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Full text of "Encyclopedia of Massachusetts, biographical--genealogical;"

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Encycbpetrta of ilassachusEtts 



Biographical — Genealogical 



Compiled with the Assistance of a 

Capable Corps of Advisers and Contributors 



ILLUSTRATED 



THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY (Inc.) 

NEW YORK PUBLISHERS CHICAGO 

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Both justice anJ decency require that we should bestow on our forefathers 
an honorable remembrance - Thucydides 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



WALLACE, Andrew B. 

Andrew B. Wallace was born in Xew- 
burg, Fifeshire, Scotland, March 27, 1842, 
son of David and Christina (Brabner) Wal- 
lace, the former named a representative of 
an ancient and honorable Scotch family. He 
was a dealer in wood, a member of the 
Town Council, a member of the Presbyte- 
rian Church, and a man of influence in his 
town. He died in 1894. 

Andrew B. Wallace attended school in his 
native town until the age of fifteen years, 
then was apprenticed to a dry goods mer- 
chant for a term of four years. When that 
term expired, in 1862, he left home and 
went to Stirling, going thence to Glasgow, 
remaining in those two cities until 1867, 
when he came to the United States, locating 
in Boston, Massachusetts. Being an ex- 
perienced dry goods clerk, and before com- 
ing over, well known, he was hired by a 
Boston firm, Hogg, Brown & Taylor, while 
in Glasgow. From Boston Mr. Wallace went 
to Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where for four 
years he was a member of the firm of Smith 
& Wallace. That firm continued in business 
until 1874, when Mr. Wallace withdrew and 
moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, there 
founding the dry goods firm of Forbes & 
Wallace. That firm has prospered and has 
become the leading dry goods house in West- 
ern Massachusetts, a large business having 
been developed. They erected, in 1920, a 
building in place of their present store at 
Numbers 392-94-96-98 Main Street, which 
when completed gave them a unified eight- 
story and basement store with the present 
Main Street front and extending down 
Vernon Street. The building is of the most 
modern type of steel frame and fireproof 
construction. The outside is faced with 
gray brick and Indian limestone, correspond- 
ing with the present Vernon and Pynchon 



Street buildings. One of the conspicuous 
features of the new store is a vestibule en- 
trance at the center front, faced with Ver- 
mont marble and bronze, the entrance being 
banked with display windows and cases. 
Large show windows occupy the entire Main 
street front, and also extend two hundred 
feet on the Vermont Street side of the store. 
The store extension adds four additional 
floors to the space already in use, with a 
total of forty thousand square feet of floor 
space, which makes possible extensive ex- 
pansion for many departments. A spacious 
new waiting-room, rest-room, and art gal- 
lery on the fifth floor is one of the new 
attractions. On the fourth floor the added 
space gives room for a necessary enlarge- 
ment of the store's private fur storage plant. 
Main ofifices are on the second floor, stock- 
rooms on the third and seventh floors, and 
the first floor includes a lady's hair-dressing 
and manicuring department, and specialty 
shop for children's hair-cutting. 

Mr. Wallace was also head of a syndicate 
known as the Consolidated Dry Goods 
Company, with stores in Pittsfield, North- 
ampton and North Adams, Massachusetts, 
and Schenectady and Poughkeepsie, New 
York — five stores. In addition to these Mr. 
Wallace was interested in a number of 
Springfield corporations, including the War- 
wick Bicycle Company, the Springfield 
Knitting Company, the Pettis Dry Goods 
Company of Indianapolis, the Springfield 
Electric Light Company, the Denholm & Mc- 
Kay Dry Goods Company, of Worcester ; the 
Springfield Loan and Trust Company, of 
which he was an incorporator and director, 
and the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company, of which he was also sf 
director. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Wallace was 
always interested in all that pertains to the 



EN'CVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGR--\PHY 



public good. He vira.s for years one of the 
auditors of the city. He was a member of 
the Qjngregational Church, having served on 
the parish committee for many years. He 
vk-as a member of the building committee in 
charge of the erection of the Young Men's 
Christian Association in Springfield, and long 
served the association as a director. 

Mr. Wallace married (first) Jean Miller, 
of Scotland, and they were the parents of 
a son, Robert M.. a merchant of Springfield. 
Married (second) Madora Crosby Vaille; 
parents of five children: i. Andrew Brab- 
ner, Jr., bom August 26, 1884; married 
Florence Woods, and has a son, Andrew 
Brabner (3), and a daughter, Barbara. 2. 
Douglas Vaille, bom November 2j, 1885 ; 
married Man.- Robinson and has two sons: 
John R., and Mack Foster. 3. Madora, bom 
July 30, 1887; married Douglas H. Thom- 
son, and has three children: James Mc-A.r- 
thur, Madora. and Douglas H., Jr. 4. Ruth, 
born Febrtiary 21, 1890, attended the Mac- 
Duffie School for Girls in Springfield, Miss 
Foster's School in Farmington, and spent 
two years in study abroad ; married, October 
31, 1920, Laurens McGregor Demarest, of 
Newark, New^ Jersey, son of Mrs. Daniel 
Demarest, of Montclair, New Jersey; the 
ceremony was performed by the Rev. Dr. 
Neil McPherson, pastor of the First Con- 
gregational Church, of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. Mr. Demarest is a graduate of 
Yale, class of 1893, and is now president 
of the American Machinery- and Equipment 
Corporation of Newark, New Jersey. 5. 
Norman, born February 24, 1893; niarried 
Marjorie Robins, and has three children: 
Marjorie, Laurens, and Johanne. 



SPOONER, Major Samuel Brigham 

A record of fony-six years as register 
of the Probate Court is only part of the 
achievement of the late Major Samuel B. 
Spooner, whose death in 1909 ended a career 
of peculiar interest and worth. Prominent 
for half a century in public office, a veteran 
of the Ci^•il War, and for four decades one 



of the best known men in Masonic circles in 
the Connecticut Valley, as well as in the 
Grand Army of the Republic, his sterling 
qualities of character endeared him to a host 
of friends and associates. 

The family bearing the Spooner name is 
of ancient English lineage. One branch lived 
in Wickwantford, Counts- Worcester, in 
1559, and had arms as follows: 

Arms — .\rure, a boar's head in bend argent, 
armed or, pierced couped gules, guttee de sang. 

Crest — A boar's head coui>ed or, pierced through 
the neck wth a spear argent, embrued with blood 
proper. 

In 1683 these arms were confirmed to 
Thomas Spooner of that place. 

(I) William Spooner, immigrant ances- 
tor, was of Colchester, England, and ap- 
prenticed himself, March 27, 1637, to John 
Holmes, of New Pl\-mouth, in America, 
gentleman. William Spooner was probably 
a brother of Thomas Spooner, of Salem, and 
is thought to be the son of John and Ann 
Spooner, who in 16 16 were li\-ing in Ley- 
den, Holland, Ann Spooner, widow of John, 
was li\-ing there in 1630, and in 1637 an Ann 
Spooner was in Salem, and was no doubt 
the widow and mother of William and 
Thomas. William Spooner was transferred 
as apprentice to John Coombs, of Pl\-mouth, 
July I, 1637, and settled there. He was 
on the list of those able to bear arms in 
1643, ^nd in 1648 was ordered by the cotirt 
to pay the debts of his master and take care 
of his children. He was admitted a free- 
man June 6, 1654, and at the same time was 
appointed surveyor of highways, and was a 
member of the jun.- in 1657 and 1666. 
About 1660 he removed to Dartmouth, 
where he received grants of land, and some 
by purchase. This remained in possession 
of the family for about two hundred years, 
imtil 1855. It is said that he and his sons 
built the first mill in the town, in what is 
now Acushnet Village. He married (first) 
Elizabeth Partridge, who died April 28, 
1648; (second) March 18, 1651, Haimah 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Pratt. He died between March 8 and 14, 
1683-4, leaving a will dated March 8, 
1683-4. The inventory was returned March 
14. Child of first wife: i. John, living in 
1734. Children of second wife: 2. Sarah, 
born October 5, 1653. 3. Samuel, born 
January 14, 1655, mentioned below. 4. 
Martha, 5. William. 6. Isaac, died De- 
cember 2~, 1709, 7. Hannah. 8. Ebenezer, 
born in 1666, died February 5, 1718. 
9. Mercy. 

(II ) Samuel Spooner, son of William and 
Hannah (Pratt) Spooner, was born Januar\- 
14, 1655. and died in 1739. He resided in 
Dartmouth; was constable in 1680-84; arid 
served often on the jury and in other posi- 
tions of trust. His will was dated September 
27, 1731, and proved February 19, 1739. 
He married Experience \\'ing, born August 
4. 1668, daughter of Daniel and Anna 
(Ewer) Wing. Children: i. William, born 
February 13, 1689, died 1750. 2. ^Mary, 
born January 4. 1691 ; married, February 6, 
1733, Caleb Peckham. 3. Samuel, of whom 
further. 4. Daniel, born February 28, 
1694; married (first) Elizabeth Ruggles; 
(second) Bethiah Xichols; (third) Mar\' 
(Dean) Whitcomb. 5. Seth, born January 
31, 1695, died March 28, 1787. 6. Hannah, 
born Januar}- 27, 1697. 7. Jashub, born 
November 13, 1698. 8, Anna, born April 
18, 1700; married, January 5, 1725, James 
Hatch; (second) Cornelius Allen. 9, Ex- 
perience, born June 19, 1702. 10. Beulah, 
born June 2"/, 1705 ; married John Spooner. 
II. Wing, bom April 30, 17 — . 

(III) Samuel Spooner, son of Samuel 
and Experience (Wing) Spooner, was born 
February 4, 1693, and died in 1781. He was 
a farmer in Dartmouth, Massachusetts ; held 
several minor town offices ; and was a regu- 
lar attendant at church worship. He mar- 
ried (first), April 10. 1717, Rebecca Wes- 
ton, who died January 20, 1729; (second) 
March 8, 1729, Deborah Pope, who was 
born April 25, 1693, daughter of Isaac and 
Alice Pope. Children of first marriage : 
Esther, Hannah, Thomas, Zephaniah, Ama- 



ziah, of whom further. Children of the 
second marriage : Elnathan, Abigail, Seth. 

(IV) Amaziah Spooner, son of Samuel 
and Rebecca (Weston) Spooner, was born 
March 9, 1726, and died July 8, 1798. He 
removed to Hardwick, Massachusetts, where 
he resided until his death. He married, Feb- 
ruary 22, I'j'i^, Lydia Fay, who was born 
in 1730, and died August 10, 181 7, daughter 
of Deacon James and Lydia (Child) Fay. 
Children : Thomas, Zephaniah. Lucy. Eliza- 
beth, Lydia, Samuel, of whom further ; 
Charles, Rebecca, Hannah, Seth. 

(V) Samuel Spooner, son of Amaziah 
and Lydia (Fay) Spooner, was born Jan- 
uary 20, 1763. and died April 18, 1840. He 
passed his Hfe in Hardwick, Massachusetts, 
where he was engaged in farming. His in- 
telligence, ?ound judgment and qualities of 
heart gave him a standing which made his 
society much sought, and his aid in neigh- 
borhood matters often required. Like his 
older brothers he was in the service of his 
country. At the early age of fifteen years 
he was in the company of Captain John 
Morgan, detached from the counties of 
Hampshire and Worcester to guard the sev- 
eral stores of Springfield and Brookfield. 
In 1781 he is recorded in the company of 
Captain John Cutter. He married, January 
14. 1798, Hannah Williams, who was born 
March 24, 1777, and died in June. 1830, 
daughter of Jacob and Sarah (Dean) Wil- 
liams. Children: i. Sarah, born January 
21, 1800, died January 2^, 1846. 2. Orin, 
born November 28, 1802, died September 
13, 1867. 3. Hannah, born October 2, 
1804. 4. Samuel Brigham. of whom fur- 
ther. 5. Lydia Maria, born July 24, 1810, 
died May 22. 1837. 6. Zep^enia, born 
March 28, 1812. 

(VI) Samuel Brigham Spooner, son of 
Samuel and Hannah (Williams) Spooner, 
was born in Barre. Massachusetts, Septem- 
ber 17. 1806. and died in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. May 8, 1862. He married Mary 
Richardson, of Barre, Vermont, who was 
born November 29, 1803, and died April i, 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



1892. Their children were: i. Major Sam- 
uel Brigham, of whom further. 2. Mary 
Jane, born June 7, 1833, died February 8, 
1924, married Justin L. Worthy. 3. Ol- 
cott. born July. 1834, died October 14, 1836. 
4. I^wton R., born February 23, 1837, died 
January 31, 1901. 5. Caroline F., married 
Frank Beebe. deceased. 6. Abbie Adele, 
who was born October i, 1850. 

(VII) Major Samuel Brigham Spooner, 
son of Samuel Brigham and Mary (Rich- 
ardson) Spooner, was born in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, in the white house that stood 
opposite Cherry Lane on Central Street, 
November 2, 1830, and died March 29, 
1909, in that city. He attended the public 
schools of Springfield and graduated from 
Springfield High School with the class of 
1849, when he delivered the valedictory. He 
then matriculated in Yale University, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 
1853. This was known as the famous class, 
and in it were men of great literary attain- 
ments who later became known throughout 
the country. For five years following the 
comi)letion of his college course he tauglit 
school. During the next three years he 
taught at Russell's Commercial and Collegi- 
iate Institute in New Haven, Connecticut, 
and for a like period in Jackson, Michigan. 
He then returned to Springfield, where in 
association with his brother-in-law, J. L. 
Worthy, he engaged in the flour business, 
locating on Worthington Street. There he 
remained for two and one-half years. His 
puljlic life began in iS6r, when he was elected 
city clerk and treasurer, which position he 
held until September of the following year, 
when he resigned to enlist in the Civil War. 
He enlisted in the 46th Regiment, Company 
A, and was made captain of the company, 
but al)ility and courage w(jn his successive 
promotion until, in February, 1863, he was 
commissioned major. The 46th Regiment 
was made up entirely of Western Massa- 
chusetts men, the volunteers coming from 
the hill towns to the west and north and to 
Plampden County. The regiment partici- 



pated in tlie battles of Goldsboro and 
Kingston, but during the greater part of the 
time its duty was that of picketing. For 
that reason other engagements besides those 
just mentioned were mostly skirmishes. 
Major Spooner won the affection of the men 
of his regiment during the war and was con- 
sidered by them an ideal officer. On July 
29, 1863, he was mustered out of service 
and returned to Springfield, The following 
September he was elected register of pro- 
bate of Hampden County, and that respon- 
sible office he held until his death. He was 
the oldest register of probate in the State, 
and for many years he served in that ca- 
pacity with his colonel, William S. Shurt- 
leflf, who was judge of probate. He was 
active in local public affairs, serving as a 
member of the Common Council in 1871 
and as mayor in 1872-73. He was the old- 
est living ex -major of Springfield. He was 
the original captain of the old Peabody 
Guard, and when Company A, City Guard, 
was organized in 1868, he was made captain 
of that company, in which office he served 
for several years. He was active in the 
affairs of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
serving as commander of the E, K. Wil- 
cox Post in 1878, at the time when the 
notable reunion of the veterans was held 
in Springfield, an occasion planned especially 
for the reunion of the veterans who had 
fought with the Army of the Potomac. He 
was marshal of the great parade on that 
occasion, and for many years he was presi- 
dent of the 46th Regiment Association. 

During the last forty years of his life 
Major Spooner was one of the best known 
Masons in the Connecticut Valley, and there 
was hardly a lodge in the valley that he had 
not visited. He was a thirty-third degree 
Mason, having taken the highest degree in 
Boston in 1885 with C. C. Spellman, the 
well-known attorney, now deceased, of 
Springfield, and in practice over fifty years. 
He also held the highest offices in each Ma- 
sonic body with which he was identified. 
He was a charter member and Past Master 



ipUBLi^. LIBHARY 






ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons; High Priest of Morning Star 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Thrice Illus- 
trious Master of Springfield Council, Royal 
and Select Masters ; Commander of Spring- 
field Commandery, Knights Templar; head 
of the Lodge of Perfection, and of the 
Princes of Jerusalem, also of Rose Croix, a 
member of the Massachusetts Consistory, 
and an honorary member of the Supreme 
Council. 

Major Spooner was a man of exceptional 
endowment and of attractive qualities of 
heart and mind. The following tribute was 
paid him by one who knew him well, through 
long years of close association. 

He was a man of warm and genial friendliness 
and tolerant acceptance of differences. Possessed 
of definite principle in regard to his own life, he 
never quarreled with any other man's choice of 
action. He never made an enemy, but made a 
great many friends. Though there never was a 
man less disposed to push himself into prominent 
postion, every citizen of the city and county to 
which his service was given, and with whom he 
was brought into relations of business, was both 
proud and fond of him for himself, as a man of 
high integrity and principle, who met them with 
genuine heart and honor, and whom they were 
glad to keep in service so long as he could stay. 
He would no doubt have been made judge of pro- 
bate after Judge Shurtleff's death had it not 
been for the infirmity of deafness which had be- 
gun a dozen years before. In his various affilia- 
tions he was prized especially among the brethren 
of the Masonic Order ; and to his comrades of 
the Union Army he was a friend deeply mourned. 
"Brigham," or more often "Brig Spooner," was 
the familiar term by which he was called by the 
older citizenry, and by his older associates. 

Major Samuel B. Spooner married, on 
October 29, 1863, Jennie M. Bishop, of 
Middletown, Connecticut, who died July 20, 
1878, daughter of Theodore and Esther 
(Bennett) Bishop. Major and Mrs. 
Spooner were the parents of the following 
children: i. Arthur Lincoln, born April 15, 
1865, who is manager of the Hotel Gotham 
in New York City. 2. Mary Eliza, who 
resides in Springfield. 



DAME, Colonel Clarence Stuart 

The Dame family came from Cheshire, 
England, where they were "freeholders" 
from the time of Edward IV, or there- 
abouts. They lived in what is now known 
as the Parish of Leighton, ]\Iinshul Vernon, 
in the town of Nantick, Cheshire, and the 
old farm is now called the Red Hall Farm, 
a portion of it being known as "Dam's 
Croft." The name is spelled variously 
Dame, Dam, Damme. 

(I) Colonel Dame traces his ancestry to 
John Damme, who was born in England in 
1 610 and came to Dover, New Hampshire, 
with Captain Thomas Wiggins' company in 
1633. This group of immigrants took pos- 
session of Edward Hilton's grant and began 
a settlement on Dover Neck, where the first 
meeting house, built of logs, was erected a 
few rods southwest of the place where the 
second meeting house was built twenty years 
later. John Hall was the first deacon, and 
after his death, in 1675, John Damme was 
elected to succeed him. In a petition to the 
governor presented by the inhabitants of 
Dover in 1689, the names of John Damme 
and Nicholas Damme appear among the 
signers, but no further mention of Nicholas 
has been found. John Damme received val- 
uable grants of land from the town of 
Dover, and was one of the prominent citi- 
zens of that place, holding high official posi- 
tion and rendering valuable service to the 
community. His will was dated May 19, 
1687, and probated March 23, 1694. He 
married Elizabeth Pomfret, daughter of 
William Pomfret, the latter being for many 
years town clerk of Dover. Children of 
John and Elizabeth (Pomfret) Damme 
were: John, of further mention; Elizabeth, 
Mary, William, Susannah, Judith. 

(II) Sergeant John Dam, son of John 
and Elizabeth (Pomfret) Damme, was born 
in Dover, New Hampshire, January 8, 1636, 
and died January 8, 1706. He resided in 
that part of Dover called Bloody Point, now 
Newington, having settled upon a grant of 
land his father had received, on the east 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



shore of Little Bay, now known as Dame's 
Point, where several generations of the 
Dame family were afterward Ijorn. He was 
an officer in the militia and did service in 
the Indian wars as well as giving service in 
various official positions in time of peace. 
He married (first) Sarah Hall, daughter of 
Sergeant John Hall, of Dover. She died 
in 1662, leaving a daughter, Abigail, born 
in 1663, who married, in 1687, Thomas 
Starbord. He married (second), November 
9, 1664, Elizabeth Furber, daughter of 
Lieutenant William Furber, of Dover. To 
the second marriage five children were born : 
John, who died in infancy; John, of whom 
further ; Alice, Moses, Bethiah. 

(III) John Dame, son of Sergeant John 
and Elizabeth (Furber) Dam, was born in 
Dover, New Hampshire (Dame's Point), 
February 2^, 1668, and died in 1730. He 
settled at Dame's Point, where he took an 
active part in public aflfairs. He was deacon 
of the church in Newington, and was also 
one of the proprietors of the town of Roch- 
ester, New York. He married (first) Jane 
Rowe, daughter of Richard Rowe, Esq., of 
Dover; (second) Elizabeth Ho}1: (or Hoit). 
Children of first marriage were: Zebulon, 
John, of further mention; Richard, Elna- 
than, Alice, Eliza, Susannah. 

(IV) John Dame, son of John and Jane 
(Rowe) Dame, was born in 1695, ^^^ ^'^^ 
in January, 1768. He lived on the home- 
stead farm at Dame's Point, Newington, 
New Hampshire, and contributed a worthy 
share to the progress of that community. 
He married, February 29, 171 8, Elizabeth 
Bickford, of Dover, New Hampshire, and 
they were the parents of twelve children: 
Joseph, of whom further; Moses, Issachar, 
Elizabeth, John, Benjamin, Theodor, Jeth- 
ero, Elizabeth, Alice, Esther, Olive. 

(V) Joseph Dame, son of John and Eliza- 
beth (Bickford) Dame, was born May 16, 
1719, and died in April, 1807. He married, 
in 1739, Mehitable Hall, of Dover, and they 
were the parents of eight children: Mary, 



Joseph, of whom further; Richard, George, 
John. Esther, Bethiah, Samuel. 

(VI) Joseph Dame, son of Joseph and 
Mehitable (Hall) Dame, was born March 
24, 1743. and died April 25, 1773. He 
married Patience Chadbourne, daughter of 
James and Bridget (Knight) Chadbourne, 
of York, Maine, and settled at Barnstead, 
New Hampshire. Their children were : 
James Chadbourne, of further mention, and 
Joseph. 

(VII) James Chadbourne Dame, son of 
Joseph and Patience (Chadbourne) Dame, 
was born at Barnstead, New Hampshire, 
August 25, 1770, and died at Concord, New 
Hampshire, October 10, 1859. He w-as 
noted as a skillful and successful schoolmas- 
ter, and lived at Barnstead, where, in con- 
nection with his duties as schoolmaster, he 
was engaged in farming. He married, Jan- 
uary II, 1795, Phebe xAyer, born February 
12, 1772, died October 30, 1859, and they 
became the parents of these children : Joseph, 
John, of whom further; Eliza, George, 
Mary, Patience, Harriet. The last named, 
Harriet, born January 5, 1815, died April, 
1900, was a successful teacher, and served 
throughout the Civil War as a nurse in 
the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Vol- 
unteers, her term of service dating from 
April, 1 86 1, to April, 1865. Such was the 
quality of her ser\ace that she received the 
thanks of the New Hampshire General Court 
and $500 in money as an expression of the 
high appreciation with which her exception- 
ally valuable service was regarded. After 
the war was over she became one of the 
founders of the Soldiers' Home, at Tilton, 
New Hampshire, and served as clerk in the 
Treasury Department at Washington, D. C, 
until seventy-eight years of age. She died 
at the age of eighty-five years. 

(VIII) John Dame, son of James Chad- 
bourne and Phebe (Ayer) Dame, was born 
at Concord, New Hampshire, March 2, 
1799. He was one of those who carried the 
stream of immigration westward, and as a 
young man went with his ox team and goods 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



to Illinois, then to Alichigan, and finally to 
Wisconsin, where he remained. He married 
Anna Drew, and among their children was 
Lewis Dame, of whom further. 

(IX) Lewis Dame, son of John and Anna 
(Drew) Dame, was born in Wisconsin, and 
died in 1919. Among his children was Les- 
ter Stuart, of whom further. 

(X) Lester Stuart Dame, son of Lewis 
Dame, was born near Spring Prairie, Wis- 
cousin, in 1850, and died in 1898, aged 
forty-eight years. He was engaged in busi- 
ness for himself as a contractor and builder, 
and was for some time on the frontier in 
North and South Dakota, later settling in 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he was liv- 
ing at the time of his death. He married 
Mary Bell, of Wisconsin, daughter of John 
Bell, a native of Scotland, and they were 
the parents of seven children: Florence, 
Pearl, Burton, Rose, Lester, Lillian, and 
Clarence Stuart, of whom further. 

(XI) Lieutenant Colonel Clarence Stuart 
Dame, son of Lester and ^Mary (Bell) Dame, 
was born in Spring Prairie, Wisconsin, Sep- 
tember 7, 1877, and while still a child went 
to Minneapolis. Minnesota, with his parents, 
receiving his education in the public schools 
of that city. W^hen school days were over 
he learned the trade of the machinist, and 
throughout the period of his active career 
has been identified with manufacturing in- 
terests. He was employed in railroad shops 
and in railroad work in various States, thus 
gaining a wide experience, and for many 
years was identified with railroad interests 
in North Dakota, Montana and Oregon. In 
191 2 he came East, locating in N^ew York, 
where until 1918 he was associated with 
financial interests. In 1918 he enlisted for 
service in the World War, and for a period 
of twenty-seven months served in the Ordi- 
nance Department in Washington, D. C, 
receiving the rank of lieutenant-colonel. In 
1920 Colonel Dame removed to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and in association with 
Arthur P. Smith and Hinsdale Smith or- 
ganized the Smith Springfield Body Com- 



pany for the purpose of manufacturing high- 
class automobile bodies. They erected a 
large plant in West Springfield, one of the 
finest of its kind in the country, and Mr. 
Dame was elected secretary of the corpora- 
tion. He is now (1925) president and treas- 
urer of the concern. 

Colonel Dame is a member of Excelsior 
Lodge, No. 112, Free and Accepted Masons, 
of Excelsior, Minnesota, also of the York 
Rite bodies, including Ark Chapter. Royal 
Arch Masons, and Commandery, No. 23, 
Knights Templar; and he is also a member 
of Zurah Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, all of IMinne- 
apolis, Minnesota. He is a member of the 
Army and Na\7- Club, of New York; of 
the Transportation Club, of N^ew York, and 
of the N'ayassett Club, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts. 

On August 29, 1898, Colonel Dame mar- 
ried Rose J. Bourgerie, a native of Bor- 
deaux, France, and they are the parents of 
two sons : Lester Stuart, of whom further, 
and Henry Raymond, born in Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, May 15, 1910. 

(XII) Lester Stuart Dame, son of Colonel 
Clarence Stuart Dame and Rose J. 
(Bourgerie) Dame, was born in Minneapo- 
lis, Minnesota, June 21, 1900, and received 
his early education in the public schools of 
his native city. He later attended the Man- 
ual Training School in Washington, D. C, 
and prepared for college at the Mercersburg 
Academy and Preparatory School, after 
which he entered the University of Vir- 
ginia, from which he was graduated in 192 1. 
After graduation, he entered the consular 
service, first as clerk to the consul at Ghent, 
Belgium, and later as vice-consul, which of- 
fice he now holds. 



NILES, Orville Weatherbee 

For many years Orville Weatherbee Niles 
has been numbered among the well-known 
and successful business men of Springfield, 
Massachusetts. At the present time he is 
living retired but spending his summers on 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



his seventy-five-acre estate, known as "Great 
Lake." in Otis, Massachusetts. 

Xiles is an ancient Welsh name, orij^inat- 
ing, according to some authorities, in Scan- 
dinavia. The family is found in all parts of 
the United Kingdom and in America. In 
the early records it was si>elled variously — 
Nile, Xilcs. Xille, Niels, Nils, Nills, Noyles, 
Nyles, Noills, etc. 

d) John Xiles. founder of the family in 
this country and ancestor of all the Colonial 
Niles families, was horn in Wales, in 1603, 
and died February 8, 1694. He came to this 
country and located in Dorchester, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1634. In 1638 or 1639 he re- 
moved to Braintree. an adjacent town, and 
was admitted a freeman May 26, 1647. His 
wife, Jane, died May 15, 1659, and his second 
wife. Hannah, died January 31, 1702-3. 
Children of first marriage, born in Brain- 
tree: Hannah, John, Joseph, Nathaniel, set- 
tled at Kingstown, Rhode Island ; Samuel, 
of further mention ; Increase, and Benjamin. 
Child of second marriage: Isaac. 

(II) Samuel Niles, son of John and Jane 
Niles, was born at Braintree, May 12, 1644, 
and was a lieutenant at Braintree in 1697. 
He married. April 20, 1680, Mary Belcher, 
widow. Children : Sarah, Hannah, Samuel, 
John (2), of further mention, and others. 

(HI) John (2) Niles, son of Samuel and 
Mary (Belcher) Niles, was born at Brain- 
tree or Kingstown, Rhode Island, about 
1690. Samuel Niles lived for a time with 
his brother. Nathaniel, at Kingstown, Rhode 
Island, and then moved with his family to 
Colchester, Connecticut. The history of 
Colchester tells us that Samuel "Niels," of 
Kingstown, came in 1709 to Colchester. 
Nine years later the Colchester records show 
that John had a son of the same name at 
Colchester. Children of John Niles, re- 
corded at Colchester : Jcjhn. Samuel, Nathan, 
Rev. Thomas. Abigail, P.arnabas. of further 
mention ; and Rev. Benjamin, a Baptist min- 
ister of Lyme. 

(IV) Barnabas Niles, son of John (2) 
Niles, was born in Connecticut, about 1740. 



He came with his brother to Rumney, and 
signed various petitions of the settlers com- 
plaining of conditions there, dated in 1770- 
^2 (see "New Hampshire State Papers," 
vol. ix, pp. 730-33 ; also "Yale Biographies," 
vol. ii). He removed to Coventry, New 
Hampshire, with his son Salmon in 1778, 
and died there. He was selectman of the 
town. 

(V) Salmon Niles, son of Barnabas Niles, 
came to Coventry in 1778. He was born 
March 14, 1770. He settled on the meadows 
just north of what is now called the Hyde 
farm. He took an active part in town af- 
fairs, both in his own right and representing 
others, in the meeting of the proprietors and 
in the town government. He was elected 
to various ofifices. He was one of the first 
selectmen in 1802 ; in 1804 he was selectman 
and town clerk and sealer of weights and 
measures. He taught the first school in 
the town. His wife, Parmelia (Medcalf) 
Niles, was born April 4, 1780. He died in 
Haverhill, New Hampshire. Children of 
Salmon and Parmelia (Medcalf) Niles, born 
at Coventry: i. Joseph, of further mention. 
2. Ezra, born August 29, 1799. 3. Millie, 
born July 27, 1803. 4. Sally, born March 
16, 1805. 5. Cynthia, born November 4, 
1806. 6. Mira, born August 6, 1807. 7. 
Marinda, born September 9, 1808. 8. Jesse, 
born March 8, 1810. 9. Salmon, born May 
15, 1812. 10. Levi, born January 26, 1814. 
II. Louisa, born October 6, 1817. 12. Mary, 
born June 15, 1820. 13. Cyrus, born De- 
cember, 1823. 

(VI) Joseph Niles, son of Salmon and 
Parmelia (Medcalf) Niles, was born June 
28, 1798, and died in East Haverhill, New 
Hampshire, in 1872. He received a careful 
practical education, and in addition to his 
activities as a farmer was also engaged in 
teaching. He married, August 6, 1823, 
Lydia Eastman, and they were the parents 
of four children : Azro B., Alonzo Fred- 
erick, of further mention ; Horace L., and 
Mary Ann. 

(VII) Alonzo Frederick Niles, son of 



10 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Joseph and Lydia (Eastman) Niles, was 
born in Haverhill, New Hampshire, March 
i6, 1829, and died in Springfield, ]\Iassa- 
chusetts, February 4, 1914. He received 
his education in the public schools of Haver- 
hill and in Newbury (Vermont Academy), 
where he later was engaged as a teacher. 
In 1850 he located in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and later established the nucleus 
of what in years following was to become 
the largest grocery establishment in Spring- 
field. For a time he conducted the enter- 
prise alone, but in 1856 he admitted his 
brother, Horace L., to partnership, under the 
firm name of A. F. and H. L. Niles. The 
store was at that time located at the corner 
of Cypress and INIain streets, but in 1875 
he purchased the business of H. L. Niles 
and the business was removed to a more 
commodious store on Emory Street, where 
Mr. Niles continued to successfully manage 
the business until the time of his retirement. 
The firm name was changed to A. F. Niles 
& Son later, and upon the retirement of 
Mr. Niles his son, Orville W., became the 
head of the concern. Mr. Niles traveled 
extensively both in this country and in 
Europe. He acquired a large amount of 
property in Springfield and vicinity and was 
an important factor in the development of 
a certain section of the city. He laid out and 
named Bancroft Street, which was first called 
Leon Street. He was interested in religious 
matters and took part in the organization of 
Memorial Church in 1868, being at the first 
meeting of eighteen men, which was held in 
Massasoit Hall for that purpose. The others 
present at that time were: O. D. Adams, 
George M. Atwater, Dr. J. G. Holland, 
Horace Chapin, C. D. Colville, N. W. Tal- 
cott, William Pynchon, Thomas Allen, H. S. 
Modelz, J. Grant, Horace Reede, M. M. 
Tracy, J. D. Stratton, J. C. Mackintosh, and 
D. J. Bartlett. Mr. Niles was deacon in the 
church during the time that services were 
held in Hooker Hall, and held this office 
for many years. He was a member of 
Hampden Lodge, Independent Order of 



Odd Fellows, from 1850 to the time of his 
death, and for many years took a prominent 
part in the aflfairs of that body, continuing 
his active interests until failing health com- 
pelled him to give up some of his respon- 
sil)ilities. Politically he gave his support to 
the Republican Party, and though he never 
held public office he took a deep interest in 
public afifairs. Mr. Niles was one of the 
citizens of Springfield who commanded in 
a high degree the respect and esteem of his 
associates, and both in his business and other 
relations he was known as a man of integrity 
and strict honor. 

Alonzo F. Niles married, in 1856, at Hav- 
erhill, New Hampshire, Martha A. Weather- 
bee, daughter of Charles and Abigail (Ladd) 
Weatherbee. She died March 16, 191 8, 
leaving four children: Orville Weatherbee, 
of further mention; Carrie S., Libby B., who 
died at the age of six, and Bessie Cross. 

(VIII) Orville Weatherbee Niles, son of 
Alonzo F. and IMartha A. (Weatherbee) 
Niles, was born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, June 20, 1857, and received a careful 
education in the public schools of Spring- 
field. When he was eighteen years of age 
he terminated his school training and began 
his business career as assistant in his father's 
store, which position he held ufitil he was 
twenty-one years of age. He was then ad- 
mitted to partnership, under the firm name 
of A. F. Niles & Son, and later, at the time 
of the retirement of his father, he became 
head of the business. For more than twenty- 
five years he continued to direct the aflFairs 
of A. F. Niles & Son, building up the 
enterprise to large proportions. He was 
also interested to quite an extent in real 
estate for some years. Since his retirement 
in 191 3 he has spent his summers at what 
is known as "Great Lake." in Otis, Massa- 
chusetts, where he has built a summer home 
and owns about seventy-five acres of land. 
Few of the citizens of Springfield are better 
known than is Mr. Niles. Fraternally he is 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. 

Orville Weatherbee Niles married (first), 



II 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in 1885, Maud Fontaine Dunton, of Union, 
Maine, dauj^hter of Charles R. and Mary 
Ella f Adams) Dunton. He married (sec- 
ond), June 23, 1898, Mabel Louise Dayton, 
of Sprinc^field, Massachusetts, daup^hter of 
Franklin Otis and Alice (Weller) Dayton. 
Mr. Xiles has one daujjhter of the first 
marriage, Gladys Madeline, who is a grad- 
uate of Mt. Holyoke College and of Sim- 
mons College. She is also a graduate of 
Orono Law School of Orono, Maine, She 
was admitted to the bar and is now prac- 
ticing law in Bangor, Maine. 



PACKARD, Azel A. 

While it is unreservedly declared by his 
host of friends and acquaintances that Azel 
A. Packard's life commanded a far-reach- 
ing business influence and respect because 
of the comprehensive knowledge that he pos- 
sessed concerning the lines of practical en- 
terprise that he had mapped out for success- 
ful procedure, he also won and maintained 
an even greater degree of public good-will 
and esteem and the friendship of more in- 
timate circles due entirely to his benign and 
kindly personality. His whole-hearted and 
well-poised system permeated all his deal- 
ings, and progressively regulated and di- 
rected his plans and work, A leader in the 
mercantile activities of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, he had won his right to that posi- 
tion by proven ability to perform with com- 
pleteness the duties of every position even 
from that of errand boy to the executive 
head of the firm of Mcekins, Packard & 
Wheat. It was by means of the exempli- 
fication of such qualities as these that Mr. 
Packard attained honored place as one of 
the leading business men of New England, 
and made the firm which he represented a 
peerless one in its field. He was a son of 
Pjradley and Mary (Webster) Packard, his 
I^aternal ancestry being among the first- 
comers to New England. 

The Packard family in America dates 
from early Colonial times, tracing its descent 
from Samuel Packard, immigrant ancestor, 



who came to New England with his wife 
and one child in the ship "Diligent," of 
Ipswich, John Martin, master, in 1638. He 
came from W^indham, a small hamlet near 
Hingham, Norfolk County, England, set- 
tled in Hingham, Massachusetts, and re- 
moved about 1660 to Bridgewater, Massa- 
chusetts, where he held office in 1664, and 
was licensed to keep an ordinary in 1670. 
His sons, and probably himself, were sol- 
diers under Captain Benjamin Church in 
King Philip's War, 1675-1676. His will was 
dated 1684. Children: i. Elizabeth, • born 
in England. 2. Samuel, Jr., born in Hing- 
ham. 3. Zaccheus. 4. Thomas, born in 
Hingham, living in Bridgewater in 1673. 
5. John, of further mention. 6. Nathaniel. 
7. IMary, married Richard Phillips. 8. Han- 
nah, married Thomas Randall. 9. Israel. 
10. Jael, married John Smith. 11. Deborah, 
married Samuel W^ashburn. 12. Deliver- 
ance, married Thomas Washburn, brother of 
Samuel. 

The line descends through son John, born 
in Hingham ; his son Joseph, his son Jo- 
seph, his son Timothy, his son Joseph, to 
Bradley, of further mention. 

Bradley Packard, son of Joseph Packard, 
was born June 23, 1808, and died March 5, 
1 88 1. He married, December 2, 1831, Mary 
Webster, who died June 2, i860. Their 
children were : Frances Submit, John Bond, 
Elvira E., and Azel A., of further men- 
tion, youngest of the family of four. 

Azel A. Packard, son of Bradley and 
Mary (Webster) Packard, was born on a 
farm in Conway, ]\Iassachusetts, September 
22, 1849, and he received his education in 
the public schools of his native town. At 
the age of fourteen years he left Conway to 
enter the employ of Azel D. Matthews & 
Sons, dry goods merchants of Brooklyn, 
New York, as errand boy. Nine months 
later he returned to Conway, and reen- 
tering the local academy, completed his 
studies there in two years. After gradua- 
tion, he became a clerk in a country store 
in Conway, for a time, but soon went to 



12 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Greenfield, Massachusetts, where he was em- 
ployed for six years in the carpet depart- 
ment of the dry goods store of T. D. Root 
and Company, where his cousin and future 
partner, Emory Meekins, was also a clerk. 
In 1 87 1, Emory Meekins took charge of 
the carpet department of the store of Tink- 
ham and Company in Springfield, then the 
largest dry goods store in the Connecticut 
Valley. A few months later he found a place 
for Mr. Packard in the Tinkham store. 
There they remained for four years, Mr. 
Meekins as a partner for the last two years, 
and Mr. Packard as a clerk. In 1875, 
Mr. Meekins disposed of his interests in 
the Tinkham store, and with a working capi- 
tal of $5,000 at his command, proposed that 
his cousin become his partner in a business 
venture. Mr. Packard consenting, the firm 
of Meekins and Packard was formed to 
conduct a business in carpets and house-fur- 
nishing goods, the new firm renting a store 
in the Main Street Building formerly occu- 
pied by the Massachusetts Mutual Life In- 
surance Company, and now owned and 
wholly occupied by Charles Hall. Predic- 
tions were freely made that they would fail 
in a year. The young merchants, however, 
not only did not fail, but prospered so well 
that in a short time they were looking for 
larger quarters. Upon the completion of the 
Third National Bank Building at Main and 
Hillman streets, then the most imposing 
structure on Main Street, and popularly 
known as the Evans Hotel Block, Meekins 
and Packard took a lease of the two stores 
on the south side for a period of five years, 
the combined area of the two stores being 
only 5,000 square feet. From that small 
beginning, the business has expanded until 
it now occupies six acres of floor space, with 
an increase into millions of dollars, an- 
nually. A few years after starting in the 
new location, the firm occupied the entire 
building, and subsequently the business over- 
flowed into three connected six-story build- 
ings on Hillman Street, with a frontage of 
four hundred and fifty-six feet. In the 



spring and summer of 1924 the lower floor 
on the Main Street side was completely 
changed and greatly improved and it is now 
one of the most imposing of the business 
blocks in the city. In later years. William 
G. Wheat, who had been a clerk for 
Meekins and Packard almost from the be- 
ginning, was admitted as a partner, and the 
firm name was changed to Meekins, Pack- 
ard & Wheat. In 1900, upon the death 
of Emory Meekins, Mr. Packard and Mr. 
Wheat bought out his interests, and they 
continued the business under the old style 
for fifteen years. In 191 5, because of the 
declining state of his health, Mr. Packard 
expressed a desire to retire from active busi- 
ness. Accordingly, a corporation was 
formed, of which Mr. Packard became a 
director, and continued as such until his 
death. Mr. Packard possessed an immense 
power for hard, painstaking work. He had 
always had direct oversight of the furniture 
department of the large store, and while 
he had fully borne his share in building up 
the business, under his direction the furni- 
ture department became one of the largest 
of its kind in New England. His judg- 
ment in furniture values particularly was 
unerring, and he made frequent trips to the 
Middle West to replenish the furniture 
stocks required by the firm. The influence 
of the important establishment which Mr. 
Packard had so large a share in building 
up is a telling one in the community. Up- 
to-date methods, combined with a wise con- 
servatism, have ever characterized the busi- 
ness policy followed by ]\Ir. Packard and 
his partners. 

In his social relations, jNIr. Packard was 
genial, frank, and lovable. While he was 
a member of the leading clubs of Spring- 
field, he took a very active interest in, and 
for many years was a member of the board 
of directors of various charitable organiza- 
tions of the city, and he gave generously 
of his means for their support. Not only 
was he deeply interested in the welfare of 
such organizations, but he was ever ready 



13 



EXCVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



to listen to any appeal for aid. and it was a 
pleasure for him to be of assistance to those 
who for one reason or another had become 
unfortunate. His charities, while generous, 
were unostentatious, as scores who were thus 
aided might testify; he was a man of noble 
imjjulses, and he will be remembered not 
only as a business leader, but as one who 
performed good deeds throughout his life. 
A Springfield newspaper, at the time of his 
passing, thus voiced the sentiment of the 
community in regard to the man : 

In the passing of Azel A. Packard, Springfield 
loses one of its fine citizens, a man who during his 
long residence here made a large contribution 
to the city's progressive development. In a quiet, 
unostentatious way, he took a deep interest in civic 
affairs, and in every movement having for its ob- 
ject the welfare of the community. He was not 
a man to push himself forward, but his willing- 
ness to help whenever called upon, his breadth 
of view and his sound judgment, earned for him 
a secure place in the regard and confidence of his 
fellow-citizens. His gracious manner, his poise, 
and his kindly sympathy endeared him to a host 
of friends. 

Mr. Packard enjoyed "The Birches," his 
beautiful summer estate at East Long- 
meadow, Massachusetts ; he was very fond 
of the outdoor life, and took a great interest 
in horses, having been owner of a number of 
animals of fine breed. He was keenly in- 
terested in all civic questions, and the 
higher interests of Springfield were ever 
near his heart, and at one time he served 
as a member of the Park Commission. He 
was a mcml)er of the board of directors of 
the City Liljrary Association ; was vice- 
presifient of the Springfield Institution for 
Savings, and president of the Springfield 
Mutual Fire Assurance Company. For 
many years he was a member of the First 
Congregational Church, and was active in 
the work of its parish committee ; but some 
years later he joined the South Congre- 
gational Church, and served as a mem- 
ber of its board of deacons and of its 
parish committee, always taking an active 



interest in that up to the time of his death. 

Azel A. Packard married (first), June 
17, 1874, Mary Vilas, daughter of the late 
Cyrus K. and Mathilda Vilas, of Alstead, 
New Hampshire. She died in 1890, and he 
married (second), June 15, 1909, Isabelle 
Young daughter of the late Frank R. and 
Isabel (Stowe) Young, of Springfield. To 
the first marriage one daughter was born, 
who died in infancy. 

Mr. Packard died in Springfield, May 
II, 1923, at the age of seventy-four years, 
A sincere tribute was paid to Mr. Packard 
when his long-time partner, William G. 
Wheat, was interviewed by a representative 
of the "Springfield Union." Recalling Mr. 
Packard's last visit to the big department 
store, ]Mr. Wheat said : "We have been here 
as partners for thirty-seven years, and never 
has a disagreeable word been spoken be- 
tween us. His was a beautiful character." 
What more fitting tribute could be given to 
such a life at its passing? 



WHEAT, William George 

Among the successful and well-known 
business men of Springfield was the late 
William George Wheat, vice-president of 
the firm of Meekins, Packard & Wheat, 
who passed away suddenly June 10, 1924. 
Mr. Wheat was a descendant of an old 
family which bears a name tracing back to 
Normandy. 

The French Ble (Wheat) was used by 
the Normans as a family name at a very 
early period, 1180, when Unfredus de Ble 
resided in Normandy. In 1192 Robert de 
Blee lived in County Stafford, England, and 
Galfridus de Blie in Lancaster. The name 
when translated into English became Wheat. 
There were many varieties of spelling, among 
them Wheatt, Whet, Wheet, Weat, Weet, 
etc. In 1 61 9 the family was widely scat- 
tered over England, living in counties Staf- 
ford, Gloucester, Lincoln, Berks, Middlesex 
and Nottingham. The family seated at 
Coventry bore arms as follows : 



14 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



/Irms — Vert, a fess indented, and in chief three 
garbs or. 

Crest — A stag's head proper, attired and gorged 
with three bars or, in the mouth three ears of 
wheat of the last. 

The Glympton family of Wheat bore: 

Arms — Vert, a fess dancete or, in chief three 
garbs of the second. 

Crest — A buck's head holding three wheat ears 
in its mouth. 

(I) Moses Wheat, immigrant ancestor, 
was a settler of Concord, Massachusetts, 
about 1635. He was born in England in 
1616, and died in Concord, May 6, 1700. 
He came probably from Southwark (South 
London), as his brother Joshua, when a 
boy of seventeen, obtained a church certifi- 
cate from the minister at St. Saviors, South- 
wark, in 1635. He was admitted a free- 
man, May 18, 1642. He received a grant 
of sixteen acres of land in Concord, and 
added to it until he owned over three hun- 
dred acres. He moved from the village and 
resided on the Bedford road, about two 
miles east of the church, and served as 
tythingman in the church. His will was 
dated September 19. 1691, and proved June 
II, 1700. He married Thomasin, surname 
unknown, who deposed July 15, 1660, that 
she was about forty-five years old. She 
died July 9, 1689. Children: Moses, Sam- 
uel, Hannah, died in infancy; Hannah, Re- 
becca, Jane, Moses, John, Aaron, Joshua, 
of further mention. 

(II) Joshua Wheat, son of Moses and 
Thomasin Wheat, was a yeoman. He re- 
sided at Lynn for a short time and then 
at Concord. He bought land at Groton in 
1679, and resided there until about 1691. 
After his father's death he exchanged his 
land in Groton with his brother John for 
a part of his father's estate, and the same 
day, December 19, 1701, deeded half his 
land to his eldest son Samuel. Five years 
later he sold the remainder to his son Jo- 
seph, and left no will. In 1691-92 he was 
enrolled in the West Regiment and served 



in the garrison. He married, in Lynn, June 
10, 1675, Elizabeth Mansfield, who died 
February 3, 1703-04, daughter of Joseph 
and Elizabeth (Needham) Mansfield, 
granddaughter of Robert Mansfield, of 
Lynn. Children: Moses, Samuel, Joseph, 
of further mention ; Dr. Joshua, Moses. 

(III) Joseph Wheat, son of Joshua and 
Elizabeth (Mansfield) Wheat, was a farmer 
at Concord. He married, June 5, 1705, 
Priscilla Flagge. Children born at Con- 
cord : Deborah, Elizabeth, Joseph, died 
young; Abigail, John, Joseph, Thomas, of 
further mention ; Benjamin. 

(IV) Thomas Wheat, son of Joseph and 
Priscilla (Flagge) Wheat, was born at Con- 
cord, May 12, 1723. He was one of the 
first settlers of Hollis, Massachusetts. 
(Hollis was later included in New Hamp- 
shire.) He married (first), at Concord, 
October 23, 1745, Mary Ball; (second), at 
Concord, August 23, 1768, Sarah Temple. 
Children of first marriage, born at Hollis: 
Mary, Abigail, Thomas, Sarah, Priscilla, 
Nathaniel, Joseph, of further mention; Jo- 
siah, Louis, and Hannah. Children of sec- 
ond marriage : Submit, Abigail, Temple, 
Sarah, and Mary. 

(V) Rev. Joseph Wheat, son of Thomas 
and ^lary (Ball) Wheat, was born at 
Hollis, New Hampshire, July 18, 1759. He 
was a soldier in the Revolution for several 
years, a private in Captain Edward Everett's 
company, Colonel Bedell's regiment, in 1776; 
also in Captain William \\'alker's company, 
Colonel David Gilman's regiment, to rein- 
force Continental army in December, 1776, 
serving to June, 1777; also in Daniel Emer- 
son's company, Colonel Moses Nichols' regi- 
ment, on Rhode Island alarm in summer of 
1777 and again in same company in 1778. 
He enlisted for a year to fill up the Third 
New Hampshire Battalion in the Continental 
service, and was mustered into service 
August 7. 1779. Later he is stated as having 
enlisted for the war. He was promoted 
corporal April I, 1 780. He is said to have 
been at Valley Forge, and his service is all 



15 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



credited to Ilollis. New Hampshire. After 
the war he studied for the ministry, and 
was ordained in the Baptist Church in 
August, 1801, and preached there until 1815. 
He resided without a charf::e at Canaan, 
New Hampshire, from 181 5 until his death, 
October 28, 1837. He married, at Hollis, 
New Hampshire, October 10, 1783, Mrs. 
Bridget (Powers) Farley. Children: Na- 
thaniel, Joseph, of further mention; prob- 
ably others. 

(VI) Joseph Wheat, son of Rev. Joseph 
and Bridget (Powers-Farley) Wheat, was 
born in Canaan, New Hampshire, about 
1790. ?Ie was educated in the district 
schools, and followed farming at Canaan 
during his active life. He was a Baptist in 
religion. He married (first), May 27, 181 1, 
Lydia Bullock; (second), March 13, 1834, 
Mrs. Lucett Kidder. Children: i. John 
Wheat, went West and was a pioneer in 
railroad building. He w'as mayor of Wood- 
stock, Illinois. 2. Lafayette. 3. Elsine, 

married Bradbury. 4. Dr. Asa, of 

further mention. 

(VII) Dr. Asa Wheat, son of Joseph and 
Lucett (Kidder) Wheat, was born at Ca- 
naan, New Hampshire, in 1836. He at- 
tended the public schools of his native town, 
and studied his profession at Dartmouth 
Medical School. He established himself in 
practice in his native town, where for many 
years he led the active and useful life of a 
general practitioner. He was one of the best 
known and most highly respected physicians 
of that section. He spent his later years in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, in the home of 
his son William. He married Isabella 
Frances George, of Croyden, New Hamp- 
shire, daughter of William W. and Lucy 
B. (Whipple) George, descendant of Gen- 
eral Israel Putnam, of Revolutionary War 
fame. Children : William George, of fur- 
ther mention ; Allen Asa, who married Ada 
Wheeler. 

(VIII) William George Wheat, son of 
Dr. Asa and Isabella Frances (George) 
Wheat, was born at Canaan, New Hamp- 



shire, July 19, 1857, and died June 11, 
1924. He attended the public schools and 
the old Union Academy of his native town. 
It was his desire to study medicine and 
follow in the footsteps of his father, but 
his father objected and so he chose a busi- 
ness career. In 1874, at the age of seven- 
teen, he left home and located in the grow- 
ing town of Holyoke, Massachusetts, where 
he found employment as clerk in the store 
of A. L. Shumway, dealer in dry goods. 
He acquired a thorough and comprehensive 
knowledge of the dry goods business, and 
then, by invitation of Mr. A. A. Packard 
(see sketch elsewhere) he took a position in 
the store of Meekins and Packard, a new 
firm in Springfield, which had been estab- 
lished in September, 1876. He early dem- 
onstrated his ability as a salesman and buyer, 
and two years and a half after he entered the 
employ of Meekins and Packard he signed 
a contract agreeing to remain with the firm 
for a period of five years. When the term 
of the contract expired such satisfaction 
had he given that he was admitted to a 
partnership, and that connection was main- 
tained to 1914, when the concern was in- 
corporated under the name of Meekins, 
Packard & Wheat, and ]\Ir. Wheat was 
made vice-president of the corporation. This 
position he continued to hold until his death. 
Through a long period of years he had 
the supervision of the dry goods depart- 
ment of the business. His foresight in dis- 
cerning the public taste and his skill in 
buying were important factors in the de- 
velopment of the department, which grew 
rapidly and finally reached proportions which 
required not only what was originally the 
entire store, but also the second story above 
it and the basement beneath it, and the first 
story of an annex, one hundred feet in depth 
with a side extension forty by sixty feet. 
From 1882 to 1894 the dry goods business 
of this firm was increased tenfold, and the 
rate of progress has continued to the pres- 
ent time (1924). Other departments of 
the enterprise have also developed, and the 



I 
I 



16 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



quarters now occupied by the business com- 
prises one hundred thousand square feet of 
floor space, and the several hundred clerks 
are required to handle the greatly increased 
volume of business. The operations of the 
firm have been extended outside the city of 
Springfield, and have continued to expand 
until the vi'hole Connecticut Valley within a 
circuit of fifty to a hundred miles has been 
included in its field of operations. A sig- 
nificant and somewhat remarkable fact is 
the senior partners were natives of the lit- 
tle town of Conway, Massachusetts. Emery 
Meekins, now deceased, was a schoolmate 
of the late Marshal Field, the merchant 
prince of Chicago. He began his career 
in Springfield as clerk in the dry goods 
store of E. F. Williams. Mr, Packard 
began in a store on Fulton Avenue, Brook- 
lyn, New York, removed to Greenfield, and 
finally to Springfield, where in 1874 he en- 
tered partnership with his old comrade and 
established the concern of Meekins, Pack- 
ard & Company. From this modest begin- 
ning has developed the modern department 
house of the first rank known as that of 
Meekins, Packard & Wheat. 

His death removes the last of the firm 
of Meekins, Packard & Wheat, as Emory 
Meekins died in May, 1900, and Azel A. 
Packard died in May, 1923. He will be 
deeply mourned, especially by his em- 
ployees, who both loved and respected him. 
His genial disposition and ready sympathy 
made him ever ready to help and advise. 
His private charities were many. 

Mr. Wheat had had full charge of the 
present extensive alterations of the lower 
floors of the store, even to choosing the 
fixtures. These alterations, including an 
almost entire new front, makes it one" of 
the most beautiful stores not only in Spring- 
field, but in Massachusetts. It was his de- 
sire to see the store completed as he wished 
in time for the fiftieth anniversary next year. 
The present members of the firm are Charles 
H. Tenney, president ; Daniel E. Galleher, 



second vice-president, and Harold A. Wheat, 
treasurer. 

In addition to the business responsibili- 
ties already mentioned, Mr. Wheat was a 
member of the board of directors of the 
Springfield Gas Light Company, the Hamp- 
den Hotel Company, and the Northern Con- 
necticut Securities Company, of Hartford, 
Connecticut. He was also a member of the 
board of directors of the Springfield Young 
Men's Christian Association, of which he 
was one of the founders and to which he 
had been a generous contributor. He was 
also one of those most active in assisting 
to have the memorial bridge across the Con- 
necticut built. He was well known in club 
circles, holding membership in the Colony 
Club, Nayasset Club, of which he was for a 
long time house chairman; the Springfield 
Country Club, the Rowing Association, the 
Golf Club, of which he was president; the 
Sons of the American Revolution and an 
associate member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic. He was vice-president of the 
Springfield Board of Trade and was for 
many years one of its directors. He gave 
his time and money freely for the advance- 
ment of the interests of the city of Spring- 
field, and was long regarded as one of the 
city's most public-spirited citizens. He was 
a member of the First Congregational 
Church, and was formerly superintendent of 
its Sunday School. For many years he was 
the prime spirit of the annual charity balls 
held in the old City Hall, and the present 
Court Square Extension plan was carried 
out partly at his suggestion. He was espe- 
cially interested in the afifairs of the old 
Independence Day Association, which be- 
came a permanent organization under his 
presidency in 1903-1904. His interest in 
this organization made it one of the outstand- 
ing organizations of its kind in the country. 

William George Wheat married Clara 
Louise Abercrombie, of Pelham, Massachu- 
setts, daughter of Stillman Abercrombie, 
and they were the parents of the follow- 
ing children: i. Isabelle Frances, born in 



17 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



1882; married George \V. Prentiss, of 
Holyoke, Massachusetts. 2. Harold Aber- 
crombie, who was born in 1886; attended 
Dartmouth ColIef[e class of 1909; is now 
treasurer of Meekins. Packard & Wheat 
Company. He married Ruth Killgren, of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and they have 
two children: Phillis Louise, born July 21, 
1920, and Dorothy Ann, born October 3, 
1922. 



MUNSELL, Samuel Wildes 

The success of Samuel Wildes Munsell, 
founder, general manager, and president of 
the Monarch Accident Insurance Company, 
has been arrived at by the sure road of 
well applied ability, energy and thrift, initi- 
ative and "stick-to-it-iveness." Since 1902 
he has devoted his entire time to the devel- 
opment and management of the big insur- 
ance concern which will, it is expected, dur- 
ing the current year, 1924, attain a premium 
income in excess of $1,000,000, insuring 
more than 50.000 policy-holders. 

The Munsell name (which is also spelled 
Mansell, Mansel, Moncil, Maunsell, etc.) 
has been prominent in New England history 
since the latter half of the seventeenth cen- 
tury. The family is distinguished for the 
Yankee traits of industry, sagacity, and 
shrewdness in financial matters and is now 
represented in many sections of the country. 
The branch of the family to which Samuel 
Wildes Munsell belongs traces its descent 
from Thomas Munsell, who was born in 
England about 1650, and is recorded as a 
resident of New London, Connecticut, in 
1 68 1. He was a resident on the Great Neck 
in 1683, and died there in 1712. He and 
his wife Lydia were the parents of seven 
children: Jacob, of whom further; Elisha, 
John, Thomas, Mary, Deliverance, and 
Samuel. 

(U) Jacob Munsell, eldest child of 
Thomas and Lydia (Morrill) Munsell, was 
born at New London, Connecticut, about 
1690, and died in October, 1741. About 
1723 he settled on the east side of the Con- 



necticut River, and was a ferryman at what 
was known as the Scantic Ferry, near the 
western portion of the town of Windsor. 
He married (first), about 1713, Sarah 
Caulkins, daughter of John and Abigail 
Caulkins. She died without issue about 
1 716, and he married (second), February 
15, 1718, Phoebe Loomis, born in Wind- 
sor, in 1697, daughter of Joseph and Lydia 
(Drake) Loomis. of East Windsor. Their 
children were: Caulkins, Thomas, Mercy, 
died young ; Elisha, Jonathan, Mercy, Gur- 
don, Jacob, of further mention ; Joseph, 
John, and Desire. 

(HI) Jacob Munsell, eighth child and 
sixth son of Jacob and Phoebe (Loomis) 
Munsell, was born in Windsor, Connecticut, 
April 21, 1732, and died about 1790. He 
married (first), at Windsor, Connecticut, 
January 2, 1 75 1, he then being nearly eight- 
een years of age, Sarah Bancroft, who was 
born in 1728, and died November 28, 1783, 
daughter of Thomas Bancroft, of Windsor ; 
(second), in 1786, Sybil Ellsworth. To the 
first marriage nine children were born, all 
in Windsor, Connecticut ; Silas ; a daughter 
who died in infancy; Sarah, Elice, Silas, 
Abigail, Eunice, Thomas, of further men- 
tion, and Rachel. 

(IV) Thomas Munsell, son of Jacob and 
Sarah (Bancroft) Munsell, was born in 
Windsor, Connecticut, May 19, 1765, and 

died prior to 1810. He married (first) 

Smith. She died, and he married (second), 
Mary Ellsworth, who was born May 30, 
1778, and died April 28, 1839, daughter of 
Charles and Betsy (Bell) Ellsworth, and 
widow of Moses Allen, of Ellington, Con- 
necticut, To the first marriage five children 
were born : Smith, Anson, Lydia, Clarissa, 
and Matilda. To the second marriage one 
son was born, Thomas Ellsworth, of further 
mention. 

(V) Thomas Ellsworth Munsell, son of 
Thomas and ]Mary (Ellsworth Allen) Mun- 
sell, was born in Windsor, Connecticut, No- 
vember 2, 1803. He was engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits, and while still a young man 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



removed from Windsor to North Sunder- 
land, Massachusetts, where he resided to the 
time of his death. He married (first), Octo- 
ber 12, 1826, Roxana R. Snell, who was born 
June 17, 1802. She died September 8, 1856, 
and he married (second), December 4, 1856, 
Emehne Morse. Children : Thomas Lyman, 
Eunice B., Charles Ellsworth, of further 
mention; Mary S., Silas S., Erastus A., 
Anson S., Otis D,, Isaac H., and Alfred A. 

(VI) Charles Ellsworth Munsell, son of 
Thomas Ellsworth and Roxana R. (Snell) 
Munsell, was born in North Sunderland, 
Massachusetts, December 3, 1830, and died 
in Springfield, Massachusetts, in April, 
1907. He was a soldier in the Civil War, 
serving from Amherst, Massachusetts, in 
Company F, 37th Massachusetts Volunteers, 
and entered into service in August, 1862, 
remaining with his unit until March. 1863, 
when he was discharged for disability. 
Among other engagements he was a partici- 
pant in the battle of Antietam and also in 
the battle of Fredericksburg. He learned 
the machinist's trade, and early in life was 
employed with Smith and Wessons in 
Springfield, and also in the Springfield 
Armory. Later, he was employed in Millers 
Falls and Greenfield, both in Massachu- 
setts, but in 1872, he returned to Spring- 
field, where he resided to the time of his 
death. He found employment with the 
Barney and Berry Skate Factory for a time, 
and later associated himself with Smith and 
Wesson, with whom he remained until he 
was past seventy years of age. He was a 

member of Post, Grand Army of the 

Republic. He married Lucy A. Wildes, of 
Amherst, Massachusetts, daughter of Israel 
Wildes, and they were the parents of two 
children : Lizzie I., who married Albert E. 
Bell, of Worcester, Massachusetts, and 
Samuel Wildes, of further mention. 

(VII) Samuel Wildes Munsell, son of 
Charles Ellsworth and Lucy A. (Wildes) 
Munsell, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, April 4, 1864. and attended the 
schools in Greenfield, North Sunderland, 



and Springfield, completing his school train- 
ing in Springfield High School. When he 
was fourteen years of age he left school 
and found employment. His first "job" was 
not an easy one, but he stuck to it with char- 
acteristic energy and patience. He helped 
deliver milk on a retail route, and rose each 
morning at four o'clock to begin his day's 
work. Later he made a change and entered 
the office of the Springfield Street Railway, 
where he remained for a period of five years. 
He made himself expert in clerical work and 
when he again changed his place of employ- 
ment he became associated wMth a lumber 
concern as bookkeeper, which position he 
held for another term of five years. Still 
following a clerical line, he next associated 
himself with the John Hancock Life Insur- 
ance Company, as one of the office em- 
plo}'ees, and later still he was associated 
with Fred Hillman, as public accountant. 
During all this time he had been acquiring 
valuable experience and waiting for the time 
to come when he might engage in business 
for himself. In 1901 he founded the Mon- 
arch Accident Insurance Company. He re- 
ceived his charter and began operations in 
1902, opening home offices in Springfield, 
and himself serving as secretary and gen- 
eral manager. The enterprise prospered, 
and later Mr. Munsell was made president 
and general manager. During the first year 
of its existence the Monarch Accident In- 
surance Company transacted only $8,000 
worth of business, but each year has shown 
a steady increase until, in 1922, the concern 
had $925,000 worth of business. Its 45.000 
policy-holders are scattered from Maine to 
California. During the current year, 1924, 
it is estimated that 10,000 more will be added. 
The concern has branch offices in many large 
cities throughout the United States, and in 
each of these districts the growth has been 
rapid. During the score of years in which 
the company has l^een in existence nearly 
two and a quarter million of dollars have 
been paid to policy-holders. 

Mr. Munsell is a member of Roswell Lee 



19 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Springfield ; of Morning Star Chapter, 
Royal Arch Mason ; of Springfield Council, 
Royal and Select Masters ; Springfield Com- 
mandery. Knights Templar ; Evening Star 
Lodge of Perfection; Massasoit Council, 
Princess of Jerusalem; Springfield Chapter, 
Rose Croix; and Springfield Consistory, in 
which he holds the thirty-second degree; 
also Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; the Masonic 
Club, and the Automobile Club. 

In July, 1S95. Samuel Wildes Munsell 
married (first), Qara M. Horton, of South 
Manchester, Connecticut, a member of the 
family to which Governor Peters, of Con- 
necticut, belongs. She died in August, 1904, 
and he married (second), in October, 1908, 
Florence A. McKenna, of Middletown, 
Connecticut. To the first marriage one son, 
Charles Horton Munsell, was born in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, December 10, 
1897. After graduating from Central High 
School, he entered Harvard College, from 
which he was graduated in 1920, and he is 
now claim examiner and adjuster for the 
Masonic Accident Insurance Company. To 
the second marriage two children were born : 
I. Ruth Marjorie, born April 7, 1912. 2. 
Margaret Annand, born March 6, 1919. 



VAN NORMAN, Charles Edward 

Charles Ivhvard Van Xorman, inventor 
of the Van Xorman duplex milling machine 
and of numerous tools used in the metal- 
working industry, has had a wide experi- 
ence in executive and administrative work, 
was one of the organizers and first presi- 
dent of the Waltham Watch Tool Company, 
and is now president of the Van Xorman 
Machine Tool Company, 

Mr. Van Xorman is a descendant of an 
old Dutch family, five brothers of which 
came to America from in, or near, Amster- 
dam, Holland, during the period of the 
American Revolution. One of the brothers 
later removed to Canada, and it is from him 



that the branch of the family to which ^Ir. 
Van Xorman belongs is descended. 

Abraham Van Xorman had three brothers, 
Joseph, Isaac, and Benjamin. Abraham 
Van Xorman was born in Ontario, Canada, 
and died in Tillsonburg, Ontario. He was 
a shoemaker by trade. In 1812 he mar- 
ried Charity Cummins and became the father 
of five children: Caleb Hopkins, of further 
mention ; Venas, Ephraim, Mary, and Han- 
nah. 

Caleb Hopkins Van X'orman. son of Abra- 
ham and Charity (Cummins) Van X^'orman, 
was born in X'^elson, Ontario, December 9, 
1819, and died in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, X^oveml:>er 2, 1905. He was a jeweler 
by trade and was for many years engaged 
in that business for himself in Hamilton, 
Ontario, Canada, but later he came to this 
country, and settling in Waltham, Massa- 
chusetts, engaged in the business of making 
watch tools. After a time he again made a 
change, this time coming to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, where he continued to re- 
side during the remainder of his life. He 
married. May 31, 1854, Elizabeth Sims 
Dewey, daughter of Daniel Ordway and 
Catherine (Sims) Dewey (see Dewey VIII), 
and they became the parents of seven chil- 
dren, two of whom died in infancy; the 
others are: i. Edmund F., who died at the 
age of twenty-five. 2. Mary Catherine, who 
married Alexander Turnbull, of Hamilton, 
Province of Ontario. Canada. 3. Charles 
Edward, of whom further. 4. Frederick 
Dewey, a biography of whom follows ; and 
5. George Henry. 

Charles Edward Van Norman, son of 
Caleb Hopkins and Elizabeth Sims (Dewey) 
Van Xorman, was born in Hamilton. Prov- 
ince of Ontario, Canada, October 6, 1859, 
and received his education in the public 
schools of his native city. When his school 
training was completed, he began his busi- 
ness career in association with his father, 
in the manufacture of watch tools, in Wal- 
tham, Massachusetts. Later, Charles Ed- 
ward Van Xorman again changed his place 



20 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of residence, this time going to Concord, 
New J-[ampshire, where he became identified 
with the Haley Manufacturing Company, 
engaged in the making of shade rollers and 
skates, and using prison labor. Some time 
later he went to Chicopee. Massachusetts, 
accepting a position with the Ames Sword 
Company as superintendent of the padlock 
manufacturing department. After remain- 
ing long enough to add materially to his 
experience, he returned to Waltham, Massa- 
chusetts, and in company with his brothers, 
Frederick D. and Edmund F., organized 
the Waltham Watch Tool Company, the 
products of which have gained an interna- 
tional reputation and are sent to all parts 
of the world. Of this concern Charles E. 
Van Norman was first president, and later, 
treasurer. In 1890 he came to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and continued the manufac- 
ture of watch tools. In the meantime, how- 
ever, he had invented the Van Norman 
duplex milling machine, and other machin- 
ery, and in 19 12 the company was reorgan- 
ized under the name of the Van Norman 
Machine Tool Company, of which he is 
president. In addition to the manufacture 
of the well-known duplex milling machine, 
the concern also manufactures Ball race- 
way grinders and other machine tools, most 
of which are Mr, Van Norman's own in- 
ventions and ideas and patented by him. 
The business was started in a small way and 
under the able direction of Mr. Van Nor- 
man has in ten years developed to its pres- 
ent proportions, employing in normal times 
some three hundred and seventy-five hands 
and sending its products to all parts of the 
world. In addition to his activities and re- 
sponsibilities as chief executive and manager 
of The Van Norman Company, Mr. Van 
Norman is also connected with several other 
business organizations. He is a member 
of the board of directors of the Lamb Knit- 
ting Company of Chicopee Falls; of the 
board of directors of the Springfield Na- 
tional Bank, and is a director of the Spring- 
field Chamber of Commerce. He was presi- 



dent for a time of the Connecticut Valley 
branch of the National Metal Trades' As- 
sociation. Fraternally, Mr. Van Norman 
was a member of Chicopee Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, but later took a demit. 
He is well known in club circles; was for- 
merly a member of the Nayasset Club; 
member the Springfield Country Club, the 
Rotary Club, and the Auto Club. Not only 
as an inventor and a business man of abil- 
ity, but as a public-spirited citizen as well, 
^Ir. Van Norman is highly esteemed among 
a very large group of friends and associ- 
ates. In the Wesley Methodist Church, of 
which he is a member and which he serves 
as a member of its board of trustees, he is 
an active and willing helper, contributing 
not only of his means but of his time and 
his ability. 

Mr. Van Norman has been twice mar- 
ried. He married (first), in 1887, Anna 
C. Whitcomb, of Waltham, Massachusetts; 
(second), Edith H. Lyon, of Ottawa, On- 
tario, daughter of Judge Robert and Mary 
Ann (Foster) Lyon. 

(The Dewey Line) 

(I) Thomas Dewey, immigrant ancestor, 
came from Sandwich, County Kent, Eng- 
land, and was one of the original grantees 
of Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 1636. He 
was in this country as early as 1633, how- 
ever, being a witness in that year to the 
will of John Russell, of Dorchester. He 
was admitted a freeman in 1634, sold his 
lands at Dorchester, August 12, 1635, and 
removed with other Dorchester men to 
Windsor, Connecticut, of which he was one 
of the earliest settlers. He was an active, 
energetic man, who took a prominent part 
in public afifairs. and died previous to May 
19, 1648, on w^hich date the inventory of his 
estate was filed. He married, March 22, 
1639. at Windsor, Connecticut, Frances 
Clark, widow of Joseph Clark, who died 
September 2"/, 1690, having previously mar- 
ried (third), George Phelps. Children of 
Thomas and Frances (Clark) Dewey: 



21 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Thomas, Josiah. of further mention ; Anna, 
Israel, and Jedediah. 

(II) Josiah Dewey, son of Thomas and 
Frances (Clark) Dewey, was haptized Oc- 
toljer 10, 1 64 1, at Windsor, Connecticut, 
and died Septeml^er 7, 1732, at Lebanon, 
Connecticut. He married, November 6, 
1622, Hepzibah Lyman, and they were the 
parents of eleven children: Hepzibah, 
Mary, Josiah, of further mention; John, 
Ebenezer, Nathaniel, Joseph, died young; 
Elizabeth, Joseph, Experience and Benja- 
min. 

(III) Josiah Dewey, son of Josiah and 
Hejizibah (Lyman) Dewey, was born De- 
cember 24, 1666, at Northampton, Massa- 
chusetts, and died at Lebanon, Connecti- 
cut, in 1750. He was engaged in farming 
at Westfield, Massachusetts, until 1696, in 
which year he removed to Lebanon, Con- 
necticut, he being one of the first settlers 
there. He married and reared a family of 
children, among whom was John, of whom 
further. 

(IV) John Dewey, son of Josiah Dewey, 
was lx)rn December 4, 1700, at Lel)anon, 
Connecticut, and died September 4, 1773. 
He married, November 30, 1726, Experi- 
ence Woodward, and they were the parents 
of eight children: Anna, Daniel, Josiah, 
John, of whom further ; Mary, Ephraim, 
Orial. and Joshua, 

(V) John Dewey, son of John and Ex- 
perience (Woodward) Dewey, was born 
December 12, 1735, at Lebanon, Connecticut, 
and died June 11, 1830, aged ninety-four 
years. He married, November 18, 1756, 
Rhoda Gillitt, and they were the parents 
of children : Darius, Rebecca, Rhoda, John 
Woodward, of whom further; Bezaleel, 
Philova, Ebenezer, died young ; Ebenezer, 
Belinda, and Nathan. 

(VI) John Woodward Dewey, son of 
John and Rhoda (Gillitt) Dewey, was born 
December 31, 1762, at Lebanon, Connecti- 
cut, and died November 15, 1839, at Hamil- 
ton, Ontario, Canada. He served in the 
Revolutionary War. He married (first), 



November 15, 1787, Abigail Rudd. She 
died in 1813, and he married (second), 
February 17, 181 5, Mrs. Emma Tupper. 
Children: Lucia, John W., Maria, Eliza- 
beth, Daniel Ordway, of whom further; 
Abigail, Rhoda, Jonathan Rudd, and 
Sarah A. 

(VH) Daniel Ordway Dewey, son of 
John Woodward and Abigail (Rudd) 
Dewey, was born at Lebanon, Connecticut, 
March 18, 1798, and died at Hamilton, On- 
tario, Canada, November 8, 1887, aged 
eighty-nine years. He married, September 
22, 1829, Catherine Sims, who was born 
August 22, 181 1, at Niagara Falls, New 
York, and died July 26, 1854, at Hamilton, 
Ontario, daughter of John and Elizabeth 
Sims. Children: Elizabeth Sims, of whom 
further ; John Woodward, George Henry, 
died young; Harriet Ann, George Henry, 
William Moore, Louisa Augusta Porter, Ed- 
ward, and Emma. 

(VIII) Elizabeth Sims Dewey, daughter 
of Daniel Ordway and Catherine (Sims) 
Dewey, married Caleb Hopkins Van Nor- 
man (see Norman). 



VAN NORMAN, Frederick Dewey 

One of the well-known business men of 
Springfield is Frederick Dewey Van Nor- 
man, vice-president of the Van Norman 
Machine Tool Company, and of the Spring- 
field Realty Company, who has been a resi- 
dent of this city since 1890. 

Frederick Dewey Van Norman, son of 
Caleb Hopkins and Elizabeth Sims (Dewey) 
Van Norman, and brother of Charles Ed- 
ward Van Norman (see preceding biog- 
raphy), was born in Hamilton, Province of 
Ontario, Canada, December 31, 1862, and 
received his education in the public schools 
of his native city. When school days were 
over, he began his business career in asso- 
ciation with his grandfather, Daniel O. 
Dewey, who was engaged in the ice busi- 
ness, and this connection he maintained for 
one year, during which time he was in charge 
of his grandfather's business. He then 



22 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



went to Waltham, Massachusetts, where he 
learned the tool-making business and became 
associated with his father in the manufac- 
ture of watch tools. Here he remained for 
eight years, at the end of which time (in 
1890) he came to Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, and continued with the Waltham 
Watch Tool Company, which had previously 
been founded by his father in Waltham, 
and which retained the name until it was 
changed to that of the Van Norman Ma- 
chine Tool Company, which corporation was 
the result of a reorganization arranged by 
the three brothers. Charles E., Frederick D., 
and Edmund F. Van Norman, Charles E. 
being made president of the new concern, 
and Frederick D., vice-president. The Van 
Norman duplex milling machine, invented by 
Charles E., and other mechanical devices 
and appliances and inventions of Charles 
E. and Frederick Dewey Van Norman, form 
the basis of the manufactures of the con- 
cern, which from a small beginning has 
grown to very large proportions and sends 
its products to all parts of the world. 

In addition to his interests in the Van 
Norman Machine Tool Company, Mr. Van 
Norman is a member of the board of di- 
rectors and vice-president of the Spring- 
field Realty Company. He is well known in 
Springfield as a successful business man 
and a worthy citizen, and is highly esteemed 
among his many friends and associates. He 
is a member of the Nayasset Club and of 
the Country Club, and his religious affilia- 
tion is with the Wesley Methodist Church, 
of which he is a steward and a member of 
the official board. 

Frederick Dewey Van Norman married, 
on July 12, 1921, Beatrice Ethel Robson. of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, daughter of John 
and Julia Robson. They have one daugh- 
ter, Barbara Elizabeth, born May 5, 1923. 



HILL, George Hampton 

One of the well-known residents of 
Springfield and Chicopee Falls is George H. 
Hill, manager of the United Casket Hard- 



ware Company of Springfield. He was for- 
merly treasurer of the W. H. Hill Envelope 
Company, which is now known as the W. 
H. Hill Division of the United States En- 
velope Company. In addition to this, Mr, 
Hill devotes considerable time to his various 
real estate and other interests in Springfield 
and in Chicopee. 

The Hill family has for centuries been 
prominent in England. Sir Rowland Hill, 
next to Wellington, was the most popular 
and able soldier of his time in the British 
service. He led the right wing of Welling- 
ton's army in the Salamanca campaign in 
1812, and in the battle of Vittoria in 1813, 
and at Waterloo led the famous charge of 
Sir Frederick Adams' brigade against the 
Imperial Guard. He attained the rank of 
lieutenant-general in 1812, was made a 
Knight of the Bath in March of the same 
year, carried the royal standard at the coro- 
nation of George IV, and was made a gen- 
eral in 1825. When Wellington became 
premier in 1828, General Rowland Hill re- 
ceived appointment as general-commander- 
in-chief, and when he resigned this office 
in 1842 he was created a Viscount. He 
was idolized by his soldiers and held the 
grand crosses of various foreign orders, 
including the Russian St. George and the 
Austrian Maria Theresa. A member of the 
Hill family was instrumental in securing 
the passage of the first penny post law in 
England. Another member of the Hill fam- 
ily served under Cromwell in the expedition 
into Ireland. 

One branch of the Hill family has for 
nearly two centuries been famous in the 
musical world, as violinists, as expert per- 
formers on the viol, as violin and organ 
manufacturers, and as experts in all matters 
pertaining to violins. Joseph Hill, born 
171 5, died 1784, was a manufacturer of 
violins and other musical instruments in 
London, England, and a recognized author- 
ity on all matters pertaining to old and val- 
uable violins. He had five sons, William, 
Joseph, Lockart, Benjamin, and John, all of 



23 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



whom were violin makers and musicians. 
Three of them played violins in the orches- 
tra which played at the first Handel Com- 
memoration in 1784. Joseph Hill, father of 
these five sons. l)ecame the ancestor of a 
long line of "fiddle makers," including the 
founder of the world-famed firm of W. E. 
Hill & Sons, of New Bond Street, Lon- 
don. Thomas Henry Hill, who died De- 
ceml>er 25, 1891, was a pupil of Sainton 
at the Royal Academy of Music. Another 
mcmljer of this branch of the family was 
one of the performers in Queen Anne's 
band; the names of others appear on the 
minute books of the Royal Society of Mu- 
sicians, and in the records of the Musicians' 
Company. Henry Hill was one of the lead- 
ing violinists of his day and one of the 
founders of the Beethoven Quartet Society. 

Anthony Hill, of English descent, but 
born in Holland, came to America, settled 
in New York City, and became a freeholder. 
He removed to Fox Meadows, now a part 
of Scarsdale, Westchester County, New 
York, April 7, 1726, and about 1741 ac- 
quired large holdings near the later site of 
Red Mills, Dutchess County; in 1749 he 
purchased more lands in Westchester 
County. He married, about 1726, Mary 
Ward. Two of his sons, William and 
Uriah, removed to lands purchased by their 
father in Westchester County. Children of 
Anthony and Mary (Ward) Hill, all born 
at Fox Meadows (now part of Scarsdale), 
New York, were : William, Uriah, Anthony, 
Andrew, Cornelius, Charity, Jane, Mary, 
and Miriam. 

Uriah Hill, one of the sons of Anthony 
Hill, was a fur trader, and in 1764 was a 
freeholder at White Plains, New York. In 
1750 he purchased land at the present site 
of Hackensack (then New Barbadoes), 
Bergen County, New Jersey. 

(I) Uri K. Hill, descendant of Anthony 
Hill, inherited the ability of a long line of 
musical ancestors, and was a composer and 
editor, his works including "The Vermont 
Harmony," published in Northampton in 



1 801 ; "Sacred Minstrel," published in Bos- 
ton, 1806; "The Handelian Repository," 
published in New York City in 1814; and 
"Solfeggio Americano," pubHshed in New 
York City in 1820. He was a veteran of 
the War of 1812, during which conflict he 
participated in the battle of Lundy's Lane. 
He married and became the father of three 
sons, two of whom were: i. Uriah C, who 
was born in New York City, in 1802, and 
died in Paterson, New Jersey, in Septem- 
ber, 1875. He was a violinist, a pupil of 
Spohr at Kassel in 1836. As leader of 
the Sacred Music Society he produced Han- 
del's "Messiah" in St. Paul's Chapel, No- 
vember 18, 1831, this being the first per- 
formance of an entire oratorio in New York 
City. In 1842 he became the founder and 
the first president of the New York Phil- 
harmonic Society, in which he played with 
the first violins. He was president of the 
New York Philharmonic Society until 1848. 
2. George Handel, of further mention. 

(II) George Handel Hill, son of Uri K. 
Hill, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
October 9, 1809, and died at Saratoga, New 
York, September 27, 1848. He received his 
education in Taunton, Massachusetts, and 
when he was sixteen years of age entered 
the employ of a watchmaker and jeweller in 
New York City. He was "devoted to the 
theatre" and occasionally served as a super- 
numerary in the Chatham Square Theatre. 
His talent was apparent, and after a time 
he joined a traveling company of comedians 
and gave entertainments as a flute player, 
comic singer, story teller, and subsequently 
as a lecturer. 

His earliest engagement as a stock actor 
was at the Arch Street Theatre in Phila- 
delphia. In 1828 he married and for a 
year or two kept a country store in Leroy, 
New York, but he was not a business man 
and his love for histrionic work made the 
routine of the country store unbearable. 
He later joined a company in the Albany 
Theatre and then lectured and acted in the 
Middle and Southern states. His success in 



24 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



a small "Yankee" part in Samuel \\'ood- 
worth's drama. "The Forest Rose," inter- 
ested him and was the means of his making 
a specialty of "Yankee" character parts. 
His debut at the Park Theatre, Xew York, 
raised him at once to the dignity of a star, 
and secured him engagements throughout 
the Union. Among his dramas were 
"Caspar Hauser," "The Green Mountain 
Boys." "A Wife for a Day," "The Yankee 
Pedler." and "The Knight of the Golden 
Fleece." In 1836 "Yankee Bill." as he was 
called, performed at Drury Lane and the 
Oh-mpic theatres in London, and in other 
large cities in England, also in Edinburgh 
and Glasgow, Scotland, returning home the 
following year. In 1838 he again visited 
Europe, appearing at the Edelphi Theatre 
in London, and also performing in Paris, 
France. In 1839 he returned to the L'nited 
States, and in 1847 he retired to Batavia. 
Xew York, from that time on only occa- 
sionally giving monologue entertainments. 
In the delineation of the typical artificial 
stage- Yankee, he is said to have been un- 
equalled. He married Cordelia Thompson, 
of Syracuse, X'ew York, who died in 1896, 
aged ninet}--four years, and they were the 
parents of seven children: i. X'ettie. mar- 
ried Fred Fink, general freight agent for 
the Old Dominion Steamship Company. 2. 
Cordelia, married \Villiam K. Valentine, of 
X'ew York City. 3. George E.. who grad- 
uated from Princeton, then he being an 
old seaman, was sent to the Academy at 
Annapolis, with the class that preceded that 
of Admiral Dewey, and was a captain in 
the L'nited States X'a\y during the Ci\-il 
War. He was also collector for the Port 
of Xew York. 4. Wade Hampton, of fur- 
ther mention. 5. Watson. 6. Franklin. 
7. Julia, married Isaac DeVoe. 

(Ill) Wade Hampton Hill, son of George 
Handel and Cordelia (Thompson) Hill, was 
born in Xew York Cit}', in February, 1835, 
and died in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 
1892. He received his education in the 
public schools of Xew York City, and 



throughout his life continued reading and 
study, the greater part of his opportunities 
for study being those which he made for 
himself. After the death of his father, 
which occurred when he was but a young 
boy, the care of his mother and the family 
was largely his responsibility. He found 
emplo\Tnent with Berlin and Jones, manu- 
facturers of envelopes in X'ew York Citv, 
and in this way learned the art of man- 
ufacturing that article of common use and 
also much of the art of managing a manu- 
facturing establishment. In 1865 he re- 
moved to Worcester, Massachusetts, where 
he purchased the interests of Trumbull and 
Hartshorn and established the W. H. Hill 
Envelope Manufacturing Company, of 
Worcester, which he successfully conducted 
to the time of his death. 

Along \s-ith his business responsibilities, 
he found time for pubHc service and for 
fraternal and other affiliations. During the 
Ci\nl War he went to Governor's Island and 
ottered his services, which were accepted, he 
being made recruiting officer for X'ew York 
City. In military service, as in business 
connections, his ability and his faithfulness 
won him advancement and enlarged oppor- 
timity for sen-ice. He rose to the rank of 
major, and later was placed on General 
Hooker's staff and raised to the rank of 
colonel. He was a member of the Free and 
Accepted Masons, in X'ew York City; a 
member of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public; and of the Worcester Qub. and his 
religious affiliation was with the Episcopal 
Church of All Saints. 

On May 30, 1865. Wade H. Hill married 
Sarah Amelia DeVoe. who was born in 
1S39. and died in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts. August 21, 1917, daughter of Moses 
and Eleanor (Valentine) DeVoe (see 
DeVoe VII), and they were the parents 
of four children: i. Frederick, who died in 
infancy. 2. George H., of further mention. 
3. Agnes Gertrude, born in 1877. died at the 
age of four years. 4. Charles Edwin, born 
in 1878. 



EN'CVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(IV) George H. Hill, son of Wade 
Hampton and Sarah Amelia (DeVoe) Hill, 
was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, Feb- 
ruary 12, 1 868. He received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native city. 
He then entered Peekskill Military Acad- 
emy, from which he was graduated in 1886, 
and pursued his college course in Trinity 
College, at Hartford, graduating with the 
class of 1 891. He taught in the New York 
Military Academy in 1891-92, being a mem- 
ber of the first faculty of that institution, 
and soon afterward became associated with 
his father in the W. H. Hill Envelope Com- 
pany, holding the position of cashier until 
the death of his father in 1892, when he 
became treasurer of the corporation. This 
office he continued to fill until 1898, when 
the business was sold to the United States 
Envelope Company. The interests that 
were the W. H. Hill Envelope Company 
are now known as the W. H. Hill Division 
of the United States Envelope Company. 

During the Spanish-American War, Mr. 
Hill was first sergeant of Company C, Sec- 
ond Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, with 
which he served all through the war, he 
being one of the seventeen survivors of the 
seventy-seven men with whom he went to 
Cuba. He has two medals he received from 
the United States for his service in this 
war. After the close of the war he was 
engaged in business for a few years in 
Worcester, then was out of business for 
three years, then as engineer in the Detroit 
River tunnel, and later serving as chief in- 
s])ector on the Cape Cod Canal. He was 
also in charge of the sounding and survey 
of fifty-four miles of the Connecticut River 
at the time of the agitation for opening it 
to navigation. Upon the completion of that 
work, he was engaged as auditor by the 
Standard Oil Company, with whom he re- 
mained until 1915, when he entered the 
employ of the New England Westinghouse 
Company, as general auditor. At the time 
of the reorganization of the Stevens-Durvea 
Company his services were also secured by 



that company as assistant treasurer. Since 
1905 Mr. Hill has been a resident of Spring- 
field and of Chicopee, where he has real 
estate interests. On November 11, 1922, he 
became general manager of the Casket Hard- 
ware Company of Springfield and served 
in that capacity until January i, 1924. In 
the World War he received a medal for 
efficiency in despatch, in connection with his 
work with the Westinghouse Company in 
the manufacture of the Browning machine 
guns. Fraternally, he is a member of Athal- 
stan Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
Eureka Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; 
Hiram Council, Royal and Select Masters; 
and of Worcester Commandery, Knights 
Templar, all of Worcester, Of all these 
he is a life member. He is also a member 
of Delta Psi College Fraternity. 

George H. Hill married (first), in 1891, 
Ella Stevens, of Worcester, Massachusetts. 
She died in 1895. He married (second), in 
1898, Edna J. Farmer, died in 1904. He 
married (third), in 1918, Margaret Crow- 
ley, who was born in Canada. The children 
of the first marriage are: i. Agnes Ger- 
trude, born in 1892, married Thomas Hogan, 
of Brockton, Massachusetts. 2. Helen 
DeVoe, married Godfrey Porter, of West 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and has one child, 
Robert Hill Porter, born January 5, 1922. 

(The DeVoe Line) 

(I) Frederick De Vaux was born about 
1645, in the Province of Annis, near Ro- 
chelle, France. When a boy of twelve or 
fourteen years of age he, with his parents 
and two brothers, at least, set out from their 
home to escape the various inflictions put 
upon them by the authorities, and, after 
much difficulty and suffering, they arrived 
at Manheim, Germany. Here Frederick de 
Vaux grew up to manhood and entered into 
trade in the town. In 1675, ^^ took pas- 
sage for England, and from there came to 
New York, and soon after he married his 
second wife. By this marriage he came into 
possession of a tract of land, known after- 



26 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



wards as the "Cromwell Farm," located on 
the eastern shore of the cove into which 
"Cromwell Creek" connects with the Har- 
lem River, near the "Central Bridge." In 
1694 he purchased the neck of land (after- 
wards known as "Devoe's Point," which 
connected McComb's Dam — now Central 
Bridge) on the east end across the Harlem 
River, from William Bickley, Senior, who 
held a patent for it, which contained one 
hundred and eighty-four acres, for which 
Frederick De Vaux agreed to pay fourteen 
pounds, and to have three years to pay for 
it. He married (first) in Manheim, about 
1673, but his wife died soon afterward. 
The record of his second marriage in Har- 
lem, June 24, 1677 (old style) appears in 
the Dutch Church records "Frederik du 
Voix, widower, to Hester Terneur, daugh- 
ter of Daniel Tourneur," of Harlem. Chil- 
dren : Jacob and Rachel (twins), Esther, 
Susannah, Frederick, of whom further ; 
Daniel, Abel, Mary, Leah, Dinah, Joseph, 
Judith, Abigail. 

(II) Frederick De Voe, Jr. (note dif- 
ference in spelling), eldest son of Frederick 
and Hester (Terneur) De Vaux, was born 
in 1684. In 1 72 1 he received the "Cromwell 
Farm," mentioned above, on which he re- 
sided until his death, which occurred in 
1753. He married (first) Hester Dykman, 
and they were the parents of three children : 
I. Frederick, of further mention. 2. Hester, 
married Peter Bant, married Jacob Brown. 
He married (second), in 1721, Mary Odell, 
and they were the parents of David, Daniel, 
David, Mary, John, Leah, Thomas, Abra- 
ham, and Sarah. 

(HI) Frederick DeVoe, son of Freder- 
ick and Hester (Dykman) De Voe, was 
born in 1710, and after the settlement of 
his father's estate he leased a farm on the 
Philips Manor, in Lower Yonkers, where 
he engaged in farming and stock-raising. 
Here he was living when the Revolution 
began. Being then over sixty years of age 
and not in very robust health he was not 
called upon for duty as a soldier, but he 



suft'ered at the hands of marauding parties 
from both sides to such an extent that he 
died about the time the war closed and was 
l)uried in a private burying ground on the 
Gilbert Valentine place, located just outside 
of the present "Woodlawn Cemetery." He 
married Jane Doty. He left seven children : 
John, of whom further ; Elanor, Frederick, 
Daniel, Hannah, Abraham, Mary. 

( IV) John De Voe, son of Frederick 
and Jane (Doty) De Voe, was born in 1756, 
and died September 8, 1824. He served in 
the Revolution as a member of the John 
Warner's company. After the war he, with 
the assistance of Augustus Van Cortlandt, 
purchased the farm which his father had 
leased, built a new dwelling house, and in 
1799 built an additional one of stone. He 
married, in 1779, Rebecca De Voe, who was 
born in 1760, and died March 10, 1841, 
daughter of his father's half-brother, Dan- 
iel De Voe, and they were the parents of 
Isaac, Frederick, John, of further mention ; 
John, Daniel, Sarah, Auley (or Alliday), 
James William, Jane, Rebecca, Abraham. 

(V) John De Voe, son of John and Re- 
becca (De Voe) De Voe, was born in 1785. 
Previous to the War of 1812, John De Voe 
(then Junior) was a non-commissioned offi- 
cer in Captain Lewis Rich's company, Yon- 
kers, in Lieutenant-Colonel Jonathan Va- 
rian's regiment, Westchester County, but on 
the opening of the war a draft was ordered 
in the regiment, by which every tenth man 
was enrolled, and Mr. De Voe became one 
of the successful ones whose names were 
placed on the roll "for six months' duty 
any time within two years, three months' 
service at a time." He served under Captain 
Lawrence Davenport, of New Rochelle. 
This company marched to Yonkers village, 
where it was joined by several others, and 
all companies proceeded to Kingsbridge. 
The next morning they marched to New 
York, received their equipments, and at 
night encamped on "Dyde's Parade," on the 
west side of Broadway, near Prince Street ; 
next day they crossed the ferry to Brooklyn, 



27 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



where the Regiment (12th) was organized 
with a Troop of Cavalry under Captain 
Pierce and Lieutenant Jesse Husted, one 
Rifle Corps organized in Brooklyn, under 
Captain Burdett Stryker, and four Infantry 
conijjanies organized in the City of New 
York, under Captains Delafield, Clark, 
McClure, and Lieutenant Stephenson (Com- 
mandant). The regiment, as organized, was 
marched down to the high grounds east of 
Fort Hamilton, where they were drilled 
daily, varied with guard duty, from Sep- 
tember 15 until December. On December 
3, the regiment left the camp, marched back 
to New York, and were "paid ofif." He 
married, in 1807, Sophia Farrington, who 
was born in 1787, daughter of Thomas Far- 
rington. Children: Isaac, Thomas Farring- 
ton, James, Moses, of further mention ; 
Susannah Jane, Mary Adelia, Harriet 
Amelia, John A., George W., Frederick 
William. 

(VI) Moses De Voe, son of John and 
Sophia (Farrington) De Voe, was born in 
1814. In 1856 he purchased a portion of 
the old farm at Fordham, once owned by 
Peter Valentine. He married, in 1836, 
Eleanor Valentine, daughter of Dennis Val- 
entine, Sr., and granddaughter of Peter 
Valentine. They were the parents of chil- 
dren : Charles H., Sarah Amelia, of fur- 
ther mention ; Walter Briggs, Dennis Valen- 
tine, Mary Eleanor, Isaac Brown, Emma 
Francis. 

(VII) Sarah Amelia De Voe, daughter of 
Moses and Eleanor (Valentine) De Voe, 
was l)orn in 1839. She married. May 30, 
1865, Wade Hampton Hill (see Hill HI). 



BARTLETT, Alfred H. 

One of the finest printing establishments 
of Western Massachusetts is that which was 
established in Ludlow, Massachusetts, by 
Alfred H. Bartlett and is now conducted by 
his son-in-law, John E. Nilsson. Growing 
from a very modest beginning, made in a 
small second-story room over a church, 
where Mr. Bartlett printed the tags used 



by the Ludlow company, by whom he was 
employed, the business has developed into 
one of the finest of its kind, and is a monu- 
ment to the ability, energy, and efficiency 
of one of Springfield's citizens who has 
passed on to the next world leaving a valu- 
able contribution behind him. 

Mr. Bartlett came of a family which 
traced its ancestry to earliest Colonial times 
in this country and is one of the most ancient 
in England, where the original spelling, 
Barttelot, has been retained by the head of 
the Sussex family, Sir and Colonel W^alter 
B. Barttelot, of Stopham, who traces his 
descent from Adam Barttelot, who came 
over with William the Conqueror and re- 
ceived from him a grant of land in Sussex. 
The American ancestor of the branch of the 
family to which Alfred H. Bartlett belonged 
was Robert Bartlett, from whom descent is 
traced as follows : 

(I) Robert Bartlett, who was born in 
England and died in Plymouth, Massachu- 
setts, in 1676, came to the New World in 
the ship "Ann," which landed in July, 1623. 
He settled at Plymouth, where he was given 
an acre of land for a hovise-Iot and garden, 
and married, in 1628, Mary W^arren, daugh- 
ter of Richard W'arren, a "Mayflower" pas- 
senger. Among their eight children was 
Joseph, of further mention. 

(II) Joseph Bartlett, second child of 
Robert and Mary (Warren) Bartlett, was 
born in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1639, 
and died in 171 1. He settled in a village 
on the seashore some eight miles from the 
town of Plymouth, known as Manomet 
Ponds or South Plymouth, and in modern 
times a summer resort, and married Hannah 
F"allowell, daughter of Gabriel Fallowell. 
She died in 1710, aged seventy-two years, 
and her monument, with that of her hus- 
band's, may still be seen on Burial Hill, in 
Plymouth, Massachusetts. They were the 
parefits of seven children, among whom was 
Robert, of further mention. 

(HI) Robert Bartlett, son of Joseph and 
Hannah (Fallowell) Bartlett, was born in 



28 






u<t) 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1663, and died 
in 1 7 18, aged fifty-five years. He married 
(first) in 1687, Sarah Bartlett, his cousin, 
daughter of Benjamin Bartlett. He married 
(second), in 1691, Sarah Cook, daughter 
of Jacob Cook, and to the second marriage 
eight children were born: i. Hannah, born 
in 1 69 1. 2. Thomas, born in 1694. 3. John, 
born in 1696, 4. Sarah, born in 1699. 5- 
James, born in 1701. 6. Joseph, of further 
mention. 7. Elizabeth, born in 1707. 8. 
William, born in 1709. 

(IV) Joseph Bartlett, son of Robert and 
Sarah (Cook) Bartlett, was born in Plym- 
outh, Massachusetts, in 1704, and died May 
30, 1783. He was a prominent citizen and 
a deacon in the church at Plymouth, where 
he lived throughout his life. He married, 
in 1737, Sarah Norton, born in 1705, who 
died December 23, 1725, the mother of 
these children: i. Sarah, born in 1737. 
2. Joseph, born in 1738. 3. Thomas, of 
further mention, 4. Josiah, born in 1744. 
5. Martha, born in 1747. 6. Hannah, born 
in 1749. Both father and mother are buried 
in Burial Hill Cemetery, Plymouth. 

(V) Thomas Bartlett, son of Joseph and 
Sarah (Norton) Bartlett, was born in 
Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1742, where he 
died in 1808. He was a soldier in the Revo- 
lutionary War, his enlistment beginning 
September 7, 1777, as a private in Captain 
John Bannister's company, Colonel Job 
Cushing's regiment. He married, in 1765, 
Betty Bartlett, born in 1747, died Septem- 
ber 20, 1779, daughter of Sylvanus Bartlett 
who served in the Revolutionary War, with 
Captain Sprague's company, list of Octo- 
ber, 1777, and with Captain Thomas Samp- 
son's company in 1776. Thomas and Betty 
(Bartlett) Bartlett were the parents of five 
children : Betsy, Jerusha, Daniel, Thomas, 
of further mention, and Deborah. 

(VI) Thomas Bartlett, son of Thomas 
and Betty (Bartlett) Bartlett, was born in 
Plymouth, Massachusetts, May 19, 1771, 
and died in Burke. Vermont, June 19, 1857. 
He received his early education in the pub- 



lic schools of his native district, and when 
he was sixteen years of age removed to 
Vermont and prepared for college under the 
tuition of Judges Miles, of Fairlee, in that 
State. In 1794 he entered Dartmouth Col- 
lege, but after two years of study in that 
institution, ill health made it necessary that 
he should ieave college. He removed to 
Burke, Vermont, in 1802, and taught school 
there during the remainder of that year. He 
was oflfered the position of town clerk, which 
he accepted, being the first to fill that posi- 
tion in Burke, and later was elected to 
represent the town in the General Assembly, 
being the first also to fill that position. He 
married Ann Little, and among their chil- 
dren was Alfred H., of further mention. 

(VII) Alfred H. Bartlett, son of Thomas 
and Ann (Little) Bartlett, was born in 
Burke, Vermont, in 1816, and died in Dan- 
ville, Vermont, at the age of thirty-five 
years. He received his education in the 
public schools of his native district, and 
while still a young man, began his long 
career in public office. He was elected high 
sheriflF of Caledonia County, and this office 
he continued to hold to the time of his death 
in 1 85 1. He married Anna H. Joy, and 
they were the parents of six children: 
I. Francis, born in 1840, died in 1841. 2. 
Henry, born in 1841, died in 1876. 3. Mary, 
born in 1842. 4. Charles W.. born in 1845. 
5. Clara Ann, who married Rufus H. Win- 
sor. 6. Alfred H., of whom further. 

(VIII) Alfred H, Bartlett. the subject 
of this review, youngest child of Alfred H. 
and Anna H. (Joy) Bartlett. was born in 
Danville, Vermont, April 29, 1851. and died 
in Ludlow, Massachusetts, October 3. 1920. 
He received his education in the schools of 
his native town and Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, to which latter city he came while in 
his early teens, and when his school training 
was completed began his active career as a 
clerk in a store. After a time he made a 
change and went to Fall River. Massachu- 
setts, and still later to Providence. Rhode 
Island, in both of which places he found 



29 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



employment as a steward in various hotels. 
He later decided upon a different line of 
business and for a time traveled through 
Pennsylvania, selling goods, and finally set- 
tling at Ludlow, Massachusetts. Here he 
later l)ecame superintendent of one of the 
mills of the Ludlow Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and it was while employed in that 
capacity that he made the modest beginning 
which has since developed into one of the 
finest printing establishments in Western 
Massachusetts. This company used many 
printed tags, and as a side occupation, in a 
small room over a church, Mr. Bartlett 
began printing these tags, using a small hand 
press. The business soon outgrew the small 
hand press and developed to proportions 
which made it advisable that he should give 
up the mill business and devote his entire 
time to printing. He bought a building 
and established what has since proved to be 
one of the most flourishing and prosperous 
printing concerns in his section of the State. 
In connection with his printing business he 
opened a store for the retail and wholesale 
handling of stationery, and in which he also 
sold the twine made by the Ludlow Man- 
ufacturing Company at this time. He was 
doing all the printing for that concern, 
which is one of the largest of its kind in 
the country, and the combination was a 
mutually satisfactory and profitable one. 
Mr. Hartlett was a large employer of labor, 
and his executive ability was demonstrated 
in the skillful way in which he secured the 
accomplishment of his aims without friction 
and to the satisfaction of all concerned. 
Since the death of Mr. Bartlett the printing 
business has been successfully conducted by 
his son-in-law, John E. Xilsson. 

In addition to his interests and responsi- 
bilities as proprietor of a busy and prosper- 
ous printing establishment, Mr. Bartlett was 
a member of the first board of directors of 
the Savings Bank in Ludlow, and he also 
gave freely of his time and energy in the 
service of the community in which he lived. 
For thirtv years he was the efficient and 



faithful town clerk of Ludlow, Massachu- 
setts, and he also served for many years as 
tax collector and town treasurer. He was 
a charter member of Brigham Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and was also a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, at Ludlow. He was a home-loving 
man and one whom his many friends and 
associates esteemed most highly for his per- 
sonal qualities as well as for his integrity 
and ability as a business man. He was an 
attendant of the Union Church. 

In 1883, ]Mr. Bartlett married Nellie Joy, 
born in Sutton, Vermont, a resident for 
many years of Ludlow, daughter of David 
and Laura E. (Beckwith) Joy (see Beck- 
w^ith VIII). David Joy was born in 181 9, 
and died in Ludlow, Massachusetts, July 16, 
1891, son of Joseph and Ollie (Benson) 
Joy. He was engaged as a merchant in 
Springfield, but later came to Ludlow, 
where he purchased land and was prominent 
in the development of the town. He built 
the first public hall in Ludlow, known as 
Joy Hall, and owned extensive tracts of land 
in the section known as Joy Street. The 
children of Alfred H. and Nellie (Joy) 
Bartlett are: i, Ruth Marion, born Febru- 
ary 28, 1884, died June 8, 1923; married 
Herbert J. Leaf, and had one son, Alfred 
William. 2. Katherine, born July 8, 1888, 
married John E. Nilsson, and has one son, 
Edwin John. 3. Grace Laura, born January 
13, 1893, married Plenny C. Averill, and 
has one son, Robert Bartlett. 

(The Beckwith Line) 

(I) Matthew Beckwith, born in York- 
shire, England, in 1610, came to New Eng- 
land in 1635 with his wife Elizabeth and 
became the progenitor of the branch of the 
Beckwith family to which Laura E. Beck- 
with belongs. Among the children of Mat- 
thew and Elizabeth Beckwith was Matthew, 
of whom further. 

(II) Matthew Beckwith, son of ^Matthew 
and Elizabeth Beckwith, was born at Say- 
brook Point in 1637, and died at New Lon- 



30 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(Ion, Connecticut, in 1727. He married 

Elizabeth , and they were the parents of 

children, among whom was James, of whom 
further. 

(III) James Beckwith, son of Matthew 
and Elizabeth Beckwith, was born in New 
London. Connecticut, in 1671, and moved, 
in 1692, to Lyme, Connecticut, where he 
died in 1719. He married Sarah Griswold, 
and they were the parents of children, 
among whom was Daniel, of whom further. 

(IV) Daniel Beckwith, son of James and 
Sarah (Griswold) Beckwith, was born in 
Lyme, Connecticut, in 1704, and died in 
1763. He was a Baptist minister, and highly 
respected in the community. He married 
Miriam Smith, and they were the parents 
of children, among whom was Amos, of 
whom further. 

(V) Amos Beckwith, son of Daniel and 
Miriam (Smith) Beckwith, was born in 
Lyme, Connecticut, in 1730, and died in 
1822. He removed to Mario w, New 
Hampshire, in 1787, later going to Sutton, 
Vermont. He was a Baptist minister, and 
during the Revolution fought with the Con- 
tinental Army in what was known as the 
Parsons' Regiment of the Connecticut line. 
He married Sarah Truman, and they were 
the parents of John, of whom further. 

(VI) John Beckwith, son of Amos and 
Sarah (Truman) Beckwith, was born Oc- 
tober 21, 1789, and died May 10, 1874. He 
was a lawyer, engaged in practice in Sutton, 
Vermont. He married Matilda Shaw, born 
in 1797, died in 1882, daughter of Jacob 
Shaw, and they were the parents of nine 
children: i. Lodoska. 2, Corydon. 3. 
Amos, who was born in 1825 and graduated 
from West Point in 1850. He served in the 
Seminole War and also in the Civil War. 
During the Civil War he was chief com- 
missary at Washington, D. C, and after- 
wards served as chief commissariat of the 
military division of Mississippi ; was on the 
staff of General Sherman during the At- 
lanta campaign; and after the close of the 
war was chief of commissarv for the De- 



partment of the Gulf. He was breveted 
brigadier-general of the United States Army, 
]\Iarch 13, 1863; was made lieutenant-colo- 
nel on the general staff, June 3, 1874, and 
was made commissary general and stationed 
at St. Louis, Missouri, in 18S9. 4. Laura 
E., of further mention. 5. Daniel Newell. 
6. John. 7. Henry Nehemiah. 8. Kate 
Susan. 9. Sarah Elizabeth. 

(VII) Laura E. Beckwith, daughter of 
John and Matilda (Shaw) Beckwith, was 
born October 10, 1827. She married David 
Joy, and they were the parents of Nellie 
Joy, of further mention. 

(VIII) Nellie Joy, daughter of David 
and Laura E. (Beckwith) Joy, married 
Alfred H. Bartlett (see Bartlett VIII). 



PHELON, Frederick David 

The entire period of the active l)usiness 
life of Frederick David Phelon has been 
associated with the paper manufacturing 
business, and for ten years prior to his re- 
tirement in 1909 he was head of the Linden 
division of the American Writing Paper 
Company, of Holyoke. The ancestry of Mr. 
Phelon is traced to Thomas Phelon. of Suf- 
field, Connecticut, through an adopted son, 
Joseph, of further mention. 

(II) Joseph Phelon, adopted son of 
Thomas Phelon, immigrant ancestor, was 
born in 1733. and died November 27. 1800. 
He was buried at Feeding Hills, Massa- 
chusetts. He was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary War. He and his wife. Mary, were 
the parents of children, among whom was 
John, of further mention. 

(HI) John Phelon. son of Joseph and 
Mary Phelon, was born in Suffield, Connec- 
ticut, in May, 1761, and served in the Revo- 
lutionary War. He married and reared 
children, among whom was Gad, of further 
mention. 

( IV) Gad Phelon, son of John Phelon, 
was born in West Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, March 14. 1793, and died in Gran- 
ville. iMassachusetts. in May, 1876. He was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits, raising prod- 



31 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



uce, and making butter and cheese, which 
he sold in Hartford, Connecticut. During 
the most of his life he was a resident of 
Granville and Blanford. both in Massachu- 
setts. He married Loveanna Parsons, who 
was born in December, 1794, and died in 
May, 1877, and they were the parents of 
six children: Lorenzo, Emeline, Joseph, of 
further mention ; Jane, Margaret, and Har- 
riet. 

(V) Joseph Phelon, son of Gad and Love- 
anna (Parsons) Phelon, was born in Gran- 
ville, Massachusetts, in 1821, and died there 
September 29, 1899. He was a successful 
farmer, and in 1863 moved from Granville 
to Springfield, Massachusetts, where for a 
number of years he was employed in the 
armory. ?Ie also was employed in the 
roundhouse of the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road for a time. Eventually, however, he 
returned to Granville, and again engaged in 
agricultural pursuits during the remainder 
of his active life. He married, June 28, 
1849, Margaret Carpenter, born in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, October 12, 1829, but resided 
in Granville most of her life. She was 
daughter of Joseph and Eliza (Quiner) Car- 
penter; she died April 24, 1892. The chil- 
dren of Joseph and Margaret (Carpenter) 
Phelon were: I. Jane Maria, who is de- 
ceased, and who married Frank H. Warner. 
2. Frank Joseph, who died young, 3. Fred- 
erick David, of further mention. 4. Lillian 
Etta, who died at an early age. 5. Breton 
Carpenter, who resides in Springfield. 

(VI) Frederick David Phelon, son of 
Joseph and Margaret (Carpenter) Phelon, 
was born in Granville, Massachusetts, Oc- 
tober 18, 1853, and received his early school 
training in the public schools of his native 
town. Later he removed with his parents 
to Springfield, where he attended the Bar- 
rows School and completed his two terms 
of study in the high school. Upon the com- 
pletion of his school training he found his 
first employment with the Greenleaf & Tay- 
lor Manufacturing Company, who were en- 
gaged in the paper manufacturing business, 



their paper warehouse being in the same 
building that John Brown used as a wool- 
house many years ago. Later, Mr. Phelon 
continued his connection with that company 
in Holyoke, Massachusetts. After severing 
his connection with Greenleaf & Taylor, he 
was employed by the Massasoit Paper Com- 
pany, and after a considerable period of 
time spent in that connection, he removed 
to Huntington, where he became actively 
identified with the Chester Paper Company. 
This company was originally a part of the 
Greenleaf & Taylor concern, and when Mr. 
Phelon went to Huntington it was organized 
by Mr. Phelon and others, and Mr. Phelon 
was made director, treasurer, and manager. 
For twenty-four years he gave his whole 
attention to the advancement of the interests 
of that concern, so successfully guiding its 
development that it came to be one of the 
important concerns of its kind in the State. 
In 1899 the Chester Paper Company sold 
its interests to the American Writing Paper 
Company, and Mr. Phelon became head of 
the Linden division of the American Writ- 
ing Paper Company in Holyoke, of which 
he was also made a director, which important 
executive posiitions he continued to hold 
until the time of his retirement in 1909. He 
now resides in Springfield, which has been 
his place of residence since 1888. He is a 
member of Hampden Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Springfield ; and his re- 
ligious affiliation is with the Park Congre- 
gational Church. 

Frederick David Phelon married, on 
March 11, 1874, Nellie M. Eastman, of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, daughter of 
Charles B. (formerly of Chicopee) and 
Catherine G. (Hanscom) Eastman, and 
they are the parents of three children: i. 
Florence Grace, born in Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, December 30, 1874, died in New 
York City, April 13, 1924; she married 
(first), April 14, 1898, William H. Gowdy; 
(second), November 2, 1918, James C. 
Chisholm. Children by the first marriage : 
Eastman Phelon, born June 28, 1901 ; and 



32 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Richard Parsons, born April 24, 1903. 2. 
Arthur E., born in Huntington, Massachu- 
setts, January 13, 1878; he is engaged in 
business as a designer and draftsman. He 
married, October 29, 1907, Gertrude Skeels, 
and they are the parents of two children, Jo- 
seph Skeels, born April 10, 1910, and 
Russell Eastman, born June 27, 1912. 3. 
Raymond Joseph, born in Huntington, 
Massachusetts, July 5, 1886; married, June 
17, 191 1, Nellie R. Skeels, and they are the 
parents of one daughter, Marjorie Russell, 
who was born July 21, 19 16. 



FULLER, Rufus Gordon 

For many years the late Rufus Gordon 
Fuller was engaged in writing for trade 
journals and newspapers, and to the time 
of his death, which occurred in Kent, Con- 
necticut, July 4, 1902, he traveled extensively 
in this country and in Europe, Mr. Fuller 
was a member of a family which has the 
honor of having its name twice inscribed on 
the "Mayflower" list, both Edward and Dr. 
Samuel Fuller being passengers on that his- 
toric vessel. 

(I) Dr. Samuel Fuller, immigrant an- 
cestor of the line of Rufus Gordon Fuller, 
came to America in the "Mayflower" in 
1620, and died in Plymouth in 1633. Be- 
fore coming to this country he had been as- 
sociated with Rev. John Robinson, at Leyden, 
Holland, and was a deacon in the original 
church there. After coming to this country 
he was a deacon in the Plymouth church. 
He married (first), in England, Elsie Glas- 
cock. She died, and, in 161 3, while in Ley- 
den, Holland, he married (second) Agnes 
Carpenter, daughter of Alexander Carpen- 
ter, who lived but a short time, and in 161 7 
he married (third) Bridget Lee, of Leyden, 
Holland. Dr. Samuel and Mrs. Bridget 
(Lee) Fuller had one child born in Holland, 
who died shortly after removal to this coun- 
try, and two others. Rev. Samuel, and 
Mercy, both of whom were born in 
Plymouth. Mrs. Fuller did not come to 



this country until 1623, when she brought 
with her their eldest child. 

(II) Rev. Samuel Fuller, son of Dr. Sam- 
uel and Bridget (Lee) Fuller, was born in 
the Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, in 
1624, and died at Middleboro, Massachusetts, 
about October i, 1695. He was a deacon in 
the church at Plymouth, and first minister 
of the church at Middleboro, where he was 
ordained December 26, 1694, after he had 
been preaching to that congregation for 
about sixteen years. Rev. Samuel Fuller 
and his wife, Elizabeth (Brewster) Fuller, 
were the parents of seven children : IMercy, 
Samuel, Experience, John, Elizabeth, Han- 
nah, and Isaac, of further mention. 

(HI) Isaac Fuller, son of Rev. Samuel 
and Elizabeth (Brewster) Fuller, was born 
in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1675, ^^d 
died in Brockton, Massachusetts, in 1727. 
He lived for a time in North Bridgewater, 
Massachusetts, and later was a celebrated 
physician in Halifax, Massachusetts. He 
married, October 20, 1709, Mary Pratt, and 
they were the parents of seven children : 
Reliance, Isaac (2), of further mention; 
Elizabeth, Samuel, Micah, Jabez, and Mary. 

(IV) Isaac (2) Fuller, son of Isaac (i) 
and Mary (Pratt) Fuller, was born in 
Halifax, Massachusetts, September 24, 1712, 
and settled in North Bridgewater, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1736. He married, in 1737, 
Sarah Packard, and they were the parents 
of the following children: Isaac (3), of 
further mention; Oliver, Lemuel, Isaiah, 
Sarah, Susannah, Lois, Benjamin, and Re- 
liance. 

(V) Isaac (3) Fuller, son of Isaac (2) 
and Sarah (Packard) Fuller, was born in 
North Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Decem- 
ber 15, 1738, and died August 22, 1805. He 
served in the French and Indian Wars, tak- 
ing part in the battle of Lake George, and 
in the fight at Ticonderoga, and he was also 
a soldier in the Revolutionary War, taking 
an active part in the battle of Bunker Hill, 
after having served as a corporal in the bat- 
tle of Lexington, and also serving in the bat- 



33 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ties of White Plains, Monmouth, and Ger- 
mantown. During the campaign in which 
occurred the last-named battles, he was en- 
gaged in active duty, and after the close of 
the war he was one of the bodyguard ap- 
pointed to escort General Washington to 
Mount Vernon. He married, September 15, 
1764, Mary Alden, who was born August 
5, 1745, and died September 10, 181 8, at 
East Mansfield, Massachusetts, daughter of 
Daniel and Abigail (Shaw) Alden, and 
granddaughter of John and Priscilla (Mul- 
lins) Alden. Their children were: Polly, 
Lemuel, Isaac, Barzillai, Alden, Hosea, 
Eunice, Alpheus, Rufus, of further mention, 
and Otis. 

(VI) Rufus Fuller, son of Isaac (3) and 
Mary (Alden) Fuller, was born November 
2Q, 1781, and died at Kent, Connecticut, 
September 13, 1850. He married (first), 
March 2, 1806, Bede Fenn, who was born 
January 10, 1786, at Plymouth, Connecticut, 
and died at Kent, Connecticut, March 18, 
1817. He married (second), February 2, 
1 82 1, Elizabeth Drake, who was born De- 
cember 27, 1792, at Easton, Massachusetts, 
and died at Kent, Connecticut, May 23, 1876. 
The children of Rufus Fuller were : Linus 
Fenn, of further mention ; Julia Ann, Rufus, 
Eliza, who died young; Bede, Ann, and 
Eliza. 

(VII) Linus Fenn Fuller, son of Rufus 
and Bede (Fenn) Fuller, was born at Rhine- 
beck, New York, February 15, 1807, and 
died at Bridgeport, Connecticut, September 
24, 1865. He married, June 14, 1844, 
Catherine Sophia Whiteside, who died 
March 17, 1902, aged seventy-seven years. 
Their children were : Maria Louise, Rufus 
G., of further mention; James, Linus, and 
Wilhelmina. 

(VIII) Rufus Gordon Fuller, son of 
Linus Fenn and Catherine Sophia (White- 
side) Fuller, was born in Dominic Street, 
New York City, April 5, 1851, and died in 
Kent, Connecticut, July 4, 1902. He was a 
man of good education and wide culture, and 
throughout the greater part of his career 



was engaged in writing for trade journals 
and for newspapers. For a short time dur- 
ing mature life he was engaged in the 
business of bottling and selling artesian 
water, but the greater part of his active 
career was devoted to literary interest. He 
traveled extensively, both in this country 
and in Europe, and was active in his chosen 
profession to the time of his death in 1902. 
Fraternally he was affiliated with the Ma- 
sonic Order, and his religious interest was 
with the Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Fuller married, May 11, 1882, Ida A. 
Thayer, who was born in North Fairfield, 
Huron County, Ohio, daughter of Nomandus 
Withby and IMary (Harrington) Thayer 
(see Thayer VIII), and they were the 
parents of two children: i. Livingston 
Vv^hiteside, born November 21, 1883, died 
August 30, 1896. 2. Linus Whiteside, born 
June 25, 1897, died June 9, 1917. 

(The Thayer Line) 

(I) Richard Thayer, immigrant ancestor 
of the branch of the family to which INIrs. 
Fuller belongs, was born and baptized in 
Thornbury, Gloucestershire, England, in 
April, 1601, and came to America in 1641, 
bringing with him eight children. He set- 
tled in Braintree, Massachusetts, where he 
followed his trade, that of the shoemaker. 
He married (first), in Thornbury, England, 
April 5, 1624, Dorothy Mortimore. She 
died, and he married (second) Jane Parker, 
widow of John Parker. His children were : 
Richard (2), of further mention; Cor- 
nelius, Deborah, Joel, Sarah, Hannah, Zach- 
ariah, Abigail, and Nathaniel. 

(II) Richard (2) Thayer, son of Richard 
(i) and Dorothy (Mortimore) Thayer, was 
born in England, in 1625, and settled in 
Braintree, Massachusetts. He married, De- 
cember 24, 165 1, Dorothy Pray, who died 
December 11, 1705; his death occurred De- 
cember 4, 1705. Children: Dorothy, Rich- 
ard, Nathaniel, of further mention ; Abigail, 
Joannah, Sarah, and Cornelius. 

(III) Nathaniel Thayer, son of Richard 



34 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(2) and Dorothy (Pray) Thayer, was born 
January- I, 165S, and died in 1728. He 
married Hannah Hayden, and among their 
children was Zachariah, of further mention. 

(IV) Zachariah Thayer, son of Nathaniel 
and Hannah (Hayden) Thayer, was born 
in 1687, and died in 1775. He married 
(first) Elizabeth Curtis; (second), Abigail 
Seeley. The children of the first marriage 
were: Zachariah, Elizabeth, and Amy. 
Children of the second marriage: Rubana, 
Abigail, Abel, Lieutenant Joshua, of further 
mention; Silence, Enoch, and Bethiah. 

(V) Lieutenant Joshua Thayer, son of 
Zachariah and Abigail (Seeley) Thayer, was 
born February 11, 1743, and died in 1822. 
He married, in 1787, Ann Putney, and 
among their children was Harvey C, of 
further mention. 

(VI) Harvey C. Thayer, son of Lieu- 
tenant Joshua and Ann (Putney) Thayer, 
was born August 28, 1787. He married, in 
181 7, Plannah Salmon, and they were the 
parents of seven children, of whom Nor- 
mandus Withby, of further mention, was 
next to the eldest ; all have passed away. 

(VII) Normandus Withby Thayer, son 
of Harvey C. and Hannah (Salmon) Thayer, 
was born in Williamsburg, Massachusetts, 
in 1829, and died February 22, 1903. He 
married Mary Harrington, and their child 
was Ida A. Thayer, of further mention. 

(VIII) Ida A. Thayer, daughter of Nor- 
mandus Withby and Mary (Harrington) 
Thayer, married Rufus Gordon Fuller (see 
Fuller VIII). 



COWLES, Robert Blodgett 

One of the younger business men of the 
lumber industry is Robert Blodgett Cowles, 
secretary of the Carlos Ruggles Lumber 
Company. Mr. Cowles has been associated 
with the lumber business from the beginning 
of his active career, and is one of the enter- 
prising representatives of the firm with 
which he is identified. 

The ancestors of the branch of the family 
to which Robert Blodgett Cowles belongs 



were pioneers in the Connecticut Valley, and 
the name is prominent in the early records 
of many of the early settlements of New 
England, being variously spelled Cole, 
Cowles and Cowls. Descendants of these 
early pioneers are today widely scattered 
throughout the country, but many have re- 
mained in the sections in which their an- 
cestors settled. Robert Blodgett Cowles 
traces his lineage to John Cowles, who came 
to this country in 1635. The line of descent 
is as follows : 

(I) John Cowles (or Cole) was born in 
England in 1593, and died in Hatfield, 
Massachusetts, in 1675. He came to this 
country in 1635, and after residing in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, for a time, removed to 
Farmington, Connecticut, from which place 
he moved to Hadley (now Hatfield), Massa- 
chusetts, where his name is recorded as one 
of the freemen holding an allotment of land 
in 1656. He married Hannah, surname un- 
known, and they were the parents of the 
following children : John, Hannah, Sarah, 
Mary, Elizabeth, Samuel, of further men- 
tion ; Esther. 

(II) Samuel Cowles, son of John and 
Hanah Cowles (or Cole), was born in 1637. 
He resided in Farmington, Connecticut, and 
was one of the eighty-four proprietors of 
that town in 1672. He died there April 
17, 1 69 1. On February 14, 1660, he mar- 
ried Abigail Stanley, daughter of Timothy 
Stanley, of Hartford, and they were the 
parents of the following children : Samuel, 
Abigail, Hannah, Timothy, of further men- 
tion ; Sarah, John, Nathaniel, Isaac, Joseph, 
Elizalieth, Caleb. 

(HI) Timothy Cowles, son of Samuel 
and Abigail (Stanley) Cowles, was born 
November 4, 1666. He married Hannah 
Pitkin, of East Hartford, Connecticut, and 
then removed to the last-named place. They 
were the parents of children, among whom 
was Joseph, of further mention. 

(IV) Joseph Cowles, son of Timothy and 
Hannah (Pitkin) Cowles, was born in 1694, 
and died in 1775. He married and reared 



35 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



a family of children, among whom was 
Abijah, of further mention. 

(V) Abijah Cowles, son of Joseph Cowles, 
was born in 1733, and died in 1782. He 
married and reared a family of children, 
among whom was Stephen, of further men- 
tion. 

(VI) Stephen Cowles, son of Abijah 
Cowles, was born in Springfield, Vermont, 
September 20, 1765, and removed to Man- 
chester, Connecticut, in 1834. His death 
occurred there October 29, 1838. He mar- 
ried, August 14, 1793, Patty Reed, and they 
were the parents of the following children : 
Lucretia, Stephen, Jr., Nancy, Paulina, 
Francis W., of further mention; Austin, 
Eliza. Patty, Walter, Sally, Mary. 

(VII) Francis W. Cowles, son of Stephen 
and Patty (Reed) Cowles, was born in 
Springfield, Vermont, July 4, 1804, and died 
March 15, 1880. During his early man- 
hood he removed to Manchester, Connecti- 
cut, and settled in the Hilliardsville section 
of that city, where he was employed in the 
Hilliard Mill, engaged in the manufacture 
of woolen goods. Later in life, however, 
he engaged in farming and also dealt in real 
estate, both of which lines of business ac- 
tivity he continued to the time of his retire- 
ment. He married, November 12, 1834, 
Harriet Wing, of East Hartford, Connecti- 
cut, and they were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: i. Alljert F., born August 
30, 1835 ; died November 7, 1914. 2. Har- 
riet E., born October 12, 1838; died Sep- 
tember I, 1858. 3. Clinton W., born July 
9, 1841 ; died March 19, 1918. 4. Walter 
Wing, of further mention. 5. Martha J., 
born May 6, 1851 ; died May 14, 1899. 

(VIII) Walter Wing Cowles, son of 
Francis W. and Harriet (Wing) Cowles, 
was born in Ellington, Connecticut, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1844, and died in Manchester, 
Connecticut, July 29, 1921. He removed 
to Manchester, Connecticut, in the early 
years of his life, and for a time conducted a 
hotel business there under the name of the 
Cowles Hotel. The later years of his life 



were devoted to agricultural pursuits. He 
took an active interest in local public af- 
fairs and at different times held several local 
offices. He married Hattie Fuller, of Man- 
chester, Connecticut, born September 10, 
1858, died May 28, 191 5, daughter of 
Horace and Amelia (Willard) Fuller. Their 
children were : Florence, who married Louis 
L. Grant, of Manchester, Connecticut, and 
has the following children : Jane, Horace, 
John, William; Clinton Wing, of Buffalo, 
New York, married Helen Pratt and has a 
son, Harold S. ; Robert Blodgett, of fur- 
ther mention; Mark Bradley. 

(IX) Robert Blodgett Cowles, son of 
Walter Wing and Hattie (Fuller) Cowles, 
was born in Manchester, Connecticut, Oc- 
tober 8, 1894. After receiving a good prac- 
tical education in the public schools of 
Manchester, he found his first employment 
with the G. H. Allen Lumber Company, of 
Manchester, with whom he remained about 
eight years, rising to the position of manager 
of the business. At the end of that time, in 
1918, he decided to make a change and re- 
moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, in 
order that he might accept the position as 
secretary of the Carlos Ruggles Lumber 
Company. That important official position 
he has continued to fill to the present time. 
He is recognized as one of the active and 
enterprising younger members of the firm, 
and is devoting to the business his time and 
energy. Mr. Cowles has many friends in 
Springfield, both among his business asso- 
ciates and those with whom he is associated 
in other connections. Fraternally, he is a 
member of Manchester Lodge, No. 73, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Manchester, Con- 
necticut ; of Morning Star Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, of Springfield ; Springfield 
Commandery, Knights Templar, and Melha 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of 
the Oxford Country Club. 

On November 10, 191 5, Robert Blodgett 
Cowles married Marion Wrisley, of Man- 
chester, Connecticut, daughter of Clarence 



36 



1 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



E. and Nellie fWhiting) Wrisley. Mr. and 
Mrs. Cowles are the parents of four chil- 
dren: I. Robert B., Jr.. born Xovember lo, 
1917. 2. Richard Wrisley, born May 2, 
1919. 3. Herbert Fuller, born October i, 
192 1. 4. Barbara Whiting, bom July 10, 
1923- 



KILBURN, Adelbert 

For the past thirteen years Adelbert Kil- 
burn, formerly president of the Chase Tur- 
bine Manufacturing Company, of Orange. 
Massachusetts, has been enjoying the well- 
earned leisure of his years of retirement in 
Springfield, Massachusetts. Prior to 1910, 
however, he was for nearly four decades 
engaged in selling furniture throughout the 
western section of the country-, and for the 
last few years of this time also sold ma- 
chinery-. During the last five years of his 
active career he was receiver for the Walter 
He}-wood Chair Company's plant at Fitch- 
burg, Massachusetts. 

The Kilburn. or Kilbourn, family in 
America traces its descent from Thomas 
Kilbourn, who was warden of the church in 
Wood Ditton, Cambridgeshire. England, in 
1632. He and his wife Frances and 
younger children sailed from London, Eng- 
land, on the ship "Increase." April 15, 1635, 
and settled in Wethersfield. Xew Haven 
Colony, where he died prior to 1639, sur- 
\*ived by his widow, whose death occurred 
in 1650. The children of Thomas and 
Frances Kilbourn were : Margaret, Thomas, 
George, of further mention; Elizabeth, 
Lydia, Mary, Frances, John. 

dl) George Kilbourn. second son of 
Thomas and Frances Kilbourn, was baptized 
in Wood Ditton, England. February 12, 
1612. He came to Xew England before 
1638 and settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts 
Bay Colony, where he was a member of the 
church founded by John Eliot in Roxbury. 
In 1640 he was admitted a freeman of the 
town of Rowley, Essex Count}-, where he 
lived with his wife Elizabeth and their six 



children : Mary, Joseph, Jacob. Samuel, 
Isaac, of whom further ; Elizabeth. 

(Ill) Isaac Kilbourn, later known as 
Isaac Kilburn, son of George and Elizabeth 
Kilbourn, was born January 26, 1659, and 
died December 19, 1713. He married, in 
16S4, Mary Cheney, daughter of John 
Cheney, of Xewbury, ^Massachusetts, and 
they were the parents of five children : Eliza- 
beth, Martha, Jacob, of further mention; 
Mary, John. 

dV) Jacob Kilburn, son of Isaac and 
Mary (Cheney) Kilburn. was baptized X'o- 
vember 9, 1690. He married Dorcas Har- 
ris, daughter of Timothy Harris, and their 
children were: Isaac (2), of further men- 
tion; Elizabeth, Joseph. 

(V) Isaac (2) Kilburn, son of Jacob and 
Dorcas (Harris) Kilburn, was born Oc- 
tober 15, 1 717. He married Joannah Clark, 
and they were the parents of seven children : 
Hannah, John, of further mention; Isaac, 
Elizabeth, Calvin, Man,-, William, 

(VI) John Kilburn, son of Isaac (2) 
and Joannah (Clark) Kilburn, was born 
April 3, 1753, and died September 26, 1840. 
He served as a soldier in the Revolutionary 
\\'ar. and was with Washington's immediate 
army in X'ew York at the Battle of Harlem 
Heights, He married, April 10, 1781, Mary 
Burpee, who was born January 29. 1763. and 
died May 23, 1845. and they were the parents 
of eleven children: Isaac, Samuel, John (2), 
of further mention; Stephen, Patty, Betsy, 
Cheney, William, Polly, Joseph, Azubah. 

(VII) John (2) Kilburn, son of John 
and Mary ("Burpee) Kilburn, was born in 
Sterling. Massachusetts, September i, 1784, 
and died in St. Louis, Missouri, May i, 1867. 
In 1808 he removed to Winchendon, Massa- 
chusetts, where he purchased a farm, which 
has been in the family for more than a hun- 
dred years, and is now owned by Adelbert 
Kilburn, the subject of this sketch. He was, 
in addition to his agricultural activities, also 
engaged in the lumbering business. He 
married. X'ovember 29, 1810, Esther Ed- 
wards, of Winchendon, Massachusetts, who 



37 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



was born February 28, 1784, and died 
August 15, 1869. Their children were: i. 
Levi, born in 181 1, died in 1815. 2. Esther, 
born in 1814, died in 1862. 3. John, born 
in 1815, died in 18S0. 4. Levi, born in 1816, 
died in 1905. 5. Cheney, born in 1818, died 
in 1894. 6. Emily, born in 1819, died in 
1879. 7. Artenias, of further mention. 8. 
Edwin, born in 1825, died in 1874, 

(VIII) Artemas Kilburn, son of John 
(2) and Esther (Edwards) Kilburn, was 
born in Winchendon, Massachusetts, July 
21, 1822, and died February 25, 1912. He 
was actively engaged in business as a manu- 
facturer throughout the entire period of his 
active life. For several years he had a mill 
in Marlow, New Hampshire, where he got 
out chair stock for his manfacturing activi- 
ties in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. He was 
also located at Gaysville, Vermont, for sev- 
eral years, and there also he was the owner 
of a mill. This plant he later sold to the 
Heywood Company, and then removed to 
Burlington, Vermont, where, under the name 
of C. Kilburn & Company, he and his 
brothers, Cheney and Edwin, engaged in 
the manufacture of chairs. This mill was 
destroyed by fire, and Mr. Kilburn next went 
to St. Louis, Missouri, where in association 
with his brother Edwin he engaged in the 
manufacture of cigar boxes. He remained 
in St. Louis and continued in this last-named 
line of business activity during the period of 
the Civil War. When he left St. Louis he 
removed to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and 
there was associated with his brother Cheney 
and a Mr. Hale in the manufacture of fur- 
niture, operating under the name of the 
Hale & Kilburn Manufacturing Company. 
This enterprise was notably successful and 
steadily grew until from five hundred to six 
hundred employees were required to meet 
the demands of the trade, Mr. Kilburn con- 
tinued active in the furniture manufacturing 
business to the time of his retirement. He 
married (first) Sarah Maria Tubbs, who 
was born in 1830, and died June 15, 1865. 
She was the daughter of Amos G. and 



Sarah Tubbs. Pie married (second) Emily 
Thurston, The children of the first mar- 
riage are: i. Adelbert, of further mention. 
2. Elmer, who was born May 28, 1858, and 
died May 28, 1879, a graduate of Dartmouth 
College, who went to Omaha, Nebraska, 
where he died in the early years of his 
young manhood. 

(IX) Adelbert Kilburn, son of Artemas 
and Sarah Maria (Tubbs) Kilburn, was 
born in Gaysville, Vermont, April 21, 1850. 
After attending the public schools of Bur- 
lington, Vermont, he removed with his 
parents to St. Louis, Missouri, and con- 
tinued his school training in the public 
schools of that city. Later he became a 
student in a military school in St. Louis. 
The head of this school was a captain in 
the militia and when the Rebellion broke 
out he was called to the colors and the school 
was closed, so Dr. Kilburn did not complete 
his course. The climate in Missouri did 
not agree with him and he came to Marlow, 
New Plampshire, where he sought to regain 
rugged health by finding employment on a 
farm. Two years later, when he was seven- 
teen years of age, he went to Orange, Massa- 
chusetts, and became associated with the 
plant owned by his uncle, Levi Kilburn, and 
that connection he maintained for a period 
of sixteen years. At the end of that time 
he went "on the road" selling furniture 
throughout the Western States, and for a 
period of thirty-eight years he continued to 
travel through that section of the country. 
During the last portion of the nearly four 
decades he was a traveling salesman, selling 
furniture, and was associated with the Hale 
& Kilburn Manufacturing Company. Later 
he removed to Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 
where he accepted a position as receiver for 
the Walter Heywood Chair Company, which 
position he efficiently filled during the five 
years prior to his retirement in 1910. He 
was also president and treasurer of the 
Chase Turbine Manufacturing Company, at 
Orange, Massachusetts, manufacturers of 
machinery, and sold for them on the road. 



38 




OM^^/^.^c 




ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Since 1909 he has made his home in Spring- 
field. He has a host of friends throughout 
the country, and is held in high esteem 
among his immediate associates in Spring- 
field, and in Orange, Massachusetts. Fra- 
ternally he is affiliated with Orange Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons ; Crescent Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons, of Orange ; Orange 
Commandery, Knights Templar, and of 
Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the ]Mystic Shrine, of Spring- 
field, which he serves as a director. He is 
also a member of Springfield Chapter, Order 
of the Eastern Star, of which he is a Past 
Patron; also member of the Grand Lodge 
of this order. He is a Past Noble Grand 
of the Orange Lodge, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows ; also a member of the Com- 
mercial Travellers' Club, of Springfield; the 
Masonic Club, of Orange, and of the Auto- 
mobile Club, of Springfield, and has taken 
an active part in the affairs of each. 

Adelbert Kilburn married, on September 
7, 1870, Laura Washburn, of Orange, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Enoch and 
Mary (Barnes) Washburn, and they are the 
parents of four children: i. Harry, who was 
born in 1871, and died in infancy. 2. 
Ernest Adelbert, born ]\Iay 13. 1874, died 
November 5, 1901 ; married 'Slay Douglass. 
3. Nellie M., born October 4, 1877. 4. 
Mabel Augusta, born July 15, 1885; she 
married Arthur C. Sterns, and has a daugh- 
ter, Laura Elizabeth, who was born May 
23, 1922. 



LANGTRY, Albert Perkins 

For more than three decades, up to 1924, 
Albert Perkins Langtry, president of the 
L'nion Publishing Company, of Springfield, 
was the editor and publisher of the "Spring- 
field Union" of that city. He made his paper 
one of the foremost of its kind in Central 
and Western Massachusetts, and has also 
rendered valuable service in public affairs, 
serving for ten years as secretary of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and hold- 
ing numerous other responsible official posi- 



tions. He is also the author of the direct 
primary law in Massachusetts. 

(I) Richard Langtry, grandfather of 
Albert Perkins langtry, was born in Bel- 
fast, Ireland, and died in St. John's, New 
Brunswick, prior to i860. He was an im- 
portant factor there, and in Ireland was a 
man of affairs and possessed considerable 
propert}'. He came to New Brunswick while 
he was still a comparatively young man. 
His children were : William, Richard, who 
married Sarah Holmes ; Joseph, of further 
mention ; George, who was killed in the 
Civil War; he was in the Second New 
Hampshire Regiment and took part in the 
battle of Bull Run ; his children were : Sarah, 
who married John Jones; Charlotte, who 
married George Carsie, and Harriet M., 
who married George Dodds. 

(II) Joseph Langtry, son of Richard 
Langtry, was born in Belfast, Ireland, in 
1825. and died in Newton. Massachusetts, 
in 1880, aged fifty-five years. He came to 
St, John's, New Brunswick, with his parents 
when he was but a child, and learned the 
trade of harnessmaker in that city. When 
he was tvventy-one years of age he came to 
Boston, Massachusetts, and engaged in busi- 
ness for himself. In the early fifties he went 
to the Pacific Coast, but later returned East, 
built a house at Newton Center, Massa- 
chusetts, where he continued to reside until 
the time of his death. He married Sarah 
Lakin. of East Boston. Massachusetts, and 
she died in 1875. Their children were: 

1. Joseph H., born in 1854, died in 1903; 
was engaged in the saddlery and hardware 
business in Boston, and left a son, Chester. 

2. Albert Perkins, of further mention. 
(HI) Albert Perkins Langtry. son of 

Joseph and Sarah (Lakin) Langtry, was 
born in Wakefield, Massachusetts, July 27, 
i860. He received his education in the 
public schools of his native city and of New- 
ton, ^Massachusetts, and when his school 
training was completed began his active 
career as a commercial traveler, representing 
the firm of E. L. Jones & Company, of Bos- 



39 



EXXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ton, soap manufacturers. He maintained 
that connection for a period of six years, 
and at the end of that time, while on a 
visit to friends in New York City, was in- 
duced to enter the newspaper business. He 
accepted a position as reporter on the 
"Brooklyn Union-Argus" and afterwards be- 
came a reporter on the "Brooklyn Union." 
Finding the work congenial, and meeting 
with a marked degree of success, he decided 
to continue in the newspaper business. He 
left the "Union" to become a reporter on 
the staff of the "Brooklyn Times," and 
three years later became the manager and 
Long Island editor of the "Times." Five 
years later he again made a change, this 
time removing to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he accepted a position as business 
manager of the "Springfield Union." A few 
years later he came into control of the 
"Union" and during the period of time 
which elapsed from the time he took over 
the management of the publication until he 
disposed of his interest in 1923, he has made 
of the "Union" a valuable property. Under 
his management the newspaper was en- 
larged from time to time and the plant 
greatly improved. Few newspapers outside 
of the metropolitan districts have so large 
a plant. About 1910 a Goss sextuple per- 
fecting press and a battery of ten linotype 
machines were installed and other improve- 
ments were made. In a field in which com- 
petition is exceedingly strong, Mr. Langtry 
built up the circulation and standing of the 
"Union" until it ranked second to none in 
Western and Central Massachusetts. 

Mr. Langtry is a prominent and influential 
Republican, and his newspaper has been one 
of the bulwarks of the Republican party for 
the past fifteen years. In addition to the 
service rendered his party through his paper 
he has rendered active service in other ways. 
He has been a member of the Republican 
State Committee for a number of years, serv- 
ing as secretary for two years; has been 
delegate to various nominating conventions 
of his party; was elected to represent his 



district in the Massachusetts House of Rep- 
resentatives, 1 909- 19 10, He was chairman 
of the committee to build an extension to 
the State House, 1913; president of the Na- 
tional Association of Secretaries of State; 
and he has the honor of being the author 
of the Direct Primary Law in Massachusetts. 
Mr, Langtry is a member of the Roswell 
Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; 
Nayasset Club, Winthrop Club, and Realty 
Club. 

On August 3, 1886, Albert Perkins Lang- 
try married Sarah C, Spear, who was born 
January 19, 1862, daughter of George A, 
and Anetta (Harper) Spear, of West Rox- 
bury, Massachusetts, where she was born 
(see Spear VIII). Mr. and Mrs, Langtry 
are the parents of one adopted daughter, 
Ruth Langtry, who married Alexander 
Thomas Skakle, April 6, 191 8, Their chil- 
dren are: Janet, who died in infancy, and 
John Albert, born February 14, 1922. 

(The Spear Line) 

The surname Spear, also spelled Spere, 
is of ancient English origin. 

(I) George Spear, immigrant ancestor, 
came from England to Massachusetts in 
1642 and settled in Braintree, He was ad- 
mitted a freeman. May 29, 1644, lived for 
a time at Dorchester, Massachusetts, and in 
his old age removed to New Dartmouth, 
now Pemaquid, Maine, He married Mary, 
surname unknown, who died at Braintree, 
December 7, 1674, Children: i, George, 
married Mary Deering, of Braintree, 2, 
Sarah, married George Witty. 3. Richard. 
4. Samuel, died young, 5. Ebenezer, mar- 
ried Rachel Deering. 6, Hannah, 7, Sam- 
uel, of further mention, 8, Nathaniel, mar- 
ried Hannah Holman. 

(II) Samuel Spear, son of George and 
Mary Spear, was born January 16, 1658, 
at Braintree, and died there December 24, 
1 71 3, aged fifty-five years. He married 
Elizabeth Daniels. Children, born in Brain- 
tree : I. Elizabeth, 2, Rev. Samuel, grad- 
uate of Harvard College, 1715, and a 



40 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



minister at Provincetown. 3. Daniel. 4. 
Mehitable. 5. Dorothy. 6. Hannah. 7. 
William, married Hannah Penniman. 8. 
John, of further mention. 9, Mary. 10. 
Benoni (posthumous), married Elizabeth 
Newcomb, widow. 

(III) John Spear, son of Samuel and 
Elizabeth (Daniels) Spear, was born in 
Braintree, April 8, i/io, and died there 
July 5, 1776, in his sixty-sixth year. He 
married Mary Arnold, daughter of Samuel 
and Sarah Arnold, of Braintree, February 
20, 1736. Children, born at Braintree: i. 
Prudence, married Daniel Baxter. 2. Mary, 
probably died young. 3. Seth, of further 
mention. 4. Mary, married James Brackett. 

5. Dorothy, married Edward Adams. 6. 
Ichabod, died young. 

(IV) Lieutenant Seth Spear, son of John 
and Mary (Arnold) Spear, was born in 
Braintree, January 19, 1742, and died 
August 26, 1 81 8. He was a soldier in the 
Revolution, in Captain Seth Turner's com- 
pany, in 1776, for three months and fourteen 
days, stationed at Braintree ; also sergeant in 
Captain Edmund Billing's company, of 
North Precinct of Braintree, Colonel Jona- 
than Bass's regiment. He resided in the 
North Precinct of Braintree, and signed the 
petition to set off the Precinct and establish 
what is now Quincy. He married (first), 
September 25, 1764, Judith Adams, born 
1746, died July 10, 1787 (town record), 
daughter of Deacon John and Mary (Swift) 
Adams; (second). May 15, 1788, Abigail 
Marsh, died October 28, 1812, daughter of 
Wilson Marsh. He married (third) Fran- 
ces Nightingale, widow of John Nightingale 
and daughter of Captain Moses Brackett. 
She died July 3, 1846, aged eighty years. 
Children of first wife: i. Mary, married Eb- 
enezer Adams. 2. Judith, married Josiah 
Bass. 3, Seth, died young. 4. Sarah, mar- 
ried Henry Hardwick. 5. John, married 
Mary Hobart, daughter of Joshua Hobart. 

6. Abigail, died young. 7. Elijah, married 
Susanna Baxter. 8. Seth. 9. ' Dorothy, 
married Joseph Blanchard, 10. Elizabeth. 



II. Lucy, married Elisha Marsh. 12. George, 
of further mention. 13. Luther, married 
Esther Savil, daughter of Deacon Samuel 
Savil. Children of second wife: i. Maria 
Bowen. 2. Sophia, married Jonathan 
Marsh. 3. Abigail, married Charles Glea- 
son. 4, Louisa, married George Nightin- 
gale. 5. Alpheus, married Ann Adams. 6. 
Lemuel, married Velera Watson. 

(V) George Spear, son of Lieutenant Seth 
and Judith (Adams) Spear, was born 
January 25, 1785, and died in Quincy at the 
age of ninety years. He was a prominent 
citizen of Quincy and a farmer. He mar- 
ried, December 20, 1809, Ann Savil, daugh- 
ter of Deacon Samuel Savil. Children: i. 
George W., of further mention. 2. Sarah 
A. 3. Lucretia S., married Charles Pierce. 
4. Elisha, 5. Edward A., captain in Civil 
War, settled in Quincy. 6. Elisha, served 
in army during Civil War, lived in Missouri, 
where he died. 7, Albert F., shoemaker, 
settled in North Weymouth. 8. Lebbeus 
C. 9. Lucy A., married Frederick Garfield. 

10. John and Mary (twins), died young. 

11. Mary E. 12. Granville A., married in 
Indiana, went to California, and later re- 
turned to Indiana, where he died. 13. Emily. 

(VI) George W\ Spear, son of George 
and Ann (Savil) Spear, was born in Quincy, 
October 30, 1810. He learned the trade of 
blacksmith, and was engaged in that busi- 
ness in Quincy for some time. He later 
became foreman for Gridley Bryant, a 
prominent architect of Boston, and worked 
in South Boston and Med ford. Here he met 
with a serious accident in a quarry, caused 
by a premature explosion, by which he lost 
an eye and was made a cripple for life. He 
later returned to Quincy, where he was 
accidentally killed by being caught in a bevel 
gearing of a machine which he was operat- 
ing. He was a good citizen, and an in- 
dustrious man. He married, in Quincy, 
EHzabeth Thayer, born April 3, 1814, died 
July 8, 1893, daughter of Elihu and Eliza- 
beth Thayer; her father was a carpenter of 
Quincy. Children: i. George A., of further 



41 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



mention. 2. E'lward. 3. Christopher A., 
Ix)rn Dcccmlicr 25. 1830. dictl March 14, 
IQ05; was in the Civil War and afterwards 
seven years purser in the United States 
Navy. 4. Ann E.. born Xovember i, 1841 ; 
married William S. Pierce, who was in the 
Civil War, and is now a clerk employed by 
the city of Boston. 5. Walter F., born Oc- 
toljer J4. 1843. died in December, 1897; 
married Amanda Guild. 6. Hiram Austin, 
t)orn February 28. 1846. now, 1923, livinj,^ 
in Middletown. Connecticut. 7. Ant^'cline 
M.. born September 28, 1848, died unmar- 
rietl. 8. Francis A., born May 15, 1S54; 
prolwtion officer, city of Quincy. 9. Elihu 
T., Unn Aujjust 18, 185 1 ; head engineer of 
Metropolitan Works, Quincy ; married Mrs. 
.'\bbie N'ewcomb. 10. Lucy G., born Sep- 
tcml>er 15. 1858; married James Walker; 
lives in Quincy. 11. Herbert, born January 
10. 1861 ; officer on a revenue cutter in the 
Navy; married Laura Jernegan, of Edgar- 
town, ^L^ssachusetts. 

(VH) George A. Spear, son of George 
W, and Elizalx-'th (Thayer) Spear, was born 
Noveml>er 14, 1836, died in 1920. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools 
of Quincy, and in 1862, at the age of fifteen, 
went to West Koxbury and was apprenticed 
to his uncle, Hiram Thayer, to learn the 
trade of cari)enter. After a few years as 
a journeyman he established himself in 
business as a carj)enter and builder. He 
soon established a rejjutation for careful, 
practical and honest work, and his business 
increased rapidly. He erected many private 
houses in West Roxbury and other suburbs 
of Boston. He was always interested in 
the growth and development of his native 
town, and is a worthy and respected citizen. 
In ix)litics he is a Republican, and in religion 
a Universalist. He married, in November, 
i8r»o, Anetta Harper, born in West Rox- 
bury. 1839. died February 22. 1874, daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Abigail (Bragg) Harper. 
Her father was a native of Dorsetshire, 
I'^ngland, who came to New England and 
settled at West Roxburv as a farmer. Cliil- 



dren: i. Sarah C. of further mention. 2. 
Alvin, born October 30, 1869. 3. George 
Harper, died young. 

(VIII) Sarah C. Spear, daughter of 
George A. and Anetta (Harper) Spear, was 
born January 19, 1862. She married Albert 
P. Langtry (see Langtry HI). 



ATKINSON, William 

William Atkinson, who was treasurer of 
the Olmstead-Quaboag Company of West 
Brookfield, Massachusetts, up to September, 
1923, and a member of the board of di- 
rectors of that concern, is now president of 
the F. L. Woodard Company, of West 
Brookfield, Massachusetts. 

George Atkinson, grandfather of Mr. At- 
kinson, was a native of England, and in that 
country he spent his entire life. He mar- 
ried and reared a family of four sons and 
two daughters, the sons being: David, who 
was a merchant ; William, who was engaged 
in farming; John, engaged in business as a 
merchant; and George, of further mention. 

George Atkinson, son of George Atkin- 
son, was born in 1814, in Carlisle, Cumber- 
land County, England, near the border of 
Scotland, and died in Truxton, New York, 
in 1887, aged seventy-three years. He re- 
ceived a practical education in the public 
schools of his native town, and then engaged 
in farming, which occupation he followed in 
England until 1859, when he came to 
America and settled in Homer, New York. 
From that time to the time of his death he 
remained a resident of Cortland County, 
New York, where he became a prosperous 
and successful farmer, loved and respected 
among a very large circle of friends and as- 
sociates. He became a naturalized citizen, 
and throughout his life took a keen interest 
in the jmblic affairs of county, State, and 
nation, though he had no desire for the 
honors of public office. He was an attendant 
of the Episcopal Church. In 1859, just be- 
fore setting out for America, George Atkin- 
son married Isabelle King, who was born 
in Carlisle, England, in 1835, and died in 



42 




(ikoAi^^ ^^^;^^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Cortland, New York, February 7, 1903, aged 
sixty-eight years. The trip to this country 
was their wedding trip. They were the 
parents of seven children: i. Maria, who 
married John Ousby, of Cortland, New 
York, and has a son, Harold, who is married 
and has a son, Harold (2). 2. Jennie, mar- 
ried A. B, Corwin, of Cortland, New York, 
and has a daughter, Grace. 3. George, a 
resident of Truxton, New York, married 
Alice Goddard, and they are the parents of 
children : Mabel, George, Jr., Francis, 
Camilla, Florence, Harold, who was killed 
in the World War, and Caroline, who died 
at the age of eleven years. 4. Belle, mar- 
ried A. N. Schermerhorn. 5. James, a resi- 
dent of Cortland, New York, married Clara 
Pierce, and has children. Earl, and Lloyd. 
6. William, of further mention. 7. Mary, 
married G. R. Harrington, of Cleveland, 
Ohio, and has children, William and Helen. 
William Atkinson was born in Homer, 
New York, February 3, 1874, and after re- 
ceiving his early education in the public and 
private schools of Homer and in Homer 
Academy, became a student in Cortland Nor- 
mal School. He then completed his prepara- 
tion for an active career by taking a business 
course at the Eastman Business College, at 
Poughkeepsie, New York, and then began 
his active life as an employee in the bank 
and store of Muller & Son, at Truxton, New 
York, where he remained for a period of five 
and a half years. In 1905 he made a change, 
entering at that time the employ of the 
Miller Corset Company, at McGraw, New 
York. This connection he maintained for 
several years, finally becoming a member of 
the board of directors and secretary of the 
company. In 19 16 he became associated 
with the Olmstead-Quaboag Company, 
manufacturers of corsets, in West Brook- 
field, as a member of the board of directors, 
and was elected to fill the position of treas- 
urer of the company in 1922, and held this 
position up to 1923, when he resigned. Dur- 
ing this time he maintained his offices in 
Springfield, Massachusetts. In September, 



1923, he became president of the F. L. 
Woodard Company, of West Brookfield, and 
still (1924) holds this position. 

Mr. Atkinson has found time for the dis- 
charge of civic and social duties as well as 
for business activities, and while in Truxton, 
New York, served as clerk of the town. He 
is a member of De Ruyter Lodge, No. C92, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of De Ruyter; 
Cortland Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; of 
Cortland Commandery, Knights Templar, 
and of Kalurah Temple, Ancient Arabic Or- 
der Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Bing- 
hamton, New York. He is also a member 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, of Cortland; of the Golf Club; of the 
Tekoa Country Club, of Westfield, and the 
Longmeadow Country Club. 

Mr. Atkinson married, on October 19, 
1916, Eloise Coates, of South Otselic, New 
York, daughter of Russell and Hulda Gar- 
dener Coates. Mr. Coates was a farmer 
in South Otselic, and both he and his wife 
spent their lives in the town. 



McGREGORY, Frederick Charles 

Among the men who will long be remem- 
bered for the work they have done is Fred- 
erick Charles McGregory, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, who, as field manager for 
the American Historical Society, Inc.. of 
New York City, has for the past seven years 
(1918 to 1925) been engaged in supervising 
the collection of material for the encyclo- 
pedia of family history of his native State. 
The McGregory family, which is of Scotch 
origin (derived from the brave and hardy 
Clan McGregor whose war cry was "Royal 
is my race") has been traced back in direct 
line for twenty-six generations to the third 
King of Scotland, who was living in 845, 
and has been represented in America for 
nearly three hundred years. 

Ebenezer McGregory, Sr., great-grand- 
father of Frederick Charles McGregory, was 
among the earliest settlers of East Long- 
meadow, Massachusetts, where he was a 
tvpical pioneer living, as was the custom of 



43 



EN'CVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the pioneers, for a time in a log house, fol- 
lowing the vocation of the agriculturist all 
his life, and dying at a good old age. He 
married Susan liradley, and they reared a 
family of six children: I. Joseph. 2. Eb- 
enezer, of whom further. 3. Susan, who be- 
came the wife of a Mr. Hlodi^ett. 4. Thank- 
ful, who married a man named Lewis. 5. 
Lucinda, whose husljand's name was Gar- 
dener. 6. Hannah, who became the wife of 
a Mr. Pease. 

Ebenezer McGregory, son of Ebenezer 
and Susan Hiradley) McGregory, was born 
in East Longmeadow and was reared to 
farm life and lal)or, but later learned and 
followed the trade of stonecutter. He spent 
his life in this town and died at the age of 
forty-four years. He married Mary P. 
Crane, who died at the age of eighty-four 
years, daughter of Allen Crane, who was 
a farmer, and who after his marriage re- 
moved from East Windsor, Connecticut, to 
East longmeadow, Massachusetts, where he 
si)ent the rest of his life. 

Eljcnezer and Mary P. (Crane) Mc- 
Gregory were the parents of eight children, 
among whom was Xelson Horatio, of whom 
further. 

Nelson Horatio McGregory, son of Eben- 
ezer and Mary P. (Crane) McGregory 
was Ijorn in East Longmeadow, Hampden 
Cciunty, Massachusetts, in 18 15, and died in 
Ludlow, Massachusetts, in 1887, aged 
seventy-two years. He remained on his 
father's farm until he was fifteen years of 
age, when he went to Hartford, Connecticut, 
to learn the trade of mason. After remain- 
ing in that city a short time, however, he 
went to New York City, and remained there 
four years, completing his knowledge of the 
trade. He then rcturncfl to Hartford, Con- 
necticut, wlicrc he followed his trade as a 
journeyman for .some years. While here he 
joined the militia, rose to be captain of a 
comiwny, and achieved considerable reputa- 
tion as a marksman, taking the first prize, 
a gold medal, for skill with the rifle. He 
was also an active member of the fire de- 



partment of that city. In 1857 he came to 
Springfield, where he remained until i860, 
when he removed to East Longmeadow and 
purchased a saw and grist mill, which he 
operated successfully for four years. Dur- 
ing the Civil War, in addition to the opera- 
tion of his mill, he was employed at the 
Water Shops, the forging plant of the United 
States Armory, where he built the forge 
hearths used in the forging of gun barrels 
for the Union troops. In 1864 he sold his 
property in East Longmeadow, and removed 
to Ludlow, where he purchased a farm of 
seventy-five acres, known as the Eaton 
Homestead, and located one mile from In- 
dian Orchard. After that he both con- 
ducted the farm and followed his trade. 
For over twenty years, from 1866 to 1888, 
he was employed by the Indian Orchard 
Manufacturing Company in the supervision 
of the repairs of their plants and the erec- 
tion of new buildings; also by the Ludlow 
Manufacturing Company in the same ca- 
pacity. In addition to this he was also 
employed by the Duckvill and Three Rivers 
companies, for each of whom he supervised 
the erection of their great cotton mills. Dur- 
ing the latter part of his life he acted as an 
independent contractor, having entire super- 
vision of the work in which he engaged. 
It was during this time that he had charge 
of laying the brick sidewalk and setting the 
curbing at Indian Orchard (the Eighth 
Ward of Springfield), and so well did he do 
this work that now (1925), sixty years 
later, they are in almost perfect condition. 
As a workman he was a master of his craft, 
understanding it thoroughly in every detail. 
The laying of 2,500 bricks was considered a 
good day's work, but he had a record of 
laying 5,000 bricks in one day on the wall 
of a church in Suffield, Connecticut. In 
politics he was a firm supporter of the Re- 
publican party, making his influence felt 
by his vote and example, but holding no 
office except that of member of the School 
Committee of Ludlow, for which he was 
well fitted, being a great reader and well in- 



44 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



formed. He was a liberal supporter of the 
Christian faith, insisting upon having his 
family regularly attend church and Sunday 
school, and was always in sympathy with 
every movement for the moral advancement 
of the community in which he lived. 

Nelson H. ]\IcGregory married twice; 
(first), j\Iarie Hunt, daughter of John Hunt, 
of East Longmeadow, and they had five 
children, four of whom, with the mother, 
died within ten years. Albert N., now 
(1925) deceased, the only one who sur- 
vived to maturity, followed his father's 
trade and resided in Lockport, New Jersey, 
where he married Miss M. Dooling (also 
now deceased) of that city. They had two 
children. Nelson H., and Maud, both now 
deceased. 

Nelson Horatio McGregory married 
(second), in 1856, Eunice Day, a native of 
Easthampton, who was born in 1829, and 
died in 1881, daughter of William and Rox- 
anna (Knowlton) Day. She proved a 
worthy help-meet, presiding over the house- 
hold with true womanly tact, care, and hos- 
pitality, and although a partial invalid for 
the last twelve years of her life and often in 
great pain, she endured her sufferings with 
patience, and was a good mother to her chil- 
dren, who bore her in affectionate remem- 
brance. She was a faithful member of the 
Congregational Church. She died in 1881, 
at the age of sixty-three, leaving two chil- 
dren : I. Frederick Charles, of whom fur- 
ther. 2. William B., born in East Long- 
meadow, was educated in the public schools 
of East Longmeadow, Pillsbury Seminary, 
at Ludlow, Massachusetts, and Wesleyan 
Academy, at Wilbraham. He spent his life 
on the old homestead at Ludlow, where he 
died at the early age of thirty-one years. 
He married, in 1883, ]\Iiss Eva Hicks, of 
Wilmington, Vermont, and they had two 
sons, Wayne, and Ebenezer N, 

Frederick Charles McGregory, son of Nel- 
son Horatio and Eunice (Day) McGregory, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, May 
2, 1858. After leaving the district school 



he continued his studies in the Indian Or- 
chard (Springfield) High School, and later 
prepared for college at Burnett's English 
and Classical Institute at Springfield. It 
was his father's desire that he should learn 
a trade, and he spent nearly three years in 
attempting to master first the mason's trade, 
later the trade of blacksmith, and still later 
that of brass moulder. But none of these 
proved to his liking. He then for a time 
studied medicine, but finally decided to take 
up the study of law. Owing to close con- 
finement in the ofiice, however, his health 
broke down and he was compelled to give 
this up. But his love for law has ever re- 
mained with him and he has spent much 
time in listening to the trials of many of the 
most famous cases. In this way he has ac- 
quired a very comprehensible knowledge of 
the principles of law, and he is frequently 
consulted by his friends along these lines. 
Finding that he must take up some outside 
employment he became identified with a 
large photographic concern in Springfield 
and travelled through Massachusetts and 
Connecticut, assisting in making views of 
residences. In 1883 he went to New York 
City and took a position with the National 
Photo View Company, and rose to be man- 
ager, which position he held for three years. 
He then organized the Standard Photo View 
Company, of which he was president and 
general manager and conducted this business 
for some years. This concern made a spe- 
cialty of group photography and secured the 
photographing of the classes in the public 
schools in all the cities and towns alxDut New 
York City, doing a very large business. Mr. 
McGregory also visited during the summer 
months the State encampments of the mili- 
tary of New York, Pennsylvania, and Con- 
necticut, and photographed the State troops. 
In this connection he was at one time as- 
sociated with Colwell Lane, one of the finest 
artistic photographers in New York City, and 
the work done for the regiments, particularly 
the /th, 22d, and 23d, of New York, elicited 
the highest praise from officers of these or- 



45 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ganizations. In iS^o he accepted a posi- 
tion as New Knj^'Iancl mana,i,'er for the Astra 
Pubhihing Cumi>any. with an office in Bos- 
ton, and continued with them some months. 
In i8<;i Mr. " " ry entered the bio- 
graphical pubh iK'ss. taking his first 
position with the biographical Review Pub- 
li>,hini; Company, of Boston. He remained 
with thi^ c.miany for six years and assisted 
in the collection of material for works cov- 
ering the New England and Middle States. 
He then took a position with J. H. Beers, 
of Chicago, with whom he remained for 
alxtut two years. In November, 1900, he 
l<camc associated with the Lewis Historical 
I' ■ Com{>any and assisted in the 
I - . : :i of a work covering the State of 
Vermont. All this time he had been collect- 
ing material and soliciting suljscriptions for 
Ijooks, but his work being highly satisfactory 
along this line the company allowed him to 
try handling the sale of portraits. He soon 
dcmon>tratctl that he could do this equally 
as well, and since that time he has continued 
successfully in this line. In 1910 he was 
sent to Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, when 
he was placed in charge of the work of Lu- 
zerne County, and here he remained two 
years, completing a highly creditable work. 
Since that time he has acted as a field man- 
ager not only for cditifjns published by the 
New York bffice. but at times for the 
OuVago office of this com])any, having been 
engaged on various jmlilications for them, 
including one of Detroit. Michigan. He has 
traveled e.xtensively, in his work, having been 
in thirty states in the Union and covering the 
territory from Portland. Maine, to Denver, 
Colorado. As Sjiringficld was his native 
city, he decided, in \()\j, to attempt the 
work of collecting the family history of his 
native State, he taking charge of Western 
Massachu-setts. A company known as the 
•American Historical Society had been 
formed and the work was undertaken by 
this concern. .\t first the encouragement 
was not forthcoming, but Mr. McGregory 
persisted in his efTorts and finallv convinced 



the people of W'^estern Massachusetts that 
the work would be a most valuable one, and 
no effort has been spared to make it so. 
Seven years, 191 8 to 1925, have been de- 
voted to the enterprise, and during that 
period Mr. McGregory has given the benefit 
of his many years of experience and his un- 
divided attention to producing an invaluable 
work for reference. That his eflForts, and 
the work of those who assisted him have 
been crowned with success is evidenced by 
the fact that the history, in many instances 
dating back to the immigrant ancestor, of 
hundreds of families, have been collected in 
fourteen volumes of over six hundred pages 
each. And Mr. McGregory feels that he 
has done for the people of his native city 
and State a work of which he can well be 
proud, and one that will be highly prized by 
succeeding (generations. Mr. McGregory 
has always been deeply interested in mili- 
tary training. At eighteen years of age he 
joined Company G of the 2d Regiment 
of Massachusetts Volunteers, known as the 
"Peabody Guard," and served with that or- 
ganization until he went to New York. In 
New York City he assisted in organizing 
Company D of the 12th Regiment, which 
was popularly known as the "Temperance 
Company." Later he passed through the 
various ranks in promotion, serving as cap- 
tain, later rising by appointment to major 
on the third brigade stafT, and as inspecting, 
reviewing, and reporting officer, he spent 
considerable time each year in the camps 
of the State Guard of all the New England 
and Middle States. He is well and fa- 
vorably known in Masonic circles in Spring- 
field, being a member of Esoteric Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons; Morning Star 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Springfield 
Council, Royal and Select Masters ; the Ma- 
sonic Club, Bella Grotto, Mystic Order of 
Veiled Prophets of the Enchanted Realm, 
and Adelphi Chapter, Order of the Eastern 
Star. In all these bodies he takes an active 
interest. Genial, courteous, always ready 
with an encouraging word, a vigorous hand- 



46 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



shake, and a friendly smile, he has won a 
host of friends not only in Springfield and 
surrounding towns, but also among his busi- 
ness associates in the New York office, with 
which he has now (1925) been identified for 
nearly a quarter of a century, a record that 
speaks for itself. During this time he has 
seen the business grow from a small be- 
ginning to the largest in the world in this 
line. 

]Mr. McGregory married, December 31, 
1886, Adele Rumler, of New York City, 
daughter of John Rumler. of England, a 
most beautiful and accomplished lady, who 
died November 18, 1910, leaving one son, 
Lawrence Thompson. 

Lawrence Thompson McGregory, only son 
of Frederick C. and Adele (Rumler) Mc- 
Gregory, was born in New York City, July 
13, 1888. He was educated in the public 
schools there, completing his studies in the 
High School of Commerce, and although it 
was the wish of his parents he should enter 
college he preferred a business career. He 
had always been of a studious nature, and 
after completing special courses in stenog- 
raphy and typewriting, decided to become a 
private secretary. He proved to be adapted 
to this position and was employed at diflfer- 
ent times by some of the best known men 
in New York City. Later he widened his 
experience by accepting a position with the 
Bush Terminal Company as head of corre- 
spondence, and still later he became iden- 
tified with the American Druggist Syndi- 
cate in the same capacity. For a time he 
was associated with Montgomery Ward and 
Company, and later with the Bacley Corset 
Company, of Newark, New Jersey, with 
whom he remained four years. While em- 
ployed with the latter concern, he inaugu- 
rated a model correspondence system for use 
in their great business of corresponding with 
over ten thousand of their representatives 
throughout the United States. He was an 
indefatigable worker and his extended 
studies, together with his strenuous duties, 
undermined his health, and he passed away 



September 7, 1922. A young man of su- 
perior ability along many lines, and pos- 
sessed of the highest qualities of character, 
he attracted warm friendships and at his 
death left a large circle of friends to mourn 
his passing. 

Lawrence Thompson McGregory married 
in New York City, August 29, 1912, Minnie 
Williams, of New York City, and they were 
the parents of one child, Margaret Adele 
]McGregory, born July 6. 191 3. 



BULLARD, Glenn Morse 

Glenn Morse Bullard, purchasing agent 
for the Fiberloid Manufacturing Company 
of Springfield, comes of very old Colonial 
stock, several representatives of the name 
having been in Massachusetts before 1636. 
The name Bullard is thought by many gene- 
alogists to be identical with Bulwer, but 
there is a tradition which recounts that in 
ancient times a man called Laird, pursuing 
a wild bull on the occasion of a royal hunting 
excursion, outstripped his fellow huntsmen 
and killed the bull, after which exploit he 
was known as the "Bull Laird," from which 
appellation the name more or less modified 
was given to his descendants. 

Representatives of the name came to this 
country at a very early date, William. Ben- 
jamin, John, and Isaac coming from Eng- 
land in 1635 and settling in the vicinity of 
Boston. Benjamin Bullard was in Water- 
town, Massachusetts, at the division of lands 
there in 1637, and among the early planters 
no less than seven of the name are recorded, 
though the tradition that they were all 
brothers is entirely without foundation. 
George Bullard subscribed to the freeman's 
oath in 1641. and had land assigned to him 
as early as 1637. John Bullard took the 
freeman's oath, May 16, 1640, and was a 
signer of the Dedham social compact, June 
I, 1636, Isaac Bullard being a signer of 
the same compact at the same time. Na- 
thaniel Bullard was admitted townsman 
there in 1655, and Robert Bullard died in 
Watertown, April 24, 1639. Of these early 



47 



EN'CVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



settlers, it is William Bullard who became 
the ancestor of Glenn Mc^rse liullard. 

(I) William Bullard, imnii^'rant ancestor 
of the branch of the family to which Glenn 
Morse Bullard Ijelongs, signed the social 
comi>act of Dcdham, June i8, 1636, and it 
is probable that the three, William, John, 
and Isaac, who signed the compact in June, 
1636, were brothers. William Bullard's 
wife was received as a member of the church 
of Dedham in 1639, and William Bullard 
was made a freeman. May 13. 1640, and 
chosen as selectman in 1643. He was an 
active and prominent citizen, highly respected 
by his associates. He died in 1643. He 
married and reared sons who inherited his 
estate at Dedliam and transmitted it to their 
descendants, who still point out to their 
chihlrcn the site of William Bullard's first 
dwelling place. Nathaniel Bullard, admitted 
freeman in 1690, is supposed to have been 
a sfjn of William, as were also Josiah, 
El)cnezer, Isaac, of whom further, and Ben- 
jamin. 

(II) Isaac Bullard, son of William Bul- 
lard, resided with his wife Ann, in Dedham, 
Massachusetts, where he was admitted a 
meml)er of the church, June 18, 1665, and 
died May 11, 1676. His children were: 
Samuel, of whfjm further; Judith, Ephraim, 
Ann, John, Mary, William. 

(III) Samuel Bullard, eldest son of Isaac 
and Ann Bullard, was born December 22, 
1659, in Dedham, and probably passed his 
life in that town, where his children were 
Ixjrn. He married, January 14, 1683, Han- 
nah Thori)e, U)rn August 19, 1665, daughter 
of James and Hannah (Newcombe) Thorpe, 
and they were the parents of children : Sam- 
uel, of whom further; Hannah, John, Ann, 
Sarah, l-ll>cne/cr, Mary, .Abigail. 

(IV) Samuel Bullard, eldest son of Sam- 
uel and Hannah (Thorpe) Bullard, was 
l)orn January 9, 1684, in Dedham. where he 
died I''el)ruary 10. 1757. His first wife, the 
mother of his children, wh(jse name is not 
recorded, died about 1740, and he married 
(second), Septeml>er 16, 1742, Mrs. Re- 



becca Farmington, who died August 13, 
1745. He married (third), June 5, 1746, 
Mrs. Hannah Holden. Among the children 
of the first marriage was Benjamin, of whom 
further. 

(V) Benjamin Bullard, son of Samuel 
Bullard and his first wife, was born about 
1730, and settled in Sharon, Massachusetts, 
where he died in 1778, aged forty-eight 
years, having served in the Revolutionary 
War. He married, April 15, 1756, Judith 
Lewis, daughter of William Lewis, who 
died in August, 1810, aged sixty-nine years, 
and they were the parents of seven chil- 
dren: Mary, Benjamin, Oliver, of whom 
further ; Judith, Zipporah, Louis, Irene, the 
youngest son of whom, Louis, settled in 
Francestown, New Hampshire. 

(VI) Oliver Bullard, second son and 
third child of Benjamin and Judith (Lewis) 
Bullard, was born September 15, 1763, in 
Sharon, Massachusetts, and died in Bethel, 
Vermont, August 13, 1839. He removed 
from Sharon to Francestown, New Hamp- 
shire, and about 1803 again removed, this 
time going to Stockbridge, Vermont, from 
which place he later removed to Bethel, 
Vermont. He married, March 16, 1786, in 
Sharon, Abigail Gay, born in that town, 
September 17, 1762, died in Bethel, Ver- 
mont, March 22, 1836. They were the 
parents of the following children, all of 
whom except one were born in Frances- 
town, New Hampshire: Oliver, Abigail, 
Betsy, Fanny, Mark, Luke John, Azubah, 
Luther, of whom further; Andes Tailor, 
Ambrose Dayton, Mulfred Dayton. 

(VII) Luther Bullard, son of Oliver and 
Abigail (Gay) Bullard, was born in Fran- 
cestown, New Hampshire, August 5, 1801, 
and died July 5, 1875. He married Nancy 
Greenleaf, who was born in Lancaster, 
Massachusetts, in 1805, and died January 
27, 1883, and they were the parents of chil- 
dren, among whom was Luther Penfield, 
of whom further. 

(VIII) Luther Penfield Bullard, son of 
Luther and Nancy (Greenleaf) Bullard, 



48 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



was born in Bethel. Vermont, December 2, 
1827. and died February lO, 191 3. He 
was of a roving disposition, and made vari- 
ous trips, going to South America before 
he was twenty years of age. After the dis- 
covery of gold in CaHfornia, he joined the 
ranks of the westward moving gold seekers, 
and went to California in 1S49. During the 
later years of his life he engaged in farm- 
ing at Bethel. Vermont, the place of his 
birth, and there he passed the remainder of 
his life cultivating the soil and raising 
blooded sheep and race horses. He married 
Ruth Morse, of Royalton, Vermont, born 
December 20, 1832, died April 14, 1897, and 
they were the parents of four children: i. 
Edson Penfield. of whom further, 2. Jessie, 
who married C. E. Noble, of Bethel, Ver- 
mont. 3. Mattie, who married Gilmdre 
Ward Bryant. 4. Alton E., of Ludlow, 
Massachusetts. 

fix) Edson Penfield Bullard, son of 
Luther Penfield and Ruth (]\Iorse) Bullard, 
was born in Bethel, Vermont, in 1855, and 
died in Springfield, Massachusetts, August 
16, 1921. He received his education in the 
public schools of Bethel, Vermont, and came 
to Springfield, Massachusetts, when he was 
twenty years of age, where he entered the 
employ of the Milton Bradley Company. 
Here he remained to the time of his death, 
as foreman of the box making department, 
which position he had held continuously for 
forty-six years, he having been the real 
builder and developer of that large depart- 
ment of the business. He possessed a rich 
tenor voice, and during the earlier years of 
his residence in Springfield sang in the 
choirs of various churches, including that 
of the State Street Baptist Church, and was 
a member of various quartettes which were 
very popular and furnished excellent music. 
He was a prominent member of Roswell 
Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
of the Orpheus Qub, in both of which or- 
ganizations he was an ever welcome par- 
ticipant in all important activities. His jo- 



vial and genial disposition made friends for 
him wherever he went, and his passing left 
a host of friends and associates scattered 
throughout the Springfield section to deeply 
mourn a loss which they felt most keenly. 
His religious affiliation was with the Asbury 
Church, which he served as leader of the 
choir for twenty years. He married Jennie 
Bugbee, of Bethel, Vermont, daughter of 
Daniel and Maria (Morse) Bugbee, and 
they were the parents of two children: i. 
Roy, who died at the age of four years. 2. 
Glenn Morse, of whom further. 

(X) Glenn Morse Bullard, son of Edson 
Penfield and Jennie (Bugbee) Bullard, was 
born in Springfield, Massachusetts, Septem- 
ber 23, 1886. He received his education 
in the public schools of Springfield, including 
the high school, and when his studies were 
completed, entered the employ of the Fiber- 
loid Manufacturing Company of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, as office boy. Like his 
father before him, he remained with the 
first concern with which he had become 
associated, rising by ability and faithful ap- 
plication to the responsible position of pur- 
chasing agent, in which capacity he is at 
the present time rendering valuable and ex- 
pert service. Mr. Bullard is a prominent 
Mason, being a member of Roswell Lee 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Springfield, and is also a charter member 
of the Samuel D. Sherwood Lodge of the 
same order, and of all the York rites, in- 
cluding the Chapter Council and Command- 
ery, also of Melha Temple. Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Mr. Bul- 
lard's favorite recreations are hunting and 
fishing. 

On October 5. 191 3. Glenn Morse Bul- 
lard married (first), Luella Williams, of 
Nova Scotia, who died in 191 8. He mar- 
ried (second), March 18, 1921, Annie Blon- 
don, of Gloucester, Massachusetts. To the 
first marriage one child, Virginia Ruth, was 
born, in Springfield, Massachusetts, June 5, 

1915- 



49 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



KINNEY. Frank Milton 

l-"rank Milton Kiiwu-y, of Springfield, is 
one of the well-known insurance men, a 
typical American in every sense of the term, 
and a man of hij^'h character. He is a 
descendant of old New England stock, and 
his family traces hack to Sir Thomas 
Kin(n)e. the old s|)elling of the name hav- 
ing l)cen in that form. The name as spelled 
today, Kinney, was adopted in this form in 
the next generation. Sir Thomas Kin(n)e's 
son, Henry, the emigrant ancestor of the 
American line. 

(I) Henry Kinney came to Salem, Mas- 
sachusetts, hy way of Holland, in 165 1. 
His father. Sir Thomas Kin(n)e, was of 
Norfolk, England, and the son is mentioned 
in "Pope's Pioneers of Massachusetts." as 
l)eing placed as an apprentice with William 
Parker, of Roxhury, in 1639, and "remov- 
ing to Salem." or Salem Village, which is 
today Danvers. His name in "Salem Vital 
Records" is twice spelled Kenning, but usu- 
ally Kinney. Henry Kinney married Ann, 
surname unknown, and they had eight chil- 
dren, among whom was Thomas, of whom 
further. 

(U) Thomas Kinney, son of Henry and 
Ann Kinney, was born in 1C36. He mar- 
ried. May 23, 1677, Elizal)eth Knight, of 
Salem. They were the parents of four 
chiMren, Ixjrn in Salem, Massachusetts: i. 
Thomas, lM)rn June 27, 1678, died in 1756; 
married Martha, surname unkncnvn. 2. 
Josci)h, lx)rn September 7, 1680. 3. Daniel, 
lM»rn July 23, 1682. 4. Jonathan, of whom 
further. 

CHI) Jonathan Kinney, son of Thomas 
and ElizalK-th (Knight) Kinney, was born 
in Salem. May 27, 1686. He married 
and there were five children, all born in 
Salem: i. Jonathan, of whom further. 2. 
Rel)ecca, bapti/.ed September 20, 17 14. 
3. Thomas, baptized September 2, 1716. 4. 
Nathan, Ixiptized March 2, 1717-18. 5. Sam- 
uel, baptized June 12, 1720. 

(IV) Jonatlian Kinney, son of Jonathan 
Kinney, was baptized in Salem, June 8, 



1712. He married, March 3, 1735, Prudence 
Gale, of Sutton, Massachusetts, and they 
became the parents of ten children: i. Jon- 
athan, baptized July 17, 1736. 2. Prudence, 
baptized December 4, 1737. 3. Jonathan, 
baptized March 30, 1740. 4. Nathan, of 
whom further. 5. Violette, born May i, 
1744. 6. Rebecca, born April 18, 1746. 7. 
Jonas, born October 24, 1748, enlisted in 
"Connecticut Line," July 10, 1780; dis- 
charged December 4, 1780. 8. Lucy, born 
October 27, 1750. 9. Mara, baptized Oc- 
tober 6, 1752. 10, A child born August 
16, 1754. 

(V) Nathan Kinney, son of Jonathan and 
Prudence (Gale) Kinney, was born Novem- 
ber 4, 1 741, in Sutton, Massachusetts, and 
came to Union, Connecticut, in 1773. He 
evidently was in Westboro, Massachusetts, 
in 1772, when he bought a farm in Union. 
The deed of John Rosebrooks, of South 
Brimfield, dated October i, 1773, conveying 
land to Nathan Kinney, said he was of 
Westboro, and he was in Westboro in 1780. 
He married (first), in Sutton, November 
6, 1768, Abigail Williams, who died March 
28, 1778, leaving five children. He married 
(second), October 5, 1780, Eunice Kinney, 
of Sutton, and they were the parents of 
three children. He married (third), Anna 
Chaffie, in Union, Connecticut. Of the 
eight children, five are in the Westboro, 
Massachusetts, records, two recorded in 
Union: i. Joel, of whom further. 2. Elea- 
zer, born March 28, 1771 ; married Mary 
Paul. 3. Ruth, born August 14, 1772; 
married Thomas Lawson, Jr., of Union. 4. 
Lucy, born December 4, 1774; married 
David Cove, of Union. 5. John, born May 
30, 1776. By the second marriage: 6. 
Alpheus, born July 29, 1781 ; married Lucy 
Eaton, daughter of John Eaton. 7. Nathan, 
born November 6, 1785, in Union; married 
Roxa Thompson. 8. David, born March 
28, 1789, in Union. 

(VI) Joel Kinney, son of Nathan and 
Abigail (Williams) Kinney, was born Au- 
gust I, 1769, and died March 2, 1852. He 



50 





>c . ..^ 




ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



married, May lO, 1792, Chloe Cove, who 
died March 21, 1834. They were the par- 
ents of the following children: i. Ahigail, 
born September 23, 1793, died September 

27, 1793- 2. Archibald, born October 24, 
1794. 3. David, born March 11, 1796, died 
March 12, 1798. 4. Elizabeth, born March 
16, 1800, died in infancy. 5. Elizabeth, 
born September 26, 1801 ; married Moses 
C. Sissions. 6. Nathan, born November 

28, 1803. 7. Elisha, of whom further. 8. 
Danforth, born November 30, 1809. 9. 
Horace, born March 22, 1814, died Janu- 
ary 21, 1897. 

(VII) Elisha Kinney, son of Joel and 
Chloe (Coye) Kinney, was born October 
II, 1808, and died August 23, 1888, in Hol- 
land, Massachusetts. For many years he 
was a hotel keeper in this town. He mar- 
ried, August 25, 1833, Mary Ann Marcy, 
of Holland, who died February 5, 1888, 
aged sixty-eight years. They were the par- 
ents of two children: i. Mary A. E., born 
November 10, 1834; she married Francis 
Wright, and they had two children, George 
H. and Everett E. K. 2. Francis E., of 
whom further. 

(VIII) Francis E. Kinney, son of Elisha 
and Mary Ann (Marcy) Kinney, was born 
in Holland, Massachusetts, February 14, 
1 84 1, and died there March 10, 1890. He 
owned a farm and conducted a hotel, and 
was active in the community life, having 
held various town offices. He was a man 
held in high esteem by every one who knew 
him, and had a wide circle of friends and 
acquaintances. He met his death while at- 
tempting to save his son, Frank M., who 
was at that time eight years of age, and 
who had fallen into the water where they 
were cutting ice. Five men assisted in the 
attempt at rescue, all of them escaping with 
their lives except Mr. Kinney. He mar- 
ried, December 29, 1869, Olivia Parker, of 
Brimfield, Massachusetts, daughter of Sum- 
ner and Melina (Parsons) Parker (see 
Parker), and they were the parents of six 
children: i. Mabel Parker, born January 



22, 1 87 1, died January 29, 1871. 2. Oscar 
Francis, born October 7, 1872. 3. Walter 
Earl, born September 10, 1874. died Janu- 
ary 23, 1923. 4. Grace Milicent, born De- 
cember 9, 1876; married Percy E. Wood- 
ward. 5. Sumner Parker, born July 13, 
1880, died in 1916. 6. Frank Milton, of 
whom further. 

(IX) Frank Milton Kinney, son of Fran- 
cis E. and Olivia (Parker) Kinney, was 
born in Holland, Massachusetts, October 28, 
1882. Among his maternal ancestors one 
came to New England on the ship "Ann" 
in 1623. He became the first Governor of 
Massachusetts Bay Plantation, and in 1634 
was one of the first three deputies elected 
by Salem to the higher branch of the Legis- 
lature and erected the first house in Salem. 
Frank M. Kinney received his early educa- 
tion in Holland and Palmer, and came to 
Springfield in 1891, where he graduated 
from the Central High School in 1902. He 
then went West and traveled extensively for 
about eleven years. He spent part of this 
time in Denver, and then bought a fruit 
ranch in the State of Washington, in the 
Yakima Valley, which he operated for about 
eight years. He traveled about twelve hun- 
dred miles on horseback on one of his trips, 
covering the states of South Dakota, Wyo- 
ming and Montana, during a period of about 
three months. In 191 3 he returned to 
Springfield, and entered the insurance busi- 
ness in association with Gilmore and Gold- 
thwaite, remaining with this concern for a 
period of three years. In 1916 he estab- 
lished an insurance agency of his own. which 
he has carried on successfully ever since, his 
offices being located in the Third National 
Bank Building. He carries all kinds of in- 
surance, including life. fire, accident, and 
represents a number of the best companies 
in America. He has always been active 
in the upbuilding of the insurance business 
and has served as secretary and president of 
the Life Underwriters' Association of West- 
ern Massachusetts. In October, 1924, he 
was elected president of the Insurance As- 



EN'CVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



sociation of Springfield, this orfjanization 
comixjscd of all the insurance representatives 
of the city. Upon the or{,'anization of the 
Kiwanis Cluh of Springfield, Mr. Kinney 
was elccteil and served as its first secretary, 
and later was elected its president. In kjjo 
he was elected president of the Central Hij,'h 
School Alumni Assfxriatiun. He is at the 
present time ( i9-'4) servinc: as vice-presi- 
dent of the Union Relief Association, and 
has for three years l)een a director of the 
Chamber of Commerce. In 1918 Mr. Kin- 
ney was elected to the lower board of the 
City Council, and after two years of service 
resigned to become a candidate for the 
upi)cr l)oard, to which he was elected. He 
has served on the following committees : 
For two years on the finance committee ; 
that of mayor's messages ; revision of ordi- 
nance, the original Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Memorial Commission ; the rules of the road 
committee, of which he was chairman for 
several years. At the time of Cardinal 
Mercier's visit to the city, he was one of 
the "Special Committee" on entertainment, 
and also served (m the Citizens' Committee 
when Springfield welcomed Marshal Foch. 
He has l)een active in all ]niblic affairs, ren- 
dering services whenever there is need. He 
lias Ixren jjresident of the Board of Alder- 
men fur the two years, 1923-1924, and 
lias Ixien called upon at various times to 
serve as acting mayor, a memorable occa- 
sion being at the Memorial Services held 
in the .Auditorium on the death of President 
Harding. He is a member of the following 
clubs iKTsides the Chamber of Commerce and 
the Kiwanis already mentioned; the Nayas- 
set, Winthrop, Longmeadow Country, Pub- 
licity and Automttbile. Mr. Kinney, alder- 
man, and president of the upper board of 
the City Council, was i)laced in the ring 
for candidate for mayor by Mayor Edwin 
F. Lcfjnard. 1 Ic was hailed as the ne.xt chief 
executive of Springfield by mem]>ers of the 
City Government at their annual farewell 
banquet in 1923, and was paid glowing 
tributes by bt)th Mayor Leonard and Al- 



derman Raymond B. Shattuck. Fraternally, 
he is a member of Springfield Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons. Mr. Kinney stands 
very high in the public esteem, and his fine 
character, his splendid force, and his genial 
nature are all qualities that help in making 
him win his way to the high offices and 
success that he has attained. His future 
smiles beckoningly, and there is every prom- 
ise that he will reach even greater heights 
than he has already achieved. 

Frank M. Kinney married, October 19, 
1910, Ida Martha Sharkey, of Yakima, State 
of Washington. 

(The Parker Line) 

The surname Parker is derived from the 
Latin "parcarius," parkkeeper, or shepherd. 
Danes, Saxons, and Normans in England 
all seem to have had the name at an early 
date. "Parcum" and "de Parco" are found 
in the Domesday Book, As early as 900- 
925, in the reign of Edward I, a Geoffrey 
Parker is mentioned, even before the com- 
mon use of surnames in England. The 
coat-of-arms of the Brownsholme family of 
Parker, the pedigree of which is traced to 
William le Parker, of Wiztwistle, Lanca- 
shire, before 1400, is the one which seems 
most likely to belong to the American line 
here given. 

Arms — Vert, a chevron between three stags' 
heads cabossed or. 

Crest — A leopard head affrontee erased or, 
ducally gorged gules. 

Motto — Scpre ande (dare to be just). 

This coat-of-arms descended through the 
Park Flail and Staffordshire lines, and is 
now used by Sir Thomas Parker, Earl of 
Macclesfield, England. It is similar to the 
earlier coat-of-arms of the Parker family of 
Eztwistle and doubtless modified from that 
design. 

(1) James Parker, immigrant ancestor, 
came from England before 1640, when he 
had settled in Woburn, Massachusetts, and 
was a taxpayer there as early as 1645. He 



52 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



was probably related to some of the numer- 
ous other pioneers of the name located in 
that section of the Bay Colony. Abraham 
Parker, of Woburn, and John, of Billerica 
and Woburn, were doubtless brothers. 
James Parker removed to Billerica about 
1654, to Chelmsford in 1658, and to Groton 
in 1660. He owned rights in Groton and 
increased his holdings by purchase until he 
was the largest owner of land and probably 
the richest proprietor in the town. He be- 
came prominent in both town and church. 
He was deacon of the church and selectman 
of the town from 1662-99, more than thirty 
years ; was town clerk for a time ; moderator 
of all the important town meetings of his 
day; chairman of important committees to 
locate highways, lay out lots and establish 
town boundaries; representative to the 
General Court in 1693. While living in 
Groton he was once elected selectman of 
Dunstable. He was a brave and sturdy In- 
dian fighter, rising to be the captain of the 
Groton company. His home was at a dis- 
tance from the present village, near Mar- 
tin's Pond, removed some distance from the 
highway, shaded and secluded, and no trace 
of it is left. A description of his home- 
stead given in a recent publication doubtless 
belongs to a later generation of the family. 
A small part of the original homestead was, 
at last accounts, still owned by descendants 
in Groton. He owned a large part of Half- 
Moon meadow. He died in 1701, aged 
eighty-three. He married. May 23, 1644, 
Elizabeth Long, daughter of Robert Long, 
of Charlestown, Massachusetts; (second), 
Eunice, surname unknown. Children: 
Elizabeth, Anna, John, Sarah, Joseph, James, 
Josiah, Samuel, Joshua, Zachariah, Eleazer, 
of further mention, and Sarah, by the sec- 
ond wife, born thirty years after the birth 
of Eleazer, December 12, 1697, as shown 
by the will and town records. His will is 
published in full in Butler's "History of 
Groton." 

(II) Eleazer Parker, son of James and 
Elizabeth (Long) Parker, was born in Gro- 



ton, November 9, 1660, and married Mary, 
whose surname is not known. Children, 
born in Groton : Anna, Eleazer, Mary, Zach- 
ariah, of further mention ; Thomas, Mehita- 
ble, and Elizalieth. 

(III) Lieutenant Zachariah Parker, son 
of Eleazer and Mary Parker, was born at 
Groton, January 29, 1699. I^^ married 
(first) at Weston, August 11, 1732, Rebecca 
Parks, died June 11, 1748; married (sec- 
ond), at Mansfield, October 26, 1748, Peace 
Ames. He resided at Mansfield. Children, 
of first wife, born at Weston: Zachariah, 
Ephraim, and James, of further mention. 
Children of second wife, born at Mansfield: 
Mary, Daniel, Eleazer, Isaac, Levi, Sarah, 
John Keith, and Rachel. 

(IV) James Parker, son of Lieutenant 
Zachariah and Rebecca (Parks) Parker, was 
born in Dutchess County, New York, Au- 
gust 18, 1740. His birth is recorded at 
Mansfield, Connecticut, whither the family 
removed soon after his birth. He served 
in the Revolution, in Captain Jonathan 
Nichols' company. Lieutenant Colonel Ex- 
perience Storr's regiment, at the Lexington 
Alarm, April 19, 1775; also in 1781 in Gen- 
eral David Waterbury, Jr.'s, regiment, in the 
state brigade. Later in life he removed to 
Willington, Connecticut, and was a land 
owner there in 1802. He married, Decem- 
ber I, 1762, Mary Conant, daughter of 
Malachi Conant, of Mansfield. Children, 
born at Mansfield : Daughter, James, Reu- 
ben, Kezia, Joanna, Eunice, Olive, Molly, 
Rebecca, David, of further mention; Ed- 
mund, Sarah. Daughter, AI)igail. 

(V) David Parker, son of James and 
Mary (Conant) Parker, was born in Mans- 
field, Connecticut, June 20, 1779. He lived 
in Willington and Ashford, Connecticut, 
until 1806. when he sold his property and 
removed to Brimfield, Massachusetts. Sev- 
eral of his brothers and sisters removed to 
Ohio. He married Hannah Curtis, daugh- 
ter of Silas Antisdel Curtis (a soldier in 
the Revolution), at Willington, Connecticut, 
March 7, 1799. Children, born at Willing- 



53 



EN'CVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ton, Connecticut; Luther, Nchcmiah, Orre, 
Orson, Orstjn (2), Da\nd, Jr., Ilannah, 
Sumner, of further mention; Silas, Harriet, 
and Philo. 

(VI) Sumner Parker, son of David and 
Hannah (Curtis) Parker, was Ix^rn Octo- 
Ijcr 30, 1815. He married Melina Parsons, 
and amonj,' their children was Olivia, of 
whom further. 

( V'll) Olivia Parker, daughter of Sumner 
and Melina ( Parsons) Parker, married 
Francis K. Kinney (see Kinney VHI). 



ROADSTRAND, Charles John 

Few men have had a more varied busi- 
ness than has Charles John Roadstrand, who 
is now acting as sp)ecial representative for 
the W. H. Graham Cxjrporation, the pur- 
chasers of Mr. Roadstrand's undertaking es- 
tablishment, located on Howard Street, in 
Sprin},'field, Mass. 

John Peter Roadstrand, father of Mr. 
Rrjadstrand, was born in Sweden in 181 8, 
and died in Xew York, in June, 1888, son 
of Bishop Roadstrand, of Sweden. John 
Peter Roadstrand followed the trade of 
harness-maker in his native country until 
he was thirty-four years of age, when, about 
1852, he came to America and located in 
New York, where he followed his trade to 
the time of his death. He was an especially 
skilled workman, and for twenty-five years 
made the harness used by the governors of 
New Jersey. He married Margaret Eliza- 
Ijcth Toline, who was born in Sweden, and 
<lied in Xew York City, in December, 1887, 
aged sixty years, and they were the parents 
of two chilflren : Annie Christine, who died 
at the age of three years, antl Charles John. 
Charles John Roadstrand was born in 
New York City, June 14, 1863, and at- 
tended the public schools of his native city 
until he was twelve years of age. He then 
l)egan his business career in the employ of 
the Lancashire Fire Insurance Company, 
with whom he remained for a period of one 
year. At the end of that time he became 
associated with the George F. Nesbeth 



Comi)any, printers for the government, with 
whom he remained for another year, and 
then went with the A. T. Stewart Estate, in 
the architectural department, in w-hich he 
was employed for two years. While here, 
he wrote the contracts for the Garden City 
schools of Garden City, Long Island. 
These schools being established by the A. 
T. Stewart Estate. He next became iden- 
tified with the Danzig and Feuchwanzer 
Company, engaged in the manufacture of 
ladies' muslin underwear, where he re- 
mained for two years, and again made a 
change, this time associating himself with 
the New York Institute for the Deaf and 
Dumb, as bookkeeper, which position he 
filled for a year. At the end of that time 
he returned to the Danzig and Feuchwanzer 
Company for a year, and then, in 1885, 
removed to East Granby, Connecticut, 
where he bought and operated a country 
store, continuing in this line from 1885 to 
1889. In the latter year he went to Kear- 
ney, Nebraska, and there engaged in the 
furniture and undertaking business, which 
he followed from 1889 to 1892. From 1892 
to 1895 ^^ W3-S engaged in the same line 
of business in Kewanee, Illinois, and in the 
latter year he removed to Norwich, Con- 
necticut, where he formed a partnership 
with George F. Lord and engaged in the 
undertaking business, under the firm name 
of Roadstrand and Lord. In 1897 he again 
changed his place of residence and busi- 
ness, going to Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 
where he engaged in the undertaking busi- 
ness alone. Later he disposed of his in- 
terest in this concern and in 1899 removed 
to Springfield, Massachusetts, where, in 
partnership with James H. Lewis, he again 
engaged in the undertaking business. This 
connection was maintained until 1901, at 
which time Mr. Roadstrand reorganized the 
business and incorporated it under the name 
of the C. J. Roadstrand Company, Inc. He 
continued to conduct the business under this 
name until 191 3, when it was changed to 
the Roadstrand, Perry Corporation. This 



54 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



continued for some years, when Mr. Road- 
strand sold out to the W. H. Graham Com- 
pany, with whom he has been identified since 
1920 as special representative. In 1909 Mr. 
Roadstrand purchased land on Howard 
Street and there erected what is probably 
the finest undertaking establishment in New 
England, and this property he still owns. 
In addition to his undertaking business, he 
is also interested in mining properties in 
the West. 

Along with his various business interests, 
Mr. Roadstrand has taken an active part in 
the advancement of the public welfare of 
the communities in which he has lived, 
\\'hile living in Kewanee, Illinois, he was 
elected mayor and president of the Board 
of Aldermen, during which incumbency he 
had the distinction of being one of the 
youngest mayors in the country. He is a 
member of Hampden Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of Springfield, of 
which he is a Past Noble Grand ; the 
Knights of Pythias, of Springfield ; Osse- 
quivevue Tribe. Improved Order of Red 
Men. and the United Order of American 
Mechanics. His church affiliation is with 
Christ Episcopal Church, 

On December 31, 1885, Charles J. Road- 
strand married Alice ]\Iaud Noble, of West 
Suffield, Connecticut, daughter of Henry S. 
S. and Augusta W, (Brooks) Noble, (See 
Noble VII). 

(The Noble Line) 

(I) Thomas Noble was born in England 
in 1632, and died in Westfield, Massachu- 
setts, in 1704. He married Hannah War- 
riner, and they were the parents of ten 
children : John, Hannah, Thomas, Matthew, 
Mark, of further mention ; Elizabeth, Luke, 
James, Mary, and Rebecca. 

(II) Mark Noble, son of Thomas and 
Hannah (Warriner) Noble, was born in 
Westfield, Massachusetts, in 1670, and died 
in 1 741. He married Mary or Mercy Mar- 
shall, daughter of Samuel and Rebecca 
(Newberry) Marshall, and they were the 



parents of six children : Noah, Mary. Abi- 
gail, John, of further mention; Miriam, 
Noah. 

(III) John Noble, son of Mark and Mary 
or Mercy (Marshall) Noble, was born in 
Westfield. Massachusetts, and died in 
Southwick, Massachusetts, in 1776. He 
married (first), Lydia Bush; (second), 
Elizabeth Remmington. The children of the 
first marriage were : Amos, Josiah, Eli, and 
John. To the second marriage were born 
four children : Elizabeth, Eunice, Amos, and 
Timothy, of further mention. 

(IV) Timothy Noble, son of John and 
Elizabeth (Remmington) Noble, was born in 
Southwick, Massachusetts, in 1758, and died 
in 1827. He served in two drafts during 
the Revolutionary War. He married Sally 
Taylor, and they were the parents of six 
children : Betsy, Ruth, Eunice, Horace, 
Sally, John, of further mention. 

(V) John Taylor, son of Timothy and 
Sally (Taylor) Noble, was born in South- 
wick, Massachusetts, April 27, 1803, and in 
1827 removed to West Suffield, Connecticut, 
where, in 1852, he was elected a represen- 
tative to the General Assembly of the State 
of Connecticut, representing the West Suf- 
field district. He married (first) Mary 
Avery; (second), Eunice Stark Bailey. The 
children of the first marriage were : Mary 
Janet, and Henry Stiles Seymour, of fur- 
ther mention. Children of the second mar- 
riage : John Wells, Mary. 

(VI) Henry Stiles Seymour Noble, son 
of John and Mary (Avery) Noble, was 
born in West Suffield, Connecticut, Febru- 
arv 17, 1832, and died November 11, 1877. 
He married, November 22, 1859. Augusta 
Ward Brooks, daughter of Peter and Emily 
Fav (Woodward) Brooks, and they were 
the parents of six children : Alice Maud, 
of further mention ; Henry Irving, John 
Wilbur, Harris Wells, Bessie Louise, and 
Walter Courtney. 

(VII) Alice Maud Noble, daughter of 
Henry S. S, and Augusta W, (Brooks) 



00 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Noble, married Charles John Roadstrand 
(sec Roadstrand). 



COOK. William Francis 

Fur more tlian halt a century William 
Francis Ci>ok has been successfully engaged 
in the marble and granite business in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, first in associa- 
tion with his father, and since 1879 as sole 
owner of the concern, which is located at 
No. 184 State Street. 

The Cook family is a very old one in 
England, and representatives of the name 
were fi>und in several of the Xew England 
colonies at a very early date. Before the 
Declaration of Independence was signed, the 
ancestors of the branch of the family to 
which Mr. Cook belongs were prominent in 
Massachusetts, among them being Isaac and 
Martha Cook, from whom the line of de- 
scent to William Francis Cook is traced 
as follows: 

(II) Jonathan Cook, son of Isaac and 
Martha Cook, was born in Salem, Massa- 
chusetts. September 2, 1722. He married 
and reared a family of children, among 
whom was Hon. Orchord, of further men- 
tion. 

(III) Hon. Orchord Cook, son of 
"Jonathan Cot)k, was born in Salem. Mas- 

chusetts. March 24. 1763, and died in 
Wiscasset, Maine, August 12, 1819. He 

married Mary , who was born in 

Newcastle, Maine, March 18, 1765, and 
died January 2^, 1837, and they were the 
parents of children, among whom was Or- 
chord. 

(IV) Orchord Cook, son of Hon. Or- 
chord and Mary Cx)ok, was born in New- 
castle. Maine, June 4. 1788, and died 
Deceml)er 13. 1842. He married Mary 
Huhlard, who was l)orn April 26, 1790, and 
died July 28, 1871, daughter of John and 
Olivia (Wilson) Hubbard, and sister of 
John Hubliard, who was at one time gov- 
ernor of the State of Maine. The children 
of Orchord and Mary (Hubbard) Cook 
were: i. Francis, born July 28, 1810, died 



February 2}^, 1825. 2. Osmand, born Sep- 
tember I, 181 1, died March 31, 1829. 3. 
John H., of further mention. 4. Orchord, 
born December 3, 1816, died February 22, 
1825. 5. Thomas H., born February 8, 
1818, died May i, 1832. 6. Richard, born 
July 8, 1 819, died February 26, 1825. 7. 
Wesley, born July 10, 1 821, died Decem- 
ber 30, 1884. 8. Charles M., born Febru- 
ary 2^, 1823. died September 8, 1857. 9. 
Eliza v., who was born May 22, 1830, and 
died June 4, 1851. 

(V) John Hubbard Cook, son of Orchord 
and Mary (Hubbard) Cook, was born in 
Readville, Maine, February 22, 181 3. and 
died in Springfield, Massachusetts, March 

28. 1889. He received his education in 
the public schools of his native district and 
then learned the trade of the stone-cutter. 
In his early years he went to Portland, 
Maine, where he was engaged in the stone- 
cutting business for a number of years. 
Later, he went to Hartford, Connecticut, 
and in association with a partner, he en- 
gaged in the stone-cutting business for him- 
self. Two years later, he sold out his 
interests to his partner, and in 1872 he 
removed from Hartford to Springfield, 
Massachusetts. There, under the name of 
J. H. Cook and Company, he established a 
marble and granite business, which he suc- 
cessfully conducted until about 1879, when 
he sold his interests to his son and retired 
from active life. As a young man he became 
a member of the Free Will Baptist Church, 
He married Frances Ann Whitney, who was 
born September 10, 1824, and died March 

29, 1893. daughter of Samuel and Mary 
( Piper) Whitney, and they were the par- 
ents of seven children: i. John Frederick, 
who was born June 20, 1848. 2. William 
Francis, of further mention. 3. Horace 
Mann, born January 18, 1854. 4. Fannie 
Whitney, born March 20, 1857, died March 
23. 1857. 5. George Edwin, born April 5, 
1858, died September 28, 1859. 6. Edgar 
Whitney, born July 14. 1861, died Septem- 
ber 28, 1875. 7. Mary Elizabeth, born Jan- 



56 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



uary i6, 1865, married Lorenzo Griswold. 

(VI) William Francis Cook, son of John 
Hubbard and Frances Ann (Whitney) 
Cook, was born in Portland, Maine, April 
I, 1 85 1, and received a good practical edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native 
district. When his school training was 
completed, he went to Boston, Massachu- 
setts, where he learned the printer's trade 
with his brother, John Frederick, who was 
established in business in Boston. At this 
time his parents also removed to Boston, 
where for two years the father served as 
agent for a firm of building contractors. In 
1869 John Frederick Cook removed to Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, and in the fall of the 
same year William Francis and his parents 
also went to that city. It was at this time 
that ]\Ir. Cook's father, John Hubbard 
Cook, established his stone, granite, and 
marble business, as has already been re- 
lated. In 1872, when his father sold the 
business in Hartford and removed to 
Springfield, William Francis accompanied 
him and, in association with him, engaged 
in the marble and granite business which 
was established under the name of J. H. 
Cook and Company. That connection was 
maintained until about 1879, when Mr, 
Cook purchased his father's interests. Since 
that time he has continued to successfully 
conduct the business, for a time being in- 
corporated under the name of W. F. Cook 
Granite Company, but later continuing alone. 
He does an extensive business in monumen- 
tal work and is well known for the excel- 
lence of his workmanship. 

Mr. Cook has always taken an active in- 
terest in public affairs. In 1894 he was 
elected to represent his district in the State 
Legislature, and during his term of serv- 
ice, 1884-85, he was a member of the Com- 
mittee on Water Supplies. He has also 
served for a year as a member of the City 
Council. His fraternal affiliations are with 
Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Springfield, and with DeSoto 



Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of Springfield. 

William Francis Cook married, in 1874, 
IMary E. Lawrence, of Stafford, Connecti- 
cut, daughter of John Murphy Lawrence. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cook are the parents of two 
children : Robert Lawrence and Dora, both 
born in Springfield. The son is associated 
with his father in the monumental busi- 
ness. Robert Lawrence Cook married Edna 
Schlessinger, and they are the parents of 
one son, Lawrence Schlessinger. 



Descent of Merritt Family from Eadnoth 
The surname ]\Ierritt is derived from the 
ancient Saxon manor and parish of Meriet 
in Somersetshire, England, the name of 
which is now written Merriott. It is, how- 
ever, probable that Meriet was the ancient 
Celtic (Welsh) name of this manor before 
the Saxon Conquest. The early form of the 
name was "de Meriet," and some branches 
of the family have always retained the "de" 
in the name. The French preposition "de" 
was introduced into England — like the most 
of our names — by the Normans. It was used 
to indicate the ownership of the estate 
names. Henry de Warren meant that Henry 
was owner of the manor of Warren. The 
Merritt family were lords of Meriet for 
over three hundred years. The following 
pedigree, except the first four generations, 
was compiled from records in the State 
Paper Office, London, and traces the main 
stem of the family, the source from which 
all the other branches spring: 

(I) Eadnoth the Staller. Comparatively 
little is known of this great Saxon general, 
and nothing at all of his early life and fam- 
ily except that he had a son, Harding fitz 
Eadnoth. His transactions with Aelfwold, 
Bishop of Sherborne, shows him to have 
been in an influential position before A. D., 
ios8. For the next ten years he served as 
a high officer under Kings Edward, Harold, 
and William the Conqueror. William of 
Malmesbury, the great historian of his 
time, writes as follows of Eadnoth: 



57 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



The invaders being driven to Ireland, the roy- 
alists purclvascd the empty title of conquest at their 
own special loss and that of their general. His 
name was Ednoth. equally celebrated before the 
arrival of the Normans, both at home and abroad. 
He was the father of Harding, who yet survives, 
a man more accustomed to kindle strife by his 
malignant tongue than to brandish arms in the 
field of battle. 

Hardy, the historian, calls Eadnoth "Har- 
old's Piaster of the horse. He was killed 
in 1068, in opposing the sons of Harold 
when they came upon their expedition from 
Ireland." 

A more extended account of Eadnoth 
may be found in Freeman's "Norman Con- 
quest," from which the following facts are 
gleaned. The sons of Harold, with a fleet 
of fifty-two ships, manned, no doubt, partly 
by Irish Danes, and partly by English ex- 
iles, sailed to some point of the Somerset 
coast not more fully described. Eadnoth, 
as King William's officer, met the sons of 
Harold in arms, at the head of King Wil- 
liam's new subjects, the local fyrd of Som- 
erset. The result seems to have been a 
drawn battle. Eadnoth fell in the fight, and 
his son, as we have seen, failed to retain 
the inheritance which might have seemed 
the due reward of his father's services. He 
is sjxjken of as the most remarkable man, 
and the ofKicial of highest rank among those 
who won William's favor in the western 
shires, a man who seems to have risen by 
the favor of Harold, who had held the of- 
fice of Stallcr under lx)th Edward and Har- 
old, and who held large estates in various 
parts of England, but especially in the west. 
Since he was a zealous adherent of William, 
and died in his service, it is almost certain 
that he must have retained his lands; still 
no j)art of them passed to his son Harding, 
who, there is every reason to believe, was 
the ancestor of the great house of the Lords 
of Herkcley. Some ])rctext must, therefore, 
have been found for defrauding Harding of 
his succession ; and such a pretext was doubt- 
less easy to find in the case of a man who 
"was more valiant with his tongue than 



with his sword." Eadnoth had a son Hard- 
ing. 

(II) Harding Fitz Eadnoth, son of Ead- 
noth. was probably born as early as 1035, 
and he is said to have died November 6, 
about 1 1 15. In Somerset Gueld Inquest, 
1084. he is called in one place "Harding de 
Meriot," and in other parts of the same 
record "Harding fitz Alnod." Two years 
later, at the time of the great survey re- 
corded in Domesday Book, "Harding holds 
jNIeriet of the King." In this record the 
manor of IMeriet is described as follows: 

Dodeman holds Meriet of the earl (Robert, 
Earl of Moreton). Merriott now has 1670 acres, 
and a population of 1,467. Sevin and Bustward 
held it in the time of King Edward, (the con- 
fessor) and yielded for seven hides. 

The arable is seven carucates, (a carucate was 
about one hundred acres). 

In demesne are two carucates, six servants, ten 
villains, six cottages, with four plough. 

There are three mills of thirty shillings' rent, 
and twenty- five acres of meadow, and half a mile 
of pasture in length and breadth. It was worth 
four pounds — now seven pounds .... Harding 
holds Meriet of the King. Godwin held in the 
time of King Edward, and yielded for five hides. 
In demesne are two carucates, two servants, nine 
villains, and six cottagers with six plough. 

The arable is six carucates. There is a mill 
of five shillings' rent, and ten acres of meadow, 
and three furlongs of pasture. 

It was worth one hundred shillings — now it is 
worth four pounds. 

Harding fitz Eadnoth had a son Nicholas, 
of whom further. 

(HI) Nicholas fitz Harding, son of 
Harding, was born before 1085, and died 
in 1 171. He was the eldest son and heir 
of Harding fitz Eadnoth, and succeeded him 
as Lord of Meriet. In 11 66 he made a 
return to the Kin, and in it he speaks twice 
of his father. At that time he must have 
been at least seventy-six years of age. Rob- 
ert fitz Harding, the ancestor of the Lords 
of Berkeley, is believed to have been his 
brother. Nicholas fitz Harding had a son 
Henry, of whom further. 

(IV) Henry fitz Nicholas, son of Nicho- 



58 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



las fitz Harding, was born about 1115, and 
died in 1192. In 1171 he made a return 
to the King as Lord of Meriet — Scutage 
Roll. As Henry de Meriet he gave lands 
in Somersetshire to the Templars. He had 
a son Nicholas, of whom further. 

(V) Nicholas de Meriet, son of Henry 
fitz Nicholas, was born about 11 50, and 
died in 1229. In the year 11 94 he paid 
thirty-eight shillings and nine pence scutage 
toward the ransom of King Richard I. He 
was succeeded in the lordship of Meriet and 
other lands by his son, Hugh, of whom 
further. 

(VI) Hugh de ]Meriet, son of Nicholas 
de Meriet, was born about 1175, and died in 
1236. He succeeded his father as Lord of 
^Meriet, which he held in chief of the King. 
In the year 1230 he paid King Henry HI 
twenty-five marks for the relief of his lands. 
He had a son Nicholas, of whom further. 

(VII) Nicholas de Meriet, son of Hugh 
de Meriet, was born about 1200, and died 
in 1254. He succeeded his father as Lord 
of Meriet, and in 1236 gave King Henry 
HI twelve pounds and ten shillings for the 
relief of one Knight forfeit in ^Meriet, which 
his father held in chief of the King. In 
1254 he contributed the sum of thirty-seven 
shillings and two pence in aid for making the 
king's eldest son a knight. He had a son, 
John, of whom further. 

(VIII) John de Meriet, son of Nicholas 
de ]\Ieriet, was born about 1230, and died 
in 1294. In the inquisition postmortem, 
taken at his death, in the thirteenth year of 
Edward I, he is described as having been 
seized of the manor of Meriet and the ad- 
vowson of the church thereof, then certified 
to be of the value of twenty pounds. The 
following is also declared to be his son and 
heir : 

(IX) Sir John de ]\Ieriet, son of John 
de Meriet, was born about 1255, and died in 
1 30 1. He was a great warrior, and had 
the honor of knighthood conferred on him 
by King Edward I, in all of whose wars he 
was engaged. In the year 1299 he obtained 



from the king a charter of free Warren, a 
market, and a fair in the manor of Meriet. 
Pie was one of the great men that had spe- 
cial summons to attend the King with horse 
and arms to march against the Scots. By 
wife Lucia he left three sons, John, George, 
and William. He was succeeded as Lord of 
Meriet by his eldest son. Sir John de Meriet, 
who was a knight and bore the arms — barry 
of six, surmounted by a bend. It is shown 
by his seal, still preserved on an ancient 
deed. He seems to have been in great favor 
at the Court of King Edward II, but was 
of a turbulent temper insomuch that he was 
excommunicated from the church by John 
de Drokensford, Bishop of Bath and Wells, 
for emboweling his deceased wife. He was 
afterward pardoned, and died in 1327. He 
was succeeded by his son, John de Meriet, 
then aged twenty years, but he died soon 
without issue, and was succeeded by his 
uncle, George de Meriet. The successor of 
George de Meriet was his son (by wife 
Isabella), Sir John de Meriet, Lord of the 
manor of Meriet and other lands in the same 
county. He died without male issue in 1345, 
and was succeeded by his cousin, Simon de 
]\[eriet, son of William de Meriet, the fol- 
lowing : 

(X) William de Meriet, son of Sir John 
de ]\Ieriet, by wife Lucia, was born about 
1280, and is not known to have possessed 
an estate. His son, Simon de Meriet, be- 
came Lord of the manor of Meriet through 
the failure of his brother's issue. 

(XI) Simon de Meriet, son of William 
de Meriet, was born about 1310. He was 
Lord of the manor of Meriet, and also pos- 
sessed of the estates of Ashton, Long Ash- 
ton, and others. He was succeeded by his 
son, Sir John. 

(XII) Sir John Meriet, son of Simon de 
Meriet. was born about 1340. He was cre- 
ated a knight by King Edward IV. and was 
a man of distinction. He married Eleanor 
de Beauchamp, sister and co-heir of Sir John 
de Beauchamp. of Hatch. Her sister, Ce- 
cilia, married Sir Roger Seymour, and from 



59 



EXCVCLOPEDIA OP^ BIOGRAPHY 



them descended I-idy Jane Sc\ niuur, (Juecn 
of Kinjj Henry VHI, and mother of King 
Edward VI. The Beauchamp and Seymour 
families were of great eminence and dis- 
tinction. Sir John Beauchamp died in the 
year 1344, without issue, and his estates 
were inherited by the heirs of his sisters 
Mcriet and Seymour. Sir John Meriet had 
a son John, of whom further. 

(XIH) John Meritt, son of Sir John 
Meriet, was torn about 1360. He was the 
only son of Sir John Meriet by Eleanor, and 
succeeded him at Hatch. He possessed also 
the lordships of Lopen Stratton and Mar- 
ston Magna, with the advowson of the 
church of Meriet and Buckland, all of which, 
at his death in 1372, descended to his son 
and heir. Sir John Meritt. He also pos- 
sessed a part of the manor of Sellindge, in 
the County of Kent, which descended 
through his mother from Sir John de Beau- 
champ. He was succeeded in his Somer- 
set estates by his son. Sir John Meritt. 

ex IV) Sir John Meritt, son of John 
Meritt, inherited the Somerset estates of his 
father. By wife Maud he had three chil- 
dren, George, Margaret, and Elizabeth. The 
former died without issue, and the latter 
married a Seymour and inherited the estates. 



MERRITT, Arthur Clifford 

An active career has Ijeen that of Arthur 
Clifford Merritt, of the "Globe News Bu- 
reau." .Mr. Merritt, who has been identified 
with newspaper work for nearly four dec- 
ades, is also treasurer of the John Heald 
Company, engaged in the manufacture of 
high-grade band instruments. 

Mr. Merritt is a member of a family 
which has been identified with the develop- 
ment of this cfjuntry from earliest times (see 
Merritt descent from Eadnoth), which pre- 
cedes this article, and there the genealogy 
goes back to 1038 A. D. Fifty-five Merits 
and Merritts served in the Revolutionary 
War. The branch of the family to which 
Arthur ClifTord Merritt belongs is descended 
from Hezekiah Merritt, of Rhode Island, 



who was an inhabitant of Newport, Rhode 
Island, as early as March 20, 1639, on which 
date his name appears on a list with forty 
others of that place. A descendant of his 
was Samuel Marryatt (note the variation of 
spelling), of whom further. 

(I) Samuel Marryatt, married, in New- 
port, Rhode Island, in 1719, Margaret Smith. 
Among their children was Samuel, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(II) Samuel Marryatt, son of Samuel 
Marryatt, was born in Newport, Rhode 
Island, Alarch, 1720, and was made a free- 
man in Newport, May 2, 1749. He joined 
the Newport Sabbatarian Church, August 
23, 1741. By deed dated at Newport, Rhode 
Island, December 6, 1770, he purhased from 
Gardner Thurston and wife Martha two cer- 
tain tracts of land situated in Hopkinton, 
Rhode Island, 1770-1771. Samuel Marryatt 
married (first), in Newport, Rhode Island, 
February 21, 1741, Elizabeth Sabin, who was 
baptized June 20, 1742. She died in 1749. 
He married (second), July 25, 1751, Ann 
Hawkins. Children of first wife : Samuel, 
Elizabeth, Mary. Children of second wife: 
F'elix, Henry, of further mention ; James, 
Ann. 

(III) Henry Marryatt (Merritt), son of 
Samuel and Ann (Hawkins) Marryatt, was 
born in Newport, Rhode Island, January 11, 
1754, and died in Hopkinton, Rhode Island, 
December 23, 1819. He was a Revolutionary 
soldier, enlisting January 18, 1776, from 
Hopkinton, Rhode Island, in Christopher 
Lippit's regiment, Captain Thomas Arnold's 
company, for one year. His term of enlist- 
ment expired January 18, 1777, when he 
volunteered to serve another month. He 
was one of the brave "defenders of the pass" 
at Newton Bridge. Henry Merritt (Mar- 
ryatt) married, in Hopkinton, Rhode Island, 
about 1775, Mary Saunders, who was born 
about 1756, and died about 1828. Among 
their children was Samuel, of whom further. 

(IV) Samuel Merritt, son of Henry and 
Mary (Saunders) Merritt, was born in 
Hopkinton, Rhode Island, September 4, 



60 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



1776, and died in North Stonington, Con- 
necticut, May 23, 1863. He was a soldier 
in the War of 181 2 and took part in the 
battle of Stonington in August, 1814, as a 
member of Captain Daniel Miner's second 
company. His wife, Sally (Partelow) Mer- 
ritt, being alone during her husband's ab- 
sence with his company at Stonington and 
hearing the heavy cannonading of the Brit- 
ish, was fearful that their supply of am- 
munition would not hold out. She melted 
up her cherished pewter dishes, made them 
into bullets, cooked up a substantial supply 
of food, and in the early dawn started for 
Stonington on horseback "with the food for 
her husband and his comrades and the bul- 
lets for the British invaders." 

Samuel Merritt married, in Stonington, 
Connecticut, November 21, 1802, Sally 
Partelow, who was born in Stonington. Feb- 
ruary 14. 1780, and died in North Ston- 
ington, Connecticut, October 12, 1831, 
daughter of Azariah and Nabbie (Main) 
(Partelow. Their children were: Samuel, 
Thomas, Isaac Partelow, of whom further ; 
Henry Nelson, Sally Ann, Lucinda. Oliver 
G., Russell W., Benjamin F., Sarah Emeline. 
(V) Isaac Partelow Merritt, son of Sam- 
uel and Sally (Partelow) Merritt, was born 
in Stonington, Connecticut, June 7, 1807, 
and died in North Stonington, Connecticut, 
February 18, 1871. He taught school as a 
young man, and later became a ship builder, 
owning ship yards at Westerly, Rhode 
Island, where he built ships for the merchant 
marine and whaling vessels. Among the 
vessels he built were the steamers "Ella," 
"Tiger Lily," and "Water Lily," and a 
schooner, "Isaac P. Merritt," named by the 
owners for the builder. He was actively en- 
gaged in ship building until within a short 
time of his death. He had gone back to the 
old Merritt homestead in North Stonington 
a short time prior to his death. 

He married (first), in 1834, Waity 
Thomas. She died in 1835. He married 
(second), Sarah Davis. He married 
(third), in 1847, ^lary Emily Gage, who 



was born December 12, 1824, and died No- 
vember 14, 1896. Children of second mar- 
riage were: Waity J. and Benjamin Frank- 
lin. Children of third marriage were: Isaac 
Nelson, born September 20. 1852; Henrietta 
Angell, born May 20, 1857; Fenton Knowl- 
ton, born May 3, 1862; and Arthur Clifford 
(see following paragraph). 

(VI) Arthur Clifford Merritt, son of 
Isaac Partelow and Mary Emily (Gage) 
Merritt, was born in North Stonington, Con- 
necticut, July 24, 1866. His father died 
when he was four years of age and he came 
to Monson, Massachusetts, with his mother, 
that city being her birthplace. He attended 
the public schools of that town and Monson 
Academy, and later attended school for a 
short time in Norwich, Connecticut, and 
then entered Wesleyan. Later he went to 
Palmer, Massachusetts, where he learned the 
trade of printer on the "Palmer Journal." 
He then took up newspaper work and for a 
time corresponded for the "Warren Herald." 
After acquiring this e.xperience, he entered 
the publishing business for himself, handling 
a publication called the "Forest Lake News." 
for which the late Hon. Charles Gardner 
contributed the editorials. He next became 
identified with the "Associated Press," for 
which he covered some twenty towns. It 
was in the early days of his association with 
the "Associated Press" that he reported a 
large bank defalcation in Stafford Springs, 
Connecticut, "pulling off" one of the great- 
est "scoops" known in journalism. 

When he was twenty years of age, he was 
writing for the "Boston Sunday Record," 
and supplied the first Western Massachusetts 
letter from Springfield. Massachusetts. In 
1886 he became a representative of "The 
Bo.ston Globe." first in Palmer and later in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and he has since 
been actively engaged in the work of the 
"Globe News Bureau." His territory covers 
three large cities and some fifty- towns in 
Western Massachusetts. He was also for- 
merly correspondent for the "Springfield 
Union and Republican." In addition to the 



61 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



activities already mentioned, Mr. Merritt is 
treasurer of the John Heald Company, a 
concern enjjaged in the manufacture of musi- 
cal instruments, which won the comparative 
test on all points at Syracuse, New York. 
over the l»est-known American and foreign- 
built instruments. Mr. Merritt was one of 
the founders and the treasurer for years of 
the Sprinj,'field Fish and Game Association, 
memlxrr of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution. Springfield Automobile Club, and the 
Men's Club of Faith Church. 

Arthur ClifTord Merritt married, Septem- 
l)er I, i8<;i. Louise .Vdelaide Wharfield, 
daughter of William Henry and Charlotte 
Elizal)eth (Dickenson) Wharfield, and they 
are the parents of two children: i. Ruth 
Wharfield, who married Dana C. Howard. 
J. Benjamin Franklin. lx)rn July i6, 1897, 
died September 3. 1913. 



NIMS, Dr. Edward Beecher 

A familiar figure in the city of Spring- 
field is Dr. Edward Beecher Nims, who for 
the past twenty-two years has made his home 
there, spending the years of his retirement 
in well-earned leisure alternated with exten- 
sive travel in this country and abroad. For 
twenty-nine years C1868 to 1897) before his 
retirement in the latter named year, he was 
identified with the State Insane Asylum at 
Northampton, Massachusetts, now called the 
Northamptf)n State Hospital, first as asso- 
ciate jjhysician and later as superintendent 
and physician f)f the Institution. 

d) The story of the first-known ancestor 
of the branch of the Nims family to which 
Dr. Nims l>elongs is associated with the 
tragedy of the Deerfield Massacre. Godfrey 
Nims (Godefroi de Nimes) was one of the 
French Huguenots who came from the city 
of Nimes, France, to this country to escape 
religious i)ersecution. He first appears as a 
Lid (September 4, 1667), in Northampton, 
Massachusetts, where in 1667 his boyish love 
of adventure made him the leader of a group 
of boys who i)lanned with an Indian boy to 
run awav to the French in Canada. T^or this 



adventurous plan the boys were punished 
with fifteen lashes, the Indian boy receiving 
twenty. In 1676, in company with the same 
lads, he was fighting Indians in the conflict 
known as King Philip's War, taking part in 
the fighting at the Salmon Fishing Falls 
under Captain Turner. He removed to 
Deerfield in 1686, and was living there on 
the fateful February day in 1704 when the 
Indians burned the town and massacred or 
carried away as prisoners most of the inhab- 
itants. The Nims' home was burned, but 
Godfrey Nims escaped, as did also his 
daughter, Thankful, and her husband. Three 
of his children died in the burning home, his 
wife and step-daughter were captured, and 
the former killed on the march. His son 
Henry, aged twenty-two, was killed, and 
Ebenezer and John were captured. John 
escaped and reached Deerfield in June, 1705, 
but it was ten years before Ebenezer was 
redeemed and returned to Deerfield. 

Godfrey Nims was twice married. He 
married (first), November 26, 1677, in 
Northampton, Massachusetts, Mrs. Mary 
(Miller) Williams, daughter of William 
Miller, and widow of Zebidiah Williams. 
She died April 2y, 1688. He married (sec- 
ond), June 27, 1692, Mrs. Mehitabel 
(Swead) Hull, widow of Jeremiah Hull, and 
daughter of William Swead. To the first 
marriage six children were born, and to the 
second marriage five were born. Besides 
these the second wife had children at the 
time of her marirage. Among the children 
of the first marriage was Ebenezer, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(II) Ebenezer Nims, son of Godfrey and 
Mary (Miller-Williams) Nims, was born in 
Deerfield, Massachusetts, March 14, 1686. 
He was captured at the time of the destruc- 
tion of Deerfield by the Indians, February 
29, 1704, and carried to Canada, where he 
was adopted by a squaw. While held a cap- 
tive among the Indians he married Sarah 
Hoyt, a fellow captive, who was born in 
Deerfield, May 6, 1686, and died there June 
II, 1761, daughter of David and Sarah (Wil- 



62 




^ cjLurei/yo^ ,kX »^^^^Jy(y 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGILAPHY 



liams) Ho}-t. Family tradition states that 
an Indian chief desired to marr>- Sarah Hon. 
but she refused him and married Ebenezer 
Xims. The first child of Ebenezer Xims 
was born in Canada. After their redemption 
bv Stoddard and Williams in 1714. Ebenezer 
Xims and his wife returned to Deerfield, 
where four more children were bom. Among 
these %s"as Da%-id. of further mention. 

t III ) Da\*id Xims, son of Ebenezer and 
Sarah ( Ko\t) Xims, was born in Deerfield, 
Massachusetts, March 30, 1716, and died in 
Keene, Xew Hampshire, July 21, 1803. He 
removed to Keene in 1730, and was among 
the first settlers of that town. He was 
granted land for his courage in undertaking 
the enterprise of settling in this territor}-, 
and was the historian of the original pro- 
prietors of Upper Ashuelot. as the place was 
then called. He was chosen the first town 
clerk and the first town treasurer of Keene 
at the first town meeting held May 2, 1753, 
and held some office in the town nearly even.- 
year until 1776. A quaint portrait of him, 
as he looked upon the street, made by Jere- 
miah Stiles, now hangs in the Cit\- HaU. He 
married. June 20, 1742, Abigail Hawks, who 
was bom in Deerfield, Massachusetts, Oc- 
tober 17, 1719. and died in Sulli\-an at the 
home of her son, Zadok, July 13, 1799. 
daughter of Ebenezer and Abigail (Wells) 
Hawks. They were the parents of ten chil- 
dren : Da-\-id, of further mention ; Asabel, 
Sarah, Asabel (2), bom October 11, 1749, 
who was killed in the battle of Bunker Hill, 
June 17, 1775; Eliakim. Zadok, Alpheus, 
Abigail, Ruth, and Abigail. 

(IV) Da\-id Xims, son of David and 
Abigail (Hawks) Xims, was born in Keene, 
Xew Hampshire. October 29, 1742, and died 
in Roxbury, Xew Hampshire, August 30. 
1826. He lived in Roxbun*- on an estate of 
104 acres which had been granted to him for 
promoting the settlement of Keene, and 
which was included within the limits of 
Keene until the incorporation of Roxbury-. 
His ten children were born on this place 
while it was still in Keene. He married, 



January- i, 1768, in Lancaster, Massachu- 
setts, Jemima Carter, who was born in Lan- 
caster, Massachusetts, September 14, 1747, 
and died in Roxbun.-, Massachusetts. Janu- 
ary.' 29. 1832, daughter of Samuel and 
Jemima (Houghton) Carter. Their chil- 
dren were : David, of further mention ; Abi- 
gail, Mathew, Roxanna. Sarah, Asabel, Lucy, 
Roswell. Alpheus. Xahum. 

CV) David Xims, son of David and 
Jemima f Carter) Xims, was bom in Keene, 
Xew Hampshire, January- 16, 1768. and died 
in Roxbur\% Xew Hampshire. June 13. 1816. 
He was engaged in farming, and lived at the 
northern end of the old Roxbur>- homestead. 
He married, June 16, 1796, Abigail Carter, 
who was born in Lancaster. Massachusetts, 
June 30. 1776. and died in Roxbun*-, Massa- 
chusetts, December 5. 1855. daughter of 
Samuel, Jr.. and Charity (Van Xostrand) 
Carter. She married (second). September 
10, 1855, Ebenezer Herrick. Children of 
Darid and Abigail (Carter) Xims were: 
Fanny, Henr\-. Xahum. Seth. of further 
mention; Abigail. Charit>-. Xancy. Darid. 

(VI) Seth Xims, son of David and Abi- 
gail ('Carter) Xims. ^N-as born in Keene. Xew 
Hampshire. August 27, 1803. and died Oc- 
tober 25, 1897. in his ninet\--fifth year. He 
was engaged in agricultural activities, and 
lived first upon the old Frost Farm, once 
owned by his \s-ife's father, and which he 
purchased of the Frosts in 1837, the year of 
his marriage. In 1873 ^^ purchased of the 
heirs of Fred B. Xims the house which the 
latter had built at the Sulli\-an Four Comers, 
and there he lived to the time of his death in 
1897, at which time he was the oldest resi- 
dent of the town. He married (first), Feb- 
ruani- 14, 1837, Maria Frost, who was born 
in Sullivan. Xew Hampshire. Xovember 23, 
1808. and died October 14. 1865. daughter 
of Elijah and Elizabeth < Farrar) Frost. He 
married (second). December 29, 1869, Mrs. 
Hannah (Hunt-Osgood). Dodge, who was 
born in Stoddard. Xew Hampshire. October 
8. 1820, and died in Marlboro, Massachu- 
setts, May 20, 19CX), daughter of Timothy 



63 



EN'CVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



and Mary (Kendrick) Hunt, and widow of 
Nathaniel Orlamlo Osgood, hut later widow 
of John DtKipe, Esq., of Bcnninf::ton, Ver- 
mont. Children of Scth and Maria (Frost) 
Nims were: Edward Beecher, of further 
mention; Ellen Elizahcth, who was horn De- 
cenilK'r JO, 1839, and died June 20, 1923, 
married Henry E. Rawson ; Augustus Frost 
(see following sketch). 

(VH) Dr. Edward Beecher Xinis, son of 
Seth and Maria (Frost) Nims, was born in 
Sullivan, New Hampshire, April 20, 1838, 
and after receiving a careful education in the 
local schools entered Williams College, from 
which he was graduated in 1862. He then 
l)egan professional study in the medical de- 
partment of the University of Vermont, at 
Burlington, Vermont, and completed his 
studies there with graduation in May, 1864. 
Dr. Nims is one of four of the family who 
have lived on the homestead at Sullivan, New 
Hampshire, and who are college graduates, 
his cf)usins, the three sons of Deacon Benja- 
min Frost being the others. After gradua- 
tion he served for a time as assistant surgeon 
in the First Vermont Cavalry, United States 
\"(jluntccrs, in the Civil War, and received 
his honorable discharge from service, August 
9, 1865, holding at that time the rank of first 
lieutenant. After the close of the war he 
served as assistant physician at the Insane 
Asylum in Brattleboro, Vermont, for nearly 
three years. During this time he had made 
a ck)se study of mental diseases, and on De- 
cember 14, 1868, he accepted a position as 
assistant physician at the State Insane Asy- 
lum at Northami)ton, Massachusetts, where 
he remained until the time of his retirement 
from active professional duties. In 1885 he 
was made superintenflent of the Institution, 
and under his able and vigorous direction 
the usefulness of the Northampton Insane 
Asylum, now called Northampton State Hos- 
pital, was greatly increased. He held that 
important executive office until June i, 1897, 
when he resigned. Three years later he re- 
moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, where 
he has since lived retired. He has traveled 



extensively both in this country and abroad, 
and he is well known as one of the public- 
spirited and scholarly residents of the city. 
He is a member of the board of trustees of 
the Clark School for Deaf Mutes; a member 
of the Massachusetts Medical Society; the 
New England Physiological Society, and the 
American Psychiatric Association, composed 
of superintendents and ex-superintendents of 
asylums. He is also a member of the E. K. 
Wilcox Post, Grand Army of the Republic, 
which organization he served as surgeon for 
a number of years. He is a member of the 
Park Congregational Church. 

On September 5, 1867, Dr. Edward 
Beecher Nims married (first) Elizabeth 
Electa De Lavo, of Ticonderoga, New York, 
who was born December 24, 1836, and died 
in Northampton, Massachusetts, May 15, 
1895, daughter of Asa Paltee and Pamilia 
(Rogers) De Lavo. Dr. Nims married 
(second), June 23, 1897, Inez Mahalah 
Field, who was born at Hawley, Massachu- 
setts, February 5, 1861, daughter of Elijah 
and Martha Williams (Manton) Field. To 
the first marriage one child, Edward Earl 
Nims, was born in Northampton, Massachu- 
setts, July 20, 1870, and died July 25, 1877. 
Children of the second marriage are : Helen 
Manton Nims, born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, April 24, 1 901 ; and Edith Nims, 
born in Springfield, Massachusetts, June 2, 
1905. 



NIMS, Brainerd Drake 

Well known in the wholesale and retail 
lumber trade is Brainerd Drake Nims, who, 
after an extended association both with other 
firms and as a partner in a lumber concern, 
has established a business of his own, under 
the name of B. D. Nims, and engaged in the 
wholesale and retail lumber trade in West 
Springfield, 

(VII) Augustus Frost Nims, son of Seth 
and Maria (Frost) Nims (see preceding 
sketch) was born in Sullivan, New Hamp- 
shire, April 9, 1843, ^"d died in Sullivan, 
]\Iarch 25, 1897. He received a practical 



64 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



education in the public schools, and then en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. At the time 
of his first marriage he settled with his 
father-in-law, Amos Ward well, Jr., upon the 
farm which is now owned by the IMarstons. 
In 1877 he purchased the farm upon which 
he lived during the remainder of his life. 
He was highly esteemed in Sullivan and 
vicinity, and in 1895 w^as chosen a deacon of 
the First Congregational Church of that 
town, which office he held to the time of his 
death. He married (first), September 23, 
1868, Estelle Adeline Corliss Wardwell, who 
was born in Sullivan, New Hampshire, July 
21, 1847, and died March 25, 1870, daughter 
of Amos, Jr., and Adeline (Mason) Ward- 
well. He married (second), August 29, 
1876, Sarah Marion Drake, who was born 
in Garland, Maine, July 22, 1845, and died 
in Keene, New Hampshire, December 16, 
1897, having survived her husband about 
nine months. She was a daughter of Rev. 
Samuel Stillman Drake and Priscilla (Bras- 
tow) Drake. (See Drake XVI.) To the 
second marriage one child was born, Brainerd 
Drake, of further mention. 

(VIII) Brainerd Drake Nims, son of 
Augustus Frost and Sarah Marion (Drake) 
Nims, was born in Sullivan, New Hamp- 
shire, September 12, 1881. After receiving 
his early and preparatory education in the 
public schools of Sullivan and in the High 
School of Keene, New Hampshire, he ma- 
triculated in the University of Pennsylvania, 
where he continued his studies for a period 
of two years. Upon the completion of his 
college course he found a position as purser 
on a steamboat running from Boston to 
Kennebec River points, where he continued 
for some time. In 1897 he removed to 
Springfield and associated himself with the 
Annable Lumber Company, of which he was 
later made vice-president. He devoted his 
time and energy to the advancement of the 
interests of the concern until 19 13. when he 
sold out his interest and became identified 
with the Fletcher Lumber Company of East 
Springfield, which connection he maintained 



until 1916. In that year he decided to en- 
gage in the lumber business for himself, and 
under the name of B. D. Nims established 
an extensive plant in West Springfield. He 
conducts both a wholesale and retail business 
and does a large local lousiness. His years 
of experience on the Kennel^ec River gave 
him a w'ide experience in dealing with men 
and in the understanding of human nature, 
and his later business experience well fitted 
him to conduct a lumber business of his own. 
His patronage has been rapidly growing since 
1916, and the concern is already one of the 
well-known and thoroughly established lum- 
ber concerns of the State. Mr. Nims is a 
member of the Commercial Travelers' Asso- 
ciation, and he is also an active member of 
the Brotherhood of Hope Congregational 
Church. He holds in a high degree the 
esteem of his many associates, both in the 
business world and in civic and commercial 
circles, a regard which he has won not alone 
because of his ability but because of his 
sterling qualities of character, and of his 
pleasing personal qualities. 

On June 6, 1905. Brainerd Drake Nims 
married Mary Josephine Aldrich, who was 
born in Keene, New Hampshire, March 20, 
1881, daughter of Herbert Cyril and Clara 
Josephine (Cook) Aldrich, and they are the 
parents of three children : Priscilla Marion, 
who was born in Keene, New Hampshire, 
December 26, 1906; Brainerd Aldrich, who 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, Jan- 
uary 27, 1909; and Edward Drake Nims, 
who was born in Springfield, May 21, 1920. 

(The Drake Line) 

The Drake family was established in 
County Devon, England, before the Norman 
Conquest in 1066, and its members are re- 
corded in six places in the Domesday book 
as being owners of land. The tradition is 
that the family in Devon has descended from 
Draco or Drago, who took possession of an 
old Norman encampment in what is now 
Musbury, County Devon, soon after the con- 
quest of Wessex by the Saxons. The home 



65 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of the family at Miisl)ury came to be known 
as Mount Drake, where there was a fortified 
house before the erection of Ashe, the an- 
cient seat of the family. This came into the 
Drake family throuj,'h the marriage of the 
first John Drake, mentioned below, and re- 
mained in their possession about four hun- 
dred years. 

(I) John Drake, Esq., of Mount Drake 
and Exmouth, County Devon, "a man of 
great estate," married in the time of Henry 
V (1413-22). Christiana Billett. daughter 
and heiress of John Billett, of Ashe. John 
Drake was engaged in shipping in Exmouth, 
an<l his son and grandson succeeded him in 
the trade. 

(II) John Drake, son of John and Chris- 
tiana (Billett) Drake, married Christiana 
Antagc, daughter and heiress of John 
Antage. 

(III) John Drake, son of John and Chris- 
tiana (Antage) Drake, married a daughter 
of John Crews, of Cruwys. 

nV) John Drake, son of John and 

(Crews) Drake, married Agnes Railway, 
daughter of John Railway, and they were the 
parents of five sons, of whom one was John, 
of further mention. 

(V) Jf)hn Drake, son of John and Agnes 
(Railway) Drake, was of Ashe, Exmouth, 
County Devon. He married Margaret Cole, 
daughter and heiress of John Cole, and their 
children were : John, of further mention ; 
John, who died young; Alice, who married 
Walter Raleigh, father of Sir Walter Ral- 
eigh ; and Gilbert. 

(VI) John Drake, son of John and Mar- 
garet (Cole) Drake, was of Mount Drake, 
Ashe and Exmouth, and served as high 
sheriff of Devon in the time of Queen Eliza- 
beth. He married, in 1535, Amye Green- 
ville, daughter of Roger Greenville, of Stow. 
Their children were: Sir liirnard, of further 
mention; Robert, of Wiscomb; Richard, of 
Esher. 

(VII) Sir Barnard Drake, knight of 
Mount Drake and /\she. was knighted Jan- 
uary 9, 1585, by Queen Elizabeth, of whom 



he was a great favorite, and "employed in 
several great ofifices at sea." He went to 
Newfoundland with a commission, also took 
many Portuguese ships, and for his deeds 
ranked as second among the most famous 
sea captains of his day. He met his death 
as a result of a wound received in action 
when he captured a large Portuguese ship 
which had long menaced the English, and 
brought her into the harbor at Dartmouth. 
He died in his house of Ashe, April 10, 
1685. He married Gertrude Fortescue, who 
was a descendant in the fifth generation of 
Sir John Fortescue, Chief Justice of the 
Rings Bench under Henry VI, and also 
Lord Chancellor, and they were the parents 
of five children : John, of further mention ; 
Hugh, Marie, Mary, Elianor. 

(VIII) John Drake, son of Sir Barnard 
and Gertrude (Fortescue) Drake, married 
Dorothy Button, daughter of William But- 
ton, and they were the parents of three chil- 
dren: Mary, who married Sir Henry Rous- 
well; Sir John; and William, of further 
mention. 

(IX) William Drake, son of John and 
Dorothy (Button) Drake, was a resident of 
Yardbury, in the Parish of Colyton. He 
married, in 1620, Margrett Westofer, daugh- 
ter and heiress of William Westofer, of 
Colyton. Their children were: John, Dor- 
othy, Eleanor, Joan, William, Elizabeth, 
Endimion, and Thomas, of further mention. 

(X) Thomas Drake, son of William and 
Margrett (W^estofer) Drake, was baptized 
in St. Andrew's Church, Colyton, County 
Devon, England, September 13, 1635. After 
the death of his parents he followed his rela- 
tive, John Drake, to Taunton, Massachusetts, 
and Windsor, Connecticut, about 1653-54, 
accompanied by his sisters, Jane and Eliza- 
beth. They had settled in Weymouth, 
Massachusetts, and took an active part in 
the affairs of the town. He served in Ring 
Philip's War, and on June 24, 1676, became 
a member of the garrison at Punckapouge. 
He married (first) Jane Holbrook, daughter 
of Thomas Holbrook; (second), March 9, 



66 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



1681, Millicent (Ford) Carver, daughter of 
William Ford and widow of John Carver. 
Children of the first marriage were : Thomas, 
John, William, Joseph, Amy, Elizabeth, and 
Benjamin, of further mention. To the sec- 
ond marriage one daughter was born. Expe- 
rience. 

(XI) Benjamin Drake, son of Thomas 
and Jane (Holbrook) Drake, was born at 
Weymouth, January 15, 1677. He was 
active in town aflfairs, serving as selectman 
of Easton for many years, and also as town 
treasurer and moderator. He married, in 
Weymouth, Massachusetts, Sarah Pool, of 
Weymouth, and they were the parents of 
nine children, of whom the third was Joseph, 
of further mention. 

(XII) Joseph Drake, of Easton, Massa- 
chusetts, son of Benjamin and Sarah (Pool) 
Drake, married Bethiah, surname unknown, 
and they were the parents of children, among 
whom was Nathan, of further mention. 

(XIII) Nathan Drake, son of Joseph and 
Bethiah Drake, died in Stoughton, Massa- 
chusetts. He married Jemima Gay, and 
among their children was Enoch, of further 
mention. 

(XIV) Enoch Drake, son of Nathan and 
Jemima (Gay) Drake, was born in Stough- 
ton, Massachusetts, December 31, 1767, and 
died May 18, 1826. He married, Novem- 
ber 14, 1791, Sarah Marion, and they were 
the parents of children, among whom was 
Rev. Samuel Stillman, of further mention. 

(XV) Rev. Samuel Stillman Drake, son 
of Enoch and Sarah (Marion) Drake, was 
born in Stoughton (now Canton), Massa- 
chusetts, July 21, 1804, and died in North 
Bernwick, Maine, November 12, 1883. He 
married, March 11, 1835, Priscilla Brastow, 
who was born in Brewer, Maine, January 
22, 1803, and died in Sullivan, New Hamp- 
shire, January 28, 1 890. They were the 
parents of five children : Samuel Otis, James 
Brainard ; Ellis Richmond, Priscilla Bras- 
tow, and Sarah ^[arion, of further mention. 

(XVI) Sarah Marion Drake, daughter of 
Rev. Samuel Stillman and Priscilla (Bras- 



tow) Drake, married Augustus Frost Nims 
(see Nims). 



GOULD, Joseph Rhodes 

Among the well-known business men of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, is Joseph R. 
Gould, president of the Springfield Bronze 
Company, which was incorporated in 1921. 
Mr. Gould comes of an old English family 
which has for centuries been prominent in 
England, tracing his ancestry from Thomas 
Gould, the line of descent being as follows : 

(I) Thomas Gould was born at Boving- 
ton, Hertfordshire, about 1455, and died 
there in 1520. He and his wife, Johan, 
were the parents of seven children : Thomas, 
Richard, of whom further; John, Alice, 
William, Henry, Joan. 

(II) Richard Gould, son of Thomas and 
Johan Gould, was born in Bovington about 
1479, ^"<J clied at Stoke, Manderville, Buck- 
shire, in 1531. He had a son Thomas, of 
whom further. 

(III) Thomas Gould, son of Richard 
Gould, was born in 1500. He had a son 
Richard, of whom further. 

(IV) Richard Gould, son of Thomas 
Gould, was born at Stoke, Manderville, about 
1530. He married Jane Weeden. a widow, 
and they were the parents of a son, Richard, 
of whom further. 

(V) Richard Golde (as he spelled the 
name), son of Richard and Jane (Weeden) 
Gould, was born about 1533. and died in 
1604. He was the father of two children : 
I. Zacheus, born about 1589. emigrated to 
New England in 1638, located first at Wey- 
mouth, Massachusetts, and later in Lynn, 
still later to Topsfield, where he died in 
1688. 2. John, of whom further. 

(VI) John Golde (or Gould), son of 
Richard Golde, married Judith, surname un- 
known, and they were the parents of a son, 
Nathan, of whom further. 

(VII) Nathan Gould, son of John and 
Judith Gould, was born in England in 1616, 
and died in 1693. He received land in 
Amesbury, Massachusetts, in 1657, and again 



(>7 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in 1667. He married, in England, Elizabeth, 
surname unkncnvn, and they were the par- 
ents of five children : Mary, Elizabeth, Sam- 
uel, of whom further; Joseph, Hannah. 

(V'HI ) Samuel Gould, son of Nathan and 
Elizaljeth Gould, was born in Amesbury, 
Massachusetts. February 3, 1668, and died 
in 1 7^6. He was a "snowshoe man" in 1708. 
He married, April 6. 1693, Sarah Rowell, 
born in Amesbury, March 3, 1674. daughter 
of Philip and Sarah (Morrill) Rowell. 
Their children were : Damaris, Nathan. Sam- 
uel, Joseph, of whom further; Judith, Han- 
nah. Elizabeth. Elihu, Sarah, Philip. 

(IX) Joseph Gould, son of Samuel and 
Sarah ( Rowell) Gould, was born in Ames- 
Imry, Massachusetts, July i, 1700, and died 
in Southampton, New Hampshire, in 1752. 
He married, June 2, 1726, Abigail Ho}t, 
born in Amesbury, Massachusetts, May 13, 
1705. daughter of Robert and Martha (Ste- 
vens) Hoyt. She survived him and married 
(second), in 1757, Thomas Pike. Their 
children were : Stevens, Joseph, Christopher, 
Gideon. Moses, Elias, of whom further ; 
John, Eljenezer, Martha, Abigail. 

(X) Elias Gould, son of Joseph and Abi- 
gail (Hoyt) Gould, was born in Newbury, 
Massachusetts, about 1737, and died in Hen- 
nikcr Cnow in New Hampshire), Novem- 
ber II, 1 81 6. With his brother Gideon he 
settled in Hopkinton, New Hampshire, 
where he resided until the beginning of the 
twentieth century, when he removed to Hen- 
niker. New Hampshire, and resided with 
his son Elias during the remainder of his 
life. He married, just before the Revolu- 
tion, in which he served as a volunteer, 
Gertrude Davis, born in Amesbury, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1745, and died December 17, 
1 83 1. She was a sister of General Aquilla 
Davis, daughter of Captain Francis Davis, 
lx)th of whom were among the early settlers 
in Werner. Children of Elias and Gertrude 
(Davis) Gould were: i. Elias, born Septem- 
ber 20, 1 77 1, died in 1776. 2. Ichalx)d. 3. 
Elias, of whom further, 4. Francis. 5. 
Gertrude. 



(XI) Elias Gould, son of Elias and Ger- 
trude (Davis) Gould, was born in Hopkin- 
ton, New Hampshire, August 18, 1779, and 
died April 24, 1845. He removed to Hen- 
niker in 1800, and engaged in the tanning 
and currying of leather, also in the manu- 
facturing of shoes. He was for many years 
librarian of the town library, that existed 
three-quarters of a century ago. He was 
very industrious, was known to be upright 
in his dealings, and was highly esteemed 
among his associates. He married, in 1800, 
Sally Hilton, of Parsonsfield, Maine, a 
woman of superior intellect, genial disposi- 
tion and endowed with those faculties which 
enabled her to make her home pleasant for 
all its inmates. She died November 5, 1867. 
Their children were: i. Lucinda. 2. Caro- 
line, married Robert Wallace. 3. Carlos 
Hilton, of whom further. 4. Clarissa, who 
married Chevey Chase. 5. Sally. 6. Gil- 
bert D. 7. Henrietta, who married Charles 
E. Frush. 

(XH) Carlos Hilton Gould, son of Elias 
and Sally (Hilton) Gould, was born in Hen- 
niker. New Hampshire. October 18, 1806, 
and died in Cincinnati, Ohio, in June, 1891. 
He attended the summer and winter schools 
of that period, and supplemented this train- 
ing with one quarter at Pembroke Academy, 
and one quarter at a select school in town. 
During part of this period he also assisted 
his father in the leather business and in 
farming. He was fond of hunting, and it 
is said of him that with the old English fowl- 
ing piece carried by his grandfather in the 
W'ar of the Revolution he would roam the 
woods in search of game. The family still 
has in its possession the old powder horn 
used by his grandfather. On a piece of 
paper in its bottom is this inscription : "New- 
bury December ye 1766, Elias Gould, his 
horn." After leaving his father's employ 
at the age of seventeen years, Carlos H. 
Gould was employed for two or three years 
in a store and in the tavern, but being in 
delicate health, as he had been from boy- 
hood, he later went to Boston, and then to 



68 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Cincinnati, where he resided, with the ex- 
ception of ten years in Clermont County, 
near Cincinnati, to the time of his death. 
Arriving at Cincinnati after a journey of 
two weeks, and among strangers, he found 
his letter of recommendation, signed by 
Judge Darling, Rev. Jacob Scales, Artimas 
Rogers, and Page Eaton, valuable to him in 
obtaining employment. For upwards of 
thirty years he was the senior partner in the 
firm of Gould, Pearce & Company, manu- 
facturers and dealers in cotton goods. 

For many years he was one of the active 
men in the business and pviblic aflfairs of 
Cincinnati. He contributed to the press ar- 
ticles upon city government, schools, manu- 
facturing, commerce, art, and was for many 
years an active worker in the various re- 
ligious and benevolent institutions of the 
city. He was president of the Cincinnati 
Union Bethel Board ; was an active worker 
on the School Board, and in the Young 
Men's Christian Association, and was presi- 
dent of the Committee of Safety, an or- 
ganization founded for the improvement of 
the city government and for the protection 
of taxpayers. He was also an inventor, and 
on April 30. 1867, he received a patent for 
an improved steam boiler, of which "The 
Scientific American," a very high authority, 
said : "It combines all the good qualities of 
the best boilers in use and is valuable in its 
combinations." He was an elder in one of 
the largest Protestant churches of the city 
for nearly a quarter of a century. 

Carlos H. Gould married (first), in 1832, 
Mrs. Malinda Dart. She died in 1856. He 
married (second), in 1859, Josephine B. 
Hall, of Wellsburg, West Virginia. To the 
first marriage one child was born, Charles 
Whitney, born in 1838. died in 1876, in Los 
Angeles, California, where he was deputy 
county clerk and auditor of the county. To 
the second marriage three children were 
born: i. Sallie Hilton, born in i860. 2. 
Mary Josephine, born in 1862. 3. Carlos 
Lincoln, of whom further. 

(XIII) Carlos Lincoln Gould, son of 



Carlos Hilton and Josephine B. (Hall) 
Gould, was born in Cincinnati. Ohio, August 
4, 1865. He received his education in the 
public schools of Cincinnati. He was as- 
sociated with his father during the early life 
of his active career, but later removed to 
New York City, where he engaged in the 
advertising business. Still later he returned 
to New England, locating in Monson. Massa- 
chusetts, where he found em[)loyment in the 
office of one of the woolen mills. His next 
connection was with the Crompton Knowles 
Company, of Worcester, Massachusetts. 
For the past twenty-four years he has been 
in the actuarial department of the Massa- 
chusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company 
of Springfield, Massachusetts. He is a mem- 
ber of the South Congregational Church of 
Springfield. Carlos L. Gould married, in 
April, 1889, Mary Rhodes, of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, daughter of Joseph H. and Mary E. 
(Abrams) Rhodes. They have one son, Jo- 
seph Rhodes, of whom further. 

(XIV) Joseph Rhodes Gould, son of 
Carlos Lincoln and Mary (Rhodes) Gould, 
was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, February 12, 
1890. After receiving his preparatory edu- 
cation in the public schools of Monson. Wor- 
cester, West Springfield, and Springfield, 
Massachusetts, he studied mechanical en- 
gineering and in that line was associated 
with the Stevens Duryea Company, in the 
manufacture of automobiles; with the Gil- 
bert & Barker Comj^any, and with the Victor 
Saw Works. In May, 1 921, he incorporated 
the Springfield Bronze Company, manufac- 
turers of castings of a very high quality, of 
which he is president. The corjxiration built 
a commodious plant in Springfield, where it 
employs many men and where it is recog- 
nized as one of the growing concerns of 
Springfield. Its product goes to all parts 
of the country. During the World War 
Mr. Gould joined the United States Navy 
and served for eleven months as merchant 
mate on a submarine chaser, cruising along 
the Atlantic Coast from Florida to Halifax. 
He received his discharge from service in 



69 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



January, 1919. Mr. Gould is a member of 
the SprinRfield Chaml)er of Commerce. He 
is also a mcml)er of the Kiwanis Club, and 
fraternally is affiliated with Mt. Orthodox 
L<xlge, Free and Accepted Masons, of West 
Springfield, and in the Scottish Rite he holds 
the thirty-second degree, and he is also a 
member of Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. His 
religious affiliation is with the South Con- 
gregational Church. 

Joseph R. Gould married, April 7, 1913, 
Lillian Jane Warriner, of Forestville, Con- 
necticut, daughter of Charles Henry and 
Lillian J. C Martin) Warriner (see War- 
riner IX), and they are the parents of one 
child, Margaret, Ijorn in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, February 17, 1915. 

(The Warriner Line) 

The word Warrener means the owner of 
a warren, or rabbit park, and the surname 
is doubtless taken from this fact. There 
were several families of the name in Eng- 
land, especially in Yorkshire. Tradition 
states that a William Warriner, about 1600, 
eloped from Lincolnshire, England, with 
Lady Clifford , daughter of Lord Howe, or 
Howard, an English admiral, and made his 
escajie into Yorkshire, where he settled. 
This same William Warriner is the one who 
later came to America, as mentioned below. 
(I) William Warriner, immigrant an- 
cestor, ai>i>cared first in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1638, and was admitted a free- 
man the same year. In violation of a law 
mafic in 1640, he sold his canoe to some one 
outsifle the plantation, and was fined. He 
received land on the second division, and 
owned a considerable part of what is now 
the heart of S|)ringficld, and his house stood 
near where the old court house now stands, 
on the north side of the First Congrega- 
tional Church, in front of Court Square. 
He married, in 1639, Joanna Scant, who 
died February 7, 1660. He married (sec- 
ond), October 2, 1661, Elizabeth Hitch- 
cock, widow of Luke Hitchcock, of Wethers- 



field, Connecticut. She married (third) 
Joseph Baldwin, of Hadley. Children born 
in Springfield: i. James, of further men- 
tion. 2. Hannah, married (first) Thomas 
Noble, (second) Deacon Medad Pomeroy. 
3. Joseph. 

(II) Deacon James Warriner, son of Wil- 
liam and Joanna (Scant) Warriner, was 
born in Springfield, November 21, 1640, 
and died there May 14, 1727. He took the 
oath of allegiance December 3, 1678. He 
was a deacon in the First Congregational 
Church. He married (first), March 31, 
1664, Elizabeth Baldwin, died April 24, 
1687, daughter of Joseph Baldwin, the first 
settler of Milford. He married (second), 
July 10, 1689, Sarah Alvord, died May 16, 
1704. He married (third) Mary Stebbins, 
widow of Benjamin Stebbins, who was her 
second husband. She died May 21, 1727. 
Children of first wife, born in Springfield : 
Samuel, James, Elizabeth, married Henry 
Burt; William, Hannah, Joseph, Samuel, 
Ebenezer, Mary. Children of the second 
wife: Sarah, married Ebenezer Thomas; 
Jonathan, John, died young; John, died 
young: Benjamin, of whom further; David. 

(HI) Benjamin Warriner, son of James 
and Sarah (Alvord) Warriner, was born 
in Springfield, Massachusetts, April 15, 
1698, and died January 22, 1764. He mar- 
ried, in October, 1726, Mercy Bartlett. 
Their children were : Benjamin, of whom 
further; Mercy', Samuel, Reuben, Anne, 
Aaron, Eunice, Jacob and Israel (twins). 

(IV) Benjamin Warriner, son of Ben- 
jamin and Mercy (Bartlett) Warriner, was 
born in Springfield, Massachusetts, Septem- 
ber 3, 1727. He was among the twenty-two 
soldiers from Wilbraham who served in the 
French War. He married, June 28, 1749, 
Persis Willard (see Willard V). Children, 
the first seven born in Springfield, the others 
in Wilbraham : Persis, Benjamin, Willard, 
of whom further ; Esther, Lydia, Bathsheba, 
Gad, Elijah, Mercy, Zadok, Phoebe. 

(V) Willard Warriner, son of Benjamin 
and Persis (Willard) Warriner, was born 



70 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in Springfield. Massachusetts, February 17, 
1753, and died in Martinsburgh, New York. 
He enlisted under Captain Enos Chapin, in 
Colonel Porter's regiment, in March, 1775, 
and served as fifer in the Revolution for one 
year. He removed from Wilbraham, Massa- 
chusetts, to Canaan, Columbia County, New 
York, in 1794, and there engaged in farm- 
ing. He married, November 27, 1779, Lois 
Stebbins Hancock, born September 11, 
1759, widow of Elijah Hancock, She died 
July 26, 1839. Children: Bathsheba, Lu- 
cinda, Jeremiah, Lois, Eunice, Rhoda, Wil- 
lard, of whom further ; Sterling. 

(VI) Willard Warriner, son of Willard 
and Lois (Stebbins-Hancock) Warriner, 
was born in Canaan, New York, October 7, 
1795, and died in Greig, New York, Decem- 
ber 9, 1 88 1. He served in the American 
Army during the War of 181 2, under Cap- 
tain A. F. Hayden. He was engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, and his religious af- 
filiation was with the Universalist Church. 
He married (first), in Norwich, New York, 
in 1813, Annie TifTany. She died May 3, 
1844. He married (second) Lydia Hill- 
man. Their children were : Jared, Henry 
Nelson, William Franklin. Lois, Mary Ann, 
Willard Sylvester, of further mention ; Al- 
burn, Mary Ann, Anna Almira, Alburn C, 
Emeline, Lorinda. 

(VII) Willard Sylvester Warriner, son 
of Willard and Annie (Tiffany) Warriner, 
was born in Martinsburgh, New York, 
February 19, 1827. He was a manufacturer 
of cattle stanchions. Both he and his wife 
were members of the Congregational Church. 
He married, April 6, 1847, Laura Jane Os- 
borne, born in Stepney, Connecticut. Octo- 
ber 29, 1828, daughter of Salmon and Annie 
Osborne. Children all born in Birmington 
(now Derby), Connecticut: i. Francis 
Almira, born May 26, 1848. 2. Catherine 
Jane, born October 14, 1852; married, No- 
vember 12, 1 88 1, Eliezer Holmes, and had 
children: Grace, deceased, and Charles, de- 
ceased. 3. Willard Fitchroy, born January 



I, 1855. 4. Charles Henry, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(VIII) Cbarles Henry Warriner, son of 
Willard Sylvester and Laura Jane (Os- 
borne) Warriner, was l)orn in Birmington 
(now Derby), Connecticut, December 20, 
1856. He married, December 25, 1888, Lil- 
lian J. Martin, anrl they were the parents 
of Lillian Jane, of whom further. 

(IX) Lillian Jane Warriner, daughter of 
Charles Henry and Lillian J. (Martin) War- 
riner, was born in Forestville, Connecticut, 
September 30, 1889. She married Joseph 
Rhodes Gould (see Gould XIV). 

(The Willard Line) 

Investigation tends to establish the origin 
of the name Willard in the old German 
duchy of Alsace or in Lorraine, its neighbor. 
In the time of William the Conqueror the 
family was fully established in England, 
and from the time of the compilation of 
Domesday Book until now, Willards have 
been residents in the counties of Sussex and 
Kent. The immediate ancestors of Simon 
Willard, the immigrant progenitor of the 
Willards of this article, resided in the south- 
westerly part of Kent in the hundred of 
Brenchley and Horsmonden. 

(I) Richard Willard was a man of sub- 
stance in the village of Horsmonden, and 
was residing there at the time of his death, 
February, 161 6 (Old Style). He was mar- 
ried three times, his last wife surviving him 
only a few days, and being buried on the 
twenty-fifth of the same month. Seven 
children survived him ; they were : Margery, 
Simon, of whom further; George, Mary, 
Richard. Elizabeth, Catherine. 

(II) Major Simon Willard, son of Rich- 
ard Willard, was born at Horsmonden, prob- 
ably in the early part of the year 1605. and 
was baptized in the church at that place, 
April 7, 1605. His mother died before he 
reached the age of four years, and when he 
was twelve years old his father and step- 
mother died. He seems to have been well 
educated, and was probably engaged in 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



active business during the years of his ma- 
■ ■•vat Ilorsnionden. lie eniharked from 
i • ;ian<l in April. 1634, in company with his 
sister Margery, and her husband, Captain 
Dolor Davis, and arrived at Boston about the 
middle of the month of May, after a short 
and very prosi)erous voyage. Six ships ar- 
rived at Boston al)out this time, and there is 
no record to show in which of these Simon 
W'illard crossed the Atlantic, Soon after 
his arrival he established himself at Cam- 
bridge. He is entitled "Merchant" by Gov- 
ernor W'inthrop in 1635. He dealt also 
extensively with the Indians of the interior, 
and engaged in the purchase and exportation 
of furs. On August 4. 1634, a tract of land 
was granted him. consisting of one hvmdred 
acres, upon which he had a dwelling house. 
This was bounded on the east by Charles 
River. In the village of Cambridge he had 
a house lot, which he sold, probably about 
1639. By trading with the Indians he had 
Ijecome acquainted with the situation of 
Musquetaquid. a place of pleasant aspect 
and easy cultivation, and to this he directed 
his attention. A grant was made by the 
General Court, September 2. 1635, of "a 
plantation of Musquetaquid * * * six myles 
of land square to belonge to it." Win- 
throp says that this grant was made "to Mr. 

Buckly (liulkeley) and (Simon Wil- 

lard), merchant, and abf)Ut 12 more fam- 
ilies," and was named Concord. Here he 
was one of the leading men of the town, 
Ijcing town clerk until 1654, and representa- 
tive fourteen years. He was chosen as- 
sistant twenty-two years, from 1654 to his 
death, and was very much employed in the 
public business of the country. As a sur- 
veyor he was celebrated. About 1652 he 
was sent as a commissioner to establish the 
northern b(mndary of Massachusetts at the 
head of the Merrimack River, and it is said 
that the letters S. \\\ which some years since 
were found ujion the P.ound Rock near Lake 
Winnepesaukee are jjrobably the initials of 
his name. 

For prominent service in the settlement of 



Lancaster he was presented with a large 
tract of land, and it is supposed that he moved 
to that town in 1659. Subsequent to his re- 
moval he acquired a strip of territory in 
Groton, now situated in the town of Ayer. 
This land has been known as the Nonas- 
coicus grant, it being adjacent to a brook 
of this name. Upon this tract he erected a 
house, probably in 1671. This house was 
attacked and burned by the Indians, March 
13, 1676. The family were absent at the 
time, warning having been given of the ap- 
proach of the Indians. The more prominent 
military service of Simon Willard as related 
to the public began when, in 1653, he was 
appointed sergeant-major of the forces of 
Middlesex County. In October, 1654, he 
was made commander-in-chief of a levy of 
a little more than three hundred footmen and 
horsemen who were sent out by the united 
colonies in an expedition against Ninigret, 
the Sachem of the Niantics, returning to 
Boston with his troops by October 24. The 
result of the expedition was the obtaining 
of a satisfactory agreement with Ninigret 
and also with the Pequod Indians. 

In the early part of King Philip's War 
he organized the Colonial troops, and one of 
his first acts in the field was the relief of the 
Brookfield garrison. Soon after he was in 
command of a considerable force sent to 
range the country about Brookfield. In this 
service he was employed from September 
20, 1675, to April 18, 1676. An old record 
states "the Major was employed about the 
country business, Settling of Garrisons in 
towns and settling of Indians at Concord 
and Chelmsford, and other business." For 
several months Major Willard was occupied 
in the various towns assisting in their de- 
fense, and soon after the return of the Nar- 
ragansett expedition at the arrival of Canon- 
chet in the Nipmuch country, the council 
ordered him to raise a large force of mounted 
men to do duty in the vicinity of Groton, 
Lancaster, and Marlboro. He returned from 
the war and went to Charlestown, where he 
died April 24, 1676. He was not an ultra- 



72 



f-^"- < m „ . 

5 THE NEW YORK 

i PUBLIC ■'J^-T'JiHyi 









• "^/cr- 



c/">y^c^. 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



religionist, and was a very useful man in 
the colony. He married (first), in Eng- 
land. Mary Sharpe, born at Horsmonden 
in 1614, daughter of Henry and Jane 
(Feylde) Sharpe. He married (second) 
Elizabeth Dunster, sister of Rev. Henry 
Dunster, of Harvard College. She died 
about a year after marriage. He married 
(third) Mary Dunster, a cousin of Eliza- 
beth Dunster. She survived her husband 
and married Deacon Noyes, of Sudbury. 
To Major Willard were born seventeen chil- 
dren, of whom nine sons and five daughters 
arrived at mature age. The children of the 
first wife were: Mary, Elizabeth, died 
young; Elizabeth. Dorothy, Josiah. Samuel, 
Sarah. Children by the third : Abovehope, 
Simon, Mary, Henry, John Daniel. Joseph, 
Benjamin, of whom further; Hannah, Jona- 
than. 

(HI) Benjamin Willard. son of Major 
Simon and Mary (Dunster) Willard, was 
born at Lancaster in 1665. He married 
Sarah Lakin. daughter of Ensign John and 
Mary Lakin. of Groton. Massachusetts, and 
among their children was Simon, of whom 
further. 

(IV) Simon Willard, son of Benjamin 
and Sarah (Lakin) Willard, was born at 
Sudbury, Massachusetts. April 2J, 1701. He 
lived successively at Grafton, Petersham, 
and Wilbraham. He was a private in Cap- 
tain Aaron Kimball's company of militia. 
Colonel Artemas Ward's regiment, who 
marched in response to the alarm of April 
IQ' 1775- He married, June 10, 1729, 
Phebe Newton, of Westborough, and had 
Persis. of whom further. 

(V) Persis Willard, daughter of Simon 
and Phebe (Newton) Willard, was born at 
Grafton. March 12. 1729-30. and married, 
June 28, 1749, Benjamin Warriner (see 
Warriner IV). 



WOOD, Fred Luther 

With Fred Luther Wood as purchasing 
agent the United States Envelope Company 
of Springfield is receiving the benefit of a 



half century of experience obtained in as- 
sociation with that concern and with its 
predecessor, the Morgan Envelope Company. 

(I) Mr. Wood is a descendant of Dr. 
Ebenezer Wood (some records say Dr. 
David Wood) of Easthampton, Massachu- 
setts, who was a surgeon in the Revolution- 
ary Army, and died at West Point, New 
York, while in the service. 

(II) Dr. David Wood, one of the seven 
children of Dr. Ebenezer Wood, was lx)rn 
in Westhampton. Massachusetts, and died in 
Holyoke, Massachusetts. He was a farmer 
by occupation, and also served in the Revo- 
lution as a surgeon. He was buried in 
Washington, D. C, and the gun he carried 
is still cherished in the family of his grand- 
son, John Boyd Wood. Dr. David Wood 
married Princess Dank; their son, Russell 
Wood, of whom further, was grandfather 
of Fred Luther Wood. 

(III) Russell Wood, son of Dr. David 
and Princess (Dank) Wood, was born in 
West Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1802, 
and died in Holyoke, Massachusetts. Octo- 
ber 16, 1872. He married Eunice Boyd, 
who was born in 1798, and died October 3. 
1867, daughter of William and Margery 
(Taylor) Boyd. William Boyd, father of 
Mrs. Wood, was born in Cambridge. Massa- 
chusetts, March 15, 1760, and died in June, 
1839. He was a resident of Springfield. 
He married, in January. 1777, Margery 
Taylor, who was born in 1758, and died in 
1833. Their children: Margery. Amos. 
Huldah. Betsey. Reuben. Elisha. Eunice, 
who married Russell Wood ; Julia. John, and 
Sabra. Among the children of Russell and 
Eunice (Boyd) Wood was Amos Boyd, of 
whom further, 

(IV) Amos Boyd Wood, son of Russell 
and Eunice (Boyd) Wood, was born in Rock 
Vallev. Holyoke, Massachusetts, in 1829, and 
died in Springfield. Massachusetts. Febru- 
ary 9, 1902. He enlisted for service in the 
Civil War as a meml>er of Company A. 
46th Massachusetts Regiment, in 1863, and 
served for nine months, taking part in the 



73 



EN'CVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



operations about Newburn. North Carolina. 
He was a painter by trade and for a time 
was employed in the United States Armory 
at Sprinijfield. In later years, however, he 
was identified with the Metropolitan Police 
Service at Forest Park. He was a member 
of the Grand Army of the Republic and of 
the Peakxly Guards, and was an attendant 
of the Memorial Church. Amos Boyd mar- 
ried Clarissa Eliza Pierce, of Belchertown, 
Massachusetts, who was born in 1833, and 
died in Springfield, January 24, 1905, daugh- 
ter of Luther and Mary Ann (Ashley) 
Pierce, She was a descendant of Thomas 
Pierce, who came from England to Amer- 
ica in 1633. tracing descent through his 
son, .Sergeant Thomas Pierce; his son, En- 
sign John Pierce ; his son, Ebenezer Pierce ; 
his son, Ebenezer Pierce, Jr. ; his son, John 
Pierce, who married Lucy Snow ; their son, 
Luther Pierce, who married Clarissa Reed ; 
their son, Luther Pierce, who married Mary 
Ann Ashley, and became the father of 
Qarissa Eliza Pierce, who married Amos 
Boyd W^ood. Children of Amos Boyd and 
Oarissa Eliza (Pierce) Wood were: i. Fred 
Luther, of whom further. 2. Minnie, who 
married John H. Vandewater. 3. Mabel 
Clara. 

(V) Fred Luther Wood, son of Amos 
Boyd and Clarissa Eliza (Pierce) Wood, 
was lx)rn in Springfield, Massachusetts, Oc- 
tober 8, 1859. Here he received a good 
practical education in the public schools. 
He l)egan his active career in the employ of 
Carter & Cooley, proprietors of what was 
then a large dry goods store, and this con- 
nection he maintained for several years. He 
later severed this connection in order to ac- 
cept a position as buyer in the glove depart- 
ment of Smith & Murray, another large 
house, with whom he remained for two 
years. In 1879 he became associated with 
the Morgan Envelope Company, which was 
later merged with the United States En- 
velope Company, and this connection he has 
maintained to the present time, 1925, more 
than forty-six consecutive years. Begin- 



ning as shipping clerk in 1892, he was ad- 
vanced to the position of salesman and for 
two years represented the concern on the 
road. Later he opened the Providence of- 
fice of the same concern, and still later the 
Boston office. When the latter office was 
opened the company was operating as the 
United States Envelope Company, and Mr. 
W'ood remained in the Boston office until 
1903, when he returned to Springfield, where 
he has since been located as purchasing 
agent of the United States Envelope Com- 
pany. Mr. Wood joined the Peabody 
Guards in 1879. He was promoted to ser- 
geant in 1880 and served until 1882, when 
he was mustered out. He rejoined in 1884 
and was elected sergeant and served until 
1885, when he resigned. In 1892 he became 
a charter member of Company H, Naval 
Reserve, and served as quartermaster up to 
September, 1893, when he received his dis- 
charge. He is a member of the Nayasset 
Club of Springfield, also the Automobile 
Club, and of the Purchasing Agents' Asso- 
ciation of Western Massachusetts. His re- 
ligious affiliation is wath Hope Church. 

Fred Luther Wood married, February 23, 
1881, Hattie E. ]\Iarsh, of Northampton, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Charles H. and 

(Wright) Marsh. Mr. and Mrs. Wood 

are the parents of two children: i. Ethel 
Louise, born in 1883; married, in 1905, 
Forest Alexander Yeaton, of West Spring- 
field. 2. Harold L., born in 1886; he is 
engaged in the automobile business in Chi- 
cago, Illinois ; married Clara Ireland. 



CUSHMAN, Walter Murdock 

Walter Murdock Cushman, secretary, di- 
rector, and general manager of the Somers 
Creamery of Springfield, Massachusetts, is 
a notably successful business man whose en- 
ergy and enterprise have contributed largely 
to the development of a large and growing 
concern. 

The Cushman family is an old one in 
England, and in this country dates back to 
earliest Colonial times. Robert Cushman, 



74 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the immigrant ancestor, was one of those 
who negotiated with the Virginia Company 
for permission to settle in America, having 
been delegated by the group of non-con- 
formists in Leyden, Holland, who later be- 
came the "Pilgrims" of the "Mayflower." 
The line of descent is traced as follows : 

(I) Robert Cushman, born in England in 
1580, joined the non-conformists in Leyden, 
and in 161 7 was sent by them to London, 
with John Carver, to gain from the Virginia 
Company permission to settle within their 
domains in America, and to present their 
petition for "liberty of conscience" to King 
James. In 1619 he again went to London, 
with William Brewster, later making a third 
journey, and finally, after securing a patent, 
making a fourth journey to London in 1620. 
with Carver and Martin, at which time the 
"Mayflower" and a pilot was secured. He 
sailed in her as associate-governor from 
Southampton, August 5, 1620, in company 
with the "Speedwell," but the latter, not 
proving seaworthy, returned, Mr. Cushman 
returning with those who remained, and fol- 
lowing in the next vessel, the "Fortune," 
which reached New Plymouth, November 9, 
1621. On December 12th he preached the 
first sermon in America that was printed, 
on "Sin and Danger of Self Love." He 
sailed for England the next day, but was 
captured by the French, and after being 
plundered, was detained for tvvo weeks on 
the coast. After his arrival in England, he 
continued to support the cause of the Pil- 
grims, writing and publishing an eloquent 
vindication of the Colonial enterprise and 
an appeal for the Christianization of the In- 
dians. Continuing in London as agent for 
the Colonists, he, with Edward Winslow, 
procured from Lord Sheffield a charter for 
the territory of Cape Ann. The exact date 
of Robert Cushman's death is not known, 
but there is evidence that he died in Janu- 
ary or February, 1625, and that he was then 
between forty and fifty years of age. 

(II) Thomas Cushman, son of Robert 
Cushman, and familiarlv known as Elder 



Thomas Cushman, was born in England in 
February, 1608, and was probably in the 
"Mayflower" when his father sailed for 
America, August, 1620, turning back with 
him to London in the "Speedwell." In July, 
1 62 1, he sailed with his father in the "For- 
tune," he then being a lad of fourteen years 
and his father's only son, and when his 
father returned to England a few days after 
landing, was left in the family of Governor 
Bradford. Thomas Cushman became a 
leading man in the Colony, and was ruling 
elder, succeeding Elder Brewster, for nearly 
fort\'-three years. He died December 10, 
1691, and twenty-four years after his death 
his gravestone was erected by Plymouth 
Church. It is in a beautiful locality on the 
southern brow of Burying Hill, and in full 
view of Plymouth Harbor and of the "Meet- 
ing House," in which for more than three 
score and ten years he prayed and wor- 
shipped. About 1636 he married Mary Al- 
lerton, daughter of Mary and Isaac Aller- 
ton, who came over in the "Mayflower" in 
1620, when she was about eleven years of 
age. She survived her husband for several 
years, and was the last survivor of the one 
hundred persons who came over in the "May- 
flower." Children of Elder Thomas and 
Mary (AUerton) Cushman were : Thomas 
F., Isaac, Elkanah, Eleazer, of whom fur- 
ther ; Sarah, Lydia, and Mary. 

CHI) Eleazer Cushman, son of Elder 
Thomas and Mary (Allerton) Cushman, 
was a resident of Plympton, Massachusetts. 
His children were: i. Lydia, who married 
John Waterman, of Halifax. 2. John, who 
married Joanna Pratt. 3. Moses, who mar- 
ried Mary Jackson. 4. James. 5. William, 
of whom further. 

(IV) William Cushman, son of Eleazer 
Cushman, was of Willington, Connecticut, 
and his children were: Sarah, Solomon, 
Lvdia. William, of whom further; Job, 
Ahijah, Mary, Olderton, Joshua. Benjamin, 
Joseph. 

(V) William Cushman. son of William 
Cushman, was of Stafford, Connecticut, and 



/D 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



his children were : Luke, of whom further ; 
William. John. James. Samuel, Eli. 

(VI) Luke Cushman, son of William 
Cushman, was of StaflFord, Connecticut, and 
his children were: George. Eliza, Loring, 
Minerva, Danforth, of whom further; 
Emelinc. Leverett. 

(VII) Danforth Cushman. son of Luke 
Cushman, was born in West Stafford, Con- 
necticut, and died in Plymouth. New York, 
He traveled West with an ox team in the 
early days of westward mit^ration, and there 
settled. His children were: George Potter, 
of whom further; an infant, Loring Bert, 
Almeda Adelade, Bert, Loring, Danforth 
Burr, all horn in Plymouth. 

(VIII) George Potter Cushman. son of 
Danforth Cushman. was born in Plymouth, 
New York, in 1836. and died there in 1895. 
He received more than an ordinary educa- 
tion, and in his younger days taught school 
for a time. He eventually engaged in farm- 
ing in which he was notably successful. He 
had a splendid farm of some three hundred 
and eighty acres, in Plymouth, which in- 
cluded a large apple orchard and a sap 
orchard of some eight hundred maple trees. 
He also conducted the Plymouth Cheese Fac- 
tory, and was master of the New York State 
Grange at the time of his death. He took 
an active interest in public affairs, was a 
gocKl public speaker, and as a local public 
official was efficient and faithful, serving as 
supervisor of the town and as justice of the 
I>eace. He was president of the Patrons' 
Fire Association. Chenango County, New 
York, and fraternally was affiliated with the 
Free anrl Accepted Masons. He was espe- 
cially active in the Methodist Church, of 
which he was a member, and in which he 
was suj)crintendent in the Sunday School 
for many years. 

George P. Cushman married Fannie Camp 
Holcomb. of Plymouth, and they were the 
parents ftf the following children : i. Almeda, 
deceased. 2. George Irving, of Plymouth, 
New York. 3. Ira Burt, postmaster of Bain- 
bridge, New York. 4. Walter Murdock, of 



whom further. 5. Martha, who married 
Burt Foster, of Plymouth, New York. 6. 
Mary (twin of Martha), who married Grant 
Anthony, of Brockton. 7. John Holcomb, 
a sketch of whom follows. 

(IX) Walter Murdock Cushman, son of 
George P. and Fannie Camp (Holcomb) 
Cushman, was born in Plymouth, New York, 
August 7, 1870. He received his education 
in the schools of Plymouth, New York, and 
of Norwich, New York, completing his prep- 
aration for the business of life with a course 
at Eastman's Business College, at Pough- 
keepsie, New York. He took the full course 
and received a diploma, also received the full 
degree of accountant there. For a time he 
assisted his father on the farm and in the 
creamery, but later he enlarged his experi- 
ence by going to Eastford, Connecticut, 
where he was employed in a creamery for a 
period of four years. At the end of that 
time he returned to his native town, where, 
having purchased the homestead farm, he 
engaged in agricultural pursuits for five 
years. He then returned to Connecticut, and 
locating at Bridgewater, became manager of 
the Bridgewater Hills Company's Creamery. 
This connection was maintained for two 
years, until the time of his connection with 
the Windsor Creamery Company, with 
whom he remained for a period of eight 
years. From Windsor he went to Somers, 
Connecticut, where he was made secretary 
and director in the Somers Creamery Com- 
pany, which was then the second oldest 
creamery in the State. Mr. Cushman is 
secretary, member of the board of directors, 
and general manager, while his brother, 
John H. Cushman, is city manager and di- 
rector. Many men, teams, and trucks are 
employed in the work of gathering and dis- 
tributing the milk and cream, and the num- 
ber of these is steadily increasing, as the 
business continues to grow. Mr. Cushman 
is a member of the Springfield Chamber of 
Commerce, and of Hampden Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. 

On August 20, 1894, Walter M. Cushman 



76 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



married Mary Maria Keith, of Eastford, 
Connecticut, daughter of James Merrill and 
Sarah M. (Chamberlain) Keith (see Keith 
VIII), and they are the parents of two chil- 
dren: I. Sarah Emeline, born in Plymouth, 
New York, July 12, 1898. 2. Walter Keith, 
born in Windsor, Connecticut, May 7, 1902. 

(The Keith Line) 

(I) This family traces its ancestry to Rev. 
James Keith, who was born in Scotland in 
1644, and died at West Bridgewater, Massa- 
chusetts, July 23, 1 719, aged nearly seventy- 
six years. He was educated in the Uni- 
versity of Aberdeen, and came to America 
about 1662, where he was ordained, Febru- 
ary, 1664, as minister of Bridgewater, Mas- 
sachusetts, in the Plymouth Colony, From 
that year on, for fifty-six years he labored 
and preached to the congregation of Bridge- 
water, rendering a service which won for 
him the deep love and respect and the high 
esteem of his people and of the surrounding 
country. He married (first) Susanna Ed- 
son, daughter of Deacon Samuel Edson, and 
they were the parents of nine children. He 
married (second) Mary Williams, of Taun- 
ton. Among the children of Rev. James 
Keith and Susanna (Edson) Keith was 
James, of whom further. 

(II) James Keith, eldest son of Rev. 
James and Susanna (Edson) Keith, first set- 
tled in Bridgewater, where his first eight 
children were born, but later removed to 
that part of Mendon which, in 1727, became 
a part of Uxbridge, Massachusetts, where 
his three younger children were born. He 
married Mary, surname unknown, and they 
were the parents of eleven children, among 
whom was James, of whom further. 

(III) James Keith, son of James and 
Mary Keith, was born November 6, 1696. 
He married. May 7, 1722, Comfort Thayer, 
and they were the parents of eleven children, 
among whom was Comfort, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(IV) Comfort Keith, tenth child and 
youngest son of James and Comfort 



(Thayer) Keith, was born March 26, 1743, 
in Uxbridge, Massachusetts, and died Sep- 
temljer 8, 1823, in Barre, Vermont. He was 
a private in Captain Thaddeus Read's com- 
pany. Colonel Nathan Tyler's regiment, en- 
listed July 28, 1780, and discharged August 
7, of the same year, being in service for four- 
teen days and spending three days in travel- 
ing home, the company having marched to 
Tiverton, Rhode Island, on a false alarm. 
He married (first), October 31. 1765, 
Deborah Nelson, born 1743, died 1774; 
(second), Jerusha Aldrich. There were 
four children of the first marriage and 
eleven of the second marriage. 

(V) Warren Keith, son of Comfort 
Keith, was born in Uxbridge, Massachu- 
setts, June 8, 1780, and died in Cameron, 
New York, June 3, 1839. He married 
(first) Jemima, surname unknown, born in 
Holliston, Massachusetts, ISIay 8, 1784, died 
March, 1816, and they were the parents of 

seven children. He married (second). , 

and to this marriage eight children were 
born. Among the children of the first mar- 
riage was Merrill A., of whom further. 

(VI) Merrill A. Keith, third child and 
eldest son of Warren and Jemima Keith, 
was born in Barre, Vermont, December 2t„ 
1808, and died in Eastford, Connecticut. 
September i, 1869. He was a carpenter 
by trade, but eventually engaged in the manu- 
facture of woolen goods. He was known 
as a very conscientious and upright man. and 
was highly respected by his associates. He 
married, October 3, 1831, Mary Warner 
Olney, who died January 3. 1888, and they 
were the parents of five children: James 
Merrill, of whom further ; Susan, John Steb- 
bins, Rosalia, Edward Olney. 

(VII) James Merrill Keith, eldest son of 
Merrill A. and Mary Warner (Olney) 
Keith, was born in Eastford. Connecticut, 
May 9. 1835. He married. July 9. 1857, 
Sarah M. Chamberlain, of Eastford, Con- 
necticut, and they were the parents of chil- 
dren : Warren P., Arthur Mason, Mary 
Maria, of whom further. 



77 



EN'CVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(VI in Mary Maria Keith, daughter of 
James Merrill and Sarah M. (Chamberlain) 
Cushman, was lx>rn August 20, 1877. She 
married, in Eastford. Connecticut, August 
20. i^A. Walter Murdock Cushman (see 
Cushman IX). 



CUSHMAN, John Holcomb 

John Holcomb Cushman, city manager of 
the Somer's Creamery of Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, and his brother, Walter Murdock 
Cushman, a sketch of whom precedes, who 
is secretary, director, and general manager 
of the concern, are notably successful busi- 
ness men whose energy and enterprise have 
contributed largely to this growing concern. 

(IX) John Holcomb Cushman, son of 
George P. and Fannie Camp (Holcomb) 
Cushman (see preceding sketch), was born 
in Plymouth, New York, October 14, 1873. 
He received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of the town of his birth, and then 
attended High School in Norwich, New 
York. He made special preparation for a 
business career by taking a business course 
in Utica, New York, and when that course 
of study was completed became his father's 
assistant on the farm, remaining there until 
the death of the latter. He then went to 
Eastford, Connecticut, where he became as- 
sf>ciatcd with the Eastford Creamery Asso- 
ciatiftn and for three years was engaged in 
butter-making. .Xt the end of that period 
he jiut the exi)erience he had gained to prac- 
tical use by establishing, in association with 
his brother, Ira B. Cushman, the Heathcote 
Hill Dairy, at I^rchmont, New York, where 
for ten years he conducted an extensive busi- 
ness, buying and selling milk, cream, butter, 
and eggs. After ten years of successful busi- 
ness operation, he went to Staten Island, 
New York, and was engaged in the Terra 
Cotta Works. In 1908 he came to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, as city manager of the 
Somer's Creamery, which was then a small 
concern, but which under the management 
of Walter M. Cushman, secretary, director, 
and general manager of the concern, has 



reached its present large proportions. No 
small part of the success of the concern is 
also due to the able and faithful work of 
the city manager, John H. Cushman. The 
already large business of the concern is 
steadily increasing, and there is every pros- 
pect that its present prosperity will not only 
be continued but increased. Mr. Cushman 
is a member of the First Congregational 
Church. 

On February 20, 1894, John Holcomb 
Cushman married Angle L. Stanton, of 
Smyrna, New York, daughter of Charles 
Stanton, and they are the parents of four 
children: I. Harry Stanton, born in East- 
ford, Connecticut, in 1896, is a graduate of 
the Worcester Polytechnic Institute ; served 
in the World War as a civil engineer in the 
40th Massachusetts Company with which he 
went overseas, and for thirteen months was 
engaged in civil engineering work. For a 
number of years he was associated with a 
Worcester, Massachusetts, concern doing 
construction work, and later he was engaged 
in the same line of work in the South. He 
is now on the road selling builders' supplies. 
2. Gladys Louise, born in 1898; graduate of 
Bainbridge High School and Westfield Nor- 
mal School, now teacher in Springfield. 3. 
John Kenneth, born in 1900; educated in 
Technical High School, Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts ; Agricultural College for two years 
and for the past four years in Rensselaer 
Polytechnic College. 4. Margaret, born in 
1903 ; graduate of Bainbridge High School 
and State College, Albany, class of 1924. 



LOVELACE, Walter Earle 

In 1907 Walter Earle Lovelace entered 
the employ of the New England Construc- 
tion Company in the humble capacity of a 
laborer. At the present time (1923) he is 
general manager and a member of the board 
of directors of the company, employing more 
than live hundred men in the work of build- 
ing railroad bridges. 

The name Lovelace in this country is 
closely associated with the history of Staten 



78 



.BL 


». 






LENOX \ND 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Island, New York, and with the struggle 
between the Dutch and the EngHsh for pos- 
session of New Netherland. Colonel Fran- 
cis Lovelace, who succeeded Governor 
Nicolls as governor of New York, was a 
descendant of John Lovelace, of the Manor 
of Hurly, in Berkshire, England. The lat- 
ter died in 1558, leaving a son, Richard 
Lovelace, of Hurly. Richard Lovelace had 
a son, Sir Richard (Lord Lovelace, Baron 
of Hurly), who married (first) Catherine 
Hill; (second) Margaret Dodsworth. To 
the second marriage four children were born : 
John Lovelace (second Lord Lovelace) ; 
Francis Lovelace, of further mention ; Eliza- 
beth and Martha. 

Francis Lovelace, son of Sir Richard and 
Margaret (Dodsworth) Lovelace, had a son 
William, who married a daughter of William 
King. Their son, John (fourth Lord Love- 
lace), died in New York, May 6, 1809. 
Meantime, Francis Lovelace, the son of John 
(Lord Lovelace), Baron of Hurly men- 
tioned above, had established himself on 
Staten Island and become prominent in local 
public affairs. He served as sheriff of 
Richmond County, and the names of Cap- 
tain Dudley Lovelace and Thomas Lovelace, 
said to have been brothers of Colonel Fran- 
cis Lovelace, also appear frequently in the 
records of that period. Colonel Francis 
Lovelace became governor of New York in 
1668, and on April 3, 1670, certain Indians 
joined in deeding Staten Island to Governor 
Francis Lovelace. When, July 27, 1673. a 
Dutch fleet appeared in New York Bay and 
demanded the surrender of the city, it is 
recorded that the officers breakfasted on 
Governor Lovelace's sheep and cows on 
Staten Island. Colonel Francis, no longer 
governor, was arrested for debt and his prop- 
erty confiscated, and on October ii, 1673, 
he was ordered out of New Netherland by 
the Dutch authorities. Upon the restora- 
tion of the English to power in New York, 
he was examined (March 2-9, 1675) by a 
commission appointed by the King of Eng- 
land to inquire into the circumstances of the 



surrender. Francis Lovelace died before 
January 21, 1679. Dudley Lovelace was sent 
to Europe by the Dutch authorities, and 
Thomas was ordered to leave, but he was 
wise enough to get his six months extenried 
and managed to delay his departure until 
the regain of control by the English enabled 
him again to live in peace on Staten Island. 

It was natural that descendants of these 
pioneers should scatter into New England, 
and to Connecticut where many of the name 
may still be found. Wherever members of 
this family are found, they seem to have in- 
herited much of the vigor and ability of their 
early ancestors. 

Maurice Lovelace, grandfather of Walter 
Earle Lovelace, was one of the sixteen chil- 
dren of Asa ( ?) Lovelace, of Saybrook, 
Connecticut, where he was born in 1804. 
He lived niuch of his life in Fishkill, New 
York, but died in Richmond, Massachu- 
setts, in 1869, at the age of sixty-five years. 
He was engaged in agricultural pursuits and 
for several years had charge of General Van 
Wick's estate, where, in addition to his other 
duties, he cared for a thousand head of sheep 
and many cattle. Later in life he removed 
to Richmond, Massachusetts, where his son. 
Walter A., purchased a place for him and 
there he engaged in gardening. His brother 
Asa settled in California. Maurice Love- 
lace married (first) Bash ford, who died 

in Western New York, where Maurice Love- 
lace lived as a pioneer during the early years 
of his career; he married (second) Polly 
Cargill. The children of the first marriage 
were : Walter Allen, of further mention ; and 
Steven B. Children of the second marriage : 
Catherine and Charles. The latter was an 
expert foundry man. engaged in the iron 
business in De Pere. Wisconsin. 

Walter Allen Lovelace, son of Maurice 
Lovelace, was born in Fishkill, New York, 
and died in Richmond, Massachusetts, in 
1896, at the age of seventy- four years. lie 
received his education in the public schools 
of his native district, working on the farm 
during vacations and before and after school. 



79 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



When his school training was comj)Ieted, he 
enKagcd in agricuhural activities until he was 
a!)out twenty-five years of age. I le then re- 
moved to Richmond. Massachusetts, and en- 
tered the employ of the Richmond Iron 
Works, where he was soon made superin- 
tendent of the entire plant. He had begun 
as an ordinary lal)orer. receiving two dollars 
a day, and through various promotions and 
increases, his rise to the superintendency had 
also included an increase of salary, until at 
the close of his long connection with the firm 
he was receiving forty-five hundred a year. 
During the long period of his association with 
the iron business Mr. Lovelace was identified 
with the Lanesboro Iron Works of Massa- 
chusetts, and the Fox River Iron Works 
in De Pere, Wisconsin. He frequently had 
charge of as many as six hundred men and 
was recognized as an expert in his line. He 
was. in the best sense of the word, a "self- 
made man," his short terms of school life 
aggregating but nine months in all. 
Throughout his life, however, he continued 
his reading and study, and it may be truly 
said of him that he was self-educated. He 
married Mary Emily Shaw, of Nassau, 
Rensselaer County, New York, who died in 

1904, aged seventy-six years, daughter of 
Peter Harrington and Eliza Ann (Water- 
bury) Shaw, and granddaughter of 

Shaw, who came to this country from the 
North of Irelancl. Peter H, Shaw, father 
of Mrs. Lovelace, was a friend of John 
Greenleaf Whittier. Peter H. Shaw died in 

1905, aged ninety-five years. Walter A. and 
Mary Emily (Shaw) Lovelace were the par- 
ents of one .son, Charles Peter, of further 
mention. 

Charles Peter Lovelace, son of Walter A. 
and Mary Emily (Shaw) Lovelace, was 
born in Richmond, Massachusetts, Novem- 
ber 15. 1859, and received his education in 
the public schools of Lanesboro and of 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts. When his school 
training was completed, he went to De Pere, 
Wisconsin, where he entered the employ of 
the Fox River Iron Company, as time- 



keeper and pay-master. That connection he 
maintained for a period of two years and 
then returned to Richmond, Massachusetts, 
where for six years he was engaged in gen- 
eral farming. He learned the painter's trade 
and for a time combined that occupation with 
his farming activities. Gradually, however, 
as he built up a large patronage, he gave up 
his farming activities and devoted more and 
more time to his trade. For thirty-five years 
he continued to follow the painter's trade in 
Richmond and in Keene, New Hampshire, 
and in the latter place, in 1913, he also es- 
tablished a general store which he continued 
to conduct until 1918. He sold paints and 
varnishes, also paper as well as general sup- 
plies, and built up a most successful and 
profitable business. In 1918 he became iden- 
tified with the New England Construction 
Company, the headquarters of which are lo- 
cated in Springfield, Massachusetts. While 
living in Richmond he served as a member 
of the board of assessors for twenty-five 
years and always took an active interest in 
all local public aflFairs. 

In December, 1881, Charles Peter Love- 
lace married Ellen Jeannette Smith, who was 
born in Angelica, Alleghany County, New 
York, and died February 12, 181 1, aged 
fifty-one years, daughter of William and 
Mary U. (Flint) Smith. Their children 
are : Walter Earle, of further mention ; and 
Gertrude Elizabeth, who married James H. 
Connor of Canaan, New Hampshire. 

Walter Earle Lovelace, son of Charles 
Peter and Ellen Jeannette (Smith) Love- 
lace, was born in Richmond, Berkshire 
County, Massachusetts, April 24, 1886. 
After receiving a good practical education 
in the public schools of Richmond and Pitts- 
field, he found his first employment in the 
offices of the Bush Terminal, of New York 
City, with whom he remained for a period 
of two years. In 1907 he severed his con- 
nection with the Bush Terminal Company 
and identified himself with the New Eng- 
land Construction Company of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, in the capacity of a laborer. 



80 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



From that humble position he has, during 
the sixteen years which have passed since he 
became identified with the company, worked 
his way up to the position of general man- 
ager and member of the board of directors 
of the company. The concern is engaged 
in general railroad construction work, and 
specializes in the building of railroad bridges. 
Its activities extend throughout Xew Eng- 
land, and it regularly requires the services 
of about five hundred men. Mr. Lovelace 
has won the confidence and esteem of his 
business associates in the company and of 
those who are employed under his direction. 
Fraternally he is a member of Springfield 
Lodge, Knights of P}-thias ; and he is also 
a member of the Lion Club. His religious 
affiliation is with the Memorial Church of 
Springfield. 

Walter Earle Lovelace married, on No- 
vember 24, 1909, Jessie xMice Wheeler, who 
was born in Richmond, Massachusetts, June 
5, 1886, daughter of Frank Wheeler, a na- 
tive of Canaan. New York, and of Mary 
(Stone) Wheeler. ^Mr. and Mrs. Lovelace 
are the parents of one son, Warren Earle 
Lovelace, who was born in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, June 19, 1912. 



BANGS, Samuel Allen 

For forty-three consecutive years, since 
1881, Samuel Allen Bangs has been iden- 
tified with the Massachusetts Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, first as clerk and later 
as manager of a department, which latter 
position he efficiently filled up to 1922, when 
he resigned, but is still (1924) connected 
with the company. 

(I) Mr. Bangs comes of a very old Colo- 
nial family, tracing his ancestry to Edward 
Bangs, immigrant ancestor, who was born 
in England about 1592, and came to 
Plymouth, Massachusetts, in the ship 
"Anne," which landed there in July. 1623, 
being one of the first three vessels which ar- 
rived at Plymouth, only the "Mayflower" 
and the "Fortune" preceding her. Tradition 
states that Edward Bangs came from Chi- 



chester, County Essex, England, and Colo- 
nial records show that on the year of his 
arrival he received four acres of land on the 
east side of the Eel River for a garden plot, 
and that, in 1627, upon the occasion of a di- 
vision of cows and goats, and also land, he 
received other shares of land. He was at 
this time one of the surveyors appointed to 
lay out the lots of land, his associates being 
John Howland, Francis Cook, and Joshua 
Pratt. He was active in public aflfairs, l)eing 
a freeman in 1623, an assessor in 1634-35, 
and from that time on almost continuously 
an office-holder. He served on a jury in 
1636, and in 1637-38-40 and 1641 was 
one of the great inquest or grand jury. In 
the latter year he was appointed with the 
governor and his assistants to divide the 
meadow lands, and in the following year he 
contributed one-sixteenth part of the money 
required for the building of a barque of 
forty or fifty tons to cost two hundred 
pounds. It is said that he superintended the 
building of the vessel. As a compensation 
the court at Plymouth granted him eighty 
acres of land. In 1645 he was a resident 
of Eastham, the oldest town on Cape Cod, 
and he is on record as being a freeman there 
in that year. From 1646 to 1665 he was 
town treasurer of Eastham, and for two 
years of that time served as selectman. In 
1650 and 1652 he was deputy to the Old 
Colony Court, and in the latter year was one 
of the jurors to lay out a convenient way 
between Sandwich and Plymouth. In 1657 
he was licensed as a merchant, and it is said 
that for many years he was extensively en- 
gaged in trade, though in early years he had 
learned the trade of the shipwright. 

Edward Bangs married (first) Lydia 
Hicks, daughter of Rol)ert and Mary Hicks, 
the former a native of Southwark, England, 
where he was a dealer in hides and leather, 
but who came to Plymouth in 1621 in the 
ship "Fortune." Edward Bangs married 
(second) Rebecca. He died at Eastham in 
1678. Child of the first marriage: John, 
who married, in 1660, Hannah Smalley, 



81 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



daughter of John Smallcy, of Eastham. To 
the second marriaf,'e nine cliildren were 
born: i. Captain Joshua, born at Plymouth, 
in 1637. 2. Rebecca, who married, October 
16, 1654, Captain Jonathan Sparrow. 3. 
Sarah, who married, in 1656, Captain 
Thomas Howes, of Yarmouth. 4. Captain 
Jonathan, of further mention. 5. Lydia, 
who married Benjamin Higgins. 6. Hannali, 
who married John Doane. 7. Bethia, born 
May 28, 1650. 8. Apphia (twin), born Oc- 
tol)er 16, 1651. 9. Mercy (twin), born Octo- 
ber 16, 1651. 

(II) Captain Jonathan Bangs, son of Ed- 
ward and Rebecca Bangs, was born at 
Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1 640, and died 
at Brewster, Massachusetts. November 9, 
1722. During his early life he lived at 
Eastham, where he was selectman for three 
years, and deputy to the Old Colony Court 
in 1674-76-82-83 and 1687. In 1692 he was 
representative to the General Court. He was 
also for some time treasurer of Eastham 
and captain of the military company there. 
In 1680, on a document relating to the 
boundary of certain lands lying at Sautucket 
(later Harwich) and adjacent places, and 
signed by him and others concerned, he used 
a crest which belonged to the Bangs family 
of England. He married (first), July 16, 
1664, Mary Mayo, daughter of Captain 
Samuel and Thomasine (Lumpkin) Mayo, 
who was baptized at Barnstable, February 
3, 1650, and died at Brewster, January 26, 
171 1. Captain Jonathan Bangs married 

(second) Sarah , who died in June, 

171 7, aged seventy-eight years. He married 
(third), in 1720, Ruth Young Cole, of 
ICastham. daughter of Daniel Cole, of that 
place. Children, all f)f tlic first marriage: 
Captain Edward, of further mention; Re- 
becca. Mary, Jonathan, Hannah, Tamson or 
Thomasine, Captain Samuel, Mercie, Eliza- 
beth, Sarah, and Lydia. 

(HI) Captain Edward Bangs, son of Cap- 
tain Jonathan Mary (Mayo) Bangs, was 
born September 30, 1665, at Eastham, Mas- 
sachusetts, and died May 22, 1746 at 



Sautucket, now Brewster, Massachusetts. 
He lived in Sautucket until after his 
second marriage, when he removed to East- 
ham, Massachusetts, where he continued 
to reside during the remainder of his life. 
He was very active in a business way as mer- 
chant, inn-keeper, and proprietor of a tan- 
ning business. He married (first) Ruth 
Allen. She died June 22, 1738, and he mar- 
ried (second), January 16, 1739, Mrs. Ruth 
Mayo, of Eastham, who died August 17, 
1747. Children, all of the first marriage: 
Captain Joshua, Mary, Edward, Ruth, Ebe- 
nezer; Dr. Jonathan, of further mention; 
and Rebecca. 

(IV) Dr. Jonathan Bangs, son of Cap- 
tain Edward and Ruth (Allen) Bangs, was 
born May 23, 1 707, and died December 7, 
1745. The inventory of his estate was dated 
March 7, 1745, and his widow was made 
administratrix of the estate. He married, 
January 4, 1733, Phebe (Hopkins) Bangs, 
daughter of Stephen Hopkins, and widow 
of Samuel Bangs, Jr. Their only child was 
Allen, of further mention. 

(V) Allen Bangs, son of Dr. Jonathan 
and Phebe (Hopkins-Bangs) Bangs, was 
born April 4, 1734, and died September 4, 
1793. He was a farmer, and served in the 
Revolutionary War. He married Rebecca 
Howes, who was born April 27, 1732, daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Paddock) 
Howes, and descendant of the Pilgrim, 
Thomas Howes, and died September 4, 1793. 
They were the parents of seven children : 
Joseph, Phebe, Jonathan, died young ; Jona- 
than, Zenas, of further mention ; Allen, died 
young, and Allen. 

(VI) Zenas Bangs, son of Allen and Re- 
becca (Howes) Bangs, was born May 3, 
1763. and died March 16, 1828. He was 
a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and a 
prominent man in his community. He mar- 
ried (first). May 20, 1784, Ruth Hall, who 
was born September 25, 1762, and died 
April 5, 1806; (second), October 23, 1806, 
Nabley Crosby, who was born March 9, 
1 78 1, and died November 7, 1827. The 



82 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



children of the first marriage were : a daugh- 
ter, still-born ; a son, still-born ; Rebecca, 
Allen, of further mention; Zenas, David, 
Dennis. David. Lewis, Ruth, Luke, and 
Mary H. Children of the second marriage: 
a son, Samuel L., Nabley, died young; 
Joseph, Benjamin, Sparrow H., Mark, died 
young; Nabley, and Mark. 

(VII) Allen Bangs, son of Zenas and 
Ruth (Hall) Bangs, was born in Hawley, 
Massachusetts. June 27, 1789. and died in 
Springfield, ^Massachusetts. January 24, 
1826. He came to Springfield, ]\Iassachu- 
setts. in 1807, and for a year made his home 

with Daniel , then postman in that city. 

Not long afterward he found employment in 
the L'nited States Armory, in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and there he remained until 
1817, when, in association with Joseph 
Bangs, Jr., he purchased a grist mill. They 
demolished the old mill and built a new one 
that same year, which was the best and larg- 
est mill in the county for a long time, and 
which remained standing until 1854. Allen 
Bangs was a prominent man in his com- 
munity. He served as a selectman for a 
number of years, was captain of the State 
militia for some time, and at the time of his 
death was holding town office. He was a 
man of decided character, mild, yet firm, of 
retiring disposition, upright and honest in 
his dealings, and loved and esteemed by all 
who knew him. He married, October 5, 
181 5, Mary Bangs (known as Polly Bangs). 
daughter of Joseph Bangs, and granddaugh- 
ter of Allen and Rebecca (Howe) Bangs 
(V). She was born February 28, 1790. and 
died August 13, 1878. The children of 
Allen and Mary C Bangs) Bangs were: 
I. John, of further mention. 2. Mary, born 
in 1819, died in 1854. 3. Allen, born in 
1821, died in 1853, a lawyer, who was a 
friend of the late Charles Sumner. 4. Sarah, 
born in 1823, died in 1846. 5. Elizabeth, 
born in 1825. died in 1857. 6. Ruth, born 
in 1830, died in 1849. 

(VIII) John Bangs, son of Allen and 
Mary (Bangs) Bangs, was born in Spring- 



field, Massachusetts, January 16, 18 17, and 
died in that city July 10. 18S0, having passed 
practically his entire life in the city of his 
birth. He was born in the little house on 
South Main Street, a short distance above 
Mill River bridge, but his father, Allen 
Bangs, soon after the birth of John Bangs, 
built a large white house on Main Street, 
between Broad and York streets, where the 
family lived for many years. This dwelling 
was later transformed into a business build- 
ing and occupied by Olm Brothers, florists. 
He received his early education in the public 
schools of his native district, and at an earlv 
age became associated with his father in 
the mill and grocery business, maintaining 
that connection to the time of the death of 
the father, when the son became the pro- 
prietor and the able manager of the business. 
The business continued to grow steadily, and 
for many years he conducted, in connection 
with his mill, a large flour and grain store 
on Main Street. At the time that public 
attention first began to center upon the busi- 
ness interests and the extensive water power 
of Holyoke, Massachusetts, and Mr. Bangs 
established a flouring mill there, which, after 
operating for a short time, he sold. Mr. 
Bangs was a good citizen and a highly es- 
teemed neighbor, and his death was felt as 
a severe loss by his many friends and by his 
fellow-citizens in general. The "Springfield 
Union." at the time of his death, expressed 
what was the general feeling in regard to 
his worthy life, as follows: ". . . . Though 
one of the most unassuming of men. he was 
always diligent in business and of sterling 
integrity. He took little active part in public 
aflFairs. but was strong in those manly quali- 
ties and friendly and domestic virtues that 
make a good citizen, an esteemed neighbor, 
and a beloved son, husband, and father." 
Pie was a member of the L'nitarian Church. 
John Bangs married, on January 6. 1847, 
Mary Ellery Jennison. who was born April 
10, 1823, and died November 19, 1902, 
daughter of Samuel and Mary Gould (El- 
lerv) Jennison, and a descendant of Robert 



83 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Jennison, who came to America from Eng- 
land in 1636. Her great-grandfather, on 
the maternal side, was W'ilHam Ellery, one 
of the signers of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. John and Mary E. (Jennison) 
Bangs were the parents of five children: 
I. Samuel Allen, of further mention. 2. 
Mary Jennison, born October 19, 1849, '^^^^ 
March 9, 1909; married Morrison Dwight 
Montague, and had children: Mabel, Harry 
J., and Ruth. 3. Kate, born December 24, 
1854, died September 11, 1855. 4. Elizabeth, 
bom Xoveml)er 23. 1S57. 5. Sarah Ellery, 
who was born September 13, 1866, and died 
March 17, 1872. 

(IX) Samuel Allen Bangs, son of John 
and Mary E. (Jennison) Bangs, was born 
in Springfield, Massachusetts, December 5, 
1847, and received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native city. When school 
days were over, he began his business career 
in association with his father, who was en- 
gaged in the feed and grain business, and 
that connection he maintained for several 
years. In 1881, however, he made a change, 
accepting a position as clerk in the office of 
the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance 
Company. His ability and his faithfulness 
there were recognized by promotion and he 
was made manager of a department, which 
responsible position he continued to hold un- 
til 1910, when he was relieved of some of 
the responsibility, but is still connected with 
the company ( 1924), his term of continuous 
service with the corporation now being more 
than forty-three years. 

Along with his business interests and re- 
sponsibilities, Mr. liangs finds time for social 
and civic activities and for out-of-door rec- 
reation. He is a member of the Winthrop 
Club, and of the Springfield Golf Club, and 
is found on the links playing nearly every 
nice day. His religious affiliation is with 
the South Congregational Church, of 
Springfield. 

Samuel Allen Bangs married, on October 
17. 1877, Cornelia A. Smith, born in Col- 
chester, Connecticut, but a resident of 



Springfield the most of her life. She died 
October 21, 1921. She was a daughter of 
Dwight R. Smith, who was the president of 
the Springfield Fire and Marine Insurance 
Company for many years, and of Mary L. 
Smith. 



CURTISS, Henry Tomlinson 

Among the well-known men of Spring- 
field and Ashfield is Henry T. Curtiss, who 
for the past twelve years has been con- 
nected with the business interests of the 
A. G. Spalding Company, in charge of the 
golf ball department, which does an exten- 
sive business in England, Canada, and the 
United States. 

(I) Mr. Curtiss comes of old Colonial 
stock, tracing his ancestry to Widow Eliza- 
beth Curtiss, whose name first appears on 
the Stratford (Connecticut) "Town Rec- 
ords," in a list of property owners, about 
1650, with the names of her two sons, John 
and William Curtiss. William Curtiss pro- 
ceeded to Roxbury. The coat-of-arms con- 
firmed to John Curtiss before leaving Eng- 
land is curiously described on the records 
as follows : 

Arms — Azure, a fesse dancettee between three 
ducal crowns or. 

(II) William Curtiss, son of Elizabeth 
Curtiss, was born in England in 1618, and 
came to Stratford, Connecticut, with his 
mother and his brother John. He was an 
original proprietor of Stratford, and a 
prominent man in that place. He repre- 
sented Stratford in the General Court al- 
most continuously from 1667 to 1686; was 
captain of the Train Band of Stratford; 
was appointed, in August, 1672, by the Gen- 
eral Court, to serve as one of six commis- 
sioners, with the governor, deputy-governor 
and assistants as a War Council against 
the Dutch at New York "to act as the Grand 
Committee of the Colony in establishing and 
commissionating Military Officers, in press- 
ing men, houses, ships, barques or other ves- 
sels, ammunition, provisions . . . and to 



84 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



manage and dispose of the Militia of the 
Colony in the best way and manner for our 
defense and safety." He was distinguished 
for bravery in King Philip's \Var ; appointed 
to command forces raised in Fairfield 
County, with power to appoint inferior of- 
ficers; in May, 1676, member of the Gov- 
ernor's Council. He died in Stratford, De- 
cember 31, 1702, his wife having died the 
previous year, 1701. He married (first) 

]\Iary ; (second), about 1680, Sarah, 

daughter of Mathew Mann, of Hartford, 
Connecticut. Children of the first marriage : 

Sarah, married Wells, Judith, Joshua, 

Abigail, Daniel, Elizabeth, Ebenezer, Zacha- 
riah. and Josiah, of whom further. 

(HI) Josiah Curtiss, son of William and 
Mary Curtiss, was born in Stratford, Con- 
necticut, August 30, 1662, and died in 1745. 
He took an active part in the affairs of the 
town; was appointed by the General Court 
to serve as captain of the Train Band of 
Stratford in 1714; and in 1716 was elected 
a deputy to the General Court. He was 
granted liberty to erect a saw mill, December 
29, 1725. He married (first), in July, 1692, 
Abigail Judson, daughter of Lieutenant 
Joseph and Sarah Judson, of Stratford. 
She died in 1697, and he married (second) 
Mary Beach, daughter of Benjamin and 
Mary Beach, of Stratford. Children: i. 
William, married Prudence Judson. 2. 
Abigail, married Hezekiah Hooker. 3. Anna, 
married Zachariah Booth. 4. Eunice, mar- 
ried Lieutenant Robert Wells. 5. Abraham. 
6. Josiah, married ^^lary Judson. 7. Benja- 
min, married Elizabeth Birdsey. 8. Peter, 
of whom further. 9. Mathew. 10. Mary, 
married John Patterson, ii. Mathew, mar- 
ried (first) Phebe Judson, (second) Abigail 
Thompson. 12. Charles. 13. Mehitable. 

(IV) Peter Curtiss, son of Josiah and 
Mary (Beach) Curtiss, was born April i, 
1707. He married (first), November 4, 
1728, Hester Clark, daughter of Ephraim 
and Hester Clark, of Stratford. She died 
July 6, 1744, and he married (second) Man.- 
Hawley, daughter of Henry and Mary Haw- 



ley, of Stratford. His will was probated 
August 5, 1766, at Fairfield. Children: 
Bethiah, Mehitable. EHhu, died young; 
Martha. Peter, Silas, Ezra. Henry, of whom 
further; Elijah, and Elihu. 

(V) Henry Curtiss, son of Peter and 
Mary C Hawley) Curtiss, was born in Strat- 
ford, Connecticut, June 8, 1754. He mar- 
ried, August 14, 1774, Anne Tomlinson, 
daughter of Zachariah and Amy Tomlinson, 
of Huntington, Connecticut. He died Janu- 
ary II, 1796. She died June 31, 1849, aged 
ninety-one years. Children : i. William Pix- 
lee, born May 29, 1778. 2. Sarah Ann, born 
in Huntington, Connecticut, June 2j, 1780; 
married Gideon Beardsley, ^I.D. 3. Lvdia. 
born in Huntington, May 20, 1785; married 
Elias Youngs Hawley, of Ballston. Xew 
York. 4. Lucius, born April 6, 1787. 5-6. 
Eloisa and Maria (twins), born December 
29, 1790; the former married Elisha Mills 
Ely. 7. Hyram, born June 6, 1793. 8. 
Henry Tomlinson, of whom further. 

(VI) Henry Tomlinson Curtiss, son of 
Henry and Anne (Tomlinson) Curtiss, was 
born in Huntington, Connecticut, September 
21, 1796, and died in Fairfield, Connecticut, 
July II, 1876. He married Mary E. H. 
Wheeler, who died September 15, 1886, aged 
sixty-four years, and they were the parents 
of three children: i. Julia A., born in 1842, 
died August 8, 1856. 2. Julia W., born in 
Fairfield, Connecticut. 3. Julian Wheeler, 
of whom further. 

(VII) Julian Wheeler Curtiss. son of 
Henry Tomlinson and Mary E. H. 
(Wheeler) Curtiss, was born in Fairfield, 
Connecticut, in 1857. He graduated from 
Yale College in 1879, and when his college 
course was completed, associated himself 
with the firm of A. G. Spalding & Bros., 
Inc., the well-known manufacturres and dis- 
tributors of sporting goods. They were then 
a small concern, but during the years which 
have since passed they have grown and ex- 
panded into the great concern which today 
is known all over the world, and the name 
of which, in the sporting world, stands for 



S5 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



excellence of quality and superiority of 
workmanship. With [)lants in England and 
in Canada, as well as in many other parts 
of this country, and an output which reaches 
practically every part of the civilized world, 
the A. G. Spalding name has hecome a house- 
hold word in this country and is known in 
every college and athletic association in the 
land. Mr. Curtiss started at the bottom in 
this concern antl has worked his way upward 
until today he holds the position of chief 
executive of this vast corporation. As presi- 
dent of A. G. Spalding & Bros., he has 
shown the same ability and faithfulness that 
characterized his discharge of the duties of 
less important offices and positions, and un- 
der his direction the business of the largest 
sporting goods manufactory in the world is 
still growing and expanding. They have a 
large manufacturing plant in Chicopee, Mas- 
sachusetts, and offices and representatives 
all over the country. For a time Mr. Cur- 
tiss lived in Stamford, Connecticut, but later 
permanently made his home in Greenwich, 
Connecticut, where he is one of the leading 
citizens, taking an active interest in all that 
ixrrtains to the welfare of the community. 
He is a member of the board of directors 
of the Greenwich Bank; a director of the 
Remington Typewriter Company ; a member 
of the t(nvn and .State school Ijoards; and 
represents the t(nvn at all public gatherings 
and special occasions. He is a member of 
the Delta Kapj^a Ejjsilon and of the Scroll 
and Key college societies; past president of 
the Vale Club, and while a student acted in 
the capacity of graduate adviser to the Yale 
rowing crew. His religious affiliation is with 
the Episcopal Church. 

Julian Wheeler Curtiss married Mary 
Case, of IJrooklyn. Xew York, daughter of 

Joseph and (Beardsley) Case, and they 

are the parents of four children: i. Jean 
Beardsley, who married Lee Wallace Gib- 
bons, of Xew York. 2. Mary Louise, who 
married Herl)ert H. Pease. 3. Henry Tom- 
linson. of whom further. 4. Margaret Burr, 
deceased. 



(VHI) Henry Tomh'nson Curtiss, son of 
Julian W^heeler and IMary (Case) Curtiss, 
was born in Stamford, Connecticut, April 
19, 1888. He received his preliminary edu- 
cation at "Greenwich Academy, and at the 
Westminster School at Simsbury, Connecti- 
cut, attending the latter for five years, 
1 90 1 -6. In the fall of the latter year he 
entered Yale College, from which he was 
graduated in 19 10. In that same year he 
came to Chicopee, Massachusetts, where he 
became identified with A. G. Spalding & 
Bros, as manager of their golf ball depart- 
ment, and this connection he has maintained 
to the present time. At least once each year 
he makes a trip to England and to Canada 
to attend to the interests of his department 
in those countries, and under his efficient 
management the already vast number of golf 
balls sold by A. G. Spalding & Bros, is 
steadily and rapidly increasing. The recent 
movements for the popularizing of the for- 
merly somewhat exclusive game of golf 
through the establishment of municipal links, 
the operation of golf schools and classes by 
department stores and other institutions, and 
the manufacture of moderate-priced balls 
and sticks, have resulted in a vast increase 
of the number of people who are interested 
in the game, and of the great increase of 
sale of golf balls resulting, A. G. Spalding 
& Bros. Company has received its full share. 

Mr. Curtiss owns an estate of some one 
hundred and fifty acres in Ashfield, Massa- 
chusetts, which he makes his permanent 
home. He has been of great service to the 
town of Ashfield by disposing of some of 
its abandoned farms to his friends, who have 
purchased them for summer homes and thus 
added greatly to the value of real estate in 
the town. Besides his interests in the A. G. 
Spalding & Bros. Company, Mr. Curtiss is 
a member of the board of directors of the 
Metcalf, Shaw Company, Inc., of New York 
City. His fraternal affiliations in college are 
the same as those of his father, he being a 
member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon and of 
the Society of Scroll and Key, of which he 



86 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



was manager, also of the Yale Rowing Crew 
while in college. He is a memher of the 
Episcopal Church. 

Henry T. Curtiss married, on October 23, 
1915. Esther Walden Tomlinson, of New 
York, daughter of John Canfield and Frances 
Barker (French- Adams) Tomlinson (see 
Tomlinson IX). 

(The Tomlinson Line) 

(I) Henry Tomlinson, with wife Alice 
and two or three children, came from Derby, 
in Derbyshire, England, and settled, in 1652, 
in IMilford, Connecticut, where he was 
granted a "home-lot" and followed the 
weaver's trade. About 1656 he removed with 
his family to Stratford, Connecticut, and on 
April I, 1857, purchased of Joshua Atwater 
the estate which Mr. Atwater had bought of 
William Quenby, one of the original pro- 
prietors of the township. In 1668, in asso- 
ciation with Joseph Hawley, he purchased 
of the Indians a tract of land in Derby, Con- 
necticut, all, or a large part of his share of 
which he gave to his son Jonas. In 1674, 
with others, he purchased of the Indians at 
Weantinock, now New Milford, a township, 
his share of which he later gave to his sons. 
He was a prominent man in the town, was 
chosen in town meeting, on January 2, 1670, 
to be "ordinary helper," an office which he 
held for several years. Henry Tomlinson 
died at Stratford, Connecticut, March 16, 
1681, and his wife Alice married (second), 
in 1688, John Birdsey, Sr., who died April 
4, 1690. She died January 25, 1698, about 
ninety years of age. The coat-of-arms 
brought by Henry Tomlinson, painted in 
colors, is still preserved, and is in the pos- 
session of Mrs. Catherine (Plant) Sterling, 
of Stratford, Connecticut. 

Arms — Sable, a fesse between three ravens, 
rising, argent. 

Crest — A griffin head argent, issuant out of a 
ducal coronet or. 

Motlo — Non sibi, scd patriae. 

Children of Henry and Alice Tomlinson: 
Abraham, died young; Jonas, of whom fur- 



ther; Margaret, Mary, Tabitha, Phebe, Agur, 
Bathsheba, Abraham. 

(II) Jonas Tomlinson, son of Henry and 
Alice Tomlinson, settled on Great Hill, in 
Derby, Connecticut, about 1675, on a tract 
of land given him by his father, where he 
resided to the time of his death in 1692 or 
1693. This land was held by his descendants 
for many generations. He married Hannah 

, and their children were: Abraham, of 

whom further ; John, Isaac, Samuel. 

(III) Abraham Tomlinson, son of Jonas 
and Hannah Tomlinson, was a prominent 
citizen of Derby, Connecticut, who conducted 
a farm on Great Hill and served his commu- 
nity in various public offices. He married 

(first) Mary ; (second), July 4, 1728, 

Lois, widow of Samuel Wheeler, and widow 
of Ebenezer Riggs before marriage to Sam- 
uel Wheeler. Children : Jonah ; Agur, of 
whom further; Abraham, Ichabod, INLirtha, 
Mary. 

(IV) Agur Tomlinson, son of Abraham 
and Mary Tomlinson, is the Agur Tomlinson 
who reared and educated "Chuse," who was 
later Indian chief at Chusetown, later 
Humphreyville. and still later Seymour, Con- 
necticut. He married, December 4. 1734, 
Sarah Bowers, daughter of Rev. Nathaniel 
Bowers, of Rye and of Greenwich, New 
York, and of Newark, New Jersey, and died 
February 4, 1800, aged eighty-seven years. 
Children : Nathaniel ; Joseph, of whom fur- 
ther; Webb, David, Abraham, Sarah, mar- 
ried Farmer ; and Hannah, married 

Freegift Flawkins. 

rV) Joseph Tomlinson, son of Agur and 
Sarah (Bowers) Tomlinson, was a promi- 
nent and wealthy gentleman, noted for his 
benevolence. He offered each of his four 
sons a college education, which offer was 
accepted by David and Daniel, Agur com- 
pleting two years of the course. Joseph 
Tomlinson married Bethiah Glover, of New- 
town, Connecticut, October 27, 1763. She 
died November i, 1790, in her fifty-seventh 
year, and he married (second) Jedida 
(Wakelee) Hawley, widow of Jeremiah 



87 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Hawley, of Brookfield. Children : i. Joseph, 
born in 1764, 2. David, of whom further. 
3. Daniel, born Octoljer 17, 1776. 4. Agur, 
born Dccemljcr 20, 1778. 

(VI) David Tomhnson, A. M.. M. D., son 
of Joseph and Bethiah (Glover) Tomlinson, 
was born at I^rby, Connecticut, in August, 
1772. He received his education in the class- 
ical defiartment of Williams College, grad- 
uating in 1798 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. He then studied medicine and 
surgery under the celebrated Dr. Wheeler, 
of Red Hcok. Dutchess County, New York, 
and was licensed, November 24, 1802, by the 
Connecticut State Medical Society, of which 
Dr. James Potter was president. He began 
practice at Rhinebeck, Xew York, and rose 
rapidly, including among his patients such 
noted men as Chancellor Livingston and 
General John Armstrong. He was for many 
years president of the Dutchess County Med- 
ical Society, an office which is filled only by 
physicians of eminence. In 1812 he was 
made surgeon to the 2d Regiment, which 
service he continued to render for years, and 
in 18 1 9 he was elected to represent Dutchess 
County in the State Assembly. In 1825 he 
went to Xew York City in order that his 
children might receive better educational ad- 
vantages, and there he rose to notable emi- 
nence, ranking as one of the ablest and most 
successful physicians in the city. 

David Tomlinson married, in 1 810, at 
Rhinelicck, Xew York, Cornelia Adams, 
granddaughter of Chief Justice Andrew 
Adams, of Connecticut, and of Hon. John 
Canfield. Children : i. Henry Talmage, born 
in 1816. 2. Hon. Theodore Edwin, of 
whom further. 3. Cornelia L., married Har- 
vey A. Weed. 4. Maria, married Abraham 
Dayron. 5. Julia Caroline, married Rich- 
ard B. Kiml)all. 6. Ellen Adams, married 
Henry A. Warren. 

(VII) Hon. Theodore Edwin Tomlinson, 
son of David and Cornelia (Adams) Tom- 
linson, was born at Rhinebeck, Dutchess 
County, Xew York. December 25, 1817. He 
received his early education in his native city, 



and then entered the University of the City 
of Xew York, from which he w^as graduated 
in 1836 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
For the following three years he was en- 
gaged in professional study in the Law 
School of Yale College, and at the end of 
that time, in 1839, was admitted to the bar. 
Beginning practice in Xew York City, he was 
notably successful, and in 1850 was ap- 
pointed attorney to the corporation of the 
cit\' of Xew Y'ork. He became one of the 
leaders of his profession in the State and 
was an associate of Charles O'Conner, James 
T. Brady, Walter Curtis Xoyes, and David 
Graham. Politically, he was a brilliant rep- 
resentative of the old Whig Party, and from 
1850 to 1855 was a chairman of the Whig 
State Committee, and an associate of Henry 
Clay and Horace Greeley. As an orator he 
was ranked second to Henry Clay by his 
party, and after his election to the Xew York 
State Assembly in 1859, was recognized as 
the most able and brilliant debater in the tv\'o 
houses. His active political career closed 
with the dissolution of the ^^ hig Part}', but 
he continued to follow the course of public 
events with keen interest to the time of his 
death in 1888. 

In 1844, Hon. Theodore E. Tomlinson 
married Abby Esther Walden, of Xew York 
City, and they were the parents of five chil- 
dren: I. David, born October i, 1846, mar- 
ried Gertrude Jenkin. 2. Henry Talmadge, 
born January 11, 1848, died December 6, 
1871. 3. Theodore Edwin, born July 20, 
1851. 4. Esther Walden. born May 15, 1853, 
married McPherson Kennedy. 5. John Can- 
field, born December 28, 1856, of whom 
further. 

(VIII) John Canfield Tomlinson, son of 
Hon. Theodore E. and Abby Esther (Wal- 
den) Tomlinson, was graduated from the 
Xew York University in 1875 with the de- 
gree Bachelor of Arts, and from the Law 
School of the same University, from which 
he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1877, receiving later, in 1882, from the 
same university, the honorary degree of Mas- 



SB 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ter of Arts. He married (first) Frances 
Barker (French) Adams, of Bangor, Maine. 
She died, April i, 1886, and he married (sec- 
ond), July 20, 1888, Elizabeth (Crane) 
Grant, of Boston. The children of the first 
marriage were : John C, born August 8, 
1880; and Esther Walden, of whom fur- 
ther. Child of the second marriage : Daniel 
G., born May i, 1889. 

(IX) Esther Walden Tomlinson, born 
December 4, 1884, married Henry T. Cur- 
tiss (see Curtiss VIII). 



RANDALL, Charles F. 

The death of the late Charles F. Randall 
on April 15, 1923, removed from Springfield 
a citizen who had been a familiar figure in 
the community for nearly a quarter of a 
century, during a part of which time he was 
deeply interested in a patent which he had 
purchased. He then retired from active life. 

The surname Randall is a shortened form 
of the personal name Randolph, which was 
in general use before the time of the Nor- 
man Conquest (1066), and is found in the 
Domesday Book belonging to thirty-three 
different men. It was borne by three famous 
earls of Chester, England, and appears prom- 
inently in the chronicles of old England. In 
this country it has been an honorable name 
in many fields of human activity. The great- 
great-great-grandfather of Charles F. Ran- 
dall, Abraham Randall, was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War, and was one of those 
who served with the heavy artillery in the 
battle of Bunker Hill. 

Joseph Randall, father of Mr. Randall, 
was born at Jamaica Plains, now Boston, 
Massachusetts, November, 1812, and died in 
1894. After receiving a practical education 
in the local school, he became interested in 
the shoe industry, and was engaged in busi- 
ness as a shoe manufacturer throughout his 
active career. He married Mary Ann Dan- 
iels, who was born in Boston in February, 
1822, and died in 1898. Their children were : 
Maria, Joseph W., Sarah, Augusta E., John, 
Stephen, Alice Jane, Emma Ada, George W., 



Josephine R., and Charles F., of further 
mention. 

Charles F. Randall, son of Joseph and 
Mary Ann (Daniels) Randall, was born in 
North Abington, Massachusetts, in 1855. and 
died in Springfield, Massachusetts, April 15, 
1923. After attending the public schools of 
his native city, he became interested in the 
shoe manufacturing business in Abington, 
and for several years was engaged in tiiat 
industry. Later he moved to the city of 
Worcester, Massachusetts, where, for some 
years, he had a shoe store on Front Street. 
This he later disposed of, and in 1904 he 
removed to Springfield and invented an ar- 
ticle, upon which he took out a patent, which 
engaged his attention for some time. He 
then retired from active business and spent 
the remainder of his life in Springfield. He 
was very fond of horses, and while in Wor- 
cester kept a stable of thoroughbreds. He 
was well known both in Springfield and in 
Worcester, and his sudden death at the age 
of sixty-eight years caused deep regret 
among his many friends. 

Charles F. Randall married (first) Eu- 
genia Lane, and to this marriage two chil- 
dren were born: Guy F., of Milford, Con- 
necticut, who is now retired ; and Eugenia, 
who married Robert Anglin. Charles F. 
Randall married (second). May 20, 1904, 
Dr. May E. (Farnum) Lowell, of Marlow. 
New Hampshire, daughter of Heman and 
Sylvania (Lowell) Farnum, and widow of 
Clark Lowell. 

Dr. May E. (Lowell) F'arnum-Randall 
received her medical education at Boston 
University, the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, of New York City, and Morgan 
Institute, and then took a post-graduate 
course in the New York Medical College. 
Upon the completion of her course, in 1903, 
she engaged in general practice, and during 
the twenty-one years since that time has built 
up a large clientele, and has won an enviable 
reputation as a skilled and conscientious 
physician. 

The first husband of Dr. May E. (Far- 



89 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



num-l^wcll) Randall was Clark Lowell, and 
to this marriaj^e one son was born: Carl P. 
Lowell, who is a graduate of Worcester In- 
stitute of Technology, who was the head 
engineer of the Fred T. Ley Company, but 
is now head of the Worcester Construction 
Company, and is located in California. He 
married Lillian Clark, and has one child, 
Loraine Lowell, who was born November 
20, 1919. 



SULLIVAN. Frederick Louis 

An an optometrist and a successful busi- 
ness man, Frederick Louis Sullivan is well 
known in Springfield, Massachusetts, where 
during the early years of his career he was 
a skilled engraver. The manual skill and the 
keen discernment acquired during the years 
of his exj)erience as an engraver have served 
him well in the professional career of his 
later vcars. and he has made for himself a 
most excellent reputation. Mr. Sullivan is 
of Irish parentage. 

John Sullivan, grandfather of Frederick 
Ij:)uis Sullivan, was born in Ireland, where 
he was engaged in farming. After the death 
of his wife, in 1851, he came to this country 
and settled in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, 
where he was employed in the cotton mills 
to the time of his death. Plis children were : 

I. Mary, who married Boylan. 2. 

Patrick. 3. John W., of further mention, 
John William Sullivan, son of John Sulli- 
van, was born in Mallow, Ireland, in May, 
1836, and died in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
November 17, 1022. He attended school in 
Ireland, and after the death of his mother, 
when he was a lad of fifteen, came to this 
country with his father, and his brothers and 
sisters. He continued his studies in the pub- 
lic schools of Woonsocket, Rhode Island, for 
a year, and then found employment in a 
cotton mill in Woonsocket, where he re- 
mained for four years. At the end of that 
time he apprenticed him.self to his uncle, 
Michael Tracy, to learn the trade of house 
jiainting, and that line of business activity 
he continued to follow until 1863, when he 



removed to Springfield, Massachusetts. For 
a short time he found employment with T. 
M. Walker, and then he was employed for 
a year with E. W. Ryan. Later, he decided 
to make a change and went to New York 
City, but after a time he again changed his 
place of residence and of business, and went 
to Elizabeth, New Jersey. He left the latter 
place the day of President Lincoln's funeral, 
and after remaining in New York for four 
months, returned to Springfield in 1865. 
From that time to the time of his death he 
was a resident of Springfield. In 1865 he 
entered the employ of Mr. Griswold, who 
had succeeded E. W. Ryan. Early in the 
spring of 1866 he became associated with 
Manchester & Woodward, and on May i, 
of that year, he began his connection with 
Albert Hancox, who was engaged in the 
painting business, and with whom he was 
identified to the time of his retirement. He 
was made a foreman in 1887, and upon the 
death of Mr. Hancox, in 1901, he was, by 
the request of the latter, made manager of 
the business, which position he continued to 
hold to the time of his retirement from active 
life. He was an expert in his line, and dur- 
ing his long career of nearly fifty years as a 
house-painter in Springfield, he worked on 
the residences of many of the most promi- 
nent men of the city, including those of Dr, 
J. G. Holland, John Olmsted, George 
Walker, H. A. Gould, and Horace Kibbe. 
He also had charge of the painting when 
Joseph Wesson's house was built, on Fed- 
eral Street. During the half-century of his 
career as a painter in Springfield, Mr. Sulli- 
van witnessed many changes in the methods 
of his trade and also in the development of 
the city of Springfield. When he first began 
to paint houses in Springfield there were only 
about fifty painters in the entire city, and at 
the time of his retirement there were more 
than three hundred engaged in that line of 
business activity. There were only three ex- 
pressmen in Springfield, in 1863, and most 
of the trucking was done by individuals and 
by individual business concerns. For in- 



90 



^/ 












cM^<^J^M 






ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



stance, if a twenty-five-foot ladder was 
needed on the "hill," a man would take hold 
of each end and carry it up the hill, a pro- 
ceeding which would be considered quite un- 
usual in 1923. ]Mr. Sullivan always believed 
that the putty and white lead of the early 
days was greatly superior to that of the pres- 
ent time, when ready-mixed paints have sup- 
planted the "home products" used when the 
men spent two or three nights each week 
grinding colors and mixing them. He was 
one of the best known of the older painters, 
and there are few who can go so far back in 
the history of trade in Springfield as can he. 
He made hosts of friends wherever he 
worked, especially among those who desired 
only the highest grade of work, and many of 
those friendships have survived to the pres- 
ent time. The last ten years of his life were 
spent in retirement, and in the enjoyment of 
a well-earned period of leisure. John Wil- 
liam Sullivan married, in 1868, Elizabeth A. 
Gilley, who was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1843, daughter of Michael and 
Elizabeth (Olworth) Gilley. Michael Gil- 
ley was a native of Ireland, where he was 
born in 1837, and the original spelling was 
Gillis. John William and Elizabeth A. (Gil- 
ley) Sullivan were the parents of four chil- 
dren: I. Mary C, who married Henry A. 
Glover, of Utica, New York. 2. William 
J., of Spokane, Washington. 3. Frederick 
L., of further mention. 4. John A., of Glen 
Cove, Long Island, New York. 

Frederick Louis Sullivan, son of John 
William and Elizabeth A. (Gilley) Sullivan, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, Feb- 
ruary 16, 1873. After receiving a good, 
practical education in the public schools of 
Springfield, he learned the engraver's trade 
and for several years was successfully en- 
gaged in that line of business activity. After 
a time, however, he became interested in 
optometry, and finally decided to fit himself 
for that profession. He entered the Phila- 
delphia Optical College, of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated 
in 1908, and since that time he has been con- 



tinuously and successfully engaged in busi- 
ness for himself as an optometrist in Spring- 
field. He has built up a large and important 
clientele, and is one of the best-known op- 
tometrists in Springfield. He has made an 
enviable reputation for careful, scientific 
work, and his many satisfied patrons are 
steadily enlarging his practice. 

Mr. Sullivan married (first), on January 
15, 1900, Nellie G. Fay, of Rockville, Con- 
necticut. She died in 1906, and he married 
(second), January 2, 1912, Elizabeth Young 
Myers. To the first marriage one son, Fred- 
erick Fay Sullivan, was born, in Providence, 
Rhode Island, December 3, 1905, 



YOUNG, Wallace Herbert 

For more than thirty years the peoi)le of 
Worcester and those dwelling in the environs 
of that city have been supplied with ladders 
by the Young Brothers who, under the name 
of Young Brothers, Inc., are still manufac- 
turing and selling all kinds of ladders. 
Wallace Herbert Young is treasurer of that 
concern. The Young family is of English 
ancestry, tracing descent in this country from 
William Young, of Yorkshire. 

(I) William Young, emigrant ancestor of 
the branch of the Young family to which 
Wallace Herbert Young belongs, was born 
in Yorkshire, England, May 2^, 1764. 
While still a young man he came to Nova 
Scotia. He married, September 22, 1789, 
Miriam Parker, who was born March 13, 
1773, and they were the parents of a large 
family, fourteen children: i. Susannah, 
born May 29, 1791. 2. Miriam, born No- 
vember 6, 1792. 3. William, born Septem- 
ber 13, 1794. 4. Edward T., born May 22, 
1796. 5. Job, born August 31, 1798. 6. 
Silas, born May 21. 1800. 7. Maria, born 
September 28, 1803. 8. Margaret, born July 
10, 1805. 9. Hannah, born May 5, 1807. 
10. Satira, born February 22, 1809. 11. 
Caroline, born June 14, 181 1. 12. George 
F., of further mention. 13. Deborah, born 
June II, 1 81 5. 14. Thomas E., born De- 
cember 30, 181 7. 



91 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(II) George Fox Young, son of William 
and Miriam (Parker) Young, was born in 
Nova Scotia. August 2, 1813, and died in 
New Germany, Xova Scotia, December 14, 
1897. He was engaged in agricultural activi- 
ties in Xova Scotia throughout the entire 
peritxl of his active career. He married 
Caroline Durland. who was born April 6, 
1817, and died July 14, 1889, daughter of 
Daniel Durland, who came to Nova Scotia 
from Devonshire, England. George Fox and 
Caroline (Durland) Young were the parents 
of seven children: Obediah P., of further 
mention; Isaac; Sarah Ann, who married 
Silas Morton; Hannah, who married For- 
man Morton; Elwood, Daniel, Hattie, who 
married Freeman. 

(III) Oljediah Parker Young, son of 
George Fox and Caroline (Durland) 
Young, was born in New Germany, Nova 
Scotia, in 1838, and died in Worcester, Mas- 
sachusetts, in 191 6. He was engaged in 
agricultural activities in Nova Scotia during 
the summer season, and was engaged in lum- 
bering during the winter. He was also post- 
master at Lake Paul for twenty-five years, 
and took an active part in the local public 
affairs, serving as road surveyor and as mem- 
ber of the board of selectmen. He was a 
captain and drilled a company which took 
part in the Fenian raids, and for this service 
he received a pension of one hundred dollars 
frf)m the Canadian Government. He kept a 
public house or tavern and was a prominent 
man in his town, where he was highly es- 
teemed because of his general abilities and 
because of his attractive personal qualities. 
Politically he gave his support to the Liberal 
Party. His religious affiliation was with the 
Methodist Church, in which he had charge 
of the music. About ten years before his 
death he removed to Worcester, Massachu- 
setts, and in that city he lived retired to the 
time of his death. He married Anna Cash- 
man, who was born in Nova Scotia, and has 
twelve children: Harris W., Wallace H., 
George F., William E., Parker J., Cora B., 



Clara M., Frank M., Lamert, Mary A., Jud- 
son O., and Foster V. 

(IV) Wallace Herbert Young, son of 
Obediah Parker and Anna (Cashman) 
Young, was born in New Germany, Lunen- 
burg County, Nova Scotia, November 20, 
1867. When he was two years of age his 
parents removed to Kings County, and in 
the public schools of that section he received 
his education. He removed to the city of 
Worcester, Massachusetts, when he was 
twenty-five years of age, and there found 
employment with W. D. Graves, ladder 
dealer, No. 490 West Boylston Street. Four 
years later, in 1896, he and his brother, 
George F. Young, became proprietors of the 
business. During the first winter they made 
a few extension ladders as an experiment. 
This venture was so successful that by 1897 
they found it advisable to admit another 
brother, H. W. Young, into partnership. At 
this time they added another delivery wagon 
to the force for the distribution of ladders, 
and in 1898 still another brother, W. E. 
Young, was employed to assist in selling lad- 
ders. One year later W. E. Y'oung became 
a partner in the firm, which from that time 
on, for a considerable period, was known as 
Young Brothers. In 1900 the services of a 
fifth brother was secured and F. M. Y^oung 
became associated with the business. In 1906 
the firm acquired all of the property of W. D. 
Graves, and Justin O. Young, a sixth 
brother, entered the employ of the firm. The 
following year G. F. Young sold his interest 
to F. M. and J. O. Y^oung, but a year later 
George F. again became a partner. He was 
killed in a railroad accident November 3, 
1906, at Barber's Crossing, Worcester. In 
1910 F. M. Young sold his share in the busi- 
ness, which steadily grew and prospered. 
On April 7, 191 1, the concern was incor- 
porated, with W. E. Young as president; 
Wallace H. Young, treasurer ; and J. O. 
Young, assistant treasurer and manager of 
the Springfield branch, which the Young 
Brothers had been conducting since 1906; 
but in 1924 the Springfield branch was sold 



92 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



to Jiidson O. Young. The site of the pres- 
ent factory at Greendale was purchased in 
1907 and the factory erected the same year. 
In 1 91 3 the company added the coal and 
wood business to their enterprise, for which 
they secured spacious buildings and facilities, 
and a large trade has been built up in a few 
years. The concern, known as the Young 
Brothers, Inc., is one of the best known and 
one of the largest of its kind in the Wor- 
cester section of Massachusetts, and its prod- 
uct, which is the best of its kind, is sent to 
all parts of the country. Wallace Herbert 
Young is a member of the Greendale Peo- 
ple's Church. 

Mr. Young married (first), April 15, 
1900, Mrs. Lucy (Homes) Kunzelman, of 
Vermont. She died August i, 1909, and he 
married (second), September 25, 1912, 
Maud A. M. Brennan, of Lake George, 
King's County, Nova Scotia, daughter of 
William and Marcia Alice (Ward) Bren- 
nan (see Brennan line). 

Mrs. Young by her first husband had chil- 
dren : Henry P. Kunzelman, who was a 
graduate of the Worcester Polytechnic In- 
stitute, 1915; Francis J. Kunzelman, of the 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1918. Chil- 
dren of the second marriage: Benjamin 
Herbert, who died in infancy, 1913; and 
Florence Marcia, born July 21, 1914. 

(The Brennan Line) 

Patrick Brennan, grandfather of I\Irs. 
Wallace Herbert Young, was born in Kil- 
kenny, and was an aide-de-camp to a general 
in the British army, stationed in London, 
England ; and later was sent to Yorktown 
(now Toronto), Canada, then to Halifax. 
He received for his military services two 
hundred acres of land in Nova Scotia, and 
to that grant he removed and reared a family 
of children, among whom was William, of 
further mention. 

William Brennan, son of Patrick Brennan, 
was born in Nova Scotia in 1829, and re- 
ceived a good education in the schools of his 
native district. He was keenly interested in 



politics, in temperance, and other reform 
movements ; was a strong Conservative in 
politics; member of the Good Templars and 
Sons of Temperance ; a land surveyor, much 
employed in surveying the old lines of grant, 
and in placing the bounrls for one thousand 
acres of timberland in that section. He was 
regarded as the best authority on old land- 
marks ; was familiar with every lake and 
river; a veteran of the Fenian Raids, receiv- 
ing a grant for his military service and hav- 
ing an excellent stock farm ; and a member 
of the Methodist Church. He married, in 
Nova Scotia, in 1871, Marcia Alice Ward, 
daughter of Joseph L. Ward, who was born 
in Alton, Nova Scotia, September 18, 181 3, 
and of Caroline Eliza Calkin, who was born 
at Cornwallis, Nova Scotia, in 1816. The 
Calkin family has been very prominent in 
Nova Scotia, one of the family being the 
originator of the system of bookkeeping 
taught in the public schools, and the author 
of various histories and geography text- 
books; and another. J. B. Calkin, brother of 
Mrs. Young's grandmother, was author of 
a geography of the world and also served 
as an inspector of schools for several years 
in Nova Scotia, as well as serving as prin- 
cipal of the Nova Scotia Normal School, at 
Truro, for a period of thirty years. Mrs. 
Young's great-grandmother was a Burgess. 
Her family built three of the largest wooden 
vessels built in Canada, and one. named "The 
Canada." was at that time the largest on this 
side of the Atlantic. 

William Brennan and Marcia Alice 
(Ward) Brennan were the parents of ten 
children: Jessie, Maud A. M., Blanche, 
Florence. Julia, William. Joseph, deceased; 
Benjamin, deceased; Edward, and Laurie. 

Maud A. M. Brennan, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Marcia Alice (Ward) Brennan, 
married Wallace Herbert Young (q.v.), 
September 25, 1912. Mrs. Young was a 
high school teacher, and was graduated from 
Truro Normal School, Nova Scotia; Truro 
School of Science, and ^SlacDonald Insti- 
tute, Guelph, Ontario. She specialized in 



93 



E.VCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



nature study, and made a complete collection 
of ferns native to Xova Scotia; also col- 
lected a larj^e herbarium of mounted mosses, 
plants of fungous growth and flowering 
plants; studied and collected many insects of 
different orders, and showed them in dif- 
ferent stages of life history; was a deep 
student of ornithology' and could identify 
nearly all the land birds of the Maritime 
Provinces of Canada. 



YOUNG, William E. 

As president of Young Brothers, Inc., of 
Worcester, and also with an office in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, up to 1924, William E. 
Young is at the head of a manufacturing 
and distributing concern which specializes in 
the production of all kinds of ladders, jacks 
and carpenter's supplies, and conducts a 
prosi)erous coal, wood and trucking business. 

(I) William Young, emigrant ancestor of 
the branch of the Young family to which 
William E. Young belongs, was born in 
Yorkshire. England, May 27, 1764. While 
still a young man he came to Nova Scotia. 
He married, September 22, 1789, Miriam 
Parker, born March 13, 1773, and they were 
the parents of the following children: i. 
Susannah, born May 29, 1791. 2. Edward 
T., l)orn May 22, 1796. 3. Job, born Au- 
gust 31, 1798. 4. Silas, born May 21, 1800. 
5. Maria, born September 28, 1803. 6. Mar- 
garet, l>orn July 10, 1805. 7. Hannah, born 
May 5, 1807. 8. Satira, born February 22, 
1809. 9. Caroline, born June 14, 181 1. 10. 
George F., of further mention. 11. 
Deborah, born June 11, 181 5. 12. Thomas 
E., horn December 30, 181 7. 

dl) George Fox Young, son of William 
and Miriam (Parker) Young, was born in 
Nova Scotia. August 2, 181 3, and died in 
New Germany, Nova Scotia, December 14, 
1897. lie was engaged in agricultural activi- 
ties in Nova Scotia throughout the entire 
period of his active career. He married 
Caroline Durland, born April 6, 181 7, died 
July 14. 1889. daughter of Daniel Durland, 
who came to Nova Scotia from Devonshire, 



England. George Fox and Caroline (Dur- 
land) Young were the parents of seven chil- 
dren: Obediah Parker, of further mention; 
Isaac, Sarah Ann, who married Silas I\Ior- 
ton ; Hannah, who married Forman Morton ; 

Elwood, Daniel, Hattie, who married 

Freeman. 

(HI) Obediah Parker Young, son of 
George Fox and Caroline (Durland) Young, 
was born in New Germany, Nova Scotia, in 
1838, and died in Worcester, Massachusetts, 
in 1916. He was engaged in agricultural 
activities in Nova Scotia during the summer 
season, and was engaged in lumbering during 
the winter. He was also postmaster of Lake 
Paul for twenty-five years, and took an active 
part in the local public affairs, serving as 
road surveyor and as member of the Board 
of Selectmen. He kept a public house or 
tavern, and was a prominent man in his town, 
where he was highly esteemed because of his 
general abilities and because of his attractive 
personal qualities. Politically he gave his 
support to the Liberal Party. His religious 
affiliation was with the Methodist Church, in 
which he had charge of the music. About 
ten years before his death he removed to 
Worcester, Massachusetts, and in that city 
he lived retired to the time of his death. He 
married Anna Cashman, born in Nova 
Scotia, died in W^orcester in 1913. and they 
were the parents of twelve children: i. Har- 
ris, who is engaged in farming in Nova 
Scotia ; has children : Loren, Mary, George, 
Edward, Oliver, Clyde, and Nellie. 2. Wal- 
lace H. 3. George, who was killed in 
a railroad accident in Worcester, November 
3, 191 7. 4. William Edward, of further 
mention. 5. Parker John, who is engaged 
in the plumbing business in Worcester ; mar- 
ried Sophia Peterson and has two children : 
Ethel Parker and Albert Alvin. 6. Cora. 

7. Clara, who died at the age of sixteen. 

8. Frank, who is engaged in farming in Nova 
Scotia ; has children : Erma, Ruth, Dwight, 
Francis, Ella, and Joye. 9. La Mert. 10. 
Mary, who married Patrick Madden. 11. 
Judson O., a sketch of whom follows. 



94 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



12. Foster Verge, who has children: Vern 
and Ethel. 

(IV) William Edward Young, fourth 
child of Obediah Parker and Anna (Cash- 
man) Young, was born in Lake Paul, Nova 
Scotia, April 29, 1872. He attended the 
schools of his native district, and completed 
his education in the evening schools of Wor- 
cester, Massachusetts. He was nineteen 
years of age when he removed to Worcester 
from Nova Scotia, and for a time he found 
employment on a farm. Soon, however, he 
learned the carpenter's trade, which he con- 
tinued to follow for a period of eight years. 
By that time his services were needed in the 
concern of which his brothers, Wallace H. 
and George F., were developing, and at the 
age of twenty-eight he entered the employ 
of the firm of Young Brothers, engaged in 
the manufacture and sale of all kinds of lad- 
ders and carpenters' supplies. Later he be- 
came a partner in the firm, which was a co- 
partnership in the beginning, of which a full 
account is given in the biography of Wallace 
H. Young, which appears also in this work. 
When the firm was incorporated, April 7, 
191 1, under the title of Young Brothers, 
Inc., William E. Young was made president; 
Wallace H. Young, treasurer ; and J. O. 
Young was assistant treasurer and manager 
of the Springfield branch, which the brothers 
had been conducting since 1906. All these 
brothers are represented in this work. The 
Springfield branch of the business they sold 
to Judson O. Young in 1924, and that he 
has operated as an independent concern. 
Though the concern specializes in the manu- 
facture of all kinds of ladders, it also pro- 
duces settees, jacks, and carpenters' supplies, 
and in addition to the manufacture of these 
articles, carries on, in Worcester as a side 
line, an extensive coal, wood and trucking 
business. The concern has so grown and 
prospered that at the present time (1924) 
many men and teams are required to carry 
on the extensive business of manufacturing 
and distributing various articles produced by 
them. Since 1896, when Wallace H. and 



George Young took over the business of 
W. D. Graves, ladder dealer, No. 490 West 
Boylston Street, all six of the Young brothers 
have been at different times identified with 
the business. George F., who was originally 
associated with Wallace H., and who later 
retired from the business but some time 
afterward resumed his connection with the 
concern, was killed in a railroad accident, 
but the other brothers remained in the con- 
cern. William E. Young is a member of 
Social Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and the W^orcester Chamber of 
Commerce. His religious affiliation is with 
the Greendale Baptist Church of Worcester, 
which he serves as a member of the board 
of deacons. 

On November 25. 191 7, William E. Young 
married Marion E. Terrill, of Worcester, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Lewis Terrill, 
who was born in Canada, and of Carrie 
(Shumway) Terrill. 



YOUNG, Judson Obediah 

One of the well-known business men of 
Western Massachusetts is Judson Obediah 
Young, manager and owner of the J. O. 
Young Company, which was formerly the 
Springfield branch of Young Brothers. Inc., 
a concern which is engaged in the manu- 
facture of all kinds of ladders, jacks, and 
carpenters' supplies. The plant is located at 
Springfield, where a modern factory was 
erected in 1909. 

(IV) Judson Obediah Young, eleventh 
child of Obediah Parker and Anna (Cash- 
man) Young, was born in Lake Paul. Nova 
Scotia, August 28, 1884. He received a 
good, practical education in the public schools 
of Lake Paul, and in 1900 removed to Wor- 
cester, Massachusetts, where he entered the 
employ of the Young Brothers, thus identify- 
ing himself with the business established by 
his brother, Wallace H. Young, in 1893. 
Nine vears after Judson O. became asso- 
ciated with this concern the business was 
incorporated, and at that time Judson 



95 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Obediah Young was made vice-president, 
assistant treasurer, and manager of the 
Springfield Branch. That branch had been 
established by George Young in 1903. After 
five years spent in Worcester, Judson Obe- 
diah Young removed to Springfield with his 
brother, George Young, and devoted his 
energy to the upbuilding of the Springfield 
Branch, purchasing same in 1924, now sole 
owner. Land was bought and the modern 
plant erected, in which the manufacture of 
stepladders, lawn swings, settees, staging 
brackets, and chimney brackets for carpen- 
ters' use, ladder hooks, ironing tables, wood 
eaves, troughs, etc., was begun. The business 
of the Springfield Branch has greatly ex- 
panded, and at the present time the services 
of about a dozen men are required in order 
to meet the demands of the trade. The con- 
cern keeps many teams on the road all the 
time, and both the Worcester plant and the 
Springfield Branch have won an enviable 
reputation for most excellent workmanship, 
for prompt and courteous service, and for 
sound business methods. The Young Broth- 
ers are well known throughout Western 
Massachusetts, and are all highly esteemed 
among their many business associates and 
among those with whom they are brought in 
contact in other connections. Judson Obe- 
diah Young is a member of Desoto Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Springfield ; and his religious affiliation is 
with the Methodist Episcopal Church of 
Springfield. 

On May 18, 1909, Judson Obediah Young 
married Ruby Pearl Johnson, of Worcester, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Lauris Eugene 
and Lillian (Scott) Johnson, and they are 
the parents of four children: i. Elmo 
Lauris, lK)rn in Worcester, Massachusetts, 
January 22, 1910. 2. Ralph Obediah, born 
February 6, 191 1, died in July, 191 1. 3. 
Dorothy Alberta, l)orn in Hartford, Con- 
necticut, Xoveml)er 29. 191 2. 4. Bertha 
Alice, born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
June 12, 1914. 



WHITAKER GENEALOGY 

(I) Richard Whitaker was an early set- 
tler of Rehoboth, Massachusetts. He mar- 
ried, in November, 1659, Bathsheba Cooper. 
Their children were: I. Nathaniel, born Au- 
gust 16, 1661. 2. John, born September 18, 
1663. 3. Mary, born August 25. 1666. 4. 
Samuel, of whom further. 5. Rebecca, born 
March 15, 1672. 6. Mehitable, born Decem- 
ber 2";, 1674. 7. Experience, born January 
2"], 1678. 8. Noah, born January 31, 1682. 

(H) Samuel Whitaker, son of Richard 
and Bathsheba (Cooper) Whitaker, was 
born in Rehoboth, Massachusetts, May 15, 
1669. He married, May 5, 1697, Mary 
Square (probably Squire). Children: i. 
Sarah, born March 9, 1698. 2. Richard, of 
whom further. 3. Mary, born March 3, 
1700. 4. Jane, born April 8, 1703. 5. Eliza- 
beth, born April 8, 1705. 6. Rachel, born 
March 28, 1707, died 171 1. 7. Grizzell, born 
April 2, 1710. 8. Samuel, born May 2, 1712. 
9. Rachel, born July 20, 1714. 10. Ruth, 
born October, 171 7. 

(HI) Richard Whitaker, son of Samuel 
and Mar\' C Squire) Whitaker, was born in 
Rehoboth. Massachusetts, May 10, 1699. He 
married Ann, surname unknown. Children : 
I. Sarah, born September 12, 1721. 2. 
Philip, born November 16, 1723. 3. Re- 
beckah. born April 11, 1725, died 1725. 4. 
Samuel, born November 3, 1727. 5. Rich- 
ard, of whom further. 

(I\') Richard Whitaker, son of Richard 
and Ann Whitaker, was born in Rehoboth, 
Massachusetts, June 6, 1730. He married, 
July 2, 1752, Patience Bowen (one record 
says Ann Bowen). Children: i. Peter, born 
October 11, 1753. 2. Richard, born Janu- 
ary 17, 1755. 3. Abel, born March 6, 1757. 
4. Abner, born June 15, 1759. 5. Amos, of 
whom further. 6. Jesse, born April 29, 1764. 
7. Sarah, born October 6, 1766. 8. Patience, 
born February 21, 1769. 9. Samuel, born 
April 22, 1771. 10. Asa, born October 10, 
1773. II. Oliver, born January 31, 1776. 

(V) Amos Whitaker, son of Richard and 
Patience Whitaker, was born in Rehoboth, 



96 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Massachusetts, October 14, 1761, and lived 
at Rehoboth, Massachusetts. He married, 
October 9, 1788, Bethiah Allen. Children: 
I. Joseph, born June 14, 1789. 2. Betsey, 
born August 30, 1790. 3. Elisha Allen, born 
June 4, 1792. 4. Cyril, of whom further. 
5, Polly, born November 15, 1795. 6. James 
B., born at North Providence, Rhode Island, 
July 12, 1797. 7. George, born at North 
Providence, Rhode Island, February 24, 
1799. 8. Harritta, born at Johnston, Rhode 
Island, November 21, 1801. 

(VI) Cyril Whitaker, son of Amos and 
Bethiah (Allen) Whitaker, was born in 
Rehoboth, Massachusetts, December 28, 
1793, and died in Eastford, Connecticut, 
October 7, 1874, aged eighty years, ten 
months, and seventeen days. Rehoboth, 
Massachusetts, then comprised the present 
town of Rehoboth, also Seekonk, East Provi- 
dence, Pawtucket, Attleborough, North 
Attleborough, all in Massachusetts, and Cum- 
berland, Rhode Island. Eastford was for- 
merly a part of Ashford, Connecticut. He 
was thought to have been born in Rhode 
Island. Cyril Whitaker was engaged in 
farming. He married Almira Horton, and 
had children: Henry, Levi, Cyril, Lucius, 
Amos, of whom further; Almira, who 
married Henry Manning ; Ann, who married 
Moody. 

(VII) Amos Whitaker, son of Cyril and 
Almira (Horton) Whitaker, was born in 
Ashford, Connecticut, in 1821, and died in 
Hampden, Massachusetts, November 23, 
1890. He followed farming in Eastford, 
Connecticut, in early life, and in 1862 came 
to Hampden, Massachusetts, where he did 
teaming for the mills. He also purchased 
the coal sheds in East Longmeadow and con- 
ducted a prosperous coal business until he 
retired. His religious affiliation was with 
the Baptist Church, He married twice, by 
his first wife he had a daughter Diantha. 
He married (second) Laura IMixter, at Wil- 
braham, Massachusetts, who died in 1906. 
Children of second marriage were: i. John 
F., a sketch of whom follows. 2. Emma 



Jane, married J. Edgar Abbe. 3. Mary 
Ann, married Frank Bradway. 4. Charles 
A., married Stella Cody, of Stafford, Con- 
necticut. 5. A child who died in infancy. 



WHITAKER, John Franklin 

(VIII) John Franklin Whitaker, now 
living retired in Springfield, one of the well- 
known citizens of Hampden and Springfield, 
a son of Amos and Laura (Mixter) Whit- 
aker, was born in Eastford, Connecticut, May 
12, 1854. He attended school in Eastford, 
and in Hampden, Massachusetts, and then 
continued his studies in a select school for 
a time. When he was thirteen years of age 
he drove teams for his father during the 
summer season and attended school in the 
winter. He continued with his father until 
1874, when he removed to Springfield, and 
was employed in the grain store of J. L. 
Worthy for a year. At the end of that time 
he returned to Hampden and was employed 
by his father for one year, and then pur- 
chased his father's business and conducted 
a successful teaming business between 
Hampden and Springfield for about three 
and a half years, then sold out and for one 
year was in the Ravine mill. Later he pur- 
chased the Hendrick farm, where he lived 
for two years. In 1889 he built in Elast 
Longmeadow a plant for the handling of 
grain, which he sold in 1899 to his son, 
Frank H. Whitaker. He then removed to 
Springfield and purchased the grain business 
of I. D. Viets, located at the water shops, 
which he conducted for a few years, and then 
sold to the Abbe boys. He was deputy sealer 
of weights and measures for the city for two 
years ; for five years he was associated with 
S. J. Cordner in the automobile business ; 
and still later he was employed by the 
National Equipment Company for a time. 
While a resident of East Longmeadow he 
served as selectman. He is a member of 
Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Springfield, and is a charter 
member of Charles C. Spellman Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of East Long- 



97 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



meadow. He is also a meniljer of Hampden 
Lodge. Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
in which order he has passed through all the 
chairs and which he has served as District 
Deputy Grand Master; was a member of the 
Improved Order of Red Men. in which or- 
ganization he also held all offices; and a 
member of Rebekah Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 

John Franklin Whitaker married, October 
13, 1875, Lucy Ann Beebe, born in Somers- 
ville, Connecticut, but a resident of Hamp- 
den, Massachusetts, for many years, daugh- 
ter of Andrew and Sophia M. (Stanton) 
Beebe; granddaughter of Ezra and Cyrena 
(Day) Beebe; great-granddaughter of Asa 
Beebe. who married (first) Alice Hunger- 
ford. C second) Phebe Burbegh, great-great- 
granddaughter of Jonah Beebe, who married 
Ruth Dowley. The Beebe family trace de- 
scent from John, Samuel, and James Beebe, 
who came to America in 1650 and settled in 
New London, Connecticut. Children of 
John F. and Lucy Ann (Beebe) Whitaker: 

1. Frank Henry, a sketch of whom follows. 

2. Edna, married S. S. Merrifield. 3. Laura 
Sophia, died in infancy. 4. Lewis Edwin, a 
sketch of whom follows. 5. Xewton Beebe, 
a sketch of whom follows. 



WHITAKER, Frank Henry 

In the capacity of manager, Frank Henry 
Whitaker has been taking care of the inter- 
ests of the Feeding Hills branch of the H. C. 
Puflfer Company since 19 16. 

(IX) Frank Henry Whitaker, son of John 
Franklin and Lucy Ann (Beebe) Whitaker 
(q.v.), was born in South Wilbraham (now 
Hampden), Massachusetts, October 24, 1876. 
He received his early education in the public 
schools of Hampden and East Longmeadow, 
and then attended Childs Business College 
for two terms. When his business training 
was completed, he began his business career 
in the employ of his father, who was engaged 
in the grain and coal business in East Long- 
meadow. In May, 1899, he purchased the 
coal and grain business conducted bv his 



father in East Longmeadow, and carried it 
on alone at the same stand until September, 
1913, when he sold out the business to his 
brother. Lewis E. Whitaker. Since 1916 
Mr. Whitaker has been associated with the 
H. C. PufTer Company, grain dealers, as 
manager of their branch store at Feeding 
Hills. In addition to the management of his 
business interests, Mr. Whitaker found time 
for the responsibilities of citizenship and for 
taking a share of the official burdens of the 
locality, serving as water commissioner for 
three years in East Longmeadow and as town 
auditor for three years. Mr. Whitaker is a 
member of Hampden Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, also the Daughters 
of Rebekah ; and member of the Improved 
Order of Red Men. His religious affiliation 
is with Park ^Memorial Baptist Church, of 
which he is deacon at the present time 
(1924). 

Frank Henry Whitaker married. Novem- 
ber 16. 1898, ]\Iabel Lelia Graves, who was 
born at Palmer. Massachusetts, but for some 
years had made her home in East Long- 
meadow, daughter of Abel and Olive (Hitch- 
cock) Graves, and granddaughter of Joshua 
and Amanda (Calkins) Graves. Children: 

1. Carroll Newton, born November 25, 1908. 

2. Olive Lucy, born May 8, 1913. 3. Arline, 
born March 20, 1916. 



WHITAKER, Lewis Edwin 

Both as a business man and as a public- 
spirited citizen and local official, Lewis 
Edwin Whitaker is well known in Long- 
meadow. His coal and grain business is a 
thriving one. and as town selectman he has 
demonstrated his ability and his integrity-. 

(IX) Lewis Edwin Whitaker, son of 
John Franklin and Lucy Ann (Beebe) 
Whitaker (q.v.), was born in Hampden, 
Massachusetts, June 18, 1886. He received 
his early education in the schools of East 
Longmeadow and then became a student in 
Springfield High School, from which he was 
graduated in 1904. When his school training 
was completed, he found employment with 



98 



an 






Yl 

I 




-Ui^ l( ihnJ'^^^^c^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



his father in the grain business in Springfield, 
where he remained for two years. He then 
went to East Longmeadow and associated 
himself with his brother, Frank H, Whita- 
ker, in the coal and grain business, locating 
in the same place where his grandfather, 
Amos Whitaker, first established his coal 
business. Mr. Whitaker maintained the 
partnership with his brother in the coal and 
grain business until 191 2, when he purchased 
his brother's interests. Since that time he 
has conducted the business alone. He has 
erected coal pockets and generally improved 
his equipment until at the present time 
(1924) he has a thoroughly modern plant. 
He handles thousands of carloads of coal 
and grain annually and has developed an im- 
mense business. In addition to the extensive 
handling of coal and grain, he also handles 
all kinds of farm implements and machinery, 
and has a large warehouse filled with grain 
and machinery. 

Though notably successful as a business 
man, Mr. Whitaker's activities are not lim- 
ited to the furtherance of his own interests. 
He is one of the selectmen of the town of 
East Longmeadow, one of the Finance Com- 
mittee, and a trustee of the Library Board. 
Fraternally, he is affiliated with Roswell Lee 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; and is 
a charter member of Charles C. Spellman 
Lodge, of East Longmeadow, of which he is 
now Master; of Morning Star Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; Springfield Council, 
Royal and Select Masters ; Springfield Com- 
mandery. Knights Templar ; and Melba Tem- 
ple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. His clubs are the Publicity 
and the Automobile ; and his religious inter- 
est is with the Congregational Church, of 
which he is an attendant. 

Lewis Edwin Whitaker married, October 
29, 1912, Lydia Olson, who was born in 
East Longmeadow, Massachusetts, daughter 
of Lars and Elizabeth (Hanson) Olson. 

Lars Olson was born in Gotland, Sweden, 
and came to America when quite young, lo- 
cating first in Portland, Connecticut, where 



he worked in the stone quarries. He later 
removed to East Longmeadow, Massachu- 
setts, and for thirty years was identified with 
Norcross & Comi)any in tiie quarries. For 
a time he was with the Street Railway Com- 
pany, and at the present time (1924) he is 
associated with Mr. Whitaker. Children of 
Lewis E. and Lydia (Olson) Whitaker: 

1. Edna Eleanor, born October 30, 191 3. 

2. Edith Lucelle, born November 5, 191 5. 

3. Lewis Edwin, Jr., born November 9, 1918. 



WHITAKER, Newton Beebe 

Throughout the entire period of his active 
career to the present time (1924), Newton 
Beebe Whitaker has been in the railway mail 
service. 

(IX) Newton Beebe Whitaker, son of 
John Franklin and Lucy Ann (Beebe) 
Whitaker (q.v.), was born in East Long- 
meadow, Massachusetts, December 30, 18S9. 
After attending school first in East Long- 
meadow, he removed with the family to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1899, and be- 
came a student in the Technical High School, 
from which he was graduated in 1908. Two 
years after the completion of his high school 
course, he entered the Railway Mail Service, 
and that connection has been maintained to 
the present time (1924). His run is from 
Springfield to White River Junction, Ver- 
mont, and return, making six round trips 
weekly. Fraternally, ^Ir. Whitaker is affil- 
iated with Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons of Springfield ; and is a 
member of the Railway Mail Service Asso- 
ciation. 

Newton Beebe Whitaker married. Septem- 
ber 14, 1914, Anna Elizabeth Bollinger, of 
Albany, New York, daughter of Otto Bol- 
linger. Children: i. Dorotliy Ann, born 
Noveml)er 3. 1917. 2. Ralph Beebe, born 
March 28, 1919. 3. Raymond Newton, born 
December 2, 1921. 



WOODBURY, Milo K. 

Thirty-three years ago, or in December, 
1890, under the name of Rood & Wood- 



99 



Qn/IQQ-! A 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



bury. Milo K. Woodbury formed a part- 
nersbip with Mr. Rood and engaged in the 
grocery business in Springfield, In 19 19 
the concern was incorporated, under the 
same name, with Mr. Rood as president, 
and Mr. Woodbury as treasurer, and it is 
now one of the most prosperous enterprises 
of its kind in Western Massachusetts. 

Though the name Woodbury is an an- 
cient and widespread one in England, it 
occurs most frequently in the County of 
Devon. An estate of Woodbergh has been 
traced in Somerset from 1304. In 1216 
Will'us de Wode-bere held a knight's fee at 
Plymtree. The name occurs in the Domes- 
day Book (A. D. 1086) spelled Wodeberic, 
and various spellings have since been used. 
Though John Woodbury, immigrant ances- 
tor of the Woodbury family in Massachu- 
setts, and in New Hampshire, was a prom- 
inent citizen and rendered valuable service, 
the records of the various branches of his 
descendants have not been very completely 
collected. The line of Milo K. Woodbury 
has been accurately recorded during the last 
four generations. The descendants of John 
Woodbury to the seventh generation are 
carefully recorded, and circumstantial evi- 
dence is conclusive that Benjamin Wood- 
bury, of the seventh generation, is the great- 
grandfather of Milo K. Woodbury. The 
line is traced as follows: 

(I) John Woodbury, immigrant ancestor 
of the branch of the Woodbury family to 
which Milo K. Woodbury belongs, came 
from Somersetshire, England, about 1624- 
25, in the interests of the Dorchester Com- 
pany, which established itself at Cape Ann, 
now Gloucester, Massachusetts, at or shortly 
before that period. His brother, William 
Woodbury, came over before 1630, and the 
two brothers settled in what is now Beverly, 
near Woodbury's Point, on Mackerel Cove. 
John Woodbur}' was admitted a freeman in 
1630, and was deputy to the General Court 
from 1635 to 1638. In 1635 he was ap- 
pointed one of the committee to lay out 
lands. In the year in which Harvard Col- 



lege was established, 1636. Captain Endi- 
cott, in behalf of Colonel John Humphries, 
presented a motion to the General Court to 
set off some lands beyond Forest River for 
the erection of a college there. John Wood- 
bury was appointed on the committee of 
six to view the lands. In 1637 he was 
elected selectman and continued in that of- 
fice until his death, being present at every 
meeting. He and his wife, Agnes Wood- 
])ury, were among the original members of 
the First Church at Salem, Massachusetts, 
in 1629. His will was proved February 8, 
1642-43, but is not preserved. He was 
probably about sixty years old at the time 
of his death. Children: i. Humphrey, of 
further mention. 2. John, resided in Bev- 
erly, called Senior. 3. Hannah, baptized 
December 23, 1636; married, April 26, 
1858, Cornelius Baker. 4. Abigail, baptized 
November 12, 1637; married John Hill. 5. 
Peter, baptized September 19, 1640 (born 
June 19, 1640, according to Savage). 

(II) Humphrey Woodbury, son of John 
and Agnes Woodbury, was born in Eng- 
land, in 1610. He and six others were 
granted a half acre each at Winter Harbor 
for fishing trade and to build upon. In 
1636 he received a grant of forty acres 
more. He was called "fisherman" in the 
deeds of various parcels of land that he 
bought. He married Elizabeth, surname 
unknown, and their children were : John, 
Isaac, Humphrey, Thomas, of further men- 
tion ; Susanna, married John Tenney ; Wil- 
liam, Peter, Richard, Elizabeth, married 
Walker, of Boston, and Christian, mar- 
ried, April 9, 1679, John Trask. 

(HI) Thomas Woodbury, son of Hum- 
phrey and Elizabeth Woodbury, was born 
about 1639, and died in 1719. He mar- 
ried (first) Hannah (Dodge) Porter, bap- 
tized in the First Church of Salem, July 24, 
1642, died January 2, 1688, daughter of 
William and Elizabeth Dodge, and widow 
of Samuel Porter. He married (second), 
April 29, 1690, Elizabeth Curtis, widow of 
Samuel Curtis. Children of first wife: i. 



100 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGR.\PHY 



William, of further mention. 2. Samuel. 
3, Thomas. 4. Israel. 5. Hannah, mar- 
ried July 5, 1694. 6. John Ober. 7. Ehza- 
beth, married Joseph Herrick. 8. Daughter, 
died young. 9. Susanna. 10. Jonathan, 
married Eleanor Ellinwood. 11. Samuel. 

(IV) William Woodbun,-, son of Thomas 
and Hannah (Dodge-Porter) Woodbur>-, 
was born September 17, 1662. and died in 
1725. He married, September 29, 1689. 
Joanna Wheeler, of Concord, who died 
April 7, 1748, aged sevent>'-six. Children: 

1. Sarah, married, 1712, Ralph Ellinwood. 

2. Hannah, married, 1718, Peter Groves. 

3. Israel, married Mary Woodbun.-. 4. Wil- 
liam, of further mention. 5. Thomas, mar- 
ried, September 28, 1724, Priscilla Wood- 
bury. 6. Hugh. 7. Lois. 8. EHsha, mar- 
ried, 1728, Joanna Ober, 9. Mihill, mar- 
ried Mary Balch. 

(V) William Woodburv-, son of William 
and Joanna (Wheeler) Woodbur}-, was born 
July II, 1697, died October 18, 1788. He 
was a miller. He married, September 2, 
1720, Martha Woodbury, baptized August 
23, 1702, died April 2"/, 1775, daughter of 
Ebenezer and Hannah Woodbur%-. Chil- 
dren: I. William, 2. Joanna, married. Jan- 
uar\^ 20. 1744. Benjamin Harvey. 3. Israel, 
of further mention, 4. Ruth, married. De- 
cember 12, 1 75 1, Larkin Thorndike. 5. 
Zacharias. 6. Jude. 7. Ebenezer. 8. Jo- 
seph. 9. Hannah. 10, Elisha, married, 
1768, Hannah Ra>-mond. 

(VI) Israel Woodbury, son of William 
and Martha (Woodbun.-) Woodbun.-, was 
born Januar>- 4, 1726. He removed to 
Salem, Massachusetts, before his marriage, 
and to Salem, Xew Hampshire, afterward. 
He was a prominent citizen of Salem. Xew 
Hampshire, often holding positions of trust 
and honor. He was a juror in 1774; se- 
lectman several years. He married (sec- 
ond) Hannah, surname unknown. Chil- 
dren, all recorded as born at Salem. Xew 
Hampshire: i. Man.-, born Xovember 2, 
1751. 2. Judith. January 2^. 1755. 3- 
Hannah. May 6. 1757. 4. Israel, December 



10. 1759. 5- Bett>-, Xovember 15. 1763. 
6. Benjamin, of further mention. 7. Mar- 
tha, January- 16, 1770. 8. Esther, March 
19. 1779. 

(VII) Benjamin Woodbun.', son of Israel 
Woodbun,-, was born in Salem, Massachu- 
setts, May 29, 1766. He married Sarah 
Page, of Wentworth, Xew Hampshire, and 
they were the parents of ten children: i. 
Samuel. 2. Benjamin. 3. Jedediah. 4. 

Moses. 5. Polly, who married Moore. 

6. Jessie. 7. Louise, who married 

Cushings. 8. Betsy. 9. Lydia, who married 

Corlis. 10. Enoch Page, of further 

mention. 

(VIII) Enoch Page Woodbun.-, son of 
Benjamin and Sarah (Page) Woodbun.-, 
was born August 15, 1793. *^"^ ^'^ Octo- 
ber 9, 1885. During the early years of 
his active career, before railroads were built 
in Xew Hampshire, he drove a team and 
drew freight over the road bet^veen Haver- 
hill. Xew Hampshire, and Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, but during the later years of his 
life he was engaged in farming. He mar- 
ried (first) Lydia Lawrence, born April 6. 
1788, died October 11, 1852. He married 
(second) ^Man.- Webster, born February 8. 
1803, died December 8, 1877. Children of 
first marriage were: i. Mary, born Feb- 
ruar}- 21, 18 18, died 1890; married Jo- 
seph Lamb. 2. Hannah P., born August 

2, 1819. died 1873; married Curtis Xoyes. 

3. Sarah P., born December 6. 1821, died 
May 30, 1902; married Moses Knight, now 
deceased ; she left one daughter. Emily, who 
married John Garland, now deceased ; she 
resides in Bradford, Vermont.. 4. EUiza S., 
bom Febnian.- 27, 1824, died July. 1905; 
married John W. Cutting. 5. Samuel Law- 
rence, of further mention. 6. Charlotte, 
twin of Samuel Lawrence, born December 
17. 1826. died February 4. 1872; married 
James Cutting. 

(IX) Samuel Lawrence Woodbun.-, son 
of Enoch Page and Lydia (Lawrence) 
Woodbun.-, was born in Haverhill, Xew 
Hampshire. December 17, 1826, and died 



lOI 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in Haverhill. New Hampshire, December i6, 
1891. He received his education in the 
public schools of his native district, and 
spent his entire life in the place of his birth. 
He married, April 17, 1850. Susan Annette 
Knapj), born in Haverhill, New Hampshire, 
March 31, 1831, daughter of James and 
Esther Knapp. She resided in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, up to her death, February 
17, 1924, aged ninety-three years, and they 
became the parents of the following chil- 
dren: I. Arthur Knapp, born January 19, 
1851, died November 13, 1915; married 
Clara Albee ; they had three sons : i. Wil- 
liam Luther, born September 17, 1875 5 mar- 
ried Mary Ingalls, one daughter, Lois An- 
nette, now in Mt. Holyoke College, ii. 
George Harvey, born January 2, 1877; mar- 
ried Jennie Craig, iii. Clarence Arthur, born 
in August, 1879; treasurer of the Citizens' 
Trust Company of Nashua, New Hamp- 
shire ; married Gladys Hodgson ; children : 
Arthur Clarence, born in July, 1916, died 
in 1917; twins, William and Paul, born Jan- 
uary I, 1918. 2. William Luther, who died 
at the age of twenty-one. 3. Milo Knight, of 
further mention. 

(X) Milo Knight Woodbury, son of Sam- 
uel Lawrence and Susan Annette (Knapp) 
Woodbury, was born in Haverhill, New 
Hampshire, July 30, 1864. He received 
his education in the public schools of his 
native district. In 1883, when he was a 
young man nineteen years of age, he re- 
moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, where 
he found employment as a clerk in the 
grocery store of A. F. Niles & Son, with 
whom he remained for seven and a half 
years. In 1890, having thriftily taken care 
of the rewards of his labor and also accu- 
mulated considerable experience, he de- 
cided he could engage in the grocery busi- 
ness for himself. He formed a partnership 
with Mr. Rood under the firm name of 
Rood & Woodbury, and began business in 
a small way, using a store of about nine 
hundred square feet floor space, and using 
two teams, two men and one bov. The ven- 



ture was most successful and business grew 
to such proportions that at the present time 
(1924) the firm occupies a store containing 
twenty-five thousand square feet of floor 
space. At one time the firm employed one 
hundred and twenty men, twenty-three 
horses and several automobiles, but some 
years ago they made an innovation by not 
making any deliveries of goods, thus reduc- 
ing the working force to fifty-seven men, 
dispensing with the services of their teams 
and generally reducing overhead expenses, 
this enabling them to sell their goods at much 
lower prices. The change was a most bene- 
ficial one. They have found that under the 
new conditions the plan is in every way 
more satisfactory. In 1919 the concern was 
incorporated under the name of the Rood 
& Woodbury Company, with Mr. Rood as 
president, and Mr. Woodbury as treasurer. 
Both members of the firm have continued to 
fill those jwsitions, and the enterprise is still 
(1924) steadily growing. They have one 
of the finest stores to be found in the coun- 
try of which they have good reason to be 
proud. 

On December 25, 1899, Milo Knight 
Woodbury married Hattie Maria Grover, 
of Whately, Massachusetts, daughter of 
Henry Josiah and Elvira (Morton) Grover 
(see Grover IV and Morton VIII), and 
they are the parents of two sons: i. Sam- 
uel Lawrence, born in Springfield, ]\Iassa- 
chusetts, March 11, 1903, and is now com- 
I)leting his third year in the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College at Amherst, Massachu- 
setts. 2. Lewis Grover, born in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, January 22, 1905, now 
in the Norwich University of Northfield, 
Vermont. 

(The Grover Line) 

(I) Hosea Grover, of Ellington, Connec- 
ticut, was born September 7, 1767, and died 
August 21, 1838. He settled in Hadley, 
Massachusetts. He married, March 7, 1796, 
Diadema Grover, born in Lebanon, New 



102 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Hampshire, September 27, 1777, died No- 
vember 25, 1870, and they were the parents 
of five children: Josiah, of further mention; 
Phineas, Leonard, Ruth Marilla, Lovisa. 

(II) Josiah Grover, son of Hosea and 
Diadema (Grover) Grover, was born No- 
vember 12, 1798, and died September 30, 
1853. He removed from Hadley to Sun- 
derland, Massachusetts. He married Mary 
S. Hitchcock, who died September 18, 1883, 
aged seventy-nine years. Their children 
were: Marriette, Harriet N., Henry Josiah, 
of further mention; Charles L., Catherine A. 

(HI) Henry Josiah Grover, son of Josiah 
and Mary S. (Hitchcock) Grover, was born 
May 27, 1833. In 1879 he removed to Am- 
herst, Massachusetts, and later to Springfield, 
in the same State. He married. May 11, 
1858, Elvira Morton, of Whately, Massa- 
chusetts, born August 22, 1838, died June 
20, 1891, and they were the parents of four 
children : Hattie Maria, of further mention ; 
Lewis Henry, Edgar J., and Fred Morton. 

(IV) Hattie Maria Grover, daughter of 
Henry Josiah and Elvira (Morton) Grover, 
married Milo Knight Woodbury (see Wood- 
bury X). 

(The Morton Line) 

(I) George Morton, born in Austerfeld, 
England, 1581, came to America in 1624, 
and settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts, 
where he died. He married Juliann Car- 
penter, and they were the parents of children, 
among whom was George, of further men- 
tion. 

(II) George Morton, son of George ]\Ior- 
ton, was born in England in 1609, and re- 
sided in Dorchester, Massachusetts. He 
married and reared a family of children, 
among whom was Richard, of further men- 
tion. 

(III) Richard Morton, son of George 
Morton, was a blacksmith by trade. He re- 
moved to Hatfield, Massachusetts, from 
Hartford, Connecticut, prior to 1670, and 
continued to live there with his wife, Ruth, 



during the remainder of his life, which was 
terminated by death, April 3. 1710. His 
wife survived him until December 31, 17 14. 
They were the parents of children, among 
whom was Jonathon, of further mention. 

(IV) Jonathon Morton, son of Richard 
and Ruth Morton, was born in Hatfield, 
Massachusetts, November 2, 1684, and died 
April 23, 1767, aged eighty-three years. He 
married, in 1710, Sarah Smith, daughter of 
Chileab Smith. She died October 5, 1760, 
aged seventy-three years. Among their chil- 
dren was David, of further mention. 

(V) David Morton, son of Jonathon and 
Sarah (Smith) Morton, was born in Hat- 
field, Massachusetts, September 2, 1721. He 
married Christian Smith, and they were the 
parents of children, among whom was Levi, 
of further mention. 

(VI) Deacon Levi Morton, son of David 
and Christian (Smith) IMorton, was born in 
Hatfield, Massachusetts, October 26, 1753, 
and died April 25, 1816. He married, March 
II, 1777, Sarah Allis, born in 1757, died 
April 2, 1827, daughter of Eleazer and Lucy 
(Dickinson) Allis, and they were the parents 
of children, among whom was Levi, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(VII) Levi Morton, son of Deacon Levi 
and Sarah (Allis) Morton, was born in 
Whately, Massachusetts, October 23, 1796, 
and died June i, 1877. He married Irene 
Smith, daughter of Joseph and Lura (Allis) 
Smith, born November 4, 1802, and they 
were the parents of the following children: 
Amoret, Maria, Miles B., Jane A., Louise 
L., Joseph, Fidelia, Elvira, of further men- 
tion ; Flam, Albert, Lena. 

(VIII) Elvira ^lortnn, daughter of Levi 
and Irene (Smith) Morton, married Henry 
Josiah Grover (see Grover III), and they 
were the parents of Hattie Maria Grover, of 
further mention. 

(IX) Hattie Maria Grover, daughter of 
Henry Josiah and Elvira (Morton) Grover, 
married Milo Knight Woodbury (see Wood- 
bury X). 



103 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



WRIGHT. Charles Austin 

A half -century of successful experience 
in the market business has made of Charles 
Austin Wright an expert in that field of 
business activity. He was continuously as- 
sociated with the market business up to 
April, 1923, and at this time was president 
of the Fifth Ward Market Company, which 
owned the oldest market on "the Hill." 

Mr, Wright bears a name which dates 
back to the earliest use of surnames in Eng- 
land, and which is derived from the term 
applied to those who were artificers in wood, 
as the name Smith is derived from the 
"smith" who was an artificer in metals. 
The Wright coat-of-arms is as follows: 

Arms — Azure, two bars argent; in chief three 
leopards' heads, or, 

Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a dragon's 
head proper. 

In Xew England, several distinct families 
of the name W^right date from the early 
Colonial period, but are not supposed to be 
all of one kin, though several of the immi- 
grant ancestors came from Essex County, 
England, and were related to each other as 
is indicated by the names of the children of 
the three English ancestors given below. 

John Wright lived in Kelvedon County, 
Essex, England, and had sons : John, of 
further mention, and Robert. The latter 
married Grace Greene, and their son John 
married Grace Glascock, and they became 
the parents of Thomas and Anthony, immi- 
grant ancestors of the Weathersfield (Con- 
necticut) family. 

John (2) Wright, son of John (i) 
Wright, was born at Kelvedon, and lived 
at Wrightsbridge, County Essex. He mar- 
ried Avis Rooke, and their sons were : John, 
of further mention, and Robert. 

John (3) Wright, son of John (2) and 
Avis (Rooke) Wright, married (first), 

Emfell; (second) Bennet Greene, and 

had children: i. John. 2. Samuel, of fur- 
ther mention. 3. Jane. 4. Nathaniel, the 
prominent London merchant who had an 



interest in the Massachusetts Bay Company. 
(I) Deacon Samuel Wright, son of John 
(3) Wright, was born probably at Kelvedon, 
England, not later than 1600. He was an 
early settler in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he was a juryman, December 12, 
1639, and, from the first, one of the leading 
citizens. After Mr. Moxom, the minister, 
returned to England, Mr. Wright, a deacon 
of the church, was employed to "dispense 
the word of God in this place," and his sal- 
ary fixed at fifty shillings a month. He was 
one of the first settlers of Northampton in 
1656-57, and died there October 17, 1665. 
His homestead remained in the family a 
hundred and fifty years. He held various 
public ofiices; was on a committee to the 
General Court; was measurer of land; one 
of the owners of the first mill; subscribed 
to the fund for the college (Harvard), and 
was an active and useful citizen. He and 
his wife Margaret were the parents of chil- 
dren : Hannah, Benjamin, Samuel (2), of 
further mention; Esther, Margaret, Lydia, 
Mary, James, Judah, Helped, who died 
young. 

(II) Samuel (2) Wright, son of Samuel 
(i) Wright, was born about 1630. He set- 
tled first in Northfield, Massachusetts, but 
was selectman of Northampton in 1656; on 
a committee to transcribe the town records 
in 1657, and measurer. He was killed by 
the Indians at Northfield in King Philip's 
War, September 2, 1675. He married, No- 
vember 24, 1653, Elizabeth Burt, daughter 
of Henry Burt. His widow married, in 
t6<S4, N. Dickinson. Children: Samuel, Jo- 
seph, Captain Benjamin, Ebenezer, of fur- 
ther mention; Elizabeth, Eleazer, Hannah, 
Benoni. 

(III) Ebenezer Wright, son of Samuel 
(2) and Elizabeth (Burt) Wright, was born 
March 20, 1663. He married (first), Sep- 
tember 6, 1684, Elizal^eth Strong. She died 
February 17, 1691, and he married (sec- 
ond), December 9, 1691, Hannah Hunt. To 
the first marriage one child was born, Mary, 
who died in February, 1691. The children 



104 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of the second marriage were : Experience, 
Obadiah, Captain Noah, of further mention ; 
Clemence. Elisha. Esther, Mary. 

(IV) Captain Xoah Wright, son of Ebe- 
nezer and Hannah (Hunt) Wright, was 
born November 29, 1699, and died June 
27* 1775- He married and reared a family 
of children, among whom was Joel, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(V) Joel Wright, son of Captain Noah 
Wright, died June 24, 1796, aged fifty-two 
years. He married Ursula Mosely, of West- 
field, who died April 20, 1802. Their chil- 
dren were : Israel, Joel, Jonathan, Noah, of 
further mention, Sereno, Ursula, Ebenezer, 
Mosely. 

(VI) Noah Wright, son of Joel and Ur- 
sula (]VIosely) Wright, was born in North- 
ampton, Massachusetts. November 25, 1775, 
and died in 181 5. He married Marion 
Phelps, who was born in March, 1779, and 
their children were : Christopher, Austin, 
Noah of further mention, and two daugh- 
ters. 

(VII) Noah Wright, son of Noah and 
Marion (Phelps) Wright, was born in 
Northampton, Massachusetts, April 5, 1810, 
and died December 15. 1892. As a young 
man he was a stagecoach driver in the early 
days before railroads were built in the Con- 
necticut Valley. Later, he removed to 
Springfield, and there conducted a wood- 
yard on the site where the Hotel Worthy 
now stands. In the later years of his active 
career he was engaged in buying and devel- 
oping real estate. He married, November 
28, 1838, Marcia Hunt Stebbins, of Deer- 
field, Massachusetts, who was born Decem- 
ber 17, 1819, daughter of Ebenezer (2) and 
Rebecca (Hunt) Stebbins (see Stebbins 
VIII). Their children were: i. George, who 
was born June 17, 1840, and died April 
13, 1841. 2. George Everett, who was born 
November 13, 1841. 3. Lewis Hunt, who 
was born October 27, 1843. 4. Henry, who 
was born August 31, 1845. 5. Noah, born 
January 18, 1848, and died June 28, 1857. 
6, Arthur Eugene, born December 14, 1849. 



7. Austin E.. born December 12, 1851, died 
July 9, 1857. 8. Elizabeth Frances, born 
Novemi)er 13, 1854; married Charles Storrs 
Dickenson. 9. Charles Austin, of further 
mention. 

(VIII) Charles Austin Wright, son of 
Noah and Marcia Hunt (Stebbins) Wright, 
was l)orn in Springfield, Massachusetts, De- 
cember 12, 1856. He received his prepara- 
tory education in the public schools of 
Springfield and South Deer field, and upon 
the completion of his school career he as- 
sociated himself with the H. L. Niles Com- 
pany, with whom he remained until the 
death of Mr. Niles. In 1893 he purchased 
the business and continued to conduct a pros- 
perous market business alone until 1908. 
In that year he incorporated under the name 
of the Fifth Ward Market Company, of 
which he was made president, and until he 
retired in January, 1923. he continued in that 
position and during that time made of the 
concern one of the leading markets of the 
county. The establishment was known as 
the "Old Market on the Hill," and at the 
time he resigned Mr. Wright was the only 
man in Springfield who had been in the 
market business continuously for half a cen- 
tury. Along with his business responsibili- 
ties Mr. Wright also found time for civic 
service, and served as a member of the Com- 
mon Council for one year. 

Fraternally Mr. Wright is a mcml)er of 
Springfield Lodge. Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons; Morning Star Chapter. Royal Arch 
Masons; Springfield Council. Royal and Se- 
lect Masters, and Springfield Commandery, 
Knights Templar; also Melha Temple, An- 
cient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. His religious affiliation is with the 
Church of Christ (Scientist). 

Charles Austin Wright married, on Janu- 
ary 5, 1880, Martha J. Cook, at East 
Hartford. Connecticut, daughter of Thomas 
H. and Justina (Keeney) Cook, and they 
are the parents of four children: i. Harry 
Thomas, who was born in 1883. and is en- 
gaged in farming in Worthington, Massa- 



105 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



chusctts. lie married Elizabeth Bacon, and 
they have children: Edward. Mildred, Wil- 
liam, Harry T., Jr., and Isabelle Martha. 
2. Charles A., Jr., who married Mabel 
Davies. 3. Marcia. who married Milton D. 
Wood, of Si)rinL,'field, and has children: 
William, and Robert Dudley. 4. Evelyn, 
married Ralph D. Rathburn, manager of the 
Maynard Coal Company; they were the pa- 
rents of two children : Richard, and Jane ; 
Mr. Rathburn died October 25, 1923. 

(The Stebbins Line) 

CI) Rowland Stebbins, born in England, 
in 1594, died in Northampton, Massachu- 
setts. December i, 1671. His wife, Sarah, 
was born in England in 1591, and died Oc- 
tober, 1649. They were the parents of five 
children, among whom was John, of further 
mention. 

(II) John Stebbins, son of Rowland and 
Sarah Stebbins, was born in England, in 
1626, and died in Northampton, Massachu- 
setts, March 7, 1678. He married, March 
14, 1646, Ann (Munson) Munden, widow 
of Abraham Munden. She died in 1656, 
and he married (second) Abigail Bartlett. 
John Stebbins was the father of fifteen chil- 
dren, among whom was John (2) of further 
mention. 

(III) John (2) Stebljins, son of John 
(i) and Ann (Munson-Munden) Stebbins, 
was IxDrn in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
January 28, 1647, and died in Deerfield, 
Massachusetts, December 19, 1724. He 
married, in 1683, Dorothy Alexander, and 
thev were the parents of six children, among 
whom was John (3), of further mention. 

(IV) John (3) Stebbins, son of John 
(2) and Dorothy (Alexander) Stel)bins, 
was born in Deerfield, Massachusetts, in 
1686, and died September 7, 1760. He 

married (first), in 1714, Mary , who 

was born in 1696. She died August 30, 
1733, and he married (second), in 1735, 
Hannah Allen. John (3) Stebbins was the 
father of twelve children, one of whom was 
John (4), who was taken prisoner by the 



Indians at Deerfield, Massachusetts, 1790-4, 
but was later returned to Deerfield. An- 
other son was Moses, of further mention. 

(V) Moses Stebbins, son of John (3) 
and Mary Stebbins, was born in Deerfield, 
Massachusetts, October 18, 1731, and died 
in 1815. He married, November 6, 1761, 
Mary Hawks, and they were the parents of 
six children, among whom was Lieutenant 
Ebenezer, of further mention. 

(VI) Lieutenant Ebenezer Stebbins, son 
of Moses and Mary (Hawks) Stebbins, was 
born in Deerfield, November 20, 1763. He 
was engaged in farming and was also an 
inn-keeper. He accumulated a large amount 
of property, including hundreds of acres of 
land, and was considered the wealthiest man 
in Deerfield. He served during the Revo- 
lutionary War, and was discharged with the 
rank of lieutenant. Before his death he 
established seven of his sons on farms along 
the Connecticut River, He married, May 
19, 1785, Rebecca Leonard, who was born 
in 1761, and died August 13, 1847. They 
were the parents of twelve children, among 
whom was Ebenezer (2), of further men- 
tion. 

(VII) Ebenezer (2) Stebbins, son of 
Ebenezer and Rebecca (Leonard) Stebbins, 
was born in Deerfield, Massachusetts, No- 
vember 14, 1792, and died August 7, 1857. 
He was proprietor of the ferry at the 
bridge landing in Deerfield, and when 
freight boats were running he was greatly 
in demand as a pilot. He was a member of 
the Sunderland choir and one of its notable 
singers. He married, February 18, 181 3, 
Rebecca Hunt, and they were the parents 
of fourteen children, one of whom was 
Marcia Hunt, of further mention. 

(VIII) Marcia Hunt Stebbins, daughter 
of Ebenezer (2) and Rebecca (Hunt) Steb- 
bins, was married, November 28, 1838, to 
Noah Wright (see Wright VII). 



BULKLEY, George Grant 

It was more than thirty years ago that 
George Grant Bulkley engaged in the insur- 



106 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ance business, and who since 1912 has been 
an officer and in 191 7 was made vice-pres- 
ident and in 1924 president of the Fire and 
Marine Insurance Company of Sprins^field, 
one of the large concerns of its kind in the 
country. 

The name Bulkeley (later sometimes 
spelled Bulkley) is of the class of surnames 
known as place names, and signifies "a large 
mountain." In the time of King John, 1199 
and later, it was spelled Buclough, and there 
have been and still are many variations in 
the spelling, some of the forms being Bulkle, 
Bulkley, and Buckley. The Bulkeley (or 
Bulkley) family is of ancient English line- 
age, tracing descent from Baron Robert de 
Bulkeley, who lived in the time of King 
John ( 1 199-1226). He married, and among 
his children was Baron William de Bulkeley. 
From that ancestor the family is traced in 
direct line to Peter Bulkeley, the immigrant 
ancestor. 

(I) Rev. Peter Bulkeley, son of Rev. 
Edward de Bulkeley, was born at Odell, 
Bedfordshire, England, January 31, 1582-3, 
and entered St. John's College, Cambridge, 
March 22, 1604-05, where he became a fel- 
low and received the degree of Master of 
Arts in 1608, and is said to have later re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Divinity. 
He succeeded his father as rector of Odell, 
but resigned and sailed for New England 
in 1635. at the age of fifty-two years, on the 
ship "Susan and Ellen." He was accom- 
panied by his children, and his wife Grace. 
There is an interesting tradition in the fam- 
ily that while on the voyage the wife Grace 
apparently died. Unwilling to have her 
body buried at sea, the husband pleaded with 
the captain to have it kept on board one 
day more and still one day more. On the 
third day symptoms of vitality were noticed 
and before land was reached animation was 
restored. Though carried from the ship an 
invalid, she recovered and lived to a good 
old age. Rev. Peter (2) Bulkeley settled 
first in Cambridge, and the next year, with 
twelve others, began the settlement of Con- 



cord. Three years later he received a grant 
of tiirce hundred acres at Cambridge. He 
was teacher of the church at Concord, of 
which Rev. John Jones was pastor, and on 
April 6, 1637, he was installed pastor there. 
He is usually spoken of as the first minister 
of Concord. He brought with him from 
England about £6,000, most of which lie 
si')ent for the good of the colony. He was 
a learned and pious man, and wrote several 
Latin poems, some of which Cotton Mather 
quotes in his "Magnalia" as a part of his 
sketch of the life of Rev. Peter Bulkeley. 
He also published, in London, in 1646, a 
volume entitled "The Gospel Covenant," a 
collection of sermons preached at Concord, 
and also containing an elegy on his friend, 
Rev. Mr. Hooker. He was among the first 
to instruct the Indians, and the immunity of 
Concord from Indian attack was largely ac- 
credited to his influence. He died at Con- 
cord, March 9, 1659, a short time previ- 
ously having presented many books to the 
library of Harvard College. He married 
(first) Jane Allen, of Goldington, daughter 
of Thomas Allen; (second), about 1634, 
Grace Chetwode, who was born in 1602, 
and died April 21, 1669, daughter of Sir 
Richard and Dorothy (Needham) Chet- 
wode, of Odell. The children of the first 
marriage, born in England, were: i. Ed- 
ward, who came to New England before his 
father, and died January 2, 1696. 2. Mary. 
3. Thomas. 4. Nathaniel. 5. Rev. John. 
6. George. 7. Daniel. 8. Jabez. died young. 
9. Joseph. 10. William, of Ipswich. 11. 
Richard. Children of the second marriage, 
all I torn in New England, were: 12. Ger- 
shom, of further mention. 13. Elizabeth. 
14. Dorothy. 15. Peter. 

(II) Rev. Gershom Bulkeley, son of Rev. 
Peter Bulkeley, was born at Concord, 
December 6. 1636, and died December 2, 
1713. He graduated from Harvard in 1655, 
as a fellow of the college, and in 1661 be- 
came the minister of the second church at 
New London, Connecticut. In 1667 he re- 
moved to Wethersfield, where he was in- 



107 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



stalled as pastor the same year. In 1676 he 
asked for his dismissal, because of ill health, 
and from that time to the end of his active 
career was enjja^'cd in the jjractice of medi- 
cine and surgery, in which profession he was 
notably successful and won a high reputa- 
tion, lie was an earnest student of chem- 
istry and philosophy and master of several 
languages, and was also an expert surveyor. 
During his pastorate in 1675 he was ap- 
pctinted surgeon to the Connecticut troops in 
King Philip's War, and made a member of 
the Council of War. So highly was his 
wisdom and his influence prized that the 
court gave orders to have him especially 
taken care of. His monument in the Weth- 
ersfield cemetery says of him: "He was 
honorable in his descent, of rare abilities, 
excellent in learning, master of many lan- 
guages, exquisite in his skill, in divinity, 
physic and law, and of a most exemplary 
Christian life." His will was dated Alay 
28, 171 2, and proved December 7, 171 3. 
He married, October 28, 1659, Sarah Chaun- 
cey, who was born at Ware, England, June 
13, 1631, and died June 3, 1699, daughter 
of Rev. Charles Chauncey, president of Har- 
vard College. Children : Catherine, Dorothy, 
Dr. Charles; Peter, who was lost at sea; 
Caj)tain Edward, of further mention; John. 

(III) Captain Edward Bulkeley, son of 
Rev. Gershom and Sarah (Chauncey) 
Hulkeley, was born in 1672, and died in 
Wether sfield, Connecticut, August 2"], 1748, 
aged seventy-six years. He was prominent 
in local public aflFairs, serving as collector 
in 1703 and as selectman in 1708. He was 
also admitted to practice as an attorney in 
June, 171 1. He married, July 14, 1702, 
Dorothy Prescott, daughter of Jonathan 
Prescott, and they were the parents of chil- 
dren : Charles, Elizabeth, Sarah, Rebecca, 
Peter, died young; Peter (2), of further 
mcntinn ; Gershom, Dorothy, Jonathan, Abi- 
gail, Lucy. 

(IV) Peter (2) Bulkeley, son of Captain 
Edward and Dorothy (Prescott) Bulkeley, 
was born in 17 12, and died April 4, 1776. 



He was an able and active man, who was 
interested in public affairs, and in May, 
1775, he w^as elected justice of the peace for 
Hartford County. He married, April 2, 
1 741, Abigail Curtis. She died November, 
1762, in her fifty-fifth year, and he married 
(second), January 26, 1769, Christian 
Smith, who died December 22, 1802. Chil- 
dren : Joseph, Abigail, Oliver, Solomon, of 
further mention ; Dorothy, Justus. 

(V) Solomon Bulkeley (or Bulkley), 
son of Peter (2) and Abigail (Curtis) 
Bulkeley, was born in 1747, and died IMarch 
4, 1780. He married, June 6, 1776, Martha 
Williams, daughter of Closes Williams, 
Children : Sally, James, of further mention ; 
Oliver, George. 

(VI) James Bulkeley, son of Solomon 
and Martha (Williams) Bulkeley, was born 
January 8, 1778, and died at Rocky Hill, 
Connecticut, January 29, i860. He was a 
seafaring man, and was known as Captain 
James. He married Hannah Meyer, who 
was born June 25, 1787, and died June 23, 
1871, and they were the parents of nine 
children: i. Sarah, who married Sylvester 
Goodrich. 2. Harriet, w-ho married Rudol- 
phus Griswold. 3. Julia, who married David 
Smell. 4. James. 5. George W. 6. Eliza, 
who married Isaac Sperry. 7, Nancy, who 
married Edwin Kisley. 8. Jane, who mar- 
ried Joseph Latham. 9. William Riley, of 
further mention. 

(VII) William Riley Bulkeley, son of 
James and Hannah (Meyer) Bulkeley, was 
born in Rocky Hill, Connecticut, April 7, 
1825, and died there, December 18, 1895. 
His entire life was spent in the town in 
which he was born. He was engaged in 
farming, but also took an active part in 
public affairs, serving as selectman and at 
different times holding practically all of the 
offices of the town as well as representing 
his district in the State Legislature. He was 
highly esteemed among all who knew him, 
and was one of the loyal and progressive 
citizens of his community. Fraternally he 



[08 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGrL^PHY 



was affiliated with Washington Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Glastonbury, Con- 
necticut. He married, in Glastonbury, Con- 
necticut, Emma Sophia Freeman, who was 
born in Glastonbury, Connecticut, October 
24, 1830, and died February 19, 1905, 
daughter of David and Mary Freeman, and 
a descendant of Elder William Brewster. 
They were the parents of eight children: 
I. William, who was born May 29, 185 1, 
and died December 20, 1908. 2. James E., 
who was born February 4, 1854, and died 
]\Iay 12, 1917. 3. Helen E., who was born 
May I, 1856, married Olin Hill. 4. Emma 
M., who was born August i, 1857, and died 



also made a director of the Ilolyoke Water 
Power Company; a trustee of the Xew Eng- 
land Investment and Security Company, 
president of the Springfield Fire and Marine 
Insurance Company, also a director; trustee 
of the Springfield Institution for Savings ; 
vice-president and trustee of the Springfield 
Railway Companies; vice-president and di- 
rector of the Springfield Street Railway 
Company, and director of the Third Na- 
tional Bank. He also is vice-president of 
the Citizens' League, and is a member of 
Lafayette Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons; Hartford Chapter, Royal Arch Ma- 
sons; Springfield Council, Roval and Select 



July 7, 1887. 5. Charles E., who was born Masters; Springfield Commandery, Knights 



April 5, 1863. 6. Mary H., who was born 
February 28, 1866, married William Saun- 
ders. 7. George G., of further mention. 
8. Jane J., who was born March 29, 1875. 
(VIII) George Grant Bulkley, son of 
William R. and Emma Sophia (Freeman) 
Bulkley, was born in Rocky Hill, Connec- 
ticut, February 4, 1871, and received his 
education in the public schools of Rocky 
Hill and of Hartford, Connecticut. When 
his school training was completed, he be- 
came identified with the Orient Fire Insur- 
ance Company, of Hartford, and that con- 
nection he maintained until 1902. He then 



Templar, and of Melha Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; 
also the Colony Club and the Nayasset Club. 
His religious affiliation is with Faith Con- 
gregational Church, which he serves as a 
member of the prudential committee and 
chairman of the official board. 

George G. Bulkley married, on June 11, 
1895, Caroline A. Griswold, daughter of 
Charles F. and Caroline D. (Hale) Gris- 
wold. Mrs. Caroline D. (Hale) Griswold 
died, March 12, 1923. at the home of her 
daughter, Mrs. Caroline A. (Griswold) 
Bulkley. Mrs. Griswold was a great-grand- 



went to Pennsylvania, where he was engaged daughter of Moses Church, who was Spring- 



in the same line of business until 1912. In 
that year he removed to Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, and accepted an official position 
with the Springfield Fire and Marine In- 
surance Company, of that city. In 191 7 
he was elected vice-president of this com- 
pany, which position he held up to the death 
of Mr. Damon, when, on January 14, 1924, 
he was elected president. The concern is 
one of the largest and best established of 
its kind in the country and is steadily in- 
creasing the scope of its operations. Mr. 
Bulkley has fully demonstrated his ability in 
the insurance field, and also his value to the 
firm with which he is associated. Upon 
the death of Mr. Damon, Mr. Bulkley was 



field's first postmaster, and who received his 
first appointment from Postmaster General 
Benjamin Franklin in 1775. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bulkley are the parents of five children: 
I. George Grant, who was born December 
23. 1896, graduated from the Yale-Sheffield 
Scientific School and is now special agent 
for the Niagara Insurance Company of New 
York. 2. Charles Griswold. who was born 
November 6, 1900; graduated from Andover 
and is now at the Yale-Sheffield Scientific 
School. 3. Chester Beach, who was born 
December 9, 1906. 4. James Stewart, who 
was born August 4. 1909. 5. Caroline, who 
was born September 10, 191 2, and died 
April 24, 1921. 



109 



EN'CVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



DE MEYER, John Everard 

Alter nearly a quarter of a century of 
successful service in the teaching profession, 
John Everard De Meyer identified himself 
with the Milton Bradley Company, of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and devoted his 
attention to the production and distribution 
of school supplies. He is now director of 
agencies of the Milton Bradley Company 

(q.v.). 

John De Meyer, great-grandfather of Mr. 
De Meyer, was a linen manufacturer of 
Ghent, Belgium. He and his wife Mary 
were the parents of four children : John 
(2), of further mention; Mary, Charles, 
Stephen. 

John (2) De Meyer, son of John and 
Mary De Meyer, was born in Ghent, Bel- 
gium, in 178S, and died in Eastbrook, Maine, 
in 1870. As a young lad he was drafted 
into the French Army and fought under 
Napoleon for several years. He was 
wounded and taken prisoner by the British 
at Salamanca, Spain, and with nine ship- 
loads of prisoners was taken to the Island 
of Campobello, in the Bay of Fundy, Can- 
ada. From there he made his escape from 
the British and landed in the town of Co- 
lumbia, Maine, where he remained for two 
years, finding employment in a mill, engaged 
in the manufacture of cloth. From Colum- 
bia, he went to Sullivan, Maine, and there 
secured employment on the ferr>' which 
plied between Sullivan and Hancock, Maine, 
where today a fine bridge makes easy trans- 
Ix)rtation. Two or three years later, he 
left Sullivan and went to Ellsworth, Maine, 
and it was there that he met his future 
wife. He^ound employment on a farm in 
Ellsworth for about three years, and though 
offered land for a nominal sum in the pres- 
ent village of Ellsworth, he again changed 
his place of residence and went to East- 
brook. Maine. There he purchased a farm 
and resided thereon to the time of his death. 
A friend of his, a Mr. Billings, who had 
fought with him in the Napoleonic wars 
and was a participant in the battle of Water- 



loo, purchased the adjoining farm, and the 
two friends spent many pleasant hours in 
each other's company, talking over old times 
and comparing notes concerning their crops. 

John (2) De Meyer married, on Janu- 
ary 4, 1820, Lucy Maddox, of Ellsworth, 
Maine, who was born in 1794, and died in 
1877, daughter of John and Catherine (Hil- 
ton) Maddox. They were the parents of 
eleven children: i. Nancy, who married Joel 
Stokes. 2. Harriet, who married Durkie 
Scofield. 3. Carolyn, who married John 
Clark. 4. Maria, who married Gardner 
Freeman. 5. Augustus, who died at the 
age of six years. 6, Charlotte, who married 
Dexter Johnson. 7. Rosella, who married 
John Billings. 8. Catherine, who married 
James Waterhouse. 9. John L., o^ further 
mention. 10. Charles, who died in infancy. 
II. Julia Ann, who married Daniel Hen- 
derson. 

John L. De Meyer, son of John (2) 
and Lucy (Maddox) De ^leyer, was born 
in Eastbrook, Maine, in 1837, and died 
there in February, 1919. He spent his en- 
tire life in Eastbrook, where he was engaged 
in agricultural pursuits. He married Mary 
Dunn, of Franklin, IMaine, daughter of Ed- 
ward Dunn, and they were the parents of 
five children: i. Lena, who married Halbert 
P. Blaisdell. 2. John Everard, of further 
mention. 3. Fred A. 4. Elwood. 5. Eliza- 
beth, who married Vernon G. Haslon. 

John Everard De Meyer, son of John L. 
and Mary (Dunn) De Meyer, was born 
in Eastbrook, Maine, March 23, 1880. and 
after attending the public schools of his 
native district became a student in Hebron 
Academy, from which he was graduated in 
1900. He then engaged in teaching for one 
year, at the end of which time he entered 
Baies College, at Lewiston, Maine, where he 
completed his course with graduation in 
1905. Since that time he has been con- 
tinuously engaged in educational work, first 
as a teacher and an executive for a period 
of thirteen years, and since 1918 has been 
a purveyor of educational books and devices. 



110 



^<\ 






.v| 








iKX^.-a^S.^ 




ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



He efficiently served as principal of the hip^h 
school and later as superintendent, of the 
school system of Scituate, Marshfield, and 
Duxbury, all in Massachusetts. That re- 
sponsible position he efficiently filled until 
1909 when he resigned in order to accept 
the position as superintendent of the schools 
of Abington and Bridgewater, in Massa- 
chusetts. In 1918 he turned his attention 
to another phase of educational work by 
associating himself with the iVIilton Bradley 
Company, of Springfield, as assistant man- 
ager of their educational department. There 
his long experience with the needs of the 
teaching profession enabled him to render 
valuable service, and he is now director of 
agencies of the Milton Bradley Company. 
His business takes him all over the United 
States and brings him in touch with the 
schools of all the larger cities, as well as 
the numerous branch offices of the company 
throughout the United States. Mr. De 
Meyer is doing a splendid work, not only for 
the concern with which he is identified, but 
for the school systems with which he comes 
in touch. In many localities he has placed 
in the hands of the teaching profession ma- 
terial and devices which greatly increase the 
value of their work, and he has also ren- 
dered valuable service in suggesting to the 
company the needs of the profession which 
before had been unprovided for. 

Fraternally, Mr. De Meyer is a member 
of Lygonia Lodge, Xo. 40, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Ellsworth, Maine; of 
Pilgrim Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of 
Abington, Massachusetts; of Abington 
Council, Royal and Select Masters ; of Old 
Colony Commandery, Knights Templar, of 
Abington, Massachusetts ; and of Aleppo 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
^Mystic Shrine, of Boston, Massachusetts. 
He is well known in club circles, being a 
member of the Old Colony Club, Winthrop 
Club, Springfield Country Club, and Long 
Meadow Country Club. 

John Everard De Meyer married, on Oc- 
tober I, 1907, Maud Reed, of Greene, Maine, 



daughter of Charles and Vina (Mason) 
Reed. Mr. and Mrs. De Meyer are the 
parents of two sons: i. John Reed, who 
was born in Abington, Massachusetts. Octo- 
ber 19, 1909, and is the fifth John De Meyer 
in his line. 2. Edgar Sanborn, who was 
born in Abington, Massachusetts, August 
30, 191 1. 



WALKER, Herman Chester 

Under the business title of the Walker 
Forestry Company, Herman Chester 
Walker, one of the prominent men of that 
town, and present chairman (1925) of the 
Board of Selectmen, is taking care of an 
extensive landscape and forestry business in 
West Springfield and vicinity. 

Mr. Walker traces descent from Thomas 
Walker, who was in Boston in 1650, and 
died in 1659. He had a son Thomas, who 
was born in England about 1625 and was 
in Sudbury in 1664. William Walker, son 
of Thomas (2) Walker, born July 22. 1666. 
married Sarah Goodenow, and the line de- 
scends through their son Thomas, born Au- 
gust 15, 1689, who married Elizabeth 
^Faynard ; their son Paul, who married 
(first) Sally Gibbs. (second) Elizabeth 
Bogle; their son William, of whom fur- 
ther, grandfather of Herman Chester 
Walker. 

William Walker, son of Paul Walker, was 
born in 1812. and died in Marlboro. Massa- 
chusetts, in 1892. He was a successful 
farmer, who cultivated some one hundred 
and fifty acres of land. His religious con- 
nection was with the Congregational 
Church. He married (first) Catherine Bea- 
ton, (second) Julia S. Woods. The chil- 
dren of the first marriage were: i. Emily 
L. 2. Thomas. 3. Joseph, of whom fur- 
ther. 4. Annie. The children of the sec- 
ond marriage were: 5. Curtis. 6. Horace W. 
7. Hiram W^ 8. Cora. 

Joseph Walker, son of William and Cath- 
erine (Beaton) Walker, was born in Marl- 
boro, Massachusetts, April 26. 1845. and 
after receiving a good practical education 



III 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in the public schools of his native district, 
engaged in general farming. Since 1875 he 
has been on the same farm, and he has 
ad<led to his farming operations a prosper- 
ous dairy, lie has always been deeply in- 
terested in music, and when quite young 
learned to play the clarinet and became a 
member of Brigham's Orchestra and later 
of other musical organizations. This inter- 
est was permanent, and for thirty years he 
was well known not only as a clarinetist, 
but as a violinist. He at various times or- 
ganized orchestras consisting of five, eight, 
or ten instruments, and played for dances 
and entertainments throughout a vi^ide area 
surrounding Marlboro. On April 26, 1923, 
the "Worcester Gazette" announced: "Jo- 
seph Walker, of the Framingham Road, is 
seventy-eight today. He is one of the best- 
known citizens of Marlboro and is receiving 
the congratulations of a large number of 
friends and relatives." Mr. Walker is a 
member of the Marlboro Grange, has been 
Master of the Local and Pomona Granges, 
and is now Past Master of the Patrons of 
Husbandry, Politically he gives his support 
to the Republican Party, and his religious 
affiliation is with the Congregational 
Church. Joseph Walker married. May 6, 
1874, Francena Elizabeth Wood, who was 
born in Southboro, Massachusetts, Novem- 
ber 2, 1 85 1, daughter of Morgan and 

CDix) Wood. Their children are: i. Carl 
E. 2. Edith, who married Herbert E. Lov- 
ering. 3. Albert W, 4. Alice W., who mar- 
ried Walter Patch. 5. Emma Isabelle. 6. 
Herman Chester, of whom further. 7. Ruth 
A. 8. Edith, who married Jedediah Per- 
kins. 

Herman Chester Walker, son of Joseph 
and Francena Elizabeth (Wood) Walker, 
was born in Marlboro, Massachusetts, June 
I, 1888, and received his education in the 
public schools of Marlboro, completing the 
grammar and high school courses. While 
still attending school he entered the employ 
of the telephone company, as night opera- 
tor, and in the same connection served as 



repair man on Saturday afternoons. He 
graduated from the high school in 1907, 
and after graduation found employment with 
the National Lamp Association, of Marl- 
boro, which is engaged in the manufacture 
of incandescent lamps. Later, he severed 
his connection with that firm and removed to 
Central Falls, Rhode Island, where in the 
same connection he took charge of the fila- 
ment department. In 1908 he became a 
student in the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College in Amherst. It was necessary that 
he should earn his way, and in order to do 
this he leased the Brooks Farm House and 
rented rooms and gave board to the stu- 
dents. Later, he purchased the John Nash 
property in order to increase his income by 
housing a large number of freshmen. Dur- 
ing his college years he took an active part 
in athletics, playing hockey and football, 
serving as captain of the football team, and 
becoming popular among his classmates. He 
was elected a member of the college Senate, 
of which he later was made president, serv- 
ing in that capacity throughout his senior 
year. He graduated in 1912 and later re- 
ceived his degree. W' hen his college course 
was completed, he engaged in forestry, in 
association with H, L. Frost & Company, 
of Boston, a farm which was engaged in 
landscape forestry. That connection he 
maintained until 191 3, when he located in 
Providence, Rhode Island, and engaged in 
forestry for himself. Later, however, he 
formed an association with Mr. Castle, under 
the name of Walker & Castle, and engaged 
in the same line of activity in West Spring- 
field, with offices at No. 168 Bridge Street, 
Springfield. This continued until 1914, 
when Mr. Castle withdrew and since then 
Mr, Walker has operated alone. Mr. Walker 
not only has a large business in and near 
Springfield, but also in Providence, Rhode 
Island. He has had charge of the land- 
scape and forestry work on many large es- 
tates and is well known as a scientific and 
artistic landscape forester. Since 1914 he 
has conducted the business alone, operating 



112 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



under the name of the Walker Forestry 
Company, His field of operation includes 
a large territory in Western Massachusetts, 
and he is a large employer of labor. Since 
locating in West Springfield, Mr. W^alker 
has been very active in local public affairs ; 
he served for a time as a member of the 
park board, in which capacity he was 
constantly striving to aid in the beautifying 
of the town and its environs. He has for a 
number of years been on the board and was 
chairman of the Board of Selectmen of 
West Springfield, 1922-1925, and has al- 
ways evidenced a deep interest in all that 
pertains to the civic advancement of the 
community. During the World War he 
served as captain of the Liberty Loan drives 
and was an indefatigable worker in that 
field. He is also secretary of West Spring- 
field Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Walker 
is well known in fraternal circles, being 
a member of Mt. Orthodox Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of West Springfield ; 
and of Bela Grotto, Mystic Order Veiled 
Prophets of the Enchanted Realm, of 
Springfield, also Tekoa Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Fish and Game Club. His re- 
ligious affiliation is with the Congregational 
Church, which he is serving as superintend- 
ent of the Sunday School. 

On October 31, 1914, Herman Chester 
Walker married Clara Vilena Farr, of Hol- 
yoke, Massachusetts, daughter of Dennie L. 
and Augusta (Schaefer) Farr. 

Dennie L. Farr, who came of an old Mas- 
sachusetts family, was born in Chesterfield, 
New Hampshire, November 29, 1861, and 
died in Holyoke, Massachusetts, May 19, 
1909. He was one of the most popular men 
in the city of Holyoke, which he served in 
various public capacities. Augusta (Schae- 
fer) Farr, his wife, was a daughter of 
Leonard Schaefer, of Windsor Locks, Con- 
necticut. 

Herman Chester and Clara Vilena (Farr) 
Walker became the parents of two chil- 



dren: r. Elizabeth, wlio was born August 
17, 1916. 2. Virginia, horn April 6, 191 8. 



ANDREWS, Dr. Robert Robbins 

The Andrews family is a very old one, 
dating back to early Colonial times in this 
country and descending from a long line 
of worthy ancestors in the Old World. The 
name signifies "manly" or "courageous," 
and has for centuries been prominent in the 
history of Scotland, from which country 
came most of the early immigrants of the 
name. It is derived from the given name 
"Andrew," the surname Andrews being 
originally used to designate a son of An- 
drew. As early as 1675, Rev. Samuel An- 
drews, of Scotch parentage, graduated from 
Harvard College, and entered the ministry. 
He served for many years at Saybrook, 
Connecticut, and was one of the founders 
of the Collegiate School there. Another of 
the name was one of the eighty-four foun- 
ders of the ancient town of Tunxis, later 
known as Farmington, and throughout the 
history of New England descendants of the 
various early immigrants of the name have 
been prominent. The branch of the family 
to which Dr. Robert R. Andrews belongs 
traces descent from the group which set- 
tled in Hingham, Massachusetts, and has 
scattered to many different sections of the 
country. 

(I) Thomas (i) Andrews, of Boston, 
Massachusetts, married (first), August 31, 
1704, Esther Wolcott ; (second). December 
7, 1713, Susanna Stetson. Qiildren: i. 
Esther, born June 30, 1706. 2. Martha. 
3. Thomas (2). of whom further. 

(II) Thomas (2) Andrews, son of 
Thomas (i) Andrews, probably by his sec- 
ond wife, lived in Boston, Massachusetts. 
He married. November 6, 1746, Anne 
Blake, and they were the parents of chil- 
dren, among whom was (probably) Thomas 
(3), of further mention. 

(III) Thomas (3) Andrews, son (prob- 
alily) of Thomas (2) and Anne (Blake) 
Andrews, was a resident of Boston, Massa- 



113 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



chusetts. He married, and among his chil- 
dren was Thomas (4), of further mention. 

(IV) Thomas (4) Andrews, son of 
Thomas (3) Andrews, was also a resident 
of Boston. He married, in Boston, Febru- 
ary 22, 1804, Betsy Bowie, daughter of 
Jonathan and Lydia Osborn (Fathingham) 
Bowie. Children: i. Robert L., a prom- 
inent dentist of Boston. 2. Thomas Jeffer- 
son, of further mention. 

(V) Thomas Jefferson Andrews, son of 
Thomas (4) and Betsy (Bowie) Andrews, 
was an able and energetic man, who took 
an active part in the affairs of the commu- 
nity in which he lived and was for many 
years a custom house official in Boston. He 
married Jerusha Baker Robbins, and they 
were the parents of six children: i. Lizzie. 
I., who married Walter Eaton. 2. Mary, 
who married Rev. Charles Dennison, and 
was a well-known writer and author, one 
of her books, "That Husband of Mine," 
having a sale of more than 300,000 copies, 
and her poems and stories continuing to 
appear in the best magazines until she was 

•more than eighty years of age. 3. Joseph. 
4. Frank. 5. James Badson. 6. Dr. Robert 
Robbins, of further mention. 

(VI) Dr. Robert Robbins Andrews, son 
of Thomas Jefferson and Jerusha Baker 
(Robbins) Andrews, was born at Boston, 
August 7, 1844, and died in February, 1921. 
His maternal great-grandfather was Robert 
Lash, a friend of Paul Revere, and a ship- 
builder who was constructing vessels at the 
time John Hart, the builder of the old 
frigate "Constitution," was working at his 
trade. Robert Lash was also a soldier in 
the Revolutionary War, during which con- 
flict he was taken prisoner. His sufferings 
in the old mill prison in England have be- 
come a tradition among his descendants. 
His son, Robert Lash, of Chelsea, Massa- 
chusetts, commanded the Knights Templar 
at the laying of the cornerstone of Bunker 
Hill Monument. The maternal grandfather 
of Dr. Robert Robbins Andrews, Joseph 
Robbins, was the first comb maker in this 



country. He came from England, and set- 
tled in Newbury, Newtown, Massachusetts, 
where he made a reputation as an artist 
in his work, and from which place many 
of the exquisite shell combs made by him 
went to various Colonial families, whose 
descendants still include them among their 
highly prized possessions. 

The early boyhood of Robert Robbins 
Andrews was spent in Chelsea, Massachu- 
setts, to which place his mother removed 
after the death of his father, which oc- 
curred when the lad was four years of 
age ; in Washington, D. C. ; in Camden, 
New Jersey ; in Buffalo, New York ; and in 
Hyde Park, Massachusetts, in all of which 
cities he attended the public schools. When 
his school training was completed, he be- 
came associated with his uncle, Dr. Robert 
L, Robbins, a well-known dentist of Bos- 
ton, who was engaged in practice in that 
city for more than forty years, and who 
carved all the teeth he used in his large 
and important practice. Young Robert R. 
was fourteen years of age when he began 
the study of dentistry under the tutelage 
of his uncle, and that connection he main- 
tained for a period of seven years. At the 
end of that time came the outbreak of the 
Civil War, and he at once enlisted as a 
private in Company H, 47th Regiment, Mas- 
sachusetts Volunteers. He was discharged, 
at the expiration of his term of service, with 
the rank of sergeant, and at once reenlisted 
in the 60th Massachusetts Volunteers, in 
which he was commissioned a lieutenant and 
served on the regimental staff. He served 
under General Butler and General Banks 
from the autumn of 1862 to the fall of 
1864, and upon his return to civilian life 
resumed his professional studies. Later, he 
became a student in Boston Dental College, 
from which he was graduated in 1875, with 
the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. 
During the last year of his college course 
he met his expenses by demonstrating den- 
tal embryology to his classmates, and so 
well was this work done that after his grad- 



114 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



uation he was made professor of Dental 
Histology in the institution in which he 
had just completed his studies. That con- 
nection he maintained for a period of seven 
years, at the end of which time he resigned 
and, opening an ofhce in Boston and another 
in Hyde Park, IMassachusetts, engaged in 
practice for himself, giving two days of 
each week to the Hyde Park office. Earlv 
in 1869 he removed to Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, and there the remainder of his 
active career was passed. In 1892 he re- 
ceived his honorary degree of Master of 
Arts from Dartmouth College in recogni- 
tion of his research work in dental embry- 
ology, and for more than thirty years he 
was deeply interested in microscopical work. 
He has done much original research work 
along this line, and has, in this connection, 
made many valuable contributions to dental 
literature, his most important paper being 
"Enamel, and the Minute Processes Taking 
Place During Its Development." This 
paper was read at the International Med- 
ical Congress at Berlin, in 1880, which con- 
gress he attended as secretary from Amer- 
ica. He has written numerous papers on 
dental embryology for the various dental 
journals, also on the dental tissues in health 
and in disease, and has done considerable 
towards demonstrating the processes of de- 
velopment before various dental societies all 
over the country. Professor Andrews wrote 
the chapter entitled "The Embryology of 
the Dental Tissue" for the first and second 
editions of Kirk's "American Text-Book of 
Operative Dentistry," and he also contrib- 
uted a chapter to "The Annual of the Uni- 
versal Medical Sciences." in 1888. Dr. An- 
drews was elected a Fellow of the Royal 
IMicroscopical Society of Great Britain, in 
May, 1895, and was a member of the Royal 
Microscopical Society, and a corresponding 
member of the Microscopical Society of 
Belgium, and of several other microscopical 
societies. He was chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Microscopy and Bacteriology at 
the World's Columbian Dental Congress, 



held at Chicago, Illinois, in 1892; honorary 
chairman of the Section of Oral and Dental 
Surgery, Pan-American Medical Congress, 
in 1892. In 1893 he was asked to accept 
the chair of Histology at the New York 
Dental School. In recognition of the valu- 
able service rendered in the dental profes- 
sion. Dr. Andrews has been the recipient 
of many honors. Pie has served as pres- 
ident of the Massachusetts State Dental 
Society, and of the American Academy of 
Dental Science, of Boston (1896). He held 
membership in the Boston Society of Dental 
Improvement; the Section of Stomatology, 
the New Jersey State Dental Society, and of 
numerous other organizations. He has in- 
vented many devices and contrivances for 
improving and expediting the work of the 
dental surgeon, and in 1867 invented a mal- 
let for condensing gold in filling teeth. In 
1893 he was asked by Governor W. E. 
Russell to accept a position as member of the 
Massachusetts Board of Registration in 
Dentistry, and in 1899 ^^ ^'^s elected a 
member of the board of trustees of Tufts 
College, which he served until his death 
as a member of the Executive Committee. 

Politically, Dr. Andrews gave his support 
to the Republican Party, but in city affairs 
was non-partisan. In 1897 he was elected 
to membership of the first class in the mili- 
tary Order of the Loyal Legion, Massachu- 
setts Commandery, and he was also a mem- 
ber of the University Club of Boston; of 
the Colonial Club of Cambridge; and of the 
Boston Art Club, with which he was con- 
nected for twenty-five years. He was in- 
terested in art and was himself an artist 
of considerable ability. He had a fine col- 
lection of oil paintings, many of which had 
been painted for him by his artist friends, 
and he also exhibited many of his own 
paintings in the galleries of the Boston Art 
Club. He also had a valuable collection of 
old ivory Japanese carvings and rare pieces 
of old Satsuma. His vacation days were 
passed at his mountain home, "Brookside." 
in the beautiful town of Randolph, in North- 



11' 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



em Xew Hampshire, just under the northern 
wall of Mounts Adams and Madison. In 
earlier years Dr. Andrews was a member of 
the Warren Literary Association and of the 
Mercantile Library Association of Boston, 
and sometimes took part in their dramatic 
entertainments. This caused him to become 
interested in the writing of plays, and in 
1870 he wrote a comedietta, entitled, "Fairly 
Won." which was produced at the W^arren 
Literary Association, in Boston. In 1870 
his comedietta, "Silverstone's Wager," was 
played at Lingard's New Adelphia Theatre, 
in Boston, and was also given at Selwyn's 
Theatre. During the same year he also 
wrote a farce, "Wollop's Wooing," a com- 
edietta, "She's Fast Asleep," and a three- 
act comedy entitled, "Scheme." He was 
fond of music and had also written a num- 
ber of poems, which were published in the 
"Boston Transcript." Among them is 
"An Ode," "Maybe," "Where Father Fell," 
and "Alone." The following excerpt from 
one of Dr. Andrews' poems, published in the 
"Boston Transcript," in 1869, gives an idea 
of the quiet beauty which characterizes his 
work : 

Evening 

The distant hills are purpled in the mist. 

And crimsoned boughs sway gently to and fro; 

Bright mottled leaves, by balmy zephyrs kissed. 
Fall trembling to the mossy bank below. 

The sun sinks slowly on his bed of gold, 
The song bird, silent now, is in its nest, 

The evening star is blinking o'er the world. 
And Nature, fading, lulls herself to rest. 

On the evening of Saturday, February 29, 
1908, the long and active service of Dr. 
Andrews in the dental profession was rec- 
ognized by a banquet given in his honor by 
the several dental societies of Massachu- 
setts, and the two dental colleges. The af- 
fair was held in the Hotel Somerset, in 
Boston, where, in the grand banquet hall, 
were seated two hundred prominent dental 
surgeons from all parts of New England 
and from distant parts of the country. Let- 



ters, telegrams, and cablegrams came from 
men whose names are famous in the field of 
science not only in the United States and 
Canada, but on the continent of Europe, 
and during the banquet a massive silver 
loving cup was presented to Dr. Andrews. 
The speech of presentation was made by Dr. 
Eugene H. Smith, dean of the Harvard 
Dental School, and among the after-dinner 
speakers were such men as President Ham- 
ilton, of Tufts College; Dr. Edward C. 
Kirk, editor of the "Dental Cosmos," of 
Philadelphia; Dr. John L. Hildreth, of 
Cambridge; Dr. George S. Allan, of New 
York; Dr. Henry O. Marcy, of Boston; 
Dr. S. W. Davenport, of New Y^ork; Pro- 
fessor George A. Bates, of Tufts College; 
Dr. Edwin T. Darby, of Philadelphia ; Pro- 
fessor B. Holly Smith, of Baltimore, and 
Dr. Edgar O. Kinsman, of Cambridge. 

Dr. Robert R. Andrews married, on 
September 14, 1870, Mary Emily LeSeur, 
who died October 12, 1921, daughter of Dr. 
Horatio LeSeur, a well-known dentist in 
Boston, where he has been engaged in prac- 
tice for a period of forty years, and Hannah 
Cook (W^aterman) LeSeur. Dr. Robert R. 
and Mary Emily (LeSeur) Andrews were 
the parents of five children: i. Angeline 
Edith, who married Albin L. Richards, an 
attorney of Boston, and has two daughters : 
Mary, and Ethel Leah. 2. Mary. 3. Ethel, 
who married Bruce Wyman, an attorney in 
Waban, Massachusetts, and has two chil- 
dren: Andrews and Rosemary. 4. Robert 
Eaton, a biography of whom follows. 5. 
Horatio LeSeur, a dentist of Waban, Mas- 
sachusetts, who married Grace Hind, and 
has three children: IMuriel, Robert R., and 
Richard. 



ANDREWS, Robert Eaton, M.D. 

Thorough preparation and a varied ex- 
perience has eminently fitted Dr. Robert 
Eaton Andrews for the efficient discharge 
of the duties and responsibilities of his pres- 
ent position, that of medical director for the 
Fisk Rubber Company, of Chicopee Falls, 



116 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Massachusetts, where he has charge of the 
physical well-being of some four thousand 
employees. 

Dr. Robert Eaton Andrews, of the sev- 
enth generation of the Andrews family, son 
of Dr. Robert Robbins and IMary Emily 
(LeSeur) Andrews (see preceding biog- 
raphy), was born in Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts, May 4, 187S, and received his early 
and preparatory education in the public 
schools of his native city and in the Brown 
and Nichols private school in Cambridge, 
Upon the completion of his preparatory 
course he entered Harvard College, from 
which he was graduated in 1899, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. He then be- 
gan his professional studies in the Harvard 
Medical School, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1903 with the degree Doctor of 
Medicine. After the completion of his 
course in the Medical College he spent two 
and one-half years in the Boston City Hos- 
pital, and this experience he supplemented 
with six months on the out-patient staff. He 
then became associated with Dr. John L. 
Hildreth of Cambridge, with whom he re- 
mained for a period of five years, at the 
same time building up his general practice. 
For eight years he continued in practice, 
building up a large and important clientele. 
During the World War he enlisted and was 
commissioned, September 4, 1918, as first 
lieutenant, and sent to Camp Greenleaf, 
Chickamauga, Georgia, later being trans- 
ferred to the Army General Hospital No. 
32, at Chicago, Illinois, where he remained 
until he received his honorable discharge, 
April 25, 1919. Soon after his return to 
civilian life he became associated with the 
Ludlow Manufacturing Associates, at Lud- 
low, Massachusetts, in the capacity of med- 
ical director, and that important position he 
held till January i, 1924, when he resigned 
to accept a similar position with the Fisk 
Rubber Company, of Chicopee Falls, where, 
as above stated, he has the oversight of the 
physical welfare of some 4,000 employees of 
this concern. He is a member of the Mas- 



sachusetts Medical Society; the American 
Medical Association ; the Massachusetts So- 
ciety of Medical Examiners; the New Eng- 
land Conference of Industrial Physicians; 
the American Association of Military Sur- 
geons; and of the Springfield Academy of 
Medicine. His religious affiliation is with 
the Episcopal Church. 

Dr. Robert E. Andrews married, on Feb- 
ruary 10, 1914, Gladys Robinson, formerly 
of Woonsocket, Rhode Island, but resided 
for some years before her marriage at 
Waban, Massachusetts. She is a daughter 
of Israel and Leah Amelia COaks) Robin- 
son. Dr. and Mrs. Andrews are the par- 
ents of one daughter, Leah Althea, who was 
born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, January 
10, 1915. Dr. Andrews is a resident of 
Springfield, where he owns a fine home at 
No. 121 Dartmouth Terrace, 



BOAS, Ralph Philip 

Ralph Philip Boas, who was until July, 
1924, head of the department of English 
in the Central High School of Springfield, 
is now (1924) associate professor of Eng- 
lish of Mt. Holyoke College. While in 
Springfield, in addition to his regular school 
cluties, Mr, Boas was director of evening 
schools and evening school extension, was 
deeply interested in Americanization work, 
and is the author of several books. 

Herman Boas, father of Ralph Philip 
Boas, was born in Gnesen, Germany, in 1854, 
and died in Providence, Rhode Island, in 
1898, aged forty-four years. In 1863, when 
he was nine years of age. he came to this 
country, settling first in Boston, where he 
learned the tailor's trade, and where, in his 
spare time, he, by self-directed study, ac- 
quired a good education. He finally located 
in Providence. Rhode Island, where he was 
a successful merchant tailor, and a repre- 
sentative citizen. His business grew stead- 
ilv. and he employed many men during the 
later years of his career. As prosperity 
came to him. he invested in real estate, and 
became a large owner of property. He took 



117 



EXCVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



an active interest in local public affairs, and 
at one time was candidate for the office of 
alderman. Fraternally, he was affiliated with 
the Masonic Order, serving as Master of his 
lodjje. He passed through all the Scottish 
Rite bodies and received the thirty-second 
degree, and was an officer in the Grand 
Lodge of Rhode Island. His religious af- 
filiation was with the Jewish Congregation. 
He married Sarah Eisenberg, and they were 
the parents of si.x children: i. Bernard, of 
Pawtucket, Rhode Island. 2. Louis, of Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts. 3. Belle, who resides in 
New York City. 4. Ralph Philip, of fur- 
ther mention. 5. George, who is assistant 
professor of Philosophy in Johns Hopkins 
University, of Baltimore, and served as first 
lieutenant in the World War. 6. Edward, of 
Fall River, Massachusetts, who served over- 
seas during the World War. 

Ralph Philip Boas, son of Herman and 
Sarah (Eisenberg) Boas, was born in 
Providence, Rhode Island, May 22, 1887. 
He received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of Providence, and then became 
a student in Brown University, from which 
he was graduated in IQ08. He continued 
his studies in the University of Chicago 
from 1911 to 1912, and in 1917 received the 
degree of Master of Arts from Harvard 
University. Meantime, from 1911 to 191 7, 
he was associate professor of English in 
\\'hitman, Walla Walla, W^ashington. In 
1 91 7 he came East and accepted a position 
as head of the department of English of the 
Central High School of Springfield. Mr. 
Boas was also director of evening schools 
and evening school extension. He resigned 
from these positions in July, 1924, at which 
time he was appointed associate professor of 
English of Mt. Holyoke College. He has 
written articles for the "Atlantic Monthly" 
and for other publications, and several books, 
including "Youth and the New World," pub- 
lished by the "Atlantic Monthly" Press, 
"Leading Facts for New Americans," pub- 
lished by the American Book Company, and 
several others. He has also lectured for 



the State Extension Department. During 
the W^orld War Mr. Boas was associated 
with the Ordnance Department in Bridge- 
port, Connecticut. Fraternally, he is asso- 
ciated with Redwood Lodge, No. 35, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Providence, Rhode 
Island ; and with the society of Phi Beta 
Kappa. 

On September 6, 191 1, Ralph Philip Boas 
married Louise Schutz, of Providence, 
Rhode Island, daughter of Rudolph G. 
Schutz, who was born in Vienna, Austria, 
and of Esther (Beekman) Schutz, who was 
born in Charlotte, Vermont. Mr. and Mrs. 
Boas are the parents of two children: i. 
Ralph P., Jr., who was born in Walla Walla, 
Washington, August 8, 1912. 2. Marie, 
who was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
October 18, 1919. 



BETH, Arthur Alfred 

The death of Arthur Alfred Beth, March 
15, 1 92 1, at the comparatively early age of 
forty-two years, prematurely terminated a 
career of honorable achievement and faith- 
ful service in the city of Springfield. 

Arthur A. Beth, son of Arthur and Julia 
(Guyette) Beth, was born in Waterloo, Can- 
ada, May 14, 1879, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts. He was but a small child 
when his parents left Canada and came to 
"The States," settling in Chicopee, Massa- 
chusetts, and in the public schools of that 
town the lad received a careful training. He 
completed his preparation for a business ca- 
reer by taking a course in Childs' Business 
College, Springfield, and then, when seven- 
teen years of age, entered the real estate of- 
fice of T. F. Dwight, in Springfield, where 
he was employed until 191 7. In that year 
he entered the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness for himself, and continued successfully 
in that line to the time of his death. In 
addition to the responsibilities of a success- 
ful business enterprise, he was especially ac- 
tive in the political life of the city. He was 
for fourteen years a member of the Repub- 
lican City Committee, of which he was 



118 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



treasurer and later secretary and chairman, 
and was also on the City Property Commit- 
tee, and was chairman of both boards at the 
time of his death. He served on the Board 
of Councilmen in 1917; served a two-year 
term as alderman from Ward Eight; and 
used his influence to aid in the organization 
of the Woman's Republican Club, of which 
his wife was later elected president. He 
was a member of the Knights of Columbus 
and of Holy Family Parish. The qualities 
of character which won for him the love 
and esteem of his many friends is evidenced 
by the following tribute which appeared in 
the "Springfield Republican," which spoke 
of him as "a man enjoying the friendship 
and esteem of a great many people." 

Mayor Leonard, learning of Mr. Beth's 
death, said : "In the death of Arthur Beth 
the city has lost a valuable official. He gave 
unsparingly to the city of Springfield of his 
time and energy. He was loyal to his work 
and his friends." Other members of the 
board testified that he was "unselfish, broad- 
minded." "His death is a decided loss and 
his place cannot be filled. He showed no 
local partiality or prejudice." 

Arthur A. Beth married, August 17, 1908, 
Ella J. McCann, of Brooklyn, New York, 
daughter of Charles J. McCann, who was 
born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and 
Amanda (Runch) McCann. Mrs. Beth was 
born in Brooklyn, New York. Since her 
husband's death she has conducted the real 
estate and insurance business founded by her 
husband. She is one of the organizers of 
the Woman's Republican Club, of which she 
was elected president in 1924. She is also 
a member of the Republican Club of Spring- 
field. 



HALL, Arthur Samuel 

In addition to special training in the ]\Ias- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology, Arthur 
Samuel Hall, superintendent of the Spring- 
field Gas Light Company, has had a varied 
experience with several construction and en- 



gineering concerns and has l)een identified 
with three other gas companies. 

Since 1633 the name Hall has been a fa- 
miliar one in New England history. The 
old English fashion of designating the va- 
rious baronial estates as "halls" accounts for 
the very frequent occurrence of the name 
both in this country and in England, as John 
or George, designated as de la Hall (of the 
Hall), later adopted the name ?Iall as a 
surname. The combination, John Hall, is 
especially frequent among the early settlers 
in this country. The branch of the family 
to which Arthur Samuel Hall belongs is de- 
scended from an ancestor who remained in 
England. 

John Hall, grandfather of Arthur Sam- 
uel Hall, was of English birth. He was a 
sea captain, and a ship-master, and was en- 
gaged in the East India trade during the 
greater part of his life, and died in Boston, 
Massachusetts, in 1883. He married Jane A. 
Arol, a native of Scotland, who died in Bos- 
ton in 1895, at the age of eighty-four years. 
They were the parents of five children : 
John. William, Jane, Marian, and Sam- 
uel R., of further mention. 

Samuel R. Hall, son of John and Jane A. 
(Arol) Hall, was born in Boston. Massachu- 
setts, in 1838, and died in Medford, Mas- 
sachusetts, in 191 5. He was a young man 
twenty-three years of age when the Civil 
War began, and he enlisted in the 50th Mas- 
sachusetts Regiment, with which he served 
in the Red River Expedition under the com- 
mand of General Gates. After the close of 
the war he engaged in the wholesale com- 
mission business in the South, where he re- 
mained until 1888. In that year he came 
North and established a fish-canning busi- 
ness in East Boston. In both lines of 
business he was notably successful, and was 
well known as a man of unusual business 
sagacity. Fraternally he was affiliated with 
the Blue Lodge of the Masonic Order, also 
the Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, the 
Council of Royal and Select Masters, 
and the Commandery, Knights Templar. 



119 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Throughout his life he was a member of the 
Episcopal Church. He married Mary Char- 
lotte Eaton, of Wiscassct, Maine, daughter 
of Charles J. Eaton, and they are the parents 
of four children: i. Charlotte, who married 
William Donaghy. of Medford, Massachu- 
setts, 2. Percival R.. who is a wireless op- 
erator in the Philippine Islands. 3. Arthur 
Samuel, of further mention. 4. John, of 
Med ford, Massachusetts, who is an engineer 
in the employ of the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road. The last-named is married, and has 
two children : John and Samuel. 

Arthur Samuel Hall, son of Samuel R. 
and Mar>' Charlotte (Eaton) Hall, was born 
in New Orleans, Louisiana, November 23, 
1875, and received his early school training 
in the public schools of that city. Later, he 
continued his studies in the public schools 
of Boston, Massachusetts, and then took a 
special course in the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. After the completing 
of his technical training, he found his first 
employment as a boiler fireman and later 
became engineer in a shoe factory. In this 
way he secured valuable experience. He 
next became associated with a construction 
concern engaged in the erection of brick 
buildings. Meantime, he had been a member 
of the State Militia for thirteen years, and 
upon the entrance of the United States into 
the Spanish-American War he enlisted and 
was commissioned a second lieutenant in 
Company E. He was in Cuba and Porto 
Rico during the greater portion of the pe- 
riod of the war of 1898, spending nine 
months in the last-named place. After the 
close of the war he identified himself with 
the Maiden and Melrose (Massachusetts) 
Gas Light Company, where he held the 
position of mechanical engineer until 1904. 
In that year he made a change and associated 
himself with the Boston Consolidated Gas 
Company, serving in the capacity of mechan- 
ical engineer and general manager. His 
next connection was with the Pintsch Gas 
Company, of Pittsburgh, with which he re- 
mained as general superintendent for a pe- 



riod of three years. After severing his con- 
nection with that concern, he came to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and took charge of the 
gas plant of the Springfield Gas Light Com- 
pany, as superintendent of the plant, and that 
responsible position he has continued to effi- 
ciently fill to the present time (1924). IMr. 
Hall is well known in Masonic circles, being 
a member of Hampden Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Springfield, and of all 
bodies of the Scottish Rite up to and in- 
cluding the Consistory, in which he holds 
the thirty-second degree. He is also a mem- 
ber of Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a mem- 
ber of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and professionally keeps in close 
touch with nation-wide development in his 
profession through membership in the New 
England Association of Gas Engineers, the 
American Association of Gas Engineers, and 
the Engineering Society of Western Massa- 
chusetts. His religious affiliation is with the 
Episcopal Church. 

Arthur Samuel Hall married, on Novem- 
ber 25, 1900, Florence Griffith of Boston, 
who died September 12, 1924, They were 
the parents of two children : Arthur Gor- 
don, who was born in Maiden, Massachu- 
setts, December i, 1901, and is now complet- 
ing his third year in the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; and Mary Sellers, 
who was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
August 7, 1905, 



SMITH, Clifford Frederick 

Among the native-born sons of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, who have spent the en- 
tire period of their active careers up to the 
present time in municipal service there, is 
Cliff'ord F. Smith, city clerk. Since 1909 
he has been associated with that office, and 
previous to his election to the ofiice of clerk 
in January, 1922, he served for five years as 
assistant clerk. He is one of the highly es- 
teemed citizens of the city, and is well known 
in fraternal circles. 

(I) The branch of the Smith family to 



120 





^ S2Cy^»n^M::t:^ 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



which Clifford F. Smith belongs is a very 
old one and traces its ancestry in this coun- 
try to Richard Smith, who was born in Eng- 
land in 1 617, and came to this country at an 
early date. In September, 1684, he testified 
that he came to Wether sfield from Martha's 
Vineyard twenty years earlier, with his ves- 
sels, and did some work for Matthias Treat, 
his brother-in-law, and that he was then 
sixty-seven years of age. He was admitted 
a freeman in Wethersfield in 1669, having 
earlier, in October, 1649, received the gift 
of a home-lot from Richard Treat, and hav- 
ing served as collector in 1667. He received 
a grant of land at Xayaug in 1672. and is 
on record as having served in King Philip's 
\\'ar and as having contributed to the fund 
for the building of the meeting house. He 
also owned land in Xew London in 1652. 
He married Rebecca Treat, and they were 
the parents of eight children: i. Richard. 
2. Esther, who married John Strickland. 3. 
Beriah, who married Richard Fox. 4. 
Bethia, who married Joshua Stoddard. 
5. Jonathan. 6. Samuel. 7. Joseph, of fur- 
ther mention. 8. Benjamin. 

(II) Joseph Smith, son of Richard and 
Rebecca (Treat) Smith, was a resident of 
Aliddletown, Connecticut, for two or three 
years prior to 1655. In that year he had a 
homestead recorded to him in Wethersfield, 
and removed to Rocky Hill, where he was 
one of the first settlers, and where he re- 
ceived from the town lands by the riverside. 
He married, about 1653. Lydia Wright, 
daughter of Thomas Wright, He died in 
1673, and at a date prior to 1687, she mar- 
ried again, Harris. The children of 

Joseph and Lydia (Wright) Smith were: 

Lydia, who married Cole, Sergeant 

Joseph, of further mention ; Jonathan, and 
Samuel. 

(III) Sergeant Joseph Smith, son of 
Joseph and Lydia (Wright) Smith, was 
born in March, 1658, and removed to Had- 
ley, Massachusetts, about 1680. There he 
was admitted a freeman in 1690. In 1687 
he had charge of the grist mill at Mill River, 



about three miles north of the village, at 
which place he was the first settler and where 
he continued to the time of his death. He 
hired a part of the school land for many 
years, and he or his sons rented the mill 
during most of the period of the Indian 
wars. The house over the mill was prob- 
abl\- not occupied by the family at night 
until after the permanent peace with the In- 
dians was made in 1726, After that time 
he and his son Benjamin each built a small 
house there and lived in Mill River in 1731. 
He was a cooper by trade, and in 1696 was 
appointed sealer of weights and measures 
and also meat packer and ganger of casks. 
The first-named of these offices he continued 
to hold to the time of his death. In 1684 
he was among those taxed for the building 
of the Fort River bridge, and in 1696 he 
was proprietor of an inn in Hadley. In that 
same year he was chosen to serve as select- 
man and was reelected in 1707 and in 1710; 
and in 1720 he was serving as a member of 
the school board. His death occurred Oc- 
tober I, 1733. He married, February 11, 
1681, Rebecca Dickinson, who died Febru- 
ary 16, 1 73 1, aged seventy-three years. 
Their children were: i. Joseph, of further 
mention. 2. John. 3. Rebecca, who mar- 
ried Joseph Smith. 4. Jonathan. 5. Lydia, 
who married Joseph Chamberlain. 6. Ben- 
jamin, who married Elizabeth Crafts. 7. 
Elizabeth. 

(IV) Joseph Smith, son of Sergeant 
Joseph and Rebecca (Dickinson) Smith, was 
born in Hadley, Massachusetts. Xoveml>er 
8, 1 68 1, and died October 21, 1767. He was 
a cooper by trade, but lived on the homestead 
and cared for the grist mill. He also suc- 
ceeded his father as sealer of weights and 
measures, meat packer, and gauger of casks. 
He participated in the fight with the Indians 
in Deerfield meadows, February 29, 1704, 
and served as selectman of Hadley, 1735- 
1737. He married, in 1715, Sarah Alexan- 
der, who died Januarv' 31, 1768, and they 
were the parents of five children : Alex- 
ander, Edward, Reuben, of further men- 



121 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



tion ; Sarah, who married Windsor Smith, 
and Thomas. 

(V) Reuben Smith, son of Joseph and 
Sarah (Alexander) Smith, was born in 
South Hadley, Massachusetts. April 2, 1721. 
He married (first) Miriam Moody. She 
died February 16. 1770, and he married 
(second) Sibyl (Worthin^on) Smith, 
dau,t,'hter of Daniel Worthington, of Col- 
chester, Connecticut, and widow of Elijah 
Smith. He was the father of si.x children : 
Jonathan. Reul>en. Abigail, Miriam, Persis, 
and Deacon Selah, of further mention. 

(VI) Deacon Selah Smith, son of Reu- 
ben and Miriam (Moody) Smith, was born 
in South Hadley. Massachusetts, May 21, 
1764. and died January 27), 1824, He mar- 
ried Polly . who died in June, 1845. and 

they were the parents of eight children : 

1. Philomena, who was born March 31, 
1793, 2. Clarissa, who was born April 9, 
179^- 3- Reuben, of further mention. 4. 
Polly, who was born August 6, 1800. 5. Re- 
becca, born August 15, 1803. 6. Xancy, 
born February 11, 1809. died December 13, 
18 14. 7. Asenath. 8. Maria. 

(VII) Reuben Smith, son of Deacon 
Selah and Polly Smith, was born in South 
Hadley, Massachusetts, August 12, 1798. and 
died in the town of Ware, Massachusetts, 
September 9, 1861, aged sixty-three years. 
In addition to his activities as a farmer he 
followed the trade of the carpenter, and for 
many years lived in Ware, near the border 
of the town of Enfield, Alassachusetts. He 
was buried in the latter town. He married 
Lucy Dewitte, of Ware. Massachusetts, who 
was lx)rn August 8, 1801. and died Novem- 
ber 9. i86r, aged sixty years. Their chil- 
dren were: T. Sarah, born March 27, 1824. 

2. Harriet Maria, born April 17, 1826. 

3. Selah, born March 17. 1828. died August, 
1828. 4. Selah. born December 20, 1829. 
5. Mary Asenath. born April 17, 1834. 6. 
Edward Sylvester, of further mention. 
7. Levi Wright, born June 30, 1839; and a 
son. who was born August 25, 184 1. 

(VIII) Edward Sylvester Smith, son of 



Reuben and Lucy (Dewitte) Smith, was 
born in South Hadley, Massachusetts, June 
29, 1836, and died in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, October 15, 1898. He received his 
education in the public schools of his native 
district and then found his first employment 
in one of the paper mills of the city. With 
the exception of a short period of time, dur- 
ing which he lived in Belchertown, Massa- 
chusetts, and the last few years of his life, 
which were passed in Springfield, his entire 
life was spent in his native town, and his 
entire active career was devoted to the paper- 
making industry. He was a member of the 
Masonic Order, and of the Congregational 
Church, and was highly esteemed by a host 
of friends and business associates. He mar- 
ried, August 18, 1859, Jane Aldrich, of 
Belchertown, Alassachusetts, daughter of 
Xahum W. and Cynthia (Buffington) 
Aldrich. She was born July 23. 1840, and 
is now residing with her son, Edward A. 
Smith, of Springfield. The children of Ed- 
ward S. and Jane (Aldrich) Smith are: 
I. Edward A., of further mention. 2. Fred, 
who was born April 12. 1862, and died in 
1889. 3. Eva Jane, who was born in August, 
1864, and died in infancy. 4. Eugene, who 
was born in February, 1866. 

(IX) Edward Albert Smith, son of Ed- 
ward Sylvester and Jane (Aldrich) Smith, 
was born in Belchertown, Massachusetts, 
July 19, i860. When he was eight years of 
age he removed to South Hadley with his 
parents, and in the public schools of that 
town he received his education. When his 
school training was completed, he found em- 
ployment in the Hampshire Woolen Mills, 
and that connection he maintained for a pe- 
riod of about five years. At the end of that 
time he made a change, and became asso- 
ciated with the Ivory Button Shop, of South 
Hadley. In 1882 he removed to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, where for a year and 
a half he found employment in a button shop. 
He had not yet found the work which sat- 
isfied him, however, and his next position 
was found in an entirelv different kind of 



122 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



work. He entered the employ of Smith & 
Wesson, who are engaged in the manufac- 
ture of revolvers, heginning in the barrel de- 
partment of that concern. At last he had 
found his work, and for the past forty years 
he has been continuously associated with that 
concern. 

Mr. Smith is a member of DeSoto Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his 
religious affiliation is with the Baptist 
Church. On October 31, 1889, Edward A. 
Smith married Grace L. Dodd, of New 
Haven, Connecticut, daughter of Frederick 
L. and Kate (Duncan) Dodd, and thev are 
the parents of one son, Clififord Frederick, 
of further mention. 

(X) Clifford Frederick Smith, son of Ed- 
ward Albert and Grace L. (Dodd) Smith, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, May 
29, 1890. He attended the Barrows and 
State Street schools, and then became a stu- 
dent in the commercial department of the 
Technical High School, from which he was 
graduated in 1909. The same year he en- 
tered the employ of City Clerk Newell, and 
his connection with the city clerk's office has 
been continuously maintained to the present 
time. He made himself very useful in many 
ways, including the keeping of the records 
of the City Council, and Mr. Newell soon 
found that he could depend upon him for as- 
sistance in all the varied duties of the office. 
In 1917, by Mr. Newell's appointment, he 
was made assistant city clerk, and that posi- 
tion he continued to fill until the death of 
Mr. Newell, at which time he became acting 
clerk. Later he was appointed city clerk, 
his term of office beginning January i, 1922, 
and the duties of that office he has been ef- 
ficiently discharging to the present time 
(1924). The thirteen years of his connec- 
tion with the office have made him thor- 
oughly familiar with every detail of the 
work as well as with the characteristics and 
personalities of many of those with whom 
he is brought in contact, and his faithful- 
ness and efficiency is recognized by the citi- 
zens of the community which he serves. 



Mr. Smith is a member of Hampden 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and of 
DeSoto Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, in the latter of which he has passed 
through all the chairs, being Noble Grand 
(1924). His religious affiliation is with the 
First Baptist Church of Springfield. He is 
also a member of the Young Men's Christian 
Association. He takes an active interest in 
the public welfare of the community in which 
he lives, and is a nieml)er of the Springfield 
Chaml)er of Commerce. 

Clifford F. Smith married, on July 24, 
1920, Mildred C. Abbe, daughter of John 
Edgar and Emma Jane (Whittaker) Abbe 
(see Abbe X), and they are the parents 
of one child, Lois Carolyn, who was born 
December 31, 1921, 

(The Abbe Line) 
The Abbe name, spelled also Abbey, and in 
various other ways, appears to have had its 
origin in the fact that one of its early groups 
lived near an abbey. The name is an old 
one in English history and for many gen- 
erations previous to the settlement of this 
country was entitled to bear arms as follows : 

Arms — Gules, five fusils in fesse between three 
escallops argent. 

Crest — On a wreath of the colors, an eagle's 
head erased or. 

As early as 1637, John Abbe, immigrant 
ancestor of the branch of the family to which 
Mrs. Smith belongs, came to New England. 
Tradition says that he was born in North- 
amptonshire. County of Norfolk, or at 
Norwich. England, about 1613. In 1637 
he was received as an iniiabitant of Salem, 
Massachusetts, and allotted an acre of land. 
In 1642 he was granted more land, prob- 
ably in the part of the town which later be- 
came Wenham. He was a man of promi- 
nence in the community, and in 1669 filled 
the office of constable. His first wife, whose 
name was Mary, died in 1672, and he mar- 
ried (second), in 1674, Mary Goldsmith, 
John Abbe died at Wenham about 1690, 



123 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Among his children was Samuel, of further 
mention. 

(II) Samuel Abhe, son of John and Mary 
Abl>e, was born about 1646, probably at 
Wenham, and lived for a time at Salem. 
In 1690 he was made freeman of Salem 
Village and in 1697 he removed to Wind- 
ham. He was one of the enlightened mem- 
bers of the community who opposed the 
fanaticism of the witchcraft delusion. He 
died in March, 1698. He married, in 1672, 
Mary Knowlton, daughter of William and 
Elizabeth Knowlton, and they were the par- 
ents of children, among whom was Ebenezer, 
of further mention. 

dll) Ebenezer Abbe, son of Samuel and 
Mary (Knowlton) Abbe, was born July 31, 
1683, in Salem Village, and in 1705 was a 
resident of Norwich, Connecticut. He set- 
tled at what is now North Windham and 
may have lived, in later life, at Mansfield. 
He was a member of Hampton Church. His 
death occurred at Windham, December 5, 
1758. He married, in 1707, Mary Allen, 
daughter of Joshua and Mary Allen, early 
settlers of Mansfield, and they were the par- 
ents of children, among whom was Ebenezer, 
of further mention. 

(IV) Ebenezer Abbe, son of Ebenezer 
and Mary (Allen) Abbe, was born July 27, 
1708, and was a resident of Windham, or 
North Windham. He married, in 1730, Abi- 
gail, probably a daughter of Joseph Cary, 
Jr., and they were the parents of children, 
among whom was Isaac, of further mention. 

(V) Isaac Abbe, son of Ebenezer and 
Abigail (Cary) Abbe, was born July 25, 
1733. at Windham, and died in April, 1788. 
He married, April 5, 1753, Eunice Church, 
and among their children was Abner, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(VI) Abner Abbe, son of Isaac and 
Eunice (Church) Abbe, was born Novem- 
ber 5, 1758, in North Windham, and served 
as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. He 
lived in StaflFord, Connecticut, and pur- 
chased land in Wilbraham, Longmeadow, 
and Granby, Massachusetts. His death oc- 



curred at Granby, December 13, 1803. He 
married, in 1782, Sarah Swetland, daughter 
of John, Jr., and Abby (Deming) Swet- 
land, of Hartford, Connecticut, and they 
were the parents of children, among whom 
was John Swetland, of further mention. 

(VII) John Swetland Abbe, son of Abner 
and Sarah (Swetland) Abbe, was born in 
September, 1787, in Longmeadow, Massa- 
chusetts, and died in Springfield, ]\Iassachu- 
setts, May 9, 1862. He married, in 1813, 
Electa (Chapin) Warner, daughter of Colo- 
nel Abel and Dorcas (Chapin) Chapin, and 
widow of Dr. Fearly Warner, and they were 
the parents of children, among whom was 
John Alden, of further mention. 

(VIII) John Alden Abbe, son of John 
Swetland and Electa (Chapin- Warner) 
Abbe, was born August 18, 1817, in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, where his death oc- 
curred March 26, 1900. He was engaged in 
farming on his father's homestead through- 
out his active career, and was highly es- 
teemed among his associates. He married, 
in 1848, Caroline Pease, daughter of Cleeland 
and Malinda (Booth) Pease, and among 
their children was John Edgar, of further 
mention. 

(IX) John Edgar Abbe, son of John 
Alden and Caroline (Pease) Abbe, was born 
February 2, 1849, at Chicopee, Massachu- 
setts, and is now living in Springfield, where 
he is engaged in business as a carpenter and 
builder. He received his education in the 
schools of Chicopee and of Chicopee Falls, 
and after learning the carpenter's trade, was, 
for a number of years, in the employ of Mr. 
Shattuck. During the last fifteen years he 
has been engaged in business for himself, 
and he is known as one of the able and suc- 
cessful business men of Chicopee. On Janu- 
ary 8, 1874, he married Emma Jane Whit- 
taker, daughter of Amos and Laura E. 
(Mixter) Whittaker, and they are the par- 
ents of seven children : Bessie E., deceased ; 
Charles E., Frederick Acken, Hattie M., de- 
ceased; Daisy Estelle, who married Edward 



124 



E\XYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Rathbun; Mildren C. of further mention, 
and Robert, deceased. 

(X) Mildred C. Abbe, daughter of John 
Edgar and Emma Jane (Whittaker) Abbe, 
married Clifford F. Smith (see Smith X). 



THOMPSON, Clifford Parker 

Clifford Parker Thompson, of Spring- 
field, is president and manager of the con- 
cern which was incorporated in 1906 under 
the name of C. P. Thompson & Company. 
During the twenty years since then, the busi- 
ness has constantly grown and he has to- 
day one of the best known and most com- 
plete drug stores in Western Massachusetts. 

(I) Mr. Thompson is a descendant of 
one of the old Colonial families of Connecti- 
cut, tracing his descent from Anthony 
Thompson, who with his wife, two children, 
and his brothers, John and William, left Eng- 
land with Rev. Mr. Davenport, Governor 
Eaton, and others of Coventry, England, 
and arrived in Boston, Massachusetts, June 
26, 1637, as stated in Governor Winthrop's 
journal. He was one of the first settlers of 
X'ew Haven, Connecticut, in 1639, signed 
the colony constitution June 4, 1639, and 
lived in X'ew Haven during the remainder of 
his life, his death occurring there March 23. 
1647. The name of his first wife is not 
known. He married (second) Catherine 

. The children of the first marriage 

were : John, of further mention ; Anthony 
and Bridget. To the second marriage were 
born: Hannah, Lydia, and Ebenezer. 

(H) John Thompson, son of Anthony 
Thompson, was born in England, about 
1632, and died June 2, 1707. He was a sea 
captain, and was known as "the mariner." 
He married Anne Vicaris. Their children 
were : John, of further mention ; Anne, 
Joseph, a child, unnamed, Samuel, Sarah, 
William, and Mary. 

(HI) John Thompson, son of John and 
Anne (Vicaris) Thompson, was born May 
12, 1657. He married, May 9, 1682, Re- 
becca Daniel, daughter of Stephen and Anna 
(Gregson) Daniel, and they were the par- 



ents of: Ann. Daniel, of further mention; 
Rebecca, Elizabeth. John, and Anthony. 

(IV) Daniel Thompson, son of John and 
Rebecca (Daniel) Thompson, was born Oc- 
tober 31, 1685. and died Xoveml^er 26, 1766. 
He lived in the parish of Amity (now Wood- 
bridge, Connecticut). He married, Janu- 
ary 16, 1717, Mary Ball, daughter of John 
and Sarah (Glover) Ball, and they were the 
parents of ten children : Ann. John, James, 
Daniel, died young; Jabez. Eunice, Daniel, 
of further mention ; Eliphalet, Lois and Joel. 

(V) Daniel Thompson, son of Daniel and 
Mary (Ball) Thompson, was born Decem- 
ber 30, 1 73 1, and removed from Wood- 
bridge, Connecticut, to Farmington, Con- 
necticut, but previous to 1785 returned to 
Woodbridge. He served in the Revolution- 
ary War, He married, September 17, 1861, 
Mar}- Carrington, who was baptized May 11, 
1740, and they were the parents of children, 
among whom was Thaddeus, of further men- 
tion. 

(VI) Thaddeus Thompson, son of Daniel 
and Mary (Carrington) Thompson, was 
born in Bethany, Connecticut, in 1762. and 
died in Xew Haven, Connecticut. June 16, 
1829. He served as a drummer-boy in the 
Revolutionary War, and was one of those 
who were quartered at \'alley Forge during 
the winter of 17-7-y^. He married (first), 
in February. 1785. Hannah Perkins; (sec- 
ond), Rhoda Spring. To the Vko mar- 
riages eighteen children were born: Lucy, 
Thaddeus. Charles. Bela. Isaac. Hannah. 
Martha. Hannah Lucretia. Children of the 
second marriage : Eunice, born 1801 ; and 
an infant. 1802; James. 1S03; George. 1806; 
Caroline, 1808; Susan. 181 1; Patience 
Amanda, 1814; William Peters, of further 
mention; Thomas Merritt. and Rhoda Au- 
gusta. 

(VII) William Peters Thompson, son of 
Thaddeus and Rhoda (Spring) Thompson, 
was born in Woodstock, Xew York. June 25, 
1815. and died October 2, 1872. He was a 
merchant tailor by trade. He went to Ohio, 
later to Decatur. Alabama, then returned 



12: 



EX'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



and resided in Woodbury, Connecticut, and 
still later was associated with his brother 
James in the Straw Board Mill, in Hotch- 
kissville. Connecticut. He was a hard 
worker, and died in middle age, as a result of 
overtaxing his strength. He married, May 
5. 1865. Mary Jane Parker, of Seymour, 
Connecticut, who died December 18, 1888. 
They were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: I. Frederick W., born August 5, 1867; 
he is now treasurer of the C. P. Thompson 
Company. He married. May 3, 1901, Jennie 
Elizabeth Lewis, of New Haven, Connecti- 
cut, daughter of Robert Hunting and Louise 
(Shepard) Lewis, and has a son Parker 
Lewis, who was born February 16, 1902. 
2. CliflFord Parker, of further mention. 3. 
George, who was born October 2, 1870, and 
died in 1912. leaving children: Eunice, 
Louis, Paul, Francis, and George, who died 
in infancy. 

( VHI) Clifford Parker Thompson, son of 
William Peter and Mary Jane (Parker) 
Thompson, was born in Woodbury, Con- 
necticut, February 23, 1869. After receiv- 
ing a careful preparatory education in the 
public schools of his native town he com- 
pleted his preparation for active life by two 
years of academic study. Upon the com- 
pletion of his course in the academy he be- 
gan his active career as a clerk in a drug 
store in Woodbury, where he remained for 
two years. He then went to New Britain, 
Connecticut, where for two years he was 
again associated with a well known phar- 
macy. He then widened his experience bv 
two more years spent in a drug store in 
New Haven, Connecticut, and then went to 
Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where he re- 
mained for one year. At the end of that time 
he returned to New Haven, Connecticut, 
where for a period of nine years he was 
associated with a well known pharmacy. In 
1901, having gained a thorough knowledge 
of the business of handling drugs and the 
various lines of goods usually sold in a drug 
store, he resolved to engage in business for 
himself. He removed to Springfield, Mas- 



sachusetts, and there, under the name of 
C. P. Thompson & Company, established a 
pharmacy of his own. The enterprise proved 
a success, and in 1906 was incorporated un- 
der the name of the C. P. Thompson Com- 
pany, of which concern Mr. Thompson is 
president and manager. The C. P. Thomp- 
son Company is doing a thriving business, 
and is known as one of the thoroughly well 
established pharmaceutical enterprises of the 
city of Springfield. 

Mr. Thompson is well known in the Ma- 
sonic Order, He originally joined the lodge 
in New Haven, Connecticut, but later trans- 
ferred his membership to the Esotoric 
Lodge, Free and Accepted ^Masons, of 
Springfield. He is a member of Evening 
Star Lodge of Perfection, of Massasoit 
Council, Princes of Jerusalem; and of the 
Springfield Consistory, all Scottish Rite 
bodies, in the latter of which he holds the 
thirty-second degree. He is also a member 
of ]\Ielha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and of Bela 
Grotto. In club circles, too, he is M-ell 
known, being a member of the Rotary Club. 
He is also active in the State Pharmaceutical 
Association, which he served as president in 
1918 and 1919. In the year 1919 he was 
sent to Halifax, Nova Scotia, by the asso- 
ciation to investigate the causes of the ex- 
plosions there. 

On June 2, 1897, ChflFord Parker Thomp- 
son married Mary Palmer Wadhams, who 
was born in Goshen, Connecticut, daughter 
of Francis Morris and Frances (Palmer) 
Wadhams. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson are the 
parents of three children: i. Clifford Fran- 
cis, who was born in New Haven, Connecti- 
cut, July 24, 1898, and is a graduate of the 
Sheffield Scientific School of Yale Univer- 
sity, class of 1918. During the World War 
he was a reserve officer in the training school, 
and later became mechanical engineer in the 
employ of the \\'orthington Steam Pump 
plant in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He 
was later associated with the Grafton Foun- 
dry Company, of Grafton, Wisconsin, where 



126 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



he held the official position of secretary of 
the company. He is now with the Lincoln 
Manufacturing Company as purchasing 
agent and factory manager, a concern lo- 
cated in Maywood, near Chicago. Illinois. 
2. Alice Ethel, born in Goshen, Connecticut, 
September 24, 1899. She was educated in 
the public schools of Springfield, Abl)ott 
Academy of Andover, Massachusetts, then 
for two years was in Simmons College. She 
married Ennis B. Mallette, of Torrington, 
Connecticut. 3. Francis Wooster, born in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, February 17, 
1905; he is a graduate of the Springfield 
High School, then took special business 
courses in the Commercial High School of 
that city. He is now with the ^tna Life 
Insurance Company in its Springfield office. 



FULLER, Jay Murray 

As president of the United Sealing Ma- 
chine Company, Jay Murray Fuller is en- 
gaged in the manufacture of a labor-saving 
device of his own invention, which is widely 
used in business and in institutional offices 
throughout the country. The Star Envelope 
Sealing Machine is the only machine in the 
market that will successfully seal 7,500 en- 
velopes per hour, and, as the inventor and 
producer of this device, Mr. Fuller is making 
a valuable contribution to the business world. 

From early Colonial times, the Fuller fam- 
ily has been producing men and women of 
marked ability who have rendered valuable 
service not only in the professions but in 
almost every line of business and mechanical 
activity as well. As lawyers, physicians, lit- 
erary artists, and inventors, their names 
have, from earliest Colonial times, been 
prominent, and it is a characteristic of the 
family that in whatever line of activity they 
engage, they render service of the highest 
quality. Several of the Fuller name came 
to this country at a very early date, and 
descendants of these early settlers scattered 
throughout the New England States. The 
ancestors of the branch of the family to 
which Jay IMurray Fuller belongs early set- 



tled in Connecticut, and there Josiah Fuller, 
grandfather of Mr. Fuller, was born. 

Josiah Fuller was born in Litchfield, Litch- 
field County. Connecticut, November 15, 
1 80 1, and died November 24, 1869. He was 
a farmer, well known in the section of the 
country and successful. He married, in 
Starksboro, Vermont, December 5, 1824, 
Temperance Bickford, who was l)orn in 
Milan, New Hampshire, July 11, 1808, and 
died January 22, 1879. They were the par- 
ents of twelve children : i. Diana, born Jan- 
uary 15, 1827, died October 5, 1827. 2. 
Thirza T., born August 12, 1828, died Feb- 
ruary 23. 1857; married Willard Ballou. 
3. Orson G., born October 17. 1830, died 
February 4, 1852. 4. Darwin W., born Jan- 
uary 20, 1833, <^ied May 8, 1897. 5. Hubbel 
Stephen, of further mention. 6. Biel C, 
born July 26. 1837, died May 6. 1867. 7. 
Josiah G., born August 2, 1839, died Decem- 
ber 17, 191 o. 8. Augusta D., born January 
31, 1842, died January 29. 1850. 9. Willard 
W., born July 2y, 1844. died May 30, 1893. 
lo-ii. Murray Jay and Mary Jane (twins), 
born December 5, 1847; Murray Jay died 
August 17, 1872, and Mary Jane died Sep- 
tember 25, 1857. 12. Catherine A., born 
March 31, 1851, died April 4. 1852. 

Hubbel Stephen Fuller, son of Josiah and 
Temperance (Bickford) Fuller, was born in 
Starksboro, Vermont, July 27, 1836, and 
died in Springfield, Massachusetts, January 
II, 1917. He received a practical education 
in the local schools and then learned the trade 
of the blacksmith, painter and carriage- 
maker, in connection with which trade he 
also engaged in farming. He was an ener- 
getic, capable and versatile man. who was 
known for the excellent quality of his work- 
manship and for his honest business methods. 
The little shop in Huntington, Vermont, 
which he used as a carriage shop is still 
standing. During his later years he re- 
moved from Vermont to East Longmeadow, 
Massachusetts, where he continued to reside 
for some vears, then came to the home of his 
son, where he spent the last six years of his 



127 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



life. He was an attendant of the First Bap- 
tist Church of Huntington. Vermont. He 
married, Fehruary 28, 1856, Helen M. Johns, 
who died December 30, 1912, daughter of 
Henry and Almeda ( Lamb) Johns, of 
Shoreham, Vermont, and they were the par- 
ents of seven children: I. Kinsey, who died 
at the age of three years. 2. Harriet, w-ho 
married Frank Smith of Starksboro, Ver- 
mont, and has eleven children. 3. Jay Mur- 
ray, of further mention. 4. Jessie, who died 
in 1889, the wife of William A. Farrington. 
5. Darwin L. 6. John L. 7. Herman H. 

Jay Murray Fuller, son of Hubbel S. and 
Helen M. (Johns) Fuller, was born in Hunt- 
ington, Vermont, November 4, 1864, an at- 
tendant in the public schools of his native 
city until he was thirteen years of age. He 
then left school and became his father's as- 
sistant on the home farm, continuing that 
connection until 1885, when he went to Iras- 
burg. \'ermont, where he found employment 
on a four hundred acre farm, later purchased 
by his father, and upon which were seven 
cows ; this number they later increased until 
they had a herd of sixty cows. They also 
raised all the hay and grain used for the 
cattle. Here Mr. Fuller remained until 
1 89 1, when he removed to Springfield, ]\Ias- 
sachusetts, and entered the employment of 
the Street Railway Company, with whom he 
was engaged in construction work for a pe- 
riod of five years, during three of which he 
was assistant road master. At the end of 
that period, in 1896, he associated himself 
with Fred T. Ley, in construction work, 
serving as the first superintendent of that 
concern, and in that capacity supervising the 
construction of all the street railways of the 
Berkshire system, and many other railroads 
in Massachusetts and Connecticut, building 
in all several hundred miles of railroad. In 
1907 he purchased a fifty-acre tract of land 
just oflF White Street, in the city of Spring- 
field, and became interested in a sealing ma- 
chine upon which he had been working for 
several years, and after a long period of 
steady work he purchased and patented the 



Star Envelope Sealing Machine, and organ- 
ized the United Sealing Machine Company, 
of which he is president. The Star Envelope 
Sealing Machine is a simple and compact 
device which requires but twelve by fourteen 
inches of table room, its dimension, includ- 
ing the stacking arm, fourteen inches by 
twenty-seven inches by fourteen inches high, 
and light enough to be readily removed. The 
frame is built of cast iron, the inner work- 
ing parts of hardened steel, the rolls of \-ul- 
canized rubber, and the frame of aluminum. 
It is electrically-driven by a I -12th horse 
power motor, connected by a cord to the 
nearest electric light socket. Its construction 
is such as to be absolutely free from possi- 
bility of accident, and so simple in operation 
that five minutes' instruction to even a young 
boy or girl is sufficient. It seals auto- 
matically all correspondence sizes and thick- 
nesses of envelopes, positively, rapidly and 
with uniformity, at the rate of 7,500 per 
hour. An expert sealer, earning fifteen dol- 
lars a week, working by hand, can seal only 
about 60,000 a week, whereas any office 
clerk, operating a "Star" sealer, can do the 
whole 60,000 in a single day; the saving of 
time and expense is evident. Before ofifering 
this machine for sale, its efficiency was thor- 
oughly demonstrated by actual commercial 
use for nearly four years. One of the ma- 
chines was placed in the mailing department 
of the Phelps Publishing Company, Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and the following letter 
indicates its value in the estimation of that 
concern : 

Springfield, Massachusetts, 
April 10, 1919. 

United Sealing Machine Co., 
City. 

Gentlemen : — 

Our records show that we have used your 
power sealer continuously since Labor Day, 1916, 
and with it we have sealed approximately twenty- 
five million (25,000,000) pieces of mail of various 
sizes and thicknesses. During this period there 
have been very few repairs, replacements or ad- 
justments on the machine, and all were of a 



128 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



minor nature. It seems to me that this record 
speaks for itself. 

That we are convinced of the practicability of 
this machine is proven by the fact that we now 
have three of them, all of which have stood the 
severe test our work demands. 

We believe that you will also be interested to 
know that the simplicity of construction and op- 
eration makes it possible for us to turn out a 
tremendous amount of work without the services 
of an expensive trained operator. About ten min- 
utes' instruction to an ordinary clerk is all that 
is necessary to insure a normal output. 
Yours very truly, 
Signed Phelps Publishing Comp.\xy, 
Circulation Manager. 

The United Sealing Machine Company is 
incorporated under the laws of Massachu- 
setts, with a capital of $100,000 divided into 
10,000 shares, with a par value of $10 per 
share (fully paid and non-assessable), of 
which $84,400 is outstanding. It is the in- 
tention of the company to put their product 
on the market in a manner commensurate 
with the demand, and the additional capital 
will be used to increase production. 

Jay Murray Fuller married, on October 3, 
1888, Martha A. Chilson, who was born in 
North Troy, Vermont, but resided in New- 
port, Vermont, daughter of Horace and 
Hannah (Plumley) Chilson. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fuller are the parents of one son, Darwin 
Jay, who was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, July 14, 1898. He was graduated 
from the Technical High School of Spring- 
field and then entered Dartmouth College, 
from which he was graduated in 1920. Dur- 
ing the World War he was county clerk at 
Dartmouth, with the rank of top sergeant, 
and would soon have been promoted to the 
rank of second lieutenant. He is now as- 
sociated with the American Optical Com- 
pany, at Southbridge, Massachusetts. 



GOODWIN, Harry Leland 

As part-owner of the Stacy Machine 
Works and manager of the mechanical de- 
partment of the business, Harry Leland 
Goodwin is one of the heads of an extensive 
jobbing and contracting concern which re- 



quires the services of some twenty men to 
meet the demands of its steadily growing 
patronage. 

Mr. Goodwin bears a name which dates 
back to the fifth century, and is derived from 
vin or zcin, meaning a "friend," and from 
guda, meaning "good," or from Goda mean- 
ing "Gods." Thus the name originally meant 
either "good friend," or "God's friend." 
The name is found in England even before 
the Norman Conquest (1066) and is rep- 
resented by many men of note both in Eng- 
land and in this country. In this country the 
branch of the family to which Harry Leland 
Goodwin belongs traces its descent from 
Ozias (or Hosea) Goodwin, the line being 
traced as follows: 

(I) Ozias Goodwin, born in 1596, was a 
landholder in Hartford, Connecticut, as 
early as 1639, and continued to reside there 
to the time of his death in the spring of 
1683. His brother William was ruling 
elder of the church of Newton, Hartford, 
and Hadley, and was a man of wealth, but 
Ozias seems to have been of limited means. 
He acquired lands later, however, and some 
of his lineal descendants still reside in Hart- 
ford. He married Mary Woodward, daugh- 
ter of Robert Woodward, of England, and 
they were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: William, of further mention; Na- 
thaniel, and Hannah. 

(II) William Goodwin, son of Ozias and 
Mary (Woodward) Goodwin, was born in 
1629. He married Susanna , who mar- 
ried (second) John Shepard, of Hartford. 
Their children were : Susanna, William, and 
Nathaniel, of further mention. 

(III) Nathaniel Goodwin, son of William 
and Susanna Goodwin, was a shoemaker by 
trade and an esteemed citizen, who served 
as deacon of the First Church of Hartford 
to the time of his death, in November, 1747. 
He married Mehitable Porter, who was born 
September 15, 1673. and died February 9, 
1726, and they were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : Mehitable. Hezekia. Bene- 
dicta, Isaac, of further mention; Abraham, 



129 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Stephen, Eleazer, Joanna, Ruth, Ahcc, and 
Nathaniel. 

(IV) Isaac Goodwin, son of Nathaniel 
and Mehitahle (Porter) Goodwin, was bap- 
tized Novemher lo, 1695, and died August 
15, 1766. He resided in West Hartford, 
where he served as grand juror and as se- 
lectman. He married (first) Hannah Mor- 
gan, daughter of Thomas and Rachel 
Morgan; (second) Ruth Gaylord, daughter 
of William and Hope Gaylord. The chil- 
dren of the first marriage were : Sarah, 
Mehitahle, Anne, Morgan, Deliverance, 
Isaac. Uriah, and Ebenezer, who died young. 
To the second marriage one child was born, 
Ebenezer. of further mention. 

(V) Ebenezer Goodwin, son of Isaac and 
Ruth (Gaylord) Goodwin, was baptized in 
West Hartford, May 29, 1743, and died 
May 18, 1810. He removed to New Hart- 
ford, where he was a prominent citizen. He 
married Ann Webster, who died January 8, 
1835, and they were the parents of eleven 
children : Ruth, Ebenezer, Lucy, James, 
Seth, William, of further mention ; Norman, 
Pitts, Horace, Polly, and Amanda. 

(VI) William Goodwin, son of Ebenezer 
and Ann (Webster) Goodwin, was born Oc- 
tober 15, 1776. He married, August 12, 
1796, Abigail Croswell, who was born Janu- 
ary 20, 1774, daughter of Caleb and Hannah 
(Kellogg) Croswell. They were the par- 
ents of children : Harley, of further men- 
tion ; Orrin, Hannah, Amanda, Janet, Caleb, 
Croswell, Ploratio Nelson, and William. 

(VII) Harley Goodwin, son of William 
and Abigail (Croswell) Goodwin, was born 
March 10, 1797, at New Hartford, Con- 
necticut, and died January 31, 1855. He 
was a graduate of Middlebury (Vermont) 
College, and on January 4, 1826, was or- 
dained as colleague to the pastor of the Con- 
gregational Church in New Alarlborough, 
Massachusetts. From 1838 to 1845 he was 
pastor in Warren, Connecticut, and from 
1845 to the time of his death he was pastor 
of the church at Falls Village, Connecticut. 
He married (first), November 4, 1828, 



Maria Lorinda Smith, who died in 1843; 
(second) Lydia Rogers Swift, who was born 
in Cornwall, Connecticut, April 18, 1806, 
and died May 25, 1858. The children of 
the first marriage were : Abigail Croswell, 
who married Edward Canfield ; Maria Lo- 
rinda, Edward Payson, and Harley. The 
children of the second marriage were : 
Harry Croswell, of further mention; 
Thomas Croswell, Agnes Maria, and 
William Swift. 

(VIII) Harry Croswell Goodwin, son of 
Harley and Lydia Rogers (Swift) Goodwin, 
was born in South Canaan, Connecticut, 
May 31, 1845, and died in Hartford, Con- 
necticut, January 22, 1916. He began deal- 
ing in horses when he was sixteen years old 
and for forty years conducted a sales stable 
and livery stable in Hartford. He shipped 
horses from Canada and from the West and 
was known as an honest and upright busi- 
ness man. He married, April 9, 1889, Adele 
H. Moore, of Worcester County, Maryland, 
daughter of Leven James T. and Mary C. 
(Hammond) Moore, and granddaughter of 
William Moore. They were the parents of 
one son, Harry Leland, of further mention. 

(IX) Harry Leland Goodwin, son of 
Harry Croswell and Adele H. (Moore) 
Goodwin, was born in Kent County, Mary- 
land, February 6, 1890. He received his 
education in the public schools of Hartford, 
Connecticut, and when his school training 
was completed, learned the trade of ma- 
chinist. When he had mastered his trade, 
he found employment with the United States 
Stamped Envelope Company, of Hartford, 
Connecticut, with whom he was employed as 
a journeyman for a year and a half. Later, 
he entered the employ of the Hartford Ma- 
chine Saw Company, with whom he re- 
mained for one year. The following two 
years he spent in the employ of the Royal 
Typewriter Company, and when he severed 
his connection with the concern he associated 
himself with Billings & Spencer, with whom 
he remained for two and a half years. He 
then became identified with the Hartford 



130 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Engineering Company, and three years later 
he again made a change, this time associating 
himself with the New Britain Machine Com- 
pany, where he remained for a short time. 
He then further widened his experience by 
two years in the employ of Taylor & Fenn, 
of Hartford, who were engaged in machine 
and foundry work. His last position before 
coming to Springfield was with the Reed 
Motor Company, which also was engaged in 
the manufacture of tools and fixtures. A 
year and a half later, in June, 1919, Mr. 
Goodwin removed to Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, and in association with Mr. Schieldge, 
purchased the Stacy Machine Works. Mr. 
Goodwin was made manager of the me- 
chanical department of the business, and the 
venture has been a most successful one. The 
concern does a most extensive jobbing and 
contract business, and has grown to propor- 
tions which require the services of from 
twelve to twenty men regularly, and some- 
times more. Mr. Goodwin devotes his time 
and his energy unreservedly to the advance- 
ment of the interests of the business, and his 
ability, experience and devotion have been 
very important factors in the development 
of the business. 



GARINGER, Frank Daniel 

After a varied and successful business ex- 
perience in several different localities, Frank 
Daniel Garinger organized the Garinger 
Motor Company, of Springfield, an automo- 
bile sales concern, of which he is president, 
and his son, Carlton H., treasurer. The 
firm handles the Auburn car, which is built 
in Auburn, Indiana, and is building up a 
most properous business. 

Representatives of the branch of the Gar- 
inger family to which Frank Daniel Garinger 
belongs settled in Northampton County, 
Pennsylvania, where the great-grandfather 
of Frank D. Garinger was accidentally killed 
by a fall from a horse when he was but 
twenty-six years of age. He married and 
left three sons: John, of further mention; 
Adam, and Daniel. 



John Garinger. grandfather of Frank D. 
Garinger, was born in 1785, and died in 
1836. He removed to Hanover. Pennsvl- 
vania, in 1810, and the remainder of his life 
was spent in that city. He married Mary 
Magdalene Hess, and they were the parents 
of thirteen children: Charles. Levi, Thomas, 
Eliza, Jesse, of further mcntiDn; John G., 
Mary, David, Susan, Isaac, Daniel, Lucinda, 
and Aaron. 

Jesse Garinger, son of John and Mary 
Magdalene (Hess) Garinger, was born in 
Hanover Township, Luzerne County, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1812, and died March 6, 1891. 
After receiving a practical education in the 
public schools of his native district, he en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits and through- 
out his life he was engaged in the success- 
ful management of a farm. He was an able 
and enterprising man, and was highly es- 
teemed among all who knew him. His re- 
ligious affiliation was with the German 
Reformed Church. He married Catherine 
Croop, of Newport, Pennsylvania, who was 
born in 1 81 6, and died in 1890. Their chil- 
dren were: Harriet, Sarah, Susan, George, 
Mary, Andrew, John, Jennie, Harrison. 
Frank Daniel, of further mention; Allan, 
and Edward. 

Frank Daniel Garinger, son of Jesse and 
Catherine (Croop) Garinger, was born in 
Newport, Pennsylvania, March 22, 1858. 
After receiving a careful education in the 
public schools of \\'ilkes-Barre, Pennsyl- 
vania, he secured a position as clerk in the 
grocery store of William Miller & Company, 
in Wilkes-Barre, and that connection he 
maintained for a period of three years. At 
the end of that time, in 1880, he decided to 
enter into business for himself. He opened 
an establishment in Wilkes-Barre and for 
twelve years successfully conducted a stead- 
ily-growing business. He then sold out and 
went on the road as representative for the 
Knickerbocker Mills, of New York, a firm 
which handled teas and coflfees. From 1894 
to 1905 he continued to represent that firm 
in several counties in New York and Penn- 



131 



EXCVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



sylvania. He then, in 1905, identified him- 
self with Harry S. Haupt & Company, of 
New York, a concern which is engaged in 
the automobile business. Mr. Garinger was 
employed as salesman and manager, and that 
position he continued to efficiently fill until 
the time of his removal to Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, where, as manager for the 
same company in their Philadelphia branch, 
he remained until 1910. His next business 
connection was in the New Departure Manu- 
facturing Company, of Bristol, Connecticut, 
with whom he remained for a year, at the 
end of which time he returned to Haupt & 
Company for another year. In November, 
191 5, he removed to Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, in order to accept a position as man- 
ager for the Springfield Buick Company. 
One year later, he became a partner in the 
corporation and was made manager and 
treasurer of the Springfield company. That 
connection he maintained for a period of 
six years, and then, in 1921, decided to sever 
his connection with the Buick Company and 
engage in business for himself. He sold out 
his interest in the Buick Company in 1921, 
and in July, 1922, organized the Garinger 
Motor Company, of Springfield, becoming 
president and manager, and his son, Carlton 
H., treasurer. He handles the Auburn car, 
which is built in Auburn, Indiana, and is 
known as one of the best medium-priced cars 
on the market. His enterprise has been suc- 
cessful from the beginning, and he is steadily 
building up a rapidly growing and prosperous 
business. Mr. Garinger has a host of friends 
in Springfield, and is well known as a re- 
liable and enterprising business man and 
a public-sijirited citizen. He attends the 
First Congregational Church. 

Frank Daniel Garinger married, on Octo- 
ber 9, 1884, Fannie H. Luder, of Newport, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of William and 
Frances Victoria (Lines) Luder. Air. and 
Mrs. Garinger are the parents of two chil- 
dren: I. Frank Raymond, who was born in 
1885. and died at the age of twenty-one 
years. 2. Carlton Hayden, who was born 



in W'ilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. June 2, 18S9. 
He received his education in the public 
schools of Wilkes-Barre and in Chestnut 
Hill Academy, and after attending the East- 
man Gaines Business School in New York 
for a year, entered Columbia College, as a 
special student in economics and engineer- 
ing, completing his course there in 191 3. 
In June, 191 8, he enlisted for sei-vice in the 
World War, and was assigned to the Field 
Artillery, at Camp Dix, New Jersey. In 
August of the same year he was sent over- 
seas for dispatch service in connection with 
the Field Artillery Motor Center. He had 
charge of a training school, which prepared 
men who were to make the change from 
horse-drawn to motorized artillery, and also 
had charge of the payrolls. He was made 
a sergeant, and was acting-captain and ren- 
dered service of a quality which caused him 
to be recommended to the Samur Military 
School, in France, by the captain and colonel 
of the French regiment and the colonel of 
his own regiment. He received honorable 
discharge from service in IMarch, 1919, and 
since that time has been associated with his 
father in the automobile business, of which 
he is treasurer. He is a member of the Pub- 
licity Club, of the Automobile Club, and of 
the American Legion. He married. May 20, 
1920, Dorothy Kibbe, daughter of Clifford 
and Nettie (Pinney) Kibbe, of Springfield, 
and they are the parents of a daughter, 
Frances Elizabeth, who was born August 
28, 1921. 



HALSTEAD, Charles Emerson 

A long career of political, literary, and 
business activity has made the name of 
Charles Emerson Halstead a familiar one 
in the State of Louisiana, in Chatham, New 
York, and throughout New England. He 
is at present (1924) vice-president of the 
Converse Coal Company of Springfield, 
Massachusetts. 

The Halstead family has produced many 
distinguished members of the various pro- 
fessions, and has long contributed a valuable 



132 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



share to the upbuilding of the nation. The 
branch to which Charles Emerson Halstead 
belongs traces descent from James Halstead, 
who went from Hyde Park, New York, to 
Greene County. New York, where he "took 
up" land. He married and a son of his 
served in the War of 1812, and died in 
1813. This son had a son, Isaac, of whom 
further. 

Isaac Halstead, grandson of James Hal- 
stead, was born in Greene County, New 
York, in 181 3, and died in Chatham, New 
York, in 1886. He received his education 
in the schools of his native district, and then 
engaged in farming in Columbia County, 
where he was a member of the Lutheran 
Church of Ghent, and took an active part in 
the work of that organization. He married 
Harriet H. Lacy, who was born in Greene 
County, New York, in 181 7, and died in 
1801, daughter of Elisha and Electa (Olm- 
sted) Lacy. Their children were: i. Joshua 
L., deceased. 2. Sarah A., who married 
Jerome Westover. 3. ISIary Elizabeth, who 
married John Shepard. She is deceased. 4. 
Emily Gertrude, married Levi Southard. 
5. Charles Emerson, of whom further. 6. 
Katy D., deceased. 

Charles Emerson Halstead, son of Isaac 
and Harriet H. (Lacy) Halstead, was born 
in Hillsdale, Columbia County, New York, 
July 28, 1850. After attending the public 
schools until twelve years of age, he went to 
New York City, where he was clerk in the 
office of the special agent in the Treasury 
Department employed in the Internal Rev- 
enue Office. In 1866 he went South and 
settled in New Orleans, Louisiana, where 
he was associated with General Joseph R. 
Swift. He soon became well known in New 
Orleans and exerted considerable influence. 
He was made clerk in the post office of New 
Orleans, later became chief enrolling clerk 
in the Louisiana House of Representatives, 
and still later served as the chief enrolling 
clerk of the State Senate for a term of three 
years. In 1870 he was made supervisor of 
registration and election for the parish and 



County of Iberville, Louisiana, and during 
the same fall he was api)ointed state and 
county tax collector. Throughout his career 
he has taken an active interest in the educa- 
tion of the boys and girls of the section in 
which he has lived. In the parish of Iber- 
ville he assisted in organizing the first free 
school, and was president of the Board of 
Education for the parish of Iberville. He 
also took an active interest in political affairs, 
and served the interests of the Republican 
party as owner and publisher of a news- 
paper, and also as a member of the Republi- 
can State Committee. In 1872 he was elected 
to serve as presidential elector-at-large of 
the State of Louisiana, supporting Ulysses 
S. Grant. In all of the numerous positions 
of trust which he held, some of them re- 
quiring great skill and tact as well as sound 
judgment, Mr. Halstead proved his ability 
and his integrity and won in a high degree 
the respect and esteem of his associates. 

In 1874 he came North and settled in 
Chatham, New York, where he engaged in 
farming and also established a considerable 
business interest in the sale of agricultural 
implements, carriages, and coal. In 1887, 
in company with Henry C. Piarsons, he 
gave a large portion of his attention to the 
enlargement of his coal business and or- 
ganized the firm of Halstead & Piarsons, 
of which he continued to be the active head 
until 191 1. The concern was removed to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1900, when 
he consolidated his interests with the Con- 
verse Coal Company, of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and became director and vice- 
president of that company. Since that time 
he has been well known as one of the ener- 
getic and successful business men of Spring- 
field. \\'hen Mr. Halstead came North he 
did not abate his interest in educational 
matters. In Chatham he served as presi- 
dent of the School Board for three years, 
and was also active in church aflFairs. He 
served as chairman of the committee which 
built the Lutheran Church in Chatham, and 
he was also instrumental in the building of 



^23 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



a church for the colored people in Chatham. 
In Springfield he is a member of the Me- 
morial Church, which he serves as deacon, 
taking an active interest in the educational 
work which is done in connection with the 
church. Mr. Halstead is a close friend of 
Mayor Leonard, of Springfield, with whom 
he is associated in church work. As treas- 
urer of the New England Coal Dealers' As- 
sociation for ten years, Mr. Halstead is 
well known to the coal trade throughout 
New England, and wherever he has gone, 
whether in pursuit of this business activity' 
or in connection with the work of his church, 
Mr. Halstead has carried with him a stimu- 
lating atmosphere of enthusiasm and earnest 
purpose. He is a member of the Chamber 
of Commerce of Springfield, and in that 
connection has contributed much to the wise 
direction of the business affairs of the city. 

Mr. Halstead is one of those sterling 
business men who carry the principle of their 
religion into the every-day business life of 
their active career, and each set of activities 
has contributed to the eflFectiveness of the 
other. He is a life member of the American 
Bible Society, and of the Libran.- Associa- 
tion ; was active in the Red Cross and other 
"drives" during the \\'orld War, and is a 
member of the Congregational Club. He 
was also a charter member of Philmont 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of Chatham, and 
well known as a "good fellow" socially, and 
a dependable friend. In addition to the 
business activities already mentioned Mr. 
Halstead is also a member of the board of 
directors of the Grain Dealers' Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, of the Beacon Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company, and of the Auto- 
mobile Mutual Liability Insurance Com- 
pany. 

On January 12, 1876, Charles Emerson 
Halstead married Carrie E. West over, of 
Austerlitz, New York, who died October 
16, 191 1, daughter of David Leroy and 
Rovilla (Champion) Westover. Children: 
I. Leroy W., who is inspector for the Grain 
Dealers' Fire Insurance Company, married 



Lillian Otto, and had a daughter, Rovilla, 
born December 12, 1907. 2. Frank J., who 
is associated with the business of Forbes & 
Wallace. 3. Harry C, who is associated 
with J. W. Adams Nursery Company. 4. 
George B., associated with the New England 
Investment and Securities Company, mar- 
ried Evelyn Spear. 5. Harriet H.. who mar- 
ried Wilbur A. Stannard. of Xew York, 
manager of the Grain Dealers' Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, for the State of Xew 
York, and has one son, Payson W. 



MILLER, Charles Ernest 

For more than three decades Charles Er- 
nest Miller has been identified with the firm 
of McLoughlin Brothers, formerly of Xew 
Y'ork City, but which business was in 1920 
purchased by the Milton Bradley Company 
'of Springfield, to which city it was removed 
and of this business he is at the present time 
(1925) vice-president. 

Henry Miller, father of Charles E. Miller, 
was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, and 
died in X'ew Y'ork, in 1913, aged seventy-two 
years. He received his education in his na- 
tive land, and then engaged in agricultural 
pursuits until 1857, when he left the Father- 
land and embarking in a sailing vessel made 
the trip to Xew York City. That the jour- 
ney was a difficult one is evidenced by the 
fact that one hundred and fifty days passed 
between the time he left Germany and the 
date of his landing in X'ew York City. For 
a time he found employment with Fair- 
weather & Ladew, dealers in raw skins, 
whose store was located in the "leather dis- 
trict" in Xew York City. After a time he 
made a change and went to Port Chester, 
Xew York, where he purchased a retail milk 
route and engaged in business for himself. 
The opportunities of the largest cit}* in the 
world, however, still attracted him, and after 
managing his own business for a time he 
again returned to Xew York City, and en- 
tered the employ of Louis De Jonge & Com- 
pany, manufacturers of fancy paper. Even- 
tually he engaged in the trucking business 



134 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



for himself in New York, and successfully 
continued in this line of activity during the 
remainder of his active career. The enter- 
prise prospered and grev^^ under his man- 
agement, and operating a dozen teams he 
made for himself and family a very com- 
fortable living, retiring in 1906, at the age 
of sixty-five years. Though largely self- 
educated, he was a man of keen discern- 
ment and of estimable character. His re- 
ligious affiliation was with the Lutheran 
Church. 

Henry Miller married, November 11, 
1867, Ernestine Seidel, born in Hesse-Nas- 
sau, Germany, daughter of Philip Seidel, 
and they were the parents of the following 
children: i. Charles E., of further mention. 

2. Frederick, who died at the age of forty- 
three years, leaving children, Arthur, Ray- 
mond, Frederick, Frances, and Dorothy. 

3. Frances. 4. Henry, who has one daugh- 
ter, Grace. 5. Louis, who has three sons, 
Henry, Irwin, and Louis. 6. Henrietta, who 
married Albert Laig. 

Charles Ernest Miller, son of Henry and 
Ernestine (Seidel) Miller, was born in New 
York City, December 15, 1869, and received 
his education in the public schools of the 
metropolis. When he was twelve years old 
he left school and began his active career 
in the employ of McLoughlin Brothers, 
manufacturers of toy books for children. 
That connection he has continuously main- 
tained to the present time (1924), a period 
of forty-three years. The McLoughlin con- 
cern was established in 1828 by John Mc- 
Loughlin. Mr. Miller began his connection 
with this establishment in the capacity of 
office boy, later being promoted to the posi- 
tion of billing clerk, then bookkeeper, later 
cashier, and subsequently was made sales- 
man. For twenty-eight years he traveled 
throughout the United States, representing 
his firm and contributing materially to its 
growth and prosperity. In 1914 the busi- 
ness was incorporated under the firm name 
of McLoughlin Brothers, and Mr. Miller 
was made vice-president in 191 8, and later 



chief executive under the third generation 
of McLoughlins. In 1920 the business was 
purchased by tlic Milton Bradley Company 
and moved to Springfield. Massachusetts. 
He now has charge of the manufacturing 
department of the business. He is known 
and respected among his associates, both for 
his business ability and for his sterling quali- 
ties of character. He finds healthful out- 
of-door recreation through his membership 
in the Longmeadow Country Club ; and his 
religious affiliation was originally with the 
Lutheran Church. 

Charles Ernest Miller married, November 
28, 1900, Emma Schlitz, born in Brooklyn, 
New York, daughter of Frank A. and Emily 
(Kriess) Schlitz, the former of whom is a 
native of Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Miller 
are the parents of two children: i. Ruth, 
born July 27, 1903, in Brooklyn, New York; 
is a social worker in the Young Women's 
Christian Association. 2. Albert, born in 
Brooklyn, New York, August 7, 1904. 



COLLINS, Thomas Joseph 

Among the younger members of the legal 
profession in Springfield is Thomas Joseph 
Collins, who was admitted to the bar in 1914 
and since that time has been engaged in prac- 
tice in that city. 

(I) Mr. Collins is of Irish ancestry, his 
great-grandfather being Dennis Collins, who 
spent his entire life in Tralee, County Kerry, 
Ireland. Dennis Collins married Ellen 
Flynn, and they were the parents of eight 
children: Maurice, of whom furtlicr ; Mich- 
ael, Patrick. John. Dennis, all of whom came 
to America in early life ; Cornelius, who went 
to Australia ; Margaret. Mary. 

(II) Maurice Collins, son of Dennis and 
Ellen (Flvnn) Collins, was born in Tralee, 
Countv Kerry. Ireland. December 5. 1820, 
and died at Mount Holly, Vermont. August 
31, 1876. He was a well-educated man, 
thoroughly familiar with the Gaelic language, 
and highly respected by his fellow-citizens. 
He came to America in 1844, locating in 
West Rutland, Vermont, where for a num- 



135 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ber of years he was employed in the marble 
quarries. P'rom West Rutland he removed 
in 1857 to Mt. Holly, Vermont. Here he 
purchased a house and entered the employ 
of the Rutland Railroad Company in the 
capacity of foreman of railroad construc- 
tion, which position he held to the time of 
his death. He married Mary O'Brien, born 
in Xainah. Tipperary, Ireland, daughter of 
Stephen and Nancy (Ryan) O'Brien, and 
who, after her father's death, came to Amer- 
ica with her mother in 1848 at the age of 
thirteen years, locating in Rutland, Vermont. 
She died in Springfield, Massachusetts, Feb- 
ruary 28, 191 1, aged seventy-six years. 
Maurice and Mary (O'Brien) Collins, were 
the parents of nine children : Ellen, who mar- 
ried John Dufify; Ann, deceased, who 
married Robert Dunn; Dennis Patrick, of 
whom further ; Stephen, Mary, who married 
James Kelliher ; John and Michael, twins ; 
William, Margaret. 

(Ill) Dennis Patrick Collins, son of 
Maurice and Mary (O'Brien) Collins, was 
born in West Rutland, Vermont, March 22, 
1855. He received his education in the dis- 
trict schools of Mt. Holly, Vermont, where 
the family had moved when he was two 
years of age, and when school days were 
over was engaged for a time in farm work. 
At the age of fifteen he entered the employ 
of the Rutland Railroad Company, doing 
con.struction work under the direction of his 
father, who was foreman, continuing this 
work until he had attained his majority. In 
188 r he came to Springfield and entered the 
employ of the Boston & Albany Railroad 
Company in the capacity of freight brake- 
man. From that time for a period of 
twenty-two years he was employed in the 
freight service of that railroad, two years 
as brakeman, and the remaining twenty as 
conductor. In IQ02 he was advanced to the 
position of passenger conductor on the Bos- 
ton & Albany Railroad running trains be- 
tween Springfield and Boston, which position 
he has efficiently filled for the past twenty- 
one years, and which he still holds (1924), 



making over forty-one years of continuous 
service with that company. Mr. Collins is a 
member of the Order of Railway Con- 
ductors, the Knights of Columbus, the New 
England Order of Protection, and is highly 
esteemed among a large circle of friends and 
acquaintances. His face is familiar to thou- 
sands of those who travel on the Boston & 
Albany road between Springfield and Bos- 
ton, and his courtesy and unfailing good 
humor have won for him the good will and 
the esteem of the traveling public. 

Dennis Patrick Collins married, February 
5, 1883, Annie Alberta Malone, born Janu- 
ary 6, 1862, in Petersville, Queens County, 
New Brunswick, daughter of Thomas and 
Honora Malone, and they are the parents of 
three children : Annie Bernice, who died at 
the age of three and one-half years ; Maurice 
D. ; Thomas Joseph, of whom further. 

(IV) Thomas Joseph Collins, son of 
Dennis Patrick and Annie A. (Malone) 
Collins, was born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, June 18, 1887. He received his pre- 
paratory education in the public schools of 
Springfield. After graduating from Central 
High School in 1906 he entered the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1910 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. In 191 1 he entered the Law School 
of Harvard University, from which he re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 
1914. He was admitted to the bar on Sep- 
tember 22 of that same year, and since that 
time has been engaged in practice in Spring- 
field, where he has built up a large clientele. 
On October 20, 1914, he was appointed clerk 
of the Western Massachusetts Transporta- 
tion Commission, which position he held 
until March, 1915, receiving public recog- 
nition for his services in the Report of the 
Commission to the Legislature. Mr. Collins 
is a member of the Knights of Columbus; 
the New England Order of Protection; 
Order of the Alhambra, Ancient Order of 
Hibernians; the Winthrop Club; the Con- 
necticut Valley Harvard Club, and the Amer- 
ican Legion. He is New England vice-presi- 



136 



I THE r 






ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



dent of the Harvard Law School Association, 
is a member of the Bar Association of 
Hampden County and the Massachusetts 
and American Bar associations. During the 
World War he entered the military service 
of the United States and served in the office 
of Chief of Staff at Washington, District of 
Columbia, from October 4, 1918, until his 
honorable discharge on January 10, 191 9. 

On April i, 1925, he was appointed by 
Governor Alvan T. Fuller Special Justice of 
the District Court of Springfield, and his 
nomination was confirmed by the Governor's 
Council on April 8, 1925. 



LANGEVIN, Rev. Alfred E. 

Among the representative citizens of 
Springfield who are rendering worthy serv- 
ice and who are highly esteemed by a wide 
circle of those who have been benefited by 
their ministrations is Rev. Alfred E. Lange- 
vin. who is known and honored in many 
sections of New England, where he has had 
various charges, and who for the past eight- 
een years has been in charge of the St. 
Aloysius Church at Indian Orchard. 

Father Langevin comes of old Colonial 
stock, tracing his ancestry to Mathunis 
Langevin, who, according to the records of 
the "Dictionaire Genealogique," of families 
of Canada compiled by Abbe Tanguay, was 
born in Quebec in 1654. 

(I) Louis Langevin, grandfather of Rev. 
Alfred E. Langevin, was a resident of St. 
Pie, where he was engaged in farming, and 
where he died in 1865. He married Gene- 
vieve Chartier, and they were the parents of 
three children : Louis, of whom further ; 
Therese, and Modeste. 

(II) Louis Langevin. son of Louis and 
Genevieve (Chartier) Langevin, was born 
in St. Pie, Canada, in 1823. and died at St. 
Hyacinthe. Canada, in 1899. He received 
his education in the local schools, and in 
early life was engaged in farming. In 1849 
he came to the States, and went to Nevada, 
where for a time he was in Carson City and 
in Virginia City. Later, he came to New 



England, and was employed in the woolen 
mills at Woonsocket, Rhode Island, and also 
at Fall River, Massachusetts. He then re- 
moved to Somerville, Massachusett3, but 
eventually returned to Canada, where he con- 
tinued to reside to the time of his death. He 
married Josephine Vachon, of St. Pie, Can- 
ada, who died in 1874, aged thirty years. 
The children of Louis anfl Josephine 
(Vachon) Langevin were: Alphonse, de- 
ceased; Rev. Alfred E., of whom further; 
Albina. Alcidas, who is at West Point, New 
York ; Severina, deceased ; Joseph, Alyrus. 

(HI) Rev. zA.lfred E. Langevin, son of 
Louis and Josephine (Vachon) Langevin, 
was born at St. Pie, Canada. April i, 1859. 
He received his preparatory education in the 
Classical College at St. Hyacinthe, and then 
entered Montreal Seminary, where he was 
prepared for the priesthood. He was or- 
dained at St. Albans, Vermont. June 22, 
1884, and the quality and degree of his aliil- 
itv is indicated by the fact that after his 
ordination he took his first charge at Enos- 
burg Falls, Vermont. wMth the Church of St. 
John the Baptist. He went as a pastor, a 
procedure which is very rare, most church- 
men being required to serve for several years 
as curates before being intrusted with the 
full responsibility of the priestly office. He 
remained in Enosburg Falls for two years, 
and during his early pastorate there he held 
missions at Richford, Montgomery, and 
Belvedere. In 1886 he went to Orwell. Ver- 
mont, where he took charge of St. Paul's 
Church, and held missions at Shoreham, 
Vermont. In 1888 he was transferred to St. 
Mary's Church at L'xbridge. Massachusetts, 
whence, after a service of two years, he was 
again transferred, this time to the Holy 
Name Church. Chicopee, Massachusetts. 
Faithful and efficient, and exerting a strong 
influence over the lives of his parishioners, 
there soon came a call to service in a larger 
field, and two years after he began his work 
at Chicopee he was transferred to take charge 
of St. Mary's Church. Gardner. Massachu- 
setts, where he remained for a period of ten 



137 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



years, during which time he built a large 
church with a seating capacity of one thou- 
sand. At the end of this time he severed his 
connection with that church and began his 
work at Worcester, Massachusetts, in charge 
of the Church of St. Joseph. After a pas- 
torate of five years, during which he ren- 
dered most valuable service to his parish and 
to the community-at-large, he made his final 
change, coming in 1906 to Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, as head of the St. Aloysius 
Roman Catholic Church at Indian Orchard, 
where he has remained to the present time 
(1924). Throughout his career he has been 
actively interested in the public welfare, 
giving freely of his time and of his ability 
for the welfare of his people and of the 
public-in-general, but his greatest work has 
been done in his present pastorate. 

After a few years here he found that the 
school facilities were insufficient to meet the 
constantly growing demand of his parish, 
and decided to build a school which would 
not only be adequate but a source of pride 
and gratification to all who should see it. 
He set about this task with the full coopera- 
tion of the members of his parish, and after 
a vast amount of study and thought decided 
upon the plans. Unfortunately, he was not 
able to have this building placed upon the 
site which he had hoped for, but although 
greatly disappointed in this respect he gave 
his individual attention to every detail con- 
nected with the project, and in the fall of 
1923 the school was opened for the reception 
of the pupils of the parish. 

The building is constructed of brick, one 
hundred and forty feet in length and eighty 
feet in depth, one story and basement. It 
was i^lanned by Father Langevin from a 
special design copied by him from some of 
the most beautiful educational buildings of 
Continental Europe, and the rich simplicity 
of its exterior impresses every beholder, and 
the interior is correspondingly beautiful. 
The entrance in the center is through doors 
of French design, the hardware of which is 
of bronze, opening into a hall finished in rich 



dark wood, with polished terrazine floors. 
Passing to the center of the building, an- 
other hall is found running the entire length 
of the building, one hundred and forty feet. 
Passing this hall, directly opposite the en- 
trance, one sees the room of the Sister Su- 
perior who is in charge of the school. This 
room, like all the others, is finished in light 
wood, except the furniture, which is of black 
walnut. Here are kept in a case especially 
built for the purpose all the school supplies. 
Here also is a box for the calling of the Fire 
Department, if necessary. 

On this floor are eight class rooms, four 
on either side of the corridor, each contain- 
ing fifty-five single desks, and so built that 
all light comes in over the left shoulder of 
each pupil. On clear days the rooms are 
flooded with light, and even on the darkest 
days rarely is it necessary to use artificial 
light. At either end of the central hall is 
an entrance for the students, one for the 
boys and one for the girls, and the dressing 
rooms are fitted with hooks, racks for um- 
brellas, etc., and large wardrobe closets. 
From these the pupils pass directly into the 
class rooms, which are connected with doors 
to enable pupils or teachers to pass from one 
to another, if necessary, without entering the 
hall. On three sides of the rooms are black- 
boards made of slate, of the very latest de- 
sign. The ventilating system is perfect and 
the air in each room is completely changed 
every twenty minutes. The heating is by 
oil, and the entire building can be brought 
to a temperature of seventy degrees, in ordi- 
nary winter weather, in a half hour's time. 
In the basement is a large assembly hall, also 
two lunch rooms, one for the larger and one 
for the smaller children, and two recreation 
rooms to be used by children in stormy 
weather. 

Everything connected with the entire 
building, heating, lighting, ventilating and 
sanitation, has been provided for according 
to the most approved methods, and without 
exception this building, for school purposes, 
is unquestionably one of the most beautiful 



138 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



and complete in the United States. It re- 
flects great credit upon Rev. Father Lange- 
vin and will stand as a monument to his 
memory and the crowning act of his life's 
work. 

Although the material achievements of 
Father Langevin's career have heen great, 
these are far from representing the full scope 
of his service. They are hut the practical 
means for ministration of a higher order, the 
facilities for the effective accomplishment of 
the real work of his long term of service. 
The personal character of Father Langevin, 
his accomplishments, and his deep spiritual 
life have been the real building forces in each 
of the parishes in which he has served. As 
a student he applied himself to the solving 
of intricate problems and the accomplish- 
ment of each task, including the mastery of 
Latin and Greek, in such a manner as to win 
the admiration of instructors and fellow- 
students, and the qualities of mind and heart 
which he then displayed have been the real 
sources of power in his pastoral achievement. 
Upon the foundations laid in his student 
days he has continued to build the great 
superstructure of his wonderful knowledge 
of men and afifairs. He has traveled exten- 
sively in foreign countries, learning the lan- 
guages and making himself thoroughly fa- 
miliar with the customs of the people among 
whom he has been. His charming personal- 
ity and convincing manner of speaking read- 
ily command a hearing, and listeners soon 
realize that he is a scholar from whom they 
may receive both pleasure and profit. Ever 
considerate of others, he makes staunch 
friends, whose esteem invariably increases 
as the years pass and they learn to know him 
better. His well-rounded Christian life 
serves as a practical demonstration of the 
principles of the faith which he teaches, and 
adds powerfully to the influence of his min- 
istrations. Conscientious and honest to the 
last degree, he stands in the community in 
which he lives for all that is best and highest 
in personal and civic life, and both in the 
afifairs of business and in his work as a 



minister of the Gospel he measures up to the 
highest possible standard of Christian man- 
hood, thus winning not only the esteem and 

trust, but also the love of all wlio know him. 



McENELLY, Edward James 

As a violinist of rare ability and as the 
organizer and leader of one of the most pop- 
ular orchestras in Western Massachusetts, 
Edward James McEnelly has given pleasure 
to thousands of music-lovers who find pleas- 
ure in dancing to music of exceptional ex- 
cellence. 

(I) Mr. McEnelly is of Irish descent, his 
great-grandfather being William McEnelly, 
who was born in County Mayo, Ireland, and 
spent his entire life there. He married 
Bridget McTigue, and they were the parents 
of four children : James, of whom further ; 
Thomas, Michael, Bridget. 

(II) James McEnelly, son of William and 
Bridget (McTigue) McEnelly, was born in 
County Mayo, Ireland, and died in Hopkin- 
ton, Massachusetts, in May, 1863. He mar- 
ried Ellen Rowley, born in Ireland, died in 
Hopkinton, Massachusetts, in March. 1870. 
Their children were: Thomas J., of further 
mention ; Bridget. 

(III) Thomas J. McEnelly. son of James 
and Ellen (Rowley) McEnelly, was born in 
Hopkinton. Massachusetts, May 18, 1858. 
After receiving a good, practical education 
in the pu])lic schools of his native city, he 
found employment in the shipping dcjiart- 
ment of the firm of Crompton &: Knowles, 
of Worcester, Massachusetts, which connec- 
tion he maintained throughout the ]ieriod of 
his active career. He married, August 12, 
1878. Mary Keefe, born in Milford, Massa- 
chusetts, August 15, 1858, daughter of Cor- 
nelius and Ann (Ryan) Keefe. They were 
the parents of children, among whom was 
Edward James, of further mention. 

(IV) Edward James McEnelly, son of 
Thomas J. and Mary (Keefe) McEnelly, 
was born in Spencer, Massachusetts, July 21, 
1880. After receiving a careful preparatory 
education in the public schools of Spencer 



139 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



and Marllxirouf^h, Massachusetts, he became 
a student in the Conservatory of Music, 
where he studied the violin, harmony, piano, 
and orphan music. He also studied vocal 
music with Mr. Barry, of St. Mary's Church, 
of Milford. and later sang^ tenor and con- 
ducted the choir of St. John's Church of 
Worcester. He also, previous to his entrance 
to the conservatory, had studied with private 
tutors and had beg^un playing the violin when 
he was eleven years of age, and at thirteen 
was playing in an orchestra. It is said of 
him that so devoted was he to his music that 
often he would begin playing in the evening 
and play far into the wee small hours of the 
following morning. He is a violinist of 
acknowledged skill, and since 1905 he has 
been conducting an orchestra of his own or- 
ganization, which has won the applause of 
hundreds of thousands in New England and 
in the other States. For more than seventeen 
years now (1924), McEnelly's Singing Or- 
chestra, composed of fourteen highly talented 
musicians, have been playing in the leading 
cities throughout the New England States, 
New York State, and also in other localities. 
The headquarters of his musical enterprise, 
however, has been in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, for the past eight years. Mr. Mc- 
Enelly is vice-president of the Cook Amuse- 
ment Company, of which W. J. Cook is presi- 
dent, and this organization has a yearly con- 
tract with Mr. McEnelly's orchestra, which 
has been carried out for the past sixteen 
years. During this time the orchestra has 
given hundreds of concerts throughout the 
country to the most exclusive gatherings. 
During the summer the orchestra is the fea- 
ture attraction at Mr. Cook's Riverside Park 
Ballroom, situated on the Connecticut River 
near Springfield, where it plays every evening 
during the season. During the fall, winter, 
and spring it has been engaged on the road, 
also at the Springfield Automobile Show. 
During the fall of 1923 Mr. Cook purchased 
a building at the corner of Hillman Avenue 
and Dwight Street, Springfield, which he 
had fitted up at a great expense and which 



is now known as the Butterfly Ballroom. 
During the time this building was being re- 
modeled, the orchestra played a number of 
farewell engagements in cities which it had 
earlier visited, and in the future they will be 
engaged during the fall and winter months 
in playing for dancing in the new Butterfly 
Ballroom. It is said that McEnelly's or- 
chesta has a style of its own and an excep- 
tional dance rhythm wdiich greatly pleases 
its many patrons. Since the first visit of 
Paul Whiteman to Springfield, in 1923, there 
has been a greatly increased interest in the 
general subject of dance music, and the 
critical audiences which have since listened 
to Mr. McEnelly's orchestra have paid him 
the tribute of hearty commendation. 'Mr. 
McEnelly's pleasing personality wins for him 
many friends wherever he goes, and is also 
a valuable business asset. Fraternally, he is 
a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and he is also a member of 
the Oxford Country Club. 

On June 25, 1905, in Milford, ]\Iassachu- 
setts. Edward James McEnelly married Mae 
Louise Cronan, of Milford, Massachusetts, 
daughter of Daniel J. and Catherine (Mori- 
arty) Cronan, and they are the parents of 
one daughter, Ruth, who was born in Mil- 
ford, Massachusetts, July 22, 191 7. 



ALBEE, Julian Royal 

Julian Royal Albee, proprietor of the 
Springfield City Laundry, located at No. 870 
State Street, Springfield, is among the well- 
known business men of that city, who also 
takes an active part and interest in its public 
affairs . 

(I) Mr. Albee, who is a descendant of 
old Colonial stock, is a great-grandson of 
Ebenezer Allbee, a native of Townsend, 
Massachusetts, born April 17, 1768, died 
December 13, 1846, and of Anna (Johnson) 
Allbee, who was born in Lancaster, ]\Iassa- 
chusetts, January 20, 1771, died September 
16, 1 8-19. Ebenezer Allbee and his wife were 
the parents of six children : Ebenezer, Tim- 
othy Johnson, Philena, Horace, George 



140 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Washington, and Elijah Warren, of further 
mention. 

(II) Elijah Warren Allbee, youngest child 
of Ebenezer and Anna (Johnson) Allbee, 
was born in Rockingham, Vermont, Febru- 
ary 29, 1812, and died March 21, 1885. He 
married Ruth Maria Adams, born December 
20, 1812, died May 6, 1900, and their chil- 
dren were : Vietts, of further mention ; 
Juetts A., Frances, Ann, Ida. 

(HI) Vietts Allbee, son of Elijah Warren 
and Ruth Maria (Adams) Allbee, was born 
in Rochester, Vermont, and died in the Na- 
tional Soldiers' Home in Iowa. He was an 
able, versatile man, of marked mechanical 
ability, who was successful as blacksmith, 
engineer, and painter, and who followed these 
trades in various locations in the West. He 
spent many years, of his life in Illinois and 
in Iowa, finding the conditions of those sec- 
tions much to his liking. He was in active 
service during the Civil War, and his last 
years were passed among the pleasant sur- 
roundings and the congenial "comrades" of 
the National Soldiers' Home in Waterloo, 
Iowa. He married Isabelle K. Flint, of 
Granville, Vermont, who died January 14, 
1922, daughter of Joseph and Hannah 
(Washburn) Flint, and they were the par- 
ents of two children : Julian Royal, of fur- 
ther mention ; and Lillian Frances, who mar- 
ried Henry A. Utley, and has two sons, 
Lewis and Lester. 

(IV) Julian Royal Albee (note the change 
in spelling; Mr. Albee dropped an "1" from 
the name some years ago), son of Vietts and 
Isabelle K. (Flint) Allbee, was born in 
Northfield, Vermont, December 22. 1863. 
When he was still but a small child he re- 
moved, with his parents, to the State of 
Illinois, and in the public schools of Moline, 
of that State, he received his earliest school 
training. When he was a lad of eleven years, 
he returned East and went to the home of 

his mother's brothers, , in Granville, 

and later in Rochester, Vermont, where he 
attended the district schools. During the 
long vacations and before and after school 



in the short winter terms he worked on a 
farm until he was sixteen years of age. De- 
siring then to make his own way in the world 
he went to Randolph, Vermont, where for 
two years he was employed in a sash and 
blind shop, and for one year he found em- 
ployment on the Moulton Brothers Stock 
Farm. He then decided to make a change 
and removed to Ware, Massachusetts, and 
here he began his career in the laundry busi- 
ness. He secured employment in a laundry 
in the town, and when he had gained a fair 
amount of experience there, he went to Am- 
herst, Massachusetts, where for eight years 
he was associated with the laundry business 
of Mr. Utley, and at the end of that time, 
February 24, 1898, he came to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and engaged in the laundry 
business for himself. He formed a partner- 
ship with Charles L. Brown under the firm 
name of Brown & Albee, and opened an 
establishment at No. 19 Lyman Street. The 
enterprise was a success, and after a time Mr. 
Albee purchased the interest of his partner 
and continued the business alone. In Au- 
gust, 1905. he moved into the large and well- 
equipped plant which he now occupies on 
State Street. This building, which he had 
built to meet the special needs of his business, 
is fitted with every convenience for the safe, 
rapid, and most hygienic handling of the 
large amount of business which he has built 
up. At the present time (1924) Mr. Albee 
employs about thirty-five hands. In addi- 
tion to his business responsibilities, Mr. .Mbee 
has found time for local public service. He 
was treasurer of the Republican City Com- 
mittee, which position he held for a period 
of five years ; for four years he also served 
as a meml)er of the City Council; and for 
two years he was one of the Board of Alder- 
men. He is a member of Roswell Lee Lodge. 
Free and Accepted Masons, of Springfield, 
and of De Soto Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He is also a member of the 
Rotary Club. He is the president of the 
Sons and Daughters of Vermont. His re- 
ligious affiliation is with St. Paul's Univer- 



141 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



salist Qiurch, of which he is president of 
the parish. 

On June 14. 1884, JuHan Royal Albee 
married CaroHne E. Snow, born in Cam- 
l)ridge, Massachusetts, but residing in West 
Randolph, Vermont, most of her life before 
her marriage, daughter of Nathaniel Osgood 
and Mary A. (Taylor) Snow. (See Snow 
X.) Mr. and Mrs. Albee are the parents 
of two children : Ethel Snow, born in Am- 
herst, Massachusetts, May 5, 1891, married 
Ralph S. Higgins, and has one child, Ralph 
Albee Higgins; and Rachel Muriel, born 
June 18, 1897, in Amherst, IVIassachusetts, 
married Frank J. Leahey, of Yonkers, New 
York, and has one child, Joan. 

(The Snow Line) 

The progenitor of the Snow family in 
America was Hon. Nicholas Snow, who came 
on the British ship, "Anne," sailing from 
England early in April, 1623, and arriving 
in Plymouth, Massachusetts, the following 
August. He was a man of considerable 
wealth, eminence, and consequence in the 
community of Plymouth, where he was 
elected to official positions in the years 1650 
and 1652. He removed to Eastham, in 1654, 
purchased land there and was elected to rep- 
resent that town in the General Court in 
1657. He lived in Eastham during the re- 
mainder of his life, and died there November 
16, 1676. He married, in Plymouth, about 
1626, Constance Hopkins, daughter of 
Stephen Hopkins, and they were the parents 
of thirteen children, only five of whom were 
recorded. 

(H) Stephen Snow, son of Hon. Nicholas 
and Constance (Hopkins) Snow, was born 
in 1630, and died December 17, 1705. He 
married Susanna (Deane) Rogers, widow 
of Joseph Rogers, Jr., and daughter of 
Stephen Deane, and among their children 
was Ebenezer, of further mention. 

(HI) Ebenezer Snow, son of Stephen and 
Susanna (Deane-Rogers) Snow, was born 
in 1677, and died April 9, 1725. He mar- 
ried, December 22, 1698, Hope Horton, and 



they were the parents of children, among 
whom was Thomas, of further mention. 

(IV) Thomas Snow, son of Ebenezer and 
Hope (Horton) Snow, was born February 
I, 1701, and died in 1766. He married, Jan- 
uary 27, 1732, Abigail Doane, born Decem- 
ber 29, 1764, died January 5, 1799. They 
were the parents of Elnathan, of further 
mention. 

(V) Elnathan Snow, son of Thomas and 
Abigail (Deane) Snow, was born May 2, 
1734, and died in 1806. He married, De- 
cember 4, 1755, Phoebe Sparrow, born Jan- 
uary 3, 1737, died in 181 3. They were the 
parents of children, among whom was Aaron, 
of further mention. 

(VI) Aaron Snow, son of Elnathan and 
Phoebe (Sparrow) Snow, was born July 2, 
1763, and died in 181 8. He married, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1786, Abigail Higgins, born April 
18, 1768, and they were the parents of chil- 
dren, among whom was Captain Thomas 
Snow, of further mention. 

(VII) Captain Thomas Snow, son of 
Aaron and Abigail (Higgins) Snow, was 
born April 7, 1788, and died in 1820. He 
married. May 12, 1808, Seviah Sparrow, 
born in March, 1790, and died May 29, 
i860. They were the parents of Thomas, 
of further mention. 

(VIII) Thomas Snow, son of Captain 
Thomas and Seviah (Sparrow) Snow, was 
born February 14, 181 1, and died in 1840. 
Fle married, August 7, 1832, Delilah Young, 
born December 8, 181 3, died February 25, 
1858. They were the parents of children, 
among whoq? was Nathaniel Osgood, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(IX) Nathaniel Osgood Snow, son of 
Thomas and Delilah (Young) Snow, was 
born October 22, 1833, and died May 18, 
191 1. He married, January 18, 1862, Mary 
A. Taylor, born August 28, 1843. They 
were the parents of CaroHne E., of further 
mention. 

(X) Caroline E. Snow, daughter of Na- 
thaniel Osgood and Mary A. (Taylor) Snow, 
married Julian Royal Albee (see Albee IV). 



142 



'/Or 



A. '» J / 



J 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ADAMS, George Edward 

George Edward Adams, president, treas- 
urer, and general manager of the H. K. 
Smith Company, of Springfield, engaged in 
selling the Ford cars and tractors and the 
Lincoln car, which is also a Ford product, 
has built up a very large and successful busi- 
ness, and his offices, show rooms, and serv- 
ice station are among the best equipped in 
Western Massachusetts. 

(I) Mr. Adams is a descendant of a very 
old Colonial family, tracing his ancestry to 
Robert Adams, who was born in England 
in 1602, and died October 12, 1682, aged 
eighty years. He came to Ipswich, Massa- 
chusetts Bay Colony, in 1635, accompanied 
by his wife, Eleanor (Wilmot?) Adams, 
and their first two children. He was a tailor 
by trade, and settled in Salem, where he was 
a resident in 1638-39. In 1640 he removed 
to Newbury, and there he became a promi- 
nent citizen and acquired a large farm and 
other valuable property. His wife Eleanor 
died June 12, 1677, and he married (second), 
February 6, 1678, Sarah (Glover) Short, 
widow of Henry Short. She died in New- 
bury, October 24, 1697. Children, all of the 
first marirage, were : John, Joanna, Sergeant 
Abraham, Elizabeth, Mary, Isaac, Jacob, 
died young ; Hannah, Jacob, of further men- 
tion. 

(II) Jacob Adams, son of Robert and 
Eleanor Adams, was born September 13, 
165 1, and died in Boston, Massachusetts, in 
November, 171 7, while in attendance upon 
his duties as a representative of Suffield in 
the General Court. Pie removed to Suffield 
(now in Connecticut) about 1681, where he 
was one of the most prominent and influ- 
ential early settlers. He was a member of 
the General Court in Boston from 171 1 to 
1714, and again in 1717. He became very 
"well-to-do" and was greatly esteemed among 
his fellow-townsmen. His will is recorded 
both at Boston and Northampton, the county 
seat of Hampshire County. On April 7, 
1677, he married Anna Allen, born January 
3, 1658, daughter of Nicholas Allen, of 



Dorchester, Massachusetts, and they were 
the parents of children : Dorothy, Rebecca, 
Sergeant Jacob, Daniel, Elizabeth, Lieuten- 
ant Abraham, John, who flied young; John, 
of further mention. 

(III) John Adams, son of Jacob and 
Anna (Allen) Adams, was born in Suffield, 
Connecticut, June 18, 1694, and resided in 
the city of his birth. He married (first), 
July 26, 1722. Abigail Rowe for Roe), 
daughter of Sarah (Remington) Rowe; 
(second), July 12, 1732, Martha Winchell. 
Children, all of the first marriage, were : 
Moses, Captain Simeon (or Simon), of fur- 
ther mention; Anna, Lieutenant Joel, Lucy, 

(IV) Captain Simeon for Simon) Adams, 
son of John and Abigail (Rowe, or Roe) 
Adams, was born in Suffield, Connecticut, 
in November, 1724, and died in Marlboro, 
August I, 1803. In 1783 he bought a farm 
in Marlboro, Vermont, to which place he 
removed about the time of the purchase. 
He was a soldier in the French and Indian 
wars, during which Conflict he was twice cap- 
tured and taken to Canada, each time being 
exchanged and returned. He was popularly 
known as Captain Simeon, and there is a 
tradition that his wife, Susanna Adams, 
drove British officers out of her house dur- 
ing the Revolutionary War. He married, in 
January, 1766, Susanna Underwood, born in 
Westfield, Massachusetts, September 22, 
1747. died in Marlboro, Vermont, September 
14, 1845. aged ninety-eight years, and they 
were the parents of children : Hannah. Cap- 
tain Oliver, Captain Simeon, of further 
mention; David, Plannah. Susanna, Rufus. 

(V) Captain Simeon Adams, son of Cap- 
tain Simeon and Susanna (Underwood) 
Adams, was born in Suffield, Connecticut, 
January 8, 1776, and died in Marlboro, Ver- 
mont. He married, in August, 1797, Lucy 
Mather, born February 26, 1780, died March 
31, i860, daughter of Major Timothy 
Mather, and they were the parents of chil- 
dren : Captain Ira, Philena. Simeon, Lucy, 
Clark, Hannah, Timothy Mather, Louisa, 



143 



EX'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Lucius Franklin, of further mention; Sam- 
uel Newell, Minerva. 

(VI) Lucius Franklin Adams, son of 
Captain Simeon and Lucy (Mather) Adams, 
was born in Marlboro, Vermont, June 8, 
i8iC, and died May 2, 1881. He married, 
May 2, 1 84 1, Clarinda Winchester, daughter 
of Charles P. and Patty (Basset) Winches- 
ter, and they were the parents of children: 
LeRoy Franklin, of further mention; Loren 
M., Lucius W., Nellie J. 

(VH) LeRoy Franklin Adams, son of 
Lucius Franklin and Clarinda (Winchester) 
Adams, was born in Marlboro, Vermont, 
April 23, 1846, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, February 4, 1910. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of 
his native district, and when school days 
were over removed to Brattleboro, Vermont, 
where he was engaged in the grain business 
for many years. In his later years he re- 
moved to Springfield, and there he continued 
to successfully engage in the grain business 
during the remainder of his active career. 
Mr. Adams was well known and highly es- 
teemed in each of the communities in which 
he lived, and always contributed his full 
share of time, energy, and means for the 
advancement of the public good. He was a 
member of the Brattleboro, Vermont, Lodge 
No. 102, Free and Accepted Masons, and of 
all the Scottish Rite bodies, having conferred 
upon him the thirty-third degree ; he is also a 
member of the Ancient Arabic Order Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. His religious affilia- 
tion was with the Brattleboro Congregational 
Church, which he served as a member of the 
board of trustees. On Octol)er 23, 1872, 
LeRoy F. Adams married Ella Crosby, of 
Marlboro, Vermont, who died in January, 
1890, daughter of Edward and Betsy L. 
(Jones) Crosby, and they were the parents 
of children : Walter Crosby, Fred C, a 
banker of Brattlesboro, Vermont ; George 
Edward, of further mention; Parker Sum- 
ner, Ruth Lovisa, wdio married Guy W. 
Downer, of Springfield, Massachusetts; Ella 
Crosby, who married Dr. George Schadt, of 



Springfield, Massachusetts, and Crosby, who 
was a resident of Plolyoke, Massachusetts, 
now of New York City. 

(VIII) George Edward Adams, son of 
LeRoy Franklin and Ella (Crosby) Adams, 
was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, Decem- 
ber 8, 1880. He received his education in 
the public schools of his native city. When 
his education was completed, he became as- 
sociated with his father, who was engaged in 
the grain business, and this connection he 
maintained until the death of his father in 
1910. He then sold the grain business and 
the following year, 191 1, became agent for 
the Ford products in the Springfield district, 
handling Ford cars and tractors and later 
selling also the Lincoln car, as aforemen- 
tioned. He was successful from the begin- 
ning, and has built up a very large concern, 
which he has organized under the name of 
the H. K. Smith Company, of which he is 
president, treasurer, and general manager. 
His offices, show rooms, and service station 
are equipped with every modern device for 
the most efficient handling of cars, repairing, 
etc., and his establishment ranks as one of 
the best equipped in Western Massachusetts. 
As a progressive citizen who is always ready 
to stand on the side of advancement and 
expansion in all matters pertaining to the 
public welfare, as a notably successful busi- 
ness man, and as a valued friend and asso- 
ciate, Mr. Adams stands high in the com- 
munity. He is a member of Springfield 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and has 
taken all the Scottish Rite degrees, including 
the thirty-second, and of the Winthrop Club, 
and his religious affiliation is with the Long- 
meadow Congregational Church. 

On October 14, 1903, George E. Adams 
married Margaret C. Averill, of Brattleboro, 
Vermont, daughter of George C. and Nellie 
C. (Chubbuck) Averill, and they are the 
parents of three children : Marion, born 
August 6, 1904; Rosamond, born April 28, 
1909; Averill, born October i, 1910. 

George C. Averill, treasurer and principal 
stockholder of the Ashuelot Paper Company, 



144 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



and former president of the Vermont Xa- 
tional Bank, was found dead in his chair in 
his home at Brattleboro, July 21, 191 7, by 
his son, Richard C. Averill, on the latter's 
return from Spofford Lake, New Hampshire, 
where his family have been on a vacation. 
Death was due to organic heart trouble. Mr. 
Averill was seen in his garden an hour or 
more before being found by his son. 

He was born in Thomaston, Connecticut, 
a son of Rev. James Averill. At the age of 
sixteen he became a clerk and bookkeeper 
in the First National Bank at Greenfield, 
remaining there eight years. He then became 
teller of the First National Bank in North- 
ampton, ^Massachusetts, and in 1885 went to 
Brattleboro and was teller of the Vermont 
National Bank one year, succeeding George 
S. Dowley as cashier in 1886. He was made 
president of the bank in 1897, remaining in 
that position until he resigned in 191 5. Since 
then he has taken an active part in the 
Ashuelot Paper Company near Hinsdale, 
New Hampshire, making daily trips to the 
plant. He was treasurer of Windham 
County, the Brattleboro Home for the Aged 
and the Austine Institution for Deaf and 
Blind Children, a trustee of the Brattleboro 
Retreat, and a director of the Connecticut 
Valley Street Railway and various other cor- 
porations. He w^as a Congregationalist. a 
Mason and an Odd Fellow. His wife, who 
was Nellie C. Chubbuck, of Boston, died 
July 25, 191 5. Besides his son, Mr. Averill 
leaves one daughter, Margaret C, wife of 
George E. Adams, of Springfield. 



HODGE, Frank Roddy 

Many of the residents of Springfield as- 
sociate the name of the late Frank Roddy 
Hodge with hours spent in the enjoyment of 
orchestral and vocal music, either as audi- 
ence, members of an orchestra directed by 
Mr. Hodge, or as pupils working under his 
instruction. He played, sang, taught, and 
directed orchestral work for many years in 
Springfield, and was engaged in choral work 
from the time he was twentv vears of age 



until his death. Pie was loved and esteemed 
by a host of friends and associates. 

(I) John Hodge, immigrant ancestor of 
Frank R. Hodge, was born about 1643, ^"^ 
died in Lyme, Connecticut, in 1692. He 
married, August 12, 1666, Susanna Den- 
slow, daughter of Henry Denslow, who was 
killed by Indians in Winslow, Connecticut, 
and they were the parents of eleven chil- 
dren : John, Thomas, Mary, Joseph, Benja- 
min, Henry, William, Elizabeth, Susanna, 
Abigail, Samuel, of further mention. 

(II) Samuel Hodge, son of John and 
Susanna (Denslow) Hodge, was born Oc- 
tober 4, 1686, and died in Glastonbury, 
Connecticut, May 8, 1764. He and his wife 
Sarah were the parents of : Samuel, John, 
of further mention, Benjamin. 

(III) John Hodge, son of Samuel and 
Sarah Hodge, was born in 1725, and died 
in 1799. He spent his entire life in Glas- 
tonbury, Connecticut. He married (first), 
June 29, 1748, Sarah Taylor, daughter of 
John Taylor, of Weathersfield, Connecticut. 
She died January 26, 1781. He married 
(second), March 27, 1783, Abigail Dodge. 

Children of first marriage were : John, Sarah, 
Elijah. Jonathan. Levi, Eli. of further men- 
tion ; Sophia, Rhoda, Roswell, Isaac, Lydia, 
Abel. 

(IV) Eli Hodge, son of John and Sarah 
(Taylor) Hodge, was born September 9, 
1758, and died in July, 1828, the entire 
period of his life being spent in Glastonbury, 
Connecticut. He married. March i, 1781, 
Elizabeth Goslie, baptized July 8. 1759. and 
they were the parents of the following chil- 
dren : Asa, of further mention ; Eli. Ira, 
Polly. Viva, Hannah, Pamelia. 

(V) Asa Hodge, son of Eli and Eliza- 
beth (Goslie) Hodge, was born in Glaston- 
bury, Connecticut. July 27. 1784. He mar- 
ried Maria Sackett. and they were the 
parents of eight children: Henry, Silas, 
Clarissa, Minerva, Alfred. James R.. of fur- 
ther mention ; Lyman. Mary. 

(VI) James R. Hodge, son of Asa and 
Maria (Sackett) Hodge, was born in 



145 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Sprinjjfield, Massachusetts, August 5, 181 5, 
and died in Springfield. Massachusetts, in 
January, 1885. He was a carpenter hy 
trade. He married. Xovemher 19, 1848, 
Mary Allen Pease, born January 23, 1S24, 
died March 14, 1882, and they were the 
parents of three children: i. James G., born 
September 30, 1850, died August 24, 1851. 
2. Fred, born October 29, 1855. 3. Frank 
Roddy, of further mention. 

(VH) Frank Roddy Hodge, son of James 
R. and Mary Allen (Pease) Hodge, was 
born in Thompsonville, Connecticut, July 31, 
1858. and died in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
November 16, 1907. After receiving a good 
practical education in the public schools of 
Springfield he learned the trade of the ma- 
chinist, but though he followed his trade as 
a means of earning a living his chief interest 
was in music. He was a natural musician 
and throughout the period of his active ca- 
reer was deeply interested in both vocal and 
instrumental music. He became a member 
of the church choir when he was twenty 
years of age and continued to sing in choir 
groups to the time of his death. He was also 
expert as a performer on musical instru- 
ments, and taught music during the latter 
part of his active career. He was the di- 
rector of the Home City Quartette, as well 
as one of its members, and was connected 
with orchestral work for many years. As 
organizer and director of the Cunlifif Hodge 
orchestra he was well known not only in the 
city of Springfield but throughout a large 
section of country surrounding that city. 
Though he had learned the trade of a ma- 
chinist he did not continue to follow the 
trade throughout his career. He was for 
twelve years special agent for the Mutual 
Benefit Insurance Company of Newark, 
New Jersey, an occupation which could be 
so arranged as to accommodate itself to his 
musical activities. He had a host of friends 
in Springfield and was popular wherever he 
went. Fraternally, he was affiliated with 
De Soto Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and Agawam Encampment, He 



was a member of Hampden County Musical 
Club, and of the Musical Art Club, and in 
the work of both organizations he took an 
active part. 

On October 17, 1888, Frank Roddy 
Hodge married Annie B. Davis, daughter 
of John W. Davis, who died June 3, 1905, 
aged seventy-seven years, and of Lucinda 
(Vibbert) Davis, and a granddaughter of 
Eliphas and Submit (Ganett) Davis. Mr. 
and ]\Irs. Hodge became the parents of two 
children: i. Marion Hodge, born July 18, 
1889, married, August 15, 1919, Leonard 
Davis. 2. James Raymond Davis Hodge, 
who was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
June 23, 1892, received his education in city 
schools, and became manager for Story & 
Clark, piano dealers of Brooklyn, New York ; 
married, August 14, 1922, Ruth Hendrick 
Day. He is now (1924) in Baltimore, 
Maryland, with J. PI. Williams Company, 
piano dealers, as sales manager. 



HUBBELL, Colonel Lindley Dodd 

Colonel Lindley Dodd Hubbell, who was 
recently appointed chairman of the new 
three-man police commission of the city of 
Springfield, is well known in that city, where 
he was vice-president of the Hendee Manu- 
facturing Company until August, 192 1, and 
where during the World War he rendered 
notably efficient service as works manager, 
and later as commanding officer with the 
rank of lieutenant-colonel, in the Springfield 
\rmory, and now holds the rank of colonel 
in the Officers' Reserve Corps, Ordnance 
Department, United States Army. 

(I) The Hubbell family in America is 
descended from Richard Hubbell, of Pe- 
quonock, Fairfield County, Connecticut, who 
was born in 1626. near Redditch, Ribsford 
Parish, son of Richard Hubbell, of Ribsford 
Parish, and of Sarah (Wakeman) Hubbell, 
and died October 23, 1699, at his residence 
in Pequonock. He married (first) Elizabeth 
Meigs, who died in 1665, daughter of John 
Meigs, Sr., of the New Haven Colony. 
Children : John, Richard, James, died young ; 



146 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Samuel, died youn;^; Elizabeth, Ebenezer, 
Mary, Martha, Samuel, of further mention ; 
Abigail, Sarah. James, John. 

(II) Samuel Hubbell, son of Richard and 
Elizabeth (Meigs) Hubbell, was born No- 
vember 6, 1657, and died September 18, 
17x3. During his early childhood he was a 
resident of Guilford, but he removed to 
Fairfield with his parents when he was five 
years of age. He became a prominent citi- 
zen of that place, conducted the village store, 
was a lieutenant in the local "train band," 
served as "society clerk," and was a recorder 
of deeds for the parish of Stratford from 
1694 to the time of his death in 1713. He 
married (first), April 4, 1687, Elizabeth 
Wilson. She died January 4, 1688. mother 
of one child, Benoni, who died January 20, 
1688. He married (second), April 17, 1688, 
Temperance Preston, and to this second mar- 
riage ten children were born: Elizabeth, 
died young; Jehiel, died young; Daniel, 
Catherine, died young; Ephraim, Stephen, of 
further mention; David, Abiel, died young; 
Tabitha, Joseph. 

(III) Stephen Hubbell, of Stratfield, 
Fairfield County, Connecticut, son of Sam- 
uel and Temperance (Preston) Hubbell, 
was born February 16, 1696, and died April 
20. 1792. He was active in public aiifairs 
and held many offices of trust. He married 
(first), January 10, 1720, Abigail Squire, 
who died October i, 1777, aged eighty-four 
years, and they were the parents of three 
children : Nehemiah, of further mention ; 
Jabez, Gershom. He married (second) Re- 
becca, surname unknown, and to this mar- 
riage one child was born, Rebecca. 

(IV) Nehemiah Hubbell, son of Stephen 
and Abigail (Squire) Hubbell, was born 
May 19, 1722, and resided in Weston, Fair- 
field County, Connecticut. He married 
Hannah Tread well, and they were the par- 
ents of eleven children : Stephen, of further 
mention; Nathaniel, Abigail, Hannah, David, 
Isaac, Huldah, Rebecca, Billy, Nehemiah, 
Rachel. 

(V) Stephen Hubbell, son of Nehemiah 



and Hannah (Tread well) Hubbell, was 
born in 1745, and died February 27, 1836. 
He was a resident of Weston (or North 
Fairfield). He married, January 27, 1765, 
Rhoda Middlebrook. of Greenfield, Connec- 
ticut, who died August 15, 1823. aged eighty- 
three years, and they were the parents of 
ten children : Joseph, of further mention ; 
William, Stephen, Hannah, Eunice, Rhoda, 
Olive. Abigail, Rachel, Elizabeth. 

(VI) Joseph Hubbell, son of Stephen and 
Rhoda (Middlebrook) Hubbell, was a resi- 
dent of Weston, Fairfield County, Connec- 
ticut, where he died in 1828, aged sixty years. 
He married Eunice Hooker, of Hartford, 
Connecticut, who died in New Haven, Con- 
necticut, December 9, 1851, aged eighty 
years, and they were the parents of twelve 
children : Eunice, Zalmon, Sally, Polly, Jo- 
seph N., of further mention ; Charlotte, 
Nancy, Alanson, Mary Ann. Caroline, Wil- 
liam, and an infant who died young. 

(VII) Joseph N. Hubbell, son of Joseph 
and Eunice (Hooker) Hubbell, was a resi- 
dent of Newtown, Fairfield County. Con- 
necticut, who died in December, 1831, aged 
thirty-one years. He married Harriet Hill, 
of Newtown, Connecticut, and they were the 
parents of five children : Horace. George 
Albert, Catherine, David Toucey. of further 
mention ; Edward. 

(VIII) David Toucey Ilul)l)ell. of Bethel. 
Fairfield County, Connecticut, son of Joseph 
N. and Harriet (Hill) Hubbell. was born 
September 4, 1827, and died in Bethel, Octo- 
ber 12. 1888. He received his education 
in the public schools of his native district, 
and then learned the trade of tinsmith and 
I)lumber. He later engaged in the hardware 
and plumbing business for himself and con- 
tinued to successfully manage an increas- 
ingly prosperous concern until just before 
the time of his retirement, when he sold out. 
He took an active interest in political affairs, 
and served as justice of the peace. He was 
also adjutant in the 4th Connecticut Regi- 
ment. He was a member of the Free and 
Accepted Masons, and prominent in the ac- 



147 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



tivities of that order, and his religious affiha- 
tion was with the Congregational Church, 
which he served as superintendent of the 
Sunday School. He married, December 24, 
1848, Hannah Piatt Sanford, who die^l in 
Bethel in 1901, and they were the parents 
of four children: I. Josephine, who married 
John G. Farnum. 2. Isabelle, who married 
Cornelius M. Corning. 3. Victor L., who 
died in childhood. 4. Lindley Dodd, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(IX) Colonel Lindley Dodd Hubbell, son 
of David Toucey and Hannah Piatt (San- 
ford) Hubbell, was born in Bethel, Connec- 
ticut, January 9, 1868, and though he at- 
tended the public schools of Bethel, is largely 
self-educated. He learned the machinist's 
trade and studied drafting, and after learn- 
ing the more difficult arts of toolmaking and 
die-sinking, engaged in machine drafting, 
designing, and factory engineering. For ten 
years he served as chief engineer of the 
Pope Manufacturing Company, of Hartford, 
where he assisted in the development of the 
bicycle, and was especially active in the de- 
signing and construction of the automobile 
in the early years of its development. Later 
he removed to Springfield and accepted a 
position as assistant chief engineer of the 
New England Westinghouse Company at the 
time it was awarded large Russian contracts 
for rifles. Upon the entrance of the United 
States in the World War, May 18, 191 7, 
he was commissioned a major in the Ord- 
nance Reserve Corps, and on June 4, 191 7, 
was ordered to report for duty at the Spring- 
field Armory, where he was assigned to the 
position of officer in charge of the Hill Shop. 
He was promoted to the rank of lieutenant- 
colonel, January 20, 1918, and six months 
later was designated to serve as works man- 
ager, with supervision of both plants, these 
being known as the Hill Plant and the Water 
Shops. When Colonel Hofifer was suddenly 
called for overseas duty, in September, 1918, 
Colonel Hubbell became acting commanding 
officer, and a month later he received his 
permanent appointment, and so continued 



until May, 1920, when he resigned. Upon 
his return to civilian life, in May, 1920, 
Colonel Hubbell became associated with the 
Hendee Manufacturing Company, of Spring- 
field, of which concern he was elected vice- 
president, serving in that official position 
until August, 1922, when he resigned. In 
November, 1922, Colonel Hubbell was ap- 
pointed by Mayor Leonard to serve as a 
member of the new three-man police com- 
mission of Springfield, for three years, and 
under his administration the police force has 
been greatly improved. He is now (1924) 
serving in this office; his term expires in 
May, 1925. 

Colonel Hubbell was appointed a colonel 
in the Officers' Reserve Corps, Ordnance 
Department, United States Army, in 1922. 
He is a member of St. John's Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Hartford, Con- 
necticut ; Pythagorean Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons ; Wolcott Council, Royal and Select 
Masters ; Washington Commandery, Knights 
Templar ; and of Sphinx Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is also a member of the Society of Au- 
tomotive Engineers, the Army Ordnance 
Association, Western Massachusetts Society 
of Engineers, National Association of Cost 
Accountants, Springfield Chamber of Com- 
merce, Springfield Fish and Game Associa- 
tion, Military Order of Foreign Wars, and 
of the American Legion. He is eligible for 
memljership in the Sons of the American 
Revolution, on the maternal side. 

His clubs are the Oxford Golf, Spring- 
field Revolver, Hartford Gun, Springfield 
Trap Shooting, Bircham Bend and Fly, and 
the Agawam Sportsmen's. 

On May 22, 1889, Colonel Lindley Dodd 
Hubbell married Nettie Perkins Stone, of 
Woodbury, Connecticut, daughter of Aber- 
nathv and Frances (Perkins) Stone. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hubbell are the parents of three 
children, all born in Hartford, Connecticut: 
I. Madge Delano, born July 3, 1891, died 
April I, 191 5. 2. Lindley Williams, born 



148 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



June 3, 1901. 3. Laura Virginia, born May 
19, 1909. 



PIRNIE, George 

A unique record is that of George Pirnie 
and family, of Springfield, all of whom, 
father, mother, and four sons, served in the 
World War. Mr. Pirnie, who was at one 
time president of the Massasoit Whip Com- 
pany, is now (1925) retired from active 
business responsibilities, but is devoting his 
time to public service as a member of the 
police commission of Springfield. 

The surname Pirnie is derived from an 
estate in Scotland, named Nether Pirnev, 
also written Netherpirny. In a later record 
the name is spelled "Pirney" also "Pirny." 
In 1654 the spelling Pirnie is found, and it 
has remained unchanged from that date to 
the present time. The forefathers of the 
Pirnie family in America dwelt in Perthshire, 
Scotland, for many generations. 

Peter Pirnie lived and died in Perthshire, 
Scotland. He married Isabel Thomson, and 
they had a son, James, of whom further. 

James Pirnie, son of Peter and Isabel 
(Thomson) Pirnie, was born in Perthshire, 
Scotland, in 1762, and died in 1827. He 
married Elizabeth Herries, who was born 
in 1767, and died in 1842, and they had a 
son, John, of whom further. 

(I) John Pirnie, son of James and Eliza- 
beth (Herries) Pirnie, was born in Perth- 
shire, Scotland, in 1791. He was the first 
of the name to come to America. Family 
traditions relate that after his marriage to 
a young American girl, Margaret W. Brown, 
he returned with his bride to Scotland for a 
visit and was shipwrecked on the Irish coast, 
but eventually, with his bride, reached his 
home. After he returned to America his 
brothers and sisters followed him to this 
country. Plis father, James Pirnie, died in 
Scotland a few days after returning from a 
visit to America, and John Pirnie then 
brought his mother to this country, that she 
might spend the closing years of her life 
among her children. She was buried in the 



Presbyterian churchyard at White Plains, 
New York, by the side of her eldest son. 
James, she being the first ancestor from 
Scotland to die in America. John Pirnie 
was an influential and well known business 
man in New York City, in partnership with 
his brother Peter in the early part of the 
nineteenth century. He died in New York 
City in 1862, having succeeded by his own 
efforts in amassing what in those days was 
considered a fortune. His wife. Margaret 
W. (Brown) Pirnie, born in 1798, died in 
1864. 

(I) George Pirnie, son of James and 
Elizabeth (Herries) Pirnie, was born in 
Perthshire, Scotland, and died in New York 
City. He came to America soon after the 
arrival of his brother John, and was en- 
gaged in business in New York City as a 
clock-maker. He married Sarah Martin, and 
they were the parents of the following chil- 
dren : I. Sarah, who married John W. 
Schenck. 2. Mary, who married Cornelius 
G. Schenck. 3. Peter M.. of whom further. 

(II) Peter Martin Pirnie, son of George 
and Sarah (Martin) Pirnie, was born in 
New York City, in 1826, and died in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, April 14. 1900. He 
was a successful banker, and lived retired for 
a number of years prior to his death. He 
married Mary Prout, of New York City, 
who died May 30, 1912, aged eighty-one 
years, daughter of Moses Pitt and Mary 
(Duke) Prout. Their children were: 
George, of whom further ; and Eliza, who 
died in 1919. 

(III) George Pirnie, son of Peter M. and 
Mary (Prout) Pirnie. was born in East 
Chester, New York, June 12. 1856, and re- 
ceived his early education in the schools of 
New York. He then attended the Franco- 
American Institute, where he prepared for 
the New York University. When his col- 
lege training was completed he became identi- 
fied with the Bradley \\'hite Lead Company, 
with whom he remained for three years. He 
then associated himself with the Pratt and 
Lambert White Lead and Varnish Company, 



149 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



for whom he traveled on the road for four 
years. In 1886 he removed to Westfield, 
Massachusetts, organized the Massasoit 
A\'hip Company, of which he was president. 
The concern successfully engaged in the 
manufacture of whips, and Mr. Pirnie con- 
tinued as executive head of the company 
until 1893, when the business was sold to 
the United States Whip Company, of West- 
field, Mr. Pirnie becoming a director in the 
last-named concern, having entire charge of 
the credits of the company. After several 
years in the whip business Mr. Pirnie became 
identified with the Fuller Varnish Company, 
of Portland, Maine, and in that connection 
he served as traveling salesman for eleven 
years, serving during a large portion of that 
period as sales manager. In 192 1 Mr. Pir- 
nie retired from active business. He has 
made his residence in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, since 1889, and in 1922 he was ap- 
pointed a member of the Police Commission, 
which office he is still (1925) efificiently fill- 
ing. 

During the World \\'ar Mr. Pirnie took 
an active part, going overseas in August, 
1918, with Edward Bok, as secretary of the 
Young Men's Christian Association Camp. 
He was located in France, and while in serv- 
ice was compelled to salute his son, who was 
a captain. It has been said that the record 
of the Pirnie family during the World War 
is unique in that it is the only one so far as 
is known which includes service for the en- 
tire family. Mr. Pirnie served as has al- 
ready been stated. Mrs. Pirnie was in 
service with the Young Women's Christian 
Association in the Hostess House at Madi- 
son Barracks, Camp Upton, and at Camp 
Greene, in North Carolina, being a pioneer 
in this work, and all four sons were in active 
service. Mr. Pirnie was discharged from 
service May 2T, 1919. 

On December 17, 1884, George Pirnie 
married Florence Augusta Pomeroy, who 
was born in 1862, daughter of Captain Julian 
and Charlotte (Morgan) Pomeroy. Mr. 
and Mrs. Pirnie are the parents of four 



sons: I. George Donald, a sketch of whom 
follows. 2. Herbert Malcolm Pirnie, born 
in 1889, graduated from Harvard College 
in 1910, and is now a member of the firm 
of Plazen & Whipple, New York, engineers. 
In 19 1 7 he went to Russia with the Red 
Cross commission and returned the same 
year. In 1918 he enlisted for service in 
the World War and went overseas with the 
engineering corps with Professor Whipple, 
who was in charge of the water supplies in 
France. He held the rank of captain and 
took over with him two hundred men on re- 
placement. He is now secretary of the 
American W'ater Works Association, and 
resides in Scarsdale, New York. He mar- 
ried Gertrude Knowlton, of Watertown, New 
York, and has four children: ]\Ialcolm, Ger- 
trude, Ely, and Florence. 3. W. Bruce, 
a sketch of whom follows. 4. Roderick, a 
sketch of whom follows. 



PIRNIE, George Donald 

As concert artist and instructor, George 
Donald Pirnie is well known to music lovers 
of Springfield. He is also known and ad- 
mired by the many students of Kimball 
Union Academy, at Meriden, New Hamp- 
shire, of which he was senior master and 
head of the English and History departments 
until February, 1925, 

George Donald Pirnie, son of George and 
Florence Augusta (Pomeroy) Pirnie (q.v.), 
was born in 1887. After receiving his early 
education, he became a student in Harvard 
College, from which he was graduated in 
1910. Upon the completion of his college 
course he entered the teaching profession, 
serving as instructor, first in Boston, then in 
Springfield, and finally in Kimball Union 
Academy, where he rose to the position of 
senior master and head of the English and 
History departments. Thoroughly prepared 
for his work, enthusiastic, and devoted to the 
work of advancing his students, he became 
a general favorite and exerted a strong in- 
fluence over the student body. During the 
summer season he became known to thou- 



1^0 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



sands as a professor of the Aleriden (New 
Hampshire) Summer School of Music and 
Dramatics. He is well known as an accom- 
plished vocal artist, and in February, 1925, 
he resigned his responsible position at Kim- 
ball Union Academy in order that he might 
devote his whole time to the musical pro- 
fession, as concert artist and teacher. He 
has a studio in Springfield, and has made 
an envialjle reputation both as artist and 
as instructor. During the World War Mr. 
Pirnie was assigned to the Reserve Officers' 
Training Camp, at Plattsburg, New York, 
and at the time of the signing of the armis- 
tice had been recommended for a commis- 
sion. Mr. Pirnie married Jean Clealley 
MacDuffie, of Springfield, Massachusetts, 
daughter of Dr. John and Abby Parsons 
MacDuffie, teachers and principals of the 
well known MacDuffie School for Girls, of 
Springfield, Massachusetts, which was es- 
tablished over thirty years ago. Mrs. Pirnie 
is a graduate of Smith College, class of IQ09, 
of which she was secretary. After gradua- 
tion she began teaching in the MacDuffie 
School, and continued to the time of her 
marriage. While a student in Smith Col- 
lege she organized the well known "Press 
Board" of that institution. She has inherited 
literary ability of which she has made good 
use. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pirnie are the parents of 
three children: Donald, Morgan, and Dun- 
can. 



PIRNIE, W. Bruce 

As a successful business man, a World 
War veteran, and a highly esteemed friend 
and associate, W. Bruce Pirnie is well known 
in Springfield and in Longmeadow, where 
he resides. He is vice-president of William 
C. Simons, Incorporated, of Springfield, who 
are correspondents of Leo Higginson & Co.. 
of Boston, New York, Chicago, and of Hig- 
ginson Company, of London. 

Born in Springfield, Massachusetts, May 
22, 1891, W. Bruce Pirnie is a son of George 
and Florence Augusta (Pomeroy) Pirnie 



fq.v.). He prepared for college in Phillips 
Andover Academy, from which he was 
graduated in 191 1, and the following fall he 
entered Harvard College, from which he 
received, in 191 5, the degree Bachelor of 
Science. Upon the completion of his col- 
lege course he accepted a position as Master 
of History in the Choate School at Walling- 
ford, Connecticut, where he remained until 
the entrance of the United States into the 
World War in 191 7. He was then commis- 
sioned first lieutenant of infantry from 
Presidio, San Francisco, California, and as- 
signed to the 20th Infantry, United States 
Army, at Fort Douglas, Utah, later he was 
commissioned captain of infantry. In 1918 
he was made instructor at the Officers' Train- 
ing Camp at the Presidio, San Francisco, 
and later he was made professor of military 
science at the Agricultural and Mechanical 
College at Messilia Park, New Mexico. 
Mr. Pirnie now holds the rank of major of 
infantry in the Reserve Corps of the United 
States Army. After the signing of the 
armistice he returned to New England and 
became Boston manager of the Pierce. But- 
ler & Pierce Manufacturing Corporation, of 
New York City. In 192 1 he made a change 
and identified himself with Arthur. Perry & 
Company, Investment Bankers, of Boston 
and New York. In 1924 he was taken into 
the firm of William C. Simons, Inc.. of 
Springfield, as vice-president. In Long- 
meadow, where he resides, he is popular 
among a very large circle of friends, and his 
business associates accord to him the respect 
and esteem which merit alone can command. 
W. Bruce Pirnie married, at Bronxville, 
New York. June 21. 1917. Dorothy Duryea, 
daughter of Dr. Jesse T. and Martha 
(Bush) Duryea. the first mentioned of 
whom is president of the Pierce. Butler & 
Pierce Manufacturing Corporation, of New 
York City, and the Wolf Manufacturing 
Corporation, of Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pirnie have two children : Warren Bruce, 
Jr., and Douglas Duryea. 



i=;i 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



PIRNIE, Roderick 

Roderick Pirnie. son of George and 
Florence Augusta (Pomeroy) Pirnie, was 
born in Springfiekl, Massachusetts, Febru- 
ary 12, 1894. After a careful preliminary 
education in the schools of Springfield, he 
became a student in Bowdoin College, of 
Brunswick, Maine, but later matriculated in 
Harvard College, where he was continuing 
his studies at the time of the entrance of the 
United States into the World War. 

With thousands of other young men he 
left college to answer the call of his country. 
After a period of training at Madison Bar- 
racks he was commissioned a second lieu- 
tenant of infantry and was sent overseas 
with the 78th Division in 1918. For three 
months he was brigaded with the British 
Army, after which he was made assistant to 
the inspector general of the 4th Army Corps. 
Later he was made Assistant Provost Mar- 
shal of the 4th Army Corps, with which he 
served in the St. Mihiel sector. After the 
signing of the armistice he entered Merton 
College, Oxford University, in England, 
where he continued his studies for one term. 
He returned to this country in July, 1919, 
holding the rank of first lieutenant, and re- 
ceived from Harvard College the certificate, 
corresponding to a diploma, which was is- 
sued by Harvard to all of her students who 
left college to enter the service. Upon his 
return to civil life he became identified with 
the Pierce, Butler & Pierce Manufacturing 
Corporation, of New York City, located at 
their Detroit branch, but he is now (1925) 
established as a life insurance counsellor 
with offices in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
and New York City. 

Roderick Pirnie married, at Watertown, 
New York, June 23, 1917, Mary Margaret 
Gregor, of Watertown, daughter of Dr. Gil- 
bert D. and Elizabeth P. Gregor. Mr. and 
Mrs. Pirnie are the parents of two children : 
I. Roderick, Jr., born April 10, 1918, died 
March 23, 1919. 2. Elizabeth, born De- 
cember 15, 1921. 



PLUMMER, John David 

From the position of Ijookkceper in the 
office of the "Springfield Daily Union," John 
David Plummer, now retired, rose to the in- 
fluential position of business manager, treas- 
urer and publisher of that paper, and owner 
of a controlling interest in the concern. 

John Plummer, grandfather of Mr. Plum- 
mer, was born in England. Fie came to 
this country while a young man, accom- 
panied by two brothers, who settled in New 
England. John Plummer, however, settled 
in Gloversville, New York State, where he 
was engaged in business as a shoemaker to 
the time of his death, about 1835. He mar- 
ried Harriet Welch, and they were the par- 
ents of the following children: i. Jane. 2. 

Caroline, who married Graflf, 3. 

Louise, who married Lyle. 4. Ange- 

line, who married Gulick. 5. Sydney, 

who left a son, Hildreth. 6. John, of further 

mention. 7. Mary, who married Kel- 

sey. 8. Eliza, who married Cumsley. 

John Plummer, son of John and Harriet 
(Welch) Plummer, was born in Glovers- 
ville, New York (then called Stump City), 
February 29, 1828, and died in March, 1872. 
He was a glover by trade and also conducted 
a hotel for a time. He married, in 1866, 
Ann McKinley, of Mayfield, New York, 
who was born August 6, 1835, and died 
August 4, 1901, daughter of John and Mary 
(McLaren) McKinley. John McKinley, 
father of Mrs. Plummer, was one of four 
brothers, Peter, James, William, and John, 
above mentioned. He came from Perth, 
Scotland. Peter and John settled in New 
York State, and James settled in the Caro- 
linas, while William settled in Ohio. He was 
the ancestor of President McKinley. The 
children of John and Ann (McKinley) 
Plummer were: i. Lillian, who married, 
February 12, 1884, John Kennedy, deceased, 
and has children : Dr. William J., Archibald, 
M. M., Anna, who married — '■ — Carlisle ; 
Grace, Helen M. 2. John D., of further 
mention. 3. Emma, who married, in Octo- 



1^2 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ber, 1894, Henry Warrick, deceased, and 
has one daughter, Agnes Warrick. 

John David Plummer, son of John and 
Ann (McKinley) Plummer, was born in 
Gloversville, New York, October 17, 1869. 
He received his first school training in 
Gloversville, but when he was ten years old 
removed with the family to Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, where he attended private school, 
grammar school and continued his studies 
for two years in the high school. Upon the 
completion of his high school course he at- 
tended business college for a year, during 
which time he earned his own tuition. When 
his business course was completed, he found 
employment with his uncle, William H. Kel- 
sey, who owned a grocery store and res- 
taurant in Springfield. After some three or 
four years of experience in his uncle's busi- 
ness, he studied bookkeeping and then took 
a position in the office of the "Springfield 
Daily Union." He was able, energetic and 
faithful, and beginning as bookkeeper he 
steadily rose, through various promotions, 
until he was made business manager. Later, 
he became a part owner of the concern and 
was made treasurer of the company. He 
disposed of his interest, in 1923, and at the 
time he was not only business manager, 
treasurer and publisher, but owned a con- 
trolling interest in the publication. The 
"Springfield Daily Union" is one of the best- 
known publications of its kind in Western 
Massachusetts, and under Mr. Plummer's 
vigorous direction it steadily increased its 
circulation and raised its standard. In ad- 
dition to his responsibilities in connection 
with the "Springfield Daily Union," Mr. 
Plummer was also a member of the board 
of directors of the Springfield National 
Bank, and one of the incorporators of the 
Institute for Savings, and of the Hampden 
Savings Bank. Along with his business ac- 
tivities Mr. Plummer finds time for social 
intercourse and for the activity of club af- 
fairs. He is an interested member of the 
Nayasset Club, the Colony Club, the Spring- 
field Country Club, and the Longmeadow 



Golf Club, His religious interest is with 
the Unitarian Church. 

Mr. Plummer married, on May 9, 1900, 
Alice Belden, of North Hadley, Massachu- 
setts, daughter of Albert Elisha and Ada 
Jane (Lawrence) Belden (see Belden IX). 
Mr. and Mrs. Plummer are the parents of 
two children: i. Lawrence Belden. born 
March 28, 1901, and educated in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and Tarrytown. New 
York, and also in the Taft School at Water- 
town, Massachusetts, and is now connected 
with an advertising agency in San Francisco. 
2. Ruth McKinley, who is a student in Dana 
Hall School. 

(The Belden Line) 

The researches of a member of the Bel- 
den family have disclosed the fact that the 
name is a place name and the family of 
ancient English origin. Bayldon, or Baildon, 
Common is a chapelry in the West Riding of 
Yorkshire, situated on an eminence over- 
looking the River Aire, and has been the seat 
of the Baildon, or Belden. family since the 
time of King John. Baildon Hall is still 
well preserved. Some alterations were made 
in 1600 by Francis Baildon. cousin of the 
American immigrant, and the cornice of the 
drawing-room bears his initials. The hall 
was built during the fifteenth century, and 
the coat-of-arms of the Bayldons or Bail- 
dons is described as follows : 

Arms — Argent, a fessc between tliree fleurs-de- 
lis, sable. 

(I) Richard Baildon was baptized at Hip- 
pax, England. May 26, 1591, and every evi- 
dence points to the fact that he was a son 
of Sir Francis Baildon, who was three times 
married, and of the second wife. Margaret 
(Goodrich) Baildon. Sir Francis Baildon 
was a son of George, son of John, son of 
Walter, earliest known English ancestor in 
the direct line. He was involved in a con- 
troversy over the settling of his father's 
estate in 1624, after which his name dis- 
appears from English records. In 1641 his 



153 



EXCVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



name appears in W'ethersfield, Connecticut, 
where he acquired and disposed of land and 
took part in the affairs of the community to 
the time of his death in 1635, when he left 
his family a considerable landed estate. His 
three sons were: William, l)orn about 1622; 
Samuel, of further mention ; John, born 
about 1 63 1. 

(H) Samuel Belden, son of Richard 
(Baildon) Belden, was born in England, in 
162S, and came to this country with his 
father, settling in Wethersfield, Connecticut. 
He removed from Wethersfield, Connecti- 
cut, to Hatfield, Massachusetts, in 1661, and 
died there January 3, 1713. His first wife, 
Mary, was killed by Indians at Hatfield, 
September 19, 1677, and he married (sec- 
ond), June 25, 1678, Mary, widow of 
Thomas Wells, and daughter of William 
Bradsby, of Wethersfield. Among his chil- 
dren was Stephen, of further mention. 

(III) Stephen Belden, son of Samuel and 
Mary Belden, was born in Wethersfield, 
Connecticut, December 28, 1658, and died 
October 6, 1720. He married, August 16, 
1682, Mary Wells, daughter of Thomas 
Wells, and they were the parents of children, 
among whom was Joshua, of further men- 
tion. 

(IV) Joshua Belden, son of Stephen and 
Mary (Wells) Belden, was born in Hatfield, 
Massachusetts, in 1696, and died in 1738. 
He married, in December, 1725, Sarah 
Field, daughter of John and Sarah (Cole- 
man) Field, and among their children was 
Elisha, of further mention. 

(Vj Elisha Belden, son of Joshua and 
Sarah (Field) Belden, was born March 28, 
1736, and died August 2, 1808. He married 
Ruth, daughter of Benoni Dickenson, and 
among their children was Elisha, of further 
mention. 

(VI) Elisha Belden, son of Elisha and 
Ruth (Dickenson) Belden, was born March 
23, 1765, and died February 21, 1838. He 
married, February 9, 1796, Abigail Kellogg, 
and among their children was William, of 
further mention. 



(VII) William Belden, son of Elisha and 
Abigail (Kellogg) Belden, was born June 
20, 1804, and died December 18, 1883. He 
married, September 10, 1828, Salome Cum- 
mings, and they were the parents of chil- 
dren, among whom was Albert Elisha, of 
further mention. 

( VHI) Albert Elisha Belden, son of Wil- 
liam and Salome (Cummings) Belden, was 
born November 18, 1845, in Whately, Mas- 
sachusetts. He married, in 1871, Ada Jane 
Lawrence, who was born January 16, 1849, 
in North Hadley, Massachusetts, daughter 
of Hubbard and Martha (Perry) Lawrence. 
Among their children was Alice Belden, of 
further mention. 

(IX) Alice Belden, daughter of Albert 
Elisha and Ada Jane (Lawrence) Belden, 
married John D. Plummer (see Plummer). 



KEYES, Dwight Harley 

As employment manager for the W^est- 
inghouse Electric and Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Springfield, Dwight Harley Keyes 
has charge of the department which em- 
ploys all labor and also supervises all relief, 
hospital, insurance and welfare work among 
the employees of the concern. He is an 
able and progressive man who not only meets 
the responsibilities of his position with 
marked efftciency, but who also holds a 
leading place among the employment man- 
agers of other concerns in his section of the 
country. He is president of the Employ- 
ment Managers' Association of the Connec- 
ticut Valley, and is also a member of the 
l)oard of directors of the Springfield 
Finance Corporation. 

(I) Mr. Keyes is a descendant of one of 
the old Colonial families, tracing his ancestry 
to Robert Keyes, who settled in Watertown, 
Massachusetts, in 1633, and removed to 
Newbury, Massachusetts, in 1643. Three 
years later he again made a change of resi- 
dence, removing to Sudbury, Massachusetts, 
in 1645. He died there in 1647. The chil- 
dren were: Sarah, Peter, Rebecca, Phebe, 



154 





^\ 




.^. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OE BIOGRAPHY 



Mary, died young ; EHas, of further men- 
tion ; Mary. 

(II) Elias Keyes, son of Robert Keyes, 
was born May 20, 1643. He married, Sep- 
tember I, 1665, Sarah Blanford, daughter of 
John Blanford, and they were the parents 
of five children: Elias, John, James, Sarah, 
Deacon Thomas, of further mention. 

(III) Deacon Thomas Keyes, son of 
EHas and Sarah (Blanford) Keyes, was 
born February 8, 1674, and died August 
25, 1742. He received his education in the 
pubHc schools of his native district and then 
settled on a farm on the east side of Marl- 
boro, where he continued to reside to the 
time of his death. He married, in 1698, 
Elizabeth Howe, daughter of John and 
Mary Howe, the former of whom was the 
first white settler in Marlboro, Massachu- 
setts. Elizabeth Howe was a sister of Mrs. 
Peter Josslyn, of Lancaster, Masachusetts, 
and in 1682, when a young girl, visited her 
sister. While there she was taken captive 
by the Indians and carried to Canada, where 
she remained for four years. At the end 
of that time she was redeemed by the gov- 
ernment and returned to her home, where 
she married Thomas Keyes, to whom she 
had been engaged before her captivity. It 
was sixteen years earlier than this that the 
town of Lancaster was attacked by 15,000 
Indians, who destroyed many of the homes 
and carried away into captivity several of 
the settlers. Lancaster, for many years, was 
a frontier town, and it was probably during 
one of the numerous raids made by the 
Indians during this period that Elizabeth 
Howe was captured. Deacon Thomas and 
Elizabeth (Howe) Keyes were the parents 
of five children : Dowd, Jonathan, of fur- 
ther mention; Cypron, Dinah, Thomas. 

(IV) Jonathan Keyes, son of Deacon 
Thomas and Elizabeth (Howe) Keyes, was 
born November 19, 1702, and died of apo- 
plexy, June 25, 1778. He was one of the 
enterprising and progressive citizens of 
Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, and took an ac- 
tive part in church afifairs, serving as deacon 



of the North Parish. He married, in 1727, 
Patience Morse, of Marlboro, Massachu- 
setts, and they were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Jonathan, Miriam, who 
married Artemas Maynard ; Dinah, died 
young; Timothy, of further mention; 
Thomas, Benjamin, Asa, Catherine and Di- 
nah (twins), who died in infancy, and Cath- 
erine, born in 1747, who married Jonathan 
Warren, and lived to be nearly one hundred 
years of age. 

(V) Timothy Keyes, son of Jonathan 
and Patience (Morse) Keyes. was Ijajitized 
November 4, 1733, and died in 181 6. He 
married, May i, 1755, Prudence Wilder, of 
Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, and they were 
the parents of six children : Jonas, died 
young; Betty, Patience, Jonas, of further 
mention; Lemuel, Kate. 

(VI) Jonas Keyes, son of Timothy and 
Prudence (Wilder) Keyes, was born in 
1764, and died in 1830. After receiving a 
practical education in the local schools, and 
learning the carpenter's trade in Wilbraham, 
IVIassachusetts, he followed that trade 
throughout his active career. He married 
(first) Delana Parker. She died, and he 
married (second) Sally Ingalls. Children: 
Owen, Sally, Willis, of further mention ; 
Electa Frances, Mary, Harriet, Levi, Elijah, 
and Justin. 

(VII) Willis Keyes, son of Jonas Keyes. 
was born in Wilbraham, Massachusetts, in 
1793, and died in Ludlow. Massachusetts, 
lanuary 15, 1871. He received a good prac- 
tical education in the public schools of his 
district, and was a man of sterling qualities 
of character who was greatly esteemed and 
respected by his associates. He was engaged 
in farming in Ludlow, Massachusetts, 
throughout the greater part of his active 
career. He married Chloe Frost, who died 
February 18. 1851, and they were the par- 
ents of four children: I. Samuel F. 2. 
Angeline, who married Samuel White. 3. 
Eliza Ann, who married Reuben Sikes. 4. 
William LeRoy, of further mention. 

(VIII) William LeRoy Keyes, son of 



'00 



EX'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Willis and Chloe C Frost) Keyes. was 
born in Ludlow, Massachusetts, in 1833, and 
died in Chicopee, Massachusetts. After re- 
ceiving careful preparation in the public 
schools of his district, he became a student 
in Wilbraham Academy, where later his ed- 
ucation was completed. He began his busi- 
ness career in the employ of the Boston & 
Albany Railroad, and assisted in the con- 
struction of the line west of Springfield. 
Later he held a position on the same section 
of the road, and still later served for some 
time in that capacity- on the line which he 
had helped to build. For a time he owned 
a small farm on what was known as the 
Sumner Avenue extension, but during the 
Civil War he gave up farming and was em- 
ployed in the United States Armor>- in 
Springfield. After the close of the war he 
bought another farm, which was located at 
what is now Parker Street, which runs off 
the Boston Road, and there for a period 
of fifteen years, from 1865 to 1880, he was 
successfully engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. In the latter year he sold his farm 
to good advantage and removed to Chicopee, 
Massachusetts, where he was made section 
master in the employ of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad Company. There he continued to 
reside to the time of his death. He married 
Amanda Pease, of Wilbraham, Massachu- 
setts, daughter of James and Mary (Terry) 
Pea5e, and they were the parents of two 
children: I. James Willis, of further men- 
tion. 2. Harley L., who is now living a* 
retired life in Springfield, Massachusetts. 

dX) James Willis Keyes. son of Wil- 
liam LeRoy and Amanda (Pease) Keyes, 
was born in Spencer, Massachusetts, Janu- 
ar>- 24, 1858. After attending the public 
schools of Springfield, Massachusetts, he 
completed his education in the Wilbraham 
Academy, and then became his father's as- 
sistant on the farm. There he continued for 
several years, but finally, in 1882, he en- 
tered the employ of Smith & Wesson, who 
were engaged in the manufacture of revol- 
vers, and that connection he maintained for 



a period of fifteen years. ser\-ing in the 
capacity of foreman. In 1893 he was made 
call man in the Springfield Fire Department, 
and four years later, December 16. 1897. he 
joined the department as a permanent paid 
member. In this connection he soon demon- 
strated his faithfulness and exceptional abil- 
ity, and he was made captain and assigned 
to the Pine Street fire station. Since that 
time many changes have been made in the 
department ; at that time the apparatus was 
all horse drawn. Xow the department is 
entirely motorized, and the apparatus is of 
the most modern and scientific kind. Mr. 
Keyes has had many thrilling adventures as 
a fireman. In December, 1908, while an- 
swering an alarm. Mr. Keyes was riding on 
the engine with the driver when the engine 
struck the curbing and the driver was thrown 
from his seat. The horses, with the hea\y 
engine, became badly frightened and dashed 
down the street at break-neck speed ; Captain 
Keyes crawled out on the pole between the 
galloping horses and getting hold of the lines 
brought them to a stop before any harm was 
done. This is an example of his promptness 
in emergencies and his abilit}' to do the right 
thing at the right time. 

In addition to his activities in the Fire 
Department, Captain Keyes has taken an 
interest in Masonry. He was a member of 
Xewton Lodge, of Wilbraham, but in 1883 
took a demit and joined Roswell Lee Lodge, 
of Springfield, and when the Samuel D. 
Sherwood Lodge, of Springfield, was 
founded, he became a charter member of 
that body. He is also a member of Hampton 
Lodge. Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
In 1876, James Willis Keyes married Emma 
Frances Knowlton, of Wilbraham, Massa- 
chusetts, daughter of Daniel and Sophia 
(Lawrence) Knowlton. and they are the 
parents of seven children: i. Grace, who 
was born January 4. 187S, and married Dan- 
iel J. Kimpton, of the Massachusetts Mutual 
Life Insurance Company, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts. 2. Lawrence William, who 
was born April 2, 18S1, married Frances 



i'',6 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Hathway, and has a son, Paul H. Keyes. 
3. Dwight Harley, of further mention. 4. 
Mildred Sophia, who married Clyde W. 
Young, of Springfield, Massachusetts, and 
has two children, Miriam Alice, and Eleanore 
Frances; and three who died in infancy. 

(X) Dwight Harley Keyes, son of James 
Willis and Emma Frances (Knowlton) 
Keyes, -^as born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, April 8, 1888, and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of the city, at- 
tending the grammar school and the evening 
high school for three years. When his school 
training was completed he began his active 
business career as a clerk in the grocery 
store of Charles H. Bennett, with whom 
he remained for about four years. He then 
secured a position with the Strathmore 
Paper Company, and that connection he 
maintained for a peirod of seven years, hold- 
ing during the greater part of that time 
the position of shipping clerk. His next 
position was with the W. J. Foss Company, 
which concern he efficiently served in the 
capacity of shipping clerk. When he sev- 
ered his connection with that concern he 
became associated with the Smith & Wesson 
plant, as inspector, being connected with the 
finishing department, his work being the in- 
spection of completed revolvers before they 
were placed on the market. Later he again 
made a change in securing employment with 
the New England Westinghouse Company, 
which was engaged in the manufacture of 
machine guns. He held the position of 
foreman for some time and then became 
associated with the Westinghouse Electric 
& Manufacturing Company as employment 
manager. This position he has continued to 
hold to the present time (1924) and in that 
capacity is rendering excellent service both 
to the firm which employs him, and to the 
working force of some 2,400 with whom he 
is associated. During the World War there 
were over 5,000 employed here. He has 
charge of all relief, hospital work, insurance 
and welfare work among the many em- 
ployees of the plant. Mr. Keyes is inter- 



ested in the larger aspects of the welfare 
work among employees, and is president of 
the lunployment Managers' Association of 
the Connecticut Valley. In addition to his 
responsibilities as employment manager. Mr. 
Keyes is also a member of the board of 
directors of the Springfield Finance Cor- 
poration. 

Fraternally, few men are better known in 
Massachusetts than is Dwight H. Keyes. 
He is a member of Roswell Lee Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Springfield, of 
which he is Past Master; Morning Star 
Chapter. Royal Arch Masons ; Springfield 
Council, Royal and Select Masters, of which 
he is Thrice Illustrious Master; Springfield 
Commandery, Knights Templar, of which 
he is Past Eminent Commander. He has 
also passed through all the Scottish Rite 
bodies, up to and including the thirty-second 
degree, and is a member of Melha Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He was appointed and served as 
District Deputy Grand Master of the 
Springfield District during 1922-23. In ad- 
dition to membership in the Masonic bodies 
mentioned above. Mr. Keyes is also a mem- 
ber of Hampton Lodge, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. His religious affiliation is 
with Hope Congregational Church, which he 
has served as president of the board of 
trustees and also as superintendent of the 
Sundav School. 



'keyes, Albert William 

Among the al)le and courageous members 
of the Fire Department of the city of Spring- 
field is Lieutenant Albert William Keyes, 
who has been connected with the department 
since 1906 and is now stationed at the North 
Street Engine House. Mr. Keyes is a 
descendant of one of the old Colonial fam- 
ilies, tracing his ancestry to Robert Keyes. 

(IX) Harley LeRoy Keyes. son of Wil- 
liam LeRoy and Amanda (Pease) Keyes 
(q.v.) was born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, /\ugust 26, 1S60. He received his 
early education in the public schools of 



0/ 



EX'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Springfield and in the private schools in 
Ludlow, Massachusetts. When his school 
studies were completed he was employed 
on a farm. He learned the machinist's trade 
and was employed in the United States Ar- 
mory in Springfield, Massachusetts, as a 
tool grinder, where he has remained for 
thirty-eight and a half years. He is now 
retired. 

Mr. Keyes married Alice J. Wheeler, of 
Winfield, Connecticut, daughter of J. and 
Clementine Elizabeth (Hall) Wheeler. 'Mr. 
Wheeler died December 28, 1922. He was 
a Civil War veteran, and lost a leg in the 
battle of Antietam. Children of Harley 
LeRoy and Alice J. (Wheeler) Keyes: i. 
Albert William, of further mention. 2. 
Elmer Francis, born September 23. 1889, 
married, April 5, 1912, Rachel Elizabeth 
Foster, of New Britain, Connecticut ; they 
have two children: i. Dorothy Foster, born 
May 12, 1913. 2. Harley Wheeler, born 
June 25, 1917. 

(X) Albert William Keyes, son of Harley 
LeRoy and Alice J. (Wheeler) Keyes, was 
born in Springfield, Massachusetts, August 
15, 1887, and received his education in the 
public schools. When through school he 
found his first employment with the Spring- 
field Street Railway Company, as motor- 
man, which position he held for one year 
and a half. In 1906, before the first motor- 
driven apparatus was installed, he entered 
the Fire Department of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, as a spare man. Since that time 
his connection with the Fire Department of 
Si)ringfield has been continued, and he now 
holds the rank of lieutenant. He was sta- 
tioned at the Chestnut Street station until 
that was torn down and is now at headquar- 
ters. 

Fraternally, Mr. Keyes is affiliated with 
Hampden Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Springfield ; he also is a member of 
the Shooting and Casting Club ; Trap Shoot- 
ing Club, and of the State Firemen's Asso- 
ciation. 

Albert William Keyes married, October 



18, 191 1, Gladys Potter, of Enfield, Connec- 
ticut, daughter of Albert and Martha 
(Brazee) Potter, and they are the parents 
of one daughter, Lois Wheeler Keyes, born 
November i, 1914. 



KEYES, Henry Samuel 

Since the completion of his school train- 
ing, Henry Samuel Keyes has been asso- 
ciated with various concerns in Springfield 
and vicinity, in clerical capacity, as an ex- 
ecutive, and as an expert accountant. Since 
1920 he has been associated with the Rolls- 
Royce Company as auditor. 

(VIII) Samuel Frost Keyes, son of Wil- 
lis and Chloe (Frost) Keyes (q.v.), was 
born in Ludlow, ^Massachusetts, February 
8, 1820, and died January 13, 1864. He was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits throughout 
the entire period of his active career. He 
married, January 20, 1842, Thankful Mi- 
randa Taylor, who was born in Granby, 
Massachusetts, November 6, 1820, and died 
in 1905, daughter of Chester and Eunice 
(Strong) Taylor. Their children were: 
Lucy S., Henry W., of further mention; 
Ellen v., Laura A., Julia A., who married 
William Walker; Emma S., Myron H., 
Eddie S. 

(IX) Henry W. Keyes, son of Samuel 
Frost and Thankful Miranda (Taylor) 
Keyes, was born in Ludlow, Massachusetts, 
June 5, 1845, and died at Indian Orchard, 
Springfield, Massachusetts, October 27, 
19 1 7. He received his education in the 
public schools of his native district and when 
the Civil War broke out ran away from 
home in order to enlist in the Third Rhode 
Island Cavalry, with which he served 
throughout the period of the war. He was 
with General Banks in the Red River Ex- 
pedition, and was wounded during his time 
of service. Upon the cessation of hostilities 
he returned to Ludlow, Massachusetts, and 
in that city and in Indian Orchard practi- 
cally his whole life was spent, in the employ 
of the Chapman Valve Company. He was 
assistant chief engineer in the Springfield 



158 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Fire Department for thirty-two years, and 
in every way within his power he was al- 
ways ready to contribute to the welfare of 
the community in which he lived. Frater- 
nally he was a member of the Hampden 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Springfield, and later of the Brigham Lodge, 
of Ludlow. He was also a member of the 
Improved Order of Red Men, and of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. His religious 
connection was \vith the Evangelical Church. 
He married, December 25, 1869, Janet 
Leslie, who was born in Scotland, November 
9, 1848, and died September 22, 1889. They 
were the parents of the following children : 
I. Gertrude, who was born August 26, 1871, 
married Frederick Miller, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts. 2, Cora, who was born Au- 
gust 26, 1873, and married William E. 
Crooker, of Springfield, Massachusetts. 3. 
Henry Samuel, of further mention. 

(X) Henry Samuel Keyes, son of Henry 
W. and Janet (Leslie) Keyes, was born in 
Indian Orchard, Massachusetts, October 2, 
1875. After receiving a careful education in 
the public schools of Indian Orchard, he 
began his business career in the employ of 
the Chapman Valve Company, of Indian 
Orchard, with whom he remained, serving in 
clerical capacity, for a period of eleven 
years. At the end of that time, in 1904, 
he became assistant treasurer and office man- 
ager for that firm. In that year he made a 
change and became associated with the Ste- 
vens-Duryea Company, manufacturers of 
automobiles, as accountant. That connec- 
tion he maintained until 191 5, when he ac- 
cepted a position as cost accountant with the 
Westinghouse Electric Company, with whom 
he remained for a period of five years, until 
1920. During the last three years he has 
been identified with the Rolls-Royce Com- 
pany as auditor. As that concern manufac- 
tures the best and highest priced car that 
is made in America, Mr. Keyes' present 
position is a most important and responsible 
one. In addition to his business respon- 
sibilities Mr. Keyes has found time for local 



public service. For three years he served as 
a member of the Common Council, and his 
time, his means, and his energy, have al- 
wa}'s been freely given for the advancement 
of the public welfare. Fraternally he is a 
member of Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Indian Orchard, of 
which he is Past Master; of Morning Star 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; of Spring- 
field Council. Royal and Select Masters; and 
of Springfield Commandery. Knights Tem- 
plar. His religious affiliation is with the 
Evangelical Church. 

On August 31, 1899, Henry Samuel Keyes 
married Bertha Irene Streeter, of Indian 
Orchard, daughter of Merrill E. and Mary 
(Maloy) Streeter. Mr. and Mrs. Keyes are 
the parents of three children: i. Doris, who 
was born in 1 900, and is a graduate of 
Springfield High School and of Bridgewater 
Normal School. 2. Merrill S., who was 
born in 1903, and is a graduate of Central 
High School. 3. Janet, who was born in 
1909. 



KEYES, Francis Dwight 

Among the well-known business men of 
Florence, Massachusetts, is Francis Dwight 
Keyes, who for nearly a quarter of a cen- 
tury has been engaged in business as a 
florist. Mr. Keyes began in a small way 
about 1900, conducting a modest estal)lish- 
ment in addition to his duties as an em- 
ployee of R. M. Branch, a merchant of 
Florence. This continued until 1906, but 
that year he left Mr. Branch and since then 
has devoted his entire time to the develop- 
ment of his prosperous enterprise, and he 
now has some 50,000 cubic feet under glass. 

(III) Elias Keyes, son of EUas and Sarah 
(Blanford) Keyes (q.v.). was born No- 
vember 15, 1666, and resided in Marlboro, 
Massachusetts, between 1696 and 1702. 
There he married, and reared a family of 
children, among whom was Oliver, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(IV) Oliver Keyes, son of Elias Keyes. 
married, November i, 1727, Rebecca Pat- 



159 



E.XCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



terson, and their children, recorded in 
Shrewsbury, ^Massachusetts, were : Lydia, 
Titus. Joanna, Orin, Stephen, of further 
mention; Sarah, Ehzabeth, Esther, Abijah. 
Barney's "History of Framingham," Mas- 
sachusetts, records that Oliver was a sol- 
dier under Buckingham. 

(V) Stephen Keyes, third son of Oliver 
and Rebecca (Patterson) Keyes, was born 
Februar)' 8, 1738, and died February 17, 
181 2. He lived in Charlemont, and later in 
Conway, Massachusetts. He married 
Widow Molly Cross, of Ashfield, Massachu- 
setts, and they were the parents of six 
children: Levinah, Elizabeth, Rev. Calvin, 
of further mention ; Gerrish, Lydia, Nabby. 

(VI) Rev. Calvin Keyes, son of Stephen 
and Widow Molly (Cross) Keyes, was born 
in Lancaster, Massachusetts, March 17, 1765, 
and died in Conway, Massachusetts, Septem- 
ber 15, 1843. He resided first in Ashfield, 
and later in Conway, Massachusetts. He 
married, February 22, 1785, Reliance Tal- 
man. of Deerfield, ^Massachusetts, who died 
in February, 1850. They were the parents 
of twelve children: i. Calvin, born Decem- 
ber 6, 1785. 2. Luther, born September 10, 
1787. 3. Reliance, born August 11, 1788. 
4. Lydia, born May 28, 1790. 5. Phila, born 
April 22, 1792. 6. Luther, born July 9, 
1795- /• Rhoda, born May 10, 1796; mar- 
ried George Barrows. 8. Joel, of further 
mention. 9. Nancy, born Alay i, 1800. 10. 
Mary, born May 16, 1803; married Syl- 
vester Childs. II. Almira, born June 23, 
1806, 12. Clarissa, born June 22, 1808; 
married Dennis Childs. 

(VII) Joel Keyes, son of Rev. Calvin and 
Reliance (Talman) Keyes, was born Au- 
gust II, 1798. and died May 20, 1884. He 
was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Con- 
way, Massachusetts, where he lived and died. 
He married, April 26, 1827, Hannah L. Por- 
ter, who died September 16, 1876, aged 
sixty-nine years. Their children were: i, 
Sylvester, who was born in 1827, and died 
in 1831. 2. Miranda Jane, born in 1828, 
died at the age of two years. 3. Christopher 



C, born October 4, 1 830. 4. James Philip, 
of further mention. 5. Wealthy R., born 
May 30, 1834; married William Rhood. 6. 
Miranda Jane, born in 1837; married Alvin 
Stone. 7. Viola B., born April 4, 1839; 
married Rodney Blodgett and resides in 
Greenfield. 8. Joel, Jr., born January 28, 
1841. 9. Fidelia, born June 12, 1844; mar- 
ried Stephen Smith and resides in Green- 
field. 10. Simeon P., born September 12, 
1846. II. Sylvester P., born November 12, 
1849. 12. Alphonso Dwight, born August 
5, 1854, and resides in Greenfield. 

(VIII) James Philip Keyes, son of Joel 
and Hannah L. (Porter) Keyes, was born 
in Conway, Massachusetts, July 2, 1832, and 
died October 24, 1918. He was a skilled 
agriculturalist and an expert mechanic, as 
well as the handy kind of a man known as 
a "jack of all trades," but unlike the indi- 
vidual of the proverb, he was good at them 
all. He worked in a machine shop in 
Schenectady. New York, and in Utica, New 
York, also in Florence, Massachusetts, and 
in the town of Northampton, He also had 
a farm in Conway, Massachusetts, where he 
was the successful proprietor of a blacksmith 
and wheelwright shop. He was a natural- 
born mechanic and his services were much 
in demand. He was also a highway sur- 
veyor in Conway for many years ; he built a 
house, doing nearly all the work himself. At 
one time he conducted a hotel in Northamp- 
ton, Massachusetts. He was thorough and 
efficient in all that he undertook, and he held 
in a high degree the respect and esteem of 
all who knew him. He married, August 23, 
1856, Jane Abercrombie, who was born No- 
vember 23, 1839, and died IMay 16, 1920, 
daughter of Joel and Sarah (Presbo) Aber- 
crombie. Their children were: i. Francis 
Dwight, of further mention. 2. Fred, who 
was born August 23, 1859, and resides in 
Conway, Massachusetts, on an old homestead 
in the house built by his father. 3. Arthur 
A., who was born April 23, 1877, and resides 
in Clifton Springs, New York, where he is 
employed in the machine shops of the Lehigh 



160 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPPIY 



Valley Railroad ; he was a lieutenant in a 
machine gun company in the World War. 

(IX) Francis Dwight Keyes, son of James 
Philip and Jane (Abercrombie) Keyes, was 
born in Northampton, Massachusetts, July 
5, 1857, and received his early school train- 
ing in the public schools of his native city. 
When he was about ten years of age he 
went to Conway, Massachusetts, where he 
entered the high school and the academy. 
Upon the completion of his academic course 
he found employment with Franklin Pease, 
a farmer, where for a period of five years 
he was engaged as a "drover." He drove 
cattle over the road from Plainfield and 
Hawley to Springfield, Holyoke, and North- 
ampton, following this and farming until he 
was about twenty years of age. He then 
came to Florence, Massachusetts, and en- 
tered the employ of his Grandfather Aber- 
crombie, with whom he remained for five 
years. His next position was with R. M. 
Branch, a merchant of Florence, in whose 
employ he remained for nineteen years, 
driving a delivery team. About a year be- 
fore he left the employ of Mr. Branch, he 
started in the florist's business in a small 
way, using his spare time. Gradually he 
built up a considerable trade, and at the end 
of a year the business had grown to the pro- 
portions which justified his severing connec- 
tions with Mr. Branch. In 1906 he built 
his first hothouse, which was a small one, 
and since that time he has devoted his entire 
attention to the development of the florists' 
business. He has been notably successful, 
and his patronage has grown rapidly. His 
plant also has grown until at the present time 
(1923) he has 50,000 cubic feet under glass. 
His establishment is located in the heart of 
the town, is therefore easily accessible to all 
who seek his services, and has attracted to 
itself a steadily increasing volume of patron- 
age. Mr. Keyes' florist establishment is 
today the best known in the Florence section 
of the county, and new customers are con- 
stantly coming to him for his beautiful plants 
and his cut flowers. Mr. Keyes enjoys in a 



high degree the esteem of his many associates 
and friends, and is well known as one of the 
public-spirited and progressive citizens of the 
town. He takes an active interest in local 
public aff^airs, and for three years served as 
a member of the City Council of Northamp- 
ton. Pie is a meml)er of the American Order 
of United Workmen, of which he was a 
charter member and held all the offices and 
is now (1923) one of the trustees; and of 
the Florists' Club, of Northampton and 
Holyoke; and his religious affiliation is with 
the Unitarian Church. 

Francis Dwight Keyes married, on April 
19, 1882, Susan Isabelle Rhood, of North- 
ampton, Massachusetts, daughter of Henry 
G. and Juliette (Todd) Rhood, the latter 
still living at eighty-seven. Mr. and Mrs. 
Keyes are the parents of three children : 
I. Harold Francis, a biography of whom fol- 
lows. 2. Lena May, who was born June i, 
1887, married, October 19, 1909, Ralph W. 
Bardwell, and has two children : Gladys 
May and Allan Ralph. 3. Bertha Isabelle, 
who was born January 25, 1896. 



KEYES, Harold Francis 

Associated with his father in the manage- 
ment of a thriving florist establishment in 
the center of the town of Florence. Massa- 
chusetts, is Harold Francis Keyes. who. after 
six years of business experience in North- 
ampton and Leominster, Massachusetts, and 
in Edwardsville, Illinois, came to Florence 
and became the business associate of his 
father, Francis Dwight Keyes. 

(X) Born in Northampton. Massachu- 
setts, September 6, 1884, Harold Francis 
Keyes is a son of Francis Dwight and Susan 
Isabelle (Rhood) Keyes (see i)receciing biog- 
raphy). He received a careful education in 
the public schools of his native city, includ- 
ing the high school, and after the completion 
of his high school course found his first em- 
ployment in the office of the Northampton 
Gas Light Company, where he remained for 
a period of four years. He then went to 
Leominster, Massachusetts, in the employ of 



161 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the same company, and a year later he was 
again transferred, this time being sent to 
Edwardsville, Illinois, where he remained 
for another year. In 1915, having completed 
six years of business experience, he went to 
Florence, Massachusetts, and became his 
father's associate in the florist's business, 
under the firm name of F. D. Keyes & Son. 
The concern is a thriving and prosperous 
one, and both father and son devote their 
whole attention to the work of meeting the 
ever increasing demands of a steadily grow- 
ing patronage. Both father and son are well 
and favorably known throughout a wide ter- 
ritory surrounding Florence, and both have 
a host of friends. Harold Francis Keyes is 
a member of the American Order of United 
\\''orkmen; of the Nonatuck Lodge No. 61, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Northampton, Massachusetts ; and he is also 
a member of the Florists' Club of North- 
ampton and Holyoke. His religious affilia- 
tion is with the Unitarian Church, of which 
he has been treasurer for the past two years, 
Mr. Keyes has taken an active interest in 
local affairs of some of the communities in 
which he has lived, and in Northampton, 
Massachusetts, served for a year as a mem- 
ber of the Common Council. 

On September 12, 191 1, at Northampton, 
Harold Francis Keyes married Evelyn Isa- 
belle Canning, who was born in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of Edward J. and 
Emma (Miles) Canning, both of whom were 
born in England, and came to this country in 
February, 1887. Mr. and Mrs. Keyes are 
the parents of four children: i. Harold 
Francis, Jr., who was born July 19, 1912. 
2. James Henry, born December 9, 1913. 
3-4. Richard Dwight and Robert Edward 
(twins), born May 17, 1915. 



KEYES, Elbert Merrick 

Few of the citizens of Western Massa- 
chusetts are better known or more highly 
esteemed than is Elbert Merrick Keyes, who 
for more than half a century has been en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits on the farm 



which he now owns. From time to time Mr. 
Keyes has added to the original acreage of 
the home farm until at the present time 
(1923) he owns and controls a large number 
of acres of splendid grazing and rich crop- 
producing land. He specializes in stock- 
raising and dairying, and has a large herd of 
"blooded" cows. Mr. Keyes is a descendant 
of one of the old Colonial families, tracing 
his ancestry to Robert Keyes, 

(VII) Owen Keyes, son of Jonas and 
Delana (Parker) Keyes (q.v.), was born in 
Wilbraham, Massachusetts, October 21, 
1789, and died February 28, 1867, He re- 
ceived a good, practical education in the local 
schools and then engaged in farming, and in 
this activity he continued throughout the 
period of his active career. His farm was 
located on the Tinkham Road, He was 
buried at Sixteen Acres, in Springfield. He 
married Anna Frost, who died in February 
9, 1876, aged eighty- four years, and they 
were the parents of three children: Elias, of 
further mention ; Dudley, and a daughter, 

(VIII) Elias Keyes, son of Owen and 
Anna (Frost) Keyes, was born in Wil- 
braham, Massachusetts, November 10, 18 17, 
and died in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
March 8, 1893. He was engaged in farming, 
and in 1865 took possession of the farm now 
owned by his son, Elbert Merrick Keyes, 
where he continued to reside to the time of 
his death. He married Elizabeth Pettes, who 
was born May 12, 1819, and died August 9, 
1899. Their children were: i, Merrick, who 
died September 22, 1849. 2. Laura, who 
died October 4, 1849, 3- Morris O., who 
died March 21, 1885, at the age of twenty- 
eight years. 4. Homer J,, who died Febru- 
ary 24, 1883, aged twenty-five years, 5, 
Mary, deceased, who married George T, 
Bliss, 6. Elbert Merrick, of further men- 
tion, 

(IX) Elbert Merrick Keyes, son of Elias 
and Elizabeth (Pettes) Keyes, was born in 
Wilbraham, Massachusetts, March 30, 185 1. 
He received a good, practical education in 
the public schools of his native district and 



162 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



was then for two years in the employ of 
John D. Stebbins. With the exception of 
those two years he has ahvays been engaged 
in agricultural activities. He was fifteen 
years of age when, with his father's family, 
he removed to the farm which he now owns 
and operates, and during the entire period 
of his active career he has continued to culti- 
vate the acres of the home farm and the one 
adjoining. He has from time to time pur- 
chased portions of adjoining farm prop- 
erties. He specializes in the raising of highly 
bred cattle and is engaged in the dairy busi- 
ness. He is widely known as an expert in 
that particular field of agricultural activities 
and has built up a business which is both 
large and profitable. During the more than 
half a century of Mr. Keyes' residence in 
the community in which he now lives he has 
taken an active interest in local public affairs 
and has borne his share of the burden of 
public ofiice. For several years he served 
as a member of the special police force, and 
for many years he was a most efficient and 
faithful road master. He has also served on 
the jury. Mr. Keyes has a host of friends 
in Springfield and vicinity, and is most 
highly esteemed both among those who are 
associated with him in a business way and 
among a large group of personal friends. 
His religious interest is with the Baptist 
Church, of which he is an attendant. For 
over thirty years Mr. Keyes was sexton of 
the local cemetery. 

In April, 187 1, Elbert Merrick Keyes mar- 
ried Susan T. Capin, of Sixteen Acres, 
Springfield, Massachusetts, daughter of Ed- 
mund and Lodica (Fuller) Capin, and they 
are the parents of eleven children: i. Cora 
Bell, who died in infancy. 2. Gracie Anna, 
who died in infancy. 3. Wilbur, who is 
married and has a daughter, Erma. 4. El- 
bert James, who is married and has children : 
Lewis and Stanley. 5. Edmund Capin. 6. 
Charley, deceased. 7. Henry, deceased. 8. 
Raymond, who is married and has chil- 
dren: Kenneth, ^luriel, and Douglas Capin. 
9. Bertha Ellen, who married Estin E. Hall. 



and has one child: Phyllis May. 10. Fred 
Elias. II. Clifton Earl, who married Mar- 
tha Stimson, and has children : Mabel and 
Lawrence. 



GURNEY, Frank Ardley 

As proprietor of a general store for a 
quarter of a century and postmaster for 
nearly two decades, Frank Ardley Gurney 
is one of the well known men of Wilbraham. 
Mr. Gurney is a descendant of Richard 
Gurney, of Braintree, Massachusetts, from 
whom descent is traced as follows : 

The Gurney family was early represented 
in this country, Edward Gurney coming to 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1636, and 
John Gurney, born September 29, 161 5, and 
died 1663, coming to Braintree. It is sup- 
posed that Richard Gurney, mentioned below, 
was a son of John Gurney. 

(I) Richard Gurney, supposed son of John 
Gurney, was a resident of Weymouth, Mas- 
sachusetts, and was admitted a freeman, Oc- 
tober 12, 1 68 1. He married (as indicated 
in the will of John Taylor and by the vital 
records of Weymouth) Rebecca Taylor, 
daughter of John and Rebecca Taylor, of 
Weymouth, and they were the parents of 
Joseph. Mary, Zachariah. of whom further, 
and probably other children. 

(II) Zachariah Gurney, son of Richard 
and Rebecca (Taylor) Gurney. of Wey- 
mouth, Massachusetts, was a soldier in King 
Phillip's War in 1675. He married Mary 
Benson, daughter of Joseph Benson, of Hull, 
]\Iassachusetts, and they were the parents of 
the following children: i. Zachariah, born 
November 19, 1695. married Sarah Jack- 
son. 2. Joseph, of further mention. 3. 
Nathan. 4. Jacob. 5. Mary. 

(III) Joseph Gurney, son of Zachariah 
and Mary (Benson) Gurney. w^as born at 
Weymouth, Massachusetts, March 7, 1698. 
He married, at Weymouth, June 10, 1718, 
Mary Perkins, of Hingham, Massachusetts. 
Children, born in Abington: i. Sarah, born 
January 15, 1 721, married Samuel Tirrell. 
2. Perkins, born in 1723, married Jane 



[63 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Darby. 3. Mary, bom in 1726, married Isaac 
Hearsey. 4. Betty, born in 1728, married 
Whitcomb Pratt. 5. Lydia, born in 1730. 
married William Hearsey. 6. Joseph, of 
whom further. 7. Benoni, born in 1737, 
married Caroline Wilks. 8. Remember, born 
in 1742, married John Wilks. 

(IV) Joseph Gurney, son of Joseph and 
Mary (Perkins) Gurney, was born in Ab- 
ington. Massachusetts, February 4, 1735, and 
resided there. He married, in Abington, 
September 8, 1758, Sarah Shaw, who died 
in Abington, January 17, 1789, aged fifty- 
two years. Children: i. Joseph, of whom 
further. 2. Molly, born in 1761, married 
Elisha Lincoln. 3. Gideon, born in 1763, 
married, in 1788, Rachel Gardner. 4. Dan- 
iel, born in 1765, married Deborah Rams- 
dal. 5. Zachariah, born in 1766, married 
Anna Fullarton. 6. Sarah, married Asa 
Whitmarsh. 7. Deborah, born in 1773, 
married Elijah Shaw, Jr. 

(V) Joseph Gurney, son of Joseph and 
Sarah (Shaw) Gurney, was born in Ab- 
ington, Massachusetts, March 28, 1759. He 
married (first) in Abington (intentions 
June 30, 1780) Mercy Smith. Child: i. 
Melvin, born April 22, 1782. He married 
Csecond) in Abington, June 10, 1783, Tamar 
Jackson, born in Abington, September 29, 
1 761, daughter of Edmond, Jr., and Silence 
(Allen) Jackson. Children: 2. Joseph, of 
whom further. 3. Josiah, born November 
23, 1786. 4. Selah, born February 20. 1795, 
died young. 5. Rachel, born May. 1798, 

(VI) Joseph Gurney, son of Joseph and 
Tamar (Jackson) Gurney, was born in Ab- 
ington, Massachusetts, April 29, 1785, and 
died in Plainfield. Massachusetts, January 4, 
1862. He married Olive Torrey, and had 
children: Josiah, Abner, William Torrey, 
of whom further ; Lydia, Celia, Gridley. 

(VII) William Torrey Gurney, son of 
Joseph and Olive (Torrey) Gurney, was 
born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, in 1809, 
and died in Plainfield, Massachusetts, July 
19. 1878. In early life he was a spinner in 
the small town mills of Taunton and Plain- 



field, Massachusetts, and being energetic and 
ambitious he finally purchased a mill priv- 
ilege in Plainfield and engaged in the mill 
business for himself. Later he purchased in 
that town a farm and there the greater part 
of his life was spent. He took an active part 
in local public affairs, serving in some town 
offices, and was also active in church affairs. 
He married (first) Huldah White. She died 
in Plainfield. He married (second) Philena 
Lydia Torrey, of Plainfield, Massachusetts, 
daughter of Josiah and Abigail (Snow) Tor- 
rey. Children of the first marriage were: I. 
Emma, died, 1922, eight\--four years of age. 
2. Charles, who was killed at the battle of 
Gettysburg. To the second marriage the 
following children were born : 3. Julia, who 
died at the age of five years. 4. Frank 
Ardley, of further mention. 5. Julia, de- 
ceased, who married Warren Sears. 

(VIII) Frank Ardley Gurney, son of Wil- 
liam Torrey and Philena Lydia (Torrey) 
Gurney, was born in Plainfield, Massachu- 
setts, October 18, 1853. He attended the 
schools of his native town, and assisted his 
father on the farm until the death of the 
latter. He then went to Pittsfield, Massa- 
chusetts, where he was employed in a knit- 
ting mill for two years. At the end of that 
time he removed to Russell, Massachusetts, 
where he conducted a store for about six 
years. In 1889 he again changed his place 
of residence, this time locating in Wilbra- 
ham. Here he established himself in the 
mercantile business, and for twenty-five years 
successfully operated a general store. 
Genial, friendly, and upright in his dealings, 
he steadily enlarged his patronage, and his 
establishment became one of the landmarks 
of the county. In connection with his gen- 
eral store he also served as postmaster for 
sixteen years. In 1913 he retired from ac- 
tive business, but since that time he has 
served on the Board of Assessors, and as a 
member of the Library Board of Trustees. 
He has also during his long career held 
several town offices, the duties of which he 
has discharged with credit to himself and 



164 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



with satisfaction to his associates. Fra- 
ternally he is a member of Newtown Lodge. 
Free and Accepted Masons, of Wilbraham, 
and he is affiliated with the Congregational 
Church. 

Frank Ardley Gurney married (first), in 
December, 1881, Gertrude Spaulding. She 
died in 1894. He married (second), May 
13, 1897, Mary Beebe, of Wilbraham, daugh- 
ter of Marcus and Frances (Newell) Beebe. 
To the first marriage one son, Raymond 
Francis, was born in Russell, Massachusetts, 
November 14, 1888. He received his early 
education in the public schools, and then 
completed his studies in Worcester Academy, 
from which he was graduated. He is now 
(1924) employed in the office of the Cutter 
Grain Company, of North Wilbraham. Fra- 
ternally, he is affiliated with Newton Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of Wilbraham, 
Massachusetts, of which he is Past Master. 
He married Eva Gebo, and has a son, Frank 
Ardley (2), born November 25, 1915. 



BEEBE, Evanore Olds 

Among the agriculturists of Massachu- 
setts is Miss Evanore Olds Beebe, of North 
Wilbraham, who in addition to the manage- 
ment of a four-hundred acre farm has found 
time for extensive public service and is also 
noted as the owner of a rare collection of 
antiques. 

Ancient family papers said to be in the 
archives of Aston Hall, Warwickshire, Eng- 
land, show that the Beebe family descended 
from tvi'o Norman Knights, Richard and 
William de Boebe, who were of the royal 
guard of William the Conqueror, and went 
to England at the time of the Conquest. 
They were granted lands in Warwickshire, 
where the family afterwards lived. The 
name has many variations of spelling, Beebe, 
Beby, Beeby, Beebee, etc. In the Revolu- 
tionary records it is found spelled twelve 
different ways. The coat-of-arms borne by 
the family of Willey Court, England, is: 

Arms — Azure, a chevron between three bees 
volant or. 



Crest — A beehive proper. 
Motto — Sc defcndcndo. 

During the parliamentary wars, John 
Beebe, of County Warwick, with two sons, 
having ardently stood Ijy the popular cause 
against the Stuarts, fighting under Essex 
and Hampden, and all through Cromwell's 
campaign, were at the restoration of the 
Monarchy exposed to persecution by the 
court officials. They were summoned to 
take the oath of allegiance before the King's 
governor at Warwick, but refused to recog- 
nize the right of that court. They, with 
others, at once emigrated to the province of 
York, and settled on estates within the royal 
demesne. Soon afterwards another branch 
of the family settled in Roxbury, Massachu- 
setts, and held correspondence with Lord 
Stanley and Henry Fairfax of Durham. 
These letters were preserved by William 
Watt, Esq., Lord of the manor of Aston, 
Warwickshire. The immigrant mentioned 
below is undoubtedly connected with this 
family. 

(I) John Beebe, immigrant ancestor, was 
born in Broughton. County Northampton, 
England, son of John of North Addington. 
Northamptonshire. England, and grandson 
of Alexander Beebe. of North Addington. 
He sailed for New England in April or 
Mav, 1650. accompanied by five children. 
His will was written on shipboard, dated 
May 18, 1650, and indicates that he died 
the same day, as he writes. "Being by God's 
good hand brought on a voyage towards 
New Engl'd to sea and there smitten by the 
good hand of God, so as that my expectation 
is for my chaynge." He married Rebecca 
Ladd, who died in England, Children: 
John, Rebecca. Thomas (twin) ; Samuel 
(twin), of further mention; Nathaniel, set- 
tled in New London and later in Stonington, 
Connecticut ; Mary, Hannah, and James. 

(II) Samuel Beebe, son of John and Re- 
becca (Ladd) Beebe, was baptized at 
Broughton, England, June 2t,. 1633. He 
came to New England and settled at New 
London, Connecticut, where land was 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



granted him. December 2, 165 1, and after- 
wards. He married (first) Agnes Keeney, 
daughter of William Keeney. He married 
(second) Mary Keeney, born 1642, sister of 
his first wife. She resided, a widow, in Col- 
chester, and on May 8, 17 16, conveyed to 
Samuel Fox, of New London, land granted 
originally to William Keeney, her father. 
Samuel Beebe moved to Plum Island and 
died there early in 1712, and administration 
was granted on his estate April 6, 1712, to 
his widow Mary and son Samuel, of South- 
old, Long Island. Children : Samuel, 
Susannah, William, of further mention; 
Agnes, Nathaniel, Jonathan, Mary, and 
Thomas. 

(HI) William Beebe, son of Samuel 
Beebe, was born in 1665, and died in 1750. 
He married and reared a family of children, 
among whom was Samuel, of whom further. 

(IV) Samuel Beebe, son of William 
Beebe, was born in New London, Connecti- 
cut, in 1685. He married and among his 
children was Gideon, of further mention. 

(V) Gideon Beebe, son of Samuel Beebe, 
was born in Fairfield, Connecticut. He mar- 
ried Betty Sherwood, and they were the 
parents of Sherwood, of whom further. 

(VI) Sherwood Beebe, son of Gideon and 
Betty (Sherwood) Beebe, was born in Lud- 
low, Massachusetts, November 16, 1768. 
He was active in local public afifairs, serving 
as selectman for six years, and holding other 
town offices. In 181 1 he was elected to rep- 
resent his district in the State Legislature. 
He married (first) Lucinda Damon, daugh- 
ter of Peter and Lydia (Putnam) Damon; 
(second) Burnis Hubbard, daughter of 
Elisha and Mary Hubbard. Children of the 
first marriage: i. Amanda, born July 25, 
1796, died September 24, 1878; married 
Stillman Alden. 2. Sylvia, married David 
Bissell. 3. Ruby, married Ambrose Allen. 

4. Emeline, born August 19, 1804, died De- 
cember 26, 1864; married Eber Stebbins, 

5. Damon, died in infancy. 6. Minerva, died 
in infancy. 7. Dura, died in infancy. Chil- 
dren of the second marriage: i. William 



Hubbard, of further mention. 2. Selina, 
who died January 18, 1889, wife of John 
Weeks. 3. Selucia, who married W^illiam 
Morrell. 4. Robert, born 181 7, died October 
15, 1835. 5. Andrew. 6. Edwin. 

(VH) William Hubbard Beebe, son of 
Sherwood and Burnis (Hubbard) Beebe, 
was born in Ludlow, Massachusetts, March 
6, 181 1, and died in Fond du Lac, Wiscon- 
sin, in 1902. Pie secured his first employ- 
ment in the mills of Ludlow, where he served 
first as a bojjbin boy, but where he later be- 
came an overseer. In 1844 he went West 
and settled in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, 
where he was one of the pioneers. He en- 
gaged in business as a contractor and par- 
ticipated in the construction of the Chicago 
and Northwestern Railroad, but later en- 
gaged in agricultural activities. He married, 
April I, 1835, Rebekah Olds, of Ludlow, 
Massachusetts, who was born December 25, 
1815, and died June 15, 1878, daughter of 
Nathan and Hannah (Wright) Olds. Their 
children were: i. Ellen R., born 1836; was 
one of the pioneers of the medical profession 
in Wisconsin. 2. Emeline R., born in 1838, 
married Melvin Roblee. 3. Robert W., born 
1841. 4. Nathan Sherwood, born 1844. 5. 
Edwin H., born 1846. 6. Andrew H., born 
1852, 7. Evanore Olds, of whom further. 
(VIII) Evanore Olds Beebe, daughter of 
William Hubbard and Rebekah (Olds) 
Beebe, was born in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, 
April 12, 1858. She received her early edu- 
cation in the public schools of her native city, 
and then, after completing her high school 
course, became a student in Minnesota Nor- 
mal School. After the death of her mother 
she came East and cared for an aunt in 
North Wilbraham, remaining with her until 
the time of her death. Upon the death of the 
uncle she inherited a farm of some four hun- 
dred acres and this extensive farm acreage 
she has continued to successfully manage. 
Along with her many responsibilities as the 
owner and manager of a large, well-equipped 
and scientifically conducted farm. Miss 



166 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Beebe has also found time for public serv- 
ice. For twenty years she has served as a 
member of the school board, during part of 
that time serving as the first woman chair- 
man of the school committee. She has also 
served as secretary of superintendents of the 
town board, and as superintendent of the 
schools of the districts which includes Long- 
meadow, East Longmeadow, Wilbraham, 
and Hampden. During the period of the 
participation of the United States in the 
World War she was very active in Red 
Cross work. At the time of the 250th an- 
niversary of the founding of Wilbraham, 
she was one of the committee which had 
charge of the arrangements for the celebra- 
tion. She is an active member of the His- 
torical Society, has always taken a great in- 
terest in historical matters and for many 
years she has been interested in collecting 
antiques, including furniture, crockery, 
wooden ware, coins, etc. Her home is filled 
with the largest and choicest collection that 
can be found in any private home in New 
England, and in addition to the articles al- 
ready named, includes not only garments of 
"ye olden times," but rare antique linen 
spreads and covers of exquisite workman- 
ship, in fact, practically everything one can 
conceive of along these lines, that was used 
by our forefathers. Miss Beebe has always 
purchased, but has never sold ; therefore her 
collection, having been gathered with care 
and discrimination, is priceless, containing 
many relics of bygone days that cannot be 
found elsewhere. Her home is visited by 
many people of note who come from distant 
places, having heard of her splendid col- 
lection and of her knowledge of articles used 
during the Colonial period of this country. 
During the World War she made a slight 
charge for the privilege of viewing her col- 
lection, for the purpose of raising money for 
the aid of the Red Cross work in which she 
was very deeply interested. Miss Beebe has 
a host of friends in North Wilbraham and 
vicinity, where she is held in high esteem. 



EEEBE, Charles Clarence 

During the major portion of his life 
Charles Clarence Beebe has been a resident 
of Wilbraham, Massachusetts. In the State 
Legislature he served his fellow-citizens 
faithfully and well. He is now enjoying his 
later years among the friends of a lifetime. 

Mr. Beebe is a descendant of one of the 
oldest New England families, and of one 
which in England has been prominent for 
centuries. (See preceding sketch of early 
ancestry.) 

From the sons of John Beebe have de- 
scended many who bear the Beebe name. 
Among these are included the ancestors of 
Charles Clarence Beebe. 

Christopher Beebe, grandfather of Charles 
Clarence Beebe, was born in Connecticut 
about 1788, and died in Monson, Massa- 
chusetts, January 12, 1846, aged fifty-eight 
years. Early in life he removed from the 
State of Connecticut to Monson, Massa- 
chusetts, where he was engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits, and where he also laid the 
foundations of the early Monson mills. He 
married Clarissa Graves, of Palmer, Massa- 
chusetts, and they were the parents of five 
children: i. Pamelia Graves. 2. Marcus 
Field, of further mention. 3. Charles Henry, 
born Alarch 14, 1820. 4. Helen, horn Jan- 
uary 20, 1835. 5. William Artemus. born 
January 27, 1838. 

]\Iarcus Field Beebe, son of Christopher 
and Clarissa (Graves) Beebe, was born in 
Monson, Massachusetts, in 18 19, and died 
July I, 1888. He received a careful educa- 
tion in the local schools, and during his 
younger years was engaged in teaching. He 
was engaged in farming most of his life, and 
in addition to this, as a young man. taught 
school winters for a time. In 1863 he re- 
moved from Monson to Wilbraham. and de- 
voted his entire time to agricultural pursuits. 
He was an intelligent and energetic man, 
who took an active interest in local public 
affairs, serving on the Board of Selectmen 
and also on the School Committee. Politi- 
cally, he gave his support to the Republican 

167 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Part\', and his religious affiliation was with 
the Congregational Church. 

Mr. Beebe married Frances Sophronia 
Newell, who was born in Hampden. Massa- 
chusetts, in 1825, and died March ii, 1890, 
daughter of John Xewell. Their children 
were: i. Helen Maria, deceased. 2. Charles 
Clarence, of further mention, 3. Mary, who 
married Frank Ardly Guerney. 

Charles Clarence Beebe, son of Marcus 
Field and Frances S. (Xewell) Beebe, was 
born in Monson, Massachusetts, August 11, 
1851. After attending the public schools in 
Monson, he completed his preparation for an 
active career by continuing his studies in 
Wilbraham Academy. From boyhood he 
was his father's assistant on the farm in 
Wilbraham. but after a time he decided to 
try his fortune in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he found employment in a furniture 
store. That connection he maintained for a 
period of two years, and then, in 1879, fol- 
lowed the "westward movement" and went 
to Colorado, where he engaged in sheep 
raising. He located southeast of Denver, 
Colorado, near Hugo, and with others be- 
came the owner of one thousand sheep. The 
first two years he was employed by Haskill 
Williard, on a sheep ranch, and the following 
seven years he was at Bokero, near Hugo, 
on a sheep ranch which he conducted in con- 
nection with Foster Brothers, who were only 
interested financially, they making their 
home in Leominster, Massachusetts. At the 
end of that time, in 1888, the death of his 
father made it necessary that he return East, 
and he then located in his home town, Wil- 
braham, on the old homestead, and here he 
continued to follow farming until November, 
1919. At that time he removed to the village 
of Wilbraham and purchased what was 
known as the Dr. Foskett place, where he 
has since resided. During the last four 
years he has been practically retired from 
active Hfe. 

In 1900 Mr. Beebe represented the Wil- 
braham district in the State Legislature. 
While a member of that bodv he served on 



the Committee of Agriculture. Fraternally, 
he is affiliated with Newton Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons. He attends the Con- 
gregational Church. Few men are better 
known in the town of Wilbraham than is 
Charles Clarence Beebe, and he numbers 
among his friends many of those with whom 
he has been associated from boyhood. 

Charles Clarence Beebe married, on Jan- 
uary 23, 1895, Helen Warner, of Albany, 
New York, daughter of George and Cath- 
erine (Feller) Warner. George Warner 
was a native of England. Mr. and Mrs. 
Beebe became the parents of one daughter, 
Kathr}-n Frances, who was born September 
6, 1896. She married George J. Clark, who 
is an official in the Chicopee National Bank 
of Springfield, Massachusetts, and they have 
one child, Sally Beebe Clark, who was born 
January 25, 1921. 



WARREN, Hon. Frederick Aaron 

Since 1919 Hon. Frederick Aaron Warren, 
of Wilbraham. has been ably serving his con- 
stituents in the State Legislature, and in 
1924 was reelected for a fourth time with a 
plurality of 4.127. Mr. Warren is a mem- 
ber of a family which traces its origin to a 
Norman baron of Danish extraction. In 
Normandy, Gunmora, daughter of one of 
these Danish barons, married Richard, Duke 
of Normandy, who had a son Richard, who 
in turn became the father of another Rich- 
ard. The last-named Richard died without 
issue and was succeeded in his dukedom by 
Robert, father of William the Conqueror, 
who by Maud, daughter of Baldwin, Earl 
of Flanders, became the father of Gundred, 
or Gundreda, who married William, first 
Earl of Warren and Surrey. William, first 
Earl of Warren, accompanied William the 
Conqueror to England and participated in the 
battle of Hastings (1066), later receiving 
from the Conqueror lands from almost every 
county in England. Later, with his wife, 
Gundreda, he erected the Cluniac Priory of 
St. Pancras, near Lewes, in Sussex, Eng- 
land. It is interesting to note that in 1845, 



168 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



when laborers were excavatin^^ throui^h the 
site for the purpose of building a railroad, 
the remains of the founders were discovered, 
each inclosed in a leaden box in which the 
names were perfectly legible although they 
then had Iain buried for more than eight 
centuries. From these Norman ancestors 
the line of John Warren, one of the early 
immigrants to New England, is traced 
through seventeen generations. In England 
the Warrens later intermarried with Saxons 
of noble blood and the Saxon Warren an- 
cestry is traced through twenty-eight gen- 
erations from Ealhmund, King of Kent, the 
line including Egbert, King of Wessex, and 
Alfred the Great, who was crowned King 
of Saxon, England, in 872. 

John Warren, descendant of these distin- 
guished forebears, came to this country with 
Governor Winthrop on the "Arabella," ar- 
riving at Salem, Massachusetts, June 12, 
1630, settling first in Charlestown, and later 
in Shawmut (Boston). He was not, how- 
ever, the only immigrant of the name who 
came to New England, nor was he the 
earliest arrival. Richard Warren, of Green- 
wich, England, came to Plymouth, Massa- 
chusetts, in the "Mayflower" in 1620. John 
Warren, of Watertown, a descendant of the 
sixth Earl of Warren, came at an early date. 
Arthur Warren, too, thought to have been a 
descendant of the Poynton branch of War- 
rens, came from England to New England 
about 1635, and settled in W^eymouth, Mas- 
sachusetts, before 1638, as did many others 
of the name. 

Deacon Jonas Warren, great-great-grand- 
father of Hon. Frederick Aaron Warren, 
was born about 1719, and died in 1806, aged 
eighty-seven years. He resided in Upton, 
Massachusetts. His wife, Lydia, survived 
him, and died in 1819, over one hundred 
years old. Their children were : Susanna, 
Mary, Jonathan, Seth, Stephen ; Moses, of 
further mention ; Aaron, Daniel, and Eunice. 

Rev. Moses Warren, son of Deacon 
Jonas and Lydia W^arren, was born in Upton, 
Massachusetts, October 31, 1757, and died 



February 19, 1829. He was first ordained 
pastor of the church of what was then known 
as the South Parish, later South Wilbraham, 
and in 1874 had its name changed to Hamp- 
den (Massachusetts). He married Lydia 
Bliss, daughter of John Bliss. John Bliss 
was one of the incorporators of the town of 
Wilbraham, Massachusetts, and served as a 
member of the General Court for seventeen 
years. He also served as a member of the 
State Senate for five terms. The children of 
Rev. Moses and Lydia (Bliss) Warren were : 
Moses, John, Aaron, of further mention ; 
and Lydia. 

Aaron W^arren, son of Rev. Moses and 
Lydia (Bliss) Warren, was born in Wil- 
braham. IMassachusetts, After receiving a 
practical education in his native district he 
engaged in agricultural pursuits, in which he 
was very successful. Although he died in 
the prime of life, in 1857, at the age of fifty- 
five years, he was one of the wealthiest 
farmers in the town. He married Betsy 
Stacy, daughter of Lorin Stacy, of Hamp- 
den. She died in 1872, at the age of seventy 
years. Their children were : Lydia B.. Moses 
Harrington, of further mention ; and John B, 

Moses Harrington Warren, son of Aaron 
and Betsy (Stacy) Warren, was born in 
Hampden County, Massachusetts. Wilbra- 
ham South Parish. He received his early 
education at a select school, later becoming 
a student in Phillips Academy at Andover. 
When he was seventeen years of age he be- 
gan teaching and for about six winter terms 
continued successfully in that occupation. 
During the summer period he was engaged 
in agricultural pursuits, and when he was 
twenty-one years of age he settled upon a 
farm, part of the old homestead, adjoining 
the village of South Wilbraham. and with 
such skill and energy did he apply himself 
to its cultivation that in 1895 he had one of 
the best farms in the town. In addition to 
his farming activities, he also engaged in the 
lumber business, in which line he achieved 
success. Mr. Warren gave his support to 
the Republican Party and took an active part 



169 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in local affairs, serving as selectman, over- 
seer of the poor, assessor, and member of 
the school committee. He was also deputy- 
sheriff for fifteen years, and in 1885 was 
elected to represent his district in the State 
Legislature. His death occurred February 
25, 191 3. He married (first) Julia Eliza- 
beth Selden. of Hartland. Connecticut. She 
died in 1872, and he married (second) Mrs. 
Louisa M. (Alden) Burleigh, daughter of 
Elijah Alden. The children of the first mar- 
riage were: i. Frederick A., of further 
mention. 2. Moses De Witt, who died in 
1894; was engaged in educational work; 
married Mattie Judd, and had one daugh- 
ter, Irene. 3. Henry Selden, married Fan- 
nie Robb, and has two children, Ida May, 
and Henry. 4. John Lyle, married Roberta 
Haggerty, and has five sons, De Witt, Ches- 
ter. Rol)ert, Frank, and Fred, who resides in 
Colorado. 5. Edward Morris, attorney and 
judge in Lamour, North Dakota; married 
Effie Stone, and they have two children, 
Elizabeth, and Francis. 6. Mary Elizabeth, 
twin of Edward M., died in 1909; she mar- 
ried Samuel Bragdon and they had one son, 
Warren. 

Hon. Frederick Aaron Warren, son 
of Moses Harrington and Julia Elizabeth 
(Selden) Warren, was born in Wilbraham, 
Massachusetts, January 17, 1857, and after 
attending the local public schools completed 
his education in South Wilbraham Acad- 
emy. When he was sixteen years of age he 
left school and began his active career in 
the Gates Store at North Wilbraham, where 
he remained for a period of five years. 
After the first year of this connection he was 
placed in charge of the store and entrusted 
with all the buying. In 1878 he went to 
Boston and became associated with the 
wholesale grocery house of S. S. Sleeper & 
Company, in whose employ he traveled for 
about twelve years. His ability as a sales- 
man soon became apparent and he was given 
the largest route covered by any grocery 
salesman on the road, traveling from Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, to Brattleboro, Vermont, 



and from Worcester to Springfield, covering 
all intervening points. At the end of twelve 
years, wishing to enlarge his experience, he 
again made a change, this time going to Chi- 
cago, Illinois, where he became identified 
with Franklin McVeagh & Company, whole- 
sale grocers, packers, and manufacturers. 
The head of the concern, Franklin ]Mc- 
Veagh, was secretary of the United States 
Treasury under President Taft. The con- 
nection with the Franklin McVeagh Com- 
pany was maintained until 1910. During his 
residence in Chicago Mr. Warren was also 
president of the salesmen's organization, 
consisting of some one hundred and seventy 
men, among whom he was deputized to set- 
tle all controversies. He was for fifteen 
years a member, and for five years chair- 
man, of the board of directors of the Illinois 
Commercial Men's Accident Association, 
which is the largest mutual commercial 
men's insurance company in America. He 
was one of the organizers and a charter 
member of the Illinois Health Association. 
In 1910 he returned to the East and became 
interested in agricultural activities, on a 
farm of two hundred acres. He has also 
bought and sold considerable land and is one 
of the large land owners in Wilbraham and 
nearby towns. 

Mr. Warren has always taken an active 
interest in public affairs. In 1904 he served 
as assistant sergeant-at-arms at the Repub- 
lican National Convention, which dominated 
President Roosevelt; in 1906 he served as 
chairman of the Finance Committee of the 
James R. Mann campaign which resulted in 
the election of James R. Mann to the House 
of Representatives, where he was minority 
leader of the House; in 1908 he was assist- 
ant sergeant-at-arms in the Republican Na- 
tional Convention, which nominated Presi- 
dent Taft. After his return to Wilbraham, 
he at once became interested in the local 
affairs of the community, and for six years 
served as a member of the Board of Select- 
men. During this time he was instrumental 
in the building of the road from North Wil- 



170 






£ f^EY/ 



n;- 






ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



braham to Wilbraham, and in the organiz- 
ing of the Wilbraham Fire Department. In 
1916 and 1917 he served as president of the 
Wilbraham Fair. In 19 19 he was selected 
to represent his district in the State Legis- 
lature, and since that time he has been re- 
elected continuously, being elected in 1924 
to serve during the term of 1925-26. At the 
present time (1925) he is house chairman 
of the House Committee on Insurance. He 
has served on the insurance and mercantile 
committees, also on the committee on recon- 
struction, and the committee on social wel- 
fare. Though his election to the State Leg- 
islature has greatly increased his responsi- 
bility, Mr. Warren has continued to take an 
active interest in the local affairs of Wilbra- 
ham, and was instrumental in retaining the 
Game Farm in that town. He is a member 
of the board of directors in the Hampden 
County Improvement League. While he 
was in Chicago he was an important factor 
in raising the money which enabled the 
city to place its "white wings" on the streets. 
During the \\''orld War he served as a mem- 
ber of the local Exemption Board No. 7, 
and with his colleagues waived all claims 
for compensation. He was also chairman 
(appointed by the governor) of food con- 
servation, and member and chairman of the 
Public Safety Committee of Wilbraham. In 
addition to this he was actively interested 
during the period of the World War in all 
the various "drives." He is a member of 
Windsor Park Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons of Chicago ; and has also been affili- 
ated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men. He was also 
a member of the Hamilton Club, the Boos- 
ters' Club, the Merchants' Club, and the 
Woodlawn Park Club, all of Chicago ; and 
for many years was a member of the Wood- 
lawn Improvement Club of Chicago. His 
religious affiliation is with South Parish Con- 
gregational Church, of Hampden. 

On September 24, 1889, Frederick Aaron 
Warren married Lizzie Collins, of Wilbra- 



ham, Massachusetts, daughter of Levi and 
Emeline (Hubbard) Collins. The death of 
Mrs. Warren occurred April 18, 191 6. 



NEWHALL, William Rice, D.D. 

Among tliose who gave freely of talent, 
energy and devotion to the upbuilding of 
Wilbraham Academy and to the enrichment 
of the lives of its students was William Rice 
Newhall, who for fifteen years previous to 
his death in 191 3 rendered valuable service 
a? principal and trustee of that institution. 
His high qualities as an educator and an ad- 
ministrator and his ability to "understand" 
and to inspire to worthy effort the young 
lives placed in his charge, won for him en- 
during gratitude, and his influence still lives 
in many lives. 

Dr. Xewhall was a descendant of an old 
and honorable English family, which was 
located at Wiltshire, as early as the eleventh 
century. At that time Oliver Cromwell 
owned the manor of Newhall, which he sold. 
The coat-of-arms of Thomas Newhall was : 

Anns — Azure, three plates on each an ermine 
spot sable. 

Crest — A cross crosslet fitchee azure. 
Motto — Diligentia ditat. 

(I) Thomas Newhall. immigrant ancestor, 
born in England, came with his brother An- 
thony Newhall to Lynn, about 1630. He 
was a farmer and owned all the land on the 
eastern side of Federal Street, as far north 
as Marion, and also owned the land at Rum- 
ney Marsh, Gaines Neck, and Lynn. He 
married Mary, surname unknown, who died 
September 25, 1665, and they were the par- 
ents of four children, among whom was 
Thomas, of further mention. 

(II) Thomas Newhall, son of Thomas 
Newhall. was born in 1630, the first white 
male child born in Lynn, and was buried 
April I, 1687. He married, December 29, 
1652, Elizabeth Potter, daughter of Nicholas 
Potter, who was buried at Lynn, February 
22.1687. Children, born at Lynn: Thomas, 
John, of further mention; Joseph, married 



171 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Susanna Farrar; Nathaniel, married Eliza- 
beth S>Tnonds; Elizabeth, died young; 
Elisha. Elizabeth. Mary. Samuel, married 
Abigail Lindsey; and Rebecca, who married 
Ebenezer Parker, of Reading. 

(III) John Xewhall. son of Thomas and 
Elizabeth (Potter) Xewhall, was bom Feb- 
ruary.- 14, 1656, and died in 1738. He mar- 
ried Esther Bartram, and among their chil- 
dren was Jacob, of whom further. 

(IV) Jacob Xewhall. son of John and 
Esther (Bartram) Xewhall, was the first of 
that name to settle in Saugus. He married 
(first) Abigail Locker; (second), in 171 3, 
Hannah Qiadwell. 

(V) Jonathan Xewhall. son of Jacob and 
Abigail (Locker) Xewhall. was bom May 8, 
1 7 16, and died October 18, 1761. He mar- 
ried Abigail Xoms'ood and they were the par- 
ents of Jacob Xewhall, who served in the 
Revolutionary- War, and from whom the line 
of descent is further traced. 

(VI) Jacob Xewhall. son of Jonathan and 
Abigail (X'or\^-ood) X'ewhall, was born in 
that part of L\-nn called East Saugus. Feb- 
ruan.- 22. 1745. He lived in the family 
homestead which, during the Revolutionary- 
times, stood on the main street of East Sau- 
gus, on the spot now occupied by the house 
of the late Fales X'ewhall. On April 19, 
1775. he was one of the first to receive the 
news that the British were coming, the mes- 
senger reaching East Saugus before day- 
light; and he helped to rally the neighbors 
who belonged to the company, who set off 
as soon as possible, going up the Boston 
Road through Maiden. The company, how- 
ever, did not go to Lexington, but awaited 
the return of the British on the road below 
that place, where, having dispersed them- 
selves behind the walls, they fired upon the 
King's troops, following them along the road. 
"At one time, with several of his neighbors, 
Jacob was in a httle ra\-ine. behind some 
boulders. They had annoyed the regulars 
so much that the latter were ordered to clear 
them out \s-ith the bayonet. The British 
thereupon made a sudden charge into the 



gully. Jacob was the last to leave, and after 
firing a parting shot, turned and addressed 
some \tr\ disrespectful language to the red- 
coats, and then made good his escape. He 
continued to follow the British down to 
(Tharlestown neck, when he dropped out of 
the fight and made his way home." Tra- 
dition has brought down the stor\- that he 
still further engaged in the war which fol- 
lowed. He may have been the Jacob who 
serv'ed as private in (Colonel Samuel Bower's 
regiment, in the company of Captain James 
Prentiss. If so, his ser\-ice was at Sara- 
toga, and he was allowed two himdred and 
fort>- miles travel home, the warrant being 
dated Februan.- 3. 1777. He married Sarah 
Berr}-, and from them the line descends 
through their son Jacob. 

(VII) Jacob Xewhall, son of Jacob and 
Sarah (Bern.-) Xewb^, married Susanna 
Pell, and their son, Fales, is of further men- 
tion. 

(\TII) Fales Xewhall, son of Jacob and 
Susanna (Pell) X'ewhall, was a sea captain, 
and married Harriet Brown. They b^d four 
children: Fales Henn.-, of whom further; 
Adam Garke. Solomon Brown, and Har- 
riet. 

(IX) Rev. Fales Henn.- Xewhall. D.D., 
son of Fales and Harriet (Brown) Xewhall, 
was bom in Saugus. Massachusetts, Jtme 
19, 1827, and died April 6, 1883. in Worces- 
ter, Massachusetts. He entered the sopho- 
more class of Wesle>-an Universir\- in .1843, 
and graduated from that institution with high 
honors in 1846. For seven years following 
his graduation he was engaged in teaching: 
One year in Gouvemeur Seminar^-, Xew 
York ; one year in Ohio ; five years in Wil- 
braham, in Wesleyan Academy. He then, 
in 1 65 1, joined the Xew England Confer- 
ence, and in 1853 began his work as a min- 
ister of the gospel. His appointments were 
as follows: 1853-4, Pynchon Street Church, 
now Trinit>- Church of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts; 1855-6, Park Street Church, now 
Trinit}- Church, of Worcester, Massachu- 
setts ; i^ljS, South Street (Thurch, L}-nn, 



172 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OE BlOGRAPliV 



Massachusetts; 1859-1860, Roxbury, Massa- 
chusetts; 1861-2, Bromfielcl Street Church, 
Boston, Massachusetts; 1863, Hanover 
Street Church, Boston. In 1863 he was 
elected professor of EngHsh Literature and 
instructor in Hebrew in Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, and that position he held until 1871. 
During the years 1867-8 he was granted 
leave of absence and travelled extensively in 
Europe. In 1871 he retired from active 
work, but was later appointed to the Lynn 
Common Church in Lynn and he continued 
to fill that pastorate until the time of his 
election to the presidency of Ohio Wesleyan 
University in 1873. ^^^ was in ill health 
for many years prior to his death. 

It is said of him that as a teacher he ex- 
pressed in a rare degree the power to arouse 
enthusiasm in his students. As a preacher 
he was characterized by his wonderful power 
in presenting the truths of the gospel, which 
he so ably expounded. But better than his 
scholarship, his teaching, his preaching, was 
the man himself. His thorough manliness, 
his exquisite gentleness, his genuine philan- 
thropy, his unswerving loyalty to truth, his 
simple faith, his unafifected piety, are lov- 
ingly remembered by many to whom the ex- 
ample of his character, more potent than his 
eloquent words, has led to a nobler and 
better life. He married Nancy Jannette 
Sweetser, born December 7, 1827, and died 
in 1887. They were the parents of two 
children : William Rice, of further mention ; 
and George Martin. 

(X) William Rice Newhall, son of Rev. 
Fales Henry and Nancy Jannette (Sweet- 
ser) Newhall, was born in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, December 22, i860, and died De- 
cember 4, 1 91 3. The following account 
published by the Wilbraham "Bulletin," in 
1922, not only gives the facts of his career, 
but also expresses a deep appreciation of his 
ability : 

"Thirty years ago, in April. 1892, William 
Rice Newhall began his service of fifteen 
years, as principal of Wilbraham Academy. 
He was born with a Wilbraham heritage. 



His mother was an Academy student in her 
girlhood, and later gave her heart and hand 
to a brilliant Wilbraham instructor, Fales 
Henry Newhall. From this i)arcntage there 
was born a son who was to give the best 
of his life service to the school which meant 
so much to his father and mother, and which 
always held his own heart's devotion. His 
early school training was at Middletown, 
Connecticut, where his father had become 
professor in English literature. . . . 

"The son, William Rice Newhall, com- 
pleted his college preparation at Wilbraham, 
where he graduated in 1877, and followed 
this with four years at Wesleyan Univer- 
sity. Here he had a distinguished record in 
scholarship, and was admitted to Phi Beta 
Kappa. In 1897 his Abna Mater gave him 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity. 

"At first he entered the teaching profes- 
sion and was instructor at Tilton Seminary, 
Tilton, New Hampshire, for one year, and 
at East Greenwich Academy, East Green- 
wich, Rhode Island, for four years. Then 
he began his chosen field of service, the 
pastorate. Two years at Auburndale and 
four years at Springfield, however, were all 
that he was permitted to labor in this early 
period of the ministry, for in 1892 he was 
unanimously elected by the trustees of Wil- 
braham Academy to the principalship of his 
early Alma Mater. 

"Reluctantly leaving the profession in 
which he was rapidly coming into the fore- 
most ranks, he accepted the call to admin- 
istrative work, and the details and burdens 
which accompany it in school life. Fifteen 
years at Wilbraham revealed in him high 
qualities as an educator, and administrator, 
and an inspiring leader of youth. His chapel 
talks are rcmemlicrcd today with admiration 
for his al)ility as a speaker, and gratitude 
for the helpfulness of his messages. His 
svmpathetic interest in boys and girls who 
needed aid or advice, or most of all just 
human, friendly understanding, bound hun- 
dreds of lives to him in undying loyalty and 
friendship. 



^73 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



"His sacrificial eflforts to stem the tide 
of financial disaster were made so quietly 
but consistently that they were not fully un- 
derstood nor even wholly known during his 
principalship or lifetime. He gave his very 
best in talented leadership, trained thinking 
and tireless endeavor to meet the constantly 
increasing competition of the high schools, 
and to counteract the rapidly growing in- 
debtedness of the Academy. Large gifts 
were made to the school through his influ- 
ence, and in 1896 there was erected what 
will remain as a tangible evidence of his 
work, the Smith Memorial Gymnasium, the 
most attractive and best equipped building 
on the Academy campus. 

"Dr. Xewhall came to believe that a rad- 
ical reorganization of the school was needed. 
After striving in vain to bring the trustees 
to definite action in this direction he resigned 
the principalship in 1 907 and reentered the 
ministry. Within five years the general re- 
organization of the Academy which he had 
long advocated was actually forced upon 
the trustees, by conditions they could not 
change. As a member of that body he 
worked loyally and harmoniously for all that 
was best in the plans of 1912 and lived to 
see the New Wilbraham take a shape and 
form which had existed in his dreams for 
many years. 

"Dr. Newhall held three pastorates in this 
last brief period of his life, one year in 
Springfield, four years at Somerville, and 
from April to December, 191 3, at the First 
Church, Lynn, where his father had served 
as pastor forty years before. He died De- 
cember 4, 191 3, while speeding on an ex- 
press train from Springfield to Boston, and 
breathed his last just as the train was pass- 
ing North W'ilbraham Station, so near to 
the happy scenes of his boyhood and the 
splendid service of his mature years. He 
was buried in Springfield. . . . 

"It is most fitting to dedicate this issue 
of the 'Bulletin' to a man who gave to the 
Academy so much in self-sacrificing service 
and loyal devotion as William Rice Xew- 



hall. As principal and trustee he was un- 
sparing of himself and unselfish in his 
gifts." 

Dr. William Rice Xewhall married (first), 
August 29, 1883, May T. Piatt, daughter 
of Rev. Smith Harrison Piatt, of South- 
ampton, Long Island. She died in 1890, 
and he married (second). May 18, 1892, 
Josephine M. Merritt, daughter of Christo- 
pher C. Merritt, of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts (see Merritt VIII). Children of the 
first marriage: i. Xina Jannette, married G. 
F. Bahnson, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 2. 
Fales, Wesleyan University, 191 1; married 
Mildred Brown and has one child. Fales 
Austin. 3. Lois ]\Iay. The children of 
the second marriage are: i. Harriet. 2. Par- 
ker, Wesleyan University, 1915; Oxford, 
1920; married Lucretia Breed. 3. Dr. Sid- 
ney Merritt, Wesleyan University, 1919; 
Columbia Universitv', X^ew Y'ork City, 1923. 
4. Eliot Martin, Wesleyan University, 1922. 

(The Merritt Line) 

The Merritt family is one of the oldest 
in X'cw England, and from earliest times its 
representatives have been able and active 
promoters of the public welfare. Fifty-five 
of the men served in the Revolutionary War, 
Henry, progenitor of the line herein traced, 
was the earliest of the several immigrant 
ancestors of the Merritt name to arrive in 
this country and from him the line to Chris- 
topher C. is traced as follows : 

(I) Henry Merritt was born in County 
Kent, England, probably in the parish of 
Tenterden, about the year 1590, and came 
to America perhaps as early as 1626 and 
with others called "Men of Kent" founded 
the town of Scituate, Massachusetts, though 
he was not made a freeman until 1638. His 
wife, called "Goodwife Merritt," joined the 
church in 1637. They left two sons : Henry, 
who died before 1673, probably without a 
family; and John, of further mention; also 
a daughter, Katherine. 

(II) John Merritt, son of Henry ^Merritt, 
was born about 1625, and died in Scituate 



174 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



after 1670. He succeeded to his father's 
estate and was the only son of Henry Aler- 
ritt who left posterity in Scituate. He mar- 
ried, April 3, 1655, Elizabeth Weyborn, 
daughter of Thomas Weyborn, of Boston. 
Children: John, of further mention; Henry, 
Jonathan, and Deborah. 

(HI) John Merritt, eldest son of John 
and Elizabeth (Weyborn) Merritt, was born 
in Scituate in 1660, and died there June 5, 
1740, He married, in 1686, Elizabeth Hy- 
land, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth 
(Stockbridge) Hyland, of Scituate, and 
they were the parents of twelve children : 
John, Thomas, Elizabeth, Mary, John, died 
young ; Hannah, Henry, Abigail, Jonathan, 
of whom further ; David, Ebenezer, and 
Ezekiel. 

(IV) Jonathan Merritt, son of John and 
Elizabeth (Hyland) Merritt, was born in 
Scituate in 1702, and died in Hebron, Tol- 
land County, Connecticut, October 21, 1758. 
He moved to Hebron about 1730. He mar- 
ried, in Scituate, in 1727, Mehitable Daman, 
daughter of Zachary and Mehitable (Chit- 
tendon) Daman, and they were the parents 
of the following children : Noah, of further 
mention ; Simeon, Jonathan, and probably 
others. 

(V) Noah Merritt, son of Jonathan and 
Mehitable (Daman) Merritt, was born in 
Scituate in 1730, and died in Templeton, 
Worcester County, Massachusetts, March 
24, 1814. He was one of the first settlers 
of Templeton, as early as 1753. He was an 
ardent patriot in the Revolution, and accord- 
ing to family traditions was one of thirty- 
seven minute-men under Captain Ezekiel 
Knowlton, leaving his plough in the field 
where he was putting in wheat, and with his 
comrades went to Lexington, where he re- 
mained until after the English were driven 
back to Boston. After his return home he 
told his oldest son, Noah, that one of them 
must stay at home and take care of the fam- 
ily, and the other must go to the front and 
fight for liberty, and gave him his choice 
of places. The young Noah was as brave 



and proud-spirited as his father, and chose 
to serve his country, which he did until the 
end of the war. Noah Merritt, Sr., mar- 
ried Sarah Lee, and they were the parents 
of : Noah, Abigail, Henry, Sarah, May, 
Lucy, Esther, Simeon, of further mention; 
Molly and Eunice (twins) ; \\'ilks, Uriah, 
Molly, Hannah, and Dytha. 

(VI) Captain Simeon Merritt, son of 
Noah and Sarah (Lee) Merritt, was born 
in Templeton, May 23, 1771, and died on 
the estate where his ancestors had lived, De- 
cember 6, 1844. He was prominent in pub- 
lic affairs, serving as a selectman, and hold- 
ing other local offices. He married July 26, 
1796, Dorcas Gay, who was born in 
Wrentham, April 19. 1775, and died in Tem- 
pleton, May 16, 1863. Children: An in- 
fant son, deceased ; Increase Sumner, of fur- 
ther mention; Cynthia, Lucy, Dorcas, Cor- 
delia, Mercy Mans, Salome, Mary Ann, 
Julia Fisher. 

(VII) Captain Increase Sumner Merritt, 
son of Captain Simeon and Dorcas (Gay) 
Merritt, was born in Templeton, October 15, 
1799, and died there April 15, 1877. He 
married Susan Penniman, and their children 
were : Simeon, Ezra Moore, Sumner Lincoln, 

Sarah Dorcas, Christopher Columbus, of 
further mention; Henry, Dulcenah. Cordelia, 
Marcus Morton, Martin V.B., Salome. 

(VIII) Christopher Columbus Merritt, 
son of Captain Increase Sumner and Susan 
(Penniman) Merritt, was born in Gardner, 
September 29, 1830, and died May 2. 1909. 
At the age of eight years he was apprenticed 
to Asa Fesscnden, of Templeton Centre, to 
learn carriage making. After mastering that 
trade he also learned the machinist trade 
with Mr. Fessenden. In 1856 he went to 
Boston and was employed at No. 69 Com- 
mercial Street, constructing machines to cut 
corks. He was next, in 1857. employed by 
Grover and Baker, making sewing machines. 
He went to Ottawa, Canada, where he took 
a position for a short time, and then returned 
to Templeton, where he was employed two 
vears bv Walter Greenwood & Company, 



■/o 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



chair makers. He was later with Baxter 
Whitney at Winchendon, where he remained 
until the Civil War broke out. He then 
went to Springfield, and in July, 1861, en- 
tered the United States Armory as a tool 
maker and remained till the close of the war, 
being inspector and foreman. From 1866 
till 1905 he was engaged in the retail drug 
business near the corner of State and Wal- 
nut streets. Mr. Merritt was a man sincere 
and earnest in his convictions, always fol- 
lowing what he thought was the right course. 
He cast his first presidential vote for John 
P. Hale, the Free Soil Democrat. In 1856 
he voted for John C. Fremont, the first Re- 
publican candidate for president, and next 
for Abraham Lincoln, the emancipator, and 
has since voted for the different Republican 
candidates. He was elected to the Legisla- 
ture, in 1875, from Ward Five, Springfield, 
and was reelected in 1876-80-81. In 1881 
he was appointed by Governor Butler as 
trustee of the Northampton Asylum, and 
served in that office five years. For eight 
years he was one of the overseers of the poor 
of Springfield, and served in each case with- 
out pay. In 1892 he was elected to the Mas- 
sachusetts Senate. Mr. Merritt's official 
service has been of such a character as to 
reflect credit on him and please his constitu- 
ency. He was fond of literary composition, 
and wrote many poems on nature, philoso- 
phy, and patriotism, most of which were 
printed in the "Springfield Repuljlican." 
During the last years of his life he owned 
a farm on the Bay road where the 46th 
Massachusetts Infantry encamped in the 
time of the Civil War, being called at that 
time Camp Banks. 

Christopher C. IVIerritt married, in Octo- 
ber, i860, Elvira (Parker) Brooks, born in 
Gardner, November 26, 1837, died Decem- 
ber 26, 1883, daughter of Oscar and 
Sophrona (Jackson) Parker. Four chil- 
dren were born of this marriage: i. Jose- 
phine May, of whom further. 2. Harriet 
S., born November 11, 1863; married Fred 
L. Howard, who is deceased. 3. Henry 



Romeo, born December 24, 1869; died May 
22, 191 1. 4. Charles Junius, born February 
21, 1874, died May 12, 1905. The last three 
were born in Springfield. 

The following may be taken as examples 
of Mr. Merritt's verse : 

NOW! 

O thou eternal now! All infinite 
To-day! Thee full and precious hour to serve • 
Forever present — quenchless to survive ! 
Behind thee death ! Before thee nothing is ! 
Great multiple in problem of age, — 
Each new-born moment crowding to fulfil 
The true and pressing destinies of life, 
Were all companionships, by time revealed. 
Unite the present in magnetic ties 
To perished ages in the calendar. 

O man! bethink thee, — for this day is thine! 
What of the Past? Dead as a mummy's dust! 
Who from her moldy sepulcher of deeds 
Can roll the massive closing stone away? 
The Sphinx-like sentry of infinitude 
Sits by her portals with the mysteries, 
But thou, O living Opportunity! 
Clothed in the shining panoply of life. 
Nerved to the quick by essence of fruition, 
Outliving all in deeds and mightiness! 
Thy vigorous hand, relaxing not its hold, 
Strives for the prize of being's own ambition 1 

WITCH HAZEL 

When the corn ears, ripe and yellow, 
Split their husks with wedge of gold, 
And the sunbeams, slant and mellow, 
Call the gentian to unfold; — 
Later still, the winds will bellow 
Through the forest, bleak and cold; — 
Dead and dying, crisp and flying. 
Hurtling leaves, — with herds in fold; — 
Scarce a jay is heard to clatter 
Fitful challenge o'er the wold ; — 
Rain in torrents comes to batter 
Struggling nurslings of the mold ; — 
Then I find this forest maiden, 
Yellow-dressed and richly laden, 
Meek and lowly, — 

This, and only 
This hale blossom, I behold. 

Naked stands this bush of treasure. 
Save its blossoms, and a nest 
Where the thrust laid home of pleasure, 
Jeweled eggs and offspring prest; 



176 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Leaves have fallen, birds are flying, 
Summer's passed ; the cold winds sighing 
Waft an odor from the bowers. 
With a breath of her sweet savor, 
'Mid the late autumnal hours, — 
Rarest gift of flitting favor. 
This last breathing of the flowers ! 

Sturdy blossoms, lone and dearest, — 

Tender tokens of the year ; 

Thou, the latest, now the nearest, 

Must not go without a tear ; 

While the rest are dead and frozen, 

Thou, the hardiest, bravest, chosen, 

Hold'st a lineage shall descend 

In fitting beauty to the end ; 

As the sunbeams, slant and yellow, 

Golden petals thread-like spin 

In a light that's clear and mellow. 

Autumn's last departing kin ; 
Who can pass thee unobserving. 
In thy meekness more deserving. 
Blooming lonely — 

Shadows only 
Of a brighter life to win. 

(IX) Josephine May Merritt, daughter of 
Christopher C. and Elvira (Parker-Brooks) 
IVIerritt, was born in Winchendon, Massa- 
chusetts, May 3, 1861. She married Rev. 
Dr. WilHam Rice Newhall (see Newhall X). 



NEILL, Dr. Roberta Estella 

The Hst of Springfield's successful mem- 
bers of the medical profession virould not be 
complete without the name of Dr. Roberta 
Estella Neill, who for the past three and a 
half years has been engaged in general prac- 
tice in that city. 

Dr. Neill is of Scotch ancestry, her grand- 
father being John Neill, who was born in 
Glasgow, Scotland, in 1822, and died in Hol- 
yoke, ]\Iasachusetts, January 31, 1896. He 
came to America in 1855, and became a resi- 
dent of Holyoke, Massachusetts, where he 
acted as agent for the Lyman Mills. He 
brought workmen with him from Scotland 
and in addition to his responsibilities as agent 
for the Lyman Mills he built two blocks of 
buildings on Bowers Street. When Mr. 
Lyman established the Hadly thread mill, 



^Ir. Neill was made foreman painter of the 
plant, where he was employed until his re- 
tirement some years prior to his death. He 
became a naturalized citizen of the L'nited 
States and took a deep and intelligent in- 
terest in the public affairs of the country. 
He married, July 31, 1848, Mary Glasgow, 
who was born in Glasgow, Scotland, August 
27, 1831, and died in Holyoke, Massachu- 
setts, in 1900, and their children were: i. 
William, who was born July 31, 1849, died 
June 14, 1854. 2. Robert G., of further 
mention. 3. Henry B., born February 12, 
1854; all these were born in Glasgow, Scot- 
land. 4. Lizzie G., born in Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, July 31, 1856, married J. H. 
Laway. 5. Jeannette, born February 10, 
1859, married Charles H. Goodrich. 6. 
James, born April 3, 1861, died March 9, 
1862. 7. John, Jr., born May 27, 1863. 8. 
Mary G., born December 3, 1865, married 
L. D. Howe. 9. Jane, born January 27, 
1868, married Alexander Casey. 10. Sarah, 
who was born August 3, 1871, died October 
25. 1876. 

Robert Glasgow Neill, son of John and 
Mary (Glasgow) Neill, was born in Glas- 
gow, Scotland, September 12, 1851, and 
came to this country with his parents when 
he was about four years of age. He received 
his education in the public schools of Hol- 
yoke, Massachusetts, and when his school 
training was completed learned the painting 
and graining trade. For a time he was as- 
sociated with his father, but later he was 
engaged in business for himself, in Holyoke, 
where he worked as a grainer for nearly 
thirty years. He also conducted a boat 
livery on the Connecticut River for six years, 
and at Hampden Roads for fifteen years. 
During the four years preceding his death, 
he resided in the home of his daughter. Dr. 
Roberta E. Neill. where he enjoyed his years 
of retirement. He died February 21, 1924. 
Mr. Neill was a member of the Improved 
Order of Red Men. and his religious in- 
terest was with the Baptist Church, of which 
he was an attendant. He married, February 



17.7 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



19, 1894, Estella McKown, who was born in 
Hudson, New York, daughter of Joseph and 
Christina (Tanner) IMcKown, and to them 
were born a daughter. Dr. Roberta Estella 
Neill, whose name heads this review. 

Dr. Roberta Estella Neill, daughter of 
Robert Glasgow and Estella (McKown) 
Neill, was born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, 
January 31, 1895, and received her early 
education in the public schools of her native 
city. When her course in the public schools 
was completed she became a student in Jack- 
son College, which is under the jurisdiction 
of Tufts College, from which she received 
the degree of Bachelor of Science. She then 
entered Tufts Medical College, from which 
she received the degree Doctor of Medicine 
in 1918. After receiving her medical de- 
gree she spent an internship of a year and a 
half in Hampden Hospital in Springfield, 
and then engaged in general practice in 
Springfield. She is building up an excellent 
practice and is winning the esteem both of 
her patients and of her professional asso- 
ciates. Dr. Neill is a member of the Mas- 
sachusetts Medical Society, of the American 
Medical Association, and of the Eastern 
Hampden Medical Association. 



ATKINS, Dexter Ashmun 

For the past seventeen years Dexter Ash- 
mun Atkins has been engaged in a special 
line of work which wins the sympathy and 
approval of all public-spirited and humane 
citizens. As prosecuting officer for the Mas- 
sachusetts Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals, he has brought relief 
to many helpless animals and has been the 
means of bringing to justice numbers of 
those who inflict unnecessary hardship and 
suffering upon the dumb friends which serve 
so faithfully. 

The Atkins family has from early times 
been identified with the history of New Eng- 
land and from that section its representa- 
tives have scattered to all parts of the coun- 
try. Among those who remained in New 



England were the ancestors of Dexter Ash- 
mun Atkins. 

Giles Atkins, grandfather of Dexter Ash- 
mun Atkins, was born in Hawley, Massa- 
chusetts, and died in Plainfield, Massachu- 
setts. He married and was the father of 
five children : Freeman, Isaac, Elisha, Sarah, 
who married Thomas Jordan, and Dexter, 
of further mention. 

Dexter Atkins, son of Giles Atkins, was 
born March 19, 1812, and died in Buckland, 
Massachusetts, November 24, 1885. He re- 
ceived a practical education in the public 
schools of his native distrct, and then en- 
gaged in agricultural activities. He was an 
able and energetic citizen who took an active 
interest in local public affairs and who bore 
his share of the burden of public office. He 
served as clerk of the school board and as 
highway surveyor, and was a captain in the 
State j\Iilitia. He was an attendant of the 
Congregational Church and one of the lead- 
ers of its choir. He married, December 14, 
1836, Mary White Field, of Buckland, Mas- 
sachusetts, born February 27, 1812, died 
March 29, 1885, in the house in which she 
was born ; she was the daughter of Reuben 
Wright and Polly (White) Field (see Field 
VII). 

Dexter Ashmun Atkins, son of Dexter 
and Mary White (Field) Atkins, was born 
in Buckland, Massachusetts, September 27, 
1847, ^"d received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native city. When his 
school training was completed he engaged in 
agricultural activities for a time and then 
secured employment in a general store in 
Shelburne Falls, where he remained for a 
period of two years. He then went to Pitts- 
field, Massachusetts, where he was employed 
as a clerk in a store for about six years. At 
the end of that time he removed to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, where he became as- 
sociated with the American Express Com- 
pany, first as the driver of one of their 
trucks, and later as a messenger, running 
between Boston and Albany. His connec- 
tion with the American Express Company 



178 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



was maintained for a period of five years. 
He was then appointed a member of the 
police force in Sprin<^field, as a detective, in 
which capacity he served the community for 
eighteen years. While on the police force 
he had especial charge of the prosecution 
of those who sold liquor illegally, and in 
that difficult work he was most successful. 
In 1904 he accepted a position as prosecut- 
ing officer in the employment of the Massa- 
chusetts Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals, his district covering the 
three counties of Hampden, Hampshire, and 
Franklin. In this capacity he has done much 
for the relief of suffering animals and has 
secured punishment of many of those who 
habitually abuse the animals in their charge. 
The quality of his work has been such that 
he has won the highest esteem of the mem- 
bers of the Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals and also of the citizens 
of the counties in which he works. 

With all his activities and his responsi- 
bilities in the various projects in which he 
has been employed, Mr. Atkins has also 
found time for social and religious affilia- 
tions, as well as for some political activities. 
He is a member of Lafayette Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of North Adams, 
Massachusetts, and in his younger days he 
was a member of various church choirs and 
also was a member of Professor Blodgett's 
Oratorical Class in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. 
He is an attendant of the First Congrega- 
tional Church of Springfield. 

In 1872, Dexter Ashmun Atkins married 
(first) Sophia Park, who was born in Eng- 
land and died in Massachusetts in 1906, 
daughter of Charles Park; he married (sec- 
ond), October 12, 191 1, Catherine Manson, 
daughter of John Manson. Mrs. Atkins is 
a woman of much ability and has a large cir- 
cle of friends. Before her marriage she was 
for several years in the office of the prose- 
cuting agent of the Society for the Preven- 
tion of Cruelty to Animals and since her 
marriage to Mr. Atkins she has been of much 
assistance to him in his work. 



(The Field Line) 

(I) Zechariah Field, emigrant ancestor of 
Mrs. Dexter Atkins, was born in Yorkshire, 
England, in 1596, and came to Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts in 1629. He settled first in Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts, but later removed 
to Hartford, Connecticut, in which place he 
resided in 1636; in 1659 he again changed 
his place of residence to Northampton, Mas- 
sachusetts, and in 1663 he was a resident 
of Hatfield, Massachusetts. He married 
Mary, whose surname is not known, and 
they were the parents of children, among 
whom was Samuel, of further mention. 

(II) Sergeant Samuel Field, son of 
Zechariah and Mary Field, was born in 
Hartford, Connecticut, in 165 1, and was 
slain by the Indians in Hatfield, Massachu- 
setts, June 27, 1697. He married Sarah 
Gilbert and they were the parents of chil- 
dren, among whom was Ebenezer, of further 
mention. 

(III) Ebenezer Field, son of Sergeant 
Samuel and Sarah (Gilbert) Field, was born 
in Hatfield, Massachusetts, in 1688. He 
married Elizabeth Arms, and they were the 
parents of Moses, of further mention. 

(IV) Ensign Moses Field, son of Eb- 
enezer and Elizabeth (Arms) Field, was 
born in Deerfield, Massachusetts, in 1719, 
and died in Northfield. Massachusetts, in 
1787. He was locally famous as a hunter 
and trapper of wolves, and it is recorded 
that at one time when the bounty was twenty 
dollars a pelt, he caught two at a time. He 
married (first) Ann Dickinson; (second), 
Martha Root. 

(V) Solomon Field, son of Ensign Moses 
Field, was born in Northfield, Massachu- 
setts, in 1746. and died in Conway, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1828. He was a soldier in Cap- 
tain Waite's Company in 1775. and in 
Captain Seth Murray's Company. He was 
one of those who took part in the Battle 
of Bennington. He married Mary Wright, 
and they were the parents of Reuben Wright, 
of further mention. 

(VI) Reuben Wright Field, son of Sol- 



179 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



omon and Mary (Wright) Field, was born 
in Conway, Massachusetts, in 1779, and died 
in Buckland, Massachusetts, in 1863, He 
married Polly White, and they were the 
parents of Mary White Field, of further 
mention. 

(VH) Mary White Field, daughter of 
Reuben Wright and Polly (White) Field, 
was born Fel)ruary 27, 1812, and died 
March 29, 1885. She married, December 
14, 1836, Dexter Atkins, of previous men- 
tion. 



DOWNS, Stephen Clifford 

For nearly sixty years Stephen Cliflford 
Downs has been a resident of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and for the past eighteen 
years he has efficiently filled the office of 
city milk and dairy inspector. 

Mr. Downs is of "Mayflower" descent, 
tracing his ancestry to John Tilley, "May- 
flower" passenger. John Tilley had a 
daughter, Elizabeth, who married John How- 
land, and their daughter married William 
Downs, great-grandfather of Stephen Clif- 
ford Downs. 

Jabez Downs, son of William Downs, was 
a seafaring man. He married Love Chase, 
and their children were : Charles, Constance, 
Baxter, of further mention. 

Baxter Downs, son of Jabez and Love 
(Chase) Downs, spent practically his entire 
life in Martha's Vineyard. He married 
Louisa Clifford, and they were the parents 
of three children : George, Stephen Clififord, 
of further mention; and Mary L. 

Stephen Clififord Downs, son of Baxter 
and Louisa (Clifford) Downs, was born 
at Martha's Vineyard, July 17, 1846, He 
received a good practical education in the 
public schools of Vineyard Haven, and then, 
in 1864, removed to Springfield, Massachu- 
setts. He was associated for a time with 
D. H. Brigham and Company, in the cloth- 
ing business, and later entered the employ of 
Meigs and Company. When he severed his 
connection with the latter concern, he identi- 
fied himself with Wood and Company, en- 



gaged in the same line of business. That 
connection he maintained until 1906, when 
he was appointed by Mayor Frank Dickin- 
son to fill the position of city milk and dairy 
inspector, which official position he has con- 
tinued to efficiently fill to the present time 
(1924). The eighteen years of his incum- 
bency in that important municipal office have 
been years of faithful and able service. He 
is well known and highly esteemed by a host 
of those who have been associated with him 
in business and social life during the six 
decades of his residence in Springfield. He 
is a member of Roswell Lee Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Springfield ; of 
Hampden Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; and of Agawam Encampment, and 
Springfield Canton, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He was the organizer of the 
Springfield Canton, and one of the first to 
wear its uniform, and is also a member of 
the Grand Lodge and of the Grand En- 
campment. Politically, he gives his support 
to the principles and the candidates of the 
Republican Party, and his religious affilia- 
tion is with the Baptist Church. On Jan- 
uary 24, 1923, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen C. 
Downs celebrated their golden anniversary 
by opening their home to their friends from 
two to four in the afternoon and from eight 
to ten in the evening. 

Stephen Clififord Downs married, Jan- 
uary 24, 1873, Emmagene M. Dudley, of 
Westfield, Massachusetts, daughter of Jo- 
seph C. and Maria Dorothy (Bradley) Dud- 
ley, and they are the parents of three chil- 
dren: I. Frank Clifford, who is associated 
with the New York "Herald," married 
(first) Julia Bidwell and (second) Marie 
Seiler, and has a son, Meredith, who is in 
the employ of the ^tna Insurance Com- 
pany, of Hartford. 2. Winifred Dudley, 
engaged in the jewelry business in New 
York City, has a son, Stephen Clififord (2), 
who is a quartermaster in the United States 
Navy. He was a cadet at Newport, where 
he was a signal man and later a wireless 
operator. During the World War he was 



180 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in the convoy service and crossed the ocean 
ten times. He was in battle with the suIj- 
marines at various times and was in active 
service on some of the mine sweepers. 3. 
Bessie Louise, married Dr. Forrest Whitte- 
more, a dentist, of Springfield, and they have 
a son, Paul J. Whittemore. 



FISKEN, Thomas 

Since February, 1923, Thomas Fisken has 
been serving as the efficient postmaster of 
Ludlow, Massachusetts, but for seventeen 
years previous to his appointment to that 
official position, he served the Ludlow public 
in the F. A. Towne Department Store, first 
as clerk and for the last nine years of his 
association with the firm as manager. He 
is, therefore, well known in the community, 
and his appointment as postmaster widens 
his field of opportunity for efficient service. 

The Fisken family is of English origin, 
but belongs to one of the groups which early 
emigrated to Scotland, where the grandfather 
of Mr. Fisken married and became the 
father of three children: i. Thomas, who 
died in Scotland. 2. Peter, of further men- 
tion. 3. Helen, who resides in Scotland. 

Peter Fisken, mentioned above, was born 
in Perth, Perthshire, Scotland, in 1854, and 
died in Ludlow, Massachusetts, in 1910. He 
received his education in his native land and 
there learned the trade of the carpet printer. 
After following his trade in his native town 
for nearly three decades, he decided to come 
to America, and in 1903 he settled in Lud- 
low, Massachusetts, where he entered the 
employ of the Ludlow ^Manufacturers' As- 
sociates, with whom he remained to the time 
of his death in 1910. He was a member 
of the order of Scottish Clans, and his re- 
ligious affiliation was with the Union Con- 
gregational Church. He married Jane Mc- 
Master, who was born in Dundee, Scotland, 
and is now living in Ludlow, Massachusetts, 
daughter of John and Jane (Lee) IMcMas- 
ter. Peter and Jane (McMaster) Fisken 
became the parents of the following children : 
I. William. 2. Jane, who married Joseph 



Blondell, of Ludlow. 3. Thomas, of further 
mention. 4. John, who is a shipping clerk 
in the Chapman Valve Foundry, of Indian 
Orchard. 5. Rachel, who married William 
John Scott, of Ludlow. 6. Eui)hemia. 7. 
George. 8. James. The last three children 
are at home. 

Thomas Fisken. son of Peter and Jane 
(McMaster) Fisken, was born at Lochee, 
Dundee, Scotland, April 10, 1885, and re- 
ceived a good practical education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native town. When his 
school training was completed he found em- 
ployment in a grocery and dry-goods store, 
where he remained for a period of two years. 
Meantime, in 1903, his father had left the 
homeland and settled in America. In 1904, 
young Thomas, then a lad of nineteen years, 
came to this country and settled first in 
Thompsonville, Connecticut, where he found 
employment in a dry-goods and grocery 
store. His experience in Scotland was use- 
ful, and when, after a time, he decided to 
remove to Ludlow, where his father had 
settled, he became identified with the F. A. 
Towne Department Store. He was able, 
industrious, and thrifty, and the connection 
with F. A. Towne was maintained continu- 
ously for a period of seventeen years. Eight 
years after his arrival in Ludlow, he was 
made manager of the F. A. Towne De- 
partment Store, and the duties of that im- 
portant executive position he efficiently dis- 
charged until February, 1923. when he 
resigned in order to accept the appointment 
as postmaster of Ludlow. He is well known 
and highly esteemed in the town, and the 
people are well pleased to have Mr. Fisken 
at the head of their post office. Mr. Fisken 
has always taken an active interest in local 
public affairs and before serving as post- 
master served as town auditor and as con- 
stable. Fraternally he is a member of 
Brigham Lodge. Free and Accepted Masons, 
of Ludlow, and of Unity Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, of Chicopee. He is also a 
member of the Foresters of America. He 
finds healthful recreation and congenial com- 



i8i 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



panionship in the Ludlow Country Clul), 
and in the Court Union League, as well as 
in the Masonic Club. His religious affilia- 
tion is with Union Congregational Church, 
of which he has served as chief usher for 
the past twelve years. In 191 3 Mr. Fisken 
made a trip to Scotland, where he remained 
for several months, visiting old friends and 
old scenes. 

Thomas Fisken married, on May 31, 1904, 
Elizabeth H. Stewart, who was born in Ed- 
inburgh, Scotland, daughter of Benjamin 
and Elizabeth (Brodie) Stewart, and they 
are the parents of four children : Jane Mc- 
Master, Elizabeth Brodie, Margaret Stewart, 
and Euphemia Lang. 



LADD, Charles Edwin 

Charles Edwin Ladd, superintendent of 
the public parks of the city of Springfield, 
has spent his entire life in the city of his 
birth, where, as a successful druggist, an able 
business man, and an efficient public official, 
he is widely known and highly esteemed. 
He is also well known in fraternal and club 
circles. 

The Ladd family is a very old one, dating 
back, in England, to the days of William 
the Conqueror, when members of the family 
came to England from France, and settled 
at Deal, in Kent County, on a grant of land 
which was situated eight miles from Dover. 
The name, variously spelled Lad, Lade, 
Laad, and Ladd, occurs often in the early 
annals of England, remote ancestors of the 
branch to which the Ladds of America be- 
long having been seafaring people, some of 
them government pilots at Margate. Not 
many generations after the Conquest the 
name De Lad appears among owners of 
land in the county of Kent. In Snodland, 
near Rochester, and in Acris, there is an 
estate known as Ladd's, which was owned 
by families bearing the name during the first 
years of the reign of King Edward I, and 
at Eleham there is an estate called "Lad- 
wood." Boswich, now called Boyke, is a 
manor in the south part of the parish, which 



was, in very ancient times, a residence of the 
Ladds. William Ladd was a juryman in 
1294, during the reign of King Edward I, 
and from 171 3 to 1722 John Ladd was a 
member of Parliament representing South- 
wark, in Surrey. The latter was created a 
baronet in 1740. In this country the branch 
of the family to which Charles Edwin Ladd 
belongs traces its ancestry to Daniel Ladd, 
the line of descent being as follows: 

(I) Daniel Ladd is on record as having 
taken, on March 24, 1634, the oath of al- 
legiance to the British King, in order that 
he might sail for New England on the ship 
"Mary and John" of London, Robert 
Sayres, master. On February 5, 1637, he 
was granted six acres of land, at Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, and on October 29, 1639, had 
a home lot assigned in Salisbury, also four 
acres "more or less" for a planting lot, 
later receiving still other grants. He later 
removed from Salisbury to Haverhill, of 
which place he was one of the original set- 
tlers. There are records of other grants and 
purchases in Haverhill, where Daniel Ladd 
was engaged in farming and where, with 
Theophilus Shatwell, he conducted a saw 
mill on "Spiggot" River, now within the 
limits of Salem, New Hampshire. He was 
an energetic, enterprising man who held 
many positions of responsibility and trust, 
including that of selectman in 1668, and 
who, in addition to his extensive farming 
operations, dealt quite extensively in land. 
He died in Haverhill, July 27, 1693, sur- 
vived by his wife Ann, who died February 
9, 1694. Children of Daniel and Ann Ladd 
were : Elizabeth, Daniel, Lydia, Mary. Sam- 
uel, of further mention; Nathaniel, Ezekiel, 
Sarah. 

(II) Samuel Ladd, son of Daniel and 
Ann Ladd, was born in Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, November i, 1649, ^^'^ ^^s killed 
by Indians, February 22, 1698. He lived 
in the West Parish, on the site where the 
West Parish Church later stood, and was 
one of the prominent citizens of the com- 
munity. He married, December i, 1674, 



I»2 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Martha Corliss, daughter of George Corliss, 
and they were the parents of ten children : 
Daniel, Lydia, Samuel, Nathaniel, Ezekiel, 
David, Jonathan, of further mention; Abi- 
gail, John, and Joseph. 

(III) Jonathan Ladd, son of Samuel and 
Martha (Corliss) Ladd, was born in Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, April 13, 1689, and set- 
tled in Norwich, Connecticut. He purchased 
a farm in Tolland, Connecticut, of Nathan- 
iel Wallis, of Windham, Connecticut, the 
deed for which is dated February 11, 1720, 
and removed to that place soon after the 
purchase. He married, December 28, 171 3, 
Susannah Kingsbury, of Norwich, Con- 
necticut, and they were the parents of ten 
children: Ezekiel, of further mention; Eliza- 
beth, Jonathan, Mary, Susannah, died 
young; Ephraim, Abigail, Zurvia, Jesse, 
Susannah. 

(IV) Ezekiel Ladd, son of Jonathan and 
Susannah (Kingsbury) Ladd, was born 
January 31, 171 5. He married, November 
3, 1740, Hannah Bigelow, and they became 
the parents of the following children : Lucy, 
Samuel, of further mention; Ruth, Han- 
nah, Daniel, Ephraim, Elizabeth, Elisha, 
Ezekiel, David, Lydia, Eunice. 

(V) Samuel Ladd, son of Ezekiel and 
Hannah (Bigelow) Ladd, was born June 
7, 1742, and died May 18, 18 14. He mar- 
ried, April 28, 1768, Margaret Chapman, 
who died February 4, 181 3, daughter of 
Captain Samuel Chapman. They were the 
parents of six children: Ruth, Samuel, Mar- 
garet, Mary, Wareham, and Jacob, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(VI) Jacob Ladd, son of Samuel and 
Margaret (Chapman) Ladd, was born De- 
cember 14, 1781, and died March 29, 1856, 
survived by his wife, who died December 
21, 1868. He was a farmer and prominent 
in the life of the town. He married, No- 
vember 26, 1 81 2, Rel)ecca Charter, who 
bore him the following children : Caroline, 
Horace W., Samuel W., Frederick R., Al- 
mira, Calista, Edwin W., of further men- 
tion, and Theodore A. 



(VII) Honorable Edwin \V. Ladd, son 
of Jacob and Rebecca (Charter) Ladd, was 
born at Ellington, Connecticut, February 18, 
1829, and died March 29, 1887. His parents 
removed to Springfield, Massachusetts, when 
he was seven years of age, settling on a farm 
at the head of the "Water-shops" Pond, 
which later was purchased by the govern- 
ment. Edwin W. Ladd received his educa- 
tion in the public schools and in the Literary 
Institute at Suffield, where he spent a short 
time in study. Lie early acquired habits of 
industry and thrift, and when his school 
days were over, learned the moulder's trade 
with Eliphalet Trask, in whose foundry he 
remained for three years. He then went to 
Westfield, where he took charge of H. B. 
Smith's foundry, in which he later pur- 
chased an interest. In 1857 he went to 
Cleveland, Ohio, where he followed his trade, 
that of the moulder, for some time, and 
from which place he went to Hamilton, On- 
tario, Canada, where he engaged in the 
foundry business. From Hamilton he re- 
turned to Massachusetts, finding employ- 
ment in Agawam for a short period and 
then associating himself with the Wason 
Car Company, of Springfield. He built 
and rented many houses, especially to people 
of moderate means, and his kindly qualities 
made him an indulgent creditor and a pop- 
ular landlord. Politically, he gave his sup- 
port to the Democratic party, but he was 
not an illiberal partisan, and could see and 
give his suport to those especially qualified 
for certain offices even though they might 
be of another party. He was elected to the 
lower branch of the city government in 
1877, and reelected in 1878. The following 
year he was elected a member of the board of 
aldermen, where his industry, good judg- 
ment, and practical knowledge, were of 
great value to the board and to the city. 
At the close of 1881, the workingmen of 
the city made him the Democratic candidate 
for mayor. He was elected and proved to 
be a vigorous and efficient administrator. 
He was known as the "working mayor," and 



183 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



his choice of Colonel John L. Rice for city 
marshal was evidence of his determination 
to enforce the laws. Violators of liquor 
laws were brought to justice, houses of ill 
fame were closed, and the law-breaking ele- 
ment held in check. Fearlessly and without 
parade, and modestly recognizing his limi- 
tations, he did his duty. He was re- 
nominated, but defeated by Colonel H. X. 
Philips. The "Springfield Republican" of 
March 30, 1887, says of him: "Undoubtedly 
the course of Mr. Ladd while in office served 
to alienate a portion of his party, but it was 
characteristic of the man that in all the local 
factional contests he was steadily allied with 
the broader and more progressive elements 
of the Democracy." 

Edwin \V. Ladd married, November 21, 
1855. Mary L. Bailey, daughter of William 
S. Bailey, of Agawam. They were the 
parents of three children: Benjamin \V., 
Charles Edwin, of whom further ; and Alice 
L., who married Arthur L. Bowen. Mrs. 
Ladd died in 1889. 

CVIII) Charles Edwin Ladd, son of Ed- 
win W. and Mary L. (Bailey) Ladd, was 
born in Springfield, Massachusetts, May 25, 
1 861, and received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of Springfield. He learned the 
drug business and for a time was employed 
as clerk in various drug stores, where he 
gained valuable experience, while he was 
earning. After a few years he engaged in 
business for himself, and from 1888 to 1900 
owned and operated a pharmacy, which was 
notably successful. From 1895 to 1900 he 
was a member of the Board of Park Com- 
missioners. At the close of his pharmacy 
activities in 1900, he was appointed super- 
intendent of the public parks in the city 
of Springfield, which covered at the time 
an area of four hundred acres, but which 
have since been increased to eight hundred 
acres. This official position he has filled 
most efficiently. The duties involving upon 
Mr. Ladd in this office carry with it the 
supervision of the playgrounds and forestry 
activities of eighty-five parks, for which an 



appropriation of $20,000 was made for their 
maintenance at the time of his incumbency, 
this later being increased to $350,000. For 
the efficient carrying on of this work, !Mr. 
Ladd has always about one hundred and 
twenty-five men under his supervision, but 
in the summer months this number is in- 
creased to two hundred. Mr. Ladd is also 
the trustee of the Everett H. Barney Fund 
for the maintenance of the parks. In ad- 
dition to his responsibilities as supervisor of 
parks, Mr. Ladd has served as a member of 
the City Council and on the Board of Alder- 
men. He is a member of the board of trus- 
tees of the Five Cent Savings Bank, and 
takes an active interest in all projects for 
the advancement of the public welfare of 
the city. Fraternally, he is affiliated with 
Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Springfield, and is also a mem- 
ber of Morning Star Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons; of Springfield Council, Royal and 
Select Masters ; of Springfield Commandery, 
Knights Templar ; and of ]Melha Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is a member of the Springfield 
Automobile Club. Formerly Mr, Ladd was 
affiliated with the Ashbury Methodist 
Church, being president of the board of 
trustees, but now he is a member of the 
Emanuel Congregational Church, which 
church he also serves as a member of the 
board of trustees. 

On April 5, 1887, Mr. Ladd married Hen- 
rietta L. Moore, of Southington, Connecti- 
cut, daughter of Henry and Demma (Wells) 
Moore, and they are the parents of three 
children, two of whom are living : Charles 
Moore Ladd, of further mention; and Mar- 
jorie, born November 2, 1891, who married 
Frank Herman Fritz, of Springfield, and 
has a son, Frank H., Jr., born January, 
1921. 

(IX) Charles M. Ladd was born May 31, 
1889, and received his early education in the 
public schools of Springfield. He then en- 
tered the Mount Hermon School, at North- 
field, Massachusetts, and later attended Am- 



184 



Pu3' 






ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



herst Agricultural College for a short time. 
Upon the completion of his agricultural 
course he was variously employed with 
Haynes & Company, in the Kinsman store, 
in a grocery store, and in a hardware store, 
all of which furnished him with experience 
for other activities. He then became asso- 
ciated with the Springfield "Republican" 
for a time. later was identified with the F. 
AI. West Box Company, and still later was 
with Oppenheimer & Field, engaged in the 
insurance business. For a number of years 
he has been employed under his father, as 
assistant superintendent of parks in Spring- 
field. During the \\'orld \\'ar he had charge 
of the war gardens in Springfield, having 
under his supervision some eight hundred 
separate garden plots. He was the first 
market master for the Springfield munici- 
pal gardens, and has rendered excellent serv- 
ice in these various lines of activity. He is 
a member of the Forest Fire \Vardens' As- 
sociation of Massachusetts. He is also a 
member of several musical societies and of a 
number of automobile clubs, and fraternally 
is affiliated with Roswell Lee Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Springfield. His 
religious affiliation is with the Ashbury 
Methodist Church, of which he is a steward. 
Both ]\Ir. Ladd and his father are members 
of the Independence Day Association, and 
both have been largely instrumental in the 
success of the Springfield celebration of that 
day. 

On September 19. 191 2, Charles ]\Ioore 
Ladd married Lilla Weber, of Queens 
County, Xew York, daughter of Lewis G. 
and Lilla (Parish) Weber, and they are the 
parents of three children : i. Charles Weber, 
born May 24. 1915. 2. George Edwin, born 
January 23, 191 8. 3. Barbara, born May 29, 
1920. 



MARKHAM, Albert Gallatin, Jr. 

Among the manufacturing concerns of 
Springfield which convert by-products and 
waste material into standard articles of trade 
is the A. G. Markham «S: Company, which 



deals in hides, skins, and furs, and manu- 
factures soaps.' poultry foods, fertilizers, re- 
fined tallow, and grease. 

Mr. Markham. who established this com- 
pany and whose death occurred September 
21, 1924, was a descendant of a very old 
English family which traces the origin of 
its name back to 1066. In those days a re- 
gion next to the border line of a hostile 
territory was known as a "march" or a 
"mark" ; the strongest and most fearless 
made their homes there, and there, too, mar- 
ket places were established around which 
settlements sprang up. A "border home" 
was thus a "mark-hame," close to the Mercia 
(later Scotland) border in this case. The 
Saxon "ham" for "village" or settlement also 
gave the term Mark-ham to designate a set- 
tlement in a "march" or border country. 

The line through which Albert Gallatin 
Markham's descent is traced goes back to 
Claron, of West ]\Iarkham, a Saxon chief 
who, for ser\'ices rendered at the time of 
the Xorman Conquest, was granted lands 
which had already been held by his father 
and grandfather before him. From his son 
Roger, of East Markham, the line is traced 
through Fulc, of East Markham; his son 
Sir Alexander, known as Knight of Cas- 
tellane, of Nottingham Castle, Nottingham- 
shire ; his son Sir William, of Markham and 
Tuxford ; his son Sir Richard ; his son Rich- 
ard (2) ; his son John, Lord of East Mark- 
ham, who married John Bottomsell ; their 
son Sir Robert, a lawyer and King's ser- 
geant, who married Isabell Caunton ; their 
son Sir John, barrister and judge, who com- 
mitted Henry, Prince of Wales (son of 
Henry IV) to the Fleet Prison in London ; 
his son Sir Robert, who married Elizabeth 
Burdon ; their son Sir Robert, Knight, who 
married Sarah Joan Daubeney ; their son Sir 
John, who married Alicia Skipworth; their 
son Sir John (3) who was a lieutenant of 
the famous "Tower of London" and whose 
daughter was maid of honor to Queen Eliza- 
beth, married (first) Ann Neville, whose 
mother was a granddaughter of the Earl of 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Somerset, son of Duke of Lancaster, son 
of Henry III, married (second) Margery 
Langford, (third) Ann Strelly Stanhope; 
his son John (4), who married Catherine 
Babhington; their son Robert, who married 
(first) Maria Leeke, (second) Jane Bur- 
nell ; their son Sir Robert, of Cotham, mar- 
ried Ann Warburton ; their third son Daniel, 
who was engaged in commercial pursuits and 
died in Pkimstead (now Pirney), Norfolk 
County, in 1690. after having regained in 
mercantile pursuits the fortune squandered 
by his father. Among his children was 
Daniel Markham, of whom further. 

(I) Daniel Markham, immigrant ancestor 
of the line herein traced, was born in Plum- 
stead Manor, near Norwich, England, of 
which city his brother IMatthew was mayor 
in 1634. The brother Matthew had a son, 
also named Daniel, who was a colonel in the 
British Army and came to New York with 
the Duke of York in 1664; the last named 
Daniel was the ancestor of Admiral Mark- 
ham, of the British Navy, whose mother, 
brothers, and sisters, were living in Inde- 
pendence, Iowa, in 1903. Daniel (2) Mark- 
ham, the immigrant ancestor, arrived in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1665, and in 
1665 removed to Middletown, Connecticut, 
where he became a freeman in 1674, and 
where he was prominent in the afifairs of 
church and State. He married (first), No- 
vember 3, 1669, Elizabeth Whitmore, daugh- 
ter of Lieutenant Francis Whitmore, of 
Cambridge. She died about 1676, and he 
married (second) Patience Harris, daugh- 
ter of William Harris, of Middletown. 
Children of the first marriage were : Daniel, 
Elizabeth, and James, of further mention. 
To the second marriage, also, three children 
were born: Martha, who died in infancy; 
Martha, and Edith. 

(II) James ]\Iarkham, son of Daniel and 
Eliza])eth (Whitmore) Markham, was born 
March 16, 1675, in Middletown, Connecti- 
cut. He married Elizabeth Lock (given as 
Lock in Volume I and as Lick in Volume II 
of Middlesex County) and they were the 



parents of one child John, of whom further. 

(III) John Markham, son of James and 
Elizabeth (Lock) Markham, died March 30, 
1788, at the age of eighty-one years. He 
married, November 3, 1748, Desire Sears 
(see Brewster-Sears line), who died No- 
vember 10, 1786, in her sixty-fourth year. 
Their seven children were : Elizabeth De- 
sire, who married Lemuel West; Nathaniel, 
who was three times married ; John, of fur- 
ther mention ; Dinah, James, Abigail, and 
Marjorie. 

(IV) John Markham, son of John and 
Desire (Sears) Markham, was born in 1756, 
and died April 15, 1852. He was engaged 
in farming in Middle Haddam, throughout 
the entire period of his active life. He was 
one of the patriot soldiers who served in the 
War of the Revolution, He married (first) 
Asenath Smith, in 1781 ; (second) Mrs. 
Annie (Esterbrook-Niles), widow of Am- 
brose Niles. The children of the first mar- 
riage were : Hiram, of further mention ; 
John, Betsy Ann, and Asenath. To the sec- 
ond marriage two children were born : 
(twins) Laura and Ambrose M. 

(V) Hiram Markham, son of John 
and Asenath (Smith) Markham, was 
born in Chatham, Connecticut, in 1794, and 
died December 5, 1870. He married, Octo- 
ber 3, 1 81 7, Laura Niles, daughter of Daniel 
Niles, and they were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Emeline, Daniel M., Mary 
P., Erskine Eldridge, Wickliflf, Elizabeth 
Ann, Frank W., Selden A., Catherine P., 
and Albert G., of further mention. 

(VI) Albert Gallatin (i) Markham, son 
of Hiram and Laura (Niles) Markham, was 
born in Chatham, Middlesex County, Con- 
necticut, February 21, 1845, and died in 
1904. After receiving a careful education 
in the town schools and a private school in 
Easthampton, he left home and found em- 
ployment in the Colts' Revolver Shop, in 
Hartford, where he remained for more than 
a year. Being ambitious, and a man of 
ability, he decided that he would try his for- 
tune in a larger city and went to New York 



186 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



City, where, after a year spent in burning 
coke, however, he returned to Connecticut, 
where for eight years he was employed in 
various capacities in different granite quar- 
ries. During that time he had gained con- 
siderable experience and had accumulated 
some capital and he finally decided to go to 
Portland, Connecticut, where he operated 
granite quarries which he owned to the time 
of his death. His quarry interests, however, 
did not occupy all of his time and energy. 
In 1890, he purchased property in East- 
hampton and engaged in the hotel and livery 
business. In this line, too, he was notably 
successful. He purchased several tracts of 
land in Chatham and in Portland, and to 
these he continued to give careful attention 
to the time of his death. He was highly es- 
teemed and had a host of friends and busi- 
ness associates, and was always ready to 
give his support to those plans which seemed 
to him to be wisely planned for the advance- 
ment of the public good. Politically, he 
gave his support to the principles and the 
candidates of the Democratic Party. On 
March 16, 1867, Albert Gallatin Markham 
married Mary E. Bates, who was born De- 
cember 17, 1842, in Ridgefield, Connecticut, 
and died May 22, 1882, daughter of Walter 
and Loraney (Wood) Bates, and they were 
the parents of seven children : 1-2. Alberta 
E. and Alberta G. (twins), who died at 
birth. 3. Clara Bates, who died in infancy. 
4. Mary P., who married Frank Cook. 5. 
Albert Gallatin, Jr., of further mention. 
6. Walter C. 7. Loraney Bates. 

(VII) Albert Gallatin (2) Markham, son 
of Albert Gallatin (i) and Mary E. (Bates) 
Markham, was born in Cobalt, Middlesex 
County, Connecticut, October 27, 1873, and 
died September 21, 1924. He received a 
good practical education in the public schools 
of his native town and of Portland, Con- 
necticut, and in 189 1, when eighteen years 
of age, he moved to Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, where he entered the employ of the 
]Milton Bradley Company. There he found 
congenial employment and an opportunity 



for advancement, and for sixteen consecu- 
tive years he continued his connection with 
that concern, serving as traveling representa- 
tive during the latter part of the term of his 
association with the firm. In 1908, he de- 
cided to engage in business for himself and 
he chose a manufacturing and trading line 
of activity. Under the name of the A. G. 
Markham Company he began dealing in 
hides, skins and furs, and also engaged in 
the manufacture of soap, poultry foods, fer- 
tilizers, and refined tallow, and grease. The 
enterprise proved a successful one from the 
beginning and Mr. Markham's ability and 
business principles brought to him an in- 
creasing amount of patronage. The volume 
of business transacted by this firm has in- 
creased steadily from year to year and the 
A. G. IMarkham Company is now one of 
the well established concerns of the city of 
Springfield, and one of the largest of its 
kind in the State. By his business associates 
and also by a host of friends was he very 
highly esteemed. He was prominent in Ma- 
sonic circles, having been a member of An- 
chor Lodge, No. 112, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Easthampton, Connecticut, and 
Morning Star Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
of Springfield ; and Springfield Council 
Royal and Select Masters ; also all the Scot- 
tish Rite bodies, including the Connecticut 
Valley Consistory, in which he holds the 
thirty-second degree. He is also a member 
of Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is affili- 
ated with the Winthrop Club and with the 
Tekoa Country Club, of Westfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and his religious interest is with 
the Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church, of 
which he is a communicant. 

On March 28, 1898, Albert Gallatin 
Markham married Mary E. Walker, of 
Belchertown, Massachusetts, daughter of 
Alva and Abbie (Stebbins) Walker, and they 
are the parents of two children : Theda 
Gertrude, who was born August 11, 1900; 
and Albert Gallatin (3), who was born Au- 
gust 2, 1902. 



187 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(The Brewster-Sears Line) 

fl) Elder William Brewster. 

(II) Patience Brewster, daughter of 
Elder William Brewster, married Governor 
Thomas Prince, and among their children 
was Mary, of further mention. 

(III) Mary Prince, daughter of Governor 
Thomas and Patience (Brewster) Prince, 
married a Mr. Freeman, and had a son, 
Thomas, of further mention. 

(IV) Thomas Freeman, son of Mary 
(Prince) Freeman, married Rebecca Spar- 
row, and they were the parents of a daugh- 
ter, Mary, of further mention. 

(V) Mary Freeman, daughter of Thomas 
and Rebecca (Sparrow) Freeman, married 
Paul Sears, and they were the parents of 
Ebenezer of further mention. 

(VI) Ebenezer Sears, son of Paul and 
Mary (Freeman) Sears, married Sarah 
Howes, and among their children was De- 
sire Sears, of further mention. 

(VII) Desire Sears, daughter of 
Ebenezer and Sarah (Howes) Sears, mar- 
ried John Markham (q.v.). 

(The Howland-Sears Line) 

(I) John Howland. 

(II) Desire Howland, daughter of John 
Howland, married Captain John Gorham. 
and among their children was Joseph, of 
further mention. 

(III) Joseph Gorham, son of Captain 
John and Desire (Howland) Gorham. mar- 
ried Sarah Sturgis. and they were the par- 
ents of Sarah, of further mention. 

(IV) Sarah CJorham, daughter of Joseph 
and Sarah (Sturgis) Gorham, married 
Ebenezer Howes, and they were the par- 
ents of Sarah, of further mention. 

(V) Sarah Howes, daughter of Ebenezer 
and Sarah (Gorham) Howes, married 
Ebenezer Sears, and they were the parents 
of Desire Sears, of further mention. 

(VI) Desire Sears, daughter of Ebenezer 
and Sarah (Howes) Sears, married John 
Markham (p.v.). 



BULLARD, William Rotch 

As treasurer of the Package Paper and 
Supply Company of Springfield, William 
Rotch Bullard is identified with a concern 
which sends its products to all parts of the 
world. The company manufactures waxed 
paper for use in automatic wrapping ma- 
chines. 

(I) Mr. Bullard is of Colonial descent, 
tracing his ancestry in this country to Rob- 
ert Bullard, who was born in England in 
1599, and died in Watertown, Massachu- 
setts, a few years after his arrival. His 
widow, Anne, married (second) Henry 
Thorpe, as his second wife. Children of 
Robert and Anne Bullard were: Benjamin, 
of further mention; and probably two 
daughters. 

(II) Benjamin Bullard, son of Robert and 
Anne Bullard, was born probably in Eng- 
land, in 1634, and died September 7, 1689. 
Upon the death of his father, when he was 
five years old, he was taken by one of his 
uncles to Dedham, where on January i, 
1655, he was admitted a townsman. He was 
one of the incorporators and earliest settlers 
of Boggestow, later Sherborn ; one of the 
founders of its first church and active in its 
public affairs from 1658 to the time of his 
death. He married (first) at Dedham, April 
5, 1655, Martha Pidge, who was born at 
Roxbury, January 12, 1642, daughter of 
Thomas and Mary Pidge. He married 
(second), 1677, Elizabeth Thorpe, daughter 
of Henry Thorpe, his stepfather. Children 
of the first marriage were: Elizabeth, Mary, 
Honorable Samuel, Benjamin, Hannah, 
Lieutenant Eleazer. Children of the second 
marriage : John, of further mention ; Eliza- 
beth, died young; Mary, Malachi, and Isaac. 

(III) John Bullard, son of Benjamin and 
Elizabeth (Thorpe) Bullard, was born 
March 7, 1678, in Sherborn, ^Massachusetts, 
but later removed to Medway, !Massachu- 
setts. He married, January 7, 1702, Abigail 
Leland, daughter of Hopestill and Abigail 
(Hill) Leland, and they were the parents 
of seven children: Thankful, John, Abigail, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Hannah, Mary, Comfort, and Henry, of 
further mention. 

(IV) Henry Bullard, son of John and 
Abigail (Leland) Bullard, was born October 
I, 1723, in jMedway, Massachusetts, and 
died April 30, 1799. He married (first). 
March 14, 1746, Jemima Pond, who was 
born in Wrentham, Massachusetts. She died 
May 19, 1766, and he married (second) Abi- 
gail Morse, daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah 
(Coolidge) Morse. Children: Mary, Henry, 
Adam, John, of further mention; Eli, Royal, 
Samuel, Abigail, Margaret, Liberty, Amos, 
and Abigail. 

(V) Reverend John Bullard, son of Henry 
and Jemima (Pond) Bullard, was born No- 
vember 28, 1756, and died September 27, 
182 1. He settled in Pepperell, Massachu- 
setts. He married, October 16, 1779, Eliza- 
beth Adams, who was born August 2. 1754, 
and died January 29, 1827, daughter of 
Reverend Amos Adams, of Roxbury, Massa- 
chusetts. 

(VI) John Bullard, Jr., son of Reverend 
John and Elizabeth (Adams) Bullard, was 
born March 5, 1784, and died September 
24, 1871. He was a resident of Pepperell, 
Massachusetts. He married, in 1808, Sally 
Parker, who was born February 13, 1786, 
and died July 15, 1813. Among their chil- 
dren was John Parker, of further mention. 

(VII) John Parker Bullard, son of John, 
Jr., and Sally (Parker) Bullard, was born 
November 30, 1809, and died January 29, 
1845. After receiving a careful preparatory 
education he became a student in Harvard 
College, from which he was graduated in 
1829, with the degree Bachelor of Arts. In 
1836 he received from the same institution 
the degree Doctor of Laws. He married, 
August 19, 1839, Lucy Forbes Brigham, 
who was born September 9, 181 8. They 
were the parents of children, among whom 
was John Lincoln, of further mention. 

(VIII) John Lincoln Bullaxd, son of 
John Parker and Lucy Forbes (Brigham) 
Bullard, was born August 17, 1840, and died 
July 2, 1899. He graduated from Harvard 



College with the degree Bachelor of Arts, in 
1861. He married, June 10, 1863. Sarah 
Walter Spooner, who was born September 
7, 1 84 1, and died June i, 1866. They were 
the parents of two children : John Thornton, 
of further mention ; and Sarah, who mar- 
ried Charles H, Deleno. 

(IX) John Thornton Bullard. son of John 
Lincoln and Sarah Walter (Spooner) Bul- 
lard, was born March 31, 1864. After com- 
pleting his preparatory education he matri- 
culated at Harvard College, from which he 
was graduated in 1884 with the degree 
Bachelor of Arts. He then continued his 
studies in the Medical School of that institu- 
tion and in 1887 received the degree Doctor 
of Medicine. He opened an office in New 
Bedford, Massachusetts, and since that time 
has been continuously and successfully en- 
gaged in practice in that city. He has a 
large and lucrative clientele, and is widely 
known in New Bedford and vicinity as a 
skillful and faithful physician. He mar- 
ried, June 18, 1889, Emily Morgan Rotch, 
who was born February 3, i860, daughter 
of William and Emily (Morgan) Rotch, 
and they are the parents of five children: 
I. John Morgan, born June 7, 1890; grad- 
uated from Harvard College with the de- 
gree Bachelor of Arts in 1913, and in 1915 
received from the same institution the de- 
gree Bachelor of Laws. He is engaged in 
legal practice in New Bedford, Massachu- 
setts. He married, October 10, 1919, Cath- 
erine Crapo, who was born July 23, 1895, 
and they are the parents of one child. John 
Crapo Bullard, born February 6, 1921. 2. 
Helen Rotch, married Francis C. Gray. 
3. William Rotch, of further mention. 4. 
Emily, married Robert C. Cobb. 5. Lydia 
Gardner. 

(X) William Rotch Bullard, son of John 
Thornton and Emily Morgan (Rotch) Bul- 
lard, was born in New Bedford, Massachu- 
setts, October 16, 1893. After receiving a 
careful elementary education in the public 
schools of New Bedford, Massachusetts, he 
entered the Berkshire School of Sheffield, 



189 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Massachusetts, for a preparatory course, and 
completed his studies there in 191 2. The 
following fall he matriculated in Harvard 
College and four years later, in 19 16. he 
graduated with the degree Bachelor of Arts. 
Immediately after the completion of his col- 
lege course he enlisted in the French Army 
for service in the World War. He was a 
member of the Norton Harjes Ambulance 
Service and continued in active service with 
that unit until after the entrance of the 
United States into the war. He then, in 
191 7, enlisted in the Artillery Service of 
the American Army, with which he served 
to the close of the war. He took part in 
practically all of the engagements in which 
his unit was involved, and was commissioned 
a second lieutenant. Later, he was promoted 
to the rank of first lieutenant, which rank 
he held at the time of his discharge. Feb- 
ruary, 1919. Upon his return to civilian 
life Mr. Bullard went to Springfield, where, 
with others, he became associated with the 
Package Paper and Supply Company. ]\Ir. 
Bullard is treasurer of the company, which 
manufactures waxed paper for use in auto- 
matic wrapping machines, and its product 
goes to all parts of the world. 

On November 3, 1921, William Rotch 
Bullard married Hilda Greenleaf, of Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, daughter of Lyman and 
Ellen (Browning) Greenleaf, and they are 
the parents of one son, Lyman Greenleaf 
Bullard, who was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1922. 



ARTERTON, Harry 

Harry Arterton, who, up to his death, 
May 28, 1923, was president of the con- 
cern known as F. A. Weake, Incorporated, 
which is engaged in plain and ornamental 
plastering, was one of the deservedly suc- 
cessful business men of Springfield, of 
which city he had been a resident since 191 1. 

Alfred Arterton, father of Mr. Arterton, 
was born in Norwich, England, in 1844, and 
died in 1913. He was, in the truest sense 
of the word, a "self-made" man, who sup- 



plemented his limited opportunities for school 
training with wide reading and self-directed 
study until by his own efforts he had ac- 
quired an unusually broad and comprehen- 
sive education. He was a mason and con- 
tractor by trade and a very successful 
business man, but his business interests did 
not terminate his pursuit of knowledge and 
his delight in the best literature. He col- 
lected a library of more than two thousand 
volumes, and himself was a noted author, 
having written several books which found 
a large reading public. He was especially 
active in politics and his name had been 
mentioned as a candidate for a seat in Par- 
liament. Alfred Arterton and Annie, his 
wife, became the parents of ten children : 
Emma Kate. Harriet Ellen, Alfred, Edmund, 
of Springfield, Masachusetts ; William, 
Harry, of further mention ; Beatrice, Annie, 
Harold, Ethel. 

Harry Arterton, son of Alfred and Annie 
Arterton, was born at Newcastle-on-Tyne, 
England, May 15, 1876, and received a 
practical education in the public schools, 
later attending evening school. When his 
regular course of school (day attendance) 
was completed, he learned the art of orna- 
mental plastering, at which trade he served 
an apprenticeship of six years, completing 
his extended training in that line in 1896. 
For ten years he followed that occupation in 
England, and then, in 1906, came to America 
and located in New York, where for five 
years he was associated with the firm of 
Klee, Thompson & Company. At the end of 
that time, in 191 1, he removed to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, where, in company with 
Mr. Frederick A. Weake, he formed the 
corporation known as the F. A. Weake, 
Incorporated, with Mr. Arterton, as presi- 
dent ; Frederick A. Weake, treasurer ; J. W. 
Webb, vice-president, and E. J. Townsend, 
secretary. They are engaged in plain and 
ornamental plastering, and their operations 
extend throughout New England, requir- 
ing the services at times of fifty employees. 
The concern is notably successful and is 



190 



Ipuslic l: 








cu.. 




ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



steadily growing, having long ago made for 
itself a reputation for excellence of work- 
manship and for integrity of business man- 
agement. I\Ir. Arterton was a member of 
the Sons of St. George, both British and 
American; also Esoteric Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Springfield. His re- 
ligious affiliation was with Christ Episcopal 
Church, of Springfield. Mr. Arterton was 
well known and highly esteemed among a 
host of friends and business associates, who 
knew him as an able business man, a pro- 
gressive and public-spirited citizen, and a 
congenial and worthy personal friend and 
associate. 

On August 5, 1902, Mr. Arterton mar- 
ried Edith Kate Crisp, of Ipswich, Suffolk, 
England, daughter of John J. Crisp, who 
was foreman on the Ipswich "Journal" for 
thirty years, and of Kate (Manning) Crisp. 
Mr. and Mrs. Arterton were the parents of 
three children, i. Frederick Harry, who was 
born in Norwich. England, August 25, 1903. 
2. Alfred Jack, who was born in Brooklyn, 
New York, and died at the age of ten 
months. 3. Ida Edith, who was born in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, March 28, 191 3. 



WEAKE, Frederick Augustus 

Since 1909 Frederick A. Weake, treas- 
urer of the concern known as Fred A. 
Weake, Incorporated, plain and fancy plas- 
tering, has been numbered among the enter- 
prising business men of Springfield, where 
he is well known and highly esteemed among 
a host of business associates and personal 
friends. 

Frederick Augustus Weake, grandfather 
of the subject of this biography, was born in 
Cheltham, England, where his entire life was 
spent as a contractor and ornamental plas- 
terer. He married and reared a family of 
children, among whom was Frederick 
Charles Weake, of further mention. 

Frederick Charles Weake, son of Fred- 
erick Augustus Weake, was born in Bir- 
mingham. England, in 1848, and received 
his education in the cshools of his native 



district. When his school training was com- 
pleted, he learned the trade of the plasterer 
and after working in the employ of others 
for a time, engaged in business for himself 
as a contractor, doing ornamental plastering. 
He was successful and throughout the years 
of his active life continued to conduct his 
own concern. At the present time (1924) 
he is retired from active life and is enjoying 
a well-earned leisure in his native land. Po- 
litically he gives his support to the Liberal 
Party, and his religious affiliation is with 
the Wesley Methodist Church. He married 
Emily Bentley, who died in 1921, daughter 
of Samuel and Mary (Tomey) Bentley, the 
former of whom came to America as an 
expert iron worker in the making of mal- 
leable iron castings, which art he was en- 
gaged in teaching to others. Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederick C. Weake became the parents of 
six sons: i. Frederick Augustus, of further 
mention. 2. Charles, who is a resident of 
Springfield, IMassachusetts. 3. Harold Ed- 
ward, who resides in England. 4. George, 
of Springfield, Massachusetts. 5. Richard, 
of England, who during the World War 
served in a Lancashire regiment, and was 
one of the second regiment which landed 
in France. He participated in all of the 
engagements in which his regiment was on 
duty, and was one of the very few surviving 
members at the end of the war. He was 
badly wounded, having been shot in the arm. 
6. Frank, who is a resident of Springfield. 
Frederick Augustus Weake, son of Fred- 
erick Charles and Emily (Bentley) Weake, 
was born in Birmingham, England, Septem- 
ber, 4, 1878. and received his education in 
the schools of Birmingham, England. When 
his school course was completed, he appren- 
ticed himself to an uncle who was engaged 
in the ornamental plastering business, re- 
maining there for a period of four years. 
At the end of that time he accepted a posi- 
tion as superintendent for William Bishop, 
who was engaged in the same line of activ- 
ity, and that connection he maintained for 
a period of seven years. In May, 1907, he 



191 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



came to America and located for a time in 
New York City, where he entered the em- 
ploy of the Klee Thompson Company, with 
whom he remained for a year. He later 
was employed for a time in Bristol and in 
Hartford, Connecticut, hut in 1909 he re- 
moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, where, 
after working in the employ of others for 
two years, he engaged in business for him- 
self. In 1 92 1 he incorporated under the 
name of Fred. A. Weake, Incorporated, of 
which concern he is treasurer. They do 
plain and ornamental plastering and operate 
all over New England and throughout the 
West and the South, keeping fifty men em- 
ployed all the time and from time to time, 
in special emergencies, taking on others. 
Mr. Weake was a pioneer in his class of 
work in this country, and from small be- 
ginnings has built up an extensive and pros- 
perous business. He is well known in Ma- 
sonic circles, being a member of Esoteric 
Lodge, Free and Accepted ]\Iasons, of 
Springfield, and all of the Scottish Rite 
bodies including the Consistory in which 
he has attained the thirty-second degree. 
He is also a member of Melha Temple. An- 
cient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, and of Bela Grotto, Mystic Order 
of Veiled Prophets of Enchanted Realm. 
His religious affiliation is with Christ 
Church. 

On August 6, 1906, Frederick A. Weake 
married May Susan Wilson, of Birmingham, 
England, daughter of William and Elen 
CTonge) Wilson. Mr. and Mrs. Weake are 
the parents of four children, all born in 
Springfield : Doris Evelyn, Clififord Fred- 
erick, Winifred May, Edith Constance. 



HANDY, Herman Huck 

After a long period of association with 
his father in business, Herman Huck Handy, 
in association with others, purchased the 
interests of the Miner Chocolate Company, 
and since that time has been actively pro- 
moting the development of that concern, in 
the capacity of director and superintendent. 



Mr. Handy is the descendant of a family 
which, though comparatively small both in 
this country and in England, is of ancient 
origin. 

(I) Richard (i) Handy, immigrant an- 
cestor of the American family, was born 
in England and was a seafaring man. His 
descendants became numerous in Sandwich, 
Massachusetts, and in other Cape Cod 
towns. He married and was the father of 
the following children : Richard, of further 
mention ; Jonathan. Though no other rec- 
ords of birth have been found, the follow- 
ing were heads of families in Sandwich and 
are thought to have been his children: Han- 
nibal, Isaac, John, Cornelius, Zacheus. 

(II) Richard (2) Handy, son of Richard 

(1) Handy, was born at Sandwich, May 21, 
1672. 

(III) John (i) Handy, son of Richard 

(2) Handy, was born about 1700. 

(IV) John (2) Handy, son of John (i) 
Handy, married, March 6, 1745. Keziah El- 
dred, of Falmouth. Children : Job, of fur- 
ther mention; Levi, and others. 

(V) Job Handy, son or nephew of John 
(2) Handy, was born in Sandwich about 
1750. He married Elizabeth, whose sur- 
name is unknown. She died September 10, 
1846, aged eighty-eight years, seven days. 
Her gravestone is standing near those of the 
family of her son Hatsel K., in the burial 
ground at Hyannis. He was a soldier in 
the Revolution in Captain Ward Swift's 
company. Colonel Freeman's regiment, in 
1778; also in Captain Elihu Giflford's com- 
pany, of Sandwich ; Colonel Turner's regi- 
ment, in the Rhode Island campaign in 1 781. 
He was also in the navy in 1776 on the 
brigantine "Rising Sun," commanded by 
Captain Richard Wheeler. He was a ship- 
builder and sea captain for many years. 
Among his children was Hatsel K., born 
1789, of further mention. 

(VI) Hatsel K. Handy, son of Job and 
Elizabeth Handy, was born in Sandwich in 
1789, and died at Hyannis, October 12, 
1 85 1. His gravestone in the family lot in 



102 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Hyannis burial ground gives his age at death 
as sixty-two years, one month, and seven 
days. Like his ancestors he followed the 
sea, and became a master mariner. He was 
also a shipbuilder. He lived at Sandwich 
until about 1820, when he moved to Hyannis 
in the town of Barnstable, Massachusetts. 
He married (intention dated November 3, 
1810) Sally Holmes, who died February i, 
i860, aged sixty-eight years, five months, 
and is buried at his side in Hyannis. Chil- 
dren, born at Sandwich: Rhoda Meriah, 
Sally Holmes, Gustena, Hatsel, who died 
young. Children, born at Hyannis (Barn- 
stable) : Hatsel, of further mention; Job W., 
Floretta, Ellen A., Benjamin F., Isabella G. 

(VII) Hatsel Handy, son of Hatsel K. 
and Sally (Holmes) Handy, was born in 
Hyannis, Massachusetts, September 20, 
1821, and died April 3, 1897. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and also fol- 
lowed the sea. He was a master mariner for 
twenty-five years and one of the best-known 
sea captains on Cape Cod. In later years 
he engaged in the retail grocery business at 
Springfield, Massachusetts, settling here in 
1873. He married (intention dated Decem- 
ber 7, 1844), Desire Bacon Lewis, born 
January 9, 1820, died June 14, 1899, daugh- 
ter of Benjamin Franklin Lewis. Her 
father was a school master at Centerville, 
Cape Cod. Children: i. Hatsel K., lost at 
sea October 14, 1865. 2. Howard B. 3. 
Benjamin F. 4. Herbert Lewis, of further 
mention. 5. Milton. 6. Frederick. 7, Flor- 
etta. 8. Winthrop. 

(VIII) Herbert Lewis Handy, son of 
Hatsel K. and Desire Bacon (Lewis) Handy, 
was born in Hyannis, January 13, 1856. He 
attended school until he was sixteen years 
of age, when he went to Hartford, Connec- 
ticut, and worked for some time in a meat 
market. Later he went to Springfield and 
was employed by his brother in the same 
business. In the autumn of 1875 he fol- 
lowed his brother to California and when 
he reached San Francisco found himself 
penniless. He obtained employment in a 



hotel sufficient to pay for his board and 
lodging, but the hotel keeper presented a 
bill, which neither of the brothers could 
pay, and at last their persuasions prevailed 
upon the proprietor and the bill was re- 
mitted. By this time the young man was 
very homesick, and anxious to return home, 
but he had no money. He sent a message 
to his father and received money enough for 
a first-class ticket home. He bought, how- 
ever, the cheapest ticket possible, and gave 
the surplus money to his brother. Upon 
arriving in Springfield he went to work for 
his father who was in the grocery business 
in Springfield and remained with him four 
years, after which he worked a few months 
in a meat market. Borrowing the necessary 
money, he went into partnership with Mr. 
Clelland in the meat business, buying out 
his former employer, George W. Hollister. 
The business was a success and at the end 
of two years he sold out his interest to his 
partner for five hundred dollars. He in- 
vested next in the sausage business, manu- 
facturing Bologna sausages and selling them 
to jobbers. One day he made the acquaint- 
ance of Mr, Skilton, of the firm of Charles 
H. North & Company, who inquired if he 
could sell his provisions in that part of the 
country, which his former agents had failed 
to do. Mr. Skilton further asked Mr. 
Handy how much money he had. "I have 
none at all," he replied, "I like your frank 
way," said Mr. Skilton, and at once offered 
to sell Mr, Handy goods on credit. This 
was the beginning of a business connection 
which has been of equal benefit to both men, 
and has grown into one of the largest meat 
trades in the country. From 1884 to 1893 
he dealt exclusively with North & Com- 
pany. The enterprise prospered and when 
the quarters at No, 15 Hampden Street were 
no longer adequate, the business was moved 
to a larger home at No. 2"] on the same 
street. Again the business outgrew its plant, 
and for a time Mr. Handy sold his meat 
from a car. In the spring of 1893 he pur- 
chased the block at Nos. 41, 43, and 45 



193 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



HampxJen Street, and remodeled the build- 
ing into a beef and provision house, pro- 
viding accommodations for the manufacture 
of sausage. Besides this establishment, he 
also conducts a beef house at Northampton, 
also one at Hartford, Massachusetts, and 
for a time he operated one at New Haven, 
but he has sold the latter. The business of 
Mr. Handy was incorporated in June, 1904, 
and he remains at the head of it, as presi- 
dent and manager. The concern has an 
extensive trade throughout New England 
and the Eastern States as far south as Vir- 
ginia, and is one of the most thoroughly 
established and best-known concerns of its 
kind in the country. He is also head of 
the Handy Chair and Table Company and 
president of the Miner Chocolate Company. 
Mr. Handy is a member of the Nayasset 
Club, and in politics he is a Republican, 

Herbert Lewis Handy married, in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, January 26, 1881, Hen- 
rietta Huck, who was born at Feeding Hills, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Herman and 
Margaret Huck, of Springfield. Children : 
I. Meda Huck, born at Springfield, October 
28, 1881, married Elisha Gage Scudder, Jr., 
of St. Louis, Missouri. 2. Herman Huck, 
of further mention. 3. Herbert Lewis, Jr., 
born June 2, 1889, educated in private and 
public schools in Springfield ; now with the 
H. L. Handy Company, Springfield. 

(IX) Herman Huck Handy, son of Her- 
bert Lewis and Henrietta (Huck) Handy, 
was born in Springfield, Masaschusetts, Jan- 
uary 10, 1888. After receiving a careful 
education in the public schools of Spring- 
field, he became associated with his father 
in the H. L. Handy Company, which was 
engaged in the meat, provision and sausage 
manufacturing business. That connection 
he maintained for a period of nine years. 
In 191 5 he became associated with the 
Handy Chocolate Company, the successor of 
the Miner Chocolate Company, as superin- 
tendent, and he is now a member of the 
board of directors of that concern. Fra- 
ternally, Mr. Handy is affiliated with 



Springfield Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons ; and he is also a member of the Nayas- 
set Club, and the Manchonis Club. 

On September 15, 191 5, Herman Huck 
Handy married Leonora Elizabeth Keeney, 
of Somersville, Connecticut, daughter of 
Lafayette and Eudora (Dennison) Keeney, 
and granddaughter of Rockwell and Leonora 
(Gowdy) Keeney. The Keeney family is 
one of the oldest in Connecticut and has 
produced a large number of men and women 
of unusual ability. It traces its descent 
from Alexander Keeney, who was a free- 
man in Wetherfield, Connecticut, in 1667, 
and died there in 1680, survived by his wife, 
Alice, whose death occurred in 1683. Mr. 
and Mrs. Handy are the parents of four 
children: I. William Lafayette, who was 
born March 27, 1917. 2. Eudora, born 
August 29, 1918. 3. Leonora, born De- 
cember 20, 1919. 4. Henrietta, born Sep- 
tember II, 1922. 



GRAVES, John Rufus 

For nearly a quarter of a century John 
Rufus Graves has been associated with the 
fire department of the city of Springfield, 
having been promoted, in 1924, to the posi- 
tion of deputy chief, the second highest of- 
fice in the department. 

The Graves family went into England 
with the Norman army under William the 
Conqueror, in 1066, and its members are 
found on record in the "Domesday Book." 
The name has been spelled De Grevis, De 
Greves, Greve, Grave, Greaves, Greeves, and 
Graves. The English family was repre- 
sented by many men of honor and distinc- 
tion. The coat of arms : 

Arws — Gules, an eagle displayed or ducally 
crowned argent. 

Crest — A demi-eagle displayed and erased or 
encircled round the body and below the wings by 
a ducal coronet argent. 

(I) Thomas Graves was born in Eng- 
land before 1585 and came to New England 
with his wife Sarah and five children, all 



194 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of mature age, the youngest being about six- 
teen years old. They settled in Hartford, 
Connecticut, where Thomas was a property 
holder in 1645. He was exempted from 
training in the militia on account of his 
age, he being over sixty years old. In Sep- 
tember, 1 661, he removed to Hatfield, IMas- 
sachusetts. He died in November, 1662, 
and his son Isaac was appointed administra- 
tor of his estate in Massachusetts, and Na- 
thaniel, in Connecticut. Children, all born 
in England : Isaac, of further mention ; John, 
Samuel, Nathaniel, Elizabeth, 

(II) Isaac Graves, son of Thomas and 
Sarah Graves, was born in England as early 
as 1620, and came to this country with his 
parents before 1645. ^^ 1661 he removed 
from Hartford to Hatfield, Massachusetts. 
He was a sergeant in the Colonial militia; 
clerk of the writs for Hatfield ; one of the 
representatives of that portion of Hadley 
which is now Hatfield ; was one of those who 
appeared before the General Court to ask 
for separate church and town rights for 
Hatfield; was killed by the Indians in their 
attack upon Hatfield, September 19, 1677. 
He married Mary Church, daughter of 
Richard and Anne Church, who came from 
England in 1637, and died June 9, 1695. 
They had ten children, among whom was 
John, of further mention. 

(III) John Graves, son of Isaac and 
Mary (Church) Graves, was born in 1664, 
and died in 1746. He married October 26, 
1686, Sarah Banks, daughter of John Banks, 
of Chelmsford, and they were the parents 
of nine children, among whom was Ben- 
jamin, of further mention. 

(IV) Benjamin Graves, son of John and 
Sarah (Banks) Graves, was born August 
12, 1689, and died October i, 1756. He 
was one of the first forty settlers of Hat- 
field. He married, April 7, 1720, ]\Iary 
Warner, who was born July 22, 1694, and 
died at South Hadley, October 10, 1779, 
daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Good- 
man) Warner, of Hadley. They were the 



parents of eight children, among whom was 
Benjamin, of further mention. 

(V) Benjamin Graves, son of Benjamin 
and Mary (Warner) Graves, was born 
February 29, 1734, and died August 17, 
1777, at Pittsfield, on his return from the 
army. He married, September 15, 1757, 
Thankful Field, who died April 11, 1794, 
daughter of Deacon Joseph Field. They had 
five children among whom was Benjamin, 
of further mention. 

(VI) Benjamin Graves, son of Benjamin 
and Thankful (Field) Graves, was born 
October 4, 1760, and died March 22, 1832. 
He married Abigail Graves, who died Oc- 
tober 23, 1843, daughter of Phineas Graves. 
They had seven children, one of whom was 
Timothy, of further mention. 

(VII) Timothy Graves, son of Benjamin 
and Abigail (Graves) Graves, was born 
September 5, 1800, and died on the old 
homestead in Sunderland, May 31, 1872. He 
was a farmer, captain of the militia, and a 
prominent man in town affairs. He married 
Eunice Robinson, who died in Amherst, 
January 24, 1886, daughter of John R. 
Robinson. Among their seven children was 
Rufus Austin, of further mention. 

(VIII) Rufus Austin Graves, son of 
Timothy and Eunice (Robinson) Graves, 
was born on old homestead in Sunderland, 
]\Iay 18, 1841, and died in 1918. He was a 
carpenter by trade and was also engaged in 
farming. He was a staunch Democrat ; was 
prominent in public aflfairs, serving as chair- 
man of the town committee; and was a per- 
sonal friend of Governor Russell, of Massa- 
chusetts. He was a member of Amherst 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; and 
an attendant of the Congregational Church. 
He married, July 30, 1862, Sarah Jane How- 
ard, who died October 14, 1924, daughter 
of George and Sarah Ann (Reed) Howard, 
of Montague. Their children were: i, 
Emma Josephine, born December 31, 1863, 
died April 4, 1864. 2. Benjamin Franklin, 
born February 13, 1865. 3. Emma Louisa, 
born June 13, 1867, married February 13, 



195 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



1886, Harry D. Goodyear. 4. Etta Jane, 
born August 16, 1868, married, September 
5, 1888, William C. Fairchild. 5. Henry 
Howard, born November 21, 1872. 6. Jolin 
Rufus, of further mention. 

(IX) John Rufus Graves, son of Rufus 
Austin and Sarah Jane (Howard) Graves, 
was born in Sunderland, Massachusetts, Oc- 
tober 18, 1877. He received a good prac- 
tical education in the public schools of Sun- 
derland, and managed his father's farm 
until he was seventeen years of age. In 
1894 he came to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he found employment in the glazed 
paper mills. Three years later he removed 
to Northampton, Massachusetts, and ac- 
cepted a position as "Keeper" in the State 
Insane Hospital. That work did not prove 
to be congenial and he soon made a change. 
Returning to Springfield, he became iden- 
tified with the Smith & Wesson shops, en- 
gaged in the manufacture of revolvers. 
While in the latter place he also served as 
call man in the Springfield Fire Depart- 
ment. 

In 1902 he entered the Fire Department 
permanently, and at that time was made lieu- 
tenant. In 1906 he was promoted to the 
rank of captain, in 1908 to the office of 
assistant chief, and in January, 1924, to 
the rank of deputy chief, the second highest 
office in the department. During the quar- 
ter of a century which has passed since he 
first became identified with the Springfield 
Fire Department, Chief Graves has seen the 
Department replace its primitive horse- 
drawn apparatus with the latest fire-fighting 
devices and has witnessed the changes by 
which the Department has become entirely 
motorized. 

Chief Graves is a member of Roswell 
Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
holds the thirty-second degree in the Scot- 
tish Rite bodies. He is also a member of 
Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order No- 
bles of the Mystic Shrine ; and of the Ma- 
sonic and the Shrine clubs. 

On March 21, 1899, John Rufus Graves 



married Emma Morgan, of Boston. Mr. 
and Mrs. Graves were the parents of one 
daughter, Vera Madeline, who died, in 1907, 
aged five years. 



STRONG, Arthur Henry 

To the veteran fireman and the veteran of 
wars, in which firemen have so conspicu- 
ously shared, one of the most interesting of 
continuously active experiences is that of a 
district chief of the Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, fire department, Arthur Henry Strong, 
who for a quarter of a century has proven 
a vital force in the fire-fighting service of 
that city. After an active, seafaring life, 
during which he saw military operations, Mr. 
Strong, since 1906, has been one of the fore- 
most members and officials of the Spring- 
field Fire Department, which is one of nota- 
ble efficiency. He is now a district chief. 

The Strong family, of which the Spring- 
field fire chief is a member, had its original 
home in Shropshire, England, according to 
the genealogists, but a member thereof mar- 
ried an heiress of Griffith, in County Caer- 
narvon, in Wales, and there he went to re- 
side, in 1545. Of this Welsh branch was 
Richard Strong, father of the founder of 
the American family of the name. Richard 
Strong was born in County Caernarvon, in 
Wales, in 1561, and in 1590 he removed to 
Taunton, in Somersetshire, England, where 
he died in 1613, leaving a son, John, of fur- 
ther mention ; and a daughter, Eleanor. 

(I) John Strong, later known as Elder 
John Strong, lived in London and Plymouth ; 
and having decided Puritan sympathies and 
convictions, he and his sister sailed, March 
20, 1630, in the ship "Mary and John," 
landed at Nantasket (Hull), and settled in 
Dorchester, The sister married Walter 
Dean, a tanner, of Taunton, Massachusetts, 
previously of Taunton, England. John 
Strong thence removed to Hingham, of 
which he was a proprietor, and on March 9, 
1636, he took the freeman's oath in Boston. 
He made but brief stay at Hingham, as on 
December 4, 1638, he is found among the 



196 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



original proprietors of Taunton, Massachu- 
setts, and in the same year he was made a 
freeman of Plymouth Colony. He was 
chosen Taunton's first constable in 1639, and 
he was deputy from that town to the Gen- 
eral Court in 1641, 1643-4, and one of seven 
who in 1641 received grants of land at 
Taunton for their great charges in attending 
courts, laying out of lands and other work. 
Shortly afterwards, he removed to Windsor, 
Connecticut, where he was appointed with 
four others "to superintend and bring 
forward the settlement" of that place. In 
1659, however, Mr. Strong removed from 
Windsor to Northampton, Massachusetts, 
where he became one of the first and most 
active founders, and lived forty years a 
prominent and influential townsman, prosper- 
ing in his business as a tanner and a hus- 
bandman. His tanyard was on what is now 
the southwest corner of Market Street, near 
the railroad station, and he owned some two 
hundred acres of land in and near North- 
ampton. He was elected ruling elder of the 
church, May 13, 1663. His first wife, whose 
name has not been ascertained, died on the 
passage from England to America, or soon 
after the landing in Massachusetts, and two 
months later, her baby died, also. He mar- 
ried (second), in December, 1630, Abigail 
Ford, born in England about 1614, daughter 
of Thomas Ford, one of the noted company 
that, with Elder Strong, founded Dorchester 
in 1630. She died, the mother of sixteen 
children, July 6, 1688, aged about eighty 
years; he died April 14, 1699, aged ninety- 
four years. He had, at the time of his death, 
one hundred and sixty descendants, among 
whom were seventeen children, and at least 
thirty-three grandchildren ; and during his 
lifetime he had made over his lands to his 
children. Children of first wife: John, and 
infant, who died in Dorchester in 1630. 
Children of second wife: Thomas, of fur- 
ther mention ; Jedediah ; Josiah, died young ; 
Return, Elder Ebenezer, Abigail, Elizabeth, 
Experience, Samuel, Joseph, twin of Samuel, 



died young; Mary, Sarah, Hannah, Thank- 
ful, Jerijah. 

(II) Thomas Strong, son of Elder John 
and Abigail (Ford) Strong, was born about 
1635. He was a trooper in 1658 at Windsor, 
under Major Mason ; removed to Northamp- 
ton with his father in 1659; married (first), 
December 5, 1660, Mary Hewett, daughter 
of Rev. Ephraim Hewett, of Windsor. She 
died February 20, 1670, and he married 
(second), October 10, 1671, Rachel Holton, 
daughter of Deacon William Holton, of 
Northampton. He died October 3, 1689, and 
his widow, Rachel, married (second), i\Iay 
16, 1698, Nathan Bradley, of East Guilford, 
now Madison, Connecticut. Of Mr. Strong's 
fifteen children, none were under fifteen 
years of age, and all but one were living at 
the time of his death, after which one more 
was born. He died intestate, and his widow 
must have had difficulties in caring for her 
large family. Children of first wife: i. 
Thomas, born November 16, 1661, died at 
Durham, Connecticut. 2. Maria, born Au- 
gust 31, 1663, married Samuel Judd, of 
Northampton. 3. John, born IMarch 9, 1664- 
65, died, unmarried, near Deerfield. 4, 
Hewett, born December 2, 1666, died un- 
married, at Durham, September 29, 1689. 
5. Asahel, born November 14, 1668. Chil- 
dren of second wife: 6. Joseph, born De- 
cember 2, 1672. 7. Benjamin, born in 1674, 
died at Guilford, August 27, 1755. 8. Adino, 
born January 25, 1676, died December 31, 
1749. 9. Waitstill, born in 1677, of whom 
further. 10. Rachel, born July 15. 1679, 
married, January 23, 1705-06, Miles Dudley, 
of Guilford. 11. Selah, born December 2^, 
1680, died April 8, 1732. 12. Benajah, 
born September 24, 1682, died 1714. 13. 
Ephraim, born January 4, 1684, died at Mil- 
ford. 14. Elnathan, born August 20, 1686, 
died at Woodbury, May 22, 1727. 15. Ruth, 
born February 4, 1688, married William 
Dudley. 16. Submit, born February 2^, 
1690, posthumous. 

(III) Waitstill Strong, son of Thomas and 
Rachel (Holton) Strong, was born in 1677, 



197 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



died November 13. 1752. He was a farmer 
of Northampton, and a large land-owner. 
He married (first), December 19, 1701, 
Sarah James, of Lebanon, Connecticut,. 
She died in 1705. and he married (second), 
March 7, 1708, Mindwell Bartiett, born Jan- 
uar}- 30, 1682, died June 26, 1741, daughter 
of Samuel and Sarah (Baldwin) Bartiett, 
of Hadley. Child of the first wife: Deacon 
\Vaitstill. Children of the second marriage : 
John, Mindwell, Phebe, Benajah, Eleazer 
(twin), died young; Ithamar (twin), of 
whom further. 

(IV) Ithamar Strong, son of Waitstill and 
Mindwell (Bartiett) Strong, was born April 
I, 1 72 1, and died June 28, 1805. He was a 
farmer, and also a boatman, and ser\-ed in 
"carrying" on the Connecticut River, at 
Northampton. He served in the Revolution- 
ar}- War. He married Experience King, of 
Northampton, Massachusetts, who was born 
1726. and died January 18. 1795. daughter 
of Samuel and Hannah (Stebbins) King. 
Children: Ithamar, Medad, Eleazer, Titus, 
Captain David, of further mention; Phebe, 
Hewett, Waitstill. 

(V) Captain Da\'id Strong, son of Ithamar 
and Experience (King) Strong, was born in 
Northampton, Massachusetts, November 25, 
1758, and died October 18, 1838. He was a 
farmer, and a lx)atman at Northampton, as 
his father had been. He married, February 
12, 1787, Esther Thayer, who was born May 
8, 1767, and died January 7, 1833. daughter 
of Timothy Thayer. Their children were : 
Qiester, Sophia, Carohne, David, of further 
mention; Samuel, Caroline, Captain Harry, 
Morris, Clarissa. 

(VI) David (2) Strong, son of Captain 
David and Esther (Thayer) Strong, was 
born in Northampton, Massachusetts, Oc- 
tober 25, 1796, and died December 24, 1875. 
He lived in Northampton, where he was 
engaged in farming throughout the entire 
period of his life, and he also worked on the 
river, running a boat for Whiting Street, 
before the days of railroads, between North- 
ampton and Hartford, Connecticut. He 



married Electa Shattuck Patch, of Hawley, 
Massachusetts, who was born July 23. 1810, 
and died October i, 1894, daughter of Oliver 
and Polly (Shattuck) Patch. Their children 
were: i. George Henry, who was born in 
1839. and was a patent lawyer, who resided 
in San Francisco, Cahfornia. 2. Melvin 
Holbrook, of further mention. 3. Carrie 
Eliza, who was born April 26, 1847. 

(VII) Melvin Holbrook Strong, son of 
David (2) and Electa S. (Patch) Strong, 
was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, 
June 19, 1 841, and died in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, in 1907. Throughout his career 
he was engaged in railroad work, and in 
October, i860, he entered the employ of the 
Wabash and Toledo Railroad; he was an 
engineer of trains running between Spring- 
field and New Haven for nearly thirty years, 
so continuing until ill health made it neces- 
sar\- for him to retire. He married, October 
30, 1865, Mary Allen Graham, of Matta- 
poisett, Massachusetts, who was born Sep- 
tember 18, 1845, daughter of William Henry 
and Rebecca Jane (Goodspeed) Graham, the 
former a native of Edinburgh. Scotland. 
Their children were: i. Gertrude Blossom, 
who married George M. Howe. 2. William, 
deceased. 3. Arthur Henry, of further men- 
tion. 4. Harold, deceased. 5. Howard. 
6. Hattie Graves, who married Daniel S. 
Bixby. 7. Ada Brigham, who married Ell- 
wood B. Vaughan. 

(VIII) Arthur Henry Strong, son of Mel- 
vin Holbrook and Mary Allen (Graham) 
Strong, was born in New Haven, Connecti- 
cut, August 28, 1875. His parents removing 
to Springfield, Massachusetts, soon after- 
wards, he received his education in the public 
schools of that city. At the age of sixteen 
years, and upon the completion of his first 
year in the high school, he enlisted in the 
L'nited States Na\y as an apprenticed sea- 
man, and he served for five years, during 
all of which time, with the exception of four 
months aboard the then modern cruiser 
"Newark." he was aboard the old wooden 
sailing ships. He sailed ten thousand miles 



198 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in the historic ship "Constellation," engaged 
in collecting exhibits from European coun- 
tries for the World's Fair in Chicago, in 
1893. He also served for three years in 
South and Central American waters, both 
along the Pacific and the Atlantic coasts. 
Upon the completion of this term of service, 
he returned to Springfield, and for ten years 
he was in the employ of Charles C. Lewis' 
Hardware Company, on Lyman Street. 

At the outbreak of the Spanish-American 
War, Mr. Strong obtained leave of absence 
from his employment, and enlisting in the 
United States Navy, he served throughout 
that war on the coasts of Cuba and Porto 
Rico, in the capacity of chief quartermaster, 
from April 11 to October 28, 1898. Return- 
ing to Springfield, he joined the fire depart- 
ment, in 1899, as call man; he was appointed 
a permanent fireman in 1906, a lieutenant 
in 1907, captain in 1908, and district chief 
in 1918, which position he still holds. While 
he was captain, he was detailed to the fire 
department drill school of New York City 
for the month of June, 1918, and upon his 
return to Springfield, he established the first 
drill school in that city, and served as drill- 
master for twelve years, in addition to his 
other duties, discontinuing this office soon 
after receiving the appointment of district 
chief. Under a reorganization of the school 
in 1921, he was chosen chairman of the 
board of supervisors of training, the board 
consisting of four district chiefs, who an- 
nually elect a corps of eight instructors 
chosen from the officers of the department, 
who have actual control of department train- 
ing. After the new system had been thor- 
oughly established, and having then been 
actively connected with the drill school for 
sixteen years, Mr. Strong was relieved from 
further duty in that line at his own request. 

During the construction of the military 
cantonment at Camp Devens, Ayer, Massa- 
chusetts, he was granted leave of absence 
from the Springfield department, and he or- 
ganized and maintained a fire department 
at the camp during the period of construc- 



tion. Four temporary stations were erected, 
and a fore of twenty-five experienced fire- 
men maintained, which force was kept intact 
by firemen from Springfield, Worcester, 
Boston, and other cities, who served during 
their vacation periods. Though many alarms 
were received, no damage to any building or 
material resulted, and when the temporary 
fire department was disbanded, commenda- 
tions were receivd from the Government 
official in charge, and from the Fred T. Ley 
Company, builders. Mr. Strong has served 
in all the branches of the department, and 
he was the captain of the first motor-driven 
hose wagon in Springfield. He served on 
the committee that obtained the two-platoon 
system in 1918, and he organized and drilled 
a company of ninety firemen, which won the 
first prize for marching in the Victory Parade 
July 4, 1919; he started a rifle team of fire- 
men which finished in third place, in 1924, 
among twelve teams from various industrial 
plants. He has a host of friends, and thor- 
oughly holds the allegiance of the men whose 
work he directs. 

Fraternally, Mr. Strong is a member of 
Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and of the General H. W. Lawton 
Camp, United Spanish War Veterans ; he is 
also a member of the Ludlow Country Club, 
and is a communicant of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, in whose faith he was 
reared. 

Arthur Henry Strong married, October 8, 
1902, Josephine Adolphson, who was born 
October 22, 1875, in Sherbrooke, Province of 
Quebec, Canada, daughter of Carl J. Adolph- 
son, a native of Sweden, and of Lena 
(Thibedeaux) Adolphson. They are the 
parents of one child, Helen Elizabeth, who 
was born September 11, 1903. 



BANCROFT, Henry Leroy 

As manager of the H. L. Handy Company, 
engaged in the manufacture of restaurant 
and hotel tables and chairs, Henry Leroy 
Bancroft is contributing a large share to the 
rapid development of that concern. Mr. 



199 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Bancroft is a descendant of early New Eng- 
land ancestors, tracing his line from John 
Bancroft as follows : 

(I) John Bancroft married in England 
prior to 1622, and came to this country, 
locating in Lynn, Massachusetts, where he 
died in 1637. Among his children was Lieu- 
tenant Thomas, of further mention. 

(II) Lieutenant Thomas Bancroft, son of 
John Bancroft, was horn in England in 1622, 
and died August 19, 1691, He was active 
in local public affairs and served in the war 
against the Narragansett Indians, as lieuten- 
ant of a foot company of Lynn, Massachu- 
setts. He married Elizabeth Bacon. Among 
their children was Thomas, of further men- 
tion. 

(III) Thomas Bancroft, son of Lieuten- 
ant Thomas and Elizabeth (Bacon) Ban- 
croft, married Sarah Poole, of Reading, and 
among their children was Raham, of whom 
further. 

(IV) Raham Bancroft, son of Thomas 
and Sarah (Poole) Bancroft, married (first) 
Abigail Eaton; (second) Ruth Kendell. 
Among their children was David, of further 
mention. 

(V) David Bancroft, son of Raham Ban- 
croft, married Eunice Bancroft, and among 
their children was Jonas, of further mention. 

(VI) Jonas Bancroft, son of David and 
Eunice (Bancroft) Bancroft, was a soldier 
in the Revolutionary War. He married 
Sarah Blood, and they were the parents of 
Nathan, of further mention. 

(VII) Nathan Bancroft, son of Jonas and 
Sarah (Blood) Bancroft, married (first), 
Charlotte Cooper; (second) Clarissa Whit- 
more; (third) Mary Rowland. Among his 
children was Nathan, of further mention. 

(VIII) Nathan Bancroft, son of Nathan 
Bancroft, was born in Sutton, Massachusetts, 
December 12, 1812, and died in Worcester, 
Massachusetts, December 20, 1880. After 
receiving a practical education in the public 
schools he learned the machinist's trade, and 
then engaged in the machine business in 
Worchester, Massachusetts, in association 



with his son, William F. He married, Jan- 
uary 13, 1839, Helen Terwilliger, of Amster- 
dam, New York, who was born July 28, 
181 5, and died March 31, 1857. Their chil- 
dren were: i. William Frederick, of further 
mention. 2. George R., born August 23, 
1843. 3. Maria A., born February 16, 1845. 
4. Nathan L., born April i, 1848. 

(IX) William Frederick Bancroft, son of 
Nathan and Helen (Terwilliger) Bancroft, 
was born in Calais, Vermont, November 8, 
1 84 1, and died in Worcester, Massachusetts, 
May 8, 1897. After receiving careful train- 
ing in the public schools of his native district 
he, like his father, learned the machinist's 
trade, which he followed in Vermont, and 
also in W^ashington, D. C. Upon the out- 
break of the Civil War he enlisted for serv- 
ice, and when his first term was completed 
re-enlisted, serving to the close of the war, 
at which time he held the rank of sergeant. 
After the close of the war he remained in 
W'ashington, D. C, for a time, but later re- 
turned to Worcester, Massachusetts, where 
he continued to reside to the time of his 
death. For a time he was associated with 
Washburn & Maen, a concern now incor- 
porated as the American Steel and Wire 
Company, but later he organized a company, 
and under the name of W. F. Bancroft & 
Company engaged in the manufacture of 
lathes, drills, and planers. This enterprise 
met with notable success, and Mr. Bancroft 
remained at the head of the concern to the 
time of his death. He served as a member 
of the Common Council in Worcester, and 
was prominent in Masonic circles, being a 
member of all bodies, both Scottish and York 
Rites, in the former of which he held the 
thirty-second degree. He was also a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and had passed through all the chairs 
of that organization. His religious affiliation 
was with the Universalist Church. 

On October 24, 1867, William F. Bancroft 
married Margaret Rachel Mundell, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, who was born May 2, 1846, 
daughter of Joseph and Martha (Merryman) 



200 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Mundell. They became the parents of eight 
children: i. George Mundell, born January 
3, 1869. 2. Frederick Nathan, born Novem- 
ber 3, 1870. 3. Martha Blanche, born Oc- 
tober 8, 1872, married W. N. Cole. 4. Wil- 
liam Giddings, born October 4, 1874, died 
in infancy. 5. Clara Ellen, born November 
28, 1878, died December 11, 1883. 6. Cora 
Maria, born December 13, 1881. 7. Henry 
Leroy, of further mention. 8. Edith Maud, 
born July ii, 1886. 

(X) Henry Leroy Bancroft, son of Wil- 
liam Frederick and Margaret Rachel (Mun- 
dell) Bancroft, was born in Worcester, Mas- 
sachusetts, June 30, 1884, and received his 
education in the public schools of Worcester. 
When his school training v^^as completed he 
sold automobiles for a time, and then entered 
the employ of the Winslow Company of 
Worcester as shipping clerk, which position 
he held for two years. At the end of that 
time he went South and engaged in the lum- 
ber business in Derby, Mississippi, for about 
four years. He then made a change and 
went to New Orleans, Louisiana, where he 
was employed in saw mills and in planing 
mills in the management of dry kilns until 
1907. In that year he entered the employ 
of a cigar company, for whom he traveled 
on the road for a period of about twelve 
months. In 1908 he removed to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, where, for a period of four 
years, he was identified with the Barnett 
Cigar and Tobacco Store as salesman. 
Recognizing the fact that there were large 
opportunities in the automobile business, he 
formed a partnership with William Bunker, 
under the firm name of Bunker, Bancroft 
& Company, and took over the agency for 
the Velie car. In 1922 he accepted a position 
as manager of the H. L. Handy Chair and 
Table Company, engaged in the manufacture 
of restaurant and hotel tables and chairs, and 
that connection he has continued to hold. 
The business has steadily grown under his 
efficient management, and at the present time 
he directs the work of some fifty men. Mr. 
Bancroft is well known in Springfield, and 



has many friends among the members of the 
Masonic order. He is a member of Spring- 
field Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; and 
his religious affiliation is with Hope Congre- 
gational Church. 

Henry Leroy Bancroft married, October 
17, 1910, Pauline Brickenfeldt, of Omaha, 
Nebraska, daughter of Hans and Celia 
(Grim) Brickenfeldt. They are the parents 
of three children: i. Henry Leroy, Jr., born 
June 17, 1917. 2. Pauline E., born August 
23, 1919. 3. An infant, who died young. 



SHAFTOE, James Thomas 

For more than thirty years James Thomas 
Shaftoe has been engaged in the optometric 
business and there are few in the city of 
Springfield who are better qualified to per- 
form the delicate task of adjusting the right 
glasses to eyes which need the help of lenses 
than he is. He has been located in Spring- 
field since 1899, and his offices at No. 68 
Main Street are well known to a large 
patronage. 

The Shaftoe (or Shafto) family is of 
great antiquity in the North of England, 
where in song and story the name is con- 
nected with many stirring events. In one of 
the ballads relating the events of a hostile 
meeting between the Scotch and English 
wardens, the latter are represented as using 
the war-cry, "A Schaf tan and a Fenwick !" 
The Scots were victorious in the fray, and 
among the many Englishmen who were taken 
prisoners was one "young Henry Shafto." 
Representatives of the name have held many 
places of honor, such as that of Mayor of 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, and one Martin Shafto, 
of the Honorable Society of Gray's Inn, and 
recorder of Newcastle in 1648, purchased, 
in 1652, Whitworth, in the county of Dur- 
ham. His son Roliert was knighted in June, 
1670, and represented the county of Durham 
in Parliament from 1760 to 1768. The fam- 
ily arms are described as follows : 

Arms — Gules, on a bend argent three mullets 
azure. 



201 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Crest — A salamander reguardant vert, in the 
middle of flames proper. 

(I) Thomas Shaftoe was born in England, 
Julv 9, 1706, and died in Michigan, Novem- 
ber 21, 1890. He was a minister of the 
Gospel in England, and while he was still a 
young man came to this country, settling first 
in New Jersey and later in the State of Mich- 
igan, where he was engaged in farming, and 

where he died. He married Rebecca , 

who was born in Albany, New York, July 
28, 1802, and died June 11, 1878. They were 
the parents of three sons and a daughter, 
of whom William, of further mention, and 
Thomas became preachers in Michigan. 

(H) William Shaftoe, son of Thomas and 
Rebecca Shaftoe, was born in Paterson, New 
Jersey, July 29, 1822, and died in Fall River, 
Massachusetts, 1909. After receiving a 
practical education in the public schools of 
his native city, he learned the art of weaving 
and ])ecame a master weaver. He went to 
North Adams, Massachusetts, where he 
worked in the mills and later worked in 
various mills of the State of New York, but 
many years of his life were spent in the mills 
of Fall River, Massachusetts. He was an 
ardent worker in the Methodist Church, and 
often went from house to house preaching. 
He married (first) Eunice Forbush, of 
Stark, New Hampshire, who was born June 
24, 1823, and died at North Adams, Massa- 
chusetts, October 16, 1853. He married 
(second) Charlotte Worthington, of Wind- 
sor, Connecticut, who was born June 29, 
1831, and died April 19, 1889. The children 
of the first marriage were: i. William, of 
further mention. 2. Thomas, deceased. 3. 
Amanda, who married Edward Jones. To 
the second marriage one daughter was born, 
Elizabeth. 

(HI) William Shaftoe, son of William 
and Eunice (Forbush) Shaftoe, was born 
at Schaghticoke, New York, April 15, 1843, 
died August 28, 1924. He received a prac- 
tical education in the public schools of North 
Adams, and also Petersburg, Massachusetts, 
and when his school training was completed 



began his active career in the office of the 
"Berkshire Eagle," of Pittsfield, where he 
learned the printers' trade. Upon the out- 
break of the Civil War in 1861, though he 
was but eighteen years of age, he at once 
enlisted and was in active service throughout 
the entire period of the war, receiving his 
honorable discharge at Readville, Massachu- 
setts, July I, 1865. He was commissary 
sergeant at Brigadier Headquarters, but 
served in all the principal battles of the Army 
of the Potomac, including the battle of the 
Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Spottsylvania, and 
Gettysburg. He served in Company D of 
the loth Massachusetts Volunteers, also with 
the 37th Massachusetts Volunteers, and with 
the 20th Massachusetts Volunteers. His 
brother Thomas served in the i6th New 
York Cavalry, and was with the troops that 
captured Booth. After the close of the war 
William Shaftoe settled in Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, where for seven years he was the 
efficient overseer in a cotton mill. At the end 
of that time he removed to Taunton, Massa- 
chusetts, where for two years he was em- 
ployed as superintendent of a cotton mill. 
He then removed to Utica, New York, and 
there for twenty-three years he served as the 
overseer in the spinning department of a 
large cotton mill. In 1904 he came to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, in order that he 
might spend the years of his retirement near 
his sons, James Thomas and William A. 
Shaftoe. He was a member of Blue Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of Utica, New 
York, and of the Chapter, Royal Arch Mas- 
sons, of Utica. He was a member of Shenan- 
doah Lodge, No. 95, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, of Utica; and of the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. He was 
actively interested in Bacon Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of which he was a 
member ; and he was a member of McQuart 
Post, which he served as commander. He 
was president of the loth Regiment Asso- 
ciation, 1921 ; also president of the lOth 
Massachusetts Veterans' Association. He 
also served as a member of the staff at vari- 



202 




N'-^^s 








, 7f7, ^(yiXM. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



oils encampments of the Grand Army of the 
RepuhHc. His rehj^ious affihation was with 
the Methodist Church. 

Mr. Shaftoe married, at the White 
Church, in West Sprinf^field, February 13, 
1863, AHce Sherman, of Savoy, Massachu- 
setts, daughter of George Sherman, and they 
were the parents of two children: WilHam, 
deceased ; and James Thomas, of further 
mention. Mr. and Mrs. Shaftoe celebrated, 
at the home of their son, James Thomas 
Shaftoe, the sixtieth anniversary of their 
marriage (1923). So far as is known, Mr, 
Shaftoe was at that time the only survivor 
of Company D, of the loth Massachusetts 
Volunteers, and was one of the twelve or 
fifteen surviving members of his regiment. 
It was during a ten-day furlough that Mr, 
and Mrs. Shaftoe were married. 

(IV) James Thomas Shaftoe, son of Wil- 
liam and Alice (Sherman) Shaftoe, was born 
in South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts, July 
27, 1866. After receiving a careful educa- 
tion in the public schools of Holyoke, Mas- 
sachusetts, he went to Taunton, Massachu- 
setts, where he learned the jeweler's trade. 
After spending a year in the City of Taun- 
ton, he moved to Connecticut for a short 
time, and then again made a change, this 
time moving to Utica, New York, where for 
a period of fifteen years he was engaged in 
various jewelry establishments. From Utica 
he moved to Washington, District of Colum- 
bia, and it was there that he became inter- 
ested in the optical business. He found em- 
ployment with an optician, with whom he 
remained for five years, and during that 
time he made a careful study of optometry. 
In 1899 he removed to Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and in July of that year he engaged 
in business for himself as an optometrist. 
During the nearly a quarter of a century 
which has since passed he has been con- 
tinuously and successfully engaged in that 
business, and has built up a lucrative pa- 
tronage. He is well known as a skilled 
optician and optometrist, and is highly es- 
teemed among the business men of that city. 



Mr. Shaftoe is well known in Masonic cir- 
cles, being a member of Springfield Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, also of Evening 
Star Lodge of Perfection, of Massasoit 
Council, Princes of Jerusalem, and of the 
Springfield Consistory, in which he holds the 
thirty-second degree. He is also a member 
of Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and of Bela 
Grotto. For two years he served as Inside 
Sentinel and later as Junior Steward of the 
Free and Accepted Masons. He is also a 
charter member of Springfield Chapter of the 
Eastern Star, and Equity Council, Royal Ar- 
canum, in which order he is a member of the 
Grand Lodge, and during the past eight years 
has filled every chair of the latter body 
and has also served as Grand Regent of 
Massachusetts. He is a member of the 
Loyal Association, also the Golden Cross, 
the American Men, and the Loyal Ameri- 
cans. Politically he gives his support to 
the Republican party, and has served as a 
member of the Republican City Committee. 
He is a communicant of the Episcopal 
Church. 

On September 2, 1888, James Thomas 
Shaftoe married Annie E. Carey, of Utica. 
New York, daughter of John Carey, and 
they are the parents of two children: i, 
Harold Raymond, who was l)orn March 29, 
1890, and is now associated with the Day- 
tona Ruick Automobile Company, of Day- 
tona, Florida; he married ^lyrtle Belle Scott, 
of Springfield, ^Massachusetts, 2. Harry 
Wells, born December 13, 1897, who is now 
engaged as a carpenter in Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts ; he married Mildred Lois Scott, 
sister of his brother's wife, and has three 
children : Thelma. Barbara, and Gordon 
Wells, 



CORLISS, Hiram Moses 

Pliram Moses Corliss, former superin- 
tendent of underground work for the Fred 
T, Ley Company, had an extensive and 
varied experience in his field and rendered 
valuable service to the concern with which 



203 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



he was identified up to the time of his sud- 
den death. December ii. 1923. He was well 
known in fraternal circles and had a host 
of friends, who held him in high esteem. 

Mr. Corliss came of a ven.- old family 
which dates back to verA- early times in Eng- 
land, and which has been represented in this 
countrA- since earliest Colonial times. The 
name has been variously spelled in England 
Corlas, CorHesse. and Corlies, and originally 
belonged to a noble family in Belgium. The 
escutcheon of the de Corlies family bears 
two tilting spears with p>ennon5 attached, 
each charged with a cross of gold. The 
motto is: Sub crucc, spcs mca — Under the 
cross is my hope. 

The immigrant ancestor of the family in 
America was George CorUss, who was bom 
in the Count\- of E>evonshire. England, about 
16 1 7, and came to this countr\- in 1639. He 
settled in Xewbvu^', Massachusetts, but the 
following year removed to Haverhill, where 
he lived for nearly half a century, until his 
death in t686. The tract of land on which 
he settled in 1640, and on which he built a 
log house in 1647. '"'as in what was later 
known as the West Parish, the farm itself 
later being known as "Poplar Ij^vm," and 
is still in the possession of his direct de- 
scendants. George Corliss, his son John, 
and his grandson John (2), all died on the 
same farm, and each one when sitting in the 
same chair. Upon his death, October 19, 
1686, he left a large property consisting of 
most of the land on both sides of the old 
"Spicket Path" for a distance of more than 
three miles. He was an industrious and 
enterprising citizen, who after being made 
a freeman of Haverhill, previous to 1645. 
was chosen to ser\-e as constable, March 26, 
1650, and as selectman. 1648-53-57-70-79. 
He married, at Haverhill. Massachusetts. 
October 26, 1645. Joanna Davis, their mar- 
riage being the second celebrated in the town. 
Their children were: i. Mary, born Septem- 
ber 6, 1646. 2. John, born March 4. 1648, 
at Haverhill. Massachusetts, died there Feb- 
ruar>- 17, 1698. 3. Joanna, born April 2S, 



1650. 4. Martha, bom June 2, 1652. 5. 
Deborah, born June 6. 1655. 6. Ann, born 
November 8. 1657. 7. Huldah, born Novem- 
ber 18, 1661. 8. Sarah, bom February 23, 
1663. Ot these. John (2), who married 
Mar}- Wilford. became the father of Jon- 
athan, who married Elizabeth Moore, of 
Haverhill, and they were the parents of 
John Moore, who. with his brother Jonathan, 
was one of the first settlers of the town of 
Alexandria. New Hampshire. Ha\"\vard's 
"New England Gazeteer." pubHshed in 1839, 
states that Alexandria. New Hampshire, was 
first settled by Jonathan, John M.. and Wil- 
liam Corliss, in 1769, but who William was 
does not appear. 

Isaac CorHss, great-grandfather of Hiram 
Moses Corliss, was born in Alexandria. New 
Hampshire, where he received his education 
and where he was engaged as a farmer. He 
married Dolly Heath, and among their chil- 
dren was Kimball, of further mention. 

Kimball Corhss, son of Isaac and Dolly 
(Heath) Corliss, was bom in Alexandria, 
New Hampshire, and died in Ph-mouth. New 
Hampshire. June 21. 1895. aged eighty 
years. He was a resident, for many years, 
of Haverhill. New Hampshire, where he 
followed farming, and was also a hunter and 
trapper of note. He married Carohne 
Chandler, and they were the parents of 
children: Lucinda, who married Charles 
Brown; Calvin. Lewis, George, and Chester, 
of further mention. 

Chester Corliss, son of Kimball and Car- 
oline (Oiandler) Corliss, was born in Can- 
ada in 1828. and died in Haverhill, New 
Hampshire, in 1906. \\"hen his education, 
which was received in the local schools, was 
completed, he became identified with the 
Pike Manufacturing Company of Pike. New 
Hampshire, engaged in the manufacture of 
whetstones, and that connection he main- 
tained for a period of forty -two years. He 
was highly esteemed by a large group of 
friends and associates, and was a worthy and 
progressive citizen. He was a member of 
the Methodist Church. On Februar>- 26, 



204 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



1854, he married Margaret A. Howard, of 
North Haverhill, New Hampshire, who was 
born April 28, 1836, and died in 1904. They 
w^ere the parents of children: i. George H., 
born August 4, 1856. 2. Jennie L., born 
December 19, 1861, married Frank K. Car- 
penter, 3. William B., born July 30, 1866, 
who was a conductor on the Boston & Maine 
Railroad and was killed in an accident, in 
1895, at Concord, New Hampshire. 4. 
Hiram Moses, of further mention. 

Hiram Moses Corliss, son of Chester and 
Margaret A. (Howard) Corliss, was born 
in Haverhill, New Hampshire, February 17, 
1874. He attended the public schools of his 
native town until he was thirteen years of 
age, and then entered the employ of the Pike 
Manufacturing Company at Pike, New 
Hampshire, a settlement in the town of Hav- 
erhill, where he remained until he was 
twenty-two years of age. He then went to 
Plymouth, New Hampshire, as an employee 
of Eben Getchell, a contractor, and after 
maintaining that connection for some time, 
went to Quincy, Massachusetts, where for 
two years and a half he was employed as 
foreman in the granite quarries. At the 
end of that period he returned to the Pike 
Manufacturing Company for a year, and 
then became identified with the L. N. Farn- 
ham & Company concern in Boston, where 
he assisted in the construction of the dam 
at Hinsdale, New Hampshire, and Vernon, 
Vermont, on the Connecticut River. For a 
period of two and a half years he continued 
as foreman in this connection, and then, still 
in association with the Farnham Company, 
he became "walking boss" in connection with 
the Springfield Water Company. On August 
10, 1904, Mr. Corliss became identified with 
the Fred T. Ley Company, as foreman, 
which position he held for two and a half 
years. He was then made superintendent 
of underground work, and that position he 
continued to hold up to the time of his death, 
December 11, 1923. In this capacity he had 
charge of many large contracts, the work of 
which often required from one hundred and 



fifty to one hundred and seventy-five men. 
Mr. Corliss' long and varied experience 
proved to be of great value, and his work as 
superintendent of underground work was 
eminently satisfactory to the firm, by whom 
he was held in high regard. 

Mr. Corliss was a member of Unity Lodge, 
No. 40, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, of Hinsdale, New Hampshire; of S. 
S. Davis Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of 
Haverhill, New Hampshire, of which he 
was Past Chancellor Commander, and Eso- 
teric Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Springfield. 

Hiram M. Corliss married, on July 26, 
1893, Victoria C. Hutton, who was born in 
Topsham, Vermont, daughter of Joseph and 
Celia (Hackett) Hutton, and granddaughter 
of John Hutton, who was born in York- 
shire, England, and came to America with 
his nine children in 1848. The father, 
Joseph Hutton, was born in Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, in 1834, came to America with his 
father when he was fourteen years of age, 
and died in 191 7. During the Civil War 
he served in Company D, 13th New Hamp- 
shire Regiment, for three years, and was 
wounded at the battle of Antietam. Mr. 
and Mrs, Corliss are the parents of three 
children: i. Florence Christobel, who mar- 
ried James W, Brennan, of Springfield, and 
has two children : William Corliss and Mar- 
garet Wander. 2. J. Gladys. 3. Howard 
Chandler, 



WHITTLE, Ralph Estes 

After a careful preparation, supplemented 
by technical training, Ralph Estes Whittle 
gained valuable experience in several lines 
of business activity and had just established 
a concern of his own when the entrance of 
the United States into the World War called 
him away from his own affairs and caused 
him to volunteer for service in the struggle 
"to make the world safe for Democracy," 
Since the close of the war, he has been a 
member of the board of directors, secretary, 
and assistant general manager of the Storms 



205 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Drop Forging Company, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts. 

James Whittle, great-grandfather of Ralph 
Estes Whittle, was born in Bolton, England, 
in 1776, and died in Pawtucket, Rhode Is- 
land, in 1863, aged eighty-seven years. He 
was a cotton goods bleacher, energetic and 
industrious, and highly respected among his 
associates. He married, and they were the 
parents of children, among who was James 
(2), of whom further. 

James (2) Whittle, son of James (i) 
Whittle, was born in Bolton, Lancashire 
County, England, in October, 181 1, and died 
in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, in January, 
1895. He also was a cotton bleacher by 
trade, and after following that occupation 
for a time in his native country, he decided 
to come to America, where he believed 
larger opportunities were to be found. He 
came in 1838, locating in Pawtucket, Rhode 
Island, where the remainder of his life was 
passed, and where he died. In 185 1 he was 
associated with the late William F. Sayles 
in the establishment of the Sayles bleach- 
eries, and that connection he maintained until 
1867, when he became identified with another 
concern. He married Ann Thornley, who 
was born in Bolton, England, in 181 3, and 
died in 1896, and they were the parents of 
nine children, among them : Richard, James 
Henry, of further mention; Peter, Emma, 
who married Dr. von Gottschalk ; Clara, 

who married Follet; and Mary, who 

married Joseph Arnold. 

James Henry Whittle, son of James (2) 
and Ann (Thornley) Whittle, was born in 
Pawtucket, Rhode Island, May 15, 1857, 
and is now living in Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts. He received his early education in 
the public schools of Lewiston, Maine, of 
Central Hills, Rhode Island, and of Prov- 
idence, Rhode Island, and then became a 
student in Brown University. Upon the 
completion of his college course he ap- 
prenticed himself to a firm which was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of sheet metal 
specialties for cotton and woolen mills. In 



1880 he engaged in business for himself in 
Putnam, Connecticut, but later he moved his 
plant to Worcester, Massachusetts, where 
there was a better market for his product. 
In 1898 he purchased the Cleveland Ma- 
chine Works, of Worcester, Massachusetts, 
and merged that concern with the business 
which he was already operating. Under the 
name of James H. Whittle & Company, he 
was engaged in the manufacture of ma- 
chinery for cotton and woolen mills until 
1909, when, on account of ill health, he re- 
tired. 

On October 4, 1882, James Henry Whit- 
tle married Louise Burnett Starrett, who 
was born in Millville, Massachusetts, daugh- 
ter of Starrett, who was killed in the 

battle of Antietam during the Civil War, 
and of Louise (Burnett) Starrett, who died 
January 18, 1901. The children of James 
Henry and Louise (Burnett) Whittle are: 
I. Mabel Starrett, who married Frank Dor- 
man, of Meriden, Connecticut. 2. Milton 
Henry, who is superintendent for the F. T. 
Ley Company, in Peru, South America. 3. 
Antoinette, who married David W. Arm- 
strong, of Worcester, Massachusetts. 4. 
Ralph Estes, of further mention. 5. Philip 
Thornley, who died in the service of his 
country during the World War, October 12, 
1918. 

Ralph Estes Whittle, son of James Henry 
and Louise B. (Starrett) Whittle, was born 
in Worcester, Massachusetts, November 30, 
1892. He received his early and prepara- 
tory education in the public schools of Wor- 
cester, graduating from the high school there 
in 19 10, and then entered the Worcester 
Polytechnic School, of Worcester, from 
which he was graduated in 191 2. Upon the 
completion of his technical course, he found 
his first employment in the actuarial depart- 
ment of the State Mutual Life Assurance 
Company, of Worcester, which connection 
he maintained for a period of one year. He 
then became identified with the Worcester 
County Institution for Savings, serving in 
the capacity of teller and clerk for two 



206 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



years, at the end of which time he associated 
himself with the Henly-Kimball Company, 
agents for the Hudson automobile, as serv- 
ice manager. He remained with that con- 
cern, rendering efficient services until Jan- 
uary I, 1917, when he formed a partnership 
with Mr. Baker, under the firm name of the 
Baker & Whittle Company, of which concern 
Mr. Whittle was president and general man- 
ager. They established a starting, lighting 
and ignition plant for automobiles, and were 
meeting with marked success, when the 
entrance of the United States into the World 
War placed duty above business interest. 

On July 5, 1917, Mr. Whittle enlisted for 
service as a private, and was sent to Fort 
Ethan Allen, where he was assigned to the 
cavalry service. Two months later he was 
sent to Camp Meade, where he remained for 
three months, in the cavalry. He then went 
to Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas, where 
he joined the Aviation Corps, and was made 
sergeant, first class in aviation. After tak- 
ing his examination for a commissioned offi- 
cer at Washington, District of Columbia, he 
was commissioned a first lieutenant in the 
air service and sent to Camp Hancock, at 
Augusta, Georgia, where he remained for 
three months and then went to Camp 
Greene, Charlotte, North Carolina. On June 
I, 1918, he left Hoboken, New Jersey, 
bound for overseas service. After landing 
at Brest, he was sent to the front where his 
first engagement was that of Chateau- 
Thierry. He was later assigned to the air 
service again and made inspector of all 
planes going to the front, and on March i, 
1919, was promoted to the rank of captain. 
He was present at the battles of the Meuse 
and Argonne, in command of the ist Com- 
pany, 3d Regiment, of the Air Service. He 
sailed for home in July, 1919, and was 
mustered out of service August i, 1919. 

Upon his return to civilian life he came to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and in Decem- 
ber, 1919, became one of the organizers of 
the Storms Drop Forging Company, of 
which he was made secretary and assistant 



general manager. He is also a member of 
the board of directors of that concern. The 
corporation is a successful and rapidly grow- 
ing one, and has already made a place for 
itself among the well-estal;lished business 
enterprises of Springfield. 

Mr. Whittle is a member of the American 
Society of IVIechanical Engineers, and of 
several similar societies in France, and his 
fraternal affiliation is with the Gamma Sigma 
college fraternity, and with Springfield 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. He is 
also a captain of Air Service in the Of- 
ficers' Reserve Corps, and a member of the 
Lions Club. 

Ralph E. Whittle married, on December 
28, 1917, at San Antonio, Texas, Mildred 
Hazel Storms, who was born in Worcester, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Frank F. and 
Edith M. (Hebb) Storms. Mr. and Mrs. 
Whittle are the parents of one child, Ralph 
E., Jr., who was born January 3, 1919. 



O'LEARY, Bishop Thomas M. 

A record of special honor and of dis- 
tinguished service is that of Bishop Thomas 
M. O'Leary, who on September 8, 1921, was 
consecrated bishop of the diocese of Spring- 
field, succeeding the Right Reverend Thomas 
D. Beaven. Twenty-five years of devoted 
service had preceded his elevation to the of- 
fice of bishop and the record he has since 
made is one of worthy achievement. 

Right Reverend Thomas Mary O'Leary 
was born in Dover, New Hampshire. August 
16, 1875, son of Michael and ]\Iargaret 
(Holden) O'Leary. He received his early 
education in the pul)lic and parochial schools 
of Dover, and then having early decided to 
devote his life to the service of the church, 
went to jMungret College, at Limerick, Ire- 
land, from which institution he received the 
degree Bachelor of Arts in 1892. He then 
returned to this continent and matriculated 
in the Grand Seminary in Montreal, where 
he continued his studies until his ordination, 
which occurred December 18, 1897. 

His first appointment was to St. Anne's 



207 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Church in Manchester, New Hampshire, but 
he was soon transferred to St. John's Church 
in Concord, New Hampshire. In 1904 he 
was again transferred, this time to St. Jo- 
seph's Cathedral, in ISIanchester, New 
Hampshire, where he held the responsible 
position of chancellor of the diocese. He 
also served as secretary to Rev. John B. 
Delaney, second bishop of Manchester, which 
position he held for six years, or until 1910, 
when he was made rector of the cathedral 
parish. In December, 1914, he was ap- 
pointed vicar-general of the Manchester 
diocese, and in January, 191 5, was appointed 
rector of St. John's Church of Concord, New 
Hampshire. Meantime, in addition to the 
responsibilities already mentioned, he had 
served as chaplain of the Precious Blood 
Monastery from 1904 to 1910, and had also 
served for a time as chaplain of the Knights 
of Columbus. He was a contributor to the 
"Catholic Encyclopedia," a member of the 
committee on war savings stamps, and dio- 
cesan examiner of the clergy in 1914. While 
he was rector of St. John's Church in Con- 
cord, he performed a remarkable work in 
carrying to completion the enlargement of 
the church property and clearing the church 
of an indebtedness of over $40,000. He also 
assumed the editorship of the "Munificat," 
the diocesan publication. On ]May 9. 192 1, 
Pope Benedict appointed Bishop O'Leary 
bishop of Springfield, to succeed the late 
Right Reverend Thomas D. Beaven, and his 
consecration took place in St. Michael's 
Cathedral September 8, 192 1. This is a 
very large diocese, embracing all of the 
Catholic churches and property in the five 
western counties of ^Massachusetts, and con- 
sisting of some seventy-five parishes and 
representing over a million dollars and com- 
municants. Bishop O'Leary has the distinc- 
tion of being the only priest in the Spring- 
field diocese who has studied abroad. An 
interesting fact in connection with his work 
is the willingness with which he has assumed 
additional responsibilities. He is the third 
bishop of this diocese and has won in a high 



degree the confidence and esteem not only 
of the churchmen of the diocese and of the 
congregations, over whom he has charge, but 
also of those who are not of his own re- 
ligious faith. While conducting the aflfairs 
of his office with the administrative and 
executive ability of a thorough business man, 
he has also devoted time and energy to the 
spiritual advancement of the many churches 
under his charge, and has contributed largely 
to tlie moral standards of the community. 
A beautiful testimonial of the high esteem in 
which he was held was given by the children 
of Brightside, Massachusetts, on the occasion 
of the twenty-fifth anniversary of his ordi- 
nation to the Catholic priesthood. Tiny tots 
who live at the Brightside home showered 
congratulations upon the bishop with bou- 
quets of flowers, while the older children 
expressed their appreciation of his service 
with suitable addresses prepared for the oc- 
casion. Christmas sketches were also a part 
of the entertainment and Christmas carols 
opened and closed the program. The enter- 
tainment was held in Institute Hall, in 
Brightside. which was a bower of greens 
with the Christmas red of streamers bright- 
ening the whole arrangement, and the spirit 
of love and good cheer animating the en- 
tire assemblage. The coat-of-arms of Bishop 
O'Leary represents a shield which is divided 
vertically into two sections, each containing 
a separate heraldic inscription. The left sec- 
tion bears the symbols of the diocese, and 
the right carries the personal insignia of 
the bishop. Sinister: On a field of silver a 
red cross, each seam of the cross terminating 
in a small globe. This peculiarly shaped red 
cross on silver is the form known as St. 
^Michael's cross. It was chosen for the See 
of Springfield because St. ^lichael is the 
patron saint of the Cathedral. To this have 
been added four heraldic springs to symbol- 
ize the name Springfield. On the right or 
personal part of the shield is a ship which 
appears on the traditional emblem of the 
O'Leary family with the colors changed 
from black on silver to silver on blue. The 



208 




J^<^^i£/ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



latter are the heraldic colors of Mary, the 
Mother of God, to which the bishop gives 
special devotion. On the background has 
been added a star to indicate Our Lady's 
title, "Star of the Sea." On the upper part 
of the shield are three spearheads, symbols 
of St. Thomas, the instruments of his mar- 
tyrdom, and, in number, symbolic of the 
Blessed Trinity. This section reads Thomas 
Mary O'Leary. Above the shield in gold 
are the episcopal miter, crozier and proces- 
sional cross, all surmounted by the episcopal 
hat of green, and underneath is the Bishop's 
motto: Viam vcritatas elegi, meaning: "I 
have chosen the way of truth," taken from 
the Book of Psalms ii8, v. 30. This coat- 
of-arms is the one adopted by a bishop on 
entering this diocese. 

Springfield is fortunate in having at the 
head of its Catholic church institutions so 
able and worthy a leader, and the city as 
a whole gives honor to the achievement of 
Bishop O'Leary. 



FALT, Joseph P. 

The death of Joseph P. Fait in 1920 closed 
a career of worthy achievement attained 
through honest effort aided by ability, perse- 
verance, and close adherence to sound busi- 
ness principles. A self-made man in the 
truest sense of the word, he first mastered 
his trade and then steadily enlarged his ca- 
pacity and his field of activity until he be- 
came the founder and the chief-executive 
of the important stone contracting concern, 
known as the J. P. Fait Company. 

(I) Dr. John Fait, great-great-grand- 
father of Joseph P. Fait, was born in Ger- 
many, and came to Canada at the time of 
the Revolutionary War to minister to the 
Hessian troops engaged in that conflict. He 
located in Nova Scotia, where he was given 
a grant of land in Canso. He married a 
McDugal, and they were the parents of three 
sons: I. James, of whom further. 2. Hum- 
phrey, settled in Petite Riviere, Lunenburg 
County, Nova Scotia. 3. Joseph, a sea-cap- 
tain, who lived in Lunenburgtown, Nova 



Scotia. He was captain of a privateer dur- 
ing the War of 1812, and kept a tavern in 
the town of Lunenburg in 1827. He married 
Sarah Pinnell, daughter of Thomas Pinnell. 

(II) James Fait, son of Dr. John Fait, 
married and had a son, John Fait, of whom 
further. 

(III) John Fait, son of James Fait, was 
born in Canso, Nova Scotia. He was en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits, and met with 
an accidental death, caused by the discharge 
of a gun in the hands of a man in his em- 
ploy while both were out hunting. He died 
in Canso, Nova Scotia, and was buried there. 
He married Abigail Parks, who was born in 
Petite Riviere, Nova Scotia, and they were 
the parents of the following children: i. 
Joseph Christopher, of further mention. 
2. Caroline, born at Dover Head, Guysboro 
County, Nova Scotia, in July, 181 1 ; married 
a Mr. Peach. 3. Manning. 4. Parks. 

(IV) Joseph Christopher Fait, son of 
John and Abigail (Parks) Fait, was born in 
Nova Scotia, in 1823, and died in Cam- 
bridgeport, Massachusetts, in 1895. After 
receiving a practical education, he learned 
the carpenter's trade, and in 1859 or i860 
came to Massachusetts, where he spent the 
remainder of his life. He married Sarah 
Green, of Blue Hill, Maine, who survived 
him. Their children were: i. Joseph P., of 
whom further. 2. Frank E., of Hackensack, 
New Jersey. 3. Fred A., of West ]\Iedford, 
Massachusetts, and three girls, who died in 
infancy. 

(V) Joseph P. Fait, son of Joseph 
Christopher and Sarah (Green) Fait, was 
born in Liverpool, Novia Scotia, in 1853, and 
died in Springfield, Massachusetts, June 20, 
1920. He was brought to Massachusetts 
with his parents when he was a child and 
received his education in the public schools 
of Boston and vicinity. When his school 
training was completed he learned the car- 
penter's trade, and later took up architec- 
ture and drafting, finally, in 1876, engaging 
in stone work for building purposes in Prov- 
idence, Rhode Island. In 1880 he removed 



209 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



to Boston and formed a partnership with 
Mr. Sullivan, under the firm name of Fait 
& Sullivan, and continued this connection 
until 1883. In that year he removed to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and opened a 
stone quarry in that part of the city, which 
was then known as "sixteen acres." Under 
the firm name J. P. Fait and Company, he 
built up an extensive business in the stone 
building line. The concern in 1910 was in- 
corporated under the name of J. P. Fait 
Company, of which Mr. Fait was made 
president. The activities of the J. P. Fait 
Company covered a wide area and the vol- 
ume of business transacted increased to pro- 
portions which require the services of from 
one hundred and twenty-five to one hundred 
and forty men in cutting stone for building 
purposes. Mr. Fait was for some years 
president of the National Cut Stone Con- 
tractors' Association of America, but retired 
because of ill health about a year prior to 
his death. In addition to his responsibilities 
and activities in connection with the rapidly- 
growing business which he had founded, Mr. 
Fait found time for local public service. He 
was a member of the board of aldermen 
from Ward Five in 1905 and 1906, and so 
efiiciently did he discharge the duties of that 
position that he was mentioned as a candi- 
date for the office of mayor. He was a mem- 
ber of the City Property Committee which 
had charge of the erection of the Technical 
High School, and in his official connections 
as well as in his private business activities 
he was known for his integrity and for his 
good judgment. Fraternally he was affiliated 
with Hampden Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons; with Morning Star Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons; Springfield Council, Royal 
and Select Masters; Springfield Command- 
ery, Knights Templar, and Melha Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Xobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He was also a member of the 
Nayasset Club and an attendant of Trinity 
Methodist Church. 

Joseph P. Fait married Eliza Widgery, 
of Woburn, Massachusetts, who was born 



in 1850. and died April 26, 1922, daughter 
of Walter and Mary (David) Widgery. and 
their children were: i. Jay Waldo, whose 
biography follows. 2. Jerome W. 3. Alonzo 
P. (see a following biography). 4. Daisy G., 
deceased, who married Leonard Peeler. 5. 
Joseph B. (see biography following). 



FALT, Jay Waldo 

As treasurer of the concern known as the 
J. P. Fait Company, stone contractors, Jay 
Waldo Fait is well known in Springfield 
and vicinity. The concern also, under the 
same name, operates a second large stone- 
cutting plant in Bedford, Indiana. 

(VI) Jay Waldo Fait, son of Joseph P. 
and Eliza (Widgery) Fait (see preceding 
biography), was born in Somerville, Massa- 
chusetts, February 20, 1874. While still a 
small child, he removed with his parents to 
Providence, Rhode Island, and from there to 
Allston, Massachusetts, and in the public 
schools of these towns and cities he received 
his education. He early became interested 
in drafting, and when his school training was 
completed he at once associated himself with 
the J. P. Fait Company, founded by his 
father. Since the incorporation of that con- 
cern he has been connected with it and for 
some years has been the treasurer of that 
company. In 1909 the J. P. Fait Company 
opened a second stone-cutting plant in Bed- 
ford, Indiana, this also operating under the 
name J. P. Fait Company. Both concerns 
carried on an extensive business, which re- 
quired the services of many men, but in 191 1 
the firm sold the Springfield plant, and since 
then have devoted their entire attention to 
the Bedford Indiana plant. Mr. Fait has 
charge of the main office in Springfield, 
where the work is planned and from which 
the work of the Indiana plant is directed. 
Fraternally, Mr. Fait is affiliated with 
Springfield Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and he is an attendant of the Meth- 
odist Church. 

Jay Waldo Fait married, September 4, 
1897, Carrie H. Dewey, of Springfield, Mas- 



210 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



sachusetts, daui^hter of Sherman B. and 
Adelaide (Story) Dewey (see Dewey IX). 
They are the parents of the following chil- 
dren : I. Daisy G., horn Novemher lo, 1903, 
was graduated from Springfield High School 
in 191 7 and from Bay Path Institute of 
Springfield, and is now (1925) a student at 
Leslie School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
2. Pauline (twin), born November 6, 1905, 
died at the age of ten years. 3. Pearl (twin), 
born November 6, 1905, died in infancy. 4. 
Sherman B., born November 26. 1906, in 
1924, a senior in the Springfield Commercial 
High School. 5. Theodore R., born Feb- 
ruary 21, 1909. in 1924, a stvident in the 
Springfield Junior High School. 

(The Dewey Line) 

(I) Thomas Dewey, immigrant ancestor, 
arrived in this country prior to 1633. Among 
his children was Josiah, of further men- 
tion. 

(II) Josiah Dewey, son of Thomas 
Dewey, was baptized at Windsor, Connecti- 
cut, October 10, 1641, and died in Lebanon, 
Connecticut, in 1732. He married, Novem- 
ber 6, 1662, Hepzibah Lyman, and they 
were the parents of Nathaniel, of whom 
further. 

(III) Nathaniel Dewey, son of Josiah 
and Hepzibah (Lyman) Dewey, was born 
in Westfield, Massachusetts, February 20, 
1673. He married, in 1700, Margaret Bur- 
roughs, and they were the parents of eight 
children, among whom was Samuel, of 
whom further. 

(IV) Samuel Dewey, son of Nathaniel 
and Margaret (Burroughs) Dewey, was 
born in Lebanon, Connecticut, July 5, 1704. 
He married Elizabeth Allen, and among 
their six children was Nathan, of whom 
further. 

(V) Nathan Dewey, son of Samuel and 
Elizabeth (Allen) Dewey, was born in 
Lebanon, Connecticut, May 7, 1742. He 
married Mindwell Hosford, and among their 
four children was Abel, of whom further. 

(VI) Abel Dewey, son of Nathan and 



Mindwell (Hosford) Dewey, was born in 
Oxford, New Hampshire, November 4, 
1772. He married, in 1796, Rhoda King. 
They were the parents of ten children, 
among whom was Timothy Morton, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(VII) Timothy Morton Dewey, son of 
Abel and Rhoda (King) Dewey, was born 
in Oxford, New Hampshire, March 16, 
18 12, and died July 17, 1888. He married, 
January 25, 1838, Maria Kellogg, who was 
born in 1818, and died in 1895. They were 
the parents of four children, among whom 
was Sherman Burke, of further mention. 

(VIII) Sherman Burke Dewey, son of 
Timothy Morton and Maria (Kellogg) 
Dewey, was born in Oxford, New Hamp- 
shire, September 4, 1839. He married, 
August 9, 1868, Adelaide Story, who was 
born in Durham, New York, August 19, 
1846. They were the parents of three chil- 
dren : Mary Story, Carrie Hotton, of whom 
further ; Alice Kellogg. 

(IX) Carrie Hotton Dewey, daughter of 
Sherman Burke and Adelaide (Story) 
Dewey, married Jay Waldo Fait. 



FALT, Alonzo Parks 

Since the incorporation of the J. P. Fait 
Company, Alonzo Parks Fait has been clerk 
and secretary of the concern, and in 1924 
he was still efficiently discharging the duties 
of both official positions. 

(VI) Alonzo Parks Fait, son of Joseph 
P. and Eliza (Widgery) Fait (q. v.), was 
born in Providence, Rhode Island, July 30, 
1878, and received his education in the 
schools of Allston and Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. After completing his school course 
he took up architectural work in offices in 
Boston and New York, and later followed 
the same line of work with the J. P. Fait 
Company, of which he has been clerk and 
secretary since its incorporation in 1910. 
Mr. Fait is a man of recognized business 
ability who believes in honest goods and a 
square deal, and he has a host of friends 
both in Springfield and in other localities 



211 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in which he has resided at various times. 
He is a member of Hampden Lodge, In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, of Spring- 
field, and also of the Springfield Automobile 
Club. 

Alonzo Parks Fait married. October 12, 
1901, Nettie Goodrich, of East Longmeadow, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Henry A. and 
Man.- (Maynard) Goodrich. Children: i. 
Leonard Goodrich, bom in Flatbush, Brook- 
lyn. New York, April 23. 1903. came to 
Springfield, with his parents when he was 
six years old. He received a good education 
in the public schools of Springfield, and 
then engaged in business as a fire protection 
engineer. He has built up an extensive 
business selling all kinds of equipment for 
fighting fires, the field of his operations in- 
cluding all of Xew England. He is a mem- 
ber of the Fire Chiefs' Association, and of 
the American Firemen's Association. 
Oznola Parks, born December 16, 1906 
3. Edith Lowman, born July 22, 1908. 4 
Henry Andrew, born March 10, 191 1 
5. Marion Delita. born January 14. 1917. 



FALT, Joseph Byron 

As president of the J. P. Fait Company, 
Joseph Byron Fait is successfully conduct- 
ing the prosperous building stone business 
incorporated by his father in 1910. 

(VI) Joseph Byron Fait, son of Joseph 
P. and Eliza (\Vidger\-) Fait (q. v.), was 
born in Allston. Massachusetts, March 12, 
1882. He received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of Springfield, Massachusetts, 
and then learned the stone cutting trade in 
his father's shops. He gave careful atten- 
tion to business and after a time was made 
foreman, which position he held until 191 3. 
In that year he was transferred to the oflSce 
to take charge of the drafting. Meantime, 
in 1910, the business incorporated, with 
Joseph Parks Fait as president. After the 
death of his father, Joseph Byron Fait was 
made president of the J. P. Fait Company, 
and that important position he has continued 
to hold to the present (1924). He is a man 



of sound ability and discriminating judg- 
ment, and holds a high place in the esteem of 
his business associates as well as among his 
many personal friends. He is an attendant 
of the Christian Science Church. 

Joseph Byron Fait married, April 15, 
1904, E\-a M. Dana, of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, daughter of Moses C. and Mary 
(Gibbs) Dana. Children: i. Robert Dana, 
born August 20. 1907. 2. Joseph Byron, 
Jr.. born February 9. 1910. 3. Stanton Har- 
court. born August 11. 1912. 



HOYT, Charles Lyford 

One of the well known business men of 
Springfield is Charles L. Ho\t, who for the 
past twenty years has been in business as a 
practical furrier. His establishment is lo- 
cated at 24 Vernon Street and is one of the 
best of its kind in the cit}*. He is also well 
known in musical circles, and has actively 
contributed to the musical life of the cit\- for 
more than a score of years. He is of early 
Xew England stock, tracing his descent from 
John Ho}t, one of the original settlers of 
Salisbury, Massachusetts, from whom de- 
scent is traced as follows : 

(I) John Ho\t, one of the original set- 
tlers of Salisbury, Massachusetts, was made 
a selectman in that town in 1682. He took 
an active part in local public affairs, was 
sergeant of the Salisbury' Military Company, 
and in 1687 was moderator of the town 
meeting. He died February 2S, 1687. He 
was twice married, both of his wives being 
named Frances, but the surname of neither 
can be learned. The first wife died Feb- 
ruary 2T,, 1643, and the second wife, whom 
he married in 1644, survived him until 1697. 
Children of the first marriage : Frances, 
John. Thomas, of further mention ; Gregory, 
and Elizabeth. Children of the second mar- 
riage : Sarah, Mar}-, Joseph, died young ; 
Joseph, Sarah, Xaomi, and Dorothy. 

(II) Thomas Ho}t, son of John and his 
first wife, Frances Ho\-t, was born January 
I, 1640. and died January 3, 1690. He 
married Mary Brown, daughter of William 



212 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



and Elizabeth Brown, of Salisbury, and they 
were the parents of ten children: Lieutenant 
Thomas, William, Ephraim, John, William. 
Israel, Benjamin, of further mention ; Jo- 
seph, Deliverance, and ]\Iary. 

(III) Benjamin Hoyt, son of Thomas and 
Mary (Brown) Hoyt, was born September 
20, 1680, and died in 1749. He was a tan- 
ner by trade, and lived at first in Salisbury, 
Massachusetts, and later in Newbury, of the 
same State. He married Hannah Pillsbury, 
of Newbury, Massachusetts, and they were 
the parents of six children : Benjamin, 
Moses, Hannah, Enoch, of further mention; 
Daniel, and Joseph. 

(IV) Enoch Hoyt, son of Benjamin and 
Hannah (Pillsbury) Hoyt, was born in Sep- 
tember, 1 714. He married, December 3, 
1735, Sarah French, and they were the 
parents of seven children: Mary, Joseph, of 
further mention; Joanna, Enoch, Martha, 
Sarah, and Hannah, 

(V) Joseph Hoyt, son of Enoch and 
Sarah (French) Hoyt, was born June 3, 
1739, and died in Cabot, Vermont, in 1815. 
He was a currier and a farmer, and removed 
to Cabot, Vermont, in 1797. He was a 
strong, able-bodied and resolute man, and 
during- the Revolutionary War he rendered 
efficient service under General Stark. At 
one time he carried his wounded captain, 
Nathan Sanborn, from the battlefield on his 
shoulder. He married Abigail Flanders, 
daughter of Samuel and Mary Flanders, of 
Brentwood, and they were the parents of the 
following children : Enoch, Joanna, Samuel, 
of further mention ; Joseph, Ezra, and Ben- 
jamin. 

(VI) Samuel Hoyt, son of Joseph and 
Abigail (Flanders) Hoyt, was born in 1771, 
and died in 1823, He removed to Cabot, 
Vermont, in 1818. He married Eleanor 
Philbrick, May 8, 1794, and they were the 
parents of four children : Jonathan, of fur- 
ther mention ; Enoch, Mary, and Seth. 

(VII) Jonathan Hoyt, son of Samuel and 
Eleanor (Philbrick) Hoyt, removed from 
Cabot, Vermont, to Woodbury, Vermont, 



where, while he was still a young man, he 
fell from a tree and was killed. Jonathan 
and Roxanna Hoyt had a son, Samuel, of 
whom further. His wife, Roxanna, married 
Charles P. Lyford, by whom she had three 
sons. 

(VIII) Samuel Hoyt, son of Jonathan 
and Roxanna Ho}1:, was born in Woodbury, 
Vermont, in 1823, and died in Hardwick, 
Vermont, March 6, 1893. He was a stone- 
cutter by trade, and a blacksmith, and at 
the time of his death was proprietor of a 
shop in Hardwick, Vermont. He was an 
able man, who was actively interested in the 
public welfare, serving as a member of the 
school committee, and acting in other town 
affairs. He married Ruth Orlana Lawson, 
of Woodbury, Vermont, who was born No- 
vember 12, 1825, and died in 1895, daughter 
of Daniel Lawson, born May 12, 1798, died 
February 14, 1873, and of Ruth U. (Nor- 
cross) Lawson, who was born in 1797, and 
died March 16, 1848. Samuel and Ruth O. 
(Lawson) Hoyt were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : Albert, Azro, Ella, Lawson, 
George, and Charles Lyford, of further 
mention. All except the last-named are de- 
ceased. 

(IX) Charles Lyford Hoyt, son of Sam- 
uel and Ruth O. (Lawson) Hoyt, was born 
in Woodbury, Vermont, December 10, 1868, 
and received his education in the schools of 
Woodbury, Vermont, and in Hardwick 
Academy. Though the completion of his 
academic course terminated his regular train- 
ing, Mr. Hoyt has, throughout the period 
of his career, continued a self-directed edu- 
cation. In 1886, when he was eighteen years 
of age, he removed to Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and found employment in the es- 
tablishment of the D. H. Brigham Company, 
with whom he remained for seventeen vears. 
At the end of that time, in 1903, he decided 
to engage in the fur business for himself, 
and since then has been thus engaged. He 
buys the raw furs, and manufactures gar- 
ments, which he sells at retail ; also makes 
garments to order. He has established for 



213 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



himself a reputation which is a valuable 
business asset. To the manufacture and sale 
of fur garments he adds remodeling and 
repairing of all kinds. In addition to this he 
has a cold storage plant, where furs are kept, 
insuring against moths and fire. He is espe- 
cially artistic in the matter of advertising, 
and the letters which he sends out are in 
themselves evidence of careful thought. In 
addition to his business responsibilities, Mr. 
Hoyt is also interested in music. For 
twenty- four years he sang in the church 
choir, and for twenty-five years he was asso- 
ciated with the Orpheus Club. He also 
played in the Court Square Theater Or- 
chestra some seven years. 

Fraternally, Mr. Hoyt is a member of 
Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Springfield ; Morning Star Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons; Springfield Coun- 
cil, Royal and Select Masters; Springfield 
Commandery, Knights Templar ; all the 
Scottish Rite bodies up to and including the 
thirty-second degree, and Melha Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is also a member of De Soto 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
also a member of the Exchange Club, of 
which he has been president. In 1923 he 
built a fine house in Longmeadow, where he 
has since made his home. 

Charles Lyford Hoyt married (first), on 
June 4, 1889, Ella F. Biddle, of Poughkeep- 
sie, New York, daughter of James E and 
Martha (Frost) Biddle. He married 
(second), October 11, 1920, Lottie C. 
Catron. To the first marriage one son was 
born, Lester F., February 2, 1891, in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts. He received his edu- 
cation in the schools of Springfield, and at 
Boston School of Technology, and is now 
a research chemist in the employ of the 
Larkin Company of Bufifalo, New York. 
He resides in East Aurora, New York. He 
is a member of Esoteric Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. He married Anna Whittlesee, and 
has three children : i. Virginia, who was born 



July 16, 191 7. ii. Anna, who was born 
February 8, 1922. iii. Jeane Lawson, born 
Deccmljer 17, 1923. 



WILLIAMSON, George Emery 

George Emery Williamson, Executive En- 
gineer of the Strathmore Paper Company of 
Mittineague and Woronoco, holds an execu- 
tive position of responsibility in the paper 
industry of that section. 

The Williamson family dates back in 
America to an early period in the eighteenth 
century. Captain Jonathan Williamson, the 
pioneer of the family in this country, was 
born in England, March 22, 171 8, and com- 
ing from England about 1734, became one 
of the foremost settlers in Wiscasset, then 
Pownals Borough, Maine, of which he was 
a leading citizen until his death, which oc- 
curred in that community in 1798. He 
served as representative to the General 
Court in 1749. 

Jonathan Williamson, Jr., son of Captain 
Jonathan, born March 15, 1735, married 
Abigail Williamson in June of 1791, and 
died in Starks, Maine, in 1826. 

Stephen Williamson, their son, born 
March 25, 1760 or 1761, married Sarah 
Young, their marriage intentions published 
October 9, 1785; he died November 13, 
1840. 

George Williamson, son of Stephen and 
Sarah (Young) Williamson, was born in 
1797; he married Mary Ingalls, about 1820, 
and died in 1879. 

Milton William Williamson, son of 
George and Mary (Ingalls) Williamson, 
was born in Stark, Maine, July 4, 1826, and 
coming to Worcester, died there, June 16, 
1893. He was long a partner of James E. 
Raymore & Company, grocers, and later hat 
manufacturers. He married Mary Ann 
Marcy, of Sturbridge, Massachusetts, and 
their two children were Frank Emery and 
Mary Stella. 

Frank Emery Williamson, son of Milton 
William and Mary Ann (Marcy) William- 
son, and father of George Emery William- 



214 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



son, was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, 
December 4, 1854, and died, June 16, 1921. 
His life was a record of worthy achievement 
and in his passing the circle of friends who 
were closest to him in his activities felt 
most keenly the loss of his aid and co- 
operation. He married Ida May Moore, 
who was born in Worcester, November 5, 
1854, and died April 23, 1919. 

The Moore line is also one of interest to 
American history and traces back to John 
Moore, who was born in England about 1610 
and died, January 6, 1673, or 1674. He was 
in Sudbury, Massachusetts, in 1642, and 
took the oath of allegiance July 9, 1645. He 
married, in Sudbury, Elizabeth Whale, 
daughter of Philemon Whale. 

Jacob Moore, son of John and Elizabeth 
(Whale) Moore, was born in Sudbury, 
April 28, 1645, and married there, May 29, 
1667, Elizabeth Loker. 

Richard Moore, son of Jacob and Eliza- 
beth (Loker) Moore, was born in Sudbury, 
in September of 1670, and died November 
19, 1767. He lived in Needham and Ox- 
ford and was a leading citizen of his day. 
He married Mary Collins, of Middletown, 
Connecticut. 

Isaac Moore, son of Richard and Mary 
(Collins) Moore, was born June 11, 1700, 
and founded the family name in Worcester, 
settling at Tatnuck Hill. He married, in 
1723, Hannah Newhall. 

Samuel Moore, the next in line, son of 
Isaac and Hannah (Newhall) Moore, was 
born in 1736, and married in Princeton, 
Massachusetts, December i, 1779, Mrs. 
Sarah Gale, a widow. 

Colonel George Moore, son of Samuel 
Moore, was born December 17, 1782, in 
Worcester, and died August 29, 1841. He 
was twice married. 

Luther Gale Moore, son of Colonel George 
Moore, and father of Mrs. Williamson, was 
born in Worcester, December 3, 1812, and 
died, July 20, 1888. He married Joanna 
Wright, born December 26, 1823, died 
January 12, 1907, and of their nine children. 



Ida May became the wife of Frank E. Wil- 
liamson, as above mentioned. 

Frank Emery and Ida May Williamson 
were the parents of two sons: i. Arthur 
Moore, general superintendent of the Ache- 
son Graphite Company, of Niagara Falls, 
New York, married Mary Schuyler and has 
two sons : Robert Schuyler and Frank 
Moore. 2. George E., of whom further. 

George Emery Williamson, son of Frank 
Emery and Ida May (Moore) Williamson, 
was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, 
September 11, 1878. His education was 
begun in the local schools and following the 
completion of his high school course, he 
attended Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 
from which he was graduated in 1900. He 
then spent one year in post-graduate work 
at the same institution, after which he be- 
came identified with the American Writing 
Paper Company of Holyoke, where he re- 
mained until December, 1901. In January, 
1902, Mr. Williamson identified himself 
with the Union Metallic Cartridge Com- 
pany, of Bridgeport, Connecticut, in the 
department of manufacture, in the capacity 
of chemist. He rose in the organization to 
the responsible office of Engineer of Works 
and was active in that connection until No- 
vember II, 1911. Mr. Williamson then 
came to Springfield to accept the position of 
Chief Engineer of the Strathmore Paper 
Company, Mittineague and Woronoco, 
which he filled until 1919. Fie was then 
made Executive Engineer, having charge of 
all mill machinery and equipment, buildings, 
tenement property, power, engineering, de- 
velopment work, personnel and employment. 
The scope of Mr. Williamson's work is thus 
comprehensive of the organization and its 
progress is a definite appraisal of his ability. 

Fraternally he is affiliated with Spring- 
field Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. He is a member of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers, and Past 
Chairman of its Western Massachusetts sec- 
tion ; The Technical Association of the Pulp 
and Paper Industry of the United States, of 



215 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



which he is past president ; and the En- 
gineering Society of Western Massachu- 
setts, of which he is also past president. 
His clubs are the Xvasset, the Kiwanis, of 
which he has served as vice-president, 
the Realty, the Springfield Automobile and 
the Chemists, of New York, He is also a 
member of the Springfield Safety Council, 
of which he is president, the Springfield 
Chamber of Commerce, of which he is a 
director, is chairman of the Committee of 
Management and a director of the Spring- 
field Young Men's Christian Association, a 
director of the Springfield Boys' Club, a 
member of the Springfield Council, Boy 
Scouts of America, and a trustee of North- 
eastern University of Boston. His re- 
ligious affiliation is with the Faith Congre- 
gational Church, of which he has been chair- 
man of the Executive Committee and a mem- 
ber of the Prudential Committee. 

George Emery Williamson married, June 
9, 1903, Alice May Lytle, daughter of Wil- 
liam A. and Alice E. (Jackson) L\tle, of 
Worcester, Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. 
Williamson are the parents of two children : 
I. Elizabeth, born in Bridgeport, Connecti- 
cut, November 11, 1906. 2. Harriet Ida, 
born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, December 
4, 1910. 

Since 191 1 they have resided in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and have a summer 
home at Woronoake Heights in the town of 
Russell, Massachusetts. 



LOCHRIDGE, Elbert Emerson 

Elbert Emerson Lochridge, of Springfield, 
engineer of the Springfield Water W^orks, 
has been connected with that department for 
nearly twenty years. 

John (3) Lochridge. of Scotch an- 
cestry, son of John (2) Lochridge, was 
born in Kentucky, in 1805, but later removed 
to the State of Iowa, where he lived 
throughout the remainder of his life and 
where he died. He was a blacksmith by 
trade, and the owner of slaves, who did 
much of the hard work connected with his 



business. He married and reared a family 
of children, among whom was Isaac New- 
ton, of further mention. 

Isaac Newton Lochridge, son of John 
(3) Lochridge, was born in Kentucky, 
in 1825, the eldest of the family, and died in 
Colesburg, Iowa, in 1902. He received a 
limited practical education in the public 
schools of Kentucky and then learned the 
trade of the cabinet-maker. He later re- 
moved to Iowa, but finally returned to Ken- 
tucky, where he remained for several years 
and then again went West, settling in Iowa. 
Fle married Martha Goldstone Emerson, 
who was born in Colesburg, Iowa, in 1827, 
and died in that town in 1902. She was a 
daughter of "Squire" Emerson, who con- 
ducted a considerable amount of legal busi- 
ness in connection with the settling of es- 
tates. Isaac Newton and Martha Goldstone 
(Emerson) Lochridge were the parents of 
ten children, including one pair of twins ; 
one of the sons was George Cavanaugh, of 
further mention. 

George Cavanaugh Lochridge, eldest 
son of Isaac Newton and Martha G. 
(Emerson) Lochridge, was born in Hop- 
kinsville, Kentucky, in 1845, ^^^ ^^^^ April 
19, 1903. He removed to Clayton County, 
Iowa, with his parents, when he was two 
years of age, and there received his educa- 
tion in the public schools and later went to 
Colesburg, Delaware County, Iowa, still 
later returning to Kentucky for a time and 
finally settling in Iowa, where he resided 
during the remainder of his life. In ad- 
dition to his course of study at the public 
schools he prepared for the ministry under 
private tutelage and was ordained a minis- 
ter of the Congregational Church. Mean- 
time, however, when he was seventeen years 
of age, the Civil War broke out and he 
at once enlisted, serving as a member of the 
Cavalry throughout the period of the war. 
He was disabled for some time by having 
been thrown from his horse and having his 
shoulder crushed, but upon his recovery he 
continued in active service until the close 



216 





t^^ a^C^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



of the war. He held pastorates in Elk Horn, 
Wisconsin, and in Waupun, Wisconsin, and 
finally went to Long Beach, California, 
where he remained to the time of his death. 
His devotion to his work and to the in- 
terests of his parishioners won him the love 
and esteem of the people of his various 
pastorates, and during his active career he 
rendered valuable service in each of the 
places in which he served. He married 
Sarah Annabel King, who was the youngest 
of fourteen children. She was born in 
Spring W^ater, Livingston County, New 
York, hut removed with her parents to Clay- 
ton County, Iowa, when she was two years 
of age. Her parents, Mason Avery King, 
who was born in Brandon, Vermont, in 
1796, and Phoebe (Dowd) King, who was 
born in Livingston County, New York, in 
1808, and died at the age of seventy-eight 
years, were of "Mayflower" descent, tracing 
their ancestry to John Carver. The children 
of George Cavanaugh and Sarah Annabel 
(King) Lochridge were: i. Elbert Emerson, 
of further mention. 2. Harvey Hayes, who 
is an architect in Long Beach, California. 

3. Grace, who married Belmont P. Jaggard. 

4. Edna. 

Elbert Emerson Lochridge, son of 
George Cavanaugh and Sarah Annabel 
(King) Lochridge, was born in Center 
Point, Iowa, June 9, 1877, and received his 
early education in the public schools. He 
then entered Beloit College, in Wisconsin, 
from which he was graduated in 1898. 
After continuing his studies in Chicago Uni- 
versity for some time, he became a student 
in the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy, from which he was graduated in 1903. 
He was later connected with several water 
supply plants in the Middle West, where for 
several years he was engaged in technical 
engineering work, first in St. Louis and later 
in Chicago, in connection with the work of 
drainage canals, where he gave expert tes- 
timony in the Superior courts. In 1904 he 
came to Springfield, Massachusetts, as engi- 
neer in the water department, where, owing 



to his careful preparation, he soon advanced 
to the position of chief engineer of the 
water works, and that important position he 
continues to hold at the present writing 
(1924), in addition to his other duties. 
During this time he had entire charge of 
building the mains and reservoir for a new 
water supply for the city, this, in itself, 
entailing a vast amount of work. Mr. Loch- 
ridge keeps closely in touch with the larger 
aspects of engineering through his connec- 
tion with the American Society of Civil 
Engineers, the Engineering Society of 
Western Massachusetts, of which he is pres- 
ident, and the Boston Society of Civil Engi- 
neers, also the Public Service Association, 
of which he is president. 

Fraternally he is a member of Roswell 
Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
of all bodies, including the following York 
Rite bodies : Morning Star Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons ; Springfield Council, Royal 
and Select Masters ; Springfield Command- 
ery. Knights Templar ; also all the Scottish 
Rite bodies including Connecticut Valley 
Consistory, where he has taken the thirty- 
second degree, and Melha Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is also a member of the Nayasset Club 
and the Publicity Club. His family attend 
the Faith Congregational Church. 

Elbert Emerson Lochridge married, on 
September 20, 1904, Mary Louise Malone, 
who was born in Beloit, Wisconsin, but was 
a resident of Denver, Colorado, daughter of 
Judge Booth M. and Alma Millicent (Ben- 
nett) Malone. Mr. and Mrs. Lochridge are 
the parents of two children : i, Mary Louise, 
who was born July 16, 1905, and is now in 
Skidmore College in Saratoga, New York, 
class of 1926. 2. Dorothy Millicent, who 
was born January 2, 1907. Mrs. Lochridge 
is a member of the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. 



SOUTHWORTH, Constant 

The Southworth family comes of very old 
Colonial stock, tracing its ancestry in Eng- 



217 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



land to Edward Southworth, who was born 
there about 1590 and died about 1621. He 
was descended from the Southworths of 
Salmesbury Hall. Lancashire, where the 
family was established in the thirteenth cen- 
tury, and on May 28, 161 3, married Alice 
Carpenter, of Wrington, Somersetshire, 
England. He was a silk weaver in Leyden, 
one of the Pilgrim exiles who formed Rev. 
John Robinson's Church, and after his death 
his widow came to this country and married 
Governor William Bradford, of Plymouth. 
Tradition relates that Alice Carpenter and 
William Bradford were lovers before either 
married, and that because of his higher so- 
cial rank, her parents selected Southworth 
as her husband. After Bradford's wife, 
Dorothy, was drowned in Provincetown 
Harbor, Governor Bradford wrote to the 
widow in England, and she came over in 
the ship "Anne," in 1623, to marry him. 
Her two sons, Thomas and Constant, came 
with her or soon followed. She lived to 
be eighty years of age, her death occurring 
March 27, 1670. The children of Edward 
and Alice (Carpenter) Southworth were: 
r. Constant, of whom further. 2. Thomas, 
born in Leyden, Holland, in 1616, died in 
Plymouth, Deceml>er 8, 1669. 

(II) Constant Southworth, son of Ed- 
ward and Alice (Carpenter) Southworth, 
was born in Leyden, in 161 5, and came to 
this country when he was a child of eight 
years, where he was reared in the family 
of his stepfather, Governor William Brad- 
ford, of Plymouth, Massachusetts. He be- 
came a prominent man in the affairs of the 
colony, in which he was admitted a freeman 
in 1637. In that same year he w-as in serv- 
ice against the Indians, and in 1647 ^^ ^'^s 
color bearer for the Duxbury Company. In 
1653 he was a member of the Council of 
War; he was deputy to the General Court 
and assistant to the governor ; and from 1659 
to 1673 he was treasurer of the colony. He 
owned land in Tiverton and in Little Comp- 
ton, as well as in Duxbury, and was one 
of the substantial and influential citizens of 



his time. He married, November 2, 1637, 
Elizabeth Collier, of Duxbury, daughter of 
William Collier, a London merchant who 
assisted the colonists in their "adventure," 
and in 1633 himself came to make his home 
in Plymouth, where he died in 1670. Con- 
stant Southworth died March 10, 1679. 
Children: i. Mercy. 2. Edward. 3. Alice, 
married Benjamin Church, celebrated Indian 
fighter. 4. Nathaniel, of further mention. 

5. IMary, married David Alden, son of John 
and Priscilla Alden. 6. Elizabeth. 7. Pris- 
cilla. 8. William. 

(HI) Nathaniel Southworth, son of Con- 
stant and Elizabeth (Collier) Southworth, 
was born in Plymouth in 1648, and died in 
Middleborough, Massachusetts, January 14, 
1710-11. He hved first at Plymouth, later 
in Middleborough. He was prominent in 
the public affairs of Plymouth, where he 
w^as surveyor of highways in 1673, constable 
in 1686, selectman in 1689 and 1691, and 
ensign in 1694-95. He also owned land in 
Tiverton, Rhode Island. He married, Jan- 
uary 10, 1672, Desire Grey, born November 

6, 1 65 1, died at Plymouth, December 4, 1690, 
daughter of Edward and ]\Iary (Winslow) 
Grey, and they were the parents of six chil- 
dren : Constant, ]Mary, Ichabod, Elizabeth, 
Nathaniel, Edward, of further mention. 

(IV) Edward Southworth, son of Na- 
thaniel and Desire (Grey) Southworth, was 
born in Plymouth in 1688, and died in 
Bridgewater, April 26, 1748. He married, 
in Hull, June 25, 171 1, Bridget Bosworth, 
of Hull, and they were the parents of nine 
children: Constant, Bridget, Ebenezer, Ed- 
ward, of whom further; Theophilus, served 
in the Revolution ; Sarah, Lemuel, Benja- 
min, Mary. Of these, Lemuel and Benjamin 
were twins. 

fV) Edward Southworth, son of Edward 
and Bridget (Bosworth) Southworth, was 
born in December, 1718. He was a blower, 
and resided in Bridgewater, Massachusetts, 
from which place the family, with the ex- 
ception of Peres, removed to Pelham, Mas- 
sachusetts. He married, in December, 



218 



I 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



1750, in North Bridgewater, Abiah Lydia 
Packard, born December 27, 1726, daughter 
of John and Lydia (Thompson) Packard, 
and they were the parents of nine children : 
Uriah, Peres, of whom further ; Desire, Ed- 
ward, Abiah, Bridget, Lydia, Avis, Fear. 

(VI) Peres Southworth, son of Edward 
and Abiah L. (Packard) Southworth, was 
born April 11, 1754. He was a cordwainer 
and a yeoman, and served in the Revolution- 
ary War with the loth Company, Plymouth 
Regiment, his service being in Rhode Island. 
He married, March 18, 1780, Eunice King- 
man, of Weymouth, and they were the par- 
ents of : Harmony, Hannah, John, of whom 
further; Edward, Martin, Azel, Benjamin, 
Peres. Eunice, Esther, Sophronia, Lucy. 

(VII) John Southworth, son of Peres 
and Eunice (Kingman) Southworth, was 
born in North Bridgewater, Massachusetts, 
September 8, 1784, and died August 20, 
1864. He was a carpenter and a farmer, 
and in one deed is mentioned as a mariner. 
He removed to New Bedford, Massachu- 
setts, and later to Dartmouth, Massachu- 
setts, and in 1824, was interested in salt 
marshes in Gardiner, Maine. He married, 
July 10, 1806, Betsy Willis Hay ward, born 
in 1789, died September 3, i860, daughter 
of Luther Hay ward, and they were the par- 
ents of children: Alanson, Betsy, Eunice, 
Kingman, died young; Edward, John Hay- 
ward, of whom further; Luther, Eunice 
Kingman, Elizabeth W., Philip Wilbour. 

(VIII) John Hay ward Southworth, son 
of John and Betsy W. (Hay ward) South- 
worth, was born at South Dartmouth, Mas- 
sachusetts, October 9, 181 1, and died at 
Springfield, Massachusetts, January 16, 
1891. He received his education in the 
public schools of North Bridgewater, and 
when his school training was completed, be- 
gan his business career, in 1836, as a clerk 
in a dry goods store at New Bedford, ]\Ias- 
sachusetts. After a time he removed to 
Chicopee Falls, then to Dartmouth, and 
finally to South Dartmouth. From 1849 
to 1 85 1 he was employed as business agent 



for two paper mills in Connecticut, and in 
1 85 1 he went to Philadelphia, where he took 
charge of the paper warehouses of the 
Southworth Manufacturing Company, of 
which he was made a director in 1854. 
While in Philadelphia, he took an active 
part in public afifairs, and in i860 was 
elected to represent the Tenth Ward on the 
Board of Alderman. In 1866 he organized 
the Hampshire Paper Company, of South 
Hadley Falls, Massachusetts, and in 1870 he 
purchased the Carew Paper Company of Jo- 
seph Carew, and while in Philadelphia he 
handled the product of both mills from his 
offices there. In 1877, he was a resident 
of Westfield, Massachusetts, where, in that 
year, he was associated with Wells South- 
worth in the construction of the Agawam 
Canal Company's cotton mills at Mit- 
tineague. He maintained his connection 
with the Southworth Manufacturing Com- 
pany until 1880, when he came to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and was made president 
of the Wilcox & Gibbs Sewing Machine 
Company, He was a man of wide influence 
in religious and mercantile circles, and gave 
liberally for the purpose of furthering the 
work of Amherst College. He was also a 
benefactor of South Dartmouth. He mar- 
ried (first), August 6, 1843, Sarah Law, 
of Nantucket, Massachusetts, born April 28, 
1 8 18. She died August 7, 1848, and he 
married (second), October 21, 1855, Eliza- 
beth Weed Henderson, born August 31, 
1833. died December 14, 1901, daughter of 
Davis and Margaretta (Brooks) Henderson, 
of Edgewood, near Norristown, Pennsyl- 
vania. The children of the first marriage 
were: Sarah Elizabeth, John Wells; of the 
second marriage: Charles Hayward, of 
whom further ; Ida Mary, who married Sol- 
omon Bulkley Grifiin; Edward Courtlandt, 
Nina E. 

(IX) Charles Hayward Southworth, son 
of John Hayward and Elizabeth W. (Hen- 
derson) Southworth, was born in Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, November i, 1856, and 
died in Springfield, Massachusetts, March 



219 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



lo, 1906. He received his early education 
in the pubhc schools of his native district, 
and when he was a lad of sixteen years, re- 
moved with his parents to Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, where he became a student in the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. W'hen 
his college course was completed, he became 
associated with his father in the management 
of the Hampshire Paper Company, of 
South Hadley Falls, and when his father 
died in 1891, he succeeded him as president 
of this concern. Later, when his brother, 
Edward Courtlandt Southworth, died, he be- 
came president of the Carew Company. 
Possessed of large executive and adminis- 
trative ability, he successfully directed the 
affairs of other concerns than the two just 
mentioned. He was president of the Wor- 
thy Paper Company, of Mittineague, and of 
the Wilcox & Gibbs Sewing Machine Com- 
pany, of New York City, and at the time 
of his death was a director of the South- 
worth Paper Company, of Mittineague, and 
of the Hadley Woolen Mills in South Had- 
ley Falls. Politically, he gave his active sup- 
port to the Republican Party. He was a 
member of the Nayasset Club, and his re- 
ligious affiliation was with the South 
Church. He married, November 17, 1887, 
Caroline Ames Bliss, born April 6, 1856, 
died December 18, 1895, daughter of Theo- 
dore and Mary Caroline (Wright) Bliss, 
and they were the parents of two children : 
I. Eleanor Bliss, born September 7, 1892, 
married Ralph S. Hopkins. 2, Constant, of 
whom further. 

(X) Constant Southworth, son of Charles 
Hayward and Caroline Ames (Bliss) South- 
worth, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
December 18, 1895. Pie received his early 
education in the public schools of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, and in Hills School, in 
Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and after due 
preparation entered Yale College. Upon the 
entrance of the United States in the World 
War, he enlisted and was sent to Camp Jack- 
son for training, and in July, 1918, went 
overseas wath the Artillery Corps of the 



5th Division. He saw active service in the 
St. Mihiel sector, and was wounded in serv- 
ice. After the signing of the armistice, 
he remained with the army of occupation at 
Luxemburg, Germany, where he remained 
until July, 1919, when he returned to the 
United States and was discharged at Camp 
Dix. Constant Southworth has always been 
identified with the mills of the Hampshire 
Paper Company, of South Hadley Falls, 
Massachusetts, of which his father was pres- 
ident, and at the present writing (1923) is 
assistant treasurer of that concern. He is 
a member of the Springfield Country Club, 
and of the Mount Tom Golf Club, of Hol- 
yoke, and is affiliated with several college 
fraternities. 

Constant Southworth married, on Octo- 
ber 6, 1923, Harriet Merriam Kirkham, of 
Springfield, daughter of Guy and Gertrude 
(Dwight) Kirkham. 



MURPHY, William Harry 

Practically the entire life of the late Wil- 
liam Harry Murphy was passed in the city 
of Springfield, where he was greatly re- 
spected and loved by all who knew him. 
His great-great-grandfather on the maternal 
side was a Scotchman named James Bell, 
who went with the British to fight the In- 
dians in Canada. He was taken prisoner 
by the Indians, but they treated him in a 
most friendly manner and invited him to 
become one of the tribe. He was under 
the condition compelled to accept their hos- 
pitality for two years, but at the end of that 
time made his escape and returned to Eng- 
land, where he was presented with a sword 
and a tract of land in Canada. He set out 
for Canada intending to establish his claim, 
but was shipwrecked oflf the coast of Ire- 
land. Finding the latter country to his lik- 
ing he settled there and never claimed his 
grant of land in the Dominion. The grant- 
included a portion of the land upon which 
the city of Montreal is now built, and some 
years later a niece of James Bell endeavored 
to establish the claim, but did not succeed. 



220 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Margaret Bell, daughter of James Bell, mar- 
ried Michael Murphy, grandfather of Wil- 
liam H. Murphy, and they were the par- 
ents of ten children, Michael (2) Murphy, 
father of William H. Murphy, being the 
second son, 

Michael (2) Murphy, son of Michael and 
Margaret (Bell) Murphy, was born in Ed- 
inburgh, Scotland, and died in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, August 5, 1 851, in his thirty- 
fourth year. He spent seven years learning 
his trade in Scotland and became an expert 
mechanical draftsman, able to "set up" on 
the right foundation any of his drawings. 
He brought his family to America in 1848. 
He married in Scotland, Sarah Taylor, who 
died November 19, 1896, in her seventy- 
fourth year, daughter of John Taylor, and 
they were the parents of six children, the 
youngest of whom was William Harry. 

William Harry Murphy, son of Michael 
(2) and Sarah (Taylor) Murphy, was born 
in Paterson, New Jersey, December 15, 1850, 
and died in Springfield, Massachusetts, Au- 
gust 19, 1916. He was brought to Spring- 
field by his parents when he was an infant 
nine months old, and in the public schools 
of that city he received his early and pre- 
paratory education, upon the completion of 
which he took a commercial course at Burn- 
ham's Business College in that city. He 
was employed by Wright and Harris as 
paymaster, and later established a connection 
with P. P. Emery and Company, copper- 
smiths ; was private secretary for D. L. 
Harris, president of the Connecticut River 
Railroad Company, and when that connec- 
tion was severed he became associated with 
the wholesale shoe house of Mcintosh & 
Company, on Chestnut Street, Springfield. 
That connection was maintained until fail- 
ing health made it necessary that he retire 
from active life, some six months prior to 
his death. He was a man of exceptionally 
fine character and was much respected and 
beloved by all who knew him. 

William Harry Murphy married, Decem- 
ber 25, 1878, Lida Sibley, of West Spring- 



field, Massachusetts, daughter of Andrew 
and Correlia (Upson) Sibley, and they were 
the parents of four children: i. Marion 
C, who graduated from Vassar College, 
1902. She is now a teacher of mathematics 
in Central High School. Springfield. 2. Jes- 
sie, who graduated from Vassar College, 
class of 1904; married K. M. Washburn, 
Jr., of Springfield, Massachusetts, and has 
a son, Richard Kirk. 3. Lambert Murphy, 
born April 15, 1885, graduated from Har- 
vard College, class of 1908. He is now a 
singer of note and has been on the concert 
stage for many years. He has made one 
European trip in addition to appearing in 
the large cities throughout the United States. 
He married Jessie Lynch. 4. Ray Dickin- 
son, who was born February 28, 1887, grad- 
uated from Harvard College in 1908, and 
is now second vice-president of the Equita- 
ble Life Assurance Society, of New York; 
he specialized in mathematics while in col- 
lege and was graduated with the degree of 
A.B., magna cum laiide. Deciding upon 
an actuarial career, he went with the Mas- 
sachusetts Mutual in the actuarial depart- 
ment of that company as a clerk and soon 
began studying to become a fellow of the 
Actuarial Society of America. At the end 
of four years he was elected to fellowship. 
In 1 9 10 he went to Hartford as an actuary 
of the Old Hartford Life, which was later 
merged into the Missouri State Life. At 
the time of the merger Mr. Murphy joined 
the Equitable Life Assurance Society as 
assistant actuary. Later he was appointed 
associate actuary and later in addition to 
this was appointed executive assistant to 
vice-president Westfall. In March, 1923, he 
was appointed second vice-president of the 
Equital>k Life Assurance Society, No. 120 
Broadway, New York City. This position 
he still retains. Ray Dickinson Murphy 
married Elizabeth Chapin, daughter of 
Charles L. Chapin, of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and they are the parents of four 
children : Chapin Taylor, Lambert, Elizabeth 
C, Ray Bradford. 



221 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(The Sibley Line) 

The Sibley name is an ancient one in 
England, where it is found in the records 
of the time of Edward the First (1272- 
1307), in the counties of Huntington, Kent, 
Oxford and Suffolk. The arms recorded 
are: 

Arms — Per pale azure and green, three crescents 
argent. 

(I) John Sibley, immigrant ancestor, born 
in England, came to New England on the 
ship "Fleet" in 1629, with the Higginson 
fleet. He settled at Salem, and was ad- 
mitted a freeman there May 6, 1635 ; was 
a proprietor of Salem; served on the jury 
in 1636; was constable, and member of the 
church. He resided at Manchester, then 
called Jeffrey's Creek, in 1637. He died in 
1661. He married Rachel Pickworth, 
daughter of John Pickworth. Children : 
I. Sarah. 2. Mary, married Jonathan Wal- 
cott. 3. Rachel, married a man by name of 
Bishop. 4. John. 5. Hannah, married Ste- 
phen Small. 6. Samuel. 7. Abigail. 8. 
Joseph, of further mention. 

(II) Joseph Sibley, son of John and 
Rachel (Pickworth) Sibley, was born prob- 
ably in 1655, in Salem. He was a fisher- 
man. On his return home from a fishing 
voyage he was impressed on a British frigate 
and put to hard service for seven weeks, 
then released and sent home. He married, 
February 4, 1684, Susanna Follett, daughter 
of William Follett, of Dover, New Hamp- 
shire. Children: i. Joseph. 2. John. 3. 
Jonathan. 4. Hannah, married Ebenezer 
Daggett. 5. Samuel. 6. William, married 
Sarah Dike. 7. Benjamin, of further men- 
tion. 

(III) Benjamin Sibley, son of Joseph and 
Susanna (Follett) Sibley, was born in 
Salem, September 19, 1703. He removed 
with his brothers to Sutton, Massachusetts, 
and settled there. About 1729 he removed 
to the adjacent town of Oxford, Worcester 
County. He went with his family soon 



afterward to Union. Connecticut, lived also 
at Ash ford and Ellington, Connecticut, and 
died at Ashford or Union. Children, born 
at Sutton : Priscilla, Benjamin. Jr. Child 
l)orn at Oxford: Zeruiah, August 31, 1729. 
Children born at Union : Joseph, Ezekiel, 
of further mention; Samuel, Jonathan. 

(IV) Ezekiel (i) Sibley, son of Benja- 
min Sibley, was born in Union, Connecti- 
cut, about 1735. lie settled in Ellington, 
Connecticut, with others of the family. 

(V) Ezekiel (2) Sibley, son of Ezekiel 
Sibley, was born in 1766 and died in West 
Springfield, Massachusetts, July 11, 1856, 
aged ninety years. He was a farmer, who 
removed to Massachusetts soon after the 
birth of his son William, settling first in 
Westfield, where he purchased land. Later 
he sold his Westfield property, and removing 
to West Springfield invested in a large tract 
of land and resided there during the re- 
mainder of his life. He married Mehitable 
Hurlburt, and they were the parents of the 
following children: i. Stephen and Benja- 
min (twins). 2. Ezekiel, removed to Ohio 
and Michigan. 3. Priscilla. 4. Allen. 5. 
Elijah. 6. William, of whom further. 

(VI) William Sibley, son of Ezekiel (2) 
and Mehitable (Hurlburt) Sibley, was born 
in Ellington, Connecticut, in 1792, and died 
in West Springfield, Massachusetts, Febru- 
ary 5, 1 841, aged forty-nine years. He lived 
with his parents in Westfield until after he 
married, then he purchased a farm in West 
Springfield where he remained for about 
thirty years, or until he died. He married 
Naomi Miller, who died August 26, 1875, 
daughter of Asa and Eunice Miller, and 
they were the parents of three children : 
Alvin, Celia, Andrew J., of further men- 
tion. 

(VII) Andrew J. Sibley, son of William 
and Naomi (Miller) Sibley, was born in 
West Springfield, and died in West Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, at the age of thirty- 
four years. He married Correlia Upson, 
and they were the parents of children, among 
whom was Lida Sibley, of further mention; 



222 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Charles A., who still resides in West Spring- 
field. 

(VIII) Lida Sihley, daughter of Andrew 
J. and Correlia (Upson) Sibley, received 
her early education in the public schools and 
after graduating from Westfield High 
School continued study in Burnett's English 
and Classical Institute. When her course 
there was completed, she began teaching in 
South Deerfield, Massachusetts, but later 
accepted a position as teacher in Burnett's 
English and Classical Institute, where she 
had received her training. This was one of 
the well-known schools that prepared young 
people for college and many of the leading 
men of Springfield were taught by her. She 
was notably successful as a teacher and was 
greatly beloved by her pupils. She married 
William Harry Murphy (q. v.). Mrs. Mur- 
phy is a direct descendant of Governor Wil- 
liam Bradford, the line of descent being 
through (2) Major William, (3) Israel, (4) 
Abner, (5) Mary, married B. Chapman; 
(6) their son, Elisha Chapman; (7) their 
daughter, Sophia Chapman, who married an 
Upson; (8) their daughter, Correlia Upson, 
married Andrew J. Sibley (q.v.) ; (9) their 
daughter Lida Sibley, married William 
Harry Murphy. 



JOHNSON, Edward Austin 

In the widest sense of the word, Edward 
Austin Johnson was a self-made man. As 
carpenter, contractor and builder, architect, 
and as a member of the Nonatuck Paper 
Company, he met his obligations with the 
strictest integrity, and was widely known as 
a man who was a master in his line. Widely 
traveled, he had a wide knowledge of men 
and affairs, which served him well in his 
various business connections. For the last 
thirty years of his life he was a resident 
of Springfield. 

Charles Johnson, great-grandfather of 
Mr. Johnson, was a resident of Sudbury, 
Massachusetts. He married Grace Solomon, 
and they were the parents of children, 
among whom was Ebenezer. 



Ebenezer Johnson, son of Charles and 
Grace (Solomon) Johnson, was born Au- 
gust 29, 1741, and died December 22, 1820. 
He married, in 1766, Elizabeth Rice, who 
w'as born in 1748, and died in 1823, and 
they were the parents of six children : Ebe- 
nezer, Elizabeth, William, Phineas, Josiah, 
of whom further; Passy. 

Josiah Johnson, son of Ebenezer and 
Elizabeth (Rice) Johnson, was born in 
Wayland, Massachusetts, March i, 1782. 
He married, April 11, 1822, Lurena Stowe, 
who was born September 19, 1797, and died 
in 1869, ^^^ they were the parents of twelve 
children: i. Ebenezer Alphonso, born in 
1823. 2. Josiah Dexter, born in 1824. 3. 
Henrietta Elizabeth, born in 1826, married 
Jenison Jones. 4. George Everett, born in 
1827. 5. Darius Irving, born in 1828. 6. 
Ellen Augusta, born in 1830, married a Mr. 
Hayward. 7. Harriet Caroline, born in 
1831. 8. Frances Louisa, born in 1833, 
married Charles Paine. 9. Emily Amelia 
(twin), born in 1836, married Oscar Eaton. 
10. Emeline Edna (twin), born in 1836, 
married Richard K. Houston. 11. Edward 
A., of whom further. 12. Rosella Stowe, 
born in 1840, who married Edwin Chase. 

Edward Austin Johnson, son of Josiah 
and Lurena (Stowe) Johnson, was born in 
Wayland, Massachusetts, in 1838. and died 
in Springfield, Massachusetts, February 22, 
1 92 1. He left home w^hen he was a very 
young boy, and was self-educated. He be- 
gan to learn the carpenter's trade when he 
was but a small boy and steadily increased 
in skill and in ability to handle for himself 
the work in that line. He studied archi- 
tecture, and became a contractor and 
builder well known for his skill and for the 
excellence of his work. For some fourteen 
years he lived in Holyoke, Massachusetts, 
and was associated with the Nonatuck Paper 
Company. He was a large employer of 
labor, and in the course of his career as a 
contractor and builder traveled extensively 
in the United States. Some thirty years 
before his death he removed to Springfield, 



223 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Massachusetts, where he was well known 
and most highly esteemed. He was a mem- 
ber of the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and 
was always interested in the welfare of his 
community. He married (first) Alice Bart- 
lett, of Holyoke, Massachusetts, and to this 
marriage one child was horn, which died 
young. He married (second), in 1915, Mrs. 
Harriett S. (Josselyn) Hunt, who was born 
in Barre, Massachusetts, daughter of Alan- 
son Kendall and Sarah Niles (Robinson) 
Josselyn, and widow of Lemuel Hampton 
Hunt. Lemuel Hampton Hunt, of Detroit, 
Michigan, was a son of John Powell and 
Sophia Maria (Hampton) Hunt, both born 
in England. 

(The Josselyn Line) 

The known history of the Josselyn (Jos- 
lin, Josslyn) family antedates the time of 
Charlemagne, whose daughter married Count 
Joceline. One of the descendants of this 
union was Sir Gilbert Jocelyne, who accom- 
panied William. Duke of Normandy, in his 
Conquest of England, in 1066, and became 
the founder of the Joslin family in England. 
He received from William extensive terri- 
torial grants in the county of Lincoln, in- 
cluding the lordships of Sempringham and 
Tyrington. His son Gilbert devoted him- 
self to a religious life and founded the order 
of Gilbertines, and was canonized by Pope 
Innocent HI, in 1202. The younger son, 
Thomas, married Maude, daughter and co- 
heiress of John Hyde, of Hyde Hall, and 
granddaughter of Baron Sudeley, by which 
marriage the family obtained the estate which 
has ever since remained in its possession. 
One of the descendants married Anne, the 
heiress of the Percys, and became Duke of 
N(jrthumberland. Another was a signer of 
the Magna Charta. Another is the i)resent 
Earl of Roden. 

Nathaniel Josselyne was born in 1452, 
and was the brother of Sir Ralph, the Lord 
Mayor of London, and Sir Thomas, of Hyde 
Hall, from whom descended Lord Newport, 
Viscount Josselyn and Earl of Roden. 



James Joslin, seventh son of Nathaniel 
Josselyne, was born in England, in 1497. 
He was the first to spell the name Joslin. 
Previously the spelling varied according to 
the whim of the writer. 

Robert Joslin, sixth son and youngest 
child of James Joslin, was born in Eng- 
land, probably about 1560. He married 
Martha Cleveland, and they were the par- 
ents of Thomas Joslin, immigrant ancestor 
of the Joslin (Josselyn) family in America. 

(I) Thomas Joslin, son of Robert and 
Martha (Cleveland) Joslin, was born in 
England about 1591, and came to this coun- 
try in the ship "Increase," in April, 1635, 
landing in Hingham, Massachusetts, with his 
wife Rebecca, son Nathaniel, four daughters 
— Rebecca, Dorothy, Eliza, Mary, and Eliza- 
beth Ward, and a servant. Later, an elder 
son, Abraham, who had been left at school 
in England, joined the family. Thomas Jos- 
lin was a proprietor of the town, 1637, was 
elected to various town offices, and was a 
selectman in 1645. He and Nathaniel Jos- 
lin sold their land at Hingham, March 11, 
1653, to George Land and Moses Collier, 
and Thomas Joslin removed to Sudbury, now 
Wayland, later, with others, settling in Lan- 
caster, Massachusetts, 1654. He and his son 
Nathaniel had lands located on the west 
side of what is now Main Street, a little 
north of the center. At the time he settled 
in Lancaster it was on the western outpost 
of civilization. Thomas Joslin died before 
the attack by the Indians in 1675. His son 
Nathaniel and his family managed to escape 
to Marlborough. The grandson, Abraham, 
had married, and was the father of an infant 
child ; they took refuge in the Rowlandson 
Garrison, which he helped defend until they 
could no longer hold it, and he, with others, 
perished in the conflict. His wife and child 
were taken captive and carried into the 
wilderness where they were both subse- 
quently put to death. Thomas Joslin died 
in 1660. His will was dated May 9, 1660, 
and proved March 20, 1661. He bequeathed 
to his wife Rebecca, sons Abraham and 



224 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Nathaniel, daughters Rebecca Nichols and 
Elizabeth Emmons, son-in-law Roger Sum- 
ner, grandson Abram Joslin. His own sig- 
nature fixed the spelling of the name as 
Joslin, though variously spelled in records. 
Thomas Joslin married, in London, in 1614, 
Rebecca Marlowe. She married (second) 
William Kerly, of Lancaster. Children of 
Thomas and Rebecca (Marlowe) Joslin: i. 
Rebecca, born in 161 7, married Thomas 
Nichols, died in Hingham, September 22, 

1675. 2. Abraham, of further mention. 3. 
Joseph, born 1621, married and had chil- 
dren. 4. Dorothy, born 1624, 5. Nathan- 
iel, born 1627. 6. Elizabeth, born 1629, 
married, in Boston, June 21, 1652, Edward 
Yeomans (Emmons). 7. Mary, born 1634, 
married Roger Sumner, great-great-great- 
grandfather of Senator Charles Sumner. 

(II) Abraham Joslin, son of Thomas and 
Rebecca (Marlowe) Joslin, was born in 
England in 1619. He was a resident of 
Hingham, Massachusetts, in 1647, ^"^ 
later was a resident of Lancaster, and still 
later of Stowe, the same State. He was 
lost at sea in 1670. He married Beatrice 

, who after his death married (second), 

1671, Sergeant Benjamin Bosworth, of 
Stowe. Children of Abraham and Beatrice 
Joslin were: i. Henry, of further mention. 
2. Abraham, who was killed by Indians in 
Lancaster, Massachusetts, in 1674, when he 
was twenty-five years of age. 

(III) Henry Josselyn (note change in 
spelling), son of Abraham and Beatrice Jos- 
lin, settled in Scituate, Massachusetts, in 
1669, and died October 30, 1730. He 
learned the blacksmith's trade, which he 
followed throughout the greater part of his 
active career. He married, November 4, 

1676, Abigail Stockbridge, who died July 
15> I7i5» siicl they were the parents of the 
following children : Abigail, Abraham, Anna, 
Charles, Nathaniel, Re])ecca, Jabez, Jemima, 
Kezia, Henry, of further mention; Joseph, 
Thomas. 

(IV) Henry Josselyn, son of Henry and 
Abigail (Stockbridge) Josselyn, was born in 



March, 1697. He married Hannah Oldham, 
and they resided in Pembroke, Massachu- 
setts, where Henry Josselyn died. Their 
children were: Henry, Lydia, Mary, Mar- 
garet, Joseph, Charles, Lucy, Isaac, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(V) Isaac Josselyn, son of Henry and 
Hannah (Oldham) Josselyn, was born No- 
vember 4, 1743. He married, September 
12, 1772, Lois Ramsdell, and they were the 
parents of eleven children : Isaac, Almorin, 
of further mention; Lois, Roland, Henry, 
Hannah, Alden, Ezra, Sylvester, Jonathan 
D., Martin. 

(VI) Almorin Josselyn, son of Isaac and 
Lois (Ramsdell) Josselyn, was born July 
16, 1775. He married, July 28, 1801, Chloe 
Whiting, and they were the parents of three 
children: Eliza, Almorin, Haughton Sum- 
ner, of further mention. 

(VII) Haughton Sumner Josselyn, son 
of Almorin and Chloe (Whiting) Josselyn, 
was born in Hanover, Massachusetts, Feb- 
ruary 3, 1807, and died in Evanston, Illinois, 
July 4, 1882. After receiving a practical 
education in the local public schools, he 
learned the shoemaker's trade, which he fol- 
lowed throughout his active life. He had a 
fine voice and for many years sang in church 
choirs in Lynn and in Maiden, Massachu- 
setts. He married Susan Sweetser, of 
Stoneham, Massachusetts, who was born 
February 4, 1815, and died December 20, 
1876. Their children were : i. William Sum- 
ner, born in 1837. 2. Abbie Celeste, born 
1839, married Theodore Marsden. 3. Ho- 
mor Ramsdell, born 1841. 4. Alanson Ken- 
dall, of further mention. 5. Benjamin. 6. 
Joseph (twins), born 1847. 

(VIII) Alanson Kendall Josselyn, son of 
Haughton Sumner and Susan (Sweetser) 
Josselyn, Avas born in Batavia, New York, 
June 17, 1844, and died in Barre, Massa- 
chusetts, March 22, 1883. Upon the com- 
pletion of his school training he became in- 
terested in the business of photography, in 
which he was successfully engaged at the 
age of twenty years. In the War of the 



22- 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Rebellion he enlisted in Company K and 
served until discharged for physical disabil- 
ity. He took many pictures of the soldiers. 
Later, he became a successful financier. He 
financed the firm of Xorksinger & Josselyn, 
of Indianapolis, Indiana, engaged in the 
manufacture of the Singer Sewing Machine, 
and later organized the Whitehill Sewing 
Machine Company, of Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin, of which he was vice-president and 
general manager. Finally his health failed. 
He purchased a country home in Barre, 
Massachusetts, to which he removed and 
where he spent the remaining six months of 
his life. He married, January 25, 1866, 
Sarah Xiles Robinson, of Barre, Massachu- 
setts, who was born in 1844, and died May 
15, 1906. They were the parents of seven 
children: i, Harriett Sarah, of further men- 
tion. 2. Louis Alanson, who was born No- 
vember 14, 1867, and died April, 1907. 3. 
William Robinson, born January 16, 1869, 
died February 16, 1869. 4. Blanche Susan, 
born April 29, 1871. 5, Mary Florence, 
born May 12, 1873. 6. Herbert Cromwell, 
born December 6, 1875. 7. Emma Bemis, 
born August 22, 1877. 

(IX) Harriett Sarah Josselyn, daughter 
of Alanson Kendall and Sarah Niles (Rob- 
inson) Josselyn, was born in Barre, Massa- 
chusetts, November 30, 1866. She married 
(first) Lemuel Hampton Hunt, of Detroit, 
Michigan; (second), in 1915, Edward Aus- 
tin Johnson (see Johnson), The children 
of her first marriage are: i. Russell Powell 
Hunt, who was born in Barre, Massachu- 
setts, October 30, 1892; married Florence 
Emma Hames, who was born in Chelsea, 
Massachusetts, July 18, 1896, daughter of 
George Wellington and Emma (Ewing) 
Hames, and has one daughter, Dorothy 
Ruth, who was born August 26, 1922. 2. 
Ruth Josselyn Hunt, born in Detroit, Mich- 
igan, October 29, 1894, who is superin- 
tendent of the Wesson Memorial Hospital. 
3. Marion Robinson Hunt, born in Detroit, 
Michigan, March 12, 1896, who is a trained 
nurse in the Wesson Memorial Hospital, 



FULLER, Alvin Walter 

For nearly a quarter of a century Alvin 
Walter Fuller has been identified with the 
insurance business in Springfield. During 
the greater part of that time he was asso- 
ciated with the Massachusetts Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, but for some time was 
ofiice manager for the Samuel M. Green 
Company, He is at present (1924) w^ith 
Frank M. Kinney in the insurance business. 

Mr. Fuller comes of one of the oldest 
and most distinguished Colonial families of 
New England, tracing his ancestry to John 
Fuller, who was born in England in 161 1 
and came to America about 1635, John 
Fuller was one of the first settlers of Cam- 
bridge Village, now Newton, Massachusetts, 
where he settled about 1644, In December, 
1658, he purchased, for one dollar an acre, 
seven hundred and fifty acres of land, 
bounded north and west by the Charles 
River, and later increased this possession to 
1,000 acres, the entire tract being known as 
"Fuller Farm." This land was divided 
among his children during his life time, 
the division being confirmed by will, with 
the provision that no part of the land 
should be sold to a stranger without offer- 
ing the next nearest relative the opportu- 
nity of purchasing. In addition to his ac- 
tivities as a farmer, John Fuller is recorded 
in Pope's "Pioneers of Massachusetts" as 
a maltster. He died February 7, 1698, aged 
eighty-seven years, his wife Elizabeth sur- 
viving him until April 13, 1700. The chil- 
dren of John and Elizabeth Fuller, all born 
in Newton, Massachusetts, were : John, of 
further mention; Jonathan, Elizabeth, Jo- 
seph, Joshua, Jeremiah, Bethiah, Isaac, 

(II) John Fuller son of John and Eliza- 
beth Fuller, was born in Newton, Massachu- 
setts, in 1645, and died January 21, 1720. 
He married (first), in 1682, Abigail Boyl- 
ston; (second), October 14, 1714, Margaret 
Hicks. The children of the first marriage 
were: Sarah, John, Abigail, James, of fur- 
ther mention ; Hannah, Isaac, Jonathan, died 
young; Jonathan, Caleb. 



226 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(III) James Fuller, son of John and Abi- 
gail (Boylston) Fuller, was born in New- 
ton, Massachusetts, September 4, 1690, and 
he removed to Ashford, Connecticut, and 
then to Union, Connecticut, where on March 
9, 1732, he purchased land of William Ward, 
and where he served as town clerk in 1737. 
He married, December 12, 1717, Abigail 
Youmans, and they were the parents of five 
children: Dinah, Abigail, Elizabeth, Wil- 
liam, of further mention; Hezekiah. 

(IV) William Fuller, son of James and 
Abigail (Youmans) Fuller, was born March 
13, 1723. He married, December 10, 1746, 
Mehitable Tyler, and they were the parents 
of children: Hezekiah, of further mention; 
Dorothy, Isaac, Calvin, Abigail Luther, Ab- 
ner, John. 

(V) Hezekiah Fuller, son of William and 
Mehitable (Tyler) Fuller, was born in Staf- 
ford, Connecticut. He was wheelwright by 
trade, and served seven years as an ap- 
prentice with a master in Holland, Massa- 
chusetts, later removing to Stafford and set- 
tling near the Fisk place, which was later 
known as Plympton Place. He purchased 
property in Stafford, April 10, 1770. He 
married (first) Margaret Tyler, who died 
February 21, 1772; (second) Margaret 
Graham, of Union, Connecticut, who was 
of Scotch-Irish descent. Their children 
were: Amos, Asa, Elizabeth, James, Phin- 
eas, Adna, Chloe, Margaret, Amasa, Jason, 
of further mention; the last four being of 
the second marriage. 

(VI) Jason Fuller, son of Hezekiah and 
Margaret (Graham) Fuller, was born about 
1788, and died February 30, 1848. He was 
a farmer in Belchertown, Massachusetts, and 
a highly respected man among his associates. 
He married Ruth Aldrich, who died Novem- 
ber 17, 1848, aged fifty-seven years. Their 
children were : Elizabeth, Hannah, Jeremiah, 
Willis, Alvin, AIney, Grant, William, of fur- 
ther mention ; Sarah, Mary, James. 

(VII) William Fuller, son of Jason and 
Ruth (Aldrich) Fuller, was born in Bel- 
chertown, Massachusetts, September 26, 



1828, and died October 3, 1895, aged sixty- 
seven years. He married, January 8, 1851, 
Jane L. French, who was born March 6, 
1828, in Williamsburg, Massachusetts, and 
died May 9, 1900. Their children were: 
William Jason, of further mention; Nellie, 
died young; Jennie, died young. 

(VIII) William Jason Fuller, son of 
William and Jane L. (French) Fuller, was 
born in Bondville, Massachusetts, April 27, 
1852, and died in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, November 9, 1912. He received a 
good practical education in the public 
schools of Bondville, and when he was sev- 
enteen years of age entered the high school 
in Springfield, Massachusetts. When his 
school training was completed he began his 
work with his father in the livery and board- 
ing stable business, which connection he 
maintained until the death of his father, at 
which time he took over the management of 
the business. He was an especially fine 
type of man, one who attended strictly to 
business until he had made his establish- 
ment the leading one of its kind in the city 
and had won the highest class of patronage. 
By his personal qualities he won the deep 
respect of all with whom he was associated. 
He was an attendant of the Congregational 
church. He married (first), November 29, 
1877, Emma E. Clough. She died April 
20, 1878, and he married (second), Septem- 
ber 25, 1879, ^lartha Virginia Growl, who 
was born in Harpers Ferry, Virginia, daugh- 
ter of Immanuel and Elizabeth (Ridenaur) 
Growl, and granddaughter of Jacob Growl, 
Alvin Walter, of further mention. 

(IX) Alvin Walter Fuller, son of Wil- 
liam Jason and Martha Virginia (Growl) 
Fuller, was born in Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, August 2;^, 1883. He received his 
education in the schools of Springfield and 
then found his first employment in the of- 
fice of the Massachusetts Mutual Life In- 
surance Company, as an office boy. For 
eighteen years he continued with that con- 
cern, rising from the position of office boy 
to that of cashier of the company. At the 



227 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



end of that time, in 1920, he associated 
himself with the Samuel M. Green Company, 
as otifice manager, and that position he con- 
tinued to hold until June, 1921, Since then 
Mr. Fuller has been connected with Frank 
M. Kinney in the insurance business. Fra- 
ternally, Mr. Fuller is associated with 
Springfield Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons; and the Country Club and the Auto- 
mobile Club, both of Springfield. His re- 
ligious aftiliation is with the First Church of 
Springfield. He married, June 4, 1907, 
Edythe Janes, of Springfield, Massachusetts, 
daughter of Edward L. and Elizabeth 
(Darling) Janes (see Janes IX). Mr. and 
Mrs. Fuller are the parents of one daugh- 
ter, Vera Fuller, who was born February 
24, 1911, 

(The Janes Line) 

(i) William Janes, immigrant ancestor of 
the branch of the Janes family to which 
Mrs. Fuller belongs, was born in England, 
and came to America in 1637, accompanied 
by his wife, Marie. He married (second) 
Hannah Broughton. The children of the 
first marriage were : Joseph, Elisha, Na- 
thaniel, Abel, Abigail, Ruth, Jacob, William, 
Rebecca, Jeremiah, Ebenezer, Jonathan. The 
children of the second marriage were: Sam- 
uel of further mention; Hepzibah, Hannah, 
Benjamin. 

(II) Samuel Janes, son of William and 
Hannah (Broughton) Janes, married (first) 
Elizabeth Smead; (second) Sarah Hinsdale, 
Their children were: Samuel, of further 
mention; Hepzibah, Jonathan, Obadiah, 
died young; Obadiah, Ebenezer, Sarah. 

(III) Samuel Janes, son of Samuel and 
Sarah (Hinsdale) Janes, was born Septem- 
ber 30, 1693, and he married Abigail , 

and they were the parents of seven children: 
Abigail, Obadiah, Samuel, Jonathan, of fur- 
ther mention; Martha, Elisha, Rachael. 

(IV) Jonathan Janes, son of Samuel and 
Abigail Janes, was born April i, 1726, and 
died in 1825. He was a soldier in the French 
and Indian War and was present at the 



surrender of the French to the British and 
Colonial forces at Louisburg, July 26, 1758. 

He married (first) Esther . She died 

May 24, 1761, and he married (second) 
Hannah Parsons, and their children were: 
Ebenezer, Jonathan, of further mention; 
Obadiah, Parsons, Rebecca, Louise Esther. 

(V) Jonathan (2) Janes, son of Jona- 
than and Hannah (Parsons) Janes, was born 
in 1771. He married (first) Rachel Clark; 
(second) Mary Kingsley. Their children 
were : Lowell, of further mention ; Jonathan, 
Rachel, Abigail, died young; Spencer, Abi- 
gail. 

(VI) Lowell Janes, son of Jonathan (2) 
Janes, was born February 23, 1794. He 
married (first) Asenah Janes; (second) 
Phoebe Phelps. Lowell Janes was the father 
of one son, Jonathan Edward, of further 
mention. 

(VII) Jonathan Edward Janes, son of 
Lowell Janes, was born November 7, 1827. 
He married Harriet Ann Lyman, and they 
were the parents of six children: i. Bertha 
Ann, who married Eugene Lavine. 2. Ed- 
ward L., of further mention. 3. Franklyn 
S. 4. Albert. 5. Arthur. 6. Anna. 

(VIII) Edward L, Janes, son of Jonathan 
Edward and Harriet Ann (Lyman) Janes, 
married Elizabeth Darling, and they were 
the parents of Edythe, of further mention. 

(IX) Edythe Janes, daughter of Edward 
L. and Elizabeth (Darling) Janes, married 
Alvin Walter Fuller (see Fuller IX). 



WAITE, Charles Howard 

As an expert tobacco grower, Charles 
Howard Waite is well known in the city of 
Springfield and vicinity. He is a descendant 
of an early Colonial family and traces his 
ancestry to Thomas Waite, from whom de- 
scent is traced as follows : 

(I) Thomas Waite lived in what was for- 
merly known as "Seaconnet" (now Little 
Compton), Newport County, Rhode Island. 
He married and reared children, among 
whom was Benjamin, of further mention. 

(II) Sergeant Benjamin Waite, son of 



228 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Thomas Waite, was born in "Seaconnet," 
Rhode Island, about 1640, and was killed 
in a battle with the French and Indians, at 
Deerfield, Massachusetts, February 29, 1704. 
He married, June 8, 1670, Martha Leonard, 
daughter of John Leonard, of Springfield, 
and they were the parents of eight children : 
Mary, Martha, Sarah, Canada, John, Joseph, 
Jeremiah, of further mention ; Joseph. 

(III) Jeremiah Waite, son of Sergeant 
Benjamin and Martha (Leonard) Waite, 
was born in Hatfield, IMassachusetts, Sep- 
tember 24, 1684, and died in 1773. He mar- 
ried, April 4, 1706, Mary Graves, daughter 
of John and Sarah (White) Graves, born 
February 24, 1683. They were the parents 
of seven children : Benjamin, Mary, Nathan, 
of further mention ; Gad, Reuben, Simeon, 
Miriam. 

(IV) Nathan Waite, son of Jeremiah and 
Mary (Graves) Waite, was born in Hatfield, 
Massachusetts, May 15, 171 1, and died at 
Whately, Massachusetts, November 25, 
1798, aged eighty-seven years. He removed 
from Hatfield to what is now Athol, where 
he was one of the early settlers, and where 
he followed his trade, that of a weaver. 
Still later he again changed his place of 
residence, this time going to Ashfield and 
still later removing to Whately, about 1780, 
where he continued to reside during the 
remainder of his life. He married, Janu- 
ary 18, 1739, Hannah Billings, who was born 
July 14, 1706, and died August 15, 1773, 
daughter of Richard and Hannah (Marsh) 
Billings, of Hatfield. They were the par- 
ents of six children: Mary, Jeremiah, of 
further mention; Elijah, Asa, Hannah, Gad. 

(V) Jeremiah Waite. son of Nathan and 
Hannah (Billings) Waite, was born in 
Athol, Massachusetts, February 16, 1742, 
and died March 16, 181 7. He married, in 
1762, Rachel Bement, who was born in 1742, 
and died December 22, 1814. They removed 
to Whately, Massachusetts, in 1780. Chil- 
dren : Oliver, Miriam, Nathan, of further 
mention; Gad, Benjamin, Rachel, Mary, 
Lois, Jeremiah, and Joseph. 



(VI) Nathan Waite, son of Jeremiah and 
Rachel (Bement) Waite, was born in Ash- 
field, Massachusetts, September 2, 1766, and 
died April 9, 1830. He married. March 10, 
1790, Lucy Munson, who was born June 3, 
1772, and died January 15, 1840, daughter 
of Reuben Munson. They were the parents 
of eleven children : Patty, Thomas, of fur- 
ther mention ; Lois, Nancy, Lucinda, Electa, 
died young; Nelson, Electa, Lucy, John 
Bement, and Julia A. 

(VII) Thomas Waite, son of Nathan and 
Lucy (Munson) Waite, was born in 
Whately, Massachusetts, October 8, 1794, 
and died September 14, 1856. He was ac- 
tive in public affairs, holding at different 
times several local offices, and was highly 
respected among his fellow-citizens. He 
married, January 8, 1822, Electa Kingsley, 
who was born August 30, 1796, and died 
April 24, 1872, daughter of Supply Kings- 
ley, of Williamsburg, and they were the 
parents of five children : Cordelia, Chester 
Kingsley, of further mention; Judith W., 
Charles D., and Mary. 

(VIII) Chester Kingsley Waite, son of 
Thomas and Electa (Kingsley) Waite, was 
born in Whately, Massachusetts, August 12, 
1825, and died September 16, 1898. After 
receiving a good practical education in the 
public schools of his native district, he en- 
gaged in agriculture, which he continued 
throughout the period of his active career. 
He took an active interest in public affairs 
and served in many offices of trust, including 
membership on the school committee, as- 
sessor, member of the Board of Selectmen, 
treasurer of the town, and representative of 
his district in the State Legislature. All of 
these offices he filled with ability and dis- 
tinction, giving notable satisfaction to his 
constituents. He married, November 23, 
1854. Miranda Hubbard, daughter of Elijah 
Hubbard, and they were the parents of two 
children: i. Alice J., who was born Novem- 
ber 15, 1857, married, November 13, 1878, 
Charles W. Marsh. 2. Charles Howard, of 
further mention. 



229 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(IX) Charles Howard Waite. son of 
Chester Kinfj^sley and Miranda (Hul)bard) 
Waite, was lx)rn in W'hately, Massachusetts, 
April 15, 1869. After completing a good 
practical education in the public schools of 
his native town and in Deerfield Academy, 
he further prepared for an active career by 
taking a course in Springfield Business Col- 
lege. When his commercial course was com- 
pleted he at once engaged in farming, and he 
has continued in agricultural pursuits to the 
present time. He specializes in the grow- 
ing of tobacco at Whately, Massachusetts, 
and is an e.xpert in that line. He has a city 
residence in Springfield, in which community 
he has always been active in local public 
aflfairs. He ser\'ed as a member of the Board 
of Selectmen for two years, was assessor 
for six years, and was chairman of the 
board, and he also served as a member of 
the school committee for nine years. Mr. 
Waite is trustee of the Savings Bank in 
Haydenville. His religious interest is with 
the Hope Congregational Church. 

Charles Howard Waite married (first), 
December 2, 1891, Bertha E. Root, who was 
born July 3, 1870, daughter of Frederick 
J. and Mary E. (Graves) Root, of Whately. 
She died April 8, 1891, and he married 
(second), February 13, 1901, Ella Louise 
Wells, who was born in Whately, daughter 
of John and Sarah Jane (Root) Wells (see 
Wells VIII in following biography). To 
the first marriage one son was born, Howard 
Root Waite, who was born February 3, 
1898, and received his education in the pul)- 
lic schools, including Northampton High 
School, and Springfield Technical School. 
On the completion of his school training he 
engaged in farming on the farm where he 
was born, and where his father and his 
grandfather before him lived and worked. 
He also is a large grower of tobacco. He 
is a member of Morning Sun Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Conway, Massa- 
chusetts. He has been the efficient town 
treasurer of Whately for seven years. He 
married, November 18, 1914, Esther Louise 



Warner, and has one daughter, Bertha Ar- 
line, who was born May 16, 1918. To the 
second marriage of Charles Howard Waite 
one daughter was born, Helen Wells Waite, 
who was born in Whately, Massachusetts, 
May 20, 1903, and when she graduated from 
the local high school became a student in the 
Junior College, from which she went to 
the Normal School, and was graduated as 
a teacher in 1924; also one son, Kenneth, 
who died at the age of three months. 



WELLS, Clifford John 

As founder, president and manager of the 
Brightwood Laundry Company, of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, Clififord John Wells is 
at the head of one of the vigorous and 
steadily growing business enterprises of the 
city. 

Mr. Wells comes of a very old family, the 
ancestry of which, according to Albert 
Wells, the family historian, is very ancient, 
dating back to 794, and of high rank in 
Normandy and in England, with records of 
royal inter-marriages covering a period of 
seven centuries, at the end of which time the 
title and estates merged into the Willoughby 
and Dymoke families. The name. Wells, or 
De Welles, comes from "Wellan," to spring 
up as a fountain. It is a place name in 
England, but also has a Norman stem in 
Val, Vals, Vaux, and De Vallibus. The 
family was founded in England in 11 20, 
when Harold de Vaux (a near connection 
of William the Conqueror) and his three 
sons, Barons Hubert, Ranulph, and Robert, 
all surnamed De Vallibus, came from Nor- 
mandy. The descent of the De Welles 
family of Lincolnshire, who were made 
l)arons by summons to Parliament, is through 
Robert, the youngest son of Harold De 
Vaux. Robert's grandson, William, had 
four sons, Robert de Dalston, baron ; Adam 
and William de Wells, of Lincolnshire, 1 194, 
and Oliver de Vallibus, prior of Pentney 
Abbey. It will be noted that Adam and Wil- 
liam, holding the manor of Welles, in 1194, 
took the surname De Welles. Of these, 



230 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Adam died without issue, and thus William 
hecame the founder of the lon^^ and il- 
lustrious line of nohlemen of Lincolnshire, 
whose history is given in full by Dugdale in 
his standard work on the "Baronage of Eng- 
land." Bishop Hugo De Welles became one 
of the most prominent men of his day in 
England. Advanced to the diocese of Lin- 
coln as Archdeacon and Lord Chancellor of 
the realm, his power became very great. He 
was chief of the Barons, and was instru- 
mental in obtaining from King John, at Run- 
nymede, in 121 5, the Magna Charta, the 
document known as the foundation of Eng- 
lish liberties, which was prepared by Bishop 
Hugo De Welles. Four centuries later 
Hugh Wells, a descendant of the family, 
came to America and founded the branch 
of the Wells family to which Frederick U. 
(q. V.) and Clifford John, Harry E., and 
Mrs. Charles Howard Waite, belong. In 
this country the family has been prominent 
in every line of human activity and is rep- 
resented by two United States Senators, 
three Congressmen, three Governors of 
States, and one who held a cabinet portfolio 
— the Hon. Gideon Welles. The Hon. Ros- 
coe Conkling was also a Welles descendant. 

(I) Hugh Wells, of Essex County, Eng- 
land, born in 1590, came to America in 1635, 
sailing in the ship "Globe" and landing at 
Boston, Massachusetts. The following year, 
1636, he removed to Connecticut, settling 
first in Hartford, where he was one of the 
pioneers, and later removing to Wethers- 
field, Connecticut, of which town he was 
one of the founders, and in which place he 
died, in 1645. He was an ensign in the 
military company of Wethersfield. He mar- 
ried, about 1 619, in England, Frances 

(who married later Thomas Coleman and 
removed to Hadley, about 1659), and they 
were the parents of four children: i. 
Thomas, born about 1620. 2. Hugh, born in 
1625. 3. Mary, born in 1626, married Jona- 
than Gilbert. 4. John, of whom further. 

(II) John Wells, son of Hugh and Fran- 
ces Wells, was born in Colchester, England, 



in 1628, and died in Hatfield, in October, 
1692. He lived for a time in Stratford, 
Connecticut, and went from there to Hat- 
field. He married Sarah , and they 

were the parents of nine children : John, of 
whom further ; Sarah, Mary, Abigail, Han- 
nah, Hester, Elizabeth f slain September 20, 
1677), Jonathan, and Elizabeth. 

(III) John Wells, son of John and Sarah 
Wells, was born in Hatfield, Massachusetts, 
September 15, 1670, and died there April 
21, 1720. He married Rachel IMarsh, born 
October 15, 1674, daughter of Samuel and 
Mary (Allison) Marsh, of Hatfield. Chil- 
dren: I. John, born March 12, 1700, mar- 
ried Martha Allis. 2. Joseph, born March 
4, 1702. 3. Samuel, born November 19, 
170-I. 4. Noah, of whom further. 5. Aaron. 
6. Sarah. 7. Jonathan. 

(IV) Noah Wells, son of John (2) and 
Rachel (Marsh) Wells, was born in Hat- 
field, January 18, 1719, and resided at 
Whately, on the west side of the Chestnut 
Plain Road. He married Abigail Bardwell, 
who was born October 14, 1721, daughter 
of Ebenezer and Mary (Field) Bardwell, 
of Hatfield, and they were the parents of 
eight children: i. Lemuel. 2. Elisha. 3. 
Daniel. 4. Abigail, born 1753. married, 
January 26, 1790, Paul Warner. 5. Simeon. 
6. Perez, of whom further. 7. Violet, born 
about 1759, married Joel Morton. 8. John, 
born about 1761. 

(V) Perez Wells, son of Noah and Abi- 
gail (Bardwell) Wells, was born in Hatfield, 
Massachusetts, November 19, 1757, and died 
at Whately, January 23, 1852. He served 
in the Revolutionary War. He married Eliz- 
abeth Crafts, who was born November 11, 
1767, and died July 30, 1848, daughter of 
Benoni and Abigail (Graves) Crafts. Their 
children were: i. Chester, born December 
30, 1782. 2. Calvin, of whom further. 3. 
Lucinda, born March 11, 1787, died young. 
4. Luther, born October 30, 1790. 5. Rhoda, 
born July 13, 1793, died young. 6. Lewis, 
born 1795, died young. 7. Isaac, born Oc- 
tober 21, 1797, died young. 8. Lewis, born 



231 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



June 3, 1799. 9. Lucinda, born August 3, 
1802, married, January, 1826, Leander Clark. 
10, Rhode, born May 17, 1806. died March 
I5» 1853. II. Isaac, born November 26, 
1808. 

(VI) Calvin Wells, son of Perez and 
Elizabeth (Crafts) Wells, was born in 
Whately, Massachusetts, May 22, 1785, and 
died March 19, 1866. He married, Feb- 
ruary 27, 1806, Thankful Crafts, who died 
May 19, 1863, daughter of John and Thank- 
ful (Atkins) Crafts. He was prominent 
in public affairs, serving as selectman and as 
representative to the General Court. Chil- 
dren of Calvin and Thankful (Crafts) 
Wells were: i. John, born November 15, 
1806, died in Ohio. 2. Nancy, born May 6, 
1809, married Noah Crafts. 3. Porter, of 
whom further. 4. Calvin, born October 18, 
1821. 5. Julia E., born September 15, 1824, 
married Alden A. Foote. 

(VII) Porter Wells, son of Calvin and 
Thankful (Grafts) Wells, was born in 
Whately. Massachusetts, January 5, 181 3, 
and died March 9, 1892. His life was passed 
in his native town, where he followed farm- 
ing and took an active part in public 
affairs, serving as selectman for many years, 
as assessor for a long period, and taking a 
generally prominent part in the civil and 
social activities of his community. He had 
a good voice and for many years was the 
leader of the church choir. He married 
Marietta Foote, who was born in 1816 and 
died May 17, 1892, and their children were: 
I. John, of whom further. 2. David Foote, 
born February 11, 1845, ^ied young. 3. 
David Porter, born October 23, 1848. 4. Cal- 
vin D., born May 5, 1856. 

(VIII) John Wells, son of Porter and 
Marietta f Foote) Wells, was born in 
Whately. Massachusetts, May 17, 1841. and 
died in September, 1922. He attended the 
public schools of his district until he was 
fourteen years of age and then entered the 
academy at Conway, became a student in 
the one at Old Deerfield, and finally grad- 
uated from the school at Westfield in i860. 



He immediately engaged in farming, which 
occupation he continued to follow until 1912, 
when he retired. As a successful farmer and 
a public-spirited citizen he was highly es- 
teemed in his community and in his declin- 
ing years was surrounded by the familiar 
scenes and some of the old friends and 
acquaintances of his active days. He joined 
the Congregational Church when he was a 
lad of fourteen years, and at the time of 
his death was its oldest living member. On 
November 18, 1863, he married Sarah Jane 
Root, of Westfield, who died October 11, 
1914, aged seventy-three years, daughter of 
Enoch Anson and Sarah (Utley) Root, and 
they became the parents of seven children : 
I. Etta M., born May i, 1865, died May 9, 
1865. 2. Ella L., born July 25, 1866. 3. 
Harry E., born August 10, 1868, married 
September 2, 1891, Jessie Merry. 4. Fred- 
erick Utley (q. v.). 5. Clifford John, of 
whom further. 6. Etta May, born August 
10, 1878, 7. Lillian Agnes, born June 27, 
1882. 

(IX) Clifford John Wells, son of John 
and Sarah Jane (Root) Wells, was born in 
Whately, Massachusetts, November 23, 1875. 
After receiving a careful education in the 
public schools of Whately and of Hatfield. 
Massachusetts, he engaged in agriculture and 
was employed on the farm until he was nine- 
teen years of age. He then came to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, where he first found 
employment in a meat and grocery store con- 
ducted by Clark Holbrook, That connection 
he maintained for a period of about three 
years, at the end of which time he decided to 
try his fortune in the West. There he en- 
gaged in the real estate business and also 
became associated with the laundry business. 
Finally, however, he returned East and en- 
tered the employ of his brother, Frederick 
U. Wells, proprietor of the Wells Coat, 
Apron and Towel Supply Company, with 
whom he remained for about nine years. 
During that time he became thoroughly fa- 
miliar with the details of the laundry busi- 
ness, and in July, 1920, started in the laun- 



232 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



dry business for himself. He organized the 
Brightwood Laundry Company, of Spring- 
field, of which he is president and manager, 
and has a large and well-equipped plant, 
which he now occupies, and gives employ- 
ment to many hands. The enterprise has 
been successful from the beginning and is 
steadily growing. 

Mr, Wells married, on November 7, 1893, 
Lizzie Belden W'hitcomb, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Calvin Whit- 
comb, and they are the parents of two chil- 
dren: I. Ethel Seldon, who was born Sep- 
tember 19, 1895. She married Fred W. 
Davis, September 8, 1923. Mr. Davis is 
with the Mason Car Company. 2. Robert 
Anderson, who was born March 14, 1899, 
and married Doris Newton. 



SIBLEY, Raymond Alvin 

Since 1923 Raymond Alvin Sibley has 
been a resident of Springfield. Born in West 
Springfield, he spent some time in the Mid- 
dle West, and then for seven years traveled 
throughout New York State and New Eng- 
land as a salesman. 

The Sibley family to which Raymond 
Alvin Sibley belongs dates back in this 
country to John Sibley, immigrant ancestor, 
who was born in England and came to New 
England on the ship "Fleet" in 1629 with 
the Higginson fleet. He settled at Salem, 
and was admitted a freeman there I\Iay 6, 
T635, was a proprietor of Salem, served on 
the jury in 1636, was constable, and member 
of the church. He resided at Manchester, 
then called Jefifreys Creek, in 1637, and died 
in 1 661. He married Rachel Pickworth, 
daughter of John Pickworth. and their chil- 
dren were : Sarah, Mary, Rachel, John, Han- 
nah, Samuel, Abigail, and Joseph. 

From the three sons of John Sibley have 
descended many sturdy citizens who have 
made valuable contributions to the develop- 
ment of the country. The christen-names, 
\^'illiam and Ezekiel, appear frequently in 
this family group. Among these was Ezekiel 



Sibley, great-great-grandfather of Raymond 
Alvin Sibley. 

Ezekiel Sibley was a resident of Connecti- 
cut, but within a few years after the birth 
of his son William he removed to Westfield, 
IMassachusetts, where he purchased land and 
where he resided for some years. Later he 
sold his Westfield property, and, removing 
to West Springfield, invested in a large tract 
of land, and resided there for the remainder «* 
of his life, his death occurring at a good old 
age. He married and reared a family of 
children, among who was William, of fur- 
ther mention. 

William Sibley, son of Ezekiel Sibley, re- 
sided with his parents in Westfield until 
after his marriage, when he purchased a 
farm in West Springfield, which he occupied 
for about thirty years. Here he died, at 
fifty years of age. He married Naomi Mil- 
ler, who was a native of West Springfield, 
and who survived her husband for a number 
of years, her death occurring when she was 
seventy-five years of age. William and 
Naomi (Miller) Sibley were the parents of 
three children : Alvin, of further mention ; 
Celia, and Andrew J., deceased. 

Alvin Sibley, son of William and Naomi 
f Miller) Sibley, received his education in 
the public schools of his native town, and 
acquired from his father a practical knowl- 
edge of agriculture. When he was twenty 
years of age his father died and the man- 
agement of the home farm devolved wholly 
upon him. He purchased the interest of the 
other heirs, and his energy and progressive 
ideas soon developed the home farm into a 
modern agricultural plant. He erected a 
substantial brick house and a large and finely- 
appointed barn, and added to the ancestral 
acres until he was the owner of one hundred 
and twenty-five acres in addition to several 
valuable tracts of outlying land. He was 
an independent in politics, but had been ac- 
customed to take an active interest in local 
pulilic aiTairs. and served as a selectman of 
his town during the trying times of the Civil 
War. On May i, 1849, Alvin Sibley mar- 



233 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



ried (first) Lovisa M. Owen, a native of 
Westfield, who died in 1874, daughter of 
Hiram Owen. He married (second) Mrs. 
Maria (Root) Lloyd, widow of the late 
Samuel Lloyd, and daughter of Benjamin 
and Rhoda (Fairman) Root, of Blanford, 
Massachusetts. Children: i. Emma, who 
married Charles Bliss, and has three chil- 
dren : Arthur, Nelson, and Harold. 2. Hat- 
tie, who married Frank Ewing. 3. Lizzie 
AL, who married Frank S. Dewey, Jr., and 
had two children, both deceased: Florence 
M. and Carlyle S. 4. Arthur A., of further 
mention. 

Arthur A. Sibley, son of Alvin and Lovisa 
M. (Owen) Sibley, was born in West 
Springfield, August 10, 1863, and died June 
25, 1922. He received his education in the 
public schools of West Springfield and later 
attended the Westfield High School, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 
1879. He had been out of school only four 
years when he began his long career of local 
public service. In 1883 he was elected a 
member of the school committee for a term 
of three years, and so well did he discharge 
the duties of that office of trust that he was 
honored with three reelections to that posi- 
tion. In 1902 he was elected selectman and 
overseer of the poor, and served six years; 
in 191 5 he was made superintendent of 
streets in West Springfield, and served three 
years, then was made associate county com- 
missioner and served until January, 1921, 
when he was made county commissioner and 
served in this office until his death. At this 
time he had served nearly forty years in 
town and county offices, by far the longest 
time of any man in his town who filled pub- 
lic office. In all these offices he gave notable 
satisfaction to his constituents and his as- 
sociates. 

Chairman Ensign, of the county commis- 
sioners, expressed his personal regret at the 
death of Commissioner Sibley, and paid the 
following tribute : "He was a wonderful man, 
and his death is a personal loss to me, for 
I had known him for many years. It is also 



a loss to Hampden County, which he served 
faithfully and well. He was a hard worker, 
conscientious in his tasks, and esteemed per- 
sonally by a large number." Mr. Sibley 
gave his support to the Republican party. 
His associates in the county commission said 
that "he brought to the office a high degree 
of efficiency in public service, and that his 
appointment and later his election to the 
position of commissioner met with general 
approval." A local newspaper, in comment- 
ing upon his death, paid the following 
tribute : "Commissioner Sibley's death, so 
close to the completion of the new Hampden 
County Memorial Bridge, was most regret- 
table. His interest in the many intricate de- 
tails of work in the bridge construction, 
notably his assistance through knowledge of 
the approaches on the West Side of the river, 
proved invaluable to his associates on the 
commission." 

Personally, in his home town and else- 
where in the county, Mr. Sibley was popular, 
and in political campaigns he was considered 
by political leaders as one of the strong men 
of his party. His connection with the Street 
Department in West Springfield at a time 
when labor w-as scarce for such work, gave 
him a task, in the opinion of many, which 
he handled well and to the great satisfaction 
of the people of the town. 

On May 20, 1888, Arthur A. Sibley mar- 
ried Plarriet Ellen Smith, of West Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, daughter of Cornelius 
and Sarah E. (Moore) Smith. They w^ere 
the parents of three children: i. Claudius, 
born November 9, 1889, married, July 2, 
1913, Alyson Blake, of New Britain, Con- 
necticut, daugliter of John and Jane (Mit- 
chell) Blake, and has one child : Jane Harriet, 
born Deceml)er 3, 1917. 2. Raymond Alvin, 
of further mention. 3. Naomi, born Sep- 
tember 6, 1898, graduated from Mt. Holyoke 
College in 1919, and is now (1924) engaged 
in teaching in the West Springfield High 
School. 

Raymond Alvin Sil^ley, son of Arthur A. 
and Harriet Ellen (Smith) Sibley, was born 



234 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



in West Springfield, Massachusetts, July 
12, 1892. After receiving his education in 
the public schools of West Springfield, he 
became his father's assistant on the home 
farm, where he remained vuitil 191 3, when 
he went to Ohio, as shipping clerk, but after 
a time he returned East and located in New 
Plaven, Connecticut, where he was engaged 
in traffic work for three years. Since that 
time he has been engaged as a salesman 
and covers a territory including New York 
and all of New England. Mr. Sibley is a 
member of Mt. Orthodox Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of West Springfield ; of 
Pulaski Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Craw- 
ford Council, No. 26, Royal and Select Mas- 
ters; Springfield Commandery, Knights 
Templar; also Melha Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is a member of the Mittineague Congre- 
gational Church, 

Raymond Alvin Sibley married, on Oc- 
tober 16, 1922, Mildred A, Cole, who was 
born in Shirley, Massachusetts, daughter of 
Alton La Forest and Rhoda (Duby) Cole 
(see Cole). 

(The Cole Line) 

Lorenzo Nowell Cole, great-grandfather 
of Mrs. Sibley, was born in Sabattus, Maine. 
in 1827, and died in Laconia, New Hamp- 
shire, August 26, 1903. He was engaged in 
the mill business throughout the entire period 
of his active career, and resided in Stone- 
ham, Maine, for many years. He served in 
the Civil War, enlisting in 1861, and serv- 
ing until 1864, as an officer. He married 
Mary Littlefield, of Auburn, Maine, who 
was born in 1833, and died in 1898, daughter 
of John Littlefield. Their children were : 
Charles Frederick, of further mention ; Clara 
Frances, Edward Augustus, John Nowell, 
Nellie, and Lorenzo, who died in infancy. 

Charles Frederick Cole, son of Lorenzo 
Nowell and Mary (Littlefield) Cole, was 
born in Stoneham, Maine, March 8, 1852. 
He was engaged in the milling business in 
early life, but later entered the employ of the 



Boston & Maine Railroad Company, with 
whom he still remains, located at Claremont, 
New Hampshire. Fraternally, he is affiliated 
with the Knights of P}1:hias, in which order 
he was Past District Deputy. He married, 
February 20, 1895, Nina Small, of Stone- 
ham, Maine, who was born December 30, 
1856, and died August 26, 1922. Their chil- 
dren were: Orvil, Teresa, Alton La Forest, 
of further mention ; Walter Herbert, and 
Lida. 

Alton La Forest Cole, son of Charles 
Frederick and Nina (Small) Cole, was born 
in Hopkinton, New Hampshire, and has 
been engaged in business as a wool spinner 
and an automobile salesman. He married 
Rhoda Duby, and they l>ecame the parents 
of a daughter, Mildred A., of further men- 
tion. 

Mildred A. Cole, daughter of Alton La 
Forest and Rhoda (Duby) Cole, married 
Raymond Alvin Sibley (see Sibley). 



SIBLEY, Frederick Henry 

The protection of the lives and property 
of the residents of Springfield from damage 
and destruction by fire is in the hands of a 
fire-fighting organization which has made 
for itself an enviable reputation for coura,t';e 
and skill. Among those who are making the 
splendid work of the department possible 
is Frederick Henry Sibley, who has been 
in municipal employ as a flame fighter since 
February, 1920. 

(I) John Sibley, immigrant ancestor of 
the branch of the family to which Mr. Sib- 
ley belongs came to New England on the 
ship "Fleet" in 1629, with the Higginson 
fleet. Richard Sibley, believed to be his 
brother, was with him. He settled at Salem, 
and was admitted a freeman there ]\Iay 6, 
1635 ; was a proprietor of Salem, served on 
the jury in 1636, was constable, and member 
of the church. He resided at Manchester, 
then called Jeflfreys Creek, in 1637, and died 
in 1 661. He married Rachel Pickworth, 
daughter of John Pickworth, and their chil- 
dren were : Sarah, Mary, Rachel, John, Han- 



235 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



nah, Samuel. Abigail, and Joseph, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(II) Joseph Sibley, son of John and 
Rachel (Pickworth) Sibley, was born prob- 
ably in 1655 in Salem. He was a fisherman. 
On his return from a fishing voyage he was 
impressed on a British frigate and put to 
hard service for seven weeks, then released 
and sent home. He married, February 4, 
1684, Susanna Follett, daughter o'f William 
Follett, of Dover, New Hampshire, and their 
children were : Joseph, John, Jonathan, Han- 
nah, Samuel, William, and Benjamin, of 
further mention. 

(III) Benjamin Sibley, son of Joseph and 
Susanna (Follett) Sibley, was born in Salem, 
September 19, 1703, and died at Ashford, 
or Union, Connecticut. He removed with 
his brothers to Sutton, IMassachusetts, and 
settled there. About 1729 he removed to 
the adjacent town of Oxford, Worcester 
County, and soon afterwards went with his 
family to Union, Connecticut ; he lived also 
at Ashford and Ellington, Connecticut. 
Children, born at Sutton: Priscilla, Ben- 
jamin, Jr. Child born at Oxford : Zeruiah. 
Children born at Union : Joseph, Ezekiel, of 
further mention; Samuel, and Jonathan. 

(IV) Ezekiel Sibley, son of Benjamin 
Sibley, was born in Union, Connecticut, 
about 1735. He settled in Ellington, Con- 
necticut, with others of the family. Among 
his children was Ezekiel, of further men- 
tion. 

(V) Ezekiel Sibley, son of Ezekiel Sibley, 
was born probably in Ellington, Connecticut, 
about 1770-80. He was a farmer, and re- 
sided in West Springfield, Massachusetts. 
He married Mehital)le Hurlburt. Children : 
Stei)hen and Benjamin, twins; Ezekiel. re- 
moved to Ohio and later to Michigan ; Pris- 
cilla, Allen, and Elijah, of further mention. 

(VI) Elijah Sibley, son of Ezekiel and 
Mehitable (Hurlburt) Sibley, was born at 
Ellington, Connecticut, June 29, 1800, and 
died at West Springfield, Massachusetts, Oc- 
tober 22, 1874. He l)ecame his father's as- 
sistant on the farm, and he also learned the 



mason's trade. He and his father operated 
a quarry at West Springfield, and he and his 
l)rother Allen had the contract to ])uild the 
piers of tlie old bridge across the Westfield 
River, also the piers for the old canal via- 
duct at Westfield. His farm at one time 
comprised five hundred acres of land, all 
in West Springfield. He was a Democrat in 
politics, and a Methodist in religion. He 
married, December 4, 1833, Lucy Lee, born 
1807, died August 22, 1863, at West Spring- 
field, daughter of Captain Charles Lee. 
Children, born at West Springfield : Henry 
A., of further mention; Laura L., Julia 
Lorette, and Augusta A. 

(VII) Henry A. Sibley, son of Elijah 
and Lucy (Lee) Sibley, was born in West 
Springfield, Massachusetts, March 9, 1835, 
and from his earliest years he was instructed 
in agricultural pursuits, which he followed 
throughout the entire period of his active 
career. Before his marriage he purchased 
a farm in West Springfield, upon which he 
resided for many years. He married 
Amanda Cooley, daughter of Rodney and 
Sabra Cooley, and they were the parents of 
one son, Fred H., of further mention. 

(VIII) Fred H. Sibley, son of Henry A. 
and Amanda (Cooley) Sibley, was born in 
West Springfield, Massachusetts, July i, 
1861, and died April 25, 1923. He received 
his early school training in the public schools 
of West Springfield, and later attended the 
Westfield High School. In 1882 he went 
to Denver, Colorado, where he engaged in 
the bakery and grocery business with C. E. 
Stery, but although successful in business, 
he decided to return East, and accordingly 
sold his interests and returned home, asso- 
ciating himself with his father in the man- 
agement of the farm. In this occupation he 
continued until 1890, when he was elected 
chairman of the Board of Road Commis- 
sioners, and later, in 1891, clerk, treasurer, 
and collector of the town, which position he 
held by reelection for thirty-one years, per- 
forming his duties to the general satisfaction 
of the townspeople. He gave his support to 



236 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the I\.cpul)lican party and cast his first presi- 
dential vote for James G. Blaine. He was a 
member of Tekoa Lodge, Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, and of Agawam En- 
campment, and the Mt. Orthodox Lodge of 
Masons. 

On September 25, 1884, Fred H. Sibley 
married Mary B. Whalen, who was born in 
Dubuque, Iowa, daughter of Michael and 
Ellen (Hayes) Whalen. Mr. and Mrs. Sib- 
ley became the parents of three children : 
I. Helen Marguerite, who married Carl B, 
Smith. 2. Rachel May. 3. Frederick Henry, 
of whom further, 

(IX) Frederick Henry Sibley, son of 
Fred H. and Mary B. (Whalen) Sibley, was 
born in West Springfield, Massachusetts, 
September 24, 1894, and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native town. 
While attending school he was employed in 
the bank of the Springfield Institute for 
Savings, afternoons and Saturdays, and when 
he graduated from the West Springfield 
High School, he found employment with the 
Gilbert & Barker Company. After a short 
time he made a change and identified himself 
with the Package Machinery Company, of 
Springfield, with whom he remained until 
July 22, 1918. He then enlisted and was 
sent to Camp Devens, at Ayer, Massachu- 
setts, preparatory to sailing for France. The 
armistice was signed, however, before he 
sailed and he was discharged from service 
December 5, 1918. From Camp Devens he 
returned to the Package Machinery Com- 
pany, with whom he remained until 1920. 
In February of that year he entered munici- 
pal employ as a member of the West Spring- 
field Fire Department, and that position he 
has continued to hold to the present time 
(1924), Few men are better known in 
West Springfield than is Mr. Sibley, and 
the number of those who are included among 
his friends is legion. His religious affilia- 
tion is with the First Congregational Church. 

Frederick Henry Sibley married (first), 
June 15, 191 8, Marion Thrasher, daughter 
of Willard I. Thrasher. She died October 



3, 1918, while her husl)and was in service, 
and he married (second), August 22, 1922, 
Florence Crosier, of West Springfield, 
daughter of William and Mary (Best) 
Crosier. Mr. and Mrs. Sibley have one son, 
William Frederick Sibley, who was born in 
West Springfield, Massachusetts, October 
22, 1923. 



ABBE, Earl Clifton 

Earl Clifton Abbe, general superintendent 
of the Moore Drop Forging Company, of 
Springfield, has been identified with that con- 
cern during the greater part of the time since 
1912, and in that important position is 
rendering valuable service. He is well 
known in Masonic circles, and is one of the 
well established and highly esteemed citizens 
of the city of Springfield. 

The Abbe family is of English descent, 
tracing their lineage through many genera- 
tions in England, where the name is va- 
riously s])elled. Abbe, Abby, Abbey, and 
Abbie. The branch of the family to which 
Mr. Abbe belongs traces its ancestry in this 
country to John Abbe, who was born in 
England about 161 3, and died in Salem, 
Massachusetts, about 1690. In Salem he 
was assigned one acre for a home-lot and 
three acres of planting ground "beyond Cas- 
tle Hill," later receiving a further grant 
of five acres in 1638, another five acres in 
1639, and various other grants at still later 
dates. He was a man highly esteemed in 
the community, as is evidenced by the fact 
that he was appointed to ser\-e with the 
selectmen in fixing the rate of the minister's 
salary, and that from 1669 to 1671 he served 
as a constable. He married (first) Mary 
Loring, who was born in England between 
1615 and 1620. She died in Wenham, Mas- 
saclnisetts, September 6. 1672, and he mar- 
ried (second), November 25. 1674, Mrs. 
Mary Goldsmith, widow of Richard Gold- 
smith. Children: I. John. 2. Samuel, who 
married Mary Knowlton. 3. Sarah. 4. 

Sarah (2), who married Kellam. 

5. Rebecca, who married Richard Kimball. 



237 



EXXVCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



6. Obadiah. who married Sarah Tibbals. 7. 
Thomas, who married Sarah Fairfield. 

(11) John Abbe, son of John and Mary 
(Loring?) Abbe, was born in 1637, prob- 
ably in Salem. Massachusetts, and died De- 
cember II, 1700, in Windham, Connecticut. 
He served as overseer of the town commons 
in 1663, resided in Wenham, and was made 
a freeman by the court of Boston, May ii, 
1670. He inherited his father's estate upon 
condition of caring for his parents in their 
old age, and resided upon the homestead 
farm until 1696. On December 9, 1696, he 
was declared a freeman in Windham, Con- 
necticut, in which place both he and his wife 
were original members of the first church, 
organized December 10, 1700. He married 

(second) Hannah , a widow, with 

three children. She married (second), No- 
vember 16, 1703, Jonathan Jennings, Sr., of 
Windham, and died March 8, 1724. On 
June 16, 1 710, Hannah divided property to 
Mary, Abigail, Obadiah, and five children 
under age, "moved by the love and affection 
I bore to my beautiful daughter, Mary 
Abl>e." The children of the first marriage 
of John Abbe, all recorded in Windham, 
were : John, died young ; John, probably died 
young; Thomas, probably died young; Jo- 
seph, Obadiah, of further mention ; and Abi- 
gail. The children of the second marriage 
were: Richard, Mary, Mercy, John (3), 
Hannah, Lydia, and Sarah, all recorded in 
Windham, Connecticut. 

(HI) Obadiah Abbe, son of John Abbe 
and his first wife, was born in Windham, 
Connecticut, about 1675, and settled first 
at Windham, Connecticut, but later removed 
to Ashford after 1718. He had, in 1717, 
received a grant of fifty acres of land from 
the town of Ashford, in consideration of a 
payment of forty shillings, and he was liv- 
ing there in 1737. He married, at Maiden, 
Massachusetts, December 26, 1701, Elizabeth 
Wilkinson, and they were the parents of 
nine children, all born at Windham : Mercy, 
Obadiah, of further mention; Elizabeth, 



Hannah, Abigail, Ruth, Joseph, who died 
young; Richard, and Joseph. 

(IV) Obadiah Abbe, son of Obadiah and 
Elizabeth (Wilkinson) Abbe, was born in 
Windham, Connecticut, April 10, 1704. He 
was a party to various transactions recorded 
in Ashford, under date of 1725, and was one 
of the signers of the Ashford petition re- 
garding the church, in 1765. He married 

Elizabeth , and they were the parents 

of six children: Joseph, Elizabeth, Obadiah, 
of further mention; Jeremiah, John, and 
Ruth. 

(V) Obadiah Abbe, son of Obadiah and 
Elizabeth Abbe, was born in 1735, and died 
in Peru, Massachusetts, April i, 1810, aged 
seventy-five years. He settled in Ashford, 
Connecticut, where he was one of the signers 
of the petition regarding the church in 1765. 
but in 1800 is recorded on the census list of 
Partridgefield, Massachusetts. He married, 
April 21, 1757, Zeruiah Balch, who was born 
April 14, 1739, and died March 2^^, 1809, 
and they were the parents of twelve chil- 
dren : Richard, who died young ; John ; Han- 
nah, Zibia, Onorah, Roger, of further men- 
tion ; Jemima, Zeruiah, Ruth, Rene, Obadiah, 
and Theda. 

(VI) Roger Abbe, son of Obadiah and 
Zeruiah (Balch) Abbe, was born June 14, 
1767, and died in Peru, Massachusetts, Jan- 
uary 24, 181 3. On May 18, 1789, when his 
intention of marriage was declared, his resi- 
dence is recorded as being in Partridgefield, 
where he and his family were living in 1800, 
though in that year he served as school col- 
lector for Peru, Massachusetts. He married 
Hannah Ferguson, who died in 1843, the 
mother of nine children: John, Russell, of 
further mention; Hannah,, Anna, Sardis, 
Leity, Amzi, Philander, and Electa Philena. 

(VII) Russell Abbe, son of Roger and 
Plannah (Ferguson) Abbe, was born in Mas- 
sachusetts, March 7, 1794, and died Novem- 
ber 17, 1 85 1. He settled in Ellington, Con- 
necticut, where he was residing in 1850. He 
married. May 25, 181 5, Martha Sprague, 
who was born August 29, 1790, and died 



238 



EXC\'CLOPEDIA OF BIOGR-A.PHY 



September 24, 1851. and they were the 
parents of eight children: Lucinda, Delilah, 
Lucretia, Sarepta, Daniel Josiah. of further 
mention; Harlow D., Joseph C, and Wil- 
liam S. 

rVIII) Daniel Josiah Abbe, son of Rus- 
sell and Martha (Sprague) Abbe, was bora 
August 5, 1825. and died in Florida, at the 
age of sevent\--two years. He was a farmer, 
and spent the larger part of his life in En- 
field, Connecticut. For several years before 
his death he lived with his son, Daniel O. 
He married, November 18, 1849. Amelia 
Vosburgh Osborn. who was born August 2^. 
1825, and died February- 3, 1873, and they 
were the parents of eight children : Alice H., 
who died young; Myron R.. Henn.- E., Dan- 
iel Osborn, of further mention ; Charles Les- 
lie, Mar\- S., Gara S., and Herbert Clifton. 

(IX) Daniel Osborn Abbe, son of Daniel 
Josiah and Amelia Vosbiu^gh (Osborn) 
Abbe, was born in East Windsor, Coimecti- 
cut, August 31. 1857, and later was a resi- 
dent of West Hartford, and of Xew York 
City, still later removing to Windsor, Con- 
necticut. He was engaged in the harness- 
making business in Windsor Locks and in 
Hartford. He married (first), October 9, 
1878. Fannie Almira Parker, who was born 
in East Windsor, September 2, 1856, and 
died January- 11, 1896, daughter of John 
B. and Man.- (Parker) Parker. He mar- 
ried (second), in Xew York Cit}-, December, 
1896, Emma J. Gallager, who was born 
Januan.- 20, 1857. in Thompsonville, Con- 
necticut. The children of the first marriage, 
all born in Windsor Locks, were: i. Leslie 
Parker, who is a dentist in Hartford. 2. 
Earl Clifton, of further mention. 3. Alice 
Estelle, died yotmg. 4, Edith May, married 
R. B. Dickson. 5. Russell Irvin, a dental 
mechanic. Children of the second marriage : 
6. Amelia Irene, born November 8, 1898. 7. 
Florence Whitton, born July 13, 1900. 

(X) Earl Gifton Abbe, son of Daniel 
Osborn and Fannie Almira (Parker) Abbe, 
was born in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, 
December 29, 1880, and received his educa- 



tion in the pubh'c schools of Windsor Locks, 
s- ::ng that training with courses in 

i- ::g classes of the Young Men's 

Christian Association, of Hartford. L'pon 
the completion of his course in the public 
schools he began his active career in associa- 
tion with his father, with whom he remained 
for a period of two years, at the end of 
which time he went to Hartford to learn the 
trade of machinist. He was employed at 
die sinking, tool-making, and drop forging 
in Connecticut, with various concerns, in- 
cluding Billings & Spencer, Pope Manufac- 
turing Company, and the Columbia Motor 
Company, for several years, and for a short 
time was in the machine business for him- 
self in Hartford. In 1913 he removed to 
Springfield, and entered the employ of the 
Moore Drop Forging Company, as die 
sinker, later rettirning to Hartford for a 
short time and then again entering the em- 
ploy of the Moore Drop Forging Company, 
of Springfield, as foreman of the die and 
press department. He was employed in that 
capacity.' for some years, but was later made 
general superintendent of the entire plant, 
which position he is still filling (^1924). Dur- 
ing the World War, under Mr. Abbe this 
great plant played an important part, run- 
ning twent}--four hours a day, and employing 
three shifts of men in the work of manu- 
facturing Libert}- Motor parts. 

Mr. Abbe belongs to the Masonic Order, 
being a member of Hampden Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons; the Ro\-al Arch 
Masons, and all the Scottish Rite bodies, in- 
cluding the Connecticut \'alley Consistory, 
in which he received the thirty-second de- 
gree. He also is a member of Melha Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine, and of the Springfield Coimtry 
Qub. 

Mr. .A.bbe married, on October 23, 1903, 
Edith Hathaway, of Suffield, Connecticut, 
daughter of Charles and Qara TMoran) 
Hathaway, and they are the parents of two 
sons: I. Earl Hathaway, who was born at 
Hartford, Connecticut, October 25, 1905. 2. 



239 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Kenneth Parker, who was born in New 
Haven, Connecticut, March 25, 1909; he is 
now in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, tak- 
ing? mechanical engineering. 



PERKINS, Lyman Holmes 

Lyman Holmes Perkins, of Springfield, 
comes of a very old Colonial family which 
was founded in this country by Abraham 
Perkins, from whom descent is traced as fol- 
lows: 

(I) Abraham Perkins was born in England 
about 1 61 3. He came to this country and 
was among the early residents of Hampton, 
New Hampshire, where he had a house lot 
of five acres, and where, May 13, 1640, he 
was admitted a freeman. In the previous 
January he had received a grant of eighty 
acres, and in 1646 was owner of three shares 
in the commons. Pie was a prominent man 
in the colony, having held various local of- 
fices, including that of marshal in 1654. He 
was also noted as a very fine penman. His 
death occurred August 31, 1683, his wife, 
Mary, who was born about 1618, surviving 
him for more than a quarter of a century, 
her death occurring May 20, 1706. Among 
their children, Luke is of further mention. 

(II) Luke Perkins, son of Abraham and 
Mary Perkins, was born in 1641, and settled 
in Charlestown, Massachusetts, where he 
carried on the trade of a shoemaker, and 
where he died March 20, 1710. He mar- 
ried, March 9, 1663, Hannah Cookery, who 
was admitted to the Charlestown Church 
March 29, 1668, and died November 16, 
1715. They were parents of children, among 
whom was Luke (2), of whom further. 

(III) Luke (2) Perkins, son of Luke (i) 
and Hannah (Cookery) Perkins, was bap- 
tized in Charlestown, March 24, 1667. He 
was a resident successively of Beverly, Ips- 
wich, Marblehead, Wenham, and Plympton, 
Massachusetts, where he followed his trade 
of blacksmith. He located in Plympton 
about 1 714, and died there December 27, 
1748. He married, May 31, 1688, Martha 
Conant, born August 15, 1664, and died 



January 2, 1754, daughter of Lot and Eliza- 
beth (Walton) Conant, and granddaughter 
of Roger and Sarah (Horton) Conant. 
Roger Conant was descended from John 
Conant, of East Budleigh, Devonshire, Eng- 
land. Among the children of Luke (2) and 
Martha (Conant) Perkins, was Mark, of 
whom further. 

(IV) Mark Perkins, son of Luke (2) and 
Martha (Conant) Perkins, was baptized 
April 30, 1699. He resided in Ipswich for 
a time, then moved, in 1741, to North 
Bridgewater, Massachusetts, where he died 
December 20, 1756. He also followed the 
trade of a blacksmith. Mr, Perkins married 
(intentions published in Ipswich, June 4, 
1721), Dorothy Whipple, daughter of Mat- 
thew Whipple, and they were the parents of 
eleven children: i. Dorothy, born April 4, 
1 72 1, married Jacob Packard. 2. Matthew, 
born June 25, 1723, died June 25, 1724. 3, 
Sarah, born March 27, 1725, married Eb- 
enezer Packard. 4. Josiah, born January 
24, 1727. 5, Jonathan, born January 25, 
1729. 6. Isaac, born April 27, 1731. 7. 
Martha, born December 30, 1733, married 
Nathan Packard ; 8. Ebenezer, born May 7, 
1736. 9. Jemima, born February 17, 1738. 
10. Mary, born February 16, 1739. 11. 
Jesse, of whom further, 

(V) Captain Jesse Perkins, son of Mark 
and Dorothy (Whipple) Perkins, was born 
December 6, 1742, at North Bridgewater, 
Massachusetts, and died January 2."], 1826, 
aged eighty-four years. He married (first), 
in June, 1769, Susanna Field, daughter of 
Dr. Daniel Field. She died June 30, 1789, 
and he married (second), November 12, 
1789, Bliss Phinney, daughter of Peletiah 
Phinney, The children of the first mar- 
riage were: i. Susanna, born August 10, 
1770, died March 9, 1784. 2. Zadock, of 
whom further, 3. Rachel, born April ii, 
1776, married Shepherd Perkins, 4, Jesse, 
born June 13, 1777, died April 23, 1780. 
To the second marriage one child : 5. Jesse, 
born January 3, 1791. 

(VI) Zadock Perkins, son of Captain 



240 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Jesse and Susanna (Field) Perkins, was born 
in North Bridgewater, Massachusetts, No- 
vember 21, 1 77 1, and died April i6, 1804. 
He married, December 15, 1796, Hannah 
Packard, who survived him and married 
(second) William Edson. She died Feb- 
ruary I, 1852, The children of Zadock and 
Hannah (Packard) Perkins were: Ansel, 
of whom further; and Sidney, born June 15, 
1799. 

(VII) Ansel Perkins, son of Zadock and 
Hannah (Packard) Perkins, was born in 
North Bridgewater, Massachusetts, October 
4, 1797, and died November 4, 1850. A 
shoemaker by trade, he made good, stout 
shoes for men, women, and children of his 
neighborhood, and asked an honest price, 
receiving often instead of money "goods in 
kind" as payment. He was a man highly 
respected by his fellow-citizens. He married 
(first), May 13, 1819, Dorothy Battles, who 
died December 13, 1826; he married (sec- 
ond), September 16, 1827, Sarah B. Leach, 
daughter of Apollos Leach, of Scotland. To 
the first marriage two children were born : 
I. Jason B., of whom further. 2. Isaac, 
born November 17, 1826. The children of 
the second marriage were : 3. Ansel Franklin, 
born October 8, 1828. 4. Apollos Leach, 
born December 13, 1830. 5. Sarah O., who 
married Hiram Kendrick. 6. Mary. 

(VIII) Jason B. Perkins, son of Ansel 
and Dorothy (Battles) Perkins, was born 
in Brockton (formerly North Bridgewater), 
Massachusetts, April 19, 1824, and died in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, April 25, 1903. 
His early education, which was a meager 
one, was received in the local schools, and 
then he learned the carpenter's trade. He 
was compelled as a boy to assist his father, 
who was engaged in the making of shoes, 
and on Saturdays, when other boys were at 
play, he was engaged in half -soling shoes. 
While learning the carpenter's trade he only 
received twenty-five cents per day and at 
times was compelled to walk five miles to his 
work, carrying his kit of tools and his lunch. 



After serving his apprenticeship, he fur- 
thered his education l)y attending the Bridge- 
water Academy. Later he engaged in the 
contracting and building business, in which 
he was very successful. He was the princi- 
pal contractor in Brockton for many years 
and was noted for his honest work. By 
careful study, observation and practice, he 
also became skillful as an architect. In 1861 
he moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, 
where he remained until his death. Here he 
was considered an authority on architecture 
and was instrumental in the designing and 
building of many of the finest blocks and 
residences in the city, and was one of the 
committee that had charge of building the 
Central High School. He was always in- 
terested in any building that would be an 
ornament to the city, and he built during the 
years of his activity: The Kinsman block, 
the George R. Dickenson building and resi- 
dence, the Cooley Hotel, Athol Block, Good- 
year House, George D. Holbrook residence, 
the Smith residence. Dr. Luke Corcoran 
residence, the Wolcott house in Long- 
meadow, many residences in Holyoke and 
Chicopee, Plinsdale Town Hall, at Hins- 
dale, New Hampshire, and many others. 
In addition to his business interests, 
Mr. Perkins was interested in the wel- 
fare of the community in which he 
lived. Although not a politician, he always 
took an active interest in the aflfairs of his 
day, civil, political, and religious. He was a 
great reader and a constructive thinker, and 
one of the interesting ways in which his 
desire for the welfare of the city expressed 
itself was in a plan which he developed for 
the beautifying of the city. Fraternally he 
was aftiliated with the Free and Accepted 
Masons of Brockton, and believed fully in 
their principles. He married, October 10, 
1853, Jerusha Blackmer Holmes, of Mid- 
dleboro, Massachusetts, daughter of Jesse 
and Mary (Burbank) Holmes, and they 
were the parents of eight children: i. Anna, 
born November 14, 1854. 2. Mary, born 



241 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



March 7, 1857. married Charles \V. Hardy, 
Jr., of Xewtonville, Massachusetts. 3. 
Henry Jason, a biography of whom appears 
in Vohime 11 of this work. 4. Lyman 
Holmes, of whom further. 5. Jessie, born 
September 14, 1866, married Frank W. 
Ellis. 6. Frank B., a biography of whom 
appears in Volume 12 of this work. 7. 
Emma Grace, born August 18, 1871, mar- 
ried Ernest F. Young. 8. Alfred B., born 
June 9, 1874. 

(IX) Lyman Holmes Perkins, son of 
Jason B. and Jerusha Blackmer (Holmes) 
Perkins, was born in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, March 29, 1864. He received his 
education in the public schools of his native 
city, and then studied architecture, associat- 
ing himself with his father and engaging in 
architectural and construction work for 
many years. Pie also assisted in erecting a 
number of important public buildings in 
Springfield, including the Central High 
School and the Xorth Chestnut Street 
School, and a number of residences in the 
city. Mr, Perkins has served on the Re- 
publican City Committee of Springfield, and 
also was a representative to the State Legis- 
lature in 1895, where he was a member of 
the Committee on Roads and Bridges. He 
was one of the originators of the idea of a 
"safe and sane" Fourth of July celebration. 
Fraternally, Mr. Perkins is a member of the 
Springfield Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons. 

He married (first) Mabel Catherine 
Choate; (second) Charlotte E. Williams. 
To the first marriage one son, Ralph War- 
ren Perkins, now deceased, was born. He 
received his preparatory education in the 
schools of his native city, and then entered 
Phelps Academy at Exeter and here pre- 
pared for and later entered Cornell Uni- 
versity, from which he was graduated with 
the degree of Civil Engineer. At the time of 
his death, he was associated in this capacity 
with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Com- 
pany. 



LEWIS, Brack Shepherd 

Many of the residents of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, who require the services of 
a first-class commercial printer have learned 
that excellent workmanship, prompt atten- 
tion, and courteous service are to be found 
at the establishment known as the Valley 
Press, located in the Lewis Building, at No. 
32 Worthington Street, at the head of which 
is Breck Shepherd Lewis, organizer and 
proprietor. This concern, which he or- 
ganized in 1910, has been supplying the 
needs of a steadily growing patronage and 
in 1922 the business had so expanded and 
developed that it became expedient to pur- 
chase the large five-story building which 
now houses the enterprise. 

There are several branches of the Lewis 
family in this country, but most of those 
who bear the name in Massachusetts and 
Connecticut are descended from Benjamin 
Lewis, who first appears in the records of 
New Haven, Connecticut, from which place 
he removed to Wallingford, as one of the 
founders in 1669; about 1676 or 1677 he 
became a resident of Stratford, where he 
was the first of the name to settle. He 
exchanged his farm in Wallingford for John 
Hull's property in Stratford. It has been 
stated that Benjamin Lewis, of Stratford, 
was a son of Edmund Lewis, who settled 
in Watertown, Massachusetts, and also that 
he was a brother of William Lewis, who^ 
was at Roxbury in 1630, and a founder of 
Lancaster, Massachusetts, in 1653, descend- 
ant of a Welsh family with a pedigree run- 
ning back for centuries. Benjamin Lewis 
married, in Stratford, Hannah Curtis, 
daughter of Sergeant John Curtis, and set- 
tled first, in Wallingford, but later in Strat- 
ford. Children: i. John, born in Walling- 
ford, in September, 1672. 2. Mary, born 
in November, 1674, in Wallingford. 3. 
James, born in 1679, in Stratford. 4. Ed- 
mund. 5. Joseph, born in 1683. 6. Hannah, 
born in 1685. 7. Mary, born al)out 1688. 
8. Martha, born in 1691. 9. Benjamin, born 
in 1696. 10. Eunice. 



242 




>l 



-o^\ -t 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Descendants of Benjamin Lewis scattered 
to nearly every section of the country, but 
some remained in Connecticut, and among 
these were the ancestors of Chauncey Lewis, 
great-grandfather of Breck Shepherd Lewis. 
Chauncey Lewis was born in Bridgeport, 
Connecticut, and later removed to Monroe, 
Connecticut, where he conducted a boys' 
school, and where he gained an honorable 
reputation as an educator. He married, 
December 5, 1830, Julia Antoinette Beards- 
ley, who was born in Roxbury, Connecticut, 
December 10, 1808, and died in Brooklyn, 
New York, November 17, 1883. Their 
children were: i. Sarah M., who was born 
December 28, 1831, married September 3, 
1855, Charles G. Cawe, of Boston. 2. Rob- 
ert Hunting, of further mention. 3. Charles 
Grandeson, who was born August 5, 1836, 
married Kate Hurlburt, of Roxbury, Con- 
necticut. 4. Catherine C, who was born 
February 19, 1839, and died August 25, 
1840. 

Robert Hunting Lewis, son of Chauncey 
and Julia Antoinette (Beardsley) Lewis, 
was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, April 
10, 1834, and died in New Haven, Connec- 
ticut, February i, 1875. He received a prac- 
tical education in the public schools of his 
native district, and later became a successful 
dry goods merchant in New Haven. He 
married Louise Child Shepherd, of New 
Haven, Connecticut, June 22, 1858, and she 
died in 1885, daughter of Leverett Shep- 
herd. They were the parents of the follow- 
ing children: i. Robert Wallace, of further 
mention. 2. Annie Louise, who married 
Frank Bigelow. 3. Leverett Shepherd, de- 
ceased. 4. Jane Elizabeth, who married F. 
W. Thompson. 5. Marion Hall, who is a 
physician in Boston. 6. Julia Antoinette, 
who married Irving Lippincott. 

Robert Wallace Lewis, son of Robert 
Hunting and Louise Child (Shepherd) 
Lewis, was born in New Haven, Connecti- 
cut, June 12, i860, and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native city. 
When school davs were over he found em- 



ployment in his father's dry goods store, 
and maintained that connection until about 
eight years after the death of his father. 
For a quarter of a century he traveled about 
the country gaining a wide and valuable ex- 
perience, and in 1908 he removed to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts. In 1910 he became 
associated with the Valley Press, conducted 
by his son, and that connection he has main- 
tained. On November 2, 1886, Robert 
Wallace Lewis married Adelaide Josephine 
Healy, of China, Maine, born April 7, 1861, 
died September 2, 1919, and they became 
the parents of one child, Breck Shepherd, 
of further mention. 

Breck Shepherd Lewis, son of Robert 
Wallace and Adelaide Josephine (Healy) 
Lewis, was born in New Haven, Connec- 
ticut, February 17, 1888. He attended the 
Trinity School in New York until he was 
thirteen years of age, and then continued 
his studies in other schools for six years 
longer. When he was nineteen years of age 
he found employment with the United States 
Envelope Company in Springfield, and there 
he remained for three years. At the end 
of that time, in 1910, he established the 
Valley Press, in Springfield, locating first on 
Bridge Street, but later removing to the 
Baker Extract Building for a short time. 
From the latter location he removed to Tay- 
lor Street, where for eight years he con- 
ducted a successful and steadily growing 
enterprise. The business grew so fast larger 
quarters were necessary, and in December, 
1921, he purchased the large building on 
Worthington Street, to which they moved 
in May, 1922, which the business occupies. 
The building, which is five stories high, con- 
tains 21.000 square feet of floor space, and 
is one of the largest printing plants in West- 
ern Massachusetts, and is admirably 
equipped for the work of Mr. Lewis's large 
business. It is known as the Lewis Building, 
and the concern does all kinds of commer- 
cial printing. In 1921 Mr. Lewis purchased 
the Cyrus W. Atwood Printing Establish- 
ment, located in the same building, and this 



243 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



he added to his business. In addition to his 
business here, Mr. Lewis also owned the 
Wise Chemical Company, of Florence, ]\Ias- 
sachusetts. During the World War, he of- 
fered his services to the country and was 
located for a time at Fort Slocum, on Long 
Island. 

Fraternally Mr. Lewis is a member of 
Roswell Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, and he is a life member of Bela Grotto. 
He is also a member of the Masonic Club, 
Mystic Order Veiled Prophets of the En- 
chanted Realm, and in this organization he 
has been one of the most active members ; 
the Automobile Club, the Publicity Club, 
the Chamber of Commerce, and of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. His 
religious affiliation is with Faith Church. 
Mr. Lewis is well known and highly esteemed 
in Springfield and vicinity, and enjoys in a 
high degree the confidence and esteem of 
his fellow citizens. 

Breck Shepherd Lewis married, on May 
25, 1918, Ruth M. Aborn, of Ellington, 
Connecticut, daughter of Miles H. and Mary 
C. (Chapman) Aborn, and they are the par- 
ents of one child, Richard Aborn Lewis, 
who was born October 2, 1921. 



BURGI, Herman 

Among the successful business men of 
Springfield who are deeply interested and 
widely informed concerning public affairs is 
Herman Burgi, general superintendent of the 
Springfield Gas Light Company, and who 
also acts in an advisory capacity to different 
concerns, as gas engineer. Mr. Burgi was 
appointed by Governor Cox, of Massachu- 
setts, as a delegate to the National Rivers 
and Harbors Congress, which is held each 
year at Washington, D. C. 

Andreas Burgi, father of Mr. Burgi, was 
born in Switzerland, in 1812, and died there 
in 1 910, aged ninety-eight years. He was a 
lumber merchant, who operated mills of his 
own and rafted lumber on the rivers in 
Switzerland and in France. He was also a 
builder and a contractor, and remained ac- 



tive to the time of his death, during the 
last ten years of his life, from eighty-eight 
to ninety-eight years of age, riding horse- 
back, and also a bicycle. He retained full 
possession of his faculties to the very last, 
his death occurring as the result of a severe 
attack of pneumonia. He was a descendant 
of a very old family, which traces its an- 
cestry back to 1292, each generation through 
that long period of time being freeholders 
and men of ability and worth, and highly 
esteemed. Politically, Andreas Burgi was 
a supporter of the Liberal Party, and had 
served as a representative of his district in 
the Legislature. He married (first) Rosa 
Weltner; she died August 12, 1865, and he 
married (second) Emma Schorer. The chil- 
dren of the first marriage were: August, 
deceased ; Herman, of further mention. To 
the second marriage four children were born : 
Paul, Rosalie, Emma, Hans. 

Herman Burgi, son of Andreas and Rosa 
(Weltner) Burgi, was born in Wangen, 
Switzerland, August 12, 1865, and received 
his early education in the schools of his 
native town. He then entered the Polytech- 
nic School in Paris, France, and graduated 
from that institution in 1883. After sei\'ing 
for six months in the militia in Switzerland, 
as an officer in the engineering corps, he 
was employed in Holland and in France, and 
later was associated with the Panama Canal 
project under De Lesseps, remaining there 
until the failure of that enterprise. He then 
went to sea for three years in the service 
of the merchant marine of Holland. Leav- 
ing Panama on a sailing vessel engaged in 
carrying freight, he later went to Cardiff, 
Wales, then to the East Indies, to Valpa- 
raiso, in South America, to the West Indies, 
and then back to Europe. Later, he went 
to San Domingo, and from there came to 
America in a condemned vessel, landing here 
in 1888. He located, first, in New York 
City, where he remained for a period of 
seventeen years. Here he learned the gas 
business, beginning as an ordinary work- 
man, shoveling coal in a gas house. From 



244 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



that lowly position he worked his way up- 
ward until finally he was made superintend- 
ent for the Light, Heat & Power Company, 
at Astoria, New York. In 1906 the 
Springfield Gas Light Company offered him 
a position as general superintendent, and in 
that capacity he has since served continu- 
ously, serving also in an advisory capacity 
to various other concerns. He is well known 
as an expert in his line, and in his chosen 
field he ranks as an authority. He has se- 
cured ten different patents of his own on 
processes and devices connected with the 
combustion of gases, and has been of inval- 
uable service to the corporation with which 
he is associated. 

Mr. Burgi is much interested in the sub- 
ject of inland waterways, and has been 
largely instrumental in the effort to open the 
Connecticut River to navigation. Governor 
Cox, of Massachusetts, appointed him as a 
delegate to the National Rivers and Harbors 
Congress, which is held in Washington, D. 
C, each fall, and with characteristic thor- 
oughness Mr. Burgi has made himself thor- 
oughly master of all the details of knowledge 
and information concerning that subject. 
He was first appointed in 1922, and was 
reappointed in 1923. He feels this project 
is vastly important to the interests of the 
New England section of the country. He 
is a member of the Springfield Yacht Club, 
and is affiliated with other interests of the 
community in which he lives. 

Mr. Burgi married, in 1890, Minna Pap- 
pendick, of Lithanen, Germany, and they 
are the parents of three children, all born 
in New York: i. Elsa, who is a teacher in 
Public Normal School, in New York City. 
2, Herman, who is a graduate of Columbia 
University, and is an electrical engineer in 
Portland, Maine. 3. Lucy, a graduate of 
Barnard College, who is a teacher in Clin- 
ton, New Jersey. 



WARNER, Raymond Cooley 

Throughout the entire period of his busi- 
ness career Raymond Cooley Warner has 



been associated with the engraving business, 
and at the present time (1924) he is at the 
head of two prosperous concerns, one lo- 
cated in Springfield and the other operating 
in Holyoke, Massachusetts, under the name 
of The Warner Branch, a corporation of 
which Mr. Warner is president. 

The surname Warner is of ancient Eng- 
lish origin and various branches of the fam- 
ilies are now living in counties Kent, Nor- 
folk, Suffolk, Warwick, and York, in Eng- 
land ; in Ayrshire, Scotland ; and in Ireland. 

(I) Andrew Warner, immigrant ances- 
tor, was born in England about 1600, a son 
of John Warner, of Hatfield, Gloucester, 
England, and came from there to Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, in 1630 or 1633, becoming a 
proprietor of Cambridge in that year. He 
was admitted a freeman, May 14, 1634. In 
1635 he was living in Cambridge on the 
northeasterly side of Eliot Street about half- 
way between the westerly end of Winthrop 
Street and Brighton Street and owned sev- 
eral other lots in Cambridge. He sold his 
property there to Captain George Cooke, 
December 20, 1636, and removed to Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. Thence, about 1659, he 
went to Hadley, Massachusetts, where he 
was one of the first settlers, and where he 
died December 18, 1684. His will dated 
June 18, 1681, was proved March 31, 1685. 
He was twice married, the Christian name 
of his second wife being Esther, widow of 
Thomas Selden. She died in 1693. Their 
children were : Andrew, Robert, Jacob, Dan- 
iel, of further mention ; Isaac, Mary, John. 

(II) Lieutenant Daniel Warner, son of 
Andrew Warner, was born about 1640. He 
went in 1659 with his father to Hadley and 
settled in that part of the town afterwards 
called Hatfield, where he died April 30, 
1692. He was a farmer, owning much land. 
He married (first) Mary, surname unknown, 
who died in Hatfield, September 19, 1672. 
He married (second), April i, 1674, Martha 
Boltwood, daughter of Robert Boltwood. 
She died September 2.2, 1710. Children: 
Mary, Sarah, Daniel, of further mention; 



245 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Andrew, Anna, Mary, Hannah. John, Abra- 
ham, Samuel Ebenezer, Mehitaljle, Elizabeth, 
Esther, Martha, Nathaniel. 

(III) Daniel Warner, Jr., son of Lieu- 
tenant Daniel and Mary Warner, was born 
in Hadley, Massachusetts, in 1666, and died 
in Hardwick, Massachusetts, March 12, 
1754. He resided in Hatfield and Sunder- 
land, and finally removed to Hardwick, Mas- 
sachusetts, where some of his children were 
already settled. He married (first) Decem- 
ber 12, 1688, Mary Hubbard, who was born 
April 10, 1669, daughter of John and Mary 
(Me^riam) Hubbard. He married (sec- 
ond) Thankful Billing, August 14, 1 714. 
She died June 13, 1716. Children of the 
first marriage were : Mary, died young ; 
Daniel, Mary, Hannah, Jonathan, Sarah, Jo- 
seph, of further mention. To the second 
marriage was born one daughter, Thankful. 

(IV) Captain Joseph Warner, son of 
Daniel, Jr., and Mary (Hubbard) Warner, 
was born in Hatfield, Massachusetts, June 
18, 1 7 10, and died in Cummington, Massa- 
chusetts, April 20, 1794. Prior to 1747 he 
removed to Hardwick, IMassachusetts, where 
he took an active part in the public afifairs 
of the neighborhood, as is shown by the 
frequent appearance of his name in the town, 
church, and military records that have been 
preserved. Captain Joseph Warner led a 
company, in Colonel Timothy Ruggles' regi- 
ment, to the relief of Fort William Henry, 
August 9, 1757, during the French and 
Indian Wars. In 1761 as captain of the 
second Hardwick company. Colonel John 
Murray's regiment, he enlisted for service 
in the campaign planned for the invasion of 
Canada. He api)ears to have been in pros- 
perous circumstances and was one of the 
few slaveholders of Hardwick. Later he 
removed to Cummington, Massachusetts, and 
was moderator of the first meeting of the 
proprietors of that town, July 19, 1771. He 
married (first) June 19, 1738, Mary Hub- 
bard, who was born July 28, 1719, and died 
March 2, 1779, daughter of John and Han- 
nah (Cowles) Hubbard. He married (sec- 



ond) November 12, 1781, Mrs. Rebecca 
Spooner, who was born May 12, 1718, and 
died in January, 1812. Children of the 
first marriage were: Elijah, Mary, Joseph, 
of further mention; Stephen, Anna, Hannah, 
John, Persis, Moses, Huldah. 

(V) Joseph (2) Warner, son of Captain 
Joseph and Mary (Hul)bard) Warner, was 
born in Hatfield, Massachusetts, July 2, 
1743, and died in Cummington, Massachu- 
setts, June 8, 181 8. He was chosen, in 
1779, to be lieutenant of a company of 
minute-men pledged to take the field at a 
moment's notice. This company was raised 
in anticipation of the approaching conflict 
with the British authorities, and when the 
news of the battle of Lexington was brought 
to the town, the company, under the com- 
mand of Lieutenant Joseph Warner, 
marched to Lexington, stopping at Wil- 
liamsburg for recruits, and leaving the lat- 
ter place on April 21, after a service of 
seven days. The company reenlisted in 
Captain Abel Thayer's company. Colonel 
John Fellows' regiment, and Joseph Warner, 
Jr., was commissioned lieutenant of the 
company. On March 22, 1776, he was 
commissioned captain of the fifteenth com- 
pany, second Hampshire county regiment ; 
and on August 16, 1777, he was commis- 
sioned captain of Colonel Benjamin Ruggles 
Woodbridge's regiment, with which he 
served in the battle of Saratoga. Besides 
his actual service on the field he loaned the 
town money to pay its soldiers. In times 
of peace as well as in times of war. Captain 
Joseph Warner was active and efficient. He 
held various town offices and was also deeply 
interested in the afifairs of the church. 

He married, November 14, 1764, Mary 
Whipple, who was born February 19, 1745, 
and died March 24, 1813, daughter of Jo- 
seph and Mary (Whipple) Whipple. Their 
children were : Susannah, Paul, Sally, Mary, 
Rhoda, John, Lydia, Joseph, Cynthia, Jo- 
seph, of further mention, 

(VI) Joseph (3) Warner, son of Cap- 
tain Joseph and Mary (Whipple) Warner, 



246 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



was born in Cummington, Massachusetts, 
September 29, 1788, and died May 10, 1864. 
On August 14, 18 14, he was elected Heu- 
tenant of a company, a regiment of cavalry 
of the 2d Brigade, 4th Division, Massachu- 
setts Militia, and on June 31, 181 8, re- 
ceived his commission, which is still in the 
possession of the family. On March 3, 
1 819, he was elected captain of a company 
in the regiment of cavalry, 2d Brigade, 
4th Division, of the Militia of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. 

In December, 1812, Joseph (3) Warner 
married Olive Holbrook, who was born Oc- 
tober 18, 1790, and died December 22, 1874, 
daughter of Amos and Lydia (Owen) Hol- 
brook. Their children were : Lydia Owen, 
Francis Joseph, Franklin John, Sumner Hol- 
brook, of further mention; Mary Ann, Lo- 
vina Swan. 

(VII) Sumner Holbrook Warner, son of 
Joseph (3) and Olive (Holbrook) Warner, 
was born in Cummington, Massachusetts, 
May 12, 1821, and died April 4, 1905, at 
Springfield, Massachusetts. After receiving 
a practical education in the local public 
schools, he learned the carpenter's trade and 
was for a time engaged in business as a 
carpenter and builder, in La Crosse, Wiscon- 
sin. Later he returned East and entered 
the employ of the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road as general repairer and inspector of the 
woodwork on engines. That connection he 
held for a period of twenty-nine years, at 
the end of which time he was retired, to 
enjoy several years of leisure. 

In 1849 Sumner Holbrook Warner mar- 
ried Delia Hubbard, of Brimfield, Massachu- 
setts. She died, December 31, 1850, and 
he married (second) Sarah Elizabeth Chap- 
pell, who was born in Lebanon, Connecticut, 
March 14, 1832, and died in La Crosse, 
Wisconsin, December 23, 1856. He married 
(third), April 18, 1858, Emily Robinson, 
who died October 8, 1859. He married 
(fourth), July 14, 1864, Marietta Flower, 
of Feeding Hills, Massachusetts, and she 
died June 2, 191 3. To the second marriage 



was born one son, Walter Holbrook, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(VIII) Walter Holbrook Warner, son of 
Sumner Holbrook and Sarah Elizabeth 
(Chappell) Warner, was born in Meriden, 
Connecticut, August 20, 1855, and died in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1922, He re- 
moved with his parents to Springfield while 
a young Ijoy, and received his early school- 
ing in the Hooker Street School in Spring- 
field, later attending a boarding school near 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts. When he was six- 
teen years of age he started to learn the 
engravers' trade and associated himself with 
Mr. Fred Martin, of Springfield, with whom 
he remained for a period of two years. At 
the expiration of that time he purchased 
Mr. Martin's business and for more than 
forty years was successfully engaged in the 
engraving business in Springfield. He 
worked only in metal, and for many years 
was the only engraver in that part of the 
county. He was an expert in his field and 
included stamp cutting, die sinking, etc., in 
his list of accomplishments. His business 
was first located at the corner of Hillman 
and Main Streets, but later was removed to 
Main Street, on the site where the Forbes 
& Wallace store is now located. Still later 
he removed to the present location of the 
business at No. 327 Main Street, where he 
took a life lease for twelve dollars a month; 
that lease automatically expired with the de- 
cease of the leasee, and Mr. Warner's son, 
the present owner of the business, has drawn 
a new lease at a figure which is several 
times larger than tlie one named in his 
father's agreement. In 191 6 Mr. Warner 
retired, turning the management of the busi- 
ness over to his son. Politically, he gave 
his sujiport to the Republican party; and 
fraternally, he was affiliated with Roswell 
Lee Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; and 
with George Washington Chapter, Sons of 
the American Revolution. He was also a 
member of the Rotary Club, and of the 
Automobile Club. In religious affairs he 
took an active interest and for many years 



247 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



served as usher in the First Congregational 
Church, of which he was a member. 

On February 27, 1878, Walter Holbrook 
Warner married Harriet Jeannette Cooley, 
of Springfield. Massachusetts, daughter of 
Carmi Ralzaman and Sophia J. (Ashby) 
Cooley. Carmi Ralzaman Cooley was born 
in East Windsor, Connecticut, June i, 1809, 
and died in Springfield, Massachusetts, May 
25, 1876. He was the son of Charles and 
Eunice Cooley and grandson of Samuel 
Cooley, who married, October 29, 171 1, 
Mary Clark. Children of Walter H. and 
Harriet Jeannette (Cooley) Warner were: 
I. Raymond Cooley, of further mention. 2. 
Fakoline Jeannette, who was born July i, 
1885. and died October 21, 1887. 3. Sarah 
Madeline, born September 17, 1888, married, 
April 15, 1 91 6, Archibald Gardner Fletcher. 

(IX) Raymond Cooley Warner, son of 
Walter Holbrook and Harriet Jeannette 
(Cooley) Warner, was born in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, August 30, 1880. After at- 
tending the public schools of Springfield, 
including the high school, he continued his 
studies for one year in Wilbraham Acad- 
emy, at Wilbraham, Massachusetts. He 
then attended the Mechanics' Art School 
and two years later he learned the 
engraver's trade with his father. After 
mastering his trade he enlarged his experi- 
ence by associating himself, first, with the 
Waltham ^Machine Tool Company for a 
short time, and then identifying himself 
with Wilcox & Holbrook, as a pattern 
maker. In 1901 he went West and was 
one of the first to travel to the Grand Canyon 
over the railroad line which had just been 
completed, arriving at the Grand Canyon 
before there was a hotel for the accommo- 
dation of tourists. After working at his 
trade for a time in Phoenix, Arizona, he 
went still further West, stopping at Salt 
Lake City for a time and then going to San 
Francisco, and to Los Angeles, California. 
The Western experience had occupied a 
space of about two years, when he decided 
to return East. In Boston and in Provi- 



dence he again made himself acquainted with 
the conditions of the engraver's trade in the 
East, and then finally located in Springfield, 
where he was associated with the engraver's 
business of his father from 1903 to 1916. 
In 1916, at the time of his father's retire- 
ment, he took over the management of his 
business w^hich he has continued to the pres- 
ent time. In addition to the successful man- 
agement of the concern in Springfield, Mr. 
Warner also has a large plant in Holyoke, 
IMassachusetts, which operates under the 
name of the Warner Branch, a corporation 
of which he is chief executive. This plant 
does an extensive business in the engraving 
of cards and office stationery, in addition to 
a general line of engraving and die stamping. 
Fraternally, ]\Ir. Warner is affiliated with 
Samuel Sherwood Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of which he is a charter 
member ; he is also a member of Newton 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of Wil- 
braham. 

On June 15, 1905, Raymond Cooley War- 
ner married Sarah Beatrice Welch, of West 
Granville, Massachusetts, and they are the 
parents of three children: i. Beatrice Fako- 
line, who was born April 24, 1906. 2. Ray- 
mond Cooley, born March 6, 1907. 3. Har- 
riet Welch, who was born November 7, 
1909, and died November 21, 1910. 



DRUMHELLER, William Philip 

For the past decade and a half, William 
P. Drumheller, one of the well-known ex- 
])erts in the manufacture of underwear, has 
been a resident of the city of Springfield, 
devoting his entire attention to his position 
of superintending the William Carter Knit- 
ting Company's plants located in Needham, 
Springfield, and Framingham, Massachu- 
setts, also the southern chain of mills in 
North Carolina and Georgia, and who was, in 
November, 1924, made general superintend- 
ent. This company represents one of the 
largest manufacturers of underwear in the 
world, the history of which will be found 
later in this article. Mr. Drumheller is a 



248 




JAaJAacu^ U ^^t^^-i^^^^JjUM^ 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



representative of a family which had been 
located in this country since the eighteenth 
century. 

(I) Dewalt Drumheller, pioneer ancestor, 
emigrated to the New \Vorld from Ger- 
many, locating in Rockland Township, Berks 
County, Pennsylvania. He patented land 
in Rockville Township in 1752, and his name 
occurs as a communicant of the Hills Church 
in 1755. He married, and among his known 
children were: i. John Leonard, who was 
born about 1724 and died in 1809, leaving 
a large family. 2. Jacob, who died in 1784, 
was a soldier in the Revolution. 3. Adam. 
4. Nicholas, of whom further, 5. Catherine. 
6. Elizabeth. 

fll) Nicholas Drumheller, son of Dewalt 
Drumheller, was born in 1750, and died 
March 27, 1823, in Mahantango Valley, 
Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. He 
was an active participant in the Revolution- 
ary War. He married Catherine Fisher, 
who died December 13, 1832, aged seventy- 
three years, ten months. Children : i. Philip, 
of whom further. 2. David. 3. Abraham. 
4. Daniel. 5. Martin. 6. Nicholas, Jr., mar- 
ried twice and by a first marriage had two 
sons, John and Jacob, the eldest settling in 
Berks County, Pennsylvania, and the young- 
est going to Virginia, settling permanently 
near Amherst Court House. 7. Margaret, 
married John Schover, 8. Catherine, mar- 
ried John Rumpel. 9. Susan, married Jacob 
Hoffman. 10, Elizabeth, married John 
Baum. 

(HI) Philip Drumheller, son of Nicholas 
and Catherine (Fisher) Drumheller, was 
born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, He 
was an upright, conscientious man, prosf)er- 
ous in his undertakings, and esteemed by all 
who knew him. He married Elizabeth 
Emerich, and they were the parents of six 
children : Henry, Elizabeth, married Joseph 
Derbert; Joseph, Samuel, Daniel, Benjamin 
Emerich, of whom further. 

(IV) Benjamin Emerich Drumheller, son 
of Philip and Elizabeth (Emerich) Drum- 
heller, was born in Landingville, Schuylkill 



County, Pennsylvania, in 1855. and died in 
1888. He attended the schools in the vi- 
cinity of his home, receiving a practical edu- 
cation. During his active business career 
he was the proprietor of a general store in 
his native town, in which enterprise he was 
successful. In addition to this he was also 
a boat ])uilder, which trade he followed in 
conjunction with his store for many years. 

He married Rebecca Deibert, born in , 

1836, died 1920, and they were the parents 
of nine children: i. Elizabeth, married 
Thomas Haesler, 2. Albert, deceased, mar- 
ried Annie Kern, and they were the parents 
of two sons, Albert and Philip. 3. Mary, 
married Dr. Schultz, 4. Henrietta, married 
James Fleming. 5. Laura, married Charles 
Lee. 6. Sarah. 7. Martha, married Howard 
Fehr. 8, Twin sister of Martha, died in 
infancy, 9. William Philip, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(V) William Philip Drumheller. son of 
Benjamin Emerich and Rebecca (Deibert) 
Drumheller, was born in Landingville, 
Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, September 
23, 1874. His preparatory education was 
obtained in a country school and was sup- 
plemented by a one-year course in Normal 
School. At the age of seventeen years he 
entered his father's store as an assistant, 
remaining until he attained his majority, at 
which time he had charge of the store. Dur- 
ing his twenty-first year he began business 
on his own account, engaging in the manu- 
facture of underwear in Landingville, and 
so continuing for the period of one year. 
He then decided to make a change, and, 
going to Barnesville, Georgia, he entered 
the employ of the Barnesville L'nderwear 
Company, remaining with that concern for 
two years and a half. At the end of that 
time he came to Brooklyn, New York, and 
for a short time was associated with the 
Kings County Knitting Company. He then 
went to Allentown, Pennsylvania, where he 
became connected with the Southdown Knit- 
ting Company, continuing with them for two 
and a half years, and then going to Grand 



249 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Rapids, Michigan, to the Simmons Knitting 
Company, for a year. These periods of 
time spent in the knitting mills of different 
sections of the country were of great value 
to Mr. Drumheller, as by these changes he 
gathered a wide experience with the various 
methods of the industry, and stored away 
a fund of facts, ideas, and methods out of 
which he later evolved his present most suc- 
cessful system of management. Close ob- 
servation of the working conditions of the 
industry in so many and diverse sections of 
the country gave him a foundation which 
was in no small degree responsible for his 
later noteworthy success. For a short time 
he resided in Hamilton, Ohio, after which 
he became associated with the Alpine Knit- 
ting Company, of Pittston, Pennsylvania, 
where he remained for two and a half years. 
In all of these connections he served in the 
capacity of superintendent. 

In 1906 Mr. Drumheller came to Spring- 
field as superintendent of the Springfield 
Knitting Company, and with his usual vigor 
and wisdom administered the affairs of that 
concern, of which, shortly after, he took 
charge, this company becoming the property 
of the Carter Knitting Company, and Mr. 
Drumheller retaining the superintendency. 

The Carter Knitting Company, which is 
one of the foremost of its kind in the 
United States, was founded by William Car- 
ter, who at the age of fifteen became the 
assistant of his father in the manufacture of 
stockings, and came to this country in Jan- 
uary, 1857, with but ten shillings in his 
pocket. After working as a journeyman 
stocking-maker for a number of years, he 
purchased a small hand frame and began 
business for himself in a small way, giving 
special attention to cardigan jackets. After 
a time, noting the ability and energy of the 
young Englishman, ^Messrs. John and Mark 
Lee induced him to become a partner in their 
business, under the firm name of Lee, Car- 
ter & Company, which engaged quite ex- 
tensively in the manufacture of a fine line 
of goods, principally fancy stockings, and 



conducted a prosperous business until the 
financial panic of 1878, when the plant and 
all the assets of the company were sold for 
the benefit of creditors, leaving Mr. Carter 
penniless. Mr. Burr, of Xewton, who held 
a mortgage on the machinery, came to the 
rescue, however, by purchasing the plant 
and turning it over to Mr. Carter on con- 
dition that he revive the business and pay 
off the mortgage. This task 'Mr. Carter 
undertook singlehanded. He sold the ma- 
chinery for which he had no immediate use, 
and with the proceeds relieved himself of 
his obligation to Mr. Burr. He was suc- 
cessful, and in time admitted his sons Wil- 
liam H. and Horace A. to partnership, or- 
ganizing and incorporating in 1902 the 
William Carter Company. They enlarged 
their plant, and the concern became the fore- 
most of its kind in the United States. 
Equipped with more than two hundred of 
the most modern knitting machines, and 
producing an annual output valued at more 
than four million dollars, consisting of men's, 
women's, and children's underwear, employs 
more than four hundred of the residents of 
Needham, and sends its products, the fa- 
mous "Carter's Underwear," throughout the 
United States and to Turkey, Japan, the 
Philippines, Mexico, South America, Can- 
ada, and other foreign countries. The wide 
demand for the Carter goods is attributable 
to the fact that the fabric from which they 
are made is exceedingly fine and elastic, of 
the best quality, and finished in a way which 
has made it an object of emulation for other 
manufacturers, many of whom have tried 
in vain to match its excellence. This con- 
cern was one of the first to grant to its 
employees a half holiday on Saturday, for 
which act he received a vote of thanks from 
the Knights of Labor ; and in every possible 
way, he earnestly endeavored to secure for 
his employees better living conditions, tear- 
ing down old houses, building other and 
more attractive as well as more comfortable 
ones, and giving land for public buildings, 
including that on which the public library 



2;o 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



is erected, and land for athletic sports. Some 
of the company's land and waterway have 
been converted into a park, with abundance 
of shade trees, flower beds, lakes with swans 
swimming about, and other features, all so 
attractively laid out and so beautiful that 
people come from miles around to enjoy its 
quiet restfulness. This in brief is the de- 
scription of the home plant at Needham 
Heights. Later this company purchased the 
plant at Framingham, and in 1923 they pur- 
chased a chain of three mills in the South, 
located at Readsville and Barriesville, North 
Carolina, and Macon, Georgia, 

In 1909, about three years after Mr. 
Drumheller came to Springfield, William 
Carter, William H. Carter, and Horace A. 
Carter, president, vice-president, and treas- 
urer, respectively, of the William Carter 
Company of Needham Heights, purchased a 
controlling interest in the stock of the Spring- 
field Knitting Company, a concern engaged 
in the manufacture of knit underwear, and 
employing several hundred operatives, and 
with which Mr. Drumheller was then as- 
sociated as superintendent. Mr. Drumheller 
retained the superintendency of the Spring- 
field plant, under the new management for 
the next five years. He was then made gen- 
eral superintendent of all the plants of the 
William Carter Company, retaining his main 
office in Springfield. In this plant he has 
made extensive improvements, installing the 
most modern machinery and conducting the 
plant so efficiently that in 1922 the plant 
had trebled its capacity and more than 
trebled its actual output. In addition to the 
extensive plant in Springfield, ]\Ir. Drum- 
heller superintends the large plant at Need- 
ham Heights, and one in Framingham, Mas- 
sachusetts. Probably few men in the United 
States have had a wider experience in the 
manufacture of knit underwear than has Mr. 
Drumheller, and possibly no other one man 
in the industry has charge of more employees 
in this line of manufacturing. Fair in his 
judgment, and always considerate of the 
claims of those under his direction, he is 



admirably fitted f<jr the responsible posi- 
tion which he so efficiently fills, and in which 
he has won the confidence and esteem of both 
employers and employees, an achievement 
possible only to one of large ability, wis- 
dom, tact, and sterling character. He has 
some 1,100 people under his control, he 
has proven himself to be a rarely gifted 
manager of men, kindly and courteous in 
his contact with all, and possessing in a 
high degree the ability to "get things done." 
Mr. Drumheller's home is in Springfield, 
and he takes an active interest in the wel- 
fare of that city, aiding in every way pos- 
sible those projects which seem to him to be 
wisely planned for the advancement of its 
interests. His religious affiliation is with 
the First Congregational Church, in the ac- 
tivities of which he takes an active part. 

On May 17, 1900, William P. Drumheller 
married Mabel Breader, of Catasauqua, Le- 
high County, Pennsylvania, born November 
27, 1879, daughter of Eugene, a miller, who 
died at the age of thirty-eight, and Alevester 
(Hohler) Breader. Mr. and Mrs. Drum- 
heller are the parents of the following chil- 
dren: I. Charles Edgar, born February 12, 
1904, 2. James William, born October 5, 
1908. 3. George Eugene, born June 8, 
1913- 



HOOVER, Blake Alexander 

For more than twenty years Blake Alex- 
ander Hoover has been scoring one success 
after another in the secretarial field of the 
Young ]\Ien's Christian Association. From 
February i, 1920, to the present time (1924) 
he has served as the efficient general secre- 
tary of the Springfield Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association. 

d) John Hoover, great-grandfather of 
Mr. Hoover, was born May 6, 1789, and 
died Septeml)er 15. 1859. He was buried at 
Alport ( formerly Morrisdale). Pennsylvania. 
He married Catherine Wierbaugh, and they 
were the parents of seven children : George, 
of whom further; Jeremiah, Samuel, John, 
Hannah, Sarah, and Mary. 



2; I 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



(II) George Hoover, son of John and 
Catherine (W'ierbaugh) Hoover, was born 
in Union County, Pennsylvania, in i8ii, and 
died in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, in 
1 89 1. He was among the pioneer settlers 
who removed to Clearfield County, Pennsyl- 
vania, with ox teams and cleared the land. 
George Hoover cleared some two hundred 
acres, cutting the trees and burning them. 
He first built a log house which he later 
replaced with a fine Colonial residence. He 
developed an extensive lumbering business, 
hauling the logs to the banks of the Susque- 
hanna River, from which point they were 
rafted to market. He had a fine farm on 
which, in addition to general farming activi- 
ties, he gave special attention to the raising 
of cattle, sheep and hogs. The soil yielded 
him a generous return for his labors, but 
beneath the soil was richer treasure than 
the soil itself could ever yield, and when the 
discovery was made that rich coal deposits 
underlaid his farm, land that had been worth 
fifteen dollars an acre became worth one 
hundred dollars an acre. Before the dis- 
covery of this "black gold" Mr. Hoover 
built his beautiful residence. He was a 
man of high ideals, and his associates bear 
record that he consistently incorporated his 
ideals in his practice. He is spoken of as 
an especially fine type of man, unselfish, 
helpful to others, and especially good to the 
poor. He was also a man of unusual ability 
and his advice was much sought by his asso- 
ciates. His religious affiliation was with the 
Presbyterian Church, which he served as a 
member of the board of elders. George 
Hoover married Elizabeth Kyler, who died 
in 1889. They became the parents of the 
following children : Jackson, Alexander, of 
further mention; Eliza Jane, Jeremiah K., 
Isaiah, Martha, Sarah, Thomas, and Cor- 
delia. 

(III) Alexander Hoover, son of George 
and Elizabeth (Kyler) Hoover, was born in 
Kylertown, Pennsylvania, November 19, 
1839, and died October 26, 191 3. He re- 
ceived a good practical education in the 



public schools of his native district, and then 
engaged as an assistant in "the timber busi- 
ness" with his father, who purchased tracts 
of woodland which they cleared, and mar- 
keted the lumber. In connection with these 
activities they also were engaged in farm- 
ing. Alexander Hoover took an active in- 
terest in local public afifairs, serving as the 
efficient supervisor of roads and highways, 
also as road commissioner, and as a member 
of the Board of School Directors. His re- 
ligious afifiliation was with the Sylvan Grove 
Methodist Church, in the work of which he 
took an active interest, serving as president 
of the board of trustees and as superinten- 
dent of the Sunday School. 

Alexander Hoover married Sarah Stras- 
ser, of Richfield, Juniata County, Pennsyl- 
vania, born March 3, 1840, and died in 
August, 1821, daughter of John and Mary 
(Zimmerman) Strasser. Mary Zimmerman 
was the daughter of George and Elizabeth 
Zimmerman, and granddaughter of William 
and Barbara (Graybill) Zimmerman, who 
came to this country from Amsterdam, Hol- 
land. Children of Alexander and Sarah 
(Strasser) Hoover: i. Nora Elizabeth, who 
married Freeman Harry Borst, 2. Harry 
John. 3. Mary Araminta, who married Wil- 
liam Hughes. 4. Florence Rebecca, who 
married Edward J. Beam. 5. Blake Alex- 
ander, of whom further. 

(IV) Blake Alexander Hoover, son of 
Alexander and Sarah (Strasser) Hoover, 
was born in Kylertown, Clearfield County, 
Pennsylvania, December 22, 1875. After 
attending the public schools of Kylertown, 
he continued his studies for a time in the 
academy at Lumber City, Pennsylvania, and 
then entered the Normal College at Lock 
Haven, Pennsylvania, from which he was 
graduated in 1900. He financed his own 
education by working part of the time while 
he was pursuing his course of study, and by 
teaching school for two years before enter- 
ing the State Normal College. It is interest- 
ing to note in this connection that Mr. 
Hoover was born in a log house from which 



252 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



the family later removed into a frame l)uild- 
iug, and that he took the place of a man in 
the lumher woods, working on a cross-cut 
saw, and helping to pilot a lumber raft down 
the river with his father when he was but 
thirteen years of age, his father being noted 
as a good pilot on the river. While a stu- 
dent in the State Normal School, Mr. 
Hoover tried to enlist for service in the 
Spanish- American War (1898), but was re- 
jected because of defective vision in one 
eye, due to an accident in 1894. After 
graduation from the State Normal College 
he accepted a position as principal of the 
high school at Winburne, Pennsylvania, 
where he remained for a year, 1900-01. He 
then removed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
where for five months in the summer he 
was employed in the accounting department 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad. In October, 
1901, he was made assistant secretary of the 
railroad branch of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association in Pittsburgh, thus begin- 
ning his long and successful career in Young 
Men's Christian Association secretarial work. 
He remained here until June i, 1903, when 
he resigned his position as assistant secretary 
to accept an appointment as general secretary 
of the Young Men's Christian Association in 
Derry, Pennsylvania. Here again he was 
successful, and for two years gave his best 
effort to the upbuilding of the Derry Asso- 
ciation. In July, 1905, he resigned and went 
to Rochester, New York, where he was made 
general secretary of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association of the Street Railway De- 
partment. This organization was the first 
of its kind in the world, and so successful 
was its work that second and third branches, 
with over a thousand members, were or- 
ganized while Mr. Hoover was in Rochester. 
He remained at Rochester until September 
15, 1908, when he went to New Castle, 
Pennsylvania, as general secretary of the 
City Young Men's Christian Association. 
During the three years of his connection 
with that organization he was instrumental 
in the erection of a new association build- 



ing, which cost $150,000. On July i, 191 1, 
he went to Binghamton, New York, as gen- 
eral secretary of the Young Men's Christian 
Association in that city, and while there he 
added to his already considerable record of 
achievement by clearing up a deficit of $100,- 
000 on a $250,000 building. Mr. Hoover's 
next connection was with the Bronx branch 
of the Young Men's Christian Association, 
of New York City, of which he became gen- 
eral secretary in 1914, at the time of the be- 
ginning of the World War. While he held 
this position he built a $465,000 building. 
The Bronx Branch is located near the Great 
Pelham Naval Training Station, and when 
the United States entered the World War 
in 1917, Mr. Hoover at once became an ac- 
tive and forceful worker among the soldiers 
and sailors. He served as executive director 
of the financial campaign of the Young 
Men's Christian Association, and of the 
United War Work campaigns for the Bor- 
ough of the Bronx ; and organized Red Cross 
campaigns in Lancaster, Harrisburg, and Al- 
toona, Pennsylvania, and in Flint, Michigan. 
He also served in New York as a member 
of the Personnel Committee of the overseas 
work of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation. His work at the Bronx Branch was 
continued until February i, 1920, when he 
became general secretary of the Springfield 
Young Men's Christian Association, which 
position he is still most efficiently filling. In 
addition to the work of the central organiza- 
tion, Mr. Hoover also has charge of the 
Central Railroad Branch, the West Spring- 
field Railroad Branch, the Community 
P>ranch at Minneneague and the School 
Branch of the International Young Men's 
Christian Association College in Springfield, 
all of which, under his able management, 
have greatly grown and prospered. His 
record is one of unusual achievement, and 
the Springfield organization is receiving the 
full benefit, both of his ability and of his 
wide experience. He has a host of friends 
in all the communities which he has served, 



253 



ENXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



anrl is a vital influence in the city of Spring- 
field. 

Fraternally, Mr. Hoover is affiliated with 
Valley Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, 
of Rochester, New York; and he is also a 
member of the Automobile Club, and the 
Rotary Club, of Springfield, and a member 
of the Springfield Chamber of Commerce. 
His religious affiliation is with the Wesley 
Methodist Episcopal Church, which he served 
as steward and as member of the official 
board, as well as teacher of the men's Bible 
class, which now (1924) has a membership 
of two hundred and eighty men. 

Blake Alexander Hoover married, June 
30. 1904, Edna Ray McCormick, of Armagh, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of James A. and 
Martha (Morrison) McCormick. Mrs. 
Hoover's father was one of those who wit- 
nessed the tragedy known as the Johnstown 
Flood, which occurred in 1889. Mrs. Hoover 
is a member of the Mothers' Research Club, 
and of the Springfield Federation of Wo- 
men's Clubs, and is active in church work. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hoover are the parents of the 
following children: i. Paul McCormick, 
born in Derry, Pennsylvania, May 25, 1905, 
died in Springfield, Massachusetts. Septem- 
ber 20, 1921. 2. Dorthea, born in Bingham- 
ton, Xew York, November 20, 19 12. 



CHILSON, Lindsey Haynes 

Since 191 4 Lindsey Haynes Chilson has 
been filling the important position of mem- 
bership secretary of the Springfield Young 
Men's Christian Association, central branch. 

d) John Chilson, great-great-grand- 
father of Lindsey Haynes Chilson, was one 
of three brothers who are thought to have 
come from Wales and located in Albany, 
New York. Among the children of John 
Chilson was John, of further mention. 

(H) John Chilson, son of John Chilson, 
was born in Albany, New York, and died 
in Buckland, Massachusetts. He was an 
able and industrious man, who was engaged 
in agricultural pursuits throughout the en- 
tire period of his active career. He married 



Clarissa Butler, of Buckland, Massachu- 
setts, and they were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : Nancy, Elizabeth, William 
Wallace, of further mention; Haynes H., 
Clarissa Milo. 

(HI) William Wallace Chilson, son of 
John and Clarissa (Butler) Chilson, was 
born in Buckland, Massachusetts, November 
15, 1822, and died in Cummington, ]\Iassa- 
chusetts, May 8, 1907. Like his father he 
tilled the soil for a living and moved about 
somewhat, residing in several different 
places including Easthampton, Williamsburg, 
Lithia in the town of Goshen, and in Cum- 
mington. He married, in Southampton, 
Sarah Ludden, who was born November 2, 
1838, and died in April, 1909. Their chil- 
dren were: i. Milo Butler, born July 26, 
1856. 2. William L., born October 28, 1858. 

3. Edwin Murray, born September 13, i860. 

4. Roselia Jane, born May 15, 1862. 5. 
Elizabeth, born December 8, 1864. 6. Ed- 
ward Andrew, of whom further. 7. Juliette 
Edna, born November 24, 1872. 8. Clara 
M., born October 18, 1874. 9. Lillian Maria, 
born January 3, 1880. 

(IV) Edward Andrew Chilson, son of 
W^illiam Wallace and Sarah (Ludden) Chil- 
son, was born in Lithia, in the town of 
Goshen, Massachusetts, October 23, 1867. 
He received a practical education in the 
schools of his native district and engaged in 
mercantile business in Cummington, Massa- 
chusetts, where he sold fish, groceries, fruit, 
and vegetables. Later he removed to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, where, after 
being identified for some time with the 
United States Armory, he associated him- 
self with the Milton Bradley Company, and 
that connection has been maintained to the 
present time (1924). Mr. Chilson is well 
known and highly esteemed in Springfield, 
and is one of the "old residents" of the 
city. He is a member of the Congregational 
Church of Cummington. 

Edward Andrew Chilson married Nellie 
McCoy, of West Cummington, Massachu- 
setts, who died in 1921. Mr. and Airs. 



254 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



Chilson became the parents of the follow- 
ing children: i. Lindsey Haynes, of further 
mention. 2. Ella, who married J. A. ]\lacln- 
nis, and has one son, James A., Jr. 

(V) Lindsey Haynes Chilson, son of Ed- 
ward Andrew and Nellie (McCoy) Chilson, 
was born in Cummington, Massachusetts, 
March 13, 1895. He received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of Cummington 
and in the high school in Springfield, and 
then completed his preparation for an active 
career by continuing his studies at Silver 
Bay, New York, and later at the Northeast- 
ern University. In 1914 he was appointed 
membership secretary of the central branch 
of Springfield's Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, and in this connection he has ren- 
dered very efficient service, especially in pro- 
moting the membership of the association. 
He is popular among the members of the 
association and exerts a wholesome influ- 
ence over the work of his department. Fra- 
ternally, Mr. Chilson is affiliated with Sam- 
uel D. Sherwood Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons; and he is also a member of the 
Kiwanis Club, the Springfield Automobile 
Club, and the Springfield Chamber of Com- 
merce. His religious affiliation is with the 
South Congregational Church. 

Lindsey Haynes Chilson married, Septem- 
ber 4, 1918, Isabella Nevers Hall, of Palmer, 
Massachusetts, the Hall family numbered 
among the early families of St. Johns River, 
Cortland County, Nova Scotia, and they are 
the parents of one child, Lindsey Miles, who 
was born December 23, 1920. 



WORRALL, Harry Clay 

After thirteen years of practical experi- 
ence in the woolen manufacturing business, 
Harry Clay Worrall made a change in his 
line of business activity and for the past 
two decades has been identified with the 
metal industry as manufacturers' agent, rep- 
resenting several concerns for whom, until 
1920, he traveled in every State of the 
Union and in parts of Canada. He now 



has his headquarters in Springfield, where 
he is in business for himself as a sales 
broker. 

The Worrall family (spelled both Wor- 
rall and Worrell) came to Pennsylvania 
from Berkshire, England, and family tradi- 
tion states that they are descendants of Sir 
Hubert de Warel, who lost three sons in 
the battle of Hastings (1066). 

John \\'orrall, from whom the branch of 
the family to which Henry Clay \\'orrall 
belongs claims descent, came to America 
from Berkshire, England, in the ship "Wel- 
come" in 1682, and arrived in Philadelphia. 
It is said that he brought with him certain 
certificates to be delivered to the Friends 
already settled on the present site of Phila- 
delphia. There was also a Peter Worrall, 
a tanner in that same locality at this time. 
He named one of his children John and 
John Worrall named one of his children 
Peter, so it may be implied that if they 
were not brothers they at least were close 
relatives and came in the same ship. John 
Worrall, immigrant ancestor, settled in Mid- 
dletown Township, Delaware County, Penn- 
sylvania, where he married (second), April 
9, 1714, a daughter of Thomas and Eliza- 
beth Goodwin, and it is from their son 
Peter that the branch of the family to which 
Harry Clay Worrall belongs is traced. 

(I) Thomas Worrall, great-grandfather 
of the subject of this sketch, was born in 
Middlctown, Delaware County. Pennsyl- 
vania. He married Ruth Pennell, and they 
were the parents of eight children : Caleb, 
Sarah, Pierce, Anna, Mary, Elizabeth, 
Thomas, William Pennell, of further men- 
tion. 

(II) William Pennell Worrall, son of 
Thomas and Ruth (Pennell) Worrall, was 
born in Middletown, Delaware County, 
Pennsylvania, ^August 16, 1 810. He mar- 
ried Catherine Richard Hemphill Matlack, 
born in Milltown, Chester County, Pennsyl- 
vania. November 11, 1810. daughter of Jesse 
and Sarah (Philips) Matlack. Their chil. 



255 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



dren were : Washington Matlack, of further 
mention ; Jessie Matlack. WiHiam Pierce. 

(Ill) Washington Matlack Worrall, son 
of William Pennell and Catherine Richard 
Hemphill (Matlack) Worrall, was born in 
West Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1837, and 
died in 1898. He received a good prac- 
tical education in the public schools of his 
native district. Upon the completion of his 
education he engaged in the clothing busi- 
ness, but upon the outbreak of the Civil 
War he enlisted in the 99th Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, and in which he was com- 
missioned captain. Later he was com- 
missioned major of the 214th Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, and before the end of his five 
years of service he was breveted colonel in 
the regular army. He took part in the 
battles of Gettysburg and Spottsylvania, and 
in the latter engagement received a wound 
which crippled his arm. Upon his return 
to civilian life he again engaged in the 
clothing business in St. Louis and also in 
Philadelphia, and during later years was in 
the produce business to the time of his re- 
tirement, which occurred several years be- 
fore his death. He was a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, and the 
organizer of the Grand Army in Pennsyl- 
vania. He took an active part in public 
affairs, was engaged in public work in con- 
nection with the Federal post office, and was 
also chosen to represent his district in the 
State Legislature. He was a personal 
friend of Simon Cameron and of Mathew 
Stanley Quay, and was well known in the 
State capitol. He married Emma Stack- 
house, of Philadelphia, of Scotch descent, 
and they were the parents of seventeen chil- 
dren, the most of whom died in their "teens" 
or before reaching that period. Among 
those who survived were: Daniel Webster, 
Horace Matlack, Mary, who married Ed- 
ward Hebermabel; Harry Clay, of further 
mention. 

(IV) Harry Clay Worrall, son of Wash- 
ington Matlack and Emma (Stackhouse) 
Worrall, was born in Philadelphia, Penn- 



sylvania, August 17, 1875. He received his 
education in the public schools of his native 
city. When his school training was com- 
pleted, he engaged in the woolen manufac- 
turing business, in which he continued for a 
period of thirteen years. He next became 
identified with the Fort Wayne Metal 
Works, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, where for 
three years he was continuously employed. 
He then made a change and removed to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, where he became 
associated with the Gilbert and Barker Com- 
pany of Springfield, which concern he rep- 
resented until 1920. He traveled ten months 
in the year, from Maine to California and 
from Canada to the Gulf Coast, covering 
every State in the Union and also extending 
his operations to Canada. Twenty years of 
experience "on the road" made him thor- 
oughly familiar with the demands of the 
metal trade in every State in the Union, 
and in 1920 he decided to give up the life 
of the traveling representative and estab- 
lished a sales brokerage of his own in 
Springfield. He has his headquarters in 
Springfield and represents several concerns 
engaged in various lines of metal manufac- 
ture. His wide and varied experience en- 
abled him to render invaluable service to the 
concerns he represents, and he has built 
up a very large and profitable business as a 
sales broker. He is widely known through- 
out the country both as an experienced sales- 
man and as a genial friend and companion. 
Fraternally, he is affiliated with Springfield 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; with 
Morning Star Chapter, Royal Arch Masons. 
His religious affiliation is with the Episcopal 
Church. 

On June 18, 1901, Henry Clay Worrall 
married Jessie Wister, of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of William H. and 
Clara G. (Hurdle) Wister, and they are 
the parents of five children, three of whom 
died in infancy: I. Morris Wister, died in 
infancy. 2. Wallace Wister, born in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, February 4, 1904. 3. 
Laura, born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, No- 



256 



EXXYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



vember 6, 1906. 4. Bruce Wister, who died 
in infancy. 5. Jean, who also died in in- 
fancy. 



ACKERMAN, John Walter 

During the entire thirty-one years of 
his mature life, John Walter Ackerman, was 
engaged in mechanical pursuits, identified at 
dififerent times with the manufacture of 
bicycles, motorcycles, automobiles and of 
guns. For several years prior to his death 
he was a resident of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. 

John Ackerman, grandfather of John 
Walter Ackerman, was a native of England, 
where he resided throughout the period of 
his life. He was a diamond cutter by trade, 
and was also a man of wealth, possessing 
large holdings in the West Indies. He was 
an able and active man whose death in early 
manhood suddenly terminated a most promis- 
ing career. After his death his widow emi- 
grated to Huntington, Canada, bringing with 
her her four sons. In Huntington she mar- 
ried John Paine and the four sons of John 
Ackerman were reared and educated in the 
home of the latter. The grandmother died 
in South Dakota. Children of John Acker- 
man were: Edward, William, George, of 
further mention, and John. 

George Ackerman, son of John Ackerman, 
was born in London, England, March 17, 
1837, and died in Constable, New York, 
February, 191 6, aged seventy-nine years. 
When he was but a small child he accom- 
panied his mother and three brothers to 
Huntington, Canada, where he received his 
early education in the public schools. When 
his school training was completed he found 
employment with the Grand Trunk Railroad 
in the capacity of brakeman, but after a time 
he resolved to learn a trade. He chose that 
of a brick and stone mason and plasterer. 
After fairly mastering the technique of those 
useful trades and after securing considerable 
experience in Huntington, he resolved to 
come to the States, where opportunity was 
larger, and he chose the town of Westville, 



Xew York, as the place of his residence in 
this country. He was interested in the activi- 
ties of the trade union, to which he gave 
material support. He married Mary Nolan, 
who was born in St. Agatha, Canada, in 
1838. and died in February, 1898, daughter 
of John and Sarah (Richardson) Nolan. 
They were the parents of five children: i. 
William, who was born in Canada in 1863, 
now deceased. 2. John Walter, of further 
mention. 3. George, a biography of whom 
follows. 4. Albert, who was born August, 
1873, and is now engaged in business in 
Chicago. 5. Mary, who married John Walsh, 
and has children, Hilda and Leonard. 

John Walter Ackerman, son of George 
and Mary (Nolan) Ackerman, was born in 
Westville, New York, in July, 1866, and 
died in Springfield, Massachusetts, Septem- 
ber 16, 1918. He received his training in the 
schools of Westville and then found em- 
ployment on a farm until he was twenty-one 
years of age. He then removed to Chicopee 
Falls, Massachusetts, in 1890, and found em- 
ployment in a machine shop. For a time he 
was employed by the Overman Wheel Com- 
pany, engaged in the manufacture of bicy- 
cles, but later he widened his experience by 
associating himself with the Stevens Duryea 
Company, engaged in the manufacture of 
automobiles. From the Stevens Duryea 
Company he went to the Hendee Manufac- 
turing Company, in Springfield, with whom 
he was for some time associated in the manu- 
facture of motorcycles. Upon the outbreak 
of the Spanish-American War in 1898 he 
"did his bit" by entering the employ of the 
Federal Government and assisting in the 
making of guns in the Springfield Arsenal. 
During the last years of his life he was a 
resident of Springfield, but throughout that 
period he attended the Congregational 
Church in Chicopee Falls. Mr. Ackerman 
had a host of friends, both in Westville and 
in Springfield, and his death caused deep 
and sincere grief among those with whom 
he was associated in business as well as 
among his many personal friends. 



257 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



On September 12, 1892, John Walter 
Ackerman married Lillian Graham, of Mon- 
treal, Canada, whose parents both died dur- 
ing her infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Ackerman 
are the parents of four children: i. Frank 
William, who was born in Chicopee Falls, 
received his education in the pul)lic schools 
of his native town. Upon the entrance of 
the United States into the World War he, 
being already a member of the Regular 
Army, having served on the Mexican border, 
was sent across the sea, where as a member 
of the Signal Corps he was in active sei-vice. 
He also served in Germany for a time. 
Upon his return to civilian life he went to 
Chicago, where he is now engaged in busi- 
ness with an uncle. 2. Beatrice May, re- 
ceived her education in the Chicopee schools, 
and after graduation married Robert Wal- 
ker, of Springfield, who is engaged in con- 
struction work, specializing in road building. 
3. Alfred, died in infancy. 4. Gladys, who 
was born in Bellows Falls, Vermont, received 
her education in Springfield, and is now 
engaged in clerical work in Springfield. 



ACKERMAN, George 

The retirement of George Ackerman from 
the police force of Chicopee in 1921 termi- 
nated a period of thirty years of continuous 
service in the police department of that city. 
He has been a resident of Chicopee Falls 
since 1889 and prior to his regular employ- 
ment in the police department was for eight 
years employed in the machine shops of the 
Overman Wheel Company. The careers of 
John Ackerman, his grandfather, and George 
Ackerman, his father, are given in the pre- 
ceding biography of John Walter Acker- 
man (q. v.). 

George Ackerman, son of George and 
Mary (Nolan) Ackerman, was born in 
Westville, New York, December 26, 1868, 
and received his education in the public 
schools of his native city. In boyhood he 
had been his father's assistant during vaca- 
tions, but when his education was completed 
he decided to engage in agricultural activi- 



ties and from the time he left school until 
1889, when he removed to Chicopee Falls, 
Massachusetts, he was engaged in farming. 
After his removal to Chicopee Falls he 
found employment in the Overman Wheel 
Company, where he remained for eight years. 
At the end of that time, in 1897, he, having 
previously served, at different times, as spe- 
cial officer of the police department, became 
a permanent officer of the force. From that 
time to the date of his retirement, in 1921, 
a period of nearly thirty years, he was con- 
tinuously and most faithfully and efficiently 
engaged in discharging the duties of his 
various positions in that department. Few 
men in Chicopee Falls have served so long 
a time in any department of municipal serv- 
ice and Mr. Ackerman is justly proud of his 
record. During the thirty-four years of his 
residence in Chicopee Falls he has made a 
host of friends and there are very few resi- 
dents in the township who are so widely 
acquainted with the people of that section 
as is Mr. Ackerman. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Chicopee Field Club and of the 
Scouts Club, and has always taken an active 
interest in projects for the advancement of 
the public welfare. He is highly esteemed 
both as a most faithful and efficient public 
official and also as a progressive and enter- 
prising citizen. 

Mr. Ackerman married Nora Gleason, 
who was born in Chicopee Falls, and died in 
June 20, 1912, daughter of Jeremiah and 
Mary (Bradley) Gleason. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ackerman are the parents of four children : 
Leonard Ackerman, Mary, who married 
Thomas Lynch, and has a daughter, June; 
Lourston, and Nora. 



THOMSON, Edward Herrmann 

As president of the Federal Land Bank 
and Federal Intermediate Credit Bank, of 
Springfield, Edward H. Thomson is render- 
ing important service not only in building 
up these rapidly-growing institutions, but 
in helping to finance agricultural interests in 



258 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



all of the New England States and in New 
York and New Jersey, 

(I) James M, Thomson, grandfather of 
Mr. Thomson, was born in Fifeshire, Scot- 
land, in 1812, and was engaged in farming 
in Scotland until 1842. In that year he 
came to America and settled in Bovina, Dela- 
ware County, New York. He later pur- 
chased a farm in New Kingston in the same 
county, where he lived for a number of 
years. In 1868 he removed to Delhi, New 
York, and continued to reside there to the 
time of his death, which occurred in IVIay, 
1885. He was a member of the Presby- 
terian Church. His first wife was a Cairns. 
After her death, he married (second) Bea- 
trice Cairns, a sister of his first wife. She 
was born in Roxburyshire, Scotland, in 181 6, 
and died in February, 1887, daughter of 
Alexander Cairns. One child was born of 
the first marriage: i. John W. Children of 
the second marriage were : 2. Betsy, mar- 
ried William Thompson. 3. Jessie, married 
William M. Aitkens. 4. Anna, married Rob- 
ert J. Blair, 5. William James, of whom 
further. 6. Melville A. 

(II) William James Thomson, son of 
James M. and Beatrice (Cairns) Thom- 
son, was born in New Kingston, Delaware 
County, New York, April 6, 1856. He re- 
ceived a thorough education in the public 
schools and then associated himself with his 
father on the farm, maintaining that con- 
nection until he was twenty-five years of 
age. He had removed to Delhi, New York, 
with his parents in 1868, and when he was 
twenty-five years of age he purchased the 
home farm of some two hundred acres. For 
many years he conducted this farm, making 
a specialty of dairying and keeping a fine 
herd of over fifty cows. About 1919 he 
sold his farm and moved to a smaller one 
adjoining the old home place and owned 
by his son. He has taken an active interest 
in matters of local welfare, being for many 
years an officer in cooperative creamery and 
store. He is a member of the First Presby- 
terian Church, of which he is an elder. 



William James Thomson married. November 
I, 1883, Isabelle Mable, born in Delhi, New 
York, December 23, 1858, daughter of 
Alexander and Elizabeth (Middlemast) 
Mable, both of whom came from Scotland. 
Children : Edward Herrmann, of whom fur- 
ther; Samuel M., of Atlanta, Georgia. 

(HI) Edward Herrmann Thomson, son 
of William James and Isabelle (Mable) 
Thomson, was born in Delhi, Delaware 
County, New York, March 6, 1887. After 
attending the district schools of Delhi, he 
prepared for college in Delaware Academy. 
He entered Cornell University, taking the 
four year course in agriculture, from which 
he was graduated in 1909 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Agriculture. Two years later, 
in 191 T, he received the degree of Master of 
Agriculture from the same institution. 

Following graduation, in 1909, he was em- 
ployed by the New Hampshire State Agri- 
cultural College at Durham, New Hamp- 
shire. In cooperation with the United 
States Department of Agriculture, he was en- 
gaged in this work and made the first farm 
management survey in New England. 

This department developed rapidly under 
his leadership, doing much pioneer work in 
the field of farm bookkeeping and farm man- 
agement studies. In 1914 he was made as- 
sistant chief of the Office Farm Manage- 
ment, and was later acting chief until the 
time of his resignation, April i, 1919. He 
then returned to Delhi, New York, where in 
1 91 7 he had purchased a farm which his 
Grandfather Mable had once owned and ad- 
joining the old homestead, which he con- 
ducted in conjunction with the old home 
farm. In July, 1919. he was called to 
Springfield, Massachusetts, to accept the 
presidency of the Federal Land Bank. He 
has continued at the head of that large and 
growing institution to the present time 
(1924). He is also president of the Federal 
Intermediate Credit Bank of Springfield, an 
institution with capital of $5,000,000, or- 
ganized in 1923. Both banks operate in 
eight States, including all of New England, 



259 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



New York and Xew Jersey, and have gross 
assets exceeding $42,000,000. In addition to 
his duties here Mr. Thomson owns four 
farms in Xew York State. 

He is a meml)er of the Greek Letter Fra- 
ternity Sigma Phi Sigma; University Club 
of Washington, District of Columbia; Long- 
meadow Country Club, Realty Club, Me- 
gantic Fish and Game Club of Northern 
Maine, Sigma Xi and Heb Sa. His re- 
ligious affiliation is with the Old First 
Church (Congregational) of Springfield. 

Edward H. Thomson married, November 
3, 191 5, Ethel Marion Cutts, of Milford, 
New Hampshire', daughter of Elber R. and 
Clara (Fisher) Cutts. Their children are 

1. Norman Edward, born in Washington, 
District of Columbia, November 26, 1916. 

2. Marion Cutts, born in Washington, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, May 17, 1918, 3. William 
James, born in Springfield, Massachusetts. 
March 10, 1920. 



FORBUSH, Erwin H. 

Erwin H. Forbush, secretary and director 
of the Federal Land Bank of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, has been identified with agri- 
cultural interests from his school days and 
is exceptionally well qualified to meet the 
responsibilities of the position which he now 
holds. He is a graduate of Connecticut 
Agricultural College, class of 1910, has been 
extension editor and supervisor of cor- 
respondence courses in the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, edited an agricultural 
paper, and served with the Massachusetts 
State Board of Agriculture. 

Mr. Forbush is of Scotch descent, tracing 
his ancestry to Daniel Forbes, immigrant an- 
cestor, who is believed to have come from 
Kinellas, Scotland, the son of Daniel Forbes, 
who died there in 1624. Daniel Forbes, the 
immigrant ancestor, was born about 1620 
and died at Marlboro, Massachusetts. He 
was probably one of the Scotch soldiers de- 
feated by Cromwell at the battle of Dunbar, 
and sent by him to the American Colonies. 
Daniel Forbes was carried on the town 



books by the name of Forbush, the town 
clerk mistaking the broad Scotch pronuncia- 
tion of P'orbes ("Farrabus"), for Forbush 
and the name "stuck." Some of the descen- 
dants, however, have now assumed the origi- 
nal name Forbes. Mr. Forbes's marriage to 
Rebecca Perriman is recorded in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, IMarch 26, 1660, and he was 
granted land there in 1664 and 1665. His 
first wife died in 1677, and about 1681 he 
removed to Marlboro. He married (sec- 
ond), May 23, 1679, Deborah Rediat, of 
Concord. Children of the first marriage 
were: Daniel, Thomas, Elizabeth, Rebecca, 
and Samuel, through whom the branch of 
the family to which Envin Hill Forbush be- 
longs is descended. Children of the second 
marriage were : John, Isaac, and Jonathan. 

(II) Captain Samuel (i) Forbush, son 
of Daniel and Rebecca (Perriman) Forbes, 
or Forbush, was born in 1674, and died in 
1766 at the age of ninety-two years. He 
was one of the first settlers in Westboro, 
Massachusetts. He married, March 8, 1699, 
Abigail Rice, and they were the parents of : 
Samuel, of further mention, and Charles. 

(HI) Captain Samuel (2) Forbush, son 
of Captain Samuel (i) and Abigail (Rice) 
Forbush, resided in Westboro, Massachu- 
setts, where he died October 10, 1767. He 
married Sarah, surname unknown, who died 
October i, 1776, and they were the parents 
of two children: (Samuel (3), of further 
mention, and Abigail. 

(IV) Samuel (3) Forbush, son of Sam- 
uel (2) and Sarah Forbush, was born in 
\\'estboro, Massachusetts, January 13, 1733, 
and died July 27, 1818. He was active in 
local public affairs and served as selectman 
at three different times, 1773-4, 1787-8, 
1 79 1 -2. He married, July 21, 1756, Abigail 
P'orbush, who died August 22, 1788. Their 
children were: Rufus, Samuel (4), of whom 
further ; Isaac, Abigail, Lydia, Coolidge, 
Sarah, Peraia, Joel, Jonah, and Polly. 

(V) Samuel (4) Forbush, son of Sam- 
uel (3) and Abigail (Forbush) Forbush, 
was born in Westboro, Massachusetts, 



260 




Xy^i^"^ 



^inyi^ 




/rr^- ^ 



'KS^ -^. 






ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOGRAPHY 



August 25, 1 77 1, and died July 24, 1827. He 
conducted a large farm and was engaged in 
the market gardening business, carrying 
beef, pork, and other farm products to the 
Boston market. He married, October 10, 
1795, Sally Nichols, and they were the 
parents of six children : Orestes, Caleb, 
Wheaton, Lowell, of further mention; Sally, 
and Charles. 

(VI) Lowell Forbush, son of Samuel (4) 
and Salh^ (Nichols) Forbush, was born in 
Westboro, Massachusetts, August 16, 1801, 
and died July 21, 1880. He received a good 
practical education in the public schools of 
his native town and then engaged in farm- 
ing. He was a man of sound judgment and 
was greatly honored and respected by all 
who knew him. He was chosen to serve on 
the board of selectmen in 1854. He mar- 
ried, April 7, 1828, Elizabeth Stone, who 
was born May 3, 1801, and died August 28, 
1874, and they were the parents of two 
children : Leander Pomeroy, of further men- 
tion, and Trowbridge Brigham. 

(VII) Leander Pomeroy Forbush, son of 
Lowell and Elizabeth (Stone) Forbush, was 
born in Westboro, Massach