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Full text of "School of Engineering - Graduate Course Catalog"

MASTERS OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING / 

MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY / MECHANICAL ENGINEERING / SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROCJRAMS IN INIORMATION SECURITY / 
NETWORK TECHNOLOGY ' WKB A I' I' LIC AT I ON DEVELOPMENT 



Fairfield University 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

School of Engineering 



2006-2007 



Information Directory 



Telephone No. 

Fairfield University Switchboard (203) 254-4000 

Athletic Tickets (203) 254-4103 

Bookstore (203) 254-4262 

Box Office - Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (203) 254-4010 

Bursar's Office (student accounts) (203) 254-4102 

Career Planning Center (203) 254-4081 

Computing and Network Services Help Desk (StagWeb) (203) 254-4069 

DiMenna-Nyselius Library (203) 254-4044 

Health Center (203) 254-4000. ext. 2241 

Housing (203)254-4215 

Information Desk - John A. Barone Campus Center (203) 254-4222 

Leslie C. Quick Jr. Recreation Complex (203) 254-4140 

Public Safety (campus safety, parking) (203) 254-4090 

Registrar's Office (registration, transcripts) (203) 254-4288 

StagCard (203)254-4009 

Study Abroad Office (203) 254-4332 



The School of Engineering Graduate Programs 

School of Engineering 

Fairfield University 

McAuliffe Hall. Room 106 

1073 North Benson Road 

Fairfield, CT 06824-5195 

Telephone: (203) 254-4147 

Facsimile: (203) 254-4013 

E-mail: acastelot@mail.fairfield.edu 

Website: www.fairfield.edu/engineering 

Applications available from: 

Office of Graduate and Continuing Studies Admission 

Fairfield University 

Canisius Hall, Room 302 

1073 North Benson Road 

Fairfield, CT 06824-5195 

Telephone: (203) 254-4184 

Facsimile: (203) 254-4073 

E-mail: gradadmis@mail.fairfield.edu 

Website: www.fairfield.edu 

The Fairfield University School of Engineering Graduate Programs catalog is printed annually. 
However, updates to programs, policies, and courses may be made after the catalog has been pub- 
lished. For current information, please refer to the University's website, www.fairfield.edu/engineering. 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



Master of Science in Management of Technology 



Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
Master of Science in Software Engineering 

Master of Science in 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Graduate Certificate Programs in 

Web Application Development 
Information Security 
Network Technology 



2006-2007 



Table of Contents 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY 

Academic Calendar 5 

Message from the Dean 6 

Mission 7 

Overview 8 

Campus Services 8 

Accreditation 10 

Campus Map Inside Back Cover 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Academic Advising; Curriculum Planning 1 

Student Programs of Study 1 

Academic Freedom 1 

Academic Honesty 1 

Honor Code 1 

Academic Dishonesty 1 

University Course Numbering System 12 

Normal Academic Progress 

Academic Load 12 

Academic Standards 12 

Auditing 12 

Time to Complete Degree 12 

Applications for and Awarding of Degrees 12 

Graduation and Commencement 12 

Grading System 

Grades; Academic Average 12 

Incompletes 13 

Transfer of Credits 13 

Scholastic Honors 13 

Disruption of Academic Progress 

Academic Probation/Dismissal 13 

Withdrawal 13 

Readmission 13 

Academic Grievance Procedures 14 

Informal Procedure 14 

Formal Procedure 14 

Transcripts 15 

Student Records 15 



Table of Contents 



THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 
GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

School of Engineering Mission Overview 20 

The Master of Science in Management of Technology 

Introduction and Overview 21 

Degree Requirements 22 

The Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

Introduction and Overview 23 

Required Courses 24 

The Master of Science in Software Engineering 

Introduction and Overview 25 

Degree Requirements 26 

Graduate Certificate Programs 28 

The Master of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Introduction and Overview 30 

Required Courses 31 

Course Descriptions 32 



ADMISSION 

Admission Policies and Procedures 16 

Certificate Programs in Software Engineering 17 

The StagCard 17 

Compliance Statements and Notifications 47 



TUITION, FEES, AND FINANCIAL AID 

Tuition and Fees 48 

Deferred Payment 48 

Reimbursement by Employer 48 

Refund of Tuition 48 

Financial Aid 48 

Federal Stafford Loans 49 

Sallie Mae Signature Student Loan 49 

Tax Deductions 49 

Veterans 49 

Administration and Faculty 50 



Calendar 




Calendar 



School of Engineering 



2006-07 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



Classes are offered on weeknights and Saturdays to accommodate those in the program who are employed full time. 
Refer to the schedules that are distributed each semester for calendar changes. 



Summer 2006 

May 29 Memorial Day - University holiday 

May 30 - Aug. 10 Summer Session 

July 3-4 Independence Day - University holiday 

July 5 Degree cards due for August graduation 



Fall 2006 

Aug. 22 Back to Campus Day 

Sept. 6 Classes begin 

Oct. 20 Degree cards due for January graduation 

Nov. 22 - Nov. 26 Thanksgiving recess 

Nov. 27 Classes resume 

Dec. 21 Last day of classes for graduate students 



Winter 2007 Intersession 

Jan. 2 - Jan. 13 Intersession classes 

Spring 2007 

Jan. 15 Martin Luther King Jr. Day - University holiday 

Jan. 16 Classes begin 

Feb. 16 Degree cards due for May graduation 

March 12 - March 16 Spring recess 

March 19 Classes resume 

April 5 - April 8 Easter recess 

May 7 Last day of classes 

May 20 57th Commencement 

Summer 2007 

May 28 Memorial Day - University holiday 

May 29- Aug. 9 Summer Session 

July 4 Independence Day - University holiday 

July 5 Degree cards due for August graduation 



6 



A Message from the Dean 



A Message from the Dean 



1 




^ 

t 


! 



The four graduate programs in the School of Engineering, mas- 
ter of science in r\/lanagement of Technology (MSMOT), in 
Software Engineering (MSSE) in Electrical and Computer 
Engineering (MSECE), and in Mechanical Engineering (MSME), 
are driven by the needs of the School's constituencies, the stu- 
dents and their employers, who establish multifaceted require- 
ments for current knowledge and skills at the workplace. Hence, 
the programs are inherently dynamic and responsive to industry 
and business. Their capacity to change, and so remain current, 
originates with the faculty in the School of Engineering who are 
leading-edge professionals in their areas of expertise and in 
instruction and mentoring. It is also prompted by the administra- 
tion team, which is entrepreneurial in delivering graduate education and in maintaining close contacts and 
open lines of communication with the industry and business sectors that are the main beneficiaries of 
the School's graduates. Located in Fairfield County, Fairfield University is in the middle of a high-density 
concentration of hardware and software industries and businesses; nearly 40 Fortune 500 companies are 
headquartered within 50 miles of the campus. This environment provides opportunities for studies of 
real-world problems in courses and in the final professional project required by the graduate programs, 
and for advancement and employment of Fairfield graduates. The degree to which established learning 
goals and program objectives are achieved by our students is measured through the Assessment and 
Continuous Quality Improvement process (ACQIP) - a three-year cycle of outcomes assessment and 
quality management - that is in effect in the School of Engineering. ACQIP embodies the philosophical 
and operational principles that are the foundation for the high quality of graduate and undergraduate 
engineering education at Fairfield University. This paradigm makes it possible for the School to continue 
satisfying graduate students' educational expectations. 

The Management of Technology program is offered in conjunction with the AACSB-accredited MBA 
program in the Charles F Dolan School of Business. Several of its courses are derived from the MBA pro- 
gram. As this catalog illustrates, the hallmark of the curricula of the four master's programs is currency and 
relevancy. These programs offer many opportunities to our students to pursue their special interests and 
grow professionally and personally. 

I would like to extend a warm welcome to all who choose to enter the exciting adventure of graduate edu- 
cation in the School of Engineering at Fairfield University. 




iliU 



'jAdL__^^ 



Dr. Evangelos Hadjimichael 
Dean. School of Engineering 



Fairfield University l\/lission 



7 



Fairfield University Mission 



Fairfield University, founded by tfie Society of Jesus, is a 
coeducational institution of hiigfier learning whiose pri- 
mary objectives are to develop tfie creative intellectual 
potential of its students and to foster in tliem etiiical and 
religious values and a sense of social responsibility. 
Jesuit education, wtiicfi began in 1547, is committed 
today to thie service of faitti, of wfiich tfie promotion of 
justice is an absolute requirement. 

Fairfield is Catliolic in bothi tradition and spirit. It cele- 
brates tfie God-given dignity of every liuman person. As 
a Cattiolic university it welcomes thiose of all beliefs and 
traditions wfio sfiare its concerns for scliolarsfiip, justice, 
truth), and freedom, and it values tfie diversity tfiat tlieir 
membersfiip brings to tfie University community. 

Fairfield educates its students through a variety of schol- 
arly and professional disciplines. All of its schools share 
a liberal and humanistic perspective and a commitment 
to excellence. Fairfield encourages a respect for all the 
disciplines - their similarities, their differences, and their 
interrelationships. In particular, in its undergraduate 
schools it provides all students with a broadly based 
general education curriculum with a special emphasis on 
the traditional humanities as a complement to the more 
specialized preparation in disciplines and professions 
provided by the major programs. Fairfield is also com- 
mitted to the needs of society for liberally educated pro- 
fessionals. It meets the needs of its students to assume 
positions in this society through its undergraduate and 
graduate professional schools and programs. 

A Fairfield education is a liberal education, characterized 
by its breadth and depth. It offers opportunities for indi- 
vidual and common reflection, and it provides training in 
such essential human skills as analysis, synthesis, and 
communication. The liberally educated person is able to 
assimilate and organize facts, to evaluate knowledge, to 
identify issues, to use appropriate methods of reasoning, 
and to convey conclusions persuasively in written and 
spoken word. Equally essential to liberal education is the 
development of the aesthetic dimension of human 
nature, the power to imagine, to intuit, to create, and to 
appreciate. In its fullest sense liberal education initiates 
students at a mature level into their culture, its past, its 
present, and its future. 

Fairfield recognizes that learning is a lifelong process 
and sees the education that it provides as a foundation 
upon which its students may continue to build within 
their chosen areas of scholarly study or professional 
development. It also seeks to foster in its students a con- 
tinuing intellectual curiosity and a desire for self-educa- 
tion that will extend to the broad range of areas to which 
they have been introduced in their studies. 




As a community of scholars, Fairfield gladly joins in the 
broader task of expanding human knowledge and deep- 
ening human understanding, and to this end it encour- 
ages and supports the scholarly research and artistic 
production of its faculty and students. 

Fairfield has a further obligation to the wider community 
of which it is a part, to share with its neighbors its 
resources and its special expertise for the betterment of 
the community as a whole. Faculty and students are 
encouraged to participate in the larger community 
through service and academic activities. But most of all, 
Fairfield serves the wider community by educating its 
students to be socially aware and morally responsible 
persons. 

Fairfield University values each of its students as indi- 
viduals with unique abilities and potentials, and it 
respects the personal and academic freedom of all its 
members. At the same time, it seeks to develop a 
greater sense of community within itself, a sense that all 
of its members belong to and are involved in the 
University, sharing common goals and a common com- 
mitment to truth and justice, and manifesting in their 
lives the common concern for others which is the obli- 
gation of all educated, mature human beings. 



8 



Fairfield University 



Fairfield University 



A comprehensive liberal arts university built upon the 
450-year-olci Jesuit traditions of scholarship and serv- 
ice, Fairfield University is distinguished by sound aca- 
demics, collegiality among faculty and students, and a 
beautiful, 200-acre campus with views of Long Island 
Sound. 

Since its founding in 1942 by the Society of Jesus (the 
Jesuits), the University has grown from an all-male 
school serving 300 to a competitively ranked coeduca- 
tional institution serving 3,300 undergraduate students 
and more than 1 ,000 graduate students, plus non-tradi- 
tional students enrolled in University College. 

In addition to 34 undergraduate majors, Fairfield offers 
full- and part-time graduate programs through its 
College of Arts and Sciences, its Charles R Dolan 
School of Business, and its schools of Engineering, 
Graduate Education and Allied Professions, and 
Nursing. Graduate students earn credentials tor profes- 
sional advancement while benefiting from small class 
sizes, opportunities for real-world application, and the 
resources and reputation of a school consistently 
ranked among the top regional universities in the North 
by U.S. News & World Report. 

In the past decade, more than two dozen Fairfield stu- 
dents have been named Fulbright scholars, and the 
University is among the 12 percent of four-year colleges 
and universities with membership in Phi Beta Kappa, 
the nation's oldest and most prestigious academic 
honor society. 

Undergraduate students represent 35 states and more 
than 30 countries. 

Fairfield is located one hour north of New York City at 
the center of a dynamic corridor populated by colleges 
and universities, cultural and recreational resources, 
and leading corporate employers. Its recently renovated 
and expanded facilities include the Rudolph F Bannow 
Science Center, the John A. Barone Campus Center, 
and the DiMenna-Nyselius Library. 

The third youngest of the 28 Jesuit universities in the 
United States, Fairfield has emerged as an academic 
leader well positioned to meet the needs of modern stu- 
dents. More than 60 years after its founding, the 
University's mission remains the same: To educate the 
whole person, challenging the intellectual, spiritual, and 
physical potential of all students. 

In the spirit of its Jesuit founders, Fairfield University 
extends to its graduate students myriad resources and 
services designed to foster their intellectual, spiritual, 
and physical development. 



CAMPUS SERVICES 

The DiMenna-Nyselius Library combines the best of 
the traditional academic library with the latest access 
to print and electronic resources, it is the intellectual 
heart of Fairfield's campus and its signature academic 
building. 

Carrels, leisure seating, and research tables provide 
study space for up to 900 individual students, while 
groups meet in team rooms or study areas, or convene 
for conversation in the 24-hour cyber cafe. Other 
resources include a 24-hour, open-access computer lab 
with Macintosh and Intel-based computers; a second 
computer lab featuring Windows-based computers only; 
two dozen multimedia workstations; an electronic class- 
room; a 90-seat multimedia auditorium; an Information 
Technology Center for large and small group training; 
the Center for Academic Excellence; photocopiers, 
microform readers, and pnnters; and audiovisual hard- 
ware and software. Workstations for the physically dis- 
abled are available throughout the library. 

The library's collection includes more than 330,000 
bound volumes, 1,800 journals and newspapers, 
1 2,000 audiovisual items, and the equivalent of 1 01 ,000 
volumes in microform. To borrow library materials, stu- 
dents must present a StagCard at the Circulation Desk. 
Students can search for materials using an integrated 
library system and online catalog. Library resources 
may also be accessed from any desktop on or off cam- 
pus at http://wvw.fairfield.edu/library.html. From this 
site, students use their StagCard number and a pin 
code to access their accounts, read full-text journal arti- 
cles from more than 100 databases, submit interlibrary 
loan forms electronically, or contact a reference librari- 
an around the clock via e-mail or "live" chat. 

During the academic year, the library is open Monday 
through Thursday, 7:45 a.m. to midnight; Friday, 
7:45 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and 
Sunday, 10:30 a.m. to midnight. 

The Rudolph F. Bannow Science Center's 44,000- 

square-foot addition, completed in 2002, houses 
advanced instructional and research facilities that foster 
the development of science learning communities, 
engage students in experiential learning, and invite col- 
laborative faculty and student research in biology, 
chemistry, computer science, mathematics, physics, 
and psychology. The original building underwent com- 
plementary renovations. 

The John A. Barone Campus Center which was 
extensively renovated in 2001 , is the social focal point 
of University activities and offers students a place to 
relax, socialize, or study during the day. Students can 
sip cappuccino at Jazzman's CyberCafe, shop at the 
University bookstore, watch deejays for the campus 
radio station, WVOF-FM 88.5, at work in their new 



Fairfield University 



glass-enclosed studio, or grab meals at one of two din- 
ing facilities. The center is open 24 hours from Sunday 
through Thursday and from 7 a.m. to 1 a.m. on Fridays 
and Saturdays. Call the Campus Center between 9 a.m. 
and 9 p.m. for bookstore and dining hall hours. 

The Career Planning Center located in the Aloysius P. 
Kelley, S.J., Administrative Center, is open to graduate 
students and offers career information, on-line job list- 
ings, and career counseling services. Counselors work 
with students to help facilitate personal and vocational 
discovery, career exploration, and assist in developing 
personal job search strategies. 

The Center also invites leading employers to recruit on 
campus. Graduate students who wish to leverage their 
master's degrees in a career transition should meet with 
the director of career planning one year prior to gradu- 
ation. Graduate students enrolled in the Charles F. 
Dolan School of Business should first consult with the 
business school's assistant dean. 

The Campus Ministry team nourishes a faith commu- 
nity on campus, taking seriously its unique role in 
expressing the University's Catholic and Jesuit identity. 
The team, composed of pastoral ministers, laypeople, 
and a council of 18 student leaders, provides counsel- 
ing and spiritual direction, fosters prayer life, conducts 
liturgies and retreats, trains students as lectors and 
Eucharistic ministers, and coordinates interfaith and 
ecumenical events. 

Service learning opportunities give students a chance 
for reflection as they work and live alongside people of 
different backgrounds. Students may apply for immer- 
sion experiences in Ecuador, Nicaragua, Mexico, and 
Haiti, as well as trips closer to home in Kentucky, Maine, 
and Connecticut. Each year, hundreds of students par- 
ticipate in Campus Ministry or community service 
events. 

Campus Ministry is housed in the Rev. Pedro Arrupe, 
S.J., Campus Ministry Center on the lower level of the 
Egan Chapel of St. Ignatius Loyola. Mass is held daily 
in the chapel during the lunch hour, on some week- 
nights, and twice on Sundays. 

Fairfield's Computing Services are state-of-the-art. 
High-speed fiber-optic cable, with transmission capabil- 
ities of 100 megabits per second, connects classrooms, 
residence hall rooms, and faculty and administrative 
offices, providing access to the library collection, e-mail, 
various databases, and other on-campus resources. 

Nineteen computer labs, supported by knowledgeable 
lab assistants and open 14 hours a day for walk-in and 
classroom use, offer hardware and software for the 
Windows and Macintosh environments. All campus 
buildings are connected to the Internet, and all resi- 
dence hall rooms have Internet connections, cable tele- 
vision, and voicemail. Students are issued individual 
accounts in StagWeb, a secure website where they can 
check e-mail, register for courses, review their academ- 
ic and financial records, and stay tuned to campus-wide 
announcements. 




Administrative Computing (SunGard SCT) is 

located in Dolan 110 East and provides support for 
the integrated administrative system. Banner. 
Additionally, Administrative Computing supports 
StagWeb, the campus portal that enables students 
to access their e-mail, grades, calendars, course 
schedules and other types of information that is 
important to the adult learner. Administrative 
Computing's Help Desk is located on the second 
floor of Dolan Commons and can be reached by e- 
mail (helpdesk@mail.fairfield.edu) or by phone 
(203) 254-4357. The hours of operation are Mon., 
Weds., Thurs., and Fri. from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
and on Tuesdays from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Computing and Network Semces, located on the 
second floor of Dolan Commons, provides lab sup- 
port, technical advice, classroom technology appli- 
cations, and personal Web page assistance. Office 
hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The SCT Help 
Desk, located on the second floor of Dolan 
Commons, assists with questions related to 
StagWeb (see above). 

The Department of Public Safety is responsible for the 
safety of people and property on campus. Officers patrol 
campus by bike, foot, and vehicle 24 hours a day 365 
days a year. The Department of Public Safety is author- 
ized to prevent, investigate, and report violations of 
State or Federal Law and University regulations. In addi- 
tion, officers are trained to provide emergency first aid 
and are supplemental first responders for the Town 
of Fairfield. Public Safety officers also oversee the flow 
of traffic on campus and enforce parking regulations. 
Any student, faculty member, or employee of Fairfield 
University should directly report any potential criminal 
act or other emergency to any officer or representative 
of the Department of Public Safety immediately, by call- 
ing (203) 254-4090 or visiting us in Loyola Hall, Room 2. 

The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts Arts serves 
as a cultural hub and resource for the University and 
surrounding towns, offering popular and classical music 
programs, dance, theatre, and outreach events for 
young audiences. The center consists of the 740-seat 
Aloysius P. Kelley, S.J. Theatre, the smaller Lawrence A. 



10 



Fairfield University 



Wien Experimental Theatre, and the Thomas J. Walsh 
Art Gallery. Tickets to Quick Center events are available 
to graduate students at a discounted price. For a calen- 
dar of events, visit www.quickcenter.com. 

In addition, various departments schedule exhibitions, 
lectures, and dramatic programs throughout the aca- 
demic year. These events are open to all members of 
the University community and many are free of charge. 



Athletics and Recreation 

in athletics, Fairfield is a Division I member of the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and 
competes in conference championship play as a char- 
ter member of the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference 
(MAAC). The men's and women's basketball teams play 
at Bridgeport's Arena at Harbor Yard, considered one 
of the top facilities in collegiate basketball. Discounted 
tickets for Fairfield Stags games are available to gradu- 
ate students. For tickets or other information, call the 
athletic box office or visit www.fairfieldstags.com. In 
addition, competitions in soccer, lacrosse, and other 
sports are held on campus and are free of charge to 
graduate students. 

Ttie Leslie C. Quick Jr. Recreation Complex, a multi- 
purpose facility also known as the RecPlex, features a 
25-meter, eight-lane swimming pool; a field house for 
various sports; a whirlpool; saunas in the men's and 
women's locker rooms; and racquetball courts. Other 
amenities are two cardio theatres, a weight room, and 
group fitness courses. The Department of Recreation 
also oversees the outdoor tennis, basketball, and sand 
volleyball courts as well as two temporary, portable ice- 
skating hnks. Graduate students may join the RecPlex 
on a per semester basis by presenting a current 
StagCard. For membership information and hours, call 
the RecPlex office, and paying the appropnate fee. 



Parking on Campus 

All vehicles must be registered with the Department 
of Public Safety and display a current vehicle regis- 
tration sticker For graduate students, the fee for this 
is included as part of tuition. However graduate stu- 
dents must register their vehicle. To do so, students 
complete and submit the online registration form 
available on StagWeb (see page 17). Students 
should then bring a copy of the submitted application 
to Public Safety (Loyola Hall, Room 2) with proof 
of enrollment and their state vehicle registration. A 
pamphlet detailing traffic and parking regulations 
will be provided with your registration sticker. 
Unauthorized vehicles parked in fire lanes, handi- 
capped, or service vehicle spaces are subject to 
both fines and towing. Handicapped persons must 
display an official state handicapped permit. 



ACCREDITATION 



Fairfield University is fully accredited by the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges, which 
accredits schools and colleges in the six New England 
states. Accreditation by one of the six regional accredit- 
ing associations in the United States indicates that the 
school or college has been carefully evaluated and 
found to meet standards agreed upon by qualified edu- 
cators. 

Additional accreditations include: 

AACSB International - The Association to Advance 
Collegiate Schools of Business 

Charles F. Dolan School of Business 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
Electrical Engineering program 
Mechanical Engineehng program 
Commission on Accreditation of Marriage and Family 
Therapy Education of the American Association for 
Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) 

Marriage and Family Therapy program 
Connecticut State Department of Higher Education 
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related 
Educational Programs (CACREP) 

Counselor Education programs 
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education 
Undergraduate Nursing programs 
Graduate Nursing programs 

Program approvals include: 

Connecticut State Department of Higher Education 

Elementary and Secondary Teacher 
certification programs 

Graduate programs leading to certification 
in specialized areas of education 

School of Nursing programs 
Connecticut State Board of Examiners for Nursing 

Undergraduate Nursing programs 

Graduate Nursing programs 
Nurse Anesthesia Council on Accreditation 

The University holds memberships in: 

AACSB International - The Association to Advance 

Collegiate Schools of Business 
American Association of Colleges for Teacher 

Education 
American Association of Colleges of Nursing 
Amencan Council for Higher Education 
American Council on Education 
ASEE - American Society for Engineering Education 
Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities 
Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities 
Connecticut Association of Colleges and Universities 

for Teacher Education 
Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges 
Connecticut Council for Higher Education 
National Association of Independent Colleges 

and Universities 
National Catholic Educational Association 
New England Business and Economic Association 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 



11 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND 
GENERAL REGULATIONS 



Academic Advising and 
Curriculum Planning 

Students create their plan of study early in their gradu- 
ate career, under the supervision and guidance of pro- 
gram directors, so that they may meet their educational 
and professional goals in a time-effective and intellectu- 
ally satisfying manner. 

Graduate courses are offered in evening classes and on 
weekends to serve the needs of part-time graduate stu- 
dents from the regional technology and business com- 
munity, and the needs of full-time students. Class sizes 
are small, 10-25 on average, with an emphasis on close 
interaction between participants and faculty. 



Student Programs of Study 

All programs of study must be planned with an advisor. 
In granting approval, the advisor will consider the stu- 
dent's previous academic record and whether or not the 
prerequisites set forth for the specific program have 
been met. Should a student wish to change his or her 
track or concentration, this request must be made in 
writing and approved by the advisor and the dean. 



Academic Freedom and 
Responsibility 

The statement on academic freedom, as formulated in 
the 1 940 Statement of Principles endorsed by the AAUP 
and incorporating the 1970 interpretive comments, is 
the policy of Fairfield University. Academic freedom and 
responsibility are here defined as the liberty and obliga- 
tion to study, to investigate, to present and interpret, and 
discuss facts and ideas concerning all branches and 
fields of learning. Academic freedom is limited only by 
generally accepted standards of responsible scholar- 
ship and by respect for the Catholic commitment of the 
institution as expressed in its mission statement, which 
provides that Fairfield University "welcomes those of all 
beliefs and traditions who share its concerns for schol- 
arship, justice, truth, and freedom, and it values the 
diversity which their membership brings to the universi- 
ty community." 



Academic Honesty 

All members of the Fairfield University community share 
responsibility for establishing and maintaining appropri- 
ate standards of academic honesty and integrity. As 



such, faculty members have an obligation to set high 
standards of honesty and integrity through personal 
example and the learning communities they create. It is 
further expected that students will follow these stan- 
dards and encourage others to do so. 



Honor Code 

Fairfield University's primary purpose is the pursuit of 
academic excellence. This is possible only in an atmos- 
phere where discovery and communication of knowl- 
edge are marked by scrupulous, unqualified honesty. 
Therefore, it is expected that all students taking classes 
at the University adhere to the following Honor Code: 

'1 understand that any violation of academic integrity 
wounds the entire community and undermines the trust 
upon which the discovery and communication of knowl- 
edge depends. Therefore, as a member of the Fairfield 
University community, I hereby pledge to uphold and 
maintain these standards of academic honesty and 
integrity." 



Academic Dishonesty 



Students are sometimes unsure of what constitutes aca- 
demic dishonesty. In all academic work, students are 
expected to submit materials that are their own and to 
include attribution for any ideas or language that is not 
their own. Examples of dishonest conduct include but 
are not limited to: 

• Cheating, such as copying examination answers from 
materials such as crib notes or another student's 
paper. 

• Collusion, such as working with another person or per- 
sons when independent work is prescribed. 

• Inappropriate use of notes. 

• Falsification or fabhcation of an assigned project, 
data, results, or sources. 

• Giving, receiving, offering, or soliciting information in 
examinations. 

• Using previously prepared materials in examinations, 
tests, or quizzes. 

• Destruction or alteration of another student's work. 

• Submitting the same paper or report for assignments 
in more than one course without the prior written per- 
mission of each instructor. 

• Appropriating information, ideas, or the language of 
other people or writers and submitting it as one's own 
to satisfy the requirements of a course - commonly 
known as plagiarism. Plagiarism constitutes theft and 
deceit. Assignments (compositions, term papers, com- 
puter programs, etc.) acquired either in part or in 
whole from commercial sources, publications, 



12 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 



students, or other sources and submitted as one's own 
original work will be considered plagiarism. 

• Unauthorized recording, sale, or use of lectures and 
other instructional materials. 

In the event of such dishonesty, professors are to award 
a grade of zero for the project, paper, or examination in 
question, and may record an F for the course itself. When 
appropriate, expulsion may be recommended. A notation 
of the event is made in the student's file in the academic 
dean's office. The student will receive a copy. 



University Course Numbering System 

Undergraduate 

01-99 Introductory courses 
100-199 Intermediate courses without 

prerequisites 
200-299 Intermediate courses with 

prerequisites 
300-399 Advanced courses, normally limited 

to juniors and seniors, and open to 

graduate students with permission 



Graduate 

400-499 



500-599 



Graduate courses, open to 
undergraduate students with 
permission 
Graduate courses 



Normal Academic Progress 

Academic Load 

A full-time student will normally carry nine credits during 
the fall or spring semester. Twelve credits is the maximum 
load permitted. During summer sessions, full-time stu- 
dents are permitted to carry a maximum load of 12 cred- 
its. Students who work full-time or attend another school 
may not be full-time students. Such individuals are ordi- 
narily limited to six credits during the fall or spring semes- 
ters and nine credits during the summer sessions.. 

Academic Standards 

Students are required to maintain satisfactory academic 
standards of scholastic performance. Candidates for a 
master's degree or certificate must maintain a 3.00 grade 
point average. 

Auditing 

A student who wishes to audit a graduate course may do 
so only in consultation with the course instructor. A 
Permission to Audit form, available at the dean's office, 
must be completed and presented at registration during 
the regular registration period. No academic credit is 
awarded and a grade notation (AU) is recorded on the 
official transcript under the appropriate semester and 
course name. The tuition for auditing is one-half of the 
credit tuition, except for those hands-on courses involving 
the use of a computer workstation. In this case, the audit 
tuition is the same as the credit tuition. Conversion from 



audit to credit status will be permitted only before the third 
class and with the permission of the course instructor. 

Independent Study 

The purpose of independent study at the graduate level 
is to broaden student knowledge in a specific area of 
interest. Students must submit a preliminary proposal 
using the Independent Study Application form, which is 
available in the dean's office, to the major advisor. 
Frequent consultation with the major advisor is required. 
Students may earn from one to six credits for an inde- 
pendent study course. 

Time to Complete Degree 

Students are expected to complete all requirements 
for the M.S. programs within five years after beginning 
their course work. Students completing certificate pro- 
grams must fulfill their requirements within three years of 
beginning course work. Each student is expected to 
make some annual progress toward the degree or certifi- 
cate to remain in good standing. A student who elects to 
take a leave of absence must submit a request, in writing, 
to the dean. 

Applications for and Awarding of Degrees 

All students must file an application for the master's 
degree and the certificate of advanced study in the 
dean's office by the published deadline. Graduate stu- 
dents must successfully complete all requirements for the 
degree in order to participate in commencement exercis- 
es. Refer to the calendar for the degree application dead- 
line. 

Graduation and Commencement 

Diplomas are awarded in January, May, and August (see 
calendar for application deadlines). Students who have 
been awarded diplomas in the previous August and 
January, and those who have completed all degree 
requirements for May graduation, are invited to partici- 
pate in the May commencement ceremony. Graduate 
students must successfully complete all requirements for 
the degree in order to participate in commencement. 



Grading System 



Grades; Academic Average 

The work of each student is graded on the following 
basis: 



A 


Excellent 


B 


Good 


C 


Fair 


F 


Failed 


1 


Incomplete 


P 


Pass 


W 


Withdrew without penalty 



The symbol + suffixed to the grades of B and C indicates 
the upper ranges covered by those grades. The symbol - 
suffixed to the grades A, B, and C indicates the lower 
ranges covered by those grades. 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 



13 



The grade of incomplete is given at the discretion of indi- 
vidual professors. All coursework must be completed 
within 30 days after the last class in the course for which 
a student has received an incomplete grade, after which 
the 1" becomes an F. Pass or Fail grades are used in a 
limited number of courses. 

No change of grade will be processed after a student has 
graduated. Any request for the change of an earned letter 
grade is at the discretion of the original teacher of the 
course and must be recommended in writing to the dean 
by the professor of record within one calendar year of the 
final class of the course or before graduation, whichever 
comes first. 

A student may request an extension of the one-year 
deadline from the dean of their school if he or she can 
provide documentation that extenuating circumstances 
warrant an extension of the one-year deadline. Such an 
extension may be approved only if the professor of record 
agrees to the extension and an explicit date is stipulated 
by which the additional work must be submitted. 

A change of an incomplete grade follows the established 
policy. 

A student who elects to withdraw from a course must 
obtain written approval from the dean. Refunds will not 
be granted without written notice. The amount of tuition 
refund will be based upon the date the notice is received. 
Fees are not refundable unless a course is canceled. 

Each grade has a numerical value as follows: 



A 


4.00 


A- 


3.67 


B+ 


3.33 


B 


3.00 


B- 


2.67 


C+ 


2.33 


C 


2.00 


C- 


1.67 


D 


1.00 


F 


0.00 



Multiplying a grade's numerical value by the credit value 
of a course produces the number of quality points earned 
by a student. The student's grade point average is com- 
puted by dividing the number of quality points earned by 
the total number of credits completed, including failed 
courses. The average is rounded to the nearest second 
decimal place. 

Incomplete 

An incomplete grade is issued in the rare case when, due 
to an emergency, a student makes arrangements - in 
advance and with the professor's and the dean's 
permission - to complete some of the course require- 
ments after the semester ends. All course work must be 
completed within 30 days of the end of the term. Any "I" 
still outstanding after the 30-day extension will become an 
F and the student will be excluded from the program. 



Transfer of Credit 

Transfer of credit from another approved institution of 
higher learning will be allowed if it is graduate work done 
after the completion of a bachelor's program and com- 
pleted pnor to entenng Fairfield University. 

No more than six credits may be transferred. Transfer 
credit will be considered for graduate coursework earned 
with a grade of B or better. An official transcript of the 
work done must be received before a decision will be 
made on approving the transfer. 



Scholastic Honors 

Alpha Sigma Nu 

Alpha Sigma Nu, the national Jesuit honor society, 
serves to reward and encourage scholarship, loyalty, and 
service to the ideals of Jesuit higher education. To be 
nominated for membership, graduate students must have 
scholastic rank in the top 15 percent of their class, 
demonstrate a proven concern for others, and manifest a 
true concern and commitment to the values and goals of 
the society. The Fairfield chapter was reactivated in 1981 
and includes outstanding undergraduate and graduate 
students who are encouraged to promote service to the 
University and provide greater understanding of the 
Jesuit ideals of education. 



Disruption of Academic Progress 

Academic Probation/Dismissal 

A student whose overall grade point average falls below 
3.00 in any semester is placed on probation for the fol- 
lowing semester. If the overall grade point average is 
again below 3.00 at the end of that semester, the student 
may be dropped from the School. Any student who 
receives two course grades below 2.67 or B- will be 
excluded from the program. 

Withdrawal 

Students who wish to withdraw from a 14-15-week 
course before its sixth scheduled class must do so in writ- 
ing or in person at the Registrar's Office. Written with- 
drawals are effective as of the date received or post- 
marked. In-person withdrawals are made in the 
Registrar's Office by completing and submitting a 
Change of Registration form. 

Those who wish to withdraw from a course after the sixth 
scheduled class must submit a written statement of their 
intention to the dean for approval to withdraw without 
academic penalty. Failure to attend class or merely giving 
notice to an instructor does not constitute an official with- 
drawal and may result in a penalty grade being recorded 
for the course. In general, course withdrawals are not 
approved after the sixth scheduled class. In extreme 
cases, exceptions may be approved by the dean. 

Readmission 

All students who interrupt their education for more than 



14 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 



two successive terms must be reinstated. Requests for 
reinstatement may be made by letter to the associate 
dean at least one month pnor to enrollment in courses. 
If a student has been inactive for 12 months or longer, 
it will be necessary to submit a new application for 
admission to graduate programs. A review of past work 
will determine the terms of readmission 

Students who receive a master's degree from Fairfield 
University and who want to begin programs leading to a 
certificate of advanced study are required to file a new 
application of admission. 



Academic Grievance Procedures 

Purpose 

Procedures for review of academic grievances protect 
the nghts of students, faculty, and the University by pro- 
viding mechanisms for equitable problem solving. 

Types of Grievances 

A grievance is defined as a complaint of unfair treat- 
ment for which a specific remedy is sought. It excludes 
circumstances that may give rise to a complaint for 
which explicit redress is neither called for nor sought, or 
for which other structures within the University serve as 
an agency for resolution. 

Academic grievances relate to procedural appeals or to 
academic competence appeals, or to issues of aca- 
demic dishonesty. Procedural appeals are defined as 
those seeking a remedy where no issue of the quality of 
the student's work is involved. For example, a student 
might contend that the professor failed to follow previ- 
ously announced mechanisms of evaluation. 

Academic competence appeals are defined as those 
seeking a remedy because the evaluation of the quality 
of a student's work in a course is disputed. Remedies 
would include but not be limited to awarded grade 
changes, such as permission to take make-up exami- 
nations or to repeat courses without penalty. 

Academic dishonesty appeals are defined as those 
seeking a remedy because of a dispute over whether 
plagiarism or cheating occurred. Remedies would 
include but not limited to removal of file letter, change of 
grade, or submitting new or revised work. 

Time Limits 

The procedures defined here must be initiated within 
one semester after the event that is the subject of the 
grievance. 

INFORMAL PROCEDURE 

Step one: The student attempts to resolve any aca- 
demic grievance with the faculty member, department 
chair, or other individual or agency involved. If, following 
this initial attempt at resolution, the student remains 
convinced that a gnevance exists, she or he advances 
to step two. 

Step two: The student consults the chair, or other indi- 



viduals when appropriate, bringing written documenta- 
tion of the process up to this point. If the student con- 
tinues to assert that a grievance exists after attempted 
reconciliation, he or she advances to step three. 

Step three: The student presents the grievance to the 
dean of the school in which the course was offered, 
bringing to this meeting documentation of steps one 
and two. If the dean's attempts at mediation prove 
unsuccessful, the student is informed of the right to ini- 
tiate formal review procedures. 

FORMAL PROCEDURE 

Step one: If the student still believes that the grievance 
remains unresolved following informal procedures, she 
or he initiates the formal review procedure by making a 
written request through the dean of the school in which 
the course was offered for a formal hearing in the aca- 
demic vice president's office. Such a request should 
define the grievance and be accompanied by documen- 
tation of completion of the informal process. It should 
also be accompanied by the dean's opinion of the griev- 
ance. 

Step two: The academic vice president determines 
whether the grievance merits further attention. If not, 
the student is so informed. 

If, however, the grievance does merit further attention, 
the academic vice president determines whether it is a 
procedural, competence, or academic dishonesty 
appeal. 

• If it relates to a procedural matter, the academic vice 
president selects a dean (other than the dean of the 
involved school) to chair a grievance committee. 

• If it relates to an academic competence matter, the 
academic vice president requests from the dean 
involved the names of two outside experts to serve as 
a consultant panel in determining the merit of the stu- 
dent's grievance. 

• If it relates to academic dishonesty, the academic vice 
president will convene a committee comprised of a 
dean and two faculty from outside the department in 
which the course was offered to review the material 
and the sanctions. 

In addition, in some instances it may be possible for the 
academic vice president to settle the grievance. 

Step three: For procedural appeals, the grievance com- 
mittee takes whatever steps are deemed appropriate to 
render a recommendation for resolving the grievance. 
The committee adheres to due process procedures 
analogous to those in the Faculty Handbook. 

For competence appeals, the academic vice president 
contacts the outside panel members and requests that 
they review the case in relation to its content validity. 

For academic honesty appeals, the academic vice pres- 
ident will request that the committee present a written 
report of their findings relating to the validity of the 
charge and the sanctions. 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 



15 



Step four: The recommendation from eitfier the griev- 
ance committee or the panel is forwarded to the aca- 
demic vice president in written form, accompanied, if 
necessary, by any supporting data that formed the basis 
of the recommendation. 

Step five: The academic vice president renders a final 
and binding judgment, notifying all involved parties. If 
the grievance involves a dispute over a course grade 
given by a faculty member, the academic vice president 
is the only University official empowered to change that 
grade, and then only at the recommendation of the 
committee or panel. 

Structure of the Grievance Committee 

The structure of the Grievance Committee is the same 
as the existing Academic Honesty Committee, as fol- 
lows: 

• Two faculty members are selected from a standing 
panel of eight faculty members elected by the gener- 
al faculty. The faculty member against whom the 
grievance has been directed proposes four names 
from that panel; the student strikes two of those 
names, and the two remaining faculty members 
serve. 

• Two students are selected from a standing panel of 
eight students elected by the student government. 
The student(s) (grievant(s) propose four names from 
that panel; the faculty strike two of those names; the 
two remaining students serve. 

• In the event that a faculty member or student select- 
ed through the foregoing process is unable to meet, 
another elected member of the panel serves as an 
alternate. 

• The committee is chaired by a dean (other than the 
dean of the school in which the course was offered) to 
be selected by the academic vice president. The dean 
so selected has no vote except in the event of a tie, 
and is responsible for overseeing the selection of the 
review committee, convening and conducting the 
committee meetings, and preparing the committee's 
report(s) and other appropriate documentation. 

• The election of committee members should take into 
account the possible need for response on 24-hour 
notice (particularly at the time of Commencement), 
and availability should, in such instances, be a prime 
consideration in committee member selection. 

Due Process Procedure 

a. Both the student and the faculty member have the 
right to be present and to be accompanied by a per- 
sonal advisor or counsel throughout the hearing. 

b. Both the student and the faculty member have the 
right to present and to examine and cross-examine 
witnesses. 

c. The administration makes available to the student 
and the faculty member such authority as it may 
possess to require the presence of witnesses. 



d. The hearing committee promptly and forthrightly 
adjudicates the issues. 

e. The full text of the findings and conclusions of the 
hearing committee are made available in identical 
form and at the same time to the student and the 
faculty member. The cost is met by the University. 

f. In the absence of a defect in procedure, recommen- 
dations shall be made to the Academic Vice 
President by the committee as to possible action in 
the case. 

g. At any time should the basis for an informal hearing 
appear, the procedure may become informal in 
nature. 



Transcripts 

Graduate transcript requests should be made in writing 
to the University Registrar's Office. There is a $4 fee for 
each copy (faxed transcripts are $6). Students should 
include the program and dates that they attended in 
their requests. In accordance with the general practices 
of colleges and universities, official transcripts with the 
University seal are sent directly by the University. 
Requests should be made one week in advance of the 
date needed. Requests are not processed during exam- 
ination and registration periods. 



Student Records 

Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
passed by Congress in 1974, legitimate access to stu- 
dent records has been defined. A student at Fairfield 
University, who has not waived that right, may see any 
records that directly pertain to the student. Excluded by 
statute from inspection is the parents' confidential state- 
ment given to the financial aid office and medical 
records supplied by a physician. 



A listing of records maintained, their location, and the 
means of reviewing them is available in the dean's 
office. Information contained in student files is available 
to others using the guidelines below: 

1. Confirmation of directory information is available 
to recognized organizations and agencies. Such 
information includes name, date of birth, dates of 
attendance, address. 

2. Copies of transcripts will be provided to anyone 
upon written request of the student. Cost of 
providing such information must be assumed by the 
student. 

3. All other information, excluding medical records, is 
available to staff members of the University on a 
need-to-know basis; prior to the release of addition- 
al information, a staff member must prove his or her 
need to know information to the office responsible 
for maintaining the records. 



16 



Admission 



ADMISSION 



Admission Policies 

In carrying out its mission, the School of Engineering 
admits graduate students in the master of science in 
management of technology, master of science in soft- 
ware engineering, master of science in electrical and 
computer engineering, and master of science in 
mechanical engineering programs, who have the requi- 
site bachelor's degree, three or more years of profes- 
sional experience, and knowledge and skills in certain 
areas such as computer programming, statistics, and 
financial accounting (in the case of the MSMOT pro- 
gram). Students with gaps in those areas are expected 
to complete bridge courses soon after they enter the 
program. Students create their plan of study early in 
their graduate career, under the supervision and guid- 
ance of program directors, so that they may meet their 
educational and professional goals in a time-effective 
and intellectually satisfying manner. Graduate courses 
are offered in evening classes and on weekends to 
serve the needs of part-time graduate students from the 
regional technology and business community, as well 
as the needs of full-time students. Class sizes are 
small, 10-25 on average, with an emphasis on close 
interaction between participants and faculty. 



International Students 

In addition to the above criteria, international students 
must provide a certificate of finances (evidence of ade- 
quate financial resources in U.S. dollars) and must sub- 
mit certified English translations and course-by-course 
evaluations, done by an approved evaluator from the 
list on file in the dean's office, of all academic records. 
All international students whose native language is not 
English must demonstrate proficiency in the English 
language. A TOEFL composite score of 550 for the 
paper test or 213 for the computer-based test is strong- 
ly recommended for admission to the graduate school. 
TOEFL may be waived for those international students 
who have earned an undergraduate or graduate degree 
from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university. 
Inter-national students should apply well in advance of 
the beginning of the term in which they intend to begin 
graduate studies. 



Students with Disabilities 

Fairfield University is committed to providing qualified 
students with disabilities with an equal opportunity to 
access the benefits, rights, and privileges of its servic- 



es, programs, and activities in an accessible setting. 
Furthermore, in compliance with Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, 
and Connecticut laws, the University provides reason- 
able accommodations to qualified students to reduce 
the impact of disabilities on academic functioning or 
upon other major life activities. It is important to note 
that the University will not alter the essential elements 
of its courses or programs. 

If a student with a disability would like to be considered 
for accommodations, he or she must make this request 
in writing and send the supporting documentation to the 
assistant director of student support services. This 
should be done prior to the start of the academic 
semester and is strictly voluntary. However, if a student 
with a disability chooses not to self-identify and provide 
the necessary documentation, accommodations need 
not be provided. All information concerning disabilities is 
confidential and will only be shared with a student's per- 
mission. Fairfield University uses the guidelines sug- 
gested by CT AHEAD to determine disabilities and rea- 
sonable accommodations. 

Send letters requesting accommodations to: David 
Ryan-Soderlund, assistant director of student support 
services, Fairfield University, 1073 North Benson Road, 
Fairfield, CT 06824-5195. 



Admission Criteria and Procedure 

Management of Technology, MSMOT 

Admission will be granted to applicants with a bachelor 
of science degree in science or engineering, or the 
equivalent, or to applicants with extensive experience in 
a technology environment, whose academic and pro- 
fessional records suggest the likelihood of success in a 
demanding graduate program. Applicants will have 
completed one course in introductory probability and 
statistics, one course in computer programming that 
uses a high-level language and includes applications, 
and one course in financial accounting, or demonstrate 
aptitude in these subjects. Applicants who have not 
completed these courses and who are unable to 
demonstrate aptitude in these subjects must begin their 
studies by registering for one or more of the bridge 
courses (undergraduate level) offered in these subjects. 

Software Engineering, MSSE 

Admission will be granted to applicants with a bache- 
lor's degree and adequate experience as a profession- 
al software developer or programmer, whose academic 
and professional records suggest the likelihood of 
success in a demanding graduate program. Potential 
students with an undergraduate degree in an area other 
than software engineering, computer science, or the 
equivalent, may need to take bridge courses, e.g., 
CS 131, CS 132, computer programming I and II, and to 
develop the required background for the program. 



Admission 



17 



Electrical and Computer Engineering, MSP>CE 

Admission will be granted to applicants with a bache- 
lor's degree in science or engineering or its equivalent, 
or to those with work experience in a technology envi- 
ronment, whose academic and professional record sug- 
gest the likelihood of success in a demanding graduate 
program in the electrical or computer engineering disci- 
plines. Furthermore, applicants should demonstrate 
aptitude in the subject matter of such bridge courses as 
EE 213, electric circuits, and EE 231, electronic circuits 
and devices, or begin their studies by registering for one 
or more of the bridge courses. 

Mechanical Engineering, MSME 

Admission will be granted to applicants with a bache- 
lor's degree in science or engineering, or its equivalent, 
in the general area of mechanical engineering, or to 
those with work experience in a technology environ- 
ment, whose academic and professional record suggest 
the likelihood of success in a demanding graduate pro- 
gram. Furthermore, applicants should demonstrate apti- 
tude in the subject matter of engineering design, mate- 
rials and thermodynamics, or begin their studies by reg- 
istering for one or more bridge courses in these areas. 



Certificate Programs in Software 
Engineering 

Applicants interested in earning a certificate of 
advanced study and those interested in taking selected 
courses may be admitted on a non-matriculating basis 
to the School of Engineering as special-status students. 
Special-status students must have a minimum of three 
years experience as a professional software developer 
or programmer, and academic and professional records 
that suggest the likelihood of success in demanding 
graduate courses. Special-status students are admitted 
to courses on a seating-available basis only. 
Matriculated students are given preference for course 
offerings, especially for required and core courses. 
Special-status students who subsequently apply for 
admission to the Master's program must submit all 
required documentation and a $55 application fee. 

Application Materials 

Applicants for admission in all programs must submit 
the following materials for consideration: 

• A completed Application for Admission form 

• Official transcripts from all previously attended col- 
leges or universities 

• Two letters of recommendation 

• Proof of immunization against measles and rubella 
(required by Connecticut regulations for students born 
after Dec. 31, 1956). 



Other Student Requirements 



The StagCard 

All students are required to obtain a StagCard, the 
University's official identification card. With the 
StagCard, graduate students can gain access to the 
University's computer labs, the library, StagPrint, and 
much more. Graduate students can also purchase a 
membership to the Quick Recreational Complex, which 
requires a valid StagCard for entry. 

To obtain a StagCard you will need a valid, government- 
issued photo identification card. Also, proof of course 
registration will quicken the processing your card, but is 
not required. Please note: returning students can use 
their existing card. 

The StagCard Office is located in Gonzaga Hall, room 
10. Office hours are: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, 
and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Tuesday from 
11 a.m. to 7 p.m. NOTE: Office is scheduled to move 
in summer 2006. Please call for location. Summer 
hours may vary from those listed in this catalog. 
For more information, you may check the website: 
www.fairfield.edu/stagcard, e-mail the office at 
stagcard@mail.fairfield.edu or call (203) 254-4009. 

StagWeb (http://stagweb.fairfield.edu) 

All graduate students are issued individual accounts 
for StagWeb, a secure website where you can check 
e-mail, register for parking, review your academic and 
financial records including course schedules and unoffi- 
cial transcripts, and stay tuned to campus-wide 
announcements. 

Your new StagWeb account will be available within 24 
hours of registering for classes for the first time. To log 
in you will need your Fairfield ID number (an eight-digit 
number which can be found on your course schedule) 
and your date of birth (in MMDDYY format). For more 
information or for assistance with StagWeb, please 
contact the StagWeb helpdesk at (203) 254-HELP or by 
e-mail at helpdesk@mail.fairfield.edu. 



18 



Admission 




School of 
Engineering 



20 



School of Engineering Overview 



THE SCHOOL OF 
ENGINEERING OVERVIEW 



Mission Statement and Goals 
of the School of Engineering 



Headquartered in McAuliffe Hall, the School of 
Engineering has laboratory and instructional facilities in 
this building as well as in the Rudolph F, Bannow 
Science Center. Among these resources are several 
computer laboratories and network and Internet servic- 
es completely dedicated to the instructional purposes 
of the School. In addition, the School of Engineering 
operates a separate network linking all its classrooms 
and laboratories. 

The School continuously measures the outcomes of its 
educational enterprise through the Assessment and 
Continuous Quality Improvement Process (ACQIP), a 
three-year cycle of quality management. This process 
includes identifying the constituencies and stakeholders 
of the engineering programs, determining which learn- 
ing goals and program objectives are compatible with 
the needs of those constituencies, crafting curriculum 
content, and developing resources to satisfy student 
learning and development in accord with those needs. 
ACQIP leads to two concrete results: It assesses the 
degree to which student learning goals are achieved, 
and it identifies opportunities for improving program 
design and implementation. 

The School of Engineering maintains an appropriate 
balance of faculty in each discipline within the School, 
and strives to create an environment conducive to 
faculty development and consistent with achieving 
excellence in pedagogy and professional advancement. 
The School also maintains a close working relationship 
with industry, through its Advisory Board, to better 
understand its needs, and draws from its network of 
practitioners in the engineering disciplines for assis- 
tance in program development and assessment. 



Mission 

In keeping with the mission of Fairfield University, the 
School of Engineering is committed to preparing stu- 
dents for leadership and success in their personal and 
professional lives, and to educating the whole person, 
one who is socially responsible and prepared to sen/e 
others and contribute to his/her discipline. 



Objectives 

The programs and curricula of the School of 
Engineering are directed to a diverse student popula- 
tion. Through innovation and an integration of 
disciplines in the arts and sciences with those of 
engineering, technology, and business, the programs 
provide the interdisciplinary knowledge, personal skills, 
and technical competencies necessary in our increas- 
ingly complex and sophisticated world. 

Specifically, the engineering programs have adopted 
four major program objectives: 

• to provide students with knowledge in the discipline 

• to teach students the skills necessary in exercising 
the discipline, problem solving, and aptitude for inno- 
vation as well as communication skills 

• to encourage students to adopt life-long learning 
practices across the spectrum of human knowledge 

• to convey to students a sense of social responsibility 

The key to educating students in their chosen disci- 
plines rests on curricula and instructional practices 
designed to promote the students' ability to design solu- 
tions to complex problems, assess the effectiveness of 
the design from a variety of perspectives, including 
economy and reliability, and proceed to implementation, 
testing and validation of design. 

The School of Engineering emphasizes excellence in 
the classroom, in research and development, and in the 
application of ideas to the world of technology and busi- 
ness. It fosters currency, relevance, and excellence in 
the curricula, and devotes resources to its facilities and 
programs, and to the professional development of fac- 
ulty and staff. 



The Master of Science in Management of Tectinology (MSMOT) 



21 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 
IN MANAGEMENT OF 
TECHNOLOGY (MSMOT) 



This degree is offered by the School of Engineering in 
conjunction with the MBA curriculum in the Charles F. 
Dolan School of Business. 



Introduction 

The MSMOT program at Fairfield University serves the 
needs of professional technologists and engineers, and 
the needs of industry and business in Connecticut and 
elsewhere. The program instructs and trains engineers 
and scientists, and those with extensive experience in a 
technology environment, in the management of such 
functions as technology research and development, 
product design and manufacturing, management of 
human and physical resources, and information and 
data analysis, as required by modern, technology- 
dependent enterprises. 

The program is intended for experienced technologists 
who aspire to favorably position their companies in fast- 
paced markets, influence crucial decision-making, and 
improve the likelihood of corporate success. Graduates 
of the program are able to help their organizations 
embrace technology innovation in a timely fashion, 
focusing their companies' energies on translating 
research and development efforts rapidly and effective- 
ly into manufacturing strategies and products that satis- 
fy market needs. 



Program Overview 



MSMOT graduates become effective leaders in small 
and large companies, providing creative guidance to the 
development and/or adoption and marketing of technol- 
ogy products and services. Specific program objectives 
are: 

• To train the technically proficient by adding to their 
skills a deeper comprehension of business planning 
and finance, plus an understanding of global markets, 
thereby empowering them to develop entrepreneurial 
skills. Technologists who are, or aspire to be 
employed as managers or supervisors and who cur- 
rently engage in technology planning and develop- 
ment will be immersed in an educational program that 
integrates studies in technology management with 
modern management principles. 

• To provide technology-dependent business and 
industry enterprises in Connecticut with a manpower 
resource skilled in the management of technology and 
capable of enhancing the strength and competitive- 




ness of those businesses. The outcome will serve to 
enrich the entrepreneurial climate in the state. 

To enhance the skills of technologists in the design 
and manufacturing disciplines, in the management 
and effective use of information resources, and in the 
developing strategies that are crucial to effective lead- 
ership in technological enterprises. 

To provide undergraduate students in engineering 
and science with the opportunity to pursue, upon com- 
pletion of their undergraduate studies, a graduate pro- 
gram that expands their career paths and ultimately 
leads to leadership roles in the management of tech- 
nology-dependent businesses. 



Students 

The program is designed to accommodate students 
who are fully employed and choose to complete their 
MSMOT studies on a part-time basis, taking five to six 
courses per year. It can also be pursued on a full-time 
basis. The program is directed toward the following stu- 
dent groups: (a) engineers and scientists who need 
skills in critical thinking and decision-making to effec- 
tively guide the technology that will enhance product 
quality and their employer's business opportunities; (b) 
manufacturing professionals who are charged with 
implementing technology initiatives in order to effective- 
ly compete in the 21st century with a lead over their 
competitors; (c) managers of technical and business 
activities responsible for creating strategic business 
plans and overseeing their execution; (d) research and 
development practitioners who require skills to recog- 
nize relevant technologies developed outside their own 
business organization and who must judge the merits of 
investing in them; (e) engineers and scientists who 
aspire to careers in management and require the knowl- 
edge to systematically integrate technology into their 
company's activity; (f) engineers and scientists interest- 
ed in academic careers combining science, engineer- 
ing, and management; and (g) technologists who 
require broad management skills to provide leadership 
in business. 



22 



The Master of Science in Management of Technology (MSMOT) 



The MSMOT Curriculum 

The MSMOT program has a curhculum of 27 courses 
available to students. Of these, several are in the 
School of Business MBA program*. Entering students 
are required to have an adequate background in proba- 
bility and statistics, computer programming using at 
least one higher order language, and financial account- 
ing. To be admitted to the MSMOT program, an appli- 
cant's undergraduate transcript(s) must indicate knowl- 
edge in the following areas: 

BR 1 - probability and statistics 

BR 2 - computer programming with a high-level 

language and with applications 
BR 3 - financial accounting 

Students who have not completed courses in these 
areas may be admitted to the program provisionally and 
must complete these courses as early as possible in 
their program. 



Degree Requirements 

Completion of a minimum of 1 2 three-credit courses (36 
total credits), as indicated below, is the requirement for 
earning the MSMOT degree. The designations (B) and 
(E) following a course name indicate courses offered 
through the School of Business and the School of 
Engineering, respectively. 

Required Courses - 24 credits 

All MSMOT students are required to complete each of 
the following three-credit courses. 

AC 500 Accounting for Decision Making (B) 

DM 460 Project Management (E) 

GK 415 Information Systems (E) 

MG 508 Strategic Management of Technology and 

Innovation (B) 
MG 584 Global Competitive Strategy (B) 
RD 460 Leadership in Technological Enterprise (E) 
CP 551 Capstone I Project Definition and Planning 

(E) 
CP 552 Capstone II Project Execution and Results 

(E) 

Of particular note among the required courses is the 
sequence of CP 551 and CP 552 courses, which con- 
stitute the MSMOT capstone, a team-driven effort to 
define and design realizable solutions to real-world 
technical/business projects. The capstone courses are 
supervised by a team mentor. 



Concentration Courses - nine credits 

MSMOT students elect one of three concentrations: 
Management of Design and Manufacturing, Strategic 
Management of Resources, or Management of 
Information Technology. In addition to the required 
courses noted above, students take a minimum of three 
courses from their chosen area of concentration. 

Management of Design and Manufacturing 

DM 405 Supply Chain Design 
DM 407 Planning for Lean Manufactunng 
DM 420 Design for Economy and Reliability 
DM 430 Design for Automation 

Management of Resources 

DM 405 Supply Cham Design 
RD 450 Planning Research & Development 
RD 485 Management of Intellectual Property 
MG 503 Legal and Ethical Environments of 
Business 

Management of Information Technology 

IM 410 Software Engineenng Practices 
IM 400 Database Concepts 
RD 430 Strategic Management with Information 
Technology 

Elective Courses - three credits 

MSMOT students complete their degree requirements 
with one elective course. This may be chosen from 
among any of the courses listed below or from any 
graduate course offered through the University with the 
program director's permission. 

IM 400 Database Concepts 

OM 400 Integrated Business Processes 

MG 400 Organizational Behavior 

MG 500 Managing People for Competitive 

Advantage 
MG 505 Human Resource Strategies 



'Within the MSMOT program, a student may take no more 
than 5 MSMOT-approved courses (15 credits) from the Dolan 
School of Business. 



The Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME) 



23 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 
IN MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING (MSME) 



Introduction 

The MSME program is designed as a course of study to 
provide graduate engineers with a deeper and broader 
understanding of the methods and skills in the area of 
mechanical engineering. For this purpose, the proposed 
program will incorporate knowledge across three ME 
domains, and will take advantage of the master's 
degree programs in Electrical and Computer 
Engineering, Software Engineering, and Management 
of Technology in the School of Engineering. 

The program outcomes are achieved through knowl- 
edge and skills that students gain by virtue of expert 
curhculum design, instruction in an effective learning 
environment, and opportunities for inquiry and profes- 
sional development. Students will have the option to 
specialize in one of the following broad ME domains: 

• Design, Dynamics and Control Systems: This domain 
includes courses in vibrations, distributed systems, 
advanced kinematics and dynamics and control sys- 
tems. 

• Materials, Mechanics, and Manufacturing: This 
domain spans the topics of engineering materials, 
design and manufacturing, structural analysis, finite 
elements, material science, mechanical behavior of 
materials, composite materials. 

• Fluids and Thermal Sciences: This domain includes 
instruction in fluid dynamics, heat transfer and ther- 
modynamics, turbo machinery, heat exchangers, and 
energy conversion 

Students will be able to identify, formulate and solve 
advanced mechanical engineering problems. They will 
also be able to use the techniques, skills, and modern 
analytical and software tools necessary for the mechan- 
ical engineering practice. Sequences of electives, as 
well as a Masters Project/Thesis, will assist in achieving 
the program's learning goals. 



Program Overview 

The aim of the MSME program is to achieve the follow- 
ing basic objectives: 

• Students will be educated in methods of advanced 
engineering analysis, including the mathematical and 
computational skills required for advanced problem 
solving. They will be trained to develop the skills and 
the ability to formulate solutions to problems, to think 
independently and creatively, to synthesize and inte- 




grate information/data, and to work and communicate 
effectively 

Students will be provided with in-depth knowledge in 
the domains of study that will allow them to apply 
innovative techniques to problems and utilize the tools 
they need to focus on new applications. Sequences of 
electives, as well as a Master's thesis, will provide 
depth in their learning experiences. 

Students will avail themselves of a breadth of knowl- 
edge that fosters an awareness of and skills for inter- 
disciplinary approaches to engineering problems 

Undergraduate students in mechanical engineering 
and industrial and manufacturing engineering have 
opportunity to pursue, upon completion of their under- 
graduate studies, a graduate program that would 
allow them broader career paths and leadership roles 
in the ME area. 



Students 

Mechanical engineering is a highly diverse discipline 
that ranges from the aesthetic aspects of design to 
highly technical research and development. The stu- 
dent population for the MSME program has several 
origins. Typical examples are as follows: 

• Engineers and scientists who, responding to the spe- 
cific needs of their industry across the spectrum of 
special domains listed above, need to acquire skills so 
that they may effectively guide the development of 
technologies which will enhance product quality and 
business opportunities. 



24 



The Master of Science In Mechanical Engineering (MSME) 



Engineers and scientists who wish to fulfill their need 
for personal and professional growth in the ME 
domain. 

Engineers who aspire to academic careers and those 
who wish to eventually continue their studies toward a 
Ph.D. degree. 

Engineers aspiring to a career change. 

Current undergraduate engineering students and 
alumni, who desire an opportunity to continue their 
studies for an advanced engineering degree at 
Fairfield University. 



The MSME Curriculum 

The MSME program offers two options for graduation: 
(a) a thesis option which requires 33 credits including 
the two-term thesis, and (b) the non-thesis option which 
requires 36 credit hours. 



Required Courses 

'- '"''- options, the program entails five required cours- 
nely. 



In both 
es, namely 

SW408 

MC400 
ME 425 



Computer programming with Java; cross 
listed in MSSE and MSECE 
Feedback and Control Systems 
Applications of numerical methods to 
engineering problems; cross listed as 
ECE415 
ME 491 Computer Aided Analysis and Design 
ME 420 Readings in ME; students research 

literature, identify and formulate problems 
and methods of investigation, and identify 
ethical issues related to engineering design 



Thesis Option 

Students may choose the thesis option provided they 
earn an A- or better in the Readings class, ME 420, and 
secure the approval of the program director. 

In the event that a student in the thesis track wishes to 
switch to the non-thesis option, the thesis courses that 
were already taken will not count toward fulfilling the 
graduation requirement. 

Core Courses 

The objective of the core courses selected from the 
three domains of the MSME program, is to provide stu- 
dents with areas of in-depth study, which are at the core 
of their major interests and career objectives. These 
major courses are recommended for setting the foun- 
dations for specialization in a functional area of ME. The 
core courses in each of the three domains are as fol- 
lows: 



1. Design, Dynamics and Control Systems: The 

courses in this domain cover the broad areas of 
mechanical systems, dynamic systems and control. 
More specifically the focus includes, but is not limited 
to, the dynamic behavior and control of mechanisms, 
machines, mechanical systems, vibration analysis and 
control, and machine dynamics. Research methods 
include a blend of techniques involving mathematics 
and computer simulation. The courses are: 

ME 410 Vibration Analysis 
ME 411 Advanced Kinematics 
ME 412 Advanced Dynamics 

2. Materials and Manufacturing: The courses in this 
domain focus on solving problems in engineering mate- 
rials and manufacturing, and include kinematics, mate- 
rial behavior, computer integrated design and manufac- 
turing, design for automation, applications in machinery 
and mechanical systems design, development of new 
manufacturing techniques, and operation of manufac- 
turing facilities. These courses are: 

ME 441 Advanced Materials Science 
ME 442 Advanced Mechanics of Materials 
ME 443 Design for Manufacturing 

3. Fluids and Thermal Systems: This domain consid- 
ers the broad areas of fluid dynamics and heat transfer, 
and advanced energy conversion. It includes study of 
conduction, convection, radiation, compressible and 
heated flows, combustion, laminar and turbulent flow. 
Application, to design and analysis, processes and 
devices, high-speed combustion system, fuel cells, and 
heat pipes. The courses offered are: 

ME 451 Advanced Fluid Dynamics 
ME 452 Advanced Heat Transfer 
ME 453 Advanced Energy Conversion 



Elective Courses 

MSME students complete their degree requirements 
with elective courses. These may be chosen from any of 
the courses listed below or from any graduate courses 
offered through the University with the program direc- 
tor's permission. 

ME 413 Road Vehicle Dynamics 

ME 444 Mechanics of Composite Materials 

ME 446 Advanced Computer Aided System Design 

ME 470 Advanced Finite Element Analysis 

ME 490 Advanced Engineering Analysis 

ME 495 Independent Study 

ME 496 Special Projects 

ME 551 Thesis I 

ME 552 Thesis II 



The Master of Science in Software Engineering (MSSE) 



25 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 

IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 

(MSSE) 



Introduction 

The School of Engineering offers a nnaster's degree in 
software engineering ([\/ISSE) as well as graduate-level 
certificate programs in select areas of software engi- 
neering. The MSSE program is intended to serve the 
needs of network administrators, software designers, 
and other information technology professionals. 
Students who do not meet a minimum experience level 
or who have other skill deficiencies will find a number of 
bridge courses available to prepare them for the MSSE 
curriculum demands. 

The certificate programs allow software professionals 
to upgrade their skills in selected areas. Certificate 
program students enroll under "special student" status 
and participate in courses offered through the MSSE 
program, earning credits toward the MSSE degree, 
should they choose to pursue it. Three certificate pro- 
grams are available: Web Applications Development, 
Information Security Technologies, and Network 
Technologies. 



Program Overview 

Engineering education programs seek to impart 
technical, mathematical, and engineering design knowl- 
edge that can be applied to the creative development of 
products, or solutions to problems, that are useful to 
society. The MSSE program emphasizes software as 
the product to be built, recognizing a transformation of 
the national economy that embraces knowledge indus- 
tries as well as traditional manufacturing. 

Software Engineering Studio 

The software engineering program is focused around a 
team driven software engineering studio. In the studio, 
the student experiences the various phases of the soft- 
ware engineering development lifecycle while working 
on a significant software development project. The proj- 
ects are chosen by the faculty. Criteria for projects are 
that they are complex, allow the students to experience 
advanced software engineering topics, and require sev- 
eral semesters for completion. During a student's work 
in the software engineering program he/she must take 
at least one semester in each of the four studio areas 
that include: 

• Requirements gathering and analysis 

• Design and prototyping 

• Implementation 

• Testing and maintenance 




The courses in the software engineering studio are the 
following: 

SW 400 Software Engineering Methods - an explo- 
ration of requirements gathering and system analysis 
and their application to a specific software project. 

SW 401 Software Design Methods - an exploration of 
software design methods and prototyping and their 
application to a specific software project. 

SW 550 Software Capstone Project I - an exploration 
into the continuing implementation of a specific software 
project. 

SW 551 Software Capstone Project II - an exploration 
into the deployment, testing and maintenance of soft- 
ware and the application of these methods to a specific 
software development project. 

In these courses there is a combination of material 
presented by lecture and team lead efforts focused on a 
specific project. 



Specialization Areas 

The MSSE program emphasizes the integration of 
design, implementation, and software engineering skills 
to meet the challenges of developing software systems. 
Specialization areas include: 

• Enterprise Systems and and Web Architecture. 

The focus of this specialization is on architectures 
of software systems, software system design, 
programming languages, system testing, operating 
systems, algorithms, and engineering systems such 
as graphics, image or voice processing. 

• Enterprise Systems Database Architecture. The 

focus of this specialization is on databases, database 
access methods, database design, data mining, 
data warehousing, performance optimization, and 
advanced database topics. 

• Software Development Management. The focus of 
this specialization is on software project planning 



26 



The Master of Science in Software Engineering (l\/ISSE) 




and control, risk identification and management, 
networl< and computer capacity planning, customer/ 
client communication and requirement gathering, 
software quality control and assurance techniques, 
measurement and metrics, people and team skills, and 
managing change. 

• Information Security. Information security involves 
the student in the analysis of potential security 
violations, the design and implementation of counter- 
measures necessary to ensure security, the study of 
data transmission encryption schemes, and discus- 
sions of the social impacts of security methodologies. 

• Network Technology. Students focus on the design 
and implementation of networks and the infra- 
structure needed to support enterprise-level software 
operations. 

Additional Specializations 

In addition, special design and technical program 
courses are offered that focus on specific technical 
needs of industrial and commercial companies in the 
area. Typically these courses are designed to meet 
specific needs of a company. 



The MSSE Curriculum 

MSSE students are required to complete the software 
engineering studio consisting of four courses. They must 
develop the skills necessary to pursue the studio 
through their additional elective coursework. 

In addition, students must be proficient in programming. 
Students in the specializations of Software Development 
Management and Network Technology must be profi- 
cient in at least one programming language. Students in 
the other specializations must be proficient in two pro- 
gramming languages. In general this proficiency would 
be in Visual Basic and one of the languages Java, C-i-i-, 
or C#. The proficiencies would be at an advanced level. 
This can be accomplished either through coursework or 
through employment. 

Students take elective courses in one or more of the 
specializations in which they have an interest, namely: 
system architecture, database architecture, software 
development management, information security, and 
network technology. 

Students may also take elective courses offered in the 
MSMOT and the MSECE programs. 



Prerequisites and Foundation Competencies: 

The MSSE degree requires students to have competen- 
cies that will allow them to pursue graduate coursework. 
Knowledge and/or experience in data structures, 
applications programming, systems analysis and 
design, and mathematics is required. Gaps in knowl- 
edge and experience in these areas can be remedied by 
bridge courses that are offered in the undergraduate 
software engineering program. Before continuing with 
graduate work, students must correct deficiencies suffi- 
ciently to allow them to succeed. 



Retraining - Special Students 

Generally, students who wish to retrain to move from 
a different discipline into software engineering are 
welcome to enroll in the program. They may expect 
to do at least 12 credits of work to catch up in the field. 
For example: Students with no prior programming 
experience would be required to take CS 131 Computer 
Programming I. CS 132 Computer Programming II and 
CS 232 Data Structures, under advisement from the 
program director. The student may also be encouraged 
to take additional non-credit courses during his/her 
graduate work as needed. These additional prerequi- 
sites will be determined on an individual basis. 



The Master of Science in Software Engineering (IVISSE) 



27 



Degree Requirements 



Completion of a minimum of eight three-credit courses 
plus a four-semester, 12-credit software engineering 
studio (36 total credits), as indicated below, comprise 
the graduation requirements for the program. 

Core Courses - Programming as needed 

Students in the Software Development Management 
and Network Technology specialization must be profi- 
cient in one programming language. Students in the 
other specializations must be proficient in two or more 
programming languages. These proficiencies can be 
accomplished either through coursework or through 
employment or external work. The proficiencies must 
be at a level that will allow the student to be successful 
in the software engineering studio. Preparation success 
will be determined by the advisor and the studio 
instructors. 

Software Engineering Studio - 12 credits 

The studio covers the software development lifecycle of 
requirements gathering, requirements analysis, design, 
prototyping, implementation, testing, deployment and 
maintenance. Students are typically organized into 
teams that contribute to a significant software develop- 
ment project. These projects are chosen to advance the 
student's knowledge in topics related to the specializa- 
tion areas. Topics are chosen by the faculty. Students 
consult with their advisors and instructors to determine 
which projects will contribute most to their education and 
are assigned to specific projects. Students may also 
suggest projects if they are of sufficient complexity and 
will advance their knowledge in an area of interest. 

The Studio consists of the following four courses: 

SW 400 Software Engineering Methods 

SW 401 Software Design Methods 

SW 550 Capstone Project I 

SW 551 Capstone Project II 

The results of these projects provide a library of 
case studies, designs, and tools that will be of general 
interest to information technology professionals and 
organizations in the area. 

Specializations and Language Sl<ills - 24 credits 

The technically focused specialization allows profes- 
sionals to develop in-depth knowledge in a technical 
area of interest. It also provides the technical basis for 
work in the Software Engineering Studio. 

Students who have opted for the Software Development 
Management or the Network Technology specialization, 
listed below, must be proficient in at least one program- 
ming language. Students in other specializations will 
be proficient in two programming languages. The 
programming language courses are: 

SW 403 Visual Basic.Net for Programmers I 
SW 408 Java for Programmers I 
SW 409 Java for Programmers II 



SW 427 Object-Oriented Programming with C++ 

SW 499 Algorithms in C# 

SW 506 VisualBasic.Net for Programmers II 



Special Topics 

Special topics courses are offered as student need and 
interest arise. These courses can be used to fulfill a 
portion of the 24 credit non-studio coursework. Students 
may take special topics courses with permission from 
their advisor and the course instructor. Special topics 
courses may have prerequisites and students should 
make sure that they have covered all prerequisites 
before taking these courses. 



a. Specialization in Flnterprise Systems 
and Web Architecture 

This specialization allows professionals to gain a greater 
understanding of the leading technologies for building 
software systems. 

Student work includes the software engineering studio in 
which the student works with a team from the system 
architecture point of view on the various phases of the 
software development life cycle. This includes require- 
ments gathering and analysis, design and prototyping of 
systems, implementation of complex systems, testing of 
software, and software maintenance. 

Coursework outside of the studio focuses upon topics 
important to the system architect such as programming 
languages, web development, graphical user interfaces, 
databases, information security, enterprise systems, 
operating systems, and engineering software such as 
image processing and graphics. The tools used by the 
student are the most up to date tools available such as 
JBoss, Rational Rose, Visual Studio.net, Eclipse, 
WebSphere, Internet Information Server, etc. 

Students working in this specialization are expected to 
have mastered two or more programming languages by 
the time they graduate. 

Courses in this area are: 

SW 406 Web Development I 

SW 41 Enterprise Java 

SW 505 Advanced Database Concepts 

SW 508 Data Warehouse Systems 

SW 518 Data Mining and Business Intelligence 

SW 511 Voice and Signal Processing 

SW 512 Web Development II with ASP.Net 

SW 513 Image Processing 

SW 516 High Performance Database Web 
Applications with ASPNET 



28 



The Master of Science in Software Engineering (!\/ISSE) 



b. Specialization in Enterprise Systems Database 
Architecture 

This specialization allows professionals to gain a 
greater understanding of database architecture and 
design. 

Student work includes the software engineering studio 
in which the student works with a team stressing the 
database architecture point of view. This includes 
requirements gathering and analysis, design and 
prototyping of systems, implementation of complex 
databases, importing of existing data into a new data- 
base, testing of the database with associated software, 
and database maintenance. 

Coursework outside of the studio focuses upon topics in 
database architecture such as database performance 
issues, database clusters, distributed databases, data 
warehousing, data mining, object relational mapping, 
information security, and web based databases. 

Students working in this specialization are expected to 
have mastered two or more programming languages by 
the time that they graduate. 

Courses in this area are: 

SW402 Database Concepts 
SW 505 Advanced Database Concepts 
SW 508 Data Warehouse Systems 
SW 516 High Performance Database Web 
Applications with ASP.NET 



c. Specialization in Software Development 
Management 

Student work includes the software engineering studio 
in which the student works with a team from the project 
management point of view. This includes managing the 
phases of requirements gathering and analysis, design 
and prototyping of systems, implementation of complex 
systems, testing of software, and software mainte- 
nance. 

Courses can be selected from the MSMOT curriculum. 
Students gain knowledge and skills related to the 
evaluation, selection, and management of new informa- 
tion technologies that are significant to the long-term 
viability of an organization. 

Students working in this specialization are expected to 
have mastered one or more programming languages by 
the time they graduate. 

Courses in this area are: 

SW 520 Project Management 

SW 420 Technology Management 

SW 430 Strategic Management with Information 

Technology 
SW 460 Leadership in Technical Enterprise 
SW 502 Software Engineering Practices 
SW 598 Computer and Network Capacity 

Management 



d. Specialization in Information Security 

Coursework and lab work in this specialization offer 
an analysis of potential secunty violations and counter- 
measures, guide the student through encryption 
schemes of transmission in web based technologies, 
and examines social engineering methods in informa- 
tion security. 

Students working in this specialization are expected to 
have mastered two or more programming languages by 
the time they graduate. 

Courses in this area are: 

SW 530 Information Security and Social Engineering 

Practices 
SW 531 Applications and Data Security 
SW 535 Internet Technologies and Data 

Transactions 
SW 599 Information Security Measures and 

Countermeasures 



e. Specialization in Network Technology 

Students work in networking laboratories and in class- 
room settings to get hands-on experience with network 
operating systems, routers and switches, local and wide 
area network topologies, and to develop the skills to 
perform network capacity planning and performance 
monitoring. This course of study combines vendor 
independent concepts and analytical skills development 
with work utilizing state of the art equipment from 
Cisco and Microsoft and other important vendors in the 
networking industry. 

This coursework provides students with all the course 
materials needed to prepare for the well-respected 
Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA) creden- 
tial. Students completing SW 404, SW 596, and 
SW 597 are eligible to take the Cisco Certification 
Exams and are provided the opportunity for a voucher 
to cover the cost of that certification test. 

Students working in this specialization are expected to 
have mastered one or more programming languages by 
the time they graduate. 

Courses in this area are: 

SW 404 Network Concepts 
SW 596 Network Routing and Switching 
SW 597 LAN/WAN Engineering 
SW 598 Computer and Network Capacity 
Management 



The Master of Science in Software Engineering (t\/ISSE) 



29 



Elective Courses 



Graduate students can take as additional electives the 
following courses from the junior and senior level under- 
graduate curriculum with the addition of a major project 
implemented under the supervision of the course 
instructor. Permission of the graduate advisor and the 
course instructor is required. 

CS 331 Operating Systems 

CS 342 Theory of Computation 

CS 353 Principles of Compiler Design 

CS 354 Theory of Programming Languages 

CS 355 Artificial Intelligence 

CS 391 Cognitive Science Seminar 

Elective courses offered jointly through the School of 
Engineering MSMOT program and the Dolan School of 
Business MBA program can help students attain their 
career objectives. These include: 

Design Skills 

SW 582 Creative Design and Development of 

Technology 
SW 585 Human Resources Strategies 
SW 583 Supply Chain Management Concepts 
SW 584 Supply Chain Validation 

Engineering Management Skills 

SW 581 Planning for Lean Manufacturing 

SW 590 Accounting and Decision-Making 

SW 592 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business 

SW 594 Leadership in Technological Enterprise 



Graduate Certificate Programs 

The following certificates of advanced study programs 
are also available. To earn a certificate, students must 
complete all listed courses for the specified certificate. 

Web Applications Development Certificate 

SW 403 VisualBasic.Net for Programmers I 

OR 
SW 406 Web Development I 
SW 506 Visual Basic. Net for Programmers II 
SW 512 Web Development II with ASPNet 
SW 516 High Performance Database Web 

Applications with ASPNET 



Information Security Certificate 

SW 530 Information Security and Social Engineering 

Practices 
SW 531 Applications and Data Security 
SW 535 Internet Technologies and Data 

Transactions 
SW 599 Information Security Measures and 

Countermeasures 



Network Technology Certificate 

SW 404 Network Concepts 
SW 596 Network Routing and Switching 
SW 597 UN/WAN Engineering 
SW 598 Computer and Network Capacity 
Management 

Students completing SW 404 and SW 596 are eligible 
to take the Cisco Certification Exams and are provided 
the opportunity for a voucher to cover the cost of that 
certification test. 



30 



The Master of Science In Electrical and Computer Engineering (MSECE) 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER 
ENGINEERING (MSECE) 



Introduction 

Electrical and computer engineering at Fairfield 
University combines the study of software and hard- 
ware. Common tasks are writing embedded software for 
real-time microcontrollers, designing VLSI chips, work- 
ing with analog sensors, designing mixed signal circuit 
boards, and designing computer-based systems. 

An ECE student can focus on topics that include digital 
logic systems, radio frequency or power electronics or 
on the interaction between software programs and the 
underlying hardware architecture. 

The MSECE program takes advantage of the School of 
Engineering's master's degree programs in software 
engineering and management of technology. As a result, 
students gain a sense of the economic and business val- 
ues needed to employ technology to serve society's 
needs. 



Program Overview 

The MSECE program provides students with the know- 
ledge and skills to innovate and lead in their discipline in 
the framework of research and development in academ- 
ic institutions, the industrial workplace, research labora- 
tories, or service organizations.. The basic objectives of 
the MSECE program include the following; 



1. 



2. 



Students receive the tools they need to take the lead 
in creating next generation technologies using fun- 
damental design disciplines. Sequences of elec- 
tives, as well as a master's thesis, provide depth in 
their learning experiences. 

Students gain exposure to the high-tech areas of 
electrical and computer engineering, including sys- 
tem and product engineering, hardware and soft- 
ware design, embedded systems, communications, 
control systems, computer architecture, and visuali- 
zation and multimedia systems. Students have the 
opportunity to become skilled in creating unique 
object-oriented designs. State of the art facilities 
available in the School of Engineering, and close 
interactions with industry, assist in those tasks. 

The MSECE program provides undergraduate stu- 
dents with the opportunity to pursue a graduate 
degree program that would allow them broader 
career paths, ultimately leading to leadership roles. 



Students 

Electrical and computer engineering embodies the sci- 
ence and technology of design, implementation, and 
maintenance of software and hardware components of 
modern electrical, electronics, and computing systems. 
This discipline has emerged from the traditional fields of 
electrical engineering and computer science. Hence, 
the student population for the proposed program has 
several origins. Typical examples include the following: 

1. Engineers and scientists who, responding to the 
specific needs of their industry across the spectrum 
of electrical and computer engineering domains, 
need to acquire skills to effectively guide the devel- 
opment technologies that will enhance product qual- 
ity and business opportunities. 

2. Engineers and scientists who wish to fulfill their 
needs for personal and professional growth and 
achieve entrepreneurship in the IT domains. 

3. Engineers who aspire to academic careers and wish 
to eventually continue their studies toward a Ph.D. 
in electrical or computer engineering. 

4. Engineers aspiring to a career change. 

5. Undergraduate engineering students and alumni 
with B.S. degrees, who seek an opportunity to con- 
tinue their studies for an advanced engineering 
degree at Fairfield University. 

In addition to mathematics and science, MSECE gradu- 
ates have a solid foundation in electronics, logic design, 
micro-devices, computer organization and architecture, 
and networking, as well as an understanding of soft- 
ware design, data structures, algorithms, and operating 
systems. 



Graduates are employed in several industries, including 
the computer, aerospace, telecommunications, power, 
manufacturing, defense, and electronics industries. 
They can expect to design high-tech devices ranging 
from tiny microelectronic integrated-circuit chips to 
powerful systems that use those chips and efficient 
telecommunication systems that interconnect those 
systems. Applications include consumer electronics; 
advanced microprocessors; peripheral equipment; 
and systems for portable, desktop, and client/server 
computing; communications devices; distributed com- 
puting environments such as local and wide area 
networks, wireless networks. Internets, Intranets; 
embedded computer systems; and a wide array of com- 
plex technological systems such as power generation 
and distribution systems and modern computer- 
controlled processing and manufacturing plants. 



The Master of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering (MSECE) 

The MSECE Curriculum 

Students in the MSECE program must complete either 
34 credits, including a thesis, or a non-thesis option 
comprising 37 credits. Four required courses build a 
foundation; students then choose a core area among 
nine domains of knowledge and skills to provide depth 
and specialization in a functional area of electrical and 
computer engineering. Upon admission, students meet 
with an advisor to prepare a plan of study that will lead 
to a master's degree in electrical and computer engi- 
neering in the most time-effective manner. 



Required courses - 18 to 21 credits with thesis 

• SW408 Java I 

• SW409 Java II (For CE students only) 

• ECE 415 Engineering Applications of Numerical 

Methods 

• ECE 420 Readings in Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 



31 




Thesis Option 

ECE 550, ECE 551, and ECE 552 if necessary 

Students may choose the thesis option provided they 
earn an A- or better in the Readings class, ME 420, and 
secure the approval of the program director. 

In the event that a student in the thesis track wishes to 
switch to the non-thesis option, the thesis courses that 
were already taken will not count toward fulfilling the 
graduation requirement. 



Required courses - 18 credits, no thesis 

Core Courses and Electives 

Nine domains of knowledge and skills, shown below, 
specify available tracks and electives in the MSECE 
program. This portion of the program provides students 
with areas of study that are at the core of their major 
interest and career objectives. One domain from the list 
below is required. 

The courses in the nine domains are as follows: 

1. Electronic product design. The courses in this 
domain cover the nature and properties of materials 
used in electronic devices and, in particular, manage- 
ment of the thermal environment for the safe operation 
of the devices. Seven credits. 

ECE 405 Electronic Materials 

ECE 425 Thermal Management of Micro-devices 

ECE510L Product Design Lab 



2. The architecture of microelectronics. The courses 
in this domain consider the design of analog, digital, 
and mixed-mode integrated circuits, along with the 
methods of fabricating high density interconnection 
structures for manufacturing microelectronic assem- 
blies: thick films, thin films, and printed circuit boards. 
Seven credits. 

ECE 435 High Density Interconnection Structures 
ECE 445 Integrated Circuit Design 
ECE515L Microelectronics Lab 



3. Systems Design. This domain includes studies of 
the fundamentals of the analysis of linear and nonlinear 
electric circuits. Seven credits. 

ECE 455 Sensor Design and Applications 
ECE 465 Nonlinear Control Systems 
ECE 520L System Design Lab 

4. Communications Systems. This domain considers 
the generation and transmission of electromagnetic 
waves. Structures used in microwave propagation, 
including transmission lines, waveguides, resonators, 
and antennas are also considered. 10 credits. 

ECE 475 Microwave Structures 

ECE 480 Wireless Systems 

ECE 485 Digital Communications 

ECE 525L Communications Lab 



5. Power and Power Electronics. The courses in this 
domain consider the design and application of electron- 
ic circuits related to power generation, conversion and 
distribution. Seven credits. 

ECE 495 Power Generation and Distribution 
ECE 505 Advanced Power Electronics 
ECE 530L Power Electronics Lab 



32 



Course Descriptions 



6. Signal Processing. The courses in this domain cover 
one-dimensional digital signal processing such as audio 
processing (CD players, electronic music synthesizers, 
personal computer sound cards) and two-dimensional 
processing such as image processing (image and video 
processing in consumer equipment, machine inspection, 
robotics, automation, remote sensing, security, and 
medical imaging). Six credits. 

ECE 410 Voice and Signal Processing 
ECE 430 Image Processing 

7. Scientific Visualization. This domain examines the 
process of converting scientific data into a visual form to 
improve understanding of the data implications. 
Applications include the visualization of fluid flow in fluid 
dynamics, the communication of ecological data, data in 
computational biology (blood clotting, chemical kinetics, 
electrical waves in muscles and the brain), and compu- 
tational physics in such areas as high-energy astro- 
physics, cosmology, and high energy physics. Students 
learn to use the power of graphics boards for interactive 
visualization and rendering techniques. Six credits. 

ECE 440 Computer Graphics 
ECE 450 Computer Animation 

8. Embedded Systems. The embedded systems 
domain is critical to the creation and deployment of 
smart systems, which are today embedded in networks 
that use microchips and computers. Understanding the 
process by which software and hardware mechanisms 
allow computations and communications with networks 
of computers is crucial to this domain. Six credits. 

ECE 460 Network Programming 
ECE 470 Network Embedded Systems 

9. Enterprise Computing. The enterprise computing 
domain addresses the needs of companies based on 
information technology for their successful operations 
by providing expertise in server-side application devel- 
opment. This is the enabling technology for deploying 
business services on the Web; it is further in accord with 
the new model of Internet services where Web content 
is replicated in different geographic locations on the 
Internet for faster accessibility by Web users and Web- 
based technologies. Six credits. 

SW 402 Database Management 
SW410 Enterprise Java 



Course Descriptions 



MSMOT 

Students in the MSMOT Program are required to com- 
plete 12 courses (36 credits). This includes six required 
courses, three core courses, two semesters of the 
Capstone course and one elective. Upon earning twen- 
ty-seven credits, students are qualified to take the first 
of the two Capstone courses. The three core courses 
are selected from the areas of concentration which are 
(a) Management of Information Technologies, (b) 
Management of Design and Manufacturing, and (c) 
Strategic Management of Resources. The 12 courses 
should be taken within a five-year period to obtain the 
degree. 

Bridge Courses 

Students without prior formal knowledge and experi- 
ence in probability and statistics, computer program- 
ming, and accounting, are required to complete 
courses BR 1, BR 2 and BR 3 as early as possible. 

BR 1 - Probability and Statistics 

This bridge requirement may be satisfied by an under- 
graduate level course in statistics and probability given 
by any accredited institution of higher learning. A course 
at Fairfield University recommended for this bridge is 
MA 217. (See undergraduate catalog or SOE website 
for a description.) 

BR 2 - Computer Programming 

This bridge requirement may be satisfied by an under- 
graduate level course in a programming language given 
by any accredited institution of higher teaming. A course 
at Fairfield University recommended for this bridge is 
CS 131 Computer Programming I. (See undergraduate 
catalog or SOE website for a description.) 

BR 3 - Financial Accounting 

This bridge requirement may be satisfied by an under- 
graduate-level course in financial accounting given by 
an accredited institution of higher learning. At Fairfield 
University, AC 400, Financial Accounting is recom- 
mended. (See the graduate catalog, Dolan School of 
Business, or SOE website for a description.) 



Required Courses 



AC 500 Accounting for Decision-Making 

This course emphasizes the use of accounting informa- 
tion by managers for decision-making. It is designed to 
provide managers with the skills necessary to interpret 
analytical information supplied by the financial and man- 
agerial accounting systems. The financial accounting 
focus is on understanding the role of profitability, 
liquidity, solvency and capital structure in the manage- 
ment of the company. The managerial accounting focus 
is on the evaluation of organizational performance of 
cost, profit and investment centers. (Prerequisite: 



Course Descriptions 



33 



AC 400 or an equivalent course in financial accounting.) 
Three credits. 

CP 551 Capstone I - Project Definition and 
Planning 

In this first semester of the capstone course, students 
form project groups, conceive technical approaches to 
problem solutions, and develop detailed plans and a 
schedule for project activities. Students execute the 
planning process using appropriate professional soft- 
ware such as Microsoft Project. The course includes 
software refresher lectures early in the semester. 
Students in each team produce a detailed project plan 
defining the work to be done (task descriptions), the 
task/subtask organizational structure, task responsibili- 
ties (assigning who does what), the task execution 
schedule (using PERT and Gantt charts as managing 
tools), areas of risk and risk abatement concepts, and 
provide an explanation of the value of the work to be 
performed to fulfill the objectives. Three credits. 

CP 552 Capstone II - Project Execution and 
Results 

The second semester of the capstone course concerns 
implementation of the project plan developed in the 
prior semester. This typically includes hardware fabrica- 
tion, software development supporting analytical work, 
detailed design, experimental studies, system integra- 
tion, and validation testing, all of which serve as proof of 
meeting project objectives in data and functional 
demonstrations. Project teams submit a final report for 
grading and make a formal presentation to faculty, men- 
tors, and interested personnel from associated indus- 
tries. Three credits. 

DM 460 Project Management 

This course focuses on the general methodology of 
managing a technology project from conception to com- 
pletion, with an emphasis on the functions, roles, and 
responsibilities of the project manager. Students learn 
principles and techniques related to controlling 
resources (people, materials, equipment, contractors, 
and cash flow) in the context of completing a technolo- 
gy project on time, within budget, and within the pro- 
ject's stated technical requirements. Through group and 
individual activities, including case study review and 
project simulation, students apply project management 
tools and techniques, and assume the roles of project 
managers who must address typical problems that 
occur during the life cycle of a project. Three credits. 

RD 460 Leadership in Technical Enterprise 

This course introduces major leadership theories and 
explores the issues and challenges associated with 
leadership of technical organizations. The course inte- 
grates readings, experiential exercises, and contempo- 
rary leadership research theory. Participants investigate 
factors that influence effective organizational leadership 
as well as methods of enhancing their own leadership 
development. The course prepares executives, supervi- 
sors, and managers to master the complex interperson- 
al, social, political, and ethical dynamics required for 
leading modern organizations. Three credits. 



GK415 Information Systems 

This course offers insights into the capabilities of mod- 
ern software and computing systems, allowing prospec- 
tive technology managers to discriminate between 
effective and ineffective applications of software and 
network systems - considerations essential to manag- 
ing businesses that depend upon efficient data and 
information processing. The course covers inputs, 
outputs, storage, transmission media and information 
processing, and networking. Three credits. 

MG 508 Strategic Management of Technology 

and Innovation: The Entrepreneurial Firm 

This course begins by presenting cutting-edge concepts 
and applications so that students understand the 
dynamics of innovation, the construction of a well-craft- 
ed innovation strategy, and the development of well- 
designed processes for implementing the innovation 
strategy. It then focuses on the building of an entrepre- 
neurial organization as a critical core competency in the 
innovation process. Concurrent with this, it focuses 
on the development and support of the internal entre- 
preneur or intrapreneur as part of the process of 
developing organizational core competencies that build 
competitive comparative advantages that, in turn, allow 
the firm to strategically and tactically compete in the 
global marketplace. Topics explored include technology 
brokering, lead users, disruptive technologies and the 
use of chaos and complexity theory in the strategic 
planning process. Three credits. 

MG 584 Global Competitive Strategy 

This course considers the formulation of effective policy 
and accompanying strategy actions, and the manage- 
ment of such policies and actions. It examines the role 
of the general manager in this process and presents the 
diversified issues and problems the management of a 
business firm may be required to consider and solve in 
strategic planning. This course also examines the prob- 
lems and tasks of strategy implementation and the 
general manager's function of achieving expected 
objectives and establishing new ones to assure the 
continuity of the business organization. Students are 
required to prepare a business plan as part of this 
course. Three credits. 



The following section presents descriptions of 
courses that may be used to fulfill core require- 
ments or serve as electives. 

DM 405 Supply Chain Design 

This course deals with the optimization of process 
arrays in a supply chain by means of modeling. The 
term "supply chain" refers to all the resources required 
in moving material through a network of manufacturing 
processes, quality assurance measures, maintenance, 
and customer interfacing to produce, deliver, and main- 
tain a product. These are modeled by instructed tech- 
niques to create a simulation of this chain, permitting an 
analyst to design the supply chain and to predict its 
performance - a process accomplished prior to com- 



34 



Course Descriptions 



mitting investments in procurement and fabrication, 
thereby permitting valid estimations of the quality of 
critical functions. Such a system offers three general 
benefits: a) it may be used to achieve an optimized 
design; b) it may be used in solving production expan- 
sion needs; and c) it can be used to locate and correct 
problems in an existing manufacturing system. Three 
credits. 

DM 407 Planning for Lean Manufacturing 

In this course, students will learn the significance and 
ramifications of the idiomatic term "Lean Manufacturing" 
and what advantages it provides to a manufacturing 
company. They will learn how to perceive the cross 
functional processes within such a company, in terms of 
"who does what" and to understand the process as to 
how general objectives, defined by corporate man- 
agers, are translated into specific actions involving facil- 
ities, equipment, new skills and process improvements 
that must be achieved. Other issues, specifically cov- 
ered in lecture include; (1) statistical segmentation of 
demand, (2) production and inventory considerations of 
facility and product design needed in achieving a true 
lean manufacturing condition, (3) use of statistical seg- 
mentation for make-to-stock, make-to-order, and make- 
to-plan conditions, (4) introduction to replenishment 
techniques including; level loading, rhythm cycles and 
considerations for safety and cycle stock, and (5) use of 
postponement strategies in optimizing inventory control. 
Three credits. 

DM 420 Design for Economy and Reliability 

Considerations of reliability permit a product to achieve 
a desired performance throughout its service life, there- 
by satisfying those who have purchased it. Careful 
thought and design produce reliability and economy of 
manufacture. This course instructs the prospective 
technology manager in the considerations leading to 
creation of cost-effective products of quality and 
presents; (1) the Total Design method, (2) concurrent 
engineering and the effective use of design reviews, 
(3) quality function deployment, (4) cost structures 
and models, (5) materials selection and economics, 
(6) robust design validation techniques and the Taguchi 
method, and (7) the Fault Tree and its use as a diag- 
nostic aid in design validation. Three credits. 

DM 430 Management of Design for Automation 

This course addresses the need for inherent flexibility in 
modern manufacturing systems that must accommo- 
date changing product lines through the application of 
robotics and other forms of programmable automation, 
and the need to provide rapid, accurate communica- 
tions between business managers, design engineers, 
and product managers. Effective product design 
requires a basic understanding of the manufacturing 
system being used in production including; mechanical 
design of all material manipulators and material han- 
dling equipment, design compatibility between all parts 
and the automation equipment considered for use. 
Coursework dealing with these issues includes; 1) the 
organization and scheduling of manufacturing process- 



es, 2) the principles of programmable automation, 3) 
the theory and application of Boothroyd's design for 
assembly methodology, 4) process cost estimation 
techniques, 5) methods for judging the soundness of 
investments in manufacturing equipment that a specific 
design may require, 6) market implications and the 
effect of design features on sales revenue and product 
market life, and 7) social impacts. Three credits. 

RD 485 Management of Intellectual Property 

Intellectual property may exist in many forms and often 
goes unrecognized as a part of the wealth of corpora- 
tions when actually it can represent the most valuable 
property that a corporation holds. This course instructs 
students in how to recognize the different types of intel- 
lectual property and the different forms of protection that 
may be used to protect its loss to competitive agencies. 
In addition to enlightenment as to what form it may take, 
the students are instructed in how to determine its mon- 
etary value and how to use it to advance important com- 
pany objectives such as increasing sales volume and 
how to eto establish policies and methods to protect it 
from theft by competitive firms. Throughout the course 
the students will learn how to address the legal issues 
surrounding the rights of ownership and the existence 
of infringements. The students will also learn how to 
recognize the specific issues that distinguish an inven- 
tion (or any other form of intellectual property) from its 
competition, causing it to obtain an edge in the market 
place. Three credits. 

RD 450 Planning, Research, and Development 

This course examines the question; How can the 
wealth-generating potential of a new concept - one 
that is in its early developmental stages and about 
which there remain unknowns and uncertainties - be 
quantified? The course first looks at the mechanics and 
assumptions of a commonly used approach, such 
as discounted cash flow and net present value, and 
examines the limitation of this approach in evaluating 
breakthrough innovations. It then examines modern 
tools for quantitatively evaluating proposals to commer- 
cialize new product concepts with high levels of uncer- 
tainty due to a lack of experience in manufacturing. The 
course considers the "option structures" concepts to 
determine value creation potential, and illustrates how 
this option approach builds communication between the 
engineer and financial analyst. Students concerned with 
investment justifications and funding advanced devel- 
opment of new products find this course particularly 
valuable. Three credits. 

RD 430 Strategic Management with Information 
Technology 

This course is an examination of the major trends in 
information technology and their impact on organiza- 
tional structures and business strategies of companies. 
Specific technologies discussed are; the Internet, elec- 
tronic commerce, enterprise systems, and the conflu- 
ence of telecommunications media. Opportunities and 
risks are discussed, associated with implementing the 
new technologies, adopting new ways to do business, 



Course Descriptions 



35 



and revising organizational structures to optimize the 
use of new technology. Examples are discussed which 
are driven by the Internet as well as interesting new 
internal business models which have been enabled by 
new technologies. In this course the students learn how 
to construct a long term business plan incorporating the 
issues noted above. Three credits. 

IM 400 Database Concepts 

This course discusses the principles of database sys- 
tems as well as data independence and rational data 
models, and reviews data structures including arrays, 
stacks, lists, trees, and graphical forms. Additional 
topics include language considerations and the archi- 
tecture of distributed database systems; efficient data 
distribution, query processing and optimization, and 
distributed synchronization; and back-end database 
processors and servers for local area networks. The 
Oracle system provides an example of the schema 
objects of a typical relational database management 
system. Demonstrations include the application of SQL 
and PUSQL (Oracle's procedural enhancement to 
conventional programming) to establish connections to 
Oracle and understand and apply the basics of data- 
base administration. Three credits. 

IM 410 Software Engineering Practices 

This course focuses on the formal software develop- 
ment process and the application of engineering man- 
agement concepts to software development. Topics 
include concepts of business process engineering, 
application of concurrent engineering techniques, and 
integration of quality and maintainability principles in the 
software development process. Other engineering man- 
agement techniques include project planning and con- 
trol, risk identification and management, customer/client 
communication and requirements gathering, software 
quality assurance techniques, measurement and met- 
rics, people and team skills, and managing change. 
This course helps MOT students perform the quality 
control function and value analysis for software pro- 
duced either in-house or subcontracted to another com- 
pany. Three credits. 

IIVI415 Software Engineering Method 

This course presents the concepts, skills, methodolo- 
gies, techniques, tools, and perspectives needed by the 
system analyst to successfully determine a systems 
requirement. In order to ensure good organization and 
planning skills for successful execution, project man- 
agement skills in terms of information systems are 
examined. Depending upon project size and complexi- 
ties, different development life cycles are compared. 
This course helps MOT students perform the quality 
control function and value analysis for software pro- 
duced either in-house or subcontracted to another com- 
pany. Three credits. 

IM 425 Software Design Methods 

Object oriented analysis and design is the principal 
industry-proven method for developing reliable, modu- 
lar testing programs and systems. Consistent use of 



00 techniques leads to shorter development life cycles, 
increased productivity and reduced system mainte- 
nance costs. The course is designed to introduce devel- 
opers to the fundamental concepts of object orientation. 
Students learn the essentials of classes, objects, inher- 
itance, and polymorphism. Students also learn to model 
problems in the object-oriented fashion. Through the 
use of case studies and project work, which has the 
student gradually building a large design specification, 
students achieve an understanding of how object ori- 
ented applications are designed and built. This course 
helps MOT students perform the quality control function 
and value analysis for software produced in-house or 
subcontracted to another company. Three credits. 

IM 430 Network Concepts 

This course covers network components, network archi- 
tecture, and operating systems, including cabling, 
wiring hubs, file servers, bridges, routers, and network 
interface cards. It discusses network software and 
hardware configurations and demonstrates network 
concepts such as configuring protocol stacks and con- 
necting a personal computer to a network. The course 
examines the seven-layer OSI-model and relates it to 
the current industry standard, TCP/IP, identifies sources 
of network overhead, introduces WAN architecture, with 
its implications for the developer and network security, 
discusses basic operating system architecture and its 
integration with the network, including operating system 
basic functions such as resource management and 
interfaces, and network-related functions such as multi- 
tasking, security, and authorization. Lab included. Three 
credits. 

OM 400 Integrated Business Processes 

Process management is concerned with the design and 
control of processes that transform inputs (such as 
labor and capital) into finished goods and services. 
Course topics include process mapping, quality man- 
agement and control, capacity planning, supply chain 
management, and operations strategies. The course 
uses case studies to show how concepts and models 
presented in lectures in lectures and readings apply to 
real-world business situations. Three credits. 

MG 500 Managing People for Competitive 
Advantage 

This course focuses on effectively managing people in 
organizations by emphasizing the critical links between 
strategy, leadership, organizational change, and human 
resource management. The course assists students 
from every concentration including finance, marketing, 
information systems, and accounting to become leaders 
who can motivate and mobilize their people to focus on 
strategic goals. Topics include the strategic importance 
of people leading organizational change, corporate 
social responsibility, implementing successful mergers 
and acquisitions, and fundamentals of human resource 
practices. Discussions interweave management theory 
and real world practice. Class sessions are a combina- 
tion of case discussions, experiential exercises, and 
lectures. Three credits. 



36 



Course Descriptions 



MG 505 Human Resource Strategies 

This course conceptualizes "human resource strate- 
gies" in the broadest sense. The central goal of this 
course is to assist students in becoming better man- 
agers of people: better bosses, better leaders, better 
motivators, and more effective employee-agents. 
Students learn the basic and best practices in several 
functional areas of employee management (including 
staffing, performance evaluation, training and develop- 
ment compensation, work design, and labor relations), 
their nexus to organizational performance and their 
interconnections. On the micro-level, it encourages stu- 
dents to develop and refine strategies that will strength- 
en their personal model of employee management. 
(Prerequisite: MG 500.) Three credits. 

MK 400 Marketing IVIanagement 

This course examines analytical and managerial tech- 
niques that apply to marketing functions with an empha- 
sis on the development of a conceptual framework nec- 
essary to plan, organize, direct, and control the product 
and strategies needed for promotion, distribution and 
pricing of a firm's products. The course also considers 
the relationship of marketing to other units within a firm. 
Three credits. 

MG 503 Legal and Ethical Environments of 
Business 

This course helps students become more responsible 
and effective managers when involved in the gray areas 
that call for insightful judgment and action. Students 
develop skills in logical reasoning, argument and incor- 
poration of legal, social, and ethical considerations into 
decision-making. The course teaches the importance of 
legal and ethical business issues and enables students 
to make a difference in their organizations by engaging 
in reasoned consideration of the normative actions of 
the firm. Using the case study method, the course pro- 
vides an overview of current topics, including the legal 
process, corporate governance, employee rights and 
responsibilities, intellectual property and technology, 
and the social responsibility of business to its various 
stakeholders. Three credits. 



Tlie following courses may be used for electives: 

IM 420 Visual Basic.Net 

This course provides an introduction to visual program- 
ming using Visual Basic.Net. Students learn to create 
applications using Windows forms and Web forms, and 
learn about Microsoft. Net, Visual Studio. Net, classes 
and objects, Windows forms, exception handling, 
debugging, interoperability with COM components, and 
basic data access using ADO. Net. Students complete 
this course under-standing how Visual Basic.Net inter- 
acts with the Net framework and will be able to build 
forms, add and manipulate controls, write procedures 
and functions, and put forms and code together to build 
Windows applications. In addition, students learn to 
access data via data bound controls and ADO.net. This 
course is intended to instruct in the developing of sys- 
tems for the Windows environment. Three credits. 



MG 400 Organizational Behavior 

This course examines the micro-level organizational 
behavior theories as applied to actual organizational 
settings. Topics include: motivation, leadership, job 
design, interpersonal relations, group dynamics, com- 
munication processes, organizational politics, career 
development, and strategies for change at the individual 
and group levels. The course uses an experimental for- 
mat to provide students with a simulated practical 
understanding of these processes in their respective 
organizations. Three credits. 



Course Descriptions 
MSSE 



SW 400 Software Engineering Methods 

This course covers the concepts, skills, methodologies, 
techniques, tools, and perspectives needed by the sys- 
tem analyst to successfully determine systems require- 
ments. To ensure good organizational and planning 
skills for successful execution, project management 
skills in terms of information systems are examined. 
Depending on project size and complexity, different 
development life cycles are compared. Three credits. 

SW 401 Software Design Methods 

Object-oriented analysis and design is the principal 
industry-proven method for developing reliable, modu- 
lar, testable programs and systems. Consistent use of 
GO techniques leads to shorter development life cycles, 
increased productivity and reduced system mainte- 
nance costs. This course is designed to introduce 
developers to the fundamental concepts of object orien- 
tation. Students learn the essentials of classes, objects, 
inheritance, and polymorphism. Students also learn to 
model problems in an object-oriented fashion. Through 
the use of case studies and project work that has the 
student gradually building a large design specification, 
students will achieve an understanding of how object- 
oriented applications are designed and built. Three 
credits. 

SW 402 Database Concepts 

This course focuses on the steps required to build and 
maintain the database infrastructure for client/server 
applications. It covers physical design and implementa- 
tion of the database; the use of the database to meet 
the informational needs of a client/server system; and 
the installation, operation and maintenance of the 
RDBMS software. Specific topics include Structured 
Query Language, utilities provided by the vendor, the 
use of an RDBMS, backup and recovery of data, and 
security and controls. Students perform a number of 
hands-on exercises using an RDBMS running on 
Windows 2000. Microsoft SQL Server or Oracle is the 
software vehicle for lectures and lab exercises. The 
course is intended for application programmers and 
database designers in a client/server environment. Lab 
included. Three credits. 



Course Descriptions 



37 





1 

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« 



SW 403 Visual Basic. Net for Programmers I 

This course provides an introduction to visual program- 
ming using Visual Basic. Net. Students learn to create 
applications using Windows forms and learn about 
Microsoft.Net, Visual Studio. Net, classes and objects, 
exception handling, debugging, XML data files, and 
basic data access using ADO. Net. Students complete 
this course understanding how Visual Basic. Net inter- 
acts with the .Net framework and will be able to build 
forms, add and manipulate controls, write procedures 
and functions, and put forms and code together to build 
Windows applications. In addition, students learn to 
access data via data bound controls and ADO. Net. The 
course is intended for designers and programmers who 
are developing systems in the Windows environment. 
Lab included. Three credits. 

SW 404 Network Concepts 

This course covers network components, network archi- 
tecture, and operating systems, including cabling, 
wiring hubs, file servers, bridges, routers, and network 
interface cards. It discusses network software and 
hardware configurations and demonstrates network 
concepts such as configuring protocol stacks and con- 
necting a personal computer to a network. The course 
examines the seven-layer OSI-model and relates it to 
the current industry standard, TCP/IP, identifies sources 
of network overhead, introduces WAN architecture, with 
its implications for the developer and network security, 
discusses basic operating system architecture and its 
integration with the network, including operating system 
basic functions such as resource management and 
interfaces, and network-related functions such as multi- 
tasking, security, and authorization. Note: Students who 
have completed the Cisco Academy CCNA Course of 
study. Part I, will have been exposed to all topics to 
prepare for the exam toward their Cisco Certified 
Network Associate certification (CCNA). Students seek- 
ing to complete the Cisco Academy CCNA series may 
do so by completing SW 404, SW 596 Network Routing 
and Switching and SW 597 LAN/WAN Engineering. Lab 
included. Three credits. 

SW 406 Web Development I 

This course introduces the student to developing appli- 
cations for use on the World Wide Web. Students learn 
basic n-tier concepts for designing distributed applica- 



tions and gain hands-on experience through the 
construction of web page based applications. The 
course covers concepts that allow communication over 
the web. This includes designing and authoring web 
pages, markup languages, the client side document 
object model, making web pages dynamic on the client 
side, client communication with a web sen/er, server 
software, server side programming, distributing server 
side functionality, sen/er side connections to databases, 
and web services. Three credits. 

SW 408 Java for Programmers I 

This programming course introduces Java fundamen- 
tals to experienced programmers. Topics include the 
Java elements: objects, classes, variables, methods, 
syntax, reserved words, data types, operators, control 
structures, and container data structures. The course 
views object-oriented programming as integral, teach- 
ing it throughout. Accordingly, it includes the concepts of 
encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, packages, 
interfaces, and inner classes. The course teaches 
screen design using classes and graphics from Sun's 
Application Programming Interface and includes data 
handling concepts such as input from the keyboard, out- 
put to the screen, input from files and output to files. The 
course also introduces the concept of multi-threading in 
preparation for follow-up studies. Lab included. 
(Prerequisite: significant programming experience or 
CS 132 or CS 134.) Typically offered fall term annually. 
Three credits. 

SW 409 Java for Programmers II 

This advanced topic Java programming course covers 
advanced threading, nested references, design pat- 
terns, introspection, I/O, persistence, and advanced API 
topics such as swing, reflection, graphics, JDBC, etc., 
as time permits. Lab included. (Prerequisite: SW 408 or 
permission of the instructor.) Elective. Typically offered 
spring term annually. Three credits. 

SW410 Enterprise Java 

This course explores new Java technologies in a struc- 
tured manner. Students present their findings and make 
substantial contributions to the set of examples 
avaihable for these new technologies. Coverage 
includes state-of-the-art explorations into server-side 
technologies such as JDBC, Sen/lets, JSP, XML, 
Bean's, EJB's, etc., as time permits. Students work 
independently, explore new Java technologies, and 
present their results in a professional manner. Lab 
included. (Prerequisite: SW 409 or permission of the 
instructor.) Elective. Typically offered fall term annually. 
Three credits. 

SW 420 Technology Management 

See GK 420 under MSMOT. 

SW 427 Object-Oriented Programming with C++ 

This introduction to object-oriented methodology and 
abstract data types includes discussions in 
polymor-iphism and data encapsulation. Participants 
study examples using object-oriented programs in situ- 
ations, as well as large system integration by object-ori- 
ented methodology. Three credits. 



38 



Course Descriptions 



SW 430 Strategic Management with Information 
Technology 

See RD 430 under MSMOT. 

SW 460 Leadership in Technical Enterprise 

See RD 460 under MSMOT. 

SW 499 Algorithms in C# (C Sharp) 

Development and evaluation of algorithms using the 
C# programming language. This class will briefly 
review programming fundamentals, continue with object 
oriented programming principles, classic algorithms, 
algorithm analysis, searching, sorting and parsing tech- 
niques, stacks, queues, linked lists, and trees. Algorithm 
efficiency and performance will be a focus as the 
student gains experiences through problems and 
programming projects. Prerequisite: prior programming 
language study or permission of the department. Three 
credits. 

SW 502 Software Engineering Practices 

This course focuses on the formal software develop- 
ment process and application of engineering manage- 
ment concepts to software development. Topics include 
concepts of business process engineering, application 
of concurrent engineering techniques, and integration of 
quality and maintainability principles in the software 
development process. Other engineering management 
techniques include project planning and control, risk 
identification and management, customer/client com- 
munication and requirements gathering, software quali- 
ty assurance techniques, measurement and metrics, 
people and team skills, and managing change. Three 
credits. 

SW 505 Advanced Database Concepts 

This course covers topics in database implementation 
designed to provide software engineers with a wide 
variety of server-side problem solving techniques. 
Topics include cursors, query and index optimization, 
implementations of common data structures and algo- 
rithms in SQL, distributed databases, object-oriented 
databases, XML metadata, and direct Web publishing. 
While Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server are both used 
for demonstration, the topics covered are applicable to 
any database platform. Format consists of lecture and 
lab. The syllabus of this advanced course assumes the 
student is well versed in relational databases, SQL, 
client-server or multi-tiered applications, data struc- 
tures, and algorithms. Topic List: 

• Advanced Query Performance (indexing techniques, 
use of statistics, use of optimizer hints) 
Using Temporary Tables 
Use of Server Side Cursors 
Subset Queries (TOP n, every nth item) 
Table-valued functions 
Representing Data Structures in a Relational 
Database (arrays, graphs, trees) 
Publishing data to HTML 
Publishing data to XML, using XPath/XDR 
Using ERWin (possible licensing problems?) 
Distribution, Publisher/Subscriber Replication, 



Transactional Replication, Snapshot and Merge 
Replication. 

• Database Trust Relationships and Cross-Server 
Quehes 

• Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) 

• Object-oriented databases 

(Prerequisites: SW 402 plus SW 403 or SW 408, or 

instructor approval.) Three credits. 

SW 506 Visual Basic.Net for Programmers II 

This course teaches application developers the more 
advanced elements of visual programming with Visual 
Basic.Net. Students learn object oriented programming 
using classes, objects and inheritance, and cover topics 
such as XML Web services, advanced data access with 
ADO. Net, threading, and more. At the completion of this 
course, students will be able to produce complete 
Windows and console based applications with Visual 
Basic.Net. Lab included. (Prerequisite: SW 403.) Three 
credits. 

SW 508 Data Warehouse Systems 

This course examines the business role, architecture, 
database management structure, and use of mapping, 
data-mining, and query tools associated with a data 
warehouse. The course explores design strategies and 
construction tools, as well as techniques for capacity 
planning and network analysis. Three credits. 

SW511 Voice and Signal Processing 

This course provides an overview of digital audio and its 
applications, including the current state of streaming 
audio on the Internet and digital audio processing fun- 
damentals. The course applies transform concepts and 
applied multimedia object-oriented programming. 
Students apply the theories of sampling, spectra, Fast 
Fourier Transform class, convolution and frequency 
space processing, and compression and one-dimen- 
sional streaming by creating programs that read, 
process, and write audio streams. Students experience 
the elements of multimedia network delivery of data and 
learn about a wide class of FFT algorithms and ele- 
mentary sound synthesis. The course emphasizes good 
software engineering practices and requires substantial 
programming effort. Lab included. (Prerequisite: 
SW 409.) Elective. Three credits. 

SW 512 Web Development II with ASP. Net 

This course teaches site developers how to create 
robust, scalable, data-driven ASP.Net Web applications 
using the Visual Basic.Net language. Students learn 
how to create ASP.Net applications using a text editor 
such as Notepad or ASP.Net Web Matrix and the com- 
mand-line tools, as well as using Visual Studio. Topics 
include the .Net framework. Visual Basic.Net Quick 
Start, Web forms, validation controls, data binding, 
ADO. Net, XML, Web services, Web service clients, 
Visual Studio, ASP.Net Web Matrix, component devel- 
opment, user controls, custom sen/er controls, and best 
practices, etc. At the end of the course, students are 
able to describe the issues involved in creating an 
enterprise Web site, creating and publishing a simple 



Course Descriptions 



39 



Web site, creating interactive content for a Web site, 
adding server scripting to a Web page using ASP.Net, 
implementing security in a Web site, and reading and 
writing information to a database from ASP.Net. 
(Prerequisites: SW 403, SW 506.) Three credits. 

SW 513 Image Processing 

This course introduces image processing involving 
image algebra, arithmetic operations. Boolean opera- 
tions, matrix operations, achromatic and colored light, 
selected intensities, gamma correction, chromatic color, 
color models, color space conversion, and low level 
pattern recognition. Additional topics include the theory 
of two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transforms, two- 
dimensional convolution and frequency space process- 
ing, compression and two-dimensional streaming, and a 
wide class of transforms. This course emphasizes good 
software engineering practices and requires substantial 
programming effort. Students write image-processing 
applications. (Prerequisite: SW 511.) Three credits. 

SW 516 High Performance Database Web 
Applications with ASP.NET 

This course builds upon course SW512 and focuses on 
developing high performance database backed web 
applications with ASP.Net using the Visual Basic. Net 
language and Microsoft SQL Server. MS SQL Server is 
a relational database management system designed for 
high-performance, scalable data warehousing, online 
transaction processing and e-commerce applications. 
This course covers accessing and optimizing data 
access to SQL server using ADO. Net and includes con- 
cepts of caching, session state management and web 
farm scenarios. Topics include: Working with ADO. Net, 
connecting to SQL Server and other data sources, 
working with ADO. Net's DataSet, DataCommand, 
DataReader and DataTable objects, using ADO. Net to 
read/write XML, caching, session state management, 
performance optimization for large web applications, 
utilizing XML web services, using the DataGrid 
effec->tively in Web applications, deployment and con- 
figura-ition of web applications and web services. At the 
con->clusion of the course, students are able to design 
and implement scalable data-driven web applications. 
(Prerequisites: SW 506 and SW 512.) Elective. Three 
credits. 

SW 518 Data IVIining and Business Intelligence 

In this course, students examine business intelligence 
concepts, methods and processes used to improve 
data-centric business decision support solutions with a 
particular focus on data mining techniques. We will first 
examine the principals and practices of gathering 
and retrieving large volumes of data for analysis and 
synthesis. The major focus of the course will be the 
examination analytical techniques for extracting infor- 
mation from large data sets to provide the students with 
a broad background in the design and use of data min- 
ing algorithms, exposure to software tools, and the 
application of these ideas to real-life situations. Data 
mining techniques such as classification, estimation, 
prediction, and clustering will be examined. The final 



portion of the course will focus on the presentation and 
cataloging of information extracted from these large 
data sets. Students will also be provided with case stud- 
ies to review in order to obtain an understanding of how 
data mining algorithms have been applied in a diverse 
set of enterprises. Three credits. 

SW 520 Project IVIanagement 

See DM 460 under MSMOT 
This course focuses on the general methodology of 
managing a technology project from its conception to its 
completion. Emphasis is on the functions, roles, and 
responsibilities of the project manager. Students leam 
the principles and techniques related to controlling 
resources (i.e., people, materials, equipment, contrac- 
tors, and cash flow). This is applied in context with com- 
pleting a technology project on time and within budget 
while meeting the stated technical requirements of 
the project. Through group and individual activities, 
including case study review and project simulation, 
students learn to apply project management tools and 
techniques. In this, they assume the roles of project 
managers who must address typical problems that 
occur during the life cycle of a project. Three credits. 

SW 530 Information Security - 

Social Engineering Practices 

This course gives students a fundamental understand- 
ing of current Social Engineering methods in the 
Information Security arena. Deception and human 
behavior is exploited to gain valuable information, which 
is very relevant to today's growing security concerns. 
This course is another key class in the Information 
Security track in the MSSE program and builds upon 
the weaknesses in the human factor. Areas of discus- 
sion will be methods, current trends, and most of all 
coun-termeasures. The pedigree will be lecture and dis- 
cussions assignment, which involves analyzing current 
work places and social gatherings coupled with scenar- 
ios of exploitation. Three credits. 

SW 531 Information Security - 

Application and Data Security 

This course is structured around Application and Data 
security in current enterprises. This is another key class 
in the Information Security track of the MSSE program. 
Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) components 
coupled with Database security are emphasized. 
Common countermeasure and best business practices 
that help ensure a solid security understanding are the 
objective of the course. Three credits. 

SW 535 Information Security - 

Internet Technologies & Data 
Transactions 

This course is structured around Internet transactions 
and data associated with these transactions. It encom- 
passes encryption schemes of transmission to 
execu-ition of code and complete flight of an execution. 
Web based technologies are the main focus, along with 
general understanding of underlying web infrastructure 
and discussing common exploits. Common counter- 
measure and best business practices that help ensure 



40 



Course Descriptions 



a solid security understanding are the objective of the 
course. Three credits. 

SW550 

and 

SW 551 Capstone Professional Project I and II 

In these capstone courses, students form teams, 
perform a technical study, and design an information 
technology system based on either their employers' 
requirements or an area that is of general interest, or 
develop a software management or development tool. 
The results of these projects provide a library of case 
studies, designs, and software development tools and 
techniques that are of general interest to local informa- 
tion technology professionals. A capstone prospectus, 
approved by your advisor, must be submitted to and 
accepted by the director of the program prior to starting 
the capstone sequence. Six credits for the two-course 
sequence. 

SW 581 Planning for Lean Manufacturing 

See DM407 under MSMOT 

SW 582 Creative Design and Development of 
Technology 

See DM410 under MSMOT 

SW 583 Supply Chain Management Concepts 

This course presents the processes of managing the 
material and product flow from source to user. The 
course considers the total material flow from acquisition 
of raw materials to delivery of finished goods and the 
related information counterflows that control and record 
material movement. It includes activities such as sourc- 
ing and purchasing, conversion (manufacturing), includ- 
ing capacity planning, technology solutions, operations 
management, production scheduling, materials plan- 
ning (MRP II), distribution planning, managing industry 
warehousing operations, inventory management, 
inbound and outbound transportation, and the linkage 
with customer service, sales, sales promotion, and mar- 
keting activities. Elective. Three credits. 

SW 584 Supply Chain Validation 

This course covers the use of simulation techniques in 
analyzing the various flows within a process chain - 
materials, information, and financial. The course mod- 
els typical processes and supply chain policies for order 
fulfillment, inventory replenishment, production plan- 
ning, and transportation, and provides an introduction to 
simulation and principles of simulation design, supple- 
mented with simulation exercises, based on statistical 
distribution characteristics. Specific application in con- 
text includes process redesign and impacts on cycle 
time, asset utilization, process variability, and customer 
service levels. The course also includes continuous and 
discrete processes; popular methodologies such as 
Six Sigma and Lean Manufacturing; requirements for 
planning and executing a simulation project - data 
requirements, sensitivity analysis, and statistical tools. 
Students gain practical experience through lab exercis- 
es, case studies, and a project and presentation. Lab 
included. Three credits. 



SW 585 Human Resources Strategies 

See MG 505 under MSMOT 

SW 590 Accounting and Decision Making 

See AC 500 under MSMOT 

SW 592 Legal and Ethical Environment of 
Business 

See MG 503 under MSMOT 

SW 594 Leadership in Technical Enterprises 

See RD 460 under MSMOT 

SW 596 Network Routing and Switching 

This course combines the second and third semesters 
of the Cisco academy courses into one routing and 
switching class. The course presents concepts and 
develops skills needed in designing, implementing, and 
troubleshooting local and wide-area networks. It also 
provides numerous lab opportunities to configure and 
troubleshoot networks with Cisco routers and switches 
(Prerequisite: SW 404.) Elective. Three credits. 

SW 597 LAN/WAN Engineering 

This course builds on the knowledge acquired and skills 
developed In SW404, Network Concepts and SW 596, 
Routing and Switching. Class presents knowledge and 
skills necessary to use advanced IP addressing and 
routing in implementing scalability for routers connected 
to LANs and WANs. Lectures include Advanced IP 
Addressing, Routing Principles, Configuring the EIGRP 
protocol. Configuring the Open Shortest Path First 
Protocol, Configuring IS-IS, and Manipulating Routing 
Updates. In addition there is discussion of wireless 
net-iworks and protocols. Students complete laboratory 
exercises using Cisco routers and switches. Students 
develop skills to list the key information routers needs to 
route data; describe classful and classless routing pro- 
tocols; describe link-state router protocol operation; 
compare classful and classless routing protocols; com- 
pare distance vector and link state routing protocols; 
describe concepts relating to extending IP addresses 
and the use of VLSMs to extend IP addresses; describe 
the features and operation of EIGRP; describe the fea- 
tures and operation of single area OSPF; describe the 
features and operation of multi-area OSPF; explain 
basic OSI terminology and network layer protocols used 
in OS; identify similarities and differences between 
Integrated IS-IS and OSPF; list the types of IS-IS 
routers and their role in IS-IS area design; describe the 
hierarchical structure of IS-IS areas; describe the con- 
cept of establishing adjacencies; and understand the 
basic wireless protocols and their uses. (Prerequisites: 
SW 404, SW 596.) Three credits. 

SW 598 Network and Computer Capacity 
Management 

This course is an in-depth review of all aspects of 
Capacity Management: the need to understand busi- 
ness requirements (the required IT service delivery), the 
organization's operation (the current IT service deliv- 
ery), and the IT infrastructure (the means of IT service 
delivery). The course will concentrate on ensuring that 
the capacity of the IT infrastructure matches the evolv- 



Course Descriptions 



41 




ing demands of the business, both now and in the 
future, in the most cost-effective and timely manner. 
The processes to achieve these goals encompass: 

• The monitoring of performance and throughput of IT 
services and the supporting infrastructure 

• Undertaking turning activities to make the most 
efficient use of existing resources 

• Understanding the demands currently being made 
for IT resources and producing forecasts for future 
requirements 

• Influencing the demand for resources in conjunction 
with financial management 

• Production of a capacity plan which enables the IT 
service provider to provide services of the quality 
defined in the Service Level Agreements (SLA) 

The course focuses on the QoS attributes of an IT sys- 
tem: response time, throughput, availability, reliability, 
maintainability, scalability and security. (Prerequisite: 
MA 126 or equivalent.) Elective. Three credits. 

SW 599 Information Security Practices and 
Countermeasures 

This course covers current information security prac- 
tices and countermeasures put in place to safeguard 
against security breaches. The course reviews Internet 
infrastructures such as firewalls, IDS systems, and 
honey pots. Additional areas include risk analysis, com- 
puter-use policies, physical security, internet/intranet 
security, Malware, firewall infrastructure, and current 
information security issues. (Prerequisite: SW 404 or 
SW 507.) Elective. Three credits. 



Course Descriptions 
MSECE 



Bridge Courses 

Required to complete one's preparation for the master's 
program is strong aptitude in the area of electric circuits 
and electronic circuits and devices. Students with defi- 
ciencies in those areas should take EE 21 3 and EE 231 . 
(See undergraduate catalog or visit the SOE website for 
a description.) 



ECE 405 Electronic Materials 

This course describes the properties and applications of 
certain materials used in the design and manufacture of 
electronic assemblies. Ceramics are often used as insu- 
lators, heat sinks, and substrates for interconnection 
structures. The course presents electrical, mechanical, 
and thermal properties of vanous ceramics, along with 
methods of fabricating and machining ceramic struc- 
tures. Adhesives used to mount components and to 
replace mechanical fasteners such as screws and rivets 
provide connections that are stronger and take up less 
space. The course examines properties of adhesives 
such as epoxies, silicones, and cyanoacrylates under 
conditions of high temperature storage and humidity, 
along with methods of applications. Solders used to 
interconnect electronic components and assemblies are 
selected for temperature compatibility, mechanical 
properties, and reliability. The course emphasizes the 
new lead-free solder materials and presents the proper- 
ties of plastic materials and the methods of forming 
plastic structures. Three credits. 

ECE 410 Voice and Signal Processing 

This course supports the signal processing and com- 
puter systems domain. It provides an overview of digital 
audio and its application, and discusses the current 
state of streaming audio on the Internet and digital 
audio processing fundamentals. Students apply these 
theories by creating programs that synthesize and 
process music and voice.. The course exposes stu- 
dents to the elements of multimedia network delivery 
ofaudio content. (Prerequisite: SW 409). Three credits. 

ECE 415 Engineering Applications of Numerical 
Methods 

This course provides students with the theoretical basis 
to proceed in future studies. Topics include root-finding, 
interpolation, linear algebraic systems, numerical inte- 
gration, numerical solution of ordinary and partial differ- 
ential equations, modeling, simulation, initial boundary 
value problems, and two point boundary value prob- 
lems. (Prerequisite: SW 408 or equivalent demonstrat- 
ed programming language skills). Three credits. 

ECE 420 Readings in Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 

This course helps students formulate a thesis proposal, 
perform literature surveys, and learn the finer points of 
technical writing at the graduate level. The course 
requires a meta-paper written about the literature in the 
field. It emphasizes the basics of technical writing and 
research, and is organized to emphasize methods of 
the writing and the research process. Students learn to 
state a problem, the techniques of analysis, methods of 
investigation, and functional organization. (Prerequisite: 
completion of one domain.) Three credits. 

ECE 425 Thermal Management of Microdevices 

This course considers the generation and removal of 
heat in electronic assemblies. The course describes the 
sources of heat in an electronic assembly, such as the 
contribution of the switching speed and the "ON" resist- 
ance of field effect transistors at the device level, covers 



42 



Course Descriptions 



the effects of heat on system reliability analytically, and 
describes the resulting failure mechanisms in detail. It 
presents methods of removing heat from electronic cir- 
cuits, including heat pipes, Peltier effect devices (ther- 
moelectric coolers), and convection, using both gases 
and fluids to transfer heat, and describes methods of 
measuring heat, including contact and non-contact 
methods. Three credits. 

ECE 430 Image Processing 

This first course in image processing covers image 
algebra, arithmetic operations, Boolean operations, 
matrix operations, achromatic and colored light, select- 
ing intensities. Gamma correction, chromatic color, psy- 
chophysics, color models, color space conversion, low- 
level pattern recognition, as well as video processing, 
compression and two-dimensional streaming, and 
multi-resolution multimedia network streaming. This 
course requires substantial programming effort and 
emphasis is placed on good software engineering prac- 
tices. Students write image-processing applications. 
(Prerequisite: ECE 410.) Three credits. 

ECE 435 High Density Interconnection Structures 

This course considers the methods of interconnecting 
electronic components at very high circuit densities and 
describes methods of designing and fabricating multi- 
layer printed circuit boards, co-fired multilayer ceramic 
substrates, and multilayer thin film substrates in detail. 
It discusses the methods of depositing thick and thin 
film materials, along with their properties, and analyzes 
these structures and compares them for thermal man- 
agement, high frequency capability, characteristic 
impedance, cross-coupling of signals, and cost. The 
course also includes techniques for mounting compo- 
nents to these boards, including wire bonding, flip chip, 
and tape automated bonding. Three credits. 

ECE 440 Computer Graphics 

This course supports the visualization and computer 
systems domain and is a unified introductory treatment 
to two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer 
graphics concepts. Topics include human-computer 
interfaces using the AWT: applied geometry: homoge- 
neous coordinate transforms: high-performance 
rendering (using Java3D) and interactive games. 
(Prerequisite: SW 409.) Three credits. 

ECE 445 Integrated Circuit Design 

This course considers the design of analog, digital, and 
mixed-mode integrated circuits. It presents the fabrica- 
tion, structure, and properties of MOS and bipolar 
devices in detail along with the structure of basic build- 
ing blocks, such as flip-flops and operational amplifiers, 
and covers circuit design techniques, such as the use of 
resistor ratios in analog design and how they relate to 
the ultimate design of the integrated circuit. The course 
also discusses custom integrated circuit specification 
and design techniques, along with economics. Three 
credits. 



ECE 446 Microprocessor Hardware 

This course covers the architecture of microprocessors, 
including how they are constructed internally and how 
they interface with external circuitry. Applications for 
microprocessors in both complex and simple equipment 
are discussed. Students learn how to apply and how to 
select a microprocessor for a given application. An 
accompanying laboratory course covers the program- 
ming of microprocessors to do a specific task. 
(Prerequisite: CR 245 or equivalent.) Three credits. 

ECE 446L Microprocessor Laboratory 

This laboratory covers the basic operation and applica- 
tions of a microprocessor. Students learn to program a 
microprocessor to control applications such as motor 
speed by the use of an emulator connected to a PC. 
They design a circuit using a microprocessor for a 
specific application and write a program to control the 
circuit. On completion of the program, they use the 
emulator to program an actual microprocessor for use in 
their circuit. (Co-requisite: ECE 446.) One credit. 

ECE 448 Embedded Microcontrollers 

This course covers the programming and application of 
the PIC microcontroller. The structure of the microcon- 
troller is discussed along with assembly language pro- 
gramming. Students are able to develop programming 
skills using software tools such as MPLAB IDE and 
MultiSim MCU. These tools are used to develop soft- 
ware code for practical applications such as motor 
speed control and voltage regulation for power supplies. 
(Prerequisite: CR 245 or equivalent.) Three credits. 

ECE 450 Computer Animation 

This overview of computer animation techniques 
includes traditional principles of animation, physical 
simulation, procedural methods, and motion-capture- 
based animation. The course discusses computer 
science aspects of animation, with lessons ranging 
from kinematic and dynamic modeling techniques to 
an exploration of current research topics — motion 
re-targeting, learning movements and behaviors, and 
video-based modeling and animation. Class projects 
offer hands-on animation expehence. (Prerequisite: 
ECE 440.) Three credits. 

ECE 455 Sensor Design and Application 

This course covers the design, fabrication, and proper- 
ties of sensors intended to measure a variety of param- 
eters, such as stress, temperature, differential pressure, 
and acceleration. Sensors of different types are used in 
a wide range of equipment, especially automated equip- 
ment, to detect changes in state and to provide the sig- 
nals necessary to control various functions. Sensors are 
generally connected to electronics systems that 
process and disthbute the signals. The support elec- 
tronics must identify the signal, separate it from noise 
and other interference, and direct it to the appropriate 
point. These support electronics are a critical part of the 
sensor technology; students discuss their design and 
packaging in detail. Three credits. 



Course Descriptions 



43 



ECE 460 Network Programming 

This course covers principles of networking and net- 
work programming. Topics include OSI layers, elemen- 
tary queuing theory, protocol analysis, multi-threading, 
command-line interpreters, and monitors. Students 
write a distributed computing system and check 
their performance predictions with experiments. 
(Prerequisite: ECE 409.) Three credits. 

ECE 465 Nonlinear Control Systems 

Control systems are used in many industrial applica- 
tions to control processes or operations and in many 
non-industrial applications as well. Nonlinear control 
systems are frequently used in applications where the 
control variables have a wide dynamic range. Unlike lin- 
ear systems, the analysis of nonlinear systems rarely 
results in a closed-form mathematical expression. 
This course considers the analysis and applications of 
nonlinear control systems by numerical and graphical 
techniques and considers means of implementing the 
solutions. Three credits. 

ECE 470 Network Embedded Systems 

This course covers distributed development — connect- 
ing peripherals to networks via Java. Plug-and-play par- 
adigm is used to add services on the fly. Students learn 
about the following topics: multicast and unicast proto- 
cols, service leasing, lookup services, remote events, 
sharing data between distributed processes, and dis- 
tributed transactions. The course also covers interfacing 
hardware (sensors, robotics, etc.) to the Web. 
(Prerequisite: SW 409.) Three credits. 

ECE 475 Microwave Structures I 

This course considers the analysis and design of struc- 
tures used in microwave transmission and reception. 
The course covers distributed parameters in detail, 
leading to a discussion of the properties of transmission 
lines. It presents the utilization of distributed parameter 
structures to design filters, couplers, and mixers, along 
with methods of implementation. Also included are strip 
line and microstrip transmission lines and filters. The 
course discusses microwave devices, both Si and 
GaAs, including low-power and high-power devices and 
laser diodes. (Prerequisite EE 321 or equivalent.) Three 
credits. 

ECE 476 Microwave Structures II 

This course is a continuation of ECE 475 and covers the 
design and analysis of microwave amplifiers, oscillators 
and mixers, frequency multipliers, and antennas. The 
course begins by presenting electrical models of RF 
components and relating those models to design meth- 
ods. The effects of internal and external noise are con- 
sidered in the models. Practical applications and design 
are emphasized. (Prerequisite ECE 475.) Three credits. 

ECE 480 Wireless Communication 

The applications of wireless communication are 
expanding rapidly - from cellular phones to wireless 
internet to household appliances — and involve many 
disciplines other than microwave transmission. This 
course covers several aspects of wireless communica- 



tion, including antenna design, FCC regulations, and 
multi-channel transmission protocols. In addition, it dis- 
cusses modern design approaches such as Bluetooth. 
Students learn how analog and digital signals are 
coded. The course also discusses transmission during 
interference and EMI/RFI as well as fiber optics com- 
munication. Three credits. 

ECE 485 Digital Communications 

This course considers the fundamentals of digital 
communications. It includes discrete time signals and 
systems, Z-transforms, discrete Fourier transforms, fast 
Fourier transforms, digital filter design, and random 
signals. It discusses methods of modulating digital 
signals, including coding theory, transmission over 
bandwidth constrained channels, and signal detection 
and extraction. Communication between computers is 
also covered. The lecture material is illustrated with 
practical examples. Three credits. 

ECE 495 Power Generation and Distribution 

This course considers the generation and distribution of 
electrical power to large areas. Three-phase networks 
are described in detail, including both generators and 
loads. Methods of modeling distribution systems by 
per-unit parameters are covered, along with power fac- 
tor correction methods. Fault detection and lightning 
protection methods are also described. Some econom- 
ic aspects of power generation and distribution are 
presented. Three credits. 

ECE 505 Advanced Power Electronics 

This course considers the design and application of 
electronic circuits related to power generation and 
conversion including inverters, power supplies, and 
motor controls. Topics include AC-DC, DC-DC, DC-AC, 
AC-AC converters, resonant converters; and the design 
of magnetic components. Models of electric motors and 
generators are presented to facilitate the design of con- 
trols for these structures. Three credits. 

ECE 510L Product Design Laboratory 

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience in 
measuring and analyzing the electrical and mechanical 
properties of materials used in the design of electronic 
products. It also covers thermal analysis and methods 
of removing the heat from electronic circuits. 
Experiential learning includes measurement of temper- 
ature coefficient of expansion, measurement of thermal 
resistance, measurement of tensile strength, measure- 
ment of material hardness, temperature measurement 
of electronic components, Peltier effect (thermoelectric 
coolers), heat pipes, convection cooling (fins and air 
flow), and heat flow across a bonding interface such as 
solder or epoxy. One credit. 

ECE 515L Microelectronics Laboratory 

This laboratory provides students with an understand- 
ing of the processes used to fabricate thick and thin film 
circuits. As part of their experiential learning, students 
sputter several materials onto a ceramic substrate and 
investigate the properties of the sputtered film, such as 
resistivity and adhesion. Students screen print thick film 



44 



Course Descriptions 



materials, including conductors, resistors, and insula- 
tors onto a ceramic substrate and fire them at an 
elevated temperature, and investigate the properties of 
the fired film, plot the distribution of resistor values, and 
apply statistical methods to determine design curves. 
Students solder components to the substrates to com- 
plete a circuit and analyze the properties of the finished 
circuit. One credit. 

ECE 520L System Design Laboratory 

This laboratory provides students with an understand- 
ing of sensors and non-linear control systems. 
Experiments include temperature sensors such as ther- 
mocouples, thermistors, and infrared, motion sensors, 
strain gauges, nonlinear servos, and computer analysis 
of nonlinear systems. One credit. 

ECE 525L Communications Systems Laboratory 

In this laboratory, students acquire hands-on experi- 
ence with waveguides, transmission lines, and anten- 
nas. They learn how to characterize these structures at 
microwave frequencies and examine how they affect 
transmission. They set up prototype wireless transmis- 
sion systems and transmit and receive analog and dig- 
ital systems. They analyze the data for integrity and 
accuracy of transmission. Experiential learning includes 
measurement of characteristic impedance of transmis- 
sion lines, simple antenna design (students construct 
simple antennas and determine the effect of the design 
on directionality and other parameters), and wireless 
concepts (students build a wireless communications 
system and send data back and forth, one-way and two- 
way; this can be a capstone project involving teams to 
design and analyze various aspects). One credit. 

ECE 530L Power Electronics Laboratory 

This laboratory provides hands-on experience in ana- 
lyzing and designing power electronics circuits and in 
analyzing and modeling power generation and distribu- 
tion systems. Students design and construct voltage 
regulators, switching power supplies, and motor con- 
trollers. Students also develop circuit models for AC and 
DC motors and power transformers. Experiential learn- 
ing includes developing circuit models for power distri- 
bution systems, measuring parameters of motors and 
transformers and using the data to develop electrical 
circuit models of these devices, and analyzing the prop- 
erties of power distribution systems and developing 
computer models for them. One credit. 

ECE 550, ECE 551, ECE 552 Thesis I, II, III 

The master's thesis tests students' abilities to formulate 
a problem, solve it, and communicate the results. The 
thesis is supen/ised on an individual basis. A thesis 
involves the ability to gather information, examine it crit- 
ically, think creatively, organize effectively, and write 
convincingly; it is a project that permits students to 
demonstrate skills that are basic to academic and 
industry work. The student must also submit a paper for 
possible inclusion in a refereed journal appropriate to 
the topic. (Prerequisite: ECE 420.) Six to nine credits. 



Course Descriptions 
MSME 



MC 400 Feedback and Control Systems 

This course emphasizes analysis and synthesis of 
closed loop control systems using both classical and 
state-space approaches with an emphasis on electro- 
mechanical systems. The mathematical requirements 
include the Laplace transform methods of solving differ- 
ential equations, matrix algebra and basic complex vari- 
ables. The discussion of classical control system design 
includes the modeling of dynamic systems, block dia- 
gram representation, time and frequency domain 
methods, transient and steady state response, stability 
criteria, controller action [Proportional (P), proportional 
and integral (PI), Proportional, integral and derivative 
(PID) and pseudo-derivatives feedback], root locus 
methods, the methods of Nyquist and Bode and 
dynamics compensation techniques. The discussion of 
state-space methods includes formulation and solution 
(analytical and computer-based) of the state equations 
and pole-placement design. The course integrates the 
use of computer-aided analysis and design tools (MAT- 
LAB) so as to ensure relevance to the design of real 
world controlled electro-mechanical systems using case 
studies and applications to electrical and mechanical 
systems. Includes lab (hardware based) exercises. 
(Prerequisites: fvIA 321 and ME 203, or equivalent.) 
Three credits. 

ME 410 Vibration Analysis 

This course covers fundamental laws of mechanics, 
free and forced vibration of discrete single and multi- 
degree- of-freedom systems, periodic and harmonic 
motion, viscous damping, and measures of energy dis- 
sipation. Modal analysis for linear systems, computa- 
tional methods in vibration analysis, natural frequencies 
and mode shapes, analytical dynamics and Lagrange's 
equation, longitudinal, torsional, and flexural vibration of 
continuous elastic systems (strings, rods, beams) are 
discussed. Students learn energy methods, approxi- 
mate methods for distributed parameter systems, and 
dynamic response by direct numerical integration meth- 
ods. (Prerequisites: ME 203, MC 290, or equivalent.) 
Three credits. 

ME 411 Advanced Kinematics 

Topics included in kinematics are spatial mechanisms, 
classification of mechanisms, basic concepts and defi- 
nitions, mobility criterion, number synthesis of mecha- 
nisms, kinematic analysis of mechanisms: Raven's 
method, Hartenberg and Denavit's method, Chace's 
vector method, general transformation matrix method, 
Dual number quaternion algebra method, method of 
generated surfaces, method of constant distance equa- 
tions, and method of train components. Class covers 
existence criteria and gross-motion analysis of mecha- 
nisms, kinematic synthesis of mechanisms, function 
generation synthesis, rigid-body guidance synthesis, 
and path generation synthesis, coupler curves and cog- 



Course Descriptions 



45 



nates, and Robert's cognates and spatial coupler 
curves. Three credits. 

ME 412 Advanced Dynamics 

The topics in the area of Dynamics include degrees of 
freedom, generalized coordinates, constraints, principle 
of virtual work and D'Alembert's principle. Energy and 
momentum, frames of reference, orbital motion, 
Lagrange's equation, moments and products of inertia, 
and dynamics of rigid bodies are also discussed, as well 
as variational principles: stationary value of a function, 
Hamilton's principle, principle of least action, Hamilton's 
equation, and phase space. (Prerequisites: ME 203, 
MC 290, or equivalent.) Three credits. 

ME 413 Road Vehicle Dynamics 

This course covers the dynamics of road vehicle sys- 
tems from a perspective that unifies the treatment of the 
causes of physical events with a treatment of the rea- 
sons for physical functions. Practical approaches 
involving pragmatic considerations of reason and cause 
are treated for each of the traditional vehicle dynamics 
areas — ride, handling (steering), braking, and acceler- 
ating behavior. In the topics related to handling, braking, 
and accelerating, the individual control inputs are 
viewed as a means of communication between the driv- 
er, or an automatic control system, and the basic vehi- 
cle. Topics include an introduction, analysis of dynamic 
systems, vehicle forces and tire mechanics, ride 
dynamics, roll dynamics, handling and steering, brak- 
ing, accelerating, total vehicle dynamics, and accident 
reconstruction. (Prerequisites: ME 411, ME 412, or 
equivalent.) Three credits. 

ME 420 Readings in ME 

A course designed to help the student formulate a the- 
sis proposal, perform literature surveys and learn the 
finer points of technical writing at the graduate level. 
Students write a meta-paper about the literature in the 
field. The basics of technical writing and research are 
emphasized. The instruction has been organized to 
emphasize methods of the writing and research 
process. Emphasis is on the processes the writer must 
consider. The student learns how to state a problem, the 
techniques of analysis, methods of investigation, and 
functional organization. (Prerequisite: 15 credit hours at 
the graduate level.) Three credits. 

ME 425 Engineering Applications of Numerical 
Methods 

This course covers root-finding, interpolation, linear 
algebraic systems, numerical integration, and numerical 
solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. 
Substantial programming projects required. The theo- 
retical basis is provided for the students to proceed in 
modeling, simulation, initial boundary value problems, 
two point boundary value problems, controls. Three 
credits. 

ME 441 Advanced Material Science 

This course covers electronic principles and concepts 
applied to the structure and properties of solid materi- 
als, as well as the relationships of these principles to the 



properties and to applications in structures and devices. 
Students discuss macroscopic phenomenological and 
electronic molecular approaches, metals and alloys, 
semiconductors, and dielectrics. Electronic structures, 
band theory, thermal properties, electrical conductivity, 
magnetic, dielectric, and optical properties are covered. 
(Prerequisite: MF 207, or equivalent.) Three credits. 

ME 442 Advanced Mechanics Materials 

This course covers both traditional and modern topics 
such as piezoelectricity, fracture mechanics, and vis- 
coelasticity. Topics covered include stress and equilibri- 
um equations, displacement and strain, energy con- 
cepts, beams, two and three dimensional solid mechan- 
ics, plates, buckling and vibration, and introduction to 
fracture mechanics. (Prerequisite: ME 306, or equiva- 
lent.) Three credits. 

ME 443 Designs for Manufacturing 

Fundamentals of concurrent engineering, product life 
cycle, product specification, standardization, functional 
requirements and datum features, selection of materials 
and manufacturing processes, cost analysis, case stud- 
ies on designing for quality, economy, manufacturability 
and productivity. (Prerequisite: MF 207, or equivalent.) 
Three credits. 

ME 444 Mechanics of Composite Materials 

Students discuss structural advantages of composite 
materials over conventional materials, high strength-to- 
weight ratios, analysis of fiber-reinforced, laminated, 
and particle materials, 3-D anisotropic constitutive rela- 
tions, classical lamination theory and boundary condi- 
tions for composite beams, plates and shells. Class 
covers boundary value problems and solutions for stat- 
ic loads, buckling and vibrations, higher order theories 
incorporating shearing deformation and layer wise the- 
ories, inter-laminar stresses and edge effects, response 
of composite structures to static and dynamic loads, 
and the study of thermal and environmental effects and 
failure criteria. (Prerequisite: ME 306, or equivalent.) 
Three credits. 

ME 446 Advanced Computer Aided System 
Design 

This course focuses on some hot and popular topics in 
industrial design applications including high speed and 
automated mechanical system design, fundamentals of 
automation, sensing technology, analysis and selection 
of different industrial motors, etc. The 3-D CAD system 
will be taught and used as the design tool in the class. 
The course emphasizes the process of developing cre- 
ative solutions through conceptual analysis and synthe- 
sis on different design processes. Topics cover the 
advanced mechanical system design, automated 
machinery design, high speed assembly product line 
design, sensing technologies, different motor applica- 
tions, 3-D CAD system, etc. Several complicated and 
practical projects will help students to gain knowledge in 
advanced mechanical system design, automated 
machinery design, high speed assembly and production 
line design, preparation on industrial design research, 
and management of multiple projects in professional 



46 



Course Descriptions 



ways that will benefit them in their careers. Projects will 
be presented by students in class. Three credits. 

ME 451 Advanced Fluid Dynamics 

This course covers stress at a point (tensor of rank two), 
equations of conservation of nnass, rate of strain tensor, 
Navier-Stokes equation derivation, source-sink flows, 
motion due to a doublet, vortex flow in two and three 
dimensional irrotational flow due to a moving cylinder 
with circulation, and two and three dimensional airfoils. 
Students discuss viscous flow, exact and approximate 
solutions, and boundary layer theory. Jets, wakes, 
rotating systems, compressible boundary layer and 
hydrodynamic stability are also covered. (Prerequisite: 
ME 347, or equivalent.) Three credits. 

ME 452 Advanced Heat Transfer 

Review of the basic concepts of conduction, convection, 
and radiation, boiling and condensation, thermal 
system design and performance (including heat 
exchangers), and detailed study of laminar, turbulent, 
free and forced convectional flows. Physical and 
mathematical modeling of engineering systems for 
applications of modern analytical and computational 
solution methods is covered. (Prerequisite: ME 349, or 
equivalent.) Three credits. 

ME 453 Advanced Energy Conversion 

This course examines aerodynamic and thermodynam- 
ic concepts. Compressors, turbines and jet propulsion, 
and single and multi-stage machines are reviewed. 
Basic gas turbine combustor design is discussed. 
Performance and evaluation of turbo-machines are 
studied. (Prerequisites: ME 347, or equivalent.) Three 
credits. 

ME 470 Advanced Finite Element Analysis 

An introduction to advanced concepts in Finite Element 
Analysis. Advanced two and three dimensional element 
formulation and structural analysis are covered, as well 
as the concepts of dynamics as applied to structures. 
The Finite Element Analysis is extended to problems in 
dynamic systems and control, design and manufactur- 
ing, mechanics and materials, and fluids and thermal 
systems. Problems in heat transfer including both 
steady state and transient analysis, conduction, con- 
vection and radiation modes are covered. Students 
solve problems both manually and with the use of mod- 
ern computer finite element software. (Prerequisite: 
ME 318, or equivalent.) Three credits. 

ME 490 Advanced Engineering Analysis 

Review of vector analysis in three dimensions, linear 
algebra, functions of a complex variable, Fourier series, 
Laplace transforms, Fourier integrals, partial differential 
equations including separation of variables. Green's 
functions, approximate techniques, linear and nonlinear 
systems: phase-space, chaos; differential algebraic 
systems and dynamic systems. (Prerequisite: MA 321, 
or equivalent.) Three credits. 




ME 491 Computer Aided Analysis of Machine 
Elements and Design 

Course covers computer aided aspects of mechanical 
design, theories of failure, optimization of the design, 
static, transient and dynamic analysis methods, finite 
element analysis, theoretical background, plane stress 
and plane strain analysis, axisymmetric stress analysis, 
isoparametric finite element formulations, element 
types for finite element analysis, mesh generation, 
and FEM software. Cyclic symmetric structures: 
advantages of cyclic symmetry, symmetric loading, gen- 
eralized loading, free and forced vibration analysis. 
Case studies. (Prerequisite: ECE 415 or equivalent.) 
Three credits. 

ME 495 Independent Study 

A well-planned program of individual study under the 
supervision of the faculty member. Three credits. 

ME 496 Special Projects 

An in depth study of selected topics of particular inter- 
est to the student and instructor. Three credits. 

ME 550, ME 551 THESIS I, II 

The master's thesis is intended to be a test of the stu- 
dent's ability to formulate a problem, solve it, and com- 
municate the results. The thesis is supervised on an 
individual basis by a faculty member. A thesis involves 
the ability to gather information, examine it critically, 
think creatively, organize effectively, and write convinc- 
ingly; it is a project that permits the student to demon- 
strate skills that are basic to both academic and work in 
industry. The student must also submit a paper for pos- 
sible inclusion in a refereed journal appropriate to the 
topic. Three credits each. 



Compliance Statements and Notifications 



47 



COMPLIANCE STATEMENTS 
AND NOTIFICATIONS 



Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy 
and Campus Crime Statistics Act 

Fairfield University complies with the Jeanne Clery 
Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus 
Crime Statistics Act. This report contains a summary of 
the Fairfield University Department of Public Safety poli- 
cies and procedures along with crime statistics as 
required. A copy of this report may be obtained at the 
Department of Public Safety in Loyola Hall, Room 2, by 
calling the department at (203) 254-4090, or by visiting 
the Fairfield University Public Safety website. The Office 
of Public Safety is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a 
year 

Fairfield University is a drug-free campus and work- 
place. 

Catalog 

This catalog pertains only to the graduate programs 
offered through the School of Engineering. It is useful as 
a source of continuing reference and should be saved 
by the student. The provisions of this bulletin are not an 
irrevocable contract between Fairfield University and 
the student. The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or any requirement at any time. 

Non-Discrimination Statement 

Fairfield University admits students of any sex, race, 
color, marital status, sexual orientation, religion, age, 
national origin or ancestry, disability or handicap to all 
the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally 
accorded or made available to students of the 
University. It does not discriminate on the basis of sex, 
race, color, marital status, sexual orientation, religion, 
age, national origin or ancestry, disability or handicap in 
administration of its educational policies, admissions 
policies, employment policies, scholarship and loan pro- 
grams, athletic programs, or other University-adminis- 
tered programs. Inquiries about Fairfield's non-discrimi- 
nation policies may be directed to the Dean of Students, 
(203)254-4000, ext. 4211. 

Notification of Rights Under FERPA 

Fairfield University complies with the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1 974 (also known 
as the Buckley Amendment), which defines the rights 
and protects the privacy of students with regard to their 
educational records. A listing of records maintained, 
their location, and the means of reviewing them is avail- 
able in the Office of the Dean of Students. 

The rights afforded to students with respect to their edu- 
cation records under FERPA are: 

1 . The right to inspect and review the student's educa- 
tion records within 45 days of the day the University 
receives a request for access. Students should sub- 



mit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic 
department, or other appropriate official, written 
requests that identify the record(s) they wish to 
inspect. The University official will make arrange- 
ments for access and notify the student of the time 
and place where the records may be inspected. If 
the records are not maintained by the University offi- 
cial to whom the request was submitted, that official 
shall advise the student of the correct official to 
whom the request should be addressed. 

2. The right to request the amendment of the student's 
education records that the student believes are 
inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the 
University to amend a record that they believe is 
inaccurate or misleading. They should write to the 
University official responsible for the record, clearly 
identify the part of the record they want changed, 
and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the 
University decides not to amend the record as 
requested by the student, the University will notify 
the student of the decision and advise the student of 
his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for 
amendment. Additional information regarding the 
hearing procedures will be provided to the student 
when notified of the right to a hearing. 

3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally 
identifiable information contained in the student's 
education records, except to the extent that FERPA 
authorizes disclosure without consent. One excep- 
tion that permits disclosure without consent is dis- 
closure to school officials with legitimate education- 
al interests. A school official is a person employed 
by the University in an administrative, supervisory, 
academic or research, or support staff position 
(including law enforcement unit personnel and 
health staff); a person or company with whom the 
University has contracted (such as an attorney, 
auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the 
Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official 
committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance com- 
mittee, or assisting another school official in per- 
forming his or her tasks. A school official has a legit- 
imate educational interest if the official needs to 
review an education record in order to fulfill his or 
her professional responsibility. 

4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. 
Department of Education concerning alleged fail- 
ures by Fairfield University to comply with the 
requirements of FERPA. The name and address of 
the Office that administers FERPA are: 

Family Policy Compliance Office 
U.S. Department of Education 
600 Independence Avenue, SW 
Washington, DC 20202-4605 

Title II Report 

The Title II Higher Education Reauthorization Act 
Report is available online at 
www.fairfield.edu/academic/graedu/acadinfo.htm. 



48 



Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid 



TUITION, FEES, AND 
FINANCIAL AID 



The schedule of tuition and fees for the acadennic year 
2006-07 is: 

Application for matriculation 

(not refundable) $55 

Registration per semester $25 

MSMOT tuition per credit hour $600 

MSSE tuition per credit hour $475 

MSECE tuition per credit hour $475 

MSME tuition per credit hour $455 

Change of course $10 

Change of major $25 

Commencement fee 

(required of all degree recipients) $150 

Transcript $4 

Promissory note fee $25 

Returned check fee $30 



The University's Trustees reserve the right to change 
tuition rates and the fee schedule and to make addi- 
tional changes whenever they believe it necessary. Full 
payment of tuition and fees, and/or authorization for 
billing a company must accompany registration. 
Payments may be made in the form of cash (in person 
only), check, money order, credit card (MasterCard, 
VISA, or American Express), or online payment at 
vi^ww.fairfield.edu/tuition. All checks are payable to 
Fairfield University. Degrees will not be conferred and 
transcripts will not be issued until students have met all 
financial obligations to the University. 



Deferred Payment 

During the fall and spring semesters, eligible students 
may defer payment on tuition as follows: 

1. For students taking fewer than six credits: At regis- 
tration, the student pays one-half of the total tuition 
due plus all fees and signs a promissory note for the 
remaining tuition balance. The promissory note pay- 
ment due date varies according to each semester 

2. For students taking six credits or more: At registra- 
tion, the student pays one-fourth of the total tuition 
due plus all fees and signs a promissory note to pay 
the remaining balance in three consecutive monthly 
installments. The promissory note payment due 
dates vary according to the semester. 

Failure to honor the terms of the promissory note will 
prevent future deferred payments and affect future reg- 
istrations. 



Reimbursement by Employer 

Many corporations pay their employees' tuition. 
Students should check with their employers. If they are 
eligible for company reimbursement, students must 
submit, at in-person registration, a letter on company 
letterhead acknowledging approval of the course regis- 
tration and explaining the terms of payment. The terms 
of this letter, upon approval of the Bursar, will be accept- 
ed as a reason for deferring that portion of tuition cov- 
ered by the reimbursement. Even if covered by reim- 
bursement, all fees (registration, processing, lab, or 
material) are payable at the time of registration. 

Students will be required to sign a promissory note, 
which requires a $25 processing fee, acknowledging 
that any outstanding balance must be paid in full prior to 
registration for future semesters. A guarantee that pay- 
ment will be made must be secured at the time of reg- 
istration with a MasterCard, VISA, or American Express 
credit card. If the company offers less than 100-percent 
unconditional reimbursement, the student must pay the 
difference at the time of registration and sign a promis- 
sory note for the balance. Letters can only be accepted 
on a per-semester basis. Failure to pay before the next 
registration period will prevent future deferred payments 
and affect future registration. 



Refund of Tuition 

All requests for tuition refunds must be submitted to the 
appropriate dean's office immediately after withdrawal 
from class. Fees are not refundable. The request must 
be in writing and all refunds will be made based on the 
date notice is received or, if mailed, on the postmarked 
date according to the following schedule. Refunds of 
tuition charged on a MasterCard, VISA, or American 
Express must be applied as a credit to your charge card 
account. 

Percent Refunded 

Before first scheduled class 100 percent 

Before second scheduled class 90 percent 

Before third scheduled class 80 percent 

Before fourth scheduled class 60 percent 

Before fifth scheduled class 40 percent 

Before sixth scheduled class 20 percent 

After sixth scheduled class No refund 

Refunds take two to three weeks to process. 

Financial Aid 

The School of Engineering reserves a modest amount 
of financial aid for graduate students. Interested stu- 
dents should complete a Financial Aid application and 
submit it to the Engineering Office along with supporting 
materials. 



Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid 



49 



Scholarships 

The School of Engineering provides modest scholar- 
ships to select students on the basis of need and merit. 



Federal Stafford Loans 

Under this program, graduate students may apply for up 
to $18,500 per academic year, depending on their edu- 
cational costs. Students demonstrating need (based on 
federal guidelines) may receive up to $8,500 of their 
annual Stafford Loan on a subsidized basis. Any 
amount of the first $8,500 for which the student has not 
demonstrated need (as well as the remaining $10,000 
should they borrow the maximum loan), would be bor- 
rowed on an unsubsidized basis. 

When a loan is subsidized, the federal government pays 
the interest for the borrower as long as he or she 
remains enrolled on at least a half-time basis and for a 
six-month grace period following graduation or with- 
drawal. When a loan is unsubsidized, the student is 
responsible for the interest and may pay the interest on 
a monthly basis or opt to have the interest capitalized 
and added to the principal. 

How to Apply 

To apply for a Federal Stafford loan, apply online at: 

www.opennet.salliemae.com 

Click on "Loan Applicant" " and follow the instructions 
on how to set up your account online and apply for a 
Federal Stafford online with Sallie Mae. 

After successfully applying for your Federal Stafford 
loan online, you can electronically sign (E-sign) the loan 
online. However, if you do not want to use E-Sign, you 
can still print out the MPN, sign it, and mail it directly to 
Sallie Mae at the address they list on the MPN. 

'Stafford Loan Borrowers must have a current FAFSA 
form on file and have completed Entrance Counseling 
via www.mapping-your-future.org before your loan 
can disburse. To apply online for the FAFSA go to; 
www.fafsa.ed.gov (Fairfield's school code is 001385). 

If you have any questions, please call the Financial Aid 
Office at (203) 254-4125. 

Approved loans will be disbursed in two installments. 
Students borrowing from Sallie Mae lenders will have 
their funds electronically disbursed to their University 
accounts. Students who borrow from other lenders will 
need to sign their loan checks in the Bursar's Office 
before the funds can be applied to their accounts. 
Receipt of financial aid requires full matnculation in a 
degree program. 




Sallie Mae Signature Loan Program 

These loans help graduate and professional students 
pay the cost of attending the University. Repayment 
begins approximately six months after you leave school 
with interest rates ranging from Prime -0.5% to Prime 
-I- 2.0% depending on credit worthiness and having/ 
not having a co-borrower. Students may borrow from 
$500 to the Cost of Attendance less financial aid. 

For information contact Signature Customer Service at 
(800) 695-3317 or www.salliemae.com/signature. 



Tax Deductions 

Treasury regulation (1.162.5) permits an income tax 
deduction for educational expenses (registration fees 
and the cost of travel, meals, and lodging) undertaken 
to: maintain or improve skills required in one's employ- 
ment or other trade or business; or meet express 
requirements of an employer or a law imposed as a 
condition to retention of employment job status or rate 
of compensation. 



Veterans 

Veterans may apply educational benefits to degree 
studies pursued at Fairfield University. Veterans should 
submit their file numbers at the time of registration. The 
University Registrar's office will complete and submit 
the certification form. 



50 



Engineering Administration and Faculty 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 
ADMINISTRATION 



FACULTY 



Evangelos Hadjimichael, Ph.D. 

Dean 

Harry W. (Bill) Taylor, Ph.D. 

Associate Dean 

Jay Hoffman, Ph.D. 

Director, Management of Technology 

Donald Joy, Ph.D. 

Director, Software Engineering 

Jerry Sergent, Ph.D., and Douglas Lyon, Ph.D. 

Co-Directors Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Rao Dukkipati, Ph.D. 

Director, Mectianical Engineering 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 
DEPARTMENT CHAIRS 



Douglas Lyon, Ph.D. 

Computer Engineering 

Jerry Sergent, Ph.D. 

Electrical Engineering 

Rao Dukkipati, Ph.D. 

Mechanical Engineering 

Donald Joy, Ph.D. 

Software Engineering 



Clement Anekwe 

Adjunct Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Ph.D., West Virginia University 

Raymond Angelo 

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Networks 
M.S., University of Hartford 

Paul Botosani 

Adjunct Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Pfi.D., Polytechnic Institute of Bucharest 

Bruce Bradford 

Associate Professor, Accounting 

Charles F. Dolan School of Business 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

Zbigniew Bzymek 

Visiting Professor, Management of Technology 

Ph.D., University of Warsaw 

Joseph Carvaiko 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
J.D. Quinnipiac University 

Joseph Corcoran 

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Software Engineering 
M.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

James Curry 

Adjunct Associate Professor, Software Engineering 
M.S., Baruch College 

James DeCarIi 

Adjunct Associate Professor, Software Engineering 
M.S., University of New Haven 

Jeffrey Denenberg 

Adjunct Professor, Electrical Engineering 
Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology 

William Dornfeld 

Adjunct Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Rao Dukkipati 

Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Ph.D., Oklahoma State University 

Birgitte Elbek 

Adjunct Senior Instructor, Software Engineering 
M.S., Sacred Heart University 

Thomas Eldredge 

Visiting Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Shahrokh Etemad 

Adjunct Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Ph.D., University of Washington 



Engineering Administration and Faculty 



51 



Thomas Galasso 

Adjunct Senior Instructor, Database Management 
M.S., Polytechnic University 

Kostas Georgakopoulos 

Adjunct Senior Instructor, Software Engineering 
M.S., Tufts University 

William Guelakis 

Adjunct Associate Professor, Software Engineering 
M.S., University of New Haven 

Evangelos Hadjimichael 

Dean, Professor of Ptiysics 

Pfi.D., University of California, Berkeley 

James He 

Associate Professor, Information Systems and Operations 

Management 

Cfiarles F. Dolan School of Business 

Pfi.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Harvey Hoffman 

Adjunct Professor, Management of Tectinology 
Ed.D., Fordfiam University 

Jay Hoffman 

Director, MSMOT Program 
Pfi.D., University of Connecticut 

Donald Joy 

Associate Professor Software Engineering 
Pti.D., University of Massacfiusetts, Amfierst 

Larry Kamhi 

Adjunct Senior Instructor, Software Engineering 
M.S., Fairfield University 

Lucy Katz 

Professor, Business Law 

Cf)arles F. Dolan Scf)ool of Business 

J.D., New York University 

Mark LeClair 

Associate Professor, Economics 
College of Arts and Sciences 
Pfi.D., Rutgers University 

Patrick Lee 

Associate Professor, Operations Management 
Charles F. Dolan School of Business 
Pfi.D., Carnegie Mellon University 

Douglas Lyon 

Associate Professor, Computer Engineering 
Pfi.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Maynard Marquis 

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Software Engineering 
M.S., Yale University 

Rosalie McDevitt 

Professor, Accounting 

Charles F. Dolan School of Business 

Sc.D. University of New Haven 



Frederick Mis 

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Software Engineering 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Michael O'Rourke 

Adjunct Senior Instructor, Software Engineering 
M.S., Fairfield University 

Rino Nori 

Adjunct Associate Professor, Software Engineering 
M.S., Fordham University 

Milo Peck Jr. 

Assistant Professor, Accounting 
Charles F Dolan School of Business 
J.D., Suffolk University 

Rama Ramachandran 

Adjunct Associate Professor, Internet Programming 
M.S., University of Central Oklahoma 

Raymond Rzasa 

Adjunct Instructor, Software Engineehng 
M.S., Fairfield University 

Ronald Salafia 

Professor, Neuroscience 
Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Carl Scheraga 

Associate Professor, Business Strategy and Technology 

Management 

Charles F Dolan School of Business 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Jerry Sergent 

Associate Professor and Chair, Electrical Engineering 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Harry W. (Bill) Taylor 

Associate Dean and Professor, Electrical Engineering 
Ph.D. University of California, Davis 

Sheila Tortorici 

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Computer Science 
M.S., Pace University 

Cheryl Tromley 

Associate Professor, Management 
Charles F Dolan School of Business 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Henri Van Bemmelen 

Adjunct Senior Instructor, Management of Technology 
M.S., Polytechnic University of New York 

Kevin Violette 

Adjunct Senior Instructor, Management of Technology 
M.S., Fairfield University 

William Watson 

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Ph.D., Lehigh University 

Carl Weiman 

Adjunct Associate Professor, Software Engineering 
Ph.D., The Ohio State University 



52 



Fairfield University Administration 



FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY 

ADMINISTRATION 

2006-07 



Jeffrey von Arx, S.J., Ph.D. 

President 

CharlesH. Allen, S.J.,M.A. 

Executive Assistant to the President 
Michael J. Doody, S.J. 

Director of Campus Ministry 
James M. Bowler, S.J., M.A. 

Facilitator of Jesuit and Catholic Mission 
and Identity 

Orin L. Grossman, Ph.D. 

Academic Vice President 

Mary Frances A.H. Malone, Ph.D. 

Associate Academic Vice President 
Judith Dobai, M.A. 

Associate Vice President for Enrollment 

Management 
Georgia F. Day, Ph.D. 

Assistant Academic Vice President, 

TRIO Programs 
Timothy L. Snyder, Ph.D. 

Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
Norman A. Solomon, Ph.D. 

Dean, Charles F. Dolan School of Business 
Susan Douglas Franzosa, Ph.D. 

Dean, Graduate School of Education 

and Allied Professions 
Edna F. Wilson, Ed.D. 

Dean, University College 
Evangelos Hadjimichael, Ph.D. 

Dean, School of Engineering 
Jeanne M. Novotny, Ph.D. 

Dean, School of Nursing 
Debnam Chappell, Ph.D. 

Dean of Freshmen 
Robert C. Russo, M.A. 

University Registrar 

William J. Lucas, MBA 

Vice President for Finance and Administration and 

Treasurer 

Michael S. Maccarone, M.S. 

Associate Vice President for Finance 
Richard I. Taylor, B.S., C.E. 

Associate Vice President for Campus 

Planning and Operations 
Mark J. Guglielmoni, M.A. 

Director of Human Resources 
Kenneth R. Fontaine, MBA 

Controller 



James A. Estrada, M.A., M.L.I.S. 

Vice President for Information Sen/ices and 
University Librarian 

Mark C. Reed '96, MBA, M.Ed. 

Vice President for Student Affairs 
Thomas C. Pellegrino '90, Ph.D., J.D. 

Dean of Students 
Eugene P. Doris, M.A.T. 

Director of Athletics 

Fredric C. Wheeler, M.PA 

Acting Vice President for University Advancement 
Martha Milcarek, B.S. 

Assistant Vice President for 
Public Relations 



Administrators Emeriti 



Aloysius P Kelley, S.J., Ph.D. 

1979-2004 
President Emeritus 

John A. Barone, Ph.D. 

1950-1992 

Professor of Chemistry and Provost, Emeritus 

Barbara D. Bryan, M.S. 

1965-1996 

University Librarian, Emerita 

Henry J. Murphy, S.J. 

1959-1997 

Dean of Freshmen, Emeritus 

Phyllis E. Porter, MSN 

1970-1989 

Associate Professor of Nursing, Emerita 

Dean, School of Nursing, Emerita 



Fairfield University Board of Trustees 



53 



FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Nancy A. Altobello '80 

Rev. John F. Baldovin, S.J. 

Rev. Terrence A. Baum, S.J. 

Joseph F. Berardino 72 

Ronald F. Carapezzi '81 

Kevin M. Conlisk '66 

E. Gerald Corrigan, Ph.D., '63 

Sheila K. Davidson '83 

Joseph A. DiMenna Jr. '80 

Charles F Dolan, P'86,'85 

William R Egan '67, P'99 

Thomas A. Franko '69 

Rev. Michael J. Garanzini, S.J. 

Rev. Edward Glynn, S.J. 

Rev. Otto H. Hentz, S.J. 

Brian R Hull '80 

Paul J. Huston '82 (Chairman of the Board) 

Patricia Hutton '85 

John R. Joyce 

Rev. James F. Keenan, S.J. 

Jack L. Kelly '67, P'96 

Ned 0. Lautenbach 

Stephen M. Lessing '76 

Clinton A. Lewis Jr. '88 

Thomas P. Loughlin '80 

Roger M. Lynch '63, P'95 

Michele Macauda '78 

William A. Malloy '80 

Michael E. McGuinness '82 

John C. Meditz '70 

EInerL. Morrell'81, P'03 

Most. Rev. George V. Murry, S.J. 

Christopher C. Quick '79 

Lawrence C. Rafferty '64 

Rosellen Schnurr '74, P'04 

Sandi Simon, P'01 

Rev. Jeffrey P. von Arx, S.J. 

William R Weil '68 




Trustees Emeriti 

Alphonsus J. Donahue 
Rev. Aloysius P. Kelley, S.J. 
Francis J. McNamara Jr. 



54 



Notes 



Notes 



55 



56 



Notes 




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Loyola and Pedro Arrupe, 
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Pedro Arrupe Hall 
Fr. Brisetle Athletic Cente 


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Fairfield 

UNIVERSITY 

Jesuit. Personal. Powerful. 



1073 North Benson Road 

Fairfield, CT 06824-5195 

Phone: (203) 254-4184 

Toll-free: (888) 488-6840 

Fax: (203) 254-4073 

email: gradadmis@mail.fairfield.edu 

www.fairfield.edu/engineering