. Knights Templar; and is also a 
member of Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mysti . Shrine ; and 
of Cabot Chapter, order oi the Eastern 
Star, of which he was worthy patron in 
1917. He is a member of Bela Grotto, 
Mystic Order Veiled Prophets of the En- 
chanted Realm, in which he has held all 
the offices, including that of monarch, 
which office he held in 1918. He has al- 
ways taken a very active part in the af- 
fairs of this body. Mr. Day is one of the 



219 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



well known musicians of Springfield. He 
began playing a cornet when only a boy 
and has continued up to the present time. 
For twenty-five years he played in the 
famous Steven's Band of Springfield, and 
in 1920, in only two weeks' time, he or- 
ganized the well known Bela Grotto Band 
and Orchestra, which he has since con- 
ducted in a most capable manner. He is 
also a member of Teko Lodge, Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, of West 
Springfield, and of the Exchange Club. 
He is fond of out-of-door activities, and 
is a member of the Westfield Country 
Club. He is a self-made man in the tru- 
est sense of the word, having attained 
his present position of prominence in 
business activities, in Masonic circles, 
and in local musical affairs entirely 
through ability, energy, and faithfulness 
to responsibilities entrusted to him. 

On April 12, 1903, Mr. Day married 
Gertrude Grace Casey, of Malone, New 
York, daughter of Thomas Henry Casey 
(born in County Cork, Ireland, Septem- 
ber 15, 1853), and Adeline (Hall) Casey, 
of Malone, New York. Mr. Casey came 
to America in 1867, and settled in Mal- 
one, New York, whence he came to Chic- 
opee Falls, Massachusetts, in 1898, remov- 
ing to Springfield, Massachusetts, in 191 1. 

(The Greene Line). 

(I) John Greene, according to tradi- 
tion, came to this country from England, 
where he had borne the name of Clarke. 
Since he held pronounced religious views, 
he probably changed his name in order to 
expedite arrangements for coming to 
America. In 1639 ^^ '^^'^s living with one 
Richard Smith, Sr., in North Kingstown, 
Rhode Island. Smith had left Gloucester- 
shire, England, for New England, and 
again had removed from Taunton, Massa- 
chusetts, to Narragansett "for conscience 



sake," according to Roger Williams ac- 
count, and Professor Huling suggests that 
"possibly young Greene was of a family 
sufficiently obnoxious to the authorities 
to render desirable a change of name as 
well as of residence." Two others bear- 
ing exactly the same name settled in 
Rhode Island about this time, John 
Greene, of Newport, and the surgeon, 
John Greene (ancestor of General Nath- 
anael Greene), who settled in Warwick 
three or four years later, but, so far as 
is known, they were not related to the 
founder of the line here traced. 

In 1663 John Greene and his friend 
Smith declared themselves in favor of be- 
ing under the jurisdiction of Connecti- 
cut rather than Rhode Island, but in 1671 
John Greene took the oath of allegiance 
to Rhode Island. He and his wife Joan 
were the parents of the following chil- 
dren : John, Jr.; Daniel; James; Ed- 
ward; and (probably) Benjamin, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(II) Benjamin Greene, probably the 
son of John and Joan Greene, was of 
North Kingstown, Rhode Island, and 
later of East Greenwich. Evidence seems 
to identify him as the son of John of 
Kingstown, though it is not conclusive. 
If so, he was born, probably, in Quid- 
nessett (North Kingstown) about 1665. 
He was prominent in local public affairs, 
serving as deputy to the General Assem- 
bly, 1698-1703; member of the Town 
Council, 1701-1704; and rate-maker and 
surveyor in 1703. Soon after March 26, 
1705, he removed to East Greenwich, 
where he died in the winter of 1718-19. 
He married, about 1687, Humility Cog- 
geshall, born in Portsmouth, in January, 
1671, sixth child of Joshua and Joan 
(West) Coggeshall, of Newport, and 
Portsmouth. Their children were : John 
(2), of further mention ; Mary ; Benjamin ; 



220 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Ann; Henry; Phebe ; Catherine; Caleb; 
Sarah; Dinah; Deborah; and Joshua. 

(HI) John (2) Greene, son of Ben- 
jamin and Humility (Coggeshall) Greene, 
was born in Quidnessett (North Kings- 
town), Rhode Island, about 1688. In 
1732 he is styled "Lieutenant John." He 
purchased a large tract of land in what is 
now West Greenwich, and died in West 
Greenwich, March 29, 1752. He married 
(first) about 1708, Mary Aylsworth, old- 
est daughter of Arthur and Mary (Brown) 
Aylsworth, of Quidnessett, but originally 
of England or Wales. Mary Brown was 
a granddaughter of Rev. Obadiah Holmes, 
the Baptist minister of Newport, who was 
persecuted by the Puritans of Massachu- 
setts. John (2) Greene married (second) 
in West Greenwich Massachusetts, Au- 
gust 24, 1741, Priscilla Bowen (or Bar- 
ney), of Swansea, who survived him. His 
children, probably all of the first mar- 
riage were : Thomas ; Philip ; Mary ; Jos- 
iah, of further mention ; Amos ; Benjamin ; 
Caleb ; Jonathan ; Joseph ; Elizabeth ; 
Ruth ; William ; and Joshua. 

(IV) Josiah Greene, son of John (2) 
and Mary (Aylsworth) Greene, was born 
about 1715, and lived in Charlestown, 
Rhode Island. He married, about 1738, 
Hannah Mowry, who died in Westerly 
between April 22 and June 24, 1771, leav- 
ing ten children: Hannah; Benjamin; 
John (3), of further mention; Ruth; 
Josiah ; Samuel ; Anne ; Mary ; Jonathan ; 
and Elizabeth. 

(V) Captain John (3) Greene, son of 
Josiah and Hannah (Mowry) Greene, was 
born about 1744, probably in that part of 
Charlestown, Rhode Island, which is now 
Hopkinton, and died in Hopkinton, in 
March, 1830, aged eighty-five years. He 
probably lived in Exeter, Rhode Island, 
for a time, but in February, 1776, was 
granted a certificate to the town of West- 



erly, Rhode Island. He lived there or at 
Stonington, Connecticut, for a short time, 
but before 1781 removed to Hopkinton, 
Rhode Island, where he resided during 
the remainder of his life. He served in 
Canada under General Amherst during 
the French War and is said to have been 
a captain in the Revolutionary War. It 
is especially remembered that he took 
part in the battle of Monmouth. He mar- 
ried (first) about 1766, Abigail Moon, 
daughter of Ebenezer Moon, of Exeter, 
Rhode Island; (second) in Westerly, 
Rhode Island, March 2, 1775, Prudence 
Saunders, daughter of Joseph Saunders, 
of Westerly. Children of the first mar- 
riage were : Richard ; William ; and Asa. 
To the second marriage eight children 
were born : Saunders ; Nathan ; Oliver ; 
Abigail ; Rowland Thurston ; George 
Saunders; Alpheus Miner; and Rev. John 
of further mention. 

(VI) Rev. John (4) Greene, son of Cap- 
tain John (3) and Prudence (Saunders) 
Greene, was born in North Stonington, 
Connecticut, October 28, 1792, and died 
in Hopkinton, Rhode Island, October 8, 
1863. He was ordained by the Seventh- 
Day Baptist General Conference and 
served as a missionary evangelist in Har- 
rison county, Virginia, in New Jersey, and 
elsewhere. He was pastor of the Friend- 
ship, Richburg, and First Genesee Sev- 
enth-Day Baptist churches in Allegany 
county, New York, from 1824-1833; after- 
ward pastor at Brookfield, Madison coun- 
ty. New York, 1838-43 ; and at Hopkin- 
ton, Rhode Island, for several years. He 
himself baptized more than thirteen hun- 
dred converts. He married, in Hopkin- 
ton, Rhode Island, April 3, 1813, Eliza- 
beth Wells, born in Hopkinton, April 30, 
1797, died there June 14, 1862, daughter 
of Edward Sheffield and Tacy (Hub- 
bard) Wells. Their children were: Dr. 



221 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Sheffield Wells, of further mention ; Fan- Daniel Barrow ; Thomas ; Jonathan ; Wil- 



ny Wells; Matthew Stillman; Elizabeth 
Lewis ; William Maxson ; Tacy Lucinda ; 
Lucy Almira; Abby Ann Eliza; Russell 
Stillman ; George Whitefield ; Albert Lee ; 
Prudence Matilda ; Rowland Jay ; and 
George Ray. 

(VII) Dr. Sheffield Wells Greene, son 
of Rev. John (4) and Elizabeth (Wells) 
Greene, was born in Hopkinton, Rhode 
Island, July 15, 1814. He lived in Brad- 
ford and in other places in Pennsylvania, 
but later was for many years practicing 
physician in Wellsville, New York. 
While residing in Friendship, New York, 
he married, in that town, April 27, 1837, 
Keziah Noble, of that place, and they 
were the parents of: i. Geraldine Eliz- 
abeth, who married (first) George L. 
Young, of Ceres, Pennsylvania ; (second) 
William Schumacher, of Bradford coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania. 2. Rosalia V., married 
J. B. Coryell, of Dundee, New York. 3. 
William Herbert, died in Bradford, Penn- 
sylvania, September 5, 1862. Enlisted in 
Third Excelsior Regiment, Sickle's Brig- 
ade, in July, 1861, served till health fail- 
ed, and was brought home to die. 4. Lucy 
Adele, of further mention. 

(VIII) Lucy Adele Greene, daughter 
of Dr. Sheffield Wells and Keziah (Noble) 
Greene, married, in Norwich, Connecti- 
cut, Edward John Day (q. v.). 

(The Noble Line). 

(I) Thomas Noble removed from Lon- 
don, England, and settled in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. He married and became 
the father of children, among whom was 
Thomas (2), of further mention. 

(II) Thomas (2) Noble, son of Thomas 
Noble, was born in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, November 25, 1731. He mar- 
ried, March 21, 1756, Elizabeth Piatt, who 
was born June 25, 1738, and they were the 
parents of the following children : Phebe, 



liam, of further mention ; Mark, born De- 
cember 21, 1768, married and had chil- 
dren : Mark Shephard, who settled near 
Shiloh, New Jersey, and Phebe, who mar- 
ried a Mr. West, and settled near Shiloh ; 
Elizabeth ; Rachel ; and Sarah. 

(III) William Noble, son of Thomas 
(2) and Elizabeth (Piatt) Noble, was 
born June 11, 1764, and died in Friend- 
ship, Allegany county, New York, March 
5, 1839, in his seventy-fifth year. He mar- 
ried (second) Elizabeth Davis, who was 
born January 8, 1783, daughter of Sam- 
uel Davis. Children of the first mar- 
riage were : Susan, and Jane. Children 
of the second marriage : Isaac, born Oc- 
tober 13, 1809, married (first) Nancy 
Eliza Jacobs ; (second) Sibyl Eddy Bent- 
ley ; Keziah, of further mention ; William 
Davis, born February 16, 1823. 

(IV) Keziah Noble, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Elizabeth (Davis) Noble, was 
born May 25, 1816, resided in 1856 in 
Richburg, Allegany county, New York, 
married, in Friendship, New York, April 
27, 1837, Dr. Sheffield Wells Greene (see 
Greene VII). 



SMITH, Raymond Howard 

For the past twenty years Raymond 
Howard Smith has been identified with 
the E. Stebbins Manufacturing Company 
of Springfield, Massachusetts, in which 
he holds the official and executive posi- 
tions of vice-president, sales manager, 
and is also one of the stockholders. Mr. 
Smith began his connection with the con- 
cern as cost clerk, and during the two de- 
cades which have passed since that time 
he has been continuously associated with 
the business. He is descended from old 
Colonial stock, tracing his ancestry to 
Joseph Smith, and the line is as follows : 

(I) Joseph Smith was a resident of 



222 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Hartford, Connecticut, in 1655, and was 
a brother of Christopher Smith, of North- 
ampton, Massachusetts. He was admit- 
ted a freeman in 1667, and his w'ill was 
dated June 13, 1689, his death occurring 
either in that same year or the one fol- 
lowing. He married, April 29, 1656, 
Lydia Huit, who died in 1677, daughter 
of Ephraim Huit, of Windsor, and they 
were the parents of fifteen children : Jos- 
eph (2), of further mention; Samuel; 
Ephraim ; Lydia, died young; Simon ; Na- 
thaniel; Lydia; Susanna; Mary; ^Martha ; 
Benjamin ; Elizabeth ; Sarah ; Edward ; 
and Mercy. 

(II) Sergeant Joseph (2) Smith, son of 
Joseph and Lydia (Huit) Smith, was born 
March 15, 1658, and in 1680 removed to 
Hadley, Massachusetts, where he was ad- 
mitted a freeman in 1690. In 1687 he took 
charge of the grist mill at Mill River, a 
lonely spot three miles north of the vil- 
lage. He was the first permanent set- 
tler of that place, and there he continued 
to reside during the remainder of his life. 
He hired a part of the school land for 
many years, and during the greater part 
of the period of the Indian wars, he or his 
sons kept the mill running. The house 
over the mill had a room with a chimney, 
one of the iew, if any, in the neighbor- 
hood. He was a cooper by trade, and in 
1696 was appointed sealer of weights and 
measures, which position he continued 
to hold to the time of his death. He was 
among those taxed for the building of the 
Fort River bridge in 1681. He kept an 
inn in Hadley in 1696, and was selectman 
in 1685, 1707 and 1720. He died October 
I, 1733, in his seventy-sixth year. He 
married, February 11, 1681, Rebecca Dick- 
inson, who died February 16, 1731, at the 
age of seventy-three years, daughter of 
John Dickinson. Their children were : 
Joseph (3), of further mention ; John, died 



young; John ; Rebecca ; Jonathan ; Lydia; 
Benjamin ; and Elizabeth. 

(III) Joseph (3) Smith, son of Sergeant 
Joseph (2) and Rebecca (Dickinson) 
Smith, was born November 8, 1681, and 
died October 21, 1767. He married, in 
171 5, Sarah Alexander, who died January 
31, 1768, and they were the parents of five 
children : Alexander ; Edward ; Reuben, 
of further mention ; Sarah, who married 
Windsor Smith ; and Thomas. 

(IV) Reuben Smith, son of Joseph (3) 
and Sarah (Alexander) Smith, was born 
April 2, 1721. He married (first) Janu- 
ary 19, 1749, Miriam IMoody. She died 
February 16, 1770, and he married (sec- 
ond) Sybil (Worthington) Smith, daugh- 
ter of Daniel Worthington of Colchester, 
Connecticut. The following seven children 
were born of the first marriage : Jonathan ; 
Reuben ; Abigail ; Miriam ; Reuben ; Per- 
sis ; and Selah, of further mention. 

(V) Deacon Selah Smith, son of Reu- 
ben and Miriam (Moody) Smith, was 
born May 21, 1764, and died January 23, 
1824. He was a resident of Granby, Mas- 
sachusetts. He and his wife Polly were 
the parents of eight children : Philomela ; 
Clarissa ; Reuben, of further mention ; 
Polly ; Rebecca ; Nancy ; Asenath ; and 
Maria. 

(VI) Reuben (2) Smith, son of Se- 
lah and Polly Smith, was born in South 
Hadley, Massachusetts, August 12, 1798, 
and died in Ware, Massachusetts, Sep- 
tember 9, 1861. The greater part of his 
life was spent in Ware, Massachusetts, 
and there, in addition to his activities as 
a farmer, he was engaged as a carpenter. 
He married Lucy DeWitt, who was born 
August 8, 1801, and died November 9, 
1861, and they were the parents of chil- 
dren : Sarah, who was born March 27, 
1824; Harriet Maria, born April 17, 1826; 
Selah, who was born March 17, 1828, and 



223 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



died August 3, 1828 ; Selah, who was born 
December 20, 1829; Mary Asenath, who 
was born April 17, 1834; Edward Syl- 
vester, born June 29, 1836; Levi Wright, 
who was born June 30, 1839, and died 
July 23, 1840; and John H,, of further 
mention. 

(VII) John Howard Smith, son of Reu- 
ben (2) and Lucy (DeWitt) Smith, was 
born in South Hadley, Massachusetts, 
August 25, 1841, and died in Holyoke, 
Massachusetts, April 22, 1922, In 1862, 
when he was twenty-one years of age, the 
Civil War broke out and he enlisted in 
Company A, 37th Massachusetts Infan- 
try, where he was promoted to the rank 
of corporal. He participated in the bat- 
tles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, 
and Gettysburg, and after the latter en- 
gagement was ill for six months with 
typhoid fever. He was discharged March 
15, 1864, and on August 25, 1864, re-en- 
listed in the 24th Regiment, Veterans 
Reserve Corps, from which he received 
his honorable discharge at Washington, 
D. C, June 28, 1865. At the time of the 
assassination of President Lincoln, he 
was on guard duty at Cabin John bridge 
and he challenged the first mounted cour- 
ier who came across the bridge, and found 
he had the message regarding the Presi- 
dent's assassination. Upon his return to 
civilian life, he went to Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, where for a time he was in the 
employ of Mr. Loomis, Later, he became 
baggage master in the employ of the Bos- 
ton & Maine Railroad Company, and that 
connection he maintained until he en- 
gaged in the fish business for himself. 
This was successfully conducted in Holy- 
oke for some time, but was eventually 
sold. Mr. Smith then returned to the 
Boston & Maine Railroad Company and 
was placed in charge of the incoming 
freight. In his late years he was placed 



in charge of the general delivery 
of freight, and that service he con- 
tinued to perform to the time of his death, 
at which time he had completed a period 
of forty-two years of consecutive service. 
He was a man of high ideals and of ex- 
cellent character, and was highly es- 
teemed by all who knew him. He was deep- 
ly interested in the young people of the 
community, and as a member of the Sec- 
ond Congregational Church until 1878, 
and of the First Congregational Church 
during the remainder of his life, he ren- 
dered valuable service, taking an active 
part in the work of the Sunday school as 
long as he lived. A home-loving man, 
his personal qualities were such as to en- 
dear him to all those with whom he was 
most closely associated, and his death 
was deeply mourned by those who knew 
him best. He married Harriet Marie 
Wood, of Holyoke, Massachusetts, daugh- 
ter of Amos Wood. She died in Febru- 
ary, 1920. They were the parents of 
three children : Alice Wood, who died at 
the age of three years ; Bertha Agusta, 
an adopted daughter, who married Arthur 
C. Livermore ; and Raymond Howard, of 
further mention. 

(VIII) Raymond Howard Smith, son 
of John Howard and Harriet Marie 
(Wood) Smith, was born in Holyoke, 
Massachusetts, July 3, 1879, and received 
his education in the public schools of his 
native district. When his school train- 
ing was completed, he found his first em- 
ployment with the Boston & Maine rail- 
road, as errand boy, and that position he 
held for a period of two years. At the 
end of that time he became associated 
with the cost department of the Ameri- 
can Thread Company, where he remained 
for four years, and then severed that con- 
nection in order to accept a position with 
the Holyoke Valve and Hydrant Com- 



224 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



pany, serving in their cost department. 
That connection he maintained for a year, 
and then, in 1904, associated himself with 
the E. Stebbins Manufacturing Company, 
of Springfield, Massachusetts, as cost 
clerk. During the nearly twenty years 
which have passed since that time he has, 
through various promotions, steadily 
risen until now, in 1923, he holds the res- 
ponsible official and executive positions of 
vice-president, sales manager, and one of 
the stockholders. The concern manufac- 
tures plumbers' brass goods and supplies 
and requires the services of more than two 
hundred employees. It is rated as one of 
the fifty-six placed on the preferred list 
for fair and generous treatment of its 
men, and in the trade it is widely known 
for the excellent quality of its product. 
Mr. Smith is well known in Masonic cir- 
cles, being a member of Mount Nonotuck 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Holyoke, which body he serves as junior 
warden ; of Holyoke Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons ; and of Holyoke Council, Royal 
and Select Masters. He is also a member 
of the United Commercial Travelers, of 
which he is a past senior councillor ; and 
of the Sons of Veterans, which he served 
as State Secretary for one year. His club 
is the Holyoke Canoe Club. In 1921-22 
Mr. Smith built his beautiful residence in 
Holyoke. 

Raymond Howard Smith married, on 
October i, 1902, Mabel Amanda Jones, of 
Holyoke, daughter of Almond A. and Ag- 
nes (Williamson) Jones (see Jones VIII). 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith are the parents of 
two children : Donald DeWitt, who was 
born February 5, 1907, and is now (1923) 
a student in the Holyoke High School ; 
and Kenneth Howard, who was born May 
II, 1910. 

(The Jones Line). 

The ancestors of the Jones family to 
which Mrs. Raymond Howard Smith be- 
Mass — 12 — 15 225 



longs were among the early settlers of the 
Connecticut Valley, and took an active 
part in the development of that part of 
New England. In common with their as- 
sociates they possessed a large amount of 
business sagacity along with their deep 
religious devotion, and they were sturdy, 
independent, and well-fitted to cope with 
the hardships of pioneer life. Descent 
from Thomas Jones, of New London, 
Connecticut, is traced as follows : 

(I) Thomas Jones married, and had a 
son, Thomas (2), of whom further. 

(II) Thomas (2) Jones, resided in Col- 
chester, Connecticut. He married and 
had a son, Jabez, of whom further. 

(HI) Jabez Jones, of Colchester, mar- 
ried Anna Ransom, and their children 
were : Thomas ; Jabez ; Amos ; Anna ; 
Israel ; Asa ; Hazel ; Jehiel, of further 
mention; Ariel; Sarah; Abijah ; Benoni; 
David ; Joshua ; and Phineas. 

(IV) Jehiel Jones, son of Jabez and 
Anna (Ransom) Jones, was born at Col- 
chester, Connecticut, in September, 1743, 
and died June 5, 1835. He removed from 
Colchester to Shelborn, and was in Deer- 
field prior to 1783. In 1787 he is record- 
ed as being a schoolmaster. Later, he set- 
tled in Wisdom, where he died. He mar- 
ried, September 20, 1765, Lucretia Hamil- 
ton, who died May 8, 1821. Their chil- 
dren were: Jehiel (2), Loruhamah ; Lov- 
inah ; Lucretia ; Sally ; Russell ; Jabez ; 
Amos; James; Israel, of further mention; 
and Amasa. 

(V) Israel Jones, son of Jehiel and Lu- 
cretia (Hamilton) Jones, was born March 
15, 1787, and died April 6, 1861. He was 
a carpenter by trade, and lived in the Wis- 
dom section of Deerfield, Massachusetts. 
He married (first) December i, 1808, 
Eleanor Broaderick, daughter of John 
Broaderick. She died May 17, 1826, and 
he married (second) in 1828, Cynthia 
Wise, daughter of Daniel Wise. She d'ed 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



June 19, 1871. Children: Dennis Stearns, 
born November 28, 1809, married Experi- 
ence F. Hutchins, and died August 31, 
1872 ; Amasa, of further mention ; Eliza, 
born November 18, 1818, married Asa R. 
Hutchins; Charles, born July 2j, 1820, 
married, December 5, 1847, Margaret 
Tombs; Eleanor, born August 12, 1830, 
married, December 25, 1845, George W. 
Jones. 

(VI) Amasa Jones, second son of Is- 
rael and Eleanor (Broaderick) Jones, was 
born at Deerfield, Massachusetts, March 
6, 1813, and died September 7, 1877. He 
was engaged in farming in West Deer- 
field. He married, December 15, 1836, 
Nancy B. Robbins, daughter of Nathan 
Robbins, and they were the parents of six 
children : Julius Wellington, who was 
born September 22, 1837, in Deerfield, 
and died in Holyoke, March 6, 191 5; Am- 
anda, born November 2, 1839 ; Gilbert E., 
born October 18, 1844, and was a carpen- 
ter in Greenfield, married Ella Eastman ; 
Almond A., of further mention ; Edward 
Jenner, born August 6, 1852 ; and Spencer, 
who was born November 10, 1854, and 
married Flora Page, of Greenfield. 

(VII) Almond A. Jones, son of Amasa 
and Nancy B. (Robbins) Jones, was born 
in Deerfield, Massachusetts, December 
17, 1845, ^^^ di^d in Holyoke, Massachu- 
setts, July 12, 1910. He received a good 
practical education in the public schools 
of his native district, and in 1866, when he 
was about twenty-one years of age, re- 
moved to Holyoke, Massachusetts, where, 
a few years later, in association with his 
brother, J. W. Jones, he engaged in build- 
ing operations. Under the firm name of 
A. A. & J. W. Jones, the brothers built 
mills, blocks, dwellings, barns and all 
kinds of structures, continuing in this line 
of business for a long term of years. 
About ten years prior to the death of 



Almond A. Jones, the partnership was dis- 
solved and he continued in the building 
business alone until ill health compelled 
him to retire from active business. He 
was always deeply interested in the pub- 
lic welfare of the community in which 
he lived, and from earliest years was es- 
pecially active in the interests of the fire 
department. For many years he was as- 
sistant engineer of the department, and 
later was a prominent member of the Ed- 
win A. Whiting Veteran Firemen's As- 
sociation, He also served as treasurer of 
the Volunteer High Street Company for 
many years. Fraternally he was well 
known in Masonic circles, being a mem- 
ber of Mt. Fain Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons ; Mt. Holyoke Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons ; Holyoke Council, 
Royal and Select Masters ; Springfield 
Commandery, Knights Templar ; and all 
the Scottish Rite bodies, including the 
thirty-second degree. He also belongs to 
Aleppo Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Boston. 

Mr. Jones married Agnes Williamson, 
and they were the parents of four chil- 
dren : Jenner ; Mabel Amanda, of further 
mention ; Robert ; and Edward, who is 
deceased. 

(VIII) Mabel Amanda Jones, daugh- 
ter of Almond A. and Agnes (William- 
son) Jones, married Raymond Howard 
Smith (see Smith VIII). 



SHERMAN, Elmer Tecumseh, D.D.S. 

For twenty-three years Dr. Elmer Te- 
cumseh Sherman has been engaged in 
dental practice in the city of Springfield, 
Massachusetts. 

The surname Sherman in England is of 
German origin, and in Germany and ad- 
jacent countries is at the present time 
found in various forms as Sherman, 
Schurman, Schearman, and Scherman. 



226 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



As early as 1635, however, a family of the 
name was living in Shropshire, England. 
The name is of the class known as occu- 
pational, being derived from the trade of 
the cloth dresser, or shearer of cloth. 
Representatives of the family came to this 
country early, and throughout the history 
of the New World have taken a worthy 
part in the upbuilding of the nation. 

The great-great-grandfather of Dr. 
Sherman was David Sherman, who mar- 
ried (second) March 9, 1797, Hannah 
Curtis. They were the parents of chil- 
dren, among whom was Andrew, of whom 
further. 

Andrew Sherman, son of David and 
Hannah (Curtis) Sherman, married Pat- 
ty Howe, and they were the parents of: 
Patty, Andrew, Jr., of whom further; 
Roxy, Willard, Laurien, Virgil, Warren, 
Celia, and Cyril. 

Andrew Sherman, Jr., son of Andrew 
and Patty (Howe) Sherman, was born 
in Swanzey, New Hampshire, April 7, 
1803, and died May 26, 1871. He received 
his education in the public schools of his 
district and then learned the trade of the 
stone-mason. He was also engaged in 
farming, and was a resident of Keene, 
New Hampshire. He married Nancy Ful- 
ler, born in Troy, New Hampshire, Janu- 
ary II, 1805, died October 17, 1896. They 
were the parents of twelve children, ten 
of whom grew to maturity : Warren, 
born December 24, 1823, died February 
13, 1909; Betsy F., born September 7, 
1826, died March 9, 1863 ! Timothy, born 
March 5, 1829, died June 20, 1905 ; Levi, 
born December 9, 1832, died January 26, 
1904; Charles, of whom further; George 
Andrew, born April 7, 1838; Harriet Jane, 
born September 5, 1840; James Albert, 
born August 5, 1843, cli^d February 25, 
1918; John Wood, born June 8, 1848, 
died September 21, 1916; and Roger, born 
June 2, 1851, died January 16, 1892. 



Charles Sherman, son of Andrew, Jr., 
and Nancy (Fuller) Sherman, was born in 
Keene, New Hampshire, July 3, 1835, and 
died January 25, 1906. He attended the 
public schools of his native district and 
then learned the trade of the stone-mason, 
which occupation he followed during his 
earlier years, but which he later aban- 
doned and became a cabinet-maker. In 
the latter business he continued for many 
years, and in association with his brother- 
in-law, George Poole, he built up a large 
business. They did especially fine wood- 
turning, and among other products manu- 
factured croquet sets. The business con- 
tinued to flourish until disaster overtook 
them in the form of a fire which destroyed 
their plant. This loss made it necessary 
that he should begin over again the task 
of accumulating capital. He worked in 
the railroad shops in Keene for a time, 
and then went to Brattleboro, Vermont, 
where for twenty years he was employed 
in organ-building. At the expiration of 
that time, he returned to Keene, New 
Hampshire, entered into partnership with 
his brothers, John, George A. and Tim- 
othy, under the name of Sherman Broth- 
ers, and engaged in the sash and blind 
business. This the four brothers success- 
fully conducted for several years, and 
then closed out the business. 

Politically, Charles Sherman gave his 
support to the Democratic party, in the 
affairs of which he took an active part. 
He served as councilman of his ward, and 
gave of his time and energy for the fur- 
therance of the local interests of his par- 
ty. Fraternally he was afifiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in 
Brattleboro, Vermont. He married, No- 
vember 22, 1864, Sarah Elizabeth Cross, 
who was born in North Chelmsford, Mas- 
sachusetts, daughter of Charles and Eliz- 
abeth (Clark) Cross, and granddaughter 
of Thomas Cross, who served in the Rev- 



227 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



olutionary War. Mr. and Mrs. Sherman 
were the parents of three children : Two, 
who died in infancy; and Elmer Tecum- 
seh, of whom further. 

Dr. Elmer Tecumseh Sherman, son of 
Charles and Sarah Elizabeth (Cross) 
Sherman, was born in Keene, New Hamp- 
shire, September 3, 1866. He received his 
preparatory education in the public 
schools of Brattleboro, Vermont, and then 
entered the Pennsylvania Dental College, 
pf Philadelphia, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1896. After his graduation he 
was associated with Dr. Russell, of Keene, 
New Hampshire, for a year. He then 
ivent to White River Junction, Vermont, 
where for two years he was engaged in 
practice. At the end of that period he 
came to Springfield, Massachusetts, Jan- 
uary I, 1899, where he engaged in prac- 
tice and where he has continued to the 
present time (1923). He is a member of 
the National Dental Association, the Mas- 
sachusetts State Dental Society, the Con- 
necticut Valley District Dental Society, 
and the First District Dental Society, of 
New York City. Dr. Sherman is a mem- 
ber of Hampden Lodge, Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, and of Agawam En- 
campment; and also holds membership 
in Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and Accept- 
ed Masons, of Springfield. He is a mem- 
ber of the Winthrop Club, of the Oxford 
Country Club, and of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, and his religious 
connection is with the Universalist 
church. 

On June 23, 1898, Dr. Elmer T. Sher- 
man married Gertrude Ryan, daughter 
of Rev. Michael and (Bruce) Ry- 
an, he a Methodist clergyman, now 
preaching in North Hartland, Vermont. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sherman are the parents 
of one child, a daughter: Wynona Bruce 
Sherman, who was born in Springfield, 



Massachusetts, December, 1900. She re- 
ceived her early education in the public 
schools of Springfield, and in the McDuf- 
fie School for Girls in the same city. She 
entered the Forsythe-Tufts Dental Train- 
ing School, in which she received a year 
of dental training. She was later gradu- 
ated, in 1921, having completed the course 
in dental hygiene. She has been her 
father's valuable associate in his profes- 
sion. 



ECKERT, William George 

William G. Eckert, late resident of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, belonged to 
that class of citizens who, undemonstra- 
tive and unassuming in their natures, 
form the character of the community in 
which they live. 

Valentine Eckert, father of William G. 
Eckert, was born in Oberselach, Alsace- 
Lorraine, Germany. He attended the 
school of his native town, and later served 
an apprenticeship at the trade of shoe- 
maker, becoming an expert in that line, 
which he followed throughout his active 
career. He made patent leather shoes, 
which were used in his day by the 
wealthy class of people. Pie finally emi- 
grated to this country, locating in the city 
of Boston, Massachusetts, and there spent 
the remainder of his days. He was ac- 
companied to this country by his wife 
Catherine, who bore him four sons, name- 
ly : Henry ; William George, of whom 
further ; Valentine, Jr., and Edward F. 

William George Eckert was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts, August 11, 1848. 
He gained a practical education by at- 
tendance at the public schools of Boston, 
and upon the completion of his studies, 
entered the employ of Faulkner, Page & 
Company, of Boston, who conducted 
woolen mills, disposing of their product 
at wholesale, and he remained with this 



228 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



concern for twenty-five years. His ten- 
ure of office was characterized by strict 
integrity, common sense and good judg- 
ment, qualities which w'ere of great ser- 
vice to his employers, by whom he was 
greatly appreciated. His life was in a 
large measure an exemplification of his 
beliefs in the brotherhood of mankind. 
He stood for advancement in public af- 
fairs, and his loyalty and support were 
always to be counted upon. He was de- 
voted to his home and family, and was 
loved and respected by all who knew him. 
He was a member of the Congregational 
church, in the work of which he took a 
keen interest. 

Mr. Eckert married, November 14, 
1883, Lucy Penniman Marsh, of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, born July 8, 1858, 
daughter of Charles and Helen (Penni- 
man) Marsh (see Marsh VIII). Chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Eckert: i. William 
George, Jr., born December 26, 1884. 2, 
Charles Marsh, born May 7, 1887 5 served 
in the World War; went overseas from 
Camp Dix, and remained there for eight- 
een months ; was with the 24th Engineer- 
ing Corps, serving as master engineer of 
the senior grade, his work being the build- 
ing of bridges ; during his service he was 
gassed, but recovered from the shock. He 
is now an inspector of elevators for the 
Travelers Accident and Indemnity Com- 
pany. 3. Raymond, born March 29, 1891 ; 
he also enlisted in the World War and 
served for one year. William George 
Eckert, father of these children, died in 
Boston, Massachusetts, February 5, 1895. 

(The Marsh Line). 

The surname Marsh has been common 
in England ever since the use of sur- 
names. It is undoubtedly a place name. 
Families of the name of Marsh were nu- 
merous in the counties of Norfolk, Suf- 
folk, York, Kent, Essex, and in Wiltshire 



and Ireland. Sir Thomas Marsh, who 
lived in 1660, bore these arms, which with 
slight variations w^ere borne by many 
different families of the same name: 

Arms — Gules, a horse's head couped between 
three crosses bottony fitchee argent. 

(I) John Marsh, immigrant ancestor of 
this branch of the family, was born in 
England in 1618, and died in Windsor, 
Connecticut, September 28, 1688. He came 
to New England in 1635, settled first in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. He went to 
Hartford the following year, and was 
one of the five higher magistrates in 1639, 
holding office until 1655, when he became 
deputy governor. He served as gover- 
nor in 1656, after which he resumed the of- 
fice of magistrate. In 1659 he removed to 
Hadley, Massachusetts. He married 
(first) in Hartford, in 1640, Anne Web- 
ster, daughter of Governor John Web- 
ster. She died June 9, 1662. He married 
(second) October 7, 1664, Hepzibah 
(Ford) Lyman, daughter of Thomas 
Ford, and widow of Richard Lyman. Mr. 
and Mrs, Marsh were the parents of nine 
children, among whom was John (2), of 
whom further. 

(II) John (2) Marsh, son of John and 
Anne (Webster) Marsh, was born in 
Hartford, Connecticut, about 1643, ^'^d 
died in 1727. He lived in Hartford and 
Hadley. He served as selectman in 1677- 
81-87-88-94 and 1701. He w^as called ser- 
geant. He married (first) November 28, 
1666, Sarah Lyman, of Northampton, 
daughter of Richard and Hepzibah (Ford) 
Lyman. He married (second) January i, 
1707-08, Susannah Butler, who died De- 
cember 24, 1714. Twelve children were 
born to Mr. Marsh, among whom was 
John (3), of whom further. 

(III) Captain John (3) Marsh, son of 
John (2) and Sarah (Lyman) Marsh, was 
born in Hadley or Northampton, Massa- 



229 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



chusetts, in 1668, and died in Hartford, 
Connecticut, October i, 1744. He was 
selectman of Hartford in 1704- 10- 14-30- 
35. He also served as deputy to the Gen- 
eral Court, associate judge of the County 
Court, justice of the peace, member of the 
Council of War. He married (first) De- 
cember 12, 1695, Mabel Pratt, who died 
June 6, 1696. He married (second) Janu- 
ary 6, 1698, Elizabeth Pitkin, who died 
December i, 1748. Nine children were 
born to Captain John (3) Marsh, among 
whom was Hezekiah, of whom further. 

(IV) Captain Hezekiah Marsh, son of 
Captain John (3) and Elizabeth (Pitkin) 
Marsh, was born in Hartford, Connecti- 
cut, April 26, 1720, was baptized May i, 
1720, and died in Hartford, in 1791. He 
succeeded to his father's business in Hart- 
ford. He married (first) December i, 
1744, Christian Edwards, born in 1727, 
died June 16, 1770, daughter of John Ed- 
wards. He married (second) Elizabeth 
Jones, widow of Levi Jones, and she died 
October 26, 1788. He married (third) 
Hannah Tiley, widow of Samuel Tiley; 
she died in 1789. Eight children were 
born to Captain Hezekiah Marsh, among 
whom was John (4), of whom further. 

(V) John (4) Marsh, son of Captain 
Hezekiah and Christian (Edwards) 
Marsh, was born in Hartford, Connecti- 
cut, October 4, 1753, and died in 1817. 
He served in the Revolutionary War. He 
married, in 1783, Susan Bunce, born in 
1765, died in 1827, daughter of Timothy 
Bunce, of Hartford. Nine children were 
born of this marriage, among whom was 
Michael, of whom further. 

(VI) Michael Marsh, son of John (4) 
and Susan (Bunce) Marsh, was born in 
Hartford, Connecticut, March 27, 1790, 
and died July 21, 1847. He was a leading 
merchant in Hartford, under the style of 
Allyn & Marsh. About 1840 he removed 



to West Springfield, Massachusetts, by 
boat up the Connecticut river. Here he 
kept a country store and was postmaster. 
He also served as town clerk and treas- 
urer of West Springfield. He married, 
in 1828, Catherine Allyn, born July 8, 
1793, died in 1849, daughter of Colonel 
Job and Abigail (Mather) Allyn. Four 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Marsh, 
as follows: i. Jane, born December ii, 
1829, died in June, 1895. 2. Charles, of 
whom further. 3. Oliver, born February 
27, 1835, and is still living (1922). 4. Dan- 
iel J., born July 27, 1837, died February 

15. 1919- 

(VII) Charles Marsh, eldest son and 
second child of Michael and Catherine 
(Allyn) Marsh, was born in Hartford, 
Connecticut, April 13, 1832, and died in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, November 27, 
1891. He assisted his father in the man- 
agement of his store and the post office, 
and at fifteen years of age was virtually 
postmaster. By a diligent use of time, 
shared between hard work and study, he 
began to prepare for college. He attended 
the Westfield Academy, and in 185 1 was 
ready to enter Williams College. Though 
his preparation had been meagre, his nat- 
ural scholarship and his determination to 
succeed enabled him not only to take a 
creditable place in his studies, but soon 
to become the recognized leader of his 
class. He proved his scholarly ability by 
leaving college and working throughout 
his junior year and still retaining the 
lead in his class, graduating as valedic- 
torian of the class of 1855. Leaving col- 
lege with a record which could hardly 
have been more full of promise, Charles 
Marsh took up his residence in Springfield, 
and after a short time spent in teaching, 
entered upon a business career. In 1857 
he was chosen treasurer of the Five Cents 
Savings Bank, and two years later he was 



230 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



given the position of secretary of the 
Hampden Fire Insurance Company. He 
served that organization until dissolution 
at the time of the great Portland fire, and 
then became associated with Dr. J. C. 
Pynchon in a general insurance busi- 
ness. In 1866 he was elected cashier of 
the Pynchon National Bank, and contin- 
ued as an officer in that institution to the 
time of his death. The responsibility of 
the bank soon fell upon him, owing to the 
advancing years of the president. Colonel 
H. N. Case, and for twenty-five years he 
directed its affairs. Upon the death of 
Colonel Case, Mr. Marsh was made presi- 
dent of the bank. He served for one year 
in the Common Council, was candidate 
for mayor in 1879, and in 1882 and 1883 
his name was on the State ticket for Sec- 
retary of State. 

Probably no man in Springfield was 
more actively identified with so many 
institutions as Charles Marsh, and he 
stood as the representative of nearly all 
the charitable organizations of Hampden 
county. His first marked benevolent 
work was in establishing the Soldiers' 
Rest Fund, at the close of the War of the 
Rebellion, and from that time on he never 
ceased to work for the sufifering. He was 
for many years, up to the time of his 
death, treasurer of the Springfield Hos- 
pital, and was untiring in his devotion to 
the work of building up that institution. 
He was treasurer of the School for Chris- 
tian Workers from its organization in 
1885, and he was also treasurer of Hamp- 
den County Benevolent Association, and 
Hampden Conference of Congregational 
Churches. He was a member of the 
finance committee of the American Mis- 
sionary Association ; served as treasurer 
of the Connecticut Valley Congregational 
Club, and one year as its president ; a cor- 
porator in the Clark Institution for Deaf 



Mutes in Northampton ; secretary and 
treasurer of the Springfield Cemetery As- 
sociation ; auditor for the Springfield 
Home for the Friendless ; vice-president 
of the Springfield Institution for Savings; 
president of the Springfield Clearing 
House; trustee and member of the finance 
committee of the Five Cents Savings 
Bank ; treasurer of the old Springfield & 
New London railroad ; commissioner of 
the City Sinking Fund ; and auditor of the 
old Springfield Fire Assurance Company. 

Immediately after graduation, Charles 
Marsh became a member of the South 
Congregational Church, where he grew 
to be a pillar of strength, and it was in his 
church associations that the richest side 
of his character was shown. He had held 
almost every office in the church and par- 
ish, and in him the pastors had found a 
true and helpful friend. He was always 
deeply interested in the work of the Sun- 
day school, partly out of his love for 
studying the Bible, and here the person- 
ality and character of the man found 
ample play. His love of the truth was 
his inspiration, and nothing gave him 
more genuine delight than in studying his 
Greek Testament, to find for himself an 
interpretation which seemed to throw 
new light on a passage in question. In 
this way he turned his scholarly research 
to practical use, and his Sunday school 
expositions, to a class of a hundred or 
more, known as the pastor's bible class, 
were full of originality. He was a care- 
ful student of modern theology, and he 
met the progressive thought of the day 
with a frankness that won deep respect 
even among those whose views were at 
variance with him. 

Mr. Marsh married, in Springfield, Oc- 
tober 22, 1857, Helen Penniman, born De- 
cember 31, 1835, died in Springfield, No- 
vember 20, 1894, daughter of Henry Har- 



231 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ding and Lucy Ann (Bond) Penniman, of 
Springfield, Massachusetts. They resided 
at this time at the corner of Main and 
Bridge streets, where Haynes & Com- 
pany's large clothing store is now (1922) 
located, and which is now in the very 
heart of the business center of the city. 
Children of Mr. and Mrs. Marsh: i. Lucy 
Penniman, of whom further. 2. William 
Charles, born February 13, 1862, died 
July 13, 1913. 3. Anna Bond, born No- 
vember 26, 1865. 4. Edward Harding, 
born December 9, 1869. 

(VIII) Lucy Penniman Marsh, daugh- 
ter of Charles and Helen (Penniman) 
Marsh, was born July 8, 1858. She be- 
came the wife of William George Eckert 
(see Eckert). 



STURTEVANT, Royal Bassett 

Among the business men of Springfield, 
who are natives of the city, is Royal Bas- 
sett Sturtevant, of the firm of Sturtevant 
& Calderwood, wholesale grocers, whose 
entire active life has been passed in this 
city. Mr. Sturtevant traces his ancestry 
to Samuel Sturtevant, one of three broth- 
ers who went from Rochester, England, 
to Holland, whence they came to this 
country in 1640, the line of descent being 
as follows : 

(I) Samuel (i) Sturtevant settled in 
Plymouth, Massachusetts, as early as No- 
vember, 1640, and was a member of the 
Plymouth Colony. He lived on what is 
called the "Colton Farm" in Plymouth, 
and married Ann . He died in Oc- 
tober, 1669, aged forty-five years, the 
father of nine children, among whom was 
Samuel (2). 

(II) Samuel (2) Sturtevant, fourth 
child of Samuel (i) and Ann Sturtevant, 
was born April 9, 1645. ^^ lived in the 
part of Plymouth which was later 
incorporated in the town of Plympton, 



and which still later became part of the 
town of Halifax. He was a prominent 
man in the affairs of Plymouth, where he 
held several offices of trust, and was one 
of the first selectmen of Plympton, and a 
deacon in the church. He married (first) 

Mercy , who died July 3, 1714, in 

the sixtieth year of her age. To this 
marriage nine children were born, among 
whom was Nehemiah, of further mention. 
He married (second) Mrs. Elizabeth Har- 
rell. His death occurred April 21, 1736. 
(HI) Nehemiah Sturtevant, seventh 
son of Samuel (2) and Mercy Sturtevant, 
was born in 1681-82, and died in 1744. He 
was a resident of Plympton, Massachu- 
setts, where it is supposed that he was 
engaged in farming. He married Ruth 
Sampson, daughter of George Sampson, 
and they were the parents of ten children : 
Cornelius (i), of whom further; Mercy, 
born in 1706; Paul, born in 1708; Nehe- 
miah, born in 1710, married Fear Cush- 
man ; Noah, born 1713; Ruth, born 1715, 
married John Loring; Noah; Abiah, born 
in 1720, married Simeon Holmes; George, 
born in 1725, married Jerusha Cushman ; 
Susanna, born in 1728, married John 
Waterman. 

(IV) Cornelius (i) Sturtevant, son of 
Nehemiah and Ruth (Sampson) Sturte- 
vant, was born November 10, 1704, and 
lived in Plympton, Massachusetts. He 

married Elizabeth , born in 1702, 

died at Keene, New Hampshire, May 16, 
1790, and they were the parents of chil- 
dren, among whom was Cornelius (2). 

(V) Cornelius (2) Sturtevant, son of 
Cornelius (i) and Elizabeth Sturtevant, 
was born in Plympton, Massachusetts, in 
1734, and died at Keene, New Hamp- 
shire, March 8, 1826. He married Sarah 
Bosworth, of Plympton, who died April 
25, 1826, aged eighty-eight years, and 
they were the parents of six sons and one 



232 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



daughter, all born in Plympton, Massa- 
chusetts, between 1767 and 1777. Four of 
the six sons were: Luke; Cornelius (3), 
born in 1771 ; Luther, of whom further ; 
and Isaac, born in 1777, died July 5, 1816. 

(VI) Luther Sturtevant, son of Cor- 
nelius (2) and Sarah (Bosworth) Sturte- 
vant, was born in 1774, in Plympton, 
Massachusetts, and died at Keene, New 
Hampshire, December 31, 1863. He mar- 
ried Azubah Claflin, born April 3, 1773, 
died at Keene, New Hampshire, Decem- 
ber 15, 1849, daughter of Caleb and Hul- 
dah (Fisk) Sturtevant, and they were 
the parents of six children : Lorra, born 
July 18, 1800; Lindamira, born July 16, 
1801 ; Luther, born September 27, 1803, 
died in 1872 ; John Adams, born January 
28, 1805; Patty, born August 23, 1806; 
and Warner C, of whom further. 

(VII) Warner C. Sturtevant, son of 
Luther and Azubah (Claflin) Sturtevant, 
was born at Keene, New Hampshire, Jan- 
uary 25, 1809, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, August 21, 1891. He at- 
tended the district school from the time 
he was five years old until he reached the 
age of nine, and then, until he was four- 
teen, assisted with the work on the farm, 
attending school for two or three months 
each winter. When he was fourteen, it 
was decided that he should learn the 
bakery business. He served five years to 
learn that trade, after which he was em- 
ployed in New Ipswich and Northamp- 
ton, Massachusetts. He was later em- 
ployed in bakeries in Washington and 
Georgetown, District of Columbia, and in 
Baltimore, Maryland, until 1833, and 
then, having decided to engage in busi- 
ness for himself, returned to New Eng- 
land and opened a bakery in Bath, New- 
Hampshire, which he successfully con- 
ducted for four and a half years. He then 
removed to Hanover, New Hampshire, 



where he was in business for five years 
more. In June, 1844, he came to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and bought out Wil- 
son & Hawes. After a time he began 
making crackers by machinery, being the 
first to make that improvement in Spring- 
field. He built up a large and successful 
business, which he conducted for twelve 
years and then sold to J. S. Carr, whom 
he had known in St. Johnsbury, Vermont. 
He was thrifty from the beginning, and 
during his years of active business life 
had purchased valuable property on Main 
street and elsewhere, to which real estate 
interests he devoted his time after his re- 
tirement from business. Mr. Sturtevant 
was always interested in public afifairs, 
and served in both branches of the City 
Council, also as overseer of the poor, and 
in 1864 and 1872 was elected to represent 
the Springfield District in the State 
Legislature. Up to 1854 he gave his sup- 
port to the Democratic party, after that 
he became a "Free Soiler," and when the 
new Republican party was formed, he 
became a Republican. He held a director- 
ship in the Old Western Bank and in the 
Massachusetts Life Insurance Company 
for many years, and was also one of the 
directors of the Springfield Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, of which he was for 
a time president. He was a life member 
of the City Library Association, and a 
member of the Winthrop Club. His re- 
ligious afifiliation was with the Church of 
the Unity, with which he was connected 
for many years. Mr. Sturtevant was twice 
married, (first), October 8, 1823, to Abi- 
gail Lyon, of Northboro, IMassachusetts. 
She died June 13, 1843, and he married 
(second), in 1844, Nancy H. Ricker, of 
Bath, New Hampshire, who died in 1884. 
Abigail Lyon, the first wife, was a de- 
scendant, in the seventh generation, of 
William Lyon, through (2) Thomas, (3) 



233 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Ephraim, (4) Josiah, (5) Ephraim, (6) 
Captain Ephraim, born in Shrewsbury, 
Massachusetts, in 1779, died in Grafton, 
Massachusetts, in 1835, married Lucy 
Fawcett, of Shrewsbury, later of North- 
boro, Massachusetts, and among their 
children was Abigail, who married War- 
ner C. Sturtevant. The children of the 
first marriage were : Warner F., of whom 
further ; and Albert Lyon. To the sec- 
ond marriage was born a daughter, Abbie 
M., who married Joseph Sawyer, of 
Dover, New Hampshire. 

(VIII) Warner F. Sturtevant, son of 
Warner C. and Abigail (Lyon) Sturte- 
vant, was born in Hanover, New Hamp- 
shire, April 17, 1838, and died in Green- 
field, Massachusetts, October 25, 1906. 
He came to Springfield when a boy, and 
was trained for a business career. He was 
first employed with the firm of Day & 
Downing, and later formed a partnership 
with Hamilton F. Downing, the firm 
name becoming Downing & Sturtevant. 
About i860 the firm located where the 
Athol building now stands, near the pres- 
ent railroad arch. Later, the railroad 
company erected a building for the firm 
on Lyman street, the firm at this time 
becoming the Downing, Sturtevant Com- 
pany, and later Downing, Sturtevant & 
Taylor. In 1894 Mr. Sturtevant severed 
his connection with this firm and organ- 
ized a new concern, the Sturtevant, Mer- 
rick Company, wholesale grocers, of 
which Mr. Sturtevant was made presi- 
dent, continuing to fill that office to the 
time of his death. He was a trustee of 
the Wesleyan Academy, at Wilbraham. 
Politically he was an Independent Repub- 
lican, and his fraternal affiliation was with 
the Masonic order. He was much inter- 
ested in fishing, and was a member of the 
North Branch Fishing Club, also leased 
land on the Deacon Clark farm at Wilbra- 



ham, in order that he might have the right 
to fish in the streams. His religious affili- 
ation was with the Trinity Methodist 
Church, of which he was one of the trus- 
tees. He married, in 1861, Julia Emeline 
Bemis, of Williamansett (now Chicopee), 
daughter of Stephen Chapin and Julia 
(Skeeles) Bemis, who died April 25, 1905. 
The children of this marriage were: i. 
Minnie A., who married (first) James 
Beebe Smith, local editor of the Spring- 
field "Republican," who died in 1889; 
(second) Alonson S. Martin, who died in 
1918. She resides in Springfield. To the 
first marriage one daughter was born, 
Ruth S. 2. Robert, died in infancy. 3. 
Royal Bassett, of further mention. 4. 
Julia Bemis, who married Rev. C. W. 
Merriam, a Congregationalist minister, of 
Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

(IX) Royal Bassett Sturtevant, son of 
Warner F. and Julia Emeline (Bemis) 
Sturtevant, was born in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, January 2"], 1868. He received 
his education in the grammar and high 
schools of Springfield, and upon the com- 
pletion of his studies, became associated 
with the Downing, Sturtevant Company, 
and later with the Sturtevant, Merrick 
Company, wholesale grocers. He was 
with this company until 1921, when he 
formed a partnership with Edwin C. Cal- 
derwood, under the firm name of the Stur- 
tevant, Calderwood Company, which took 
over the business of the Sturtevant, Mer- 
rick Company, the latter becoming a 
holding company, owning valuable prop- 
erties. 

Mr. Sturtevant is a trustee of the Trin- 
ity Methodist Church, of which he is treas- 
urer. He is a member of Springfield 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
of all other Masonic bodies. He is also a 
member of the Nayasset Club, and of the 
Blandford Countrv Club. 



234 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



On October 14, 1893, Royal B. Sturte- 
vant married Jennie Frances Cook, daugh- 
ter of Orrin W. and Harriett (Butter- 
field) Cook, of Springfield, Massachusetts, 
and they were the parents of one son, 
Warner Butterfield Sturtevant. 

(X) Warner Butterfield Sturtevant, 
son of Royal Bassett and Jennie Frances 
(Cook) Sturtevant, born December i, 
1894, received his early education in the 
schools of Springfield. From the public 
schools he went to Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College for two years, after which 
he entered Dartmouth College, from which 
institution he was graduated in 1917. 
During the World War he served in the 
Ordnance Department in Washington, 
District of Columbia, and then went to 
France, where he served in the Supply 
Division of the Ordnance Department. 
He received his discharge after the sign- 
ing of the armistice, his rank being that 
of second lieutenant. Warner B. Sturte- 
vant married, October 6, 1920, Dorothy 
H. Cole, born November 27, 1894, daugh- 
ter of Daniel Pomeroy and Harriet 
(Brooks) Cole, of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, and they are the parents of a daugh- 
ter, Harriet Mather, born July 31, 1921. 
Mrs. Warner B. Sturtevant is a graduate 
of Smith College, class of 1917. 



MERRIAM, G. Frank 

Among the successful business men of 
Springfield is G. Frank Merriam, who for 
nearly forty years has been identified with 
the Holyoke Card and Paper Company, 
of Springfield, a concern which he first 
served as bookkeeper, and of which he is 
now president and general manager. 

Mr. Merriam is descended from a very 
old English family of which there is rec- 
ord as far back as the reign of Edward I. 
The name was originally spelled Mery- 
ham, Merryham, Meriham, and Mirriam, 



a name derived from the term ham, mean- 
ing house or home, and the adjective 
merry, the surname thus literally being 
merry house or happy house. That the 
family is an ancient one is evidenced by 
the fact that in the years 1295-96 Laur- 
ence de Meryham is recorded as paying 
taxes to Edward I at Isenhurst in Sus- 
sex. In the sixteenth century there was 
a manor of Meriham, in Pembrokeshire, 
the southwest corner of Wales, and it is 
a curious fact that though the name is 
quite commonly found in this country, it 
is now practically extinct in England, the 
branch of the Merriam family to which 
G. Frank Merriam belongs being de- 
scended from William Merriam, who was 
a resident of Kent, England, during the 
latter part of the sixteenth century. 

(I) William Merriam was a clothier, 
which meant in those days that he made 
cloth and handled the manufactured 
goods, a business requiring more than 
ordinary intelligence and usually very 
profitable. He never came to America, 
but at least three of his sons were pio- 
neers in New England, Robert, who set- 
tled in Concord, was town clerk, deputy 
to the General Court, and died in 1681 ; 
George, settled in Concord, where he was 
admitted a freeman on June 2, 1641, and 
died December 29, 1675 ; and Joseph. Wil- 
liam Merriam, the father, died in Septem- 
ber, 1635, and was buried in Hadlow, 
where his life had been passed. He mar- 
ried Sara , and they were the par- 
ents of eight children, whose names are 
recorded, though the order of birth is not 
known : Susan ; Margaret ; a daughter 
who married Thomas Howe ; Joseph, of 
whom further ; George, about 1603 ; Joane ; 
Sara; and Robert, born about 1613. 

(II) Joseph Merriam, son of William 
and Sara Merriam, and the eldest son, as 
mentioned in the father's will, was born 



235 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in the County of Kent about the year 
1600. Like his father he was a clothier or 
cloth maker and merchant, and there is 
evidence that he was the possessor of 
considerable property when he set out for 
the New World. He settled in Concord, 
Massachusetts, in June, 1638, where he 
was soon afterward admitted to the 
church and made a freeman of the Col- 
ony of Massachusetts Bay. He married, 
in England, about the year 1623, Sara 
Goldstone, daughter of John and (prob- 
ably) Frances (Jefiferie) Goldstone, of the 
County of Kent, and they were the par- 
ents of seven children : William ; Sarah ; 
Joseph, of whom further ; Thomas ; Eliz- 
abeth ; Hannah ; and John, all born in 
England except the youngest, who was 
born in Concord. Joseph Merriam, the 
father, died at Concord, Massachusetts, 
January i, 1640-41, less that three years 
after his arrival in America. 

(HI) Joseph (2) Merriam, son of Jos- 
eph (i) and Sara (Goldstone) Merriam, 
was born in England about 1629. He came 
with his father's family to Concord, Mas- 
sachusetts, but when he attained his ma- 
jority removed to Cambridge, settling in 
the part of that town known as "The 
Farms," which afterward became the par- 
ish and town of Lexington. He was ad- 
mitted to the church and made a freeman, 
May 22, 1650. He was successful in the 
management of his afifairs, and like his 
father accumulated a considerable estate 
He died in middle life, April 20, 1677, 
aged forty-seven years. He married, at 
Concord, July 12, 1653, Sarah Stone, 
daughter of Deacon Gregory Stone, of 
Cambridge, and their children, born at 
Cambridge Farms, or Lexington, were: 
Sarah ; Lydia ; Joseph ; Elizabeth ; John, 
of whom further ; Mary ; Robert ; Ruth ; 
and Thomas. 

(IV) John Merriam, son of Joseph (2) 



and Sarah (Stone) Merriam, was born at 
Concord, Massachusetts, August 30, 1662, 
and died May 21, 1727. About the time 
of his marriage he removed from Concord 
to Cambridge Farms, now Lexington, 
where he was a subscriber to the meeting 
house in 1692, he being an original mem- 
ber of the church, its first deacon and one 
of the most prominent men of the Lexing- 
ton parish. He was an assessor of the 
parish, and when the precinct became a 
separate town he was elected to serve 
as selectman, an office which he held for 
many years. His homestead was in the 
southwest part of the town. He married, 
in 1688, Mary Wheeler, who died Decem- 
ber 26, 1747, aged seventy-five years, and 
their children were : Mary, born Febru- 
ary 26, 1689; Benjamin, baptized Janu- 
ary 6, 1701, married May Preston; John; 
Jonas, of whom further ; Ebenezer, born 
March 4, 1706, married Esther Gleason : 
Joshua, born February, 1708, died June 
21, 1735; Amos, baptized July 25, I7i5» 
married Hannah Danforth. 

(V) Jonas Merriam, son of John and 
Mary (Wheeler) Merriam, was born in 
Lexington, Massachusetts, and baptized 
January 12, 1704. He lived in Lexington, 
and he and his wife were admitted to the 
church there, July i, 1729. He was prom- 
inent in the public afifairs of the town, 
and held several town offices, including 
that of town treasurer in 1747. He mar- 
ried (first) October 17, 1728, Abigail 
Locke, daughter of William Locke, Jr., 
and granddaughter of William Locke, Sr., 
who came to this country with his par- 
ents in 1634. She died in December, 1755, 
and Jonas Merriam married (second) 
June 22, 1758, Sarah Winship. He died 
July 23, 1776. The children of the first 
marriage were : i. John, of whom further, 
2. Jonas, Jr., born in Lexington, now 
Lincoln, December, 1730, graduated from 



236 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Harvard College in 1753 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, and received from the 
same institute the degree of Master of 
Arts in 1757 ; was ordained a pastor at 
Newton, Massachusetts, where he diea 
August 3, 1780, after a pastorate of twen- 
ty-two years ; married three times and 
had two children, Mehitable and Nathan' 
iel. 3. William, baptized December 17, 
1732. 4. Abraham, born December 23, 
1734. 5. Silas, born March 5, 1737, a 
prominent physician. 6. James, born 
April 10, 1739. 7. Abigail, born June 11, 
1741. 8. Eunice, born June 29, 1742, died 
before 1746. 9. Ebenezer, born Novem- 
ber 2, 1745, died December 11, 1745. 

(VI) John (2) Merriam, son of Jonas 
^nd Abigail (Locke) Merriam, was borr 
in Lexington, Massachusetts, July 28, 
1729, and died in East Sudbury, 
Massachusetts, August 12, 1798. He 
married, at Lynn, Massachusetts, Novem- 
ber 24, 1752, Mary Bancroft, and they 
were the parents of children, among 
whom was John (3), of further mention. 

(VII) John (3) Merriam, son of John 
(2) and Mary (Bancroft) Merriam, was 
born in East Sudbury, Massachusetts, 
December 9, 1760, and died July 20, 1843. 
He was a carpenter by trade, and lived at 
various times in Sudbury, Lexington, 
Springfield and Fitchburg, all of Massa- 
chusetts. He married Diana Hudson, 
born July 31, 1766, died November 5, 
1843, and they were the parents of ten 
children : Samuel ; Abigail, of whom fur- 
ther ; John George ; Abel H. ; Cynthia ; 
William ; Francis ; Aaron Fames ; Lucre- 
tia Hudson ; and Emily Charlotte. 

(VIII) Abigail Merriam, daughter of 
John (3) and Diana (Hudson) Merriam, 
was born March 9, 1789. She married, in 
1810, Peter Pride, a woolen manufacturer, 
who was born in Manchester, England. 
They resided in Millville, Mendon, 



Watertown, and Fitchburg, all in Massa- 
chusetts, and were the parents of three 
children: Eliza Pride; George Merriam 
Pride, who afterwards took the name 
George Henry Merriam, of whom fur- 
ther; and William M. Pride. 

(IX) George Merriam Pride or George 
Henry Merriam, son of Peter and Abi- 
gail (Merriam) Pride, was born in Water- 
town, Massachusetts, March 14, 1814, and 
by order of the General Court in 1836 took 
the name of George Henry Merriam. He 
resided at difTerent times in Portland, 
Maine ; Brattleboro, Vermont ; and in 
Boston, Massachusetts; and was engaged 
in the insurance business. He married 
Caroline Lowe, of Fitchburg, Massachu- 
setts, and they were the parents of : 
George F., of whom further ; and Emma. 

(X) George F. Merriam, son of George 
Henry and Caroline (Lowe) Merriam, 
was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, in 
1837, and died in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, January 21, 1893. He received his 
education in the public schools of his 
native district, and then learned the trade 
of machinist. Upon the outbreak of the 
Civil War, he enlisted in the old Tenth 
Massachusetts Volunteers, and was later 
transferred to Company I, unattached 
Engineers Corps. He served in the Army 
of the Potomac, operating in Virginia, 
assisting in building many pontoon 
bridges across the James river. Soon 
after his discharge from service at the 
close of the war, he entered Government 
employ as postal clerk in the newly or- 
ganized railway mail service, being one 
of the first to engage in that line of work. 
His route was from Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, to Newport, Vermont, and this 
work he continued until shortly before 
the time of his death. He was known as 
the best informed mail clerk in the ser- 
vice, and his friends were legion. He was 



237 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



an active member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, which he served as com- 
mander of the Newport Post for a num- 
ber of years. Fraternally he was affili- 
ated with Hampden Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Springfield, and his 
religious affiliation was with the Unitar- 
ian church. He married Emily Maria 
Wheeler, of Ashby, Massachusetts, who 
was born in 1836, and died January 18, 
1918, daughter of Waterman and Rebecca 
(Newhall) Wheeler, and they were the 
parents of two children : William, de- 
ceased ; and George Frank, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(XI) G. Frank Merriam, son of George 
F. and Emily Maria (Wheeler) Merriam, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
August I, 1863. He attended the public 
schools of his native city, completing his 
studies in the grammar grades, and then 
entered the high school, where he re- 
mained for one year. Upon the comple- 
tion of his first year in high school he 
became associated with Kibbe Brothers, 
candy manufacturers, in the capacity of 
clerk, and this connection he maintained 
for three and a half years. At the end of 
that period, he began to learn the woolen 
business, but in 1886 changed his plans 
and entered the employ of the Holyoke 
Card and Paper Company as bookkeeper. 
From that position he has steadily ad- 
vanced, being promoted from one position 
to another. In 1892 he was made secre- 
tary of the company, and in 1904 was 
elected president and general manager, 
positions which he holds at the present 
time (1923). The Holyoke Card and 
Paper Company are manufacturers of 
card board and surface coated papers, and 
do an extensive and prosperous business. 
Mr. Merriam is also a director in the com- 
pany of which he is president, and in ad- 
dition holds directorships in the Spring- 



field National Bank, the Morris Plan 
Company, Crocker McElwain Company, 
of Holyoke, and in the Chemical Paper 
Manufacturing Company of Holyoke. He 
is president of the National Card Board 
Manufacturers' Association, and treasurer 
of the Glazed and Fancy Paper Manufac- 
turers' Association. He was for a time 
active in the affairs of the First Traffic 
Bureau, and of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, of which he was a director. He 
is also a member of the property and 
finance committee of the South Congre- 
gational Church, and a director of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. 

With all his business responsibilities, 
Mr. Merriam finds time for social and 
fraternal affiliations. He is a member of 
the Colony Club, the Nayasset Club, the 
Springfield Country Club, the Long- 
meadow Country Club, the Publicity 
Club, the Rotary Club, and the Anglers 
Club. Fraternally he is affiliated with 
the Masonic bodies of Springfield, being 
a member of Springfield Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons ; Morning Star Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons ; Springfield Council, 
Royal and Select Masters ; Springfield 
Commandery, Knights Templar ; Connec- 
ticut Valley Consistory, Scottish Rite; 
and Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Or- 
der Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

On January 20, 1886, G. Frank Mer- 
riam married Ida Belle Towne, of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, daughter of John 
and Corena (Thomas) Towne, and they 
are the parents of one daughter, Ethel 
Frances Merriam, who married, October 
18, 1910, John Barwis Van Horn, and 
has one child, Cortlandt, born February 
14, 1921. 



JAGER, Frederick George 

Frederick George Jager, president of 
the Springfield Automobile Company, is 



238 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 

one of the pioneers of the automobile in- creating beauty by means of harmonious 

dustry, having been identified with that arrangement of shrubs, trees, plants, and 

field since 1899, i^'^ which year he pur- flowers, soon impressed the owners of the 

chased and brought to Northampton, estate that he was a man of more than or- 

where he then resided, the first steamer dinary ability. He always took an active 

car which had ever traversed the streets interest in his adopted country and ap- 

of that city, exciting the wonder, admira- plied for naturalization papers, receiving 

tion, and sometimes the ridicule of the his final papers, October 29, 1856, which 

residents. made him a citizen of the United States. 

(I) Mr. Jager is of German ancestry. He built a residence in Northampton, 
tracing descent from Johann Jakob Jager, Massachusetts, two years later, and there 
a master tailor of Dudenhofen, Hesse- he lived happily the remainder of his life, 
Darmstadt, Germany, who was born Oc- enjoying to the full the delight of taking 
tober 24, 1771, and died in Leckbach, No- care of his own modest lawns, and also 
vember 8, 1835. Johann Jakob Jager mar- of the extensive grounds of the Musgrave 
ried Anna Margaret Schneider, who was estate. The house which he built in 1858 
born in Leckbach, April 16, 1772, and is now the home of his son, Frederick 
died January 30, 1831, and they were the George Jager. Johann (John) Jager mar- 
parents of five children: Johann Kaspar, ried Christine Siebert, born in Leckbach, 
born February 2, 1795, died January 2, Germany, October 5, 1821, and died in 
1850; Margarete, born December 28, 1796, Northampton, Massachusetts, June 24, 
died February 3, 1875 ; Eva, born Febru- 1895, daughter of Johann Friedrich and 
ary 10, 1802 ; Magdalene, born March 22, Margarete (Gross) Siebert (see Siebert 
181 1 ; Johann, of further mention. line). Johann and Christine (Siebert) 

(II) Johann (John) Jager, son of Jo- Jager were the parents of nine children, 
hann Jakob and Anna M. (Schneider) two of whom died in infancy, the others 
Jager, was born in Leckbach, near Frank- being: John, who died in 1907, married, 
fort, Germany, December 25, 1823, and and left five sons and one daughter; 
died in Northampton, Massachusetts, Louisa, deceased, married Forest Par- 
June 13, 1864. He was a landscape gar- sons, and left three children ; Evans, died 
dener, or horticulturist, who left his na- in childhood ; Lena, deceased, married For- 
tive land where taxes were high and est Kirsch, and left two children ; Wil- 
restrictions numerous, and came to Amer- Ham, an automobile dealer in Northamp- 
ica, arriving August 15, 1848, and settling ton, and has four children; Frederick 
first in New Jersey. Not finding in that George, of further mention ; and George, 
region the opportunity for which he w^as a resident of Springfield, IVIassachusetts. 
looking, he after a time removed to the (III) Frederick George Jager, son of 
longer settled New England region, Johann (John) and Christine (Siebert) 
where estates requiring the services of Jager, was born in Northampton, Massa- 
the landscape gardener were more numer- chusetts, January 25, 1862. He received 
ous. On the Musgrave estate in Leeds, his education in the public schools of his 
Massachusetts, he secured the kind of native city. The death of his father when 
position for which his training and ex- he was two and a half years of age left 
perience so well fitted him, his practical his mother with a number of children and 
knowledge of plants and of the art of the father's business of raising early vege- 

239 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



tables and flowers upon her hands, and in 
the continuation of this all the children as- 
sisted, Frederick George beginning as a 
mere child to share in the labor of the 
enterprise, assisting in the sale of vege- 
tables and flowers. When he was seven- 
teen years of age he was "bound out" to 
a machinist in accordance with the con- 
ditions of the Oliver Smith will, which 
stipulated that if he met the conditions 
he should receive $500, when he was 
twenty-six years of age. He served until 
he was twenty-one years of age, and 
when he was twenty-six received the $500 
with interest to which he was entitled. 
Meantime, having thoroughly mastered 
his trade, he went into the machine shops 
as a designer. After a time he decided to 
make a change, and going to Hatfield, 
Massachusetts, he took a contract to build 
engine lathes. He employed about twenty 
men, and had been engaged in this work 
for about three years when the firm with 
which he had contracted failed. He then 
became associated with the Hayden Brass 
Company, of Haydenville, Massachusetts, 
as tool designer, which connection he 
maintained for a short time, and then 
came to Springfield, Massachusetts, where 
he became identified with the Morton & 
Hill Company, of Springfield, manufac- 
turers of cash carriers for store service. 
After a time this concern was absorbed by 
the Lamson Store Service Company, 
which removed the plant to Lowell, Mas- 
sachusetts, taking Mr. Jager with them as 
superintendent, and in that capacity he 
remained with them until 1894, a period of 
five years. In that year Mr. Jager went 
into the manufacturing business for him- 
self, taking as a partner his brother-in- 
law, Frank Densmore, under the firm 
name of Jager & Densmore. They began 
manufacturing musical instrument trim- 
mings, a line in which there was no com- 



petition in this country, since there was 
no other manufacturing plant of the kind 
this side of the Atlantic. After the death 
of Mr. Densmore, Mr. Jager, in addition 
to his manv:facturing interests, began the 
handling of automobiles. 

Those were the days when that now in- 
dispensable article of pleasure, business 
and profit was just being introduced, and 
in 1900 Mr. Jager brought into Northamp- 
ton a curiosity which excited great inter- 
est and speculation, and not a little ridi- 
cule. It was a steamer car, the first of its 
kind to enter the city of Northampton 
and as it went puffing along its noisy way, 
emitting rolling clouds of white vapor, it 
drew crowds of curious people to the edge 
of the street, though none were inclined to 
venture near enough to interfere with its 
triumphant progress. Another element of 
the population, however, did interfere. So 
great was the fright of horses at this 
queer looking affair that on his first trip 
from Newton to Northampton, by way of 
Worcester, he was "on the way" from 
eight o'clock in the morning to seven 
o'clock in the evening, covering a dis- 
tance of seventy-five miles in eleven hours, 
it being necessary to stop nearly every 
time he met a horse and carriage and as- 
sist in getting the horse past the car. The 
smaller towns tried to pass laws prohibit- 
ing all cars from passing through their 
streets, so great was the fear of horses 
and the dangers to life and limb caused 
by their fright. In those days no instruc- 
tion was given to the purchaser of a car. 
He bought it and operated it — if he could. 
Mr. Jager, however, being an expert me- 
chanic and understanding thoroughly the 
principles of steam as a working force, 
had comparatively little trouble and soon 
mastered all obstacles in his way. Still 
continuing with the manufacture of mu- 
sical instrument trimmings, Mr. Jager, 



240 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



who saw clearly that the new automobile 
had come to stay, and would offer a splen- 
did new field for business enterprise, or- 
ganized, in 1900, the Springfield Auto- 
mobile Company, which at that time was 
a partnership affair. By 1905 the auto- 
mobile was proving so profitable and pre- 
senting so large a field for expansion that 
Mr, Jager closed out his manufacturing 
business and incorporated the Springfield 
Automobile Company, of which he was 
made president, which office he still holds 
(1923). The first car he handled in 1900 
was the "Locomobile," which was then a 
steam car. In 1904 the "Locomobile" was 
converted into a gas car, and Mr. Jager 
continued to act as agent for its manu- 
facturers until 1914. He also, in 1905, 
took the agency for the "Franklin," an 
air cooled car, and for the now (1923) 
"Stevens-Duryea" cars. They also handle 
the "Roma" pleasure car, the "Velie," and 
the "Seldon" truck and bus. In 1905 the 
company of which Mr, Jager is president 
built the largest one-story garage in the 
city, a fire-proof structure, about 300 feet 
long and 250 feet wide, and affording 
more floor space on a single floor than any 
other in the State. It aft'ords accommo- 
dation for 250 cars. In addition to this 
the firm employs a corps of skilled me- 
chanics, and conducts a large repair shop, 
Mr. Jager has seen the automobile busi- 
ness grow from very small beginnings to 
its present vast proportions, and can re- 
late many interesting experiences of the 
days when the automobile puffed its way 
into a horse and bicycle world, and when 
people were wondering whether or not it 
could be possible that the "horseless car- 
riage" had come to stay, and whether or 
not self-respecting and life-loving citizens 
might venture to risk their lives in the 
mysterious vehicles. 

With all his business responsibilities. 
Mass— 12— 16 241 



Mr, Jager has found time for fraternal and 
social affiliations. He is a member of 
Lowell Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Lowell, Massachusetts ; of North- 
hampton Commandery, Knights Templar, 
of Northampton, Massachusetts ; and of 
Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Spring- 
field, He is also affiliated with the Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; 
with the Northampton Club ; and with 
the Nayasset Club, of Springfield. His re- 
ligious affiliation is with the Edwards Sec- 
ond Congregational Church, of North- 
ampton, Massachusetts, 

Frederick George Jager married (first) 
June 17, 1906, Sarah J, Densmore, of Hat- 
field, Massachusetts, daughter of Almaron 
and Mary (Bigelow) Densmore. She 
died September 7, 1906, He married (sec- 
ond) June 22, 1907, Alice Louisa Parker, 
of Westfield, Massachusetts, daughter of 
James and Elizabeth Parker, and they are 
the parents of four children : Ruth, born 
April 10, 1908; Arline, born February 14, 
1910; Dorris, born April 13, 191 1; and 
Barbara, born June 18, 1912. The home 
of the family is at No. 365 Prospect street, 
Northampton, Massachusetts. 

(The Siebert Une). 

(I) Johann Friedrich Siebert, born 
April 30, 1782, died November 5, 1835. 
He married, March 22, 1808, Margarete 
Gross (see Gross line). They were the 
parents of five children : Konrad, born 
December 22, 1814, died April 4, 1891 ; 
Philip, born November 5, 1816, died Au- 
gust I, 1854, unmarried; Margarete, born 
March 16, 1819, died November 12, 1859; 
Christine, of further mention ; Michael, 
born December 31, 1828, died in New Or- 
leans. 

(II) Christine Siebert, daughter of Jo- 
hann Friedrich and Margarete (Gross) 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Siebert, was born in Leckbach, Germany, 
October 5, 1821, and died in Northampton, 
Massachusetts, June 24, 1895. She mar- 
ried Johann (John) Jager (see Jager II). 

(The Gross Line). 

(I) Johann Michael Gross, son of Mar- 
tin Gross, was born September 4, 1763, 
and died May 30, 1835. He married, Jan- 
uary 20, 1786, Anna Margarete Emmel, 
born June 22, 1763, died January 13, 1842, 
and they were the parents of two chil- 
dren : Margarete, of further mention ; 
Johannes, born January 6, 1795, died Oc- 
tober 6, 1864, married', February 9, 1815, 
Margarete Emmel, daughter of Johann 
Heinrich and Katherine Elisabeth Emmel, 
born in Worner, December 23, 1793, and 
died April 10, 1850, leaving children: 
Michael, Maria, Johannes, and Kather- 
ine. 

(II) Margarete Gross, daughter of Jo- 
hann and Anna Margarete (Emmel) 
Gross, was born December 28, 1786, and 
died June 29, 1864. She married, March 
22, 1808, Johann Friedrich Siebert (see 
Siebert I). 



TARBELL, Edward Norris 

Edward Norris Tarbell, treasurer of the 
Tarbell and Watters Company, wholesale 
dealers in automobile accessories and sup- 
plies, traces his ancestry to the early days 
of the settlement of the vast wildernesses 
of the State of Pennsylvania. His grand- 
father, Norris Tarbell, born in Pennsyl- 
vania, February 4, 1804, left his native 
State and settled in Albany, New York, 
where he died in May, 1833. He was a 
manufacturer of brushes, expert in his 
line, prosperous, and a prominent citizen 
of his community. He married Margaret 
Durrie, and became the father of two 
sons : Edmund Norris and Horace D. 

Edmund Norris Tarbell, son of Nor- 



ris and Margaret (Durrie) Tarbell, was 
born in Albany, New York, July 8, 1831, 
and died at Yaleville, Connecticut, Au- 
gust 14, 1916, at the age of eighty-five 
years. His father died when he was not 
yet two years old, and the family removed 
to Hartford, Connecticut, where the lad 
received his education in the public 
schools. A bright, energetic lad, he was 
handicapped from childhood by the loss of 
his hearing, but he did not permit this 
difficulty to interfere with his ambition 
or with his achievement. Seeking and 
finding companionship, recreation and in- 
struction in books, he became a great 
reader, and cultivating a natural manual 
dexterity, he became a most excellent 
penman. When his school days were 
over he learned the art of wood engrav- 
ing, and in this occupation both his man- 
ual dexterity, his wide reading, and his 
artistic taste found expression. It is often 
true that the necessity for overcoming a 
difficulty or handicap develops power 
which carries a man far on his way to 
success. So it seemed to be with the lad, 
Edmund Norris. With untiring energy 
and perseverance he worked to perfect 
himself in his chosen line, with the result 
that he became an expert, doing especially 
fine work in the profitable field of getting 
out catalogues for large concerns. Pos- 
sessed of large executive and adminis- 
trative ability, added to the fineness and 
quickness of perception that so often com- 
pensates the loss of the use of one of the 
sense organs, he built up a large and suc- 
cessful business, becoming the employer 
of many people. Highly esteemed by all 
who knew him and greatly loved by those 
who knew him best, he filled an enviable 
place in his large circle of friends and 
associates. He married Mary Hubbard, 
of East Norris, Connecticut, born Septem- 
ber 29, 1827, died October 14, 1896, daugh- 



242 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ter of Ithamar and Lavinia (Barnard) 
Hubbard, and they were the parents of 
two children : Hattie D., who married 
Edwin S. May, of Yaleville, Connecticut ; 
and Edward Norris, of whom further. 

Edward Norris Tarbell, son of Edmund 
N. and Mary (Hubbard) Tarbell, was 
born in Meriden, Connecticut, November 
9, 1868. He first attended the schools of 
his native city, and then finished his pre- 
paratory education in the High School 
of Springfield, Massachusetts. When he 
was seventeen years of age, he came to 
Springfield, and, intending to engage in 
secretarial work in the Young Men's 
Christian Association, entered the Young 
Men's Christian Association College, 
where he studied for a year. At the end 
of that time, a lad of eighteen, he became 
assistant secretary of the Milford, Mas- 
sachusetts, Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, which position he filled enthu- 
siastically and efficiently until he ac- 
cepted the position of assistant post- 
master at Milford, which last named of- 
fice he filled for a period of five years. 
At the end of that time he began to feel 
that opportunity for further advancement 
in Milford was extremely limited, and 
looked about for larger fields. In 1896, he 
went to Hartford, Connecticut, and en- 
tered the employ of the Pope Manufactur- 
ing Company, makers of bicycles, where 
he filled the office of secretary, attending 
to the correspondence and taking charge 
of the stock room. It is interesting to 
note that this is the company which put 
the first automobile on the market in this 
country. After a time, Mr. Tarbell sought 
larger opportunity and wider experience 
at another change of residence and of oc- 
cupation. He came to Springfield as man- 
ager of the Post & Lester store, engaged 
in selling automobile accessories, and here 
he remained for about six years, gaining 



valuable experience and preparing for the 
time when he might engage in business 
for himself. In 1915 he decided that the 
time for launching an enterprise of his 
own had come. The automobile had come 
to stay and with it had come many and 
various new fields of business activity. 
Mr. Tarbell formed a partnership with 
Mr. Watters under the corporate name of 
Tarbell & Watters, and engaged in the 
business of selling automobile supplies. 
Mr. Tarbell was, and is, treasurer of the 
organization, and under skillful manage- 
ment the firm has built up an extensive 
wholesale business. 

Mr. Tarbell is well known in Spring- 
field, and is one of the prominent, public- 
spirited citizens of his community. Fra- 
ternally he is affiliated with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, being a 
charter member of Milford Lodge, and a 
member of the encampment at Hartford, 
of which he is a past chief patriarch. He 
is also well known in club circles, being a 
member of the Kiwanis Club, the Nay- 
asset Club, and the Automobile Club, of 
Springfield. His religious interest is with 
the Congregational church, of which he 
is an attendant. 

On September 21, 1893, Edward N. 
Tarbell married Florence E. Hale, of Mil- 
ford, Massachusetts, daughter of William 
B. and Elizabeth (Safreed) Hale. Mrs. 
Tarbell died May 5, 1920. Mr. and Mrs. 
Tarbell were the parents of two children : 
I. Lucius Hale, born in Hartford, Con- 
necticut, April 5, 1896 ; attended the gram- 
mar and high schools of Hartford, Con- 
necticut, and passed the entrance examin- 
ations for the Worcester School of Tech- 
nology. During the World War he served 
in the ordnance department located at 
Camp Reardon, New York, receiving his 
honorable discharge after the signing of 
the armistice, and is now purchasing 



243 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



agent for the firm of Tarbell & Watters. 
He married, October 8, 1919, Dorothy Isa- 
belle Joslyn. 2. Margaret Elizabeth, born 
in Hartford, Connecticut, January 19, 
1898; attended Hartford public schools 
and graduated from Hartford High 
School. 



FABER, Patrick Henry Clay 

Patrick Henry Clay Faber has contri- 
buted to the comfort of citizens of Spring- 
field by building and managing the well- 
known Oaks Hotel, the first of its kind 
in New England, which not only caters 
to transient guests but provides a per- 
manent residence for families. He is of 
German ancestry, his grandfather, Conrad 
Faber, having been born in Hesse-Darm- 
stadt, Germany, about 1791, died in Bal- 
timore, Maryland, in 1861, at the age of 
seventy years. The Fabers were artisans, 
and Conrad Faber followed the calling of 
his family, acquiring extensive real es- 
tate, and dying a wealthy man. He had a 
son, John Conrad, and a daughter. 

John Conrad Faber, son of Conrad 
Faber, was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, 
Germany, about 1826, and came to this 
country with his parents when an infant. 
He served in the Civil War on the Con- 
federate side, was made an officer with 
special duties, and was captured while 
carrying dispatches and confined in the 
barracks at Washington, D. C. After the 
close of the war he came to New York, 
where for a time he was engaged in mak- 
ing cloth and in managing a grocery busi- 
ness located on the corner of Second ave- 
nue and Thirty-sixth street. He finally 
went to Baltimore, Maryland, where he 
entered the employ of the Baltimore and 
Savannah Steamship Company as clerk, 
and continued in their employ until he 
died July 24, 1874. He was very patriotic 
and a member of all the German societies. 



He married Ellen Moyna, born in Liver- 
pool, England, died October 20, 1888, in 
Baltimore, Maryland, daughter of Alex- 
ander Moyna, her father being a promi- 
nent man in English shipping interests. 
Their children were : Emma, Patrick H. 
C, Francis, Augustus, all deceased except 
Patrick H. C. 

Patrick Henry Clay Faber, son of John 
Conrad and Ellen (Moyna) Faber, was 
born in Baltimore, Maryland, August 8, 
1855. He received his education in vari- 
ous schools in Baltimore, Maryland. As 
a young man he went into the transporta- 
tion business, and for a period of thirty 
years was clerk ; later he was the New Eng- 
land agent for the Southern Railway Com- 
pany, with headquarters in Boston. He 
severed his connection with this company 
in 1897, ^^^ ^" i8g8 came to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and entered the hotel busi- 
ness. In 1899 he purchased the property 
of the Haynes estate, including buildings, 
located on the easterly side of Thompson 
street, near State. These he later tore 
down and upon their site he erected what 
is known as the Oaks Hotel, the first of 
its kind in New England. In those days 
the business of the hotel was to minister 
to transient guests. Mr. Faber ran an 
establishment which not only catered to 
transients but was built and managed for 
the especial purpose of providing comfort- 
able, homelike, permanent residence for 
families, as well. This feature of the new 
hotel was a great success, and in the years 
which have passed since its beginning it 
has more than doubled its size, now con- 
taining some 150 rooms with fifty bath 
rooms, and located in the best residential 
section of the city. With its genial host, 
and its many comforts and conveniences, 
its patrons are always comfortable and 
happy. The reputation of this hotel ex- 
tends throughout New England and the 



244 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Middle States. Mr. Faber has been a 
member of the Railroad and Steamship 
Agency of Boston for over thirty-five 
years. He is also a member of the Nay- 
asset and Country clubs of Springfield ; 
and of the Knights of Columbus and the 
Holy Name Society. 

On January 24, 1894, Mr. Faber married 
Edith Augusta Perkins, of Chicopee, Mas- 
sachusetts, but who was born in Bidde- 
ford, Maine, daughter of Albert and Ac- 
sah (Wiley) Perkins, and they are the 
parents of three children : A. Conrad, 
assistant manager of the Oaks Hotel ; 
Mildred Wiley, married Andrew Broad- 
dus Johnson ; Philip Howard, deceased. 



FRISSELL, Solon Emmons 

As a faithful member of the police force 
of the city, in active service for twenty 
years, Solon Emmons Frissell contributed 
worthily to the welfare of the city of 
Springfield, being at the time of his death 
one of the longest in the service of the 
members of the department. 

Mr. Frissell was a descendant of early 
New England stock, the name, variously 
spelled, appearing upon the records of 
that region about the middle of the seven- 
teenth century. The immigrants of this 
name wer,e all, or nearly all, of Scotch ex- 
traction. James Frissell was of Roxbury, 
Massachusetts, where a daughter Mary 
was born, May 16, 1656. John Frissell, 
a native of Scotland, died in Braintree, 
Massachusetts, January 19, 1664. Wil- 
liam Frissell, also a Scotchman, of Con- 
cord, married Hannah Clarke, November 
28, 1667. Various others of the name are 
mentioned later in the century. The 
branch of the family to which Solon E, 
Frissell belongs traces its ancestry to 
Joseph Frissell, the line being traced as 
follows : 

(I) John and Joseph Frissell were 



among the thirty-five original proprietors 
of the town of Woodstock, Connecticut, 
by virtue of the grant made by the town 
of Roxbury, Massachusetts, as is evi- 
denced by an ancient deed still on file in 
the office of the town clerk. Joseph Fris- 
sell married Abigail Bartholomew, Janu- 
ary II, 1691, this being one of the earliest 
marriages recorded in the town of Wood- 
stock. 

(II) John Frissell, son of Joseph and 
Abigail (Bartholomew) Frissell, married 
Abigail Morris, November 10, 1726, and 
among their children was William, of 
whom further. 

(III) Lieutenant William Frissell, son 
of John and Abigail (Morris) Frissell, 
was baptized in Woodstock, Connecticut, 
July 9, 1737, and died in Peru, Massachu- 
setts, December 25, 1824, aged eighty-six 
years. William Frissell's name is on the 
Lexington alarm list from the town of 
Woodstock, term of service fifteen days. 
He was ensign in the Seventh Company, 
Third Regiment, (Captain Israel Put- 
nam's), commissioned May i, 1775, dis- 
charged December 16, 1775. He re- 
entered the service in 1776. Two state 
batallions, under Colonels Mott and 
Swift, raised in June and July, 1776, to 
reinforce the Continental troops in the 
Northern Department, at Fort Ticonder- 
oga and vicinity, served under General 
Gates, and returned in November of the 
same year. The commission of first lieu- 
tenant given "William Fizle" under the 
hand of Jonathan Trumbull, Esq.. cap- 
tain general and commander-in-chief of 
the English Colony of Connecticut in 
New England, at Hartford, June 20, 1776, 
with the public seal of the colony at- 
tached, is now the property of Francis W. 
Rockwell, of Pittsfield, IMassachusetts. 
William Frissell moved from Woodstock 
to Partridgefield (now Peru), Massachu- 



245 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



setts, about 1784, and represented the 
town in the Legislature in 1800 and for 
the two following years. He married 
Judith Mason, of Woodstock, Connecti- 
cut, who died in Peru, Massachusetts, 
August 15, 1831, aged ninety years. Their 
children were : Monica Amasa ; William ; 
Thomas, of whom further ; Sarah ; Lem- 
uel; Walter; and John. 

(IV) Captain Thomas Frissell, son of 
Lieutenant William and Judith (Mason) 
Frissell, was born in Woodstock, Connec- 
ticut, December 20, 1773, and died in 
Peru, Massachusetts, November 21, 1835. 
He removed with his family to Peru, 
where he was a successful farmer and 
prominent in the public aflfairs of the 
town, serving as selectman, as captain of 
the militia, and holding other town offices. 
In 1817-19, he represented his district in 
the General Legislature, and was a gener- 
ally esteemed and trusted citizen. He 
was a Free ]\Iason, and he joined the 
church at the same time that his youngest 
daughter became a member. He married, 
April 19, 1805, Hannah Phillips, born in 
Peru, Massachusetts, July, 1784, died 
there April 3, 1849, daughter of Smith 
Phillips. Children of this marriage were : 
Augustus Caesar, of whom further ; Sem- 
iramis ; Cleopatra ; Statira ; and Monica 
Aspasia. 

(V) Captain Augustus Caesar Frissell, 
eldest child of Captain Thomas and Han- 
nah (Phillips) Frissell, was born in Peru, 
Massachusetts, April 9, 1806, and died 
there November 14, 1851. He received 
his education in the public schools of his 
native district, and grew up on his father's 
farm, which he afterward owned. An able 
man, a good manager and successful in 
business, he was prominent in the affairs 
of the town, and was frequently chosen 
by his fellow townsmen to fill local of- 
fices. He served as a member of the 



Board of Selectmen, and as captain of the 
militia in 1849-50, and was also a mem- 
ber of the General Legislature. He was 
an active member of the Peru Congrega- 
tional Church. He married, September 
20, 1833, Laura Mack Emmons, born in 
Hinsdale, July 3, 1810, died September 18, 
1898, daughter of Major Ichabod and 
Mindwell Emmons, and they were the 
parents of six children: i. Eliza, born 
September 20, 1835 ; married Henry A. 
Messinger, who died January 21, 1888; 
Mr. and Mrs. Messinger had three chil- 
dren: Henry Burdett, Jennie Eliza, and 
Robert W. 2. Dora (name afterward 
changed to Emily), born May 7, 1837; 
married William Joy, and had one son, 
William Ashman, who died in childhood. 
3. Seraph, born in Peru, August 20, 1840, 
now deceased ; graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, department of medi- 
cine and surgery, Alarch 24, 1875, and 
has continued to practice medicine 
throughout her life ; she was the first 
president of the Women's Christian Tem- 
perance Union in Pittsfield, and was the 
fourth woman to be admitted to the Mas- 
sachusetts Ikledical Society. 4. Susan^ 
born February 19, 1845 ! married Charles 
E. White, and had three children : Made- 
line, Charles Euclid, and Frank Russell. 
5. Solon Emmons, of whom further. 6. 
Thomas A., born October 18, 185 1 ; mar- 
ried Susan Hutchinson Bingham, and be- 
came the father of three children : Clinton 
H., Thomas Augustus, and Nelson Em- 
mons. 

Captain Frissell made no will, the 
youngest child, Thomas A., being only 
four weeks old at the time of his death, 
in compliance with her husband's wishes, 
Mrs. Frissell kept the home for the chil- 
dren. Nineteen years later, it was trans- 
ferred to the eldest son, Solon E., who 
was to care for his mother, the four 



246 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



daughters each receiving a small compen- 
sation. Thomas A., the youngest son, was 
not then of age, but he agreed to the ar- 
rangement, and when he was twenty-one 
years of age signed the quit-claim deed. 

(VI) Solon Emmons Frissell, son of 
Captain Augustus C. and Laura Mack 
(Emmons) Frissell, was born in Peru, 
Massachusetts, May 25, 1847, and died in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, August 30, 
1907. When he was four years of age his 
father died, the oldest child in the family 
being then fifteen years of age. As Solon 
E. was the eldest son, the farm was let 
out "on shares" until he was twelve years 
of age, at which time, under the direction 
of his mother, he took over the manage- 
ment. For several years he continued to 
conduct the business of the farm, but was 
then taken with an attack of rheumatic 
fever and was obliged to cease his labors. 
He went to Baltimore, Maryland, for his 
health, remaining there for a year. He 
was then twenty-five years of age, and 
upon his return to the North went to his 
native town, remaining for a short time, 
and then came to Springfield, where he 
resided during the remainder of his life. 
After his removal to Springfield, Mr. Fris- 
sell found employment in the old Wool- 
son's grocery, which stood at the corner 
of Bridge and Water streets, and there he 
remained for about two years. He then 
became a commission salesman for the 
George E. Mansfield bakery, w'hich posi- 
tion he held for nine years. In the w^inter 
of 1886, however, misfortune came again 
in the form of another attack of rheuma- 
tism, and for a year and a half he was 
unable to continue his employment ex- 
cept for short periods. In June, 1887, he 
was appointed a member of the police 
force of the city of Springfield, and given 
badge No. 34. Later he was for many 
years No. 11, and for six years he patrol- 



led the beat bounded by Dwight, State 
and Federal streets. He continued in this 
position to the time of his death, at which 
time he had been in continuous service 
for twenty years, and was one of the old- 
est in point of service in the department. 

Mr. Frissell was a member of Hamp- 
den Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows ; of Equity Council, Royal Ar- 
canum, of Springfield; of the Springfield 
Relief Association ; and of the Police Re- 
lief Organization of Massachusetts. Soon 
after coming to Springfield, he became a 
member of Hope Congregational Church. 
He was also a charter member of the Ar- 
mory Hill Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, which was later consolidated, 
with all branches, into the Springfield 
Young Men's Christian Association. 

On May 25, 1875, Solon E. Frissell 
married Fannie E. Boutwell, who was 
born in Montague, Massachusetts, but 
resided in Northampton, daughter of Wil- 
liam H. and Mary (Graves) Boutwell. 
Mr. and Airs. Frissell's home at No. 125 
Catherine street was built soon after their 
marriage, and is still (1923) the residence 
of Mrs. Frissell. The children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frissell are: i. Fred B., born Sep- 
tember 2, 1876; an optician in Pittsfield, 
Massachusetts ; married Minnie Jervis, 
and has a daughter, Clarice. 2. Marion 
E., born September 20, 1878, died Novem- 
ber 3, 1878. 3. Florence B., born Septem- 
ber 15, 1887, residing at home. 



CLARK, George H. 

Among those citizens of Springfield 
whose work survives them and whose in- 
fluence is still contributing to the welfare 
of the city is George H. Clark, who for 
twenty-three years served as probation 
officer of the city of Springfield, not only 
systematizing the work of that office for 
the first time and thus rendering its rec- 



247 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ords available as the basis of future con- 
structive work, but exerting an influence 
over his charges which won for him the 
reputation of being the best probation 
officer the city of Springfield ever had. 

George H. Clark, son of Moses Clark, 
was born in Monson, Massachusetts, June 
21, 1827, and died in Springfield, May 11, 
1921. He received his education in the 
public schools of his native city and in the 
Academy of Monson. When he was fif- 
teen years of age, he removed with his 
parents to Jenksville, now Ludlow, Mas- 
sachusetts, where he resided for four years, 
and then went to Thorndyke, Massachu- 
setts, where he entered the employ of the 
Thorndyke Manufacturing Company as a 
section man. For twenty-two years he 
maintained his association with this com- 
pany, receiving one promotion after an- 
other until he was made superintendent of 
the plant, and at the end of that period 
resigned and came to Springfield. Here, 
in 1872, he formed a partnership with 
Merriam Frost, and purchasing the web- 
bing business of Martin Wesson, contin- 
ued the business under the firm name of 
G. H. Clark & Company. Some three 
years later Mr. Clark sold his interests 
in this concern and associated himself 
with Tucker & Cook, the cotton yarn 
manufacturers of Conway, Massachusetts, 
taking charge of their branch factory and 
general office on Lyman street, Spring- 
field. For thirteen years he maintained 
his connection with this firm, holding the 
position of superintendent, and discharg- 
ing the duties of his position with effici- 
ency and faithfulness. At the end of that 
time he severed his connection with the 
firm in order to engage in the real estate 
business, for which purpose he became 
associated with ex-Alderman Charles M. 
Mather. 

In July, 1891, the city of Springfield 



was in need of a good probation officer. 
Judge H. W. Bosworth was determined 
that this important office should be filled 
by a man who would make himself a vital 
force in the lives of those youthful citi- 
zens of Springfield whose parents were 
either unable or unwilling to see that the 
laws of the City, State, and Nation were 
obeyed, as well as in the lives of older 
oflfenders who might be reclaimed and 
helped to become upright, useful citizens. 
He looked about and decided that Mr. 
Clark was the man for the position, but 
the finding of the right man was a less 
difficult task than was the work of per- 
suading that man to accept the position. 
Mr. Clark protested that he did not want 
the position, as he knew very little about 
the work, but Judge Bosworth persisted, 
enlisting the services of others of the city 
who also insistently urged and argued 
that he might at least try the work for a 
year. Finally, Mr. Clark consented to 
accept the appointment and try the work 
for one year. The first few weeks were 
so discouraging that he seriously con- 
sidered resigning before the year was 
fairly begun. There was not a record and 
no system of any kind. There seemed to 
be no way of getting the department in 
shape but to lay foundations and build 
from the beginning. This he did, system- 
atizing the work, keeping records, and 
finally reducing the routine work to an 
efficient plan which enabled him to give 
his energy to the vital factors in the work, 
the delinquent citizens who might be re- 
claimed and helped to become useful, law- 
abiding members of their community. In 
this phase of the work he succeeded so 
admirably that for twenty-three years he 
continued to safeguard the interests of 
Springfield by building, directing, and in- 
spiring those of its residents who would, 
without his valuable service, have become 



248 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



an economic burden to the community, 
a menace to the moral life of the city, and 
individual failures, living out lives of un- 
happiness and crime. Instead, hundreds 
of first offenders received another chance 
and the inspiration and help that was 
needed to make of them strong, worthy 
citizens. The foundations which Mr. 
Clark laid during his nearly a quarter of 
a century of service are still a part of the 
work of the office of the probation de- 
partment of the city of Springfield, and 
the methods and ideals which made his 
term of service a landmark in the history 
of the office are still influencing the lives 
of those who come under its care. 

In addition to his responsibilities as 
the best probation officer Springfield ever 
had, Mr. Clark took an active interest in 
the public affairs of Springfield. He was 
a staunch supporter of the principles and 
candidates of the Republican party, and in 
1890 and 1891 represented Ward Five in 
the Common Council. He was also an 
officer in the old Ward Five Republican 
Club. Fraternally, he was affiliated with 
Thomas Lodge, Free and Accepted ^la- 
sons, of Palmer, Massachusetts, which he 
joined in 1863, later transferring his mem- 
bership to Roswell Lee Lodge, Spring- 
field. He took an active part in the work 
of the order, being a member of Spring- 
field Council, Royal and Select Masters, 
and of Springfield Commandery, Knights 
Templar. His religious affiliation was 
with the Congregational church. 

In 1890 Mr. Clark married Patience 
Upton (Hadlock) Chase, daughter of Ith- 
amar and Lucinda (Upton) Hadlock, who 
on the maternal side is a granddaughter 
of Otis Upton, and great-granddaughter 
of Elisha Upton. George D. Upton, who 
for many years owned and operated the 
cigar store in the rotunda of the old 
Haynes Hotel, and who for many years 



was prominent in the political and civic 
life of the city, serving as representative 
of Ward Three in the Common Council 
for six years, on the Board of Supervisors, 
on the Board of Overseers of the Poor, 
and on many other committees, as well 
as on the Board of Building Commission- 
ers which had charge of the erection of 
the municipal buildings, was a maternal 
uncle of Mrs. Clark. 



WILLIAMS, John Henry 

A resident of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, for some forty years, John Henry 
Williams has contributed much to the 
growth and development of the city of 
his adoption, both as proprietor of a pros- 
perous painting and decorating business, 
and after his retirement as a successful 
real estate operator, owning, developing, 
and controlling much valuable property. 

Mr. Williams is of English birth, hav- 
ing been born in England of English par- 
ents, his father being Thomas W. Willi- 
ams, who was born in Liverpool, Eng- 
land, and died there at the age of forty- 
three years. He was a wine merchant. 
He married (first) Sarah Chandler; (sec- 
ond) Mary Chandler. To the first mar- 
riage four children were born: i. John 
Henry, of further mention. 2. Thomas. 3. 
Richard, a decorator, resides in Spring- 
field ; married Nellie Wood, one child, 
Clara, a graduate nurse. 4. Sarah. The 
children of the second marriage were : 5. 
]\Iary Louise. 6. Emily. 7. Ada. 8. Min- 
nie. 9. Florence. 

John Henry Williams, son of Thomas 
W. and Sarah (Chandler) Williams, was 
born in Liverpool, England, July 8, 1861. 
He received his education in the schools 
of his native city. Upon leaving school, 
he learned the art of decorating, serving 
an apprenticeship of seven years with the 
Alexander White Company, of Liverpool. 



249 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Upon the completion of his apprentice- 
ship, he became associated with his father, 
under the firm name of Thomas W. Wil- 
liams & Son, engaged in art decorating 
and paper hanging. Three years after his 
admittance to partnership, the connection 
was severed by the death of his father, 
and for four years Mr. Williams contin- 
ued the business alone, providing for his 
widowed mother and her children. At 
the end of that time, he decided that 
larger opportunity was to be found in the 
land to the westward, and in 1885 came to 
America, arriving at Portland, Maine, in 
April of that year, after a stormy passage 
of nineteen days. After a brief stay in 
Portland, he came to Chicopee, Massa- 
chusetts, where he engaged in decorating 
and paper hanging for a year. He then 
went to England for a visit to his family, 
and after a short stay returned to this 
country on the "Adriatic," locating this 
time in Springfield, Massachusetts, where 
he has continued to reside to the present 
time (1923). Seeing that opportunities 
for his work were better in this city, he 
formed a partnership with a Mr. Watson, 
under the firm name of Williams & Wat- 
son, and engaged again in the painting 
and decorating business. The venture 
was successful, and after a time Mr. Wil- 
liams bought out his partner's interests, 
continuing the business alone until his re- 
tirement in 1908, since which year he has 
devoted his time to the management of 
his real estate interests. For many years 
he did all the decorating for the residents 
of Springfield, being without competition 
in his line, and he invested his earnings 
in real estate, becoming the owner of val- 
uable properties, including business as 
well as valuable residential sites, both de- 
veloped and undeveloped. About the year 
191 1 he located on Round Hill, where he 
owns properties to which he devotes the 



larger part of his time. Upon the out- 
break of the World War, he enlisted in 
the Merchant Marine, and during his ser- 
vice on the "Caledonian," a British flag- 
ship, on which he was a petty officer from 
June to September, 1918, he assisted in 
convoying forty-seven ships and 1700 
head of horses across the Atlantic, but 
unfortunately three ships were torpedoed 
by submarine. 

On September 11, 1881, John Henry 
Williams married Juvenea Burnett, who 
was born in Liverpool, England, daughter 
of George Wellstood and Juvenea (Leaf) 
Burnett. Mrs. Williams is deeply inter- 
ested in art, and has gathered from all 
parts of Europe a collection that is price- 
less. She is an expert in art embroidery, 
and has given instruction in that beautiful 
art to as many as three hundred pupils. 
Mr. and Mrs. Williams have an adopted 
son, Vivian E. Steers, who was born in 
the British West Indies, and served with 
the English forces during the World War. 
He was in prison camp for three years. 
He is an electrical engineer. 



AXTELL, Charles Sumner 

Among the successful business men of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, is Charles 
Sumner Axtell, founder and manager of 
the engraving, lithographing, and emboss- 
ing concern which operates under the 
name of C. S. Axtell Company. The con- 
cern does all kinds of copper and steel 
plate work, embossing and lithographing, 
and includes among its patrons many of 
the best known stationery manufacturing 
concerns in the East. The Axtell family 
is one of the oldest in this country, and 
the branch to which Charles Sumner Ax- 
tell belongs traces its ancestry to Thomas 
Axtell, from whom the line of descent 
is traced as follows : 

(I) Thomas Axtell was born in Berk- 



250 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



hamstead, England, and was baptized 
June 26, 1619. He sailed from England 
on the ship "Globe" in 1635, accompanied 
by his family, and later, probably about 
1640, settled in Sudbury, Massachusetts, 
where his death occurred in 1646. He 
married and reared a family of children, 
among whom was Henry, of further men- 
tion. 

(II) Henry Axtell, son of Thomas Ax- 
tell, was born in 1641, and was killed by 
the Indians, April 21, 1676. He married 
and among his children was Thomas, of 
further mention. 

(HI) Thomas (2) Axtell, son of Henry 
Axtell, was born in 1672. He married and 
among his children was Joseph, of further 
mention. 

(IV) Joseph Axtell, son of Thomas (2) 
Axtell, was born in 1705. He married and 
was the father of Daniel, of further men- 
tion. 

(V) Daniel Axtell, son of Joseph Ax- 
tell, was born January 4, 1734, and re- 
sided in Grafton, Massachusetts. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Whittemore, who died in 
Grafton, Vermont, in 1799, and they were 
the parents of four sons: Moses, born in 
1755; Aaron, born in 1757; Daniel (2), of 
further mention; Joseph, born in 1763; 
and Alexander, born in 1767. 

(VI) Daniel (2) Axtell, son of Daniel 
(i) and Elizabeth (Whittemore) Axtell, 
was born May i, 1759, and died in 1837. 
He was a soldier in the Revolutionary 
War. He was twice married, and one of 
the children of the first marriage was Wil- 
liam, of further mention. 

(VII) William Axtell, son of Daniel 
(2) Axtell, was born November 29, 1791, 
and died in Huntington, Massachusetts, 
March 28, 1880. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native 
district, and in addition to his activities 
as a farmer learned the trade of stone 



mason. He married Violet Sheldon, born 
January 31, 1794, died December 23, 1858, 
and they were the parents of five children : 
William Derwin, born July 22, 1820; 
Doras L., born April 2"], 1822, died Oc- 
tober 5, 1894; Louise Forbes, born Feb- 
ruary 17, 1824, married Francis Hinckley; 
Francis Harliegh, born May 8, 1825, was 
killed in war, July i, 1864; and Elbridge, 
of further mention, 

(VIII) Elbridge Axtell, son of William 
and Violet (Sheldon) Axtell, was born in 
Chesterfield, Massachusetts, November 
19, 1834, and died in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, May 31, 191 5. He received a 
good practical education in the public 
schools of his native district, and when 
his school training was completed learned 
the printer's trade. That line of business 
he continued to follow throughout the 
period of his active life, finding employ- 
ment in various places and with several 
different concerns in Pittsfield, Westfield, 
and Springfield. In Westfield he was 
foreman in the job printing department 
of the "Times" office, and for many years 
he was employed in Springfield. He was 
a member of the Improved Order of Red 
Men, and was highly esteemed among a 
very large group of friends and associates. 
He married. May 6, 1856, Martha Crowell, 
of West Yarmouth, Massachusetts, daugh- 
ter of Alexander and Ruth (Crowell) 
Crowell, who was born November 26, 
1838, and died October 18, 1905. Mr. and 
Mrs. Elbridge Axtell were the parents 
of two children: i. Charles Sumner, of 
further mention. 2. ^Minnie Allen, mar- 
ried, August 27, 1890, Thomas Harrison 
Lloyd, of Springfield, Massachusetts ; 
they are the parents of a son, Axtell Al- 
fred Lloyd, born August i, 1891, married, 
June 30, 1915, Emma Davenport Thomas, 
and they are the parents of a son, Thomas 
Axtell Lloyd, born June 24, 1921. 



251 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(IX) Charles Sumner Axtell, son of 
Elbridge and Martha (Crowell) Axtell, 
was born in Hyannis, Massachusetts, Jan- 
uary 29, 1859. He received his education 
in the schools of Westfield, Massachu- 
setts. When school days were over he 
associated himself with the job-printing 
department of the "Times" office in West- 
field, in order that he might learn the 
printer's trade. After serving his appren- 
ticeship there, he found employment in 
various printing establishments in Provi- 
dence and in Pawtucket, Rhode Island ; 
in Chicago, Illinois ; and in Holyoke, Mas- 
sachusetts. In the latter place he was for 
a period of twelve years a trusted and 
highly esteemed employee in the oflice of 
the "Transcript." At the end of that time 
he engaged in the printing business for 
himself in Holyoke, and for two years he 
continued to efficiently conduct that busi- 
ness. He then removed to Gardner, Mas- 
sachusetts, where for a short time he was 
at the head of the Art Printing Company's 
plant. In 1893 he again made a change 
and removed to Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, where, in association with John A. 
Loring, they organized the Loring Axtell 
Company. The enterprise met with 
marked success until the death of Mr. 
Loring; then the business was incorpo- 
rated as the Loring and Axtell Company, 
and this continued until, owing to ill 
health, Mr. Axtell was obliged to relin- 
quish all business cares for a time, and he 
withdrew from the corporation. Three 
years later, in 1910, he engaged in busi- 
ness under his own name and continued 
for two years, at the end of which time 
he took in Carle Philip Reilley as a part- 
ner, and the firm name became C. S. Ax- 
tell & Company. Under that style the 
business continued to January i, 1923, 
when it was incorporated as the C. S. Ax- 
tell Company. During the thirteen years 

2: 



which have passed since 1910, the concern 
has steadily grown, both in the amount 
of business done and in the scope of its 
activities. Several departments have 
been added and the different kinds of 
work done by the firm enables it to in- 
clude among its patrons such concerns as 
the Hampden Paper Company, the Amer- 
ican Writing Paper Company, of Holy- 
oke, Massachusetts, Case, Lockwood & 
Brainard, of Hartford, Connecticut, and 
other large and important concerns. 
Through adherence to the policy of main- 
taining a high standard of quality as well 
as efficient and courteous service, Mr. Ax- 
tell has built up a business which stands 
among the first of its kind and has made 
for himself an enviable reputation in his 
chosen field. For a period of five years he 
traveled for the Smith and Wesson Com- 
pany of Springfield, visiting Europe three 
times and traveling throughout the South 
and West of this country, and also visited 
Brazil and other countries of South Amer- 
ica. He owns a beautiful summer home 
at Madison, Connecticut, where he spends 
his summers. It is situated on the Sound, 
and affords every facility for the enjoy- 
ment of a peaceful and well-earned leis- 
ure. He is a member of Springfield Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons ; Morning Star 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Spring- 
field Council, Royal and Select Masters ; 
Springfield Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar; and Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He 
is also a member of the Masonic Club, 
the Automobile Club, the Revolver Club, 
the Fish and Game Club, and the Unity 
Men'^s Club. His religious connection is 
with the Church of the Unity, of Spring- 
field. 

On November 24, 1881, Charles Sum- 
ner Axtell married Clara Louise Sprague, 
daughter of Henrv Oscar and Catherine 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



M. (Brigham) Sprague (see Sprague 
III). Though Air. and Mrs. Axtell have 
never had children of their own, they 
have reared the three children of Mrs. 
Axtell's brother, Alvin Leroy Sprague, 
who died at the early age of thirty-seven 
years. They are : Harry L. Sprague, 
Charles Eugene Sprague, and Florence 
May Sprague. 

(The Sprague Line). 

(I) Zebulon Sprague, a descendant of 
Edward Sprague, died in Douglass, Mas- 
sachusetts, July II, 1862, at the age of 
ninety years. He lived in Danby, Ver- 
mont, during a part of his life, and reared 
a family of eight children : Rachel, born 
in 1801 ; Salisbury, born in 1802; Daniel, 
born in 1803 ; Hosea, of further mention ; 
Catherine, born in 1806; Ebenezer, born 
in 1808; Lydia, born in 1810; and Zeb- 
ulon, Jr., born in 1814. 

(II) Hosea Sprague, son of Zebulon 
Sprague, was born in Danby, Vermont, 
April 17, 1805, and died in Whitingsville, 
Massachusetts, in 1881. He was a farmer 
by occupation, but at times he worked in 
the mills, thus profitably employing his 
time during the slack seasons on the farm. 
In religious faith he was a Friend, or 
Quaker. He married (first) March 12, 
1826, Mary Foster, who died October 14, 
1829. He married (second) in 1832, Hep- 
zibah Foster, sister of Mary Foster. She 
died March 17, 1859. He married (third) 
January 21, i860, Susan Speakman. To 
the first marriage one child was born, 
Henry Oscar, of further mention. Chil- 
dren of the second marriage were : Mary 
Foster, born in 1833 ; Judith, born in 1835, 
died 1837; Samuel, born in 1836, and was 
killed in the battle of the Wilderness 
(Civil War) May 8, 1864; Frances Leroy, 
born in 1839; Abner, born in 1848; and 
Alvin Leroy, born in 1849, <^^^^ in 1854. 



(Ill) Henry Oscar Sprague, son of 
Hosea and Mary (Foster) Sprague, was 
born in Douglass, Massachusetts, Novem- 
ber 13, 1828, and died in Westfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, January 9, 1896. He received 
his education in the local schools, and 
after the completion of his studies went 
to Westfield, Massachusetts, where he 
entered the employ of a company engaged 
in the manufacture of whips. For twenty 
years he continued on the road, driving a 
team and selling whips throughout the 
States of Massachusetts and Connecticut. 
He was not only an efficient salesman, but 
he was thrifty, and from the earnings of 
his years of traveling and selling whips 
he saved enough to enable him to engage 
in business for himself. He formed a 
partnership with his son, Alvin Leroy 
Sprague, under the firm name of H. O. 
Sprague & Son, bought out an established 
plumbing business, and began his inde- 
pendent business career, he having charge 
of the salesrooms. The business was most 
successfully conducted by father and son, 
both of whom proved themselves to be 
experts in their line and possessed of un- 
usual business ability. Mr. Sprague was 
not only a successful business man, but 
he was a prominent and highly respected 
citizen of Westfield. Genial, friendly, 
alert, and capable, he was always a wel- 
come guest in any social circle, and many 
a citizen of Westfield found in H. O. 
Sprague a friend in the time of need. He 
was a prominent member of the Masonic 
order in W^estfield, and was a charter 
member of the Congregational church of 
that town. He married Catherine M. 
Brigham, born April i, 1829, died Janu- 
ary 10, 1910, daughter of Willard and 
Betsy Oberman (Willard) Brigham, and 
they were the parents of four children : 
Alvin Leroy, fully mentioned in the 
sketch of Harry L. Sprague (q. v.) ; Clara 



253 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Louise, married Charles Sumner Axtell 
(see Axtell IX) ; Kate, married James 
Case ; and Effie, who married Henry Sher- 
wood. 



McKENZIE, William Daniel 

Among the citizens of Springfield who 
have taken an active part in the develop- 
ment and growth of the city is William 
Daniel McKenzie, contractor and builder, 
who has erected many important struc- 
tures in the city of his adoption, of which 
he has been a resident since 1882. 

McKenzie is one of the old and hon- 
ored names in Scotland, and representa- 
tives of the family have played an impor- 
tant part in Scotch history. Three gener- 
ations ago one of the members of the 
branch of the family to which William 
Daniel McKenzie belongs resolved to 
leave the rugged land of his birth and go 
to the vast British Dominion in the north- 
ern part of the Western Hemisphere. He 
settled in New Brunswick, Canada, and 
engaged in tilling the virgin soil in the 
New World, where he remained to the 
time of his death, enjoying the freedom 
and the unlimited opportunities of the 
new land to which he had come, and 
winning from the rich soil prosperity and 
happiness for himself and his family. Al- 
though a hard worker during his entire 
life, he lived to the advanced age of nine- 
ty-nine years. He reared a family of 
children, among whom was John McKen- 
zie, father of William D. McKenzie. 

John McKenzie was born in Sault 
Springs, Kings county, New Brunswick, 
May 4, 1821, and died April 23, 1920, aged 
ninety-nine years. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of his dis- 
trict, and then, as was the custom of the 
day, learned a trade, choosing that of 
mason. For some years he followed his 
trade as a journeyman, but finally en- 



gaged in contracting, and throughout the 
remaining years of his active life was en- 
gaged in business as a contractor and 
builder, spending the entire period of his 
life in the region in which he was born. 
He was an active, intelligent man, deeply 
interested in public affairs, although hold- 
ing no public offices, and was highly es- 
teemed among his associates as an up- 
right, God-fearing man, whose integrity 
was beyond question and whose word was 
as good as his bond. Politically he was a 
Conservative, and his religious affiliation 
was with the Presbyterian church. He 
married Margaret McCloud, of Campbell- 
ton, New Brunswick. She was born in 
1834, and died in 1884, at the age of fifty 
years. Mr. and Mrs. McKenzie were the 
parents of twelve children: i. An infant. 
2. Lydia, married Alexander Odell. 3. 
James. 4. William D., of further men- 
tion. 5. Emma, married James Feeney. 
6. Victor, died young. 7. Frederick. 8. 
Angeline, died young. 9. Margaret, mar- 
ried Smith. 10. Mary. 11. Jennie, 

deceased. 12. Georgia, who is a trained 
nurse and served for four years in the 
World War; she volunteered in 1914 and 
was chosen as one of ten to go to Europe, 
and was in service until 1916 when she 
joined the Canadian army and continued 
in service until after the close of the war; 
she held the rank of first lieutenant in the 
medical corps ; she served in the transport 
service between England and France, and 
was also at Salonica ; during the last six 
months of her term of service, she was 
engaged in caring for soldiers being re- 
turned to Canada and was on transports 
sailing between Liverpool, England, and 
Halifax, Nova Scotia ; she was one of the 
most popular of the nurses in the service, 
and has, as a testimonial, two albums 
containing not only autographs but large 
numbers of pen drawings executed in the 



254 





^_/Yr/t5^ 



(^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



most artistic manner and given to her by 
her patients to express in some slight de- 
gree their appreciation of her unremitting 
care in trying to ameliorate their suffer- 
ings ; she received her discharge in Oc- 
tober, 1919. 

William Daniel McKenzie, son of John 
and Maragaret (McCloud) McKenzie, 
was born in Kings county, New Bruns- 
wick, April 23, 1858. He received his 
education in the schools of his native 
town, and then learned the trade of brick 
mason. He was an enterprising young 
man, and believing that larger oppor- 
tunity was to be found in the United 
States, came, in the fall of 1879, to Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, where he followed his 
trade until 1881. In that year he re- 
moved to Chicopee Falls, where for a 
period of one year he continued at his 
trade. He then removed to Springfield, 
and there he has continued to reside to the 
present time (1922). For a time he en- 
gaged in brick-laying and other mason 
work in the employ of others, but in 1891 
he formed a partnership with D. W. Mel- 
lon, and engaged in business under the 
firm name of Mellon & McKenzie (see in 
another volume of this work) until 1894. 
Then this partnership was dissolved and 
Mr. McKenzie became a partner of Mr. 
Peterson, under the firm name of McKen- 
zie & Peterson, this firm doing business 
in Springfield, Massachusetts, and in 
Hartford, Connecticut, until 1896, when 
the partnership was dissolved. Since that 
time Mr. McKenzie has conducted busi- 
ness alone. A man of sound judgment 
and strict integrity, he has been success- 
ful, and in the course of his operations has 
taken an important part in the upbuilding 
of the city. He has constructed many 
large buildings, including the great Knox 
automobile plant, the Highland Baptist 
Church, the Wesleyan Methodist Church, 



St. James' Methodist Church, and 
the Nayasset Club building. He also 
erected a part of the great Fisk plant at 
Chicopee Falls, and many other buildings, 
including the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows building on Pynchon street, all 
of which bear testimony to his skill and to 
the soundness of his principles and meth- 
ods. In addition to the erection of build- 
ings for public and private use, Mr. Mc- 
Kenzie has filled large contracts for the 
laying of sewer systems. He has been a 
large employer of labor, and has taken an 
active interest in the growth and pros- 
perity of the city of his adoption. Mr. 
McKenzie is a member of Springfield 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; of 
Morning Star Chapter, Royal Arch Ma- 
sons ; and of the Masonic Club. He is 
also a member of Hampden Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. His re- 
ligious affiliation is with Hope Church. 

On June 2J, 1881, William Daniel Mc- 
Kenzie married Minnie Morehouse, of 
Saratoga, New York, daughter of Talcott 
and Amanda (Burbee) Morehouse. Mrs. 
McKenzie is a descendant of Thomas 
Morehouse through (II) Thomas, who 
married a daughter of Ralph Kuler, (III) 

Gideon Morehouse, married Mary , 

(IV) John Morehouse, married Mary Jes- 
sops, (V) Joseph, married ]\rolly Bradley, 
(VI) Talcott Morehouse, married Amanda 
Burbee, (VII) Minnie Morehouse, mar- 
ried William D. McKenzie. William D. 
and Minnie (Morehouse) McKenzie are 
the parents of two children: i. Herbert 
William, born in Springfield, October 21, 
1891 ; received his early education in the 
public schools of his native city, and then 
entered Norwich University, from which 
institution he went to Sheffield Scientific 
School, Yale University. During the 
World War he served at the Boston Navy 
Yard as chief store keeper in the pay- 



255 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



master's office. He is now engaged in the 
real estate and insurance business. He 
married, September 8, 1919, Elva Hollis- 
ter. 2. Grace Lucille, born September 19, 
1899; received her early education in the 
public schools, and after her graduation 
from Springfield High School completed 
a course of study and graduated from the 
famous Sergeant School of Boston. 



CARLTON, William Roberts 

William Roberts Carlton, who for the 
past six years has been auditor of the 
Federal Land Bank in Springfield, and 
who is also rendering efficient service as 
lecturer on accounting in the Northeast- 
ern College, is of Scotch origin, the orig- 
inal name being Cloutman, derived from 
an occupation and originating in the 
Highlands of Scotland. The family is 
not very numerous, but was represented 
in Massachusetts in early Colonial times. 
The name seems to have been Cloudman 
when it first arrived in America, and 
many of the descendants still use that 
form. John and Thomas Cloudman, 
brothers, came to America in September, 
1690, from the Highlands of Aberdeen- 
shire, Scotland. They landed at Plymouth, 
Massachusetts, and settled at Marble- 
head, Massachusetts, where, according to 
tradition, they were noted for their 
strength and their large stature. They 
belonged to the Society of Friends, and 
were persons of the strictest integrity. 

(I) Thomas Cloudman reared a family 
of children, among whom was William, 
of further mention. 

(II) William Cloudman, son of Thomas 
Cloudman, removed from Marblehead to 
Dover, New Hampshire, and among his 
children was Edward, of further mention. 

(HI) Edward Cloudman, son of Wil- 
liam Cloudman, married Sarah (Tuttle?) 



and among their children was Edward 
(2), of further mention. 

(IV) Edward (2) Cloutman (as the 
name now became), son of Edward Cloud- 
man, was born February 15, 1715, in 
Dover, New Hampshire. He settled in 
Falmouth, Maine, when he was twenty- 
two years of age, and there married, April 
16, 1738, Anna Collins (or Colin), of Phil- 
adelphia, who was born January 16, 1716, 
daughter of Timothy and Sarah Collins, 
of Philadelphia. After his marriage he 
went to Presumpscot, Lower Falls, where 
he had charge of the first saw mill built 
there. He is said to have been a tall and 
very strong man, weighing about two 
hundred and twenty pounds, and a great 
wrestler. The story is told of him that 
one night while running a mill alone, he 
was attacked by an Indian who fired twice 
but missed fire, whereupon Edward Clout- 
man hurled a bar used in operating the 
mill and instantly killed the Indian. The 
next night his mill was burned by the In- 
dians, and Mr. Cloutman took his wife 
and children in a canoe and paddled down 
the river to Stroud water. In 1745 he 
located in Gorham, Maine, and bought a 
thirty-acre lot near Fort Hill. On April 
19, 1746, he was overpowered by a party 
of Indians and carried a captive to Can- 
ada. On October 23, 1746, he and a com- 
panion escaped from Quebec and were 
never heard from again. It is thought 
that they were drowned while trying to 
cross Lake Champlain. In the following 
summer two skeletons, still covered with 
clothing, were washed ashore by that 
lake and in one of the pockets was a com- 
pass which was identified as the property 
of Mr. Cloutman. His widow, who died 
December i, 1802, aged eighty-five years, 
married (second) Abner (or Abraham) 
Anderson, son of John and Rebecca 
(Wright) Anderson, of Windham, Maine. 



256 



EN' CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGR.\PHY 



Among the children of Edward and Anna 
(Collins) Cloutman was Timothy, of 
further mention. 

(V) Timothy Cloutman, son of Edward 
and Anna (Collins) Cloutman, was born 
at Presumpscot, Lower Falls. He was 
large, strong and courageous, like his 
father, and accustomed to going on scout- 
ing expeditions against the Indians. He 
settled on a farm in Gorham, Maine, and 
first began housekeeping in a log building 
which he erected. He sometimes worked 
in a saw mill and cultivated his farm in 
'"between times." He married, July 24, 
1766, Katie Partridge, and they were the 
parents of eleven children : Betty, Xancy, 
Edward, Nathan and Jesse ( twins), John, 
Polly. "William, Thomas, Solomon and 
David. 

(AT) John Cloutman, fourth son and 
sixth child of Timothy and Katie (Par- 
tridge) Cloutman, was born February 20, 
1776, and settled in Wakefield, Xew 
Hampshire. where he followed the car- 
penter's trade, and where he continued to 
reside during the remainder of his nearly 
eighty years of life. He married (first) 
Hannah Folsom, at Rochester, Xew 
Hampshire, the ceremony being performed 
by the Rev. Joseph Hanes. His children 
were : Mary, John F., Ann, Oilman, Al- 
fred, Hersey, and Jeremiah A., all born 
in Wakefield. Xew Hampshire. 

(VII) John F. Cloutman, second child 
of John Cloutman, was a farmer and car- 
penter, also, according to some accounts, 
a shoemaker, who died at Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, at the age of forty-eight years. He 
married Patience Tash Edgerly, who was 
born May 2^^, 1803, and died in 1894, aged 
ninety-one years. Colonel Thomas Tash, 
her grandfather, shared with General 
Washington and his men the sufferings 
of the winter at Valley Forge. John F. 
and Patience Tash (Edgerly) Cloutman 



v.-ere the parents of nine children, three of 
whom died, the surviving six being: Eras- 
tus F., of further mention ; Martha, mar- 
ried James Davis ; John F., Jr., married 
(first) March 4, 1854, Amanda M. Davis, 
(second) July 3, 1869, Ellen E. Kimball ; 
Horatio G., who lived in Farmington, 
Xew Hampshire ; James A., lived in Farm- 
ington ; Ellen F., who married Edward D. 
Seymour, and lived in Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, and in Farmington, Xew Hamp- 
shire. 

(VIII) Erastus F. Cloutman, son of 
John F. and Patience Tash (Edgerly) 
Cloutman. was born in Alton, Xew 
Hampshire, and died in 1862, while serv- 
ing in the Civil War. He was a shoemaker 
and a musician. He ser%-ed in the Mexican 
War in 1848, and during the Civil War 
was a captain of Company E, Third Xew 
Hampshire Regiment. He raised this 
company in Farmington, Xew Hampshire, 
was commissioned captain, and was killed 
while in service, at James Island, South 
Carolina, in 1862. He had his name 
changed, by act of Legislature, to Ralph 
Carlton. He married Amanda Pearl, of 
Rochester, Xew Hampshire, who died in 
Farmington, X'ew Hampshire, in 1903, 
aged seventy-one years, daughter of Jon- 
athan and Clarissa (French) Pearl, and 
they were the parents of seven children : 
Charles, died young; Ralph, deceased; 
Cora, deceased ; Charles, deceased : Wal- 
ter, who is living in Alton, Xew- Hamp- 
shire ; and Edward Ellsworth, of further 
mention. 

(IX) Edward Ellsworth Carlton, son of 
Erastus F. and Amanda (Pearl) Carlton, 
was born in Farmington, Xew Hamp- 
shire, September 22, 1861. He received his 
education in the public schools of Farm- 
ington, including Farmington High 
School. L'pon the completion of his 
school training he engaged in the clothing 



Mass — 12 — 1" 



257 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



business in Farmington, and during Presi- 
dent Cleveland's administration was post- 
master there. In 1901 he came to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, with the Natick Un- 
derwear Company, which manufactured 
its own muslins and had a branch manu- 
facturing plant in Farmington. This con- 
nection he maintained throughout the re- 
mainder of his active life, becoming a 
member of the board of directors and then 
being made superintendent of the plant 
and treasurer of the company, which posi- 
tions he held until his retirement in 1921, 
He is well known and very highly es- 
teemed in Springfield, both as a success- 
ful business man and as a worthy citizen 
and valued friend. He is a member of 
the Congregational church. 

On May 10, 1884, Edward E. Carlton 
married Gertrude E. Smith, of Farming- 
ton, New Hampshire, daughter of Lucius 
F. Smith, who died in Andersonville 
prison during the Civil War, and of Julia 
M. (Roberts) Smith, who is still living 
(1923) aged eighty-six years. Joseph Rob- 
erts, grandfather of Mrs. Carlton's mother, 
served with John Paul Jones in the Rev- 
olutionary War and was present when the 
first American flag was raised on ship- 
board. Edward E. and Gertrude E. 
(Smith) Carlton were the parents of Wil- 
liam Roberts, of further mention. 

(X) William Roberts Carlton, son of 
Edward Ellsworth and Gertrude E. 
(Smith) Carlton, was born in Farming- 
ton, New Hampshire, October 10, 1887. 
He received his early education in the 
public schools of his native town, and 
upon the removal of his parents to Spring- 
field entered the high school of that city. 
He then made a specialty of accounting, 
and for four years taught that subject in 
the Springfield Business College. At the 
end of that time he was associated with 
Mr. Hillman and the New England Audit 



Company for a time as public accountant. 
This business he then engaged in for him- 
self, continuing until 1917, when he be- 
came identified with the Federal Land 
Bank of Springfield, in the capacity of 
auditor, which position he has continued 
to efficiently fill to the present time. He 
also lectures on accounting at the North- 
eastern College, and is generally recog- 
nized as an authority in this field. Mr. 
Carlton is very highly regarded among 
a host of friends and associates, and is 
numbered among the representative citi- 
zens of the city who are contributing 
worthy lives to the community in which 
they live. 

On June 26, 1912, William R. Carlton 
married Etta Wilson Boynton, of Lynn, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Elmer Ells- 
worth and Etta (Wilson) Boynton (see 
Boynton IX), and they are the parents of 
three children : Elizabeth Boynton, born 
May 10, 1913; Julia Roberts, born No- 
vember 3, 1916; and Susan Emily, born 
June 18, 1918. 

(The Boynton Line). 

The family of Boynton is of very old 
English origin, deriving its name from 
the ancient village of Bounton, situated 
not far from the shore of the North Sea, 
in the eastern part of Yorkshire, England. 
The church there was built in the four- 
teenth century and bears an inscription 
referring to the Boynton family. The 
coat-of-arms used by the present baronet 
is as follows : 

Anns — Three crescents on a field of gold 
crossed by a crimson bar. 

Crest — A helmet, surmounted by the well-known 
heraldic antelope. 

Motto — In tempo passa. 

The branch of the family to which Mrs. 
Carlton belongs traces an unbroken line 
of twenty-one known generations in Eng- 



258 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



land, from Bartholomew de Boynton, the 
first of the name known, who was assized 
of the manor of Boynton in 1067, to John 
and William, the immigrant brothers. 

(I) John Boynton, son of William Boyn- 
ton, and younger brother of William 
Boynton, was born in the East Riding of 
Yorkshire, at Knapton, in Winteringham, 
England, in 1614. He came to New Eng- 
land with his brother William in 1638, in 
the company with Rev. Ezekiel Rogers, 
and settled at Rowley, Massachusetts, 
where in 1640 he was granted an acre and 
a half of land next that of his brother. 
He was a tailor by trade, but also tilled 
his plot of land. He married Ellen Pell, 
of Boston, and they were the parents of 
seven children : Joseph, of further men- 
tion ; John; Caleb; Mercy; Hannah; 
Sarah ; and Samuel. 

(II) Captain Joseph Boynton, son of 
John and Ellen (Pell) Boynton, was born 
in 1644, in Rowley, Massachusetts, and 
died there December 16, 1730. He was 
prominent in public affairs, serving as 
captain of militia, town clerk and deputy 
to the General Court for many years. 
He and his wife Sarah were admitted, 
with son Benoni and wife, to the Groton 
church, December 4, 1715, but he returned 
to Rowley, where he died December 16, 
1730. He married (first) May 13, 1669, 
Sarah Swan, daughter of Richard and 
Ann Swan. She was born in Rowley in 
1646, and died in Groton, Massachusetts, 
February 27, 1718. He married (second) 
March 5, 1720, Elizabeth Wood. Chil- 
dren, all of the first marriage were: Jos- 
eph, Sarah, Ann, Richard, of further men- 
tion ; John, Benoni, Jonathan, Hilkiah ; 
and Daniel. 

(III) Sergeant Richard Boynton, son 
of Captain Joseph and Sarah (Swan) 
Boynton, was born November 11, 1675, 
and died December 25, 1732. He married. 



December 24, 1701, Sarah Dresser, born 
April 4, 1678, died April 26, 1759, daugh- 
ter of John and Martha (Thorla) Dresser, 
and they were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, among whom was Nathaniel, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(IV) Nathaniel Boynton, son of Ser- 
geant Richard and Sarah (Dresser) Boyn- 
ton, was born August 18, 1712, and died 
at sea oflf Cape Ann, May 13, 1762. He 
married Mary Stewart, of Rowley, Massa- 
chusetts, born March 3, 1736, daughter 
of Ebenezer and Elizabeth Stewart, and 
they were the parents of twelve children, 
among whom was Richard (2), of fur- 
ther mention. 

(V) Richard (2) Boynton, son of 
Nathaniel and Mary (Stewart) Boynton, 
was born at Rowley, Massachusetts, May 
15, 1756, and removed to Meredith, New 
Hampshire, in 1795, where he became one 
of the leading merchants, and where he 
died August 15, 1802. He married Susan- 
nah Williams, born on Governor's Island, 
July II, 1754, died August 2, 1835, ^^id 
they were the parents of eleven children, 
among whom was Nathaniel (2), of fur- 
ther mention. 

(VI) Nathaniel (2) Boynton, son of 
Richard (2) and Susannah (Williams) 
Boynton, was born in Chelsea, Massa- 
chusetts, October 11, 1776, and died at 
Danvers, Massachusetts, February 23, 
1857. He married, December 2^, 1818, 
Hannah Humphries, and resided at Lynn, 
Massachusetts. Among their children 
was Benjamin F., of further mention. 

(VII) Benjamin F. Boynton, son of 
Nathaniel (2) and Hannah (Humphries) 
Boynton, was born January 18, 1819. He 
married, August 13, 1840, Sarah D. 
Thompson, and their children were : Ben- 
jamin P.; Ann M., died young; Hannah 
E., and Harriet E. (twins); Anna M.; 



259 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



William ; Frank E. ; and Elmer Ellsworth, 
of further mention. 

(VIII) Elmer Ellsworth Boynton, son 
of Benjamin F. and Sarah D. (Thomp- 
son) Boynton, was born at Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, March 23, 1861, and died in 1917. 
He married Etta Wilson, and they were 
the parents of: Arthur Howard ; and Etta 
Wilson, of further mention. 

(IX) Etta Wilson Boynton, daughter 
of Elmer Ellsworth and Etta (Wilson) 
Boynton, married William Roberts Carl- 
ton (see Carlton X). 



BURGESS, George Marcus 

George Marcus Burgess, incorporator, 
president, and treasurer of the P. & B. 
Engraving Company of Springfield, comes 
of an old English family. 

(I) James Burgess, grandfather of 
George M. Burgess, was born in England, 
and came to America as a young man in a 
sailing vessel. He was employed as a 
mill worker in Lowell, Massachusetts, 
for a time, and later was engaged in 
farming for several years previous to his 
retirement. He married Avis McCumber, 
and they were the parents of three chil- 
dren : Gertrude ; Edward Kirk, of fur- 
ther mention ; and George H. 

(II) Edward Kirk Burgess, son of 
James and Avis (McCumber) Burgess, 
was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, in 
1849. He received his education in the 
public schools of his native district, and 
when his school days were over began his 
active career as a wool sorter. Some 
time later he made a change and was en- 
gaged in the grocery business for a time. 
He is now a resident of Auburndale, Mas- 
sachusetts. He married Hattie A. Daven- 
port, of Broadbrook, Connecticut, daugh- 
ter of Charles W. Davenport, and they 
are the parents of six children : George 
Marcus, of further mention; Leslie A.; 



Olive A., married William A. Bland ; 
Mildred D. ; Albert A. ; and Charles ElHs. 
(Ill) George Marcus Burgess, sdn of 
Edward Kirk and Hattie A. (Davenport) 
Burgess, was born in Broadbrook, Con- 
necticut, January 17, 1877. He received 
his earliest school training in the public 
school of his native district, and then en- 
tered the Maynard High School, at May- 
nard, Massachusetts. When his school 
training was completed, he found his first 
employment in a mill in Maynard, where 
he remained for a period of five years. 
At the end of that time he went to Fitch- 
burg, ^Massachusetts, and entered the em- 
ploy of the Fitchburg Railroad Company, 
with whom he remained for two years as 
passenger brakeman. Recognizing the 
fact that economic opportunity was to be 
found in the conduct of one's own busi- 
ness rather than in the employ of others, 
he decided to learn thoroughly the arts of 
photography and of photo engraving. In 
order to accomplish his purpose he at- 
tended the Illinois College of Photogra- 
phy and Photo Engraving, where he pur- 
sued a course in both of these lines. After 
graduating he at once began the practice 
of his profession and has since devoted his 
time and energy to work in this field. He 
first took a position with the Suffolk En- 
graving Company, of Boston, where he 
remained for ten years. He then removed 
to Springfield, Alassachusetts, where for 
two and a half years he was associated 
with the Phelps Publishing Company. 
He then spent two years in Bridgeport, 
Connecticut, and then returned to Boston, 
Massachusetts, where he remained until 
1916. In that year he came to Springfield 
and incorporated the P. & B. Engraving 
Company, of which he is president and 
treasurer. Since that time he has been 
steadily building up a business, which in- 
cludes among its patrons some of the best 



260 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



firms of the city. He does all the work 
on the Springfield "Union," and by his 
reliability and the excellence of his work 
his business is constantly increasing. 

On March 7, 1908, George M. Burgess 
married Gertrude E. Squarebriggs, born 
in Prince Edward Island, but spent her 
life up to marriage in Milton, Massachu- 
setts. Mr. and Mrs. Burgess are the par- 
ents of two children : Clifford Wilson, 
born June 22, 1912; and Eleanor Alice, 
born April 14, 1917. The family attend 
the Congregational church. 



CARLSON, Gabriel 

The northern countries of Europe have 
contributed much to the life blood of this 
nation, and the energy, thrift, ability, and 
moral worth of immigrants from those 
countries have played no small part in 
maintaining here that stability which is 
the result of thrift and integrity. One of 
the most prominent Scandinavians of the 
New England region, and an inventor of 
note, was Gabriel Carlson, who was born 
in Finland, and came to this country a 
poor boy some thirty years before his 
death, which occurred in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, April 19, 1908. He located 
first in Texas, where he was employed on 
the railroad. After a time he went to 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, and for thirteen 
years was employed in the flour mills 
there. He then decided to follow the 
strong natural bent which constantly at- 
tracted him toward mechanical fields. He 
went into the machinery business and 
here found opportunity for his large 
ability to express itself. His first inven- 
tion was a whirling lawn spray, and later 
he invented a refrigerating system, and 
was one of the first to conceive the idea 
of an aeroplane. He invented his first 
machine for candy-making while in Min- 
neapolis, and in 1894 came to Springfield, 



Massachusetts, and became interested in 
the National Equipment Company, of 
which Mr. F. H. Page was president, and 
Mr. Carlson was made superintendent and 
inventor. He was one of the large stock- 
holders of the company and the chief fac- 
tor in its pronounced success. Starting 
with six employees, the business contin- 
ued to grow and expand until at the 
time of Mr. Carlson's death it required the 
services of some 200 hands. Possessed 
of large mechanical ability and the imag- 
ination and resourcefulness so essential to 
the inventor, plus the patience, persever- 
ance, thoroughness and thrift of his race, 
he added to these qualities executive 
ability of a high order, which enabled 
him not only to invent machines which 
have achieved a world-wide reputation 
and are used both in this country and 
abroad, but to superintend and manage 
the ever-increasing business of producing 
those machines. This company has con- 
tinued in a very successful manner, and 
at the present time is one of the largest of 
its kind in the country, capitalized at 
over $3,000,000. 

Mr. Carlson was a member and deacon 
of the Swedish Congregational Church, 
and was prominent in its affairs, being 
chairman of the board of trustees, and 
everywhere esteemed not only as a suc- 
cessful business man but as an earnest 
Christian gentleman. His death, which 
occurred at Springfield, April 20, 1908, as 
a result of injuries received in the plant 
of the Confectioners' Machinery Com- 
pany, of which he was superintendent, 
caused the deepest sorrow among his 
many friends and associates, and repre- 
sented a severe loss to the business to 
which he had contributed so much of 
energy and ability. 

In 1888 Mr. Carlson married Ella M. 
Samuelson, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, 



261 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



born in Finland, daughter of Samuel and 
Anna Maria Samuelson, and they became 
the parents of five children : i. Emil, died 
at the age of three years. 2. Huldah, mar- 
ried Dr. Frank Dutton, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts. 3. Lydia, married Elmer 
Johnson, of Minneapolis, and has two 
children : Drexel and Orrin. 4. Clara 
Sophia, married Edwin Strasenburgh, of 
Rochester, New York, and has two sons : 
Robert and Edwin Griffin. 5. Malvina 
Maria, died at the age of eighteen years. 



REDDEN, Eugene Edgar 

As secretary and treasurer of the Red- 
den Resilient Wheel Company of Spring- 
field, Eugene Edgar Redden is engaged 
in the manufacture and sale of an article 
of his own invention, the Redden Resili- 
ent Wheel, which during the past four 
years has been widely introduced and has 
created for itself a large demand. Mr. 
Redden was formerly president of the 
Wales Woolen Company, which execu- 
tive position he held for fifteen years. He 
is the third of his family to bear the name 
Eugene Edgar, both his father and his 
grandfather on the paternal side having 
borne it before him, 

Eugene Edgar Redden, grandfather of 
the subject of this review, was born in 
Ireland. He came to this country, where 
he resided during the remainder of his 
life. He settled in Albany, New York, 
and there his children were born. He 

married Warner, and they were 

the parents of Eugene Edgar (2), of fur- 
ther mention. 

Eugene Edgar (2) Redden, son of Eu- 
gene Edgar (i) and (Warner) 

Redden, was born in Albany, New York, 
in 1841, and died in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1916. He received a good 
education in the public schools of his na- 
tive district, and when his school training 



was completed learned the trade of cop- 
persmith. From the time of the com- 
pletion of his technical training to the 
time of his death he continued at his 
trade, finding employment in Springfield 
with P. P. Emery & Company, copper- 
smiths, about 1881, and eighteen years 
later, in 1899, going to Philadelphia, where 
he continued to reside to the time of his 
death. He was a resourceful man of an 
inventive turn of mind who contrived 
many labor-saving devices for his own 
use and who patented a worm for the use 
of distilleries. He married Mary Agnes 
Ward, who was born in Dublin, Ireland, 
and died in New York, in 1918, aged sixty- 
nine years, daughter of Patrick Ward, 
and they were the parents of nine chil- 
dren : Eugene Edgar (3), of further men- 
tion ; Augusta, who died at the age of 
twelve years ; Silvia, who married Wil- 
liam J. Ryan, of Boston, and has two 
children, William J., Jr., and Madeline; 
Lillian, married William Porter, de- 
ceased ; Madeline, deceased ; Stephen, de- 
ceased; Florence, deceased; Joseph, de- 
ceased ; and Gertrude, married George 
Connor, of New York City, and has one 
son, Eugene. 

Eugene Edgar (3) Redden, son of 
Eugene Edgar (2) and Mary Agnes 
(Ward) Redden, was born in Albany, 
New York, May 14, 1866. He received 
his education in the public schools of 
Albany and in the School of Saint Jos- 
eph's Brethren, where he remained until 
1880. In the following year, 1881, he came 
to Springfield, Massachusetts, with his 
parents, and there he learned the cigar 
maker's trade, which he continued to fol- 
low for some time. Eventually, he gave 
up the cigar-making business and found 
employment in the Hampden Woolen 
Mills at Wales, which later became 
known as the Wales Woolen Company. 



262 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



That concern he was the means of reviv- 
ing and starting on a new course. He 
was made president of the firm, and that 
executive position he continued to hold 
for a period of fifteen years, during which 
time he transformed the establishment 
into a thriving and lucrative business. 
Upon the entrance of the United States 
into the World War, Mr. Redden enlisted 
and w-as associated with the Westing- 
house Company and the Springfield Ar- 
mory in the filling of Government con- 
tracts. Meantime Mr. Redden had been 
working upon an invention of his own, 
which in 1919 he perfected and patented. 
In June, 1919, he organized the Redden 
Resilient Wheel Company, of which he 
is secretary and treasurer. The concern 
is engaged in the manufacture and sale of 
the Redden Resilient Wheel, and Mr. 
Redden devotes the whole of his time to 
the advancement of the interests of that 
enterprise. He takes an active interest 
in political affairs, but has never sought 
nor desired public office. He is always 
ready to give his support to those pro- 
jects which seem to him to be well plan- 
ned for the advancement of the public 
welfare, but he prefers to render his ser- 
vice in the quiet ways of the average 
citizen. He is a home-loving man and is 
highly esteemed among a large number of 
business associates and personal friends 
who respect and honor him for his sterl- 
ing character. 

On August 19, 1889, Eugene Edgar 
Redden married Ellen IMcQuade, who was 
born in Springfield. Massachusetts, daugh- 
ter of Andrew- and Ellen (Phillips) Mc- 
Ouade, and granddaughter of James and 
Anna (McCort) McQuade. The grand- 
father, James McQuade, was born in 
Countv- Tyrone, Ireland, and died in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, October, 1880. 
His wife, Anna (McCort) McQuade, was 



born in County Tyrone, Ireland, and died 
in Springfield, in 1876. Andrew McQuade, 
the father, born in County Tyrone, Ire- 
land, died March 15, 1915, in Springfield, 
at the age of eighty years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Redden are the parents of eleven children : 
Dr. Joseph E. Redden, who is engaged in 
the dental profession in Springfield, mar- 
ried Pauline E. Guyette ; Andrew P., of 
Springfield, engaged in the real estate 
business there ; Harold P., an attorney, 
married Mary McCormick. and has two 
children, Mary Louise and Teresa ; Es- 
ther, died in infancy ; James A., a dentist 
of Springfield, married Alma C. Chick; 
Helen C. : Mary ; Alice G. ; Lettie E. ; Ed- 
ward D. ; and Reta G. 



WEBB, Charles Winne 

Since 1908 Charles Winne Webb, of 
Springfield, has been engaged in the stor- 
age warehouse business in that city; for 
eight years he had entire charge of the 
furniture storage department of the Bay 
State Storage Warehouse, but is now 
(1923) with the Central Storage Ware- 
house. 

The Webb name is a very ancient one 
in England, and is of the class known as 
occupational surnames, being derived 
from the old English word meaning 
"weaver." Very early in the history of 
this country representatives of the Webb 
family came to Xew England, the first of 
the name recorded being Richard Webb, 
w^ho came from Dorsetshire. England, to 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1626, and 
later removed to Boston, Massachusetts, 
where he was made a freeman in 1632. 
Still later, in 1635, he was in Connecticut, 
being on record as a resident of Xorwalk 
in 1650, and of Stamford in 1656. His 
death occurred in the latter place, Janu- 
ary I, 1656. He and his wife, Elizabeth 
(Gregory') Webb, were the parents of 



263 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



sons, from whom are descended numerous 
lines of the Webb name. Another immi- 
grant ancestor of the Webb name was 
Samuel W. Webb, who in 1713 ran away 
from the master to whom he was appren- 
ticed and came to New England. He 
married (first) in Weymouth, Massachu- 
setts, in 1721, Susan Randall. She died 
and he married (second) in 1726, Bethiah 
Spear. He was the father of eight sons 
and from these many able and valuable 
citizens have descended. Some remained 
in New England and many have scattered 
to other parts of the country. Among 
those of the name who remained in Con- 
necticut was Ebenezer Webb, great-great- 
grandfather of Charles Winne Webb, 
from whom the line of descent is traced 
as follows : 

(I) Ebenezer Webb was born in Con- 
necticut, July 26, 1772, and died in South- 
wick, Massachusetts, November 6, 1838. 
He removed from North Haven, Connec- 
ticut, to Southwick, Massachusetts, at an 
early day, and there he followed farming 
throughout the entire period of his active 
career. He married, April 8, 1795, Eliz- 
abeth Tuttle, who was born May 13, 1775, 
and died December 30, 1843. Their chil- 
dren were : Sarah T., died in infancy ; 
Amos ; Elizabeth ; Isaiah Tuttle, of fur- 
ther mention ; and Betsy. 

(II) Isaiah Tuttle Webb, son of Ebe- 
nezer and Elizabeth (Tuttle) Webb, was 
born in Southwick, Massachusetts, March 
20, 1805, and died July 6, 1883. He was 
engaged in farming in Southwick, and to 
his agricultural pursuits he added the 
business of buying and selling cattle. He 
was an expert on appraising the "points" 
of live stock, and his advice was often 
sought by those who were considering 
investing in new stock. He married. May 
12, 1831, Eliza Harvey, who died October 
3, 1867. They were the parents of two 



children : Harvey Rowe, of further men- 
tion; and James, born August 13, 1838. 

(III) Harvey Rowe Webb, son of 
Isaiah Tuttle and Eliza (Harvey) Webb, 
was born in Southwick, Massachusetts, 
April 27, 1832, and died in Southwick, 
January 17, 1913. His entire life was 
spent in his native town, where he was a 
successful farmer and where he took an 
active part in local public affairs, serving 
as a member of the Board of Selectmen 
and also as a member of the School Com- 
mittee. He was an active and energetic 
man who consistently stood for progress 
in all civic affairs, and his influence was 
considered among his fellow-townsmen. 
His religious affiliation was with the Con- 
gregational church. He married Laura 
Vining, of Simsbury, Connecticut, born 
October 24, 1833, died December 29, 1912. 
They were the parents of four children : 
Charles Edwin, of further mention ; Nellie 
Eliza, married William A. Hamilton, of 
Westfield, Massachusetts ; Jennie Eliza- 
beth, died in infancy ; and Fanny Eliz- 
abeth, married Frank Dewitt Lambson, 
of Southwick, ^Massachusetts. 

(IV) Charles Edwin Webb, son of Har- 
vey Rowe and Laura (Vining) Webb, 
was born in Southwick, IMassachusetts, 
June 2, 1858. He received his education 
in the public school of Southwick. When 
school days were over he found employ- 
ment in the dry goods store of Orlando 
Bruce & Company, of Westfield, Massa- 
chusetts, with whom he remained for sev- 
eral years. He then removed to Kingston, 
New York, where he became a clerk in 
the hardware store of Crosby, Sayles & 
Reynolds, He later took a position with 
the L. S. Winne Company, of the same 
city, in the same line of business. Later 
he entered upon a new departure, enter- 
ing the employ of the Laflin & Rand 
Powder Company, where he remained for 



264 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



five years. At the end of this time he 
received an appointment as deputy-post- 
master, holding- this position for three 
years. He then secured a position with 
the Ulster County Savings Bank, where 
he remained for one year, when he was 
again re-appointed deputy-postmaster and 
served for three years. The following 
thirteen years he traveled on the road for 
a wholesale drug house, covering the dis- 
tricts of Staten Island, Long Island and 
Brooklyn. At the end of his thirteen 
years' experience as a traveling salesman, 
he removed to Chicopee Falls, Massachu- 
setts, where he secured a position as in- 
spector in the Westinghouse plant. Two 
years later he again made a change, this 
time coming to Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, where he entered the employ of the 
Wire Wheel Corporation, but after a time 
he again took a position with the West- 
inghouse people, with whom he remained 
until entering the employ of the Atlantic 
Coast Hardware Company in Boston, 
where he remained for two years, then 
went with the J. Douglass Law Hardware 
Company, of Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he is serving at the present time 
(1923). He is a member of Kingston 
Lodge, Xo. 10, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Kingston, New York. He mar- 
ried Jennie M. Hardy, of Westfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, daughter of Henry and Mary 
(Doane) Hardy, and they are the parents 
of three children : Henry Hardy, died at 
the age of thirty-three years, was the 
father of one child, Ethel ; Charles Winne, 
of further mention ; and Hazel, who mar- 
ried George Root, of Southwick, Massa- 
chusetts, and they were the parents of 
two children, Richard and Muriel. 

(V) Charles Winne Webb, son of 
Charles Edwin and Jennie M. (Hardy) 
Webb, was born in Kingston, New York, 
June 30, 1886. He received his education 



in the public schools of his native town. 
Cpon the completion of his school train- 
ing he found his first employment in a 
dry goods store in Kingston, where he 
remained for two years. He was then 
employed in several dift'erent places in 
different lines of business until 1908, when 
he removed to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
and engaged in the storage warehouse 
business. In 1915 he was placed in charge 
of the furniture storage department of the 
Bay State Storage Warehouse, and from 
that time until 1923 he devoted his entire 
time to the management of that depart- 
ment, of which he had entire charge, and 
in that connection rendered the firm most 
efficient service, and through his strict 
attention to detail the furniture storage 
department was greatly enlarged. In 
1923 he resigned and took a position with 
the Central Storage Warehouse, which 
position he still holds. Mr. Webb is a 
member of Esoteric Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted ]\Iasons, of Springfield. He has 
always been ready to contribute his share 
toward the advancement of the public 
welfare of the city of Springfield, and he 
is recognized as one of its progressive 
and public-spirited citizens. 

On March 24, 1907, Charles ^^'inne 
Webb married Nellie Cunningham, of 
Rome, Indiana, daughter of Grafton C. 
Cunningham, of Wolcott, New York, and 
they are the parents of one child, William 
Grafton, born in Springfield, ]\Iassachu- 
setts, September 6, 1913. 



DALE, Daniel 

Among the business men of Springfield, 
whose success is the direct result of per- 
severance and business judgment, must 
be mentioned Daniel Dale, president of 
Dale Brothers Laundry, Inc., a concern 
which has been in successful operation for 
more than a decade and a half. 



265 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



William Dale, father of Daniel Dale, 
was born in Belfast, Ireland, in 1805, and 
there spent his childhood and boyhood, 
acquiring a practical education in the 
schools of the neighborhood. Upon at- 
taining young manhood, he left his native 
land, locating in Cumberland, Ontario, 
Canada, where he devoted his attention 
to the occupation of farming, in which 
line of work he was highly successful, 
providing a comfortable home for his fam- 
ily, which consisted of his wife, Mary 
(Lough) Dale, whom he married Novem- 
ber I, 1833, her birth occurring in County 
Antrim, Ireland, 181 5, and who died in 
1855, and nine children, as follows : Rosa, 
born in 1834; John, 1836; James, 1838; 
Samuel, 1840; Mary Jane, 1844; Daniel, 
of further mention; Robert, born 1849; 
Margaret, 1851 ; Charlotte, 1853. Of the 
above, Samuel, Daniel and Chorlotte are 
all that are living. The two former reside 
at the old homestead in Cumberland, On- 
tario. 

Daniel Dale, fourth son of William and 
Mary (Lough) Dale, was born in Cum- 
berland, Ontario, Canada, January 28, 
1847. He attended the common schools 
in his native town, and there resided for 
many years, the tilling of the soil being 
his principal occupation. He later came 
to the United States, residing for some 
time in the States of Wisconsin and Min- 
nesota, where during the winter months 
he worked in logging camps and during 
the summer months on farms, the out- 
door life appealing to his tastes and inclin- 
ations. He later moved to South Dakota, 
where he took up a government claim, 
upon which he resided for six years. His 
next move was to St. Paul, Minnesota, in 
which city he resided until 1897, when he 
came East, locating in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and in company with his brother, 
Robert Dale, handled the Bradbury Bak- 



ery products, each driving a team from 
which they made deliveries. They con- 
tinued this until 1905, in the meantime 
saving a portion of their earnings, and 
then engaged in business on their own 
account, establishing the Dale Brothers 
Laundry, which has been in active oper- 
ation ever since, the business increasing 
in volume and importance with each pass- 
ing year. The business was incorporated 
in 1917, and in 1918, after the death of his 
brother, Robert Dale, Daniel Dale was 
made president of the corporation, he fill- 
ing that responsible position from that 
time to the present. Mr. and Mrs. Dale 
are members of the North Congrega- 
tional Church, of Springfield, in the affairs 
of which they take an active interest. Mr. 
Dale is always interested in every move- 
ment that has for its object the advance- 
ment and prosperity of his adopted city. 

Mr. Dale married, October 29, 1877, 
Margaret Kincella, of Cumberland, On- 
tario, Canada, daughter of Thomas and 
Eleanor (McKee) Kincella. Children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Dale : Rose Maud ; Alfred 
Chester, married Grace Ann Shipman. 

Robert Dale, brother of Daniel Dale, 
was born in Cumberland, Ontario, Can- 
ada, in 1849, ^"^ ^^^^ ^" Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, 1918. He was always closely 
associated in business with his brother, 
as aforementioned, and was a man of good 
judgment and great force of character. 
He married, the same day as his brother, 
October 29, 1877, Elizabeth Kincella, a 
sister of Margaret Kincella, his brother's 
wife. Three children were born of this 
marriage, as follows : John A., who mar- 
ried and has a son, Robert A. ; Lillian, 
married Edwin A. Marden, and they have 
a son, Frederick Dale; Russell P., who 
married and has three children : Jane, 
Mary Elizabeth, and Russell P., Jr. 



266 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



PROCTOR, Charles Bela 

Among the business men of Springfield 
is Charles Bela Proctor, who for thirty- 
years has been engaged in the real estate 
business of that city, also conducting a 
brokerage and loan business. 

The Proctor name is a very old one, 
dating back to very early times in Eng- 
land, and apparently derived from the 
Latin word "procurator," meaning any- 
one who acts for another or takes care 
of his interests, in other words, a proxy, 
or proctor. A "History of Northumber- 
land" published by Andrew Reid & Com- 
pany, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, 
states that "the Proctor family originally 
settled in Yorkshire, was established at 
Shawdon, at the beginning of the six- 
teenth century, through the marriage of 
William Proctor, of Nether Bordley, to 
Isabel, daughter of John Lilburn, of Shaw- 
don." Arms were granted to a family 
in England bearing the name of Proctor 
as early as 1436, and the shield is des- 
cribed as follows : Argent with two chev- 
rons sable, between three martlets sable. 
Representatives of this old family came 
very early in the Colonial movement from 
the Old World to New England, John, 
Richard, George, and Robert Proctor all 
settling in Massachusetts between the 
years 1636 and 1643, ^1^ thought to be 
descendants of Sir William Proctor. 

Robert Proctor, ancestor of Charles 
Bela Proctor, was made a freeman at 
Concord, Massachusetts, in 1643. He may 
have come from England with the other 
three Proctors mentioned above, but there 
is another tradition concerning his an- 
cestry. Under date of July 26, 1897, Mrs. 
Lucretia H. Lawrence, of Leominster, a 
daughter of Jacob Proctor, of Littleton, 
Massachusetts, writes as follows : 



My father in his last days dwelt much upon the 
history of his family and events of his early life. 



He said his grandfather (who was Nathaniel 
Proctor, a great-grandson of Robert Proctor, of 
Concord) told him that three brothers from a 
wealthy family in Scotland came to this country 
in a ship of their own. One of the brothers set- 
tled in, or near, Chelmsford. The Littleton branch 
descended from this brother. My father remem- 
bered visits back and forth with the Chelmsford 
relations. 

The conflict between these two tradi- 
tions must remain unsettled until addi- 
tional evidence in favor of one or the 
other can be obtained. 

In 1653 Robert Proctor, with twenty- 
seven others, petitioned the General Court 
for a grant of land six miles square "to 
begin at Merrimack river at a neck of 
land next to Concord river south and west 
into the country to make up the circum- 
ference or quantity of land as above ex- 
pressed." The petition was granted, and 
in 1654 Robert Proctor removed to the 
new plantation which was organized on 
November 22, 1654, as a town under the 
name of Chelmsford. The first four or 
five of his children were born in Concord, 
the others in Chelmsford. His descend- 
ants resided in many of the neighboring 
towns, and at an early date some of them 
pushed back into the wilderness and set- 
tled in New Hampshire, Vermont, and 
New York, and have since scattered over 
the West. Letters of administration on 
his estate were granted to Jane Proctor, 
executrix, July 13, 1697. Some of his 
children settled in what afterwards be- 
came the West Precinct, and later the 
town of Westford. Robert Proctor mar- 
ried, December 31, 1645, Jane Hildreth, 
eldest daughter of Richard Hildreth, of 
Concord and Chelmsford, ancestor of the 
Hildreths of America, who died at 
Chelmsford in 1688, and their children 
were: i. Sarah, born October 12, 1646; 
married, August 10, 1666, Thomas Cham- 
berlain. 2. Gershom, born May 13, 1648. 



267 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



3. Mary, born April 20, 1650; married, 
1685, John Bourne. 4. Peter, born 
1652. 5. Dorothy, born 1654; mar- 
ried, December 18, 1679, John Barret, Jr. 
6. Elizabeth, born December 16, 1656; 
became, in 1705, the third wife of Samuel 
Fletcher. 7. James, born January 8, 1658. 
8. Lydia, born February 19, 1660, died Au- 
gust 13, 1661. 9. John, born August 17, 
1663. 10. Samuel, of further mention. 
II. Israel, born April 29, 1668. 12. Thorn- 
as, born April 30, 1671, went to sea, and 
there is no evidence that he returned. 

Samuel Proctor, tenth child of Robert 
and Jane (Hildreth) Proctor, was born 
in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, September 
15, 1665. He was one of the petitioners 
for the grant of land which became Town- 
send, at which place he died April 12, 1740. 
He married Sarah , who died Janu- 
ary 17, 1757, and they were the parents 
of eleven children, all born at Chelmsford, 
and among these was Thomas, of further 
mention. 

Thomas Proctor, son of Samuel and 
Sarah Proctor, was born December 12, 
1698, and died at Proctorsville, Vermont, 
June 3, 1750. He married, in 1722, Han- 
nah Barron, daughter of Isaac and Sarah 
Barron, who was born October 14, 1703, 
and died September 3, 1774. Their chil- 
dren were: i. Philip, born January 3, 
1726. 2. Lucy, born February 10, 1733. 3. 
Leonard, of further mention. 4. Olive, 
born January 22, 1738; married, Novem- 
ber 27, 1780, Thomas Scott. 

Captain Leonard Proctor, second son 
of Thomas and Hannah (Barron) Proc- 
tor, was born at Chelmsford, Massachu- 
setts, January 16, 1734, and died at Proc- 
torsville, Vermont, June 3, 1827. He was 
an able, energetic, and resourceful man, 
deeply interested in the public welfare. 
He served as selectman of Westford in 
1770, 1778, and 1779. He was an ofBcer 



in the Revolutionary War and took part 
in many important battles, including those 
of Lexington, Trenton, and IMonmouth. 
He was second lieutenant in Captain 
Minot's company, which marched from 
Westford in response to the alarm of 
April 19, 1775. He was one of the com- 
mittee of correspondence for 1780, and 
was chosen the same year as one of a 
committee of thirteen "to take under con- 
sideration the new form of government." 
In 1781 he was a "captain" and was 
"head" of one of the five "classes" into 
which the town was divided for the pur- 
pose of procuring soldiers for the Con- 
tinental army. After the war. Captain 
Proctor removed to Cavendish, where he 
founded in an unbroken forest the village 
of Proctorsville, Vermont. He married 
(first) in 1760, Lydia Nutting, of West- 
ford, who died November 16, 1767 ; mar- 
ried (second) December 25, 1769, Mary 
Keep, daughter of Captain Jabez Keep. 
To the two marriages twelve children 
were born : Philip, Abel, Leonard, Asa, 
]\Iary, Lydia, Solomon, Thomas, Hannah, 
Jabez, Experience, and John. Descend- 
ants of the eight sons of Captain Leonard 
Proctor have settled in various localities 
throughout the country, and many distin- 
guished representatives of the family have 
increased the prestige of the name. 

Among the many worthy descendants 
of this Vermont branch of the Proctor 
family was George Proctor, grandfather 
of Charles Bela Proctor, who was born in 
Burlington, Vermont, and married Har- 
riet , of Waterbury, Vermont. 

George and Harriet Proctor were the par- 
ents of nine children, among whom were: 
Henry, Martin, of further mention ; Delia ; 
and Julia. 

Martin Proctor, son of George and Har- 
riet Proctor, was born in Burlington, Ver- 
mont, in 1838, and died in Springfield, 



268 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Massachusetts, October g, 1888. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools 
of Burlington, Vermont, and when his 
studies were completed went to Lester, 
Massachusetts, where he learned the trade 
of painter and decorator. He was a lad 
of sixteen years when he went to Lester. 
When the Civil War broke out, seven 
years later, he enlisted, in July, 1862, at 
Worcester, Massachusetts, in Company 
F, Forty-second Regiment, Massachusetts 
Volunteers, and was sent to Louisiana, 
where he was attached to the quarter- 
master's department. The hardships of 
military life, combined with the debilitat- 
ing effect of the Southern climate, im- 
paired his health and he was sent North 
to recuperate. In July, 1863, at Worces- 
ter, he was relieved from further duty, 
owing to his discharge on account of dis- 
ability, and there is little doubt that his 
death at the early age of fifty years was 
the result of hardships suffered during 
his term of service. In 1868 Mr. Proctor 
came to Springfield and engaged in the 
business of painting and decorating. Be- 
ing a man of fine artistic taste, as well 
as a good executive, he built up a very 
large and prosperous business, employing 
as many as one hundred men at one time. 
Mr. Proctor's artistic ability, combined 
with a keen intellect and an ardent spirit, 
made him a brilliant speaker, much in 
demand, whose addresses, whether im- 
promptu or formal, were always a delight 
to his audience. He was a member of the 
Repertorial Society, of Leicester, Massa- 
chusetts, of which he was president ; and 
his religious afifiliation was with the Me- 
morial Church of Springfield, in the work 
of which he was actively interested, serv- 
ing in various capacities, including that of 
membership on the parish committee. 

A successful business man, squaring his 
conduct by the highest ideals of integrity 



and honor, a loyal friend, a public-spirited 
citizen, and a social companion of infinite 
resourcefulness and charm, the death of 
Mr. Proctor at the early age of fifty years 
was deeply mourned by a host of friends, 
acquaintances, and business associates, 
and represented a real loss to the com- 
munity in which he had proven himself 
so worthy a citizen. On November 24, 
1868, Martin Proctor married Clara S. 
Parsons, of Springfield, daughter of Bela 
and Clarissa (Cowles) Parsons, and 
granddaughter of Amasa and Mary 
(Bliss) Parsons, of Enfield, Connecticut. 
Mr. and Mrs. Proctor became the parents 
of four children : Charles B., of whom 
further; Roy Starr, who died in infancy; 
Floyd G., born July 6, 1877, who resides 
in Springfield ; and Harvey Owen, born 
May 18, 1880, now residing in New York 
City. 

Charles Bela Proctor, eldest son of 
Martin and Clara S. (Parsons) Proctor, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
September 18, 1869. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Springfield, 
and early became interested in the real es- 
tate business, his first association with 
which began when he was but a lad of 
fifteen years. He later began to operate 
in a small way for himself, and being pos- 
sessed of sound judgment, considerable 
experience gained through his early em- 
ployment in a real estate office, the power 
of making prompt decisions, and a large 
gift of tact and discernment, he was suc- 
cessful from the beginning. Throughout 
the thirty years that have elapsed since, 
as a boy, he began his business career in a 
real estate office, Mr. Proctor has contin- 
ued in that line of business, adding to his 
real estate operations a thriving broker- 
age and loan business. Known through- 
out Springfield as an active, successful, 
representative business man of the city, 



269 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



he is esteemed as a progressive, public- 
spirited citizen as well as a genial friend 
and associate. In club circles he is well 
known, being a member of the Nayasset 
Club, the Country Club, the Oxford Club, 
of Springfield, and the Manchonis Club, 
of Wilbraham. His religious affiliation is 
with Hope Church, 

On April 12, 1892, Charles B. Proctor 
married Gertrude A. Kelley, of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, daughter of John I. 
and Isabelle E. (Ashley) Kelley, who was 
born at Boothbay, Maine. Mr. and Mrs. 
Proctor are the parents of one son, Charles 
Bela, Jr., born January 31, 1902. 



CRANE, Roger Walter 

From the position of office boy in the 
Pittsburgh works to that of manager of 
the Springfield branch of the Crucible 
Steel Company's business, Roger Walter 
Crane has risen, gaining a wide experi- 
ence in various departments and in differ- 
ent localities, and rendering most valu- 
able service to the corporation with which 
he is associated. 

Walter Crane, father of Mr. Crane, was 
born in Aberdeen, Scotland, about 1855, 
and died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 
1902. He was a highly educated man, a 
graduate of Gordon College and of the 
University of Edinburgh, in Scotland, and 
for a time after completing his education 
was associated with an uncle who was en- 
gaged in the grain business. In 1882 he 
came to America, settling first in Boston, 
Massachusetts, where for a period of six 
years he was engaged as a teacher in the 
Young Men's Christian Union. From 
Boston he went to Chicago, Illinois, and 
later to Joliet, Illinois, serving as superin- 
tendent and librarian of the Illinois Steel 
Company's Club for seven years. From 
Illinois he came to Braddock, Pennsyl- 
vania, as Hbrarian of the Carnegie Library 



of that place, and the latter position he 
continued to hold for five years or more, 
being thus actively engaged to the time 
of his death. He became a naturalized 
citizen of his adopted country and always 
took a keen interest in its public affairs, 
though he never held political office. He 
was a member of the Masonic order in 
Scotland, and his religious affiliation was 
with the Episcopal church. He married 
Bella Young Ogg, who was born in Aber- 
deen, Scotland, daughter of David Ogg, 
and they were the parents of seven chil- 
dren : David G., who resides in Wilkins- 
burg, Pennsylvania ; Alice, married E. E. 
Evans, of Carrick, Pennsylvania ; Emer- 
son P., of Rochester, New York; Roger 
W., of further mention ; Harry, of Wil- 
kinsburg, Pennsylvania ; Douglass, who 
died at the age of ten years ; and Stephen, 
who lives in Florida. 

Roger Walter Crane, son of Walter and 
Bella Young (Ogg) Crane, was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts, September 26, 
1886, removed with his parents to Joliet, 
Illinois, where he attended the public 
schools until the time of the removal of 
the family to Braddock, Pennsylvania. 
He then entered the public schools of the 
latter place, graduating from the high 
school, and then entered the Western 
University of Pennsylvania. One year 
after his matriculation in that institution, 
his father died, and he was obliged to 
leave school and at once engage in re- 
munerative employment. He was six- 
teen years of age at the time, and his first 
employment was found with the Crucible 
Steel Company in Pittsburgh. With this 
corporation he has maintained his con- 
nection to the present time (1922). Be- 
ginning as office boy he worked his way 
upward, finally being made junior clerk 
in that office. This was in Pittsburgh. He 
was then sent to the Cleveland branch as 



270 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



salesman, later being recalled to the Pitts- 
burgh plant in the same capacity, and in 
191 1 came to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he was made manager of the 
Springfield branch of the Crucible Steel 
Company's business. This position he 
has continued to efficiently fill to the pres- 
ent time. 

Mr. Crane is well known in Masonic 
circles in Springfield, being a member of 
Esoteric Lodge, Free and Accepted ]\Ia- 
sons, and of all bodies, both York and 
Scottish Rites, and in the latter he re- 
ceived the thirty-second degree, and of 
Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also 
a member of the Nayasset Club, the Coun- 
try Club, the Manchonis Club, of Spring- 
field, and of the Fish and Game Club, of 
Quebec. He is an attendant of the Con- 
gregational church. 

On January 25, 1910, Roger W. Crane 
married Claudia B. Shirley, of Louisville, 
Kentucky, daughter of James Shirley, 
and they are the parents of one child, 
Walter Shirlev Crane. 



MEADE, William George 

William George Meade, treasurer and 
founder of the firm of W. G. ]\Ieade & 
Son, has been engaged in the business of 
setting boilers for more than thirty years 
and has achieved a wide reputation for 
the excellency of his work. 

(I) Mr. Meade is of Irish ancestry, his 
grandparents on* the paternal side being 
John and Jane (Brady) Meade, who were 
born in Ireland and came to New York 
City when they were young. John Meade 
was a mason, and after laying brick for a 
time in New York City went to Spring- 
field, ^lassachusetts, but returned to New 
York, where he continued to live to the 
time of his death. He was the father of 



two sons, William, and John M., of whom 
further. 

(II) John M. Meade, son of John and 
Jane (Brady) Meade, was born in New 
York City, in 1835, and died in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, August 31, 1896, 
aged sixty-one years. He was a brick 
maker by trade, and came to Springfield, 
IMassachusetts, in 1861, where he was for 
many years a foreman for Mr. Sanderson, 
who was engaged in the manufacture of 
brick. In this line of work John M. ^leade 
remained active to the time of his death. 
He was well known and highly esteemed 
among a large circle of friends and associ- 
ates, and fraternally was affiliated with 
Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Springfield ; and with Hamp- 
den Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He married Anna McClinchy, 
of New York City, and they were the par- 
ents of seven children : William G., of 
further mention ; Edward E. ; Frank R. ; 
Harry W. ; Charles 'SL, who died young; 
John H., died young; and Daisy. 

(III) William George Meade, son of 
John M. and Anna (McClinchy) Meade, 
was born in Springfield, Illinois. August 
II, 1859, and came to Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, with his parents when he was 
two years of age. He attended the public 
schools of Springfield until he was fifteen 
years of age, and then left home in order 
to follow the sea. After two years' ex- 
perience as a seaman, he returned home 
and entered Amherst Agricultural Col- 
lege, where he continued his studies for 
a year, at the end of which time he 
changed his plans and entered the employ 
of a machine shop in Springfield. Later 
he became associated with the Ames 
^Manufacturing Company, of Chicopee, for 
a time, and still later was employed in the 
shops at Haydenville, and in the armory 
at Springfield. He then began laying 



271 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



brick and for one season was thus em- 
ployed by Dan Mellen, the well known 
contractor, at a wage of one dollar a day. 
His next position was with Mr. Flynt, a 
contractor, of Monson. In 1885 he went 
to Florida, where he assisted in the build- 
ing of houses in the town of Palatka. 
Upon his return to Springfield, in 1886, 
he was employed by D. J. Curtis for a 
time. In 1889 he decided to engage in 
business for himself. He began setting 
up boilers, and made it a point to set up 
each one as carefully and as expertly as 
was possible. The result of that policy, 
which was faithfully adhered to, meant 
a steady increase of business. He set the 
boilers in the United Electric Light Com- 
pany's plant and they remained for thirty- 
seven years, until 1922, when they were 
reset. He built the power plant at the 
hospital at the City Almshouse, and the 
boilers remained for twenty-three years 
before they were replaced. He also set 
the boilers in the Springfield Foundry 
Company's plant and they too gave effici- 
ent service for over twenty years, and 
then another set of boilers were placed 
upon the same foundation. His excellent 
work has been Mr. Meade's most efficient 
advertising. In 1915 Mr. Meade admitted 
his son, Joseph W. Meade, to partnership, 
and later the business was incorporated 
under the name of W. G. Meade & Son, of 
which concern Joseph W. Meade is now 
president and William G. Meade treas- 
urer. The concern does an extensive busi- 
ness, setting up boilers all over New Eng- 
land. 

On June 19, 1889, William G. Meade 
married Edith A. Williams, of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, daughter of Joseph 
Sprague and Ellen Maria (Willis) Wil- 
liams (see Williams IV), and they are the 
parents of four children: i. Joseph Wil- 
liams, born November 2, 1893 5 received 



his early education in the public schools 
of West Springfield, later graduating 
from the Technical High School in 
Springfield, and from Amherst College; 
since that time he has been associated 
with his father in the business of the W. 
G. Meade & Son ; he married, October 
4, 1915, Hazel Bradley. 2. and 3. Win- 
fred F. and Pauline C. (twins) born Sep- 
tember 12, 1895. 4. William G., Jr., born 
May 16, 1907. 

(The Williams Line). 

(III) Joseph Sprague Williams, son of 
Lester and Cynthia (Becker) Williams 
(for early generations see E. L. Williams 
on other pages in this volume) was born 
December 17, 1825. He married Ellen 
Maria Willis, and among their children 
was Edith A., of whom further. 

(IV) Edith A. Williams, daughter of 
Joseph S. and Ellen Maria (Willis) Wil- 
liams, married William George Meade 
(see Meade HI). 



SWAN, Charles Phelps 

Charles Phelps Swan, treasurer and 
general manager of the Swan Rigging 
Company, has been engaged in the truck- 
ing business since he was eighteen years 
of age, and is an expert in his line. He 
is extensively engaged in moving heavy 
machinery, smokestacks, and boilers, and 
his business operations take him all over 
the country, and require the services of a 
large number of men. 

(I) The Swan family traces its ancestry 
to Richard Swan, who was born in Eng- 
land, where his wife died. He came to 
this country at an early date, and was 
admitted to membership in the church in 
Boston, January 6, 1639. He removed to 
Rowley, Massachusetts, where he became 
a prominent citizen, and was chosen to 
represent the town in the General Court 



2^2 




-^AeU^ ,A? jJiA/ysLyL^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in 1666. He served in King Philip's War 
and was a member of the famous expedi- 
tion to Canada, but survived and contin- 
ued to live in Rowley to the time of his 
death, May 14, 1678. He married (sec- 
ond) Mrs. Ann Trumbull, and they were 
the parents of seven children, among 
whom was Robert, of further mention. 

(II) Robert Swan, son of Richard and 
Ann (Trumbull) Swan, was born in 1628, 
and lived in Rowley, Andover, and Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, being a resident of 
the last named place in 1650. He served 
in King Philip's War. He married (first) 
Elizabeth Acie. She died in 1689. He 
married (second) April i, 1690, Hannah 
Russ. To the first marriage twelve chil- 
dren were born, among whom w^as John, 
of further mention. 

(III) John Swan, son of Robert and 
Elizabeth (Acie) Swan, was born August 
I, 1668, and died May i, 1773. He lived 
in Haverhill, Massachusetts, for a time. 
In 1707 he removed to Stonington, Con- 
necticut, locating on what is known as 
Swantown Hill, North Stonington. He 
married, August i, 1699, Susanna (East- 
man) Wood, daughter of Philip Eastman, 
granddaughter of Roger Eastman, and 
widow of Thomas Wood, who, with a 
daughter, was killed by Indians, May 15, 
1697. She died December 20, 1772, aged 
one hundred years. Mr. and Mrs. Swan 
were the parents of seven children, one 
of whom was John (2), of further men- 
tion. 

(IV) John (2) Swan, son of John (i) 
and Susanna (Eastman-Wood) Swan, 
was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
December 28, 1700. He married, March 
5, 1726, Lucy Dennison, and they were 
the parents of children, among whom was 
Joshua, of further mention. 

(V) Joshua Swan, son of John (2) and 
Lucy (Dennison) Swan, was born No- 



vember 15, 1736. He married, December 
I, 1763, Martha Dennison, and they were 
the parents of six children, among whom 
was Joshua (2), of further mention. 

(VI) Joshua (2) Swan, son of Joshua 
(i) and Martha (Dennison) Swan, was 
born June 8, 1766. He married, March 
16, 1789, Esther Smith, and among their 
eleven children was Jabez, of further men- 
tion. 

(VII) Jabez Swan, son of Joshua (2) 
and Esther (Smith) Swan, was born Feb- 
ruary 2},, 1800. He was a locally famous 
Baptist preacher, and was familiarly 
known as "Elder Swan." He married 
Laura Grififin, of East Haddam, Connecti- 
cut, and they were the parents of chih 
dren : Elizabeth; Helen, of further men- 
tion ; Annie, married Phelps ; Sam- 
uel ; and Charles. 

(VIII) Helen Swan, daughter of Jabez 
and Laura (Griffin) Swan, married 
Charles Phelps, band master of the Sixty- 
ninth Regiment Band. The latter died 
in 1872, and their son, Charles Phelps, of 
whom further, was legally adopted by 
his maternal grandfather. Elder Jabez 
Swan, whose name he received. 

(IX) Charles Phelps Swan, son of 
Charles and Helen (Swan) Phelps, and 
legally adopted by Jabez Swan, was born 
in New London, Connecticut, August 21, 
1868. Both his parents died when he was 
four years of age, and he was reared by 
his maternal grandfather and adopted par- 
ent, Jabez Swan. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of New London, 
and when eighteen years of age engaged 
in the trucking business for himself, in 
New London. Energetic and progressive, 
he owned the first moving van in Connec- 
ticut, and conducted his business most 
successfully. He remained in New Lon- 
don until he was twenty-eight years of 
age and then went to New York, where 



Mass — 12 — 18 



273 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



for a period of five years he was engaged 
in trucking in association with the Dun- 
nican Company. At the end of that time 
he returned to New London, where for 
the next five years he was associated with 
the Thomas Manufacturing Company of 
that city. From there he went to New 
Haven, Connecticut, and identified him- 
self with the Smedley Trucking Com- 
pany, remaining in their employ for a 
time. About 1910 he removed to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, where for a period 
of nine years he was general superintend- 
ent of the Bay State Storage and Ware- 
house Company. At the end of that time, 
having gained a wide and varied experi- 
ence and accumulated some capital, he 
founded the Swan Rigging Company, of 
which he is treasurer and general man- 
ager. That his experience and his ability 
have eminently fitted him for the efficient 
management of this concern is evidenced 
by the success and prosperity of the busi- 
ness, which has steadily grown and ex- 
panded. The firm does an extensive busi- 
ness moving heavy machinery, smoke 
stacks, and boilers, and this work takes 
them all over the country and requires the 
services of a large number of employees. 
Along with his business responsibilities, 
Mr. Swan finds time for recreation and 
social intercourse through his affiliation 
with the Springfield Automobile Club and 
the Springfield Yacht Club. 

On September 2t„ 1920, Mr. Swan mar- 
ried Irene Neville, born in Ware, ]\Iassa- 
chusetts, August 13, 1891, the eldest 
daughter of James and Katherine (Shea) 
Neville, and granddaughter of Andrew 
Neville. The latter named was born in 
Ireland and came to this country when a 
young man. settling in Ware, Massachu- 
setts, where his son James was born. 
There the family resided until 1916, when 
they came to Springfield, Massachusetts, 



which has since been their home. There 
were five other children born to James 
and Katherine Neville, namely : James 
Henry, Jr., who conducts his own busi- 
ness, plumbing and heating, with offices 
in the Fuller building, Springfield ; Mary 
E. ; Gertrude F. ; Lillian ; Alys, deceased. 
Mrs. Swan was educated in the schools of 
Ware, and studied music under the super- 
vision of Madame Dienne, intending to 
make music her life work, but upon the 
death of her mother she decided on a busi- 
ness career. In 1916 she came to Spring- 
field, and in August, 1918, entered the 
employ of the Swan Rigging Company, 
and when the company incorporated in 
September, 1918, she was made clerk of 
the corporation. In 1920 Mrs. Swan pur- 
chased the interest of Mr. Arthur Hall, 
who was then president, and the company 
reorganized, making Mrs. Swan president, 
Mr. Swan, treasurer and general manager, 
and Mr. Leonard Wiley a director. Mrs. 
Swan has since had entire charge of the 
office and of the business. 



SWEENEY, John James 

Self-made in the truest sense of the 
word, successful in his undertakings and 
aims, the career of the late John James 
Sweeney is an apt illustration of the value 
of character in the determining of the 
measure of success possible to attain. No 
man gained higher reputation than he for 
faithful and conscientious service in the 
interest of the public, and during his in- 
cumbency of the offices of chief of police 
and tax collector he manifested commend- 
able characteristics which won the re- 
spect and admiration alike of his politi- 
cal colleagues and the communty-at- 
large. 

Owen Sweeney, grandfather of John J. 
Sweeney, was a native of Ireland, in 
which country he spent his entire life 



274 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



and where his death occurred. He was a 
tiller of the soil, and a man of good re- 
pute. He married Ellen Hurley, and 
among their children was John, of fur- 
ther mention. 

John Sweeney, father of John J. Sween- 
ey, was born in the parish of Marah, 
County Cork, Ireland, about the year 
1839. He was reared and educated in his 
native land, there he spent the first thirty- 
three years of his life, emigrated to the 
United States in 1872, and located in West 
Springfield, Massachusetts, where he 
spent the remainder of his days, his death 
occurring in 1910. He was employed on 
the Boston & Albany railroad, and also 
worked as an agriculturist. He married, 
in Ireland, Mar}' Lorden, born in County 
Cork, Ireland, daughter of Dennis and 
Katharine (Toomey) Lorden, and they 
were the parents of nine children, the first 
five of whom were born in Ireland, the 
remainder in West Springfield, as fol- 
lows: Helen, became the wife of Patrick 
O'Brien ; Owen, deceased ; John J., of fur- 
ther mention ; Katharine, became the wife 
of Daniel Sullivan ; Dennis, deceased ; 
Hannah, became the wife of Michael 
Shane ; Mary, became the wife of Michael 
Corcoran ; Edward, and William. 

John James Sweeney was born in 
County Cork, Ireland, June 24, 1866. In 
1872, when he was six years of age, his 
parents came to this country, locating as 
previously mentioned in West Spring- 
field, and he attended the common school 
in Mittineague, a portion of West Spring- 
field, completing his studies at the early 
age of nine years, when he became an 
employee in a cotton factory. He later 
secured employment in the mill of the 
Worthy Paper Company, and had charge 
of the loft in the Agawam Paper Mill. He 
later aided in building the mill of the 
Strathmore Paper Company, and on its 



completion had charge of the loft there, 
retaining that position for seven years, 
until 1906, when he joined the police 
force of West Springfield, and for the 
following three years served as patrol- 
man. He was then advanced to the office 
of chief, serving from 1909 to 1914, when 
he resigned. On April i, 1914, he was 
elected tax collector, which position he 
held up to the time of his death, and his 
conduct of that office won the commenda- 
tion of all, regardless of political party. 
W^ith the exception of one year, Mr. 
Sweeney had the honor of being named on 
both Republican and Democratic tickets, 
there being no opposition to his candi- 
dacy. His many friends and acquaint- 
ances in official and private life attest the 
personal regard in which he was held. 
Mr. Sweeney was prominently identified 
with fraternal orders of West Springfield, 
and served as chief ranger of St. Brendan 
Court, Foresters of America ; was treas- 
urer of the Past Chief Rangers i\ssocia- 
tion of Western Massachusetts ; also 
served as sachem of Toto Tribe, Improved 
Order of Red Men ; and was a member of 
Division 6, Ancient Order of Hibernians. 
He was the second vice-president of the 
Massachusetts Tax Collectors' Associa- 
tion, and a member of the Veteran Fire- 
men's Association. He was a member of 
the Church of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion, and was actively identified with the 
Holy Name Society of that church. He 
was a director of the West Springfield 
Co-operative Bank, in which his services 
were of inestimable value. 

Mr. Sweeney married, June i, 1886, 
Bridget C. Shean, of West Springfield, 
daughter of Michael and Bridget (Sulli- 
van) Shean, natives of Ireland, the for- 
mer-named having come to this country in 
boyhood. Children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Sweeney: i. Mary Agnes, died in infancy. 



275 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



2. Margaret Irene, deceased, was the wife 
of D. F. McCall, of Springfield ; children : 
Ruth Eleanor and Daniel Francis. 3. Ger- 
trude C. 4. Rachel E., became the wife of 
Edward E. Raleigh. 5. John James, Jr., 
died in infancy, 6. Raymond M,, was ap- 
pointed to fill the unexpired term of his 
father as tax collector of West Springfield, 
and elected in 1921 to hold office until 
1922. 7. Claire, deceased. 8. Kathryn C. 
Mr. Sweeney died in his home. No. 16 
Worcester street. West Springfield, Aug- 
ust 8, 1920, his death coming as a distinct 
shock to his many friends and acquaint- 
ances. A solemn mass of requiem was 
sung in the Church of the Immaculate 
Conception, and his remains were interred 
in St. Thomas' Cemetery, Mittineague. 
Mr. Sweeney was a public servant of the 
highest type and discharged the duties 
devolving on him with unfailing effi- 
ciency. His affability and kindness won 
him a wide circle of friends, all of whom 
appraised him of his true value. The fol- 
lowing is the tribute paid to Mr. Sweeney 
by Fred H. Sibley, town clerk of West 
Springfield : "Mr. Sweeney was a faithful 
official, conscientious in his work, a 
good citizen, and all who knew him will 
be sorry to hear of his death." The fol- 
lowing is the tribute paid to Mr. Sweeney 
by John J. Lysaght, former selectman, 
and during whose terms of office Mr. 
Sweeney served as chief of police and tax 
collector: "I have known him for thirty 
years. He was a splendid man and in 
his passing West Springfield loses a val- 
uable official." 



HOLLISTER, Robert Clinton 

Robert Clinton Hollister, a well known 
jewelry merchant and a successful busi- 
ness man of Westfield, is a representative 
of an old English family. Tradition says 
the patronymic may be derived from the 



word star and one or two other words, 
thus signifying holy star, holy guide, or 
master of the holly. An old orthography 
of the name is Holester. The escutcheon 
of the family is as follows : 

Arms — Sable, between a greyhound courant 
bendways and a dolphin, hauriant in base, argent 
three roses gules ; on a chief of the second, two 
slips of strawberry, fructed proper. 

Crest — An arm in armor, embowed between two 
sprigs of strawberry, as in the arms, and holding 
a branch of holly proper. 

Motto — Fuimus et sub Deo erimus. 

(I) John Hollister, the founder of the 
family in the United States, was born in 
England in 1612, was there educated and 
attained manhood years, and about the 
year 1642 emigrated to the American 
colonies, sailing, it is said, from Bristol. 
He settled in Wethersfield, Connecticut, 
and became prominent in the community, 
where he owned a large amount of land, 
also held various offices, and attained the 
rank of lieutenant. He married Joanna 
Treat, daughter of the Hon. Richard 
Treat, Sr.. and his wife, Joanna Treat. 
John Hollister died in Wethersfield, Con- 
necticut, in April, 1665, survived by his 
widow many years, her death occurring 
in 1694. 

(II) John (2) Hollister, son of John (i) 
and Joanna (Treat) Hollister, was born 
in Wethersfield, Connecticut, about 1644, 
and his death occurred in Glastonbury, 
Connecticut, November 24, 171 1. He re- 
moved from his native town to Glaston- 
bury, where he became one of its promi- 
nent men. He married, in 1667, Sarah 
Goodrich, daughter of William and Sarah 
(Marvin) Goodrich. Her death occurred 
in 1700. 

(III) Thomas Hollister, son of John (2) 
and Sarah (Goodrich) Hollister, was 
born in Wethersfield, Connecticut, Jan- 
uary 14, 1672. The greater part of his 



276 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



life was spent in Glastonbury, same State, paper manufacturing in Burnside, Hart- 



where he followed the occupation of a 
weaver. He took an active interest in 
church matters and held the office of dea- 
con. He married Dorothy Hill or Hills, 
daughter of Joseph Hill or Hills. She 
died in Glastonbury, October 5, 1741, and 
her husband survived her only one week, 
his death occurring in Glastonbury, Oc- 
tober 12, 1741. 

(IV) Gideon Hollister, son of Thomas 
and Dorothy (Hill or Hills) Hollister, 
was born September 23, 1699. Later he 
settled in Eastbury parish of Glaston- 
bury. He took an active part in military 
affairs, and in 1736 was commissioned 
lieutenant in Eastbury. He also served 
as deacon of the church. He married, in 
1723, Rachel Talcott, daughter of Nath- 
aniel Talcott, of Glastonbury. Mr. Hol- 
lister died in Glastonbury, February 15, 
1785, in a house which had been built by 
his father and which was still standing in 
1882. His widow died in Glastonbury in 
1790. 

(\^) Nathaniel Hollister, son of Gideon 
and Rachel (Talcott) Hollister, was born 
in Glastonbury, Connecticut, in 1731. He 
married, in 1754, IMehitable Mattison. 
His death occurred in 1810, and his widow 
survived until 1824. 

(VI) Gideon (2) Hollister, son of 
Nathaniel and IMehitable (]\Iattison) 
Hollister, was born in Glastonbury, 
Connecticut, January 20, 1776, and 
died in Andover, Connecticut, Feb- 
ruary 22, 1864. He removed from 
Glastonbury to Andover, where he be- 
came a paper manufacturer. He married 
Mary Olmstead. of East Hartford, Con- 
necticut, who died in 1827. 

(\"II) Samuel O. Hollister, son of Gid- 
eon (2) and Mary (Olmstead) Hollister, 
was born in Andover, Connecticut, June 
4, 1801. He conducted the business of 



ford county, Connecticut. Being one of 
the prominent men of that section, he re- 
ceived an appointment and served as post- 
master of Poquonnock, one of the vil- 
lages in Burnside. His religious mem- 
bership was in the Congregational 
church. He married, in 1824, Sally M. 
Loomis, daughter of Levi and Uletta 
(Thomas) Loomis. 

(V^III) William Thomas Hollister, son 
of Samuel O. and Sally ]M. (Loomis) Hol- 
lister, was born in Windsor, Connecticut, 
March 11, 183 1. For thirty years he was 
engaged in business as a paper manufac- 
turer, but at the end of that time was 
forced by failing health to abandon that 
branch of industry. He removed to South 
Hadley Falls, Massachusetts, in 1865, 
there remained until 1880, in which year 
he removed to Westfield, same State, 
where he was the proprietor of a drug 
store. During his residence in South 
Hadley Falls, he served for three years as 
one of the water commissioners, and for 
two years was treasurer of the board, and 
for six years he occupied a' seat on the 
Board of School Commissioners, during 
five of these years serving as its treasurer. 
He married, in 1855, Marcia G. Winchest- 
er, daughter of John and Sophia Win- 
chester. Mr. and Mrs. Hollister are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church. 

fIX) Robert Clinton Hollister, son of 
William Thomas and Marcia G. (Win- 
chester) Hollister, was born in South 
Hadley Falls, Massachusetts, February i, 
1873. At the age of seven years he was 
brought by his parents to Westfield, same 
State, and in its public schools received 
his primary and high school education, 
later attending the Westfield State Nor- 
mal School, where he pursued advanced 
studies. After serving an apprenticeship 
to the jewelry trade, Mr. Hollister, in 



277 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



association with Dexter Wetherill, estab- 
lished a jewelry business in Westfield 
under the firm name of Wetherill & Hol- 
lister. The partnership was maintained 
for about five years, at the end of which 
time Mr. Hollister purchased the interest 
of his partner and conducted the business 
alone. In 1922 Mr. Hollister admitted 
to partnership Henry Wilder, who had 
been with him for twenty years, this firm 
now being known as Hollister & Wilder, 
the establishment being one of the best of 
its kind in Westfield. The fraternal as- 
sociations of Mr. Hollister are numerous. 
He affiliates with Mount Moriah Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of Westfield; 
Evening Star Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons ; Westfield Council, Royal and 
Select Masters ; and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. His clubs are 
the Springfield Fish and Game, and the 
Springfield Country. He is a member of 
the Second Congregational Church. 

Mr. Hollister married, October 20, 1896, 
Freda Steiger, daughter of Jacob and 
Mary (Feierabend) Steiger. mentioned in 
the sketch of Albert Steiger, which ap- 
pears in another volume of this work. 



WITHEY, William Albert 

To have lived and worked in one city 
and with one firm for more than half a 
century is a record achieved by few. 
Among the few in Springfield, was Wil- 
liam Albert Withey, whose death, July 
25, 1921, terminated a fifty-six year term 
of service with Smith & Wesson, of that 
city. Mr. Withey came of an old family 
thought to have come to New England 
from Virginia. 

He was born in Hartford, Connecticut, 
March 29, 1844, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, son of William P. Withey, 
an architect and builder, and Mary 



(West) Withey, his wife, of Manchester, 
Connecticut. 

William A. Withey received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native 
city, and when fourteen years of age en- 
tered the employ of the Colt Revolver 
Company, where he remained for two 
years. At the end of that time he came 
to Springfield and entered the employ of 
the United States Government, in the ar- 
mory there. When the Civil War broke 
out he enlisted in Company A, 46th 
Massachusetts Regiment, under Colonel 
Bowler, for a term of nine months, but 
his actual term of service in. that com- 
pany was extended to eleven months. He 
then enlisted for another year under the 
late Colonel W. S. Shurtlefif, was taken 
prisoner May 29, 1863, and after spend- 
ing some weeks in Libby Prison was pa- 
roled. After his discharge from service, 
he obtained work in Chicopee Falls, and 
on October 20, 1865, he became associated 
with the frame department of the Smith 
& Wesson factory. He was energetic, 
able and faithful, and soon acquired skill 
in the work to which he was assigned. 
In the course of his long term of service, 
during which he worked in various de- 
partments, he became an expert at cross 
milling, and being of a resourceful, inven- 
tive type of mind he was invaluable to 
Smith & Wesson in many ways, inventing 
and designing many factory tools, and 
with the late George M. Smith made the 
first Smith & Wesson 44-caIibre military 
revolver. He knew the factory, its various 
departments, its policy, and the infinite 
details of the daily life and w^ork of the 
organization as few could know it, and 
for fifty-six years maintained his associa- 
tion with the company, rendering valuable 
and faithful service throughout that pe- 
riod of more than half a century. He was 
well known in Springfield as an active. 



278 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



public-spirited citizen and a genial friend 
and companion. He was a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, and at the 
time of his death was one of the few sur- 
vivors of Company A, 46th Regiment, 
Massachusetts Volunteers, the first com- 
pany with which he enlisted at the begin- 
ning of the Civil War. He was also a 
member of De Soto Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and for twenty 
years he served his community as a mem- 
ber of Springfield Volunteer Fire Depart- 
ment, in which he was captain of the hook 
and ladder company and a member of the 
Board of Fire Engineers. He was also 
an active, deeply interested member of 
the Firemen's Aid Association, being one 
of the organizers, and in that association 
his death has caused a vacancy that will 
long be unfilled. Highly respected and 
greatly trusted by a large circle of friends 
and associates, his passing was deeply 
mourned and left a sense of loss which 
only time can heal. 

On January 8, 1890, William Albert 
Withey married Alice E. (McLean) In- 
gram, daughter of Madison and Sarah C. 
(Bull) McLean, by whom he is survived. 
She was born in Wisconsin, and her par- 
ents were from Syracuse. 



WALLACE, James Lombard 

James Lombard Wallace, who for many 
years has been connected with the Ameri- 
can Writing Paper Company, of Holyoke, 
Massachusetts, but now residing in 
Springfield, is of Scotch descent. 

(I) Malcolm Wallace, great-grand- 
father of James L. Wallace, was a native 
of Scotland, there spent his entire active 
career, and there his death occurred. By 
this marriage to a Miss Ferguson he be- 
came the father of several sons, among 
whom was George, through whom the line 
descends. 



(II) George Wallace, grandfather of 
James L. Wallace, was born in Scotland, 
May 15, 1807, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, December 12, 1873. In 
early life he removed to Sligo, Ireland, 
and from there emigrated to the United 
States when between thirteen and four- 
teen years of age, accompaning some old- 
er brothers. He located in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and there spent the re- 
mainder of his days. He was a shoe- 
maker by trade and followed that line of 
work in Springfield for a time, achieving 
a certain degree of success, and later 
was the proprietor of several restaur- 
ants in Springfield, which yielded 
him a goodly return for labor expended. 
For some time prior to his death he led 
a retired life, having accumulated suffi- 
cient capital to allow him to cease from 
his labors. Mr. Wallace married Har- 
riet Lombard Parsons, born July 21, 1815, 
died ]\Iarch 11, 1883, daughter of Asa and 
Rachel (Lombard) Parsons. They were 
the parents of four children : Edward, 
born October 13, 1834, died IMarch 11, 
1879; George, born August 12, 1843, 
served in the Civil War, and died Febru- 
ary 26, 1906; James, through whom the 
line descends ; William, born June 28, 
1852, died October i, 1919. 

(HI) James Wallace, father of James 
L. Wallace, was born in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, May 3, 1847, and died 
there, December 30, 1898. He attended 
the school in the vicinity of his home, and 
upon attaining the age when he should 
become self-supporting in a measure, he 
accepted a position in a hardware store in 
Springfield, serving as clerk, and in this 
manner gained a thorough knowledge of 
that line of work, which he followed for 
many years. Later he was a member of 
the hardware firm of Graves, Wallace & 
Shattuck, who were well known in the 



279 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



trade, conducting an extensive business, 
and this connection continued until the 
dissolution of the firm by the sale of the 
stock. Mr. Wallace then accepted a po- 
sition as traveling salesman for the 
American Writing Paper Company, and 
also acted as manager of their Westfield 
mill, and in these positions rendered val- 
uable service to the company. He was 
always a resident of Springfield, in the 
affairs of which he took a keen interest. 
He held membership in the South Church, 
Springfield ; Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons ; and the Winthrop 
Club. Mr. Wallace married, September 
I, 1875, Lucy Miner, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Henry Clark 
and Julia (Burdick) Miner. Children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace: i. Louis, born 
March 23, 1878, died November 26, 1917; 
married (first) Nora Harrison, of Ports- 
mouth, England, who bore him two chil- 
dren : Florence and Dorothy ; married 

(second) , who bore him 

two children : Ruth, born August, 1905, 
and Evelyn, born October 10, 1906. 2. 
Harriet, became the wife of Charles Her- 
bert Bell, a banker of Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts. 3. James Lombard, of this re- 
view. 

(IV) James Lombard Wallace, son of 
James and Lucy (Miner) Wallace, was 
born in Springfield, Massachusetts, April 
16, 1884. He acquired a thorough prep- 
aration for the activities of life by a 
course of study in the public schools of 
Springfield, proving an apt and intelli- 
gent scholar, making the most of every 
advantage. He began his active career by 
accepting a position in the office of the 
American Writing Paper Company, of 
Holyoke, Massachusetts, with which con- 
cern he is connected at the present time 
(1922), his service being continuous, ex- 
tending over a period of eighteen years. 



This long tenure of office amply proves 
that he is the right man in the right place 
and that he makes the interests of the 
concern his interests, thus rendering his 
service doubly valuable. In religion he 
adheres to the tenets of the Congrega- 
tional church, being with his wife, mem- 
bers of Faith Church, and in politics 
is staunch in his advocacy of the princi- 
ples of the Republican party. 

Mr. Wallace married, April 11, 1910, 
Christine Geisel, daughter of Theodor and 
Christine (Schmaelzle) Geisel, and they 
are the parents of two children : Theodor 
Geisel, born November 24, 1912, and Rich- 
ard Avery Geisel, born January 21, 1915. 



GEISEL, Theodor Robert 

Theodor R. Geisel, one of the success- 
ful business men of Springfield, was born 
in Springfield, June 28, 1879. 

Theodor Geisel, father of Theodor R. 
Geisel, was born in Muehlhausen, Baden, 
Germany, July 8, 1840. He attended the 
public schools of his native town until 
fourteen years of age, and then began a 
six years' apprenticeship in the jewelry 
shops of Pforzheim, during which period 
of time he mastered the details of the 
trade and was listed as an expert work- 
man. In keeping with the German cus- 
tom, he went through a regular military 
course in the German army, serving three 
and a half years in the cavalry. He saw 
active service with the German military 
forces during seven weeks' war with Aus- 
tria, and later, in the conflict between the 
Southern German States and Prussia. In 
1867, immediately after the latter struggle, 
Mr. Geisel emigrated to this country, and 
immediately took up his residence in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, where he se- 
cured employment with the Rumrill Chain 
Company, whose plant was located on 
Maple street. He lost no time in taking 



280 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



out his first citizenship papers, and as 
soon as his five years' residence was com- 
pleted he applied for and was granted 
citizenship in 1872. Four years later, in 
1876, in partnership with Christian Kalm- 
bach, he purchased the Rocke Brewery, 
located on the Boston road. This connec- 
tion continued until 1893, during which 
time the interests of the firm prospered 
and the business gradually expanded, and 
then Mr. Geisel purchased his partner's 
interests and immediately organized the 
Highland Brewing Company, he serving 
in the capacity of president, treasurer and 
manager. The business assumed large 
proportions under the successful guidance 
of Mr. Geisel, and in 1898 he disposed of 
the same to the Springfield Breweries 
Company, remaining as manager of the 
Highland Branch, as it was called, until 
1901, when he severed his connection with 
the company. The following year Mr. 
Geisel organized and financed the Liberty 
Brewing Company, erected the plant on 
Liberty street, and remained as its active 
head until 1910, when the business was 
purchased by the Springfield Breweries 
Company. With the sale of the plant, 
Mr. Geisel retired from active business, 
although he always maintained an in- 
terest in the industry. When this country 
entered the World War Mr. Geisel was 
desirious of exhibiting his patriotism and 
was informed that the Second Regiment 
was in need of an automobile for the use 
of the officers. He therefore purchased a 
car which he presented to the regiment 
at Camp Bartlett, and it became a part of 
the 104th Infantry and did good service, 
and the gift was highly appreciated by 
the officers of the command. 

Mr. Geisel married, in 1871, Christine 
Schmaelzle, whose death occurred March 
12, 1908. They were the parents of seven 
children, namely: i. Bertha G., wife of 



Henry T. Schulz, of Wilkes-Barre, Penn- 
sylvania. 2. Christine, died in infancy. 3. 
Emma Louise, died May 28, 1913; was 
the first wife of Dr. H. W. Van Allen. 
4. Theodor Robert, of this review. 5. 
Adolf A., a resident of Springfield. 6. 
Christine, wife of James L. Wallace, 
whose sketch precedes this. 7. George 
Alexander, died in childhood. Mr. Geisel 
died at his late home. No. 162 Sumner 
avenue, Springfield, December 5, 1919. 
His remains were interred in Oak Grove 
Cemetery. 

Theodor Robert Geisel was born in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, June 28, 1879. 
He was educated in public and private 
schools in Springfield, and upon the com- 
pletion of his studies accepted a position 
as shipping clerk in his father's office, 
thereby gaining a comprehensive knowl- 
edge of the brewing industry. Later he 
was appointed assistant treasurer of the 
Springfield Breweries Company, and was 
also appointed treasurer of the Liberty 
Brewing Company, manager of the Lib- 
erty and Hampden breweries, and a direc- 
tor in the Liberty and Springfield Brew- 
ing Company. At the present time (1921) 
Mr. Geisel is a director in the Facto 
Truck Company, an organization found- 
ed by his brother. Adolf A. Geisel, for the 
manufacture of automobile trucks, and 
which is conducting an ever-increasing 
business. In addition to his business ac- 
tivity, Mr. Geisel is interested in the 
public affairs of his native city, and since 
1909 has served as a member of the Board 
of Park Commissioners of Springfield. 
He has also served as an officer in the 
Second Regiment for eight years, with 
headquarters in Springfield, holding the 
rank of captain and was also regimental 
adjutant and inspector of rifle practice. 
Mr. Geisel is an expert rifle shot and at 
one time held the world record for rifle 



281 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



shooting at two hundred yards ; this was 
gained in competition with the best 
sportsmen in the world, Mr. Geisel having 
engaged in that sport all over the world. 

Mr. Geisel married, August 31, 1901, 
Henrietta Seuss, a native of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, born May 13, 1878, daugh- 
ter of George J. and Margaretha (Greim) 
Seuss. Mr. and Mrs. Geisel are the par- 
ents of two children : i. Margaretha Chris- 
tine, born July 4, 1902 ; completed her 
studies in the Springfield High School at 
the age of sixteen years, and now (1922) 
at the age of twenty years, is in her third 
year in Smith College, class of 1923. 2. 
Theodor Seuss, born March 2, 1904, a 
graduate of public schools of Springfield, 
now a freshman at Dartmouth College. 



SACKETT, Albert Henderson 

Among those who have made for them- 
selves a name and a place in the theatri- 
cal profession is Albert Henderson Sack- 
ett, who began his career on the stage 
when he was thirty years of age and since 
that time has toured the country many 
times, playing for five years in stock com- 
panies, and making his home in New York 
and Philadelphia. 

The Sackett family is an ancient one in 
England, its ancestors having come to 
England from Normandy with William 
the Conqueror. The name is variously 
spelled, Sackett, Sacket, and Sackville, 
and is supposed to have come from a cer- 
tain Adam le Sackere (Adam the Sacker), 
who was a man engaged in the purchase 
and exporting of wool, which was put in 
sacks. In England, Thomas Sackville, 
Earl of Dorset, born 1636, bore arms, and 
was a lineal descendant of one of the band 
who accompanied William the Conqueror 
to England. The American immigrants, 
Simon and John Sackett, were doubtless 
of the same family, but the connection is 



not known. Eugene C. Sackett is a de- 
scendant of Simon Sackett, who came to 
this country in 1630, and the line of de- 
scent is traced as follows : 

(I) Simon Sackett, immigrant ancestor 
of the branch of the family to which Mr. 
Sackett belongs, came to this country on 
the ship "Lyon" which sailed from Bris- 
tol, England, December i, 1630, and after 
a very stormy voyage landed at Boston, 
Massachusetts, February 5, 1631. He was 
accompanied by his wife Isabel and their 
infant son Simon, Jr., also his brother 
John and his nephew John. They settled 
at Cambridge, and his house was on the 
north side of what is now Winthrop 
street, in the center of the block between 
Brighton and Dunster streets. He lived 
but a short time after coming to New 
England, and died in October, 1635. In 
November, 1636, at the same session of 
the court which banished Roger Williams 
from the Colony, the widow, Isabel Sack- 
ett, was granted permission to administer 
his estate. The widow and her sons were 
among the group which made the memor- 
able journey through the wilderness to 
form the settlement at Hartford, Connec- 
ticut, and she married there (second) Wil- 
liam Bloomfield. Children of Simon and 
Isabel Sackett were : Simon, born in 1630, 
died July 9, 1659, married Sarah Bloom- 
field ; and John, of whom further. 

(II) John Sackett, son of Simon and 
Isabel Sackett, was born in Newtown, 
now Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1632, 
and is supposed to have been the first 
white child born there. He was a resident 
of Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1653, and 
was granted land there, later living in 
Northampton and in Westfield. Soon 
after his first marriage he sold his house 
and land at Springfield, and removed to 
property he had purchased at Northamp- 
ton, where he lived until 1665, when he 



282 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



again sold and went to a farm he had pur- 
chased near Westfield, on what are now 
known as Sackett's Meadows. He was 
one of the first settlers of Westfield, and 
the house and barn which he built there 
were both burned by the Indians, October 
27, 1675. He rebuilt and erected a mill 
on a creek running into the Westfield 
river, which last structure involved him 
in a law suit because the dam caused the 
water to back up on the grist mill of the 
Dewey family. The dam was ordered re- 
moved with the help of the plaintiff's 
hired man and oxen. John Sackett was 
selectman in Westfield in 1672 and at var- 
ious times afterward, as late as 1693. He 
married (first) November 23, 1659, Abi- 
gail Hannum, born in 1640, died October 
9, 1690, daughter of William and Honor 
(Capen) Hannum; (second) Sarah 
(Stiles) Stewart, daughter of John Stiles 
and widow of John Stewart, of Spring- 
field. His children, all born to the first 
marriage, were : John, of whom further ; 
William ; Abigail, died in 1683 ; Mary, died 
young; Hannah; Mary; Samuel; Eliza- 
beth; and Abigail, born in 1683, married 
David King. 

(III) John (2) Sackett, son of John (i) 
and Abigail (Hannum) Sackett, was born 
in Westfield, Massachusetts, November 4, 
1660, and died December 20, 1745. He 
married (first) December i, 1686, De- 
borah Filley, daughter of AVilliam and 
Margaret (Riley) Filley, of Windsor, 
Connecticut; (second) Mehitable (Banks) 
Harris, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth 
(Swift) Banks, and widow of John Harris, 
To the first marriage six children were 
born : John, Abigail, Daniel, David, Ben- 
jamin, and Deborah. The children of the 
second marriage were : Isaac, Ezra, Israel, 
Eliakim, of whom further; and Mary. 

(IV) Eliakim Sackett, son of John (2) 
and Mehitable (Banks-Harris) Sackett, 



was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, 
March 12, 1712, and died in 1764: He 
married, July 5, 1738, Bethesda Fowler, 
daughter of Samuel and Maud (Root) 
Fowler, and they were the parents of 
ten children : Eliakim, Rhoda, Mercy, Jus- 
tice, of whom further; Stephen, Ezra, 
Pliny, Eunice, Sarah and Matty. 

(V) Justice Sackett, son of Eliakim 
and Bethesda (Fowler) Sackett, was born 
in 1745, and died in 1778. He married 
Naomi Weller, and their children were: 
Electa; Eliakim, of whom further; and 
Justice. 

(VI) Eliakim (2) Sackett, son of Jus- 
tice and Naomi (Weller) Sackett, was 
born in Westfield, Massachusetts, in 1775, 
and died in 185 1. He married, September 
5, 1799, Annie Edwards, of Westhampton, 
and they were the parents of five chil- 
dren: Noah, Edward, Belinda, Justus, of 
whom further; and Rufus. 

(VII) Justus Sackett, son of Eliakim 
(2) and Annie (Edwards) Sackett, was 
born in 1804, and died in 1893. He was a 
carpenter and builder by trade, and lived 
in Northampton, Massachusetts, where 
he was highly esteemed among his as- 
sociates. He married Electa Clark, and 
they were the parents of two children : 
John (3), of whom further; and Ann. 

(VIII) John (3) Sackett, son of Jus- 
tus and Electa (Clark) Sackett, was born 
in Northampton, Massachusetts, in 1831, 
and died in 1908. He was an able 
and energetic man, a carpenter and 
builder by trade, who came to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1875, ^"^ 
there passed the remainder of his life. 
He was associated with the Smith & 
Wesson Company for a time, and later 
went into business for himself, becoming 
the proprietor of a boarding house. He 
was an active supporter of the temper- 
ance cause, ably assisting in the work of 



2^Z 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the Golden Cross and the Good Templars, 
temperance societies which did much for 
the advance of the cause in those times. 
Mr. Sackett was himself a strong and con- 
vincing speaker, and in the interest of 
the cause in which he so thoroughly be- 
lieved he made many eloquent and ef- 
fective addresses. He married Julia 
Maria Clark, of Northampton, daughter of 
Daniel and Louisa (Eaton) Clark, and 
they were the parents of four children : 
Emma, deceased, married (first) Edward 
Little; (second) George Hutchinson; Ed- 
ward B. ; Albert Henderson, of whom fur- 
ther; and Eugene Charles, a biography 
of whom appears on following pages. 

(IX) Albert Henderson Sackett, son of 
John (3) and Julia Maria (Clark) Sack- 
ett, was born in Northampton, Massa- 
chusetts, April 26, 1861, and received his 
education in the public schools of his na- 
tive city. When his school training was 
completed he engaged in farming for a 
time, and then came to Springfield, where 
for several years he was in the employ of 
Smith & Wesson. Though he worked 
steadily and faithfully, however, he had 
from boyhood been deeply interested in 
amateur theatricals, and possessed talent 
in that line, and when he was thirty years 
of age he followed the line of his interest 
and entered the theatrical profession. He 
was successful, and since that time has 
made for himself a place and a worthy 
name in that field. He has toured the 
country many times, playing in stock 
companies for a period of five years, and 
making his home in New York and Phila- 
delphia. He is a member of the Green 
Room Club, and is highly esteemed among 
a very large circle of friends and profes- 
sional associates. 

On December 14, 1885, Mr. Sackett 
married Jeannette Sanderson, of Hatfield, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Sanford and 



Eliza Ellen (Remington) Sanderson, and 
granddaughter of Alvin and Jeannette 
(Reed) Sanderson, and they are the par- 
ents of two children : Raymond Albert, 
who died at the age of six years ; and 
Julia Sanderson, who has followed her 
father's profession, and under the stage 
name of Julia Sanderson has distinguished 
herself in that field. She owns a beauti- 
ful summer home in Longmeadow, Massa- 
chusetts. Julia Sanderson Sackett was 
born in Springfield, Massachusetts, and 
received her education in the schools of 
that city and in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. She made her first appearance 
with the Forepaugh Stock Company, of 
Philadelphia, continuing with them for a 
period of five years. In 1902 she ap- 
peared in "Winsome Winnie" at the Ca- 
sino, New York, later playing Mrs. Pine- 
apple in "A Chinese Honeymoon," and 
playing with DeWolf Hopper as Mataya 
in "Wang" at the Lyric Theatre in New 
York. She made a brief tour in vaude- 
ville in 1907 ; appeared in "The Honorable 
Phil" and "The Darling Little Duke" in 
London, England ; and later with Ray- 
mond Hitchcock and G. P. Huntley in 
"Hitchy-Koo" at the New Amsterdam 
Theatre, New York ; as Aileen Cavanaugh 
in "The Arcadians" at the Liberty Thea- 
tre, New York, in 1910; as Dora Dale in 
"The Sunshine Girl" in leading cities of 
the United States ; she was made a star 
and opened in Washington, and at that 
time President Taft threw her a bouquet 
of flowers ; she appeared in "The Girl 
from Utah," a musical comedy, in Chi- 
cago, with Donald Brian and Joseph Caw- 
thorn, in 1915 ; starred with the Sibyl 
Company in 1916-17 ; and also appeared 
in "Tangerine." Since that time she has 
continued an eminently successful career, 
and is well known throughout the coun- 
try. Julia Sanderson Sackett married 



284 



-s^--™-| 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(first) Tod Sloan; (second) Lieutenant 
Bradford Barnett, commander and navi- 
gator of the 4th Division Flag Ship of the 
Atlantic Fleet, under Admiral Rodman, 
whose father was captain of Admiral 
Dewey's flagship. 



SACKETT, Frank Herbert, Jr. 

Among the younger business men of 
Springfield who are contributing to the 
development of the city is Frank Herbert 
Sackett, Jr., treasurer and clerk of the 
Sackett Brothers Company, engaged in 
contracting and landscape gardening. 

(IV) Daniel Sackett, son of John (2) 
Sackett and Deborah (Filley) Sackett 
(q. v.), was born in Westfield, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1693, and died in 1776. He 
was an active participant in the Colonial 
wars, serving in 1723 as a sentinel in 
Captain Adaget Dewey's troop of horse ; 
later as a member of Captain Hezekiah 
Noble's troops ; and still later was on 
duty, guarding Westfield under Captain 
John Ashley. He married, February i, 
1732, Mary Weller, daughter of Eleazer 
Weller, Jr., and they were the parents of 
children : Margaret, Daniel, Ozum, Mary, 
Ann, Moses, Israel, Gad, of whom fur- 
ther; and Abner, 

(V) Gad Sackett, son of Daniel and 
Mary (Weller) Sackett, was born in 
Westfield, Massachusetts, in 1748. He 
served in the Revolutionary War, enlist- 
ing May 4, 1775, in Captain Wareham 
Park's Company, Colonel Timothy Dan- 
ielson's regiment, and serving as corporal 
for three months and four days. The 
Massachusetts records show that he was 
also mustered in at a later date. He mar- 
ried, in 1773, Lucy Williams, and they 
were the parents of five children : Derrick, 
Russell, Elijah, of whom further ; Gad, 
and Lucy. 

(VI) Elijah Sackett, son of Gad and 



Lucy (Williams) Sackett, was born in 
West Springfield, Massachusetts, April 
9, 1785. He married, March 12, 1804, 

Cynthia , born August 11, 1784, 

and their children were : Edwin, born Feb- 
ruary I, 1805 ; Israel, born August 8, 1808; 
Clarissa, born July 30, 1812; Justin, born 
September 5, 1814; Cynthia, born Feb- 
ruary 3, 1820; and Elijah, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(VII) Elijah (2) Sackett, son of Eli- 
jah (i) and Cynthia Sackett, was born in 
West Springfield, Massachusetts, January 
29, 1825, and died in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1897. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native 
city, and resided in West Springfield un- 
til 1867, when he removed to Springfield, 
where for many years he was employed 
in the water shops. Eventually he en- 
gaged in contracting, grading, and land- 
scape gardening, which occupation he fol- 
lowed during the remainder of his life. 
For a time he was associated with Mr. 
Reynolds, under the firm name of Sackett 
& Reynolds, and later he admitted to part- 
nership his sons, William H., and Frank 
H. During the years of his activity, he 
did the grading and landscape work on 
many of the finest places in Springfield, 
and built up an eminently successful and 
prosperous business. He was an able, ac- 
tive man, actively interested in the wel- 
fare of his community, and highly es- 
teemed by a large circle of friends and as- 
sociates. His religious affiliation was 
with Trinity church. 

Elijah (2) Sackett married Olive An- 
toinette Dunham and they were the par- 
ents of four children: i. William, de- 
ceased; married (first) Isabelle Illsley; 
(second) Elizabeth Carrier; children of 
the first marriage : Clarabelle, who mar- 
ried W. W. Johnson ; and George Illsley, 
who died March 12, 1906. 2. Clara, died 



285 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in infancy. 3. Frank H., of whom further. 
4. Fred E., a sketch of whom follows. 

(VIII) Frank H. Sackett, son of Eli- 
jah (2) and Olive Antoinette (Dunham) 
Sackett, was born in Payne, Illinois, Sep- 
tember, 1855, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, November 13, 191 1. He 
received his education in the public 
schools of his native city and in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, to which city his 
parents removed when he was a boy of 
about twelve years. After completing his 
studies, he engaged in business with his 
father, in the firm of Sackett Brothers & 
Reynolds, which later became the firm of 
Sackett Brothers, the other member of 
the firm being Fred E. Sackett. Mr. Sack- 
ett was a capable business man, possessed 
of energy, foresight, and excellent execu- 
tive and administrative ability, and in ad- 
dition to his interest in the contracting 
firm of Sackett Brothers, which is still 
engaged in sewer construction, the laying 
of cement walks, and landscape garden- 
ing, was a stockholder in the East Spring- 
field Realty Company, a concern to which 
he devoted much time and attention. 
Though meeting his business responsi- 
bilities with marked efficiency and suc- 
cess, Mr. Sackett found time for fraternal 
and social affiliations, being a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and of the Nayasset and Winthrop clubs. 

On April 15, 1879, Frank H. Sackett 
married Sarah J. Cafrier, born in Nor- 
wich, Massachusetts, daughter of Oliver 
and Hannah (Butler) Carrier, and they 
became the parents of one son, Frank H., 
Jr., of whom further. 

(IX) Frank Herbert Sackett, Jr., son 
of Frank H. and Sarah J. (Carrier) Sack- 
ett, was born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, December 21, 1882. He received his 
education in the public schools, including 
the Springfield High School, and then 



went to New York City, where for a year 
he was engaged in the contracting busi- 
ness. At the end of that time he returned 
to Springfield, and associated himself 
with the firm of Sackett Brothers, en- 
gaged in contracting and landscape gar- 
dening, and upon the incorporation of the 
company in 1914 was made treasurer and 
clerk of that concern, which positions he 
still holds (1923). Mr. Sackett is thor- 
oughly conversant with the details of the 
several departments of the extensive busi- 
ness of the Sackett Brothers Company, 
and is materially contributing to the suc- 
cess of the concern. Fraternally he is a 
member of Springfield Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, and also a member of 
the North Congregational Church. 

On November i, 1906, Frank Herbert 
Sackett, Jr., married Grace Bridge, of Suf- 
field, Connecticut, daughter of Alfred 
Skinner and Margaret (Conlin) Bridge. 



SACKETT, Fred Ellsworth 

Among the successful business men of 
Springfield is Fred E. Sackett, president 
and general manager of the Sackett 
Brothers Company, which is engaged in 
landscape gardening, sewer construction, 
and the laying of cement walks. 

(VIII) Fred Ellsworth Sackett, son of 
Elijah (2) and Olive Antoinette (Dun- 
ham) Sackett (q. v.), was born in West 
Springfield, Massachusetts, December 10, 
1865. He received his education in the 
public schools of Springfield, and as a 
young man was employed by his father 
in the contracting business, later becom- 
ing a partner in the firm of Sackett 
Brothers. When the concern was incor- 
porated in 1914, he was made president 
and general manager, which responsible 
offices he still holds (1923), conducting 
most efficiently the rapidly expanding 
business founded by his father. The firm 



286 




^^^^J^^ efa^ii^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of Sackett Brothers is doing an extensive 
business in landscape gardening, sewer 
construction, and the laying of cement 
walks, and employs from fifty to one hun- 
dren men in their work. To the artistic 
taste, mechanical skill, and business abil- 
ity of the Sackett Brothers, Springfield 
owes many of her most attractive 
grounds. The father was one of the first 
to assist in laying out the McKnight 
property, embracing what is now a large 
number of the most beautiful streets in 
the city. The brothers also laid out the 
Dingle Heights tract of land on Dickin- 
son street, the Colony Hill Trust Com- 
pany land near Forest Park, and they 
also assisted Air. Moore in laying out the 
streets and building the sewers in what 
is now East Springfield, one of the largest 
developments in the State, now well cov- 
ered with residences and containing some 
of the largest manufacturing plants in 
the country, such as the great Rolls-Royce 
automobile plant. In the course of the 
successful career, the Sackett Brothers 
have laid out a number of streets in dif- 
ferent sections of the city, including a 
number on the property of the late Dr. 
Hooker. A part of the last mentioned 
tract was known as the Knox pasture, and 
among the streets opened there were Shel- 
don street, part of Birnie avenue, the rear 
of Arch street, also South, George, Knox, 
Newman, Dexter and Windsor streets, 
also the magnificent grounds of what was 
the Wesson Mansion, now the Colony 
Club House on ]\Iaple street, and the 
beautiful grounds of the C. B. Goodhill 
Mansion on Central Walnut street. The 
firm also developed the Noriss Howard 
tract of land and Flighway Park. In ad- 
dition to the vast amount of work repre- 
sented in the contracts already mentioned, 
they also did a vast amount of work in 



developing Montague City, near Green- 
field, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Sackett has for many years been a 
collector of Indian relics, and he now has 
one of the finest collections in the country, 
consisting of more than three thousand dif- 
ferent specimens, including hundreds of ar- 
row heads of all sizes, carefully arranged, 
from the very smallest to the largest, also 
numbers of Indian hatchets, and, in fact, 
everything used by the Indians, including 
some of the rarest and most perfect speci- 
mens to be found in the country. He 
also has a collection of the kind of money 
known as "script," which was used in this 
country previous to the time of the mint- 
ing silver coins. All denominations from 
five cents to fifty cents are included in 
Mr. Sackett's collection ; each script is 
new, and it is probable that this collec- 
tion is the only one of its kind in New 
England. Mr. Sackett also has a paper 
bearing the date 1831 and containing an 
address delivered by Judge Hutchinson, 
of Woodstock, to the Freemen of Ver- 
mont, and a copy of the "New York 
Herald" issued April 15. 1865, giving all 
the details of the assassination of Presi- 
dent Lincoln. He also has in his collec- 
tion a paper issued September 20, 1881, 
containing an account of the assassina- 
tion of President Garfield. In addition to 
his business responsibilities and his inter- 
est in historic collections, Mr. Sackett 
finds time for fraternal and social affili- 
ations. He is a member of the Knights 
of Malta ; of the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks ; and of the Nayasset 
Club ; and in the early days of the bicycle, 
he became a charter member of the Bi- 
cycle Club. He is also a member of the 
Oxford-Winthrop Turn Verein, the Com- 
mercial Travelers' Club, and the Colonial 
Club, all of Springfield, and of the Man- 
chonis Club of Wilbraham. 



287 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



On March 17, 1885, Fred E. Sackett 
married Bessie Estelle Burlingham, of 
Windsor Hill, Massachusetts, daughter of 
Albert James and Julia (Hathaway) Bur- 
lingham, and they are the parents of one 
son, Leslie Melvin, who died in infancy. 



SACKETT, Eugene Charles 

For nearly half a century, Eugene 
Charles Sackett has been a resident of 
Springfield, coming to that city with his 
parents when he was a child of six years, 
receiving his education there, and there 
building his entire business career. For 
thirty-seven years he has been associated 
with the men's furnishing business, in 
which he is still engaged (1923) under his 
own name, E. C. Sackett. 

(IX) Eugene Charles Sackett, son of 
John (3) and Julia Maria (Clark) Sack- 
ett, was born in Northampton, Massa- 
chusetts, September 23, 1869, and came to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, with his par- 
ents when he was six years of age. He 
received a good, practical education in 
the public schools of Springfield, and 
when school days were over began his 
business career in the store of Walker 
Brothers & Toby, as errand boy. The 
firm, which later became the Walker 
Brothers & Lewis Company, was engaged 
in the men's furnishing business, and for 
twenty-six years IMr. Sackett maintained 
his connection with that business, stead- 
ily rising and carefully saving a worthy 
proportion of his earnings until 191 1, when 
he engaged in that busness for himself, 
under the corporate name of The Sackett 
Company, of which he was treasurer. In 
1917, however, he severed his connection 
with the rest of the company, and since 
that time has continued in the same busi- 
ness alone, under his own name, E. C. 
Sackett. His new building occupies the 
same ground on which he first began 



business for himself eleven years ago, at 
No. 485 Main street, but in 1917 a beau- 
tiful new building was erected and in this 
he has since been conducting a success- 
ful business. In 1908 he bought land in 
Longmeadow upon which he built a resi- 
dence, and since that time has resided in 
that home. 

Interested in public affairs and in the 
welfare of his city, Mr. Sackett has taken 
an active part in political affairs of his 
district, city and State. He gives his 
support to the principles and the candi- 
dates of the Republican party, and has 
served as a member of the Republican 
City Committee. Fraternally he is affili- 
ated with Hamp