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ENCYCLOPEDIA 



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VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



UNDER THE EDITORIAL SUPERVISION OF 

LYON GARDINER TYLER, LL. D. 

President of William and Mary College, Williamsburg; Author of 'Parties and Patronage 

in the United States," "The Cradle of the Republic," "Williamsburg, the Old 

Colonial Capital," "England in America," "The Letters and Times of 

the Tylers," etc.; Vice-President of the Virginia Historical 

Society, Member of the Maryland Historical 

Society, and various other societies. 



VOLUME III 




NEW YORK 

LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1915 



Copyright, 1915 
Lewis Historical Pubushing Company 



PREFACE 

In volumes I. and II., the history of Virginia as set forth in the biographies of its 
distinguished citizens was brought down approximately to the year 1861. The present 
volume brings that history down to date. The divisions are as follows: I. The Gov- 
ernors of the State; II. Judges of the Supreme Court of Appeals: III. Under the Con- 
federacy — Department Officers, Members of Congress, and Military and Naval Officers; 
IV. President of the United States; V. United States Senators; VI. House of Repre- 
sentatives; VII. Prominent Persons. 

While it is believed that the list of persons under the first six heads may be deemed 
substantially correct and on the whole satisfactory, the same remark as was made in 
the preface to the second volume applies to the last division. The selection may not 
always have been wise, and some important persons have doubtless been omitted, but 
it is the best that could be done under the pressure of official work and the time allowed 
by the publishers. It is proper, however, to add that some names of important living 
persons were purposely omitted from the third volume because of their appearance in 
a more extended form in the fourth or fifth volumes prepared directly by the pub- 
lishers. The Author. 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



-GOVERNORS OF THE STATE— 1861-1915 



Letcher, John, son of William Letcher, 
was born at Lexington, Rockbridge county, 
Virginia, March 28, 1813. He took a course 
at Washington College, and graduated in 
1833 from Randolph-Macon College, where 
he also studied law. He entered upon prac- 
tice in Lexington, and for some time vn^ 
also editor of the "Valley Star." In 1850 
he sat in the constitutional convention ; as a 
Democrat he served in congress, 1852-59, 
and was active on the ways and means 
committee. He was governor from January 
I, 1859, to January i, 1864, thus holding the 
cilice at the time of secession, which policy 
he had previously opposed, but earnestly 
supported when the Federal government re- 
sorted to force; and it was at his instance 
that the state forces were at once placed 
at the disposal of the Confederate govern- 
ment, without waiting for a vote of the 
people. At the close of the war he resumed 
practice at Lexington, and in 1875 was 
elected a member of the house of delegates. 
In 1876. while attending upon the house, he 
was stricken with paralysis. He lingered 
eight years, and finally died at his home in 
Lexington, January 26, 1884. 

Smith, William, second term, January i, 
1864-May 9, 1865 (q. v.). 

Pierpont, Francis H., born in Mononga- 
hcla county, \'irginia, January 25, 1814. He 
graduated from Allegheny (Pennsylvania* 
College in 1839, then taught school in Miss- 



issippi, studied law, returned home, and en- 
tered upon practice at Fairmont, Marion 
county. He was a pronounced anti-slavery 
man, and at the Wheeling convention in 
1861, called to reorganize the state govern- 
ment, was unanimously chosen governor, 
and held office under this election for a year ; 
meanwhile he was elected by the people 
of West Virginia to fill an unexpired term 
of two years, and subsequently re-elected 
for the full four-year term. After the divis- 
ion of Virginia into two separate states in 
1863 he removed the state archives to Alex- 
andria, convened a so-called legislature, re- 
mained there two years, and in 1864 called 
a convention which decreed the abolition .)f 
slavery. May 29, 1865, he removed the seai 
of government to that city. On the expir- 
ation of his term as governor, he resumed 
practice at Fairmont ; in 1870 he was elected 
to the West Virginia legislature ; and served 
as collector of internal revenue under Presi- 
dent Garfield. 

Wells, Henry Horatio, born in Rochester, 
New York, September 17, 1823; educated at 
Romeo (Michigan) Academy, and was a 
lawyer. He was a member of the Michigan 
legislature in 1854-56. He was colonel of 
the Twenty-sixth Michigan Infantry in the 
civil war, serving with distinction, and was 
brevetted brigadier-general. In 1865 he set- 
tled in Richmond, Virginia, and engaged in 
law practice. In 1868 he was appointed pro- 
visional governor, under military authority. 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



superseding Governor Pierpont; in 1869, as 
a Republican, he was defeated for governor 
liV Gilbert C. Walker. He was afterward 
:ippointed United States district attorney 
for the eastern district of Virginia by Presi- 
dent Grant. He resigned in 1872, and re- 
Mimed the practice of his profession. In 
1875 he removed to Washington City, and 
became L'nited States attorney for District 
cf Columbia. He held this post till 1879. 
W hilc Wells was a military appointee, and 
therefore looked upon as an alien by the 
l)eople of Virginia, they had a kindly regard 
for him because of the general friendliness 
o: his conduct. 

Walker, Gilbert Carleton, born in Bing- 
hamton. New York, August i, 1832; edu- 
cated in various colleges, lastly Hamilton 
College, graduating in 1854, and winning 
the first prize for oratory. He subsequently 
studied law. He became the recognized 
leader of the young Democracy of Tioga 
county, New York. He removed to Chicago, 
Illinois, where he became prominent at the 
bar. On account of his health he settled 
in Norfolk. Virginia, in 1864, where he was 
.in active leader in financial and manufac- 
turing affairs and was president of a bank. 
In 1869 he became candidate for governor, 
in opposition to the Republican nominee. 
Being elected, his rigid enforcement of law 
and order won for him the title of "Politi- 
cal Savior of \'irginia." He established a 
well organized free school system, enforced 
rigid economy in public expenditures, and 
secured the reorganization of the state debt 
and the rc-establishment of the public credit. 
When he retired, he was unquestionably the 
most popular man in Virginia, and the one 
term principle alone prevented his re-elec- 



tion. He was elected to congress from the 
Richmond district in 1874 and again 1876. 
During his four years of congressional ser- 
vice, he was a princi[)al member of several 
important committees — the Pacific railroads, 
revision of the laws, expenditures of the 
state department, and education and labor. 
In 1881 he located in New York City, where 
he secured a large law practice, in associa- 
tion with Gen. B. F. Tracy, and was known 
as a popular and effective orator. He was 
a'so a very handsome man and an excellent 
speaker, ile died in May. 1888. 

Kemper, James Lawson, born in Madison 
county, \irginia, June 11, 1823, son of Wil- 
liam Kemper, a descendant of John Kemper, 
a member of one of the twelve families from 
Oldenburg, Germany, seated by Gov. Spots- 
wood upon his lands at Germanna, \'irginia. 
He was graduated from Washington Col- 
lege, and became a lawyer. He was a cap- 
tain of volunteers in 1847, commissioned by 
President Polk. He served ten years in the 
legislature, being speaker two years, and a 
number of years chairman of the military 
affairs committee ; was president of board of 
visitors of Virginia Military Institute. He 
was made colonel of the Seventh Virginia 
Regiment on May 2, 1861, and was pro- 
moted brigadier-general in May, 1862. He 
took part in many battles, and was desjjer- 
ately wounded while leading his brigade in 
a charge at Gettysburg. After he had suffi- 
ciently recovered, he was placed in com- 
mand of the local forces in and about Ricli- 
mond, and so served until the close ot the 
war, meantime being promoted to major- 
general. After peace was restored, he re- 
sumed law practice in Madison county. He 
took an active part in (ip])Ositi()n to the 



GOVERNORS OF THE STATE— 1861-1915 



Republicans, and was elected governor in 
1873 ; while so serving, a legislative com- 
mittee waited upon him to assure him of 
his unanimous election as United States 
senator if he would accept, but he declined, 
declaring that the state had already be- 
stowed upon him the highest position in its 
power — the one he now held. He retired 
tc his farm in Orange county, and died at 
Gordonsville, April 7, 1895. ^^ married 
Mrs. C. Conway Cave. 

HoUiday, Frederick William Mackey, 

born in Winchester, Virginia, February 22, 
1828, son of Dr. Richard J. M. Holliday, an 
early settler of Scotch-Irish ancestry. He 
graduated from Yale College in 1847, 'iii<i 
then entered the University of Virginia, 
from which he was graduated in law after 
one session, and was selected as final orator 
of the Jefi'erson Literary Society. He was 
made commonwealth attorney for Frederick 
county, and served until the war broke out. 
He went with the first troops to Harper's 
Ferry, and on his return became captain of 
a company, which was assigned to the 
Third Regiment, of the Stonewall Brigade, 
and rose to the colonelcy ; was in numer- 
ous engagements, losing his right arm 
at Cedar Run (or Slaughter's Mountain), 
disabling him for field service. He then 
entered the Confederate congress, of which 
he continued a member until peace was re 
stored. Resuming practice, he took first 
rank at the Winchester bar. He was a 
commissioner at the Centennial Exposition 
of 1876, in Philadelphia ; in the same year 
he was a presidential elector. Without op- 
position, he was elected governor in 1877. 
His administration was principally concern- 
ed with the state debt question, and he 



yetoed the repudiation scheme. .\s governor 
he delivered the address of welcome at the 
^ orktown Centennial, under congressional 
appointment. After retiring from oiifice he 
busied himself on his farm, and in literary 
pursuits. He died at Winchester, May 20, 
1S99. 

Cameron, William Evelyn, born in Pe- 
tersburg, \'irginia, November 29, 1842, son 
of Walker Anderson Cameron and Eliza- 
beth Page (W'alker) Cameron, his wife. 
His father was a cotton broker, descended 
from Sir Ewan Lochiel, the celebrated chief 
of clan Cameron in Scotland. Among Gov. 
Cameron's distinguished American progeni- 
tors were Benjamin Harrison, who settled in 
Virginia in 1630, and was secretary to the 
colony ; Sir Dudley Digges, master of the 
rolls to King Charles I. ; Col. William Byrd, 
of Westover (1673) I ^''"i Edmund Jenings 
(1690), deputy governor of the colony 1706- 
xo. The founder of the Cameron family 
in Virginia and North Carolina was the Rev. 
John Cameron (1770), graduate of Aber- 
deen University, an Episcopal clergyman, 
and rector of old Blandford Church, Peters- 
burg, Virginia 

William E. Cameron's early life was spent 
in his native city. He was studious and 
ambitious. He attended various schools, 
among which was the classical school of 
Mr. Charles Campbell, of Petersburg, the 
historian of Virginia. His first early em- 
ployment was that of a clerk on a Missis- 
sippi steamboat. In i860, he was selected 
for a cadetship at West Point, and took a 
preparatory course in St. Louis under Capt. 
(afterward Major-General) John Reynolds. 
In 1861, he acted as drillmaster for the Mis- 
souri state troops, and was captured at 



\1RGI.\1A r.IOGKArilV 



Camp Jackson, but escaped the same night, 
and returned to Virginia. There he joined 
at Norfolk Company A, Twelfth Virginia 
I<cgimcnt. and subsequently took part in 
c\cry engagement of Lee's army, except 
^harpsburg. being at that time disabled by 
a wound received at Second Manassas 
uhich disabled him for several months. 
I'romotcd to second lieutenant in June, 1861, 
he was appointed regimental adjutant in 
May. 18(12, on the brigade staff January, 
i8(>3, made inspector of Davis' Mississippi 
brigade, February, 1864, appointed adju- 
lant-gcneral of Weisiger's Virginia brigade, 
October. i8<i4. and in this capacity surren- 
dered with Mahone's division at Appomat- 
tox in .\pril, 1865. 

Returning to his native city, Capt. Cam- 
eron was local editor of a small daily paper 
founded by the late A. M. Keiley, which 
was suppressed by Gen. Canby. He was 
then city editor of the Petersburg "Index" 
until i8(j6, when the "Norfolk Virginian" 
was founded and put under his editorial 
management. The following year he pur- 
chased the "Index," became its editor, and 
continued until 1872, when he became asso- 
.ciatcd with the late Baker P. Lee in editing 
the "Richmond Enquirer." In the reconstruc- 
tion times, Capt. Cameron was foremost in 
advocating the conservative policy which re- 
sulted in July. 1869, in the election of Gilbert 
C. Walker as governor, and the redemption 
ol the state from the car])et-baggers. He be- 
came involved in a duel with the late Judge 
Robert \V. Hughes, and was badly wounded. 
In 1876. he was elected mayor of Petersburg, 
and was twice re-elected. In 1879, he was 
one of those Democrats who declared in 
favor of a readjustment of the state debt, 



and did strenuous battle for his views in 
the "Richmond Whig," and on the stump, 
and in 1880 was a Hancock elector on the 
Kcadjuster ticket. In the following year 
he was nominated for governor by the Re- 
adjuster convention, against Maj. John W. 
Daniel, candidate of the regular Democrats 
whose platform pledged the state to pay the 
debt as funded. Capt. Cameron was elected 
(•y a substantial majority. After his four 
years of gubernatorial service, he engaged in 
the practice of law. In 1892, he was ap- 
pointed agent for the Columbian Exposition 
in Chicago, was later appointed a member of 
the Jury of Awards of Liberal Arts, and still 
later was selected to prepare a history of 
that great enterprise. He remained in Chi- 
cago until 1894, when he returned to Pe- 
tersburg. In 1896, he sup])orted Palmer and 
Kuckner against William Jennings Bryan 
and the proposed free-coinage of silver. In 
1901. he was elected without opposition to 
the constitutional convention of Virginia, 
and in the convention, he was chairman of 
the coniniittee on the executive department, 
and member of the committees on the judi- 
ciary and on final revision. He ranked as 
?. polished and forceful speaker, and as a 
well-informed constitutional lawyer. In 
1908 he removed to Norfolk, where for 
seven years he has been editor of the "Nor- 
folk Virginian." Among the products of 
his pen are a "History of the World's Fair," 
(1892) ; "The Columbian Exposition," 
( .1894) ; and biographical sketches of Lee, 
Tyler, Wise, and other distinguished Vir- 
ginians. 

On October 2, 1868, William E. Cameron 
married Louisa C. Egerton, of Petersburg, 
Virginia. They have had three children. 



GOVERNORS OF THE STATE— 1861-1915 



Lee, Fitzhugh, born at Clermont, Fair- 
fax county, November 19, 1835, son of 
Commodore Sydney Smith Lee, U. S. N., 
grandson of "Light Horse Harry Lee," and 
nephew of Gen. Robert E. Lee. After re- 
ceiving an academical education he was ap- 
pointed to the United States military acad- 
emy in 1852, graduating in 1856, and was 
commissioned second lieutenant of cavalry. 
He was in active service against the In- 
dians, and was severely wounded. In May, 
i860, he was ordered to report at the United 
States Military Academy as cavalry instruc- 
tor, and was on this duty until the out- 
break of the civil war when he resigned. 
Entering the Confederate service, he was 
commissioned first lieutenant of cavalry. 
For four months he was adjutant-general 
of Gen. Ewell's brigade. In August, 1861, 
he was made lieutenant-colonel of the First 
Virginia Cavalry, was promoted to colonel 
in March, 1862; to brigadier-general, July 
24, 1862, and to major-general, August 3, 
1863. He was with the Army of Northern 
Virginia in all its campaigns. He was se- 
verely wounded in the battle of Winchester, 
September 19, 1864, and had three horses 
shot under him. In March, 1865, he was 
given command of the cavalry corps. Army 
of Northern Virginia, with which, in April, 
he surrendered to Gen. Meade, at Farm- 
ville, Virginia, and returned home, living in 
retirement several years. In 1874, on invi- 
tation, he attended the Bunker Hill Cen- 
tennial, and his speech on that occasion was 
one of the earliest efforts of leading men on 
either side to lay aside the asperities of the 
late conflict, and grow together in the old 
fraternal bonds. In 1886, at the Washing- 
ton Centennial celebration, New York City, 
at the head of the Virginia troops in the 



parade, he received an ovation second to 
that accorded to no public man present. 
He was elected governor in 1885, serving 
until 1890, the constitutional provision alone 
preventing a re-election. In 1896 he was 
made consul-general at Havana, by Presi- 
dent Cleveland. During this service he had 
ample opportunity to distinguish himself by 
his calm but firm protection of American 
ir.terests, amid the ragings of the Cuban 
rising against the Spaniards. His life was 
threatened, and Americans were in constant 
danger. In this contingency he had full 
power to call war vessels from Key West, 
but did not resort to this method. When 
the government was obliged to send a war 
vessel, he cabled to the state department 
lecommending delay of such action, but the 
Maine had already sailed and was out of 
reach, and that ship was destroyed by a 
submarine explosion soon after her arrival 
;-.t Havana. Following this, the feeling 
against Americans in Cuba was very threat- 
ening. On March 5th Spain asked for the 
recall of Gen. Lee, which was refused, but 
on April 5th all American consuls were re- 
called, and Lee with many other American 
c'tizens, returned home. On the organiza- 
tion of troops, Gen. Lee was placed in com- 
mand of the Seventh corps, and though it 
was not called into active service, he was 
designated, in the event of military move- 
ments about Havana, to command oper- 
ations. Late in 1898 he was given com- 
mand of the artillery forces in the district 
of Havana, and later of the department of 
Cuba. He was author of the life of his 
uncle. Gen. Robert E. Lee, in a "Great 
Commander" series. He died in Washing- 
ton City, April 28, 1905. 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



Mc Kinney, Philip Watkins, was born in 
I'.uckingliani county, Virginia, May i, 1832, 
son of Charles McKinncy. He graduated 
from llampdcn-Sidney College, taking high 
r;.nk as a speaker, and receiving the Philan- 
thropic Society gold medal. He studied 
l.(w under Judge Urockenbrough, of Lex- 
ington, and engaged in practice; the same 
year ( 1858) he was elected to the general 
assembly, in which he served with distinc- 
tion four terms, until the close of the war. 
He was a strong Union man, but went with 
his state when it seceded. He became cap- 
tain of a company in the Fourth Cavalry 
Regiment, and served with it until severely 
wounded at Brandy Station, thereafter be- 
ii:g on post duty at Danville. After the 
war he resumed practice. He was a Demo- 
cratic candidate for congress, twice a presi- 
(If^ntial elector, several times common- 
wealth's attorney, and a delegate to the na- 
tional conventions of 1884 and 1888, and was 
elected attorney-general in 1881. In 1889 he 
was elected governor, over William Mahone, 
and his administration was notable for its 
■incccssful settlement of the state debt, on 

plan of readjustment which was accep- 
i.ible to the bondholders, since which time 
the interest has been steadily paid. 

O'Ferrall, Charles Triplett, was born near 
I'rucetown, l"redcrick county, Virginia, Oc- 
'ber 21. 1840. His father was John O'Fer- 
r,<ll, of Scotch-Irish descent, a farmer and 
hotel proprietor of Morgan county, Vir- 
i'lnia. now West Virginia, who served as 
Icrk of the county court, sheriff, and mem- 
ber of the legislature. He attended private 
•uhi>ols and at fifteen began public life as 
clerk of the circuit court of Morgan 
. and on the death of his father in 



1857 he was appointed by the governor to 
fill the vacancy. In 1861 he entered the 
Confederate army and during the course of 
the war, rose to be colonel of cavalry. He 
was wounded several times and was once 
left for dead on the battlefield. After the 
war Col. O'Ferrall studied law at Wash- 
ington College, now Washington and Lee 
University, which was at the time, presided 
ever by Gen. R. E. Lee. He then began to 
practice law at Harrisonburg in Rocking- 
ham county. He was soon elected to the 
legislature and took an active part in saving 
the state from the "carpet-baggers." In 
1874, he was made by the legislature 
county judge of Rockingham. In 1884 he 
was elected to the forty-eighth congress 
and was re-elected to the five succeeding 
congresses, serving from May 5, 1884, to 
March 3, 1895. After this he was elected 
governor of the state (January i, 1894 — 
January i, 1898). W'hen his term of office 
came to an end, he settled in Richmond and 
practiced law, meeting with much success. 
He died September 22, 1905. As a public 
speaker Gov. O'Ferrall had few equals, and 
his "Four Years of Active Service" is a book 
of much value and has been highly praised. 

Tyler, James Hoge, born at his father's 
home, "Blenheim," Caroline county, Vir- 
ginia, August II, 1846, son of Hon. George 
Tyler and Elva (Hoge) Tyler, his wife. The 
father, oldest son of Henry and Lucy 
(Coleman) Tyler, owned the "Blenheim" 
e.'^tate and many others, and was known for 
his hospitality and generosity: he was a 
member of the Virginia legislature both be- 
fore and after the civil war. His mother 
dying at his birth. James Hoge Tyler was 
brought up by his grandparents, Gen. and 



GOVERNORS OF THE STATE— 1861-1915 



Mrs. James Hoge, at their home, "Belle 
Hampton," in Pulaski county, Virginia. 
When he was ten years old, his grand- 
mother died, and his grandfather, stricken 
with paralysis, made him an assistant in his 
business affairs. To the age of fifteen he 
was instructed by private tutors and by his 
grandfather. After the death of Gen. Hoge, 
in 1861, he joined his father in Caroline 
county, and was sent to the school of Frank- 
lin Minor in Albemarle county. When Vir- 
ginia seceded, he enlisted as a private in 
the Confederate army, and served through- 
out the war with characteristic courage and 
fidelity. After the surrender, he returned 
to Pulaski county, and took up farm work, 
but soon became interested in public-affairs, 
and wrote frequently for the press urging 
manufacturing and mining development. In 
1877 he was elected to the state senate, and 
proved himself a most efficient legislator. 
He urged the reduction of state taxes from 
fifty to forty cents. As a member of the 
commission which settled the state debt, his 
influence was potent in effecting a saving 
of interest. He was a member of the board 
of public buildings at Blacksburg and Mar- 
ion, and the labors of that body received 
special commendation by the governor. He 
v/as made rector of the Virginia Agricul- 
tural and Mechanical College (now Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute), but resigned to en- 
ter upon his duties as lieutenant-governor, to 
v.^hich office he was elected in 1889. ^^ w^-'' 
a member of the commission to examine 
into the disputed Virginia-Maryland boun- 
dary line, and was elected chairman of the 
joint committee of the two states. He gave 
earnest attention to the resources of the 
state, and in public addresses and letters to 
the press, he urged displays at the various 



fairs and expositions. In 1897, by acclama- 
tion he was made the Democratic candidate 
for governor, and was elected by a majority 
of more than 52,000 votes. During his term 
of ofilice he greatly contributed to the pros- 
perity of the state. By careful economy, the 
state debt was reduced by more than a 
jnillion dollars, nor was this done at the 
exj^ense of any public concern. Besides 
meeting the additional expense incident to 
an extra legislative session and a constitu- 
tional convention, the public school fund 
was increased by $21,000, and the literary 
fund by $68,000, while more than $800,000 
remained in the public treasury, and the 
constitutional convention further reduced the 
tax rate from forty to thirty cents. He re- 
commended a labor bureau, and the con- 
ditional pardon system, and these were es- 
tablished ; the agricultural department was 
placed upon a sound practical basis ; and 
all the state institutions received liberal and 
sympathetic support. During his term also 
the Virginia-Tennessee boundary dispute 
was settled. 

In 1892 he was a delegate to the Pan- 
Presbyterian Alliance at Toronto, Canada ; 
and in 1896 went to Scotland as a represen- 
tative of the Southern General Assembly at 
the Alliance meeting in Glasgow. He was 
a member of the board of trustees of Hamp- 
d en-Sidney College, of the Union Theologi- 
cal Board, and of the board of the Synodi- 
cal Orphans' Home at Lynchburg. Since 
retiring from the governorship he has re- 
sided at East Radford, Virginia, where he 
has been active in various business enter- 
prises. He was married, in 1868, to Miss 
Sue Montgomery Hammet. Gov. Tyler is 
descended from Richard Tyler, who settled 
in Essex county in the latter part of the 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



seventeenth century (q. v. I, 346). He is 
a very happy and popular speaker and is 
distinguished for his genial and affable 
manners. 

Montague, Andrew Jackson, born in 
Campbell county. \'irginia. October 3, 1802, 
son of Judge Robert Latane Montague (q. 
v.). He was educated at private schools and 
by private tutors in Middlesex county, and 
in early youth developed a taste for the 
best of English literature— historical, bio- 
graphical, poetical. After a year in the 
grammar school of William and Mary Col- 
lege. Wiliianij-burg, he entered Richmond 
College, at Richmond, Virginia, and in due 
time was graduated from several of the 
schools of that institution, and having achiev- 
ed much distinction as an orator and debater 
ii; the literary societies. He served as a pri- 
>ate tutor from 1882 to 1884, and displayed 
such ability as to give promise of a high 
place in the educational field, had he seen 
proper to engage in it permanently. In the 
summer of 1S84 he became a law student in 
the University of Virginia, under Professor 
John B. Minor, took the regular course in 
the following session, and in 1885 was grad- 
uated with the B. L. degree. He then enter- 
ed u]K>n practice in Danville, Virginia, and 
soon took a prom.inent place at the bar. He 
took an enthusiastic interest in politics, and 
in the campaign of 1892 he attracted the ad- 
miring attention of Mr. Cleveland, who, on 
c««ming to the presidency in the following 
year, appointed him United States district 
attorney for the western district of Virginia. 
In 1897 he was elected attorney-general of 
the state, and therefore resigned the district 
attorneyship. His services in this new 
|M>Hition. during his four year term, were 



conspicuously creditable, and a factor in 
his further advancement. In 1901 he was 
th.e Democratic nominee for governor, over 
several distinguished competitors, and in the 
ensuing campaign he delivered many able 
speeches, and was elected by a large major- 
ity. During his four year term, he won 
general commendation as a most useful and 
progressive executive. In large measure, to 
him is due a deeply awakened interest in 
the public school system, and its substan- 
tial development. It was largely through 
his instrumentality that the primary plan 
for the nomination of United States sena- 
tors was adopted. Retiring from the guber- 
natorial chair in 1906, Mr. Montague re- 
sumed the practice of his profession, in 
Richmond, and in May, of the same year, 
President Roosevelt selected him as one of 
the six delegates from the United States to 
the Third International Conference of 
.Xmerican States, in Rio de Janeiro, July 
21, 1906. Mr. Montague is well read in 
sociolog>' and political economy, and in 1905 
he received from Brown University, Rhode 
Island, the degree of LL. D. He was mar- 
ried, December 11, 1889, to Elizabeth 
Lynne Hoskins, of Middlesex county. In 
191 3 he succeeded John Lamb in congress 
from the Richmond district and is the pres- 
ent incumbent. 

Swanson, Claude Augustus, born March 
31, 1862, at Swansonville, Pittsylvania 
county, son of John Muse Swanson and 
Catherine Pritchett, his wife. His father 
was a highly respected merchant and manu- 
facturer of tobacco in Pittsylvania county, 
who suffered a reverse and lost all his prop- 
erty in the panic of 1876. The subject of 
this sketch was put early to school and 



\IRGI.\IA BIOGRAPHY 



studied law without assistance, and was 
.-.dniittcd to the bar in 1867. In 1890 he 
became county judge of Xottoway county, 
tcrving until 1892, when he resigned. He 
was an active and effective campaign speak- 
er, and in 1899 was a member of the Demo- 
cratic State executive committee ; during the 
s.\me period he was a state senator, and 
chairman of the committee on revison of 
laws of Virginia. He was the author of the 
"Mann Law." under the operations of 
which were closed about eight hundred 
saloons in the country districts where there 
was no police protection; and he was also 
patron of the high school bill, passed in 
1906. and under which some four hundred 
and fifty high school buildings have been 
erected. In 1910 he was elected governor, 
and his administration proved most notable, 
especially in giving practical effect to the 
temperance and public school legislation 
which he advocated so strenuously during 
his senatorial service. The termination of 
h:s term of office did not mean absolute re- 
tirement, as Gov. Mann has been very ac- 
tive since that date in making campaign 
speeches and taking part in public affairs. 
He resides at his plantation in Nottow.iy 
county, and is much interested in farming. 
He married (first) Sallie Fitzgerald, who 
died November 2, 1882. and (second) at 
Petersburg. Etta, daughter of Hon. Alex- 
ander and Anna Wilson Donnan. 

Stuart. Henry Carter, born at Wytheville, 
Wythe county, \irginia, January 18, 1855, 
son of William Alexander Stuart and Mary 
Taylor (Carter) Stuart, his wife. His father 
was desccn<led from Archibald Stuart, who 
was of Scotch descent, but who came directly 
from Londonderry, Ireland, in 1726, first 



settled in Pennsylvania, and in 1732, in Au- 
gusta county, Virginia. His son, Alexander 
Stuart, was a major in the revolutionary 
war, and had a son Alexander Stuart, who 
was a lawyer of ability and was territorial 
judge of Missouri by appointment of Presi- 
dent Jefferson. The latter's son, Archibald 
Stuart, was a member of congress and of 
the conventions of 1829-30 and of 1850-51. 
He married Elizabeth Letcher and had six 
children, of whom Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, of 
Confederate fame, was one, and Willian; 
Alexander Stuart, father of the subject of 
this sketch, was another. William Alex- 
ander Stuart was prominently engaged in 
manufacturing and general business and ac- 
tjiiired a large fortune. 

Henry Carter Stuart wa.s so unfortunate 
as to lose his mother at the age of seven 
years, but he had the care of kind friends 
and a devoted father. His life was passed 
mainly in the country, where he was re- 
ouired by his father to acquaint himself with 
all kinds of manual labor and was not al- 
lowed to be idle, .\fter an attendance of 
several years upon private schools, he enter- 
ed Emory and Henry College from which 
i.f graduated in 1874 with the degree of A. 
1>. He then took a course of law at the 
l.niversity of Virginia for one year, after 
which he began the active work of life, in 
1875, as assistant to his father. .\s a promi- 
nent stock raiser, president of the Stuart 
Land and Cattle Company, president of the 
Citizens' National l')ank, president of Buck- 
horn Iron and Improvement Company, and 
vice-president of the Prudential Fire Insur- 
ance Company, he has been deeply engrossed 
in the development of the southwest, and has 
acquired by his own unaided efforts very 
large interests in lands and cattle, besides 









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GOVERNORS OF THE STATE— 1861-1915 



13 



substantial interest in mineral properties and 
mining enterprises. While so much of his 
life has been spent in the way suggested, 
Mr. Stuart has, nevertheless, found time to 
engaged in public service. He was a lead- 
ing member of the constitutional convention 
of 1901-02, and in 1903 was elected a mem- 
ber of the Virginia corporation commission 
for a term expiring in 1908. In 1914 he was 
elected governor, and he is still the chief 
executive. Two events so far contribute to 
make his term memorable. One is the adop- 
tion by the people of the prohibition of the 



sale of liquor ; and the other is the great 
'"Confederate reunion" held in June, 1915. in 
the city of Richmond. He was a member also 
of the board of visitors of the University of 
Virginia, and of the College of William and 
Mary. In religious preference Mr. Stuart 
is a Methodist and in politics a Democrat. 
He is a member of the Society of Sons of 
the Revolution, the D, K. E. fraternity, and 
of ihe Westmoreland and Commonwealth 
clubs in Richmond, Virginia. He married 
Margaret Bruce Carter, February 26, 1896, 
and has one child. 






JUDGES SUPREME COURT OF APPEALS 



II— JUDGES SUPREME COURT OF APPEALS 



^ 



Rives, Alexander, son of Robert Rives, an 
eminent merchant of Virginia, and brother 
of Hon. William C. Rives, was born at Oak- 
ridge, Nelson county, Virginia, June 17, 
1806. He was educated at Hampden-Sidney 
College, and the University of Virginia, 
graduating from the latter in 1828. He was 
elected to a professorship in Washington 
College, and accepted, but followed it imme- 
diately with a declination, was admitted to 
the bar, and engaged in practice. He was 
originally a Democrat, but because of oppo- 
sition to the sub-treasury project of Mr. Van 
Buren became a Conservative in 1840, and 
joined the Whig party in 1844. During the 
civil war, he was a strong Unionist, and bit- 
terly opposed secession. After the war, he 
acted for a time with the Conservatives, and 
then with the Republicans. He was a mem- 
ber of the state convention of 1850-51 ; of the 
house of delegates in 1852-53; and of the 
state senate in 1859-61. He was appointed a 
judge of the supreme court of appeals, De- 
cember 19, 1866. In 1870 he was the Repub- 
lican candidate for congress from his district, 
and was defeated by R. T. W. Duke. The 
same year, he was appointed judge of the 
U. S. district court for the western district 
of Virginia, by President Grant, and contin- 
ued in that office until his death. He was 
a rector of the University of Virginia, and 
a member of the board of visitors, 1865-66. 
He was an Episcopalian ; "he was kind, 
courteous and forbearing to all, a beautiful 
example to those who shared his intimate 
acquaintance." He was married (first) to 

VIR-2 



Isabella Bachen Wydown, daughter of the 
Rev. Samuel Wydown, a native of England, 
and an Episcopal minister; he married (sec- 
ond) Sallie Hearsley, daughter of Dr. 
George Watson, of Richmond. After his 
first marriage he resided at Charlottesville 
until 1833; then at his seat, "Carlton," on 
"Monticello," until 1873 ; and then at his 
home, "Eastbourne Terrace," Charlottes- 
ville, where he died, September 17, 1885, in 
his eightieth year. 

Thompson, Lucas P., was born in Nelson 
county, Virginia, but moved to Staunton, 
where he was made judge of the circuit 
court in 1831. He continued in this office 
for many years, and was elected in 1866 a 
judge of the supreme court, but died before 
taking his seat. He had a law school at his 
home in Staunton. 

Jo3aies, William T., born in Accomac 
county, Virginia, March 14, 1817, son of 
I'homas R. Joynes, a lawyer of ability, who 
is mentioned by Henry A. Wise, in his 
"Seven Decades of the Union." He settled 
in Petersburg, in 1839, and by his studious 
habits and talents soon gained for himself 
an enviable reputation as a lawyer. He was 
appointed United States district attorney, 
and discharged the duties of that position 
with marked ability. In the summer of 1863 
he was elected judge of the first judicial dis- 
trict, under the Confederate establishment, 
which position he held until the termination 
of the war. In the fall of 1865 he was 
elected to the legislature of Virginia. Dur- 



i8 



\IRG1XIA BIOGRAPHY 



ing the following session he was elected to 
the supreme court bench, where he distin- 
guishetl himself by his erudition and the 
practical good sense of his opinions. With 
a brief interval he remained upon the bench 
until March 12, 1873, when ill health ob- 
liged him to resign. When he tendered his 
resignation, the entire court addressed him 
in a letter of regret, in which they showed 
that he held the highest possible position 
in the estimation of his associates on the 
bench. He never regained his health, and 
died in Petersburg, March 14, 1874. On 
March 17, of the same year, was held a 
memorial meeting of the bench and bar of 
Petersburg, and eulogistic tributes were paid 
his memory by Maj. Chajles S. Stringfel- 
low and Captain (later Judge) Drury A. 
llinton. He married in Petersburg, in 1839, 
a daughter of Judge John F. May. 

Bouldin, Wood, born at "Golden Hills," 
Charlotte couiity, Virginia, January 20, 181 1, 
son of Hon. Thomas Tyler Bouldin, and 
Ann (Lewis) Bouldin, his wife; his grand- 
parents on the paternal side were W'ood 
touldin and Johanna Tyler, sister of John 
Tyler, of revolutionary fame. His early 
\outh was passed in Richmond, where he 
Dttended a school conducted by Mr. Turner. 
He afterwards was a student at New Lon- 
don Academy, in Bedford county, then un- 
der the charge of the Rev. Nicholas H. 
Cohbs, afterward the distinguished Bishop 
of .Mabama. .At this celebrated school he 
completed his academic studies, and on his 
return home, for a year taught a neigh- 
borhood school. He then removed to Hali- 
>ax counly. where he took up law studies 
under the orticc preceptorship of the Hon. 
William Leigh, one of Virginia's greatest 



jurists, and who ever afterward cherished a 
genuine afTection and admiration for his 
whilom pupil. On coming to the bar, Mr. 
Bouldin found his capabilities taxed to the 
utmost in settling the affairs of his father, 
and the extensive estate of Frederick Ross 
(for whom the elder Bouldin was the repre- 
sentative), which had been left greatly em- 
barassed. In discharging these onerous du- 
ties, Mr. Bouldin established a high reputa- 
,tion for ability and integrity. He now set- 
,tled at Charlotte Court House, where he 
^practiced his profession with great success. 
In 1842, seeking a larger field, he removed 
to Richmond, where he entered into a law 
jjartnership with Robert C. Stanard, one of 
the most eminent lawyers of his day. He at 
,once took his position in the front rank of 
the Richmond bar, and Grattan's Reports 
record many opinions which attest his abil- 
ity and learning. In 1853 he purchased the 
fine plantation on Staunton river, on which 
John Randolph, of Roanoke, had resided, and 
Jiere took up his residence, and practiced 
his profession in Charlotte, Halifax and 
Mecklenburg counties. When civil war was 
impending, Mr. Bouldin was made a delegate 
to the Virginia convention of 1861. Here 
he insisted that the state should never leave 
the Union until she had made every en- 
deavor to settle the differences between the 
different sections of the country, and re- 
fused to vote for the secession ordinance 
until President Lincoln called upon Virginia 
for troops, when he cast his lot with his 
state. During the war, he was one of the 
most trusted leaders in the legislature. 
After the surrender of Gen. Lee, he did 
not indulge in vain regrets, but took a pa- 
triot's part in seeking to recover the state 



JUDGES SUPREME COURT OF APPEALS 



iy 



and its people from the destructive results 
of the war. In the great "capitol disaster" 
ill Richmond, he was among those who were 
in the court room, and went down with the 
falling floors. He was extricated, as was 
believed, without serious injury, but his sys- 
tem had been severely shocked, and he 
sought a brief rest. In 1872 he was elected 
by the legislature to the supreme court of 
appeals, to succeed the Hon. William T 
Joynes, and, after much hesitation, he ac- 
cepted, at the cost of considerable pecuniary 
sacrifice. His judicial career was short, his 
death occurring, at his home. October 10. 
1876. "He exhibited a learning and grasp 
of intellect which placed him in the front 
rank of tlie great jurists who had adorned 
'ihe Virgniia bench." 

Christian, Joseph, born in Middlesex 
count}', \"irginia, July 10, 1828, oldest son of 
Richard Allen Christian, M. D., and Eliza- 
beth Steptoe, his wife. He was educated at 
Columbian College, Washington, U. C. (now 
Columbian University) ; studied law at 
Staunton, Virginia.; was admitted to the bar 
al the age of twenty-one ; practiced his pro- 
fession in Middlesex and adjoining counties. 
He was elected to the state senate in 1858, at 
the age of thirty years, and served as senator 
during the war. He was an old-line Whig 
in politics, and one of the electors on the 
Bell and Everett ticket in i860. He was 
opposed to secession, until Lincoln called 
on the south for her pro rata share of troops, 
and he spoke against secession on many 
occasions, his chief opponent being the Hon. 
Beverley Douglass. He was elected circuit 
judge in 1866, at the age of thirty-eight, for 
the circuit composed of the counties of Mid- 
dlesex, Gloucester, Mathews, James City, 



Warwick, New Kent, Charles City and Hen- 
rico. He moved to Richmond, Virginia, in 
1869, and formed a partnership in law with 
the Hon. ^\■illiam T. Joynes, of Petersburg, 
\'irginia. They practiced together for eight 
months, when both were elected to the 
bench of the supreme court of appeals of 
Virginia for a term of twelve years from 
Ji'.nuary i, 1870. He was forty-one years 
of age at the time of his election, and forty- 
two the following July. At the death of 
Judge R. C. L. Moncure, he was made presi- 
dent of that court, and served on the bench 
o*^ that court for twelve years. He was de- 
feated by the Readjuster party, and resumed 
the practice of law in 1882, and continued 
W practice his profession until incapacitated 
by ill health. He died at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, May 29, 1905. 

Staples, Waller R., born in Patrick county, 
\ irginia, in the year 1826, son of Abram 
Staples. He began his collegiate education 
at the University of North Carolina, where 
he sj)ent two years, then entered the Col- 
lege of William and Mary, W^illiamsburg, 
Virginia, from which he was graduated in 
1845. Having attained his majority, he re- 
moved to Montgomery county, Virginia, 
where he began the practice of law in the 
office of the Hon. William Ballard Preston, 
secretary of the navy under the administra- 
tion of President Taylor. In 1853-54 he was 
a member of the state legislature, and was 
a Whig presidential elector in 1856 and 
i860. He was one of the four delegates sent 
by the Virginia convention of 1861 to repre- 
sent the state in the Confederate provisional 
congress at Montgomery, Alabama, till Feb- 
ruary 22, 1862. On that day, the new Con- 
federate congress came into existence, and 



\ JKC.IXIA niOGRAPIlY 



Mr. Staples became a member of its house 
of representatives ; he was re-elected in 1863, 
and served until the end of the war. He 
then resumed the practice of his profession 
in Montgomery county. In February, 1S70, 
he was elected a judge of the supreme court 
of aj>peals, receiving the largest vote given 
any candidate except the Hon. K. C. L. 
Moncure. In 1882 the Readjuster party 
tame into control of the state, and Judge 
Staples and his associates on the bench were 
not re-elected. In 1884, Judge Staples was 
a member of the committee chosen to revise 
the civil and criminal laws of the state, a 
work which occupied three years, and being 
embodied in what is known as the code of 
Virginia of 1887. Judge Staples was twice 
a Democratic presidential elector. During 
his term on the supreme bench, he could 
have received the nomination for governor 
on two occasions, and also that for attorney- 
general ; but he was steadfastly reluctant to 
being a candidate for any political office. 
He was counsel for the Richmond tS: Dan- 
\ille Railroad Company, but resigned the 
position. He was a member of the law firm 
of Staples & Munford, acknowledged leaders 
at the bar. 

Anderson, Francis T., born at Walnut 
Hill. Botetourt county, Virginia, December 
T 1. 1808, son of William Anderson and Anne 
I'homas) Anderson, his wife; the latter a 
daughter of Col. Francis Thomas, of Fred- 
erick county, Maryland. He received his 
early instruction from his mother; then at 
the school of Curtis Alderson ; for one ses- 
sion in a school at Ben Salem, Rockbridge 
county, and then for some years at the Fin- 
castle Classical School. He subsequently 
entered Washington College, from which he 



v.as graduated with distinction at the age of 
nineteen. He read law under the direction 
of Fleming B. Miller and Chancellor Creed 
'laylor, and came to the bar just when he 
attained his majority. In his early profes- 
sional life he for some years had a small 
class of young law students, but his prac- 
tice demanded so much of his time that he 
dismissed them. In 1855 his health de- 
manded a change, and he removed to Rock- 
bridge county, and settled at Glenwood, 
where he lived until 1866, devoting himself - 
chiefly to his farm and iron interests. In 
1S60 he was an elector on the Constitu- 
tional Union party ticket, was elected, chos- 
en president of the electoral college which 
cast the vote of Virginia for Bell and Ever- 
ett — the first occasion in the history of the 
state when her vote was cast against the 
nominees of the Democratic party. He was 
a i)ronounced Unionist until war was pre- 
cipitated, when he gave his firm adherence 
to the southern cause. In May, 1861, he was 
elected to the house of delegates, and in 
that body was distinguished for the zeal 
and ability with which he aided in providing 
fcir the troops in the field, and for security 
ai home. Owing to impaired health he de- 
clined a re-election in 1863. In 1865 he was 
again elected, but, on account of war con- 
ditions, he was unable to take his seat. In 

1869 he resumed the practice of law. In 

1870 he was made, by the general assembly, 
one of the original five members of the 
.'•uprenic court of appeals, which i)osition he 
Ik 1(1 until January i, 1883, when he retired 
Jind gave himself to the care of his private 
business. From the first, he took rank as 
an able and fearless judge. He was a de- 
\oted friend of education. In 1853 he was 
elected a trustee of Washington College. He 



JUDGES SUPREME COURT OF APPEALS 



participated in the reorganization in 1865, 
aided in bringing Gen. Robert E. Lee to its 
presidency, and cooperated with him in his 
plans for enlarging the usefulness of the 
institution. In 1879 he was chosen rector 
of Washington and Lee University, and 
held that position until his death, November 
30, 1887. in his seventy-ninth year. He was 
married, December 8, 1836, to Mary Ann 
Alexander, daughter of Andrew Alexander, 
of Rockbridge. 

Burks, Edward C, born in Bedford 
county, Virginia, May 20, 1821, came from 
a highly respectable family of Irish origin. 
In his boyhood he attended nine dif- 
ferent schools, his education occupying all 
his time until he attained his majority. He 
was studying the classics when ten or 
eleven years of age. He attended several 
sessions of the New London Academy, in 
Bedford county, under the superintendence 
of Henry L. Davies, and then of George E. 
Dabney, afterward a professor at Washing- 
ton College (now Washington and Lee 
University). In 1839 he entered the last- 
named institution, and was graduated there- 
from in 1841, delivering the Cincinnati 
oration, the highest honor of the graduating 
class. Later the same year, he entered the 
law department of the University of Vir- 
ginia, and was graduated in 1842. He at 
once entered upon the practice of his pro- 
fession in Bedford and adjacent counties 
and steadily advanced in the estimation of 
both bench and bar. In December, 1876. 
he was elected by the legislature to the 
supreme court of appeals, and remained in 
that position for six years, when, the Re- 
adjuster party having come into power, a 
question was raised as to whether he had 



been elected for a full term or for an unex- 
pired term, and it was decided against him, 
and he returned to his profession, with his 
office in Bedford City. He was one of the re- 
visers of the code of Virginia of 1887, with 
Judge Staples and Maj. John W. Riely. He 
was a member of the house of delegates in 
1861-62, and a part of 1863 — the only politi- 
cal ofhce he ever held, and he declined a 
re-election. Washington and Lee Univer- 
sity conferred upon him the degree of LL. 
D. In 1891 he was president of the Virginia 
.State Bar Association, and that year deliv- 
ered a most meritorious address, which was 
widely distributed. 

Lewis, Lunsford Lomax, born in Lewis- 
ton, Rockingham county, Virginia, March 
17, 1846, son of Samuel Hawes Lewis and 
Ann Maria (Lomax) Lewis, his wife, and 
a descendant of John Lewis, of county 
Down, Ireland, who came first to Pennsyl- 
vania, and removed to Virginia in 1732, 
being the first permanent white settler in 
Augusta county, and in 1745 was a justice 
cf its first court. The father of Lunsford 
L. Lewis was a member of the state legis- 
ialure, for m.any years a presiding justice 
of the Rockingham county court, and gen- 
eral of the state militia. On his mother's 
side he was descended from Sir Thomas 
Lunsford, lieutenant of the Tower of Lon- 
don, who came to Virginia in 1649. 

Limsford L. Lewis was educated at Cen- 
ter (Kentucky) College, and at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia. He was admitted to the 
bar, and entered upon practice at Culpeper, 
Virginia, in 1869, and shortly afterward be- 
came commonwealth attorney. He was ap- 
pointed by President Grant as district at- 
torney for the eastern district of Virginia, 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



;.nd by successive reappointments tilled the 
I osition until 1882, when Gov. Cameron ap- 
IK.intcd him to the bench of the supreme 
ci.urt of appeals, to succeed Judge Moncure, 
1; tc presiding judjfc who died August 28, 
ifVj. lie was elected by the next legisla- 
ture (which was Republican) for the term 
uf twelve years, and was immediately chos- 
en by the court as its president: and in this 
capacity served with eminent ability until 
the end of his term. On January i, 1895, 
Judge Lewis returned to his profession, and 
changed his residence to Richmond. He 
did not long remain in privacy, for Presi- 
dent Roosevelt restored him to the office 
which he had held under President Grant, 
that of United States district attorney. He 
remained in that position until 1905, when 
he received the Republican nomination for 
governor, but his Democratic opponent was 
elected. He was then re-appointed district 
attorney by President Roosevelt. He was 
married (first) to Rosalie Botts, daughter 
of Hon. John Minor Botts, and (second) 
to Janic Looney. daughter of Col. Robert 
r. Looney. of Memphis. Tennessee. He re- 
sides in the city of Richmond. 

Richardson, Robert A., born in Smyth 
count). Virginia; was elected to the bench 
(f the supreme court of appeals in 1882, 
and served till 1895. He was very popular 
with the bar. 

Lacy, Benjamin Watkins, i)orn at "Ells- 
worth." New Kent county, \'irginia, Janu- 
ary 27. 1839. son of Hon. Richmond T. 
Lacy; hi.s mother was a daughter of Col. 
John Lane, of "X'audusc." .\melia county, 
\"irgin-n He was taught by his mother 
unt '. advanced in Latin and 

mat inter the academies of Pike 



Powers, of Staunton ; and Brown and Tebbs 
of Albemarle ; and his education was com- ^ 
pleted at the University of Virginia, after 
which his father was his law preceptor. 
The war intervened, however, and he 
joined the New Kent troop of horse, April 
17, 1861, as a private. He was three times 
disabled by wounds, but, in spite of his con- 
dition, participated with his company in all 
the battles of Gen. Lee's army. He rose co 
the rank of first lieutenant, and during the 
latter part of the war commanded a squad- 
ron of two companies, with which he sur- 
lendered at Appomattox Court House. 
After the war, he reviewed his law studies, 
a.id engaged in practice in partnership with 
his father — an association which was ne- 
cessarily terminated when the son came 
to the bench of the county court in 1870. 
After three years service, he resigned, and 
in 1873 was elected to the house of dele- 
gates, to which body he was returned for 
three following terms ; he was on the com- 
mittee on courts of justice every term until 
the last, when he was made speaker. While 
serving in the latter position, he was elected 
ill 1880 to the circuit court bench, from 
which he resigned in 1883 to take his seat 
as a member of the supreme court of ap- 
peals, and served till 1895, when his term 
expired. 

Fauntleroy, Thomas T., born in Winches- 
ter. Virginia, Uecember 20, 1823, son of 
Gen. Thomas T. Fauntleroy, a Virginian, 
who in 1861 resigned his commission as 
colonel of the Eleventh United States Dra- 
goons, and who was then the ranking offi- 
cer in the United States army, of all who 
took sides with the south. He was educated 
at the celebrated high school of Benjamin 



JUDGES SUPREME COURT OF APPEALS 



Hallowell, in Alexandria, \'irginia, and 
graduated in 1844 with the law class of the 
University of Virginia, with John Thruston 
Thornton, John Page, of Hanover, J. Ran- 
dolph Tucker, John C. Rutherfoord, William 
C Rives, Jr., and others, among his class- 
mates. He entered upon the practice of 
his profession in 1847, at Winchester. In 
1850 he was elected commonwealth attor- 
ney in Frederick county. He was elected 
to the legislature. In 1859 he participated 
in the capture of John Brown and his fol- 
lowers at Harper's Ferr}^ and in 1861 was 
commissioned lieutenant in the state mili- 
tary service. Upon the passage of the "se- 
questration act" of the Confederate con- 
gress, he was chosen as one of the receiv- 
ers to execute the difficult and delicate re- 
sponsibilities imposed by that law. At the 
close of the war, he resumed practice, with 
broken health. He again represented 
Frederick county in the legislature, and in 
1879 he was elected by the legislature, sec- 
retary of the commonwealth. In 1883 he 
was elected by the legislature, one of the 
five judges of the supreme court of appeals, 
for a term of twelve years, and upon the 
organization of the court, he was made 
resident judge at Richmond. He made an 
excellent judicial record. 

Hinton, Drury A., born in Petersburg, 
Virginia. He was descended, on his father's 
side, from Maj.-Gen. Abraham Wood, who 
received a patent for the land upon which 
the city of Petersburg stands ; and on his 
mother's side, from Capt. John Stith. He 
attended the best schools in his native town 
until 1857, when he was sent to the famous 
teacher, Lewis Minor Coleman, at Taylors- 
ville, Hanover coimtv, where he remained 



two years. He was a hard student, and im- 
paired his health by allowing himself not 
more than four hours sleep in the twenty- 
four, and this overwork so wrought upon 
him afterward, that at the University of 
Virginia he was not able to remain longer 
than four months in any one session. He 
Avas studying law in March, 1861, when he 
left the university to enter the Confederate 
army as first lieutenant of Company G, 
I'orty-first Virginia Infantry. He served 
throughout the war, and was paroled at 
.\ppomattox. He was post adjutant at Se- 
v.-ell's Point during the fight between the 
Mcrrimac (or Virginia) and the Monitor. He 
was subsequentl)' adjutant of the Forty- 
fourth Virginia Battalion. He served as vol- 
imteer aide to Col. (afterward General) D. 
A. Weisiger, and was subsequently com- 
missioned as aide-de-camp, and continued 
on duty with that officer. In 1866 he re- 
viewed his law studies under the distin- 
guished judge William T. Joynes, and in 
.August of that year was admitted to the 
bar. In 1872 he was elected common- 
wealth's attorney, and corporation counsel 
for the city of Petersburg, both of which 
positions he occupied until 1883, when he 
lesigned to take his seat upon the bench of 
the supreme court of appeals. It is said 
that during his occupancy of the common- 
v/ealth attorneyship, no verdict was taken 
against the city of Petersburg. On the 
bench, he was regarded as one of the ablest 
of the five judges. In 1894 he left the 
bench, and resumed law practice in Peters- 
burg. He was married, December 22, 1870, 
to Fannie Howard Collier. 

Keith, James, born in Fauquier county, 
Virginia, September 7, 1839, son of Isham 



24 



\IR<;!X1A lUOCRAPHY 



Keith ami Juliet (Chilton) Keith, his wife. 
In early childhood he was feeble, but his 
youth was robust. The influence of his 
mother was salutary in directing his cdu- 
cction and shaping his life. He was pre- 
I'ared for college in the schools of his neigh- 
lorhood, and took his law course at the 
University of \'irginia, under Professor 
John U. Minor. On April 16, 1861, he en- 
listed as a private in the famous Black 
Horse Cavalry, and in December, 1863, was 
made adjutant of the Fourth Virginia Cav- 
alry Regiment. He saw service on many a 
field, under Payne, Wickham. Fitzhugh 
Lee and Stuart. The last scene was near 
Appomattox Court House, where his com- 
mand drove the enemy back nearly two 
miles, but was finally intercepted by the 
Federal (Jen. Ord with an overwhelming 
force. .After the war he engaged in the prac- 
tice of law. He was a member of the Vir- 
ginia legislature. 18^9-70. He was elected 
circuit judge in the latter year, and by suc- 
cessive re-elections was continued in that 
position until January i. 1895, when he was 
elected to a seat on the bench of the su- 
preme court of appeals of Virginia, and was 
soon made president. In January, 1906, he 
was re-elected for a term of twelve years. 
He is recognized as a most able lawyer, 
and most competent judge. He has receiv- 
ed the LL. D. degree from the W'ashington 
and Lee University. He was married, Feb- 
ruary 16, i8«7, to Francis P.arksdale Mor- 
sf-n. of Warrcnton. \'irginia. 

Cardwell. Richard Henry, born at Madi- 
son. Rockingham county. North Carolina, 
AuRust I, 1845. son of Richard Perrin Card- 
well and Klizal.cth Martin (Dalton) Card- 
well, his wife. In bis y.,„fh he labored on 



the farm, and in winter attended school in 
a nearby village. Losing his father in in- 
fancy, he met with difficulties in obtaining 
iiu education, but his mother was an in- 
spiring influence upon him. He attended 
the Beulah Male Institute and the Madison 
Male Academy, but this was the extent 
of his educational advantages. From 1863 
until the close of the war between the 
states, he served as a private soldier in a 
North Carolina company, acquitting him- 
self with soldierly courage and fidelity. At 
the close of ihe war. he returned to his 
North Carolina home but in 1869 removed 
to Hanover county. Virginia, to 1)0 near his 
wife's people, and engaged in farm work, 
ami reading law in his spare hours. In 1874 
ho was admitted to the bar, and entered 
upon practice, and had soon drawn to him- 
self a considerable clientele. From 1881 to 
1895 he was a member of the house of dele- 
gates, and from 1887 to 1895 was speaker. 
In 1884 he was a Democratic presidential 
elector, and displayed fine talents as a cam- 
paign orator. In 1892 he was a meinber of 
the state debt commission which settled the 
public debt of Virginia. lie was chairman 
of the joint committee of the legislature to 
adjust and settle with Maryland the con- 
troversy over the boundary line between 
the two states, and he prepared the report 
which was adopted by the legislature of 
Virginia, and accepted by that of Maryland. 
In 1894 he was elected a member of the 
supreme court of appeals, for a term of 
twelve years, and in January, 1906, was re- 
elected for another term of twelve years. He 
is known as an admirable jurist — able, in- 
dustrious, and entirely faithful to his trusts. 
He was married, February 9, 1865, to Kate 
Harwood, of Richmond, \'irginia. 



JUDGES SUPREME COURT OF APPEALS 



Buchanan, John Alexander, born in 
Smyth county, Virginia, October 7, 1843, 
son of James A. and Mary G. Buchanan. 
He received his early education in the old 
field schools, and his collegiate training at 
Emory and Henry College. When Vir- 
ginia seceded he enlisted as a private in an 
infantry regiment in the Stonewall Brigade, 
;ind served entirely through to the end of 
the war, participating in many of its most 
sanguinary battles. In the battle of Gettys- 
burg, he was captured, and held as a pris- 
oner of war from July, 1863, to February, 
1865, when he was exchanged, returned to 
his regiment, and was with it at its dis- 
banding in April, following. He then en- 
tered the law department of the University 
of Virginia, completed the course, was ad- 
mitted to the bar, and engaged in practice 
at Abington, Washington county. He was 
successful from the outset, and soon came 
to be known as one of the most capa- 
ble lawyers of southwestern Virginia. In 
1885-87 he was a member of the house of 
delegates, in which body he made an ex- 
cellent record. In 1889 he was elected to 
congress, as representative from the ninth 
congressional district, and was returned 
for a second term. In 1895 he was elected 
to a seat on the bench of the supreme court 
of appeals, and came to be regarded as one 
of the ablest men on the bench. In 1913 
he gave notice of his intention not to apply 
for re-election, when his term should ex- 
pire in 1915, and in 1914 the general assem- 
bly elected Joseph W. Kelley, of Bristol, 
tc succeed him. 

Harrison, George Moffett, was born near 
Staunton, Virginia, February 14, 1847, son 
of Henry Harrison and Jane St. Clair Coch- 



ran, his wife. He had for his early teacher 
his talented father, who took a genuine 
pleasure in instructing his children. He 
was just at the proper age to prepare for 
college, when the civil war broke out, and 
l;t at once enlisted in the Confederate army. 
He acted with courage and fidelity during 
the entire struggle, serving in the Freder- 
icksburg artillery, with which he surren- 
dered at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 
1865. Returning home, he busied himself 
with his books until 1869, when he entered 
the law school of the University of Vir- 
ginia. Finishing his course in the summer 
o: 1870, he was admitted to the bar and en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession, in 
Staunton which has since continued to be 
his place of residence. While in active 
practice, he was counsel in many highly im- 
portant cases. For a number of years he 
was a member of the law firm of Harrison 
& Tucker, his partner being Harry St. 
George Tucker. He was one of the master 
commissioners in chancery of the circuit 
court of Augusta county. He was elected 
a judge of the supreme court of appeals, 
January i, 1895, ^"d his marked ability as 
a jurist won for him a re-election in 1906, 
for a twelve year term. He married Bettie 
Montgomery Kent. 

Phlegar, Archer Allen, born at Chris- 
tiansburg, Virginia, February 22, 1846, son 
of Eli and Ann Phlegar ; his father was a 
v/ell known lawyer. He attended a male 
academy in Montgomery county, and 
Washington College. He entered the Con- 
federate army as a private, and rose to the 
lank of lieutenant. After the war, he 
worked on a farm, meantime studying law, 
and in due time was admitted to practice. 



VIRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



aiul Ijccamc the legal representative of sev- 
eral railroad, mining and manufacturing 
companies. From .\pril. 1901, to April i, 
1903. he was ihc managing receiver of the 
Virginia Iron, Coal and Coke Company, 
and vice-president of the Virginia & South- 
western Railroad Company. Mis first pub- 
lic position was that of commonwealth at- 
ttrney for Montgomery county, to which 
he was appointed in 1870, and held for a 
period of seven years, through consecutive 
elections, and in 1877 he was elected to the 
state senate. In October, 1900, he was ap- 
l>ointed, by Gov. J. Hoge Tyler, a judge of 
the supreme court of appeals, and held the 
olTice to February 22, 1901, when the legis- 
lature failed to return him to the ofhce. In 
1903 he was elected to the state senate, for 
the second time. He held high rank both 
as a legislator and jurist, and his mind was 
01 the highest order. He married Sue 
Shanks, and had five children. 

Whittle, Stafford Gorman, Ixirn at 
■A\'tX)dstock." the family home, in Meck- 
lenburg county, Virginia, December 5, 
1849. son of Commodore William Conway 
Whittle and Elizabeth Beverley Sinclair, 
l)is wife. The father was a commodore in 
the United Stales and Confederate States 
navies, and the mother was a daughter of 
Commodore Arthur Sinclair, of the United 
States navy. The son. Stafford G. Whittle, 
in early years took instructions in schools 
ill the city o£ Norfolk, but upon the break- 
ing out of the civil war he returned to his 
native county, and there continued his edu- 
cation. He was subsequently under the 
care of a tutor at his father's home in 
huchanan. Botetourt county, and the in- 
Mniclion was supplemented by a course of 



study at the Chatham Male Institute, in 
Pittsylvania county. .\t the age of eigh- 
teen, he entered Washington College, under 
the presidency of Gen. Robert E. Lee. The 
following year (1868) he studied law at the 
l.'niversity of Virginia, under Professor 
iobn L!. Minor. In 1891 he was admitted 
lo the bar, and entered upon law practice 
in Henry county, and was soon employed 
ii' most of the important litigation in the 
counties of the district. After ten years 
practice, he was appointed, February i, 
i88i. by Gov. F. W. M. Holliday, judge of 
the fourth judicial circuit, to fill the vacancy 
occasioned by the resignation of Judge 
Benjamin Green. The Democratic caucus 
of the succeeding legislature nominated 
him for the unexpired term, but he was 
defeated by the Readjuster legislature, and 
retired from the bench in March, 18S2. In 
1H85 he was elected to the position by the 
Democratic legislature, for a full eight year 
term, and at its expiration was re-elected 
lor another term, without opposition. Upon 
the death of John Randolph Tucker, Judge 
Whittle was unanimously chosen to suc- 
ceed him as law professor at W'ashington 
and Lee University, wdiich honor he de- 
clined. In iQfio, he was called upon to sit 
with President Judge James Keith, and 
Judges B. R. Wellford, Jr., and Henry E. 
Blair, as a special court of appeals in the 
Peyton's administrate)r t.v. Stuart case, in- 
volving the entire properly of the White 
Sulphur Springs. WHien the Lynchburg 
judicial circuit was abolished, that city and 
Campbell county were attached to Judge 
Whittle's circuit, upon the unanimous peti- 
tion of their bars ; his circuit, by this ad- 
dition, becoming the largest in the state. 
On February 12, 1901, he was elected, by 



JUDGES SUPREME COURT OF APPEALS 



27 



the legislature, judge of the supreme court 
ot appeals, to fill the unexpired term of 
Judge John W. Riely, deceased, succeeding 
Hon. A. A. Phlegar, a temporary appointee. 
In January, 1906, he was re-elected for the 
term .beginning February i, 1907. He is 
recognized as a most industrious and cap- 
able jurist. He married, in 1880, Ruth 
Drewry, daughter of Dr. H. M. Drewry, of 
Henry county, Virginia. 

Kelly, Joseph L., born in Smyth county, 
Virginia, March 4, 1867, son of John A. 
Kelly and Martha Peck, his wife; his 
father was a lawyer, and for twenty-five 
years was judge of the sixteenth judicial 
circuit of Virginia. He began his educa- 
tion in the neighborhood schools, and com- 
pleted it at Emory and Henry College, 
from which he was graduated in 1886, with 
the B. A. degree. After reading law for a 
year under the preceptorship of his father, 
he entered the law school of the University 



of Virginia, and was graduated B. L. in 
June, 1889. Later, Emory and Henry Col- 
lege conferred upon him the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts. He began practice in 1S89, at 
Estillville (now Gate City), in partnership 
with Gen. Rufus A. Ayers. In 1892 he re- 
moved to Big Stone Gap, where he followed 
his profession until the fall of 1892, when he 
took up his residence in Bristol, where he 
has since remained. Since 1895 he has been 
a member of the law firm of Bullitt & Kelly, 
who have an extensive practice in south- 
west Virginia, maintaining two offices — one 
at Big Stone Gap, in charge of J. F. Bullitt, 
and the other at Bristol, under the man- 
agement of Mr. Kelly. In January, 1915, 
Mr. Kelly was elected to the bench of the 
supreme court of appeals. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, and a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, South. He married, 
July 29, 1896, Mary Eloise Hull, daughter 
of Capt. D. D. Hull, of Marion, Virginia, 
and they have four children. 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



-UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



DEPARTMENT OFFICERS. 



Hunter, Robert Mercer Taliaferro, sec- 
ond secretary of state (July, i86i-March, 
1862), born at Hunter's Hill, Essex county, 
Virginia, April 21, 1809, son of James and 
Maria (Garnett) Hunter, grandson of Wil- 
liam and Sarah (Garnett) Hunter, and of 
Muscoe and Grace Fenton (Mercer) Gar- 
nett, and a direct descendant of James Hun- 
ter who immigrated from Scotland and set- 
tled in or near Fredericksburg, Virginia. He 
was graduated at the University of Vir- 
ginia in 1829, and at the Winchester Law 
School in 1830. He practiced law in Essex 
county, and was a representative in the state 
legislature, 1834-36. He represented his dis- 
trict in the twenty-fifth, twenty-sixth, twen- 
ty-seventh and twenty-ninth congresses, 
1837-43 and 1845-47, and served as speaker 
of the house in the twenty-sixth congress, 
when only thirty years of age. He was 
chosen United States senator in 1846 as 
successor to \\". S. Archer ; took his seat, 
December 6, 1847, and was re-elected in 
1852 and again in 1858. In the senate he 
advocated the annexation of Texas, the 
compromise of the Oregon question, the 
tariff bill of 1846, and opposed the Wilmot 
proviso. He advocated the retrocession to 
Virginia of the portion of the District of 
Columbia west of the Potomac river, and 
voted to extend the line established by the 
Missouri compromise to the Pacific ocean. 
He opposed the admission of California and 
the abolition of slavery in the District oi 



Columbia. He became chairman of the 
finance committee in 1850, held that position 
until 1861. and framed the tariff act oi 1857 
which lowered duties. In 1857-58 he ad- 
vocated the admission of Kansas under ihe 
Lecompton constitution. In the Democratic 
national convention of i860 at Charleston 
he was a candidate for the nomination for 
president, and received next to Stephen A. 
Douglas, the largest number of votes on the 
first six ballots. He took an active part in 
the campaign of 1856, speaking through the 
north and foretelling the dissolution of the 
Union if the rights of the southern states 
were abrogated in the territories. On the 
secession of Virginia in 1861, he left the 
United States senate, and became a member 
of the provisional Confederate congress at 
Montgomery, Alabama. Mr. Davis made 
hun secretary of state, on the resignation of 
Secretary Robert Toombs. Mr. Hunter re- 
signed this position when unanimously 
elected to the Confederate States senate by 
the legislature of Virginia and he was made 
president pro tempore of the senate. In 
February. 1865, with Alexander H. Ste- 
phens and John A. Campbell he was a peace 
commissioner and met Mr. Lincoln and Sec- 
retarv Seward on board the River Queen in 



•The Provisional Congress of tlie Confederate 
States met at Montgomery, Alabama. February 4, 
ISSl. and adjourned permanently. February 17. 1S62, 
having held five sessions. The first regular Con- 
gress under the Confederate Constitution, met at 
Richmond. Virginia. February 18. 1S62. and contin- 
ued till February 17, 1864. The Second Congress 
met in Richmond, May 2, 1864, and adjourned March 
IS. 1865. 



32 



\IR(iI.\IA BIOGRAPHY 



Jlamptou Roads. On his return to Rich- 
mond he presided over the war meeting that 
resolved, without opposition, to carry on the 
war till the south had achieved its independ- 
ence. He opposed the bill allowing freedom 
to such slaves as should serve in the Con- 
federate army, and when the question came 
to a vote, he acted under instructions from 
his constituents and voted for the measure 
under an emphatic protest. He was arrested 
at the close of the war, and after imprison- 
ment is Fort Pulaski for several months, 
was released on parole, and in 1867 was 
pardoned by President Johnson. He was an 
unsuccessful candidate for United States 
senator from Virginia in 1874, was elected 
treasurer of the state in 1877, and at the 
close of his term, in 1880, retired to his farm 
in Essex county, \"irginia. He was ap- 
pointed by President Cleveland United 
States collector of customs at the port of 
Rappahannock, Virginia, in June, 1886. He 
died in Essex county, Virginia, July 18, 1887. 

Seddon, James Alexander, secretary of 
war (q. v., p. 44). 

Randolph, George Wythe, second secre- 
tary of war (March 24, 1862-November 17, 
1862), born at Monticello, Virginia, March 
10, 1818, son of Gov. Thomas Mann and 
Martha (Jefferson) Randolph. He attended 
school at Cambridge, Massachusetts, while 
under the care of his brother-in-law, Joseph 
Coolidge, of Boston, and in 1831 was war- 
ranted midshipman in the United States 
nav3'. He was given leave of absence in 
1837, to attend the University of Virginia, 
where he studied two years. In 1839 he 
resigned his commission in the navy, and 
after studying law. practiced in Richmond. 



He was one of the commissioners sent by 
the state of Virginia to confer with Abraham 
Lincoln at his home in Springfield, with the 
hope of maintaining peace. He raised a 
company of artillery at the time of the John 
Brown raid, and the organization then 
known as the Virginia Howitzer Battalion, 
Maj. George W. Randolph, was attached to 
Magruder's force in the battle of Big Bethel, 
Virginia, June 10, 1861. He was commis- 
sioned brigadier-general, and commanded a 
brigade in Magruder's army until March 17, 
1862, when President Davis appointed him 
secretary of war in his cabinet to succeed 
Judah P. Benjamin, transferred to the state 
department. The question of the use of 
hidden shells as charged against the Con- 
federate troops at the evacuation of York- 
town, led to his decision that it was not 
admissable in civilized warfare to take life 
with no other object than the destruction of 
life, but that planting shells was admissible 
on the parapet of a fort to prevent its cap- 
ture or on the trail of a retreating army to 
save the army. He resigned his seat in the 
cabinet of President Davis, November 17, 
1862, and returned to the army, but was 
forced to resign and seek relief from a pul- 
monary complaint by running the blockade 
and living in southern France. He returned 
to Virginia several years after the close of 
the war, and died at "Edge Hill," Virginia, 
i\pril ID. 1878. 

Ould, Robert, assistant secretary of war, 
and chief of bureau of exchange ; born at 
Georgetown. District of Columbia, January 
31. 1820. After a course of study at Jeffer- 
son (Pennsylvania) College, he was gradu- 
ated from Columbia College, Washington. 
D. C, in 1837, and in law from William and 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



33 



Mary College, \\'illiamsburg, Virginia, in 
1842, and practiced his profession in Wash- 
ington City until 1861. During the years 
preceding the war, he served on the com- 
mission, appointed by President Pierce, for 
the codilication of the district laws. He 
was also district attorney, and as such con- 
ducted the prosecution of Daniel E. Sickles 
for the killing of Philip Barton Key. He 
retained the office until after the inaugura- 
tion of Mr. Lincoln, when he went to Vir- 
ginia with his family. In 1861 he was ap- 
pointed assistant secretary of war for the 
Confederate States, and held the position 
during Secretary of War Benjamin's term 
of service. Under the cartel of exchange of 
prisoners of war, as arranged by Generals 
Dix and Hill, in July, 1862, Mr. Ould was 
appointed agent of exchange on behalf of 
the Confederacy, and in this position, which 
he held until the close of hostilities, he 
earned the respect of all parties by his 
humane efforts to effect the exchange of 
prisoners, and his careful attention to all 
the details of his office. At Appomattox he 
tendered his parole to Gen. Grant, who 
declined to treat him as a prisoner, and 
sent him under safeguard to Richmond. He 
was subsequently imprisoned by order of 
Secretary of War Stanton, was indicted for 
treason, and tried by a military commission, 
which promptly acquitted him. He then 
resumed the practice of law in Richmond. 

Tyler, Robert, register of the treasury, 
born at "Cedar Grove," in New Kent county, 
^'irginia, September 9, 1818, eldest son of 
President John Tyler and Letitia Christian. 
his first wife. In October, 1833, he entered 
\Villiam and Mary College, Williamsburg, 
and graduated from the academic depart- 

VIR-3 



ment B. A., 1835 (the sole graduate in that 
year), and from the law department in 1837. 
As a young man he displayed fine literary 
powers and was the author of various 
poems, among them "Ahasuerus," and 
"Death, or Medora's Dream." He removed 
to Philadelphia, and entered on the practice 
of law, and met with success at the bar. 
He also engaged actively in political affairs. 
-At the age of twenty-eight, was elected 
president of the Irish Repeal Association. 
During his father's administration, he acted 
as signer of patents, and for a time as the 
president's private secretary. In 1847 h^ 
was appointed solicitor of the sheriff of 
Philadelphia, holding the office three years, 
and was afterwards appointed to the office 
of prothonotary of the supreme court of 
Pennsylvania, and in which he served until 
his removal to Richmond, in 1861. In 1854 
he introduced and passed in the Democratic 
State Convention of Pennsylvania, the first 
resolution passed in any state in favor of a 
Pacific railroad, and wrote a largely cir- 
culated pamphlet in its favor. In 1858 he 
was chairman of the Democratic executive 
committee of Pennsylvania. He was active 
in promoting the nomination of Mr. Pierce 
tor the presidency in 1852, and the nomina- 
tion of Mr. Buchanan in 1856. Both these 
presidents held him in the highest esteem, 
and both offered him missions and offices of 
importance, all of which he declined. At 
the time of the Mexican war he recruited 
and tendered to the government a regiment 
in Philadelphia, but which was declined, on 
account of the quota of the state being al- 
ready filed. He was yet at his post as 
prothonotary in 1861, when Virginia, his 
native state, seceded. His southern senti- 
ments were well known throughout Phila- 



34 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



delphia, and he was, like many others, as- 
saulted by a mob, and obliged to fly for his 
life. He succeeded in reaching Richmond, 
and was soon afterward appointed register 
ol the treasury by President Davis, and dis- 
charged the duties of the position with con- 
sjjicuous ability until the close of the war. 
He afterwards made his residence in Alont- 
gomery, Alabama, where he was editor of 
the "Mail and Express," and chairman of 
the Democratic state central committee. He 
v/as an impassioned and eloquent speaker, 
and won the respect of all by his high and 
delicate sense of personal and official honor. 
In 1839 he married Priscilla, daughter of 
Thomas A. Cooper, the famous tragedian. 
He died, in Montgomery, Alabama, Decem- 
ber 3, 1877. 

Crump, William Wood, born in Henrico 
county, \'irginia, November 25, 1819, a son 
of Sterling Jamieson Crump, a well known 
importing merchant of his day, and Eliza- 
beth Wood, his wife. William Crump, 
American progenitor of the family, settled 
in York county, Virginia, and his descend- 
ants lived for many generations in New 
Kent county, which had been cut from York 
county. William \\'ood Crump jjassed his 
early life in Richmond, where he was a pupil 
in the well known school conducted by Dr. 
Gwathmey. Subsequently he prepared for 
college at Amherst Institute, .'\mherst, Mas- 
sachusetts, then entered William and Mary 
College in 1835, and was graduated from 
this institution in the class of 1838. He stud- 
ied law under the preceptorship of Professor 
K. Beverley Tucker, to whom he was tied 
by the bonds of sincere friendship until the 
death of the latter. He was admitted to the 
bar in 1840, and at once entered into the 



practice which was to make him so famous. 
He was a most effective speaker on the sub- 
ject of states rights, supported John C. Cal- 
houn in 1844, strongly advocated the annex- 
ation of Texas, and was a leading spirit in 
enrolling Virginia with those states which 
sujjported James K. Polk. In the next presi- 
dential canvass he was equally prominent in 
the support of Lewis Cass. Early in 185 1, 
Mr. Crump was elected by the legislature 
tc succeed Hon. John S. Caskie, who re- 
signed as judge of the circuit court of Rich- 
mond City; July I, 1852, the new constitu- 
tion of the state terminated all these judge- 
•ships, and he retired from the bench. Prior 
to the civil war he was an important figure 
in the city council of Richmond, and was the 
author of many ordinances which tended 
greatly to improve the city. When the civil 
war broke out, he was ardent in his support 
of the Confederacy, and was appointed as- 
sistant secretary of the treasury of the Con- 
federate States, the duties of which office he 
discharged with his usual ability. At the 
close of the war he was elected a delegate 
of the city of Richmond to the first general 
asscmldy, was chairman of one of the most 
important committees of this body, and was 
an active participant in all the debates. 
\\'hen all the members of the legislatures of 
the southern states were retired by the 
Shellabarger bill, Judge Crump resumed his 
practice of the law, and was successfully 
identified with this until the close of his 
life, with the exception of a term of service 
again spent in the legislature. Prior to the 
war he had been appointed a member of the 
board of visitors of William and Mary Col- 
lege an<l was president of its board of vis- 
itors. He was always an active worker in 
the interests of this college, and it is largelv 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



35 



due to his efforts that she was placed on a 
sounder financial basis. Judge Crump was 
identified with innumerable important cases 
in the course of his long professional life, 
and among the most important were : The 
defence of President Jefiferson Davis, when 
accused of treason, going on his bond when 
Mr. Davis was released ; the John Randolph 
will case, tried in Petersburg; the case of 
Jeter Phillips, who was tried in Hanover 
for the murder of his wife ; and Thomas Jud- 
son Cluverius, who was tried in Richmond 
for the murder of Fannie Lillian Madison, 
his cousin. His religious affiliation was with 
the Protestant Episcopal Church. He was 
one of the most eminent jurists of the state 
Judge Crump married Mary S. Tabb, now 
deceased, a daughter of Philip Edward Tabb, 
Esq., of Waverley, Gloucester county, Vir- 
ginia, and is survived by four children. He 
died at Richmond, Virginia, February 21, 
1897. 

Cooper, Samuel, adjutant and inspector 
general, C. S. A. ; born at Hackensack, New 
Jersey, June 12, 1798, son of Maj. Samuel 
Cooper, of the revolutionary army, and 
Mary Horton, his wife. He graduated 
from the United States Military Academy in 
1815 ; was commissioned brevet second lieu- 
tenant of light artillery, and served at New 
England posts, 1815-18, in the adjutant- 
general's office in \\^ashington Cit}- until 
1825, and for a year in garrison in Florida. 
He was on duty at the artillery school at 
Fortress Monroe, 1826-28, and then became 
aide-de-camp to Gen. Alexander Macomb. 
Jn 1836 he became captain in the Fourth 
Artillery, and was assigned to staff duty at 
army headquarters, as assistant adjutant- 
general. During the Florida war he was 



cliief of staff to Gen. W^illiam J. Worth, be- 
ing engaged against the Seminole Indians, 
in 1841-42. For the next ten years he was 
on special duty in the war department as 
assistant adjutant-general, with the rank of 
lieutenant-colonel. For meritorious service 
ir the Mexican war he was brevetted colo- 
nel. On May 30, 1848, he became adjutant- 
general of the army. On March 7, 1861, he 
resigned his commission, and offered his 
services to the seceded states, and as a citi- 
zen of Virginia, was appointed adjutant 
and inspector-general of the C. S. A. He 
published "A Concise System of Instruction 
and Regulations for the Militia and Volun- 
teers of the United States" (1836). He mar- 
iied, in 1827, a granddaughter of George 
Mason, of "Gunston Hall," Clermont, Vir- 
ginia. After the war he resided at "Cam- 
eron," near Alexandria, \'irginia, where he 
died, December 14, 1876. 

Gorgas, Josiah, chief of ordnance, born in 
Dauphin county, PennS3dvania, July i, 1818. 
His long residence in Richmond, and his de- 
votion to its people, gave him standing 
as an adopted son. He graduated from the 
United States Military Academy in 1841, 
sixth in his class, and was assigned to the 
ordnance department. In 1845-46 he visited 
Europe by direction of the war department, 
to observe military methods. He served 
with credit in the Mexican war, was especi- 
ally distinguished at the siege of Vera Cruz, 
and rose to the rank of captain in 1855. 
After serving on duty in various govern- 
ment arsenals, he resigned at the beginning 
of the civil war, and was placed at the head 
of the Confederate ordnance department, 
with the rank of brigadier-general. His 
task was stupendous by reason of the com- 



af" 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



plete poverty of the soutli with regard to 
munitions of war. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston 
said of him, "he created the ordnance de- 
partment out of nothing." Immediately 
after his appointment, he sent a capable of- 
ficer to Europe to procure arms and ammuni- 
tion ; established arsenals ; arranged for the 
development of lead and copper mines ; and 
made preparation for the manufacture of 
artillery and small arms, of powder, and 
ammunition. Out of this grew the impor- 
tant bureau of foreign supplies, and the 
mining and nitre bureau. He displayed rare 
judgment in the selection of ofScials for the 
work under his control, and impressed all 
with whom he came in contact, as an execu- 
tive officer of remarkable ability and energy. 
After the war he devoted himself to busi- 
ness, and for a time was superintendent of 
the Briarfield Iron Works. He was elected 
vice-chancellor of the University of the 
South, at Sewanee, Tennessee, in 1872, and 
v,as made president of the University of 
Alabama in 1878, and where he remained 
until failing health obliged him to resign. 
He was, however, made librarian, and served 
in that capacity until his death, May 15, 
1883. He married a daughter of ex-Gov. 
Gayle, of Mobile, Alabama. 

Kean, Robert Garlick Hill, chief of bureau 
of war, March, 1862- April, 1865; was born 
on October 24, 1828, at "Mt. Airy" in Caro- 
line county, Virginia, the residence of his 
maternal grandfather, Col. Humphrey Hill. 
His father was John Vaughan Kean, of 
"Olney," and his paternal grandfather was 
Ur. Andrew Kean; ot "Cedar Plams," 
Goochland county, who came to Virginia 
from Ireland upon the completion of his 
education at the University of Dublin. It 



is said that Dr. Kean was tendered a chair 
in the University of Virginia by Mr. Jefl'er- 
son. Young Kean's mother died when he 
was three years old, and he was brought up 
by his aunt. Miss Elizabeth Hill, who taught 
school at "Mt. Airy." His father married 
a sect)nd time, and he returned with him to 
"Olney." He attended the Episcopal High 
School under Dr. Pendleton, who was after- 
wards Gen. Lee's chief of artillery. He sub- 
sequently attended the Concord Academy 
under the famous teacher, Frederick W. 
Coleman. In 1848 he entered the University 
of Virginia, and graduated as Bachelor of 
Arts and Master of Arts. He subsequently 
studied law. In 1853, he settled in Lynch- 
burg, Virginia, and practiced law in part- 
nership with the late J. O. L. Goggin. He 
entered the Confederate army as a pri\'ate, 
Jind after the battle of Manassas was made 
adjutant-general on the stafif of his kins- 
man, George W'. Randolph. When Col. 
Randolph became secretary of war of the 
C. S. A., Mr. Kean was made chief of the 
bureau of war. After the war he returned 
to Lynchburg, and resumed the practice of 
his profession. He always took a deep in- 
terest in the welfare of the university, and 
was for eight years a member of the board 
of visitors, and rector of the board for four 
years. During this time, much was done 
for the university, notably the placing of it 
upon a better financial condition by refund- 
ing its debt. At the bar, Mr. Kean was 
regarded as among the ablest and most 
learned members of the profession, and was 
highly regarded by all who knew him. He 
was for many years a vestryman in St. 
Paul's Episcopal Church, and on the stand- 
ing committee of the diocese of Southern 
Virginia. In 1854, he married Jane, daugh- 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



ter of Col. Thomas J. Randolph, of "Edge 
Jlill ;" and in 1874 married, for his second 
wife. Adelaide, daughter of Col. William H. 
Prescott, of Louisiana. 

Tidball, chief clerk of the navy depart- 
ment. 

Spottswood, W. A., chief of medical and 
surgical bureau, navy department. 

MEMBERS OF CONGRESS. 

Baldwin, John Brown, born at Spring 
Farm, in Augusta county, Virginia, Janu- 
ary II, 1820, son of Judge Briscoe G. Bald- 
win, of the supreme court of appeals of Vir- 
ginia, and of his wife, Martha Steele Brown, 
daughter of Judge John Brown, chancellor 
of the Staunton district. His early educa- 
tion was obtained in the primary schools of 
Staunton and at the Staunton Academy, 
taught by Littleton Waddell. At the age of 
sixteen he entered the University of Vir- 
ginia, where he remained for three years, 
imbibing that love of his alma mater, which 
went with him through life, not only when 
he was a distinguished member of the board 
of visitors of that institution, but at all 
times and on all occasions. After leaving 
the university, he read law for two years 
with his father, who was then one of the 
leaders of the Staunton bar. At the age 
of twenty-one he began the practice of his 
profession in Staunton, in partnership with 
I'.is brother-in-law. the Hon. A. A. H. 
Stuart. After three years this partnership 
was dissolved, and John B. Baldwin opened 
an office of his own. In 1844 he took an 
active part in behalf of the Whig ticket, and 
this canvass he acquired a reputation as 
a debater which remained with him through 
life. The next vear he was elected to the 



legislature, and took an active part, being a 
strong advocate of the provision that repre- 
sentation should be based on what was 
known as the "mixed basis," that is, of per- 
sons and property, as against what was 
known as the "white basis," which meant 
representation upon white persons alone. 
The result was, his defeat at the next elec- 
tion. This was a matter of little concern 
tc him, and he devoted his attention to the 
practice of his profession. La 1859, upon 
the death of Judge Samuels, he became a 
candidate against his friend. Judge William 
J. Robertson, for the position thus left va- 
cant upon the supreme court of appeals of 
\'irginia. The election of Judge Robertson 
called from him a message of congratulation 
which was suitably replied to, and showed 
the pleasant feeling existing between these 
two eminent lawyers. In i860 he was an 
ardent advocate of the Bell and Everett 
ticket, and made a notable speech in behalf 
of that ticket in the Richmond Club House. 
In 1861 he was a representative from Au- 
gusta county to the convention known as the 
Secession Convention. There he opposed, in 
what was supposed by many the ablest 
speech of that body, the ordinance of seces- 
sion. Another notable speech made by him 
in that convention was one in opposition to 
the right of suspension of the writ of habeas 
c( rl^tis. He was one of the committee sent 
by the convention to confer with President 
Lincoln, in the hope of averting hostilities. 
After the war began, he was appointed by 
Gov. Letcher as inspector-general of the 
state volunteers, and upon the state troops 
being merged into those of the Confederacy, 
he took the field as a colonel of the Fifty- 
iccond Regiment. During the operations in 
West Virginia he was taken with an illness 



38 



\-IRGIXlA BIOGRAI'IIV 



which compelled him to return home, and 
before his recovery he was elected to the 
lirst regular congress under the Confederate 
constitution, and was re-elected to the sec- 
ond congress. After the war he was one 
oi the moving spirits in the state in trying 
to bring about peace and order, and was 
influential in the meeting called for that pur- 
pose in Staunton, on Alay 8, 1865. He was 
elected a member of the legislature of 1865, 
and was speaker of that body. Here he won 
a reputation as an able presiding officer, and 
the rules under which the present general 
assembly of \'irginia is conducted are 
known as Baldwin's Rules. In 1868 he was 
a member and president of the convention 
of the Conservative party which met to 
nominate state ofificers. In that body he was 
urged to accept the nomination for the gov- 
ernorship, but stoutly refused to _ do so, 
though he received fifty votes for the nomi- 
nation against fifty-two for Col. R. E. 
Withers, who was a nominee of the con- 
vention. In 1868 he was a member of the 
committee of nine which went to Washing- 
ton and securc<l the permission of the gov- 
ernment to have the disfranchising clauses 
of the Underwood Constitution submitted 
separately to the people of Virginia. He 
was also the chairman of the Virginia dele- 
gation which met in New York in the con- 
vention that nominated Seymour and Blair. 
In any body of men. Col. Baldwin was na- 
turally a leadei. Ilis great bodily form, his 
hearty honest manners and genial kindly 
disposition to all, especially to children, 
made him a unique figure in the life of his 
people. At the bar he was regarded as a 
power, and to him people flocked for advice 
from all over the commonwealth. Perhaps 
the most notable feature of his life's work 



was in connection with the extension of the 
railroad now known as the Chesapeake & 
Ohio, from its narrow limitations within the 
state of \'irginia, to the Ohio river. At the 
time of his death, September 30, 1873, ^^^^ 
ixsolutions adopted by the various bodies 
01' which he was a member attested the es- 
teem in which he was held. On September 
20, 1842, he married. Miss Susan Madison 
Peyton, eldest daughter of John Howe Pey- 
ton, Esq., one of the leaders of the Staunton 
bar. 

Bocock, Thomas Stanley, born in Buck- 
ingham (now Appomattox) county, \'ir- 
ginia, May 18, 1815. He graduated from 
Hampden-Sidney College in 1838, studied 
law, and was admitted to the bar. He was 
county attorney, 1845-46; and for several 
years a member of the Virginia house of 
delegates. He was elected as a Democrat 
to the thirtieth, thirty-first, thirty-second, 
tb-irty-third. thirty-fourth, thirty-fifth and 
thirty-sixth congresses (March 4, 1847- 
March 3, 1861). He was elected representa- 
tive to the Confederate congress in 1862, 
and February 14, of that year, was chosen 
speaker of the house and was re-elected to 
the second congress. He vi'as a member of 
tlie state legislature, 1869-70; and a delegate 
in the Democratic national conventions of 
1S68, 1876 and 1880. He died in Appomat- 
tox county, \'irginia, August 5. 189 1. 

Boteler, Alexander Robinson, born in 
Shepherdstown, Virginia, May 16, 1815. He 
was graduated from Princeton College in 
1835. He served in the state assembly ; in 
1S52 was a Whig presidential elector, and 
in 1856 an American presidential elector, 
lie was elected as a National American to 
tlic thirty-sixth congress, in 1859, his term 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



39 



closing March 3, 1861. At the outbreak of 
the war between the states he entered the 
Confederate army, and became a member of 
Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson's staff. In No- 
vember, 1861, he was elected to the Con- 
federate provisional congress, and was sub- 
sequently elected to the first Confederate 
congress. He was appointed a member of 
the Centennial Commission in 1876; was ap- 
pointed as a member of the tariff commis- 
sion by President Arthur, and was subse- 
quently made pardon clerk in the depart- 
ment of justice, by Attorney General Brew- 
ster. He died in Shepherdstown, Virginia, 
May 8, 1892. 

Brockenbrough, John White, was the son 

of William Brockenbrough, of Richmond 
county, who was born July 10, 1778, and 
long distinguished in public life as member 
of the house of delegates, of the council, 
judge of the general court and of the su- 
preme court of appeals. He was born in 
Hanover county ; educated at William and 
Mary College (1824-1825 1, and was for 
many years judge of the United States 
court for the western district of Virginia ; 
member of the provisional congress of the 
Confederate States, and after the war pro- 
fessor of law in Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity. He married Mary C. Bowyer, of 
Lexington, \'irginia, and left issue. 

Caperton, Allen Taylor, born near Union, 
Monroe county, \'irginia, November 21, 
1810. He was educated in the schools of 
Huntsville. Alabama, the University of 
Virginia, and Yale, graduating from the lat- 
ter in 1832. He studied law, and was ad- 
mitted to the Virginia bar. He became a 
director of the James River and Kanawha 
Canal Company. He was elected to the 



legislature, and in 1859-60 was a state sena- 
tor. In 1861 he was a member of the Vir- 
ginia convention, and was an active oppo- 
nent of secession until the beginning of 
hostilities, when he joined the fortunes of 
the state. He was elected to the Confed- 
erate States senate in 1863, and served until 
its dissolution in 1865. In 1875 he was 
elected to the United States senate from 
West Virginia, and was a member of the 
committees on claims, railroads, and the 
revision of laws. He devoted his energies 
to bringing to the notice of distant capital- 
ists the undeveloped wealth of the coal, 
iron, timber and grazing lands of West Vir- 
ginia. He died in Washington City, July 
26, 1876. 

Chambliss, John Randolph, born at Hicks- 
ford, Greenville county, Virginia, January 
23, 1833 ; graduated from United States 
Military Academy, 1853; resigned the fol- 
lowing year and remained at home until 
1861. He was a representative in the sec- 
ond Confederate congress. He was aide- 
de-camp to the governor, 1856-1861 ; com- 
manded a brigade of Virginia militia, and 
was brigade inspector. In July, 1861, he 
was commissioned colonel of the Thirteenth 
Virginia Cavalry Regiment, and took part 
in the operations on the Rappahannock. 
Later he was assigned to W. H. F. Lee's 
cavalry brigade, and served under Stuart ; 
in December, 1864, promoted to brigadier- 
general, and was killed August 16, leading 
in a cavalry battle on the Charles City road, 
north side of the James river. His body 
was treated with honor by the enemy, and 
delivered to his friends. 

Collier, Charles Y., a member of the Con- 
federate States house of representatives. 



40 



\"IK(il.\"lA r.IOCiRArilY 



De Jarnette, Daniel Coleman, born near 
iJovvling Green, \'irginia, September 27, 
1822 ; pursued classical studies ; served sev- 
eral years in the state house of delegates ; 
elected as an anti-administration Democrat 
to the thirty-sixth congress (March 4, 1859- 
March 3. 1861) ; re-elected to the thirty-sev- 
enth congress, but did not serve ; represen- 
tative from Virginia to the first and second 
Confederate congresses, 1862-1865 ; died in 
White Sulphur Springs, Virginia, August 
18. 1881. 

Funston, David, representative in second 
Confederate congress. 

Garnett, M. R. H., (q v.) ; member of 
first Confederate congress. 

Gholson, Thomas Saunders, born in Ghol- 
sonville, Brunswick county, Virginia, De- 
cember 9, 1809, son of Maj. William Ghol- 
son ; was graduated from the University of 
Virginia in 1827. He became a judge of 
the state circuit court in 1859; was presi- 
dent of several railroads, and aided to sup- 
port a public library in Petersburg, V'irginia. 
He was a member of the second Confederate 
congress. He died at Savannah, Georgia, 
December 13, 1868. 

Goode, John, born in Bedford county, 
Virginia. .May 27, 1829, son of John and 
Ann M. Goode, of English descent. lie 
was educated at the New London Academy 
and Emory and Henry College, studied law 
under Hon. John W. Brockenbrough, at 
Lexington, Virginia, and admitted to the 
bar in 1851. At the age of twenty-two 
elected from Bedford county to the general 
assembly. In the convention of 1861 he 
voted for the secession ordinance after the 
failure of the peace conference in Washing- 



ton. He volunteered at the opening of the 
v,ar between the states, took part in the first 
b?ttle at Manassas, and was called to the 
staft' of Gen. Jubal A. Early. He was a 
member of the Confederate congress from 
February, 1862, until the end of the war. 
In 1865 he engaged in practice of law in 
Norfolk, and was elected to the house of 
delegates. He was a member of congress 
from 1874 to 1 88 1, and served on the com- 
mittee on education. A Democrat in poli- 
tics, he was a presidential elector in 1852, 
1856 and 1884; a delegate in the national 
conventions of 1868, 1872, 1883 and 1892, 
and served on the national committee of 
his party frnm 1868 until i87f). He was a 
member of the board of visitors of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, W'illiam and Mary Col- 
lege, and the Virginia Agriculture and Me- 
chanical College. From May, 1885, to Au- 
gust, 1886, he was solicitor-general of the 
United States, and in 1893 was a member 
of the United States and Chilian claims 
commission. In 1898 he was president of 
the \'irginia State Bar Association, and in 
igoi unanimously elected president of the 
\'irginia constitutional convention. He mar- 
ried Sallie, daughter of R. A. Urquhart, of 
Isle of Wight. Virginia. He died at Nor- 
tolk. July 14, looi). 

Holcombe, James Philemon, born in 
Lynchburg. X'irginia. September 25, 1820; 
attended Yale University and the Univer- 
sity of V'irginia, pursued a legal course, in 
which profession he subsequently achieved 
;in eminently brilliant success as a teacher 
and author, as well as in the political 
phases of the profession ; elected to the posi- 
ticm of adjunct professor of constitutional 
and international law, mercantile law and 
equity, in the University of X'irginia in 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



41 



1852, to assist Professor Minor, and two 
years later was advanced to the full profes- 
sorship of his subjects; in 1861 he was a 
member of the secession convention of Vir- 
ginia, and in 1862 was elected to the house 
of representatives of the Confederate con- 
gress and continued until 1863 ; was a firm 
believer in the cause of the southern Con- 
federacy, and vigorously advocated the jus- 
tice of the right of secession ; after the close 
of his term in the Confederate congress, he 
accepted an appointment as commissioner 
to Canada, representing the Confederate 
government: in 1868 he opened a school for 
boys in Bedford county, Virginia, and later 
removed the school to Capon Springs, West 
Virginia, and continued to direct it until 
his death, August 22, 1873; was an orator 
cf much eloquence and a writer of distin- 
guished merit, and some of the most valu- 
able of his writings were contributed to the 
publications of the Virginia Historical So- 
ciety, of which he was a member; he also 
wrote extensively for other periodicals, and 
published several law books: "Leading 
Cases on Commercial Law," New York, 
1847 ; "Digest of the Decisions of the United 
States Supreme Court," 1848; and "Mer- 
chants' Book of Reference," 1848; he also 
published, in 1868, "Literature and Letters" : 
his death occurred at Capon Springs, West 
Virginia. 

Holliday, F. W. M., (q. v.) : member of 
second Confederate congress. 

Jenkins, Albert Gallatin, born in Cabell 
county, Virginia, November 10, 1830; en- 
tered the V^irginia Military Institute, then 
studied at Jefiferson College, Pennsylvania, 
where he was graduated in 1848 ; immedi- 
ately took a course of la.v at Harvard, was 



admitted to the bar in 1850, but never prac- 
ticed ; went instead to his plantation, and 
devoted himself to farming; his public spirit 
would not permit an absolute agricultural 
existence, and he became a delegate to the 
national Democratic convention, held in 
Cincinnati in 1856, and was then elected a 
representative from Virginia, serving in the 
thirty-fifth and thirty-sixth congresses 
f:\I;irch 4, 1857-March 3, 1861) ; delegate in 
the Confederate provisional congress in 
1861 ; enlisted in the Confederate service, 
appointed brigadier-genenal, August i, 1862; 
assigned to Gen. Hill's division, and after- 
wards transferred to Stuart's cavalry ; as a 
commander he was ever on the alert, and 
especially showed his genius in the hand- 
ling of his forces at the battle of Gettys- 
burg: he subsequently served in the Shen- 
andoah Valley, and in western Virginia, and 
was killed in the battle of Floyd's Mountain, 
near Dublin, Virginia, May 9, 1864. 

Lyons, James, was born in Hanover town, 
Mrginia, in 1801, the eldest son of Dr. James 
Lyons, and grandson of Peter Lyons, presi- 
dent of the supreme court of appeals. He 
attended A\'illiam and Mary College in 1817, 
and settled in Richmond City, where he 
practiced law. In 1824, being then just 
twenty-three years old. he was sent by the 
city council to New York to arrange with 
LaFayette as to his visit to A'irginia. In the 
I'olitics of his day he was a states rights 
AMiig and drew the \'irginia ^^'hig address 
of 1840, pledging the Whig party against 
a bank and a protective tariflf. He was twice 
elected to the senate, and on his resignation 
from that body was elected to the house of 
delegates. On the death of John Tyler, Jan- 
uary 18, 1862, he was elected in his place to 
the hou'^e of representatives of the Confed- 



42 



\-IRGl.\IA l:5IOr.RArilY 



erate congress, and during the war was ap- 
pointed by the Confederate government a 
judge to try political prisoners. After the 
war he practiced his profession in Richmond 
with great success, and was one of its repre- 
sentative citizens. He possessed a com- 
manding person and prepossessing manners. 

Johnson, Robert, member of provisional 
congress, and representative in first and sec- 
ond congresses. 

Mason, James M., member of provisional 
congress (q. v.). 

McFarland, William H., was a prominent 
financier and lawyer of Richmond, president 
of the Farmers' Bank, member of the provi- 
sional congress of the Confederacy; in 1871 
he was a member of the board of visitors of 
William and Mary College. 

McMullen, Fayette, born in Scott county, 
\'irginia, in 1810; received an academic 
education ; was a stage driver in early life. 
He was elected to the senate of Virginia 
from the Washington district in 1838, and 
served until 1849. He was elected as a 
Democrat to the thirty-first congress and 
reelected to the thirty-second and thirty- 
third congresses without opposition, and 
was elected a fourth time, serving from De- 
cember 3, 1849, to March 3, 1857. He was 
appointed governor of Washington terri- 
tory by President Pnichanan, and served as 
such from 1857 to 1861. He was elected 
from Virginia to the second Confederate 
congress, serving from February 22, 1864, 
to the overthrow of the Confederacy. He 
died at Wytheville, Virginia, November 8, 
1881, from injuries sustained in a railroad 
accident. 



Miller, Samuel A., representative in sec- 
ond Confederate congress. 

Montague, Robert Latane, born at "Ellas- 
lee," Middlesex county, Virginia, May 23, 
1819, son of Lewis B. Montague and Cath- 
erine Street (Jesse) Montague, his wife. 
He was a student in Fleetwood (King and 
Queen county) Academy, and studied law 
under Judge Lomax, of Fredericksburg. In 
1841 he entered William and Mary College, 
Williamsburg, and graduated in law in 
1842, the same year taking a post-graduate 
course in the same institution. He was one 
of the most brilliant and polished speakers 
in the state. He was several times a Demo- 
cratic presidential elector ; and was for many 
years commi,in wealth attorney of Middlesex 
county. He was elected lieutenant-gov- 
ernor under Governor Letcher, leading his 
ticket by five thousand votes. He was presi- 
dent of the Virginia convention of 1861, and 
was made a member of the executive coun- 
cil which had power to organize the army 
and make appointments to office. He was 
a member of the second Confederate con- 
gress, and was one of the most conspicuous 
of the younger members. In 1872 he was 
elected to the house of delegates, tlu)ui,di the 
count}- had a large negro Republican popu- 
lation. In 1S75 he was elected judge of the 
eighth judicial district, and in 1878 was re- 
elected for eight years, dying in office, 
Alarch 2. 18S0, at "Inglew-ood," Middlesex 
county. He was for many years moderator 
of the Virginia Baptist General .Association. 
He married Cordelia Gay, daughter of 
Joseph C. Eubank, 

Preston, Walter, born in Abingdon, Vir- 
ginia, son of John M. Preston. He was edu- 
cated fi-ir the bar, and became distinguished 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



43 



in his profession. Previous to the civil war 
he was a candidate for attorney-general of 
Virginia. He was a member of the Con- 
federate provisional congress, and a repre- 
sentative in the first regular congress under 
the Confederate constitution, defeating Fay- 
ette McAIullen. He died shortly after the 
war. 

Preston, William Ballard, was born at 
"Smithfield," Montgomery county, Virginia, 
November 25, 1805, son of Governor James 
Fatten (q. v.) and Ann (Taylor) Preston. 
He was a student at the University of Vir- 
ginia, was admitted to the bar, and practiced 
successfully in his native state, meantime 
serving as a representative in the Virginia 
legislature, and as a state senator. He mar- 
ried a Miss Redd, of Virginia. He was a 
Whig representative from Virginia in the 
thirtieth congress, 1847-49; and secretary of 
the navy in President Taylor's cabinet, from 
March 8, 1849, to July 22, 1850. He visited 
France in 1858-59, as an agent from Vir- 
ginia, to effect the establishment of a direct 
line of steamers between Norfolk and Havre, 
but the plan was defeated by the civil war. 
He was a delegate from Virginia to the pro- 
visional Confederate congress that met at 
Richmond, July 20, 1861, where he still 
sought to prevent war. He was elected a 
senator from \'irginia in the first Confed- 
erate congress, which met February 22, 
1862, being succeeded on his death by Allen 
T. Caperton. He died at "Smithfield." \'ir- 
ginia, November 16, 1862. 

Pryor, Roger Atkinson, born in Dinwiddie 
county, Virginia, July 19, 1828; was gradu- 
ated from Hampden-Sidney College in 1845. 
and from the University of Virginia in 1848 ; 
studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 



1849. After practicing law a short time in 
Petersburg, he abandoned the profession on 
account of ill health, and engaged on the 
editorial staff of the ■■\\'ashington Union," 
and later on that of the "Richmond En- 
quirer." In 1854 he was appointed special 
minister to Greece, returning home in 1857 
and again engaging in newspaper work. He 
was elected as a Democrat to the thirty- 
sixth congress, to fill vacancy occasioned by 
the death of William O. Goode, and served 
from December 7, 1859, to the close of the 
session, March 3, 1861, and was reelected to 
the next congress, but did not serve on ac- 
count of the breaking out of the civil war. 
He was a member of the provisional Con- 
federate congress, and of the first Confed- 
erate States congress. He entered the Con- 
federate army as colonel, and was promoted 
to brigadier-general, but resigned and en- 
listed as a private soldier. He was captured 
by the Federals in November, 1864, and 
was confined in Fort Lafayette, but was 
soon released. After the war he located in 
New York City, and engaged in the practice 
of law. He was a delegate to the Demo- 
cratic national convention of 1876: judge 
of the New York court of common pleas, 
1890-94; justice of New York supreme 
court, 1894-99, retiring upon reaching the 
age limit, and resuming his law practice. He 
was made official referee in 19 12. 

Rives, William C, member of second Con- 
federate congress (q. v.). 

Russell, Charles W., member of provi- 
sional congress and representative in first 
and second congresses. 

Scott, Robert E., son of John Scott and 
Elizabeth Pickett, his wife, and a descend- 
ant of Rev. John Scott, M. A., of Dipple 



44 



\'IRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



parish. Morayshire, Scotland, was born 
April 22, i8oS, was educated at the Univer- 
sity of X'irginia, 1825-1827, studied law and 
was admitted to the bar of Warrenton, Vir- 
ginia, 1829. He was elected commonwealth's 
attorney and for years served in the legis- 
lature ; member of the constitutional con- 
vention of 1850 and of the convention of 
1861, in which body he supported the Union 
until the proclamation of Lincoln for troops 
to coerce South Carolina. He was a 
member of the provisional congress of the 
Confederate States, July, i86t. In Septem- 
ber, 1861, he was a candidate for the Con- 
federate house of representatives. He died 
May 3, 1862, killed by two marauders from 
the United States army in Fauquier county, 
while trying to arrest them. He had been 
offered by Mr. Seward the position of Sec- 
retary of Navy of the United States. He 
married (first) March 10. 1831, Elizabeth 
laylor, born 1815, died March 11, 1834, 
daughter of Robert Johnston Taylor, of 
Alexandria ; (second) Anne Morson, daugh- 
ter of Alexander and Anne (Carson) Mor- 
son, of Staflford county, and (third) Hening- 
ham Watkins Lyons, sister of Hon. James 
Lyons, of Richmond (q. v.). 

Seddon, James Alexander, born in Fal- 
mouth, \'ir,ninia, July 13, 1815, son of 
Thomas Seddon, a merchant and subse- 
quently a banker, who was descended from 
John Seddon, of Lancashire, England, who 
was one of the early settlers of Staftord 
county, Virginia; his mother, Susan (Alex- 
ander) Seddon, was a lineal descendant of 
John Alexander. James A. Seddon enter- 
ed the law department of the University 
of Virginia and was graduated in 1835; 
after graduation began practice in Rich- 



mond, where his abilities attracted imme- 
diate attention, and he became one of the 
foremost members of his profession in the 
state; elected as a Democrat to the twenty- 
ninth congress (March 4, 1845-March 3, 
1847), receiving a handsome majority, al- 
though the district was usually uncertain ; 
he declined a renomination in 1847, because 
his views were not in accord with the plat- 
form of the nominating convention ; re- 
elected to the thirty-first congress (March 4, 
i849-]March 3, 1851), but his delicate health 
obliged him to decline another nomination, 
and he retired to Sabot Hill, his home on 
the James river, above Richmond; he took 
an active part in the debates during his serv- 
ice in congress, and was acknowledged to be 
the leader of his party : his debates upon the 
reform revenue bill, in which he advocated 
free trade, were models of strength and eru- 
dition, and commanded wide attention ; in 
i860 was appointed, with John Tyler and 
others, a commissioner to the peace con- 
gress which, at the instance of the state of 
Virginia, was held in \\'ashington ; he was 
placed upon the committee of rules, and by 
the instruction of his state made the minor- 
ity report, recommending the amending of 
the constitution according to the resolution 
which had been introduced into the senate 
by John J. Crittenden. He was a delegate 
to the Confederate provisional congress, and 
upon the establishment of the Confederate 
government was given the portfolio of sec- 
retary of war in the first cabinet of Jeffer- 
son Davis, November 20, 1862. In his con- 
tention with Governor Brown, of Georgia, 
upon the subject of conscription, he showed 
the strength of his personality ; the prin- 
ciple of state sovereignty, according to Gov- 
ernor Brown, did not permit the general 




. A',,/,,,,,.,,,/. l,,;^/,„„. /.Vi'fi /.VA-A- 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



45 



government to conscript the citizens of any 
state, carried out logically there could be no 
general government ; upon the fall of the 
Confederacy, Mr. Seddon retired from pub- 
lic life, and died in Goochland county, \"ir- 
ginia, August 19, 1880. 

Smith, William (q. v.), member of first 
regular Confederate congress. 

Staples, Waller R. (q. v.), member of first 
and second Confederate congresses. 

Tyler, John (q. v.), member of the provi- 
sional and first Confederate congresses. 

Whitfield, Robert H., representative in 
second congress. 

Wickham, Williams Carter, born in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, September 21, 1820, son of 
William Fanning and Anne (Carter) Wick- 
ham, grandson of John Wickham, the dis- 
tinguished lawyer who defended Aaron 
Burr, and a descendant of Robert Carter, 
and of Gen. Thomas Nelson, a signer of the 
Declaration of Independence and com- 
mander of the Virginia forces at Yorktown ; 
educated in the private schools of Rich- 
mond, and the University of Virginia, where 
he studied law ; after graduation he returned 
to his father's estate in Hanover county, 
Virginia, where he established himself as a 
farmer; nominated and elected as a Whig 
candidate to the Virginia house of delegates 
and the state senate, of which he was a 
member for many years ; elected to the 
secession convention, where he opposed 
secession, but on the outbreak of the civil 
war formed a cavalry company and became 
the captain of the Hanover troop ; was suc- 
cessively promoted to be colonel and briga- 
dier-general. He was a member of the sec- 



ond Confederate congress. After the war 
was elected president of the Chesapeake & 
Ohio Railway Company, at that time the 
Virginia Central Railroad Company, and 
was associated with the same at the time 
of his death ; served for years as a member 
of the board of supervisors of his native 
county, and always took a deep interest in 
the welfare of his own people; he married 
Lucy P. Taylor, granddaughter of John 
Taylor, of Caroline county, Virginia ; three 
children survived him : Hon. Henry T. 
Wickham, Mrs. Robert H. Renshaw, Wil- 
liam F. Wickham ; at the time of his death 
a monument was erected to him in the city 
of Richmond by his old soldiers and the 
employees of the railroad which he man- 
aged. 

MILITARY AND NAVAL OFFICERS. 
Anderson, Joseph Reid, son of William 
and Anne Thomas Anderson, was born in 
Botetourt county, Virginia, February 6, 
1813, and graduated from the United States 
Military Academy, 1836; appointed lieuten- 
ant in the Third Artillery ; served in engi- 
neer bureau at Washington ; transferred to 
corps of engineers as brevetted second lieu- 
tenant ; assisted in building Fort Pulaski, 
at entrance of Savannah river. He re- 
signed September 30, 1837, to accept posi- 
tion as assistant engineer, state of Virginia ; 
chief engineer of Valley Turnpike Com- 
pany, 1838-41 ; subsequently head of firm of 
Joseph R. Anderson & Company, proprie- 
tors of Tredegar Iron Works, Richmond. 
In September, 1861, he was commissioned 
brigadier-general, C. S. A., and assigned to 
command of forces at Wilmington, North 
Carolina. In the spring of 1862 ordered to 
Fredericksburg in command of brigade ; 



46 



\'IRGI\IA IUO(;RArilY 



later given command of a new division un- 
der A. P. Hill ; participated in battles of 
Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill and Fra\scr"s 
Farm : seriously wounded in latter engage- 
ment, and resigned July 19, 1862. He died 
at Isle of Shoals, New Hampshire, Septem- 
ber 7. 1892. 

Armistead, Lewis Addison, born at New 
Bern. North Carolina, February 18, 1817, 
son of Gen. Walker Keith Armistead. Grad- 
uated from United States Military Acad- 
emy, 1839, commissioned second lieuten- 
ant, Sixth United States Infantry ; March, 
1844, promoted to first lieutenant ; served 
in Mexican war, and brevetted captain for 
gallantry at Contreras and Cherubu.'^co, 
and major for services at Molino del Key. 
Continued in army, serving against Indians, 
and promoted to captain, 1855. In March. 
1861, major C. S. A.; later became colonel 
of Fifty-seventh Regiment; April i, 1862, 
promoted brigadier-general. At Seven Pines, 
distinguished for personal bravery ; at Mal- 
vern Hill led charge under personal order 
of Gen. R. E. Lee. Subsequently command- 
ed brigades under R. H. Anderson and 
Pickett; September 6, 1862, appointed pro- 
vost marshal general of the army. At 
Gettysburg led his brigade of Pickett's di- 
vision in the historic charge, scaled the 
works, ur.r] fell wounded into the ha-.-ds of 
the enemy, but not until he had planted 
his colors over their fortifications. He died 
from the effects of his wound. July 4, iSf),:^. 

Ashby, Turner, born at Rose Hil', Fau- 
quier county, Virginia, 1824, grandson of 
Capt. John Ashby, of the revolution. Was 
captain of volunteers at time of John 
Brown raid, and aided in cloture of Har- 
per's Ferry. He commanded Confederate 



post at Point of Rocks ; was soon prf.- 
nioted to lieutenant-colonel and colonel; 
later was assigned to command of cavylry 
in the valley district. He was authorized 
by war department to recruit cavalry, in- 
fantry and heavy artillery, and was com- 
missioned brigadier-general. He pla_\cd a 
prominent part in all the operations in the 
Shenandoah Valley. Near Harrisonburg 
he led an attack upon the enemy, when his 
horse was shot under him, and he led his 
men on foot, when a ball pierced his breast 
and he fell dead, June 6, 1862. "His daring 
was proverbial, powers of endurance almost 
incredible, tone of character heroic, and his 
sagacity almost intuitive in divining I'.ie 
movements of the enemy." In October, 
1866, his body was reinterred in the Stone- 
wall Cemetery at Winchester. 

Barton, Seth Maxwell, son of Thon;a^ 
Bowerbank Barton ; graduated from United 
States Military Academy, 1849; as brevet 
second lieutenant Third Infantry, served at 
Fort Columbus, New York ; promoted sec- 
ond lieutenant, serving in the southwe.-it 
until 1861, being promoted to captain. He 
resigned June 11, 1861, to enter the Con- 
federate service ; became lieutenant-colonel 
of Third Arkansas Regiment, and partici- 
pated in operations in West Virginia. Un- 
der Gen. E. Kirby Smith he commanded a 
brigade in East Tennessee. He subse- 
quently was made prisoner with the Vicks- 
burg garrison, but was soon exchanged. 
He was given command of Armistead's 
brigade, Pickett's division, and served in 
North Carolina and on the James river ; 
later he commanded a brigade for The de- 
fense of Richmond under Gen. Ewell, and 
was under I^ee at the surrender at Appo- 
mattox. 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



47 



Beall, John Yates, born at Charlestown, 
Jefferson county, Virginia, January i, 1835. 
He was a member of a highly respectable 
family, and said to be heir apparent to the 
English Lord Egelby. He was educated at 
the University of Virginia, and trained for 
the law, but never practiced. He was the 
owner of a large plantation and more than 
one hundred slaves. He entered the Con- 
federate service in Company G, Second Vir- 
ginia Regiment, was wounded in action, and 
went to Canada. While there he conceived 
a plan for the liberation of the Confederate 
prisoners at Johnson's Island, and, return- 
ing South, was commissioned acting master 
in the navy, but was not assigned to a ves- 
sel. On his own initiative he engaged in 
privateering operations in Chesapeake Bay 
and the Potomac river, and in November, 
1863, was captured and put into irons at 
Fort McHenry, Baltimore. This led to re- 
prisals, and he was exchanged in May of the 
following year. Resubmitting to the Con- 
federate authorities his plans for the John- 
son's Island project, and after meeting with 
approval, he returned to Canada, and set 
about the undertaking in his own way. 
On September 28, 1864. with three chosen 
men, he boarded the steamboat Pliilo Far- 
sens, on Lake Erie, ostensibly to take a 
pleasure trip. In the afternoon, when the 
boat had nearly reached Kelly's Island, 
about six miles from the Ohio shore, the 
men drew revolvers on the officers in charge 
of the boat, and, imprisoning them in the 
cabins, took possession. They threw freight 
overboard, examined the ship's papers, took 
the money from the clerk's offices and ran 
the boat to Middle Bass Island, where the 
passengers were put ashore. Soon after 
this, a freight and passenger steamboat, the 



Island Queen, came alongside, and was 
promptly seized and sunk. As soon as the 
news reached the outside world, officers 
were sent to arrest Beale and his party. He 
escaped capture for a time by taking up his 
residence on the American side of the Sus- 
pension Bridge, and by disguising his per- 
sonal appearance. He made observations 
on the defences of the frontiers, and was the 
instigator of a foray in St. Albans, Ver- 
mont, which was accompanied with incen- 
diarism and loss of life. He had many 
S3mpathizers in the South, with whom he 
was in communication. He was finally ar- 
rested on December 16. 1864, at Suspension 
Bridge, New York. The charges against 
him were violation of the laws of war by 
seizing the Philo Parsons and the Island 
Queen, for "undertaking to carry on irregu- 
lar and unlawful warfare as a guerrilla, 
without lawful authority and for unlawful 
purposes," and for acting as a spy. Oi 
these he was found guilty and was sen- 
tenced to be hanged. An eft'ort to save 
Beale was made by President Davis, who 
issued a proclamation assuming responsi- 
bility for the act, and declaring that the 
seizure of the vessels had been effected by 
his authority. But this could not help one 
v;ho had ventured into the enemy's coun- 
try and made war while wearing no badge 
of service. He was hanged on Governor's 
Island, New York, February 24, 1865. His 
courageous bearing at his trial and execu- 
tion were admired even by his judges and 
executioners. 

Bledsoe, Albert Taylor, born in Frank- 
fort, Kentucky, November 9, i8og, son of 
Moses Bledsoe and Sophia (Taylor) Bled- 
soe, his wife. He was graduated, 1830, 



48 



\'1RG1XIA BIOGRAPHY 



from the United States Military Academy, 
where he had Robert E. Lee as a class- 
mate and personal friend. After two years 
service on the plains, he resigned from the 
army. He then began to study law under 
his uncle, Samuel Taylor, in Richmond, 
Virginia, but forsook it to accept a position 
a? a tutor in Renyon (Ohio) College. After 
two years he took up the study of the- 
ology, and took orders in the Episcopal 
church, and became an assistant of Bishop 
Smith, of Kentucky, but conscientious 
scruples as to infant baptism led him to 
leave the ministry, though he remained a 
zealous churchman. He then went to 
Springfield. Illinois, where he was admitted 
to the bar and practiced in the same courts 
with Lincoln and Douglas, and then in 
Washington City. In 1848, he became a 
professor in the University of Mississippi, 
leaving it in 1854 to take a chair in the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and where he remained 
until the breaking out of the civil war. He 
was at first a strong Union man, but when 
Virginia seceded he changed his views. 
Commissioned colonel, he was soon made 
assistant secretary of war. When he re- 
turned, Jefferson Davis was imprisoned, 
and in 1866 Col. Bledsoe published his 
work, "Is Davis a Traitor ; or was Seces- 
sion a Constitutional Right?" He went to 
Baltimore the same year, and conducted the 
Louisa School. At the same time he edited 
the "Southern Review," which was after- 
ward made the organ of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, with which Col. Bled- 
soe connected himself, and some years later 
became one of its ministers. He published 
several scholarly works. He died suddenly, 
at Alexandria, Virginia, December 8, 1877. 



Brooke, John Mercer, born December 18, 
1826, son of Gen. George Mercer Brooke 
and Lucy Thomas, his wife. He was born 
at Tampa Bay, Florida, where his father, a 
distinguished officer of the United States 
army, was on duty. From his early youth 
he became familiar with army life, and he 
received such schooling as officers could 
then provide their children at army posts, 
his training being principally at Fort How- 
ard, Wisconsin, one of the extreme northern 
stations. At the age of fifteen he was ap- 
pointed to the United States Naval Acad- 
emy, from which he graduated in 1847, hav- 
ing previously seen some service as mid- 
shipman on board the Delaware. He served 
on the Coast Survey, 1849-50, and was sta- 
tioned at the Naval Observatory, 1851-53. 
He was assigned to the duty of surveying 
the route between California and China, and 
with special reference to the islands in the 
Pacific ocean. His deep-sea soundings 
measured from 6,000 to 20,400 feet. It was 
then that he put to practical use the deep- 
sea sounding apparatus, which was so use- 
ful when the submarine telegraph cable 
came to be laid, and in recognition of his 
scr\ices to science, he received from King 
William I, of Prussia, the gold science 
medal of the Academy of Berlin. In 1861 
he resigned his commission, and entered the 
service of the state of \'irginia. His inven- 
tive genius was of inestimable value to the 
struggling Confederacy, which was particu- 
l.-irly weak in na\al resources. One of his 
most important achievements, and which 
ga\e to the navies of the world a hitherto 
unknown offensive device, was the sub- 
merged bow on ship construction, which 
came to be known as the ram, and which he 
applied to the Confederate States ship Vir- 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



49 



ginia, formerly the Mcrriniac. This inven- 
tion was duly recognized by one of the first 
letters patent issued by the Confederate 
States government. In 1863 Capt. Brooke 
was made chief of ordnance and hydrog- 
raphy. Among his innovations, introduced 
by experiments with a thirteen-inch Blak- 
ley gun, was placing the firing charge 
wholly in front of the chamber, lessening 
the initial tension of the gasses. This met 
with some ridicule, but Capt. Brooke suc- 
cessfully demonstrated his theory, and it 
came to be adopted by the navies of the 
world, to the overthrow of a former error, 
and acceptance of the "air-space" as one of 
the most important improvements in the 
use of ordnance. The name of Capt. Brooke 
is famous for the beforementioned achieve- 
ments — the deep-sea sounding apparatus, 
the submerged ship-bow, and the air-space 
in artillery. Immediately after the war, 
Capt. Brooke was called to a professorship 
in the Virginia Military Institute at Lex- 
ington — a position which he adorned until 
incapacitated by age and infirmities, and he 
was retired as professor emeritus. He mar- 
ried (first) Mary Elizabeth Garnett, (sec- 
ond) Kate Corbin Pendleton. 

Chilton, Robert Hall, son of William and 
Sarah Powell Chilton, of Westmoreland 
county, Virginia, born about 1816; gradu- 
ated from United States Military Academy, 
1837; was second lieutenant of First Dra- 
goons, he served on frontier duty, and was 
promoted to first lieutenant ; served in 
Mexican war, promoted to captain, and bre- 
vetted major for gallantry at Buena Vista. 
He subsequently served in the pay depart- 
ment until 1861, when he resigned and en- 
tered the Confederate service as lieutenant- 
viR— 4 



colonel in the adjutant-general's depart- 
ment, and was promoted to colonel. He 
was called to the staiT of Gen. R. E. Lee as 
chief-of-stafif, Army of Northern Virginia. 
Promoted to brigadier-general, he served 
nntil April i, 1864, when he resigned. He 
made his home in Columbus, Georgia, 
v.'here he died February 18, 1879. 

Cocke, Philip St. George, born in Surry 
county, Virginia, in 1808, son of Gen. Jonn 
Hartwell Cocke. He graduated from the 
United States Military Academy in 1832, 
and as second lieutenant of artillery was 
stationed at Charleston, South Carolina. 
In 1834 he resigned, and lived as a planter 
in Virginia and Mississippi, wrote agricul- 
tural essays, and for some years was presi- 
dent of the Virginia State Agricultural 
Society. He was prominent in Virginia 
councils in April, 1861, and was appointed 
brigadier-general in the state service, and 
given a command on the Potomac river. 
In May he recruited a large force. As colo- 
nel he commanded a brigade under Beaure- 
gard, and also served at Blackburn's Ford. 
He rendered efficient service at the stone 
bridge at Manassas. He was promoted to 
brigadier-general, but returned home, shat- 
tered in body and mind, and died December 
26, 1 86 1. 

Colston, Raleigh Edward, born in Paris, 
France, October 31, 1825, son of Raleigh 
Edward Colston and Elizabeth (Marshall) 
Colston, his wife ; his grandmother was sis- 
ter of Chief Justice John Marshall. He 
came to the United States when seventeen 
years old. He graduated in 1846 from the 
Virginia Military Institute, and was a pro- 
fessor there until April, 1861, when he 
marched to Richmond in command of the 



50 



\"1 RGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



cadets. In May he was made colonel of the 
Sixteenth Virginia Infantry, and given 
command of a brigade on the James river, 
and subsequently commanded it at York- 
town, Williamsburg and Seven Pines. After 
being invalided for a time, he commanded 
a brigade in southern Virginia and North 
Carolina, and later at Petersburg. After 
Chancellorsville, he commanded a brigade 
ir' Jackson's old division, until May, 1863, 
when he took duty in Richmond, and in 
October was given command at Savannah, 
Georgia. In April, 1864, he was again in 
command at Petersburg, and in July at 
Lynchburg, where he remained until the 
surrender. Subsequently he conducted a 
military academy at Wilmington, North 
Carolina, and from 1873 to 1879 was in the 
service of the Khedive of Egypt, and con- 
ducted two important exploring expeditions 
to the Soudan ; in the last named, he was 
paralyzed, and was carried on a litter for 
hundreds of miles. Returning home, he was 
engaged in literary work, and from 1882 to 
1894 held a position in the war department 
at Washington, D. C. He died at the Sol- 
diers' Home, Richmond, July 29, 1896. 

Corse, Montgomery D., was born at Alex- 
andria, \'irginia, March- 14, 1816. He re- 
ceived an academic and business education, 
and served in the Mexican war as a captain 
in the First Virginia Regiment. He was 
with the gold-seekers in California, return- 
ing in 1856 and engaging in banking in 
Alexandria. In i860 he organized the "Old 
Dominion Rifles," at Alexandria, and later 
became major. He was later colonel of the 
Seventeenth Virginia Regiment, and in 
Longstrect's (later Kemper's) brigade, took 
part in the battles of Manassas, York- 



town, Williamsburg, Seven Pines and the 
Seven Days. He was wounded at the Sec- 
ond Manassas, and again at Boonsboro. In 
1862 he was promoted brigadier-general 
and given command of Pickett's old bri- 
gade. He took part in the Pennsylvania 
campaign, and in 1863-64 operated in south- 
west Virginia and East Tennessee. Later 
he was with the forces opposing Butler on 
the James river ; shared the service of 
Pickett's division at Petersburg, Richmond, 
Dinwiddie Court House and Five Forks, 
and ended his military career with honor at 
Sailor's Creek. After the surrender, he was 
confined at Fort Warren until August, 1865. 
He returned to Alexandria, and engaged in 
banking. He was seriously injured in the 
fall of a part of the capitol at Richmond, 
causing a partial blindness. He died Feb- 
ruary II, 1895. 

Bearing, James, was born in Campbell 
county, Virginia, April 25, 1840, died in 
Lynchburg in April, 1865. He was a great- 
grandson of Col. Charles Lynch, of revolu- 
tionary fame, who gave his name to the 
summary method of administering justice, 
now known as "Lynch law," through his 
rough-and-ready way of treating the tories. 
He was graduated at Hanover, Virginia, 
Academy, and was appointed a cadet in the 
United States Military Academy, but re- 
signed in 1861 to join the Confederate army 
when Virginia passed the ordinance of se- 
cession. He was successively lieutenant of 
the Washington artillery of New Orleans, 
captain of Latham's battery, major and 
commander of Denny's artillery battalion, 
and colonel of a cavalry regiment from 
North Carolina, and was promoted to the 
r.mk of brigadier-general for gallantry at 




^ 




UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



51 



the battle of Plymouth. He participated in 
the principal engagements between the 
Army of Northern Virginia and the Army 
o^' the Potomac. On the retreat of the Con- 
federate forces from Petersburg to Appo- 
mattox Court House, he was mortally 
wounded near Farmville in a singular en- 
counter with Brig.-Gen. Theodore Read, of 
the Federal army. The two generals met 
on April 5, at the head of their forces, on 
opposite sides of the Appomattox, at High 
Bridge, and a duel with pistols ensued. 
Gen. Read was shot dead, but Gen. Dear- 
ing lingered until a few days after the sur- 
render of Lee, when he died in the Old City 
Hotel at Lynchburg, Virginia. 

De Lagnel, Julius Adolphus, a native of 
New Jersey, was appointed to the United 
States army from Virginia, in 1847, as sec- 
ond lieutenant. Second United States In- 
fantry, and promoted to first lieutenant in 
1849. ^" 1^61 he resigned, and was com- 
missioned captain of artillery, C. S. A. He 
was chief of artillery to Gen. Garnett, in 
West Virginia, and distinguished himself 
at Rich Mountain, fighting a gun alone ; the 
enemy was upon him, but he made his es- 
crpe. On his return to service he was made 
major of artillery, and declined a commission 
as brigadier-general. He afterward served 
in the ordnance department at Richmond. 

Dimmock, Charles, was born in Massa- 
chusetts in 1800, died in Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, October 27, 1863. He was graduated 
at the United States Military Academy in 
1821, assigned to the First Artillery, and 
served as assistant professor of engineering 
at West Point in 1821-22. He was attached 
to the artillery school at Fort Monroe in 
1825-26 and 1828-29, being adjutant of the 



school in the last named year. He was pro- 
moted to first lieutenant in 1828, was as- 
sistant quartermaster in 1831-36, and su- 
perintended operations at Delaware break- 
water in 1831-33. He was made captain on 
August 6, 1836, but resigned on September 
30, and became a civil engineer in the 
south, being employed on many important 
railroads, and in 1837-38 in the location of 
a United States military road to Fort 
Smith, Arkansas. In 1843-47 he was direc- 
tor of the James river and Kanawha canal. 
He was captain of Virginia militia in 1839- 
40, lieutenant-colonel in 1841-42, and super- 
intendent of the state armory in 1843-61. 
He was a member of the Richmond city 
council in 1850, 1854 and 1858, and at the 
beginning of the civil war entered the Con- 
federate service, became brigadier-general 
and was chief of ordnance department of 
^'irginia. He died October 27, 1863. 

Early, Jubal Anderson, born in Franklin 
county, \'irginia, November 3, 1816, He 
graduated from the United States Alilitary 
Academy in 1837; in 1838 promoted to first 
lieutenant of artillery, resigned and engag- 
ed in law practice. He was a member of 
ihe house of delegates. 1841-42, and com- 
monwealth's attorney, 1842 to 1852, except 
(luring 1847-48, when he served in the Mexi- 
can war as major of volunteers. In 1861, 
a3 a member of the Virginia convention, 
he opposed secession, but went with his 
state. As colonel of the Twenty-fourth 
Virginia Regiment he commanded a bri- 
gade at Manassas, and was promoted to 
hrigadier-general. He was wounded at 
Williamsburg, in leading a charge. In the 
Manassas campaign of 1862 he commanded 
a brigade of Ewell's division, and he 



52 



\'IRGL\IA BIOGRAPHY 



commanded the division at Sharpsburg 
and at Fredericksburg. In January', 1863, 
he was promoted to major-general. He es- 
pecially distinguished himself in the Penn- 
sylvania campaign and at Gettysburg. In 
the opening engagement in the Wilderness, 
he temporarily commanded Hill's corps, to 
the saving of Lee's flank, and defeated 
Burnside at Spottsylvania Court House on 
May 31, 1863, he was promoted to lieuten- 
ant-general. He defeated Hunter at Lynch- 
burg, and Wallace at Alonocacy. March- 
ing upon Washington, he was just about 
to assault when the city was reinforced by 
two Federal army corps. He was then en- 
gaged in the valley, where he made a stub- 
born resistance against Sheridan in a series 
or desperate engagements. When Lee sur- 
rendered, he rode on horseback to Texas, 
hoping to find a Confederate force still hold- 
ing out, then he went to Mexico, and then 
to Canada. Returning home, he resumed 
his law practice, but in his later years lived 
most of the time in New Orleans. He died 
at Lynchburg, \'irginia, March 2, 1894. 

Echols, John, born at Lynchburg, Vir- 
ginia, March 20, 1823, son of Joseph Echols, 
a native of Halifax county, Virginia, and 
of Elizabeth F. Lambeth, his wife, daugh- 
ter of Meredith Lambeth ; educated at Vir- 
ginia Military Institute, Washington Col- 
lege, and Hars^ard College. He studied law 
and practiced with much success in Monroe 
county. West Virginia. He took a promi- 
nent part in the Virginia convention of 
1861, but on the passage of the ordinance of 
secession, resigned, and was appointed by 
the convention colonel of volunteers and re- 
el uited forces in the vicinity of Staunton. 
As lieutenant-colonel of the Confederate 



army he commanded the Twenty-seventh 
Virginia Regiment at the first Manassas, 
iii the Stonewall brigade ; promoted to colo- 
nel, and served under Jackson in Shenan- 
doah Valley. He was wounded at Kerns- 
town, was promoted to brigadier-general, 
and commanded a brigade in the army of 
W^estern Virginia. In 1864 his service was 
in the Shenandoah Valley; in April, 1805, 
in southwest Virginia, he received news of 
the surrender at Appomattox, and at once 
set out to join Johnston's army. Subse- 
quently he accompanied President Davis to 
Augusta, Georgia ; after the war he re- 
sumed law practice in Staunton, bore a 
useful part m restoring Virginia to its 
proper relations with the general govern- 
ment, and as a member of the Virginia leg- 
islature. He died at the residence of his 
son. State Senator Echols, in Staunton, 
May 24, 1896. 

Ewell, Richard Stoddert, born at George- 
town, D. C, February 8, 1817, son of Dr. 
Thomas Ewell and Elizabeth Stoddert, his 
wife. He was graduated from the United 
States Military Academy in 1840, and as 
lieutenant served on the frontier until 1845, 
and was then on coast duty for a year. In 
the Mexican war he took part in the battles 
of Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Contreras, 
Cherubusco. ]\Iolino del Rey and Chapul- 
tepec. He was brevetted captain of 
dragoons, and after the Mexican war was on 
frontier duty until May 7, 1861, when he 
resigned. He was made lieutenant-colonel 
of cavalry, and promoted to brigadier-gen- 
eral, June 17. At the first battle of Manas- 
sas he commanded a brigade. In October 
he was promoted to major-general, and 
commanded a division under lackson in the 



UNDER THE CONEEDERACY 



53 



Shenandoah Valley. He defeated Banks at 
Winchester, and Fremont at Cross Keys. 
As senior major-general under Jackson he 
took a prominent part in the battles before 
Richmond, and in the subsequent opera- 
tions until Groveton, August 28, 1862, when 
he received a wound which necessitated 
amputation of the leg. He returned to the 
army in May, 1863, with the rank of lieu- 
tenant-general, and succeeded to the com- 
mand of the Second Corps, when Stonewall 
Jackson fell at Chancellorsville. He cleared 
the Shenandoah Valley of Federals, and was 
engaged in the invasion of Pennsylvania, 
and especially distinguished himself at 
Gettysburg, and again in the Wilderness, 
where at Spottsylvania his horse was shot 
under him, and he was so injured by the 
fall that he was obliged to leave the field. 
Later he commanded the Richmond de- 
fenses, and, after the evaculation was en- 
gaged at Sailor's Creek, where he was taken 
prisoner, and for four months was confined 
at Fort Warren. He died in Tennessee, 
January 25, 1872. 

Garland, Samuel, Jr., born in Lynchburg 
Virginia, December 16, 1830, son of Maur- 
ice H. and Caroline M. (Garland) Garland, 
and grandson of Spottswood Garland, who 
was clerk of Nelson county, Virginia, for so 
many years ; attended a classical school in 
his native county for one year, then entered 
the Virginia Military Institute, where he 
helped to establish a literary society, and 
entered the University of Virginia in 184Q, 
remained two years, graduated with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Law ; returned to 
Lynchburg, and engaged in the practice of 
his profession ; entered the Confederate 
army at the beginning of the war between 



the states, having been a captain in the 
Home Guard of Lynchburg ; was promoted 
tc the colonelcy of the Third Virginia Regi- 
ment ; was made brigadier-general and giv- 
en command of four North Carolina regi- 
ments ; his command was heavily engaged at 
Seven Pines, Gaines' Mill, and Second Man- 
assas, and was the first to cross the river 
in the campaign into Maryland ; while hold- 
ing the pass near Boonsborough, just prior 
to the battle of Sharpsburg, his men were 
driven back, and in his effort to rally them 
he naturally exposed himself to the hottest 
f^.re, and though he succeeded in his efforts, 
was mortally wounded; his remains were 
brought back to Lynchburg, where he was 
buried, September 19, 1862; he married, in 
1856, Eliza Campbell Meem, daughter of 
John G. Meem, Esq. 

Garnett, Richard Brooke, nephew of 
J.'.mes Mercer Garnett (q. v.), and Robert 
Selden Garnett (q. v.) ; born in Virginia, in 
1819; graduated from the United States 
Military Academy in 1841. He entered 
the army as second lieutenant, and served 
in the Florida war, and subsequently in the 
west. I^e was made first lieutenant in 1847, 
and later captain. He aided in quelling 
the Kansas disturbances in 1856-57; was en- 
gaged in the Utah expedition. He entered 
the Confederate service as major of artil- 
lery in 1861, and was promoted to brigadier- 
general the same year. He served in the 
Shenandoah Valley under Jackson, and at 
the battle of Kernstown commanded the 
Stonewall brigade. During and after the 
Maryland campaign he commanded Pick- 
ett's brigade, which he finally led at Gettys- 
burg, where he fell dead, shot from his 
horse in the midst of action. He died July 
3. 1863. 



54 



\iRGixiA niuc.RAriiv 



Garnett, Robert Selden, son of Roliert 
Seidell Garnett (q. v.), born in Essex 
county, Virginia ; graduated from United 
States Military Academy, in 1841, as second 
lieutenant of artillery, and was an instruc- 
tor there till October, 1844. In 1845 ^^ went 
tc Mexico as aide to Gen. Wool, and served 
with distinction at Palo Alto and Resaca de 
la Palma; and was aide to Gen. Taylor at 
Monterey and Buena Vista. As captain, he 
was again an instructor at West Point in 
1852-54. Promoted to major he served on 
the western frontier. He was on leave of 
absence in Europe when the civil war broke 
out. Returning, he resigned, was commis- 
sioned lieutenant-colonel, C. S. A., and was 
adjutant-general to Gen. R. E. Lee. In 
June, 1861, as brigadier-general, he went 
into service in western Virginia, and while 
leading his troops at Carrick's Ford, July 
13, was killed by a volley from the enemy. 
His body was tenderly cared for by Gen. 
McClellan, and returned to his friends. 

Green, Thomas, Ijorn in Amelia county, 
\'irginia, June 8, 1814. son of Nathan Green, 
a distinguished Tennessee jurist and presi- 
dent of Lebanon (Tennessee) Law College. 
Thomas Green, in 1835, having just attain- 
ed his majority, joined the revolutionary 
army in Texas, and was in the engagement 
ar San Jacintn. April 21, 1836. After the 
disbandment of the arm)-, in 1837, he locat- 
ed at La Grange, and found occupation as 
a survej-or. In 1839-40 he was engaged in 
various expeditions against the Indians, and 
in 1842 in resisting the Mexican frontier in- 
vasion. In May, 1846, as captain of an ex- 
cellent company, he went to join Gen. Tay- 
lor, on the Rio Grande, and took a gallant 
part in the three days' battle at Monterey, 



resulting in its capture. He served until 
the end of the war, and from 1841 to 1861, 
with slight intermissions on account of ab- 
sence, was clerk of the supreme court of 
Texas. In 1861 he entered the Confederate 
service as colonel of a regiment recruited in 
.Arizona and New Mexico, and took part in 
all the battles and operations in Texas, 
until overwhelmed by superior forces and 
forced to another field. On January i, 1863, 
he won distinction in the recapture of the 
city of Galveston and the Harriet Lane, 
of the United States navy. Promoted to 
brigadier-general, he now saw service in 
Louisiana, and in the course of operations 
there, was further promoted to major-gen- 
eral. During a period of thirteen months 
he commanded in many se\ere engage- 
ments, ending with that of April 12, 1864, 
at Pleasant Hill, where he was mortally 
wounded, and died two days later. His 
biographer says, "No man in Texas came 
nearer enjoying the universal love of his 
c( mrades, and all who knew the nobility of 
his unselfish character." A county in Texas 
bears his name. 

Harris, David Btdlock, born in Fredericks 
Hall, Louisa county, \'irginia, September 
28, 1814; graduated from United States 
Military Academy, 1833, and made assistant 
professor of engineering at West Point. In 
1835 resigned and became civil engineer on 
the James River and Kanawha Canal ; in 
1861 was made captain of engineers of \'ir- 
ginia forces, and assigned to the staf^" of 
Gen. Beauregard, with whom he was asso- 
ciated until the end of the war. He con- 
structed the works at Island No. 10, in the 
Mississippi river, aided in fortifying Vicks- 
burg, and as colonel performed similar ser- 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



vice on the James river, and was promoted 
to brigadier-general. He died October lo, 
■ 1864. 

Heth, Henry, was born in Chesteriieia 
county, Virginia, December 16, 1825, son of 
Lieut. John Heth, of the navy in the war of 
iSi2, who served with Decatur, and grand- 
son of William Heth, colonel in the revolu- 
tion. Henry Heth graduated from the United 
States Military Academy in 1847, and went 
into service in the Mexican war, and was 
present at Matamoras and Galaxara. He 
afterwards saw service against the Indians 
and was promoted through the grades to 
cj-ptain. He was in Utah in i860, came 
home on leave of absence, resigned when 
Virginia seceded, and organized the quarter- 
master's department in Richmond. He was 
promoted from major to colonel of the For- 
ty-fifth Virginia Regiment, and served un- 
der Gen. Floyd in West Virginia. In 1862 
he was promoted to brigadier-general, 
served in West Virginia, and afterwards in 
Kentucky, under Gen. Kirby Smith. In 
February, 1863, he took command of a bri- 
gade in the Army of Xorthern \'irginia. 
At Chancellorsville he commanded a divis- 
ion after the wounding of Gen. A. P. Hill, 
but was himself wounded the next day. He 
was promoted to major-general, and was 
given command of a division in Hill's corps. 
He was conspicuous in the Pennsylvania 
campaign, and in all the subsequent oper- 
ations of the army until the surrender at 
Appomattox. After the war he engaged in 
the insurance business in Richmond. 

Hill, Ambrose Powell, born in Culpeper 
county, Virginia, November 9, 1825, son of 
Maj. Thomas Hill, who was a politician and 
merchant for many years ; was graduated at 



the United States Military Academy in 
1847 ; entered the First Artillery, was made 
second lieutenant, August 22, 1847, served 
ill Mexico during the war, was engaged in 
riorida against the Seminoles in 1849-50, 
v;as promoted to first lieutenant of the First 
r\rtillery, September 4, 1851, and later was 
promoted to a captaincy; in November, 
1855, he was made assistant on the coast 
survey, and was stationed in Washington 
until. March 1, 1861, when he resigned; 
when Virginia seceded he was appointed 
colonel of the Thirteenth Regiment Virginia 
Volunteers, and was ordered to Harper's 
Ferry; his regiment shared in the last tight 
at the tirst battle of Bull Run; was later 
promoted to brigadier-general: fought at 
the battle of Williamsburg, May, 1862, after 
which he was made major-general; one of 
the council of war held in Richmond, June 
25, 1862; in ihe seven days battles around 
Richmond he opened the series of engage- 
ments, occupied the center of Gen. Lee's 
army in the attacks against McClellan, was 
active in the campaign against Gen. Pope, 
v.as present at the second battle of Bull 
Run, July 29-30, 1862, received the surren- 
der of the Federal troops at Harper's Ferry, 
September 17, 1862, was at the battle of 
Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862, Chan- 
cellorsville, May 5 and 6, 1863; promoted 
.lieutenant-general. May 20, 1863, led his 
corps at Gettysburg, took part in the action 
at Bristow Station, October, 1863. his corps, 
with Longstreet's, repelled the attack on 
the Weldon Railroad, June 22, 1864, and a 
few weeks before the final attack on the 
Southside railroad and the defences of 
Petersburg, Gen. Hill was taken ill and 
granted leave of absence, but he returned 
before his leave expired, March 31, 1865; on 



^G 



VIRGINIA BIOCiRAPIIY 



April 2, 1865, ill the struggle for the posses- 
sion of the works in front of Petersburg, 
he attempted, contrary to the wishes of Gen. 
Lee, to reach Heth's division, and was shot 
from his horse by stragglers from the Fed- 
eral army ; by Gen. Lee's orders a charge 
was made, and his body was recovered and 
buried in Chesterfield county, but was later 
rcmoxed to Hollywood Cemetery, Rich- 
mond, \'irginia ; Gen. Hill married a sister 
Oi Gen. John Morgan, the Confederate cav- 
alry leader, and left two daughters. 

Hunton, Eppa, born in Fauquier county, 
A'irginia. September 23, 1823, son of Eppa 
Hunton, a well known planter of that coun- 
ty. His early schooling was limited, and he 
was chiefly self taught. He studied law, 
was admitted to the bar, and engaged in 
practice, and became prominent in his pro- 
fession. He served as commonwealths at- 
torney for Prince William county from 1849 
to 1862. In 1861 he was a member of the 
Virginia convention, and served in the firs*' 
session. He entered the Confederate army 
as colonel of the Eighth Virginia Infantry 
Regiment, and in 1863 was promoted to 
brigadier-general, succeeding Gen. Garnett, 
and served until .April 6, 1865, when he was 
captured at Sailor's Creek, Virginia. He 
was then impiisoned in Fort Warren, from 
which he was released in July following. 
In 1873 he was elected to congress, and was 
three times re-elected. He was subsequent- 
ly appointed and then elected to the United 
States senate, succeeding John S. P.arbour. 
and served from May 28, 1892. to .March 3 
1895. During the forty-fourth congress he 
acted on the joint committee which framed 
the electoral bill, and was made a member 
of the electoral commission, which decided 



for the title of Rutherford B. Hayes to the 
presidency, l)v a strict party vote of eight 
to seven ; member of several of the most 
miportant committees of the senate. After 
retiring from the senate, he pursued his pro- 
fession in Washington City, making his resi- 
dence at Warrenton, Virginia. He died in 
Richmond, Virginia, October 11, 1908. 

Imboden, John D., a resident of Staun- 
ton, X'irginia, as captain of the Staunton ar- 
tillery company, equipped it partly at his 
own expense, and took part at Harper's 
Ferry at the moment of the Virginia seces- 
sion, and later served in the battle of Man- 
assas. In 1862, as colonel, under Gen. Jack- 
son, he organized the First Virginia Parti- 
san Rangers, afterwards known as the 
Eighteenth \'irginia Cavalry. Promoted to 
brigadier-general, he operated with his bri- 
gade in northwest Virginia and the Shen- 
andoah Valley. During the Gettysburg 
campaign he supported Lee, and his service 
was of great value on the retreat. On July 
21, 1863, he was placed in command of the 
valley district, where he carried on active 
operations against the Federals. He took 
part in the advance upon Washington, and 
Early's campaign against Sheridan, and was 
on duty in the valley until the end. 

Jackson, Thomas Jonathan, famous as 
"Stonewall'' Jackson, born at Clarksburg, 
(now West Virginia), January 21, 1824. 
lie was orphaned in early life, and was cared 
for by Cummins Jackson, a bachelor 
uncle. He was weakly, but the rough life 
of a West Virginia farm strengthened him. 
At the age of eighteen he was appointed 
to the United States Military Academy, but 
was poorly prepared, and did not reach a 
high grade. He graduated in 1846, as a lieu- 





S(r 



f 




V. /- /> v^. 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



57 



tenant of artillery in Magruder's battery, 
took part in Gen. Scott's campaign, from 
Vera Cruz to the city of Mexico, and was 
twice brevetted for meritorious conduct at 
Cherubusco and Chapultepec. After the 
war, he was on duty for a time at Fort Ham- 
ilton, New York harbor, and later was sent 
ti' Fort Meade, Florida. He resigned in 
1 85 1, to accept the professorship of philos- 
ophy and artillery tactics in the Virginia 
Military Institute. He was noted for the 
faithfulness with which he performed his 
duties, but he was not greatly approved as 
a teacher. He was zealous in religious mat- 
ters, was an officer in the Presbyterian 
church, and took such a deeo interest in the 
slaves, that he led a Sunday school for 
them, and which was maintained for many 
years after his death. Soon after Virginia se- 
ceded, he took command of his troops at 
Harper's Ferry, and, under the Confederate 
establishment, he was given a brigade under 
Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. At a critical mo- 
ment, in the battle of Bull Run, he came in 
haste and ciiecked the Federal onslaught, 
and gave the Confederates an opportunity 
to take the aggressive and gam the victory. 
This episode was the occasion of Jackson 
receiving his sobriquet as "'Stonewall" 
from Gen. Bee's exclamation, "See, there is 
Jackson, standing like a stone wall : rally 
on the Virginians." For his conduct in 
this affair, Jackson was promoted to ma- 
jor-general. In November, 1861, he was 
given command of the district including the 
Shenandoah Valley and the Virginia region 
northwest of it. He cleared it' of Federal 
troops, but winter weather obliged him to 
return to Winchester. In March, 1862, with 
five thousand men, he displayed masterly 
strategy against Gen. Banks, whom, by a 



forty miles retreat, he allowed to occupy 
Winchester. From there, Banks sent away 
portions of his command in various direc- 
tions, when Jackson made a forced march, 
and made a vigorous attack on the enemy 
at Kernstown. In this affair, Jackson was 
defeated, but he had crippled Banks' com- 
mand so that it returned to the valley. In 
April, 1862, he was given command of all 
the Confederate troops in northern Virginia 
— his own division of 8,000 men, and Ewell's 
division, numbering about the same, in all 
about 16,000 men. These were threatened by 
Banks, with 20,000 men, while Gen. Edward 
Johnson's force of 3,000 men was opposing 
Fremont's army of 15,000 men. Making a 
rapid circuitous march, Jackson joined his 
force to that of Johnson, and on INIay 8 
struck Fremont a paralyzing blow. Return- 
ing rapidly to the valley, he surprised 
Banks (who had detached a portion of his 
command to the Rappahannock), crushing 
his troops at Front Royal, May 23, and two 
days later at Winchester, driving the Fed- 
erals beyond the Potomac, and taking im- 
mense quantities of stores. From this on, 
Jackson's movements were rapid, and his 
successes brilliant. Stationed at Winchester, 
he was almost surrounded by converging 
forces, when by an early march, May 31, he 
/nade Strasburg, interposing his troops be- 
tween McDowell and Fremont, and succeed- 
ed in sending his prisoners and stores to a 
place of safety. Retreating up the valley, 
pursued by Fremont and McDowell, by ex- 
ceedingly rapid movements, he defeated 
them in turn, and they retreated to the lower 
Shenandoah. Jackson now rapidly marched 
t'L the aid of Lee, and on January 27, 1862, 
in the battle of Gaines' Mills, defeated Gen. 
Porter, and then followed the retreating 



58 



X'lRGIXlA I'.IOGRAPIIY 



McClellan. In July he was again dispatched 
to the valley, and defeated Banks at Cedar 
Run. On August 25th he turned Pope's 
right, seized his immense stores at Man- 
assas, and held his enemy until the arrival 
of Lee, when Pupe was disastrously de- 
feated on the 30th, in the battle variously 
known as the Second Manassas (or Liull 
Run), and Groveton. In the Maryland 
campaign, Jackson directed the operations 
resulting in the capture of Harper's Ferry, 
with 13,000 prisoners, seventy cannon, and 
large amount of stores. Making another 
of the rapid marches for which he was fam- 
ous, Jackson arrived at Sharpsburg on Sep- 
tember i6th, and commanded the Confeder- 
ate left wing in resisting the assaults of 
McClellan, with thinned lines he held a posi- 
tion near the Dunker Church, until Hill's 
division arrived from Harper's Ferry and 
defeated Burnside. who was threatening the 
Confederate right flank. Jackson, now pro- 
moted to lieutenant-general, commanded the 
right wing of the army, and repelled Frank- 
lin, at Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. 
In the spring of 1863, near Chancellorsville, 
Jackson encountered Hooker, now in com- 
mand of the Federal army, who was obliged 
to seek the wilderness and entrench 
himself. Sent by Lee to flank the Federal 
right, he passed through the wilderness, and 
late on May 2nd he was on the flank and 
re ar of Howard's corps, the right of Hook- 
er's army. Attacking in three lines of battle, 
Jr.ckson made a furious attack, and in a 
half hour had routed Howard's corps, pursu- 
ing them to the vicinity of Chancellorsville, 
when his men were stoutly opposed by an 
artillery fire directed by the Federal Gen. 
Plcasanton. Between eight and nine o'clock 
a! night. Jackson, with some staff officers, 



went to reconnoiter the Federal positions. 
As he rode back, his party was fired upon by 
Lane's brigade, of his own command, under 
the impression that the enemy was advanc- 
ing. Some of the party were killed, and 
Jackson received three wounds — two in the 
left arm, and one through the right hand. 
Being taken from his horse, it was some 
minutes before he could be conveyed with- 
in his own lines, on account of the severity 
of the artillery fire. One of his litter bear- 
ei s was struck down by a shot, and Jack- 
son was badly injured by the resulting fall, 
but retained his senses, and said "Do not 
tell the troops that I am wounded." His 
left arm was amputated, and for some days, 
he appeared to be improving, but a few 
days later was taken with pneumonia, and 
he died. May loth. His remains were taken 
to Richmond, and after impressive funeral 
services, were interred at Lexington, near 
the spot where, years afterward, was laid 
the body of his idolized chief and persona! 
friend. Gen. Robert E. Lee. He was of a 
deeply religious nature, and austere morals. 
He never used intoxicating liquors, and once 
said. "I am more afraid of them than of 
Federal bullets." He was, perhaps, the 
most unique character of the war period, 
combining the qualities of the masterly sol- 
dier and devout Christian. In 1875 a bronze 
siatue of Gen. Jackson, provided by Eng- 
lish admirers, was unveiled in Richmond. 
His life was written by R. L. Dabney (New 
York. 1863) ; by John Esten Cooke (1866) ; 
b}- G. F. R. Henderson, and by his wife 
(New York, 1892). Lie married (first) Eli- 
nor, daughter of the Rev. George Junkin, 
president of Washington College. She died 
about fourteen months after her marriage, 
and Gen. Jackson married (second) July 16, 




^ 



^^Of /cTU 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



59 



1S57, Alary Anna, daughter of Rev. Dr. R. 
H. Morrison, president of Davidson (North 
Carohna) College. 

Johnson, Edward, born in Kentucky, 
April 16, 1816; graduated from United 
States Military Academy in 1838. As sec- 
ond lieutenant of the Sixth United States 
Infantry he served against the Florida In- 
dians, 1838-1841. In the Mexican war he 
was brevetted captain for gallantry at Mo- 
lino del Rey, and major for Chapultepec. 
Subsequently he saw frontier service. In 
1861 he resigned, and was commissioned 
lieutenant-colonel, C. S. A. As colonel of 
the Twelfth Georgia Regiment he served in 
Virginia against Milroy, and was promoted 
to brigadier-general. In February, 1863, he 
was promoted to major-general, and given 
command of a division under Ewell. After 
again defeating Milroy, he was engaged at 
Gettysburg, and 'led the attack on Gulp's 
Hill. He fought Warren at the wilderness, 
and at Spottsylvania held "the bloody 
angle," until he was captured, with a part 
of his command. After his exchange, he 
took part in Hood's Tennessee campaign, 
led a desperate charge at Franklin, and was 
captured at Nashville. He died at his home 
in Chesterfield county, V^irginia, February 
22, 1873. 

Johnston, Joseph E., born at "Cherry 
Grove," Frince Edward county, Virginia, 
February 3, 1807, eighth son of Lieut. Peter 
and Alary (Wood) Johnston, and grandson 
of Peter and Alartha (Butler) Rogers John- 
ston, and of Col. \'alentine and Lucy 
(Henry) Wood, of Goochland county, \'ir- 
ginia. 

Joseph E. Johnston received his prepara- 
tory education from his parents, both of 



whom were competent instructors. He at- 
tended the Abingdon Academy, and in 1825, 
through the influence of Senator Barbour, 
was appointed to the United States Alilitary 
Academy, entering with a class of one hun- 
dred and five, in which were Robert E. 
Lee and seven other Virginians. He was 
graduated in 1829, thirteenth in the class 
of forty-six, and was the only Virginian, 
besides Lee, to graduate, Lee standing sec- 
ond. Johnston was assigned to the Fourth 
Artillery as second lieutenant ; was iii gar- 
rison at New York and elsewhere, and took 
part in the Black Hawk campaign, in 1832. 
In 1834-35 he was on topographical duty; 
was promoted to first lieutenant, 1836; was 
aide-de-camp to Gen. Scott in the Seminole 
war, and resigned, Alay 31, 1837. On July 
7, 1838, he was made first lieutenant topo- 
graphical engineers, and brevetted captain 
tor gallantry in the .Seminole campaign. In 
1 841 he was given charge of the topograph- 
ical bureau, Washington City, leaving that 
position in 1842 to act as adjutant-general in 
the Florida war. In 1843-44 he surveyed the 
boundary between the United States and 
the British possessions, and for two years 
following was on coast survey service. He 
was promoted to captain in 1846. During 
the Alexican war he was with Scott at Vera 
Cruz, took part in the battles of Cerro 
Gordo, Contreras, Cherubusco, Molino del 
Rey, Chapultepec, and City of Mexico, and 
was brevetted major, lieutenant-colonel and 
colonel, for gallant conduc* in reconnoiter- 
ing at Cerro Gordo, where he was wounded. 
He was also wounded at Chapultepec, being 
the first to plant a regimental color on the 
walls. Mustered out of the volunteers at 
the close of the war he again became captain 
of topographical engineers, and chief of the 



6o 



VIRGLXIA BIOGRAPHY 



corps in the department of Texas. In 1853- 
55 he supervised western river improve- 
ments, and in 1858 was acting inspec- 
tor-general in the Utah expedition. On 
June 28, i860, he was made quartermaster- 
general, U. S. A., and resigned April 22, 
1861, thus ending a service of thirty-one 
years with but a single brief break, as an 
officer. At once commissioned major-gen- 
eral of \'irginia volunteers, he was asso- 
ciated with Gen. Robert E. Lee in the work 
of organization. Later he was called to 
Montgomery, the capital of the Confederacy 
to receive commission as brigadier-general. 
He was assigned to command at Harper's 
I-erry, but .soon transferred his troops to 
Winchester, and thence, in July, 1861, went 
to the assistance of Beauregard at Manas- 
sas ^nd turned the tide against the enemy. 
After Bull Run, Johnston, as ranking offi- 
cer, combined all the troops there. In 1S62 
he attacked McClellan at Seven Pines (Fair 
Oaks), and was severely wounded. Early 
in 1863 he was given command in the south- 
west, at first stationed at Chattanooga. 
AVhen Grant began his investment of Vicks- 
burg, Johnston was ordered to the command 
of all forces in Mississippi. He ordered 
Pemberton to evacuate Vicksburg, but the 
order was disregarded and Vicksburg, with 
its garrison surrendered. Beginning in 
December, 1863, Johnston faced Sherman, 
who was then invading Georgia. Johnston's 
conduct of his slow retreat was a master- 
piece of military skill, but did not meet 
the approval of the Confederate authorities, 
and he was superseded by Hood. Later 
Johnston was given command of the troops 
in North Carolina, and with an inferior 
force harrassed Sherman severely in his 
march to the coast, but was unable to de- 



feat him. Following the surrender of Lee 
at Appomattox, Johnston met Sherman and 
they united on terms that the Washington 
government thought too liberal. The two 
generals subsequently arranged another 
agreement based on the Grant-Lee terms, 
and which marked the end. Gen. Johnston 
met the changed conditions with manly for- 
titude. He represented the Richmond dis- 
trict in congress in 1877, and served as rail- 
ri'ad commissioner under President Cleve- 
land. He wrote "A Narrative of Military 
Operations during the Late War between 
the States." He died in Washington City, 
March 21, 1891. He had been suffering 
from a heart ailment aggravated by a cold 
contracted at the funeral of Gen. Sherman, 
on which occasion he was an honorary pall- 
bearer. Grant's estimate of Johnston rnay 
be noted: "I have had nearly all the south- 
ern generals in high command in front of 
me, and Joe Johnston gave me more anxie- 
ty than any of the others." And Sherman 
speaks of him as "equal in all the elements 
01 generalshi]) to Lee." 

Jones, Catesby ap Roger, horn in Clark 
county, Virginia, about 182 1, was a son of 
Roger Jones, adjutant-general of the United 
States army and of Mary Anne (Mason) 
Page, his wife and a descendant of Roger 
Jones, who was captain of a government 
vessel in the days of Lord Culpeper, govern- 
01 of Virginia. He received an appointment 
as midshipman at an early age and served 
under his uncle Commodore Thomas ap 
Catesby Jones, then in command of the "Ex- 
ploring Expedition." He served through the 
war with Mexico, at first in the gulf and 
then on the western coast, and was at one 
time attached to the naval batteries at the 




^A-^ftJ-:^ y^ /Z ^i^^<^ 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



6i 



siege of Vera Cruz. He also served in the 
United States Coast Survey with Alaury, 
and at the naval observatory. He assisted 
Dahlgren in conducting his experiments 
with the Dahlgren gun, and at his request 
Lieut. Jones was ordered to the Merriinac 
as ordnance officer, and at her return from 
her cruise he was selected by Dahlgren as 
executive officer of the ordnance ship Ply- 
mouth, which was the first to mount an 
eleven inch gun upon a naval carriage. He 
later served as ordnance officer of the Para- 
guay expedition. Jones, coming of a Vir- 
ginia family distinguished in public service 
for many generations, was proud of his 
state and believed in the right of secession, 
and on the day of the passage of the seces- 
sion ordinance at once resigned his com- 
mission. Gov. Letcher appointed him a cap- 
tain in the Virginia navy. With Capt. Pe- 
gram he organized an expedition, and seized 
the naval powder magazine from under the 
guns of the Cumberland, and other men-of- 
war. The battle of Bull Run was fought 
with this powder. He then performed a 
useful service in improving the harbor de- 
fences of Norfolk and James river. He 
erected batteries at Jamestown island, 
which lend so much to the present pictur- 
esqueness of the site of the first settlement. 
Here he experimented with targets to test 
the efficiency of different kinds of arms for 
ships and in November, 1861, was ordered 
as executive and ordnance ofificer to the 
Mcrriiunc, which had been scuttled In' the 
Federals, when they abandoned the navy 
yard at Norfolk. He aided in converting the 
Mcrrimac into the Virginia, plated Avith 
iron two inches thick. He served as third 
in command, in the battle of March 8, 1862, 
with the Federal wooden fleet, which was 



defeated. In this conflict Flag Officer Lieut. 
Franklin Buchanan and F^lag Lieut. Minor 
were both wounded and disabled and Jones 
commanded the Virginia in the battle next 
day with the Monitor. The engagement lasted 
four hours, at the end of which time the 
captain of the Monitor was blinded by a 
shell, and his ship retired from action. The 
I irginia was unable to get close enough to 
the Minnesota to destroy her, and steamed 
back to Norfolk. As Lieut. Buchanan was 
unable to resvmie command, the government 
at Richmond placed the Virginia under Com- 
modore Josiah Tatnall and made Lieut 
Jones his sei:ond ; Commodore Tatnall as- 
sumed command March 29, 1862, and on 
April II the reconstructed J'irginia steamed 
down the Roads expecting again to meet 
the Monitor, but the fleet of United States 
vessel was behind Fort Monroe and did 
not come out for a second trial ; on May 8 
the Virginia again went down to the Roads, 
to find the Monitor, Nangatuck, Galena and 
a number of heavy ships shelling the Con- 
federate batteries on Sewell's Point, and on 
the approach of the Virginia the fleet retired 
under the protecting guns of Fort Mon- 
roe, and Tatnall, despairing of obtaining an 
open fight, fired a gun to the windward and 
took the Virginia back to her Jjuoy. After 
the evacuation of Norfolk by the Confederate 
forces, the Virginia steamed down the Eliza- 
beth river to co-operate with the army, but 
or. reaching Hampton Roads the pilots de- 
clined to venture farther up, and Commo- 
dore Tatnall gave orders to destroy her, 
and she was burned on the shore near Craney 
Island, the crew escaping by marching to 
Suffolk and taking the cars to Richmond, 
Lieuts. Jones and John Taylor Wood being 
the last to leave the famous vessel, which 



62 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAIMIY 



by its victory over the Federal fleet on 
March 8, revolutionized naval warfare 
throughout the world. Lieut. Jones was 
placed in command of the defences of 
James river, and constructed batteries on 
Drewry's Bluff, sunk vessels in the channel, 
and the crew of the Virginia under Lieut. 
Jones barred the Federal fleet, and Rich- 
mond was saved ; Lieut. Jones was pro- 
moted to the rank of commander, April 27, 
1863, and ordered to Selma, Alabama, to 
take charge of the Confederate government 
works there and to complete the armament 
of the iron-clad Tennessee; he was employed 
by Peru and Chili in their war with Spain, 
1S65-69, and refused the command of the 
sc[Uadron in deference to the feelings of the 
native officers; he died in Selm:i, Alabama. 
June 17, 1877. 

Jones, John Marshall, born in Charlottes- 
ville, X'irginia, July 26, 1820; graduated 
from the United States Military Academy, 
1 84 1. He was on duty at western posts until 
1845, and from then to 1852 was an instruc- 
tor at West Point. He was made first 
lieutenant, of the United States Infantry, in 
1847. promoted to captain in 1855, and was 
en duty in the west until he resigned to 
enter the Confederate service. He was 
commissioned lieutenant-colonel of artillery, 
( . S. A., and made adjutant-general to Gen. 
Richard S. Fwell, serving in the battles of 
Front Royal, Winchester, Cross Keys, Port 
Republic, thi Seven Days battles. Cedar 
Mountam, Groveton, and Chancellorsville. 
At Gettysburg he was dangerously wound- 
ed in the assault at Gulp's Hill. Returning 
to duty, he commanded a brigade on the 
Rappahannock and Rapidan, and was again 
wounded. At the Wilderness he sustained 



the first attack of Warren's corps, and was 
killeil in action. May 10, 1864. 

Jones, John R., entered the Confederate 
service as captain in the Thirty-third Vir- 
ginia Regiment, and was promoted to lieu- 
tenant-colonel. In 1862 he was made briga- 
dier-general and given command of a bri- 
gade in Jackson's division, serving at Cold 
Harbor and Malvern Hill, and being 
wounded in the latter engagement. Re- 
suming duty, he participated in the Mary- 
land campaign, and was given command of 
Jackson's division. He reinforced Lee at 
Sharpsburg, where he was disabled by the 
explosion of a shell. He commanded his 
brigade at Fredericksburg and Chancellors- 
ville, and then retired on account of dis- 
abilities. 

Jones, Samuel, born in \'irginia, in 1820; 
graduated from United States Military 
Academy in 1841. As lieutenant of artillery 
he served at various posts ; was an instruc- 
tor at West Point, 1846-51. He was pro- 
moted to first lieutenant and captain, and 
was on duty at New Orleans and in Texas 
until 1858, when he became assistant to the 
judge advocate, U. S. A. In April, 1861, he 
entered the Confederate service, as major 
of artillery, was promoted to lieutenant- 
colonel, and made assistant adjutant-gen- 
eral. IXiring the organization of Beaure- 
gard's army he was chief of artillery and 
ordnance, and was promoted to colonel and 
brigadier-general. He then commanded a 
Georgia brigade until January, 1862, when 
he was given command of the troops at 
Pensacola. On March 3rd he was assigned 
to command the department of Alabama 
,ir.d ^Vest Florida. Later he commanded a 
division at Corinth, and afterwards Hind- 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



63 



man's division. He was in command at 
Chattanooga, and later of the department of 
East Tennessee. From December, 1862. to 
March, 1864, he commanded the department 
of Western Virginia, and later that of 
South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. He 
surrendered at Tallahassee, May 10, 1865. 
He resided at Mattoax. Virginia, from 1866 
to 1880, when he was given a position in 
the adjutant-general's office, Washington. 
D. C. He died at Bedford Springs, Virginia, 
July 31. 1887. 

Jones, William E., born near Glade 
Spring, Wasliington county, Virginia, in 
May, 1824. He graduated from the United 
States Military Academy in 1848, then 
served in the west until 1857, when as first 
lieutenant of the Mounted Rifles, he re- 
signed, and engaged in farming at his old 
home. In 1861, with a company of cavalry, 
he joined Stuart in the valley. He was 
made colonel of the First Virginia Cavalry, 
and was entrusted by Stuart with important 
operations in the Second Manassas cam- 
paign. Promoted to brigadier-general, he 
was given command of the "Laurel Bri- 
gade," with Imboden he made successful 
raids on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 
and he especially distinguished himself at 
Brandy Station. In the Gettysburg cam- 
paign he was Lee's main outpost ofificer, 
protecting the rear and flanks of the army. 
Gen. Jones subsequently commanded a cav- 
alry brigade in southwest Virginia, and in 
a desperate engagement at Piedmont, June 
5, 1864, he was killed, and his body fell into 
the hands of the enemy. 

Jordan, Thomas, born in Luray Valley, 
Virginia, September 30, 1819; graduated 
from the United States Military Academy, 



1840. As second lieutenant. Third United 
States Infantry, he took part in the Seminole 
v/ar, and was among the captors of chief 
"Tiger Tail." He was on frontier duty until 
1846; in the Mexican war he served credit- 
ably at Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma ; 
was promoted to captain and assistant quar- 
termaster in 1847, ^nd was on duty at Vera 
Cruz for a year after the war. He was 
then on duty on the Pacific coast until May, 
1S61, when he resigned, and was commis- 
sioned captain, C. S. A. He was chief-of- 
stafif to Gen. Beauregard on the organization 
of his army, rendered excellent assistance 
at the battle of Manassas, and accompanied 
President Davis to the field. Accompany- 
ing Beauregard to the west, he aided in pre- 
paring for the battle of Shiloh and the oper- 
ations about Corinth, for which he was pro- 
moted to brigadier-general. He was subse- 
quently chief-of-stafif to Gen. Bragg until 
after the Kentucky campaign. When 
Beauregard was called to the defense of 
Charleston, he accompanied him as chief- 
of-stafi'. In May, 1864. he commanded a 
military district in South Carolina. After 
the war, he became chief-of-staf? of the 
Cuban insurgent army, succeeded to <.he 
chief command, and gained a signal vic- 
tory in January, 1870, but on account of 
want of supplies, resigned and returned to 
the United States. He took up his resi- 
dence in New York, where he edited "The 
Mining Journal," and made many valuable 
contributions to Confederate history. 

Lee, Edmund G., born at "Leesland," Vir- 
ginia. May 25. 1835, son of Edmund Jen- 
nings Lee : attended William and Mary 
College in 1851-52, and engaged in the law. 
He entered the Confederate service as sec- 



04 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPIIV 



orid lieutenant in the Second \'irginia Regi- 
ment, was promoted to first lieutenant, and 
was aide to Gen. Jackson. Promoted to 
major, and later lieutenant-colonel of the 
'I'hirty-third Regiment., he served in the 
valley campaign and other operations in 
1862. As colonel, he commanded his regi- 
ment at I'redericksburg. He was invalided 
ill 1S63, and on returning to duty in June, 
1864, was given command at Staunton. He 
was promoted to brigadier-general, Septem- 
ber 20, and was sent to Canada on secret 
service. He died August 24, 1870, at Yel- 
low Sulphur .Springs, Virginia. 

Lee, George Washington Custis, was 
born at For: Alonroe, Virginia, September 
16, 1832, son ot Robert Edward and Mary 
Anne Randolph (Custis) Lee. He was 
graduated at the United States Military 
Academy at the head of the class of 1854; 
was commissioned second lieutenant in the 
corps of engineers, U. S. A. ; was promoted 
first lieutenant, October, 1859, and served 
in the engineer bureau, Washington, D. C, 
1859-61. In May, 1861, after the secession 
of Virginia, he resigned his commission in 
the U. S. A., and was commissioned major 
ot engineers in the Provisional Army of Vir- 
ginia, and with that army was transferred 
to the C. S. A., June 8, 1861. On July i, 
1861, he was assigned to the engineers 
corps with the rank of captain, and was en- 
gaged in the fortifications around Rich- 
mond. On August 31, 1861, President 
Davis made him an aide-de-camp on his 
staff with the rank of colonel of cavalry. 
He visited Bragg's army at Murfreesboro, 
Tennessee, in December, 1862, with Presi- 
dent Davis, and on June 25, 1863, was com- 
missioned brigadier-general and organized 



a brigade which he commanded in the de- 
fense of Richmond, tie was promoted ma- 
jor-general in October, 1864, and command- 
ed a division of the corps of Gen. Ewell in 
the defense of Richmond. In the retreat 
from Richmond, he crossed with his divis- 
ion on the pontoon above Drewry's Bluff, 
April 2, 1S65, and at Sailor's Creek, April 
6. he was made prisoner with Gens. Ewell, 
Kershaw, Barton, Du Bose, Hunton, Corse 
and other officers and conveyed to City 
Point, Virginia, where he was paroled and 
sent to Richmond, Virginia. He was profes- 
sor of civil and military engineering and ap- 
plied mechanics in the Virginia Military 
Institute, Lexington, Virginia, 1865-71 ; and 
on February i, 1871, succeeded his father 
as president of Washington College, having 
been elected to the office, October 28, 1870. 
The name of the institution was in honor 
of his father's memory changed to Wash- 
ington and Lee University and in 1873 ^^^ 
assumed charge of the chair of applied 
mathematics which was made the Thomas 
A. Scott professorship of applied mathe- 
matics in June, 1881. In December, 1896, 
he resigned the presidency of Washington 
and Lee University on account of ill health, 
and it was accepted to take effect, July i, 
1897, when he was made president emeritus 
for life. He was never married, and on Icav- 
iiig Lexington went to Ravensworth, near 
P.urke's Station, Virginia, the home of the 
v.idow of his brother, W. H. F. Lee. He 
received the honorary degree of LL. D. 
from Tulane University in 1887. He died 
at "Ravensworth," February t8. 1913. 

Lee, General Robert Edward, was born at 
"Stratford." Westmoreland county, Vir- 
ginia. January 19. 1807. son of Gen. Henry 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



65 



and Anne Hill (Carter) Lee, grandson of 
Henry and Lucy (Grymes) Lee, and of 
Charles and Anne Butler (Moore) Carter. 
In 181 1 Gen. Henry Lee removed his fam- 
ily from Stratford to Alexandria^ Virginia, 
where Robert received his preparatory edu- 
cation, at the academy under W. B. Leary, 
and at the high school of which Benjamin 
Hallowell, a Quaker, was head-master. He 
was graduated from the United States Mili- 
tary Academy, second in his class of 1829, 
was commissioned second lieutenant of en- 
gineers and assigned to duty in the engi- 
neer bureau, Washington. In September, 
1S31, he was ordered to duty on the defences 
at Hampton Roads, where he remained, 
1831-35. He was promoted first lieutenant 
in 1S35 and became assistant to the chief 
engineer at \\'ashington. He was commis- 
sioned captain of engineers in 1836 and 
made astronomer of a joint commission 
created by the legislature of Ohio and 
Michigan to determine the boundary line 
bttween those states. In 1837-40 he was 
employed on the Upper Mississippi in con- 
structing levees above St. Louis, Missouri. 
He was on topographical duty in Washing- 
ton, 1840-41, and on fortifications in New 
York harbor, 1841-45. In January, 1846, he 
v/as ordered to report to Gen. Zachary Tay- 
lor on the Rio Grande, and was made chief 
engineer on the staff of Gen. Wool and took 
part in the engagement at Palo Alto, May 
8. at Reseca do la Palma, May 9, and in the 
capture of Matamoras, May 18. Later Capt. 
Lee was made chief engineer on the staff of 
Gen. Winfield Scott, at Vera Cruz. On 
March 13, Capt. Lee supported by the Pal- 
metto regiment of South Carolina and the 
First New York Volunteers, made a recon- 
noissance of the Mexican lines, designated 

VIA-5 



the position of the assaulting batteries to 
be constructed of sand-bags within one 
thousand yards of the rock masonry walls 
of the city, and March 22 bore under a flag 
of truce a demand for surrender. This be- 
ing denied two days were given to remove 
the women and children, when the army 
and navy opened fire, and on March 29 the 
Mexicans capitulated. The American troops 
were without transportation, the Mexicans 
having cleared the country- of horses and 
mules. The situation was desperate as yel- 
low fever threatened the place. In this 
emergency Capt. Lee became responsible 
for the honesty of a Texan soldier. Col. Tom 
Kinney, and the commanding general on his 
recommendation paid over to Kinney 5p50,- 

000 in gold for six thousand mules to be 
delivered within three days. The contract 
was carried out by bribing the paroled 
Mexicans, and the army moved toward the 
city of Mexico. At Cerro Gordo Pass, April 
14, 1847, the engineering skill of Lee sur- 
mounted the advantage of position and the 
Mexicans under Santa Anna were defeated, 
as they were at every stand through the 
valley to the city of Mexico. On September 
13. 1847, at the head of the storming party, 
he planted the flag of South Carolina on the 
wall of Mexico city, and the following day 
Capt. Lee rode at the right of Gen. Scott 
at the head of his army of ten thousand 
men. In 1858, referring to this campaign. 
Gen. Scott said: "My success in the Mexi-* 
can war was largely due to the skill and 
valor of Robert E. Lee. He is the greatest 
military genius in America ; the best soldier 

1 ever saw in the field; and if opportunity 
offers he will show himself the foremost 
captain of his time." 

He was brevetted major, lieutenant-colo- 



66 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



iiel and colonel ot engineers for his services, 
and returned to his home in Arlington. In 
1848 he was ordered to Baltimore to con- 
struct defensive works, and he was super- 
intendent of the United States Military 
Academy, 1852-55. He was promoted lieu- 
tenant-colonel in February, 1855, and as- 
signed to the Second United States Cav- 
alry, Col. Albert Sidney Johnston. The 
regiment was stationed at Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Missouri, and in October was ordered 
to Fort ^lason, Texas, but Lee was de- 
tained on court-martial duty April, 1856, 
when he rejoined his regiment in Texas and 
was engaged in repressing Indian outbreaks 
until October, 1859. He then visited Ar- 
Imgton to settle the estate of his father-in- 
law, who had died in 1857, leaving him first 
executor of his will. On October 17, 1859, 
he received orders to report to the adjutant- 
general at Washington and was ordered to 
Harper's Ferry in command of three com- 
panies of United States marines to sup- 
press a threatened attack on the United 
States arsenal. He found the arsenal in 
the possession of a revolutionary party led 
by John Brown, numbering about forty-five 
men. Col. Lee called upon him through Lieut. 
J. E. B. Stuart, under a flag of truce, to 
surrender, which Brown refused to do un- 
less guaranteed safe conduct with his prison- 
ers and men across the river into Maryland 
and not to be pursued until his party had 
gained a point half a mile from the arsenal. 
This Lee refused, and at once opened an as- 
sault on the engine house on the arsenal 
grounds, in which seventeen whites and three 
negroes were taken prisoners at the point of 
the bayonet. Col. Lee had Brown and his 
wounded cared for in the arsenal by a sur- 
geon of the marine corps and afterward de- 



livered them over to Judge Robert J. Ould, 
the United States district attorney. The 
prisoners were given over to the state 
courts, and tried and convicted on a charge 
of treason, murder and inciting insurrection 
among slaves, and the state militia sup- 
planted the United States troops as guard. 

Col. Lee left Harper's Ferry, December 
3 1859, and soon after rejoined his regi- 
ment at San Antonio, Texas, where he re- 
mained till ordered to Washington, where, 
March i, 1861, he reported to Lieut-Gen. 
Scott. Seven states had passed the ordi- 
nance of secession, and on February 4. 1861, 
formed "The Confederate States of Amer- 
ica." Lincoln would be inaugurated presi- 
dent, March 4, 1861, and Gen. Winfield 
Scott desired the advice of the officers of the 
L^iited States army. Col. Lee assured Gen. 
Scott that if Virginia seceded and the gov- 
ernment decided to coerce the states by 
military force, his sense of duty would 
oblige him to go with his state. On March 
lu, 1861, Col. Lee was made a member of 
the board to revise the "Regulations for the 
government of the United States army," 
and he filed the report of the board, April 
18, 1861. 

On April 15, 1861, President Lincoln 
called for 75,000 volunteers and Virginia 
was called upon for her quota. This demand 
left Virginia no alternative, and the conven- 
tion passed the ordinance of secession by a 
very large vote. President Lincoln offered 
Col. Lee the command of the United States 
;irni\-, which Gen. Scott wished to transfer 
tv) a younger man than himself. This offer 
was made at army headquarters, through 
Francis Preston Blair, Sr., April 18, 1861. 
Col. Lee replied that he was opposed to se- 
cession and deprecated war. but that he 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



67 



could take no part in the invasion of the 
southern states, considering such an act a 
breach of his oath to "support and defend the 
constitution of the United States'" as inter- 
preted by Attorney-General Black. He re- 
ported his decision to Gen. Scott, and on 
April 20, 1861, he tendered his resignation, 
at the same time addressing a letter to Gen. 
Scott, asking him to recommend its accept- 
ance. 

On April 23, 1861, upon the invitation of 
a committee of the Virginia convention, he 
visited Richmond, where he accepted the 
commission of commander-in-chief of the 
military and naval forces of Virginia with 
the rank of major-general. On April 24, 
1861, in his address before the convention, 
assembled in Richmond, accepting the trust, 
he closed with these words : "Trusting in 
Almighty God, an approving conscience and 
the aid of my fellow-citizens, I devote my- 
self to the service of my native state, in 
whose behalf alone will I ever again draw 
my sword." On May 23, 1861, the people 
of Virginia by a vote of 125,000 to 20,000 
ratified the ordinance of secession, and the 
same day the United States navy yard at 
Norfolk was evacuated by the United States 
authorities and taken possession of by the 
Virginia state troops ; 10,000 Federal sol- 
diers crossed the Potomac and took po.ises- 
sion of Alexandria, Virginia. On May 29, 
President Davis with his cabinet arrived in 
Richmond, which became the capital of the 
Confederate States of America. On June 
8, 1861, Virginia transferred her military 
forces to the new government and Gen. 
Lee became military adviser to Gov. Letcher, 
commander-in-chief. 

In selecting defensive lines for the state, 
he designated Manassas Junction, where, on 



July 21, 1861, the first great battle was 
frught and won by the Confederacy. After 
the death of Gen. Robert S. Garnett, Lee 
was ordered to command the troops in west- 
ern Virginia comprising about 6,500 men 
commanded by Generals Johnson, Loring, 
Wise and I'loyd. He had been commis- 
sioned a general in the Confederate army, 
but was outranked by both Generals Cooper 
and Albert Sidney Johnston. He found the 
Federal forces commanded by Gen. W. S. 
Rosecrans, with an army double the num- 
ber under Lee, and both commanders acted 
on the defensive, chiefly on account of in- 
cessant rains and the state of the roads. 
After the season for active operations in the 
mountains was over, Lee was put in charge 
of the defenses of South Carolina and 
Georgia. In the spring of 1862 he was made 
m.ilitary adviser of President Davis. On 
June I, 1862, after Gen. Joseph E. Johnston 
had been wounded and the command of the 
Confederate army had devolved on Gen. 
Gustavus W. Smith, President Davis ap- 
pointed Gen. Lee to the command of the 
Army of Northern Virginia, and he drove 
the army of McClellan to the protection of 
the Federal gunboats at Harrison's Land- 
ing, on the James river. Lee had inflicted 
on his adversary a loss of one hundred and 
fifty ordnance and commissary wagons and 
12,000 stands of arms, burned to prevent 
change of ownership, and 15,900 killed and 
wounded, 10,800 prisoners, 50 pieces of ar- 
tillery, and 36,000 stands of arms captured 
by the Confederate army. On July 13 he 
detached Gen. Jackson with 22,000 men to 
operate against Pope, who was advancing 
upon Richmond by way of Manassas Junc- 
tion, and in August he advanced with the 
main body of his army, about 35,000 strong. 



08 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



to give battle. The issue was joined at 
Manassas, August 29-30, and Pope's army 
made a hasty rcireat to Washington. 

Gen. Lee then moved into Maryland, 
crossing the Potomac, September 8, 1862, at 
Leesburg Ford. He issued a proclamation 
tc the citizens of jMaryland to rally to the 
flag of the Confederacy, closing his appeal 
with these words : "While the people of the 
Confederate States will rejoice to welcome 
you to your natural position among them, 
they will only welcome you when you come 
of your own free will." Gen. Lee's army at 
this time amounted to 35,255 men, and had 
taken position near Sharpsburg, Maryland, 
between the Potomac river and Antietam 
creek. On September 17, McClellan opened 
the battle, and the conflict continued dur- 
ing the day. Lee showed splendid general- 
ship, and with an army, much inferior to 
McClellan's, held the field at the close of 
the battle and withdrew across the Potomac, 
without disorder, on September 19, 1862. 
On October 8 Lee ordered Stuart with 5.000 
horse to recross into Maryland and harass 
McClellan's army, and he accomplished his 
purpose and entered the state of Pennsyl- 
vania almost unopposed. On October 26. 
1862, McClellan crossed the Potomac and 
encamped in Loudoun county, Virginia, and 
on November 2, 1862, he was succeeded by 
Gen. Burnside. Then followed the battle 
of Fredericksburg, where Burnside mus- 
tered 116,683 ni^" ^"d was opposed by Lee 
with 78,513 men. The battle was fought 
and won by Gen. Lee, December 13, 1862. 

In 1862 Gen. Lee executed a paper eman- 
cipating all the slaves held by his estate, 
196 in number, in accordance with the will 
of his father-in-law, G. W. P. Custis, by 
which, five years after Mr. Custis's death. 



\vhich occurred October 10, 1S57, all his 
slaves were to be freed. This was Lee's 
second act as an emancipator, he having 
freed the slaves owned by himself in 1854, 
while an oflicer in the United States army. 
On Alay 2-5. 1863, the Army of the Poto- 
mac, under Hooker, recruited to the 
strength of 138,378 men, fought Gen. Lee's 
army of 53,000 men, 170 pieces of artillery 
and 2,700 cavalry at Chancellorsville. 
Hooker was out-generaled and driven back 
t'j the Rappahannock. On June 2, 1863, 
Lee moved toward the Potomac, and on 
June 13, Hooker followed. The Army of 
Northern Virginia invaded Pennsylvania 
late in Jime. Lee reached Gettysburg, July 
I, 1863, where he found the Army of the 
Potomac under Gen. Meade, who had suc- 
ceeded Gen. Hooker. Meade brought into 
action an army of 89,000 men with over 
15,000 in reserve and Lee faced him with 
62,500 men and no reserve. Each army lost 
over 20,000 men and no decisive victory was 
won by either side. Lee failed in his effort 
to drive the Federal army before him, and 
Meade's army was too shattered to do any- 
thing more. Lee retired across the Poto- 
mac into Virginia and Meade did not at- 
tack, and was soon relieved from his com- 
mand. 

On August 8, 1863, Gen. Lee tendered his 
resignation to President Davis, but Davis 
refused to receive it and wrote : "To ask 
me to substitute you by some one in my 
judgment more fit to command, or who 
would possess more of the confidence of the 
army or of the reflecting men of the country, 
is to demand an impossibility." Gen. Lee 
confronted Gen. Grant at the Wilderness, 
May 5, 1864, and the battles that followed 
up to June 3, 1864, ended with that of Cold 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



69 



Harbor, in which Grant's army lost 16,000 
men killed and wounded in a succession of 
assaults. In forcing Lee's army of 63,000 
men seventy-five miles, Gen. Grant with 
149,000 men lost 61,000. Then followed 
the investment of the Army of Northern 
Virginia within the lines of Richmond and 
Petersburg, where the armies of the Poto- 
mac and James slowly crushed out its life 
after a ten months' siege, ending with the 
evacuation of Richmond, April 2, and the 
surrender of its remnant of an army com- 
prising 10,000 of^cers and men at Appo- 
mattox, April 12, 1865. 

Gen. Lee's last words to his army were : 
"Men, we have fought together for four 
years. I have tried to do the best I could 
for you." 

On August 24, 1865, Gen. Lee accepted 
the presidency of Washington College, at 
Lexington, Virginia, at a salary of $1,500 
per annum, declining several offers with 
much larger salaries. He was formally in- 
augurated, September 18, 1865, and under 
his administration the college greatly pros- 
pered. He received the honorary degree of 
LL. D., from Mercer University, Georgia, 
in 1866. In 1871 the general assembly of 
Virginia changed the name of the institu- 
tion to Washington and Lee University,- 
and as a further memorial a recumbent 
statue of Gen. Lee by Valentine was pre- 
sented to the university by the Lee Memor- 
ial Association and his remains placed in a 
\ ault under the statue. This statue was un- 
veiled by the association with appropriate 
ceremony in June, 1873. An equestrian 
statue by Mercie, surmounting a massive 
pedestal erected in Capitol Square, Rich- 
mond, Virginia, was unveiled and dedicated 
May 29, 1890. On June 19, 1901, bronze 



busts of Washington and Lee were unveiled 
at the university ; the former being the gift 
of Oscar Straus, of New York, and the 
latter of Frank T. Howard, class of 1874, 
of New Orleans. The busts were placed^on 
either side of the archway leading to the 
rotunda. In 1869 Gen. Lee prepared a 
new edition of, and added a memoir to, 
his father's work, "War in the Southern De- 
partment of the United States" (2 vols.). 
See also biographies of John Esten Cooke 
(1871), Edward A. Pollard (1871), John W 
Jones (1874), and E. Lee Childe (London 
1875) : "Four Years with General Lee," by 
Walter H. Taylor (1877); "Memoirs" by 
Gen. A. L. Long (1886), and "Robert E. 
Lee and the Southern Confederacy," by 
Henry .\. \\'hite (1899). 

On June 30, 1831, he was married at "Ar- 
lington House," Virginia, by the Rev. Mr. 
Keith, to Mary Anne Randolph, only daugh- 
ter of George Washington Parke and Mary 
Lee (Fitzhugh) Custis, and a descendant of 
John Custis, who came to Virginia from 
England in the seventeenth century. This 
alliance subsequently made Lee master of 
Arlington estate, and of the White House 
estate on the Pamunky river. Gen. Lee 
died at Lexington, Virginia, October 12, 
1870. -The estimate of his character and 
abilities has been continually rising. Lord 
Wolseley referred to him as "the greatest 
soldier of his age," and "the most perfect 
man I ever met." 

Lee, Robert Edward, Jr., youngest son of 
Gen. Robert E. Lee (q. v.), and Mary Anne 
Randolph Custis. his wife, was born at 
"Arlington," Fairfax county, Virginia, Oc- 
tober 27, 1843. His early education was 
under the superintendence of his father, and 



(UJ 



VIRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



his further studies were continued at the 
school of Mr. Ambler, and at the University 
01 \'irginia, where he matriculated in the 
autumn of i860. After the passage by the 
\'irginia convention of the ordinance of se 
cession, Lee went with one of the companies 
organized among the students at the uni- 
versity to seize the arms and ammunition 
in the arsenal at Harper's Ferry. In Feb- 
ruary, 1862, he entered the "Rockbridge 
Artillery" and as a private in that battery 
took part in Jackson's celebrated valley 
campaign, and was with it during the 
''Seven Days Battles" in front of Richmond, 
at "Cedar Mountain," at "Second Manas- 
sas," and notably at "Antietam" (Sharps- 
burgj where his father failed to recognize 
Inm owing to his changed appearance, 
blackened and grimy with the dust and 
sweat of battle. Six weeks after Antie- 
tam he was appointed, October 30, 1862, 
aide-de-camp, with the rank of first lieu- 
tenant, on the staff of his brother. Gen. 
\\'illiam H. F. Lee, and served till the end. 
After the war he pursued the simple life of 
a farmer, refusing to enter public life. H ; 
lived at "Romancoke," in King William 
county, formerly the estate of Col. William 
Claiborne after he was dri\en from Kent 
Island by Lord Baltimore, and died at 
"Xordley," his summer home, in Fauquier 
county, October 19, 1914. His remains 
were taken to Lexington, and a great con- 
course of people witnessed their interment 
by the side of his illustrious father. He 
married (first) in 1871, Charlotte Maxall. 
daughter of Barton Haxall, of Richmond. 
He married (second) his cousin. Juliet, 
daughter of Col. Thomas Hill Carter. He 
was the author of "Recollections and Let- 



ters of General Robert E. Lee," Doubleday, 
Page & Co, Xew York, 1904. 

Lee, William Henry Fitzhugh, born in 
the "Lee nian.'^ion," .\rlington (now National 
Cemetery), \'irginia. May 31, 1837; in 1857 
entered Harvard College, but left in 1857; 
appointed second lieutenant in the Sixth 
Regiment United States Infantry, and ac- 
companied his regiment in 1858 in the ex- 
pedition to Utah ; resigned in 1859 ; returned 
tr, \'irginia and took charge of his estates 
in the county of Xew Kent; in 1861 raised 
a company of cavalry and joined the Con- 
federate service, and was promoted succes- 
sively from captain to major-general of 
cavalry ; wounded at Brandy Station in 
June. 1863; captured in Hanover county by 
a raiding party, and taken to Fortress Mon- 
roe : transferred to United States prison at 
I'ort Lafayette in 1S63, where he was con- 
fined until March, 1864, when he was trans- 
ferred to Fortress Monroe and exchanged : 
returned to his command, and served 
throughout the campaign of 1864, until the 
/urrender at Appomattox ; returned to his 
plantation ; member of the state senate for 
one term ; removed to Burke's Station, Fair- 
fax county, X'^irginia ; president of the state 
agricultural society ; engaged in agricultural 
pursuits : elected as a Democrat to the 
fiftieth and fifty-first congresses (March 4, 
iS87-March 3. 1891): died at "Ravens- 
uorth." Loudoun county, \'irginia. October 
T5, 1801. 

Lilley, R. D., in 1861 entered the Con- 
federate service as captain of the Augusta 
Lee Rifles, and took part in the operations 
in western \'irginia; subsequently his regi- 
ment was attached to Early's brigade of 
I'^well's divisicm. with which he was iden- 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



71 



tified throughovit 1862. He was promoted 
major in 1863, and in the following spring 
was with Imboden in western Virginia, later 
being assigned to Jones' brigade of the 
Stonewall division. He was promoted to 
brigadier-general and given command of 
Early's old brigade, which he led in the 
expedition through Maryland against 
Washington. He was severely wounded, 
snd captured near Winchester, July 20, 
1864, but four days later was retaken by 
his own men. Until the close of the war 
he commanded the reserve forces in the val- 
ley district. He died November 12, 1S86. 

Logan, Thomas Muldrup, born at Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, November 3, 1840, son 
of Judge George William Logan and ,\nna 
D'Oyley Glover, his wife, and a rejjre- 
sentative of a family of Scotch ancestry, 
located at Restalrig, Scotland, and among 
the more noted members are the following: 
Col. George Logan, of the British army, the 
pioneer ancestor of this line, who settled in 
Charleston, South Carolina ; Robert Daniel 
Logan, governor of South Carolina, 1716; 
\\'illiam Logan, prominent in the affairs of 
the colony during revolutionary period: Dr. 
George Logan, for forty years physician of 
the Charleston City Orphan Asylum, author 
01' medical books, and who served a long 
period as United States naval surgeon in 
charge of the naval station of Charleston. 
Judge Logan, aforementioned, devoted his 
attention to the practice of law, served as 
judge of the city court of Charleston, and 
was the author of a "Record of the Logan 
Family." Thomas AL Logan attended the 
schools in the neighborhood of his home, 
and later entered South Carolina College at 
Columbia, from which he was graduated in 



i860, taking highest honor. Shortly after- 
wards he enlisted as a private in the famous 
Washington Light Infantry of Charleston, 
served during the operations which culmi- 
nated in the capture of Fort Sumter, and 
later assisted in organizing the company 
that became Company A of the Hampton 
Legion, and was elected second lieutenant, 
later promoted to captain, and bore his full 
part in the campaign of the summer and 
autumn of 1862; was wounded at the battle 
of Gaines' Mills, but rejoined his command 
in time to lead his men on the field of Sec- 
ond Manassas. In the battle of Sharpsburg 
or Antietam he was promoted major of his 
regiment for gallant conduct, and on De- 
cember 13, 1862, the regiment bore its part 
in the great Confederate victory at Fred- 
ericksburg. Major Logan was promoted to 
the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and served 
creditably in the Suffolk and Black Water 
campaign of Longstreet, and later was made 
colonel and put in command of his regiment. 
In December, 1864, General M. C. Butler 
■was made major-general, and he recom- 
manded that Col. Logan be promoted and 
assigned to the command of his old brigade, 
which was accordingly done, and Col. 
Logan, though one of the junior colonels of 
his state, was commissioned brigadier-gen- 
eial, and was at that time the youngest 
brigadier in the army. He assisted Gen. 
Wade Hampton in resisting Gen. Sherman's 
march through the Carolinas, and while in 
command of the rear guard of Johnston's 
army. Gen. Logan, at the .head of Keith's 
battalion of his brigade, made the last cav- 
alry charge of the war, and was present 
when the terms of surrender of Gen. John- 
ston's army were arranged. After the war, 
Gen. Logan located in Richmond, Virginia, 



VIRGINIA BIOGRArHY 



and for twelve years was engaged in his 
chosen profession — law, which he relin- 
quished in order to organize the system of 
railroads now represented by the Southern 
railway system. He was also an active fac- 
tor in the organization of various railroads 
and other enterprises, and subsequently the 
Gray National Telautograph Company, of 
v/hich he became president. He was a staunch 
adherent of the policy of the Democratic 
party, but never sought or held public ofiice ; 
he served as chairman of the executive com- 
mittee of his party in 1879, was active in 
the organization of the Gold Democratic 
party of \"irginia in the first McKinley cam- 
paign of 1896, and was elected chairman of 
its executive committee. He held member- 
ship in the Westmoreland Club, of Rich- 
mond ; the Commonwealth Club, of Rich- 
mond ; the Manhattan Club, of New York, 
and the Southern Society, of New York. 
His greatest pleasure was derived from read- 
ing and out-door life in the country. Gen. 
Logan married. May 25, 1865, Kate \'ir- 
ginia, daughter of Judge James H. Cox, of 
Chesterfield county, Virginia. They were 
tliC parents of eleven children. 

Lomax, Lunsford Lindsay, was born at 
Newport, Rhode Island, son of Maj. Mann 
Fage Lomax, U. S. A., of Virginia. He 
graduated from the United States Military 
Academy in 1856, and served on frontier 
duty until April 25, 1861, when he resigned, 
holding the rank of first lieutenant. Ap- 
pointed to a captaincy in the Virginia state 
forces, he was made assistant adjutant- 
general to Gen. J. E. Johnston ; later he 
was transferred to the west, as inspector- 
general to Gen. McCulloch ; in October, 
1862, he was made inspector-general of the 



.Army of East Tennessee, and bore a part in 
the operations and battles in .Arkansas, Mis- 
sissippi and Tennessee. In 1863, as colonel 
of the Eleventh \'irginia Cavalry, he served 
in West Virginia, and in the Pennsylvania 
campaign. On July 23 he was promoted 
to brigadier-general, and served gallantly 
with his brigade under Fitzhugh Lee, and 
August 10, 1864, was promoted to major- 
general, and rendered distinguished service 
ill the valley under Early. At ^\'oodstock, 
October 9, he was captured, but escaped a 
few hours later. On October 31 he was 
given command of Early's cavalry wing, 
and March 29, 1865, was given command of 
the ninth valley district. After the fall of 
Richmond, he reached Lynchburg, and after 
Lee's surrender he joined Gen. Johnston at 
Greensboro, North Carolina, and, with him, 
surrendered to Gen. Sherman. Returning 
home, he accepted the presidency of Blacks- 
burg College, resigning after five years" ser- 
vice. He was later engaged in the war 
records office in Washington City. 

Long, Armistead Lindsay, born in Camp- 
bell county, \'irgiiiia, September 13, 1827. 
He graduated from the United States Mili- 
tary Academy in 1850; was at Fort M6ul- 
trie until 1852, and on frontier duty as first 
lieutenant until 1854. In 1855 he was again 
sent west. In i860 he was at the Augusta 
(Georgia) arsenal, whence he was sent to 
Washington City as aide to Gen. Sumner. 
He resigned, and was commissioned major 
of artillery, C. S. A., and was sent to West 
\'irginia as chief of artillery to Gen. Loring. 
In the fall of 1861 he was attached to Gen. 
R. E. Lee as military secretary, with tne 
rank of colonel. His efficiency was par- 
ticularly shown in his disposition of artillery 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



71 



at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and 
Gettysburg. In September, 1862, he was 
promoted to brigadier-general, made chief 
of artillery of the Second Corps, and con- 
ducted artillery operations with masterly 
skill in the movement on Washington, the 
operations in the Shenandoah Valley, and to 
the surrender. After the war he was chief 
engineer of the James River & Kanawha 
Canal. He soon afterward lost his eye- 
sight, and at Charlottesville passed the last 
twenty years of his life in total darkness, 
during which time he wrote his "Memoirs 
of Gen. Robert E. Lee," a model of bio- 
graphical history and military operations. 
He died April 29, 1891. 

Magruder, John Bankhead, born in Win- 
chester, Virginia, August 15, 1810; enter- 
ed the University of Virginia in 1825, 
where he remained two years ; then entered 
the Military Academy at West Point, from 
which he was graduated in 1830 ; entered 
the Mexican war and served with distinc- 
tion as a captain of artillery ; for gallantry 
a1 Cerro Gordo he was brevetted major, and 
dt Chapultepec, where he was wounded, he 
v/as brevetted lieutenant-colonel ; after the 
war he was stationed at Newport ; at the 
outbreak of the civil war he came south 
and offered his services to his native state ; 
he was in command of the Confederate 
forces in the Peninsula, and made a great 
reputation for efficiency there, with a small 
command, having greatly deceived his op- 
ponent, and having won the battle of Big 
Bethel ; for services there rendered he was 
made major-general, and took part in the 
fights around Richmond, having been in the 
terrible fight at Malvern Hill ; in the fall 
of 1862 he was given command of the de- 



partment of Texas, and in 1863 recovered 
Galveston, capturing the United States ship, 
Harriet Lane, with land forces alone ; after 
the close of the war he went to Mexico and 
took service as major-general under the ill- 
fated Maximilian, upon whose downfall he 
returned to Houston, Texas, where he died 
February 19, 1871. 

Mahone, William, born near Monroe, 
Southampton county, Virginia, December i, 
1826, son of Col. Fielding J. Mahone, who 
commanded a regiment of militia during the 
"Nat Turner Insurrection." He began his 
education under his father, attended school 
two years, and then entered the Virginia 
]\Iilitary Institute, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1847. He taught for two years at 
the Rappahannock Military Academy, stud- 
ied engineering, and became chief engineer 
and instructor on the Norfolk & Petersburg 
Railroad. In 1861 he entered the Confed- 
erate army as lieutenant-colonel of volun- 
teers, and soon became colonel of the Sixth 
Virginia Infantry Regiment. He was pres- 
ent at the capture of the Norfolk navy yard 
in April, 1861, participated in most of the 
battles of the Peninsula campaign, on the 
Rappahannock, and at Petersburg, where he 
won the sobriquet of "the hero of the 
crater," for his bravery at the time of its 
explosion under Grant's mining operations, 
July 30, 1864. He was commissioned briga- 
dier-general in March, 1864, and major- 
general in August, for distinguished services 
at Petersburg. Gen. Lee held him as in- 
ferior only to "Stonewall" Jackson. Later 
he commanded a division in A. P. Hill's 
corps, and was at Bermuda Hundred when 
Lee surrendered. After the war he devoted 
himself to railroad matters, and became 



74 



VIRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



president of the Norfolk & Tennessee Rail- 
road Company. He was defeated in 1878 
for the nomination for governor, but be- 
came the leader of the Readjuster party, 
ar.d in 1880 was elected United States sena- 
tor, serving until 1887, when he was de- 
flated for a re-election. He died in Wash- 
ington City, October 8, 1895. 

Marshall, Charles, horn in W'arrenton. 
^'irginia, October 3, 1830, son of Alexander 
John Marshall, and a descendant of John 
Marshall, of Westmoreland county, and 
Elizabeth IMarkham, his wife ; was a student 
af the University of Virginia, from which 
he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in 1846, and Master of Arts in 1S49; was 
professor of mathematics at the University 
of Indiana from 1849 to 1852; then studied 
law, was admitted to the bar, and began the 
practice of his profession in Baltimore, Mary- 
land ; in 1861, at the outbreak of the civil war, 
he returned to his native state, joined the 
Confederate army the following year, and 
served on the personal staff of Gen. Robert E. 
Lee as assistant adjutant and inspector-gen- 
eral with the rank of first lieutenant; from 
1862 to 1865 he served as major and aide- 
de-camp to Gen. Lee and served with him 
in the .^rmy of Northern Virginia ; attained 
the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and with 
Cien. Horace Porter he arranged the terms 
of the surrender of the Confederate army at 
Appomattox, and he prepared a general 
order containing Gen. Lee's address to his 
army ; Mr. Marshall wrote a book entitled 
"Life of General Robert E. Lee"; he prac- 
ticed his profession in Baltimore. Maryland. 
from 1865 to 1902. a period of almost four 
decades ; his death occurred in Baltimore. 
Maryland, April 19, 1902. 



Maury, Matthew Fontaine, an eminent 
scientist, born in Spottsyivania county, \'ir- 
ginia, January 14, 1806, son of Richard and 
Diana Minor Maury. When he was five 
years old, his father emigrated to Tennes- 
see and settled near Franklin. He attended 
an old field school and studied at Harpeth 
Academy, of which he was an instructor. 
At nineteen he obtained a midshipman's 
warrant and went on a cruise around the 
world. In 1831 though only a passed mid- 
shipman, he was given command of several 
vessels. He returned home in 1834 and 
published a popular text book on naviga- 
tion. In 1837 he was promoted lieutenant, 
and in 1839 met with a painful accident, 
which disabled him. and caused lameness 
for life. He began the publication of a 
series of articles in the "Southern Literary 
Messenger" on the navy, which he called 
"Scraps from a Lucky Bag" and which he 
signed "Henry BlufT." They made a great 
impression, and the "National Intelligencer" 
advocated his appointment as secretary of 
the navy. In these papers he urged inland 
fortification and a few big guns on ships of 
war instead of many small guns. When it 
became known that Maury was the author, 
he was placed, in 1843, i" charge of the 
depot of charts and instruments at Wash- 
ington, which was soon converted into the 
National Observatory. He studied the 
winds and currents of the ocean and issued 
a series of charts, which obtained for him 
the name of "the Pathfinder of the Seas." 
The ship masters by following his "sailing 
directions" saved much valuable time. It 
was while tabulating the data for this work 
that he wrote his "Physical Geography of 
the .'^ea and its Meteorology." Orders of 
kni":hthood were offered him bv manv for- 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



75 



eign countries and medals were struck in his 
honor. He was elected in 1856, president 
of the National Institute, and suggested all 
the principles of the modern weather bur- 
tt'U. He instituted a system of deep sea 
soundings, and showed that the bottom of 
the sea between Newfoundland and Ire- 
land was a plateau admirably adapted for 
a telegraphic cable. He suggested the char- 
acter of the cable to be employed and 
pointed out to Cyrus W. Field how it should 
be laid. He was promoted commander in 
1855. On the outbreak of the civil war he 
resigned his commission, and returned to 
Virginia. Immediately he received flatter- 
ing calls to the service of Russia and France 
which he declined. He was commissioned 
by Mr. Davis thief of the "seacoasts, har- 
lor and river defences" of the south, and 
invented an electric torpedo and protected 
Richmond by mining the James river. He 
was sent by the Confederate government to 
England, where he continued his experi- 
ments in torpedo defense and purchased 
and outfitted cruisers for the Confederacy. 
After the war he removed to Mexico, and, 
as a member of Maximilian's cabinet, vis- 
ited Europe on a special mission. Soon 
after, Maximilian went to his death, but 
Maury succeeded in conferring a perma- 
nent blessing on Mexico — the cultivation of 
the cinchona tree, whose bark is so useful 
in fevers. While in England, he taught the 
use of torpedoes and torpedo boats, and pre- 
pared a series of geographical books for the 
schools, and wrote a book on astronomy. In 
1868 the degree of LL. D. was conferred 
upon him by the University of Cambridge. 
In this year he returned to Virginia to 
accept the position of professor of metere- 
ology in Washington and Lee University, 



having declined the superintendency of the 
National Observatory at Paris. He was 
made a member of all the principal scien- 
tific societies of Europe. He died at Lex- 
ington, Virginia, February i, 1873, and his 
lemains were carried through Goshen Pass 
to their interment place in Richmond. 

Maury, Dabney Hemdon, born in Fred- 
ericksburg, Virginia, May 21, 1822, a de- 
scendant of the French Huguenot settlers 
of earlv Virginia, connected with some of 
the best families of that state ; he was a 
nephew of Matthew Fontaine Maury, the 
great scientist, to whom he was indebted 
for his early education ; he entered the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, in 1839, remained for 
one year ; he used to tell with great interest 
of the way in which he came to leave the 
profession of the law and devote himself to 
military affairs ; he was asked by the pro- 
fessor whether ignorance of the law was an 
excuse for crime, to which he promptly re- 
plied, "Of course," and upon being advised 
o*' the error of his answer determined that 
he would have nothing to do with any pro- 
fession where such an iniquity prevailed ; 
he graduated from the West Point Military 
Academy, in 1846, and, immediately was 
sent to Mexico ; was wounded at the battle 
of Cerro Gordo, and made first lieutenant ; 
I'pon his return to Fredericksburg he was 
presented with a sword by admiring 
friends: from 1847 to 1850 he was assistant 
professor of history and ethics at West 
Point, and was assistant professor of in- 
fantry tactics for the following two years ; 
he was on the frontier at Texas at the out- 
break of the civil war, and resigned to cast 
in his lot with the Confederacy ; he was 
made adjutant-general of the Confederacy 



76 



MRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



arid chief of slaft to Gen. Earle Van Dorn ; 
after the battle of Pea Ridge he was pro- 
moted brigadier-general, and led a division 
at Corinth, where he was made major-gen- 
eral ; he was given command of the depart- 
ment of the Gulf, and was in charge of the 
defenses at Mobile ; after the war he re- 
turned to Richmond and took part in or- 
ganizing the Southern Historical Society 
and the Westmoreland Club ; in 1859 he 
published "Skirmished Drill for Mounted 
Troops" ; he subsequently published "Recol- 
lections of a Virginian," and a school his- 
tory of Virginia ; General Maury was a 
vigorous and chaste writer, a charming 
companion, and chivalrous gentleman, and 
at the time of his death, which occurred at 
the home of his son in Peoria, Illinois, he 
counted among his friends all who had ever 
known him ; his remains were brought to 
Fredericksburg, where they were laid in the 
soil of his native state, which he loved with 
a passionate devotion. He died in 1900. 

Moore, Patrick T., born in Galway, Ire- 
land, September 22, 1821. Prior to the war 
he was a merchant, and captain of militia 
in Richmond, Virginia. In the spring of 
1861 he was commissioned colonel of the 
First Regiment Virginia Infantry, and as- 
signed to Longstreet's brigade ; in the battle 
of Manassas was severely wounded in the 
head while leading his regiment. During 
the seven days' campaign before Richmond, 
he served upon the staiif of Gen. Longstreet. 
In May, 1864, he organized the reserve 
forces of Virginia ; later in the year was 
promoted to brigadier-general, and given 
command of First Brigade, Virginia Re- 
serves, under Gen. Ewell. He died Febru- 
ary 20, 1883. 



Mosby, John Singleton, was born in 
Powhatan county, Virginia, December 6, 
1833. son of Alfred D. and Virginia I. (Mc- 
Laurine) Mosby, and grandson of Catharine 
(Steger) Mosby and of Jane (Ware) Mc- 
Laurine. He prepared for college in Char- 
lottesville and graduated at the University 
or Virginia with honors in Greek, June 29. 
i852. He studied law and practiced in 
Bristol, Washington county. He was mar- 
ried, December 30, 1856, to Pauline Clarke, 
of Kentucky, and they had six children. 
In 1861 he enlisted in a company recruited 
Ijy William E. Jones, for the First Virginia 
Cavalry, ot which he became adjutant. 
Later, he was a scout at Gen. J. E. B. 
Stuart's headquarters, and guided Stuart's 
command to the rear of McClellan's army 
on the Chickahominy, June 14, 1862. In 
January, 1863, he recruited a force of cav- 
alry in northern Virginia with which, aided 
by friendly citizens of Fauquier and Lou- 
doun counties, he harassed the Federals, 
cut communications and destroyed supply 
trains. When not on active duty his men 
.'■.cattered for safety, with the understanding 
that they were to assemble at a given time 
and place. This system of warfare exas- 
perated the Federal commanders who tried 
to capture the partisan leader, and this fail- 
ing, the searching party destroyed the crops 
and farmhouses belonging to the citizens 
tl-,ought to have harbored or abetted Mosby 
or his men. At Chantilly, March 16, 1863. 
he routed a superior Federal cavalry force, 
and at Dranesville, April i, 1863, defeated 
a detachment of cavalry sent to capture 
him. During the battle of Chancellorsville 
he sur])riscd a l)ody of Federal cavalry at 
Warrenton Junction, but was obliged to re- 
treat before overpowering numbers, which 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



17 



he did without loss to his command. He 
then procured a howitzer and passed in the 
rear of Gen. Hooker's army ; wrecked a 
railroad train laden with supplies ; inflicted 
severe damage on the troop guarding the 
tiain, and finally cut his way through and 
escaped. He captured a transport near 
Aquia creek in May, 1864, while Grant was 
engaged in the Wilderness and the Federal 
commander was olsliged to detach a cavalry 
force to protect his communications. With 
twenty-nine men he marched into Fairfax 
Court House on the night of March 7, 1863, 
captured Gen. E. H. Stoughton at his head- 
quarters with a number of his stafT, and 
delivered them as prisoners to Gen. J. E. 
B. Stuart. His command was known as the 
Forty-third Batallion, Virginia Cavalry, and 
he was commissioned successively captain, 
major, lieutenant-colonel and colonel, C. S. 
A. After the close of the war he engaged 
in the practice of law at Warrenton, Vir- 
ginia. In 1876 he made public through a 
letter to the "New York Herald" his inten- 
tion to support the candidacy of Rutherford 
E. Hayes for the presidency, and in this 
letter first applied the phrase the "Solid 
South." President Hayes appointed him 
United States consul to Hong Kong, China, 
in 1878, and he retained the office until 1885. 
Returning to the United States he began 
the practice of law in San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, and became counsel for the Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company. On September 
23, 1899, a granite monument, twenty-five 
feet high, was unveiled at Front Royal, Vir- 
ginia, by "Mosby's men," in memory of the 
seven comrades executed near the spot, 
September 23, 1864, while prisoners of war 
in the hands of the Federal army. In July. 
iQoi, he was appointed special agent of the 



general land office, with headquarters at 
Sterling, Colorado. He is the author of 
" .\ Bit of Partisan Service" and "The Con- 
federate Cavalry in the Gettysburg Cam- 
paign" in "Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
\\'ar" (Vol. Ill, pages 148 and 251), and 
of "Mosl)y's War Reminiscences and 
Stuart's Cavalry Campaign" (1887). See 
"Partisan l^ife with Mosby" by John Scott, 
(1867); "Mosby and His Men" by J. M. 
Crawford, (1867), and "Mosby's Rangers," 
by J. J. Williamson (1895). 

Munford, Thomas Taylor, born in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, in 1831, son of Col. George 
Wythe Munford, for twenty-five years sec- 
retary of the commonwealth. He graduated 
in 1852 from the Virginia Military Institute, 
and, was mainly engaged as a planter. On 
May 8, 1861, he entered service as lieuten- 
ant-colonel of the Thirtieth Virginia 
Mounted Infantry, subsequently known as 
the Second Cavalry Regiment. At Man- 
assas he commanded what was practically 
a brigade. In the spring of 1862 he was 
attached to Ewell's command, and then 
joined Jackson in the valley. He succeeded 
Ashby, when that officer fell, being person- 
ally named by Gen. R. E. Lee. He led 
Jackson's advance in the Chickahominy 
campaign, and joined Stuart in the Manas- 
sas campaign, receiving two sabre wounds. 
He was brigade commander in the Mary- 
land campaign, and later commanded a di- 
vision. After Chancellorsville he com- 
manded Fitzhugh Lee's brigade, under 
\,hom he took part in the Gettysburg cam- 
paign ; was with Early in the valley ; and 
i'l November, 1864, was promoted to briga- 
dier-general, and given command of Fitz- 
hugh Lee's division. He made a gallant 



78 



VIRGINIA BIOCiRAI'llV 



fight at Five Forks, and on the retreat from 
kichmond. At Appomattox he commanded 
the cavalry on the Confederate right, and, 
driving the enemy, moved toward Lynch- 
burg. After the surrender of Gen. Lee, he 
endeavored to rally the scattered Confed- 
erate bands to make a junction with Gen. 
Johnston, but failing, disbanded his men late 
m April. He retired to his home at Lynch- 
burg and lately has been residing' at Union- 
town, Alabama. He has taken much inter- 
est in getting the governor and legislature 
to adopt a correct conception of the Vir- 
ginia state seal. 

Page, Richard L., was born in Clarke 
county, \'irginia, in 1807, son of William 
pjyrd Page and Ann (Lee) Page, his wife. 
He became a midshipman in the United 
States navy in 1824, and cruised with Com- 
modore Porter. In 1825 he was ordered to 
the Brandywine, to convey Lafayette to 
France. He later was on duty on the Con- 
stitution, the Constellation, and other famous 
vessels. In 1834 he was commissioned lieu- 
tenant, and after cruising in various ships 
until 1837, was given two years' leave of ab- 
sence to visit Europe. Returning, he per- 
formed ship and shore duty until 1845, when 
he was made executive officer and for two 
years lieutenant commanding Commodore 
Shubrick's flagship. Independence. After duty 
at the Norfolk navy yard, in 1852-54 he was 
in command of the brig Ft'rn', and on return 
ing, became executive officer at the Nor- 
folk navy yard. When Virginia seceded; he 
resigned, and was made aide on the staff 
of Gov. Letcher, and superintended the for- 
tifying of the James and Nansemond rivers. 
On June 10, 1861, he was commissioned 
commander. C. S. N., was ordnance officer 



at Norfolk, and as a volunteer fired the 
eleven-inch gun at Sewell's Point. Promoted 
to captain, he sat up at Charlotte, North 
Carolina, the machinery removed from the 
Norfolk navy yard, and operated it for two 
years, meantime commanding the naval 
forces at Savannah for a time. On March 
I, 1864, he was commissioned brigadier- 
general, and commanded the outer works in 
Mobile Bay, opposing Farragut's fleet, and 
m.aking a heroic defense of Fort Morgan 
until the building took fire, necessitating 
capitulation. Gen. Page was held as a 
prisoner of war until September, 1865, after 
which time he resided in Norfolk, where he 
was for several years superintendent of the 
pul)Iic schools. 

Paxton, Elisha Franklin, born in Rock- 
bridge county, in 1828, son of Elisha Pax- 
ton, who served in the war of 1812, and 
grandson of William Paxton, who com- 
manded a Rockbridge company at the siege 
of Yorktown, in 1781. He graduated from 
AVashington (Virginia) College, from Yale 
College, and in law from the University of 
\''irginia, and practiced his profession at 
Lexfngton. He was an original secessionist. 
In April, 1861, as first lieutenant, he accom- 
panied his company to Harper's Ferry, and 
:t was a part of the Fourth Virginia Regi- 
ment at Manassas. In October, 1861, he 
was made major of the Twenty-seventh In- 
fantry. In the following spring he was at- 
tached to Gen. Jackson's staft', and shortly 
afterward was made adjutant-general and 
cliief-ot-staff. In September, 1872. he was 
promoted to brigadier-general, and given 
conmiand of the "Stonewall" brigade, which 
he commanded at Fredericksburg and Chan- 
cellorsville. Near Germanna Junction, on 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



79 



May 3, 1863, while on foot leading his com- 
mand, he was killed by a shot in the breast. 
His remains rest within a few feet of his 
chief, in Lexington Cemetery. 

Payne, William Henry Fitzhugh, was 
born at Clifton, Fauquier county, Virginia. 
January 27, 1830, eldest son of Arthur Alex- 
ander Mason and Mary Conway Mason 
( Fitzhugh) Payne ; grandson of Capt. Wil- 
liam and Marion (Morson) Payne, and of 
the Hon. Nicholas and Sarah Washington 
(Ashton) Fitzhugh, and a descendant in the 
seventh generation from John Payne, who 
with his brother William came to Virginia 
in 1620. His mother was a great-grand- 
flaughter of Augustine Washington. He 
was educated at the University of Missouri, 
the University of Virginia, and the Virginia 
Military Institute, and was married, Sep- 
tember 29, 1852, to Mary Elizabeth Win- 
ston, daughter of Col. William Winter 
Payne (q. v.) ; practiced law, and served as 
commonwealth's attorney for Fauquier 
county until 1869, save during the suspen- 
sion of civil duties, 1861-65. He entered the 
Confederate service as captain of the Black 
Horse Cavalry, and in September, 1861, was 
promoted major of the Fourth Virginia 
Cavalry, and took part in the Peninsular 
campaign. He was wounded, left on the 
field and reported dead in the battle of 
Williamsburg, May 5, 1861, was taken 
prisoner, and after his release prosioted 
lieutenant-colonel, and placed in temporary 
command of the Second North Carolina 
Cavalry, with which regiment he held War- 
renton, Virginia, against a Federal attack, 
thus preventing the capture of 3,000 
wounded Confederates in hospital there. He 
was wounded and taken prisoner at Han- 



over, Pennsylvania, June 30, 1863, and on his 
exchange was promoted brigadier-general 
and commanded the Fifth, Sixth, Eighth 
and Thirty-sixth Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, 
which made up Payne's Brigade, Fitzhugh 
Lee's Division, Early's army, operating in 
the valley against Sheridan in the fall of 
1864, and south of the James river in the 
spring of 1865 in Fitzhugh Lee's Cavalry 
Corps. He was conspicuous in the battle of 
Five Forks, April i, 1865, where he was 
wounded, Col. R. B. Boston succeeding to 
the command of the brigade. He was cap- 
tured, April 13, 1865, ^brought to Washing- 
ton April 16, was mistaken for the Payne im- 
plicated in the assassination of President 
Lincoln, and by the firmness of the officer 
having him in charge was rescued from a 
mob intent on killing him. He practiced law 
at Washington, D. C, and in 1902 was the 
counsel for the Southern Railway. He died 
in Washington, D. C, March 29, 1904. 

Pegram, John, was born in Petersburg, 
\^irginia, January 24, 1832, son of James 
West (1803-1844) and Virginia (Johnson^ 
Pegram, and grandson of John and Martha 
Ward (Gregory) Pegram and of William 
R. and Mary (Evans) Johnson. John Pe- 
gram was graduated from the United States 
Military Academy in 1854 and was assigned 
to the dragoons. He served in California, 
1854-57; was promoted second lieutenant of 
Second Dragoons, March 3, 1855, and served 
in Kansas and Dakota, 1855-57. He was 
promoted first lieutenant February 28, 1857 ; 
served as adjutant of Second Dragoons in 
the Utah expedition, 1857-58: was on leave 
or absence in Europe, 1858-60, and served 
on the Navajo expedition of i860. He 
was stationed in New Mexico. 1860-61, 



8o 



VIRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



and resigned his commission May lo, 1861. 
He was appointed lieutenant-colonel of 
the provisional army of Virginia ; com- 
manded a detachment of about 1,300 men 
and four cannon at Rich Mountain, \'ir- 
ginia, in July, 1861, and sent a force of 
350 men and one cannon, with orders to 
guard the rock at the mountain summit. 
The force was attacked by Gen. Rosecrans 
and after a gallant defense defeated, and 
Col. Pegram was forced to abandon his 
position. July 12, 1861. He retreated to 
Beverley and on account of scarcity of food 
and on learning of Gen. Garrett's retreat, 
surrendered his force of thirty officers and 
525 men to Gen. McClellan, July 13, 1861. 
He was commissioned brigadier-general in 
the Confederate army, November 7, 1862; 
was assigned to the command of a brigade 
made up of the First Georgia and First 
Louisiana Cavalry regiments in Wheeler's 
cavalry corps, in the Army of the Tennes- 
see, and engaged in the battle of Stone's 
River. Tennessee, where he was posted on 
the Lebanon Pike in the advance of Breck- 
enridge's right. He was promoted major- 
general and took part in the battle of Chick- 
amauga in command of the second division 
of Forrest's cavalry corps, and his division 
was held in reserve by Gen. Breckenridge. 
He commanded a brigade in Early's divis- 
ion, Ewell's corps, in the Wilderness and at 
Cold Harbor, and when Early assumed com- 
mand of the Confederate army in the Shen- 
andoah Valley he succeeded to the com- 
mand of Early's division and took a con- 
spicuous part in the battles of W'inchester, 
Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek. He com- 
manded his division in Gordon's corps at 
Petersburg and Richmond. December. 1864, 
t > February. 1865. He was married in Jan- 



uary, 1865. to Hetty Cary, of Baltimore 
Maryland. He was fatally wounded at Hat- 
cher's Run, near Petersburg, and died on 
iho battlefield, February 6, 1865. 

Pegram, Robert Baker, was born in Din- 
widdle county, \'irginia, December 10, 181 1, 
son of Gen. John (q. v.) and Martha Ward 
(Gregory) Pegram. He was appointed mid- 
."hipman in the United States navy, Febru- 
ary 2, 1829. and served :n the Mediterran- 
ean squadron. He was promoted lieuten- 
ant. September 8, 1841, and during the war 
v.ith j\Iexico, served under Capt. David G. 
I'crragut on the Saratoga. In 1852 he took 
part in the Japan expedition.. He was en- 
gaged in the expedition organized by the 
combined forces of the British ship Rattler 
and the Uniied States vessel Poichatan 
tgainst a piratical fleet of thirty-one junks, 
of which he captured sixteen, and also one 
hundred canron with a loss to the pirates of 
(lOO men. For this service he was personally 
thanked by Admiral Sir James Stirling, flag 
officer of the British East India squadron 
and by the government of Hong Kong and 
Great Britain^ and presented with a sword 
from the state of Virginia. He was on duty 
in the Norfolk navy yard, 1856-60; served 
in the Paraguay expedition nine months of 

1858. and as a commissioner to define the 
limits of the Newfoundland fisheries in 

1859. He resigned his commission in the 
United States navy. April 17, 1861. and was 
ajipointed captain in the Confederate navy. 
He was given command of the Norfolk navy 
yard after its evacuation by the Federal 
troops, April 21, 1861 ; fortified Pig Point 
on the Nansemond river. \'^irginia, and with 
its batteries disabled the LTnited States 
steamer Harriet Lane, which was surveving 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



8i 



and buoying the river. He commanded the 
steamer Nasliz'illc, October, 1861, to Febru- 
ary, 1862. It was the intention of Mason 
and Slidell, the Confederate commissioners, 
to take passage on the Nashville, and for this 
purpose Pegram was to run the blockade 
from Charleston ; but they feared to take the 
chances, and while he ran the blockade suc- 
cessfully in October, 1861, they were cap- 
tured on board the British mail steamer 
Trent. Pegram after capturing the Harvey 
Birch in the English Channel, landed his 
prisoners in Southampton and was held in 
port by the United States steamer Tuscarora 
until February, when he effected his escape 
and made harbor at Beaufort, North Caro- 
lina. He was detailed to superintend the 
armament of the iron-clad steamer Rich- 
mond, which he took to Drewry's Bluff, 
when he was transferred to the new iron- 
clad Virginia, the best vessel in the Confed- 
erate fleet. In 1864 funds were raised by 
Virginia to purchase and equip in England, 
a naval force to be called the Virginia Vol- 
unteer Navy, to be commanded by Capt. 
Pegram. He went to England for the pur- 
pose, and had one vessel in readiness when 
Lee surrendered. He was married (first) to 
Lucy Binns Cargill, of Sussex county, who 
was the mother of his seven children ; and 
(^secondly) to Sarah Leigh, of Norfolk. His 
eldest son, John Cargill Pegram, was killed 
ill battle before Petersburg, June 16, 1864, 
while a member of the staff of Gen. l^.lat- 
thew \V. Ransom, of North Carolina, who 
commanded the Fourth brigade in Gen. 
P'Ushrod R. Johnson's division. Gen. R. H. 
/vnderson's corps. Capt. Pegram died in 
Norfolk, Virginia, October 24, 1894. 

VIR— 6 



Pendleton, Alexander Swift, who nad at- 
tained the rank of adjutant-general in the 
Confederate army, serving as such at the 
tnue of his death in the Second Corps in the 
Army of Northern Virginia, was born in 
Fairfax county, Virginia, September 28. 
1840, at what is now the Episcopal High 
School, of which his father, the Rev. Dr. 
William N. Pendleton, was then the rector; 
his father was afterwards chief of artillery 
of the Army of Northern Virginia ; his 
mother was Anzolette Elizabeth (Page) 
Pendleton, daughter of Francis Page, Esq., 
of Hanover county, Virginia. Alexander S. 
Pendleton received his early education under 
his father's tuition, at thirteen years of age 
entered Washington College, Lexington, Vir- 
ginia, and in his senior year, before he was 
sixteen years old, was tutor in mathematics, 
and in 1857, before he was seventeen, was 
graduated at the head of his class, receiving 
the first honor of the college, and being ap- 
pointed to deliver the "Cincinnati Oration" ; 
entered the University of Virginia, in 1859, 
and in one year was graduated in half of 
the academic classes, intending to apply for 
the master's degree the following year; this 
was prevented by his entering the Confed- 
erate army, in which he was offered a sec- 
ond lieutenantcy ; he was on the stalif of 
Col. Thomas J. Jackson, and his successors: 
was promoted for conspicuous gallantry at 
Falling Waters and at Manassas, and was 
again and again recommended for promo- 
tion ; after the seven days' fight around 
Richmond, he was made a captain and was 
also promoted major in the same year ; he 
was with Gen. Jackson at Chancellorsville 
when the latter was shot ; when Gen. Ewell 
succeeded Gen. Jackson, he was promoted 



S2 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



lieutenant-colonel and occupied the same 
position upon the staft' ; he was offered a 
brigade, but declined it to hold the position 
which he preferred ; he was Gen. Early's 
chiefrof-staff in the famous march that he 
made from the Chickahominy to the gates 
Oi Washington, and was known by all ac- 
quainted with the history of that movement 
as among the most efficient officers in that 
.rommand ; after the battle of Winchester, 
in trying to stay the retreat at Fisher's Hill, 
Ac was truck by a piece of shell, which 
proved to be his death wound ; thus he died 
September 23, 1864, before he was twenty- 
four years old; of him Col. Allen said: "In 
the long catalogue ot useful sons who 
sprang to arms at her bidding and fell in 
her defense, Virginia mourns no one more 
worthy of her grand renown and whose open 
life gave promise of a more useful and dis- 
tinguished future ;" his wife, Kate (Corbin) 
Pendleton, of Moss Neck, survived him. 

Pendleton, William Nelson, born at Lex- 
ington. Virginia, December 2^. 1809, son of 
Pldmund Pendleton and Lucy (Nelson) 
Pendleton, his wife. He was graduated in 
1830 from the United States Military Acad- 
emy, where he formed a close friendship 
with Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis. 
He was for a year an instructor at West 
Point, then as second lieutenant served with 
the artillery at Fort Hamilton, New York, 
until 1833, when he resigned. He was a 
professor at Bristol (Pennsylvania) Col- 
lege, and then at Delaware College. In 1837 
he took orders in the Episcopal church, and 
received the degree of D. D. In 1861 he 
became captain of a Lexington company, 
and soon was commissioned captain of ar- 
tillery, C. S. A. He commanded the Rock- 



bridge artillery until shortly before the 
battle of Manassas, when he was iiromoted 
to colonel and made chief of artillery to 
Gen. J. E. Johnston. It is told that in the 
battle, when he brought his artillery into 
action, he said, with solemn reverence, "Lord, 
have mercy on their souls !" He continued 
under Johnston, was promoted to brigadier- 
general, and after Lee came into command of 
the army, served under him in the same 
capacity to the end of the war. Under him 
the artillery rendered excellent service at 
Gettysburg. With Gens. Longstreet and 
Gordon he arranged the details of the sur- 
render. After the war he resumed his cler- 
ical duties at Lexington. His only son. Col. 
"Sandie" Pendleton, was a member of Gen. 
Jackson's staff, and was mortally wounded 
at the battle of Winchester. Gen. Pendle- 
ton died January 15, 1883. 

Pickett, George Edward, l)orn in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, son of Robert Pickett, who 
took an active interest in affairs of church 
and state, of Henrico county, and of Mary 
Johnston, his wife. He graduated from the 
L'nited States Military Academy in 1846, 
and commissioned brevet second lieutenant, 
Eighth Infantry. In the Mexican war he took 
j>art in the siege of Vera Cruz, battle of 
Cerro Gordo, capture of San Antonio, battles 
of Contreras, Cherubusco. Molino del Rey, 
Chapultepec, and capture of City of Mexico, 
winning several brevets for conspicuous gal- 
lantry. He was on frontier duty in Texas, 
1849-55 ' promoted to captain. Ninth Infan- 
try, serving against the Indians in the far 
west. On June 25, 1861, he resigned and 
enterd the Confederate service as colonel of 
Virginia troops, and went into service on 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



83 



the Rappahannock river ; promoted to briga- 
dier-general and commanded a brigade in 
Longstreet's division at the opening of the 
Seven Days fighting, and at Gaines' Mills 
was severely wounded and had to leave the 
field. In 1862, promoted to major-general, 
ho commanded a division under Longstreet. 
He held Lee's center at Fredericksburg. 
His famous charge at Gettysburg became a 
glowing theme for the poet, and an inspir- 
ing scene for the painter. He was given 
command of the department of North Caro- 
lina, September 23, 1863. On May 18, 1864, 
he saved Petersburg from capture, person- 
ally leading the troops that took the Fed- 
eral works, and turning its guns on the re- 
treating foe. His division received the full 
force of the Federal attack at Five Forks. 
April I, 1865. Appointed to West Point by 
Lincoln, then a congressman. Gen. Pickett 
declined the United States marshalship 
tendered him by President Grant, and en- 
gaged in the life insurance business. He 
died in Norfolk, July 30, 1875, ^"d was bur- 
ied at Hollywood, Richmond. 

Posey, Carnot, who was one of the bril- 
liant and gallant soldiers of the Confederate 
army, attaining the rank of general, was 
born in Wilkinson, Mississippi, August 5, 
1818; attended the schools of his native 
place, and in 1836 entered the University of 
Virginia, there pursued a law course, and 
subsequently engaged in the active practice 
of his profession ; shortly afterward he en- 
tered the Mexican war as lieutenant of vol- 
unteers, fought under Col. Jeflferson Davis, 
and was wounded at Buena Vista ; at the 
outbreak of the civil war he joined the Con- 
federacy as colonel of the Sixteenth Miss- 
i.^sippi Regiment, and on November i, 1862, 



was made a brigadier-general, his brigade 
consisting of four Mississippi regiments, 
which formed a part of Anderson's division 
of A. P. Hill's famous corps of the Army of 
Northern Virginia ; in the fight of Bristow 
Station he was mortally wounded, October 
14. 1863, and died November 13, 1863, in 
Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Price, Sterling, was born in Prince Ed- 
ward county, Virginia, September 14, 1809, 
son of Pugh W. Price. He attended Hamp- 
den-Sidney College, studied law under 
Chancellor Creed Taylor at Prince Edward 
Court House ; and with his father's family 
settled in Keysville, Charlton county, Mis- 
souri, in 1831. He was a Democratic mem- 
ber of the legislature in 1836, 1840 and 1842 
and at each session was chosen speaker. In 
1844, he was elected to congress, and when 
the war with Mexico broke out, he raised 
a regiment, and had an independent com- 
mand in New Mexico and Chichuahua. He 
gained victories over greatly superior forces 
at Cancada, Lambenda and Taos. President 
Tyler made him a brigadier-general. March- 
ing next agamst Chihuahua, he captured an 
army double his own. This was really the 
last battle of the war. At the next state 
election he was elected governor of Mis- 
souri. He was president of the Missouri 
state convention, and opposed secession, but 
when Capt. Lyon captured Camp Jackson, 
held by the state militia. Price gave his 
support to Gov. Jackson. His was the diffi- 
cult task of organizing and disciplining the 
militia and attempting to win battle with 
half armed men against superior numbers 
well equipped. He gathered 7,000 men ai 
Carthage, Missouri, and on August 10, 1861, 
joined by Gens. Ben. McCulloch and N. B. 



84 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



Pearce commanding troops from Texas and 
Arkansas, defeated the Federals at Wilkins 
Creek, where Gen. Lyon was killed. At 
Lexington, on September 21, 1861, he de- 
feated Col. -Mulligan and captured immense 
stores. The I'^ederals under Gen. S. R. 
Custis advanced with large forces, and 
I rice retired into Arkansas, Februar}' 12, 
1862. On M&rch 6, 1862, he was commis- 
sioned major-general in the regular Confed- 
erate service, and under Gen. Earl Van 
Dorn fought the battle of Pea Ridge (Elk- 
horn), where he was wounded and nar- 
rowly escaped death. Shortly after the battle 
of Shiloh, Gen. Price with his Missourians, 
accompanied \'an Dorn to the east of the 
Mississippi and after Bragg had departed 
lor Kentucky, Price was left to face the 
greatly superior numbers of Grant and 
Rosecrans. At luka and Corinth he and his 
men fought with great bravery. The year 
1863 found Price again in the trans-Miss- 
issippi region. At Helena, on July 4, 1863, 
Price's men were the only part of the army 
that carried the enemy's works. He co- 
operated with Kirby Smith in the campaign 
against Banks and Steele in 1864. He made 
his last desperate effort to recover Missouri 
in the latter part of 1864. His campaign 
was marked by brilliant achievements, but 
he was confronted by overwhelming num- 
bers and forced to retreat. At the close of 
the war he was included in Gen. Kirby 
Smith's surrender, but he preferred to leave 
the country and went to Mexico. He en- 
gaged in a scheme of colonization under the 
imperial government, but it was not suc- 
cessful. He returned to the United States 
and died at St. Louis, September 29, 1867. 

Reynolds, Alexander Welch, born in 
Clarke county, \'irginia, in August, 1817; 



graduated from United States Military 
Academy in 1S38; served in the Florida war 
as adjutant; subsequently was on frontier 
duty, then on recruiting service until 1847, 
v.'hen he was promoted to captain, and as- 
signed to quartermaster duty at Philadel- 
phia in the Mexican war and in New Mexico 
and Texas. He left the service to enter the 
Confederate army, and in July, 1861, was 
commissioned colonel of the Fiftieth \''ir- 
ginia Infantry, and served in West Virginia. 
Later he commanded a brigade in Tennes- 
see and Mississippi, and was captured at 
the surrender of Vicksburg. After being 
exchanged, he resumed command of his 
brigade with the rank of brigadier-general. 
He commanded a brigade at Chickamauga 
and Missionary Ridge, and subsequently 
served under Hardee in the Atlanta cam- 
paign, where he was painfully wounded. 
After the war he was appointed brigadier- 
general in the Egyptian army, and died at 
Alexandria, Egypt, May 26, 1876. 

Robertson, Beverly Holcombe, a native of 
V'irginia, graduated from United States 
AJilitary Academy, 1849. After a year at the 
cavalry school at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, as 
second lieutenant of Second Dragoons, he 
;erved in the west against the Indians ; pro- 
moted to first lieutenant, and made acting 
assistant adiutant-general. department of 
Utah: promoted to captain March 3. 1861. 
In August, having left the service, he was 
commissioned colonel of Fourth \irginia 
Cavalry Regiment. In June he was pro- 
moted to brigadier-general, and with his 
brigade joined Stuart on the Rapidan. In 
Septembe'-. he was sent to North Carolina to 
recruit and instruct cavalry troops, and saw 
'service in that state. He commanded a cav- 
;;!ry division in the Gettysburg campaign, 



UXDER THE CONFEDERACY 



85 



and was afterwards transferred to South 
Carolina ; he rovered Hardee's retreat from 
Charleston, and harassed Sherman's troops. 
After the war, he engaged in the insurance 
business in \\'ashington City. 

Rodes, Robert Emmett, born in Lynch- 
burg, Virginia, Alarch 29, 1829, son of 
David Rodes, deputy clerk of Albemarle 
county, and Martha, his wife, daughter of 
Joel Yancey, of Bedford. He graduated 
from the Mrginia Alilitary Institute, 1848, 
and from that time until the breaking out 
of the war he was a professor there. He 
was captain of the Mobile cadets, 1861 ; 
made colonel of Fifth Alabama Infantry, 
and led the advance at the first Bull Run; 
promoted to brigadier-general and com- 
manded a brigade at Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia, May 5, 1862. At Seven Pines he was 
severely wounded, but refused to relinquish 
his command until the firing had ceased 
He rendered exceptionally brilliant service 
at Gaines' Mills, leading the final advance; 
and at Chancellorsville, where he demol- 
ished Hooker's left, for which he was pro- 
moted on the field to major-general. At 
Gettysburg he displayed great courage, and 
lost nearly one-half his division. He also 
rendered etticient service m the Wilder- 
ness and in Early's march on Washington. 
At Winchester, he scattered the enemy, but 
fell while leading the attack, and died on the 
field, September 19, 1864. 

Rosser, Thomas Lafayette, born in Camp- 
bell county, Virginia, October 15, 1836; son 
of John and Martha Melvina (Johnson) 
Rosser; grandson of Thomas and Nancy 
(Twedy) Rosser and of Jonathan and Ma- 
halah (Hargrave) Johnson, and a descend- 
ant from John Rosser, a Huguenot, and on 



the Johnson side from English, Danish and 
Scandinavian ancestors. In 1849 he re- 
moved with his parents to Texas and en- 
tered the United States Military Academy 
in 1856. He was to graduate in 1861, but 
the entire class was ordered intp tlje army 
on the attack on Fort Sumter, April 12, 
1861, before being graduated, and Rosser 
resigned to join the Confederate army. He 
was commissioned first lieutenant of artil- 
lery, was in the battle of Bull Run, July 21, 
1861, and was promoted captain in the 
Washington Artillery of New Orleans. He 
fought in the Peninsular campaign ; was 
wounded at Mechanicsville, Virginia, June 
26, 1862, and was promoted lieutenant-colo- 
nel. He was promoted to colonel and given 
command of the Fifth Virginia Cavalry of 
Fitzhugh Lee's brigade under J. E. B. 
Stuart. During Gen. T. J. Jackson's man- 
oeuvres on Pope's left, Col. Rosser pro- 
tected one flank ; was engaged at the second 
Bull Run, and at South Mountain, where 
he was sent by Gen. Stuart to seize Fox's 
Gap on Braddock road, and after the death 
of Gen. Garland, he assumed command of 
the brigade of infantry. He was engaged in 
the operations around Fredericksburg and 
Charlottesville; fought at Gettysburg, and 
on October 15, 1863, was promoted briga- 
dier-general and given command of the Sec- 
ond Brigade in Wade Hampton's division. 
He was engaged in the cavalry operations 
in the Wilderness and around Richmond, 
fighting desperately at Trevillian Station, 
where he was badly wounded in the leg. 
He was promoted major-general, September 
12, 1864; joined Gen. Early in the Shenan- 
doah Valley on October 5, and took com- 
mand of Fitzhugh Lee's division, that officer 
having been incapacitated from wounds re- 



86 



\4RGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



ceived at the battle of Winchester, Rosser 
skirmished successfully on October 8; was 
defeated at Tom's Brook by Sheridan the 
following day, and on October 17, attacked 
Custer in the rear of his picket line. At 
Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864, he led the 
attack on the Federal right ; was met by a 
superior force, and with difficulty held his 
own, but during the retreat of Early's army 
his command retired in good order, and was 
left at Fisher's Hill to act as a rear-guard. 
He held this position until the following 
day and then fell back to Stony Creek. He 
captured the stronghold at New Creek with 
eight pieces of artillery, two thousand pris- 
oners, large quantities of military stores, 
horses, and commissary supplies, Septem- 
ber, 1864, and did great damage to the B. 
& O. R. R., burning the round house and 
shops at Piedmont. In February, 1865, he 
crossed the Great North Mountain in a 
severe snow storm (still on crutches and 
suffering from wounds received at Trevil- 
lian station), captured Beverly with its gar- 
rison of nine hundred men, large stores and 
many cattle, and brought them all back to 
Staunton, losing only one ofhcer (Col. 
Cook), and five men. He commanded a 
division in the Appomattox campaign ; re- 
fused to surrender, and charged through the 
Union lines with two divisions of cavalry. 
He escaped and attempted to reorganize the 
Army of Virgmia, but was captured at 
Hanover Court House, Virginia. May 2, 
1865. After the war he studied law, and 
in 1870 became interested in railroading, 
being chief engineer of the eastern division 
of the Northern Pacific Railroad, 1871-81, 
and chief engineer of the Canadian Pacific 
Railroad. 1881-83. I" 1885 he retired to an 
estate in Virginia, where he was living, 



June ID, 1898, when he was conmiissioued 
brigadier-general of volunteers by President 
^IcKinley. He served at Chickamauga 
Park and Knoxville, commanding the Four- 
teenth Alinnesota, Second Ohio, and First 
Pennsylvania regiments of volunteer infan- 
try, and was engaged in drilling troops and 
equipping them for battle when the war 
ended. He was honorably mustered out, 
November 31, 1898, and returned to his 
home in Charlottesville, V'irginia. He was 
married May 28, 1863, to Elizabeth Barbara, 
daughter of William Overton and Sarah 
Ann (Gregory) Winston, of Hanover 
county, \'irginia. 

Ruggles, Daniel, a native of Massachu- 
setts, gave his services to Virginia at the 
beginning of the civil war. He was born 
January 31, 1810, and graduated from the 
United States Military Academy in 1833. 
He served with the Fifth United States 
Infantry in the northwest and in Florida. 
He took part in the Alexican war, and was 
brevetted major for gallantry at Contreras 
and Cherubusco, and lieutenant-colonel for 
Chapultepec. He was in the Utah expedi- 
tion, and in 1861 resigned. In April he was 
commissioned colonel, and put in command 
al Fredericksburg. In August he was made 
brigadier-general and served at Pensacola 
and New Orleans. At Shiloh and at Cor- 
ir,th he commanded a division in Bragg's 
corps. In June he was sent to the Missis- 
sippi, and commanded Breckenridge's left 
wing in the battle of Baton Rouge. Later 
he commanded at Port Hudson, and at Co- 
lumbus. His age unfitting him for field 
service, he was made commissary-general of 
prisoners of war. After the war he lived in 
Fredericksburg, where he died, in 1897. 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



87 



Slaughter, James E., a native of Virginia, 
was made second lieutenant of Voltigeurs ; 
in 1847, transferred to First United States 
Artillery in 1848, promoted to first lieuten- 
rnt in 1852, and served until 1861. He was 
cemimissioned first lieutenant of artillery, 
C S. A., and became inspector-general on 
tlie stafif of Gen. Beauregard in the depart- 
ment of Alabama and West Florida. Early 
in 1862 he was promoted to brigadier-gen- 
eral, and in May was made chief of the in- 
spector-general's department of the Army of 
the Mississippi under Gen. Bragg. After 
the Kentucky campaign he was transferred 
to Mobile, and then to Texas as chief of 
artillery to Gen. Magruder. The remainder 
of his service was in similar relations in 
the same region. 

Starke, William E., served as aide-de- 
camp to Gen. R. S. Garnett, on the Cheat 
river. Later he commanded the Sixtieth 
Virginia Regiment, in Kentucky. After the 
Seven Days battle in Virginia, he was pro- 
moted to brigadier-general, and commanded 
a Louisiana brigade at Manassas, and later 
the "Stonewall" division. He was with 
Jackson at the capture of Harper's Ferry. 
At Sharpsburg, he succeeded Gen. J. R. 
Jones (wounded), and soon afterwards fell 
mortally wounded, pierced by three minie 
balls. September 17, 1862. 

Stevens, Walter Husted, born at Penn 
Yan, New York, August 24, 1827. He was 
appointed from New York to the United 
States Military Academy at West Point, 
and graduated in 1848, fourth in his class, 
and was commissioned brevet second lieu- 
tenant, corps of engineers. He was on duty 
at Newport, Rhode Island, and then given 
charge of fortification repairs in the neigh- 



borhood of New Orleans, until 1853, when 
he was placed in charge of harbor and river 
work in Texas. He was lighthouse inspec- 
tor on the Texas coast from 1853 to 1857, 
meantime being promoted to first lieuten- 
ant. Then, until i860, as superintending 
engineer, he had charge of the construction 
of the New Orleans custom house, and the 
fortifications below the city. In May, 1861, 
he entered the service of the Confederate 
States, and accompanied Gen. Beauregard 
to \'irginia, as a member of his stafif, and 
ranking as captain of engineers. Previous 
to the battle of Manassas, he was with the 
advance at Fairfax Court House, and laid 
out the fortifications with great skill, and 
was commended by his chief as "an ofhcer 
of energy and ability ;" was promoted to 
major, and made chief engineer of the Army 
of Northern Virginia. When Gen. Lee came 
to the command. Major Stevens was given 
charge of the defensive works at Richmond, 
and promoted to colonel, and was in com- 
mand of the works and troops when Kil- 
patrick and Dahlgren made their raids, and 
;.gain when the city was threatened by But- 
ler. In August, 1864, he was promoted to 
brigadier-general, and reassigned to duty as 
chief engineer of the Army of Northern 
Virginia. After the war he went to Mexico, 
and became superintendent and construct- 
ing engineer of the railroad between the 
City of Mexico and Vera Cruz. He died in 
the latter named city, November 12, 1867. 

Stevenson, Carter Littlepage, son of Car- 
ter Littlepage Stevenson, of Spotsylvania 
county, Virginia, and Jane Herndon, his 
wife, and grandson of Rev. James Stevenson 
and Frances Arnet Littlepage, his wife, half- 
sister of Gen. Lewis Littlepage (q. v.). He 



8R 



VIRGIX'IA BIOGRAPHY 



graduated at the United States ^Military 
Academy in 1838, and as second lieutenant 
was assigned to the Fifth Infantry. His 
first service was in the Florida war, and the 
occupation of Texas. In the Mexican war 
he won distinction in the battles of Palo 
Alto and Resaca de la Palma, and in 1847 
was promoted to captain. After the war, he 
was an duty as aide-de-camp to Gen. Brady, 
in Mississippi, and on frontier duty at Fort 
Gibson, Indian Territory and Fort Belknap, 
1 exas, and was engaged against the Apache 
Indians, with the Pacific railroad explora- 
tion, lie took part in the Seminole war of 
1856-57, and was with the Utah expedition. 
In i86i he tendered his services to his native 
state, and became colonel of the Fifty-third 
X'irginia Infantry Regiment, and later was 
promoted to brigadici -general, on the recom- 
mendation of Gen. Beauregard. In March, 
1862, he was placed under Gen. Huger, on 
the Weldon railroad, but was soon after 
transferred to the west and given command 
ot a division in East Tennessee, and served 
in conjunction with Kirby Smith, in the 
movements culminating in the return to 
Murfreesboro. In December, 1862, he was 
sent by Gen. Bragg with ten thousand troops 
to reinforce Gen. Pemberton, at Vicksburg. 
He subsequently commanded a division 
under that officer, and with which he with- 
stood the fiercest attack of the enemy at 
Champion Hills. During the siege of Vicks- 
burg, he commanded the Confederate right. 
He was paroled, with the surrendered garri- 
son, and joined the army at Chattanooga, 
where he was given command of a division 
in Hardee's corps. He had occupation of 
Lookout Mountain, from which he with- 
drew to Missionary Ridge, and bore a part 
in the great battle there. He was thencc- 



f( rward with the .\rmy of Tennessee until 
the end of the war, in command of a divi- 
sion. In the Atlanta campaign he served 
under Gen. Hood, in the battles of Resaca 
and Kenesaw Mountain, and after Gen. 
Hood superseded Gen. Johnston, Gen. 
Stevenson temporarily commanded Hood's 
corps. In the Nashville campaign he com- 
manded a division in Gen. Stephen D. Lee's 
corps, and held the centre of the Confed- 
erate line in front of Nashville, and, after 
Lee was wounded, his division covered the 
retreat. His division, now reduced to about 
twenty-five hundred men, took part in the 
operations against Sherman, in the Caro- 
hnas, and, under Johnston, surrendered in 
April, 1865. After the war, Gen. Steven- 
son was occupied as a civil and mining engi- 
neer, until his death, in Caroline county, 
\'irginia, August 15, 1888. 

Stuart, James Ewell Brown, soldier, was 
born in Patrick county, Virginia, February 
6, 1833 ; son of Archibald and Elizabeth 
Letcher (Parmill) Stuart, and a descendant 
of Archibald Stuart, who emigrated from 
Ireland in 1726, and settled in Pennsylvania. 
His maternal ancestor, Giles Letcher, emi- 
grated from Ireland prior to the revolution- 
ary war, and settled in Virginia. James 
Stuart attended school at Wytheville, Vir- 
ginia ; Emory and Henry College, Virginia, 
1848-50; was graduated from the United 
States Military Academy, and brevetted sec- 
ond lieutenant of mounted riflemen, July i, 
1854, and served on the western frontier, 
1854-59, being severely wounded at the 
combat on Solomon's Fork, Kansas. He 
was promoted second lieutenant, October 
31, 1854: was transferred to the First Cav- 
alry, March 3. 1855 : was married, Novem- 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



ber 14, 1855, to Flora, daughter of Col. 
Philip St. George Cooke, and was promoted 
first lieutenant, December 20, 1855. He 
served as volunteer aide-de-camp to Col. 
Robert E. Lee, on the Harper's Ferry expe- 
dition to suppress John Brown's raid in 
1859 ; was on frontier duty in Kansas, 1859- 
60 ; took part in the Keowa and Comanche 
expedition of i860 ,and was promoted cap- 
tain, April 22, 1861, but upon the secession 
of Virginia, he resigned his commission and 
was promoted lieutenant-colonel of Virginia 
infantry, Alay 10, 1861. He reported to Col. 
Thomas J. Jackson at Harper's Ferry ; was 
'promoted colonel of cavalry, July 16, 1861, 
and was given command of the First Vir- 
ginia Cavalry, which he commanded at the 
first battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861, driv- 
ing back the Union attack. He was pro- 
moted brigadier-general, September 24, 
1861 ; guarded the rear of the Confederate 
retreat from Yorktown to Richmond ; com- 
manded four regiments of infantry at the 
battle of Dranesville, December 20, 1861, 
but was defeated by Gen. E. O. C. Ord, and 
commanded the Confederate cavalry during 
the seven days' battles before Richmond, 
June 25-July I, 1862. He was promoted 
major-general, July 25, 1862; made a raid 
on Gen. John Pope's camp at Catlett's Sta- 
tion, August 22, 1862, and captured his offi- 
cial correspondence, and on August 23, made 
a similar attack on Manassas Junction. He 
commanded the cavalry division. Army of 
Northern Virginia, at the second battle of 
Bull Run, August 29-30, 1862 ; commanded 
the cavalry in the Maryland campaign ; took 
part in the battle of Antietam, where he led 
the movement that resulted in the defeat 
oi Gen. Edwin V. Sumner's corps. On Oc- 
tober TO, 1872, he started <in his famous 



"ride around McClellan," crossing the Po- 
tomac near Williamsport, and riding as far 
north as Mercersburg, Pennsylvania ; re- ■ 
turned on the other side of McClellan's 
army, eluding Pleasanton's vigorous pur- 
suit, and recrossed the river near the mouth 
of the Monocacy. He commanded the cav- 
alry corps, Army of Northern Virginia, at 
the battle of Fredericksburg, guarding the 
extreme Confederate right. His cavalry 
took part in the battle of Chancellorsville, 
and when Gen. T. J. Jackson was mortally 
wounded, and Gen. Ambrose Hill disabled, 
he succeeded to the command of the Second 
Army Corps ; retook the position at Hazel 
Grove, from which Jackson had been re- 
pulsed, and forced the Federal army to fall 
back from Chancellorsville and Fairview. 
He commanded the cavalry division at 
Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863; was detailed to 
guard the flanks of the advance guard of 
Gen. Lee's army, but was checked by Fleet- 
wood and Stevensburg by the Federal cav- 
alry. He made a raid in the rear of the 
Federal army, rejoining the Army of North- 
ern Virginia, July 3, 1863, and guarded the 
mountain gaps during the retreat from 
Gettysburg. During the remainder of the 
summer of 1863, he engaged in skirmishes 
with the cavalry under Gens. Kilpatrick and 
Buford, and defeated the cavalry under Gen. 
Pleasonton at Brandy Station, and the brig- 
ade under Gen. Henry E. Danes near Buck- 
land. He commanded the cavalry corps, 
Army of Northern Virginia, during Grant's 
campaign against Richmond, taking part in 
the battles of the Wilderness and Cold Har- 
bor. On hearing of Sheridan's advance to 
Richmond, he concentrated his forces at 
Yellow Tavern, where, on May 11, 1864, he 
v.as mortally wounded while urging on his 



90 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



men. His last words on the field of battk 
were: "Go back! I would rather die than 
be whipped!" He died, May 12, i8()4, and 
a monument marks the place where he fell. 

Taliaferro, Alexander Gait, born at 
"Churchill," Gloucester county, V'irginia, in 
September, 1808. He graduated Bachelor 
oi Arts at William and Mary College, and 
in 1832 graduated in law. In 1861 he was 
lieutenant-colonel of cavalry, in the state 
militia. He applied to Governor Letcher 
for orders, but was told that all militia 
offices were out of commission. He at once 
went to Harper's Ferry and took his place 
in the ranks in a company of minute-men 
from Culpeper county. A few days later he 
was given command of a squad of men from 
Baltimore, and with them he was assigned 
to Col. Ambrose P. Hill's regiment, but in 
a few days received from Governor Letcher 
a commission as lieutenant-colonel of in- 
fantry, and was assigned to the Twenty- 
third Virginia Regiment, of the "Stonewall" 
division. In the operations which followed, 
ht was wounded in the battle of Kernstown, 
and soon afterwards he was chosen colonel 
of his regiment. At the battle of McDowell, 
a second horse was killed under him ; at the 
first battle of Winchester his sword was 
torn away by a grapeshot, and at Port Re- 
public he was wounded in the shoulder, ren- 
dering him incapable of taking part in the 
battles about Richmond, and while invalid- 
ed at his home in Culpeper county, only 
escaped capture through the sagacity of his 
wife, who put the Federals upon a wrong 
scent. After the death of Gen. Winder. 
Col. Taliaferro was promoted to brigadier- 
general, and succeeded to the command of 
the lirigade, and he temporarily commanded 



ilie "Stonewall" division. At the time of 
the surrender, he was post commander at 
Charlottesville. He now retired to his 
ejtate, "Ninondale," Culpeper county, where 
he died, June 29, 1884. He married, in 1836, 
Agnes Harwood, daughter of Thomas Mar- 
shall, of "Oakhill," Fauquier county, Vir- 
ginia. 

Taliaferro, William Booth, son of Warner 
T. Taliaferro and Frances Booth, his wife, 
born at Belleville, Gloucester county, Vir- 
ginia, December 28, 1822. He attended Har- 
vard College, and was graduated from Wil- 
liam and Mary College in 1841. During the 
Mexican war he was captain in the Eleventh 
L'Uited States Infantry, was promoted to 
major, and in 1848 his regiment was dis- 
banded. He commanded the Virginia state 
forces at the time of the John Brown raid, 
and was later at Norfolk and Gloucester 
Point. As colonel of the Twenty-third Vir- 
ginia Regiment, he served in West Virginia, 
and in 1862 was made brigadier-general. In 
December he joined Jackson in the valley. 
cc>mmanding a brigade. He succeeded to the 
command of Jackson's division, and took 
part in the operations against Pope, and was 
wounded. He was in the battle of Freder- 
icksburg, and was subsequently given com- 
mand of the district of Savannah. In July. 
1863, he commanded at Morris Island, and 
then on James Island. He subsequently 
commanded in East Florida, and afterwards 
in South Carolina. When Sherman came 
before Savannah, he guarded the route for 
Hardee's escape. In December he was 
given a division, and January i. 1865, was 
promoted to major-general. After the war, 
he returned home, and rendered good ser- 
vice to the cause of education, as president 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



91 



of the board of visitors to William and Mary 
College and other institutions. He died at 
home, February 27, 1898. 

Terrill, James B., born at Warm Springs, 
Bath county, Virginia, February 20, 1838. 
He was educated at the Virginia Military 
Institute, studied law, and practiced in his 
native town. In 1861 he was elected major 
of the Thirteenth Virginia Regiment, Col. 
A P. Hill. He served under Jackson in the 
Shenandoah Valley and at Manassas, and 
was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and 
commended in general orders for his con- 
duct at Cross Keys, Port Republic, Cedar 
Mountain and the Second Manassas. He 
was conspicuous at Fredericksburg, in the 
Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and was 
killed near Bethesda Church, May 30, 1864. 

Terry, William, born in Amherst county, 
\irginia, August 14, 1824; was graduated 
from the University of Virginia in 1848: 
taught school; studied law, was admitted 
to the bar in 185 1, and began practice in 
AVytheville, Virginia; engaged in news- 
paper work; served in the Confederate 
army as a lieutenant in the Fourth Virginia 
Infantry ; promoted to major in 1862 ; colo- 
nel in February, 1864, and was commis- 
sioned brigadier-general. May 20, 1864; re- 
sumed the practice of law in Wytheville ; 
elected as a Conservative to the forty-second 
congress (March 4, 1871-March 3, 1873) ; 
re-elected to the forty-fourth congress 
(March 4, 1875-March 3, 1877) ; after leav- 
ing congress resumed the practice of law ; 
drowned while trying to ford Reed Creek, 
near Wytheville, Virginia, September 5, 
1888. 

Terry, William Richard, was born at 
Liberty, Virginia, March 12, 1827. He was 



graduated from the Mrginia 2^Iilitary In- 
stitute in 1850, and engaged in mercan- 
tile pursuits until 1861, when he was com- 
missioned captain of Virginia cavalry, Con- 
federate States army. He was promoted 
colonel and assumed command of the Twen- 
ty-fourth Virginia regiment. On May 16, 
1864, he led Kemper's brigade. General Ran- 
som's division, Army of Northern Virginia, 
in the advance of Drewry's Bluff, serving 
with acknowledged gallantry in carrying 
the enemy's breastworks ; was promoted 
brigadier-general. May 20, 1864, and con- 
tmued in command of Kemper's brigade. 
Gen. George E. Pickett's division, and at 
the battle of Five Forks, x\pril i, 1865, was 
posted on the extreme right in the intrench- 
ed line, with Corse, Steuart, Ransom and 
Wallace following to the left. Gen. Terry 
was a state senator for several years ; super- 
intendent of the Richmond penitentiary, and 
of the Lee camp soldiers' home. He died 
in Chesterfield county, IMarch 28, 1897. 

Tucker, John Randolph, born in Alex- 
andria, Virginia, January 31, 1812; not a 
kinsman of him of same name (1823-97). 
He received the warrant of midshipman in 
the navy, June i, 1826, and was made lieu- 
tenant, December 20, 1837. As executive 
officer of the StromboU 'he took part in the 
Mexican war, being commander toward the 
last. He was promoted to commodore in 
1855. and stationed at Norfolk, Virginia, on 
the receiving ship and as ordnance officer. 
Upon the secession of Virginia, he resigned 
and was placed in command of the Virginia 
vessels on the James river. In March, 1862, 
he commanded the Yorktozvn, and ran the 
batteries at Newport News under a heavy 
fire. When Virginia came into the Con- 
federacy, he entered the Confederate navy. 



92 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



and as commander of the Patrick Henry 
was engaged in the Merrimac-Monitor con- 
flict, and other engagements in Hampton 
Roads. He was given command of the 
v.ooden fleet, and was engaged in the attack 
on Drewry's Bluff. Promoted to captain. 
May 13, 1863, he commanded the flagship 
Chicora at Charleston, until the downfall of 
that city, when he organized a naval bri- 
gade, which he commanded in the battle of 
Sailor's Creek, April 6, 1865, and which, 
with other troops, was forced to surrender. 
In 1866, as rear-admiral in the Peruvian 
navy, he had charge of the naval operations 
of that country and Chile in their war with 
Spain. Later, as president of the Peruvian 
Hydrographic Commission, he surveyed the 
upper Amazon and its tributaries. He died 
in Richmond. June 12, 1883. 

Walker, Henry H., a native Virginia, 
graduated from the United States Military 
Academy in 1853. Until 1855 he was on 
duty in New Mexico ; became first lieuten- 
ant. Sixth United States Infantry, in 1857, 
and became aide-de-camp to Governor 
Walker, of Kansas, and afterward served 
on the staff of Gen. Clarke, at San Fran- 
cisco. When Virginia seceded, he came 
home, and was commissioned captain, C. S. 
A. Later he became lieutenant-colonel of 
the Fortieth Virginia Regiment. He was 
twice wounded at Gaines' Mill. In July, 
1863, after being in charge of a convalescent 
camp, he was promoted to brigadier-general, 
and commanded a brigade at Bristoe Sta- 
tion and Mine Run. In December he was 
ordered to the Shenendoah Valley to rein- 
force Gen. Early ; in March, 1864, was re- 
called east, and served in the Wilderness 
and at Spottsylvania Court House, until 



severely wounded, May 10, 1864. In No- 
vember following his brigade was consoli- 
dated with Archer's, and he was placed on 

general court martial duty. 

Walker, James Alexander, born in Au- 
gusta county, Virginia, August 27, 1832 ; 
was graduated from the Virginia Military 
Institute in 1852; studied law in the Uni- 
versity of Virginia during the sessions of 
1854 and 1855 ; was admitted to the bar and 
began practice in Pulaski county, Virginia, 
in 1856; attorney for the commonwealth in 
i860; entered the Confederate army in April, 
1 86 1, as captain of the Pulaski guards, 
afterwards Company C, Fourth Virginia In- 
fantry, Stonewall Brigade ; lieutenant-colo- 
nel and assigned to the Thirteenth Virginia 
Infantry in July, 1861 ; colonel of the Thir- 
teenth Virginia Infantry in March, 1862, 
and brigadier-general and assigned to com- 
mand of the "Stonewall brigade" in May, 
1863 ; commanded Early's old division at 
the surrender of Appomattox; severely 
wounded at Spottsylvania Court House, 
May 12, 1864; member of the house of dele- 
gates of Virginia, 1871-1872; elected lieu- 
tenant-governor of Virginia in 1877 ; elected 
as a Republican to the fifty-fourth and fifty- 
fifth congresses (March 4, 1895-March 3, 
1899) ; died in Wytheville, Virginia, Octo- 
ber 21, 1901. 

Walker, Reuben Lindsay, was born at 
Logan, Albemarle county, Virginia, May 
29, 1827, son of Captain Lewis Walker. He 
graduated from the Virginia Military Insti- 
tute, and became a civil engineer. He was 
sergeant-at-arms of the Virginia convention 
of 1861, and when secession was accom- 
plished, asked of Governor Letcher permis- 
sion to organize an expedition for the cap- 



UNDER THE CONFEDERACY 



93 



ture of Fortess Monroe, and which was de- 
nied him. He was captain of the Purcell 
battery, the first to leave Richmond, and 
was engaged at Manassas. On March 31, 
1862, he was promoted to major, and was 
made chief of artillery to Gen. A. P. Hill. 
He was at Fredericksburg and Chancellors- 
ville and was promoted to lieutenant-colonel 
and colonel, and made chief of artillery of 
the Third Corps. At Gettysburg he com- 
manded sixty-three guns. In 1864 he served 
in all the principal battles, from the Wilder- 
ness to Ream's Station. In January. 1865, 
he was promoted to brigadier-general. He 
was active in the final days at Petersburg, 
and thence to the end. After the surrender 
Gen. Walker gave himself to railroad and 
public building construction. He died upon 
his farm, at the confluence of the James and 
Rivanna rivers, June 7, 1890. 

Weisiger, Daniel Adams, a resident of 
Petersburg, Virginia, served as lieutenant 
and adjutant in a Virginia regiment in the 
Mexican war. In May, 1853, he was elected 
colonel of a Virginia militia regiment which 
he commanded until i860, when he formed a 
battalion which marched to Norfolk and 
witnessed the evacuation of the navy yard. 
This command became the Twelfth Vir- 
ginia Regiment, of which he was colonel, 
and became a part of the .'\rmy of North- 
ern Virginia. At the second battle of 
Manasses, he was dangerously wounded and 
invalided. In May, 1864. in the Wilderness, 
he was given the Virginia brigade, which 
he commanded from thence on to the sur- 
render, he having been promoted to briga- 
dier-general. 

Wharton, G. C, became major of the 
Forty-fifth Regiment Virginia Infantry, in 



July, 1861 ; in August he became colonel of 
the Fifty-first Regiment, and campaigned 
under Gen. Floyd in West Virginia. At 
Fort Donelson he commanded a brigade, 
and when surrender was determined upon, 
he escaped with a part of his command, and 
aided in preserving the government stores 
at Nashville. He subsequently served in 
the Kanawha Valley; later was promoted 
tc brigadier-general, and was transferred to 
Gen. Longstreet's command in East Ten- 
nessee. Returning to Virginia, he aided in 
defeating Sigel and Hunter. He com- 
manded a division in the Shenandoah cam- 
paign. After the war he resided in Radford, 
Virginia. 

Whittle, William Conway, born in Nor- 
folk, \'irginia. in 1805, son of Fortescue 
Whittle, of county Antrim. Ireland, and 
Mary Anne Davies. his wife, daughter of 
Col. William Davies, of Petersburg. He 
was appointed midshipman in the United 
States navy. May 10, 1820, and rose to the 
rank of commander, serving on a number 
of vessels, including the Brandywine and 
Ohio. He was in Florida during the Semi- 
nole difficulties. In the Mexican war he 
v.-as wounded at the battle of Tuspan, and 
later commanded the dispatch boat Colonel 
Harucv. In 1853 he commanded the United 
States sloop Decatur, on the banks of New- 
foundland, and the United States sloop Dale, 
en the coast of Africa. 1854-55. When Vir- 
ginia seceded, he resigned his commission, 
and entered the naval service of his state. 
On June 11, 1861, he entered upon duty in 
the Confederate States navy. He com- 
manded the naval defenses on the York 
river, later commanded the Confederate 
flotilla on the upper Mississippi, and then 



94 



\IRGJXIA BIOGRAPHY 



the naval station at New Orleans, Louisi- 
ana. He was promoted to captain, October 
23, 1862. He died in Virginia, in 1878. 

Wilkinson, John, born at Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, November 6, 1821. He entered the 
navy as a midshipman in 1837, attended the 
Philadelphia naval school, and was made a 
passed midshipman in 1843. I'or three years 
he served on the Oregon and the Portsmouth. 
In 1846 he was attached to the Saratoga, on 
dut\- in the Gulf of Mexico. Was commis- 
sioned master in June, 1850, and lieutenant 
in November of the same year. In 1858-59 
he served on the Southern Star, on the Para- 
guay expedition, and was on coast survey 
duty from the latter year until the breaking 
out of the civil war in April, 1861, when he 
resigned and entered the Confederate navy 
as a lieutenant. He was assigned to duty at 
Fort Powhatan, on James river, and was 
thence transferred to the command of a bat- 
tery on Acquia Creek. In the spring of 
1862 he was appointed executive officer of 
the Confederate States ram Louisiana, at 
New Orleans, and was taken prisoner when 
Farragut captured the city. In August, 
1862. he was exchanged, and on the 12th 
left Richmond for England with funds to 
purchase a vessel, war munitions and ma- 
chinery for making Confederate paper 
money. He there bought the steamer 



Giraffe (afterward the R. E. Lcr), with wj-.ich 
he ran the blockade at Wilmington, North 
Carolina. With the same vessel he after- 
wards made rejjeated voyages between Wil- 
mington and I'.ermuda, taking out cotton 
and bringing in arms and munitions of war. 
In October, 1863, he was instructed to or- 
ganize and command an expedition to re- 
lease the Confederate prisoners held at John- 
son's Island, his operations to be based from 
sume convenient point in Canada. In this 
he was defeated, the Canadian governor- 
general learning of the plot, and so guard- 
ing the lake ports that no force could be 
assembled, nor a vessel procured. In 1864 
Captain Wilkinson commanded the iron- 
clad Albemarle, and later the same year was 
transferred to the Chiekamauga, with which 
he captured and destroyed a considerable 
numl)er of Federal merchant vessels, from 
which he took large quantities of valuable 
stores. In 1865 he commanded the blockade- 
runner Chameleon, which he took to Liver- 
pool, where she was seized just after the 
cessation of hostilities, and delivered to 
L-nited States authorities. Captain Wilkin- 
son published "The Narrative of a Blockade- 
Runner" (New York, 1877). 



NOTE. — A number of military and naval officers 
of the period of (he Confederacy appear elsewhere 
under the title "Members of Congrress" and "Promi- 
nent Persons." 



PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 



IV— PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 



Wilson, Woodrow, the present President 
01 the United States, was born at Staunton, 
Virginia, December 28, 1855, son of Rev. 
Joseph R. Wilson and Jessie (Woodrow) 
Wilson, his wife, the former a distinguished 
clergyman of the Presbyterian church of the 
South. His father was a native of Ohio, 
and his mother of Scotland, and his ancestry, 
on both sides, is Scotch-Irish. At the call 
of the church, the father of President Wil- 
son moved South, and during the war be- 
tween the states resided at Augusta, Georgia. 
President Wilson's boyhood days were spent 
at the latter place and at Columbia, South 
Carolina, and Wilmington, Xorth Carolina, 
V. here he prepared for college with private 
tutors and at the schools of those places. 
His real educator, however, was his father, 
who. besides being an orator of considerable 
power, was also a scholar, and for some 
years professor in the Theological Seminary 
at Columbia, South Carolina, and closed his 
career as professor in the Southwestern 
Theological Seminary at Clarksville, Ten- 
nessee. 

President ^\'ilson was not born with a sil- 
ver spoon in his mouth, and many were the 
privations he and his people were called 
upon to endure during the civil war, part of 
V hich raged around their home. 

In 1874 he entered the freshman class at 
Davidson College, North Carolina, remained 
one year, and in the fall of 1875 he entered 
the freshman class at Princeton College, 
graduating in 1879. In college he was a hard- 
working student, and an omnivorous reader, 

VIR_7 



and especially distinguished for his com- 
mand of language and literary ability. His 
outdoor life was that of the average college 
boy. Athletics interested him and he was 
fend of baseball and football. 

Upon his graduation from Princeton Uni- 
versity, in 1879, he entered the University 
of \irginia, Charlottesville, N'irginia, as a 
l?w student, and graduated in 1881. For 
the two years that followed he practiced 
liw at Atlanta, Georgia, and in that time 
fciund that \\-hile the [principles of the law 
and its study interested him. the practical 
business side of it did not. 

Briefly his career as an educator by years 
is as follows: From 1883 to 1885 he did 
graduate work at Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Baltimore, Maryland, in political econ- 
omy and history; from 1885 to 1888 he was 
piofessor of history and political economy 
at Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania, a 
famous school for the higher education of 
young ladies ; from 1888 to 1890 he was pro- 
fessor in the same branches of science at 
'\\esleyan University; in June, 1890, he was 
elected professor of jurisprudence and politi- 
cal economy, and entered upon his duties in 
the September following; in 1895 the de- 
partment was divided and he was assigned 
to the chair of jurisprudence ; in 1897, as the 
result of a large gift by Mr. Cyrus H. Mc- 
Cormick, of Chicago, of the class of 1879, 
he was promoted to the McCormick pro- 
fessorship of jurisprudence and politics; in 
1902 he was elected president of the univer- 
sity, and continued as such till 1910, during 



98 



\']RG1XIA IIIOGRAPIIY 



whicli time Mr. Wilson gave much attention 
to the study of government and history. 
though his official duties, as his writings 
show, doubtless prevented any great investi- 
gation of original records and sources. His 
j>ul)lished works show the trend of his mind 
and culture, and are as follows: "Con- 
gressional Government," 1885 ; "The State 
Elements of Historical aiid Practical Poli- 
tics," 1889; "Division and Reunion," 1893; 
"An Old Master, and Other Political Es- 
says," 1893; "Life of George Washington," 
1896; "History of the American People," 
IQ02; "Constitutional Government in the 
United States," 1908. 

PiUt probably it was his happy turn at 
public speaking which directed public atten- 
tion to him more than anything else. He is 
not only a good thinker, but a master of 
words and phrase-making. His speech at 
the "Dollar Dinner" at Elizabeth, New Jer- 
sey, in the last week of March, 1910, so well 
declared the purposes of the modern Democ- 
racy that his nomination for governor of 
New Jersey was the direct result. In this 
speech he declared that these principles con- 
sisted in a profound and abiding faith in the 
people themselves, in the belief that the wel- 
fare of the nation consists in the welfare of 
the individuals of whom the nation is com- 
posed. Not the corporation, but the in- 
dividual, not the artificial group of persons 
existing by permission of law but the single 
living person, is the only rightful possessor 
of rights and privileges. The corporation is 
simply a legal instrumentality created for 
the convenience of the individual and must 
be used only for his convenience. Soon after 
this speech Dr. Wilson was nominated for 
governor of New Jersey, and resigned the 
presidency of Princeton. His election was 



a triumph over the political machine, and 
the platform on which he was nominated 
called for the control of corporations, for a 
thorough-going and honest election law, for 
the publicity of campaign contributions, and 
f(ir the enactment of an employer's liability 
l)ill. In the campaign which followed. Dr. 
\\'ilson proved to be an effective campaign 
speaker, without being an orator of the old 
style, his appeal being to the reasoning 
powers rather than to the emotions. His 
administration as governor made good the 
promises of the platform. A new election 
bill was passed, as well as several measures 
tending to suppress graft in public places 
ai:d limiting the power of the machine. His 
success put him to the front as a possible 
presidential candidate. In 1912 he was the 
choice of the progressive democracy, and his 
name was oiTered in the Democratic conven- 
tion at I'.altimore. Here again there was 
the struggle with the machine. His nomi- 
nation was made possible only by the superb 
powers of \Villiam Jennings Bryan as a 
master manager and orator. The campaign 
which followed was one of the most exciting 
in recent times, and resulted in the election 
oi Dr. Wilson by a division in the ranks of 
the Republican party. As President, Dr. 
\\'ilson has infused his personality into the 
government administration far beyond any- 
thing any of his predecessors ever deemed 
proper or even constitutional. He discarded 
the example of Jefferson, the founder of his 
party, and revived the rule of the old Fed- 
eralist presidents of reading his messages 
to congress. .Ml important bills have been 
jirepared by him in conference with the 
leaders, in advance of their submission to 
congress, and he has in large measure been 
his own .'^ecretarv of State. Thus far the 



PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 



99 



fruits of this legislation have been a new 
tariff bill and a new banking bill, and it is 
only justice to say that both have given gen- 
eral satisfaction. Hating force, Dr. Wilson 
has made it his cardinal policy to keep the 
country out of war. Mexico has been, dur- 
ing his administration, a constant thorn in 
the side, and the violations by England, and 
especially by Germany, of our neutrality 
have been frequent and flagrant. But Dr. 
Wilson has presented to each strong repre- 
sentations, which have undoubtedly had 
their effect, though it is also true that his 
devotion to the primary object of peace has 
subjected him to the charge of weakness 
and indifference to American rights, and 
there are some who in matter of the Euro- 
pean war would have had him take his 
stand upon the broad grounds of humanity 
and promptly registered a protest when 
Belgium was invaded and ruthlessly trod- 



den under foot. It is probably too early to 
pronounce judgment, with accuracy, upon 
those matters, and in the meantime tJie 
American people, having the highest faith 
in the honesty and integrity of the Presi- 
dent, have irrespective of party, let it be 
known that they will stand by him to the 
end, under the unquestionably difficult con- 
aitions which surround him. 

Mr. \\'ilson married, June 24, 1885, Ellen 
Louise Axsen, a charming Southern lady, 
from Savannah, Georgia. Mrs. Wilson had 
a distinct claim on New Jersey, when her 
husband was so highly honored, in that she 
was the direct descendant of the southern 
branch of the Fitz-Randolph family of that 
state, a family which donated a portion of 
the land upon which Princeton University 
now stands. She was an artist of merit, and 
her death not many months ago was greatly 
regretted. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 



V-UNITED STATES SENATORS 



Barbour, John Strode, Jr., son of John S. 
Harbour (q. v.) and Eliza A. Byrne, his wife, 
born in Culpeper county, Virginia, in 1819; 
was educated in private schools, and at the 
University of Virginia, from which he was 
graduated with the Bachelor of Laws degree 
in 1842. He began law practice in his native 
county, and became greatly interested in 
railroad development, and was president of 
the Virginia Midland Railroad Company. 
He was elected to the house of delegates in 
1847. ^"d was reelected four times. He was 
remarkable for his power of organization, 
and the great work for which he is remem- 
bered in his native state is. when as chair- 
man of the Democratic organization he ac- 
cc.mplished the overthrow of the Mahone 
regime. He was elected as a Democrat to 
the forty-seventh, forty-eighth and forty- 
ninth congresses (March 4, 1881-March 3, 
1887). He was a delegate at large in the 
Democratic national conventions of 1884 
and 1888, and member of the Democratic 
national committee, 1884-1892. He was 
elected to the United States Senate, and 
served from March 4, 1889, until his death 
in Washington City, May 14, 1892. 

Bowden, Lemuel Jackson, born in Wil- 
liamsburg. Virginia, January ]6, 1815; was 
graduated from William and Mary College, 
Williamsburg; studied law, and engaged in 
practice. He was a member of the state 
legislature for three terms ; was member of 
the Virginia constitutional conventions of 
1849 and 1851 ; in 1861 was a presidential 
elector. He was elected to the United 



States senate by the so-called Virginia legis- 
lature at Alexandria, and served from March 
3. 1863, until his death, in Washington City, 
January 2, 1864. 

Carlile, John Snyder, ( q. v.). 

Daniel, John Warwick, born in Lynch- 
burg. Virginia, September 5, 1842, son of 
William Daniel (q. v.), judge of the supreme 
court of appeals, and grandson of William 
Daniel, judge of the general court of Vir- 
ginia. He was educated at private schools, 
and at the old Lynchburg College, where 
he was an industrious student, and gave 
evidence of fine oratorical powers. When 
the civil war opened, he. in his nine- 
teenth year, entered the Confederate pro- 
visional army as second lieutenant and 
drillmaster in the Stonewall brigade, and 
he was soon given the same rank in the 
famous Eleventh Virginia Regiment, and 
was made adjutant. Later he was promoted 
to major, and served as chief-of-stafif to 
Gen. Jubal A. Early. His three years of 
active service were marked by devotion to 
duty and gallant conduct. He was four 
times wounded, and he received an almost 
fatal injury on May 6, 1864, during the 
battle of the Wilderness. He was unhorsed 
by a volley from the enemy, a large femoral 
vein was opened, and his thigh bone shat- 
tered. Timely assistance saved him from 
bleeding to death, but he was crippled for 
life, and he used crutches ever after. He 
now entered the University of Virginia, 
where for a year he studied law, carrying 



104 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



off the highest honors for oratory. Re- 
turning to L3nchburg, he was admitted to 
the bar, and engaged in the practice of law 
with his father, the partnership continuing 
until the death of the latter, seven years 
later. In 1869 he was elected to the state 
legislature as a member of the house of 
delegates, and served for two years. In 
1875 he was elected to the state senate, and 
was re-elected four years later. In the 
meantime he had twice been an unsuccess- 
ful candidate for nomination to congress on 
the Democratic ticket, against older men. 
In 1877 he was a candidate for governor, 
before the Democratic state convention ; a 
deadlock between himself and his leading 
competitor, gave the nomination to a com- 
promise candidate. In 1881, when he was the 
candidate for governor, the chief issue was 
the funding of the state debt. The Read- 
justers were successful, and Mr. Daniel was 
defeated. In 1884 he was elected to the na- 
tional house of representatives, and in that 
body acquitted himself most creditably. In 
1886 he was elected to the United States sen- 
ate, to succeed Senator Mahone, and was 
four times re-elected without opposition, 
serving until his death, having served longer 
than any other senator from X'irginia, in all 
the history of the state. He was a pioneer in 
the establishment of the free school system 
cf Virginia, and the patron of the act that 
aided school restoration when the school 
funds were contracted by the funding act of 
1870. In the fifty-ninth congress, on his initi- 
tive, southern representation in the South 
American Congress at Rio de Janeiro was 
provided for. He also procured the adoption 
of a motion for the establishment of a na- 
tional powder factory, with the purpose of 
breaking the power of the powder-trust. 



He took a leading part in the debates on 
the railroad rate bill, and his speech on that 
measure was one of his most notable efforts. 
In the senate, he was second to none as a 
loader, and his words in debate attracted 
the attention and admiration of the whole 
country. As a member of the committee on 
foreign relations, on finance, on appropria- 
tions, and on the industrial commission, the 
powers of his well-trained mind, his broad 
information, and his lofty patriotic purpose, 
commanded the utmost respect of his oppo- 
nents. A Democrat from conviction and 
principles, he v^-as in the very forefront of 
party leadership. In 1876 he was a Demo- 
cratic presidential elector ; and he was a 
delegate-at-large in every Democratic na- 
tional convention from 1888 to 1900. In 
1896 he could have been the party nominee 
for vice-president by simply yielding assent, 
and the same was true in the convention of 
igoo. In the state constitutional conven- 
tion, he made a minority report on suffrage, 
which, after a long struggle, and with slight 
amendment, was finally adopted, and its 
presence in the present state constitution 
has practically solved the suffrage ques- 
tion in ^'irginia. As an orator. Senator 
Daniel was very distinguished. His appear- 
ance was impressive, his voice sonorous and 
musical, and his gestures graceful, without 
being theatrical. He delivered addresses 
covering a great variety of subjects, and sev- 
eral are of permanent historic value. His ad- 
dress on Washington, in the hall of repre- 
sentatives, Washington City, and that on 
General Lee at the unveiling of his recum- 
bent statue at Lexington, are fine examples 
of dignified eulogium. He was the author of 
two law works which have been accepted as 
standard — "Daniel on Xegotianle Instru- 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 



105 



ments," and "Daniel on Attaciiments." In 
recognition of his scholarly attainments, he 
received the degree of LL. D. from Wash- 
ington and Lee University, and from the 
University of Michigan. Senator Daniel died 
ai Lynchburg. Virginia. June 29, 1910. 

Hunton, Eppa, (q. v.). 

Johnston, John Warfield, born near Ab- 
ijigdon. \'irginia, September 9, 1818, son of 
John Warfield Johnston (elder brother of 
Gen. Joseph E. Johnston) and Letitia Floyd, 
his wife; attended Abingdon Academy, and 
the South Carolina College at Columbia, 
South Carolina ; studied law at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia ; was admitted to the bar in 
1839, and was commonwealth attorney for 
'J'azewell county, 1844-46. He was a state 
senator, 1846-48; judge of the circuit court, 
1866-70. He was elected as a Conservative to 
the L^nited States senate to fill vacancy, 
serving from October 20. 1869, to March 3, 
1871 ; re-elected to fill vacancy, and was 
again re-elected, serving from March 15, 
1S71, to March 3, 1873. He died at Rich- 
mond. Virginia, February 2"], 1889. 

Lewis, John Francis, born near Port Re- 
public, Virginia, March i, 1818. He was 
a deleg-ate in the state convention of 1861, 
and refused to sign the ordinance of seces- 
sion. In 1869 he was elected lieutenant- 
governor on the Conservative ticket ; and 
was later elected to the United States 
senate, serving from October 20, 1869, to 
March 3, 1875. He was appointed by Pres- 
ident Hayes United States marshal for the 
western district of Virginia, April 11, 1878. 
and served until March i, 1882, when he re- 
signed. He was again elected lieutenant- 
governor on the Readjuster ticket in 1881. 



He died September 2, 1895, in Lynnwood, 
\'irginia. 

Mahone, William, (q. v.). 

Martin, Thomas Staples, born at Scotts- 
ville. Albemarle county, \'irginia, January 
29. 1847, son of John Samuel Martin and 
Martha Ann Staples, his wife. He received 
his primary education in the public schools, 
and March i, 1864, attended the Virginia 
Military Institute. At the time of the battle 
o' New Market, he and six others were ill 
in hospital, and were unable to march with 
their cadet battalion. Later the cadets were 
enrolled as a reserve force of the Confed- 
erate army, and young Martin, with his 
companions, stood ready for such military 
duty as might be required of them. In 1865 
he entered the University of Virginia, but 
at the end of his second year he was obliged 
to abandon his studies and return home, on 
account of the death of his father. The mer- 
cj:ntile business in which the father had 
been engaged did not appeal to him. and he 
applied himself diligently to a course of self- 
prescribed law reading. In 1869, at the age 
of twenty-two. he was admitted to the bar 
of Albemarle county, and in due time was 
busied with caring for the interests of vari- 
ous corporations and firms, as well as of 
private individuals. His deep interest in 
the financial condition of the state led him 
to become a member of the Democratic gen- 
eral committee, of which Mr. John S. Bar- 
bour was chairman, who reposed great con- 
fidence in him, and found in him perhaps 
his most efficient aide. It was due in large 
measure to Mr. Martin that the party was 
rehabilitated and brought into control, re- 
sulting in the restoration of the financial 
integrity of the commonwealth. In 1893 



io6 



VIRGIXIA lUOCRAIMn- 



cuiulitions pointed to liim as the logical can- 
<Iidate for L'nited States senator, to succeed 
Cen. Eppa Hiiiiton, who had been appointed 
to till out the unexpired term of Senator 
.Kihn S. r.arhour, deceased. That he was 
nominated over such a strong opponent as 
Gen. I'itzhug-h Lee, and was elected to the 
hij^h ollice when he had never sat in the 
slate legislature, attests the estimation in 
which he was held. In the senate he was 
from the outset industrious and sagacious, 
and performed highly useful labors on the 
committees on claims, commerce, naval af- 
fairs, and the District of Columbia. He was 
reelected in 1899, 1905 and 191 1. being the 
present incumbent of the office. In 1904 the 
Democrats adopted the primary system of 
nomination, and the appeal was to be made 
directly to the people. ]\Ir. Martin had as 
his opponent Governor A. J. Montague, a 
man of excellent character and attainments, 
and an accomplished orator. Except at the 
bar, Mr. Martin was not much known as a 
speaker, but in this canvass he displayed fine 
oratorical qualities and won for himself new 
honors. In the senate, while at the fore- 
front on questions of national importance, 
he has not been neglectful of local interests, 
and the liberal approjiriations for the cus- 
tom houses at Xew]jort News and Peters- 
burg, and for other public works, have been 
procured largely if not chiefly as the result 
o' his effort. To him is also due the final 
settlement of the debt due by the Federal 
government to the state of Virginia from 
the time of the war with Great Britain in 
1812. Such confidence did his fellow sen- 
ators have in him that they made him floor 
leader of his party in the senate. He is a 
m.ember of the board of visitors to the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and to the Miller Man- 



ual and Labor School of .\lbemarle. He 
married, in 1894, Lucy Chambliss. daughter 
of Col. C. Fenton Day, of Smithfield, Vir- 
ginia. 

Riddleberger, Harrison Holt, horn in 
Edinburg, Shenandoah county, \irginia, 
October 4, 1844; was educated in the com- 
mon schools. He served three years in the 
Confederate army, as second and first lieu- 
tenant of infantry and captain of cavalry. 
After the war he returned home and became 
editor of the "Tenth Legion Banner." He 
studied law, was admitted to the bar, and 
served as commonwealth attorney, 1876-80. 
For two terms he was a member of the 
house of delegates, and state senator one 
term. He was editor of the "Shenandoah 
Democrat," and later of the "Virginian." 
He was a member of the state committee of 
the Conservative party until 1875, =i"d a 
piesidential elector on the Democratic 
ticket of 1876, and the Readjuster ticket of 
1880. He was elected as a Readjuster to 
the United States senate in 1881. He died 
in Woodstock, \'irginia. January 24. 1800. 

Swanson, Claude Augustus, ( q. v.). 

Withers, Robert Enoch, born in Camp- 
bell county. Virginia. September 18, 1821, 
son of Robert Walter Withers. He at- 
tended private schools at his home until 
l.c was old enough to enter the Univer- 
sity of \'irginia, where he took up medi- 
cal studies, and in 1841. graduated with 
the M. D. degree. He engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession in his native county, 
and later in Danville, Virginia. At the out- 
break of the civil war, in April, 1861, he en- 
tered the Confederate provisional service, as 
major of infantry, and under the regular 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 



107 



army establishment became colonel of the 
Eighteenth Virginia Infantry Regiment, 
which he commanded from the battle of Bull 
Run to the second Cold Harbor, in 1864. 
In the last named engagement, he was 
severely wounded and incapacitated for fur- 
ther service in the field. On recovering 
sufficiently he was placed in charge of the 
extensive prisons and hospitals at Dan- 
ville, Virginia, where he rendered services of 
great value until the close of the war. He 
located in Lynchburg in January, 1866, and 
became editor of the Lynchburg "News," a 
daily newspaper devoted to the interests of 
the Conservative party ; later he occupied a 
similar position on the Richmond "En- 
ouirer." In 1868 he was the Conservative 



candidate for governor, and was defeated 
In 1873 he was a presidential elector on the 
Greeley ticket, and was elected lieutenant- 
governor. He was elected in 1874 to the 
United States senate, as a Conservative, to 
succeed John F. Lewis, and served from 
March 4, 1875, to March 3, 1881. In 1885 
he was then appointed consul at Hong 
Kong, China, by President Cleveland, served 
air' such for a term of four years, when he 
resigned, and took up his residence in 
Wytheville, Virginia. He took an active 
part in the aflfairs of the Protestant Episco- 
pal church, and represented his diocese in 
general conventions for many years. He 
died in Wytheville, Virginia, September 21, 
1907. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



VI-HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



Ayer, Richard Small, born at Montville, 
Waldo county, Alaine, October 9, 1829; edu- 
cated in the common schools ; enlisted in 
the Union army as a private in Fourth 
Maine Volunteers in 1861, and was mus- 
tered out as a captain ; settled in Virginia in 
1865; elected a delegate to Virginia con- 
stitutional convention in 1867; elected as a 
Republican to the forty-first congress, and 
took his seat January 31, 1870, and served 
until March 2, 1871 ; died at Liberty, Maine, 
December 14, 1896. 

Barbour, John S., Jr. (q. v.). 

Beale, R. L. T., (q. v.)- 

Blair, Jacob Beeson, born at Parkersburg, 
Wood county, Virginia, April 11, 1821 ; he 
was educated in the public schools, studied 
law, engaged in practice ; was for several 
years prosecuting attorney for Ritchie 
county; was elected from Ritchie county 
as a Unionist, to the thirty-seventh con- 
gress, serving from March 4, 1861, to March 
3, 1863 ; was elected to the succeeding con- 
gress from the new state of West Virginia, 
took his seat December 7, 1863, ^"d served 
until March 3, 1865 ; was surveyor-general 
of Utah ; from 1868 to 1873 was minister to 
Costa Rica ; for twelve years was a member 
of the supreme court of Wyoming, and for 
a number of years occupied the same posi- 
tion in Utah; died at Salt Lake City, Utah, 
February 12, 1901. 

Booker, George William, born in Patrick 
county, Virginia, December 5, 1821. He 



received a common school education, taught 
school, studied law, and was admitted to the 
bar. He served some years as a justice of 
the peace, and was subsequently presiding 
justice of the county court for ten years, 
lie sympathized with the North during the 
war between the states. He was elected to 
the state legislature in 1865. In 1868 he was 
the Republican candidate for attorney gen- 
eral, was elected, but resigned the follow- 
ing year, being elected to congress as a 
Conservative, and was re-elected. In 1873 
he was elected to the state legislature, after 
two years retiring from public life and re- 
suming the practice of his profession. He 
died at Martinsville, Virginia, June 4, 1883. 

Bowden, George Edwin, born in Wil- 
liamsburg, \'irginia, July 6, 1852; attended 
a" private school ; studied law ; admitted to 
the bar, but never practiced ; elected bank 
president in 1874; collector of customs for 
port of Norfolk from September, 1879, until 
May, 1885 ; elected as a Republican to the 
fiftieth and fifty-first congresses (March 4. 
1887-March 3, 1891) ; again collector of cus- 
toms for port of Norfolk; clerk of the 
United States court for the eastern district 
of Virginia; died at Norfolk, Virginia, Jan- 
uary 22, 1908. 

Bowen, Henry, born at Maiden Springs. 
Tazewell county, Virginia, December 26, 
1841; attended private school and college; 
entered the Confederate army in 1861 as a 
cpptain of cavalry and served until 1865 r 
member of state legislature 1869-71 ; elected 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



as a Readjuster and Independent Democrat 
to the torty-cight and fiftieth congresses 
f March 4, 1883-March 3, 1885) and (March 
4, 1887-March 3, 1889) ; resumed farming 
and stock raising in Tazewell county, Vir- 
ginia. 

Bowen, Rees T., born at Maiden Springs, 
"i azewell county, X'irginia, January 10, 
1809 ; attended Abingdon Academy, \'ir- 
gniia; member of the state legislature of 
\ irginia in 1S60 and 1864; magistrate for 
several years and presiding justice of the 
county ; elected as a Conservative to the 
forty-third congress (March 4, 1873-March 
3. 1875) ; f^i^d i" Tazewell county, \'irginia, 
August 29, 1S79. 

Brady, James Dennis, burn at Ports- 
mouth, \'irginia, April 3, 1843 ; engaged in 
business ; resided in New York at the com- 
mencement of the civil war ; enlisted as a 
private in the Thirty-seventh New York 
Volunteers, in which regiment served as 
acting adjutant, when he was transferred 
and commissioned adjutant of the Sixty- 
third New York Volunteers; subsequently 
held the rank of captain, major, lieutenant- 
colonel and colonel of that regiment ; served 
in the judge advocate's, adjutant general's, 
and inspector general's departments of the 
Second Corps, Army of the Potomac, and 
commanded the Sixty-third Regiment when 
honorably mustered out of service in July, 
1865 : appointed collector of internal reve- 
nue in June. 1877; delegate from Virginia 
in the Republican national convention of 
1880, and delegate at large in the Republi- 
can national convention of 1884; elected as 
a Republican to the forty-ninth congress 
(March 4, 1885-March 3, 1887) ; died at 
Petersburg, Virginia, November 30, 1890. 



Braxton, Elliott Muse, l)orn in l-'redericks- 
burg, \irginia. October 8, 1823; attended 
the common schools; studied law, was ad- 
mitted to the bar, and began practice in 
Richmond, Virginia ; subsequently removed 
to Richmond county, and was elected a 
state senator in 185 1, and was re-elected in 
1853; removed to Fredericksburg in i860, 
where he raised a company for the Confed- 
erate army, and was its cajjtain ; commis- 
sioned major, and served on the staft of 
Gen. John R. Cooke; member of the com- 
mon council of Fredericksburg in i86b", 
elected as a Democrat to the forty-second 
congress (March 4, 1871-March 3, 1873) '< 
died at Fredericksburg, Virginia, October 
2 1 89 1 . 

Brown, John Robert, born in I'Vanklin 
c(,iunty, \'irginia. Janu;iry 14, 1842; attended 
common school and academy; entered the 
(.Confederate army in 1861 as a private in 
Company D, Twenty-fourth \^irginia \"ol- 
unteers ; in 1870 formed a co-partnership 
with his father as manufacturers of tobacco 
at Shady Grove, and in 1882 moved to Mar- 
liiisville; elected mayor in 1884; elected as 
an Independent Repulilican to the nftieth 
congress (March 4. 1887-March 3. 18S9). 

Brown, William Guy, born at Kingwood, 
Preston count}-. Virginia (now West Vir- 
ginia), September 25. 1800; attended the 
public schools, studied law, and in 1823 be- 
gan practice in his native town. He was a 
member of the house of delegates in 1832 
and again. 1840-43. lie was elected as a 
Democrat to the twenty-ninth and thirtieth 
congresses (March 4, 1845-March 3. 1849) ; 
member of the state constitutional conven- 
tion of 1850; delegate to Democratic Na- 
tional Conventions of i860 at Charleston and 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



Baltimore; member of the Virginia State 
Convention of 1861. He was elected to the 
thirty-seventh congress from Virginia as a 
Unionist (March 4, 1861-March 3, 1863), 
and elected to the thirty-eighth congress 
from West Virginia ; took his seat Decem- 
ber 7, 1863, and served until March 3, 1865. 
He died at Kingwood, West Virginia, April 
19, 1884. 

Browne, Thomas Henry Bayly, born at 
Acconiac, Virginia, February 8, 1844; at- 
tended Hanover and Bloomtield academies 
in Virginia, leaving the latter in May, 1861 : 
volunteered as a private in Company F, 
Thirty-ninth Regiment Virginia Infftutry; 
-nfterwards served as a private in Chew's 
battery of the Stuart horse artillery ; was 
surrendered with the Army of Northern 
^'^irginia in April, 1865 ; was graduated from 
the law department of the University of 
Virginia in 1867; '" ^^73 elected attorney 
for Accomac county, presidential elector on 
the Blaine ticket in 1884, and elected as a 
Republican to the fiftieth and fifty-first con- 
gresses (March 4, 1887-March 3, 1891) ; 
died at Accomac, Virginia. August 27, 1892. 
He was a son of Peter F. Browne and Sally 
Cropper Bayly, and was descended from 
William Browne, of James City county, who 
died in 1773-1776. 

Buchanan, John Alexander, (q. v.;. 

Cabell, George Craighead, born in Dan- 
ville, Virginia. January 25, 1836, son of 
Joseph Cabell and his second wife, Anne 
Everard Boiling attended the Danville 
Academy, and the law school of the Univer- 
sity of Virginia in 1857; was admitted to 
the bar, and commenced practice in Dan- 
ville in 1858; edited the Republican, and 

VIR-8 



later the Democratic "Appeal" in Danville ; 
elected, in September, 1858, commonwealth 
attorney for Danville, and served until April 
23. 1861, when he volunteered as a private 
soldier in the Confederate army ; commis- 
sioned major in June, 1861, and assigned 
tc the Eighteenth Virginia Infantry ; at the 
close of the war held the rank of colonel ; 
after the war resumed the practice of law ; 
elected as a Democrat to the forty-fourth, 
forty-fifth, forty-sixth, forty-seventh, forty- 
eighth and forty-ninth congresses (March 
4. 1875-March 3, 18S7) ; resumed the prac- 
tice of law in Danville, Virginia. His father 
was the son of Col. Joseph Cabell and Mary 
Hopkins, his wife, and grandson of the im- 
migrant Dr. William Cabell and Elizabeth 
llurks. his wife. 

Carlile, John S., ( q. v.). 

Carlin, Charles Creighton, born in Alex- 
andria, Virginia, April 8, 1866; attended the 
public schools and was graduated from the 
National Law University; served for years 
as postmaster : presidential elector on the 
Democratic ticket in 1904 ; elected as a 
Democrat to the sixtieth congress, Novem- 
ber 5, 1907, to fill vacancy caused by the 
death of John F. Rixey ; was re-elected to 
the sixty-first congress, and served from 
December 2, 1907, to March 3, 191 1 ; re- 
elected to the sixty-second, sixty-third and 
sixty-fourth congresses. 

Critcher, John, born in Westmoreland 
ccunty. Virginia, March 11, 1820; was grad- 
uated from the University of Virginia in 
1839 : studied at the University of France 
for three years ; studied law and practiced ; 
elected to the state senate and to the state 
convention of 1861 ; lieutenant-colonel of 



114 



\'IRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



cavalry in the Confederate army; appointed 
judge of the eighth judicial circuit of Vir- 
ginia, but removed by the thirty day reso- 
lution of congress ; elected as a Conserva- 
tive to the forty-second congress (March 4, 
1871-March 3, 1873) ; died at Alexandria, 
\'irginia, September 27, 1901. 

Croxton, Thomas, born at Tappahannock, 
Essex county, Virginia, March 15, 1822; at- 
tended the primary schools, the Tappahan- 
nock and Fleetwood academies, and the 
Lniversity of Virginia; graduated in law in 
June, 1842, and practiced ; attorney for the 
commonwealth from July, 1852, to July, 
1865, when he resigned; served on the staff 
of Gen. George E. Pickett in the civil war ; 
elector from the first district of Virginia on 
the Hancock and English ticket in 1880; 
elected as a Democrat to the forty-ninth 
congress (March 4, 1885-March 3, 1887) ; 
elected judge of Essex county, Virginia ; 
died at Tappahannock, \'irginia, July 3, 
1903. 

Daniel, John W., (q. v.). 

Davis, Alexander M., a resident of Inde- 
pendence. \ irginia ; presented credentials as 
a member-elect to the forty-third congress, 
and served from March 4, 1873, to March 
5. 1874. when he was unseated in a contest 
with Christopher Y. Thomas. 

Dezendorf, John Frederick, born at Lan- 
singburg, Xew York, .\ugust 10, 1834; pur- 
sued an academic course ; learned the car- 
penter's trade ; studied architecture, survey- 
ing and civil engineering ; engaged on rail- 
road and other buildings at Toledo and 
Cleveland. Ohio, 1850-1860; mercantile pur- 
suits 1860-1862: moved to Norfolk. Vir- 
ginia, in 1863. and engaged in the shipping 



business until 1866; city and county sur- 
veyor of Norfolk city and county 1866-69; 
assistant assessor of the United States in- 
ternal revenue 1869-71 ; appraiser of mer- 
chandise at the Norfolk custom house 1872- 
1877; delegate to the national Republican 
convention in Cincinnati in 1876; defeated 
as the Republican candidate for congress in 
1878; elected as a Republican to the forty- 
seventh congress (March 4. 1881-March 3, 
1883) ; died in Norfolk. Virginia, June 22, 
1894. 

Douglas, Beverly Browne, born at Provi- 
dence Forge, New Kent county, \'irginia. 
December 21, 1822, son of William Doug- 
las, of Providence Forge, New Kent county 
and Elizabeth Christian, his wife. He at- 
tended William and Mary College and the 
University of Edinburgh. He studied law 
in the celebrated school of Judge Beverly 
Tucker, was admitted to the bar, and prac- 
ticed in his native county and Norfolk. In 
1846 he removed to King William county, 
and rapidly rose in his profession, taking 
a front rank as an able practitioner and elo- 
quent advocate, being specially gifted be- 
fore a jury. When the convention to re- 
model the constitution of the state was 
called in 1850. he was chosen a member from 
four counties. He sat in the state senate 
continuously from 1852 until 1865, and for 
five years of this period was chairman of the 
committee on finance and during the war 
between the states was chairman of the 
committee on military affairs. He served in 
the Confederate army, entering as first 
lieutenant of "Lee's Rangers," was pro- 
moted to captain, and afterward to major 
of the Fifth Virginia Cavalry, in which he 
served until 1863. when he resigned. .M- 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



"5 



ways a Democrat, in i860 he was a presi- 
dential elector on the Breckenridge and 
Lane ticket, and in 1868 a delegate to the 
convention which nominated Seymour and 
Blair. He was elected to the forty-fourth 
and forty-fifth congresses, but took no ac- 
tive part in the house proceedings, his most 
important service being as chairman of the 
select committee to investigate the conduct 
of the Freedmen's Savings Bank. He mar- 
ried a daughter of Robin Pollard, of King 
William county. He died December 22, 
1878. 

Duke, Richard Thomas Walker, born at 
Mill Brook, Albemarle county, Virginia, 
June 6, 1822, son of Richard Duke and Maria 
Walker, his wife, daughter of Capt. Thomas 
Walker. Richard T. W. Duke attended 
private schools until 1842, when he entered 
the Virginia Military Institute, at Lexing- 
ton, Virginia, from which he graduated in 
1845, second in a class of twenty. During 
his last two years he was cadet professor of 
mathematics, and in conjunction with the 
late Gen. Francis Smith, prepared an arith- 
metic which is still used in that institution. 
After graduating he taught in the Richmond 
Academy with Col. Claude Crozet, during 
the sessions of 1845-46, and then taught two 
years in Lewisburg, Greenbrier county, now 
West Virginia In 1849. being recalled to 
Albemarle county by the death of his father, 
he entered the University of Virginia, and 
graduated in the law school with the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws in one session. He 
then located in Charlottesville, Virginia, 
and commenced the practice of law, and 
practiced there until his death. He was 
regarded as one of the ablest lawyers at the 
bar. In 1858 he was elected common- 



wealth's attorney for Albemarle county, 
and held that office until elected to the for- 
ty-first congress in 1870. In 1859, just after 
the John Brown raid, he organized the "Al- 
bemarle Rifles," a volunteer company of 
riflemen, which in 1861 was mustered in as 
Company B, Nineteenth Virginia Regiment, 
C. S. A., he being captain of that company 
up to the re-organization of the army in 
1862. At the reorganization he was elected 
colonel of the Forty-sixth Regiment, Wise's 
brigade, and from May, 1862, to March, 
1864, was colonel of that regiment, spend- 
ing the winter of 1863-64 in South Caro- 
lina with the brigade. In March, 1864, Col. 
Duke resigned his commission as colonel of 
the Forty-sixth Virginia Regiment, but re- 
mained out of service only thirty days, in 
the meantime organizing the reserve forces, 
taking command of a battalion of reserves 
at Richmond in 1864. At first the reserves 
were employed in guarding prisoners at 
Belle Isle, but the fall of 1864, and winter 
of 1864-65 they were under Col. Duke in 
the trenches at Fort Harrison. At the 
evacuation Col. Duke was placed in com- 
mand of the brigade of reserves. He was 
with Gen. Custis Lee's division, captured 
at Sailor's Creek. He was taken to Wash- 
ington, and was in the old capitol prison 
the night President Lincoln was assassin- 
ated. He and five hundred other prisoners 
were threatened with burning by the Wash- 
ington roughs, but the mob was dispersed, 
and Col. Duke taken to Johnson's Island 
Prison, where about 2.500 Confederate of- 
ficers were imprisoned. Col. Duke remained 
a prisoner of war until July 25, 1865, when 
he was released. Col. Duke was in the en- 
gagement at First Manassas, and was com- 
plimented in Gen. Beauregard's report of 



Ii6 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAniV 



the battle. He was at Malvern Hill, and 
many other important engagements. While 
in the army and at the front he was elected 
attorney for the commonwealth, but the 
duties of the yffice were performed by Judge 
E. R. Watson, who kindly volunteered his 
services, Col. Duke remaining in the army. 
In 1870 Col. Duke was nominated again for 
commonwealth attorney, but, before the 
election, was nominated for congress, his 
Republican opponent being the late Judge 
Alexander Rives. While the canvass was in 
progress, the Hon. Robert Ridgeway, the 
sitting member, died, and Col. Duke and 
Judge Rives were nominated for the va- 
cancy. Col. Duke was elected and served 
out Ridgeway "s term in the forty-first con- 
gress and the full term of the forty-second 
congress. He was not a candidate for re- 
election, but returned to Charlottesville and 
continued the practice of law. In 1877, dur- 
ing the struggle between the debt paying 
and readjusting element of the Democratic 
party. Col. Duke was prevailed upon to be- 
come a candidate for the Virginia legis- 
lature, and was elected to the house as a 
debt-paying Democrat. On July 26, 1846, 
Col. Duke was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Scott Eskridge, daughter of William S. Esk- 
ridge. Col. Duke died in Charlottesville in 
July. 1898, after a lingering illness of some 
seven months. 

Edmunds, Paul Carrington, born in Hali- 
fax county, Virginia, November i, 1836; 
trained by a private tutor ; attended the Uni- 
versity of \'irginia and was graduated in 
law from William and Mary College, Wil- 
liamsburg, Virginia ; was admitted to the 
bar; practiced in Jefferson City, Missouri; 
returned to Virginia in 1858; engaged in 
agriculture on his farm in Halifax county; 



elected to the senate of Virginia in 1881, 
and served four terms; re-elected in 1884; 
delegate, to the Democratic National Con- 
vention in Chicago in 1884; elected as a 
Democrat to the fifty-first, fifty-second, fif- 
ty-third congresses (March 4, 1889-March 
3, 1895) ; died at Houston, Halifax county, 
Virginia, March 12, 1899. 

Ellett, Tazewell, born in Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. Januarx- I, 1856; attended the private 
school of John M. Strother until sixteen 
years old ; cadet in the Virginia Military 
Institute, and was graduated from that in- 
stitution in 1876 ; studied law in the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and was graduated with 
the degree of LL. B. in 1878; practiced law 
in Richmond ; several years a member of 
the board of visitors of the Virginia "Mili- 
tary Institute; presidential elector in 1888 
on the Democratic ticket ; elected as a Demo- 
crat to the fifty-fourth congress (March 4, 
1895-March 3, 1897) ; resumed the practice 
of law in Richmond, Virginia, and New 
York City. 

Epes, James Fletcher, born in Nottoway 
county, \'irginia. May 2^, 1842 ; attended 
the primary and private schools and the 
University of Virginia; served in the Con- 
federate army 1861-1865 ; was graduated 
from the law department of Washington and 
I ee University in 1867 ; was admitted to 
tlie bar and practiced law in Blackstone. 
Virginia; elected as a Democrat to the fifty- 
second and fifty-third congresses (March 4, 
1891-March 3, 1895I ; retired to hi.« planta- 
tion, "The Old Place," in Nottoway county, 
\'irginia. 

Epes, Sydney Parham, born in Nottoway 
county, Virginia, August 20, 1865 ; moved 
with his parents to Kentucky, where he 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



"7 



pursued an academic course : returned to 
Virginia in 18S4 and edited and pulslished a 
Democratic newspaper for a number of 
years ; member of the Democratic State 
Central Committee, and chairman of the 
fourth congressional district committee ; 
elected in i8yi a member of the general as- 
sembly; register of the land office 1895-97; 
presented credentials as a member-elect in 
the fifty-fifth congress and served from 
March 4, 1897, until March 3, 1898, when 
he was succeeded by Robert T. Thorp, who 
contested his election ; elected to the fifty- 
sixth congress and served from March 4, 
1899, until his death in Washington, D. C, 
March 3, 1900. 

Flood, Henry Delaware, born at Appo- 
mattox county, Virginia, September 2, 1865, 
son of Joel W. Flood, a prominent farmer of 
the county, who served as major four years 
under Lee; attended the schools of Appo- 
mattox and Richmond, Washington and 
Lee University, and the University of Vir- 
ginia ; began the practice of law on Septem- 
ber 15, 1886; elected to the house of dele- 
gates of the general assembly of Virginia in 
1887 and re-elected in 1889; elected to the 
state senate in 1891, and re-elected in 1895 
and in 1899. In the senate he introduced 
a bill placing the state department of agri- 
culture upon a stronger basis ; and the bill 
authorizing the attorney-general to bring 
suit against the state of West Virginia for 
her pro rata share of the old state debt ; and 
he was made one of the commissioners 
elected by the legislature to carry out the 
provisions of the bill, and whose labors re- 
sulted in the consequent litigation, just 
recently ended. Elected attorney for the 
commonwealth of Appomattox county in 



1891, 1895 and 1899; presidential elector on 
the Cleveland and Stevenson ticket in 1892 ; 
nominated for congress by the Democratic 
party in i8g6 and defeated ; elected as a 
Democrat to the fifty-seventh, fifty-eighth, 
fifty-ninth, sixtieth and sixty-first con- 
gresses and re-elected to the sixty-second 
congress (March 4, 1901-March 3, 191 1) ; he 
is still a member (1915) ; was author of reso- 
lution admitting Arizona and New Mexico 
to statehood. He was a member of the 
constitutional convention in 1901. His ad- 
dress is Appomattox, Virginia. 

Fulkerson, Abram, born in Washington 
county, Virginia, May 13, 1834; was gradu- 
ated from the Virginia Military Institute; 
studied law, was admitted to the bar, and 
practiced; entered the Confederate service 
in March, 1861, as a captain; promoted to 
major, lieutenant-colonel and colonel ; 
elected to the house of delegates of Vir- 
t;inia in 1871-1873, and to the senate of 
\irginia in 1877-1879; elected as a Read- 
juster CO the forty-seventh congress (March 
.-., t88i-March 3, 1883) I resumed the prac- 
tice of law after leaving congress: died at 
Bristol, Virginia, December 17, 1902. 

Gaines, William Embre, born in Charlotte 
county, Virginia, August 30, 1844; attended 
the common schools ; when the civil war 
broke out in ]86i ; enlisted as a private in 
Company K, Eighteenth Virginia Regiment 
(Pickett's Division) ; re-enlisted in the Army 
of the Cape Fear and surrendered with 
Johnson, near Greensboro, North Carolina, 
in April, 1865, having attained the rank of 
adjutant of Manly's Artillery Battalion; en- 
gaged in business in banking in Burkeville, 
Virginia ; elected as a Republican to the Vir- 
ginia state senate in 1883, and served three 



ii8 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



years, when he resigned ; delegate in the 
national convention which nominated Blaine 
for the presidency in 1884 ; mayor of Burke- 
ville several years, and delegate to several 
state conventions ; elected as a Republican 
to the fiftieth congress (March 4, 1887- 
March 3, 1889). 

Garrison, George Tankard, born in Ac- 
comac county, Virginia, January 14, 1835; 
was graduated from Dickinson College, Car- 
lisle, Pennsylvania, in 1853, and from the 
law school of the University of Virginia in 
1857; was admitted to the bar and prac- 
ticed law until the civil war ; entered the 
Confederate service as a private ; soon 
thereafter elected to the state legislature, 
and served in that body, first in the house 
and then in the senate, until the close of the 
war; practiced law and engaged in agricul- 
ture; elected judge of the eighth Virginia 
circuit in 1870, and subsequently judge of 
the seventeenth circuit ; elected as a Demo- 
crat to the forty-seventh congress (March 
4. 1881-March 3, 1883) ; successfully con- 
tested the election of Robert M. Mayo to 
the forty-seventh congress ; died at Acco- 
mac Court House, \'irginia, Novemlier 14, 

1889. 

■ I 

Gibson, James King, born at Abingdon, 
Virginia, I-"ebruary 18, 1812; attended the 
common schools ; went to Limestone 
county, Alabama, in 1833, and engaged in 
business ; returned to Virginia, and was de- 
puty sheriff of Washington county, 1834- 
1^35; postmaster of Abingdon, 1838-1849; 
engaged in farming; elected as a Democrat 
to the forty-first congress (March 4, 1869- 
March 3. 1871) ; died at Abingdon, Virginia, 
March 30, 1879. 



Glass, Carter, born in Lynchburg, Vir- 
ginia, January 4, 1858, son of Maj. Robert 
H. Glass, a prominent journalist, and Au- 
gusta Christian, his wife, of an old and well- 
known Virginia family. He attended pri- 
vate and public schools until he was four- 
teen years old, when he began learning the 
printer's trade in the Lynchburg "Republi- 
can" office, and was afterwards employed on 
I he Petersburg "Post," his father being 
editor of both these papers. From 1877 he 
was for three years a clerk in the auditor's 
office of the Atlantic, Mississippi & Ohio 
Railroad. In 188c he took a position on the 
staft' of the Lynchburg "News," under its 
owner, Albert ^V'addill, laboring as a local 
reporter and editorial writer. In 1888 he 
purchased the "News," valued at $13,000, 
his sole capital then being sixty dollars, but 
he was backed by friends who had confi- 
dence in his abilities. He soon brought his 
paper to a higher plane of influence, and 
prospered accordingly, and by 1895 'is had 
added to his newspaper property the plants 
of the Lynchburg "Virginian," and the 
"Evening News." His abilities as a writer 
are of a very superior order. In addition to 
his journalistic work, his public activities 
have been notable. He was clerk of the 
Lynchburg city council for twenty years, 
from 1881. He was a delegate to the Demo- 
cratic National Conventions of 1892 and 
1896, and in 1897 ^o the Democratic State 
Convention in which body he made a notable 
speech in presenting J. Hoge Tyler as a 
candidate for the nomination for governor. 
In 1899 he was elected to the state senate, 
and in 1902, before his term had expired, he 
v/as elected to the fifty-seventh congress, as 
a Democrat, to succeed Peter J. Otey (de- 
ceased), and has been returned to his seat 




^^jLt^u^^>^ 




HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



119 



each succeeding term, to the present time. 
His success in his canvass for the sixty- 
third congress was notable, in his defeating 
the Progressive and Socialist nominees by 
some six thousand plurality. Probably the 
most notable achievement of his congres- 
sional career has been his securing the pass- 
age through congress of the present govern- 
ment banking measure. Mr. Glass is a for- 
midable debater, a master of caustic retort. 
He married, in 1886, Aurelia Campbell, of 
Lynchburg, Virginia, and the family reside 
in that city. 

Goode, John Jr., (q. v.). 

V 

Harris, John Thomas, born in Albemarle 
county, Virginia, May 8, 1823; completed 
academic studies ; studied law, was admitted 
to the bar and began practice in Harrison- 
burg, in 1847. He was United States dis- 
trict attorney, 1852-59 ; presidential elector 
on the Buchanan ticket. 1856; elected as a 
1 democrat to the thirty-sixth congress 
(March 4. 1859-March 3, 1S61) : member of 
the state legislature, 1863-65 ; judge of the 
twelfth judicial district, 1866-69; elected as 
a Democrat to the forty-second, forty-third, 
forty-fourth, forty-fifth and forty-sixth con- 
gresses (March 4, 1871-March 3, 1881 ) ; de- 
clined a unanimous renomination. He was 
chairman of the Virginia Democratic Con- 
vention in 1884; was delegate to several 
Democratic National conventions ; presiden- 
tial elector on the Cleveland ticket in 1888 ; 
commissioner to the World's Fair at Chica- 
go. He died at Harrisonburg, Virginia, Oc- 
tober 14, 1899. 

Hay, James, born in Millwood, Clarke 
county, \'irginia, January 9, 1856, son of Dr. 
William Hav, who served in the war be- 



tween the states, and Emily Lewis, his wife ; 
attended private schools and the University 
of Pennsylvania, and was graduated from 
W'ashington and Lee University, Virginia, 
in law, in June, 1877; moved to Harrison- 
burg, Virginia, in 1877, where he practiced 
until June, 1879 ; moved to Madison, Vir- 
ginia, and devoted himself exclusively to his 
profession ; elected attorney for the common- 
wealth in 1883, and re-elected in 1887-1891, 
and 1895 ; elected to the house of delegates 
in 1885, and re-elected in 1887 and 1889; to 
the state senate in 1893 ; member of the 
Democratic state committee for four years, 
and member of the Democratic National 
Convention of 1888 ; elected as a Democrat 
to the fifty-fifth, and to the six succeeding 
congresses (March 4, 1897-March 3, 1911); 
chairman of the Democratic caucus of the 
house of representatives in the fifty-sixth, 
fifty-seventh, and fifty-eighth congresses ; 
re-elected to the sixty-second and sixty- 
third congresses, and is still a member 
(1915).' Mr. Hay's grandfather was James 
Hay, who married Elizabeth Burwell, 
daughter of Nathaniel Burwell, of t_larke 
county, formerly of James City county, and 
hif great-grandfather was William Hay, 
who was born in Kilsyth, Sterlingshire, 
Scotland, November 10, 1748, and came to 
Virginia in 1768. William Hay, the lawyer, 
whose named is found in "Randolph's re- 
ports." was a son of the emigrant. 

Holland, Edward Everett, born in Nanse- 
mond county, Virginia. February 26, 1861 ; 
educated in private schools in the county, at 
Richmond (Virginia) College, and Univer- 
sity of Virginia ; studied law, and admitted 
to practice; since 1892 president of the 
Farmer's Bank of Nansemond ; mayor of 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



Suffolk. 1885-1887; commonwealth attorney 
for Nansemond county, 1887-1907; state 
senator, 1907-1911 ; was elected to the sixty- 
second, sixty-third and sixty-fourth con- 
gresses. He is still a member (1915). 

Hooper, Benjamin Stephen, born in IJuck- 
ii gham county, Virginia, Alarch 6, 1835; at- 
tended the common schools, engaged in 
mercantile business and the manufacture of 
tobacco. He was elected as readjuster to 
the forty-eighth congress (March 4, 1883- 
March 3, 1885). He died at Farmville, Vir- 
ginia, January 17, 1898. 

Hopkins, Samuel Isaac, born in Prince 
George county, ^Maryland, December 12, 
1843; moved in infancy to Anne Arundel 
county, where he attended the common 
schools ; while a minor enlisted in Company 
A, Second Maryland Confederate Infantry, 
and served during the war ; wounded several 
times; after the war he located in Lynch- 
burg; elected as a Knight of Labor to the 
fiftieth congress (March 4, 1887-March 3, 
1889) ; a resident of Lynchburg, Virginia. 

Hunton, Eppa, (q. v.). 

Johnston, Joseph E., (q. v.). 

Jones, William Atkinson, born at Warsaw. 
Virginia, March 21, 1849, son of Thomas 
Jones, of Richmond county, and Anna Sey- 
mour Trowbridge, his wife, she a descend- 
ant of Gen. Joseph Jones, of Dinwiddle 
county (q. v.). He entered the Virginia 
Military Institute in 1864, and served with 
its corps of cadets in defense of Richmoncl, 
until its evacuation after the war; he at- 
tended Coleman's School in Fredericksburg, 
and graduated from the law department of 
the Lniversily of Virginia in 1870; admitted 



to the bar in July, 1870, and commenced 
practice in Warsaw, Virginia ; common- 
wealth attorney for several years ; delegate 
in the Democratic National Conventions of 
1880, 1896 and 1900; elected as a Democrat 
to the fifty-second and to the nine succeed- 
ing congresses (March 4, 1891-March 3, 
191 1) ; re-elected to the sixty-second, sixty- 
third and sixty-fourth congresses, and is 
still serving. In 1880 he was a delegate-at- 
large to the Democratic National Conven- 
tion which ncjminated Gen. Hancock for the 
presidency, and chairman of the Virginia 
delegation in that body. He was also a dcle- 
gate-at-large to the Democratic National 
Convention of igoo, in Kansas City. 

Jorgensen, Joseph, born in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. February 11, 1844; was grad- 
uated from the medical department of the 
University of Pennsylvania; cadet surgeon 
United States army, March 17, 1864-March 
23, 1865; acting assistant surgeon, April 10, 
1865-September ID, 1865, and June 5, 1S67- 
February 21, 1870; elected to the house of 
representatives of Virginia, 1871 ; appointed 
postmaster of Petersburg; elected as a Re- 
publican to the forty-fifth, forty-sixth and 
forty-seventh congresses (March 4, 1877- 
March 3, 1883) ; appointed register of the 
land office at Walla Walla, Washington, by 
President Arthur, February 27, 1883; and 
served until removed by President Cleve- 
land in 1886; delegate in the Republican 
National Convention of 1880: died at Port- 
land, Oregon, January 21, 1888. 

Lamb, John, born in Sussex county, Vir- 
ginia, June 12. 1840, son of Lycurgus A. 
Lamb and Ann E. Christian, his wife, she 
a lineal descendant of Col. Joseph Christian, 
of the revolutionary army. When he was 




pyl^Ay^r-iM,,^i^''i^ 




V-U\xO^ (LA^l^l^Lv^ 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



five years old his family removed to Charles 
City county. When he was fifteen, his 
father died, and the care of his mother and 
her younger children devolved upon him. 
He had been well taught by his father, and 
he now gave his nights to studying civil 
engineering. He was thus occupied when 
the civil war broke out. He enlisted in 
Company D, Third Regiment Virginia Cav- 
alry, and as captain commanded it for three 
years, receiving one severe wound, and two 
of minor importance. After the war, he en- 
gaged in business, and at various times was 
elected sheriff, treasurer, and surveyor of 
Henrico county. He was elected as a Demo- 
crat to the fifty-fifth congress, in 1897, and 
has been re-elected to each succeeding con- 
gress until the year 191 1. He married, 
Kovember 20, 1869, Mattie R. Wade, of 
Charles City county. His address is Rich- 
mond, Virginia. 

Langston, John Mercer, born in Louisa 
ccunty, Virginia (born a slave but emanci- 
pated when six years old), of mixed descent, 
December 14, 1829; attended common 
schools in Ohio ; was graduated from Ober- 
lin College in 1849, and from the theologi- 
cal department in 1852; studied law in 
Elyria, Ohio, was admitted to the bar in 
1855, and practiced in Ohio 1855-1867; ap- 
pointed inspector general of the bureau of 
fieedmen, refugees and abandoned lands in 
1868; moved to Washington, D. C, and 
practiced law ; dean of the law department 
of Howard University ; appointed and com- 
missioned by President Grant a member of 
the board of health of the District of Co- 
lumbia in 1871 ; appointed by President 
Hayes minister resident and consul general 
to Haiti, and charge d'afifaires to Santo Do- 



mingo; elected vice-president and acting 
president of Howard University in 1872; 
elected president of the Virginia Iviormal 
and Collegiate Institute in 1885 ; took active 
part in recruiting colored troops during the 
civil war ; especially the fifty-fourth and 
fifty-fifth Massachusetts and Fifth Ohio 
(colored) regiments; filled several township 
offices in Ohio ; twice elected a member of 
the council of Oberlin, and member of the 
board of education for twelve years ; pre- 
sented credentials as a member-elect from 
Virginia to the fifty-first congress, and was 
seated after contesting the election of Ed- 
ward C. Venable, September 23, 1890; 
served until March 3, 1891 ; declined to make 
a contest in the fifty-second congress, for 
which he was the Republican candidate, and 
declined a renomination to the fifty-third 
congress; died in Washington, D. C., No- 
vember 15, 1897. He wrote, a book entitled 
"From the Plantation to the National Capi- 
tol," which is reviewed in William and Mary 
Quarterly Historical Magazine III. p. 282. 
From this it appears that Langston was- 
probably descended from Gideon Langston,. 
an Indian who attended the Indian School 
at the college in 1754. 

Lassiter, Francis Rives, born in Peters- 
burg, Virginia, February 18, 1866; son of 
Dr. Daniel W. Lassiter, of Huguenot de- 
scent, and Anna Rives Heath, his wife. He 
graduated from several academic schools, 
and attended the University of Virginia,. 
1883-84, graduating from various of its 
schools, including the law, receiving the B. 
L. degree ; was admitted to the bar in Suf- 
folk county, Massachusetts, in 1887, and to 
the Virginia bar in 1888. He engaged in 
practice in Petersburg, Virginia ; member of 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



the \'irginia Democratic state central com- 
mittee ; elected city attorney of Petersburg 
in 1888, 1890 and 1892 ; presidential elector 
1892 ; appointed United States attorney for 
the eastern district of Virginia in 1893, and 
resigned in 1896; appointed supervisor for 
the twelfth census of the fourth district of 
Virginia in 1899; elected as a Democrat to 
the fifty-sixth congress, to fill vacancy caus- 
ed by the death of Sydney P. Eppes ; re- 
elected to the fifty-seventh congress, and 
served from April 28, 1900, to March 3, 
1903 ; again elected to the sixtieth and sixty- 
first congresses, and served from March 4, 
1907. until his death at Petersburg, Mr- 
ginia, ()ctol)er 31. 1909. 

Lavi-son, John William, born in James 
City county, Virginia, September 13. 1837; 
attended the schools of ^Villiamsburg, Wil- 
liam and Mar}' College, and the University 
Oi Virginia : studied medicine and was grad- 
uated from ;he University of the City of 
New York, March 4, 1861 ; returned to Vir- 
ginia and enlisted in the Thirty-second Regi- 
ment V'irginia Infantry ; served on the Pen- 
insula ; participated in the battle of Wil- 
liamsburg and in the series of battles be- 
ginning with Seven Pines; entered the medi- 
cal department ; assistant surgeon in charge 
ol artillery battalion ; promoted to full sur- 
geon March 10, 1864, and served until the 
surrender at Appomattox, April 9, 1S65; 
settled in Isle of Wight county, V'irginia, 
December. i'S(>$: practiced medicine for ten 
years ; elected to the house of delegates and 
re-elected ; elected to the state senate ; en- 
gaged in farming; elected as a Democrat to 
the fifty-second congress (March 4, 1891- 
March 3, 1893) ; died in Smithfield, Virginia, 
February 21, 1905. Tie was president of the 



hoard of visitors of William and Mary Col- 
lege at the time of his death. 

Lee, William H. F., ( q. v.). 

Lester, Posey Green, born in Ployd 
county, Virginia, Alarch 12, 1850; attended 
the common s-chools ; engaged in teaching, 
and studied theology- ; ordained a minister in 
the primitive or old school Baptist church 
in 1876; traveled and preached in eighteen 
states; associate editor of "Zion's Land- 
mark" in 1883; elected as a Democrat to the 
fifty-first and fifty-second congresses (March 
4. 1889-March 3. 1901 ) ; resumed ministerial 
relations in I''loyd, Virginia. 

Libbey, Harry, born at Wakefield, New 
Ham])shire, November 22, 1843: attended 
the common schools ; moved to Hampton, 
\'irginia, and engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits ; appointed one of the presiding justices 
of Elizabeth City county, Virginia, in 1869; 
elected as a Republican to the forty-eighth 
and forty-ninth congresses (March 4, 1883- 
March 3, 1887) ; engaged in the oyster in- 
dustry ; postmaster of Hampton. \'irginia. 

McKenney, William Robertson, Ijorn in 
Petersburg, Virginia, December 2, 185 1, son 
01 Robert Anderson McKenney and X'irginia 
Eland Robertson, his wife. He attended 
McCabe's University School. Petersburg, 
and the University of \'irgitiia. and was 
graduated from a number of the depart- 
ments of the latter institution ; taught 
school for two }ears. and in the fall of 1875 
entered the law school of said university ; 
was graduated in June. 1876, was admitted 
to the bar, and commenced practice in Pe- 
tersburg. Virginia ; elected president of the 
city council of Petersburg in the spring of 
1888 and served six years; presidential clec- 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



123 



tor on the Democratic ticket in 1888 and 
in 1892 a delegate to the Democratic Na- 
tional Convention in Chicago ; served as a 
member of the Democratic state executive 
committee ; presented credentials as a Demo- 
cratic member-elect to the fifty-fourth con- 
gress ancj served from March 4, 1895, until 
May 2, 1896, when he was succeeded by 
Robert T. Thorp, who successfully contested 
his election ; resumed the practice of law in 
Petersburg, Virginia, where he still resides. 

McKenzie, Lewis, born at Alexandria, 
Virginia, October 7, 1810; pursued an aca- 
demic course ; prominently engaged in ship- 
ping and mercantile pursuits ; city council- 
man for a number of years ; elected as a 
Unionist to the thirty-seventh congress to 
fill vacancy caused by the unseating of 
Charles H. Upton, and served from Febru- 
ary 16, 1863, to March 3, 1863, and as a 
Union Conservative to the forty-first con- 
gress, and served from January 31, 1870, to 
March 3, 1871 ; president of the Washington 
&; Ohio Railroad Company ; appointed post- 
master of Alexandria, Virginia, in 1878; 
died at Alexandria, Virginia. June 28, 1895. 

McMullen, Fayette, (q. v.). 

Marshall, James William, born in Augusta 
county, Virginia, March 31, 1844, son of 
Mansfield Marshall and Sarah A. Parsons, 
his wife. He attended the common schools, 
and was at Mossy Creek Academy when 
war broke out in 1861. On July i6th he 
joined the army at Staunton, Virginia, and 
served faithfully until the surrender at Ap- 
pomattox Court House. He was wounded 
in the leg at the "Bloody Angle," May 12, 
1864. After the war he attended Roanoke 
College, in 1870 receiving the medal for 



oratory. He then read law, both at home 
and in a lawyer's otifice, was admitted to the 
bar in 1872, and began practice. He was 
commonwealth attorney for Craig county, 
1870-1875 ; in the latter year he was elected 
to the state senate, and served four years ; 
was a member of the house of delegates, 
1882-83; again elected commonwealth at- 
torney for Craig county, and served four 
years. He was a presidential elector on the 
Cleveland and Thurman ticket in 1888. He 
again served in the state senate, 1891-92, 
and was elected to the fifty-third congress 
(March 4, 1893-March 3, 1895). I" 1902 he 
was a member of the constitutional conven- 
tion. In 1893 ^^ became local counsel for 
the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway, and in 
1901 an attorney for the Low Moore Iron 
Company. He married, February 29, 1872. 
Virginia, daughter of Dr. H. M. Grant. His 
address is New Castle, Craig county, Vir- 
ginia. 

Maynard, Harry Lee, born at Portsmouth. 
New Hampshire, June 8, i86i-; attended the 
common schools of Norfolk county ; was 
graduated from the Virginia Agricultural 
and Mechanical College in 1880; member of 
the \'irginia house of delegates in 1890; 
elected to the Virginia state senate in 1894 
and 1898; elected as a Democrat to the 
fifty-seventh, and to the four succeeding 
congresses (March 4, 1901-March 3, 1911); 
interested in irrigated lands in Yakima, 
\\'ashington ; a resident of Portsmouth, Vir- 
ginia. 

Mayo, Robert M., presented credentials as 
a member-elect to the forty-eighth congress, 
and served from March 4, 1884, to March 20. 
1884. when he was succeeded by George T. 
Garrison, who contested his election. 



124 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAI'JIY 



Meredith, Elisha Edward, born in Sumter 
county, Alabama, December 26, 1848; at- 
tended Hampton-Sidney College, Virginia ; 
was admitted to the bar in 1869 ; prosecuting 
attorney for Prince William county seven- 
teen years; a member of the senate of Vir- 
ginia from 1883 to 1887; presidential elector 
in 1S88; elected as a Democrat to the fifty- 
second congress, to fill vacancy caused by 
the death of William H. F. Lee ; re-elected 
to the fifty-third and fifty-fourth congresses, 
;ind served from December 7, 1891, to 
March 3, 1895 ; resumed the practice of law ; 
died at ^Manassas, Virginia, July 29, 1900. 

Milnes, William, Jr., born in Yorkshire, 
England, December 8, 1827 ; came with par- 
ents to Pottsville, Pennsylvania, in 1829; 
completed preparatory studies ; learned the 
machinist's trade; engaged in mining and 
shipping coal; moved to Virginia in 1865; 
engaged in the iron business; elected as a 
Conservative to the forty-first congress, and 
served from January 27, 1870, to March 3, 
1871 ; died at Shenandoah, Virginia, August 
14. 1889. 

Montague, Andrew Jackson, (q. v.). 

O'Ferrall, Charles T., (q. v.). 

Otey, Peter Johnson, born at Lynchburg, 
Virginia, December 22, 1840; attended the 
Virginia Military Institute and was gradu- 
ated July I, i860; while a cadet he partici- 
pated in the defense of Virginia in the John 
Brown raid ; entered the profession of en- 
gineering on the Virginia & Kentucky Rail- 
road ; in April, 1861, he joined the Confed- 
erate army and remained in the infantry un- 
til the close of the war; organized and built 
the Lynchburg & Durham Railroad ; electeu 
as a Democrat to the fifty-fourth, fifty-hfth, 



fifty-sixth, and fifty-seventh congresses, and 
served from March 4, 1895, until his death 
a; Lynchburg, Virginia, May 4, 1902. 

Paul, John, born in Rockingham county, 
Virginia, June 30, 1839. On his father's 
side he was of French extraction, and on his 
mother's, German. He attended the com- 
mon schools of his neighborhood, and en- 
tered Roanoke College in i860. In his 
twenty-second year, in April, 1861, he en- 
listed in the Confederate army as a private 
in the Salem Artillery, and was subsequent- 
ly transferred to the Fifth \'irginia Regi- 
ment of Cavalry as a lieutenant. In the 
charge at Catlett Station, in 1862, he was 
severely wounded, but recovered in time to 
join his regiment later on. In the fall of 
1865, he entered the University of Virginia 
as a law student, and was graduated there- 
from in 1867 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Law. In 1869 he was elected common- 
wealth's attorney of his county, a position 
which he resigned in 1877 to become a mem- 
ber of the state senate, 1877-81. He sided 
with Gen. Mahone in the readjuster move- 
ment in the state, and voted for him for the 
United States senate. He was defeated for 
congress by Judge John T. Harris, and in 
1880 was elected over Judge Henry C. Allen, 
who contested his election, and was re-elect- 
ed but was unseated. May 5, 1884. Upon the 
death of Judge Alexander Rives, he was ap- 
pointed United States district judge for the 
western district of Virginia, by President 
Arthur, which position he held from 1883 
until the date of his death. His career upon 
the bench continued till death. In 1874, 
he married Kate Seymour Green, daughter 
of Charles II. Green, Esq., of \\'arren 
county, Virginia. He died Xovcmber i, 
1901. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



Piatt, James H., Jr., born of American 
parents at St. Johns, Canada, July 13, 1837 ; 
completed preparatory studies and was 
graduated from the medical department of 
the University of Vermont in 1859; entered 
the Union army in 1861 as first sergeant of 
the Third \'ermont Volunteers ; served as 
captain and lieutenant-colonel and assigned 
t(; duty as chief quartermaster of the Sixth 
Corps, but declined ; settled in Petersburg, 
Virginia, April 6, 1865 ; elected a member of 
the constitutional convention of Virginia in 
1867 ; moved to Norfolk, Virginia ; elected 
as a Republican to the forty-first, forty-sec- 
ond, and forty-third congresses (March 4, 
1869-AIarch 3, 1875) ; defeated as the Re- 
publican candidate for the forty-fourth con- 
gress. 

Porter, Charles Howell, born at Cairo, 
New York, June 21, 1833; completed pre- 
paratory studies ; studied law, was admitted 
to the bar, and began practice in Greene 
county. New York ; entered the Union army 
in 1861 as a member of the First New York 
Mounted Rifles ; moved to Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia ; held various local offices ; member of 
the constitutional convention of Virginia in 
1867 and 1868 ; elected as a Republican to 
the forty-first and forty-second congresses 
(March 4, 1869-March 3, 1873) ; died at 
Cairo, New York, July 9, 1897. , 

Pridemore, Auburn L., born in Scott 
county, \^irgi:iia, January 27, 1837. He was 
brought up on a farm, and by alternate 
school attendance and teaching, obtained a 
substantial education. In August, 1861, he 
recruited a company for the Twenty-first 
Battalion, Virginia Infantry, of which he 
was captain ; in 1862 he was promoted to 
major, and later to lieutenant-colonel. In 



October, 1863, he was commissioned colonel 
0/ the Sixty-fourth Regiment Virginia Cav- 
alry, which he commanded until the end of 
the war. In 1865 he was elected to the house 
of delegates, but was unable to take his seat 
on account of the reconstruction regime 
The same year he took up the study of law, 
was admitted to the bar, and entered upon 
practice at Jonesville, Virginia. He was a 
state senator from 1871 to 1875. He was 
elected as a Democrat to the forty-fifth con- 
gress (March 4, 1877-March 3, 1879). He 
died at Jonesville, May 17. 1900. 

Quarles, Julian Minor, born in Caroline 
county, \'irginia, September 25, 1848, son of 
Peter Quarles, a soldier in the war of 1812, 
and Mary E. Waddy, his wife ; six sons of 
these parents served in the Confederate 
army — three in the Army of Northern Vir- 
ginia, and three in the western army; one of 
these, N. F. Quarles, in the battle of Cedar 
Run, August 9, 1862, was the sole captor 
of nineteen prisoners and three flags, for 
which feat Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson pre- 
sented him an officer's sword, now in pos- 
session of the family. The gallant young 
soldier was killed in the second battle of 
Manassas. Julian Minor Quarles attended 
the Pine Hill Academy and Aspen Hill 
Academy. For a few years he taught school, 
and in 1872 entered the academic depart- 
ment of the University of Virginia, in 1874 
began the law course, graduated, was ad- 
mitted to the bar, and engaged in practice 
in Staunton, where he afterwards contin- 
ued. He has served as a master commis- 
sioner in chancery and as county judge of 
Augusta county ; and as a member of the 
board of directors of the Western State 
Hospital, and of the board of trustees of the 



126 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



Mary Llaldwin Seminary. He was elected 
as a Democrat to the fifty-sixth congress 
(March 4, 1899-March 3, 1901), and dis- 
tinguished himself in his advocacy of the 
rural free mail delivery, and by his speeches 
on the bill to regulate trade with Porto 
Rico; and his resolution of sympathy with 
the Boers in South Africa. He was a dele- 
gate in the state constitutional convention 
of 1901-02, in which he was a leading figure. 
He married, October 19, 1876, Cornelia 
Stout, of Augusta county. He resided in 
Staunton, \'irginia. 

Rhea, William Francis, born in Washing- 
ton county, \'irginia, April 20, 1858; at- 
tended Oldfield school and a college for 
three years; studied law. was admitted to 
the bar; soon afterwards elected judge of 
the county court of Washington county, 
and served four years; elected to the state 
senate and served four years ; elected judge 
ot the city court of Bristol ; resigned in 1895 
and resumed the practice of law ; elected as 
a Democrat to the fifty-sixth and fifty-sev- 
enth congresses (March 4, 1899-March 3, 
1903) ; member of the state corporation 
commission and a resident of Richmond, 
\'irginia, 1915. 

Richmond, James Buchanan, born at Tur- 
key Cove, Lee county, Virginia, February 
27, 1842, son of Jonathan Richmond, state 
senator and general of militia, and Mary 
Dickinson, his wife. He attended the local 
schools and was for eight months a student 
at Emory and Henry College. At the age of 
nineteen he entered the Confederate army, in 
June, 1861, as orderly sergeant, and became 
captain of Company A, Fiftieth Regiment. 
Virginia Infantry; was promoted to majnr. 
and later was given the colonelcy of the 



Sixty-fourth Regiment, mounted infantry, 
and served till the end of the war. For eight 
years after the war he was a merchant at 
Jonesville, Virginia. Meantime he studied 
law, and took a sixty days' course in the 
summer law school of Profes.sor John B. 
Minor, was admitted to the bar, and took 
up the practice of his profession. In 1873 
he was elected as a Democrat to the legis- 
lature. In 1878 he was elected to the forty- 
sixth congress (March 4, 1879-March 3, 
1881). In 1885 he was elected judge of the 
county court of Scott county, and he was a 
member of the Virginia constitutional con- 
vention of 1901-1902. In i8g6 he opposed 
Bryan on the silver question, voting for Pal- 
mer and Buckner, and in 1900 he voted for 
McKinley on the money issue. He married 
(first) Lizzie Duncan, and (second) Kate 
Mori son. 

Ridgway, Robert, born in \'irginia ; pur- 
sued classical studies ; claimed to have been 
elected to the fortieth congress, but not ad- 
mitted to his seat ; elected as a Conservative 
to the forty-first congress; died in Cool 
Well, Virginia, October 17, 1869. 

Rixey, John Franklin, born in Culpeper 
county, Virginia, August i, 1854, son of 
Presley M. Rixej' and Mary H. Jones, his 
wife. He attended the public schools and 
Bethel Academy, then entering the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, from which he graduated 
in law. Admitted to the bar in 1875. ^e en- 
gaged in practice at Culpeper, and from 1879 
to 1891 served as commonwealth's attorney. 
In 1896 he was elected as a Democrat to the 
fifty-fifth congress, and was re-elected for 
five succeeding terms, embracing a period 
of twelve years. In his third congressional 
term he strongly advocated placing Con- 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



127 



federate and Union soldiers in the same 
class with reference to admission to national 
soldiers' homes, and also giving national 
aid alike to Confederate and national state 
homes. He was during one session a lead- 
ing member of the committee on naval af- 
fairs. He delivered several able speeches, 
mainly in favor of financial econo'ny, and 
questions arising out of the acquisition of 
far-distant territory as the result of the 
Spanish-American war. He died, in Wash- 
ington City, February 8, 1907, while still a 
member of congress. He married, Novem- 
ber 30. 1881, Ellis, daughter of Hon. James 
Barbour, of Culpeper, Virginia. 

Saunders, Edward Watts, is descended 
from John Saunders, a wealthy resident of 
York county, Virginia, who died aboui 
1700. His grandfather was Judge Fleming 
Saunders, of Franklin county, and his father 
was Hon. Peter Saunders, who was a well- 
known member of the Virginia legislature. 
He is also descended from Robert Hyde, an 
early lawyer of York county, a descendant 
or connection of the famous Chancellor Ed- 
ward Hyde, Lord Clarendon, in evidence of 
which the name Chancellor has descended in 
the family. He was born in Franklin 
county, Virginia, October 25, i860, and has 
always resided in that county; educated at 
home, at the Bellevue High School of Bed- 
ford county, and University of Virginia, 
where he graduated in a number of academic 
schools, and in 1882 received the degree of 
B. L. ; was associated with Prof. F. P. 
Brent in the conduct of a high school in 
C'nancock, Accomac county; began the 
practice of law in Rocky Mount in 1882 ; in 
1887 elected to legislature and re-elected for 
seven terms ; served as chairman of commit- 



tee on privileges and elections and courts of 
justice; in 1899 elected speaker, and was 
such until 1901. when he was elected judge 
of the fourth circuit court ; under the oper- 
ation of the new constitution he became 
judge of the seventh circuit, and while so 
.'erving was elected to fill vacancy in fifty- 
ninth congress, caused by the resignation of 
Hon. C. A. Swanson; re-elected to sixtieth, 
sixty-first, sixty-second, sixty-third and six- 
ty-fourth congresses. :\Ir. Saunders is a 
man of fine talent and as a debater has few 
superiors. 

Segar, Joseph E., born in King William 
county, Virginia, June i, 1804; attended the 
common schools; held several local offices; 
member of the state house of representa- 
tives ; elected as a Unionist to the Thirty- 
seventh congress (March 4, 1861-March 3, 
1863) ; presented credentials on February 
17, 1865, as United States senator-elect, to 
fill vacancy caused by the death of Lemuel 
J. Bowden ; he was not permitted to take 
his seat; unsuccessful Republican candi- 
date for election to the forty-fifth congress ; 
died in 1885. 

Sener, James B., born at Fredericksburg, 
Virginia, May 18, 1837; completed prepara- 
tory studies; studied law, was admitted to 
the bar, and practiced; held several local 
offices ; army correspondent of the southern 
associated press with Gen. Lee's army ; dele- 
gate in the Republican national conven- 
tion in Philadelphia in 1872; elected as a 
Republican to the forty-third congress 
(March 4, 1873-March 3, 1875); died at 
Washington, D. C., November 18, 1903. 

Slemp, Campbell, born in Lee county, Vir- 
ginia, December 2, 1839. son of Sebastian 
Slemp and Margaret Reasor, his wife, both 



\'IRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



of German ancestry. lie was a student at 
Emory and Henry College and was within 
a few months of graduation, when he was 
obliged to leave, on account of the death of 
his father. He engaged in school teaching, 
and was so employed when the civil war 
broke out. He at once entered the Con- 
federate service as captain of Company A, 
Twenty-first Virginia Battalion, was pro- 
moted to lieutenant-colonel, and later was 
commissioned colonel of the Sixty-fourth 
Virginia Regiment, a combined infantry and 
cavalry command, with which he served 
with ability to the close of the war. Re- 
turning home, he engaged in farming, and 
operating in mining and timber lands. From 
1880 to 1884 he was a member of the house 
of delegates ; in 1888 was a presidential elec- 
tor on the Harrison ticket, and in 1889 was 
a candidate for lieutenant-governor on the 
ticket with Gen. William Mahone. In 1890 
lie was superintendent of the state census. 
In 1896 he was a presidential elector on the 
McKinley ticket. He was elected as a Re- 
publican to the fifty-eighth congress, and 
re-elected to the fifty-ninth, sixtieth and 
sixty-first congresses, serving until his death, 
at Big Stone Gap, Virginia, October 13, 
1907. He was regarded as a strong type of 
ihe business man in politics, as evidenced 
by his leaving the Democratic party in 
1884. to ally himself with the Republicans, 
by reason of his deep conviction as to the 
benefits of a protective tarifif. He married, 
in 186^, Naimie B. Cawood, of Owsley 
county, Kentucky. 

Slemp, Campbell Bascom, born at Turkey 
Cove, Lee county, Virginia, September 4, 
1870; a page in house of delegates of \'ir- 
ginia, 1881-1882; was graduated from the 



\'irginia Militar_\- Institute: commandant of 
cadets in the Marion Military Institute for 
one year; adjunct professor of mathematics, 
\'irginia Military Institute; resigned in 
I'loi, to enter professional and business 
life : chairman of the Republican state com- 
mittee in 1905 ; elected as a Republican to 
the sixtieth congress, December 17, 1907, to 
fill vacancy caused by the death of his 
father, Campbell Slemp ; re-elected to the 
sixty-first congress, and served from Janu- 
ary 6, 19(58, to March 3, 191 1 ; re-elected to 
the sixty-second and to the sixty-third by 
increasing majority, also to the sixty-fourth 
congress. 

Smith, John Ambler, born at Village 
View, Virginia, September 23, 1847 ; com- 
pleted preparatory studies ; studied law, was 
admitted to the bar and began practice in 
Richmond, Virginia, in 1867; held several 
local otifices ; member of the state senate in 
1869 ; elected as a Republican to the forty- 
first congress (March 4, 1873-March 3, 
1875) ; resumed the practice of law in Wash- 
ington, D. C, and died there January 6, 
1892. 

Southall, Robert Goode, born in .\melia 
county, Virginia, December 26, 1852, son of 
Dr. Philip Francis Southall and a descend- 
ant of D'Arcy Southall, who settled in Hen- 
rico county, Virginia, about 1720; attended 
the Washington Academy and high school 
01 Amelia county ; deputy clerk of Notto- 
way county for fourteen years ; was gradu- 
ated from the law school of the University 
of Virginia in June, 1876, was admitted to 
the bar, and began practice in January, 
1877 ; delegate to the Democratic conven- 
tion at St. Louis in 1888 and at Chicago in 
189^ ; member of the state house of dele- 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



129 



gates, 1899-1903; commonwealth's attorney 
oi Amelia county, Virginia ; elected as a 
Democrat to the fifty-eighth and fifty-ninth 
congresses (March 4, 1903-March 3, 1907) ; 
judge of the judicial circuit court of Vir- 
ginia ; a resident of Amelia county, Virginia. 

Stowell, William H. H., born at Windsor, 
Vermont, July 26, 1840; attended the high 
schools in Boston, Massachusetts ; mer- 
chant; moved to Virginia in 1865; collector 
of internal revenue for the fourth district in 
1869; elected as a Republican to the forty- 
second, forty-third, and forty-fourth con- 
gresses (March 4, 1871-March 3, 1877. 

Swanson, Claude A., (q. v.). 

Terry, William, ( q. v.). 

Thomas, Christopher Yancy, born in t'itt- 
sylvania county, Virginia, March 24, 1618; 
attended the common schools and was 
graduated from a private academy in 1838 ; 
studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1844, 
and began practice in Martinsville, Virginia ; 
i/iember of the state senate 1860-1864; mem- 
ber of commission to settle the boundary 
line between Virginia and North Carolina ; 
prosecuting attorney for Henry county ; 
member of the state constitutional conven- 
tion ill 1868; elected in 1869 to the state 
house of representatives; elected as a Re- 
publican to the forty-third congress (March 
4, 1873-March 3. 1875); unsuccessful can- 
didate for re-election to the forty-fourth 
congress ; resumed the practice of law ; died 
<it Martinsville, Virginia, February 11, 1879. 

Thorp, Robert Taylor, born in Granville 
county, North Carolina, March 12, 1850; at- 
tended Horner Academy, Oxford, North 
(Carolina ; was graduated from the law de- 

VIR-9 



partment of the University of Virginia in 
.•870, was admitted to the bar, and began 
practice in Boydton, ^Mecklenburg county, 
ill 1871 ; commonwealth attorney for that 
county, 1 877- 1 895 ; successfully contested as 
a Republican the election of William R. Mc- 
Kenney to the fifty-fourth congress and 
served from May 2, 1896, to March 3, 1897; 
successfully contested the election of Syd- 
ney P. Epes to the fifty-fifth congress and 
served from March 23, 1898, to March 4, 
1899; resumed the practice of law at Nor- 
folk, Virginia. 

Tucker, John Randolph, was born in Win- 
chester, Virginia, December 24, 1823, son of 
Henry St. George Tucker, president of the 
supreme court of appeals. He received his 
e-iirly education at a private school near his 
home, the Richmond Academy and the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, from which he was 
graduated in 1844. He was admitted to the 
bar in 1845 and practiced at Winchester. 
He was a lawyer of eminent ability, entered 
politics, was a presidential elector on the 
Democratic ticket in 1852 and 1856, and was 
elected attorney-general of Virginia in May, 
1S57, to fill a vacancy, and was reelected in 
1859 and 1863. After the war he was made 
professor of law and equity in Washington 
and Lee University in 1870, and continued 
in this ofifice till he was elected in 1874 to 
congress, where he remained until 1887. In 
Congress he was regarded as one of the 
ablest members from the South. He was 
chairman at different times of the ways and 
means committee and of the judiciary com- 
mittee. His speeches on the tariff in oppo- 
sition to the protective policy, on the recon- 
struction measures, the electoral commis- 
sion bill, the use of the army at the polls, 



I30 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



and other leading measures, were powerful 
and convincing. After his congressional 
service he returned to his chair at Washing- 
ton and Lee, where he continued till his 
death at Lexington, Virginia, February 12, 
1897. He delivered many addresses, and in 
1887 spoke before the law school at Yale 
L'niversity, which in that year gave him the 
degree of Doctor of Laws. At the time of 
his death he was engaged in writing a work 
on the constitution, which was subsequently 
published by his son, Harry St. George 
Tucker (q. v.). Mr. Tucker married Laura 
Holmes Powell, a descendant of Col. Leven 
Powell (q. v.). 

Trigg, Connally F., born at Abingdon, 
\irginia, September 18, 1847; studied law, 
was admitted to the bar, and practiced in 
Abingdon, Virginia ; elected commonwealth 
attorney for Washington county in 1872, 
which position he held until he resigned in 
1884; elected as a Democrat to the forty- 
ninth congress (March 4, 1885-March 3, 
1887) ; died at Abingdon, Virginia, .April 
23, 1907. He was descended from ,\bram 
Trigg (q. v., Vol. II., p. 130). 

Tucker, Harry St. George, born at Win- 
chester, Virginia, April 5, 1853, son of 
Hon. John Randolph Tucker and Laura 
Holmes Powell, his wife. His father was 
prominent in state and Federal service, and 
as an author ; his grandfather, Henry St. 
George Tucker, was president of the su- 
preme court, and his great-grandfather, St. 
George Tucker, was a state and Federal 
judge, member of the Annapolis convention 
and professor of law at William and Mary 
College. Harry St. George Tucker received 
his preparatory training at Middleburg, Vir- 
ginia, under Virginius Dabney, and in 1871 



entered Washington and Lee University, 
from which he received the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts in 1875 and Bachelor of Law in 
1876. He was admitted to the bar in 1877, 
and practiced in Staunton, Virginia. In 
1897 he removed to Lexington, Virginia. In 
1889 he was elected as a Democrat to the 
fifty-first congress and was reelected to the 
fifty-second, fifty-third and fifty-fourth con- 
gresses (March 4, 1889-March 3, 1897) ; was 
the author of the bill which became a law 
in the fifty-third congress repealing the Fed- 
eral election laws, and author of the con- 
stitutional amendment to elect the senators 
of the L'nited States by the people, which 
passed the house; in May, 1897, he was 
elected to and accepted the chair of consti- 
tutional and international law and equity 
in Washington and Lee University, made 
vacant by the death of his father, and was 
from June. 1899, until July, 1902, dean of the 
law school. On the death of William L. 
Wilson, he was acting president of the uni- 
versity, and subsequently was professor of 
law in George Washington University. In 
1907 he was president of the Jamestown 
Tercentennial Exposition, succeeding Gen. 
Fitzhugh Lee. In 1909 he was a candidate 
for governor in opposition to William H. 
JMann, and received a very large vote, but 
was defeated. In 1899 he edited the work 
of his father, "Tucker on the Constitution," 
and he has recently published a treatise on 
the treaty-making power, which has re- 
ceived much commendation. 

Turnbull, Robert, b<irn at Lawrenceville, 
Brunswick county, \'irguiia, January 11, 
1850; attended the common schools and was 
graduated from the L'niversity of \'irginia 
in 1871 ; studied law, was admitted to the 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



131 



l.ar, and practiced in Lawrenceville, Vir- 
ginia; member of the state senate in 1894; 
delegate to the state constitutional conven- 
tion in 1901 ; delegate to the Democratic 
national conventions in 1896 and 1904; 
elected as a Democrat to the sixty-first con- 
gress, to fill vacancy caused by the death 
of Francis R. Lassiter and took his seat 
March 16, 1910; re-elected to the sixty-sec- 
ond congress. Mr. Turnbull resides in 
Lawrenceville, Virginia. 

Turner, Smith Spangler, born in Warren 
county, Virginia, November 21, 1842; cadet 
at the Virginia Military Institute when the 
civil war commenced, and subsequently 
given an honorary diploma ; enlisted in the 
Confederate army in 1861 ; served with Gen. 
T. J. Jackson as drill officer; an officer of 
Pickett's division during the remainder of 
the war; once wounded, and, about the close 
of the war, badly injured and disfigured by 
an explosion of gunpowder; taught mathe- 
matics in a female seminary in Winchester, 
Virginia, 1865-1867; studied law, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1869, and practiced 
in Front Royal, Virginia ; member of the 
Virginia legislature, 1869-1872 ; prosecuting 
attorney for Warren county, Virginia ; for 
eight years a member of the state board of 
visitors of the Virginia Military Institute ; 
elected as a Democrat to the fifty-third con- 
gress, to fill vacancy caused by the resigna- 
tion of Charles T. O'Ferrall ; re-elected to 
the fifty-fourth congress, and served from 
February 12, 1894, to March 3, 1897. ^^ 
died at Front Royal, Virginia, April 8, 1898. 

Tyler, David Gardiner, was born July 12, 
1846, while his mother was on a visit to her 
mother, at East Hampton, New York, but 
his life has been wholly identified with Vir- 



ginia. He is the eldest son of President 
John Tyler by his second wife, Julia Gard- 
iner. As a boy he attended the school of 
Mr. Austin H. Ferguson in Charles City 
county, and entered Washington College 
(now Washington and Lee University; in 
the latter part of 1862, where he stayed for 
two sessions, seeing military service at in- 
tervals in the college company, commanded 
first by Prof. White and later by Charles 
Freeman, a student of the college. In 1864 
he joined the Rockbridge Artillery com- 
manded by Capt. Graham and was in the 
defenses around Richmond till Gen. Lee re- 
treated to Appomattox, where the army sur- 
rendered April 9, 1865. After the war he 
was sent by his mother to Europe with his 
brother, Alexander, under the care of Rev. 
Robert Fulton, of New Orleans. He stayed 
in Europe and attended the Polytechnic 
School at Carlsruhe two years. He returned 
to Virginia, and again attended Washington 
College of which Gen. Lee was now presi- 
dent. After the first year he studied law 
i\nd took the degree of Bachelor of Law and 
in 1869 studied about a year in Richmond 
under James Lyons. In 1871 he took charge 
ot the old plantation and practiced in the 
courts of Charles City and New Kent, but, 
as the negroes had the domination, there 
was not much chance for political prefer- 
ment for many years. He served as a mem- 
ber of the board of visitors of William and 
Mary College and as a member of the board 
lor the Eastern State Hospital at Williamsn 
burg; was member of the Democratic Cen- 
tral Committee and presidential elector in 
1888. After 1891, when negro domination 
ceased, his promotion was rapid. He was 
elected to the state senate ; served as a 
representative in the fifty-third and fifty- 



132 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



fourth congresses (March 4, 1893-March 3, 
1897) ; again elected to the state senate in 
1899; '^"'^1 finally elected judge of the four- 
teenth judicial circuit of the state for a term 
of eight years and re-elected in 1912 for 
another term. lie is a man of much culture, 
a judge whom the supreme court has sel- 
dom reversed, is a fluent conversationalist 
and eloquent speaker. On June 6, 1894, he 
married Mary Morris Jones, daughter of 
James Alfred Jones, a prominent lawyer of 
Richmond. He resides at his father's for- 
mer residence "Sherwood Forest," Charles 
City county, Virginia. He is the author of 
various notable addresses — one of them es- 
pecially on his old commander, Gen. Robert 
E. Lee, delivered at William and Mary Col- 
lege, has been much commended. 

Upton, Charles Horace, born at Belfast, 
Maine, August 23, 1812; was graduated 
from Bowdoin College in 1834; moved to 
Falls Church, Virginia ; held several local 
offices ; elected as a Republican to the thir- 
ty-seventh congress (March 4, 1861-March 
3 1863) ; United States consul to Geneva. 
Switzerland ; died in Geneva, Switzerland, 
June 17, 1877. 

Venable, Edward Carrington, Imrn at 
"Long Wood," Prince Edward county, Vir- 
ginia, January 31, 1853, son of Samuel 
Woodson \'enable, a leading tobacco manu- 
facturer, and Elizabeth Travis Carrington, 
his wife. He was educated at the private 
school taught by John E. Christian, and at 
W. Gordon McCabe's university school in 
Petersburg, Virginia. In 1869 he entered 
the University of \'irginia, and graduated 
from several of its academic schools in 
187 1. He then taught school for three years 
in Petersburg, in the school which subse- 
quently became a part of the Tulane Uni- 



versity of Louisiana, the presidency of 
which he subsequently declined. After 
spending the winter of 1875 '" Europe, he 
engaged in tobacco manufacturing, and 
carried on an extensive business until 1901, 
when the establishment was sokl to the 
Continental Tobacco Company. He pre- 
sented credentials as a member-elect to the 
fifty-first congress, and served from March 
4, 1889, to September 23, 1890, when he was 
succeeded by John M. Langston, who con- 
tested his election. He was for years chair- 
man of the Democratic party for the Peters- 
burg district ; and was president of the 
Chamber of Commerce of Petersburg. He 
married Helen Skipwith Wilmer, daughter 
01 Bishop Wilmer, of Louisiana. 

Waddill, Edmund, Jr., born in Charles 
City county, \ irginia. May 22, 1855, son of 
Edmund Waddill, clerk of Charles City 
county from 1856 to 1887; deputy clerk of 
the courts of Charles City, New Kent, Han- 
over and Henrico counties, and of the cir- 
cuit court of the city of Richmond ; studied 
law. was admitted to the bar in 1877, and 
entered upon practice in Richmond in 1878; 
judge of the county court of Henrico in 
1880; resigned this office in 1883 to accept 
the office of United States attorney for the 
eastern district of Virginia, which position 
he filled until 1885 ; a representative in the 
state legislature, 1885-1889; Republican 
nominee for congress in 1886, and defeated ; 
elected as a Republican to the fifty-first con- 
gress (March 4, 1889-March 3, lOoi) : ap- 
pointed United States judge for the eastern 
district of Virginia, March 22, 1898, which 
position he still holds. 

Walker, Gilbert C, (q. v.). 

Walker, James A., (q. v.). 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



I. S3 



Watson, Walter Allen, born November 
25, 1867, son of Meredith and Josephine 
(Robertson) Watson, on paternal plantation 
in Nottoway county, Virginia, where he 
still resides ; educated at "old field" schools, 
Hampden-Sidney College, and University of 
Virginia ; taught school two years, and in 
intervals worked on farm ; practiced law, 
and was circuit judge eight years, when he 
resigned to stand for congress ; has been 
commonwealth attorney, state senator, and 
member of Virginia constitutional conven- 
tion, 1901-02; elected to sixty-third con- 
gress ; married Constance Tinley, of Rich- 
mond. Mr. Watson is a man of fine address 
and much culture. 

WhaJey, Killian Van Rensselaer, born 
ii' Onondaga county, New York, May 6. 
1821 ; moved to Ohio, in youth, and attended 
the public schools; moved to western Vir- 
ginia in 1842, located in Point Pleasant, and 
engaged in lumbering and mercantile busi- 
ness ; elected as a Republican to the thirty- 
seventh congress (March 4, 1861-March 3, 
1863 ; serving on the committee on invalid 
pensions ; afterwards acted as an aid to 
Gov. Pierpont in organizing and equipping 
regiments, and was in command at the 
battle of Guyandotte, when he was taken 
prisoner, in November, 1861 ; after travel- 
ing with his captors sixty miles toward 
Richmond, he made his escape, and arriving 
safely at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, he was 
soon able to resume his seat in the house 
of representatives ; elected a representative 
from the new state of West Virginia in the 
thirty-eighth and thirty-ninth congresses 
and served from December 7, 1863, to 
March 3, 1867; in the thirty-ninth congress 
he served as chairman of the committee on 
revolutionary claims, and as a member of 



that on the death of President Lincoln; he 
\\as also a member of the national commit- 
tee appointed to accompany the remains of 
President Lincoln to Illinois ; delegate in 
the Republican national convention in Balti- 
more in 1864; appointed collector of cus- 
toms at Brazos de Santiago. Texas, in 1868 ; 
died at Point Pleasant, West Virginia, May 
20, 1876. 

Whitehead. Thomas, born at Clifton, Vir- 
ginia, December 27, 1825 ; received a limited 
schooling; became a merchant; studied law, 
was admitted to the bar and began practice 
in Amherst, Virginia ; engaged in farming ; 
elected prosecuting attorney for Amherst 
county in 1866 and 1869, resigning in No- 
vember. 1873 ; elected state senator in 1865, 
but did not qualify; served in the Confed- 
erate army 1861-1865 ; elected as a Conserva- 
tive, indorsed by Republicans, to the forty- 
third congress (March 4, 1873-March 3, 
1875) ; died at Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1902. 

Wise, George Douglas, born in Accomac 
county. Virginia, June 4, 1831, son of Tully 
R. Wise, of Accomac county ; was gradu- 
ated from Indiana University ; studied law 
in William and Mary College, Williams- 
burg, Virginia, was admitted to the bar, 
and practiced in Richmond; captain in the 
Confederate army ; commonwealth attorney 
of the city of Richmond from 1870 until he 
resigned, in 1899; elected as a Democrat to 
the forty-seventh and to the six succeeding 
congresses (March 4, 1881-March 3, 1895) ! 
died at Richmond. Virginia, February 4, 
1898. 

Wise, John Sergeant, son of Hon. Henry 
A. Wise, formerly governor of Virginia, 
was born December 27, 1846, at Rio de Jane- 
iro, Brazil, while his father represented the 



i.U 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



L'nited States as minister to that country. 
He was a student at the Virginia Military 
Institute, and with the cadets from that in- 
stitution participated in the battle of New 
Market, \'irginia, May 15, 1864. He entered 
the Confederate army, serving with the 
rank of lieutenant. He was a student at 
the university ; read law, and was admitted 
to the bar. Inheriting the talents of his 
father as an orator and debater, he took an 
active part in politics and aspired as a Dem- 
ocrat to the gubernatorial office but failing 
in this ambition joined the Readjuster party 
and was made United States district attor- 
rey for the eastern district of Virginia. 
1882-1883, and member of congress (March 
4. 1883-March 3, 1885). He was defeated 
as the Republican candidate for governor 
in 1885, after which he removed to New 
York, where he engaged successfully in the 
practice of the law and was made United 
States district attorney for the city of New 
York. He died May 12, 1913. His remains 
were brought to Richmond and interred in 
HollvAvood Cemetery. He was the author 
C'f several v/ell-known books "Diomed." 
1898; "The End of an Era," 1899; "The 
Lion's Skin," 1905 ; a treatise on American 
citizenship. 

Wise, Richard Alsop, born in Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, September 2, 1843, son 
of Gov. Henry A. Wise ; attended private 
schools in Richmond, Virginia, Dr. Gess- 
ner Harrison's university school, and Wil- 
liam anil Mary College for two years: 
served in the Confederate army as a private 
in Stuart's cavalry and as assistant inspec- 
tor-general of Wise's brigade. .Army of 
Northern Virginia; was graduated in medi- 
cine from the Medical College of Virginia 
in 1867, and practiced ; professor in the Col- 
Uge of William and Mary in 1869-1880; 



superintendent of the Eastern Lunatic Asy- 
lum of \'irginia, 1882-1884; member of the 
state legislature, 1885-1887; clerk of the cir- 
cuit and county courts of the city of Wil- 
liamsburg and county of James City, 1887- 
1893; elected as a Republican to the fifty- 
fifth congress and was seated after a con- 
test with William A. Young, April 26, 1898, 
and served until March 3, 1899; re-elected 
tc the fifty-sixth congress and was seated 
after a second contest with William A. 
Young, April 26, 1900, and served until 
March 3, 1901 ; died at Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia, December 21, 1901. 

Yost, Jacob, born at Staunton, \'irginia. 
April I. 1853; received a primary schooling; 
learned the trade of a printer ; followed 
civil engineering; candidate for Republican 
elector in 1880; Republican nominee for 
congress in 1884; elected mayor of the city 
of Staunton in May, 1886; elected as a Re- 
publican to the fiftieth congress (March 4, 
1887-March 3. 1889) ; re-elected to the fifty- 
fifth congress (March 4, 1897-March 3, 
1899). 

Young, William A., born in Virginia, May 
17. i860; attended the schools of Norfolk, 
and began the study of law ; entered mer- 
cantile pursuits ; clerk of the circuit and cor- 
poration courts of the city of Norfolk ; dele- 
gate in the national Democratic convention 
in Chicago in 1892; presented credentials 
as member-elect to the fifty-fifth congress, 
and served from March 4, 1897, to April 26, 
1898. when he was succeeded by Richard A. 
Wise, who contested his election ; again 
]iiesented credentials as a member-elect to 
the fifty-sixth congress, and served from 
March 4, 1899, to March 12, 1900, when he 
was again succeeded by Richard A. Wise, 
who contested his election. 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



VII— PROMINENT PERSONS 



Lynch, William Francis, born in Nor- 
folk, \'irginia, April, 1801 ; at the age of 
eighteen, after preparatory study, he entered 
the United States navy as midshipman, and 
nine years later, in 1828, was promoted lieu- 
tenant ; in 1847 he proposed the expedition 
to explore the River Jordan and the Dead 
Sea, the government looking with favor 
upon the proposition, and accordingly he 
sailed on the United States store-ship, Sn['- 
ply, to Smyrna, from whence he went over- 
land to Constantinople, where he obtained 
the necessary authority and protection from 
the Turkish government, and in March, 
1848, landed at the Bay of Acre, and in 
metallic life-boats navigated and explored 
the Jordan from Lake Tiberius to the Dead 
Sea ; upon his return to his native country 
he planned an expedition to explore West- 
ern Africa, but did not carry it through, the 
government failing to sanction the plan ; in 
1849 he was promoted to the rank of com- 
mander, and seven years later, in 1856, to 
that of captain, in which capacity he served 
for six years, then resigned his commission 
ii' the United States navy and enlisted his 
services in the Confederate navy ; he was 
commissioned flag-officer, and assigned to 
the coast defence of North Carolina ; cap- 
tured the Federal supply ship, Fanny; com- 
manded the mosquito fleet, composed of the 
Confederate vessels, Appomattox, Seabird, 
Ellis, Black Warrior, Curlczv and Fanny, in 
defence of Roanoke Island ; unsuccessfully 
resisted the attack of Flag-Officer Louis M. 
Goldsborough ; fired one of his own steam- 
ers, the Curh'7s<, to prevent her capture ; blew 
up Fort Forrest ; on February 10, 1862, he 



engaged the Union fleet, under Commander 
Rowan, with a loss of five of his six vessels, 
and escaped to Norfolk in the Beaufort ; he 
subsequently commanded at Smithville, 
North Carolina, during the attack on Fort 
Fisher, December, 1864, January, 1865, and 
after the surrender dismantled the defences 
and returned to Wilmington, North Caro- 
lina. He was author of "Narrative of the 
United States Expedition up the River Jor- 
dan and the Dead Sea" (1849) I "Naval Life, 
or Observations Afloat and Ashore" (1851) ; 
he died in Baltimore, Maryland, October 17, 
1865. 

Alexander, Edmund B., born in Prince 
William county, Virginia, October 2, 1802; 
graduated at West Point in 1823. He served 
on the frontier and on garrison duty for 
twenty years. In the Mexican war he won 
distinction at Cerro Gordo, Contreras and 
Cherubusco, and was brevetted major and 
lieutenant-colonel. He was afterward ma- 
jor of the Eighth Infantry, November 10, 
1857, and colonel of the Tenth Infantry, 
March 3, 1855. He commanded the Utah 
expedition of 1857-58 until relieved by Gen. 
Albert Sidney Johnston. In the civil war he 
was provost marshal of St. Louis, chief dis- 
bursing officer for Missouri, and superin- 
tendent of the volunteer recruiting service 
at St. Louis. He was brevetted brigadier- 
general March 13, 1865, and commanded at 
Fort Snelling, Minnesota, until February 22, 
1869, when he was placed on the retired list 
after fifty years' service. He removed to 
W'ashington, D. C, where he died January 
3, 1888. 



138 



\IRG1XIA BIOGRAPHY 



Ramsay, George Douglas, was born in 
Dumfries, \'irginia, February 21, 1802, son 
01 Andrew and Catherine (Graham) Ram- 
say, grandson ot Patrick and Elizabeth 
(Poythress) Ramsay and of Richard and 
Jane (Brent) Graham. Patrick Ramsay 
emigrated from Glasgow, Scotland, to Vir- 
ginia, and settled in Bristol Parish. He re- 
turned to Scotland prior to the revolution, 
and after his death, in 1791, his widow 
brought her sons to Alexandria, Virginia, 
where they followed mercantile pursuits. 
George Douglas Ramsay was graduated 
from the United States Military Academy, 
and promoted second lieutenant, light ar- 
tillery, July I. 1820; was transferred to the 
First Artillery on the reorganization of the 
army, June i, 1821 ; and promoted first lieu- 
tenant, March i, 1826. He served as adju- 
tant of the First Artillery, 1833-35 ; as as- 
sistant ordnance officer at Washington, D. 
C, in 1835, and was promoted captain and 
transferred to the ordnance department, 
February 25, 1835, serving as commandant 
of the New York, Washington, Frankford, 
and Augusta- arsenals. He was married, 
September 23, 1830, to Frances Whetcroft, 
daughter of Thomas and Frances (Whet- 
croft) Munroe, of Washington, D. C. ; his 
wife died April 22, 1835. He was married 
(.second) June 28, 1838, to Eliza Rae, daugh- 
ter of Thomas Gales, of Louisiana. He was 
ordnance officer at Corpus Christi and Point 
Isabel in the military occupation of Texas, 
1845-46. and in the battle of Monterey, 
where he was brevetted major, for gallant 
conduct. He was chief of ordnance of Gen. 
Taylor's army, 1847-48 ; commandant of the 
Frankford, Fort Munroe, St. Louis and 
Washington arsenals. 1848-61 ; and was pro- 
moted major, April 22, 1861 ; lieutenant- 
colonel, August 3, 1861 ; and colonel, June 



I. 1863. He commanded the arsenal at 
Washington, D. C, 1861-63; served as chief 
or ordnance of the United States army with 
headquarters at Washington, 1863-64; was 
promoted brigadier-general, and made chief 
of ordnance of the L'nited States army, Sep- 
tember 15, 1863, and retired by age limit, 
September 12, 1864. He was inspector of 
arsenals, 1864-66; commanded the Wash- 
ington arsenal, 1866-70; was brevetted ma- 
jor-general, U. S. A., March 13, 1865, for 
long and faithful services, and was a mem- 
ber of the examining board. He died in 
^\'ashington, D. C, May 23, 1882. 

Barron, Samuel, was born in Virginia, 
about 1802, son of Commodore Samuel Bar- 
ron, U. S. N., entered the navy as a mid- 
shipman ; lieutenant. March 3, 1827; com- 
mander, July 15, 1847; captain in 1855. 
When the civil war broke out he was ap- 
pointed chief of the bureau of detail, but had 
already accepted a commission as commo- 
dore in the Confederate navy, and superin- 
tendency of the defenses of North Caro- 
lina and \'irginia. He was in command at 
the surrender of Forts Clark and Hatteras. 
August 28, 1861, and was one of the pris- 
oners sent to New York. An exchange was 
eflected in 1862, after which he went to 
England, and engaged in fitting out block- 
ade runners and privateers. At the close of 
the war he settled on a farm in \^irginia. 
He died February 20. 1888. 

Powell, Levin Minn, was born at Win- 
chester, Virginia, April 21. 1803, son ot 
Alfred Harrison and Sidney (Thruston) 
Powell ; grandson of Col. Levin and Sarah 
(Harrison) Powell: great-grandson of \\"\\- 
liani and Eleanor (Peyton) Powell, llis 
grandfather. Levin (1737-1810), raised and 
equipped the Sixteenth Mrginia Regiment ; 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



139 



served through the Valley Forge campaign, 
and was a Federalist representative in the 
Sixth United States congress, 1749-1801. 
Levin Minn Powell was appointed mid- 
shipman in the United States navy, March 
I, 1817; assigned to the Franklin, and was 
engaged in suppressing piracy in the Medi- 
terranean and China seas, the Gulf of Mexi- 
co and the West Indies. He was promoted 
lieutenant, April 28, 1826; commanded sev- 
eral expeditions against the Indians in the 
Seminole war; was wounded in a fight with 
them on the Jupiter river in January, 1837 ; 
received the thanks of the navy department 
for his services in Florida, and commanded 
two surveying expeditions on the eastern 
coasts and harbors of the Gulf of Mexico. 
He was promoted commander, June 24, 
/843 ; was made assistant inspector of ord- 
nance in October, 1843, ^""i continued on 
ordnance duty until 1849. He commanded 
the sloop John Adams on the coast of South 
America and Africa, 1849-50; served as ex- 
ecutive officer of the United States navy 
}ard at Washington, D. C., 1851-54, and 
commanded the flag-ship Potomac on a 
cruise in the North Atlantic and West In- 
dies, 1854-56. He was promoted captain, 
September 14, 1855 ; served as inspector of 
contract steamers in 1858, and as captain of 
the frigate Potomac, in the Gulf squadron, 
1861-62, having been retired December 21, 
1861, six months before he left his ship. He 
was promoted commodore on the retired 
list, July 16, 1862 ; served as inspector of 
the third lighthouse district, 1862-66; on 
special service, 1867-72, and was promoted 
rear-admiral on the retired list. May 13. 
1869. He died in Washington, D. C., Janu- 
ary 15, 1885. 



Summers, George Washington, born in 
Favette county, Virginia, March 4, 1804; 
completed preparatory studies and was 
graduated from Ohio University ; studied 
law, and was admitted to the bar in 1827 ; 
began practice in Kanawha, Virginia ; mem- 
ber of the state house of delegates, 1830- 
40 ; elected as a Whig to the twenty-seventh 
and twenty-eighth congresses (March 4, 
1841-March 3, 1845) ; delegate to the state 
constitutional convention in 1850; Whig 
candidate for governor in 185 1 ; judge of the 
eighteenth judicial circuit of Virginia, 1852- 
58 ; member of the famous peace congress 
of 1861 ; the convention was called at the 
recommendation of the \'irginia legislature 
for the purpose of effecting a general and 
permanent pacification ; it adopted what be- 
came known as the "Guthrie Plan," named 
from its sponsor, Hon. James Guthrie, of 
Kentucky, which provided that neither the 
constitution nor any amendment thereof 
should be construed to give power to con- 
gress to interfere with the status of persons 
held to service in labor as it now exists in 
any of the territory lying south of thirty- 
six degrees and thirty minutes. As this 
action materially departed from the terms 
of Mr. Crittenden's compromise resolutions 
and neither defined the meaning of the word 
"status" nor used the word slave, many of 
the Southern members deemed it ambigu- 
ous, and a majority of the Virginia delega- 
tion refused to vote for Mr. Guthrie's propo- 
sitions. On being reported to the senate 
they were rejected by a large vote, and in 
the house of representatives the speaker 
was refused permission to present them. 
Nevertheless, in the Virginia convention 
Mr. Summers afterward supported them in 
a strong speech, as the best means of pacifi- 



140 



\IRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



cation. They were still pending when Lin- 
coln called for troops, whereupon Mr. Sum- 
mers signed the ordinance of secession and 
afterwards gave his best efforts to the 
Southern cause. He died in September, 
1868. 

Dabney, William C, born in Charlottes- 
ville, \ irginia, July 4, 1849. He graduated 
from the University of Virginia with the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine, in 1868, and 
ei:tered upon practice in his native coun- 
ty (.\lbemarlej, eventually locating in Char- 
lottesville. In 1886, following the resig- 
nation of Professor Harrison from the 
chair of medicine in the University of ^'ir- 
ginia, Dr. Dabney was appointed to the 
\acancy, and served in that position with 
signal ability until his death, August 20, 
1894. He was a distinguished authority on 
several subjects in the medical profession, 
and made many contributions to medical 
literature, the most important of which 
were : "Medical Chemistry," the Boylston 
Prize Essay; "Nitrite of Amyl as an An- 
tidote to Chloroform ;" "Development of 
Connective Tissue ;" "Extirpation of Kid- 
ney for Renal Calculus;" "Physiological and 
Pathological Effects of Excessive Soil Mois- 
ture ;" "Choleate of Soda in Biliary Lith- 
iasis;" "Contributions to the Histology of 
I'^pithelial Xew Formations;" "Disturbances 
of Nutrition Consecutive to Nerve Lesions." 
Dr. Dabney married, March 16, 1869, Jane 
Pell Minor, daughter of William W. Minor, 
.'^i., of Albemarle county, \'irginia. 

Ryland, Robert, born in King and Queen 
county, \'irginia, March 14, 1805, son of 
Josiah Ryland and Catherine (Peachy) Ry- 
land. his wife. He was licensed as a Baptist 
preacher in 1825, and ordained in 1827. 



After studying in classical schools he was 
graduated in 1826 from Columbian Univer- 
sity, Washington, D. C. For five years he 
was pastor at Lynchburg. In 1832 he took 
charge of the Manual Labor School at Rich- 
mond, known as the Virginia Baptist Semi- 
nary, and in 1840, when it became Richmond 
College, he was made president. Mean- 
while, in 1834-36, he was chaplain of the 
University of Virginia. In 1866 he resigned 
liis college presidency, and for twenty-five 
years was pastor of the First African Bap- 
tist Church, of Riclimond, during which 
time he baptized 3,800 persons. In 1868 he 
v>ent to Kentucky, where he conducted fe- 
male schools and preached in country 
churches. He died in Lexington, Kentucky, 
April 23, 1899. His son, William S. Ryland, 
was president of Lexington Female Col- 
lege, and later, of Bethel College. 

Faulkner, Charles James, born in Mar- 
tinsburg, Virginia, July 6, 1806; was grad- 
uated from Georgetown ( D. C.) University 
in 1822 ; attended Chancellor Tucker's law 
lectures in \\'inchester ; was admitted to the 
bar in 1829, and entered upon practice. He 
was a member of the state house of dele- 
gates in 1832-33; was a commissioner on 
the disputed Virginia-Maryland boundary ; 
v.as a state senator, 1841-44, but resigned ; 
was elected to the revising legislature in 
1S48 ; member of state constitutional con- 
vention, 1850. He was elected to the thir- 
ty-second congress, March 4, 185 1, and to 
the two succeeding congresses. In 1859 he 
was appointed minister to France by Presi- 
dent Buchanan. He returned at the out- 
break of the civil war, in 1861, and was 
taken and held as a prisoner of war. but in 
December of the same year was exchangetl 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



141 



for Congressman Ely, of New York. During 
the war he was a member of the staff cf 
Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson. After the war 
ht was engaged in various railroad enter- 
prises. He was a member of the West Vir- 
ginia constitutional convention in 1872, and 
'vas elected from that state, as a Demo- 
crat, to the forty-fourth congress (March 
4 1875-March 3, 1877). He died in Boyd- 
\ille, West Virginia, November i, 1884. 

Conrad, Charles M., born at Winchester, 
Virginia, about 1804. In his infancy his 
parents removed to Mississippi and then to 
Louisiana. He received a liberal education, 
studied law, was admitted to the Louisiana 
bar in 1828, and practiced in New Orleans, 
tor several years he was a member of the 
state legislature ; and was elected to the 
United States senate to fill the unexpired 
term of Alexander Mouton, resigned, and 
served from April 14, 1842, to March 3, 
1843. He was a member of the state con- 
stitutional convention of 1844, was elected 
to congress in i8-|8, and served till Au- 
gust, 1850. when he was appointed secre- 
tarv of war by President Fillmore, serving 
as such from August 13, 1850, to March 7, 
1853. He was a leader of the secession 
movement in Louisiana in December, 1800, 
and was a delegate from Louisiana to the 
provisional congress held in Montgomery. 
Alabama, in 1861. He was a member of the 
first and second congresses of the Confed- 
eracy, and from 1862 to 1864 served in the 
Confederate army as brigadier-general. He 
died in New Orleans, Louisiana, February 
II, 1878. 

Brownlow, William Gannaway, born in 
Wythe county, Virginia, August 29, 1803. 
Early orphaned, he had to make his own 



way in life, and by working as a carpenter 
I'aid his way in school, and acquired a fair 
education. He became a Methodist minis- 
ter and for several years after 1826, travelled 
extensively through Tennessee and South 
Carolina, preaching, at the same time taking 
an active part in politics, and in South Caro- 
lina he made himself obnoxious by his op- 
position to nullification. In 1838 he be- 
came editor of the "Kno-xville (Tennessee) 
Whig," in which he so unsparingly criti- 
cised his political opponents, that he gained 
the sobriquet of "the fighting parson." In 
1843 he was a candidate for congress, and 
was defeated by Andrew Johnson. In 1850, 
under appointment by President Fillmore, 
he was one of the government commis- 
sioners on the improvement of western 
rivers. In 1858 he published a work which 
had a large vogue— "The Great Iron Wheel 
Examined and its Spokes Extracted," being 
an answer to "The Great Iron Wheel, or 
Republicanism backwards, and Christianity 
Reversed," published two years before by- 
Rev. J. R. Graves, a Baptist minister, and 
editor. In 1858, in Philadelphia, in a public 
discussion with Rev. A. Prynne, of New 
York, he upheld slavery as divinely right, 
as well as expedient. In i860, nevertheless, 
he took a prominent stand against seces- 
sion. He refused to remove the United 
States flag from his house or office, or to 
take the oath of allegiance to the Confed- 
erate government, and in October, 1861, his 
paper was suppressed, and he left the state, 
passing over into North Carolina. In De- 
cember of the same year he returned, was 
arrested on a charge of treason, when he 
was released from jail, but held under guard 
in his home until March, 1862, when he was 
sent into the Union lines at Nashville, his 



14-2 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



presence in the Confederacy being held as 
dangerous to the new government. He de- 
hvered speeches in advocacy of the Federal 
cause, in the principal cities of the north, 
until 1864, when he returned to Tennessee, 
and the next year, with the aid of the negro 
vote, was elected governor under the mili- 
tary state government During his admin- 
istration the people sought relief from his 
rule by establishing the "Ku Klux Klan," and 
disturbances arose, and in his endeavor for 
suppression, he declared martial law in sev- 
eral counties. In 1867 he had the aid of 
the United States troops to carry into effect 
the hated reconstruction law, disfranchising 
the whites in Nashville, where resistance 
vvas made by the mayor. In 1869 he was 
elected to the United States senate, and he 
resigned as governor, sold his newspaper, 
and confined himself to his senatorial duties. 
At the end of his term, he returned to 
Knoxville, and again became its editor. In 
1862 he published a volume, "Rise, Prog- 
ress and Decline of Secession." He died at 
Knoxville, April 29, 1877. 

Ammen, Jacob, born in Botetourt county, 
Virginia, January 7, 1808. He was gradu- 
ated at West Point in 1831, and served there 
ab assistant instructor in mathematics, and 
afterward of infantry tactics until August 
31, 1832. During the threatened "nullifica- 
tion" of South Carolina he was on duty in 
Charleston harbor. From October 4, 1834, 
to November 5, 1837, he was again at West 
Point as an instructor, and he resigned from 
the army November 30, 1837, to accept a 
professorship of mathematics at Bacon Col- 
lege, Georgetown, Kentucky. Thence he 
v/ent to JeiTerson College, Washington, 
Mississippi, in 1839, to the University of 



Indiana in 1840, to Jefferson College again 
in 1843, ^"d returned to Bacon College in 
1848. From 1855 to 1861 he was a civil 
engineer at Ripley, Ohio, and on April 18 
of that year became captain of the Twelfth 
Ohio Volunteers. He was promoted lieu- 
tenant-colonel May 2, and participated in 
the West Virginia campaign (June and 
July) under McClellan. where the first con- 
siderable Federal successes of the war were 
gained. After the campaigns in Tennessee 
and Mississippi he was promoted to be brig- 
adier-general of volunteers, July id, 1862, 
and was in command of camps of instruc- 
tion in C^hio and Illinois until December 
16, 1863. From April 10, 1864, to January 
14. 1865, when he resigned, he was in com- 
mand of the district of East Tennessee. 

Cranch, Christopher Pearce, born at Alex- 
andria, Virginia, March 8, 1813, son of 
Judge William Cranch, of the circuit court 
of Washington, a jurist of eminence, and 
for many years reporter for the United 
States supreme court. He was intended for 
tlie ministry, and studied at the Harvard 
Theological Seminary, but his love for art 
and literature induced him to leave the 
ministry in 1842. He went to Italy and 
Paris, and remamed there as a student, 
with a single visit to America, until 1863, 
when he returned home and located in New 
York. He soon achieved reputation as a 
landscape paii.ter. and was elected to the 
.National Academy in 1864. In his later 
years he practically abandoned painting, 
and devoted himself to letters. An early 
collection of poems, published in 1S44. was 
the beginning of a long line of varied liter- 
rry and ])oetical works. In addition to a 
translation of the .-Eneid," he issued 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



145 



"Satan;" a libretto; a number of books for 
children, and many short poems. He died 
at Cambridge, Massachusetts, January 20, 
1892. 

Joynes, Levin Smith, born in Accomac 
county, Virginia, May 13, 1819, son of Judge 
William Thomas Joynes, of the Virginia 
court of appeals. He was educated in the 
private schools of his neighborhood, and en- 
tered Washington College, Pennsylvania, 
from which he was graduated in 1835. He 
tlien entered the University of Virginia, 
and was graduated therefrom in 1839 with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. After 
leaving the university, he traveled abroad 
and studied in Paris and Dublin, and upon 
his return home began the practice of his 
profession in his native county. In 1844 he 
removed to Baltimore, and in 1846 was 
elected professor of physiology and medical 
jurisprudence in the Franklin Medical Col- 
lege of Philadelphia. In 1849 he returned to 
Accomac county, Virginia, and in 1855 was 
elected professor of medicine at the Medi- 
cal College of Richmond. In 1857 he was 
elected dean of the faculty of that college, 
which position he held until 1871, when he 
resigned and was elected emeritus profes- 
sor. In 1872 he was made secretary of the 
state board of health, a position in which 
he did much towards the putting of the 
board of health upon a successful basis. 
Dr. Joynes was a learned physician and en- 
joyed an extensive practice in the city of 
his adoption. He contributed constantly to 
the medical journals of his day. He died in 
Richmond, January 18, 1881. 

Jones, Tiberius Gracchus, born in Pow- 
hatan county. Virginia, in 1819, son of Wood 
Jones, of Nottoway county, Virginia, and 



his wife, Elizabeth Trent (Archerj Jones, 
the former named a kinsman of John Win- 
ston Jones, speaker of the house of repre- 
sentatives, and the latter a member of the 
v.ell-known Virginia family of Archer. 
After completing his preparatory education, 
he entered Richmond College, and in 1842 
m.atriculated at the University of Virginia, 
where he remained for one session, then 
became a student at William and Mary Col- 
lege, where he received the honor, which, 
he had also received at the University of 
\irginia, of being the valedictory orator of 
the literary society. He held many posi- 
tions of responsibility and was regarded as 
a strong preacher, a learned writer and a 
sound thinker. He was elected president 
cl Wakeforest College. North Carolina, and 
of Mercer College, Georgia, which positions 
he declined, and he was also elected presi- 
dent of Richmond College. Among his well 
known works are: "The Duties of Pastors 
to Churches," and the "Great Misnomer, 
the Lord's Supper Called the Communion." 
At the time of his death he was a resident 
i>f Nashville. Tennessee. 

Dabney, Robert Lewis, was born in 
Louisa county, Virginia. March 5, 1820. He 
studied at Hampden-Sidney College and 
later graduated from the University of Vir- 
ginia in 1842. He taught for two years 
and then entered the Union Theological 
Seminary in Virginia, was licensed to preach, 
in 1846, ordained by the Lexington Pres- 
bytery in July, 1847, and became pastor of 
Tinkling Spring Church in Augusta county, 
Virginia, where he remained for six years. 
In 1853 he accepted the professorship of 
church history in Union Seminary, Virginia, 
and remained until 1883, except during the 



144 



\1RGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



ci\ il war, when lie was actively engaged in 
the Confederate service as chaplain of the 
Eighteenth Virginia Regiment, and after- 
ward as chief-of-stafT to Gen. T. J. Jackson. 
In 1883 he was elected to the chair of moral 
jihilosophy in the University of Texas. The 
degree of D. D. was conferred upon him by 
Hampden-Sidney College in 1853, and that 
of LL. D. by the Southwestern Presbyterian 
Uni\ersity, Tennessee, in 1877, and simul- 
taneously by Hampden-Sidney College. Be- 
sides being a voluminous contributor to 
periodical literature Dr. Dabney published 
'"Life of Rev. Dr. F. S. Sampson" (Rich- 
mond, 1854) ; "Life of Gen. T. J. (Stone- 
wall) Jackson" (London, 1864) ; "Sacred 
Rhetoric" (Richmond, 1866) ; "Defence of 
\'irginia and the South" (New York, 1868) ; 
' Sensualistic Philosophy of the Nineteenth 
Century Considered" (1876) ; "A Course of 
Systematic and Polemic Theology" (St. 
Louis, 1878) ; and "The Christian Sabbath" 
(Philadelphia. 1881). 

Holmes, George Frederick, Ixirn at De- 
marara. British Guiana, in August, 1820. 
He was reared and educated in England, 
attending Durham University, and in 1838 
emigrated from that country to the United 
.States, his first occupation being that of 
teacher in schools in Virginia, Georgia and 
South Carolina. In the meantime he pur- 
sued a course of study in the law, and was 
admitted to the bar of South Carolina in 
1842, but did not practice his profession for 
any length of time, resuming his work of 
teaching. Three years later, in 1848, after 
serving two years in a professional position 
in Richmond College, and one year as pro- 
fessor of history, political economy and in- 
ternational law at the College of William 



and Mary, he accepted the presidency of the 
University of Mississippi, remaining but a 
short period of time, teaching history, poli- 
tical economy and the evidences of Chris- 
tianity, after which he returned to Virginia 
and engaged in literary work, his writmgs 
aj.ipearing principally in encyclopedias, re- 
views and magazines. In 1857, Professor 
Holmes was called to the chair of history 
and general literature at the University of 
X'irginia, which had been established the 
previous year, and so continued until the 
} ear of his decease. In 1882 his work was 
reduced to the subject of historical science, 
including political economy, the creation of 
ihe school of English language and litera- 
ture relieving him of the literature courses, 
filed in 1889, upon the appointment of an 
adjunct professor of history, he taught 
classes only in political economy and the 
science of society. He was the author of a 
series of text-books especially designed for 
the use of southern schools — readers, an 
Fnglish grammar, and a history of the 
I'nited States. He also printed privately 
lectures on the science of society. He died 
November 4, 1897. 

Allen, Henry Watkins, was born in 
I'rir.cc P.dward county, \'irgin'a. .'Xpril 29, 
1820. His father was a practicing physi- 
cian and removed to Missouri, where the 
son was educated at the Marionville Col- 
legiate Institute. He studied law, was ad- 
mitted to the Mississippi bar and practiced 
his profession. In 1842 he responded to 
President Houston's call for volunteers to 
aid the people of Texas in their war with 
Mexico, and raised a company which ho led. 
He returned to Grand Gulf, resumed prac- 
tice, anil was. in 184^1. elected tii the state 



PRO.MIXEXT PERSONS 



145 



legislature. He then engaged in sugar 
planting in West Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 
where he was elected to the state legisla- 
ture of Louisiana, in 1853. The next year 
he took a legal course at Harvard College, 
and in 1859 started for Italy, intending to 
enlist with Garibaldi in his struggles for 
independence. On his arrival, the war being 
over, he made the tour of Europe, and re- 
turned home, where he again served in the 
state legislature. When Louisiana seceded 
he enlisted in the Confederate army and 
was made lieutenant-colonel. He was soon 
promoted to be colonel of the Fourth 
l^ouisiana Regiment and military go\ernor 
(if Jackson, Mississippi. He was wounded 
at Shiloh and at Baton Rouge, where he 
commanded a brigade At Vicksburg he 
did effective service. He was promoted 
brigadier-general in 1864, and the same year 
elected governor of Louisiana. In this ca- 
pacity he organized a route of trade to the 
Alexican border and exchanged cotton tcr 
supplies needed in the state, which he sold 
to the people at moderate prices, besides 
giving to the poor. He also secured to the 
planters the right to pay the cotton tax 
imposed by the Confederate government in 
kind, and was largely engaged in preventing 
the manufacture and sale of liquor in the 
state. After the war he removed to the city 
of Mexico, and established the "Mexican 
Times." He died April 22, 1867. 

Lewis, David Peter, born in Charlotte 
county, Virginia, about 1820, son of Peter 
C. and ^lary Smith (Buster). Lewis, and of 
\\'elsh and English ancestry: dur'.ig his 
childhood his parents removed to Manjon 
county. Alabama, in the schools of which 
he received an excellent education, after 
which he studied law in Huntsville, Ala- 
viR— 10 



bama, and later practiced his profession in 
Lawrence county, which he represented in 
the state constitutional convention of 1861 ; 
he voted against secession, but eventually 
signed the ordinance as passed ; was elected 
to the Confederate provisional congress, at 
Montgoinery by the convention, but re- 
signed his seat ; in 1863 he was appointed 
judge of the circuit court of Alabama by 
Gov. Shorter, but after spending several 
n,onths on the bench, he passed through the 
army lines and reached Nashville, Tennes- 
see, where he remained imtil the close of the 
v.ar; in 1865 he returned to Alabama, set- 
tled at Huntsville, and resumed the prac- 
tice of his profession ; was elected governor 
of Alabama on the Republican ticket, and 
served in that capacity from 1872 to 1874, 
inclusive : he died at Huntsville, Alabama, 
July 3. 1884. 

Tucker, Nathaniel Beverley, (generally 
known as Be\erley Tucker), born in Win- 
chester, Virginia, Jtnie 8, 1820, son of Henry 
St. George Tucker. He was educated at 
the University of Virginia. In 1853 he 
founded the Washington "Sentinel," and in 
the same year was made printer to the sen- 
ate. He was appointed consul to Liverpool 
ill 1857, and served as such till 1861. Dur- 
ing the war he was made secret agent of 
the Confederate States, and in 1862 was sent 
by the Confederate government to England 
and France to obtain supplies, and in 1863- 
64 to Canada for a like purpose. He was 
included by President Johnson in his pro- 
clamation on the assassination of Lincoln, 
and a price was set on his head. In reply 
'I ucker wrote to Johnson that he had better 
look nearer home, as the person profiting 
most by Lincoln's death was Johnson him- 
self. He went to Mexico, where he remained 



146 



MRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



until the downfall of Maximilian, when he 
returned and took up his residence in W'ash- 
ington City, and Berkeley Springs, West 
Virginia. He died in Richmond, July 4, 
1890. 

Page, John, was born at Rug Swamp. 
Hanover county, Virginia, April 26, 1821, 
son of Francis and Susan (Nelson) Page^ 
and grandson of Gov. John Page, and Gov. 
Thomas Nelson, a signer of the Declaration 
of Independence, and commander of the 
Virginia forces at Yorktown. During his 
boyhood he attended school at the home of 
Bishop Meade, in Frederick county, Vir- 
ginia, and then attended Bristol College, 
Pennsylvania, and Newark College, Dela- 
ware. The year following the completion 
of his studies, he was a tutor at the Episco- 
pal High School near Alexandria, and dur- 
ing this time he read law with Henry Win- 
ter Davis. In 1843 '"'^ entered the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, graduating from that in- 
stitution the following year with the degree 
of Bachelor of Law. He began the active 
practice of his profession in Hanover county, 
\"irginia, and so continued, with a large 
degree of success for the remainder of his 
days. Upon the outbreak of the war 
between the states he enlisted in the Pat- 
rick Henry Rifles, a company formed in 
his neighborhood, and which became dis- 
tinguished as one of the constituent com- 
panies of the Fifteenth Virginia Regiment, 
and after the Peninsula campaign he re- 
ceived an appointment upon the staff of 
his brother-in-law, Gen. William N. Pendle- 
ton, chief of artillery of the Army of North 
Virginia. He was a Whig in politics, but 
the only political office he held was that 
of commonwealth's attorney. He was a 



lever of literature, and was thoroughly 
familiar with the Latin and Greek classics, 
as well as with those of his own tongue. 
He married, in 1846, Elizabeth I'.urwell 
Nelson, his cousin. Children : Rev. Dr. 
Frank Page, rector of St. John's Church, 
Brooklyn ; Thomas Nelson Page, of Wash- 
ington ; Rosewell Page, of Richmond, \"ir- 
ginia. Mr. Page died at his home in Han- 
over county, A'irginia, October 30. 1901. 

Hughes, Robert William, born in Pow- 
hatan county, \'irginia, June 16, 1821, and 
was reared by Mrs. General Carrington, 
daughter of General Francis Preston, of 
Abingdon. He w-as educated at Caldwell 
Institute, Greensboro, North Carolina, and 
was tutor in Bingham high school. Hillsboro, 
North Carolina, 1840-43. He was a practic- 
ing lawyer in Richmond, 1843-53 > "^^'^s edi- 
tor of the "Richmond Examiner," 1850-57, 
in which he strongly favored secession, and 
joint editor of that paper from May, 1861, 
to April, 1865. Upon the close of the war 
he aligned himself with the Republican 
party, and edited first the "Richmond Re- 
public," and afterwards the "Richmond 
Journal." In 1873 he was the Republican 
candidate for governor, and in January, 
1874, he was by President Grant commis- 
sioned United States district judge for the 
eastern district of Mrginia. in which posi- 
tion he served with marked ability and dis- 
tinction till February 22, 1898, when, owing 
tc his advanced age, he tendered his resig- 
I'ation. On June 4, 1850, at the governor's 
mansion in Richmond, he married Eliza M. 
Johnston, daughter of Hon. Charles C.John- 
ston, and Eliza Mary Preston, niece of Gen- 
eral Joseph E. Johnston. For many years 
he occupied as a summer home his fine 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



147 



estate, about three miles southeast of Ab- 
ingdon. He was the author of biographies 
of General Floyd and General Joseph E. 
Johnston, published in "Lee and his Lieu- 
tenants,'' 1867; a volume entitled "The 
American Dollar," 1885, and of five vol- 
umes of United States circuit and district 
court reports, entitled "Hughes' Reports, 
1879-1885." In 1866 Judge Hughes fought 
a duel with William E. Cameron, afterwards 
governor of Virginia, which resulted in Cam- 
eron's receiving a broken rib at the first fire. 
He died December 10, 1901. His remains 
were interred in Sinking Spring Cemetery, 
Abingdon, Virginia. 

Balch, Thomas, was born at Leesburg, 
Loudoun county, Virginia, July 23, 1821. 
He studied at Columbia College, read law 
in the office of Stephen Cambreleng, New 
York, and was admitted to the bar in 1850. 
In 1852 he removed to Philadelphia, served 
ill the city councils and presided over some 
of its most important committees. At the 
request of the Historical Society of Penn- 
sylvania, he edited "The Shippen Papers," 
"Letters and Papers relating to the Pro- 
vincial History of Pennsylvania," "The 
Maryland Papers," and ''The Examination 
cf Joseph Galloway for the Seventy-sixth 
Society." In 1859 he went to Europe, and 
remained upwards of ten years, making 
Paris his headquarters, collecting material 
for his work entitled "Les Francais en 
Amerique pendant la Guerre de I'lndepend- 
ence des Etats Unis, 1773-1783." In 1865 
he proposed in a letter to Horace Greeley, 
published in the New York "Tribune," a 
court of international arbitration as a meas- 
ure of averting war, which is believed to 
have been the first step in this direction. In 



it was laid down the code of rules observed 
by the Geneva tribunal. Returning to the 
L'nited States he devoted himself to literary 
labor. In September, 1876, he read before 
the Social Science Association, at Saratoga, 
a paper in favor of a double standard in 
coinage, and a paper before a similar asso- 
ciation in Philadelphia on "Free Coinage 
and a Self-adjusting Ratio.'' An account 
of many of his writings may be found in an 
obituary by John Austin Stevens, in the 
"Magazine of American History" for June, 
1877. He died in Philadelphia, March 29, 
1876. 

Wilson, Joseph Ruggles, born in 1822, in 
Ohio, son of Judge James and Annie 
(.Adams) Wilson. He attended Jefterson 
College, from which institution he was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
.\rts in 184J ; Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary, from which he was graduated with 
the degree of P>achelor of Divinity in 1846, 
and Oglethorpe University, from which he 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity in 1857. He served as professor 
of chemistry and natural science in Hamp- 
ton-Sidney College from 1850 to 1855 ; was 
pastor at Staunton, Virginia, from 1855 to 
1857; pastor at Augusta, Georgia, from 1858 
to 1870; professor of pastoral and evangel- 
istic theology in Columbia (South Carolina) 
Theological Seminary from 1870 to 1874; 
pastor at W'ilmington, North Carolina, from 
1874 to 1885 ; professor of theologj' in the 
South Western Presbyterian University, 
Clarksville, Tennessee, from 1885 to 1893. 
He resided in Columbia, South Carolina, 
and Princeton, New Jersey, until 1903, the 
year of his death. He also served as per- 
nianent clerk of the general assembly of 



148 



\IRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



the Presbyterian church, south, from 1861 
to 1865; as stated clerk from 1865 to 1899, 
and as moderator in the year 1879. Rev. 
Dr. Wilson married Jessie Woodrow, a 
native of Scotland, daughter of Thomas and 
Marion (Williamson) Woodrow, and a de- 
scendant of the Rev. Thomas Woodrow, 
the ecclesiastical historian of Scotland, in 
whose honor the Woodrow Historical So- 
ciety of Scotland was named. The Wood- 
row family has alwa3's been a distinguished 
one and stands high in the literary and 
church life of Scotland. He was the father 
of President \\'oodrow Wilson. 

Thompson, John Reuben, a noted literary 
man of his time, was born in Richmond. 
Virginia, October 23, 1823; attended the 
private schools of his native city, and the 
University of Virginia, which he entered in 
1840, pursued the academic and law courses, 
graduated in 1844 with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Law; settled in Richmond: in 1847 
became the editor of the "Southern Liter- 
ary Messenger:" in 1834 went to Europe, 
during which time he wrote for the "JNIes- 
senger :" upon his return went to Augusta. 
Georgia, while there edited the "Southern 
Field and Fireside ;" upon the outbreak of 
the civil war he was much interested in the 
welfare of the Confederacy ; in 1863 went 
abroad, combining some diplomatic mission 
with his literar}- work: lived in London and 
constantly contributed to the English re- 
views; after the war returned home and 
became one of the literary editors of the 
New York "Evening Post;" his writirgs 
were characterized by a tenderness and pur- 
ity of style which made them charming, and 
he was among the most popular writers of 
his time ; among the notable poems which 



he wrote were : "The Burial of Latane" and 
"The Death of Stuart;" he died in the city of 
New York, April 30. 1873. 

Corcoran, William Wilson, born in 
Georgetown, D. C., December 27, 1798, son 
of Thomas Corcoran and Hannah Lemmon, 
his wife. His father was a native of Lime- 
rick, Ireland, who came to America in 1783, 
and settled in Georgetown, where he was 
magistrate and postmaster, and was a trus- 
tee of the Georgetovi'n College. Air. Cor- 
coran was educated in private schools and 
at Georgetown College. At the age of sev- 
enteen he commenced his commercial career 
in association with his two older brothers, 
\\ ho were engaged in an extensive dry goods 
and wholesale auction and coinmission busi- 
ness. In a time of great financial distress, 
1823. the firm failed and made a compro- 
mise on a basis of fifty cents on the dol- 
lar. At a later date Mr. Corcoran dis- 
charged the debts of this concern at the full 
figure. From 1822 to 1836 he managed the 
large real estate interests in the District of 
Columbia held by the United States Bank 
and the Bank of Columbia, and in 1837 he 
opened a general banking and brokerage 
business in Washington. After three years, 
George W. Riggs was admitted to partner- 
ship, and the firm of Corcoran & Riggs rap- 
idly acquired a business of enormous pro- 
portions, accepting during times of war, a 
large proportion of the government loans. 
At one period in the Mexican war when the 
concern had negotiated government loans 
to the extent of twelve million ilollars. a 
falling market reduced the value below 
the iiriginal rate at which the loan had 
been taken. .\s Riggs had withdrawn from 
the partnership. Mr. Corcoran sailed for 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



149 



London, and there enlisted the support of 
the most influential of the English bank- 
ing houses. This transaction augmented 
tlie success of the already wealthy house, 
and in 1854, when he retired, Mr. Corcor- 
an's property was estimated in millions. Of 
his memorable benefactions to the public 
welfare, the most notable is the Corcoran 
Art Gallery in Washington. He was also 
the founder of the Oak Hill Cemetery, of 
Georgetown and the Louise Home for 
Needy Gentlewomen; while his gifts to var- 
ious colleges and universities, churches and 
theological seminaries, and to various char- 
itable institutions abundantly testify to his 
spirit of genuine philanthropy. He is said 
to have spent in this way over $5,000,000. 
To the University of Virginia he gave, be- 
tween the years 1870 and 1876, sums of 
money amounting to $6,000. of which $1,000 
was devoted to the needs of the chemical 
department, and $5,000 to the uses of the 
university library. He died in Washington 
City, February 24. 1888. 

Lay, Henry Champlin, a native of Vir- 
ginia, born December 6, 1823; attended pri- 
vate schools of Richmond, and the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, from which he graduated in 
1843 with the degree of Master of Arts ; 
then entered the Episcopal Theological 
Seminary at Alexandria, and was ordained 
deacon by Bishop Meade in 1846; went to 
Huntsville, Alabama, in 1848, and was 
ordained priest by Bishop Cobbs, and be- 
came rector of the Church of the Nativity 
o^ that city ; was elected rfiissionary bishop 
of Arkansas and Indian Territory, and was 
c<3nsecrated in St. Paul's Church. Richmond, 
in October, 1859, at the time that the general 
convention met in that city; in 186S the 



diocese of Ivlaryland was divided, and in 
1S69 Bishop Lay was translated from his 
missionary diocese to the diocese of Easton, 
which consisted of the eastern shore of 
Maryland ; he was a learned churchman and 
an eloquent preacher ; the degree of Doctor 
oi Divinity was conferred upon him by Ho- 
bart College and by William and Mary Col- 
lege, and upon his visit to the Lambeth con- 
ference held in England after the civil war, 
he was given the degree of Doctor of Laws 
by the University of Cambridge ; he wrote 
considerable on theological subjects, among 
the most notable of his writings being 
"Studies in the Church ;" he died in Easton, 
Maryland, September 17, 1885. 

Waddell, Joseph Addison, was born at 
Staunton, Virginia, March 19, 1823, son of 
Dr. Addison Waddell and Catherine Ann 
Boys, his wife, grandson of Rev. James 
Waddell, D. D., known as the "Blind 
Preacher," and great-grandson of Thomas 
and Janet Waddell, who in 1739 emigrated 
to Pennsylvania from county Down, Ire- 
land. His father, Dr. Addison Waddell, was 
born at "Hopewell," April 19, 1785, gradu- 
ated in medicine at the University of Penn- 
sylvania, located in Staunton in 1809, and 
died there in 1855. His mother, Catherine 
Ann (Boys) Waddell, was a descendant of 
Capt. Nathan Boys, of the Pennsylvania 
navy in 1775, city commissioner of Phila- 
aelphia from 1793 to 1797, also represented 
Philadelphia in the Pennsylvania legislature. 
His only son, John Boys, a native of Ches- 
ter, Pennsylvania, came to Staunton, Vir- 
ginia, in 1789, died in Philadelphia, Novem- 
ber 20, 1798. He married Anna St. Clair, 
and their daughter, Catherine Ann, married 
Dr. Waddell. Joseph A. Waddell obtained 



I50 



\'IRGL\IA BIOGRAPHY 



his preliminary educalioii at the Staunton 
Academy, then entered Washington College, 
now Washington and Lee University, and 
afterwards was a student in the University 
of Virginia, and subsequently pu'^sued a 
course of study in law in the law school of 
Judge Lucas P. Thompson, in Staunton, and 
was admitted to the bar. He engaged in a 
general practice of his profession in his 
native city, but this not being entirely to his 
liking, he turned his attention to journalistic 
work and became interested in "The Staun- 
ton Spectator," of which he was the co- 
editor and co-proprietor for almost twelve 
years, up to i860, when he was appointed 
to the office of commissioner in chancery of 
the circuit court presided over by Judge 
"'hompson, and he has also served for many 
years as the commissioner of accounts of 
Augusta county, and clerk of the supreme 
court of appeals of Virginia, at Staunton. 
In 1865 he was elected a member of the Vir- 
ginia house of delegates ; represented Au- 
gusta county in the constitutional conven- 
tion of 1867 which framed the constitution 
of Virginia, known in Virginia history as 
"the Black and Tan convention ;" represented 
Augusta county in the state senate in 1869, 
serving as president /to fcin. of that body. He 
also served as president of the board of visi- 
tors of the Institution for the Deaf, Dumb and 
Blind, at Staunton, now known as the Vir- 
ginia School for the Deaf and Blind, and as 
president of the board of the Western Lu- 
natic Asylum at Staunton, now known as the 
Western State Hospital. He was the author 
of the "Annals of Augusta County," and of 
several historical addresses, the most no- 
table being that read before the seventh 
annual congress of the Scotch-Irish in 
America at Lexington, in June, 1895, on the 



"Scotch-Irish of the Valley of \'irginia." 
In recognition of his historical work, Wash- 
ington and Lee University conferred upon 
him the degree of Doctor of Laws. Mr. 
Waddell is a member and elder of the Pres- 
byterian church, and in politics was a W hig 
before 1861 and a Democrat after 1865. He 
married (first) Virginia AlcClung; (second) 
I.aleah Dunwody. 

Ruffner, William Henry, born at Lexing- 
ti n. \'irgini;i, P'ebruary 11, 1824, son of 
Henry Ruffner and Sarah M. (Lyle) Ruff- 
ner, his wife. He was graduated from 
\\'ashington College, whn his father was 
president of the institution. He took special 
scientific courses at the college and at the 
University of Virginia, and prepared for the 
ministry at Union (Virginia) Theological 
Seminary, and Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary. He was chaplain of the University of 
Virginia, 1849-51; and held a pastorate in 
Philadelphia, 1851-53. His health failed in 
the latter year, and he abandoned the minis- 
try. He was a strong advocate of educa- 
iiDii, and was elected superintendent of pub- 
lic instruction in Virginia, and immediately 
devised a public school system so satisfac- 
tory that he was required to prepare a school 
bill, which he did and which was passed in 
July, 1870. He devoted himself to school or- 
ganization, using the "Educational Journal," 
of which he was editor, as the official organ 
of the educational department, and estab- 
lished graded schools and normal institutes. 
After the plan which he drafted for the or- 
ganization of the projected Agricultural and 
Mechanical College at Blacksburg, was de- 
veloped the present Virginia Polytechnic In- 
stitute. He twice declined a college presi- 
dency, l)ut. when superseded in office 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



151 



through a political change, he accepted a re- 
coniioisance of five hundred miles for a 
railroad across three states. He was em- 
ployed for many years as geologist for 
corporations and individuals. At Farmville. 
in 1884, he organized a state female normal 
college, of which he was made president. 
After the school was thoroughly organized, 
he resigned in 1887 to give his entire time 
to geological examinations and reports on 
mineral properties. He made many contri- 
Laitions to scientific publications, and was 
the author of several volumes. 

Koiner, Absalom, born at Augusta county, 
Virginia, August 5, 1824, son of Jacob 
t.oiner and Elizabeth Koiner; was a de- 
scendant of a worthy German family, mem- 
bers of which emigrated to this country 
several centuries ago, the pioneer ancestor 
being Michael Koiner, who located in Lan- 
caster, Pennsylvania, about 1740, and shortly 
afterward made his home in the valley of 
Virginia, where his descendants are to be 
f&und at the present time (1915). His wife, 
Margaret (Diller) Koiner, was of French 
Huguenot stock. Jacob Koiner (father), 
served as ensign in the American army dur- 
ing the war of 1812. Absalom Koiner's 
boyhood days were spent on his father's 
farm, and he supplemented his meagre edu- 
cational advantages by good reading, his 
favorite books being the Bible and biograph- 
ies of self-made men. Later he attended 
local schools, and in 1846 enrolled as a 
student in the law school of the University 
of Virginia, and in his junior year received 
the class certificate of distinction. During 
his course he was a member of the Wash- 
ington Literary Society, thus acquiring a 
knowledge of public speaking. He began 



the active practice of his profession in Staun- 
ton, Virginia, in August, 1847, in partner- 
ship with Mr. Baylor, under the style of 
Baylor & Koiner. During his leisure time 
he pursued a course of reading, especially 
in political science, jurisprudence and gov- 
ernment. In 1853 he was sent to the house 
of delegates from his native county, and in 
1873 was again elected to the same office, 
where the principal question then was how 
te settle the state debt; Mr. Koiner was in 
favor of and introduced the plan of a sliding 
scale of interest, beginning very low ; this 
was satisfactory to many of the bondhold- 
ers, and on this basis there was enacted a 
law known as the "McCulloch Bill." His 
next political office was state senator, and 
he served as a member of the finance com- 
mittee of that body for twelve years, chair- 
man of the Democratic caucus of the two 
houses, and also chairman of the Demo- 
cratic state central committee. He was also 
the first chairman of the Virginia state 
board of agriculture after the organization 
of that body in 1888. Mr. Koiner retired 
from the practice of law in 1854, and from 
that time until his retirement devoted him- 
self to farming, and journalism, occasionally, 
during the campaign of James Buchanan 
for the presidency, acting as editor and pro- 
I)rietor of the "Vindicator." Mr. Koiner was 
loyal to his native state, and prior to the 
war between the states was made captain 
ot one of the first companies organized in 
Augusta county, and when war was immi- 
nent, he was elected lieutenant-colonel of a 
regiment of Virginia volunteers. On April 
19, 1861, his regiment was ordered to Har- 
per's Ferry, where it became a part of Gen. 
Jackson's division. Col. Koiner participated 
in the Hancock and Romney campaign. 



\IRGI.\1A BIOGRAl'llY 



served in the battle of Kernstown, was put 
temporarily in command of the "Stonewall 
brigade," while Gen. Garnett was acting- 
president of a court-martial in Winchester, 
and Gen. Garnett, being unwilling to bear 
the responsibility of commander at so great 
a distance from headquarters, ordered Col. 
Koiner to report and assume temporary 
command of the same. Subsequently Col. 
Koiner rendered valuable service in repell- 
ing tjen. Hunter. He was a lifelong mem- 
ber of the Evangelical Lutheran church. 
He married, April 15, 1850, Virginia M. 
koiner, his cousin. They were the parents 
ot three children. 

Norton, George Hatley, was born in W in- 
chester, Virginia, May 7, 1824; son of the 
Rev. George Hatley and Catherine (Bush) 
Norton ; grandson of John Hatley and Anne 
(Nicholas) Norton, and of Philip and Cath- 
erine (Clough) Bush, and a descendant of 
John Norton, a native of London, England, 
who settled in Yorktown, Virginia. He ma- 
triculated at Hobart College in the class 
of 1843, left to study law in Virginia, but 
abandoned it for the ministry, and was 
graduated at the Theological Seminary of 
Virginia in 1846. He was admitted to the 
diaconate in July, 1846, and ordained priest 
in May, 1848, by Bishop Meade ; was rector 
of St. James', Warrenton, Virginia, 1846- 
48; of Trinity, Columbus, Ohio, 1858-59, 
and of St. Paul's, Alexandria, Virginia, 
1859-93. He was a delegate to the general 
council of the Protestant Episcopal church 
in the Confederate States ; deputy to the 
general conventions in the United States, 
1868-86; a member of the standing commit- 
tee of the diocese, and a trustee of the Theo- 
logical Seminary of Virginia, 1865-93. He 



was elected professor of systematic divinity 
in the Theological Seminary of Virginia in 
1S74, and president of Kenyon College. 
Ohio, in 1876, but declined both. He re- 
ceived the degree S. T. D. from William 
and Mary College in 1869. He was mar- 
ried, June I, 1854, to Ann Burwell, daugh- 
ter of James Keith and Claudia Hamilton 
(Burwell) Marshall, of Fauquier county, 
\ irginia. He contributed to current relig- 
icus literature and is the author of: "In- 
quiry into the Nature and Extent of the 
Holy Catholic Church" (1853). He died at 
Alexandria, \'irginia, September 15, 1893. 

Preston, Margaret Junkin, born in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, about 1825, daughter 
c f the Rev. George Junkin, D. D., a dis- 
tinguished Presbyterian divine and clergy- 
man, founder of Lafayette College, and 
president of Washington College, Lexing- 
ton, Virginia. She received her early edu- 
cation from her father, and private tutors 
at home, and she was so apt a pupil that at 
the age of three years she was learning the 
Plebrew alphabet, and from a mere child 
she thought in verse. In 1857 she married 
Professor John T. L. Preston, founder of the 
Virginia Military Institute, at Lexington, 
\' irginia. Her first contribution to the press 
was to "Sartain's Magazine," in 1849. ^'i 
1856 she published "Silverwood," a novel 
which she brought out anonymously, though 
she was offered double price for use of her 
name. She was a keen southern sym- 
pathizer, and in 1865 brought out her most 
sustained poem "Beechenbrook ; or Rhyme 
of the War," which she wrote by firelight 
during the evenings of a single week. This 
contained "Stonewall Jackson's Way," and 
"Slain in Battle," and brought her wide 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



153 



jjopularit}-. Her second volume of poems, 
"Old Songs and New," came out in 1870; 
this work including poems from Hebrew and 
Greek story. In 1887 she published "For 
Love's Sake,"' and "Colonial Ballads." In 
addition she wrote "Cartoons," "Mono- 
graphs," and "Aunt Dorothy." For many 
years she gratuitously aided in editing sev- 
eral of the best papers of the south, in order 
to advance southern literature. The New 
York "Evening Post" characterized her 
joetry as "belonging to the school of 
Browning;" and Paul H. Hayne said that 
she was "one of the best writers of sonnets 
in America." She died March 28, 1897. at 
Baltimore, Maryland. 

Daniel, John Moncure, son of Dr. John 
Moncure Daniel and Elizabeth Mitchell, 
his wife, was born in Stafford county, Vir- 
ginia, October 24, 1825, died in Richmond, 
Virginia, March 30, 1865. His father was 
the son of Dr. John M. Daniel, an eminent 
surgeon in the United States army, who 
married Mary Eleanor Stone, a daughter of 
Thomas Stone, of Maryland, signer of the 
Declaration of Independence. John Mon- 
cure Daniel was educated mainly by his 
father, studied law with Judge Lomax in 
I'redericksburg, Virginia, but did not com- 
plete his studies, his father's death render- 
ing it necessary to earn support for himself 
and aid his brothers. In 1845 he went to 
Richmond where he obtained a position as 
librarian, which, while not lucrative, gave 
opportunity for indulging his passion for 
reading. The first exhibition of his skill as 
a writer was on an agricultural monthly, 
"The Southern Planter," to which he at- 
tracted so much notice that he was offered a 
place on a new Democratic newspaper 



(J847), the "Richmond Examiner." which 
siieedily became the leading paper of the 
south. The brilliant invective of the paper 
led to his fighting several duels. Mr. Dan- 
iel's "Democratic" principles were of the 
philosophical European school, and he was 
enabled to harmonize his pro-slavery radi- 
calism with these by the adoption of Car- 
Ivle's theory (in "The Nigger Question") 
which he interpreted as meaning that ne- 
groes were not to be considered as men in 
the same sense as whites. He was an ad- 
mirer of Emerson and Theodore Parker. 
The literary character of the "Examiner" 
vvas very high. He was a friend of Edgar 
Allan Poe, whom he aided in many ways, 
r.nd of whom he wrote a remarkable sketch 
in the "Southern Literary Messenger." In 
1853 he was appointed by President Buchan- 
an minister to the court of Victor Emanuel, 
and while there took high ground in de- 
manding the same immunities for an Italian 
naturalized in the United States and visiting 
Sardinia as for any other American, and 
was indignant that Mr. Marcy did not sup- 
port him in threatening a rupture of diplo- 
matic relations. Garibaldi requested Daniel 
to annex Nice to the American republic, 
which Daniel declined to do on the ground 
that it was contrary to the Monroe doc- 
trine. After seven years abroad he returned 
hc.me at tlie beginning of the civil war and 
served on the staff of Gen. A. P. Hill. Be- 
ing incapacitated from further service by a 
wound in his arm he resumed the editorship 
oi the Richmond "Examiner." He was an- 
tagonistic toward Jefferson Davis and Mr. 
Elmore (Confederate treasurer), attacking 
them with great severity in his paper, and 
was challenged to a duel by the latter, in 
1864. He was unable to point his pistol on 



154 



\1RG1.\IA BIOGRAPHY 



account of his wounded arm and was shot 
in the leg in this duel. He predicted the 
collapse of the Confederacy and died three 
days before it occurred. Frederick S. Dan- 
iel has printed privately a volume containing 
his brother's leading articles during the war. 
together with a memoir. 

Aylett, Patrick Henry, was born in King 
William county, Virginia, j\Iay 9. 1825, son 
of John Philip Aylett, Esq., and his wife, 
Judith Page (Waller) Aylett. His grand- 
mother, Elizabeth Henry, was the youngest 
daughter of Patrick Henry ; he attended 
Rumford Academy, Washington College at 
Lexington, \'irginia, the University of Vir- 
ginia, which he entered in 1844, and re- 
mained one session in the academic depart- 
ment, then entered Harvard College, where 
he was graduated in law in 1846; he began 
the practice of law in Richmond, in the fall 
of 1847, but the death of his father, who left 
him his executor with a large estate, in- 
duced him to return to Alontville, the old 
home in King William county ; there he 
practiced his profession until 1853, when he 
returned to Richmond, where he spent the 
remainder of his life ; upon the establishment 
of the "Richmond Examiner,"' in 1847, ^^ 
became a contributor to its editorial 
columns, and in all of his editorial work 
seemed influenced by the responsible posi- 
tion which the editor of a leading paper oc- 
cupied ; he was appointed In' President 
Buchanan as a member of the board of 
visitors to the United States Military Acad- 
emy at West Point, and was subsequently 
appointed by the same President, without 
his solicitation. United States district attor- 
ney for the eastern district of Virginia ; this 
position he held at the outbreak of the civil 



\\ar. and was immediately reappointed by- 
President Davis as Confederate States dis- 
trict attorney; as a writer in the field of lit- 
ciature, he was as gifted as in politics and 
law; he married, February 23, 1853, Emily 
-A. Rutherfoord, daughter of the Hon. John 
Kutherfoord, of Richmond; his death, in 
common with so many other distinguished 
citizens of Virginia, occurred in the dreadful 
calamity, when the floor of the supreme 
court room in the state capitol gave way, 
i\pril 2"/, 1870; in all the sorrow of that 
affliction the death of no man was more sin- 
cerely mourned and was a greater loss to 
state and family than was that of Mr. .\y- 
Ictt ; he w"as survived by his wife and three 
daughters: Airs, ^^'illiam L. Royal, Mrs. 
John Enders, Mrs. Thomas Boiling, all of 
Richmond, \ irginia. 

Puryear, Bennett, born in Mecklenburg 
county, \'irginia, July 23, 1826, son of 
Thomas and Elizabeth Puryear. He was 
graduated in 1847 from Randolph-AIacon 
College, taught one year in Alabama, then 
v/as a student at the University of Virginia. 
In 1850 he was made a tutor in Richmond 
College, and the next year professor of 
natural science. The college was closed 
during the civil war. and was reopened in 
1866, when Professor Puryear resumed his 
chair, later became the first chairman of the 
faculty, and was re-elected for seventeen 
consecutive years. Then, after an interval 
of four years, he was again chosen, and 
btld the ofifice continuously until July. 1895. 

Morris, Charles, born at Taylor's Creek, 
Hanover county. Virginia. April 27, 1826. 
On both sides of his family he was descended 
from English and ^^'elsh settlers in the 
colonv of \'irginia, several of them having 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



155 



been large landed proprietors prior to the 
revolutionary war. His father was Rich- 
ard Morris, a lawyer and public man, who 
represented his district in the famous con- 
vention of 1829-30, where his eloquence and 
abilities gave him rank with the other great 
men that formed that convention. His 
mother before her marriage was Miss Mary- 
Watts, the daughter of Judge Watts, of 
Plotetourt county, Virginia. Charles Morris 
obtained his early education from private 
tutors, by whom he was prepared for the 
University of \'irginia, from which he grad- 
uated in July, 1845, with the degree of 
Master of Arts. Having begun the study of 
law, he settled in his native county, where 
he served for years as commonwealth's at- 
torney. In 1850-51 he traveled abroad. In 
1859 he was elected professor of law at Wil- 
liam and Mary College, which position he 
held at the outbreak of the civil war. He 
entered the Confederate army as a member 
of the Hanover troop, which became dis- 
tinguished as a part of the Fourth Virginia 
Regiment. Upon the reorganization of the 
Confederate army, he was attached to the 
command of Gen. Lafayette McLaws. At 
the close of the war he held the commission 
oi major, having received his commission 
from Gen. John C. Breckenridge, secretary 
of war of the Confederate States. In Janu- 
ary, 1869, he was elected professor of Eng- 
lish in the University of Georgia, and in 
1876 accepted the chair of Greek at Ran- 
clolph-Macon College. In 1882 he was re- 
elected to the chair of English in the Uni- 
versity of Georgia, which position he ac- 
cepted and filled up to the time of his death, 
in May, 1893. Professor Morris represented 
to the fullest degree the best type of the 
southern gentleman of the old school. 



Among his most devoted friends he counted 
the late Henry W. Grady. As a compli- 
ment to Professor Morris, no less than as a 
tribute to their own merit, two of his sons 
after his death were elected professors in the 
University of Georgia, which he so well and 
faithfully served. On October 12, 1854. he 
married his kinswoman, Mary Minor Mor- 
lis, daughter of Dr. John Morris, of Gooch- 
land county, Virginia. 

Baker, Richard Henry, born December 
18, 1826, at Suffolk, Nansemond county, 
Virginia, son of Judge Richard Henry 
Baker, who was for thirty-five years upon 
the bench of the circuit court and Lelia A. 
Barraud, his wife. His father's ancestors 
were English people who came to this coun- 
try in 1632, and his mother's were French, 
v/ho settled here in 1700. He was educated 
at the well known boys' school in Amelia 
county, taught by Mr. \\'illiam H. Harri- 
son ; at the Episcopal high school near 
Alexandria, Virginia; and at the Norfolk 
Academy, from which he entered the Uni- 
versity of Virginia in 1847. There he stud- 
ied for two sessions, being graduated in 
1850 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Upon leaving the university, he began the 
practice of his profession in the city of 
Norfolk. In 1861 he enlisted in the Con- 
federate army as a member of the Third 
Virginia Battalion, and was afterwards ap- 
pointed quartermaster and organized the 
quartermaster's department for the city of 
Norfolk. In 1862 he was elected to the 
legislature of Virginia, where he served until 
1865. After the war he returned to Norfolk 
and resumed the practice of his profession. 
In 1872 he was appointed a member of the 
board of visitors of the University of Vir- 



1^6 



\" I RG I N I A B 1 G R A P H Y 



ginia. on which board he served for four 
years. Up to the time of the war he was a 
Whig, and after the war he voted the Demo- 
cratic ticket. He was president of the Nor- 
folk Law Library Association, and a mem- 
ber of the Norfolk Bar Association, the Nor- 
folk and Portsmouth Bar Association, the 
\'irginia Bar Association, and many social 
organizations. On November 12, 1850, he 
married Anna Maria May, of Petersburg, 
Virginia. He died February i, 1913. 

Broadhead, Garland Carr, born in .Albe- 
marle county, Virginia, October 30, 1827. 
The family moving to the west, he w^as 
educated at the University of Missouri and 
the Military Institute of Kentucky. He 
was a civil engineer on the Pacific railroad, 
1852-57; was twice assistant geologist of 
Missouri, 1857-61 and 1871-73; geologist of 
the state, 1873-75; United States deputy 
collector of internal revenue, 1862-64, and 
assistant engineer of the Missouri Pacific 
railroad, 1864-66. In 1866 he was United 
States assessor of the fifth district of his 
slate. He was a member of the board of 
jurors of the Centennial Exposition, Phila- 
delphia, 1876, and special agent of the tenth 
census, investigating quarry industry in 
Kansas and Missouri. From 1877-97 Mr. 
Broadhead was professor of geology in the 
Missouri State University, and from 1884- 
1902 a member of the Missouri River Com- 
mission. He is the author of several well- 
known works on geology. 

Broun, William Leroy, son of Edwin 
Conway iln.un, of Middleburg, Loudoun 
county, Virginia, was born in Loudoun 
county, Virginia, in 1827, and completed his 
own education in the university of that 
state. He had no pecuniary advantages to 



aid hini, hut his strong purpose, honorable 
determination and inherent ability enabled 
him to advance to a position of distinc- 
tion in his chosen walk of life. Through- 
out his entire professional career he was 
connected with educational work, and as 
an instructor he occupied successively the 
chairs of mathematics and physics in a col- 
lege in Mississippi, the University of 
Georgia. \'anderbilt University, and the 
L'niversity of Texas. Fie founded Bloom- 
field Academy, Virginia, in 1856, and re- 
mained at the head of that institution until 
the outbreak of the civil war. From 1872 
until 1875 he was president of the Agricul- 
tural and Mechanical College in Georgia. 
His connection with the Alabama Polytech- 
nic Institute, formerly the Agricultural and 
Mechanical College, dated from 1852, when 
he was elected president. He remained only 
a year at that time, however, but was called 
again in 1884, and continued to occupy the 
p^residency up to the time of his death, re- 
taining the details of the administration 
very largely in his own hands. He was the 
executive officer of the experiment station 
from 1892 until 1897 and was president of 
the station council at the time of his demise, 
January 25, 1901. Dr. Broun's efforts were 
not limited entirely to the advancement of 
the institutions with which he was individ- 
ually connected, but reached out to larger 
lines of development that have been of di- 
rect benefit to the south. He established the 
first manual training laboratory in the south, 
and the first well equipped electrical engi- 
neering plant. He had a high appreciation 
of the value of the study of the natural 
sciences, and encouraged the upbuilding of 
biological laboratories. Flis high concep- 
tion of the aims and i)urposes of the land- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



157 



grant colleges was clearly set forth in his 
presidential address delivered before the 
Association of American Agricultural Col- 
leges and Experiment Stations at the New 
Orleans meeting in 1892. This was an 
earnest plea for that form of technical edu- 
cation which trains and develops the mind 
as well as the hand, and this, he urged, 
called for both breadth and liberality in the 
curriculum. He was the author of various 
articles upon educational subjects, setting 
forth advanced ideas, many of which have 
been adopted by different colleges and uni- 
versities of the south. He died January 23, 
1902. 

Buford, Algernon Sidney, born in Rowan 
county, North Carolina. January 2, 1826 
(during the temporary residence of his par- 
ents in that state), son of William Buford, 
of Lunenburg county, Virginia, and Susan 
Robertson Shelton, of Pittsylvania county, 
Virginia, his wife. On his father's side, he 
was descended from colonial English set- 
tlers, his great-grandfather, Henry Buford, 
having settled in Culpeper county, Virginia. 
His early education was obtained at a pri- 
vate school taught by his father in Pittsyl- 
vania county, \'irginia. For two years he 
taught school. In October, 1846, he entered 
the University of Virginia, and in June, 
1848, graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
or Law. L'pon leaving the university he 
began the practice of law in Pittsylvania and 
adjacent counties ,and so continued until 
the outbreak of the civil war. For a shor^ 
time before the war, having become a resi- 
dent of Danville, Virginia, he owned and 
edited the "Danville Register." In 1853 he 
was elected to the state legislature, from 
Pittsvl\ ania countv, but declined re-election. 



In 1861 he was elected to the house of dele- 
gates, while he was serving as a non-com- 
missioned officer in the Confederate army, 
v.'hich position he held until the close of the 
war. During his membership in the house, 
he was commissioned by Gov. Letcher, lieu- 
tenant-colonel by brevet, and given special 
service in aid of the \'irginia soldiers in the 
t'eld. In October, 1865, he was elected 
president of the Richmond & Danville Rail- 
road Company, which position he held for 
upwards of twenty years, and during his 
administration he saw this railroad enlarged, 
under his active direction, from about two 
hundred miles to about two thousand miles. 
He removed early in 1866 to Richmond, and 
in 1887 he was elected and served a term 
in the house of delegates from that city. He 
has always taken an earnest and active in- 
terest in agriculture, and in the commercial 
and material development of the state, and 
was for years president of the Virginia 
board of agriculture. His first wife was 
Emily W. Townes, of Pittsylvania county, 
whom he married in 1854. His second wife 
was Kate A. Wortham. of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, whom he married in May, 1872. His 
third wife was Mrs. Mary Cameron Stro- 
ther, iicc Ross, whom he married in 1879, in 
Richmond, Virginia. 

Rutherfoord, John Coles, born in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, November 20, 1825, son of 
Gov. John Rutherfoord (q. v.), and Emily 
(Coles) Rutherfoord, his wife, was educated 
in the private schools of Richmond, Wash- 
ington College, now Washington and Lee 
University, and the University of Virginia, 
which he entered in 1841, and graduated 
therefrom in 1843 with the degree of blaster 
of Arts : traveled abroad for a year, and upon 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



his return studieil law and practiced his 
profession in partnership with the late John 
K. Guy ; represented the county of Gooch- 
land in the general assembly for twelve 
years ; married Anne Seddon, daughter of 
William H. Roy, Esq., of Green Plains, Mat- 
thews county, Virginia, and resided at Rock 
Castle, Goochland county, Virginia, one of 
the best known and best types of the old 
Virginia homes; children: Mrs. Bradley 
S. Johnston, Mrs. George Ben Johnston, 
John Rutherfoord, Esq., of the Richmond 
bar; Mr. Rutherfoord died August 14, 1866. 

Broadus, John Albert, was born in Cul- 
peper county, \irginia, January 24, 1827, 
son of Edmund Broadus, who represented 
the county in the general assembly of Vir- 
ginia for many years. He was graduated 
from the University of Virginia in 1846, and 
was appointed assistant professor of ancient 
languages in that institution in 185 1, holding 
the position for two years. In 185 1 he en- 
tered the ministry, and for the following 
four years preached in the Baptist church 
at Charlottesville, Virginia. He resigned 
his pastorate to accept the chaplaincy of the 
university, and after two years returned to 
his church. In 1859 he was elected to the 
chair of New Testament interpretation and 
homiletics at the Southern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary, and subsequently was for 
several years president of that institution. 
In 1863 he preached as missionary in Gen. 
Lee's army of Northern Virginia. Among 
his published writings are: "The Prepara- 
tion and Delivery of Sermons" (1870) ; 
"Recollections of Travel" (1872-73) ; "Lec- 
tures on the History of Preaching" (1877) ; 
"Three Questions as to the Bible" (1884); 
"Commentary of Matthew" (1886); and 



"Sermons and .Addresses" (1886J. He was 
a member of the International Sunday- 
school Lesson Committee. He died at 
Louisville, Kentucky, March 16, 1895. 

Coleman, Lewis Minor, born in IIano\er 
county, Virginia, February 3, 1827; gradu- 
ated with high honors at the University of 
Virginia, in 1846, and became principal of 
the Hanover Academy; in 1859, upon the 
resignation of Dr. Harrison from the chair 
of ancient languages in the University of 
Virginia, Mr. Coleman, who had been a pupil 
of Dr. Harrison, was elected professor of 
Latin, and relinquished his position in the 
Hanover Academy to accept the same; he 
si;rved in that capacity but for two years, 
for in 1861, at the outbreak of the civil war, 
he joined the ranks of the Confederate army, 
in which he enlisted as captain of an artil- 
lery company which he recruited ; he was 
promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel 
of artillery in 1862 ; at the battle of Freder- 
icksburg, December 13, 1862, he was se- 
verely wounded, and after three months 
died from his injury, March 21, 1863. 

Southall, James C, who at tlie time of his 
death was regarded as having w'ritten some 
of the most notable scientific works of his 
times, was born in Charlottesville, Albe- 
marle county, Virginia, in 1827 ; attended 
private schools and the University of Vir- 
ginia, entering the latter in 1843, gradu- 
ated in 1846 with the degree of Master of 
.Arts ; then became editor of the "Charlottes- 
ville Chronicle," and later the editorial 
writer of the "Richmond Enquirer" and 
editor of the "Central Presbyterian," and for 
a time occupied a position in the office of 
superintendent of public instruction ; he was 
a great student, and in the list of his studies 



PROAIINENT PERSONS 



159 



were archaeology, geology, anthropology 
and Biblical history; his literary works are 
various, among which may be mentioned 
"The Recent Origin of Man," "Epoch of the 
Mammoth," "Man's Age in the World" ; he 
delivered a notable address at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia at the opening of the 
Brooks Museum ; he married a Miss Sharp, 
0/ Norfolk; died September. 13, 1897. 

Hope, James Barron, son of \\'ilton Hope, 
of Hampton, Virginia, and Jane Barron, his 
wife, daughter of Commodore James Bar- 
ron, was born in Norfolk. Virginia, March 
23, 1827. He received his early education 
in the public schools, and entered William 
ajid Mary College, Williamsburg, Virginia, 
from which he was graduated in 1847. He 
then studied law, and began practice in 
Elizabeth City. He began writing at an 
early day. and achieved some literary repu- 
tation from a series of poetical sketches 
which were published in a Baltimore jour- 
iial, under the pen-name of "The late Henry 
Ellen, Esq." Upon the breaking out of the 
civil war, he entered the Confederate army, 
and reached the grade of captain and quar- 
termaster, and serving until the conflict was 
over. At the close of the war. when penni- 
less and crushed, he was made superintend- 
ent of the schools of his native town, and 
ar the same time was editor of the "Norfolk 
Landmark." He produced "Leoni di Monota" 
ill 1851 ; "A Collection of Poems" in 1859; 
"Elegiac Ode, and Other Poems" in 1875 ; 
and "Under the Empire, or, the Story of 
Madelon," in 1878. A poem of especial 
merit is "The Charge at Balaklava," which 
the "Literary Messenger" said, "combines 
all the wild and incongruous elements of 
battle, victory, defeat, death and glory, in its 



triumph and rhythm." His verse is char- 
acterized by thought, dramatic elevation, 
and keen observation. Mr. Hope was in- 
vited by a joint committee of the United 
States senate and house of representatives, 
to deliver an address at the centennial of the 
surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown, and 
read "Arms and the Man," which was highly 
praised as not containing a single common- 
place line. His devotion to "The Lost 
Cause" is shown in his memorial poems, 
which are noble and touching. In "Summer 
Studies" he has produced summer sounds 
and summer scenes. He never fully recov- 
ered from the exposure and hardships of 
the war period, and, after years of failing 
health, he died, September 15, 1887. 

Venable, Charles S., born at Longwood, 
Prince Edward coimty, Virginia, April 19, 
1827, son of Nathaniel E. Venable and Mary 
Embra (Scott) Venable, his wife. He at- 
tended the schools of his native county, and 
in 1842 was graduated from Hampden-Sid- 
ney College, where he tutored for three 
years in mathematics, and at the same time 
studied law. He was professor of mathe- 
matics, 1846-52, with the exception of one 
year spent in study at the University of 
Virginia. He also studied in the universi- 
ties at Berlin and Bonn, Germany. He then 
resumed his chair in Hampden-Sidney Col- 
lege, continuing until 1856, when he was 
elected professor of natural history and 
chemistry in the University of Georgia. 
After one year he accepted the chair of 
mathematics and astronomy in the Univer- 
sity of South Carolina, which he held until 
1862. although absent on military service 
during the last two years, serving through- 
out the war, the last two years on the staf? 



i6o 



\'IR(_;i.\IA I'.IOCRAl'IIV 



oi Cien. Rolierl E. Lee. lie was professor 
cr mathematics in the University of Virginia 
from 1865 to 1896, when he resigned. Dur- 
ing 1870-73 and 1886-88 he was chairman of 
the faculty. It was due almost entirely to 
his efforts that Leander McCormick, of 
Chicago. Illinois, donated the great telescope 
to the university, and that $75,000 was added 
to the endowment fund by the alumni, and he 
also secured $70,000 for a natural history 
museum.- He was the author of many valu- 
able scientific works. 

Crocker, fames Francis, born in Isle of 
Wight county, \'irginia, January 5. 1828, 
son of James Crocker and Frances Hill 
(Woodley) Crocker, his wife. He was onlv 
six months old when his father died. He 
attended a classical school in Smithfield, 
Virginia, and in 1850 was graduated from 
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania) College, as 
valedictorian of his class. He taught school. 
Jind was professor of mathematics in Madi- 
son College. He studied law, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1854. In 1855 he was 
elected to the house of delegates from his 
native county. In 1856 he removed to 
Portsmouth, where he practiced law in part- 
nership with Col. David J. Godwin. In 
1861 he entered the Ninth Virginia Infantry 
Regiment as a private, and was made ad- 
jutant: was desperately wounded at -Mal- 
vern Hill, and in Pickett's charge at (Gettys- 
burg was again wmuided and taken prisoner, 
and confined in F"ort Johnson. After the 
war he resumed law practice. On Januarv 
I, 1901. he became judge of the court of 
hustings in Portsmouth, and declined a re- 
election. He was a member of the board of 
visitors of William and :\Iary College. He 
has written various historical narratives re- 



lating to the civil war, and genealogy. 
"Gettysburg — Pickett's Charge," "My Per- 
sonal Experiences" etc. In all the aspects of 
life — as a gentleman, a scholar, a soldier — 
Judge Crocker is respected and admired. 

Bagby, George William, born in Ikicking- 
ham county, \'irginia, August 13, 1828, died 
in Richmond, Virginia, November 29, 1883. 
He was educated at Edgehill School, Prince- 
ton, New Jersey, and at Delaware College, 
Newark. Delaware, leaving the latter at the 
end of his sophomore year. Subsequently 
he studied medicine and was graduated at 
the medical department of the University of 
Pennsylvania. In 1853 he became editor of 
the Lynchburg (Virginia) daily "Express," 
.ind was for some time the Washington cor- 
respondent of the New Orleans "Crescent," 
Charleston "Mercury." and Richmond "Dis- 
patch." From 1859 he was, until its sus- 
pension near the end of the war, editor of 
the "Southern Literary JMessenger," and at 
'.he same time associate editor of the Rich- 
mond "\Miig," and a frequent contributor to 
the "Southern Illustrated News." From 
January I. 1870. to July I, 1878, he was state 
librarian of Virginia. He lectured fre- 
quently, and met with success as a humorist 
in many parts of Virginia and Maryland. 
He was the author of many humorous ar- 
ticles published under the pen-name of 
"Mozis Addums." His sketches were col- 
lected and published by Mrs. Pagby, as 
"The Writings of Dr. Bagby" (3 vols., 
Richmond, 1884-86). 

White, John Jones, who served as profes- 
sor of Greek for many years in Washington 
and Lee University, was born in Nottoway 
county. Virginia. November 7, 1828: at- 
tended the private schools of his neighbor- 



TROMINENT PERSONS 



i6i 



hood, then the University of Virginia, 
which he entered in 1846 and where he re- 
mained until 1850; then taught a classical 
school in Charlottesville, Virginia, for sev- 
eral years ; in 1852 was elected professor of 
Greek in what was then Washington Col- 
lege, a chair which he held for forty years : 
after Gen. Lee's death, the college was called 
Washington and Lee University ; Professor 
White was regarded by his students with 
the greatest affection ; he was a staunch 
Presbyterian, inheriting his love from his 
Scotch-Irish ancestor. Dr. William S. 
White, one of the able men of the Presby- 
terian church in this country; Professor 
White died April 29, 1893, ^'^d is buried in 
Lexington, Virginia. 

Tucker, St. George, son of Henry St. 
George Tucker, president of the Virginia 
supreme court of appeals, and Anne Evelina 
Jiunter, his wife, daughter of Moses and 
Anne Stephen, his wife, daughter of Gen. 
Adam Stephen, was born January 5, 1828. 
He studied at the University of Virginia in 
1843-44-45, and took law at William and 
Mary College under his uncle. Judge Na- 
thaniel Beverley Tucker. He practiced 
law, and in 1851-52 was clerk of the senate 
of Virginia and in 1853 became clerk of the 
house of delegates. He inherited a taste for 
letters from his father and grandfather, and 
iii 1857 recited a poem before the literary 
society of Washington College, and in 1859 
a poem at William and Mary College on 
the one hundred and sixty-sixth anniversary 
of the foundation. In the former year ap- 
peared his most considerable effort in prose 
romance "Hamford, a Tale of Bacon's Re- 
bellion." This met with much success, and 
after the war it was issued under a new 
viR-n 



title "The Devoted Bride," by a Philadel- 
phia publishing firm. After the election of 
Lincoln in i860, Mr. Tucker took grounds 
for secession, and wrote his war song "The 
Southern Cross." He had resigned the 
clerkship of the house of delegates, and 
opened a school in Ashland for the instruc- 
tion of youths, but when the war opened he 
raised a company the "Ashland Grays" 
which was incorporated with the Fifteenth 
Virginia Regiment under Col. Tom Au- 
gust. He was made lieutenant-colonel, and 
saw service around Williamsburg, but his 
constitution w-as undermined from exposure 
and he returned to Charlottesville, where he 
died January 24, 1863. He married Eliza- 
beth Gilmer, daughter of Gov. Thomas Wai- 
ker Gilmer. He is credited with having 
been one of the wittiest and most gifted men 
in Virginia. 

Hotchkiss. Jed, was born at \\'indsor, 
Broome county, Virginia, New York, No- 
vember 30, 1828, a son of Stiles Hotchkiss 
and Lydia Beecher, his wife ; and a direct 
descendant of Samuel Hotchkiss, of Scotch 
ancestry, who settled at New Haven, Con- 
iiecticut. in 1642, and one of whose de- 
scendants migrated to the Susquehanna val- 
ley in New York state, near the borders of 
Pennsylvania, purchased an extensive tract 
of land, and laid out the village of Windsor. 
Mr. Hotchkiss led the healthy, happy life 
of the country lad. The hours which were 
i:ot spent in attendance at school or acad- 
emy, or in outdoor work in connection with 
botany and geology, of both of which stud- 
ies he was especially fond, were spent in the 
performance of such lighter tasks of farm 
labor as were consistent with his growing 
strength. In the winter of 1846-47. in asso- 



l62 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



ciation with a <mall company of other young 
men, he went to the newly exploited coal 
region at Lyken's \'alley, near Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. While he was studying the 
geological formation of this region, he was 
also engaged in teaching school, and when 
school closed he and another teacher trav- 
eled on foot through the Cumberland Val- 
ley of Pennsylvania, the Piedmont region of 
Mar^dand, the Shenandoah and the James 
river of the great valley of Virginia, and 
some sections of Piedmont, Virginia. While 
crossing the Blue Ridge several times in 
the course of this trip he became thoroughly 
familiar with many features of the land 
which were destined to be of signal useful- 
ness to him in his later career. In the fall 
of 1847 he became a teacher in the family 
of Daniel Forrer, of Mossy Creek, Augusta 
county. Virginia, and his success in this 
capacity was so encouraging, that it resulted 
in the founding of the Mossy Creek Acad- 
emy, which, under his supervision, became 
one of the most noted schools of the state. 
For various reasons he sold his interest in 
this in 1858, and removed to Stribling 
Springs, same county, where he was at the 
head of a small school one year. He then, 
in association with a brother from New 
York, purchased an extensive, well culti- 
vated farm at Churchville, in the same 
county, and in the fall opened the Loch 
Willow School for Boys, which he conducted 
with a staff of teachers, while his brother 
superintended all farm operations. The 
school was a flourishing enterprise until the 
outbreak of the war between the states, 
when one of the assistant teachers raised a 
company of infantry which was joined by 
some of the pupils, others joined the cavalry, 
and Mr. Ilotchkiss dismissed the remainder 



to their homes, while he joined the army. 
Ii was at this point that his [previous ex- 
I)lorations of the country placed him in a 
position to render excellent service, and he 
was appointed topographical engineer. His 
first service was under Col. Heck in July, 
1861, his next with Gen. Lee, at \'alley 
Mountain. While there he almost succumbed 
to an attack of typhoid fever, but wliile 
convalescing he already returned to his 
duties by making a series of maps for the 
officers in command of the Rich Mountain 
and Tjgart's \'alley campaigns. He be- 
came a member of the staff of "Stonewall" 
Jackson in March, 1862, and his maps earned 
high commendation from this commander. 
After the death of Jackson, Mr. Hotchkiss 
was appointed major on the staff of Gen. 
F.well, was with him on the first day of 
Gettysburg, and during the remainder of 
this momentous battle was stationed at 
Seminary Ridge. He was with Gen. Early 
in 1864 in the campaign against Sheridan, 
furnishing over a hundred maps during this 
year alone. He was with Gen. Rosser at 
Lj'nchburg, when Lee surrendered at Ap- 
pomattox. He placed his maps in security, 
as he thought, but their existence was re- 
ported to the Federal government, and a 
demand was made for them by Gen. Grant. 
In a personal interview with Gen. Grant at 
Washington, Mr. Hotchkiss protested 
against this order, offering to make exact 
copies for the government; Gen. Grant off- 
ered to pay for such copies as he could use 
and ordered the originals to be returned. 
Major Hotchkiss displayed great bravery 
and courage during the war; he had two 
horses killed under him, and his field glass 
intercepted a ball which would otherwise 
have killed him at the battle of the Wilder- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



163 



iiess. At the close of the war Mr. Hotch- 
kiss made his home in Staunton, Virginia, 
there opened a school for no more than fif- 
teen boys, and conducted this two years. 
He then was civil and mining engineer for a 
time, during which he made an exhaustive 
study of the natural resources of Virginia. 
When Gen. Lee became president of what 
is now Washington and Lee University, 
Maj. Hotchkiss took charge of the topo- 
graphical department at his request, but the 
death of Gen. Lee interfered with the pub- 
lication of his maps. For the purpose of 
making known the riches of the section he 
had so thoroughly explored he made trips 
to England in 1872 and 1874, also traveled in 
the north and west of the United States, 
with the same idea in view, and secured 
millions of dollars from these sources for 
the development of the mines and timber 
resources. His contributions to literature 
were also valuable. His "The Summary of 
Virginia," 1875, contains valuable statistics 
and maps ; he furnished the mineral statis- 
tics for Virginia for the census of 1879, and 
from 1880 to 1886, he published "The Vir- 
gmias," a monthly magazine of facts con- 
cerning the natural resources of Virginia 
and West Virginia. Scientific journals in 
this country and Europe also had the bene- 
fit of articles from his pen. He represented 
Virginia at the New Orleans Exposition, was 
one of the judges of mines and mining at 
the Chicago Exposition in 1893, and was fre- 
quently in the government employ as ex- 
pert topographer, being especially com- 
mended for the service he rendered the 
Battle Fields Commission of Antietam and 
Fredericksburg. As a lecturer he was in 
great demand, both here and abroad. He 
was a member of the American Association 



foi the Advancement of Science, the Na- 
tional Geographic Society, the American 
Society of Civil Engineers, the American 
Philosophical Society, Stonewall Jackson 
Camp of Confederate Veterans, and June 
30, 1896, he was commissioned "brigadier- 
general and chief of the engineer corps, staff 
of Gen. J. B. Gordon," the commission be- 
ing signed by Gen. Gordon "general com- 
manding the United Confederate Veterans." 
Maj. Hotchki&s had joined the Presbyterian 
church while still young, and in Staunton he 
was one of the founders of the Second Pres- 
byterian Church, and was a leading spirit in 
it many years, as well as serving as super- 
intendent of the Sunday school for a long 
time. The Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation also had his hearty co-operation. 
He died at his home, "The Oaks," in the 
suburbs of Staunton, January 17, 1899. Maj. 
Hotchkiss married, December 21, 1853, 
Sarah Comfort, of Lanesboro, Pennsylvania, 
and they had children : Mrs. George S. 
Holmes, of Charleston, South Carolina, and 
Mrs. Allen M. Howison, of Staunton. 

Claiborne, John Herbert, born at Roslyn 
Castle, Brunswick county, Virginia, March 
10, 1828, son of the late John Gregory Clai- 
borne, a distinguished lawyer and clergy- 
man of Brunswick county, Virginia, and 
Mary Elizabeth Weldon, his wife. On his 
father's side he was descended from Wil- 
liam Claiborne, the first settler of that name 
who came to this country from England. 
His great-grandfather, Augustine Claiborne, 
was clerk of the county of Surry before the 
revolutioTi. His grandfather, John Herbert 
Claiborne, served in the Surry troops under 
Light Horse Harry Lee in the revolutionary 
v/ar. Dr. Claiborne received his early edu- 



164 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



cation at the Ebcnczer Academy of Bruns- 
wick county, Virginia, the Leesburg Acad- 
emy of North Carolina, and Randolph- 
Macon College, Virginia, from which col- 
lege in 1848 he graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, and in 1850 with that of 
Master of Arts. After leaving Randolph- 
Macon College he entered the University of 
\'irginia, and graduated therefrom with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. He subse- 
quently studied in the JefTerson Medical 
College of Philadelphia and in the Pennsyl- 
vania Hospital, from both of which institu- 
tions he received the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. In 185 1 he came to Petersburg, 
Virginia, and began the practice of his pro- 
fession. On April 19. 1861, he joined the 
Confederate army as assistant surgeon, with 
the rank of captain. He was soon promoted 
tc be surgeon and major, and attached to 
the Twelfth Virginia Regiment of Infantry. 
While in the field he was elected to the 
senate of Virginia, a position which he was 
ordered to accept by Juda P. Benjamin, the 
secretary of war. In accordance with this 
Older, he entered the senate, but resigned 
immediately, and reported again for field 
duty. He was then sent to Petersburg, 
where he organized the general hospital, 
and where he remained until the city was 
occupied by General Lee in 1864, when he 
was made surgeon-in-chief of all general 
military hospitals, a position which he filled 
until the evacuation of the city of Peters- 
burg on the 2nd of April, 1865. During the 
siege of Petersburg he was severely wound- 
ed, and was captured just before the sur- 
render at Appomattox. In 1855 he had been 
elected to the house of delegates, and in 
1857 he was elected to the senate of Vir- 
ginia, where he served until the outbreak of 



the war. He was a member of the Medical 
Society of Virginia, and an honorary fellow, 
having been also its president ; a fellow of 
the American Medical Association, the 
Southern Surgical and Gynecological Asso- 
ciation, and a corresponding fellow of the 
Gynecological Association of Boston ; a fel- 
low of the Victoria Institute of Great Brit- 
ain, and of the International Medical Asso- 
ciation ; also fellow of the American Health 
Association, and an honorary alumnus of 
the University Aledical College of Virginia. 
He was vice-president of the Medical Asso- 
ciation of the Confederate Army and Navy, 
1876. He wrote much upon medical sub- 
jects, was always a student of literature, 
and did much to preserve the history of the 
old regime in Virginia. Among his best 
known articles • may be mentioned, "The 
Last Seven Days of Lee and His Paladins," 
"Seventy-Five Years in Old Virginia," "The 
Negro in the Environments of Slavery," and 
"The Old Virginia Doctor." In 1853 he mar- 
ried Sarah Joseph Alston. In i860 he mar- 
ried (second) Anne Leslie Watson. 

Thornton, John Thruston, familiarly 
known as "Jack Thornton." was born in 
Cumberland county, Virginia, in 1829, son 
of Col. John Thornton, of Hanover county, 
and Sarah, his wife, daughter of Charles 
Mynn Thruston. He attended the private 
schools of his native county, the University 
of Virginia, from which he graduated in 
1844 with the degree of Bachelor of Law. 
one of the first men of the class; engaged 
in the practice of his profession for a short 
time, then engaged in editorial work ; wrote 
with strength and cleverness, and early es- 
tablished the reputation of being one of the 
leaders of thought in the state; was also one 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



165 



of the best speakers on the hustings at that 
time ; enlisted in the war between the states 
at the beginning of that conflict, for gal- 
lantry was promoted to a colonelcy in the 
Confederate army, and a greater promotion 
seemed possible for him when, in the 
memorable Sharpsburg fight, September 17, 
1862, he was killed; his son, William M. 
Thornton, Esq., is a distinguished professor 
in the University of Virginia. 

Peters, William Elisha, born in Bedford 
county. Virginia, August 18, 1829, son of 
Elisha Peters, a successful agriculturist and 
planter of Bedford county, and Cynthia 
Turner, his wife ; grandson of the Rev. Wil- 
liam Peters, a minister of the Church of 
England, who came from England to this 
country, settling in Virginia in 1750, and 
his death occurred in 1773, William E. 
Peters was brought up on his father's farm, 
and his education was acquired in the New 
London Academy, Emory and Henry Col- 
lege, and the University of Virginia, from 
which institution he received the degree of 
Master of Arts. From 185 1 to 1856 and 
again from 1858 to 1861 he served as pro- 
fessor of Latin in Emory and Henry Col- 
lege, the periods of time between these 
dates being spent in the University of Ber- 
lin, where he studied Latin and heard lec- 
tures. In 1861 he entered the Confederate 
army as a private, was later promoted to the 
rank of captain, then lieutenant-colonel, and 
colonel, and served with all the ardor of his 
young manhood. Upon his return from the 
seat of war, he was elected professor of 
Latin in the University of Virginia, and 
served for the long period of thirty-seven 
years, from 1866 to 1902, being made pro- 
fessor emeritus in the latter named year. He 



excelled as a teacher, his enthusiasm throw- 
ing a charm about his work. The degree 
of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him 
by Emory and Henry College. Professor 
Peters published two books of high author- 
ity, namely : "Syntax of the Latin Verb," 
and "Latin Case Relations," both of which 
were constantly used by the Latin classes 
of the University of Virginia. He was a 
Democrat in politics, and a Presbyterian^ in 
religion. Professor Peters married (first) 
in 1858, Margaret Sheiifey ; married (sec- 
ond) in 1873, Mary Shefley. He was the 
father of three children. His death occurred 
March 22, 1906. 

Cooke, John Esten, was born in Winches- 
ter, November 3, 1830, son of John Rogers 
Cooke, a distinguished lawyer of Richmond. 
He spent the first nine years of his life near 
Frederick at Glengary, his father's country 
house, and in 1839 removed with the family 
to Richmond. He left school at ten years 
of age to study law with his father, was 
admitted to the bar and practiced about 
four years, in the course of which he wrote 
verses and short prose articles for the maga- 
zines. His first publication was "Leather 
Stocking and Silk," "followed by the "Youth 
of Jeft'erson. or a Chronicle of College 
Scrapes." Then he devoted himself to novel 
writing, and in four years produced six 
novels, including "The Virginia Comedians" 
and "The Last of the Foresters." The for- 
mer was issued anonymously. The success 
Of this work induced Mr. Cooke to avow his 
authorship and receive the benefit in litera- 
ture of his growing reputation, though still 
devoted to the law. In 1861 he entered the 
Confederate army, serving on the stalT of 
Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, and taking an active 



i66 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



part in almost every engagement on Vir- 
ginia soil. At Lee's surrender he was in- 
spector-general of the horse artillery of the 
Army of Xorthern \'irginia. After the war 
he wrote a "Life of General Lee," a "Life 
of Stonewall Jackson," and over twenty 
novels. His publications not already men- 
tioned include "Henry St. John, Gentleman," 
a sequel to the "Comedians;" "Surrey of 
Eagle's Xest." which is an autobiography 
depicting military incidents in the Confed- 
erate cavalry: "Hilt to Hilt," "Out of the 
Foam :" "Hammer and Rapier," and ".Stories 
of the Old Dominion," from the settlement 
until the end of the revolution. Nearly all 
his writings relate to Virginia life, past and 
present. Besides he wrote a vast number 
of sketches, stories, poems, etc., for period- 
icals, which have never been collected in 
permanent form. He died at his home, The 
Briars, near Boyce, Clark county, Virginia, 
September 20, 1886. 

Uavis, Noah Knowles, born at Philadel- 
phia, Alay 15, 1830, son of Rev. Noah Davis, 
of Salisbury, Maryland, and Mary Young, 
cf Alexandria, Virginia, his wife. He is of 
Welsh descent, his American ancestor and 
great-great-grandfather being John Davis, a 
native of South Wales, who settled near 
Salisbury, Maryland. Daniel Davis, grand- 
son of John Davis, was elder of the Salis- 
bury Baptist church forty years, and died 
in 1856. His son, Rev. Noah Davis, was 
pastor of the Baptist church in Norfolk, 
later removing to Philadelphia, where he 
was given charge of the publication inter- 
ests of the Baptists of the United States. 
Il was due to his efforts that tlie American 
Baptist Publication Society was established, 
and while in its service he died at the age 



of twenty-seven years, leaving a widow and 
infant. Some years later his widow married 
Rev. John L. Dagg, of Virginia, and the 
family removed to Alabama. Noah Knowles 
Davis commenced his education in schools 
of Alabama, where the early years of his 
life were spent, and after proper preparation 
matriculated at Mercer University in 
Georgia, from which he was graduated in 
1849, the degree of Bachelor of Arts being 
conferred upon him. Later the same insti- 
tution conferred the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, while Bay- 
lor University bestowed the degree of Doc- 
tor of Laws. He prepared in the north for 
his career as an instructor, accepted a chair 
in Howard College. Alabama, and was sub- 
sequently appointed to the principalship of 
the Judson Institute. In 1868 he accepted 
the appointment as president of Bethel Col- 
lege, Kentucky, and while actively dis- 
charging the duties of this ofifice, was ap- 
pointed to the chair of moral philosophy in 
the University of \'irginia in 1873. Upon 
the completion of his thirty-third year at 
the university, he was invited to accept a 
life annuity on the Carnegie foundation, and 
retired from active duties, July i, 1906, be- 
coming professor emeritus of philosophy in 
the University of Virginia. He gained emi- 
nence in his career as an instructor. His 
teachings were not altogether oral, his facile 
pen being also in evidence. More than fifty 
schools and colleges in the United States 
adopted his treatises on logic, ethics and psy- 
chology as text books, and he was a liberal 
contributor to periodical literature. For 
more than a quarter of a century he has de- 
livered I'liljlical lectures on .Sunday after- 
noons at the LIniversity of \'irginia, and 
tliese have been published in book form 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



167 



under the titles: "Juda"s Jewels: a Study 
ill the Hebrew Lyrics," and "'The Story of 
the Nazarene in Annotated Paraphrase." It 
was due to the personal efforts of Dr. Davis 
that the local Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation has attained its present strong foun- 
dation. Dr. Davis married, November 25, 
1857, Ella C. Hunt, of Albany, Georgia. 
Children : Noah Wilson, Marella, Archibald 
Hunt, Clara Bell. 

Rives, Alfred Landon, born in Paris, 
France, March 25, 1830, son of William 
Cabell and Judith (Walker) Rives; at the 
time of his birth his father, who was among 
the most distinguished citizens of the Old 
Dominion, was the United States minister 
to France, and he also filled the same posi- 
tion in 1848 ; Alfred L. Rives was taught 
by private tutors until fourteen years of age, 
then became a student of Concord Acad- 
emy, and at the age of sixteen entered the 
Virginia Military Institute, was graduated 
in two years, being sixth in a class of twen- 
ty-four ; being proficient in engineering, he 
determined to adopt that as a profession, 
and in 1848 entered the University of Vir- 
ginia, where he remained one session, then 
accompanied his father to France ; after a 
year devoted to the study of mathematics 
and French, he successfully passed an ex- 
amination for entrance in the Government 
Engineering School of France, "Ecole des 
ponts et Chaussees ;" after graduation in 
1854 he was offered a position upon the 
great French railroad, "Du Nord." but in- 
stead returned to the United States, where 
ht served in the engineering corps of the 
Virginia Midland railway; later accepted a 
position in Washington under Captain M. 
V. Meigs, of the United States Engineering 



Corps, where he served for one year as as- 
sistant engineer of the United States Capi- 
tol and Post Office buildings ; was appointed 
secretary of the interior under President 
Pierce, to report upon the best location for 
a bridge across the Potomac, and directed to 
present details and estimates therefor; this 
rtport was published in the "Congressional 
Records," in 1857, and attracted favorable 
comment : was selected to make calculations 
and estimates for the Cabin John bridge, 
which was built under his personal super- 
vision ; upon the secession of Virginia he 
returned to his native state, and three days 
later received the commission of captain of 
engineers from the state of Virginia, and 
was directed to report to Colonel Talcott, 
at that time chief engineer of the state ; was 
assigned to duty on the lower Virginia 
peninsula, and upon the resignation of Colo- 
nel Talcott he was soon made acting chief 
engineer of the state of Virginia ; later he 
was appointed acting chief of the Engineer 
Bureau of the Confederate States, which 
position he held until the close of the war; 
he was promoted successively to be major, 
lieutenant-colonel and colonel of engineers ; 
after the war he was offered a professor- 
ship in several institutions of learning, and 
also a good architectural position under the 
United States government, all of which he 
declined, preferring to try to recover his 
fortunes in Richmond as an engineer and 
architect; in 1868 was division engineer of 
the Chesapeake & Ohio railroad ; in 1870 
was appointed chief engineer of the Mobile 
&- Birmingham railroad ; engineer in charge 
of the South & North Alabama railroad and 
part of the Louisville & Nashville system, 
which he completed in 1873; h^ was offered 
by Gen. Sherman, for the Khedive of Egypt. 



1 68 



VIRGINIA BIOCiRAPIIY 



the position of chief engineer of the civil 
works of Kg\-i)t, which position he declined 
tc accept : that of chief engineer and gen- 
eral superintendent of the Mobile & Ohio 
railroad; in 1883 became vice-president and 
general manager of the Richmond & Dan- 
v'lle railroad, now a part of the Southern 
Railway System; in 1886 was appointed a 
member of the United States commission to 
inspect and receive on the part of the gov- 
ernment forty miles of the Northern Pacific 
railroad in the state of Washington, and 
the following year became general superin- 
tendent of the Panama railroad, and while 
with that railroad went to Paris, and con- 
cluded a traffic agreement with the Canal 
Company ; he presented to the canal com- 
mission a plan for the completion of the 
Panama Canal, in which he had always 
taken a great interest; in 1894 he communi- 
cated to the directeur of the canal a plan 
for the construction of a port at La Boca, 
in the vicinity of Panama, which if con- 
structed would tend greatly to facilitate and 
increase the traffic across the isthmus ; after 
resigning his position with the Panama 
ri;ilroad, he was made chief engineer of the 
Cape Cod canal ; was also elected vice-presi- 
dent, and was specially charged with the 
construction of the Vera Cruz & Pacific 
railroad in Mexico ; these positions he held 
at the time of his death at Castle Hill, Feb- 
ruary 27, 1903 ; his wife, who survived him, 
was the well known Virginia belle. Miss 
Sadie MacMurdo; children: .Amelia, the 
well known authoress, who became the wife 
of Prince Trubetskoy ; Gertrude, who be- 
came the wife of Allen Potts, Esq. ; Miss 
Landon Rives. 

Marshall, Charles, bnrn in W'arrenton. 
X'irginia, October 3, 1830, son of Alexander 



John Marshall, and great-grandson of 
Thomas Marshall, born 1655, died 1704; 
was a student of the University of Virginia, 
from which he received the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts in 1846, and Master of Arts in 
1849; ^^'as professor of mathematics at the 
University of Indiana from 1849 to 1852; 
then studied law, was admitted to the bar, 
and began the practice of his profession in 
Baltimore, Maryland; in 1861, at the out- 
break of the civil war, he returned to his 
native state, joined the Confederate army 
the following year, and served on the per- 
sonal staff of Gen. Robert E. Lee as assist- 
ant adjutant and inspector-general, with the 
rank of first lieutenant ; from 1862 to 1865 
he served as major and aide-de-camp to 
Gen. Lee and served with him in the Army 
or Northern Virginia ; attained the rank of 
lieutenant-colonel, and with Gen. Horace 
Porter he arranged the terms of the sur- 
render of the Confederate army at Appo- 
mattox, and he prepared a general order 
containing Gen. Lee's address to his army ; 
I\Ir. Marshall wrote a book entitled "Life 
of (jen. Robert E. Lee ;'" he practiced his pro- 
fession in Baltimore, Maryland, from 1865 
to 1902. a period of almost four decades; his 
death occurred in Baltimore. Maryland, 
April 19, 1902. 

Duncan, James Armstrong, was born in 
Norfolk, \ irginia. .\pril 14, 1830. died in 
Ashland. \'irginia, September 2^^. 1877. His 
father, David Duncan, was a graduate of 
the University of Glasgow, emigrated to the 
United States, and for forty years was pro- 
fessor of ancient languages in Randolph- 
Macon College, Virginia, and at Oxford, 
South Carolina. James was graduated at 
Randolph-Macon in 1849. and joined the 
\'irginia conference of the Methodist 



PRUAIINENT PERSONS 



169 



church. During the civil war he was pastor 
ot the Broad Street Church in Richmond, 
and throughout this period preserved a con- 
servative attitude, never permitting politics 
to enter into his religious discussions, and 
eiideavoring in every way, after the strug- 
gle, to promote good feeling between the 
stctions. From 1868 until his death he was 
president of Randolph-AIacon College. Dr. 
Duncan was a leader in the councils of his 
church. For many years he was editor of 
the "Richmond Christian Advocate." 

Dickinson, Alfred Elijah, born in Decem- 
ber, 1830, in Orange county, Virginia, and 
came of a strong and sturdy stock. At an 
early age he entered Richmond College, 
from which he was graduated. He then at- 
tended the University of V^irginia for spe- 
cial courses, and while there, became inter- 
ested in the Baptist church at Charlottes- 
ville, and at the conclusion of his course of 
study became its pastor. In this work he 
was eminently successful, reaching many of 
the university students, and building up the 
church in every department of its work. 
L.ater he became superintendent of the Sun- 
day school and colportage work of the Bap- 
tist General Association of Virginia, and in 
his nine years in this position, he organized 
many new Sunday schools, strengthened 
those already in existence, enlarged their 
libraries, and improved their facilities for 
work. During this period he was especially 
active and useful in colportage and mission- 
ary work in the Army of Northern Vir- 
ginia. Dr. Dickinson finally resigned to ac- 
cept the pastorate of the Leigh Street Bap- 
tist Church in Richmond, which grew 
rapidly and steadily under his ministry. In 
1865 he formed a co-partnership with the 



late Dr. J. B. Jeter, for the purchase of the 
"Religious Herald." This paper, founded in 
1S27, had been published continuously ex- 
cept for occasional interruptions during the 
war. The close of the war found it greatly 
crippled and the labor of re-establishment 
was a discouraging task, but under the guid- 
ance of these strong men it soon entered 
upon a prosperous career. Dr. Dickinson's 
editorial connection with it has continued 
since 1865 until the present writing, making 
him, in period of service, the dean of Bap- 
tist editors in the whole world. Alore than 
half of his long life has been spent in this 
work, and his editorial career extends over 
more than one-half of the life of the 
paper itself. Dr. Dickinson's work on the 
paper was only one form of his activities. 
He was frequently engaged in special meet- 
ings ; churches all over the state, seeking to 
rebuild their houses of worship and to 
gather their scattered membership, had his 
help. His success in regathering members, 
in collecting money, in enlisting the sym- 
pathy and securing the help of generous 
persons outside of the state, made him a 
notable and useful figure in those trying 
days. After the death of Dr. Jeter, it was 
decided to erect a building on the grounds 
of Richmond College to his memory. Dr. 
Dickinson was the active agent, and speed- 
ily brought the movement to a successful 
issue. In his earlier years he visited the 
slate meetings of his denomination through- 
out the South and a great many in the 
North. In physical proportions Dr. Dickin- 
son was notable. Of unusual height, broad 
shouldered, deep chested, with a massive 
head, he would command attention in any 
assembly. As a speaker, his style was col- 
loquial and familiar. A keen sense of humor 



170 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



was a distinguishing trait and often served 
to relieve the tedium of lengthy and serious 
discourse. As a writer, his style was plain 
and unaffected, simple and lucid. He 
wrote no volume, but his contributions to 
the "Religious Herald" would, if gathered 
up, make many volumes of charming mis- 
cellany. He was the author of a number of 
monographs, one of which attained a cir- 
culation of over a million and has been re- 
printed in several foreign tongues. Dr. 
Dickinson was married three times. His 
first wife was the daughter of James B. 
Taylor, Sr., D. D., for many years a promi- 
nent and useful Virginia Baptist minister. 
His second wife was Miss Craddock, of 
Halifax county, Virginia. His third wife 
was Miss Bagby, of King and Queen county. 
Furman University. Greenville, South Caro- 
lina, conferred on him the degree of Doctor 
o' Divinity. 

Gildersleeve, Basil Lanneau, born at 
Charleston, South Carolina, October 23, 
1831, son of the Rev. Benjamin Gildersleeve, 
D. D., and Emma Louisa (Lanneau) Gilder- 
sleeve, the former of English descent, and 
the latter of French and German descent. 
Rev. Benjamin Gildersleeve was a Presby- 
terian clergyman, a teacher, and for many 
)ears editor of religious periodicals ; his 
father and grandfather served in the revolu- 
tionary war, the family being among the 
tarly setlers of Connecticut and Long 
Island, and the father and grandfather of 
his wife also served in the same struggle. 
P.asil L. Gildersleeve acquired his early edu- 
cation in his home and in the private school 
of W. E. Bailey, in Charleston, and this was 
supplemented by study at the College of 
Charleston, at JeflFerson College, Pennsyl- 



vania, and at Princeton College, New Jer- 
sey, from which he graduated in 1849, with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and received 
the degree of Master of Arts in course. In 
1850 he taught the classics in Dr. Maupin's 
private school in Richmond, Virginia, and 
then went abroad, studying in the univer- 
sities of Berlin, Bonn, Gottingen for three 
years, obtaining the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy from Gottingen in 1853. Upon 
his return to the United States, he engaged 
in teaching as private tutor for two years, 
and in 1856 was elected professor of Greek 
in the University of Virginia, which chair 
he held until 1876. in the meantime, from 
1861 to 1866, having the additional subject 
of Latin. Upon his return from service in 
the war between the states, in which he 
served as aide-de-camp on the staff of (Con- 
federate) Gen. Gilham, and later on that 
ot Gen. J. P>. Gordon, he returned to his chair 
at the University of Virginia, where he re- 
mained until he was called to the professor- 
ship of Greek in Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sit)', upon its establishment in 1876. He 
has published a number of text-books and 
editions of the Greek and Latin classics, 
served as editor of the "American Journal of 
Philology," which was established in Balti- 
more in 1880, and is a frequent contributor 
to the magazines. William and Mary Col- 
lege conferred upon him the degree of Doc- 
tor of Laws in 1869, received the same honor 
from Plarvard in 1886, and the degree of 
Doctor of Civil Law from the University of 
the South in 1884. He is president of the 
University Club of Baltimore, and a member 
of various learned societies. He married 
September 18, 1866, Elisa Colston. 

Henry, William Wirt, son of John Henry, 
the voungest son of Patrick Henrv. was born 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



171 



at the old Henry place, "Red Hill," Charlotte 
county, \'irginia, on February 14, 1831. He 
entered the University of Virginia in 1847, 
and was graduated therefrom in 1849, with 
the degree of Master of Arts. In 1853 he 
came to the bar in his native county, where 
he soon acquired the reputation of being 
a sound and successful lawyer. In 1861 
lie volunteered as a private soldier in an 
artillery company commanded by Captain 
Charles Bruce. He was commonwealth's 
attorney of his county for years. After 
the close of the war he removed to Rich- 
mond, \'irginia, where he enjoyed a large 
appellate court practice. He served four 
sessions in the legislature of \'irginia 
where ne was regarded as one of its most 
influential members. He naturally ■ took 
great pride in the history of his country and 
delivered many addresses upon subjects con- 
nected therewith. He was an ardent mem- 
ber of the Virginia Historical Society, and 
C'clivercd an address in Philadelphia upon 
the centennial of the resolutions for inde- 
pendence. He was a member of the Pea- 
body board at the time of his death. His 
great work was "The Life of Patrick 
Henry," which is a noble biography. Air. 
Henry was a brilliant conversationalist and 
a charming companion. Some years ago he 
was president of the American Historical 
Association. His wife was Lucy Gray Mar- 
shall, (laughter of Col. James P. Marshall. 

Barksdale, Randolph, born in Amelia 
county, \'irginia, October 25, 1831, son of 
William Jones Barksdale, and Marianna 
M'abb, his wife, daughter of John Tabb, of 
the committee of safety, and granddaughter 
of Sir John Peyton, of Isleham, Gloucester 
county, \'irginia. He was educated in pri- 



vate schools, snd at Amelia Academy, from 
which he entered the University of Virginia 
in 1848, where he remained three years. 
From there he went to the University of 
Pennsylvania, where he graduated in medi- 
cine in 1852. After spending twelve months 
in the Philadelphia Hospital (Blockley), he 
went abroad, studying medicine and attend- 
iiig clinics, for a year and a half in Paris. 
In 1856 he began the practice of his profes- 
sion in Richmond, Virginia, where he re- 
mained until the beginning of the civil war. 
In June, 1861, he joined the Confederate 
army, and was first assistant surgeon. He 
was afterw-ards surgeon on Gen. Long- 
street's stafi^, where he remained until the 
surrender at Appomattox Court House. 
From 1870 until 1896 he was superintendent 
cf the Central Lunatic Asylum of Virginia. 
He was a member of the \'irginia Medical 
Society, and was a Democrat in politics. His 
first wife was Elizabeth Macfarland, of 
Richmond, Virginia, whom he married in 
1858, and by whom he had three children. 
His second wife was Miss Patteson, of 
Petersburg, X'irginia, whom he married in 
1890. 

Trent, William Peterfield, born in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, November 10, 1862, son of 
Dr. Peterfield Trent, and Lucy Carter Bur- 
well, his wife. He prepared for college at 
a school taught by Mrs. Hobson and Mrs. 
W'ise, and at Norwood's University School. 
In 1880 he entered the University of Vir- 
ginia, from which he graduated, in i88.i, 
with the degree of Master of Arts. After 
some teaching, he became a student at 
Johns Hopkins University, devoting him- 
self to graduate work in history during the 
session of 1887-88. In 1888 he was elected 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



professor of English and history in t!ie Uni- 
\ersity of the South, at Sewanee, Tennes- 
see, which chair he filled until 1900, having 
also served as dean of the academic depart- 
ment from 1894 to 1900. He resigned these 
positions in 1900, having been elected pro- 
fessor of English literature in Columbia 
University, New York City. He became 
known as a writer through many works, 
among them "The Life of William Gilmore 
Simms," published in the "American Men of 
Letters" series ; he is also the author ot 
"English Culture in \'irginia," "Southern 
Statesmen of the Old Regime," "A Histoiy 
of American Literature," etc., etc. He is a 
member of the Author's Club, the Century 
Association, and the National Institute of 
y\rts and Letters. In politics he is an In- 
dependent. In 1896, Mr. Trent married 
Alice L}-man. of East Orange, New Jersey. 

Marye, John Lawrence, Jr., born Novem- 
ber 4, 1823, in Eredericksburg, Virginia, son 
cf John Lawrence Marye, and Anna Maria 
Burton, his wife. He was educated in the 
private schools of Eredericksburg, and in 
1840 entered the University of Virginia, 
where he was a student for two sessions. 
Upon his return home he studied for his 
profession in the office of his father, and 
soon entered upon a successful career as a 
lawyer. He served in the legislature of 
\'irginia from 1863 to 1865, and as a member 
of the state convention of 1869, he rendered 
great service to the commonwealth during 
the reconstruction period. In 1869 he was 
nominated for attorney general upon the 
first Democratic ticket after the civil war. 
but it became necessary to withdraw this 
ticket in order to unite the best element of 
the state against the carpet-baggers. This 



plan was successful, and resulted in the 
election of Messrs. Walker and Lewis as 
governor and lieutenant-governor. Subse- 
qucntl}', when Lieut. -Gov. John E. Lewis 
was chosen to the United States senate. Mr. 
Marye was elected lieutenant-governor in 
his place, a position which he held from 
1S70 to 1873. F'^i' years he was a member 
of the board of visitors of the University of 
\''irginia, and served as rector of the board. 
He was an able debater, and popular upon 
the hustings. .\s a citizen and churchman, 
ho was faithful to the duties about him. He 
was a successful lawyer, and the tribute of 
bar and people at the time of his death in 
.\ugust, 1902. attested his worth and char- 
acter. His wife, whom lie married in 1846, 
was Mildred S. Browne, a daughter of Dr. 
William Browne, of Eredericksbtirg, Vir- 
ginia. 

Guigon, Alexander Barclay, born in Rich- 
mond. X'irginia. Eebruary 13, 1831. son of 
Auguste ( iuigon and Ellen Smithey, his 
wife; his father was a Erenchman who 
came to Richmond, where he was a teacher. 
He was privately educated, and as a \outh 
became a page in congress, where he formed 
the acquaintance of many of the distin- 
guished lawyers of the country, which aided 
in determining his selection of a profession. 
After attending private schools in Rich- 
mond, he studied law and upon attaining 
his majority entered upon the practice of his 
profession shortly before the war. He was 
one of the original company of Richmond 
Howitzers, formed by the late George W. 
Randolph. When war broke out in .\pril, 
1 86 1, the Howitzer company had so many 
members it became necessary to organize a 
battalion of three companies, which were 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



1/3 



mustered into the service of the Confeder- 
acy, April 21, 1861. Guigon, then a private, 
was made orderly sergeant of the Sec- 
ond company, commanded by J. Thompson 
Brown. Guigon was with a section of this 
company, which was sent to Gloucester 
Point and fired on the gunboat Yankee, on 
May 20, 1861, the first gun of the war hred 
i.i Virginia. He served in the Peninsula 
campaign under Gen. John Bankhead Ma- 
gruder ; was at the battle of Bethel, and 
from the battle of Bethel (June 10, 1861), to 
the advance of McClellan up the Penmsula 
(April, 1862), Guigon was, with a short in- 
terval of sickness, continuously witii his 
company. On April 15, 1862, Guigon was 
tommissioned captain in the Confederate 
army, and authorized to raise a company of 
artillery. The project was unsuccessful and 
ho joined the First company of Richmond 
Howitzers as a private, but later was 
appointed ordnance sergeant of a battery 
commanded by his old partner, Capt. I ifter- 
wards Colonel) Marmaduke Johnson, and 
served in that capacity with the 1 hird Corps 
of the Army of Northern Virginia up to its 
surrender at Appomattox. After the sur- 
render of Gen. Lee's army at .\ppomattox, 
Capt. Guigon resumed the practice of the 
law in Richmond. In 1870 he was elected 
judge of the hustings court, being the first 
elected to hold that office after the war. 
After serving as judge for eight years, he 
died, February 22, 1878, and the event was 
the occasion of the largest meeting of mem- 
bers of the bench and bar of the city of Rich- 
mond and its vicinity ever assembled, and 
the resolutions passed by them express far 
more than the ordinary state formalities. 
Judge Guigon founded, in 1856, "The Quar- 
terly Law Journal," the first law journal 



published in the south, which he conducted 
until shortly before the beginning of the 
civil war. He was a master Mason and 
member of Joppa Lodge, No. 40, in Rich- 
mond. Before the war he was a Whig, but 
v.'hen the war terminated he allied himself 
with the Democratic party. He was a regu- 
lar attendant of the Monumental Episcopal 
Church in Richmond. On August 20, 1857, 
he married Sarah Bates Allen, daughter of 
James Allen of the firm of Davenport 8: 
Allen. Richmond, and formerly ot New 
Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Buchanan, John Lee, born in Smyth 
cnunty, Virginia, June 19, 1831. In 1856 he 
was graduated from Emory and Henry Col- 
lege, \'irginia, and at once entered upon 
what was destined to be a long and success- 
ful career as teacher and professor of ancient 
languages in his alma mater, which position 
he held from 1856 until 1878. He then 
taught Latin in Vanderbilt University, after 
uhich he became president successively ci 
Emory and Henry College, and of the Vir- 
ginia Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
After serving as superintendent of public 
education of Virginia, 1886-90, Buchanan 
held the positions of professor of Latin in 
Randolph-Macon College, Virginia, 1890- 
94. and president of the University of Arkan- 
sas, 1894-1902, after which he retired. 

Barnes, Thomas H., born May 28, 1831, 
son of James Barnes, and Elizabeth Barnes, 
his wife, and a descendant of immigrants 
who settled at an early date in Hertford 
county. North Carolina, and from thence 
removed to Nansemond county, Virginia. 
James Barnes was a well-known citizen of 
Nansemond county, and for many years was 
a maodstrate and a member of the countv 



174 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



court. Thomas H. Barnes was a student at 
Kinsalc Academy in Nansemond county, 
Virginia; Buckhorn Academy, Hertford 
Academy, North Carolina ; matriculated at 
the Universily of Virginia in 1849, study- 
ing there three years ; then took up the 
study of medicine at the Medical College of 
X'irginia, and graduated with the class of 
1853. In 1854 he commenced the active 
practice of his profession, with which he 
was occupied until 1888, at the homestead 
where he was born. He was for a long time 
chairman of the county Democratic commit- 
tee, and was for many years a member of 
the house of delegates and the senate of 
Virginia. He was of imposing height and 
dignity in bearing, and was known as the 
"tall sycamore of Nansemond." For a long 
time he served as a member of the board 
cf visitors of the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia, and that of William and Mary Col- 
lege. He was a delegate to the constitu- 
tional convention which assembled in Rich- 
mond in 1901, was chairman of the commit- 
tee on county government, and rendered 
excellent service in the deliberations of this 
body. In his earlier years one of his chief 
recreations was found in fox hunting. He 
never married. 

Williams, John Langbourne, born July 13, 
183 1, in Richmond, Virginia, son of John 
Williams, who was brought up in England, 
of Scotch-Irish descent, came to America in 
1820, where he married Sianna Armistead 
r^andridge, daughter of William Dandridge, 
and granddaughter of Bartholomew Dan- 
dridge, a member of the house of burgesses 
and brother of Martha Washington. John 
L. Williams was educated in private schools 
and at the University of \'irginia. from 



which he graduated with the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts in 1S51, having been distinguish- 
ed in the school of mixed mathematics. He 
taught school for a year at Loretto, Essex 
county, \'irginia, and practiced law for a few 
years in Richmond, where he subsequently 
went into the banking business. During the 
civil war he was a member of the firm of 
Lancaster & Company, financial agents of 
the Confederate States. After the war he 
founded the banking house of John L. Wil- 
liams & Sons, of which he became senior 
partner. His firm had a large share in many 
of the large financial operations in the 
south ; in the establishment of the Georgia 
(S- Alabama Railway, the S. A. L. Railway, 
and in building and organizing city railways 
and manufacturing industries. He never 
held public office, but took a deep interest 
in the welfare of the community. In politics 
he was a Gold Democrat, and was an active 
and interested member in the affairs of the 
Protestant Episcopal church, belonging to 
what may be called the conservative, or 
Virginia school. He was for years a dele- 
gate to the diocesan council, and was a 
deputy to the general convention of the 
church which met in San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. He was devoted to the classics, and 
c'eemed by many to be one of the best 
informed authorities upon the English clas- 
sics in the state. He was always a wirm 
friend of the University of Virginia, where 
he educated his sons. In many ways he 
showed his afifection for his alum muter. 
having presented to her many valuable gifts, 
which include contributions to her library 
and the portraits of Chief Justice Marshall 
and Commodore Matthew F. Maury. To 
him also is due the completion of the capi- 
tals of the pillars of the rotunda, which was 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



done in his honor by his son, the distin- 
guished railroad president, John Skelton 
WiUiams. He was a member of the Phi 
L'eta Kappa Society of William and Mary 
College, to which he was elected in 1900 in 
appreciation of certain articles published as 
"(Observations of a Philosophical Friend," 
and on account of his loyalty to learning. In 
1864 he married Maria Ward Skelton, 
daughter of Dr. John Gififord Skelton and 
Charlotte Randolph, his wife, of Powhatan 
county, Virginia, she being the granddaugh- 
ter of Gov. Edmund Randolph. 

Tompkins, Christopher, born in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, September 17, 1847, son of 
Col. Christopher Tompkins, Confederate 
States army, a graduate of West Point Mili- 
tary Academy, and Ellen Wilkins, of Balti- 
more, Maryland, his wife. On both sides 
of his family he is descended from the early 
English colonial settlers. His early educa- 
tion was obtained in private schools of 
Richmond, Virginia, and at William and 
Mary College, from which he graduated in 
i868 with the degree of Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy. He entered the University of Vir- 
ginia, where he studied for one year in the 
academic department. After leaving the 
university he became a student of medicine 
in the Medical College of Virginia, and 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1870. After leaving the medical 
college he continued his medical education 
in New York City. He then returned to 
Richmond, Virginia, and began the practice 
of his profession, which he has since con- 
tinued. He has been professor of anatomy 
and obstetrics in the Medical College of 
Virginia, and he was dean of the faculty. 
He is ex-surgeon of the Fourth Battalion of 



Virginia Volunteers (militia), and is one of 
the medical examiners of the Mutual Life 
Insurance Company of New York. He has 
been deputy coroner of the city of Rich- 
mond, assistant city physician, and is presi- 
dent of the Southern Medical College Asso- 
ciation. He is a member of the medical 
staff of the Memorial Hospital of Richmond, 
Virginia ; medical referee in Virginia for 
the Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Com- 
pany of Newark, New Jersey ; a member 
of the Medical Society of Virginia, ex- 
v'ce-president of the Southern Surgical 
and Gynecological Association, and a mem- 
1 er of the Association of Obstetricians and 
Gynecologists. He has written a number of 
papers upon medical subjects. On Novem- 
ber 8, 1877, he married Bessie McCaw, 
daughter of Dr. James B. McCaw, of Rich- 
mond. 

Pollard, Edward Alfred, born in Nelson 
county, Virginia, February 27, 1831, son of 
Maj. Richard Pollard and Pauline Cabell, 
his wife, and a direct descendant of Col. 
William Cabell, of the committee of safetj' 
during the revolutionary war , he was also 
a nephew of Hon. Alexander Rives. After 
?ttending Hampden-Sidney College, and the 
L'niversity of Virginia, from which he was 
graduated in 1849, he began law studies at 
William and Mary College, and completed 
them in Baltimore. He spent several years 
in travel in California, Mexico and Nicarau- 
gua, and afterwards in Europe, China and 
Japan, and during this time won consider- 
able fame as a writer. During the adminis- 
tration of President Buchanan, he was clerk 
of the judiciary committee of the house of 
representatives. While under deep depres- 
sion on account of the death of his wife, his 



176 



VIRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



relative and intimate friend, Dishop Meade, 
induced him to study for the Protestant 
Episcoi)al ministry. However, journalism 
soon reclaimed him, and he gave himself 
to the duties of co-editorship on the "Rich- 
mond Examiner," in which, from 1861 to 
1865, he supported the struggle for south- 
ern independence with sustained enthusi- 
?.--m and ability. Toward the latter part of 
the war, in order to iiromote the sale of his 
published books, he sailed for England, but, 
while on the voyage, was captured by the 
United States officials. He was held a pris- 
oner in Fort Warren and Fortress Monroe 
for eight months, and was then released on 
parole. He now established the "Southern 
Opinion," and "The Political Pamphlet," 
reither of which continued over two years. 
His literary laurels were chiefly won during 
the civil war. when he was undoubtedly the 
ablest writer in behalf of the Confederacy. 
Moreover, his position in this respect was 
somewhat unique, for he was a ruthless de- 
nunciator of President Davis. The later 
}-ears of his life were passed in Xew York 
City and Brooklyn. His publications in- 
cluded: "Black Diamonds in the Homes 
ol the South" (1859: "Letters of a South- 
ern Spy in Washington and Elsewhere" 
(1861) ; "Southern History of the War" 
(1862-66, published in various forms and at 
different dates, in Richmond, Xew York and 
I^ondon) ; "Observations in the Xorth, 
I'-ight Months in Prison, and on Parole" 
(1865) ; "The Lost Cause, a New .Southern 
History of the War of the Confederates" 
(1866) ; "Lee and His Lieutenants" (18671 : 
'The Lost Cause Regained" (1868") ; "Life 
of Jeflferson Davis, with the Secret History 
01 the Southern Confederacy" (1869) ; "The 



Virginia Tourist" (1869). He died at 
Lynchburg. \'irginia. December 12, 1892. 

Mallet, John William, born at Dublin, 
Ireland, October 10, 1832, son of Robert 
Mallet and Ccrdelia \\'atson, his wife, his 
f.-ither a noted civil engineer and member 
of the Institute of Civil Engineers and a 
Pellow of tlie Royal Society, also 1 nell 
known scientific author. John William 
Mallet enjoyed exceptional opportunities in 
his youth, both along educational lines and 
for general enjoyment, and after preparing 
at a i)rivatc school taught by Rev. J. P. 
Sargent, entered the University of Dublin, 
whence he was graduated A. B. in 1853. He 
then studied ni the University of Gottingen. 
Germany, which institution awarded him 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Upon 
the completion of his work at the latter 
university he came to the Lnited States, re- 
ceiving an appointqient as chemist to the 
geological survey of the state of Alabama 
and commencing his duties in this capacity 
in January, 1855. He became professor of 
chemistry in the University of Alabama in 
the following year, and occupied this chair 
until i860, when he accepted a professor- 
ship in the Medical College oi Alabama, at 
Mobile. Dr. Mallet abandoned his educa- 
tional work at the outbreak of the war be- 
tween the states, and on Xoveniber 16, 1861, 
took a first lieutenants commission in the 
Confederate States army, becoming aide-de- 
camp on the staff of Gen. Robert E. Rodes. 
He rose through the ranks of captain and ma- 
jor to that of lieutenant-colonel of artillery, 
the Confederate States government then util- 
izing his technical and scientific knowledge in 
the construction and maintenance of ord- 
nance laboratories at different places in the 




^^^^^:^^^^^^^y^ 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



states of the Confederacy, much of the ma- 
chinery used being of his own design. With 
the close of the war and the defeat of the 
cause he had so ably espoused. Dr. ]\lallet 
returned to his profession, becoming a pro- 
fessor in the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Louisiana, being in the service of 
this institution from 1865 to 1868. From 
the latter year until 1883 he was a profes- 
sor in the University of Virginia, then was 
lor one year a member of the faculty of the 
University of Texas, afterward teaching in 
Jefferson Medical College, of Philadelphia. 
He returned to ihe University of Virginia 
in 1885. The educational institutions and 
learned societies that have honored Dr. Mal- 
let with degrees and membership are many 
and widely dispersed. He was the recipient 
of the honorary degree of M. D. from the 
medical department of the University of 
Louisiana ; LL. D. from William and Mary 
College (1872), the University of Missis- 
sippi (1872), Princeton University (1896), 
and Johns Hopkins University (1902J. He 
is a fellow of the Royal Society of London ; 
member of the English, French. German and 
American Chemical Societies, having been 
president of the American and vice-president 
01 the Chemical Society of London ; asso- 
ciate fellow of the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences (Boston) ; member of the 
American Philosophical Society ; corre- 
sponding member of the New York Acad- 
emy of Sciences : member of the Academy of 
Science (^^'ashington, D. C.) ; fellow of the 
College of Physicians (Philadelphia); hon- 
orary member of the Medical and Chirur- 
gical Faculty of Maryland ; fellow of the 
Medical Society of Virginia; and honorary 
member of a Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) scien- 
tific society and of two scientific societies 
viR-12 



of the City of Mexico. The most noted of 
scientific journals have printed the results 
of his researches along chemical lines, his 
j.iapers numbering about one hundred : three 
times a member of the United .States Assay 
Commission, his professional skill has been 
employed by the United States Board of 
Health in the chemical analysis of certain 
sources of water supply, and he is the 
author of the following works; "British 
Association Catalogue of Earthquakes" (in 
collaboration with his father, 1852-54), 
"Physical and Chemical Conditions of the 
Cultivation of Cotton" (London, i860), 
"Svliabus of a Course of Lectures on Gen- 
eral Chemistry" (1890, second edition, 
1901 ). Dr. Mallet is a member of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal church, and, remaining a 
British subject, never acquired political al- 
legiance. He married (first) Mary Eliza- 
beth Ormond, (second) Mrs. Josephine 
(Pages) Burthe, and has children. 

Christian, George Llewellyn, born April 
13, 1841, in Charles City county, Virginia, 
son of Edmund Thomas Christian and Ta- 
bitha Rebecca Graves, his wife. His father's 
ancestor, Thomas Christian, settled in Charles 
City county, Virginia, in 1687, having come 
from a distinguished family in the Isle of 
Man His grandfather was Turner Chris- 
tian, who was a brother of Henry Christian, 
who was a captain in the revolutionary war. 
On his mother's side his ancestors were also 
English. Llis early education was obtained 
ar private schools, and in the Northwood 
and Taylorsville Academies of Charles City 
county. In 1861, when tw-enty years of age, 
he enlisted in the Confederate army as a 
-private in the Second Company of the Rich- 
mond Howitzers, with which he served un- 



178 



VIRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



til May i^, 1864, when he was desperately 
wounded (near the Bloody Angle) at Spott- 
iylvania Court House. At that time he was 
a sergeant of the company. He lost one leg 
and a part of the other foot, and as the 
result of these wounds was incapacitated for 
further service in the field, and he entered 
the University of Virginia, in 1864, where he 
remained one session. Upon leaving the 
university, having lost everything by the 
w.ir, he entered the clerk's office of the cir- 
cuit court of the city of Richmond, and in 
1870 began the practice of his profession, 
i'rom 1872 until 1878 he was clerk of the 
court of appeals, and from 1878 to 1883 was 
judge of the hustings court of the city of 
Richmond. He has been president of the 
Richmond City Chamber of Commerce, of 
the city council of Richmond, of the City 
Bar Association, of the National Bank of 
Virginia, of which he is now president, and 
cf the Virginia State Insurance Company. 
Judge Christian is a member of the Grand 
Camp of Confederate Veterans of \'irginia, 
j'tid has made many contributions to the 
literature of the war for southern independ- 
ence. His "Report on the Conduct of the 
War." October 11, 1900, is a splendid tribute 
tc the humanity of the south. His address 
on John Tyler and Abraham Lincoln, the 
'"Capitol Disaster," and his '"Confederate 
F.xperiences" are written with remarkable 
mastery of the pen. He is a member of the 
City and State Bar associations, and other 
social organizations. In politics he is a 
Democrat. His first wife was Miss Ida 
Morris, l)y whom he had three children: 
Csssie Claudia, Morris H., and George L., 
Jr. His second wife was Miss Emma Chris- 
tian, bv whom he has three children : Stuart, 



William, and Frank Christian. His address 
is Richmond, \'irginia. 

Brooke, James Vass, born at Falmouth, 
\'irginia, Uctcber 10, 1824, son of William 
Brooke, exporting merchant, and Jcannie 
Morrison, his wife, half-sister of James 
Vass, of Fredericksburg. He studied law 
rnder Judge R. L. C. Moncure, settled in 
Warrenton, and began law practice at the 
early age of nineteen years. He was an 
ardent Whig. He served as commonwealth 
attorney, and state secretary of the Ameri- 
can party. He was elected to the convention 
of 1861, and signed the ordinance of seces- 
sion. In 1862 he organized and took to the 
field, Brooke's battery, which was attached 
to Jackson's corps. During the valley cam- 
jiaign, his ankle was broken by the kick of 
an artillery horse, but he returned on 
crutches, and took part in the battle of 
Fredericksburg. His disability forbade fur- 
ther military service, and in 1863 he entered 
the house of delegates, in which he served 
until the fall of Richmond. After the war 
he was a law partner of Hon. R. Taylor 
Scott, in \\'arrenton, and his practice cov- 
ered a period of fifty-five years. He can- 
vassed actively for every Democratic presi- 
dential nominee from 1868 to 1896, when he 
supported Palmer and Buckner. He served 
several times in the house of delegates and 
senate, and in the latter body, in 1877, 
labored arduously for the "Brooke bill," 
providing for an amicable settlement of the 
state debt. In the next session he was chair- 
man of the judiciary committee, and took a 
leading part in the revision of the code of 
Virginia. He served in all important offices, 
and was largely instrumental in moderniz- 
ing the pavements, lighting and water Svip- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



179 



ply of \\'arrenton. He was for forty-five 
years an elder of the Presbyterian church, 
and many times a delegate to the general 
assembly ; for two years acceptably filled the 
pulpit in the absence of the pastor ; and was 
for twenty-five years superintendent of the 
Sunday school. He died October 9, 1898. 

Holladay, Lewis L., born in Spottsyl- 
\'ania county, Virginia, February 23, 1832. 
He was graduated with honor from Hamp- 
den-Sidney College in 1853, and was at once 
appointed a tutor. In 1854-55 he attended 
the University of Virginia, and in the latter 
year returned to Hampden-Sidney as profes- 
sor of physical science, and occupied this 
chair until his sudden death, July 23, 1891. 
P'or a time he was president f>ro tcin. of the 
college. 

Newton, William Brockenbrough, born 
in Richmond, Virginia, April 15. 1832, son 
of Hon. Willoughby Newton, of Westmore- 
land county, Virginia, who served as a dele- 
gate to the legislature, and a grandson of 
Judge William Brockenbrough ; educated 
by private tutors, attended the Episcopal 
High School near Alexandria, which he en- 
tered in 1848, remained for two years, and 
received the medal ; entered the University 
c'f Virginia, in 1850, graduated with degree 
of Bachelor of Law in 1852, and delivered 
the valedictory address before the Wash- 
ington Literary Society in same year; set- 
tled in Hanover county, Virginia, and soon 
established himself as a lawyer of ability ; 
was elected to the legislature upon the 
Democratic ticket, without opposition, in 
1859 ; upon the formation of a military 
company, he was elected lieutenant, this com- 
pany becoming famous as the Hanover 
Troop, which constituted a part of the 



I'ourth \'irginia Regiment of Cavalry, and 
in all its actions he bore a conspicuous part; 
he was killed in the fight at Morton's Ford, 
I'car Raccoon Ford, October 11, 1863, in the 
charge made by the Fourth Regiment; his 
death was the occasion of a special message 
to the legislature by Gov. Letcher, which 
concluded with these words, "When such 
men die it is proper that their names and 
services should be held in grateful remem- 
brance ;" he married Mary Mann Page, who 
survived him with two children : Willough- 
by Newton. Esq., and Mrs. Walter Chris- 
tian, of Richmond. Virginia. 

Conway, Moncure Daniel, born in Stafford 
county. Virginia, March 17, 1832. His 
father was a member of the Virginia legis- 
lature, and for thirty-five years presiding 
justice of Stafford county. His mother was 
a daughter of John Moncure Daniel, sur- 
geon-general, U. S. A., in the war of 1812, 
and granddaughter of Thomas Stone, a 
signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Mr. Conway passed from the Fredericksburg 
(Virginia) Academy to Dickinson College, 
from which he received B. A. (1849) and A. 
M. (1852). He studied law at Warrenton. 
Virginia, and wrote for the "Richmond 
Examiner." edited by his cousin, John Mon- 
cure Daniel. He also wrote a pamphlet, 
"Free Schools in Virginia" (1850), of which 
T. Davidson, in his "Eminent Radicals out 
of Parliament," says: "I have read this 
plan for free schools, and can only wonder 
that a lad of eighteen should have the ability 
or patience to produce so masterly an ap- 
peal." He abandoned the law for the min- 
istry, and was appointed by the Baltimore 
Methodist conference to a circuit in Mont- 
gomery county, Maryland, where he made 



i8o 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



the acquaintance of the cultivateil liicksite 
Quakers, and his faith in both Methodism 
and slavery was somewhat impaired. He 
also became a student of the works of Em- 
erson, with whom he corresponded. In 1852 
he was appointed to a circuit in Frederick 
county, Maryland, but soon resigned to enter 
the Unitarian Divinity School at Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, from which he received his 
B. D. degree (1854). He was a minister of 
the Unitarian church at Washington, D. C., 
from 1854 to 1857, when his anti-slavery 
discourses caused a division in the society. 
I' or a time he preached to those who adhered 
tc him. but finding the two sides willing to 
unite on Mr. Channing as a successor, lie 
accepted an invitation from the First Con- 
gregational Church in Cincinnati. Here 
hi.'-, first book appeared. "Tracts for To-chy" 
(1858). In i860 he founded the "Dial" in 
Cincinnati, to which Emerson contributed. 
C)n the breaking out of the civil war, Mr. 
Conwav went through Ohio, delivering ad- 
dresses in favor of emancipation as the true 
weapon of liberty and union, and meeting, 
at times, rough, opposition. In 1861 he pub- 
lished his views in a little book, "The Re- 
jected Stone," which gained a wide circu- 
lation. It was followed (1862) by "The 
Golden Hour. ' Mr. Conway was invited to 
oive a lecture on the subject at the Smith- 
cnian Institution, and he also delivered a 
sermon in the senate chamber. About this 
same time, his father's slaves being within 
the lines of the Federal army of the I'oto- 
r:ac, he gathered them together and colo- 
nized them in Ohio. In 1863 he was chosen 
editor of the Boston "Commonwealth," es- 
tidjlished in the interest of emancipation. 
He visited England in 1863, and there gave 
many addresses on the issue in America, 



wrote papers in "Fraser" and the "Fort- 
nightly," and published his "Testimonies 
Concerning Slavery" (1864). Under in- 
structions from the abolitionists of America 
he made overtures to James M. Mason, the 
Confederate commissioner, to ef?ect the in- 
dependence of the south on condition of its 
abolishing slavery. Accepting an invitation 
to the South Place chapel, London, he was 
itp minister until 1S84. but always retained 
his .American citizenship. Mt. Conway was 
a member of several learned societies in 
London, and lectured occasionally at the 
Royal Institution. In 1885 he returned to 
the United States, and became a resident of 
New York City. Besides many printed dis- 
courses, a large number of magazine articles 
and letters to the New York "Tribune" and 
the Cincinnati "Commercial," of which 
papers he was successively the London cor- 
respondent, Mr. Conway has published the 
ft.llowing works in England and America: 
"The Earthward Pilgrimage" (1870); "Re- 
publican Superstitions" (1872) ; "The Sacred 
Anthology" (1876); "Idols and Ideals" 
(1877) ; "Demonology and Devil-Lore" 
(1879); "A Necklace of Stories" (1880); 
"Thomas Carlyle" (1881) ; "The Wandering 
Jew" (1881); "Travels in South Kensing- 
ton" ( 1882) ; "Emerson at Home and 
Abroad" (1882): "Pine and Palm. A 
Novel" (1887) ; "Life of Edmund Randolph" 
(1888) "George Washington and Mount 
\'ernon" (1889): "Life of Hawthorne" 
( 1890) : "Prisons of .Air. A Novel" (1891) ; 
"Life of Thomas Paine" (1892), and many 
later works. In 1858 Mr. Conway married 
Miss Ellen Davis Dana. He died in Paris. 
France. November 13. T907. 

Darling, James Sands, born in New York 
City. February 3, 1832, son of Hamilton 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



i8i 



Darling and Temperance Smith, his wife. 
He passed his early life in the country, liv- 
ing upon a farm, engaged in farm work, and 
attending country schools. In his eighteenth 
year he engaged with an older brother in 
building pleasure boats, and from the begin- 
ing he displayed remarkable mechanical 
skill. In October, 1866, Mr. Darling went 
to Hampton, Virginia, where he built up a 
large planing mill business. He also estab- 
lished a successful business in fertilizers, pro- 
duced from the menhaden fish. He then 
took up the enterprise of a street car line 
for the cities of Newport News and Hamp- 
ton, which he built and equipped with his 
own capital ; and he established the largest 
oyster-planting business in the United 
States. On September 22, 1864, he married 
Mary Annie Daulman. Mr. Darling was 
connected with the Protestant Episcopal 
church, and was a Mason. He died April 28, 
1000, at Hampton, Virginia. 

Blackford, Charles Minor, born in Fred- 
ericksburg, Virginia. October 17, 1833, son 
of William Matthews Blackford, Esq., and 
Mary Berkeley Minor, daughter of Gen. 
John Minor, his wife. On both sides of his 
family he was descended from a long line 
of distinguished ancestors. His early edu- 
cation was obtained from his own father, 
and from private schools of his native place 
and of Lynchburg, to which his father's 
family moved in 1846. Being very thor- 
oughly prepared, he entered the University 
of Virginia, and graduated in 1855, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Law. He soon ac- 
quired a successful practice, and established 
the reputation of being a man of culture and 
learning in his profession. Upon the out- 
break of the civil war he joined the Confed- 



erate army, and was promoted to captaincy 
of Company B, Second Regiment \'irginia 
Cavalry. For a time he served upon the 
stafif of Gen. Stonewall Jackson, and at the 
request of Gen. Longstreet was made judge 
advocate of the military court of his corps. 
After the war he returned to Lynchburg, 
and formed a partnership with the late 
Thomas J. Kirkpatrick, a distinguished law- 
yer of that place. . This partnership lasted 
until within a few years of Capt. Blackford's 
death, and their names may be found asso- 
ciated with many of the most important 
cases that have ever occurred in the courts 
of the commonwealth of Virginia. In addi- 
tion to his busy professional life, he found 
time do much literary work, including his 
"Memoirs of the War," in which he gave a 
graphic account of his experience while in 
active service. His home in Lynchburg was 
noted for its culture and refinement, and 
was the scene of much hospitality. He was 
honored by the State Bar Association with 
its presidency, and his address made before 
it was a notable contribution to the litera- 
ture of that association. In 1900 he deliv- 
ered a striking historical address on "The 
Trials and Trial of Jefferson Davis." In 
this paper he discussed the constitutional 
questions involving the right of secession. 
Mr. Blackford was a devoted member of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church and had 
for many years prior to his death been a 
delegate in the diocesan council of that 
church. He had also represented the south 
ern diocese of Virginia in the general con- 
vention of the church. On February 19, 
1856, he married Susan Lee Colston, daugh- 
ter of Thomas M. Colston, Esq., of Fauquier 
county, Virginia. 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



White, James Lowery, M. D., born at Ab- 
ingdon, \'irginia, May 30, 1833, son of James 
Lowery White and Margaret R. Preston, 
his wife, the former named an agriculturist 
and merchant, traces his ancestry to Scotch- 
Irish forebears, early members of the White 
family settling in Pennsylvania, and those 
of the Preston family settling in Virginia. 
James L. White acquired his preliminary 
education in the Abingdon Male ^\cademy, 
jjursued advanced studies in the Virginia 
Military Institute, which he entered in 1850 
and was graduated from in 1853, the follow- 
ing year, 1853-54, was a student in the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, then matriculated at the 
Jefiferson ]\Iedical College, from which he 
received the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1855. He opened an office for the active 
practice of his profession at Abingdon, and 
later removed to Farmville, Virginia, and 
in addition to attending to the needs of his 
patients is an active and prominent member 
of the Virginia Medical Society, which he 
served as vice-president from 1880 to 1881. 
He held the rank of captain in the Thirty- 
seventh Regiment of Virginia Volunteer In- 
fantry during six months of 1861, and was 
then commissioned a surgeon of the Con- 
federate States army and served in that 
capacity until the close of hostilities. He 
is a Presbyterian in religion, a Democrat in 
politics, and a member of the Order of Free 
and Accepted Masons, Royal Arcanum and 
Knights of Honor. Dr. W'hite married, 
September 21, 1864, Miss L. E. Jackson. 

Gregory, Roger, born in King William 
county. \'irginia. in 1833, son of Roger 
Gregory. He had the advantage of the best 
instruction in his home, and in the best 
known schools in his part of the state. He 



studied law two sessions in the University 
of Virginia, graduating in 1855 with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Law, and was admitted 
to the bar in 1856. After the war, under the 
constitution of Virginia 1867- 1868, he was 
first judge of King William county. Leav- 
ing the bench in 1873, he again took up the 
practice of law. Owing to the general rec- 
ognition of his manifest fitness for the work, 
and without any effort on his part, he was 
chosen to plan for and organize the new law- 
school of Richmond College. Under his 
management and direction during sixteen 
sessions this department of the college 
ranked high among the American schools 
of law. On his retirement Judge Gregory 
largely confined his activity to the manage- 
ment of his large estate of "Elsing Green,'" 
King V\illiam county, \'irginia, and other 
business interests in this and other parts of 
the state. 

Southall, Joseph Wells, born in Prince 
F.dward county, \'irginia, March 4, 1833, 
son of Philip Turner Southall and Elizabeth 
Webster, his wife, the former a physician 
and planter, a descendant of Major Stephen 
Southall, of the revolutionary army, and 
Lucy Henry, sister of Patrick Henry. Jo- 
seph W. Southall acquired his early edu- 
cation in a private school conducted by 
Henry Anderson, then entered Hampton- 
Sidney College, where he remained one 
}ear, then became a student in William and 
Mary College, graduating in 1855. after 
u hich he matriculated at the \'irginia Med- 
ical College, from which he received the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine in i860, and en- 
gaged in practice. At the beginning of the 
war between the states he became a sur- 
geon in Gen. Jackson's valley command. 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



183 



and served at Manassas and elsewhere, later 
joining the Amelia cavalry, but shortly 
afterward resigned, owing to defective hear- 
ing. He then resumed his former duties. 
In iSgi he was elected to represent the 
counties of Amelia, Prince Edward and 
Cumberland, in the Virginia state senate, 
holding the office for eight years by reelec- 
tions, and in 1898 was elected state super- 
intendent of public instruction, serving from 
that date until 1906. He was formerly a 
Whig, later transferred his allegiance to the 
Democratic party, and his religious belief 
was that of the Protestant Episcopal church. 
He was a member of the state medical ex- 
amining board, and of Phi Beta Kappa Soci- 
ety, at William and Mary College. He mar- 
ried, February 27, 1866, Rosa Hatchet. 

Harvey, James Madison, born in Monroe 
county, Virginia, September 21, 1833; at- 
tended the public schools of Indiana, Iowa 
and Illinois, and acquired an excellent edu- 
cation, and later pursued a course in sur- 
veying and civil engineering, which lines of 
v.ork he followed until 1859, in which year 
he removed to Kansas, where he devoted his 
attention to agricultural pursuits ; he served 
as captain in the Fourth and Tenth regi- 
ments of Kansas Infantry for three years, 
from 1861 to 1864; was a member of the 
lower house of the legislature in 1865-66. 
and of the state senate in 1867-68; was gov- 
ernor of Kansas from 1869 to 1871, and from 
1874 to 1877 was a United States senator, 
having been chosen as a Republican to fill 
the vacancy caused by the resignation of 
Alexander Caldwell. 

Boyd, David French, born at Wytheville, 
A'irginia, October 5. 1834. He was edu- 
cated at private schools and at the Univer- 



sity of Virginia, from which he received the 
degree of Master of Arts in 1856. For three 
years he taught school in V'irginia and in 
North Louisiana. In 1859, when the Louisi- 
ana State Seminary was opened at Alex- 
andria, under the presidency of William 
Tecumseh Sherman (afterwards General), 
Boyd was elected professor of ancient lan- 
guages. \\'hen the war between the states 
began, he enlisted as a private, and rose to 
the rank of major in three arms of the serv- 
ice — infantry, engineers and cavalry — his 
first service being with the Ninth Louisi- 
ana Regiment, under General "Stonewall" 
Jackson. In 1863 he resigned, to return to 
Louisiana and reopen the State Seminary ; 
but finding forbidding war conditions, he 
entered the engineer service under Gen. 
Richard Taylor, and built Fort De Russey, 
on the Red river. Early in 1864 he was 
captured by marauders, and sold to the Fed- 
erals for a hundred dollars, but through the 
friendship of Sherman he was exchanged, 
and then became major and assistant adju- 
tant-general of Brent's cavalry brigade. In 
1865 he became superintendent of the 
Louisiana State Seminary (later the Louisi- 
ana State University), and for nearly thirty 
years was closely connected with it as presi- 
dent, 1865-80 and 1884-87, and as professor 
at intervals. In reorganizing it after the 
war, he kept it from falling under radical 
control during the carpet-bag negro domi- 
nation ; in 1877 secured the union of the 
Agricultural and Mechanical College with 
the university, and procured from the 
United States government the donation of 
the grounds and buildings of the historic 
military post at Baton Rouge. He was a 
pioneer of public education in the South, 
especially of industrial and technical educa- 



1^4 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



tion. At intervals, he was president of the 
Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege (1883-84) ; Kentucky Military Institute 
(1888-93); professor in the Ohio Military 
Academy (1893-94), and in the Michigan 
Military Acadeiny (1894-96). In 1885-86 
he was Louisiana commissioner of the New 
Orleans Exposition. The alumni of the 
Louisiana State University erected a memo- 
rial hall to his memory. He died Alay 27, 
1899, at liaton Rouge, Louisiana. 

Hatcher, William Eldridge, born in Bed- 
ford county, \irginia. July 25, 1834, son 
of Henry Hatcher and Mary Latham, his 
wife. His early life was spent in the 
mountains of \'irginia, where he acquired 
a taste for substantial reading. He 
taught school from seventeen to twenty, 
then went from Bedford county to Rich- 
mond College, graduating in 1858 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts ; in 1873 Rich- 
mond College conferred on him the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity ; in 1898 he received 
from Denison University, Ohio, the degree 
of Doctor of Laws. Leaving Richmond 
College in 1858, he entered upon the active 
ministry, taking the following pastorates 
in the order and for the periods indicated: 
Bainbridge Street Baptist Church, Manches- 
ter, eight 3'ears ; Franklin Square Baptist 
Church, Baltimore, nearly two years ; First 
Baptist Church, Petersburg, six and one- 
half years; Grace Street Baptist Church. 
Richmond, twenty-six years. Two houses of 
worship were built and paid for under the 
leadership of Dr. Hatcher. He resigned his 
pastorate to conduct a campaign for the en- 
dowment of Richmond College, and his term 
of service in this work ended in April. T906. 
He has delivered manv lectures, addresses 



and special sermons, and has contributed 
continuously to the public press as editor 
and correspondent of various denomina- 
tional papers. Within the few years prior to 
1906, under his wise and inspiring leader- 
ship. Fork Union Academy was founded. 
Dr. Hatcher served as president of the board 
ot trustees of Richmond College, member 
of the board of trustees of the Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary, president of 
the Virginia Baptist orphanage trustees, 
and president of the education board of the 
I'aptist General Association of \^irgiiiia. 
Among some of his published articles are: 
"Biography of Dr. J. B. Jeter," acknowl- 
edged leader of \irginia Baptists ; and a 
\\ork on John Jasper, the most extraordi- 
nary orator of the negro race. Dr. Hatcher 
married, December 22, 1864, Virginia O. 
Sncad. nf Fluvanna coimty, Virginia. 

Blair, Lewis Harvie, born at Richmond. 
Virginia, June 21, 1834, son of John G. 
Blair, and Sarah Ann Eyre Heron, his wife ; 
and a grandson of Rev. John D. Blair (Par- 
son Blair) and his wife, Mary (Winston) 
Blair, a lineal descendant of Isaac Winston, 
a native of Yorkshire, England, who emi- 
grated to America in 1704 and settled near 
Richmond, Virginia. The Blairs also have 
been resident in Richmond for more than a 
hundred years, and both families have dis- 
tinguished themselves in numerous afTairs 
that have tended to the betterment of the 
country during the colonial and revolution- 
ary periods, and down to the present time. 
The education of Lewis Harvie Blair was 
interrupted at the age of seventeen years 
by the death of his father, at which time he 
entered the service of the United States gov- 
ernment. Four years later we find him in a 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



185 



mercantile office for a time, then in the light 
house service of the United States on the 
Great Lakes. When he left this branch of 
public service it was to establish himself in 
business, a fact that he had scarcely accom- 
plished when the outbreak of the civil war 
interrupted his plans, and, fired by loyalty 
to the South, he enlisted in the Confederate 
army and served from 1862 to 1865. Re- 
turning to Richmond after the war, Mr. 
Blair again became identified with business 
interests, and his progressive, yet to a cer- 
tain extent conservative, methods, have been 
the means of building up the business im- 
portance of the city. For many years he 
devoted his entire business time to the gro- 
cery trade, but subsequently associated him- 
self with the late Stephen Putney, in the 
manufacture and sale of shoes, the head- 
quarters of this industr)' being located in 
Richmond, with affiliations in various other 
places. Mr. Blair has earned considerable 
reputation as an author. His first book, 
published by the Putnams in 1888, was 
"Unwise Laws," and contained the expres- 
sion of his opinions on many questions of 
national import. To quote from a more 
recent expression of them: "I believe in the 
civil equality of every man, regardless of 
race or previous condition, and that every 
man should have a voice in the government 
under which he lives, and which, when call- 
ed upon he must defend at the hazard of his 
life. I believe that laws should bear equally 
upon all. and that there should be no favori- 
tism or discrimination against the negro be- 
cause he is a negro. I condemn protection 
in every guise, even incidental protection, 
because incidental protection gives away 
the whole question of protection ; for it is 
a far cry from part protection, which is in- 



cidental protection, to protection in full." 
In his second book, "The Prosperity of the 
South Dependent upon the Elevation of the 
Negro," Mr. Blair utters views that in all 
probability will never achieve popularity 
south of the Potomac. He has also very 
decided opinions in religious matters, opin- 
ions which differ radically from those of the 
majority of his friends and neighbors, but 
he has the courage of his convictions, and 
founds his creed upon the "school of Adam 
Smith, Herbert Spencer and Haeckel." Mr. 
Blair married (first ) Alice Wayles Harri- 
son, of Amelia county, Virginia, (second) 
Mattie Rufifin Feild, of Mecklenburg county, 
Virginia. There were seven children by the 
first marriage, four by the second. 

Mcllwaine, Richard, horn at Petersburg, 
Virginia, May 20, 1834, of Scotch-Irish de- 
scent. He was graduated from Hampden- 
Sidney College in 1853, and was afterward 
a student at the University of Virginia, 
Union Theological Seminary and the Free 
Church College, Edinburgh, Scotland. He 
was a licentiate of the East Hanover (Vir- 
ginia) presbytery in 1857, and until 1872 
pastor at Farmville and Lynchburg. In 
1872 he was elected secretary and treasurer 
of the home and foreign missions commit- 
tee of the Southern Presbyterian church, 
and in 1882-83 was secretary of home mis- 
sions, which position he resigned to enter 
upon the presidency of Hampden-Sidney 
College. He increased the student body from 
seventy-four to one hundred and fifty-four 
in 1891-92; the endowment was also largely 
increased, and a memorial building erected. 
In 1874 he received from the Southwestern 
Presbyterian University the degree of Doc- 
tor of Divinity. In 1902 he was a member 



i86 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



of the state convention called to revise the 
constitution, and was chairman of the com- 
mittee on schools. He resigned the presi- 
dency of the college not long after and re- 
tired to private life. 

Scott, Robert Taylor, who at the time of 
his death was the attorney-general of \'ir- 
ginia, was born in Fauquier county, Vir- 
ginia, in 1834. son of Robert Eden and Eliz- 
abeth (Taylor) Scott, his father a distin- 
guished lawyer, and grandson of Judge John 
Scott, well known in the history of the state 
of Virginia, and of Robert L. Taylor, an emi- 
nent lawyer of Alexandria, Virginia. Rob- 
ert Taylor Scott was educated in the public 
schools of Warrenton and Alexandria, in 
the private school of his father's house, and 
the University of Virginia, which he enter- 
ed in 185 1, and where he remained until 
1854. He then settled in his native county, 
and became a successful lawyer ; upon the 
outbreak of the civil war he joined the Con- 
federate army, and organized a company of 
infantry; served as a captain in the famous 
brigade of Gen. Eppa Hunton. then was 
on the staff of Gen. Pickett : after the war 
was a delegate to the constitutional conven- 
tion of 1867; was a member of the legisla- 
ture of 1881 ; was nominated and elected 
attorney-general in 1888. reelected in 1893. 
During his incumbency the state had much 
trouble with the bondholders, and Mr. Scott 
was sent to jail by the Federal court for his 
fearless enforcement of the state laws called 
"Coupon Killers," designed to bring about 
a compromise of the state debt fastened 
upon the commonwealth by the "scalla- 
wags" and "carpet-baggers" just after the 
war. He was a member of the Episcopal 
church, and often represented that church in 



its diocesan councils. In 1858 he married 
Frances Carter, eldest daughter of Richard 
H. Carter, Esij., of Fauquier. He died Au- 
gust 5, 1897. 

Fontaine, William Morris, born in Louisa 
ccamty, Mrginia, December i, 1835, son of 
James Fontaine and Juliet Morris, his wife, 
and a descendant of the Rev. James Fon- 
taine, a Huguenot refugee after the revoca- 
tion of the Edict of Nantes, whose son, the 
Rev. Peter Fontaine, came from England to 
the \'irginian colony in 1715, and made his 
home in King William county. William 
Morris Fontaine was reared in the country, 
and his education was conducted under pri- 
vate tuition until he entered Hanover Acad- 
emy in 1834. where he was under the per- 
sonal instruction of Prof. Lewis Coleman, 
subsequently professor of Latin at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia. In this institution he 
was prepared for entrance to the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, at which he matriculated in 
1856, and from which he graduated in the 
class of 1859 with the degree of Master of 
Arts. The following year he entered upon 
tne duties of teaching at Hanover Academy, 
and remained there with Major Hilary P. 
Jones until the outbreak of the civil war, 
when he entered the Confederate army. Un- 
til 1862 he served as second lieutenant of 
artillery ; during the next two years was 
second lieutenant of ordnance with Jones' 
battery of artillery ; and from that time until 
the close of the war was first lieutenant of 
ordnance with Anderson's division at 
Petersburg, his service in the army ending 
at Appomattox, April g, 1865. The observa- 
tions he had made during the course of his 
military service determined him to follow 
scientific lines, and in pursuance of this idea 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



187 



he went to Europe, and there studied min- in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and in 1852 en- 
eralogy and geology at the Royal School of tered William and Mary College, Williams- 
Mines at Freiberg, Saxony, remaining there burg. He had no intention of preparing for 
1869-70. He was elected professor of chem- a profession, but hearing such orators as 
istry and geology at the University of West ex-President Tyler and Henry A. Wise gave 
Virginia in 1873, and was the incumbent of ^^'"'' ^ "«^w inspiration, and at a following 
this office until 1878. He was elected to the session he took up the law course, and in 
chair of natural history and geology at the ^^55 was graduated with the Bachelor of 
University of Virginia in 1879, and is still '-^^^ degree. Not having attained his ma- 
its capable incumbent. He is an author of i^^^Y- ^e could not be admitted to the bar, 
note in the scientific world, among his pub- ^"^ ^^'^ father purchased for him a half 
lications being: "Resources of West Vir- '"terest in the "Southern Argus," and he 
ginia," 1876, in which he collaborated with ^^'^^ occupied with its editorial control until 
M. F. Maury ; "Report PP. Second Pennsyl- ^^^^- ^^ '''^'^ previously joined the Woodis 
vania Geologic Survey," 1880, in collabora- ^'^es, which, with him as captain, went to 
tion with I. C. White; "Monograph VL, ^^arper's Ferry, at the time of the John 
Ignited States Geologic Survey," 1883; ^'°^'" '■^''^' '" ^^59- He now (in April, 
"Monograph XV, United States Geologic '^^^' became a captain in the Sixth Vir- 
Survey," 1889; "Bulletin of the Potomac ^'"'^ Regiment, and in October was made 
Formation, United States Geologic Sur- ™^J°'' °" ^^^ ^taff of Gen. Joseph R. An- 
vey;" various papers on geologic subjects ^lerson, and ordered to Wilmington, North 
and on fossil botany, which were published Carolina, where he subsequently was placed 
in the "American Journal of Science;" in ",' command of Fort St. Philip, on Cape 
the "Proceedings of the United States Na- ^'^^^ "^^'■- ^^ i^^Y 4. 1862, he was in com- 
tional Museum;" and in the "Annual Re- "^^"^ °^ ^°^^ Fisher, and its connecting 
ports of the Director of the United States fortifications. Promoted to colonel of ar- 
Geologic Survey." In political opinion he ^'"^'■>'' ^^ continued in command and kept 



has always been a Democrat, and he is a 
member of the Protestant Episcopal church. 
He is a fellow of the Geological Society of 
America, and a member of the Huguenot 
Society of America. 

Lamb, William, born in Norfolk, Virginia, 
September 7, 1835, son of William Wilson 
Lamb and Margaret Kerr, his wife. After 



up a gallant defense until its capture, in 
1865. Col. Lamb then returned to Norfolk, 
and engaged in various stirring enterprises, 
representing various coasting and trans- 
atlantic steamship lines and connected with 
the Norfolk & W'estern railroad, and doing 
much of the development of the cotton and 
coal trade of the city. He served for three 
terms as mayor, and declined a fourth term. 



attending the Norfolk Academy, at the age He was several times president of the board 

Of fourteen he became a student in the of trade and Chamber of Commerce, presi- 

Rappahannock Military Academy. He was dent of the Military Organization, manager 

an ardent student of history and biography, of the Jackson Orphan Asylum, president of 

He prepared for college at the Jones School the Seaman's Friend Society, a member of 



i88 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



the board of visitors of the University of 
\'irginia, rector of the College of William 
and Mary, first president of the Norfolk 
I'ublic Library and serving as such until he 
resigned, and a vestryman of St. Paul's 
Church. As a Democrat, he was a presi- 
dential elector on the Breckinridge and Lane 
ticket in i860, but in 1882 his views as to 
the protection of American manufacturing 
and kindred interests brought him to the 
support of the Republican party. He was 
at one lime chairman of its state committee, 
and took an active part in political cam- 
])aigns. His services to the community have 
been many and valuable. He induced large 
investments of European as well as of Amer- 
ican capital to be made in Virginia, and 
established the direct trade between Nor- 
folk and Europe. He aided largely in the 
establishment of the present public school 
s\stem : took an important part in the up- 
building of William and Alary College after 
the war; and contributed to the larger effi- 
ciency of the University of Virginia. He 
was connected with many of the most im- 
portant societies and fraternities. He was 
a forceful and graceful speaker, and many 
of his addresses have been printed. Is 1899 
St. Lawrence (New York) University con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Laws ; and King Oscar of Sweden made 
him a knight of the Noble Order of Wasa, 
in recognition of his services as American 
consul. He married, in Providence, Rhode 
Island. .Se])tember 7, 1857, Sarah Ann Chaf- 
fee. 

Foote, George Anderson, born in W arrcn 
county. North Carolina, December 16, 1835. 
He received a medical education at the Jef- 
ferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Penn- 



sylvania, from which he graduated with the 
degree of doctor of medicine in 1856. Upon 
the breaking out of the war in 1861, he en- 
tered the service of the Confederate States 
as a surgeon, and served throughout the 
war, participating in the campaign in east- 
ern North Carolina, and receiving the pub- 
lic thanks and commendation of the Con- 
federate officer in command at Plymouth 
for gallant and meritorious service. He was 
on the Confederate ram Albemarle when it 
was blown up by a Federal force under 
Lieutenant W. B. Gushing, on the night of 
C^ctober 27, 1864, in the Roanoke river; and 
took part in the capture of Cushing's party,, 
of whom Gushing and one other alone es- 
caped. He was for 'many years a distin- 
guished practitioner of his profession in his 
native state, and was president of the North 
Carolina Historical Society. He was a fre- 
quent contributor to medical and other 
periodicals ; and published, among other 
papers, articles on "Higher Education" and 
on "Hypodermic Medication." 

Minor, Charles Landon Carter, who was 
one of the distinguished educators of the 
state, was born at Edgewood, Hanover 
county, Virginia, December 3, 1835, son of 
Lucius H. Minor, Esq., and Catherine Fran- 
ces (Berkeley) Minor, and grandson of Gen. 
John Minor, of Fredericksburg, Virginia, 
and his wife, Lucy Landon (Carter) Minor, 
of Cleve, and of Dr. Carter Berkeley, of 
Hanover county, Virginia, and his wife, 
Frances (Page) Berkeley, daughter of Gov. 
Jc hn Page, of Rosewell ; he was educated 
under his father's tuition, attended a private 
school in Lynchburg, and later entered the 
University of \'irginia, graduated therefrom 
in 1858 with the degree of Master of Arts; 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



189 



he then became assistant respectively of Dr. 
William Dinwiddle in Albemarle county, 
the Rev. Dr. Philips at the Diocesan School, 
the N'irginia Female Institute in Staunton. 
Virginia, and with Col. Leroy Broun in Al- 
bemarle county, Virginia : when the civil 
-war began he entered the Confederate army 
as a private, in Mumford's Second Virginia 
Cavalry Regiment, and saw active service 
at Manassas, in the Valley campaign under 
Stonewall Jackson, and in the battles around 
Eichmond; in 1862, by competitive exami- 
nation, he was appointed lieutenant and 
then captain of ordnance, and was assigned 
tf. Gen. Sam Jones, then commanding the 
Department of Southwest Virginia ; he fol- 
lowed Gen. Jones to Charleston, South Caro- 
lina, when he took command of that depart- 
ment in June, 1864, and some months later 
was assigned to duty as executive officer at 
the Richmond Arsenal under Gen. Gorgas. 
M'here he remained until the close of the 
war ; after the war he opened a private 
school at his old home in Hanover county, 
but soon accepted the presidency of the 
Maryland Agricultural College ; subse- 
quently opened a school in Lynchburg, from 
which he was elected to a chair in the Uni- 
VLTsitv of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee, 
whence he returned to Virginia to accept 
the presidency of the Virginia Agricultural 
and Mechanical College just opened at 
Blacksburg, where he remained for eight 
years ; in 1880 he purchased the Shenandoah 
\ alley Academy at Winchester, Virginia, 
and in 1888 he accepted the charge of St. 
Paul's School, in Baltimore ; he later be- 
came associate principal with his old friend 
and kinsman, L. M. Blackford, at the Epis- 
copal high school, near Alexandria, \'ir- 
ginia ; in Baltimore, where he spent the last 



years of his life, he was most successful as 
a teacher, and he also devoted much time 
to political and historical subjects, writing 
for the press mainly of the times of the civil 
war; he published in pamphlet form '"The 
Real Lincoln," a second and enlarged edi- 
tion of which, in book form, he was about 
to publish at the time of his death ; in 1874 
he received the degree of Doctor of Laws 
from William and Mary College ; he mar- 
ried, in i860, Frances Ansley Cazenove, 
daughter of Lewis Casenove, Esq., of Alex- 
andria, Virginia ; children : Fannie, who be- 
came the wife of the Rev. James F. Plum- 
mer. of Washington, D. C, and Anne Caze- 
nove, who became the wife of the Rev. An- 
drew G. Grinnan, of \\'eston. West Vir- 
ginia; Dr. Minor died at the home of his 
brother-in-law, R. M. Fontaine, Esq., in Al- 
bemarle county, Virginia, July 13, 1903. 

Draper, John Christopher, born at Chris- 
tiansville, Virginia, March 31, 1835. brother 
of Henry Draper. In 1850-52 he took the 
arts course, and in 1855-57 the medical 
course, in New York University, and then 
studied in Europe. He was professor of 
natural sciences, 1858-60, and of analytical 
and practical chemistry, 1858-71, in New 
York University, and in 1859 was professor 
of chemistry in Cooper Union. From 1863 
to 18S5 he was professor of physiology and 
natural history in the College of the City 
of New York; in 1865-85, professor of chem- 
istry in the medical department of New 
York University; and in 1864 was surgeon 
of a regiment in service. In 1873 he re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Laws from 
Trinity College. He wrote "A Text-Book 
on Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene" 
(1866, 6th ed. 1883); "A Practical Labora- 



ipo 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



tory in Medical Chemistry" (1882); •"Med- 
ical Physics" (1885) ; and many articles in 
the "American Journal of Sciences." He 
(lied in New York, December 20, 1885. 

Dabney, Virginius, born in Gloucester 
CDiinty. N'irginia. February 15, 1835. He en- 
tered the University of Virginia in 1852, 
where he studied for several years, being the 
compeer of Bishop Thomas Hugh Dudley, 
Thomas R. Price and other distinguished 
alumni. Upon leaving the university he be- 
gan the practice of the law, but left it to lie- 
cnme a teacher. He was a staff officer during 
the civil war. with the rank of captain, in the 
Confederate army. After the war he estab- 
lished in Xew York City a boys' school, 
where he had great success as a teacher. At 
the time of his death he held a position in the 
New York custom house. He was ever a 
genial companion, and a brilliant raconteur 
in any company. He published the striking 
novel, "The Story of Don Miff, a Symphony 
of Life," a striking picture of the old regime 
in Virginia. Professor Thomas R. Price, 
his lifelong friend, wrote of him as follows : 
"His mind had two special qualities : the one 
was his peculiar gift of imaginative humor, 
revealing itself in strong delightful freaks 
of language, in happy terms of picturesque 
expression, in penetrating glimpses of char- 
acter reading, and delicious bits of story 
telling. The other was the massive origi- 
nality of his philosophical thinking, his 
power to understand things and explain 
things by philosophical analysis. His mind 
was a storehouse of original imagination, 
of shrewd and delightful reasoning and of 
definite philosophical conception. A fallacy 
could not live under the light of his eyes. 
A falsehood or a false pretence flashed into 



sudden deformity under the illumination of 
his humorous exposure." He died June 2, 
1894. and was buried at the University of 
\'irginia. 

Smith, Thomas, born at Culpeper Court 
House, August 25, 1836, son of William 
Smith and Elizabeth Hansborough Bell, his 
wife. His father was twice governor of 
\'irginia — first in 1845, and again in 1864. 
.•\t the beginning of the war between the 
states, he was commissioned colonel of Vir- 
ginia volunteers, and organized the Forty- 
ninth \'irginia Regiment, transferred later 
to the Army of the Confederacy, and was 
ai>pointed by the President of the Confed- 
eiate States to the positions of brigadier- 
general and major-general, without appli- 
cation for such promotion. Thomas Smith 
acquired an academic education in W'arren- 
tt'n. \'irginia, and in Washington, D. C, 
arid afterward became a student in William 
and Mary College, from which he was grad- 
uated. He prepared for the bar in the law 
department of the University of \^irginia, 
where he spent the years of 1856-57 and 
I '^57-5^- Successfully passing the examina- 
tion which entitled him to practice in the 
courts of \^irginia, he removed to Charles- 
tcm, Kanawha county, then a part of Vir- 
ginia, where he remained until the outbreak 
of the civil war. He enlisted as a private 
in the Kanawha Riflemen ; soon became ad- 
jutant-general of the Virginia forces in the 
Kanawha \'alley, and was subsequently 
made major of the Thirty-sixth Virginia 
Regiment, with which rank he was serving 
when Floyd's command was sent to Fort 
Donelson. At the head of his regiment he 
took a battery, and armed his men with cap- 
tured F.nfield rifles, .\ftcr the surrender of 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



191 



Fort Donelson, he recruited his regiment in 
southwestern \'irginia. ahnost to its full 
complement. Upon its reorganization, he 
was tendered the position of colonel by the 
ofificers of his regiment, but declined, pre- 
ferring that the old officers should retain 
their places, and being willing to again 
serve as major. Subsequently, however, he 
became colonel, and was also commissioned 
brigadier-general, but never served as such, 
the commission failing to reach him because 
of military movements. He was wounded, 
it was thought fatally, at the battle of 
Cloyd's Farm. Recovering from his injury, 
he rejoined his command in the Valley of 
Virginia, and participated in all of the en- 
gagements in that entire campaign. After 
the surrender of Gen. Lee, he refused to 
accept the parole until August. 1865. when 
he realized that all effort to continue the 
struggle had been abandoned. Following 
the war, Mr. Smith began the practice of 
law in Warrenton, Virginia, being unwilling 
to restime in Charleston because of the re- 
quirements of the court there as to the oath 
cf allegiance to the Federal government, and 
because he had been indicted for treason. 
He practiced at Warrenton, with the excep- 
tion of a brief interval, until 1884, and for 
six years of that time served as county 
judge. He was also a member of the state 
legislature for one term, and was chosen for 
a second term. However, he became an 
elector for Cleveland and Hendricks, and 
was appointed by President Cleveland to 
the position of United States attorney for 
New Mexico, for a term of four years. On 
the expiration of his term of service he re- 
turned to Virginia, and became connected 
with the settlement of the Virginia debt, 
and was largely instrumental not only in 



jireventing its repudiation, but also in secur- 
i!ig its adjustment on terms creditable to 
the commonwealth. He was appointed 
chief justice of the territory of New Mexico, 
at the beginning of Cleveland's second ad- 
ministration, without solicitation, and served 
out a term of four years. He then returned 
tu Virginia, but did not resume the prac- 
tice of law, and lived quietly at his home in 
Warrenton. He married Elizabeth Fairfax, 
daughter of Judge \\'illiam H. Gaines, of 
Warrenton. 

Rouss, Charles B., born in Frederick 
county. Alary land, February 11, 1836. son of 
Peter Hoke and Belinda (Baltzell) Rouss, 
and a descendant of Austrian ancestry, vari- 
ous members being prominent in the public 
affairs of the Empire, notable among whom 
was George Rouss, a member of the com- 
mon council of Kronstadt, in 1500. Peter 
Hoke Rouss in 1841 removed from Mary- 
land to Berkeley county, \^irginia, where 
he purchased in the Shenandoah Valley, 
twelve miles from Winchester, an estate to 
which he gave the name of Runnymede. 
Charles B. Rouss supplemented his public 
school education by attendance at the Win- 
chester Academy, where he was a student 
from the age of ten until fifteen, when he 
took a position as clerk in a store. Three 
years later he engaged in business on his 
own account, having accumulated sufficient 
capital from his earnings, and after another 
three years was proprietor of the most ex- 
tensive store in that section of the county. 
Upon his return from the war between the 
states, in which he served as a private in the 
Twelfth Virginia Regiment, he engaged in a 
mercantile business in New York City, but 
fniled, the result of the then general credit 



192 



VIRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



system. Later he opened another estaljlish- 
ment. but upon the basis of a strictly cash 
s\stem. This proved a successful under- 
taking, and in due course of time he erected 
a building which cost a million dollars, on 
Broadway, Xew York City, and there con- 
tniued until his death, March 3, 1902. Al- 
tliough a resident of New York City for 
many years, he was loyal to the South Land, 
passing his vacations at Winchester, Vir- 
ginia, and was each year an honored par- 
ticipant in the Agricultural Fair, on "Rouss 
Day." so named in his honor for his gener- 
ous benefactions to that and other local in- 
stitutions. He also contributed generously 
t.) other worthy objects, namely, the sum 
of $30,000 for the establishment of the city 
v.'ater works, $10,000 for the improvement 
and adornment of the grounds of the Mount 
tiebron Cemetery Association, the magnifi- 
cent Rouss Physical Laboratory which he 
provided for the University of Virginia, and 
the splendid Confederate Memorial Hall at 
Richmond, Virginia, with its priceless col- 
lection of records and relics illustrating the 
period of the war between the states. He 
also erected at IVIount Hope Cemetery, near 
New York City, a monument to the dead of 
the Confederate Veteran Camp of New 
York City, and he also presented to New 
York City a masterly replica of Bartholdi's 
statutes of Washington and Lafayette, the 
originals of which are in a ])ark in Paris, 
France. Mr. Rouss married, in 1859, ^lag- 
gie, daughter of James Keenan. of Winches- 
ter, Virginia. 

Brock, Charles William Penn, M. D., born 
in the \alley of Virginia, June i, 1836, son 
of Ansalem Brock, a farmer and teacher, 

and F.lizabeth Beverlev Buckner. his wife. 



The .American ancestor was Joseph Brock, 
"(lentlcman." born in England, who settled 
in Spottsylvania county before 1738, receiv- 
ing from the secretary's office at \\'illiams- 
burg a grant of land. Joseph Brock, one of 
his descendants, was a colonel in the war of 
1812. Colonel Mordecai Buckner, of the 
Sixth Virginia Regiment, of the Continental 
army, was an ancestor in the maternal line. 
Dr. Brock spent his early years partly in 
the city and partly in the country, where 
he could follow his natural inclination for 
outdoor sports. His classical education was 
obtained in private schools, from whence he 
\\ cut to the University of \'irginia in order 
to pursue it in the higher branches. In this 
institution he also commenced his profes- 
sional studies, completing them at the Med- 
ical College of Virginia, from which he was 
graduated in the class of 1839. At the time 
ol' the outbreak of the civil war. Dr. Brock 
enlisted as a private in the Confederate 
army, later becoming a surgeon, and subse- 
quently chief surgeon on the staff of Major- 
General James L. Kemper. Since 1865 he 
has been surgeon of the police department 
of Richmond City; since 1882, chief sur- 
geon of the Chesapeake &: Ohio railroad : 
and he served as president of the National 
Association of Railway Surgeons in 1892 
93. Dr. Brock married, October i, 1863, 
Elizabeth Tyler, daughter of John H. Tyler, 
of Richmond, and has fnur children. 

Dudley, Thomas Underwood, Ixirn in Rich- 
incind. \irginia, September 2(1, 1837, son of 
Thiinias L'nderwood Dudley and Maria 
I'riend Dudley, his wife. His education was 
begun in private schools, and he afterwards 
attended Hanover Academy. He then en- 
tered the Universitv of \'irtrinia, in October. 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



193 



1S55, and was graduated with the degree of whom has been conferred the high Alasonic 



Master of Arts, in the class of 1858. He 
taught for one year in the Dinwiddie school, 
Albemarle county, Virginia, and one year in 
Powell's Female School in Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. The following session he was ap- 
pointed assistant professor of Latin in the 
l/niversity of Virginia. Then came the 
great civil war, and in 1861 he enlisted as a 
private in the army of Northern Virginia, 
but was soon afterwards promoted to the 
rank of captain and later to major. He re- 
mained in service until the close of the war, 
and then became a law student in Middle- 
burg, Virginia, with John Randolph Tucker, 
as his preceptor. For six months he contin- 
ued his reading, but abandoned the law for 
the ministry; and in January, 1866, entered 



honor of the thirty-third degree of the Scot- 
tish rite. He was married three times — 
(first) Miss Fannie Berkeley Cochran, of 
Loudoun county, Virginia, by whom he had 
four children; (second) Miss Virginia 
Fisher Rowland, of Norfolk, Virginia, by 
whom he had three children, and (third) 
Miss Mary Elizabeth Aldrich, of New York 
City, by whom he had two children. 

Walke, Henry, naval officer, was born in 
Princess Anne county, Virginia, December 
^4, 1808 ; son of Anthony Walke, and a de- 
scendant of Thomas Walke, who emigrated 
from England in the seventeenth century. 
His parents removed to Chillicothe, Ohio, in 
181 1, and his father served in the Ohio 



the Protestant Episcopal Theological Semi- house of representatives, 1827-31, and in the 
nary of Virginia, at Alexandria. Ordained to senate, 1831-35. On February i, 1827, 
the ministry, he served for one year as rector Henry was appointed midshipman on the 
of the Episcopal church at Harrisonburg, .-llcrt and in July, 1833, was advanced to 
Virginia, which was erected by his efforts, jiassed midshipman. He was commissioned 
and in January, 1869, was appointed rector lieutenant in February, 1839; was with the 
o! Christ Church, Baltimore, Maryland, Inited States fleet in the war with Mexico, 
where he officiated until January, 1875. ^^ '"^^ Vera Cruz, Tabasco, Tuspan and Alva- 
was then made assistant bishop of Ken- rndo. He was promoted commander in 
tucky, and upon the death of Bishop Smith, 1855 ^"d commanded the store-ship Supply, 
ten years later, succeeded as bishop of that 1858-61. Being stationed in Pensacola har- 
diocese. He is widely known through his bor, after Lieut. Slemmer and his troops 
published volumes of lectures and sermons, had evacuated Fort Barrancas and taken 
One of the great works that he has accom- refuge in Fort Pickens, he took the officers' 
j)lished has been in promoting the welfare families on board the Supply, and with the 
of the LTniversity of the South at Sewanee, paroled prisoners, transported them to New 
Tennessee. Bishop Dudley was president \'ork, although he had been ordered to Vera 
of the Virginia University Alumni Associa- Cruz. He was court-martialed for disobey- 
tion of Louisville, a member of the Coun- ing orders and was reprimanded by the sec- 
try Club of New York, the Delta Kappa retary of the navy, but the country ap- 
Epsilon Club of New York, the Pendennis plauded his patriotism in rescuing one hun- 
Club of Louisville, and was a Mason, having dred and six sick soldiers and noncombatants 
■attained the knight templar degree, and upon i)cnned up in Fort Pickens. On September 
vi:?-i3 



194 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



12. 1861, he was ordered to relieve John 
Rodgers, in command of the little flotilla on 
the Mississippi river, and with a detail of 
officers he reconnoitered down the Missis- 
sippi to Columbus. In November he con- 
veyed Gen. Grant's transports to Belmont, 
and led in the attack on that place, pre- 
vented the landing of a Confederate force, 
and protected Grant's army as it re-em- 
barked on the transports. Commander 
Walke was transferred to the Carondclct 
and on February 6, 1862, took part in the 
assault upon Fort Henry under Flag-Officer 
Foote, and during the interval after the 
surrender of the fort and before the arrival 
of Grant, he was in command of the fort. 
Under orders from Grant, Walke proceeded 
to Fort Donelson and engaged the enemy 
on February 13, 1862. Foote arrived in the 
evening and on the afternoon of February 14, 
the entire fleet renewed the attack, the Car- 
ondclct suffering severely. After undergoing 
some repairs, the Carondclct joined Foote's 
fleet above Island No. 10 and on March 30, 
1862, Walke volunteered to run the gauntlet 
of the forts and support Pope at New Madrid. 
This he accomplished on the night of April 4, 
1862. and on April 7, silenced the batteries at 
Watson's Landing and covered the landing of 
Pope's army and the capture of the Island. 
When, on May 10, 1862, eight Confederate 
rams, steamed up the river at full speed to 
attack mortar boat No. 16 and her consort 
the Cincinnati, the CarondcU't was practically 
the only boat ready for an encounter. She 
attacked the boats and drove them all under 
the protection of Fort Pillow before the 
other Union boats arrived. Vurt Pillow was 
abandoned, June 4. and on June 6, Walke, 
with the Carondclct, engaged in the battle ot 
Memphis. I^'arragut moved up to \ icks- 



burg, passed the fleets and was joined by 
Capt. Davis, who had succeeded Foote. In 
making a reconnoisance of the Yazoo river, 
Walke, meeting with the ram Arkansas, 
retreated and was pursued until, with his 
steering gear disabled, he ran close into the 
bank, and the ram in passing discharged 
repeated broadsides into the Carondclct, and 
kept on her way to Vicksburg. He was pro- 
moted captain, July 16, 1862, was given 
command of the gun-boats patrolling the 
river below Helena, and in December made 
an excursion up the Yazoo. He led the sec- 
ond division of Porter's fleet at Grand Gulf, 
April 29, 1863, and remained in the Missis- 
sippi squadron until September 24, 1863, 
when he was assigned to the Sacramento 
and sent in search of the Alabama. \\ hen 
he arrived at Lisbon he learned of her de- 
struction by the Kcarsargc, but he blockaded 
the Rappahnnnock at Calais for fifteen 
months, and after her escape, pursued her 
to Liverpool, where he held her until the 
end of the war. He was promoted commo- 
dore, July 25. 1866; rear-admiral, July 13. 
1 870, and was retired at his own request. 
April 26, 1871. He is the author of: "Naval 
Scenes and Reminiscences of the Civil \\ ar" 
(1S77). He died in Brooklyn. New York, 
March 8, 1896. 

Brice, Benjamin W., was born in \'ir- 
ginia, 1809. He was graduated from West 
Point in 1829, and served on frontier duty 
at Jefiferson barracks. Missouri, in 1829-30, 
at Fort Armstrong. Illinois. 1830-31. and on 
the expedition against the Sac Indians in 
i8y. He resigned February 13, 1832, and 
from 1S35 to 1S39 was brigade major of the 
( ihio militia. In 1845 he was counsellor-at- 
l.-.w and associate judge of common pleas. 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



195 



Licking county, Ohio. In 1846 he was ad- 
jutant-general of the state of Ohio, and on 
March 3, 1847, he was reappointed in the 
United States army with the rank of major 
and paymaster. He served in the pay de- 
partment at Cincinnati, Ohio, and later in 
the war with Mexico at Camargo, Monterey, 
Sahillo and Brazos Island, Mexico, and at 
Fort Brown, Texas, during 1847, 1848 and 
1849. The army disbanded March 4, 1849, 
and in 1852 he was again reappointed in 
the army with the same rank as before, 
serving in the pay department in New 
Mexico, Louisiana, Florida and Kansas. 
During the civil war he was paymaster at 
various places, and in October, 1864, was 
placed over the pay department at Wash- 
ington, D. C. He was appointed paymaster- 
general with the rank of colonel in Novem- 
ber, 1864, and in December was brevetted 
lieutenant-colonel, colonel and brigadier- 
general. In March, 1865, he was brevetted 
major-general for "faithful, meritorious and 
distinguished services in the pay depart- 
ment" during the war, and in July, 1866, he 
was promoted brigadier-general. He was 
retired from active service by reason of age 
limit, January i, 1872. He died in Wash- 
ington, D. C, December 4, 1892. 

Preston, John Smith, was born at the Salt 
Works, near Abingdon, Virginia, April 20, 
1809; son of Gen. Francis and Sarah (Camp- 
bell) Preston, and great-grandson of Pat 
rick Henry, the orator. He was graduated 
from Hampden-Sidney College, Virginia, 
A. B., 1824; did post-graduate work at the 
University of Virginia. 1825-26, and at- 
tended the Harvard Law School. He was 
married in 1830 to Caroline, a sister of Ger. 
Wade Hampton, of South Carolina. He 



afterward moved to Columbia, South Caro- 
lina, and thence to Louisiana, where he 
V. orked his sugar plantations. He became 
prominent as an orator in the south and de- 
livered many famous addresses, among them 
the one at the laying of the cornerstone of 
tl-.e University of the South, at Sewanee, 
Tennessee, in 1857. He was chairman of 
the South Carolina committee to the Demo- 
cratic convention at Charleston in May, 
i860 ; was a commissioner to Virginia, and 
in February, 1861, advocated the secession 
of Virginia. He was on the stafif of Gen. 
Beauregard in the first battle of Bull Run, 
1S61, was promoted brigadier-general and 
served in the conscript department, 1865. 
He was then in Europe for a number of 
years and subsequently returned to South 
Carolina. He delivered his last public ad- 
dress at the unveiling of the Confederate 
monument at Columbia, South Carolina. He 
made a collection of painting and sculpture, 
and was a helpful friend to Hiram Powers 
and other rising artists. He died in Colum- 
bia, South Carolina, May i, 1881. 

Thompson, Richard Wigginton, cabinet 
officer, was born in Culpeper county, Vir- 
gmia, June 9, 1809. He removed to Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, in 1831, and later to Law- 
rence county, Indiana, where, in 1834, he 
was admitted to the bar. He was a repre- 
sentative in the Indiana legislature, 1834- 
36; state senator, 1836-38, and was presi- 
dential elector for Harrison and Tj-ler in 
1841. He was a Whig representative from 
Indiana in the twenty-seventh and thirtieth 
congresses, 1841-43 and 1847-49; was - de- 
feated as a candidate for presidential elector 
on the Clay and Frelinghuysen ticket in 
1844; declined President Taylor's oiifer of 



196 



\'IKGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



the Austrian mission, as well as President 
Fillmore's offer of the recordership of the 
general land-office, and during the civil war 
was in charge of a recruiting post near 
I'crre Haute, Indiana. He was a presiden- 
tial elector for Lincoln and Johnson in 1865 ; 
was a delegate to the Republican national 
conventions of 1868 and 1876, framing the 
platform of the former, and was judge of 
the fifth Indiana circuit court, 1867-69. In 
1877 he was appointed secretary of the navy 
in President Hayes's cabinet, resigning in 
1881 to become chairman of the American 
committee of the Panama Canal Company. 
He is the author of : "The Papacy and Civil 
Power" (1877) ; "History of the Protective 
Tariff" (1888); "Footprints of the Jesuits" 
(1894), and "Recollections of Sixteen Presi- 
dents from Washington and Lincoln" (2 
vols. 1894). He died in Terre Haute, In- 
Giana, February 9, 1900. 

Ladd, Catherine, born in Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. October 28, 1809, daughter of James 
owd Nancy (Collins) .Stratton, and grand- 
daughter of James and Catherine (Foulk) 
Collins, of Philadelphia ; her education was 
acquired in the schools of her native city ; 
in 1828 she became the wife of G. W. Ladd. 
a painter of portraits and miniatures; she 
established and was principal of a boarding 
school at W'innsborough, Fairfield county, 
South Carolina, for twenty years, covering 
the period between 1841 and 1861, she won 
fame as a writer, beginning her career in 
1828, and in addition to articles on art and 
education, wrote numerous stories and 
poems for the "Floral Wreath" and other 
periodicals, and in 1851. through the press, 
ifged the necessity of procuring white labor 
and of engaging in the manufacture of cot- 



ton in South Carolina ; during the progress 
of the civil war she nursed the sick and 
wounded Confederate soldiers, and she is 
said to have been the designer of the first 
Confederate flag; at the close of the war she 
resumed her work of teaching; in 1880 she 
removed to a farm in Fairfield county, near 
\\"iniisl)orough. South Carolina, where she 
spent the remainder of her days ; her death 
occurred at Buena Vista, Fairfield county, 
Stiuth Cari)lina, January 31, 1899. 

McCabe, John Collins, born in Richmond, 
Virginia, November 12, 1810; his first posi- 
tion after leaving the school-room was in one 
of the banks of Richmond, and subsequently 
he prepared for the priesthood under the in- 
struction of Bishop Meade, was ordained in 
1845, ^"d served as rector of Christ Church, 
Smithfield, \'irginia, from 1845 ^o 1850, and 
of St. John's, in Elizabeth City parish, 
Hampton, Virginia, from 1850 to 1855; he 
made abstracts from the parish registers for 
an "Early History of the Church in Vir- 
ginia" and published in the "Church Regis- 
ter" sketches of many of the parishes. He 
transferred his manuscript to Bishop Meade 
for use in compiling his "Old Churches, 
Ministers and Families of Virginia" (1857) ; 
he served as chairman of the \'irginia state 
yellow fever committee in 1855; in the fol- 
lowing year he removed to Maryland, and 
from 1856 to 1859 was rector of a church in 
Baltimore, and from 1859 to 1861 was rector 
o; a church in Anne Arundel county ; from 
iS6i to 1863 he served as chaplain of a \'ir- 
ginia regiment in the Confederate army, 
and from 1862 to 1865 filled the same office 
in Libby Prison, Richmond ; at the close of 
the war he returned to Maryland, and offi- 
ciated as pastor of St. Matthew's Church, 



PROAHNENT PERSONS 



197 



Bladensburg, from 1865 to 1867; of St. 
Anne's Church, Middletown, Delaware, 
from 1867 to 1872, and of Trinity Church, 
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, from 1872 to 
1875 ; the degree of Doctor of Divinity 
was conferred on him by William and Mary 
College in 1855 ; he was the author of sev- 
eral poems, collected under the title of 
"Scraps" (1835), and he also contributed 
papers on colonial history to different per- 
iodicals ; his death occurred in Chambers- 
burg, Pennsylvania, February 26, 1875. 

Ewell, Benjamin S., born in Washington 
City, June 10, 1810, son of Dr. Thomas 
Ewell and Elizabeth (Stoddert) Ewell, the 
latter a daughter of Benjamin Stoddert, first 
secretary of the United States navy. From 
the preparatory department of Georgetown 
C'ollege, he went to the United States Mili- 
tary Academy, from wihch he was gradu- 
ated in 1832, as lieutenant of artillery He 
v.as instructor in the academy until 1836, 
when he left the army, and became assistant 
engineer on the Central railroad, from Bal- 
timore, completing his work in 1839, when 
he was made professor of natural philosophy 
at Hampden-Sidney College. In 1847 he 
became the first professor of mathematics 
and military science at Washington College. 
In 1848 he was elected president and pro- 
fessor of mathematics at William and Mary 
College, Williamsburg; he declined the 
presidency, but acted as such pro ton until 
Bishop John Johns arrived. After Bishop 
Johns resigned, in 1854, Professor Ewell 
was made permanent president, and served 
until 1857, when the faculty was reorgan- 
ized, he being retained in his professorship 
but was soon recalled to the presidency. 
During his administration (in 1859) the col- 
lege building, library and scientific instru- 



ments were destroyed by an accidental fire. 
In May, 1861, the college suspended. Presi- 
dent Ewell and nearly all the professors 
and students entering the Confederate army. 
Ewell was made colonel of the Thirty-sec- 
ond Virginia Regiment, and later became 
assistant adjutant-general to Gen. Joseph E. 
Johnston, who, in May, 1862, asked that 
Col. Ewell be made his chief-of-staff, with 
the rank of brigadier-general — a request not 
granted, because there was no law permit- 
ting a staff officer to hold such rank. Ewell, 
however, continued to act as chief-of-staff 
to Gen. Johnston to the end of the war, 
being finally commissioned brigadier-gen- 
eral. After the war he went to the assistance 
of William and Mary College, which had 
been burned by Federal troops, and opposed 
the removal of the institution to Richmond, 
and, in 1869 the faculty was again organ- 
ized, with him as president. The cost of 
repairs and operating expenses made a 
heavy drain on the endowment fund and in 
1881 the college suspended. In 1888, Col. 
Ewell favored the scheme of applying to 
the legislature for an appropriation in con- 
nection with a normal department, but when 
the application was granted declined, on ac- 
count of advanced age, any active connec- 
tion with the college, and was elected presi- 
dent emeritus. His loyalty to the college in 
its darkest hours, won for him the admira- 
tion and love of everybody. He received the 
degree of LL. D. from Hobart College, and 
was a fellow of the Royal Historical Society. 
He died June 19, 1894, aged eighty-foizr 
years, having retained almost to the last, 
his brilliant powers of conversation, and 
inexhaustible fund of cheerfulness and wit. 
liis remains were deposited in the college 
burying ground back of the main building. 



iqS 



VIRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



Alexander, Archer, was born near Rich- 
mond, X'irginia, about 181D. He was a slave, 
and in 1831 he was temporarily taken to 
Missouri by his master. Years later he ran 
away and went back to St. Louis, in the 
same state, and where he remained. During 
the reign of terror in that state at the out- 
break of the war he learned that the Con- 
federates had cut the timbers of a certain 
bridge so that it should break down under 
a train carrying a detachment of national 
troops about to pass over it. At the risk of 
his life he conveyed the information to a 
well-known Union man, and the detachment 
was saved. Alexander was suspected as the 
informant and arrested by a Confederate 
committee. He made his escape to and 
secured employment in St. Louis under a 
provost marshal's certificate. Until the 
Emancipation Proclamation assured his per- 
manent freedom he was in constant danger 
from kidnappers. Although almost wholly 
illiterate, he had a shrewd intelligence and 
was a skilled and efficient workman. .'\ 
stone commemorating his capture as a fugi- 
tive slave has been raised on the spot where 
he was taken when making his escape from 
slavery. He served as the model for "the 
freedman'' in the bronze group by Thomas 
Ball, standing in the capitol grounds in 
Washington, and known as "Freedom's 
Memorial." -See "The Story of .\rcher Alex- 
ander" (Boston. 1886). He died in St. Louis, 
Missouri, December 8, 1879. 

Taylor, Alfred, naval officer, was born in 
Fairfax county, \'irginia. May 23. 1810. He 
was warranted midshipman in January. 
1825, made his first cruise, 1826-29, visiting 
the Mediterranean, and on June 4, 1831, was 
advanced to passed midshipman. He was 



conmiissioncd lieutenant, February 3, 1837, 
and served on the Cuiiibcrhind during the 
Mexican war. He was attached to the Miss- 
issippi when that vessel sailed in Perry's ex- 
pedition to Japan, 1853-55, ^"d was pro- 
moted commander, September 14, 1855. In 
1861, while in command of the Saratoga, 
engaged in suppressing the slave-trade on 
the east coast of .\frica. he was ordered 
lioine, promoted captain in the Federal ser- 
vice. July 16, 1862, stationed at the Charles- 
tcwn navy yard, 1862-65, and in 1866 given 
command of the flagship of the Brazilian 
scjuadron. He was promoted commodore, 
September 27, 1866, in 1869 was made light- 
house inspector, and was promoted rear- 
admiral, January 29, 1872. He was retired, 
May 23, 1872, and died in Washington, D. 
C, -April 19, i8gi. 

Syme, John William, was born in Peters- 
burg, Virginia, January 9, 1811; son of the 
Rev. Andrew and Jean Mathewson (Camer- 
on) Syme. He was graduated at Norwich 
L^niversity, \ermont, in 1828, and at the Col- 
lege of William and Mary in 1832 ; studied 
law with his kinsman, Frederick Nash, of 
Hillsboro, North Carolina; was married, 
April ID, 1833, to Mary Cowan Madden, and 
practiced law in Petersburg, Virginia, for 
a few years. He purchased the "Petersburg 
Intelligencer," which under his direction be- 
came the most influential Whig newspaper 
in Virginia. He was a representative in the 
state legislature for several years. In 1856 
he purchased the Raleigh, North Carolina. 
"Register," and conducted it with eminent 
success, making it the principal Whig organ 
of the state. He opjiosed the secession of 
North Carolina, but when it became evident 
that the tide could not be stopped, he gave 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



199 



tlie support of his newspaper to the cause 
ol the Confederacy, and continued its publi- 
cation without profit up to 1S64, when he re- 
turned to Petersburg, hoping to re-estab- 
lish the "Register" with better financial suc- 
cess, but his hopes were destroyed by the 
presence of the Federal army before that 
city, and he did not long survive the down- 
fall of the Confederacy, dying suddenly at 
Petersburg, Virginia, November 26, 1865. 

r'reston, John Thomas Lewis, was born in 
Lexington, Virginia, x-\pril 25. 181 1, son of 
Thomas Lewis and Edmonia (Randolph) 
Preston; grandson of Col. William (1729- 
1783) and Susanna (Smith) Preston, of 
Smithfield, and great-grandson of John 
Preston, the immigrant. His father was a 
major in the war of 1812, lawyer, and mem- 
ber of the Virginia legislature. In 1836 Mr. 
Preston conceived the idea of substituting 
for the company- of soldiers who guarded 
the arsenal, a company of cadets, who, in 
addition to the duties of an armed guard, 
should pursue a course of scientific and mili- 
tary studies. The idea materialized, March, 
1839, in the Military Institute of Virginia, 
of which Preston and Gen. Francis H. 
Smith (q. v.) constituted the entire faculty 
from 1839 to 1842. He was married (first) 
August 2, 1832, to Sara Lyle, daughter of 
William and Phebe (Alexander) Caruthers, 
of Lexington, Virginia, and had five sons 
and three daughters; and (second) August 
4, 1857, to Margaret Junkin Preston, the 
poetess (q. v.), by whom he had two sons. 
In April, 1861, at the call of the state, the 
corps of cadets marched for Richmond under 
tlie command of Maj. T. J. Jackson, of whose 
staff Preston became a member, with the 
I'ank of colonel. In 1862 the institute was 



re-opened as a training school to supply 
skilled and educated ofiicers for the army, 
the cadets being called repeatedly into ac- 
tive service during the war. On May 15, 
1864, at New Market, the corps lost eight 
killed and forty-four wounded out of two 
hundred and fifty, and on June 11, 1864, all 
the institution buildings, save the quarters 
of the superintendent, were burned by order 
o: Gen. David Hunter (q. v.). When the 
institute was re-opened in October, 1865, 
Col. Preston resumed his professorial duties, 
subsequently traveled abroad, accompanied 
by his wife, and after his return continued a 
member of the university faculty until with- 
in a few- months of his death. He was the 
author of a biographical sketch of John 
Howe Peyton in "x^ugusta County, Vir- 
ginia." He died in Lexington, Virginia, July 
15, 1890. 

Lee, Samuel Phillips, born at Sully, Fair- 
fax county, Virginia, February 13, 1812. son 
c\ Francis Lightioot and Jane (Fitzgerald) 
Lee, and grandson of Richard Henry and 
Anne (Gaskins) Pinckard Lee, and of Col. 
John and Jane (Digges) Fitzgerald ; at- 
tended the schools of his native place, and 
on November 22, 1825. was appointed mid- 
sliipman from Virginia, was promoted 
passed midshipman, June 4, 1831, and lieu- 
tenant, February 9, 1837; was given com- 
mand of the coast schooner, J'aiidcrbilt, Au- 
gust 4. 1844, was in command of the coast 
survey schooner. Nautilus, of the coast sur- 
vey brig, Washington, and was present at 
the capture of Tabasco, Mexico; was pro- 
moted commander, September 14, 1855, and 
during the years 1858 to i8fio w-as a member 
of the board of examiners ; on November 
I, i860, he was given command of the sloop- 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



or-\var, I'anJalia. with orders to sail to the 
East Indies, but upon learning of the out- 
break of the war between the states he 
brought his ship back and was assigned to 
blockade duty of Charleston, South Caro- 
lina ; (111 January 20, 1862, he was ordered 
ti' command the sloop-of-war, Oneida, and 
in the expedition against New Orleans he 
commanded the advance division in the at- 
t;.ck on Forts Jackson and St. Philip and by 
driving off two rams succeeded in reliev- 
ing the I'aruiui, and capturing Lieut. Ken- 
non, commander of the Confederate steamer, 
Goi'crnor Moore; commanded the advance 
division below Vicksburg and participated 
in both passages of the Vicksburg batteries, 
the Oneida being second in line on both oc- 
casions ; was promoted captain, July 16, 
1S62: appointed acting rear-admiral, Sep- 
tcml)er 2. 1862. and ordered to command the 
North Atlantic blockading squadron ; he 
originated a system of blockading cruisers 
by which the Confederacy was completely 
isolated and fifty-four blockade running 
steamers were captured ; he was detached, 
October 21. 1864. and ordered to command 
the Mississippi squadron, co-operating with 
the army of Thomas in its operations against 
Hood on the Cumberland and Tennessee 
nvcrs; was detached from the Mississippi 
squadron, August 14, 1865, and promoted 
commodore, July 25, 1866 ; was president of 
the board to examine the volunteer officers 
for admission into the regular navy, 1868- 
6g; president of the court martial held in 
New York City, May 29, i858; member of 
the board of examiners of the Atlantic navy 
yards, and was put in charge of the signal 
service at Washington, D. C, October 13, 
1869; was promoted rear-admiral, April 22, 
1870; was ordered on special duty at the 



navy department at Washington, D. C., 
June 27, 1870, and commander of the North 
Atlantic squadron from August 9, 1870 to 
August 15, 1872, when he was detached; he 
was retired. February 13, 1873: he was the 
author of "The Cruise of the Dolphin."" inib- 
lished in the '"Reports'" of the United States 
navy department (1854) and a report on 
the condition of the Atlantic navy yards 
(1869); he died at Silver Springs, near 
\\ashington. D. C. June 5, 1897. 

Preston, Thomas Lewis, born in Abing- 
dcn, \'irginia, November 20, 1812, was 
(/! the distinguished Preston family from 
which came so many statesmen and ora- 
tors, among them his brilliant brothers, 
Hon. William C. Preston. United States 
senator from South Carolina, and John S. 
Preston. Thomas L. Preston attended the 
University of \'irginia, 1830-33, and in the 
latter year graduated from the law school. 
He made a protracted tour of Europe and the 
Holy Land, and after his return settled 
down to the life of a gentleman planter and 
man of affairs, a large part of his occupation 
being the management of large salt works 
in the counties of Washington and Smythe, 
which were the property of his family. He 
made a heroic effort to conduct the salt 
works successfully, and sacrificed his large 
estate in the endeavor. luU without avail. 
He then removed to Albemarle county, and 
purchased pr(^])erty just north of the I'ni- 
versily of \'iiginia, which was his abode 
during the remainder of his life, and he was 
residing upon it when the civil war began. 
Although beyond the age of military service, 
he entered the Confederate army, in which 
he served with gallantry, and during a por- 
tion of the time was a member of the staff 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



of his near kinsman, Gen. Joseph E. John- 
ston. During the war. he was appointed 
to membership on the university board of 
visitors, and served as rector. In that ca- 
pacity, in company with Professors Minor 
and Maupin. he met the Federal troops on 
the occasion of their entrance into Charlot- 
tesville, in March, 1865, and made a formal 
surrender of the venerable university build- 
ings to Gen. Phil Sheridan, who received 
Col. Preston and his colleagues with urban- 
ity and respect, and afforded to the property 
protection and safety. Col. Preston was 
twice a member of the Virginia legislature, 
and could have attained to more distin- 
guished position had he so desired. He 
preferred, however, to devote himself to his 
large family interests Yet he preserved a 
deep interest in all public aiTairs, and 
wielded a potent influence throughout his 
county and its vicinage. He was of high 
cultivation, of extensive reading in English 
and the classics, a graceful and eloquent 
speaker. He wielded a facile pen, and de- 
voted some years of his later life to the 
preparation and publication of one or more 
volumes relating to the history of southwest 
Virginia. He served many years as vestry- 
man in Christ Church, Charlottesville. He 
lived many years beyond the time allotted to 
mortal man. Col. Preston's first wife was a 
daughter of Gen. Edward Watts, of Roa 
noke, Virginia ; she died very soon after hei 
marriage. Some years later, Col. Preston 
married Anne M. Saunders, a daughter of 
C.-en. Fleming Saunders, of Franklin county, 
Virginia. 

McClelland, Thomas Stanhope, born in 
Lynchburg. Virginia, Alarch 13, 1810, son of 
Thomas Stanhope McClelland, Esq., and 



Margaret Washington Cabell, his wife. 
His father, who was a well-known lawyer, 
was born near Gettysburg, February 4, 1777, 
;ind was educated at Dickinson College, Car- 
lisle, Pennsylvania. His mother was a 
daughter of William Cabell. Esq., of Union 
Hill, Nelson county, he being thus connected 
with the distinguished Cabell family of Vir- 
ginia. His early education was obtained at 
a crossroad school taught by an English- 
man named Young, from which school he 
went to Washington College, Lexington, 
\ irginia, when very young, where he re- 
mained three years and a half, and gradu- 
ated at the age of sixteen. He entered the 
I'niversity of Virginia in 1827, where he 
studied for three sessions. He subsequently 
attended the law school of Judge Baldwin 
iiT Staunton, Virginia, where he studied law, 
but never engaged in the practice of that 
profession. For a time he was engaged in 
the tobacco business, but subsequently re- 
moved to Buckingham county, where he 
lived as a farmer. While at Washington 
College, he was a member of the Graham 
Debating Societ}'. On November 5, 1849, 
he married Maria Louisa Graaf, of Baltimore, 
Maryland, by whom he had two daughters, 
Anna LaMotte, the wife of W. H. Whelan, 
Esq., and Mary Greenway McClelland, the 
well-known author of "Oblivion," and other 
brilliant stories, whose early death in 1895 
removed one of the most promising of the 
modern American writers. 

Minor, John Barbee, who for fifty years 
was a teacher of law in the University of 
Virginia, among his students being many 
who became eminent in professional public 
lite, was born in Louisa county, Virginia, 
June 2, 1813, son of Launcelot and Elizabeth 



VIRGINIA BIOGRArilY 



Minor; in early life, in order to recuperate 
his health, he took a long horseback jour- 
ney through the state of Virginia, acting in 
the capacity of a newspaper agent and col- 
lector, and then went afoot to Ohio, where 
he e,ntered Kenyon College; subsequently 
h.- walked through Ohio and New York, for 
health and recreation, and after reaching 
home, entered the University of Virginia, 
in January, 1831. where he was a student 
for three sessions, graduating in several 
schools, and receiving the r.achelor of Laws 
degree in 1834; he began law practice at 
Buchanan, Botetourt county, Virginia, and 
six years later removed to Charlottesville, 
where he formed a partnership with his 
brother Lucian, who was afterward profes- 
sor of law in William and Mary College; 
he was called to the chair of law in the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, in 1845, and was the 
sole teacher in that department until 185 1 ; 
upon the appointment of James P. Holcombe 
as adjunct professor of constitutional an'^l 
international law, mercantile law and equity, 
I'rofessor Minor's subjects became common 
and statute law, and in these branches he 
became distinguished as an author as well 
as a teacher ; out of his class work grew his 
monumental "Institutes of Common and 
Statute Law;" the first and second volumes 
o! the work were i)ublished in 1875, and 
the fourth volume in 1878, while the third 
volume, which had long been used in i)am- 
phlet form by Professor Minor's pupils, was 
first published in its completeness, in two 
parts, in 1895; Professor Minor began a 
summer course of law lectures, in 1870, and 
his is believed to have been the first sum- 
mer law school in the country ; this became 
widely popular, drawing to the university 
in a single session upwards of a hundred 



students; as a teacher he was regarded with 
peculiar affection, his personal interest in 
his pupils being fervent and sincere, and he 
made it his constant endeavor to develop 
their character as well as to impart instruc- 
tion ; his lectures were characterized by ex- 
traordinary clearness of statement and felic- 
ity of language and illustration, and he was 
peculiarly skillful in his questions to test 
accuracy of knowledge on the part of his 
auditors ; he continued his work to the time 
of his death, July 29. 1895, a period of fifty 
years ; in recognition of his eminent attain- 
ments, he received the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws from Washington and Lee 
University, and from Columbia University ; 
he published, in 1850, "The Virginia Re- 
ports," 1799-1800; and in 1894, an elaborate 
work, "Exposition of the Law of Crimes 
and Punishments." which is in general use 
in the United States; on the fiftieth anni- 
versary of his entrance upon his career as a 
teacher of the law, and shortly before his 
death, was presented to the university by the 
Ir.w alumni, a fine life-size marble bust of 
th.e distinguished man. mounted upon a 
polished pedestal bearing these impressive 
words : "He taught the law and the reason 
thereof ;" he was a communicant of the Pro- 
testant Episcopal church for more than 
four decades, lived an ideal Christian life. 
served as superintendent of a Sunday school 
o! slaves, and for a long period also taught 
a Sunday morning Bible class composed of 
students, whose last meetings were in their 
revered teacher's study, after he was unable 
to walk to the lecture room. 

Cabell, James Lawrence, born in Nelson 
county. \'irginia. August 2Ck 1813. son of 
Dr. George Cabell. Jr.. and great-grandson 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



203 



of Dr. ^^'illiam Cabell, a surgeon in the Eng- 
lish navy, who emigrated to Virginia from 
Warminster, England, abotit 1720, and from 
whom has descended the now very exten- 
sive Cabell family residing in Virginia, Ken- 
tucky and other southern and western 
states ; educated at private schools in Rich- 
mond, and at the University of Virginia, 



honorary degree of Doctor of Laws ; Dr. 
Cabell resigned his professorship in the Uni- 
versity of Virginia in 1889; he died August 
13, 1889. 

Smith, Francis Henney, was born in 
Norfolk. \'irginia, Octol.)er 18. 1812; son 
of Francis Henney and Anne (Marsden) 
graduating from the latter named in 1833, Smith; grandson of James and Mary (Cal- 
v-'ith the degree of Master of Arts, then re- \ crt I Marsden. and great-grandson of Cor- 
mained for a year to study for his profes- r.clius and Mary (Saunders) Calvert, who 
Mon ; then entered the medical department were married in Princess Anne county, Vir- 
o'" the University of Maryland, Baltimore, ginia. July 29. 1719. His father, Francis 
from which he graduated in 1834; pursued Henney Smith, was born in England and 
special professional studies in Baltimore, v.as commission merchant in Norfolk, Vir- 
Philadelphia, Paris, France, until the winter ginia. I'-rancis H. Smith, Jr., was graduated 
session of 1837, when he was called home to from the United States Military Academy 
take the chair of anatomy and surgery in the and assigned to the First Artillery, July i, 
L niversity of Virginia, and for more than 1833 : was commissioned second lieutenant, 
fifty years he continued in distinguished November 30, 1S33 ; was assistant professor 
service to the university, and from 1849 held of geography, history and ethics at the Mili- 
tlie position of professor of comparative tary Academy, 1834-35, and served on ord- 
physiology and surgery: in 1846 was at the nance duty until May I. 1836, when he re- 
head of the university as chairman of the signed his commission. He was married 
faculty ; he was in the service of the Con- June 9, 1835, ^t West Point, New York, to 
federate government during the civil war, Sara, daughter of Dr. Thomas (U. S. A.) 
having charge of the military hospitals ; was and Anna (Truxtun) Henderson, of Dum- 
chairman of the National Sanitary Confer- fries, Virginia. He was professor of mathe- 
e:-ce in Washington City during the yellow matics at Hampden-Sidney College, 1837- 
fever epidemic in Memphis, Tennessee, and 39, and superintendent (with rank of colo- 
again as president of the National Board of iiel and professor of mathematics at Vir- 
Health, an office which he held for several ginia Military Institute, Lexington, Vir- 
ycars in his later life ; was an original mem- ginia, 1839-89). He was president of the 
her of the American Aledical Association, board of visitors at the United States Mili- 
and in 1876 was president of the Medical tary Academy in 1856. In 1861 he was made 
Society of Virginia ; he contributed fre- colonel of a regiment of Virginia volunteers 
quently articles to professional and scien- stationed at Norfolk, and in 1864 with his 
tific journals, and in 1858 published a corps of cadets he aided in the defense of 
volume, "The Testimony of Modern Science Richmond and later opposed Gen. Hunter 
to the Unity of Mankind ;" in 1873. Hamp- before Lynchburg. In 1865 he rebuilt the 
den-Sidney College conferred upon him the military institute and continued as its su- 



204 



\IRGI.\IA BIOdRAPHY 



perinteiulcnt until January I, 1890. He re- 
ceived the degree of A. .M. from Hampden- 
Sidne}- in 1838 and that of LL. 1). from \\\\- 
liam and Mary in 1878 and was the author 
of: "Best Methods of Conducting Common 
Schools" (1849); "College Reform" (1850, 
and several mathematical books. He died 
in Lexington. \'irginia, March 21, 1890. 

Graham, Lawrence Pike, was born in 
Amelia county, \'irginia January 8, 1815; 
a son of Dr. William Graham ; was ap- 
pointed second lieutenant of the Second 
Dragoons in 1837, and subsequently pro- 
moted first lieutenant and captain. In 1842 
he served in the campaign against the Semi- 
noles, and was present at the battle of Loch- 
ahatchee. In the Mexican war he was bre- 
vetted major for gallantry in the engage- 
ments at Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, 
and promoted major June 14, 1858. In Oc- 
tober, 1861, he was made lieutenant-colonel 
ci the Fifth Cavalry in the United States 
army, colonel of the Fourth Cavalry, May 
9. 1864, and brevet brigadier-general for 
meritorious services during the civil war, 
March 13. 1865. Previously, in August, 
i8fii, he was commissioned brigadier-gen- 
eral of volunteers, and in 1862 raised and 
commanded a brigade of cavalry in the 
Army of the Potomac. He afterwards acted 
as president of a general court-marital at 
Si. Louis, and of a board for the examina- 
tion of invalid officers at Annapolis. He 
vvas mustered out of the volunteer services, 
August 24, 1865, and placed on the retired 
list December 15, 1870. 

Dyer, Alexander B., was liorn in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, January 10, 1815, died in 
Washington, D. C, IMay 20, 1874. He was 
graduated at the United States Military 



Academy in 1837. serving in garrison at 
Fortress Monroe, \'irginia, in the Florida 
war of 1837-38, and on ordnance duty at 
various arsenals in 1838-46, was chief of 
ordnance of the army invading Xew Mexic(' 
in 1846-48, during a part of which time he 
was on the staff of Gen. Sterling Price, and 
was engaged at Canada, Taos, where he was 
wounded February 4, 1847, ^"^ Santa Cruz 
de Rosales, Mexico, receiving for his ser- 
vice brevets of first lieutenant and captain. 
He was afterwards in command of the North 
Carolina arsenal. At the beginning of the 
civil war Capt. Dyer was active in promot- 
ing the efficiency of the ordnance depart- 
ment. He invented the Dyer projectile for 
cannon. He was in command of the Spring- 
held armory in 1861-64, and greatly extended 
the manufacture of small arms for the arrry. 
In 1864, PS chief of ordnance, United States 
arnn-. he was placed in charge of the ord- 
nance bureau in Washington, D. C. with the 
rank of brigadier-general, and he retained 
this rank until his death. In March, 1865, 
he was brevetted major-general. United 
States army, for faithful, meritorious aiid 
distinguished services. 

Thomas, George Henry, born in South- 
ampton county, \'irginia, July 31, 1816. He 
p/as a law student when in 1835 he was ap- 
pointed to the United States Military Acad- 
emy, from which he was graduated and 
a])pointed second lieutenant of artillery, 
July I. 1840. Lie served in the Seminole 
war in .''"lorida and was brevetted first lieu- 
tenant for gallantry and good conduct ; on 
garrison and recruiting duty, 1842-45 ; in thf 
Mexican war was brevetted captain for gal- 
lant conduct at Monterey, and major for 
Luena \"ista. In 1849-50 he was engaged 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



205 



in the second Seminole war. He was in- nessee, was promoted to major-general, U. 

strutor in artillery and cavalry at West S. A. His great success was at Nashville. 

Point, 1851-54. He was made captain De- December 14-15, 1864, when he defeated the 

ci'mber 24, 1853, and was on frontier duty. Confederates under Hood, for which he re- 

1854-60 ; wounded in skirmish at Brazos ^^{..gd the thanks of congress, and from the 



river, August 21, i860. He was made lieu- 



general assembly of Tennessee a gold medal. 



tenant-colonel, April, 1861, and colonel. May \ c^ ^u <_ i.- r u 11 

' ^ ' ' " >->^"j ^1, ij. _v After the restoration of peace he commanded 

3 At the outbreak of the war between the 



states he was transferred to the Fifth Cav- 
alry, and operated in the Shenandoah Val- 
ley. On August 17, 1861, he was made 
Lrigadier-general of volunteers, and given 
command of rendezvous camp at Robinson, 
Kentucky. He commanded the Federal 
forces at the battle of Logan's Crossroads, 
Kentucky, January 19-20, 1862; commanded 
a brigade in the advance on Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, and afterwards a brigade in the 
Army of the Ohio, under Buell. He was 
promoted to major-general of volunteer.-. 
<Vpril 25, 1S62, and commanded the right soldier, was born in Martinsburg, Virginia, 
wing of the Army of the Tennessee during September 16. i8i6; son of Col. John and 
the siege of Corinth, Mississippi. He served Elizabeth Pendleton (Hunter) Strother. 
under Buell in North Alabama, Tennessee He studied drawing with Pietro Ancora in 
and Kentucky, and second in command. He 1829, was graduated at JeiTerson College in 
had command of the centre of the Army of 1835; studied art with S. F. B. Morse in 
the Cumberland at the battle of Stone's 1836, in Rome. 1842-44, and in New York, 
river, Tennessee; and commanded the Four- 1845-49. In 1850, over the pseudonym 



various military districts. Fie died in San 
Francisco, California, March 28, 1870, and 
was buried with full military honors at 
Troy, New York. There is a fine equestrian 
5tatue of Gen. Thomas in Washington City. 
At the beginning of the war (1861-65;. 
rhomas wrote to Gov. Letcher assuring 
him of his intention to follow the fortunes 
of his native state, but afterwards changed 
ground, under the influence, it is believed, 
of his northern wife. 

Strother, David Hunter, author, artist and 



teenth Corps at the battle of Chickamauga. 
He checked the Confederate advance on 
Chattanooga, was promoted to brigadier- 
general, U. S. A., and given command of the 



"Porte Crayon." his first article appeared in 
"Harper's Magazine." At the outbreak of 
the war, he was commissioned captain in the 
United States army, and appointed assist- 



departmeiit and Army of the Cumberlan<l, ant adjutant-general on McClellan's stafif. 
October 19, 1863. He commanded thai; He served on Pope's staff in the Virginia 
army in the battles of Missionary Ridge, campaign, and on Banks' staf? in the Red 
Dallas, Pine Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, River campaign. He was colonel of the Third 
Peach Tree Creek, and Atlanta. When Virginia Cavalry ; was chief of staff to his 
Sherman was preparing for his march to the cousin, David Hunter, in the Shenandoah 
sea, Thomas was massing scattered troops, campaign, and was brevetted brigadier-gen- 
with which he fell back toward the Ohio eral of volunteers. After the war he re- 
river, and for the success at Franklin, Ten- sumed his literarj- work ; and his "Personal 



206 



\'IRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



Recollections of the War," written from a 
note-book actually kept while at the front, 
was very popular. He was United States 
consul-general at Mexico, 1879-85. He was 
twice married, first to Anne Doyne Wolfe, 
and secondly to Mary Elliott Hunter. By 
his first marriage he had one daughter, 
Emily, who became the wife of John Bris- 
ben Walker (q. v.), and by his second mar- 
riage, he had two sons. He was the author 
of "The Blackwater Chronicle" (1853), ^^'^ 
"Virginia Illustrated" (1857). Gen. Stro- 
ther died in Charlestown, Jefferson county. 
West Virginia, March 8, 1888. 

Blow, Henry T., was born in Southamp- 
ton county, Virginia, July 15, 1817. At the 
age of thirteen he removed to Missouri, and 
was graduated from the St. Louis Univer- 
sit}-. He engaged in the wholesale drug 
business, and as a lead miner, with financial 
success. He was an active Abolitionist, and 
after serving some years in the state senate 
of Missouri he was appointed, in 1861, by 
President Lincoln minister-resident at Ven- 
ezuela. In 1862 he was elected a repre- 
sentative from Missouri to the thirty-eighth 
congress on the Republican ticket, and was 
re-elected to the thirty-ninth congress. In 
1S69 he was appointed by President Grant, 
United States minister to Brazil, and after 
his return to the United States in 1871 he 
resided in Washington, D. C.; and in 1874 
was appointed by President Grant a mem- 
ber of the commission governing the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. lie died September 11, 

Harris, Thomas Mealey, born in Wood 
county, \'irginia, June 17, 1817; after pre- 
paratory studies, he pursued a course in 
medicine, and practiced his profession at 



Harrisville and (ilenville. X'irginia: was ap- 
pointed colonel of the Tenth W est Virginia 
Infantry ; in May, 1862, was promoted briga- 
dier-general ; March 29, 1865, sent out the 
detachment that engaged the last Confeder- 
ate guns at Appomattox, and was mustered 
out of the service of the government, April 
30, 1866; after the cessation of hostilities he 
devoted his attention to scientific farming, 
in which he was successful ; he was a mem- 
ber of the legislature of West Virginia in 
1867, was adjutant-general of the state in 
1869-70. and was pension agent at Wheel- 
ing in 1871-77; he is the author of medical 
essays and of a tract entitled "Calvinism 
\'indicated." 

Johnson, Waldo Porter, born near Bridge- 
port, Virginia, September 16, 1817, a nephew 
cl Gov. Joseph Johnson ; was educated in the 
schools of his native state, pursued a course 
of study in law, later removed to Missouri 
and was admitted to the bar, practicing his 
profession at Osceola ; he enlisted for ser- 
vice in the Mexican war in 1846, but was dis- 
charged the following year, having been 
elected a representative in the Missouri leg- 
islature ; he served in the capacity of prose- 
cuting attorney for St. Clair county, judge 
of the judicial district, and United States 
senator in the thirty-ninth congress, from 
July 4, 1861, to January 10, 1862, when he 
v.as expelled on account of having joined the 
Confederate army during the recess of con- 
gress; in the special session in July. 1861, 
he offered the resolution for a peace con- 
ference to be held in Louisville, Kentucky; 
he was wounded at Pea Ridge, March 8, 
1862 ; was promoted lieutenant-colonel ; took 
part in the evacuation of Corinth, Missis- 
s;]ipi. May 30. 1862, after which he was 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



207 



detailed to special service until appointed 
by Gov. Reynolds to the Confederate States 
senate, to fill a vacancy ; after the war he 
fled to Hamilton, Canada, but subsequently 
returned to Osceola, Missouri, and was 
president of the convention of October, 1875, 
that adopted a new state constitution ; he 
died in Osceola, Alissouri, August 14, 1885. 

McSherry, Richard, born in Martinsburg, 
Virginia, November 21, 181 7, son of Dr. 
Richard McSherry, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania Medical School, and 
for more than half a century practiced his 
profession in his native state ; Georgetown 
College, D. C, the University of Maryland, 
and the University of Pennsylvania, from 
which he received the degree of M. D. in 
1841, aiYorded Richard McSherry, Jr., the 
means of obtaining a classical and profes- 
sional education; on August 21, 1838. he 
v/as appointed assistant surgeon in the 
medical corps of the United States army, 
served imder Gen. Taylor in the Seminole 
war, and resigned his commission, April 30, 
1840; for a period of thirteen years, from 
1843 to 1856, he was assistant surgeon in 
the United States navy : he began the prac- 
tice of his profession in Baltimore, Alary- 
land, in 1856. and continued until 1883; was 
professor of materia medica in the Univer- 
sity of Maryland from 1862 to 1865, and of 
the principles and practice of medicine there 
from 1865 to 1885, the latter being the year 
o' his death ; was a member of the medico- 
chirurgical faculty of Maryland, vice-presi- 
dent of that body in 1870, and president in 
1883 ; one of the founders and first president 
of the Baltimore Academy of Medicine, and 
president of the Maryland State Board of 
Health; he was a frequent contributor to 



the leading medical journals, and was the 
author of "El Puchero, or a Mixed Tjish 
from Mexico" (1850) ; "Essays" (1869) ; and 
"Health and How to Promote It" (1883); 
he married, m 1842, a daughter of Robert 
Wilson, a prominent lawyer of Baltimore, 
Alaryland ; Dr. McSherry died in Baltimore, 
Maryland, October 7, 1885. 

Stevenson, Carter Littlepage, son of Car- 
ter Littlepage Stevenson and Jane Hern- 
don, his wife, was born near Fredericksburg, 
Virginia, September 21, 1817. He was 
graduated from the United States Military- 
Academy, July I, 1838, and assigned to the 
Fifth Infantry. He served on frontier duty 
and in the Florida war, and was commis- 
sioned first lieutenant. He also served in 
Texas and through the Mexican war, and 
was promoted to captain. After the war he 
was again on frontier service, and in 1861 
resigned from the army. He was at once 
made lieutenant-colonel. C. S. A., and served 
as adjutant to Gen. Long, 1861 ; commis- 
sioned colonel of the Fifty-third Virginia 
Infantry; in 1862 promoted to brigadier- 
general, and later the same year to major- 
general. He commanded a division under 
Gen. Bragg in Tennessee, bore the brunt of 
the battle at Edward's Station, and pro- 
tected the Confederate rear in the retreat 
to Vicksburg. He distinguished himself in 
the Georgia campaign against Sherman, and 
in front of Atlanta succeeded to the com- 
mand of Hood's corps when that oificer suc- 
ceeded Johnston in command of the army, 
and again aided in resisting Sherman during 
the Carolina campaign. He died in Caro- 
line county, Virginia, August 15, 1888. Gen 
Lewis Littlepage (q. v.) was his half-great- 
uncle. 



208 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



Denver, James W., was born in Winches- 
ter, N'irginia, in 1818. He received a public 
school education, emigrated in childhood 
with his parents to Ohio, removed to Mis- 
souri in 1 841, where he studied law and 
was admitted to the bar. He was appointed 
captain of the Twelfth Infantry in March. 
1847, and served in the war with Mexico 
till its close in July, 1848. Removing to 
California in 1850, he was appointed a mem- 
ber of a relief committee to protect emi- 
grants, and was chosen a state senator in 
1852. While a member of this body in 1852. 
he had a controversy with Edward Gilbert, 
ex-member of congress, in regard to some 
legislation, which resulted in a challenge 
from Gilbert, that was accepted by Denver. 
Rifles were the weapons and Gilbert was 
killed by the second shot. In 1853 Mr. Den- 
ver was appointed secretary of state of Cali- 
fornia, and from 1855 to 1857 served in con- 
gress. He was appointed by President 
P.uchanan commissioner of Indian affairs, 
but resigned, and was made governor of 
Kansas. Resigning this post in 1858, he 
was reappointed commissioner of Indian 
aflfairs, which ofifice he held till March, 1859. 
In 1861 he entered the Federal service, was 
made brigadier-general, served in the west- 
ern states, and resigned in March, 1863. 
Afterward he settled in Washington, D. C. to 
practice his profession as an attorney. John 
W. Forney, in his "Anecdotes of Public 
jMen" savs : "Gen. Denver, while in con- 
gress, as chairman of the committee on the 
Pacific railroad, in 1854-55, presented in a 
conclusive manner the facts demonstrating 
the practicability of that great enterprise, 
and the advantages to be derived from it." 

Minor, Benjamin Blake, born at Tappa- 
hannock, Essex county, Virginia, October 



21. 1818. son of Dr. Hubbard Taylor and 
Jane (r)lake) Minor, grandson of Col. 
'I homas and Elizabeth (Taylor) Minor, and 
of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Aldridge) 
Blake, and great-grandson of Thomas and 
Alice (Thomas) Minor; he attended Bristol 
College, Pennsylvania, during the sessions 
of 1833-34, the University of Virginia, 1834- 
2,J, graduating in several of its schools, and 
subsequently entered William and Mary 
College, graduating in moral and political 
science and law in the class of 1839; prac- 
ticed law in Petersburg, Virginia, 1840-41 ; 
in Richmond, 1841-43; owned and edited the 
"Southern Literary Messenger," 1843-47; 
V. as principal of the \'irginia Female Insti- 
tute, Staunton. 1847-48, and founded the 
Home School for Young Ladies, Richmond, 
1848; originated the historical department of 
the Society of Alumni of the University of 
Virginia, in 1845 : the same year was vice- 
president of the commercial convention at 
Memphis; in 1847 was a chief factor in the 
revival of the Historical Society of Virginia 
of which he was made a life member: was 
made a corresponding member of the his- 
torical i^ocieties of New York and Wiscon- 
sin, and secretary of the African Coloniza- 
tion Society of Virginia and of the Virginia 
Bible Society, which antedates the Ameri- 
can Bible Society ; resumed the practice of 
law in Richmond in 1848 and the same year 
was the mover and author of the memorial 
tc the \'irginia legislature that led to the 
erection of the Washington Monument on 
Capitol Square ; was commissioned lieuten- 
ant-colonel of the Nineteenth Virginia mili- 
tia; was a warden, register and diocesan 
delegate of St. James' Church, and one of 
the founders of the Richmond Male Orphan 
Asvlum ; on July 4. i860, he was elected 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



209 



president of the State University of Mis- 
souri, and served until the curators sus- 
pended the work of the university during 
the civil war ; was principal of a female 
seminary in St. Louis, 1865-69; life insur- 
ance state agent and superintendent, also 
public lecturer, 1869-89. and in the latter 
named year rejoined his family in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, and engaged in literary 
work; he edited a complete edition of "Re- 
ports of Chancellor George Wythe, with a 
Memoir of the Author;" a new edition of 
Hening & Munford's "Virginia Reports," 
and contributed to law journals in New 
York City ; he received the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Laws from the State Univer- 
sity of Missouri in 1894, and in 1896 was 
made secretary of the Virginia Society of 
the Sons of the American Revolution ; he 
married, May 26, 1842, Virginia Maury, 
daughter of the Rt. Rev. James Hervey 
Otey. He died in 1904. 

Broadhead, James O., was born in Albe- 
marle county, Virginia, May 19, 1819. He 
was educated at the high school, and when 
sixteen years of age studied one year at the 
University of Virginia. In June, 1837, he 
removed to Missouri, where he studied law 
in the office of Edward Bates for three 
years. In 1841 he began the practice of 
law in Pike county, Missouri, and in 1845 
was elected as a delegate to the constitu- 
tional convention of the state. In 1846 he 
was elected to the state legislature from 
Pike county, and in 1850 to the state senate, 
and served in that capacity four years. In 
1859 he located in St. Louis, and in Febru- 
ary, 1861, he was appointed United States 
district attorney of Missouri, but resigned 
when he found that it interferred with his 
duties as a delegate to the state convention, 

VIR— 14 



"for vindicating the sovereignty of the state, 
and the protection of its institutions." Under 
tlie provisions of resolutions offered by Mr. 
Broadhead, this convention abolished the 
existing state government and established a 
provisional government, which for the first 
three years of the civil war managed its 
affairs, raising and organizing a military 
force in support of the United States gov- 
ernment. He was commissioned lieutenant- 
colonel of the Third Missouri Cavalry, and 
was assigned to duty on the staff of Gen- 
eral Schofield, as provost marshal-general 
of the department of Missouri. In 1876 he 
was appointed by President Grant as coun- 
sel on the part of the government in the 
prosecution of the "whiskey frauds." In 
1S78 he was chosen president of the Amer- 
ican Bar Association, which met at Sara- 
toga, New York. In 1882 he was elected a 
representative to the forty-eighth congress 
as a Democrat, and in 1885 was appointed 
by the government as special agent to make 
preliminary search of the record of the 
French archives in the matter of the French 
spoliation claims, making his report in Oc- 
tc>ber, 1885. He was United States minister 
to Switzerland, 1893-97, and on his return 
he took up the practice of his profession. 
He died in St. Louis, Missouri, August 7, 
1898. 

Hays, William, born in Richmond, \^ir- 
ginia, in 1819; was a student in the United 
States Military .Academy, from which he 
was graduated in 1840; was promoted to the 
rank of first lieutenant in 1847, captain in 
1853, and major in 1863; he served through- 
out the Mexican war with the light artil- 
lery : was wounded at Molino del Rey, and 
brevetted captain and major; was engaged 
in the Seminole Indian wars for one year, 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



1853-54, and from 1856 to i860 was on fron- 
tier duty; during the years 1861-62 he com- 
manded a brigade of horse artillery, being 
attached to the Army of the Potomac and 
was actively engaged in the battles of An- 
tietam and Fredericksburg, and in Novem- 
ber, 1862, was appointed brigadier-general 
of volunteers ; was wounded and taken pris- 
oner at Chancellorsville, May 6, 1863, re- 
joined the army at Gettysburg, and in No- 
vember was appointed provost marshal of 
the southern district of New York ; at the 
expiration of his term in February, 1865, he 
rejoined his regiment at Petersburg, and 
served with the Second Corps, and in com- 
mand of the reserve artillery until the close 
Of the war, when he was brevetted briga- 
dier-general in the regular army, the reward 
of gallant service and meritorious conduct ; 
was mustered out of volunteer service in 
1866 with the rank of major, and served on 
various posts, commanding Fort Independ- 
ence from April 29, 1873, until his death, 
which occurred in Fort Independence, Boston 
harbor. February 7, 1875, aged fifty-six years. 

McCormick, Leander J., born at "Walnut 
Grove." \'irginia, February 8. 1819, son of 
Robert and Mary McChesney (Hall) Mc- 
Cormick; his education was obtained in the 
public schools of Rockbridge county, after 
which he devoted his attention to agricul- 
tural pursuits, assisting his father and 
brothers in the work of the farm and in per- 
fecting and constructing the reaping ma- 
chine invented by his brother Cyrus ; he in- 
herited in marked degree his father's turn of 
mind, and helped to make various improve- 
ments in his brother's reaper, including a 
seat or stand from which a man could divide 
the grain in sheaves suitable for binding, 
an improvement on the divider seat, both in 



the year 1845, ^"d later a seat for the driver, 
who previously had ridden on one of the 
horses, all of which made the machine rnbre 
useful and practical ; in 1847 h^ ^^'^s sent by 
his brother Cyrus to Cincinnati. Ohio, to 
superintend the construction of one hundred 
reaping machines, and in the following year 
removed to Chicago, Illinois, there being 
joined by his brother in 1849, 3^id they es- 
tablished a factory, Leander J. McCormick 
assuming entire charge of the manufactur- 
ing department, continuing until the year 
1879, when the business was incorporated 
as the McCormick Harvesting Machine 
Company, and Leander J. McCormick re- 
tired from active participation in .the busi- 
n^-ss ; in 1871 he presented the University 
of Virginia with a twenty-six-inch refract- 
ing telescope constructed by Alvan Clark 
K Sons, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, at 
the time the largest refracting lens in the 
world, and the observatory building was 
known as the McCormick Observatory ; he 
married, in 1845, Henrietta Maria, daugh- 
ter of John Hamilton, of Rockbridge coun- 
ty, Virginia; she died in Chicago in No- 
vember, 1899; their son, Robert S., was sec- 
retary of legation under United States min- 
ister, Robert T. Lincoln, in London, and he 
married a daughter of Joseph Medill, edi- 
tor of the Chicago "Tribune," and in 1901 
was appointed by President McKinley en- 
voy extraordinary and minister plenipoten- 
tiary of the United States to Austria-Hun- 
gary ; Leander J. McCormick died in Chi- 
coga. Illinois, February 20, 1900. 

Walker, Cornelius, clergyman, was born 
at Richmond. \'irginia, June 12, 1819, son 
of William Woodson and Mary (Bosher) 
A\'alker. He attended the Episcopal high 
school at Fairfax county. \'irginia ; was 




(^•t^'c^ti >^ c^^z-tt>ir 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



giaduated from the Virginia Theological 
Seminary, 1845 ; admitted to the diaconate, 
July 12, 1845 '< advanced to the priesthood. 
September 23, 1846, and was in charge of 
Lexington parish, Amherst, Virginia, 1845- 
47. He was married, December i, 1847, to 
Margaret Jane, daughter of James and Eliz- 
abeth Fisher, of Richmond, Virginia. He 
was assistant at St. Paul's, Richmond, 1847- 
48; rector of Christ Church, Winchester, 
Virginia, 1848-60; of Christ Church, Alexan- 
dria, 1860-61, and of Emmanuel Church, 
Richmond, 1862-66. He was professor of 
church history in the Virginia Theological 
Seminary, 1866-76; professor of systematic 
divinity and homiletics, 1876-98, and dean 
ot the faculty, 1895-98, retiring in 1898. The 
honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity was 
conferred on him by the College of Wil- 
liam and Mary in 1859. He is the author 
of: "Biography of Rev. William Duval, 
City Missionary of Richmond" (1854) ; 
"Life and Correspondence of Rev. William 
Sparrow" (1876) ; "Biography of Rev. 
Charles W. Andrews" (1877); "Sorrowing, 
not without Hope" (1887) ; "Outlines of 
Theology" (1893) ' "Lectures on Christian 
Ethics" (1896); a history of the Virginia 
Theological Seminary, in preparation, 1903, 
and many articles on ecclesiastical subjects. 

Murdaugh, Claudius W., born at Ports- 
mouth, Virginia, December 28, 1828, son of 
James Murdaugh, of Nansemond county. 
Iswyer and legislator, and Mary Reddick, 
his wife, of Gates county. North Carolina. 
He was educated at William and Mary Col- 
lege and the University of Virginia, became 
a lawyer, and engaged in practice in Ports- 
mouth. He served in the legislature from 
1855 till the civil war broke out. In 1861 
he raised a company in Norfolk, of which 
he was made captain, and which became a 



part of the Sixty-first Virginia Regiment. 
He served until the end of the war, taking 
part in all the battles around Richmond, at 
Chancellorsville ; at Salem Church, where ne 
was wounded ; and in others. After the war 
he was commonwealth's attorney, and judge 
of the hustings court, holding the latter 
position six years. He married Eugenia, 
daughter of John Dickson. 

Sands, Alexander Hamilton, was l)orn in 
Williamsburg, Virginia, May 2, 1828, son 
of Thomas Sands, of York county. He 
studied at William and Mary in 1838-42, 
but was not graduated, read law, and in 
1S43 became deput}- clerk of the state su- 
perior court. In 1845-49 he held the same 
office in the United States circuit court. He 
was a judge-advocate in the Confederate 
army during the civil war, and a short time 
before his death entered the Baptist minis- 
try, serving congregations in Ashland and 
Glen .\llcn, Virginia. Besides contribu- 
tions to periodicals, he published "History 
of a Suit in Equity" (Richmond, 1854J ; a 
new edition of Alexander Tate's "American 
Form-Book" (1857) ; "Recreations of a 
Southern Barrister" (Philadelphia, 1860) ; 
"Practical Law Forms" (1872) ; and "Ser- 
mons by a Village Pastor." He compiled 
"Hubbell's Legal Directory of Virginia 
Laws," and was the editor of the "Quarterly 
Law Review" and the "Evening Bulletin" 
(1859), both in Richmond. He died in 
Richmond, Virginia, December 22. 1887. 

Wellford, Beverley Randolph, born in 
Fredericksburg, Virginia, May 10, 1828, son 
of Dr. Beverley Randolph Wellford, profes- 
sor in the Medical College of Virginia, and 
Mary, his wife, daughter of William Alex- 
ander and Sarah Casson, his wife. He at- 
tended the Fredericksburg schools, and then 



\'IRGIX1A BIOGRAPHY 



Frinceton College, where he graduated in 
the centennial class of 1847. He studied law 
ai Fredericksburg, under Hon. John Tayloe 
l.omax, was admitted to the bar in 1849, and 
engaged in practice at Richmond. In 
March, 1870, he was elected judge of the 
seventh judicial circuit of Virginia, and was 
twice re-elected. 

Cooke, Philip St. George, born near Lees- 
burg, X'irginia, June 13, 1809. He acquired 
his academical training at the academy of 
Martiu'^burg, Virginia, then became a cadet 
in the United States Military .Academy, 
from which he was graduated in the class 
of 1827, and was assigned to the Sixth In- 
fantry. For many years he was stationed 
at the frontier, and was adjutant of his regi- 
ment at the battle of Bad Axe river, Au- 
gust 2, 1832, in the Black Hawk war. He 
escorted a party of Santa Fe traders to the 
Arkansas river in 1843, and captured a 
Texan military expedition on June 30, of 
the same year. During the progress of the 
Mexican war he commanded a Missouri 
volunteer battalion in California from 1846 
to 1847, and in 1848 a regiment in the City 
of Mexico, having been promoted to the 
rank of major, February 16, 1847, and brev- 
etted lieutenant-colonel, February 20, for 
his conduct in California. Subsequently he 
Vvas engaged in various Indian expeditions; 
commanding the cavalry in the action at 
Blue Water, September 3. 1855. He com- 
manded in Kansas during the troubles there 
in 1856-57, performing that delicate duty to 
the satisfaction of all concerned ; and was at 
the head of the cavalry in the Utah expedi- 
tion of 1857-58, becoming colonel of the 
Second Dragoons, June 14, 1858. He pre- 
pared a new system of cavalry tactics in 
1859, this being adopted for the service in 



Xo\ ember. 1861, and a revised edition issued 
in 1883. In June, 1861, Gen. Cooke publish- 
ed a letter in which he declared he owed 
allegiance to the general government rather 
than to his native state of Virginia. He was 
promtjted to the rank of brigadier-general, 
Xovemher 12, 1861, and commanded all the 
regular cavalry in the Army of the Potomac, 
during the Peninsular campaign, particu- 
larly in the siege of Yorktown. and the bat- 
tles of Yorktown, Gaines' Mills and Glen- 
dale. He sat on courts-martial in 1862-63, 
commanded the Baton Rouge district until 
1864, and was general superintendent of the 
recruiting service until 1866. He was at the 
head of the department of the Platte in 1866- 
67, head of the department of the Cumber- 
land in 1869-70, and head of the depart- 
ment of the Lakes from 1870 until 1873. He 
was placed on the retired list, October 29, 
1873, having been in active service more 
than forty-five years. He published "Scenes 
and Adventures in the Army," Philadelphia, 
1856; "The Conquest of New Mexico and 
California ; an Historical and Personal Nar- 
rative," 1878. 

Triplett, George W., born in Franklin 
county, Kentucky. February 8, 1809, son of 
Hedgman Triplett, soldier of the revolu- 
tion. In 1827 he married Pamela Head, he 
being fifteen years old. and she fourteen. 
They moved in 1833 to Davis county, Ken- 
tucky. He was public surveyor fourteen 
years ; representative and senator in the 
Kentucky legislature: major in the Confed- 
erate army on the staff of Generals Helm, 
Hanson and \'nn Dorn, and afterwards 
chief quartermaster of Gen. lireckinridge's 
corps. \\ hen Gtn. lireckinridge went into 
the Confederate cabinet, Tri])lett was a 
member of the Confederate congress from 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



213 



Kentucky. After the war he was judge in 
his own county. He died in 1884, and his 
wife in 1890. 

Marye, Morton, son of John Lawrence 
Marye (q. v.), was born at Fredericksburg; 
studied law and practiced his profession 
with success. In 1861 he entered the serv- 
ice of the Confederacy as lieutenant-colonel 
of the Seventeenth Virginia Regiment, 
which was assigned to the brigade of Gen. 
A. P. Hill, and acted as part of the rear 
guard to Johnston's army when it retreated 
from Yorktown to Richmond ; fought in the 
battles around Richmond against McClel- 
If n, and at second Manassas, where he lost 
a leg, and was incapacitated from further 
active service. After the war he returned 
to his profession as a lawyer, and in 1870 
was made clerk of the corporation and cir- 
cuit courts of Alexandria, Virginia. This 
position he held till 1883, when he was elect- 
ed by the general assembly of Virginia first 
auditor of the state, which position he held 
till his death. 

Marye, Simon Bolivar, son of William 
Staige Marye and Mary Rufifner, his wife, 
was born in Virginia, June 7, 1825 ; gradu- 
ated Bachelor of Arts at William and Mary 
College, then studied law and took Bachelor 
of Law ; went to Yucatan in 1848 and served 
as an officer in the revolution there ; return- 
ed in 1849; went to California; elected first 
state's attorney ; removed to Oregon in 
1852, thence to Washington, D. C, thence 
to Memphis, and finally settled in Bolivar 
county, Mississippi. He married Sarah 
Chapman, of Portland, Oregon. 

Marye, John Lawrence, son of James 
Marye, third of that name in Virginia, and 



Mildred, his wife, daughter of Lawrence 
Slaughter, of Culpeper county, Virginia ; 
was a lawyer of Fredericksburg, Virginia. 
He purchased Brompton Heights, which as 
■'Marye's Heights" are historically famous 
through the events of the war between the 
slates. Mr. Marye was a Whig and as a 
m.ember of the convention of 1860-61 op- 
posed secession till Lincoln called for troops, 
when he signed the ordinance. He died in 
1868. 

Borland, Solon, a native of Virginia, re- 
ceived his education in North Carolina, 
where he studied medicine, and then estab- 
lished himself in the practice of his profes- 
sion in Little Rock, Arkansas. He was a 
major in Yell's cavalry during the Mexican 
war, and in January, 1847, was captured 
with Major Gaines. When his troop was 
disbanded in June, of that year, he was dis- 
charged, but continued in service as volun- 
teer aide-de-camp to Gen. Worth, until the 
end of the campaign, from the battle of El 
Molino to the capture of the City of Mexico, 
September 14, 1847. Upon his return to 
Arkansas Mr. Borland was appointed to the 
senate to fill the vacancy caused by the res- 
ignation of Senator Ambrose H. Sevier, and 
later the legislature elected him to serve the 
unexpired term of this gentleman. Having 
served in the senate from April 24, 1848, to 
March 3, 1853, he was appointed minister 
to Nicaragua, and was also accredited to the 
four other Central American states. His 
credentials were received April 18, 1853, 
and he remained in Nicaragua until April 17, 
1S54, then returned to his home and re- 
signed from this office on June 30. When 
he was returning to the United States the 
authorities attempted to arrest him at San 



214 



MRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



Juan de Nicaragua, in May, 1854, for inter- 
fering to prevent the arrest of a person 
charged with murder at Puntas Arenas. He 
was obliged to seek refuge in a hotel and 
while there protesting against his arrest, a 
glass bottle was thrown at him by a man in 
the crowd and struck him. This incident 
was the main reason for the bombardment 
and destruction of Greytown, or San Juan 
de Nicaragua, by the sloop of war Cyanc, 
under Commander Hollins, July 13, 1854, 
under instructions from the United States 
government. The post of governor of New 
Mexico was offered Mr. Borland by Presi- 
dent Pierce after the return of the former, 
but he declined, preferring to remain in the 
practice of his profession at Little Rock, 
and took no further part in political affairs 
except occasionally to declare himself an 
adherent of the states rights doctrines. Be- 
fore the ordinance of secession, which was 
passed May 6, 1861, he organized a body of 
troops and, under the direction of Gov. Rec- 
tor, at midnight of April 24, took possession 
of the buildings at Fort Smith one hour 
after the withdrawal of Captain Sturgis with 
the garrison. He raised the Third Arkansas 
Confederate Cavalry, became colonel of that 
regiment, and was subsequently a brigadier- 
general in the same service. His death oc- 
curred in Texas, January 31, 1864. 

Garland, Landon Cabell, born in Nelson 
county, Virginia, March 21, 1810, son of 
Hon. 13avid Shepherd Garland, member of 
congress (q. v.). He was graduated from 
Hampden-Sidney College in 1829, and from 
1830 to 1833 he was professor of chemistry 
in Washington College, Virginia. In the 
last mentioned year he became professor of 
physics, and in 1835, president of Randolph- 



Macon College, remaining the incumbent 
ot this office until 1847. From that year 
until 1866 he filled the chair of mathematics 
and physics in the University of Alabama, 
of which he became president in 1855. He 
next became professor of physics and as- 
tronomy at the University of Mississippi, 
retaining this office until 1875, when he was 
chosen chancellor and professor of physics 
at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. He traveled through Europe in 
1875 in order to purchase the physical and 
astronomical apparatus of that university. 
He was a frequent contributor to the maga- 
zines of the Southern Methodist Episcopal 
church, and published a treatise on "Trigo- 
nometry, Plane and Spherical," Philadel- 
phia, 1841. 

Brooke, Walter, born in Virginia, Decem- 
ber 13, 1813; graduated in 1835, and studied 
law. He emigrated to Kentucky, where he 
taught school two years, and then began to 
practice law in Lexington, Mississippi. He 
was elected a senator in congress in place of 
Henry S. Foote, who had resigned in order 
to accept the governorship, and served from 
March 11, 1852, till March 3, 1853. He was 
a member of the Mississippi secession con- 
vention of 1861 ; w-as elected a member of 
the provisional Confederate congress, in 
which he sat from February 18, 1861, till 
February 18, 1862, and was a candidate for 
the Confederate senate, but was defeated by 
James Phelan. He died in \'icksburg. Miss- 
issippi, February 19, 1869. 

Atkinson, John Mayo Pleasants, born at 
"Mansfield," Dinwiddle county, Virginia, 
son of Robert and Mary Tabb (Mayo) At- 
kinson, and grandson of Roger Atkinson, a 
prominent merchant, was born January 10, 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



215 



1817. He was educated at Hampden-Sidney 
College, from which he graduated in June, 
1835. He studied for the Presbyterian min- 
istry three years at Union Seminary and 
two years at Princeton. Sixteen years fol- 
lowed, spent in active ministerial duty — two 
in Texas, seven in Warrenton, Virginia, and 
seven in Georgetown, D. C. He was elected 
president of Hampden-Sidney in 1857, and 
did much to keep the college up to its 
ancient traditions. At the beginning of the 
war for Southern independence he organ- 
ized the students into a company and 
marched to the front, but a week later they 
were captured at Rich Mountain by Gen. 
McClellan, who sent them all home under 
parole — a characteristic act of that noble 
Federal general. Dr. Atkinson met the diffi- 
culties of reestablishing the college after the 
war with courage and fidelity. Beginning 
with four professors and one tutor, he 
brought the student roll from thirty-eight in 
1865 to ninety-two in 1873. He was greatly 
beloved by his scholars. He died in 1883. 
He married (first) Elizabeth, daughter of 
Rev. Peyton Hawke ; (second) Mary B. 
Baldwin ; (third) Fanny, daughter of Hon. 
Alexander H. H. Stuart. 

Hoge, Moses Drury, born near Hampden- 
Sidney College, Virginia, September 17, 
1819, a son of Samuel Davies Hoge. He 
was graduated from Hampden-Sidney Col- 
lege in the class of 1839, then pursued his 
studies at the Union Theological Seminary 
and was licensed to preach in 1844. He at 
once received a call to Richmond as assist- 
ant pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, 
and under his charge a colony soon went 
from that church, and organized as the Sec- 
ond Presbyterian Church in January, 1845. 



For a period of forty years this was his only 
charge. He ran the blockade to England 
during the civil war in order to obtain Bibles 
and other religious works for the Confed- 
erate army. Among those who cordially fav- 
ored his application to the British and 
Foreign Bible Society, was the Earl of 
Shaftesbury, who was the leading spirit in 
obtaining for him a grant of four thousand 
pounds worth of Bibles and testaments. Dr. 
Hoge traveled extensively throughout 
Europe and the east, was a delegate to the 
Evangelical Alliance that met in Philadel- 
phia in 1873, and to the Pan-Presbyterian 
Council in Edinburgh in 1877. In 1875 
hs delivered the oration at the unveil- 
ing of the statue of "Stonewall" Jack- 
son, that was presented by English gentle- 
men to the state of Virginia. He received 
tlie degree of Doctor of Divinity from Union 
Theological Seminary, Virginia, and de- 
clined the presidency of Hampden-Sidney 
College. He was associated with Rev. 
Thomas Moore, D. D., in the editorship 
of the "Central Presbyterian," 1862-67. 
Ihroughout his ministry he made numerous 
addresses before literary and scientific soci- 
eties, and was regarded as the most eloquent 
pulpit orator in the Southern Presbyterian 
church. 

Fairfax, Donald McNeill, born in Vir- 
ginia, August 10, 1822, became a midship- 
man, August 12, 1837, and served under Du- 
pont on the west coast of Mexico and Cali- 
fonia. during the Mexican war, participating 
actively in the capture of a number of towns. 
He was promoted to a lieutenancy, Febru- 
ary 26, 185T ; made commander, July 16, 
1862 ; and served on the Cayuga, of the West 
Gulf squadron, from June, 1862, until Feb- 



2l6 



VIRGINIA UIOGRAPHY 



ruary, 1863, under Farragut, when he was 
transferred to the command of the steam- 
ers Nantucket and Montauk, of the South 
-nllantic squadron, in which he made several 
attacks on the defences of Charleston Har- 
bor, under Dupont and Dahlgren. In 1864- 
(>5 he was in command of the Naval Acad- 
emy ; promoted to a captaincy, July 25, 1866; 
served on the flag-ship Rhode Island in the 
North Atlantic squadron, in 1866-67; and on 
the steam sloop Susquchamia in 1867-68. He 
was advanced to the rank of commodore, 
-\ugust 24. 1873 ; and made rear-admiral, 
July II, 1880. Admiral Fairfax was in ser- 
vice forty-eight years and five months; of 
this time twenty years and four months 
were spent at sea, his last cruise terminating 
in 1868. 

Whittle, Francis McNeece, born in Meck- 
lenburg county, Virginia, July 7, 1823, son 
of Fortescue Whittle, Esq., of county An- 
trim, Ireland, and Mary Davies, his wife, 
a daughter of Col. William Davies, aide to 
Washington in the revolution, and grand- 
daughter of Rev. Samuel Davies, president 
of Princeton College. He graduated at the 
Iheological Seminary of Virginia in 1847; 
was ordained deacon in St. Paul's Church, 
Alexandria, July 16, same year, and ordained 
priest in St. John's Church, Charleston (now 
West Virginia), October 8, 1848, by Bishop 
William Meade. He was successively rector 
of Kanawha parish, Kanawha county, Vir- 
ginia (1847-49), St. James, Northam parish, 
Goochland county (1849-52), Grace, Berry- 
ville (1852-57), and St. Paul's, Louisville, 
Kentucky (1857-68). In 1867 he was elected 
assistant bishop of Virginia, and was con- 
secrated in St. Paul's Church, Alexandria, 
April 30, 1S6S, by liishops Johns of Virginia, 



Lee of Delaware, and Bedell of Ohio. He 
received the degree of D. D. from the Theo- 
logical Seminary of Ohio in 1867, and that 
of LL. D. from the College of William and 
Mary, AN'illiamsburg, Virginia. He became 
bishop, April 5, 1876, on the death of Bishop 
Johns. In 1877 the diocese of Virginia was 
divided. West Virginia being erected into a 
separate diocese, and Bishop Whittle retain- 
ing the parent diocese. He married. May 
1.5, 1848, Emily Gary, daughter of Wilson 
Miles Gary Fairfax and Lucy A. Griifith, 
his wife. He died in 1902. 

Holcombe, William Henry, born at 
Lynchburg, Virginia, May 25, 1825. He 
was graduated from the University of Penn- 
sylvania in the class of 1847 with the degree 
o: Doctor of Medicine, and practiced his 
profession in Lynchburg, Virginia; Cincin- 
nati, Ohio; and New Orleans, Louisiana. 
He was president of the American Institute 
of Homeopathy in 1874-75. I" addition to 
numerous contributions to homeopathic and 
Swedenborgian literature, he has published : 
"Scientific Basis of Homeopathy," Cincin- 
nati, 1852; ••Poems," New York, i860; "Our 
Children in Heaven," Philadelphia, 1868; 
"The Sexes Here and Hereafter," 1869; "In 
Both Worlds," 1870; "The Other Life," 1871 ; 
"Southern Voices," 1872; "The Lost Truths 
of Christianity," 1879; "The End of the 
World," 1881; "The New Life," 1884; and 
"Letters on .Spiritual Subjects," 1885. 

Kent, Robert Craig, born in \\'ythe county, 
\irginia, November 28, 1828, and died at 
Vv'ytheville, Virginia, April 30, 1905. a son 
of Robert Kent and his wife, Eli.zabeth 
Craig, and a descendant of Jacob Kent, who 
fled to Holland from England because of 
religious per.-^ecution. from thence came to 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



217 



Virginia in 1760, settling in what is now 
Alontgomery county. The Craigs were a 
prominent family of Southwest Virginia, 
and closely allied to the Montgomery famil}'. 
Robert Kent was an extensive land owner 
and a farmer of Wythe county, where for a 
number of years he was a justice of the old 
county court. After a careful education in 
the preparatory schools in the vicinity of 
his home, Robert Craig Kent matriculated at 
Georgetown College, Washington, D. C, 
and from this institution he went to Prince- 
ton, from which he was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. He then com- 
menced the study of law in the office of 
Judge Andrew Fulton, of Wytheville, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1853. He at once 
established himself in Wytheville and rap- 
idly acquired a lucrative and extended prac- 
tice. He represented Wythe county in the 
constitutional convention which passed the 
ordinance of secession for the state of Vir- 
ginia ; was twice commonwealth's attorney 
oi Wythe county; was twice a member of 
the house of delegates of Virginia; served 
cnce as president of the electoral college of 
Virginia; and was in office as lieutenant- 
governor of the state four years. For many 
years he served as president of the Farmers 
Bank of Wytheville, Virginia. All his life 
he was a stanch supporter of the Democratic 
party, and he gave his religious support to 
the Presbyterian church. Gov. Kent mar- 
ried (first) Eliza Ann Wood, (second) An- 
astatia Pleasants Smith. 

Emmet, Thomas Addis, born at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, May 29, 1828, son of Dr. 
John Patten Emmet (q. v.) and Mary Byrd 
(Tucker) Emmet. He received his educa- 
tion at a preparatory school near the univer- 



sity, and in a school at Flushing, Long 
Ihland, under the charge of the Rev. Francis 
L. Hawks, with a partial course in the aca- 
demic department of the University of Vir- 
ginia. In the autumn of 1845 he entered 
Jffterson Medical College, Philadelphia, 
under the supervision of Dr. Robley Dung- 
lison, one of the original professors, gradu- 
ating in 1849-50, and immediately afterwards 
passing a competitive examination, and re- 
ceiving an appointment as resident physician 
to the Emigrant Refuge Hospital, Ward's 
Island, New York Harbor. He served in 
that capacity for two years, when he was 
appointed a visiting physician to the same 
institution, and served until the spring of 
1855, being the junior by twenty years of 
the next youngest member of the medical 
board. Forming the acquaintance of Dr. J. 
Marion Sims, he began to assist him in his 
operations at the opening of the Woman's 
Hospital, in May, 1855. In the following 
September he received the appointment of 
assistant surgeon. This position he held 
until the resignation of Dr. Sims, in 1861, 
when he became surgcon-in-chief, and when 
the Woman's Hospital Association became 
merged under the charter of the Woman's 
Hospital of the State of New York, in 1868, 
he continued to hold the same position from 
the board of governors. Under Dr. Emmet's 
supervision a large proportion of the money 
was subscribed, and the first buildings of 
the Woman's Hospital were constructed 
under his advice, and he fully organized the 
medical department. The service rapidly in- 
creased, and Dr. Emmet had a number of 
assistants, but it became too large eventual- 
ly for him to give his attention to the neces- 
sary details. It was then decided by the 
board of governors to place the hospital in 



2l8 



\']K(;i.\"T.\ lUOGRAPHY 



charge of a medical board, and Dr. Emmet 
became visiting surgeon, and he contiiiued 
on duty until his resignation in 1902, having 
given a continuous service of nearly forty- 
seven years to the institution. Dr. Emmet 
served as consulting surgeon or physician 
to the Roosevelt Hospital, St. Vincent's 
Hospital, the Foundling Asylum, and other 
institutions in the city of New York. He 
published in 1868 an original surgical work. 
■'Vesico Vaginal Fistula," which was the 
foundation of this form of plastic surgery. 
His chief professional work, and one em- 
bodying the experience of a lifetime, was 
"The Principles and Practice of Gynaecol- 
ogy," issued in 1879, going through three 
editions in this country, and translated into 
German and French, of each a single edition. 
It has been estimated that Dr. Emmet con- 
tributed to the medical journals, at home 
cr abroad, over seventy original monographs 
bearing chiefly on the surgical diseases of 
women, and his modes of operating and 
treatment have generally become the ac- 
cepted practice. Many of these papers were 
translated abroad, and one treatise describ- 
ing an original operation which has proved 
of incalculable value in laceration of the 
ctrvix uteri was translated and printed in 
Chinese characters for circulation in Japan. 
Dr. Emmet is the author of various essays 
and addresses upon subjects connected with 
American history. On the inception of the 
Irish National Federation in Ireland for 
gaining home rule by constitutional means, 
he was chosen president of that organiza- 
tion in America, and during his service of 
eight )'ears he produced a number of papers 
and addresses on subjects connected with 
Irish history. One, "Irish Emigration Dur- 
ing the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Cen- 



turies," the result of considerable research, 
\i as read January 19, 1899, before the Anien- 
cun-Irish Historical Society, and published 
in its "Transactions." He issued in 1899, in a 
limited edition, an extensive work, "The Em- 
met Family, and with some incidents relating 
10 Irish History, and a Biographical Sketch 
cf Professor John Patten Emmet, M. D., 
Lie." octavo, pp. 411, with over one hundred 
jiortraits and other illustrations. Dr. Em- 
met's "Ireland Under English Rule, or a 
Plea for the Plaintiff," was issued by G. P. 
Putnam's Sons, New York. 1903. two 
volumes, octavo, pp. 333 and 359, in which 
the political and commercial relations oi Ire- 
land arc treated in detail for the past three 
hundred years. The title of Doctor of Laws 
was conferred upon Dr. Emmet by the trus- 
tees of the Jefferson Medical College. Phila- 
delphia, the governing power of the Jeffer- 
son University, Pennsylvania. Dr. Emmet 
is a member of the principal medical socie- 
ties of New York, and has been president of 
the New York Obstetrical Society, president 
of the American Gynaecological Society, 
twice vice-president of the Medical Society 
of the County of New York, a permanent 
member of t'ne State Medical Society, and 
himorary member of the State Medical So- 
ciety of New Jersey and Connecticut. He 
has been an honorary member of various 
societies in England, Scotland, Ireland, Nor- 
way, Belgium, Germany and France, and of 
nearly every gynaecological society in the 
L'nited States. He was the recipient of the 
Laetare Medal from the University of Notre 
Dame. As a pioneer, his chief professional 
vvork was devoted to the development of the 
surgery and treatment of the diseases of 
women as a distinct branch, and from 1861 
his practice was devoted exclusively to gy- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



219 



naecology as a specialty. In 1903 he retired 
from practice, and since that time has de- 
voted himself to literary pursuits, and par- 
ticularly to the study of the Gaelic or Irish 
language. He acquired some knowledge of 
this language during his service in the Emi- 
grant Refuge Hospital after the great Irish 
famine in 1849, and at which time but a small 
portion of the Irish peasantry was familiar 
with any other but their native tongue. Dr. 
Emmet was married in 1854 to Catherine 
Rebecca, daughter of John and Catherine 
Aloffit Duncan, of Montgomery, Alabama. 

Latane, James Allen, born in Essex county, 
Virginia, January 15, 1831, a descendant 
of Dr. Lewis Latane, a French Hugue- 
not, who came to Virginia in 1700; gradu- 
ated at the University of Virginia in 1852, 
and then studied law. In 1854 he entered the 
Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary, 
near .\lexandria, and in 1856 was ordained 
deacon, and in 1857 was made priest by 
Bishop Meade, at Millwood, Virginia. He 
was rector at Staunton from 1857 to 1871, 
then at Wheeling, West Virginia, till 1874, 
when he formally withdrew from the Prot- 
estant Episcopal church, and announced his 
adhesion to the Reformed Episcopal tenets. 
Returning to his early home, he founded a 
Reformed church in Essex county, and one 
in King William county. He was elected 
bishop in 1876, and declined the position, 
but accepted it when he was elected a second 
time, in 1879, and was assigned to the south- 
ern jurisdiction. He was unanimously 
elected presiding bishop in 1883. He re- 
sided in Baltimore, having charge of the 
Bishop Cumming Memorial Church. He 
died in 1902. 



Talley, Susan Archer, born in Hanover 
county, X'irginia, in 1835, of Huguenot de- 
scent. When she was eight years old her 
father removed to Richmond, in order to 
educate her. At ten years of age, an attack 
of scarlet fever left her with impaired hear- 
ing, and she took to drawing, and then paint- 
ing in water colors and oil, becoming skillful 
in all, and made some essays at sculpture. 
Her tasks, however, inclined her to poetry, 
;ind at the age of eleven she wrote creditable 
\erse which was published in the "Southern 
Literary Messenger." At Richmond, and in 
1859 her first volume of poems was pub- 
lished. She was for a time a clerk in the 
war department. She later became a con- 
tributor to "Harper's" and "Scribner's Maga- 
zines," and other leading periodicals and 
newspapers. Her poem which is of greatest 
note is "Ennerslie," by many held to be re- 
mindful of Tennyson's "Lady of Shalott." 

Cruse, Mary Ann, born in Virginia, about 
1S35, and long a resident of Huntsville, Ala- 
bama. In 1866 she published "Cameron 
Hall," a tale of the civil war, which brought 
her high praise. She also wrote several Sun- 
day schools books — "The Little Episcopa- 
lian." "Bessie Melville," and "Little (jrand- 
pa." 

Poague, William Thomas, born in Rock- 
bridge county, Virginia, December 20, 1835, 
son of John Barclay Poague and his wife, 
Elizabeth Stuart Paxton ; and a descendant 
of Robert Poague, the immigrant, who came 
to Virginia from the north of Ireland, and 
purchased land in the vicinity of Staunton. 
William Thomas Poague was reared on his 
father's farm, and there obtained a practical 
knowledge of farm cultivation and the care 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



of stock. He attended the Presbyterian 
High School at Brownsburg, Rockbridge 
county, then matriculated at \\'ashington 
College, from which he was graduated in 
June, 1857. He taught school in Georgia, 
1858-59, then took up the study of law in 
the office of Judge Brockenbrough, at Lex- 
ington, Virginia, where he remained, 1859- 
60. Having been admitted to the bar, he 
established himself in practice at St. Joseph, 
Missouri, in June, i860, but returned to Vir- 
ginia at the outbreak of the civil war. He 
enlisted in the Confederate army in 2\lay, 
1861, and served until the close of the 
struggle, being advanced by regular grada- 
tion from private to lieutenant-colonel. He 
participated in all the battles with which 
Stonewall Jackson was identified, and all 
of those commanded by Gen. Robert E. Lee 
in West Virginia. At the close of the war 
he returned to Rockbridge. His health had 
become impaired by the strenuous years of 
the war, and as his father had died in :864, 
he took charge of the homestead, living 
there, 1866-85. In the last mentioned year, 
without any solicitation on his part, he was 
elected treasurer of the Virginia Military 
Institute and secretary of its board of visi- 
tors, positions of which he is still the in- 
cumbent. He served as a member of the 
Virginia house of delegates from Rock- 
bridge county, 1871-72. 1872-73; a member 
or the board of directors of the Western 
State Hospital of Virginia, at Staunton, 
1874; member of the board of trustees of 
Washington College and Washington and 
Lee University, 1865-85 ; member of the 
Lexington school board, 1895-1901. Politi- 
cally he has always been a Democrat. He 
is a member of Phi Kappa Phi fraternity, 
and his address is Lexington, \'irginia. He 



has been an elder of the Presbyterian church 
for almost hall' a century. 

Hardinge, Belle Boyd, born at Martins- 
burg, Virginia, about 1835, daughter of Dr. 
I'loyd, of that place. As a Confederate spy 
during the civil war, she performed valuable 
service, and her exploits made her famous. 
She was at one time captured by the Fed- 
erals and imprisoned. After the war she 
married a former Federal officer, was di- 
vorced from him in 1868, then visited Eu- 
rope, and on her return went on the stage. 
She published "Belle Boyd in Camp and 
Prison" (1865). 

Cutler, Lizzie Petit, born at Milton, Albe- 
niarle county, Virginia, in 1836; was prin- 
cipally educated at a female seminary at 
Charlottesville. At the age of nineteen she 
wrote her first novel, "Light and Darkness," 
which was received with such favor that it 
was republished in London and translated 
into the French. In i860, as "Miss Petit," 
she gave a series of popular readings. Her 
published works are : "Household Myster- 
ies, a Romance of Southern Life" (1856) ; 
and "The Stars of the Crowd, or Men and 
Women of the Day." She married Mr. Cut- 
ler, of New York, in 1858. 

Allan, William, born at Winchester, \'ir- 
ginia, November 12, 1837, son of Thomas 
Allan, Esq., and Jane D. George, his wife. 
His early education was received at a private 
school in Winchester, Virginia, and he en- 
tered the University of Virginia. There he 
remained until 1861, when he joined the 
Confederate army, in which he served faith- 
fully and gained distinction. His skill in 
mathematics attracted him to the ordnance 
(kpartnu-nt. and at the close of the war. after 



PROMIXEXT PERSONS 



having been intimately associated with Gen. 
"Stonewall" Jackson and other eminent sol- 
diers of the Army of Northern Virginia, he 
held the rank of lieutenant-colonel. Aftc- 
the war he was cashier of the National Val- 
ley IJank at Staunton, where he remained 
until 1866. He was that year elected pro- 
lessor of applied mathematics in Washing- 
ion College, which was soon to become 
Washington and Lee University, and where 
he achieved great success as a teacher, and 
had the esteem and afifection of Gen. Rob- 
ert E. Lee, under whom he had so long and 
faithfully served as a soldier. In 1873 he 
became principal of the McDonough Insti- 
tute in Alaryland, and did much to make it 
one of the foremost high schools of the 
country. There the last years of his life 
were spent, devoted to the instruction of 
youth and at spare times to writing upon 
subjects connected with engineering and 
with the Army of Northern Virginia. Among 
the most faithful, interesting and useful his- 
tories of the civil war are found to be his 
articles on "Chancellorsville," "Jackson's 
Valley Campaign," and "The Army of 
Northern Virginia in 1862." An introduc- 
tion to this last work was written by his 
friend and former adversary in arms, the 
late John Codman Ropes, the distinguished 
lawyer and war critic of Boston. It may 
be said with regard to what Col. .\llan has 
written upon the subject of the civil war, 
that his work is history. He also published 
several engineering brochures, and a num- 
ber of articles in the magazines and journals 
cf his time. He married, May 14, 1874, 
Elizabeth Randolph Preston, daughter of 
Mrs. Margaret Preston, the well known 
southern poetess. His wife and five children 



survived him. He died September 17, 1889, 
al McDonough, Maryland. 

Fauntleroy, Archibald Magill, born at 

Warrenton. \'irginia, July 8, 1837, a son of 
Thomas Turner Fauntleroy. He was grad- 
uated from the University of Pennsylvania 
in the class of 1856, with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine, and the following year 
became assistant surgeon in the United 
States army. However, he and his brother, 
a lieutenant in the navy, resigned when their 
father did, upon the formation of the Con- 
federate government. He then became a 
surgeon in the Confederate army, and was 
president of the board for the admission of 
surgeons, and chief on the medical staf^ of 
Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, serving with him 
until the battle of Seven Pines. He was 
then ordered to build and organize the hos- 
pitals at Danville, Virginia, and later had 
charge of the military hospital at Staunton, 
\'irginia, until the close of the war. After 
the war he engaged in general practice at 
Staunton, and for a number of years was 
superintendent of the Lunatic Asylum in 
that city. His contributions to medical 
literature include papers on bromide of po- 
tassium, chloral hydrate, the use of chloro- 
form in obstetrical practice, and a "Report 
upon Advance in Therapeutics," which was 
printed in the "Transactions" of the Vir- 
£;inia Medical Society. Dr. Fauntleroy died 
at Staunton, Virginia. June 19. 1886. 

Kable, William Hartman, born in Jeffer- 
?cn county. West Virginia, September 25, 
1837, a son of John Kable, a farmer and 
m-iuufacturer. and his wife, Elizabeth Hun- 
ter Johnston. The Kables have been resi- 
dent in this country since 1684, when they 



\'IRG1XIA r.IOGRAPIlV 



settled in eastern Pennsylvania with Wil- 
liam Penn, the Hartmans also living there, 
and both families had many members who 
distinguished themselves as privates and 
officers in the revolutionary war. There 
v.'ere intermarriages between these two 
families, hence the middle name of Mr. 
'-'able. Attending the schools near his heme 
for his elementary education, at the age uf 
seventeen years he found himself depeml- 
cnt upon his own resources for the continu- 
ance of his education, and made ihe be<t 
use of his opportunities. He attended a pri- 
vate school, and then pursued an academic 
course at the University of Virginia, devot- 
ing especial attention to languages and 
physics. He commenced what was to be his 
life work as a teacher in a private school. 
and was assistant in Green Plain .Academy. 
Southampton county. 18C10-61. For four 
years, however, he was a participant in the 
war between the states. He entered the 
army as a private and came out as a cap- 
tain. :\Ir. Kable was principal of Charles- 
ton Academy, Jefferson county, West Vir- 
ginia, from 1872 to 1883, then becoming 
principal of the Staunton Military Academy. 
The Columbian (now George Washington 1 
University, Washington, D. C. conferred 
upon him the honorary degree of Master of 
Arts, for the eminent service he has ren- 
dered in the field of education. Mr. Kable 
married (f^rst) Willie L. Gibbs, who died 
June 10. 1888; he married (second) Decem- 
ber 29, 1903, Mrs. Margaret Holladay, cf 
Albemarle county, \'irginia. 

Alfriend, Frank H., a native of Virginia, 
born about 1830. and educated at William 
and Mary College in 1859-60; was editor of 
the "Southern Literary Messenger." of 
Richmond. In 1868 he published "The Life 



of Jefferson Davis," a work which has l>een 
given place in the same rank with Dabney's 
"Defence of Virginia." 

Terhune, Mary Virginia (Marion Har- 
land), i)orn in Amelia county, Virginia, in 
1830, daughter of Samuel Pierce Hawes, a 
native of Massachusetts, who became a mer- 
chant in Richmond, Virginia, and Judith 
Smith, his wife, of Olney, Mrginia. At 
the age of nine she began writing compo- ' 
sitions under a governess, and when she 
was eleven she was reading the best English 
authors. At the age of fourteen she was 
an anonymous contributor to Richmond 
papers, and a few months later, as "Robert 
Remer," was writing for the "Central 
Presbyterian." She was sixteen when she 
wrote her first novel, "Alone." and began 
writing for "Godey's Lady Book." In 
1856 she married Edward Pay son Ter- 
hune, a young Presbyterian minister, at 
Charlotte Court House, and her next 
novel, "Ruby's Husband," was dedicated to 
him. Her published works are too numer- 
ous to enumerate. Of her "Common Sense 
in the Household," more than 300,000 copies 
have been sold. "His Greater Self" she con- 
sidered her best effort. Her "When Grand- 
mamma was Fourteen" is largely autobio- 
graphical. In 1S93-94 she visited Egypt and 
the Holy Land, and after her return wrote 
"The Home of the P.ible." She went abroad 
again in 1897-98. as a delegate from the 
American Historical Society to the Interna- 
tional Historical Congress at The Hague, 
and upon her return wrote "The Haunts of 
Familiar Characters in History and Litera- 
ture." Her son. .A.lbert Payson Terhune. is 
n New York journalist, and her daughter, 
Mrs. Christine Herrick and Mrs. X'irginia 
\'an do Water, arc both writers. 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



223 



Hume, Thomas, born in Portsmouth, Vir- Church. He published articles on various 

ginia, October 21, 1836, son of Thomas topics In the press of the country, and was 

Hume. His mother, Mary Anne Gregory, was largely instrumental in the establishment of 

a daughter of Dr. Richard Baynham Greg- the professorship of English in the Univer- 

ory, of Gloucester county, Virginia. On the sity of Virginia. In July, 1885, Dr. Hume was 

paternal side he is descended from the Rev. elected professor of English language and 

Thomas Plume, a Presbyterian minister of literature in the University of North Caro- 

Edinburgh, who came to Virginia and joined ^^"^' where he organized the department of 



hi;-, uncle, the Rev. Robert Dickson, of Prin- 
cess Anne county. Dr Hume received his 
in-eparation at the Virginia Collegiate Insti- 
tute in Portsmouth, Virginia, from which he 
came to Richmond College, where he was 
graduated in 1855 with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts, receiving afterward the degree 
of Master of Arts. He then entered the 
University of Virginia, where he remained 
three years, being graduated therefrom in 
1059 in several schools. Upon leaving the 
university he taught for several years and 
soon entered the ministry of the Baptist 
church. He subsequently received the de- 
gree of Doctor of Divinitv, from Richmond 



English philology and literature, and did 
much to promote the knowledge of the mod- 
ern methods of teaching English. He then 
became professor of English literature 
in that university. For four years he was 
lecturer on English philology and literature 
in the national summer school for teachers 
at Glens Falls, New York, and for sev- 
eral years gave courses of lectures before 
literary societies, colleges, etc., on educa- 
tional and literary topics. He was a member 
of the Washington Society of the University 
of Virginia, and is a member of the Modern 
Language Association of America. He was 
one of the organizers of the Young Men's 



College, and of Doctor of' Laws from Wake ''^'^'''stian Association at the University of 



Forest College, North Carolina. He be- 
came a member of the Third Regiment, Vir- 
ginia Infantry, of which he was made chap- 
lain, but was transferred to Petersburg dur- 
ing the siege of that place. After the war 
he became principal of the Petersburg Clas 



X'irginia, the first College Young Men's 
Christian Association to be established, and 
drafted its constitution. Dr. Hume was a 
friend of the distinguished English scholar, 
Thomas R. Price, and takes great delight in 
his higher English work. He has written 



sical Institute, where he took a deep interest '"^^^P^ ^ ^he Study of Hamlet," and pub- 

ir. the teaching of English, philology and ''"'''^^ ^^^"^ °" '"^^^ ^""'^^ Teachmgs of 

literature. He traveled abroad, and on his Shakespeare," "'John Milton's Religious 

return home became principal of the Roan- <^^P'"'0"s," "The Literature of the Bible," 

oke Female College at Danville, Virginia ''"'^ ^""^ '^^""^^ various other notable contri- 

and during a part of the same period was' ^^"■*'°"' ^° literature. October 31, 1878, Dr. 



also the pastor of the First Baptist Church 
of that city. From 1876 until 1885 he re- 
sided in Norfolk, and was professor of Eng- 
lish and Latin in the Norfolk College and 
for four years pastor of the First Baptist Richmond, was descended from early Eng- 



Hume married Anne Louise Whitescarver, 
and to them were born four children. He 
died July 15, 1912. 

Chamberlayne, John Hampden, born in 



224 



VI RC. I XI A lUOGRAPIiY 



lish settlers. His early education was re- 
ceived in the private schools of his native 
place, and he entered the University of Vir- 
ginia in 1855, and graduated with the de- 
gree of Master of Arts in 1858. At the out- 
break of the civil war he enlisted, and rose 
to be a captain of artillery. He was a bril- 
liant scholar, and at the close of the war 
turned his attention to journalism. He 
founded the "Richmond State," which, dur- 
ii:g his time, was the leading evening Demo- 
cratic paper of that city, exercising a potent 
influence in the politics of the state. He had 
the faculty of binding to him a host of 
friends who admired his brilliant conversa- 
tion, his ready wit and his thorough schol- 
arship. He represented the city of Rich- 
mond in the legislature, and was regarded, 
at the time of his death, as one of the fore- 
liiost men of the state. Among those who 
were intimately associated with him in jour- 
nalism were the late Richard F. Beirne, and 
\\ . \V. Archer, Esq. His wife was the 
daughter of Rev. J. Churchill Gibson, many- 
years a power in the Episcopal church in 
\ irginia. 

Draper, Henry, was born at liampden- 
Sidney, Prince Edward county, Virginia, 
March 7. 1837, son of Dr. John William 
Drajier. Two years after the birth of Henry 
his father took the chair of chemistry in 
New York University. He first went 
through the primary school connected with 
the university, from which he passed into 
the preparatory school. At the age of fifteen 
ho entered the collegiate department, where 
he was distinguished for excellent scholar- 
ship. P.y the advice of his father he entered 
the medical dejjartment which his father was 
prominent in establishing, and passed all his 



examinations satisfactorily, but not being of 
the age necessary for graduation, his diploma 
was withheld, and with his brother he stud- 
ied and recreated in Europe for one year, 
and upon his return took his medical degree 
in 1858. While in Europe he received an 
appointment ujion the medical staff of Belle- 
vue Hospital, which he held for sixteen 
months, but then decided to abandon prac- 
tice and give himself to teaching. He was 
elected professor of natural science in the 
undergraduate department in the New York 
University in i860, and in 1866 became pro- 
fessor of physiology in the medical depart- 
ment, and dean of the faculty. He resigned 
in , 1S73 and taught advanced analytical 
chemistry in the academical department. 
Upon the death of his father in 1882, he was 
appointed to succeed as professor of chemis- 
try, but previous to the opening of the last 
f;ill term of 1882 he severed his connection 
with the institution. He was taught to love 
science, and was early put upon the line of 
original investigation in which he acquired 
his celebrity. He inherited not only his 
fnther's genius, but his spirit and problems 
of research. The elder Draper was one of 
the founders of the recent science of photo- 
chemistry, and by his extensive contribu- 
tions to this subject, he prepared the way for 
those who entered to reap the fruits of his 
hil)nrs in the splendid field of spectrum 
analysis. Henry pursued the same line of 
research and by his extension of it will have 
a permanent place among the discoverers of 
the period. His first important scientific in- 
vestigation was made at the age of twenty, 
and was embodied in his graduating thesis 
at the medical college, on the functions of 
the spleen, illustrated by microscopic photo- 
graphy — an art then in its infancy. While 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



ill Europe he visited the observatory ot Lord 
Rosse and studied the construction and 
working of his celebrated colossal reflecting 
telescope. On his return home he constructed 
a telescope of this kind of fifteen and a half 
i:;ches aperture and with it took a photo- 
graph of the moon fifty inches in diameter — ■ 
the largest ever made. His success spurred 
him on, so that he became an adept in grind- 
ing, polishing and testing reflecting mirrors. 
An equatorial telescope was afterwards con- 
structed by him with an aperture of twenty- 
eight inches, for his observatory at Hast- 
ings-on-the-Hudson. The instrument was 
wholly the work of his own hands, and was 
at'signed mainly to photograph the spectra 
of the stars. After a long series of experi- 
ments, it was finished in 1872 and was pro- 
nounced by President Barnard as "probably 
the most difficult and costly experiment in 
•celestial chemistry ever made." He was the 
first to obtain a photograph of the fixed lines 
in the spectra of stars, and he continued the 
work until he had obtained impressions of 
the spectra of more than one hundred stars. 
In 1874 he was appointed superintendent of 
the photographic department of the commis- 
sion created by congress, for the purpose of 
observing the transit of Venus, and received 
from congress in recognition of his services, 
a gold medal bearing the inscription, "He 
adds lustre to ancestral glory." In 1876 he 
made a negative of the solar spectrum, and 
iii the following year announced, "the dis- 
covery of oxygen in the sun by photography, 
and a new theory of the solar spectrum," — 
the most brilliant discovery ever made by 
an American. He was a member of the 
principal scientific societies in America and 
Europe, and in 1882 was awarded the degree 
of LL. D. by both the University of New 

VIR_15 



York and Wisconsin. Henry Draper died 
in New York City, November 20, 1882, leav- 
ing no children. 

Bernard, George S., born at Culpeper 
Court House, Virginia, August 27, 1837, son 
of David Meade Bernard and Elizabeth 
Mildred Ashby, his wife. His father was 
for many years clerk of the corporation court 
of Petersburg. His colonial ancestry em- 
braces the Bernards and Ashbys and Stiths, 
v/ho were identified with Virginia from the 
latter part of the seventeenth century. 
Among them was Col. John Stith, ancestor 
of Rev. William Stith, the Virginia historian 
rnd president of the College of William and 
Mary, and Capt. John Ashby. Mr. Bernard's 
mother died when he was an infant, and he 
grew up under the care of his paternal 
grandmother. He attended the best schools 
of Petersburg until he was eighteen years 
old. In 1855, he entered the University of 
Virginia, where he remained for two ses- 
sions, graduating in three of its schools. He 
tlien taught for nine months in the family 
of United States Senator R. M. T. Hunter, 
I if Essex county, and while there, under Mr. 
Hunter's advice, and with access to his 
fine library, he made diligent study of his- 
tory. He studied law in the office of the 
late Judge William T. Joynes, was admitted 
to the bar in the city of Petersburg in 1859. 
Upon the breaking out of the civil war, in 
April, 1861, he entered the military service 
of the Confederate States ; and, with the 
exception of about five months, when in- 
capacitated by ill health, served faithfully 
until the surrender at Appomattox Court 
House in April, 1865. In the battle of 
Crampton Gap, Maryland, September 14, 
1862, he was wounded, captured and made 



226 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



prisoner: and he was again wounded in the 
1-attle of Hatcher's Run, February 6, 1865. 
After the war, he was for some months local 
editor and reporter on the Petersburg "Daily 
Express," which position he left in Decem- 
ber, 1865, to devote himself to this profes- 
sion. He represented a number of im- 
portant interests, and for many years was 
local counsel in the counties from Din- 
widdie to Xansemond for the Norfolk & 
Western Railroad. From 1870 to 1879, a 
year or two excepted, he served as a member 
cf the school board of Petersburg. In 1877- 
79 he was a member of the house of dele- 
gates of Virginia. He was a frequent 
contributor to the press, and in 1885 pub- 
lished a volume entitled "Civil Service Re- 
form vs. The Spoils System," which at- 
tracted favorable attention throughout the 
country ; and also edited "War Talks of Con- 
federate Veterans," a volume of war remin- 
iscences, two of the chapters of which are 
from his own pen. He was for several years 
commonwealth's attorney for the city of 
Petersburg, and since 1898 has served as a 
referee in bankruptcy. Several of his opin- 
ions in bankruptcy cases were adopted by 
the district court of the United States for 
the eastern district of Virginia, and appear 
in the "Federal Reporter" and "American 
Bankruptcy Reports." He served as presi- 
dent of the Petersburg Bar Association. In 
June, 1870, he married Fanny, daughter of 
the late Samuel J. Rutherford, of Richmond, 
and a niece of former Gov. John Ruther- 
ford. 

Converse, Amasa, Ixirn in \'irginia, in 
1795 ; was graduated at Dartmouth in 1822. 
After completing a theological course, he 
was for some years a pastor in the south, 



whence he removed to Philadelohia, and 
founded the "Christian Observer," a Pres- 
'oyterian weekly organ of old school doc- 
trine and southern political sympathies. 
When the civil war began he removed his 
paper to Richmond, Virginia, and after the 
war to Louisville, Kentucky, where it con- 
tinued to be the organ and exponent of the 
Southern Presbyterian church. He died at 
Louisville, Kentucky, December 9, 1872. 

Chew, Robert Smith, born in Spottsyl- 
vania county, \'irginia, in 181 1, son of Rob- 
ert Smith Chew and Caroline French, his 
wife. He entered the service of the govern- 
ment in his youth, and had served in the 
state department more than forty years, 
when he was advanced to the chief clerk- 
ship on the appointment of William Hunter 
as second assistant secretary of state, in 
July, 1866. He died at Washington, D. C 
August 3, 1873; father of Richard S. Chew, 
born September 4, 1843, died April 10, 1S75, 
who was a lieutenant in the United States 
navy and served on the Minnesota when she 
was attacked by the Merrimac and in the 
fight in Mobile Bay ; uncle of Robert Smith 
Chew (son of John James Chew, clerk of 
Spottsylvania county, Virginia), who was a 
colonel of infantry in the Confederate States 
army. 

Speed, John M., born in Mecklenburg 
county. Virginia, May 5, 1815, son of John 
H. and Susan M. Speed ; he was a cousin 
(>f James Speed, attorney-general in Lin- 
coln's cabinet. He was a graduate of \\"il- 
li;:m and Mary College; became a lawyer at 
Lynchburg. \'irginia. attained eminence in 
his profession, and occupied various high 
jositions in the state. He married Catherine 
Page Waller, whose brother. \\'illiain Wal- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



227 



ler, married Elizabeth, daughter of Piesi- 
dent John Tyler. 

Corbin, Thomas G., born in Virginia, Au- 
gust 13, 1820, son of Hon. Francis Corbin 
and Anna M. Beverley, his wife. He was 
appointed a midshipman in the United States 
navy. May 15, 1838; served on the coast 
survey, and in the Brazilian and Pacific 
squadrons ; was commissioned lieutenant, 
June 10, 1852, and employed in the survey 
of the river Plata during 1853-55. He was 
attached to the United States steamer IVa^ 
bash, of the South Atlantic blockading 
squadron, in 1861-63. and at the battle of 
Port Royal, November 7. 1861, taking part 
in the capture of Forts Beauregard and 
Walker. He was commissioned commander, 
July 16, 1862, and was commandant at the 
naval academy in 1863. In 1864-65 he com- 
manded the United States ship Augusta; 
served as fleet-captain of the West Indies 
squadron in 1865-66; was commissioned 
captain, July 25, 1866; made his last cruise 
ii: command of the flagship Guerriere, of the 
South Atlantic squadron, in 1868; and after- 
ward served on ordnance duty at Philadel- 
phia. He was retired January 5, 1874, and 
died in 1886. He was a grandson of Col. 
Richard Corbin, of the colonial council (q. 
v. vol. I, 258). 

De Vere, Maximilian Scheie, a native of 
Sweden, born in Wexio, November i, 1820. 
He came of a distinguished family, whose 
representatives in Sweden and Prussia hold 
high rank in church and state. At an early 
age he evinced the greatest aptitude for 
scholarship, particularly in the languages, 
ir which he acquired a familiar knowledge 
with unusual ease, and he was known as an 
eminent linguist even before he attained 



his majority. His higher studies were pur- 
sued in the Universities of Berlin and Bonn, 
and the former conferred upon him the de- 
gree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1841, when 
h( was but twenty-one years of age. He 
subsequently received the degree of Juris 
Utriusquc Doctor, or Doctor of Civil and 
Canon Law. Following the completion of 
his university work, he became connected 
v/ith the Prussian military and diplomatic 
service, in which he rendered valuable ser- 
vice to the government. He came to the 
United States in 1843, first residing in Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts. Soon afterward he en- 
tered upon a course of study in modern 
Creek, at Harvard College. In the follow- 
ing year (1844) he accepted the position of 
professor of modern languages in the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and occupied his chair 
for more than a half-century (fifty-one 
years), acquitting himself with distinguished 
ability. His resignation, in 1895, was a step 
necessitated only by advanced age. After 
bis retirement from the professorship he 
removed to Washington City, where he died 
in 1898. Professor De Vere (or Scheie, as 
he was familiarly known to the students of 
the University,) performed an enormous 
amount of labor in many fields of literature 
and scholarship. In philology — especially 
his published studies of the English lan- 
guage, its origin and development — his work 
was of highly original character, and in ad- 
vance of similar effort elsewhere. All his 
writings were characterized by clearness and 
literary finish, and comprise an interesting 
bibliography. His principal works were : 
"Outlines of Comparative Philology," 1853 ; 
"Stray Leaves from the Book of Nature," 
1856; "Studies in English," 1867: "Gram- 
mar of the Spanish Language," "Grammar 



228 



\'1KGIXIA BIOGRAI'lIY 



of the French Language," 1867; "American- 
isms," 1871 ; and "The English of the New 
World," 1873. He was the author of a num- 
ber of historical romances, of which "The 
Great Empress" is, perhaps, the best known. 
His published translations from the French 
and German were numerous and excellent, 
and among these were Spielhagen's ro- 
mances, which were speedily and success- 
fully translated by him as they appeared in 
German. His "Semi-Centennial Catalogue 
of the University of Virginia," published in 
1878, has an enduring value. This volume 
also contained his article on "Mr. Jefferson's 
Pet," which was originally published in 
"Harper's Magazine," and is reproduced in 
the work mentioned. Throughout his life he 
was a constant contributor to reviews and 
encyclopedias. Professor De Vere was 
twice married, each time to a daughter of 
Jiidge Alexander Rives, of Albemarle 
county, Virginia, a distinguished jurist. His 
second wife, who was Miss Lucy Rives, 
survived him. but is now deceased. 

Dowell, Greensville, born in Albemarle 
county, \'irginia, September i, 1822: re- 
ceived his literary education at the Univer- 
sity of Louisville, and his medical educa- 
tion at Jefferson Medical College, from 
v.hich institution he was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He was 
actively engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession in various states, but finally settled 
in Galveston, Texas, and for fifteen years 
preceding his death served in the capacity of 
professor of surgery in the Texas Medical 
College. During the early part of the war 
between the states he served as surgeon in 
the Confederate army. For a period of 
twelve years, from 1863 to 1875, he was 



editor and publisher of the "Galveston Medi- 
cal Journal," originated the Dowell system 
for hernia, and was the author of several 
books on that subject and also on yellow 
fever. He died in Galveston, Texas, in 1881. 

Davidson, John Wynn, born in Fairfax 
county. \'irginia, August 18, 1824; after his 
graduation from the United States Military 
Academy, in 1845. he ^^'is assigned to the 
First Dragoons, and in the following year 
accompanied Gen. Kearny to California, in 
charge of a howitzer battery, and during 
the Mexican war he served in the Army of 
the West, participating in the combats of 
San Pasqual, San Bernardo, San Gabriel, 
and Mesa. In 1850 he served as a scout, on 
May 17 was at the action of Clear Lake, on 
June 17 at Russian River, and from that year 
until the beginning of the war between the 
states continued un frontier and garrison 
duty. On March 30, 1854, he fought the 
battle of Cieneguilla, New Mexico, against 
the Apache and Utah Indians, in which he 
not only lost three-fourths of his command, 
but was severely wounded. On January 20, 
1855, he was promoted to the rank of cap- 
tain : on November 14, 1861, to major, and 
on February 3, 1862, was commissioned 
brigadier-general of volunteers. In the 
same year he commanded a brigade in Gen. 
Smith's division, and received two brevets 
for- gallant conduct, that of lieutenant-colo- 
nel for the battle of Gaines' Mills, and that 
of colonel for Golding's Farm, and he also 
participated in the battles at Lee's Mills, 
Mechanicsville. Savage Station, and Glen- 
dale. From August 6, 1862, until Novembe*' 
13, 1862, he commanded the St. Louis dis- 
trict of Missouri ; from the latter named 
date until I'chruary 23. 1863, commanded 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



229 



the Army of Southeast Missouri, and from 
the latter named date until June 6, 1863, 
again commanded the St. Louis district, co- 
operating with Gen. Steele in his Little 
Rock expedition and directing the move- 
ments of troops against Pilot Knob and 
Frederickstown, and in the pursuit of the 
enemy during Marmaduke's raid into Mis- 
souri. From June until September, 1863, he 
led a cavalry division, commanded in the 
actions at Brownsville, Bayou Metre, and 
Ashley's Mills, Arkansas, and took part in 
the capture of Little Rock. On June 26, 
1864, he was made chief of cavalry of the 
military division west of the Mississippi, 
and on November 24, 1864, led a cavalry ex- 
pedition from Baton Rouge to Pascagoula. 
On March 13, 1865, he was brevetted briga- 
dier-general in the regular army for the cap- 
ture of Little Rock, and major-general for 
his services during the war. On December 
I, 1866, he was made lieutenant-colonel of 
the Tenth Cavalry, was acting inspector- 
general of the department of the Missouri 
from November, 1866, until December, 1867, 
and professor of military science in Kansas 
Agricultural College from 1868 to 1871. He 
commanded various posts in Idaho and 
Texas, also the district of Upper Brazos, 
Texas, in 1877-78, and was made colonel of 
the Second Cavalry, March 20, 1879. He 
died at St. Paul, Minnesota, June 26, 1881. 

Monteiro, Aristides, came of a Castilian 
family in the paternal line and of English 
ancestry on the maternal side. His father, 
Francis Xavier Monteiro de Barros, was a 
man of great learning and literary attain- 
ments, who after taking an active part in 
an efTort to establish a republic in Portugal, 
was forced to flee from that country. He 



settled in Virginia about 1823, and devoted 
the remainder of his life to science and liter- 
ature. At his death in December, 1848, he 
left eight sons and a daughter. Dr. Aris- 
tides Monteiro, the seventh son, was born in 
Goochland county, \'irginia, January 12, 
1S29, and soon after his father's death en- 
tered the medical department of the Univer- 
sity of Virginia. The following year he be- 
came a student in the Jefiferson Medical Col- 
lege of Philadelphia, where he was gradu- 
ated in March, 185 1. He began the practice 
of medicine in his native county, and in 
1857 he removed to Albemarle county. He 
was at first surgeon of the Tenth Virginia 
Cavalry Regiment in West Virginia, and was 
then attached to Hillary P. Jones' battalion 
of artillery, with which he served through the 
Seven Days' battles of the Chickahominy, 
and then proceeded into Maryland. He was 
afterward with Nelson's battalion of artil- 
lery until the battle of Sharpsburg, and 
next was ordered to serve with Maj. Rich- 
ardson's battalion, which was disbanded at 
Staunton, Virginia. With Col. Alexander's 
battalion he served through the Gettys- 
burg, Chickamauga and Knoxville cam- 
paign until the spring of 1864 and next was 
stationed at the general receiving hospital 
of the Army of Northern Virginia. After 
two months he was transferred to Gen. 
Wise's brigade, and remained as surgeon of 
the Twenty-sixth Regiment until Col. Mosby 
sought his services, and with that intrepid 
leader he remained until the command was 
disbanded, April 21, 1865. He resumed the 
practice of medicine in Albemarle county, 
Virginia, and in 1866 went to Chesterfield, 
that state, and in 1870 to Manchester. In 
1882 he removed to North Carolina, where 
his practice covered a wide area, and while 



230 



\' I RG IX I A B lOG R A PH Y 



living in Columbia, Tyrrell county, he was 
elected to the medical staff of the Eastern 
I^unatic Asylum, remaining in charge of the 
male department of that institution until 
Alay, 1887. While in Manchester, Virginia, 
he engaged in the banking and drug busi- 
ness, was a member of the city council, and 
for nearly ten years he was president of 
the board of health. He was married, Octo- 
ber 4, 1853, to a daughter of John S. Cocke, 
of Albemarle county, \'irginia 

Minor, Charles Landon Carter, born De- 
cember 3. 1835, ''■t Edgewood, Hanover 
county, \'irginia, son of Lucius H. Minor, 
I'.sq.. and Catherine Frances Berkeley, his 
wife. His paternal grandfather was Gen. 
John Minor, of Fredericksburg, Virginia, 
who married I^ucy Landon Carter, of Cleve, 
and his mother's father was Dr. Carter 
Berkeley, of Hanover county, who mar- 
ried Miss Frances Page, daughter of Gov. 
John Page of Rosewell. He was taught 
ii\ home by his father and later attended 
a private school in Lynchburg, Virginia, 
where one of the teachers was Profes- 
sor Peters, afterwards of the University of 
Virginia. He entered the L^niversity of 
Virginia, and graduated in 1858 with the 
degree of Master of Arts. Just before tak- 
ing his degree he had made an engagement 
t.> teach with Professor Lewis Minor Cole- 
man at Hanover Academy, which was pre- 
vented by Professor Coleman's appoint- 
ment to the chair of Latin in the University 
of Virginia. He then became assistant re- 
s])ectively of Mr. William Dinwiddie in Al- 
bemarle county, the Rev. Dr. l'hili])s at the 
Diocesan School, the \'irgini;i l'"cm;ile In- 
stitute in Staunti>n. X'irginia. and with Col. 
Leroy Broun in Albemarle county, Virginia. 



\\'hen the civil war began, he entered the 
Confederate army as a private in Munford's 
Second \'irginia Cavalry Regiment, and saw 
active service at Manassas, in the valley 
campaign under Stonewall Jackson, and in 
the battles around Richmond. In I8^)2, by 
competitive examination, he was appointed 
lieutenant and then captain of ordnance, and 
was assigned to Gen. Sam Jones, then com- 
manding the department of Southwest Vir- 
ginia. He followed Gen. Jones to Charles- 
ten, South Carolina, when he took com- 
mar.d of that department in June, 1864, and 
some months later was assigned to duty as 
executive oflicer at the Richmond Arsenal 
imder Gen. Gorgas, where he remained un- 
til the close of the war. After the war he 
opened a private school at his old home in 
Hanover county, but soon accepted the pres- 
if'ency of the Alaryland Agricultural Col- 
lege. He subsequently opened a school in 
Lynchburg, from which he was elected to 
a chair in the University of the South at 
Sewanee, Tennessee, whence he returned to 
\'irginia to accept the presidency of the 
\'irginia Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege just opened at Blacksburg. Here he re- 
mained for eight years, doing much to es- 
tablish that institution upon the firm basis 
which it has since occupied. In 1880 he 
]>urchased the Shenandoah \'alley .Academy 
at Winchester. \'irginia, where he did a hne 
work for years, but an e])idemic of scaidet 
fever and the loss of his wife caused him to 
It.ive \ irginia to accept the charge of St. 
P.-iul's School, ill I'.altimore, in 1S88. He 
afterwards became associate principal with 
his old friend and kinsman, L. M. Black- 
ford, at the l'pisco!)al High School, near 
.Alexandria. \ irginia. In Baltimore, during 
the latter vears of his life, he devoted much 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



231 



time to political and historical subjects, 
^vritiIlg■ for the press, mainly of the times of 
the civil war. He published in pamphlet 
form "The Real Lincoln," a second and en- 
larged edition of which, in book form, he 
was about to publish at the time of his death. 
In 1874 he received the degree of Doctor of 
Laws from William and Mary College. In 
i860, he married Miss Frances Ansley Caz- 
enove, daughter of Lewis Cazenove, P^sq., 
cl Alexandria, Virginia, of which marriage, 
which was singularly happy, two children 
survived him. Fannie, wife of the Rev. 
James F. Plummer. of Washington, D. C, 
and Anne Cazenove, wife of the Rev. An- 
drew G. Grinnan, of Weston, West \^ir- 
ginia. Dr. Minor died July 13, 1903, at the 
home of his brother-in-law, R. M. Fontaine, 
Esq., in Albemarle county, Virginia. 

Nash, Herbert Milton, born in Norfolk, 
Virginia, May 29, 1831, son of Thomas Nash 
and Lydia Adela Herbert, his wife. The 
former, born May 12, 1805, died August 9, 
1855, and the latter, born in 1805, passed 
away in September, 1849. The Nash family 
was founded in Virginia by Thomas Nash 
and his wife Anne, who with their servants 
settled in Norfolk county, \^irginia, in 1665. 
They were adherents of the church of Eng- 
hmd, and Thomas Nash received land grants 
in the \'irginia colony. The fourth Thomas 
Nash, great-grandfather of Dr. Nash, was a 
vestryman of St. Bride's parish in Norfolk 
county from 1761 until his death in the latter 
part of the eighteenth century. The fifth 
Thomas Nash, son of the foregoing, was 
born in 1758, and when little more than a 
youth was wounded in the battle of Great 
Bridge. He subsequently served his coun- 
try during the revolutionary war, and in the 



war of 1812. His eldest son served in the 
artillery at Craney Island and took part in 
the repulse of Admiral Cockburn's fleet. 
Thomas Nash, the sixth, sacrificed himself 
by exposure during the epidemic of yellow 
fever in Norfolk, Virginia, in August, 1855. 
The Herbert family, from whom Dr. Nash 
is descended in the maternal line, settled in 
Norfolk county, Virginia, in 1650, and for 
one hundred and fifty years its men were 
[jrominent in public and business aflfairs. 
The grandfather, Alaximilian Herbert, was 
sent to England in his youth to study mathe- 
matics and the principles of scientific ship 
construction, and became connected with 
ship building, an industry for which Norfolk 
was noted from 1780 until 1825, and even 
later. Dr. Herbert Milton Nash attended 
the classical school of the late James D. 
Johnson, and the Norfolk Military Academy, 
pursuing the study of mathematics, under 
Col. John B. Strange, who was killed at 
Crampton's Gap during the civil war. In 
185 1 Dr. Nash entered the University of 
Virginia, and graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in June, 1852. He re 
ceived clinical instruction in New York City 
in both medicine and surgery during the 
twelve months following, and began prac- 
tice in Norfolk in 1853. He was the last 
survivor of the physicians who encountered 
the yellow fever-epidemic of 1855. In April, 

1861, he was appointed assistant surgeon of 
the state forces of Virginia, and attached to 
the post at Craney Island until May, 1862. 
After the evacuation of Norfolk, in May, 

1862. he served with Lee's army through all 
the campaigns. He was disabled and cap- 
tured in a cavalry charge of the enemy upon 
the Confederate reserve artillery on the 
evening of April 8, 1865 — the evening be- 



\'IRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



fore the surrender <if the entire army — and 
was paroled a few days afterward. Return- 
ing to Norfolk in 1865, Dr. Nash again en- 
tered civil professional life, and soon re- 
gained a good practice. He gave special at- 
tention to plastic surgery and gynecology, 
and was the ])ioneer of such work in his 
city. He was a member of the Norfolk 
Medical Society since its organization, and 
several times served as president. He be- 
came a member of the Virginia State Medi- 
cal Society, was formerly its president, and 
was an honorary fellow. He was a member 
of many other societies and had an extended 
reputation. Dr. Nash was married, in Feb- 
ruary, 1867, to Mary A., daughter of Nich- 
olas Wilson Parker, of Norfolk, Virginia, 
and his wife, Elizabeth Boush, a representa- 
tive of one of the oldest families of south- 
eastern \'irginia. 

Saunders, Fleming, born in Campbell 
county, \'irginia, July 18, 1829. a son of 
Judge (general court) Fleming Saunders 
and Alice Watts, his wife, and a descendant 
of John Saunders, a native of England, who 
died in York county, Virginia, in 1700. 
Fleming Saunders was prepared for college 
at the New London Academy, matriculated 
at the University of Virginia, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1S52 with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He pursued 
the study of law at the same institution for 
one year, then, as his father's health had be- 
come imjiaired, he abandoned his legal 
studies in order to take charge of the exten- 
sive plantation. He was an old-line Whig, 
and opposed to secession, but cast his for- 
tunes in with those of his state when the 
latter seceded, and at once enlisted in tlic 
Confederate arm v. His career as soldier 



was characterized by the thoroughness evi- 
dent in all that he undertook, and after the 
surrender at Appomattox he received the 
personal commendations of Generals Robert 
E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. At the close 
of the war he resumed his agricultural 
duties. Mr. Saunders married. July 30, 
1874, Mary Gwathmey. 

Coke, Richard, born in Williamsburg, 

\'irginia, March 13, 1829, son of John 
Coke and Elizabeth Hankins, his wife ; was 
educated at William and Mary College ; 
studied law, and after admission to the bar 
removed to Waco, Texas, and practiced his 
profession. He served as a private and 
afterward as captain in the Confederate 
prmy. In June. 1865. he was appointed dis- 
trict judge, and in 1866 elected judge of the 
supreme court of Texas. A year later, Gen- 
cial Sheridan removed him, on the ground 
that he was an impediment to reconstruc- 
tion. In 1873 he was elected governor of 
Texas, and in 1876 was reelected. Elected 
as a Democrat to the United States senate, 
he resigned the governorship to take his 
seat in the senate, March 4, 1877. In 1833 
he was elected for another term, to expire 
March 3. 18S9. 

Taylor, William Henry, M. D., born at 
F'ichmond, \'irginia. May 17. 1835, a son 
of William Taylor and his wife, Emeline 
Pearson. W^illiam Taylor, who was in 
the commercial business, was for a time 
recorder of Richmond, later a member of 
the city council, a member of the state legis- 
lature, and treasurer of Henrico county. Dr. 
William Henry Taylor commenced his edu- 
c.ilion in various schools of his native city, 
;in(l in 1854 matriculated at the Medical Col- 
lege of \'irginia, from which he was gradu- 





9}^^//^-^ .-^^ 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



2Zi 



aled in 1856 with the degree of Doctor of 
AFedicine. He at once established himself 
in the practice of his profession at Rich- 
mond, where he was successfully engaged 
until the outbreak of the civil war, when he 
volunteered his services. He became as- 
sistant surgeon of the Eighth Regiment, 
Virginia Infantry, and after a time was ap- 
pointed surgeon of the Nineteenth Regi- 
ment, Virginia Infantry, with which he was 
associated until the close of the war. From 
his earliest years he had displayed decided 
preference for scientific study and research, 
and now decided to abandon medical prac- 
tice in favor of chemistry, an idea which he 
has followed since that time. He was chosen 
state chemist for \*irginia when that office 
was established, remaining its incumbent 
until it was abolished in 1906. For a time 
he was also the official chemist for the State 
Department of Agriculture for Virginia. He 
was a member of the Richmond Board of 
Flealth for about twenty years, and since 
1S72 has been coroner of the city. He has 
filled the chairs of chemistry, toxicology and 
medical jurisprudence in the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, and has served as chair- 
man of the faculty. Upon the opening of 
the Richmond high school Dr. Taylor was 
chosen as teacher of physics and chemistry, 
holding this position for twenty-eight years, 
until June, 1901. As the author of books on 
scientific subjects. Dr. Taylor has gained a 
reputation, among his publications being: 
"The Book of Travels of a Doctor of 
Physic," 1871, not long after his return from 
Europe ; "Outlines of Physics," 1895 ; "Out- 
lines of Every-Day Chemistry," 1899; 
"Fundamental Facts and Principles of 
Chemistry," 1901 ; "Outlines of Medical 
Jurisprudence," 1904: and a number of 



scientific monographs. For a time he was 
editor of one of the departments of "The 
Old Dominion Journal of Medicine and Sur- 
gery." He gives his political support to the 
Democratic party, and is a member of the 
Medical Society of Virginia. Dr. Taylor 
has never married. 

Fox, William Fayette, born in King Wil- 
liam county, Virginia, May i, 1836, son of 
Richard Woolfolk Fox and Mary Elliot 
Trant, his wife. He pursued his education in 
the old field schools of Virginia, in Rumford 
Academy, King William county, in Rich- 
mond College, Richmond. Virginia, and the 
University of Virginia. After the comple- 
tion of his own education, Professor Fox 
devoted his talents and energies to the in- 
struction of others. He was a teacher in 
Cc>Iumbia, Virginia, in 1859-60, and then 
t.'iught successively in a private school near 
Marion, Alabama, and in private schools of 
King William county. Virginia, Essex coun- 
ty, Mrginia, and in Richmond, Virginia. In 
1871 he accepted a position as principal in 
the public schools of Richmond, serving 
until February, 1889, when he was made 
superintendent. He was the author of a 
work entitled "Civil Government of Vir- 
ginia," and was for a number of years editor 
and proprietor of the "Educational Journal 
of \'irginia." Professor Fox was married. 
E)ecember 22, 1870, to Elenia Pemberton 
Carter. 

McGuire, John Peyton. Mr. McGuire, 
who has so long been known as head of the 
McGuire's School for Boys, located in the 
city of Richmond, Virginia, was born at 
'The Parsonage," in Essex county, Virginia, 
September 30, 1836, son of the Rev. John 
P. McGuire, who was one of the most faith- 



234 



\1K(;1XIA BIOGRAPHY 



till and successful ministers of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal church in \'irginia. His 
grandfather, Colonel William AIcGuire, of 
Winchester, Virginia, was a lieutenant of 
artillery in the revolution, having enlisted 
at the age of thirteen, and being in most of 
th.e l)attles from Boston to Eutaw Springs, 
ai which last battle he was disabled perma- 
nently. After the revolution, he studied 
law. and became the first chief justice of the 
territory of Mississippi. He was a member 
of the Society of the Cincinnati. The wife 
of this William McGuire was Mary Little, 
daughter of William Little, of Frederick 
county, Virginia. The mother of John P. Mc- 
Guire was Maria Mercer Garnett, daughter 
of Hon. James M. Garnett, of Essex county, 
who, with his son and grandson, were mem- 
bers of congress from Virginia, and grand- 
daughter of Judge James Mercer, an officer 
in the French and Indian wars, who was 
subsequently a member of the Virginia con- 
vention of 1775 and 1776. He was a mem- 
ber of the committee of safety of Virginia, 
and an admiralty judge under the Virginia 
constitution. John P. McGuire was edu- 
cated at his father's school at "The Parson- 
age," taught by various teachers, and at the 
Episcopal high school, near Alexandria, Vir- 
ginia, of which his father was principal from 
1852 until the breaking out of the war be- 
tiveen the sections. In this school he took 
the gold medal for general excellence in con- 
duct and school work. From the high school 
he entered the University of Virginia, and 
for two years studied under Dr. Gessner 
Harrison, Dr. Albert Taylor Bledsoe. Pro- 
fessor Francis H. Smith and Dr. Scheie De 
Vera. Upon leaving the university in 1856 
he entered the Episcopal high school as one 
of the assistants, remaining there until the 



school was closed by the war. During a 
]inrti()n of the war period he served as first 
lieutenant ami instructor in the Confederate 
States na\-y. lui the school shi[) Patrick 
Henry, commanded by Captain William H. 
Parker. In .^e])tember, iS^is, he opened a 
limited school of twenty-four boys in Rich- 
mond, especially preparatory to the Univer- 
sity of Virginia. From this small begin- 
ning, gaining favor by its university and 
college record, the present large school has 
grown. Mr. McGuire published addresses 
ujion various subjects of interest, notable 
among which are "The Siege of Yorktown" 
and "The Virginian of 1781 and 1861," "The 
Cause and Consequences of the W^ar uniting 
to justify the position of the South in all the 
Sectional Strife," and besides these some 
writings for school use, in algebra. Latin 
and English. By addresses and critical 
essays, he contributed largely to the success 
of the efforts to banish false histories from 
tlie schools of Virginia and the rest of the 
south. He was a member of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, of which organiza- 
tion he was first vice-president ; and of the 
executive committee of the Historical Soci- 
ety of Virginia. He was married twice. 
I lis first wife was Clara Mason, daughter of 
Commander Murray Mason, an officer in 
the United States and Confederate States 
navies. His second wife was Susan Rose 
Morris, daughter of Dr. John Morris, of 
Goochland county, Virginia. Of his first 
marriage were three children, John P. Mc- 
Guire, Jr., associate principal of McGuire's 
School ; Clara Fors3'the. wife of the Rev. 
Claudius F. Smith, of V\"ashington, D. C, 
and Murray Mason McGuire, a lawyer of 
K.elnm md. 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



235 



Dudley, Thomas Underwood, born in 
Richmond, Virginia, September 26, 1837, son 
of Thomas Underwood Dudley and Alaria 
Friend, his wife, both of English lineage. 
His early education was received in private 
schools, and he attended Hanover Academy 
prior to entering the University of Virginia 
in October, 1855, and where he continued 
until his graduation with the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts, in the class of 1858. Following 
his collegiate course, he taught one year in 
the Dinwiddle School, Albemarle county, 
\irginia, and one year in Powell's Female 
School, at Richmond, Virginia ; and the fol- 
lowing session was appointed to the posi- 
tion of assistant professor of Latin in the 
University of Virginia. In 1861 he enlisted 
ai a private in the Army of Northern Vir- 
gniia, but was soon afterward promoted to 
the rank of captain and later to major. He 
remained in service until the close of the 
V\ar, and then became a law student in Mid- 
dleburg, Virginia, with John Randolph 
Tucker as his preceptor. For six months 
he continued his reading, but abandoned the 
law for the ministry, and in January, 1866, 
entered the Protestant Episcopal Theolog- 
ical Seminary of Virginia, at Alexandria. 
Ordained to the ministry, he served for one 
year as rector of the Episcopal church at 
Harrisonburg, \'irginia, which was erected 
by his efforts, and in January, 1869, was 
appointed rector of Christ Church, Balti- 
more, Maryland, where he officiated from 
January, 1869, until January, 1875. He was 
then made assistant bishop of Kentucky, 
and upon the death of Bishop Smith, ten 
>ears later, succeeded as bishop of that dio- 
cese. He was widely known through his 
jiublished volumes of lectures and sermons, 
and was regarded as one of the ablest 



preachers in the American church. One of 
the great works that he accomplished was 
m promoting the welfare of the University 
of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee. He 
died in 1904. He was twice married. He 
married (first) Fannie Berkeley Cochran, 
of Loudoun county, Virginia ; and (second) 
Virginia Fisher Rowland, of Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. 

Portner, Robert, born at Rahden, province 
of Westphalia, Prussia, Alarch 20, 1837, son 
ol Henry Portner, a German lawyer, judge 
and officer in the German army, and Henri- 
etta Gelker, his wife. Having obtained a 
practical education at the village schools of 
Prussia, and the military school of Anna- 
burg, Saxony, he emigrated to the United 
States, at the age of sixteen, and for the 
first eight years was variously employed, 
then took up his residence in Alexandria, 
Virginia, where he was a grocer in partner- 
ship with a friend. They established a small 
brewing plant, which proved a profitable 
enterprise. After the civil war the partner- 
ship was dissolved and iVIr. Portner retain- 
ing the brewing business, formed the Robert 
Portner Brewing Company, of which he be- 
came president, and he also became inter- 
ested in artificial refrigeration, inventing 
the first successful machine, with direct am- 
monia expansion, ever used for that pur- 
pose. In addition to the above undertakings 
Mr. Portner served as president of three 
building and loan associations in Alexandria, 
v.'hich he organized ; the Alexandria Ship 
Yards, which he originated ; the German- 
American Banking Company, later known 
as the German American Bank, which he or- 
ganized ; Capital Construction Company, 
and German Building Association ; vice- 



2lU 



X'IRC.IXIA IIIOC.RAPHY 



president of the Xational Capital Brewiiii^ 
Company, of Washington ; and director in 
the American Security and Trust Company, 
of Washington ; Riggs Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, of Washington ; National Bank of 
Washington; Virginia Midland Railway 
Company ; Washington & Ohio Railway 
Company ; National Bank of Manassas, \'ir- 
ginia ; Portner Brown Stone Company ; 
Loula Cotton Mills, and a number of other 
enterprises too numerous to mention. lie 
was a member of the board of aldermen of 
Alexandria. He took up his residence in 
Washington, D. C, in 1881, but still retain- 
ed his citizenship in Alexandria, and his 
summer residence, known as "Annaburg," 
was at Manassas, Virginia. He was a mem- 
ber of the Masonic order. Mr. Portner mar- 
ried, April 4, 1872. Anna von Valer, daugh- 
ter of Johann von \'aler. a native of Switz- 
erland. Mr. Portner died at "Annaburg.'" 
May 28, 1906. 

Blackford, Launcelot Minor, born in Fred- 
ericksburg, \'irginia, February 23, 1837, son 
of William M. Blackford and Mary Berke- 
ley Minor, his wife. Mr. Blackford's father 
was an editor and bank cashier in Lynch- 
burg, and at one time he held an appoint- 
ment as charge d'affaires at Bogota. An 
American ancestor of Mr. Blackford was 
John Carter, of Corotoman, who came from 
England in 1630, and settled in \^irginia. 
Jc^hn's third wife, Sarah Ludlow, was the 
mother of Robert, familiarly known as 
"King Carter," who was the direct progeni- 
tor of Mr. Blackford. Launcelot M. Black- 
ford attended the best day schools of Lynch- 
burg. In i860 he took the degree of Master 
of Arts at the University of Virginia. When 
the civil war broke nut he enlisted as a pri- 



vate in the Rockbridge artillery, composed 
largely of university and college graduates 
and students of theological seminaries, one 
of the most highly efficient body of soldiers 
that ever went from Virginia. Mr. Black- 
fcird afterward became clerk to the military 
court of Longstreet's corps, and later was ad- 
jutant of the Twenty-fourth Virginia Infan- 
try. After the war he became associate prin- 
cipal of the Norwood School, Nelson county, 
which was for many years one of the lead- 
ing boys' schools of Virginia, serving there 
from 1865 to 1870. In the latter year he be- 
came principal of the Episcopal high school, 
and the credit for its high reputation is 
largely due to the labors of ]Mr. Blackford. 
In 1904 Washington and Lee University 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Laws. He is an Episcopalian; for forty 
years has sat in the annual councils of the 
diocese of Virginia ; has been three times 
elected to represent his diocese in the gen- 
eral convention, and since 1890 has been a 
member of the standing committee of the 
diocese. On August 5, 1884, he married 
Eliza Chew, daughter of Rev. John Ambler. 
Mr. Blackford's address is Alexandria, Vir- 
ginia. 

Hundley, George Jefferson, born near 
Mobile, Alabama, March 22. 1838. son of 
Josiah Hundley and Cornelia Jeft'erson, his 
wife. On his father's side he is of mixed 
English and Huguenot blood ; on his 
mother's side he is great-great-grandson of 
Peter Jeft'erson, uncle of Thomas Jefferson. 
His mother and father died when he was an 
infant. He had two years tuition at Fleet- 
V, ood Academy and a year at Ilampden- 
Sidney College, supplementing his educa- 
tion liv rcadiiicf standard authors, lie en- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



237 



ttred the private law school of Judge John 
W. Brockenbrough, in Lexington, Virginia, 
i860; his license was signed by three judges, 
f!.nd he was about to enter upon practice 
",vhen \'irginia seceded from the Union and 
he enlisted among the earliest volunteers, 
serving to Appomattox Court House. After 
the war Mr. Hundley taught school, and in 
i86G located at Buckingham Court House, 
to practice law. In 1S98 he was appointed 
circuit judge of the fifth judicial circuit. In 
1870 he was elected to the state senate, serv- 
ing for four years; and in 1895 to the house 
ot delegates, where he took especial interest 
in a reform in the laws relating to criminal 
trial, and securing the passage of a bill pro- 
viding that no mere technicality not affect- 
ing the merits of a case should delay or post- 
pone a criminal trial. He has served on the 
board of trustees of the Farmville Normal 
School, and of the Institution for the Deaf, 
Dumb and Blind, at Staunton, Virginia. In 
politics he is a Democrat. On October 5, 
1881, he married Lucy Waller Boyd, of Nel- 
son county, Virginia. His address is Farm- 
ville, Virginia. 

Hurt, John Linn, born in Carroll county, 
Tennessee, March 10, 1838, but reared in 
\'irginia, son of William Walker Hurt and 
Nancy Sims, his wife ; his early ancestor 
came from England about the middle of the 
eighteenth century. His elementary educa- 
tion was received in the Samuel Davies In- 
stitute, at Halifax Court House, Virginia. 
In 1854 he was appointed deputy in the 
clerk's office of Halifax county, and after- 
wards became clerk of the circuit court of 
Pittsylvania county, which position he filled 
for twelve years. In 1861 he entered the 
army, and in 1863 was captured, but not 



long afterwards was paroled, and returned 
to his farm in Virginia. Mr. Hurt served 
in the senate of Virginia in 1877, 1881- 
1882, and was one of the recognized lead- 
ers of the Conservative, or anti-Mahone, 
Democrats. He married (first) Nannie 
Kate Clement, (second) Sallie T. Douglas. 
His residence was in Pittsylvania county. 

Taylor, Walter Herron, born at Norfolk, 
\'irginia, June 13, 1S38, son of Walter Her- 
ron Taylor and Cornelia Wickham, his wife. 
He was a student in the Norfolk Academy 
and the Virginia Military Institute. In 1855 
he was railroad clerk in Norfolk, later be- 
came a bank officer, and in the war (1861- 
1865) was aide-de-camp to General Lee 
from 1861 to 1865, adjutant-general of the 
Army of Northern Virginia, and lieutenant- 
cc/lonel. After the war in 1877 he became 
the president of the Marine Bank, of Nor- 
folk. He was one of the pioneers of build- 
ing associations in his section of the state, 
thus enabling wage earners to become the 
owners of their own homes. For a period 
of more than two decades he was an active 
member of the board of directors of the Nor- 
folk & Western railroad, in which he was 
an extensive stockholder. He was a Con- 
servative state senator, serving from 1869 
to 1873, and the most important legislation 
of that period, so far as Norfolk was con- 
cerned, was the consolidation of the Nor- 
folk and Petersburg, Southside, and Vir- 
ginia and Tennessee railroads, making the 
trunk line of the Norfolk & Western, run- 
ning from Norfolk to Bristol. He was also 
chairman of the senate committee on roads 
r'nd internal navigation and led in the sen- 
ate in the advocacy of Gen. Mahone's 
scheme for consolidation. In 1882 he ac- 



238 



VIRGLXIA BIOGRAPHY 



cepted the office of commissioner of the 
sinking fund of the city. He is the author 
of one of the great books of the war, "Four 
Years with General Lee." Col. Taylor mar- 
ried, April 3, 1865, Elizabeth Selden Saun- 
ders, and they are the parents of eight chil- 
dren. 

Stubbs, James New, son of JetTerson 
Washington Stubbs, was born in Glouces- 
ter county, October 17, 1839, was educated 
a: William and Mary College, and studied 
law under John W. Brockenbrough in Lex- 
ington. \'irginia; entered the Confederate 
anny as a member of the Gloucester artil- 
lery ("Red Shirts") ; was detailed for duty 
in the signal corps early in the war, in which 
service he remained, rising to the rank of 
m.ajor. He went with General John Bank- 
head Magruder to Texas in 1862, and remain- 
ed with him till the close of the war. After 
the war he resumed his law studies, and be- 
gan to practice in 1866. Elected in 1869 to 
the house of delegates, and since that time 
has remained almost continuously in the 
senate and house of delegates. Vice-presi- 
dent of the board of visitors of William and 
Mary College since 1888; for some time 
president of the Blind. Deaf and Dumb 
Asylum at Staunton. He has been state 
commander of the Confederate Veterans of 
Virginia, and is a member of Botetourt 
Lodge, No. 7, of Virginia, Masonic order. 
He married, in 1866, Eliza Medlicott. daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Hester (Shackelford) 
Medlicott. 

Duncan, William Wallace, l)orn at Ran- 
doI])h-Macon College, Boydton, \'irginia, 
December 20, 1839, son of David Duncan, 
who was of Irish birth, graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Glasgow, Scotland, saw service 



in the British navy, came to .America, taught 
a classical school in Norfolk, \'irginia, when 
Randolph-Macon College was founded, was 
called to the chair of ancient languages, and 
later took a chair in WofYord College, 
Spartanburg, South Carolina. WilliatTi \\ al- 
lace Duncan was educated at Randolph- 
Macon College, and Wofford College, where 
he was graduated in 1858. He was pre- 
pared for the ministry by his brother. Rev. 
James A. Duncan, president of Randolph- 
Macon College, and in 1859 was received 
into the Virginia conference, and under 
which he served appointments until 1875, 
when he was called to the chair of mental 
and moral science at W^ofiford College. 
While there was made a delegate to the 
ecumenical conference in London, England ; 
Emory (Georgia) College and Central (Mis- 
souri) College conferred upon him the de- 
gree of Doctor of Divinity. In 1886 he was 
elected bishop of the Methodist Episcopal 
church South. He died in 1908. 

Ryan, Abram Joseph, born in Norfolk. 
\'irginia. August 15, 1839. He was ordained 
in the Roman Catholic priesthood in 1861. 
and was a chaplain in the Confederate army 
throughout the war. He was given a charge 
in New Orleans, Louisiana, after the war, 
and edited the "Star." a religious weekly ; 
was tranferred to Knoxville, Tennessee, and 
then to .\ugusta, Georgia, where he founded 
and edited the "Banner of the South." He 
vvas pastor of St. Mary's, Mobile, Alabama, 
1868-80, and traveled and lectured to raise 
money for the Mobile Cathedral. In 18S0 
lit removed to Baltimore, Maryland, intend- 
ing to make a lecture tour. He delivered 
his first lecture in Baltimore, on "Some 
.Aspects of Modern Civilization," and gave 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



239 



to the Jesuit Fathers $300 to found a medal spent in travel and study in Berlin, KieU 

for poetry. His lecture tour was unsuccess- Paris, and Athens. The outbreak of the 

ful, and, in feeble health, he retired from civil war prevented the completion of his 

ministerial work and settled in Biloxi, studies. He ran the blockade, and reached 

Mississippi, giving himself to literary work, his home in 1862. He at once volunteered 

Among his various volumes the one most for army service, and was assigned to duty 

regarded is "Poems — Patriotic, Religious as lieutenant on Gen. J. E. B. Stuart's staflf, 

and Miscellaneous" (1880), containing "The and later was transferred to the corps of 

Sword of Lee," "The Lost Cause," and the engineers, and served as captain till the close 

world-famous "Conquered Banner." He of the war. In the fall of 1865 h^ opened in 



died in Louisville, Kentucky, April 22, 1886. 

Davies, Samuel D., born near Petersburg, 
Virginia, March 21, 1839, son of Col. W'il- 
liam Davies and grandson of Samuel Da\ ies, 
president of Princeton College ; was edu- 
cated at William and Mary College. Wil- 
liamsburg, and was known as an enthusi- 
astic student of languages. During the civil 
war he served as a lieutenant on the staff 
of Gens. Pettigrew and Archer. After the 
war he was a constant contributor of both 
poetry and prose to the "Southern Literary 
Messenger," of Richmond ; the "Crescent 
Monthly," of New Orleans, and other per- 
iodicals. His published works include "Fine 
Arts of the South," "Satirical Romances," 
"Novels, and Novel Writing," "Subjective 
and Objective Poets," "Literary Ambition," 
?nd "Review of Tannhauser." His poem, 
"An Evening Visit to the Lines Around 
Petersburg," written in 1865, won for him 
highest praise. At the time of his death 
he was a member of the board of visitors of 
William and Mary College. 

Price, Thomas Randolph, born in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, in 1839, and died at his home 
in New York City, May 17, 1903. He en- 



Richmond, with his old schoolmate, John 
M. Strother, a classical school for boys, and 
taught there until 1868, when he was called 
to a chair in Randolph-Macon College, and 
was thus at last fairly launched upon the 
work of his life. In 1876 the opening of 
Johns Hopkins University called his old 
master, Gildersleeve, to Baltimore, and Mr. 
Price was called to fill his chair at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and for the next six 
years served there as professor of Greek. 
A call to Columbia University was the re- 
ward of his success. To Price it seemed 
rich in beautiful possibilities — relief from 
much of the drudgery of his professional 
duties, opportunities for special study, time 
for original research, the artistic resources 
of urban life in a great city, and above all, 
ptrhaps, restoration to that work in Eng- 
lish which he particularly loved. He spent 
twenty-one years in Columbia, saw it grow 
into a great university, and when he died 
was sixth in official rank in that vast 
faculty. The courses offered by him covered 
a wide range — from Anglo-Saxon literature 
clown through Chaucer and Shakespeare, to 
Tennyson and Browning and Matthew 
Arnold. He never narrowed his field to that 
tered the University of Virginia, and was of the modern specialist. He was not a pro- 
graduated with the degree of Master of lific v/riter, and the works of his pen are few 
Arts in 1858. The next three years were in number and slender in volume. His 



240 



VIRGIXIA RIOGRAPHY 



"Teaching of the Motlier Tongue," "Shake- 
speare's \'erse Construction," and mono- 
graphs of "King Lear," and other plays, go 
far to exhaust the list. There passed from 
his lecture rooms an extraordinary number 
< f men with the impulse and the instinct of 
the scholar. In the six years of his profes- 
sorship in X'iiginia alone, Dabney and b'itz- 
hugh and Kent, were his pupils; Kern, of 
Washington and Lee, Whiting, of Hamp- 
den-Sidney, Try, of North Carolina, Bruce, 
tif I'ennessee. Henneman, of Sewanee. 
Hall, of William and Mary, Ficklin, of 
Tulane, Trent, of Columbia, these and many 
more. His lifework was his wonderful mon- 
ument. 

Wright, Thorr.as Roane Barnes, born at 
Tappahannock, Virginia, July 4, 1842. son 
of Capt. W'illiam Alfred Wright and Char- 
lotte Barnes, his wife, grandson of Edward 
Wright and Mary Pitts, his wife, and of Rich- 
ard Barnes and Rebecca Roane, his wife, and 
great-grandson of William Wright, who emi- 
grated to the New World from Scotland, 
early in the seventeenth century. William 
A. Wright (father) was an eminent lawyer, 
commonwealth's attorney of Essex county, 
\'irginia, and served as a private in the war 
of 181 2. Thomas R. B. W'right was edu- 
cated at Fleetwood Academy, Hanover 
Academy, and the University of Virginia, 
which he entered during the session of 1S59- 
60. Two days after the fall of Fort Sumter, 
he was one of a company of university 
students, known as the "Southern Guard," 
to march to Harper's Ferry, and shortly 
after was a ])rivate in the Second Company, 
Richmond Howitzers, and was later trans- 
ferred to Company F. Fifty-fifth \^irginia 
Regiment ; was elected lieutenant. Com])any 



A of that regiment, and later promoted for 
gallantry ; was dangerously wounded in 
charge of Fort McCrae, September 30, 1864. 
After the close of the war he studied in the 
law office of James M. ^Matthews, Esq., and 
in 1S68 began the practice of law, and two 
years later was elected commonwealth's at- 
torney of Essex county ; was elected judge 
of the ninth judicial circuit of Virginia, De- 
cember 14, 1891. He was twice re-elected 
judge. He took an active part in politics, 
serving as canvasser for the state at large 
i:i many heated campaigns; was presidential 
elector from the first congressional district 
on the Cleveland ticket in 1888 ; a member 
cf the Democratic state committee, and 
chairman of the committee of the first dis- 
trict. He was the first president of the 
Tidewater Alumni Association of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and served as first com- 
mander of the Wright-Latane Camp, Con- 
federate Veterans. In early manhood Judge 
Wright was baptized in St. John's Episcopal 
Church, Tappahannock, Virginia. Judge 
Wright married, November 29, 1876, Mar- 
garet Davidella Preston, of Lewisburg, West 
Virginia. She was the first president of the 
Essex Chapter, United Daughters of the 
Confederacy, and was president of the Wo- 
man's Monument Association of Essex 
County (incorporated) which erected m 1907 
a monument to the heroic Confederate dead 
f f I'"ssex county. 

Maury, Richard Launcelot, l)iirn in \'ir- 
ginia, October 9. 1840. son of Commodore 
Matthew F. Maury and Anne Herndon. his 
wife. He enlisted as a private in the \'ir- 
guiia army, April 28, 1861 : promoted lieu- 
tenant in Virginia State Troops. June, 1861 ; 
promoted major in the Confederate army 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



241 



and assigned to the Twenty-fottrth Virginia 
Infantry; elected major at the reorganiza- 
tion of the regiment, May, 1862; badly 
wounded at the liattle of Seven Pines, May 
31, ib'62; promoted lieutenant-colonel, May, 
1S63; badly wounded through the hips at 
the battle of Drewry's Bluff: promoted colo- 
nel, May 16. 1864; permanently disabled, 
"but rejoined the army on the evacuation of 
Richmond and surrendered at Appomattox 
April 9, 1863 ; afterwards a prominent mem- 
Ler of ihe Richmond bar. 

Williams, Charles Urquhart, born at Mont- 
rose, Henrico county, Virginia, December 
2j, 1840, son of Charles Bruce Williams, 
editor and farmer, and Ann Mercer Hack- 
ley, his wife ; -and a descendant of pioneer 
settlers of Virginia, among whom we find : 
Philip Pendleton, of Caroline county ; Wil- 
liam Williams ; Edward Duncanson and 
James Hackley. of Culpeper county ; and 
James Bruce and George Stubblefield, of 
King George county. Charles Urquhart 
Williams attended private schools in Rich- 
mond and Culpeper county, after which his 
education was finished by attendance for one 
year at the school conducted by David 
Turner. He read law at the University of 
Virginia, but he was interrupted by the out- 
break of the civil war, when he at once en- 
listed in the Confederate army, and served 
as a private in the Richmond Howitzers, 
and later became lieutenant and drill master. 
Wlien the army departed from Richmond 
Mr. Williams went with Brig. -Gen. D. R. 
Jones, as volunteer aide-de-camp, and sub- 
sequently became assistant adjutant and in- 
spector-general. When Gen. Jones died in 
July, 1863. Lieut. Williams was assigned to 
the stafi:' of Gen. M. D. Corse until the close 

VIR— 16 



o"" the war, first as aide-de-camp, then as as- 
s'stant-adjutant and inspector-general. He 
was admitted to the Richmond bar in Octo- 
ber, 1865, ^nd practiced his profession stead- 
ily after that time. He was a Democratic 
member of the X'irginia legislature, 1875- 
"j"/ : and served in both branches of the Rich- 
mond city council. He was president of the 
Westmoreland Club and of the Sons of the 
.American Revolution: commander of R. E. 
Lee Camp, No. i, Confederate Veterans, and 
a member of the Society of Foreign Wars 
and of the Delta Psi fraternity. Mr. Wil- 
l:;ims married. August 27, 1867, .-Xlice Daven- 
port. He died in 1910. 

Garnett, James Mercer, M. A., LL. D., 

born .April 24, 1840, at "'Aldie," Loudoun 
county, Virginia, the residence of his great- 
uncle, Hon. Charles Fenton Mercer; he is 
the son of Theodore Stanford Garnett, and 
Florentina Isidora Moreno, daughter of 
Francisco Moreno, Esq., of Pensacola, Flor- 
ida, his wife. His father was a civil engi- 
neer, and the early life of James Mercer 
Garnett was spent in Virginia, Pennsyl- 
vania, Florida, Kentucky, South Carolina 
and North Carolina. He was educated for 
four years at the Episcopal High School of 
X'irginia. and for three years at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, taking the degree of Master 
of Arts in 1859. He taught at Brookland 
School, Albemarle county, Virginia, the ses- 
sion of 1859-60. When the war broke out. 
he enlisted in the Confederate service, July 
17, 1861, as a private in the Rockbridge Ar- 
tillery, then attached to Jackson's (later the 
'"Stonewall") brigade, under command of 
Gen. T. J. Jackson. He was promoted to 
second lieutenant of infantry, C. S. A., then 
to first lieutenant of artillery, P. A. C. S., 



242 



X'IRGIXIA rilOGRAPHY 



for (irdnanco tluty ; afterwards to captain, 
and was assigned to the charge of the gen- 
eral reserve ordnance train of the Army of 
Northern Virginia. He was paroled at Ap- 
pomattox Court House, \'irginia, Ajiril 9, 
1865, being then ordnance officer of Grimes's 
(formerly Rodes') Division, Second Corps, 
Army of Northern Virginia. He taught 
from 1865 to 1867 at Midway School, Char- 
lottes\ille, \'irginia, as professor of Greek 
in the Louisiana State University (1867), 
and at the Episcopal High School of Vir- 
ginia (,1867-69). He passed the year of 
1869-70 at the universities of Berlin and 
Leipzig, studying classical philology, and on 
his return was chosen principal of St. John's 
College, Annapolis, Maryland, and profes- 
sor of history and the English language and 
literature, where he remained for ten years 
(1870-801. He resigned his position at St. 
Jc'hn's College in 1880, and conducted for 
two years a university school at EUicott 
City, ^L•^ryland (1880-82), when he was 
chosen professor of the English language 
and literature in the University of Virginia. 
Here he remained for fourteen years, the 
l.'ist three years as professor of the English 
language alone, when he resigned, and filled 
a temporary vacancy in the chair of English 
literature at the Woman's College of Balti- 
more for one year (1896-97), since which time 
he has been taking private pupils in the city 
of Baltimore, and doing literary work. He 
has served as vice-president of the Modern 
Language Association of America (1887-88), 
and of the Spelling Reform Association, and 
at president of the American Dialect So- 
ciety (1890-91), and of the American Philo- 
logical Association (1893-94). The degree of 
Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him by 
St. John's College in 1874. While a student 



at the University of \'irginia he assisted in 
organizing the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, and was its president for one 
term ; was a member of the Jefferson So- 
ciety, the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, 
the University Cricket Club, and the "South- 
em Ciuard," which organization he accom- 
p;.nied to Harper's Ferry on the secession of 
"Virginia, April 17, 1861. While a professor 
in the University of X'irginia, he was a 
member of the vestry of Christ Church, 
Charlottesville, for ten years : often repre- 
sented that church in the \^irginia diocesan 
councils, and was a delegate from the dio- 
cese of Virginia to the Triennial Convention 
of the Protestant Episcopal church at Min- 
neapolis in 1895, and in Washington, D. C, 
in 1898. In 1900 he became, by invitation, a 
niemlier of .Mpha Chapter. Phi Betta Kappa, 
William and Mary College. Virginia, the 
]iarent chapter in the Lniited States, from 
which all otlicr cha])ters trace their origin. 
He is editor of "Selections in English Prose 
from Elizabeth to \'ictoria" (1891); 
"Hayne's Speech to which \\'ebster Re- 
plied" (1894), "Macbeth" (1897), and 
"Burke's Speech on Conciliation with 
America" (1901). He is the author of a 
translation of "Beowulf" (1882), often re- 
printed, of "Elene and other Anglo-Saxon 
Poems" (1889), reprinted; a "History of the 
University of \'irginia," prepared in 1899, 
and (if numerous essays and reviews in var- 
ious periodicals. He married, April 19, 
1871, Kate Huntington Noland, daughter of 
the late Maj. Burr Powell Noland, of Mid- 
dleburg. Loudoun county. Virginia, and had 
one son, James Mercer Garnett, Jr., a lawyer 
of Baltimore, Maryland. He still resides in 
i'laltimore, ^farvland. 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



243 



Patteson, Camm, born in Amherst county, 
A'irginia, February 21, 1840, a son of David 
Patteson, a physician of note, and his wife, 
Elizabeth Camm. He was the recipient of 
an excellent preparatory education, which 
was continued at the University of Virginia, 
fiom which he was graduated with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws and a diploma in 
moral philosophy. This was just at the time 
of the outbreak of the civil war, and Mr. 
Patteson became a volunteer in the Confed- 
erate service early in 1861. He was ad- 
vanced to the captaincy of Company D. 
Fifty-sixth Regiment, Virginia Infantry, and 
he was in active service until the close of 
the war. From that time he became iden- 
tified with the legal profession. He was a 
member of the Virginia house of delegates 
twice ; served as senator from the eighteenth 
senatorial district ; was a delegate to a num- 
ber of Democratic national conventions ; 
served eight years as a member of the board 
of visitors of the University of Virginia. He 
Vv-as a frequent contributor to legal and 
other periodicals, and in 1900 published a 
novel, '"The Young Bachelor." Capt. Pat- 
teson married, March 3. 1863, Mary Eliza- 
beth Mills. 

Old, William Whitehurst, born in Prin- 
cess Anne county, Virginia, November 17. 
1840, son of Jonathan Whitehead Old and 
Anne Elizabeth Whitehurst, his wife. His 
ancestors belonged to the early English 
stock that settled in Virginia ; one of them 
was a member of the committee of safety of 
Princess Anne county during the revolu- 
tionary war. He was educated in the public 
schools of Princess Anne county, and in the 
private schools of Norfolk, Virginia. He at- 
tended Southgate's school, also the Norfolk 



Military Academy, and Col. Strange's school 
and the Albemarle Military Institute at 
Charlottesville, Virginia. He entered the 
University of Virginia in 1858, from which 
lie graduated with the M. A. degree in July, 
1861. Upon the outbreak of the civil war. 
lie enlisted in the University Volunteers, 
and was elected second lieutenant of his 
company. He served with Wise's Legion 
until December, 1861, when the company 
was disbanded by the secretary of war, and 
he re-enlisted as a private in the Fourteenth 
A'irginia Regiment, and was wounded at 
the battle of Seven Pines. In August, 1861, 
he was commissioned captain and assistant 
quartermaster, and was stationed at battery 
No. 9, near Richmond. In May, 1863, he 
received an appointment on the staff of 
Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson, and served un- 
til December of that year, when he resigned 
his commission as quartermaster and was 
made aide-de-camp. After Gen. Jackson 
was captured. May 12, 1864, he served on 
the staff of Gen. Ewell, until he was relieved 
from command of the Second Corps, in June, 
1S63. He then served on the staff of Gen. 
Jubal A. Early, through the valley and 
Maryland campaigns, until August 12, 1864, 
when he resumed his position on Gen. John- 
son's staff, who had been exchanged and had 
been ordered to Hood's army, and with 
whom he served until October 31, 1864, 
Vihen he was disabled by a wound from fur- 
ther service. After the war he studied law 
and settled in Norfolk, Virginia, having been 
for years a partner of the late Richard 
Walke, one of the leaders of the Norfolk 
bar. He was a member of the Norfolk Bar 
Association, the Virginia State Bar Asso- 
ciation, and of many social organizations. 
He was a member of the citv council of Nor- 



244 



VIRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



folk, and was a Democrat in politics. He for 
years represented the Episcopal church in 
the diocesan councils of Virginia and South- 
ern Virginia, and also as a delegate to the 
general convention. On June 23, 1870, he 
married Miss Alice Herbert. 

Fetrie, George Laurens, D. D., was born 
at Cheraw, South Carolina, February 25, 
1840, a son of George H. W. Petrie, and his 
wife, Mary J. Prince, the former a minister 
of the Presbyterian church. Alexander 
Petrie, the first of the family to settle in 
America, came from Elgin, Scotland, in the 
eighteenth century, and made his home in 
South Carolina, where his descendant, 
George Petrie, grandfather of the subject of 
this review, was a lieutenant in the conti- 
nental army. George Laurens Petrie, D. D., 
received his classical education in Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, and Marietta, Georgia, 
then became a student at Davidson College, 
North Carolina, and later studied at Ogle- 
thorpe University, Georgia, where he grad- 
uated as Bachelor and Master of Arts. He 
then entered the Columbia Theological 
Seminary, and studied for the ministry. In 
1862 he commenced his lifework, and be- 
came a chaplain in the Confederate army in 
1863, being assigned to the Twenty-second 
Alabama Regiment. At the close of the war 
he conducted a classical school at Mont- 
gomery ; was professor of Latin at Oakland 
College, Mississippi, 1866-69 ; and became 
pastor of the Presbyterian church at Green- 
ville, Alabama, in 1870. He was pastor of 
the Presbyterian church on Washington 
street. Petersburg, Virginia, 1872-78; in the 
.last mentioned year was called to the Pres- 
byterian church in Charlottesville, \'irginia. 
Hampden-Sidney College, Virginia, confer- 



I cd ui)iin him the honorary degree of Doc- 
tor of Divinity in 1887. Dr. Petrie married, 
November 29, 1864, Mary Cooper. 

Conrad, Holmes, born in Winchester. 
\ irginia, January 31, 1840, son of Robert 
\ oung Conrad and Elizabeth Whiting 
Powell, his wife : she was a descendant of 
Col. Levin Powell, who was a colonel in 
the continental army during the revolution- 
ary- war and became a member of the first 
congress of the United States. Holmes 
Lor.rad pursued his early education in the 
primary schools, and in the Winchester 
Academy, at \\'inchester, Virginia. He was 
a student in the University of Virginia from 
1858 until i860, graduated, and read law un- 
der a private preceptor. He continued his 
reading through the winter, but on April 17, 
186 1, he enlisted as a private in a cavalry 
c<>mpany from his native county. In 1862 
he was commissioned adjutant of his regi- 
ment, and became major and assistant adju- 
t;int-general in 1864. He served on the staff 
o' Gen. Rosser, in a cavalry division, until 
the clo-;c of the war in April, 1865. He re- 
sumed his studies after the cessation of hos- 
tilities, and was admitted to the bar in Janu- 
ary. 1866, when he joined his father in the 
practice of law in Winchester. He was a 
member of the board of visitors of the Uni- 
versity of \'irginia. having been appointed 
by Gov. Kemjier at the beginning of his ad- 
ministration. He also continued a member 
of the board under Govs. Fitzhugh Lee and 
Holliday, this being the board of which the 
Hon. .\. H. H. Stuart was rector. In 1881- 
82 he served as a member of the Virginia 
legislature; in 1893 was appointed assistant 
attorney-general of the L^nited States, and 
in 1895 became solicitor-general of the 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



United States, filling that position until 
July, 1897. In 1892 he was elector-at-large 
on the Cleveland ticket. He belongs to the 
American Bar Association, and to the Vir- 
ginia State Bar Association. For several 
years Mr. Conrad was a member of the 
Cosmos Club of Washington, and is well 
known as a leader in Democratic circles in 
Virginia. He was married, in 1869, to 
Georgia Bryan Forman. 

Bruce, Blanche K., born in Prince Ed- 
ward county, Virginia, March i, 1841, of 
African descent, born a slave, and received 
the rudiments of education from the tutor 
of his master's son. When the civil war be- 
gan he left his young master, whose com- 
panion he had been, and who went from 
A'lissouri to join the Confederate army. 
Bruce taught school for a time in Hannibal, 
Missouri, became a student at Oberlin 
(Ohio) College, and afterward pursued spe- 
cial studies at home, and after the war went 
to Mississippi, where he was a planter. He 
was sergeant-at-arms of the legislature, a 
member of the Mississippi levee board, 
sherifif of Bolivar county, in 1871-74, county 
superintendent of education in 1872-73, and 
was elected United States senator in 1875, 
as a Republican, and serving till March 3, 
1881. He was a member of every Republi- 
can convention held after 1868. On May 
19. 1881, he entered upon the office of regis- 
ter of the treasury, to which he was ap- 
pointed by President Garfield. In 1886 he 
delivered a lecture on the condition of his 
race entitled "The Race Problem," and one 
on "Popular Tendencies." He died March 
17. 1898. 

Stubbs, Thomas Jefferson, born in Glou- 
cester county, Virginia, September 14, 1841, 



245 

son of Jefferson Washington Stubbs, for 
many years presiding justice of Gloucester 
county, and Ann W. C. Baytop, his wife; 
her grandfather was a captain in the revo- 
lutionary army. His early education was 
obtained in private schools and at William 
and Mary College, from which he graduated 
in i860 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
and in 1869 he received the degree of Master 
of Arts in course. In 1882 the honorary de- 
gree of Doctor of Philosophy was conferred 
upon him by Arkansas College. At the 
outbreak of the civil war he joined the Con- 
federate army as a member of the Gloucester 
Artillery, served throughout the war, and 
v/as taken prisoner at Petersburg just be- 
fore the surrender, and was not released 
until Appomattox. In 1865 he entered the 
University of Virginia, and studied for one 
year in the academic department. He was 
master of the grammar school of William 
and Mary College in 1868-69. In the latter 
year he removed to Arkansas, and was for 
sixteen years professor of mathematics and 
history in Arkansas College. For two terms 
he was a member of the Arkansas legisla- 
ture. In 1888 he returned to Virginia, hav- 
ing been elected professor of mathematics 
in William and Mary College, a position 
which he has held ever since. For more 
than ten years he conducted a summer nor- 
mal school for the state. He is a Mason, 
and has been president of the Phi Beta 
Kappa society, the parent chapter of which 
is at William and Mary College. He has 
been commander of the Magruder Camp of 
Confederate Veterans at Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia. On December 22, 1869, Professor 
Stubbs married Mary Mercer, daughter of 
Captain J. R. Cosnahan, of the Confederate 
army. She is a lineal descendant of Gen. 



246 



\'IRGI.\IA inOGRAPHY 



Hugh Mercer, who was killed at the battle 
of Princeton. 

Dooley, James Henry, born at Richmond, 
\'irginia, January i~, 1841, son of John 
Dooley and Sarah, his wife. Both John and 
Sarah Dooley came from their home in 
Limerick. Ireland, to Alexandria, Virginia, 
in 1834, whence they came to Richmond. 
He was first a student in Richmond institu- 
f.ons, at the age of eight years coming under 
the teaching of Dr. Socrates Maupin, who 
later was for many years professor and chair- 
man of the faculty of the University of Vir- 
ginia. His preparation in Richmond en- 
abled him to enter Georgetown University, 
District of Columbia, at the age of fifteen 
years, where he won highest honors during 
each year of his college course, in 1861 tak- 
ing his A. B. with the first honors of his 
class. The same year he enlisted as a pri- 
vate in the regiment of which his father was 
major, the First Virginia, and at the battle 
01 Williamsburg, May 5, 1862, was wounded 
and made a prisoner. Until his exchange in 
the following August he was confined at the 
Rip Raps in Hampton Roads, and soon 
afterward passed the difficult examinations 
of the Confederate government for service in 
the ordnance department, being appointed 
lieutenant of ordnance and assigned to nuty 
under Gen. J. L. Kemper. At the close of 
the war he began the practice of law and 
was very successful. From 1871 to 1877 he 
w-as a member of the Virginia house of as- 
sembly, holding place upon some of the most 
important committees of that body. He re- 
tired from practice in 1898 to devote his 
entire time to the administration of the vast 
business interests he had acquired. In 1881 
and 1882 he was a director of the Richmond 



(S,- Danville Railroad, at llic same time hold- 
ing like office in the Richmond & West 
loint Terminal Railway and Warehouse 
Company, and iluring the year 1S86 he 
served as vice-president of the first named 
road. He has long served as president of 
the Richmond and St. Paul Land and Im- 
I)rovement Company, also as president of 
the Richmond and West Point Land, Navi- 
gation, and Improvement Company. He 
was president of the North Birmingham 
Street Railway Company in 1888, also of 
the North Birmingham Land Company, and 
in the following year was one of the organ- 
izers of the Seaboard Air Line Railway 
Company. In 1900, 1901 and 1902 he was 
chairman of the executive committee of this 
last named company, and he has long been 
president of the West End Home Building 
Fund Company and of the Henrico Build- 
ing Fund Company. From 1898 to 1904 he 
was first vice-president of the Richmond 
Trust and Safe Deposit Company, and is a 
director of the Merchants National Bank, 
of Richmond. Mr. Dooley married, Sep- 
tember II, 1869, Sallie May, of the well 
known Mav family of that name. 

Orr, James Wesley, born in Lee county, 
Virginia, July 19. 1841, son of David Orr, 
who was a progressive agriculturist of Lee 
county, \'irginia, and Rhoda Orr, his wife. 
The pioneer ancestor of the line of the Orr 
family herein recorded was Alexander Orr, 
who emigrated from Ireland, accompanied 
by a brother and sister, they locating in the 
state of Pennsylvania. James W. Orr was 
raised to manhood on his father's farm, and 
obtained his education at the local schools 
and the Jonesville Academy ; he also ob- 
tained a knowledge of law by a course of 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



247 



study in the usual text books of a law 
ccurse. At the beginning of the war be- 
tween the states, he entered the service of 
the Confederate army as private, and was 
promoted to first lieutenant; although he 
lost an arm at the battle of Sharpsburg, he 
remained at his post until the close of hos- 
tilities and peace was declared. He then 
returned to his home, and in the same year 
(1865) was elected sheriff of the county, 
which office he filled for three years, and 
later was elected clerk of the circuit and 
county courts, and so served for ten and 
a half years, after which he was made judge 
ot the county court of Lee county, by the 
general assembly of Virginia, and served as 
such for eight years. In 1901 he was elected 
a member of the constitutional convention 
and served throughout its sessions, and he 
was also chosen as chairman of the Demo- 
cratic county committee of Lee county, in 
which capacity he served for eight years. 
Judge Orr married, November 9, 1865, 
Patty Vcrmilliam. They were the parents 
<>f .^ix children. 

McBryde, John McLaren, Ijorn at Abbe- 
A ille, South Carolina, January i, 1841, a son 
cf John McP>ryde and his wife, Susan Mc- 
Laren. He attended classical schools and 
studied at South Carolina College, Colum- 
Lia, South Carolina. The two LeContes, 
later eminent scientists, were among his in- 
structors at this institution. He then entered 
the University of Virginia, at which he was 
a student when the civil war broke out. He 
served in the Confederate army, but an at- 
tack of typhoid fever obliged him to resign, 
and accept a position in the Confederate 
treasury department, where he soon became 
the head of an important division of the war 



tax bureau. After the war he engaged in 
farming and turned his attention to scientific 
studies, giving especial attention to agricul- 
tural chemistry and botany, and making ex- 
tensive collections of plants indigenous to 
the Piedmont section of the state. He was 
appointed professor of agriculture and bot- 
any at the University of Tennessee in the fall 
cf 1879, and there so strengthened the de- 
partment of agriculture, that agriculture and 
botany became most important features ot 
the institution. Upon the reorganization of 
South Carolina College, a chair in it was 
oftered Professor McBryde, which he accep- 
ted, and he was unanimously elected presi- 
dent of the college at the first meeting of the 
board, 1883. The college prospered greatly 
during the next four years, and early in 
1887 the presidency of the University of 
Tennessee was tendered him, but this ofifer 
was declined. The legislature of South 
Carolina mcreased the appropriation for the 
college in the winter of 1887-88, ordered 
that it should be turned into a university, 
and at the same time made it the State Agri- 
cultural and Mechanical College and Ex- 
perimental Station. A social and political 
storm some time later again reduced the 
status of the institution to that of a small 
college, and the position of president of the 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Vir- 
ginia, at Blacksburg, being offered him, he 
accepted the offer, and his services there won 
wide commendation, and resulted in offers 
from a number of institutions, the highest 
honor thus coming to him being his unso- 
licited election to the presidency of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, which he declined. The 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy was con- 
ferred upon him by the LT^niversity of Ten- 
nessee in 1887, and that of Doctor of Laws 



248 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



by the Southern Presbyterian University in 
1883. President Cleveland tendered him the 
office of assistant secretary of agriculture 
for the United States, in 1893, but he de- 
clined ; he is ex-officio member of the Vir- 
ginia Board of Agriculture, and his agricul- 
tural reports and papers on agricultural 
subjects are of great value in scientific 
Circles. He retired from his active duties at 
ihe college (now called the Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute) at the end of the session 
of 1906-07. Dr. McBryde married, Novem- 
ber 18, 1863, Cora, daughter of Dr. James 
I'.olton, of Richmond, Virginia. 

Wilson, William Lyne, born in Jefferson 
county, Virginia, May 3, 1843, son of Ben- 
jamin and Mary (Lyne) Wilson; educated 
at Charlestovvn Academy, and was gradu- 
ated from Columbian College, D. C, in i860, 
and subsequently studied in the University 
of Virginia. He served in the Confederate 
army as a private in the Twelfth Virginia 
Cavalry. After the war he was professor of 
Latin in Columbian College, from 1865 to 
1&71, but resigned his position on the over- 
throw of the lawyers' test oath in West Vir- 
ginia, and for eleven years practiced law at 
Charlestown. He was a delegate in 1880 to 
the national Democratic convention in Cin- 
cinnati, and the same year was an elector-at- 
large for the state on the Hancock ticket ; 
chosen president of the West Virginia Uni- 
versity, and entered upon the office, Septem- 
ber 4, 1882, but resigned it the following 
)-ear, having been chosen a Democratic 
member of the forty-eighth congress; he 
served in tliat and each successive congress 
until the fifty-fourth, when he was defeated : 
he was chairman of the committee on w-iys 
and means of the fiftv-third congress, and 



rarried through the house of representatives 
the measure repealing the purchasing clause 
of the Sherman law, and also the tariff bill 
wliich bears his name; Columbian Univer- 
sity conferred upon him the degree of LL. 
1). in 1883, and he received the same honor 
from Hampden Sidney College in Virginia, 
the University of Mississippi, Tulane Uni- 
versity, Central College of Missouri, and the 
West X'irginia University ; in 1890 he was 
offered the presidency of the University of 
Missouri, but did not accept it; he served 
six years as one of the regents of the Smith- 
sonian Institution ; was permanent presi- 
dent of the Democratic national convention 
at Chicago, 1892; his name was frequently 
mentioned as United States senator from his 
state, and he was frequently urged to accept 
the speakership of the house of representa- 
tives ; in 1895 was made postmaster-gen- 
eral in President Cleveland's cabinet, and 
on the expiration of his term was elected 
president of Washington and Lee Univer- 
.fity : died at Lexington, Virginia, October 
17, 1900. 

Miller, Polk, born in Prince Edward 
county, Virginia, August 2, 1844, a son of 
Giles A. Miller and his wife, Jane Anthony 
Webster, the former for some terms a mem- 
ber of the state legislature. He was edu- 
cated in private schools, and in 1863 enlisted 
as a private in the Richmond Howitzers, 
and served till the end of the war. After 
the war he kejjt a drug store, and finally 
became the manager and chief proprietor of 
two large concerns of that nature. Pos- 
sessing a fine voice, and fondness for the 
banjo, he gave a number of private amateur 
entertainment? illustrating plantatio'i life, 
'i'hese were so enthusiastically received. 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



249 



lliat in the course of time tiiey were elabor- 
ated into "Old Times Down South," a col- 
lection of songs and stories depicting ne- 
groes and their masters before the war. Mr. 
Miller has delivered these semi-lectures 
more than twenty-five hundred times, ap- 
pearing in almost all the states of the Union. 
Mr. Miller married, November 29, 1871, 
Maude Lee Withers. 

Dunlop, James Nathaniel, born in Rich- 
mond, Virginia. August 24, 1844, son of 
J.imes and Ann Dent (McCrae) Dunlop, 
his ancestry being Scotch-Irish ; attended 
schools of David Turner and Dr. Gessner 
Harrison, as also the military school of the 
University of Virginia, and became a mem- 
ber of Powhatan Troop, was with the Con- 
federate army at the surrender at Appomat- 
tox ; studied law at the University of Vir- 
ginia, and began to practice in 1867; elected 
to legislature from Richmond in 1883, was 
re-elected in 1885, leading the Democratic 
ticket by a handsome majority. He was a 
•fine orator and in 1885 electrified the con- 
vention that nominated Fitzhugh Lee. On 
March 21, 1876, he married Elizabeth Lewis 
C arrington ; children : Maria Louise, be- 
came the wife of Hampton D. Ewing, of 
New York; Ann Dent, Elizabeth Lewis, 
Jnmes Nathaniel, and William Carrington. 
He died June 28, 1888. 

Ezekiel, Moses Jacob, was born at Rich- 
mond, Virginia, October 28, 1844, and is of 
Hebrew parentage. At an early age he 
manifested his talent by painting panoromas. 
He entered the \'irginia Military Institute, 
at Lexington, in 1861, and was graduated 
from that institution in 1866, after serving 
in the Confederate army, 1864-65. For a 



time he then assisted his father in the latter's 
dry goods store, but a portion of each day 
was devoted to the study of art, and at this 
time some notable paintings left his brush, 
among them "The Prisoner's Wife."' He 
soon gave his attention more especially to 
sculpture, and produced "Cain, or the Offer- 
ing Rejected," an ideal bust that showed 
great dramatic talent. He studied anatomy in 
the Medical College of Virginia, removed to 
Cincinnati in 1868, and in 1869 went to Ber- 
lin, Germany. In 1872 he modeled the colos- 
sal bust of Washington, now in Cincinnati, 
which gained him admission to the Society 
of Artists of Berlin. In 1873 he won the 
Alichael Beer prize, which had never before 
been awarded to a foreigner. In 1874, the 
Jewish secret order of Sons of the Covenant, 
commissioned him to execute a group en- 
titled "Religious Liberty," for the Centen- 
nial Exhibition. This was iniveiled in Fair- 
mount Park, Philadelphia, November 30. 
1876, and now stands in front of Horticul- 
tural Hall. He was afterward commis- 
sioned to execute statues for the outside 
nichesof the Corcoran Art Gallery, at Wash- 
ington, D. C. Since 1886 his subjects have 
been mainly ideal. Among his works are 
busts of Liszt and Cardinal Hohenlohe ; a 
statuette of "Industry," 1868; reliefs of 
Schiller and Goethe, 1870; bas-relief por- 
traits of Farragut, 1872, and Robert E. Lee, 
1S73; "Pan and Amor," a bas-relief, 1875, 
"Fountain of - Neptune," Netturno, Italy, 
1884; a bron.^e medallion of William W. 
Corcoran for his gallery in W'ashington, 
]886; and a group entitled "Art and Nature," 
in Frankfort, Germany, 1887. He received 
the Cavalier's cross of merit for art and 
science, with a diploma from the grand 
duke of Saxe-Meiningen, in 1887. 



25° 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



Tuttle, Albert Henry, born at Cuyahoga 
I-alls, -Summit county, Ohio, November 19, 
1844, son of Henry Blakeslee Tuttle and 
Fmeline Reed, his wife. His father was a 
successful merchant of Cuyahoga Falls, 
from whence he removed to Cleveland. 
Cliio, in 1852. He was a pupil in the Cleve- 
land High school, the Cleveland Institute, 
and the State College of Pennsylvania, from 
which last he graduated B. S. and M. S., and 
later pursued post-graduate studies at Har- 
vard University from 1870 to 1872 and at 
Johns Hopkins University in 1882-83. He 
was a teacher of natural science in the State 
Normal School at Plattsville, Wisconsin, 
from 1868 to 1870; for the following two 
years was an instructor in microscopy in 
Harvard College ; then became professor of 
zoology and geology in the State College of 
Pennsylvania; was called to the chair of 
/.oology and comparative anatomy in the 
Ohio State University, served from 1873 to 
1888, when he was elected professor of bi- 
ology in the University of Virginia. He has 
been a frequent contributor to scientific 
journals, and is the author of an "Introduc- 
tion to the Study of Bacteria," (1895), and 
"Elements of Histology" (1898). He en- 
listed as a private in the Eighth Battery of 
the Ohio National Guard, U. S. A., for three 
months' service during the war between the 
states. Prof. Tuttle married in Paris, 
France, August 7, 1873. Kate .Austin Seeley ; 
three children. 

Humphreys, Milton Wylie, born in 
Greenbriar county, Virginia (now West 
Virginia). September 15, 1844, son of Dr. 
Andrew C. Humphreys and Mary McQuain 
Hefner, his wife, who was of German de- 
scent. Dr. Humphreys was also a justice of 



the peace, and a lieutenant-colonel in the 
militia. Samuel Humphreys was the first 
member of this family to come to America, 
from his native land, Ireland, and he first 
settled in Pennsylvania prior to the revolu- 
tion, and thence removed to Greenbriar 
county. The maternal American ancestor 
was Jacob Hefner, who came prior to the 
revolutionary struggle, and was killed while 
in the continental army. Prof. Humphrevs 
studied in private schools, and entered 
Washington College, but the civil war 
broke out and he enlisted, was corporal 
of artillery and served four years. At the 
close of the war he resumed his studies at 
Washington College, and was graduated 
Master of Arts in 1869, becoming a tutor 
in Latin, and later assistant professor of 
ancient languages. He then continued his 
studies at the universities of Berlin and 
l.tipsic, the last mentioned conferring the 
ucgrce of Doctor of Philosophy. Elected 
professor of Greek at the Vanderbilt I ni- 
\ersity in 1875: professor of ancient lan- 
guages in the University of Texas in 1S83; 
and professor of Greek at the Uni\ ersity of 
\irginia in 1887. The degree of Doctor of 
Laws was conferred upon him by Vander- 
bilt University in 1883: was made editor- 
general for North .America of the "Revue 
des Revues," of Paris, France, about the 
srme time: subsequently chosen to prepare 
the pa])er of Greek for the Witrld's Con- 
p.ress of Science and .Arts at St. Louis; he 
was vice-president of the American Philo- 
logical Association from 1880 to 1882. and 
elected annual president in the last named 
year. In the first years of his research work. 
Prof. Humphreys published a work upon 
Greek meters; he has written many articles 
which have been published in ])hilological 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



251 



journals here and abroad ; he published an 
edition of the "Clouds," of Aristophanes in 
1S85 ; and of the "Antigone," of Sophocles in 
1891. Prof. Humphreys married. May 3, 
1887, Louise F. Garland, daughter of Dr. 
Landon C. Garland, late chancellor of Van- 
(lerbilt University. 

Jones, Maryus, born in Gloucester county, 
Virginia, July 8, 1844, son of Catesby 
Jones and Mary Ann Brooke Pollard, his 
wife, and descended from Capt. Roger Jones, 
who, coming to Virginia with Lord Cul- 
peper, was captain of a sloop of war for the 
suppression of piracy and unlawful trading 
in Virginia waters. He was the youngest 
cliild of his father by the second marriage 
and acquired his early education in the 
country schools in the vicinity of his home, 
was then prepared for college at Newnig- 
ton Academy, after which he matriculated at 
Randolph-Macon College, but left this insti- 
tution in 1861 at the outbreak of the civil 
war. He enlisted in Company D, Twenty- 
fourth Regiment. Virginia Cavalry, and was 
actively engaged in a number of battles, a 
notable one being the charge at Samaria 
Church, June 24, 1864, where the entrench- 
ments of the enemy were carried by assault ; 
another well known engagement was the 
battle at Darbytown Heights, July 2"], 1864; 
he had the misfortune to be captured by the 
enemy, and was not set at liberty until the 
close of the war, but was advanced to the 
rank of sergeant while still a prisoner. After 
the war he attended lectures at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia and in 1868 commenced 
teaching school, and while following this 
occupation for four years studied law. He 
was admitted to the Gloucester county bar 
in 1872, and at once established himself in 



the practice of his profession, was elected 
commonwealth's attorney of the county in 
1879, and was the incumbent of this office, 
by repeated re-elections for a period of six- 
teen years. He removed to Newport News 
i.i 1899, and became mayor of that city. Mr. 
Jones married, December 10, 1873, Mary 
Armistead Catlett, and they have had four 
children. 

Stubbs, William Carter, son of Jefiferson 
Washington Stubbs, was born in Gloucester 
county. Virginia, December 7, 1846. was 
schooled by private tutors and studied at 
William and Mary College in i860. The 
war suspended the college exercises and Mr. 
Stubbs graduated at Randolph-Macon Col- 
lege. Served throughout the war afterwards 
in a company called "The Partisan Rangers," 
commanded by Capt. Thomas C. Clopton. 
which afterwards became Company D of 
the Twenty-fourth Virginia Cavalry. After 
the war studied at the University of Vir- 
ginia, and in 1869 was professor in East 
Alabama College and in 1872 was made pro- 
fessor of chemistry in the Alabama .Agri- 
cultural and Mechanical College. In 1878 
was made state chemist of Alabama. In 1885 
was called to Louisiana to take charge of a 
sugar experiment station ; was elected by 
the Louisiana legislature, state chemist, and 
in 1887 became director of the north Louisi- 
ana experiment station at Calhoun, Louisi- 
ana. In 1892 was authorized to conduct a geo- 
logical survey of the state, and was given 
charge of the Audubon Sugar School. Has 
published many reports and pamphlets upon 
agricultural topics and the manufacture of 
sugar. In 1900 was commissioned by Hon. 
James Wilson, Secretary of Agriculture, to 
\ isit the Hawaiian Islands and make report. 



\'IRG]XIA lUOGRArHY 



which was done. He has represented Louisi- 
ana as commissioner at many expositions. 
He married, in 1878, Elizabeth Saunders 
Blair, daughter of Henry Dickinson and 
Mary Louisa Blair, of Mobile, Alabama. 
Mrs. Stubbs, aided by her grandfather. Col. 
Jp.mes E. Saunders, published "Early Set- 
tlers of .Afabama and Notes and Gene- 
alogies." 

Robertson, Alexander Parish, was born 
ill Culpeper county. A'irginia, February 15, 
1853, a son of William .\. Robertson, a 
country gentleman, and his wife, Sarah Tun- 
stall Parish; and a descendant of William 
Robertson, a native of Scotland, who set- 
tled on a farm in Culpeper in 1784. John 
'J'unstall, a maternal great-great-grandfather 
of Mr. Robertson, was a member of the com- 
mittee of safety in 1775. 

Alexander Parish Robertson obtained his 
preparatory education in private schools in 
Culpeper county, then matriculated at the 
University of Virginia, from which he was 
graduated Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of 
Law. Between the close of the civil war 
and his entrance into the university, he as- 
sisted in all the labors incidental to the cul- 
tivation of the homestead farm, a training 
which endowed him with a robust constitu- 
tion. He established himself in the practice 
of the legal profession in Staunton, Virginia, 
ill 1876. and for a time took a rather active 
I)art in political affairs, but then devoted his 
entire time to his profession, making a spe- 
cialty of chancery and fiduciary practice. 
The Democratic party has always had his 
political support, although he was a "(iold 
Democrat," in 1898. Mr. Robertson mar- 
ried. May 4, 1882, Margaret Briscoe Stuart, 
daughtcT of the lion. .'\. H. H. Stuart, and 



cousin of General J. E. B. Stuart, the dash- 
ing cavalry officer of the Confederacy. 

Bullitt, Joshua Fry, was born in Jefferson 
county, Kentucky, July 24, 1856, a son of 
Joshua Fry Bullitt, Sr., and his wife, Eliza- 
beth Roland Smith, eldest daughter of Dr. 
George W'. Smith, a leading physician in 
Louisville. Joshua Fry Bullitt, Sr., a dis- 
tinguished member of the bar of Louisville, 
served as a member of the Louisville city 
council, of the legislature of Kentucky, as 
city attorney of Louisville, as associate 
judge and chief justice of the supreme court 
of Kentucky, and was reviser and editor of 
the "Codes of Practice," and "General Stat- 
utes." The Bullitt family was founded in 
this country by Benjamin Bullitt, a Hugue- 
not, who fled from France after the revoca- 
tion of the Edict of Nantes, and settled at 
Port Tobacco, Maryland. For a time the 
family was resident in Virginia, whither the 
son of Benjamin Bullett had removed, and 
from there to Kentucky. He was a student 
:.t the Rugby Grammar School for a year, 
was the winner of a scholarship in Washing- 
ton and Lee University, and matriculated 
at this university in the fall of 1876. He 
studied there two years, being a leader dur- 
ing this period in the literary and athletic 
societies, and winning other honors. After 
teaching for one year at Rugby, he com- 
menced the study of law in a private class 
presided over by his father and ex-Attorney- 
General James Speed, and he also attended 
the lectures of Prof. Minor at the University 
of \"irginia during the summers of 1879 and 
1883. In iSSo he became associated in the 
practice of law with his father in Louisville, 
and seven years later he associated himself 
with Ilenrv C. McDowell, of Lexington. 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



253 



Kentucky, went to Mineral City, now Big 
Stone Gap, and there they practiced suc- 
cessfully until they dissolved partnership 
in 1894. The following year Mr. Bullitt 
formed a partnership with J. L. Kelly, hav- 
ing offices at Big Stone Gap, and at Bristol, 
Virginia. While their practice is a general 
one, it is chiefly connected with corporation 
v^ork, and the firm of Bullitt & Kelly is a 
-well known one. In 1885 and 1886 he served 
at a member of the Kentucky legislature, 
and was a candidate for congress in Vir- 
ginia in 1896, but withdrew because of his 
dissatisfaction with the Chicago platform. 
He was first lieutenant and then captain of 
the Crescent Hill Guards (Cavalry), this 
later becoming Company E, of the Louisville 
Legion. He and his partner, Mr. Mc- 
Dowell, organized the "Police Guard," of 
Big Stone Gap, about forty of the best men 
of the town joining this body. Mr. Bullitt 
was elected captain, and Big Stone Gap be- 
came a model town of the west. This body 
IS still in existence, and is mentioned in the 
dedication of "Blue-Grass and Rhododen- 
dron," by John Fox, Jr. who says : "To 
Joshua Bullitt, Henry Clay McDowell, 
Horace Fox, the first three captains of the 
Guard." One of the stories in this book, 
"Civilizing the Cumberland." contains an 
account of the "Police Guard" and its cap- 
tain. Mr. Bullitt is the author of: "Panics 
and their Causes," "New Woman," "Trusts 
and Labor Unions," and "Objections to the 
Torrens System." His address is Big Stone 
Gap, Wise county, Virginia. 

Mr. Bullitt married, in 1885. Mrs. Maggie 
Talbott Churchill, only daughter of Jere- 
miah J. Talbott, of Jeflferson county, Ken- 
tucky. 



Mears, Otho Frederick, born near Keller. 
-\ccomac county, \'irginia, June 4, 1862, son 
of Benjamin W\ Mears and Emma S. Mapp, 
his wife, is a descendant of a family, whose 
ancestors settled on the Eastern Shore at 
ail early date. He studied at Onancock 
Academy, and at Randolph-Macon College, 
where he pursued his studies for two years. 
Upon his return to the Eastern Shore, he 
taught school for five years. He next stud- 
ied law under John B. Minor and James H. 
Gilmore at the University of Virginia, from 
which he was graduated June 30, 1886. 
.After his admission to the bar, he located 
for active practice in .Accomac, and shortly 
afterward formed a business connection 
with Thomas C. Walston, and then removed 
to Eastville, where the partners conducted 
a successful business until the death of Mr. 
Walston, which occurred in December, 
1SS7. since which time Mr. Mears has de- 
\oted his entire time to his private practice, 
to the duties pertaining to the office of com- 
monwealth's attorney, to which he was 
elected twice. Mr. Mears married, Novem- 
ber 19, 1890, Florence R. Holland, daughter 
of N. L. Holland. His address is Eastville, 
Virginia. 

Summers, Lewis Preston, was born four 
and a half miles west of Abingdon, Wash- 
ington county, Virginia, November 2, 1868, 
a son of John Calhoun Summers and Nannie 
Montgomery Preston, his wife, who was a 
daughter of John F. Preston, of Locust 
Glen, Washington county, \'irginia, and a 
sister of the later Dr. Robert J. Preston, 
superintendent of the \\'estern State Hos- 
pital for a number of years. The immigrant 
ancestor of Mr. Summers in the paternal 
line was George Summers, of Flemish 



254 



VIRGIXIA r.IOGRAPHY 



origin, who settled in Frederick county, 
afterward Shenandoah county, near Tom's 
Brook, in 1766. 

His early education was acquired at the 
public schools of his native county and at 
the W'ytheville Male Academy, his spare 
time being devoted to the performance of 
the various sorts of labors incident to the 
cultivation of a farm. He commenced the 
s'.udy of law in the summer school conduct- 
ed by Prof. John B. Minor, at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, during the years 1890-91, 
and continued the regular course at this 
university. 1892-93. being graduated in the 
last mentioned year with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. He was a student at the 
Tulane University of Louisiana, 1894-95, 
?nd was graduated with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Laws in 1895. While engaged in his 
legal studies, he was also otherwise occu- 
pied in order to render himself self support- 
ing, the first of his positions being that of 
railway postal clerk on the route between 
Lynchburg, Virginia, and Bristol, Tennes- 
see. He served as postmaster of Abingdon 
from March 1, 1890, to March i, 1894. Dur- 
ing the next ten years he was a member of 
the Republican district committee, of the 
ninth congressional district of V'irginia; 
from January i, 1904, to May i, 1905, he was 
commonwealth's attorney for Washington 
county, resigning this office in order to ac- 
cept that of collector of internal revenue. 
In April, 1904, he had been elected chairman 
of the Republican district committee of his 
district, and resigned this at the same time 
and for the same reasons. As an author .Mr. 
Summers has earned considerable praise ; 
his "History of Southwest \^irginia from 
1746 to 1786. and of Washington County, 
1777 to 1870," published in 1903, is consid- 



ered a valuable contribution to the local his- 
tory of his section. He resides at Abingdon, 
Washington county, Virginia. Mr. Sum- 
mers married, February 24, 1897, .\nnie 
Katherine Barbee. daughter of .M. .A. Bar- 
bee, of Giles county, \'irginia. 

Sands, Alexander H. G., was born in 1828. 
son of Thomas Sands, of Williamsburg. In 
1838 he entered the grammar school of Wil- 
liam and Mary College, under Professor 
Dabney Brown, and continued four years. 
At the age of ten years he began the study 
of Latin, and when he left the school he 
liad read through the ordinary course, had 
made some proficiency in Greek, and had a 
limited knowledge of French. He made a 
distinguished record as a lawyer, and was a 
law writer of note. He was author of Sands' 
"Suit in Equity," "Recreation of a Southern 
Barrister," and some miscellaneous writ- 
ings. He left an incomplete "History of 
Legal and Constitutional History of \'ir- 
ginia." He died in Richmond, in 1887. 

Fristoe, Edward T., born in Rappahan- 
nock county, Virginia, December 16, 1830. 
He graduated from the \'irginia Military 
Institute in 1849, "'^s then a teacher for 
three years, and in 1855 graduated from the 
University of Virginia. While an under- 
graduate, he was called to the chair of 
mathematics in Columbian University, 
Washington City, where he served until 
1S60, when he accepted the professorship of 
mathematics and astronomy in the L'niver- 
sity of Missouri. In 1862 he entered the 
confederate army, as captain and assistant 
adjutant-general, later being promoted to 
colonel of cavalry, under Gen. Sterling 
Price. .After the war he was professor of 
chemistry in Columbian University; in 1871 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



255 



took similar position in the National j\Ied- 
ical College ; in 1874 was dean of the Cor- 
coran Scientific School of the Columbian 
University, Washington. D. C. ; and was 
kter professor of chemistry in the National 
College of Pharmacy in the same city. In 
186S he received the degree of Doctor of 
Laws from \\'illiam Jewell College. 

Keiley, Anthony M., born in New Jersey, 
in 1S35; he was a brother of Bishop Benja- 
min J. Keiley. He was educated at Ran- 
dolph-Macon College, and after leaving that 
institution, founded the Norfolk "Virgin- 
ian," which he edited for a time, and 
also the Petersburg "Index and News." A 
staunch Democrat, he "stumped" for his 
party in many campaigns, and in 1881 was 
chairman of the Virginia Democrat state 
committee. He was mayor of Richmond for 
one term, and from 1875 to 1885 was city 
attorney. In the latter year he was nomi- 
nated by President Cleveland as envoy ex- 
traordinary and minister plenipotentiary to 
Italy, but the appointment was withdrawn 
on account of objections by the Italian gov- 
ernment, and his subsequent nomination for 
the Vienna post ended similarly. In 1886 
President Cleveland appointed him to the 
international court of first instance, at Cairo, 
Egypt, a body constituted to regulate the 
privileges and status of foreigners domiciled 
within the dominions of the Turkish Sultan. 
The court comprises two divisions, the lower 
and the upper, or final court of appeals. In 
1894 Mr. Keiley was transferred from the 
former to the latter, and served in that ca- 
pacity until 1902, when he resigned and took 
up his residence in London. For twelve 
years he was president of the National Irish 
Catholic Benevolent Union. He died from 
an accident in Paris, January 24, 1905. 



Pegram, William Johnson, who served as 
a colonel of artillery in the Confederate 
army, was born in Petersburg, Virginia, in 
1841 ; entered the University of Virginia in 
i860, and was a student of the law when 
the civil war began ; he was a member of the 
famous F Company of Richmond, and he 
enlisted at once as a private in the artillery, 
and was soon elected lieutenant of the Pur- 
cell Battery, one of the crack batteries of 
the Confederate army; the following win- 
ter he was promoted lieutenant-colonel, and 
at the time of his death at Five Forks, in 
April, 1865, he was full colonel of artillery, 
when twenty-four years of age; among his 
friends and companions he had always been 
noted for the modesty of his demeanor, and 
ir was only upon the field of battle that men 
realized what a master in the art of war this 
young soldier was ; no man of his age ever 
received greater commendation from his su- 
perior officers, and time and again he was 
the popular hero of his community; he fell 
as a soldier desires to fall, upon the field of 
battle, having attained the highest success 
which any officer of his rank attained dur- 
ing the war ; of him, his faithful friend and 
gallant subordinate. Captain W. Gordon 
McCabe, says: "Thus passed away this in- 
comparable young man ; it was his lot to be 
tried in great events and his fortune to be 
equal to the trial ; in his boyhood he had 
nourished noble ambitions, in his young 
manhood he had won a fame greater than 
his modest nature ever dreamed of and at 
last there was accorded him, on the field of 
battle, the death counted sweet and honor- 
able." 

Lindsay, John Summerfield, born in Wil- 
liamsburg. \'irginia. March 19, 1842; gradu- 
ated at William and Mary College in 1859, 



2.s6 



VIRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



and at the University of \'irginia in 1866, 
^•.llerc iie was chaplain for two years. lie 
was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
church until 1868, when he took orders in 
the Protestant Episcopal church. He was 
rector of St. James' Church. Richmond, 
1871-79. and in the latter year took charge 
of St. John's, Georgetown, Virginia. He was 
chaplain of the United States house of rep- 
resentatives. 1883-85. In 1887 he was elect- 
ed bishop of the diocese of Eastern Mary- 
land, but declined it. He published two his- 
torical sermons relating to the churches at 
Richmond and Georgetown, and an address 
on "The True Citizen" (1889). He removed 
to Boston, where he was a prominent 
preacher till his death in 1903. 

Fox, Luther Augustine, D. D., born at 
Randleman, Randolph county. North Caro- 
lina, August 3, 1843, son of Alfred J. Fox, 
a minister of the gospel, and his wife, Lydia 
Fox ; and a descendant of David Fox, a 
native of Germany, who came to this coun- 
try in 1750, and took up his residence in 
North Carolina. His early life was the 
usual one of a country lad. After proper 
preparation he became a student at Roanoke 
College, Virginia, from which he graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1868. 
Not long afterward, he entered upon his 
duties as a minister of the Lutheran church 
in North Carolina, and subsequently served 
churches in Roanoke, Virginia ; Strouds- 
burg, Pennsylvania, and Waynesboro, Vir- 
ginia. He was elected professor of philoso- 
phy at Roanoke College in 1882, devoting 
his energies to the duties of this position up 
to the present time. He was also acting 
president of the college for many years, the 
president himself being called away by oHier 



duties, and this institution conferred upon 
him the honorary degrees of Master of Arts 
and of Doctor of Divinity. He has achieved 
a reputation as an author, his work, entitled 
"Evidences of a Future Life," earning espe- 
cial commendation, as did also his articles 
appearing in the "Lutheran Quarterly." Dr. 
Fox married, September 9, 1869, Etta Gloss- 
brenner, daughter of Bishop J. J. Gloss- 
brenner. 

Brown, Alexander, born at Glenmore, 

Nelson county, \ irginia, September 5, 1843, 
and died at his home in the same county, 
August 25. 1906, son of Robert Lawrence 
Brown and Sarah Cabell Callaway, his wife. 
The Browns have only been in .\merica 
about a century, the grandfather of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, also Alexander Brown. 
coming from Perth, Scotland, in 1811, and 
settling in Williamsburg, \'irginia. Robert 
L. Brown was a farmer and teacher, a man 
ot high literary attainments, who at the 
commencement of the civil war, abandoned 
his peaceful pursuits and joined the Con- 
federate army, in which he rose to the rank 
of lieutenant. The earliest American an- 
cestor of Alexander Brown in the maternal 
line was Dr. \\'illiam Cabell, an eminent 
surgeon in his day. born in luigland, who 
acquired lands in what are now Nelson, 
.Xniherst, Aj)pomattox and Buckingham 
counties. He held many oflices of public 
trust and responsibility, and four of his sons 
achieved eminence, the eldest. Colonel Wil- 
liam Cabell, of Union Hill, becoming the 
great-grandfather of .Alexander Brown, the 
subject of this sketch. The early tuition of 
.Alexander Brown was acquired under his 
father and the late Horace W.Jones, an emi- 
nent tc;icluT of the past half century, and 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



257 



the well furnished library of his home fur- 
nished him with the best examples of Eng- 
lish literature, so that he could follow his 
natural inclination for reading to his hearts 
content. He was about to engage in the 
study of engineering when the civil war 
broke out, and at the age of seventeen years 
he enlisted in the Confederate army, serv- 
ing faithfully until the close of this moment- 
ous struggle, and was unfortunate enough 
to completely lose his hearing as a result of 
the tremendous explosion at Fort Fisher. 
Handicapped as he was by his deafness, 
Mr. Brown engaged in the battle of life 
after the war with a courage which was 
nothing less than admirable. For three 
years he was a salesman in a grocery store 
in Washington, D. C, then removed to Nor- 
wood, Nelson county, Virginia, which was 
his place of residence until his death. He 
lived a quiet, retired life, devoting himself 
tc literary labors, with a most gratifying 
result. Not having at hand the necessary 
books for consultation, he sent to all parts 
of the world to have old records, etc., copied 
and forwarded to him, collecting his data at 
great expense, but the results justified his 
methods. In 1886 he published "New Views 
on Early Virginia History;" in 1890 his 
monumental work. "The Genesis of the 
United States;" in 1895, "Tlie Cabells and 
their Kin ;" in 1898, "The History of our 
Earliest History." He was also the author 
of articles which appeared in various period- 
icals, and these always commanded atten- 
tion. He was a member of many societies. 
Some 3'ears prior to his death he was elect- 
ed a member of the mother chapter of Phi 
Beta Kappa fraternity of William and 
Mary College, and the same institution con- 
ferred the degree of Doctor of Laws upon 

VIR-17 



him in 1901. He already held the degree of 
Doctor of Civil Law from the University 
of the South. Dr. Brown married (first) 
Caroline Cabell; (second) Sara Randolph 
Cabell. He had no children. 

Thomas, Reuben Smith, born in Madison 
county, Virginia, March 19, 1843, son of 
Reuben Thomas and Eliza Carpenter, his 
wife, is a descendant of an English and Ger- 
man ancestry, respectively. His father was 
a successful agriculturist, also a soldier, 
serving in the war of 1812 and participating 
ir. the battle of New Orleans in 1814. and 
was active in the political affairs of Madi- 
son county, serving as magistrate and pre- 
siding justice. Reuben S. Thomas spent 
his early years on his father's farm, and his 
education was acquired in the schools and 
academy of the neighborhood. After com- 
pleting his studies, at the age of sixteen, he 
went to Charlestown, Virginia, now West 
Virginia, as a member of the Richardson 
Guards, to assist in putting down the John 
Brown raid. In 1861, at the beginning of 
the war between the states, during his aca- 
demical course, he enlisted in the Seventn 
\ irginia Regiment, and participated in all 
the battles and engagements of that body, 
being severely wounded at the battle of 
Gettysburg, captured at the engagement at 
Sailor's Creek, April 6, 1865, and remained 
h prisoner at Point Lookout until June 20, 
1865, when he took the oath of allegiance 
rnd was released. Upon his return from 
the war he studied law in the office of Gen. 
James L. Kemper, also attended the law 
school of Judge Brockenbrough, in Lex- 
ington, and was admitted to the bar in 1866. 
Mr. Thomas married. May 28. 1867. Ella C. 
Hamm. daughter of J. C. Hamm and Lucy 
Hamm, his wife. 



2^8 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



Boulware, Aubin Lee, born in King and 
Queen county, Virginia, December 27, 1843, 
son of Andrew Moore Boulware and Mar- 
tha Ellen Todd, his wife, she a daughter of 
lieorge Thompson Todd, a native of Scot- 
land, and his wife, Mary (Smith) Todd, of 
Fredericksburg, Virginia. He studied at 
different private schools until his education 
was interrupted by the outbreak of the civil 
war. In i86j he enlisted as a private in the 
Xinth Regiment. Virginia Cavalry. Lee's 
Rangers, serving with bravery until the 
close of the war, and promoted to a lieu- 
tenancy, l)ut never commissioned. At the 
close of the war he resumed his studies at 
Mr. Schooler's Edge Hill Academy, and the 
following year matriculated at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, from which he was gradu- 
ated three years later in the class of 1869, 
with the degree of Master of Arts. He 
taught school at the Kenmore high school, 
and on the death of Judge R. L. Coleman, 
the principal, the following spring, Mr. 
Boulware opened the University high 
school, of which he was the proprietor. 
After one or two years he commenced read- 
ing law in the offices of Judge Barton and 
St. George R. Fitzhugh, in Fredericksburg. 
Having been admitted to the bar, he prac- 
ticed for a time in the office of Johnston & 
Williams, the firm subsequently becoming 
Johnston. Williams & Boulware, when he 
became a memljer of the firm. When Mr. 
Johnston died the firm was continued as 
Williams & Boulware. When the Southern 
Railway Company was organized Mr. Boul- 
ware became a director and served in this 
ofifice until his death. He acted as receiver 
in the United States courts, in the White 
Sulphur Springs case : the Arlington Life 
Insurance case and the Southern Telegraph 



Company case. He became president of the 
I'irst National Bank of Richmond in 1891, 
and later in the same year, president of the 
Union Bank of Richmond. He died June 
12, 1897. Mr. Boulware married, November 
14. 1878, Janie Grace Preston, daughter of 
the late Hon. William Ballard Preston, of 
Montgomery county, \'irginia. and they had 
three children. 

Hume, Frajik, born in Culpeper county, 
Virginia, July 21, 1843, son of Charles Hume 
and Virginia Rawlins, his wife, and a de- 
scendant of (]eorge Hume, son of George 
Hume, Lord of Wedderburn, Berwickshire, 
Scotland. His father had a position in the 
second auditor's office in Washington and 
the son attended a school in that city, and 
in July, 1861, joined the "Volunteer South- 
ern" attached to the Twenty-first Alississippi 
Regiment and participated in many battles 
of the war, being wounded severely in the 
hip at Gettysburg. After the surrender at 
Appomattox, he was for two years engaged 
in agricultural pursuits, and then took up 
the grocery business in W'ashington and 
amassed a considerable fortune. He was 
associated with other important enterprises 
both in Washington and Alexandria. He 
was interested in politics, and was elected 
to the Virginia legislature in 1889 and 1899. 
and served as chairman of the board of 
supervisors of Alexandria county. He mar- 
ried, June 22, 1870. Emma Phillips Norris. 
daughter of John E. Norris, a lawyer of 
\\ashington. D. C. He died in Washington, 
ji'ly 17. ii)0<'i. 

Woods, Micajah, born May 17, 1844. at 
•ilolkham.' .Albemarle county. X'irginia. 
son of Dr. John Rodes Woods, and Sabina 
Lewis Stuart Creigh. his wife. He was de- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



259. 



scended on both parental sides from Scotch- 
Irish ancestry. His first American progeni- 
tor, Michael Woods, received a patent to 
a large tract of land in 1737, in the 
western part of Albemarle (then Gooch- 
land) county ; his wife, Mary Campbell, be- 
longed to the clan of which the Duke of 
Argyle was the head. William Woods, 
great-grandfather of Micajah Woods, was a 
member of the legislature of Virginia, 1798- 
90 ; and his son, Micajah, was a member of 
the Albemarle county court, 1815-37, and 
sheriff of the county at the time of his death. 
Micajah Woods was educated at the Lewis- 
burg Academy, the Military School of Char- 
lottesville, taught by Colonel John Bowie 
Strange, and the Bloomfield Academy. In 
1861 he entered the University of Virginia, 
but with many of the other young men of 
the South soon entered the Confederate 
army. He served when barely seventeen 
years of age as volunteer aide on the stafif 
of General John B. Floyd in West Virginia, 
and in 1862 was a private in the Albemarle 
light horse company. Second Regiment Vir- 
ginia Cavalry, and afterwards was first lieu- 
tenant in the Virginia state line. In May, 
1S63, he was commissioned first lieutenant 
in Jackson's battery of horse artillery, in 
which capacity he served until the close of 
the war, participating in the battles of Car- 
nifax Ferry, Port Republic, Second Cold 
Harbor, New Market, Second Manassas, 
Sharpsburg, Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and 
Gettysburg. At the close of the war he re- 
turned to the University of Virginia, where 
after studying in the academic department 
for one year, he took up law, and was gradu- 
ated therefrom in 1868 with the Bachelor of 
Law degree. He opened an ofifice for the 
practice of his profession in Charlottesville, 



\'irginia, and in 1870 was elected common- 
wealth's attorney for that county, and filled 
that position for thirty-three years, with- 
out opposition for the nomination since 1873. 
In 1872 he was made a member of the board 
of visitors of the University of Virginia, a 
position which he held for four years, at the 
tmie of his appointment being the youngest 
member of the board ever selected. He was 
chairman of the Democratic party of Albe- 
marle county for several years ; as elector 
represented the seventh congressional dis- 
trict of Virginia ; and also was a member of 
the presidential electoral board in 1888. He 
was permanent chairman of the Virginia 
Democratic state convention which met in 
Staunton, in 1896, to elect delegates to the 
national convention. As captain of the 
Monticello Guard at Charlottesville, he com- 
ir.anded that famous old company at the 
Yorktown celebration in October, 1881. In 
1893 he was made brigadier-general of the 
Second Brigade of Virginia Confederate 
\ eterans, which position he held until 1901, 
when he declined reelection. On June 9, 
1874, he married Matilda Minor, daughter 
of the late Edward Minor Morris, Esq., of 
Hanover county, Virginia. 

Croghan, George St. John, son of Col. 
George Croghan, was a Confederate officer, 
and was fatally wounded at McCoy's Mills, 
West Virginia, during the retreat of Gen. 
Floyd in December, 1861. He invented a 
pack-saddle for mules, which was first suc- 
cessfully used in carrying wounded soldiers 
over the mountains in West Virginia. 

Thurman, Allen Granberg, born in Lynch- 
burg, Virginia, November 13, 1813. His 
grandfather, a Baptist minister, opposed 
slavery, and removed with his family to 



26o 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



C)hio, and there taught school, with young 
Thurman as one of his pupils, and who 
later entered an academy at Chillicothe, 
v.'here his proficiency in mathematics won 
for him the sobriquet of "right-angled, tri- 
angled Thurman." At the age of eighteen 
he began law studies under his uncle, 
William Allen, and after three years thus 
occupied, he became private secretary 
to Governor Lucas, of Ohio, at the same 
time continuing in law studies under Judge 
Swayne. After being admitted to the bar, 
he became a partner of his uncle at Chilli- 
cothe, who soon engaged in politics, Thur- 
man succeeeding to the business of the firm. 
In 1844 he was elected to congress, being 
the youngest member of that body. He de- 
clined a renomination, and practiced his pro- 
fession until 1851, when he was elected to 
the supreme court of Ohio, in which posi- 
tion he remained for four years, being chief 
justice for one-half of that period. He then 
resumed his law practice, in which he con- 
tinued until 1867, when he received the 
unanimous Democratic nomination for gov- 
ernor, and at the election was defeated by 
Rutherford B. Hayes (afterwards Presi- 
dent), but reduced the Republican majority 
of 42,000 the year before to less than 3,000. 
The legislature was Democratic, and Mr. 
Thurman was at once elected United States 
scnatnr, to succeed Ben Wade. He took his 
seat March 4, 1869, and at once became 
leader of the Democratic minority. His 
speeches on the Geneva award and the Pa- 
cific railway funding bill attracted wide at- 
tention. He was reelected, and closed his 
twelve years' service March 4, 1881, with a 
reputation which stood among the highest 
for judicial fairness, and for dignity and 
strength in debate, especially on questions 



of constitutional law. He ser\ed usefully 
on the committees on the judiciary and pri- 
vate land claims. He was the author of an 
act ( the "Thurman Act") to compel the 
Pacific railroad corporations to fulfill their 
obligations to the government, and which 
he forced through the senate, in spite of the 
powerful railroad influences. On retiring 
fiom the senate, he resumed his law prac- 
tice, and was particularly prominent in the 
Bell Telephone patent contest, being on 
principal in opposition to a monopoly. In 
1886 he was nominated by the Democratic 
caucus of the legislature for United States 
senate, but was defeated. In 1884 his name 
was brought forward for the Democratic 
presidential nomination, but was not seri- 
ously considered. In 1887 he declined a 
position on the interstate commerce com- 
mission. He was the Democratic nominee 
for vice-president in 1888, but his ticket was 
defeated. He married Mrs. Mary (Dun) 
Tompkins, of Chillicothe, Ohio. He died 
December 12, 1895. 

English, Thomas Dunn, born in Philadel- 
I hia, Pennsylvania, June 29, 1819, of Quaker 
ancestors, who settled in New Jersey, in 
1684. He was educated chiefly in private 
academies and at the Friends' boarding 
school in Burlington, New Jersey, ^^'hen 
only seventeen years of age he already 
wrote for the "Philadelphia Press." He 
graduated in medicine at the University of 
Pennsylvania in 1839, but after a short prac- 
tice he studied law, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1842. He edited a daily paper in New 
"N'ork in 1844, and in 1845. issued a literary 
magazine, "The Aristidean." but only a 
single volume appeared. In 1848 he edited 
a humorous periodical. "John Donkey," and 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



261 



the same year wrote a work on the French 
revolution of that period, in conjunction 
v/ith G. G. Foster. In 1852 he removed to 
Virginia, remaining five years, then went to 
New York, where he wrote the "Logan 
Grazier" and other poems, descriptive of 
life and character in that 'region. In 1859 
he settled in New Jersey, and practiced med- 
icine many years. Politics engaged a share 
of his attention, and in 1863-64 he was mem- 
ber of the New Jersey legislature. William 
and Alary College (Williamsburg, Virginia) 
conferred on him the degree of Doctor of 
Laws in 1876. He wrote several novels, 
mostly pseudonymous, and more than 
twenty dramas, of which "The Mormons"' 
is the only one printed. He wrote "Ben 
Bolt," a popular song, which first appeared 
in the "New York Mirror," in 1843, ^"d the 
"Gallows-Goers," which had a large circu- 
!;.tion during the agitation of the question 
of capital punishment from 1845 to 1850. 
H is other publications are : "Walter W'oolfe," 
Philadelphia, 1842; "MDCCCXLIV, or the 
Power of the S. F.," a political satire; 
"Poems" (suppressed) ; "Ambrose Fecit, or 
the Peer and the Painter ;" "American Bal- 
lads ;" "Book of Battle Lyrics," and "Jacob 
Schuyler's Millions." He also wrote numer- 
ous pamphlets, and contributed lyrics and 
essays to various periodicals. He died in 
1902, 

Elliott, Wyatt M., born in Campbell coun- 
t_\ , Virginia. February 25, 1823, son of 
Thomas Elliott and Elizabeth Bonduvant, 
his wife. When eight years old, he was 
taken to the home of his maternal uncle, 
Thomas M. Bondurant, in Buckingham 
county, and at the age of sixteen entered the 
\'irginia ^Military Institute, at its organiza- 



tion, and was made captain of the first com- 
pany of cadets. He graduated in 1842, re- 
turned to Buckingham county, and taught 
school for two years, meantime reading law 
under Col. W. P. Bock. In 1846 he went to 
Richmond, where for twenty years he was 
connected with the "Whig" newspaper. He 
was chosen captain of the "Richmond 
Grays" in 1847, and which he commanded 
until the second year of the late war, an in- 
cident of this service being guard duty at 
Harper's Ferry, at the execution of John 
IJrown. During the war he retained a nomi- 
nal relation to the "Whig," but in 1862 re- 
signed his captaincy of the Grays and re- 
cruited a battalion of six companies (Fif- 
teenth Virginia), of which he was commis- 
sioned lieutenant-colonel. He commanded 
the same under Gen. Ewell until he was 
captured at Sailor's Creek, April 6, 1865, and 
thence taken to Johnson's Island, being lib- 
erated by President Johnson in July follow- 
ing. Returning to Richmond, he resumed 
his connection with the "Whig," continuing 
until December, 1866, when he removed 
with his family to Appomattox county. He 
was a member of the house of delegates, 
1871-73, and in 1875 was elected to the state 
senate. In 1884 he was made clerk of the 
United States circuit and district courts at 
Lynchburg. 

McCaw, James Brown, was born in Rich- 
mond. \'irginia, July 12, 1823, and repre- 
sented a line of distinguished physicians. 
His grandfather, James Drew McCaw, was 
a nephew of the celebrated Dr. James Mc- 
Clurg (q. v.), who brought him up and sent 
him to the University of Edinburgh, where 
he graduated in 1792. He settled in Rich- 
mond, where in 1799 he was pronounced 



262 



VIRGINIA lilOGRAPHV 



"one of the greatest men of his profession 
in America." having the best lilirary of 
books in Richmond. II is father, William 
R. McCaw, was also a prominent physician, 
who married Anne Ludwell Brown, daugh- 
ter of James Brown, Jr.. state auditor for 
forty years. James Brown McCaw gradu- 
ated in 1844 at the medical department of 
the ITniversity of New York, and engaged 
in practice in Richmond. During the war 
between the states he was chief surgeon of 
Chimborazo Hospital and during the four 
years treated some 76,000 patients. He was 
a professor in the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia and editor of the "Virginia Medical 
Journal." He was a man of splendid ap- 
pearance and was counted one of the finest 
physicians in Richmond. He married Delia, 
daughter of Dr. William A. Patterson, of 
Richmond, and had two sons — also surgeons 
and physicians — Dr. David McCaw, of Rich- 
mond, and Dr. Walter McCaw, of the United 
States army. 

Boiling, Stith, born in Lunenburg county, 
\'irginia, February 28, 1835. son of John 
.'^tith Boiling and Mary T. Irby, his wife. 
He attended the Laurel Hill school, and Mt. 
Lebanon Academy. He farmed until 1858, 
and then engaged in a mercantile business 
until the beginning of the civil war. In 
April, 1861, he enlisted in Company G, 
Ninth \'irginia Cavalry, and was promoted 
through various grades to captain, and in 
1863 became acting assistant adjutant-gen- 
eral on the staflfof Gen. W. H. F. Lee. He was 
six times wounded — near Cul])C]ier Court 
House; near Green House; at Morton's 
Ford; at Guinea Station; near Petersburg: 
and at Gaines' Mills. After the war, he re- 
turned to Lunenburg county and farmed 



until iSf)C). In that year he was elected to 
the house of delegates, and was reelected. 
He was then appointed tobacco inspector 
by Governor Kemper, and served as such 
until 1880, when he was appointed post- 
master at Petersburg, and held that position 
something mor^ than four years. He be- 
en me connected with the Oaks Warehouse 
Company, and served as president of the 
Lunatic Asylum board, and as president of 
the board of education. Petersburg. 

Bouldin, Edw^in E., born in Charlotte 
county, \'irginia, March 31, 1838, son of 
James \V. Bouldin, a former congressman, 
;md Almeria Read, his wife, daughter of 
Rev. Clement R. Read. He took an aca- 
demic course at the University of Virginia. 
;ind studied law under George W. Read. 
He practiced at Goliad. Texas, from 1859 
till the opening of the civil war, when he 
leturned to Virginia and joined Company 
B, Fourteenth \'irginia Cavalry, known as 
the "Charlotte Cavalry." In September. 
1861, he was commissioned lieutenant, and 
was elected captain in 1862. He command- 
ed his regiment at Gettysburg, where he 
was wounded, and he was again seriously 
wounded at the crossing of the Potomac, 
near Hagerstown. He was taken prisoner 
at Moorfield, in 1864, and held in the Camp 
Chase (Ohio) prison for eighteen months. 
He was exchanged in 1865, and commanded 
his regiment from Five Forks till the sur- 
render. He then engaged in law practice 
in Danville. In 1902 he was a member of 
the state constitutional convention. He 
married Lucy L. Fd wards, of Charlotte. 

Coke, John Archer, liorn in Williamsburg, 
\'irginia. July 14. 1842, son of John Coke 
aiul Fli/a llankins. his wife. He was edu- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



263 



cated at William and Mary College, where 
he also studied law. In April, 1861, he be- 
came a lieutenant in the Lee Artillery, and 
ai the reorganization in 1862 became cap- 



r.nd began practice in Prince Edward and 
adjoining counties. In 1886 he was made 
jr.dgc of the county court. In 1885 he be- 
came secretary and treasurer of the State 



tain: was slightly wounded in "Dahlgren's hemale Normal School, at Farmville. He 

raid," near Richmond ; served with the army also served in the state senate, where he 

nntil 1864. and was then on duty in Rich- was one of the most influential and popular 

mond until the close of the war. In Septem- members. He married Nannie E., daugh- 

ber, 1865, he entered upon law practice in ter of W. W. Forbes, of Buckingham county. 

Richmond. He married Emma Overbv, of _ , ^ 

n, , , , ' Traylor, Robert Lee, born at "Midway 

Mecklenburg count v. ,,.,, ,, , , 

Mills, Nelson county, Virginia, September 

Royall, William L., born in Fauquier 23, 1864, son of Albert W. Traylor and 

county. Virginia, November 15, 1844, son of Mary E. Adams, his wife. He was educated 

Rev. John J. Royall and Anna K. Taylor, at Richmond College, and on leaving school 

h.is wife. His education was given him by became a rodman in the engineer corps of 

his mother and by his grandmother, who the Richmond & Alleghany railroad. He 

was a sister of Chief Justice Marshall. In afterwards served in various capacities with 

March, 1862, when a little more than seven- the Georgia Pacific railroad, at Atlanta, 

tten years old, he entered the Confederate Georgia, and Birmingham, Alabama: the 

army, and took part in all its great battles Memphis, Birmingham & Atlanta railroad, 

until March, 1864. when he was wounded and the Tennessee Midland railroad, at 

and taken prisoner. After the war he stud- Memphis, Tennessee. He was a director 

ied law under William Green, in Richmond, and secretary for the last named company, 

was admitted to the bar, and engaged in with ofifices in Richmond. He was later 

practice in Richmond, and was one of the connected with the banking and insurance 

most prominent attorneys. He was espe- business. Mr. Traylor was fond of litera- 

cially prominent as attorney for the holders ture and was an experienced bibliographer. 

of state bonds, who after years of litigation He had a remarkable collection of books 

finally agreed to compromise. He married ^\•hich he disposed of just before his death. 

Judith Page Aylett, daughter of Patrick 



Henry Aylett and Emily Rutherfoord. his 
wife. 

Watkins, Asa D., Ijorn in I'rince Edward 
county, Virginia, June 5. 1856. son of F. N. 
Watkins and Martha A. Scott, his wife; his 
father was county judge and member of the leading civic, educational, literary and other 
house of delegates. He was a student at societies ; is a member of the Woman's Club. 
Flampden-Sidney College, read law with his and of the Baptist church. She is the author 
father, and attended law lectures at the Uni- of "Mary Gary" (1910) ; "Miss Gibbie Gault" 
versity of Virginia, was admitted to the bar, (1911) : "Bobbie;" all three of which have 



Bosher, Kate Langley, born in Norfolk, 
Virginia, February i, 1865, daughter of 
Charles Henry Langley and Portia Deming 
Langley, his wife : graduated at Norfolk 
College for Young Ladies, with Bachelor of 
Arts degree. She is identified with various 



264 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



proved very popular and had large sales. 
She has also been a frequent contributor to 
magazines. She is descended from \\ illiam 
Langley, who settled in Lower Norfolk 
county about 1850. and from Salvato Mus- 
coe, a lawyer (q. v.), who settled in Essex 
count)' about 1700. She is the wife of 
Charles G. Bosher. of Richmond, \'irginia. 

Johnston, Mary, born at "Buchanan," 
Botetourt county. \'irginia. November 21, 
1870, daughter of Major John William John- 
ston, a veteran of the civil war, and Eliza- 
beth Alexander, his wife. She was not 
strong as a child, and was not sent away to 
school, and her education was largely de- 
rived from her industrious reading in her 
father's library, particularly along histor- 
ical and general literary lines. She did her 
hrst writing in Birmingham, Alabama, 
while her family was residing there, and 
afterwards went to New York, and in 1902 
to Richmond, Virginia. She made various 
journeys, to familiarize herself with places 
which she made the scene of her work. Her 
published volumes include: "Prisoners of 
Hope" (1898), dealing with colonial Vir- 
ginia, and republished in England as "The 
Old Dominion ;" "To Have and to Hold" 
(1900), also based on colonial Virginia, and 
published in England as "By Order of the 
Company;" "Audrey" (1902), on similar 
lines to the two preceding works ; "Sir Mor- 
timer" (1904), relating to the Elizabethan 
I^eriod in England ; "The Goddess of Rea- 
son" (1907), based on the French revolu- 
tion; "Lewis Rand" (1908), a talc of the 
Burr conspiracy ; and "'The Long Roll" 
(191 1 ), relating to the achievements and 
character of Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson. Miss 
Johnston's works have given her rank with 
the first novelists tif the day. 



Flournoy, H. W., born in Halifax county, 
X'irginia, in 1846, son of Thomas S. Flour- 
iKv. who was a candidate for governor 
against Henry A. Wise in 1S51, and Rosa 
Buena Wood, his wife. He was educated 
at the Samuel Davis Institute, Halifax coun- 
ty ; T. T. Bouldin's school, Charlotte coun- 
ty ; John H. Powell's school, Halifax county, 
and the Pike Powers school, at "Mt. Lau- 
rel." In January, 1862, before he was six- 
teen years old, he enlisted as a private in 
Company G, Sixth Virginia Cavalry, serv- 
ing until he was wounded at Tom's Brook, 
Virginia, October 8, 1864. In November 
following he joined the Third Company, 
Richmond Howitzers, with which he served 
till the end of the war. In September, 1867, 
lit entered upon law practice in Danville; 
he was elected judge of the corporation 
court in June, 1870, and reelected in 1876, 
resigning in the latter year, and resuming 
practice in Halifax county. In 1881 he re- 
moved to Washington county. In 1883 he 
was elected secretary of the commonwealth 
of Virginia, and was twice reelected. 

Bosher, Lewis C, born in Richmond, \'ir- 
ginia, February 17, i860, son of Robert H. 
Bosher and Elizabeth Eubank, his wife. He 
attended Richmond College, graduated at 
the Medical College of Virginia, and entered 
into practice at Richmond. He was pro- 
fessor of anatomy in the Medical College ; 
deputy coroner of Richmond ; and surgeon, 
with the rank of major, of the First \'irginia 
Artillery Battalion. He was one of the Icad- 
i'ig Richmond physicians. 



Carter, John C, Ixirn in X'irginia in 1S05. 
He was appointed to the naval service from 
Kentucky, March i, 1823. served on the 

sloop Lcxiuijton in 1827, and on the frigate 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



265 



Dclaivarc. of the Mediterranean squadron, in 
1829-30; was promoted passed midshipman, 
June 4, 1831, and commissioned as lieuten- 
ant, February 9, 1837. He served on the 
United States steamer Mississippi, of the 
home squadron, during the Mexican war. 
On September 14, 1855, he was made com- 
mander. In 1862 he commanded the steamer 
Michigan, on the lakes. After the war he 
was placed in command of the receiving 
ship Vermont, and of the naval rendezvous 
at San Francisco. He was commissioned 
commodore and placed on the retired list on 
April 4, 1867. He died November 24, 1870, 
at Brooklyn, New York. 

Campbell, John Lyle, born in Rockbridge 
county, Virginia, December 7, 1818; gradu- 
ated at Washington College (now Washing- 
ton and Lee) in 1843. O" leaving college 
he became assistant in the academy at 
Staunton, Virginia, and afterwards had 
charge of a similar institution in Richmond, 
Kentucky. In 1851 he was called to the 
chair of chemistry and geology at Washing- 
ton College, an office which he occupied 
iMitil his death. He was a recognized au- 
thority on the geology of Virginia, and 
wrote reports on that subject as well as 
frequent contributions to the scientific jour- 
nals. Among his larger works were: "Geol- 
ogy and Mineral Resources of the James 
River Valley" (1882), and "Campbell's Agri- 
culture ; A Manual of Scientific and Prac- 
tical Agriculture for the School and Farm" 
(Philadelphia, 1850). He died February 2, 
1886, at Lexington, Virginia. 

Armstrong, George Dodd, born in Mend- 
ham, New Jersey, September 15, 1813. He 
graduated at Princeton in 1832, was a teacher 
for over three vears, and then entered 



the Union Theological Seminary in Prince 
Edward county, Virginia. Two years later 
he became professor of chemistry and me- 
chanics in Washington College (now Wash- 
ington and Lee University), Lexington. In 
1 85 1 he resigned his professorship and took 
charge of a church in Norfolk. The degree 
Of S. T. D. was conferred on him by the 
college of William and Mary in 1854. He 
contributed from an early age to period- 
icals, and published "The Christian Doctrine 
of Slavery" (New York, 1857) ; "Scriptural 
Examination of the Doctrine of Baptism," 
and "The Theology of Christian Experi- 
ence" (1857); "The Summer of the Pesti- 
lence ; A History of the Ravages of the Yel- 
low Fever in Norfolk, Virginia, in 1855" 
(Philadelphia, 1857); "Sacraments of the 
New Testament" (1880); and "The Books 
of Nature and Revelation Collated" (1886). 

Battelle, Gordon, born in Newport. Ohio, 
November 14, 1814. He graduated at Alle- 
ghany College in 1840, and was licensed as 
a Alethodist preacher in 1842. From 1843 
to 185 1 he was principal of the academy at 
Clarksburg, Virginia. In 1847 he was or- 
dained deacon, and in 1849 elder, in the 
Methodist church. As preacher and presid- 
ing elder he occupied most of his time from 
1851 to i860, and was a member of the gen- 
eral conferences of 1856 and i860. His in- 
fluence in western Virginia was very great, 
and at the begmning of the civil war he was 
appointed official visitor to the military 
camps. He was a member of the conven- 
tion that met November 24, 1861, and 
framed the constitution of the new state of 
West Virginia. To him more largely, prob- 
ably, than to any other, was due the aboli- 
tion of slavery in that region. In Novem- 



266 



\'IRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



ber, 1861, he was chosen chaplain of the 
First \^irginia Regiment, and so continued 
till his death in camp. January 7, 1862. of 
typhoid fever, after a service of but a few 
weeks. 

Cain, Richard H., born in Greenbrier 
county, \irginia. April 12. 1825: removed 
to Ohio in 1831, and settled in Gallipolis. 
Though his education was limited, he en- 
tered the ministry at an early age. In i860 
he entered A\'ilberforce University. Xenia, 
Ohio, and in 1865 went south and engaged 
iti the work of reconstruction. In 1867 he 
was elected to the constitutional convention 
of South Carolina, and the year following 
to the senate of that state. He was elected 
to congress for two terms, serving from 
1876 till 1880. In 1880 he was chosen bishop 
by the general conference of the .\frican 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and was ap- 
pointed to supervise its interests in Louisi- 
ana and Texas. In the latter state he or- 
ganized Paul Quinn College at Waco. He 
was presiding bishop of the first Episcopal 
district of the African Methodist Episcopal 
church, embracing the conferences of New 
York, New Jersey. New England, and Phil- 
adelphia. In 1873 the degree of D. D. was 
conferred on him by Wilberforce Univer- 
sity. 

Burnett, Henry Clay, born in Essex coun- 
t\. \'irginia. October 5. 1825. He received 
a classical education, removed early to Ken- 
tucky, where he entered upon the practice 
of law, and was in 1851-53 clerk of the cir- 
cuit court of Trigg county. He was elected 
to congress as a Democrat from 1855 to 
1861, but was expelled at the latter session 
for his open sympathy with the South, on 
December 3, 1861. He had jiresided over a 



Kentucky southern conference held at Rus- 
sellville on October 29, 1861, and called a 
sovereignty convention at Russellville on 
November 18, of which he also was presi- 
dent, and which passed an ordinance of se- 
cession and organized a state government. 
He was a representative from Kentucky in 
the provisional Confederate congress, serv- 
ir.g from November 18, 1861, till February 
17, 1862, and a senator in the Confederate 
congress, serving from February 19. 1862. 
till February 18, 1865. After the downfall 
of the Confederacy he exerted himself to 
restore the Democratic party to the ascend- 
ency in his state. He died near Hopkinton. 
Kentucky, October i, 1866. 

Chambliss, William Parham, l)nni in Bed- 
ford county, Virginia, March 20, 1827. After 
attending a private school in Giles county, 
Tennessee, he served through the Mexican 
war as second lieutenant in the First Ten- 
nessee Volunteers, from June, 1846, till July, 
1847, and afterward as captain of the Third 
Tennessee Volunteers. From 1850 till 1855 
he practised law in Pulaski. Tennessee, and 
from 1852 till 1855 edited there the "Citi- 
zen," a democratic weekly newspaper. He 
was also a member of the legislature from 
1853 till 1854. He entered the Federal army 
as first lieutenant in the Second Cavalry, 
March 3, 1855, and was engaged in Texas 
against Indians until March, 1861. He was 
made captain in the Fifth Cavalry, April 6, 
1861. and served through the Manassas and 
Peninsula campaigns, receiving the brevet 
of major. May 4. 1862. for gallantry at Han- 
over Court House, \'irginia. At the battle 
of Gaines' Mills. June 2~. 1862, he was 
wounded in several places, lay four davs and 
four nights on the field of battle, and was 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



267 



then taken to Libby prison, Richmond. For 
his conduct at Gaines' Mills he was bre- 
vetted lieutenant-colonel on June 28, 1862. 
The wounds that he received on this occa- 
sion nearly caused his death, and par- 
tially disabled him for the rest of his life. 
After his release from Libby prison he un- 
derwent treatment in St. Luke's hospital, 
New York, and then served as instructor of 
cavalry at the United States military acad- 
emy from October, 1862, till June, 1864. He 
was made major in the Fourth Cavalry, 
March 30, 1864, served as special inspector 
of cavalry, division of the Mississippi, from 
August, 1864, till April, 1865, and with his 
regiment in Texas till November i, 1867, 
when he resigned and became president and 
general manager of the Cobourg Railway 
and Mining Company, Cobourg, Canada. 
He published a pamphlet on "General Mc- 
Clellan and the Presidency" (1864). He 
died February 22, 1887. 

Chancellor, Charles William, born in Spot- 
sylvania county, Virginia, February 19, 
1833 ; was educated at Georgetown College, 
D. C, and at the University of Virginia ; 
graduated at Jefferson Medical College, Phil- 
adelphia, in 1853. and practised in Alexan- 
dria, Virginia, till 1861. During the civil 
war he was medical director on the staff of 
General Pickett, in the Confederate army. 
After the war he practised in Memphis, 
Tennessee, till 1868, when he was elected 
professor of anatomy in Washington Uni- 
versity, Baltimore, Maryland ; he was made 
dean of the faculty in 1869, and transferred 
to the chair of surgery in 1870; resigned in 
1873; was elected secretary of the state 
board of health in 1876, and president of the 
state insane asylum in 1877. He published 



a "Report upon the Condition of the Pris- 
ons, Reformatories, and Charitable Institu- 
tions of Maryland," made to the governor of 
the state (Frederick, Maryland, 1875) ; a 
treatise on "Mineral Waters and Seaside 
Resorts" (Baltimore, 1883); and a large 
number of monographs on medical and san- 
itary subjects, including "Contagious and 
Infectious Diseases" (Baltimore, 1878) ; 
"Drainage of the Marsh Lands of Mary- 
land" (1884); "A Sanitary Inspection of 
Elkton, Maryland," (1886); "Heredity" 
(Philadelphia, 1886) ; and the "Sewerage of 
Cities" (Baltimore, 1886). He has also read 
papers before the American public health 
association on "The Squalid Dwellings of 
the Poor" (1884) ; and "Impure Air and 
Unhealthy Occupations as Predisposing 
Causes of Pulmonary Consumption'' (1885). 
Dr. Chancellor was a fellow of the Royal 
Society of London. 

Bangs, Francis C, born in Virginia, in 
Octol)er, 1837. His first appearance on the 
stage was in November, 1852, in the old 
National Theatre, Washington, D. C. He 
played in New York for the first time, at 
Laura Keene's theatre, in the spring of 
1858: at Wallack's in December of that 
year, and at the Winter Garden in i860; 
after which he retired from the stage until 
1865, when he appeared as William Tell at 
the National Theatre, Washington. He 
played Old Tom in "After Dark" at Niblo's 
Garden in November, 1868, and in 1869 ap- 
peared as the Duke of Alva in "Patrie" at 
the Grand Opera House. He took part in 
the Shakespearian revival at Booth's Thea- 
tre in 1873, and afterward played with 
Charles Thorne in the "Corsican Brothers." 
In 1884 he appeared in the role of Willie 
Denver in "The Silver King." 



268 



\"iR(;i.\iA r.ior.RAPHY 



Roller, John E., l)orn at Mt. Crawford, 
Kockingham county. \'irginia, October 5, 
1844, son of Peter S. Roller, who served as 
jr.stice of the county court Of Rockingham. 
and whose wife was a descendant of Chris- 
tian AUcljach. an early settler in the Perkio- 
nun X'alley. and of John Boneauvent, an 
early settler of Colebrook Dale. John Peter 
Roller, great-great-grandfather of Gen. 
Roller, was of Huguenot stock, originally 
from France, and he located in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, in 1752, having been the first 
of the name in this country. Later he set- 
tled in the Valley of the Hawksbill. now 
in Page county, Virginia, removing from 
there to the North Fork of the Shenandoah 
in Rockingham county, where he was the 
possessor of an extensive estate. All his 
sons served in the revolutionar}' army, be- 
ing attached to the Third Virginia Regi- 
ment. In 1861. when about to enter the 
University of Virginia, the war between the 
states broke out, and John E. Roller attached 
himself to Company I, First Virginia Cav- 
alry, and participated in the first battle of 
Manassas. In the following year he was 
appointed a cadet in the Virginia Military 
Institute, from which he graduated July 4, 
1863. He was elected lieutenant of Captain 
Blackford's scouts, and later was appointed 
lieutenant of engineers in the regular serv- 
ice. Shortly afterward he was ordered to 
the institute as assistant professor, but in 
1863, on his own application, was ordered 
to Charleston, served under Gen. Beaure- 
gard and accompanied him to Virginia in 
the spring of 1864; was assigned to Hoke's 
division. Fourth Corps of the Army of 
North Virginia, as engineer officer, and was 
promoted two grades for his share in the 
campaign of 1864 and the defense of Peters- 



burg; he organized Companies G and H, 
Second Regiment of Engineer Troops, win- 
ter of 1864-65, and served in front of Rich- 
mond and Petersburg until the evacuation, 
April 21, 1865. He was paroled at Appo- 
mattox. In September, 1865, he opened the 
old academy at Pleasant Grove, and studied 
law at the University of Virginia the fol- 
lowing year. He practiced law at Harrison- 
burg, Virginia, making land law his spe- 
cialty. He met with much success and be- 
came the owner of extensive mines and man- 
ufacturing plants, mineral and timber lands, 
and real estate in Virginia and other States. 
He has met with much success as a lecturer, 
some of the more popular being addresses 
as follows : "The German Element in Vir- 
ginia," "Tersteegen," "The Reflex Power 
of Missions," "Michael Schlatter." and 
"Robert E. Lee." He is a member and 
elder of the Reformed Church in the United 
States, and in 1887 identified himself with 
the Republican party. He has taken much 
interest in history and literature and is a 
member of many societies. Gen. Roller 
married (first) June 27, 1878, Margaret 
Rector Schacklett. He married (second) 
November 11. 1896, Lucy Brown Cabell, 
daughter of Patrick Henry Cabell, of the 
distinguished family of that name. 

Smith, Francis Lee, born at Alexandria, 
X'irginia, October 6, 1845, son of Francis 
Lee Smith, a prominent lawyer, and Sarah 
Gosnell Vowell, his wife. He was a pupil in 
the schools of Alexandria, and completed 
his studies at the Virginia Military Insti- 
tute, and graduated in 1864. During his 
])eriod of study there he served occasionally 
in the Confederate army, being seriously 
wounded twice in the battle of New Market. 



PROMKNENT PERSONS 



269 



In 1867, after being admitted to the bar, he 
began practice in Alexandria. He served as 
corporation attorney for Alexandria for the 
years 1871-72, and shortly afterward became 
attorney for various corporations, including 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. He 
has also served as a member of the board 
of directors of the Citizens' National Bank 
of Alexandria, as president of the school 
board of Alexandria, as a member of the 
board of visitors of the Virginia Military 
Institute, as member of the state senate 
from 1879 to 1883, as member of the board 
of aldermen of Alexandria from 1885 to 
1887, as member of the constitutional con- 
vention in 1901, as captain of the Alexandria 
Light Infantry appointed in 1878, as major 
of the Third Regiment Virginia Volunteers 
commissioned in 1881, and as lieutenant- 
colonel of the same regiment appointed in 
1882. He married, November 20, 1871, Janie 
L. Sutherlin, of Danville, Virginia. 

Scott, William Wallace, born in Orange 
county, Virginia, April 10, 1845, son of Gar- 
nett and Sarah Ellen (Nalle) Scott. In 
ancestral lines he is connected with the 
Scott, Barbour and Pendleton families of 
Virginia. He was taught by Lewis Willis, 
John P. Walters, Thomas C. Nelson, F. B. 
Davis. R. H. Newman. Charles O. Young 
and J. S. Newman, all educated at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia ; and was a cadet at the 
Virginia Military Institute in 1863. He 
studied law at the University of Virginia 
from 1865 until 1867, being graduated in 
the latter year with the degree of Bachelor 
of Law. His school work, however, was 
not entirely consecutive, for during the civil 
war he put aside his books and joined the 
Thirteenth Regiment Virginia Infantry, and 



later served in the Black Horse Cavalry. He 
practiced law in Lexington, Virginia, from 
1867 until 1869, when he became a member 
of the bar of Orange until 1879. In the 
meantime he edited the "Charlottesville 
Chronicle,'' and in 1873 founded the "Gor- 
donsville Gazette," which he published until 
1877. He was secretary of the Democratic 
state central committee of Virginia from 
1883 until 1889; was clerk to the committee 
on the District of Columbia in the United 
States House of Representatives from 1885 
until 1887; was in the United States internal 
revenue service, and special agent in con- 
nection with the Eleventh Census of the 
United States. In 1901 he was appointed 
state librarian of Virginia, which position 
he resigned in 1903 to become librarian to 
the Supreme Court of Appeals. Mr. Scott is 
the author of some political articles, and in 
connection with W. G. Stanard v/rote "A 
History of the Capitol," "The Public 
Square," "The Library and Its Contents." 
He is also the author of a "History of 
Orange County." He was married, Sep- 
tember 29, 1869, to Claudia Marshall Willis. 
They have eight children. The family home 
is in Gordonsville. Virginia. 

Bryan, Joseph, born at his father's planta- 
tion. "Eagle Point." Gloucester county, Vir- 
ginia, August 13, 1845. son of John Ran- 
dolph Bryan and Elizabeth Tucker Coalter, 
his wife ; his father was godson and name- 
sake of John Randolph, of Roanoke. His 
early education was by his mother, and after 
her death he entered the Episcopal high 
school near Alexandria, where he remained 
until the beginning of the civil war. He 
was only sixteen years old, but was anxious 
to enter the army. However, he yielded to 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



ihc wislies of his latlu-r and returned home, 
where he remained until October, 1862, 
when he entered the academic department 
of the University of Virginia, where he re- 
mained until July, 1863. He was now more 
anxious than before to join the army, but 
was disabled by an> accident in which he 
broke his bridle-arm, and he took service in 
the government nitre and mining bureau in 
Pulaski county. In 'Slay. 1864, he procured 
leave of absence, and joined the Second 
Company of the Richmond Howitzers, and 
took part in the battle of Spotsylvania Court 
House, two weeks later (May 18, 1864). 
On the expiration of his leave, he returned 
ic bureau duty in Pulaski county, and after 
if a few months, having recovered the use of 
his arm, he enlisted in Captain jVIountjoy's 
company of Mosby's command. In less 
than a month he had been wounded twice, 
ar.d he was sent back to "Carysbrook," 
where his father was now living, but soon 
rtjoined his company in the field, and served 
creditably until the end of the war. Shortly 
afterwards, he entered the academic depart- 
ment of the University of Virginia, and in 

1867 took up the law course, but on account 
of lack of means was unable to remain for 
graduation. He kept up his studies, and in 

1868 was admitted to the bar, and engaged 
in practice at Palmyra, Fluvanna county, 
anfl in 1870 he removed to Richmond. In 
that city, so many important financial inter- 
ests were committed to his care that he was 
obliged to gradually withdraw from the 
active labors of his i)rofession. He was 
actively connected with the Schloss Shef- 
field Works, the American Locomotive 
Company, and was a director in the South- 
ern Railway Company, the New \ork 
Equitable Life .Assurance Association 



( which latter position he accepted on the 
personal solicitation of Grover Cleveland. 
^\ ho was then chairman of the committee 
on reorganization), and he was closely 
identified with this important corporation. 
He was deeply interested in the historj' and 
antiquities of his native state. The Vir- 
ginia Historical Society claimed his largest 
interest. He was for many years its presi- 
dtnt. and he made it the object of many of 
his benefactions. It was largely through 
his interest that Mrs. Stewart, of "Brook 
Hill," and her daughters, gave to the society 
the old residence of Gen. Robert E. Lee, for 
its permanent home ; and his purpose to pro- 
vide a fire-proof annex for the safekeeping 
ot its valuable manuscripts was only de- 
feated by his death. He was also deeply in- 
terested in the Association for the Preserva- 
tion of Virginia Antiquities, in which he 
held official position, and one of the last of 
his many gifts to it was the superb bronze 
statue of Captain John Smith, erected on 
Jamestown Island, the joint gift of himself 
and wife. He was a member of the board of 
\ isitors of the University of \'irginia, and 
a trustee of the university endowment fund. 
He was an Episcopalian in religion — a mem- 
ber of the standing committee of the diocese 
of \'irginia ; a delegate, year after year, to 
the Episcopal Council of Virginia ; a dele- 
gate from 1866 to the end of his life to the 
t;i:neral convention of the church in the 
United States, and which in 1907 convened 
in Richmond, largely at his instance: and a 
trustee of the Episcopal high school. He 
was a director of the Jamestown Exposition, 
the chief management of which was twice 
pressed upon him. and declined. He was 
sole owner of the "Times-Dispatch" news- 
pa])er of Richmond, and as its controlling 



PROMIXEXT PERSONS 



271. 



spirit wielded a potent influence for good 
throughout the state and nation. He mar- 
ried, in 1871, Isabel L. Stewart, daughter of 
John Stewart, of "Brook Hill." He died at 
his country seat, "Laburnum," near Rich- 
mond, November 20, 1908. 

Brock, Sarah A., born at Madison Court 
House, Virginia, in 1845. Her education 
V, as acquired at home, under private tutors, 
and she early developed excellent literary 
tastes, and capability as a writer. In 1867 
she published "Richmond during the War," 
under the iioiii dc plume of "Virginia Madi- 
son." Her succeeding works were : "The 
Southern Amaranth" (1888) ; "Kenneth my 
King" (1872) ; and "Poets and Poetry of 
America." She married Rev. Richard Put- 
nam, of New York. 

Dreher, Julius Daniel, born in Lexington 
county. South Carolina, October 28, 1S46, 
son of John J. Dreher and Martha E. 
(Counts) Dreher. his wife. He left school 
to enter the Confederate army, continuing 
until the surrender of Gen. Joseph E. John- 
ston, under whom he was serving. After 
four years spent in study and teaching, he 
entered Roanoke College, from which he 
was graduated in 1871. and for seven years 
after was a professor in the institution. In 
1878 he was elected president, and was emi- 
nently successful in placing the college on a 
high basis, erecting various buildings, lay- 
ing the foundations of a substantial endow- 
ment, and largely increasing the number of 
students. 

Reed, Walter C, born in 1846, Gloucester 
county, Virginia. He obtained his early 
education in the schools of that place and 
Charlottesville, \'irginia, from which he en- 



tLred the University of Virginia in 1866, 
graduating therefrom with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1868. After leaving 
the university he entered Bellevue Medical 
College, New York, from which he was also 
graduated. He was appointed assistant sur- 
geon in the United States army, following 
the duties of that position with fidelity. He 
became famous on account of the scientific 
discoveries which he made in connectioa 
with the work of suppressing yellow fever. 
The experience which he and his associates 
made, established one of the most remark- 
able discoveries of modern science — that 
;.ellow fever is conveyed by the bite of mos- 
quitoes of certain species. In February. 
1901, he read before the Pan-American 
Medical Congress, at Havana, a paper in 
which he gave a modest, though exact and 
scientific history, of the results achieved by 
himself and his colleagues. On his return 
to the United States, he was received with 
enthusiasm by the Johns Hopkins Medical 
Association and other medical bodies, who- 
realized the soundness of his conclusions, 
and the importance of his discoveries. Ex- 
periments were further conducted in Cuba, 
with the result that there has been a marked 
decrease in yellow fever in that island. 
Among investigators. Dr. Reed stood pre- 
eminent, both as a man of science and as a 
disinterested lover of humanity. He died in 
Washington, D. C, November 23, 1902. A 
tablet to his memory is in Gloucester Court 
House, Virginia. 

Graham, Samuel Cecil, born at "Blue- 
stone." Tazewell county, Virginia, at the 
heme of his maternal grandfather, William 
\\'itten, January I. 1846, son of Robert Craig" 
Graham, merchant and farmer, and Eliza- 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



beth Peery Witten, his wife. He is of Scotch 
descent in the paternal line ; his grandfather, 
Maj. Samuel Graham, was born while his 
parents were on their way to this country. 
He was a volunteer captain during the war 
of 1812, at which time he was in his early 
forties, and during his service at Norfolk, 
\irginia, he was appointed to the rank of 
major. He had been a member of the Vir- 
gmia legislature from Wythe couniy, 1806 
and 1808, and died in Smyth county, Vir- 
ginia. He married Rachel, daughter of John 
Montgomery, and his wife. Nancy Agnes 
Montgomery. Thomas Witten, great-great- 
grandfather of Samuel Cecil Graham in the 
maternal line, came to Virginia in 1771 from 
the Maryland colony. With him came Sam- 
uel W. Cecil. Each of these men had ten 
children, five of each family intermarrying, 
and among these was Thomas Witten. 
great-grandfather of Samuel Cecil Graham, 
and father of the William Witten men- 
tioned above. Samuel Cecil Graham at- 
tended the log cabin schools of the moun- 
tains, and at the age of seventeen years he 
became a private in Company I, Sixteenth 
Virginia Cavalry, at that time under the 
command of his uncle, Lieut.-Col. William 
i Graham. He was wounded at "Hanging 
Rock," June. 1864, near Salem, Virginia; 
at Monocacy Junction, in July, 1864; and at 
Moorfield, in Hardy county, West Virgmia, 
in .\ugust, 1864, this last injury being a 
most serious one. At the close of the war 
he returned to his home, and after prepar- 
ing for college at the local schools, he en- 
tered Emory and Henry College in the fall 
of 1867, and after a two years' attendance 
read law in the office of Col. Andrew J. May, 
at JefTersonville, then the county seat of 
Tazewell county. He was admitted to the 



Ijar in October, 1870. and in the folk)wing 
lanuary established himself in jjractice at 
Tazewell. Three years later he was elected 
judge of the Tazewell county court, filling 
this ofifice until 1880. He formed a law part- 
nership with Maj. Robert R. Henry in July, 
1 88 1, the style of the firm being Henry & 
Graham, and this is still in existence. Since 

1889 he has been a member of the Virginia 
State Bar Association ; was vice-president in 

1890 and 1895; elected president in 1902, 
the following year delivering the president's 
address, entitled "Some Philosophy of the 
Law and of Lawyers," which was published 
in \'olume 16, Reports of the Virginia State 
Bar Association. "A Criticism of the Profes- 
sion Reviewed," was the title of a paper read 
before the same association in 1892. and this 
was published in \"olume 5 of its reports. 
Judge Graham married (first) October 16. 
1872, Anna Elizabeth Spotts, who died Sep- 
tember 6, 1895, daughter of Washington 
Spotts. and his wife, Jane (Kelly) Spotts; ■ 
he married (second) June 2. 1898, Minnie 
Cox, of Richmond, \"irginia, daughter of 
Capt. Henry Cox and his wife, Martha 

EUyson, J. Taylor, born in Richmond. 
\'irginia. May 20, 1847. son of Henry K. 
Ellyson and Elizabeth P. Barnes, his wife. 
He was trained in the private schools of 
Richmond, at Columbia College. Rich- 
mond College, and entered the Univer- 
sitv of \'irginia in 1867, graduating in a 
number of schools. He served during 
the war, and surn-ndi-red with his coni- 
]);.ny at Appomattox. Immediately there- 
after he resumed his college duties ; was an 
active member of the Jefferson Literary So- 
ciety of the university, and represented that 
societv as one of the editors of the "Univer- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



^li 



sily Magazine," in 1868-69; ^^c ^^so was a 
member of the Sigma Chi fraternity. After 
completing his studies at the university, he 
entered business, and became actively iden- 
tified with the commercial life of Richmond 
for more than thirty years. He occupied 
rr.any public positions, having served as 
jiresident of the city council, and president 
of the board of public interests. In 18S5 he 
v/as elected state senator, and in 1888 re- 
signed to accept the mayoralty of Rich- 
mond, which office he held for three terms. 
He was for fourteen years chairman of the 
Democratic state committee, and also repre- 
s-ented V'irginia on the Democratic national 
committee. He was many times a delegate 
to the state and national convention of his 
■[larty, and was a candidate for Democratic 
nomination for governor in 1897. He was- 
L-:rgely interested in Confederate aifairs, 
having been president of the JelTerson Davis 
Alonument Association, president of the 
Richmond Howitzers Association, and an 
active member of R. E. Lee and George E. 
Pickett Camps of Confederate Veterans, and 
has represented these camps in the general 
ct,nvention of United Confederate Veterans 
each year since the organization of that 
ct:nvention. Mr. Ellyson has always been 
interested in the work of education, and he 
served his city for sixteen years as chairman 
of the city school board. He is a member 
and vice-president of the board of trustees 
01 Richmond College, and has been for thir- 
ty-one years executive officer of the educa- 
tion board of the Baptist General Associa- 
tion of Virginia. He has been prominent in 
the affairs of his denominations, having been 
for three terms president of his state asso- 
ciation, and vice-president of the Southern 
Baptist Convention, besides being a rejire- 

VIR— 18 



scntative on the State Mission Board, the 
Orphanage Board and the Education Board 
of the Baptist General Association of Vir- 
ginia. He has been prominently identified 
with the social life of Richmond, being a 
member of the Westmoreland and Common- 
wealth clubs, of the Society for the Preser- 
vation of Virginia Antiquities, the Confed- 
erate Memorial and Literary Society, and 
many other well known organizations. He 
i.s at present lieutenant-governor of \'ir- 
ginia and I'.r officio president of the senate. 

McCarthy, Carlton, was born at Rich- 
iviond. \'irginia, August 18, 1847, son of 
Florence McCarthy and Julia Anne Humes, 
his wife, the former named a native of Ire- 
land, who settled in Virginia, and was a 
highly esteemed merchant during his active 
career, and the latter named a native of 
Virginia, of Scotch parentage. Carlton Mc- 
Carthy obtained an excellent education in 
the academies of his native city, and had 
almost completed his studies when the war 
between the states broke out. his father and 
elder brothers enlisting in defense of the 
southern cause, and Carlton being too young 
to enlist. Three years later, after the death 
c f his brother. Capt. McCarthy, of the Rich- 
mond Howitzers, Carlton McCarthy en- 
listed as a private soldier in the same com- 
pany, and served until the cessation of hos- 
tilities. Upon his return to Richmond, he 
secured employment in a tannery, after 
which he became successively a bookseller 
and stationer, secretary of a building and 
loan association, and city accountant, and 
during his incumbency of the latter office 
introduced many reforms, and greatly im- 
proved the financial system of the city. He 
V. as honored by his fellow citizens by elec- 



2/4 



\-IRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



tion to the office of mayor of Richmond, in 
1904, the duties of which he discharged to 
tlie satisfaction of all concerned. He is the 
author of "Walks about Richmond," writ- 
ten shortly after the war; "Our Distin- 
<,uishcd Fellow-Citizen," and "Soldier Life 
in the Army of Northern Virginia," which 
has been adopted by the state board of edu- 
cation for use in the public schools of Vir- 
ginia, and he has also compiled and edited 
several volumes of the "Record of the How- 
itzers." He is a forceful and able speaker. 
Mr. McCarthy m;irried, January 5, 1877, 
Susie Ryall .Vpperson. of Richmond. \'ir- 
ginia. 

Bowman, Alpheus Michael, born in Rock- 
ingham county, \'irginia, January 11, 1847, 
son of George Bowman and Sarah V. Zeig- 
kr, his wife, both of German Lutheran de- 
scent. His earliest American ancestor was 
Joist Hite, who, with his three sons-in-law 
and their families, settled on Cedar creek, 
in the Shenandoah Valley, west of the Blue 
Ridge Mountains. Together they owned 
forty thousand acres of land, which they 
obtained by purchase from Isaac and John 
\ anmeter, who had patented this tract in 
1730. One of these sons-in-law was George 
Bowman, who had married ^lary Hite and 
raised a large family. The stone house 
occupied by him is still standing on the one 
thousand acre tract which he patented in 
1734. He was an active participant in the 
Indian wars, and died in 1768. Benjamin 
liowman, one of his sons, was killed by the 
Indians, tradition telling us that his scalp 
was taken by the famous chief Logan him- 
self. .\braham, Joseph and Isaac Bowman, 
three other sons, were officers in the revolu- 
tionarv war. Of these. .Vbrahani Bdwman 



was major of the well known Eighth Regi- 
ment, organized by Gen. Peter Muhlenburg, 
and known as the "German Lutheran regi- 
ment :'' he was in command of this regiment 
v.hen it made the last charge upon the re- 
doubts at Vorktown. Joseph Bowman, the 
second mentioned, ranked ne.xt to George 
Rogers Clark in the noted Illinois campaign, 
the success of which assured to the United 
States that ])art of the northwest territory 
now represented by five fine states ; his 
death occurred in the fort at Vincennes, 
shortly after its surrender by the British, 
and it is supposed that he was the only offi- 
cer who lost his life in actual service during 
tl'is campaign. Isaac Bowman, the third of 
the trio, was a lieutenant in the same com- 
pany as his brother Joseph, and was en- 
trusted with the responsible duty of con- 
veying the English governor Hamilton and 
a number of other prisoners from Fort \'in- 
cennes to Williamsburg, \'irginia ; he was 
the direct ancestor of Alpheus Michael Bow- 
man. The early years of Mr. Bowman's life 
were spent in the country, where he at- 
tended the schools near his home, and the 
Xew Market Academy. At sixteen years 
(_ild he became a private in Company H, 
'twelfth Regiment. \'irginia Cavalry, and 
after two years' service was cajitured in 
March, 1865. and held a prisoner in Fort 
Delaware uniil June I, 1865. After the war, 
he engaged in farming and stock raising on 
an extensive scale in Augusta county, then 
removed to Saltville, Washington county, 
liis next remove was to Roanoke county, 
where for many years he was the owner and 
])ersonal manager of the Bowmont stock 
f.'.rni, and ])resident of the Diamond Orchard 
Com])any, the largest concern of its kind 
east of the .Mleghany Mount;iins and north 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



275 



of Georgia. He was a member of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the American Short- 
l;orn Breeders' Association eleven years, 
was vice-president of the American Berk- 
shire Association, first president of the 
American Saddle Horse Association, and a 
life member of the American Jersey Cattle 
Clul). His record in public life was equally 
notable. In 1883 he was a member of the 
executive committee of the Democratic 
party, and aided in defeating William Ma- 
hone. He was a member of the Democratic 
state committee twelve years, was chairman 
of the ninth congressional district commit- 
tee six years, and chairman of the Roanoke 
county Democratic committee many years. 
He was elected to the house of delegates 
from Roanoke county in 1901, was appointed 
a member of the finance committee, and 
secured the appropriation of $50,000 so that 
\'irginia might be adequately represented at 
tlie World's Fair at St. Louis. He was re- 
elected in 1903. and again served on the 
finance committee; in 1905 he was elected 
for the third time, and this time was ap- 
pointed chairman of the finance committee. 
Mr. Bowman married, February 11, 1869. 
Mary E. Killian. 

Avary, Myrta Lockett, born at Halifax. 
Virginia. She was educated in her native 
state, and was afterwards for some years a 
resident of New York, where she was en- 
gaged on various newspapers, among them 
the "Christian Herald." Her published 
volumes include "A Virginia Girl in the 
Civil War" (1903) : "Dixie .\fter the War" 
( 1906) ; and "A Diary for Dixie" ( 1903 ) ; 
and "Letters and Recollections of Alexander 
II. Stephens" — all works which found a 
wide sale. Her address is Atlanta, Georgia. 



Tucker, John Randolph, born August 13, 
1857, son of Dr. David Hunter Tucker and 
Elizabeth Dallas, his wife, is a descendant 
of a distinguished ancestry, the early mem- 
bers of the Tucker family being among the 
first settlers of the \'irginia colony. The 
home of the family in the old country was 
in county Kent, England, from whence emi- 
grated Daniel and George Tucker, sons of 
George Tucker, of Milton, in the year 1606, 
the line in this particular case being traced 
through George Tucker, who was a member 
of the London Company ; through his son 
George, born in 1594, died about 1648 ; 
through his son George, who married Fran- 
ces, daughter of Henry St. George, Knight 
oi the Garter, and principal king of arms ; 
through their son, St. George Tucker, born 
in Bermuda, died in 171 7, married Jane Hub- 
bard ; through their son, Henry Tucker, 
liorn in 1683, died Deceml)er 14. 1734, mar- 
ried Frances, daughter of John Tudor ; 
through their son, Col. Henry Tucker, sec- 
retary of state for Bermuda, married Nancy 
Butterfield; through their son. Col. St. 
George Tucker, of Williamsburg, Virginia, 
married Frances Bland, widow of John 
Randolph; through their son, Henry St. 
George Tucker, president of the court of 
appeals of Virginia, married Anne Evelina 
piunter; through their son. Dr. David Hun- 
ter Tucker, an eminent physician of Rich- 
mond. On the maternal side, John R. 
Tucker is a descendant of George M. Dallas, 
a native of Pennsylvania, senator of the 
United States for many years, and was 
vice-president from 1845 to 1849. He spent 
his boyhood and youth in the city of 
Richmond, and acquired his education in 
schools in Richmond and an academy. 
He began his active career as an employee 



276 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



in a cotton factory in Manchester, after 
which he was employed on the Richmond 
>S Danville railroad, and sub.sequently 
became a student in Washington and Lee 
University, and during the sessions of 
1881-82 studied law in the University of 
V'irginia, and was admitted to the bar. l-'or 
several succeeding years he practiced his 
profession in Richmond, then moved to 
Bedford county, \'irginia, and in 1898 was 
elected by the legislature of Virginia judge 
of the circuit court, which office he held un- 
til by the reorganization of the circuits by 
the constitutional convention of 1901-02, he 
lost his position, when he again engaged in 
his practice in Bedford county, residing in 
Bedford city. He later served in the state 
senate, and in 19 14 was apjiointed by Presi- 
dent Wilson judge of the United States 
Court for Alaska. 

Kent, Charles William, born in Louisa 
county. X'irginia, September 27, i860, son of 
Robert Meredith Kent, of that county, and 
Sarah Garland Hunter, his wife. On his 
father's side he is descended from Abram 
Kent, who settled in Hanover county, Vir- 
ginia, from England, and established him- 
self as a planter. His father was a merchant 
until about 1850, when lie retired to his 
country home, where he lived the rest of 
his life, lieing past military life at the out- 
break of the civil war, he ser\ed the Con- 
federate government in a civil capacity. On 
his mother's side he is descended from Scotch 
ancestors who came to Virginia in the early 
part of the seventeenth century. His grand- 
father, John Hunter, was named after the 
famous Scotch surgeon of that name. George 
Hunter, one of his ancestors, was a surgeon 
in the continental navy during the revolu- 



tionary war. His brother, the late Linden 
Kent, a distinguished lawyer of Washing- 
ti'ii. U. C, was adjutant to Col. R. T. W. 
Uuke during the civil war, and was cap- 
tured just before the surrender at Appo- 
mattox, and imprisoned on Johnson's Island. 
Professor Kent was educated in the private 
schools of his native county, and at the 
Locust Dale Academy. He entered the 
University of Virginia in 1878, and gradu- 
ated in 18S2 with the degree of Master of 
.Arts. He recei\ed that )ear the debater's 
medal from the Jefterson Literary Society, 
making a unicjue family record, his brothers, 
Linden and Henry, having already won 
medals in the Washington and Jefferson 
societies resjjectively. From 1S84 to 1887 
he continued his advanced work in English, 
German and philosophy in the universities 
of Goettingen, Berlin and Leipsic. The 
University of Leipsic conferred upon him. 
in June, 1887, the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
oso])hy (magna cum laiidc). Upon his return 
home he was appointed licentiate for one 
year in I'rench and German at his a!)iia 
mater, and for the next four or five years he 
held the professorship of English and mod- 
ern languages in the L^niversity of Tennes- 
see. In 1893 1'*^ ■^^■''•^ elected professor of 
h'nglish literature, rhetoric and belles 
lettres in the University of X'irginia. Dr. 
Kent is recognized as a lecturer of ability, 
and possesses oratorical gifts of a high 
order. His addresses on literature before the 
Summer School of Methods, have attracted 
scores of teachers whom he has delighted 
and filled with enthusiasm. He has been 
among the prominent lecturers at Mont- 
eaglc, Tennessee ; Salt Springs, in Georgia ; 
Tulane ITniversity ; the \'. P. I. at Blacks- 
Inirg. and other sclmols and colleges. .Xs 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



277 



author and editor he has already distin- 
guished himself, writing upon a variety of 
themes and editing a number of select 
works, among which may be noted : "Teu- 
tonic Antiquities in Andreas and Elene" 
(1887) ; Cynewulf's "Elene" (in "Library of 
Anglo-Saxon Poetry," 1888) ; "The Use of 
the Negative by Chaucer" (1889) ; "A Study 
of Lanier's Poems" (1891), Addresses be- 
fore the Modern Language Association of 
America ; "Outlook for Literature in the 
South" (1892); "Literature and Life" 
(1893); "Shakespeare Note Book" (1897). 
In 1901 appeared "Poems from Burns," Ten- 
nyson's "Princess," and the "Poe Memorial 
Volume ;" in 1902, "Preservation of Virginia 
Antiquities," and "Poe's Poems," in the 
Virginia edition. In 1903, "Poe's Poems." 
He is engaged at present on Tennyson's "In 
Memoriam," and "A Study of Poetry." Dr. 
Kent has shown himself to be a very earnest 
and sympathetic student of Edgar Allan 
Poe. It is largely due to his interest and 
activity as president of the Poe Memorial 
Association that the Zolnay bust of Poe is 
now in the University Library. The late 
Virginia edition of Poe's complete works, 
edited by Harrison and Kent, elicits hearty 
])raise from literary critics. He was a mem- 
ber of the State Board of Education, 1903-11. 
On June 4, 1895, he married Mrs. Eleanor 
A. Miles, daughter of Professor Francis H. 
Smith. 

Sutherlin, William T., born on his father's 
estate, near Danville, Virginia, April 7. 
1822, son of George S. Sutherlin and Polly 
S. Norman, his wife. He went from a home 
school to a male academy in Danville, where 
he was a student for three years, and then 
attended Joseph Godfrey's school in Frank- 



lin county. He remained at home until he 
was twenty-one, and then until the begin- 
ning of the war, was a tobacco manufacturer 
in Danville. He was mayor of that city 
ivom 1855 to 1861, and was a delegate to 
the secession convention. He entered the 
Confederate army, but his health would not 
admit of his doing field duty, and he was at 
different times commandant and quarter- 
master at Danville. Early in war days, he 
became a member of the Danville board of 
public works ; and after the war he served 
two years in the house of delegates. He 
was a leader in all community affairs. He 
built two railroads — the Milton & Sutherlin, 
and the Danville & New River, and estab- 
lished the Danville Bank, and aided largely 
in establishing the Border Grange Bank. 
He aided in reorganizing the Virginia State 
Agricultural Society. He liberally aided 
Randolph-Macon College and the Danville 
College for Young Ladies. He married 
Jane E. Patrick. 

Snead, Thomas Lowndes, born in Henrico 
C(junty, Virginia, January 10, 1828; gradu- 
ated at Richmond College in 1846, and at 
the University of Virginia in 1848; was ad- 
mitted to the bar, and removed to St. Louis, 
Missouri, where he was editor and pro- 
prietor of the "Bulletin" in 1860-61. He 
v«as aide-de-camp to Gov. Claiborne F. 
Jackson, and adjutant-general of the Mis- 
souri state guard in 1861, and took part in 
the battles of Booneville, Carthage, Wil- 
son's Creek and Lexington. He was a com- 
missioner from Missouri to negotiate a mili- 
tary convention with the Confederate States 
ii' October, 1861. ' He became an assistant 
adjutant-general in the Confederate army, 
cind served with Price in Arkansas, Mis- 



278 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



souri, and Mississippi. He was elected to 
the Confederate congress by Missouri 
soldiers in May, 1864. He removed to New 
York in 1865, was managing editor of the 
"Daily News" in 1865-66, and was admitted 
to the bar of New York in 1866. He pub- 
lished the first volume of a history of the 
war in the Trans-Mississippi department, 
entitled "The Fight for Missouri." 

Pryor, Sara Agnes, born in Halifax 
county, Virginia, in 1830, daughter of Rev. 
Samuel Blair Rice and Lucinda Walton 
Leftwich, his wife; she married, at Char- 
lottesville, Virginia, in 1848, Roger Atkin- 
son Pryor (q. v.). She was educated by 
private tutors, being given special instruc- 
tion in English literature, history, modern 
languages and music. In 1903 she published 
"The Mother of Washington, and Her 
Times," which was received with general 
commendation; and her "Reminiscences of 
War and Peace" (1904), was hailed as a 
delightful portraiture of the leading people 
of a stirring period. She was a leading 
member of the principal patriotic orders. 

Tabb, John Banister, born in Amelia 
county, Virginia, in 1845, son of John Yel- 
verton Tabb, and great-grandson of Col. 
John Tabb, of the public committe.e of 
safety (1775), and Frances Peyton, his 
wife, daughter of Sir John Peyton, of 
Mathews county, Virginia. He was edu- 
cated at home by private tutors. He was a 
lad when he entered the Confederate army, 
was capturecl and held prisoner for seven 
months. After the war, he studied music in 
Baltimore, later entered St. Mary's Theo- 
logical Seminary, and was ordained a priest 
in the Roman Catholic church in 1884. In 
1884 he published a volume containing 



poems he had previously written for the 
pi ess. He was made professor of English 
at St. Charles College, Ellicott City, Mary- 
land, in 18S5. In 1889 he published a sec- 
ond volume of poems. His verse is char- 
acterized by natural imagery, and a refined 
taste. He died in 1909. 

Magruder, Julia, born at Charlottes\ ille, 
X'irginia, in 1854, daughter of Allan Bowie 
Magruder and Sarah M. Gilliam, his wife. 
She was almost entirely educated by her 
I)arents and governesses. She was only 
sixteen when her "My Three Chances" was 
published in a southern journal, and re- 
ceived with marked favor. Her first im- 
portant novel was "Across the Chasm, ' 
dealing with the period after the civil war. 
Among her other works are : "At Anchor," 
"A Magnificent Plebeian," "The Princess 
Sonia," "A Beautiful Alien," and "The 
Thousandth Woman." 

Dabney, Richard Heath, born in Memphis, 
Tennessee, March 29, i860, son of Virgiiiius 
Dabney and Ellen Maria Heath, his wife. 
His mother died when he was less than a 
month old, and he was brought up by his 
maternal grandmother, by whom he was 
t;!Ught until he was sent to Miss Sue Wil- 
liams' private school in Richmond, at the 
age of seven years. He was further in- 
structed by his father, and in 1878 he entered 
the Univer^ty of \'irginia, and graduated in 
1881 with the Master of Arts degree. He 
t'lught school for a year, and was then a 
student of history, politics and economics in 
the Munich, Berlin and Heidelberg univer- 
sities, and graduating from the latter in 
1885 as Ph. D., iiiulta ciiiii laudc. In the 
v/inter of that year, while living with his 
father, in New \'ork, he wrote a series of 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



279 



lectures on the French revoUition, which he 
dehvered the next year, at Washington and 
L.ee University, and which were subse- 
quently expanded into book form. From 
1886 to 1889 he was professor of history at 
the Indiana University, and in the latter 
year was made adjunct professor of history 
at the University of Virginia, being pro- 
moted in 1897 to the chair of historic and 
economic science. His "John Randolph" is 
a specially meritorious work, and he has 
made frequent contributions to leading 
niagazines and newspapers. He is a mem- 
ber of numerous historical and literary so- 
cieties. He married (first) Mary Amanda 
I'.entley, of Richmond; and (second) Lily 
Heath Davis, of Albemarle county, Virginia. 

Seawell, Molly Elliott, born in Gloucester 
cfiunty. Virginia, daughter of John Tyler 
Seawell (q. v.). (a nephew of President John 
Tyler), and F"rances Jackson, his wife. She 
was educated at home. Her father dying, 
her mother and herself took up their resi- 
dence in Washington City. She began writ- 
ing sketches and stories in 1886 ; and pub- 
lished her first novel in 1890, and in that 
year took a prize of $500 offered by the 
'""^'outh's Companion" for the best story for 
boys. In 1895 she received from the New 
York "Herald" a prize of $3,000 for her 
"Sprightly Romance of Marsac." Her most 
important works are : "The Berkeleys and 
Their Neighbors." "Throckmorton," "Chil- 
dren of Destiny," "Maid Marian," "History 
■of Betty Stair," "The House of Egremont." 
"A Virginia Cavalier," "The Loves of the 
Lady Arabella." "The Great Scoop Garvin 
Hamilton." Some of her novels have been 
wrought into plays. 



RufTfin, Thomas, born in King and Queen 
county, \'irginia, November 17, 1787, son 
of Judge Sterling Rufifin, of Brunswick 
county, Virginia, and Alice Roane, his wife. 
He graduated at Princeton College in 1805, 
studied law, and went to Hillsboro, North 
Carolina. He served in the legislature there, 
1813-16, being speaker in the latter year; 
was judge of the state supreme court in 
1816-18, elected again in 1825, and was chief 
justice from 1829 till 1852, and again in 
1856-58, after which he was presiding judge 
of the county court. He opposed nullifica- 
tion in 1832, and secession in i860, but in 
the North Carolina convention voted for the 
secession ordinance. He was a delegate to 
the peace congress in 1861. The University 
O' North Carolina gave him the degree of 
LL. D. in 1834. He died in Hillsboro, North 
Carolina, January 15, 1870. He was re- 
garded as one of the ablest judges in the 
L'nited States. 

Whelan, Richard Vincent, l)orn in Balti- 
more, Maryland. January 28, i8og; educated 
at Mount St. Mary's College, Emmitsburg, 
and studied theology in the Seminary of St. 
Sulpice, Paris. He was ordained priest in 
1832. and after his return to the United 
States was appointed pastor at Harper's 
Ferry, at the same time attending neighbor- 
ing missions. He was made second bishop 
of Richmond in 1840. and consecrated at 
Baltimore by Archbishop Eccleson. There 
were only six priests in Virginia to minister 
to six thousand souls, and he appealed for 
help to the societies for the propagation of 
the faith in Europe. He received a liberal 
response, and founded a school at Martins- 
burg. To continue to provide priests for his 
diocese, he bought land near Richmond, and 



28o 



\"IRr.lXIA BIOCiRATHY 



erected a theological seminary. He estab- 
lished missions at Wytheville, Summers- 
ville, Kingwood, and Lynchburg. Jn 1846 
hf went to Wheeling, and labored as a 
l-riest on this mission. Feeling that his 
supervision was needed in building up the 
church in western Virginia, he removed 
there, and never returned. He built a 
cathedral at Wheeling, founded schools, and 
opened an ecclesiastical seminary in his own 
house, in which he trained young men for 
the priesthood. He attended the seventh 
provincial council of Baltimore in 1849. In 
1850 the bishopric of Wheeling was created, 
and he was made its first bishop. His 
efforts brought upon him a heavy debt, and 
in 1857 he sought assistance in Europe, and 
obtained the necessary aid. He began a 
college at Wheeling in 1866, and opened 
several academies. He was present at the 
Vatican council in 1869-70, and opposed the 
dogma of papal infallibility, but submitted 
to the decision of the council, declaring that 
his opposition did not arise from disbelief in 
its truth, but that he believed its definition 
iiiopportune at that time. At the beginning 
of the administration of Bishop Whelan, the 
dit)cese of Wheeling contained two churches 
and two priests, and was without Roman 
Catholic schools or institutions of any kind. 
.\t his death there were forty-eight 
cluirches, forty stations where religious ser- 
vices were held, and twenty-nine priests. It 
contained six academies for girls, four con- 
vents, a hospital, an orphan asylum, and a 
college. The Roman Catholic population 
had increased from less than one thou.^and 
to eighteen thousand. He died in I'.alti- 
more, Maryland. July 7. 1874. 

Woods, John Rodes, horn in .Mbemarlc 
county, Virginia, January 13, 1815; son of 



Micajah Woods, and Sarah, his wife, 
daughter of John Rodes; graduated in 
medicine at the University of Virginia in 
1835, I"->t abandoned practice in 1837, to give 
his attention to scientific agriculture, and 
brought large importations of English stock 
to his estate, "Holkham." He was an old- 
line Whig, a personal friend of Henry Clay, 
and attended many Whig conventions. He 
was a director of the Virginia Central (now 
Chesapeake and Ohio) Railway Company. 
He was a supporter of the University of 
Virginia, and a member of its board of visi- 
tors from 1S67 till 1872. He died in Albe- 
marle county, Virginia, July 9, i88v 
Micajah A\'oods lately deceased in Albe- 
marle county, for a long time common- 
wealth's attorney, was his son. 

Wingfield, John Henry Ducachet, born in 
Portsmouth, Virginia, September 24, 1833. 
He entered St. Timothy's College, Mary- 
land, at the age of thirteen, graduated in 
1850, and was a tutor there two years. He 
entered the senior class of William and 
Mary College, Virginia, in 1852, and grad- 
uated in 1853. Returning to St. Timothy's, 
he taught for another year, and in 1854 went 
to New York and became a tutor in the 
Churchill Military Academy at Sing Sing. 
In 1855 he entered the Theological Semi- 
nary of \'irginia, where he remained a year, 
then removing to Arkansas, and becoming 
principal of Ashley Institute, at Little Rock. 
He was ordained priest in the Protestant 
Episcopal church, in tlie chaiiel nf the Theo- 
logical Seminary of \'irginia. Julv 1. 1859. 
by Bishop Johns. In July, 1858, he became 
assistant to his father, who was rector of 
Trinity Church, Portsmouth, Virginia. He 
was rector of Christ Church, Rock Spring, 
Harford county. Maryland, in 1864, but re- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



281 



turned to Portsmouth in 1866. In 1868 he 
became rector of St. Paul's Church, Peters- 
burg, Virginia, where he founded St. Paul's 
school for young ladies. The degree of D. 
D. was conferred upon him by William and 
Mary College in 1869, and that of LL. D. by 
the same college in 1874. In that year he 
removed to California, and was rector of 
Trinity Church, San Francisco. At the 
general convention at New York in 1874, he 
was elected missionary bishop of northern 
California, and was consecrated in St. Paul's 
Church, Petersburg, Virginia, December 2, 
1874, but remained in charge of his parish 
until April, 1875. ^e became president of 
the missionary college of St. Augustine, 
P.enicia, and in 1876 head of St. Mary's of 
the Pacific, a school for girls, and rector 
of St. Paul's Church in that city. He was 
elected bishop of Louisiana in 1879, but de- 
clined. 

Willcox, Louise Collier, was born in 
Chicago, Illinois, April 24, 1865, daughter 
of the Rev. Robert Laird Collier and Mary 
Price, his wife. She received her education 
from private tutors in France. Germany and 
England, and at the Conservatory in Leipzic, 
in 1882-83. For some years before her mar- 
riage, she was engaged in educational pur- 
suits. On June 25, 1890. she married, in Nor- 
folk, Virginia, J. Westmore Willcox, a prom- 
ii'ent lawyer of that city. Her life has been 
h'.rgely devoted to literary occupations of 
various kinds, for which she was particularly 
adapted, not only on account of her wide in- 
formation in such matters, but also on ac- 
count of her admirable critical judgment 
and her great felicity of expression. For 
i[u\te a time she was an editorial writer for 
"Harper's Weekly," and contributed many 



excellent articles to "Harper's Bazaar." 
From 1896 to 1903 she was on the staff of 
the "North American Review." From 1903 
to 1909 she was reader and literary adviser 
ti the great book firm of the Macmillans. 
In 1909 she published some of her essays, 
under the title of "The Human Way;" in 
1910 "A Manual of Spiritual Fortification," 
being an anthology of mystic poems; and 
in 1912 a short essay entitled "The Road to 
Joy." Mrs. Willcox contributes from time 
to time to magazines and newspapers, and 
is prominent in all matters connected with 
literature and art in the city of Norfolk. 
She is a member of the National Institute 
of Social Sciences, of the MacDowell Club 
(New York), and of other organizations of 
a social and literary character. 

Morrison, Alfred James, born in Selma, 
Alabama, July 11, 1876, son of Rev. Alfred 
J. Morrison and Portia Atkinson, his wife ; 
grandson of Robert Hall Morrison, first 
president of Davidson (North Carolina) 
College, and of John M. P. Atkinson, presi- 
dent of Hampden-Sidney College, Virginia. 
He graduated A. B. at Hampden-Sidney 
College in 1895 ; attended the University of 
\ irginia, 1895-96; and received the degree 
of Ph. D. from Johns Hopkins University in 
1903. He was a reporter on the Baltimore 
"News" in 1903; was with Henry Holt & 
Company, publishers. New York, 1904-05 ; 
and since 1907 has been engaged in histori- 
cal and statistical work at Hampden-Sidney. 
His published works are: "Halifax County. 
Virginia: A Handbook," (Richmond, 1907) ; 
"Travels in Virginia in Revolutionary 
Times. 1776-1800," a series of articles ap- 
pearing in the "Richmond Times-Dispatch," 
1909, showing the opinions regarding Vir- 



282 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



ginia formed by intelligent travelers, lirit- 
ish, French, German and Italian; "Travels 
in the United States during four years and 
a half, 1-98-180J, by John Davis of Salis- 
bur\ ," nuich of the material bearing on Vir- 
ginia (Xew York, Henry Holt & Company, 
1909) ; a re-edition of this very interesting 
book of impressions, equipped with intro- 
duction and a great many notes ; "Travels in 
the Confederation, 1783-1784," from the 
(icrnian of Dr, Johann David Schoepf, sur- 
geon to the Ansbach troops in the British 
army (Philadelphia, William J. Campbell, 
iqiii, two volumes, volume two dealing 
with \'irginia and the south; "The College 
of Hampden Sidney: Calendar of Board 
Minutes, 1776-1876," a documentary history 
(Richmond: The Hermitage Press, 1912) ; 
''Secondary Education in \'irginia, 1776- 
1860," manuscript now in the hands of the 
United States Commissioner of Education ; 
"Virginia Agriculture: 1607-1860," a series 
of articles running in the "Southern 
Planter," Richmond, 1914; miscellaneous 
articles in the A'irginia Historical Society's 
Magazine" and the "William and Mary Col- 
lege Quarterly," about thirty articles in a 
local newspaper on the "History of Prince 
Edward County," etc., etc. 

Stanard, William Glover, born in Rich- 
mond, \"irginia, October 2, 1858, son of 
Robert C. Stanard, captain in the Confed- 
erate States army, and Virginia M. Cowan, 
his wife, was a student at William and 
Mary and Richmond colleges (1876-1880). 
He began soon after to take great interest in 
the early history of Virginia, and prose- 
cuted his inquiries by a personal investiga- 
tion of the county records. He contributed 
many articles on Virginia families to the 



Richmond "Critic" and other periodicals 
and became known as an authority. In 
October, 1898, on the resignation of Philip 
Alexander Bruce, he was elected correspond- 
ing secretary of the Virginia Historical So- 
ciety, and editor of the "\'irginia Magazine 
of History and Biography." In addition to 
numerous articles contributed to this maga- 
zine, he has published "Colonial Virginia 
Register" 1902, and "Some Emigrants to 
Virginia," 191 1. He is a member of the 
Phi Beta Kappa society, as well as of var- 
ious other societies, antiquarian and histor- 
ical, and in 1915 William and Mary College 
conferred upon him the degree of LL. D. 
He married, in 1900, Mary Mann Page 
Newton, of Richmond, daughter of Rt. Rev. 
John Brockenbrough Newton. His address 
is 707 East Franklin street. 

Stanard, Mary Mann Page Newton, born in 
Westmoreland county, \'irginia, daughter of 
Rt. Rev. John Brockenbrough Newton and 
Roberta Page Williamson, his wife; gradu- 
ated at the Leach- Wood School in Nor- 
folk, Virginia; married William Glover 
Stanard, secretary of the \'irginia Historical 
Society (q. v.), April 17, 1900. She is the 
historian of the board of managers of the 
Association for the Preservation of Virginia 
Antif|uities. and a member of the Colonial 
Dames Society of .America. She is the 
author of "The Story of Bacon's Rebellion," 
1907, "The Dreamer, a Romantic Render- 
ing of the Life Story of Edgar .Allan Poe." 
i<}0(). and of other works. 

Mahan, Dennis Hart, born in New York 
City, .\])ril 2, 1S02. He spent his boyhtwd 
in Norfolk, \'irginia, and was appointed 
from that state to the United States Mili- 
tary Academy, where he graduated in 1S24, 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



283 



at the head of his class. In his third year he 
was appointed acting assistant professor of 
mathematics at the academy, and continued 
as such after his commissioning as second 
lieutenant of engineers, until 1825, when he 
became principal assistant professor of en- 
gineering. In 1826 he went abroad under 
orders of the war department, to study 
public engineering works and military in- 
stitutions, and he spent some time, by spec- 
ial favor of the French government at the 
military school of application for engineers 
and artillerists in Metz, and was frequently 
the guest of Lafayette. He returned to 
West Point in 1830, and resumed his duties 
a.-, acting professor of engineering, which 
chair he accepted in 1832, and held, with 
that of dean, after 1838, until his death by 
suicide, during a tit of insanity resulting 
from learning that the board of visitors had 
recommended his being placed on the retired 
list, although assured by the president that 
he should be retained. Professor Mahan 
vv-as appointed by the governor of Virginia, 
in 1850, a member of the board of engmeers 
t(.- decide the controversy between the city 
of Wheeling and the Baltimore & Ohio 
Railroad Company as to the proper route 
of the railroad to Wheeling. He received 
the degree of LL. D. from William and 
Mary College in 1852: from Brown in 1852; 
and from Dartmouth in 1867. He was a 
member of many scientific societies in the 
United States, and a corporate member of 
the National Academy of Sciences in 1863. 
He gained a world-wide reputation by his 
ttxt-books, which were used in the military 
academy and in many universities. They 
include "Treatise on Field Fortifications," 
"Elementary Course of Civil Engineering," 
"Elementary Treatise on Advanced Guard, 



Outposts, and Detachment Service of 
Troops," "Elementary Treatise on Indus- 
trial Drawing," "Descriptive Geometry, as 
applied to the Drawing of Fortifications and 
Stereometry," and "Military Engineering," 
including "Field Fortifications, Military 
Mining, and Siege Operations," and "Per- 
manent Fortifications." He edited, with 
additions, an American reprint of Mosely's 
"Mechanical Principles of Engineering and 
Architecture." His portrait, painted by 
Robert W. Weir, is included in the collec- 
tions of professors to be seen in the library 
of the United States Military Academy. He 
died September 16, 1871, near Stony Point, 
New York. 

Trotter, James Fisher, born in Brunswick 
county, X'irginia, November 5. 1802; emi- 
grated with his parents to eastern Tennes- 
see, and in 1820 became a lawyer. He set- 
tled in Hamilton, Mississippi, in 1823. After 
serving several terms in the legislature, he 
became a judge of the circuit court, and in 
1838 succeeded Judge Black in the United 
States senate, as a Democrat. After serv- 
ing from February to December of that 
year, he resigned to accept a seat on the 
bench of the court of appeals of Mississippi, 
which he held till 1840, then resuming his 
profession. He was vice-chancellor of the 
northern district of the state, 1855-57, and 
professor of law in the University of Miss- 
i.=sippi. 1860-62. He supported the southern 
cause during the civil war, and after its 
close labored earnestly for peace. He be- 
came a circuit judge in 1866, and died in 
Holly Springs, Mississippi, March 9, the 
sr-me year. 

Plumer, William Swan, born in Griers- 
burg (now Darlington), Beaver county. 



284 



\'IRG1XIA BIOGRAPHY 



Pennsylvania, July 25, 1802; graduated at 
Washington College. Virginia, in 1825 ; 
studied at Princeton Theological Seminary 
i-i 1826; was ordained in 1827, and organized 
the first Presbyterian church in Danville, 
\ irginia. in 1827. He removed to Warren- 
t(in, North Carolina, where he formed a 
cluirch. and afterward preached in Raleigh. 
Washington, and New lierne. North Caro- 
lina, and in I'rince Edward and Charlotte 
counties, \^irginia. He was pastor of a 



istic school. He died in lialtimore, Mary- 
land, October 22. 1880. 

Trimble, Isaac Ridgeway, born in Cul- 
I>i.l)er county, \'irginia, May 15, 1802. His 
f;.thcr. John Trimble, removed to Fort Sterl- 
ing. Kentucky, in 1805. At sixteen, secur- 
ing an appointment to the United States 
Alilitary Academy through his uncle Davis, 
then in congress, he traveled to West Point 
on horseback, and mostly by night, the 
country through which he passed being then 
church in Petersburg, Virginia, 1831-34, and little settled and infested with Indians, 
in Richmond in 1835-46. Pie founded the Graduating in 1822, he was employed in 
"Watchman of the South," a religious surveying the military road to the Ohio. He 
weeklv. in 1837. and for eight years was its loft the army in 1832, entered into business 
sole editor. In 1838 he was instrumental in a:, a civil engineer, and was chief engineer 
establishing the Deaf, Dumb and Blind In- successively of the Baltimore and Susque- 
stitution in Staunton, Virginia. He was hanna, Philadelphia, Wilmington and Balti- 
pastor of churches in Baltimore, Maryland, more, and Boston and Providence railtoads. 
1847-54, and in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, On the outbreak of the civil war he hastened 
1855-62, at the same time serving as profes- from Cuba to Baltimore, entered the service 
sor of didactic and pastoral theology in cf Virginia, and then of the Confederacy, as 
Western Theological Seminary there. He colonel of engineers ; was sent by Gen. Lee 
resided in Philadelphia for the next three to construct the defenses of Norfolk and 
years, was in charge of a Presbyterian J. E. Johnston to close the Potomac by bat- 
church in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, in 1865- teries at Evansport. As a brigadier-general 
66. and became professor of didactic and he had a command under Ewell and Jack- 
polemic theology in the Theological Semi- son in 1862. was prominent in the valley 
nary in Columbia, South Carolina. He was campaign, chose the ground at Cross Keys, 
transferred to the chair of historic, casuistic took part in the seven days' fighting around 
and pastoral theology in 1875, and held that Richmond, and in the defeat of Gen. Pope, 
office until a few months previous to his and with two regiments took Manassas 
death. He was moderator of the general Junction, with all the supplies and ammuni- 
assembly of the Presbyterian church in tion there. August 27, an exploit highly 
1838. and of the southern branch of that commended by Gen. Jackson, to the com- 
body in 1871. He received the degree of niand of whose division he succeeded when 
D. D. from Princeton, Lafayette, and Wash- J.ickson was put at the head of a corps. The 
ir.gton colleges in 1838, and that of LL. D. day after this service he was wounded at 
from the University of Mississippi in 1857. the second Bull Run. Commissioned ma- 
His writings were of the extreme Calvin- jor-gcncral. .\pril 2t,. 1863. he led a division 



PROiMIXENT PERSONS 



285 



a'. Cliancellorsviile, and in June had charge transferred to the flag-ship Niagara, and 
of the left wing of the Army of Northern later to the San Jacinto, and then to the St. 
\'irginia. His military career was cut short Laic>rCnce, remaining until 1863. He was 



al Gettysburg, where, in Pickett's charge, 
on the third day, he lost a leg and his liberty. 
After long imprisonment on Johnson's 
Island he was exchanged in April, 1865, and 
was on his way to resume his duties when 
h;' heard of Lee's surrender. His later years 
Avere spent in Baltimore, Maryland, where 
he died January 2, 1888. 

Horner, Gustavus Richard Brown, born at 



then on duty at the marine rendezvous at 
Philadelphia until 1866, when he was placed 
on the retired list, at the head of the list of 
navy medical directors. He married Mary 
Agnes Teresa, daughter of Dr. Charles 
F'yrne, of Jacksonville. Florida. 

Marshall, James W., born in Clarke 
county, \'irginia, August 14, 1822. His 
early boyhood was passed at Mount Sterl- 



^,- ^ \ ■• • • I ,Q ,Q^. c ing, Kentuckv, and on arriving at school age 

W arrenton, \ irginia, June 18, i(So4, son of ° ' . . 

he returned to his native section to prepare 
himself for college. He entered Dickinson 
College, from which he was graduated in 



William Horner, of Maryland, and Mary, 
his wife, daughter of Col. William Edmonds, 
of Fauquier county, who commanded a regi- 
ment in the revolutionary war. He attended 
Rev. William Williamson's high school near 
Middleburg, and the Warrenton Academy, 
and afterwards graduated in medicine at the 
University of Pennsylvania. He was as- 
sistant surgeon on the United States ship 

Macedonian for two and a half years, and 

... r J ^ i-i D J • r ed four vears. In 1860 President Grant ap- 

was then transferred to the Brandxzmne for . - -^ ^ 

^, Tj ^t i 4. Ju 1 pointed Mr. Marshall first assistant post- 

six months. He then was sent to the sloop- ^ , •. ^-^ <■ 

! I I ij i J i master-general, in which position he served 

of-war John Adams, was promoted to sur- '^ ' 



1848. He was retained at the college as in- 
structor in the position of adjunct-professor 
imtil 1850, when he was promoted to a full 
[irofessorship of ancient languages, and con- 
tinued to fill that chair until i86i,when Pres- 
ident Lincoln appointed him United States 
consul at Leeds, England, where he remain- 



geon, and for three years cruised in the 

Mediterranean sea, and he made a second 

c-uise of four years on the frigate United 

States. He was then on shore duty until 

1841, and went to Brazil on the Delaware, 

remaining until 1843 as fleet surgeon, and 

Avas then sent again to the Mediterranean. 

Ill 1844 as fleet surgeon on the frigate 

Sai'annah. he went to California, remaining acted as quasi-ambassador to England for 

eighteen months, then coming home in 1850 the southern Confederacy. When Mason 

by way of Panama. In 1856-58 he was fleet and Slidell were overtaken and detained, 

surgeon on the Wabash. In 1861 he went as Mr. Chiselin. who had followed them by 

fleet surgeon 10 the flag frigate Colorado, of another route as an emergency diplomat, 

tl:e Gulf blockading squadron; in 1862 was took the place which they were designed to 



up to the close of the administration, except 
for the brief term in 1874, when he tempo- 
rarily filled the ofifice of postmaster-general. 
In 1877 he was appointed general superin- 
tendent of the railway mail service, which 
position he held for one year. 

Chiselin, George R., born at Staunton, 
\'irginia, in 1824. During the civil war he 



286 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



fill and during the war labored zealously to 
enlist the aid of the English government 
for the Confederacy. He remained in Eng- 
land for three years following the close of 
the civil war, and for a number of years 
prior to 1877 lived in Chili, where he had 
acquired wealth in mines and railroads, but 
his later years were passed in New York, 
in which city he died September 14, i8go. 

Jackson, William Lowther, burn in 
Clarksburg, \irginia, February 3, 1825 ; was 
admitted to the bar in 1847. He served two 
terms as commonwealth's attorney, two 
terms in the Virginia house of delegates, 
two terms as second auditor and superin- 
tendent of the state literary fund, one term 
as lieutenant-governor, and in i860 was 
elected judge of the nineteenth judicial cir- 
cuit. In 1861 he was commissioned colonel 
of the Thirty-first Regiment Virginia Infan- 
try, and in 1862 became a member of the 
stafT of his cousin, Gen. '■Stonewall" Jack- 
son. He served through the campaigns and 
battles around Richmond, Cedar Run. 
Harper's Eerry, and Antietam, then, rank- 
ing as brigadier-general, he recruited ? 
brigade of cavalry in northwestern Virginia 
which he led in \'irginia, Maryland, and 
Pennsylvania In May. 1865, he disiaanded 
his troops at Lexington, being among the 
last to be paroled. After the war he spent 
some time in Mexico, then came north, in- 
tending to settle in West Virginia and re- 
sume the practice of his profession, but a 
statute of that state debarred him from 
practice and he located in Louisville. Ken- 
lucky, where he practiced until 1872, when 
he was elected judge of the circuit court. 

Buford, Algernon Sidney, born in Rowan 
county. North Carolina. January 2, 1826, 



during the temporary residence of his par- 
ents in that state, son of William Buford. 
ol Lunenburg county. Virginia, and Susan 
Robertson Shelton. of Pittsylvania county, 
Virginia. On his father's side he was de- 
scended from colonial English settlers, his 
great-grandfather, Henry Buford, having 
settled in Culpeper county, Virginia. These 
ancestors were devoted patriots to the 
American cause in the revolution. His 
early education was obtained at the private 
school taught by his father in Pittsylvania 
county, Virginia. In October, 1846, he en- 
tered the University of Virginia, and in 
June, 1848. graduated with the degree of 
r.achelor of Law. Prior to entering the uni- 
\ersity, he had taught a private school for 
two years. Upon leaving the university he 
began the practice of law in Pittsylvania 
and adjacent counties, and so continued un- 
til the outbreak of the civil war. Upon his 
circuit he took and maintained honorable 
ar.d progressive rank among the distin- 
guished lawyers. James M. Whittle, Wil- 
liam M. Tredway, Judge George H. Gil- 
mer, Judge N. M. Taliaferro, Jubal Early, 
and many others whose names are well 
known in the history of the Virginia bar. 
For a short time before the war, having be- 
come a resident of Danville. \'irginia, he 
owned and edited the "Danville Register." 
Ill 1853 he was elected to the state legisla- 
ture from Pittsylvania, but declined re- 
election. In 1861 he was elected to the 
house of delegates, while he was serving as 
a non-commissioned officer in the Confed- 
erate army, which jiosition he held until the 
close of the war. During his membership 
in the house, he was commissioned, by Gov. 
Letcher, lieutenant-colonel by brevet, and 
given special service in aid of the ^^rgmla 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



287 



soldiers in the field. In October, 1865, he 
was elected president of the Richmond & 
Danville Railroad Company. This position 
he held for upwards of twenty years, and 
during his administration he saw this rail- 
road enlarged, under his active direction, 
from about two hundred miles to about two 
tb.ousand miles. He removed early in 1860 
to Richmond, and in 1887 he was elected to 
the house of delegates from that city. He 
always took an earnest and active interest 
in agriculture, and in the commercial and 
/■laterial development of the state, and was 
for years president of the Virginia Board of 
Agriculture. His first wife was Emily W. 
Townes, of Pittsylvania county. His sec- 
ond wife was Kate A. W'ortham, of Rich- 
mond. \'irginia. His last wife was Mrs. 
Mary Cameron Strother, iicc Ross. 

Lupton, Nathaniel Thomas, born in Fred- 
crick county, X'irginia, December 19. 1830; 
graduated at Dickinson College in 1849; 
spent two years in Heidelberg, specializing 
in chemistry under Bunsen, then returned 
to the United States. In 1857 he was elect- 
ed professor of chemistry and geology at 
Randolph-Macon College, and in 1858 re- 
signed to accept a like chair at the Southern 
University, Greensborough, Alabama. In 
1871 he resigned to accept the presidency of 
the University of Alabama, with the chair 
or chemistry. Three years later he was 
chosen professor of chemistry in \'anderbilt 
University, also dean of the faculty, and 
continued eleven years, devoting a great 
deal of attention in seeking to improve eco- 
nomic and sanitary conditions in Nashville 
and the state. In 1865 he was appointed 
state chemist of Alabama, and professor of 
chemistrv in the .\s;ricultural College at 



Auburn. He received the degree of Doctor 
oi Medicine from Vanderbilt University and 
Doctor of Laws from the University of Ala- 
bama in 1875. He held important positions 
in a number of scientific societies ; was vice- 
president of the American Chemical Society 
in 1880, chairman of the chemistry section 
of the American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science in 1877, and vice- 
president of the Association in 1880. In 
1880 he published "The Elementary Princi- 
ples of Scientific Agriculture," a work of 
enduring value. 

Lucas, Daniel B., born at Charlestown, 
Virginia (now West Virginia), March 16, 
1836, son of William Lucas, congressman 
from Virginia. In infancy he sustained 
a fall, causing a permanent spinal difficulty. 
He went from, an academy to the UniA'er- 
sHy of Virginia, v\diere he remained four 
vtars, and after graduation studied law 
under Judge John \\'. Brook, and entered 
upon practice in 1859, at his native place. 
The next year he located in Richmond, and 
was there when the civil war broke out. He 
\\as given a position on the staff of Gen. 
Henry A. Wise, in June, 1861, with whom 
he served throughout the valley campaign 
until October. On June i, 1864 he ran the 
blockade to Canada, in order to assist in 
the defence of Captain John Yates Beall 
(q. v.), a college friend, in his trial as a spy. 
Captain Beall's trial was conducted by the 
f.inious New York lawyer, John P. Brady, 
the l-"ederal department commander. Gen- 
eral John A. Dix. refusing to allow Mr. 
Lucas to appear in the case. Mr. Lucas re- 
mained in Canada for some months, and 
while there wrote his famous poem, "The 
Land Where ^^'e W'ere Dreaming." which 



288 



VIRGIXIA llIOC.RArilV 



first appeared in the "Montreal Gazette," 
r.nd was afterwards re])roduced in many 
newspapers in England and the United 
States. After the war he returned to Charles- 
town (now in West Virginia), but the "test 
oath" provisions would not admit of his 
practicing his profession until 1870, when 
he- forined a law partnership with Judge 
Thomas B. Green, afterwards president of 
the supreme court of appeals of West \"ir- 
ginia. In 1884-86 he was a member of the 
legislature, and in that body he was the im- 
portant factor in defeating the election of a 
Standard Oil Company official as a United 
States senator, and his speech on that occa- 
sion was widely disseminated. On March 
5, 1887, he was appointed United States 
senator by Governor Wilson. On Decem- 
ber 5. 1S89, on the death of Judge Green, of 
the supreme court of appeals, he was ap- 
pointed to fill the position, to which he was 
elected at the end of the term. After leav- 
ing the bench he lived a retired life. In 
1875 he delivered the ode at the semi-cen- 
tennial anniversary of the University of Vir- 
tennial anniversary of the University of 
Virginia. He published ''Memoir of John 
Yates Beall." "The Wreath of Eglantine, 
and Other Poems," "The Maid of Northum- 
berland," "Ballads and Madrigals," "Nica- 
ragua and the Filibusters." In recognition 
of his ample learning, and brilliant qualities 
as an orator and writer, the L'niversity of 
A'irginia conferred u])iin him the degree of 
Doctor of i^aws. He married Evelina 
Tucker Brooke, daughter of Henry Laurens 
Brooke, and Virginia Tucker, his wife, 
daughter of Henry St. George Tucker, judge 
of the Virginia supreme court of appeals, 
and Evelina Hunter, his wife. 



McKim, Randolph Harrison, son of John 
S. McKim and Katharine 1 larrison, his wife ; 
is descended on the father's side from a 
Scotch-Irish family emigrating to America 
in the eighteenth century ; and on the 
mother's from Benjamin Harrison, of James 
river, \'irginia (1635), ancestor of the two 
presidents of that name, and from William 
Randolph, of Turkey Island. He left the 
University in July. 1861, to enlist in Com- 
p;;ny H, First Regiment, Maryland Infan- 
tr\, Ca]nain William H. Murray, attached 
tc Elzey's brigade, under Gen. Joseph E. 
Johnston. He participated in the first battle 
of Manassas, and subsequently in Stone- 
wall Jackson's famous valley camiiaign of 
1862, in the various engagements from 
Harper's Ferry to Cross Keys, at which 
battle (having been appointed aide-de-camp 
to Brigadier-General George H. Stewart) he 
had a horse shot under him. In the cam- 
paign of 1863, Lieutenant McKim was .sev- 
eral times mentioned for gallantry in offi- 
cial despatches, especially for conduct at 
Stephenson's Depot in volunteering to serve 
a piece of artillery whose cannoneers had all 
been killed or wounded, and at Gettysburg 
for volunteering to bring a supply of am- 
munition, under fire, to the men of the Third 
Brigade lying in the Federal breastw(.rks 
on Gulp's llill. In this brittle he was touch- 
ed four times by the bullets of the enemy, 
but escaped serious injury. In the follow- 
ing autumn he resigned, with the consent 
or his superior officers, in order to fit him- 
self for the post of chaplain. Fie spent the 
winter in study in Staunton, Virginia, and 
v,as ordained in May. 1864. He then served 
a.- chaplain in the field until the surrender 
o;' .Appomattox, first in Chew's Battalion of 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



289 



Horse Artillery, and then in the Second 
Kegiment \'irginia Cavalry (Fitzhugh Lee's 
regiment), taking part in the battles and 
skirmishes of Early's campaign of 1864, and 
sharing the hardships of a winter campaign 
in the mountains of West Virginia in 1864- 
65. The war over, after a brief service as 
assistant minister of Emmanuel Church, 
Baltimore, he became rector of St. John's 
Church, Portsmouth, Virginia. In 1867 he 
removed to Alexandria, Virginia, and served 
as rector of old Christ Church for eight 
} ears, when he accepted the charge of Holy 
Trinity Church, Harlem, New York City, 
where he remained eleven years, and re- 
signed to accept the rectorate of Trinity 
Church, New Orleans. From there he re- 
moved to Washington, D. C., and became 
rector of the Church of the Epiphany in De- 
cember. 1888. In 1S71 the University of 
Washington and Lee conferred upon him 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity. While in 
New York, Dr. McKim was instrumental in 
fiirming the Church Temperance Society 
and the Parochial Mission Society. He rep- 
resented the diocese of Maryland, and sub- 
sequently the diocese of Washington, in the 
general conventions since 1892, and was 
continuously a member of the standing com- 
mittee, and was president of that body. He 
was largely instrumental in the creation of 
the diocese of Washington in 1895. He was 
a member of the Society of the Army and 
Navy of the Confederate States, and chap- 
lain of the Confederate Veterans of Wash- 
ington, and also chaplain of the Sons of the 
Revolution. .Among the books published by 
him are the following: "The Doctrine of 
the Christian Ministry," "Protestant Prin- 
ciples," "Sermons on Future Punishment,'' 
■"Christ and Modern Unbelief," "Leo XIII 

VIR-I9 



ac the Bar of History," "Present Day Prob- 
lems of Christian Thoughts," "Bread in the 
Desert," and "The Gospel in the Christian 
'\'ear," besides various occasional sermons 
and pamphlets, among which may be men- 
tioned two addresses given at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia. 

Barnett, Edward Hammet, born in Mont- 
gomery county, Virginia, October 8, 1840. 
His father, James Barnett, owned the Big 
Spring farm on the Roanoke river, and died 
when Edward was a child, leaving his 
mother and three little children in charge 
of her father, William Wade, a Presby- 
terian elder in Christiansburg, Virginia. He 
was educated in the village academy until 
sixteen years old, worked three years on 
what is now the Norfolk and Western Rail- 
road, and entering in 1859, Hampden-Sid- 
ney College, Prince Edward county, Vir- 
ginia; was graduated in 1861 with first 
honor. He entered the war as third ser- 
geant of a students' company,' and was cap- 
tured in July, 1861, at the battle of Rich 
Mountain, northern Virginia, paroled and 
exchanged in 1862. He then entered the 
Fifty-fourth Virginia Infantry Regiment, in 
\vhich he was promoted to be captain and 
quartermaster, and was afterward trans- 
ferred to the Twenty-first Virginia Cavalry, 
v/ith which he gallantly served until he sur- 
rendered with Lee at Appomattox. In Sep- 
tember, 1865, he entered Union Theological 
Seminary in Prince Edward county, Vir- 
ginia, graduating in 1867, was licensed by 
the Montgomery presbytery, in Virginia, 
.\pril 19, 1867, and went at once to Lynch- 
burg, Virginia, as assistant to Rev. Dr. 
Ramsey in the first Presbyterian church in 
that city. In i86g he became pastor of the 



290 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



Abingdon (\'irginia) church, and was or- 
dained by the Abingdon presbytery, Janu- 
ary 14, 1870, preaching there until 1883. In 
July, 1873, he declined a call to the first 
Presbyterian church of Atlanta, Georgia ; 
accepted a call from the same church, in 
December, 1882, but his presbytery refused 
t.i release him from his Virginia charge, and 
finally upon the renewal of the call, and the 
consent of his presbytery, he came to At- 
lanta in May, 1883. He has been for five 
years an editor of the "Presbyterian Quar- 
terly," of Richmond, and is the author of 
scholarly contributions to the religious 
volume called "Life's Golden Lamp." In 
1889 his congregation gave him a five 
months' vacation and the expenses of a trip 
to Palestine and Egypt, of which he spent 
a month in the Holy Land, and on these 
travels, after his return, he delivered more 
than twenty instructive and eloquent lec- 
tures. He received, in 1882, the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity from Alfred University, 
New York. He married, March 8, 1870, 
Caroline L. Trent, of Buckingham county, 
\ irginia. 

Bolton, Channing Moore, born in Rich- 
.nond, Virginia, January 24, 1843, eldest son 
of Dr. James Bolton, deceased. He was 
.;ducated at Richmond and the University 
of Virginia. From 1861 to 1862 he was in 
the service of the state of Virginia on the 
military defences around Richmond ; en- 
gaged in railroading February, 1862, and 
was successively rodman, transitman, and 
r(!sident engineer of the Piedmont railroad, 
Virginia and North Carolina, up to 1863; 
from 1863 to 1865 he was a commissioned 
officer in engineer corps, Confederate States 
Army, and assigned to duty with the .\rmy 



Cif Xcjrtlu-rn \"irginia ; in 1865 to 1866 was 
in charge of the location and construc- 
ti(in of the Clover Hill railroad, Virginia; 
1866 to 1867 resident engineer of the con- 
necting railroad through Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, and constructed the tunnel under 
Gamble's Hill; 1867 to 1869, resident engi- 
neer of the Louisville, Cincinnati and Lex- 
ington railroad, Kentucky, and from 1869 to 
1874, division engineer of the Chesapeake 
and Ohio railroad. During this time Major 
Ilolton located the western division of the 
great trunk line down the New river through 
the mountains of West Virginia. He locat- 
ed the eastern terminus of Chesapeake and 
Ohio railroad, from Richmond to Newport 
News, and constructed "Church Hill" tun- 
nel at Richmond, Virginia, one of the most 
difficult pieces of engineering work of the 
country. From 1874 to 1876 he surveyed 
and located several small railroads in \'ir- 
ginia and North Carolina, and from 1876 to 
1879 was engineer in charge for the United 
States government of location and construc- 
tion of a canal and locks around the cas- 
cades of the Columbian river in Oregon ; 
also, during the same time, made surveys 
and reports of the improvement of the en- 
trance to Coes Bay, and the Coquille river 
in the same state. In 1880 to 1881 he was 
division engineer of the Richmond and Alle- 
ghany railroad, Virginia, a road two hun- 
dred and fifty miles long commenced and 
completed in about fourteen months. From 
1881 to 1882 he was engineer and superin- 
tendent of the Greenville. Columbus and 
I'irmingham railroad, with headquarters at 
Greenville, Mississippi. Since 1882 to date 
he has been the chief engineer of the Rich- 
mond and Danville railroad, the great trunk 
line to the south and the southwest, extend- 





/^./f^€^ 



J'ROMINENT PERSONS 



291 



i-ig from Washington, D. C, through the 
Slates of Virginia, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi. 
From 1879 to 1888 he was also president 
and general manager of the Richmond City 
(Street) Railroad Company. On February 
17, 1874, he married Miss Lizzie Parker, 
daughter of Air. Parker Campbell, of Rich- 
mond, Virginia. She died October 6, 1889. 

Price, Samuel, born in Fauquier county, 
\'irginia, August 18, 1805. He removed to 
Preston county, Virginia, at twelve years of 
age, received a common school education, 
and engaged in law practice in Nicholas 
county. He served two terms in the legis- 
lature, and moved to \\'heeling, and subse- 
quently to Lewisburg, and represented 
Greenbrier county in the legislature for 
many years. He was a leader of internal 
improvements, and an originator of the prop- 
osition to establish a railroad from Tide- 
V, ater, Virginia, to the Ohio river. He was 
a member of the state constitutional con- 
vention in 185 1, and of the secession con- 
vention in 1861. He earnestly opposed se- 
cession in the latter body, but, when Lin- 
coln left no alternative he supported the 
measures that followed. He was elected 
lieutenant-governor of Virginia in 1863, 
and served as president of the state senate 
till the close of the war. He was appointed 
a circuit judge in 1865, but declined to take 
the test oath, and did not serve. He was 
an unsuccessful candidate for the United 
States senate in 1876; was president of the 
West Virginia constitutional convention in 
1872 ; and in 1876 was appointed by the gov- 
ernor to fill out the unexpired term of Allen 
T. Caperton, deceased, in the United States 
senate, serving four months. He died at 



Lewisburg, West Virginia, February 25, 
1884. 

Hubbard, David, born in Virginia, in 1806, 
removed to Alabama, practiced law, and be- 
came solicitor of his judicial district. He 
\/as a member of the state senate in 1830, 
and served in the legislature in 1831-53. He 
was elected to congress as a states rights 
Democrat in 1838, serving until 1841 ; was 
a presidential elector on the Polk and Dal- 
las ticket in 1845 • was reelected to congress 
in 1849, serving till 185 1. He was presi- 
dential elector on the Breckenridge ticket in 
1S60 ; a member of the first Confederate con- 
gress, and in 1861 was appointed commis- 
sioner of Indian aflfairs for the Confederate 
government. After the close of the civil 
war he removed to Nashville, Tennessee. 
He died in Louisiana in 1874. 

Underwood, John Curtiss, born in Litch- 
field, Flerkimer county. New York, in 1808. 
He graduated at Hamilton College in 1832, 
and located in Clarke county, Virginia. In 
1856 he was a delegate to the convention 
that nominated John C. Fremont for Presi- 
dent. His anti-slavery sentiments led him 
to leave Virginia and settle in New York, 
where he became secretary of a company 
dealing in southern lands. In 1861 he was 
appointed United States consul at Callao, 
Peru, but took instead the office of fifth 
auditor in the United States Treasury De- 
partment. Early in the civil war he affirm- 
ed the right of the United States govern- 
ment to confiscate the property of Confed- 
erates. During reconstruction he was ap- 
pointed judge of a district court in Virginia, 
and it was in his court that bail was refused 
the President of the Confederacy, Jeflferson 
Davis, in June, 1866, after he had been in- 



292 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



dieted for treason. He presided over the 
court in May, 1867, when the Confederate 
leader was released. He was bitterly de- 
nounced in the South on account of his vio- 
lent and unbecoming partisanship, and was 
forced to defend suits brought against him 
on account of his decrees sanctioning confis- 
cation. He died in Washington, D. C., De- 
cember 7, 1873. 

Price, Thomas Lawson, born near Dan- 
ville, \irginia, January 19, 1809. In 1831 
he settled in JefTerson City, Missouri, at 
first engaged in mercantile pursuits, and 
afterward bought and sold real estate. In 
1838 he obtained the contract for carrying 
the mail between St. Louis and Jefferson 
City, and established the first stage line be- 
tween those places. Later he gained control 
of all the stage routes in the state, and be- 
came lessee of the state penitentiary. He 
was the first mayor of JelTerson City in 
1838, and was reelected. In 1847 ^^^ ^^as ap- 
pointed brevet major-general of Missouri 
militia, and in 1849 he was elected lieuten- 
ant-governor as a Democrat. In 1856 Gen- 
eral Price headed a Benton delegation to 
the Democratic national convention that 
nominated James Buchanan, but was not 
admitted. In i860 he served in the state 
legislature, and on September 21, 1861, was 
appointed by General John C. Fremont brig- 
adier-general of volunteers. The appoint- 
ment expired by limitation, July 17, 1862. 
He was elected to congress in place of John 
W. Reid, expelled, and served from January 
21, 1862, till March 3, 1863. In 1864 he was 
nominated by the Unionists for governor. 
His health now began to fail, and his only 
subsequent appearance in public life was as 
delegate to the Democratic national con- 



vention in 1868, where he acted as vice- 
president when Horatio Seymour was nomi- 
nated. He was connected with railroad 
ailairs both as contractor and officer, and, 
as a member of the legislature, he was 
largely instrumental in inducing the state 
to lend its aid to the construction of Iron 
Mountain and Hannibal & St. Joseph rail- 
roads ; and was also identified with the con- 
struction of the Missouri Pacific and the 
Kansas Pacific roads. Besides building the 
greater part of the Kansas Pacific, he was 
also a fund commissioner and director of 
that road, and united with other capitalists 
in extending the line from Denver to Chey- 
enne. He died in Jefferson City, Missouri, 
July 16, 1870. 

Harris, John Woods, born in Nelson coun- 
ty, Virginia, in 1810. He became a lawyer, 
was admitted to the bar. and began practice 
in Texas, in 1838. During the earlier years 
his practice was general, but after the civil 
war he confined himself chiefly to important 
cases in the higher courts. He was a mem- 
ber of the first congress of Texas, at Austin, 
ir; 1838. In 1841 he proposed abolishing the 
Mexican laws, and engrafting the common 
law on the jurisprudence of the republic. 
He was made attorney-general of Texas in 
1846, was reappointed, and in 1854 was one 
of a commission to revise the laws of the 
state. He was a staunch Democrat, and 
though opposed to secession he finally ac- 
cepted it when Lincoln left no alternative, 
and gave a loyal support to the Confed- 
eracy. He died at Galveston, Texas, April 
I. 1887. 

Smith, Benjamin Mosby, horn in Pow- 
hatan count}-. \'irginia. June 30. 181 1 : grad- 
uated at Ilanipden-Sidney College in 1829, 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



293 



and at the Virginia Union Theological Semi- 
nary in 1832. He was then tutor in Hebrew 
and introductory studies until- 1836, and was 
successively pastor of Presbyterian churches 
in Danville and Augusta county, Virginia, 
from 1840 till his appointment in 1854 to the 
chair of Oriental and biblical literature in 



the sloop-of-war Hornet, and he was in serv- 
ice until the Texan war of independence of 
1836, when the new government of Texas 
cr.lled him to the command of its navy, with 
the rank of commodore. Resigning his com- 
mission in the United States service, partly 

. fiom the credit of the republic and partly 

Union Semmary. From 18 1;8 to 1874 he was t u- 111 

J :, ^yj o/^ lie waa £,.Qj^ jjjg Q^j^ resources, he purchased two 

pastor of Hampden-Sidney College Church, ,^^11 ^u;^^ u- u i, • j r 

^ ■' ^ ' small ships, which he equipped for war. 

and he was moderator of the general assem- wnt-u tu^^ u -i 1 r xt r^ ^ 

=• With these he sailed from New Orleans 



bly of the Presbyterian church in 1876. 
Hampden-Sidney College gave him the de- 
gree of Doctor of Divinity in 1845. 

Phillips, Dinwiddle Brazier, son of Col. 
William Foulke Phillips and Edith Harrison 
Ashmore Cannon, his wife, was born in 
P'auquier county, Virginia. He entered the 
United States navy as assistant surgeon in 
1847; was surgeon of the J'irginia or Mcrri- 
tiwc during her entire existence ; medical 
director of the Wise Legion and command- 
ed the post at White Sulphur Springs as 



early in 1843, the Mexicans awaiting him 
in the Gulf with a fleet of eight or ten ves- 
sels, including two steamers, the Guadalupe 
and Montezuma, which had been built in 
England at an expense of $1,000,000. Fear- 
ing the destruction of his two ships. Presi- 
dent Houston repeatedly ordered Commo- 
dore Moore to take shelter in Galveston bay ; 
but, disregarding these orders, or failing to 
receive them, Moore put out in search of the 
ti.emy. A series of hot engagements en- 
sued, in which the enemy were routed with 
major of that legion. After the war he ^'^'-^'^J losses. Commodore Moore, however, 



resided at Madison Run Station, Orange 
county, Virginia. He wrote a paper entitled 
"The Career of the Iron-Clad Virginia (for- 
merly the Merrimac), Confederate States 
Navy," which was published in "Virginia 
Historical Collections," vol. vi., new series, 
miscellaneous papers. He married Nannie 
F., daughter of William Walden, of Rappa- 
hannock county, Virginia. He was de- 



was dismissed from the service by President 
Houston for disobedience of orders, but the 
Texan congress indemnified him for his 
pecuniary losses, granting him a large tract 
of land. After the annexation of Texas, 
Moore and his associate Texan naval offi- 
cers applied to congress to be reinstated in 
the United States navy, with the rank they 
had held in that of Texas. A compromise 



scended from John Dinwiddle, brother of ^^^® finally passed in the shape of an appro- 
Robert Dinwiddle, governor (1751-1758) priation of leave-pay from the time of annex- 
(q. v.). ^t'on to the passage of the bill. Of this ap- 
propriation in 1855, the share accruing to 
Moore, Edwin Ward, born in Alexandria, Commodore Moore was about $17,000. He 
Virginia, in 181 1 ; entered the United States subsequently resided in New York City, en- 
navy as a midshipman in 1825, and became gaged in mechanical experiments and in- 
heutenant in 1835. His first cruise was in ventions, and died there, October 5, 1865. 



294 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



Mines, Flavel Scott, horn in Leesburg, 
\'irginia, December 31, 1811, son of John 
Mines, D. D., a Presbyterian clergyman of 
\'irginia. He graduated at Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary in 1830, and became pastor 
o' Laight Street Presbyterian Church, New 
York City, but resigned his charge in 1841, 
and in 1842 took orders in the Protestant 
Episcopal church. In 1849 he organized at 
San Francisco, California, the first Protes- 
tant Episcopal congregation on the Pacific 
coast, and built Trinity Church, under the 
chancel of which he was buried. He was 
the author of a "Presbyterian Clergyman 
Looking for the Church." He died in 1S52 
at San Francisco. California. 

Mutter, Thomas Dent, born in Richmond, 
\'irginia, March q. 181 1; graduated at 
Hampden-Sidney College, and at the med- 
ical department of the University of Penn- 
sylvania in 183 1, then went to Paris. On 
his return he settled in Philadelphia. In 
1841-56 he was professor of surgery in Jef- 
ferson Medical College. He wrote an ac- 
count of the salt sulphur springs of Vir- 
ginia, an essay on "Club-Foot," contributed 
various professional papers to periodicals, 
and published an edition of Robert Liston's 
"Lectures on the Operations of Surgery," 
with additions (Philadelphia, 1846). He 
died at Charleston, South Carolina. 

Jenkins, Thornton Alexander, born in 
Orange county, Virginia, December 11, 1811. 
He entered the United States navy as a mid- 
•shipman, November i. 1828; in 1829 saw 
service on the Natchez in breaking up pirates 
in Cuba, and in 1831 assisted in suppressing 
Nat Turner's negro insurrection in Virginia. 
He was commissioned lieutenant, December 
9. 1839, and until 1842 was engaged on the 



coast survey. In 1845 he was sent to Europe 
to c.Kamine lighthouse systems, and in 1846 
presented a report on the lighthouse service 
in England, France, and other European 
countries. During the Mexican war he was 
executive ofificer of the sloop-of-war Gcr- 
umiitown : commander of the store ship Re- 
lief, and of the supply and hospital station 
on Salmadena Island, and commanded land- 
ing parties in the capture of Tuxpan and 
Tabasco. From 1848 to 1851 he was in com- 
mand of the steamers Jefferson and Corunn, 
in meteorological and hydrographic obser- 
vations and taking deep sea temperatures. 
The Conein was built from his own plans 
and under his supervision. In October, 
1852, he was appointed naval secretary to 
the lighthouse board; September 14, 1855, 
he was promoted to commander, and placed 
in command of the Preble in the Paraguay 
ex]3edition, 1855-59. On his return he was 
ordered to the Caribbean in search of 
^^'alkcr. the filibusterer : then to Vera Cruz, 
\\hcre he aided in the capture of the Mira- 
nioii and the Marquis of Havana, which he 
convoyed to New Orleans. Before the war 
between the stages was begun he and Cap- 
tain William F. Smith saved the forts at 
Key West and Dry Tortugas from falling 
iiito the hands of an expedition sent from 
New Orleans. In February, 1861, he was 
again appointed secretary of the lighthouse 
board, and during the year performed secret 
service at the request of President Lincoln, 
until stricken with illness in November. On 
July 16, 1862, ho was ])romoted captain, and 
as senior officer repulsed the attack of the 
Confederates at Coggin's Point, James 
river, and the attack on City Point in .Au- 
gust. 1862. Later that year he was engaged 
ill blockading Mobile and its approaches, in 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



295 



ccimmand of the Oneida. He was fleet cap- 
tain and chief of staff of Farragut's squad- 
ron on the Mississippi, commanding the 
Hartford at the passing of the Port Hudson 
and Grand Gulf batteries. At the capture of 
Fort Hudson he was in chief command of 
tlie naval forces, Admiral Farragut having 
been called to New Orleans. In the block- 
ade of Mobile in 1864, he commanded the 
Riclinifliid, and the second division of Farra- 
gut's fleet, and was left in command in 
Mobile Bay until February, 1865, when he 
was ordered to the James river, remaining 
there until the surrender. After the war he 
was sent to the Ohio and Mississippi rivers 
tc: investigate seamen's bounty claims, and 
as president of a board awarded a large sum 
to enlisted men and their families. From 
1865 until 1869 he was chief of the board of 
navigation, then chief of the lighthouse 
board until 1871. He was promoted to rear- 
admiral July 13, 1870. Later he commanded 
the naval forces on the Asiatic station until 
his retirement, December 12, 1873. At the 
Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia in 
1876, he was in charge of the exhibit made 
by the United States Navy Department. 

Halsey, Leroy Jones, born in Goochland 
county, Virginia, January 28, 1812. When 
he was six years old his parents removed 
to Huntsville, Alabama, and his education 
was obtained at Nashville University, from 
which he graduated in 1834, and for two 
years was tutor of ancient languages there. 
He pursued his theological studies at Prince- 
ten, was licensed to preach in 1840, and 
served as a preacher in Dallas county, Ala- 
bama. From 1843 until 1848 he was pastor 
of the Presbyterian church in Jackson, Mis- 
sissippi, then removed to Louisville. Ken- 



tucky, where for a decade he served as pas- 
tor of the Chestnut Street Presbyterian 
Church. In 1859 he was elected to the chair 
of pastoral theology, homiletics and church 
government in the Theological Seminary of 
the Northwest, Chicago, Illinois, and filled 
the same until 1881, when he was made pro- 
fessor emeritus. His published works are: 
'"The Literary Attractions of the Bible" 
(New York, 1859) ; "The Life and Pictures 
of the Bible" (Philadelphia, i860) ; "The 
Beauty of Emanuel" (1861) ; "The Life and 
\\'orks of Philip Lindley (3 vols., 1866); 
"Memoir of the Rev. Lewis W. Green, D. 
I.'." (New York. 1871). and "Living Chris- 
tianity" (1881). 

Wilmer, Joseph Pere Bell, born in Kent 
county, Maryland, February 11, 1812; was 
educated at Kenyon College, and the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Theological Seminary, Alex- 
andria, Virginia ; was ordained deacon in 
July. 1834, and priest in May, 1838. After 
serving for a few months as chaplain at the 
University of Virginia, he was appointed 
a chaplain in the United States army. He 
resigned in 1843. and was in charge suc- 
cessively of Hunger's parish, Northampton 
county, and St. Paul's parish, Goochland 
county, Virginia ; became rector of St. 
Mark's Church, Philadelphia, in 1848. con- 
tinuing there till the beginning of the civil 
v/ar. when he resigned, and settled on his 
plantation in Albemarle county, Virginia. 
He went to England in 1863 to purchase 
Bibles for the Confederate army, was cap- 
tured on his return voyage, and for a short 
time confined in the old Capitol prison, 
Washington, D. C. He became bishop of 
I,ouisiana in 1866. The diocese at that time 
was in a disorganized condition, but he de- 



296 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



voted himself with great energy to recon- 
structing churches that had been burned, 
and supplying vacant pulpits, and was suc- 
ct-ssful in restoring the affairs of the dio- 
cese to a prosperous condition. He was 
classed with the high church party. He 
died in New Orleans, Louisiana, December 
2, 1878. 

Scott, Gustavus Hall, born in Fairfax 
county, \"irginia. June 13, 1812. He entered 
the United States navy as midshipman, Au- 
gust I, 1828, became passed midshipman, 
June 14, 1834, and made two cruises in the 
West Indies in the I'andalia in 1835-36 and 
1839-40. He was also off Charleston, South 
C arolina. during the nullification excitement. 
He was commissioned lieutenant, February 
25, 1841, and was flag lieutenant of the 
Pacific squadron in the frigate St. L(iZ\.'rciici\ 
in 1852-53; was commissioned commander, 
December 27, 1856, and served as lighthouse 
inspector in 1858-60. In June, 1861, he com- 
manded the steamer Keystone State, pursued 
the Confederate privateer Sumter, and cap- 
tured the steamer Sah'or off Tampico. He 
commanded the Maraiitanca in the opera- 
tions with the army in James river, was on 
the blockade, and had numerous engage- 
m.ents with Confederate batteries in the 
sounds of North Carolina in 1862-63. He 
was commissioned captain, November 4, 
1863, ^ncl commanded De Soto, in which he 
captured several blockade-runners in 1864. 
Subsequently he took charge of the steam- 
sioop Camuidaiyiia, on the blockade, and was 
senior officer at the surrender of Charleston, 
South Carolina, in 1865. He was a mem- 
ber of the examining board for the admis- 
sion of volunteer officers to the regular navy 
in 1868 ; served as lighthouse inspector in 



1869-71 ; was promoted to commodore, Feb- 
ruary 10. 1869. and to rear-admiral, Febru- 
ary 14. 1873. He was then commander-in- 
(.hief of the North .Atlantic squadron until 
June 13, 1874, when he was retired, having 
reached the age of sixty-two. He died at 
Washington, D. C, March 23, 1882. 

Ambler, William Marshall, youngest son 
of Col. John Ambler and Catherine Bush, 
his wife, was born in Richmond, \'irginia, 
July 25, 1813. He spent two years at Wil- 
liam and Mary College and two years at 
the University of Virginia, and then studied 
law at the law school of Judge Lomax, at 
I'redericksburg, and for many years prac- 
ticed in Louisa and surrounding counties 
with great success. He served several 
terms in the senate of Virginia, and was for 
many years chairman of the committee on 
justice, and was at one time speaker of the 
senate. In 1861 he was a member of the 
state convention and signed the ordinance 
o' secession. He died at his estate "Lake- 
land." Louisa county, Virginia, August 25, 
1896. He married. June 20, 1855, Martha 
Elizabeth Coleman, daughter of Thomas 
G. Coleman, of Halifax county. 

Wilmer, Richard Hooker, born in Alex- 
andria. \'irginia, in 1816, son of Rev. \\\\- 
liam H. Wilmer, president of William and 
Mary College. He graduated from Yale 
College, and received the degree of Doctor 
of Laws from the University of Alabama. 
and that of Doctor of Divinity from \\illiam 
and Mary College. He was made bishop of 
Alabama in 1862. When the civil war end- 
ed, he instructed the clergy of his diocese 
to omit the prayer "for the president and all 
others in antliorily." on the ground that 
.Alabama w;is under niilitarv, and not civil 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



297 



authority. Gen. George H. Thomas issued 
an order suspending him, and which was 
revoked by President Johnson. He pub- 
lished : "The Recent Past from a Southern 
Standpoint ;" "Reminiscences of a Grand- 
father," and "Guide Books for Young 
Churchmen,' and many sermons and ad- 
dresses. He married Margaret Brown, of 
Kelson county. Virginia. He died in 1902. 

Gary, John B., born at Hampton, Virginia, 
in 1819, son of Col. Gill A. Cary and Sarah 
E. Baytop, his wife. He attended Hamp- 
ton Academy, and William and Mary Col- 
lege, where he graduated on July 4, 1839. 
He taught a common school five years, and 
was principal of Hampton Academy (com- 
bining the ancient schools of Benjamin 
Syms and Thomas Eaton) for seventeen 
years, ending with its closing in April, 
1861, on account of the war. He entered 
the army as major of Virginia volunteers, 
and was promoted to lieutenant-colonel 
after the battle of Bethel, and assigned to 
the Thirty-second Virginia Regiment. Later 
he became assistant adjutant-general and 
inspector-general on the staff of Gen. John 
E. Magruder, with whom he served in the 
Peninsular campaign and the Seven Days' 
battle near Richmond. After Gen. Magru- 
der's transfer to the west, he was put on 
duty in the pay department in Richmond, 
and where he served till the close of the 
war. He was paroled April 24, 1865, and 
after farming for a year he engaged in the 
commission business. He was also made 
genera! agent for the Virginia penitentiary, 
from which position he was removed in 
December, 1868, by the military command- 
ant. In January, 1869, he became general 
agent of the Piedmont Life Insurance Com- 



jiany, and a few months later went to New 
'N'ork, and was soon appointed general agent 
of the Piedmont and Arlington Life Insur- 
ance Company, serving as such nearly two 
years. He was then for several years with 
Gen. Harry Heth as general agent and man- 
ager for the Life Association of America, 
later becoming sole manager, and resigning 
late in 1887. In January of the following 
year he was made general agent for Virginia 
cf the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of Alilwaukee, Wisconsin ; and in 
1883 he and his son, T. A. Cary, were ap- 
jiointed general agents for the company in 
Virginia and North Carolina. Col. Cary 
strved as treasurer and superintendent of 
the Democratic city committee of Rich- 
mond for six years, to July, 1886, when he 
was appointed superintendent of the city 
schools. He was a man of polished man- 
ners, and very successful in all his under- 
takings. He married Columbia H. Hudgins. 

Beale, Richard Lee Turberville, son of 
Robert Beale and Martha Felicia Turber- 
ville, his wife, daughter of Major George 
Lee Turberville, born at Hickory Hill, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, May 22, 1819. 
He was educated at Northumberland Acad- 
emy and Dickinson College, Pennsylvania, 
th.en, taking up the study of law, he gradu- 
ated at the law department of the Univer- 
sity of Virginia in 1838. Subsequently he 
was engaged in the practice of his profes- 
sion and attained prominence in the political 
field. From 1847 until 1849 he represented 
his district in congress, to which he declined 
reelection. He was a delegate to the State 
reform convention in 1850, and was elected 
to the state senate in 1857. Upon the seces- 
sion of Virginia he enlisted in the cavalry 



298 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



strvicc, and being jiromoted captain and 
then major, was put in command at Camp 
Lcc, near Hague, on the lower Potomac, 
where his intelligence and excellent judg- 
ment were of much value. Subsequently he 
.ser\ed under Col. W. 11. l\ Lee, in the 
Ninth Cavalry Regiment until Lee was pro- 
moted brigadier-general, w'hen he was ad- 
vanced to the rank of colonel and given com- 
mand of the regiment. In December, 1862, 
he attracted attention and much favorable 
comment by a bold expedition into Rappa- 
hannock county, in which the Federal gar- 
rison at Leeds was captured, without loss. 
On A])ril ifi, 1863, he won the praise of J. E. 
B. Stuart for his heroic service in meeting 
and repelling the threatened raid of Stone- 
man's cavalry division, and during the re- 
newed movement by Stoneman at the close 
of the month, he was for a week in almost 
constant fighting, his regiment everywhere 
behaving valorously and capturing many 
prisoners. At the battle of Fleetwood he 
led the Ninth in the brilliant charge in which 
Gen. W. H. F. Lee was wounded and Col. 
Williams killed. He participated in Stuart's 
raid through Maryland, fought at Gettys- 
burg, and rendered faithful service in the 
cavalry affairs during the return to \'ir- 
ginia. During the fight at Culpeper Court 
House he was in command of W. H. F. 
Lee's brigade. In March, 1864, having been 
stationed on the Northern Neck, he made a 
forced march to intercept Dahlgren and his 
raiders, and a detachment of his regiment, 
under First Lieutenant James Pollard, Com- 
pany H, successfully ambushed the Fed- 
erals, and aided by other detachments cap- 
tured about one hundred and seventy-five 
men and killed Dahlgren. The papers found 
upon Dahlgren's person, revealing a design 



to burn Richmond and kill President Davis 
and cabinet, were forwarded by Col. Beale, 
through Fitz Lee, to the government. A 
correspondence with the Federal authorities 
followed. He participated in command of 
bis regiment in the campaign from the 
Rapidan to the James, was distinguished in 
tlie fighting at Stony creek, and toward 
Reams' Station in July, capturing two Fed- 
eial standards : and in August, upon the 
death of Gen. Chambliss, was given com- 
mand of the brigade. February 6, 1865, he 
was promoted brigadier-general, and in this 
rank he served during the remainder of the 
struggle. After the war he was elected as a 
Democrat to the forty-sixth congress and 
served from February 8, 1879, to March 3, 
1S87 ; retired to his home near Hague, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, and practiced 
law; died in his home. April 21, 1893. 

Taylor, James Barnett, born in England, 
March 19, 1819; received his early education 
in New York City ; his parents removed 
about 1818 to Mecklenburg county. \'irginia. 
After receiving an academical course, he be- 
came a Baptist home missionary, and in 
1826 was made pastor of a church in Rich- 
mond, \'irginia. In 1839-40 he was chap- 
lain of the University of Virginia. Return- 
ing to Richmond, he Served as a pastor five 
years, and in 1843. soon after the organi- 
zation of the Southern Baptist convention, 
became its corresponding secretary, which 
office he filled until within a few weeks of 
his death, travelling and preaching con- 
stantly throughout the South. He was edi- 
tor of the "Religious Herald," and subse- 
quently of the "Southern Baptist Missionary 
Journal." and the "Home and Foreign Jour- 
nal." both of which he founded. During the 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



299 



I 



civil vvar he was a colporteur in camps and 
hospitals, and a Confederate post-chaplain. 
After the war he revived the Southern Bap- 
tist missions, aided in the education of the 
freedmen, preaching often to colored con- 
gregations, and conferring with the Freed- 
men's Bureau in planning for assisting the 
emancipated slaves. He was one of the 
founders of the Virginia Baptist education 
society, also of Richmond College. His chief 
published works were "Life of Lot Cary ;" 
"Lives of Virginia Baptist Ministers ;" and 
"Memoir of Luther Rice, one of the First 
IMissionaries in the East." When he died 
he had nearly completed a "History of Vir- 
ginia Baptists." His wife was a daughter 
of Elisha Scott Williams. He died in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, December 22, 1871. 

Jones, James Alfred, born in Mecklenburg 
county, Virginia, June 3, 1820, son of James 
B. Jones and Judith Bailey, his wife. He 
took the Master of Arts degree at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia in his nineteenth year, 
and also took the law course, completing his 
legal studies under Conway Robinson, of 
Richmond. He was admitted to the bar in 
1840, and the next year entered upon prac- 
tice in Petersburg, removing to Richmond 
in 1857. In 1850 he was a member of the 
state constitutional convention ; he was emi- 
nently conservative, and he did not favor the 
amendments proposed in that body, nor the 
constitution which it framed. In 1853 he 
was elected to the state senate. From the 
time of his removal to Richmond, his prac- 
tice was for the greater part a practicing 
attorney in the supreme court of appeals, 
ranking as one of the ablest in the state. He 
was an earnest exponent of states' rights 
doctrines. He was a director and counsel 



for railroads and banks, and a trustee of 
Richmond College. He married Mary Henry, 
daughter of James G. Lyon, of Mobile, Ala- 
bama. 

Garnett, Alexander Yelverton Peyton, born 
in Essex county, Virginia, September 20, 
1820. He was graduated in medicine at the 
University of Pennsylvania in 1841, then 
entered the United States navy, was pro- 
moted surgeon in 1848, and resigned on Oc- 
tober 21, 1850, to accept the professorship 
of clinical medicine in the National Medical 
College at Washington, D. C. In 1861 he 
left Washington, and became a member of 
the examining board of surgeons for the 
Confederate army, and afterward surgeon in 
charge of the two military hospitals in Rich- 
mond. He was the family physician of Jef- 
ferson Davis and of all his cabinet officers, 
and accompanied Mr. Davis after the evac- 
uation of Richmond. Afterward he returned 
to Washington, and was again elected a 
professor in the medical college in 1867. but 
resigned in 1870, and was made an emeritus 
professor. He was elected a vice-president 
of the American Medical Association in 
1885. He contributed to medical literature 
papers on the claims of "Condurango as a 
Cure for Cancer;" "The Potomac Marshes 
and Their Influence as a Pathogenic Agent ;" 
"Epidemic Jaundice Among Children ;" "The 
Sorghum Vulgare or Broom-corn Seed in 
Cystitis ;" "Nelaton's Probe in Gunshot 
Wounds," and "Coloproctitis Treated by 
Hot-water Douche and Dilation or Divi- 
sion of the Sphincters." He married in 1848 
the eldest daughter of Henry A. Wise. He 
died July 11, 1888, at Rehoboth Beach, Dela- 



300 



\-lRGI\-IA BIOGRAPHY 



Langhorne, Maurice Scarisbrook, born in 
Cumberland county, \'irginia, March 27, 
1823, son of Col. Maurice Langhorne, a lieu- 
tenant of the Cumberland troop in the war 
of 1812, and Elizabeth Allen, his wife; his 
grandfather, William Langhorne, was a 
member of the house of burgesses. He was 
brought by his parents to Lynchburg, 1827, 
was educated at that city, and in 1840 be- 
gan business life as clerk in a dry goods 
house. Four years later he engaged in a busi- 
ness career as a tobacco manufacturer, and 
continued until the passage of the ordinance 
cf secession. He then held the rank of captain 
of the Lynchburg Rifle Greys, and with his 
command at once answered the call of his 
state. The company was mustered in as 
Company A, of the Eleventh Virginia In- 
fantry, on April 23, 1861. He participated 
ill the action at Blackburn's Ford, July 18, 
and in the battle of Manassas, July 21. In 
September he was promoted to major, and 
given command of ten companies by Gen. 
J. E. B. Stuart, comprising his own com- 
pany and details from other regiments. At 
Munson's Hill, overlooking Washington, on 
September 29, 1861, he sustained an attack 
by a three-fold prepondering force of Fed- 
erals, and with the aid of two pieces of 
artillery repulsed three assaults. In No- 
vember following, he fought at Dranesville, 
and on May 5, 1862, participated in the bat- 
tle of Williamsburg, in the Peninsular cam- 
paign. Promoted to lieutenant-colonel. May 
31, he did gallant service at Seven Pines in 
command of his regiment, but was severely 
wounded. Promotion to colonel soon fol- 
lowed, but his injuries were such that it 
was impossible for him to return to the field. 
Determined, however, to aid the Southern 
cause all he cr)ul(l. as soon as he was partially 



recovered, in the winter of 1862-63, he ac- 
cepted command of the military post at 
Lynchburg and held this position until the 
following summer. Subsequently, having 
been retired from active service by the med- 
ical board at Lynchburg, he was assigned to 
the department of reserves, under command 
cf Gen. Kemper, and remained upon that 
duty until toward the close of 1864. He 
was then transferred to the engineers' de- 
partment at Richmond, under Gen. Gilmer, 
and served in that capacity in the defense 
of the city until its evacuation. Returning 
to Lynchburg, by order of Gen. Gilmer, he 
was paroled there in April, 1865, terminating 
a highly creditable military career. On re- 
turning to civil life at the close of the war, 
he was engaged until 1867 as an insur- 
ance agent, and then returned to his original 
occupation, the manufacture of tobacco, 
which he carried on for six years, then re- 
tiring from business. 

Bauder, Ezra, Ijorn at Indian Castle, Her- 
kimer county, N'ew York April 6, 1824, son 
of Joseph liauder and Elizabeth Eigen- 
broadt, his wife. He was educated at 
Kingsboro ( Xew York) Academy, the 
Pennsylvania College, and Union College, 
Schenectady, New York, graduating from 
the latter in 1847. For a time he was a civil 
engineer on the New York Central Railroad, 
and then became tutor in the family of Dr. 
Jricquelin A. Marshall, son of Chief Justice 
John Marshall. Some time after he took a 
similar position in the family of Mrs. Wil- 
kinson, widow of (ien. Wilkinson, of revo- 
lutionary fame, meantime jnirsuing theologi- 
cal studies. He then became principal of a 
school at Port Royal, South Carolina, and 
also edited the "Times," of that placp, and 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



301 



I 



was postmaster from 1854 until the breaking 
cut of the civil war. As a northern man, 
he was viewed with suspicion, and was ar- 
rested by a party of citizens and taken to 
Fredericksburg. At the instance of southern 
friends there, he was released by Judge 
Braxton. He was again arrested, brought 
tc trial, and acquitted. Having lost his 
property and post-ofifice, he went to Rich- 
mond, and was appointed to a clerkship in 
the office of the Confederate medical direc- 
tor, serving until 1864, when he went to 
Charlotte, North Carolina. There he was 
teacher to the sons of Confederate officers 
and refugees until the surrender of Gen. 
Lee in April, 1865. He then retired to a 
form in Culpeper county, and later resumed 
v.ork as a teacher. In 1876 he became 
headmaster of Ridley Hall, a church school 
at Fenton, Michigan. Three years later he 
returned to Richmond and established the 
rirentsville Seminary, which he closed in 
1888, his wife having died. He afterwards 
became principal of Creswell Academy, in 
A\'ashington county. North Carolina. He 
married, in August, 1863, Julia .\. Care, 
whose mother was a sister of William F. G. 
Garnett. and related to Muscoe Russell Gar- 
rett and Senator R. M. T. Hunter. 

Minor, Virginia Louisa, born in Gooch- 
land county, Virginia. March 27, 1824; was 
educated at a young ladies' academy in 
Charlottesville," Virginia. She married, in 
1843, Francis Minor, a relative of the same 
name, and removed in 1846 to St. Louis, 
Missouri. During the civil war she aided 
the sick and wounded soldiers in the camps 
and hospitals around St. Louis. She origin- 
ated the woman suffrage movement in Mis- 
souri in 1866, organized the Woman Suf- 
frage Association in 1867, and presided 



over the convention of woman suffragists in 
St. Louis in 1869. She was the first woman 
in the United States in the nineteenth cen- 
tury to claim sutTrage as a right, and not as 
a favor. With this end in view, in 1872 she 
brought the matter before the courts, taking 
it finally to the United States supreme court. 

Gannaway, William Trigg, born in Wythe 
count} . \'irginia, June 10, 1825. He gradu- 
?ted at Emory and Henry College in 1845, 
and for nine years afterwards had charge of 
bloyd Institute, in Virginia, and the follow- 
ing three years held a similar position at 
Germantown, North Carolina. In 1857 he 
became professor of Latin and Greek in 
Trinity (North Carolina) College, and was 
.-onnected with the institution until its re- 
moval to Durham, North Carolina, in 1892. 
The first year he taught Greek and phil- 
osophy ; and after this time Latin, adding in 
turn. Greek, history and French. In De- 
cember. 1863, he became president pro tern., 
on the resignation of President Craven. 
With the exception of the University of 
North Carolina, this was perhaps the only 
important institution of learning that was 
kept open during the entire period of the civil 
v.ar, and Professor Gannaway encountered 
great difficulties in maintaining it. The 
military needs of the Confederacy ha-d so 
narrowed the teaching force, that he was 
obliged to teach all classes in Latin, Greek 
and French ; while he also had to provide 
for the boarding of the students in years 
v.'hen provisions were scarce and inordi- 
nately expensive. In 1864 girls were ad- 
mitted to the school. It inanaged to sur- 
\ive the war period, but suspended at the 
time of Gen. Lee's surrender, in April, 1865, 
but was revived in the fall of the same year. 



302 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



Hereford, Frank, born in Fauquier 
cdUiUy, \irginia, July 4, 1825. He studied 
hiw, was admitted to the bar, and after be- 
ginning practice in Virginia removed to 
California, where from 1855 till 1857 he was 
district attorney of Sacramento county. He 
afterward settled in West Virginia, was 
elected to congress, and twice re-elected, 
serving from March 4, 1871, to December 
4. 1876, when he took his seat in the United 
States senate, having been appointed in the 
place of Allen T. Caperton, deceased. 

Tyler, Charles Humphrey, soldier, born 
in \'irginia in 1826. He was graduated at 
the United States Military Academy in 
1848, and became second lieutenant in the 
Second Dragoons, April 25, 1849. He 
served in garrison in the cavalry-school at 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania, on frontier duty, and 
in the Utah expedition of 1857-59. On 
June 28, 1861, he was promoted captain. 
He then entered the Confederate service, 
became a brigadier-general, and was killed 
ill battle at West Point, Georgia, April 17, 
1865. 

Thompson, Merriwether Jeff, born at 
Harper's Ferry, Virginia, January 22, 1826; 
was educated in the common schools. He 
was mayor of St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1859; 
was appointed brigadier-general in the Mis- 
souri state guard early in 1861, and in the 
Confederate army in October of that year. 
He was a scout and partisan officer, and ac- 
complished frequent successes over superior 
forces. He was held in high regard by 
Gen. Sterling Price and Gen. Leonidas Polk. 
He recruited his command personally, and 
usually clothed, armed, and subsisted them 
without expense to the Confederate govern- 
nient. He inxcntcd a hemp-hrcak, wliich is 



now in general use, and an improved pistol- 
l(;ck. He surveyed the greater part of the 
ilannibal & St. Joseph Railroad, and a por- 
tion of the Kansas & Nebraska road. He 
died in St. Joseph, Missouri, in July, 1876. 

Starke, Lucien Douglas, burn near Cold 
Harbor. Hanover county, Virginia, Febru- 
ary 9, 1826, son of Col. Bowling Starke and 
Eliza, daughter of Hon. Anthony New. He 
was educated for the law, but early entered 
upon a public career. He was collector of 
customs for the port of Elizabeth City, 
North Carolina, under the administrations of 
Presidents Pierce and Buchanan. He en- 
tered the Confederate service at the begin- 
ing of the civil war, as colonel of the Third 
Regiment, North Carolina Militia, and was 
the first officer assigned to the command at 
liatteras Inlet, while the fortifications there 
were being erected. Later he became as- 
sistant commissary of subsistence for the 
!-cventeenth Regiment, in Martin's brigade, 
but served at brigade headquarters as acting 
inspector-general, and was in the trenches 
and at the front in all the operations of the 
brigade, including the battles about Peters- 
burg, Bermuda Hundred, and the second 
Cold Harbor. For a time he served as ad- 
jutant-general to Gen. J. Johnston Petti- 
grew. He surrendered under Gen. Joseph 
E. Johnston, at Greensboro, North Caro- 
lina, in April, 1865. He soon located in 
Norfolk, and engaged in latv practice. He 
served in the house of delegates. He mar- 
ried (first) Elizabeth F. Marchant ; and 
(second) Tabitha E. I'i]ii)en. 

Cochran. John Lewis, born in .^taunton. 
\irginia. .\ugust 22, 1827, son of John 
Cochran, of Charlottesville, county court 
iudge, and Margaret Lynn, his wife. He 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



303 



v.as educated at the University of Virginia. 
In April, 1861, he became lieutenant in the 
Nineteenth Virginia Regiment, and in 1862 
was elected captain. In 1863 he became 
jirovost marshal under Gen. Longstreet, and 
scr\-ed in that capacity until the surrender. 
tie took part in the following battles : 
First Manassas, Williamsburg, Sharpsburg, 
Greensboro Gap, Second Manassas, first 
IVedericksburg-, and numerous minor en- 
j.',r.gements. In 1856 he was a Whig presi- 
dential elector. In i860 he was a candidate 
for the legislature, but the war forbade his 
service. In 1865 he was elected to the legis- 
lature which never convened. In 1872 he 
was elected county judge, and served for 
twelve years. He was a lawyer, and prac- 
ticed in Charlottesville. He married Mary, 
daughter of Thomas James, of Chillicothe, 
Ohio. 

Cutshaw, Wilfred E., born at Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, January 25, 1828, son of 
George W. Cutshaw and Martha J. Moxley, 
his wife. He graduated at the Virginia 
Military Institute in 1S58, and was a teacher 
in the Hampton Military Institute from 
1859 until 1861, when he resigned to enter 
the army. In April, 1861, he was commis- 
sioned first lieutenant, and then, entering 
the artillery arm, was made captain in 1862, 
and major in fall of the same year, and lieu- 
lenant-colonel in February, 1865. He 
served on the peninsula and in the valley, 
and in May, 1862, was severely wounded in 
the knee, taken prisoner, held until April, 
1863, and then exchanged. Being unfit for 
field service, he was made commander of 
cadets at the Virginia Military Institute, 
and in September. 1863, again entered the 
army, although his wound was unhealed. 



As assistant inspector-general of the Second 
Corps artillery, he served until early in 1864 
when he was promoted to major, and given 
command of an artillery battalion, and so 
served until 1865. At Spotsylvania he was 
slightly wounded in the right arm. In Feb- 
ruary, 1865, he was promoted to lieutenant- 
colonel. At Sailor's Creek, three days be- 
fore the surrender, he was shot in the right 
leg, and the next morning it was amputated 
above the knee. Fie was paroled, June i, 
1865. In September, 1866, he became as- 
sistant professor of mathematics in the Vir- 
ginia Military Institute. In January, 1868, 
he was appointed assistant mining engineer 
of the Dover Coal and Iron Company, of 
Henrico county. Later the same year, he 
became assistant professor of mathematics 
and physics in the Virginia Military Insti- 
tute, and in 1871, assistant professor of 
civil and military engineering. He holds 
membership in various scientific and histori- 
cal societies. He married (first) Mrs. E. 
S. Norfleet: and (second) Miss M. W. Mor- 
ton. 

Smith, William Waugh, born in Fauquier 
county, Virginia, son of Richard M. Smith 
and Ellen Harris Blackwell, his wife. Rich- 
ard M. Smith was closely related to Gov. 
William Smith and was the governor's inti- 
mate friend as well. He improved his edu- 
cational opportunities in his youth, and 
from his eleventh to his sixteenth year at- 
tended the school maintained by Caleb 
liallowell, a Friend, in Alexandria, Vir- 
ginia, an institution of high standard and 
most favorably regarded throughout Vir- 
ginia. When his father transferred his 
journalistic activities to Richmond at the 
Ijeg-inning- of the war between the states. 



304 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAI'IIV 



William Waugh Smith temporarily ahan- 
(loned his studies and became associated 
with his father, reporting the sessions of 
the Confederate senate for the "Enquirer" 
and one other periodical. Exempt from 
military service because of his youth and 
his reportorial duties, he waived such free- 
dom from service and enlisted in the Con- 
federate States army, being twice wounded 
in action. He was left wounded on the 
hattlefield of Gettysburg and was cared for 
in the West Building Hospital in Balti- 
more, being exchanged among the last pris- 
oners before the practice was discontinued 
by Gen. Grant. After the war he and his 
father continued in the newspaper business 
a.^ R. M. Smith & Son until 1867, when 
William W. entered the University of Vir- 
ginia and his father returned to educational 
work. In the University of Virginia Dr. 
Smith graduated in Latin with high honors, 
then entered Randolph-Macon College, in 
which his father was professor of natural 
sciences. He left college to become an in- 
structor in the Richmond school of Gen. J. 
II. Lane, and at this time married his first 
wife. Returning to college in the following 
vear he was graduated .\. M. in June of 
1871. and in the fall of that year formed a 
coniiectinn with his uncle, Maj. Albert G. 
Smith, in the conduct of Bethel Military 
Academy in Fauquier county. In the year 
1878 Dr. Smith became professor of moral 
und mental i)liilosophy in Randolph-Macon 
College, afterv^'ard occui)ied the chair of 
Greek, finally that of Latin, in which he had 
specialized. In 1886 he was elevated to the 
] residency of the college, the fruits of his 
devoted application to its welfare being the 
addition of more than one hundred and 
twentv-five thousand dollars to the endow- 



ment fund (in addition to forty thousand 
he had gained for this fund while still a 
professor), and the establishment of two 
academies, one at Front Royal, the other 
at Bedford City, each at a cost of one hun- 
dred thousand dollars and both under the 
direction of the college authorities. In 1893 
Dr. Smith founded the Randolph-Macon 
Woman's College at Lynchburg, and from 
a small beginning built up an institution 
v.orthy of a great educator. In addition to 
his duties as president of this college. Dr. 
Smith retained the chancellorship of the 
Randolph-Macon educational system. Dr. 
Smith was a leading layman of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church and was a member of 
the general conference that created the 
church board of education, of which he was 
the first secretary, with the powers of ex- 
ecutive office. He was honored in 1889 with 
the degree of Doctor of Laws from Wes- 
levan University, of Middletown, Connecti- 
cut. .Among his published works are 
"Outlines of Psychology" and "A Compara- 
tive Syntax Chart of Latin, Greek, German, 
I'rench and English." He married (first) 
Ella Junes, of Richmond : (second) Marion 
Love Howison. of .Alexandria. \'irginia. 

Jordan, Cornelia Jane Matthews, born in 
Lynchburg, \'irgini;i. January 11, 1830, 
daughter of Edwin Matthews, at one time 
mayor of Lynchburg. She was educated at 
the -Academy of the X'isitation in George- 
town, D. C. and in 1851 married Francis H. 
Jordan, of Page county. Virginia. In 1863 
she visited Corinth, Mississippi, where her 
husband was a staff officer under Gen. I'.eau- 
regard. and where she wrote her poem, 
'Corinth." This was seized on its publica- 
tion in 1865 as "objectionable and incendi- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



305 



ar\-." and was burned in the court-hcuse 
yard in Lynchburg, by order of Gen. Alfred 
H. Terry. Her publications include "Flow- 
ers of Hope and Memory,'" "Corinth and 
Other Poems of the War," ".\ Christmas 
I'oem for Children," "Richmond: Her Glory 
and Her Graves," and "Useful Maxims for 
a Nol)Ie Life." 

Duncan, James Armstrong, burn at Nor- 
folk. \'irginia. .April 14. 1830, son of David 
Duncan, professor of ancient languages at 
Randolph-Macon College. He graduated 
fiom Randolph-Macon College in 1849, and 
jomed the Virginia conference of the Meth- 
odist church ; was pastor of the Broad Street 
I'hurch, at Richmond, Virginia, during the 
civil war, and throughout this period ])re- 
SLTvcd a conservative attitude, never per- 
iiitting politics to enter into his religious 
('iscussions, and endeavoring in every way, 
a''ter the struggle, to promote good feeling 
between the sections. He was president of 
F..andolph-Macon College from 1868 until 
his death, at Ashland, A'irginia, September 

- :,. 1877. 

Hanson, Poindexter Smith, born in ]^""lu- 
vanna county, Virginia, December 7, 1831 ; 
graduated at Richmond College in 1848, and 
at the LTniversity of Virginia in 1851. He 
laught in Milton. North Carolina, for two 
;ears, also studying law and editing a 
weekly paper. He was professor of natural 
science in the Chowan Female College at 
Murfreesborough, North Carolina, for two 
years. After beginning the practice of the 
law in his native county, he was ordained 
as minister of the Baptist church in Flu- 
vanna, in February, 1856. and he also con- 
(lucted a female seminary while there. On 
December 2"], 1867, he became pastor of the 
viR-20 



f'road Street Church in Philadelphia, which 
ht left in 1867 to organize the Memorial 
Church, where he gathered the largest Prot- 
estant congregation in that city. Dr. Hen- 
scm was editor of the "Baptist Teacher." 
In 1878 he declined the presidency of 
Lewisburg University. 

Fishback, William Meade, born in JelTer- 
sonton, Culpeper county, \'irginia, Novem- 
ber 5, 1831, son of Frederick Fishback and 
Sophie Yates, his wife. His paternal grand- 
father, Martin Fishback, a revolutionary 
soldier, was descended from John Fishback, 
one of the German miners settled by Gov. 
Spotswood at Germanna. in \'irginia, and 
from Agnes Haeger, his wife, daughter of 
Rev. John Henry Haeger, parson of the 
colony. His maternal grandfather was Col. 
^^'illiam Yates, of Petersburg, Virginia. 
He received his early education at the 
schools of his native village and vicinity, 
subsequently entering the University of 
\'irginia. After his graduation in 1855, he 
studied law in the office of Luther Spellman, 
of Richmond, and was admitted to the bar 
\\ 1858. His first venture in law practice 
was in 1858, while on an extended visit to 
Illinois. Here he became acquainted with 
Abraham Lincoln, who, entrusted to him 
some important legal business. In 1858 Mr. 
Fishback took up a permanent residence at 
Fort Smith, Arkansas, where he engaged in 
the practice of his profession. Meanwhile 
Lincoln, with oflfers of other business, urged 
him to return to Illinois, which, however, he 
c(id not do, preferring the Arkansas climate. 
In 1861 he was elected delegate to the state 
convention which passed the ordinance of 
secession. Although so pronounced a 
L^nion man that the secession press of Ar- 



so6 



\'IRGI.\'IA BIOGRAPHY 



kansas denounced him as an abolitionist, he 
was opposed to the policy of coercion, 
thinking chat it would provoke civil war. 
Upon President Lincoln's call for troops tc 
coerce Soulii Carolina, Mr. Fishback, by 
advice of his constituents, voted for seces- 
sion in the hoj)c that when the north saw 
the withdrawal of all the southern states, it 
nii,<,dit he forced into accejiting the Critten- 
den compromise. All efTorts at compromise 
failing, however, when the war broke out 
he went north, and during the occupation of 
Little Rock by the Federal troops in 1863, 
lie established a newspaper there called the 
"Unconditional Union." While editing the 
paper, he, as commander, was raising the 
I'ourth Arkansas Cavalry for the Federal 
service. When about nine hundred men 
had enlisted, he was elected to the United 
States senate by the Union legislature, and 
thus was never mustered into service. Un- 
der the proclamation of President Lincoln 
the reorganization of the state had been at 
length accomplished. Mr. Fishback having 
such influence with the convention in charge 
that he was called upon to write the greater 
part of the constitution of 1864, sometimes 
called the "Fishback Constitution." He was 
advised that if the word "white" as a pre- 
requisite to voting was not stricken out, 
the state would not be received into the 
Union, and he would not get the seat in 
the senate to which it was known he would 
be elected. Helieving, however, that it 
would not be safe to confer the suffrage 
upon such a large mass of ignorance, he re- 
fused to strike it out. His was the first 
case from the south of an effort to restore 
representations in congress. President I-in- 
ci/ln's cabinet recognized the senators, but 
other leaders of the party in power, headed 



by Sumner and Wade, took the ground that 
as the state had run down like a watch, and 
could only be wound up by some extran- 
eous power, that power was congress, and 
that no scjuthern states should be therefore 
not seated. In 1865 he was appointed treas- 
ury agent for Arkansas, a position which he 
refused to accept until told that by so donig 
he could save the people many millions of 
money. His conduct of that oftice added 
largely to his popularity. In 1874 he was 
elected to the constitutional convention 
which framed the present constitution, and 
in 1877, 1879, and 1885 served in the legis- 
lature. He was the author of what is known 
as the "Fishback Amendment" to the con- 
stitution of Arkansas, by which the legis- 
lature is forbidden ever to pay certain 
fraudulent state bonds issued during recon- 
struction. During the summer of 1892, 
contrary to the policy of his opponents, he 
made no canvass for the nomination for gov- 
ernor. His cause was taken up by the 
people, however, and he received 540 votes 
out of 628 in the nominating convention, 
while his plurality at the polls was larger 
than that received by any other governor 
since reconstruction times. Immediately 
after election he accepted the urgent invita- 
tion of the national Democratic committee, 
and coming north, made a number of 
s]ieeches in New York and Indiana, which 
met with gratifying success. His adminis- 
tration was marked by continual prosperity. 
It was at the instigation of Gov. Fishback 
that the go\eriiors of the southern states 
met in convention at Richmond, Virginia, in 
April. 1893. one of the most important and 
distinguished assemblies ever held in Amer- 
ica, and of which he was made president. 
In 1867 he was married to Adelaide, daugh- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



307 



ter of Joseph Miller, a prominent merchant 
of Fort Smith, Arkansas, who was robbed 
and murdered on board a Mississippi river 
steamboat in 1850. He died at Fort Smith, 
Arkansas, February 9, 1903. 

Ambler, James Markham, son of Dr. 
Richard Gary Ambler and Susan Marshall, 
his wife, was born in Fauquier county, Vir- 
ginia, December 30, 1848. Attended Wash- 
ington College in 1865-67 and graduated in 
medicine at the University of Maryland in 
March, 1869; entered the United States 
naval service, as assistant surgeon, April i, 
1874; served in the naval hospital at Nor- 
folk, and volunteered for duty on the Jca)i- 
ncttc, sent to the northern seas in 1881. He 
might have saved himself by leaving his 
companions, but this he would not do. He 
died in the cause of science and humanity. 
He and his companions perished on the 
banks of the Lena river about October 30, 
1 88 1, in the retreat of Capt De Long's com- 
pany from the steamer. He appears to have 
been the last to die. His frozen body was 
recovered, and in February, 1884, interred 
at Leed's church. His fellow surgeons 
placed in the church a brass tablet to his 
memory and the professors, officers and 
students of Washington and Lee LTniver- 
sity, unveiled a tablet there also in his 
honor, June, 1885. 

Green, William, descended from Robert 
Green, who emigrated with his uncle Wil- 
liam DufT, a Quaker, to Virginia in 1710, 
was a son of John Williams Green, judge 
of the Virginia supreme court of appeal.-, 
and was born at Fredericksburg, November 
10. 1806. He was self taught, with the ex- 
ception of brief terms at the school of Mr. 
Goolrick, in Fredericksburg, and Mr. John 



Lewis, a famous teacher in Spotsylvania 
county. Nevertheless, by intense applica- 
tion, aided by the great powers of his mind, 
he became the most learned lawyer and 
scholar in Virginia. For six months at a 
lime he would speak scarcely a word to any 
human being, absorbed entirely with his 
books. He came to the bar in his twenty- 
first year and practiced in Culpeper and the 
surrounding counties, and soon acquired a 
reputation for profound knowledge of the 
law. In 1855 he removed to Richmond, and 
practiced with great success. His most 
notable forensic effort was made in the case 
of ]\Ioon vs. Stone, involving the operation 
of the famous rule in Shelly's case. The 
supreme court was so impressed with it that 
they directed its publication in their reports, 
it fills one hundred and twenty-seven pages 
of the nineteenth volume of "Grattan's Re- 
ports." It elicited high praise from several 
of the judges of the English courts. Pjaron 
Bramwell declared that '"it showed a pro- 
digious amount of industry and well dircrted 
upon very difficult questions." Mr. J W. 
Wallace inscribed his work "The Reports" 
to him, and wrote of Mr. Green that "his 
knowledge of law books exceeded that of all 
the men I have ever known in England f)r 
.'\merica." He was as familiar with the 
ancient legal works as he was with the mod- 
ern. His love of literary study was as great 
as his love of the law. He was an accom- 
plished Greek and Latin scholar and a close 
student of history. During the war he filled 
n post in the Confederate treasury depnrt- 
ment. After the war he was apponited to 
succeed Judge Luons on the bench of the 
"court of conciliation" extemporized by 
n,ilitary authority while the life of the state 
was in a condition of suspended animation. 



308 



\1RGI\IA BIOGRAPHY 



In 187c he was elected ])rofessor of law in 
Pichmond College, but declined the posi- 
tion on account of his health. His library 
contained a splendid collection of rare nnd 
ancient books, many of them in black letter. 
He died July _'g. 1880. Although Mr. Green 
left behind him copious notes of inten^led 
compilations, legal and historical, ncthing 
that might be called a "work" was ever 
completed by him. Among his known ]nil)- 
lished results were: "An Essay on Lapse, 
Joint Tenants and Tenants in Common,"' 
"Articles in Res Judicata," "Power of a 
Partner," a paper on "The Editions of 
the Code," published in the "Virgini.i Law 
Journal ;" another paper on "Stare Decisis," 
published in the ".American Law Journal," 
of September, 1880. A manuscript on the 
"Genesis" of the old counties of V'ir^'inia. 
presented by Mr. Green to Rev. Pliilip 
Slaughter, was jniblished in 1883 by the lat- 
ter in connection with a "Memoir" of .^Ir. 
Green. This disquisition gives a gocd idea 
of the closeness of Mr. Green's historical 
researches. On his death, and burial in Hol- 
lywood Cemetery, tributes of high praise 
were rendered by the bars of Culpeper and 
Richmond and by the Virginia Historical 
Society, of which he was vice-president Mr. 
Green married, April 6, 1837, Colum")ia E., 
daughter of Samuel Slaughter, of \\'estern 
View, Culpeper county, lie had two chil- 
dren: John Williams Green, born March 13, 
1838, who was in the Confederate cavalry, 
and was killed September 22, 1863, and Eliz- 
abeth Travers Green, who married James 
Haj-es, a merchant of Fredericksl)urg. 

Lee, Cassius Francis, born at /Mexandria, 
\'irginia, .May 22. 1808, son of Edmund Jen- 
nings Lee and Sarah Lee, his wife. Mis e.i- 



tire lite was passed in the town of his "-irth. 
After receiving a liberal education, he 
served for a time as clerk of the United 
States courts, meantime studying law. He 
was admitted to the bar, but never prac- 
ticed. He was long a member of the mer- 
cantile firm of Cazenove & Company, of 
Alexandria. He was from early days a 
tommunicant of Christ Church, of Alexan- 
c'ria ; for years he was a member of the an- 
nual councils of the church; a lay delegate 
to general conventions ; and for more than 
a third of a century a member of the stand- 
ing committee of the diocese. For many 
years he served as treasurer of the Theo- 
logical Seminary and of the Virginia Edu- 
cational Society, and without compensation. 
He married (first) Hannah Philippa Lud- 
well Hopkins, daughter of John and Cor- 
nelia (Lee) Hopkins; and (second) Anne 
Eliza, daughter of William Collins and Eliza 
Frances (Cazenove) Gardner. Mr. Lee died 
at his residence in Alexandria, January 23, 
1890. 

Cabell, James Alston, born in Richmond, 
\'irginia, son of Col. Henry Coalter Cabell 
and Jane Alston, his wife. The father was 
a lawyer when the war of 1861 broke out, 
and, entering the Confederate army, became 
chief of artillery of the Army of the Penin- 
sula, and afterwards chief of artillery in 
McLaw's division of the Army of Northern 
Virginia. His wife belonged to the dis- 
tinguished Alston family of South Carolina. 
James Alston Cabell attended the best pri- 
%ate schools of Richmond, and the Norwood 
school of Nelson county; entered Richmond 
College; then the I'nivcrsity of \'irginia, 
the College de I-'rance. and the Sorbonne. 
Thus fully equipped and bearing the degrees 



PROMIXEXT PERSONS 



309 



of B. Sc, C. E., and M. E., he accepted a 
chair in the Central University of Ken- 
tucky, where he taught for several years, 
until 1880, when he removed to Richmond, 
Virginia, and engaged in the practice of 
law. In 1885 he was elected to the Rich- 
mond city council, and in 1893 to the house 
of delegates, to represent the city of Rich- 
mond. During his four years service in the 
legislature, he proved himself an earnest 
and faithful representative, serving as chair- 
man of the committees on library, on gen- 
eral laws, and propositions and grievances. 
In politics he is a Democrat. He was for 
seven years president of the Sons of the 
Revolution, and is a member of the Society 
of the Cincinnati, and the reorganizer and 
first president of the Virginia society, a 
member of the Westmoreland Club, a Mason 
and a Knight Templar. He is at this time 
commander of the Military Order of For- 
eign Wars. He is deeply interested in 
athletics, and is president of the Richmond 
Athletic Club. He is a leading member of 
the American, the Southern and the Virginia 
Historical associations, and scientific and 
literary societies in this country and abroad. 
June 12, 1895, Mr. Cabell married Ethel 
Koyt Scott, of New York, and had five chil- 
dren. They reside at 410 East Grace street, 
Richmond, Virginia. 

Stanton, Frederick Perry, born in Alex- 
andria, Virginia, December 22, 1814. He 
pursued classical studies and was graduated 
from Columbian College, Washington, D. 
C, in 1833; taught school; studied law, ad- 
mitted to the bar, and began practice in 
Memphis, Tennessee; elected to the twenty- 
ninth and to the succeeding four congresses 
(March 4, 1845-March 3, 1855) ; governor 



of Kansas territory, 1858-61 ; moved to Vir- 
ginia and subsequently settled in Florida. 
He died near Ocala. Florida, June 4, 1894. 

Humphreys, Milton Wylie, born in Green- 
brier, Virginia, September 15, 1844; was a 
pupil at Washington College, now Wash- 
ington and Lee University, but left at the 
;ige of seventeen to enlist in the Confederate 
army ; was a gunner in Bryan's battery ; 
after the war re-entered Washington Col- 
lege, was made tutor of Latin, assistant pro- 
fessor of Greek and Latin, and adjunct pro- 
fessor of ancient languages, and received the 
degrees of M. A. in 1869 from Washington 
?nd Lee University, and Ph. D. in 1874 from 
Leipsic University ; was called to the chair 
of Greek in Vanderbilt University at its 
opening in iS/'s, and to that of ancient lan- 
guages in the University of Texas at its 
opening in 1883 : in 1887 was made professor 
of Greek in the LIniversity of Virginia, a 
position which he held till his retirement 
in 1912; Vanderbilt University gave him 
the degree of LL. D. in 1883; published 
numerous papers in the "Transactions of 
the American Philological Associations," of 
which he was president in 1882, and editions 
ci the "Clouds" of Aristophanes, the "Anti- 
gone" and "Oedipus Tyrannus," of Sopho- 
cles, and the second book of Thucydides ; 
he was editor for the United States and 
Canada of the "Revue de Revues," and cor- 
respondent of the "Philologische Wochen- 
schrift." 

O'Donovan, William Rudolf, born in Pres- 
ton county, Virginia, March 28, 1844. After 
serving in the Confederate army during the 
civil war, he went to New York, where he 
opened a studio. He was elected an asso- 
ciate of the National Academy in 1878. He 



3'o 



\1RG1.\IA BIOGRAPHY 



has executed portrait-busts and bas-relief-j 
of John A. Kennedy, William Page. K 
Swain (iifford. Arthur Ouartley, Puiyard 
Taj'lor (for the memorial tablet in Cornell 
University), W'inslow Plomer, Erminnie A. 
Smith, and Edmund C. Stedman. His larger 
works include the Tarrytown monument to 
the captors of Major Andre ; a statue of 
\\'ashington for the government of Vene- 
zuela; two flags for the soldier's monuiDent 
at Lawrence, Massachusetts ; two bas-reliefs 
for the monument in Herkimer countv, New 
York, commemorating the battle of Ons- 
kany, and a statue of Washington for the 
monument at Newburg. W'ashington is one 
of his favorite subjects, and he has ])nb- 
lishcd a series of papers on his portrait^'. 

Van de Vyver, Augustine, born at Hoes- 
(lonck, Belgium, December i, 1844. He was 
ordained to the Roman Catholic priesthood 
in Brussels, Belgium, in 1870, and was con- 
secrated bishop of Richmond, Virginia, Oc- 
tober 20, 1889. 

Baker, William Washington, born Octo- 
ber 20, 1 84 4., ne;.r Hallsboro, Chesterfield 
count), \'irginia, son of John Daniel Baker 
;-rid Ann Elizabeth, daughter of William 
Howard and Mary Taylor, his wife. He 
was brouglu up in the country, but was 
trail in his youth, and did not perform any 
severe manual labor. His mother died when 
he was only nine years of age. He attended 
a private school taught by Dr. R. B. W in- 
free, and at the age of twelve, in 185(1, at 
hi.s own desire, began his apprenticeship in 
the office of the Danville "Register." After- 
wards he worked on the Richmond "En- 
t|Uirer," where he had charge of the print- 
ing and press rooms, and mailing at night. 
Iri the sijring of 1863 he enlisted in the pri- 



vateer service of the Confederate navy un- 
der Capt. John Yates Beall. His service 
v»as on Chesapeake Bay, crippling the com- 
merce of the enemy and destroying light- 
houses. In September, 1863, when sharing 
with fifteen others in an attempt to surprise 
a Federal gunboat, he was captured and 
confined in irons in Fort McHenry, near Bal- 
timore, for nearly six weeks. To save him 
and his associates from being shot as priva- 
teers, the Confederate authorities held an 
equal number of Federal prisoners in irons 
ir. Charleston, South Carolina, as hostages 
for their proper treatment as prisoners of 
war. This had its effect ; the irons were 
removed from Mr. Baker, and he was trans- 
ferred to Fortress ]\Ionroe and afterwards 
to Fort Norfolk and later to Point Look- 
out, where in the spring of 1864 he was ex- 
changed, and proceeded to Richmond. 
There he was placed on light duty as clerk 
in Provost Marshal Carrington's office, and 
n-mained until the evacuation of Richmond, 
being among the last to leave the city. He 
then joined Gen. Lee's army at Amelia 
Court House, and was with the Twenty-fifth 
Virginia Regiment in the battle of Sailors 
Creek. He rejoined the army at High 
Bridge, and connected himself with a Texas 
regiment with which he served until the 
surrender at Appomattox Court House. 
After being paroled, he set out for Richmond, 
but at Jude's Ferry took work on a farm. 
Later he formed a partnership with .\. T.. 
B. \\'. and J. II. Martin, under the name of 
Martin Brothers iv Baker, for manufactur- 
ing lumber, grinding sumac and tanning 
leather, at Hallsboro and Manchester, \'ir- 
ginia, and after the death of his partners, 
he succeeded to the business, which he still 
conducts. He has served as justice of the 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



3" 



peace, and for two terms was supervisor of copal cliurch. South, of the Virginia confer- 

Midlothian district. Chesterfield county. In cnce ; he received the degree of Doctor of 

1S83-84. he served in the house of delegates, Divinit 
where he secured the passage of bills to 



prevent the running of trains on Sunday, 
and to require clerks of courts to certify 
that bonds should be given by special com- 
missioners before selling property decreed 
for sale. He was a member again in 1899- 
1900, and was afterwards re-elected for 
three more terms. During his service he was 
a member and chairman of the new peniten- 
tiary building commission of which he was a 
member of the finance committee. At the 
Virginia Exposition, in 1888, he was com- 
missioner from Chesterfield county, serv- 
ing as such without compensation. Its ex- 
hibit received the first jirize as the best 
county exhibit in the state. At the St. 
Louis Exposition, in 1904, he was assistant 
ccmmissioner, and it was due, in great meas 



son ; 
!883. 



•. He is the author of "John New- 
Tale of College Life." Nashville, 



McCarrick, James William, born at Nor- 
folk. Virginia, June 22, 1843, son of Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Patrick McCarrick, C. S. A., 
and Margaret Collins, his wife. He was a 
student at Norfolk Military Academy, St. 
Mary's College and Georgetown College, 
leaving the latter at the age of nineteen 
years to enlist as a private in the Twelfth 
\'irginia Regiment, Mahone's brigade. Army 
oi Northern Virginia. Later he entered the 
naval service of the Confederacy, rose to the 
lank of master, was in command of a land 
battery at Shell Bluflf, Georgia, served under 
.Admiral Franklin Buchanan in Mobile Bay, 
^nd for a time was master of the flagship 



ure. to his labors that the Virginia exhibit '^"™"^''<^- After peace was restored he be 

came wheelman on a steamboat plying be- 
tween Norfolk and Richmond, became mate, 
then wharf clerk, and later a sub-agent. He 
was appointed claim agent of the Seaboard 
-A,ir Line system of railroad and steamship 
I:nes. and later became southern agent for 
the Clyde Steamship Company, and has con- 



was made a great success. He was also 
commissioner from Virginia to the James- 
town Exposition of 1907. He has been a 
frequent contributor to the newspapers on 
leligious, social, and political subjects. In 
1S88, he wrote, at the request of the board of 
ipervisors of Chesterfield county, a 



pamphlet on the history and resources of ^'""0"sly held close connection with impor- 

the county, and 1892 he produced a fuller *''"^ business activities of his native city, 

edition of the work. He is a trustee of Rich- ^'^ ^^^^ president of the Suburban and City 

mond College. On December 25, 1866, he '^''"'''way Company, of the Norfolk board of 

married Sarah Thomas Martin, and thev ^''^'^'^' °^ ^^'^ board of pilot commissioners 



have six children. His address is Halls- 
l>oro. Chesterfield county. \'irginia. 



Edwards, William Emory, born in Prince 
Edward county, Virginia, June 10, 1842, 
son of Rev. John Ellis Edwards ; graduated 

from Randolph-Macon College in 1862, and of his party and supported its nominees 
tecame a clergyman of the Methodist Epis- married Georgianna Binns Jones. 



of the state of Virginia ; first vice-president 
of the Virginia Navigation Company, and a 
Virginia commissioner of the Jamestown 
tercentenary exposition. A Democrat in 
politics, he at one time served as council- 
man. In 1908 he joined with the Gold wing 

He 



3'- 



\'IRr,lXIA BIOGRAPHY 



Leake, William Josiah, born in Gooch- 
land count}-, X'irginia, September 30, 1S43, 
son of Samuel D. Leake, and Fannie M. 
Kean, his wife. He attended home schools, 
and St. George Tucker's school at Ashland, 
\irginia, leaving the latter at the beginning 
of the civil war. In July, 1861, he became 
a non-commissioned officer in the company 
of artillery commanded by Captain Walter 
D. Leake, with which he served until 1862, 
when he was transferred to another com- 
pany, and again, in 1863, to a battery under 
Col. J. H. Guy. He served with the latter 
until the close of the war, taking part in the 
second battle of Manassas, Fredericksburg, 
Fort Harrison, and around Richmond. In 
1867 he engaged in the practice of law in 
Richmond and Hanover county. In 1890 
he was appointed judge of the chancery 
court to fill a vacancy, and for a number of 
years he served as commissioner in chan- 
cery, and special master in both Federal and 
state courts. He afforded valuable aid to 
the Asylum for the Insane, of which he was 
a director. 

Ranson, Thomas Davis, born at "Home- 
stead House," near Charlestown, Jefferson 
county, Virginia, May ig, 1843, son of James 
M. Ranson and Mary Eleanor Baldwin, his 
wife. The Ranson ancestor (Ransone) 
traces back to Peter Ransone (q. v.), who 
was the first settler in the present Mathews 
county, Virginia. He attended Jacob Ful- 
ler's classical school, and in 1859 entered 
Washington College, at Lexington, Virginia. 
In April, 1861, he was at the capture of 
Harper's Ferry, then enlisted as a private 
in Company C, Second Regiment, X'irj^inia 
Infantry, "Stonewall" Jackson's brigade. 
was promoted to sergeant-major; later was 



transferred to Company I, Fifty-second 
Regiment N'irginia Infantry, and was elect- 
ed lieutenant; he was wounded at Cross 
Keys, and on recovery joined Baylor's com- 
pany of the Twelfth X'irginia Regiment of 
Cavalry, serving in 18(13-64 in charge of 
scouts in the secret service department with 
captain's pay, reporting to Generals Stuart 
and Lee. He also served Generals Ed- 
ward Johnson and William L. Jackson as 
aide. He was captured inside the Union 
lines, narrowly escaping death as a spy, and 
spent the last months of the war in military 
prisons, refusing to take the oath of allegi- 
ance, and was held two months after the 
surrender. From 1865 until 1867 he en- 
gaged in farming, at the same time pursuing 
a course of legal study, then entered the law 
department of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, graduated in 1868, and began prac- 
tice. In 1873 he was appointed law inspec- 
tor for the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, and 
has been counsel for many American and 
European corporations, including the Tide- 
water Railway Company, of which he was 
vice-president. He was visitor to the Insti- 
tution for the Deaf, Dumb and Blind; a 
trustee of Washington and Lee University ; 
trustee of the Virginia Female Institute r 
president of the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation of Staunton ; president of the Vir- 
ginia Young Men's Christian Association ; 
president of Washington and Lee Alumni 
Association ; president of the Staunton and 
Augusta .Mumni Association of the Univer- 
sity of \'irginia ; member of the Staunton 
cuniinon council; ])rcsi(k'nt of the .^tauntnn 
Clianiber of Commerce; lieutenant-com- 
mander of Grand Camj) of Virginia, United 
Confederate W'terans ; commander of the 
local camp of the same order; and vice- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



313 



president of the \'irginia State Bar Associa- 
tion. Me declined a nomination for a fed- 
eral judgeship, a circuit judgeship, and the 
state senate. He was a Whig prior to the 
war, then until 1867 a conservative, but 
since 1869 has been a Democrat. He is a 
vestryman of Trinity and Emanuel churches. 
He is a member of the American Peace Soci- 
ety, was chairman of the state committee 
on international arbitration. He is a mem- 
ber of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity and of 
other prominent societies and clubs. He 
married (first) April 12, 1871, Alary Fon- 
taine Alexander, of "Walnut Farm," Jeffer- 
son county, West Virginia, a lineal descend- 
ant of John Augustine Washington, the 
elder, of Richard Henry Lee, the "Signer." 
He married (second) January 5, 1887, Jan- 
ctta Ravenscroft Harrison, of West Hill, 
Augusta county, Virginia. He married 
(third) February 15, 1900, Margaret Fisher 
Warren, of Richmond, \'irginia. 

Rinehart, William A., born in Botetourt 
county, Virginia, April 3, 1846, son of John 
and Mary A. Rinehart, and great-grandson 
of Aaron Rinehart, who came from Ger- 
many to Botetourt county about 1753. He 
attended the public schools, and in his six- 
teenth year enlisted in Company C, Second 
Regiment Virginia Cavalry, served for three 
years, and received wound in the arm at 
Gettysburg. After the war he engaged in 
the lumber business for five years, and then 
was superintendent of railroad work for 
seven years. In 1880 he became a contractor 
of railroad work of all kinds, and became 
head of the Rinehart & Dennis Company, a 
r.'ilroad contracting firm. He was vice- 
j.resident of the First National Bank of 
Covington, \'irginia. .A Democrat in poli- 



tics, he has represented the counties of Alle- 
ghany, Bath, and Highland in the Virginia 
legislature. He is a member of the Baptist 
(.liurcli. He married, December 20, 1867, 
Mary Lewis Lipes. 

Henry, Robert Randolph, born at Chester, 
Chester county. South Carolina, April 26, 
1845, ^ son of William Dickson Henry, a 
planter and merchant of Chester, and Julia 
Hall, his wife, who was born in Fredericks- 
burg, V^irginia. James Henry, the great- 
great-grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, was a native of county Tyrone, Ire- 
land, from whence he came in 1725, and set- 
tled near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He 
l.ad married a Miss Swan in his native land, 
and brought her and his children with him, 
but almost every member of the family was 
murdered by the Indians not long after they 
had made their home here. William Henry, 
son of James Henry, lived for some years 
in the Cumberland Valley, but after his mar- 
riage to Margaret Cowan he removed to 
York District, South Carolina, settling at 
the foot of King's Mountain. He was one 
of the stanchest supporters of the \\'hig 
party and fought bravely in the cause of the 
American revolution ; with four of his sons 
he was active at the battle of King's Moun- 
tain, the battle of Ninety-Six, and the en- 
gagement at Brattonsville, York county, 
South Carolina. In Dr. Lyman Draper's 
"King's Mountain and Its Heroes," we find 
the following incident: "Two of his (Wil- 
liam Henry's) sons followed two of Colonel 
r-erguson's Tory messengers, who were 
bearing dispatches to General Cornwallis. 
requesting reinforcements, and pursued 
them with such relentless heat that the mes- 
sengers were compelled to conceal them- 



314 



VIRGINIA ISIOGRAPHY 



selves by day and to travtd by night by a 
roundabout course, so that the message did 
not reach Cornwallis until the morning of 
the battle, when it was too late to send re- 
inforcements and prevent the disaster." 
Francis Henry, a younger son of William 
Henry, was the grandfather of Robert Ran- 
dolph Henry. He married Margaret Dick- 
son, daughter of Rev. William Dickson, a 
Scotchman, noted as a Presbyterian minis- 
ter in upper South Carolina, who built Dick- 
son's meeting house, about 1750, the first 
church erected in York county, and which 
is now known as "Bethel." In the maternal 
b'ne the family of Mr. Henry is also an an- 
cient one; Richard Hall, the immigrant an- 
cestor, was born in Warwickshire, England, 
1634, arrived in Maryland in 1647, becoming 
the owner of extensive lands is Cecil county ; 
the family home for generations has been 
'Mount Welcome," which was erected by 
him in 1670. Dr. Elisha Hall, great-grand- 
father of Mr. Henry, was graduated from 
the School of Medicine conducted by Dr. 
Benjamin Rush in Philadelphia, and was a 
first cousin of this gentleman. He married 
Carolanna Carter, daughter of Charles 
Carter, of "Cleve." on the Rappahannock, a 
sen of Robert ("King") Carter and his sec- 
ond wife, Elizabeth Landon ; Charles Carter, 
of "Cleve," married Anne Byrd, daughter of 
William I'.yrd, of Wcstover. 

Robert Randolph Henry passed the first 
eleven years of his life in Chester, then, his 
father having died in 1856,'he and his mother 
took up their residence in Fredericksburs.' 
r.nd Petersburg, Virginia. He was a stu- 
dent at Bloomfield Academy, which he lia<l 
entered just prior to the outbreak of the 
civil war. and. although but sixteen years 
of age, he enlisted in the Confederate army. 



and serxed until the close of the war. At 
first his service was with Company E, 
Iwelfth Virginia Infantry, but during the 
last two years he was first a member of the 
staft' of (jlen. R. H. .Anderson, and later that 
of Gen. William Mahone. He displayeii 
extraordinary bravery on the battlefield, 
having fi\-e horses killed under him, and 
was wounded three times. Upon the return 
of peace he engaged in teaching in Rappa- 
hannock county, Virginia, but devoted his 
spare time to the study of law under pri- 
vate tuition; after his admission to the liar 
he settled at Wise Court House, Virginia, 
l)racticing there from 1872 to 1875. and dur- 
ing this period was commonwealth's attor- 
ney for the county. He then removed to 
Tazewell, where he has since been a resi- 
lient while following his legal practice, 
being associated with Judge S. C. Graham 
since July i, i88i, with whom he had prac- 
ticed in other courts since 1873. The style 
or the firm is Henry &: Graham, and it is 
j.robahly the oldest law firm in Virginia. Pie 
has always given his political support to the 
Democratic party, was an elector on the 
Hancock and English ticket from the ninth 
congressional district of Virginia in 18S0, 
and was nominated for congress from this ^ 
district in i88(), but defeated. His religious 
affiliation is with the Episcopal church. 
Major Henry married. December 19, 1869, 
I.ucv Strother .\shby, of Culpeper. \'irginia. 

Edwards, Landon Brame, born in Prince 
Edward county, X'irginia, September 20, 
1845, son of Rev. John P^Uis Edwards. He 
was educated at Randolph-Macon College. 
Pie enlisted in the artillery corps of the Con- 
federate army in 1863, and served until the 
end of the war. lie graduated from the med- 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



315 



iial department of the university of the city 
of New York in March, 1867, and until Oc- 
tober was an interne in the Charity Hos- 
pital on Blackwell's Island, and was then 
assistant physician at the hospital for nerv- 
ous diseases at Lake Mahopac, New York. 
He engaged in practice in 1868 at Lynch- 
burg, Virginia, and two years later was 
active in establishing the Medical Society 
of Virginia, and was made recording secre- 
tary. He was a member of the state board 
of health in 1872, and the same year re- 
moved to Richmond. He established the 
"Virginia Medical Monthly" in April, 1874; 
was appointed lecturer on anatomy in the 
Virginia Medical College; lecturer on ma- 
teria medica and therapeutics, 1875 ; and on 
medico-legal jurisprudence, in 1880. He was 
a member of many professional societies, 
and has been a frequent contributor to med- 
ical journals. 

Glazebrook, Otis Allan, born at Rich- 
mond. Virginia, October 13, 1845. His 
father went to Richmond, Virginia, when a 
mere lad, and entering into business, be- 
came a useful and influential citizen. He 
was a student at Randolph-Macon College 
when Virginia seceded from the Union, and 
v.as at once sent to the Virginia Military 
Institute, to be educated as an oflicer in the 
regular Confederate army. He had large 
war experience, serving under Lee, Jackson 
;ind other great Confederate leaders. At the 
battle of New Market he was complimented 
for distinguishing gallantry on the field. He 
was at Appomattox, and after the war he 
returned to Lexington, graduating from the 
Virginia Military Institute the following 
vear with the first honors of his class. He 
first inclined to law; but upon the death of 



his father, he matriculated in the middle 
class of the Episcopal Theological Seminary 
of Virginia, in September, 1867, and was 
graduated two years after, being ordained 
to the priesthood at the early age of twenty- 
three. His first parish was in South Side, 
Virginia, where in addition to his regu- 
lar work, he organized gratuitously one of 
the first colored congregations in Virginia 
after the war, to which he ministered, in ad- 
dition to his regular parish, for six years. 
He was called to Baltiinore. Maryland, in 
1875, and built the Church of the Holy Trin- 
ity. While there he was made chaplain of 
the famous Fifth Maryland Regiment, and 
was complimented for his cool bravery in 
the labor troubles of 1877. In 1878 he was 
called to the rectorship of Christ Church, 
Macon, Georgia, and became the dean of 
that convocation. Being severely injured 
in a railroad accident he was compelled to 
resign his charge, and spent months in 
Europe. Upon his return he was elected to 
the chaplaincy of the University of Virginia, 
where his work was eminently success- 
ful. In 1885 he was called to St. John's 
Church, Elizabeth, New Jersey, the largest 
and most influential parish in New Jersey. 
He was the founder of a leading southern 
college Greek letter society, the Alpha Tau 
Omega, and was editor of the magazine of 
that fraternity for years. The degrees of 
Doctor of Divinity and Master of Arts were 
conferred upon him, and the diocese of New 
jersey sent him as a delegate to two general 
c(-nventions of the Protestant Episcopal 
church. He married, in 1866, Virginia Cal- 
vert Key, the second daughter of Francis H. 
Smith, superintendent of the Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute from its founding. 



3i6 



VIRGIXIA BIOGRAPHY 



Richardson, David Clarke, born June 7, 
1845, son of Turner Richardson, a success- 
ful farmer, and Margaret Ann Robertson, 
his wife. The family is among the old and 
highly respected families of Virginia, set- 
tling in New Kent county at an early date. 
David C. Richardson assisted his father on 
the farm during his early years, and from 
1855 until 1862 attended the best schools of 
Richmond, whither his father removed in 
1855. He served as a private in the war be- 
tween the states from March 12, 1862, until 
the surrender of Gen. Lee, and received a 
wound at the second battle of Manassas. 
During the period of his enlistment, he con- 
tinued his studies, in leisure moments, also 
for a short period after the war, and in 1867 
entered the office of Johnson & Guigon to 
iludy law. and remained until July, 1870, 
when he became clerk to the police justice 
of Richmond, serving in that capacity for 
ten years, in the meantime continuing his 
law studies and attending the law lectures 
o! Professors Maury and Neeson, at Rich- 
mond College, during the session of 1873- 
74, and was graduated with the degree of 
I'.achelor of Law. He was elected police 
justice of Richmond at the expiration of his 
term as clerk, filled that office for eight 
years, during which time he became familiar 
with the criminal law of the state, and then 
declined a reelection, although strongly 
urged to accept. From 1888 to 1896 he was 
engaged in the practice of his profession, 
and was then elected commonwealth's at- 
torney of the city of Richmond, but at the 
expiration of his term of ten years declined 
reelection, and again resumed the practice 
of law. On June 8, 1908, he was elected 
mayor of the city of Richmond, and in iyi2 
was made judge of the hustings court. 



Judge Richardson married (first) December 
4, 1874, Alice A. Fellows; married (second) 
February 10, 1892, Florence B. Hechler. 

Davis, Richard Beale, born in Norfolk 
county, Virginia, February 5, 1845, son of 
William T. Davis, a teacher, of Gloucester 
county, and Elizabeth Taylor Corbin, 
daughter of Major Robert Beale, of the war 
of 1812. He was educated at Randolph- 
Macon College. He served for three years 
in Company E, Twelfth Virginia Regiment, 
lie was wounded by a shell at Seven Pines, 
and in the battle of the Crater was shot in 
the right arm. He served in the battles of 
Chancellorsville, second Manassas, Gettys- 
burg and Petersburg. From i866' to 1870 
he was a student at the University of Vir- 
gmia, with the exception of one year when 
he taught school, where he took the law 
course. He entered upon law practice in 
Petersburg in January, 1871. He served as 
city attorney for one term ; and in 1875 was 
elected to the house of delegates as a Dem- 
ocrat. He was a member of the board of 
trustees of Randolph-Macon College. He 
married Annie Warwick Hall. 

McGuire, William Province, born at W'in- 
chester. X'irginia, February 19, 1845, ^ ^O" 
of Dr. Hugh Holmes McGuire, and his wife, 
Ann Eliza McGuire. The McGuire family 
was founded in this country by Edward Mc- 
Guire. a native of county Fermanagh, Ire- 
land, who came to this country in 1754, set- 
tling at Winchester, Frederick county. X'ir- 
ginia, where his descendants have taken 
high rank in the medical profession for three 
successive generations. Dr. Hugh Holmes 
McGuire established himself in the practice 
of the medical profession at Winchester in 
1822, became the president of a medical 



PROMINENT PERSONS 



317 



school which he put into successful opera- 
tion in 1847. was one of the noted physicians 
and surgeons of his day, and practiced until 
1861. Two of his uncles were David 
Holmes and Judge Holmes, and one of his 
sens was Dr. Hunter McGuire, of Rich- 
mond, and another, the subject of this sketch. 
Dr. William Province McGuire commenced 
his education in the schools of his native 
town, attended the Winchester Academy, 
at Winchester, and the Greenwood Acad- 
emy, in Albemarle county, Virginia, after 
which he commenced a course of study at 
the Medical College of Virginia, this being 
interrupted by the civil war, and he was 
graduated in the class of 1867 with the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine. He at once 
established himself in medical practice in 
Winchester, with which city he has been 
uninterruptedly identified. He was one of the 
surgeons of the Winchester Memorial Hos- 
pital ; had served as vice-president of the 
Medical Society of Virginia several times, 
and as president of this organization, 1893- 
94; and was vice-mayor of the city of Win- 
chester two terms. He gave his political 
support to the Democratic party, attends the 
Episcopal church. Dr. McGuire married, 
June 17. 1871, Nannie H., a daughter or 
Hon. John Randolph Tucker. 

Hamilton, John William, born at Weston. 
W^est Virginia, March 18, 1845 ; graduated 
at Mount Union College, Ohio, in 1865, and 
at Boston University in 1871 ; entered the 
m.inistry of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and in 1871 founded the "People's Church" 
in Boston. He is the author of "Memorial 
of Jesse Lee" (1875) '< "Lives of the Meth- 
odist Bishops" (1883), and "People's Church 
Pulpit" (1884). 



Longley, Seldon, born at Emory and 
Henry College. AVashington county, Vir- 
ginia, February 7, 1846, a son of Edmund 
Longley, and his wife, Mary Hammond, a 
granddaughter of William Hammond, who 
emigrated to this country from England ; 
and a great-great-grandson of Edmund 
Longley, who came from England in 1750, 
and settled in West Waterville, Maine. Ed- 
mund Longley, the father, was for a long 
period of time a professor at Emory and 
Henry College; was postmaster at Emory, 
Virginia ; a member of the board of trustees 
of Martha Washington College; and was 
nominated as a representative of his dis- 
trict in congress in 1867. The civil war 
interrupted his studies at college, and at 
seventeen years of age he enlisted as a pri- 
vate in the Confederate army. Assigned to 
Captain J. K. Rambo's company of Border 
Rangers, and later served in Company F, 
'I'wenty-first Regiment, Virginia Cavalry. 
A\'as appointed orderly sergeant, and finally 
captain of his company. Returning to his 
studies he was awarded the Robertson prize 
for oratory at Emory and Henry College in 
June, 1866. Graduated Bachelor of Arts in 
1S68, and in 1869 Master of Arts. He stud- 
ied law at the University of Virginia, 1869- 
70, and was "Final Orator." He practiced 
law, and in 1873 was a Democratic member 
of the house of delegates from Washington 
countv. Since that time he has served as 
delegate to various state conventions. He 
had removed to Pulaski county in 1891, and 
after a short residence there, was appointed 
by Governor Charles T. O'Ferrall, judge of 
the county court, this being confirmed by 
the general assembly, in 1897, for the regu- 
lar term of six years. Mr. Longley married. 



3i8 



VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 



December 24. 1873. Leona Howard Jordan, 
a daughter of Colonel W". J. Jordan, of Pu- 
laski county. 

White, William Henry, born in Norfolk 
county, Virginia, April 16, 1847, son of 
Colonel William White, and Henrietta 
Kemp Turner, his wife. His ancestors be- 
longed to the old colonial stock who settled 
ill Virginia during the early period of its 
history, from England and Wales. His 
grandfather, William White, served with 
distinction in the war of 1812, as did his 
father in the Confederate army as colonel 
of the Fourteenth Regiment Virginia In- 
fantry, in Pickett's division. Young White 
was educated in private schools in Norfolk 
county, and of Richmond, Virginia; Ran- 
dolph-Macon College; and the Virginia 
Military Institute, where he was a member 
of the cadet battalion that distinguished 
itself at the battle of Newmarket. He then 
entered the University of Virginia as a law 
student, and after leaving that institution, 
began the practice of his profession in Ports- 
mouth, Virginia, having received his license 
the day after he was twenty-one years old. 
1 he next year he became commonwealth's 
attorney of Norfolk county, and in 1870 
opened an office in Norfolk. Virginia. Short- 
1-; thereafter he was elected commonwealth's 
attorney for the city of Norfolk, and served 
as such several terms. In 1873 he was a 
member of the firm of White & Garnett. his 
partner being Judge Theodore S. Garnett. 
a partnership w-hich continued for more 
than twenty years. In 1900 Mr. \\ hite was 
appointed United States district attorney for 
the eastern district of Virginia. He is now 
president of the Richmond. Fredericksburg 
& Potomac Railroad. He is a member of the 



Norfolk and Portsmouth Bar associations, 
the Virginia State Bar Association, the Vir- 
ginia Club, the Norfolk Country Clulj, the 
Richmond Club at Willoughby Beach, and 
is a non-resident member of the Lotus Club 
of New York City. He is a Democrat in 
politics. On November 4, 1869, he married 
Lucy Landon Carter Minor. His second 
wife was Emma Gray, whom he married on 
March 10. 1S80. 

Harrison, Constance Gary (Mrs. Burton 

Harrison), born in Fairfax county, Virginia, 
April 25, 1S46, daughter of Archibald Gary 
and Monimia Fairfax, his wife. Her home 
was destroyed during the civil war, and 
after its close she visited Europe in cnm- 
p.Luy with her mother. After returning 
home, she married Burton Harrison, of Vir- 
ginia, a lawyer, who was one time secretary 
to President Davis. They removed in 1876 
to New York, and there Mrs. Harrison be- 
gan her literary work with ".A Little Cen- 
tennial Lady." a magazine article which at- 
tracted much attention. Her "Anglo- 
maniacs," which appeared anonymously in 
"The Century" magazine, gave her instant 
standing as a finished novelist. Her other 
principal works are: "Flower-de-Hundred," 
"Sweet Bells Out of Tune," "Crow's Nest," 
"A Daughter of the South," "A Bachelor 
Maid," "An Errant Wooing," "A Merry 
Maid of Arcady," "A Son of the Old Do- 
minion." She has also produced several 
l>lavs, mostly adaptations from the French. 

Morehead, John Alfred, born at Dublin, 
Pulaski county. \'irgiiiia. son of James Wil- 
liam Morehead and Barbara Katherine 
Yonce, his wife. His father, a farmer, was 
prominent in educational matters in Wythe 
countv, \'irginia. and Dr. Morehead de- 



PROMINENT TERSONS 



319 



scends paternally from Scotch forbears, ma- commander of the Virginia forces at the 

tcrnally of German ancestry and a nephew battle of Craney Island, in 1813. He died 

of Dr. William B. Yonce, for many years soon after the close of the war. His wife 

professor of Greek and Latin in Roanoke was Mary Mackey, a daughter of Captain 

College. He attended private schools in the Andrew Mackey. who was a member of the 

county of his birth. He graduated with the Society of the Cincinnati. John Boyd, the 

Bachelor of Arts degree at Roanoke College maternal grandfather of Mr. Faulkner, was 

in 18S9, then entered the Lutheran Theolog- '^o""" i" Scotland, and on coming to Amer- 

ical Seminary at Alount Airy, Pennsylvania. '^^ settled first in Pennsylvania, but moved 

He was graduated from this institution in ^" ^ierkeley county, Virginia, about 1742. 

1892, in the same year being ordained into Elisha Boyd, father of Mary Boyd Faulkner, 

the Evangelical Lutheran ministry, and also ^^'^^ ^ soldier of the war of 1812, and for a 

ii: that year receiving assignment to his first "umber of years served as a general of state 

charge, Burke's Garden, Virginia. For two ""I'tia of Virginia. He built one of the 

years he filled this pastorate, then became fid homesteads of the state known as "Bcyd- 

pastor of the First English Lutheran Church ^'He," in the vicinity of Martinsburg. which 

of Richmond, where he remained until 1898. •'^^'■- Faulkner now occupies. Senator Fanlk- 

In 1898 Dr. Morehead was elected president ' *^'" ^^^^ ^ student in private schools of Elli- 

of the Southern Lutheran Theological Semi '■'°'' ^'^3'- Maryland, in Paris, France, and 

nary, at Charleston, South Carolina, also <^'ermany and Switzerland, during the time 

being elected to the chair of systematic, '""'^ father was minister to France. Return- 



theology, a connection that endured until 
1903, although during the scholastic year of 
1901-02 he pursued courses at the univer- 
sities of Berlin and Leipsic. In 1903 Dr 
Morehead accepted the presidency of Roa- 
noke C