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Full text of "The English and Scottish popular ballads"

rS^C^^t- 1 ^"T^ \ 

THE 



ENGLISH AND SCOTTISH 



POPULAR BALLADS 



EDITED BY 

FRANCIS JAMES CHILD 



(J>ART 




BOSTON 
HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND COMPANY 

NEW YORK: n EAST SEVENTEENTH STREET 

W)t Ktocrflfior Picctfflf, CambriDgr 

LONDON : HENRY STBVBNS, SON AND STILES, 39 GREAT RUSSEU. STREET, W. C. 



<3tfcou0anb 



s/ 



, a 



COPYRIGHT, 1898, BY ELIZABETH SEDGWICK CHILD 
ALL BIGHTS RESERVED 






CONTENTS 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 283 

GLOSSARY 309 

SOURCES OF THE TEXTS 397 

INDEX OF PUBLISHED AIRS 405 

BALLAD AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT: 

3. The Fause Knight upon the Road 411 

9. The Fair Flower of Northumberland 411 

10. The Twa Sisters +^ 411 

11. The Cruel Brother 412 

12. Lord Randal 412 

17. Hind Horn 413 

20. The Cruel Mother 413 

40. The Queen of Elfan's Nourice 413 

42. Clerk Colvill 414 

46. Captain Wedderburn's Courtship 414 

47. Proud Lady Margaret 414 

53. Young Beichan ............. 415 

58. Sir Patrick Spens ............. 415 

61. Sir Colin 415 

. 63. Child Waters 415 

68. Young Hunting 416 

75. Lord Lovel 416 

77. Sweet William's Ghost 416 

84. Bonny Barbara Allan ............. 416 

89. Fause Foodrage 416 

95. The Maid freed from the Gallows .417 

97. Brown Robin 417 

98. Brown Adam ......'..... 417 

99. Johnie Scot 418 

100. Willie o Winsbury 418 

106. The Famous Flower of Serving-Men 418 

144. Johnie Cock 419 

157. Gude Wallace 419 

161. The Battle of Otterburn 419 

163. The Battle of Harlaw 419 

164. King Henry Fifth's Conquest of France 420 

169. Johnie Armstrong 420 

173. Mary Hamilton 421 



^ CONTENTS 

182. The Laird o Logie 

222. Bonny Baby Livingston . . 

226. Lizie Lindsay . ..... 421 

228. Glasgow Peggie ' 

235. The Earl of Aboyne .. . .... 422 

247. Lady Elspat ..... 

250. Andrew Bartin . .423 

256. Alison and Willie . ; V . . ... 

258. BroughtyWa's . 

278. The Farmer's Curst Wife . ... . 

281. The Keach i the Creel . 

286. The Sweet Trinity ."* 

299. Trooper and Maid 

INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 425 

TITLES OF COLLECTIONS OF BALLADS, OB BOOKS CONTAINING BALLADS, WHICH ARE VERY BRIEFLY 

CITED IN THIS WORK . .... 

INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE ... ....... 

BIBLIOGRAPHY . . . ... .... 

CORRECTIONS TO BE MADE IN THE PRINT 567 






ADVERTISEMENT TO PART X 



FOR texts, information, or correction of errors, I have the pleasure of expressing my 
indebtedness to the following gentlemen in Europe : Mr ANDREW LANG ; Mr J. K. HUD 
SON of Manchester; Professsor J. ESTLIN CARPENTER of Oxford; Messrs W. MACMATH 
and DAVID MAcRiTCHiE of Edinburgh ; Mr W. WALKER of Aberdeen ; Dr AXEL OLRIK 
of Copenhagen ; and in America to the following ladies and gentlemen : Miss MARY C. 
BURLEIGH of Massachusetts ; Miss LOUISE PORTER HASKELL of South Carolina ; Professor 
KITTREDGE, Dr W. H. SCHOFIELD, Dr W. P. FEW and Mr E. E. GRIFFITH of Harvard Col 
lege ; Professor W. U. RICHARDSON of the Harvard Medical School ; Dr F. A. MORRISON 
of Indiana, and Mr W. W. NEWELL, editor of the Journal of American Folk-Lore. The 
services of Mr LEO WIENER of Harvard College have been at my full command in Slavic 
matters, and had time been at my disposal would have been employed for a much wider 
examination of the very numerous collections of Slavic popular songs. Mr G. F. ARNOLD, 
late of Harvard College Library, obligingly undertook the general bibliographical index at 
the end of this volume ; but the labor proving too great for his delicate health, this index 
was completed by my friend Miss CATHARINE INNES IRELAND, who besides has generously 
devoted a great deal of time to the compilation or correction of all the other indexes and 
the preparation of them for the press. Still further favors are acknowledged elsewhere. 
In conclusion I would recognize with thanks and admiration the patience, liberality and 
consideration shown me by my publishers from beginning to end. 

F. J. C. 

[The manuscript of this Tenth and final Part of the English and Scottish Ballads 
(including the Advertisement), was left by Professor Child substantially complete, with the 
exception of the Bibliography, and nearly ready for the press. The Bibliography, which 
Miss Ireland had in hand at the time of Professor Child's death, has been completed by 
her, with some assistance. In accordance with Professor Child's desire, and at the request 
of his family, I have seen the present Part through the press. My own notes, except in the 
Indexes and Bibliography, are enclosed within brackets, and have been confined, in the main, 
to entries in the Additions and Corrections. Acknowledgments are due to Mr MACMATH, 
Professor LANMAN, and Dr F. N. ROBINSON for various contributions, and to Mr W. R. 
SPALDING for reading the proof-sheets of the music. Mr LEO WIENER, Instructor in Slavic 
Languages in Harvard University, has had the great kindness to revise the Slavic titles in the 
List of Ballads, the List of Collections of Ballads, and the Bibliography. To Miss IRELAND 
I am especially indebted for material assistance of various kinds, especially in the proof 
reading. 

G. L. K.] 

JANUARY, 1898. 






ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS* 



VOL. I. 
1. Riddles Wisely Expounded. 

P. 1. Rawlinson MS. D. 328, fol. 174 b., Bodleian 
Library. 

I was unaware of the existence of this very impor 
tant copy until it was pointed out to me by my friend 
Professor Theodor Vetter, of Zurich, to whom I have 
been in other ways greatly indebted. It is from a book 
acquired by Walter Pollard, of Plymouth, in the 23d 
year of Henry VI, 1444-5, and the handwriting is 
thought to authorize the conclusion that the verses were 
copied into the book not long after. The parties are 
the fiend and a maid, as in C, D, which are hereby 
evinced to be earlier than A, B. The " good ending" 
of A, B, is manifestly a modern perversion, and the 
reply to the last question in A, D, ' The Devil is worse 
than eer woman was,' gains greatly in point when we 
understand who the so-called knight really is. We ob 
serve that in the fifteenth century version, 12, the fiend 
threatens rather than promises that the maid shall be 
his : and so in E, V, 205. 

Inter diabolus et virgo. 

1 Wol je here a wonder thynge 
Betwyxt a mayd and fe fovle fende? 

2 Thys spake fe fend to fe mayd : 
' Beleue on me, mayd, to day. 

3 ' Mayd, mote y thi leman be, 
Wyssedom y wolle teche the : 

4 'All fe wyssedom off the world, 

Hyf f ou wolt be true and forward holde. 

5 'What ys hyer fan ys [fe] tre? 
What ys dypper fan ys the see ? 

* All the ballads in Scott's Minstrelsy, excepting a few 
pieces, of which only ' Cospatrick ' and ' The Bonny Hind' 
require mention, were translated in Historische und roman- 
tische Balladen der Schottischen Grenzlande, Zwickau, 
1826-7, 7 small vols, by Elise von Hohenhausen, Willibald 
Alexis, and Wilhelm von Liidemann, a work now rare, 
which has just come to hand. Registering these translations 
here, in 53 entries, would require an unwarrantable space. 



6 ' What ys scharpper fan ys fe forne? 
What ys loder fan ys }>e home ? 

7 'What [ys] longger fan ys fe way? 
What is rader fan ys fe day? 

8 What [ys] bether than is fe bred? 
What ys scharpper than ys fe dede? 

9 'What ys grenner fan ys fe wode? 
What ys swetter fan ys fe note? 

10 'What ys swifter fan ys the wynd? 
What ys recher fan ys fe kynge? 

11 'What ys jeluer fan ys fe wex? 
What [ys] softer fan ys fe flex? 

12 'But fou now answery me, 

Thu schalt for sofe my leman be.' 

13 'Ihesu, for fy myld myjth, 
As thu art kynge and knyjt, 

14 ' Lene me wisdome to answere here ryjth, 
And schylde me fram the fovle wyjlh 1 

15 ' Hewene ys heyer than ys the tre, 
Helle ys dypper fan ys the see. 

16 ' Hongyr ys scharpper than [ys] f e thorne, 
Jonder ys lodder than ys f e borne. 

17 'Loukynge ys longer than ys fe way, 
Syn ys rader fan ys the day. 

18 ' Godys flesse ys betwr fan ys the brede, 
Payne ys stronger fan ys fe dede. 

19 ' Gras ys grenner fan ys fe wode. 
Loue ys swetter fan ys the notte. 

20 ']?owt ys swifter fan ys the wynde, 
Ihesus ys recher fan ys the kynge. 

21 ' Safer is jeluer than ys the wexs, 
Selke ys softer fan ys the flex. 



284 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



22 ' Now, thu fende, styl thu be ; 
Nelle ich speke no more wuA the ! 

2 2 . Be leue. 3 1 . the leman. 3 2 . theche. 13 2 . knyjt 
seems to be altered to knyt. 14 2 . fold : cf. l a . 19 2 . lowe. 
Pollarde is written in the left margin of 22 1 . and 
W ALTER VS POLLARD below the last line of the 
piece. 

[' Inter Diabolus et Virgo ' is printed by Dr Furni- 
vall in Englische Studien, XXIII, 444, 445, March, 
1897.] 

P. 2 f., 484 a, IT, 495 a, IV, 439 a. Slavic riddle- 
ballads. Add : Romanov, I, 420, No 163 (White Rus 
sian). 

2. The Elfin Knight. 

P. 7. Of the custom of a maid's making a shirt for 
her betrothed, see L. Pineau in Revue des Traditions 
Populaires, XI, 68. A man's asking a maid to sew him 
a shirt is equivalent to asking for her love, and her con 
sent to sew the shirt to an acceptance of the suitor. See, 
for examples, Grundtvig, III, 918. When the Elf in 
'Elveskud,' D 9, Grundtvig, II, 116, offers to give 
Ole a shirt of silk, it is meant as a love-token ; Ole re 
plies that his true love had already given him one. The 
shirt demanded by the Elfin Knight may be fairly un 
derstood to have this significance, as Grundtvig has sug 
gested. So, possibly, in ' Clerk Colvill,' No 42, A 5, I, 
387, considering the relation of 'Clerk Colvill' and 
' Elveskud.' We have silken sarks sewn by a lady's 
hand in several other ballads which pass as simple cre 
dentials ; as in ' Johnie Scot,' No 99, A 12, 13, D 6, 
E 2, H 4, 5, II, 379, 385, 389; etc. Here they may 
have been given originally in troth-plight : but not in 
Child Maurice,' No 83, D 7, F 9, II, 269, 272. 

7, 8, 484 a, II, 495 a, III, 496 a, IV, 439 a, V, 205 b. 
Add : ' Les Conditions impossibles,' Beauquier, Chan 
sons p. recueillies en Franche-Comte", p. 133. 

"White Russian. Sejn, Materialy, I, i, 494, No 608 
(shirt, etc.). Croatian, Marjanovi6, ' Dar i uzdarje,' 
p. 200, No 46. 

8 ff. Questions and tasks offset by other questions 
and requisitions in the Babylonian Talmud. See Singer, 
Sagengeschichtliche Parallelen aus dem babylonischen 
Talmud, Zeitschrift des Vereins fiir Volkskunde, II, 
296. 

11, note *, 12. The story of the two mares is No 48 
of R. Schmidt's translation of the C/ukasaptati, p. 68 ff.; 
that of the staff of which the two ends were to be dis 
tinguished, No 49, p. 70 f. The Clever Wench (daugh 
ter of a minister) appears in No 52, p. 73 ff., with 
some diversities from the tale noted at p. 12 b, 2d para 
graph. More as to the Clever Wench in R. Kohler's 
notes to L. Gonzenbach's Sicilianische Marchen, now 
published by J. Bolte in Zeitschrift des Vereins fiir 



Volkskunde, VI, 59. [See also Radloff, Proben der 
Volkslitteratur der nordlichen tiirkischen St'amme, VI, 
191-202.] 

17 f., 484 f., II, 495 f., IV, 439 f., V, 206. The Jour 
nal of American Folk-Lore, VII, 228 f., gives the fol 
lowing version, contributed by Miss Gertrude Decrow 
of Boston, in whose family the song has been tradi 
tional. 

1 As I walked out in yonder dell, 

Let ev'ry rose grow merry in time 
I met a fair damsel, her name it was Nell, 
I said, ' Will you be a true lover of mine? 

2 ' I want you to make me a cambric shirt 

Without any seam or needlework, 
And then you shall be, etc. 

3 ' I want you to wash it on yonder hill, 

Where dew never was nor rain never fell. 

4 ' I want you to dry it on yonder thorn, 

Where tree never blossomed since Adam was 
born.' 

5 ' And since you have asked three questions of me, 

Let ev'ry rose grow merry in time 
Now and I will ask as many of thee, 
And then I will be a true lover of thine. 

6 ' I want you to buy me an acre of land 

Between the salt sea and the sea-sand, 
And then, etc. 

7 ' I want you to plough it with an ox's horn, 

And plant it all over with one kernel of corn. 

8 'I want you to hoe it with a peacock's feather, 

And thrash it all out with the sting of an adder, 
And then,' etc. 

19 J. At p. 229 of the same are these stanzas from 
a version contributed by Mrs. Sarah Bridge Farmer, 
as learned from an elderly lady born in Beverly, Mas 
sachusetts. 

Can't you show me the way to Cape Ann ? 

Parsley and sage, rosemary and thyme 
Remember me to a young woman that's there, 

In token she's been a true lover of mine. 

(" The requirements which follow are identical with 
those of the previous version. There is an additional 
stanza: " ) 

And when he has done, and finished his work, 
If he'll come unto me, he shall have his shirt, 
And then he shall be, etc. 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



285 



The copy in The Denham Tracts, II, 358, from D. D. 
Dixon's tractate on The Vale of Whittingham, Newcas- 
tle-upon-Tyne, 1887, has been given from elsewhere at 
II, 495. 

4. Lady Isabel and the Elf-Knight. 

P. 25, B. Een Liedeken van den Heere van Haele- 
wyn, with trifling verbal differences from Hoffmann's 
text, in Oude Liedekens in Bladeren, L. van Paemel, 
No 25. The copy in Nederlandsch Liederboek, Gent, 
1892, II, 1, No 44, 'Van Heer Halewijn,' is Willems's. 

27 a, 32 a, 37 b, 487 b. Lausen des Kopfes durch das 
Madchen : notes by R. Kb'hler to L. Gonzenbach's Sici- 
lianische Marchen, now published by J. Bolte, Zeit- 
schrift des Vereins fur Volkskunde, VI, 62. [Cf. 
Georgeakis et Pineau, Folk-lore de Lesbos, p. 257.] 

29-37, 486 a, III, 497 a, IV, 441 a, V, 206 f. GG, 
HH, ' Der Ritter im Walde,' Herrmann u. Pogatschnigg, 
Deutsche V.-L. aus Karnten, Salon- Ausgabe, p. 33 ; 
4 Es ritt ein Rauber wohl iiber den Rhein,' Wolfram, 
Nassauische Volkslieder, p. 61, No 33, resemble N-R : 
Liedlein von dreierlei Stimmen ; eleven (two) warning 
doves, three cries, to father, mother, brother; huntsman- 
brother rescues sister and disposes of the knight or 
robber. 

Bohme, in his edition of Erk's Deutscher Liederhort, 
I, 118-146, 1893, prints twenty German versions under 
numbers 41, 42. Of these 41', 42 k , 42' are of oral deri 
vation, and 42 h is from Erk's papers. Bohme notes 
two other copies taken down from singing, and one in 
MS., which he does not give. Judging by what has 
been given, what has been withheld must be of trifling 
value. 

486 a, V, 207 a, DD. So ' Als die wunderschone 
Anna auf dem Brautstuhle sass,' Wolfram, p. 66 f., No 
89 a ; and No 39 b, which is even worse preserved. 
Again, ' Die wunderschone Anna auf dem Rheinsteine,' 
K. Becker, Rheinischer Volksliederborn, p. 20, No 17. 

37 f., A. Add : 'Der Reiter u. die Kaiserstochter,' 
K. Becker, Rheinischer Volksliederborn, p. 15, No 12. 

41-44, III, 497 b, V, 207 a. Pair (or one of a pair) 
riding a long way without speaking. Add : ' Los dos 
hermanos,' Mild, Romancerillo Catalan, 2d ed., p. 234, No 
250: " Siete leguas caminaron, palabra no se decian." 
Add also: Afzeliiis (1880), I, 21, st. 22. 

42 a, 488 a. Six Ruthenian copies (in two of which 
the girl is a Jewess), Kolberg, Pokucie, II, 20-25, Nos 
21-26. White Russian versions of the ballad of the 
Jewess in ejn, I, i, 490 f., Nos 604, 605 ; Romanov, 
I, n, 199, No 46. 

P. 50, note || ; IV, 441 b. Leprosy cured by (chil 
dren's) blood. See G. Rua, Novelle del " Mambriano," 
pp. 84, 88 ff. The story about Constantine's leprosy 
(Reali di Francia, lib. 1, c. 1) occurs also in Higden's 
Poly chron icon, Lumby, V, 122 ff., and in Gower, Con- 
fessio Amantis, bk. u, Pauli, I, 266 ff. See also Ben 
Jonson, Discoveries, ed. Schelling, p. 35 (G. L. K. and 
W. P. Few). [See Prym u. Socin, Kurdische Samm- 



lungen, pp. 35, 36. H. von Wlislocki, M. u. S. der 
Bukowinaer u. Siebenbiirger Armenier, pp. 60, 61. 
The latter gives a number of references for the story 
about Constantine. Cf. also Dames, Balochi Tales, No 
2, in Folk-Lore, III, 518.] 

IV, 441 b, 3d paragraph. Another ballad (White 
Russian) in which the girl is burned, Sejn, Materialy, 

I, I, 492, No 606. 

57. D a was derived " from the housekeeper at Meth- 
ven." Sharpe's Ballad Book, ed. 1880, p. 130. 

IV, 442 a, 1st paragraph. Both hands are of the 
18th century. 

5. Gil Brenton. 

P. 6 7. What is said of the bilwiz must be understood 
of the original conception. Grimm notes that this sprite, 
and others, lose their friendly character in later days 
and come to be regarded as purely malicious. See also 
E. Mogk in Paul's Grundriss der germ. Philologie, I, 
1019. 

72. Splendid ships. See also Richard Coer de Lion, 
60-72, Weber's Metrical Romances, II, 5 f. ; Melusine, 

II, 438 f. 

Some of the French ships prepared for the invasion 
of England in 1386 had the masts from foot to cap cov 
ered with leaves of fine gold : Froissart, ed. Buchon, X, 
169. King Henry the Eighth in 1544 passed the seas 
in a ship with sails of cloth of gold : Lord Herbert of 
Cherbury, Life and Raigne of King Henry the Eighth, 
1649, p. 513. When Thomas Cavendish went up the 
Thames in 1589, his seamen and soldiers were clothed 
in silk, his sails were of damask, " his top-masts cloth of 
gold." Birch, Memoirs of the Reign of Q. Elizabeth, 
1754, I, 57. 



6. Willie's Lady. 

P. 82 ff. Hindering childbirth. Notes by R. Kohler 
to Laura Gonzenbach's Sicilianische Marchen, now pub 
lished by J. Bolte, Zeitschrift des Vereins fiir Volks 
kunde, VI, 63. 



7. Earl Brand. 

[P. 95 f, 489 b, III, 498 a, IV, 443 a. Death-naming, 
etc. See also W. R. Paton, Holy Names of the Eleusin- 
ian Priests, International Folk-lore Congress, 1891, Pa 
pers and Transactions, p. 202 ff.] 

96 f., 489 f, II, 498, III, 498, IV, 443, V, 207. 

Swedish. Cf. Kristensen, Jyske Folkeminder, XI, 
293. 

Romaic. See Ztaypcupf'tos 'Ayv, p. 170, No 321. 
[Georgeakis et Piueau, Folk-lore de Lesbos, pp. 208, 
221.] 

Italo-Albanian. De Grazia, Canti pop. albanesi, 
p. 102, No 11. 

[Turkish. Sora Chenim went down into the grave 



286 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



of Taji Pascha, which opened to receive her. The 
" black heathen " ordered one of his slaves to slay him 
and bury him between the two. " Da wuchs Taji Pascha 
als eine Pappel aus dem Boden hervor, Sora Chenim 
wuchs als ein Rosenstrauch hervor. Zwischen diesen 
Beiden wuchs der schwarze Heide als ein Dornbusch 
hervor," etc. Radloff, Proben der Volkslitteratur der 
nordlichen tiirkischen Stamme, VI, 246.] 

100. Looking over the left shoulder. 1, 100 f., A 21, 
B 4; 103, E 1 ; 464, 21; 490, 14 (left collar-bane); 
492, 3 ; III, 259, 20 ; 263, 20 ; 264, 24 ; 339, 7; 368, 
11 ; 369, 13 ; 413, 37; 465, 35 ; 488, 32; 18, 13; 15, 
18 ; 17, 8 ; 18, 4 ; 20, 6 ; 52, 5 ; 135, 24 ; 445, 11 ; 518, 
9 ; 519, 10 ; 520, 9. [In IV, 11, 21, it is the right 
shoulder.] 

At I, 464, III, 259, 263 f., 339, 368 f, 413, IV, 135, the 
person looking over the left shoulder is angry, vexed, or 
grieved ; in the other cases, no particular state of feel 
ing is to be remarked. Undoubtedly the look over the 
left shoulder had originally more significance, since, 
under certain conditions, it gave the power of seeing 
spectres, or future events (but looking over the right 
shoulder had much the same effect). See A. Kuhn, 
Sagen, u. a. w., aus Westfalen, I, 187, No 206, and his 
references; and especially Bolte, in Zeitschrift des 
Vereins fur Volkskunde, VI, 205-07 (using R. Kohler's 
notes). After sowing hemp-seed in the Hallowe'en rite, 
you look over your left shoulder to see your destined 
lass or lad. See note to Burns's Hallowe'en, st. 16. 

10. The Twa Sisters. 

P. 124 a, 4th paragraph. The ballad in Schlegel's 
Reisen is simply a threnody in Esthonian marriage cer 
emonies over the carrying away of the bride to her hus 
band's house, and is not to the point. 

125, 493 b, II, 498 b, III, 499 a, IV, 447 b, V, 208 b. 
' L'os qui chante : ' M. Eugene Monseur has continued 
his study of this tale in Bulletin de Folklore, I, 39-51, 
89-149, II, 219-41, 245-51. See also Bugiel in Wista, 
VII, 339-61, 557-80, 665-85. 

[See also ' Die Geschichte von zwei Freunden,' 
Socin u. Stumme, Dialekt der Houwara des Wad Sus 
in Marokko, pp. 53, 115, Abhandlungen der Phil.-hist. 
Classe der K. Sachs. Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, 
XV.] 

[On disclosure by musical instruments see Revue 
Celtique, II, 199; Hartland, Legend of Perseus, I, 193. 
F. N. Robinson.] 

1 26 a. [For a parallel to the South African tale see 
Jacottet, Contes pop. des Bassoutos, p. 52.] 

126 b. C is also translated by H. Schubart in Arnim's 
Trb'st Einsamkeit, 1808, p. 146. 

11. The Cruel Brother. 

P. 144 a. For ' Frau von Weissenburg,' Frau von 
der Lbwenburg, 1 ' Junker Hans Steutlinger,' see Erk, 
ed. Bohme, Nos. 102, 103, 1, 360 ff. 



144 b, 2d paragraph, V, 208 b. Add : < Le Tes 
tament du Chien,' Be"dier, Les Fabliaux, 2d ed., p. 
473 ; 'Testament de la vieille Jument,' 'de la vieille 
Truie,' 'de la Chevre,' Luzel, Chansons pop. de la 
Basse-Bretagne, II, 88-97. The Robin's Last Will,' 
Miss M. H. Mason's Nursery Rhymes and Country 
Songs, p. 41. 



12. Lord Randal. 

P. 153 a. German. Two other copies in Bohme's 
Erk, No 190 b, I, 582. 

[154 a ; IV, 449 b. Danish. < Den forgivne Dat- 
ter,' Grundtvig-Olrik, No 341, Ridderviser, I, 146 ff., 
two versions: A = Kristensen, Jyske Folkeminder, No 
92, X, 358; B, that communicated to Professor Child by 
Professor Grundtvig and mentioned in I, 154. Olrik 
mentions 7 Swedish copies, 5 of them unprinted.] 

156 a, III, 499 b, V, 208 b. ' Donna Lombarda.' See 
Archivio, X, 380. [See also ' Utro Faestem0 vil for 
give sin Faestemand,' in the Grundtvig-Olrik collection, 
No 345, Ridderviser I, 165 ff., 3 versions A-C (A, B, 
from MS. sources going back in part to the 16th cen 
tury; C, from oral tradition, printed by Kristensen, 
Jyske Folkeminder, No 19, 1, 49, No 56, X, 234). Olrik, 
in an elaborate introduction, studies the relations of the 
Danish ballad (which is found also in Norse, Bugge's 
MS. collections, No. 221) to 'Donna Lombarda ' and to 
the history of the sixth century Lombard queen Rose- 
munda. He opposes the views of Gaston Paris, Jour 
nal des Savants, 1889, pp. 616 ff., and holds that 'Donna 
Lombarda,' ' Utro Fsesteme,' (his No 345), ' Giftblan- 
dersken ' (his No 344), ' Fru Gundela' (see above I, 
156 b), and the Slavic ballads of the sister who poisons 
her brother at the instigation of her lover, are all de 
rived from the saga of Rosemunda. He even regards 
' Old Robin of Portingale,' No 80, II, 240, as related to 
the ' Utro Faesteme.' See below, p. 295.] 

156 b, 499 a, II, 499 a, III, 499. The ballad of the 
maid who poisons her brother and is rejected by the 
man she expects to win in Lithuanian, Bartsch, Dainu 
Balsai, I, 172 ff., No 123 a, b. More ballads of poison 
ing, sister poisoning brother at the instance of her lover, 
girl poisoning her lover, and at col. 306 one resembling 
Lord Randal, Herrmann, Ethnologische Mitteilungen 
aus Ungarn, I, cols 292-308 (with an extensive biblio 
graphy). Herrmann's collections upon this theme are 
continued from cols 89-95, 203-11. [Cf. the Danish 
ballad ' Tule Slet, Ove Knar og Fru Magnild,' Grundt 
vig-Olrik, No. 350, Ridderviser, I, 186, where, how 
ever, the murderess uses a knife.] 

157. Compare, for dialogue and repetition, the Cata 
lan ballad ' El Conde Arnau,' Mild, Romancerillo, No 
78, p. 67 ; where, however, the first half of the third 
line is also regularly repeated in the fourth. 

' ^Tota sola feu la vetlla, muller lleyal? 
^Tota sola feu la vetlla, viudeta igual? ' 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



287 



' No la faig yo tota sola, Comte 1'Arnau, 
No la faig yo tota sola, valga 'm Deu, val ! ' 

157 b. A is translated by Professor Emilio Teza. 
' L'Avvelenatrice, Canzone Boema,' Padova, 1891, p. 
12. [Atti e Memorie della R. Accademia di Scienze, 
Lettere ed Arti in Padova, Nuova Serie, VII, 234.] 

13. Edward. 

P. 167, 501 b, III, 499 b, V, 209 b. ' Svend i Rosens- 
gaard ' is No 340 in the Grundtvig-Olrik collection of 
Danish ballads, Ridderviser, I, 142. Danish versions 
are limited to three, of which the second is a fragment 
and the third a copy from Norway in all but pure Danish. 
Of Swedish versions eleven are enumerated, besides a 
half-comic copy from a manuscript of 1640, or older, 
which is spun out to 33 stanzas. As before remarked, 
a palpable tendency to parody is visible in some of the 
Scandinavian specimens. 



14. Babylon, or, The Bonnie Banks o 
Fordie. 

P. 170, 501 b, II, 499 a, III, 499 f., IV, 450 a, V, 
209 b. ' Hr. Truelses Detre ' is No 338 of the Danish 
ballads in the continuation of Grundtvig's collection by 
Dr. Axel Olrik, Danske Ridderviser, 1895, 1, 114, where 
the ballad is subjected to a minute study. The exist 
ence of a ballad is mentioned in 1624, and indicated as 
early as 1598. There are Danish, Swedish, and Ice 
landic versions of the 1 7th century, and numerous later 
copies, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, and Faroe : Dan 
ish, in all, 10, one of the 17th century; Swedish 12, 4 
of the 17th century; Norwegian 6; Faroe 4. Five 
of the Norwegian copies take the direction of the Ice 
landic and Faroe in the treatment of the story. Two 
varieties of the ballad may be specially distinguished : 
one in which we have the miracle of a light burning or 
a fountain (fountains) springing over the place where 
the maids were murdered (called by Olrik the legend 
ary form), the other in which the career and fate of 
the sons are made prominent. The " legendary " ver 
sions are the older. In these the maids are regarded 
as martyrs, and popular religious observances in con 
nection with the miraculous fountains and in com 
memoration of the murdered maids have been kept up 
into the present century. The story is localized in 
not less than thirteen Danish accounts and others in 
Sweden. 

II, 499 a, HI, 500, V, 209 b. Add to the French 
ballads a copy, which has lost still more of the charac 
teristic traits, obtained by M. Couraye du Pare in Basse- 
Normandie : fitudes romanes de'die'es a Gaston Paris, 
1891, p. 47, No 10. 

II, 499 a. A Ruthenian story like that of the Great 
Russian ballad in Kolberg, Pokucie, II, 30, No 33. 



15. Leesome Brand. 

Pp. 181, 502 a. German. Add : Bbhme, Erk's Lie- 
derhort, I, 592 f., < Der Reiter und seine Geliebte,' No 
194 b, from Erk's papers, c, from oral tradition (frag 
ments). Bockel, 'Das Begrabniss im Walde,' p. 33, 
No 4 7. 'Es gingen zwei Liebchen durch einen griinen 
Wald,' Wolfram, p. 89, No 63. 

17. Hind Horn. 

[P. 188 b. Horn Child.' See the edition by J. 
Caro, in Englische Studien, XII, 323 ff.] 

190 a. Hereward will not drink unless the princess 
presents the cup : very like Horn here. Michel, Chro- 
niques Anglo-Normandes, II, 18 f. 

191, note *. Blonde of Oxford (Jehan et Blonde). 
See Suchier's edition, (Euvres poetiques de Philippe de 
Remi, Sire de Beaumanoir, II, 89, 99, 103. 

193 a. That Horn Child, though much more modern 
in its present form than the Gest, " would seem to have 
been formed on a still older model " was suggested by 
T. Wright in 1835, and was the opinion of J. Grimm 
and of Ferdinand Wolf. Wolf maintains that Horn 
Child was the work of a popular jongleur, or vagrant 
minstrel, and that for this reason Chaucer put it among 
the " romances of prys," which are mentioned in Sir 
Thopas. Anyway, this must have been the form of the 
story which was known to Chaucer. Wolf, Ueber die 
Lais, p. 217 f. 

195 a (8). Oude Liedekens in Bladeren, L. van 
Paemel, No 28 = Hoffmann, No 2. 

199 a. Albanian. De Grazie, Canti p. albanesi, 
p. 118. 

199 a, note *. Ring in betrothal. So in Twelfth 
Night, iv, 3, as Prior remarks, II, 277, apropos of 
4 Axel and Walborg ', st. 44. 

201, note. These talismans also in India : Tawney's 
Katha-Sarit-Sagara, II, 161. 

502 b, 5th paragraph, III, 501 b, IV, 450 b. Add : 
Kolberg, Lud, IV, 23, No 146 ; VI, 166 f., No 832 ; XII, 
115-118, Nos 221-224 (jumps seven tables and touches 
the eighth) ; XVI, 271, No 438 ; XVI, 272, No 440 ; 
Valjavec, p. 300, No 17; Kolberg, Mazowsze, II, 109, 
No 251. A soldier comes back after seven years' ab 
sence to his " widow ; " drops ring into cup, and is rec 
ognized as her husband. Lud, XXI, 61, No 123. 

20. The Cruel Mother. 

P. 219 b, 504 a, II, 500 a, IV, 451 a, V, 212 a. Add : 
T, Wolfram, p. 90, No 64, ' Es hiitet ein Schafer an 
jenem Rain,' ' Die Rabenmutter ; ' Bb'hme's edition of 
Erk's Liederhort, I, 636, No 212 e ; and to the litera 
ture several items at p. 637. 

219 b, III, 502 b. Similar Slavic ballads : Polish, 
Kolberg, Lud, IV, 52, No 220 ; XII, 308 f., Nos 611, 
612 ; XVII, 9, No 17 ; XVIII, 188, No 346 ; XXI, 



288 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



85, No 179 ; XXII, 160, No 284 ; Kolberg, Mazowsze, 
II, 160, No 352 ; IV, 366, No 436. 

P. 220. C, sts 9, 10, 11 are in Motherwell's MS., p. 
183, written in pencil. 



Fish flying out of the pan. See Wesselofsky, Archiv 
f. slavische Philologie, VI, 574. 

241 b. Herod's questions. Compare Bergstrom and 
Nordlander, 98, 3 ; Pidal, p. 128. 



21. The Maid and the Palmer. 

P. 228 b, 2d paragraph. The Finnish ballad was first 
printed by C. A. Gottlund, Otava, 1832, II, 9 (Holland, 
Chansons Populaires, VI, 47-50, with a translation). 

230 f., Ill, 502 b, IV, 451 b. White Russian ver 
sions, Sejn, II, 607 ff., Nos 12-16, ' Pesn' o grgsnoj 
deve, Song of the sinful girl,' five copies, the third im 
perfect. Jesus sends the girl to church, in the first the 
earth comes up seven cubits, the lights go out, etc. ; she 
shrives herself, and things are as before. In the other 
copies she crumbles to dust. Polish (with variations), 
Kolberg, Lud; XII, 309, No 613; XIX, 187, No 658 ; 
XX, 101, No 37; XXI, 86, No 180; XXII, 161 f., Nos 
285, 286 ; Kolberg, Mazowsze, 1, 142, No 46; IV, 367, No 
437 ; Siarkowski, in Zbidr wiadomosci, IV, 94, No 18. 

231 a. Legend of the Magdalen unmixed. Italian, 
Archivio, XIV, 211 f., 'Maria Maddalena,' two copies, 
fragmentary. In the second, Maria asks the master of 
a vessel to take her in ; a tempest arises ; the dona 
pecatrice, lest the vessel should founder on her account, 
with many people aboard, throws herself into the sea, 
is swallowed by a whale, and not disgorged for three- 
and-thirty years. 

22. St. Stephen and Herod. 

P. 236 a, last paragraph. Here, and in other places 
in volumes I, II, Catalan is treated as if it were a dia 
lect of Spanish. The corrections required are as fol 
lows : I, 236 a, last paragraph, 384 a, 2d par., 505 a, 
2d par.; II, 174 a, 2d par., 347 a, 2d par., 512 a, No 
72, read Catalan for Spanish, and I, 384 a, 2d par., 
drop K. I, 462 a, 3d par., read Catalan for C. II, 69 a, 
7th line, 113 b, llth line, 158, 2d par., read Spanish 
and Catalan^ and at the last place insert Catalan be 
fore the 3d and 4th citations and transfer them to the 
end. 

237, III, 502 b. The Breton story with the miracu 
lous sustentation of the maid (but without the marvel 
of the capon): Bohme's Erk, I, 637 ff., No 213 a, ' Die 
Weismutter,' b, 'Die unschuldig gehangene und ge- 
rettete Dienstmagd,' and note to b ; Wolfram, p. 38, 
No 10, ' Zu Frankfurt steht ein Wirtshaus.' 

240 f., 505 f., II, 501 b, IV, 451 f. Joie des Bestes. 
Add : Marin, Cantos Populares, I, 61, No 124 ; Iglesia, 
El Idioma Gallego (' a maldicion d' a ovella '), cf. II, 8, 
note f, III, 174, both cited by Munthe. 

240, 241, 505 b, II, 501 b, III, 502 b, IV, 452 a, V, 
212 a. A roast pheasant gets feathers and flies away 
in attestation of a tale : M. Wardrop, Georgian Folk 
tales, p. 10 f., No 2. G. L. K. 



23. Judas. 

[P. 243 b. Trinity College MS. B, 14, 39, has been 
recovered, and Professor Skeat has had the kindness 
to furnish a copy of the ballad. Wright's text proves 
to be in all essentials accurate ; but, on account of the 
age and great interest of the poem, Professor Skeat's 
copy is here reproduced. The ballad has no title in 
the MS. 

Hit wes upon a scereforsday J>at vre louerd aros. 

ful milde were J>e wordes he spec to iudas. 
iudas lp ou most to iurselem oure mete for to bugge. 

fritti platen of seluer J>ou bere up ofi rugge. 
J>ou comest fer if e brode stret fer if e brode strete. 5 

suwzme of fine tunesmen J>er J>ou meist i mete, 
imette wid is soster fe swikele wimon. 

iudas f ou were wrfe me stende the wid ston. .ff. 

for the false prophete fat tou bileuest upon. 
Be stille leue soster fin herte f e to breke. 10 

'wiste min louerd erist ful wel he wolde be wreke. 
Iudas go fou on fe roc heie up on f e ston. 

lei fin heued i my barm slep fou J>e anon. 
Sone so iudas of slepe was awake. 

f ritti platen of seluer from hym weren itake. ' 15 
He drou hym selue bi f e cop fat al it lauede ablode. 

f e iewes out of iurselem awenden he were wode. 
Foret hym com f e riche ieu fat heiste pilatus. 

wolte sulle f i louerd fat hette iesus. 
I nul sulle my louerd for nones cunnes eiste. 20 

bote hit be for fe f ritti platen, fat he me bi taiste. 
Wolte sulle f i lord cn'st for enes cunnes golde. 

Nay bote hit be for fe platen, fat he habben 

wolde. 
In him com ur lord * gon as is postles seten at mete. 

Wou sitte ye postles ant wi nule ye etc. .ff. 25 

ic am iboust ant isold to day for oure mete. 
Vp stod him iudas lord am i fat 

I nas neuer ofe stude fer me fe euel spec. 
Vp him stod peter ant spec wid al is miste. 

f au pilatus him come wid ten hundred cnistes. .ff. 30 

yet ic wolde louerd for f i loue fiste. 
Still f ou be peter, wel i f e i cnowe. 

f ou wolt fur sake me f rien. ar f e coc him crowe. 33 

V. 24, *. The word c'st has here been erased, and 
should not be inserted. Skeat. 

V. 27. Blank space. Read 'frek ' (= man). Skeat. 

The MS. has ff at end of 11. 8, 25, 30. This means 
that there are here two second lines, i. e., that three 
lines rime together. Skeat. The long f's of the MS. 
are printed s.] 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



289 



25. Willie's Lyke-Wake. 

P. 250, 506 a, II, 502 a, III, 503 a. Add the Cro 
atian ballad, ' Ive uinira za Marom,' Hrvatske Narodne 
Pjesme iz "Nase Sloge," II. Diel, 15, No 11. 



29. The Boy and the Mantle. 

[P. 261 f. On the Gaelic ballad in the Dean of Lis- 
more's Book see the elaborate article by Professor 
Ludw. Chr. Stern, Die galische Ballade vom Mantel 
in Macgregors Liederbuche, Zeitschrift fur celtische 
Philologie, I, 294 ff. The text is given according to 
the edition of Alexander Cameron, Reliquiae Celticae, 
I, 76, with another copy from a 1628 MS. in the Fran 
ciscan Convent at Dublin. Stern's translation clears up 
some points, and brings out one striking similarity be 
tween the Gaelic and the English ballad. When Mac- 
Reith's wife tried on the mantle, " er passte ihr, beides 
an Fuss und Hand, bis auf die Gabel ihrer kleinen 
Finger und Zehen." She explains this failure of the 
mantel to cover her completely : " ' Einen Kuss bekam 
ich verstohlen von O'Duibhnes Sohne Diarmaid ; der 
Mantel wiirde bis auf den Boden reichen, wenn es nicht 
der allein ware.' " Compare sts 28-30 of ' The Boy 
and the Mantle.' This similarity, in a feature unknown 
to other versions of the story, coupled with the form 
' Craddocke ' in the English ballad (a form which " nur 
aus dem welschen Caradawc entstanden sein kann ") 
convinces Stern that ' The Boy and the Mantle,' and 
probably also the Gaelic ballad, are derived directly 
from Welsh tradition, independently of the Old French 
versions, which, however, he thinks also go back ulti 
mately to Wales (p. 310). I am indebted to Dr F. N. 
Robinson for calling my attention to Stern's article. 
G. L. K.] 

268 ff., 507 a, II, 502 a, III, 503, IV, 454 a, V, 
212 f. Tests of chastity. " The jacinth stone will not 
be worne on the finger of an adulterer, nor the olive 
grow if planted by one that leadeth his life in unlawful 
lusts." Greene, Never too late, Pt. II, 1590, Works, ed. 
Grosart, VIII, 141. A note on the general subject in 
G. Rua, Novelle del " Mambriano," pp. 66 f., 73-83. 
G. L. K. [See also Zupitza, Herrig's Archiv f. das 
Studiutn der neueren Sprachen, LXXXII, 201 ; Nyrop, 
Dania, I, 13, n. 2 ; Feilberg, Dania, I, 154; 'La Mensu 
ration du Cou,' Perdrizet and Gaidoz, Melusine, VI, 
225 ff.] 

270 a, 1st paragraph. The Shukasaptati story at 
p. 29 f. of R. Schmidt's translation. 

30. King Arthur and King Cornwall. 

P. 284. Sts 17, 18. Compare Carle of Carlile, w. 
143 ff., Percy MS., Hales and Furnivall, III, 282. 
VOL. v. 37 



31. The Marriage of Sir Gawain. 

P. 288 ff., II, 289 b, III, 454 a. Mr. Whitley Stokes 
has pointed out that the incident of a hag turning into 
a beautiful woman after a man has bedded with her oc 
curs in the Book of Bally mote, an Irish MS. of about 
1400, and elsewhere and earlier in Irish story, as in the 
Book of Leinster, a MS. of the middle of the twelfth cen 
tury. The Academy, XLI, 399 (1892). It is singular 
that the sovereignty in the first tale is the sovereignty of 
Erin, with which the disenchanted hag rewards her de 
liverer, and not the sovereignty over woman's will which 
is the solution of the riddle in the ballad. See also the 
remarks of Mr. Alfred Nutt in the same volume, p. 425 
(and, again, Academy, October 19, 1889, p. 255), who, 
while denying the necessity for any continental deri 
vation of the hideous woman, suggests that Rosette in 
Gautier's Conte du Graal, vv. 25380-744, furnishes a 
more likely origin for her than Chretien's damoisele, 
since it does not appear that the latter is under spells, 
and spells which are loosed by the action of a hero. 
[See also O'Grady, Silva Gadelica, p.-328 ff.; transla 
tion, p. 370 ff. F. N. Robinson.] 

289 b. Gromere Gromorson (Grummore Gumraur- 
sum) and Gromore somyr loure, in Malory's Morte 
Darthur, ed. Sommer, 256, 258, 799. 



32. King Henry. 

P. 290, note f, IV, 454 a. "La nuit si jolie fille, le 
jour si jolie biche:" Pineau, Le Folk-lore du Poitou, 
p. 391. [A raven by day, a woman by night: von Wlis- 
locki, M. u. S. der Bukowinaer u. Siebenbiirger Arme- 
nier, p. 75. On transformations of all kinds, see S. 
Prato, Bulletin de Folklore, 1892, p. 316 ff.] 

298, II, 502 b, IV, 454 a. A man marries a snake. 
At midnight it becomes a woman, and it keeps that 
form thereafter : J. Krainz, Mythen u. Sagen aus dem 
steirischen Hochlande. No. 147, p. 194. A snake 
(enchanted man) marries a girl, and is thereby freed : 
Briider Zingerle, Tirols Volksdichtungen, II, 1 73 ff. ; cf. 
11,317. G. L. K. 

33. Kempy Kay. 

P. 300. I have serious doubts whether this offensive 
ballad has not been made too important; whether, not 
withstanding the points noted at p. 301, it is anything 
more than a variety of ' The Queen of all Sluts.' 

305 b. A 10 1 . lauchty in Sharpe with a line drawn 
in ink through 1 (probably by the editor, as this is a 
presentation copy). 

V, 213 a. Since we have Pitcairn's copy only in 
Sharpe's handwriting, we cannot determine which of 
the two made the changes. 



290 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



34. Kemp Owyne. 

P. 307 f, II, 502 b, III, 504 a. Disenchantment ; 
kissing a serpent. A remarkable case alleged to have 
occurred at Cesena in 1464 : [Angelo de Tummulillis, 
Notabilia Temporum, ed. Corvisieri, 1890, p. 124 ff. ;] 
Giornale Storico della Letteratura Italiana, XVII, 161. 
G. L. K. On the whole subject see R. Kohler's notes 
in Mennung, Der Bel Inconnu, p. 20 ; S. Prato's notes, 
Bulletin deFolklore, 1892, p. 333 f. [W. H. Schofield, 
Studies on the Libeaus Desconus, in Studies and Notes 
in Philology and Literature published under the direc 
tion of the Modern Language Departments of Harvard 
University, IV, 199 ff.] 

36. The Laily Worm and the Maokrel 
of the Sea. 

P. 316 a. Naktergalsvisan, Bohlin, in Nyare Bidrag 
till Kannedom om de Svenska Landsmalen, II, 10, Folk- 
toner fran Jamtland, pp. 5, 6. 



37. Thomas Rymer. 

P. 319, note t. Dr. W. H. Schofield has furnished 
me with an abstract of the Visions d'Oger le Dannoys 
au royaulme de Fairie (which book after all is in the 
Paris library). There is nothing in the Visions which 
throws further light on the relation of the stories of 
Thomas Rhymer and of Ogier. 

320, note J. Bells. See R. Kbhler, Zeitschr. des 
Vereins f. Volkskunde, VI, 60. 

321, note f. The duration of paradisiac bliss ex 
ceeds three hundred years in some accounts. Three 
hundred years seem but three days in the Italian 
legend of three monks, Graf, Miti, Leggende, etc., 1892, 
I, 87 f., and in that of the young prince who invites 
an angel to his wedding, Graf, 90 ff., after the Latin 
text published by Schwarzer, Zeitschrift fiir deutsche 
Philologie, XIII, 338-51, 1881. (R. Kohler pointed 
out in the same journal, XIV, 96 ff., that an abstract 
of the story had been given in Vulpius's Curiositaten, 
I, 179 ff., as early as 1811.) In the lai of Guingamor, 
printed by M. Gaston Paris in Romania, VIII, 50 ff., 
1879, three hundred years pass as three days. In both 
the last, the eating of earthly food brings an immedi 
ate decrepitude, followed by speedy death in the case 
of the prince. [See also W. Hertz, Spielmannsbuch, 
p. 318 f.] 

39. Tarn Lin. 

[P. 339 b, n, 505 b, III, 505 b. Fairy salve. Kirk's 
Invisible Commonwealth, ed. Lang, pp. 13, 34; Den- 
ham Tracts, II, 188 f.] 

340 a, II, 505 b, III, 505 b, IV, 455 b. Sleeping 
under trees: ympe tree. Bugge, Arkiv for nordisk 



Filologi, VII, 104, refers to Liebrecht, Gervasius von 
Tilbury, p. 117, and to W. Hertz, Spielmannsbuch, 
p. 322. 

40. The Queen of Elfan's Nourice. 

P. 358 b, II, 505 f., Ill, 505 f., IV, 459 a, V, 215 b. 
Mortal midwives for fairies, etc. : Wucke, Sagen der 
mittleren Werra, II, 25 ; Gebhart, Oesterreichisches 
Sagenbuch, p. 208 ; Baader, Neugesammelte Volks- 
sagen, No 95, p. 68. G. L. K. 

[Kirk's Secret Commonwealth, ed. Lang, p. 13; Den- 
ham Tracts, II, 138.] 

42. Clerk ColviUe. 

[P. 372 b. Der Ritter von Staufenberg. See the 
edition by Edward Schroder : Zwei altdeutsche Ritter- 
maren, Moriz von Craon, Peter von Staufenberg. Ber 
lin, 1894. Schroder dates the composition of the poem 
about 1310 (p. LI). He shows that Schott's edition, 
which Culemann followed, was a reprint of one printed 
by Priiss in 1483 at the earliest, but thinks that it fol 
lowed that of Priiss at no long interval (p. XXXIV). 
Cf. also Schorbach, Zeitschr. f. deutsches Altertum, 
XL, 123ff.] 

374-78. The mother's attempt to conceal the death 
of her son from his wife occurs also in ' Ebbe Tyges0ns 
D0dsridt ' and ' Hr. Magnuses D0dsridt,' Olrik, Danske 
Ridderviser, Nos 320, 321, and Swedish copies of the 
former ; borrowed no doubt from ' Elveskud.' 

380, II, 506 a, III, 506 a, IV, 459 a, V, 216 a. Add : 
XX, ' La Mort de Jean Renaud,' Beauquier, Chansons 
p. recueillies en Franche-comte, p. 152. 



43. The Broomfield Hill. 

[P. 393 a, III, 506 b, IV, 459 b. With the Italian 
ballad cf. ' Quarante ans j'ai travailleV Georgeakis et 
Pineau, Folk-lore de Lesbos, p. 246.] 

393 f., 506. Jager-Romanze in Bohme, Altdeutsches 
Liederbuch, No 437, from Melchior Franck, Fasciculus 
Quodlibeticus, Niirnberg, 1611, No 6: slightly different, 
no disposition to kill the maid. Three copies of this all 
but inevitable ballad in Blatter fiir Pommersche Volks 
kunde, II. Jahrgang, p. 77 f., ' Jagerslied ; ' and more 
might be added. 

44. The Twa Magicians. 

[P. 400. Greek. Cf. ' Les Transformations,' George 
akis et Pineau, Folk-lore de Lesbos, p. 210 ff. (no men 
tion of the Turk's transforming himself).] 

401. Polish. Add : Kolberg, Lud, XXT, 27, No 50; 
XXII, 102, No 157; Kolberg, Mazowsze, II, 54 f., Nos 
131, 132 ; III, 247, 321; IV, 274, No 240. 

401 b, H, 506 b, III, 506 f., IV, 459 b, V, 216 a. Trans- 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



291 



formations during flight. Add B. Kb'hler's notes to 
L. Gonzenbach's Sicilianische Marchen, now published 
by J. Bolte, Zeitschrift des Vereins fiir Volkskunde, 
VI, 65. 

The incidents of the flight of the girl and her lover, 
the pursuit and the transformations, and of the Devil 
outwitted by his pupil are discussed by G. Rua, No- 
velle del " Mambriano " del Cieco da Ferrara, p. 95. 
See also M. Wardrop, Georgian Tales, p. 4, No. 1. 
G. L. K. 

45. King John and the Bishop. 

[P. 405 ff., II, 506 f., IV, 459 b, V, 216 a. A Chris 
tian ascetic has taken up his abode in a hogshead, on 
which he has written, " If thou art wise, live as I live 1 " 
The sultan puts three questions to him : How far is it to 
heaven ? At how much do you value me ? Which is 
the best religion? The penalty for failure to solve 
them is to be dragged at the tail of the sultan's horse. 
The answers are : A day's journey; twenty-nine silver 
pieces ; neither of the two religions is the better, for 
the two are God's eyes, one of which is as dear to him 
as the other. Von Wlislocki, M. u. S. der Bukowinaer 
u. Siebenbiirger Armenier, ' Der weise Mann,' No 30, 
p. 83 ff.] 

46. Captain Wedderburn's Courtship. 

[P. 417 a, II, 507 b, III, 507 a, IV, 459 b, V, 216 a. 
Heads on stakes. See W. H. Schofield, in the (Har 
vard) Studies and Notes in Philology and Literature, 
IV, 175 ff.] 

418 a, II, 507 b. See Stiefel, Ueber die Quelle der 
Turandot-Dichtung Heinz des Kellners, in Zeitschr. f. 
vergleichende Litteraturgeschichte, N. F., VIII, 257ff. 



47. Proud Lady Margaret. 

P. 426. Add : La fille damnee,' Daymard, p. 178; 
' La sposa morta,' Archivio, VIII, 274 ; the " romance " 
in Ballesteros, Cancionero popular gallego, III, 256; 
see also the " romance " ' Bernal Francez ' from Al- 
garve in Encyclopedia Eepublicana, Lisbon, 1882, 
p. 156. 

49. The Twa Brothers. 

I. 

P. 435, V, 217. Communicated by Mr J. K. Hudson 
of Manchester. Sung after a St George play regularly 
acted on All Souls' Day at a village a few miles from 
Chester, and written down for Mr Hudson by one 
of the performers, a lad of sixteen. The play was in 
troduced by a song called Souling (similar to a Ste- 



phening, see I, 234), and followed by two songs, of 
which this is the last, the whole dramatic company 
singing. 

1 ' And it's where hast thou been all this night long, 

my son? 

Come tell it unto me.' 
' I have been lying on yonder bull-rushes, 
Which lies beneath yond tree.' 

2 ' And it's what are the spots on this thy coat, my 

son? 

Come tell it unto me.' 

'They are the spots of my poor brother's blood, 
Which lies beneath yonder tree.' 

3 * And it's what didst thou kill thy poor brother for, 

my son? 

Come tell it unto me.' 
1 Because he killed two pretty little birds, 
Which flew from tree to tree.' 

4 ' And it's what will the father say when he comes, 

my son? 

Come tell it unto me.' 
* I will dress me up in sailor's clothes, 
And my face he will never see.' 

5 'And it's what wilt thou do with thy pretty little 

wife, my son? 
Come tell it unto me.' 
'I will dress her up in lad[d]ie's clothes, 
And she will sail along with me.' 

6 ' And it's what wilt thou do with thy children three, 

my son? 

Come tell it unto me.' 

' I will leave them to my poor grandfather to rear, 
And comfort [to] him [to be].' 

7 ' And it's when shall we see thy face again, my son ? 

Come tell it unto me.' 

' When the sun and moon shines both at once, 
And that shall never be.' 



53. Young Beichan. 

P. 459 a. For a late German ballad on the Moringer 
story ('von dem Markgrafen Backenweil ') see Bolte, 
Zeitschrift des Vereins fiir Volkskunde, III, 65-7, and 
for notes of dramas upon the theme, pp. 62-4. I do 
not observe that I have anywhere referred to the ad 
mirably comprehensive treatment of the subject by von 
Tettau, Ueber einige bis jetzt unbekannte Erfurter 
Drucke des 15. Jahrhunderts, Hitter Morgeners Wall- 
fahrt, pp. 75-123. The book did not come into my 
hands till two years after my preface was written. 



292 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



VOL. H. 

56. Dives and Lazarus. 

P. 10 b, III, 507 b, 508 a, IV, 462 b, V, 220 a. Add : 
Ruthenian ballad, Kolberg, Pokucie, II, 280, No 505. 
Legends not in stanzas, White Russian, ' Lazar,' Sejn, 
II, 578-90, 3 copies ; Romanov, Part V, pp. 341-56, Nos 
22-26, 5 copies and variants ; Great Russian, Jakus- 
kin, p. 44, No 13, 2 copies. Lazarus and the rich man 
are brothers. 

II ricco Epulone,' the Madonna begging, Archivio, 
XIV, 209 . 



57. Brown Robyn's Confession. 

P. 13, 510 a, IV, 463 a, V, 220 a. A serpent stops a 
ship and demands a passenger : Larminie, West-Irish 
Folk-Tales, p. 131. On the detention of ships by sub 
marine folk, see Whitley Stokes, Revue Celtique, XV, 
294 f. G. L. K. (The article attributed to R. Kohler, 
II, 510 a, is by L. Laistner.) [Add Jataka, Bk. I, No 
41, Co well, I, 110. A ship mysteriously detained be 
cause the owner has neglected a promise : Yacoub Ar- 
tin Pacha, Contes pop. de la vallee du Nil, p. 74.] 

59. Sir Aldingar. 

[P. 33, 511 b, III, 508 a, IV, 462 a. For parallels, 
including the child champion, see R. Kbhler's account 
of the Breton mystery of Sainte Tryphine, Revue Cel 
tique, I, 222 ff. F. N. Robinson.] 

64. Fair Janet. 

P. 102 f. (Breton ballad), III (497 b, No 5), 508 b, 
IV, 464 a, V, 222 a. Add to the French ballads a copy 
from Basse-Normandie obtained by M. Couraye du Pare, 
fitudes romanes dediees a Gaston Paris, 1891, p. 49; 
'L'infidele punie,' Beauquier, Chansons p. recueillies 
en Franche-Comte, p. 254. [On the similarity of the 
beginning of 'La Fidanzata Infedele' to that of the 
Danish ballad ' Hyrde og Ridderfrue,' see Olrik, Rid- 
derviser, I, 181, No 349.] 

P. 109. Something similar to what is narrated in P 
7-10 is, I am assured by high authorities, familiar to 
practising physicians. An eminent professor in the 
Harvard Medical School informs me that in the case of 
two families under his care the husband has been regu 
larly troubled with " morning sickness " during the first 
three or four months of the wife's pregnancy (the hus 
band in neither case being of a nervous or hysterical 
disposition). Mr. E. E. Griffith, late of Harvard Col 
lege, tells me that a respectable and intelligent man of 
his acquaintance in Indiana maintained that he always 
shared the pains of his wife during parturition, and that 
his labors were as intense in degree and as lono 1 in time 

O 

as hers. A distinguished physician of Indiana, while 



testifying to the frequency of cases of the like sympa 
thy, insists that such experiences occur only to hus 
bands who have witnessed the pains in question, or 
who have learned about them by reading or conversa 
tion on the matter, and that " suggestion " affords an 
explanation of the phenomenon. 

65. Lady Maisry. 

P. 1 1 2 f. In a Polish ballad a girl who has had a 
child irregularly is burned by her two brothers. Her 
paramour comes by when she is half burned, and she 
begs him to save her. (How can I? he says ; your 
brothers are here. The brothers say, we have done 
wrong to burn her ; we have left her child an orphan.) 
Kolberg, Lud, XVI, 291, No 476. 

P. 114, st. 17. 

O whare is a' my merry young men, 
Whom I gi meat and fee ? 

With this common-place compare : 

Hvor ere nu de Ka?mper, min Fader giver Brad 
(Len), Grundtvig, D. g. F., No 184, G, 8, 9. 

Aqui, aqui, los mis doscientos, 
Los que comeis el mi pan. 

Wolf and Hofmann, Primavera, I, 39, 41 f., and Conde 
Claros, the same, II, 374. 

66. Lord Ingram and Child Wyet. 

Pp. 127, 511, III, 509 a. Naked sword as emblem 
of chastity. More notes by R. Kohler to Laura Gon- 
zenbach's Sicilianische Marchen, Nos 39, 40, now pub 
lished by J. Bolte in Zeitschrift des Vereins fiir Volks- 
kunde, VI, 76. 

[Mame Ala, in the Kurdish story ' Mam and Sin,' 
lays a dagger (Dolchmesser) between himself and Sine, 
" so dass der Griff desselben gegen ihre, die Spitze gegen 
seine eigene Brust gerichtet war." Prym u. Socin, 
Kurdische Sammlungen, Petersburg Academy, transla 
tion, p. 101.] 

127, note *, III, 509 a. Italian ballad (sword reduced 
to a straw). Bernoni, Trad. pop. veneziane, p. 36 ; 
Ferraro, Canti pop. di Ferrara, pp. 56, 103; Villario, 
in Archivio, XI, 35; Menghini, Canzoni pop. romane, 
in Sabatini, II Volgo di Roma, I, 75 ff. 

[127 f., 511 b, III, 509 a. Table- jumping. 

Et chil Robert d'Artois n'i fist arestement, 
La table tressali tost et apertement ; 
Au conte Salebrin ala premierement. 

The Vows of the Heron (about 1340), Wright, Politi 
cal Poems, I, 9 f.] 

[128. 'Ebbe Skammelsen' is now No 354 in the 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



293 



Grundtvig-Olrik collection of Danish ballads, Ridder- 
viser, I, 197 ff. 8 Danish versions are printed (some 
of which go back to MSS of the 17th century), with a 
very elaborate introduction and critical apparatus. Dr. 
Olrik regards the extant Norwegian texts as derived 
from print. He enumerates 8 Swedish versions.] 

67. Glasgerion. 

P. 137, II, 511 f. Soporific effect of harping : cf. 
Eevue celfcique, XII, 81, 109, XV, 438. G. L. K. 

69. Clerk Saunders. 

P. 166. Stanzas 30-37 are inserted in Buchan's first 
MS. on a separate slip of paper, and at 29, where the 
ballad originally ended, there is this note : " See the ad 
ditional stanzas on the annexed leaf." W. Walker. 

72. The Clerk's Twa Sons o Owsenford. 

P. 174, note *. 'Dass Schloss in Oesterreich,' etc.: 
see Bohme's Erk, No 61*' g ; Frischbier u. Sembrzychi, 
Hundert Ostpreussiche Volkslieder, No 16, p. 26 ; 
Becker, Rheinischer Volksliederborn, No 2, a, b, c, p. 
2 ff. ; Wolfram, No 44, p. 71; Kristensen, Jyske Folke- 
minder, XI, 218, No 81. 

73. Lord Thomas and Pair Annet. 

P. 181, III, 510 b, IV, 469 a, V, 223 b. Add to the 

Southern ballads ' Le mariage tragique,' Beauquier, 
Chansons p. recueillies en Franche-comte, p. 81 ; 'Las 
bodas,' Mild, Romancerillo Catalan, p. 257, No 262. 
(In this last, ' vert marca esperansa.') 



1 There was such a man as King William, there was, 

And he courted a lady fair, 
He courted such a lady as Lady Margaret, 
For a whole long twelve-month year. 

2 Said he, ' I 'm not the man for you, 

Nor you the maid for me, 
But before many, many long months 
My wedding you shall see.' 

3 Said she, ' If I 'm not the maid for you, 

Nor you the man for me, 

Before many, many long days 

My funeral you shall see.' 



4 Lady Margaret sat in a green shady bower, 

A combing her yellow, yellow hair, 
When who should she see but King William and his 

bride, 
And to church they did repair. 

5 She threw all down her ivory comb, 

Threw back her yellow hair, 
And to the long chamber she did go, 
And for dying she did prepare. 

6 King William had a dream that night, 

Such dreams as scarce prove true : 
He dreamed that Lady Margaret was dead, 
And her ghost appeared to view. 

7 'How do you like your bed?' said she, 

' And how do you like your sheets? 
And how do you like the fair lady 
That 's in your arms and sleeps ? ' 

8 ' Well do I like my bed,' said he, 

' And well do I like my sheets, 
But better do I like the fair lady 
That 's in my arms and sleeps.' 

9 King William rose early the next morn, 

Before the break of day, 
Saying, ' Lady Margaret I will go see, 
Without any more delay.' 

10 He rode till he came to Lady Margaret's hall, 

And rapped long and loud on the ring, 
But there was no one there but Lady Margaret's 

brother 
To let King William in. 



74. Fair Margaret and Sweet William. n 



P. 199. Communicated by Miss Mary E. Burleigh, 
of Worcester, Massachusetts, and derived, through a 
relative, from her great-grandmother, who had heard the 
ballad sung at gatherings of young people in Webster, 
Massachusetts, not long after 1820. 



12 



' Where, O where is Lady Margaret? 

Pray tell me how does she do.' 
' Lady Margaret is dead in the long chamber, 

She died for the love of you.' 

' Fold back, fold back that winding sheet, 

That I may look on the dead, 
That I may kiss those clay-cold lips 

That once were the cherry-red.' 



13 Lady Margaret died in the middle of the night, 

King William died on the morrow, 
Lady Margaret died of pure true love, 
King William died of sorrow. 

14 Lady Margaret was buried in King William's church 

yard, 

All by his own desire, 

And out of her grave grew a double red rose 
And out of hisn a briar. 




294 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



15 They grew so high, they grew so tall, 

That they could grow no higher ; 
They tied themselves in a true-lover's knot, 
And both fell down together. 

16 Now all ye young that pass this way, 

And see these two lovers asleep, 
'T is enough to break the hardest heart, 
And bring them here to weep. 

199 f. Mallet and ' Sweet William.' Full particu 
lars in W. L. Phelps, The Beginnings of the English 
Romantic Movement, 1893, p. 177 ff. 

75. Lord Lovel. 

P. 204 f., note f, 512 b, IV, 471 a, V, 225 a. Add : 
Wolfram, p. 87, No 61, ' Es spielte ein Hitter mit einer 
Madam.' 

205 b, note *. The Swedish ballad (p. 71 f. of the 
publication mentioned) is defective at the end, and al 
together amounts to very little. 

[206. Romaic. Add : 'La belle Augiranouda,' 
Georgeakis et Pineau, Folk-lore de Lesbos, p. 223 f.] 

206 a, and note *. Add : Wolfram, No 28, p. 55, Es 
war ein Jager wohlgemut,' and 'Jungfer Db'rtchen,' 
Blatter fiir Pommersche Volkskunde, II. Jahrgang, 
p. 12. 

211, H. I have received a copy recited by a lady in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, which was evidently derived 
from print, and differs but slightly from a, omitting 8 8 > 4 , 
9 L2 . 

76. The Lass of Roch Royal. 

P. 215. ' Germaine ' : see Daymard, p. 170 ; Revue 
des Traditions populaires, III, 364 ; Beauquier, Chan 
sons pop. recueillies en Franche-Comte, p. 259. 

77. Sweet William's Ghost. 

P. 228 f., 233, 239, HI, 514, IV, 474. Of the suc 
cession of three cocks, white, red, black (reduced to two 
in English ballads), see R. Kbhler, Der weisse, der rothe 
und der schwarze Hahn, Germania, XI, 85-92. [So 
in the tale ' L'Andromede et les Demons,' Georgeakis 
et Pineau, Folk-lore de Lesbos, p. 82 f.] 

228, note f. Two or three additions in Bbhme's Erk, 
I, 598 ff., No 197, c, d, g. 

78. The Unquiet Grave. 

P. 285 a, last paragraph. Servian ballad in which a 
child's shirt is wet with its mother's tears, Rajkovic", 
p. 143, No 186, ' Dete Lovzar i majka mu ' (' The child 
and his mother '). 

[235. Tears burning the dead. Professor Lanman 
furnishes the following interesting parallel from the 



Mahabharata, XI, 43 ff. : Dhrtarastra is lamenting 
for his fallen sons. His charioteer says ; The face 
that thou wearest, covered with falling tears, is not ap 
proved by the sacred books ; nor do wise men praise 
it. For they [the tears], like sparks, 'tis said, do burn 
those men (for whom they're shed).] 



79. The Wife of Usher's Well. 

[P. 238, III, 513. Communicated, 1896, by Miss 
Emma M. Backus, of North Carolina, who notes that it 
has long been sung by the " poor whites " in the moun 
tains of Polk County in that State. It has the mother's 
prayer for the return of her children, as in C, III, 513, 
but is in other respects much nearer to A. In the last 
stanza we should doubtless read " They wet our wind 
ing sheet," or the like. In 4 8 the MS. has lonely or 
lonely, perhaps meant for lovely. 

1 There was a lady fair and gay, 

And children she had three : 
She sent them away to some northern land, 
For to learn their grammeree. 

2 They hadn't been gone but a very short time, 

About three months to a day, 

When sickness came to that land 

And swept those babes away. 

3 There is a king in the heavens above 

That wears a golden crown : 
She prayed that he would send her babies home 
To-night or in the morning soon. 

4 It was about one Christmas time, 

When the nights was long and cool, 
She dreamed of her three little lonely babes 
Come running in their mother's room. 

5 The table was fixed and the cloth was spread, 

And on it put bread and wine : 
' Come sit you down, my three little babes, 
And eat and drink of mine.' 

6 'We will neither eat your bread, dear mother, 

Nor we'll neither drink your wine ; 
For to our Saviour we must return 
To-night or in the morning soon.' 

7 The bed was fixed in the back room ; 

On it was some clean white sheet, 
And on the top was a golden cloth, 
To make those little babies sleep. 

8 ' Wake up ! wake up ! ' says the oldest one, 

'Wake up! it's almost day. 
And to our Saviour we must return 
To-night or in the morning soon.' 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



295 



9 ' Green grass grows at our head, dear mother, 

Green moss grows at our feet ; 
The tears that you shed for us three babes 
Won't wet our winding sheet.'] 

80. Old Robin of Portingale. 

[P. 240. Dr. Axel Olrik thinks that this ballad is 
related to the Danish ballad ' Utro Faestem0 vil forgive 
sin Faestemand,' No 345 in the Grundtvig- Olrik collec 
tion (Ridderviser, I, 167, note *), which he refers for 
its origin to the story of the Lombard queen Rosemunda 
(see note on ' Lord Randal,' No 12, p. 286, above). The 
drink promised to Old Robin by his wife Dr Olrik 
thinks may indicate that the English ballad was once 
more similar to the Danish than it is in the version 
which we possess.] 

87. Prince Robert. 

P. 284. A mother prepares wholesome drink for her 
son, poison for his wife ; both son and wife are poi 
soned. They are buried separately, one in the church, 
one in the graveyard. Trees from their graves join 
their tops. White Russian, Sejn, I, i, 444, No 544, 
447-51, Nos 546-9 ; Hiltebrandt, p. 64, No 65 ; Kup- 
canko, ' Vdova otravljaet nevgstu,' p. 255, No 300. 
Ruthenian, Kolberg, Pokucie, II, 41, No 48. 

90. Jellon Grame. 

P. 303 b, 513 b, III, 515 b, IV, 479 b, V, 226 a. 

Vol'ga, Volch, of the Russian bylinas, must have a 
high place among the precocious heroes. When he was 
an hour and a half old his voice was like thunder, and 
at five years of age he made the earth tremble under 
his tread. At seven he had learned all cunning and 
wisdom, and all the languages. Dobrynya is also to be 
mentioned. See Wollner, Volksepik der Grossrussen, 
pp. 47 f., 91. 

Simon the Foundling in the fine Servian heroic song 
of that name, KaradXic, II, 63, No 14, Talvj, I, 71, 
when he is a year old is like other children of three ; 
when he is twelve like others of twenty, and wonder 
fully learned, with no occasion to be afraid of any 
scholar, not even the abbot. (Cf. ' The Lord of Lome,' 
V, 54, 9, 10.) 

Other cases, Revue Celtique, XII, 63 ; Wardrop, 
Georgian Folk Tales, No 6, p. 26. G. L. K. [Lady 
Guest's Mabinogion, III, 32, 65 ; 201, 232 ; Firdusi, 
Livre des Rois, Mohl, 1838, 1, 353 ff. A. and A. Schott, 
Walachische Marchen, p. 265 (cf. A. Wirth, Danae in 
christlichen Legenden, p. 34). F. N. Robinson. See 
also von Wlislocki, M. u. S. der Bukowinaer u. Sieben- 
biirger Armenier, No 24, p. 65 ; Jacottet, Contes pop. 
des Bassoutos, p. 196 f. ; Georgeakis et Pineau, Folk 
lore de Lesbos, p. 168.] 



93. Lamkin. 

Pp. 320-42, III, 515, IV, 480 f., V, 229 f. 

Denham, Tracts, II, 190, refers to a Northumbrian 
version of the ballad which associated Long Lonkin with 
Nafferton Castle in the parish of Ovingham. He also 
gives a story, obtained from an old man in Newcastle, 
according to which Long Lonkin is no mason but a 
gentleman, who kills the lady and her one child be 
cause the lord of Nafferton had been preferred to him. 
The husband, abandoning his journey to London on 
account of a misgiving that all was not right at home, 
after finding his wife and child dead, hunts down the 
murderer, who drops from a tree in which he had con 
cealed himself into a pool, thence called Long Lonkin's 
pool, and is drowned. 

Communicated by Mr. W. W. Newell, with the super 
scription (by the original transcriber, Miss Emma M. 
Backus) " as sung in Newbern, North Carolina, seventy- 
five years ago" (1895). 

1 John Lankin was a good mason 

As ever laid a stone ; 
He built Lord Arnold's castle 
And the lord he paid him none. 

2 John Lankin then swore, 

If the lord did not pay him, 

He would break into his castle 

And murder all his kinsmen. 

3 Lord Arnold soon did hear 

Of John Lankin's threat so dour; 
He did guard all his castle 
With soldiers every hour. 

4 He said to his lady, 

' I am going away from home, 
And what should you do 
If John Lankin should come ? ' 

5 ' I care not for John Lankin, 

Or any of his kin ; 
I will bar all my doors 
And I '11 pin my windows in.' 

6 The doors were all barrd 

And the windows pinned in, 
And out of the kitchen-window 
The nurse she let him in. 

7 He killed the good lady ' 

With a cowardly cruel blow, 
And threw her pretty baby 
To the dank moat below. 

8 John Lankin was hung 

On the gallows so high, 



296 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



And the nurse she was chained 
In a dungeon to die. 

95. The Maid freed from the Gallows. 

P. 346 f., Ill, 516 a, IV, 481 a, V, 231 a. Michele 
Barbi, Poesia popolare pistoiese, p. 9, found a fragment 
of Scibilia Nobili at Pian dagli Ontani under the 
name of Violina, and Giannini's ' Prigioniera ' (III, 
516 a), otherwise 'Mosettina,' under the name * Vio 
lina,' ' Brunetta,' etc. 

The following copy was communicated by Mr W. 
W. Newell, as derived from Miss Emma M. Backus, 
North Carolina, who says : " This is an old English song, 
in the Yorkshire dialect, which was brought over to 
Virginia before the Revolution. It has not been writ- 

O 

ten for generations, for none of the family have been 
able to read or write." Miss Backus adds that the pro 
nunciation indicated is by no means that which is ordi 
narily used by the people who sing this ballad. It will, 
however, be noted that the Yorkshire dialect is not 
well preserved. 

THE HANGMAN'S TREE. 

1 'Hangman, hangman, howd yo hand, 

howd it wide and far! 

For theer I see my feyther coomin, 
Riding through the air. 

2 'Feyther, feyther, ha yo brot me goold? 

Ha yo paid my fee? 
Or ha yo coom to see me hung, 
Beneath tha hangman's tree?' 

3 ' I ha naw brot yo goold, 

1 ha naw paid yo fee, 

But I ha coom to see yo hung 
Beneath tha hangman's tree.' 



4, 5 \ meyther ) 

7, 8 C as in 1, 2, substituting sister (-for feyther. 

10, 11 ) sweetheart) 
6, 9, as in 3. 



12 Oh I ha brot yo goold, 
And I ha paid yo fee, 
And I ha coom to take yo froom 
Beneath tha hangman's tree.' 

3*. hangmens. 4 8 . mither. 5 2 . Or ha. 5 8 . hang. 
5 4 , 8*, II 4 . gallows tree. 12 8 . An. 12 4 . the. 

348 b. German. Bb'hme, in his edition of Erk's 
Liederhort, I, 277, adds a copy, from singing, dated 
1878, 'Die Losgekaufte,' No 78 e. 

349 f., 514 a, III, 516 b. A young man in prison 
bought out by his sweetheart, father, mother, etc., re 
fusing help : Little Russian, Romanov, I, 63, No 2 ; 
Croatian, Valjavec, p. 303, No 19, ' Junak vu Madjarski 



vuzi ;' Great Russian, Jakuskin, p. 147 f.; Ruthenian, 
Kolberg, Pokucie, II, 226 f., Nos 418, 420. Woman 
rescued by lover from Tatar who was about to kill her, 
the blood-relations declining : Romanov, I, 53, No 105. 
514 a. In Nesselmann's Littauische Volkslieder, No 
119, p. 96, and Bartsch's Dainu Balsai, I, 147, No 107, 
II, 202, No 321 (from Bezzenberger, Litauische For- 
schungen, p. 17, No 27), we have a ballad of a youth 
who does not get release from confinement though his 
blood relations lay down handsomely for him, but in the 
end is freed by his sweetheart with a trifle of a ring or 
a garland. In Bartsch, I, 63, No 53, a girl who has 
been shut up nine years is let alone by her father and 
her brother, but liberated by her lover; II, 296, Ulmann, 
Lettische Volkslieder, p. 168, relations make an attempt 
to buy off a conscript, without success, but his sweet 
heart effects his release by selling her garland. Silly 
stories all. 

96. The Gay Goshawk. 

P. 356, III, 517 a, IV, 482 a, V, 234 a. Chanson du 
Roi Loys, ou de la Belle dans la Tour. Add ' Le Prince 
qui torture sa Fille,' Beauquier, Chansons p. recueillies 
en Franche-Comte', p. 147 ; copy from Normandy, copy 
from Savoy, Revue des Traditions populaires, X, 641 f. 

356 b, III, 517 a, IV, 482, V, 234 a. ' Les trois capi- 
taines.' Add : ' Au chateau de Belfort,' Beauquier, pp. 
59 f., 369 f. 

Ill, 517 b. Girl feigns death to avoid a disagreea 
ble suitor ; test of water, fire, and hand in bosom, which 
last is the hardest to bear : ' Vojvoda Janko i mlada 
Andjelija,' Hrvatske Pjesme iz " Nase Sloge," II, 65, 
No 68. 

100. Willie o Winsbury. 

P. 399, note. The ballad need not be older than the 
16th century. Drop " but it was hardly," etc. 

104. Prince Heathen. 

P. 424 b. It is more commonly the lady that is rolled 
in silk ; the son is laid, dressed, rolled in silk, No 5, 
C, 82, No 20, C, 8 of the places cited (C, 83, E, 32, are 
to be dropped), and No 104, B, 14. 

112. The Baffled Knight. 

H, 479 a. The Complete Collection of Old and New 
English and Scotch Songs, 1735, a rare book, is in the 
library of the British Museum, and Mr Round, who 
has kindly examined it for me, informs me that all the 
ballads in it are repetitions from earlier publications ; 
in the present case of B, from Pills to purge Melan 
choly. 

481 b, IV, 495 a. Add ' II fallait plumer la perdrix,' 
Beauquier, Chansons p. recueillies en Franche-Comte, 
p. 303. 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



297 



481 b, III, 518 a, IV, 495 a, V, 239 b. Tears : add 
'L'Amant timide,' Beauquier, Chansons p. recueillies en 
Franche-Comte, p. 180 ; La Tradition, 1895, p. 69. 

483 b, V, 240 a. La Bateliere ruse'e in Beauquier, 
Chansons populaires recueillies en Franche-Cointe, p. 
40. 

Slavic ballads of similar tenor (Servian), Rajkovic, 
'Mudra devojka,' p. 16, No 23, 'Lukava Cobanka,' p. 
129, No 173. 

VOL. III. 
116. Adam Bell, etc. 

P. 22. Translated after the original text by Professor 
Etnilio Teza : 'I tre Banditi,' Padova, 1894. 

26, 87 1 . I regret having changed 'an oute-horne,' 
which is the reading in all the texts which have the stanza 
(b-f), to 'a noute-horne.' Oute home was originally 
given, and therefore this reading was not entered in the 
variations of c-f, as should have been done later, when 
the reading ' a noute-horne ' was adopted. 

117. A Gest of Robyn Hode. 

P. 43, note . Right-hitting Brand is one of the at 
tendants of Robin in A. Munday's Metropolis Coronata 
(1615), Fairholt, Pageants, I, 40. J. M. Manly. 

52 and note. See further on Le pret miraculeuse- 
ment rembourse, M. Rene Basset, in Revue des Tradi 
tions populaires, IX, 14-31. 

54. Mr Macmath has sent me a transcript of an 
other copy of the song in Deuteromelia which exhibits 
some variations. It was found April 5, 1895, in a bun 
dle of papers that had belonged to Jobn, Duke of Rox- 
burghe. This copy is in a 17th century hand, and at 
the end is written : " This song was esteemed an old 
song before the rebellion broke out in 1641." 

76, st. 412. The first two verses should be corrected 
according to f, g, thus : 

'Mercy,' then said Robyn to our kynge, 
Vnder this.' 

120. Robin Hood's Death. 

P. 103, note *, V, 240. Communion-bread called God 
(Lord). " For it was about Easter, at what times maidens 
gadded abroade, after they had taken their Maker, as 
they call it." Wilson, Arte of Logike, fol. 84 b. J. M. 
Manly. 

" In oure louerd fat he had ynome wel ioyful he was 
f>o." St Edmund the Confessor, v. 573, Furnivall, 
Early English Poems, Philol. Soc., p. 86. " Preostes 
. . . fette to Jis holi maide godes flesch and his blod." 
St Lucy, v. 168, ib. p. 106. G. L. K. 

103, note f. The met-yard, being a necessary part 
of an archer's equipment for such occasions as p. 29, 
148, 158; p. 75, 397 ; p. 93, 28 ; p. 201, 18, 21, may 
well enough be buried with him. 
VOL. v. 38 



104. Russian. Similar directions as to the grave in 
Jakuskin, p. 99. 

123. Robin Hood and The Curtal Friar. 
P. 128 a, v. 80. The reading should be 
Now am I, frere, without, and thou, Robyn, within : 
otherwise there is no change in their relative plight. 

125. Robin Hood and Little John. 

P. 133 a. There is a black-letter copy, printed by 
and for W. Onley, in Lord Crawford's collection, No 
1320 ; the date put at 1680-85. A white-letter copy 
in Roxburghe, III, 728. See Ebsworth's Roxburghe 
Ballads, VIII, 504. 

155. Sir Hugh or the Jew's Daughter. 

[241 a. The Life and Miracles of St William of 
Norwich have been edited by Drs Jessopp and James.] 

156. Queen Eleanor's Confession. 

P. 258 b, 3d paragraph. The Danish ballad is printed 
in Dania, II, 275, 1893: 'Vise om Caroline Mathilde,' 
derived from an old lady who in childhood had beard 
it sung by a peasant girl, about 50 years before the 
publication. 

159. Durham Field. 

P. 283 a. Knights wearing the king's armor in bat 
tle. This was naturally frequently done. So John at 
Poitiers had twenty in his " parements," Froissart (Bu- 
chon), III, 186, and Charles VIII a good number at 
Fornovo, Daniel, Histoire de France, VIII, 222. 

161. The Battle of Otterburn. 

Pp. 294, 520 a, IV, 499, V, 244 b. St George Our 
Lady's Knight. Add: Torrent of Portyngale, v. 1677 : 
E. Fliigel, Neuenglisches Lesebuch, I, 441. 

162. The Hunting of the Cheviot. 

P. 306 a, 38 f. Motherwell has cited an apt passage 
from the romance of Alisaunder which may well be re 
peated. 

Ac theo deol that Alisaunder made 
No may Y nought fully rede. 
Darie starf in his armes two : 
Lord that Alisaunder was wo 1 
He wrong his hondes saun faile, 






298 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



Ofte he cried and ofte he uaile : 
Y wolde Y hadde al Perce y-geve, 
With that Y myghte have thy lif ! 

Weber, Kyng Alisaunder 
vv. 4648-55. 

P. 306, st. 54, IV, 502, V, 244. Hrafn fights after 
Gunnlaugr has hewn off his feet : Gunnlaugs saga Orm- 
stungu, ed. Mogk, p. 27. W. H. Schofield. 

Note f- The Highlander is paralleled by an Indian 
in The Observations of Sir Richard Hawkins, Mark- 
ham, The Hawkins' Voyages, Hakluyt Society, p. 243, 
and by Mordred in Malory's Morte Darthur, ed. Som- 
mer, Bk 21, ch. 4. G. L. K. 



168. Flodden Field. 

P. 351 b (12, lapt all in leather), IV, 507 a. The 
dying witch of Berkeley says to her children : Insuite 
me corio cervino, deinde in sarcophago lapideo supinate, 
operculum plumbo et ferro constringite. William of 
Malmesbury, Gesta Regum Anglorum, ed. Stubbs, Bk 
2, I, 254, 204. 

169. Johnie Armstrong. 

[P. 367. Johnie's plain speech to the king. So in Li 
Charrois de Nymes, v. 283, in Jonkbloet, Guillaume 
d' Orange, I, 80 : " Et dit Guillaumes, ' Dans rois, vos i 
mentez.' "] 

367, and note. The Baron of Brackley's son (No 
203), set on the nurse's knee, uses nearly the same words 
as Johnie Armstrong's in B, 24. M. Gaidoz, Melusine, 
VII, 70, cites from Hone the passage in No 54 (B, 5, 6, 
see also A, 5, 6, D, 4, 5), in which Jesus speaks from 
his mother's womb. See further Melusine, IV, 447, 
V, 36, 257, VI, 92. 



170. The Death of Queen Jane. 

P. 372-6. Appendix. 'The Duke of Bedford,' 
Longman's Magazine, XVII, 217, 1890, " sent from Suf 
folk," is one hdf (sts 5-8) a plagiarism from ' The 
Death of Queen Jane.' Compare A, 5, 6, B, 8, C, 5, 6, 
D 6 of Queen Jane with what follows. The remainder 
of ' The Duke of Bedford ' is so trivial that it is not 
worth the while at present to assign that piece its own 
place. I have not attempted to identify this duke of 
Bedford; any other duke would probably answer as 
well. 

THE DUKE OF BEDFORD. 

1 Six lords went a-hunting down by the seaside, 
And they spied a dead body washed away by the 
tide. 



2 Said one to the other, ' As I 've heard them say, 

'T is the famous Duke of Bedford, by the tide washed 
away.' 

3 They took him up to Portsmouth, to the place where 

he was born, 

From Portsmouth up to London, to the place where 
he was known. 

4 They took out his bowels and laid down his feet, 
And they garnished his body with roses so sweet. 

5 Six lords went before him, six bare him from the 

ground, 

Eight dukes followed after, in their black velvet 
gowns. 



And the Royal Princess Mary went weeping away. 

7 So black was the funeral and so white were their 

fans, 

And so pretty were the flamboys that they carried in 
their hands. 

8 The drums they did beat and the trumpets they did 

sound, 

And the great guns they did rattle as they put him 
in the ground. 

173. Mary Hamilton. 

P. 382. The passages folio-wing relate to the affair 
of the Frenchwoman and the apothecary. Calendar of 
State Papers, Foreign Series, of the Reign of Elizabeth, 
1563. (Indicated to me by Mr Andrew Lang.) 

The Queen's apothecary got one of her maidens, a 
Frenchwoman, with child. Thinking to have covered 
his fault with medicine, the child was slain. They are 
both in prison, and she is so much offended that it is 
thought they shall both die. Randolph to Cecil, Edin 
burgh, 21 Dec., 1563, p. 637. The apothecary and the 
woman he got with child were both hanged this Friday. 
Randolph to Cecil, Dec. 31, 1563, p. 650. 

The heroine of this ballad is Mary Hamilton in all 
copies in which she has a full name, that is, twelve out 
of the twenty -four which have any name ; Mary simply, 
or Mary mild,* is found in eleven copies, and Maisry in 
one. Finding in the history of the court of Peter the 
Great an exact counterpart of the story of the ballad 
with a maid of honor named Mary Hamilton filling the 
tragic role, and " no trace of an admixture of the Rus 
sian story with that of the Frenchwoman and the queen's 
apothecary," I felt compelled to admit that Sharpe's 

* Mild Mary is an appellation which occurs elsewhere (as 
in No 91 E), and Mary Hamilton and Mary mild are inter 
changeable in X. It is barely worth remarking that Myle, 
Moil, in C, S, are merely varieties of pronunciation, and 
Miles in W, an ordinary kind of corruption. 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



299 



suggestion of the Russian origin of the ballad was, how 
ever surprising, the only tenable opinion (III, 382 f.). 
Somewhat later a version of the ballad (U) was found 
at Abbotsford in which there is mention of the apothe 
cary and of the practices for which he suffered in 1563, 
and this fact furnished ground for reopening the ques 
tion (which, nevertheless, was deferred). 

Mr Andrew Lang has recently subjected the matter 
of the origin of the ballad to a searching review (in 
Blackwood's Magazine, September, 1895, p. 381 ff.). 
Against the improbability that an historical event of 
1718-9 should by simple chance coincide, very minutely 
and even to the inclusion of the name of the principal 
actor, with what is related in a ballad ostensibly re 
counting an event in the reign of Mary Stuart, he sets 
the improbability that a ballad, older and superior in 
style to anything which we can show to have been pro 
duced in the 18th, or even the 1 7th century,* should have 
been composed after 1719, a ballad in which a contem 
porary occurrence in a foreign and remote country 
would be transferred to Scotland and Queen Mary's 
day, and so treated as to fit perfectly into the circum 
stances of the time : and this while the ballad might 
entirely well have been evolved from a notorious domes 
tic occurrence of the date 1563, the adventure of Queen 
Mary's French maid and the apothecary which has 
now turned out to be introduced into one version of the 
ballad.f 

I wish to avow that the latter improbability, as put 
by Mr Lang, has come to seem to me considerably 
greater than the former. 

The coincidence of the name of the heroine is indeed 
at first staggering ; but it will be granted that of all the 
' ' honorable houses ' ' no one might more plausibly sup 
ply a forgotten maid of honor than the house of Hamil 
ton. The Christian name is a matter of course for a 
Queen's Mary. 

384 ff., IV, 507 ff., V, 246 f. 

BB. 

THE QUEEN'S MABIES. 

Communicated by Mr Andrew Lang as received 
from Mrs Arthur Smith ; sung by a nurse. 4 is clearly 
modern. 

1 Yestreen the queen had four Maries, 
But the nicht she '11 hae but three ; 
There was Mary Beaton, and Mary Seaton, 
And Mary Carmichell, and me. 

* In the 18th century we have ' Derwentwater ' and ' Rob 
Roy,' both of slight value; in the 17th 'The Fire of Fren- 
draught ' and ' The Baron of Brackley,' both fairly good 
ballads, and others of some merit ; but nothing in either to 
be compared with ' Mary Hamilton.' 

t As to the "ballads" about the Maries mentioned by 
Knox, I conceive that these may mean nothing more than 
verses of any sort to the discredit of these ladies. 



2 Oh little did my mither think, 

At nicht when she cradled me, 
That I wad sleep in a nameless grave 
And hang on the gallows-tree. 
Yestreen, etc. 

3 They '11 tie a kerchief round my een, 

And they '11 na let me see t' dee, 
And they '11 spread my story thro a' the land, 
Till it reaches my ain countrie. 

4 I wish I micht sleep in the auld kirkyard, 

Beneath the hazel tree, 

Where aft we played in the long simmer nichts, 
My brithers and sisters and me. 

176. Northumberland betrayed by 
Douglas. 

P. 411 a. Looking through a ring. " The Dul Dauna 
put a ring to his eye, and he saw his grandfather on the 
deck walking." Larminie, West Irish Folk-Tales, p. 9. 
G. L. K. 

177. The Earl of Westmoreland. 

P. 417. DrW. H. Schofield suggests that the ro 
mance imitated in the second part of this ballad is, 
Libeaus Desconus. There the hero, who is but a child 
in years (in the ballad he has a child's voice), comes to 
a fair city by a river side, the lady of which is besieged 
by a giant, black as pitch. Libeaus undertakes to fight 
the giant, and is received by him with disdainful lan 
guage. The fight is " beside the water brim." They 
break their spears at the first encounter ; then fight on 
foot with swords. Libeaus strikes off the giant's head 
and carries it into the town ; the people come out to 
meet him" with a fair procession," and the lady invites 
him to be her lord in city and castle. Compare the 
ballad, etc., 54-78, and Libeaus Desconus, v. 1321 ff. 
[See Dr Schofield's Studies on the Libeaus Desconus, 
p. 242, in Studies and Notes in Philology and Litera 
ture published under the direction of the Modern Lan 
guage Departments of Harvard University, Vol. IV.] 

178. Captain Car, or, Bdom o Gordon. 

IV, 513 b, H 2 4 . Mr Macmath is convinced that the 
missing (illegible) word is orghie (orgeis=a fish, a large 
kind of ling). 

182. The Laird o Logie. 

P. 456. Buchan's original MS. p. 216 ff., < The 
Laird o Logic.' 

1 Lady Margaret carries the keys o the cellar, 
I wyte she carries them carefullie; 



300 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



Nae other ane her favour coud gain 
But the winsome laird o young Logic. 

2 When the king gat word o that, 

I wat an angry man was he ; 
He 's casten him into prison strong, 
And sware high hanged he shoud be. 

3 Lady Margaret tore her yellow hair, 

She 's torn it out locks three by three ; 
Says, ' Wae to the day I eer was born, 
Or knew the young laird o Logie.' 

4 ' Now hold your tongue,' the queen she said, 

' And ye '11 let a* your folly be ; 
I hae minded me on a wyle 

Will gain the life o young Logic.' 

5 Then she has done her up the stairs, 

And she fell low down on her knee ; 
' Win up, win up, my dame the queen, 
What makes ye bow sae low to me? ' 

6 ' O do you mind when we were wed, 

Ye promisd askings three by three? 
And a' the boun that I now crave 
Is, Save the life o young Logie. 

7 ' If ye had asked lands, my dame, 

Ye might had askings three by three ; 
But a' the lands in fair Scotland 
Winna save the life o young Logie.' 

8 Then she has done her down the stairs, 

But nae gude tidings brought her wi ; 
The king has sworn a solemn oath, 
And broken it can never be. 

9 Hold your tongue, Margaret,' said the queen, 

' And ye '11 lat a' your folly be ; 
1 11 mind me on another wyle 
To gain the life o young Logie.' 

10 She's counterfeit the king's hand write, 

And she has stole his right glove tee ; 
And sent the jailors strict command 
To loose and set young Logie free. 

11 She sent him a bag o gude red gowd, 

Another bag o white monie ; 
Likewise a pistol by his side, 

And bade him shoot when he wan free. 

12 As he passd by the queen's window, 

He fell low down upon his knee ; 
Says, ' Peace be wi the queen hersell, 
And joy be in her companie.' 



13 As he passd by the king's window, 

There a proud volley then gae he ; 
Says, ' Hang your dogs when ye think time, 
For ye 'se neer hang him, young Logie.' 

14 Out then speaks the king himsell, 

I wyte a solemn oath sware he ; 
1 1 '11 wad my head an my crown baith, 
I hear the voice o young Logie.' 

15 The king he calld his jailors all, 

He called them then three by three ; 
Says, ' How are the prisoners ane and a' ? 
Where is the laird o young Logie ? ' 

16 ' Did you not send your ain hand write? 

Did you not send your right glove tee? 
We took the keys o the jail-house door, 
And loosd and set young Logie free.' 

17 Then out it speaks the king again, 

I wyte an angry man was he ; 
' The morn, before I eat or drink, 
High hanged shall you jailors be.' 

18 Then out it speaks the queen hersell, 

I wyte a light laugh then gae she ; 
' If ye 're to hang them ane and a', 
I fear ye will begin wi me. 

19 'Did I not steal your ain hand write? 

Did I not steal your right glove tee? 
Then sent the jailors strict command 
To loose an' set young Logie free.' 

190. Jamie Telfer. 

P. 5 a first paragraph. However, "in the list of 
Border thieves made in the year 1552, William Patrick, 
the priest, and John Nelson, the curate of Bewcastle, 
are both included " : Denham Tracts, 1, 1 50. This shows 
that the society was homogeneous. 

191. Hughie Grame. 

P. 14, E. Between 12 and 13 follows in Buchan's 
original MS. : 

Ye '11 tell this news to Maggy my wife, 
The first time ye gang oer the muir, 

She is the cause I loose my life : 

She bade me steal the bishop's mare. 

192. The Lochmaben Harper. 

P. 21. E has in Buchan's original MS. this refrain 
at the end of the verse : 

Hey, didentie, didentie, didentie (bis). 






ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



301 



196. The Fire of Frendraught. 

P. 41, note J. Read : The peerage of Aboyne was 
first created in 1626, in favor of John Gordon, fifth son 
of the first Marquis of Huntly (Viscount of Aboyne and 
Melgum in 1627). He married Sophia Hay, a daugh 
ter of Francis, Earl of Errol, The Records of Aboyne, 
edited by the Marquis of Huntly, New Spalding Club ; 
1894, pp. 325, 526. 

V, 251 b, P. 44. In " But Rothiemay lie," may seems 
to have been accidentally omitted. The "Turn" in 
Scott was probably meant for Twin, the dot of i being 
omitted. 

200. The Gypsy Laddie. 

P. 61 ff., V, 252. The three stanzas which follow are 
given in H. A. Kennedy's " Professor Blackie : his Say 
ings and Doings, London, 1895 " as they were sung by 
Marion Stodart, Professor Blackie's aunt, to her sis 
ter's children. P. 12 f. (Communicated by Mr David 
MacRitchie, of Edinburgh.) 

There were seven gypsies all in a row, 

And they were brisk and bonny ; O 
They sang till they came to the Earl o Cassilis' gate, 

And there they sang sae sweetly. O 

They sang sae sweet and sae complete 

That doun came the fair leddy ; 
And when they saw her weel-faured face 

They cast the glamour ower her. 

So she 's taen off her high-heeled shoes, 
That are made o the Spanish leather, 

And she 's put on her Highland brogues, 
To skip amang the heather. 

" On the discovery of which the earl ' saddled to him 
his milk-white steed,' and rested not till he had hanged 
the seven gypsies on a tree." 

O at the end of the second and the fourth verse of each 
stanza. 

216. The Mother's Malison, etc. 

P. 186 f. In 'Majcina kletva,' Hrvatske Pjesme iz 
"Nae Sloge," II, 22, No 18, two lovers go off in a 
boat, under a mother's curse, and are both drowned. 

229. Earl Crawford. 
P. 280 a, A, b. b was written down March 25, 1890. 

234. Charlie MacPherson. 

P. 310. Mr Walker of Aberdeen suggests that Billy 
Beg in 3 should be Bellabeg, a small property in Strath- 



don. It will be observed that two other men in the 
same stanza are named by their estates. 

235. The Earl of Aboyne. 

P. 311 b, omit the paragraph beginning J, and say : 

Charles, first Earl of Aboyne, married for his first 
wife Margaret Irvine of Drum, who died in December, 
1662. (The Records of Aboyne, edited by the Marquis 
of Huntly, New Spalding Club, 1894, p. 552.) The 
story of the ballad, so far as is known, is an absolute 
fiction. 

In vol. ii of Retours or Services of Heirs, No 4906 
(Aberdeen), 17 June, 1665, there is the entry : Domino, 
Anna Gordoun, haeres Dominae Margaret* Irving, spon- 
S33 Comitis de Aboyne matris. (Mr Walker of Aber 
deen.) 

311, V, 270. Mr Macmath has sent me this stall- 
copy, printed by J. Morren, Cowgate, Edinburgh. 

PEGGY IRVINE. 

1 Our lady stands in her chamber-door, 

viewing the Grahams are a coming ; 
She knew by the light of their livery so red 
they were new come down from London. 

2 She called on her chambermaid, 

and Jeany her gentlewoman : 
You '11 dress my body in some fine dress, 
for yon is my good lord a coming. 

8 Her smock was of the holland so fine, 

her body round with busting ; 
Her shoes were of the small corded twine, 
and her stockings silk and twisting. 

4 Her petticoats was of the silk so fine, 

set out with the silver and scolloping ; 
Her gown was of the red damask silk so fine, 
trimmed with the red gold gold mounting. 

5 ' You guildery maids, come trim up my gauze, 

and make them silver shining ; 
With strawberry flowers cover all my bowers, 
and hang them round with the linen. 

6 ' Ye minstrels all, be on our call 

when you see his horses coming ; 
With music spring, spare not your string 
when you hear his bridles ringing.' 

7 She called on Meg her chamber-maid, 

and Jeanny her gentlewoman : 
' Go bring me a bottle of the good Spanish wine, 
for to drink his health that 's coming.' 

8 She gently tripped down the stair, 

and away to the gate to meet him : 



302 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



< You are welcome, you lord of the Boyne, 
you are welcome home from London.' 

9 ' If this be so, come let me know, 
come kiss me for my coming ; 
For tomorrow should have been my wedding-day 
if I had staid in London.' 

10 She gave the glass out of her hand, 

she was a woeful woman : 
' If the morrow should be your wedding-day, 
Go back to your whores in London.' 

11 He looked oer his right shoulder, 

his comely court behind him : 
' This is a merry welcome ' he says, 
' that we have got from London. 

12 ' To your horse, to your horse, my nobles all, 

to your horse, let us be going ; 
This night we '11 lodge in Drummond castle, 
and tomorrow we '11 march to London.' 

13 Now this lady has fallen sick, 

and doctors we her dealing, 
But at length her heart did break, 
and letters sent to London. 

14 He took the letter in his hand, 

and loud, loud was he laughing, 
But before he read it to an end, 
the tears did come down rapping. 

15 * To your horse, to your horse, my nobles all, 

to your horse, let 's be going ; 
To your horse, let us all go in black, 
and mourn for Peggy Irvine.' 

16 When he came to his own castle-gate, 

the knight was weary weeping : 
' Cheer up your heart, you lord of Boyne, 
your lady is but sleeping.' 

17 'Sleeping deary, sleeping dow, 

I 'm afraid she 's oer sound sleeping ; 
It 's I had rather lost all the lands of the Boyne 
before I would have lost Peggy Irvine.' 

4 s . set out out. 10 8 . If he. 

238. Glenlogie, or, Jean o Bethelnie. 

P. 338 b, 2d paragraph. As to the name Melville, 
Mr Walker of Aberdeen remarks : If Buchan's story 
(given in his notes) of the Glenlogie incident were cor 
rect, the maiden's name must have been Seaton, and 
not Melville, the Seatons and Urquharts being the only 
two names which in historical times could be called 
lairds of Meldrum or Bethelnie. 



248. The Grey Cock, or, Saw you my 
Father ? 

P. 390. Add to the French ballads ' Le voltigeur 
fidele,' Beauquier, Chansons p. recueillies en Franche- 
Comte", p. 338. 

250. Henry Martyn. 



P. 393. 'Andrew Bartin,' communicated by Miss 
Louise Porter Haskell as derived from Gen. E. P. Alex 
ander of South Carolina, and derived by him from the 
singing of a cadet at West Point Military Academy in 
the winter of 1856-7. Two or three slight corrections 
have been made by Mrs A. C. Haskell, sister of Gen. 
Alexander. This copy comes nearer than the others 
to the original Andrew Barton ; but sts 11-13 are de 
rived from Captain Ward, No 287, 8, 10. 

1 Three bold brothers of merrie Scotland, 

And three bold brothers were they, 
And they cast lots the one with the other, 

To see who should go robbing all oer the salt sea; 
And they cast lots the one with the other, 

To see who should go robbing all oer the salt sea. 

2 The lot it fell on Andrew Bartin, 

The youngest of the three, 
That he should go robbing all oer the salt sea, 
To maintain his two brothers and he. 

3 He had not sailed but one long summer night, 

W nen daylight did appear ; 
He saw a ship sailing far off and far round, 
At last she came sailing quite near. 

4 'Who art? who art?' says Andrew Bartin, 

' Who art thee comes sailing so nigh? ' 
' We are the rich merchants of merrie England, 
Just please for to let us pass by.' 

5 'Pass by? pass by?' says Andrew Bartin, 

' No, no, that never can be ; 
Your ship and your cargo I will take away, 
And your brave men drown in the sea.' 

6 Now when this news reached merrie England 

King George he wore the crown 
That his ship and his cargo were taken away, 
And his brave men they were all drowned. 

7 ' Go build me a ship,' says Captain Charles Stewart, 

' A ship both stout and sure, 
And if I dont fetch this Andrew Bartin, 
My life shall no longer endure.' 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



303 



8 He had not sailed but one long summer night, 

When daylight did appear, 
He saw a ship sailing far off and far round, 
And then she came sailing quite near. 

9 'Who art? who art? ' says Captain Charles Stewart, 

'Who art comes sailing so nigh? ' 
' We are the bold brothers of merrie Scotland, 
Just please for to let us pass by.' 

10 'Pass by? pass by? ' says Captain Charles Stewart, 

' No, no, that never can be ; 
Your ship and your cargo I will take away, 
And your brave men carry with me.' 

11 ' Come on ! come on 1 ' says Andrew Bartin, 

' I value you not one pin ; 

And though you are lined with good brass without, 
I '11 show you I 've fine steel within.' 

12 Then they drew up a full broadside 

And at each other let pour ; 
They had not fought for four hours or more, 
When Captain Charles Stewart gave oer. 

13 ' Go home ! go home ! ' says Andrew Bartin, 

' And tell your king for me, 
That he may reign king of the merry dry land, 
But that I will be king of the sea.' 

2 1 , etc. Bartyn. Gen. Alexander remarks that "the 
accent was on the last syllable." 



' Row tu me, row tu me,' says He-ne-ry Burgin, 

' Row tu me, row tu me, I prah ; 
For I ha tarnd a Scotch robber across the salt seas, 

Tu ma-i-ntn my tew brothers and me.' 

Fragment of a Suffolk Harvest Home song, remem 
bered by an old Suffolk divine. Contributed by Ed 
ward Fitzgerald to Suffolk Notes and Queries in the 
'Ipswich Journal,' 1877-78 ; where another stanza fol 
lows which has no connection with the above. See 
'Two Suffolk Friends,' by Francis Hindes Groome, 
Edinburgh and London, 1895, p. 79 f. 

269. Lady Diamond. 

PP. 29 a. Zupitza, Die mittelenglischen Bearbeitun- 
gen der Erzahlung Boccaccio's von Ghismonda u. Guis- 
cardo, in Geiger's Vierteljahrsschrift f. Kultur u. Lit- 
teratur der Renaissance, 1886, I, 63 ff.] 

29. Italian. D. ' Ricardo e Germonda,' communi 
cated by P. Mazzucchi, Castelguglielmo, July, 1894, to 
Rivista delle Tradizioni pop. italiane, I, 691. 

[32 ff. On these stories of the husband who gives his 



wife her lover's heart to eat, see H. Patzig, Zur Ge- 
schichte der Herzmare, Berlin, 1891.] 

34. A is translated by Professor Emilio Teza, ' Donna 
Brigida,' in Rassegna Napolitana, II, 63, 1895. 

272. The Suffolk Miracle. 
P. 60 ff. See Professor Schischmanov in Indc^er- 

O 

manische Forschungen, IV, 412-48, 1894, Der Leno- 
renstoff in der bulgarischen Volkspoesie. Professor 
Schischmdnov counts more than 140 versions of The 
Dead Brother, ballad and tale, in Albanian, Bulgarian, 
Greek, Roumanian, and Servian, 60 of these Bulgarian. 
Dozon 7 is affirmed to be a mere plagiarism. The ver 
sions of the Romaic ballad run up to 41. A very strong 
probability is made out of the derivation of all of the 
ballads of ' The Dead Brother ' from the Greek. 

62. Compare La Jeune Fille et 1'ame de sa mere, 
Luzel, I, 60, 61 ff. A girl who grieves for her dead mo 
ther, and wishes to see her again, is directed by the 
cure* to go three nights to the church, taking each time 
an apron for her mother. The mother tears the apron 
into 9, 6, 3 pieces successively. 

La mere va alors trouver sa fille 
Et lui parle de la sorte : 

' Tu as eu du bonheur 

Que je ne t'aie mise toi-meme en morceaux ! 

' Que je ne t'aie mise en pieces, toute vivante, 
Comme je le faisais a mes tabliers ! 

' Tu augmentais mes peines, chaque jour, 
Par la douleur que tu me temoignais ! ' 

64. A dead lover takes his mistress on his horse at 
midnight and carries her to the grave in which he is to 
be buried the following day. Her corpse is found there, 
flattened out and disfigured. 'La fiancee du mort,' 
Le Braz, La Legende de la mort en Basse-Bretagne, 
pp. 359-67. 

[65 a. Romaic. Add : Georgeakis et Pineau, Le 
Folk-lore de Lesbos, p. 253 (in translation).] 

273. King Edward the Fourth and a Tan 
ner of Tamworth. 

P. 74 f. Similar tales : Se*billot, Contes pop. de la 
Haute-Bretagne, II, 149 f. ; Luzel, Contes pop. de la 
Basse-Bretagne, I, 259. 

274. Our Goodman. 

P. 88 a. [A version similar to that in Smith's Scotish 
Minstrel, but not absolutely identical, is mentioned in 
Blatter f. literarische Unterhaltung, 1855, p. 236, as 
contained, with a German translation, in " Ten Scottish 



304 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



Songs rendered into German. By W. B. Macdonald of 
Rammerscales. Scottish and German. Edinburgh, 
1854." Professor Child refers to this version in a MS. 
note. A specimen of the translation is given in the 
journal just cited, as well as enough of the Scotch to 
show that the copy is not exactly like Smith's. " Vet- 
ter Macintosh " and " der Furst Karl " are mentioned. 
Macdonald's book is not at this moment accessible. 
G. L. K.] 

89 f., 281 a. ' Le Jaloux, ou Les Repliques de Marion ; ' 
add version from Normandy (prose), Revue des Tradi 
tions populaires, X, 136 ; Hautes-Pyrenees, p. 515. 

The copy in Le chroniqueur du Perigord et de Limou 
sin is 'La rusade,' Poesies pop. de la France, MSS, III, 
fol. 84. The copy in Le Pelerinage de Mireille (A. 
Lexandre), is from Provence, and closely resembles that 
in Daudet's Numa Roumestan. 

Italian. Add ' Marion,' Rivista delle Tradizioni pop. 
italiane, II, 34-37. ' O Violina ' is repeated, very nearly, 
in a Tuscan Filastrocca, Rivista delle Tradizioni pop. 
italiane, II, 474 f. ; see also Archivio, III, 43, No 18. 
A Polish ballad has some little similarity : Kolberg, 
Lud, XXI, 54, No 112. 

275. Get up and bar the Door. 

P. 96 ff., 281. Add : ' Le fumeur de hachich et sa 
femme,' cited by R. Basset, Revue des Traditions Po 
pulaires, VII, 189. G. L. K. [Also The First Fool's 
Story,' M. Longworth Dames, Balochi Tales, Folk- 
Lore, IV, 195.] 

277. The Wife Wrapt in Wether's Skin. 

P. 104. From the recitation of Miss Lydia R. Nich 
ols, Salem, Massachusetts, as heard in the early years 
of this century. Sung by a New England country fel 
low on ship-board : Journal of American Folk-Lore, 
VII, 253 ff., 1894. 

As to "drew her table," 13, the following informa 
tion is given : " I have often heard a mother tell her 
daughter to draw the table. ' Forty years ago it was 
not uncommon to see in farmhouses a large round table, 
the body of which was made to serve as an armchair. 
When the table was not in use the top was tipped back 
against the wall. Under the chair-seat was a drawer 
in which the table linen was kept. When meal-time 
came the table was drawn away from the wall, the top 
brought down on the arms of the chair, and the cloth, 
which had been fished out of the drawer, spread over 
it." 

1 Sweet William he married a wife, 

Gentle Jenny cried rosemaree 
To be the sweet comfort of his life. 

As the dew flies over the mulberry tree. 

2 Jenny couldnt in the kitchen to go, 

For fear of dirting her white-heeled shoes. 



3 Jenny couldnt wash, and Jenny couldnt bake, 
For fear of dirting her white apurn tape. 

4 Jenny couldnt card, and Jenny couldnt spin, 
For fear of hurting her gay gold ring. 

5 Sweet William came whistling in from plaow, 
Says, ' O my dear wife, is my dinner ready naow?' 

6 She called him a dirty paltry whelp : 

'If you want any dinner, go get it yourself.' 

7 Sweet William went aout unto the sheep-fold, 
And aout a fat wether he did pull. 

8 And daown on his knees he began for to stick, 
And quicklie its skin he thereof did strip. 

9 He took the skin and laid on his wife's back, 
And with a good stick went whikety whack. 

10 ' I '11 tell my father and all my kin 
How still a quarrel you 've begun.' 

11 'You may tell your father and all your kin 
How I have thrashed my fat wether's skin.' 

12 Sweet William came whistling in from plaow, 
Says, ' Oh my dear wife, is my dinner ready naow ? ' 

13 She drew her table and spread her board, 
And, Oh my dear husband,' was every word. 

14 And naow they live free from all care and strife, 
And naow she makes William a very good wife. 

Folk-Lore Society, County Folk-Lore, Printed Ex 
tracts : No 2, Suffolk, 1893, collected and edited by the 
Lady Eveline Camilla Gurdon, p. 139 f. Contributed 
by " a Suffolk man " to the Suffolk Notes and Queries 
column of The Ipswich Journal, 1877. 

1 There wus a man lived in the West, 

Limbo clashmo ! 

There wus a man lived in the West, 
He married the wuman that he liked best. 
With a ricararo, ricararo, milk in the morn, 

O dary mingo. 

2 He married this wuman and browt her horn, 
And set her in his best parlour rom. 

3 My man and I went to the fowd, 

And ketcht the finest wuther that we could howd. 

4 We fleed this wuther and browt him horn, 
Sez I, ' Wife, now youar begun yar doon. 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



305 



5 I laid this skin on my wife's back, 
And on to it I then did swack. 

6 I 'inted har with ashen ile, 

Limbo clashmo ! 
I 'inted har with ashen ile, 
Till she could both brew, bake, wash and bile. 

O dary mingo mingo. 

278. The Farmer's Curst Wife. 

P. 107 a. This has no connection with the story in 
Wendenmuth, CEsterley, I, 366, p. 402; see (Esterley's 
note, V, 60. 

Compare the broadside ballad 'The Devil and the 
Scold,' Roxburghe Collection, I, 340, 341 ; Chappell, 
Roxburghe Ballads, II, i, 367 ff. ; Collier, Book of Rox 
burghe Ballads, 1847, p. 35 ff. 

280. The Beggar-Laddie. 

P. 116. Motherwell sent a copy of C to Sharpe with 
a letter from Paisley, 8th October, 1825, and printed C 
in an article on " Scottish Song" in the Paisley Maga 
zine, 1828, p. 621, in both cases with two or three insig 
nificant variations. He mentions in the latter another 
version in which the hero is called King James, in 
accordance with the vulgar traditions concerning the 
Gudeman o Ballengoich. 

In Findlay's MSS, I, 144, there are five unimportant 
stanzas, nearer to D than to the other versions, and 
having, like D, the title ' The Gaberlunzie Laddie.' 

286. The Sweet Trinity (The Golden 

Vanity). 

P. 137. B. Mr Macmath has a copy of ' The Goul- 
den Vanitee ' in the handwriting of Peter Scott Fraser 
which is identical with that printed by Logan except 
that it has Vanitee for Vanitie in I 3 and 9 2 , Countree in 
4 2 , they row'd in 6 1 , Oh I in 8 1 , and Eck iddle dee (not 
du) in the burden. Mr. Macmath notes that B was 
printed by Mrs. Gordon, in Christopher North, a Me 
moir of John Wilson, Edinburgh, 1862, II, 317 ff., in 
a form identical with that in Mr. Eraser's MS. copy 
[except for one variation (they 've row'd for they row'd 
in 6 1 )]. 

287. Captain Ward and the Rainbow. 

P. 135. A copy taken down from the lips of an old 
Suffolk (Monk Soham) laborer was contributed by 
Archdeacon Robert Hindes Groome to Suffolk Notes 
and Queries in the Ipswich Journal [1877-78], and 
is repeated in Two Suffolk Friends, 1895, p. 46. 
W. Macmath. 



291. Child Owlet. 

P. 156. Mr Macmath has called my attention to a 
ballad on the story of Child Owlet by William Bennet 
in The Dumfries Monthly Magazine, II, 402, 1826. 
This piece, called 'Young Edward,' "is founded upon 
a tradition still current in the district in which Morton 
Castle is situated." Its quality is that of the old-mag 
azine ballad. 

294. Dugall Quin. 

P. 165. Dugald Gunn, Mr Macmath suggests, may 
have been a mistaken reading of Scott's difficult hand 
writing on the part of the editor of the Ballad Book ; 
as is certainly the case with regard to The Stirrup of 
Northumberland, V, 207 b, No 9, G. 

I unhappily forgot Buchan's 'Donald M'Queen's 
Flight wi Lizie Menzie,' Ballads of the North of Scot 
land, II, 117, which, though I think it corrupted at the 
end, removes the principal verbal difficulties in the Old 
Lady's copy. Mr Walker of Aberdeen has reminded 
me of Buchan's ballad, and he had previously suggested 
to me that Dunfermline was proprietor of Fyvie, and 
this fact had disposed me to read Fyvie where the text 
already given has farei, farie. Of the rightfulness of 
this reading there can now be no doubt, though infor 
mation is desirable as to the tempting cheese of Fyvie, 
of which I have not found mention elsewhere. 

Buchan, II, 319, makes the following note on his 
copy : 

" Donald M'Queen, the hero of this ballad, was one of the 
servants of Baron Seaton of Fyvie, who, with his master, 
had fled to France after the rebellion in 1715. Baron Sea- 
ton having died in France, Donald, his man, returned to 
Fyvie with one of his master's best horses, and procured a 
love potion, alias 'the tempting cheese of Fyvie,' which had 
the effect of bewitching, or, in other words, casting the gla 
mour oer his mistress, Lizie Menzie, the Lady of Fyvie. Some 
years afterwards this lady went through the country as a 
common pauper, when, being much fatigued, and in a for 
lorn condition, she fell fast asleep in the mill of Fyvie, 
whither she had gone to solicit an alms (charity) : on her 
awakening, she declared that she had just now slept as soun 
a sleep with the meal-pock beneath her head, as ever she had 
done on the best down-bed of Fyvie. This information I 
had from James Rankin, an old blind man, who is well ac 
quainted with the traditions of the country." 

Alexander Seaton acquired Fyvie, it is said, hi 1596, 
and in 1606 was created Earl of Dunfermline. Castle 
and title were forfeited in 1689, and the property was 
purchased of the crown in 1726 by the Earl of Aber 
deen. Dunfermline had no horses for Dugald or Don 
ald to take after 1689. The whole story of Lizie Men 
zie, Baroness of Seaton, seems to be a fiction as sheer 
as it is vulgar. Lizie Menzie's forsaking her husband 
for a footman is refuted by the well-informed Rankin 
himself, who tells us that the husband had died in 
France before his man " returned to Fyvie with one of 



VOL. v. 



39 



306 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



his master's best horses." The conclusion is borrowed 
mostly from ' The Gypsy Laddie,' where even the drink 
ing of one's own brewage is to be found ; but ' The 
Gypsy Laddie ' is not to be reproached with the foolish 
last stanza. 

1 Donald, he 's come to this town, 

And he 's been lang awa, 
And he is on to Lizie's bedside, 
Wi his tartan trews and a'. 

2 ' How woud you like me, Lizie,' he said, 

' An I ware a' your ain, 
Wi tartan coat upo my back, 

And single-soled sheen, 
A blue bonnetie on my head, 

And my twa winking een ? ' 

3 Weel woud I like you, Donald,' she said, 

' An ye ware a' my ain, 
Wi tartan coat upo your back, 

And single-soled sheen, 
And little blue bonnetie on your head, 

And blessings on your een. 

4 ' But how woud ye like me, Donald,' she said, 

' An I ware a' your ain, 
Wi a siller snood into my head, 

A gowd fan in my hand, 
And maidens clad in green satins, 

To be at my command? ' 

5 ' Weel woud I like you, Lizie,' he said, 

' And ye ware a' my ain, 
Wi a siller snood into your head, 

A gowd fan in your hand, 
But nane o your maidens clad in green, 

To be at your command.' 

6 Then but it speaks her mither dear, 

Says, ' Lizie, I maun cross you ; 
To gang alang wi this young man, 
We 'd think we had but lost you. ' 

7 O had your tongue, my mither dear, 

And dinna think to break me ; 
For I will gang wi this young man, 
If it is his will to take me.' 

8 Donald M'Queen rade up the green, 

On ane o Dumfermline's horses, 
And Lizie Menzie followed him, 
Thro a' her father's forces. 

9 ' O follow me, Lizie, my heart's delight, 

And follow me for you please ; 
Rype well the grounds o my pouches, 
And ye '11 get tempting cheese.' 



10 ' O wae mat worth you, Donald M'Queen 1 

Alas, that ever I saw thee ! 
The first love-token ye gae me 
Was the tempting cheese o Fyvie. 

11 ' O wae be to the tempting cheese, 

The tempting cheese o Fyvie, 

Gart me forsake my ain gudeman 

And follow a footman-laddie ! 

12 ' But lat me drink a hearty browst, 

Just sic as I did brew ! 
On Seton brave I turnd my back, 
A' for the sake o you.' 

13 She didna wear the silken gowns 

Were made into Dumbarton, 

But she is to the Highlands gane, 

To wear the weeds o tartan. 

14 She 's casten aff the high-heeld sheen, 

Made o the Turkey leather, 
And she 's put on the single brogues, 
To skip amo the heather. 

15 Well can Donald hunt the buck, 

And well can Lizie sew ; 
Whan ither trades begin to fail, 

They can take their bowies and brew. 



P. 174. 



299. Trooper and Maid. 



D. 



'The Trooper Lad.' Communicated by Mr Mac- 
math, with, this note : "Received, 21st August, 1895, 
at Crossmichael, from my aunt, Miss Jane Webster. 
Learned by her many years ago, at Airds of Kells, 
from the singing of John Coltart." 

1 The trooper lad cam to oor gate, 

And oh ! but he was weary, 
He rapped at and chapped at, 
Syne called for his kind deary. 

2 The bonnie lass being in the close, 

The moon was shining clearly, 
'Ye'r welcome here, my trooper lad, 
Ye'r welcome, my kind deary.' 

3 She's taen his horse by the bridle-reins, 

And led him to the stable, 
She's gien him corn and hay to eat, 
As much as he was able. 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 



307 



4 She's taen the knight by the milk-white hand, 

And led him to her chamber, 
And gied him bread and cheese to eat, 
And wine to drink his pleasure. 

5 'Bonnie lassie, I'll lie near ye noo, 

Bonnie lassie, I'll lie near ye, 
An I'll gar a' your ribbons reel 
In the morning or I leave ye.' 



6 



And she put off her wee white smock, 
Crying, ' Laddie, are ye ready? ' 



7 The first time that the trumpet played 

Was, Up, up and awa, man ! 
The next time that the trumpet played 
Was, The morn's the battle-day, man ! 

8 ' Bonnie lassie, I maun leave ye noo, 

Bonnie lassie, I maun leave ye ; 
But, if e'er I come this way again 
I will ca in an see ye.' 

9 Bread and cheese for gentlemen, 

An corn and hay for horses ; 
Pipes and tobacco for auld wives, 
And bonnie lads for lasses. 

10 'When will us twa meet again? 

When will we meet and marry? ' 
' When cockle-shells turn silver bells, 
Nae langer, love, we '11 tarry.' 

11 So he's taen his auld grey cloak about him noo, 

An he's ower the mountains fairly, 
Crying, ' Fare ye weel, my bonnie lass, 
Fare wee), my am kind deary.' 



Mr Macmath adds the following stanza, "remem 
bered by Miss Agnes Macmath, 2nd January, 1896, 
from the singing of her mother." 

'When will we twa meet again? 

When will we meet and marry ? ' 
When peace and truth come to this land, 

Nae langer, love, we'll tarry.' 

305. The Outlaw Murray. 

P. 186 a. Mr Macmath writes (Dec. 24, 1895) that 
he has examined two boxes of MSS belonging to the 
late Mr George Wilson and found not The Song of the 
Outlaw Murray,' but ' The Song of the Rid Square,' in a 
transcript (perhaps early rather than late) of the 1 7th 
century. He thinks that by a slip of memory on Mr 
Wilson's part ' The Outlaw Murray ' was mentioned in 
stead of this. 

Fragments. 

P. 202 b, last stanza. Mr Macmath has given me 
the following variation, communicated (with a story of 
a wife carried off by fames) by J. C. to The Scottish 
Journal, II, 275, 1848. 

O Alva woods are bonnie, 

Tillycoultry hills are fair, 
But when I think on the braes o Menstrie 

It maks my heart aye sair. 



P. 210 b, to III, 500. Mr Macmath informs me that 
the manuscript of Motherwell here referred to is the 
same as that already printed, and correctly printed, at 
III, 500 f. 



GLOSSARY 



NOTWITHSTANDING every effort to make this glos 
sary as complete as possible, there remain not a few 
words and phrases with which I can do nothing satis 
factory. This is the case not only with ballads from 
recent tradition, but with some that were taken down 
in writing three hundred years ago or more. 

At every stage of oral transmission we must suppose 
that some accidental variations from what was delivered 
would be introduced, and occasionally some wilful vari 
ations. Memory will fail at times ; at times the lis 
tener will hear amiss, or will not understand, and a 
perversion of sense will ensue, or absolute nonsense, 
nonsense which will be servilely repeated, and which 
repetition may make more gross. Dr Davidson in 
forms me that one of his female relatives rendered * an 
echo shrill did make ' (in Chevy Chace, 10) 'an achish 
yirl did make,' and that he took ' aching or frightened 
earl ' to be the meaning until he read the piece. Happy 
are we when we are sure of the nonsense ; as when, in 
The Gypsy Laddie, ' they cast their glamourie owre her ' 
is turned into 'they called their grandmother over.' 
" The combination of two words into one," says Dr 
Davidson, " is not rare in Scotch, nor is the reverse pro 
cess. For example, the word ' hypochondriac ' is turned 
into 'keepach and dreeaeh,' and the two parts often 
used separately. ' I 'm unco keepach ' and ' I 'm unco 
dreeaeh' are common expressions among old people. 
Imagine an etymologist, ignorant of the facts, trying to 
discover the etymology of ' keepach ' or of ' dreeaeh.' " 
Words of one or two syllables are long enough for the 
simple ; a laboring man of my acquaintance calls rheu 
matism 'the tisin': what are the other syllables to such, 
who understand no one of the three ? Learned words 
do not occur in ballads ; still an old native word will be 
in the same danger of metamorphosis. But, though 
unfainiliarity naturally ends in corruption, mishearing 
may have the like effect where the original phrase is 
in no way in fault ; hence, perhaps, ' with a bretther 
a degs ye '11 clear up my nags,' ' a tabean briben 
kame,' ' I '11 have that head of thine, to enter plea att 
my iollye,' etc. 

It must be borne in mind, however, that as to non 
sense the burden of proof rests always upon the expos 
itor. His personal inability to dispose of a reading is 
not conclusive ; his convictions may be strong, but pa 
tience and caution are his part and self-restraint as to 
conjectures. 

It is with a strong feeling of what ' a kindly Scot ' 
signifies that I offer my thanks to many gentlemen who 



have favored me with comments on lists of words sub 
mitted to them. Especial acknowledgment is due to 
Dr Thomas Davidson, a native of Old Deer, who has 
made his home in the United States, and to Mr Wil 
liam Walker, of Aberdeen. Besides these, I have to 
mention with gratitude the Rev. Robert Lippe, Rev. 
Dr Walter Gregor, the late Dr William Alexander, 
Principal Sir W. D. Geddes, Dr James Mori, Messrs 
William Forbes, James Aiken, David Scott, W. Car- 
nie, W. Cadenhead, and William Murison, all of Aber- 
deenshire ; Dr James Burgess, Messrs J. Logic Rob 
ertson and William Macmath, of Edinburgh ; Professor 
A. F. Murison, of London, and Dr Robert Wallace, 
M. P. ; Professor James Cappen, Queen's University, 
Kingston, Ontario ; Rev. Professor J. Clarke Murray 
and Principal Dr W. M. Barbour, of Montreal; Rev. Dr 
Alexander McDonald, St Francis Xavier's College, An- 
tigonish, N. S. ; Rev. Dr Waters, -of Newark, N. J. 
For some difficult English words help has been given 
by Dr W. Hand Browne of Johns Hopkins University, 
Professor Manly of Brown University, and Professor 
Kittredge of Harvard College. 

It will be observed that ballads in the Skene MS 
which were derived from the " Old Lady's Collection " 
are not glossed, but the originals, which should be sub 
stituted for Skene's more or less incorrect copies. 

[References are usually to volume, page, and stanza.] 

A 

a', aa, aw, all. 

a'= every, a' man, I, 68, 27; II, 71, 16; 75, 13; 193, 24; 

IV, 46, 5, 6; 235, 10; V, 169, 6; 221, 10; 224, 22; 237, 
8; 239, 36; 260 b, 5. a' body, V, 273 a. 

a, abridgment of have, I, 315, ll; III, 215, 10; 440, 13; 
441, 26; V, 55, 26; 79, 33; 213, 10; 224, 28; 251, 36. 

a=he, III, 54, 3, 7. 

a=I, in the phrase a wat (a wait, a wite, etc.), II, 159, 
11, 16, 19; 160, 10-16, 19; III, 299, 9: I know, verily, 
assuredly. II, 230, 6 : used by a mere trick, with 
hardly a meaning, a's, V, 266, 9: I's, I shall, will. 

a=of : III, 91, 2; 93, 36; 298, 59; 307, 10; 308, 12, 24; 
309, 40 (a trusti tre ?) ; 349, 37, 39; 464, ll; IV, 504, 27. 

a= on. a grefe, III, 69, 268. a blode (ablode), I, 244, 9; 

V, 288 b, v. 16. a row, III, 117, 24. 
a=one: I, 126, 4; 326, 7; 327, 24. 

a= ae, one single : V, 256 b, 2; 257, 6, 15; 278, 26. a warst, 
V, 215, 6. V, 239, 36 : one and the same. See ae. 

a=to. abound, II, 109, 20: to go. a dee, 110, 25: to do. 
So, perhaps, abee. 



310 



GLOSSARY 



a be, abe, a bee, abee, a beene (with let), I, 356, 

D b 4; II, 29, 5; 108, 5; 159, 25; 185, 27; III, 455, 4, 

8; V, 229, 35: be." 

let abee with, IV, 96 f., D 9, 13. 

let abee of, IV, 97, E 4, 5; 98, 15; 99, 14, 15. 
abeen, abeene, aboon, abone, etc., I, 315, 8; II, 468, 

7; IV, 326, 16, 19: above, his hose abeen his sheen, 

V, 17, 35 ; 18, 14 : his stockings ungartered, falling 

above, over his shoes, 
abide, abyde, III, 67, 219 ; 73, 345 ; V, 82, 24, 40: stop, 

wait. Ill, 97, 8; 279, 13: withstand. 
pret. abode, III, 63, 143: waited. 
p. p. abiden, abyden, III, 57 f., 25, 30: awaited, 
able, II, 51, 4 : suitable, 
ablins, aiblins, III, 467, b 2: perhaps, 
aboard, V, 134, 16: alongside; and so 8, 20, 22, or, laid us 

aboard may be boarded us. 
abode, III, 335 a : waiting, delay, 
abode, III, 430, l, burden: endured, 
aboone, aboun, abown. See abune. 
abound, ill a bound, II, 109, 20: ill (prepared) to go. 
about, been, V, 52, 77: been engaged, 
abowthe, III, 112, 52: about, 
abune, aboone, aboon, abon, abone, abown, aboun, 

abeen, II, 20, 8; 22, 16; 23, D 7, E 8; 24, P 10; 25, 

G 13; 27, 21; 28, 25; 29, 19; 30, 12; 145, 20: above (above 

them). 

abyde. See abide, 
abyden. See abide. 

abye, III, 128, 84; V, 234 b, 3: pay, suffer consequences. 
Acaron, III, 149, 32: being the oath of a Turk (36), 

this may be taken as Alcoran. 
acward, ackward stroke, III, 110, 17; IV, 148, 43: 

described as a backhanded stroke. See aukeward. 
advance, V, 147, 8: help on (?). 
aduenture, III, 359, 90: hazard. 
aduise, II, 436, 63: observe. 
ae = one, single : I, 310, 6; 467, 33; 478, l; II, 77, 29; 

IV, 257, 10; 260, 10; 261, 9; 262, 24; 445, 1; 476, 3. 

ae best, I, 465, 13, 17; IV, 479, 13. ae first, I, 426, 7, 

8; 494, 22. ae warst (a warst), V, 214 f., l, 6. the 

ae . . . the ither, III, 500 b, 7: the one . . . the other. 
ae = mere, sole, ae licht o the moon, IV, 469, 4; 470, 35. 
ae = aye, always: 1, 245, 7; II, 185, 40; 208, 12; IV, 247, 

B n; 265, 13. 

aer, I, 16, C 12: ear, plough, 
aevery, III, 465, 25: voracious, very hungry. (A. S. 

gifre.) 
afar, afore, affore, I, 438, A l; II, 21, 15, 16; 138, 8; 

III, 405, 15; IV, 128 f., 19, 21, 23, 24: before, 
aff, I, 346, 12: oft. 

affronted, II, 367, 45; IV, 242 b: put to shame, morti 
fied. Ill, 152, 6: confronted, opposed, 
a-fit, V, 115, 7: on foot, 
aft, III, 491, 8; V, 299 b, 4: oft. 
after, after the way, III, 99, 57: along, on. aftere brade 

waye, I, 333, l: along, over, after me, III, 74, 367: 

according to me, my advice, 
against, III, 344, 36: by way of preparation for the case. 



agast of him, III, 99, 49: alarmed about him (the con 
sequences to him). 

agaste, V, 71, note f: terrified. 

agayn(e), ageyn, III, 98, 29; 297, 46: against, a-geyn 
euyn, III, 13, 3: towards. 

agoe, V, 83, 44: gone. 

agree, IV, 147, 32: bring to agreement. 

a-3on, comyn a-jon, III, 13, 4: came upon, encountered. 

ahind, ahint, ahin, I, 299, 14; II, 105, ll; 315, 5; III, 
480, 14; 481, 30; IV, 246, 6: behind. V, 17, 32: over 
and above. 

aiblins, ablins, I, 439, 4: perhaps. 

aileth at. See at. 

air, in a drowsy air, IV, 20, ll: air seems to mean at 
mosphere simply ; possibly disposition, condition. 

air, aire, ayre, by air, by ay re, II, 106, l; 270, 30; 

III, 162, 58; 164, b 58; V, 270, 7: early, betimes, 
airn, ern, I, 342, 33; 348, 13, 19; 355, 42; III, 474, 39; 481, 

35; 505, 21: iron. 

airt, art, II, 23, E 5: quarter of the heavens, point of 
the compass, west-airt lands, II, 73, 30: western, rade 
the airt o, IV, 27, 31 : in the direction of. a' airts o 
wind, II, 341, Q. been at that art, III, 163, 87. 

air ted, V, 99, C 4: laid their course, 

aith, oath. 

a' kin, a' kin kind, II, 114, 2: all kind, every. 

'al, that 'al, IV, 17, 3: 'ull, wull, will. 

al, al so mote I the, III, 68, 243: absolutely. 

al, will. 

alaffe, III, 34, ll: aloof. 

alane, I, 347, 2. mine alane, I, 332, E l, F l. See lane. 

alang, along. 

albergs, II, 340 b: houses, dwells. 

ale an, alone. 

alee, IV, 516 b, 3: on the lea, a-field, but for the pur 
pose of keeping guard; cf. Ill, 487, A 15; 492, D 5; 
495, B b 4. 

aleene, I, 346, 4: alone. 

alelladay, I, 220, A l: exclamation of grief. 

algate, IV, 93, note *: anyway. 

aliment. IV, 91, a: provision for maintenance; here, 
apparently, alimony. 

alive, I loved ye best ye were born alive, IV, 521, 19: 
corrupted; the sense appears in IV, 26, A 16, / love 
best that 's born alive, best of all living things. 

all. all and, I, 56, 6, 7; III, 432, 16, 17; all as she stood, 

1, 117, 16; all in my hand, III, 186, 20; all by the 
roode, III, 188, 2; all by his side, V, 212 b, 8; all on, 

IV, 393, 5; 394, B 2, 5; 395 f., B b 2, 3, 5; V, 233 f., 

2, 3, 5; all at her head, feet, V, 158, 9; all down, V, 
293 b, 5; all oer, 302 b, 2. 

allacing, IV, 18, 21: repeating of alace (alas), 
allther, III, 57, 9; 70, 283, 284, representing the ancient 

genitive plural of all, allther moste, allther best: best 

of all, etc. 

along of, III, 279, 8: owing to. 
alongst, V, 267 a, 7, 8: along, 
alow, III, 4, 1: below, 
alow, aloe, George Aloe, V, 133. 



GLOSSARY 



311 



ala, alsua, I, 327, 27; IV, 366 D 5: also. 

also, I, 328, 46: all so, just as. 

althocht, III, 370, 19: although. 

amain (e), III, 345, 48; 350, 51 : with vigor, strength, 
force, blew, sound, cald, amain, III, 181, 27; 341, 46; 
343, 17; 344, 36: with strength, loudly. II, 385, 24; 
IV, 13, 2: in force, in numbers. I, 398, 4; III, 176 f., 
11, 16; 209, 9: at once, quickly. 

amain, V, 134, 7, 16: (Fr. amener) lower, strike. 

a-married, IV, 236, 4: married. 

a-marvel, II, 386, 12: marvel (Fr. e*merveiller). 

amense, III, 465, 23: amends. (Should be printed as 
one word, not a mense as in the MS.) 

American leather, I, 494, 14; III, 3, is; 5, C 2: has 
been explained as morocco made from American 
horsehides, for which a patent was obtained c. 1799. 
See The Scots Magazine, 1799, LXI, 286. But the 
date of the text at III, 3, is 1780. 

amo, V, 306 b, 14: among. 

among, II, 451, 89: between. 

amoued, II, 442, 9: excited, agitated. 

an, II, 75, 20; V, 214 b, 4: one. 

-an, -ane, -and, -en, etc., annexed to the definite form 
of the superlative of the adjective (preceded by the, 
her, etc.) or to numerals, or following separately, 
seems to be an=one. (The history of this usage has 
not been made out.) The firstan, nextan, firsten, 
nexten, passim (the seconden only at I, 507, 3); the 
firstand, I, 135, O 18 ; the nextand, II, 94, 6 ; her 
firsten, thirden, etc., II, 161, 9-12 ; her uexten, II, 
164, 19; the firstin, the nextin, II, 380, 22; the first 
an, the niest an, I, 351, 45; the warst in, the best in, 
II, 98, 43, 44; the third ane, the fourth ane, etc., II, 
71, 5, 6; 78, 8-ll; the third one, fourth one, etc., II, 72, 
5-7; the first ae, IV, 490, 20; the first y, III, 3, 15; the 
firsten ane, II, 370, 16. So, that samen, II, 475, 17. 

an, I, 295, 30; 468, 6, 9; 480, 6, 7; II, 21, B 11: and, if. 

ance, anse, I, 341, 9; 342, 23; 344, 21, 22; V, 9, 2, 4: once. 

anchor, did on anchor rise so high, III, 344, 34 (c, g, 
have ride): the ship is in full sail; no apparent sense. 

ancient, ancyent, III, 286, 40; 340, 37; 341, 46; 406, 
so, 31, 39; 420, 20; 422, 65, 66: ensign. 

and, superfluous (as in "when that I was and a tiny 
little boy," and two other songs in Shakspere), see 
II, 57 b; II, 58, 7, 8; 59, 22, 27; 60, 39; 87, 31; III, 
145, 6; 277, 16; 419, 8; IV, 448 a, 1, 2. The same 
usage in German, Swedish, and especially Dutch bal 
lads. 

and, if. 

-and, -end, termination of the present participle: whiss- 
land, singand, cumand, seekand, etc., I, 326-329; II, 
268, 17; IV, 195 f ., D 2, 7, 10, 14; V, 192 f., 35, 49. 

ane=a, I, 327, n. 

ane = alone, me ane, I, 333, 1. 
ane, II, 191, 37= en, end. 

aneath, aneth, II, 185, 29; 191, 23; V, 224, 17: beneath, 
aneath the sun, III, 5, D 7: sheltering the eyes with 
the hand. So, below the sun, III, 6, 6; 8, 6. 



anent, I, 222, 8; II, 166, 21; 191, 24; 391, 20: over 
against, in the face of. 

anew, I, 305, i; III, 495, B b 3-6; IV, 249, 10; 271, 
B 4: enough, enow. 

angel(l), II, 444, 55; 449, 61; 453, 32; III, 156, 4; V, 
101, 4: a gold coin, of value varying from 6s. 8d. to 
10s. 

angerly, III, 286, 55; 361, b 21: angrily. 

ankir, III, 66, 198: recluse, hermit. 

another, III, 138, 8, 12, is: corrupt, or verbiage. 

anse, IV, 518, 3: once. 

answers your quarrel, I, 411, 18: be responsible for, 
take on me to settle, your difference. 

answery, v., V, 283, 12: answer. 

ant, I, 244; V, 288 b: and. 

antine (Fr. antienne), IV, 439 b, 6: anthem. 

anunder, I, 302, A 9: under. 

aout, V, 304 b, 7: out. 

apayd, euelle apayd, III, 322 a: ill satisfied, displeased. 

ape, lead an ape in hell, penance for old maids : I, 
232, 14. 

apparent, III, 451, note *: heir apparent, (parand, 
II, 447, 2, 4.) 

applyed, p.p., V, 51, 67: plied. 

appone, I, 327, 14, 28: upon. 

apurn, V, 304 b, 3: apron. 

ar, I, 244, 18; III, 110, 18: or, before. 

ar blast, I, 311 a: cross-bow. 

archborde, III, 340, 23, 29 (in 29, MS. charke-bord) : 
may be a misspelling of hachebord, st. 36 (hatch-bord, 
p. 342, 70). Barton grappled the ship to his archborde, 
from which we should infer that the word meant the 
side of the ship, as hatch-bord would naturally signify 
at p. 342, 70. But archborde might of itself mean the 
stern of the ship, a timber at the stern being still so 
called, and German hack-bord meaning the upper part 
of the stern of a ship. (It is singular that none of 
the difficult words archborde, hachebord, hall (III, 
340, 29) occur in the York copy, IV, 503, which, how 
ever, has difficulties of its own.) 

archery, III, 309, 41 : collected archers. 

arches, II, 307, 29: aims, shoots. 

are, I, 327, 23: before. 

armorie, I, 285, 34, seems to be employed in the sense 
of armament, men at arms. 

armorye, III, 286, 56: armor. 

arselins, V, 124, 12: backwards. 

art, airt, quarter of the heavens, been at that art, III, 
163, 87: in that quarter, at that place. See airt. 

as, pron., I, 477, 6, 7, 13, 15; II, 4, D 4; 452, 14; V, 206 a, 
1; b, 6: that, who. 

as, con/., I, 477, 5, 18, 19; II, 453, 28: that. 

as, V, 218 b, D l: was. 

as ever, III, 281, 10: as long as. 

asay, p.p., Ill, 112, 48: tried. [Read asayedf] 

asembled, III, 164, b 15: met (encountered). 

ask, I, 353, H n; 355, 41; II, 504, 32: newt, lizard. 
(A. S. aSexe.) Cf. ass. 



312 



GLOSSARY 



askd, my father he askd me an acre o land, I, 17, D 9: 

askd seems to be an erroneous repetition from 8; 

aucht, owned, would be expected ; or left, gave, as 

in K, L. 
asking, asken, askend, askent, II, 91, D 27, 28; 92, 

22-25; 192, 7, 14; 194, 23; 359, 7-10; V, 221 ., 27, 29, 30, 

32; 223, 6, 7; 418, 8: boon, request, 
askryede, I, 326, 4: described, 
ass, I, 349, 11, 15: ask, newt, 
assoyled, absolved, 
aste, I, 217, i: east. 

astoned, astonied, V, 76, 24; 82,35: astonished, amazed, 
asurd, I, 334, 5: of azure; should probably be asur. 
at. reade must rise at, II, 53, 34, 35; take councell at, 

III, 405, 17, 23; take leaue att, III, 357, 42: from, ask 
at, beg at, spear at, 1,497, L 5-8, M 2-5; III, 161,32; 
330, 15; IV, 331, 10: of, from, ails ye at, aileth thee at, 
II, 72, 3; 78,7; 80, 3; IV, 95, 12; 96, 4; 99, H 7: with 
(what ail comes to you from me ?). see at me, IV, 
345, 8: in. come atte, IV, 507, 81: to, to the presence 
of. I was at thee, IV, 436, 1: (apud) with. 

at, IV, 331 b, 8: out (?). 

at, jobbing at, I, 104, A b 10: jogging off, away (?). 

at, with ellipsis of the door, rappit at, clappit at, I, 

105 a, 29; IV, 444, 16, 35; V, 173, 1; 306 b, l. 
at, att, pron. and conj., II, 472, 24; III, 488, 19; IV, 

348, l; 446, 6; 469 b, 10, 12; V, 79, 31; 118, B 12; 220 b, 

5; 224, 28; 236, li 4 ; 256, 8: that, (it, V, 236, li 2 , may 

be for this at.) 
a ta, III, 464, l: at all. 
athort, I, 305, 3: across (upon), far athort, V, 164, 

D b 13: a long way. 
attempt, III, 39, no: tempt, 
attemptattis, III, 451 b: enterprises, 
atteynt, I, 328, 34: (here) lay hands on. 
attoure, III, 458 b: outowr, over and above, 
atweel, I, 22, 2, 3: I wot well, assuredly. 
atween, I, 466, n; II, 315, 6; V, 156, ll, 13: between. 

atween hands, II, 139, 6: meanwhile, 
atwyn, V, 80, 57: from one another, 
aucht, aught, wha 's aucht ? = who is it owned (owns) ? 

whose is (are) ? I, 22, 4; 472, l; II, 114, ll; 164, 8, 11; 

IV, 32, C 6; 194, 8; 199, 21; 202, 9; 203, 17. aught 
a bairn, II, 494, 4: had. where is the knight aught 
me for wedding, IV, 182, F 6: who was (is) under 
obligation to marry me ? (This is my ransome I ought 
to him to pay, I, 294, 12.) It is not unlikely that aucht 
in the phrase wha 's aucht is present in sense. Indeed 
we have oughts, II, 336, Q 5. Cf. who owes ? whose 
is ? IV, 205, 27. 

aught, v., suld hae come and aught a bairn to me, II, 
494, 4: had (a child by). 

aukeward, awkwarde stroke, II, 59, 23; III, 93, 40: 
backhanded. See acward. 

auld son, without regard to absolute age: 1, 79, 58; 184, 
8, 9; IV, 94, A 4; 97, P 4. So old sister for elder 
sister, eldest of three: I, 175, 8; auld dochter, II, 
462, 33. auld son, of child just born and the only one, 
H, 105, 7; 107, 3-6, 17; IV, 206, 15. So at II, 95, li, 



called young son immediately after. Of babe in the 

cradle, II, 325, 10. See old. 
aull, auld, old. I, 359, 6, 9, in four nights auld: at the 

age of four days. II, 80, 9, in twall years auld. 
aussy pan, I, 301, 6: ash pan. 

austerne, I, 134, N 3: austere, harsh. See osterne. 
ava, II, 189, 33; 323, 25; III, 7, 13, 14; IV, 257, 12; 300, 

3: of all. II, 360, 10; V, 112, B b 7: at all. 
avayle, II, 436, 70: put down, doff, 
avow, IV, 240, 7: seems to be used as consent rather 

than, own, confess ; but cf. IV, 56, A 8; V, 252 a. 
avowe, n., Ill, 65, 180, 187, 190; 68, 240; 73, 346; 297, 44; 

307, i: vow. 
avowe, avower, III, 67, 232; 620 a, No 161: patron, 

protector. 

avoyd, V, 53, 102: begone, 
aw, all. 

await, lie at await, III, 409, note *: in wait, 
awaite, awayte, III, 72, 330; 84, 330; 88, 331: lie in 

wait for. awayte me scathe, III, 66, 202: lie in wait 

to do me harm. 

awende, I, 244, 9: weened, imagined, 
awet, III, 112, 64: know. Perhaps, await, descry, 
awkwarde stroke, III, 93, 40: a backhanded stroke. 

See aukeward. 
awsom, V, 193, 49: awful, 
ay, I, 333, l, 2, 3: a. 

ayenst, III, 76, 420: against, towards, about, 
ayon, ayone, ayont, I, 301, i; 302, i; 428, 20; II, 133, 

D 4, 6; IV, 412, e: beyond. IV, 330 a, appendix, l: 

and oddly of the man, as farther from the wall. 1 1ll, 

392, 20, 21: beyond, across. I, 220, A 2; IV, 8, 46: 

over against, in the face of. 
ayre, eare, ere: heir. 



ba, IV, 354, i: a luUaby. 

baas, balls. 

baba, II, 339, 19: baby. 

bace, V, 104 a=bash (Swed. basa): beat; pret. baist, 

III, 164, b 26(7). See baist. 

bacheeleere, II, 58, 13: young knight devoted to the 

service of a lady. 

back-spald, V, 106, 1! 4: hinder part of the shoulder, 
bad, bade, V, 18, 9; 27, 41; 243, ll: ordered, offered. 

(A. S. be6dan.) 
bad, bade, baed, III, 267, 15: abode, stopped, waited 

for. II, 115, 22; III, 312, 28; V, 236, 17: remained, 

staid. (A. S. bfdan.) 
badgers, III, 477, 8: pedlars, 
baed, II, 115, 22: abode, stopped. See bad. 
baffled, II, 479 : thwarted (perhaps, made a fool of). 

IV, 146 f., ll, 31: affronted, insulted, or disgraced, 
bail, life in, III, 10, 19: in power, at disposal, 
bailie, III, 385, 12: municipal officer, alderman. IV, 

326, 12: bailiff, steward, manager of an estate. See 
baylye. 

bairn, barn, bern, III, 437, 28, 36; 453, 17; IV, 309, 5; 
310, 12: child. 



GLOSSARY 



313 



baist, pret ., Ill, 164, b 26 : beat, baste, p.p., Ill, 165, 92 : 

beaten. (Icel. beysta ?) See bace. 
baked, II, 403, 2: becked, curtsied, made obeisance, 
bale, II, 45, so, 44; 58, ll; 419, 51; 466, 34; III, 92, n, 

16; 99, 51: ill, trouble, mischief, harm, calamity, de 
struction. See balys. 
bale, I, 355, 41: fire, 
bale-fire, II, 118, 9; 119, 19; 155, 36; IV, 467, 12, 14: 

bonfire, large fire, 
ballants, IV, 129, 30: ballads. 

ballup, III, 181, 15 (ballock) : front or flap of breeches, 
balow, IV, 351, l; 352, C 1: lullaby, sing a lullaby to. 
balys, III, 310, 68: misfortunes, troubles. See bale, 
ban, band, I, 69, 38; 73, 53; II, 376, 36; III, 491, 12: 

hinge, 
ban, bann, v., I, 304, E 5; 305, 6; HI, 104, 8; IV, 87, 

14; V, 115, 7: curse, 
ban, band, bande, bond, IV, 388, 7: band. IV, 388, 

11: bond. 

ban, I, 55, 12: bound (pret.). 
band(e), III, 430, 8; 431, 7: bond, compact, 
band-dogs, bandoggs, III, 123, 16; 125, 31; 126, B b 

31; c 31: dogs that are kept chained (on account of 

their fierceness). 

banded, IV, 388, 7: bound, secured with bands, 
bane, I, 285, 33; III, 92, 7: destruction, death, 
bane, saddle of the bane (MS. bone), I, 468, 13; bouer 

o bane, II, 185, 31 : meaning probably the royal bone 

of I, 466, 10. See roelle bone, 
bane-fire, II, 146, 23; 331, 17: bonfire, 
bang, II, 438, 4: may be any implement for banging ; 

it is sometimes stick, here strap (in should be wi). 
bang, IV, 85, 5: emend to hang. 

bangisters, IV, 37, 7; 38, 9: people violent and re 
gardless of law. 

banis, III, 78, 453: slayers, murderers, 
banished, III, 401, 15: possibly with the meaning 

banned, but the ordinary sense does well enough, 
bank, sea-bank, IV, 229, 3, 7: shore (?). 
bankers, I, 334, 9: carpets, tapestries for benches, 
banket, III, 446 b: banquet, 
banneret, II, 395, N i: banner-bearer (see B l; E l; I 

1; K 1; M 1; P l). 
barck, bark, II, 239, 1: birk, birch, 
barelins, II, 212, 12: barely, 
bargain, III, 181, 13: brawl, fight. 
barker, V, 78, ll; 80, 43, 49, etc.; 82, 20: tanner, 
barking, I, 109, C 10: who uses bark, as a tanner, 
barm, I, 243, 7: lap. 
barn-well thrashing, II, 322, 8: the well has no sense, 

and has probably been caught from 9, at the far well 

washing. To be dropped, 
barn, barne, II, 437, 85; IV, 141, 17; V, 114, 10; 267, 

3: (A. S. beam) child. Ill, 308, 14: (A. S. beorn) 

man, fighting man. 
baron, I, 293, 2; 294 f., 5, 9, 23, 28: simply knight, and 

that, in all cases but the first, vaguely, 
barras, oer the, IV, 372, 6: beyond the barriers (as 

374, A b, after 5). 
VOL. v. 40 



barrine, bairn. 

base-court, III, 470 b: lower or outer court. 

bassonet, basnet, basnit, in, 298, 51, 52; 308 f., 29, 32: 
a light helmet, shaped like a skull-cap. 

bat, but. 

batit, baited. 

batts, blows, burden of, IU, 465, 20: all the blows 
(beating) he can bear. 

baubee, bawbee, III, 268, 6; 269, D 6; 270, 4, 5; V, 
242 b, 5: halfpenny. 

baube, II, 132, so: babe. 

baucheld sheen, IV, 380, 26: shoes down at the heels 
(ill-bukled, wrongly, V, 276, 18). 

bay, by. 

bay berry kame, IV, 471 f., 2, 4: a corrupt passage, 
yielding no sense (so of other readings here). 

bay dogs, III, 126 f., e, f si: dogs that bring to bay, or 
that bay (?). 

baylleful, III, 298, 58: destructive, deadly. 

bay lye, III, 28, 140: bailiff, sheriff's officer (to execute 
writs, etc.). Ill, 332, 15: chief magistrate, mayor. 
See bailie. 

bayne, perdition. 

bayr, V, 110, is: byre, cowhouse. 

be=by. be to and al be on, I, 242, 11: by two[s] and 
all by one[s]. be, be that, III, 100, 73; 482, 26: by the 
time that, sey be, V, 79, 26: about. See by. 

be 's, it be 's, III, 160, 9: shall be=it s' be. 

be wi, IV, 261, 23: tolerate, bear with. 

beager, beggar. 

beagly, V, 224, 10. See bigly. 

beam, beam gold, II, 402, 10: for learning? Probably 
corrupt. 

beame, of the utuer beame, IV, 506, 59: utuer is per 
haps utter, outer ; but what outer beam would Hors- 
ley come to in climbing the mast ? Probably cor 
rupt. If we read, of (=on) the utter (outer) bane 
(bone), which rhymes, we have to explain the outer 
bone of the buttocke. 

bean, bone. 

bear, I, 149, 6: move on, proceed. 

bear, bier. 

bear, beer. 

bear, IV, 324, C l: barley. 

bear-seed, IV, 323, 6: barley; bear-seed time seems 
to refer to barley-harvest. 

beare mercy, as the lawes will thee beare, V, 53, 98: 
have for (as in, bear malice, etc.). 

beare, pret., II, 266, 30: bare. 

beared, buried. 

bearing arrow, III, 29, 150; 202, 33; 341, 53: "an ar 
row that carries well," Percy; "an arrow made to 
carry especially straight," Nares; but on the first oc 
casion a broad arrow is used when " an arrow that 
carries well" (straight) is equally, or even more, 
necessary, and on the third a bearing and a broad 
arrow are used indifferently, III, 29, 153, 159; 341, 56. 
Perhaps a very long arrow, such as required to be 
carried in the hand. " Longe arrowes like staudarts 



314: 



GLOSSARY 



with socetts of stell for my Lord's f outemen to here 
in their hands, when they ryn with my Lorde " are 
noted as berrying arrows in the preparations for the 
Earl of Northumberland's expedition to Terouenne, 
5 Henry VIII. Dillon's Fairholt's Costume in Eng 
land, II, 8, 1885. Mr C. J. Longman, himself an 
archer, remarking that a bearing arrow is used for a 
range of 20 score paces, III, 29, 148, 150, and a broad 
arrow for 6 score, 153, suggests that a bearing arrow 
was probably what is now called a flight-arrow, a 
thin, light arrow with a tapering point for long shoot 
ing. 

bearly, V, 219, 17: buirdly. 

beat, IV, 379, 15: boot, recompense. 

became, II, 422, 2: came. 

became bis courtisie, III, 464, 18: that is, his cour 
tesy became him (as in Shakspere's " youth becomes 
the livery that it wears "). See become. 

because, III, 29, 157: in order that. 

beck, made a beck on her knee, II, 359, 7, 9: curtsy. 

becke (A. S. bee), I, 334, 8: stream, brook. 

become them well, IV, 147, 22: look well in them (i. e., 
they became him well) ; so III, 464, 18; cf. set, IV, 
331, 18. place, part, does well become me, IV, 152, 
D 2; 153, l: suit. See became. 

becomed, pret. of become, IV, 505, 53. 

bed, I, 272, 9: offered. See bede. 

bed-head, 1, 184, 44, 46: the top of the box or case of a 
Scottish bed. 1, 116, C 5: should be bed-stock, as the 
rhyme shows. 

bed-stock, I, 115, 3; IV, 94, 7; V, 208, 4: the outer 
side of a bed, that farther from the wall. 

bede, v., II, 499 b: offer. See bed. 

bedone, I, 271, 2; II, 183, 20: worked, ornamented. 

bedyls, III, 28, 140 : under-bailiffs, summoners. 

bee-ba, II, 330, 11, 12: sounds to lull a child. 

beeds. that beeds, I, 69, 67: string of beads. 

beek, biek, IV, 69, 22; 77, 3, c 3: bask. 

beenits, IV, 381, 12: bayonets. 

beere, II, 445, 73: bare, bore. 

beerly (bride), II, 132, 24 : large and well made ; 
stately. See bierly. beerly, burly cheer, I, 298, 4; 
300, 4: great, huge. 

beet, bete, beik, III, 495 a; IV, 517, 15: better, help. 
Of fire, II, 120, 16, 17; IV, 467, 13: kindle, keep up. 
p. p. bett, II, 44, 14. See bete. 

beet, II, 475, 7; III, 281, 2: behooved. 

beet, v., inf., II, 151, H 2: boot, furnish with boots. 
pret. bet, 4. 

beets, n. pi., IV, 187, 10: boots. 

beette, III, 298, 54: pret. of beat. 

befa, IV, 357, C 4: may befall (he does not care what 
name he gets). IV, 357 f., 6, 8, 12, 14: belong to, 
suit. 

befalle, I, 241, 2: may it befall ! 

before, taen your God before, II, 62 b, 15, representing 
'minged not Christ before,' II, 59, 21: an artificial- 
sounding expression, which may mean, previously 
taken God for your helper. 



beforne, II, 58, 15; III, 13, 12, 14: before. II, 58, 15, be 
fore (morning). 

beft, III, 161, 26: beat. 164, 92: beaten. 

begane, bigane, IV, 366, D 4: overlaid, covered. 

begeck, begack, give a, III, 162, 63; 164, b 63: play 
a trick on, make a fool of. (A. S. geac, cuckoo, sim 
pleton.) 

begoud, begood, begud, I, 473, 11; II, 99, B b 9; 
IV, 167, C 10; 194, B 5; 195, 14; 201, 21; 203, 15; 224, 
13: began. 

beguile, p.p., Ill, 36, 41: beguiled. 

begule, beguile. 

behad, II, 160, 3: behold. 

behear, II, 240 f., 7, 9; III, 93, 46; 131, 3: hear, beheard 
him, III, 421, 58: heard. 

beheld, II, 61, 12: tarried. 

beheste, III, 90 b: promise. 

behind his hand, a stroke behind his hand, II, 63, 24: 
seems = backhanded stroke. 

behote, III, 71, 315 ; pres., promise, thou behote, III, 
71, 297: didst promise. 

beik, beet, bete, on, II, 121, 20: put on fuel. 

being, II, 410, 26: means of living. 

belinger, IV, 74, G b 3 : corruption or misprint for 
(best ?) ginger. 

beliue, belyfe, b(e)lyue, III, 4, 18; 28, 125; 29, 144; 
35, 18; 84, 87, 300; 94, 53; 117, 13: soon, immediately. 

bell, silken, III, 261, D 7: conical canopy? corrupted 
from beild, shelter (screen) ? Aytoun, with great 
probability, conjectures pall. Cf. A 10; E 10; P 14, 
which support the emendation. 

Bell (Archie), III, 491, 3, 7: billie (comrade, brother), 
as in D, III, 492, 2. 

belle, bere the, I, 328, 42; II, 58, l; V, 202 b: stand 
foremost, take the lead. 

bell-groat, I, 251, A 3, 5. Same as next word. 

belling-great, I, 252, 3, 5: groat for ringing bell. 

belly-, billie-blind. See Billie Blin. 

below the sun, lookit below the sun, II, 78, 15; III, 
6, 6; in below the sun, 8, 6. See aneath the sun. 

belted plaids, IV, 84, n; 85, 3: 87, 2; V, 253, No 203, 
D 2: "properly twelve yards of tartan cloth worn 
round the waist, obliquely across the breast and left 
shoulder, and partly depending backwards, ut in bello 
gestatur." 

belyfe, straightway. See beliue. 

belyue. See beliue. 

bemean, V, 163, 4: bemoan, compassionate. 

ben. Good ben be here, III, 267, 10: God's (or good) 
benison ? Probably corrupt. 

ben (shoes o, sheen o), IV, 378, 7; 380, 14: bend, bend- 
leather, strong ox-leather, thickened by tanning. 

ben, I, 56 f., C 2, 14; III, 267, 20; 268, 17; 270, 16; 272, 
20; 274, 33: towards the inner apartment of the house, 
or parlor, in, within, come farer ben, I, 369, 51; he 
was ben, II, 313, 16; he wood her butt, he wood her 
ben, I, 56, 2. V, 216, B a 7; 219, 10; 242 b, 8. 

ben, royal ben, I, 478 f., 12, 46: (emended from bend) 
bone. See roelle-bone. 



GLOSSARY 



315 



benbow, III, 54, 6; 104, 5; 132, 5; bend bow, III, 7, 4; 

8, 25; 11, 6; bende bowe, III, 309, 44; bent bow, III, 

8 G 2 ; 106, 16, 17: bow, simply, the bow being in 

actual use only in III, 11, 54, 104 (?), 106, 16, 309. 
bend, III, 145, 5: where the way turned (?). 
bend, III, 362, 71 : pret. of bend. So II, 125, Q 6: 

pret. of bend (should not have been changed to bent, 

p. 122). 

bended, IV, 78, l: bounded, 
benjed, II, 403, 2 ; beenged, bynged, made humble 

obeisance, cringed. 

bent the way, IV, 442, 13 : took her course over, 
bent, sword bent in the middle clear, middle brown, 

IV, 12, ll, 12: nonsense, or close upon nonsense, 
bent, I, 3, 1; 5, D l: a coarse, reedy grass. 
bent, bents, II, 58, 16, 18; 62, 11; 172, 24, 25, 27, 35, 43; 

III, 295, 5; 296, 20; 297, 40; 307, 5, 8; 308, 26; 312, 28; 

IV, 86, 3: field, fields covered with bent grass, 
benty ground, atween the brown and benty ground, 

IV, 27, 12: between heather and bent ground, 
benty line, III, 7, 5: line of bent grass. 
ber, pret. of bear, 
berafrynd, V, 71 b: a drinking word, in response to 

passilodion. 
bere, V, 264 a, 2 : bigg, a sort of coarser barley (Hor- 

deum hexastichum, not H. vulgare or distichum). 
berl, V, 224, 26: birl, dispense, 
bern, barn, bairn, IV, 456, 7-9, 12; V, 247, ll: (A. S. 

bearn) child, 
berne, III, 295, 5: (A. S. beorn, fighting man, brave, 

etc.) man. 
berry, brown berry comb, II, 224, l: the material of 

this comb is elsewhere said to be haw bay berry; all 

the passages describing it are corrupt, 
beryde, I, 326, 2: made a bere, noise, 
bescro, III, 110, 26; V, 80, 49: beshrew, curse, 
bese, I, 329, 58: shalt be. 
beside, besids, III, 357, 38, 41, 43, 45-7: aside from, 

away from, 
beside, in addition to, four and thirty stripes comen 

beside the rood, II, 59, 29: referring to the scourging 

before the crucifixion, 
besom, hid herself in the besom of the broom, 1, 398, 9: 

besom seems to be twigs (as scopae is both twigs and 

broom). Wedgwood cites from a Dutch dictionary 

of 1654, brem-bessen, broom-twigs, scopae spartiae. 
bespeak: pret. bespa(c)ke, III, 420, 26, 30, 35; 430, 9; 

431, 19, 23; bespoke, V, 149, 8-ll; bespake him, I, 

286, 52-5; III, 419 f., 6, 13, 22, 24: spake, 
bespeek, IV, 498, l, 3, 9: speak with, 
bespoke, V, 149, 10, well-bespoke: well-spoken, 
bestand, III, 105, 23: help, avail, 
bested, bestead, circumstanced, ferre and frembde 

bested, III, 63, 138: in the position of one from a 

distance and a stranger, hard bestead, III, 161, 

36. 

bestial, IV, 41, note *: all the animals of a farm, 
best man, IV, 342, 4: principal servant, 
bet, II, 151, H 4: booted. 



betaken, II, 59, 38: made over. 

bete, beet, III, 310, 68: better, second, relieve. See 
beet. 

beth, both, III, 59, 53, 54; 79, 54: be, old plural. 

bether, V, 283, 8: better. 

Bethine, II, 4, 12, for rhyme: if meant for anything, 
Bethany is meant, however inappropriate. 

betide, II, 411 a, last line but two: nearest that ever 
fall to one, an unlikely phrase. Motherwell reads 
whatcer betide. 

betide, I, 503 b, 4, what news do ye betide ? i. e. what 
do you (does your coming) signify? or, as at I, 
205, F 10 (doth thee betide), what news has befallen 
you, come to your knowledge ? 

betide, boots of the tangle (sea-weed) that nothing can 
betide, V, 259 a, ll: should read to the effect, That 's 
brought in by the tide. 

betook, I, 126, 6: took (simply). 

bets, pi., V, 257, 10: boots. 

bett, II, 44, 14, pret. of bete, beet : kindled. 

better, she stood, and better she stood (printed bitter), 
I, 492, 5; they rode, and better they rode, I, 102, 10; 
492, 10, 14; he rade and better rade, II, 209, D 6: 
longer, farther still, better swam, V, 140, e 7. bet 
ter be, I, 128, 13: still more. 

beuk, book. 

bewch, III, 91 b: bough. 

bewrailed, V, 55, 38: berailed. 

bewray, V, 86, 35: reveal. 

beyt, V, 79, 25: beeth, be. 

bickering, IV, 7, 34: (hail) pattering. 

bide, byde, I, 430, 4, 5, 8, 9; II, 177, 14; 289, A 2; 313, 
14; III, 465, 30; V, 108, B 8: stay. p.p. bidden, IV, 
262 f., 32, 33; 524, 9. bide (a doulfou day), II, 159, 
23: await, look for. bide anither bode, III, 268, 12; 
270, 12: wait for another offer. I never bade a better 
bode, III, 267, 15. your wedding to bide, III, 387, ll: 
await, bide it whoso may, IV, 433, 21: await the 
result ? (obscure passage), bide frae me, V, 236, 16: 
stay away. In : she bade the bride gae in, II, 195, 
30, it is not likely that a rival would bid a bride ; in 
terpret rather, she waited for the bride to go. 

bidene, by dene, bydeene, I, 105 a, 20: immediately 
(or, all together). I, 273, 34: successively, one after 
another. Ill, 65, 185: together. Ill, 73, 350: simul 
taneously, or en masse. 

biek, beek, IV, 77, 3: bask. See beek. 

bier, III, 161, 32; V, 161, l; 162, D l: cry, lamenta 
tion. 

bierly, beerly (bride), I, 467, 29; II, 75, 19; 132, 24; 
the same as buirdly bride, II, 82, 51 : portly, stately 
(large and well made). See buirdly. 

big, bigg, I, 15, 13; 17, 16; 108, l; II, 330, l; 331, 1; 
332, i: build, pret. and p. p. biggit, bigget, IV, 202, 
K 5; 203, 13. pret. bug, IV, 199, 17. p. p. buggin, 
bugn, IV, 445, l; 446, 1. build a stack for corn, I, 
17, 12; 428, 11 ; V, 206 a, 8. 

bigane, I, 334, 5: covered, wrought. 

biggeall, beguile. 



316 



GLOSSARY 



bigging, biggin, II, 115, 23, 24; 117, 10, 11; 123, 25, 26; 
255, 11, 12; 257, 19, 20; IV, 128, 2-4: building, house, 
"properly of a large size, as opposed to a cottage." 

bigly (Icelandic, byggiligr, habitable), commodious, 
pleasant to live in, I, 68, 32; 107, l, 3; II, 98, 30-32, 35, 
36; 172 f., 40, 42, 45; 294, 4, 5 ; 370, 6; 417, 3; 419, 45: 
frequent epithet of bower. II, 358, 26, of a bier: hand 
somely wrought. 

bile, v., V, 305 a, 6: boil. 

bill, V, 15, 16, is: a paper, bills, IV, 422, 45, 46: (the 
necessary legal) papers, sworne into my bill, III, 
411, 5: sworn in writing. 

bill, I, 302, B 12; 303, 10; IV, 331 b, 2: bull. 

billaments, I, 433, 17: habiliments, of head-gear. 

billie, billy, comrade, brother ; " a term expressive of 
affection and familiarity : " I, 448, A 2, 4; III, 464, 2, 
5, 6, 19; 467, 56; 489, ll; V, 128, 29. born billy, III, 
495 b, 23, 24. See bully. 

Billie Blin, Bellie Blind, I, 73, 35, 44; 86, 29; 466 f., 
14, 23; II, 464, 15, 16; 470, 60-63; 472, 31; V, 239, 39: 
see I, 67 ; V, 285 b. 

belly -blind, II, 464, 15, 16: may mean here nothing 
more than an innocent warlock or wizard. 

billy -pot, I, 164, L 6: pot with a semicircular handle 
(bail) ? 

bine, be not: V, 238, 18. 

binge, IV, 462, so: bend. 

binkes, I, 334, 9: benches. 

binna, be not. 

bint, V, 110, 12: bind, pay for. 

bird (burd), I, 76, 50, 51; II, 314, 29, 30; C 10; 316, 12; 
IV, 422, 2, 5, 10: maid, lady, bird her lane, II, 313, 
12, 19: maid by herself, solitary. II, 272, 5: child, 
boy. 

birk. he was standing on the birk, II, 165, 13, seems to 
be nonsense. There is no birk to stand on unless the 
floor is birken, and nothing could be more inept than 
a reference to that matter. 

birlin, II, 28, l: drinking. See birl. 

birl, berl, II, 28, 1; 92, 17; 219, 6; IV, 154, 9; 166, 1; 
234, 35; 385, l: drink. II, 152, J 3; 299, 16; 368, 7: 
ply with drink, birled in him, II, 144, 3, 4: poured 
into. Of dispensing both bread and wine: II, 191, 
34, 35; V, 224, 26. birled wi them, IV, 438, 8: should 
apparently be birled them wi. ptc., birlin, II, 28, 1. 

birnande, burning. 

birtled, I, 273, 42: cut up. 

bisette, I, 334, 8: devote (to the matter a space greater 
by two miles). 

bit (used with a noun instead of a diminutive), wee bit 
banes, I, 225, L 7: bits of. 

bit, but. bit an(d), II, 3Q, 4; 132, 26: and also. 

bitailite, I, 244, 11: committed to. 

bitten, V, 130, 13: taken in, cheated. 

bla, III, 350, 53, 54: blow. 

blabring, V, 247, 9: babbling. See blobberin. 

bla 'd, II, 21, 6: bla it, blow it. 

blaewort, IV, 212, 6: corn bluebottle, round-leaved 
bell-flower, bluebell of Scotland. 



blaise, blaisse, IV, 503, 19; 505, 49: display, show 
forth, display itself. 

blan, blane, blanne, II, 53, 29; 140, 23; 265, 9; III, 
309, 4l; 405, 13; 406, 38; 466, 40: pret. of blin, stop, 
cease. 

blast, V, 82, 39: puff, breathe hard. 

blate, II, 260, 2; III, 160, 10; 163, 85: dumfoundered, 
abashed, silly, spake blate, II, 470, 47, 50: bashfully, 
diffidently. 

blavers, V, 213, 14: corn bluebottle (blaewort). 

blaw, I, 15, B 2; 16 C 2: blow. pret. blow, III, 112, 
65. p.p. blawin, I, 17, D l; blawn, I, 15, B l; 16, 
C 1, 2. pres. p. blawn (blawing), II, 114, 20. 

blee, I, 272, is, 20, 24; 293, l; II, 364, 26; 442, l, 2: color, 
complexion. 

bleed, blood. 

bleed, I, 441, 5, 7, pret. of bleed : bled. 

bleeze, III, 457, B 4: blaze. 

blewe, I, 326, 7: blew on a horn (see st. 10). 

blin, blind. 

blin, blyn, blinne, II, 138, 3; V, 14 f., 2, 20: (belin) 
cease, stop. pret. blan. See blan. 

blind, blint, II, 345, 26; 382, 6; IV, 265, A b 8; 486, 
10: blinded. 

blink, n., IV, 136, 17; 360, 15; 384, 3, 4; look, glance. 
IV, 390, 7, of the moon : gleam. IV, 389 b: (of time) 
moment. 

blink, to look: II, 433, 6; IV, 127, 14; 351, 7; 353, 18; 
416, 2; V, 53, 107; 54, 3; 154, A ll: glance, emit, 
throw a glance. Ill, 371, 27; IV, 256 f., l, 10: shine, 
glitter, blinkin ee, IV, 194, (4,) 5; 201, 25; 203, 5; 
211, 9: shining, twinkling, wha is this that blinks in 
Willie's ee ? II, 189, 25 : sends brightness into, 
whose brightness is reflected from, nor ever did 
he blink his ee (at the gallows), IV, 12, B 8: wink, 
shut, blench, his look was steadfast, cam blinkin 
on an ee, II, 475, 17: winking as if blind, playing the 
blind. 

blint, II, 17 b; IV, 515, 12: blinded. See blind. 

bliss : bless. 

blobberin, II, 256, 13: perhaps, blubbering, crying ; 
perhaps = blabring. V, 247, 9: babbling. 

block, II, 216, 16: exchange. IV, 148, 54: bargain ; 
lost the better block, had the worse in a bargain or 
dealing. 

blood, blude, II, 114, 16; 123, 13: man (disrespect 
fully), fellow. 

blow, pret., blew. 

blowe, II, 478, 8: blossom. 

bio we (wynde), II, 478, 12: give vent to. 

blowe (boste), III, 59, 59: give breath to, utter. 

blude, bluid, blood. See blood. 

bluid is gude, IV, 433, 21: good to dream of. 

bluntest, III, 492, 25: stupidest. 

blutter, III, 161, 43: dirty. 

blyue, belyfe, beliue, III, 29, 144 ; 71, 300 ; 74, 371: 
quickly, immediately. 

boad, n., V, 243, ll: offer. 

boams, fire-beams (not beams), IV, 96, D 3: bombs. 



GLOSSARY 



317 



board-floor, II, 160, 5, 6: should probably be bower- 
floor, as in 159, 6, 9; 161, 6, 8. 

bocht : bought. 

booking, III, 161, 33: vomiting, belching. 

boddoin, bottom. 

bode, n., offer: III, 267, 15; 268, 12; 270, 12; 272, 14. 

bode, p. p., Ill, 67, 222: bidden, invited. 

bodes, wild fowl bodes on hill, II, 410, 7: announces 
day. Cf. II, 230, 5, the wild f ule boded day. 

bode-words, III, 4, 19: messages. 

body: faith, faikine, of my body, III, 180, 17; 199, 
24; 216, 33; 296, 16; 472, 7; truth of my body, III, 
180, B, 7; 181, 15, 16, 21; IV, 7, 31 : either by my per 
sonal faith, or, by my body, faith in my body, III, 
411, 6. 

body- clothes; IV, 152, 7: clothes of my body. 

bold, bauld (of fire), II, 116, 18; 117, 12; 119, 5, 6; 123, 
18, 27: sharp, brisk. 

boldly (understand), IV, 146, 19: freely, confidently, 
fully (verbiage). 

bokin, bodkin. 

bolts, IV, 409, l: rods, bars (to make a petticoat stand 
out). 

bon, bone, boune, on the way, going. See boun. 

bone, boon. 

bone, sadle of the bone, V, 219, 13. See bane, roelle- 
bone. 

bonins, by, V, 253 a, 4: in plenty (Gypsy cant). 

bonnetie, V, 306, 2, 3: dimin. of bonnet. 

booting, III, 159, l: making of boot or booty. 

boot, v., IV, 501, 26: matter. See bote. 

bord, borde, bowrd, V, 78, l; 80, 48, 49: jest, sport, 
amusement, comic tale. 

bord, II, 450, 80; 451, 84: should perhaps be bore, as in 
445, 77. Still, carried him out of the saddle by the 
impact of the spear which bored him through is not 
unlikely, and we have, p. 454, 55, out of his saddle 
bore him he did. 

borden, adj., IV, 506, 73: of plank; borden tree, wooden 
plank. 

born alive, ye were, IV, 521, 19; A, IV, 26, 16, has 
' That I love best that 's born alive,' i. e. of all that are 
born. The ye should be y', that, and probably was 
so meant. 

borough-town, borrow's toun, borrous-toun, etc. 
See borrows-town, burrow-town. 

borowe, borrow, n. Ill, 59, 62-64, 66; 68, 237, 250: se 
curity. Ill, 405, 9: sponsor, vindicator. 

borowe, borrow, v., I, 309, A3; II, 177, 27; III, 25, 
50; 298, 69; 329, 6; IV, 33, 15-18, 20, 21: set free, de 
liver, ransom. 

borowehode, III, 68, 239: securityship. 

borrows-town, borrous-toun, IV, 229, 1; V, 117, A 
6, 7; 126, l: borough-town, borough, corporate town. 
See borough (burrow)-town. 

bosky d, III, 112, 60: busked, made ready. See busk. 

bot, but. bot and : see but and. 

bot, without. See but. 

bot, II, 94, 3: behoved. 



bote, boote, boot, II, 45, 30, 34; III, 27, 104; 94, 56; 

187, 33: help, use, advantage, (boot, v., IV, 501, 26: 

matter.) 

both, beth, III, 59, 53, 54; 79, 54: be (old plural), 
bottle (of hay), V, 114, 4: bundle, 
bottle, be my bottle, V, 170, l: hold my own, bear my 

full part, in drinking ? Corrupt ? 
bottys, butts. 

boud, V, 176, 17: behoved, were obliged, 
bouerie, II, 232, l: diminutive of bower, chamber, 
bought = bucht, IV, 198, i; 199, n, 23: fold, pen. 
bouk, buik, buke, II, 149, 14; IV, 127, 14; 484 a: 

trunk, body, 
boun, bowne, bune, bound, bownd, bowynd, ., 

make ready, go. buske yee, bowne yee, III, 91, 6; 

431, 25: make ready, boun, bound, I, 369, 44; IV, 
183, 2; V, 256, 5: go. make ye boun, I, 75, 18: go. 
must bound home, V, 9, 4. get up and bound your 
way, II, 405, 9: go, come, bownd away, III, 161, 30; 
bowynd hym to ryde, III, 295, l; bounded for to 
ride, II, 118, 7: set out, went, bound him to his 
brand, III, 160, 23: went, betook himself, was boon, 
boun, bound, II, 298, 5; IV, 432, 2; V, 256 a, 4: going, 
on the way. how she is bune, II, 191, 30: going on. 
go boun away, IV, 224, 15, 16 (tautology) : go, depart. 

boun, bon, bowne, bo wen, bowyn, bun, adj. 
(biiinn, p.p. of Icelandic biia, to make ready) : bound, 
ready, made him boun, III, 163, 76. to batell were 
not bowyn, III, 295, 4. make ye bowne, I, 75, 18, 22; 
III, 296, 28. bun to bed, bon to rest, II, 191, 26; V, 
35, B 3. made him boun, bound, III, 163, 76; V, 81, 
2: equipped himself, your friends beene bowne, I, 
210, 14: ready to come, ready boun (tautology), IV, 

432, 5. See boun, v. 
boun, V, 300, 6: boon. 

bounties, V, 231, 14: presents, in addition to wages. 

bountieth, V, 9, 12: bounty, alms. 

bourde, v., Ill, 179 b: jest. 

bourden, III, 179 b: staff. 

bourn, III, 470 a: brook. 

boustouslie, bousterously, boustresslie. bous- 
trouslie : I, 108, 13; IV, 446, 13; 447, 13; 465, 19, 35: 
boisterously, roughly. 

bout, II, 27, 18: bolt. 

bouted, I, 68, 4; 70, 4: bolted. 

bow, bough. 

bow, lint seed bow, 1, 305, 14: the boll or pod containing 
the seeds of flax. 

bow, II, 28, 16: boll, a dry measure; of salt, two bush 
els; "for wheat and beans, four Winchester bushels; 
for oats, etc., six bushels." Scottish, four firlots (see 
firlot). bow o here, V, 264. a: boll of barley. 

bower, chamber: I, 65, A l; 68, 25, 32; 73, 47; etc., etc. 
bouerie, II, 232, i: diminutive of the same. 

bower, house, home : I, 56, 3; 79, 3; 80, 1; 107, 1; etc., 
etc. Often indistinguishable from the above. 

bower-head, II, 76, ll: top of the house. (Unless the 
reading should be tower-head; cf. II, 74, D 5; 78, 1 14, 
but we have an upmost ha, highest room, II, 72, C 14.) 



318 



GLOSSARY 



bower-yett, house-gate. 

bowie, V, 306, 15: a kind of tub. 

bown, V, 273, No 239, 4: bowed, bent. 

bowne, bownd, bowyn. See boun. 

bowrd, I, 264: comic tale. See bord. 

bows (o London), I, 131, H l: arches of a bridge? 
windings of the river? 

box, V, 19, 18: a compartment partitioned off in a 
drinking-room. 

boyt, III, 109, 3: both. 

bra, braw, I, 128, 19; V, 268, 25; 272, 3, 7, ll: brave, 
fine, handsome. See braw. 

bracken, braken, brachan, breckin, breaken, 
breckan, brecken, breachan, IV, 257, B 7; 268, 21; 
269, d 19, f 19; 272, 11, 3; 501, 28, 31, 37; V, 244, 16, 19, 
20; 265 b, 19: fern, brake. 

brae, bra, bray, hillside, hill : I, 324, 14; IV, 92, l; 
264, 15; 274, 8 ; 448 a, 3d st. braes o Yarrow, IV, 
164 f., 1-9, B 3-5: the equivalent word is sometimes, 
banks, pp. 168, 169, 170, 178; otherwise houms, 
p. 168, but downs, p. 166 f., and the topography 
seems to indicate hills. " Conjoined with a name, it 
denotes the upper part of a country, as the Braes of 
Angus." Jamieson. 

brae, river-bank : III, 484 a, 32 ; burn-brae, IV, 275, C 
b 8. Cholar foord brae-head, III, 482, 21? 

brae, brow : III, 4, 17. 

braid, IV, 399, 28: breadth. See breed. Adj., broad. 

braid (broad) letter, II, 20, 3; 25, 3; 26, 3; 27, 3; 251, 
2; 393, 4; IV, 118, C 1; 119, D l; 120, l; 373, 2; 382, 3: 
either a letter on a broad sheet or a long letter. The 
king's letter, II, 21, 3; 23, B 3; 24, 3, is lang, and at 22, 
3, is large. A braid letter has been interpreted to be 
an open one, a patent, but in almost every case here 
cited the letter is said to be sealed. The letter at II, 
251, 2, is private and confidential, written by a lady. 
Private folk write broad letters, IV, 320, l; 339, 13; 
342, 17; 343, 7; a lady again, II, 382, 5; 395, 18; IV, 
233, 20; 342, 6; 343, 2. 

brain, II, 124, 39; 130, 28; 131, 20; 133, 9; 169, 25; 407, 
10; III, 274, 33: mad. 

brake, break, V, 166, 8; 306, 7: cause to break off, 
correct, cure. 

braken, III, 299, 12, 14; 300, 25, 26: fern. See bracken. 

braken, I, 350, 17: p.p. of break. 

bramly, III, 9, 13: brambly, thorny. 

branded (bull), III, 459, 7: of a reddish brown color. 

brank, n., Ill, 440, 10: caper, prance, gallop. 

branken, branking, III, 299, 4; 301, D 1: galloping. 

branks, III, 480, 9: a sort of bridle; a halter with two 
pieces of wood, instead of a leathern strap or a cord, 
over the nose, the whole resembling a muzzle. 

brash, sickness: II, 364, 20; IV, 483, 16. 

brast, I, 370, 14, 18; V, 76, 26; 80, 45; 82, 40: burst, 
broke, broken. 

branches, I, 271, 2: brooches. But perhaps branches, 
the clothes embroidered with rings and sprigs. 

braw, I, 491, l, 2, etc. ; II, 80, 3-7: comely. I, 127, 21 ; 
467, 29; II, 23, E 5; fine, handsome, finely dressed. I, 



184, 11; V, 210, ll: (of a meeting) pleasant. See bra 
and braws. braw wallie, IV, 296, F l: exclamation 
of admiration. 

brawn, IV, 212, 5: calf of the leg. 

braws, IV, 269, f, 19: fine things, finery. 

bray, brae, hillside, hill. 

brayd on, V, 198 b, after 52: move on, fall on. 

brayde, breyde, at a brayde, III, 26, 91; of a, III, 32, 
9l: in a moment, of a sudden. 

breachan. See bracken. 

bread, breed, bred, III, 339, 13, 16; 341, 42: breadth. 

bread, broad. 

breaden, I, 433, 9: braided (here, perhaps, woven). 

break, brake, V, 166, 8; 306, 7: cause to break off, 
correct, cure. 

break, till five minutes break, II, 325, 19, 20: expire. 

breaken. See bracken. 

breast, smoothd his breist and swam, II, 248, 9, 15: 
made it even, level with the water, set her, his 
brest and sworn, II, 459, 8; V, 137, 5, 9. bent bis 
breast and swam, V, 138, C 3, 5; 141 b, 6, 9; 142 a, 4. 
lay on his brest and swumme, II, 247, 14. 

breast, in a, IV, 11, 12, 13: in one voice (all at once, 
p. 13, 4). in a breast, Scottish, sometimes = abreast, 
side by side. 

breast, v., II, 299, 22, breast a steed : mount, by bring 
ing the breast to it. 

breast-mills, II, 403, 15: mills operated by a breast- 
wheel. 

breastplate, II, 380, 15; 383, 14; 385, 4, etc.; IV, 486, 
6, etc. : some part of a woman's attire, said here to 
be of steel instead of gold. Possibly a stomacher. 
"Curet, breastplate, or stomager." Huloet, 1552. 
" Torace, also a placket, a stomacher, or brest plate for 
the body." Florio. At II, 381, 10, we have bracelets, 
which would be a plausible emendation for breast 
plate, did not the latter occur quite a dozen times. 

breast- wine, II, 338, T 7: milk (Irish ballad). 

breathed, II, 47, unto, 21, on, 22: does not seem to be 
the right word. Possibly breved, gave information 
to (but the word is antique for the text, and on in 22 
would not suit). 

brecham, III, 480, 9: 492, 4; brechen, III, 491, 6: a 
straw collar for a horse, also a pack-saddle made of 
straw, so more probably here, carts not being used. 

brechan, brichan, IV, 157, 7, 12, 14, 18, 19: (Gael, 
breacan) plaid. 

brechen. See brecham. 

breckan. -en, -in. See bracken. 

bred, brede, V, 283, 8, 18: bread. 

bred, bread, breed, III, 347, c 44, g 38: breadth. 

brede, I, 242, 7: to have the whims attributed to breed 
ing women ? (Not satisfactory, as not being suffi 
ciently simple. Prof. Kittredge has suggested to me 
gynnyst to wede, to go mad; which seems to me quite 
worth considering. The rhyme with the same sound 
in a different sense, is entirely allowable.) 

bree, brie, I, 129, 14; 341, 3, 8, 17; 417, 13; III, 11, K; 
V, 191 f., 3, 18, 31: brow, eyebrow. 



GLOSSARY 



319 



bree, broth. See broo. 

breed, bread, bred, braid, III, 349, 38; IV, 503, 13, 
16; 505, 45: breadth. 

breek-thigh, III, 464, 15: thigh of his breeches. 

breeme, III, 285, 19: fierce. 

breist. See breast. 

bren, brene, brenne, brin, II, 45, 24; 59, 32; III, 24, 
29, 35; 361, b, c, 28: burn. p.p. brent, II, 44, 3, 14; 46, 47. 

brent (brow), II, 191, 25 ; IV, 272, 2; 387, 1: high and 
straight. Also, smooth, unwrinkled. 

brents, I, 74, 76, 78: door-posts, or doors. (Icelandic 
brandar, postes, Egilsson; ships' beaks used as orna 
ments over the chief door of dwellings, Vigfusson.) 

brest. See breast. 

brest, burst. 

brother, brothers, brethren, I, 104, 10; III, 478, 15. 
bretheren, III, 26, 74; 478, 14. brethern, bretherne, 
II, 73, 17; 160, 3, 9; III, 57, 27; 67, 217. brethren, III, 
29, 148. brethen, III, 22, 4, 6; 23, 10; V, 135 b, 19. 

bretther o degs, with a b. of d. ye '11 clear up my nags, 
IV, 312, 3 (the reading may be bretlher . . . clean) : 
corrupt, "brathay an degs would mean with old 
cloth and torn rags : brathay (obsolete) worn out 
brats or clothes." W. Forbes. 

breyde, n., with a breyde, III, 110, 20: with a rush, in 
haste. 

breyde, v., Ill, 110, 9: rushed, bounded. 

bride-steel, brid-stell, bride-stool, bride-styl, IV, 
181, 7, 8; 182, F 2, 3; 183, 2; V, 256 a, 4, 5: seat in 
church where the bridegroom and bride sat before 
the beginning of the service. 

brie, brow. See bree. 

brig, brigue, I, 118, D 2; II, 24, 14; 177, 13, 15; 272, 13: 
bridge. 

bright, bryghte, I, 285, 25; 293, 2; 296, 51, 56; 327, 12, 
21: sheen, beautiful. 

brim, II, 274, 3: sea. In, fa oure the brim, IV, 419, 16, 
26, the brim of a precipice may be meant. 

brin, II, 146, 23; V, 223 a, No 68, A 22: burn. 

bring hame, I, 76, 53; 367, 9; II, 97, 24; 425, 9, 10; V, 
41, 17; give birth to. brought King James hame, II, 
345, 29: brought into the world, (come hame, be 
born, see hame.) 

brirben, II, 217, 2, 4. tabean brirben (printed by Herd 
birben) is corrupt. A copy mentioned by Finlay had 
birchen; see IV, 471, 221. 

blither, II, 163, 7, n, 16; 164, 17; 165, 3; V, 123, 4; 
299, 4: brother. 

Brittaine, Litle, I, 285, 24, 33, 37. 

brittled, bryttled, brittened, I, 328, 51; III, 7, 7: 
cut up. 

broad (brode) arrow, brod arwe (aro), III, 13, 
9; 29, 153, 159; 106, 16; 307, 5; 341, 56; "catapulta." 
Prompt. Parv. The Catholicon explains catapulta to 
be "sagitta cum ferro bipenni, quam sagittam bar- 
batani vocant." Way. Cotgrave : " Rallion. An 
arrow with a forked, or barbed head; a broad arrow." 
broode-headed arrowe, IV, 605, 56; 506, 64; broode- 
arrowe-head, 506, 59. 



broad letter. See braid letter. 

broad-mouthd axe, IV, 123, 14: broad axe. 

broad sow, V, 91, 3: a sow that has a litter (brod= 
breed). 

brockit, brookit, bruckit, I, 303, 8; 304, E 8, P 8; 
V, 213, 8: streaked or speckled in the face, streaked 
with dirt. See broked, bruchty. 

brodinge, II, 58, 14: shooting up, sprouting. (Old Eng. 
brodden.) 

brogues, IV, 70, G 4; 72, I 7; 269 a, d 20; V, 265, 
No 227, 20; 301, No 200: coarse light shoes of horse- 
hide, worn especially by Highlanders. 

broke, brook, III, 69 f., 271, 274, 279; 310, 62: enjoy. 

broked cow, III, 459, 7: a cow that has black spots or 
streaks mixed with white in her face. See brockit. 

broken, IV, 356, 12: bankrupt, ruined. 

broken men, III, 473, 19, 24 ; IV, 41, note * : men 
under sentence of outlawry, or who lived as vaga 
bonds and public depredators, or were separated from 
their clans in consequence of crimes. Jamieson. 

broo, brue, bree, brie, II, 30, n: brow. 

broo, brue, bree, I, 160, C 2, D 3; 161, E 3; IV, 449, 
2, 3: broth. I, 499, 4; V, 98, 9, 10: water in which 
something has been boiled. 

brook, broke, bruik, II, 189, 33, 34; 420, 7; III, 212,8; 
IV, 435, 14: enjoy. 

broom-cow, I, 394, 5: twig of broom. 

brose-cap, II, 463, 25: pottage-, porridge-bowl. 

brot, p.p., V, 296, 2, 3, etc.: brought. 

brothered, IV, 373, 17: broidered? (He is to have a 
change of clothes every month, and those embroid 
ered ?) 

brough, V, 128, 29, 30: borough, town. 

brought hame. See bring hame. 

broun, brown, IV, 169, F 2; G l (browns, brouns, in 
the MSS.). Might be thought a corruption of brand, 
but brand occurs in each case immediately after. 
Brown for brown blade would be extraordinary. 

browen, III, 9, 4 : brewed, (brown corrected from 
earlier MS.) 

browjt, browt, browthe, brought. 

brown ground, IV, 27, 12: brown with heather. 

brown sword, I, 70, 22; 294, 24; III, 71, 305. Brtln 
as an epithet of sword in Anglo-Saxon has been in 
terpreted literally, as denoting that the weapon was 
wholly or in part of bronze; also as gleaming, which 
may at first seem forced. Gleaming is the meaning 
given to brown sword by Matzner, who cites three 
cases from romances. We have bright brown sword, 
II, 139, 22; 241, 24; 266, 26, 27; and, blades both browne 
and bright, III, 93, 36. The late Mr. Edward Bangs, 
remarking upon these passages, suggests that the 
blades may have been artificially browned with acid 
and then polished, as gun-barrels still are, and he re 
fers to P. Lacombe's description of the magnificent 
sword of Charles V, Armes et Armures, p. 221 : "la 
lame est d'acier bruni presque noir." We have 
browne tempered blade, III, 35, 13, meaning, prob 
ably, a blade tempered to that color. 



320 



GLOSSARY 



browt, browthe, brought. 

browst, V, 306, 12: brewage. 

bruchty, bracket, brockit, 1, 301 f., A 5, 9; V, 213 a, 
No 33, 5: spotted or streaked with dirt ; of a sheep, 
streaked or speckled in the face. See brockit. 

brae, V, 209 a: broo, broth, soup. 

brue, I, 334, 3: brow. 

bruik, II, 422, 2; IV, 385, 27; V, 179, 12, 13: enjoy, 
possess. See brook. 

bruue, III, 9, H 8: error for brume (which is the read 
ing in an earlier MS.). 

brang, pret., p.p. of bring, IV, 191, B, after 7; 466, 11. 

brunt, IV, 211, 2; 392, 17; 468, 17: burnt. 

brusted, brusten, II, 186, 15; IV, 2, 6: burst. 

bryde, II, 442, 3; 478, l: young woman. 

bryk, III, 13, 13: breeches, hose. 

bryn, I, 136, R 4: should probably be brim, as in R, 
b, c. brin, brow, from the Icelandic, is unlikely. 

bryng yow on your way, III, 99, 45: take, accompany. 

bryste, I, 327, 12: burst. 

brytlyng, bryttlynge, III, 307, 8; 308, 13: (breaking) 
cutting up. See brittled. 

bucht, bught, bought, ra., IV, 193, l, 2, 5; 194, 6, 9; 
195 f., l, 3, 4; 198 f., l, 3, 6; etc.: a small pen, usually 
put up in the corner of the field, into which it was 
customary to drive the ewes when they were to be 
milked. Jamieson. 

bucht, bught, v., IV, 200, 1, 18; 201, 10; 205, 22: go 
into the bucht, or pen. pret. buchted, IV, 201, 24: 
drove into the pen; p.p., 201, ll: built a pen for (cf. 
198, 8; 200, 19). 

buckle, crisp, curl (of hair). Curling Buckle, IV, 357, 
C 6, 7: one with hair crisped or curled. 

buckled up our lap, II, 473, 17: fastened up apron or 
gown so as to make a bag for carrying away meal. 

bucklings, V, 183, 21: encounters ? 

bud, I, 72 f., 7, 62: behooved. See buse. 

bug, IV, 199, 17, pret. of big : built. 

bugge, I, 243, l: buy. 

buggin, \yagn,p. p. of big, IV, 445 b, l ; 446 b, l: built. 

bulk, bouk, IV, 485, 12, 14: body. 

bulk, buke, IV, 411, 2; V, 122, 9: book. 

bulk, II, 71, 10: pret. of bake (A. S. bdc). 

builded, pret., Ill, 123, 4 ; sheltered, hid. (A. S. byl- 
dan, Scot, bield.) 

buird, V, 138, ll, 12, 14: board. 

buirdly, buirlie (bride), II, 82, 51 ; 130, 8 : portly, 
stately, large and well made, buirdlie men, II, 315, 
E 6. See bierly. 

buke, II, 165, 14: bouk, body. The verse is suspicious; 
more sense could be had by reading Maist fair, etc., 
and making the line the beginning of the speech of 
the fourth brother. See bouk, bulk. 

buke, bulk, book. 

bukeld, V, 276, 18. See baucheld. 

buld, build, built. 

bull-baits, I, 103, E 4: represents strokes, blows (cf. 
other versions), and must have some such sense. Pos 
sibly a corruption of buffets, though I see not how. 



A compounding of Old English bollen, to strike, and 
of beat would be unlikely. Bull-baits, for violent 
assaults, no doubt seemed good enough to the reciter. 

bully, billy, IV, 146 f., 5, 12, 18-21, etc.: brother, fellow, 
mate. See billie. 

bully ship, IV, 147, 29, 33: comradeship. 

bun, II, 191, 26; IV, 45, 6: boun(d), ready to go. 

bun, V, 267 a, 9: bound, tied up. 

bune (how she is), II, 191, 30: going on, faring. 

burd, bird, I, 69 f., 70, 72; 71, 57; II, 282, 6; HI, 393, 
14; 394, K 3; IV, 418, 2, 3, 5, etc.; 420, 2, 4, 5, etc.; 
424, l, 2, 4; V, 228 f., 12, 22, 34, 35: damsel, maid, lady. 
V, 229, 32: perhaps offspring. 

burd-alone, he lay burd-alone, I, 298, 2: solitary, by 
himself ; cf. maid alone, II, 149, 2. 

Burd Alone, II, 95, 1, 3, 4, 5: desolate, forlorn one; 
corruption of Burd Helen, 96, J 2 : cf. bird her lane. 

bure, I, 108, 8: bore (pret.). 

Burgesse (?), IV, 503, 4; 504, 24: Bordeaux. Should 
probably be Burdesse. 

burgh, IV, 53, 15-17: town. 

burken, II, 133, 8: birken, birchen. 

Burlow-beanie, I, 287, 60, 65, 70, 74: = Billy Blin, which 
see (I, 67). 

burly, I, 300, 4. See beerly. 

burn, bourn, I, 438, A 3, 4; III, 440, 16; 460, 27: brook. 

burn-brae, IV, 76, l: hillside with a brook at the bot 
tom. 

burnyssht, III, 63, 136: shining, made bright. 

burrow-town, burrows-town, IV, 288, E 3; 299, d 
13: properly, chartered town, corporate town ; perhaps 
nothing more than a town of some size, larger than a 
village. See borrows-town. 

bursen, IV, 4 b 6 : burst, bursen day, IV, 481, 20 : 
overpoweringly fatiguing. 

buse, J>e buse agayne, 1, 328, 54: it behoves thee (other 
texts, thou most), pret. (personal) bot, II, 94, 3; 
beet, III, 281, 2; bud, boud, I, 73, 62; V, 176, 17. 

busk, buss (Icel. Mask, old reflexive of biia, make 
ready, from the participle of which comes boun, so 
that busk and boun are of the same origin and equiva 
lent). 1. make ready, buske you, III, 73, 340. busk 
and boune, II, 24, 5; III, 434, 22. buske yee, bowne 
yee, III, 91, 5. the[y] buske them bowne, he buskes 
him bowne, III, 285, 26, 38. they busked and made 
them bowne, III, 284, 2. 2. dress, deck, busk and 
mak yow braw, II, 23, E 5. busk the bride, II, 104, 
16, 18; 105, 10, ll; 106, ll. p. p. busket, III, 433, 3. 
weel -busked hat, IV, 199, 9: decorated, buskit wi 
rings, V, 203 a. busk on you the flowers, II, 465, 3: 
put on as ornaments, buskit fire wi leaves, II, 411, 
10: set about, busk your ship roon (with feather 
beds), IV, 381, 8, cf. 10: wrap, sheathe. 3. betake 
oneself, go. I wol me buske ouer the salte see: III, 
59, 56. See buskit. 

buske, III, 97, 12: bush. 

busker, III, 252, 16 : corrupt; testament in other copies. 

buskit, -et, III, 433, 3: dressed, buskit his bow in her 
hair, 1, 131, 15: furnished, strung. See busk. 



GLOSSARY 



buss, I, 130, 16; II, 133, 8; III, 3, 6; 5, D 7; 6, 6: bush. 

buss, IV, 510, 4; 513 a, 1: busk, make ready, dress. 
See busk. 

busshement, III, 71, 301: ambuscade. 

busting, n., V, 301 b, 3: padding or the like used to 
improve the figure. 

but, prep., without: I, 16, 6; 420, 9, 10; 430, 3; III, 161, 
30; IV, 41 b; 326, 16; 329, A, b after 12. 

but, III, 267, 20 ; 268, 17; 270, 16 ; 272, 20 ; 274, 33 : 
towards the outer apartment or kitchen, without, 
out. gae butt the house and bid her come ben, V, 
115, 6. he wood her butt, he wood her ben, I, 56 f., 
C 2, 14; cf. V, 219, 10. but it speaks, V, 306, 6: out 
speaks. 

but, if ye be a maiden but, I, 72, 25 : corrupt ; read, 
binna maiden yet ? 

but and, bot and, but an, bat an = and also: 1, 18, 
P 7; 69, 49; 72, 5; 345, C 8, 9, 10; 464, 8; 474, 36; IV, 
418, 5; V, 246 b, 4, 6, 8. 

but nor hed, II, 191, 27: but and had not. 

but than = but and, IV, 465, 23. 

by (cf. also be), II, 56 a; 433, 2; III, 22, 2; 91, 2; IV, 
420, 2, 4; 422, 2: about, concerning (as, by a knight 
I say my song). V, 272 b, 3, 7, 11; 277, 4; 278, 20 
(spelled bay), 31 : in comparison with, on comparing 
(by 272 b, 3 4 , should perhaps be but ; cf. ll 4 ). kend 
thy freind by thy foe, III, 420, 18: in distinction 
from, by than, III, 77, 435: by the time that, by 
weeke, spend forty pounds by weeke, II, 442, 7: dis- 
tributively, a week. So, by yere, III, 61, 92. he 
maun do them by, V, 169, 12: do without, no far by, 
V, 123, 10: not far off. called young Brichen by, I, 
465, 5: called on, to. ca'd by Andrew Lammie, IV, 
302, i: called by the name of. 

by and bye, the keys hang at that lady by and bye, I, 
471, 4: one next to the other (?). 

by and by, IV, 196 f., l, 14: nigh. 

by and by, I, 287 f., 60, 71, 75, 77; V, 122, l; 123, l: 
directly, immediately. 

by=aby, pay for, atone for: III, 97, 15. 

byckarte, pret. of bicker, III, 307, 5: (fought) at 
tacked (the deer). 

byd, must, am under necessity. 

byddys, III, 308, 26: abides. 

byde, III, 297, 37: wait. p.p. byddin, V, 202 a : staid. 
pret. byde, there was naething byde him wi, IV, 428, 
ll: nothing which did remain. 

bydene. See bideiie. 

bye fell, III, 440, 8: a rocky hill or piece of high land 
lying off or aside of the way. 

bye-yett, IV, 21, 10: side-gate (subsidiary, not princi- 
pal). 

bygane, gone by. 

byggande, ptc., I, 327, 33: building. 

byrde, I, 327, 22: woman (wife or maid). See burd. 

byre, II, 182, 8; 184, 13; 188, 13; IV, 293, 9; 297, 9: cow 
house. 

bystode, hard bystode, III, 98, 33: hard pressed. 

bytecke, commit to: I, 327, 29. 
VOL. v. 41 



ca, caw, call = drive, strike, ca a nail, 1, 403, 13; III, 
495, B b, after 7. ca a pin, IV, 381, 9, ll. ca in the 
stake, II, 123, 14, 27. caw shoon on a steed, IV, 470, 
18. ca up a gallows, II, 253, 8. ca'd holes, V, 141 b, 
8. ca hogs, II, 258, 32. ca the mare, IV, 17 f., 5, 13. 
ca horse, IV, 109, l. call sheep, II, 255, 17. caw ky, 
IV, 193, 13 ; 194, 17. ca the pleugh, V, 105, A 10. 
waft (emend from wraft) was neer ca'd throw, I, 
424 a, 12, is; 425, 12, 13. ca'd the table wi her foot, 

II, 313, 20. ca'd out the sheriff's een, IV, 392, 19. 
ca'd by, ca'd by Andrew Lammie, IV, 302, l: called 

by the name of. 
caddie. See cadie. 
cadger, cauger, an itinerant huckster, corn-caugers, 

III, 479, 8 ( = corn-buyers, 491, 6; corn-dealers, 492, 4). 
cadgily, V, 115, 1: merrily. 

cadie, caddie, IV, 351, 4, 5; 353, 6, 7, 9, 10, etc.: a young 
fellow who does errands, or any inferior kind of work. 

caft, IV, 330 a, appendix, 2: calved. 

cairdman, II, 474, 9, 10: tinker, beggar. 

cald, III, 455, 10: could. 

cale, call, calle, V, 221, 20; 228, 19; 247, l (MS. calld) ; 
248, 21; 257, 15: cold. 

call, a call opon, V, 221, 14, 19: a call out, (simply) 
call. 

call, v., Ill, 62, 113; 111, 38: address. 

calland, II, 267, 9: lad. 

called their grandmother over, IV, 70, Q 2: cor 
rupted from cast their glamour oer her. 

caller, cauler, IV, 484, after 23; 485, 19: (of air), fresh. 

cam, pret. of come: III, 61, 91; 69, 259. 

came home, hame, of child-birth, IV, 405, 54; 420, 5. 
See bring hame. 

cammer, II, 131, 6: (conjecture for cannell) cambric 
(Scottish cammeraige, camroche). 

camovine, IV, 212, 4; 213, 12: camomile. 

campioun, II, 386, 18: champion. 

campy, I, 304, 1 : having the quality or make of a 
champion, or (name) champion (like kempy). 

camric, cambric. 

can, II, 445, 62 ; 450, 67; III, 66, 210 ; 67, 227; 162, 66: 
knows. 

can, in/., will never can steer ye, IV, 69, 16. 

can, cann, an auxiliary of the present tense, can bee= 
is: II, 442, 14; 443, 30; 444, 51; 446, 93. Cf. do be 
(are), I, 184, 47. (may be, II, 448, 33; 451, 100; might 
be, III, 452, 10, show a misunderstanding of this.) 
auxiliary of the past tense, =did: 11,446, 81, 84; III, 
65, 184; 67, 223; 298, 56. (Probably a corruption of 
gan.) cold, colde, could, cowde,=did : I, 294, 23, 24; 
III, 298, 56, 59; 440, 10; IV, 3, 19; V, 278, 37. cold be, 
II, 443, 34; III, 413, 34: were, was. cold see, III, 
413, 32: saw, have seen. (An extension of the use of 
can = gan.) 

canker dly, III, 160, 13; 267, 10: crossly. 

cankred, III, 189, A 9: ill-humored, complaining, 
crabbed (Scottish canker, to fret), with reference to 
the behavior in c. But as John shows no crooked 



322 



GLOSSARY 



temper to the palmers, possibly cankred is to be 

taken literally as crooked (see B 10), having in mind 

Icel. keugr, a crook of metal, English kink, etc. 
cannas, cannis, canies, V, 239, 35; 276, 14, 15: canvas, 

coarse cloth. 

cannel, II, 147, 3, 4: candle, 
canny, adj., IV, 303, 16; 304, 4: gentle. IV, 305, 25: 

cautious. IV, 306, 17: clever, expert. V, 121 a: wily. 

IV, 132, G 4: canny (Cannygate) seems to be for jin 
gle, but may be a terra of general commendation, 
canny, cannie, cannilie, adv., IV, 154, 4; 304, 14; 

306, 29 : cautiously. IV, 133, 3, 4; 306, 18; 354, 2, 3: 

attentively. I, 245 f., 11-14: carefully, expertly. I, 

245, 8, 9: expertly, or gently. II, 161, 18: slowly, or 

softly. 

cantie, canty, IV, 261, 3; 317, P 6; V, 115, 2: merry, 
cap, caup, II, 344, i: cup. 
cap, cape, V, 230 a, 10, 11: catch, pret., p.p. caped, II, 

317, B b 20; V, 219, 23; 271, 14: struck. See kep. 
cape, V, 79, 32: cloak. 

capuU-hyde, III, 92, 7; 93, 44; 94, 48: horse-hide, 
care, car, cart. 

care, v., II, 370, 16: mind, object, 
care-bed, H, 58, 4; 433, 3; 434, 28; 435, 47; 436 f., 58, 

79 (of a hopeless lover): almost, or quite, sick-bed; 

(of a mother) III, 3, 2; so, bed of care, V, 227, 11. 

"care-bed lair, a disconsolate situation; a sick-bed." 

Jamieson. 

carefull, III, 57, 28; 343, 18: full of care, sorrowful, 
carket, carknet, I, 69, 56; 71, 46: necklace, 
carl, carle, carel, carril, cerl, II, 466 f., 35, 36, 45, 46; 

III, 189, B 10, 11; IV, 493 f., 7, ll, 30; V, 237, 6, 7; 

238, 12, 13, etc.: fellow, man of low condition, peasant, 
carlin, car line, old woman, V, 26, 24; of a gentleman's 

mother, I, 71, 31; of a wealthy woman, II, 238, l, 2. 

low-born woman, peasant woman : II, 467, 40, 47; 

469 f., 42, 51, 56-58; V, 26, 24. 
carlish, churlish, uncivilized, 
carrlis, careless. 

carnal, II, 8, l, 2, 4: (cornicula, corneille) crow, 
carp, carpe, III, 127, play, 31 ; 310, 58 : talk. In, 

harp and (or) carp, I, 324, 5; 325, 5; 329, 2; IV, 

18, 9, 10 ; 19, B 5, 6, 12 ; 20 f., C 7, D 7, 8 ; 21, E 8 ; 

23, A c 22 ; 454 b ; 455, 8, carp seems to mean tell 

tales, probably sing or chant tales (ballads) to the 

harp. See I, 329, 2, 3. 
carping, III, 13, l; IV, 21, n: talk, tale, 
carry, IV, 247, C u; 253, 15: pass, allow to pass, make 

effective, hold good, 
case, in case that, I, 351, 38; II, 103, l, 8; 171, 22; IV, 

205, 17: against the chance that, lest, 
case, cassed, V, 274, 4, 5: cause, caused, 
casey, cassie, IV, 354, 4; V, 16, 2, 3, 5, 6: causeway, 
cast, n., Ill, 68, 248: venture. (Possibly cost, outlay.) 
cast : pret., coost, koost, cust, cuist, keist, kiest, kyst, 

kest. p. p. casten, castin, coosten, custan, cuisten. 
cast, III, 308, 17: project, intend, cast on sleepe, III, 

401, 10: thrown into a sleep, fallen asleep. 
cast, pret., Ill, 344, 34: struck, (upcast, III, 349, 34.) 



casten, castin, p.p. of cast, I, 245, 7; 463, 3; II, 115, 

29; V, 300, 2; 306, 14. 
cat o clay, III, 11, L: a roll of straw and clay wrought 

together, used in building mud walls. Perhaps only 

a bit of clay. 

caterans, V, 253 b, l: robbers, Highland or Irish irreg 
ular soldiers. (Gaelic ceatharnach, soldier.) 
canger. See cadger, 
caul, kell, IV, 483, 20: a woman's cap. 
cauler, IV, 26, 6; 485, 19: cool, fresh. See caller, 
caup, II, 472, 27: cup. See cap. 
cause, in that cause to flee, II, 421, 34: exigency (such 

exigency that you had to flee), 
caution, III, 447 b; 451, note *: surety. 
cavil, kavil, kaivle, kevel (Dutch kavel), I, 69, 46, 

48: lot. 

caw, cawd. See ca'. 
cawte, III, 296, 26: wary, 
ceppet, kepit, II, 410, 6; 407, 13: received, caught, 

when falling. See cap, cape, 
cerl. See carl, 
cerstyn, III, 111, 44: Christian, 
certyl, III, 14, 15: kirtle (man's garment). 
ce"serera, sassaray, II, 207, A 5; 209, E 5: intended 

for an imitation of the sound of bells, 
chaffare, III, 111, 33; 113, 68; V, 79, 21, 25: ware, mer 
chandise. 

chaffe, III, 34, 11: chuff, clown, loon, simpleton, 
chaft-blade, III, 269, 9; V, 243, 12: jaw-bone, 
chafts, III, 267, 16: chaps, jaws, 
chalmer, chamer, chaumer, chamber. , . 

chamber thy words, II, 435, 45: restrain, suppress, 

be chary of. 

changehouse, IV, 153, E 3: tavern, ale-house. 
charmer in. II, 239, 11: fretting, petulant, 
chap, knock, rap, tap: I, 107, 3, 4; 465, ll; 481, 29; II, 

140, 15; 177, 14, 16; 272, 14; 313, 14; IV, 445 f., 3, 4; 

V, 228, 16; 306 b, 1. of the striking of the hour, II, 

371, 7. 
chaperine, III, 514, 10, would make some sense as 

chapel, but the form is unaccountable except as a 

popular diminutive, 
chare, III, 250, J 7, 8: turn, 
charge, IV, 457, 1, must be understood as charge not, 

forbid. 

charter (simply) : III, 358, 82. See next word, 
chartre of peace, III, 27, 108: grant of pardon, paper 

condoning past offences, 
chase, III, 26, 74: follow up, hunt down, chase the 

wine, III, 169, 24: follow, keep up, like follow strong 

drink. (But a rhyme-end.) 
chaunler-chaftit, I, 303, 6: having chafts (chops) like 

a chandler (candlestick, lantern), lantern-jawed, with 

a long, thin face, 
chaunter, I, 438, B 6: usually, tube of the bagpipe, 

which would not be expected here. A book of chants 

would suit. Cf. Sir Hugh, III, 247, 20; 248, 14; 249, 

H 7, 1 5, etc. 
chays, hunting-ground. 



GLOSSARY 



323 



che, I, 415 b: she. 

chear, II, 193, 27: sounds expressing a state of feeling 
(here sad). IV, 18, 19: referring to the evening's 
entertainment, or, simply doing and saying. See 
chere. 

chear well to, III, 160, ll: have good cheer at. 

check, tether's check, V, 213, 10: spike of a tether. 

cheel, IV, 69, 12: child, fellow. 

cheepe, better cheepe, V, 15, 26: (price) cheaper. 

cheeped, IV, 516, 15: chipped, broken. 

cheik, II, 336, P 2, close to the cheik and chin: cheik 
is door-post, chin of ten = gin, the contrivance for fas 
tening, but gin would not come in well here, and it is 
likely that chin is meaningless, coming in because of 
its frequent association with cheek (kissed her cheek 
and chin, etc.), see door-cheik. 

chelvellrye, IV, 503, l: corrupt. Read, chevauchie, 
excursion on horseback ? (would a progress ride, III, 
343, 2.) 

chepe, cheepe, n., bargain, better chepe, III, 69, 259: 
more cheaply, gret chepe ! Ill, 111, 34: great bar 
gain ! 

chepe, v., Ill, 110, 26; 111, 33: cheapen, bargain for, 
or buy. 

chere, cheer, cheir, chier, chear. carefull, sorry 
chere, III, 57, 28; 68, 239: face, countenance. 1, 109, 
14; 117, 6; 330, B 7; II, 189, 37; III, 441, 37; IV, 20, 
15: of state of mind, bearing, or behavior. Ill, 66, 
197; 67,215; 75,394; IV, 18, 19: entertainment, merry 
making, here is a symple chere, III, 59, 61. made 
gode chere, III, 100, 67: repast. 

cherish, v., I, 76, 19; IV, 96, C n; 437, 25: cheer. 

cherry, V, 264, 4: sherry. 

chess, I, 86, 15: jess, strap; properly, leather strap for 
a hawk's leg (explained by R. Jamieson, hawk's bell). 

chess, IV, 457, L 8, dancin in a chess : chace ? forest ? 
Probably corrupt, since A 10, B 10, I, 341, 343, have 
playing at the chess. 

chess, chiss of farie, V, 165 f., 6, 9, 10: corrupt ; read, 
cheese o Fyvie (see V, 305 f.). 

chest, kist, IV, 342, 12: coffin. 

cheue, v., Ill, 73, 349: end. See chewys. 

cheverons, III, 374, 8: gloves. 

chewys, I, 327, 20 : endest, comest off. (French 
chevir.) See cheue. 

cheys, III, 112, 48: choose. 

child, chiel, chil, cheel, child, young fellow: I, 72, 8; 
367, 3; IV, 69, 12; 432, 15; V, 278, 33. as an appel 
lation, II, 85 f., l, 2, 6, etc.; 128 f., l, 5, 8, etc.; 264 f., 
1, 7, etc.; V, 157, l, 6, etc. auld chiel, V, 125, 6, 8: 
devil, pi. chylderin, III, 13, 2, 3. 

childer, III, 478, 24; IV, 99, ll: children. 

chill, V, 287, 16: child. 

chimly, II, 71, 9; IV, 481, 22; V, 122, 5: chimney. 

chin, chappit at the chin, II, 140, 15, 24; stecked doors 
close to the chin, II, 336, P 2: gin, that is, pin. See 
gin, pin. 

chine, IV, 188, 18: chin. 

chip-hole, 1, 305, 3: a hole chipped or cracked, a chink. 



chiss, chess, V, 165 f., 6, 9, 10: cheese. See V, 305 f. 

chive, II, 362, 34=schive, slice. 

chiven, play the, III, 145, 8: "run away precipitately," 

Nares; chiven, chivin=zchub, or any shy fish, chivie 

= fearful, 
choice, choise, II, 463, 17; 469, 34; 473, 12; V, 269, 15: 

choose. 

choised, chosen, 
choose, chose, I, 103, 7; 329, 2 ; IV, 211, notes, 6: 

choice. 

choosed, p.p., Ill, 440, 23. 
chossen, p.p., chosen. 
Christendom, christendame, christendoun, -doom, 

I, 341, 21; 344, 20; 346, ll; 350, 24; 369, 48; 370, 15, 19: 

christening (as in Old English), 
christentie, cristendie, I, 286, 46; II, 53, 41; V, 192, 

22, 33; 194, 65: Christendom. 

chry stall, II, 52, 17: rock-crystal, a variety of quartz, 
church-style, IV, 412, 14: the gate of the enclosure 

round a church. 

churlish, I, 102, 2: of vulgar derivation, 
chylderin. See child, 
cirsned, p.p., V, 224, 19: christened, 
clade, dead, deed, clad, 
claes, claise, I, 488, 17; II, 90, 25; IV, 18, 16; 262, 22; 

V, 118, 6, 7, 14: clothes. 

claidiug, cleadin, etc., IV, 424, 12: clothing, 
claith, II, 131, 8: garment, 
clam, pret. of climb, II, 166, 35; V, 249, 4. 
clap, in a clap, IV, 41 b: moment, 
clap, II, 269, 25; IV, 278, 4; 303, 18; 403, 12; 414, 25, 14; 

V, 125, 4; 277, 7: pat, fondle, embrace, 
clappit at, V, 173, l: knocked at (with ellipsis of the 

door). 

clarry, claret. 

clatter, IV, 21, 14: to be loquacious, 
dead, deed, cleid, died, I, 220, B 6; 224, J 6, 7; 225, 

L 2, 4; 504 b, 2; IV, 451 a, 2; V, 211 b, 4: clothe. 

pret. cled, IV, 492 a, l. p. p. dead, IV, 456, l. 
cleadin, deeding, cleiding, clieden, eliding, n., II, 

92, 7; 108, 6; 183, 19; 273, 24; IV, 445, 12; 457, 2, 7; 

515, 4: clothing, one of thy deeding, II, 271, 18: 

dresses. 
cleare, III, 307, 5 ; IV, 166, C 7; 477, 21 ; 506, 22 : 

bright. 

cleathe, I, 222, P ll, 12; V, 128, 27, 28: clothe, 
decked, clekit, pret.,p.p., 1, 254 a; II, 261, 7: hatched, 
cleek, n. and v., I, 494, 13; V, 106 B 4; 122, 5: hook, 
clef, pret. of cleave, III, 13 f., 5, 15. 
cleffe, III, 109, 6; 112, 52: cleave, 
cleiding, clieden, clothing. See cleadin. 
clekit, decked, I, 254 a: hatched, 
cleugh, clough, III, 22, l; IV, 6, 13; 7, 26; V, 182, 1; 

250, 12: a hollow between steep banks, narrow glen 

or valley, high rocky bank, 
cleynt, pret., V, 80, 43: clung, 
died. See dead, 
clift, I, 137, Ace: cliff, 
clifting, IV, 179, 4: clift, cleft, fissure. 



324 



GLOSSARY 



cliitt, III, 179, 5: read clutt, clouted, patched. 

cling, V, 154, 15: shrink. 

clintin, IV, 179, B l: crevice, fissure,=clifting, A 4. 

cloathe, III, 93, 43; 174, 24: garment. 

clock, IV, 3, 20, 22: limper, hobbler (Fr. clocher, Picard 
cloquer). 

clocken-hen, V, 92, 15, 16: sitting hen. 

clod, got the clod that wiuna cling, V, 154, 15: the loaf 
of bread (?) that will not shrink (but will rise ?), re 
ferring to the impending increase of her size. 

cloks, II, 166, 36: beetles. 

Clootie, I, 5, 18: a name for the Devil, from cloot, the 
half-hoof of a cloven-footed beast. 

close, closs, enclosure, yard, and, before a house, court 
yard: I, 145, 15; 146, 10, 19, 21; 147, 14; 148, G 10; 149, 
I 7; V, 173, l; 279, No 257, 11; 306 b, 2. castle-yard: 
IV, 84, 22; 86, C 10; 87, 7; 89, 10. lady standing in 
the close pinning her gown, III, 436, 3. close parler, 
III, 431, 22 : securely enclosed, or fastened ? 23, you 
are in close : one (not trustworthy) transcript has to 
chose, which would make easier sense. Saint Evron's 
closs, I, 146, 19, 21: cloister? 

closely, III, 470 a: covertly, without attracting ob 
servation. 

closs. See close. 

cloth and fee, III, 433, 7: clothing and wage, holde 
with cloth and fee, III, 61, 107: retained by presents 
of clothes and money. 

clot-, clout-lether, V, 79, 27: mending-leather. 

cloudy, II, 31, N 1, cloudy stone: (A. S. cliidig) rocky. 
(Read, cloud and stone = reef and rock ?) 

clout, n., V, 116, 10: patch. See clouts. 

clout-leather, clouting-leather, V, 77, 39; b 39; 83, 
55: leather for mending, patching. 

clouts, II, 463, 24, 470, 54 : pieces of cloth for bed- 
coverings, or sheets (linsey clouts, canvas clouts). II, 
470, 53: duds, clothes. See clout. 

clouty, I, 206, 35; 207, 33; V, 110, 2; 116, 4, 5: patched. 

clud, IV, 174, 12, clud o night: cloud. 

clunkers, clunkerts, I, 305, 13; V, 213, 9: clots of 
dirt. 

clutt, III, 179, 5: clouted (given wrongly cliitt). 

clyffe, III, 91 a (play) : rive, sunder, be split. 

co, V, 250, 17, 19: quo, quoth. 

coad, II, 132, 27. See cod. 

coardie, V, 244, 7: cowardice. 

coat-neuk, II, 107, 3, 5: corner of his coat. 

coate-armor, III, 284, ll, 13: surcoat or tabard, em 
broidered with armorial bearings, worn over the 
armor as a personal distinction, and for identifica 
tion, the face being concealed. 

coble, IV, 128, 7; 359, 2, 5, etc.: boat (yawl, flat-bot 
tomed boat). 

cock, II, 472, 20, 28; V, 269, 14: knots, or other arrange 
ments, of ribbon for the hair. (French coque.) 

cockward, I, 285, 24, 26: old cock, fool (French co- 
quard). 

cod, coad, I, 68, 29; II, 132, 27; 270, 27: pillow. 

coffer, trunk or box, for clothes and valuables: I, 69, 



60; 71, 49; II, 375 f., 23, 26, 29; IV, 258, 19. In a com 
monplace with mantle: I, 350, 16; III, 244, 11; IV, 
385, 26; V, 175, 2; absurdly introduced in the first two 
instances; ridiculously corrupted, I, 348 f., F 1,3, 13; 
II, 475, 5. 

coft, I, 356, 56; 394, 9; 397, D 8, 10, 12; III, 11, 6; V, 
118, 9; 162, C 7; 163, 13: bought. 

cog, coug, II, 30, 6; IV, 378 f., 2, 3, 20; 379 f., 2, 4, 17- 
19; V, 275, 2, 3, 9: boat, vessel. 

cog, cogie, II, 273 a; IV, 199, 15; 200, 17; 206, 9; V, 
273 a: milk-pail. 

coif, quoif, II, 280, B 3; III, 514 b, 3; 515 a, 1, 4: cap. 

coil (of hay), II, 233, 7: cock. 

coilyear, V, 70 b: collier, charcoal-burner. 

cold, could, coud, understood, cold of wisdome, of 
curtesye, I, 271, l, 3. cold of his curtesie, I, 286, 49; 
V, 132, 3. cold, could, coud his curtesye, II, 433, 10; 
435, 35; III, 75, 385; V, 132, 3. 

cold, could, coud, did. See can. 

cole, III, 74, 372; 76, 421 : cowl, monk's hood, also frock, 
which last is intended here, for the king wears a 
broad hat and puts on a green garment when he casts 
off his cowl. 

coled (high coled). See colld. 

coll, v. See cow. 

coll, cold. 

collaine, collayne, collen, swords of, III, 298, 50: of 
Cologne steel, collaine, collen brand, I, 286, 45, 42, 43. 

colld, coled, cut, shaped, fashioned, high-colld hose, 
I, 69, 52; 71, 42. high coled stockings, 1, 72, 9: made to 
go to the knee or above (perhaps in contradistinction 
to short hose, worn by common people), high-coled 
shoon, I, 73, 64. laigh-colld shoon, I, 69, 52; 71, 42; 
72, 9: low-cut shoes, high-colld hat, IV, 204, 12: hat 
peaked before and behind. 

colleen, II, 497 f., 4, 13, 16: (Ir. and Sc. Gaelic cailin, 
diminutive of caile, simple country maid) girl. 

collen, of Cologne. See collaine. 

com, come, pret. of come, I, 244, 10, 13; 328, 46. 

comand, V, 80, 56: commanded. (Read, comanded ?) 

comd, pret. of come, III, 430, 6; 467, 61. p. p., I, 324, 
4; III, 464, 3, 7. 

come, pret. cam, com, come, coom, comd. pret.pl. come. 
ptc. pres. coomin. p.p. comen, commen, coom, comd. 

come, pret. pi. of come, III, 216, 34. 

come by (life), IV, 515, 7: get, obtain, gain. 

comen, commen, p.p. of come, II, 52, 19; 54, 46; HE, 

35,32. 

comentye, comyntie, III, 361, b, c 58: commonalty. 

comfort, p. p. of comfort, II, 370, 22. 

commant, p. p. of command, III, 9, 1. 

commaunded theym agayne, III, 77, 430: come has 
perhaps dropped out; later editions, them to come. 

compare, made him no compare, V, 260, No 221, 1: 
made no comparison (of others) with him. 

compass, I, 346 f., 17, 25; 351, 32, 44: circle. 

compear, compeir, III, 364 b; IV, 81 b; 164 a: ap 
pear. 

comt, count. 



GLOSSARY 



325 



complete, sang sae sweet and sae complete, V, 301, 
No 200: excellently, skilfully. 

compted, III, 77, 437: emendation for commytted of 
80 and 81, 437. (85, 88, commended for.) 

comunye, I, 285, 31 : communing. 

comyn-bell, III, 100, 73 : town bell, a clerc the 
commun belle rong. Robert of Gloucester, p. 541, 
Hearne. 

condescend upon, IV, 41 b, note : particularize. 

conduction, III, 403 a: direction, charge. 

cone, liftet up the cone, IV, 484, a, last stanza: ap 
parently the face-cloth, which may have been gath 
ered into a conical form the better to fit the face. 
J. Aiken. 

conferred, III, 336, note f: made the subject of con 
ference. 

conform, IV, 63 b: conformably. 

confound, II, 443, 38; 449, 44: be the destruction of. 

conqueas, V, 191 f., 9, 13, 23, 35: conquer. 

convay. See convoy. 

conve, V, 117, 13; 268, 27, 28: convoy, escort. 

convened, III, 409 a, note: agreed. 

convenient, IV, 78, 4: suitable. 

convention, made a, III, 364 a: had a meeting. 

convey. See convoy. 

convoy, convay, n., I, 252, 16; IV, 37, 15; 38, 15; 
267, 14: escort. IV, 453, 6: of attendance upon the 
dead. 

convoy, convey, v., II, 27, 4: convey. IV, 267, 3, 10; 
269 f., f 2, 3, g 3; 317, 7; 318, 12; V, 119, 12: escort, 
accompany part of the way homeward, or on a jour 
ney, see a friend off, a young woman home. 

coom, p.p., V, 296 a: come. 

coomin, ptc., V, 296 a: coming. 

coops, IV, 461, 4: carts (tip-carts). 

coost, koost, pret. of cast, I, 73, 69; 102, 18; IV, 477, 
6; V, 173, 3, 4. I, 74, 70; 78, 48: threw things about. 
p.p. coosten, I, 77, 5; 324, B 6; 371, 3. 

coot, queet, IV, 212, 5: ankle. 

cop, coppe, I, 244, 9; III, 123, 6: head. 

coped, overset. See couped. 

cor, Corehead, Corhead, V, 192, 37; 195 f., 35 (MS., 
Carhead) ; 196, 52: (Gaelic coire, cauldron, dell) corrie, 
a hollow in a hill. Jamieson. Penman's Core, 193, 51, 
55, 58, described as a hollow on the top of a high ridge 
of hills, might possibly be Penman score (score, a 
deep, narrow, ragged indentation on the side of a 
hill, South of Scotland. Jamieson). poor man's core, 
V, 196, 52, corruption. 

corbie, I, 253, l; 254, b l, c 1; III, 473, 23: raven. 

cordain, cordan, cordevine, II, 435, 50; IV, 312, 7; 
317, P 3: Cordovan leather. 

cordin, shoon laced with cordin, IV, 435, 8: cording, 
cord (and not with whangs of leather). 

cordiuant, adj., V, 49, 23 : of Spanish, Cordovan 
leather. 

cored, II, 217 f., 5, 10: covered. 

coresed (hors), III, 61, loo: bodied (?) (later texts, 
corese, corse). 



corn, II, 88, 17, 18, etc.: in Scotland, unground oats. 
(Here distinguished from white meal, which is usu 
ally oat-meal.) 

corn-caugers, III, 479, 8: cadgers, hucksters, in corn. 

corp, II, 218, 25; 229, 11: a vulgar singular of a sup 
posed plural; corps, II, 217, 30; these corps, 31; cf. 
IV, 483, 23; 484 a, after 31. corpes, HI, 231, 97, may 
be corpse. 

cors, curse. 

corse, corss, 1, 117, 7; 351, 31, 32, 44; IV, 53, 8; 512 a, 
9; V, 161, 4: cross. 

corser, III, 68, 256: should probably be forser= coffer 
(text g has coffer). 

cosh, coush, II, 363, 13: quiet (snug). 

cote a pye, coate a pie, cote of pie, III, 65, 194; 80, 
194; 86, 194: corruption of courtepi, short cloak or 
gown. (Dutch kort, short, and pij, coat of warm 
woolen stuff.) 

cots, coats, III, 481, 2, 6: petticoats. 

couchd, V, 9, 12: lay, leaned. 

coug, cog, V, 275 b, 2, 3, 9: boat. 

could, did. See can. 

couls, V, 228, 19: cools, chills. 

couiicell, counsell, II, 58, 3; III, 68, 45; V, 52, 78: 
secret. 

cound, IV, 467, 13: count. 

counsell, II, 246, C 9-11 ; III, 217, 53: secret. See 
councell. 

counterfeit, j.^?., V, 300, 10: counterfeited. 

country-keeper, V, 196, 41 : "one employed in a 
particular district to apprehend delinquents." Ja 
mieson. 

coup, cupe, cup. 

couped, koupd, coped, I, 469, 23; II, 313, 20; IV, 
315, 14: overturned. 

couper, cowper, IV, 259, 7; 260, 7: buyer and seller, 
dealer. 

couple-root, I, 302, 13: rafter-end (the end resting on 
the wall). 

courting, III, 146, 20: demonstration of affection, em 
bracing. 

courtnolls, V, 85, 14: courtiers. 

courtrie, V, 191, 5; 198 b, after 52: belonging to a 
court, courtiers. 

coush, cosh, IV, 483 b: quiet. 

coustome, IV, 507, 78: duty (the king will remit). 

cout, cowte, IV, 18, 20, 21; 21, 16: colt. 

couth, II, 357, 2: sound, word, Jamieson (the sense re 
quired, but the suggested derivation from Icel. kviSr, 
A. S. cwide, is not easy). 

couent, III, 60, 86; 357, 55: convent. 

coving-tree, II, 193, H 4: meeting- tree. " A large tree 
in the front of an old Scottish mansion-house, where 
the laird met his visitors." Similar to trysting-tree. 
Jamieson. In Roxburghshire, covin ; in the north 
of England, covan, coban, and even capon. Denham 
Tracts, II, 226 ff. 

cow, twig. See broom-cow, heather-cow, kow. 

cow, coll (locks), II, 423, 4, 7: clip, (brume), III, 9, 



326 



GLOSSARY 



H 8: browse. (Norwegian kolla (Aasen), dock, take 
off the top.) 

cowing, eating. 

cowper. See couper. 

cowte, colt. See cout. 

coxcomb, III, 35, 19: pate. 

crabby (crabbed), III, 488, 23: provoking. 

crack, crak, II, 271, 18; 488, 6, 10; III, 161, 28; IV, 
261, 3; V, 106, E 3: talk. Ill, 487, 6, 14, 16: brag, 
crackd (the Border-side), IV, 146, 4: defied, chal 
lenged. (In Scott's printed copy, bragged, defied.) 

crack, crak, a moment of time, in a crack, within 
a crack, IV, 314, 16; 315, 13; 317, E 6; V, 271, 13: 
instantly. 

crack fingers, in grief or perplexity, II, 26, G- 16. See 
knack. 

crae, preL, V, 253 a, No 200, B a 8: crew. 

crak. See crack. 

cramoisie, cramasie, IV, 93, 8, 2, 3; 410, 17, 20; 472, 
9: crimson. 

crap, II, 261, 10; 286, 16: crop, top. 

crap, pret. of creep, II, 323, 3; 330, H 3; 336, P 2; 337, 3. 

crapotee, I, 326, 6: toad-stone, supposed to be gener 
ated in the head of toads; "in fact, a petrifaction of 
the teeth of extinct fishes." Matzner. Sometimes 
defined, smaragdus, emerald. 

cravin, II, 335, N 2: asking for, demanding. 

crawen, crawn, p.p. of craw, crow, II, 139 f., 7, 12, 
22; 222, 17; IV, 473, 36. 

cray, cry. 

credence, III, 449 b: credit. 

creed, n., IV, 262, 13, 14: blame. 

creel, V, 122, 5, ll, 12; 123, 5, 11; 124, 4, 12: basket. 

creep, pret. crap. See crap. 

cries, n., II, 73, 22: calls, demands. 

Cristiante, Cristinty, Cristendie : Christendom. 

croche, I, 413, 36: crouch. 

croft, IV, 142 a : a piece of land adjoining a house. 

crooden, croodin, croodlin, croudlin, I, 163 f., J 
l, 2, etc.; 165, M i, N l, etc.; 166, K c l: cooing. 

cropped (knee), III, 280, 26: crooked (Icel. krop- 
pinn). 

Cross, v., V, 306, 6 (correct V, 166, 7 2 , in accordance 
with this reading): oppose, p. p., the sheriff was 
crost, III, 157, so: balked. 

croudlin. See crooden. 

crouds, cruds, IV, 260, 5: curds. 

crouse, crouselie, crously, II, 169, 9; III, 161, 28; 

IV, 261, 3; V, 17, 33: briskly, merrily, jubilantly. HI, 
493, 16: (perhaps) bumptiously. See crowse. 

crow, craw, crow, ar the coc him crowe, I, 244, 18; 

V, 288 b, v. 33. p.p. crowen, crawen, crawn. 
crowen, p.p. of crow, II, 138, 7. 

cr owner, I, 141 b: coroner. 

crowse, III, 457, B 5 : audacious. See crouse. 

crowt, I, 273, 28: draw together, pucker up. 

cruds, n., IV, 260, 7, 18, 19; 262, 30; 265, A b l, ll: 

curds, 
cry, crye, proclaim, proclamation, cry in, III, 320, 



A b 7: call in. cry on, upo, 1, 127, 6; II, 150, 13; III, 
318, 7; IV, 7, 24: call upon, summon, cryed out on 
Robyn Hode, III, 70,296: cried out against, or, sim 
ply, cried out R. H." 

cryance, II, 58 f., 18, 20, 21: cowardice, fainthearted 
ness (disposition to succumb). 

cud, V, 104 a: cudgel. 

cuddy, IV, 69, 6: ass. 

cuirt, pret., I, 439, C ll: covered. 

cuist, oust, pret. of cast, II, 248, l, 2; IV, 68, E 2; 182, 
G 5; 394, C l; V, 116, 5. keist, kiest, I, 69, 46; 75, 
36; 80, 4. 

cuisten, p. p. of cast, I, 495, 11. See custan. 

cum, V, 191, 8: become. 

cum, pret. of come, III, 386, 22. 

cumand, ptc., V, 192 f., 35, 49: coming. 

cumber, V, 53, 104: oppress, torment. See cumre. 

cumbruk, cambric. 

cummers, V, 106, E 2: gossips (commeres). 

cumre, n., IV, 316, 19: cumber, trouble. See cum 
ber. 

cun thanke, III, 68, 242: am, feel, grateful. 

cunues. nones cunnes, I, 244, ll: of no kind, enes 
cunnes, 1, 244, 12: of any kind. 

cunning, V, 82, 21: craft (mystery, trade). 

curch, curche, II, 131, 6; III, 472, 10: kerchief, wo 
man's head covering. 

cure, III, 262, 7: pains. McNaughtoun's cure, II, 386, 
25: "McNaughtoun's cure to ye is, Devil relieve ye." 
Motherwell. 

curn, III, 160, 19; IV, 85, 3: quantity, parcel, paek. 

curst turne, III, 93, 34: malignant, spiteful, ferocious 
job, piece of work, feat. 

curstlye, V, 53, 104: fiercely, savagely. 

curtal (frier), III, 124 ff., 6, 7, ll, 13, etc.: (Lat. curti- 
larius) having charge of, attached to, the vegetable 
garden of a monastery, curtal dogs, 125, 34. 

oust, pret. of cast, V, 116, 5. See cuist. 

custan, p.p. of cast, III, 4, 2. 

cut, V, 202 a: horse. 

cut, V, 112, 7; 124, 6; 125, 5: bite, gnaw. 

cutted (friar), III, 123, 3, ll, 13, 15, 17: short-f rocked 
(but apparently a corruption of curtal, see III, 
121 f.). 

cutters, III, 228, 10: bravos, robbers. 

cuttie, I, 72, 13; 74, 74: short. 

cutties, II, 470, 49: spoons. 

cweet, queet, II, 96, I 3: ankle. 

cypress queen, as fair as a cypress queen, V, 164, 15: 
Cyprus, Cypris (Venus). 



'd, for 't (it), bla'd wind, bla'd weet, II, 21, 6; doo'd, 
IV, 464, 16; born'd, deal'd, 465, 22, 37; 471, 41 ; lai'd, 
520, 10; dee'd, V, 248, 12. 

dabs, II, 167 b, F: pricks. 

dada, dadda, II, 339, 16, 18; V, 112, B b 5: daddie. 

daft (love), II, 410, 8: foolishly fond. 

dag-durk, I, 55, 12: dagger. 



GLOSSARY 



327 



daggle, IV, 258, 25: drizzling (dag, a slight rain). 

daghter, dather, daughter. 

daghterie, IV, 324, l: a word of no meaning, the ori 
ginal being simply daughter : see V, 272 b, 1. 

daigh, daighe, I, 302, A 10; II, 467, 42: dough. 

dail, IV, 430, 5: (dool) the grief, the ill consequences. 

daily, dayly, daily flower, I, 76, 9, 15, 18; II, 393, 2; 
IV, 19, 8: (Icelandic daelligr, Danish deilig) beauti 
ful, charming. 

daily dight, IV, 432, 6: beautifully adorned. 

dairgie, II, 195, 41: refection given after a funeral. 

dale, been at a, III, 161, 28, so: dole (to mendicants), 
satirically. 

dam, II, 192, 10: dame. 

damasee, II, 327, 32: damson plum. 

dame, addressed to an unmarried girl by her father, 
IV, 195, 7. 

dandily, V, 106, E 5: over nice or dainty. 

dandoo, III, 5, C 7, 8: dun doe ? 

dane, done, I, 68, 20, 24; 69, 45, 53; II, 81 f., 41, 56: 
done, dane him to, III, 273, 15, 27: betaken himself. 
See do. 

dang, pret. of ding, I, 55, 12; 129, D 6; 130, P 5; 133, 
M 7, 10; II, 253, 19; 261, 9; IV, 305, 18: beat, struck, 
knocked, thrust, shoved, dang down, III, 460, 32. 
p. p., II, 282, 10: overpowered. 

danger, do danger, III, 163, 67: exercise of the power 
of a superior ? violence ? 

dank (moat), V, 295, 7: damp, wet. 

danting, danton, IV, 287, l (burden); V, 267, 1 (bur 
den) : (Fr. dompter) sexual conquest. 

danton, V, 248, 19 : subdue, intimidate. See daun- 
ton. 

daown, adv., V, 304, 8: down. 

dapperpy, IV, 185, 11: diapered, of variegated cloth. 

dather, dother, V, 257, 15: daughter. 

datit, IV, 467, 15: dawtit, caressed. 

dative of pronoun: III, 58, 37, 44; 60, 82; 61, 100; 65, 184; 
75, 381, 391. after verbs of motion (dative of the sub 
ject): I, 244, 10, 13; 326, l; III, 70, 281. 

daunton, danton, 1, 325, 6; III, 364 b: daunt, subdue, 
put down. 

daut, dawt, IV, 104, O; 277, 4; 302, 2: fondle, caress, 
make much of, pet. 

daw, v., II, 146, 7: dawn. p. p. da wen, II, 139, 7, 12. 

dawdy, II, 308, 5: the unborn young of an animal. 

dawt, daut, IV, 304, 3; V, 106, D 3: caress. 

dawtie, V, 117 f., B 5, 9, 13; 173, 11: darling. 

day, dey, die, dye, IV, 257, B 9; 259, 7, 17; 260, 7, 16; 
262, 16; V, 265 a, 10: dairy-woman. 

day, dayed, die, died. 

dayly. See daily. 

de, dee, dea, deei, die, = do: I, 165, N 8; 183, 24; II, 
175 f., i, 8. a dee, II, 110, 25: to do. dee'd, V, 248, 
12: do it- p. p. deen. See dee. 

dea, die. 

dead, deed, deid, dede, died, n., I, 104, 14; 353, 13; 
388, A n ; 465, 19; II, 385, 25; 505, 92; III, 387, 16, 
10; IV, 36, 3; 505, 57: death. 



dead, be dead, II, 58, 5, 7; III, 23, 25; 28, 120; 99, 50: 
die. 

deak, V, 270, 7: deck. 

dean, den, IV, 167, D 5, 6, ll: hollow where the ground 
slopes on both sides, valley. 

dean, done. 

dear, deare, dere, I, 411, 5; III, 164, b 67: injury. 

Dear-Coft, II, 62, 18: Dear-Bought. 

dearly, IV, 98, P 6: costly. 

dearsome, III, 488 f., 38, 44: costly. 

dear vow, interjection of surprise or commiseration. 

deas, II, 189, 24: pew (stone seat at the door of the 
church. Chambers). Same word as dais. See dice. 

deave, I, 389, C 3; IV, 69, 17: deafen. 

debate, III, 314, 64: quarrel. 

deceivin (tree), III, 396, N 3: corruption of savin (see 
380 a). 

decencey, V, 242 b, 8: corruption of bencite, benedi- 
cite. 

deck-board, deck-buird, oer (over), V, 138, B 5, 6; 
139, c 6, 7: overboard. 

dede, V, 283, 8: death. See dead. 

dee, deei, do. how can this dee, 1, 453, 6: be allowed, 
borne ; and so, perhaps, a' this winna dee (wont do), 
II, 97, 14. a' this winna dee, gif ony prayer can dee, 
II, 132, 16; 176, 10; it wad na do, IV, 509 b, 13; it 
widne deei, V, 227, 2: avail. 

dee, deei, do. See de. 

dee, deei, die. 

deed, death. See dead. 

deed, w., I, 164, K 6; 165, O 5: died. 

deed, indeed, by my deed, III, 262, 12: on my word. 

deed-thraw, III, 501, 10: death-throe. 

deei, do, avail; die. See de, dee. 

deemed, demed, III, 61, 95: judged. Ill, 356, 35: con 
demned. 

deen, I, 16, C 18; II, 182 a; 409, 18, 19 done (with no 
sense in 19). 

deerlye (dight), III, 340, 28, 36: expensively (orna 
mented). Ill, 356, 16, 31, 35 : perhaps, with great 
cost to the sufferer, possibly, to his hurt; lovingly, 
out of love, would answer in the first two cases, but 
not in the third. 

deft, III, 145, 3: neat, nice-looking. 

degree, III, 323, 58; IV, 258, 20: rank, sort, served 
him in his ain degree, V, 191, 19; 193, 57: rendered 
him respect accordant with his rank, wee shall beare 
no degree, III, 333, 19: shall have no position, stand 
ing, (requite, thank, show) in euerye degree, V, 
84 f., 9, 14, 27: to the full extent demanded by the 
occasion. 

deid, I, 105, 26; 353, 13: death. See dead. 

deighte, IV, 504, 29: dight, furnished, adorned, equipped. 

delated, III, 449 a, b; IV, 63 b: accused. 

dell, V, 79, 32: deal, bit, whit. 

dell, II, 345, 29: we are apparently to understand that 
it was a dismal dell that brought James into the world 
(not in itself, but from the melancholy fact of his 
being born there). Possibly we may understand dell 



328 



GLOSSARY 



= dale, affliction. But the piece is spurious, and we 
need uot be nice. 

delle, I, 327, 22: perhaps, dally, talk, disport; perhaps, 
deal. 

demean, IV, 41, note*; 107, 3: treat, maltreat, (in 
107, 3, treat as he deserves, damage, do harm to.) 

demed. See deemed. 

den, dean, IV, 166, B 8; 168, 5, n; 169, 3, 9, G 2; 174 f., 
2, 7; 306 f., 12, 20, 48; V, 119, D 2: small valley, glen, 
dingle. 

den, dien, V, 260, 8, 14: done. 

denay, deny, V, 110, 10; 260, 3, 4: refuse. 

deol, V, 297 b: sorrow. 

dep, gave him a dep unto the heart, III, 281, 14: per 
haps dab, Old Eng. dabbe, stroke. But Dr Davidson 
suggests that the line was misheard, and that what 
was said was, a dep 'oon (wound), which seems to me 
very likely. 

depart, III, 139, 27: part company. 

deputed, III, 414, 52: consigned, handed or delivered 
over (used of a fugitive carried back for trial). 

dere, dear(e), III, 99, 69: injury. 

dere-worthy, 111,58,36, 37; 59, 60; 61, ill; 67, 219; 68, 
250; 73, 346: precious, dear. 

derf, derf blowes, III, 422, 73: powerful. 

derne, I, 327, so; III, 57, 21: secret, hidden, privy, ob 
scure. 

descry vd, IV, 405, 50: described. 

desse, I, 328, 45: dais, the elevated part of the hall, on 
which was the table for the chief personages. 

deuylkyns, III, 79, 73: devilish sort of. 

de veiling, come, I, 302, 5: moving like the devil, 
whether hieing, scouring, bouncing, or what not; or, 
possibly, O. Fr. devalant, descending; an equivalence 
to daundering, sauntering, has been suggested. 

devyse, I, 327, 16: will, pleasure. 

dey, die, dye, IV, 257, 9; 259, 7, 17; 260, 7; 262, 16: 
dairy-woman. See day. 

dey the, dyth, III, 112, 59: dight, prepared. 

di, die, II, 132, 24; V, 35, B 5: do. dinna, I, 146, 6, 
and passim : do not. See dinne. 

dice, IV, 416, I7=deis: pew in a church. 

did, I, 104, 3, 4: used for should, 

did (be wrought), II, 506 a: caused. 

did him to. See do to. 

did of. See do. 

die, IV, 264, 5: dey, dairy- woman. See day. 

die. See de. 

die, do, din, dien, done. 

died, IV, 386, 19: death. See dead. 

died, IV, 407, 7, 8: dead. 

dien. See den, die. 

dight, dicht, dycht, deight, dyght, III, 57, 19: pre 
pared, dedys that here be dyght, III, 72, 320: done, 
of grain, I, 16, B 16; IV, 242 a: winnow, dight 
shoon, V, 105, A 11: clean, had not men to dight my 
men, III, 300, 18; IV, 500, 19: serve, handle, she 
dighted her father's wounds, I, 101, 8; 103, D 6: 
dressed, pinnace, hachebord deerlye dight, III, 340, 



28,36; IV, 504,29: fitted out. dill (grief) to him was 

dight, II, 58, 4: ordained, 
dight, adv., bird sang fu dight, II, 261, 10: readily, 

freely (strange use of the word). Cf. complete, 
dild, God, III, 35, 31: God ild, yield, reward (d carried 

on from the subject), 
dill, II, 58, 4, ll: dule, grief, 
dimitted, III, 447 b: discharged, released, 
din, dien, done. 
din, I, 133, 10; II, 186, 16: dun. 
dine, I, 127, 23; II, 94, 12; 194, 13, 17; 313, 17; III, 267, 

18; V, 277 f., 18, 29: dinner, meal, 
ding, II, 62 a, 17; 261, 8; IV, 97, P 2; 304, 16, 17: beat, 

knock, ding down, II, 240, 6; III, 5, D 2, 6; 6, 2, 6; 

8, 5; 9, 2, 7: lay low, overthrow, pret. dang, dung. 

p. p. dung, dang, my ain wand dings me now, IV, 

97, F 2: I am suffering the consequences of my own 

folly. 

dink, I, 74, 72: neat, trim, 
dinua, do not. 
dinne, V, 229 a, 35: do (you) not. V, 229 b, 6: (diane) 

does not. dinner = dinna, dinne. 
dinne, I, 272, 25: (noise) ado, trouble, 
dint (of arrow), III, 345, 48; 350, 48: stroke, impact, 
dirt, v., V, 304, 2, 3: soil, 
dis, does. 
Disaware, V, 49, 29; 51, 51, 62: O. E. aver (O. Fr. 

aver, avoir) seems to be the basis of the word, which 

would mean stripped of wealth, sans aver (avoir) ; a 

Galterius Sine Avero is noted by Ducange. 
discared, III, 38, 85: revoked, withdrawn (apparently 

for discarded). 

discharged, IV, 63 b: revoked, 
discreene, II, 439, 2: descry, spy out, discover, 
discreeue, II, 58, 3, should be disceuere, diskevere, dis 
cover, reveal. 

disgrate, V, 269, 17: disgrace, 
disgrate, III, 58, 48: unfortunate, out of fortune's 

favor. (Ital. disgraziato.) 
disiia, does not. 

distan, IV, 329 a, after 16: (distance) distinguish, 
dittay, IV, 245 a: indictment, 
dive, II, 132, 25: do. 
diuel's mouth. He could not finde a priuy place, for 

all lay in the dieul's mouth, II, 483, 4: as the devil's 

mouth is depicted wide open in painted windows, etc., 

Professor Skeat has suggested that meaning for the 

phrase. 

do, it wad na do, IV, 509 b, 13: avail. See dee. 
do. See doo. 

do, doe, doe my thy hawkes, I, 211, 20: give, deliver, 
do adowne, III, 67, 226; 69, 263: put down, 
do away, III, 59, 63: have done with, stop, 
do be, I, 184, 47: are. 
do down. See do to. 
do gladly, III, 58, 34; 61, 103; 67, 232: make yourself 

happy (=;make glad chere, 67, 215). 
do (doe) of, off, II, 138, 13; IH, 78, 449; V, 49, 23-25: 

put off. pret. doft, II, 490 b. 



GLOSSARY 



329 



do on, III, 23, 27; 76, 421: put on, don. 

do to, do till, with reflexive pronoun, I, 86, 30; 87 b; 
115, B 3, 4; 182 ., 7, ll, 13, 17; 352, 32, 44; III, 72, 
328: betake. So with up, down, V, 300, 5, 8. 

do up. See do to, and dop. 

doited, IV, 427, 10: stupid, doting. 

doll, dolle, dol, dule, I, 217, 3; V, 111, 19, 21: grief. 

domineer, in, wi, III, 268, 9; 270, 9; V, 242 b, 8: with 
haughtiness, superciliously. (Perhaps a corruption 
of III, 270, E 7, since the captain is said to be buke- 
learned in 268, 9.) 

doo (ynne gon), III, 91 a : cause, make. 

doo, dou, dow, I, 163-165; 497, L 2; V, 40 f., 3, 9, 
15, etc.: dove. 

don, down. 

done, how done you ? Ill, 35, 31 : old plural, how do 
you do ? 

done upon, V, 48, 6: put on. 

doo'd, IV, 464, 16: do it. 

dool, doll, dule, II, 175, 17; IV, 85, 42; V, 17, 31; 111, 
19, 21: grief. See dail. 

dool, dool and down, II, 271, 26: corruption of dale and 
down ; cf. II, 175, 14; 273, 33; IV, 219, B 5: and 
elsewhere. 

doon, II, 198 b, 2d line : a corruption, or possibly an 
Irish word, of which I can make nothing. 

doon, youar begun yar doon, V, 304 b, 4. 

doorcheeks, II, 99 b, 33: door-posts. 

dop, III, 34 f., 6, 21: do up, open. 

dorn, II, 300, 5: (sheets of) dornic, table-linen, ordi 
narily, from Dornick, the Dutch name for Tournay. 

dorty, IV, 288, 10: pettish, peevish, saucy. 

dother, IV, 327, 15; V, 110, l; 237 f., 6, 7, 12, 22, etc.; 
264, 7: daughter. 

dottled, V, 94, A3: in a state of dotage. 

dou, dove. See doo, dow. 

dou, dow (A. S. ddah, dugon), HE, 245, B 12; 247, 18; 
370, 10, 13; IV, 472, 22: can (of physical ability). II, 
78, 4; 104, 24; 105, 16; 168, 12; III, 386, 21; IV, 31, 9; 
512, 12: (with negative) am unable from aversion, 
want of resolution, etc. dought (A. S. dohte, pret. of 
dugan), pret., 1, 146, 20; II, 401, C 7; III, 465, 22; IV, 
23, A c 18: was able, could. Subjunctive, I, 326, 18, 19 
(be at liberty); I, 330, B 3: should be able, dought, 
he neere dought good day, I, 434, 32: he never was 
good for anything a good day. But we should ex 
pect him : never a good day profited him. 

double - horsed, III, 489, 42: with horse carrying 
double. 

doubt, doute, dout, n. and v., I, 295, 35; 478 f., 19, 28; 
II, 52, 22; III, 57, 10; 76, 406; 125, 26; 188, 4: fear. 

doubt, if tho[u], II, 449, 58: corrupt. A 53, without 
all doubt. 

doubtit, III, 364 b: redoubted, held in awe. See 
doubt. 

douce, I, 184, l; V, 210 a, l: staid and sober, violence 
douce, II, 271, 19: corrupt; read done? 

doue, douey=:dowie, V, 257, 7, 17: dreary, melancholy. 
V, 220 f., 6, 7, 9 (of bran): wretched. 
VOL. v. 42 



doughete, III, 308, 28: doughty man. 

dought. See dou. 

douk, duck, II, 151, H 6; 153, 16, 17, 19, 21: dive. 

doukers, duckers, II, 151, H 6, 8: divers. 

doulfou, II, 159, 23: doleful. 

dounae. See dou. 

doup (dish-doup), II, 463, 23: bottom. 

dour(e), I, 117, 17: hard, severe. V, 295, 3: savage, 
knocks bauldly and dowr, II, 341, R after 3: hard, 
or pertinaciously. 

dout, doute. See doubt. 

dow, dou, doo, I, 163 f., J i-e, etc.; II, 299, 22-24; 
301, 14; V, 111, is; 302, 17: dove. 

dow, do. 

dow, downa, v. See dou. 

dowie, dowy, I, 56, B n; II, 146, 19; 148, 21, 22; 189, 
36, 37; IV, 33, 24; 165, 12; 166, C 4, 5, 6; etc.: sad, dole 
ful, melancholy, wretched. See doue'. 

dowilie, I, 439, ll: sadly. 

down, wi meikle dool and down, 11/271,26: nonsense; 
corruption of, beheld baith dale and doun, F 33. 

down-browed, scowling; I, 302, A ll. 

downfall, downcome of Robin Hood, with the, III, 
271, 10; 274, 30: knocked down in R. Hood's fashion ? 

dowr. See doure. 

doyn, III, 111, 39: done. 

doyt, III, 109, i: doth (plural). 

draff, refuse, dirt. 

drank, II, 30, 7: gave to drink, drenched. 

drap, III, 281, 10, drap down: perhaps, drap[d] down; 
otherwise, should drop. 

draps, drops. 

draught, I, 432, l: sketch, picture. 

draw, drew her table, V, 304, 13: see explanation, 304 a. 

draw, III, 6, 14, 15: move (cf. Germ, ziehen). 

draw to, ti, till, draw to hose and sheen, II, 249, 15; 
256, 9; IV, 464, 10: draw on. drew till him his hose, 
IT, 189, 35. drew to him his sheen, II, 257, 30. 

draw up wi, II, 114, 14: take up with, enter into inti 
macy, relations of love, with. 

drawght that thowe dost drawe, IV, 503, 16: of the 
drawing of a bow. (So " Chaucer's Dream," v. 788, 
Morris.) 

drawn, ere the horse was drawn and brought, IV, 346 b, 
I b 5: chosen. 

drawn a stroke behind his hand, II, 63, 24: evidently 
means give a back-handed stroke, but the phrase 
sounds factitious. 

dreaded, II, 169, 14: suspected. 

dreads, IV, 32, C 7: suspicions. 

dreamed, I was, I, 432, l: dreamed, had a dream. 

drede, n., Ill, 296, 8: doubt. 

dreder, II, 403, 3, 4: dread, apprehension. 

dre(e), dri, drie, drye, suffer, undergo, hold out, stand, 
be able, dree pine, II, 466, 35; 467, 45. doom, III, 
391, 9. death, HI, 391, l. dill I drye, II, 58, 11. 
dreeing trying hour, I, 73, 47. as fast as they might 
dree, III, 286, 49: could do it; so, II, 149, 7; 255, 10; 
HI, 106, 12; 267, 9; IV, 2, 6; 6, 13; V, 195, 13, 35; 196, 




330 



GLOSSARY 



37. whylle the myghte dre, III, 298, 58; 309, 47: as 
long as they could hold out. draw carts, which horse 
were wont to drie, 1, 465, 2: do, perform, drie to feel, 
III, 479, 5: be compelled, come to feel. 

dreel, gie a, I, 403, 9: stir up, put into a flurry, 
make scud. (Old Dutch drillen, ultro citroque cur- 
sitare gyrosque agere, etc. Scottish dreel, to move 
quickly.) 

dreigh, IV, 47, 4: seems to mean here, far to jump 
from. 

dress, III, 336 b: redress. 

dressen, v. the dressede into the countrey, V, 71, 
note f: betaken. 

drew (her table). See draw. 

dri. See dree. 

drie, n., Ill, 415, 22: an unauthorized word of Percy's, 
to mean suffering. 

drie, dri. See dree. 

driep, drop. 

drifts, IV, 2, 10: droves. 

drive, IV, 6, 19; 7, so, 32: drive off. 

droonet, I, 133, 13: drowned. 

droop, droop and drowsie (of blood), IV, 220, 13: droop 
might be the Old English drup, sad, piteous, but a 
word indicating the quality or condition of the blood 
would be expected (as in German triibe, thick, 
muddy). The nearest is drubly, turbid, muddy. 
Cf. wan and drousie, IV, 224, 23. her lothely lere 
is droupy and drowsy, Skelton, Elynour Rummynge, 
15: downcast and drowsy. See drousie. 

droped, III, 164, 88: drooped. 

drouflye, III, 85, 22: sad. See drousli. 

drousie, wan and drousie, IV, 224, 23. droop and 
drowsie, IV, 220, is (of blood): sluggish, perhaps 
slowly dripping. The combination occurs in Skel- 
ton's Elynour Rummynge, 15, droupy and drowsy, 
with sense. See droop. 

drousli, III, 82, 22, should be droufli (drouflye, or 
drouslye, 85, 22): (Old Eng. drof, droflie) sad. 

drowryis, I, 415 b: love-tokens. See drury. 

drowsie. See drousie. 

drucken, II, 155, A b 3: drunken (and in A a 3, where 
there is a misprint). 

druken, drucken, p.p., II, 285, 9; V, 99, n, C 6; 155, 
C 2: drunk, imbibed. 

drumlie, -ly (stream), IV, 185, 8, 14; (eye), IV, 368, 10; 
369 b: perturbed, turbulent, turbid, gloomy. 

drunken, p. p. of drink, II, 110, 24; 134, 26. drunken 
was = had drunken, IV, 46, 5, 6. 

drunkilie, III, 490, 25: merrily (as being tipsy with 
pleasure ?). 

drury, IV, 58, A b 5: dowry. Drowry is used as syn 
onymous with morning-gift in the Acts of James VI. 
Jamieson. See drowryis. 

drussie, V, 257. 14: drowsy. 

drye. See dree. 

drywyng, driving. 

dub, I, 164, J 3; III, 162, 49; IV, 470, 25, 26; V, 169, 9: 
pool. 



dubby, IV, 257, A 6: dirty, having many small pools, 
ducatdowns, dukedoons, IV, 128, 8; 139, I b 21: 

ducatoons. corrupted ridiculously, IV, 137, 2, to 

ducks. 

duck, douk, II, 145, 18, 19, 22, 23: dive, 
duckers, doukers, II, 145, 18: divers, 
ducks. See ducatdowns. 
duddie, I, 208, G 15: ragged, 
duddies, dudes, V, 111, 24; 112, B 13; 113 b, 13: duds, 

poor clothes. 

dujty, III, 98, 32: doughty, valiant, 
duke, IV, 295, D 5: dyke, wall. 
dukedoons. See ducatdowns. 
dulchach, dulget, I, 305, l; V, 213, 1: bundle, always 

applied in Aberdeenshire to ill-shaped, untidy bun 
dles of clothes carried on the person (also, bul- 

shach). 
dule, dool, I, 169, B 3; 442, E 15; II, 290, 8, 12; IV, 

86, 20; 303, 14: grief, 
dulget, I, 305, i. See dulchach. 
dumped, V, 227, 4: struck with the feet, 
dumpes, III, 313, 50: in the modern sense, but not 

inelegant. 

dune, I, 302, 2; IV, 326, 15: done, 
dune out, V, 27, 28: worn out, used up. 
dung, pret. of ding, beat, knock, strike, II, 132, 17. 

p. p., II, 62 a, 17; 392, J 9; 472, 20, 28; III, 161, 43; 

IV, 479, 4: beaten, worsted, overpowered, put down. 

IV, 183, 8: overwhelmed, disconsolate, dung over, 

V, 127, 22: knocked over, struck down, dung down, 
I, 345, 5: thrust down. 

Dunny's well, Dunny's dyke, II, 189, 28: an imper 
sonation, signifying that the washing and drying have 
been done in dark-colored water and on a dark-col 
ored (dirty) wall. 

dunts, III, 491, is: dints, blows. See dynt. 

dwine, IV, 303 f., 12, 21, 27; 304, 10: pine, waste. 

dwrf, IV, 290, D c 5: dowf seems to be intended, 
lethargic, inert, impotent ; rather than dwarf, as 
being puny or incomplete. 

dyd him to, III, 72, 328: betook himself. See do to. 

dyde adowne, III, 67, 226: put down. 

dye, IV, 260, 16: dey, dairy- woman. See day. 

dyght, III, 72, 320, dedes that here be dyght : prepared, 
concerted. 

dyght (to the deth), III, 309, 40: done, brought. 

dyghtande, III, 75, 388: making ready (but seems to 
be intended for a past participle). 

dyke=wall, IV, 295, E 6; 296, F 6. castle-dyke, II, 
410, 4. garden-dyke, II, 370, 5; 371, 5. fail dyke, 
I, 253, 2: turf wall, hollan dyke, II, 195, 32; net 
tle-dyke, II, 463, 22: wall on which hollies, nettles, 
are growing. 

dyke, III, 441, 36: ditch. 

dyne, garre me ones to dyne, III, 296, 24: give me my 
dinner, my fill, beat thoroughly. (Able to give the 
greatest prince in Christendome a mortall breakfast, 
if he had been the king's enemie. Holinshed's Chron 
icle, III, 512, ed. 1807-8. G. L. Kittredge.) 



GLOSSARY 



331 



dynt(e), dint, III, 309, 42, 45, 46: stroke, hit, lunge, shot 

(of spear, arrow). See dunts. 
dypper, V, 283, 5, 15: deeper, 
dysheryte, III, 60 f., 87, 95: dispossessed, 
dyspyse, II, 478, 6: cause to be despised, 
dyth, deythe, I, 334, 7: dight, furnished or built. 



E an O me, E an O an O me, V, 275 a, 9, 10: simple 
exclamations, having here the character of a refrain. 

e, II, 217, 24: ae, only. 

ea, V, 214 b, 3: to be dropped ; remnant of a corrected 
reading. 

eaen, V, 267, 4: even. 

eaght, the, the eighth. 

ealky, elky, eke a, ylk a, ilka, V, 220 f., 4, 5, 8: each 
(one). 

ean, V, 165, 2: eyes. See ee. 

ear, I, 395, l; 480, 54: early. 

ear, eer, ever. 

eare, ere, ayre, heir. 

eare, v. t I, 15, 12: plough. 

earn, V, 115, 6: curdle. 

eartly, II, 494, l: earthly. 

eased, III, 61, 101 (of horses) : cared for, attended to. 

eased we, V, 239, 35: used (as in 33), familiar with. 

easer, IV, 315, 14; V, 271, 14: maple (mazer). See 
ezar. 

caster ling (born), V, 54, 3, 4 (in A, 48, 3, 4, stranger 
borne). The boy learned too fast for a native. Eas- 
terling, a native of the Hanse towns, or of the East 
of Germany. Halliwell. 

eathe, III, 408, 33: easy. 

eather, V, 224, 25; 241, No 156, 6: other. 

eay, eayn, V, 238, 18, 28; 248, 18: eye(s). See ee. 

edder-flowe, IV, 450 a, 2: adder-morass. 

ee, III, 4, 9; 11, E! : eye. PL een, eeen, II, 158 f., 5, 
8, 18; 160, 4, 7, 17. See ean, eay, eghne, eyen. 

ee (of a cup), IV, 221, 9: may be eye, top, brim. 

ee, the table ee, II, 409, 20 (Motherwell, table eye) : seems 
to be nonsense; edge does not suit, b, the printed 
copy, has play. 

ee (A. S. ege, O. Eng. eje, eie, etc.), IV, 3, 15: awe; an 
unsatisfying emendation of lee, lye (eie would be bet 
ter ; I have not found ee). The Campbell MS. has 
fee, meant, I suppose, for value. 

ee-bree, III, 11, K; IV, 257, 5: eye-brow. 

een, IV, 257, 13: one. 

een, v., Ill, 495, 23, 24; IV, 517, 21: even, make of the 
same value. 

eenin, IV, 169, F l: evening. 

eerie, eiry, I, 342, 24, 36; 355, 46; II, 466, 39; IV, 175, 
N 5; 368, Q 8: dreary, gloomy, weird, exciting super 
stitious dread. 

eft, eft agayne^eftsones, HI, 83, 238; 87, 238. 

eftsones, III, 68, 238: hereafter, another time. 

eghne, I, 327, 23: eyn, eyes. 

eh, IV, 512, n: exclamation of grief. 

eight, the eight, I, 55, 9; 56, B 10; C 5, 11: eighth. 



eihte, I, 244, 11: possession, valuable thing. 

eild, III, 162, 46: age. 

ein, I, 134, 13: een, evening. 

eiry. See eerie. 

eisin, IV, 331 b, 2: serve. 

eke, also. At I, 133, L l, eke . . . eke seems to be 
wrongly used for either ... or. 

eke a, III, 298, 57: each (one). See ealky. 

elbouthe, I, 334, 5: elbow (the th for g or 3). 

eldelike, I, 334, 5: elderly. 

eldern, eldren, eldrin, I, 350, 12, 13; II, 20, 2; 26, 2; 
27, 2; 61, 2; IV, 486, 28: old. 

eldrige, elridge (hill, king), II, 58 f., 14, 15, 23, 25-7, 36= 
Scottish elric, elvish. The eldrige king has something 
of the character of the ellor-gast family in Bedwulf 
(spirits who belong outside of mankind), haunts a 
hill, is a pagan, no one that has coped with him has 
come off alive. The lady who attends him, however, 
seems in no way extra-human, elric hour, I, 140, N 
(Pinkerton) : hour when elves, or bad spirits, are ac 
tive. In Elrick's hill, II, 62, 8, 10, etc., the adjective 
is improperly turned into a noun. See elrick. 

element, I, 286, 44: air, sky. 

elephant, III, 211, 2: a species of scabious is so called, 
according to Halliwell. 

elfin, elphin, elphan, n. and adj., 1, 15 ff.; 341, 15; IV, 
456, is: elf, elvish. I, 346, 15 (the Elfins); 350, 28; 
IV, 456 f., 14, 15, 19, 24: fairy-land. 

Elfins, the, I, 346, 15: fairy-land. See elfin. 

elfish, n., I, 343, 15: elf. 

elflyn, of the elves. 

Elizium, V, 158, 16: Elysian. 

elky. See ealky. 

ell, ill, ull, v., will. 

ellish, III, 481, 9: ellis, ells, (h may well be dropped.) 

elphan, elphin, n. and adj. See elfin. 

elrick, elritch, adj., II, 63, 18; I, 357, 53: elvish. El- 
rick's, 62 f., 8, 10, 16, 21: as a substantive. See eldrige. 

embowered, pret., II, 503, 13: used as bower. 

erne, III, 296, 26: uncle, emys, III, 98, 38: uncle's. 

-en, -n, -yn, sign of plural of verb, I, 244, 9; II, 5 b, 3; 
54, 61; 445, 62; III, 13, 2, 3, 4, 8; 35, 31; 63, 134; 92, il; 
104, 7; 105, 9, 11; 277, 15; 284, 3, 8, 17; 285, 30, 32, 33; 
286, 48, 49; 404, 3; 406, 28; etc. 

end, en, end. hous(e)-end, -en, I, 254, variations of 
Twa Corbies, b, l, c, l; toun-end, V, 267 f., 10, n, 24. 
on end, IV, 353, 18: to an end. 

-end, termination of the present participle, sighend, I, 
55 f., B 7, 9. 

endres daye, pis, I, 326, 1: the other day. 

eneuch, enew, I, 102, 5; HI, 318, 6; 440, 10; IV, 117, 
8; 384, 8: enough. 

enlured, III, 36, 45: allured (which is the word in b). 

enter plea att my iollye, III, 278, 32: unintelligible 
to me. iollye should probably be iollyte. The king 
will have the head to serve some inscrutable purpose 
when he is making merry. 

enterprise, v., I, 411, 9; III, 230, 70: undertake. 

entertain, III, 153, is: take into service. 



332 



GLOSSARY 



envye, III, 296 f., 12, 30: ill-will, hostility, spite. 

ere, V, 300, 3: eer, ever. 

ere, eare, ayre, n., heir. 

ere, v., heir. 

ere, II, 216, 19; 470, 44; IV, 242 a; 378, 6; 433, 31: till. 

ere syne, II, 362, 34: ere then, before that. 

erlis, I, 329, 60: should probably be ernis, eagle's 

(herons, yrons in other texts), 
erlish, I, 355, 49: elrish, elvish, 
ermeline, ermine. 
ern, IV, 490, 12: iron, 
-e's, -is, -ys, -us, preserved in gen. sing., I, 69, 52; II, 26, 

7; III, 40, n.; 98, 21, 35; 99, 47 f., 52; 100, 64 .; Ill, 

33, 36, 42, etc. In the plural, I, 72, 15; III, 40, n.; 

97, 2, 3, 20; 98, 25, 33, 37, 40-2; 100, 63, 82; 109, l; 111, 

29, 31-37, 45 f ., etc. 

esk, I, 355, 50: newt. See ask. 

ettled, IV, 47, 2: purposed. 

even cloth, I, 324, 16: smooth, with the nap well 

shorn, 
even down, IV, 110, 10, ll: flat to the ground. V, 124, 

B 14: perpendicular. 225 b, No 78: straight down 

(of heavy rain). 

even forward, I, 324, 3: straight forward, 
even up, I, 305, 7: straight up. 
evening-mass, II, 168, A, 4: a religious service at the 

end of the day (as in Romeo and Juliet, IV, 1). 
euery syde, III, 75, 398: each side of. 
euerych, euerichone, euerechone, euerilkon, ev- 

erlke ane, I, 334, 5; III, 22, 4 ; 65, 174; 67, 230; 98, 

30: each, each one. 
evidents, IV, 40 b: title-deeds, 
evyll, adv., Ill, 26, 93: ill. euyll go, HI, 77, 429: ill 

walk. 

ew-bught. See bucht. 
ewer, IV, 19, 8: dug, udder. 
exaltre, III, 90 b: axletree. 
examine, II, 58, 15: put you to test. 
earite, II, 125, B 22; excit, V, 223 a, No 65, B 22: 

amended to sight under the supposition that exit must 

be impossible. 

exoiier. IV, 307, 42: exonerate, 
ey, I, 415 b: egg. 

eye (cote with one eye), III, 360, 117: window? 
eyen, eyne, I, 472, 29; in, 74, 359: eyes. See ee. 
eylde net the, III, 112, 62: yield, requite thee for it. 
eylyt, I, 241 f., 5, 7: aileth. 
eyre, pi., Ill, 113, 70: years. 
ezar, II, 271, 17; 273, 23: maple. See easer, masar. 



f, in Northern Scotch, often for wh; as,fa,faa, who; 

fan, when; far,faer, where, 
fa, IV, 260, 6; 261, 6: who. 
fa, V, 118, B 10: fault, 
fa, my lady cannot fa sic servants, 1, 116, 11: have such 

fall to her, put up with, fa frae her, II, 133, D 1: 

break off, give up. 
fa, fae, IV, 256, 5; 337, f 2, 3, 7: from. 



faa, V, 275 a, 8: who. 

face, with a, III, 180, 12: with effrontery, boldness. 

fache, fetch. 

fact, III, 229, 32; IV, 11, ll: offence, crime. 

fadge. fat fadge, II, 182, 8: "a lusty and clumsy 

woman." Jamieson. "fadgy, corpulent, unwieldy. 

fudge, a little, fat person. North." Halliwell. 

"fodge, a fat person; evidently the same with fadge." 

Jamieson. A dirty drab is the phrase corresponding 

to fat fadge, II, 194, 10 (fusom fag, IV, 469, 1 10, 12). 

See fag, fug. 

fadther, IV, 260, 7: father, 
fae, fay, fey, fee, fie, I, 245, 6; III, 481 f., 30, 24; 489, 

39; 490, 24; 492, 26; IV, 430, 2: (A. S. fsege) destined 

to die. 

fae, II, 184, 19; 196, 9: foe. 

fae, IV, 165 f ., 2, 10; 337 f, 2, 3, 7: frae, from. See fa. 
faein, faen, fawn, fallen. 
faem, fame, I, 68, l; 70, l; 86, l; II, 24, 12; 25, G 14: 

foam, sea. 

faer, IV, 262, 15; 378 f., 6, 19: where, 
fag, I, 304, P 2, 3; IV, 469, 1 10, 12: a dirty drab. Cf. 

fusome fug, described as a dirty drab, B 3-6; dirty 

slut, C 4; dirty bitch, E 4; filthy foul flag, G 4. See 

fadge, fug. 

faikine, III, 199, 24: faith, 
fail, feall, fell, I, 304, F 6: turf, 
fail-dyke, I, 253, 2: turf-wall, 
fails, II, 365 f., 2, 3, 23: falls, befalls, 
fain(e), fayn(e), II, 444, 48, 57; 453, 28; III, 100, 66; 

298, 50; 309, 32: glad, pleased, eager. IV, 211, 13; 

V, 115, 2: fond, for faine, III, 479, 40 : for glad, for 

gladness. 

fainly, joyfully, blithely, 
fair, V, 26 f., 13, 39: far. 
fair lie, farlie, ferlie, I, 324 5 ll; 325, B 9: wonder, gars 

me fairlie, IV, 357, 2: causes me astonishment, 
fairly (fields), IV, 57, D l: fair, looking well, 
fait, faitt, fett, V, 224, 18, 19; 274, 10; 278, 29: white, 
faith and troth, to be, IV, 147, 34: to be in the rela 
tion of men who have taken the engagement of mu 
tual fidelity, sworn-brethren, 
fald, fall, fauld, n., V, 105, A 3; 248, 21: fold, 
fall, III, 76, 406: suit, become, well falls me, V, 25, 5: 

my luck is good, 
fall, V, 206 b, 8: pret. of fall, unless there is ellipsis of 

did. 

falling, III, 470 a: sunset, 
fallow's deed, I, 448, 7-10 : deed of a bad fellow 

seems unlikely, felloun's ? farlie, strange ? 
falsh, IV, 442, l, 10, 12: false, 
falyf, III, 13, 4: fallow, 
fame, faem, I, 68, l; 86, l: foam, sea. 
fa'n, IV, 6, 7; V, 249, 7: fallen. 
fan, fand, found. 

fan, IV, 262, 19; V, 110, 4; 116, l; 184, 49: when, 
fancy, fell in her, V, 272 b, 2: fell in love with her. 

faen deap in my fancy, 273, 12. 
fand, found. 



GLOSSARY 



333 



fang, III, 160, 5: fastening. (164, b 5, whang.) Per 
haps North Scotch for whang. 

fankit, IV, 27, 28: entangled, obstructed. 

far, III, 513 b, 1-4: fair. 

far, fare, faur, I, 165, N l; II, 191, 23; 335, N 3-6; V, 
224, 17, 18; 227, 8; 248, 22: where. 

fare, go, I, 170, 4; II, 222, 21; III, 22, 6; 98, 24; 340, 
23, 24; 421, 43; V, 183, 22, 32. I fare you well, II, 207, 
A l: I bid you fare well. pret. foor. p. p. forn. 

fare, go on, comport oneself: III, 188, 6; 357, 59. 

fare, n., Ill, 160, 11, 20: going on, procedure. Ill, 76, 
403: (in the modern sense) fortune, experience. 

fared, favored, well-fared, well-(weel-)fard, weel-fart, 
well-(weel-)faird, weil-faurit, weill-(weel-)faurd, 
well-fard, II, 268, 21; 317, B a 21; 408, 26; 462, 7, 8; 
TV, 220, 8, l, 4; 223, 3; 274, 2; 434, 2, 3; V, 16, 1; 
154, 10; 163, 12; 177, 14: well-favored, handsome. 

farei, farie, Parie (MS. farie), V, 165 f., 6, 9, 10: should 
be emended to Fyvie. See V, 305 f. 

farer, I, 369, 51; V, 91 f., 4, 8, 12, etc. ; 208, 9: further. 

ffarley, adj., ffarley thinge, III, 92, 9: strange. 

farlies, farleys, ferlies, I, 325, B 9; IV, 147, 26: won 
ders, novelties. See fairlie. 

far sought, was, V, 161, 6: required long to reach. 

fart, weel-fart, IV, 223, 3: fared, favored. See fared. 

fas, fase, III, 299, 6; V, 248, 5: false. 

fa's, IV, 399, 46: fall, 1st per. sing. pres. 

fash, IV, 493, 21, 23; V, 238, 22: meddle, make trouble, 
or, perhaps, trouble yourself, fashed himself, IV, 
69, 18, 19: got himself into trouble by meddling. 

fashes, II, 238, 4: troubles (emendation forjishes ; pos 
sibly we should read freshes). 

fast, fast they bad, III, 26, 90: strenuously, stare, look, 
III, 62, 122; V, 82, 35: intently, weep, II, 240, 3: co 
piously, fast unto, III, 131, 6: close down to. 

Fastness, IV, 103, 15: originally meant for faustness, 
falseness. 

fat, fatt, III, 281, 4; IV, 260, 2; 357, C 5, 7, 9, etc.; 
V, 111, 18; 214 b, 5: what. 

fate they coud na fa, II, 130 l: from it (fae it, frae 
it) they could not desist. 

fatten a, V, 221, 22; 247, 2: what, what sort of. 

faue, V, 260, 7: fie ! 

fauld-dyke, IV, 199, n: fold-wall. 

faun, fallen. 

faur, V, 124, 2: where. See far. 

faurit, faurd. See fared. 

fause, false. 

fause fa thee, III, 435, F 5: may treachery befall thee, 
be thy lot I 

fave, V, 275 b, 8: five. 

fa we, IV, 505, 54: fall. 

fawn, IV, 277, is: fallen. 

fay, adj. See fae. 

fay, III, 74, 362; 110, 13; V, 85, 16: faith. 

ffayne, III, 297 f., 48, 50: glad, in, 100, 66: fond of, 
pleased with. See fain. 

fe, feea, wage, etc. See fee. 

feall, feale, fail, fell, IV, 262, 29: turf. 



Feansell, feanser, V, 55, so: emended to le and fell. 

fear, II, 470, 51: frighten (us from dancing). 

fearder, feardest. See feart. 

feare, in, V, 15, 18: together. See fere. 

fearsome, II, 394, 18: fearful. 

feart, feert, III, 262 f., n, 13, 16, 17; IV, 456, 15; 498, 
12, 14, 16: frightened, fearder, III, 267, 13: more 
frightened, feardest, III, 162, 56: most frightened. 

feather, IV, 512 b, 2, 9: father. 

feathern, IV, 482 f., 4, 9, is: feathers. 

fecht, feght, v., II, 319, 16; 391, 16, 17; in, 370, 15; IV, 
224, 14, 15: fight. See ficht. 

feckless, I, 429, 28 (dress): weak, feeble, effectless, 
miserable, silly, (here = inefficacious, of no account.) 

fedred, ifedred fre, III, 69, 275; 70, 288: feathered lib 
erally, handsomely. 

fee (A. S. feoh), 1, 327, 16 (wylde fee): animals. 1, 58, 
2; 434, 31; II, 25, 7; 172 f., 40, 42, 45; 442, 8; 447, 8; 
III, 94, 51; IV, 18, 17: wealth, possessions, property, 
having. I, 182, 2; II, 31, N 4; 114, 17; 123, 15; 379, 
l; 403, 9; III, 433, 12; 435, F 6; 436, 14; IV, 614, 21: 
pay, wages. II, 117, 5, 6; III, 163, 72; 299, 5: reward. 

I, 328, 57: tribute, gentylman of clothynge and of 
fee, III, 30, 165: entitled to a regular stipend, knights 
fee, III, 94, 51 : land of the value of 20 per annum 
(under Edward I., II.). See foster of the fe, III, 
28, 140. penny-fee (-fie), I, 491, 10; IV, 444, 10: gift. 

fee, v., I, 211, 3, 4: hire, (gae fee, go hire yourself.) 

See feet, pret. 

fee, fey, doomed. See fae. 
feed, feid, III, 436, 2; 464, 2; 468, c 2; IV, 2, 9; 36, 3; 

37 f., 3, 10: feud. 

feed, fode, food, I, 309, B l: child, man. 
feed about your fire, II, 184, 13: the sense eat seems 

unlikely. Possibly, to move about, to sit or move 

restlessly (like feik). 
feed, pret. of feed, V, 236, is: fed. 
feel, fiel, II, 175, l; 176, C 3; IV, 262, 29: fool, 
feel daft, II, 410, 8: foolishly fond, 
feel = fell: very, 
feere, fere, feire, feer, mate, consort (fere) : 1, 295, 43; 

II, 58, 2. V, 15, 13: fellow (contemptuously). See 
feires. 

feert. See feart. 

feet, pret., IV, 355 b, D: hired. See fee. 

feeties, V, 209 b, 4: feet. 

feght, fight. See fecht. 

feid: feud. See feed. 

feires, feiries, I, 295, 43; IV, 2 f., 7, 20, 22: comrades, 
consorts. See feere. 

felaushyp, III, 67, 229: abstract for concrete, our fel 
lows. 

felischepe, fellowship. 

fell, fail, feale, feall, IV, 266, E 29: turf. 

fell, III, 300, 9; IV, 500, 10: skin, hide. 

fell, in, 439 f., 4, 8, ll; IV, 455, 15; V, 55, so: high land, 
fit only for pastures, a wild hill, fells, III, 299 f., 
C 3, 6; IV, 26, 6; 500, 3: chain of hills. 

fell (yard), I, 287, 63: severe, cutting, (spice), III, 



334 



GLOSSARY 



388, 3: hot, biting. IV, 258, 20: strange, prodigious, 
fell thing to see, II, 132, 27: strange, freezes fell, 
IV, 93, 7; 105, 7; 514, 17: sharply, severely. 

fell, v., II, 419, 46: kill. 

fell, feel, I, 478, 14; II, 344, 15; V, 183, 20: very. 

fellen, p.p. of fell, III, 483, 7: felled (a tree). 

fells, befalls, well fells me, IV, 437, 25: good for me ! 

felon (the kynggis), III, 98, 21, 22: traitor, rebel. 

felt, III, 146, 14: should be emended delt. 

fences, cock shall crow fences three, II, 8, 10, 11: evi 
dently bouts, coups ; but I have not found this usage 
elsewhere. 

fend, fende, V, 283, 2; 284, 22: fiend. 

fend, v., Ill, 300, 12; IV, 500, 13: provision. 

fend, III, 440, 12: defence. 

fiend, that ffend I Godys fforbod, III, 113, 72: seems 
to be a double expression for deprecation, I in 
hibit, protest, God forbid (see forbode). "I fende 
to Goddes forbode it should be so : a Dieu ne playse 
qu'aynsi il aduiengne. Palsgrave, p. 548, col. 1." 
Hales and Furnivall, Percy MS., Ill, 554. 

fende, III, 61, 106; 117, 8: defend. 

fer dayes, III, 57, 16: far on in the day. 

ferd, III, 99, 52: fear. 

fere, fere love, IV, 219, B 3, 5: fair, (fair love, V, 
260, E 5.) 

fere, feere, II, 58, 2; III, 22, 5: mate, consort. 

fere, in, on, III, 57, 27; 59, 61; 67, 231; 77, 423; 98, 38: 
in company, together. See feare. 

fferli, I, 334, 7: fairly, civilly. 

ferlicke, I, 334, 8: strange. See ferly. 

ferly, ferlie, ferley, farlie, I, 325, C i, 10; 329, 4; 333, 
2; 424, d ll; III, 440, 20; IV, 455, 1, 13; 524, 10; V, 
244, 8, 12: marvel, wonder, news. 

ferly, adj., ferly strife, III, 97, 13: strange, extraordi 
nary. See ffarley. 

ferra-cow, farrow-cow, I, 224, I 9, ll; II, 261, 8: a 
cow not producing a calf for the current year. 

fesh, fess, III, 319, 15; IV, 94, 14; 257, i, 2: fetch. 

fet. See fett. 

fetchie, III, 520 b (note to II, 272, 22): tricky, prac 
tising fetches ? Cf . wylie, st. 21. 

fetcht a race, II, 454 f., 54, 58: took a swift prelimi 
nary run. 

fett, I, 432, 5: fetch, pret. fet, fette, III, 31, 14; 63, 
145; 64, 172; 298, 67. 

fett, V, 224, 18: white. 

ffettle, III, 92 ff., 15, 37, 56: make ready. 

feud, II, 279 a, 16: contest of feeling ? 

feughten, p. p. of fecht, ficht, fight, I, 109, 15. 

feume. IV, 473, 44: foam. 

fey, I, 245, 6; IV, 44, 4; 430, 2: destined to death. See 
fae. 

ffeyt, faith. 

feyther, V, 296 a : father. 

ficht, fecht, feght, v., IV, 84 f., 16, 26, 27, etc.: fight. 
pret. focht, foucht. p.p. foughten, feughten. 

fie. See fee. 

fie, doomed. See fae. 



fiel, feel, II, 176, C 3: fool. 

fielder t, V, 126, l: field ward, away (from where they 
were). 

fiend thing, IV, 23, A c 18: devil of a thing. 

fift, II, 75, 6: fifth. 

file, v., I, 135, 4: defile. 

file, IV, 494, 33: while, till. 

file snap, V, 260, 16: fellowship. 

fill, full. 

fill, I, 403, 10: follow, pursue. 

Sltt,p.p., HI, 490, 20: filed. 

fin, find. 

fin, craig and fin, II, 28, 27: whin, whin-stone, synony 
mous with greenstone, but applied to any hard rock. 

finikin, III, 174, 18: fine, handsomely dressed. 

fire-beams, IV, 96, 3: should be fire-boams (bombs), 
as at 99, G a, H 6. 

fire-boams, bombs. See fire-beams. 

fir lot, IV, 46, 3; 379, 13: the fourth part of a fou, which 
is a dry measure varying from two to six Winchester 
bushels (a Winchester bushel being of a slightly less 
capacity than the present imperial bushel). 

firmaty, V, 114, 3: frumenty; in old cookery, wheat pot 
tage, with flesh in it; hulled wheat boiled in milk and 
seasoned with cinnamon, sugar, etc. 

fit, fitt, fyt, fytte, II, 54, 60: song. I, 329, 62; III, 
25, 51; 27, 97; 308, 24: division of a song. (A. S. fitt.) 

fit, I, 131, G 4, 5; 164, J 6; 302, A 7; 472, 2; 491, 26; 
IV, 119, 6: foot, feet. 

fit, III, 142, 32; V, 240, 5: ready. 

fitches (of deer), II, 132, 19: flitches, sides. 

fite (bread), V, 220, 6: (probably) wheat. See white 
bread. 

fitt, III, 465, 21: it is better to read sitt, as in Caw's 
text. 

fitted, IV, 18, 9: footed. 

fitted, II, 485, 18, 31; V, 103 a: suitably treated or 
served. V, 132, 2: ready, disposed. 

fittie, IV, 450 a, 4: foot. 

fivesome, III, 472, 3: five together. 

flaff, IV, 470, 20: flap, fan. 

flag, I, 305, 3, 4; V, 213, 3, 4: corruption of fag, drab, 
slut. See fag. 

flain in, IV, 224, 23: correct tofla ovflai (flew) in? 

flamboy, V, 298, 7: flambeau, torch. 

flat, II, 258, 45, 46: highest and lowest layer of a grave. 

flatte, IV, 504, 32: positively determined on. 

flattered, flottered (on the faem), II, 25 G 14; 27, 22: 
flitted, floated (O. Eng. floteren, Germ, flattern). 

flattering (toung), II, 144, 8 : fluttering, waggling, 
flattering tongue that flutters, II, 154, 21. 

flaugh, flaw, pret. of fly, I, 286, 56; 397, B 8; II, 314, 9. 

flaw, tell me without a flaw, V, 41, 28: lie. 

flay, frighten. See fley. 

flay (A. S. fle'on), fly. pret. flaw, flaugh. 

fleachy, II, 470, 53: infested with fleas. 

flear, fleer, I, 454, ll; IV, 392, 7; 410, 26: floor. 

flee, v., V, 304 b, 4: flay. pret. fleed. 

flee, not a, IV, 53, 12 : not a whit (fly, for a small 



GLOSSARY 



335 



thing). I count him lighter than a flee, etc., Ill, 

480, 23; 482, 19; 488, 26 (flea); 490, 15. left him not 

a flee, IV, 53, 12. 

fleechin, I, 424, d 11; II, 32, Q 2: wheedling, cajoling, 
fleed, pret., V, 304 b, 4: flayed, 
fleed, flied, V, 257, 7, 17: frightened. See fleg. 
fleed, IV, 348, 14; 349, 9: flood, 
fleer, I, 69, 39; 298, 4; 452, 14: floor. See Hear, 
fleet, flute. 
fleg, fley, flay (A. S. fle*gan, Old Eng. fleyen), V, 253 b, 

No 203, 3: frighten, 
flesse, V, 283, 18: flesh, 
flex, V, 283, 11, 21: flax, 
fley, flay, III, 457, A 2; 474, 36: frighten, pret. fleed, 

flied. See fleg. 

flight, I, 21, note *: dispute and scold, 
flink, care a flink, V, 259, 3: care a whit, 
flirry, I, 424, d 10: blossom. 

flo, flon(e) (A. S. fla, flan), 1, 327, 10; III, 13, 5, 15: arrow, 
flotterd. See flattered, 
flourishd, I, 398, 13: adorned, 
flow, IV, 79, 14: moss with a spring in it, morass, 
flower, I, 352, 3, 4 : get flowers for, or deck with 

flowers. 

flutters, II, 154, 21: waggles, 
flyte, flight, III, 414 b: dispute, debate, scold (here 

Percy's word, replacing flout and mock). 
forward, V, 283, 4: compact, 
focht, pret. of fecht, ficht, fight, IV, 167, C 10. p. p. 

feughten, foughten. 
fode. See feed, 
folde, pret., Ill, 76, 407: folded, 
folle, foal. 
folye, I, 327, 17: a very unlikely word (unless we may 

understand it to have the meaning of Old Fr. foler, 

errer c.k et Ik). Another text has balye (Fr. baillie), 

which gives a good sense, under thine own control, 

in thine own custody, (folye, in 17, may be caught 

from 18.) 

fone, II, 196 b, 2, 8: foes, 
fond, fond to see him sleep, II, 269, 26 : doted, was 

foolishly happy ? (But probably corrupt: cf. fondly 

seen thee sleep, 271, 30.) 
food, III, 287, 61: man. See feed, 
ffooder, II, 46, 41 : (cf. Ger. fuder, cart-load, the largest 

or one of the largest measures for corn, liquids, and 

other things), here, tun, as is clear from auger, 41. 
foonshief, V, 206 a, 8: foundation, bottom sheaf of a 

stack. 

foor, V, 99, C 4: fared, went, 
foote, goe two foote, III, 188, 6: corrupt for fold; cf. 

267, 9. 
for, ffor. ye (yes), for God, nay, for God, III, 61, 105, 

107; 69, 259, 267, 269, 271; 76, 413, 414: by. 

for, II, 124, 38: before. 

for, IV, 21, 6; 438, 9; V, 16 f., 2, 5, 29: where. 

for when but would be expected, II, 58, ll, 13; 59, 22 (see 

II, 57 b). for and, V, 76, 25; 144, 9. 
for no, I, 183, 25 ; II, 256, K 3 : phrase of refusal, 



obscurely elliptical, after the manner of why, no; or 

corruptly for fye, no (cf. II, 158, 2). 
forbears, I, 206, 2; II, 63, 19: forefathers, 
forbode, forbott, ouer Goddes, III, 29, 162; 123, 18; V, 

199 a, 64: God forbid, against God's prohibition ; so 

A. S. ofer cinges bebod, against the king's order; ofer 

dryhtnes word, against the word of the Lord, etc. 

Elliptically, God's forbod, as HI, 37, 79; 180, 16. HI, 

113, 72: see fiend, 
forbye, forebye, I, 402, l; H, 154, 8, 9; IV, 224, 17; 

433, 16: near by. I, 86, 33; II, 70, 22: apart, aside. 

IV, 203, 2: further, 
forbye, forebye, forby, I, 305, l; IV, 203, 2; V, 17, 32; 

213 a, l: besides. 

force, no, III, 57, 13; 67, 227: no matter, 
forces, for (thro, V, 306, 8) a' her father's forces, V, 

166, ll: in spite of all her father could do ? 
fordoo, destroy. 

fore, first fore love, II, 191, 22, 25, 28, 29: earlier, 
forebye. See forbye. 
ffbrefend, III, 340, 26; 407, 5: avert, forbid, 
forehammer, I, 21 b, 12; III, 474, 34: sledge-hammer, 

the large hammer, which strikes before the smaller. 
foremost man, 1, 146, 12; IV, 412, 19 : apparently 

the bridegroom's " best man." 
forenent, foment, I, 221 f ., E 7, 17; 504, 7; IV, 77, 3; 

288, F 2; 451 a, 3, 5: over against, in the face of. 
foresteed, V, 237, 28: protection, protector, 
foret, I, 244, 10: forth, 
forfaulted, V, 194, 68, 73: forfeited, 
forfouchald, IV, 4 b, 28: very much tired. (Scottish 

wauchle, forwauchld, forfaughlit.) 
forfoughen, IV, 3, 28: tired out with fighting, 
forgone, forgo, 
foriete, forgotten, 
forked, I, 492, 7; IV, 445, p. 100, B 7: of blood from 

a wound, issued in divided jets. 
forl, V, 116, 2; 117, 3: whorl, fly of a spinning-rock, 
f or-lee, she '11 come in att your formast an gee out att 

yer forlee, IV, 377, 5; V, 275 b, 5: she '11 cross your 

bows and sail round you, coming out at your fore-lee 

or lee-bow, 
forlorn, I, 450, 8; II, 114, 15, 16; III, 124, 13; 212, 16: 

lost, has him forlorn, II, 147, 17: causatively. II, 

123, 13; V, 41, 23: destroyed, killed. I, 183, 42; III, 

145, 9; V, 210 b, 2: destitute, deserted, 
forn, p.p. of fare, II, 29, 6, 9. be weel forn: see that 

ye have fared well, eat and drink heartily, 
foments, forenent, foment, II, 197 a, 15: opposite 

to, directly against, 
forren, foreign, 
forsake, forsake a ring, I, 192 a: let go, part with. 

forsake that I haue promised, III, 29, 156: withdraw 

from, forsake this sorowe, III, 73, 341 : decline to 

have to do with this sad matter. II, 454, 52: decline 

as adversary in a combat. Ill, 360, 106 : refuse an 

appointment. IV, 172, l; 173, K 2: refuse suitors. 

Ill, 149, 33; IV, 181, 2: give up, renounce, 
forth, find forth, III, 148, 17; choose forth, III, 440, 9: 



336 



GLOSSARY 



out. thou maye well fforth for to pay mee, II, 444, 
58; thou mayst well forth, thou shalt pay me, 449, 63; 
(b, mayst forthwith) : go on, or, make out ? 

fforthi, I, 329, 60 : therefore. 

forth withall, III, 127, 16 (play): forthwith. 

forthynketh, III, 28, 137: repenteth. 

fortune be my chance, III, 308, 21= my hap it were, 
311, 16. 

forward, III, 284, li: van. 

forward, V, 283, 4: compact. 

foster of the fe, III, 28, 140: " A person who had for 
some service to the crown a perpetual right of hunt 
ing in a forest on paying to the crown a certain rent 
for the same." Halliwell. 

fot, I, 141 b, 10: fetched. 

fothe, III, 112, 6l: foot. 

fou, II, 25, 8; 26, li : a tirlot, which see. 

fou, V, 270, 9: how. 

fou, fow, full, fou drunken, II, 144, 4. 

foucht, pret., II, 391, 21: fought. IV, 200, l: toiled. 
p.p. foughten, II, 418, 32; III, 277, 22; 281, 14; 333, 30. 

fouie, IV, 20, 10: well off, "possessing a comfortable 
independence." Jamieson. 

fouled, a bill was fouled against him, III, 463 a : 
(equivalent to) found; he was indicted as guilty. 

foumart, IV, 389 b: polecat. 

found, III, 23, 15: provided for. 

foure-eard foole, II, 483, 7: as denoting a double ass ? 

fousome, fusom(e), I, 302, B 3, 5, 6; 304, 2, 3: (ful 
some) disgustingly filthy. 

fow, fou, II, 273, 35; III, 490, 13; IV, 168, D 14, 15: full. 

fowd, V, 304 b: sheep-fold. 

fowk, I, 245, e: folk. 

frae, fray, from, be frae, IV, 433, 21 : remain away 
from. 

fraine, i\, I, 334, 6, 7, 10: question. 

frame, IV, 78, 4: succeed, sae weel we frame: we are 
doing, or beginning so well. 

frank, of horses kept in a close, you keep them all both 
frank and free, II, 450, 64: apparently, fat. Free is 
a much abused word, and the only apt meaning here 
would be, liberally treated. In A 444, 59, you keepe 
them ranke and royallye. 

ffrankely, II, 440, 13: freely. 

free, n., I, 334, 8: (complimentary term for man) noble, 
etc. 

free, adj., is used in a great variety of senses, and is 
often indefinite and hardly more than a rhyme word: 
bounteous, gracious, of noble birth or rank, indepen 
dent, unrestricted, exempt, spirited, valorous, beauti 
ful, precious, excellent in any way. The danger will 
be in assigning too positive a meaning to the word, 
of Mary, III, 420 f., 29, 44. lady, ladies free, I, 324, 
A 8; 328, 52; 464, 5; V, 87, 39; 279 a. a true-love 
free, IV, 461, 22. God make you safe and free (your 
own master ?), I, 427, 2; II, 177, 28; 421, 22. castles 
free, I, 465, 6; 474, 21. lands sae free, I, 474, 25. 
tocher free, II, 380, 33; 383, 26; 385, 27. Clymme of 
the Clowgh so fre, Little John so free, III, 26, 96; 



154, 2. freyke fulle fre, III, 308, 30. of courage 
free, V, 86, 31. chrystall free, II, 52, 17. gold soe 
free, V, 49, 23. gowd and jewels free, I, 474, 23. 
silver free, II, 69, 9; 445, 64; 450, 70. money ffeyre 
and ffre, III, 113, 82. metal free, III, 300, 7; 368 f., 
12, 14; IV, 372, 7; (nonsense in IV, 404, 29). staff of 
oke so free, III, 138, 15. Less definite are the fol 
lowing : Couentrye faire and free, Derby Hills so 
free, Cannongate-side so free, III, 284, 17; 323, 10; 
386, 10 ; seas so free, IV, 498, 6 ; water soe free, V, 
51, 68 ; forest frie, V, 191 f ., 8, 12, 23, 28, 34 ; learning 
my lesson free, I, 438, B 7; chariot, coach, free, I, 
475, 44; IV, 410, 29; 462, 35. horses kept free, II, 
450, 64: liberally, going free, IV, 289, 7: not under 
control, running off. free of grace, V, 20, 24: void of 
grace, cf. 43. 

free, adv., arowes ifedred fre, III, 69, 275; 70, 288 : in 
handsome style, ring she brake so free, I, 470, 26: 
generously (cf. II, 450, 64). 

freely, adj., freely feed, I, 309, B l: of noble birth, or 
beautiful. 

freely (naked), I, 508, 10: entirely. 

freits, III, 434, 23 : superstitious notions concerning 
omens. 

freke, freck, freake, freyke, III, 298, 58; 308, 30; 309, 
32, 47: bold man, man. (A. S. freca.) 

frem, foreign. 

frembde, adv., frembde bested, III, 63, 138: in the 
position of a stranger (other readings, frend, friend). 

frese, frese your, our, bowes of ewe, III, 67, 215; 80, 
215: seems to be corrupt. The interpretation in Don 
aldson's Supplement to Jamieson, where " to frese a 
bow " (cited as if a phrase in full use) is said to mean 
unbend, slack, would be entirely inappropriate here, 
since three men are to make a desperate attack on 
two hundred and fifty (bende your bowes, st. 218). 
f, g have, bend we, the required sense. Chese will 
not do; they have but one bow each, leese loose is 
possible, or dress, or even, free. 

frichtit, frighted. 

frienged, fringed, gray, III, 481, 7; IV, 2, 5: refer 
ring to mane and fetlocks, or perhaps to long fetlocks 
only. 

frightened the boar will, I, 214, 3: afraid, etc. 

frith, frythe, firthe, V, 191 f., 14, 24 : enclosed land, 
wood. 

froom, V, 296 a: from. 

froth-mill, I, 305, 13: " wauk-mill, or fulling-mill, from 
the froth of the soap." But the expression seems not 
to have been heard of, and froth-mill is more prob 
ably corrupt for frozen mill. See next word. 

frozen mill, V, 213, 10: mill of which the lade, or canal 
conveying the water, is frozen. 

frush, IV, 185, 13: brittle. 

frythe, I, 329, 3: enclosed land, preserve, deer-park, 
wood. See frith. 

fue, few. 

fug, I, 302, 3, 5: slut, filthy woman. See fag, flag. 

fuird, n, 471, 6: ford. 



GLOSSARY 



337 




fule, fowl. 

full, IV, 356, B l: proud. 

fun, fune, V, 215, 15; 248, 9: whun, whin, furze. 

fundid, I, 334, 8: went. (A. S. fundian.) 

fur, II, 188, 12; III, 474, 41: furrow. 

fusom, fusome, fousome, I, 302, B 3, 5, 6; 304, P 2, 3; 

IV, 469, 10, 12: offensive, disgusting (fulsome), 
fusty bandy as, V, 72 b: a drinking-formula. 
fute, whute, v., Ill, 123, 15: whistle, 
fynde, III, 308, 24; Professor Skeat would read fyne, 

end. 

fynly, III, 70, 284: goodly, 
fyt, fytt, fytte. See fit. 



ga, gaa, gaw, I, 420, 9, 10; 421, 9, 10; 423, 6, 7; V, 216, 
9, 10: gall. 

ga, gaa, I, 146, 5; V, 166, 8; 221, 16; 227, 6; 247, 3; 278, 
25: go. See gang, gae. 

ga, gaa, IV, 513 a, 4; V, 221, 14; 242 a, 8; 268, 23: gave. 

gab, n., I, 302, B 12: 422, 13: mouth. 

gab, v. t H, 149, IT: prate. 

gab, n., I, 277 f . : joke, sportive brag. 

gabber reel, I, 217, 8, 13: evidently a sprightly air. 
The root may be Icelandic gabb, mockery. Perhaps 
simply gabber, jabber. 

gaberlunyie, V, 115 f., 6-10 ; 119, 8, 9: beggar's wal 
let. 

gad, gaud, I, 342, 33; 344, 32; 348, 13, 19; 355, 42; III, 
505, 21: bar. 

gad, gade, IV, 493 f., 13, 26: went, 
gaddie, IV, 273, l=gaudie : showy, dashing. 

gae, gai, gay, ga, gaa, gee, gie, I, 69, 49, 62; 71, 39, 60; 
II, 304, 17; 468, 14; V, 166, 7; 278, 24: go. pret. gaed, 
gade, gad, gaid, gied, gid, ged, good, gude. p.p. 
gaen, gain, gane, gaed. pres. p. gain, gan, gaen, gane, 
gaun, gawen, etc. See gang. 

gae, gang, go down, IV, 12, C 6, 7; 518, 2: be hanged. 

gae, IV, 493 f., 23, 32: give. 

gae, pret. of gie, I, 69, 55-58, 68; 71, 45-47; 75, 42; 108, 15: 

gave. 

gae, gay, gey, adv., V, 266, 9: (gay) pretty, rather, 
gaed, gade, gad, gaid, pret. of gae, go, I, 102, D 4; 

103, E 3; 131, G 10; 439, 14, 15; II, 140, 17, 18; III, 

453, 10; IV, 395,6; 494, 26; V, 117,11; 238,27; 274 b, 

6; 278, 24. 

gaed, p.p., II, 70, 21; III, 473, so: gone, 
gaen, gain, gane, p. p. of gae, I, 70, 19; 108, 12; II, 

468 f., 15, 18, 22; IV, 507, 2; V, 237, 5: gone, 
gaen, gain, p. p. of gie, gae, give, I, 469, 23 (gaen the 

table, given a knock); III, 271, 13; V, 183, 34. So 

perhaps TI, 212, 15; cf. gain, fifth word below, 
gaeng. See gang. 

gae-through-land, IV, 428, 13: vagrant, 
gai. See gae. 
gaid. See gaed. 
gain. See gaen. 
gain, gaine, gaing, gan, gaen, gane, gaun, gawn, 

gawen, pres. p. of gae, ga, go. gain, etc., I, 466, 15; 
VOL. v. 43 



II, 151, H 2, 4 ; IV, 257, 8; V, 247, 15; 256, 6. gan, 
etc., II, 144, 12; IV, 210, 3; 507, 2. 

gain, II, 212, 15, ye 's gain as much at mine : will get, 
receive. (But will (have) given, dealt, is perhaps 
possible.) 

gain (him at the law), IV, 286, 3: Icel. gegna, to pro 
ceed against ? 

gain, gane (Icel. gegna, to suit, be meet), II, 25, 8; 26, 
11 (with ellipsis of will): serve, suffice. II, 369, 15: 
suit my case. 

gaing. See gain, pres. p. 

gaix, pay meat and gair, V, 268, 27: gear, clothes an 
arms ? or money (a variation of pay meat and fee) ? 

gair (of clothes). See gare. 

gait, III, 266 b ; 272, 5; IV, 265, A b 10: way, road. 
See gate. 

galerie, V, 140, f l, 5: for gallaly, galley (doubtful 
form). 

Galiard, III, 459 f ., 1, 4, etc. : sobriquet of a freebooter 
of a gay (perhaps dissipated) character. 

galla. See gallowe-ti ee. 

gallage, V, 247, 20: gallows. 

gallaly, galalie, V, 136 f., 1-3, etc.; 141, d l: galley, 
prolonged for metrical convenience. 

gallan, gellant, gillan, IV, 260, 4; 315 f., 1, 4-7, 18: gal 
lant, gayly or finely dressed. 

gallio, V, 141, 2, 3, etc. = galley O. 

gallowe, sing, (like A. S. galga), a gallowe, III, 92, 18. 
Cf. next word. 

gallows, the highest, 1, 150, 13: one elevated above a 
triangular framework, for special offenders ; der 
hochste Gralgen ; see Grimm's Deutsches Worterbuch, 
Galgen, column 1168 (?). Perhaps simply the high 
est that is to be had. 

gallows-pin. See pin. 

gallow-tree (A. S. galgtrdow ; O. Eng. galwetre), 

III, 24, 43; 180, 17; 358, 71; 368, 10. gallou-, gal 
lage-, galla-tree, gallow-pine, V, 247, 17, 18, 20, 23, 24. 

gam, game. 

game, had god game, V, 80, 46, 47: sport, amusement. 

gamene, I, 328, 52: game, sport. 

gamon, II, 59, 25: gamen, amuse himself. 

gan, gane. See gain, pres. p. 

gan, gon, with infinitive : began, did. 

gane, II, 26, ll: serve, suffice. See gain. 

gane,^>.j9. of gae, go. See gaen. 

gane, III, 281, 14: p.p. of gae, give. See gaen. 

gane frae, IV, 378, 3: gone ahead of, left behind. 

gang, gange, gaeng, gieng, I, 55, A 5; 57, 4; 68 f., 21, 
37, 46; 75, 36, 39; 217, 16; II, 175, 13; 468 f., 13, 14, 38, 
39; III, 75, 397; V, 16, 2, 5: go, walk. pret. yede, 
yeede, yeed, yed, jede, yode, yod, youd. p. p. gaen, 
gain, gane, gaed, gade, gad, gaid, gude, good. inf. 
also, gon, gone. p. p. ganged : III, 362, 102. See 
gae. 

gang, gae, go down : IV, 11, 9, 12; 12, C 6, 7; 518, 2: 
like the Scottish be put down, be hanged. 

gantrees, II, 369, ll; 370, ll: barrel-stands. 

gar, gaur, 1, 100, 8; 127, 15; 130, 8; 397, D 9, ll, 13; II, 



338 



GLOSSARY 



115, 30, 31; 153, 16; 358, 17, 22-24: (Icel. gora) make 
do, cause, as auxiliary, gar lay, I, 5, D l: do lay, 
lay. So II, 106, il; 107, 19; 216, 3, 4. 

garded, III, 117, 16: looked at. 

gare, gair, gore, properly, a triangular piece of cloth 
inserted in a garment to give width at that part ; in 
Old English often coat or gown, low down by his 
(her) gare is a frequently recurring expression which 
may be taken literally, down by that part of a gar 
ment where the gore would be = low by his knee, II, 
197, 18. In, your ain hand sewed the gare (of a shirt), 

II, 379, 13; 389, 5; 395, 12 (following ain hand sewed 
the sleeve), gare in the limited sense seems hardly im 
portant enough, and perhaps is to be understood side: 
cf . rive it (sark) f rae gore to gore, gair by gair, 1, 439, 
4; 440, 5, 7; 441, 6, 7; 442, 6, 6; II, 294, 31, 32. So also 
in, frae breast to gare, I, 438, B 4, probably, though 
the limited sense would answer. So, riven him frae 
gair to gair, IV, 416, 17; the brown bride pat her 
hand in att Anne's left gare, V, 224, 20. penknife, 
sword, brand, down by (below) his (her) gare, 1, 451, 
9; II, 98, 40; 144, 6; 154, 11; 172, 34; IV, 465, 38. 
keys hung leugh down by her gair, IV, 465, 34. she 
hung 't (cup of wine) low down by her gare, II, 369, 
10 (recklessly and absurdly ; the cup is in her hand 
in the next stanza). In, frae my sark ye shear a 
gare, I, 388, A 8, 9, B 6, gare must be a strip large 
enough to make a bandage for the head. 

}are, III, 98, 24: ready. 

garl, II, 129, 18; V, 223 a, No 66, 18: gravel (suspicious 
word). 

gar land e, in, 93, 31; rose-garlonde, III, 75, 398: a cir 
cular wreath, apparently hung upon a wand or rod. 
In III, 93, 31, this can be nothing more than an ex 
temporized circlet of twigs. 

gar lings, II, 366, 24: garlands. 

garmarcie, garmercy, III, 33, 130; 81, 34: gramercy. 

garned. the bride she garned round about, IV, 410, 23, 
is a misprint of Buchau's for gazed, which stands in 
the original MS. 

garrett, III, 332, 16: watch-tower, look-out. 

gars, garse, IV, 221, 11; 467, 7: grass. 

gartan, garten, gartin, IV, 169, 10; 170, H 6; 175, 
M 8; 176, N 14, P 2; 490, 12: garter. (Gael, gairtein.) 

garthes, girths. 

gast, guest. 

gate, gait, get, I, 225, 8; H, 311 f., 2, 15, 21; 402, 10; 

III, 92, ll; 477 f., 11, 15 (ford); 480, 24; IV, 3, 21; 
V, 99, C 4: way, road, water-gate, V, 250, 12: round 
by the water, in this gate, II, 73, 26: in such a way 
or condition, to the gate (get) has gain, IV, 493, 5; 
V, 237, 5: has gone away, tnke the gate, II, 30, 7; 

IV, 392, 9: started, departed. 

gaucy, IV, 271, B l; V, 152, 3: lusty, jolly. 

gaud. See gad. 

gaudie, gaudy, gawdie, IV, 273, 12, 13, of speech: 
with a stately or pompous air. 274, D 19; 297, 13: 
showy, conspicuous. 274, E 1: dashing, gaudy locks, 
285, 10, 19: bright-colored. 356, B i: ostentatious. 



gaule, I, 272, 11: of the color of gall; or gules, red. 

gaun, gawn, gawen, I, 22, A l, B l; III, 473, 21-24; 
479, 8; IV, 261, 8; 511 a, 6; 513 a, 3: going. 

gaunt, IV, 20, 12: yawn. 

gaur, gar, I, 73, 36; IV, 226, ll: make. 

gavellock, gavlock, III, 470 b; 493, 10: iron lever. 

gavil-post, II, 227 a: gable-post. 

gaw. See ga. 

gawdie. See gaudie. 

gawen, gawn. See ga, and gaun. 

gay. See gae. 

gay, gae, gey, adv., II, 184, 16; IV, 271, 9; 329, c 20; 
V, 266, 9: pretty, rather. 

gaze, IV, 313, 10: gauze. 

ge> ye. 

ge, give. See gie. 

gear, geare, geere, geir, gier, I, 411, 5; II, 182, 5; 
184, 9; 185, 38; III, 440, 12; 459, 3; IV, 6 f., 5, 19, 29; 
469, 10; V, 170, 3, 4: goods, property, often cattle, 
silken gear, 1, 145, 22: clothes. Ill, 440, 7, 18, 19; 446 
b: fighting equipments, the less gear and the mair, 
III, 8, 23: smaller game and greater, pay meat an 
gair, V, 268, 27: clothes and arms? or money? Ill, 
341, 47; 404, l; IV, 505, 51; 506, 66: business, affair. 

geat. See get. 

geeks, gien the, II, 105 f., 20, 21: made a fool of. 
Geek in German, the northern languages and Eng 
lish, fool; in Scottish, according to Jamieson, "sign 
of derision, gibe, cheat." See gowk. 

gee, give. See gie. 

gee, gie, IV, 508, 2; V, 238, 22: go. pret. gied, gid, ged. 
See gae. 

geere. See gear. 

geet, IV, 494, 37: get, progeny, child. 

geid, pret. of gie, give, II, 277, A 8. See gied. 

gein, p. p. of gie, IV, 316, 18. 

geir. See gear. 

gell, V, 221, 20 (unnecessarily changed to kell) : congeal, 
freeze. (Aberdonian.) 

gellant, gallant. See gallan. 

gen, V, 247, 10: given. 

gen, gen Pasehe, II, 146, 9: against, for, Easter. 

general, with the, III, 176, 2: people in general (in 
public). 

genty, I, 421, 10: elegant of form or dress, but here 
refers to gentleness of disposition. 

gep, gip, III, 138, ll ; 140, d 11= gup, go up, get up 
(properly, a call to a horse), marry gep, interjec 
tion of contempt = marry, come up. 

gereamarsey, III, 111, 37: gramercy. 

gerss, I, 450, 5; II, 248, 9, 16; 464, 8, 10: grass. 

get, IV, 493, 5: gate, road (to the get he 's gane, has 
gone away). See gate. 

get, gett, geat, II, 470, 56-8; V, 238, 13, 24: progeny, 
brat. 

getterne, I, 328, 49: a stringed instrument. 

geve, give. See gie. 

gey, adv. gey sad, II, 184, 15, 16: pretty, rather. See 
gay. 



GLOSSARY 



339 



ghesting, I, 284, 17, 18: guesting, lodging. 

gie, go. See gae. 

gie, gi, ge, gee, gae, geve, give, gie, I, 71, 55, 56; 74, 
76, 77; 206, 26, 30; 207, 30. gi, I, 68 f., 26, 69, 70; IV, 
493, 21. ge, gee, IV, 222, 19; 493, 15; V, 228, 10; 248, 
4, 5, 21, 22. pret. gae, ga, gaa, gaed, geed, geid, gied. 
p. p. gin, gine, geen, gein, gien, gen, gane, gaen. geve 
on (like take) = strike, III, 127, 53. gien, II, 232, 13: 
struck. 

gied, gid, ged, pret. of gae, gie, go, I, 74, 3; 80, 5; 310, 
10, 12, 14; II, 75, ll; 357, 7; III, 434, 27. 

gied, geed, geid, pret. of gie, give, I, 79 f., 24, 28; 439, 3; 
n, 408 f., 3, 4; IV, 512 b, 8. 

gien, gine, gin, gein, geen, gen, p. p. of gie, give: I, 
100, 25; 467, 25; IV, 316, 18; 509 a, 13; 510, 16; 513, 
12; V, 215, 13; 219, 23; 224, 20; 229, 30; 247, 10; 306 
b, 3. V, 219, 23: given (a blow) to. 

gieng, II, 61, 3: gang, go. 

gier. See gear. 

gif, giff=if, I, 70, 16; II, 21 B 10; 28, 3; III, 285, 22. 

giff-gaff, I, 21 b, 14: give and take, tit for tat. 

gile, III, 482 ll : jail. 

gill, a steep, narrow glen. 

gillan, V, 272 b, l: gallant. See gallan. 

Gilliecrankie, be a, IV, 268, 22: a Gilliecrankie woman, 
live in Gillecrankie (see 20), be a Highlander, g reads, 
hae a Killycrankie, that is, a domestic battle, or row. 

gillore, III, 136, 34: galore, in plenty. 

gilt, III, 370, 10: money. 

gimp, I, 387, l; II, 220, l, 3: jimp, slender. 

gin, gine, ginne, V, 125, 9: a contrivance, specially, 
the apparatus for fastening a door, I, 107, 4; II, 241, 
23; III, 492, 6; IV, 445 f ., 3, 4; 446, b 3, 4 ; door and 
window, IV, 480, 4, 5. chappit (knocked) at the 
gin, I, 465, 11; IV, 445 f., 3, 4. lift the gin (that is 
the lever for raising the latch), II, 158, 4; 165, 4, 7, 
altered to pin, II, 158, 4, in the margin of the MS., 
and pin stands in 7 of the same piece. Otherwise, 
chin. 

gin, I, 108, B 3, like the gin: corrupt, compare A 4. 

gin, II, 23, E 8; 271, 34; 286, 3; IV, 412, ll; 485, 15; 
V, 243, 17: (of time) against, towards. II, 313, 14; 
IV, 138, M l; 166, C 6; 392, 12: by the time that. 

gin, con/., I, 5, C 8; 68, 21, 22; 70, 15; 72, 24; 310, 4, 6; 
466, 4, 5; 468, 5, 8; 478, 4, 6, 8-10: if. 

gin, gine, given. 

gine, ginne, n. See gin. 

gip. See gep. 

gird, III, 35, 19: blow, stroke. 

girded out, guirded, V, 76, 23; 82, 37: cracked, let. 

girdle, I, 403, 12: griddle. 

girds, II, 70, 27; IV, 481, 6: hoops. 

girn, I, 344, 31: (of a hound) snarl. IV, 69, 18: (of men 
hanged) grin. 

girth was the gold-twist to be, III, 490, 16, see 
486 b. girth should probably be graith, but ad 
mitting this, the sense is not clear, and further cor 
ruption may be suspected. We may understand, per 
haps, that after the rescue the mare was to have a 



caparison of gilded chains. Or we may read, her 

graith was used the gold-twist to be. 
gitter, V, 243, 16: gutter, 
glue, II, 442, 7, io: = gif, if. 
gives, II, 448, 26: misgives, 
gladdynge, III, 70, 297: gladdening (cheering in later 

texts). 

glaive,glaue,IV,491,ii; V, 235, 32: sword. Seeglaue. 
glamer, glamour, glamourie, glaumry, IV, 65, 2; 

66, 2; 67, 2; 68, D 2, E 2; 70, P 2, etc.; 367, 8; V, 301, 

No 200: a charm deluding the eye. IV, 310, 14: 

glitter, gleam. 

glance, III, 394, K 6; 397, 5; IV, 508 a, 8: shine, 
glaned, IV, 406, 14: (giant, from glent) glanced, shone, 
glar, I, 494, 18: mire, 
glashet, 1, 434, 36: (0. French, glacer, glachier) darted, 

flashed, 
glasse, III, 340, 32; 344, 30, 31 ; 349, 31 ; IV, 504, 36: 

lantern, ship-light, 
glaue, glaive, III, 105, 20: (in this place) a cutting 

weapon fixed to the end of a pole. See glaive, 
glaumry. See glamer. 
glazen, of glass. 

gleat (Icelandic glit), I, 100, 28: glitter. 
glede, gleed(e), I, 285, 28; 287, 67; 342, 34; III, 308, 

14; IV, 379, 14; V, 184, 42: glowing coal. II, 115, 29; 

140, 18; V, 27, 46: fire. See glyde. 
glee (=glue), I, 68, 9, 12: glove, 
gleid, gley(e)d, IV, 56, B 3; 58, 3, 4, 9, 10; 135, 23, 24: 

squint-eyed, 
glen, set her on the glen, IV, 284, 25; take her to the 

glen, 286, 29; set her to the glen, 287, 18: because, 

the roadways running usually through glens, this 

amounts to a public exposure, 
glent, I, 105 a, 28: glitter, glancing, wi a glent, II, 

119, 19; IV, 467, 14: in a flash, a moment (otherwise, 

in a glent). 

glent, III, 307, 6: glanced, went (perhaps, darted). 
gley(e)d. See gleid. 
glided, I, 333, 3: glittered, glinted, 
glintin, IV, 450 b, 6: gleaming, flashing, 
glister, IV, 510, 5: shine, 
gloamin, III, 319, 23: twilight, evening, 
gloe, III, 455, 8, 9, 11: glove. See glee, 
gloom, IV, 94, 9: frown, morose look, 
gloom, I, 302, A ll, B 9; 303, C 6; IV, 337, g before 

20: frown, look sullen, 
glore, II, 319, 13: glory, 
glove, cut my glove, etc., II, 105, 18: lovers were wont 

to cut a glove and each take a part. S. W. will take 

in his hand the half of his glove which represents 

Janet and dance for two. T. Davidson, played at 

the glove, III, 448, 5: some game for braw gallants, 

unexplained ; possibly, spearing a glove when riding 

rapidly. 

glove tee. See tee. 
glowd, glowde, II, 454 f., 54, 58: glided, 
glowred, IV, 429, a 15: stared, 
glue, II, 147, 12: glove. See glee, gloe. 



340 



GLOSSARY 



glyde, II, 375, 19: spark. See glede. 

go, goe, goo, gone, III, 64, 160; 71, 302; 77, 429; 105, 
22; 432, 19: walk, go boun away, IV, 224, 15, 16: go, 
depart, go down, IV, 13, 2, 3; 14, 2: be hanged 
(cf. gae down), goe vppon his death, V, 53, 99: 
pass upon the question of. 

gockies, II, 470, 48: deep wooden dishes. 

god, godde, III, 113, 72, 78, 80: property, goods. 

God, omitted, O save and you may see, III, 181, 19; 
184, 16. 

God, II, 46, 5l; in, 29, 146; 59, 62, 63; 61, 92; 68, 240; 
75, 391; 101, 90; 105, 23 (mood, wrongly for my 
God?}; 359, 103; 444, 16, 17: the second person in 
the Trinity. 

G-od a marsey, God amercy. God have mercy, III, 
111, 39; 138, 22; 149, 41; 445, 30; V, 76, 10; 77, 39; 
80, 51, 53; 81, 13; 83, 55: gramercy (not Dieu merci, 

i thank God, which meaning, unlikely in all, is impos 
sible in most of the cases). 

God beffore, V, 79, 19: before God (attestation). Cf. 
for God. But perhaps God before (and God before) 
is always to be distinguished from before God, and to 
be understood as, God my guide or helper ; which 
sense seems to be required in Shakspere's Henry V, 
I, n, 307, III, vi, 165; Percy MS., Hales & Furni- 
vall, III, 30, v. 304, 528, v. 57. [So, and God to- 
forn, in Chaucer, Troilus, i, 1049 ; n, 431. Cf. also 
King Edw. and the Shepherd, Hartshorne, Ancient 
Metrical Tales, p. 47 ; Peniworth of Witte, Englische 
Studien, VII, 116, v. 287 ; Weddynge of Syr Gawen, 
v. 640, Madden, p. 298 s ; etc.] 

God's peny, V, 14, 5; 15, 27: an earnest-penny, to bind 
a bargain. 

Godzounds, V, 93, 4, 8, 12, etc.: God's wounds. 

gogled, III, 179, 7: joggled, waggled. 

golden-knobbed (gloves), II, 133, 6: ornamented with 
golden balls or tassels, (siller-knapped, 134, 8, 13.) 

golett of J?e hode, III, 99, 49: throat, part covering 
the throat. 

gon, gone, infin. of go, III, 24, 45; 35, 32; 66, 204; 
67, 223; 71, 316; 74, 363; 77, 435; 111, 28. 

gon, gon gae, I, 333, 3: did go. 

gone, subj. of gon, go, III, 67, 219. 

good, gude, pret. of go, III, 464, 4; V, 153, 1. 

Good, V, 199 b, 20: God. 

Good-ben, III, 267, A 10. If ben is to stand, it must 
be benison abridged. Good benison be here, quoth 
he, makes a satisfactory line. Compare B 9, D 9. 

good-brother, IV, 168, 9: brother-in-law. 

good b'w'ye, III, 134, 6: God be wi you, good-bye. 

goodman, III, 274, 33, 35; V, 91, 1, 5, etc.; 98, 2, 3: 
master of a house. 

good-mother, IV, 412, 19: mother-in-law. 

good-son, IV, 283, 10: son-in-law. 

goodwife, III, 274, 33, 35; V, 91, 2, 6, etc.; 98, 1, 2: 
mistress of a house, housewife. 

goold, V, 296 a: gold. 

gorgett, III, 422, 75: defense for the neck, here a part 
of a jack. 



gorgett, II, 45, 32: a neckerchief. (" Nearly = wimple 
in Edward I.'s time ; in 15th century, neckerchief.") 

gorney, journey. 

goud = gan, did, IV, 20, 12, 13. (Cf . begoud = began.) 

goud, gowd, n. and adj., I, 127, 12; 135, 9-12; 351, 35; 
429, 28: gold. 

gouden, go w den, I, 127, 21, 22; 145, 23: golden. 

goudie, goudy, V, 110, 7; 267 b, 10; 268, 19: golden, 
yellow (locks). 

goun-teall. See gown-tail. 

goupen, I, 356, D b after 23: hollow of the hand. 

gouernor, I, 286, 40: director, guardian. 

go wans, I, 55, A 1: daisies. 

gowany, I, 315, 12: covered with daisies. 

gowd. See goud. 

gowk, II, 111, 12: (cuckoo), fool, gien me the gowk, 
made a fool of me. See geeks. 

gown of green, gien her a, II, 472, 2: defloured. got 
on the, I, 350, ll: strangely used for to be with 
child; properly, she got a gown of green eight months 
before: it can hardly mean, put on a green gown, 
literally, as at I, 358, 40. 

gown-tail, gooun-teall, II, 31, M 4; 472, 19; V, 235, 
4: lower part of the skirt of a gown. 

soy, joy- 

graid, great. 

graie dogs, III, 7, l: Scottish hunting dogs, deer dogs, 
rough greyhounds. 

grain, sitt in a graine, I, 210, 5: fork of a tree. Ill, 
267, 2l; 269, 14; V, 243, 17: branch of a tree. 

graith, n., IV, 86, 8: equipment (horse and arms). 

graith, v., V, 192, 34; 198 b, 34: make ready, p.p. 
graithed, IV, 2, 5; 27, 26: equipped in defensive ar 
mor, golden graithed behin, II, 191, 18; gowden- 
graithd before and siller-shod behind, II, 343, 4; shod 
wi silver afore an gold graithed behind, II, 194, 16, 
20: properly, harnessed, but as the horse is silver-shod 
before and gold behind, 183, 16; 185, 23; V, 224, 14, 
shod seems to be meant here. So in the patched-up 
ballad IV, 410, 18. The horse silver-shod before and 
gold-shod behind is a commonplace ; see II, 266, l; 
267, 1. 

graithing (gowd), IV, 410, 18: harness or caparison, 
behind horse. But see graith, v. 

grammarye, grammeree, V, 294 b, 2: grammar, learn 
ing. II, 53, 36, 41; 54, 55; 55, 68: magic. Gramery= 
grammar, learning, occurs three times in the Towne- 
ley Mysteries, but strangely enough seems not to 
have been heard of in the sense of magic till we 
come to Percy's Reliques. Percy suggests that the 
word is probably a corruption of the French grimoire, 
a conjuring book. Grimoire, however, does not ap 
pear until the 16th century and was preceded by 
gramoire (Littre). Gramaire in the 13th-15th cen 
turies has the sense of magic: see the history of 
grimoire in Littre'. Godefroi interprets gramaire 
savant, magicien. 

grandmother over, IV, 70, G 2: corruption of, glamer, 
oer her. 



GLOSSARY 



341 



grange-house, III, 360, lie: farm-house. 

grat, II, 70, 25; 323, 26, 27; IV, 7, 36; V, 166, 11, 13, 
pret. of greet, weep. 

gravat, II, 283, 21; V, 240, 14: cravat. 

graveld green, II, 158, l: a green with gravel walks? 
Probably corrupt: in yonder green, B, garden 
green G. 

gravil, I, 350, 18, 19 (pile o the gravil): expounded by 
Donaldson, Supplement to Jamieson, p. 304, as " the 
plant graymill or gromwell, of the genus Litho- 
spermum, anciently used in the cure of gravel, hence 
its name. Said to be used also in producing abor 
tion." I fear this is somewhat conjectural or even 
arbitrary. The pile seems to be simply some downy 
plant (velvety moss) which grows on stones; indeed 
we are expressly told this, IV, 456, 9, 12 : 'a flower, it 
grows on gravel greay,' ' the pile that grows on gravel 
green.' ("We have gravel green and gravel grey in 
the ordinary sense again, I, 347, l.) 

greaf, grave. 

greahondes, grehoundis, greyhounds. 

great, I, 252, 3, 5: groat. 

great, IV, 373, 15; V, 176, 16: intimate, high in favor. 

grece, harte of, III, 27, 105: a fat hart. 

gree, III, 61, 108 (made the gree) : paid my dues, 
(make gre in Old English, to discharge obligation; 
Old Fr. gre, gret, from gratum.) 

gree, from them take the gree, IV, 248, 16: prize, su 
periority. (Lat. gradus.) 

greecy (ghost), II, 390, 27: frightful (grisly). 

greeme, I, 69, 51 : (groom) young fellow. See grome. 

greet, greit, I, 186, B 3; 359, l, 2; 448 f., B l, 5; II, 
77, 30; III, 384, 4; 387, 6; 391, 5; V, 36, C 3: weep, 
cry. pret. grat. 

greete, III, 105, 26: grit, gravel, sand. 

greeter, V, 183, 17: weeper. 

greeting, weeping. 

grefe, III, 69, 268; 83, 268: 87, 268: offence, displeasure, 
a-grefe, III, 69, 268: in displeasure. 

grehoundis, greyhounds. 

greit, greet, weep, cry. 

grenner, compar., V, 283, 9, 19: greener. 

gret, pret. of greet, address, III, 111, 40. 

grett wurdes, III, 297, 31: high, haughty words. 

grevis, III, 307, 6: groves. See grief. 

grew, grow. 

grew, V, 113 b, 7: greyhound. See next word. 

grew hound, grew(e)hund, I, 328,47; II, 70,24; 79, 
37: Dr. J. A. H. Murray says Greek hound; "still 
called in Scotland a grewe, which was the older 
Scotch for Greek." Grew= Greek is well known in 
Middle English, and greyhound (Icelandic greyhundr) 
may have been changed to grewhound under its influ 
ence. 

grey (meal), oat-meal and grey, II, 462, 30: barley- 
(bere-) meal, as distinguished from oat-meal (= white 
meal). 

grief, V, 151, F l: grove, (tier should be tree.) See 
grevis. 



grien, III, 397, Q 2: yearn, long. 

griesly, grisly, grizly, I, 298, 4: 300 a; V, 234 b, 31: 
frightful. 

grievd, pret., Ill, 162, 58: injured. 

grimlie, grimly, II, 45, 19, 31; 199 a; 201, 7: grim, ter 
rible. 

grind, II, 216 f., 4, 27, 29: an apparent corruption for 
graith, graithed, accoutre, adorn. Cf. II, 191, 18; 194, 
16, and many other places. 

grinding, I, 130, l; 134, O l: this word of the refrain 
may be suggested by the mill. 

grips, IV, 53, 13: clutches, fastenings. See signots. 

grisel, grissell, III, 369, 20, 23: gray horse. 

grisly, II, 397, A so: terrible. See griesly. 

grit, grite, gryte, IV, 312, 9; 445, b l: great. 

grit oats, IV, 20, 14: great, or improved oats as dis 
tinguished from the sma corn or oats of the early 
part of the century. 

grith, III, 101, 86, 87: (peace) remission of hostility, 
" charter of peace." neither grith nor grace, 358, 65. 

grizly, IV, 398, 21: frightful. See griesly. 

grome, groom, greem, I, 75, 40; 77, 20; 342, 40; 345, 
38; 355, 52; 371, 3; III, 56, 4; 67, 224: man, young 
fellow. 

gross, II, 267, 13; 268, 18: big, burly. 

ground, the grounds o my pouches, V, 306, 9: bottoms 
(V, 165, 6 has, the boddoms of my pakets). 

ground-wa-stane, III, 433, 12, 13 : foundation-stone. 
(A. S. grundweall, fundamentum.) 

growende, ground. 

grumly (A. S. gramlfc, gromlfc), (of the sea) II, 22, 
10: furious, (of a seal) II, 494, 2: fierce-looking. 
(Jamieson: muddy, turbid.) 

grun, ground. 

gryming, IV, 6, 7; V, 249, 7: sprinkling, thin covering. 

grype, II, 45, 19, 31: griffon (also vulture). 

grysely, III, 298, 60: frightfully. 

gryte, great: I, 127, 22. See grit. 

gude, gued=God, II, 94, 17; V, 221, 24. 

gude, guid, gueed, good. 

gude, good, pret. of go, III, 464, 4; V, 153, 1. 

gude father, gude faythir, I, 301, l; 302, l; 303, C 1: 
father-in-law. 

gude mother, II, 284, 10: mother-in-law. 

gude neighbours, I, 352, 8: euphemism for fairies. 

gudeson, guidson, II, 463, 20; IV, 309, 3; 310, 6: step 
son, son-in-law, wrongly used of an own son, II, 
219, 9. 

gued, gueed(e), I, 68, 10, 14; V, 221, 24: good. 

gued, God. See gude. 

guid, good. 

guide, gyde, n., I, 101, 9; 102, 7; IV, 174, 19; 425, 6: 
one who has charge, etc., custodian. I shal be Ipe 
munkis gyde: III, 98, 35: take charge of him. death 
is her guide, II, 191, 29: has her in hand, this sword 
shall be thy guide, V, 49, 28: shall settle thy case. 
IV, 309, 2: escort, convoy. 

guide, v., 1, 481, 44; II, 152, 1 2; III, 459, 21: treat, use. 

guiding, gude, I, 303, C 3: thrifty management. 




342 



GLOSSARY 



guidson. See gudeson. 

guildery, guildery maids, V, 301 b, 5 : guildry is 
Scottish for guild, but this makes small sense here. 

guilt, all of guilt, II, 46, 43: of gilding or gilt metal, 
all begilt. 

guirded, V, 77, a b 23. See girded. 

gull, III, 217, 44: a fool. 

gunies, guineas. 

gurious, II, 380, 31 : (same as gruous, grugous) grim, 
grisly (or, ugly). 

gurly, (sea) II, 26, 14; IV, 366, 7: grim, surly, growl 
ing. gurrl(e)y fellow, IV, 489, 24, 25: gruff, surly. 

gutter-hole, I, 164, K 3: the place where filth from 
the kitchen is thrown. 

gyde, be }>e munkis, III, 98, 35: take charge of the 
monk. See guide. 

gyff, gif, if. 

gyll, II, 478, 4: opprobrious term for woman, here re 
ferring to levity. 

gyrde, pret., Ill, 66, 211: girt. 

gyat, III, 13, 10: gettest. 

jare, III, 98, 24: ready. See yare. 

jates, jatis, III, 99, 61, 62: gates. See yate. 

3 e, V, 283, l: ye. 

36, III, 97, 6: yea. 

jede, III, 99, 60: went. See yede. 

jelpe, III, 14, 16, IT: brag. 

jeluer, campar., V, 283, ll, 21: yellower. 

jeman, joman, III, 99, 58; 100, 74; 101, 86, 87: yeo 
man. 

jete, III, 100, 82: ate. 

jeue, III, 13, 12, 14: give, jouyn, 14: given. 

3006, I, 327, ll, 12; 328, 38-44; III, 13, 1: yon. 

jowe, I, 328, 53: you. 



ha, hae, hay, I, 299, 7, 9, 11; 330, A 6, B 6; 331, C 3, 6; 
D 6; 332, F 5; II, 74, E 6; 145, 27; V, 215, 9; 219, 20, 
21; 221, 16, 22: have. See haed, haet. 

ha, hall, I, 101, 14; 133, M l; II, 371, 8; 387, 13; IV, 
84, 5; V, 209 a, the last 2: house, manor-house, hall, 
IV, 513 b, 1, 2; V, 247, 1, 2, must be hold, as in other 
versions; but in IV, 514, 15, 16, would be house, un 
less an error for hale, whole. 

haad, v., II, 338, R 11: hold. See baud. 

hachebord, hatchbord, III, 340, 36; 342, 70: would 
most naturally be interpreted gunwale, or side of 
the ship, and so archborde, 340, 23. But in 36 Sir 
Andrew lies at the hache-bord (which is hached with 
gold), and stern would be a better meaning for hache 
bord in that place, the high stern of the old ship 
being a conspicuous place for a captain to lie. See 
archborde. Barton lies a larborde in the York copy, 
IV, 504, 38, which is quite loose. 

hached, the hache-bord is hached with gold, III, 340, 
36: gilt (possibly inlaid). 

haches, hatches, III, 341, 54, 57: deck, properly a frame 
of crossbars laid over an opening in a ship's deck. 
(Skeat.) 



had, ellipsis of, V, 274, 10, [had] rather [have] wedded, 
and [have] trailed, I [had] rader. 

had, haad = hold. See haud. 

hadden, p. p., I, 402, 4, 6: held. 

hadno, had not. 

hads, hads slaine, III, 358, 61 : the s in hads is per 
haps caught from slaine. Other readings are had, 
hadeste. 

hae, have. See ha. 

hae, II, 97, 18: correct to has; cf. drees, 17. 

haed, II, 110, 33: had. 

haely. See haly. 

haet, hayt, hajt, I, 415 b; III, 109, 5; 110, 20; 111, 41; 
113, 78: hath. 

hafe-gate. See half-gate. 

hagg-worm, II, 503 : a monstrous snake. 

haghty, V, 219, 21: haughty. 

ha-house, manor-house. 

haik ye up, IV, 219, 13: keep you in suspense (from 
hake, a frame on which fish are hung to be dried (?), 
or, haik, to drag up and down to little purpose 
(Jamieson), " bear in hand," delude with false 
hopes ? 

hail, III, 163, 77: whole, wholly. See hale. 

hail, II, 151, H l; 256, K 5: conceal. See heal. 

hailing (Old Eng. halen=Germ. ziehen, draw, move), 
denoting rapid motion, driving, rushing, wind come 
hailing, II, 22, 9. ship come hailing, IV, 402, 15, 25. 
went hailing to the door, hailing ben the floor, hailing 
through the closs, IV, 422 f, ll, 15, 18; V, 279 a, No 
257, ll. Of tears and blood falling fast, tears dame 
hailing down, II, 407, 14; drops o blude came hailing 
to the groun, II, 418, 31. See hailing. 

hailing at the ba', II, 269, 8: playing foot-ball. Hail 
the ba is specifically drive the ball to or beyond 



haill. See hale. 

hailsed, I, 333, 2: greeted. 

hain, II, 92, 17, strong participle of have (haven), 
wald hain = would (have) had. 

haind grass, II, 465, 7 (spared, preserved) : grass kept 
from cutting or pasturing. 

hair, hire. 

haisling, IV, 46, B 9, come haisling to the town; of. 
hailing, proceeding. (Perhaps miswritten; Hill Bur 
ton's hand is not always careful.) 

halch, halch vpon, I, 294, 18, 20; III, 419 f., 7, 37: 
salute, bestow a salutation on. 

hald. See hauld, hold. 

hale, haill, hail, haylle, hell, II, 28, 23; 80, 15; III, 
296, 23; IV, 379, 11; 380, 20; 381, 8; 382, 13; V, 276, 
14, 15: whole, in sound condition. Ill, 163, 77; 299, 
3: wholly. 

Haleigh, as he was walking the Haleigh throw, I, 76, 
E 6: ha-lee, the lea of the hall ? 

halfendell, III, 75, 382: the half part. 

half -gate, hafe-gate, II, 313, 14, 16: half-way. 

halke, III, 74, 366: corner, hiding-place. 

hall, house, manor-house. See ha. 



GLOSSARY 



343 



hall, either in arcbbord or in hall, he wold ouercome 
you, III, 340, 29: hull ? 

hall, hold. See hauld. 

hall, IV, 514, 15, 16: perhaps written for hale; in any 
case meaning whole. 

hall an, V, 99, 2: in cottages a wall between the fire 
place and the door, to shelter from the air (extending 
only as far as is thought requisite for that purpose). 

halld. See hauld. 

halle, V, 236, 23: hollo ! or, perhaps, simply halle= 
hail. 

hailed, V, 270, 11: hailed, saluted. 

halleen, V, 197, 9: holly. See hollen. 

hailing, come hailing to the town, V, 277 f., 15, 25. See 
hailing. 

hallow, haly, II, 175, 16; 239, l: holy. 

hallow, good hallow, II, 270, 10: a form of salutation; 
perhaps, God hallow, sanctify, cleanse us from sin ! 
perhaps simply an elliptical Good saint ! I have not 
met the phrase elsewhere, and it seems no longer to 
be familiar in Scotland. 

Hallo wday, 1, 342, 25; 507, l; in, 246, B 1: saints' day, 
All Saints. 

hallow seat, I, 367, 7: a saint's place. 

hals-bane, hass-bane, hause-bane, hase-bane, I, 
394, 8: neck-bone. 

halse, I, 327, 10: neck. See hause. 

haly, haely, hallow, II, 104, 22; 175, 16; 179, 13; 239, 
i; 417, 13; III, 262, 5: holy. 

halycon, come halycon to the town, III, 434, B 3: in a 
rollicking, or a boisterous, turbulent way. North 
Eng. hallacking, making merry; Scottish hallach, hal- 
lokit, crazy. 

halyde, hauled. 

hame, bring bame, bear a child. See bring. 

name, home, came, IV, 405, 54; 420, 5: was born. 

hame, gae hame, III, 398, A c after 3: that is, to the 
heaven where you belong, seek your lover hame, IV, 
174, ll: go for and bring. 

hame-gaun, I, 72 f., ll, 66: home-going (to go home). 

hamesucken, IV, 244 b: invasion of a private house. 

hand, att hand of, III, 278, 30: nearly, about; cf. Old 
Eng. nearhand. (stroke) behind his hand, II, 63, 24: 
seems to be intended for backhanded. 

hand for hand, III, 465, 34; 466, 48: in a fair match ? 
(hand to hand, 468, 48.) 

hand, lokyde at his hand, III, 307, 10: probably, shad 
ing his eyes with his hand; possibly, looked aside. 
Cf. lookit aneath (below) the sun, III, 5, D 7; 6, 6; 
8,6. 

hand, on the upper, II, 245, 29: side, uppermost (see 
II, 247, 32; 254, 22). 

hand, out of, III, 440, 25: forthwith ? (The line seems 
to be corrupted; without resource, unable to help 
themselves, hors de combat, would give an easier sense 
if allowable.) Should we read: as many as was, out 
of hand ? 

hand-write, III, 455, 8, 9, ll; V, 300, 10, 16, 19: hand 
writing. 



hang, pret. of hing, to hang, I, 327, 23 (hange); 448, 5; 
451, 9; II, 154, 11; 172, 34; IV, 465, 38. 

hang down, III, 483, D 9: unintelligible to me, whether 
hang or gang, ding down ? (drown my mare and 
thee, III, 492, 26; 493, 15.) 

hanging well, III, 440, 17 : draw-well of which the 
bucket is raised and lowered by a pole or beam turn 
ing on an upright post ? By some understood as, a 
well near the place of execution. 

hankit, I, 224, J 2, 8: tied tight. 

hansell, haffe hansell for the mare, III, 111,32: have a 
present, the more you buy ? have the first purchase 
(which was thought lucky) for the larger part (of the 
ware) ? (Doubtful.) HI, 284, 10: reward. V, 112, 
B b 9: used in Galloway of a piece of bread given 
before breakfast (Jamieson); here apparently of a 
draught of ale given early in the morning. 

hantle, II, 337, ll: a large number. 

hap, happing, cover, coverlet: IV, 65, 7; 258 f., 6, 20. 

hap, v., I, 15, 18; 299, 5; IV, 233, 2: cover, wrap. 

hap, v., IV, 483 b, after 12: hop. 

happer, hopper. 

happing. See hap. 

harbengers, III, 198, 2: harbingers, officers who pre 
ceded the king in a progress to provide accommoda 
tion for the court. 

harl, harl her thro the lin, I, 303, D 4: drag. See 
haurld. 

harme, III, 357, 50: sorrow. 

harnessed (men), III, 62, 133: equipped. 

harns, V, 201, note f : brains, barn-pan, brain-pan, 
skull. 

harried, haryed, pvtf. and p. p., Ill, 295, 4, 6; 296, 12; 
IV, 6, 9, 14, etc.; V, 250, 9, 13 : plundered. See herry. 

harte of gre(e)ce, III, 27, 105; 124, 3, 4: a fat hart. 

har tinge, IV, 504, 31: encouragement. 

hart-roote, II, 241, 27: (Icel. hjarta-rcetr, pi., Old 
Eng. heorte rotes, heart-roots, -strings) term of 
affection. 

has be, I, 86, 24: as if for future (see a, us, etc.); but 
shall in 7, 16, and sail in b. 

base, halls. 

hase, hass, neck, throat. See hause. 

hase-bane, hass-bane. See hause-bane. 

hast, V, 78, 12: am in haste (as well as fow hast, hast- 
est). 

hastely, hastilye, III, 74, 376; 75,392; 405,20: immedi 
ately, soon, promptly. 

hat, pret. of hit, I, 299, 5; III, 350, 50. 

hatches = deck: III, 335 b; IV, 505, 57. See haches. 

hather, III, 424 b; 426 a: heather. 

haud, had, hawd, haad, howd, I, 21 b, 3, 4; 74, 75; 
341, 12; 354, 17; 421, 4, 8, ll; II, 70, 17; 74, D 7; 463, 
24, 25; III, 491, 9; V, 296, l, etc.; 304 b, 3: hold, 
keep. pret. had, II, 371, 7. p. p. hadden, I, 402, 6; 
hauden, II, 161, 7. 

haud me un thought lang, IV, 260, 10: keep me with 
out the time seeming long, interested, entertained. 

haugh, low ground, properly on the border of a river: 






344 



GLOSSARY 



in, 9, G 10; 483, 5; IV, 3, 17; 77, 3; 273, C 7; V, 

250, 20, 21. 

hauld, hald, halld, hall, hold, III, 281, l; 371, 33; 
433, l, 2; 434, 1, 2; 436, l; IV, 513 b, 1, 2; V, 247, l, 
2: place of shelter, stronghold, quarters. See hold. 

hauld, I, 359, 9, gang by the: walk by taking hold of 
things, gang by haulds, III, 162, 46. 

hauping, II, 463, 16: hopping, hobbling. 

haurld=harld, V, 99, C 6: dragged. 

hause, base, hass, halse, I, 149, H l; 327, 10; II, 
165, 22; 319, 3; 366, 38; in, 163, 76; V, 184, 44: 
neck, throat. 

hause-bane, base-bane, bass-bane, hals-bane, I, 
394, 8; 395, B 3; H, 146, 14; 147, 15; IV, 165, 15; 
447 b, after 13; 448 a, 2d stanza; V, 204 b: neck- 
bone. 

have, ellipsis of. would been, 1, 169, 7. I wad taen, I, 
356, 54, 55. shuld I slain, II, 169, 7. ye widna kept, 
III, 390, 10. I woud not swum, III, 489, 42. I should, 
might, enjoyd, IV, 135, 23; 137, 32. he woud guarded 
me, IV, 148, 55. they taen, IV, 221, D 7. as muckle 
as wald bocht, IV, 386, 18. I seen 't, IV, 465, 31. 
euer I scene, V, 53, 105. seem[d] to worn, V, 55, 26. 
he 11 learned, V, 196, 53. had rather lost, V, 302, 17. 

have = proceed, go. have in (to water), have over, III, 

128, 76, 77. 

ha ve= provide or procure that a thing is done, hae me 
hame, II, 82, 54; hae me to the town, II, 122 f., 4, 
28: take. 

have in, had him in, II, 216, 8: had him in my posses 
sion (Germ, innehaben) ? 

have (on the skynne), III, 127, 60: get a blow. 

haw, green haw sea, II, 28, 21; IV, 379, 10, 14; 380, 19: 
bluish. " azure; pale, wan; " Jamieson. (A. S. hsewen, 
glaucus, caeruleus. Old Eng. hawe, haa.) green raw 
sea, II, 30, 6, is a corruption; I have been lately in 
formed that the singer ordinarily gave haw. In haw 
bayberry kame, IV, 471 f., 2, 4, there is again cor 
ruption; as in the same passage of other versions. 

hawd. See baud. 

hay, II, 160, is: for hae, has. 

hay, went forth to view the hay, IV, 233, 1; 238, 1: to 
see how the hay was coming on, as a way of taking 
the air. 

hay, IV, 225, 15; V, 261 a, No 221, G 22; hays, 16: in 
Maidinent's text, lea, leas, probably right, hays mak 
ing no reasonable sense. 

hay lie, III, 296, 23: whole, entire. See hale. 

hayt, hajt, I, 415 b; III, 109, 5; 111, 41; 113, 78: 
hath. See haet. 

he, him, she, her, with proper names (almost always 
him, her) : like Icelandic hann, hdn (htin) (" so fre 
quent in modern conversational usage that a person 
is scarcely ever named without the pronoun," Vigfus- 
son.) out and spak he Sweet Willie, II, 108, 19; 
185, 33. sighing said he Love Robbie, 370, 8. up 
and raise he Sweet Willie, 108, 15. up and raise he 
the bridegroom, 108, 13. up and stands she Fair 
Annie, 189, 32. whare it is him Sir Colin, 61, l; so 



147, 16. out it speaks him Young Bondwell, I, 479, 
41; so II, 418, 25; 419, 37, 53. sighing says him 
Brown Robyn, II, 371, 8, 9. leugh him Childe Vyet, 
134, 21. out it spake her Dow Isbel, II, 97, 21; so 
418, 34. out spoke her Lady Frendraught, IV, 44, 12. 
out waked her May Meggie, 188, 14. it was her 
May Catheren, II, 145, 25. sighan says her Suse Pay, 
V, 219, 17. Etc., etc. Cf. Chaucer in, he lakke 
Straw, he Theodomar, he Pluto, = perhaps, ille; but 
not, him Arcite, Knight's Tale, 352, 475.) with the 
objective case: as, sought her Lady Maisry, II, 114, 
3, 4, 10; 154, ll, 24, 26, 27; 370, 18; etc. (Him, her, 
with verbs of motion may possibly be a relic of the 
old use of a dative, and such cases are not included.) 

he, I, 242, 12; HI, 13, 4, 8: they. 

he, hee, III, 307, 4: high. 

header, heather. 

heal, healle, hail, I, 453, 9; H, 145, 26; 146, 9, 10; 
154, 13, 14; 155, 37: conceal. 

healy, hooly, adj., gentle. 

healy, heely, hooly, slowly, gently: II, 94, 15; 110, 

22, 23. 

beans, hens. 

heard, V, 253 f., No 203, D 2, 8: hired. 

hearten, IV, 444, 32: encourage. 

heathen (child), II, 246, 13: unbaptized. 

heathennest, I, 284, 15: heathendom. 

heather-cow(e), I, 302, A 9; 304, E 8, P 8; 305, 14; V, 
173, 8; 174, C 2; 213, 8; heather-crow, I, 301, note *: 
tuft or twig of heather. 

heather-knaps, V, 173, 8: heather hillocks, knolls. 

hech and how, III, 392, 13: to utter these interjec 
tions of grief. 

heckle, IV, 247, 12; 248, 17 : hackle, flax-comb (board 
set with sharp steel spikes). 

hecks, IV, 319, I, 5: racks. 

hee. See he. 

heely, n, 220, 21: slowly. See healy. 

heer, heir, heire, I, 301, 3; 303, C 3; 304, E 2: the 
sixth part of a hank of yarn, 240 threads. 

hegehen, I, 333, 3: eyen, eyes. 

heght, IV, 179, A l: promised. 

heigh a ween, and Oh a ween ! interjections of grief, 
II, 504, 27. a ween is probably I ween. 

height, heihte, hight, hith, heiste, hette, I, 244, 10; 
IV, 503, ll, 14; V, 288, 18: was, is, called. 

heir, heire. See heer. 

heiste. See height. 

hele=heal, conceal. 

hell = whole, staunch, tight, V, 276, 14, 15. See hale. 

hell, heel. 

helt, IV, 457, 22: pret. of hile: hailed. 

he me, III, 434, 27, 28: home. 

hempten, V, 87, 11: hempen. 

hend, hende, heynd, hind, hindy, III, 57, 25: noble, 
gracious, lady hende, of the Virgin, III, 68, 251. 
hend soldan, II, 59, 36, 37: noble, of rank. Ill, 110, 
27; V, 49, 12: friendly, kindly. I, 71, 4i(?) ; 329, 
57: fine-looking. Ill, 98, 41 : civil. See hind. 



GLOSSARY 



345 



hende, I, 71, 41 (gallant hende) : hind, young fellow ? 
The adjective, of noble rank, courteous, kindly, is 
less likely. 

hent, III, 110, w; 123,8, 10: caught, took. 

hepe, III, 66, 204: hip (as II, 273, 35), berry of the wild 
rose. 

herbere, I, 327, 32: garden. 

herkeneth, herkens, imperative plural, III, 81, 317; 
109, 2. 

herowed, herowed hell, III, 25, 63: harried, despoiled. 
See harried, herry. 

berry, II, 261, 7; III, 473, 23; IV, 26, 2: harry, pil 
lage, rob. See harried. 

hersed, V, 156, 15: rehearsed, repeated praise of? 

her ship, IV, 41, note*: plundering. 

he ae. See -s as sign of future. 

het, eat. 

het, hot. 

hethyne, I, 329, 58: hence. 

hett, I, 271, 5: bid. 

hette, I, 224, 10: is called. See height. 

heuch, heugh, I, 312, is; II, 503 f., 11, 15, 28; IV, 231, 
1 15: steep hill or bank, glen with steep overhanging 
sides. 

heved, I, 243, 7; III, 70, 290 (?): head. 

hewene, V, 283, 15: heaven. 

hey, I, 438, B l: interjection of pleasure, displeasure, 
pain, excitation. (Not the dance which is called the 
hay.) 

heye, III, 482, 21: hie. 

heyer, hyer, compar., V, 283, 5, 15: higher. 

heynd, III, 110, 27: friendly, kindly. See hend, 
hind. 

hey ng, pret. of hang, V, 78, 4. 

heyt war howte! Ill, 111, 28: heyt ! is a well-known 
call to horses, as in Chaucer (get up !), and war-oute 
is a term used in driving, according to Halliwell's 
Dictionary. 

hi, I hi, III, 349, 46: have. I hinna, H, 469, 28: have 
not. 

hich, high. 

hide, II, 467, 44, 50: should probably be heed, as writ 
ten by Motherwell. 

hie, hye, n., I, 328, 37; II, 164, 9, 12; III, 99, 50: haste. 

hie, she smiled hie, V, 51, 55: with a smile not confined 
to her mouth, but mounting higher. 

Mean, II, 147, 2: hying. 

hiesed, IV, 424, b 7, 8: hoised, lifted, dragged. 

high-gate, V, 239, O 4: high-road. 

highman, I, 203, C 16, 17. In a 16, the reading is 
hymen, which is in itself plausible, but not ballad- 
like. If highman is right, the meaning would seem 
to be, the chief man of the occasion, the bride 
groom. 

hight, III, 441, 30: is, was, called. See height. 

bight, III, 309, 34: I promise, pret. heght, hight, 
III, 407, 17. 

hile, v., IV, 456, 17: hail. pret. helt, 457, 22. 

hill-gate, IV, 249, F 4: hill-road. 
VOL. v. 44 



hilt, V, 76, 21: flayed. 

him. him, hym come, I, 244, 10, 13, 17; up stod him, 16, 
16: dative of subject after verb of motion, stert hym, 
III, 62, 120. wente hym, III, 62, 126. rade him, IV, 

2, 5. ar the coc him crowe, I, 244, 18. 
hin-chill, V, 278, 33. See hind-chiel. 
hinchman, III, 320, A b 16: henchman, servant (man 

who stands at the hinch, haunch). 

hind, hiiide, hindy. hynde, adj., courteous, gracious, 
gentle, kindly: I, 430, 5, 9; II, 177 f., 20, 35; HI, 
310, 52; 358, 69. See hend. 

hind, hynde, n. (A. S. hina, O. Eng. hine, servant), 
youth, chiel, callant, seems often to be used as an 
epithet = young (but this may possibly be hind = kindly 
courteous, etc., in some cases). Hynde Etin, 1, 369 f ., 

3, 5, etc. (called Young Akin in A 367, 6, etc., Young 
Hastings the groom in C, 371, 3). Hind Henry, II, 
305 f., 6, is, etc.; Hynde Henry, H, 306 f., 6, 8, etc. 
hind-chiel, hin-chill, hynd-chiel, I, 367, 3; II, 83, 
after 38; IV, 432, 15; V, 278, 33. hind-greeme, I, 69, 
51. hind-squire, I, 452, C 10; 453, 7; hynde squire, V, 
25 f., 2, 13, 19, etc. hine-squar, V, 278, 29 (called 
young squar in 18). In all three, both parts signify 
young fellow. 

hind, gane hind away, 11,248, 5=hyne away, faraway. 

hindy. See hind. 

hing, II, 194, 22, 27; 239, 6; III, 299, 6; V, 226, 4: hang. 
pret. hang, hanget. p. p. hanged, hangit. 

hingers, V, 40, 4: hangings. 

hinna, I hinna will, II, 469, 28: I have not will, I wish 
it may not. 

hinnie, hinny, honey, IV, 66, 15; 69, 15; 70, 12; 72, 
I 5: term of affection. 

hinnie-mark, honey-mark, IV, 479, 7: mole ? (cf. 
Germ, honigflecken, yellow spot.) 

hinny -drap, II, 283, 5: mole ?= hinnie-mark. 

hire, a yearl's hire, II, 191, 20: rent, revenue. 

hirewoman, IV, 202, J 3: female servant, hired 
your ban, IV, 240, 14, if right, must mean, she 
would have paid you to do it. Other copies, kissed. 

hirn, I, 334, 9: corner. 

hirpling, II, 474, 8; 476, 3: halting. 

hisn, V, 293, 14: his. 

hith, I, 334, 7: hight, am called. See height. 

ho, who. 

hochis, III, 306 b, note *: hocks. 

hoe, IV, 19, 7: (as a singular of hose) stocking. 

hoes, IV, 486, 7, 8: as plural of hoe (?). 

hog, II, 258, 32; IV, 325, 6, 7; 328, 3, 4; 332, 13; 469, 
10, 12: young sheep that has not yet lost a fleece. 

hog-rubber, IV, 208 a : (seemingly) a fellow em 
ployed to rub down hogs, or fit for such business. 

hoised, hoisd, hoist, I, 206 f., 9, n; IV, 248, 2, 5; 
V, 132, 7, pret. of hoise, heave, lift, drag. 

hoky-gren (burnt like), II, 145, A 27: hoakie, "a fire 
that has been covered up with cinders, when all the 
fuel has become red." Jamieson. A branch or stem 
in such a fire ? or good to make such a fire with ? 
Scott has, hollins grene. 



346 



GLOSSARY 



hold, holde, hauld, II, 216 f., 4, 27, 29; III, 358, 74; 
430, 1; 435, l: housing, quarters, place of shelter, 
lodging, thirty horsses in one hold, II, 444, 59: per 
haps place of keeping (450, 64, in one close). See 
hauld. 

hold, holde, v., Ill, 97, n; 176, 5, 6: wager. 

holde, III, 61, 93, 107: retain (legally). 

hole-house, I, 305, 3; V, 213, 3: said in depreciation 
of an humble sort of house (hole of a house), as a 
divot-house, a turf-cottage. (Still in use. W. Walker.) 

hollaii, hollin, holland, linen. 

Hollan, Hollans, boats, I, 467, 18, 22: Dutch boats. 
Dutch fishing-luggers are to be seen in great num 
bers on the Scottish coast in summer. 

ho 11 an. holland, of holly, hollan dyke, II, 195, 32: 
wall planted on the top with holly. 

hollen, hollin, I, 294 f., 15, 27; II, 153, 29; V, 191 f., 
3, 18: holly. (Perhaps hollin's, V, 194, 2, should be 
hollins.) 

hollie, V, 111, 16: (slowly) softly. See hooly. 

hollin, holland. 

holm, holme, houm, howm, III, 460, 38; 488 f., 31, 
34, 41; IV, 522, 4, 10: low ground on a river-bank. 

holpe, pret. of help, III, 342, 76. See hope. 

holtes, III, 296, 14; 357, 53: woods. 

holy dame, by my, III, 209, 7: halidom. Originally 
halidom in oaths meant reliques of saints ; my hali 
dom seems to be used in the sense of sacred oath. 
(Printed holy dame in three copies, and very likely 
often so understood.) 

horn, V, 304 b, 2, 4: home. 

horn, III, 308, 26: them. 

home, hame, came, IV, 405, 54; 420, 5; was born. 
See bring hame. 

hondert, hondreth, hondrith, hundred. 

honey, term of endearment. See hinny. 

honey-mark, II, 282, 12: mole ? See hinnie-mark, 
hinny-drap. 

honey month, she has turned the honey month about, 
to see if he was coming, IV, 320, J 2: inexplicable. 

hongyr, V, 283, 16: hunger. 

honour's gate, II, 163, 21: (honour, a manor, the man 
sion-house of a manor) an imposing gate, such as 
would be put at the principal entrance to a mansion- 
house. W. Maemath. 

hooding. See huddin. 

hook, IV, 19 f., C 3, 8: loop. 

hook-tooth, I, 18, F 9: tooth of a sickle with serrated 
edge. 

hooly, adj., II, 107, 9: slow, gentle. 

hooly, hoolie, hollie, huly, adv., slowly, softly: I, 451, 
12; II, 108, 10; 111, 10; III, 393, 14. See healy. 

hope, houp, IV, 25, 4; 27, 12; 184, 2, 3: "a deep and 
pretty wide glen among hills." Jamieson. 

hope, pret., V, 103, A c 14: holp, helped. See holpe. 

hope, I, 327, 12; 449, 17; II, 311, 6; V, 54, 3: expect, 
think. 

hore, hoar, gray, greue wode hore, holtes hore, III, 
65, 176; 357, 53: gray as to trunks. 



home and lease, III, 360, 113. See Pegge, Archseo- 
logia, III, 1, 1775, " Of the horn as a charter or 
instrument of conveyance." Professor Gross, of Har 
vard College, has favored me with the following case : 
" Pro quo officio [i. e. coroner and escheator of the 
Honor of Tutbury] nullas evidentias, cartavel alia 
scripta, proferre possit nisi tantum cornu venato- 
rium." The possession of this horn still conveys the 
right to hold the office. Cf. J. C. Cox, Three Centu 
ries of Derbyshire Annals, London, 1890, I, 73-79. 

horse-brat, I, 302, B 10: horse-cloth (horse's sheet, 
horse-sheet, of A 13, F 4). 

hose, I, 285, 38: embrace, hug (halse, Scottish hawse). 

hosen, hose, III, 65, 193: stockings (not breeches; 
see 196). 

hosens, IV, 257, 3: stockings without feet. 

hostage, III, 271, F 10; hostage-house, 4, 5, 8, 9: inn. 

hosteler-ha, III, 270, E 3, 4, 5, 7: inn. 

hostess-house (= hostage-house), IV, 175, N 4: inn. 

hostler, III, 266 f., 4, 6, 9, 10; V, 153 f., A 3, 4, B 3-5; 
156 b, B: innkeeper. 

hostler- wife, IV, 508 l; V, 154, 3: woman keeping an 
inn. 

honk, V, 218, 5: dig. Pret. andjo. p. houked, houket, 
houkit, howket, etc., I, 184, 9; 220, A 2, B 4, C 4; 
221 f., B 7, 17; III, 500 b, 8; IV, 451 a, 3, 5; V, 210, 9. 

houl, III, 247, 5: hold. 

houm, howm, holm, I, 394, 14; III, 370, 5; IV, 168, 
E 2, 5, 7, 8, ll, 12; 523, 3, 5: level low ground on a 
river-bank. 

hound, IV, 19, 4; 20, 9: chase, drive. 

houp, hope, IV, 2, 13: (A. S. h6p) sloping hollow 
between two hills. 

hour, whore. 

house, V, 273, No 237, 20: hose. 

house 11, II, 3, 10; 5 b, 2: house (sing.). 

house-end, -en, I, 254, b l, c l: gable. 

housle, houzle, II, 46, 46; III, 330, 13: give the sacra 
ment. 

houzle, III, 105, 22, 23: communion. 

hove, hove hole, I, 304, F 2: a hole which one haunts 
or lives in. 

hoved, III, 296, 20: hung about, tarried. 

hoved on, III, 358, 69: moved on (hied, 362, 69). 

hoves, V, 227, 4: hoofs. 

how, how soon, III, 450 a: so soon as. 

how, howe, n., Ill, 164, b 49; 316 a, last line; IV, 
110, 10; 303, 7: hollow, sometimes, plain. 

how, adj., IV, 476 a, 4: hollow. 

how, III, 392, 11, is (as verb) : exclamation of grief. 

howbeit, III, 450 a: although. 

howd, hold. See haud. 

howded, V, 124, C 15: swung. 

howk, howked, etc. See houk. 

howm. See houm. 

howre, V, 78, 5, 6; 79, 28, 33, 35; 80, 37: our. 

howther o dirt, II, 184, 13: a mass of dirt. 

howyn, own. 

hoy Be, hoise, II, 26, 8: hoist. 



GLOSSARY 



347 



huddin, hooding (hud, hod, to hide), IV, 262, 30; 266, 
15: covering, coverlet. 

huddle, II, 246, B 7: (hide) cover, protect (Scot, 
hiddle, hide). 

huggar, I, 303, D 5: stocking without a foot. 

huggell, II, 244, 16: hug, or, perhaps, a variety of 
huddle. 

huly, hooly, healy, II, 168, B 4; 169, 12; 216, 2; IV, 
413, 18; 436, 8: slowly, softly. 

humming, III, 136, 30: heady, strong, as causing a 
hum in the head. 

hunder, hundre, hunner, huner, hundredth, hun 
dred. 

hunger, hungre, v., II, 382, 4; 386, 4; 387, 2; 391, 2: 
starve. 

hunkers, V, 213, 9= clunkers, clots of dirt. 

hunt's ha, I, 298, 2: hunting-house or lodge. 

husbande, husbonde, III, 57, is; 295, l: farmer, hus 
bandman. Ill, 58, 46: economist, manager. 

hussyfskap, husseyskep, V, 98, A 3, B 3: housewifery 
(she was making puddings). But perhaps, specifically, 
hussyskep, a sort of basket or bin of straw, formerly 
used, especially in ruder districts, for holding corn 
or meal. In like manner, a " platted hive of straw " 
is called a bee-skep. G. F. Graham's Songs of Scot 
land, III, 181. 

hy, hye, hyght, on, vpon, III, 296, 9; 297, 31, 47, 48; 359, 
91: in a loud voice, on hy, hye, III, 309, 51; 297, 46: 
on high, up, erect, on hyght, III, 297, 34: on high. 

hye, hie, n., I, 328, 37; III, 99, 50: haste. 

hyer, heyer, compar., V, 283, 5, 15: higher. 

hyf, V, 283, 4: if. 

hyghte, I, 328, 36: promise, hyght, p.p., Ill, 297, 29: 
promised; III, 77, 442: vowed. 

hym, wente hym, stert hym, III, 62, 120, 126: dative of 
subject after verb of motion. See him. 

hyndberry, I, 177, A c: raspberry or brambleberry. 

hynd-chiel. See hind. 

hynde, n., Ill, 64, 164: fellow, hynde Henry, II, 
306 f., 6, 8, etc.; hynde squire, V, 25 f., 2, 13, 19, etc. 
See hind, n. 

hynde, adj., II, 177 f., 20, 35: gentle, or the like. See 
hind, adj. 

hyne, II, 314, C 3: (up) behind. 

hyne, II, 314, C 3: hence, away. 

hypped, III, 77, 429: hopped. 



(See also under J, Y.) 
I, II, 59, 34; 160, 10-16; 264 f., 4, 18; III, 185 f., 3, 4, 15, 

23; 203, 18; 287, 59; 356, 28: ay. 
i, abridgment of in, passim. 
i, abridgment of with . IV, 465, 23. 
i-bouht, bought. 

ickles of ice, III, 154 f i: icicles, 
i-dyght, y-dyght, III, 62, 131, 132: furnished, adjusted. 

Ill, 75, 392: made ready, 
if, apparent ellipsis of, II, 62, 9, with honour that ye do 

return. 



i-fedred, feathered. 

i-flawe, III, 13, 6: flayed. 

ile, oil. 'inted (anointed) har with ashen ile, V, 305 a, 
6: gave her a beating with an ashen cudgel. 

ilk, ilke, same, of that ilk, III, 451, note *: having a 
title the same as the surname: as, Wemys of Wemys. 
in that ilke, I, 287, 72: in that same; III, 105, 14: at 
that same moment. 

ilka, I, 107, 7; 302, A 9, 11, 12; 474, 40: each, either, 
ilka ane, ilkone, II, 185, 25; III, 97, 16: each one. 

ilkone. See ilka. 

ill, ell, ull, will. 

ill-bukled, V, 276, 18: badly run down at the heel. 
See baucheld. (Unless ill be for old.) 

iU-far'd, I, 342, 41: ill-favored. 

ill-fardly, V, 115, 9: ill-favoredly, in an ugly way. 

ill-wordie, V, 243, 15: unworthy. 

ini, am. 

impale, V, 182, 5: make pale. 

imy, I, 243, 7: in my. 

in, IV, 464, 3; V, 277, 5, 9: an, and, if. 

in o = in (in some part of ?), Ill, 495 b, 23, 24; IV, 19, 
3; 517, 19. 

in one, II, 186, l; 187, 8; 196 e 1, 7; into ane, 184, 5, 
8, ll, 18: anon, or, at once = in a single answer. In, 
riddle both of us into ane, the intention was, per 
haps, together, simultaneously; and so, all in one, III, 
4, 7; both as one, II, 187, 2. 

inbearing, II, 28, 15: obtrusive, over-officious, inter 
meddling (with the object of thereby ingratiating 
oneself). 

infeft with, in, I, 478, 5, 10; IV, 350, B b, 4, 6; V, 
274, 6, 7; convey (land, money) to, put in possession 
of. inheft (o), IV, 349, B 4, 5: mistakenly for infeft. 

in-fere, together. See fere. 

ingle, III, 484 a, 36; V, 45 l: fire. 

inheft, IV, 349, B 4, 5, for infeft b, to invest with a 
possession in fee. 

inn, inne, III, 117, 11; 118, 8; 200, 6, 7; 212, 5: lodg 
ing. 

i-nocked, III, 62, 132: nocked, notched. 

inowe, III, 57, 13; 58, 43: enough. 

instiled, III, 227, 3: styled, intitled. 

'inted, V, 305 a, 6: anointed. See ile. 

intil, intill, I, 68, 28; 69, 36; 302, A 11, IV, 171, l: into, 
in. 

Into, I, 70, 20; 71, 29; 127, 5; 440, 13-15; IV, 263, 36: in. 
into his age, IV, 359, 12: at, of. 

into ane, II, 184, 5, 8, 11, 18: anon, in a single answer, 
or simultaneously. See in one. 

intoxicate, pret., II, 47, 8: intoxicated. 

i-pyght, III, 63, 136: put. 

ir, are. 

irale (stane, as the rhyme shows the reading should 
be), I, 326, 9: an undetermined stone mentioned in 
romances. 

ire, thro, II, 408, 17: seems to mean, as resenting the 
covering (not ballad-like), wi ire, II, 411, 10, is 
sufficiently incongruous. 



348 



GLOSSARY 



irke with, V, 15, 14: tired, weary of. 

is, III, 440, 11: has. 

-is, -ys, termination of 3d pers. pres. indie., he stendis 
louys: III, 98, 22; 101, 88. 

I'se, IV, 506, 68: I am. 

istow, I, 175 f., 4, 10, 16: is thou, art thou. 

it (=O. Eng. his), its. defile it nest, III, 445, 32. 

ith, in the. 

'ith, with. 

ither, IV, 210 a; V, 306, 15: other. IV, 110, 9: one 
another. 

I wat, a wat, I wot, I wad = surely: I, 107, l; 471, 
11; and very often. See a=I. 

I wis, IV, 405, i: probably to be taken as assuredly, 
since we have I wot in that sense in 7. 

i-wis, i-wisse, i-wys, II, 46, 43; 265 f., 9, 26; III, 27, 
104; 277, 17; 359, 84: surely, indeed. As to i-wis that, 
III, 277, 18, 19, it is to be remembered that a super 
fluous that is common in the Percy MS. 

I wist, III, 187, 32: for iwis, indeed. Perhaps the 
Scottish I wat, surely, has influenced the form. 

iyen, iyn, III, 57, 23, 28; 59, 58: eyen, eyes. 



Jack, IV, 112, 4; 113, 5: insolent fellow. 

iacke, III, 342, 64: (here) coat of mail, cf. 58, 59, 60. 
soldans iack, III, 422, 75. An ordinary soldier's jack 
(III, 440, 18; 465 f., 33, 42, 49; IV, 147, 4l) consisted 
of two folds of stout canvas, or some quilted mate 
rial, with small pieces of metal enclosed. Fairholt. 
Old Robin, II, 241, 21, puts a silke cote on his backe 
was thirteen inches folde. 

jail-house, V, 300, 16: jail. 

jamp, pret. of jump, II, 121, 21: jumped. 

iapis, III, 59, 63: japes, jests, waggery, trifling. 

jauel, V, 81, 11: a term of abuse, good-for-nothing, idle 
fellow. Prompt. Parvulorum, gerro. " He called 
the fellow ribbalde, villaine, iauel, backbiter, sclaun- 
derer, and the childe of perdition." Utopia, Arber, 
p. 53. 

jaw, jawe, 1, 127, 10; 128, 8; II, 21, 8; 24, ll; 29, 10-12: 
wave. 

jawing, jawing wave, II, 223, P 7; IV, 472, 16: surging. 

jawing, n., IV, 462, 24: surging. 

jee, I, 389, 7; IV, 476, 5: move, stir. 

jelly (jolly), I, 69, 51; 298, 2; 452, 10; II, 403, 5; IV, 
413, 20: handsome, pleasant, jovial. Jamieson: " up 
right, worthy, excellent in its kind." 

ietted, III, 199, 19; V, 86, 30: moved in state or with 
pride. 

jimp, gimp, jump, adj., I, 330, 8; 333, 6; II, 216, 18, 20; 
217, 1, 3; 221, l, 3; 225, J l; IV, 212, l; 272, 2: slender, 
slim. 

jimp, adv., TL, 74, D 3: tightly, so as to make slender. 

jo, II, 103, 5: sweetheart. 

jobbing (of faces), III, 219, 14: billing (like doves). 

jobbing at, I, 104 b, 10 : jogging. The at is diffi 
cult. The old prefix means off, away, but is not 
separable. 



Jock Sheep, John Sheephead, II, 480 a; IV, 290, 
23: a man deficient in virility (?). V, 206 a, 9: sim 
pleton, of one who has been stultified or outwitted. 

iollye, III, 278, 32: should probably be iollyte. See 
enter plea. 

joukd, V, 9, 12: bent forward. See juks. 

jow (of bell), II, 277, A 8: stroke. 

juks, V, 110, 5: bows, obeisances. See joukd. 

jule, jewel. 

jully-flowers, gilly-flowers. 

jumbling, V, 102 B 13: mudding, fouling. 

jumly, IV, 182, F 9: turbid. 

jump, V, 267 b, 5: jimp, slender. 

jumpted, IV, 519 a, 3: jumped. 

justle, III, 280, 26: joust, tilt. 

justler, III, 280, 31, 32: jouster, tiiter. 

justling, III, 279, 12, 14, 16: jousting. 



kail, kale, colewort, made the baron like kail to a pot, 
IV, 86, 13 : cut him up. broth made of greens, espe 
cially of cole worts: II, 467, 41 ; III, 300, 12; 388, 3; 
IV, 500, 13. See kell. 

kaily lips, I, 302, A 10: covered with kail, and so 
repulsive. 

kaim, kame, keem, comb. 

kaivle, II, 298 f., 3, 19: lot. See kavil. 

kale. See kail. 

kame, keem, comb. 

kamen, combing. 

kane, I, 353, 15; 356, 56: tribute (originally a duty 
in the form of a part of the produce, paid by an 
occupant of land to his superior). 

kauk, V, 116, 10: chalk. 

kavil, kaivle, kevel, cavil, I, 71, 36, 38: lot. 

kay, key, kine. 

keach, V, 123, 17: perturbation, shaking up. 

kean, v., V, 110, 4: ken. 

kebars, I, 332, P 6; II, 227 a: rafters. 

kebbuck, IV, 323, 5: cheese. 

keckle-pin, burnt like keckle-pin, II, 155, 38: that is, 
I suppose, like heckle-pin, the sound of the k being 
carried on from like. Mr William Forbes, of Peter- 
head, suggests the following explanation: The pins 
used to hold the straw raips which hold down the 
thatch on cob or mud huts ; being driven into the 
top of the walls close to the eaves, they are always 
dry and ready to burn. JThe mass of interlaced 
straw is called a hackle. Used all over East Aber- 
deenshire. 

keeked, keekit, I, 303, D l; 304, E 3: peeped. 

keel, V, 116, 10: red chalk. 

keem, kem, kemb, kame, comb. 

keen, v., V, 238, 18; 278, 38: ken, know. 

keen, armour, II, 62, 10: no sense except for arms of 
offense (as in Old Eng.). 

keen (of tying), II, 162, D 3: strong or hard. 

keen(e), II, 45, 26; 46, 39; V, 192 f., 27, 57: bold, spak 
sharp and keene, III, 394, K 3: cuttingly, poignantly. 



GLOSSARY 



349 



keep, catch. See kep. 

keep up, V, 114, 12: keep under custody, safe from 
the hands of others, lock up. See kept up. 

keep(e) with, II, 411, 15; III, 36, 41: stay, live, with. 

keepit a bower, II, 407, 8: frequented, lived in. 

keepit, IV, 215, A 2: heeded, observed. 

keist, kiest, kest, kyst, pret. of cast, I, 69, 46; 241, 3. 

kell, II, 264 f., 5, 12; 364, 30; V, 161, 7: a cap of net 
work for women's hair. 

kell. lang kell, V, 110, 9, 10. See lang kell. 

kelter, kelter-coat, V, 64, 20 : made of kelt, black 
and white wool mixed and not dyed. Dillon, Fair- 
holt's Costume in England, where a kelter-coat is 
cited from a will. Kelt, cloth with the knap, gener 
ally of native black wool. Jamil-son. 

keltit, IV, 493, 5: kelted, tucked. 

kem, kemb, comb. 

kemp, kempe, kempy, I, 301, i; 302, 6, B i; 303, C l, 
9; 309, 3, 5; II, 53 f., 25, 31, 55; III, 447 a: champion, 
fighting-man (A. S. cempa). kemp o the ship, V, 
151 f ., F 2, 4, is no doubt a corruption. 

kempery(e), II, 54 f., 54, 66, 68: company of fighting 
men (or, if adjective, fighting). 

kempy. See kemp. 

ken, I, 343, 42; 345, 41; 348, 21; III, 268, 4: know. 
Ill, 266, 4: to make known. 

kene, cawte and kene, III, 296, 26: wise, shrewd, or, 
perhaps, brave. 

kenna, know not. 

kep, keep, cap, cape, catch, stop, intercept: II, 322, 
21; 325, 21; 407, 13; 413, 6, 8; III, 125, 34; 245, 2; 
246, E 2; 436, 5, 7; IV, 480 f., 17, 18, 19; V, 230, 10, 
11. she keppit him (received him) on a penknife 
(as he leaned over to her), II, 147, 6. she keppit 
Lamkin, II, 335, M 7; V, 230 b, Y 10: encountered, 
he kepped the table, door, wi his knee, I, 476, J 5; 
481, 42; II, 91, 26; 94, 18; 271, 17: took, struck, 
keppit, III, 246, D 2, is an obviously wrong reading, 
and should be kicked; cf. 243, 2; 245, 2; 246, E 2. 
kepd the stane wi her knee, II, 421, 29, is absurdly 
taken from other ballads (and from ball-playing). 
pret. kept, kepd, kepped, kepit, keppit. See cap. 

kepe, I, 329, 2: care for, value, kepe I be, III, 100, 
80: care I to be. 

keping, IV, 313, 20: meeting. The meaning is that 
he went to meet (come should be came) the body 
which was lying at the gates. There was no proces 
sion towards him. 

kepping, keeping. 

kept up, IV, 287, 15: shut up. See keep up. 

kerches, kerchiefs. 

kest, keste, pret. of cast, III, 76 f., 421, 422. See keist. 

kettrin, IV, 84, 8: cateran, Highland marauder. See 
caterans. 

kevel, kevil, I, 74 f., 3, 36; 77, 4; 80, 4-6; IE, 16, 2; 
301, i; IV, 394, C i: lot. See kavil. 

key, kye. 

keys, rang the keys, IV, 430, 2: keys of her spinnet. 

kickle, III, 230, 59 (the actual reading) : not easily 



managed, unsteady, Scot, kittle. (But perhaps we 
should read kick, since a verb would be expected.) 

kiest, keist, pret. of cast, I, 74, 2; 75, 36; 80, 4; 351, 
44; IV, 32, 11. 

kilt, IV, 257, 3: a skirt worn by Highlanders, reaching 
from the belly to the knees. 

kilt, kelt, tuck up: I, 341, 3, 17; 343 f., 3, 8, 16, 35; 369, 
2; II, 92, 7; 461, 5; 462, 5; 471, 4. p. p. kilt, II, 423, 
8; IV, 210, 7. 

kin, a' kin kind, II, 114, 2: a' kin, all kind, equivalent 
to every, na kin thing, I, 394, 10. 

kin, ken. 

kind, kindly, II, 319, 7; III, 266 f., i, 5, 21; 300, 26; 
IV, 501, 30: kindred, native, kindly cock ward, I, 
285, 24: natural, born, fool, kindly rest, V, 124, C 14: 
natural. 

kine, what kine a man, IV, 504, 27: kind (of). 

king's felon, kynggis felon, kings ffelon, III, 98, 
21; 180, 16: traitor, or rebel, to the king. 

kinnen, III, 370, 4: coney, rabbit. 

kintra, country. 

kipeng, keeping. 

kipple, I, 333, 5; IV, 432, 6: couple, rafter. 

kipple-roots, I, 304, P 5: the ends of couples (rafters) 
that rest on the top of the wall. " In rude erections 
the couples were rough unhewn tree-stems, which 
were placed with their thickest, or root, ends on the 
walls, the smaller ends abutting at the ridge of the 
roof." J. Aiken. 

kirking, I, 371, 6, 12, 14: churching. 

kirk-shot, IV, 359, 10: the fishings on the water where 
nets are shot, belonging to, or adjacent to, the kirk. 

kirk-style, 1,441, 8-10 ; 498, 16, 24; IV, 183, 9, ll; 360, 
16: the gate of the enclosure round a church, or, the 
stile in the church-yard wall. 

kirk-toun, II, 219, 13: village in which is a parish 
church. 

kirkyard, V, 299, 4: churchyard. 

kirn, n. and v., V, 115, 6: churn. 

kirtle, kirtell, kyrtell, part of a man's dress, per 
haps waistcoat: III, 65, 194; 71, 299. name given to 
a variety of articles of female attire, explained as 
jacket, corsage or waist, upper petticoat, a loose 
upper garment, tunic or short mantle, etc. dress of 
silk worn under a gown, over a petticoat, I, 433, 9. 
gown, petticoat and kirtle, III, 273, 14. kirtle and 
gown, III, 215, 10; IV, 432, 7, 8. 

kist, chest, I, 15, A 3; B 3; 17, D 2; III, 189, 34; IV, 
485, 19; V, 115, 5: coffin. 

kithe, a, III, 93, 36: of kith, of the same country, re 
gion, people, kith, kyth, and kin, II, 216, 6, 8; 252, 
29; III, 93, 36. 

kitt, V, 240, 14: outfit, supply. 

knabby, IV, 262, 23: knobby, rough. 

knack fingers (in sign of grief): IV, 418, 7; 435, 13; 
knak, V, 227, 5 (passage corrupted) ; knick, III, 455, 
E 1; knock, II, 312 f., 5, 6, 7: crack the finger-joints. 
(Elsewhere, wring, II, 315, D 7; 319, 17; in, 477, 
4.) ladies crackt their fingers, II, 26, G 16. 



350 



GLOSSARY 



knapped, II, 134, 8, 13: knobbed, ornamented with 
balls or tassels. See naps, golden-knobbed, II, 
133, D 6. (knob, sometimes a tassel to the cord of a 
mantle.) 

knapscap, napskape, IV, 7, 35; V, 251, 3i: head-piece. 

knaue, III, 14, 16, 17; 60,81; 94, 50; 127, 44 (play): 
servant. IV, 501, 37: person of servile or low rank. 

knave-bairn, I, 350, 20; 11,418,23: male child, knave- 
boy, V, 235 b, after so. 

kneene, III, 362, 87: knees. 

knell, v., II, 189, 23: ring. 

knet,pret. of knit, III, 431, 17; IV, 31, B 6: knitted, 
knotted. 

knicking fingers, III, 455, E: making the finger-joints 
crack. See knack. 

knight-bairn, V, 236 f., 21, 28, 29: male child. 

knip-knap, V, 213, 6: a knock, tap. V, 124, C 15: to 
express the sound of cracking. 

knobbed. See knapped. 

knock. See knack. 

knocking-stane, I, 304, 10: stone mortar. 

knoe. See know. 

knop, III, 138, 9: (knap), blow. 

knoppis, knobs. 

know(e), knoe, II, 308 b; III, 464, 5; 466, 38; IV, 
171, 4; 193, l; 195, l; 201, 10; 205, 22: hillock. 

knowe-tap, IV, 60, C b 6: top of a hill. 

kod, kuod, quoth. 

koors, I, 353, 15: turns. 

koupd. See couped. 

kouthe, II, 499 b: known. 

kow, V, 157, 11, 12: twig. See cow. 

ky, kye, kyne, III, 464, 6, 7; 465 f., 19, 62; IV, 7, 

29-32; 84, 17, 18: COWS. 

kyrtell. See kirtle. 
kyst, I, 241, 3: cast. 

kyth (and kin), home, country, people. See kithe. 
kythe, II, 168, 10: be manifest, appear, pret. kythed, 
1, 117, 10: appeared. 



laa, law. 

lachters, lauchters, IV, 166, 14: locks. 

lack, lake, a<i/. = laigh, low, humble, in lack o luve, 
II, 376, 24, 27, 30. so lack a knight as bid her ride, 
II, 97, 10. thought his father lack to sair, II, 408, 1 
(lake, V, 235 b, l; cf. thought father's service mean, 
II, 178, 2); V, 272 b, 8, 10: of mean position. 

lack, lake, n. (think, hae, lack), reproach, discredit, 
IV, 15, 16; 518, 8. woman, lack o our kin, IV, 325, 
13. had ye nae lack (reproach or fault), IV, 281, 3. 
what other ladies would think lack, II, 159, 22 (but 
here lack may = laigh, and mean beneath them, as 
in II, 97, 10). tooke a lake, III, 419, 2: incurred a 
reproach or blame ? of his friends he had no lack, 
IV, 11, 18: corrupted from, of him his friends they 
had no lack (or the like). See lauch. 

lad, in surgeon-lad, IV, 484, after 25: man. lad nor 
lown, IV, 304, 8, 9: should probably read, laird. 



lad-bairn, II, 299, 12, 21; III, 392, 7; 395, L l, 5; IV, 
610, V s: boy. 

lad, pret. of lead, III, 75, 388. 

lade, led, taken. 

lader, V, 265 b, 20: leather. 

laid, III, 35, 15: laid a plan, laid about, III, 329, l: 
invested. 

laid, laid her bye, V, 169, 6: lay down by her. 

laidler, II, 503 f., 10, ll, etc.: corruptly for laidley (as 
in 7). 

laidley, laily, layle, layely, etc. (A. S., laClic), I, 
312, 8, 13; 348, 14, 20; II, 503 f., 7, 32, 35; V, 214 f., 
2, 3, 5, etc.: loathly, loathsome. 

laigh, II, 188, 3; III, 384, 2; 397, A b l; IV, 200, 9; 
268, 21; V, 236, 11: low, mean, oer laigh, III, 480, 
12: too low, too short. See lack. 

laigh, leugh, n., Ill, 162, 49: low ground. Ill, 489, 10: 
lower part; so, leugh, 487, 6, 14, 16. 

laily, layle, layly, layelly, V, 214 f. See laidley. 

lain, laine, layne, leans, lene, len (Icel. leyna), III, 
332, 7; IV, 7 f., 30, 47; V, 250 f., 27, 40: conceal. 

lain, alone. See lane. 

laine, p. p., Ill, 401, 16: laid. 

lair, lear (A. S., lar), II, 175, 16; 305, 15: instruction, 
unco lair, to learn, get: 11,118,1; 119,1; 174,1; 178, 
2; III, 385, l; IV, 411, l; unco lear, IV, 467, l: 
strange lesson, applied to one who is to have an ex 
traordinary experience; cf. English lair, IV, 466, l. 
See lear. 

lair, lear, II, 311, 1: lying-in. 

laird, a landholder, under the degree of knight; the 
proprietor of a house, or of more houses than one. 
Jamieson. 

lairy, IV, 22, 10: miry, boggy. 

laith, loath. See leath. 

lake, n., Ill, 419, 2; V, 235 b, l; 272 b, 8, 10. See 
lack. 

lake, I, 254, 8: pit, cavity. See laigh, n. 

lake, V, 235 b, l; 272, 8, 10= laigh, of mean position. 
See lack, adj. 

lake-wake, leak- wake, lyke-wake, II, 311, 19: 
watching of a dead body. 

lamar, lamer, lammer, II, 131, 6; 323, 24; IV, 203, 5; 
204,14: amber. 

lambes woole, V, 85, 18: pulp of roasted apples 
mixed with ale. 

lammas beds, II, 96, J 4, in virtue leave your: cor 
rupt. See note, II, 100 b. Dr Davidson, correcting 
by sound, would read, never to leave. For lammas 
beds we may perhaps read, families. Cf. 87, B l, 
that ye dinna leave your father's house. 

lammer, lamer, lamar, amber. See lamar. 

land, V, 128, 29: country (opposed to town). 

land-lieutenant, IV, 517, 17. lord lieutenant, III, 
492 f ., 7, ll, 17. lieutenant, III, 488, 32, 33, 35, 37. See 
next word. 

land-serg(e)ant, III, 481, 33; 482, 27; IV, 2, 9, 14: offi 
cer of the gendarmerie of the Borders, called land- 
lieutenant, IV, 517, 17. 



GLOSSARY 



351 



landart, V, 106, E i; 111, l: belonging to the country, 
rural. 

landen, II, 29, 17: landing. 

landen span, III, 511, 16, 18: corrupted from London 
band, or the like. 

landsman, III, 489, 44: land owner. 

lane, III, 357, 51 : lane, as where poor men live ? 
(Rhymed with aye, and perhaps corrupt. 361, C 51, 
lawne.) 

lane, lain, leen, lean, lone, alane, alone, annexed to 
the dative or genitive of the personal pronoun (as in 
Old Eng. him ane, hire ane), my, mine, thy, our, 
your, her, his, him, its: I alone, by myself, etc. my 
lane, I, 79, 22. thy lane, IV, 197, 8. our lane, I, 72, 
20. your lane, II, 69, l. your lone, IV, 195, 16. her 
lane, lean, I, 350, 10; IV, 456, 1. his lane, lean, IV, 
227, 6; 345, 5. him lane, leen, I, 368, 26, 28; II, 90, 
18. their lane, I, 254, c l. its lone, I, 132, J 4; II, 
308, 3. its leen, IV, 418, l. it lane, II, 82, J; 307, 
22; III, 388, 5. me ane, I, 333, l. by my lane, I, 330, 
B l. mine alone, alane, I, 332, E l, F l; III, 489, 1. 
him alone, in, 159, 2; cf. IV, 464, 1. 

lane, IV, 281, 2: misprint for bane. 

lang, at lang, IV, 318, P 9: at length. 

lang kell, V, 110, 9, 10: coleworts not cut up and 
mashed, "lang kail [a tall-growing cabbage?] be 
came extinct about 60 years ago, giving place to 
finer-flavored varieties." W. Forbes. 

langin, she's gane langin hame, IV, 198 a, 7: perhaps 
simply longing, languishing; lingering would be more 
appropriate if the interpretation were justifiable. 

Ian g-s ought, V, 35, B 5: been long (and fruitlessly) 
seeking for some object (if the reading is right), 
indicating a hopeless passion. 

lap, grip her in his lap, II, 325, 18: (possibly) embrace, 
clutch. 

lap, lappe, III, 59, 70; 65, 194; 353, 12; 430 f., 15, 17: 
wrap, roll. 

lap, pret. of loup, leap, I, 330, A 5, 7, B 5; 331, C 5, 7; 

III, 270, l; V, 228, 16. lap him, III, 266, 2: the old 
construction of dative of the subject after a verb of 
motion. 

lappen, p. p. of loup, leap. 

lapperin, III, 395, L 4; IV, 224, 23: clotting. 

lappin, IV, 510, V 3: covering; probably corrupted 

from lapperin of L 4, clotting, 
lard, leard, V, 36, B 8, 9: laird, 
lass-bairn, lassie-bairn, I, 350, 20; II, 301, 10, 11; IV, 

418, 5: girl. 

lat, I, 310, 8; 351, 37: let. 

lat down, III, 281, 2, 5, 6: give over, discontinue, 
late, III, 164, b 51: let, hindrance, 
late, pret. of let, allow, V, 256, 13. 
latten, p. p. of let, II, 189, 26; IV, 493 f., 7, 28, 31 

(left), 
lau, low. 
lauch, n., II, 20, 4; 385, 6; 390, 7; IV, 259, 9: laugh. 

IV, 327, 12: perhaps laughing-stock; but cf. lack, 325, 
13, reproach. 



lauch, lawhe, v., IV, 121, G 2; V, 80, 48: laugh, pret. 

laugh, laughe, leuch, leugh, luke, lough, low, lowe, 

lowhe, laucht, lought. 
laucht, pret. of laugh, II, 106, 14. 
lauchter, IV, 385, 6: laugh, 
lauchters, I, 74, 68, 72; 79, 25: locks, 
lauchty, V, 213 a, No 33, 10: the reading in Sharpe's 

Ballad Book corresponding to tauchy, I, 302, A 10. 

In the copy of Sharpe used (a presentation copy), a 

line is drawn through the 1, indicating, probably, the 

editor's intention to emend to tauchty or tauchy. 
laue, law. 
laugh, laughe, pret. of laugh, II, 418, 34; 420, 69; III, 

287, 59. 
launde, lawnde, III, 27, 105; 33, 105: plain ground in 

a forest; "a small park within a forest, enclosed in 

order to take the deer more readily, or to produce 

fatter venison by confining them for a time." 
launsgay, III, 63, 134: a kind of lance, javelin (com 
pound of lance and the Arabic zagaye). 
lave, leve, II, 78, li; III, 495 b, 23, 24; IV, 220, 3; 428, 

6; 517, 20: rest, remainder. 

lauede ablode, I, 244, 9; V, 288, 16: swam in blood. 
lav(e)rock, I, 201, 3; 202, 3; 205, P 4; IV, 266, 16: 

lark. 

law, I, 209 a: faith, creed, 
law, Castle-law, II, 149, 4, 7; Biddess-law, III, 460, 

29: hill (A. S. hlsfcw). 
lawhe, V, 80, 48: laugh, pret. lowhe. 
lawin(g), III, 472, 7; IV, 151 f., A 2-4, B 5, 9, 10, etc.; 

157, 5, 6: tavern-reckoning, 
lawiug, V, 266, 8: lying (reclining), 
lawude. See launde. 
lax, IV, 233, is: relief, 
lay, II, 59, 25: law, faith, 
lay, II, 483, l; IV, 203 f., 6, 7, 23; V, 260, 10, 11: laud 

not under cultivation, grass, sward, lays, IV, 224, 23: 

fields, plains, ground, 
lay, >., lie. 
lay, I, 399 a, E n: seems to be nonsense; probably we 

should read gray, as in No 248, IV, 389 f . 
lay by, IV, 519, 5, 7, n; 520, 5, 10 (lay'd=lay it): 

lay aside, let be, cease, lay bay, V, 275 b, 3: put 

aside or behind, outsail, 
layelly, loathsome. See laidley. 
laying, IV, 174, 1: lawing, reckoning, 
lay-land, II, 59, 23: (Old Eng. leyland) lea land, un- 

tillcd land; simply plain, ground, 
layle, loathsome. See laidley. 
layn (withouten), III, 97, 17; 100, 81: lie (truly), 
layne (Icel. leyna), IV, 7 f., 30, 47: conceal. See lain, 
layne, v. (A. S. legman), III, 297, 35, 40: lie. 
layne, v., II, 87, 33: lean, 
lazar, -er, II, 44-46, 4, 5, 9, 11, etc.: leper, 
lea, lee, lie, loe, loi, loie, loy, loo, low, lue, v., I, 

438, 10; II, 260, 4; 408, 23; 417, 2; 419, 52; V, 116, 2, 

3; 117, 3; 220, 6; 221, 9; 242, 14; 260, 13; 272 b, 3, 7, 

ll; 277 f., l, 4, 23, 31 : love, 
lea, lee, lie, mentiri. 



352 



GLOSSARY 



lea, in, 457, A 2; IV, 100, 4; 102, L 6; 263, 2: leave, 
(so leave, IV, 94, 15, is to be sounded.) 

lea, n. See lee. 

lea, lee, lie lea, lie lee: IV, 26, 5; 350, B b after 2; 
520, 2: untilled. lay lee, V, 189 b: lay waste. 

leace, withouten leace, III, 27, 108, 115: falsehood. 

lead, III, 460, 26: lead their horses ? 

lead, V, 36, 11; 117, 14; 221, 18; 268, is: led. 

lead, laid. 

lead(e), I, 232, 9; V, 53, 103: vat, boiler. 

leaf, loaf. 

leaf, gae out under the leaf, IV, 379, 6: luff, loof, after 
part of a ship's bow; or here, as opposed to lee, the 
weather side. See lowe. 

leak, adj., V, 111, 20; 224, 26: like. 

leak, v., V, 242, 15: like. 

leak, II, 193, 28; V, 224, 26; 228, 28:=lyke, for lyke- 
wake, watching of a dead body. 

leak-wake, V, 228, 13, 14, 23, 24: lyke-wake, watch 
ing of a dead body. See lake-wake, lyke-wake. 

leal, leel, leil, liel, III, 464, 12: loyal, faithful, true. 
I, 70, 24 ; 73, 34, 45, 46; II, 73, 19; III, 437, 36; IV, 212, 
l; 240, 13; 283, ll; 289, ll: virginal, chaste, expers 
viri; so, lealest, leelest, I, 220, A 3; 221, D 6. Ill, 
464, 3; 465, 30: veracious. V, 115, 5: upright, honest, 
love me leel, I, 345, 9: faithfully. 

lea-lang, I, 352, 7. See lee, adj. 

leall, V, 248, 4: perhaps only faithful; but possibly 
lief, lee (dear), leman, the final 1 being caught from 
leman. 

learn, leem, v., II, 410, 24: gleam. 

lean, leen, his, him, IV, 345, 1 5: lane, lone. See lane. 

lean, leane, lene, len, v., II, 403, 8 (see len); III, 
330, 19; 420 f., 30, 32, 34, 52; IV, 277, 15, 17; V, 36, 
B 8, 9: conceal. II, 164, 8, ll, 14: conceal, or lie. 
See lain, to conceal. 

leap, pret. of leap, loup, V, 227, 17. See leepe. 

lear, II, 176, C l, 2: instruction. IV, 413, 2; 414, 1; 
467, l: learning. Ill, 473, 24: information. See 
lair. 

lear, II, 313, 25: apparently meant for lair, bed; but 
rhymed with white, and the reading should undoubt 
edly be lyke, that is, lyke-wake, as in II, 117, 16. 

leard, laird. See lard. 

lease leash, II, 265, 19: a thong or string (as if for 
bringing back the deer he should kill ?). I, 211, 20: 
a leash (of hounds), pack. Ill, 216, 31: a leash (of 
bucks), three. 

ledsing(e), leasynge, lesynge, leesin, 1, 412, 26; III, 
28, 132, 134; 359, 86; IV, 465, 22: falsehood. 

leath, laith, III, 162, 54; IV, 479, 4; V, 216, 6: loath. 

leaugh, leugh, lewgh, leiugh, lieugh, III, 465 f., 33, 
39, 42, 49; 487, 6, 14, 16 (see laigh) : low. 

leave, gie them a' thier leave, I, 431, D 13, E 10: take 
leave of them all. 

leave sleeve, dear, II, 414, 24. leaver, III, 362, 82. 

leave (to weepe), IV, 140, 10: cease. 

leave, live. 

lede, III, 74, 368: leading, conduct. 



ledes-man, lo desman, III, 74, 369; 88, 369: guide. 

ledyt, I, 242, 11, old imperative plural : lead. 

lee, lea, 1, 100, 4; III, 171, 9; 174, 20: untilled ground, 
grass land, open plain, ground. 

lee, lie lee, IV, 26, 5: untilled. lay lee, V, 189 b, lay 
waste. 

lee, adj., the (this, a) lee-lang, lief-lang day, I, 100, 11, 
12; 440, 3; II, 96, 1 2: (Old Eng. the leeve longe day) 
livelong, from A. S. le'of, used like German lieb in 
der liebe lange tag, die liebe lange nacht. So lee, le, 
lei, ley, licht o the moon, I, 389, 5; II, 188 f., 4, 14, 35; 
195, 37; 233, P l; 374, B 3; 413, 7, as in die liebe sonne, 
der liebe mond, regen, wind, and other formulas in 
great variety, (lee licht o the moon is replaced, II, 
103 f., 10, 12; 106, 10, by hie light, ae light.) 

lee, v., lie, mentiri. 

lee, II, 256, K 5: live. 

lee, v., love. See lea, love. 

leech, IV, 426, ll: meant for leesh, and so spelt in 
another copy. 

leed, lied (A. S. beden), I, 207, 18; 430, 5, 9; II, 366, 
19; IV, 379, 14: talk. 

leed (A. S. le'od), III, 355, 3: man. pi. leeds, 6: people. 

leed, laid. 

leed, n., II, 366, 37: lead. 

leedginge, II, 58, 7: leeching, doctoring. 

leeft,pret., IV, 220, l: lived. 

leel, loyal, faithful, etc. love me leel, I, 345, 9: faith 
fully. See leal. 

lee-lang. See lee. 

leemin, II, 361, 33: gleaming. ,' 

leems, IV, 460 a, No 47: gleams; but langs, belongs, 
is the word required; cf. I, 430, 6. 

leen, lean, her, your leen, him leen, IV, 291 b; 345, 9; 
V, 171, 2, 6: lone. See lane. 

leepe, leap, pret. of leap, loup, II, 445, 76; V, 227, 17. 

lees, leeze, me on thee, III, 495 a, after 7; IV, 517, 
15: blessings on, commend me to. (lees me, origi 
nally leeve is me, dear is to me, my delight is.) 

leese, III, 37, 75; 189, 4; 228, 17; 374, 3: lose. 

leesin, IV, 465, 22: a lie. See leasing(e). 

leesome, I, 182-3; IV, 432, 2; 455, 18; V, 178, l: lovely, 
pleasing, leesome blew the wind, IV, 410, 10: pleas 
antly. 

leeve, leve, leave, lefe, lieve, live, adj., II, 305, 13; 
414, 24; V, 227, 13: lovely, dear, pleasant; camp, leifer, 
leuer, 1, 328, 43; III, 24, 35; 189, A 9; 297, 42; 436 f., 10, 
25; V, 83, 51. epithet of London, II, 265, 5, 12; 440, 
14; III, 276, l; 284, 6, 7; 330, 16; 406, 35; V, 227, 8. So, 
lovely London, III, 352, l; 355, 7. lilly Londeen, 
IV, 485, 19. whether he were loth or lefe, III, 67, 
225 (properly, him were): disagreeable or agree 
able; here, unwilling or willing. For had lever see 
leuer. 

leeve, III, 105, 15: believe. 

leeve, III, 287, 62: grant. 

leeze. See lees. 

lefe, III, 28, 128: pleasing, agreeable. Ill, 67, 226: 
pleased. See leefe. 



GLOSSARY 



353 




leffe (A. S. Isefan), wolde not leffe beheynde, III, 112, 
60: remain. 

leg, V, 126 f., l, 2, 5, etc.: highwayman. 

legg, V, 275, 7: league. 

leguays lequays, V, 217, 12, 13: likewise. 

lei, ley, lei light o the moon, II, 188 f., 4, 14, 36; 195, 37. 
See lee, adj. 

leifer, leifar, III, 436 f., 10, 25; IV, 196, 13: rather. See 
leeve. 

leil. See leal. 

leiugh, low. See leaugh. 

leman, lemman, Old Eng. leof man, beloved (of both 
sexes). I, 232, 6, 7; 314, 2-4, 6; II, 271, 18; 273, 24, 
400, 6; IV, 151, B i, 2; 154, 2, 3; V, 283, 3: lover, 
paramour. I, 72, 30, 32; 117, 8; 254, 10; II, 73, 27, 28; 
81, 40; 289, B 2, 3; V, 248, 4; 283, 12: love, mistress, 
loose woman. 

lemanless, III, 434, 28: without lovers. 

lemaury, V, 25, 4: illicit love. 

len, v., lean. See lend. 

len, lene, III, 420 f., 30, 32, 34, 52; neither lee nor len, 
IV, 277, 15, 17: conceal. II, 164, 8, 11, 14: conceal, or 
lie. that cannot longer len, II, 403, 8: remain con 
cealed (but the reading should probably be, I cannot). 
See lain, lean. 

len, lene, III, 79, 40, si; V, 283, 14: lend, give, grant. 

lend, II, 229, 5, 8; III, 63 f., 153, 165; 82, 76; 85, 76; V, 
49, 21: grant, give. 

lend, n., II, 185, 38: loan. 

lend, I, 207, 19, lend ye till your pike-staff: we should 
no doubt read len = lean, lent, I, 223, 1 4: leaned. 

lende, III, 75, 395: dwell. 

lene, conceal. See len. 

lenger, lengre, III, 61, 105; 73, 341; 78, 443: longer. 

lenght, III, 478, 17: length. 

length, this length, IV, 271, A 4: for so long. 

lent,pret., I, 223, I 4: leaned. 

lequays, likewise. See leguays. 

lere (A. S. hle"or), III, 57, 28: cheek, face. 

lere, III, 57, 16; 77, 426: learn. 

lese, leese, III, 59, 56: lose. 

less (age), IV, 64 a: minor. 

less o him, I, 332, G l: smaller of him, than him. 

lesse, III, 296, 25: false, falsehood. 

lest, II, 81, 45 (reading in earlier MS. for rest) : last. 

lesynge, falsehood. See leasing(e). 

let, lat (A. S. Ijgtan), allow, leave. II, 54, 48; 265, 
8, 15, 24; III, 58, 38: omit, fail. pret. late, loot, lute, 
lett. p. p. latten, letten, lotten, looten, loot (?). 

let, lette (A. S. lettan), I, 334, 8; III, 110, 22, 23; 128, 
75; 307, 2: hinder. 

letten, p. p. of let, I, 87, 43; 452, 6: allowed, left. 

letters, letturs, III, 99, 55 (the kyng did hit vnf old) ; 

III, 297, 36: letter. 

leuch, luke, pret. of laugh, II, 30, K l; 81, 33; 366, 23; 

IV, 272, 9. 

leugh, n., lower part. See laugh. 
leugh, pret. of laugh, I, 388, A 7; II, 134, 21; in, 69, 
273; 467, 60; 490, 17. 
VOL. v. 45 



leugh, leaugh, lewgh, etc., IV, 465, 34, 38; 484 f., 8, 
10: low. 

leutye, lewte, IH, 64, 154, 169: loyalty, faith. 

leuve, 1, 17, 14: palm of the hand. See loof. 

leve, lave, m., II, 75, 20: rest. 

leue, v., Ill, 61, 112; 79, 76: permit, grant. 

levedys, I, 334, 9: ladies. 

leven, I, 324, 13; 325, 12: lawn, glade, open ground in 
a forest. See launde. 

leuer, leifer, pleasanter, preferable, rather, had leuer, 
HI, 24, 35; 189, A 9; 297, 42; 436 f., 10, 25; V, 83, 61. 
See leeve. 

lewde (lye), in, 171, 8: base, vile. 

lewgh, low. See leaugh. 

lewte. See leutye. 

ley, lea, lee, III, 109, 4; for a' his father's leys, II, 
333, ll; 334, M 4; riding the leys, IV, 137, 34: land 
not under cultivation, simply land, plain, field, lands 
and ley, V, 157, 2: arable land and pasture; a com 
mon phrase in Scots conveyancing, " all and whole the 
lands and leas." 

ley-land, I, 15, ll; 16, B 11: land lying lea, not under 
cultivation. See lay-land. 

ley licht. See lei, lee. 

leyngger, V, 80, 37: longer. 

leyt, V, 80, 37: lighted. 

leythe, III, 112, 62: light. 

liag, V, 237, 5: leg. 

libertie, lying at, II, 464, 11 : possessed in one's own 
right, unencumbered. 

liberty, lybertye, place of, II, 443, 39; 449, 44, 52: where 
one can fight without fear of interruption ? 

liberty-wife, II, 291, 2: mistress. 

licence, V, 155, C 3, make their licence free: pay the 
licence of an inn-keeper. 

licht, I, 146, 19, 20: alight, lichted, lichtit, II, 92, 16; 
IV, 195, D 2; 337 b, g after 20. 

lichter, I, 21 b, 8; U, 105, 10: delivered. See lighter. 

lichtlie, lichtly, lightly, IV, 94, 3; 98, 8; 100, 7; 337 a, 
g 16: make light of, treat, or speak of, with disre 
spect. 

lick, II, 470, 45: gratuity (of meal from the miller). 

lick, III, 163, 87: take for one's self; cf. II, 470, 45. 

lidder, lither, III, 464, l: lazy, as adv., 467, b l: ex 
cessively. (A. S. lyore, bad.) 

lie, ly, lye, 1, 103, 10; III, 123, 5; 432, 17; V, 191, 6: re 
side, live. 

lie, lee, lea, love. See lea. 

lie, m, 301, E: lea. 

lie, thou lie, IV, 197, 17: for thou liest, ye lie. 

lied (A. S. l&den), I, 430, 6, 9: language, talk. See 
leed. 

lied, pret., V, 220, 6: loved. 

lief-lang. See lee-lang, under lee. 

liel, I, 70, 24: chaste. See leal. 

lien, p. p., II, 135, 32: lain, she 's nouther pin'd nor 
lien, IV, 484, after 25: has not been lying bed-rid, 
does not look like one who has long been confined to 
bed. 



GLOSSARY 



lierachie, III, 319, 20: hubbub. " leerach=the bottom 

of a dung-pit after the dung has been removed, but 

left in a filthy state. The word is used to signify 

anything in a disordered state. Hence, confusion, 

hubbub." Rev. Walter Gregor. 
lieugh, low. See leaugh. 
lieve,'II, 345, 34: dear. See leeve. 
life, leaf, 
life, man of life, II, 244, 10: man alive (Chaucer's lives 

man). 

lift, I, 370, 16; 440, 18; II, 26, 14: air, sky. 
lift, V, 82, 37: lifted, 
lig, ligg, ligge, lygge, imperat., I, 328, 36; II, 437, 72; 

439, 4, 7; IV, 396, 6; inf., Ill, 212, 17: lay. 
lig, ligge, lygge, I, 328, 38-41; II, 244, 6, 7: lie. 
light, jore*., 11,46, 38; 54,49; V,53,93: lighted, alighted. 

See lyght. 

light, III, 156, i: corruption of lith, listen, 
lighter, of a bairn, I, 86 f., 7, 8, 16, 17, 24, 25, 43; II, 

98, 35; 108, 12; 109, 11; 115, 23; 117, 10, ll; 118, 13; 

123, 25, 26: delivered. (Icel. verSa le'ttari, Old Eng. 

to lighten.) lighter a dochter, II, 132, 15 : ellipsis of 

of. See lichter. 
lightly, lightlie, lyghtly(e), III, 23 ff., ll, 41, 45, 61, 

V, 82, 36: quickly. Ill, 35, 35: easily. V, 84, 3: 

for slight reason, 
lightly, lichtlie, -ly, III, 472, 10; IV, 351, 2, 9: treat 

with disrespect. IV, 92, 2: slight (in love). IV, 

94, 3; 98, 8; 100, 7; 103, M 1; IV, 337 a, g 16: speak 

disparagingly of. 
like, liken, like to be dead (dee), II, 58, 7; 372, 24; 

III, 386, 7; 392, 6; 394, J 4; 395, M 2 (cf. L 2): in 
a condition, in a fair way, or likely, liker, II, 97, 22: 
more likely (?). See lyken. 

like, III, 355, 13; 358, 60, 80; 360, 109, ill: please. Ill, 
400 a, (7) : be pleased, satisfied. 

likesome, II, 433, 5, 6, 8; 440, 23; 442, 4; 446, 89: pleas 
ing, lovely. 

lilt, I, 187 b; IV, 266, 16: to sing cheerfully, lilted, 

IV, 95, 3: sang, chanted. 

lily, lilly, lilye, lillie, liley, lillie, lea, lee, lie, I, 325, 
B 11; III, 299,8,11; 300, 25; 301, 32, E; 435, 2; IV, 
454, 6; 455, 14; 458, 7; V, 244, 16, 19; lillie leven, I, 
324, 13; 325, C 12; lilly bank, brae, IV, 220, 13, 14: 
explained as " overspread with lilies or flowers," but 
clearly from A. S. le'oflfc, Old Eng. lefly, etc., lovely, 
charming. So, lilly feet (i. e. leely), I, 130, E 13; 
lily leesome thing, IV, 432, 2. We have lilly Lon- 
deen, IV, 485, 19= the frequent leeve London, lovely 
London. See leeve, lee-lang. 

limmer (French limier, a kind of hound), a term of 
opprobrium, or simply of dislike. II, 322, 6; III, 
466, 47: wretch (m. or/.), rascal, limmer thieves, 
439 f., 4, 20; 441, 34. limmer loon, IV, 146, 15, 17. 
of a woman, II, 219, 9: jade. 

lin. See linn. 

Lin, Linn, Linne, Line, Lyne, a stock ballad-locality 
(like Linkum): I, 78, 38; 466, 5; 478 f., 5, 10, 16, 34; 
H, 240, 2; 290, 19; IV, 379, 18; 381, 12; 382, 15; V, 



14, 1 ff.; 182 f., 2, ll, 29; 219, 6; thro Linkum and 
thro Lin, II, 124, 37. 

lin, III, 105, n; 174, 15: stop. 

lin'd, III, 164, 91 : beat. 

ling, lyng, III, 3, 6; 7, 5; 99, 53: a species of rush, or 
thin long grass, bent grass, Scotland ; in England, 
heath, furze. 

lingcaii, I, 299, 5: lichame, body. 

linger, I, 334, 8: longer. 

Linkem. See Linkum. 

linkin, linken, IV, 332 b; V, 124, 4; 240, l: tripping, 
walking with a light step, on a horse, II, 285, ll. 
linking ladie, IV, 355 b : light of movement, key 
gaed linking in, V, 18, b 23: passing in quickly, slip 
ping in. 

linkit his armour oer a tree, III, 270, E 7, compar 
ing A 9; B 8; D 8, and observing the crooked carle 
in E 8, seems likely to be corrupt, and perhaps we 
should read leaned his arm out-oer. Otherwise, hung 
his armor, etc. 

Linkum, an indefinite ballad-locality, not a bell in 
merry Linkum, II, 106, 21, 22. thro Linkum and 
thro Lin, II, 124, 37. cock crew i the merry Linkem, 
II, 239, B 4. a the squires in merry Linkum, IV, 
432,1. 

linn, lin, lynn(e), water-course, torrent, river, pool in 
a river (A. S. hlynna, torrens): I, 303, D 4; II, 147, 
9; 153, 24; III, 274, 1. of a mill-stream, I, 129, D 
6. o'er the linne, II, 282 f., 9, 17, 18; IV, 479, 10 (= 
in the lynn, IV, 479, 5); II, 283, 8, 9: over the bank 
into. 

Linnen, II, 225, D 3: Lunnon, London. 

linsey, linsey-woolsey. 

lint, IV, 433, 32: linen, linen mutch or cap. 

lippen on me, II, 94, 10: depend, to God, III, 269, 
12; to good = God, V, 243, 15: trust. 

lirk, IV, 198, 2: crease, hollow. 

lish, leash. 

list, n., Ill, 137, 2; 181, 16: inclination. 

list, v., Ill, 171, 9; 179, 4; 311, 19: desire, be disposed. 
pret. list, III, 171, 11. impersonal, me list, III, 97, 9. 
See lyste. 

lith, lyth, I, 135, O 15, 17; 345, C 4; II, 412, l; 413, 8: 
member, joint. 

lith, I, 334, 7: light. 

lith, lithe, lythe (Icel. hlyoa), I, 334, 10; in, 22, 5; 
198, l; 411, l: hearken. 

lither, II, 54, 51 ; 138 f., 9, 13, 22, 23: bad. See lidder. 

Litle Brittaine, I, 284 f., 4, 24, 33, 37: generally under 
stood as French Brittany, but it is inexplicable that 
Arthur should be reigning there. Perhaps Litle 
means no more in this piece than in Litle England, 

II, 440, 20, 22; III, 278, 34; 285, 27; Litle London, 

III, 285, 22; Litle Durham, III, 285 f., 29, 39, 40. All 
these places, it will be observed, are in the Percy 
MS. 

live, leave. 

live, V, 227, 13: dear. 

live best, IV, 146, 2: are the best of those living. 



GLOSSARY 



355 



lively, I, 184, 47: alive, 
liuer, adj., Ill, 180, 10: deliver, agile, 
lluerance, III, 411, 8: payment for delivering, 
livery-man, I, 419, i; 421, l: servant, 
liues, II, 59, 25: 'lieves, believes. 

liuor, III, 411 f., 8, 9, 10, 14: deliver, hand over, sur 
render. 

load, III, 267, 10: loaded (with liquor), 
leaden, p. p. of load, IV, 395, A b 5. 
loan, lone, a common, any free or uncultivated spot 

where children can play or people meet, even the 

free spaces about a house: II, 62 a, 14, 16; 140, l; V, 

118, 2. (loan-head, IV, 285, 11, is toun-head in the 

original.) 
locked, lockit, in a glove, II, 461, 21; 464, 6; 477, D 

17: fastened, 
lockerin, comes lockerin to your hand, IV, 213, 14; 

lockren, V, 258 b, 7: curling, closing as if to em 

brace. 

loddy, IV, 70 f., G 4, 5, etc.: laddy. 
lodder, loder, V, 283, 6, 16: louder, 
lodesman. See ledesman. 
lodging-maill, III, 474, 38: rent for lodging, 
lodly, I, 285 f., 31, 43, 56; II, 44, 12: loathly, disgusting, 
lodomy, IV, 398 f., 9, 34: laudanum. 
loe, loie, loy, lou, v., I, 438, 10; V, 221, 9; 260, 13; 

272 b, 3, 7, 11; 277, l, 4: love. See lea. 
loffe, n. and v., V, 79, 26, 28: love, 
logie, IV, 175, N 11: lodge, 
loie, loy, love. See loe. 
lome, II, 44, 12: lame man. 
lone, n., II, 333, l; 489, 17. See loan, 
long, tall. Long Lankyn, Long lamie, II, 328, l, etc.; 

Ill, 358, 63, 65, etc. 

long of, II, 436, 53; III, 98, 22: owing to, the fault of. 
loo, love, II, 408, 23. pret. lood, II, 417, 2; 419, 62. 

See lea. 
lood, loud, 
loof, looff, lufe, luve, leuve, 1, 15, 15; 16, B 16, C 16; 

17, 14; 18, F 9; 19, 14; III, 374, 8: palm of the hand. 

(Icel. I6fi.) 

looke, IV, 503, 12: look up. 
loon. See loun. 
loord. See lourd. 
loose, V, 300, No 191: lose, 
loot, bend. See lout. 
loot, pret. of let, I, 68, 7; 204, 19: allowed. 
loot, p. p. (?) of let, I, 351, 49; III, 436, 13; IV, 33, 26: 

allowed, allowed to come, 
looten, p.p. of let, II, 168,8: allowed (to come). See 

lotten. 
lope, pret. of loup, II, 59, 30; 434 f., 28, 47; 436, 58; III, 

479, 39. 
lord nor loun, III, 301, 32: man of high or low rank. 

In II, 159, 26, lord is a wrong reading; rogue nor 

loun, or the like, is required, as in 160, 20. 
lordane, lurden, III, 25, 61 : dolt, clodpoll, etc. 
lore, lorne, III, 59, 51; V, 79, 32: lost, 
loset, III, 94, 52: loosed, delivered. 



loss, V, 200 a, 65; 262, No 223, 10; 277, 6: lose. 

lotten, p. p. of let, I, 87, 38: allowed. See looten. 

loudly, in, 440, 12: loud. 

lough, loughe, pret. of laugh, II, 54, 58; 444, 48; V, 
254 b, 2. See leuch, leugh. 

lou&ht, pret. of laugh, HI, 82, 74; V, 61, 55. 

loukynge, V, 283, 17 : expectation, hope deferred. 

loun, lown, lowne, loon, IV, 501, 36, 37: a person of 
low rank, laird or (nor) loun (lown), I, 69, 40, 41; 
71, 32; in, 435, P 8; IV, 514, 12. lord nor (or) loun 
(lowne), III, 301, 32; 430, 13; 435, E 5; 436, 6, 8. 
IV, 11, 2; 519, H 2, I 2: rogue, often a mere term 
of general disparagement (as in, English loun): (of 
a man) II, 118, 3, 4; 140, 25; V, 171, 4; (woman) I, 
100, so; 491, G 24, H 22. fellow, without disparage 
ment, IV, 258, 21. naughty girl, II, 419, 37. mis 
tress, concubine, whore, II, 181 b; IV, 14, 13; 330 a, 
3; 332 b; 469, 3; 519, 9; 520, 13. See lown. 

loup, I, 102, D 3; II, 464, l; IV, 44 f., 14, 15, 17, 23; 47, 
4, 5: leap. pret. lap, leap, leepe, lope, loup, louped. 
p. p. loupen, luppen. loupin, V, 213, 3, has been ex 
plained as a form of leeping, heating (warming her 
self over the coal; cf. cowering oer a coal, I, 304, 2). 
We have, however, whisking ore the coal, I, 302, 4; 
reeking (=raiking) oer the coal, 304 E 3; and across 
agrees better with leaping than with heating. 

loup, pret. of lonp, II, 461, 5. 

loupen, louped, p. p. of loup, III, 465, 27; IV, 462, 36. 

lourd, loord, pret. and p. p. of lour = prefer, verb 
made from lever, rather. I had lourd, IV, 199, 18. 
I wad lourd have, IV, 7, 43. loord a had, V, 251, 36. 
I rather lourd it had been, II, 275 b. 

lout, loot, I, 56, B 12; 351, 36, 48; II, 401, C 5: bow, 
bend, lean. pret. louted, looted, louted in, I, 331, D 
5: bent our heads to enter ? louted twafauld, three- 
fauld, V, 242 b, 7: bent double, treble, p.p. louted, 
lootit, louten. 

louten, p. p. of lout, II, 168, 9: bent. 

love, I, 476, J 4: loaf. 

love-clapped, II, 165, 10; 169, 8; 171, 13; 370, 8; 371, 
8; IV, 392, 8; V, 277, 8: embraced lovingly, caressed. 

loverd, I, 243 f., l, 6, 17: lord. 

louesome, III, 431, 30 : lovely. 

lov(e)ly, louelie, epithet of London: III, 199, 19; 
310, 6i; 352, l; 355, 7. See leeve. 

low, lowe, I, 211, 35; III, 93, 46: hill. 

low, lowe, III, 435, P 5, 10; 436 f., 13, 20, 24, 34; IV, 
47, 5; 514, 8: flame. 

low, lowe, pret. of laugh, III, 110, 16; 112, 63; V, 
78, 4. See lowhe. 

lowe, doggs bite soe, III, 342, 66: a phrase for, take 
mean advantages. 

lowe, bye lerbord or by lowe, IV, 504, 30: loof, luff, 
the after part of a ship's bow (Falconer, Marine 
Dictionary) ; or perhaps the weather side. See leaf. 

lowhe, low, lowe, pret. of laugh, V, 80, 44, 46-J8. 

lown, IV, 304, 8, 9: must mean here a young man in a 
low social position, since there can be no question of 
her kissing a disreputable fellow. There is no proper 



356 



GLOSSARY 



contrast with lad, and probably we should read, laird 

nor lown (see loun). 
lowse, loose, free, 
loyed, V, 221, 9: loved, 
lucettes, III, 297, 46: luces, pikes. 
Luckenbooths, V, 162, C 7: a range of buildings 

which formerly stood in the thoroughfare of the High 

Street in Edinburgh, parallel to Saint Giles Church, 
lue, loe, loo, lou, loie, lea, lee, lie, v., love. See lea. 
lufe, luve, leuve, loof, I, 16, C 16; 17, 14; 19, 14; III, 

374, 8: palm of the hand, 
lugs, I, 302, A 10; IV, 63, 11; 296, 8; V, 102, B 15; 

103 b, 15: ears, 
luid, III, 370, 19: loved, 
luke, pret. of laugh, V, 238, 28. 
lum, V, 125, 3, 9: chimney, 
luppen, p. p. of loup, leap, I, 55, A 3, B 3; IV, 444, 

26; 470, 30; 518, 8. 

lurden, lor dan, III, 35, 18: dolt, clodpoll. 
luscan, a sturdy beggar (and thievish), III, 519 a. 
lust, V, 213 a, l: a bundle, (last, a measure, as twelve 

dozen hides or skins, etc. ?) 

lust, III, 56, 6; 85 and 89, 446; 332, 13: inclination, dis 
position, thy lustes to full fyll, III, 90 b: wishes. 

att his owne lust, III, 332, 13: pleasure, 
lute, pret. of lett, IV, 345, 8: allowed. V, 248, 15: let 

down. 

luve, palm of the hand. See loof. 
ly, lye, IV, 261, 24; V, 168 f., l, 2, 3, etc.: live, dwell. 

pret. lyed. 
lyand, lying. 

lyart, IV, 7, 36: grizzled, gray, 
lybertye, apoint a place of, II, 443, 39; 449, 44, 52: a 

place where the two can fight freely, without risk of 

interruption ? 
lye. See ly. 

lyed, II, 266, 28: lay, lived. See ly. 
lygge, ligge, I, 328, 38-41: lie. See lig. 
iygse, lay. See lig. 
lyghte, lyght, I, 327, 21; III, 297, 33: alighted. See 

light. 

lightly(e). See lightly. 

lyke, I, 327, 22; in, 28, 121; 64, 165; 76, 417: please, 
lyke, I, 506, 3, 8, 9; II, 295, 8; IV, 236, 30: lyke-wake, 

watching of a dead body. In II, 117, 16: simply, 

death-scene, 
lyke-wake, I, 251, B 4, 6, 7; II, 282, 14; III, 495 b, 

21; IV, 516 f., 1, 7, 18: watch of a dead body, dead 

lyke-wake, I, 251, B 4, 5: wake for your death. See 

lyke, leak, leak-(lake-)wake. 
lyken, participle, IV, 511 b, X 6: about, at the point. 

See like, liken, 
lynde, lyne, III, 75, 398; 91, 2; 92, 22; 93, 33; 97, 10; 

98, 23; 100, 76, 78: linden, tree. 
lyne. See lynde. 
lyne. See lin. 

lyng, III, 99, 53: heath. See ling, 
lyon, III, 344, 33; 349, 33: the royal standard (quite 

out of place here). 



lyste, me lyste, III, 78, 446: it would please me, I 

should like. See list, 
lyth, lyth, lithe (Icel. hlySa), III, 56, l; 63, 144, 70, 282; 

71, 317: hearken, 
lyth, member. See lith. 
lyuer, III, 362, 82: leever, rather. 
lyueray, III, 59, 70 : present of clothes. Ill, 64, 161 : 

purveyance of drink. 

M 

ma, III, 490, 15, 27, 29: bit, whit. 

Mable, booke of, 111,422, 61: some book of predictions, 
like Thomas Rymer's. 

made, a lie, I, 478, 25: told. 

made, men, III, 406, 37: raised, made a bow o bere, V, 
264 a, 2: contributed. 

mae, III, 301, E; 349, 46; IV, 490, 27: more. 

maen, mane, meen, n., II, 107, 2: moan. 

magger of, in the, III, 307, l: in spite of, maugre. 

maick, make, mate. 

maid, may, used loosely of a young wife: II, 300, 6, 8; 
307, 33; V, 227, 7. So K^pi], irapMvos, in Homer, of a 
young wife, and puella of married woman often. 

maid of a place, as, maid of the Cowdenknows, IV, 
200, 12, 13; 202, J 2, 3; 203, 8; 205, 14: the eldest 
daughter of the tenant or proprietor, who is gener 
ally called by the name of his farm. 

maid alone, II, 149, 2: solitary, like burd-alone, I, 298, 
2 (which, however, is there used of a man). 

maiden, IV, 30 a: an instrument for beheading, re 
sembling the guillotine. 

maigled, IV, 41, note *: mangled. 

maik. See make. 

mail, rent, lodging-maill, III, 474, 38. 

main, man o the main, is it to a man o the might, or 
till a man o the main, II, 403, 7, 8: main can have no 
sense distinct from might, and man of the might, man 
of the main, is simple verbiage. In B 4, H 6, we 
have, to a man of micht or a man of mean: man of 
mean cannot be wrenched into man of low degree, 
and we do not want that sense even if we could legit 
imately get it, for the antithesis is not between the 
man of micht and the man of mean degree, but be 
tween both these and the robber or robbers of the 
last half of the stanza. The stall copy, 405, 5, 6, 
having only grammar in mind, reads man (one) that 's 
mean, and but for rhyme might perhaps have gone 
so far as, a man of means. IV, 146, 21, reads, man 
o mine, to avoid the difficulty. See mean. 

main, n., IV, 473, 39: moan. See mane. 

ma-i-ntn, V, 303 a: maintain, support. 

mair, IV, 21, 14: more, bigger. 

mairly. IV, 59 f., d 2; e 2, g 2: a rhyme used for mair. 

maist, II, 169, 7: almost. 

maistly, I, 138 b, d 5: mostly, almost. See mostly. 

make, maik, maicke, 1, 127, 14; 128, ll: 129, D 8; 347, 
23, 30; 348, 11, 17: mate, consort. I, 403, 12; II, 46, l; 
IV, 344, 7; V, 184, 44: match, like; and so in, what is 
my lineage or what is my make, IV, 341, D 8. 



GLOSSARY 



357 



make, III, 37, 67: for made, p. p. 

making, IV, 208, 3: doing, deportment. 

maks, V, 307 b: makes. 

male, III, 63, 134; 68, 247, 255: (O. Fr. male) trunk, 
male-hors, III, 74, 374. 

mall, with the leaden mall, III, 357, 42: mallet, ham 
mer (referring to the weight of his stroke). 

mallasin, malison. 

man, V, 191, 8, 12: vassal. V, 304 b, 3: husband. 

man, mane, maun, mun, I, 16, B 8, 9, 12-16; 146, 5, 6; 
V, 197, 12; 219, 29; 220, 4; 248, 12, 13: must. 

mane, maen, main(e), meane, meen, I, 72, 20; 448, 
A l, 3; etc.: moan, complaint, lament; often nothing 
more than utterance, enunciation, as, I, 253, l; 394, 
A 2; 395, C 4; III, 489, l. 

mane, v., I, 72, 23: moan. See mean. 

maney, III, 109, 4: meny, followers. See mene. 

mang, I, 108, 6: among. 

manhood, manhead, manheed, men (man) o your, 
men to your, I, 108, 14; 109, 13; IV, 446 f., 14: a 
strange way of saying, if you are men (man) of 
true valor, willing to fight one by one. Ill, 422, 
69: manly deed, exploit demanding courage. 

manie, mennie, V, 270, 8: maunna, must not. 

mankie, V, 173, 3: calamanco, a stuff made in the Low 
Countries. 

manratten, manrydden (A. S. manrsSden), III, 359, 
95; 362, 95: homage, vassalage. 

manrent, IV, 34 b: homage, vassalage. See manrat 
ten. 

mans worn, I, 394, 3; IV, 442, 10: perjured. 

marchandise, III, 92, 22: dealing. 

march-man, III, 296, 8: one who lives on the march, 
or border. 

March-parti, Marche-partes, III, 310, 58, 67: Border- 
part, -parts, Border, Borders. 

marie, III, 491, 14: mare. 

marie. See mary. 

mark, II, 62 b, 11; 132, 29; IV, 202, K 2: murky, the 
mark, II, 164, 3. See mirk. 

marke, merk, I, 394 ff., B l; C 2; III, 68, 243, 246; 69, 
270: two thirds of a pound. 

marke hym, III, 297, 44: commit himself by signing 
the cross. 

marries, IV, 487, 25: maids. See mary. 

marrow, I, 147, 5; 148, G 4; 149, I 4; IV, 165, 13; 168, 
2; V, 41, 16: (of man or woman) mate, husband, wife. 
IV, 165, 8, 9; B 2; 166, 2, 3; 167, D 6; 169, 5, 6; 170, 
G 3; H 3: match, equal in rank, equal antagonist, 
bear ye marrow, 169, 4: should perhaps be, be your 
marrow, as in 170, G 3. 

mary, marie, marrie, marry, II, 369, 13, 15, 19, 20; 
370, is, 14, 17; 371, 14, 15, 20, 21, etc.; 390, 25; 391, 19; 
IV, 487, 25; 489, 26 : a queen's lady, maid-of-honor 
(cf. Ill, 381 b ; 385, 18; 386, 19; etc.), maid (like 
abigail). 

mary mild, IV, 213, 13: marigold; cf. V, 259, 5. 

Mas (James Melvine), III, 471 a: Magister, Mr. Mess 
James Murray, V, 196, 51 : see Mess. 



masar, maser, HI, 65, 175; 83, 86, 175: a drinking-ves- 
sel, of wood, especially of knotty-grained maple, often 
mounted with bands or rings of precious metals. See 
Way's note, Prompt. Parv., p. 328. 

mass, in the frequent formula, when bells were rung 
and mass was sung and a' men bound to bed, II, 70, 
21, etc. : a domestic religious service at the end of the 
day. evening-mass, II, 168, A 4. 

mast, maste, III, 296 f., 22, 31; V, 79, 22: mayst. 

master-man, II, 16, 2: captain of a ship. V, 191, 19: 
chief. 

masteryes, make, III, 92, 27: do feats of skill. 

mat, matt, mat he (ye) dee! wae mat fa, mat(t) 
worth ! = mot, in the sense of may: II, 27, 7, 10; 
472, 25, 33; IV, 391, 6; 392, 9, 21; 428, 6; V, 166, 10; 
306, 10. See met. 

maught, maugt, might. 

maugre, maugre in theyr teethe, III, 67, 225: in spite 
of. 

maun, I, 16, B 8, 9, etc.; C 7-10, etc.; 17, D 6-7, etc.; 
146, 5, 6; 183, 25, 26: must. 71, 39 in pret. sense. See 
man, mun. 

maunna, I, 185, 25: must not. See manie. 

mavosie, I, 465, 8: mavis, song-thrush. 

maw, sea-maw, II, 360, 3; 363, 7; 365, 5; IV, 482, 6: 
sea-mew, gull. 

maw, v., I, 427, 13, 15: mow. 

mawys, I, 326, 2: mavis, song-thrush. 

may, mey, 1, 115, B i, 3, etc.; 173 f., 6, 10; III, 93, 39; 
286, 45; IV, 432, 9; 515, 2: maid. 

may, optative, frequently put after the subject, as, 
Christ thy speed may bee ! thou mayst sune be! I 
may be dead ere morn ! Ill, 355 f., 5, 23; 359, 87; 
370, 8, n; IV, 365, 18. 

may be is, like can be: II, 448, 33; 451, 100. might 
be = was, III, 452, 10. (So, possibly, might see, I, 
434,30.) 

may gold, III, 497, 13: marigold. 

mayue, strength. 

maystry, mastery. 

me, I, 243 f., 5, 15: men, French on. 

me, ethical dative, sawe I me, etc., Ill, 65, 184; 68, 249; 
75, 381; 79, 147; 80, 169. 

meal, III, 163, 77: meal-bag. 

meal, II, 230, 14, 15; 362, 36: mold, dust, earth. See 
meel. 

mean, man of, I, 358, 30; II, 233, F 3; 400, 4, 5; 404, 
6, 7; V, 36, B 8, 9: mere verbiage, I judge; mean looks 
like an attempt to escape from main, which see. (man 
of mean, II, 233, F 3, not being joined with man of 
might, might be understood as, man of main, or vio 
lent man.) 

mean, meane, meen, v., I, 426, 5; V, 246, 4, 6: moan, 
lament. I, 388, A 7, 10 : bemoan, lament the state of. 
not to mean, V, 160, 2: not to be pitied, mean, V, 
160, l, is doubtful, but the verb corresponding to 
moan is to be preferred. See mane, menyd. 

mean, n., moan. See meen. 

meany, III, 307, 3, 10: troop. See mene. 



358 



GLOSSARY 



meateu, meeten, II, 434, 17; III, 33, 158: measured. 

meathe, IV, 378, 9; 380, 17: landmark. 

meatrif, III, 163, 87: abounding in food. 

meckle, meikle, muckle, IV, 513, 6, 7 : much. 

medder, V, 221, 11: mother. 

medill-erthe, I, 327, 27. See middle-earth. 

meed, I, 68, 10, 14; II, 172, 33: mood, heart, state of 

feeling, 
meed, warld's meed, I, 108, 14; IV, 446 f., 14: seems 

to be corrupted from mate (make). Woreldes make 

is a familiar phrase in Old English, and not unfre- 

quent in ballads, 
meel, meel or mor, III, 281, 8, 10: mold, earth, ground; 

but perhaps an error for mede, mead. See meal. 
meen, v., moan, lament. See mean, v. 
meen, mean, I, 427, 5; II, 124, 39; 417, 11; III, 389, 

12, 13 : lamentation. See mane, 
meen, I, 222, 8; 315, 8; IV, 416, 10: moon, 
meet, I, 148, P 10: (causative) pass, put, thrust in. 
meet, meete, II, 46, 45: even, equal. II, 229, 13: scant, 

close, and so, perhaps, II, 436, 61. 
meeten, meateu, II, 434, 17: measured, by measure. 

See met. 

meiht, I, 243, 3: mayst. 
meikle, meickle, mickle, muckle, I, 72, 24, 25; 86, 

2, 3; 309 f., 2, 4; 330, A 3, B 3; IV, 514, 5: much, 

great, 
meisseine, V, 132, 7: spanker, or perhaps, Fr. misaine, 

foresail, 
mell, I, 299, 6; 304, 10; F 6; 305, 12; V, 108, B 6: mall, 

wooden hammer, beetle, 
mell, IV, 177 b, I 7: mail, 
mell, III, 172, 24: meddle. 
meller's hoops, I, 304, P 5: mill-casings, the circular 

wooden frames which surround mill-stones, 
melten (goud), IV, 471, 37: molten, 
mene, menye, meany, menyie, meyne, maney, 

monie, III, 72, 335: followers, band, 
menement, V, 242, 9, ll, 13: amendment, 
menji, menji feathers in her hat, V, 163, 13: many, 
mennie, mauie, V, 270, 8: maunna, must not. 
mensked, I, 334, ll: honored, dignified. 
meuyde (of hir songe), I, 326, 2: moaned, uttered, de 
livered. See mean, 
menye, menyie, household, retinue, people: III, 91 a; 

IV, 127, 4, 5. See mene. 
mere, IV, 493, 21: more. 
meri. See mery. 
merk, marke, I, 394 f., B i, C 2: two thirds of a 

pound. 

merk. See merkes. 
merk, v., mark, merked them one, III, 297, 47: took 

their aim at. 

merkes, III, 75, 397: distances between the bounds, 
merke-soote, I, 334, 4: mark-shot, distance between 

the marks (cf. Ill, 75, 397), from bow to target, bow 
shot. 
merlion, merlyon, II, 45, 21, 33: merlin, the smallest 

of British falcons. 



merrily e, III, 329, 11: in good or valiant fashion. So, 
nearly, IV, 477, 8. 

merry (men). See mery. 

merry Cock land, III, 250, l: corruption of the merry 
Scotland of 249, I, J, 1; 251, M, l; 252, O, 1. 

merrys, I, 327, 22: mars, marrest. 

mery, meri, merry, merrie, myrri, myrry (men), 
II, 386, 12; III, 66, 205; 71, 316; 73, 340; 97, 9; 114, 
121, 131; 116, 2; 285 f., 30, 48; 309, 37; 330, 17; 430, 5; 
431, 4; 432, 2; 433, 2; IV, 234, 39; V, 191, 4, 14: a 
standing phrase for followers, companions in arms. 

mese, I, 328, 45: course (at table). 

mese, III, 484 a, 16: mitigate. 

Mess, an epithet said to be contemptuous for a priest 
or parish minister (as one who says, or said, mass), 
so Mess John,,IV, 442, 10, 12; but there is no reason 
to suppose disrespect in V, 196, 51. See Mas. 

mestoret, V, 80, 42: needed. 

met, I, 324, 3; IV, 455, 4; V, 195, 9: mat, may. See 
mat. 

m.et,pret. of mete, III, 60, 73: measured, p. p. met, 
mete, HI, 60, 72; 203, 17; IV, 465, 23; 467, 13. 

methe, meat. 

mett, meet. 

met-yard, III, 105, 27: measuring-rod. 

mey, V, 161, 9: maid. See may. 

meyne, III, 27, 96; 58, 31; 61, 95, 97; 76, 419: retinue, 
suite, household, company, body of people. See 
mene. 

mey the, III, 112, 59: might. 

micht, v., V, 299, 4: might. 

micht'll, might well. 

mickle, great, much. See meikle. 

midder, mideer, mother. 

middle-earth, medill-erthe, 1, 327, 27; II, 69, 25: (A. S. 
middangeard, middaneard), earth (conceived as being 
the middle of the universe; see miogarSr in Vig- 
fusson). 

middle stream, III, 125, 19: middle of the stream. 

middle waist, IV, 523, 6: middle of his waist. 

mid-larf, crowing a, II, 230, 5, 8: corrupt (changed by 
Scott to merry midnight). Taking into account the 
young cock crew i the merry Linkem, II, 239, B 4, 
midlarf may stand for some locality (suggestion of 
Professor Kittredge). 

might be = was, III, 452, 10. See may, can. 

mild, maidens mild, II, 312, l; 314, C 1, D l; 316, l: 
meek, gentle, demure. So Mild Mary, II, 315, E 7; 
Mary(-ie) Mild, III, 395, M l, 3; 396, N l; 398 a, c 
4; Mary Mile, III, 386, 5, 6, 8. Corrupted to Moil, IV, 
507 b, 3 2; Miles, IV, 511 a, 5. myld(e) Mary, of 
the Virgin, III, 97, 7, 17; 98, 35: lenient, compassion 
ate, myld myjth, V, 283, 13. 

milk-dey, IV, 262, 26; 524, 6: dairy-woman. 

mill, mille, IV, 503, 13; 505, 45; V, 221, 15, 16; 224, 25: 
mile. 

millaine, I, 286, 42, 45: of Milan steel. See myllan. 

mill-capon, II, 477 b, D 27 : a poor person who asks 
charity at mills from those who have grain grinding, 



GLOSSARY 



359 






the alms usually given being a gowpen, or handful, 
of meal. 

millering, II, 467, 42: waste meal, sweepings of a mill 
(dust [which] lyes in the mill, II, 470, 43). 

mill-town, mill-toun, II, 471, 18; V, 238, 29: miller's 
steading or place. 

miln, I, 18, 11: mill. 

milner, mylner, III, 85, 4; 360, ill: miller. 

min. See mind. 

mind, II, 216, 12, 15; 218, 13, 16: recollection, her mind 
she keeped, II, 72, 13: did not forget what she had 
promised, for changing o her min, 81, 32: seems to 
mean, lest she should change her mind; but the sense 
is not striking. 

mind, mind o, on, I, 481, 26; IV, 194, 16, 9; 195, 15; 
196, 17; 197, 17, etc.: remember, pret. mind, I, 183, 30. 
mind of, on, mind to, I, 470, 16; IV, 403 f., 14, 28; 
437, 24: remind of. he mind't him on, V, 18, 5: re 
membered. 

minde, ffor the may dens loue that I haue most minde, 
II, 58, 5 : elliptical or corrupt. Comparing 59, 24 (where 
the MS. reads, wrongly, most meed) we see that for 
is not to be taken with minde. We must understand 
most in mind or most mind to or of, or, possibly, minde 
may be (from minnen, remember) had in mind. 

mlnge (A. S. myndgian), III, 355, 6; 362, 72 : utter, 
minged, II, 59, 21: didst name the name of, mention 
(or, perhaps, only bore in mind), myn, III, 358, 72. 

minikin, V, 201 b: little, pretty little. 

minion, I, 284, 12: dainty. 

minnie, minny, II, 473, 16, 17; IV, 69, 16; 294, C 9, 
10; V, 115, 9: mother. IV, 6, 15; V, 250, 14: dam. 

mint to, H, 469, si; IV, 493, 20; V, 28, 67; 238, 21: 
put out the hand towards, move towards, minted as, 
V, 9, 7: took a direction as if, made as if. 

mire, myre, I, 428, 13, 14; 429, 7, 8; III, 475 b: 
swamp, bog. mire an moss, bog, an miery hole, IV, 
22, 12; cf. 184, 5. 

mirk, myrke, mark, I, 326, 16; IV, 517, 14: dark. 

Mir ry -land toune, III, 244, B l: probably a corrup 
tion of the merry Lincoln of A 16, 17; 246, D 1; 251, 
Ll. 

miscarry me, IV, 267, ll: get me into trouble; fail, 
disappoint me (?). 

misgae, misgave. 

misgiding, V, 117, 15: ill treatment. 

misguide, misgiding, V, 117, 15; 119, 15: ill treat 
ment. 

miss, n., IV, 317, E 5; 325, C 5, D 3: mistress, whore. 

miss, n., II, 465, 4: wrong or injury. 

miss(e), v., I, 210, 12: omit, fail, miss your Wanton 
slack, IV, 22, 10, 12: fail to keep him tightly reined (?). 

mis-sworn, I, 395, C 5: mansworn, perjured. 

mister, myster, III, 450 a; IV, 268, 26; 464, 15: 
need, requirement, an exigency, misters, III, 164, 90: 
sorts of. 

mistkane, I, 105 a, 18, if not miswritten, seems to be 
simply a phonetic variation of mistane. 

mith, mithe, n., I, 334, 6, 7, 11: might. 



mith, mithe, v., II, 139, 10; IV, 493, 19: might, mith 
slain, II, 165, 23: might [have] slain. 

mode, I, 328, 47: spirit. 

modther, IV, 260, 3, 7: mother. 

mody, mudie, I, 334, 10: proud, high-spirited. 

mold, molde, mane of molde, I, 327, 20: earth, ouer 
the mold, into the Scottish mold, I, 433, 21, 23: land, 
country. I, 434, 37; II, 246, 7: ground. 

Moll Syms, 1, 126,13; IV, 448, 7: a well-known dance 
tune of the sixteenth century. 

mome, in, 352, 7: dolt. 

monaud, n., II, 87, 36: moaning. 

mone, I, 326, 1: moan, lamentation, complaint. See 
meen. 

mome, IV, 437, 2: menie, company, suite. See mene. 

montenans. See mountnaunce. 

monty, IV, 42 a, note : staircase. (Fr. monte'e.) 

mood, giue me, III, 105, 23: though give me my God 
looks like a bold change, it is not improbable. We 
have, yeve me my savyour, in the Romaunt of the 
Rose, 6436, le cors nostre Seigneur, 12105, Michel. 
And again: For it was about Easter, at what times 
maidens gadded abrode, after they had taken their 
Maker, as they call it. Wilson, Arte of Logike, fol. 
84 b. "In 1452 John Bulstone (of Norwich) be 
queathed to the church of Hempstede ' j pyxte, to 
putte owre lord god in.'" Academy, XL, 174. (These 
last two citations furnished by Prof. J. M. Manly.) 
Again, the Breton ballad, Ervoan Camus, Revue 
Celtique, II, 496, st. 6, has 'she has received my 
God.' (Dr F. N. Robinson.) See V, 297 a. 

moody-hill, moudie-hill, mould-hill, IV, 148 f., 48; 
150, g, h 48: mole-hill. 

mool, mools. See moul. 

morn, morrow, the morn, III, 480, 18; 482, 14; 488, 19; 
489, ll ; IV, 617, 18: to-morrow, the morn's morning, 
IV, 373, 8. 

mornin's gift, morning gift, II, 132, 32; 135, 28: 
gift made the morning after marriage. 

mort, III, 307, 8; IV, 26, 8: note on the horn to an 
nounce the death of deer. 

mose-water. See moss-water. 

moss, muss, mose, I, 78, 32; 99, 6; III, 4, 3, 48; 440, 
10; IV, 443 f., 6, 19; 445, 8: bog. 

moss-water, mose-water, II, 193, 21; 195, 83; V, 
224, 19: water of a peat-bog. 

most, I, 328, 50: greatest. 

mostly, maistly, IV, 242 b: almost. 

mot, I, 473, 5: must. 

mot, mote, I, 333, 2; HI, 7, 9; 68, 243; 75, 394; 113, 
81; IV, 137, 29; V, 82, 25, 27; 83, 44, 50, 53; 283, 3: may. 

mote, III, 68, 253: meeting. 

moten, molten. 

mothe, mouthe, I, 334, 4, 6: for meahte (mohte), 
might. 

mother-in-law, II, 71, ll; 72 f., 14, 15: stepmother. 

mother-naked, I, 344, 33: naked as in, or coming 
from, the womb. 

mothly, III, 148, 27: motley. 



360 



GLOSSABY 



motion, III, 216, 38: proposal. 

mou, moue, mow, I, 302, B 8; III, 149, 34; IV, 277, 
10; V, 115, 9; 268, 18; 269, is: mouth. 

moudie-hill. See moody-hill. 

moue, I, 16, C 15: put up in ricks. 

mo ught, V, 76, 28; 83, b 25, etc.: mote, may. Ill, 30, 
98: might, were able. 

moul, mouls, mool, mools, IV, 329, A b, after 16; 
330, D d 20: mould, dust, ashes (of the dead). I, 
184, 10; II, 233, 6; 429, 6; IV, 492, 6; V, 210, 10: 
earth of a grave. See meal, II, 230, 14, 15. 

mould-hill. See moody-hill. 

mould-warpe, III, 420, 20: mole. 

mountnaunce, montenans, I, 327, 31; III, 64, 168: 
amount. 

mouthe. See mothe. 

mow, III, 149, 34: seems to be meant for mouth (lip). 
But perhaps we may understand grimace (for a 
tyrant to make faces at). See mou. 

mow, mows, IV, 224, 22; 225, 20: jest. 

moyen, IV, 42 a, note: means. 

mucell. See muckle. 

muck, IV, 323, 6: dung. 

muck the byre, IV, 293, 9; 294, C 9, 10; 295, D 9; 
297, 9: carry out dung from the cow-house. 

muckle, mukle, mucell, meikle, IV, 398, 6; 494, 33: 
big. IV, 399, 40; V, 271, 13: much. 

mudie, III, 434, 27, 28: bold. See mody. 

muir, moor. 

mullertd, IV, 86, 12: miller. 

mini, maun, man, II, 59, 20; 314, 28; IV, 343, 6: 
must. 

mune, moon. 

munt, I, 304, E 2: come to, make out. 

mure, V, 202 b: moor, heath (?). 

muss, III, 4, 3, 4, 8: moss, bog. See moss. 

myght, welcome myght thou be, III, 65 } 177: Old Eng. 
2d pers. pres. ind. = mayst. 

myght neuer no tyme to sleepe, III, 77, 441: prob 
ably corrupt, and to be read, no tyme slepe ; but the 
construction is not unknown. 

my 3th, n., V, 283, 13: might, power. 

myld, mylde. See mild. 

myle, two myle way, III, 64, 168: the time it takes to 
go two miles. 

myllan, III, 309, 31: Milan steel. See millaine. 

mylner, milner, III, 81, 4; 97, 8: miller. 

myn, III, 358, 72: say. See minge. 

myneyeple, III, 308, 30: corruption of manople, a 
gauntlet protecting the hand and the whole fore 
arm (?). Skeat. 

myre. See mire. 

myrke, mirk, mark, I, 327, 30: dark. 

myrri, myrry. See mery. 

myrthes can, III, 66, 210: knows pleasant stories. 

my saunter, III, 13, 10: mischance. 

myster, III, 68, 244: need, occasion. See mister. 

mystery, mysterie, III, 495, B b, after 7; IV, 517, 
15: craft. 



N 

n, carried on from preceding word to following, noo 
nother, no noder, III, 81, 58; 100, 80: none other, a 
nother, nether, III, 80, 200; V, 247, 9: an other, a 
naughtless, noughtless, IV, 286, 12; 287, 5: an aught- 
less, good for nought, a noke, V, 81, 45: an oke. 
they nere, they nee, III, 112, 50; 204, b 31 : theyn 
ere, thyn ee. my nane, I, 469, 29 (but nane should 
probably be name). So, his nawn, her nain (nen), 
yer nane, as if from hisn, hern, yern, I, 469, 28; III, 
269, 1; IV, 132, 13; V, 224, 24. In, an onte-horne, 
III, 30, 87, n seems to have been carried back, from 
nonte (see V, 297 a), n in naut, III, 35, 24, 31, is an 
arbitrary prosthesis. 

na, nae, no, not: I, 68 f., 12, 22, 31, 44, 51; 107, 3, 8; 
310, 9, 11, 13; V, 260, 16. Frequently united with the 
preceding verb, hadna, I, 343, 5, 18. winna, 354, 27. 
canno, 368 f., 35, 37, 39. coudna, 369, 51. wadna, 
394, 9, 11. shanae, 394, B i. woudna, 396, 23, 26. 
shoudna, 396, 27. didna, 397, 12. kensnae, 466, 13. 
wasnae, 467, 34, etc., etc. 

naesaid, IV, 371, 7: refused. 

nags, naggs, nogs, III, 480, 11; 481, 8; 484 a, n: 
notches, nicks. 

nain, own. See n. 

nane, nen, yer nane, my nane, etc.: own. (n, origi 
nally, carried on from mine.) See n. 

nane, neen, none. 1, 16, 6; 309, 12; II, 108, 13; 129, 16; 
425, 3: adverbially, not, not at all. See none. 

nant, III, 35, 24, 31 : aunt. 

naow, V, 304, 5, 12, 14: now. 

napkin (-ken, -kain), I, 395, 9, 14: neckerchief. II, 
108, 3; 158 f., 5, 8; 160, 4, 7; 163, 4, 6: pocket hand 
kerchief. pocket-napkin, IV, 468, 2. 

nappy, V, 84, 13 (of ale) : strong. 

naps, naps of gold were bobbing bonnie, IV, 295, 8, 
9: knobs, balls, mentioned as ornaments to gloves, II, 
133, D 6, golden-knobbed gloves; 134, 8, 13, siller- 
knapped gloves. 

napskape, knapscap, IV, 7, 35; V, 251, 31 : head-piece. 

nar^nor, with comparative, for than: III, 112 f., 57, 69; 
V, 78 f., 12, 18. See nor. 

nas, I, 244, 15: ne was, was not. 

naught, V, 102, A 13: naughtiness. 

naughtless, a naughtless lord, IV, 287, 5; a noughtless 
heir, 286, 12: an aughtless, onghtless, good-for-naught, 
impotent. 

naughty, V, 267, 13: good-for-naught. 

naur, II, 62 a, 15: near, or nearer. 



naw, IV, 442, 2: nay. V, 296, a: not. 

nawn, own. See n. 

naye, withowghten naye, III, 296, 18: undeniably, 

truly. 
ne, III, 349, 46; V, 272 b, 5, 6; 273, 16: no. Ill, 62, 

128: not. 
ne, stand ye ne aw, III, 350, 53: misprint (in original); 

g, stand in no awe. 
nean, V, 219, 27; 220, i; 257, n: none. 



GLOSSARY 



361 



near, neare, ner, nere, I, 101, 19; II, 183, so; 191, 37; 
HI, 62, 119; 111, 46; V, 224, 28: nearer. 

near, IV, 446, 14 4 ; 447, 14 4 : corrupt, as the repetition 
from the second verse shows; while (till) my days are 
near (to an end) would be extremely forced, in any 
case. 

near, neer, never. 

near-hand, adj., IV, 197, 4, 5: near, short, adv., Ill, 
161, 36; IV, 222, 8 (near-ban) : near, almost. 

neast, neist, nist, nest, V, 117, A 7; 216 f., l, 5, 7, 10, 
18; 242 a, 10, 12: next. 

neathing, nothing. 

neave, III, 123, 16, 20: fist. 

neb, I, 425, A 16: beak. 

nee, III, 422, 67: nigh. 

needle-tack, II, 217, 5 : fastening or stitch with a 
needle. 

neen, none. See nane. 

neen nae, II, 318 b, 4: need na, need not. 

neerice, nurse. See nourice. 

neeze, V, 222 b, 26: sneeze, snort. 

neigh, v., II, 54, 54, 55: nigh, approach. 

neis, I, 302, B 8; IV, 247, B 12: nose. 

neist, niest, I, 223, 9; 314, 5; 419 f., l, 3, etc.: next. 

nelle, V, 284, 22: ne will, will not. 

nen, her nen, V, 224, 24: own. See nane. 

ner, nere, III, 62, 119; 111, 46: nearer. See near. 

nere, III, 113, 75: were [it] not. 

nere, they nere, III, 112, 50 : theyn ere, thine ear. 

neshe, III, 445, 31 : of delicate quality. 

nest, next. See neast. 

nettle-dyke, II, 463, 22: wall with nettles growing on 
it, or near it. Cf. II, 467, 40; 469, 42. 

neuk, coat-neuk, II, 107, 4, 5: nook, corner. 

new-f angle, I, 272, 9 : fond of novelties, capricious, 
inconstant. 

next, I, 412, 27; II, 45, 30, 34: nighest. 

nextand, II, 94, 6. See -an. 

neys, V, 80, 39: nice (ironically). 

nicher, nicker, n. and v., Ill, 370, 10; IV, 18, 15; 19, 
13; 20, 10; 21, ll: neigh. 

nicht, the, to-night. 

nicked him of naye, II, 52, 12; nickd them wi nae 
(nay), V, 182 f., 12, 30 (clearly borrowed from the 
above in Percy's Reliques) : refused with nay. 

nicker. See nicher. 

nick-nack, playd nick-nack on the wa, V, 123, 16; 
124, B 14: to express the sound of successive colli 
sions. 

niddart, niddart ither wi lang braid-swords, II, 422, 
49: thrust at. Jamie son, pressed hard upon. Corre 
spondents from the North of Scotland say, notched, 
slashed. 

nie, III, 473, 27: neigh. 

nie, neigh, nigh. 

niest, I, 15, B 3; 147, 5: next, nearest, come niest, 
IV, 485, 30: nigh to. See neist. 

niffer, n. and v., I, 203, C 10, 15; IV, 406, 24: ex 
change. 



night-coif, III, 514, 3; 515, l; V, 225, 4: night-cap, 
night-wake, IV, 453, 3, 4: night-watch, as of a dead 

body, perhaps a corruption of lyke-wake. 
nimble, nimle, wrongly for thimble, thimber, I, 332 

B 2, F 2, G 2. 

nine, the, m, 392, 8: the nine justices of the supreme 
criminal court of Scotland. Kinloch, A. S. B., p. 259. 

ning, V, 165 f., 4, 12: nine, nine, 111, 26, is changed 
from ninge. In the older stages of the language, re 
marks Dr. Murray (Dialect of the Southern Coun 
ties of Scotland, p. 125), ng was often written for 
Latin gn, and vestiges of this substitution of the 
nasal for the liquid n are still found in the spoken 
dialect. 

nip, III, 160, 18, 19: bit. 

nires, norice, nurse. See nourice. 

nist, nest, neast, V, 216, 10; 242 a, 10, 12: next. 

nit, in, 465, 20: knit, fasten. 

nit, I, 450, 2-1: nut. 

nit-broun, IV, 469, 7; 470, 23, 29, etc.: nut-brown. 

no, I, 86, 13; 100, 10; 108, 6, 8; 135, P 8, 10; II, 218, 12; 
222, 19; HI, 465, 32: not. 

noble, nobellys, III, 113, 81; 126, 39; 201, 29: a gold 
coin of the value of one third of a pound. (Fifteen 
score nobles is of course exactly an hundred pound.) 
=20 groats, V, 76 f., 18, 19, etc. 

nocked, III, 82, 132; 86, 132: notched. 

noder, nother, III, 81, 58 ; 100, 80, no noder, noo 
nother = none other. See n. 

nog. See nags. 

noghte, not. 

nolt, nout, V, 249, 4: neat, neat-cattle. 

nom, III, 51 b, 13-15: take. 

none, adv., II, 361, 24; V, 295, l: not at all. See nane. 

none of, none of my brother, II, 11, 3, 6, 7: not at all 
my brother. 

noo, V, 307, 11: now. 

noorice. See nourice. 

nor, nar, after a comparative, I, 5, C 9-18; II, 134 f., 
15, 29; 268, 21; 374, 13; 409, 19; IV, 166, 12; V, 184, 
49: than, nor be, II, 97, 22: than to be (if liker 
means more likely), too gude nor ever woud make 
a lie, II, 372, 26: better than, too good, to make. I 
doubt not nor she be, U, 390, 23,=:je ne doute pas 
qu'elle ne soit. 

not, IV, 331 b, 8: misprint for out. 

note, notte, V, 283, 9, 19: nut. 

note, m, 512, I! 6: corrupt (nut in F 7). Some im 
possibility is required. 

noth, nothe, I, 334, 7, 8: not. 

nother. See noder. 

noughtless, naughtless, IV, 286, 12; 287, 5: a nought- 
less = an oughtless, good-for-nothing, impotent. 

noumbles, nowmbles, noumbles of the dere, of a do, 
HI, 58, 32; 64, 172: frequently defined entrails; Pals 
grave, praecordia, the numbles, as the heart, the 
splene, the lunges, and lyver. At least a part of the 
noumbles are the two muscles of the interior of the 
thighs of a deer: venatores nombles vocant frustum 



VOL. v. 



46 



362 



GLOSSARY 



carnis cervinae sectum inter femora (Ducange). See 
the elaborate directions for breaking or undoing deer 
in Juliana Barnes's Boke of Huntynge, and in Mad 
den, Sir Gawayne and the Grene Knyjt, vv. 1344- 
48 especially. 

nourice, nourrice, noorice, nourry, nurice, nur- 
ische, nury, II, 322, 6, 13-17; 333, 5-7; III, 433, C 
7; IV, 31, 7; 32, 3; 480, 5, 10, etc.: nurse. 

nout, nolt, III, 460, 25, 36; IV, 246, is; V, 116, l: 
neat cattle. 

noute-horne, a, III, 26, 87: horn of neat, ox, cow 
(wrongly substituted for, an oute-horne; see V, 297). 

uouthe, I, 334, 5: not. 

nouther, IV, 219, 8: neither. 

now, V, 78 f., 5, 24, 25: new. 

noy, I, 217, 7, 12: grief. 

nul, nule, I, 244, 11, 13: will not. 

mime, preL, III, 355, 4: took. 

nurice. See nourice. 

nurische, IV, 28 a, 29 a: nurse. See nourice. 

nury. See nourice. 

nyghtgales, I, 327, 33: nightingales. 

nyll, II, 478, 4: will not. 



O, brighter O shall, IV, 170, O 10: heard for rose. For 
rose (which the last letter of brighter, the o, and the 
first letter of shall make) cf. 167, 17; 169, 14; 175, 
Mil. 

o=of. diel o there, III, 488, 26: devil (1. e. not a 
bit) of anything in that way (?) (devil be there, 
489, 43). 

o=on: I, 232, A 2; II, 375, 15, 16; III, 488 f., 23, 39, 
45; IV, 84, 19. 

ochanie, och how, IV, 103, 14; III, 392, ll: inter 
jections of sorrow. 

ocht, IV, 230, l: aught. 

ochree. See ohoii. 

of=on: I, 284, 14, 16: II, 59, 23; 452, 5; III, 105, 19; 
309, 46 (on, 45, vppone, 42); 355, 8; 359, 89; 464, 2; IV, 
503, 20. beate of mee, II, 54, 53 (?). In, put of the 
pot, put of the pan, II, 118, 8, of is perhaps simply 
an error of the scribe; we have, put on, 119, 5, 6. In, 
seruyd (q. v.) him of bred, I, 241, I, for is required, 
and of, which would signify with, cannot stand. 

officier, V, 155, D 2: officer. 

ojaines, I, 192 a: against, towards. 

oger, I, 202, l: auger. 

ohon ochree, III, 390, 13: exclamation of sorrow. 

okerer, III, 58, 46: usurer. 

old, auld, old (auld) son, of babe just born, II, 95, 11, 
12; 105, 7; 107, 4, 5, 6, 17: called young son, II, 104, 
12, 15; 106, 8, 10, 18, and, at II, 95, immediately after, 
13, 14. See auld son. old daughter, II, 382, l; 387, 
1; 388, 15: oldest, old sister, I, 175, D 8: one older 
than a second sister. 

old, auld, in your fifteen year old, I, 115, 13; in fifteen 
years old, I, 116, 13: of age. See aull, auld. 

on=of: III, 93, 38; 132, 3; 231, 84; 296, 20; 308, 13. 



on = one: V, 78 f., 7, 26, 28; 80, 52. on for on, III, 308, 

21. 

on, wedded on, I, 146, 24; married on, I, 497, 22: on 
the strength of (to have as a dowry). 

on ane, I, 334, 6: anon. 

on fere, III, 98, 38: in company. 

on o = on (on upon?): Ill, 349, 38 (calld on o); 488, 
25, 27; IV, 470, is; 517, 9. (cald of, IV, 503, 20.) 

onbred, I, 415 b: incompletely grown. 

one, I, 104, 6; II, 45, 28: a. of one, I, 104, 6 2 should 
have been retained (=on a). 

one, on. 

one', ony, onie, II, 58, 3: any. 

ones, onys, III, 98, 23: once. 

onfowghten, III, 297, 41: unf ought, without fighting. 

onlouping, III, 449 b: mounting (of a horse). 

onthought lang, I, 478 f., is, 47: without wearying, 
entertained. See unthought lang, thinke lang. 

ony, onie, one, any. 

oor, I, 133, M 6: hour. 

or, I, 285, 33; 294, 10; 328, 35; 411, 17; II, 22, is; 105, 
8: before, or eir, II, 21, A 9 : or or (doubling of 
before). 

or, II, 166, 27: than. 

order, ordre, III, 66, 197, 198: rule of an order. 

ordered, II, 257, 9: taken order for, made arrange 
ments for. 

orders, III, 286, 44: prepares. 

ordeyn, III, 72, 326: give order for, levy. 

orghie, IV, 513, H 2 4 (to be supplied): orgeis, a 
fish, large kind of ling. See V, 299 b, note on No 
178. 

orlange, II, 61, 8, 9, 12: perversion of eldrige. 

orless, I, 141 b, 8 : emended to unless. 

orphare, I, 326, 9: orfevrie, goldsmith's work. 

osterne, III, 412, 27: austere. See austerne. 

ostler, V, 155, C 4, D 2: innkeeper. 

ostler-ha, III, 270, 6: ostler-house, hostelry, inn. 

ostler-house, III, 268, 4, 6, 8; 269, 4-6: hostelry. 

other, pL, III, 298, 66; 335 b. 

ottrauuce, at, III, 90 b: to the utterance, extremity, 
death. 

ought, I, 294, 12: am under obligation, pret. and/). p. 
Ill, 228, 9; 431, 30: owed. 

ould, IV, 456, 9; V, 199 b, 35: would. 

our, owr, ower, over, too. 

oure, prep., over. See ower. 

ousen, owsen, owsn, II, 192, 6: oxen. 

out, he slew out, II, 383, 25; beat out, III, 151, A 4, 
B 4: out and out. fight ye all out, IV, 173, 6: 
through, to the last. 

out into, I, 115, B 2: from within. 

out of hand, II, 321, 3; III, 440, 25: forthwith. 

out the gate, way, IV, 470, 21; 477, 12: along the 
way. 

outehorne, III, 26, 87(the original and popular read 
ing) : here, a horn blown to call out citizens to the 
support of the civil authority. See Spelman's Glos 
sary, 1687, p. 441. Cf. V, 297 a. 






GLOSSARY 



363 



outlyer, I, 175 f., D 3, 9, 15, 21: one who lives away 
from men, in the woods, banished man, outlaw. 

out make I, 61, C c 5: make out. 

outmet, jp. p., Ill, 29, 158: measured out. 

out-oer, -our(e), -ower, -owre, -over, I, 246, 13, 14; 
II, 256, K l; III, 6, 19; 7, 17; 270, 13, 17: over, above, 
heirs out ower a' my land, II, 176, C 8. leand 
himsel outowre a tree, III, 270, D 8. the flower 
out ower (owr) them a', II, 256, L l; III, 246, D 7. 
out oer her, IV, 224, 19, should perhaps be, out o' 
her. 

outrake, III, 413, 32: excursion, outing. 

outside, outsyde, II, 444, 43; 449, 48: place apart, re 
tired. 

outspeckle, IV, 7, 30; V, 250, 27: laughing-stock. 

outthro, IV, 445, 20: through to the opposite side. 

out-wood, III, 179, 8: wood outside (of a town ?). 

ouer all, III, 28, 141: everywhere. 

ouer goddes forbode, forbott. See forbode. 

ouer-by-gone, I, 326, 8: covered, set. 

overthrew us, V, 134, 8: threw us over. 

o-vour, II, 25, F 13: half owre, half way over. 

ower, owre, oure, I, 16, C 17; 80, l: over, ower (a 
window) : over against. 

ower, owr, our, over, too. 

owerturn, owre turn, I, 332, E, F 7; III, 10, 21: re 
frain. See owerword. 

owes, who, IV, 205, 27: owns, whose is (who owns= 
wha's aucht). 

owerword, owre-word, oerword, II, 254, 8, 9; 363, 
14; IV, 7, 28; 482 f., 8, 11: refrain (word frequently 
repeated), call, cry. See owerturn. 

owre, II, 20, 8: or, before. 

owsn, owsen, ousen, I, 465, 2; II, 175, 7, 8; 176, 8, 9; 
192, 6; 194, 10: IV, 12, C 8; 27, 20: oxen. 

owthe, III, 112, 51: out. 

owtlay, III, 99, 43: outlaw. 

oxe-lig, ox-leg. 

oxtere, IV, 506, 6: (A. S. dhsta) arm-pit. 

oyes, II, 315, ll; V, 229, 37: grandsons. 

oysyd thare trawale, III, 41 a: used, carried on 
their operations. 



pa, paw. 

pa. See palle. 

Pa, III, 244, B l: unintelligible and doubtless cor 
rupt. Percy, who supposed that Mirryland toune 
might be corrupted from Milan, Germ. Mailand, un 
derstands Po, although, as he observes, the Adige, 
not the Po, runs through Milan. 

pack, IV, 69, 12: familiar. 

pad, V, 114, 1: (in canting language) highway. 

pae, I, 333, 3: peacock. 

pakets, V, 165, 6: pockets. (V, 306, 9, has pouches,, 

pale (of a puncheon), II, 81, 45: tap, spigot. 

pale, and the covring that these lovers had was the 
clouted cloak an pale, I, 305, 12: a derivation from 
Lat. pallium, coverlet, cloak, O. Fr. paile, palle, has 



been suggested, and as to meaning would suit; but 
if the word were popular it should be heard of else 
where. Possibly an error for fale, turf, which is the 
bed-covering in F 6, p. 304; though the combination 
with cloak would be strange. 

palle, pale, paule, pa, I, 68, 7; 333,1; II, 139,4; 256, 
L 4; 259, A a 3, b 3, C c 3; 483, 5: fine cloth. 

pallions, III, 300, 15; IV, 500, 16: pavilions. 

palmer, I, 232, 3-5, 12, B l; 284, 8: pilgrim. Ill, 3, 
10, ll; 4, 4, 5; 180, B 8; 186, 10, ll, 17; 189, A 8, B 3; 

IV, 445, 3, 4, 20; V, 16, 9, 17: tramp, vagabond, beg 
gar. 

pannells, V, 86, 29: riding-pads or cushions. 

papeioyes, I, 328, 33: popinjays. 

paramour, I, 68, 4; 70, 4: in A 4, the word, coming 
between bouted flour and baken bread, should signify 
something eatable; B has attempted to make easy 
sense by inserting the. Paramour as lover, lady 
love, in the honest sense occurs II, 86, 19, 21; 412, 2 ; 

V, 182, 7. the love was like paramour, II, 407, 8: 
like amorous passion (?). Quite unintelligible in II, 
409, 4, a red rose flower, was set about with white 
lilies, like to the paramour; again, 410, 2. 

parand, heir and par and, II, 447, 2, 4: parand, in 4, 
might appear to be meant for apparent, but we have 
his parand and his heir, in 2. There is more igno 
rance of the meaning of words in the piece. 

pardon, I, 411, 8: leave of absence. 

part, God, Christ haue part(e) of the (me), III, 58, 39; 
329, 8: perhaps, make me an object of his care (as 
prendre part en = take an interest in); or, take me 
for his, number me among the saved. 

part, part the quick, II, 231, 9; parte our company, 
III, 71, 307: quit, part from. 

partakers, III, 138, 7, 8: helpers. 

parti, vppone a parti, III, 308, 19: aside. March- 
parti, III, 310, 58: Border-side. Marche-partes, 
III, 310, 67. 

party, nane to party me, V, 127, 19: be of part with. 

Fasch, Pasche, II, 146, 9; 147, 7: Easter. 

pass for, III, 138, 15: care for. 

passe vppon, V, 51, 67: pass, go, on. 

passe, III, 73, 357: extent ? In 84, 357, and 88, 357, the 
reading is, compasse. 

passage, IV, 515, l: occurrence, incident, adventure. 

passilodion, V, 71 b; 72 a: a drinking-word. 

passments, IV, 343, 4: laces, trimmings for dresses. 

pat, pot. 

pat, patt, paut, I, 396, 20; II, 123, 29: strike the 
ground with the feet, stamp, pat the ball, III, 251 
L l, 2: kick, patted wi her lips, II, 83 a: struck to 
gether, smacked (?). 

pat, patt, pret. of pit, put, 1, 107, 7; 465, 2, 3; V, 218, 2. 

pat-fit, I, 302, B 8: pot-foot. 

paughty, II, 364, 21: haughty, malapert. 

pauky, V, 115, l: sly. 

pautit, I, 397, D 9, ll: patted, struck with the foot, 
stamped. See pat. 

pavag, pauage, pawage, III, 109 f., 5, 11-13: Fr. 



364 



GLOSSARY 



pavage, road-tax. See Ducange, pavagium. (passage, 

III, 114 f., 130, 180, 181, etc.) 

paw, a slight motion, neer played paw, III, 480, 14: 
never stirred again. 

pay, n., 1, 285, 32; III, 28, 128; 59, 66: satisfaction. 

pay, paye, ., I, 328, 37; II, 478, 12: satisfy, please. 

pay, III, 142, 36; 161, 26; V, 105, A 5, 6; 106, E 6: 
beat. 

payetrelle, I, 326, 9: poitrail, part of the harness on 
the breast of a horse. 

payrelde, parelde, I, 327, 16, 17: apparelled. 

peak, pick. 

peak, peck. 

peak-staff, pike-staff. 

pean-kniff, pen-knife. 

pear, peare, V, 110 f., 2, 4, 6, etc.: poor. 

pearled, apron, IV, 67, 12: bordered or trimmed with 
lace. 

pearlin, pearlins, III, 9 f., 6, 14; IV, 448 a, 2d line: 
pearls. 

pearling, pearlin, II, 323, 6; IV, 326, 16: lace. 

pearting, parting, separation. 

peat, I'se gar ye dance upon a peat, V, 104 b (a 
threat) : on a (burning) peat, make it hot for you. 

pecis, III, 65, 175: vessels (of silver), probably cups. 

peed, IV, 316, 14: pu'd, pulled. 

peel, I, 403, 9: pool. 

peel, a tower, stronghold; climbing the peel seems 
inappropriate at IV, 6, 4; V, 249, 4, unless the mean 
ing be that the peel was " ransakled " for valuables 
(since kye would not be kept in the peel). 

peeped, V, 10, 3: spoke faintly, whined. 

peerls, peerls many, IV, 134, 10: poor folk (Chaucer's 
poraille). B 8, C 6, D 10, P 8, G 4, etc., poor folk 
many. 

peers, pears. 

peit, I, 22, 3: a peat carried to school as a contribution 
to the firing. 

pellettes, III, 430, 12: bullets. 

pendles, IV, 296, 8: pendants, ear-rings. 

penned in, of windows, II, 330, G 3: fastened, per 
haps pinned. See pin, v. 

penny-brown, III, 281, 10: brown as a penny, penny- 
gray, III, 281, 8, at best would mean gray as a silver 
penny; but silver is called white money. It is just 
possible that the word is legitimate, and that, penny- 
brown being understood as very brown, penny-gray 
might come into use for very gray. Possibly penny- 
brown (gray) might mean dappled with brown (gray) 
spots. 

penny-fee, -fie, 1, 491, 10; IV, 444, 10: gift of a penny 
largess, pour-boire. (I, 490, 6, penny instead of 
penny-fee.) II, 469, 25, 26: simply, money. 

peny, shete a peny, III, 97, 10: shoot for a penny, as 
104, 6. 

Perce, V, 298 a: Persia. 

perelle, I, 326, 8: pearl. 

perfyte, II, 72, 4; 75, 6; 78, 8: perfectly. 

pestilett, III, 430, 11: pistolet. 



petty toes, I, 133, L 9: pettitoes, feet (as in Winter's 
Tale, IV, 4), or a play upon words, little toes. 

phat, III, 318, 8: what. 

philabeg, IV, 234, 21; 271, 8; V, 266, 8: kilt, skirt 
worn by Highlanders, reaching from belly to knee. 

pibrochs, IV, 298, G b 14: bagpipe airs; seems here 
to be meant for the pipes. 

pick, pick a mill, I, 211, B 3, 4: sharpen the surface 
of a mill-stone when worn smooth by friction, picked 
a stane, II, 323, l: dressed with a pick. 

pick, pickle, I, 16, C 14; IV, 481, 5; V, 206 a, 6: a 
grain. 

pick, n., IV, 2, 12: pitch. 

pick, pict, v., 380, 20: pitch (pict, II, 28, 23, may be a 
misspelling). 

picke, III, 358, 77: pitch (throw). 

pickle, a grain. See pick. 

pickle, II, 147, 12, 14; 476, 16, 17: pick, collect. 

picklory, III, 132, 4: name of a cloth. 

pickman, pikeman. 

pict, v., II, 28, 23: pitch (probably a misspelling). 

pig, I, 305, 5; IV, 206, 9: an earthen vessel, earthen 
pitcher. 

pig-staves, V, 213 a, l: pike-staves. 

pile, o corn, I, 18, H 7: a grain. 

pile, pile o the gravil green, gray, I, 350, 18, 19; pile 
that grows on gravel green, IV, 456, 11, 12: a fibre or 
blade of some velvety moss which grows on stones. 
See gravil. 

pilk, II, 473, 16: pick, collect. See pickle. 

pilleurichie. See pitleurachie. 

pin, pinn, an implement for raising the fastening of a 
door, tirled the pin, IV, 390, 4; 415, 5. tirled at 
the pin, I, 470, 23; II, 141, 8; 164, 3; 471, 8; 474, 
I 3, etc. tirled on the pin, II, 461, 11. thirled at the 
pin, II, 121, 15. thrild upon a pinn, II, 138, 10, 16. 
twirld at the pin, IV, 390, b 4. lifted, lifted up 
the pin, II, 104, 14; IV, 391, 3; 415, 6. " The pin was 
always inside, hung by a latch, or leather point, the 
end of which was drawn through a small hole in the 
door to the outside. During the day-time, the pin 
was attached to a bar or sneck in such a way that 
when the latch was pulled the door was free to open. 
But at night the pin was disconnected from the door- 
fastening and hung loose, so that when the latch was 
pulled the pin rattled." W. Forbes. (See tirled.) 
knocked at the pin, II, 387, 10; 468, 15; upon a pin, 

III, 105, 12; rappit at the pin, I, 472, 17; chapped 
at the pin, I, 481, 29, are probably corrupted from 
knocked, etc., at the ring (and so, tinkled at the pin, 
II, 253, 3) ; if not, the meaning must be, knocked at 
the door at the place of the latch, that so priuilye 
knowes the pinn, 1, 433, 25, implies that there was some 
secret connected with the pin (like, knew not the gin, 

IV, 446 b, 3), which it is difficult to conceive in an 
arrangement so simple as that described above; but 
it is probable that complications were employed by 
the cautious. See gin. 

pin, gallows-pin, gallou-pine, I, 146, 25; 150, 17; III, 



GLOSSAKY 



365 



388, 18; V, 247, 18; hanged them out-oer a pin, III, 
268, 18; hang you on a pin before my door, V, 26, 15: 
the projecting, or horizontal beam of the gallows ? 
Any projection upon which a rope could be fastened. 

pin, v., pin my windows in, V, 295, 5, 6: fasten. See 
penned. 

pindee, II, 326, 2, of windows, pinned-ee for rhyme, or, 
possibly, for in, as penned in, II, 330, G 3. 

pinder, pindar, pinner, III, 131 ff., A 1-5, etc.; B 
1-3; II, 484, C 6, 7; 491 a, 5, b, 6: pounder. 

pine, pyne, I, 464, 8; 470, 15, 32; 474 f., 36, 41; IV, 430 
f., 4, 23; V, 219, 25: suffering, pain. Goddes, Creys- 
tys, pyne, III, 75, 391; V, 79, 18: suffering, distress, 
passion. 

pine, I, 453, 3: (pind, poiiid) distrain, seize. 

piner-pig, III, 385, 7: an earthen vessel for keeping 
money. 

pingo, pingo white, IV, 213, 12: pinkie (?). 

Pinnatree, The Gold, V, 141 b: name of a ship. 

pinner. See pinder. 

pint, point. 

Pirie, in Pirie's chair you '11 sit, the lowest seat o hell: 
I, 429, 30, 31. For the derivation Sir W. D. Geddes 
suggests as possible le pire, which would be in the 
way of the Scottish " ill chiel." Professor Cappen 
writes: "Familiar name in doggerel lines recited by 
boys in their games. One boy stood back against the 
wall, another bent towards him with his head on the 
pit of the other's stomach; a third sat upon the back 
of the second. The boy whose head was bent down 
had to guess how many fingers the rider held up. 
The first asked the question in doggerel rhyme in 
which Pirie, or Pirie's chair, or hell, was the doom 
threatened for a wrong answer. I remember Pirie 
(pron. Peerie) distinctly in connection with the doom. 
Pirie's chair probably indicates the uncomfortable 
position of the second boy (or fourth, for there may 
have been a fourth who crouched uncomfortably on 
the ground below the boy bending), whose head or 
neck was confined in some way and squeezed after a 
wrong answer." 

pistol-pece, III, 432, 9: pistol. 

pit, I, 86, 31; 467, 17; V, 219, 10: put. pit mee down, 
H, 131, 4: be my death, pit back, IV, 510, W 3: 
stop the growth or development of. pret. pat. p. p. 
pitten, putten. 

pith, hammer o the, II, 374, B 2: sounds like non 
sense. The smith's anvil being of gold and his 
bellows-cords of silk, his hammer should be of some 
precious material. To say his hammer was wielded 
with force would be out of keeping, and very flat at 
best. 

pitleurachie, pilleurichie, III, 320, A a 20, b 20: 
hubbub, discord. See lierachie. 

pit-mirk, III, 495 a, after 7; IV, 517, 14: dark as a 
pit. 

pitten, p.p. of pit, put, I, 463 f., 2, 14. 

place, in place, V, 84 f., 10, 25: presence, in place, III, 
422, 76: (means only) there. 



plaet, pret., IV, 465, 40: plaited. 

plaiden, IV, 257, 3, 5: coarse woollen cloth diagonally 

woven. 

plain fields, IV, 432 f., 2, 10, 17, 21: open fields. 
plainsht, III, 360, 121: plenisht, filled. 
plainstanes, IV, 152, 5: pavement. 
plaow, n., V, 304, 5, 12: plough. 
plat, I, 101, 19; II, 285, 20, pret. of plet: plaited, inter- 

folded. 
plate-jack, IV, 147, 22: a defensive upper garment 

laid with plates. 

platen, I, 243 f., 8, 11: plates, pieces. 
play-feres, in, 244, 2, 6; 245, 4, 5: play-fellows. 
plea, I, 169, 7; II, 282, 2: quarrel. 
plea, enter plea att my iollye, III, 278, 32. See enter. 
plead, III, 277, 10, 12: contend. 
pleasure, drink his, V, 307 a, 4: drink as much as he 

wishes. 
plee, III, 165, 72: plea (your offer to give up your 

money is but a slight ground for a plea to be spared ? 

or a slight argument to enforce the justification pre 

viously attempted ?). 
pleuch, pleugh, n., II, 190, 9; 194, 10: plough. IV, 

196, 19; 197, 19: (of land) plough, which see. 
pie wed, feathers pie wed with gold, II, 435, 49: not 

understood. 
plight I lay, IV, 433, 21: the pledge I did lay ? con 

dition in which I should lie ? (Very obscurely ex 

pressed stanza.) 

plight, pret., II, 52, 24; 364, 24; V, 50, 45: plighted. 
plooky, II, 47, 14: pimpled. 
plough, pleugh, pleuch, plow, IV, 194, 18, 11; 195, 

18; 196, 19; 197, 19; etc. (of land): as much land as 

one plough will till in a year. 
plucke, fyght a plucke, III, 128, 85: (blow, stroke) 

a bout. 
pluck e-buffet, they shote, III, 77, 424: at taking and 

giving a buffet for missing. (This supposes pluck = 

take, get; it may be the noun pluck, blow.) 
plummet, of swords, III, 466, 40 : pommel. 
pock, III, 160, 6, 16; 163, 68, 74, 83: bag. 
pocket-napkin, IV, 468, 2: pocket-handkerchief. 
poind, pret., poinded, p. p., II, 429 b, 3; IV, 80 b; IV, 

492 a, 3: distrained. 
poll, lighter than the poll, IV, 434, 1 (not recognized 

as Scottish by any of my correspondents) : boll, lint- 

bow, the seed-pod of flax ? Not probable. 
poorly, IV, 444, 35: feebly. V, 10, 3; 266 b, 2: faint 

heartedly. 
portioner, IV, 81 a: possessor of a part of a property 

originally divided among co-heirs. Jamieson. 
portly, III, 280, 24: of imposing appearance. 
pot, II, 144 f., 14, 24; 153, 22; 154 f., 17, 31, 34, 36; 474, 

J e; IV, 181, 13; 189 f., 7, 22, 28: deep place or pool 



n a ver. 



potewer, I, 271, 6: read potener, French pautonniere, 
pouch, purse. " pawtenere, cassidile." Prompt. Parv. 
" Marsnpium, a pawtenere, a powche. . . . Cassidile 
est pera aucupis, vel mercipium, vel sacculus, a 






366 



GLOSSARY 



pautenier or a pouche. Cassidile dicitur pera . . . 
crumena, etc. cremena, a pautener." (Way's note.) 

pottinger, IV, 509 b, 13: apothecary. 

pottle, V, 86, 35: a measure of two quarts. 

pow, II, 476, 16: head. 

powd, III, 268, 7: pulled. 

powder, IV, 514, 17: dust (?). 

power, above (loved), II, 286, 2: beyond (ordinary) 
capacity or intensity. 

powther, powder. 

prah, v., V, 303 a: pray. 

praise, III, 204, 29: prize. 

praise, V, 115, 5:= God. 

praisin, III, 455, D l: if the line is genuine, all the 
meaning praisin can have will be, the laudation of 
the queen for her generous behavior. 

pran, V, 220 f., 6, 7, 9: bran. 

prece, prese, prees, III, 24, 36; 67, 218: press, crowd. 
Ill, 62, lie: thick of a conflict. 

pree, I, 81 a: taste. See prey. 

preen, n., I, 430, 13: pin. 

preen, v., I, 147, 13; III, 436, 3; V, 105, B 7: pin. See 
prin. 

prees, prese. See prece. 

preke, n., Ill, 112, 62. See pricke. 

preke, v. See prekyd. 

preker, V, 79, 13: rider. 

prekyd, prycked, V, 78, 6; 80, 40: spurred, rode fast, 
the hors prekyd, 80, 42: ran, scampered, sped. 

prese. See prece. 

present, III, 199, 19: represent, act as representatives of. 

presenttiiig, wine, IV, 37, 16: holding out the cup or 
glass towards the person saluted. 

presently, III, 400 a (7) : at present. 

president, III, 231, 82: precedent. 

press, V, 111, 22: closet. 

prest, the made them prest, III, 111, 45: ready, berdys 
sang preste, III, 112, 63: freely, con amore. 111,171, 
10: in haste. 

prestly, III, 27, 113: quickly. 

pretend, I, 110, 18; V, 57, 66: purpose, design. 

prevayle, III, 313, 55: avail. 

prey, II, 490 b, 12-14: (prie, pree) taste. 

price, III, 358, 63: estimation. 

prick them to the gin, IV, 480, 4: pin to the fasten 
ing. 

prick(e), pry(c)ke, preke, rod or wand, used as a 
mark in shooting = pricke- wand: III, 93, 28,30; 202, 
34. he cleffed the preke on three, III, 112, 52. ' have 
at the pryke ! " and Y cleue the styke,' III, 90 b. a 
mark or butt generally, III, 29, 145. slise, cleue the 
wand=cteffe the preke, III, 70, 292; 75, 401. 

pricked, pret., II, 266,28: stuck. 

pricke-wande, III, 93, 31 : a rod set up for a mark. 

prickt, p. p., I, 345, C l: prinkt, deckt. 

priefe, V, 81, 14: prove, experience, enjoy. 

pril, V, 73 a: a drinking word, to which the response 
must be wril. 

prime, pry me, I, 254, 9: the first canonical hour. 



prin, n. and v., I, 345, C l; 431, 10; II, 109, 17, 19; 

111,388, 17; IV, 189, 4, 6; V, 105, B 7 (preened): 

pin. 
pr inkling, II, 386, 20: seems to be used (perhaps an 

error) for trinkling, trickling, 
prittle, I, 59, 15: a doublet of prattle, 
priving, V, 115, 8: tasting. 

process, III, 164, 90: occurrences, story of occur 
rences, 
propine, I, 79, 24: present, gift, in thy propine, I, 

227 b: to be had by thee as a gift. 
propose, n., V, 207 b, No 5: proposal, 
proselya, the reef was o the proseyla, I, 333, 6: in 

other copies the roof is of beaten gold, the floor of 

cristal a'. The roof here might be of proseyl a', if 

that would help, but I know no more of proseyl than 

of proseyla. The nearest I can come to cristal is, 

porcelain. 
pressed, proceed, 
proue, II, 446, 81 : try? Poor sense and no rhyme. 

The MS. reading is perhaps praie, which is, however, 

not preferable. Pross is a northern word for talk 

(Halliwell), and the corresponding verb would suit 

here. 

prowed, proud. 

Prudents, I, 471, 2, 4: black people of the Holy Land 
pruel, made her heart to pruel, II, 376, 32: to ache or 

shiver with fear. (Dr Davidson.) To preel in Aber- 

deenshire is to cool. (Principal Barbour.) 
pryce, III, 63, 137: prize, 
prycke, n. See pricke. 
prycked, as faste as he myght ronne, III, 296, 21: 

sped; and so V, 80, 42. See prekyd. 
pryckynge, III, 67, 229: spurring, riding briskly, should 

probably be rakynge; the yeomen are on foot. Cf. 

Ill, 123, 12; 180, 9, 11. 
pryke, n. See pricke. 
pry me, prime, III, 23, 9; 25, 72: the first canonical 

hour, first hour of the day. 
pryse, I, 327, 16, 17: value, most(e) of pryse^most 

richly. 

pu, pow, pull, 
pudding-pricks, III, 160, 19: wooden skewers to 

fasten the end of a gut containing a pudding, 
puggish, II, 427, 6: in a later copy, ragged. Mr Ebs- 

worth suggests the meaning, tramper's. (puggard, 

thief; pugging, thieving.) 
purchase, III, 203, 20: booty, prize, 
purchast, p.p., Ill, 36, 48: acquired (perhaps, stolen), 
pure, poor. 

pusin, n. and v., poison, 
puss-pay, V, 110,9, 10: hare or rabbit pie (still in use: 

W. Walker). 

put down. See putten down, 
put on (intransitively), II, 92, 21; 255, 22; 278, 7; IV, 

190, 25: dressed, put on him, II, 162, 12: jogged, 

pushed. 

putten, putn, p. p. of put, 1, 446, 10; 469, 3; III, 433, 3. 
putten, put, down, II, 178, 39; HI, 393, 15; IV, 14, u; 



GLOSSARY 



367 



66, A 10; 70, 13: hanged. IV, 32, 12: put to death 

by violence, 
putting-stane, II, 421, 28: as the stone is thrown, 

there is no propriety in the hitting and kepping 

(catching) in 29. 

pyet, pyot, magpie: II, 93, 6; 148 f., 11, 13, 15, 17. 
pyght, III, 296, 19: pitched (fixed in the ground the 

pole of). 

py grail, III, 410 b, note: paltry, 
pylled, hatte, III, 179 a: (bald) that has lost the 

nap. 
pyne, Goddes, Creystys, pyne, III, 75, 391; V, 79, 18: 

passion. See pine, 
pyot. See pyet. 



quaich, V, 264 a, 3: cup or bowl (Irish cuach). 
quarrelld, p. p., I, 367 f., 12, 20: quarrelled with, found 

fault with, 
quarry, IV, 26, 6: of living game, in the modern way 

(in an adulterated ballad). See querry. 
quarterer, IV, 152, B 9, 10: lodger, 
queed, II, 423, A i: gueed, good is required; queed 

could mean only ill. 
queen, quean, queyne, quen, quien, I, 69, 38, 39; 

302, A 11; 303, C 6: woman. II, 141, ll; V, 272, 8, 

10: concubine. 

queer, quir, IV, 465, 39; V, 224, 27: choir, 
queet, quit, cweet, IV, 190, 26; II, 96, I 3: ankle, 
quen. See queen, 
quequer, III, 112, 51 : quiver, 
quere, III, 250, K 7: inquire, 
querry, quyrry, III, 307, 8; 311, 11: quarry, dead 

game. See quarry, 
quest, III, 25, 69; IV, 11, 12: inquest, 
questry-men, another, IV, 11, 13: men constituting a 

quest, inquest; but another raises a doubt whether 

we should not read quest of, as in 12 (ry being caught 

from jury, above). 

queyt, III, 112, 59: quit, requite. See quite, 
quien. See queen, 
quiles, II, 488, 1, 2: coils, colls, cocks, 
quill, IV, 213, ll: quill, the small round fold of a ruff, 

seems to be put for the quilled ruff; otherwise, kell, 

cap (or coul, night-cap, not likely), 
quine-stane, qunie-stane, V, 248, 10,11: (quoin, coin) 

corner-stone. 

quir, queer, V, 224, 27: choir, 
quirn, I, 17, 15: hand-mill, 
quit, II, 283, 3: ankle. See queet. 
quite, III, 333, 28: requite. See queyt, quyte. 
quite, III, 431, 28: free, clear, unpunished, 
qunie-stane. See quine-stane. 
quoif, coif, II, 279, l: cap. 
qustens, V, 217, a 15: questions, 
quyrry, III, 307, 8: quarry, the slaughtered game. See 

querry. 
quyte )?e, III, 100, 77: acquit thyself, square the 

account. The other text has, quit me. 



race, of ginger, IV, 70, O 3: root. 

race, II, 445, 70, 72; 450, 77, 79; III, 278, 24, 29: course 
in justing, fetched a race, II, 454 f., 54, 58: took a 
run (for impetus); so 1, 176, 22. 

race, castle-race, II, 75, 15; 81, 43: course in the castle- 
grounds, or contour of the castle (?). 

rache, I, 327 f., 10, 16, 51 : a scenting dog. 

rack, III, 472, 3, 4: ford. "A very shallow ford, of 
considerable breadth: Teviotdale." Jamieson. 

rad, V, 192, 26: afraid. 

rader, rather. V, 283, 7, 17: quicker. 

rader, rider. 

radly, III, 98, 24: quickly. See rathely. 

rae, I, 350, 21; 352, 7: roe (referring to the wildness of 
Tarn Lin). 

raid, read, rede, pret. of ride. 

raid, n., IV, 520, 3: simply ride, for hunting. 

raik. See rake. 

rair, I, 256, 4: roar. 

rais, raise, rase, jwe*. of rise, I, 305, 5; 327, 13; 420, 
18; 422, 18; 451, 12; II, 30, 5; 92, 21; 108, 13-15; IV, 
215, A 6. 

raiths, rathes, reaths (Gael, raidh), II, 314, 30; V, 
268, 21, 22: quarters of a year. 

rake, raik, reek, n, 216 f., 5, so; 483, i; in, 125, 27; 
162, 47; 180, 9: walk, move, raking on a rowe, III, 
117, 24; 123, 16; 180, ll: advancing in a line; on a 
rowte, III, 180, 9: in a company. 

ramp, rider, IV, 198, G 6: wild (of manners or habits). 
See rank. 

ramp, I, 302, B 7: spring, bounce, whisk, ramped him, 
I, 215 a, 7: Cramped, bounded. 

randy, I, 104 a, burden of d: probably unmeaning, 
though the sense "indelicate hoyden" would suit 
with stanza 2. 

rane, lang rane, II, 82, C: yarn, tedious tale. 

rang, wrong. 

rank (A. S. rane, strenuus, fortis, protervus), wild, 
bold (turbulent), strong, violent, rank river, IV, 
200, 5; 442, 4. rank robber (who robs with violence, 
"strong thief "): II, 223, F 4; 233, F 3; 399, 6; 400, 
4; 401, C 6; 404, 6. rank reiver, III, 472, 6; IV, 
195, C 3; 472, ll. rank rider, IV, 196, 4; 204, ll: 
rude, boisterous; but II, 434, 24; 437, 75: of spirit 
and courage, sturdy (stout rider, IV, 197, 3, no 
reference to horsemanship). ramp rider, IV, 
198, G 6. rank Highlands, II, 93, 2, 3: rude, wild, 
ranke (of horses), II, 444, 59: high-fed (or used ad 
verbially), 
rankit, pret. and p. p., V, 197, 10: drew, drawn, up in 

military order. 

ranshakled, IV, 6, 4; V, 249, 4: ransacked, 
rantan, ranten. See ranting, 
ranted, IV, 153, E 4; V, 115, l; was rantin, IV, 85, 

39: of making noisy merriment, 
ranting, n., IV, 284, 26; 287, l; 288, l: raking, 
ranting, rantin, rantan, ranten, laird, laddie, III, 455, 
D l, 13; IV, 351, l, 3 ff.; 356 f., B l, 3, 4; V, 274 b, 



368 



GLOSSARY 



3-6: jovial, dissipated, wanton, rakish, "fast;" we 

have a rantin lassie, IV, 354, A b l, 2. 
rap, IV, 382, 14: knock, drive, pret. rapped, rappit, 

rappet, at, with ellipsis of the door, I, 105 a, 29; IV, 

444, 16, 35; V, 173, 1; 306 b, 1. 
rap, II, 426, 12; IV, 352, 7; V, 161, B l, 5; 274 b, 7; 

302, 14: (of tears) to fall in quick succession. 
rape, rope, 
rarely, IV, 58, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11; 358, 20, 21: rhyme-word 

(to which any one can assign all the sense it has). 

as adj., IV, 154, 7: rare, 
rase, pret. of rise. See rais. 
rash, n., IV, 75 a, b; 76, l; 448 b, 5 (rash-bush); 524, 

4, 7; V, 157, 12: rush, 
rashin, V, 173, 7: rushen, of rush, 
rassiecot, V, 107, 2: perhaps of no meaning, or, rush- 
coat. 

rathely, I, 327, is: quickly. See radly. 
rathes, II, 314, so. See raiths. 
rau, row. See rawe. 
r aught, I, 434, 36: reached, delivered, 
ranked, I, 69, 61 : searched, rummaged. (Misprinted 

ranked.) 
rave, reave, rive, pret. of rive, I, 439, 5; II, 294, 32; 

IV, 181, 15. See rive, 
ravie (rave ?), V, 111, 19: rive, raving, V, 254, 14, 18, 

19: tearing, 
raw, green raw sea, II, 30, 6: as of weather, wet 

and cold; but I am informed that the singer ordina 
rily gave haw, as II, 28, 21. 
rawe, rewe, n., Ill, 71, 306: row. 
rawstye by the roote, III, 94, 56: rusty, soiled, foul, 

(with blood) at the end (?). 
ray, n. and v., Ill, 112, 60; 201, 17; 406, 29; V, 83, b 3: 

array. V, 192, 34: make ready, saddle, 
ray, n., IV, 3, 22: track, 
raye, III, 67, 230: striped cloth, 
raysse, III, 295, 2: riding, raid. 
reacheles on, III, 93, 38: reckless of, heedless about, 
read, pret. of ride, IV, 457, 23; V, 166, ll; 228, 26. 
read, I, 309, B l; 310, B b: rehearse, tell. 
read (of dreams), IV, 167, D 9, 10; 171, 11; 172, 12, 

etc.; 180, C 3; 190, 23; V, 221, 24; 224, 23; 257, 14: 

interpret, give an issue to. 
read, reade, rede, red, redd, n., II, 53, 34, 35; 182, 4: 

advice. See rede, 
read, reade, red, v., II, 52 f., 6, 34; III, 104, 2, 4; 105, 

25: advise, read my rede, II, 186, l: corrupted from 

riddle my riddle, 187, 2, 8. See riddle, 
readilie, ready lye, II, 23, E 7; 444, 43: (without 

difficulty or hesitation) certainly, 
ready, V, 75, 6, 7; 81, 10: direct, readye, II, 58, 16: 

indubitable, certain, 
reaf, reif, III, 458 b: plunder, 
reak, smoke. See reek, 
reaming, a suit o claise were o the apple reamin, IV, 

176, 15: reaming = creaming, foaming, which of course 

gives little or no meaning. Apples were sometimes 

used to scent clothes. 



rean, rin, run. 

reap, V, 165 f., 6, 9:= ripe, search, rummage; see V, 

306,9. 

reapeu, p. p. of reap, II, 9, 26. 
rear, rare. 

reas, praise. See roos. 
reas, ryse, III, 307, 5: rouse, 
reast, reest, V, 256 b, 4: roost, 
reaths. See raiths. 
reave, IV, 26, 1: rob. 

reave, rave, rive, pret. of rive, I, 442, 6; IV, 416, 18. 
reavel(l)d, II, 140, 19, 20: ravelled, disordered (of hair), 
reaver, rever, riever, IV, 85, 2: robber, 
recher, compar., V, 283, 10, 20: richer, 
reck, v., II, 340 b, 2d line: rock (perhaps miswritten). 
recones, IV, 496 b: reckonings. 
record, sma, III, 319, 22: note, 
red, redd, rede, n., II, 182, 4; III, 112, 58: counsel. 

I, 22, B l; 227 a, 5: talk, tale. See read, 
red, redd, rede, reid, v., I, 329, 58; II, 59, 20; 62 a, 

15; 182,4,6,9,10; 272,6; IV, 495, 2 ; V, 191, 8: advise, 
red, III, 163, 80: to rid, clear out. of hair, comb (see 

redding-kaim). red the question, II, 253, 18: clear 

up, settle. 
redlan(d),I,16,Cll; IV, 274, 6; V, 206 a, 5: cleared, 

ploughed. 
red river comb, II, 216, 19, 21: corrupted, as are 

other versions in this passage, 
redding-kaim, reeding-comb, III, 452, 8; IV, 515, 

7: comb (for disentangling). 
rede. See red. 

rede, p.p., Ill, 298, 53: read, divined, discerned, 
rede, pret. of ride, III, 63, 134 (reden,they rode); IV, 

182, P 5. See read, 
redly, III, 67, 223: quickly, 
reeding-comb. See redding-kaim. 
reef, I, 333, 5: roof, 
reef-tree, I, 299, 5: roof-tree, beam in the angle of a 

roof, 
reek, reak, reik, n., II, 191, 24; 193, 21; 195, 33; III, 433, 

C 6-8, D 12; 434, 15; 435, 14; IV, 514, 16, 20: sinoke. 
reek, v., I, 304, E 3; II, 30, L 2; V, 162, E b l: rake, 

range, move, turn. See rake, 
reekit, V, 108, B 7: smoked, smoky, 
reel, reel went round, V, 155, C 2: revel, riot (of merry 
makers) ? 

reem, II, 335, N 7: room, 
reest, reast, IV, 189, 3, 4: roost, 
reet, I, 367, 7; V, 213, 8: root, 
reeve, V, 69 b: bailiff, steward, pi. reues. 
refell, I, 110, 22: repel. 

refer, message, II, 286, C 10: report, announce, 
regulate, III, 509, l, 7: corruption of, riddle it. 
reid, v., V, 200 a, after 50: advise, 
reif, reiff, III, 365 b; 471, notef; V, 198 b, after 62: 

robbery. 

reign, II, 8, 1: for rhyme; range ? or rein, as 9, b 1. 
reik, smoke. See reek. 
reill, reel. 



GLOSSARY 



369 



reiver, rever, riever, III, 472, 6; 473, 22: robber. See 

reaver. 

rejoyfull, IV, 173, 7: rejoicing, 
remeid, II, 367, 42; 371, 13; IV, 405, 49; 428, ?: 

remedy. 

remorse, III, 209, 10; 231, 94: compassion, 
remoued, II, 58, 4: agitated. 

renisht, renisht them to ride of twoe good renisht 
steeds, II, 52, 8; 53, 42 (42 emended from, on tow 
good renish, in conformity with 8) : should have some 
such meaning as accoutred, but a derivation is not to 
be made out. Qy. [ha] renisht, harnessed ? 
renown, spake wi renown, IV, 348, ll: force of au 
thority (of prestige), or, with the air of a person of 
repute, 
repair, II, 163, 18: resort to? fix upon? (probably 

nonsense for rhyme). 

require, II, 427, 6: ask for. (Other texts, inquire.) 
reset, IV, 281 a: harboring, 
respect, in respect, III, 364 b: considering, 
rest, pret. of rest, IV, 424, 12. 

restore, IV, 425, 8: restore, because the morning-gift 
would revert to the father and be at his disposition, 
no son having been born, 
retour, IV, 91, note f: return, 
returned, III, 356, 33: turned away, 
reuelle, I, 328, 51, 52: festivity. 
rever, III, 458 b; IV, 472, 11: robber. See reaver, 
reues, III, 68, 254: bailiffs. See reeve, 
rewe, be re we, II, 479, 15: in a row, one after another, 

each of the whole class. See rawe. 
rewth, III, 28, 136: pity. 

ribless kiln, I, 18, F ll: the ribs of a kiln for dry 
ing grain are the cross-beams, on which were laid 
the " stickles," or short pieces of wood, to support 
a layer of straw (or hair-cloth, or bricks) on which 
the grain was placed. It would of course be impos 
sible to dry grain on a ribless kiln. 
rid, ried, red. 

riddle, II, 184, 5, 8, ll, 18; 186, l; 187, 2, 8; 196, e l, 7: 
resolve, riddle my riddle, 187, 2, 8: resolve my di 
lemma, read my rede, 186, l, is probably corrupted 
from riddle my riddle; cf. 187, 2, 8. 
ried, ride. 

rien, V, 161, 9; 162, B 6: riven, 
riever, reiver, rever, IV, 84, 8; 195, C 3: robber. 

See reaver, 
rig, rigg, riggin, ridge. 

rig, rigg, of land, I, 19, 9; II, 152, ll; V, 164, 16; rig- 
length, III, 273, 23: a measure of land 600 feet by 
15, containing 9000 square feet. Donaldson, 
riggin, III, 459, 5: ridge, 
right, III, 356, 19: right off, directly, 
rigland, land under the plough, and so in rigs, ridges. 

rigland shire, II, 132, 32: a shire of such land (?). 
rin, rine, rean, V, 221, 15: run. 
ring, plural, II, 285, 16 f . : misprint in Scott ? 
ring (dancing), II, 104, 23; so, take me to the middel 
o the ring, V, 273, 12. 
VOL. v. 47 



ring, knocked at the, with the, ring, II, 187, 12; 201, 2; 
459, 10; III, 106, 4; 250, ll. rappit wi a, H, 462, 10! 
rapped on the, V, 293 b, 10. pulled at a, H, 490, 
D b 9. tinkled at the, II, 196 b, 4; 251, 4; 266, 7; 
267, 9; 393, 11; 475, K 6: the hammer of a door 
knocker. But, perhaps, in the case of tinkling, the 
ring may have been gently drawn up and down or 
struck against the projecting bow or rod of a door 
handle (often wound with a spiral), an operation 
which, when vigorously performed, is described as 
risping or rasping. 

ring (game), to ride at the ring, III, 448, A 3: to 
attempt, while at full gallop, to carry off, on the 
point of a rod, a ring suspended on a cross-beam 
resting on two upright posts. Jamieson. 
ring and the ba, IV, 257, 4; 354, A b l, 2: a game in 
which a ring was thrown up, and a ball was to be 
thrown through before the ring fell. Dr. W. Gregor. 
The rantin lassie plays at this, IV, 354. 
ringle-tree, V, 112, B b 11: probably the huge block 
of wood used for scutching flax and mangling clothes. 
An old game-keeper tells me that he has heard the 
word and so understands it. When not in use for 
beating flax, the beetle and tree-block were used by 
the women to mangle their clothes after washing. 
W. Walker. 
ripe, reap, rype, III, 160, 16; 163, 83, 84; V, 306, 9: 

search, rummage, clear or clean out, rifle, 
rise, III, 332, 2: branch, 
rise = raise: III, 513 b, 4. pret. rose, 514 a, 6. See 

ryse. 

rise, pret. of rise, III, 369, 17. 

rise, did on anchor rise so high, III, 344, 34: said of a 
ship in full sail; no apparent sense, (ride in B c,g, 
347, 34; upon an anchor rose so high in h, 349, 34.) 
rispen, fine rispen karne, II, 225, J 2: keen, sharp, 
risping, rasping ? or, p. p., filed ? (This passage is 
variously corrupted in different versions.) 
ritted, II, 295, B b 4, 22: stuck, stabbed, 
rive, rave, reave, pret. of rive, tear, V, 256, 13. p. p. 

II, 465, 4, 6, 8. 

rive up, I, 303, 7: plough up, tear up. 
riued, I, 284, 9: arrived, travelled, 
river, III, 364 b: robber. See reaver, 
river-comb, red, II, 216, A 19: is river a corruption of 
ivory f In B 2, 4, it is a tabean brirben kame. H 
1, brown berry comb. J 2, fine rispen kame: fine- 
filed (?). All seem to be badly corrupted, 
rock, roke, IV, 84, 14; 85, 4; 86, 6; 87, 4; V, 254 a, 4: 

distaff. 

rocked, rocket, roked, II, 191, 24; 195,33: smoked, 
rod, III, 8, 21: a bier was extemporized by taking rods 

from bushes for spakes, spokes, or bars, 
roddins, II, 408, 19, 20; 409 f., 21, 23: berries of moun 
tain ash. (But the berries are said to grow on yon 
der thorn, 409, 21.) 
rode, rood. 

roelle-bone, I, 326; 6. royal bone, I, 466 f., 10, 38; 
royal ben, I, 478 f., 12, 46: interpreted variously, 






370 



GLOSSARY 



without satisfaction. See rewel-boon, Professor 
Skeat's note to Chaucer's Sir Thopas, v. 2068. Hertz- 
berg suggests Reval bone, mammoth tooth, fossil 
ivory, imported into western Europe via Reval, 
Chaucer Nachlese, in Jahrbuch fur Rom. und Engl. 
Litteratur, VIII, 164 f.; and Prof. Skeat (with a 
different derivation), ivory of the walrus, citing Gode- 
froy, "roehal, ivoire de morse." 

roke, III, 298, 51: reek, vapor. 

roke, V, 254 a, 4: rock, distaff. See rock. 

roked, rocket, rocked, II, 191, 24; 193, 21; 195, 33; V, 
224, 19: smoked. 

rom, V, 304 b, 2: room. 

rood, III, 93, 28: rod (a measure). 

rood, four and thirty stripes comen beside the rood, 

II, 59, 29: referring to the scourging of Jesus (?). 
room ye roun, II, 89, 29: move round so as to make 

room. 

roome, III, 36, 44: companye (the reading in b). 

roos, rous, reas, v., IV, 69, 21; 378, 2; 379, 2; 384, 2; 
V, 275, 2: to praise, laud, boast. 

roose, n., IV, 503, 19: rose. 

roosing, rosin, rousing, n., IV, 378, i; 379, l; 383, 
l; V, 275, l: praising, boasting, bragging. 

root, I, 304, F 5: the end of a rafter, resting on a wall, 
ring of an auld tree-root, I, 304, F 4: hoops are some 
times made of tree-roots, which are very tough; the 
point here is the size of the fingers which such a ring 
would fit. 

root of his sword, III, 268, ll: a blunder; see note, 

III, 275. 

rose-garlonde, III, 75, 398: a "garland" appears to 
have been attached to the yerdes (397), and every 
shot outside of the garland was accounted a failure. 
The garland as the limit of allowable shots is men 
tioned at 93, 31. This must have been an extempo 
rized ring of twigs in the latter case, and was so, 
perhaps, in the other, for it is likely that the term 
would become conventional, and mean, as Mr C. J. 
Longman suggests, nothing more than a disk with 
circular rings, such as survive to this day in archery 
targets. 

rosin, V, 275, ll: boasting. See roosing. 

rosses, roses. 

rottens, rottons, I, 466, 8; V, 124, 6: rats. 

roudes, II, 284, 4: haggard (subst., an old wrinkled 
woman). 

roun, rown, round, III, 199, 28; 356, 19: whisper. 

rounin(g), n., V, 256, 10: whispering. 

round, so it went round, IV, 146, 7: so much it 
came to (?). 

round tables, II, 343, l: a game. 

rouudlie, I, 104, 6: at a good pace. 

rous, roos, reas, IV, 379, 2; V, 275, 2: boast of. 

rousing, n., boasting. See roosing. 

rout, n., Ill, 160, 22: blow. 

rout, n., IV, 113, 3; 114, D l: row, brawl, disturbance. 

rout, v., II, 318 a; IV, 378, 5; 380, ll: roar. IV, 6, 
16; V, 250, 14: bellow. 



route, rowte, rowght, III, 23, 22; 26, 88; 180, 9; 297, 
33: company, band, crowd. In III, 297, 33: perhaps 
melde, affray. 

routh, I, 298, l: plenty. 

row, rough. 

row, rowe, I, 71, 61; 80, 33; 441, 6, 8; II, 443,35; 448, 
39; IV, 267, 9; 269 b, 9: roll. pret. and p. p. rowed, 
rowd, rowit, rowt, I, 441, 7, 9; IV, 274, 15; V, 106, 
D 7: rolled, wound. 

rowan, row on, rown, tree, II, 504, 18: mountain-ash. 

rowe, on a, III, 67, 229; 117, 24: in a line, file. 

row-footed, III, 473, 25: rough-footed. 

rowght, III, 297, 33: company, ryall in rowghte, kingly 
among men. See route. 

rowght, wrought. 

rown, 1, 312, 17, 22: rowan, mountain-ash. See rowan. 

rown, roun, round, III, 356, 19: whisper. 

rowt, pret., V, 106, D 7: rolled. See row. 

rowte. See route. 

rowynde, III, 297, 33: round. 

royal bone, royal ben. See roelle-bone. 

royalty e, III, 411, 5: splendid display, or the like. 

rub-chadler, rub-chandler, I, 285 f., 31, 43: rubbish- 
barrel. See I, 279. 

rudd, n., I, 272, 13, 20, 24: (redness) complexion, face. 

rudd, v., IV, 28, 34: redden. 

rudely, III, 162, 49: sturdily. 

rue, III, 220, 6: cause to rue. 

rugge, I, 243, 2: back. 

rule, III, 98, 32: going on, taking on, noisy bewailing. 

run, IV, 289, F 6: issue, outcome (said to be slang). 

run, red runs i the rain, II, 304, 4: gives no sense, and 
so of Scott's reading at this place, the red sun's on 
the rain. It will be observed that the day has not 
dawned. 

run a reel, II, 108, 17: gone through, danced. 

rung, I, 202, A 12; III, 161, 43; IV, 444, 20: staff, pike 
staff. 

rung (of the noise of a cannon), n., IV, 52, 14: ring; 
appears to have been altered, for rhyme, from ring, 
which is in two other copies. 

rusty, V, 151, E 6: surly, 

rybybe, I, 328, 49: a stringed instrument. 

ryght, straight, directly, ryjth, V, 283, 14: aright. 

rynde, be rynde and rent, III, 297, 42: flayed, (rynde 
should perhaps be riven.) 

rype, v. See ripe. 

ryse, III, 22, 2; 23, 20: rouse. See rise. 

rysse, I, 328, 39: probably rising ground, elevation 
(compare mountayne, playne, delle, hill, in 38, 40-42: 
not twig, brushwood). 

rysyt, I, 242, ll: riseth (old imperat. pL), rise. 

S 

s, se, as sign of the future tense. I 'se, III, 488, 19; IV, 
428, 18. thou 's, 'se, IV, 3, 31; 12, C 6. he 's, hee 'se, 
II, 442, 16; IV, 146, 6. we 's, I, 467, 29; IV, 181, 
D 14. ye 'se, IV, 22, 18; 109, 7. yow 's, IV, 504, 36. 
they 's, IV, 486, 32. itt's, H, 443, 22. heart's, IV, 



GLOSSARY 



371 



181, 17. Jocky Ha 's, III, 487, 6. thy dinner 's, III, 
489, 41. (The s being the initial letter of sal, it 
would be better to write I s', etc.) s attached to the 
verb, be 's, III, 160, 9. We even find shals, I, 481, 

28. 

-s(-is), of the genitive, omitted, III, 97 f., 8, 23, 28; 111, 
39. moder son, III, 98, 24, 27, as in A. S. 

's, II, 375, 19: of his. 

-s (-se), termination of the 2d pers. sing, of the pres. 
indie, thou was, I, 222, E ll; seese J>ou, I, 328, 38-42; 
JH>U commes, 44. thou 's welcome, III, 488, 24. shals 
thou, 1, 481, 28. istow, 175 f., D 4, 10, 16. See 1, 130, 
5; 327, 20; 328 f., 56, 58; 341, 13; 411, 4; 413, 3; II, 
64, 57; 148 f., 12, 20; 218, 8, 10, 16; III, 97, 11, 15; 99, 
62; 110, 23. Etc., etc. 

-s, -es, -ys, termination of pres. indie, plur. cods that 
sleeps, cheeks gars, bairns has, lies men, raches 
rynnys, fowles synges, I, 68, 29; 115, C 3; 130, P ll; 
327, 16; 329, 59; 342, 40; 345, 39; II, 32, P 4. So, is, 
was, I, 68, 27; 69, 43; 255, 3-5; 342, 30; 344, 28; H, 

71, 13, 14. Etc. 

saa, pret., saw. 

sabelline, I, 221, D 8, 9: sable. 

Backless, sakeless, saikless, II, 145, 22, 23; 153, 19, 

21; HI, 437, 27; IV, 373, 9: innocent, 
sad, III, 67, 215; 357, 40: steadfast, firm, stanch, 
saep, v.y III, 269, D 3: soap, 
saerd, p. p., IV, 494, 33: served, 
safe, II, 160, 4, 6, 7: save, 
safeguard, V, 66, ll: riding-skirt, 
safer, V, 283, 21: saffron, 
safly, IV, 18, 10: softly, 
salt (of sleep), HI, 489, ll: lightly, 
saikless. See sackless. 
sain, I, 351, 36, 48: cross, bless, p. p. sained, I, 354, 26. 

ill sained, pret., I, 350, 25. well saint, p. p., Ill, 488, 

37. 

saint, in, 488, 37: blest. See sain. 

saint, v., disappear. See sainted. 

St Mary knot(t), III, 465, 26, 27: a triple knot (see 
462, note *). 

sainted, saunted, I, 331, C 8; 333 b, 8: disappeared. 

saipy-sapples, I, 303, D 5 (the right reading) : soap 
suds in which clothes have been washed (probably 
meaning the strong of V, 213, 5). 

sair, sore. I, 100, 9: lamentable. 

sair, sare, saer, sere, I, 301, 2; II, 71, 15; 105, 9; 408, 
1, 2; IV, 248, 10; V, 105, B 3, ll; 239, 34: serve. 

sairly, IV, 358, 19 : rhyme word; much is all the mean 
ing. 

salt, set. 

sakeless. See sackless. 

sale, V, 228, 19: sold. 

sail, shall, pret. sould. 

sally rod, HE, 252, 12: sallow, willow. 

salten, adj., IV, 452, 6; 475, 6: salt. 

sallied, in, 61, 102: greeted. 

Saluter, HI, 250, 3: corrupted from Sir Hugh (see 
other versions of the ballad). 



same, alle in same, HI 91 a: all, together, vppon the 

same, III, 361, b 33: again, after the same fashion (?). 
san, sane, sayn, syne, V, 214 f., 4, 9; 221, 24; 242 a, 

7; 257, 14: since, 
sanchojris, of his bryk, HI, 13, 3: apparently the 

fork of the breeches, but the etymology is to me 

inexplicable. 

sang, pret. of sing, to singe, II, 155, 37, 38. 
sanua, shall not. 

sarbit, H, 132, 33, 34: exclamation of sorrow, 
sare, serve. See sair. sare a man a wear, I, 301, 2: 

serve, supply, a man (of) with his wear, clothing, 
sark, I, 15, 8, 17; 16, B 8, 18, C 6, 18, etc.; 387 f., A 5, 

8, 9; B 5, 6, 7: shirt, shift, 
sarsenent, IV, 312, 8: sarcenet, 
sassaray, H, 209, E 5: imitation of the sound of 

church-bells. See ceserara. 
sat, saut, I, 310, 4: salt, 
sate, sit a gude sate, a silly sate, IV, 469, 8: occupy, 

be in, a good, pitiable, position, 
sathe, I, 333, appendix l, wrongly written (or read) 

for sagh (or something equivalent), saw. (th in this 

piece very frequent for gh.) 
saugh, III, 459, 15; IV, 95, 2: willow, 
saun faile, V, 297 b: assuredly, 
saunted, sainted, I, 331, C 8; 335 b, 8: disappeared, 
saut, sat, IV, 258, 26: salt, 
saute, III, 327 b: assault, attack, 
sauyour, see (saw) my sauyour, III, 97, 7: attended 

mass, or, took the sacrament. 

saving tree, HI, 398, D 4: corruption of savin tree, 
saw, v., I, 427, 13, 15; 428, ll: sow. 
sawe,/>.^>. of see, III, 59, 60. 
sawe, speech. 

sawten, v., S pi., HI, 100, 63: assault, attack, 
sawtrye, I, 328, 49: psaltery, a stringed instrument, 
say, H, 87, 30: try. 
say, saye, pret. of see, IH, 111, 34; 309, 44; V, 79, 35; 

80, 47. 
sayn, san, sane, syne, V, 239, 34; 254, 9, 11, is, 22; 

257, 15: since, then, 
sayne, I, 70, 19, strong participle of say. In, I yow 

sayne, III, 297, 46, an auxiliary, do or can, must be 

omitted, or else we must read saye, as in 32, 34, 62, 65. 
scad, I, 102, 12: reflection (of the color of). In other 

texts, shade, shadow, I, 490, 21; 491, 20; 492, 12. 
scaith, skaith, scath, n., HI, 162, 52, 66: hurt, 
scaith, skaith, v., Ill, 5, D 8; 6, 17: hurt, 
scale, I, 429, 11: a drinking-vessel. (Icelandic skal, 

Danish skaal, a bowl for drinking.) 
scale, III, 403 a: scatter, disperse. Ill, 393, 6: expel, 

drive away, scaling wide, III, 301, D 2: scatter 
ing, covering a good deal of ground, 
scales, V, 211, 25, 31-34: discs worn as ornaments on 

the head. 

scanct, I, 336 a, last line but one: shone, gleamed, 
scarson, II, 434, 29: scarcely up to. 
scart, I, 301, 5, 6; 303, D 2: scratch, scrape, 
scath, scaith, n., I, 284, 18: harm. 



372 



GLOSSARY 



scathe, awayte me scathe, III, 66, 202; wayte me 
skathe, wait me scath, III, 83, 202; 86, 202: lie in 
wait, seek an opportunity to do me harm. 

scathe away, I, 348 f., 5, 8: expel, get rid of ? See 
skaith, I, 397, 14. 

scaur, Braidscaur, III, 5, D 2, 6: a bare and broken 
place on a steep hill; also, cliff, precipice. Broad- 
spear, 6, 2, 5, is probably a corruption. 

Scere-thorsday, 1, 243, i: Maundy Thursday, Thurs 
day before Easter. (Icelandic Skfri-J>orsdagr.) 

schane, pret., shone. 

scharpper, compar., V, 283, 6, 16: sharper. V, 283, 8: 
emend to strenger. 

schele, scheel, II, 164, 2; 335, N 5; IV, 328, A b, 
after 7: school. See schule. 

schet, schette, pret. of schote, shoot, III, 13 f ., 13, 15. 

schill. See shill. 

scho, II, 146, 19; IV, 418, 2: she. 

schon, shon. shone, V, 79, 27: shoes. See sheen. 

schoote his horsse away, froo, III, 297, 32, 33: dis 
carded, sent off. 

schrewde (arrow), III, 13, 6: accursed, pernicious, 
baneful. 

schule, scheel, squeel, II, 175, 16; IV, 327 f., 2, 5; 
329, D d 7: school. 

schunte besides, beside, III, 361, b, c 38, 41: turn 
aside from. 

schylde, imperat., V, 283, 14: shield, protect. 

sckill, I, 295, 28: reason, judgment. See skill. 

sclasps, twa lang sclasps between his eyes, IV, 489, 25: 
clasps. Span would answer were it not that there are 
but three sclasps between the shoulders. (In L 18, 
of the same ballad, II, 394, there are three women's 
spang (span) between his brows.) If sclasps were 
taken in the sense of fathom, the space between the 
arms extended, this would suit the shoulders well 
enough, but the absurd disproportion in relation to 
the eyes would remain. Probably yard or ell has 
dropped out in 25 4 . (yards three in L 18.) 

sclavin, I, 190 a: pilgrim's cloak. 

scob(b), scope, scoup, II, 313, 26; 316, 10: gag. 

scop, III, 138, 9: (scalp) pate, head. 

scope, scoup, scob, II, 312, 29; V, 229, 33: gag. 

score. See cor. 

scorn, skorne, II, 105, 20; III, 113, 77: shame, humili 
ation, mortification, give the, this, a, scorn, III, 111, 
12; 360, 23; 362, 35; 363, D 14; 367, 49; IV, 201, 23; 
224, 24, 25; 254, 25; 357, B 6, 10; 358, 16; 465, 35, 
36 : put to shame, subject to humiliation (especially, 
by showing a preference as to marriage, or by slight 
ing a woman). So, playd you the scorn, IV, 483, 25; 
get the scorn, II, 367, 47; IV, 221, 16; 222, 18, 19; 
227, 16, 17; 228, 19; 230, 24. 

scort, I, 334, 4: short. 

scoup, n., V, 229, 33: gag. See scob, scope. 

scoup, v., II, 70, 15: move hastily from one place to 
another, fly. 

scouth, III, 161, 42: room, range. 

scray, III, 116, 4, as to form suggests scrag, scrog; 



but the meaning required is, branches, branckage, or 
even spray. 

scread, II, 425, A 6: shred, bit, piece. 

screeded (or scrieded), pret., II, 212, 13: rent. 

screeking, screening, II, 485, 17: screeching. 

screfe, screfie, shryve, III, 111 ff., 27, 33, 38-42, etc.: 
sheriff. 

screighed, IV, 174, 20: shrieked. 

scrieded. See screeded. 

scrime, IV, 10, 2; serime, 15, d 2: seem to be cor 
rupt; possibly, crime; pursuing the crime for pursu 
ing the criminal. 

scrodeley, V, 79, 14: shrewdly, rudely, ungraciously. 

scroggs, scrogs, III, 3, 12; 5, C 3; 7, E, F 11; 9, G 
10, H 13; 10, I 5; IV, 496, 8: stunted bushes, or per 
haps trees; underwood. " Scroggs, blackthorn." Hal- 
liwell, from a MS. scrogg-bush, V, 10, 4 (high 
enough here to hang the pair on). 

scroggy, scroggie, IV, 174, 10; 273, 14: covered with 
stunted bushes; "abounding in underwood," Halli- 
well. 

scug, to scug his deadly sin, II, 283, 22: shade, screen. 
(Icel. skyggja, overshadow; Dan. skygge, Swed. 
skugga, shade.) expiate, W. Scott. 

scuttle-dishes, II, 467, 43: the larger dishes, in which 
things are served, in distinction from those out of 
which things are eaten (T. Davidson) ; platters. 

se, sign of the future tense. See s. 

se, pret. of see. See see. 

sea-ground, I, 448, 11 : bottom of the sea. 

sea-maw, II, 363, 7; 365, 5; IV, 482 b, 6: gull. 

seal, IV, 409, 5: (A. S. ssll) happiness, blessing, gude 
seal that it sae spread, II, 420, 1: (happiness result 
from its spreading ?) quod fans turn sit! 

scale, III, 412, 24: sail. 

sear, sair, IV, 456 f., 15, 19: sore. 

sear, V, 223, 8: sure. 

sear, serve. See sair. 

search her, IV, 446, 2: look her up, see about her, 
overhaul (should, perhaps, be seek, visit). 

seat, V, 274 b, l: sight. 

seek, I, 15, 15: sack. 

Second person of pret. indie, without termination, thon 
made, thou did, thou came, etc., I, 221, C 9; 222, E 
10-17; 434, 27; II, 148 f., 12, 14, 20; 218, 16. So, thou 
will, schall, thou '11, well thow, I, 130, 4; 221, C 10, 
ll; III, 110, 24; 112, 48. 

securly, III, 98, 34: surely. 

see (videre), pret. say, saye, sey, se, see, seed. pret. se, 
see, I, 283, l; 295, 27; II, 46, 40; 245, 27; III, 24, 47; 
27, 99; 97, 19. p. p. se, III, 27, 102. 

see, save and se(e), II, 44, 6, 15; 52 f., 10, 18, 44; III, 65, 
177; IV, 198, G 4; 455, 4: protect (tueri). 

see, well mot ye fare and see, III, 266, 3: as here 
used, see well would have to mean, see prosperity; 
but apparently there is a confusion of well may you 
fare and God see you, protect you (as in, save and 
see). In B 3, p. 268, loeel may ye save might mean, 
may God save you, but far better, in the next line, is 



GLOSSARY 



373 



not in concatenation, and we shall be obliged to un 
derstand weel as good fortune. The passage must 
be corrupted, well may you sit and see, lady, well 
may you sit and say, II, 290, 15: (corrupted) non 
sense. 

see, sigh and see, IV, 193, 14: apparently a doublet of 
sigh, as ne of neigh and nigh, he of high. 

see, n. t V, 283, 5, 15: sea. 

seed, pret. of see, IV, 151, 6. 

seek, seke, I, 75, 46; II, 146, 18, 20; 171, 16; III, 68, 
255; V, 256 b, 14: search. I, 202, 16; 204,11; V, 211, 
19, 23: ask. socht, II, 30, 8: asked for. par tic. seek 
and, seeking. 

seek in, V, 180, 13, 15: ask admission. 

seeke to, unto, III, 444, 5: resort to. 

seel o downs, IV, 218, 12: chelidonium, celandine, 
mallow-wort. 

seely, happy, seely court, I, 315, 12; 507 f., 2, 12: 
fairy court (as I, 346, 16; elfin court, 351, 30). 

seen, I, 504, 7: sun. 

seen, I, 183, 9, 15; II, 166, 20; 257, 30; IV, 135, 26: 
soon, seener, IV, 262, 31. 

seen = syne, afterwards. 

seene, I seene, V, 53, 105: ellipsis of have. 

seep, II, 148, in: ooze, leak. 

seeth, III, 281, 7: sooth. 

seke, III, 68, 255; 100,76: search. See seek. 

seke, to, III, 110, 14: at a loss. 

seker, III, 67, 215: firm, resolute. 

sekirlye, I, 327, 18: certainly, truly. 

seld, IV, 2, 2: sold. 

selerer, III, 61, 91, 93; 67, 233: the monk who has 
charge of the provisioning of a convent. 

selke, V, 283, 21: silk. 

selkie, silkie, II, 494 a: seal. 

selle, I, 326, 6: saddle. 

semblant, semblaunce, semblaunte, semblaunt, 
III, 57, 22; 79, 22; 82, 22; 85, 22: mein, look. 

sembled, III, 160, 15 : met. (b, asembled.) 

sen, sent. 

sen, II, 32, Q 2; 110, 2; 272, 10, 12: since. 

send, sene, II, 360, 10; 365 f., (10), 17, 18: a thing sent. 
IT, 109, 15: the messengers sent to fetch the bride. 

Bend, pret., 1,204, D 3: sent. 

sendered, IV, 229, 12, 16: sundered, parted. 

senes, IV, 315, 2; 316,25: sends, messages. See send. 

sent, III, 75, 384: sendeth. 

sent, sent I me, III, 76, 414: assent. 

sentence past, IV, 514, 6: order given. 

sere, serve. See sair. 

serre, II, 59, 29: sair, sore ? (MS. serrett). 

serundad, surunded, V, 262, No 225, A 3; 263, 4: 
surrounded. 

servit, II, 371, 5: (serviette) table-napkin. 

seruyd him of bred and cloth, I, 241, t: for would 
make an easier reading than of, which will have to 
be understood, on terms of (receiving food and cloth 
ing). 

set, V, 80, 57: sitteth. 



set, II, 168, l; 282, 7; 463, 19, 25; HI, 216, 29; IV, 135, 
20; 204, 9; 331, 18: sit, become, suit, set a petticoat, 
IV, 331, 18: became (looked well in) the petticoat. 
See become. 

set, p. p., Ill, 37, 61: fixed, determined. See set for, 
below. 

set her brest (and sworn), II, 459, 8: brought her 
breast to a level with the water. (Elsewhere, 
smoothed.) 

set, set a mill, I, 134, O, 8: to stop the machinery by 
turning off the water from the wheel. 

set, set the monke to-fore the brest, III, 67, 223: as 
sailed, shot at. 

set (sete, and wrongly sat) a dynt on, vppon, of, III, 
309, 42, 45, 46: inflicted a blow, stroke. 

set by, IV, 11, 15, 20: lay aside, cease, let be. 

set for, IV, 229, 12, 16: set upon, bent upon. 

set them up in temper -wood, IV, 222, 20: corrupt. 
See note, 231, D 20. 

sete, n., Ill, 63, 133: suit, dress. 

sett, III, 340, 3l: take aim. 

settle by, IV, 219, 13: set you aside (?). 

settled, gun, III, 341, 44: levelled, adjusted. 

sevent, II, 75, 7: seventh. 

several, III, 224, 13: variously. 

sey, pret. of see, V, 80, 41. 

seyn, syen, syne, then, afterwards. 

seyte, neys seyte, V, 80, 39: pretty sight ! 

sez I, V, 304, b, 4: say(s) I. 

sha, shaw, V, 267, 10: show. 

shack, shake, IV, 325, 9; 326, 7: shake straw so that 
the corn may fall out (?). 

shade, shadow, scad, I, 101, 13; 490, 21; 491, 20; 
492, 12: reflection (of the color of). We have, shad- 
doowes greene, in one copy of Adam Bell, see III, 

32,48. 

shaft their arrows on the wa, IV, 3, 16: so in both 

copies, unintelligible; corrected by Scott to sharp, 
shaftmont, shathmont, I, 330 f., A 2, B 2, C 2; 332, 

E 2: the measure from the top of the extended thumb 

to the extremity of the palm, six inches. (A. S. " ix. 

scaefta munda." Lex. Ath.) 
shake. See shack. 

shals thou, 1, 481, 28. See s as sign of the future tense. 
shambo, II, 376, 26: shamoy, chamois, 
shame, the, II, 70, 15; III, 464, ll; 466 f., 44, 62, 68: 

euphemism for the Devil, shame a ma, III, 490, 15, 

27, 29: devil a bit. 
sham ef 11 reel, II, 110, 28: the first reel that is danced 

with the bride, her maiden, and two young men; 

called the Shame Spring or Reel, because the bride 

chooses the tune. Buchan. 
shames death, II, 60, 41; III, 330, 14: death of shame, 

shameful death. 

shamly, III, 80, 337: shamefully. 
shaii e, pret. of sheen, shine, IV, 469 a, 11. 
shank, IV, 37, A 6, B 8: the projecting point of a hill, 

joining it with the plain, 
shapen, III, 79, 81, 85, 50: devised, ordained. 



374 



GLOSSARY 



share, I, 388, B 7; IV, 416, 17: cutting, portion. 

shathmont. See shaftmont. 

shaw, shawe, I, 422, 3; HI, 91, l; 97, l; V, 250, 25: 
wood, thicket. See wode shawe. In Teviotdale 
shawe is " a piece of ground which becomes suddenly 
flat at the bottom of a hill or steep bank." Jamie- 
son. So, perhaps, V, 250, 25. 

shaw, sha, show. 

shay, V, 110, 8, 9: shy. 

she, III, 318, 4: spurious Highland dialect, repre 
senting he, they, and even Highlander, for which 
she, her, hernanesell have become a nickname. (The 
Gaelic having no word for the neuter it, the masc. e 
and fern, i do duty for the absent form, i in some 
Highland districts is largely used in speaking of 
sexless objects.) 

sheaf, shefe, of arrows, in, 3, 5; 62, 131 : bundle of 
twenty-four. Cf. II, 168, 5; III, 13, 9. 

shealin, shiel, shielin, shielen, shieling, shield, IY, 
258, 23; 259, 17; 260, 16; 262, 27, 29; 266, 17: herds 
man's hut. 

shear, III, 307, 6, 8: several. (Scot, seir.) 

sheave, shive, n., I, 470, 32; II, 358, 27; 367, 44; V, 
16, 13, 14; 18, 3, 4; 219, 25: slice. 

sheave, v., IV, 476, 7: slice. 

sheave-wisps, V, 213, 5: wisps of straw from a 
sheaf, put by peasants into their shoes for more 
warmth. 

shed, II, 116, 27; 118, 21: a piece of ground on which 
corn grows, so called as being separate from adja 
cent land. 

shed by (hair), II, 129, 26, 27: parted, threw off from 
the face on both sides, shed back, II, 135, 39 (shook 
back, 135, 38). 

shedd, prat. See sheede. 

shee, shie, I, 68, 9, 12; III, 271, P 9; 384, 9: shoe. 

sheed, V, 251, 36: sheet. 

sheede, I, 273, 43, 44: shed, spill. 

sheen, sheene, sheyne, I, 490, 7; II, 52, 5, 11; 372, A 
b 2; III, 24, 48; 91, l; 97, l: shining, bright, beauti 
ful, (bright is also beautiful, I, 285, 25; 293, 2.) In, 
shawes been sheene, III, 91 and 97, l; shadowes 
sheene, III, 24, 48, we must take sheene in the 
secondary sense, beautiful. 

sheen, shene, I, 176, 2, 7, 12; II, 395, 17; IV, 380, 26; 
416, 12; V, 306, 2, 3: shoes. See schon. 

sheen, shene, v., Ill, 392, 9, 10: shine, pret. shane. 

sheene, n., II, 183, 13: brightness, splendor (evidently 
a word of Percy's here). 

shefe. See sheaf. 

shend, III, 27, 114; 63, 140; 123, 13: put to shame, in 
jure, destroy. 

shent(e), p. p., HI, 27, 114: blamed. Ill, 75, 396; 
123, 13: hurt, etc. 

shete, shoot, shete a peny, III, 97, 10, n: shoot for a 
penny-stake, pret. shet, III, 97,12; shyt, III, 26, 83. 

sheu, IV, 289, P 9: show. 

sheugh, II, 238, 6; V, 108, B l: trench, ditch, furrow. 

shew, I, 299, a 13; II, 332, J 6: sew. 



shewed, III, 450 b: represented. 

sheyne. See sheen. 

shie, shoe. See shee. 

shiel, shielen, shieling, shield. See shealin. 

shill, schill, I, 16, l; 17, E l; n, 254, 10; 382, 28; 
383, 29; 386, 24; IV, 200, 2; 201, 1: shrill. 

shimmerd, glittered. 

shin'd, preL of shine, IV, 240, 2. 

shirife, shirrie. shrife, sheriff. See screfe. 

shirrs, shears. 

shive, sheave, V, 219, 25: slice. 

shock, v., IV, 106 b: collide, encounter. 

shoder, V, 221, 10: shoulder. 

shogged, III, 332, 14: moved away. 

shon, schon, shone, shoon(e), shoun, I, 69, 52; 71, 
42; 73, 64; 78, 39; III, 65, 193; V, 83, 55: shoes. 

shook (sword over the plain), II, 393, K 14: the MS. 
has shook, not strook, but strook must at any rate be 
meant (cf. 380, A 32). See II, 378 a. 

shooled, I, 184, 10 ; V, 210, 10: shovelled. See shule. 

shoon(e), shoun, shoes. See shon. 

shoon, shoun, soon. 

shoot at Sim and moon, III, 201, 21; to the sun or 
the moon, III, 203, 18: they wish to have no mark 
measured, are ready to take any distance. 

shope, III, 59, 64: created. 

shopen, shapen, III, 82, 50: devised, ordained. 

short-bread, V, 262, 22: "a thick cake of fine flour 
and butter, to which caraways and orange-peel are 
frequently added." Jamieson. (A sweet short-bread 
is still well known in Scotland.) 

shorten her, I, 478, 14: while away the time for her 
self; cf. Germ, kiirzen, kurzweilen. See shortsome. 

shortly^ and anone, III, 23, 10: speedily. 

shortsome, adj., II, 371, 2: enlivening, cheering. 

shortsome, v., II, 370, 13, 14: divert (while away the 
time, opposed to langsum). See shorten. 

shot, o wheat, IV, 459, 2: field, patch. 

shot, V, 76, 9; 127, 3: reckoning, trust me one shott, 
V, 15, 22. 

shot, II, 256, K 2=schawit, looked at(?). 

shot, p. p., IV, 458, 3: shod. 

shot-window, II, 122, 5; 141,10; 177,24; 230, 9; 322, 
7; 357, 8; 368, 3; 375, 22; 376, 37,40; III, 23, 22; 105, 
20; IV, 135, 19; 151, 6; 153, E 6; 154, 11; 428, 3; 
493, 12; V, 248, 8. II, 141, a princess looks out at a 
shot-window; II, 368, a lady draws her shot- window 
in her bower, harps and sings; II, 376, a knight 
jumps to a shot-window to escape; III, 105, Robin 
Hood glides out of a shot- window; IV, 135, a queen 
looks oer her shot-window; IV, 493, a knight goes in 
at a shot-window. " Windows called shots, or shut 
ters of timber with a few inches of glass above 
them." Wodrow's History, II, 286. But the shot- 
window of recent times is one turning on a hinge, 
above, and extensible at various angles by means of 
a perforated bar fitting into a peg or tooth. Donald 
son, Jamieson's Dictionary, 1882, notes that in the 
west of Scotland a bow-window is called an out-shot 



GLOSSARY 



375 



window. A bow-window would be more convenient 

in some of the instances cited. 
shott, V, 15, 22: reckoning (oddly used here as of an 

ale-house.) See shot. 

shouir, shower, III, 385: throe, pang. See showr. 
shoulder, looked over the left, III, 339, 7; 368, ll; 

369, 13, etc.: apparently a gesture of vexation or of 

indignant perplexity. See the passages cited at V, 

286 a. 

shoun, shun, shoes. See shon. 
shoun, soon, 
shour, sure. 

shourn, V, 225^ 5: shoulders, 
shouther, showther, shuder, I, 21 b, 3 ; 302, A T; 

303, 9; 331, D 2; 332, F 2; IV, 297, 10: shoulder, 
showded, V, 124, C 15: swung. 
shower. See showr. 
shower o his best love, I, 476, J 4: share, or cut, of 

his best loaf. 
sh owing-home, II, 437, 78: shoeing-horn, a pun on 

the beggar's horn, whether as a means of sponging 

liquor, or of helping one to take in drink, 
showne, pret., Ill, 37, 84: showed, 
showr, shower, shouir, I, 68, 32; II, 105, 3; III, 385, 

5; 386, 7: throe, paroxysm of pain, 
shradds, III, 91, 1: coppices (Halliwell, perhaps con- 

jecturally). The equivalent shard, he says, is in 

Yorkshire an opening in a wood. (A. S. scre"adian, 

cut, dock ?) 
shrewde, shrewed, a term of vituperation; originally, 

cursed, thou art a shrewed dettour, III, 61, 104; 

thou arte a shrewde hynde, III, 64, 164 : perhaps 

ironical (devilish pretty), shrewde wyle, III, 65, 

181: clever, 
shroggs, III, 93, 28: rods, wands (serving for prickes, 

marks). 

shryue, III, 70, 287: sheriff. See screfe. 
shuder, IV, 493, 8: shoulder. See shouther. 
shule, v., IV, 207, 20: shovel. See shooled. 
shun, shoun, shoes, 
shun, III, 357, 41: better, shunte, as in the other texts, 

turn off, aside. Shunte is to be understood in 43, 

45, 47. 

shuped, I, 204, E 2: shipped. (The reading may be 

sheeped.) 

shyt, pret., Ill, 26, 83: shot, 
shyt, imperative, III, 71, 314: shut. p. p., Ill, 25, 53: 

shut, 
si, so. 

siccan, sic, sick, sicke, sicken, such, such a. 
siccarlie, III, 492, 27: so as to make all safe, sick- 

erlie, III, 491, 5: securely. Ill, 491, 12: so as to 

make certain, make sure of the effect, 
siccer, sicker (siccer and honestly), III, 487, 9; IV, 

31, B 6: securely, safely. 

sich, sick, n., sigh: II, 139, 6; 168, 15; 230, C l. 
sich, sick, v., I, 451, 12; V, 164, D b 10: sigh. pret. 

sicht, I, 73, 66; III, 453, 2. sikt, II, 241, 8. siched, 

I, 72, 21. sight, IV, 503 f ., 6, 21, 23. pres. p. sichand, 



sichan, sichin, II, 96, I 3, 4, 6; 471, 13; V, 41, 31; 
IV, 382, 6. 

sichin, n., II, 286, C 10: sighing. 

sicht, sight. 

sicke, sicken, III, 367, 3; 441, 32; V, 194, 64 (sicken- 
like): such. 

sicker. See siccer. 

sickles of ice, ickles of ice, III, 152, l; 154, f l: 
icicles. 

side, keeping her flocks on yon side, IV, 323, 1: ellipsis 
of hill, river, or the like. 

side, adj., II, 122, H 7, 8; 407, 9; 409, 15; 466, 37, 38; 
469, 38, 39; IV, 165, 15; 283, 12; 285, 4; V, 267, 4: 
long, and so, probably, IV, 130, 4; 134, 8. I, 80, 12, 
of stirrup too long, low for the foot (Icel. sfor, de- 
missus), saddle a steed side, IV, 464, 18 : wide, 
wear your boots sae side, 1, 428, 8; 429, 5: of boots the 
tops of which lap a good way over, or perhaps of 
boots wide at the tops; I, 430, 2. See syde. 

side be, mother-in-law side be, II, 71, ll: seems to 
mean, side by, by his side. Possibly, sud, should, be. 

sighan, sighend, pres. p. of sigh. 

sight, sikt, pret., IV, 503 f., 6, 21, 23: sighed. See 
sich, v. 

signd, IV, 288, 10: that is, sind. Si nd is to wash, 
rinse; here she has simply wet her lips. 

signots, took out the gowd signots, IV, 53, 13: orna 
ments, whether seals or not, attached to the ears by 
" grips." Three sygnets hang at a gold ring, IV, 37, 
13; 38, 13, which is taken off in the latter place, and 
was, therefore, a finger-ring. 

sike, syke, II, 238, 6; IV, 3, 28: ditch, trench (water 
course, marshy bottom with a stream in it. Jamie- 
son.) IV, 470, 25: (perhaps) rivulet. 

sikt, sighed. 

sile, IV, 118, C 3: flow. 

silkie, selkie (A. S. seolh), II, 494, 3, 4: seal. 

siller-knapped (gloves), II, 134, 8, 13: ornamented 
with silver balls or tassels, (golden-knobbed, 133, 
D6.) 

silly, silly tin, silly twine, II, 224, 12, 17: simple, mean, 
of slight value, silly sisters, II, 311, l: harmless, 
innocent ? silly old man, silly old woman, etc., Ill, 
5 f., 10, 11, 20; 6 f., 9, 10; 9, G- 9; 180 f., 3, 8, 9, 19; 
271, 8 : of a "puir body," palmer, beggar. V, 129, 
l; 130, l; 131, d l, e 1-3 : of a supposedly simple 
old man who turns out to be shrewd. V, 253 f., No 
203, D 2, 8: (perhaps) spiritless, cowardly, sit a silly 
sate: see sit. 

simmer, II, 261, 10 ; V, 299, 4 ; etc. : summer, sim 
mer-dale, II, 261, 8, 9. 

simple, III, 163, 72: poor, scant. 

sin, III, 281, 7; IV, 260, 17: son. 

sin, II, 494, 6; IV, 77, 3; 280, b 22: sun. 

sin, sine, syne, I, 16, C 9; 17, 7; 204, E 3 ; II, 32, 3; 
160, 4, 7; 161, 5, 7; III, 433, n ; 436, 9 (?): since 
(temporal and causal), then. II, 237, 6: when, as 
in Shakspere after verbs of remembering (Winter's 
Tale, v, i, 219, etc.). See syne, then. 



376 



GLOSSARY 



sin-brunt, V, 224, 19: sun-burnt. 

Binder, II, 164 f., 18, 19, 21: sunder. 

sindle, II, 261, 8: seldom. 

Binary, II, 344, 4: several. IV, 219, A 6: sundry 
(people). 

sine, then, since. See sin and syne. 

single, liverie, IV, 261, 5: dress of a plain or inferior 
man; IV, 334, 11, 12: dress of a private soldier, sin 
gle man, sodger, soldier-lad, IV, 336, b, c, d 16; 337, 
f, g 15; 338, h after 15: private. 

sinner, V, 254, 12: sooner. 

sinsyne, synsyne, I, 227 b; III, 394, J 2; 396, N 2: 
since, afterwards. 

sir, title of parson: III, 217, 49. 

it a sate, IV, 469, 8: maintain or enjoy a position. 
(You may live comfortably if you are well stocked 
with cattle, but only in a beggarly or pitiable way 
with nothing but beauty.) " You shall sit at an easier 
rent." Scott's Redgauntlet, Wandering Willie's Tale. 
Falstaff sits at ten pounds a week (his expenses came 
to that), Merry Wives, I, 3. 

sitt, p.p., HI, 400, 5: seated. 

sitten, sutten, p. p. of sit, II, 273, 37; III, 433, 4. 

skail (blood), IV, 373, 13: spill. 

skaith, skaeth, n., I, 370, 5; II, 292 f., 8, 18: III, 162, 
66: harm, gien the skaeth, II, 364, 36; IV, 465, 35, 
36: done a wrong, injury. 

skaith, v., Ill, 371, 21: harm. 

skaith frae, v., I, 397, 14: keep from. (A. S. sce'adan, 
Germ, scheiden, O. Eng. shed, part, divide.) See 
scathe. A skaithie in Scottish is a fence or wall to 
keep off wind. 

skeely, skilly, III, 26, l: skilful, intelligent. 

skeigh, III, 495 b, 23, 24: shy, skittish. 

skelp, V, 106, B 6: drub. 

skerry, rocky, skerry fell, I, 325, 10: rocky hill. 

skerry, skerrie, II, 494: a rock or rocky islet in the 
sea. 

skill, sckill, skylle, reason, discernment, knowledge. 
a baron of sckill, I, 295, 28: reasonable, of good judg 
ment, etc. that's but skill, I, 295, 44: reason, some 
thing right and proper, the skylle I sail pe telle 
wharefore, I, 328, 56: the reason why. can skill, little 
they can skill of their train, etc., II, 445, 62; 450, 67, 
69: Icel. kunna skil, to know distinctions, have know 
ledge, could noe skill of the whisstill heare, IV, 506, 
70: perception (that is, literally, could not hear whether 
there was a whistle or not), had no skill, IV, 213, 
3: knew nothing of the matter, or, possibly, had no 
regard, felt no approbation. 

skilly, skeely, II, 97, 21: intelligent, knowing, skil 
ful. 

skink, I, 190 a: pour out liquor. 

skinkled, II, 183, 19: sparkled. 

sklate, II, 293, 15: slate. 

skomnshes, III, 433, C 4, 7: stifles (discomfits). 

skorne, III, 113, 77: disgrace, humiliation. See scorn. 

sky-setting, I, 351, 31: sunset. 

skylle. See skill. 



skyred, IV, 413, 12, 14: startled, blenched, shrank 
back. 

slack, II, 116, 20; 117, 14; 313, 23; III, 181, 29; 281, 
12; 363, notef; IV, 7, 27; 184, 2, 3; 467, ll; V,250, 
25; 262, 19. 1.) a gap or narrow pass between two 
bills. 2.) low ground, a morass. It is often not 
possible to determine which is intended. In III, 
281, 12, the meaning is morass. Plain ground will 
suit III, 181, 29. Such terms vary according to lo 
cality and time. Cf. slap. 

slacke (woe), V, 83, 44: lessen, mitigate. 

slade, III, 92, 12: "a valley, ravine, plain." Halli- 
well. Cf. slack, slap. 

slae, I, 450, 2: sloe. 

slap, II, 120, 14; III, 185, 24, 25; V, 228, 26: a narrow 
pass between two hills (= slack). In III, 185, 24, 
25, there is a contrast with glen, the word replacing 
the slack of III, 181, 29; perhaps, plain ground. IV, 
300, 12: a breach in a dyke or wall. 

slate, slait, of whetting a sword by passing it over a 
straw or the ground (Icel. sletta, to slap, or sle*tta, to 
level, smooth), has slaited on the strae, II, 273, 30. 
slate it on the plain, IV, 491, ll. slait it on the 
plain, V, 235, 32. See strip, streak, streak, straik, 
strike. 

slawe, p. p. of slay, III, 14, 16, 17; 71, 306. y-slaw, 

III, 28, 140. 
slee, sly. 

sleste, slist, III, 70, 292; 79, 146: sliced, split. 

slet, pret. of slit, III, 63, 146. 

slichting, slighting. 

slight, III, 473, 13: demolish, we '11 fecht them, we '11 

slight them, IV, 85, 5: make light of (?). 
slipe, sleep. 

slist, III, 70, 292: sliced, split, 
slo, sloe, sloo, slon, I, 210, 9; III, 77, 438; 97, 8; 

110, 19: slay. pret. sloughe, III, 308, 25. p. p. slo, 

slowe, slone, II, 479, 17; III, 35, 22; 77, 428. slawe, 

y-slaw. 

slocken, sloken, IV, 386, 16: quench, 
slode, pret. of slide, II, 59, 22: split. 
sloe, sloo, I, 210, 9; III, 77, 438: slay. pret. sloughe. 

p. p. slowe, slone. See slo. 
slogan, III, 474, 32: war-cry, gathering word of a clan. 

Jamieson. 
sloken, slocken, III, 473, 14: quench (fire), p-p-, 

IV, 60 b, after 10 (with ellipsis q/"have). 
slough-hounds, IV, 3, 15: sleuth-hounds, blood-hounds 

(slooth, b, 4, 15). 

sloughe, pret. of slo, slay, III, 308, 25. 

slowe, p. p. of slo, slay, II, 479, 17. 

sma, small, of linen, I, 428, 18; 419, 3; II, 128, 5; 130, 
4' ; 133, D 3 ; 134, 7 ; 269, 15 ; III, 7, E 12 : of fine 
texture, of the blast of a horn, II, 258, 31; small, V, 
83, 48: shrill, keen, of wine, I will drain it sma, IV, 
476, 8: should mean, strain it fine, or, pour out in a 
thin stream, run it off gently; the intention seems to 
be, give but a small quantity. 

smeek, IV, 385, 25: smoke. 



GLOSSARY 



377 



smiddie, IV, 470, 18: smithy. In smiddy-bour, II, 
186, 12, hour for room or workshop is strange. 

smirkling, smirkling smile, IV, 117, 3: suppressed. 

smit, II, 149, 2: noise, clash. 

s mi the red, III, 268, 17: smothered. 

smoldereth, III, 431, 19: smothereth. 

smooth, II, 233, 14; V, 167, A 7: pass lightly over, 
smooth the breast for swimming, see breast. 

smore, V, 37, 6: smother. 

smotley, V, 79, 15: pleasantly. 

snack, IV, 415, 6: quick. 

snags, III, 483, 7: protruding remnants of branches 
hewn off. 

sned, II, 274, C 19; 462, 26: cut, lop. (misprinted 
sued, II, 462.) 

sneed, V, 165, 4, 5: snood, fillet for a maiden's hair. 

sneer, IV, 18, 15; 19, 13: snort. 

sneeters, V, 213, io: = snotters, gatherings of snot. 

snell, of weather, wind, frost, I, 342, 23; 344, 22; III, 
435, l; IV, 213, 17; 214, 4; V, 99, 2: sharp, keen, of 
a blast of a horn, III, 195, 7: keen, shrill, of talk, 
III, 492, 31: sharp, caustic. 

snoded, tied with a snood. 

snood, V, 306, 4, 5: a fillet with which a maiden's hair 
was bound up. See sneed. 

snotters, V, 213, 10: gatherings of snot. See sneeters. 

soberly, III, 487, 17: quietly, making no noise. 

socht, sought, pret., 1, 147, 11, 12; II, 30, 8; III, 466, 
46: asked for. 

sodde, pret., V, 53, 103: seethed, boiled. 

solace, I, 328, 53: pleasure. solaces, III, 287, 65: 
merry-makings, diversions. 

soldan, II, 59, 35-37: sultan, any pagan king; hence, 
giant. See soudan. 

Soldanie, Soudonie, V, 199 b, 33; 200 b, 33: Sultan's 
people. 

solde, I, 326, 4: should. 

some, with singular, some clean white sheet, V, 294, 7. 

somers, III, 67, 216, 224; 74, 374: sumpter-horses, pack- 
horses. 

sone, at once. 

sone so, I, 243, 8: as soon as. 

sonsie, II, 370, 16: plump. 

soom, soum, sume, swoom, II, 29, 19; III, 394, K 
4; IV, 493, 9; 511 b, 4; V, 138, B 6: swim. 

soon, III, 440, 13: early, soon at morn, IV, 446, 2: 
early in the morning. 

soone, II, 446, 92: swoon. 

sore, as, they mighten a had, III, 441, 26: on whatever 
hard terms. 

sorn, IV, 464, 14: sworn. 

sorners, IV, 41, note*; 81 b: sojourners, properly 
those who take free quarters (such may be expected 
to make free generally with the property of those 
upon whom they impose themselves); "forcible in 
truders, people quartering themselves on tenants, etc., 
masterful beggars." 

sorowe, sorrow, III, 61, 96; IV, 174,6; 241 b; V, 28, 
55: sorry, sorrowful, sad. 
VOL. v. 48 



sorraye, II, 209, 9: sorrow. 

sorrowful, III, 440, 12: sorry, pitiful. 

sorte, III, 128, 97: set. 

souce, V, 84, 7: the head, feet and ears of swine 
boiled and pickled. 

soud, sude, should. 

soudan, sowdan, souden, soldan, I, 54, 66; V, 195, 
26; 197, 5. 

Soudron, V, 192, 22: Southron. 

Soudronie, V, 192, 33: Southronry. 

sough, sound. 

sould, should. 

soum, soom, sume, II, 464, 2, 3; 474, J 6; V, 237, 9: 
swim. 

soun, make bed saft and soun, IV, 279, 31, 32: smooth, 
lead the bridle soun, II, 105, 14: steadily, so as not 
to cause a jolt by jerking it. 

sound, IV, 206, 10: safe and well, sailed it sound, II, 
223, P 8: safe. 

sound, a sound, III, 165, 88: a-swoon. 

sound, IV, 172, 12, 14; 173, 7, 10, 11: in the sleep of 
death. 

sounded, IV, 99, 3: should probably be rounded, whis 
pered. 

souner, I, 442, 10: sounder. 

soup, I, 324, B 9: sup. 

sour (reek), III, 433, C 6: sharp, bitter. 

souter, soutter, III, 282 a; IV, 262, 16: shoe-maker. 

south, I, 334, 9: sweet. 

southen, southin, II, 358, 16, 28; IV, 482 b, 2, 3, 4; 
483, 9, 17, 18: southern. 

southering, IV, 48, b 18: soldering (corruption of, seeth 
ing)- 

sowdan. See soudan. 

so we, III, 41 b, line 17: to be corrected to sowter, cob 
bler (?). 

sowens, V, 108, B 10: flummery; "oat-meal sowr'd 
amongst water for some time, then boiled to a con 
sistency, and eaten with milk or butter." Herd. 

sowt, III, 13, 8: sought, peered, scanned. 

sowt, south. 

soyt, III, 110, 23; 111, 31, 43; 112, 55; V, 79, 30: sooth. 

spait, III, 473, 26; 479, 2: flood. 

spak well in his mind, V, 260, 15: sounded well, 
suited his own thoughts. 

spakes, I, 61, C c, 15: the bars of a bird-cage. 

spald. See spaul. 

spang, II, 394, 18: span. 

spare, I, 302, A 10; 446, 10; 451, ll; III, 246, B 7: 
opening in a gown or petticoat. 

sparks out o a weet, IV, 379, 15: rain-drops from a 
shower. " Spirks, spirkins, applied to drops of water 
in Scotland; sparks usually to fire." W. Forbes. 

sparred, III, 97, 20; 99, 61: shut. 

spartled, v., II, 94, 6: sprang, spartling, II, 306, 15: 
kicking, struggling. 

spartles, n., II, 94, 4: springs. 

spaul, spauld, spald, spole, III, 473, 17; V, 105, A 
3, B 6; 106, D 6, E 4; 107, 3: shoulder. 



378 



GLOSSARY 



spayed, spied. 

speal, I, 428, 17; 430, 6, 7: another form of scale, a 
wooden drinking vessel. 

speals, spells, II, 410, 24; V, 236, 18: chips. 

spear, v., IV, 85, l: spare. 

spear, speer, speir, spier, sper, ask. See spyrr. 

speed, prosperity, help. 

speel, w., II, 73, 25: climb. 

speen, IV, 287, 19; 357, C 8, 9: spoon. 

speer, inquire. See spyrr. 

speere, V, 15, 20: "a hole in the wall of the house, 
through which the family received and answered the 
inquiries of strangers." Ritson. This, I fear, may 
be conjectural. Speere, a screen (wall) between fire 
and door to keep off the wind is well known both in 
England and Scotland. But the Heir seems to be 
outside and could not look up at this speere. 

speir, ask. See spyrr. 

spelle, v., I, 329, 3: discourse. 

spells, speals, II, 410, 24; V, 236, 18: chips. 

spendyd, a spear, III, 309, 40 : "spanned; hence, got 
ready, placed in rest." Skeat. 

aper, V, 78, 6: inquire. See spyrr. 

spier-hawk, IV, 484, l, 2: sparrow-hawk. 

spin, spine, gar your blood, IV, 84, 3, 6; V, 253, D l: 
spirt (as in Shakspere's Henry V, iv, 2, spin in Eng 
lish eyes). 

spird, II, 144, 12: spurred. 

spite, I, 211, 27: spital. 

spleen, v., Ill, 220, 5: regard with spleen, hatred. 

spleene, n., Ill, 230, 70: animosity. 

splent (splint), III, 473, 17: armor of overlapping 
plates. 

splinders, II, 91, 26: splinters. 

splits, II, 389, 10: strands. 

sply, II, 252, l: (perhaps miswritten) spy. 

spole, III, 342, 63: (O. Fr. espaule) shoulder. See 
spaul. 

sporne, v., Ill, 64, 161 : kick. 

spreckl(e)d, 1, 159, 5; 160, 3: speckled. 

sprente, III, 309, 32: sprang, spurted. 

spring, IV, 265, 13: probably miswritten or corrupted 
for young, which we find in the next stanza. 

spring, 1, 129, 17; 130, 20; 132, 13; 135, O 18, P 18, 19; 
IV, 312, 4; 313, 7: quick tune. 

spring (well both clear and spring), II, 198 a, last 
line: spring water, pure as a spring. 

sprunks, fine, III, 221, 12: showily dressed women ? 
(Cf. prank, prink, Dan., Swed., Germ., prunk.) 

spulye, n., Ill, 458 b: spoil. 

spulyie, spuilye, spuilzie, v., Ill, 463 a; IV, 53, u; 
84, 5, 8: despoil. 

spunk-hole, V, 213, 3 (spunk = fire): a hollow in the 
floor, where the fire was made, fire-place. 

spurn(e), n., Ill, 310, 65, 66: kick. The word, 
though protected by rhyme and by occurring twice, 
is suspicious. If spurn could be taken as clash, 
encounter, collision, it might stand, but such a sense 
is forced. 



spurtle, V, 92, ll, 12: stick for stirring porridge, 
spy lie, I, 327, 20: mar, destroy. 

spyrr, spire, spier, speir, speer, spear, sper (A. S. 
spyrian), I, 176, 17; 325, B 13; 349, G 9; 440, 10-15; 

III, 98, 41; 100, 64; V, 115, 4: ask, inquire, spear 
at, I, 151 a, 10; IV, 328, A b, after 3: inquire of. I, 
349, G 7; II, 268, 12; 272, 9, 18; 379, 12; IV, 203, 9; 
205, 15: ask, request. 

squar, squer, squire. 

square-wright, V, 124, 3: carpenter, joiner. 

squeel, schele, schule, II, 175 f., l, 6; 306, 19; IV, 

327, 8. 

squier, n, 59, 30:=swire, neck, 
st, as sign of the future. I'st, II, 449, 62; III, 411, 1; 

413, 36; thoust, 'st, I, 211, 29; 433, 8, 26; II, 44, 13; 442, 

10; 449, 60, 6i; III, 277, 4; 411, 4; 432, 7; 477, 7; V, 50, 

33. shee'st, she'st, II, 442, 3; 447, 3. you'st, II, 451, 

88; HI, 104, 6; 412, 12. (All from English ballads.) 
sta, pret. of steal, III, 464, 13, 14. 
stack, I, 16, B 14: stalk, 
stad, V, 248, 19: stood, 
staen, stolen. 

stage, at a, III, 98, 39: from a floor, story (?). 
stage, III, 295, 3: stag. 

staig, III, 301, A a, 3; IV, 26, l: a young stallion, 
staking, III, 138, 18: cutting into stakes (cleaving, 

140, c 18; stacking, 140, d 18). 
stale, stathle, I, 18, H 9; 19, 12: the foundation of a 

stack, the undermost layer of sheaves in a stack. 
stale straiig, V, 213, 5: urine long kept for a lye and 

smelling strong. (But stale may = urine as well as 

strang.) 
stalle, in strete and stalle, III, 101, 89: station; from 

the contrast with street, we may infer the meaning 

to be, when in movement (on the road) and when 

stationary, or housed. 
stamp o the melten gond, IV, 471, 37: an embossed 

plate. 

stanch, III, 364 b: check, 
stand (of milk, water), I, 344, 34: a barrel set on 

end. 
stand, briddel-(bridell-)stand, V, 228, 12, 22: suit of 

clothes (bridal clothes), 
stand, III, 453, A 14; IV, 515, 13: (of a court) sit. 

IV, 420, 9; V, 222, 34; 269, 1: take place. 

stand, IV, 152, C 11; stand out, HI, 439, 2: stickle, 
scruple. 

stand na, ne, no(e), awe, I, 421, 5; III, 350, 53; IV, 
505, 54; 506, 69: na may be a contraction of in na. 
na stand in awe, I, 419, 4; stand not in awe, HI, 
345,53. 

standen, p. p. of stand, HI, 361, b, c 64. 

stane, II, 467, 56: i. e. the (stone) wall. 

stane-auld, III, 9 f., 11, 12, 20: very old (Germ, stein- 
alt). 

stane-chucking, I, 441, E l: throwing the stone, as in 
B 2. 

stank, IV, 47, 12, 13: (0. Fr. estanc) ditch. 

stap, n. and v., I, 298, 4; II, 88, 8, 9: step. 



GLOSSARY 



379 



stap, stape, stop. II, 494, i: stop, stay, reside, will 
stap to die, IV, 107, 7: shrink, hesitate. 

stap, I, 439, 4, 5; 440, 6, 7; 504, 7; II, 294, 31, 32; 467, 
41: stuff, cram. 

stare, III, 128, 104: (eyes) protrude, or, are fixed, can 
not move (?). 

stare (of hair), V, 66, 19: stand up. 

Btarf,pret., V, 297 b: died. 

stark, I, 69, 39; III, 474, 37: strong, stark thief, III, 
365 b=the English strong thief, one who uses vio 
lence, stark and stoor, II, 47, 5: in a moral sense, 
wanting in delicacy, rude, violent, or indecent, the 
wind up stark, IV, 378, 5; 380, 11: ellipsis of blew, 
came, before up. 

starn, stern, 1, 440, 18; IV, 455, 10: (Icel. stjarna), star. 

start, I, 341, 5; 343, 5; 347, 3; 348, 2: spring, jump. 
Ill, 164 b, 49; 342, 64: recoil, flinch, recede, pret. 
start, stert, I, 108 b, 8; 286, 56; II, 454, 56; III, 32, 
8l; 64, 159; IV, 477, 16: sprang. See stert. 

state of my lande, II, 446, 91 ; state of my father's 
lands, 451, 98: landed estate. 

stathle, stale, I, 17, 12 : the foundation of a stack, the 
undermost layer of sheaves in a stack. 

staw, II, 90, 23; 184, 13: stall. 

staw, pret. of steal, II, 76, 25; 80 f., 9, 29; IV, 12, 13; 
490, so. 

stawn, p. p. of steal, IV, 18, 19, 20. 

stay, stey, IV, 262, 23: steep. 

stead (e), steed (e). See stede. 

steal, pret. sta, staw. p. p. stawn, stowen, stown, stoun. 
stealed, steald, IV, 20, 16; 166, 2, 3. stelld, III, 459, 7. 

stean, Marie's stean, II, 183, 19: a stone seat at the 
door of St. Mary's Church. 

stear, steer, III, 474, 33: stir, commotion. 

steck. See steek. 

stede, steed(e), stead(e), I, 334, 7; 411, 7, 16; II, 
359, 19; III, 60, 81; 74, 376; 79, 133; V, 194, 71, 72; 197, 
66; 199, 71, 72: place, dwelling-place, stand in stead, 
steed, steede, III, 344 f., 38, 44; 349, 38; IV, 505, 45: 
hold good, be kept, maintained, made good. 

steed, I, 298, 4: stood. 

steek, steck, steik, II, 336, P 2; IV, 188, 9; 279, 19, 
27; 480, 4, 5; 514, 5: stick, shut, fasten, steekit (dor 
an window) to the gin, IV, 480, 5: to the fastening. 

steek, steik, n., II, 364, 30; IV, 483, 20: stitch with the 
needle. Ill, 397, A b 5: stitch (of pain). 

steeking, n., II, 361, 26: stitching. 

steel, pret., I, 477, 4: stale, stole. 

steer, steir, II, 21, 10, 11; 29, 13, 14: rudder. 

steer, stear, II, 369, 12: disturbance. 

steer, sture, I, 69, 39; 71, 31 : strong, robust, (stor, 
big.) 

steer, II, 161, 12; IV, 69, 15: disturb, meddle with (for 
harm). 

steer, I, 251, A 13: stir, move. 

steik, n., stitch. See steek. 

steik, v., shut. See steek. 

steir, n., rudder. See steer. 

stell, steel. 



stelld, pret. of steal, III, 459, 7. 

stelld, IV, 110, 10: placed, planted. 

stende, me stende, I, 243, 5: that people should stone. 

step-minnie, II, 367 b: stepmother. 

stern, starn, I, 326, 16: star. 

sterne, III, 308, so: stern (men). 

stert, start, pret. of start, III, 66, 211 : sallied, stert 

out of the dore, sterte (start) to an offycer, stert hym 

to a borde, III, 26, 81; 32, 81; 62, 120, 125: rushed. 

stert to foot, IV, 224, 14: sprang to their feet, 
steuen, III, 94, 52: voice, vnsett steven, III, 93, 27: 

time not previously fixed, 
stey, stay, IV, 185, 10; 264, 15: steep, 
stiffe, I, 293 f., 2, 9, ll; II, 55, 67: unyielding, stanch, 
still, had your still, IV, 85, 7; V, 247, 14: hold your 

peace, 
stime, styme, I, 482, E; III, 163 f., 78, 91: glimpse, 

ray, particle of light. 

Stincher, IV, 69, 6: a river of Carrick, Ayrshire. (Mis 
printed stincher.) 

stingy, IV, 316, 17: forbidding, cross. 
stint, stinte, I, 334, 8; 411, 8, 17; 412, 28: stop. 
stirred, III, 162, 49: should probably be stirted (shrank, 

flinched). The other text has, started, 
stirt, stirred, 
stock, I, 419, 2; 421, 2, 4, etc.; II, 467, 56: the outer 

side of a bed, opposite the wall (the bed, an enclosed 

box, being enterable at this side only), 
stock, I, 402, 5: (term of disparagement) wanting in 

vitality, sensibility, youth, or what not. 
stogg, IV, 480, 7, 8: stick, stab, 
stoll yellow, IV, 453 a, b 13: corrupt; a has, gold that 

is yellow. 
stomach will givs him, II, 447, 17: disposition will 

incline him. II, 450, 69: courage, 
stomached, well, III, 335 b: courageous, 
stonde, I, 334, 8; III, 286, 55: while, time. See 

stound(e). 

stony t, I, 242, ll: stoneth, old plural of the imperative. 
stood, V, 269, 1: took place, stood him upon, III, 

228, 11: was incumbent on. See stand, 
stoode, my need stoode, III, 412, 16: existed, 
stook, I, 485, 10: put into shocks, 
stoor, stark and stoor, II, 47, 6: (store, big) in a 

moral sense, rude, brutal, 
store, I, 328, 60 : big. See stoor. 
store, buffets store, III, 145, 8: in plenty, 
store, purse of gold and store, II, 461, 23: treasure 

(precious things laid up), carryd the store (of con 
stancy), V, 158, 16: the totality. 
stot, stott, IV, 12, B 4; 26, 1; 248, 19; 519, 6; 520, 6, 

7: young ox. 
stoun, III, 388, 8: (stoun, stound, North of England, 

to smart with pain, Scott, an acute intermittent pain) 

a painful attack, 
stoun, p.p. of steal, III, 453, 10; V, 221, 24. See 

stowen. 
tound(e), stonde, III, 25, 68; 284, 3; 298, 55; V, 83, 

42: time, point, moment of time. 



380 



GLOSSARY 



stoup, II, 344, l; V, 91, 7, 8: pitcher, can, bucket (nar 
rower at the top than at the bottom). 

stour, stoure, stowre, II, 55, 67; III, 26, 89; 298, 58; 
309, 47; 441, 27: tumult, brawl, fight, stour of thy 
hand, III, 280, 37: turbulence, destructiveness. JII, 
270, 16: disturbance, commotion. 

stour, II, 195, notes, A; IV, 470, 20: dust. 

stourished, III, 520 a: read flourished (?), blooming. 
(Cf. Ill, 373, 4.) 

stout(e), II, 282 ., 4, 17 (audacious), 18; III, 339, 5; 
IV, 503, 5, 7: haughty, high-mettled, bold. Ill, 411, 
8 (traitor): audacious, unflinching. V, 36 f., 9, 10: 
unabashed. I, 3, 3; IV, 197, 3: sturdy. 

stowen, stown, p. p. of steal, I, 367, 14; II, 72, 23; 
79, 38; IV, 133, H 6, 7; 241 a. See stoun. 

stowre, n. See stour. 

stowre, adj., I, 293, 2: (originally, big) strong. 

stracht, straght, III, 521 b, 272, 15; V, 236, 9: straight. 

strack, struck. 

strae, stray, stro, II, 162, 8; 169, 19; 185, 36; 261, 15, 
etc. : straw. 

straik. streak, streek, stroke, (a sword) oer (on) a 
strae (strow), II, 261, 15; V, 37, 8: pass it over a 
straw to give it an edge. See streak, straiked 
back hair, IV, 184, E 17: stroked, straik (streek) 
wi a (the) wan(d), II, 188, 8; IV, 46, 3; 480, 15: 
of a measure, to even at the top by passing a stick 
over. 

straine, streen, the, V, 221, 24: evening of yesterday. 

strait (a rope), IV, 398, 7, 25: straighten, stretch, 
tighten, pret., of stirrups, III, 492, 27. 

strait, IV, 262, 23, strait and stay: another word for 
stay, stey, steep. 

straith, strath, IV, 184 a: a valley through which a 
river runs. 

st raked, streaked, straked her trouth on a wand, II, 
230, 9: a symbolical act, of gently rubbing or passing 
the fingers over a wand, by way of giving back a 
lover's troth. 

strand, I, 165, M 4; III, 460, 28; IV, 172, 15; 174, 16: 
stream. Sometimes hardly more than a rhyme-word. 
In, Scotland's strands, strand, II, 289, 7; 294, 8, strand 
appears to be put for country, bounds; and for no 
thing more definite than way, road, in he gaed in the 
strand, etc., II, 177, 23; 289, B 2; III, 3, 5; IV, 210, l. 
In, stript it to the stran, II, 390, 28, stran cannot 
mean more than plain (ground). 

strang, V, 213, 5: urine kept for a lye, and smelling 
strong. See stale. 

strang, strange. 

strange, V, 76, 16 : backward, diffident. 

strated, V, 228, 15: stretched. 

stratlius, I, 368, 23: straddlings, stridings. 

straucht, straught, adj. and adv., I, 146, 14; 251, A 
10; II, 461, 5; IV, 94, 9; 214, l: straight. 

straught, V, 199 a, after 61 : stretched. See straucht. 

stray. See strae. 

streak, straik, of whetting a sword by passing it 
over a straw (cf. Germ, streichen, strike, smooth, 



whet), streakd it on a strow, V, 37, 8. straiked it 
oer a strae, II, 261, 15. See stroak, strike, strip, 
slate. 

streak, streek, I, 299, 17: stretch. 

streak by, I, 454, 12: to put off, put away. 

stream-tail, IV, 185, 12: the lower end of a stream as 
opposed to the upper. Tail-race is the name given 
to the stream that carries away the water after it has 
passed the mill. J. Aiken. 

streek, streak, I, 299, 17; II, 139, 7, 12; 345, 30; V, 
174, 4; 209 b, 6: stretch, streeket, streekit, strickit, 
p. p., II, 189, 38; IV, 128, 17; 316, 25; 318, G 9; 319, 
H 7: stretched, laid out, as dead. 

streekit. See straik, and streek. 

streen, straine, the streen, I, 57, C 13; II, 30, 4; III, 
396, N i; IV, 47, 10, 18; V, 118, B 13; 221, 24; 257, 
14: yestreen, yester-night. 

stronger, compar., V, 283, 18 (and so we should read 
in 8 instead of scharpper) : stronger. 

strickit. See streek. 

strike, of whetting a sword, etc., on a straw, or the 
ground, he 's struck it (rappier) in the straw, II, 
249, 18. struck it (brand) ower a strow, V, 226 b, 8; 
(dagger) 227, 21. struck it (bran) across the plain, 
II, 380, 32. See stroak, streak, strip, slate. 

strinkled, III, 4, 10; 5, C 6: sprinkled. 

strip, of whetting a sword by passing it across straw, 
a stone, the ground; replaced by stroak, streak, 
strike, slate, draw (cf . German streifen). has striped 
it throw the straw, II, 159, 15. he stript it to the 
stroe, II, 161, 13. he 's stripped it athwart the straw, 
n, 256, 12. he 's stripd it oer a stane, II, 396, 28. 
has stript it to the stran, II, 390, 28. he drew it 
through the strae, II, 185, 36; three times thro the 
strae, II, 162, 8. See stroak, etc. 

stro, stroe, strow, strae, stray, II, 131, 16: straw. 

stroak, stroke, of whetting a sword by passing it over 
a straw, stroakd it oer a stro, strae, stray, II, 131, 
16; 166, 17; 169, 19; 305, 8, 21; 306, 14. See strip, 
streak, straik, strike, slate. 

stroe, stro, strow, II, 161, 13: straw. 

stroke. See stroak. 

stroke, III, 180, 13: probably corrupt; read streke, 
stretch ? (Scott, streik, streek). 

stronge th(i)efe, strong thief, III, 13, 2; 67, 221; V, 
77, 32; 83, 49: a thief using violence. See stark 
thief. 

strook, pret. of strike, V, 135, b 18. 

strow, stro, V, 37, 8; 226 b, 8; 227, 21: straw. 

strucken, p. p. of strike, II, 48, 3; III, 487, 13. 

stryke pantere, V, 72 b: a drinking formula, in re 
sponse to fusty bandyas. 

stubborn, IV, 168, 8; 169, 6, 15; 170, G 4, 11, H 3, 4, 
10: seems to have its old meaning of truculent, fierce, 
rather than wilful, mulish. See note to H 3, 4, IV, 
177. 

stude, stede, I, 244, 15: place. 

study, studie, studdy, II, 374, A 2, B 2; 375, 3: 
stithy, anvil. 



GLOSSARY 



381 



sturdy, sturdy steel, II, 380, 15; 381, 10; 385, 4; 388, 
13: stiff, rigid (stubborn, II, 393, 10). 

sture, steer, I, 71, 31; 69, 39: strong, robust, (stor, 
big.) 

sturt, II, 249, 4: trouble, anger. 

stye, I, 310, 9, 11, is: pen, den. Ill, 100, 76: a smaller 
thoroughfare, alley. 

styme, I, 482, E. See stime. 

styrande, III, 295, 3: stirring, dislodging. See note, 
301. 

sty the, I, 311, 9, il: place. 

suan, V, 277, 14: swain. 

suar, III, 308, 27; 309, 42: sure, trusty. 

succeed the fame, his fame, IV, 249, 9; 251, 10: cor 
rupt for, exceed in fame, or the like. See note, IV, 
254, E 9. 

such an a, IV, 312, 12: such a. 

sud, soud, suld, should. 

suddled, thy suddled silks, that thou wears every day, 
etc., II, 186, 5, 6, 10, ll: soiled, or rumpled, creased. 

suddling, suddling silks, III, 398, C 9: soiling, which 
one would not mind exposing to soiling. Perhaps 
we should read suddlit. See suddled. 

suderen, V, 217, 17: southern. 

suds, leave you in the suds, V, 114, 12: in difficulty, in 
a strait. 

sugar-sops, defined in dictionaries as sugar-plums. 
Fletcher's Monsieur Thomas, ii, 3, "Dandle her 
upon my knee, and give her sugar-sops." By analogy, 
bits of bread or cake dipped in sugar juice. 

sugh, II, 258, 34: sough, sound (of wind). 

suit, V, 215, n; 223 b, l; 246 b, 2: sweet. 

suith, III, 468, c 9: sooth. 

sulle, sell. 

sume, V, 221, ll, 12; 237, 10: swim. See soum. 

sun-bruist, IV, 469, 9: should, perhaps, be sun-burnt, 
as in the following line. 

sundry, II, 212, 17: asunder, apart. 

sune, adj., V, 256, 12: sound. 

sunks, IV, 262, 29: seats. 

supply, IV, 154, 13: afford help, mak him some 
supply, V, 196, 39, cf. 43: succor, reinforcement. 

surrount, IV, 245, 3: Skene's spelling for the original 
serundad, surrounded. 

suspitious, II, 448, 37, 38: worthy of Mrs. Malaprop, 
but not so easy to unriddle: in her mouth, auspi 
cious; here the modern suggestive, significant, would 
suit. 

sujjfe, III, 514 b, 1st line: then. 

sutor, I, 430, 2: shoemaker. See souter. 

sutten, p. p. of sit, IV, 468, 6. 

swack, IV, 415, 6: nimble. 

swack, v., V, 305, 5: whack. 

a wads, swades, V, 134, 7; 135 b, 7: "swad in the 
North is a pescod-shell: thence used for an empty 
shallow-headed fellow." Blount, in II alii well. Also, 
a cant term for soldier. 

swaft, swaffed, III, 511, 8, 11: swapped. 

swair, swaird, laird o the Ochilberry swair, IV, 207, 



27, 29; laird o Athole swaird, IV, 198, 14: sware, 

neck or slope of a hill, (swaird, a corruption of 

swair, = sward, grassland, is not likely.) 
swak, III, 300, 21. See swap, 
swap, swak, swords, with swords, III, 298, 50, 54; 299, 

9; 300, 21 (swakked); 301, 30; 309, 31; 422, 73; IV, 

487, 29; 500 f., 22, 35 (swakked); V, 240, 6, 9: smite, 
swarmd, III, 347, g 45; IV, 505, 56, 59: climbed. 

(swarm, to climb a tree that has no side branches to 

help one.) 
swarued, swerved, III, 341, 53, 56; 345, 45: climbed 

(= swarmd, IV, 505, 56, 59). 
swat, pret. of swe(a)t, III, 299, 9; 300, 21; 301, 30; 

309, 31. swett, III, 422, 73. swette, III, 298, 50, 64. 
swathed, II, 305, 10: swaddled (as it were) in blood, 
swatter, I, 135, P ll: flounder, splash, 
sway, howsoeuer this geere will sway, III, 341, 47: 

whatever turn this business may take, however this 

affair may turn out. 
swear, pret., swore. 

sweauen, sweueu, II, 45, 18; III, 91, 4: dream, 
sweer, II, 61, 4; IV, 229, 20: slow, reluctant. Ill, 

160, 14: reluctant (to part with money), 
swerers, quest of, III, 25, 69: jurors, 
swerved, III, 347; d, e, f 45: climbed. See swarued. 
swet, swett, swette, pret. of swe(a)t. See swat, 
swetter, compar., V, 283, 9, 19: sweeter, 
s we veil, sweauen, II, 45, 18; III, 91, 4: dream, 
sweythyli, V, 80, 45: swiftly, 
s wick, IV, 438, 12: blame, 
swikele, I, 243, 4: deceptive, treacherous, 
swilled, I, 287, 72: tossed about or shook, as in rinsing 

(but in this case to effect a mixture), 
swimd, swimmed, pret. of swim, II, 16, 5; 24, F 9; 

IV, 129, 5; 130, D 9. 
swinke, III, 171 f., 8, 26: labor. 

swire, swyre, I, 295, 34; III, 91 a: neck. IV, 5, 2; 

7, 27; V, 249, 2: "the declination of a mountain or 

hill, near the summit." Jamieson. 
swith, II, 65, 67; 248, 18: quickly, 
swither, III, 268, 17; 272, 21: trepidation. 
swittert, I, 129, ll: struggled, floundered, splashed 

(made spasmodic motions to keep herself up), 
swoghynge, n., I, 327, 31 : sounding, 
swoom, V, 151, P 2: swim, 
swoond, swound, n., I, 434, 29; II, 105, 19; HI, 373, 

A 4: swoon. 

swumd, p. p. of swim, III, 482, 26. 
swylke, I, 327, 15: such, 
swyre, swire, III, 91 a: neck, 
syde, I, 333, 3: (of beard) long, hanging down. I, 

426, 3: of a horn worn low. See side, 
syke, sike, II, 238, 6; IV, 3, 28: ditch, trench. IV, 

470, 25: perhaps, rivulet, (water-course, marshy 

bottom with a stream in it. Jamieson.) 
syne, sayn, san, sane, I, 17 f., P 2, 7; 127,27; 347, 9; 

III, 437, 16, 20, 21, 24: then, afterwards. I, 204, E 3; 

V, 306 b, l; III, 436, 9 (?): since, 
synsyne, since. See siusyue. 



382 



GLOSSARY 



sypress, cypress, III, 148, 10; 150, b 10: crape (veil), 
syre, IV, 21, 10: (sewer) drain, gutter, 
syt, III, 70, 280: old contracted form of sitteth. 
sythis, I, 327, 21: times. 

T 

tabeau brirben (kame), II, 217, 2, 4: printed by 
Herd, Tabean birben. Jamieson conjectured for 
Tabean, ' made at Tabia, Italy.' Dr C. Mackay very 
properly remarks that Tabia was not known as a 
place of manufacture for combs. He suggests a 
Gaelic origin: taobh, a side, taobhan, sides; bior, a 
pin, point, prickle, the tooth of a comb; bean, a 
woman; whence taobhan bior bean, the side comb 
of a woman. Whether this is good Gaelic, I am 
myself unable to say; but it is a simple criticism that 
a woman's hair is not combed with a side-comb. The 
passage is undoubtedly corrupt. In IV, 471, 2, we 
have, a haw bayberry kame, also corrupt; bayberry 
was heard for whatever tabean brirben stands for. 
One copy had birchen, IV, 471, note to 221. 

table, take vp the, III, 29, 142: take away, the tables 
were laid on trestles and easily handled, removed, 
and, as we often see in ballads, kicked over, drew 
her table, V, 304, 13: see explanation at V, 304 a. 

tack (of needlework), II, 30, L i: attachment by 
stitching, needle-tack, II, 217, 5. 

tack, took. 

tacken, taiken, IV, 515, 12: token. 

tae, II, 147, 4: too. 

tae, the tae,=ae, one. See tane. 

taen, tane, tean, teyne, p. p., taken. 

taiglet, taiglit, IV, 195, 4; 196, 9: tarried. 

taiken, tacken, I, 396, 5, 6: token. 

Tailliant, Talliant, II, 383, 22, 24, 25; 385, 23, 25, 26; 
387, 17, 19, 20; 388, 16, 18, 19: Italian. 

taipy-tapples, I, 303, D 5: misreading of saipy-sap- 
ples, which see. 

tait. See tate. 

take, V, 277, 2: talk. 

take, III, 60, 72, 76; 62, 123; 65, 194; 73, 351; 110, 9: 
hand over, give. I, 465, 18; 472, 28; II, 108, 17; 271, 
17; 273, 23; III, 110, 18; 472, 9; IV, 508, 5: deliver a 
blow, strike. 

take on (lawing), IV, 175, N 4: run up (reckoning). 

take road, take foot, II, 62 b, 14: make off. 

take sworne, III, 340, 34; IV, 504, 34; V, 52, 73: take 
an oath of, put under oath. 

take truce, II, 443, 39; 449, 44; III, 469 a: take 
trewes, pledges of good faith, for suspension of hos 
tility, take peace, III, 278 f., 3, 6: perhaps formed 
upon take truce. 

take up (the table), III, 29, 142: clear away (remove 
the boards). See table, take up (dogs), III, 125, 
35, 36: stop, restrain, call off (?). 
take with, III, 413, 47; IV, 334, 13: take up with, put 

up with, submit to. 

takle, takyll, III, 70, 288; 75 f., 398, 404: arrow, 
talbott, III, 333, 28: a species of hound. 



talents. 

The talents of golde were on her head sette 
Hanged low downe to her knee, 

II, 52, 17: talents probably refers to the weight or 

value of gold worn in massive ornaments (cf . a weight 

of goud hung at her chin, 1, 472, 24). It is not likely 

that the lady wore coins, 
talk, IV, 13, 12: should probably be lack, reproach, 

blame. The reading in A 18; D 5, is suspicious; 

lack, reproach, is in E 16. 
talkitive, IV, 13, D 8: used for talkativeness. 
Talliant. See Tailliant. 
tamper ye at, keep ye up and, IV, 226, is: seems to 

be corrupt, cf. 221, 17, keep ye up i temper guid. 

tamper may be meant for temper, in the sense of 

putting a machine into working order, try expedients 

to humor or manage you. 
tane, the tane, the tither, tother, I, 253, 1; II, 104, 30; 

132, 18; 190, 42; 212, 16. See tean, ton. 
tane, taen, tean, teyne, p. p., taken, tane with me, 

IV, 98, 12: occupied, engrossed, captivated (seized 

or smitten with compassion for, love ?) tane sworn 

(I am), V, 52, 73: of one who has taken an oath, 
tangle, V, 259 a, ll: sea-weed, 
taps, V, 173, 8: tops, tips (of heather). 
Targalley, V, 141, c 1, 2: perhaps a corruption of 

Turk (Turkish) galley, cf. C, a, f, g. 
targats, targits, III, 363, note*; 371, 26, 27: tassels, 
targe, III, 75, 385: "Targe or chartyr. Carta." 

Prompt. Parv. " quatre grosses blancs appeltes 

targes." Ducange, targa. (Corrected from tarpe.) 
tarlottus, tynkerris in tarlottus, III, 41 b (?). 
tarnd, V, 303 a: turned, 
tarpe, III, 75, 385; 80, 385: emended to targe. 
tasse, V, 37, 9: cup (tarse in MS.). 
tate, tait, teet, tet, tette, I, 86, 15; 130, E 14; 323, 2; 

II, 189, 23; 191, 18; 194, 27; 389, 16; IV, 449, 15: 

lock (of hair, of mane), 
tattles, tittles, I, 302, B 7: tits, bits, 
taucher, toucher, tocher, dowry. See toucher, 
tauchy, I, 302, 10: greasy. 
taul, told. 

taunt, bide to taunt, II, 272, 11: endure taunting (?). 
tay, tie. 

tayened, tayned, V, 228, 26, 27: (tined) lost, killed, 
teacht, IV, 150, g 25, 30: taught, 
teall, tale. 
tean, IV, 456 f., 5, 24; 515, 12; V, 36, ll, 15: taken. See 

taen. 
tean, the tean, the eather, V, 224, 27: the one, the 

other. See tane. 

tear begane this spurn, III, 310, 65: see note, 307. 
tee, IV, 446, 7:= tie, 447, 7. glove tee, V, 300, 10, 16, 

19. 

tee, ti, I, 300, 7, 9, 15; II, 30, 4: to, too. 
teem, toom, II, 169, 13; IV, 182, F 5: empty, 
teem, I, 444, G b 2: pour, 
teemed, II, 435, 36: allowed, 
teen, teene, tithe. See teind. 



GLOSSARY 



383 



teene, tene, I, 328, 40; III, 24, 48; 37, 63; 60, 78; 62, 

128; 66, 211; 72, 329; 230, 70; 412, 22; 443, 1: injury, 

wrath, vexation, annoyance, grief, trouble, 
teenouslye, III, 356, 21: angrily, 
teet. See tate. 
teeth, I, 305, A isfc tooth, 
teind, teein, tiend, tene, teen, I, 342, 24; 344, 23; 

350, 23; 354, 32; 452, 3; III, 504 b, 9; IV, 456, 15; 

458, 16: tithe. 

teindings, IV, 455, 18: tithings. 
tell, till, to. 

tempeng, tempen, V, 165 f., 6, 9, 10: tempting, 
temper, set them up in temper wood, IV, 222, 20: cor 
rupted, as will appear from the conclusion of the 

other versions. Parts of two stanzas are mixed, 
tene, v., Ill, 110, is: do harm to. 
tene, n. See teene. 
tenements, V, 77, 38: holdings (whether of lands or 

houses does not appear here), 
tenish, V, 245 a, 8: tennis, 
tent, n., II, 139, li; IV, 223, 3; 390, 4: heed, 
tent, v., I, 74, 81; III, 478, 28: take care of, guard, 

watch. 

tet, tette. See tate. 
tew, V, 303 a: two. 
teyne, IV, 504, 26: taken. See taen. 
teytheyng, tythyng, V, 79, 25: tidings, 
tha, then. See tho. 
tha, V, 296 a: the. 
thae, I, 369, 3; 427, 15; 447, 14; II, 190, 43; IV, 69, 12; 

258, 27; 470, 28, 29: they, them, those, these, 
thairbut, thairben, IV, 291, after ll: out there, in 

there, 
thar, I, 334, 8: it is necessary (it is not necessary to 

hinder thee of thine errand), 
that, II, 451, 93: till that, 
that, imperative particle, anone that you tell me ! Ill, 

27, 118. no peny that I se ! Ill, 58, 41; 68, 246. no 

ferther that thou gone ! Ill, 67, 219. 
that, superfluous, I, 273, 38; 284, 7; II, 58, 6; 433, 3; 

434, 16, 18; 436, 59; 437, 89; 442, 18; 444, 41; III, 276, 

l; 277, 18, 19; 341, 46, 54, 57; 413, 39; IV, 503, 8; V, 

48, 6. (Very common in the Percy MS., where all 

the above, excepting one, occur.) 
that, plur., that two lords, II, 130, 28, 29. See this, 
that . . . his = whose, IV, 330, Appendix, 2. 
that -was her own, II, 73, 20: that referring to roses 

and ribbons, or the bridal relation, or to both, 
the, the, I, 284 f., 9, 30; III, 307 f., 3, 8, 12, 25, 28; 

419 f., 14, 33; 421, 45, 65; 477, 4; 479, 38; V, 263, 7, 9, 

ll, 12: they. 

the, the, I, 296, 50: thee. 

the day, I, 356, 56; II, 32, Q 2; 248, 5; 285, 14: to-day, 
the morn, II, 104, 18; III, 480, 18; 482, 14; 488, 19; 

V, 300, 17; 307, 7: to-morrow, the morn's nicht, II, 

208, C 9: to-morrow night, 
the night, the nicht, I, 303, C 4; 304, E 4; III, 480, 

18; 488, 19; V, 299 a, l: to-night, 
the streen, yestreen. See streeu. 



the, IV, 494, 29: to be corrected to she; they in the 
next line to mean the mill-people. 

the, thee, then, thye, II, 164, 17; III, 67, 234; 78, 452; 
113, 81; V, 76, ll; 79, 14; 82 f., 26, 27, etc.: thrive, 
prosper. 

thee, III, 6, 20: for thou. 

theek, I, 253, 4: thatch, pret. and p. p. theekit, theekd, 
IV, 76 f., l, 2, 4; 458 b, 9: thatched, roofed. 

theer, V, 296 a: there. 

thegither, thegithar, thegether, III, 261, 3; V, 217 
b, No 49, l: together. 

their. See thir. 

then, v. See the. 

there, the diel o there, III, 488, 26: seems to mean of 
that; but we have, devil be there in 43, as an equiva 
lent phrase. 

there, III, 504 a, 14; IV, 465, 25, 26; 485, 24; 510 a, 2: 
there is. Ill, 489, 9: there are (or, there is, Scottice). 

there down, downwards, down. 

theretoo, III, 64, 172: besides. 

thes, III, 111, 34; 113, 76: thus. See this. 

they, II, 434 f., 25, 38; 437, 78; 442 f., 19, 29: the (fre 
quent in Percy MS.). 

thick, spak thick, I, 343, 13: not articulating distinctly 
(from emotion). 

thick, III, 35, 29: thilke, that. 

thie, I, 19, 14: 330, B 2; 331, C 2, D 2: thigh. 

thief, foul thief, V, 123, 14; 184, 44: devil. 

thiggin, V, 117, 2: begging, levying supplies. 

thimber, I, 330, A 2: (Icelandic Jmngbserr, heavy to 
bear ?) heavy, massive. Not understood and changed 
to nimble, nimle, I, 332, P 2, G 2, umber, I, 331, C 2. 

think, thynk, III, 27, 98; 58, 37, 44; 60, 82: seem, me 
thinke, me thynke, methink, III, 81, 37; 153, c 5; 158, 
d 17; 321 b; V, 82, 26, 41 : methinketh, methinks. See 
thoghte, thouth. 

think lang (A. S. lang thyncan, seem long), thouth 
me nouthe lange, 1, 334, 5, 9: seemed not long, amused 
me, impressed me pleasantly. In Scottish, personal, 
with substitution of think for seem, think lang, I, 
370, 4; V, 115, 2: find the time wearisome, suffer 
from ennui. I think lang, I, 368, 35, 37, 39; 506, 2: 
long for. I '11 never think lang, IV, 257, 10: shall 
never be discontented, she thought (thocht) lang, I, 
478, 14; II, 76, ll; 78, 14: was weary with waiting, 
keep frae thinking lang, I, 467, 16, 20. keep him on- 
thought long, I, 478, is. See unthought lang. 

thir, their, I, 5, C 5; 329, 61 ; 482, C b 11; II, 78, 23, 
24; 271, 21; III, 441, 34, 35; 464, 4; IV, 7, 30; 476, 4, 
5; V, 115, 2; 195, 9, 10: these, those. 

thirld in his ear, II, 208, 5: thrilled. 

thirled at the pin, II, 121, 15: tirled, rattled. 

this, pi., this bonny boys, II, 81, 37; this twa, II, 158 f ., 
l, 19. See that. 

this, thes, thys, III, 73, 346; 111, 34; 113, 76; IV, 210, 
4; V, 283, 2: thus. 

tho, III, 28, 138; 34, 7, ll; 36, 44; 111, so: then. 

thoe, III, 285, 33: they (possibly, then). 

thoghte, I, 328, 50: (probably) seemed. See think. 



384 



GLOSSARY 



thole, thoule, I, 508, 8; II, 46, 2; 124, 38; 314, 10; IV, 

17, 2; 21, 16; 278, 12; V, 229, 32: bear, suffer (IV, 

17, 2: like dree, be capable of.) 
thorn, II, 27, I 6: dialectic variation of forn, J 6, 

parlic, of fare: fill yourselves with good fare, 
thornd, II, 110, 24: fared, 
thoth, thouth, I, 334, 7, 8: though, 
thother, the, III, 111, 43: tother, other, 
thou, though. 

thou is, thou's, III, 483, 31; 488, 24. 
thou sitts, thou ryd.es, III, 479, 35. 
thou will, thou made, thou was, thou took, etc., 

# pers. sing, without termination: I, 221, C 9-11, 

222 E n-17; 223, 12, 16. 

thought lang, I, 370, 4; 478, 14, etc. See think lang. 
thoule, II, 159, 20: suffer, put up with. See thole, 
thouth, I, 334, 5, 8, 9: seemed. See think, 
thouth, I, 334, 8: though. See thoth. 
thowt, n., V, 283, 20: thought. 
thra, thrae, IV, 128, l; 220, 2; 369 b; 446, 8; 465, 34; 

470,20; 479, 3; 518, 10; V, 197,3,13: dialectic variety 

of fra, frae, from, 
thrae, I, 170, 6: through, 
thrall, III, 480, 15: bondage, 
thrang, V, 115, 2: intimate, familiar, 
thrashes, threshes, IV, 77, b 4: thrushes, rushes, 
thrashin oer his songs (of blackbird), I, 133, M 3, 5: 

repeating, or practising, 
thrast, pret., Ill, 98, 25.: pressed, 
thrave, I, 21, 10: twenty-four sheaves of corn, two 

shocks. 
thraw, II, 146, 14; 147, 15; 149, 14; 283, 16; IV, 479, 

8: twist, contort, pret. threw, p. p. thrawen, thrawin, 

thrawn, IV, 348, 6, 7; 349, b 3; 350, B b, after 5; V, 

273, No 239, 3. 
thrawin, I, 465, 12: thrown, 
thrawn, twisted. See thraw. 
thrawn, IV, 465, 20: ill-humoredly, 
threefold oer a tree, III, 267, 9: with a double curve, 

over a stick. 

threesome, II, 270, 30: three together, 
threshes, thrashes, IV, 258 f., 5, 20: rushes, 
threty, thirty. 
threw, pret. of thraw, I, 102, 18; 492, 18; II, 111, 21; 

183, 30; 185, 40; 208, 12; 286, 16; V, 262, 24: twisted, 

intertwined. Ill, 180, 10, Robin he lope, Robin he 

threw: may be, threw himself about, or twisted 

twirled, showing his suppleness, 
thrien, I, 244, 18: thrice, 
thrild vpon, thirled at, a pinn, II, 121, 15; 138, 10, 16: 

tirled, rattled. See pin. 
thrill, II, 291, 27: pierce, penetrate, 
thristle-cock, I, 427, 8; thristle-throat, I, 429, 8: 

throstle, thrush. 

throch, II, 30, 6; 256, 12: through, 
throly, III, 98, 25: strenuously, doggedly, 
thronge, III, 25, 56: pressed, made his way. 
throw, intrans., fyer out of his eyen did throw, I, 211, 

23: dart, shoot. 



throwardlie, III, 365 a: frowardly, crossly, ill-tem- 

peredly. 

thro we, III, 78, 448: space of time, 
thrown, IV, 249, P 3: corrupted from this road; cf. 

A 6; B 7; C 9; D 6. 
prumme, III, 13, 9: the extremity of a weaver's warp, 

from six to nine inches long, serving to hold arrows. 

Cf. II, 168, 5, four-and-twenty arrows laced in a 

whang. 

thrusty, IV, 172, 4: trusty ? (rusted, 173, K 4.) 
thurst, IV, 60 b, 6: thrust, 
thryfte, euyll thryfte, in, 67, 220: ill thriving, ill 

speed, bad luck, 
thu, V, 283, 13: thou. 
thye, thigh. 

thye, II, 241, 14: thrive. See the. 
thys, V, 283, 2: thus. See this, 
ti, I, 299, 13: to; too. 
ticht. See tight, 
tide, tyde, III, 299, C 1; 432, 15; 473, ll; V, 83, 49: 

time, into the tide, V, 160, 2; by the tide, 163, 4; 

164, l: at the time, now. 

tidive, tidive hour, II, 257, 15: timely, early? (the 
hour may be early morning). 

tiend, tithe. See teind. 

tier, V, 151, F i, should be, tree. 

tift, II, 183, 17: puff, whiff. 

tight, ticht, V, 151, E 3; 161, 2: (of a man) well built. 
V, 258, 4: (of a maid) neatly shaped, jimp. 

till, n., II, 409, 12: toil. 

till, till see, II, 191, 22; till and frae, II, 71, 15: to. At 
III, 338 b, it is said that in A 66, till may mean 
while. Here Jamiesou was followed: but there ap 
pears to be only one case to cite, in a single MS. of 
Barbour's Brus, where others read quhil. The re 
mark must be withdrawn, though while might be 
offered as an emendation, since it is, for obvious 
reasons, far more probable than till. 

till, v., II, 54, 57: entice. 

timmer, timber, wooden. 

timouslie, IV, 63, l: early. 

tine, tyne, tayen, I, 16, C 14; II, 70, 30; 313, 21; 336, 
O 8, 9; III, 75, 398; lose. I, 324, B 7; IV, 454, 3; 
455, ll; 458, 5: to be lost, perish. I, 115, ll: cause 
to perish, pret. and p. p. tint, IV, 18, 20; 127, 14; 

165, 15; V, 99 C 4: lost. 

tinye, n., a little tinye, V, 51, 69: bit. 

tip, tippet (of horse's mane), IV, 410, 18, 21; 413, 13: 
= tate, lock. 

tirl at the pin, trill, rattle, at that part of the door- 
fastening which lifts the latch. See pin. 

tit, V, 125, 9: quick pull. 

tithyngus, III, 98, 40-42: tidings. 

tittles and tattles, I, 302, B 7: tits, bits. 

to, III, 110, 14, 16: two. 

to, till. 

tobreke, subj., I, 243, 6: break, burst (apart), p. p. 
to-broke, broken up. 

tocher, toucher, tougher, taucher, n. See toucher. 



GLOSSARY 



385 



to-clouted (gowne), III, 179 a: with patches set to it. 
tod, I, 355, 44; IV, 193, il; 194, 4; 195, 9; 196, 13, 

etc.: fox. 
toe from home, boune, IV, 504, 24: to a place away 

from? (perhaps corrupt), 
to-hande, III, 110, 14: two-hand, two-handed, 
tolbooth, tolbuith, tollbooth, III, 482, 18; 489 f., 9, 

10, 15: prison, jail. That in Edinburgh, III, 385, 12; 

386, 12; 389, 14; IV, 508 b, 8; 609, 9 (Towbooth). 
tolde, III, 59, 67-69; 68, 247: counted, 
to-morne, I, 328, 57: to-morrow, 
ton, tone, the, III, 296 f., 12, 30: the one. tone, 

tother, II, 53, 27, 32. the tone, the tother, II, 51, 2. 

See tane. 

tooke, III, 405, 14: put. See take, 
tooken vpon one part, III, 404, 3: engaged, enlisted, 

on the same side. 
toom, teem, I, 72, 17; II, 124, 38; IV, 143, B i, 3, C 

6; 180, 8; V, 196, 53; 251, 30, 32; 256, 8: empty, 
toomly, IV, 181, 11: empty, 
toorin, I, 500, R 1-4: cooing. (Imitative, cf. Scott. 

curr, curroo, Germ, gurren.) 
too-too, to-towe, III, 217, b, c, 41: a strong too. 
top, IV, 288, E 3: should be toss, toast. 
topcaatle, III, 340 f., 32, 58; 344 f., 28, 46; IV, 504 f., 

32, 58 (topcasaille) = top. See topps. 
topps, III, 419, 15; IV, 506, 61: " Among seamen tops 

are taken for those round frames of board that lye 

upon the cross-trees, near the heads of the masts, 

where they get up to furle or loose the topsails." 

Phillips. A noble ship at III, 419, 15, has five tops. 
tor (of saddle), IV, 410, 21: pommel. 
tor, tore, II, 323, ll; 334, M 2; IV, 480, 8: projection 

or knob at the corner of old-fashioned cradles (as 

also, ornamental balls surmounting the backs of 

chairs). 

torne, III, 112, 56: turn, bout, 
tortyll-tre, III, 112, 56: corruptly for trystell-tre. 
toss, IV, 288, E 3: toast (as a beauty), (misprinted 

top.) 

to t', III, 439, 4: to the. 
to-towe, III, 430, i: too-too, a strong too. 
toucher, tougher, taucher, n., IV, 283 f., 10, 22, 23; 

285, 12, 13; 286, ll; 287, 4; 487, 30; 489, 29; V, 267, 

12, 13: tocher, dowry. 

toucher, u., IV, 284, 23: pay a dowry to. 
touchered, V, 224, 11: dowered, 
toun, town, IV, 200,19; 201, n; 202, K 5; 203, 13; V, 

228, 27: a farmer's steading or place (or, a small col 
lection of houses). V, 267, 7: perhaps simply house, 
toun-head, V, 267, ll: centre or principal part of the 

town. 

tour, lyin in a tour, IV, 87, 20: continuous route, 
tout, I, 274, 18: backside, 
touting, blowing. 

tow, III, 396, N 8; 449 b; V, 125, 9: rope, 
tow, III, 434, 17, 18; 435, 12: let down by a rope. V, 

123, 15, 16: draw up and let down, 
towbooth. See tolbooth. 
VOL. v. 49 



toweld, II, 194, 22: twilled (?). 

town. See toun. 

tows, went to the, IV, 380, 8: tows= touts, drinking- 
bouts, fell to drinking (in contrast to Allan, who 
went to pray. Tows cannot be ropes; they had not 
gone aboard the ship). 

trace, II, 479, 16: track, path, way. 

trachled, V, 169, 9: tired out. 

trade, II, 454, 37: should be train, as in 445, 62; 460, 

67. 

train, IV, 107, l, 13, 16: company. 

train(e), II, 445, 62; 450, 67: training. 

traitorye, III, 411, 2: treachery. 

trailed, V, 274, 10: trailed (had rather have married 
A. and have trailed). 

trance, II, 468 f., 18, 22; V, 268, 7: passage in a house. 

tranckled, I, 284, 10: travelled. (Dutch trantelen, 
tranten, tarde progredi; morari. Hexham, to go 
lazily, at a soft pace.) 

trap, a doublet of trip, trip for trap, II, 328, 17: trip 
ping. 

trapand,p. p., (of horse) IV, 44, 4: treacherously dealt 
with. 

trappin, IV, 342, 12: tape. 

trattles, II, 152, 5: tattles. 

travisse, II, 92, 20: (a frame for confining cavalry 
horses) horse's stall. 

trawale, III, 41 a: travail, operations. 

tray, tree (A. S. trega), injury, suffering, grief, vexa 
tion, tene and traye, I, 328, 40; tray and tene, III, 
66, 218: grief and vexation, tree and teene, III, 412, 
22: grief and injury, (tregan and te*onan, Genesis, 
2274.) 

tray, try. 

tread, tred, pret. of tread, II, 160, 5, 6; 165, 9; 171, 10, 
12; IV, 468, 3, 4. jp. p., IV, 128, 19. 

treasonie, II, 344, 14: treason. 

tree, tre, I, 343, 42; 345, 40; II, 218, 19; III, 23, 26; 
309, 44: wood. I, 465, 2; 473, 4: pole, shaft of a 
cart. I, 341, 21; 344, 20; III, 25, 59; 29, 154; 63, 147; 
97, 4: the cross. Ill, 160, 22, 25; 161, 42; 162, 55, 62; 
163, 78; 267, 9; 268, 8; 270, D 8; 271, F 10: staff, 
straight piece of rough wood, crooked tree, III, 160, 
18: bow. trenchen tree, III, 164, 91: truncheon, cud 
gel, staff, of (a) myghtte tre, III, 308 f., 27, 42: of 
strong wood, a trusti tree, III, 309, 40: perhaps 
shaft; but the a is likely to be of, as Professor 
Skeat suggests, and the meaning, of trusty wood (cf . 
44, bowe made off trusti tree), horse of tree, III, 
478, 13: bridge, or, at least, tree-trunk. 

tree, III, 412, 22. See tray. 

trenchen tree, III, 164, 91 : truncheon, cudgel, staff. 

trew, true, II, 384, 20, 21; III, 474, 45: trow, believe. 

trews, trues, IV, 157, 18, 19; 267, 7; 272, 3; V, 165, i; 
267 a, 6; 306, l: trousers. 

treyffe, III, 113, 81 : thrive. 

triest, trist. See tryst. 

trinkle, I, 497, 15; H, 197, 17; 209, D 7; 290, 25; 326, 
ll; 411, B 17; IV, 236, 5; 409, 6; 487, 27: trickle. 



386 



GLOSSARY 



trip for trap, came down the stair, III, 328, 17: trip 
ping, trip-trap (trap, a doublet of trip). 

tristil-tre, III, 98, 37. See tryateU-tre. 

troule, V, 84, 13: go round (of a bowl of ale). 

trow, trew, true, believe, suppose. I trow, 1, 104, c 
13: assuredly. 

trowt, trowet, III, 110, 23, 26: troth. 

truce, my petticoat, IV, 288, E 2: put in a trouss, tuck 
or fold, to shorten. 

true, days of, III, 352 a: (singular of truce, trews, 
pledges of good faith) truce. 

true, IV, 486 f., 5, 21; 491, 5: trow. See trew. 

true-love, lover, betrothed lover (often not to be dis 
tinguished from true love), passim. 

trues, trousers. See trews. 

truff, II, 144 f., 14, 24: turf. 

trust, II, 307, 34; 379, 4; IV, 494, 37; V, 38, 5: trow, 
believe, suppose (of the things one would rather not 
believe). 

truste, III, 66, 207: trusty. 

trusty tree, III, 92, 8; 116 f., 2, 21; 200, 37; V, 75, 4: an 
obvious corruption of trystill-tree, a tree appointed 
for a meeting or assemblage. (Trusty also in later 
copies of Adam Bell and the Gest for trysty, trys- 
tell, which see.) 

trusyd, III, 13, 9: trussed, bound up. 

tryst, tryste, ., I, 394, A i; 395, l; IV, 2, 4, 6: ap 
pointment to meet. IV, 413, 7; 414, 3, 4: appoint 
ment for wedding. I, 326, 18: market. 

tryst, tri(e)st, v., I, 314, l; II, 270, 3; 272, 4; IV, 201, 
8; V, 171, 4: engage, induce, entice, to come, go 
with. II, 294, 13; IV, 194, 6; 198, 8; 200, 19; 201, 
li; 202, K 5: prepare a way for coming, cause to 
come. 

tryst, n. or v., IV, 154, 5: appoint a place, or, appoint 
ment of a place. 

trystell-tree, trysty-tre, trystyll-tre, tristil-tre, 

III, 69 f., 274, 286; 71, 298; 75, 387; 76, 412: a tree serv 
ing for a meeting-place (of Robin Hood's band). 
(In later texts, trusty.) 

trysty tre, HI, 26 f., 95, 98; 27, 102: tree fixed upon for 
rendezvous (trusty, trustie in later copies). 

tu, V, 303 a: to. 

tua, the tua part, V, 254 b, 4: two thirds. But twa 
part, V, 276, 20, seems to mean second part, half, 
which we have at IV, 120 P 7; 381, 16; that is, it 
is more likely that an equal share should be offered. 

tul, III, 440, 25; til, to. tul a, III, 440, 13: to have. 

turn, IV, 477, 14; turning o the tune, II, 249, 11; o the 
note, 250, 13; IV, 477, 13: refrain (owretura, I, 332, 
E, P 7; owreword, II, 254, 8, 9). turnin o the bell, 

IV, 314, 19. 

turn the wind wi thee, IV, 379, 6:= take the wine 
(i. e. wind) fra thee, V, 275, 5. (The meaning is clear, 
but whether turn is in actual use in the required 
sense I have not ascertained.) 

turning. See turn. 

tust, IV, 224, 20: tost. 

twa, two. twa part, see tua. 



twafald(-fold), oer a tree, staff, II, 461, 19; III, 268, 8: 
bent double over a stick, twafald ower his steed, 

III, 8, 18: doubled, head hanging on one side, feet 
on the other. See twofold. 

twain, v., part. See twin. 

twal, twelve. 

twalmon, twalmont, twelvemonth. 

twalt, twelt, twelfth. 

twan, pret. of twine, I, 256, 2. 

twatling, dishes, V, 86, 36: unmeaning, nonsensical, of 
no account. 

twaw, two. 

twig, IV, 31, B 6: twitch, pull. 

twin, twine, twyne, twin me o my make, twin babe 
of life, I, 129, 8; 174, 18; 175, D e, 12; 177, 17; 220, 
B 3; 222, 7; H, 218, 16; IV, 179, A 2: deprive, 
twine a mantle, I, 453, 3; twine me, IV, 154, 5: part 
with. twin(n) with, 1, 175, 4, 5, 10, li; II, 232, 7, 10, 12; 
twin(e) me and my make, etc., I, 127, 14; 128, ll; 
350, 15; II, 159, 12, 13 (twain); V, 178, i: separate, 
gar twa loves twin (twain), etc., I, 56, B 9; II, 63, 
23; 230, B 3, 6: part, intrans. 

twine, coarse linen, duck, crash, for towel, IV, 460, 
No 47, 1, 2; shift (contrasted with holland), II, 224, 
17. II, 27, 19, 20: canvas. 1, 221, C 9; 504, 4: coarse 
stuff of some kind. Lincoln twine, III, 5, D 5; 8, 12; 

IV, 496, 10, is doubtless the Lincoln green of other 
versions, and so simply texture. Ill, 192, 10: yarn, 
ropes o silken twine, IV, 472, 10: twist, shoes of 
small corded twine, V, 301 b, 3. 

twinkle, II, 409, 17; 425, A 7: triukle, trickle, 
twinn, v. See twin. 

twinn, part in twinn, I, 432, 3: in twain, in two. 
twirld, at the pin, IV, 390, b 4: tirled, rattled, 
twofold oer a staff, threefold oer a tree, III, 267, 

9; the body being bent double over the staff, the 

whole presentation is, with the staff (tree) threefold. 

Corruptly, III, 188, 6, two foote on a staffe, the third 

vpon a tree. See also twa-fald. 
tydand, II, 433, 9: tidings, 
tyde. See tide. 

tyndes, III, 65, 186: (A. S. tind) tynes, antlers, 
tyne, I, 17, ll: = tynd, harrow-tooth (harrow-pin, 1, 19, 

10). 

tyne, v. t to lose, to perish. See tine. 

tyte, his backe did from his belly tyte, III, 277, 17: 
quickly. A verb of the sense fall away may have 
dropped out after did, and is at any rate to be under 
stood, unless tyte had that sense. A Scottish tyte, to 
totter, fall (tyte oer, fall over), is noted by Jamie son. 

tythance, tythand(e)s, tythyng, III, 361, b, c i; c 
14, 49; 362, 93; V, 78, 5: tidings. 



ugsome, II, 47, 15: exciting disgust or abhorrence. 

(Icel. uggr, fear.) 
nil, I oil, V, 267, 5: will, 
umber, I, 331, C 2: seems to be the same as thimber 

(I, 330, A 2): massive. 



GLOSSARY 



387 



unbeen, my barn's unbeen, IV, 143, A 4: not thor 
oughly closed in or made tight ? (been, well-pro 
vided, warm, dry and snug. A bein cask, water 
tight, Jamieson.) a house is beind when thoroughly 
dried. 

vnbethought him, I, 214, A 17 (printed um-); II, 
240, 5; V, 15, 16: bethought himself of. 

unbigged, IV, 143, A 4: unbuilt. 

unco, adj., A. S. unciiS (uncouth, III, 245, ll). unco 
man, IV, 235, 11: unknown, strange, unco land, 
ground, I, 182, 1, 3; 324, 4; IV, 410, 10, 11. unco 
squire, V, 26 f., 25, 36: stranger, unco woman, I, 78, 
26: unfriendly, unco lair (lear), II, 118, l; 119, 1; 
174, l; 178, 2; HI, 385, l; IV, 411, l; 467, l: ex 
traordinary. 

unco, adv., I, 370, 5: unusually, very. 

uncouth, vnkowth, vnkuth, vnketh, 1,344,25; III, 
245, ll: (A. S. unciiS) unknown, strange. See unco. 

vnder, Grenwich, III, 358, 78: perhaps, below, further 
down the Thames. 

vnder hand, shott it vnder hand, III, 199, 29; 202, 33; 
shot under his hand, III, 204, 26: Dr Furnivall and 
Mr C. J. Longman suggest, putting the bow horizon 
tally, in which case you shoot with the arrow under 
the left hand, instead of beside it, as in shooting with 
the bow vertical. Ascham speaks of an underhand 
shaft, but without denning it: "The underhande 
[shaf te] must have a small breste, to go cleane awaye 
oute of the bowe; the forehande muste have a bigge 
breste, to bere the great myght of the bowe." Tox- 
ophilus, 1545, ed. Arber, p. 126. And again, as 
cited by Dr W. Hand Browne, of Johns Hopkins 
University: " Men doubt yet, in looking at the mark, 
what way is best, above or beneth hys hand"; "a 
byg brested shafte for hym that shoteth under hande, 
bycause it will hobble." Upon which Dr Browne re 
marks, " As he is here speaking only of taking aim, 
under-hand shooting would seem to be done when 
the archer raised his bow high, and looked at the 
mark under the arrow-hand." 

under night, I, 100, l: in the night. 

vndergoe, II, 59, 33: undertake. 

undertaking, be your, IV, 152, 6; 153, D 7: will under 
take, manage for you. 

vnfaine, III, 355, 14: not glad. 

unfriends, III, 470 b: enemies. 

vngoodly, III, 322 a: unhandsome. 

vnhappie, V, 82, 29: ill-conditioned, having bad tricks. 

unhappy, IV, 64 a: mischievous. 

unhappy, V, 86, 32: unlucky (as speaking inoppor 
tunely). (The on of horson occasioned the omission 
of un-.) 

unkensome, III, 495 B b 7: not to be known. 

unkent, IV, 435, 12: unknown. 

vnketh, vnkouth, vnkuth, III, 56, 6; 57, 18; 66, 209; 
79, 6, 18; 82, 6, 18; 85, 6: uncouth, unknown, stranger. 

vnmackley, II, 59, 30 : misshapen. (Scott, makly, well 
proportioned, mackerly, Northumberland, shapely. 
Halliwell.) 



vnneth, unneath, III, 73, 358; 171, 17: with difficulty, 

scarcely. 

vnready, V, 81, 10: indirect, or, attended with difficul 
ties. 

unright(e), I, 294, 7; III, 339, 5; IV, 503, 5: wrong, 
unruly, IV, 383, 1: should probably be unseally, as in 

IV, 378, i. 

unseally, IV, 378, l: unlucky, 
vnsett, III, 358, 71 : surrounded, invested. (A. S. 

ymbsettan.) 

unshemly, V, 215, 14: unseemly, 
unthought, unthocht, onthought lang, haud, keep, 

I, 478, 13; 482, C b 16, 20; II, 139, 3; III, 492, 5; IV, 

260, 10: keep from thinking long, wearying, from 

ennui. See think lang. 
vnthrift, V, 81, 16: spendthrift, 
until, untill, I, 221, D 3, 4; III, 488, 35, 36: unto, to. 
unto, IV, 170, ll; 467, ll; V, 262, 19: into, in. 
vnto the same, I, 284, 12: after the same fashion, 
vntyll, gates shut them vntyll, III, 25, 52: to, against, 
vnwieldie, V, 82, 29: unmanageable, 
vowsed, uowsed, V, 79, 14: used, practised. 
vp chaunce, III, 57, 18; 66, 209: on, for, the chance. 
up stark, IV, 378, 5; 380, ll: (came, blew) up strong, 

as still common, with the like ellipsis, V, 51, 68; 56, 

45. 

upgive, V, 193, 59: avow, acknowledge, own up. 
vpon, vppon, I, 271, 2; 433, 15, 16: on. stay upon, 

wait upon, III, 450 b: for. 
upper hand, II, 245, 29: upper tier, above, 
upricht, I, 473, 3: right out. 
upstart, II, 54, 56: sprang up. 
us, I us gar, V, 267, 12: shall, will. See B, sign of 

future, 
used, V, 85, 23: frequented, used him in her company, 

IV, 98, P 6: accustomed him to. 
vtter, III, 361, b, c 52: outer. 
utuer, IV, 506, 59. See beame. 



vain, streams proud and vain, IV, 204, 8: repetition of 

proud in the sense of fierce, etc. 
valiant (of ladies), V, 119, l: of worth, estimation, 
value (of an hour), IV, 514, 15, 16: amount, 
value, va(l)low, v., II, 162, E 2: think important, make 

ado about, stick, vallow not the feed, IV, 36, 3: value, 

care not for the feud which will ensue; cf. B 3. 
vance, spak wi a vance, IV, 465, 30: seems to be meant 

for vaunt. It is hardly probable that the plural of 

the old Scottish and English avant, vaunt (with 

avauts*) can be intended, 
vanitie, IV, 300, 2, is nonsense, 
vawward, III, 284, 14; vanward, III, 285, 21, 34; 333, 

27: vanguard, van. 

veiwe, vew, vewe, III, 92, 15: yew. 
velvaret, IV, 369, l: meant for velvet; not velveret. 
venie (?), Ill, 219 b, note: vein, 
venison, II, 59, 38: hunting (prerogative of), 
vension, III, 196, d 4: venison. 



388 



GLOSSARY 



vepan, weapon. 

verament, III, 308, 26; 333, 26: truly. 

vessell, pi., Ill, 65, 175, 179, 191 : vessels. 

vew, your vew, V, 86, 40: sight of you. 

vew, vewe, veiwe, III, 92, 15; 105, 27; 362, 78: yew. 
(The v is not for u. The word is pronounced vewe 
in Cheshire.) 

vild, V, 53, 102: vile. 

virgus, I, 420, 13: verjuice, a kind of vinegar (green 
juice). 

virr, I, 183, 16: vigor. 

virtue, in virtue leave your lammas beds, II, 96, J 4: 
corrupt. Cf. B i. Dr Davidson suggests, never tae 
leave your lammie's, lambkin's beds (lammie's, inno 
cent). 

vo, vou, woe. 

vogie, IV, 176, ll: vain, merry; no longer have you 
cause for self-gratulation, to be demonstratively joy 
ful. 

vones, I, 334, 6: dwellest. 

voss. a voss o, IV, 224, 8, 12: comparing G 8, 10, 21, 
K 22, the voice of, this last seems to be meant. Oth 
erwise, a corruption of, it was a (cf. A 11; C 15; D 
17; E 19; H ll). 

votes, IV, 114, C 2: for voters ? probably a corrup 
tion. 

vou 's me, V, 271, 16, 17, wo is me! 

vouch it safe, III, 75, 381: grant, bestow (safe cor 
rected from halfe). 

voued, pret., V, 268, 17: viewed. * 

vour. o vour, II, 25, P 13: half owre, as in C 18. 

vow, wow, IV, 133 f., 12, 15; 136, 21; V, 118, C ll: 
exclamation of surprise, emphasis, or admiration. 

voyded, III, 26, 79: made off. 

vue, v., V, 265, 17: view. 

vyld, wild. 

vy tout en nay, I, 334, 4: without, beyond, denial. 

W 

wa, wae, IV, 448 a, 3 d st.: wo. 

waaf, II, 72, 2: waif. 

wad, n., II, 63, 23; 172, 31, 32: pledge, in security. I, 

340, 2; 343, 2; II, 376, 39; III, 455, 10: forfeit, 
wad. I wad, I, 130, F 14, 15, 20: I wot, in a weak 

sense, assuredly, truly. See a=I, and wat. 
wad, wade, I, 71, 55, 56; 74, 76, 77; III, 465, 30; V, 

299, 2: would. See wads, 
wad, wade, v., IV, 18, 17; 185, 7; 384, 5; 385, 2, 7; 

386, 2; V, 219, 23; 275 b, 6; 300, 14s wager. IV, 

432, 4, 5: engage (to fight), 
wadded, I, 272, 11: of woad color, blue, 
wadded, V, 261, 6: wedded, 
wadding, wadin, II, 131 f., ll, 16, 19, 20; IV, 470, 15- 

17: wedding, 
wade, wad, pret. of wide, wade, II, 97, 12, is; 283, 4; 

461, 10; IV, 68, 6; 190, 27, 28; 438, 13; 455, 9. 
waders, IV, 188, 20: miscopied by Skene for mideers, 

mothers. 
wadin. See wadding. 



wads, II, 133, D 4, 6, 6: wishes (wad, would, treated 
as a present tense). 

wae, wa, I, 69, 48; 127, 28; 169, 3; 217, 3, 6; V, 306, 
10: wo. 

wae, adj., I, 367, ll; II, 70, 25; 89, 36; 129, 17: un 
happy. 

wael, IV, 443, 5: choice. See wale. 

waely, IV, 59, d 3: a rhyme- word for wae, sad. 

waesome, IV, 369 b: woful. 

waft, I, 420, 15, 16; 422, 12, 13: weft, woof. 

wafu, woful. 

wainless, II, 72, 8: homeless (without a wane, habita 
tion). 

wair, II, 472, 24: bestow. See war. 

wait, I wait, a wait, wate, IV, 128, 16, 17; 169, 3; 
371, 2, 3, 5; 447, 6, 17; 470, 17; 510, W 2; 515, 12, 15; 
517, 20: I wot, know, indeed. See wat, and a=I. 

wait, IV, 456, 7:=wite, blame. 

wait, wayte, III, 57, 18; 66, 209; 83, 202; 86, 202; 412, 
21: watch, lie in wait, seek an opportunity, to do. 

waith, steed, V, 176, 18: waif, stray, wandering. 

waitmen, II, 424, 3: waiting-men (or possibly, wight 
men, strong men). 

wake, II, 327, 2, 4, 6: aperture, way. (Icel. vok, aper 
ture, especially one cut in ice, or remaining in water 
not completely frozen over; passage cut for ships in 
ice; Swed. vak, hole in ice; Dutch vak, empty space. 
"In Norfolk, when the 'broads' are mostly frozen 
over, the spaces of open water are called wakes." 
Wedgwood.) 

wake, I, 107, 5; IV, 446, 5; 447, 5: watch (people set 
to watch me), but the reading at I, 107; IV, 447, 
is probably wrong; cf. I, 108, B 4. See wane. 

wake, IV, 141, 12: merry-making, sport. 

wake, v., V, 277, 2: walk. 

wake, III, 88, 340, is an original misprint. 

waken, I, 433, 24: waking. 

wakerife. See waukrife. 

wald, walde, I, 334, 6: would. 

wale, wael, walle, IV, 265, A b 10; 477, 19; V, 
256 a, 2: choice. 

wale, weil, wile, wyle, I, 428, 14; IV, 169, 6; 300, 
12; 461, 19; V, 105, B i: choose. 

wale wight, I, 490, 13. See wall wight. 

walker, I, 272, 14: fuller. 

wall, I, 387, 2, 4; 440, 4, 6; V, 206 a, 3: well, spring. 
The water at St Johnston's wall was fifty fathom 
deep, II, 21, 14: an alleged deep place in the Tay; 
cf . 24, 14, there 's a brig at the back o Sanct John's 
toun, it 's fifty f adorn deep. 

wall, green wall sea, green wall wave, V, 275 b, 7, 8: 
apparently wave, despite tautology; cf. II, 22, 15, 
green- waved sea. (haw sea, IV, 379, 10; 380, 19. 
Prof. Murison informs me that when Mrs Murison 
sings the ballad mechanically, or without attention, 
she invariably sings haw.) 

walle, V, 256 a, 2: wale, choice. See wale. 

wallourt. See wallowt. 

wallowd, II, 392, 10: rolled over (?). 



GLOSSARY 



389 



wallowit, II, 361, 32: withered. 

wallowt, IV, 127, 3: drooped, grew pallid, was wal- 

lourt, IV, 138, M: (misspelt) was pallid, 
wall-wight, II, 123, 15; 403, 9; III, 10, 23; IV, 392, 

II, 12; V, 37, 6; 41, 29, 32 (all from Buchan's ballads): 
explained by Donaldson as waled wight, picked 
strong men. Donaldson cites weild wightman from 
Seinple of Beltrees. See well wight, wale wight 
men, I, 490, is. 

wallwood, swine, II, 299, 16: wild-wood, compare II, 
144, 3, wild-wood steer (unhallowed swine, II, 154, 
10). 

waiting, IV, 312, 8: welting, edging. 

waly, IV, 21, 13: fine large. 

waly, wallie, wally, II, 363, l, line 1; IV, 109 f., 6, 
8; 293, A 1, 2, 7, 9 (oh and a waly); V, 195, 8; 197, 
9, 10, ll: exclamation of admiration. O braw wallie, 
IV, 296, P l: literally, O good, lucky I or, O good 
luck ! but, as before, an exclamation of admiration. 

waly, wally, II, 363, l, line 3; IV, 92, l, 3; 94, l; 95, 

I, etc.: interjection of lamentation (probably A. S. 
wd 14 !). the wally o 't, IV, 290, D b l: sorrow, pity 
of it! waly 's my love! V, 208, 1, 2, etc. 

wamb(e), wame, II, 130, 2; 183, 24; 189, 27; 195, 33; 

III, 437, 23: womb. See weam. 
wan, one. 

wan, dark-colored, pallid, colorless, white. II, 92, ,, 
4, 9; 97, 11; 144, 13; 147, 10; 150, 14: dark-colored. 

II, 74, E 6; 79, 28; 185, 33; 187, 16; 399, 2: pallid, 
wan water (as contrasted with wine), II, 70, 17; 74, 
D 7; 75, 10; 92, 4; 96, J 7, 8: colorless, far got ye 
that water that washes ye so wan, II, 191, 23: white 
(ye wad never be so white, 24). 

wan, wane, pret. of win, I, 73, 53; II, 21, 4; 123, 22; 

III, 474, 32; IV, 180, 7. he wan free, V, 300, ll: got 
free. 

wan, p. p. of win, IV, 385, 26. 

wand, II, 146, 13; 147, 14; 150, B 9; 151, G 4: of 
(willow) twigs, staff made of the wand, II, 118, 
22 (very nearly verbiage) : made of a rod. 

wane, I, 334, 7; III, 63, 148: habitation, in my bower 
there is a wane, IV, 446, 5: wane, says Jamieson, 
denotes not only a dwelling (Old Eng. wone), but 
"different apartments in the same habitation;" if 
so, in my house there is a room, is the sense here, 
wan, in the wake there is a wan, IV, 447, 5: should 
at least be, in the wane there is a wake, as the rhyme 
shows, and as we have at 446, 5. In, at the wake 
there is a wane, I, 107, 5, wane was meant by Scott 
to be understood as a collection of people (wheen). 
See wake. 

wane, III, 309, 36: "quantity, multitude; a single 
arrow out of a vast quantity." Skeat (quantity as 
in Chaucer's wone, see wheen). This is to me 
quite unsatisfactory, but I have no better interpreta 
tion to offer. Wain, in the sense of a vehicle for a 
missile, ballista, catapult, would be what is wanted, 
but I have not succeeded in finding a case. 

wanhappy, IV, 386, l: unlucky. 



wanna, did not win, go. 

wannelld, III, 488, 38: was unsteady, staggered. (A. 

S. wancol, North Eng. wankle, unstable, Germ. 

wankeln.) 

wannle, IV, 491, 32: agile, vigorous, strong, 
wanny, II, 261, 8, 9: small wand, rod. 
want, IV, 196, 3; 268, 17, 22; 357, B 7; 358, 17: do 

without, dispense with, sae soon as we 've wanted 

him, IV, 359, 12: had to do without. Ill, 513 b, 2, 

pret. : wanted, 
wanton, HI, 452, l; 453, l: free and easy, frolicsome. 

(rantin, 455, l.) Cf. Wanton Brown (a horse), IV, 

17, l, etc. 
wantonlie, -ly, HI, 488, 27; 490, u: gaily, merrily. 

rode, lap, wantonly, IV, 146 f., 8, 38: in easy, spirited 

style. 
wap, horse will gie his head a wap, I, 182 f., 8, 14: 

throw, toss. 

wap, n., coost a wap on horse's nose, IV, 21, 9: noose, 
wap, v., wrap, lap. wap cloth into ship's side, II, 27, 

19: stuff, rouii ship's side, 20: wrap, wap halter 

oer horse's nose, IV, 17, 4: lap, twine, perhaps throw, 
wap, v., throw, wappin corn and hay oer to horse, 

IV, 21, 18: throwing, wappit wings, II, 139 f., 7, 

12, 22: beat, flapped, 
war, ware, be war, ware, a, of, on, I, 273, 37; II, 46, 

37; III, 66, 213; 109, 4; 296, 20; 307, 10: be aware, 

have a sight of. was war wher, III, 98, 39. 
war,waur, I, 388, A 10; 420, 12,13; 466, 22; II, 417, 6, 

9; V, 193, 48: worse. 

war, waur, I, 132, 1 1; 149, 1 1; 331, B 8: were, 
war, ware, wair, I, 431, 3; 478, 7; II, 418, 22; 472, 

24; V, 142, 11: expend, bestow, ware my dame's 

cauf's skin on thee, IV, 7, 31 ; V, 250, 29: apply, use, 

my wife's (mother's) whip, 
waran, warran, warrand, warraner, warrant, III, 

430, 15; 435, F 7; 436, 5, 7: sponsor for, security. 

Ill, 405, 7; IV, 310, 4 (cf. warn): safeguard, 
ward, warde, III, 404 b; 470 b: defence. Ill, 72, 

332, 337; 449 a; IV, 11, 18: prison, confinement, enter 

himself in ward, III, 447 b: voluntarily go into con 
finement. 

ward, IV, 446, l: corrupt. See weird, 
warde, II, 273, 25; 340 b, line 8: forewarn, advise, 
warden, I, 161, 4; V, 209 a, 4: guardian, tutor. 
warden, IV, 317, F 3, 4: facing, edging (cf. the wait 
ing, welting, of 312, A 8). 
warden pies, III, 216, 35: made of large pears called 

wardens, 
wardle, I, 127, 14; V, 214 f., l, 6: world, wardle's 

make, see warld. 
ware, V, 169, ll: sea-weed, alga marina (used for 

manure). 

ware, V, 306, 2, 3: were, 
ware, pret., V, 221, 20: wore, 
ware. See war. 

warison, waryson, III, 100, 74; 297, 43: reward, 
warld, world, warld's make, 1, 129, 8; 348, 17; 351 f., 

40, 54; 353, H 12; wardle's make, I, 127, 14; warldly, 



390 



GLOSSARY 



worldly, make, mate, I, 344, 30; II, 118, 6, 7; world's 
make, I, 128, 11; 348, 11; wordlye make, II, 86, 18, 
20: world's, earthly, mate, consort, world's mait, I, 
508,9. 

warldly. See warld. 

warlock, II, 220, 11, 12; 223 f., 8, 14; IV, 472 ., 24, 25: 
wizard. 

warn, IV, 309, 2, 6: surety, safeguard. Cf. warran, 

IV, 310, 4, and see waraii. 

warn, p. p., IV, 445 b, 2, No 8: warnd (as 446, b 2). 

warp, v., I, 312, 8; II, 503, 7: curl, twist. 

warran, warrand. See waran. 

warraner. See waran. 

warsle, n., I, 438, A l: wrestle. 

warsle, warsel, v., I, 438, A 2; 439, 2; 440, 3; 441, 

1-3: wrestle, warsled, 1, 56, 14: wrestled, struggled, 

bestirred herself. 

warslin, a-warslin, I, 440, l, 2: a-wrestling. 
warwolf, I, 311, 15, 16: werewolf, man-wolf, man 

transformed into a wolf, 
waryson. See warison. 
wa's, ways. 
was. See wash, 
wash. pres. was, I, 494, 7; HI, 111, 41. pret. weesh, 

wish, wush. p. p. washen (I, 304, E 5; II, 111, 10; 

V, 102, B 15), wushen, which see. 
wast, west. 

waste, I, 349, F 9: seems to be nonsense (ride ex 
pected). 

wat, wate, wait, watt, weet, wet, wit, wite, wyte, 
wis, wot, know. I wat, wate, a wat, a wite, etc., 
frequently nothing more than assuredly, indeed: II, 

159, 11, 13, 15, 16, 19, 23; 160, 10-16, 18, 19; 161, 12, 13, 17; 

in, 199, 23; 464 f., 10, 15, 34; 466, 43; IV, 175, M 7; 
359, 4, 5, 7, etc.; 470, 17; V, 300, 2. pret. wist. p.p. 
wist, west. 

wat, pret. of weet, weit, to wet, I, 17, D 6; II, 21, 12, 
13; 23 f., D 7, F 10, etc.; IV, 424, 5. p.p., 1, 55, B 7; 
II, 23, E 8. 

wate, knew. See wat, wait. 

wate, pret. of wite, blame, II, 273, 25. 

water, water-side, IV, 7, 25; V, 250, 24, 25: "the 
banks of a river, in the mountainous districts of 
Scotland the only inhabitable parts." Scott. 

water-cherry, II, 186, 18: perhaps a species of cherry 
used as a cosmetic. 

water-gate, IV, 510, 6; V, 250, 12: street leading to 
the water, way along the water. 

water-kelpy, IV, 185, 10: water-sprite. 

water-side. See water. 

water-sluice, bored nine holes in her water-sluice, 
V, 142, f 5, should mean in the gate or valve of 
some vent for water; bored a watery sluice, or aper 
ture for water, g 6, is a more rational reading. 

water-stoups, V, 91, 7, 8: water-buckets or pitchers. 

wather, wither, wuther, V, 107, 3, 5: wether. 

watt, III, 199, 23: know. See wat. 

waught, I, 299, 14: draught. 

wauk, walk. 



wauk, II, 139, 5, is: watch, be awake. 

wauken, II, 139, ll, 13: waken, pret. waukenit, II, 79, 

38: awoke. 
wauken(e)d at, II, 162, 12: tried to waken; perhaps, 

chid, expostulated with. 

waukrife, wakerife, IV, 389 b: watchful, wakeful, 
waur, war, I, 5, 13, 18; 422, 17; 475, 44; 476, J 6; II, 

421, 26; IV, 26, 4, 5: worse. 

waur, I, 147, C l; II, 61, 9; IV, 417, 5, 10: were, 
wavers wi the wind, II, 266, B l: is as restless, 

changeable (?). 
wawis, IV, 196, 19: walls, 
way, I, 4, A 13, 16; B 8, 9; 5, D 4, 9; V, 283, 7, 17-. 

the Milky Way. 
way. would I way or would I wight, I, 77, 13; 78, 42: 

nonsense. See weight. Motherwell conjectures, 

would I away, or would I wait. See wee. 
waylawaye, alas, 
ways, IV, 196, 15: in a direction, 
wayte, wait, III, 57, 18; 66, 209; 83, 202; 86, 202; 412, 

21: look out for ; watch, lie in wait, seek an oppor 
tunity, to do. pret. wayted, III, 72, 331: lay in wait 

for. 

waythmen, III, 41 a: hunters. See wight-men. 
we, V, 302 a, 13: with, 
we an E an O me, we an E an O an O me, V, 

275 a, 9, 10: these words have been treated as in 
terjections. It is possible that they are corrupted 

from something like, were a' foald in a yeir to me, 

III, 370, 9; cf. II, 465, 9. 
wea, see your body wea, V, 226 b, 7:= wae, suffering ? 

(strange expression, see II, 305, 7, you red and blue.) 
wead, would, 
weal, III, 310, 60: "clench so as to leave marks, mark 

with wales "(?). " Perhaps read wringe and wayle." 

Skeat. 

weame, IV, 505, 56: belly. See wamb(e), weme. 
wean, II, 136 a, 16; III, 253, R; 397, A b 2: wee an, 

little one, child, 
wear, sare a man a wear, I, 301, 2: sair, supply, a 

man, of, with, his wear, clothing, 
wear, pret., V, 221, 21: wore. 
Wearie, I, 55 f., 3, 4, 6, etc.: the Devil, 
wearied, wearit. See wearyd. 
wearifu, V, 115, 7: tiresome, vexatious, cursed, 
wearin's wa, I, 333, 6: wearing his way, growing less 

and less, slowly vanishing, 
weary fa, IV, 389 b: a curse befall, 
weary, wearie, I, 310, 16; II, 131 f., 11, 16; 231, 1; 

III, 319, 24; IV, 56, A 3, B 3; 57, C 3, 6; 133, G 6; 

V, 16, 1, 2, 5, 8; 192, 25: sad, unhappy, distressed. IV. 

44, 6; 290, B c 5; 359, 6; 480, 3: vexatious, hateful, 

horrid, cursed, 
weary, weary high hat, III, 184, 13: monstrously, 

deucedly. 
wearyd, wearied, wearit, III, 261 f., 8, 10; IV, 128, 

5; 132, 8: troubled, afflicted, 
weary in for me in, V, 155, 6: longing to have me 

indoors. 



GLOSSARY 



391 



weate, III, 341, 47: corrupt. Possibly, I weate, wit, 
know. 

weather, IV, 213, 17, 18: storm of rain or snow. 

wed, wedd(e), wad, III, 66, 214; 71, 298; 110, 7, 8, 12, 
13; 356, 34: pledge, fine, forfeit (ley a wed, 110, 7, 8,= 
leffe, leave a wed, 12, is), sette to wedde, III, 59, 
54: put in pledge. 

wed, v., I, 481, 42: wager. See wad. 

wed, proudest wed, III, 4, 5: proudest dressed (from 
wede). 

wede, weed, II, 28, 28; III, 61, 97; 74, 368, 371; IV, 
212, 2, 7; 213, 10, 15; V, 306, 13: clothing, garment. 

wee, I, 163, J l, 2, etc.; 164, K l, 2, etc.: little. I, 
203, 5; IV, 412, 15; 413, 18; 421, 25: short time. 

wee. would I wee or would I way, I, 77, 12; 78, 41 : 
would I (stay) wi (him) or (go) away, is all the 
meaning this can have. Motherwell conjectures, 
would I wait or would I away. See way. 

weed. See wede. 

weel, well. See well. 

weel. the weel gae wi his body, IV, 129, 21, 23-25: 
prosperity. 

weel, well, weel fa! good luck befall, I, 388, B 5. 
for my weel, II, 461, 8; 466, 24: well, advantage 
(461, 9, for my better). Euphemism for God: weel 
met thee save! I, 324, 3 (MS. thou); well met ye 
(you) save! IV, 455, 4; V, 195, 9; well (weel, weill) 
may ye (you) save! IV, 195, 13; 198 f., G 4, 21. So 
III, 268, 3 1 , originally; the far better in the line 
following, is nonsense. 

weel, well, IV, 517, 19: a pot, deep place, or whirl 
pool in a river. 

weel that was her own, II, 73, 20: seems to mean 
that the roses and ribbons were indeed hers by right. 

weel-busked, hat, IV, 199, 9: handsomely adorned. 

weel-fared, weel-fart, weil-faurit, etc.: well-fa 
vored. See fared. 

weel-worst, V, 214 a, l: very worst. 

ween, II, 132, 21: whimper, whine, lament. 

ween, heigh a ween and oh a ween (where a may be 
7), II, 504, 27: exclamation of distress. 

weep, n., V, 241 a, 4, 6: weeping, tears. 

weer, I, 72 f., 6, 6i: weird, fortune. 

weer, war. See weir. 

weesh, pret. of wash, V, 213, 6. 

weet, II, 293, is: know. 

weet, n., Ill, 160, 6; IV, 379, 15: rain, shower of rain. 

weet, weit, v. } III, 401, 7: wet. 

weetie, weety, IV, 197, 9, 17; 258, 25: rainy. 

weighed more, II, 455, 57: made more account. 

weight, IV, 224, 23: wight, strong. 

weight, was he weel or was he weight, I, 80, 9: non 
sense; weight would be wight, strong, etc., which 
has no pertinency. The same of, would I way or 
would I wight, 77, 13. See way. 

weil, weel, IV, 182, G 8: a pot, deep place, or whirl 
pool in a river, weil-head, II, 153, 17: vortex of a 
whirlpool. 

weil, wile, V, 10, 2: wale, choose. See wale. 



weil =: well, very. See well. 

weir, weer, were, III, 480, 9; 491, 6; IV, 432, 14; V, 
183, 21: war. 

weir, bot weir, I, 140 N: without doubt. (Pinker- 
ton.) 

weir-window, wire-window, IV, 44, 10; 46, 11, 7: 
seems to be a window grated with iron bars. 

weird, wierd, weer, n., I, 69, 42, 47; 71, 37; 72 f., 6, 
61; 77, 6; 309, B l; 482, E: fate, fortune, destiny. 

weird, v., I, 311, 3: destine. 

weird, I, 107, l: the reading at this place is com 
pounded from, weird her a grit sin, IV, 445, 1, and 
ward her in a great sin, IV, 446, l; the reading of 
IV, 445, would mean, destined, put her in the way 
of, a great sin; ward in of the other text does not 
give an easy sense, and ward is perhaps a corruption 
of weird. 

weirdless, III, 391, H 3: unlucky. 

weit, I, 140, N (Pinkerton): know. 

welde, III, 112, 52: would. 

well, euphemism for God. See weel. 

well, III, 112, 48: will. 

well, the well o wine gaed in, IV, 428, 16: perhaps 
wale, choice, the best; but since the wine was poi 
soned, this must be meant ironically. 

well, weel, weil, very, right, well good, II, 46, 43; III, 
132, 6; 478 f., 15, 34; V, 49, ll: very good, weil 
gaucy, V, 152, 3. well warst, V, 180, 14, 16; 214 a, 
1: very worst, well faire mayde, II, 439, 3, 8, should 
perhaps be well-fared. 

well and wells ome, II, 159, 16: should probably be 
wae and waesome (sad and woful). 

well o Spa, IV, 286, 6: a spring to the west of Aber 
deen. 

well or wae, was he well or was he wae, I, 80, 8: 
whether he liked or disliked. (The passage is vari 
ously corrupted, and the original reading probably 
nowhere preserved.) 

well-a-woo, III, 77, 438: a variety of well-a-way. 
(A. S. wa-la-wa.) 

well-bespoke, V, 149, 9-u : well spoken. 

well-strand, I, 165, M 4; IV, 172, 15; 174, 16: stream 
from a spring. 

well-wight, III, 3 f., 12, 16, 21; 487, 6, 7; IV, 165, 7; 
222, 9 (wiel-wight) ; 428, 4: very strong, sturdy, stal 
wart; but, sometimes, brave, see III, 4, 16. See 
wall-wight. 

welt, pret. of wield, III, 74, 366: disposed of. 

welth(e), III, 77, 436: either, simply, his money, or, 
more probably, his well-being, his palmy days; so 
III, 287, 65. Ill, 295, 5, 6; 296, 15, (rich) booty. 

weme (of ring), III, 412, 21: belly, hollow. See weame. 

wen, III, 200, 3: win, get, go. V, 256, 7: pret. of win. 

wend, HI, 38, 104: gone (gone, b). 

wend, went, V, 80, 42; 81, 14: weened. 

weuion, with a, III, 138, ll: wanion, a curse, bad 
luck (waniand, waning (of the moon). Skeat). 

wenking, winking. 

went. See wend. .-;..' 



392 



GLOSSARY 



were, I, 334, ll: war. See weir. 

were, vulgar English, he were, II, 4, 2; 8, 8. 

werne, II, 139, 23: were. 

werre, I, 327, 20: worse. 

werryed, I, 273, 37: worried. 

werschepyd, III, 109, 3: showed respect to. 

west, ;>. jt>., Ill, 113, 70: wist. 

west-airt lands, II, 73, 30: western. See airt. 

westlan, westlin, westryn, II, 258, 34; III, 431, 20; 

435, E 7; IV, 240, 18: western. 
wet, wete, III, 63, I4i; 70, 287; 112, 60 : know, 
wether, I, 210, 14; HI, 430, 2; 432, 19 (perhaps= 

whether): whither. 
wex, weks, n., V, 283, ll, 21: wax. 
weynde, III, 297, 41 : wend, go. 
wha, who. 

wha 's (whae 's) aught. See aucht. 
whall, white as whall, II, 478, 7: that is, whale's bone, 
whang, I, 19, ll; II, 168, A 5: thong. In II, 217, l, 

3, lace his middle with a whang, the reading should 

no doubt be band as in other versions, 
whang (of cheese), V, 115, 8: slice, 
whar, whaur, I, 164, K l, 3, L l, 5: where, 
whas, whose. 
what an a, whaten a, whatna, whattna, whatten, 

I, 169, B 4; 203, C 18; 441, 19; II, 195, 34; III, 433, 

2; 434, 2; 453, 12, 13; V, 162, C 2: what sort? what 

(in particular) ? what a ! So, what for a ? V, 160, 

3; what like a ? V, 163, 5; 164, E b 2. 
wheder, III, 57, ll: whither. 
wheen, a wheen blackguards, IV, 67, 5, 6: number, 

pack, etc. 

whether, II, 455, 62; III, 92, 26: which of the two. 
whether, whither. 

whew, whue, whute, III, 440, 10: whistle, 
whidderand, whither ing, V, 191, 16: (of arrows) 

whizzing, moving with a whiz, 
whight. See wight, 
whikety whack, V, 304, 9: whick-whack (whick, 

doublet of whack). 

while, the other, 1, 414, 18: the remaining time, hence 
forth (?). 

while, I, 232, A 2: for a while, 
while, whyll(e), II, 223, P l, 2; III, 201, 23, 31; 298, 

60, 54; 309, 47: till. 
whiles, I, 115, B l; C l; 131, G 9; 256, 2; II, 470, 59: 

at times. 
whiles, whilest, whileste, whilste, whyllys, the 

whyles, HI, 87, 278; 107 b, 7; 357, 38, 45; 358, 83; 

361, b, c 38, 43, c 4i: while, 
whilk, IV, 373, 10; 476, l: which, 
whin, whun, win, fun, II, 116, 10, 18; 117, 4, 12; 360, 

6, 7: furze, 
whirpled, V, 106, E 5: evidently whipped, stripped 

(but I have not found the word elsewhere), 
whistling (of ladies moving), II, 386, 19: whisking, 
white bookes, III, 357, 58: clear of oppressive 

charges. 
white bread, II, 88, 15, 16, 22, 23: wheat bread, as 



in 89, 4; 92, 5, 6 (white meal is contrasted with corn 
and oats, II, 88, 17, 18). So 96, J 5, 6; fite bread, 
whit bread, V, 220 f ., 6, 7, 9. 

white-fish, II, 129, 8; IV, 436, 10, 18, 19; V, 122, l; 
124, l; 274, 10 (fait fish): haddock, cod, ling, etc., 
as distinguished from gray-fish, coal-fish; in Banff, 
as opposed to salmon, trout, herring. 

white-fisher, IV, 436, 18, 19: one who fishes for had 
dock, cod, etc. (as distinguished from salmon). 

white-land, IV, 213, 14: wheat-land. 

white meal and gray, II, 261, 12; IV, 494, 29; V, 
238, 29: oat-meal as distinguished from barley-meal 
(oat-meal and grey, II, 462, so). But white meal, 
II, 88, 17, 18, being contrasted with corn (oats), must 
there be wheat. 

white money, monie, I, 464, 7; 471, 11, 12; 473, 12; 

II, 352 f., E 5, 7; 473, 7, 8, 14; 475, 13, 14; 476, 10, 13; 

III, 389, 17, 18, 20, 22: silver. 

white rigs, IV, 131, 14: of grain (to distinguish from 
crops which remain green). 

whithering, whidderand, V, 191, 16; 199 b, 16: whiz 
zing. 

who would, III, 163, 87: if one would. 

whorle, V, 116, 10; 118, 4; 119, 7; 120, 5: the fly of a 
spinning-rock. 

whue. See whute. 

whummil, I, 255, 2: wimble, gimlet. 

whun, fun, III, 5, D 7; 6, 12: whin, furze. See whin. 

whunnie, IV, 69, 22: covered with whins, furze. 

whute, fute, whue, whew, n. and ., Ill, 125, 29-31: 
whistle. 126 B, b 29-31, whues. 

why, V, 264, 5: whey. 

whyles, the whyles, III, 70, 278: while. See while*. 

whyll(e), till. See while. 

whyllys, III, 309, 37: while. See whiles. 

wiald, wield. 

wicht. See wight. 

wicker, wigger, III, 125, 20; 126 f., b, d-f : willow. 
(Wycker, osier. Palsgrave. Swed. and Dan. dia 
lects, vikker, vsegger, willow. Skeat.) 

wicker, IV, 31, 6: twist. 

wid, IV, 456, 15: would. 

wide, I, 55 f., B 4, 6, 8; II, 88, B; 94, 3; 96, I 6; IV, 
424, 11 : wade. (Spelt wade, but rhymed with -ide, 
H, 462, 7; 465, 19; III, 493, 14.) pres.p. widen, IV, 
68, 6. pret. wade, wad. p. p. wooden. 

widifu, widdifu, widifau, widdefu, IV, 84, 7, 10, ll, 
is; 85, 3; V, 253 f., No 203, D 2, 8: one qualified to 
fill a widdie or halter. 

widna, widne, would not. 

wiel-wight, IV, 222, 9: bold, stanch. See well-wight. 

wierd. See weird. 

wigger. See wicker. 

wight, wyght, wicht, whight, I, 330 f., A 3, B s, 
C 3; 333, 4; II, 409, 16; III, 63, 152; 414, 49: strong; 
but also, denoting bodily activity, brisk, as III, 117, 
20; III, 63, 148, of John, who has shot well. Ill, 27, 
97; 65, 195; 75, 389; 78, 448, Adam Bell, Glim, and 
William, and Robin Hood's men are wight young 



GLOSSARY 



393 



men. Ill, 91 f ., 6, 8, Guy of Gisborne is a wight yeo 
man: sturdy. See well- wight, wighty, III, 94, 48, 
has perhaps caught the y from the word following. 
See wighty. 

wightdom, III, 488, 26: weight. 

wightlye, II, 58, 10: with vigor, or briskness. 

wight-men, II, 433, 7: waith-men, hunters. (Icel. 
veiSi-maSr, Germ, weidmann.) See waythmen. 

wightsmen, IV, 432, l: wechtsmen, winnowers, wecht 
is "an instrument for winnowing corn, made of 
sheep's skin, in the form of a sieve, but without 
holes." 

wighty, III, 32, 46, 50; 94, 48; 362, 70:= wight, strong. 
See wight. 

wil, IV, 472 f., 24, 25: wild, perhaps vile. 

wild, I, 334, 6: would. 

wild-fire, III, 281, 12: ignis fatuus. (slack here is 
marsh.) 

wild-wood swine, steer, drunk as, II, 144, 3, 4; 368, 
7: a popular comparison like, drunk as a dog. 

wile, vile. 

wilfull, III, 92, 24, wilfull of my way: (Scottish will, 
Icel. villr) astray, lost ; and of my morning tyde may 
be that he does not know the hour, or, he has lost 
his time as well as his road. See will. 

wile, wyle, weil, wale, I, 428, 13; 429, 7, 8; II, 344, 
12 ; IV, 287, 14 ; V, 127, 20, 21; 157, 9: choose. 

will, pret. wald, walde, wad, wade, wild, wid, wud. 

will, would, ellipsis of. as muckle guid canvas as wrap 
the ship a' roun, II, 28, 22. there 's nane come, win, 
II, 89, 34; 99 b, 34. So, II, 26, 11; 375, 23; IV, 131, 
13; 379, 11; 380, 7; 381, 8, 10; 382, 13; V, 177, 9; 184, 
38; 276, 14. 

will, V, 16, 10, 15, 20: bewildered, at a loss what to do. 
will of his way, V, 70 b: lost, astray. See wilfull. 

willinglye, I, 272, 22: at will, freely. 

williwa, IV, 19, C 6: wellaway, interjection of (af 
fected) reluctance. 

willy, willow. 

wilsome, IV, 235, 3: erratic, intricate. 

win, I, 72, 22, 23: whin, furze, gorse. See whin. 

win, wynne, won, wonne t hay, III, 295, l; 299, B 
l, C 1; V, 243, 1: dry by airing. 

win, wine, wynne, wen, won, make your way, ar 
rive. Ill, 71, 314; IV, 314, 15: get, go. IV, 189, 2, 
4, 6: arrive, get there, win down, I, 481, 39. win 
frie, III, 453, 11. lat me win in, II, 148, 25: get in. 
win up, I, 368 f., 34, 36, 44, 47: get up. win on, I, 
388, A 7: go on, keep on. win through, I, 21 b, 4: 
transitively, allow, cause, to pass through, win to, 
I, 466, 13; V, 262, 17: get to, arrive at. pret. wan. 
p. p. wone, wan, win, wine, wen. 

win, p. p. of win, I, 101, 15; IV, 189, 15; 220, 3; 446, 
17; 467, 8, 9. 

win your love aff me, II, 207, B 2: detach your 
love from me. 

wine, p. p. of win, V, 276, 22. 

winder, I, 430, l: wonder, wondrous. See wonder. 

windie, II, 362, 3: window. 
VOL. v. 50 



windling sheet, III, 245, B 13: winding-sheet, 
winking, II, 463, 16: with eye closed as if blind, 
winn, in your barn, IV, 323, 6: do harvest work gen 
erally, dry corn, etc., by exposing to the air. (unless 

meant for winna, winnow.) 
winna, IV, 326, 7: winnow, 
winna, winne", will not. 
winten, V, 248, 7: (wanting) without, 
winter, wynter, III, 58, 47; 64, 162; 285, 20: year(s). 
wir, I, 217, 9: our. 
wire-window. See weir-window, 
wis, I, 217, 9: us. 
wis, you wis, IV, 233, 13: know, 
wis, III, 319, 20, 24; V, 206 a, No 2, 4: WM. 
wish, pret. of wash, V, 36, 14. 
wiss, n., I, 420, 12; II, 194, 8: wish, 
wiss, wis, v., I, 22, 6, 8; 217, 3; III, 463, 3; IV, 168, 

E 15; 169, 12; 461, 8, 9: wish. pret. wist, II, 423, 

A l; III, 434, 20; V, 248, 18. 
wiss, I wiss, HI, 223, 10: perhaps for I wot (not 

i-wiss). wist, III, 187, 32; 222, 34: know. (I wist, 

187, 32= assuredly.) 
wist, pret. of wiss, wish. See wiss. 
wiste, vriBt,pret. of wat, etc., I, 243, 6; 334, 6; 368, 23; 

413, 37. p. p. west, III, 113, 70. 
wit, witt, n., Ill, 393, 22, 23; 419, 8, 12; IV, 509 a, 11; 

512, 16, 17: knowledge, information. 

wit, wite, wyte, I, 334, 6; II, 307, 34; III, 67, 230; 
385, 15, 16; 396, M 8; IV, 98, 2; 221, 5; 508, 10, 11; 

513, 6, 7; V, 81, 7; 82, 23: know. p.p. wit, IV, 98, 2. 
wite, I wite, II, 160, 18; IV, 260, 12; 277, 6: I know= 

indeed. See wat, wyte. 
wite, wyte, witt, n., I, 350, 12; II, 145, 25; 146, 8; 

312, 30; IV, 33, 2S; 127, l; 207, 21; V, 171, 6; 247, 

11: blame, 
wite, wyte, v., I, 397, 13; II, 271, 19; 273, 26; III, 

357, 53: blame, pret. wate, II, 273, 25. 
with, I, 334, 7: wit, know (orthography doubtful), 
with, wyth, III, 297, 42; 358, 75; 434, 23: by. 
with that, II, 478, 5; III, 76, 414; V, 298 a: on condi 
tion that. 

wither, wather, V, 105, B 7, 8: wether, 
witherlands, witherlins, IV, 378, 6; 380, ll: (-lins, 

-lingis as in Scottish backlingis, backlins, English 

sidelins, sidelong; -lauds a corruption of -lins) in a 

contrary, unwished-for, direction, 
withershins, II, 318 a, 2: (M. H. Germ, widersinnes) 

in the wrong direction, in a direction contrary to the 

usual, or the desired (contrary to the course of the 

sun, often, but not necessarily here), 
within me, lept, III, 127, Play 12: inside of my 

guard (?). 
withouten, withowghten, I, 425, f 9, 10; III, 272, 6; 

296, 18: without. See wythowtten. 
witt, knowledge. See wit. 
witt, n., blame, V, 247, ll. See wite. 
witted, V, 132, 2: minded, 
witter, I, 399, A b 8:= wittering, information, 
wittering, I, 394, 8: information, indication. 



394 



GLOSSARY 



witty, III, 131, 3: corruption of wight, wighty. 

wo, woo, woe, II, 59, 33; 86, 16; 139, 20; III, 23, 23; 
27, 101; 70, 297; 97, 19: sad, unhappy, a woe ses me, 
II, 504, 27: exclamation of distress; perhaps corrup 
tion of, woe is. 

wobs, I, 305 a, A 3: webs (of cloth). 

wod, wode, mad. See wood. 

wode, III, 54, 3: went. 

wode, V, 283, 9, 19: wood. 

wode-shawe. grene-wode shawe, greenwood shaw, 
in, 57, 14; 70, 284; IV, 427, l: thicket of the wood, 
(wood-shaw is of rather frequent occurrence and Hal- 
liwell cites, under the shawe of the wood, Morte 
d' Arthur, 1, 374). 

wodewale, woodwele, woodweele, I, 326, 2; III, 
91, 2: wood-lark (?). 

woe. See wo. 

wol, ., V, 283, l, etc.: will. 

wolt, v., V, 283, 4: wilt. 

wolwarde, III, 77, 442: with skin against wool, that is 
wearing a woolen fleece directly against the skin. 

won, wone, one. 

won, I, 18, 1 1; 174, 1; 246, 1; 299, 6, 17; II, 419, 44, 
51; III, 71, 315; IV, 19, C 5; 26, 15: dwell. 

won, wonne, win, hay, III, 293 a; IV, 432, l; 499, 
l: dry by airing. 

won, win, I, 464, 15; 506, 7; II, 89, 32; 140, 22; 172, 24; 
256, K 2; 407, 12; IV, 242 a; 259, 21, 23: get, go, 
come, arrive. II, 316, 3, 7; IV, 115, D 9: gain, earn, 
(spelt one, IV, 284, 23; corrected to win.) p. p. 
wone, V, 276, 20. See wun. 

wonder, III, 411, 2: bewilderment ? disaster ? 

wonder, V, 283, l: wondrous. See winder. 

wone, III, 98, 25: number, plenty. 

wone, withowtyn, withowt wone, V, 78 f., 9, 23: fail. 

wonige, I, 334, 7: dwelling. Qy. wonninge ? 

wonynge, wonning, III, 63, 148; 86, 148: dwelling. 

woo, wool. 

woo. See wo. 

wood, woode, wode, wod, wud, I, 242, 7; 244, 9; 
328,51; 348, 12, 18; II, 183, 26; 242, 30; 245, 27; V, 80, 
42: mad. 

woodcock(e), III, 199, 27; 201, 31 : tropically, fool 
(from the bird's reputation for folly). (A proverb, 
perhaps.) 

wooden, p. p. of wide, wade, I, 324, B 6. 

woodweele, wodewale, III, 91, 2 (MS. woodweete): 
wood wale, woodlark ? (generally explained as wood 
pecker; sometimes as thrush, red-breast). 

woon, won, v., Ill, 146, 16: dwell. 

woone, III, 358, 77; domicile. 

woot, V, 82, 26, 41: wolt, wilt. 

word, att a, I, 411, 9: in short. 

wordie, III, 269, 12: worthy. 

wordlye make, II, 86, 18, 20: earthly mate, consort. 

See warld. 

wordy, IV, 135, 16: worthily. 

worrie, worry, v., (of smoke, flame) III, 434, 15; 435, 
14; 437, 24; IV, 514, 20: choke. 



worselaid, V, 217, H 2: wrestled. 

worset, worset lace, III, 11, J l: worsted; lace must 
be meant for web; it cannot mean cord, and seems 
quite out of place. 

worth, wat sal worth of, I, 334, li: come, come to pass, 
wo the worth, worth the ! Ill, 65, 189; 70, 296; 400, l: 
come, be, to thee. woe worth you, wae worth ye, II, 
245, 27; V, 247, 10; 248, ll. wae mat worth, IV, 236, 
28 ; 428, 6; V, 166, 10; 306, 10: may wo come to. 

won, I, 244, 13: how. 

wouche, III, 308, 26: (A. S. wdh, Scott, wouch) evil, 
harm. 

would, ellipsis of, II, 375, 23; IV, 131, 13; V, 177, 9; 
184, 38; etc. See will. 

wound, pret., II, 148, 4; IV, 15, 19; 392, 19: wounded. 

wow, I, 101, 20; 299, 8, 10, 12; II, 260 f., l, ll, 14: ex 
clamation of distress. IV, 65, l; V, 272 a, 9: excla 
mation of admiration, sorrowful surprise. II, 282 
2; IV, 271, A 3, 4, 7, 9; V, 197, 6: of confirmation, 
(vow!). See vow. 

wrack, ruin. 

wrack, V, 122, ll: mischief ! devil ! 

wraft, I, 424, b 12, 13: waft (woof) misspelt. 

wraikit, III, 427, note J: wrecked, destroyed. 

wraith, wroth. 

wraith, 1, 134, N 15; in, 505, 12: apparition. 

wreck, sea-wreck, IV, 442, 7: whatever is thrown up 
by the sea. 

wreke, p. p., I, 243, 6: avenged. 

wril, V, 73 a: a drinking-word, in response to pril. 

wrist, III, 179, 4; 181, 16; 188, 3: ankle, instep. (Icel. 
rist, instep, ristar-liSr, instep-joint; Germ, rist, instep 
or wrist; fotwerst, fotwriust, hondriust, Richthofen, 
Altfriesisches Wbrterbuch.) 

writer, writter, IV, 131, 18; 135, 25: scrivener. IV, 
180, D 2, 3; 181, 3; V, 256 a, 2, 3: attorney (?). 

writhe of, III, 413, 34: ( pret. of writhe, twist) twisted 
off. 

writs (things written), papers. 

writter. See writer. 

wrobbe, I, 326, 4: wrabbe, warble ? or Scottish wra- 
ble, warble, wriggle ? J. A. H. Murray. 

wrocht, wrought. 

wrocken, wroken, jj. ^)., Ill, 91, 3: avenged. 

wrongeoua, II, 129, 25: unjust. 

wrought, p. p., II, 46, 40: rought, recked. 

wrought, pret., I, 286, 51 : raught, reached. 

wrthe, I, 243, 5: worthy. 

wruched, I, 286, 47: thrown up (ruck, a heap, to 
gather in heaps) ; perhaps, thrown ashore as wrack 
(Icelandic rek, originally vrek, reki, originally vreki, 
a thing drifted ashore). 

wrye, I, 326, 4: twist. 

wud, II, 249, 19: mad. See wood. 

wud, I, 78, 53: would. 

wuddie, IV, 69, 18: widdie, withy, a rope of willow- 
twigs. 

wuman, V, 304 b, l, 2: woman. 

wun, n., II, 315, E 6: wind. 



GLOSSARY 



395 



wun, v., II, 190, 4, 10: win, gain. See won. 

wundouten nay, I, 334, 9: without, beyond contra 
diction, truly. 

wus, V, 304 b, i: was. 

wush, pret. of wash, III, 386, 20; IV, 166, C 7. p. p. 
wushen, I, 490, 22. 

wuther, V, 304 b, 3, 4: wether. 

wyght, adj., strong, sturdy, active. See wight. 

wyjth, n., V, 283, 14: wight. 

wyld, III, 307, 6: (like Germ, wild) deer; or, perhaps, 
an adjective with noun to be supplied, of which there 
are several cases in the ballad. 

wyle, choose. See wile. 

wyled, they wyled the bonny lassie by, IV, 205, 26: 
the meaning cannot be that they (a troop of gentle 
men) enticed the lassie aside. Mr. Forbes suggests, 
very plausibly, wyled (waled, took) their way past 
the lassie. 

wyliecot, V, 107, 2: under-vest. 

wynd, alley, lane. 

wynke, III, 77, 441 : shut the eyes. 

wynne, III, 296, 22: joy, pleasure. 

wynne, v. See win. 

wynter, winter, III, 58, 47; 64, 162; 285, 20: year(s). 

wyse in, V, 156, B after 16: show the way in (?), let 
in. 

wystly, III, 76, 410 : observingly, thoughtfully. 

wyte, I wyte, I, 332, G 3; II, 376, 25; IV, 32 f., 6, 17, 
19, 27; 136, is; 278, 21; 410, 25; V, 299 b, l, 300, 14, 
17, 18: (I know) indeed, assuredly. II, 307, 34: I 
know, simply. See wit, wyte. 

wyte, n. and v., blame. See wite. 

wyth, with, III, 297, 42; 358, 75; 434, 23: by. 

wythe, I, 334, 11: wight, strong. (Orthography ques 
tionable.) 

wythowtten, drede, III, 296, 8: without, beyond 
doubt, withowghten naye, 296, 18: beyond denial, 
wythowghten (withouten) stryffe (strife), 295, 2; 299, 
B 2: beyond contestation. See withouten. 



acal, I, 242, 8, 9; III, 13 f., 7, 10-12, 14: shall, 
acalt, III, 13 f., 9, 16, 17: shalt. 
xul, sing. and^Z., Ill, 13, 4, 12: shall, 
xuld, I, 415 b: should. 



(See also under $, at the end of G and I.) 

y, first y, III, 3, 15: ae, one. See a, ae. 

yad, III, 483, 5, 9: jade, mare. 

yae, I, 446, 8, 9: ae, only. II, 183, 17: every. See 
a, ae. 

yard, yerde, I, 287, 63; III, 75, 397: rod, stick. 

yard o stane, I, 466, B 23: perhaps, garden stane, 
something being meant equivalent to the fountain 
stane of A 23, at which the lady was christened. 

yare, jare, II, 261, 6; III, 98, 24: ready. 



yate, yeat, yett, I, 68 f., 23, 69; II, 336, P 2; III, 268, 
15; V, 28, 60: gate, jates, jatis, III, 99, 61, 62. 

yatid, I, 334, 10: granted. (A. S. ge"atan). 

ychon, III, 101, 88: each one. 

ydrawe, III, 91 a: drawn. 

ydyght, idyght, III, 62, 131, 132: prepared, made, fab 
ricated, adjusted. Ill, 75, 392: made ready. 

yeaman. See yeman. 

yeard-fast, yird-fast, II, 88, 11; 94, 8; 97, 15: fixed 
firmly in the earth. 

yearl, II, 191, 20: earl. See yerl. 

yeat, IV, 68, D i: gate. See yate. 

yebent, III, 308, 25: bent. 

yede, yeede, yeed, yed, jede, yode, yod, pret. of 
gang, gae, go, I, 211, 37; III, 73, 346; 76, 408; 83 and 
86, 160; 99, 60; 110, 18; 163, 69: went. 

yee, III, 297, 39: eye. 

yeen, I, 333, 2: towards, on. 

ye feth, i faith. 

yeff, yeffe, V, 79 f., 17, 51, 53, 54: if. 

yeffell, III, 109, 6; 111, 34: evil, ill. 

yeffor. See yeuer. 

yeft, III, 70, 295: gift. 

yeldyde, surrendered. 

yellow-fit, yellow-foot[ed]. 

yeman, yeaman, III, 22, 4; 24, 43; 25, 51; 28, 121; 30, 
165, 170; 56, 1, 3, etc.: yeoman. 

yemanr(e)y, yemenrey, yeomanry, yeomandree, 
yeomandrie, yeomendry, III, 58, 45; 110, 23; 113, 
83; 123, 19; 157, 31; 186, 14; 192, 23; 204, 31: class or 
company of yeomen; what is in accordance with a 
yeoman's principles, idea or character. 

yend, III, 110, 17: yond, yon. 

yenoughe, enough. 

yeomanry, yeomandrie, etc. See yemanr(e)y. 

ye'r, V, 306 b, 2: ye are. 

yerde. See yard. 

yerl, yerle, yerlle, yirl, yearl, III, 298, 52, 60; 308, 
19; 309, 33; IV, 298, G c ll: 354, 7: earl. 

yerly, III, 307, 7: early. 

yerning, I, 334, 10: desire. 

ye'se, ye shall. See s. 

yestreen, II, 20, 7; 21, 7; 22, 6; 23, 7, etc.; V, 299 a, l: 
yesterday even, yesternight. See streen. 

yet, yett, I, 204, ll; 207, 20; 465, 11, 15; 472, 17, 18, 21; 
III, 269, ll ; 270, 15: gate. See yate. 

yett-pin, IV, 483 b: bolt, or latch, of a gate. 

yeuer, yeffor, III, 113, 82; V, 79, 33; 80, 52: ever. 

ygeve, V, 298 a: given. 

yield, IV, 514, 9: grant, concede. 

yill, III, 449, 8; IV, 481, 6; V, 99, 9: ale. 

yird-fast. See yeard-fast. 

yirl, IV, 69, 9: earl. See yerl. 

ylk a, I, 328, 45: each, every. See ilka. 

ylke, III, 61, 95: same. See ilk. 

yll, with grete, III, 26, 90: in much distress. 

ymet, III, 85, 72: measured. 

ympe tree, I, 216 a: a grafted fruit tree; here, per 
haps, apple, see I, 340 a. 



396 



GLOSSARY 



ynowe, III, 113, 80: enough. 

yo, V, 296 a: you. 

yo, V, 296 a: your. 

yode, yod, youd, pret. of gang, gae, go, I, 333, l; 

II, 138, 12; 265, 9; 483, 7; III, 110, 25: went, good, 

III, 464, 4. gude, V, 153, 1. See yede. 
yolden, III, 282 b: surrendered. 

yon, such a blast as yon, III, 4, 7: that. 

yonders, III, 187, b 13; 193, b 17; 259, 16, 17; 264, A 

b, c 17: yonder, 
yont, I, 431, 3; II, 82, 61: beyond, lie yond, yont, II, 

82, 49; 168, 12; IV, 345, ll; 494, 40: further off. 



you, yowe, IV, 195 f., l, 4, 10, 12, 17; 198, P 6; 206, l; 

261, 20: ewe. 

youd, II, 138, 12: went. See yode. 
young son, of a babe just born, I, 183 f ., 32, 45, 47; II, 

89, 35; 91, 30, 33, 35, D 29; 92, 22; 93, 9-12, etc.; called 

auld son, being the oldest because the only one, I, 

184, 3, 8, 9. See auld son, old son. 
yowe-bucht. See bucht. 
yowre, V, 78 f., 7, 15: our. (But otore twelve times 

in the same piece, howre six.) 
y-slaw, p. p. of slay, III, 28, 140. 



SOURCES OF THE TEXTS 
OF THE ENGLISH AND SCOTTISH BALLADS 



MANUSCEIPTS. 

MS. B. 14. 39, Library of Trinity College, Cambridge, 
13th century. Recently recovered (see V, 288). 
(No 23.) 

Kawlinson MS. D. 328, 15th century (before 1445). 
Bodleian Library. (No 1.) 

MS. F. f . 5. 48, Library of the University of Cambridge, 
c. 1450. (No 119, a.) 

One leaf of MS. in Bagford Ballads, vol. i, art. 6, 
British Museum, c. 1450. (No 119, b.) 

Sloane MS. 2593, British Museum, c. 1450. (Nos 22, 
115.) 

MS. E. e. 4. 35, Library of the University of Cambridge, 
C. 1500. (No 121.) 

Rawlinson MS. C. 813, beginning of the sixteenth cen 
tury. Bodleian Library. (No 111.) 

Cotton MS. Cleopatra, C. iv., British Museum, c. 
1550. (No 161, A, a.) 

MS. Ashmole 48, Bodleian Library, Oxford, 1550, or 
later. (No 162.) 

MS. in York Minster Library, 16th century. (No 167, 
C, IV, 503.) 

Cotton MS. Vespasian, A. xxv, British Museum, end 
of 16th century. (No 178.) 

Harleian MS. 293, leaf 52, British Museum, about 1620. 
(No 161 A, b.) 

Percy MS., British Museum, Additional MSS, 27879, 
C. 1650. 

Philiphaugh MS. of No 305, Edinburgh, 1689-1708 (?). 
Not now accessible : printed by Aytoun. A sup 
posed transcript extant among the Philiphaugh pa 
pers is not older than 1848. (V, 191.) 

Fly-leaf of a volume printed at Edinburgh, 1670. Laing 
MSS, Div. II, 358, Library of the University of Ed 
inburgh. (Fragment, V, 202 b.) 

Elizabeth Cochrane's Songbook, Collection of Songs 
English and Scots, 1730(?). Harvard College Li 
brary. (Nos 5, E, I, 76 ; 76, A, II, 215 ; 144, B, 
III, 195 ; 293, A, V, 160.) 

Mrs Cockburn's MS. of No 305, used by Scott, and 
described by him as "apparently of considerable 
antiquity." Edinburgh. Not now accessible. (V, 
191.) 

Bishop Percy's papers. MS. copies of ballads from 



Rev. P. Parsons of Wye, Miss Fisher of Carlisle, 
Principal Robertson of Edinburgh, the Dean of 
Derry, George Paton of Edinburgh, Rev. Robert 
Lambe of Norham, Roger Halt, the Duchess Dowa 
ger of Portland, and others. In all about 33. 1766- 
80. Harvard College Library. 

David Herd's MSS, two volumes folio, the second vol 
ume duplicating a portion of the first. 1776. British 
Museum, Additional MSS, 22311-12. (See Mr H. 
L. D. Ward's Catalogue of Romances, I, 531.*) 

MSS of Mrs Brown of Falkland. 1783-1801. 

(1) Jamieson-Brown MS., mostly taken down from 
the mouth of Mrs Brown by Professor Scott of 
Aberdeen about 1783. Laing MSS, Library of 
the University of Edinburgh. 

(2) William Ty tier's Brown MS. Fifteen ballads, 
with the airs : thirteen being revisions of pieces 
in (1). Presented by Mrs Brown to W. Tytler in 
1783. Described by Anderson in a letter to Percy, 
Nichols's Illustrations, VII, 176 ff. The MS. has 
disappeared, but, excepting one, all the pieces it 
contained are substantially known from (1) or other 
sources. 

(3) Alexander Fraser Tytler's Brown MS. Nine 
ballads sent A. F. T. by Mrs Brown in 1800 ; with 
the airs. Anderson, as above, VII, 179 f. Aldourie 
Castle, Inverness-shire. 

Sir Walter Scott's collection, Abbotsford. 1783-1830. 

(1) Small folio without title, Library, L 2 (Catalogue, 
p. 57). Two fragments. 

(2) 'Scottish Songs,' 1795. Library, N 3 (Cata 
logue, p. 104). Seven ballads with airs and three 
fragments. All the ballads appear to be Mrs 
Brown's copies altered. 

(8) Letters addressed to Sir Walter Scott, 1796- 
1831. Ballads enclosed have in most cases been 
removed, but some seven remain. 

(4) 'Scotch Ballads, Materials for Border Min 
strelsy,' a folio volume made up at a recent date 
from detached pieces to the number of above eighty. 

(5) ' North Country Ballads ' in a quarto volume 

* Mr Macmath drew up for the Edinburgh Bibliographical 
Society a bibliography of Scottish Popular Ballads in Manu 
script (Session 1891-2, and a supplement, 1893-4), which may 
be advantageously consulted for details, as I myself have found. 



398 



SOURCES OF THE TEXTS 



with the title ' Miscellanea Curiosa,' Library B 5 
(Catalogue, p. 15). 

(6) ' Miscellanies,' a folio with one ballad and a frag 
ment. 

Glenriddell MS., 1791. In vol. XI of Robert Riddell's 
collection of Scottish Antiquities. (There is an ear 
lier transcript of one of the ballads in vol. VIII.) 
Library of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. 

MS. described by Scott as the ' collection of an old 
lady's complete set of ballads.' In two portions, the 
first in 53 pages, on paper of 1805-6-7; the second 
in 10 pages, on paper of 1818. Contains thirty-two 
popular ballads and gives the titles of others known 
to the compiler. Obtained by Skene of Rubislaw in 
the north of Scotland (but obviously not so early as 
1802-3 as endorsed by Scott on the cover of the 
Skene MS.), turned over to Scott by Skene, and in 
1823 by Scott to C. K. Sharpe. In the possession of 
Mr Macmath. 

Skene MS., nine separate quires, amounting in all to 
125 pages, and containing thirty- six pieces. Almost 
all of these are found in the Old Lady's Collection, 
from which they appear to have been transcribed, 
but with misreadings and changes. 118 pages in the 
possession of Mr Alexander Allardyce of Edinburgh ; 
the remainder in the possession of Mr Macmath. 

Pitcairn's MSS, 1817-25. Three volumes in the writ 
ing of Robert Pitcairn ; partly from printed sources. 
In the possession of the representatives of Mr James 
L. Mansfield, Edinburgh. 

Charles Kirkpatrick Sharpe's Collection (besides the 
Old Lady's MS. and the Skene MS.). (1) ' Songs,' 
12mo, in Sharpe's handwriting. (2) MS. of 32 pages, 
small 4 to, on paper of 1822, not in Sharpe's hand. 
(3) MS. of 12 pages, on paper of 1820, not in Sharpe's 
hand. (4) An independent transcript by Sharpe of 
the pieces entitled by Scott ' North Country Ballads.' 
(5) Letters from Motherwell to Sharpe, enclosing 
ballads. (6) Single copies of ballads, not in Sharpe's 
hand. All in the possession of Mr Macmath. 

Motherwell's MS., 1825 and after. A folio, almost en 
tirely in Motherwell's hand, containing, besides some 
pieces not indexed, 228 indexed ballads. Most of 
these are from the West of Scotland, but not a few 
were given Motherwell by Buchan and are dupli 
cates of copies which occur in Buchan's MSS. In 
the possession of Mr Malcolm Colquhoun Thomson, 
Glasgow. 

Motherwell's Note-Book, c. 1826-27. A small octavo 
containing various memoranda referring to ballads, 
including the whole, or a portion, of several copies. 
Formerly in the possession of Mr J. Wylie Guild. 

Kinloch MSS, 1826 and after. Seven volumes, the 
fourth being an interleaved (printed) copy of Kin- 
loch's Ancient Scottish Ballads with additions and 
variations. Vols I, II, III, VII, are almost wholly 
in Kin loch's hand ; V, VI are mostly in the writing 
of James Beattie, John Hill Burton, and Joseph 
Robertson. Harvard College Library. 



Peter Buchan's MSS, about 1828. Two volumes, folio. 
British Museum, Additional MSS, 29408-9. For 
a description, see Mr Ward's Catalogue of Romances, 
etc., I, 537. 

Mr. David Scott of Peterhead possesses a volume 
entirely in Buchan's writing " which contains all 
[the ballads] that Buchan ever collected except 
some ' high-kilted ' ones in another volume." [The 
two volumes here mentioned are now in the Child 
Memorial Library of Harvard University. The 
" high-kilted " volume is entitled Secret Songs of 
Silence.'] 

Joseph Robertson's MSS, 1829-32. Four small note 
books, one entitled * Journal of Excursions ; ' an 
other, Adversaria ' ; also an annotated copy of The 
New Deeside Guide [1832]. In the possession of Dr 
Robertson's representatives. 

John Hill Burton's MSS, 1829-30. Mostly in the 
Kinloch collection, but his daughter, Mrs Rodger, 
Aberdeen, has a small volume containing portions of 
two ballads. 

Alexander Laing of Brechin's MS., 1829-35. * An 
cient Ballads and Songs, etc., etc., from the recita 
tion of old people ; never published, 1829.' Three 
ballads and a fragment. Harvard College Library. 

Robert White's Papers, 1829 and after. Ballads se 
lected from his collectanea by Mr White of New- 
castle-on-Tyne. Harvard College Library. 

British Museum, Additional MSS, 20094. 1829. (No. 4.) 

Campbell MSS, 1830 or earlier. ' Old Scottish Songs 
collected in the counties of Berwick, Roxburgh, Sel 
kirk and Peebles.' 2 volumes. Collector unknown. 
At Marchmont House, Berwickshire. 

' Scottish Songs and Ballads,' copied probably before 
1830, by a granddaughter of Lord Woodhouselee, 
mostly from print or from A. F. Tytler's Brown MS., 
but containing two or three versions of popular bal 
lads not found elsewhere. 

Harris MS. Ballads learned by Amelia Harris in 
her childhood from an old nurse in Perthshire (the 
last years of the 18th century) ; taken down by her 
daughter, who has added a few of her own collect 
ing. With an appendix of airs. Harvard College 
Library. 

Joseph Robertson. An interleaved and annotated copy 
of The New Deeside Guide [1832] (of which J. R. 
was the author). 

Gibb MS., 1860. Twenty-one ballads written down 
from the recitation of his mother by Mr James Gibb 
of Joppa, representing the form in which ballads 
were recited about the beginning of the century in 
Angus and Mearns. Harvard College Library. 

David Louden's MS., 1873. Contains four popular 
ballads derived from reciters in Haddingtonshire. 
Harvard College Library. 

Murison MS., about 1873. Some forty pieces collected 
by Mrs A. F. Murison in Old Deer, among which 
there are several traditional popular ballads. Har 
vard College Library. 



SOURCES OF THE TEXTS 



399 



A few detached ballads collected by Dr Alexander 
Laing of Newburgh-on-Tay. About 1873. 

Findlay MSS. Two volumes, the first (only) contain 
ing several ballads and many fragments gathered 
from recitation by Rev. William Findlay, of Saline, 
Fifeshire, 1865-85. In the hands of the collector. 

Macmath MS. Ballads and songs recently collected 
by Mr Macmath. In the possession of the collector. 

" Common Place Book filled with a collection of Old 
Ballads of the 17th century," a MS. formerly be 
longing to J. Payne Collier, now in the British 
Museum. Contains thirty ballads written in a forged 
hand of the 19th century, some of the pieces being 
also spurious. Nos 8 C, 137, 168 are in this MS. 

Communications, noted in their places, of a single bal 
lad or of several ballads, taken down or remembered 
by friends or correspondents in Europe and America, 
and several taken down by myself. [Child MSS, 
Harvard College Library.] 

PRINTED SOURCES. 

A Gest of Robyn Hode. Fragment without printer's 
name or date, but of the end of the 15th or begin 
ning of the 16th century : the eleventh and last piece 
in a volume the other contents of which are nine 
pieces printed by Walter Chepman and Andrew Myl- 
lar three of these purporting to be printed at Ed 
inburgh in 1508 and one other piece the printer of 
which is also unascertained. Advocates' Library, 
Edinburgh. 

A Lytell Geste of Robyn Hode, etc. Wynken de 
Worde, London, n. d. (1492-1534). Library of the 
University of Cambridge. 

Three fragments (one of which was attributed to Wyn 
ken de Worde by Ritson). Douce, Bodleian Library. 

A Mery Geste of Robyn Hoode, etc. London, Wyl- 
lyam Copland, n. d. (1549-69). British Museum. 

A Merry lest of Robin Hood, etc. London, Printed for 

Edward White, n. d. (1 5 7 7-1 6 1 2) . Bodleian Library. 

The sources of the later Robin Hood ballads may 

more conveniently be entered here, than in regular 

course. Articles n. d. may of course not be in 

strict chronological order. 

Broadside copies in the Wood, Pepys, Douce, Rox- 
burghe, and Rawlinson collections. 

Martin Parker, A True Tale of Robbin Hood. Lon 
don, 1634 ( ?). British Museum, C. 39, a. 52. The 
same. By Clark, Thackeray, and Passinger. Lon 
don, 1686. Bodleian Library. 

Robin Hoods Garland; or Delightful Songs, Shewing 
the noble Exploits of Robin Hood, and his Yeomen- 
drie. With new Edditions and Emendations. Lon 
don, Printed for W. Gilbertson, at the Bible in Gilt- 
spur-street without Newgate, 1663. (17 ballads.) 
Wood, Bodleian Library. 

Robin Hoods Garland. Containing his merry Ex 
ploits, and the several Fights which he, Little John, 
and Will. Scarlet had, upon several occasions. Some 



of them never before Printed. [London,] Printed for 
F. Coles, T. Vere, and J. Wright. 1670. (16 bal 
lads.) Douce, Bodleian Library* 

Robin Hood's Garland. Printed by C. Dicey in Bow 
Church Yard, n. d. (before 1741).* 

Robin Hood's Garland, without place or printer. 1749. 
Percy Papers, Harvard College Library. 

Robin Hood's Garland. Printed by W. & C. Dicey, 
in St. Mary Aldermary Church Yard, Bow Lane, 
Cheapside, and sold at the Warehouse in Northamp 
ton, n.d. (c. 1753).* 

The English Archer . . . Robin Hood. Paisley, printed 
by John Neilson for George Caldwell, Bookseller, 
near the Cross, 1786.* 

The English Archer, or . . . Robin Hood. York, printed 
by N. Nickson in Feasegate, n. d.* 

Robin Hood's Garland. Printed by L. How in Peti- 
coat Lane, n. d.* 

Robin Hood's Garland. London, J. Marshall & Co., Al 
dermary Churchyard, n. d. Harvard College Library. 

Robin Hood's Garland. London. R. Marshall, in Al 
dermary Church Yard, Bow Lane, n. d. Harvard 
College Library. 

Captain Delany's Garland. In a collection of folio 
sheet - ballads mostly dated 1775. Edinburgh (?). 
British Museum, 1346. m. 7. (9.) 

Robin Hood's Garland. York, T. Wilson and R. Spence, 
n. d.* 

Robin Hood's Garland. Preston, Printed and sold 
by W. Sergent, n. d.* 

Robin Hood's Garland. Wolverhampton, Printed and 
sold by J. Smart, n. d.* 

Adventures of ... Robin Hood. Falkirk, Printed 
and sold by T. Johnston, 1808.* 

The History of Robin Hood and the Beggar. Aber 
deen. A. Keith (1810-35).* 

Adam Bell, Clirn of the Clough, and William of Clou- 
desly. Two fragments of an edition by John Byd- 
dell. London, 1536. Library of the University of 
Cambridge. 

A fragment by a printer not identified, formerly in the 
possession of J. Payne Collier. (No 116.) 

Adambel, Clym of the cloughe, and Wyllyam of clou- 
desle. William Copeland, London, n. d. (1562-69. 
See Arber, Transcript, V, 25). British Museum. 

Adam Bell, Clim of the Clough, and William of Clou- 
desle. London, Printed by James Roberts, 1605.* 

[Thomas Ravenscroft.] Deuteromelia, or, The Second 
Part of Musicks Melodie or Melodius Musicke, etc. 
London, 1609. 

[Thomas Ravenscroft.] Melismata, Musicall Phansies, 
fitting the Court, Cittie, and Countrey Humours. 
London, 1611. 

Thomas Deloney. Pleasant History of John Winch- 
comb, in his younger years called Jacke of New- 
berie : reprint of the 9th edition, of London, 1633, 
by J. O. Halliwell. London, 1859. 

* Bodleian Library, Oxford. 



400 



SOURCES OP THE TEXTS 



The History of the Houses of Douglas and Angus, writ 
ten by Master David Hume of Godscroft. Edin 
burgh, 1644. 

Broadsides : mostly of the second half of the 1 7th 
century. 

Wood, Rawlinson, Douce collections. Bodleian Li 
brary. Here from the originals. 
Pepys collection. Magdalen College Library, Cam 
bridge. Mostly from the originals. 
Roxburghe collection. British Museum. Here some 
times from originals, sometimes from The Rox 
burghe Ballads, Ballad Society. Vols I, IE, edited 
by William Chappell, London, 1871-80. Vols 
IV-VII, edited by J. W. Ebsworth, 1883-93. 
Bagford Collection. British Museum. Here from the 
Bagford Ballads, Ballad Society, edited by J. W. 
Ebsworth, 2 vols. Hertford, 1878. 
Osterley Park Library, British Museum, c. 39, k. 6 

(60). 1690(?). 

Laing (Scottish) Broadsides, c. 1700. In the pos 
session of Lord Rosebery. 

A Scottish Broadside formerly in the possession of 
J. Maidment, c. 1700. (No 162.) Harvard Col 
lege Library. 

" Ballard's Collection" (so cited by Percy). 
Pepys Penny Merriments. Magdalen College Library, 

Cambridge. 
The King's Pamphlets. British Museum, 669. f. 20, 

55. 1657. 

Wit Restord, in several select poems not formerly pub- 

lisht. London, 1658 (in Facetise, Musarum Deliciae, 

1656, Wit Restord, 1658, and Wits Recreations, 

1640. 2 vols. London, 1817). 

Wit and Drollery, Jovial Poems. Corrected and 

amended, with New Additions. London, 1682. 
Wit and Mirth, or, Pills to Purge Melancholy, being a 
collection of the best Merry Ballads and Songs, etc., 
[with airs]. London. [Ed. by Henry Playford,] 
four editions, London, 1699-1714, 5 vols. ; [ed. by 
T. D'Urfey,] 6 vols. London, I-V, 1719, VI, 1720. 
True Love Requited, or, The Bayliff's Daughter of 
Islington. Printed and sold in Aldermary Church 
yard, Bow Lane, " 1700 or a little later." 
A Collection of Old Ballads, corrected from the best 
and most ancient copies extant. With introductions 
historical, critical, or humorous. 3 vols. London, 
I, H, 1723; m, 1725. 

Allan Ramsay. The Ever Green, being a collection of 
Scots Poems, wrote by the ingenious before 1600. 2 
vols. Edinburgh, 1724. 

Allan Ramsay. The Tea-Table Miscellany, or a collec 
tion of Choice Songs, Scots and English. (Vol. I, 
Edinburgh, 1724 ; vol. II, 172-? ; vol. HI, 1727. 
3 vols in one, Dublin, 1729; London, 1733. 9th 
edition, enlarged with a fourth volume, London, 1740. 
llth edition, four volumes in one, London, 1750. 
David Laing's notes in the Musical Museum, ed. 
1853, pp. 108* f., 382*, 393* f.) London, 1733, 3 
vols in one; 1763, 4 vols in one. 



W. Thomson. Orpheus Caledonius, or, a Collection of 

the best Scotch Songs. [London, 1725.] 1 vol. 

fol. Orpheus Caledonius, or, a Collection of Scots 

Songs. 2 vols, 8, London, 1 733. 

Gill Morrice. An Ancient Scottish Poem, 2d ed. 

Robert & Andrew Foulis, 1 755. 

Young Waters. An Ancient Scottish Poem, never be 
fore printed. Robert & Andrew Foulis, Glasgow, 
1755. 

Edom of Gordon. An Ancient Scottish Poem, never 
before printed. Robert & Andrew Foulis, Glasgow, 
1755. 
Letter of Thomas Gray, June, 1757? (Gray's Works, 

ed. Gosse, II, 316. London, 1884.) 
Thomas Percy. Reliques of Ancient English Poetry : 
consisting of Old Heroic Ballads, Songs, and other 
pieces of our Earlier Poets, together with some few 
of later date. 3 vols. London, 1765, 1767, 1775. 
4th ed., 1794, ostensibly edited by Percy's nephew, 
with restoration of some original readings. 
Garlands, etc., of the second half of the 18th century : 
The Brown Girl's Garland. British Museum. 11621 

c. 3. (10.) 

The Duke of Gordon's Garland. British Museum. 

11621 c. 2. (15.) Also, Harvard College Library. 

The Glasgow Lasses Garland. British Museum. 

11621 c. 3. (68.) 
The Jovial Rake's Garland. (No 104.) Bodleian 

Library. 

Lord Roslin's Daughter's Garland. (No 46.) 
Lovely Jenny's Garland. (No 91.) 
Sir James the Rose's Garland. Harvard College 

Library. 

The Rambler's Garland. B. M. 11621 c. 4. (57.) 
A chap-book of Four New Songs and a Prophecy. 
1745? (Here from The Sects Musical Museum, 
1853, IV, 458.) 

The Merry Cuckold and Kind Wife. Broadside. 
Printed and Sold at the Printing Office in Bow 
Church- Yard, London. 
Five Excellent New Songs. Edinburgh, 1766. B. 

M. 11621. b. 6. (8.) 

The Duke of Gordon's Daughter, 1775, in a collec 
tion of folio ballads. B. M. 1346. m. 8. 
Sir James the Rose, stall-tract of about 1780. Ab- 

botsford Library. 
The Duke of Gordon's Daughter. C. McLachlan, 

Dumfries, 1785 (?). 

Lord Douglas Tragedy, stall-copy of 1792. 
[David Herd.] The Ancient and Modern Scots Songs, 
Heroic Ballads, etc., now first collected into one 
body from the various Miscellanies wherein they 
formerly lay dispersed, containing likewise a great 
number of Original Songs from Manuscripts never 
before published. Edinburgh, 1769. 
[David Herd.] Ancient and Modern Scottish Songs, 
Heroic Ballads, etc., collected from memory, tradi 
tion and ancient authors. The second edition. 2 
vols. Edinburgh, 1776. 



SOURCES OP THE TEXTS 



401 



John Pinkerton. Scottish Tragic Ballads. London, 
1781. 

John Pinkerton. Select Scotish Ballads. 2 vols. 
(vol. I, Tragic Ballads ; vol. II, Comic Ballads). Lon 
don, 1783. 

[Joseph Bltson.] A Select Collection of English 
Songs, with their Original Airs, and a historical 
essay on the Origin and Progress of National Song. 
3 vols. London, 1783. (The second edition, with 
Additional Songs, and occasional Notes. By Thomas 
Park. 3 vols. London, 1813.) 

[Joseph Ritson.] " The Bishopric Garland, or Dur 
ham Minstrel. Being a choice collection of Excel 
lent Songs relating to the above county. Stockton, 
1784. A new edition, corrected, 1792." Reprinted 
by J. Haslewood in, Northern Garlands, edited by 
the late Joseph Ritson, Esq. London, 1810. 

[George Caw.] The Poetical Museum. Containing 
Songs and Poems on almost every subject. Mostly 
from periodical publications. Hawick, 1784. 

James Johnson. The Scots Musical Museum, in six 
volumes. Consisting of Six Hundred Scots Songs, 
with proper Basses for the Piano Forte, etc. Edin 
burgh, [1787-1803]. (Second Edition, 1839.) Third 
Edition, with copious Notes and Illustrations of the 
Lyric Poetry and Music of Scotland, by the late 
William Stenhouse, [and] with additional Notes and 
Illustrations [by David Laing]. 4 vols. Edinburgh 
and London, 1853. 

[Joseph Ritson.] Ancient Songs, from the tune of 
King Henry the Third to the Revolution. London, 
1790. ("Printed, 1787; dated 1790; published 
1792." Second Edition. Ancient Songs and Bal 
lads from the Reign of King Henry the Second to 
the Revolution. Collected by Joseph Ritson, Esq. 
2 vols. London, 1829.) 

Joseph Ritson. Pieces of Ancient Popular Poetry : 
from authentic manuscripts and old printed copies. 
London, 1791. 2d ed., London, 1833. 

[Joseph Ritson.] "The Northumberland Garland, or 
Newcastle Nightingale. A matchless collection of 
Famous Songs. Newcastle, 1793." Reprinted by J. 
Haslewood in, Northern Garlands, edited by the late 
Joseph Ritson, Esq. London, 1810. 

[Joseph Ritson.] Scotish Song. In two volumes. 
London, 1794. 

[Joseph Ritson.] Robin Hood : A Collection of all 
the Ancient Poems, Songs, and Ballads, now extant, 
relative to that celebrated English Outlaw. To which 
are prefixed Historical Anecdotes of his Life. In 
two volumes. London, 1 795. (Second edition, Lon 
don, 1832.) 

[J. Currie.] The Works of Robert Burns, with an 
Account of his Life, etc. 4th ed., 4 vols. London, 
1803. 

John Leyden. The Complaynt of Scotland, written in 
1548. With a Preliminary Dissertation and Glos 
sary. Edinburgh, 1801. 

Walter Scott. Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border: 
VOL. v. 51 



consisting of Historical and Romantic Ballads col 
lected in the Southern Counties of Scotland, with a 
few of modern date, founded upon local tradition. 
3 vols. Vols I, H, Kelso, 1802 ; vol. Ill, Edin 
burgh, 1803. 2d ed., Edinburgh, 1803; 3d, 1806 ; 
4th, 1810. 4 vols, edited by J. G. Lockhart, with 
airs. Edinburgh, 1833. 

The Edinburgh Magazine, or, Literary Miscellany. 
Edinburgh, 1803. 

The Scots Magazine, vol. LXV, 1803 ; vol. LXXX, 
1817 ; vol. LXXXIX, 1822. Edinburgh. 

The Sporting Magazine, vol. XXV. London, 1805. 

Robert Jamieson. Popular Ballads and Songs from 
Tradition, Manuscripts, and Scarce Editions ; with 
translations of similar pieces from the Ancient Dan 
ish Language, and a few Originals by the Editor. 
2 vols. Edinburgh, 1806. 

John Finlay. Scottish Historical and Romantic Bal 
lads, chiefly ancient. 2 vols. Edinburgh, 1808. 

R. H. Cromek. Remains of Nithsdale and Galloway 
Song : with Historical and Traditional Notices rela 
tive to the manners and customs of the Peasantry. 
London, 1810. 

R. H. Cromek. Select Scottish Songs, Ancient and 
Modern ; with Critical Observations and Biograph 
ical Notices, by Robert Burns. 2 vols. London, 1810. 

Gammer Gurton's Garland, or, The Nursery Parnassus. 
London, 1810. 

John Bell. Rhymes of Northern Bards, being a curious 
collection of Old and New Songs and Poems peculiar 
to the counties of Newcastle upon Tyne, Northum 
berland, and Durham. Edited by John Bell, Jun. 
Newcastle upon Tyne, 1812. 

[John Fry.] Pieces of Ancient Poetry from unpub 
lished manuscripts and scarce books. Bristol, 1814. 

H. Weber, R. Jamieson, W. Scott. Illustrations of 
Northern Antiquities, etc. Edinburgh, 1814. 

Sir Egerton Brydges. Restituta, vol. I. London. 
1814. 

Alexander Campbell. Albyn's Anthology, or, a select 
collection of the Melodies and Local Poetry peculiar 
to Scotland and the Isles, hitherto unpublished. 
2 vols. 1816, 1818. 

R. H. Cromek. Reliques of Robert Burns. 4th ed. 
London, 1817. 

James Hogg. The Jacobite Relics of Scotland, be 
ing the Songs, Airs, and Legends of the adherents 
to the House of Stuart. 2 vols. Edinburgh, 1819- 
21. 

R. A. Smith. The Scotish Minstrel, a selection from 
the Vocal Melodies of Scotland, ancient and modern. 
6 vols. Edinburgh, [1820-24]. 

John Struthers. The British Minstrel, a selection of 
Ballads, ancient and modern, etc. 2 vols. London, 
1822. 

Robert Trotter. Lowran Castle, or, The Wild Boar of 
Curridoo, with other Tales, illustrative of the Su 
perstitions, Manners, and Customs of Galloway. 
Dumfries, 1822. 



402 



SOURCES OF THE TEXTS 



[Alexander Laing.] Scarce Ancient Ballads, many 
never before published. Aberdeen, 1822. 

Alexander Laing. The Thistle of Scotland, a selection 
of Ancient Ballads, with notes. Aberdeen, 1823. 

[Charles Kirkpatrick Sharpe.] A Ballad Book. Ed 
inburgh, 1823.] Reprinted by E. Goldsmid, Edin 
burgh, 1883. 

Davies Gilbert. Some Ancient Christmas Carols, with 
the Tunes to which they were formerly sung in the 
West of England. Together with two ancient Bal 
lads, a Dialogue, etc. 2d edition. London, 1823. 

William Hone. Ancient Mysteries. London, 1823. 

[James Maidment.] A North Countrie Garland. Ed 
inburgh, 1824. Reprinted by E. Goldsmid. Edin 
burgh, 1884. 

The Common-Place Book of Ancient and Modern Bal 
lad and Metrical Legendary Tales. An original 
selection, including many never before published. 
Edinburgh, 1824. 

John Mactaggart. The Scottish Gallovidian Encyclo 
pedia, or, the original, antiquated, and natural Curi 
osities of the South of Scotland. London, 1824. 

David Webster. A Collection of curious Old Ballads 
and Miscellaneous Poetry. Edinburgh, 1824. 

The Gentleman's Magazine. Vol. XCV, Part I. Lon 
don, 1825. 

Peter Buchan. Gleanings of Scotch, English, and 
Irish scarce old Ballads chiefly tragical and historical, 
etc. Peterhead, 1825. 

Allan Cunningham. The Songs of Scotland, ancient 
and modern, with an introduction and notes, his 
torical and critical, etc. 4 vols. London, 1825. 

Stall copies, etc., mostly of uncertain date : 
The Song of Bewick and Grahame. B. M. 11621. 

e. 1. (4.) 
Bewick and Graham's Garland. M. Angus & Son, 

Newcastle. 
A Jolly Book of Garlands collected by John Bell in 

Newcastle. Abbotsford Library. 
Curious Tracts, Scotland. B. M. 1078. m. 24. A 
collection made by J. Mitchell at Aberdeen in 
1828. 
The Unfortunate Weaver, etc. (for No 25). Green- 

ock, [1810]. B. M. 11621. b. 7. (43.) 
Stall or chap-book copies by M. Randall & C. Randall, 
Stirling ; John Sinclair, Dumfries ; W. Fordyce, 
Newcastle ; T. Johnston, Falkirk ; P. Buchan, 
Peterhead ; Aberdeen, printed for the booksellers. 
Recent Broadsides of Catnach, Pitts, Such. 
Peggy Irvine. Stall-copy printed by J. Morren, 
Cowgate, Edinburgh. 

Robert Chambers. The Popular Rhymes of Scotland, 
with illustrations, chiefly collected from oral sources. 
Edinburgh, 1826, 1870. 

George R. Kinloch. Ancient Scottish Ballads, recov 
ered from tradition and never before published, with 
notes, historical and explanatory, and an appendix 
containing the airs of several of the ballads. Lon 
don and Edinburgh, 1827. 



[George R. Kinloch.] The Ballad Book. Edinburgh, 
1827. Reprinted by E. Goldsmid. Edinburgh, 
1885. 

Thomas Lyle. Ancient Ballads and Songs, chiefly 
from tradition, manuscripts, and scarce works, etc. 
London, 1827. 

William Motherwell. Minstrelsy, Ancient and Mod 
ern, with an historical introduction and notes. Glas 
gow, 1827. (A copy with MS. entries by Mother- 
well). 

Peter Buchan. Ancient Ballads and Songs of the 
North of Scotland, hitherto unpublished, with ex 
planatory notes. 2 vols. Edinburgh, 1828. 

The Paisley Magazine, or, Literary and Antiquarian 
Miscellany. Paisley, 1828. 

Robert Chambers. The Scottish Ballads, collected and 
illustrated. Edinburgh, 1829. 

Sir N. H. Nicolas. History of the Battle of Agincourt. 
2d ed. London, 1832. 

[Joseph Robertson.] The New Deeside Guide, by 
James Brown. Aberdeen, [1832]. 

Andrew Picken. Traditionary Stories of Old Families. 
2 vols. London, 1838. 

William Sandys. Christmas Carols, Ancient and 
Modern, including the most popular in the West of 
England, and the airs to which they are sung, etc. 
London, 1833. 

William Sandys. Christmastide, its history, festivities, 
and carols. London, [18 ]. 

Sir Cuthbert Sharpe. The Bishoprick Garland, or a 
collection of Legends, Songs, Ballads, etc., belonging 
to the county of Durham. London, 1834. 

The Universal Songster, or, Museum of Mirth, forming 
the most complete, extensive, and valuable collection 
of Ancient and Modern Songs in the English lan 
guage. 3 vols. London, 1834. 

The Songs of England and Scotland. 2 vols. London, 
1835. 

Fisher's Drawing-Room Scrap-Book. London, 1835. 

[E. V. Utterson.] A Little Book of Ballads. [Printed 
for the Roxburghe Club.] Newport, 1836. 

J. E. Tyler. Henry of Monmouth, or, Memoirs of the 
Life and Character of Henry the Fifth. 2 vols. 
London, 1838. 

The Loving Ballad of Lord Bateman. Illustrated by 
George Cruikshank. London, 1839. 

Sir N. H. Nicolas. The Poetical Works of Rob 
ert Burns. Aldine Edition. 3 vols. London, 
1839. 

J. O. Halliwell. The Nursery Rhymes of England, 
collected principally from oral tradition. London, 
1842 (Vol. IV of the Percy Society Publications). 
4th ed., 1846 ; 5th ed., 1853. 

Alexander Whitelaw. The Book of Scottish Song ; 
collected and illustrated with historical and critical 
notices, etc. (Glasgow, 1844.) Glasgow, Edin 
burgh, and London, 1855. 

Alexander Whitelaw. The Book of Scottish Ballads ; 
collected and illustrated with historical and critical 



SOURCES OF THE TEXTS 



403 



notices. Glasgow, Edinburgh, and London. [1844] 
1845. 

J. O. Halliwell. Nugse Poeticae. Select Pieces of 
Old English Popular Poetry, illustrating the man 
ners and arts of the fifteenth century. London, 
1844. 

R. Chambers. Twelve Romantic Scottish Ballads, 
with the original airs. Edinburgh, 1844. 

[James Maidment.] A New Book of Old Ballads. 
Edinburgh, 1844. 

T. Wright and J. O. Halliwell. Reliquiae Antiquae. 
Scraps from Ancient Manuscripts. 2 vols. Lon 
don, 1845. 

The New Statistical Account of Scotland, vol. V. Ed 
inburgh and London, 1845. 

James Henry Dixon. Scottish Traditional Versions 
of Ancient Ballads. (Vol. XVH of the Percy So 
ciety Publications.) London, 1845. 

James Henry Dixon. Ancient Poems, Ballads, and 
Songs of the Peasantry of England, taken down from 
oral recitation, and transcribed from private manu 
scripts, rare broadsides, and scarce publications. 
(Vol. XVH of the Percy Society Publications.) Lon 
don, 1846. 

M. A. Richardson. The Borderer's Table Book, or, 
Gatherings of the Local History and Romance of the 
English and Scottish Border. 8 vols. Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne and London, 1846. 

James Paterson and Charles Gray. The Ballads and 
Songs of Ayrshire, illustrated with sketches histori 
cal, traditional, narrative, and biographical. 2 series. 
Ayr, 1846, 1847. 

Frederick Sheldon. The Minstrelsy of the English 
Border, being a collection of Ballads, ancient, re 
modelled, and original, founded on well known Bor 
der legends. London, 1847. 

John Matthew Gutch. A Lytyll Geste of Robin Hode, 
with other Ancient and Modern Ballads and Songs 
relating to this celebrated yeoman, etc. 2 vols. 
London, 1847. 

The Scottish Journal. Vol. II, 1848. 

The Edinburgh Topographical, Traditional, and Anti 
quarian Magazine. [Sept.-Dec. 1848.] Edinburgh, 
1849. 

J. O. Halliwell. Popular Rhymes and Nursery Tales ; 
a sequel to the Nursery Rhymes of England. Lon 
don, 1849. 

J. O. Halliwell. Ballads and Poems respecting Hugh 
of Lincoln. Brixton Hill, 1849. 

Abraham Hume. Sir Hugh of Lincoln, or, an examina 
tion of a curious tradition respecting the Jews, with 
a notice of the Popular Poetry connected with it. 
London, 1849. 

Notes and Queries. London, 1850 -. 

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. 
Vol. I, 1852. 

J. S. Moore. The Pictorial Book of Ancient Ballad 
Poetry of Great Britain, historical, traditional, and 
romantic, etc. London, 1853. 



John Miller. Fly-Leaves, or Scraps and Sketches, 
literary, biographical, and miscellaneous. The Sec 
ond Series. London, 1855. 

William Chappell. Popular Music of the Olden Time. 
A collection of Ancient Songs, Ballads, and Dance 
Tunes, illustrative of the National Music of England, 
etc. 2 vols. London, [1855-59]. 

Jabez Allies. The British, Roman, and Saxon Anti 
quities and Folk-lore of Worcestershire. 2d ed. 
London, " 1856 " [1852?]. 

Robert Bell. Ancient Poems, Ballads, and Songs of 
the Peasantry of England, taken down from oral 
recitation, and transcribed from private manu 
scripts, rare broadsides, and scarce publications. 
London, 1857. 

William E. Aytoun. The Ballads of Scotland. 2 
vols. Edinburgh and London, 1858 ; 2d ed., re 
vised and augmented, 1859. 

James Maidment. Scotish Ballads and Songs. Edin 
burgh, London, and Glasgow, 1859. 

R. Chambers. The Romantic Scottish Ballads : their 
Epoch and Authorship. London and Edinburgh, 
1859. 

Thomas Hughes. The Scouring of the White Horse. 
Cambridge [England], 1859. 

Joshua Sylvester. A Garland of Christmas Carols, an 
cient and modern, including some never before given 
in any collection. London, 1861. 

Mary (Wilson) Gordon. Christopher North. A Memoir 
of John Wilson. 2 vols. Edinburgh, 1862. 

William AUingham. The Ballad Book. A selection 
of the choicest British Ballads. London, 1865. 

Robert Hunt. Popular Romances of the West of Eng 
land. First Series. London, 1865. 

M. H. Mason. Nursery Rhymes and Country Songs, 
both tunes and words from tradition. London, n. d. 
[c. 1877]. 

William Henderson. Notes on the Folk-Lore of the 
Northern counties of England and the Borders. 
With an Appendix by S. Baring-Gould. London, 
1866 ; new ed., 1879. 

Llewellyn Jewitt. The Ballads and Songs of Derby 
shire, with illustrative notes and examples of the 
original music, etc. London and Derby, 1867. 

John W. Hales and Frederick J. Furnivall. Bishop 
Percy's Folio Manuscript. Ballads and Romances. 
3 vols and a supplement. London, 1867-68. 

James Maidment. Scotish Ballads and Songs, Histor 
ical and Traditionary. 2 vols. Edinburgh, 1868. 

W. H. Logan. A Pedlar's Pack of Ballads and Songs, 
with illustrative notes. Edinburgh, 1869. 

Robert Chambers. Popular Rhymes of Scotland. New 
edition. London and Edinburgh, [1870]. 

Wm. Henry Husk. Songs of the Nativity, being 
Christmas Carols, Ancient and Modern, several of 
which appear for the first time in a collection. Lon 
don, [187-?]. 

Salopian Shreds and Patches. Vol. I. Shrewsbury, 
1875. 



404 



SOURCES OF THE TEXTS 



Jahrtmch fur Romanische u. Englische Sprache und 
Literatur. Vol. XV. Leipzig, 1876. 

W. Christie. Traditional Ballad Airs, arranged and 
harmonized, etc., from copies obtained in the counties 
of Aberdeen, Banff, and Moray, etc. Edited, with 
the words for singing and with illustrative notes. 2 
vols. Edinburgh, vol. I, 1876 ; vol. II, 1881. 

Suffolk Notes and Queries, in The Ipswich Journal, 
1877-78. 

H. 11. Bramley and J. Stainer. Christmas Carols, 
New and Old. London, [187-?]. 

Folk-Lore Record. Vol. II. London, 1879. 

Francis Hindes Groome. In Gipsy Tents. Edinburgh, 
1880. 

The Leisure Hour, February 14, 1880. London. 

Walter W. Skeat. Specimens of English Literature, 
from the Ploughmans Crede to the Shepherdes Cal 
ender, etc. 3d ed. Oxford, 1880. 

A Ballad Book. By Charles Kirkpatrick Sharpe, Esq. 
1823. Reprinted with Notes and Ballads from the 
unpublished MSS of Charles Kirkpatrick Sharpe, 
Esq., and Sir Walter Scott, Bart. Edited by the late 
David Laing. Edinburgh and London, 1880. 

Aungervyle Society's Publications. A Garland of Old 
Historical Ballads. Edinburgh, 1881. 

B. Harris Cowper. The Apocryphal Gospels. 5th ed. 
London, 1881. 

J. C. Bruce and J. Stokoe. Northumbrian Minstrelsy. 
A collection of the Ballads, Melodies and Small-Pipe 
Tunes of Northumbria. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1882. 

A. Nimmo. Songs and Ballads of Clydesdale. Edin 
burgh and Glasgow, 1882. 

G. A. Sala. ' Sir Hugh,' in Illustrated London News, 
October 21, 1882. (Repeated in Living London, 
1883.) 

Charlotte Sophia Burne. Shropshire Folk-Lore, a 
sheaf of gleanings edited from the collections of 
Georgina F. Jackson. London, 1883-6. 

Wm W. Newell. Games and Songs of American Chil 
dren. New York, 1883. 

Edmund Venables. A Walk through Lincoln Minster. 
Lincoln, 1885. 

W. H. Long. A Dictionary of the Isle of Wight Dia 
lect, and of Provincialisms used, . . . with illustra 
tive anecdotes and tales, etc. London and Newport, 
1886. 



Transactions of The New Shakspere Society, 1880-86. 
London, 1886. 

A. H. Bullen. Carols and Poems from the 15th cen 
tury to the present time. London, 1886. 

Letters from and to Charles Kirkpatrick Sharpe, Esq. 
Ed. by Alexander Allardyce. 2 vols. Edinburgh 
and London, 1888. 

Mrs Graham R. Tomson. Ballads of the North 
Countrie. London, 1888. 

S. Baring-Gould and H. Fleetwood Sheppard. Songs 
and Ballads of the West. A collection made from 
the mouths of the People. 4 parts. London, [1889 
(?)-91]. 

The Monthly Chronicle of North-Country Lore and 
Legend. Vol. HI. Newcastle-on-Tyne and Lon 
don, 1889. 

The Folk-Lore Journal. Vols VI, VII. London, 
1888-9. 

James Raine, Jr. A volume of English Miscellanies, 
illustrating the history and language of the North 
ern Counties of England. Surtees Society, No 85. 
Durham, 1890. 

Blackwood's Magazine. Vol. CXLVII. Edinburgh, 
1890. 

Margaret Warrender. Walks near Edinburgh. Ed 
inburgh, 1890. 

Longman's Magazine. Vol. XVII. London, 1890. 

Journal of the Gypsy-Lore Society. Vol. H. Lon 
don, 1890-91. 

Frank Kidson. Traditional Tunes. A collection of 
Ballad Airs, chiefly obtained in Yorkshire and the 
South of Scotland, together with their appropriate 
words from broadsides or from oral tradition. Ox 
ford, 1891. 

Lucy E. Broad wood and J. A. Fuller Maitland. Eng 
lish County Songs, words and music. London and 
New York, 1893. 

County Folk-Lore. Printed Extracts. No 2. Suf 
folk. Collected and edited by the Lady Eveline 
Camilla Gurdon. Folk-Lore Society. London, 1893. 

The Journal of American Folk-Lore. Vol. VII. Bos 
ton, 1894. 

H. A. Kennedy. Professor Blackie : his Sayings and 
Doings. London, 1895. 

Francis Hindes Groome. Two Suffolk Friends. Ed 
inburgh and London, 1895. 



INDEX OF PUBLISHED AIRS OF ENGLISH AND SCOTTISH 

POPULAR BALLADS 

WITH AN APPENDIX OF SOME AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT 



THE oldest book of airs here referred to is Thomson's 
Orpheus Caledonius, ed. 1 733. Earlier music-books or 
manuscript notations were used in great number by 
Chappell, Rimbault, and others, and the results are 
accessible through their works as cited below. The 
same air will frequently be found to have been repeated 
in successive publications. Undoubtedly the cases in 
which the original air of the older ballads has been 
preserved are but few. 

Of the airs from manuscript some are very likely to 
have been published already ; the ascertaining of the 
fact would have cost considerable labor, and was not 
demanded for a list which avowedly includes repetitions 
from printed books. The earliest noted down are, I 
suppose, the five from the Abbotsford MS. entitled 
" Scottish Songs," which appear to have been derived 
from William Ty tier's unrecovered Brown MS. This 
lost MS. was obtained by William Tytler in 1 783, and 
contained fifteen ballads with the melodies as written 
down by Professor Scott from Mrs Brown's singing ; 
of which melodies it is said : " Being then but a mere 
novice in music, he added in the copy such musical 



notes as he supposed might give some notion of the 
air, or rather lilts, to which they were sung." Twenty- 
three airs are given from the Harris Ballad- MS. as 
sung by Mrs Amelia Harris to her children about 1830. 
Miss Jane Harris, one of them, says that the airs are 
to be " orally and directly traced from my great father's 
(Rev. P. Duncan, Tibbermore) manse from 1745." 
Six airs are from a MS. of Charles Kirkpatrick Sharpe 
written on paper with a watermark of 1822. The re 
maining airs are very recent communications from vari 
ous duly registered sources, and were all but a very 
few seemingly written down within a year or two. 

The compilation of the list of printed airs was un 
dertaken for me by my constant friend Mr William 
Walker, of Aberdeen. Some additions have been made. 
Mr Walker also furnished me with several melodies 
from the north of Scotland. Revision of the manu 
script airs was required in some cases to correct obvious 
errors of notation, and this was performed for me by 
Mr W. R. Spalding, of Harvard College, who has not 
gone beyond the amendment of self-evident errors of 
transcribers. 



ABBREVIATED INDICATIONS OF BOOKS REFERRED TO 



Baring-Gould. S. Baring-Gould, English Minstrelsie. 
Edinburgh, 1895-. 8 vols (7 published.) 

Baring-Gould, S. Baring-Gould and Sheppard, Songs 
and Ballads of the West. London, [1889-91]. Four 
parts. 

Barsanti. Francis Barsanti, A Collection of Old Scots 
Tunes. Edinburgh, [1742?]. 

Bramley. H. R. Bramley and J. Stainer, Christmas 
Carols, New and Old. London, [187-?]. 

Broadwood. L. E. Broadwood and J. A. F. Maitland, 
English County Songs. London, 1893. 

Bruce. J. C. Bruce and J. Stokoe, Northumbrian 
Minstrelsy. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1882. 

Burne. Charlotte Sophia Burne, Shropshire Folk- 
Lore. London, 1883-6. 

Campbell. Alexander Campbell, Albyn's Anthology. 
Edinburgh, 1816, 1818. 2 vols. 

Chambers. Robert Chambers, Twelve Romantic Scot 
tish Ballads. Edinburgh, 1844. 

Chappell. W. Chappell, Popular Music of the Olden 
Time. London, [1855, 1859]. 2 vols. 

Christie. W. Christie, Traditional Ballad Airs. Edin 
burgh, 1876, 1881. 2 vols. 



Cruikshank. The Loving Ballad of Lord Bateman. 

London, 1839. 
Dauney. Wm. Dauney, Ancient Scottish Melodies, 

from a Manuscript of the reign of King James VI. 

Edinburgh, 1838. 
Gilbert. Davies Gilbert, Some Ancient Christmas 

Carols, with the tunes. London, 1823. 
Gordon. Mrs. Gordon, Christopher North, A Memoir 

of John Wilson. Edinburgh, 1862. 2 vols. 
Graham. G. F. Graham, The Songs of Scotland. 

Edinburgh, [1854-561 3 vols. 
Husk. Wm. Henry Husk, Songs of the Nativity. 

London, [187- ?]. 
Jewitt. Llewellyn Jewitt, The Ballads and Songs of 

Derbyshire. London and Derby, 1867. 
Johnson. James Johnson, The Scots Musical Museum. 

Edinburgh and London, [1787-1803]. 6 vols. 
Journal. Journal of American Folk-Lore. Vol. VIH. 

Boston and New York, 1895. 
Kidson. Frank Kidson, Traditional Tunes. Oxford, 

1891. 
Kinloch. G. R. Kinloch, Ancient Scottish Ballads, 

Appendix. London and Edinburgh, 1827. 



406 



INDEX OF PUBLISHED AIES 



Mason. M. H. Mason, Nursery Rhymes and Country 

Songs. London, n. d. [1877], 
Mother-well. Wm. Motherwell, Minstrelsy Ancient and 

Modern, Appendix. Glasgow, 1827. 
Rimbault. Edward F. Kimbault, Musical Illustrations 

of Bishop Percy's Reliques of Ancient English 

Poetry. London, 1850. 
Rimbault, C. E. F. Rimbault. (Chappell's Christmas 

Carols.) A Collection of Old Christmas Carols with 

the tunes to which they are sung. London, n. d. 
Rimbault, G. E. F. Rimbault, Musical Illustrations of 

the Robin Hood Ballads, in J. M. Gutch's Robin 

Hood Garlands and Ballads. London, 1850. 2 vols, 

the second. 
Ritson, A. [Joseph Ritson,] Ancient Songs. London, 

1790. 
Ritson, E. [Joseph Ritson,] A Select Collection of 

English Songs. London, 1783. 3 vols. Cited by 

pages of 2ded., 1813. 
Ritson, S. [Joseph Ritson,] Scotish Song. London, 

1794. 2 vols. 



Sandys, C. C. W. Sandys, Christmas Carols, Ancient 
and Modern. London, 1833. 

Sandys, C. T. W. Sandys, Christmastide, its history, 
festivals, and carols. London, [18 ?]. 

Scott. Walter Scott, Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border. 
Edinburgh, 1833. 4 vols. 

Smith, R. R. A. Smith, The Scotish Minstrel. Edin 
burgh, [1820-24]. 6 vols. 

Smith, S. J. Stafford Smith, Musica Antiqua : a Col 
lection of Music from the 12th till the 18th Century. 
London, 1812. 2 vols. 

Sussex. Sussex Songs, arranged by H. F. Birch Rey- 
nardson. London, [1891?]. 

Thomson, G. George Thomson, The Select Melodies 
of Scotland, etc. [1793-1841. 6 vols. fol.] Lon 
don, [1822-25]. 6 vols. 8vo. 

Thomson, W. W. Thomson, Orpheus Caledonius, or, 
A Collection of Scots Songs. 2d ed. London, 1733. 
2 vols. 



INDEX 

[The figures in the left-hand column refer to the numbers of the ballads in this collection.] 



1. Riddles Wisely Expounded. Gilbert, 65 (B); 25. 

Cbappell, 531 (A) ; Mason, 31 (E) ; Bruce, 

76 (A). 26. 

2. The Elfin Knight. Bruce, 79; Kidson, 43, 172; 

Broad wood, 12. 

3. The Fause Knight upon the Road. Motherwell, 

No 32 (B). 27. 

4. Lady Isabel and the Elf-Knight. Smith, R., IH, 33, 

92 (C b); Motherwell, No 24 (D c); Christie, 37, 
n, 236 (D); Bruce, 48 (B); Burne, 652; Kid- 38. 
son, 27 (E), 172; Broadwood, 164 (E). 

5. Gil Brenton. Motherwell, No 5 (P b) ; Christie, 

II, 10 (D). 39. 

7. Earl Brand. Scott, III, 1 (B); Smith, R., Ill, 41. 

86 (B); Chambers, 17 (B); Bruce, 31 (A). 43. 

9. The Fair Flower of Northumberland. Motherwell, 45. 

No 2 (D); Kinloch, to p. 131 (Bb); Christie, 

n, 46 (C) ; Bruce, 51 (A). 46, 

10. The Twa Sisters. Motherwell, No 20 (P b); 

Christie, I, 40 (C, B), 42 (O); Bruce, 61 (C); 47. 
Broadwood, 118 (R c). 52. 

11. The Cruel Brother. Gilbert, 68 (P); Christie, I, 

108 (A). 53. 

12. Lord Randal. Johnson, No 327 (P); Campbell, 

H, 95 (D); Smith, R., IH, 58 (D); Chambers, 
21 (D) ; Graham, II, 74. 64. 

14. Babylon, or, the Bonnie Banks o Fordie. Mother- 
well, No 26 (A c); Kinloch, to p. 210 (E). 

16. Sheath and Knife. Johnson, No 461 (C). 56. 

17. Hind Horn. Motherwell, No 13 (B) ; Christie, 

H, 252. 58. 

18. Sir Lionel. Christie, I, 110 (B). 

20. The Cruel Mother. Johnson, No 320 (B) ; Smith, 

R., IV, 83 (L); Kinloch, to p. 44 (D) ; Christie, 61. 
I, 104 (P); I, 106 (I); Burne, 651 (Q). 



Willie's Lyke-Wake. Motherwell, No 17 (D); 
Christie, I, 120 (B), 122 (E). 

The Three Ravens. Ritson, A., 155 (a); Mother- 
well, No 12 (b); Chappell, 59 ; Kidson, 17. 

[The Twa Corbies. Campbell, H, 26 ; Chambers, 
15.] 

The Whummil Bore. Motherwell, No 3 (b). 

Kempy Kay. Motherwell, No 33 (C). 

Thomas Rymer. Scott, IV, 117 (C). 

The Wee Wee Man. Ritson, S., II, 139 (A) ; John- 
son, No 3 70 (A); Smith, R., IV, 70 (A); Gra 
ham, HI, 64. 

Tarn Lin. Johnson, No 411 (A); Smith, R., I, 2. 

Hind Etin. Christie, II, 156 (A). 

The Broomfield Hill. Kinloch, to p. 195 (D). 

King John and the Abbot of Canterbury. Rim 
bault, 73; Chappell, 350 (B), 352 (B). 

Captain Wedderburn's Courtship. Christie, II, 
48 (B, A). 

Proud Lady Margaret. Christie, I, 28 (B a). 

The King's Dochter Lady Jean. Motherwell, No 
23 (A b) ; Christie, I, 228 (C). 

Young Beichan. Kinloch, to p. 260 (H) ; Cruik- 
shank (L) ; Christie, I, 30 (H) ; Bruce, 64 ; 
Burne, 651 (L) ; Kidson, 33 (L) ; Sussex, 48. 

The Cherry-tree Carol. Sandys, C. C., No 10 
(A a) ; Rimbault, C., 22 (B) ; Husk, 194 (B a) ; 
Bramley, 60 (C). 

Dives and Lazarus. Bramley, 84 ; Broadwood, 
102. 

Sir Patrick Spens. Johnson, No 482 (A) ; Camp 
bell, II, 62, 2 airs ; Smith, R., IV, 60 (A a) ; 
Rimbault, 47 (A) ; Christie, I, 6 (H, I), 8. 

Sir Cawline. Christie, II, 18 (King Malcolm and 
Sir Colvin, No 61, H, 62). 



INDEX OF PUBLISHED AIRS 



407 



64. Fair Janet. Graham, I, 92 (A). HO. 

65. Lady Maisry. Motherwell, No 14 (I a). 

68. Young Hunting. Motherwell, No 8 (F b), No 11 ; 
Kinloch, to p. 1 (B) ; Chambers, 9. 112. 

69. Clerk Saunders. Motherwell, No 16 (A) ; Kin- 

loch, to p. 233 (C) ; Christie, II, 112 (G). 

72. The Clerk's Twa Sons o Owsenford. Chambers, 114. 

7 ; Christie, I, 212. 

73. Lord Thomas and Fair Annet. Johnson, No 535 116. 

(A) ; Smith, R., VI, 58 (A) ; Sandys, C. C., No 

18 (D); Rimbault, 94 (D), 112 (A) ; Chappell, 118. 

145 (D) ; Christie, II, 26 (A), 196 (B) ; Burne, 

651 (D) ; Kidson, 40 (D). 119. 

74. Fair Margaret and Sweet William. Chappell, 383 120. 

(A d). 122. 

76. The Lass of Roch Royal. Johnson, No 5 (I) ; 

Graham, I, 54. 123. 

77. Sweet William's Ghost. Ritson, S., II, 201 (A) ; 

Johnson, No 363 (A) ; Chambers, 11 (A) ; Rim- 124. 
bault, 98 (A) ; Christie, I, 118 (A). 

78. The Unquiet Grave. Burne, 651 (F) ; Baring- 125. 

Gould, S., I, 12. 

79. The Wife of Usher's Well. Scott, III, 262 (A). 126. 
81. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. Mother- 
well, No 21 (M) ; Rimbault, 92; Chappell, 170 

(A). 128. 

83. Child Maurice. Ritson, S., II, 157 (F a) ; John 

son, No 203 (F a) ; Smith, R., II, 106 (F a) ; 
Thomson, G., V, 33 ; Motherwell, No 6 (C) ; 131. 
Rimbault, 96 (F a) ; Christie, 1, 158 (F). 

84. Bonny Barbara Allan. Ritson, S., n, 196 (A a) ; 132, 

Johnson, No 221 (A a) ; Thomson, G., 111,35 133, 

(A a) ; Smith, R., II, 80 (A a) ; Rimbault, 98 

(B), 99 (A a) ; Chappell, 538 (B d) ; Graham, 135, 

II, 16 (A) ; Christie, I, 86, 88 (A), 283 ; Kidson, 

37, 38 (three airs). 136, 

85. Lady Alice. Mason, 46 (C). 138, 

88. Young Johnstone. Motherwell, No 18 (F) ; Cham 

bers, 19 ; Christie, I, 156 (E). 140, 

89. Fause Foodrage. Christie, I, 1 72 (A). 

93. Lamkin. Smith, R., II, 94 (F) ; Christie, I, 60 141. 

(A). 

94. Young Waters. Smith, R., II, 30. 142. 

95. The Maid Freed from the Gallows. Broad wood, 

112 (K). 143. 

96. The Gay Goshawk. Christie, n, 124. 

97. Brown Robin. Christie, I, 136 (B). 144, 

99. Johnie Scot. Motherwell, No 15 (B). 

100. Willie o Winsbury. Kinloch, to p. 89 (H). 145. 

101. Willie o Douglas Dale. Christie, II, 32. 

102. Willie and Earl Richard's Daughter. Christie, 146. 

I, 128. 

103. Rose the Red and White Lily. Kinloch, to p. 148. 

65 (C). 

105. The Bailiff's Daughter of Islington. Rimbault, 150. 

100 (two airs) ; Chappell, 203-4 (two airs) ; 
Sussex, 10 ; Baring-Gould, I, 50. 155. 

106. The Famous Flower of Serving-Men. Thomson, 

G., IV, 39 ; Smith, R., V, 73 ; Rimbault, 95. 



The Knight and Shepherd's Daughter. Kinloch, 
to p. 25 (H) ; Rimbault, 94 (A) ; Chappell, 127 
(A) ; Christie, 1, 184 (F b) ; Kidson, 20. 

The Baffled Knight. Ritson, A., 160 ; Johnson, 
No 477 (Da); Rimbault, 81 (C) ; Chappell, 
68 (A a), 520 (C) ; Bruce, 81 (D, see IV, 495). 

Johnie Cock. Motherwell, No 22 (F) ; Cham 
bers, 13. 

Adam Bel, Clim of the Clough and William of 
Cloudesly. Rimbault, 48. 

Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne. Chappell, 
397 (?). 

Robin Hood and the Monk. Chappell, 542 (?). 

Robin Hood's Death. Rimbault, G., 435 (B). 

Robin Hood and the Butcher. Rimbault, G., 
433 f. ; Chappell, 392. 

Robin Hood and the Curtal Friar. Rimbault, G., 
436; Chappell, 393 (B), 542(?). 

The Jolly Finder of Wakefield. Chappell, 203 (?), 
394 (A). 

Robin Hood and Little John. Rimbault, G., 
433 f. ; Chappell, 392. 

Robin Hood and the Tanner. Rimbault, G., 
433 f. ; Chappell, 392. (Air also of 122, 125, 
128, 131, 133, 142 B, 143, 146, 150.) 

Robin Hood Newly Revived. Rimbault, G., 433 f. 
(Air also of Nos 122, 125, 126, 131, 133, 142 B, 
143, 146, 150.) Chappell, 392. 

Robin Hood and the Ranger. Rimbault, G., 
433 f. ; Chappell, 392. 

The Bold Pedlar and Robin Hood. Jewitt, 8. 

Robin Hood and the Beggar, I. Rimbault, G., 
433 f. ; Chappell, 392. 

Robin Hood and the Shepherd. Rimbault, G., 
435. 

Robin Hood's Delight. Rimbault, G., 485. 

Robin Hood and Allan a Dale. Rimbault, G., 
439. 

Robin Hood Rescuing Three Squires. Rim 
bault, G., 438 (B). 

Robin Hood rescuing Will Stutly. Rimbault, G., 
435. 

Little John a Begging. Rimbault, G., 433 f. (B) ; 
Chappell, 392. 

Robin Hood and the Bishop. Rimbault, G., 
433 f. ; Chappell, 392. 

Robin Hood and the Bishop of Hereford. Chap 
pell, 895 (A). 

Robin Hood and Queen Katherine. Rimbault, 
G., 435. 

Robin Hood's Chase. Rimbault, G., 433 f. ; Chap 
pell, 392. 

The Noble Fisherman, or, Robin Hood's Prefer 
ment. Rimbault, G., 436 ; Chappell, 393 (?). 

Robin Hood and Maid Marian. Rimbault, G, 
433 f. ; Chappell, 392. 

Sir Hugh, or, The Jew's Daughter. Smith, S, 
L, 65 ; Johnson, No 582 (B) ; Motherwell, No 
7 (R) ; Rimbault, 46 (B) ; Mason, 46 (T). 



408 



INDEX OF PUBLISHED AIRS 



156. Queen Eleanor's Confession. Motherwell, No 208. 

27 (P); Rimbault, 65 (P) ; Chappell, 174 (A). 209. 

157. Gude Wallace. Johnson, No 484 (C). 

161. The Battle of Otterburn. Scott, I, 368 (C) ; 

Rimbault, 45 (C). 210. 

162. The Hunting of the Cheviot : Chevy Chase. 211. 

Ritson, E., Ill, 315 ; Rimbault, 56 ; Chappell, 212. 
(see 196), 198, 199, 201 ; Bruce, 2, 3, 145 ; Kid- 
son, 19. 213. 
164. King Henry Fifth's Conquest of France. Jewitt, 214. 
2,3. 

169. Johnie Armstrong. Ritson, S., II, 7 (C) ; John- 215. 

son, No 356 (C) ; Scott, I, 416 (C) ; Dauney, 
222. 

170. The Death of Queen Jane. Kinloch, to p. 116 

(B). 216. 

178. Captain Car, or, Edom o Gordon. Chappell, 

226 (A) ; Christie, I, 56. 217. 

181. The Bonny Earl of Murray. Thomson, W., II, 

No 4 (A) ; Barsanti, 14 ; Ritson, S., II, 29 (A) ; 
Johnson, No 177 (A) ; Smith, R., IV, 100 (A) ; 
Rimbault, 68 (A) ; Christie, I, 202 (A). 

182. The Laird o Logic. Motherwell, No 25 (A) ; 218. 

Christie, II, 170 (B). 219. 

185. Dick o the Cow. Campbell, H, 30 (c) ; Scott, 

II, 62. 221. 

186. Kinmont Willie. Campbell, I, 78. 225. 

187. Jock o the Side. Campbell, II, 28 (B b) ; Cham- 226. 

bers, 22 (B) ; Bruce, 37 (B). 

188. Archie o Cawfield. Christie, I, 98 (C) ; Journal, 

VIH, 256 (P). 227. 

191. Hughie Grame. Johnson, No 303 (B) ; Smith, 

R., IV, 29 (B) ; Chambers, 24 (B) ; Graham, 228. 
H, 44 (?) ; Christie, II, 82 (B) ; Bruce, 34 (C). 229. 

192. The Lochmaben Harper. Johnson, No 5 79 (A b). 231. 

193. The Death of Farcy Reed. Bruce, 42 (B). 232. 

195. Lord Maxwell's Last Goodnight. Scott, II, 140 233. 

(B). 

196. The Fire of Frendraught. Dauney, 218, No 4 (?); 235. 

Christie, I, 58. 236. 

199. The Bonnie House o Airlie. Smith, R., H, 2 (A) ; 

Thomson, G., I, 34; Kinloch, to p. 100 (D) ; 237. 
Graham, II, 130 (A b) ; Christie, II, 276 (Cd). 

200. The Gypsy Laddie. Barsanti, 6 ; Ritson, S., II, 

176 (A); Johnson, No 181 (A); Smith, R., 238. 

III, 90 ; Thomson, G., IV, 35 (A) ; Dauney, 

228, No 30 ; Graham, I, 114 ; Burne, 652 (H); 239. 
Baring-Gould, S., H, 52, 54. 

201. Bessy Bell and Mary Gray. Thomson, W., I, No 240. 

2 ; Thomson, G., VI, 41 ; Smith, R., IV, 21 ; 
Graham, H, 96. 241. 

203. The Baron of Brackley. Christie, I, 20 (C b). 

204. Jamie Douglas (" O waly, waly "). Mother- 243. 

well, No 9 (O) ; Christie, II, 158 ; Thomson, 
W., I, No 34 ; Johnson, Nos 158, 446 ; Ritson, 245. 
S., I, 156 ; Graham, I, 100 ; Rimbault, 102 ; 247. 
Smith, R., II, 1, VI, 62 ; Thomson, G., I, 19. 248. 
206. Bothwell Bridge. Smith, R., IH, 62 ; Scott, H, 
246 ; Chambers, 26. 



Lord Derwentwater. Motherwell, No 4 (A). 

Geordie. Johnson, No 346 (A) ; Smith, R., H, 
68 (A) ; Kinloch, to p. 187 (E b) ; Christie, 
I, 52 (J), II, 44 (H) ; Kidson, 25. 

Bonnie James Campbell. Smith, R., V, 42 (C). 

Bewick and Graham. Bruce, 25. 

The Duke of Athole's Nurse. Christie, I, 80 
(Fb). 

Sir James the Rose. Christie, I, 16. 

The Braes o Yarrow. Scott, III, 150 (B b) ; 
Kidson, 22 (Q). 

Rare Willie Drowned in Yarrow. Thomson, W., 
H, No 49 (A) ; Ritson, S., I, 142 (A) ; John 
son, No 525 (A) ; Smith, R., VI, 76 (A) ; 
Christie, I, 64, 66 (E). 

The Mother's Malison, or, Clyde's Water. Chris 
tie, II, 250 (C). 

The Broom of Cowdenknows. Thomson, W., 

I, No 10 ; Barsanti, 18 ; Ritson, S., I, 118 ; 
Smith, R., H, 45 ; Thomson, G., Ill, 32 ; 
Motherwell, No 10 (D) ; Christie, I, 126, 284 ; 
Chappell, 461. 

The False Lover won Back. Christie, 1, 144 (B). 
The Gardener. Kinloch, to p. 74 (A) ; Christie, 
n, 206 (B) ; Baring-Gould, S., IV, 52, No 108. 
Katherine Jaffray. Christie, II, 16. 
Rob Roy. Smith, R., I, 32 (G-). 
Lizie Lindsay. Johnson, No. 434 ; Smith, R., 

II, 100, 101 ; Graham, n, 82 ; Christie, n, 88 ; 
privately printed, Brighton, 1895 (H). 

Bonny Lizie Baillie. Johnson, No 456 (d) ; 
Smith, R., IV, 90 (f). 

Glasgow Peggie. Christie, I, 70 (E). 

Earl Crawford. Christie, I, 68 (A). 

The Earl of Errol. Christie, I, 206 ; II, 40. 

Richie Story. Christie, I, 72 (G- d). 

Andrew Lammie. Motherwell, No 28 (C b) ; 
Christie, I, 48 (C). 

The Earl of Aboyne. Christie, I, 22 (B a). 

The Laird o Drum. Kinloch, to p. 199 (A b) ; 
Christie, I, 24. 

The Duke of Gordon's Daughters. Johnson, 
No 419 (a) ; Smith, R., IV, 98 (a) ; Christie, 
1,2. 

Glenlogie, or, Jean o Bethelnie. Smith, R., IV, 
78 (I b) ; Christie, I, 54 (E b), 282. 

Lord Saltoun and Auchanachie. Christie, I, 10 
(Bb). 

The Rantin Laddie. Johnson, No 462 (A a) ; 
Smith, R., IV, 6 (A) ; Christie, I, 210 (A b). 

The Baron o Leys. Johnson, No 237 (The Lin- 
kin Ladie). 

James Harris (The Daemon Lover). Motherwell, 
No 1 (P) ; Christie, I, 188. 

Young Allan. Christie, I, 252. 

Lady Elspat. Christie, I, 102. 

The Grey Cock, or, Saw you my Father ? John 
son, No 76 ; Smith, R., VT, 54 (a) ; Chappell, 
731 (b) ; Graham, I, 102 (a). 



INDEX OF PUBLISHED AIRS 



409 



250. Henry Martyn. Kidson, 30 (B c), 31 (B b) ; 

Baring-Gould, S., Ill, 2. 

251. Lang Johnny More. Christie, I, 44. 

252. The Ritchie Boy. Christie, I, 14. 

253. Thomas o Yonderdale. Christie, I, 96 (b). 

254. Lord William, or, Lord Lundy. Motherwell, No 

19 (A). 

255. Willie's Fatal Visit. Christie, I, 218. 

257. Burd Isabel and Earl Patrick. Christie, II, 34 

(B). 
260. Lord Thomas and Lady Margaret. Christie, IT, 

12 (B). 

265. The Knight's Ghost. Christie, n, 238. 

266. John Thomson and the Turk. Christie, II, 52. 

267. The Heir of Linne. Christie, I, 112 (B o). 

269. Lady Diamond. Christie, II, 218. 

270. The Earl of Mar's Daughter. Christie, II, 38. 

271. The Lord of Lorn and the False Steward. Chap- 

pell, 230 (B). 

273. King Edward the Fourth and a Tanner of Tarn- 

worth. Chappell, 392 (?), 542 (?). 

274. Our Goodman. Johnson, No 454 (A) ; Smith, 

R., IV, 66 (A). 

275. Get up and Bar the Door. Ritson, S., I, 226 
(A a) ; Johnson, Nos 300 (A a), 365 (C); 

v. 52 



Smith, R., I, 62 (A) ; Thomson, G., II, 8 ; 
Graham, II, 62 (A a) ; Christie, II, 262 (A a). 
276. The Friar in the Well. Chappell, 274 (A). 

279. The Jolly Beggar. Thomson, W., I, 95, App. 

No 43 ; Ritson, S., I, 168 ; Johnson, No 266 
(Ba). 

280. The Beggar Laddie. Christie, I, 100 (D). 

281. The Keach i the Creel. Motherwell, No 29; 

Bruce, 82 (A). 

282. Jock the Leg and the Merry Merchant. Christie, 

I, 130. 

283. The Crafty Farmer. Chappell, 554 (c) ; Mason, 

43 (f) ; Kidson, 141 (b) ; Baring-Gould, S., L. 
38 (c). 

284. John Dory. Ritson, A., 164 ; Chappell, 68. 

286. The Sweet Trinity (The Golden Vanity). Gor 
don, II, 317 (B a) ; Christie, I, 238 (C c) ; Bar 
ing-Gould, S., IH, 24 (C d) ; Broadwood, 182 
(C). 

289. The Mermaid. Motherwell, No 30 (B b) ; Chap 
pell, 743 (B). 

293. John of Hazelgreen. Kinloch, to p. 206 (B); 
Christie, I, 124. 

298. Young Peggy. Christie, II, 20. 

299. Trooper and Maid. Christie, II, 210 (A). 



411 



BALLAD AIES FROM MANUSCRIPT 



3C. THE FAUSE KNIGHT UPON THE ROAD. 

Miss M. MACMATH. 



\) , n. 

XT K> .</ r^ 


i 1^ 
* 


1 Pi P* 


hd J F-H 


~T~ ~f~ f 


W-* v 1 


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"Oh, whare are ye gaun," 



the fause knight up - 



+ f 










on the road. "I'm gaun to the schule," says the wee boy; and still he stood. 



9 G. THE FAIR FLOWER OF NORTHUMBERLAND. 



SHABPE MS. 







Slow. 



10 Be. THE TWA SISTERS. 

ABBOTSFOBD MS. "SCOTTISH SONGS." 




m 



There was twa sis -ters in a bour, Ed- in-bor-ough, Ed- in-boromgh; There 




was twa sis - ters in ae bour, Stir - ling for ay. There was 




be their wooer, Bon - ny St. John - ston stands up - on Tay. 



412 



BALLAD AIKS FROM MANUSCRIPT 

10W. THE TWA SISTERS. 



T. LUGTEN, KELSO. 



^ 



There were three la - dies play - ing at the ba, 



Nor - ham, down by 




view them a,' By the bon - nie mill - dams o Nor - ham. 



10. THE TWA SISTEES. 



Mrs HABBIS AND OTHEBS. 



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11 C. THE CRUEL BROTHER. 



HABBIS MS. 



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12 D. LORD RANDAL. 




Received from J. P. CAMPBELL (of Islay). 
" Transcribed by G. E. JOHNSTONE." 

/r\ 



3 



is 



Oh, where hae ye been, LorSf 



I hae been to the wild wood,mith-er 



For I'm 



BALLAD AIKS FROM MANUSCRIPT 

12 P. LORD RANDAL. 



413 



Miss M. MACMATH. 



s^ 



Whare hae ye been a' day, Lord Ran - dal, my son? 



Whare 









hae ye been a' day, my hand - some young one? I've been 



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in the wood hunt -ing, Moth 

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wea 



ry, wea - ry hunt - ing and fain would lie down. 



171. HIND HORN. 



Miss M. MACMATH. 




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She gave him a gay gold ring, hey lil - le - lu and how lo Ian, and 



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he gave her a far bet - ter thing, Wi my hey down and a he did - die down-ie. 



20 Ja. THE CRUEL MOTHER. 



Mrs HABBIS AND OTHERS. 



^ 



*=- 



40. THE QUEEN OF ELFAN'S NOURICE. 

W. WALKER, ABEBDEEN. * 



i 




* "Perhaps an improvised adaptation of a pibroch tune." 



414 



BALLAD AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT 



42. CLEEK COLVILL. 

ABBOTSFOKD MS. "SCOTTISH SONGS."* 







J 1 




m 



Slow. 



42. CLEEK COLVILL. (EEVISED.) 



P * 



S3 



Clerk Col - vill and his la - dye gay 



m 





46 Be. CAPTAIN WEDDEEBUEN'S COUETSHTP. 



Mrs HAEBIS. 







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47 D. PEOUD LADY MAEGAEET. 



HABBIS MS. 






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I 



/-. 



*Also noted In Glenriddell's hand in the fly-leaf at the end of VoL I of his copy of Herd, 1776, in the Signet Library. 

W. MACMATH. 



BALLAD AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT 

53. YOUNG BEICHAN. 



415 



Mrs HARRIS. 



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58 J. SIR PATRICK SPENS. 



Mrs HARRIS. 



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61. SIR COLIN. 



Mrs HARRIS. 









63 E. CHILD WATERS. 



Mrs HAKKIS. 







fl 



416 



BALLAD AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT 



68 C. YOUNG HUNTING. 







Mrs HAKKIS. 



-r-=1- 



75. LORD LOVEL. 

J.s aunjrtn -46erdeen above forty years ago. 



W. WALKER. 




speed, . And wished Lord Lov- el much speed. 



77. SWEET WILLIAM'S GHOST. 



Mrs HAEBIS. 






' * 



84 A. BONNY BARBARA ALLAN. 



Mrs HAKRIS. 



r 



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i 



r == j = r == : 



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89 C. FAUSE FOODRAGE. 



HARRIS MS. 




i 



BALLAD AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT. 



417 



95 L. THE MAID FREED FROM THE GALLOWS. 

Miss E. M. BACKUS, North Carolina. 









^ 






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3 



j j j 



J J J I ' J - J. I J J J 



J J J I J J 



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97 Ab. BROWN ROBIN. 

AEBOTSFORB MS, "SCOTTISH SOHGS." 







98 B. BROWN ADAM. 



Mrs HARRIS. 



^s- 



VOL. V. 63. 



418 



BALLAD AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT 



99 A. JOHNTE SCOT. 

ABBOTSFOED MS., " SCOTTISH SONGS. 







99 O. JOHNIE SCOT. 



Miss M. MACMATH. 






Out then spak his auld fai - ther, And a blythe auld man was he, sayin, "I'll 



BK3CZ2 






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J 





J 




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v 


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send five hun-ner o my brisk young men, To bear John - ie com - pa - nie." 



100 J. WILLIE O WINSBURY. 



Miss M. MACMATH. 




There was a 



in the north coun-trie, And her cloth - ing it was the 



green ; And she's looked ower her fa - ther's cas - tie wa', For to 



J 



j 



1 






see her fa-ther's ships sail in, in, For to see her fa-ther's ships on sea. 



106. THE FAMOUS FLOWER OF SERVING-MEN. 



Mrs HABBIS. 






m 






-g 






^ J J J. 



z 



BALLAD AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT 



419 



114 G. JOHNIE COCK. 



1571. GUDE WALLACE. 



Mrs HARRIS. 



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161 (V, 243). THE BATTLE OF OTTERBUEN. 



SHARPE MS. 









^==b^ 



It was a - bout the Lam-mes time When moor-land men do win their hay, 




Brave Earl Doug - lass in ar - mer bright, Marchd to the Bor - der with - out de-lay. 



163. THE BATTLE OF HARLAW. 

W. WALKER, "from a residenter in the Garioch.' 



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420 



BALLAD AIKS FROM MANUSCRIPT 



164. KING HENRY FIFTH'S CONQUEST OF FRANCE. 

Mrs HARRIS. 



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164 (V, 245). KING HENRY FIFTH'S CONQUEST OF FRANCE. 

SHARPE MS. 



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1 



^=^^ 



CHORUS 

^ 



169 C. JOHNIE ARMSTRONG. 



SHARPE MS. 






f* gs- i r 

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T 






169. JOHNIE ARMSTRONG. 



Mrs HARRIS. 






y r r r j 



BALLAD AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT 

173 J. MARY HAMILTON. 



3! 



421 



Mrs HAKBIS. 






^ 






J 



182 D. THE LAIRD O LOGIE. 



Mrs HARRIS. 



? 



. 













222 (V, 261). BONNY BABY LIVINGSTON. 



SHARPE MS. 



II 



Bon - ny An - ny Liv ie ston Went out to see the play, 







By came the Laird of Glen - lion And took her quite a - way. 



226 H. LIZIE LINDSAY. 

As sung by George Mitchell, Edgell Castle, Forfarshire. 



W. WALKEB. 



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422 



BALLAD AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT 



228 C. GLASGOW PEGGIE. 



Miss M. MACMATH. 



Q=^t=* 



i* r*- 



It was on 



day, and a fine sum-mer's day, When the 



&i 



Low - lands they were mak - ing read - y, There I 



- pied a 









weel far'd lass ; She was gaun to Glas - gow, and they ca' her Peggy. 



235 E. THE EAKL OF ABOYNE. 



Mrs HARRIS. 



SS 



- 



-S 



3=&- 



^ 



5f=^=e 



ix ix 



Slow. 



247 b. LADY ELSPAT. 

ABBOTSFORD MS., " SCOTTISH SONGS. 











247 b. LADY ELSPAT. ( REVISED. ) 



How brent is . . your brow, my la - dy Els - pat ; How . . gold - 






en yel - low is your 




Scot - land There . . is . . none like . . la - dy Els - pat fair. 



BALLAD AIRS FROM MANUSCRIPT 



423 



250 E (V, 302). ANDEEW BARTIN. 

Miss L. P. HASKELL, South Carolina. 



Three bold bro's of met - rie Scot - land, And three bold broth - ers were 



aE= 


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they, 



And they cast lots, the one with the oth - er, t'see 



^ 



E 






-^ *- 






Who should go rob - bing all oer the salt sea, And they cast lots, the 



$=5= 



one with the oth - er, t'see Who sh'd go rob - bing all oer the salt sea. 



256 A. ALISON AND WILLIE. 



Mrs HARRIS. 



A 3EE 


.1 , 


1 J J 


m C^ 1 r ^ 


1 m 


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258 B. BROUGHTY WA'S. 



Mrs HAEBIS. 



J. , i ^ 



= 



^^ 



j J^ir 



278 B. THE FARMER'S CURST WIFE. 



Miss M. MACMATH. 






. 



!t 



The auld Deil cam to the man at the plough, Rum- chy ae de aid - ie, saying, "I 



Si 



^ 






^ * 



^=^ 



iP^BP^ 







wish ye gudeluck at the mak-ing o yersheugh. "Mushy toor- in an ant tan air - a. 



424 



SEE 



BALLAD AIKS FEOM MANUSCRIPT 

281. THE KEACH I THE CREEL. 



W. WALKER, Aberdeen. 




286 Ba. THE SWEET TRINITY. (THE GOLDEN VANITY.) 



MACMATH MS. 
From a copy in the handwriting of P. S. FBASEB (slightly corrected). 



3 






286 Cg. THE SWEET TRINITY. (THE GOLDEN VANITY.) 

Miss M. MACMATH. 




-IF 1 



There was a ship of the North Coun-trie, And the name of the ship was the 






J j p- CIC-^I 









Gold - en Trin - i - tie; She wa sail - ing in the Low - lands 






J. 



low, low, low, She was sail - ing in the Low - Lands low. 



299 D (V, 306). TROOPER AND MAID. 



*fe= 



MACMATH MS. 



Jggi 



^ 



The troop-er lad cam to oor gate, And oh, but he was wea - ry; He 




1 J J. 



f r 



rap - ped at and chap - ped at, Syne called for his kind dear - y. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



English and Scottish. 
The Abashed Knight, II, 480. 
Abduction of Nelly Symon, V, 264. 
ADAM BELL, CLIM OF THE CLOUQH, AND WILLIAM 

OF CLOUDESLY (No 116), III, 14-39, 518; IV, 

496 ; V, 297. in, 90, 95, 96, 121 n., 334; IV, 

391, 516 n. 
Adambel, Clym of the cloughe, and Wyllyam of 

cloudesle, III, 14. 
Adam Bell, Clim of the Clough, and William of 

Cloudesle, III, 14. 
Adam Bell, Clime of the Cloug[he], and William off 

Cloudeslee, III, 14. 
Adam Bell, The Second Part of, HI, 34-39. Ill, 

214. 

Airlie (=The Earl of Errol), V, 268. 
ALISON AND WILLIE (No 256), IV, 416 f. 
Allan Water, or, A Lover in Captivity, IV, 184. 
Allan Water, or, My Love Annie 's very Bonny, IV, 

184. 
ALLISON GROSS (No 35), 1, 313-5; III, 504; V, 214. 

I, 315, 339 n. 

Ainang the blue flowers and yellow, I, 247. 
Andrew Bartin, V, 302 f. 
Andrew Bodee, IV, 393. 

ANDREW LAMMIE (No 233), IV, 300-8. IV, 92. 
Annan Water, IV, 184 f. IV, 179. 
Annie Livingston, IV, 231. 
ARCHIE o CAWFIELD (No 188), in, 484-95; IV, 

516 f . Ill, 476 n. 
Archie of Cafield, III, 484, IV, 516. 
Archie of the Cawfield, IH, 484. 
Armstrong and Musgrave, IV, 432. 
Arthur's Seat shall be my Bed, or, Love in Despair, 

IV, 105. IV, 93. 

As I went out ae May morning, IV, 332. 

Auld Carle Hood, or, Earl Brand, I, 489, 491. 

The Auld Harper, IV, 16. 

Auld Ingram, H, 126. H, 113 n. 

AULD MATRONS (No 249), IV, 391 f. 11,406; IH, 

15 n. 
Aye as the Gowans grow gay, I, 22. 

Baby Livingstone, IV, 231. 
BABYLON, OR, THE BONNIE BANKS o FORDDE (No 
14), 1, 170-7, 501; II, 499; HI, 499 f.; IV, 450; 

V, 209, 287. 1, 121 n. 
VOL. v. 54 



THE BAFFLED KNIGHT (No 112), n, 479-93; HI, 

518; IV, 495; V, 239 f., 296. H, 378; HI, 258 n. 
The Baffled Knight, or, the Lady's Policy, II, 479. 
THE BAILIFF'S DAUGHTER OF ISLINGTON (No 105), 

II, 426-8; in, 518; V, 237. 
Ballade of the Scottysche Kynge, IV, 499. 
The Banished Man, I, 170. 
The Banks of Italy, IV, 360. 
The Banks of Omey, IV, 270. 
Bar aye your bower door weel, I, 300. 
Barbara Allan, II, 276. 
Barbara Allen's Cruelty, II, 276, 278. 
Barbara Livingston, IV, 231. 
THE BARON OF BRACKLEY (No 203), IV, 79-89, 

522; V, 253 f., 298. II, 240; IV, 309 n. 
The Baron of Braickly, IV, 309 n. 
THE BARON o LEYS (No 241), IV, 355-8; V, 275. 
The Baronne (Barrone) of Braikley (Braikly), IV, 79. 
The Barren of Breachell, V, 253 f . 
The Battle of Agincourt, V, 245. 
The Battle of Alf ord, IV, 78. 
The Battle of Balrinnes, III, 317, and n. 
THE BATTLE OF HARLAW (No 163), III, 316-20; 

V, 245. 

The Battle of Loudon Hill, IV, 105. 
THE BATTLE OF OTTERBURN (No 161), HI, 289- 

302, 620; IV, 499-502; V, 243 f., 297. HI, 304, 

305,332. 

THE BATTLE OF PHIUPHAUGH (No 202), IV, 77-9. 
Bauld Rankin, II, 320. 
The Beautifull Shepherdesse of Arcadia, II, 457, 

476 f. 

THE BEGGAR-LADDIE (No 280), V, 116-20, 305. 
The Beggar's Bride, V, 116. 
The Beggar's Dawtie, V, 116. 
Benorie, I, 493 f . 
THE BENT BAE BROWN (No 71), H, 170-3; IH, 

509; IV, 469; V, 223; II, 167, 240. 
Bertram the Bauld Archer, IH, 1; IV, 495. 
BESSY BELL AND MARY GRAY (No 201), IV, 75- 

77, 522; V, 253. 
The Betrayed Lady, I, 111. 
BEWICK AND GRAHAM (No. 211), IV, 144-50, 522. 
Bewick and Grahame, the Song of, IV, 144-8. 
Billie Archie, III, 484. 
Binnorie, 1, 118, 493, 495. 
Binnorie, O an Binnorie, 1, 118. 



426 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



The Birth of Robin Hood, LT, 412. 1, 178, 182; II, 

406, 411, 416. 
The Bishop of Hereford's Entertainment by Robin 

Hood and Little John, etc., Ill, 196. 
BLANCHEFLOUR AND JELLYFLORICE (No 300), V, 

175 f. 

The Blende Harper, etc., IV, 16. 
The Blind Harper, IV, 16. 
The Blind Harper of Lochmaben, IV, 16. 
Bloody Lambkin, II, 513. 
Blow the winds, heigh, ho ! II, 479. 
Blue Flowers and Yellow, I, 247. 
The Blue Flowers and the Yellow, I, 247; IV, 453. 
The Blynde Harpers, with the Answere, " a ballet," 

IV, 16. 

Bob Norice, II, 263. 
Bold Burnet's Daughter, I, 450. 
Bold Dickie, III, 495. 

THE BOLD PEDLAR AND ROBIN HOOD (No 132), 
LU, 154 f.; V, 240. LU, 130, 137, 144 n., 168; 

V, 126. 

Bold Rankin, LT, 320. 

Bondsey and Maisry, LT, 281. 

BONNIE ANNIE (No 24), I, 244-7; IV, 452 f. I, 

182; H, 499. 

Bonnie Annie Livieston, V, 261. 
BONNY BABY LIVINGSTON (No 222), IV, 231-9, 

523; V, 261 f. IV, 423. 

THE BONNY BANKS o FOBDIE (No 14). See BABY 
LON. 
BONNY BARBARA ALLAN (No 84), LT, 276-9; LLT, 

514. V, 166. 
BONNY BEE HOM (No 92), H, 317-9; V, 229. I, 

200 f.; H, 156, 234. 

THE BONNY BIRDY (No 82), II, 260 f. LT, 243. 
The Bonny Bows o London, 1, 118. 
The Bonny Braes of Yarrow, IV, 160. 
The Bonny Brown Girl, V, 166. 
The Bonny Earl of Livingston, LT, 309. 
THE BONNY EARL OF MURRAY (No 181), HI, 447- 

9; IV, 515. IV, 44. 

Bonny Foot-Boy, IV, 400. H, 441; IV, 451 a. 
Bonnie George Campbell, IV, 142. 
THE BONNY HIND (No 60), I, 444-7; V, 218. I, 

178, 185, 283 n. 

The Bonny Hind Squire, I, 425. 
THE BONNIE HOUSE o AIRLIE (No. 199), IV, 54-60; 

V,252. IV, 161 n. 
The Bonnie (Bonny) House o (of) Airlie (Airly, 

Airley), IV, 64. 

The Bonny Hyn (Heyn), I, 444, 447. 
BONNIE JAMES CAMPBELL (No 210), IV, 142-4. 
Bonnie Jean o Bethelnie, IV, 338. 
Bonnie John Campbell, IV, 142. 
BONNY JOHN SETON (No 198), IV, 51-4; V, 251 f. 
Bonnie Johnie Scot, II, 377. 

THE BONNY LADS OF ANGLESEY (No 220), IV, 214 f . 
The Bonnie Lass o Englessies Dance, IV, 214. 
The Bonnie Lass o Fyvie, V, 172. 



The Bonnie Lass o the Hie Toun End, V, 153. 
The Bonny Lass of Lochvoyan, or Lochroyan, II, 

213. 
BONNIE LIZIE BAILLEE (No 227), IV, 266-70; V, 

265. 

Bonny Lizie Lindsay, IV, 255. 
Bonny (Bonnie) May (=The Broom of Cowden- 

knows); IV, 191; (=The Reach i the Creel), V, 

121. 

The Bonnie Mermaid, V, 148. 
The Bonnie Milldams o Binnorie, I, 118. 
Bonny Molly Stewart, II, 317 n. 
- Bonny Peggy, IV, 270. 

Bonny Peggy Irvine, IV, 311. 

Bonnie Rantin Laddie, IV, 351. 

Bonnie Susie Cleland, II, 112. 

The Bonnie Wee Croodlin Dow, 1, 151. 

Bony Catrain Jaffry, V, 260. 

Bothwell, I, 62. 

BOTHWELL BRIDGE (No 206), IV, 108-10. IV, 106. 

THE BOY AND THE MANTLE (No 29), I, 257-74, 

507; n, 502; LU, 503; IV, 454; V, 212 f., 289. 
^-THE BRAES o YARROW (No 214), IV, 160-77, 

622 f.; V, 255 f. IV, 276. 

The Braes of Yarrow, Logan's, IV, 161, 178; Ham 
ilton's, IV, 163. 
The Brave Earl Brand and the King of England's 

Daughter, I, 88. 
The Bridal Sark, I, 7. 
The Bridegroom Darg, I, 7. 
The Bride's Testament, I, 141, 496. 
Brig. Macintosh's Farewell to the Highlands, or, 

Macintosh was a Soldier Brave, IV, 117. 
The Broom blooms bonnie (bonie) (= Leesome 

Brand), I, 177. 
The Broom blooms bonnie (= Sheath and Knife), I, 

185; V, 210. 

The Broom o the Cathery Knowes, LT, 346. 
THE BROOM OF COWDENKNOWS (No 217), IV, 191- 

209, 523; V, 257 f. I, 446; III, 451; V, 153. 
The Broom of the Cowdenknowes, IV, 191. 
THE BROOMFIELD HILL (No 43), I, 390-9, 508; LT, 

506; III, 506; IV, 469; V, 290. I, 335; IV, 

389. 

Broomfield Hills, I, 390. 
The Brothers-in-Arms, IV, 145. 
BROUGHTY WA'S (No 258), IV, 423 f. 
BROWN ADAM (No 98), II, 373-6. V, 234. 
Brown Adam the Smith, II, 373. 
The Brown Bride and Lord Thomas, II, 179. 
Brown Edom, II, 373. 
THE BROWN GIRL (No 295), V, 166-8. 
The Brown Girl (=Lord Thomas and Fair Annet), 

HI, 509 f . 

BROWN ROBIN (No 97), LT, 368-73. 
Brown Robyn and Mally, LT, 368. 
BROWN ROBYN'S CONFESSION (No 57), II, 13-6, 

510; III, 508; IV, 462 f.; V, 220, 292. I, 245, 

and n., 436; II, 17. 






INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



427 



The Buchanshire Tragedy (=Sir James the Ross), 

IV, 156. 

Burd Alone, II, 83. 
Burd Bell, IV, 417. 
Burd Ellen, II, 83. 
BURD ELLEN AND YOUNG TAMLANE (No 28), I, 

256, 507; III, 503. 
Burd Helen (=Fair Annie), II, 63. 
Burd Helen (= Child Waters), H, 83. I, 23 n. 
Burd Hellen, or, Browghty Wa's, IV, 428. 
BDRD ISABEL AND EARL PATRICK (No 257), IV, 

417-23; V, 278 f. 

Burd Isbel and Sir Patrick, IV, 417. 
Burning of Auchindown, III, 456. 
The Burning of Frendraught, IV, 39. 
The Burning o Loudon Castle, III, 423. 
The Burning of the Tower of Frendraught, FV, 

521 f. 

The Cambrick Shirt, I, 6. 

CAPTAIN CAR, OR, EDOM o GORDON (No 178), III, 

423-38, 520; IV, 513-5; V, 247 f., 299. IV, 44, 

64. 

Captain Glen, II, 16 ; IV, 463. 
CAPTAIN WARD AND THE RAINBOW (No 287), V, 

143-5, 305. 
CAPTAIN WEDDERBURN'S COURTSHIP (No 46), I, 

414-25; II, 507; III, 507; IV, 459; V, 216 f., 

291. I, 1, 2 n., 3 n., 20, 426. 
Captain Wederburn, V, 216. 
Carle of Kelly-Burn Braes, V, 107. 
THE CARNAL AND THE CRANE (No 55), II, 7-10, 

509 f.; Ill, 507; IV, 462; V, 220. I, 233, 235. 
A Carol for St. Stephen's Day, I, 233. 
The Carpenter's Wife, IV, 360. 
The Carrying-off of the Heiress of Kinady, FV, 309, 

and n. 

Castle Ha's Daughter, I, 450. 
Catharine (Catherine) Jaffery (Janferry), FV, 216. 
Catherine Johnson (Johnstone), IV, 216. 
Cathrine Jaffray, IV, 216. 
Charles Graeme, IV, 475 f. 
CHARLIE MACPHERSON (No 234), IV, 308-10 ; V, 

301. 

The Cherry-Tree, II, 1. 
THE CHERRY-TREE CAROL (No 54), II, 1-6, 509; 

V, 220. 

Chevy Chase, III, 303, 314. IH, 293, 317. 

Chield Morice, II, 263, 274. 

Chil Brenton, I, 62. 

Child Brenton, I, 62. 

CHILD MAURICE (No 83), H, 263-75; ITI, 614; 

FV, 478. H, 127, 303, 377, 378; V, 284. 
Child Noryce, II, 263; IV, 478. 
Child Nourice, Buchan's MSS, II, 264. 
The Child of Ell, I, 88. 
CHILD OWLET (No 291), V, 156 f., 305. 
Child Rowland to the darke tower came, fragment, 

V, 201. 



Child Vyet, II, 126. 

CHILD WATERS (No 63), II, 83-100, 511; III, 508; 

IV, 463; V, 220-2. I, 23 n., 49 n., 112 n.; II, 
127, 406, 430, 458, 499; IV, 186, 423. 

Chirstie Graeme, IV, 144. 
CHRISTOPHER WHITE (No 108), II, 439 f. 
Clark Colven, I, 371 f. 
Clerk Colin, V, 215. 

CLERK COLVILL (No 42), I, 371-89; II, 506; III, 
506; IV, 459; V, 215 f., 290. II, 143; IV, 187; 

V, 284. 

Clerk Colvill, or, The Mermaid, I, 371. 

Clerk Sandy, n, 156; IV, 468. 

CLERK SAUNDERS (No 69), II, 156-67, 512; III, 

509; IV, 468 f.; V, 223, 293. 11,100,167,170, 

173, 226, 240, 244, 317, 406; IV, 39, 163, 276, 

415, 474; V, 91, 166. 
Clerk Tamas, IV, 426. 
Clerk Tamas and Fair Annie, IV, 426. 
The Clerks of Owsenfoord, II, 173. 
THE CLERK'S TWA SONS o OWSENFORD (No 72), 

n, 173-91, 512; III, 509; FV, 469, 293. II, 112 

n., 156, 238, 264, 417. 

The Clerks Two Sons of Oxenfoord, II, 173. 
CLYDE'S (GLIDE'S) WATER (= THE MOTHER'S MAL 
ISON) (No 216), IV, 185-91; V, 256 f., 301. IV, 

117, 415, 471 b. 

Clyde's Water (= Young Hunting), II, 142. 
THE COBLE o CARGILL (No 242), IV, 358-60. 
Cold blows the wind, III, 512. 
Cold blows the wind, sweetheart, IV, 474. 
The Cooper of Fife, V, 104. 
Cospatrick, I, 62; V, 283 n. 
A councell brave [grave] our king did hold, ballad 

on Agincourt, HI, 321. 
The Countess of Errol, IV, 282. 
Courteous King Jamie, Lewis's ballad, I, 297. 
The Courteous Knight, I, 425. 
The Courtier and Country Maid, II, 483. 
The Covering Blue, V, 121. 
THE CRAFTY FARMER (No 283), V, 128-31. 
The Crafty Miller, V, 128. 
The Crafty Ploughboy, V, 129. 
The Creel, or, Bonny May, V, 121. 
The Croodin Doo, I, 151; V, 209. 
The Croodlin Doo, I, 151. 
CROW AND PIE (No 111), H, 478 f. 
The Crowdin Don, I, 498. 
THE CRUEL BROTHER (No 11), I, 141-51, 496-8; 

H, 498; IH, 499; IV, 449; V, 208, 286. I, 66 n., 

155, 383 n., 436; II, 298. 
The Cruel Brother, or, the Bride's Testament, I, 

141. 

The Cruel Knight, II, 288. 
Cruel Lammikin, II, 320. 
THE CRUEL MOTHER (No 20), I, 218-27, 604 f.; H, 

500 f.; Ill, 502; IV, 451; V, 211 f., 287. I, 230. 
The Cruel Sister, I, 118; IV, 447. 
Cruel William, H, 83. 



428 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



The Cruelty of Barbara Allen, II, 276. 
The Cunning Clerk, V, 121. 

THE DAEMON LOVER (No 243). See JAMES HARRIS. 

The Dainty Downby, V, 153. 

Dame Oliphant, or, Willie o Douglass-dale, II, 406. 

Davie Faw, IV, 61. 

Dead Maid's Land, V, 259. 

Death and the Lady, II, 204. 

The Death of John Seton, IV, 51. 

Death of Lord Rannal, V, 209. 

Death of Lord Warriston, IV, 28. 

THE DEATH OF PARCY REED (No 193), IV, 24-8, 

520 f. 
THE DEATH OF QUEEN JANE (No 170), HI, 372-6; 

V, 245 f., 298. 
The Death of the Countess of Aboyne, IV, 309 n., 

311. 

The Deil's Courting, I, 6. 
The Deil's Courtship, I, 6. 
Dernie Hughie, II, 480. 
The Devil and the Scold, V, 305. 
Devonshire's Noble Duel with Lord Danby, in the 

year 1687, IV, 110. 
Diabolus et Virgo, V, 283. 
DICK o THE Cow (No 185), III, 461-8. HI, 475 

n.; IV, 1. 
Dick of the Cow, An excelent Old Song cald, HE, 

461. 

The Disconsolate Lady, II, 424. 
A Discourse betwixt (between) a young Woman and 

the Elphin Knight, I, 6, 20. 
The Distressed Ship-Carpenter, IV, 360, 369. 
Diverus and Lazarus, II, 10. 
DIVES AND LAZARUS (No 56), II, 10-12, 510; LTI, 

507 f.; IV, 462; V, 220, 292. 

Donald M'Queen's Flight wi Lizie Menzie, V, 305 f. 
Donald of the Isles (= Glasgow Peggie), IV, 270. 
Donald of the Isles (= Lizie Lindsay), IV, 255. 
The Douglas Tragedy, I, 88, 91, 96, 99, 489, 492; 

H, 170 n., 457 n.; in, 497; IV, 64, and n., 426. 
Douglass Dale, II, 406. 
Dowie Banks of Yarrow, IV, 160. 
The Dowie Den in Yarrow, IV, 160. 
The Dowie Dens, IV, 160. 

The Dowy Dens, non-traditional ballad, IV, 163. 
The Dowie Dens o Yarrow (= The Water o Gamrie), 

IV, 178. 

The Dowie Dens of Yarrow, IV, 160, 522. 
The Dowie Downs o Yarrow, IV, 160. 
The Dowie Glens of Yarrow, IV, 160, 177 b. 
The Dowy Houms o Yarrow, IV, 160. 
The Dragoon and Peggy, V, 172. 
The Drowned Lady, I, 118. 
The Drowned Lovers, I, 372, and n., 435; LI, 240; 

IV, 185. 

Drowsy Lane, I, 300. 

DBUMCLOG (LOUDON HILL) (No 205), IV, 105. 
The Drunkard's Legacy, V, 12, 19 f. 



DUGALL QUIN (No 294), V, 165 f., 305 f. 

The Duke of Athol, IV, 299. 

Duke of Athole's Gates, IV, 150. 

(The) Duke (o) of Athol's Nourice, IV, 150. 

THE DUKE OF ATHOLE'S NURSE (No 212), IV, 

150-5. IV, 161, 178. 
The Duke of Bedford, V, 298. 
THE DUKE OF GORDON'S DAUGHTER (N 237), IV, 

332-8; V, 273. 

The Duke of Gordon's Daughters, IV, 332. 
The Duke of Gordon's Three Daughters, IV, 332, 335. 
Duke of Perth's Three Daughters, I, 170. 
The Duke's Daughter's Cruelty, II, 500, 501. 
DURHAM FIELD (No 159), III, 282-7; V, 297. Ill, 

352. 

Earl Bichet, IV, 460. 

Earle Bodwell, III, 399. 

EARL BOTHWELL (No 174), III, 399-401; V, 247. 

Earl Bran, I, 88; IV, 444. 

EARL BRAND (No 7), I, 88-105, 489-93; II, 498; 
in, 497 f.; IV, 443-5; V, 207, 285 f. I, 67, 
93, 95, and n., 106, 178, 496; II, 170 n., 240; 
IV, 64. 

EARL CRAWFORD (No 229), IV, 276-80; V, 301. 

Earl Lithgow, II, 457. 

Earl Marshall, III, 257; IV, 498. 

THE EARL OF ABOYNE (No 235), IV, 311-21; V, 
270-2, 301 f. IV, 355. 

Earl of Aboyne, IV, 311. 

The Earl o Boyn, IV, 311. 

The Earl o Bran, IV, 443 f. 

The Earl of Douglas and Dame Oliphant, LT, 406. 

THE EARL OF ERROL (No 231), IV, 282-91; V,267- 
70. 

Earl of Errol and Lady Catherine Carnegie, Ballad 
of Gilbert, IV, 289. 

Earl of Essex, V, 145. 

Earl of Hume, IV, 270. 

THE EARL OF MAR'S DAUGHTER (No 270), V, 
38-42. 

The Earl of Rosslyn's Daughter, I, 414. 

THE EARL OF WESTMORELAND (No 177), III, 416- 
23, V, 299. HI, 402, 408. 

Earle of Westmorelande, HI, 416. 

The Earl of Winton's Daughter, IV, 291. 

Earl Patrick, IV, 375. 

Earl Patrick and Burd Isabel, IV, 417. 

Earl Patrick Graham, II, 17. 

Earl Patricke Spensse, II, 17. 

Earl Richard (= Young Hunting) II, 142. 

Earl Richard (=The Knight and Shepherd's Daugh 
ter), 1,67 n.; 11,457. 

Earl Richard's Daughter, IV, 400. 

Earl Richard, the Queen's Brother, H, 457. 

Earl Richmond, IV, 492. 

Earl Robert, II, 284. 

EARL ROTHES (No 297), V, 170. 

Earl Walter, ballad of Mrs Hampden Pye, II, 83. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



429 



Earlington's Daughter, IV, 445 b. 

Earlistown, IV, 109. 

Eastmuir King, II, 296. 

The Eastmure King and the Westmure King, II, 

51 n., 296. 

Edinburgh castle, towne and tower, fragment, V, 202. 
Edom of Achendoon, V, 247. 
EDOM o GORDON (CAPTAIN CAR), (No 178), III, 

423-38, 520; IV, 513-15; V, 247 f. IV, 44, 64. 
EDWARD (No. 13), 1, 167-70, 501; II, 499; III, 499; 

V, 209, 287. I, 143, 155, 437, 446. 
The Egyptian Laddy, IV, 61. 
The Elfin Knicht, I, 6. 
THE ELFIN KNIGHT (No 2), I, 6-20, 484 f.; II, 495 

f.; Ill, 496; IV, 439 f.; V, 205 f., 284. I, 23 n., 

178 n., 283. 

Elfrida and Sir James of Perth, IV, 156. 
Elisa Bailly, V, 265. 
The Enchanted Ring, II, 317. 
EPPIE MORRIE (No 223), IV, 239 f.; V, 262. IV, 

232, 245. 

Eppie Norrie, V, 262 b. 
ERLINTON (No 8), I, 106-11; III, 498 f.; IV, 445-7. 

I, 88, and n., 93, 178. 
Errol's Place, IV, 282. 

FAIR ANNIE (No 62), II, 63-83, 511; IV, 463; V, 

220. II, 180 n.; IV, 409. 
Fair Annie and Sweet Willie, II, 179. 
Fair Annie of Lochroyan, II, 17, 100. 
Fair Anny, II, 213. 

Fair Eleanor's Tragedy, II, 180; III, 509 b. 
Fair Ellen, V, 220. 
THE FAIR FLOWER OF NORTHUMBERLAND (No 9), 

I, 111-18, 493; II, 498; III, 499; V, 207 f. I, 

49 n., 432, 456 n.; 111,351. 
Fair Helen of Kirconnell, II, 429. 
Fair Isabell of Rochroyall, II, 213. 
FAIR JANET (No 64), H, 100-11; III, 508; IV, 

464-6; V, 222, 292. I, 96; II, 113, and n., 137, 

499; III, 381, 497 b; IV, 39, 411, 471. 
Fair Janet and Sweet William, II, 100. 
Fair Mabel of Wallington, II, 309. 
Fair Margaret ( = Child Waters), II, 83. 
Fair Margaret (= Proud Lady Margaret), I, 425. 
FAIR MARGARET AND SWEET WILLIAM (No 74) , II, 

199-203; V, 224 f., 293. I, 96; II, 156, 180, 204, 

205, 214, 288. 
Fair Margaret's Misfortune (Misfortunes), II, 199, 

and n., 203. 
FAIR MARY OF WALLINGTON (No 91), II, 309-17, 

513; III, 515; IV, 479 f.; V, 227-9. II, 126 n., 

127, 377. 

Fair Orange Green (= Jamie Douglas), IV, 90. 
A fair pretty maiden she sat on her bed, IV, 439. 
The Fairy Court, I, 335. 
The Fairy Knight, I, 6, 178 n. 
The False Knight, I, 20, 485. 
The False Knight Outwitted, I, 22. 



THE FALSE LOVER WON BACK (No 218), IV, 209- 

11. 

False Sir John, I, 22. 
THE FAMOUS FLOWER OF SERVING-MEN (No 106), 

II, 428-32; III, 518; IV, 492. II, 501. 

The Famous Flower of Serving-men, or, The Lady 

turned Serving-man, II, 431. 
The Famous Sea-Fight between Captain Ward and 

the Rainbow, V, 145. 

The Famous Victories of Henry Fifth, ILT, 322 n. 
THE FARMER'S CURST WIFE (No 278), V, 107 f., 

305. 

The Farmer's Old Wife, V, 107. 
Fa'se Footrage, II, 296. 
FAUSE FOODRAGE (No 89), II, 296-301, 513; III, 

515; IV, 479. II, 51 n., 303; III, 430. 
THE. FAUSE KNIGHT UPON THE ROAD (No 3), I, 

20-22, 485; II, 496; III, 496; IV, 440. 
The Fause Lord, II, 63. 
The Fause Lover, IV, 209. 
Fause Sir John and May Colvin, I, 22. 
Fine Flowers in the Valley, I, 218, 227. 
Fine Flowers of the Valley, I, 141. 
THE FIRE OF FRENDRAUGHT (No 196), IV, 39-49, 

521 f.; V, 251, 300. 
Flodden Ffeilde, Ffloden Ffeeld, Flowden Feilde, 

III, 353, 361. 

FLODDEN FIELD (No 168), III, 351-62; IV, 507; V, 

298. Ill, 294, 332; IV, 36. 
The Flower of Northumberland, I, 111. 
The Flowers of Edinburgh, V, 153. 
For I '11 cut my green coat a foot above my knee, 

fragment, V, 202. 
The French Galley, V, 135. 
The French Gallic (Galolee), V, 135. 
Frennet Hall, non-traditional ballad, IV, 39. 
The Friar, V, 100. 
The Friar and Fair Maid, V, 100. 
THE FRIAR IN THE WELL (No 276), V, 100-3. HI, 

122. 

The Fryar and the Maid, V, 100. 
The Fryer servd in his kind, V, 100. 
The Fryer well fitted, V, 100, 103. 

The Gaberlunyre Man, V, 109, 115, 116. 

The Gaberlunzie Laddie, or, The Beggar's Bride, 

V, 116, 305. 
Galla Water, IV, 270. 
The Gallant Grahams, IV, 78. 
THE GARDENER (No 219), IV, 212-14; V, 258-60. 

IV, 210. 

The Gardener Lad, IV, 212. 

Gay Gos Hawk, IV, 483 b. 

THE GAY GOSHAWK (No 96), II, 355-67; LTI, 517; 

IV, 482-6; V, 234, 296. I, 247; V, 6. 
GEORDIE (No 209), IV, 123-42. IV, 55, 351, 370. 
Geordie Lukely (Lukelie), IV, 123, 127. 

THE GEORGE ALOE AND THE SWEEPSTAKE (No 285), 

V, 133-5. V, 136. 



430 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



George of Oxford, The Life and Death of, IV, 126, 

141 f. 
George Stoole, a lamentable new ditty made upon 

the death of a worthy gentleman named, etc., IV, 

126 f., 140 f. 
A GEST OF ROBYN HODE (No 117), III, 39-89, 518 

f.; IV, 496 f.; V, 240, 297. I, 257 n.; U, 13; III, 

16, 22, 96, 103, 108, 109, 116, and n., 121 n., 129, 

130, 159, 191, 194, 197, 220, 223, 227. 
GET UP AND BAR THE DOOR (No 275), V, 96-9, 281, 

304. 

The Ghost and Sailor, II, 234. 
Gight's Lady, IV, 123. 
GIL BRKNTON (No 5), I, 62-81, 489; II, 498; III, 

497; IV, 442 f.; V, 207, 285. I, 268; IV, 214, 

276 

Giles Collins (Collin), III, 515; V, 225. 
Giles Collins and Lady Annie, III, 514. 
Giles Collins and Proud Lady Anna, II, 279. 
Gill Morice, Gil Morrice, II, 263, 377. 
Gillnokie, III, 363. 
The Gipsey Davy, IV, 61. 
The Gipsy Countess, IV, 62. 
Give him flowers enow, palmer, give him flowers 

enow, fragment, V, 202. 
GLASGERION (No 67), II, 136-42, 611 f.; HI, 509; 

IV, 468; V, 293. II, 101, 144; V, 220. 
GLASGOW PEGGIE (No 228), IV, 270-5; V, 266 f. 
Glen Skeeny, IV, 468 a. 

Glenkindie (-kindy), II, 136, 368; IV, 468. I, 23 n. 
GLENLOGIE, OR, JEAN o BETHELNIE (No 238), IV, 

338-46; V, 273, 302. 
Glenogie, IV, 338. 
God be wi the, Geordie, IV, 454. 
God sen the Due hed byddin in France, fragment, V, 

202. 

The Golden Ball, H, 346; V, 201, 233. 
The Golden Key, II, 346. 
THE GOLDEN VANITY; OR, THE Low LANDS Low 

(THE SWEET TRINITY) (No 286), V, 135 ff., 305. 
The Gordons and the Grants, IV, 49. 
The Goulden Vanitie (-tee), V, 135, 305. 
The Gowans sae Gay, I, 22. 
Greeme and Bewick, IV, 144. 
The Great Bull of Bendy-law, V, 203. 
THE GREAT SILKIE OF SULE SKERRY (No 113), II, 

494; III, 518; IV, 495. H, 496. 
The Green Broomfield, I, 390 n. 
Greenland, V, 148. 
THE GREY COCK; OR, SAW YOU MY FATHER? (No 

248), IV, 389 f.; V, 302. IV, 415. 
Gude Earl Brand and Auld Carle Hude, I, 489 f. 
GUDE WALLACE (No 157), in, 265-75; V, 242 f., 

11,513; 111,179, 191. 
Guye of Gisborne, III, 89. 
The Gypsie Loddy, IV, 61. 
THE GYPSY LADDIE (No 200), IV, 61-74, 622; V, 

252 f., 300. IV, 266; V, 306. 



The Hagg Worm, II, 503. 

The Hangman's Tree, V, 296. 

Hardyknute, II, 296. 

The Haughs o Crondale, HI, 317 n. ; IV, 78. 

The Haughs o Yarrow, recent ballad, IV, 163. 

Hayrlau, The Battel of the, III, 317. 

He steps full statly on ye stre[et], fragment, V, 

202. 

He took a sword in every hand, fragment, V, 203. 
The Heir of Lin, V, 11. 

THE HEIR OF LINNE (No 267), V, 11-20. I, 455. 
The Heiress of Northumberland, V, 207. 
Helen, IV, 423. 

HENRY MARTYN (No 250), IV, 393-6; V, 302. 
Hero and Leander, Tragedy of, IV, 186. 
Hey wi the rose and the lindie, O, I, 218. 
The High Banks o Yarrow, I, 244. 
The Highwayman Outwitted, V, 129. 
HIND ETIN (No 41), I, 360-71, 508; II, 506; HI, 

606; IV, 459; V, 215. I, 340, 450, 488 a; IV, 

440. 

Hind Henry, II, 302. 
HIND HORN (No 17), I, 187-208, 502-4, 508; II, 

499 f.; Ill, 501 f.; IV, 450 f.; V, 210 f., 287. 

I, 255, 455, 456 n., 459; II, 317 ; III, 179, 188; 

IV, 401. 

Hindhorn, I, 187. 

HOBIE NOBLE (No 189), IV, 1-4 III, 476, and n. 
Hold up, hold up your hands so high (=Maid freed 

from the Gallows), IV, 482 a. 
THE HOLY NUNNERY (No 303), V, 179-81. 
The Honour of a London Prentice, III, 608. 
The House-Carpenter, IV, 361. 
Hugh of Lincoln, III, 233. 
Hugh Spencer, III, 275. II, 377, 439. 
HUGH SPENCER'S FEATS IN FRANCE (No 158), 

HI, 275-82; IV, 499; V, 243. H, 441; IV, 

231 b. 

Hughie Graham, IV, 8. 
HUGHIE GRAME (No 191), IV, 8-15, 618-20; V, 300. 

HI, 367 n., 471 n.; IV, 126. 
Hughie the Graeme, IV, 8. 
THE HUNTING OF THE CHEVIOT (No 162), HI, 

303-15; IV, 502; V, 244, 297. HI, 292 n., 

295. 

Huntingtower, IV, 299. 
Hunttis of Che vet, III, 292 n., 303. 
Hynd (Hynde) Horn, I, 187, 503. 
Hynde Etin, I, 360. 

I had six lovers over the sea (= Captain Wedder- 

burn's Courtship), HI, 507 a. 
1 11 no ly neist the wa, I, 414. 
I 'U wager, I '11 wager, I, 390. 
I sowd the seeds of love, V, 259. 
Inter Diabolus et Virgo, V, 283. 
Irish Dragoons, V, 172. 
Isaac-a-Bell and Hugh the Graeme, I, 208. 
It 's braw sailing here, V, 259. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



431 



It was an old tale, ten thousand times told, frag 
ment, V, 202. 
It was the friar of orders gray, fragment, V, 201. 

Jack, the Little Scot, II, 377. 

Jacky, my son, V, 209. 

James V and the Tinker, V, 73 n. 

JAMES GRANT (No 197), IV, 49 f.; V, 251. 

JAMES HARRIS (THE DAEMON LOVER) (No 243), 

IV, 360-9, 624. 

James Hately (Hatelie), IV, 370. 
JAMES HATLEY (No 244), IV, 370-5. 
James Herries, IV, 360. IV, 390. 
JAMIE DOUGLAS (No 204), IV, 90-105. IV, 276. 
Jamie o' Lee, II, 441; III, 518; IV, 370. 
Jamie Telfer in the fair Dodhead, V, 249. 
JAMIE TELFER OF THE FAIR DODHEAD (No 190), 

IV, 4-8, 518; V, 249-51, 300. 
Janet, II, 112. 

JEAX o BETHELNIE (No 238). See GLEKLOGIE. 
Jean o Bethelnie's Love for Sir G. Gordon, IV, 338. 
JELLON GRAME (No 90), II, 302-8, 513; III, 515; 

IV, 479; V, 226 f., 295. II, 240, 298, 368, 378, 

412; IV, 35 n. 

Jellon Grame and Lillie Flower, II, 302. 
THE JEW'S DAUGHTER. (SiR HUGH) (No 155), 

HI, 233. II, 13; V, 241. 
Jo Janet, II, 457. 

Jock of Hazeldean, Scott's, V, 160. 
Jock o Hazelgreen, V, 159. 
JOCK o THE SIDE (No 187), III, 475-84. n, 240; 

III, 472 n., 485, 486; IV, 1 n. 
Jock Sheep, II, 480. 

Jock Sheep, or, the Maiden Outwitted, II, 480. 
JOCK THE LEG AND THE MERRY MERCHANT (No 

282), V, 126-8. 

The Jockey's Lamentation, I, 7. 
John a Side, III, 475. 
John and William, I, 435. 
John Armstrong, The Death of, III, 363. 
John Arm-strongs last Good-Night, III, 362, 371; 

IV, 36. 

John (Johnie) Blunt, V, 96. 

JOHN DORY (No 284), V, 131 f. 

John Lankin, V, 295. 

John o Cockielaw, IV, 495. 

JOHN OF HAZELGREEN (No 293), V, 159-64. 

John o the Side, III, 475. 

John Tamson, V, 1. 

John the Little Scot, IV, 491 ; V, 234. 

JOHN THOMSON AND THE TURK (No 266), V, 1-10, 

279 f. 
John Tom sou and Jakaman his wife, A merry jest 

of, V, 8. 

Johnie Armstrang, III, 362. 
JOHNIE ARMSTRONG (No 169), HI, 362-72, 520; 

IV, 507; V, 298. IV, 10, 80; V, 187 n. 
Johnny Annstrong's last Good-Night, III, 362, 372. 

II, 276. 



Johnnie Barbour, II, 398. 

Johnnie Brad, III, 1. 

Johnie Buneftan, II, 377. 

JOHNIE COCK (No 114), III, 1-12; IV, 495 f. IV, 

163. 

Johny Cox, III, 1. 
Johnnie Faa, IV, 522. 
Johnnie Faa and the Countess o Cassilis, The rare 

Ballad of, IV, 62. 

Johnnie Faa the Gipsy Laddie, IV, 61. 
Johnie of Braidisbank, III, 1; IV, 495. 
Johnie of Breadislee, III, 1. 
Johnie of Cockerslee, III, 1. 
Johnie o Cocklesmnir, III, 1. 
JOHNIE SCOT (No 99), II, 377-98; IV, 486-91; V, 

234 f. IV, 111, 397; V, 284. 
Johnston Hey and Young Caldwell, II, 288. 
THE JOLLY BEGGAR (No 279), V, 109-116. 
The Jolly Beggar-man, V, 109. 
The Jolly Beggars, V, 109. 
The Jolly Goshawk, II, 355. 
The Jolly Harper, IV, 16. 
The Jolly Hind Squire, I, 425. 
Jolly Janet, I, 425. 
THE JOLLY FINDER OF WAKEFIELD (No 124), III, 

129-132. Ill, 121, 132. 
Joseph was an old man, II, 1. 
The Jovial Beggarman, V, 109. 
The Jovial Hunter of Bromsgrove, I, 208. 
The Jovial Tinker and Farmer's Daughter, V, 109. 
JUDAS (No 23), I, 242-4; V, 288. 

Kate Carnegie, IV, 282. 

KATHARINE JAFFRAY (No 221), IV, 216-31, 523; 

V, 260 f . 

Katherine Jaffarie, IV, 216. 
THE KEACH i THE CREEL (No 281), V, 121-6. 
Kellyburnbraes, V, 107. 
Kemp Owayne, I, 306. 
KEMP OWYNE (No 34), I, 306-13; II, 602-5; III, 

504; IV, 454; V, 213 f., 290. I, 315 f. 
Kempion, I, 306. 
Kempy Kane, I, 300. 
KEMPY KAY (KAYE) (No 33), I, 300-6; V, 213, 

289. 

Kertonha, or, The Fairy Court, I, 335. 
King Alfred and the Shepherd, III, 165; V, 73. 
King and Shepperd, V, 73 n. 
A King and a Shepherd, A merry songe of, V, 

73 n. 

King and Tanner, V, 68. 
The King and the Bishop, I, 404; IV, 459 b. 
The King and the Forrester, V, 74, and n. 
The King and the Tanner, V, 68. 
The Kinge and the Tanner, A merie songe of, V, 

67 f. 

The King and the Tinkler, V, 73 n. 
KING ARTHUR AND KING CORNWALL (No 30), I, 

274-88, 507; II, 502; in, 503. I, 67; H, 240. 



432 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



King Edelbrode, V, 203. 

King Edward the Fourth and a Tanner of Tamworth, 

Percy's ballad, V, 68, and n. 
KING EDWARD THE FOURTH AND A TANNER OF 

TAMWORTH (No 273), V, 67-87, 303. 
KING ESTMERE (No 60), n, 49-55, 510 f.; Ill, 508; 

IV, 463. II, 57; III, 18 n. 
KING HENRY (No 32), I, 297-300; II, 502 ; IV, 

454; V, 289. I, 292, 301. 
KING HENRY THE FIFTH'S CONQUEST OF FRANCE 

(No 164), III, 320-6; V, 245. 
KING JAMES AND BROWN (No 180), III, 442-6. 

III, 400. 

King James and the Tinker (Tinkler), V, 73, and n. 
King James the First and the Tinker (Fortunate 

Tinker), V, 73 n. 
Kinge John and Bishoppe, I, 403. 
King John and the Abbot, Percy's ballad, I, 404. 
King John and the Abbot of Canterbury, I, 403. 

1,1. 
KING JOHN AND THE BISHOP (No 45), I, 403-14, 

508; II, 506 f.; IV, 459; V, 216, 291. 
King Knapperty, I, 300. 
King Malcolm and Sir Colvin, II, 62. 
The King of Fairies, I, 496 f . 
The King of Scots and Andrew Browne, III, 445. 
KING ORFEO (No 19), I, 215-17, 504; H, 500; III, 

502; IV, 451; V, 211. I, 339. 
King William and his Forrester, V, 74 n. 
King William going a hunting, V, 74 n. 
THE KING'S DISGUISE AND FRIENDSHIP WITH ROBIN 

HOOD (No 151), III, 220-2. Ill, 133 n. 
THE KING'S DOCHTER LADY JEAN (No 52), I, 

450-4. 
KINMONT WILLIE (No 186), III, 469-74; IV, 516. 

II, 127, 240; III, 463; V, 187 n. 
The Kitchen-boyes Songe, A ballett, V, 34. 
THE KITCHIE-BOY (No 252), IV, 400-8; V, 277 f. 

IV, 451; V, 11 n., 34. 

The Knicht o Archerdale, I, 425. 

The Knight and Lady, II, 479. 

THE KNIGHT AND SHEPHERD'S DAUGHTER (No 

110), II, 457-77; IV, 492^; V, 237-9. I, 67, 

292, 340, 446; II, 84, 170 n., 399; III, 265 n.; 

IV, 423. 
Knight and a fair virgin, ballad, or " sonnet " of a, 

I, 292. 

The Knight and the Chief's Daughter, II, 497. 
The Knight in Jesuite, V, 34 n. 
THE KNIGHT OF LIDDESDALE (No 160), III, 288. 
THE KNIGHT'S GHOST (No 265), IV, 437 f. 
Knip Knap, V, 213. 

THE LADS OF WAMPHRAY (No 184), III, 458-60, 

520. IV, 34. 
LADY ALICE (No 85), II, 279 f.; Ill, 514 f.; V, 

225 f. 

Lady Anne, recent ballad, I, 218 n., 227. 
Lady Barbara Erskine's Lament, IV, 91 n. 



Lady Daisy (Dayisie), V, 29. 

LADY DIAMOND (No 269), V, 29-38, 303. II, 244. 

Lady Diamond, the King's Daughter, V, 29. 

Lady Douglas and Blackwood, IV, 90. 

LADY ELSPAT (No 247), IV, 387 f. 

LADY ISABEL (No 261), IV, 429-31. I, 432; IV, 

426. 
LADY ISABEL AND THE ELF-KNIGHT (No 4), I, 22- 

62, 485-9; II, 496-8; III, 496 f.; IV, 440-2; 

V, 206 f., 285. I, 13, 112 n., 113, 123 n., 432. 
The Lady Isabella's Tragedy, V, 34, and n., 203. 
Lady Jane (=Fair Annie), II, 63. 
The Lady Jane (=The Death of Queen Jane), III, 

372. 

Lady Maiserye, V, 222 a. 
LADY MAISRY (No 65), II, 112-26; III, 608; IV, 

466-8; V, 222 f., 292. II, 100, 103, 204, 264, 309 

n.,406; IV, 339 n.; V, 34. 
Lady Maisry (=The Maid freed from the Gallows), 

11,346. 

Lady Maisry (=Mary Hamilton), III, 379. 
Lady Margaret (=Earl Brand), I, 88. 
Lady Margaret (= Child Waters), II, 83. 
Lady Margaret has bound her silken snood, frag 
ment, V, 203. 

Lady Margerie (= Jellon Grame), II, 302. 
Lady Margery, II, 112; IV, 466. 
Lady Marjory, II, 112. 
Lady Mary Ann, I, 226. 
Lady Mazery, II, 309. 
Lady Ouncebell, II, 204. 
THE LADY OF ARNGOSK (No 224), IV, 241-3. IV, 

232. 

The Lady of Livenston, V, 227. 
The Lady turnd Serving-Man, II, 429 n. 
The Ladye o the Drum, IV, 322. 
The Lady's Policy, or, The Baffled Knight, II, 479. 
The Laidley Worm of Spindleston Heughs, I, 308, 

311, 316; II, 502-5. 
THE LAILY WORM AND THE MACHREL OF THE SEA 

(No 36), I, 315 f.; V, 214 f., 290. 
The Laird of Blackwood, IV, 90, 525 b. 
THE LAIRD o DRUM (No 236), IV, 322-32; V, 

272 f. 

The Laird of Geight (Gigh), or Gae, IV, 123. 
Laird of Gight, IV, 123. 
The Laird of Kellary, V, 172. 
The Laird o Keltic, V, 153. 
The Laird of Knotington, IV, 191. 
The Laird of Laminton, IV, 216. 
Laird o Leys, IV, 355. 
The Laird o Linne, V, 11. 
The Laird o Livingstone, II, 309. 
The Laird of Lochinvar, IV, 191. 
Laird o Lochnie, IV, 191. 
THE LAIRD o LOGIE (No 182), III, 449-56, 520; 

IV, 515 f.; V, 299 f. 

The Laird o Logie, or, May Margaret, III, 449. 
(The) Laird of Ochiltree, IV, 191, 5 1 1>. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



433 



The Laird o Ochiltree Wa's, IV, 191. 

The Laird of Roslin's Daughter, I, 414. 

The Laird o the Dainty Downby, V, 153. 

The Laird o the Drum, IV, 322. 

THE LAIRD OP WARISTON (No 194), IV, 28-33. 

III, 381. 

(The) Laird of Waristoun (Wariestoun), IV, 28. 

Lairde Rowlande, or Ronalde, V, 208. 

Lambert Linkin, II, 320. 

Lambkin, II, 320. 

The Lament of the Border Widow, II, 429, 430. 

Lament of the Queen's Marie, IV, 509. 

The Lamentation of Quene Jane, III, 372. 

The Lamenting Lady, etc., II, 68 n. 

Lamerlinkin, II, 320. 

LAMKIN (No 93), II, 320-42, 513 f.; in, 515; IV, 

480 f.; V, 229-31, 295. I, 201; II, 243. 
Lammikin, II, 320. 
Lang Johnny Moir, IV, 396. 
LANG JOHNNY MORE (No 251), IV, 396-400, 524. 

II, 378. 

The Lard of Drum, V, 272. 
The Lass of Aughrim, II, 213. 
The Lass of Lochroyan, II, 213; IV, 471. 
The Lass of Ocram, III, 510 f . 
The Lass of Philorth, IV, 309 n., 347. 
THE LASS OF ROCH ROYAL (No 76), II, 213-26; 

IH, 510-12; IV, 471-4; V, 225, 294. II, 288; 

IV, 186. 

The Leaves of Lind, I, 63. 

LEESOME BRAND (No 15), I, 177-84, 501 f.; II, 

499; III, 500; IV, 450; V, 209, 287. I, 33 n., 66, 

90 n., 92; II, 101 n., 406, 412, 416; III, 501. 
Leezie Lindsay, IV, 255. 

The Life and Death of George of Oxford, IV, 141. 
The Life and Death of Sir Hugh of the Grime, IV, 

8. 

The Linkin Ladie, IV, 355. 
Little Harry Hughes and the Duke's Daughter, III, 

233. 

LITTLE JOHN A BEGGING (No 142), III, 188-90. 
Little John and the Four Beggers, III, 188. Ill, 

133. 

The Little Man, I, 329. 

Little Mousgrove and the Lady Barnet, II, 242, 259. 
Little Musgrave (Massgrove), II, 242. 
LITTLE MUSGRAVE AND LADY BARNARD (No 81), 

II, 242-60, 513; IV, 476-8; V, 226. II, 137, 158, 

240, 260, 264. 

Little Musgrave and the Lady Barnard, II, 242. 
Little Mushiegrove, II, 242. 
Little Sir Grove, II, 242. 
Little Sir William, V, 241. 
Little wee toorin dow, I, 498, 500; IV, 450. 
Lizie (Lizae) Baillie, IV, 266. 
LIZIE LINDSAY (No 226), IV, 255-66, 524; V, 264 f. 

II, 84; V, 116. 
LIZIE WAN (No 51), I, 447-9. I, 167, 168, 437, 

446. 

VOL. v. 55 



The Loch o the Loanie, I, 504. 

Loch-in-var, IV, 216. 

Lochinvar, Scott's ballad, IV, 218. 

THE LOCHMABEN HARPER (No 192), IV, 16-23; V, 

300. 

Logan Water, or, A Lover in Captivity, IV, 184 n. 
The Long-armed Duke, IV, 110. 
Long Lankyn, II, 320; V, 295. 
Long Lonkin (Longkin), II, 320. 
Lord Aboyne, IV, 351. 
Lord and Lady Errol, IV, 282. 
Lord Arnwaters, IV, 115. 
Lord Bangwell, I, 63. 
Lord Barnabas' Lady, II, 242. 
Lord Barnaby, II, 242. 
Lord Barnard, II, 242. 
Lord Barnett and Little Musgrave, II, 242. 
Lord Bateman, II, 508. I, 455 n. 
Lord Bateman, The Loving Ballad of, I, 454. 
Lord Beichan and Susie Pye, I, 454. 
Lord Beichim, V, 218. 
Lord Bengwill, I, 62 f. 
Lord Brangwill, I, 62 f. 
Lord Darlington, II, 309. 
Lord Delamare (Delaware), IV, 110. 
LORD DELAMERE (No 207), IV, 110-15. 
Lord Dernt water, IV, 115. 
LORD DERWENTWATER (No 208), IV, 115-23, 622; 

V, 254 f . IV, 466. 
Lord Derwentwater's Death, IV, 115. 
Lord Dingwall, I, 63 f. 
Lord Donald, I, 151. 
Lord Douglas, I, 88. 

Lord Douglas, or, The Laird of Blackwood, IV, 90. 
Lord Douglas' Tragedy, I, 489 b, 492; IV, 445 b. 
Lord Dunwaters, IV, 115. 
Lord Garrick, IV, 61. 
Lord Gregory, II, 213. 
LORD INGRAM AND CHIEL WYET (No 66), II, 126- 

36, 511; in, 508 f.; V, 223, 292. II, 157 n., 264. 
Lord Ingram and Childe (Viat) Vyet, II, 126. 
Lord Ingram and Gil Viett, II, 126. 
Lord Jamie Douglas, IV, 90. I, 437. 
Lord John (=The Elfin Knight), I, 6. 
Lord John (=The Broomfield Hill), I, 390. 
Lord John ( = Johnie Scot), II, 377. 
Lord John (= Young Hunting), II, 142. 
Lord John and Bird Ellen, II, 83. 
Lord Johnnie Scott (Scot), II, 377, 397. 
Lord John's Murder, II, 288. 
Lord Lavel, II, 204. 

LORD LIVINGSTON (No 262), IV, 431-3. H, 156. 
LORD LOVEL (No 75), II, 204-13, 512; III, 510; 

IV, 471; V, 225, 294. I, 96; II, 200, 214, 279. 
LORD LUNDY (LORD WILLIAM) (No 254), IV, 411- 

415. 

Lord Maxwell's Goodnight, IV, 34. 
LORD MAXWELL'S LAST GOODNIGHT (No 195), IV, 

34-8; V, 251. 



434 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



Lord of Learne, V, 42. I, 455 n.; H, 510. 

THE LORD OF LORN AND THE FALSE STEWARD 

(No 271), V, 42-58, 280 f. V, 295. 
The Lord of Lorn and the Fals Steward, A pretty 

ballad of, V, 42. 
Lord of Lome, V, 42. 

The Lord of Lome and the False Steward, V, 42. 
LORD RANDAL (No 12), I, 151-66, 498-501; II, 

498 f.; Ill, 499; IV, 449 f.; V, 208 f., 286. I, 

168, 496. 

Lord Rannal, I, 498. 
Lord Revel, II, 204. 

Lord Robert and Mary Florence, LT, 284. 
Lord Ronald, my son, I, 151, 498 f. I, 143. 
Lord Roslin's Daughter, I, 414. 
Lord Salton and Auchanachie, IV, 347. 
Lord Saltoun and Annachie, IV, 347. 
LORD SALTOUN AND AUCHANACHIE (No 239), IV, 

347-50; V, 273 f. 
Lord Saunders, II, 156. 
Lord Soulis, Leyden's ballad, V, 1 n. 
Lord Thomas (=Lord Thomas and Fair Annet), II, 

197. 
Lord Thomas (= Lord Thomas and Lady Margaret), 

IV, 426. 
LORD THOMAS AND FAIR ANNET (No 73), II, 179- 

99, 512; in, 509 f.; IV, 469-71; V, 223 f., 293. 

I, 54 n., 96; II, 65, 126 n., 200, 204, 240, 244, 

288; III, 381; IV, 409; V, 166. 
Lord Thomas and Fair Annie, II, 63. 
Lord Thomas and Fair Ellinor (Eleanor), II, 179 f., 

195; III, 509; IV, 471; V, 166. 
LORD THOMAS AND LADY MARGARET (No 260), 

TV, 426-9. 

Lord Thomas of Winesberrie (Winsberry, Wynnes- 
bury), II, 398; III, 517. 

Lord Thomas of Winesberry and the King's Daugh 
ter, II, 398. 
Lord Thomas of Winsbury (Wynnesbury), EC, 398; 

III, 517 b. 
LORD THOMAS STUART (No 259), IV, 425 f.; V, 

279. 

Lord Travell, II, 204. 
Lord Wa'yates and Auld Ingram, II, 126. 
Lord William (=Fair Janet), II, 100. 
Lord William (= Young Hunting), II, 142. 
Lord William (=Lord Lundy), IV, 411. 
LORD WILLIAM, OR, LORD LUNDY (No 254), IV, 

411-15. IV, 218. 
Lord Willie Douglas, II, 406. 
LOUDON HILL, OR, DRUMCLOG (No 205), IV, 105-7. 
Loudoun Castle, III, 423. 
Love Annie, IV, 391. 
Love Gregory (Gregor), n, 213. 
Love in Despair, IV, 105. 
Love Johny, II, 377. 
Love Robbie, II, 368. 

The Lovely Northerne Lasse, IV, 208 f. IV, 192. 
A Lover in Captivity, IV, 184, and n. 



The Lovers' Quarrel, or, Cupid's Triumph, II, 441, 

456. 

The Lover's Riddle, V, 216 a. 
Low in the Lowlands Low, V, 135. 
The Lowlands Low, V, 135. 
The Lowlands of Holland, II, 317; V, 229. 
The Loyal Forrister, or, Royal Pastime, V, 74 n. 
A Lytell Geste of Robyn Hode, III, 39, 79. 

McNachton, II, 377. 

McNaughtan, II, 377. 

McNaughton's Valour, II, 398. 

The Maid and Fairy, V, 201 n. 

The Maid and the Magpie, I, 446. 

THE MAID AND THE PALMER (THE SAMARITAN 

WOMAN) (No 21), I, 228-33, 504; 11,501; III, 

502; IV, 451; V, 212, 288. I, 218. 
THE MAID FREED FROM THE GALLOWS (No 95), II, 

346-55, 514, III, 516 f.; IV, 481 f.; V, 231-4, 

296. Ill, 381. 
The Maid of Rygate, V, 129. 
The Maid o the Cowdenknows, IV, 191. 
Maiden o the Cowdenknowes, IV, 191. 
The Maiden Outwitted, II, 480. 
The Maidens' Song (=The Fair Flower of North 
umberland), I, 111. 

The Maid's Answer to the Knight's Three Ques 
tions, I, 1. 
The Maid's Lamentation for the loss of her true 

love, V, 229. 

Margaret's Ghost, Mallet's ballad, II, 199; V, 294. 
Marie Hamilton, III, 379. 
Marjorie and William, II, 226. 
THE MARRIAGE OF SIR GAWAIN (No 31), 1, 288-96, 

507; II, 502; IV, 454; V, 213,*289. I, 297 f., 

301, 315; II, 458. 
MARY HAMILTON (No 173), III, 379-99; IV, 507- 

13; V, 246 f., 298. I, 436; II, 14 n., 346; IV, 

30 n. 

Mary Miles, III, 379. 
Mary-a-Row, LI, 302. 

May Collean, The Historical Ballad of, I, 23 n. 
May Collin (Collean), I, 22; IV, 442. 
May Colven (Colvin), I, 22. 
May Colvin, or, False Sir John, I, 22. 
May Colvine and Fause Sir John, IV, 440 b. 
May Culzean, The historical ballad of, I, 485. 
May Margaret, III, 449. See The Laird o Logie. 
THE MERMAID (No 289), V, 148-152. H, 19. 
The Mermaid (= Clerk Colvill), I, 371. 
The Merry Broomfield, or, The West Country 

Wager, I, 390. 

The Merry Cuckold and Kind Wife, V, 88. 
A Mery Geste of Robyn Hoode and of hys Lyfe, III, 

39, 81. 

Mild Mary, II, 309. 

Mill o Tifty's (Tiftie's) Annie, IV, 301, 302 n. 
The Miller and the King's Daughter (Daughters), 

1, 118. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



435 



The Miller's Melody, I, 118. 

The Minister's Daughter of New York, I, 218. 

The Minister's Dochter o Newarke, I, 226. 

Montrose he had a poor shepherd, IV, 330 f. 

Moss Groves, IV, 478. 

THE MOTHER'S MALISON, or, CLYDE'S WATER (No 

216), IV, 185-91; V, 256 f., 301. IV, 117, 415, 

471 b. 

The Murder of the King of Scots, HI, 399. 
Musleboorrowe ffeild, III, 378. 
MUSSELBURGH FIELD (No 172), III, 378 f.; IV, 

507. 

My bonny Lizzie Baillie, IV, 266. 
My lady ye shall be, V, 153. 
My love Annie 's very bonny, IV, 184 a. 
My love, she lives in Lincolnshire, IV, 416. 
My Wee Croodling Doo, IV, 450 a. 

Nanghton's Valour, II, 398. 

THE NEW SLAIN KNIGHT (No 263), IV, 434 f.; V, 

279. 
The Noble Ffisherman, or, Robin Hoods great Prize, 

III, 211. 

THE NOBLE FISHERMAN, OR, ROBIN HOOD'S PRE 
FERMENT (No 148), in, 211-13. Ill, 95, 208 n., 

227; IV, 393. 
A Noble Riddle Wisely Expounded, or, The Maid's 

Answer to the Knight's Three Questions, I, 1. 
The Norfolk Maiden, V, 129. 
Norham, down by Norham, 1, 493, 495. 
A Northern Ballet (Ballad) (= Johnie Armstrong), 

III, 362. 
NORTHUMBERLAND BETRAYED BY DOUGLAS (No 

176), III, 408-16; V, 299. II, 49 n.; Ill, 402, 

406. 

Northumberland Betrayd by Dowglas, III, 408. 
The Nut-Brown Bride, II, 179. 

O Alva hills is bonny, fragment, V, 202, 307. 

O come you from the earth she said, fragment, V, 

203. 

O my bonie, bonie may, IV, 330. 
O saw ye my father, IV, 389. 
O, the twelfth day of December, IV, 507. 
Ocbiltree Walls, IV, 207 b. 
Of a Knight and a Fair Virgin, I, 292. 
Oh, open the door, Lord Gregory, II, 213. 
The Old Abbot and King Olfrey, I, 404; IV, 459. 
The Old Man and his Three Sons, I, 208. 
OLD ROBIN OF PORTINGALE (No 80), II, 240-2, 513; 

III, 514; IV, 476; V, 225, 286 b, 295. 
Old Wichet and his Wife, V, 88. 
One king's daughter said to anither, III, 500. 
OUR GOODMAN (No 274), V, 88-95, 281, 303 f. H, 

158. 

The Outlandish Knight, I, 22; V, 207 a. 
THE OUTLAW MURRAY (No 305), V, 185-200, 307. 
Outlaw Murray, an antient historical ballad, V, 185. 
Outlaw Murray, An old song called, V, 185. 



The Outlaw Murray, The Sang (Song), of, V, 185. 
The Over Courteous Knight, II, 479. 

A Paradox (= Captain Wedderburn's Courtship), V, 

216. 

Parcy Reed, IV, 520 b. 
Parcy Reed and the Three False Halls, A song of, 

IV, 24. 

Peggie's gane oer the seas, a' dressed in red, V, 172. 

Peggy Irvine, V, 301 f. 

Perthshire Tredgey, V, 217. 

The place where my love Johnny dwells, IV, 209. 

The Politick Maid, n, 491. II, 480; V, 239 b. 

The Politick Squire, or, The Highwaymen catch'd in 

their own play, V, 129. 
The Pollitick Begger-Man, V, 110, 113. 
Pretty Peggy, V, 172. 
The Prickly Bush, V, 233. 
PRINCE HEATHEN (No 104), II, 424-6; V, 296. 
PRINCE ROBERT (No 87), II, 284-7; V, 295. 1, 96. 
PROUD LADY MARGARET (No 47), I, 425-31; IV, 

460; V, 291. I, 1; II, 156, 227; V, 203. 
The Provost's Dochter, I, 111. 

QUEEN ELEANOR'S CONFESSION (No 156), HI, 257- 

64; IV, 498 f.; V, 241 f., 297. 
Queen Elizabeth's Champion, or, Great Britain's 

Glory, etc., V, 145. 
Queen Jeanie, III, 372. 
The Queen of all Sluts, The Queen of Sluts, modern 

"ballad," I, 301, and n.; V, 289. 
THE QUEEN OF ELF AN 's NOURICE (No 40), I, 358- 

60; II, 505 f.; Ill, 505 f.; IV, 459; V, 215, 290. 
The Queen of England, III,. 257. 
THE QUEEN OF SCOTLAND (No 301), V, 176 f 
The Queen of the Fairies, III, 504. 
Queen's Marie, III, 380. 

The Queen's Marie (Mary), HI, 379; IV, 507, 513. 
The Queen's Maries (Marys), HI, 379; IV, 611 f.; 

V, 299. 

Quin Mary's Marreys, V, 246. 

The Rantan Laddy, V, 274. 

THE RANTIN LADDIE (No 240), IV, 351-5; V, 274 f . 

IV, 355. 
RARE WILLIE DROWNED IN YARROW, OR, THE 

WATER o GAMRIE (No 215), IV, 178-85; V, 256. 

IV, 161. 

Red-Cap, he was there, fragment, V, 203. 
REDESDALE AND WISE WILLIAM (No 246), IV, 383- 

6; V, 276 f. V, 25. 
Reedisdale and Wise William, IV, 383. 
Renowned Robin Hood, III, 196. 
Ricadoo, V, 121. 
Richard Storie (Story), IV, 291. 
Richie Storie (Storrie), IV, 291. 
RICHIE STORY (No 232), IV, 291-300; V, 270. H, 

441; IV, 299. 
Richie Tory, IV, 291. 



436 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



Richie's (Ritchie's) Lady, IV, 291. 
A Riddle Wittily Expounded, I, 1. 
RIDDLES WISELY EXPOUNDED (No 1), I, 1-6, 484; 

II, 495; III, 496; IV, 439; V, 205, 283. 
THE RISING IN THE NORTH (No 175), III, 401-8. 

II, 49 n. 

Risinge in the Northe, III, 401. 

Ritchie's Tory Laddie, IV, 291. 

Rob Oig, IV, 243. 

ROB ROY (No 225), IV, 243-54, 523; V, 262-4. IV, 
232, 239; V, 165. 

Rob Roy MacGregor, IV, 243. 

Robin he's gane to the wude, V, 104. 

Robin Hood ( = Henry Martyn), IV, 393. 

Robin Hood and a Beggar, A pretty dialogue be 
twixt, III, 158. 

ROBIN HOOD AND ALLEN A DALE (No 138), III, 
172-5. Ill, 49 n. 

Robin Hood and Allin of Dale, III, 172. 

ROBIN HOOD AND GUY OF GISBORNE (No 118), 

III, 89-94. Ill, 42, 53, 95, 96, 102 n., 122, 141, 
156. 

ROBIN HOOD AND LITTLE JOHN (No 125), III, 133- 

6; V, 297. Ill, 116, 130, 145. 
ROBIN HOOD AND MAID MARIAN (No 150), III, 

218 f., 519. Ill, 130, 133 n. 
ROBIN HOOD AND QUEEN KATHERINE (No 145), 

HI, 196-205. Ill, 122, 191, 194, 205, 227; V, 

190. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE BEGGAR, I (No 133), III, 

155-8. Ill, 116, 130, 133, 144, 178, 520. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE BEGGAR, II (No 134), III, 

158-65. Ill, 130, 156, 170. 
Robin Hood and the Beggar (II), The. History of, 

III, 158. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE BISHOP (No 143), III, 191-3. 

Ill, 133, and n., 144, 156, 178, 227. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE BISHOP OF HEREFORD (No 

144), III, 193-6. Ill, 197. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE BUTCHER (No 122), III, 

115-20. Ill, 108, 109, 120, 130, 133, and n., 156, 

520. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE CURTAL FRIAR (No 123), 

III, 120-8. Ill, 96, 108, 109, 126, 130, 178; V, 

8, 126, 297. 
Robin Hood and the Curtal Fryer, The Famous 

Battel between, III, 120. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE GOLDEN ARROW (No 152), 

III, 223-5; V, 241. Ill, 133 n., 220. 
Robin Hood and the Jolly Tinker, III, 143. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE MONK (No 119), III, 94-101. 

Ill, 13, 16, 42, 102, 159. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE PEDLARS (No 137), III, 

170-2. in, 130, 133 n., 499. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE POTTER (No 121), III, 108- 

15; IV, 497. Ill, 42, 49, 90, 95, 96, 115, 130, 

137. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE PRINCE OF ARAGON (No 

129), in, 147-50. Ill, 133 n., 144 n., 145. 



Robin Hood and the Proud Pedlar, V, 240. 

ROBIN HOOD AND THE RANGER (No 131), III, 

152-4. Ill, 130, 133, 168. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE SCOTCHMAN (No 130), III, 

150 f. Ill, 130, 133, and n., 145. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE SHEPHERD (No 135), III, 

165-7. Ill, 109, 130, 137, 168, 198; V, 126. 
Robin Hood and the Sheriff, III, 184 f. 
Robin Hood and the Stranger, in, 116, 133, and n., 

144, and n., 145. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE TANNER (No 126), III, 137- 

40. Ill, 121 n., 130, 133, 144. 
Robin Hood and the Tanner's Daughter, I, 106, 109; 

II, 416 f. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE TINKER (No 127), HI, 140- 

3. Ill, 130, 137. 
ROBIN HOOD AND THE VALIANT KNIGHT (No 153), 

III, 225 f. UI, 104, 133 n., 220, 223. 
Robin Hood, John, Scarlock, and Three Keepers, HI, 

168. 
ROBIN HOOD NEWLY REVIVED (No 128), III, 144- 

7. Ill, 133, and n., 137, 147, 150, 154, 214. 
Robin Hood rescuing the Three Squires from Not 
tingham Gallows, III, 177. 
Robin Hood rescuing the Widow's Three Sons from 

the Sheriff, when going to be executed, III, 177. 
ROBIN HOOD RESCUING THREE SQUIRES (No 140), 

HI, 177-85. Ill, 122, and n., 156, 185, 188, 363 

n.; V, 8, 126. 
ROBIN HOOD RESCUING WILL STUTLY (No 141), 

III, 185-7; IV, 497. Ill, 16, 198. 
Robin Hood, Scarlet and John, III, 196. 
Robin Hood, Will. Scadlock and Little John, III, 

147. Ill, 144 n., 145. 

ROBIN HOOD'S BIRTH, BREEDING, VALOR AND MAR 
RIAGE (No 149), in, 214-17. Ill, 159, 197. 
ROBIN HOOD'S CHASE (No 146), III, 205-7. Ill, 

133, 198. 
ROBIN HOOD'S DEATH (No. 120), III, 102-7; V, 

240, 297. I, 274 n.; II, 499; III, 42, 49, 96. 
Robin Hood's Death and Burial, UI, 102-7. 1, 185, 

436; III, 107. 
ROBIN HOOD'S DELIGHT (No 136), III, 168-70. 

Ill, 130, 154, 170. 
ROBIN HOOD'S GOLDEN PRIZE (No 147), III, 208- 

10, 519. Ill, 122. 
Robin Hood's Great Prize, III, 211. 
ROBIN HOOD'S PREFERMENT. See THE NOBLE 

FISHERMAN (No 148). 
ROBIN HOOD'S PROGRESS TO NOTTINGHAM (No 

139), III, 175-7. Ill, 49, 133, and n., 168, 198, 

208. 

Robin Oigg's Elopement, IV, 523. 
Robin, the Kitchie-Boy, V, 29. 

Robine Hood and Ffryer Tucke, III, 120. HI, 122. 
Robine Hoode his Death, III, 102. 
ROBYN AND GANDELEYN (No 115), III, 12-14. 
ROOKHOPE RYDE (No 179), III, 439-41. 
The Rose o Malindie, O, I, 218. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



437 



THE ROSE OF ENGLAND (No 166), III, 331-3. HI, 
t 294. 

Rose the Red and White Lilly (Lillie), II, 415. 
ROSE THE RED AND WHITE LILY (No 103), II, 415- 

24. 1, 182; II, 368, 407, 412, 499. 
The Roses grow sweet aye, I, 496 f. 
Rosie Ann, I, 447. 
Roudesdales, IV, 383. 
The Royal Frolick, or, King William and his Nobles' 

Entertainment at the Farmer's House, V, 74, and 

n. 
The Royal Recreation (Second Part of The Royal 

Frolick, etc.), V, 74, and n. 

Saddle to Rags, V, 128. 

The Sailor's Caution, V, 148. 

The Sailor's Joy, V, 133 n. 

ST. STEPHEN AND HEROD (No 22), I, 233-42, 505 
f.; H, 501; III, 502 .; IV, 451 f.; V, 212, 288. 

THE SAMARITAN WOMAN. See THE MAID AND 
THE PALMER. 

SAW YOU MY FATHER? (No 248). See THE GREY 
COCK. 

Scarborough Fair, II, 495 f.; IV, 440; V, 206. (Cf. 
1, 17, 484 f.) 

The Scotchman Outwitted, II, 483. 

Scotish Field, ballad of, III, 307, 352, 354 n. 

The Scottish Squire, II, 355. 

The Seamans (Saylors) only Delight: Shewing the 
brave fight between (the) George Aloe, the Sweep 
stakes (Sweepstake), and certain French men at 
sea, V, 134 f . 

The Seaman's Sorrowful Bride, V, 229. 

The Seamen's Distress, V, 148. 

The Seamen's Song of Captain Ward, V, 143. 

The Seamen's Song of Dansekar, V, 143. 

The Seven Bluidy Brithers, II, 156. 

Seven pretty sisters dwell in a bower, V, 207. 

The Seven Sisters, or, The Leaves of Lind, I, 63. 

She cares not for her daddy, V, 201. 

She '11 no ly neist [the] wa, I, 414. 

SHEATH AND KNIFE (No 16), I, 185-7; II, 499; 

III, 500 f.; IV, 450; V, 210. I, 178. 
The Shepherd and the King, V, 73. 
The Shepherd's Bonny Lassy, V, 116. 
The Shepherd's Boy, IV, 495. 

The Shepherd's Daughter, II, 457. 

Shepherd's Dochter, II, 457. 

The Shepherd's Son, II, 479; IV, 495 a. 

The Shipherd Boy, V, 116. 

The Silly Old Man, V, 128. 

SIR ALDINGAR (No 59), II, 33-48, 510; III, 508; 

IV, 463; V, 292. II, 50. 

Sir Andraye Barton, Knight, The Sonnge of, IV, 

502. 
SIR ANDREW BARTON (No 167), III, 334-50; IV, 

502-7; V, 245. I, 54 n.; IV, 393; V, 143, 302. 
Sir Andrew Barton, The Life and Death of, IIL, 334, 

346 f. 



Sir Andrew (Andro) Wood, II, 17. 

SIR CAWLINE (No 61), H, 56-63, 511; III, 508; 

IV, 463. 

Sir Colin, II, 61. 

Sir Hew, or, The Jew's Daughter, III, 233. 

Sir Hugh, III, 233. 

SIR HUGH, OR, THE JEW'S DAUGHTER (No 155), 

III, 233-54, 519 f.; IV, 497 f.; V, 241, 297. 
Sir Hugh in the Grime's Downfall, IV, 8, 15. 
Sir Hugh le Blond, II, 33. 
Sir Hugh the Graeme, IV, 8. 
SIR JAMES THE ROSE (No 213), IV, 155-60. IV, 

150; V, 245. 

Sir James the Ross (de Ross), IV, 159 a. 
SIR JOHN BUTLER (No 165), III, 327-330. 
SIR LIONEL (No 18), I, 208-15; II, 500; IV, 451, 

I, 274 n. 

Sir Patrick, II, 17. 
Sir Patrick Spence (Spensse), II, 17. 
SIR PATRICK SPENS (No 58), II, 17-32, 610; V, 

220. I, 35 n.; II, 13 n., 113 n.; IV, 376, and n.; 

V, 148. 

Sir Robert Bewick and the Laird Graham, A Re 
markable and Memorable Song (History) of, IV, 

144, 148 f . 

Sir Thamas (=Erlinton), I, 111. 
Sir Walter Raleigh sailing in the Low-lands, etc., V, 

135, 139. 

Sir William Stanley, I, 463. 
Sir William Wallace, III, 265. 
Sir William Wallace killed thirty Englishmen, An 

old song shewing how, V, 242 f. 
Sir William Wallace, On an honorable achievement 

of, near Falkirk, III, 265. 
Sister, dear Sister, I, 118. 
Skipper Patrick, II, 17. 
THE SLAUGHTER OF THE LAIRD OF MELLERSTAIN 

(No 230), IV, 281 f . IV, 371. 
Sleepest or wakest thou, jolly shepheard ? fragment, 

V, 201 b. 

The Sleepy Merchant, I, 393. 
The Soldier and Peggy, V, 172. 
The Sorrowful Lover's Regrate, or, The Low-Lands 

of Holland, V, 229. 
The Stirrup of Northumberland, V, 207 b, title due to 

a misreading of Scott's hand (should be Heiress). 
The stormy winds do blow, V, 148. 
THE SUFFOLK MIRACLE (No 272), V, 68-67, 303. 

V, 225. 

Susan Py, or, Young Bichen's Garland, I, 454, 483 b. 
Susan Pye and Lord Beichan, I, 454. 
Susie Cleland, II, 112. 
The Swain's Resolve, IV, 389. 
The swan swims bonnie, O, I, 118. 
Sweet Robin, V, 104. 
THE SWEET TRINITY (THE GOLDEN VANITY) (No 

286), V, 135-42, 305. 
Sweet William, IV, 411. II, 101, 112 n., 113 n., 

356. 



438 



INDEX OP BALLAD TITLES 



Sweet William and May Margaret (= Sweet Wil 
liam's Ghost), II, 226. 

Sweet William and the Young Colonel, II, 288. 
SWEET WILLIAM'S GHOST (No 77), II, 226-34, 512; 

IV, 474; V, 225, 294. I, 435; II, 156, 174, 204, 
234, 240; IV, 390, 415; V, 60 n., 166. 

Sweet Willie ( = Fair Janet), II, 100. 

Sweet Willie (=The Famous Flower of Serving- 
Men), II, 428. 

Sweet Willie and Fair Annie (= Lord Thomas and 
Fair Annet), II, 100, 179. 

Sweet Willie and Fair Maisry (=Fair Janet), II, 
100. 

Sweet Willie and Lady Margerie (= Willie and Lady 
Maisry), II, 167. 

Sweet Willie and May Margaret (=The Mother's 
Malison), IV, 185. 

Sweet Willie of Salisbury, II, 399. 

Sweet Willy (=Willie's Lady), I, 81. 

TAM LIN (No 39), I, 335-58, 507 f.; II, 505; HI, 
504 f.; IV, 455-9; V, 215, 290. I, 308, 320 n., 
360 n., 446, 450; III, 381; IV, 186 n.; V, 11 n., 
40 n., 223. 

Tam-a-lin, or, The Knight of Faerylande, I, 335. 

Tam-a-line, the Elfin Knight, I, 335. 

Tamlane, I, 507; IV, 458 a. I, 256. 

There livd a knight in Jesuitmont, V, 34 n. 

There livd a wife in the wilds of Kent, IV, 439 a. 

There was a jovial beggar, V, 113 n. 

There was a knight in Jessamy, V, 34 n. 

There was a knight was drunk with wine, II, 491. 

There was a wife in yon town, V, 109. 

There waur three ladies, I, 141. 

There were aucht an forty nobles, IV, 338. 

Ther wer three ravens, IV, 454. 

There were three sisters going from home, III, 500. 

The Thief Outwitted, V, 128. 

Thomalyn, a ballett of, I, 336. 

THOMAS CROMWELL (No 171), III, 377. 

Thomas of Potte, II, 441. 

THOMAS o YONDERDALE (No 253), IV, 409-11. II, 
69. 

THOMAS RYMER (No 37), I, 317-29; II, 605; III, 
504; IV, 454 f.; V, 290. I, 330, 358; IV, 458. 

Thomas Rymer and Queen of Elfland, I, 317. 

Thomas the Rhymer, IV, 454. 

The Three Brothers, III, 484. 

The Three Knights, I, 141. 

THE THREE RAVENS (No 26), I, 253 f.; IV, 454; 

V, 212. II, 429. 

The Three Sisters (= Riddles Wisely Expounded), 

1,1. 

The Three Sisters (=The Twa Sisters), 1, 118. 
The Thyme Song, V, 258. 
Tifty's Nanny, IV, 300. 
The Tinker and Farmer's Daughter's Garland, V, 

109. 
Tiranti, my Son, 1, 151. 



Tom Linn, I, 335. 

TOM POTTS (No 109), IV, 441-56; III, 518. Ill, 

276. 

Tomaline, I, 335. 
Tring Dilly, II, 432. 
The Trooper, V, 172. 

The Trooper and Fair Maid, V, 172. I, 437. 
TROOPER AND MAID (No 299), V, 172-4, 306. 
The Trooper Lad, V, 306 f. 
True Love Requited, or, The Bayliff's Daughter of 

Islington, II, 428. 
A TRUE TALE OF ROBIN HOOD (No 154), III, 227- 

33. Ill, 103, 220, 223. 
True Tammas (=Erlinton), I, 106. 
True Thomas and the Queen of Elfland, I, 317. 
The Trumpeter of Fyvie, IV, 300. 
The Tryal of the Laird of Gycht, IV, 309 n. 
The Turkish Galley, V, 135. 
The Turkish Lady, I, 463. 

The Turkish Lady and the English Slave, I, 463. 
The Twa Brithers, I, 435. 
THE TWA BROTHERS (No 49), 1,435-44; II, 507; III, 

507; IV, 460; V, 217 f. I, 167, 168, and n., 446, 

448; II, 14 n., 137, 234, 288; III, 381; V, 291. 
The Twa Brothers, or, The Wood o Warslin, I, 435. 
The Twa Corbies, I, 253; IV, 454. 
THE TWA KNIGHTS (No 268), V, 21-28. I, 67; IV, 

383; V, 277. 
THE TWA MAGICIANS (No 44), I, 399-403; II, 506; 

III, 506 f.; IV, 459; V, 216. 
THE TWA SISTERS (No 10), I, 118-41, 493-6; II, 

498, 509; III, 499; IV, 447-9; V, 208, 286. I, 

40 n. 

'Twas on a Christmas Day, V, 95. 
The Two Brothers, I, 435; IV, 460. 
The Two Constant Lovers in Scotland. II, 441, 456. 

The Unco Knicht's Wowing, I, 1. 

The Unfortunate Forrester, or, Fair Eleanor's Tra 
gedy, II, 180; III, 509 b. 

The Ungrateful Knight and the Fair Flower of 
Northumberland, I, 111. 

THE UNQUIET GRAVE (No 78), II, 234-8, 512; III, 
512 f.; IV, 474-6; V, 225, 294. V, 116. 

Wakefylde and a grene, A ballett of, III, 129. 

The Wakerife Mammy, IV, 389. 

Wallace and his Leman, II, 513; III, 265. 

WALTER LESLY (No 296), V, 168 f. 

Warenston and the Duke of York's Daughter, II, 

346. 
A Warning for Maidens, or, Young Bate man, I, 

455. 

A Warning for Married Women, etc., IV, 360. 
A Warning-Piece to England against Pride and 

Wickedness, etc., Ill, 257. 
THE WATER o GAMRIE (Gemrie, Garaery), IV, 

178. See RARE WILLIE DROWNED IN YARROW. 
The Water o Wearie's Well (Wells), I, 22. 



INDEX OP BALLAD TITLES 



439 



A Waukrife Minnie, IV, 389. 

We were sisters, we were seven, I, 62. 

The Weary Coble o Cargill, IV, 358. II, 156. 

The Weary Heir of Limie, V, 11. 

The Wedding of Robin Hood and Little John, II, 

415. 

Wee Messgrove, II, 242. 

THE WEE WEE MAN (No 38), I, 329-34. I, 335. 
THE WEST-COUNTRY DAMOSEL'S COMPLAINT (No 

292), V, 157-9. 

The West-Country Wager, I, 390. 
The Western Tragedy, I, 23 u. 
What a bad luck had I (=The Queen of all Sluts), 

I, 301 n. 

THE WHITE FISHER (No 264), IV, 435-7. 

Whittingham Fair, II, 495; V, 206. 

THE WHUMMIL BORE (No 27), I, 255; V, 212. I, 
187; V, 203. 

The Widdow- Woman, III, 513. 

THE WIFE OF USHER'S WELL (No 79), II, 238 f.; 
Ill, 513 f.; V,294f. 11,173. 

THE WIFE WRAPT IN WETHER'S SKIN (No 277), 
V, 104-7, 304 f . 

WILL STEWART AND JOHN (No 107), II, 432-8; V, 
237. 

Will ye go to the Hielans, Geordie ? IV, 123. 

William and Marjorie, II, 226. 

William Clowdisley, A ballad of, neuer printed be 
fore, III, 34. 

William Grismond's Dowufal, II, 16. 

William Guiseman, II, 16. 

Willie and Annet, II, 100. 

WILLIE AND EARL RICHARD'S DAUGHTER (No 
102), II, 412-15; III, 518. n, 296, 303, 406, 499. 

Willie and Janet, II, 100. 

WILLIE AND LADY MAISRY (No 70), II, 167-9. 

II, 240, 244. 

Willie and Margaret, IV, 185. 

Willie and May Margaret, IV, 185. I, 372, 435. 

Willie Doo, I, 151; IV, 450 a. 

WILLIE MACINTOSH (No 183), III, 456 f.; IV, 

516. 
WILLIE o DOUGLAS DALE (No 101), II, 406-11; 

III, 517; V, 235-7. II, 368, 377, 412, 416. 
Willie of Duglass Daill, V, 235. 

Willie of Winsberye, II, 398. 

WILLIE o WINSBURY (No 100), II, 398-406, 514 f.; 

Ill, 517; IV, 491; V, 296. II, 377, 406; V, 29. 
Willie, the Kitchie-Boy, IV, 400. 
Willie, the Widow's Son, n, 167. 
Willie Wallace, III, 265. 
Willie's drowned in Gamery, IV, 178. 
WILLIE'S FATAL VISIT (No 255), IV, 415 f. IE, 

406, 513; IV, 389. 
WILLIE'S LADY (No. 6), I, 81-8; II, 498; in, 497; 

V, 207, 285. I, 67. 
WILLIE'S LYKE-WAKE (No 25), I, 247-52, 506 f.; 

II, 502; III, 503; IV, 453; V, 212, 289. II, 356. 
Willy's rare and Willy's fare, IV, 178. IV, 163. 



Wilson, III, 496. 

The Wind hath blown my Plaid away, or, A Dis 
course betwixt a young [Wojinan and the Elphin 
Knight, a proper new ballad entituled, I, 6. 

The Wind hath blown my Plaid awa, or, A Discourse 
between a Young Woman and the Elphin Knight, 

I, 6, 20. 

The Winsome Laird of Young Logic, IV, 516. 
With that came out his paramour, fragment, V, 202. 
The witty lass of Somersetshire, or, The fryer servd 

in his kind, V, 100. 
The Wofull Death of Queene Jane, wife to King 

Henry the Eight, etc., Ill, 372. 
The Wood o Warslin, I, 435. 
THE WYLIE WIFE OF THE HIE TOUN HIE (No 

290), V, 153-6. 

The Yerle o Aboyne, V, 271. 

The Yetts of Cowrie, IV, 160. 

Yorkshire Bite, V, 129. 

The Yorkshire Farmer, V, 128. 

Young Airly, IV, 54. 

Young Akin, I, 360. 

YOUNG ALLAN (No 245), IV, 375-83; V, 275 f. II, 

17, 19 n. 

YOUNG ANDREW (No 48), 1, 432-4. 1, 113. 
Young Annochie, IV, 347. 
Young Beachen, V, 218. 
YOUNG BEARWELL (No 302), V, 178 f. 
YOUNG BEICHAN (No 53), I, 454-83; II, 508 f.; 

Ill, 507; IV, 460-2; V, 218-20, 291. 1, 67, 279 n.; 

II, 127, 204; III, 498, 514; IV, 5, 409. 
Young Beichan and Susie Pye, I, 454. 
Young Bekie, I, 454; V, 218. 

YOUNG BENJIE (No 86), II, 281-3; IV, 478 f. 

Young Betrice, II, 377. 

Young Bicham, I, 454. 

Young Bichen, I, 455 n. 

Young Bichen's Garland, I, 454, 483 b. 

Young Bondwell, I, 454. 

Young Brechin, I, 454. 

Younge Cloudeslee, III, 34. 

THE YOUNG EARL OF ESSEX'S VICTORY OVER THE 

EMPEROR OF GERMANY (No 288), V, 145-8. 
Young Edward, V, 305. 
Young Hastings, I, 360. 
Young Hastings, the Groom, I, 360. 
The Young Heir of Bakichan (Baleighan), IV, 156 n. 
YOUNG HUNTING (No 68), II, 142-55, 512; III, 

509; IV, 468; V, 223. II, 137, 406, 407; IV, 

39. 
Young Hyn Horn (Hynhorn, Hyndhorn), I, 187, 

502. 

Young Hyndford, III, 509 a. 
YOUNG JOHNSTONE (No 88), II, 288-95. 
The Young Laird o Keltie, V, 153. 
The Young Laird of Ochiltree, III, 449. 
Young Logic, III, 449, 520; V, 299 f. 
Young Luiidie was in Brechin born, I, 455 n. 



440 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



The Young MacLean, IV, 270. 

Young Musgrave, II, 242. 

Young Patrick, II, 17. 

YOUKG PEGGY (No 298), V, 171. 

Young Prince James, II, 112. 

Young Ratcliffe, IV, 116. 

Young Redin (Riedan), II, 142. 

YOUNG RONALD (No 304), V, 181-4. 

(The) Young Tarn Lane (Tainlane), I, 335, 507. 

Young Tamlin, I, 335. 

Young Tolquhon, IV, 48 f. 

Young Tom Line, I, 335, 356 a. 

YOUNG WATERS (No 94), II, 342-5; III, 516. 

Albanian. 

BoAo ^ 'E-x7J6A.il/es, La ballata di Angelina, I, 97. 
Garentina, V, 65. 

KoaraiT/vi I b6y&\id t Costanino il piccolo, I, 198 f., 
502 b. 

Catalan. 

La adiiltera castigada, II, 158. 

La boda interrumpida, I, 462. 

Las bodas, V, 293. 

La bona viuda, I, 384. 

Catarina de Lid, I, 144, 496 b. 

La cautiva, II, 347. 

El Conde Arnau, V, 286. 

Don Joan j Don Ramon, I, 382 n., 384 f. 

La donzella, II, 347. 

Las dos germanas, hermanas, II, 69, and n. 

Los dos hermanos, V, 285. 

La esquerpa, I, 400. 

Los estudians de Tortosa, II, 174. 

Los estudiantes de Tolosa, II, 174. 

La Fugida a Egipte, III, 507 b. 

El guerrero mal herido, I, 385. 

Herodes, II, 7. 

L'infanta, n, 113. 

La infanta seducida, II, 113, 406. 

Magdalena, I, 504 b. 

El mal rico, II, 10. 

La mort de la nuvia, II, 206. 

El peregrino, II, 427. 

El poder del canto, II, 137, 511 b. 

Lo reseat, II, 347. 

Lo retorn soptat, II, 158. 

Lo Rey Herodes, II, 7. 

El Rey marinero, II, 137. 

El romero, I, 236. 

El romero acusado de robo, I, 236, 505 a. 

S. Jaume de Galicia, I, 236. 

Santa Magdalena, I, 231; III, 502 b. 

El testamento de Amelia, I, 144, 496 b. 

La tornada del pelegrf, II, 427. 

Las transformaciones, I, 400. 

La trapassera, V, 91. 

Trato feroz, I, 496 b. 

Los tres estudiantes, II, 174. 



La viuda, I, 384. 

La vuelta del peregrino, II, 427. 

Celtic. Breton. 

Ann Aotro ar C'hont, Le seigneur Comte, I, 378 f. 

Ann Aotro Nann, Le seigneur Nann, I, 379. 

Ann Aotro Rosmadek, Le seigneur de Rosmadek, 

1,436. 
Ann hini oa et da welet he vestrez d'ann ifern, Celui 

qui alia voir sa maitresse en enfer, I, 426. 
Aotrou Nann hag ar Gorrigan, Le seigneur Nann et 

la Fe-e, I, 379, 387, 490. 
Ar breur mager, Le frere de lait (ballad of Ville- 

marque"s), V, 65. 
Ar C'hont a Weto, Le Comte de We"to (Le Comte 

de Poitou), IV, 464 a (II, 102). 
Ar C'homt Gwillou, Le Comte Guillou, II, 102; IV, 

464 a; V, 292. 
Cloaregic ar stanc, Le jeune Cloarec du bord de 

l'e"tang, IV, 471 b. 

Ervoan Camus, Yves Camus, IV, 522 a. 
Ervoanik al lintier, Ervoanik le lintier, I, 144. 
Fillorez aim Aotrou Gwesklen, La filleule de du 

Guesclin, I, 45. 

Floc'h Loeiz Trizek, Le page de Louis XIII, I, 381. 
Ar Ge"ant Lizandre*, Le Ge*ant Lizandrd, Le Ge"ant 

Les Aubrays, II, 378 f . 
Itroun Varia Folgoat, Notre Dame du Folgoat, I, 

237. 

Janedik ar Rouz, Jeanne Le Roux, I, 45. 
Komt ar Chapel, Le Comte des Chapelles, I, 379 n., 

381. 
Lezobre ha Maurian ar Roue, Les Aubrays et le 

More du Roi, II, 378 f. 
Ldzobre", II, 378; IV, 486 a. 
Marc'harit Lauranz, Marguerite Laurent, I, 237. 
Marivonnik, Marivonnic, I, 45; IV, 441 b. 
Markiz Trede, Le Marquis de Coatredrez, I, 45. 
Monsieur Nann, I, 379. 
Ar plac'h hi daou bried, La femme aux deux rnaris, 

V,65. 
Ar plae'hik hag ine hi mamm, La jeune fille et Fame 

de sa mere, II, 236; V, 303. 
Pontplancoat, I, 144; II, 309. 
Prinses ar Gwillou, La Princesse le Guillou, II, 102; 

V, 292. 

Renea ar Glaz, Rene'e le Glaz, I, 144. 
Ar Rosmadek ha Baron Huet, Rosmadec et le Baron 

Huet, I, 436. 
Rozmelchon, I, 45. 
Le sone de la fiance'e, II, 506 a. 
Sonen Gertrud guet hi vam, Chant de Gertrude et 

de sa mere, I, 379; III, 506 a. 
Breton ballads cited without titles: I, 97; III, 498 b; 

IV, 443 b, 495 a; V, 234 a. 

Celtic. Gaelic. 

Collun gun cheann, or, The Headless Trunk, I, 298. 
The Death of Diarmaid, I, 8. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



441 



How Fingal got Graine to be his wife, and she went 

away with Diarmaid, I, 8. 
Neyn a wrata inn, The Maid of the White Mantle, L, 

261, and n.; V, 289. 

Celtic. Welsh. 
Marchog Glas, or, Green Knight, III, 178. 

Danish. 

Aage og Else, II, 227. 
Adelbrand, I, 143; III, 499; IV, 449. 
Den afhugne Haand, II, 373. 
Agnete i Bjserget, I, 361 f.; IV, 459. 
Agnete i Havet, IV, 459 a. 
Agnete og Bjsergmanden, I, 364 n. 
Agnete og Havmanden, I, 364; III, 506 a; IV, 

459 a; V, 215 b. 
Albred Lykke, II, 137. 
Angenede og Havmanden, III, 506. 
Axel og Walborg, V, 287. 
Barnefedsel i Lunden, IV, 450 a; V, 209 b. 
Barnemordersken, I, 218 f.; Ill, 502 a; IV, 451 a. 
Barselkvinden, I, 82; III, 497 b; V, 207 b. 
Bjsergjomfruens Frieri, III, 504; V, 214. 
Bolde Hr. Nilaus' L0n, I, 66, 178, 180. 
Brodermordet, I, 168. 
Brud i Vaande, I, 65; II, 127. 
Brud ikke M0, 1, 64; IV, 442 b. 
Den dyre Kaabe, II, 482; IV, 495 a. 
Ebbe Gait (Hr. Tidemand), I, 446; II, 458; IV, 492. 
Ebbe Skammels0n, II, 128; V, 292 f. 
Ebbe Tygesen, I, 382 n. Ebbe Tyges0ns D0dsridt, 

V, 290. 

Ellen henter sin Faestemand, I, 459; IV, 460 b. 
Den elskedes D0d, II, 205; III, 510 b; IV, 471 b; 

V, 225 a. 

Elvedansen, IV, 459; V, 216. 
Elveh0j, II, 137. 
Elveskud, I, 314, 374-378, 437, 496; II, 143; IV, 

459 a; V, 216 a, 284, 290. 
Esben og Malfred, II, 310. 
Den farlige Jomfru, I, 89, 93, 417 n.; II, 51. 
Folke Lovmandsan og Dronning Helvig, II, 342. 
Den forgivne Datter, V, 286. 
Den forgivne S0ster, IV, 449 b. 
Den forstilte Vaagestue, I, 248. 
Den fortryllende Sang, II, 137. 
Fostermoder, I, 82. 
Den Fredl0se, I, 112; II, 85. 
Frillens Hsevn, I, 143, 378 n.; II, 143. 
Fru Gundela, I, 156; V, 286. 
Fru Gunder i Spire, II, 34, and n. 
Fru Silleve (Kristensen), V, 8, 280. 
Frsendehaevn, I, 27 n., 392; III, 367. 
Den fule Bondedreng, n, 137. 
Faestemanden i Graven, II, 227. 
Germand Gladensvend, II, 13 n. 
Giftblandersken, V, 286. 
Greve Genselin, I, 298, and n., 301. 

VOL. v. 56 



Greven og lille Lise, III, 510 b; IV, 471 b; V, 225 a, 

Grevens Datter af Vendel, II, 68 n. 

Guldsmedens Datter, I, 54 n., 64 n., 66. 

G0de og Hillelille, IV, 471. 

Harpens Kraft, I, 435; II, 137; IV, 441 a, 451 a; 

V, 211 b. 

Hellig-Olavs Vseddefart, IV, 377. 
Henrik af Brunsvig, I, 194 n., 195. 
Hr. Adelbrand, I, 143; IV, 449 a. 
Hr. Adelbrant og Jomfru Lindelil, III, 499. 
Hr. Essendal, IV, 218. 
Herr Find og Vendelrod, I, 65; II, 511 b. 
Hr. Gronnevold, III, 508 b. 
Herr Helmer Blaa, I, 142; IV, 164. 
Herr Hjselm, I, 94 n.; IV, 164, 469 a. 
Herr Jon som Fugl, V, 39. 
Herr Lave og Herr Iver Blaa, V, 25. 
Herr Lave og Herr Jon, II, 511 b. 
Herr Lovmand, I, 193, 502 a; III, 501 a; IV, 450 b. 
Herr Lovmand og Herr Thor, I, 193. 
Herr Magnus og Bjeergtrolden, I, 314. 
Hr. Magnuses D0dsridt, V, 290. 
Herr Medelvold, I, 182. 
Hr. Mortens Klosterrov, IV, 453 b. 
Herr Olufs D0d, I, 378 n. 
Herr Peder og bans S0ster, I, 447. 
Herr Peder og Liden Malfred, II, 310. 
Hr. Peder og Mettelille, I, 142. 
Herr Peders Hustru, IV, 442 b. 
Herr Peders Kjsereste, IV, 471 b. 
Herr Peders Slegfred, II, 180. 
Hr. Peters Stalddreng, III, 508 b. 
Hr. Ribolt, III, 498 a; V, 207 b. 
Herr Samsings Nattergale, I, 64. 
Herr Thors Bern, I, 171. 

Hr. Tidemand (Ebbe Gait), 1, 446; II, 458; IV, 492. 
Hr. Truelses D0ttre, 1, 171; IV, 450 a; V, 209 b, 287. 
Herr Tures D0tre, IV, 450 a; V, 209 b. 
Hr. T0nne af Als0, II, 137. 
Hertug Frydenborg, V, 31, 207. 
Hertugen af Skage, I, 249. 
Hildebrand og Hilde, I, 66, 89-93, 99, 180; III, 

498 a. 

Holger Danske og Burmand, II, 50. 
Det (de) hurtige Svar, II, 158; IV, 468 a. 
Hustru og Mands Moder (Fostermoder, Stifmoder), 

I, 82, 143; III, 367 n., 497 b. 
Hustru og Slegfred, I, 82 f. 
Hyrde og Ridderfrue, V, 292. 
HsBvnersvserdet, I, 96; III, 367. 
I D01gsmai, III, 502 a. 
I Rosenlund, II, 482. 
Hdpr0ven, II, 113. 
Ingefred og Gudrune, I, 64. 
Ingelilles Bryllup, I, 65, 67. 
Iver Hr. Jonson, I, 66. 
Iver Lang og bans S0ster, I, 142. 
Jesusbarnet, Stefan og Herodes, I, 233 f. 
Jomfru Ellensborg og Hr. Olof, I, 142. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



Jomfru Giselmaar, I, 142. 

Jomfru i Hiudeham, IV, 450. 

Jomfru og Stalddreng, II, 84, 430; HI, 508 b; IV, 

463 b. 

Jomfrue Ellensborg, I, 459. 
Jomfrueu i Bjierget, V, 215. 
Jomfruen i Hindeham, I, 178. 
Jomfruen i Linden, I, 307; III, 504 a; IV, 454 a. 
Jomfruen i Ormeham, I, 307. 
Jomfruen i Skoven, I, 142; II, 170; IV, 164. 
Jomfruen og Dvsergekongen, I, 361-4, 375 n.; Ill, 

506 a; IV, 459 a; V, 215 b. 
Jomfruen og Dvsergen, III, 506. 
Jomfruens Br0dre, II, 170; III, 509; IV, 469 a; 

V, 223. 

Jomfruens Harpeslaet, I, 66. 
Jomfruens Udlesning, III, 516 b. 
Jon Riunaardsens Sejlads, IV, 463. 
Jon Rimaardss0ns Skriftemaal, II, 13. 
Karl Grevens sen, III, 429. 
Karl HiHebarn, V, 223 b. 
Kjaerestens D0d, III, 510 b. 
Kjserligheds Styrke, II, 170. 
Klosterranet, I, 247 f., 249. 
Kong David og Solfager, V, 8, 280. 
Kong Valdemar og haus S0ster, I, 143; II, 101, 157; 

IV, 464 a. 
Kvindelist, II, 356. 
Kvindemorderen, I, 26, 90, 112 n., 362 n.; II, 86; 

III, 497 a; IV, 440 b; V, 206 b. 
Kaellingen til Barsel, I, 298 n. 
Liden Ellen og bendes Broder, I, 447. 
Liden Engel, II, 298; III, 430, 515 b; IV, 479 b. 
Liden Grimmer og Hjelmer Kamp, II, 57. 
Liden Kirsten som Stalddreng, III, 508 b. 
Liden Kirstins Dans, I, 66; IV, 214. 
Liden Malfreds Vise, II, 310. 
Lille Lise, V, 225 a. 
Lille Villum, II, 297. 
Limgrises Vise, I, 210. 
Lindormen, I, 298, 307, 314; IV, 454. 
Livsvandet, V, 34. 
Lodkastningen, II, 13. 
Magnus Algots0n, II, 127; IV, 218. 
Malfred og Sadelmand (Sallemand), II, 458 n.; IV, 

193, 492 b. 

Malfreds D0d, II, 310; III, 515 b. 
Maria Magdalena, I, 228-30. 
Mimering, II, 34 n. 
Den mislykkede Flugt, III, 498. 
Moderen under Mulde, V, 203. 
M0en paa Baalet, I, 143; II, 113. 
Munken i Vaande, V, 101. 
Nattergalen, I, 316, 336, 340; V, 215. 
Naevnet til D0de, IV, 443; V, 207. 
N0kkens Svig, I, 23 n., 27 n., 362 n.; IV, 441. 
Oluf og Ellinsborg, I, 65. 
Den onde Svigermoder, V, 208 b. 
Orm Ungersvend og Bermer Rise, II, 35 n., 49 f ., 67. 



Peder og Malfred, I, 65; III, 497; IV, 442 b. 
Raven gaard og Memering, I, 49; II, 34 ff. 
Redselille og Medevold, I, 33 n., 50 n., 66, 178-80, 

182, 382 u.; Ill, 500 b. 
Den rette Brudgom, IV, 442 b. 
Ribold og Guldborg, I, 27 n., 32 n., 60 n., 88-93, 

94 n., 99, 106, 112 n., 144, 178, 180, 378 n.; II, 

85, 170 n.; Ill, 498 a; IV, 443 a. 
Ridder Oles Lud, V, 25 n. 
Ridderen i Fugleham, V, 39. 
Ridderens Hjserte, V, 31. 
Ridderens Runeslag, V, 25 n. 
Roseuelle og Hr. Agervold, III, 500 b. 
Rosenelle og Hr. Medervold, III, 600 b. 
Rosmer, I, 47. 
Den saarede Jomfru, I, 143. 
Samson, I, 50 n. 
St. Jorgen og Dragen, III, 294. 
Sankt Steffan, I, 234. 
Sejladsen, II, 13; V, 220 a. 
Signild og hendes Broder, III, 122. 
Skj0n Anna, II, 65; V, 220 b. 
Skj0n Medler, IV, 450 a. 
Slegfred og Brud, II, 69. 
Stalbroders Kvide, I, 179 f. 
Stifmoder, I, 82. 
Stjsernevisen, V, 212. 
Stolt Ellen henter sin Faestemand, I, 459; IV, 

460 b. 

Stolt Ellensborg, I, 459. 
Stolt HedeliJ, III, 498 a. 
Stolten Hellelille, II, 205 n.; IV, 471 b. 
Store Fordringer, I, 7; III, 496; IV, 439 a; V, 

205 b. 

Svend af Vollersl0v, IV, 479 b. 
Svend i Rosensgaard, I, 168; III, 499 b; V, 287. 
Svend Ranild, IV, 377. 
Svend Vonved, I, 2 n., 405 n., 437. 
Synderinden, I, 228; III, 502 b; IV, 451 b. 
S0nnens Sorg, I, 66, 179, 180, 182. 
Sevnerunerne, I, 391. 
De talende Strenge, IV, 447. 
Den talende Strengeleg, I, 119; ILT, 499 a; IV, 

447 b. 

Thors Hammer, I, 298. 
Tord af Havsgaard, I, 298, and n. 
Torkild Trundes0n, I, 67. 
Den trofaste Jomfru, I, 27 n., 90, 112; n, 85. 
Trolden og Bondens Hustru, I, 307. 
Troskabspr0ven, IV, 434. 
Tule Slet, Ove Knar, og Fru Magnild, V, 286. 
Tserningspillet, II, 458; IV, 492. 
Den ulige Kamp, V, 223. 
Umulige Fordringer, V, 205. 
Ung Villum, II, 297 f., 513 b; IV, 479 b. 
Unge Hr. Tor og Jomfru Tore, I, 193. 
Ungen Essendal, IV, 218. 
Utro Fsestem0 vil forgive sin Fsestemand, V, 286, 

295. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



443 



Vaagestuen, I, 249; III, 503 a. 
Verkel Vejemands0n, II, 281. 
Vise om Caroline Mathilde, V, 297. 
Void og Mord, II, 297. 
Vseddemaalet, V, 25, 277. 

Dutch, Flemish, and Frisian. 
Brandenborch, Van, V, 31 f . 
Brennenberg, V, 31 f., 223. 
Brunenborch, V, 32. 
Halewijn, I, 24; II, 496 b; V, 285. 
Halewyn en het kleyne Kind, I, 25 n. ; IV, 440 b. 
Den Hertog van Brunswyk (Heinrich der Lb'we), I, 

195. 

Isabelle, I, 154. 
Jan Alberts, I, 485 b. 
De kreupele Bedelaer (Ein schoner Kriippel), V, 

110. 
Een Liedeken van den Heere van Haelewyn, V, 

285. 

Een Liedeken van Sint Jacob, I, 236. 
List der Bedrukte, II, 483. 
Madel, II, 66, 67. 
Die Maeget, I, 394. 
Des Markgraven Zoon, I, 38. 
Mi Adel en Hir Alewijn, I, 26 n. 
Mijn Man komt thuis, V, 88. 
Mijnheerken van Bruindergestem, IV, 440 b. 
Mooi Aeltje en Koning Alewijn, II, 66. 
Roland, I, 25, 26 n., 54. 
De Ruiter en Mooi Elsje, I, 181. 
Schbn Adelheid, II, 66. 
Ein schoner Kriippel, De kreupele Bedelaer, V, 

110. 

Skuin over de Groenelands Heide, III, 502 b. 
Van Brandenborch, V, 31 f . 
Van Heer Halewijn, V, 285. 
Van den Hertog van Brunswijk, I, 195. 
Van Mijnheerken van Bruindergestem, IV, 440 b. 
De Vlucht naar Egypten, II, 1, 7. 

Esthonian (see also Finnish). 

Anne laeb meilta sodaje, V, 232 a. 

Armuta omaksed, Heartless Kinsfolk, V, 232 a. 

Die Ausgeloste, II, 349. See The Maid freed from 
the Gallows. 

Die Harfe, 1, 124. 

Kallewisohnes Tod, I, 46. 

Lilla lunastamini, V, 231 b. 

The Maid freed from the Gallows, Finnish and Es 
thonian versions, II, 349; IV, 482 a; V, 231-3. 

Orja laul. V, 220 a. 

Esthonian ballads cited without titles: V, 225 a, 
231-3. 

Faroe. 

Arngrlms Synir, II, 50, and n. 
Asmundur Skeinkjari, I, 281 n. 
Ebbin kail, IV, 492 b. 



FaSir og ddttir, II, 157 ; III, 509 a; IV, 468 a. 

Frfsa visa, II, 347 ; III, 516. 

Galians kvseSi, I, 257 n. 

Gatu rlma, I, 405. 

Geipa-tattur, I, 275, and n., 280-2. 

Geyti Aslaksson, III, 17. 

Gongu-Rdlvs kvseSi, I, 508 b. 

Harpu rlma, I, 119 ; II, 498 b. 

Harra Psetur og Elinborg, I, 459b; III, 507 b. 

Kail og Svein ungi, III, 496. 

Margretu kvseSi, I, 444, 446. 

Mariu visa, I, 228; II, 501 b. 

(3luvu kvaeSi, II, 40, 510 b. 

Reji Smiur, Regin SmiSur, II, 513 b. 

Rudisar visa, I, 234 ; II, 501. 

Sveinur f VallaliS, H, 513 b. 

Torkilds Rum, eller St Cathariiue Vise, I, 54 n., 

172; II, 499 a. 
Torkils detur, II, 499 a. 

Finnish (see also Esthonian). 
Kojosen poika, Kojoin's Son, I, 46. 
Lunastettava neiti, II, 349. 

The Maid freed from the Gallows, Finnish and Es 
thonian versions, II, 349; IV, 482 a; V, 231-3. 
Mataleenan vesimatka, I, 228, 230. 
Morsiamen kuolo, II, 205 b, n., 512 b. 
Velisurmaaja, Brother-Murderer, I, 168. 
Werinen pojka, The Bloodstained Son, I, 168, 446. 
Finnish ballads cited without titles : V, 231-3. 

French and Provencal. 

A la ronde, mesdames, IV, 495 a. 

Adiu, Margaridoto, I, 400. 

Allons, inie, nous promener, I, 43. 

L'amant discret, II, 481 b; III, 518 a; IV, 495 a. 

L'amant timide, V, 297. 

Apres ma journee faite, IV, 495 a. 

Arnaud, IV, 459. See Renaud. 

L'Arnaud 1'Infant, I, 380. 

Au Chateau de Belfort, V, 296. 

Au jardin des olives, IV, 482. 

L'autre jour, II, 481. 

La bateliere, La bateliere ruse'e, II, 483; V, 297. 

Le beau D6on, II, 356; III, 517 a. 

Du beau marinier, I, 44. 

Belle, allons nous e"promener, I, 43; II, 497 a. 

La belle dans la tour, IV, 482 a; V, 234 a, 296. 

La belle et Termite, IV, 495. 

Belle Idoine, IV, 482 a; V, 234 a. 

Belle Isambourg, II, 355. 

La belle qui fait la morte, V, 234. 

La belo Marioun, V, 208. 

La bergere ruse'e, II, 482. 

La biche blanche, II, 156. 

Lou bouiaje, IV, 462. 

Lou cabalier discret, IV, 495 a. 

Le cavalier, II, 482. 

C'est trois garcjons de'payse's, V, 209. 



444 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



La chanson de la bergere, V, 90. 

La chanson de Reuaud, V, 216. 

Chanson de voyageur, I, 400. 

Chanson du brave Altizar, II, 497. 

Le chant de 1'alouette, IV, 390. 

Chante, rossignolet, II, 181. 

Chasseur, mon beau chasseur, V, 239 b. 

Les chevaux rouges, II, 612. 

La concubine, I, 426. 

Les conditions impossibles, V, 284. 

Les coumpagnons, V, 209. 

Lou Counte Arnaud, I, 380; IV, 459. 

Lou Cros de* Proucinello, IV, 441. 

La damnde, I, 4:16. 

De Dion et de la fille du roi, I, 42 ; II, 356, 497. 

La delaissee, III, 510 b; IV, 469 a. 

Derrier' la Trinite", II, 512 b; III, 510 b. 

Le de*serteur, III, 381. 

Dessous le rosier blanc, IV, 482. 

Les deux amoureux, IV, 443. 

Les deux maris, II, 499. 

La doulento, III, 500. 

En allant au bois, II, 481. 

En chevauchant mon cheval rouge, II, 512 b.; Ill, 

510 b. 

En reveuant de la jolie Rochelle, I, 43, 488 a. 
En revenant de Saint-Francois, II, 481. 
L'enfant noye", IV, 507. 
Eutre Paris et Saint-Denis, I, 463. 
L'e'pe'e libe"ratrice, I, 44. 
Et qui vous passera le bois ? II, 481. 
La feinme abandonee, I, 463. 
La fausse morte, I, 502. 

La fiancee du prince, III, 497 b (No 5); V, 222 a. 
Lou fil del rey et sa mio morto, IV, 471 b. 
La filho doou ladre, II, 481. 
La ftlle bien avise"e, II, 481. 
La fille dainne"e, V, 291. 
La fille dans la tour, III, 517 a; IV, 482 a. 
La fille d'honneur, II, 482. 
La fille d'un boulanger, II, 406. 
La fille d'un cabaretier, II, 499 a; III, 500; V, 287 a. 
La fille d'un prince, II, 356. 
La fille de Saint Martin, III, 497; IV, 441. 
La fille de Saint-Martin de 1'Ile, I, 43. 
La fille des sables, I, 44. 
La fille du due de Montbrison, V, 234. 
La fille du le*preux, II, 481. 
La fille du patissier, I, 44. 
La fille du prince, I, 44 n. 
La fille du roi et le Prince de Guise, II, 356; III, 

517 a; IV, 482; V, 234 a. 
La fillette et le chevalier, I, 43. 
Le fils Arnaud, II, 506. 
Le fils du Roi d'Espagne, II, 499. 
Le fils Louis, I, 380. 
Las finesses de la Marioun, V, 89. 
La Fuite en gypte, II, 7; IV, 462. 
La Fuito en Egypto, II, 1, 7, 509. 



Lou galant, V, 89. 

Le galant maladroit, II, 481. 

Germaine, II, 215; V, 294. 

L'honnete garcon, II, 481. 

II e*tait un chasseur, II, 481. 

II fallait plumer la perdrix, V, 296. 

L'infidele punie, V, 292. 

J'ai fait un reve, II, 181. 

J'ai fait une maitresse, I, 400; IV, 459. 

J'ai fini ma journe'e, IV, 495 a. 

Lou jalous, V, 89. 

Le jaloux, V, 89, 304. 

Jean Renaud. See Renaud. 

Jeannetoun, V, 89. 

J'entends le rossignolet, I, 181. 

La jeune coutouriere, IV, 495. 

La jolie bateliere, II, 483; V, 240 a. 

La jolie couturiere, V, 240. 

La jolie fille de la Garde, II, 356. 

Lou jolous, V, 89. 

La-bas, sus ces grands champs, V, 209. 

Lazare et le mauvais riche, II, 10; V, 220. 

La le"gende de Pontoise, II, 512 a; IV, 469 a. 

Lise et Mainfroi, II, 459. 

Le lourdand moine, V, 101. 

Ma pauvre Elise, II, 499. 

La maitresse captive, II, 356. 

La maitresse gagne"e, I, 400. 

La marchande d'orauges (pornmes), II, 481; III, 

518 a. 

Margarideto, IV, 459. , 

Margueridette, II, 481. 
Le mari assassin, IV, 441. 
Le mari de Marion, V, 89. 
Le mari jaloux, V, 89. 
Le mari soupgonneux, V, 90. 
Le mariage tragique, V, 293. 
Marie-Madeleine, I, 231. 
Marie Magdeleine, I, 231. 
Marion, V, 89, 281 a. 
Le mauvais riche, IV, 462 ; V, 220 a. 
Les metamorphoses, III, 506. 
Mignonne, II, 506. 
Le moine Nicolas, V, 101. 
Monsieur de Savigna, II, 497. 
La mort des deux amants, III, 498. 
La mort de Jean Raynaud (Renaud), V, 216, 

290. 

L'occasion manque"e, II, 481. 
Le passage du bois, III, 500. 
Lou pastour bre*gountsous (trop discret), IV, 

495. 

Lou pastour et la pastouro, II, 482. 
Lou pastre, II, 481. 
La pauvre Madeleine, I, 231. 
Les pelerins de Saint Jacques, II, 510 a. 
Des pelerins de Saint Jacques, La grande chanson, I, 

238, and n. 
Petite Rosalie, I, 463 n. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



445 



Le plongeur, III, 381. 

La poursuite d'amour, I, 400. 

Praube moussu, II, 481. 

Lou premier jour de Mai, II, 181. 

Lou premier miracle, II, 1. 

Le prince qui torture sa fille, V, 296. 

La priucesse, II, 356. 

La princesse de la Grand' Tour, II, 356. 

La prisonniere, III, 517. 

Las rebirados de Marioun, V, 89. 

La religieuse, I, 506. 

Renaud, I, 379-82; II, 506 a; HI, 506 a; IV, 

459 a; V, 216 a. 
Renaud et ses t'emmes, IV, 441 b. See Renauld et 

ses quatorze fortunes. 
Renauld et ses quatorze femmes, and other related 

French ballads, I, 42 f., 44, 488 a; II, 497 a; III, 

497 a; IV, 441 b. 
La recontre, II, 481. 
Le rendez-vous, IV, 390. 
Les re'pliques de Mario(u)n, V, 90, 304. 
Las respounsos de Marioun, V, 90. 
Un retour de guerre, IV, 450. 
Le retour du mari, I, 198, 502 b; II, 499 b; IV, 

450 b; V, 210 b. 
Le Roi He"rode, II, 7. 
Le Roi Le'ouis, III, 506 a. 
Le Roi Loys, V, 296. 
Le Roi Renaud, La ballade du Roi Renaud, I, 380. 

See Renaud. 

La ronde du battoir, III, 381. 
Rosine, I, 43. 

Le rossignolet, IV, 469; V, 223. 
La rusade, V, 89, 304. 
Saint Joseph avec Marie, IV, 462. 
Le serpent vert, III, 367 n. 
Siffle, berger, de mon haleine! II, 498. 
Le Sire de Cre*qui, I, 198; II, 215. 
Le soldat au convent, I, 506. 
Lo surprero, V, 89. 

Le testament de Marion, I, 144, V, 208 a. 
Tout au milieu de Paris, IV, 460 b. See I, 462 f.; 

II, 508 a. 

Le traitre noye*, I, 43. 
Les transformations, I, 400; II, 506 b; III, 506 b; 

IV, 495 b; V, 216 a. 
La triste noce, III, 510. 

Les trois capitaines, II, 356; III, 517 a; IV, 482 b; 

V, 234 a, 296. 

Les trois clercs, II, 512 a; III, 509 a. 

Les trois e*coliers, II, 512. 

Trois pelerins de Dieu, I, 236; IV, 451 b; V, 212 a. 

Lou tsalous, V, 89. 

Tsanno d'Oyme, IV, 440. 

Veux-tu venir, bell' Jeanneton, I, 42. 

La villageoise avisde, II, 482; HI, 618 a. 

Le voltigeur fidele, V, 302. 

Youp ta deritou la la, IV, 495 a. 

Zjean et Mariou, V, 89. 



German. 

Ach Wunden liber Wunder, I, 181. 

Adelger, I, 29. 

Der Ahornbaum, I, 493. 

Der Albrecht uud der Hanselein, I, 30. 

Alle bei Gott die sich lieben, I, 97; II, 206 n., 

310. 
Als die wunderschone Anna (auf dem Brautstuhle 

sass), V, 207, 285. 
Alte Ballade die in Entlebuch noch gesungen wird, 

1,29. 

Der alte Halter und das Kind, I, 504. 
Annele, I, 29. 

Das ausgesetze Kind, I, 504. 
Der Bauer und sein Weib, V, 89. 
Das Begrabniss im Walde, V, 287. 
Die Betrogene, II, 137. 
Der betrogene Ehemann, V, 89. 
Der Bettelman, V, 110. 
Der Bettler, I, 502. 
Bie wriie it auv der rittergman, I, 29. 
Der bose Bruder, II, 101. 
Der Brautmb'rder, I, 29. 
Brautmorder, I, 38. 
Der Bremberger, V, 31. 
Christinchen, II, 101. 
Curt Mundel, I, 486. 
Die drei Spielleute, I, 493. 
Des Ehemaunes Heimkehr, V, 89. 
Ehestandsaussichten, I, 484. 
Eitle Dinge, I, 7. 
Der Erbgraf, II, 204 n. 
Die Erie, I, 493. 
Erlkonigs Tochter, I, 376 n. 
Der ernsthaf te Jager, I, 393. 
Es blies ein Jager, I, 97. 
Es gingen zwei Liebchen durch einen griinen Wald, 

V, 287. 

Es hiitet ein Schafer an jenem Rain, V, 287. 
Es reitet ein Ritter durch Haber und Klee, I, 29. 
Es ritt ein Rauber wohl iiber den Rhein, V, 285. 
Es schlief ein Graf bei seiner Magd, V, 225. 
Es sitzt gut Ritter auf und ritt, I, 29. 
Es spielte ein Ritter mit einer Madam, V, 294. 
Es trieb ein Schafer mit Lammlein raus, II, 500 a. 
Es war ein Jager wohlgemut, V, 294. 
Es wollt sich ein Markgraf ausreiten, I, 29. 
Das falsche Mutterherz, I, 219. 
Der falsche Sanger, I, 29. 
Frau von der Lowenburg, I, 144; V, 286. 
Die Frau zur (von) Weissenburg, I, 144; V, 286. 
Gemalte Rosen, I, 7. 
Die Gerettete, I, 29 f. 
Gert Olbert, I, 29 f., 47. 
Graf Friedrich, I, 33 n., 97, 142, 143, 436, 496; IV, 

449 a. 
Graf Hans von Holstein und seine Schwester Ann- 

christine, II, 101 f. 
Der Graf im Pfluge, I, 459 n. 



446 



INDEX OP BALLAD TITLES 



Der Graf von Rom, I, 459 n. 

Der Graf und das Madchen, V, 225. 

Der Graf und die Bauerntochter, II, 206 n., 310. 

Der Graf und sein Liebchen, V, 225. 

Der grausame Bruder, II, 101 f . ; V, 34. 

Der grobe Bruder, II, 101 f. 

Grossmutter Schlangenkb'chin, I, 153. 

Das Gugibader-Lied, I, 29. 

Hammen vou Reystett, III, 367 n. 

Hans Markgraf, II, 206 n., 310, 513 b. 

Hans Steutlinger, I, 144; V, 286. 

Hansel June, I, 506 a. 

Herr Olof, I, 376 n. 

Der Herr und seine Dame, II, 205 n. 

Hdllisches Recht, I, 219. 

Der Jager, I, 393 f., 508 b; II, 506 a. 

Der Jager und die reine Jungfrau, I, 393. 

Jagers Trauer, II, 206 n. 

Des Jagers Verdruss, I, 393. 

Jagerslied (Jager-Romanze), V, 290. See Der Jager. 

Die junge Mutter, II, 206 n. 

Jungfer Ddrtchen (ist todt), II, 206 n., V, 294. 

Jungfrau Linnieh, I, 29, 31. 

Junker Hans Steutlinger, I, 144; V, 286. 

Der Junker und das Madchen, II, 483. 

Junkernlust und Madchenlist, II, 483. 

Kind, wo bist du denn henne west ? 1, 154. 

Die Kindesmorderin, I, 219. 

Eyn klegliche Mordgeschicht, von ey' m Graven 

vnnde eyner Meyd, II, 204 n. 
Konigs Tochterlein, I, 38 n. 
Kranzsingen, I, 2 n. 
Kurz gefasst, I, 508. 
Lazarus, II, 10. 
Liebchens Tod, II, 206 n. 
Liebe ohne Stand, I, 26 n., 37. 
Liebes-Neckerei, I, 7. 
Liebesprobe, II, 348. 
Liebesspielereien, I, 7. 

Des Liebsten Liebe die grosste Liebe, II, 348. 
Das Lied vom Herren und der Magd, II, 204 n. 
Das Lied vom Pfalzgrafen, II, 101. 
Das Lied von dem falschen Rittersmann, I, 30. 
Das Lied von der Lowenburg, I, 144; V, 286. 
Die Losgekaufte, II, 348; V, 296. 
Das losgekaufte Madchen, II, 348. 
Loskauf, II, 348. 

Die Machte der Thranen, II, 235. 
Des Mannes Heimkehr, V, 89. 
Das Mantelein, II, 482. 
Die Morners Sang, I, 29. 
Miillertiicke, I, 39. 

Der Mutter Fluch, I, 37 n.; II, 310; IV, 187. 
Die Nixenbraut, I, 38 n. 
Nun schiirz dich, Gredlein, I, 39. 
O Schipmann, II, 348. 
O Wind, O Wind, O Wind! V, 89. 
Der Pfalzgraf vom Rhein, II, 101 f. 
Des Prinzen Reue, II, 204 n. 



Die Rabenmutter, I, 219; V, 287. 

Rathsel, I, 2. 

Rathsel um Rathsel, I, 1. 

Rathselfragen, I, 2, and n. 

Rathsellied, I, 1, 2. 

Der Reiter und die Kaiserstochter, V, 285. 

Der Reiter und seine Geliebte, V, 287. 

Der Ritter im Walde, V, 285. 

Der Ritter und das Magdlein, II, 204 n. 

Der Ritter und die Konigstochter, I, 37; V, 207. 

Der Ritter und die Magd, II, 406. 

Der Ritter und die Maid, I, 96, 486; II, 204 n., 205 

n., 512 b; IV, 471 a; V, 225 a. 
Der Ritter und seine Dame, II, 204 n. 
Der Ritter und seine Geliebte, I, 502 a. 
Der Schafer und der Edelmaun, II, 349. 
Die Schaferstochter, III, 502. 
Schlangenkochin, I, 153. 

Das Schloss in Oesterreich, II, 174 n.; V, 293. 
Schbn Adelheid, II, 66. 
Schon-Aennelein, I, 30. 
Schon Anneli, III, 497. 
Schon Elselein, II, 406 b. 
Schon Hannchen, V, 206. 
Schon Ullerich und Hauselein, I, 30. 
Schon Ulrich, I, 486. 
Schon Ulrich und Rautendelein, I, 30. 
Schon Ulrich und Roth-Aennchen, I, 30. 
Schondili, I, 486 a. 
Schondilie, I, 29. 

Die schbne Agnese, I, 365; n, 506 a. ., 

Die schone Agnete, I, 365. 
Die schone Agniese, I, 365. 
Die schone Angnina, I, 365. 
Die schone Anna, V, 207. 
Die schbne Dorothea, I, 365; IV, 459 a. 
Die schone Hannale, I, 365. 
Die schone Hannele, I, 365. 
Ein schoner Bremberger, V, 31. 
Das Schwabentochterlein, II, 406. 
Die schwarzbraune Hexe, I, 97. 
Soldatenlohn, V, 225. 
Stiefmutter, I, 153. 
Stolz Heinrich, I, 38 n., 113. 
Stolz Sieburg, I, 38. 
Siideli, II, 127. 

Der Teufel und die Miillerstochter, I, 219. 
Der todte Freier, II, 228, and n., 240; V, 225 a, 

294. 

Die Todtenbraut, V, 63. 
Der Todwunde, I, 97. 
Traugemundslied, I, 2 n. 
Die traurige Begegnung, II, 205 n. 
Ulinger, I, 29-39, 47, 93, 486 a; III, 497 a; IV, 

441 a; V, 206 f. 
Ulrich, I, 30. 

Ulrich und Aennchen, I, 30. 
Ulrich und Annie, I, 30. 
Die ungliickliche Braut, I, 38 n. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



447 



Unmogliche Dinge, I, 7. 

Unmogliches Begehren, I, 7. 

Unmoglichkeiten, I, 7. 

Die unschuldig gehangene und gerettete Dienstmagd, 

V, 288. 

Der unschuldige Tod des jungen Knaben, II, 174 n. 
Das unverdiente Kranzlein, II, 206 n. 
Van ideln unnaoglichen Dingen, I, 7. 
Das vergiftete Kind, I, 154. 
Der verschlafene Jager, I, 393. 
Die Verschmitzte, II, 483. 
Die verwundete Dame, I, 437. 
Der verwundete Knabe, I, 437. 
Vom Judenmord zu Deggendorf, III, 240 n. 
Vom jungen Markgrafen, II, 206 n. 
Von dem Markgrafen Backenweil, V, 291. 
Von den Juden zu Fassau, III, 240 n. 
Von der jungen Markgrafin, II, 613 b. 
Von einem gottlosen Zauberer und seiner unschul- 

digen Kindlein wunderbarer Erlosung, I, 402. 
Von einem frechen Rauber, Herr Ulrich geheissen, 

1,30. 
Von einem wackern Magdlein, Odilia geheissen, etc., 

I, 29, 31. 

Von eitel unmoglichen Dingen, I, 7. 
Von Farbe so bleich, I, 181. 
Der Vorwirth, II, 235. 
Die Waisen, I, 181. 

Der Wasserman, I, 38 n., 365; IV, 441 a. 
Wassermans Braut, I, 38, and n., 39 n., 365. 
Die Weismutter, V, 288. 
Wettgesang, I, 7. 
Wind iiber Wind, V, 89. 
Wunderbare Aufgaben, I, 7. 
Die wunderschone Anna auf dem Rheinsteine, V, 

285. 
Der Zimmergesell und die junge Markgrafin, III, 

109 n. 

Zu Frankfurt steht ein Wirtshaus, V, 288. 
Zu spate Reue, II, 204 n. 

Gypsy. 

(Transylvanian etc.) ballads cited without titles: III, 
517; V, 63. 

Icelandic. 

Asu kvseSi, I, 28, 53; II, 496. 
Eyturbyrlunar kvseSi, I, 156. 
Gunnhildar kvseSi, II, 34 n. 
Horpu kvsetSi, I, 119, 122. 
KvseSi af Loga i Vallarhlffi, II, 297. 
Kvseol af 6lafi Liljurds, I, 374. 
MalfrfSar kvseSi, II, 310. 
Margretar kvseSi, I, 445. 
Marteins kvseSi, I, 249. 
6lafs kvatfi, I, 374. 
tflafur og alfamser, I, 374. 
(3lofar kvaeft, II, 157. 
Ormars rfmur, II, 49 n. 



Ribbalds kvatfi, I, 91 ; II, 127. 

Rika alfs kvseSi, I, 362. 

Sfmonar kvsetSi, IV, 492. 

Soffm kvseSi, II, 101, 102. 

Sonar harmur, I, 179, 180. 

Ssetrolls kvseSi, II, 13 n. 

Tristrams kvseSi, I, 98. 

JriSriks kvseSi koutings, II, 406. 

J?orkels kvaeoi J?raudarsonar, II, 498 a. 

Vallara kvsetJi, I, 173. 

Italian. 

L' adultera, II, 103 n. 

L'amante avvelenato, III, 499. 

L' am ante deluso, I, 393. 

Ambrogio e Lietta, III, 508 b. 

Amor costante, III, 517. 

Amor di fratello, IV, 186. 

Amore inevitabile, III, 506. 

L' avvelenato, I, 152 f., 498 b; 208 b. 

La ballerina, V, 231. 

La bella Brunetta, I, 393; III, 506; IV, 459. 

La bella Inglese, IV, 441. 

Bennardo, III, 501. 

La bevanda sonnifera, I, 393; III, 506 b; IV, 459 b. 

Bombarion, V, 90. 

(La) Brunetta, I, 393; V, 296. 

Buonasera, vedovella, IV, 186. 

Canto marinaresco di Nicotera, IV, 481. 

La canzdne de 'nucdnzie, I, 496. 

n Castello d' Oviglio, HI, 498. 

Catarine, III, 516. 

II cavaliere della bella spada, I, 382 f.; II, 506 a. 

II cavaliere ingannato, III, 506. 

U cavalieru traditu, IV, 449. 

Che mestiere e il vostro ? Ill, 496. 

La contadina alia fonte, I, 393, 488. 

II conte Angiolino, I, 382, 383. 

Conte Anzolin, El conte Anzolin, I, 382; V, 216 a. 

II conte Cagnolino, I, 270, 382. 

U corsaro, I, 44; III, 497. 

Danze e funerali, III, 510 b. 

De lu cavalieri e figliu de re, I, 498. 

Donna Lombarda, I, 156; III, 499 b; V, 286. 

Le due tombe, III, 498. 

Un' eroina, III, 497; IV, 441. 

La fandell e lu cavale're (cavaljiere), I, 393; III, 

497, 506. 
La fidanzata infedele, II, 103 n.; Ill, 497 b, 508 b; 

V, 292. 

La figlia del conte, I, 44. 
La figlia del re, II, 482. 
La figlia disobbediente, IV, 186. 
La figlia snaturata, III, 516. 
II finto (falso) pellegrino, III, 501. 
Fior di tomba, III, 498. 
Flavia, V, 30. 
La fuga, III, 497. 
La fuga e il pentimento, III, 517. 



448 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



H furto amoroso, IV, 390. 

II galante burlato, III, 518 a. 

II Genovese, I, 250; in, 503 a; V, 212 a. 

Giovanina, V, 207. 

Inglesa, IV, 441. 

La Inglese, I, 44. 

Laura, I, 44. 

La lavandaia, I, 382. 

Leggenda marinesca, V, 231. 

Leggenda napitina, IV, 481. 

La liberatrice, I, 44; III, 497. 

Luggieri, I, 383 n., 496. 

La Mad al en a, I, 505 a. 

La Madonna e il riccone, II, 10. 

La madre indegna, I, 393. 

Mai ferito, III, 506. 

La maledetta, I, 44; IV, 186. 

Maledizione della madre, IV, 186. 

La maledizione materna, IV, 186. 

Mamma e figghiolo, III, 499. 

Maria Maddalena, IV, 451; V, 288. 

Marinai, IV, 186. 

II marinaro e la sna amorosa, IV, 186. 

El mariner, V, 207. 

Marion, V, 304. 

II marito geloso, V, 90. 

La mpglie fedele, III, 501. 

La monacella salvata, III, 518 a. 

Monchisa, I, 43 f. 

La Monferrina, I, 44; III, 497. 

La Monferrina incontaminata, I, 44, 488; III, 497; 

IV, 441. 

Montiglia, IV, 441. 

Moran d' Inghilterra, I, 462; III, 507 b. 
Morando, I, 462. 
La Moraschina, HI, 506. 
Morte occulta, I, 382 f.; H, 506 a; III, 506 a; V, 

216 a. 

Mosettina, V, 296. 
La 'nfantina e lu cavalieri, III, 506. 
O Violiua, tu hai le gote rosse, V, 90 n., 304. 
Occasione niancata, III, 518 a. 
L' onore salvato, III, 517. 
H padre crudele, V, 29. 
II penitente, III, 520. 
Poter del canto, III, 509 b. 
La prigioniera, III, 516 a; V, 296. 
II primo amore, II, 181. 
Lu pringepe de Melane, III, 497. 
La prova, II, 426; III, 518 a. 
La prova d' amore, II, 426; III, 518 a. 
La ragazza assassinata, III, 500. 
La ragazza ed i soldati, II, 426. 
La ragazza fantina, III, 506. 
La ragazza onesta, I, 393. 
II re Carlino, I, 382. 
Le repliche di Marion, V, 90. 
Ricardo e Germonda, V, 303. 
II rieco epulone, III, 507; V, 292. 



II riconoscimento, II, 426. 

Risguardo belo e Rismonda bela, V, 30. 

Rissiala, V, 208. 

II ritorno, II, 426; in, 518 a. 

II ritorno dalla guerra, II, 426. 

H ritorno del soldato, III, 501. 

Rizzardo bello, I, 142, 383 n., 496 a; III, 499 a; IV, 

449 a; V, 208 b. 
Rizzdl d'amor, I, 496. 
La rondine importuna, IV, 390. 
La rondinella, IV, 390. 
Ruggiero, III, 499. 
Rusiue e Ddiamdre, II, 426. 
Sant' Alessio, III, 520. 
S. Maria Maddalena, I, 504 f. 
Scibilia nobili, II, 346 f.; in, 516 a; IV, 481 a; V, 

231 a; 296. 

Gli scolari di Tolosa, II, 174; IU, 509 a. 
Soldatino, II, 507. 
La sposa colta in fallo, V, 90. 
La sposa morta, III, 510, 613; V, 291. 
Testameuto dell' avvelenato, III, 499. 
Testamento della moglie, III, 499. 
I tre tamburi, IV, 439. 
La vendicatrice, I, 44. 
La vergine uccisa, III, 500. 
Violina, V, 296. 
La visita, IV, 390. 

Ladin. 

Who is the younker that goes afield ere dawn, I, 
400. 

Lettish. 

Das Lied von der Jiingsten, I, 493 b. 

Die Lindenharfe, I, 493 b. 

Der losegekaufte Soldat, II, 349 n. 

Lithuanian. 

Berne'lio rauddjimas (Die Elage des Jiinglings), I, 

124. 
Lithuanian ballads cited without titles: I, 124, 418 

f ., 504 a. 

Magyar. 

Aspis kfgyd (Die Aspschlange), HI, 616 b. 

Darvas Kis Clement, II, 103. 

Janos, I, 499. 

Ki veszi ki a kigydt ? (Wer nimmt die Schlange 

heraus ?), Ill, 516 b. 
A mege'tett Janos (Der vergebene Johann), I, 154, 

498 f.; Ill, 499 b. 
Molnar Anna, I, 45, and n., 487 n. 
Palbeli sze"p Antal (Schon Anton), I, 249 f., 606 a. 
Sa>ga merges kfgyd (Die gelbe giftige Natter), III, 

616 b. 

Sarig kiesi kigyd (Gelbe kleine Natter), in, 616 b. 
Sasi ke-ny6, III, 516 b. 
Sasi kigyd, HI, 516 b. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



449 



Szildgyi 4s Hagym&si (Szilagyi und Hagymasi), I, 

107 b, 463; III, 498 b. 
Two Princes (Hero and Leander), I, 98. 
Magyar ballads cited without titles: I, 98, 437, 463 

(see III, 498 b); II, 406, 498 a; III, 516; V, 89. 

Norwegian. 

Antonetta, I, 362. 

DJB bur ein Mann hser utnife Aa, I, 119. 

Ebbe Skammels0n, V, 292 f. 

Far aa Ddtter, II, 157; IV, 468 a. 

Grivilja, I, 179. 

Harald Kongin og Hemingen unge, III, 17. 

Hemingjen aa Harald Kungen, III, 518 b. 

Herr Nikelus, I, 112; II, 85. 

Herr Stragi, II, 204 n., 205. 

Herre Per i Riki, I, 459. 

Herre Per og GjoSaliu, II, 143. 

Herre Per og stolt Margit, I, 112; II, 85. 

Ivar Erlingen og Riddarsonen, II, 513. 

Lfti Kersti, I, 90. 

Liti Kersti som Stalldreng, II, 85. 

Liti Kersti, som vart inkvervd, I, 362. 

Liti Kerstis Hevn, I, 54 n.; II, 180. 

Malfri, I, 362. 

Maalfrf, II, 310. 

Maarstig aa bass Moy, II, 205. 

Margit Hjuxe, som vart inkvervd, I, 362. 

Maria, I, 228 f. 

Nykkin beolar til Heiemo, I, 39 n. 

Olaf Liljukrans, I, 374. 

Opsaug, I, 7. 

Pa GronaliSheiSi, I, 404. 

Reven og Bjoimen, I, 144. 

Reven og Nils Fiskar, I, 144. 

Rikeball og stolt GutJbjorg, I, 91. 

Rullemann og Hildeborg, I, 28. 

Signelill aa hennes Synir, I, 156. 

S61fager og Ormekongin, V, 7. 

Svein NorSmann, I, 28. 

Die tvse Systa, I, 119. 

Die tvo Systar, I, 119. 

Unge herr Peder pa Sjoen, II. 13. 

Unge Ingelbrett, II, 298, 303. 

Utro Faestema, V, 286. 

Veneros og stolt Olleber, I, 91. 

Portuguese. 

A bella infanta, III, 501. 

Bella infanta, I, 503; II, 427. 

Bernal Francez, V, 291. 

Branca-Flor, Romance de, II, 69 n. 

Bravo-Franco, Estoria do, I, 488 a. 

O cacador, II, 481. 

O ca<jador e a donzilla, II, 481. 

O caso de D. Ignez, IV, 441. 

O cego, V, 110. 

Conde Nillo, I, 97. 

Conde Nino, I, 97. 

VOL. v. 57 



Dom Alberto, II, 512 a. 

Dom Carlos de Montealbar, II, 113. 

Dom Diniz, I, 97. 

Dom Doardos, I, 97. 

Dom Duarte e Donzilha, II, 498. 

Dom Franco, Romance de, I, 45. 

Dom Pedro e Dona Leonarda, I, 385. 

Dona Aldonga, II, 113. 

Dona Ausenda, II, 113 and n. 

Dona Branca, II, 512 a. 

Dona Catherina, I, 503; II, 427. 

Dona Helena, I, 144. 

Dona Inez, I, 45. 

Dona Infanta, I, 503; II, 427. 

Donzella encantada, II, 481. 

A encantada, II, 481. 

A ermida no mar, I, 97. 

Filha Maria, I, 97. 

Flor de marilia, II, 512 a. 

Gallo-frango, I, 488 a. 

Gerinaldo, II, 127 n. 

Infantina, II, 481. 

A Infeiticada, II, 481. 

Miragaia, V, 6. 

Rainha e captiva, II, 69 n. 

A romeira, I, 45 n. 

Romeirinha, Romance de, I, 45 n. 

(Many of these ballads occur in the Galician dialect : 

see Antonio de la Iglesia, El Idioma Gallego, III, 

114-17.) 

Romaic. 

'H alxna\<o<rla, I, 199. 

'H a\cii(Tis rrjs K.uvffravrtvovir6\fus, I, 241. 

'H avayvdpiffis, II, 215, 427. 

I A.vayvupi(r/j.6s, I, 199 ; II, 427 ; V, 210 b. 
H avdrn, II, 483. 

'H apva-yft, I, 200. 
"'Afffut TIO.VVO.KOV, I, 199. 
''A.fffjM rov Tlvtyfifvov, III, 381. 
La Belle Augiranouda, V, 294. 
'H Bovpyapoirov\a Kal T\ KCIKJ) ireOepd, I, 157. 

II Compito, IV, 439. 
Ti yvpifffM, II, 427. 

'O rv<prdKiis, dvaros rov PvQrditi), ToO Tixprdmi, III, 64. 

'O ATJ/WS, 'O rdtyos rov A-fifjiov, III, 104. 

'O Awvvs Kal fi KaK)) ireBepd, I, 157. 

Tek eitarbv Aoio, I, 416. 

'O Upwras 's rkv rd<po, II, 206. 

Ti EvyevdKi, II, 206. 

'H Evyfvov\a, 'H Evyevov\a Kal 6 Xdpos, 'H Evyvov\a ^ 

Tdpos Kal |<^Si, II, 206. 
Qdvaros rov rvQrdKt), III, 54. 
To KaKa ireOepiKd, I, 156. 
Tb Kv&ovpi riov appa&wviaff/ji^vtD, II, 206. 
Ktoffravrlvos Kal 'Aper^. See 'O veKpbs a$e\<p6s. 
'O \a{l<on4vos K\e<f>Ti)s, III, 104. 
'H ftdyiffffa, III, 381. 
Tow yiavpiav(nrov\ov t V, 21. 



450 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



'O yiavpiavbs K' 6 j8a<nA.eas, V, 21. 

'O Maupiaybs ita.1 6 j8a<n\ei$s, V, 21. 

Maurogeue, V, 22. 

'O MiKpoKtaffravrlvos ' ^ pdyiffffa, III, 381. 

'H povoBvyartpa, II, 206. 

'O 1/e/cpbs a$e\<(>6s, Kuffravrivos (KworTcwHjs) ical ' 
('Aperd, EvSoKta), V, 65. 

'O vi6vavTpos ffK\d/3os, I, 199. 

'H wto-T^ <7t5/7os, II, 427. 

Quarante ans j'ai travaille', V, 290. 

'H 'Pjuaioiroi5A.a, I, 400. 

'O 2ravpiavbs KO.} 6 fiaffi\ias, V, 21. 

Tb oro/x^a, V, 21. 

Tb <rrolx'n(*-<* TOW /3a<riA.ia /cal roC MaupiavoC, V, 21. 

2ro/x^M a A ifli/5 /cal lavTo-apA?}, V, 22. 

'O rd<f>os TOV A^/uou, III, 104. 

Les Transformations, V, 290. 

'O Xapos KoL fi K6py, II, 206. 

Romaic ballads cited without title (besides some of 
which the title is here supplied): I, 97, 437; II, 
215, 406, 498 a, 507 b; V, 210 b, 285 b. 

Roumanian. 

Cucul si turturica (Cuckoo and turtle-dove), I, 400; 

II, 506. 

Giurgiu, III, 517. 
Inelul si naframa, Anelulu si nafram'a (Ring and 

handkerchief), I, 97, 201 ; III, 498 a. 
Mihu Copilul, II, 137. 
Miorita, IV, 460. 
alga, II, 137. 
Vidra, II, 137. 
Roumanian ballad cited without title, I, 437. 

Slavic. Bohemian. 

Herman a Dornicka, I, 386 ; IV, 459 a. 
Klas z hrobu, Voice from the Grave, II, 228. 
Nevesta nest'astnice, The Unhappy Bride, I, 487. 
Oklaman^ Turek, The Turk Duped, II, 356 ; IH, 

517 b. 

Sestra travicka, The Sister a Poisoner, I, 156. 
Zabite* devce, The Murdered Maid, I, 487. 
Zabitd sestra, The Murdered Sister, I, 487. 
Zakleta dcera, The Daughter Cursed, I, 493 b. 
Zenich umrlec, Dead man for Bridegroom, V, 63. 

Slavic. Bulgarian. 

Chozdenie mertveca po belomu svetu, The Ghost's 

wandering over the white world, V, 64. 
Elin Dojka, V, 64. 
Elin Dojna, V, 64. 
Jana, V, 64. 
Koga nevestata se klanjat na kumot, When the 

Bride makes her Curtsey to her best-man, III, 

501 b. 

Lazar i Jovana, V, 64. 
Lazar i Petkana, V, 64. 
Markokralevic verolomnym obrazom ubivaet junaka 

ditja semi mesjacev imejuscago konja semi me- 



sjacev, Markokralevic treacherously kills the hero, 
a child of seven months having a seven months 
old horse, IV, 463 b. 

Markokralevic verolomnym obrazom ubivaet junaka 
bolee sil'nago cem on, ditja Dukatince, Marko 
kralevic treacherously kills a hero stronger than 
himself, the child Dukatince, IV, 463 b. 

Marko i dete Dukadince, Marko and the child Duka- 
dince, IV, 463 b. 

"Momtchil," Le baiser fatal, I, 496 b. 

Prevzemanie na Carigrad, The Taking of Constanti 
nople, IV, 452 a. 

Respel Georgia, IV, 463 a. 

Simon i negova nevesta, Simon and his Bride, III, 
501 b. 

Son moglenskoj korolevy. . . . Zenid'ba ich syna 
Pavla Junaka, The dream of the Moglen queen, 
etc. The marriage of their son, Paul the Valiant, 

III, 501 b. 

Stojan i Bojana, Stojan and Bojana, III, 503 a. 
Stojan vojnik, Stojan the Soldier, III, 501 b. 
Temisvar Gjuro, Marko Kraljevike, Jankulja Voj- 

voda i dete Goljomese. T. G., M. K., J. V., and 

the child G., IV, 463 b. 
Vojnik Stojan i kralica, Soldier Stojan and the Queen, 

IV, 450 b. 

Slavic. Croatian. 

Dar i uzdarje, Present and return present, V, 284. 
Ive umira za Marom, John dies for Mary, V, 289. 
Jnnak vu madjarski vuzi, Young man in Magyar 

Prison, V, 296. 

Majcina kletva, The Mother's Curse, V. 
Marko Kraljevic i brat mu Andrijas, Marko Kral- 

jevic and his brother Andrew, III, 507 b. 
Parapaticev brig, The Parapatic shore, III, 503 a. 
Popijevka od Svilojevica, A Song about Svilojevic, 

IV, 497 a. 
Vojvoda Janko i mlada Andjelija, Vojvoda Janko 

and young Andjelija, V, 296. 

Slavic. Great Russian. 

Begstvo vo Egipet, Flight to Egypt, II, 7. 
Brat'ja-razbojniki i sestra, The Robber-Brothers and 

their Sister, II, 499 a. 
Car Konstantin ; Vzjatie Carjagrada, Emperor Con- 

stantine ; The Taking of Constantinople, II, 501 b. 
Devjat' bratcev i sestra, Nine little Brothers and 

their Sister, II, 499 a. 
Djuk Stepanovic (bylina), III, 501 b. 
Dobrynja i Alesa (bylina), I, 199 n., 200 ; II, 499 f., 

511 b. 

Dobrynja i Vasilij Kazimirovic (bylina), IV, 499 a. 
Lazari : Lazar ubogoj, Lazaruses : Lazarus the beg 
gar, II, 10. 
Rodici oslyseny milau wyslysen, Rejected by Parents, 

Accepted by his Sweetheart, II, 349 b. 
Sadko Kurec, bogatyj gost', (bylina) Sadko Kurec, 

the Rich Merchant, II, 15. 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



451 



Slavic. Little Russian. 

Cernomorskaja burja, The storm on the Black Sea, 
II, 15. 

Lazar; O Lazare, Lazarus; Of Lazarus, III, 508 a. 

Vdova otravljaet nevestu, The Widow poisons her 
Son's Wife, V, 295. 

Vykup kozaka miloju iz tureckoj nevoli, The Ran 
som of the Cossack from Turkish Servitude by his 
Sweetheart, II, 514 a. 

Slavic. Moravian. 

Dorada, Good Advice, IV, 439 b. 

Hrisnice, The Sinner, III, 502 b. 

Lazar a bohatce, Lazarus and the Rich Man, LI, 10. 

The Magdalen, I, 230. 

Maruska a Jandsek, I, 493 a. 

Matka travicka, The Mother a Poisoner, I, 496 b. 

Nest'astna" svatba, The Doleful Wedding, I, 386, 

496 a. 

Prvnf milejsf, The First Love, I, 502 b; II, 127 b. 
Sestra travicka, Sister a Poisoner, I, 156 b. 
Umrlec, The Dead Man, I, 487 n.; V, 63. 
Utek Marife Panny, Flight of Virgin Mary, III, 

607 b. 

Vrah, The Murderer, I, 487. 
Vyminov^ni, Excuses, IV, 439 b. 
Zaklet.l dcera, The Daughter Cursed, I, 493 b. 
Zbojce, The Murderer, I, 487. 

Slavic. Polish. 

Helene, V, 63. 

JaS i Kasia, I, 39-41, 486 b; IV, 441. 

Ucieczka, The Flight, V, 63. 

Slavic. Servian. 

Braca i sestra, The Brothers and the Sister, V, 64. 

Dete Lovzar i majka mu, The Child and his Mother, 
V, 294. 

La fanciulla assediata, I, 401. 

Jani i Miljenko, I, 496 b. 

Jovan i Jelica, V, 64. 

Jovan i Mara, V, 64. 

Jurisid Janko, IV, 497 a. 

Kletve djevojacke, The Maiden's Curses, II, 236. 

Koja majke ne slusa, She who does not obey her 
Mother, I, 42. 

Lukava cobanka, Tricky Shepherdess, V, 297. 

Marko Kraljevic i kci kralja arapskoga, Marko Kra 
ljevic and the Daughter of the Arab King, III, 
499 a. 

Marko Kraljevic u azackoj tamnici, Marko Kraljevic 
in the Azak Prison, II, 357. 

Mudra devojka, Shrewd Lass, V. 

Nachod Simeun, Simon the Foundling, V. 

Prelja i car, The Spinster and the Tsar, IV, 439. 

Prelja i kujundzija, The Spinstress and the Gold 
smith, IV, 439. 

Riba i djevojka, The Fish and the Maid, I, 2, n. 

Sestra otrovnica, The Sister a Poisoner, I, 156. 



Ti si nioja svakojako, You are mine for all that, 

^ L'amante inevitabile, I, 401. 

Zenidba Jaksica Mitra, Marriage of Jaksic Mitar, V, 

212. 
2enidba Stojana Jankovica, The Marriage of Stojan 

Jankovic, III, 501 b. 

Slavic. Slovak. 

Same nesnadnosti, Sheer Impossibilities, I, 8 a. 
Sestra a brat, Sister and Brother, III, 499 b. 
Wyswobozeny Janjik, John set free, III, 516 b. 

Slavic. Slovenian. 

Cudna bolezen, Strange Sickness, I, 250. 
Neve>nost, Unfaithfulness, II, 158. 
Povoduji mdsh, The Merman, I, 366. 
Rodbina, Kinship, II, 350. 
Sve*ti Ureh, Saint Ulrich, I, 14, and n. 

Wendish. 

Aria, dzjeci mofdafka, Aria the Child-Murderess, I, 

230. 

Helska reja, Der Hollentanz, Hell Dance, I, 220. 
Judasowa pserada, The Judas Treachery, I, 242. 
Knez a holicka, Der Herr und die Maid, II, 205 

b, n. 

Lubcicka wuplaci, Die Liebste lost aus, II, 349. 
Marine ceknenje, Mary's Flight, II, 7. 
Na psemd, The Contest, I, 8. 
Plakajuca newesta, The Weeping Bride, I, 386. 
W<5dny muz, Der Wassermann, The Water-Sprite, I, 

366. 
Wojbesneny korcmaf, The Tavern-keeper hanged, 

I, 236 f . 

Wumdzenje, Die Erlosung, II, 349. 
Zjesi husmersniea, Die Kindesmorderin, I, 230. 
Z jjedora zawdaty Hindrask, Poisoned Henry, 1, 154. 
Zrudny kwas, The Doleful Wedding, I, 386. 

Slavic. White Russian. 
Pesn' o gresnoj deve, Song of the Sinful Girl, V, 288. 

Slavic ballads cited without titles: 1, 2 and n., 39, 41, 
97, 124, 155 f ., 230, 386, 400 f ., 437 b, 484 a, 487- 
90, 499 a, 502 b, 506 a; H, 14, n., 228, 240, 349 f., 
406, 495 a, 496 f., 498 a, 499 a, 502 a, 511 b; III, 
104, 367 n., 498 f ., 501 b, 502 b, 503 a, 506 b, 507 b, 
509 a, 516 f.; IV, 439, 441, 443 b, 447 b, 450 b, 
451 b, 452 a, 459 b, 474 b, 481 a, 497 a, 499 a; V, 
63 f.; 284, 285, 287, 288, 290, 292, 295, 296, 304. 

Spanish. 

A cazar va el caballero, II, 480. 

La Ausencia, V, 237 a. 

El caballero burlado, II, 480 ; III, 518 a. 

Caballero de lejas tierras, II, 427. 

Cdmo el conde don Ramon de Barcelona libr<5 la 

emperatriz de Alemaua que la tenian para quemar, 

Romance de, II, 42. 



452 



INDEX OF BALLAD TITLES 



Conde Amaldos, II, 137. 

Conde Claros de Montalvan, II, 113, and n. 

Conde Guarinos, Romance del, I, 469 n. 

Conde Lombardo, Romance del, II, 158. 

El Conde Sol, I, 461, and n. 

De Blanca-Nina, II, 158; V, 91. 

De Francia partio" la niiia, II, 480. 

De la infanta y don Galvan, II, 113, and n. 

De la infanta y el hijo del rey de Francia, II, 406. 

Don Bueso, II, 481 n.; Ill, 510 b; V, 207 a. 

Don Pedro, IV, 459 a. 

Dona Alda, III, 506 a. 

Dona Ana, Romance de, I, 384. 

Las dos hermanas, II, 69, and n. 

Espinelo, II, 67 n. 

La Esposa infiel, III, 509 a. 

Estando un caballerito, II, 158. 

Galancina, III, 508 b; IV, 466 a. 

Galanzuca, III, 508 b. 

Gerineldo, I, 462; II, 127 n.; Ill, 507 b, 509 a; IV, 

460 b. 

La Hija de la viudina, III, 497 b. 
La Infanta encantada, II, 480. 
La Infanta y Don Galvan, De, II, 113, and n. 
La Infantina, II, 480. 
Mananita, mananita, IV, 468 a. 
Marque's de Mantua, Romance del, II, 197. 
El penitente, III, 520 a. 
La Princesa Isabel, IV, 441 b. 
Rico Franco, Romance de, I, 44. 
Tiempo es, el caballero, V, 110. 
Las tres adivinanzas, II, 507 b. 
Venganza de honor, III, 497 b. 

Swedish. 

Agneta och Bergamannen, I, 362; II, 511 b. 
Agneta och Hafsmannen, I, 364. 
Bergkonungen, I, 362. 
Den Bergtagna, I, 362. 
Den Bortsaida, II, 347 f.; IV, 481 a. 
The Bride Drowned, IV, 440 f. 
Deielill och Lageman, I, 194. 
Den dode Brudgummen, II, 228. 
Elf-Qvinnan och Herr Olof, I, 374, 376. 
Ellibrand och Froken Gyllenborg, IV, 443 a. 
Elvehoj, II, 137. 
Falkvard Lagermanson, II, 342. 
Den falske Riddaren, I, 27. 
Froken Gyllenborg, I, 489 b. 
Fru Gundela, I, 156. 
Fru Malin star ute och borstar sitt bar (The Bride 

Drowned) IV, 440 f. 
Fru Margaretha, II, 127; III, 508 b. 
Fastmon, III, 510 b. 
Den fortrollade Jungfrun, I, 502 a. 
Den fortrollade Prinsessan, I, 336; IV, 465 b. 
Den grymma Brodern, II, 157. 
Hafsfrun, I, 54 n. 



Harpans Kraft, II, 137. See Harpens Kraft, under 

Danish ballads. 

Helena och Hafsmannen, I, 364. 
Helleman Unge, II, 297. 
Herr Axel, I, 168 n., 447. 
Herr Balder, I, 92. 
Herr Carl, eller Klosterrofvet, I, 249, 506 a; III, 

503 a; IV, 453 b. 
Herr Elver Bergakonungen, I, 362. 
Herr Hjelmer, Helmer, Hjelman, I, 94 n.; II, 170 

n.; IV, 164. 

Herr Lagman och Herr Thor, I, 194. 
Herr Magnus, II, 143. 
Herr Magnus och Hafstrollet, I, 314. 
Herr Malmstens Drbm, II, 205. 
Herr Olof i Elfvornas Dans, I, 374. 
Herr Olof och Elffrun, I, 374. 
Herr Olof och Elf vorna, I, 374. 
Herr Peder, II, 13. 

Herr Peders Sjoresa, II, 13; IV, 462 b. 
Herr Peder och liten Kerstin, II, 180. 
Herr Peder och Malfred, II, 310. 
Herr Radibrand och lilla Lena, IV, 449 a. 
Herr Redebold, I, 91, 92. 
Herr Redevall, I, 179. 
Herr Riddervall, IV, 450 a. 
Herr Samsing, II, 143. 
Herr Aster och Froken Sissa, I, 64 n., 65. 
Herren Bald, 1, 144. 

Hertig Frojdenborg och Froken Adelin, V, 30. 
Hertig Henrik, I, 194. 
Hertig Henrik och Konungen, IV, 482 b. 
Hertig Hillebrand och hans Syster, II, 356 b. 
Hertig Magnus och Elfvorna, I, 314. 
Hertig Nils, II, 205, 206 n. 
Herting Liljebrand, I, 92. 
Hildebrand, I, 489 b. 
Hillebrand, I, 91. 
Husarerna, V, 89. 
Jungfru Adelin, I, 228. 
Jungfru Maja, I, 228. 
Jungfru Solfager, V, 7, 280. 
Jungfrun och Bergakonungen, I, 362. 
Jungfrun och Bergamannen, I, 362. 
Jungfruns Dbd, II, 205, and n. 
Koloregris, I, 210. 

Krist' lilla och Herr Tideman, I, 179. 
Kung Valdemo, IV, 443 a; V, 207. 
Kung Vallemo, I, 91. 

Kung Vallemo och liten Kerstin, III, 498 a. 
Kung Walrnon, I, 92. 
Kampen Grimborg, V, 207. 
Lageman och hans Brud, I, 194. 
Det lef vande Liket, I, 249. 
Lilla Lisa och Herr Nedervall, III, 500. 
Den lillas Testamente, I, 154. 
Linden, I, 307. 
Liten Kerstin och Dane-Peter, II, 85. 



INDEX OP BALLAD TITLES 



453 



Liten Kerstin och Drottning Sofia, II, 101, 102. 

Liten Kerstin och Fru Sofia, II, 101 f. 

Liten Kerstin Stalldrang, II, 84. 

Liten Kerstins Fb'rtrollning, I, 84. 

Liten Kerstins Haind, II, 180. 

Magdalena, I, 228. 

Moder och Son, I, 179. 

Necken, I, 366 n. 

Naktergalsvisan, V, 290. 

En Naskonung bodde pa Illvedens f jail, I, 493 b. 

Olof Adelen, III, 610 b. 

Peder och liten Stina, IV, 469 a. 

Peder Palleson, II, 205, 206. 

Pehr Tyrsons Dbttrar i Wange, I, 172. 

Prins Olof, II, 506 a. 

Eibbolt, I, 92. 

Ridborg, V, 207 b. 

Riddar Lage och stolts Elensborg, I, 66. 

Riddar Ola, I, 54 n., 64 n. 

Riddar Olle, I, 63, and n. 

Riddar Olof, I, 64 n.; IV, 442 b. 

Riddaren och Torpardrangen, IV, 468 a. 

Riddaren Tyne, II, 137. 

Risa lill, I, 501 b. 

Rosa lilla, I, 179, 501 b. 

Rosen lilla, I, 96; IV, 443 b. 

Rofvaren Brun, I, 27. 



Rbfvaren Rymer, I, 28. 

Sankt Staff ans Visa, I, 235. 

De sju Gullbergen, I, 112; H, 85. 

Skbn Aniia, II, 65; IV, 463 b. 

Skbn Anna och Hafskungen, I, 364. 

Skbn Anna och Herr Peder, IV, 463 b. 

Skbn Helena och Riddaren Hildebrand, IV, 449. 

Sorgens Magt, II, 227. 

Staffans Visa(n), I, 234; II, 7. 

Stolt Ingrid, I, 194. 

Stolts Botelid Stalldrang, II, 84. 

Stolts Elins Fbrtrollning, I, 84 (C). 

Stolts Karin, I, 54 n. 

Stolts Signild, III, 122. 

Den stridbare Munken, I, 298 n. 

Sven i Rosengard, 1, 167, 501 b; III, 499 b; V, 209 b, 

287 a. 

Systermordet, I, 119. 
Sbmn-runorna, I, 391. 
Den Sbrjande, II, 205. 
There och bans Syster, II, 158. 
Torpardrangen, II, 137. 
De tva Systrarne, I, 119; IV, 447. 
Den underbara Harpan, I, 119. 
Ung Hillerstrbm, II, 170. 
Unger Sven, H, 170. 
Ungersveunens Drbm, II, 205 u. 



TITLES OF COLLECTIONS OF BALLADS, OH OF BOOKS 

CONTAINING BALLADS, 

WHICH ARE VERY BRIEFLY CITED IN THIS WORK 



Albanian. 

Camarda, D. Appendice al saggio di grammatologia 
comparata sulla lingua albanese. Prato, 1866. 

de Grazia, Demetrio. Canti popolari albanesi tradi- 
zionali nel mezzogiorno d' Italia, riordinati, tra- 
dotti, e illustrati da . Noto, 1889. 

de Rada, Girolamo. Rapsodie d' un poema albanese 
raccolte nelle colonie del Napoletano, tradotte da 

e per cura di lui e di Niccolb Jeno de' Coronei 

ordinate e messe ia luce. Firenze, 1866. 

Breton. 

Luzel, F. M. Gwerziou Breiz-Izel. Chants popu- 
laires de la Basse-Bretagne. 2 vols. Lorient, 
1868-74. 

Soniou Breiz-Izel. Chansons populaires de la 

Basse-Bretagne. 2 vols. Paris, 1890. 

Quellien, N. Chansons et danses des Bretons. 
Paris, 1889. 

Taylor, Tom. Ballads and Songs of Brittany, trans 
lated from the Barsaz-Breiz of Vicomte Hersart de 
la Villemarqne'. London and Cambridge, 1865. 

Villemarque', Le Vicomte Hersart de la. Barzaz 
Breiz, chants populaires de la Bretagne. 6 e e"d. 
Paris, 1867. 

Catalan. 

Cansons de la terra. Cants populars Catalans, col- 
leccionats per Francesch Pelay Briz y Candi Candi. 
Barcelona, I, 1866; II, F. P. Briz y Joseph Saltd, 
1867; 1II-V, F. P. Briz, 1871, 1874, 1877. 

Mild y Fontanals, Manuel. Romancerillo Catalan. 
Canciones tradicionales. Segunda edicion, refun- 
dida y aumentada. Barcelona, 1882. 

Observaciones sobre la poesia popular, con 

muestras de romances catalanes ine"ditos, por . 

Barcelona, 1853. 

Miscelanea folk-ldrica per los Srs Almirall, Arabia, 
et cet. Barcelona, 1887. 

Danish. 

Abrahamson, Nyerup og Rahbek. Udvalgte Danske 
Viser fra MWdelalderen ; ef ter A. S. Vedcls og P. 
Syvs trykte Udgaver og efter haandskrevne Sam- 



linger, udgivne paany af Kjebenhavn, 

1812-14. 5 vols. 

Berggreen, A. P. Danske Folke-Sange og Melodier. 
2d ed. Kjebenhavn, 1860. 3d ed. med et Tillaeg 
af islandske og fsereiske. Kjebenhavn, 1869. 

Boisen, P. O. Nye og gamle Viser, af og fra danske 

Folk, samlede og udgivne af . 10th ed. Kje- 

benhavn, 1875. 

Borrow, George. Romantic Ballads, translated from 
the Danish, etc. London, 1826. 

Brage og Idun, et nordisk Fjaerdingarsskrift, udgivet 
af Frederik Barfod. Kebenhavn, 1839-42. 4 vols 
and 1 haefte. 

Dansk Kirketidende. Kjebenhavn, 1846-. 

Feilberg, Henning Frederik. Fra Heden. Hader- 
slev, 1862. 

Grimm, W. C. Altdanische Heldenlieder, Balladen 

und Marchen, iibersetzt von . Heidelberg, 

1811. Zusatze und Verbesserungen, in Drei alt- 
schottische Lieder. Heidelberg, 1813. 

Grundtvig, Svend. Engelske og skotiske Folkeviser 
med oplysende Anmaerkninger, fordanskede. Kje 
benhavn, 1842-6. 

Danmarks gamle Folkeviser, udgivne af . 

I-V (first half). Kjebenhavn, 1853-78. V, com 
pleted by Axel Olrik, 1890. 

Danske Ridderviser, efter Forarbeider af 

Svend Grundtvig udgivne af Axel Olrik. 1 Bind, 
1, 2 Haefte. Kebenhavn, 1895-96. 

Folkelaesning. Danske Kaempeviser og Folke- 

sange fra Middelalderen, fornyede i gammel Stil. 
Kjebenhavn, 1867. 

Gamle danske Minder i Folkemunde : Folke- 

seventyr, Folkeviser, Folkesagn, samlede og ud 
givne af . Kjebenhavn, 1854. Ny Samling, 

1857. 

Kristensen, E. T. Gamle jyske Folkeviser, sam 
lede af Folkemunde (100 Gamle jyske F.; Gamle 
Viser i Folkemunde). Vols. I, II, X, XI, of 
Jyske Folkeminder. Kjebenhavn, 1871-76, '89, 
'91. 

Skattegraveren. 12 half-yearly parts. Kol- 

ding, 1884-89. 

Efterslaet til Skattegraveren. Kolding, 1890. 



456 



TITLES OF BOOKS OF BALLADS 



Nyerup, Rasmus. Almindelig Morskabslaesning i 

Danmark og Norge. Kjebenhavn, 1816. 
Nyerup, 11., og Rasmussen, P. Udvalg af danske 

Viser fra Midten af det 16de Aarhundrede til 

henimod Midten af det 18de. 2 vols. Kjeben- 

havn, 1821. 
Prior, R. C. Alexander. Ancient Danish Ballads, 

translated from the originals. 3 vols. London, 

Edinburgh and Leipzig, 1860. 
Madsen, Jens. Folkeminder fra Hanved Sogn ved 

Flensborg, samlede og udgivne af . Kjaben- 

havn, 1870. 
Oehlenschlager, A. G. Gamle danske Folkeviser, 

utgivne af . Kjebenhavn, 1840. 

Olrik, Axel. Danske Ridderviser, efter Forarbeider 

af Svend Grundtvig udgivne af . 1 Bind, 1, 2 

Hzefte. K0benhavn, 1895. 
Pontoppidan, Erik. Everriculum ferment! veteris, 

seu residuae in Danico orbe cum paganismi turn 

papism! reliquiae in apricum prolatae. Hafniae, 

1736. 
Rahbek, K. L. Laesning i blandede JEmner. Et 

Maanedsskrift af . 4 vols. Kjebenhavn, 

1821-23. 
Rask, H. K. Morskabslsesning for den danske Al- 

mue, udgivet af . Kjabenhavn, 1839-46. 4 

vols. 
[Sandvig, Berthel Christian.] Levninger af Middel- 

alderens Digtekunst. Kj0benhavn, 1780, 1784. 2 

Hefter. 

Beskrivelse over M0en. Kj0benhavn, 1776. 

Syv, Peder. Et Hundrede udvalde Danske Viser om 

allehaande merkelige Krigs-Bedrivt og anden sel- 
som Eventyr. . . . For0gede med det Andet Hun 
drede Viser om Danske Konger, Ksemper og Andre. 
Kj0benhavn, 1695. 

[Vedel, A. S.] Et hundrede vduaalde danske Viser. 
Ribe, 1591. Kj0benhavn, 1632, 1643, 1671. Chris- 
tiania, 1664. 

Tragica, eller gamle danske historiske Elskoffs 

Viser. Kj0benhavn, 1657. 

Dutch, Flemish and Frisian. 

Alberdingk-Thijm, J. A. Gedichten uit de ver- 
schillende Tijdperken der Noord- en Zuid-neder- 
landsche Literatuur, verzameld, naar Tijdsorde 

gerangschikt en toegelicht door . 2 vols. 

Amsterdam, 1850-52. 

and L. J. Oude en nieuwere Kerstliederen. 

Amsterdam, 1852. 

Antwerpener Liederbuch vom Jahre 1544. Heraus- 
gegeben von Hoffmann von Fallersleben. Han 
nover, 1855. (Horae Belgicae, studio atque opera 
Henrici Hoffmann Fallerslebensis, XI.) 

Baecker, Louis de. Chants historiques de la Flandre, 
400-1650. Lille, 1855. 

Coussemaker, E. de. Chants populaires des Fla- 
mands de France. Gand, 1856. 

Dykstra, W., and van der Meulen, T. G. In Doaze 



fol aide Snypsnaren. Oarde en folle formeardere 

Druk. Frjentsjer, 1882. 
Fetis, Fran9ois Joseph. Histoire gene'rale de la 

Musique. 5 vols. Paris, 1869-76. 
Hoffmann von Fallersleben. Niederlandische Volks- 

lieder. Gesammelt und erlautert. Zweite Aus- 

gabe. Hannover, 1856. 
Le Jeune, J. C. W. Letterkundig Overzigt en 

Proeven van de nederlandsche Volkszangen se- 

dert de XV d Eeuw. Door . 's Gravenhage, 

1828. 

Lootens, Adolphe, and Feys, J. M. E. Chants popu 
laires flamands, avec les airs note's, et poesies 

populaires diverses, recueillis a Bruges. Bruges, 

1879. 
Snellaert, F. A. Oude en nieuwe Liedjes, bijeen 

verzameld door . Tweede vermeerderde Uit- 

gave. Gent, 1864. 
Nederlandsch Liederboek, uitgegeven door het Wil- 

lems-Fonds. 2 vols. Gent, 1891-92. 
van Paemel, L., publisher. Oude Liedekens in Bla- 

deren. Te Gend, by L. van Paemel, Boekdrukker 

op den Brabanddam. 

Volkskunde. Tijdschrift voor nederlandsche Folk 
lore, onder Redactie van Pol de Mont en Aug. 

Gitte*e. Gent, 1888-. 
Willems, J. F. Oude vkemsche Liederen. Gent, 

1848. 

Esthoiiian. 

Dorpater Jahrbiicher fiir Litteratur, Statistik und 
Kunst, besonders Russlands. 5 vols. Riga, Dor- 
pat and Leipzig, 1833-36. 

Fosterlandskt Album. Utgifvet af H. Kellgren, R. 
Tengstrom, K. Tigerstedt. Helsingfors, I, II, 
1845 ; III, 1847. 

Hurt, Jakob. Vana Kannel. Alte Harfe. Vollstan- 
dige Sammlung alter estnischer Volkslieder. Dor- 
pat, 1875-86. (Erste, Zweite Sammlung, Dorpat, 
1886.) 

Neus, H. Ehstnische Volkslieder. Urschrift und 
Uebersetzung. Neval, 1850. 

Rosenplanter, J. H. Beitrage zur genauern Kennt- 
niss der ehstnischen Sprache. Herausgegeben von 
. 5 parts. Pernau, 1813-25. 

Faroe. 

Antiquarisk Tidsskrift, udgivet af det Kongelige 

Nordiske Oldskrift-Selskab. 7 vols. Kjebenhavn, 

1845-64. 
Fugloyarbdk. MS. collection, by Hans Hansson, of 

ballads of Fugla : now included in Grundtvig and 

Block's F0royja kvaeSi. 
Grundtvig, Svend, and Block, Jorgen. Feroyja 

kvaeSi. Corpus Carminum Faeroensium. MS. 

Royal Library, Copenhagen. 16 vols. 
Hammershaimb, V. U. Faeroiske Kvaader, samlede 

og besbrgede ved . 2 vols. K0benhavn, 1851, 

1855. 



TITLES OF BOOKS OF BALLADS 



457 



Hammershaimb, V. U. Faerask Anthologi. 2 vols. 

Kebenhavn, 1891 [1886-91]. 
Lyngbye, Hans Christian. Faereiske Qvaeder om 

Sigurd Fofnersbane og bans JEt. Med et An- 

hang. Samlede og oversatte af . Randers, 

1822. 
Nyeste Skilderie af Kjebenhavn. Udgivet, redigeret 

og forlagt af S. Soldin. Attende Aargang. Kj0- 

benhavn, 1821. 
Svabo, Jens Kristjan. MS. 3 vols in Royal Library 

at Copenhagen: now included in Grundtvig and 

Block's Feroyja kvaeSi. 

Finnish. 

Finsk Tidskrift for Vitterhet, Vetenskap, Konst och 

Politik. Utgifven af C. G. Estlander. Vol. X. 

Helsingfors, 1881. 
[Lbnnrot, Elias.] Kanteletar, taikka Suomen kansan 

wanhoja lauluja ja wirsia. [The Harp, or, The 

Finnish People's old Songs and Lays.] 2d ed. 

Helsingfors, 1864. 
Schroter, H. R. von. Finnische Runen. Upsala, 

1819. 2d ed., by G. H. v. Schroter. Stuttgart, 

1834. 

Flemish. See Dutch. 

French and Provencal. 

" Airs de Cour, comprenans le Tre*sor des Tre"sors, 
la Fleur des Fleurs, et Eslite des chansons amou- 
reuses. Poictiers, 1607." 

Almanach de Boulogne-sur-Mer pour 1863. Bou 
logne, 1863. 

Almanach des Traditions populaires. [E. Rolland.] 
Paris, 1882. 

[Ampere, J. J., and others.] Bulletin du Contrite" de 
la Langue, de 1'Histoire et des Arts de la France, 
1852-1857. Paris, 1854-60. 

Instructions relatives aux Poesies Populaires 

de la France [redige"es par J. J. Ampere]. Extrait 
du Bulletin du Comite* de la Langue, de 1'Histoire, 
et des Arts de la France. Paris, 1853. [Vol. I, 
pp. 217-279, of the above.] 

Arbaud, Damase. Chants populaires de la Provence, 

recueillis et annotes par . 2 vols. Aix, 1862- 

1864. 

Atger, Aime". Poesies populaires en Langue d' oc, 

recueillis par . Montpellier, 1875. (Extrait de 

la Revue des Langues romanes, t. VI.) 

Aycard, Marie. Ballades et chants populaires de la 
Provence. Paris, 1826. 

Basselin, Olivier. Vaux-de-vire d' Olivier Basselin, 
suivis d'un choix d'anciens vaux-de-vire, de bac- 
chanales et de chansons, etc. Publics par Louis du 
Bois. Caen, 1821. 

Vaux-de-vire d'OHvier Basselin et Jean le 

Houx, suivis d'un choix d'anciens vaux-de-vire et 
d'anciennes chansons normandes, etc. Nouv. ed. 
revue par P. L. Jacob [Paul Lacroix]. Paris, 1858. 

VOL. v. 58 



Beauquier, Charles. Chansons populaires recueillies 

en Franche-Comte'. Paris, 1894. 
Beaurepaire, Eugene de. Etude sur la poe'sie popu- 

laire en Normandie, et spe"cialement dans 1'Avran- 

chin. Avranches et Paris, 1856. 
Blade, J. F. Poesies populaires en langue fran9aise, 

recueillies dans 1'Armagnac et PAgenais. Paris, 

1879. 

Poesies populaires de la Gascogne. 3 vols. 

Paris, 1881-82. 

Bosquet, Ame"lie. La Normandie romanesque et 
merveilleuse. Paris and Rouen, 1845. 

Buchon, Max. Noels et chants populaires de la 
Franche-Comte. Salins, 1863. 

Bujeaud, Jerome. Chants et chansons populaires 
des provinces del' Quest, Poitou, Saintonge, Aunis 
et Angoumois, avec les airs originaux. 2 vols. 
Niort, 1866. 

Bulletin du Comite", etc. See Ampere, J. J. 

Bulletin de Folklore. Socie"te de Folklore Wallon. 
Tome II. Liege, 1893. 

Champfleury [= Jules Fleury], Chansons populaires 
des provinces de France. Paris, 1860. 

Combes, Anacharsis. Chants populaires des Pays 
Castrais. Castres, 1862. 

Le Chroniqueur du Perigord et du Limousin. Re 
vue historique, artistique et religieuse, sous la 
direction de M. Armand de Siorac. Premiere 
annee. Perigueux, 1853. 

Dardy, L'abbe Leopold. Anthologie populaire de 
1'Albret. I. Poesies gasconnes. Agen, 1891. 

Daudet, Alphonse. Numa Roumestan. Moeurs pari- 
siennes. Paris, 1881. 

Daymard, Joseph. Collection de vieilles chansons 
recueillies par M. Daymard, ingenieur civil a Se- 
rignac. In Bulletin de la Societe* des Etudes litte"- 
raires, scientifiques et artistiques du Lot. T. IV, 
2' fascicule. Cahors, 1878. 

Vieux chants populaires recueillis en Quercy, 

etc. Cahors, 1889. 

Decombe, L. Chansons populaires recueillies dans 

le departement d'llle-et-Vilaine. Rennes, 1884. 
de Gaspe, Philippe Aubert. Les anciens Canadiens. 

2 vols. Quebec, 1887. 
Fleury, Jean. Litterature orale de la Basse-Nor- 

mandie. Paris, 1883. 
Gagnon, Ernest. Chansons populaires du Canada, 

recueillies et publides avec annotations, etc. 2 e e*d. 

Quebec, 1880. 
Gaste, A. Chansons normandes du XV* siecle, 

publiees pour la premiere fois sur les MSS de 

Bayeux et de Vire. Caen, 1866. 
[Gothier, J.] Recueil de crSmignons populaires 

fran9ais et wallons. Lie*ge, 1882. 
Guillon, Ch. Chansons populaires de 1'Ain. Paris, 

1883. 
Haupt, Moriz. Franzosische Volkslieder zusam- 

mengestellt von und aus seinem Nachlass 

herausgegeben. Leipzig, 1877. 



458 



TITLES OF BOOKS OF BALLADS 



Laforest, Pierre. Limoges au XVI? siecle. Li 
moges, 1862. 

Laroche, Pierre (" P. Fagot "). Folk Lore de Lau- 
ragnais. 7 parts. Albi, 1891-94. 

Legeay, Georges. Noels anciens. Socie'te' ge'ne'rale 
de Libraire catholique. Paris and Bruxelles, n. d. 
(1875?). 

Le Herieher, Edouard. Litte'rature populaire de 
Normandie. Avranches, 1884. 

[Lovell, J.] Recueil de chansons canadiennes et 
fran9aises. Montreal, 1859. 

Malo, Charles. Les chansons d'autrefois, vieux 
chants populaires de nos peres. Recueillis et an- 
notes par . Paris, 1861. 

Melusine. Recueil de mythologie, litte'rature popu 
laire, traditions et usages. Publie par MM. H. 
Gaidoz et E. Rolland. Paris, 18 78-. 

Meyrac, Albert. Traditions, coutumes, le"gendes et 
contes des Ardennes. Charleville, 1890. 

Moncaut, Cenac. Litterature populaire de la Gas- 
cogne. Contes, mysteres, chansons historiques, 
satiriques, sentimentales, rondeaux, recueillis dans 
1'Astarac, le Pardiac, le Be"arn, et le Bigorre. 
Paris, 1868. 

Le Moniteur Universel. Paris, 1853. 

Montel, Achille, and Lambert, Louis. Chansons 
populaires du Languedoc. Paris, 1880. 

Nerval, Gerard de (= Gerard Labrunie). La Bo- 
heme galante. Paris, 1866. 

Les Filles du Feu. Paris, 1867. 

Les Faux Saulniers. (Euvres Completes, t. 

IV. Paris, 1868. 

Chansons et ballades populaires du Valois, 

recueillies par . Paris, 1885. 

Noelas, Frederic. Essai d'un romancero forezien. 
In Annales de la Socie'te' imperiale d' Agriculture, 
Industrie, Sciences, Arts et Belles-lettres du de"- 
partement de la Loire, t. IX. St.-Etienne, 1865. 

Pineau, Leon. Le folk-lore du Poitou. Paris, 1892. 

Poesies populaires de la France. MS. 6 vols. Bibli- 
otheque Nationale, Paris. 1852. [A copy of this 
MS. is in the Library of Harvard College.] 

Pouvillon, Emile. Nouvelles rdalistes. Paris, 1878. 

Puymaigre, Le comte [Theodore] de. Chants popu 
laires recueillis dans le pays Messin, mis en ordre 

etannotes par . Metz et Paris, 1865. Nou- 

velle e*dhion, augmentee de notes et de pieces nou- 
velles. 2 vols. Paris, 1881. 

Questionnaire de folk-lore, public par la Socie'te' du 
Folk-Lore Wallon. Liege, 1891. 

Revue critique d'histoire et de litte'rature. Paris, 
1866-. 

Revue des Deux Mondes. Paris, 1849, 1854. 

Revue des Provinces de 1'Ouest, histoire, litterature, 
sciences et arts. Annee I- VI. Nantes, 1853-57. 

Revue des langues romanes. Montpellier et Paris, 
1870-. 

Revue des traditions populaires. Socie'te des Tra 
ditions Populaires. Paris, 1886-. 



Rolland, Eugene. Recueil de chansons populaires. 

6 vols. Paris, 1883-90. 
Romania. Recueil trimestriel, consacre" a Petude 

des langues et des litteratures romanes. Public" 

par Paul Meyer et Gaston Paris. Paris, 18 7 2-. 
Rondes et chansons populaires, illustrees, avec mu- 

sique. Paris, 1876. 
Smith, Victor. Chansons populaires du Velay et du 

Forez. Chants de Pauvres en Forez et en Velay. 

Noels du Velay et du Forez. See Romania. 
Vieilles chansons recueillies en Velay et en 

Forez. (Extrait de la Romania, t. VII.) Paris, 

1878. 
Socard, Alexis. Noels et cantiques imprimes a 

Troves, depuis le XVII* siecle jusqu'a nos jours. 

Paris, Troyes and Reims, 1865. 
Soleville, Emmanuel. Chants populaires du Bas- 

Quercy, recueillis et notes. Paris, 1889. 
Souvestre, Emile. Les Derniers Paysans. Paris, 

1871. 
Tarbe", P. Romancero de Champagne. Collection 

des Poetes de Champagne ante"rieurs au XVI* 

siecle. Vols XX-XXIV. Rheims, 1863, 1864. 
Terry, Leonard, and Chaumont, Leopold. Recueil 

d'airs de cramignons et de chansons populaires a 

Liege. Lie"ge, 1889. (Extrait du t. V de la 2' serie 

du Bulletin de la Soci^te" liegoise de Litte'rature 

wallonne.) 
La Tradition. Revue ge'ne'rale des contes, l^gendes, 

chants, usages, traditions et arts populaires. Paris, 

188 7-. 
Vaugeois, J. F. Gabriel. Histoire des antiquity's de 

laville de 1'Aigle et de ses environs, etc. L'Aigle, 

1841. 
Wallonia. Recueil de Litte'rature orale, croyances 

et usages traditionnels. Fonde" par O. Colson, 

Jos. Defrecheux et G. Willame. Lie"ge, 1893-. 
Wolff, O. L. B. Altfranzosische Volkslieder. Leip 
zig, 1831. 

Frisian. See Dutch. 

Gaelic. 

Campbell, J. F. Leabhar na Feinne. Heroic Gaelic 
Ballads collected in Scotland chiefly from 1512 to 
1871. Arranged by . London, 1872. 

German. 

Alemannia. Zeitschrift fur Sprache, Litteratur und 
Volkskunde des Elsasses und Oberrheins (E., 
O. und Schwabens). Herausgegeben von A. 
Birlinger. Bonn, 1873-90. Zeitschrift fiir Spra 
che, Kunst und Altertum, besonders des aleman- 
nisch-schwabischen Gebiets, fortgefiihrt von F. 
Pfaff. Bonn, 189 2-. 

Baumgarten, P. A. Aus dervolksmassigen Ueberlie- 
ferung der Heimat. Linz, 1869. 

Becker, Karl. Rheinischer Volksliederborn. Aus- 
wahl der edelsten und schonsten Volkslieder mit 



TITLES OP BOOKS OF BALLADS 



459 



ihren Melodien der verschiedenen Gegenden der 
Rheinlande. Neuwied a/Rhein, [1892]. 
[Birlinger, Anton.] Schwabische Volks-Lieder. Bei- 
traff zur Sitte und Mundart des schwabischen 

O 

Volkes. Freiburg im Breisgau, 1864. 

Schwabisch - Augsburgisches Wbrterbuch. 

Miinchen, 1864. 

and Crecelius, W. Deutsche Lieder. Festgruss 

an L. Erk. Heilbronn, 1876. 

Blatter fiir pommersche Volkskunde. Herausgegeben 
von D. Knoop und Dr. A. Haas. Stettin, 1892-. 

Bdckel, Otto. Deutsche Volkslieder aus Oberhessen. 
Marburg, 1885. 

Bohine, Franz M. Altdeutsches Liederbuch. Volks 
lieder der Deutschen nach Wort und Weise, aus 
dem 12. bis zum 17. Jahrhundert, gesammelt und 
erlautert von . Leipzig, 1877. 

Deutscher Liederhort . . . von Ludwig Erk . . . 

nach Erk's handschriftlichem Nachlasse und auf 
Grund eigener Sammlung neubearbeitet und fort- 
gesetzt. 3 vols. Leipzig, 1893-94. 

Bbrner, W. Volkssagen aus dem Orlagau, u. s. w. 

Altenburg, 1838. 
[Brentano, Clemens.] Godwi oder Das steinerne 

Bild der Mutter. Ein verwilderter Roman von 

Maria. 2 vols. Bremen, 1801-02. 
Briefe Goethes und der bedeutendsten Dichter seiner 

Zeit an Herder. Herausgegeben von Heinrich 

Diintzer und F. G. von Herder. Besonderer Ab- 

druck aus der Sammlung Aus Herders Nachlass. 

Frankfurt am Main, 1858. 
Braofur. Ein litterarisches Magazin der deutschen 

O o 

und nordischen Vorzeit. Herausgegeben von F. 

D. Grater (und anderen). 8 vols. Leipzig, 1791- 

1805. 
Biisching, Johann Gustav. Wbchentliche Nach- 

richten fiir Freunde der Geschichte, Kunst und 

Gelahrtheit des Mittelalters. 4 vols. Breslau, 

1,11,1816; III, 1817; IV, 1819. 
and von der Hagen, F. H. Sammlung deutscher 

Volkslieder, mit einem Anhange flammlandischer 

und franzbsischer, nebst Melodien. Berlin, 1807. 
Deutsches Museum. [H. C. Boie and C. K. W. von 

Dohm.] 26 vols. Leipzig, 1776-88. 
Ditfurth, Franz Wilhelm, Freiberr von. Frankische 

Volkslieder, aus dem Munde des Volkes selbst 

gesammelt und herausgegeben von . Erster 

Theil, Geistliche Lieder ; Zweiter Theil, Weltliche 

Lieder. Leipzig, 1855. 

Deutsche Volks- und Gesellschaftslieder des 

17. und 18. Jahrhunderts. Wort und Weise ge 
sammelt und herausgegeben von . Nbrdlingen, 

1872. 

Diintzer, Heinrich, and von Herder, F. G. Briefe 
Goethes und der bedeutendsten Dichter seiner 
Zeit an Herder. Besonderer Abdruck aus der 
Sammlung Aus Herders Nachlass. Frankfurt a. 
M., 1858. 

Elwert, A. Ungedrukte Reste alten Gesangs nebst 



Stiicken neurer Dichtkunst. Giesen und Mar 
burg, 1784. 

Erk, Ludwig. Neue Sammlung deutscher Volks 
lieder mit ihren eigenthumlichen Melodien. Ber 
lin, 1841-45. (Vols. I, II, in 6 Hefte, and Vol. 
Ill, 1st Heft.) 

Deutscher Liederhort. Auswahl der vorzu'g- 

lichern deutschen Volkslieder aus der Vorzeit und 
der Gegenwart mit ihren eigenthumlichen Melo 
dien. Berlin, 1856. For new edition see Bbhme, 
Franz M. 

and Irmer, Wilhelm. Die deutschen Volkslieder 

mit ihren Singweisen. Gesammelt und herausge 
geben von . Zweite Ausgabe in Einem Bande. 

Leipzig, 1843. 

Erlach, Friedrich Karl, Freiherr von. Die Volks 
lieder der Deutschen. Eine vollstandige Samm 
lung der vorziiglichen deutschen Volkslieder von 
der Mitte des fiinfzehnten bis in die erste Halfte 
des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts. Herausgegeben 
und mit den Bemerkungen und Hinweisungen ver- 
sehen, wo die verschiedenen Lieder aufgefunden 
werden konnen. 5 vols. Mannheim, 1834-36. 

Eschenburg, Johann Joachim. Denkmaler altdeut- 
scher Dichtkunst, beschrieben und erlautert. Bre 
men, 1799. 

Fiedler, Eduard. Volksreime und Volkslieder in 
Anhalt-Dessau. Gesammelt und herausgegeben 
von . Dessau, 1847. 

Firmenich, J. M. Germaniens Vblkerstimmen. 
Sammlung der deutschen Mundarten in Dichtun- 
gen, Sagen, Mahrchen, Volksliedern, u. s. w. 3 
vols. and Nachtrage. Berlin, [1843]-67. 

Forster, Georgius. Frische Liedlein. Niirnberg, 
1552, 1560. 

Frankfurter Liederbuch. Lieder Biichlein, darin 
begriffen sind zweyhundert vnd sechtzig allerhand 
schbner weltlicher Lieder, u. s. w. Frankfurt a. 
M., 1584. 

Frischbier, H., and Sembrzycki, J. Hundert bst- 
preussische Volkslieder in hochdeutscher Sprache. 
Leipzig, 1893. 

Frommann, G. Karl. Die deutschen Mundarten. 
Eine Monatschrift [Vierteljahrsschrift] fiir Dich- 
tung, Forschung und Kritik. Begriindetvon J. A. 

Pangkofer, fortgesetzt von . 6 vols. Niirnberg, 

1854-57; Nordlingen, 1858-59. 7th vol., Halle, 
1877 (Zeitschrift, u. s. w.). 

[Herder, J. G. v.] Volkslieder. Erster Theil. Leip 
zig, 1778. Zweiter Theil. Volkslieder (nebst 
untermischten andern Stiicken). Leipzig, 1779. 

Herrmann, E., and Pogatschnigg, D. Deutsche Volks- 
Lieder aus Karnten. Gesammelt u. ausgewahlt 
von . Salon- Ausgabe. Graz, 1884. 

Hoffmann von Fallersleben, and Richter, Ernst. 
Schlesische Volkslieder mit Melodien. Aus dem 
Munde des Volks gesammelt und herausgegeben 
von . Leipzig, 1842. 

Hruschka, Alois, and Toischer, Wendelin. Deutsche 



460 



TITLES OF BOOKS OF BALLADS 



Volkslieder aus Bdhmen. 3 Lieferungen. Prag, 
1888-89. 

Jahn, Ulrich. Volkssagen aus Pommern und Riigen. 

Gesammelt und herausgegeben von . Stettin, 

1886. 

Kind, Friedrich. Auserwahlte Unterhaltungen. 10 
vols. Wien, 1827. 

Knoop, Otto. Volkssagen, Erzahlungen, Aberglau- 
ben, Gebrauche und Marchen aus dem dstlichen 
Hinterpommern. Posen, 1885. 

Kb'hler, Job. Aug. Ernst. Volksbrauch, Aberglau- 
ben, Sagen, und andre alte Ueberlieferungen im 
Voigtlande. Leipzig, 1867. 

Kb'rner, Ph. Max. Historische Volkslieder aus dem 
sechzehntep und siebenzehnten Jahrhundert, nach 
den in der k. Hof- und Staatsbibliothek zu Mu'n- 
chen vorhandenen fliegenden Blattern gesammelt 

und berausgegeben von . Mit einein Vorworte 

von J. A. Schmeller. Stuttgart, 1840. 

Kretzschmer, Andreas. Deutsche Volkslieder mit 
ihren Original-Weisen. Unter Mitwirkung des 
Herrn Professor Dr. Massmann in Miinchen, des 
Herrn von Zuccalmaglio in Warschau, und mehre- 
rer anderer Freunde der Volks-Poesie, nach hand- 
schriftlichen Quellen herausgegeben und mit An- 

merkungen versehen von . Erster Theil. 

Berlin, 1840. 

Kurz, Heinrich. Aeltere Dichter. Schlacht- und 
Volkslieder der Schweizer. In einer Auswahl 
herausgegeben von . Zurich, 1860. 

Lemke, Elisabeth. Volksthiimliches in Ostpreussen. 
2 pts. Mohrungen, 1884-87. 

Lewalter, Johann. Deutsche Volkslieder in Nieder- 
hessen aus dem Munde des Volkes gesammelt. 
5 Hefte. Hamburg, 1890-94. 

von Liliencron, R. Die historischen Volkslieder der 
Deutschen vom 13. bis 16. Jahrhundert. Gesam 
melt und erlautert von . 4 vols and Nachtrag. 

Leipzig, 1865-69. 

[Longard, J. B.] Altrheinlandische Mahrlein und 
Liedlein, grosse und kleine, hiibsche und reine, 
zarte und feine, so man von alters her in rheini- 
schen Landen aller Enden hort singen und pfeifen. 
Zu besserer Gedachtniss und seinen Landsleuten 
zu Nutz und Frommen ganz treulich und fleissig- 
lich gesammelt und in dies Biichlein gebracht 
durch einen Liebhaber teutscher Poeterei. Co- 
blenz, 1843. 

Liitolf, Alois. Sagen, Brauche und Legenden aus 
den fiinf Orten Lucern, Uri, Schwyz, Unterwal- 
den und Zug. Lucern, 1865. 

Meier, Ernst. Deutsche Kinder-Reime und Kinder- 
Spiele aus Schwaben. Aus dem Volksmunde ge 
sammelt und herausgegaben von . Tubingen, 

1851. 

Schwabische Volks-Lieder. Mit ausgewahl- 

ten Melodien. Aus miindlicher Ueberlieferung 
gesammelt von . Berlin, 1855. 

Meinert, Joseph Georg. [Der Fylgie.] Alte teutsche 



Volkslieder in der Mundart des Kuhlandchens. 

Herausgegeben und erlautert von . Erster 

Band. Wien und Hamburg, 1817. 

Mittler, Franz Ludwig. Deutsche Volkslieder. 

Sammlung von . Marburg und Leipzig, 1855. 

2* Ausg. Frankfurt am Main, 1865. 

Montanus. See Vincenz von Zuccalmaglio. 

Miillenhof, Karl. Sagen, Marchen und Lieder der 
Herzogthiimer Schleswig-Holstein und Lauen- 
burg. Kiel, 1845. 

Miiller, Alfred. Volkslieder aus dem Erzgebirge. 
Annaberg, 1883. 

Miindel, Curt. Elsassische Volkslieder. Strassburg, 
1884. 

Miinsterische Geschichten. Sagen und Legenden, 
nebst einem Anhange von Volksliedern und Spriich- 
wortern. Miinster, 1825. 

Neocorus. Johann Adolfis, genannt Neocorus, 
Chronik des Landes Dithmarschen. Aus der Ur- 
schrift herausgegeben von Prof. F. C. Dahlmann. 
2 vols. Kiel, 1827. 

Der neuen Preussischen Provinzial-Blatter andere 
Folge. Herausgegeben von Dr. A. Hagen. Band 
HI. Konigsberg, 1853. 

Nicolai, Friedrich. Eyn feyner kleyner Almanach 
vol schonerr echterr liblicher Volckslieder, lus- 
tigerr Reyen vnndt kleglicherr Mordgeschichte, 
gesungen von Gabriel Wunderlich weyl. Benkel- 
sengerrn zu Dessaw, herausgegeben von Daniel 
Seuberlich, Schusterrn tzu Ritzmiick ann der 
Elbe. Erster Jahrgang, Berlynn vnndt Stettynn, 
1777. Zweiter Jargang, 1778. Verlegts Friedrich 
Nicolai. 

Niederdeutsche Volkslieder, gesammelt und heraus 
gegeben vom Vereine fur niederdeutsche Sprach- 
forschung, Heft 1. Die niederdeutschen Lieder- 
biicher von Uhland und de Bouck. Hamburg, 
1883. 

[Norrenberg, P.] Niederrheinische Volkslieder, im 
alten Miihlgau gesammelt von Dr. Hans Zur- 
miihlen. Zweite Ausgabe von : Des Diilkener 
Fiedlers Liederbuch. Viersen, 1875. Leipzig, 
1879. 

Pailler, Wilhelm. Weihnachtlieder aus Oberoster- 

reich. Gesammelt und herausgegeben von . 

Innsbruck, 1881. 

Parisius, Ludolf. Deutsche Volkslieder mit ihren 
Singweisen, geistliche Lieder und Balladen, in der 
Altmark und im Magdeburgischen aus Volks 
munde gesammelt von . Erstes Heft. Mag 
deburg, 1879. 

Paudler, A. Nordbb'hmische Volkslieder. Bbhm.- 
Leipa, 1877. 

Peter, Anton. Volksthiimliches aus Osterreichisch- 
Schlesien. Gesammelt und herausgegeben von 
. 3 vols. Troppau, 1865-73. 

Pogatschnigg, V., and Herrmann, Emanuel. Deutsche 

Volks-Lieder aus Karnten. Gesammelt von . 

2 vols. Graz, 1869. 



TITLES OP BOOKS OP BALLADS 



461 



Prbhle, Heinrich. Weltliche und geistliche Volks- 

lieder und Volksschauspiele. Mit einer Musikbei- 

lage. Aschersleben, 1855. 
Reifferscheid, Alexander. Westfalische Volkslieder, 

in Wort und Weise, mit Klavier-begleitung und 

liedervergleichenden Anmerkungen. Heilbronn, 

1879. 
Eichter, L., and Marschner, A. E. Alte und neue 

Volks-Lieder, mit Bildern und Singweisen. Her- 

ausgegeben von . Leipzig, n. d. 

Rochholz, Ernst Ludwig. Schweizersagen aus dem 

Aargau. Gesammelt und erlaiitert von . 2 

vols. Aarau, 1856. 
Rosegger, Petri Kettenfeier, and Heuberger, Richard. 

Volkslieder aus Steiermark, mit Melodieen. Pest, 

1872. 
Schade, Oskar. Bergreien. Eine Liedersammlung 

des XVI. Jahrhunderts, nach dem Exemplare 

der Groszherzoglichen Bibliothek zu Weimar her- 

ausgegeben von . Weimar, 1854. 

Scherer, Georg. Deutsche Volkslieder. Gesammelt 

von . 2* Auflage. Leipzig, 1851. 

Deutsche Volkslieder mit ihren eigenthiimli- 

chen Singweisen. Gesammelt und herausgegeben 
von . Stuttgart, Heft I, 1854; Heft II, 1855. 

Jungbrunnen. Die schbnsten deutschen 

Volkslieder, gesammelt von : . (Dritte Auflage 
der " Deutschen Volkslieder ".) Berlin, 1875. 

Scleicher, Aug. Volksthiimliches aus Sonneberg im 

Meininger Oberlande. Weimar, 1858. 
Schlossar, Anton. Deutsche Volkslieder aus Steier 
mark. Innsbruck, 1881. 
Schmeller, J. A. Die Mundarten Bayerns gramma- 

tisch dargestellt. Miinchen, 1821. 
[Schmid, C. H., and Dyck, J. G.] Taschenbuch fiir 

Dichter und Dichterfreunde. Achte Abtheilung, 

1778. Leipzig, 1774-81 (12 Abtheilungen). 
Schmitz, Jacob H. Sitten und Sagen, u. s. w., des 

Eifler Volkes, herausgegeben von . 2 vols. 

Trier, 1856, 1858. 
Schroer, K. J. Ein Ausflug nach Gottschee. Bei- 

trag zur Erforschung der Gottscheewer Mundart. 

Wiener Akademie. Sitzb. d. PhiL-hist. Cl., LX, 

1868. Wien, 1869. 
Schuster, Fried. Wilhelm. Siebenbiirgisch-sachs- 

ische Volkslieder, Sprichworter, Rathsel, Zauber- 

formeln und Kinder-Dichtungen. Hermannstadt, 

1865. 
Schweizerblatter. Eine Monatschrift, herausgegeben 

von A. Henne und 1. 1. Reithard. II. Jahrgang, 

St. Gallon, 1833. 
Seckendorff, Leo, Freiherr von. Musenalmanach 

fiir das Jahr 1808. Regensburg. 
Seuffert, Bernhard. Maler Miiller. Im Anhang, 

Mittheilungen aus Miiller's Nachlass. Berlin, 

1877. 
Simrock, K. Die geschichtlichen deutschen Sagen, 

aus dem Munde des Volkes und deutscher Dichter. 

Frankfurt am Main, 1850. 



Simrock, K. Die deutschen Volkslieder. Gesam 
melt von . Frankfurt am Main, 1851. 

Spec, Johannes. Volksthiimliches vom Niederrhein. 
2 Hefte. Kbln, 1875. 

Tobler, Ludwig. Schweizerische Volkslieder. 2 
vols. Frauenfeld, 1882-84. 

Tschischka, F., and Schottky, J. M. Oesterrei- 
chische Volkslieder, mit ihren Singweisen. Gesam 
melt und herausgegeben durch . Zweite ver- 

besserte und vermehrte Auflage, besorgt von Franz 
Tschischka. Pesth, 1844. (! Auflage, 1818.) 

Uhland, Ludwig. Alte hoch- und niederdeutsche 
Volkslieder, in fiinf Biichern, herausgegeben von 

. 2 Abtheilungen. Stuttgart und Tubingen, 

1844-45. 

Walter, Wilibald. Sammlung deutscher Volkslieder 
welche noch gegenwartig im Munde des Volkes 
leben und in keiner der bisher erschienenen Samm- 

lungen zu finden sind. Herausgegeben von . 

Leipzig, 1841. 

Wittstock, Heinrich. Sagen und Lieder aus dem 
Nbsner Gelande. Bistritz, 1860. 

Wolf, Adam. Volkslieder aus dem Egerlande. Ge 
sammelt und herausgegeben von . Eger, 1869. 

Wolfram, Ernst H. Nassauische Volkslieder nach 
Wort und Weise aus dem Munde des Volks ge 
sammelt, u. s. w. Berlin, 1894. 

Wunderhorn. Des Knaben Wunderhorn. Alte 
deutsche Lieder gesammelt von L. Achim v. 
Arnim und Clemens Brentano. 3 vols. Heidel- 
burg: I, 1806; II, III, 1808. Erster Theil, 
Zweite Auflage, 1819. 

Des Knaben Wunderhorn. Alte deutsche 

Lieder gesammelt von L. A. von Arnim und 
Clemens Brentano. Vierter Theil, nach A. v. 
Arnim's handschriftlichen Nachlass herausgegeben 
von Ludwig Erk. Berlin, 1857. 

Des Knaben Wunderhorn. Alte deutsche 

Lieder gesammelt von L. A. v. Arnim und Clemens 
Brentano. Neu bearbeitet von Anton Birlinger 
und Wilhelm Crecelius. Vol. I, Wiesbaden, 1874; 
II, Wiesbaden und Leipzig, 1876. 

Zacher's Zeitschrift. See Zeitschrift fiir deutsche 
Philologie. 

Zarnack, August. Deutsche Volkslieder mit Volk- 
weisen fur Volksschulen, nebst einer Abhandlung 
iiber das Volkslied. Erster Theil, Berlin, 1818; 
Zweiter Theil, Berlin, 1820. 

Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Philologie herausgegeben 
von Ernst Hopfner und Julius Zacher (von Hugo 
Gering). Halle, 186 9-. 

Zuccalmaglio, A. Wilhelm von. Deutsche Volkslie 
der mit ihren Original- Weisen. Unter Mitwir- 
kung des Herrn Professor Dr. E. Baumstark und 
meherer anderer Freunde der Volks- Dichtung, 
als Forsetzung des A. Kretzschmer'schen Werkes, 
gesammelt und mit Anmerkungen versehen. Zwei 
ter Theil, Berlin, 1840. 

[Zuccalmaglio, Vincenz von.] Die deutschen Volks- 



462 



TITLES OF BOOKS OF BALLADS 



feste. Ein Beitrag zur vaterlandischen Sitten- 
geschichte, von Montanus. Iserlohn und Elberfeld, 
1854. 

Gipsy. 

Wlislocki, H. v. Volksdichtungen der siebenbiirgi- 
schen und sudungarischen Zigeuner. Wien, 1890. 

Icelandic. 

Grundtvig, Svend, and SigurtJsson, Jdn. Islenzk 
FornkvseSi. Kj0benhavn, 1, 1854-58 ; II, 1859-85. 

Italian. 

Alexander, Francesca. Roadside Songs of Tuscany, 

translated and illustrated by ; and edited by 

John Ruskin, 10 parts. New York, 1885 [1884-85]. 

Archivio per lo studio delle tradizioni popolari. Ri- 
vista trimestrale, diretta da G. Pitre e S. Salo- 
mone-Marino. Palermo, 1882-. 

Barbi, Michele. Poesia popolare pistoiese. Firenze, 
1895. 

Bernoni, Dotn Giuseppe. Canti popolari veneziani, 
raccolti da . Venezia, 1872. 

Nuovi canti popolari veneziani, raccolti da 

. Venezia, 1874. 

Tradizioni popolari veneziane, raccolte da 

. Venezia, 1875. 

Biblioteca di letteratura popolare italiana, publicata 
per cura di Severino Ferrari. 1 vol., and 2 fas- 
cicoli of a 2 d . Firenze, 1882-83. 

Bolognini, Nepomuceno. Usi e costumi del Tren- 
tino. Le Leggende del Trentino. Rovereto, 1885- 
89. In Annuario della Societa degli Alpinisti Tri- 
dentini, XI-XIV. 

Bolza, Giambattista. Canzoni. popolari comasche, 
raccolte e publicate colle melodic. (Sitzungsbe- 
richte der Phil.-Hist. Classe der Kaiserl. Akademie, 
LIII, 637-95.) Wien, 1867. 

La Calabria. Rivista di letteratura popolare. Di 
retta da Luigi Bruzzano. Monteleone, 1888-. 

Casetti, Antonio, and Imbriani, Vittorio. Canti 
popolari delle provincie meridional!. 2 vols. 
Torino, etc., 1871-72. 

Dalmedico, Angelo. Canti del popolo veneziano, per 

la prima volta raccolti ed illustrati da . 2 d ed. 

Venezia, 1857. 

D' Ancona, Alessandro. La poesia popolare italiana. 
Livorno, 1878. 

De Nino, Antonio. Saggio di canti popolari sabi- 
nesi, illustrati da . Rieti, 1869. 

Ferraro, Giuseppe. Canti popolari monferrini, rac 
colti ed annotati dal Dr. . Torino, Firenze, 

1870. 

Nuova raccolta di canti popolari monferrini, 

per . Estratto dalla Rivista Europea. Firenze, 

1875. 

Canti popolari di Ferrara, Cento e Ponte- 

lagoscuro, raccolti per cura del Prof. . Fer 
rara, 1877. 



Ferraro, Giuseppe. Canti popolari del Basso Mon- 

ferrato, raccolti ed annotati da . Palermo, 

1888. 

Canti popolari in dialetto logudorese, raccolti 

per cura di . Torino, 1891. 

Gianandrea, Antonio. Canti popolari marchigiani, 

raccolti e annotati dal Prof. . Roma, Torino, 

Firenze, 1875. 
Giannini, Giovanni. Canti popolari della Montagna 

Lucchese, raccolti e annotati da . Torino, 

1889. 
Giornale di filologia romanza. Diretto da Ernesto 

Monaci. 4 vols. Roma, 1878-83. 
Guerrini, Olindo. Alcuni canti popolari romagnoli, 

raccolti da . Bologna, 1880. 

Ive, Antonio. Canti popolari istriani, raccolti a 

Rovigno ed annotati da . Roma, Torino, 

Firenze, 1877. 
Kaden, Woldemar. Italiens Wunderhorn. Volks- 

lieder aus alien Provinzen der Halbinsel und Sicili- 

ens in deutscher Uebertragung. Stuttgart, 1878. 
Kopisch, August. Agrumi. Volksthiimliche Poesieen 

aus alien Mundarten Italiens und seiner Inseln. 

Gesammelt und iibersetzt. Berlin, 1838. 
Marcoaldi, Oreste. Canti popolari inediti umbri, 

liguri, piceni, piemontesi, latini, raccolti e illus 
trati da . Geneva, 1855. 

Mazzatinti, Giuseppe. Canti popolari umbri raccolti 

a Gubbio e illustrati da . Bologna, 1883. 

Nannarelli, Fabio. Studio comparativo sui canti 

popolari di Arlena. Roma, 1871. 
Nigra, Costantino. Canzoni popolari del Piemonte 

in Rivista Contemporanea, Vols. XII, XIII, XV, 

XX, XXIV, XXXI. Torino, 1858-62. 

Canti popolari del Piemonte, pubblicati da 

. Torino, 1888. 

Nuove Effemeridi Siciliani. 2 d serie, I. Palermo, 

1875. 
Oesterreichische Wochenschrift fiir Wissenschaft, 

Kunst, und b'ffentliches Leben, I. Wien, 1863. 
Pitre, Giuseppe. Studi di poesia popolare. Palermo, 

1872. 

Canti popolari siciliani, raccolti ed illustrati 

da . Preceduti da uno studio critico dello 

stesso autore. 2 vols. Palermo, 1870-71. 

Secunda edizione, interamente rifusa. 2 

vols. Palermo, 1891. 
La Rassegna settimanale di politica, scienze, lettere 

ed arti. Vol. III. Roma, 1879. 
Ricordi, Giulio. Canti popolari lombardi, raccolti, 

etc. Fasc. I. Canti milanesi. Milano, [1857]. 
Righi, Ettore Scipione. Saggio di canti popolari 

veronesi, per cura di . Verona, [1863]. 

La Rivista Europea. Firenze, 1869-76. 

Rivista Contemporanea. Vols. XII, XIII, XV, XX, 

XXIV, XXXI. Torino, 1858-62. See Nigra, C. 
Rivista di filologia romanza, diretta da L. Manzoni, 

E. Monaci, E. Stengel. 2 vols. Imola and Roma, 

1872-75. 



TITLES OF BOOKS OP BALLADS 



463 



Rivista di Letteratura popolare diretta da G. Pitre 
e Francesco Sabatini. 4 fascicoli. Roma, 1877- 
79. 

Rivista delle Tradizioni popolari italiane, diretta da 
Angelo de Gubernatis. II. Roma, 1894. 

Salomone-Marino, Salvatore. Leggende popolari 

siciliane in poesia, raccolte ed. annotate da . 

Palermo, 1880. 

Tigri, Giuseppe. Canti popolari toscani, raccolti e 
annotati da . 2 d ed. Firenze, 1860. 

Trifone Nutricati-Briganti, A. Intorno ai canti e 
racconti popolari del Luccese. Wien [Lecce], 
1873. 

Vigo, Lionardo. Canti popolari siciliani raccolti e 
illustrati da . Catania, 1857. 

Raccolta amplissima di canti popolari sicili 
ani. 2* ed. Catania, 1870-74. 

Visconti, P. E. Saggio de' canti popolari della pro- 
vincia Marittima e Campagna. Roma, 1830. 

Widter und Wolf. Volkslieder aus Venetien. Ge- 
sammelt von Georg Widter, herausgegeben von 
Adolf Wolf. Wien, 1864. (Akademie der Wis- 
senschaften, Phil.-hist. Classe, Sitzungsberichte, 
XLVI.) 

Wolff, O. L. B. Egeria. Sammlung italienischer 
Volkslieder . . . begonnen von Wilhelm Mueller, 
vollendet, u. s. w., von . Leipzig, 1829. 

Ladin. 

Flugi, Alfons von. Die Volkslieder des Engadin. 
Nebst einem Anhange engadinischer Volkslieder 
im Original und in deutscher Uebersetzung. 
Strassburg, 1878. 

Lettish. 

Dorpater Jahrbiicher fiir Litteratur, Statistik und 

Kunst, besonders Russlands. 5 vols. Riga und 

Dorpat, 1833-36. 
Tielemann, G. T. Livona. Ein historisch-poetisches 

Taschenbuch fiir die deutsch-russischen Ostsee- 

provinzen. 2 vols. Riga und Dorpat, 1812, 

1816. 
Ulmann, Karl. Lettische Volkslieder ubertragen im 

Versmaass der Originale. Riga, 1874. 

Lithuanian. 

Bartsch, Christian. Dainu Balsai. Melodieen litau- 
ischer Volkslieder, u. s. w. Heidelberg. Erster 
Theil, 1886: Zweiter Theil, 1889. 

Beitrage zur Kunde Preussens. 7 vols. Konigsberg, 
1818-24. 

Bezzenberger, Adalbert. Litauische Forschungen. 
Beitrage zur Kenntniss der Sprache und des Volks- 
tumes der Litauer. Gottingen, 1882. 

Leskien, A., and Brugman, K. Litauische Volks 
lieder und Marchen. Strassburg, 1882. 

Nesselmann, G. H. F. Littauische Volkslieder, ge- 
sammelt, kritisch bearbeitet und metrisch ubersetzt 
von . Berlin, 1853. 



Rhesa, L. J. Dainos oder Litthauische Volkslieder, 
gesammelt, ubersetzt, u. s. w., von . Konigs 
berg, 1825 ; Neue Auflage, verbessert von Fried. 
Kurschat, Berlin, 1843. 

Magyar. 

Aigner, Ludvig. Ungarische Volksdichtungen , uber 
setzt und eingeleitet von . 2 Auflage. Buda 
pest, [1879]. 

Arany, J. Koszoru, 1864. Sze"pirodalmi satalanos 

miveltse'g terjeszto hetilap. Szerkeszti . 

Pest, 1863-. 

Arany, Lazlo, and Gyulai, Pal. Magyar ne'pkblte'si 
gyiijteme'ny. Uj folyam. [Collection of Magyar 
Popular Poetry. New Series.] Pest, I, II, 1872; 
III, 1882. 

Erde'lyi, Janos. Nepdalok es mondak : a Kisfaludy- 
Tarsasdg megbizdsdbul szerkeszti e"s kiadja. [Pop 
ular Songs and Tales collected and edited at the 
instance of the Kisfaludy Society.] 3 vols. Pest, 
1846-48. 

Herrmann, Anton. Ethnologische Mitteilungen aus 
Ungarn. Zeitschrift fiir die Volkskunde der Be- 
wohner Ungarns und seiner Nebenlander. Buda 
pest, 1887-96. 

Kalmany, Lajos. Koszoriik az Alfbld vad viragaibdL 
[Garlands from Alfold Fieldflowers.] Aradon, 
1877-78. 2 vols. 

Kertbeny [=K. M. Benkert]. Ausgewahlte unga- 
rische Volkslieder. Darmstadt, 1851. 

Kn'za, Janos. Vadrdzsdk. Szekely nepkb'lte'si 

gyiijtemeny, szerkeszti . [Wild Roses. A 

collection of Szekler popular poetry, edited by 
.] vol. I. Kolozsvartt, 1863. 

Ungarische Revue. Mit Unterstiitzung der Ungari- 
schen Akademie der Wissenschaften herausgegeben 
von Paul Hunfalvy und Gustav Heiurich. Leipzig, 
etc., 1881-. 

Norwegian. 

Bugge, Sophus. Gamle norse Folkeviser, samlede og 

udgivne af . Kristiania, 1858. 

Landstad, M. B. Norske Folkeviser, samlede og 

udgivne af . Christiania, 1853. 

Lindeman, L. M. JEldre og nyere norske Fjeld- 

melodier, samlede og bearbeidede for Pianoforte. 

Kristiania, 1853-67. 3 vols and 1 hefte. Ny 

revideret udgave. 2 vols. Kristiania, 1878 (?). 
Moe, J. M., and Mortenson, Ivar. Norske Forn- 

kvaede og Folkevisur, tilskipade ved . I. 

Kristiania, 1877. 
Norske Universitets- og Skole-Annaler. Kristiania, 

1834-. 
Nytaarsgave for Illustreret Nyhedsblads Abonnenter, 

udgivet af P. Botten-Hansen. Christiania, 1860. 

Portuguese and Galician. 

Almeida-Garrett. Romanceiro pelo Visconde de Al- 
meida-Garrett. 3 vols. Lisboa, 1863. [4* ed. of 



464 



TITLES OF BOOKS OF BALLADS 



vol. I, Romances da renascer^a : 2* ed. of vols 

II, III, Romances cavalherescos antigos.] 
Azevedo, Alvaro Rodrigues de. Romanceiro do 

Archipelago da Madeira, colligido e publicado por 

. Funchal, 1880. 

Bellermann, Christ. FT. Portugiesische Volkslieder 

und Romanzen, portugiesisch und deutsch, mit 

Anmerkungen herausgegeben von . Leipzig, 

1864. 
Braga, Theophilo. Romanceiro geral, colligido da 

tradi^ao por . Coimbra, 1867. 

Cantos populares do Archipelago A9oriano. 

Publicados e annotados por . Porto, 1869. 

Ampli^oes ao Romanceiro das Ilhas dos 

Azores, in Revista Lusitana, I, 99 ff. 

Coelho, F. A. Romances populares e rimas infantis 
portuguezes. In Zeitschrift fiir romanische Phi- 
lologie, III, 1879. 

Hardung, Victor Eugenio. Romanceiro portuguez, 
coordinado, annotado e acompanhado d'uma intro- 
duc9o e d'um glossario. 2 vols. Leipzig, 1877. 

Iglesia, Antonio de la. El idioma gallego, su anti- 
giiedad y vida. 3 vols. La Coruna, 1886. 

Revista Lusitana. Archive de estudos philologicos 
e ethnologicos relatives a Portugal, publicado por 
J. Leite de Vasconcellos. Porto, 1887-92. 2 vols. 

Rodrigues de Azavedo. See Azavedo. 

Romero, Sylvio. Cantos populares do Brazil, colli 
gido pelo Dr. , acompanhados de introduc9ao 

e notas comparativas por Theophilo Braga. 2 vols. 
Lisboa, 1883. 

Veiga, Estacio da. Romanceiro do Algarve. Lis 
boa, 1870. 

Romaic (and Italian Greek). 

Arabantinos, Panagiotes. 2v\\oy)i Srj^Suv ^<r/&rw 

rijs 'Hweipov. Athens, 1880. 
Bartholdy, J. L. S. Bruchstiicke zur naheren Kent- 

niss des heutigen Griechenlands, u. s. w. Erster 

Theil. Berlin, 1805. 
Chasiotes, G. Chr. 2v\\oy)i T&V tta-rh r^v "Hireipov 

Sij/jLoriKuv Qfffidrwif. Athens, 1866. 
AeXriov rrjs 'IffToptKTJs Kal 'EOpoXoyi/oji 'Eraipias rrjs 

'EAAaSoj. 4 vols. Athens, 1883-92. 
Eulampios, K. 'O 'A/tdpavros, tfrot rk p6$a rijs ca>ayfv- 

vnOftffris 'E\\d$os. St Petersburg, 1843. 
Fauriel, C. Chants populaires de la Grece moderne. 

2 vols. Paris, 1824-25. 
Garnett, Lucy M. J. Greek Folk-Songs from the 

Turkish Provinces of Greece, literal and metrical 

translation by . Classified, revised and edited 

by J. S. Stuart Glennie. London, 1885. 
Jeannaraki, Anton. "Aff/jLara K/WJTIKC. Leipzig, 1876. 
Joannides, Sab. 'Iffropla Kal aranariK^t Tp\_a]irtovvTos, 

Kalri)s irepl ra6niv x^>P as - Constantinople, 1870. 
Kanellakes, K. N. Xia/cek 'AwUe/cTa. Athens, 1890. 
Kind, Theodor. Anthologie neugriechischer Volks 
lieder. Im Original, mit deutscher Uebersetzung. 

Leipzig, 1861. 



Legrand, fimile. Recueil de chansons populaires 
grecques. Paris, 1874. 

Lemercier, N. Chants he"roiques des montagnards 
et matelots grecs, traduits en vers fra^ais. Paris, 
1824. 

Manousos, Antonios. TpayovSta ^flvi/ci a-wayneva. Kal 
$ia<ra$7]vi<THf>>a. forJ> . 2 parts. Corcyra, 1850. 

Marcellus, Marie Louis de. Chants du peuple en 
Grece. 2 vols. Paris, 1851. 

NeoeAAT/piKefc 'At>d\fKra, vcptoSiKWY e/cSiSo'/xeya inrb rov 
<pi\o\oyiKov <rv\\6yov Uapvaffffav. Athens, 1, 1870-72; 
II, 1874-81. 

Oikonomides, Athanasios K. Tpayottiia rov 'OK^itov 
ffv\\fyevra vwb . Athens, 1881. 

TlavStapa. 2vyypafjifj.a irepio$iK6i>. Athens, [1850J-72. 

Passow, A. Carmina popularia Graeciae recentioris. 
Leipzig, 1860. 

K&ij/j.os. 26yypa/j.fj.a irfpiodiitbv fab \oyiuv 
ffvvracrardfjLfvojf. Athens, 1849. 

Sakellarios, Athanasios A. T& KvirpiaKa. III. Ath 
ens, 1868. 

Schmidt, B. Griechische Marchen, Sagen und 
Volkslieder. Leipzig, 1877. 

Sheridan, C. B. The Songs of Greece, from the 
Romaic text edited by M. C. Fauriel, with addi 
tions, translated by . London, 1825. 

Tommaseo, N. Canti popolari toscani, corsi, illirici, 
greci. 4 vols. Venezia, 1841-42. 

Zampelios, Spuridion. "Atr/tora Srifj-oriKd rrjs 'E,\\dSos. 
Corcyra, 1852. 

>v, tfroi Mvn/ze7a rrjs e\\. apxaidniTos 
<j> vw'E.\\i)viK<j> \a<j>. Vol. I. Constantino 
ple, 1891. 

Comparetti, Domenico. Saggi dei dialetti greci dell' 

Italia meridionale, raccolti ed illustrati da . 

Pisa, 1866. 

Morosi, Giuseppe. Studi sui dialetti greci della 
terra d' Otranto, preceduto da una raccolta dei 
canti, etc. Lecce, 1870. 

[Pellegrini, Astorre.] Canti popolari dei Greci di 
Cargese (Corsica). Bergamo, 1871. 

Roumanian. 

Alecsandri, Vasile. Poesii populare ale Romanilor, 

adunate si intocmite de . Bucuresci, 1866. 

Ballades et chants populaires de la Roumanie 

(principaute"s danubiennes) recueillis et traduits 

par . Paris, 1855. 

Marienescu, At. Marianu. Poesia popurala, Balade; 

culese si corese de . Pest'a, 1859. 

Mironu, Pompiliu. Balade populare Romane, adunate 

de . lassi, 1870. 

Mbckesch, S. Romanische Dichtungen ins Deutsche 

ubersetzt von . Hermannstadt, 1851. 

Murray, E. C. Grenville. The National Songs and 

Legends of Roumania. London, 1859. 
Schuller, J. K. Romanische Volkslieder, metrisch 

iibersetzt und erlautert von . Hermannstadt, 

1859. 



TITLES OF BOOKS OF BALLADS 



465 



Stanley, Henry. Rouman Anthology, or, Selections 
of Rouman Poetry, Ancient and Modern, being a 
collection of the National Ballads of Moldavia and 
Wallachia, etc., with an appendix containing trans 
lations of the poems, notes, etc. Hertford, 1856. 

Slavic. 

Ahacel, Matija, and Korytko, Emil. Slove*nske 
pe'smi krajnskiga nardda. [Slovenian Songs of 
the Carniola people.] 5 parts. Laibach, 1839-44. 

Altrnann, Julius. Die Balalaika. Russische Volks- 
lieder, gesammelt und in's Deutsche ubertragen 
von . Berlin, 1863. 

Antonovic, VI., and Dragomanov, M. Istoriceskija 
pesni malorusskagq naroda. [Historical Poems of 
the Malorussians.] 2 vols. Kiev, 1874-5. 

Bartos, Frantisek. Nove* narodnf pisne moravske'. 
Za doplnek sbirky Susilovy. [New popular Mora 
vian Songs. Supplement to Susil's collection.] 
Briinn, 1882. 

Narodni pisne moravske v nove nasbfrane. 

[Popular Moravian songs newly collected.] Briinn, 
1889. 

Bezsonov, P. Kaleki perechozie. Sbornik stichov i 
izsledovanie. [Travelling Pilgrims. Collection of 
Religious Songs, with an Investigation.] 2 vols. 
Moscow, 1861-4. 

Bodenstedt, Friedrich. Die poetische Ukraine. 
Stuttgart, 1845. 

Bogisic, V. Narodne pjesme, iz starijih najvise 
primorskih zapisa. [Popular Songs from old Col 
lections, mainly from the Littoral.] 2 parts. Bel- 
grad, 1878. 

Bowring, John. Wybor z bdsnictwi ceske'ho. Ches- 
kian Anthology. London, 1832. 

Bowring, John. Narodne srpske pjesme. Servian 

Popular Poetry, translated by . London, 

1827. 

Buslaev, T. J. Istoriceskie ocerki. [Historical 
Sketches.] 2 vols. St. Petersburg, 1861. 

Carrara, Francesco. Canti del popolo dalmata. 
Zara, 1849. 

Chodzko, A. Les chants historiques de 1' Ukraine. 
Paris, 1879. 

[Czeczot, Jan.] Piosnki wiesniacze znad Dzwiny. 
[Peasant Songs from the Dvina Country.] Ksia- 
zeczka trzecia (third pamphlet). Wilna, 1840. 

Celakowsky, F. L. Slowanske narodni pisne. [Slavic 
Popular Songs.] 3 Parts. Prague, 1822-7. 

Danilov, Kirsa. Drevnija rossijskija stichotvorenija, 

sobrannyja . [Old Russian Poems, collected 

by . Ed. K. Kalajdovic.] Moscow, 1818; 3 d 

ed. Moscow, 1878. 

Davidovic, S. N. Srpske narodne pjesme iz Bosne 
(Zenske). [Serbian Popular Songs from Bosnia.] 
Pantchevo, 1884. 

Dozon, A. Bulgarski narodni pesni. [Chansons 
populaires bulgares ine"dites.] Paris, 1875. 

von Diiringsfeld, Ida. Bohmische Rosen. Cze- 
VOL. v. 59 



chische Volkslieder, ubersetzt von . Breslau, 

1851. 

Erben, K. J. Pjsne narodnj w Cechach. [Popular 
Songs in Bohemia.] 3 vols. Prague, 1842-5. 

Prostonarodni ceske pisne a Kkadla. [Popu 
lar Bohemian Songs and Saws.] Prague, 1864. 

Kytice z basni. [Anthology of Fables.] 

Prague, 1871. 

Fedorowski, M. Lud okolic Zarek, Siewierza i Pi- 

licy. [The Peasantry in Zarki, Siewierz and 

Pilica.] 2 vols. Warsaw, 1888-9. 
Goetze, P. von. Serbische Volkslieder in 's deutsche 

ubertragen von . St. Petersburg and Leipzig, 

1827. 

Stiminen des russischen Volks in Liedern. 

Gesammelt und ubersetzt von . Stuttgart, 

1828. 

Golovackij, Jakov F. Narodnyja pesni galickoj i 
ugorskoj Rusi. [Popular Songs in Galician and 
Hungarian Ruthenia.] 3 parts in 4 vols. Moscow, 
1878-9. 

Grudziriski, Stephan. "Lenore " in Polen, eine 
litterarhistorische Abhandlung. Bochnia, 1890. 

Griin, Anastasius. [Graf Anton Alexander.] Volks 
lieder aus Krain. Leipzig, 1850. 

Hapgood, Isabel Florence. The Epic Songs of Rus 
sia. New York, 1886. 

Haupt, Leopold, and Schmaler, Johann Ernst. 
Pjesnicki hornych a delnych Luziskich Serbow. 
Volkslieder der Wenden in der Ober- und Nieder- 
Lausitz. 2 parts. Grimma, 1841, 1843. 

Hilferding, A. F. Onezskija byliny. [Bylinas from 
Onega.] St Petersburg, 1873. 

Hiltebrandt, Peter A. Sbornik pamjatnikov narod- 
nago tvorcestva v severo-zapadnom krae. Izdanie 
redakcii Vilenskago Vestnika. [Collection of 
Monuments of the Popular Creation in the North- 
West. Edited by the Vilenski Vestnik.] Wilna, 
1866. 

Hrvatske narodne pjesme sto se pjevaju po Istri i 
Kvarnerskih Otocih, prestampane iz " Nase Sloge." 
[Croatian Popular Songs sung in Istria and the 
Quarnero Islands, reprinted from " Nase Sloge."] 
Triest, 1879. 

Jakuskin, P. Narodnyja russkija pesni iz sobranija 

. [Russian Popular Songs from the Collection 

of .] St Petersburg, 1865. 

Kapper, Siegfried. Die Gesange der Serben. 2 vols. 
Leipzig, 1852. 

Karadzic, Vuk Stefanovic. Srpske narodne pjesme. 
[Serbian Popular Songs.] 5 vols. Vienna, 1841- 
65. 

Srpske narodne pjesme iz Hercegovine (Zen 
ske). [Serbian Popular Songs from Hercegovina.] 
Vienna, 1866. 

K^trzyrfski, W. OMazurach. [TheMazuri.] Posen, 

1872. 
Kireevskij, P. V. Pesni sobrannyja P. V. Kireev- 

skim. [Songs collected by P. V. K. ; edited by 



466 



TITLES OF BOOKS OF BALLADS 



P. A. Bezsonov and others. 2 a ed., 10 parts. 
Moscow, 1868-75. 

Kolberg, Oskar. Piesni ludu polskiego. [Songs of 
the Polish Peasantry.] (1" vol. of Lud.) War 
saw, 1857. 

Lud, jego zwyczaje, sposdb zycia, mowa, po- 

dania, prsyslowia, obrz^dy, gusta, zabawy, piesni, 
muzyka i tance. [The Peasantry : their customs, 
manner of life, speech, traditions, saws, rites, 
tastes, amusements, songs, music and dances.] 
Cracow, 1865-89. Vols II-XXII. (Krakowskie, 
5-8; Poznariskie, 9-15 ; Lubelskie, 16-17; Kie- 
leckie, 18-19 ; L^czyckie, 22.) 

Mazowsze. Obraz etnograficzny. [The Mazo- 

vians. An ethnographical Sketch.] 4 vols. Cra 
cow, 1885-88. 

Pokucie. Obraz etnograficzny. [Pokucie, 

ethnographical Sketch.] 4 vols. Cracow, 1882- 
89. 

KolMr, Jan. Ndrodnie zpievanky, cili pjsne svetske* 

Slov&ku v Uhrdch. [Popular Songs or Worldly 

Songs of the Slovaks in Hungary.] 2 vols. Buda, 

1834-85. 
Eonopka, Jdzef. Pielni ludu krakowskiego. [Songs 

of the Cracow Peasantry.] Cracow, 1840. 
Kozlowski, Kernel. Lud. Piesni, podania, basnie, 

zwyczaje i przesady ludu z Mazowsza Czerskiego. 

[The Peasantry. Songs, Traditions, Fables, Habits 

and Prejudices of the Peasantry in Mazowia, near 

Czersk.] Warsaw, 1869. 
Krasic, V. Srpske narodne pjesme, starijeg i novijeg 

vremena. [Serbian Popular Songs of ancient and 

modern times.] Pantchevo, 1880. 
Eupcanko, G. I. Sbornik pesen bukovinskago na- 

roda. Sostavil A. Lonacevskij. [Collection of 

Songs of the People of the Bukowina. Arranged 

by A. L.] Kiev, 1875. 
Kurelac, Fran. Jacke ili narodne pesme prostoga i 

neprostoga puka hrvatskoga na Ugrih. [Popular 

Songs of the Masses of the Croatian Populace in 

Hungary.] Agram, 1871. 
Lewestam, F. H. Polnische Volkssagen und Ma'r- 

chen. Aus dem Polnischen des K. W. Woycicki, 

von . Berlin, 1839. 

Lipinski, J. J. Piosnki ludu wielkopolskiego. [Songs 

of the Peasantry in Great Poland.] Posen, 1842. 
Maksimovic, Michail. Ukrainskija narodnyja pesni. 

[Popular Songs of the Ukraine.] Moscow, 1834. 

Sbornik ukrainskich pesen'. [Collection of 

Songs of the Ukraine.] Kiev, 1849. 

Marjanovic, Luka. Hrvatske narodne pjesme. [Croa 
tian Popular Songs.] Agram, 1864. 

Mazuranic, Stjepan. Hrvatske narodne pjesme. 
[Croatian Popular Songs.] Seng, 1876. 

Metlinskij, Ambrosius. Narodnyja juznorusskija 
pesni. [Popular South Russian Songs.] Kiev, 
1854. 

Mickiewicz, Adam. Dziela. Wydanie zupelne przez 
dzieci autora dokonane. [Works. Complete edi 



tion, edited by the author's children.] 6 vols. 

Paris, 1880. 
Mikulici6, F. Narodne pripovietke i pjesme iz hravt- 

skoga primorja. [Popular Tales and Songs from 

the Croatian Littoral.] Porte Re, 1876. 
Miladinov, D. L. K. Bulgarski narodni pesni. 

[Bulgarian Popular Songs.] Agram, 1861 ; Sophia, 

1891. 
Pauli, Zegota. Piesni ludu polskiego w Galicyi. 

[Songs of the Polish Peasantry in Galicia.] Lem- 

berg, 1838. 

Piesni ludu ruskiego w Galicyi. [Songs of 

the Ruthenian Peasantry in Galicia.] 2 vols. 
Lemberg, 1839-40. 

Pellegrini, Ferdinando de. Saggio di una versione 
di canti popolari slavi. Torino, 1846. 

Periodicesko spisanie na bulgarskoto knizovno druz- 
estvo v Sredec. [Periodical Journal of the Bulga 
rian Literary Society.] Sophia, 1882. 

Petranovic, J. B. Srpske narodne pjesme iz Bosne 
(Zenske). [Serbian Popular Songs in Bosnia 
(women's songs).] Serajevo, 1867. 

Srpske narodne pjesme iz Bosne i Hercego- 

vine. [Serbian Popular Songs from Bosnia and 
Hercegovina.] Belgrad, 1867. 

Plohl-Herdvigov, R. F. Hrvatske narodne pjesme i 
pripoviedke. [Croatian Popular Songs and Tales.] 
Warasdin, 1868. 

Prace filologiczne. [Philological Memoirs.] War 
saw, 1885-. 

Przyjaciel ludu, czyli tygodnik potrzebnych i pozy- 
tecznych wiadomosci. [Friend of the Peasantry, 
or, Weekly of Necessary and Useful Knowledge.] 
Leszno, 1834-39. 

Rajkovic, Djordje. Srpske narodne pesme (Zenske). 
[Serbian Popular Songs (women's songs)]. Neu- 
satz, 1869. 

Ralston, W. R. S. The Songs of the Russian Peo 
ple, as illustrative of Slavonic Mythology and 
Russian Social Life. London, 1872. 

Rambaud, A. La Russie epique, e*tude sur les chan 
sons heroiques de la Russie. Paris, 1876. 

Roger, Julius. Pieini ludu polskiego w Gdrnym 
Szlasku. [Songs of the Polish Peasantry in Upper 
Silesia.] Breslau, 1863. 

Romanov, E. Belorusskij sbornik. [White-Rus 
sian Collection.] 5 parts. Kiev, Vitebsk, 1886- 
91. 

Rosen, Georg. Bulgarische Volksdichtungen, ge- 

sammelt und ins Deutsche iibertragen von . 

Leipzig, 1879. 

Rybnikov, P. N. Pesni sobrannyja . [Songs 

collected by P. N. R. Edited by P. Bezsonov and 
others.] 4 vols. I, II, Moscow, 1861, '62 ; III, Pe 
trozavodsk, 1864; IV, St Petersburg, 1867. 

Sacharov, J. Pesni russkago naroda. [Songs of 
the Russian People.] 5 vols. St Petersburg, 1838- 
39. 

Skazanija russkago naroda. [Utterances of 



TITLES OF BOOKS OF BALLADS 



467 



the Russian People.] 2 vols. St Petersburg, 1841- 
49. 

Sbornik za narodni umotvorenija, nauka i kniznina, 
izdava ministerstvoto na narodnoto prosvestenie. 
[Collection of the National Creations, Science and 
Literature, edited by the Ministry of Public In 
struction.] 11 vols. Sofia, 1889-94. 

Sejn, P. V. Belorusskija narodnyja pesni. [White 
Russian Popular Songs.] St Petersburg, 1874. 

Russkija narodnyja pesni. [Russian Popular 

Songs.] Moscow, 1870. 

Materialy dlja izucenija byta i jazyka russ- 

kago naselenija severo-zapadnago kraja. [Mate 
rials for learning the State and Language of the 
Russian Population in the North- West.] 3 parts. 
St Petersburg, 1887-93. 

Stojanovic, M. Pucke pripoviedke i pjesme. [Pop 
ular Tales and Songs.] Agram, 1867. 

Stur, Ludevft. O narodnich pisnich a povestech 
piemen slovanskych. [On the Popular Songs and 
Tales of the Slavic Nations.] Prague, 1853. 

Sumlork, W. S. [=Krolmus]. Staroceske* powesti, 
zpewy, etc. [Old-Bohemian Tales, Songs, etc.] 
3 vols. Prague, 1845-51. 

Susil, Frantisek. Moravske* narodni pisne. [Mora 
vian Popular Songs.] 2 d ed. Briinn, 1860. 

Swoboda, W. A. Sbi'rka ceskych narodnich pism. 
[Collection of Bohemian Popular Songs.] Prague, 
1845. 

Talvj [T. A. L. von Jakob Robinson]. Volkslieder 
der Serben, metrisch iibersetzt und historisch ein- 
geleitet. Neue umgearbeitete und vermehrte 
Auflage. 2 vols. Leipzig, 1853. 

Historical View of the Languages and Liter 
ature of the Slavic Nations, with a sketch of their 
Popular Poetry. New York, 1850. 

Trudy etnograficesko-statisticeskoj ekspedicii v za- 
padno-russkij kraj, narjazennoj Imperatorskim 
Russkim Geograficeskim Obscestvom. Jugo-za- 
padnyj otdel. [Memoirs of the Ethnographic- statis 
tical Expedition in the West-Russian region, under 
the auspices of the Russian Imperial Geographical 
Society, South- West Division.] 7 vols. St Peters 
burg, 1872-77. 

Valjavec, M. K. Narodne pripovjesti u Varazdinu i 
okolici. [Popular Tales in and about Warasdin.] 
2d ed. Agram, 1890. 

Verkovi6, Stefan J. Narodne pesme makedonski 
Bugara. [Popular Songs of the Macedonian Bul 
garians.] Belgrad, 1860. 

Vraz, Stanko. Narodne pesni ilirske, koje se pevaju 
po stajerskoj, krajnskoj, korusskoj, i zapadnoj 
strani ugarske. [Popular Illyrian Songs, sung in 
Styria, Carniola, Carinthia, and West-Hungary.] 
Agram, 1839. 

Vuk. See Karadzic. 

Waldau, Alfred. Bb'hmische Granaten. Czechische 

Volkslieder, iibertragen von . Prague, 1858. 

Zweiter Band. Prague, 1860. 2 vols. 



Waldbriihl, Wilhelm von [A. W. F. von Zuccalma- 
glio]. Slawische Balalaika. Leipzig, 1843. 

Wasilewski, L. Jagodne. Zarys etnograficzny. 
[Ethnological Sketch.] Warsaw, 1889. 

Wenzig, Joseph. Bibliothek slavischer Poesien, in 
deutscher Uebertragung. Prague, 1875. 

Westslawischer Marchenschatz. Ein Cha- 

rakterbild der Bbhmen, Mahren und Slowacken in 
ihren Marchen, Sagen, Geschichten, Volksgesangen 
und Spriichwbrtern. Leipzig, 1857. 

Slawische Volkslieder ubersetzt von . 

Halle, 1830. 

Wisla, Miesiecznik geograficzno-etnograficzny. [Vis 
tula. Geographic-ethnographical Monthly.] Ed. 
by Jan Karlowicz. Warsaw, 1887. 

Wojcicki, K. W. Klechdy. Starozytne podania i 
powiesci ludowe. [Klechdy. Old Traditions and 
Stories of the Peasantry.] 2 vols. Warsaw. 
1851-52. 

Piesni Ludu Bialo-Chrobatdw, Mazurdw i 

Rusi znad Bugu. [Songs of the Peasantry, the 
White Croatians, Mazurs and Ruthenians near the 
Bug.] Warsaw, 1836. 

Wollner, Wilhelm. Untersuchungen tiber die Volks- 
epik der Grossrussen. Leipzig, 1879. 

Zapolskij, M. Belorusskaja svad'ba i svadebnyja 
pesni. [White Russian Wedding and Wedding 
Songs.] Kiev, 1888. 

Zawilifiski, R. Z powiesci i pieini gdrali beski- 
dowych. [Stories and Songs of the Bieskid Moun 
taineers.] Warsaw, 1889. 

Zbidr wiadomosci do antropologii krajowej. [Collec 
tion of Facts bearing on native Anthropology.] 
Cracow, 18 7 7-. 

Z Oleska, Waclaw (Zaleski) Piesni polskie i ruskie 
ludu galicyjskiego. [Polish and Ruthenian Songs 
of the Galician peasantry.] Lemberg, 1833. 

Spanish. 

de los Rios, Jose Amador. Historia crftica de la 
literatura espanola. 7 vols. Madrid, 1861-65. 

Romanzen Asturiens, aus dem Volksmunde 

zum ersten Mai gesammelt und herausgegeben von 

. In Jahrbuch fur romanische und englische 

Literatur, III. Leipzig, 1863. 

Depping y Galiano. Romancero castellano 6 colec- 
cion de antiguos romances populares de los Espa- 
fioles, publicada con una introduccion y notas por 
G. R. Depping. Nueva edition, con las notas de 
D. Antonio Alcala-Galiano. 3 vols. Leipsique, 
1844-46. 

Duran, Agustin. Romancero General, 6, coleccion 
de romances castellanos anteriores al siglo XVIII, 
recogidos, ordenados, clasificados y anotados por 
. 2 vols. Madrid, 1849-51. 

El Folk-Lore Frexnense y Betico-ExtremeSo. Fre- 
genal, 1883-84. 

Grimm, J. Silva de romances viejos, publicada por 
Jacobo Grimm. Vienna, 1815. 



468 



TITLES OF BOOKS OP BALLADS 



Marin, Francisco Rodriguez. Cantos populares es- 

panoles, recogidos, ordenados e ilustrados por 

. 5 vols. Sevilla, 1882-83. 

de Ochoa, Eugenic. Tesoro de los romanceros y 

cancioneros espanoles, histdricos, caballerescos, 

moriscos y otros, recogidos y ordenados por . 

Paris, 1838. 
de Puymaigre, Le comte (Thdodore). Les vieux 

auteurs castillans. 2 vols. Paris and Metz, 1861- 

62. 
Pidal, Juan Menendez. Poesia popular. Coleccion 

de los viejos romances que se cantan por los Astu- 

rianos, et ct. Madrid, 1885. 
Recuerdos y Bellezas de Espana. 10 vols. [Madrid, 

1842-65.] 
Wolf, F. J., y Hofmann, C. Primavera y Flor de 

Romances, d, coleccion de los mas viejos y mas 

populares romances castellanos, publicada con una 

introduccion y notas por . 2 vols. Berlin, 

1856. 

Swedish. 

Afzelius, Arv. Aug. Svenska Folk- Visor fran Forn- 
tiden, samlade och utgifne af Er. Gust. Geijer och 
Arv. Aug. Afzelius. 3 vols. Stockholm, 1814- 
16. 

Svenska Folkvisor, utgifna af E. G. Geijer 

och A. A. Afzelius. Ny betydligt tilldkad Upp- 
laga, utgifven af R. Bergstrdm och L. Hdijer. 3 
vols. Stockholm, 1880. 

Swenska Folkets Sago-Hafder, till Lasning 

for Folket. Andra Upplagan. 5 parts. Stock 
holm, 1844-53. 

Album utgifvet af Nylandingar. 8 numbers. Hel- 

singfors, 1860-81. 
Aminson. See Bidrag. 
Arwidsson, Adolf Iwar. Svenska Fornsanger. 3 

vols. Stockholm, 1834-42. 
Atterbom, P. D. A. Poetisk Kalender for 1816. 

Upsala. 
Axelson, Maximilian. Vandring i Wermlands Elfdal 

och Finnskogar. Stockholm, [1852]. 

Vesterdalarne, dess Natur, Folklif och Forn- 

minnen. Stockholm, 1855. 

Berggreen, A. P. Svenske Folke-Sange og Melodier. 
2* ed. Kjdbenhavn, 1861. Vol. Ill of his Folke- 
Sange og Melodier, faedrelandske og fremmede. 
11 vols. 2 d ed. Kjdbenhavn, 1860-71. 

Bidrag till Sddermanlands aldre Kulturhistoria. 
Utgifna af H. Aminson (Hafte 1-5) ; Hafte 6 af J. 
Wahlfisk. Strengnas and Stockholm (Hafte 6, 
Upsala), 1877-86. 

"Borgstrdm, F. L. Folkvisor upptecknade i Verm- 
land och Dalsland, 1845. Kristinehamn, 1875 " ? 

Djurklou, G. Ur Nerikes Folksprak och Folklif. 

Anteckningar, o. s. v., utgifne af . Orebro, 

1860. 



Dybeck, Richard. Swenska Wisor, upteknade och 
samlade af . 2 Hefts. Stockholm, n. d. 

Runa. En Skrift (Lasning) for Faderneslan- 

dets Fornvanner. 10 parts in 3 vols. Stockholm, 
[1842]-50. 

En Skrift for Nordens Fornvanner. 

Stockholm, 1865-74. 2 a Samlingen, 1874. 

Fagerlund, Lars Wilhelm. Anteckningar om Korpo 
och Houtskars Socknar. Helsingfors, 1878. In 
Bidrag till Kannedom af Finlands Natur och Folk, 
utgifna af Finska Veterskaps-Societeten. Haefte 
28. 

1500- och 1600-Talens Visbdcker, utgifna af Adolf 
Noreen och Henrik Schu'ck. Harald Oluffsons 
Visbok. Fdrsta Haf tet. Stockholm, 1884. Brb'ms 
Gyllenmar's Visbok, Fdrsta Haf tet. Stockholm, 
1885. 

Hazelius, Artur. Ur de nordiska Folkens Lif. Skil- 

dringar. Utgifna af . Stockholm, 1882. In 

his Bidrag til var Odlings Hafder. Stockholm, 
1881-85. 

Hof berg, Herman. Nerikes gamla Minnen. Orebro, 
1868. 

Lagus, Ernst. Nylandska Folkvisor, ordnade och 

utgifna af . Helsingfors, 1887 . In Ny- 

land. Samlingar utgifna af Nylandska Afdelnin- 
gen, III. 

Nicolovius [Nils Loven]. Folklifwet i Skytts Harad 
i Skane, Barndomsminnen. Lund, 1847. 

Nyare Bidrag till Kannedom om de svenska Lands- 
malen ock svenskt Folklif. Tidskrift. Stock 
holm, 1879. 

[Oberg, Theodor.] Filikromen. Hittills otryckta 
skamtsamma Sanger (ord och musik), samlade och 
utgifna af Axel I. Stahl. 1-9. Stockholm, 1850- 
65. 

Rancken, Oskar. Nagra Prof af Folksang och Saga 
i det svenska Osterbotten. Helsingfors, 1874. 
(Separat afdragf ur Finska Fornminnes-Fdrenin- 
gens Tidskrift, Argang 1.) 

Svenska Fornminnesfdreningens Tidskrift. Stock 
holm, 1871-. 

Werner, Hilder. Westergdtlands Fornminnen. An 
teckningar af . Stockholm, [1868]. 

Westergdtlands Fornminnesfdrenings Tidskrift. 
Hafte 1-3, Lund, 1869-77; Hafte 4-7, Stock 
holm, 1888-93. 

Wigstrdm, Eva. Folkvisor fran Skane. In Artur 
Hazelius, Ur de nordiska Folkens Lif. 

Folkdiktning, Visor, sagner, sagor, o. s. v., 

samlad och iipptecknad i Skane af . Kd'ben- 

havn, 1880. 

Andra Samlingen. Folkdiktning, Visor, 

Folktro, Sagner, o. s. v., samlad och upptecknad i 
SkEne af . Gdteborg, 1881. 

Skanska Visor, Sagor och Sagner, samlade 

och utgifa af . Lund, 1880. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Aaltje, Ethel, Adeline, Dutch representative of Fair An 
nie, II, 66. 
Abortion sought by eating of rose, I, 341, 343 f ., 354 ; savin 

tree (abbey tree, deceivin tree), III, 387, 393, 396; IV, 

610 ; sycamore tree, IV, 511 ; pile o the gravil, 1, 350 ; 

an herb, leaf from the tree, flower, I, 349, 352 ; III, 386 ; 

IV, 456. 

Aboulcassem, tale of, I, 282. 
Aboulfaouaris, tale of, II, 499. 
Aboyne, Earl of, ballad, IV, 311 ff. ; V, 270 f., 301. 
Acta Sanctorum, I, 239, and n. ; II, 510 a ; III, 237 n., 241 f. 
Adam Bell maintained to be an historical or mythical per 
sonage, III, 21 f. 
Addison on Chevy Ghace ; his interest in traditional songs 

and tales, HI, 305, and n., 306. 
Adelheid, Dutch and German representative of Fair Annie, 

H, 66 f. 
Adland, King, father of lady sought in marriage by King 

Estmere, II, 52 f. 
Adler, II, 50-55; king, 50, and Estmere his messenger; 

brother of King Estmere, 51-55, and his nuncio. 
Adrian and Ritheus, I, 13 n. 

L'Adroite Princesse, imitation of Basile, in, 4, I, 269. 
Adultery, noble lady accused of, vindicated by champion or 

by ordeal, H, 34-48, 510 b ; III, 508 a. 
Les Adventures d'Abdalla fils d'Hanif, etc., I, 392. 
Adventures of the Cauzee (J. Scotts's Arabian Nights), n, 

43 n. 

./Esop, Life of, I, 12, 13, and n. ; a clever fence of his, 13. 
Af biskupi ok puka, Icelandic legend of Saint Andrew, I, 

484 b. 

Af Fru Olif ok Landres, Karlamagnus Saga, II, 40. 
Af klerk ok gyolngum, legend, III, 240. 
Afezzell, Histoire du devin, I, 489 a. 
Agilulf, Decameron, m, 2, II, 137 a, 511 b. 
Agolafre, V, 244 b. 
Aiol et Mirabel, III, 508 a. 
Air, importance of, for producing the proper effect of a 

ballad, II, 204 a. 

Airlie, House of, plundered, ballad, IV, 54 ff. 
Ajax, flower from his blood, I, 99. 
Aladdin, story of, I, 323 n. ; II, 127. 
Alboazar, V, 4 f . 
Alcon, the archer, III, 20. 
Aldora, V, 4 f. 

Alexander, romances of, III, 322 n. ; V, 226 a, 297. 
Alexander of Metz, poem and tale, I, 268, 459. 
Alfonsus of Lincoln, III, 239. 
A"li, IV, 502 b. 
Allan Water, a tune, Allan Water, or, My love Annie 's very 

bonny, a song, Allan Water, or, a Lover in Captivity, a 

song, IV, 184. 



Allen a Dale married to his true-love by Robin Hood in 
spite of the bishop, III, 173 f. 

Alpthier, III, 498 a. 

Als61, transformed by step-mother, I, 306 f. 

Alvfasmal, I, 13, 419. 

Amadas et Ydoine, romance, III, 508. 

Amadis of Gaul, I, 267, 308 (Amadis d' Astra) ; III, 508 b. 

Amasis, tasks given to and by, propounds riddles, I, 13, 
and n. 

Amis and Amilonn, Amis e Amiloun, II, 127, 511 b ; III, 

^ 508 b. 

Amis and the Bishop, in Pfaffe Amis, I, 406. 

Ancrum Muir, Battle of, = Lilliard's Edge, HI, 306. 

Andrius, the monk, I, 505 b. 

L'Andromede et les demons, Lesbian tale, V, 294 a. 

Annals of Burton, H, 236 f . ; of Waverley, II, 235 ; of Win 
chester, II, 38 n. 

Antonius Liberalis (Metamorphoses of Nicander), I, 84. 

Anvar-i Suhaile', tale in, V, 14. 

Apollodorus, I, 337, 338 n. 

Apollonius of Tyana, I, 485 a. 

Apollonius of Tyre, I, 1, 416 ; IV, 402 b ; V, 245. 

Apologie pour He'rodote, story in V, 122. 

Appetite, monstrous and revolting, of bewitched women, I, 
290, 298 f., 301. 

Apple, gold, thrown into woman's lap controls her will, 
1,364. 

Apple-tree, danger from fairies of sleeping under, I, 340, 
350 ; IV, 455 f. See I, 319 b, and Ympe Tree. 

Apuleius, Metamorphoses, I, 84 f . 

Arabian Nights, Thousand and One Nights, Tausend und 
eine Nacht, I, 11 n., 12 f., 269, 323 n., 402 ; II, 43 n., 127, 
511 b ; V, 13. 

Ardai Viraf, ArdS-Virai, H, 236, 506 f., 513 a. 

Argyll. See under Family Names. 

Arioald, H, 39. 

Arm-ring, bribing to secrecy with, H, 51. 

Arms, long arms seemingly regarded as a beauty, II, 168 ; 
IV, 415 ; V, 160 f., 164. (Cf. Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, 
v. 9476, Tyrwbitt.) 

Armstrong, John (Gilnockie), said to have molested no 
Scotsman, but to have levied tribute on the English from 
the border to Newcastle, III, 364; makes King James 
great offers for his life, 365, 370 ; appears to have been 
apprehended by unfair dealing, 365 f. ; hanged, with 
all his men, 365 ; is invited by the king to visit him, and 
goes with eight score men gallantly attired, 368 f. ; the 
king thinks him a king, as well as he, 369 f. ; refused 
pardon, comes near to killing the king, but is finally 
slain, with all his company, 368 f. 

Armstrong, William of Kinmouth (Kinmont Willie), made 
prisoner by the English hi violation of trace, taken by 



470 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



force from Carlisle castle by Sir Walter Scott, laird of 
Buccleuch, III, 469-74 ; his extraordinary and proverbial 
rapacity, 471. 

Armstrongs, their strength, HI, 363 ; ravage both the Eng 
lish and the Scottish border, 364 a. See under Family 
Names. 

Arngosk, Lady of, ballad, IV, 241 8. 

Arrow, bearing, IH, 29, 202, 341 ; broad, IH, 29, 160, 176, 
199, 202, 341 ; IV, 505 f. ; letter sent on an arrow-head, 
TIT, 223 f., 231 ; V, 241 a ; arrow shot to determine 
place for grave, I, 185 (?) ; III, 106 ; to show where a 
wife is to be sought, II, 499. 

Arthour and Merlin, romance of, IV, 479 b. 

Arthur, King, I, 257-67, 271-3, 283-91, 289-91, 293-6 ; his cus 
tom of not dining until he had had or heard of an adven 
ture, 1, 257, 263 ; III, 51, and n. So Robin Hood, III, 51. 

Arthur a Bland, tanner of Nottingham, kinsman of Little 
John, III, 137 ; the tune, 133, and n. 

Arthur a Bradley, a ballad, IH, 215, 217. 

Arthur's seat shall be my bed, song, IV, 105. 

Artificial curiosities, wand with three singing living lavrocks 
sitting thereon, etc., I, 201 f., 205, 503 ; IH, 501 b ; IV, 
450 b. 

Artiga, V, 4 f. 

Atamulc, story of, V, 13. 

Athelbrus, steward of King Ailniar, and tutor of Horn and 
his comrades, I, 188 f. 

Atherly. See John of Atherly. 

Athulf, Horn's faithful friend, I, 188, 190. 

Les Aubrays, Lizandre", Breton knight, kills a Moor by re 
ceiving him on the point of his sword as the Moor leaps 
in the air, H, 378 ; III, 276. 

Audam and Doorkhaunee, Afghan poem, I, 98. 

Augur (wimble) bore, lady first seen, or courted, through 
an, I, 202, B, 205, F, 206, H ; first and only sight, I, 255. 

Auld Man = Devil, I, 18, I. 

Auld Robin Gray, a play, V, 88. 

Die Ausgleichung, I, 265. 

Austerities vowed by actors in tragic stories, as tributes of 
grief, penances, etc., II, 156 f., 159, 162 f., 165 f., 175, 177, 
179, 258, 318 f . ; IV, 97, 360, 433 ; V, 223 a. 

Austrriki, I, 460 n. 

The Avowynge of King Arthur, metrical romance, I, 209. 

Ayrer's plays, V, 24 f., 97. 

Baba-Yaga, I, 484 a. 

Baffling malice with ready answers, I, 20-22, 485 ; IH, 496 ; 

IV, 440. 

Bahome, Bee Horn, II, 318 f. 
Baillie Lunnain, Gaelic tale, I, 191 n. 
Balcanqual, II, 337. 
Balewise, bseliwis, I, 67 n. 
Balfour, John, called Burly, IV, 106 f. 
Bandello, Novelle, I, 269 ; H, 42 ; IH, 258 ; V, 23 n. 
Banier, Sir (=Sir Beduer, Bedewere ?), I, 295. 
La Barbe Bleue, I, 47. 
Barberine, A. de Musset, I, 269. 
Y Bardd Glas Keraint, II, 136, 511. 
Der Barenhauter, tale, I, 198. 
Barnard, Bernard, Barnet, Burnett, Burnard, Lord, H, 

244-8, 251 f., 256-8, 266-74. 
Barnsdale, HI, 50 f. 
Barrel spiked, punishment of rolling or dragging in, H, 

343; IV, 30 n., 32; V, 48. 



Barton, Sir Andrew, maintained by the English to be a pi 
rate, HI, 335 f ., 339, 345, 352 ; IV, 503 ; his dangerous 
" beams," III, 337, and n., 338, 340 f., 344 f., 349 ; IV, 
504 f. ; his ship brass within and steel without, III, 340, 
344, 349 ; IV, 504 ; and magnificently ornamented, IH, 
340, 342 ; boasts that he once salted thirty heads of the 
Portuguese, and sent them home to eat with bread, IV, 
505 ; 300 crowns (500 angels) tied about his middle, when 
his body is thrown overboard, to secure burial, HI, 342 ; 
IV, 506. 

Basile, H Pentamerone, I, 269, 461 n. ; H, 127 ; V, 48. 

Bastars de Buillon, Li, romance, V, 6. 

Bathing for recovering human shape, I, 308, 338, and n. ; H, 
505; HI, 505; V, 39 f . 

The Battle of Harlaw, of Hara Law, a tune ; The Battle of 
Hardlaw, a pibroch, HI, 318. See Harlaw. 

Beating of daughters, I, 192 ; H, 435 ; V, 237 a. 

Beaumont and Fletcher, Knight of the Burning Pestle, I, 
105 ; H, 199, 243, 457 n. ; V, 201 f. ; The Spanish Cu 
rate, I, 239 n.; Monsieur Thomas, H, 10, 243; HI, 294, 
331; Bonduca, H, 243; V, 202; The Pilgrim, H, 457; 
The Two Noble Kinsmen, H, 506 b ; V, 133, 202 ; Phi- 
laster, HI, 129. 

Beauty and the Beast, La Belle et la Bete, tale, I, 308, 
313 f. 

Becket, Gilbert, romantic story of, I, 457 f. 

Becket, Thomas, stands by his votaries, I, 505 a. 

Beeldwit, I, 67. 

Beggar (palmer), Hind Horn changes clothes with, I, 189, 
191 f., 202-7 ; Robin Hood, HI, 178-82, 184; Little John, 
IH, 188 ; Wallace, HI, 271, 273 ; other disguises as beg 
gar or pilgrim, V, 2, 4, 5, 279 f . ; beggar who receives 
girl's favors turns out to be a person of high degree, V, 
109 ff., 116 ff., 305 a. 

The Beggar and the Five Muffins, Eastern story, V, 281. 

Beggar and Robin Hood, HI, 156, 159 ; beggar (beggars) 
and Little John, IH, 188 f. 

Beggar's dress and equipment, II, 436 f. (61, 78). 

Die beiden Fiirsten, Turkish tale, I, 10. 

Beket. See Becket. 

Le Bel Inconnu, Libeaus Desconeus, I, 308 ; II, 51, 510 b. 

Bele Ydoine, romance, IV, 482 a. 

Belewitte, I, 67. 

La Belle et la Bgte, I, 308 n., 313 f. 

Bellerophon's sons and Sarpedon, HI, 20. 

Bells, numerous, on horses, I, 320 n. ; V, 290 a ; on every 
lock of horse's mane, I, 323 ; H, 189, 191, 344; IV, 410, 
413 ; mane and tail, II, 194 ; twenty-four on horse's mane, 
H, 183, 185 ; hung at every corner of a ship, IV, 462 a ; 
bell sewed to every stitch of a cap for a (supposed) dead 
girl, III, 364; IV, 483; bells ring of themselves, I, 173, 
231 ; HI, 235, 244, 519 f. ; bells rung backward as an 
alarm, III, 26 ; girl sold for a new church-bell, I, 91 f . 

Belly-blind. See Billie Blind. 

Beloe's Oriental Apologues, V, 97. 

Benbow, Admiral, V, 147. 

Benediction in church, merman's (human) wife must not 
stay till, or expose herself to, 1, 366 ; nix flies from, ib., n. 

Bengwill, Benwall, Brangwill, Lord, I, 62, 76, 78 ; II, 253. 

BeWulf, I, 50, 54 n. ; II, 56. 

Der Berghiiter undeine kluge Tochter, Transylvanian tale, 
1,8. 

Berkeley, Witch of, V, 298 a. 

Beraabb Visconti and the Abbot, tale of Sacchetti, I, 406. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



471 



Bernard, Lord. See Barnard. 

Bernard de Brusban, of the twelve peers, I, 278. 

Bernardo del Carpio, III, 367. 

Bertha im Wald, children's game, I, 33 n. 

Berthold von Neuhaus, I, 198. 

Bertrand, Nicolas, I, 237 f. 

Bessy Bell, nursery song, IV, 75; Bessy Bell and Mary 
Gray, ballad, 75 ff. 

Der betrogene Betriiger, tale, I, 47. 

Bewick and Graham, ballad, IV, 144 ff. 

Bewsey, a poem, III, 329. 

Bias extricates himself from tasks, I, 13, and n. 

The Bible, I, 51 f., 245, 271, 282 n., 404, and n. ; II, 14 n. 

Bier half gold, half silver, I, 506 ; II, 358 f., 362, 366 ; V, 
224 ; with ae stamp o the melten goud, another o silver 
clear, IV, 471. 

Bil-eygr, bol-eygr, appellatives of Odin, I, 67. 

Billie (Bellie) Blind (Blin), I, 63, 67, 73, 86, 466 f. ; H, 
458, 464, 470, 472; IV, 494; V, 239. 

Bilvfe, bilwiz, I, 67 ; V, 285 b. 

Binyan's Bay, I, 24, 61 b. 

Birds : bird takes a message or carries a letter, II, 113 n., 
356-60, 362 f., 365 f. ; III, 4, 8 ; IV, 412, 482, 484 f. ; 
V, 234 ; bird (parrot, pyet, popinjay) comments on a 
murder it has witnessed, murderess tries in vain to en 
trap him, II, 144, 146-52, 154 ; testifies to the murder, 
153, 155 ; warns maid of danger, I, 31-5, 37 ; II, 496 f. ; 
IV, 441 ; V, 285 ; warns lover of mishap, II, 206 n. ; 
warns mother that her son tarries long, III, 10 ; (nightin 
gale, lark) reveals maid's death (being really the soul of the 
dead), I, 180, 181 ; speaks to encourage Fair Ellen, I, 90, 
92, 95 ; V, 221 ; bird informs knight of wife's infidelity, 
H, 260 ; bribes or promises to birds for services, 1, 57-60 ; 
n, 144, 146 f., 149-52, 154, 359 ; IV, 389 f., 416 ; par 
tridge betrays the hiding-place of the Virgin, II, 8 ; quail 
plays partridge's part, swallow befriends the Virgin, H, 
509 f . ; birds call out in human voice at seeing a living 
woman riding behind a dead man, V, 65 ; lover in bird- 
shape (or coat), V, 39-42. 

Birth arrested, I, 82-87, 489 ; III, 497. See Childbirth. 

Bitte mette, Danish tale, I, 489 a. 

Bjorner's Kampadater, I, 50, 259 ; H, 57 n. 

The Black Bull of Norroway, tale, V, 201. 

Blak, the horse, I, 96. 

Blind Harry's Wallace, III, 109, 191, 265, 266. 

Blind the Bad, Blindr inn bolvfei, I, 67, 95. 

Blinde belien, I, 67. 

Blindr inn bolvisi, I, 67, 95. 

Blonde of Oxford and Jehan of Dammartin (Jehan et 
Blonde), romance, I, 191 n. ; V, 287 b. 

Blood : blood of children or virgins reputed a cure for lep 
rosy, I, 47, 50 n. ; IV, 441 b ; V, 285 ; blood of Chris 
tians in Hebrew rites, III, 240-3 ; IV, 497 a ; blood, 
drinking to dissolve enchantment, I, 337, and n. ; blood, 
emission of, from dead body on being touched or ap 
proached by the murderer, II, 143, 146, 148, 153; IV, 
468 a. 

Blood stanched with a charm, II, 441, 445, 450. 

Blood-relations refuse to ransom a captive woman, a woman 
about to be hanged ; done by husband or lover, II, 346-9, 
350-3; III, 516; IV, 481 f.; V, 23 1 -4, 296; the same 
story, with parts shifted, of a man ransomed by his mis 
tress, II, 349 f. ; in, 516 ; IV, 481 ; V, 233 f., 296 ; Fin 
nish and Esthonian versions, V, 231-3. 



Blow thy home, hunter, fragment of a song, I, 209 ; IV, 
451. 

Blue, fortunate in love matters, II, 182, 512 a ; symbolic of 
good faith, thy coat is blue, thou hast been true, HI, 479 
(6), 481 (6). 

Bluebeard, La Barbe Bleue, I, 47, 49 n., 50 n., 54. 

Boar, terrible, in romantic tales, I, 209-14; IE, 500 a. 

Bocca della verita, I, 270 n. 

Boccaccio, Decamerone, 1, 197 f., 457 n. ; H, 128, 137, 156 n. ; 
HI, 258 ; V, 23 nn., 29, 30, and n., 31, and n., 32, and n., 
33, 303 a. 

Bodman, I, 198. 

Boiling to death, in a caldron, molten lead, in oil, or throw 
ing into boiling oil, H, 321 n., 327; IV, 480 a; V, 53, 
56, 230, 281. 

Bol-eygr, I, 67. 

Bolverkr (Odin), I, 67. 

Bolvfs, I, 67. See Blindr. 

Bone Florence of Rome, Le, romance, III, 235. 

Bonny Lass o Livingston, song, IV, 232 n. 

Books in church read without man's tongue, III, 244. 

Boon of being allowed to fight at odds rather than be judi 
cially executed (cf. No 141) in South Slavic songs, IV, 
497 a. 

Boots pulled off half-way, to embarrass a gallant, H, 482 ; 
IV, 495 a. 

Borde, Andrew, I, 237 n., 238. 

Bore, Sir (= Sir Bors ?), I, 293, 295. 

Bosworth Field, a history in ballad verse, HI, 307, 331 fc, 
354 n. 

Bothwell, Earl, ballad, III, 399 ff. 

Bothwell Bridge, Battle of, ballad on, IV, 108 ff. 

Bow, bent before swimming, H, 114, 116 f., 119, 121 f., 129, 
177, 212, 257, 272, 313, 379, 395; IV, 229, 398; slacked 
to swim, II, 250; slacked to run, II, 116f. ; IV, 229; 
bent to leap wall, H, 115-17, 129, 177, 272, 313; IV, 
229. 

Bow shots : six score paces, to cleave apple on boy's head, 
HI, 17, 29 ; twenty score paces to split a rod, IH, 29 ; 
three score rood (330 yards), III, 93 ; a hundred rod, III, 
176; fifteen score (300 yards), HI, 201, 203; (not to be 
taken seriously) a mile, or half a mile and more, and 
through an armed man at the end, HI, 54 ; two north- 
country miles and an inch, HI, 215. 

Bower, Scotichronicon, III, 41, 43, 96, 266, 282, and n., 292, 
and n., 305, 316, 476 nn. 

The Boy and the Mantle, ballad, I, 257 ff., etc. ; story in 
Welsh, I, 265 nn. 

Boy baffles carlin by ready answers, I, 21. 

Brackleys, several, murdered, IV, 80-83, 522; Baron of 
Brackley, ballad, 79 ff. 

Brags, gabs, vows, I, 277 f., 281-3, 285 ; H, 502. 

Brand and ring, choice given to maid, signifying the death 
of violator or marriage with him, II, 469 ; IV, 493 ; V, 
28, 238. 

Brand, Right-hitting, HI, 43 n. ; V, 297 a. 

Brandimarte, in Orlando Innamorato, I, 308. 

Brangwain, Isold's maid, I, 67. 

Bread. See Communion bread. 

Bredbeddle, one of Arthur's knights, I, 280. 

Bremor, king of Spain, demands the hand of King Adland's 
daughter, II, 52-4. 

Bride accidentally but fatally wounded by bridegroom's 
sword while he is bringing her home (Graf Friedrich), I, 



472 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



142 f. ; bride assigned by dying man to his brother, I, 
376, 378, and n. ; she will not give her troth to two bro 
thers, I, 376, 378, and n. ; bride, wife, whose bridegroom, 
husband, has died is put off with false explanations, I, 
376-9, 381, 383-87 ; bride carried off by lover on the day 
she was to wed a rival, IV, 218, 230 ; V, 260 f. 

Bridegroom caressing bride while taking her home killed 
by her brother, I, 142 ; bridegroom killed on his way to 
fetch the bride, I, 386 ; bridegroom drowned on the way 
to his wedding, IV, 179-183, 189 f . ; V, 257 ; lover 
drowned on his way to visit his mistress, IV, 185. 

Brome, brome on hill, song, I, 390. 

The broom blooms bonny and says it is fair, I, 450. 

The Broom of Cowden Knowes, O the broome, the bonny 
bonny broome, tune, IV, 192, 208. 

Brother's consent to a sister's marriage, importance of ob 
taining, I, 142 ; brother whose consent has not been asked 
Mils his sister as she is riding to or from the wedding, I, 
145-50 ; brother flogs to death unmarried sister who has 
had a child, II, 102. 

Brown, Andrew, his services to James VI, III, 442-6. 

Brown bride despised for her complexion, II, 182-97 ; 
brown girl rejected for this reason, V, 167 f. See also 
I, 120, 133 (M 10), 135 (1). 

Brown Robin, II, 305 f., 368, 371, 418. 

Bruce, David. See David Bruce. 

Die Bruck zu Karidol, I, 267, and n. 

Buccleuch, Sir Walter Scott of, rescue of Kinmont Willie, 
III, 469 ff. See under Family Names. 

Bulat and Ivan, tsar's son, Russian tale, V, 46. 

Bunion Bay, I, 24, 57. 

Burden, burden-stem, I, 7 n., 484 a ; II, 204 n. 

Burial, gold bound round bodies thrown into the water, to 
secure, II, 14; III, 342; IV, 502 b, 506 a; V, 245. 

Buridan and the Queen of France, tale, IV, 502. 

Burlow-beanie, a variety of Billy Blin (here a loathly fiend, 
with seven heads), I, 286 f. 

Bnrnet, Burnett. See under Family Names. 

Burning, penalty for incontinence (in Danish ballads, for 
incest), n, 41, 43 f., 46-8, 113-125 ; HI, 508 b ; V, 292 b. 

Burns, Robert, author of Kellyburnbraes, V, 107 ; his Hal 
lowe'en, V, 286 a. 

Butler, Sir John, his murder and the ballad thereon, III, 
327 ff. 

Buttons bursting, as a consequence of violent emotion, II, 
186; IV, 101, 302; waistcoat bursted, IV, 185; stays, 
gown and all, IV, 320. 

By Lands-dale, hey ho, song, III, 54. 

Byliny, Russian popular epics, I, 200 (IE, 499 f.) ; LT, 15, 
and n., 502; III, 122, 501 b; IV, 463, 497 a, 499 a; V, 
2 ; Bulgarian, IV, 463. 

Byron, Child Harold's Pilgrimage, III, 91 ; IV, 36. 

Caberstaing, Guillems de, story of, V, 33. 

Caesarian operation, three and five wives die successively 
thereof, II, 309 f. ; six sisters (and the seventh doomed), 
311-16, V, 227-9 ; in the case of Queen Jane, III, 373-6 ; 
V, 245 f. ; in Danish ballad, I, 83. 

Csesarius Heisterbacensis, Dialogus Miraculorum, 1, 197, 237. 

Calaf , Prince, Persian story, I, 417. 

Calender, tale of the Second, I, 402. 

Campbell. See under Family Names. 

Campbell, Bonny James, ballad, IV, 142. 

La cana del riu de arenas, Catalan story, I, 126. 



Cane (walking rod), ridiculously introduced. See the com 
monplace of mantle and cane (under Commonplaces) ; 
also, IV, 190, 421 ; V, 16 f . 
Car, Ker, Captain, III, 424-7, 430-2. 
Caradawc, I, 265 ; V, 289 a. See Carados. 
Carados (Briebras, Brisie" Bras), I, 258, 261 n., 263-5 ; Ca 
radawc Vreichvras, 265 ; variations of the name Carados, 
I, 264 n. ; V, 289 a. 

Carduino (Le Bel Inconnu), Italian romance, I, 308. 
Carevic i ego Sluga, The Prince and his Servant, Russian 

tale, V, 281. 

Carl Blind, surnamed Bavis, I, 67, 95. 
Carl Hood, old, I, 67, 92, 95, and n., 489 ; IV, 443 . 
Carl of Carlile, rhymed tale, I, 290 n., 301 n., 316; V, 

289 a. 

Caskets, riddle of the three, I, 13. 
Cassilis. See under Family Names. 
Catharine I., Empress of Russia, III, 383. 
Cawfield, Archie of, ballad, III, 484 ff. 
Ce qui plait aux Dames, Voltaire's tale, I, 292. 
The Ceabharnach, West Highland tale, III, 507. 
Le Centi Novelle Antiche, V, 34. 
Chains of gold, servants in waiting wear, I, 410. 
Chambers, Robert, his contention that Lady Wardlaw was 
the author of Sir Patrick Spens and other ballads, II, 
20 n. 

Champion, diminutive, successful against huge and danger 
ous antagonist in judicial combat, II, 35-37, 37 n., 38, 
39 ?, 43 n., 45 f. See Child-champion. 
Change of clothes with beggar, palmer, I, 189, 191, 192, 

202-207; III, 157, 179, 181 f., 184, 188, 271, 273 f. 
Change of parts of man and woman in different versions of 
the same or a similar tale, I, 142, 187, 455, Nos 17, 53 ; 
298 ; II, 236, 349, 426 ; IV, 186 ; V, 34, 296. 
Charcoal-burners, III, 109 ; V, 6. 70 f ., 75, and n. 
Charlemagne's Journey to Jerusalem, 1, 274-9 ; III, 503 b. 
Charles the Fifth (emperor) and a broom-maker; and a 

peasant ; Belgian stories, V, 74. 
Charles the Great and the charcoal-burner, rhymed tale, V, 

70 f. 

Charm : knight obliges lady to go off with him by sticking 
a charm in her sleeve, I, 57 ; charm or rune employed to 
induce sleep, I, 28, 48, 55, 391. 
Charrois de Nymes, Li, chanson de geste, V, 298 a. 
Charter of peace sought by outlaws, III, 27. 
Chastity, or fidelity in love, tests of, I, 258-71, 507 a ; II, 
502 ; HI, 503 ; IV, 454 a ; V, 212 f., 289 a. 
Arch, sword and garland in Amadis which test the fact 

and the measure of faithful love, I, 267. 
(Talking) bed, blankets, pillows, rug, sheets, I, 64 f., 

68, 70. 
Bridge in the younger Titurel which cannot be passed 

by knight or lady faulty in matter of love, I, 267. 
Brook which tests virginity, I, 269. 
Chair, golden, in which none but a maid will sit till 

bidden, I, 72 f . ; can sit, 75. 

Crown that exposes the infidelity of husbands, I, 266 f . 
Cup from which no man or woman can drink who has 

been false to love, I, 264. 
Cup of tears in Palmerin of England which tests the 

best knight and most faithful lover, I, 267. 
Flowers (lotus, rose) or evergreen which keep fresh as 

long as wife or man and wife are faithful, I, 268. 
Glove as test of virtue of man or woman, I, 266. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



473 



Harp which playa out of tune and breaks a string on 
the approach of a girl who has lost her maidenhead, 
I, 269. 

Horn, or drinking-cup, probation of wife's chastity by 
husband's drinking from, I, 262-265, 273 ; by wife's, 
264. 
Jacinth will not be worn on the finger of an adulterer, 

V, 289 a. 
Knife, cuckold's knife cannot carve a boar's head, I, 

273. 

Mantle, probation of wife's fidelity by, I, 260-2, 265 ; 
V| 289 a; this mantle preserved in some religious 
house or at Dover, I, 261 n. ; Karodes's mantle which 
would fit no woman who was not willing that her 
husband should know both her act and her thought, 
I, 261. 
Mirror which indicates the state of a woman's fidelity, 

I, 269. 

Nightingales, I, 64 f. 
Olive refuses to grow, V, 289 a. 
Picture (wax image) which by its color indicates the 

state of a wife's fidelity, I, 269. 
Ring which by its color indicates the condition of a 

woman's fidelity, I, 269. 

Robe which will fit only the pure woman, I, 262. 
St. Wilfred's needle, in Ripon Minster, V, 212 f. 
Shirt (mantle) will not soil, spot, etc., as long as hus 
band and wife, or wife, keeps faithful, I, 268. 
Statue which shows whether a young woman is a maid, 

I, 269 f . 
Stepping stone at bed-side, if stepped on, reveals un- 

chastity, I, 66. 
Stone, Aptor, red to the sight of clean man or woman, 

I, 269. 
Stone which cannot be approached by one who is not as 

clean as when born, I, 269 n. 
Sword, given by husband to wife, will not spot as long 

as he is faithful, I, 268. 

Valley from which no false lover could escape till it 
had been entered by a lover perfect in all points as 
such, I, 267. 

Clean paid can blow out a candle with one puff and 
light it with another, make a ball of water, or carry 
water in a sieve, I, 270. 
Egyptian test (Herodotus), I, 271 ; V, 212 f. 
Ordeals for chastity in Greek romances, brazier, cave, 

Stygian water, statue of Diana, I, 270. 
Test of chastity of women in Numbers and Apocryphal 

gospels, I, 271. 
Le Chat Botte", tale, I, 461 n. 

Le Chatelain de Couci et la Dame de Faiel, romance, V, 33. 
Chaucer, Wife of Bath's Tale, I, 291 f . ; II, 458 ; Squire's 
Tale, II, 51 ; Prioress's Tale, HI, 239 ; Clerk's Tale, IV, 
93 n. ; Sir Thopas, V, 287 b ; House of Fame, II, 136. 
Cheese of Fyvie as a love potion, V, 305 b. 
Chera, V, 13. 

La Cheviuerie Ogier de Danemarche, I, 239, and n. 
Du Chevalier a la corbeille, fabliau, V, 121. 
Le Chevalier au Cygne, romance, III, 515 b. 
Le Chevalier a I'Espe'e, fabliau, III, 508 a. 
Li Chevaliers as Deus Espees, romance, HI, 505. 
Du Chevalier qui fist sa femme confesse, fabliau, HI, 258. 
Du Chevalier qui ooit la masse, et Notre-Dame estoit pour 
lui au tournoieruent, fabliau, III, 96 n. 
VOL. v. 60 



Cheviot, Hunting of the, ballad, HI, 303 ff. 

Child, children, living, buried with dead mother, I, 180, 
185 ; IV, 450 a (No 15) ; child, young or unborn, speaks 
miraculously, to save life, vindicate the innocent, or to 
threaten revenge, IH, 367, and nn. ; IV, 507 a ; V, 298 a. 

Child Rowland and Burd Ellen, tale, I, 322 ; V, 201. 

The Child of Wane, boy who protects school-girls from the 
assaults of his fellows, I, 308 n. 

Childbirth, man's help rejected and presence forbidden at, 
1, 179, 181-3, 245 f., 502 a; H, 98, 106 f., 414, 418, 422, 
499; IV, 450 a, 464; V, 236 ; pains of woman in child 
birth repeated in the person of the man, II, 109 ; V, 
292 ; roddins (mountain-ash berries), juniper, desired by 
a woman at the point of childbirth, II, 408 f ., 414 ; first 
child, all the seven sisters of a family to die thereof, and 
six have so died, H, 311-16 ; woman who has just borne a 
child to a lover, forced to marry another man, dances 
with her lover, and falls dead, H, 104-8, 110 ; IV, 465 ; 
knots in woman's clothes, or knots in the house, to be un 
tied at childbirth, I, 85 ; all locks to be shot during, II, 
498; mortal midwives and nurses desired by fairies, I, 
358-60 ; n, 505 f . ; IH, 505 f. ; IV, 459 a ; V, 215 b, 290 b ; 
woman gives birth to child (children) in stable, among 
the great horse feet, H, 85, 87, 89, 91 f., 94 f., 97-9; V, 
221 ; top of tree as place for labor, II, 109. 

Childbirth obstructed by spells, I, 82-7 ; V, 285 b ; seven, 
nine days, three, seven, eight, twenty years, I, 82-85 ; by 
the Fates and Ilithyia sitting down and folding their hands, 
by Lucina's crossing knees and clasping hands over them, 
84 ; by throwing an enchanted pitcher into a draw-well, 
driving a nail into the roof-beam, placing folded hands 
between the knees, 85 ; spells broken by persuading the 
operator that birth has taken place, I, 82-87. See, fur 
ther, 1,489; HI, 497. 

Child-champions, marvellous valor of, H, 37, 43 n., 45 f. ; 
V, 292 a ; in Slavic tales, IV, 463 ; cf. Growth, marvel 
lous, etc. ; child (or dwarf) fights with huge or otherwise 
formidable adversary, II, 35-37, 43 n., 46. 

Children born seven, eight, twenty years old (in consequence 
of obstructed parturition), I, 83-85. 

Children of unwedded mother who has died in giving them 
birth buried alive with her by the father, I, 180. 

Children's game, ballads that have become, I, 33 ; II, 346. 

Choice of sword or ring given maid, to stick him wi the 
brand or wed him wi the ring, II, 469 ; IV, 493 ; V, 28, 
238. 

Chretien de Troyes, Cage's, III, 517 b ; V, 2, 6 ; Erec, TTI, 
507 a; Perceval le Gallois, I, 257 n., 261 n., 263, 265 n., 
269; H, 51, 502 b, 510 b; HI, 503 b, 508 a; IV, 454 a; 
V, 289 b. 

Christian IV of Denmark and a countryman, Danish tale, 
V,74. 

Chronicles cited as authority in ballads, HI, 297, 333, 360. 

Claverhouse, IV, 105-107, 109 f . ; accused of procuring 
Monmouth's execution, 109 f. 

Clergy accused of adultery with noble ladies, H, 34-36, 38. 

The Clever Lass, Clever Wench, or Wise Daughter, I, 1, 
8-13; answers king's puzzles, performs or offsets his 
tasks, 9 ; answers questions or performs supposed impos 
sibilities and is married for it, 9-11 ; solves difficult ques 
tions and is elevated by king to the rank of his sister, 12. 
See I, 409 n., 410 n., 484 a; II, 495 a; IV, 439 a; V, 
284. 

Clifton, assumed name (ineptly) for Scathlock, HI, 201, 204. 



474 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Clitophon and Leucippe of Achilles Tatius, I, 270. -. 
Clorinda, queen of the shepherds, espoused by Robin Hood, 

III, 217. 
Clothes kilted (cut) a little above (below) the knee, hair 

braided (snooded, cut) a little above the brow, I, 341, 

343 f ., 369 ; II, 86, 229, 417, 420, 423 ; IV, 457. 
Clyde Water, I, 389 ; H, 32, 88 f., 92, 94, 97, 144-7, 151-5, 

461 ; IV, 188-90, 203 ; V, 208, 227, 237, 257. 
Coach and three, I, 476 f. 
Cober, Cabinet-prediger, I, 408. 
Cock (capon) crows Christus natus est ! I, 240-2, 505 f . 

II, 501 b ; IV, 451 f. ; miracle of the roasted cock reani 
mated, I, 233-242, 505 ; II, 8, 501 b ; HI, 502 f . ; IV, 
451 f. ; V, 212 a, 288 a ; originally a feature in a legend 
of Judas, I, 239 f . 

Cock, unfaithful or remiss, IV, 389 f., 416. 

Cocks (crowing in the night), three, white, red, black, n, 
228 ; V, 294 a ; two, red, grey, II, 229, 239 ; milk-white, 
grey, II, 233 ; IV, 474 ; white, red, in, 514. 

Cognizances, parties in The Rose of England (a ballad of 
Henry VII's winning the crown) mostly indicated by, 

III, 331. 

Cokwolds Daunce, English comic tale, I, 264. 
Commonplaces (recurrent passages) : 

When bells were rung and mass was sung, 
And a' men bound to bed, I, 68, 70, 73 ; II, 70, 73, 
75 f., 79, 88, 90, 129 f., 132, 191, 300, 370, 470, 472 ; 
HI, 244-7, 254 ; IV, 44 f., 237 f., 240, 283, 327, 432, 
470; V, 171,224,239. 
Lord William was buried in St. Mary's Kirk, 

Lady Margret in Mary's quire ; 
Out o the lady's grave grew a bonny red rose, 

And out o the knight's a briar. 
And they twa met, and they twa plat, 

And fain they wad be near, etc., I, 101 f., 492 ; II, 
104, 108, 111, 183, 185, 190 f., 198, 201 f., 207 f., 
210-12, 219, 280, 285 f . ; HI, 515 ; IV, 465 ; V, 
224, 226, 262. 
Where will I get a bonnie boy, 

Will win gold to his fee ? 

O here am I, etc., H, 114, 116-19, 121, 123 f., 129, 131, 
177, 186, 188, 190, 194, 212, 284-7, 311, 313, 316, 
379, 394 f . ; IV, 229, 235, 398, 466 f ., 486, 488 ; V, 
227. 
O whan he came to broken briggs 

He bent his bow and swam, 
An whan he came to the green grass growin 
He slackd his shoone (set down his feet) and ran, 
H, 114 f., 117, 119, 121 f., 129, 177, 212, 247 f., 
250, 253, 257, 272, 287, 311, 313, 379, 395 ; IV, 
229, 398, 466 f., 477 ; V, 228, 262. 
whan he came to Lord William's gates, 

He baed na to chap or ca, 
But set his bent bow till his breast, 

An lightly lap the wa ; 
An, or the porter was at the gate, 
The boy was i the ha, H, 115-17, 129, 177, 272, 313 ; 

TV, 477; V, 228. 
O is my biggins broken, boy ? 

Or is my towers won ? 
Or is my lady lighter yet 

Of a dear daughter or son ? 

Your biggin is na broken, sir, but , H, 1 15-19, 122 f ., 
131 f., 212, 248, 250, 253-5, 257 ; IV, 467, 477. 



O saddle me the black, the black, 

Or saddle me the brown : 
O saddle me the swiftest steed 

That ever rade frae a town, H, 115-18, 120-13, 212, 
216-18, 254, 312 f. ; IV, 234, 236, 467, 477 ; V, 228, 
262. 
O where is a' my merry young men 

Whom I gie meat and fee ? I, 368 f., 396 ; II, 114, 

123, 266-8, 403 ; HI, 10; V, 35, 37, 292. 
O is your saddle set awrye ? 

Or rides your steed for you owre high ? (saddle, bri 
dle, stirrups, or something, not comfortable for 
maid who is riding), I, 66, and n., 68, 70, 72, 75-7, 
79 f ., 146, 179 ; IV, 450 a. 
The first line that Sir Patrick red, 

A loud lauch lauched he ; 
The next line that Sir Patrick red, 
The teir blinded his ee, H, 18 n., 20 f., 26 f., 29 f., 
381 f., 385, 387, 389 f., 392 f ., 395 ; IV, 117-121, 
351-4, 413, 483, 486. 

Gown narrow that was wont to be wide ; coats short 
that were wont to be side, etc., II, 85, 122, 399, 401, 
406 f., 409, 413 ; V, 36, 236. 
I'm oer laigh to be your bride, 
And I winna be your whore, II, 181, 188 ; IV, 323, 

325, 327, 330-32 ; V, 272. 
Janet has kilted her green kirtle 
A little aboon her knee, etc., I, 341, 343 f., 369 ; H, 

86, 229, 417, 420, 423 ; IV, 457 ; V, 202 a. 
(Pretence that a maid is trespassing in a wood.) 
She had na pu'd a double rose, 

A rose but only twa, 
Till up there started young Tarn Lin, 
Says, Lady, thou 's pu nae mae, 1, 41, 341, 343, 345 i., 
349, 360, and n., 367, 369, 450-53 ; IH, 504 ; IV, 
456 f. 

He took her by the milk-white hand, 
And by the grass-green sleeve, etc., I, 346, 349, 357 b, 

387, 452 f.; H, 465, 468, 475 ; IV, 193, 195-200, 
203, 205 f., 456; V, 239. Cf. IV, 219-22, 225-7, 
229. 

syne ye 've got your will of me, 
Your will o me ye 've taen, 

'T is all I ask of you, kind sir, 
Is to tell me your name. 

Sometimes they call me Jack, he said, etc., I, 346, 444, 
446, 450 f. ; H, 458, and n., 459 f., 462, 465, 468, 
471, 473-5, 478 f . ; IV, 196, 200 ; V, 153-6, 237, 239. 

(Dower despised.) 

1 'm seeking nane o your gold, he says, 

Nor of your silver clear, 
I only seek your daughter fair, etc., II, 380, 382 f., 385 f., 

388, 390 f., 393 f ., 396, 400 f ., 403-5 ; IV, 381 f., 
399, 413 f., 487 ; V, 184, 276. 

Lord Wayets lay over his castle-wa, 

Beheld baith dale and down, 
And he beheld, etc., I, 183; H, 131, 175, 257, 343 f.; 

IV, 235, 279, 403 f., 408, 433 ; V, 277 f. 
Hold your tongue, my daughter dear, 

And ye '11 lat a' your mourning be ; 
I '11 wed you to a higher match, etc., H, 163, 166 ; IV, 

96-103, 166-72, 174 f., 277, 279. 
If this be true, a reward ; if a lie, hanging, II, 244 f ., 

247-9, 251, 253-5, 257 ; HI, 299 ; cf. H, 114. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



475 



Pfor because thou minged not Christ before, 

Thee lesse me dreadeth thee, H, 59, 62 ; HI, 422. 
Sheet (sark, smock) for the dead, one half cambric, 
the other needlework (beaten gold and needlework ; 
silk and cambric), bier one half gold, the other sil 
ver, I, 506; H, 358 f., 362, 366; IV, 471 (IV, 485, 
bier lacking ; V, 224, sheet or sark lacking). 
Horse : Wi siller he is shod before, 

Wi burning gowd behind, I, 341 ; IE, 183, 

185, 191, 194, 266 f., 315, 343 f. ; V, 224. 
The day ye deal at Annie's burial 

The bread but and the wine ; 
Before the morn at twall o'clock 
They '11 deal the same at mine, II, 190 f., 193, 195, 
201, 203, 208, 211 f., 217, 219, 295 ; IV, 236, 465, 
471 ; V, 224, 262. 
It 's kiss will I yer cheek, Annie 
And kiss will I your chin, etc., II, 191, 212, 217, 

219, 221 f., 269, 273 ; IV, 236 f ., 474. 
She 's put it to her fause, fause cheek, 

But an her fause, fause chin, 
She 's put it to her fause, fause lips, 

But never a drap went in. 
He 's put it to his bonny cheek, etc., II, 284 f., 287; IV, 

235, 427 f., 431. 
The firstin kirk (town) that they came till 

They gard the bells be rung, 
At the nexten kirk that they came till 
They gard the mass be sung, II, 358, 350 f., 367, 380, 

385, 388 f., 391 f., 396, 469 ; IV, 487 f., 490. 
Johnny Barbary used to be the first, 

But now the last came he, II, 401, 403, 460 f., 463, 

466, 469, 471, 473-6 ; IV, 491 ; V, 238. 
She 's taen her mantle her about, 

Her cane (pike-staff, rod) intill her hand, II, 223; 
IH, 245, 248, 505 ; IV, 408 (6) ; of man, II, 
370; IV, 408 (14). (Corrupted, also, HI, 250, 
252.) 
She 's taen her mantle her about, 

Her coffer by the band, I, 350 ; III, 244 ; IV, 385. 

Cf . IV, 456. 
She 's taen her petticoat (petticoats) by the band, 

Her mantle owre her arm, 1, 348, 349 (bis) ; II, 475. 
The knight he knacked (wrung) his white fingers, 
The lady tore her hair, II, 26, 312-15, 319 ; 111,455, 

477; IV, 418,435; V, 227-9. 
Will ye gae to the cards or dice, etc., II, 109, 154, 164, 

409 ; IV, 391, 415. 
(Wedding procession.) 
Wi four-and-twenty buirdlie men 

Atween ye and the wun, 
And four-and-twenty bonnie mays 

Atween ye and the sun. 
Four-and-twenty milk-white geese, 
Stretching their wings sae wide, 
Blawing the dust aff the high-way, 
That Mild Mary may ride, II, 315. See II, 132, 183, 

195 a; IV, 470. 
I '11 gae in at your gown-sleeve, 

And out at your gown-hem, I, 508 ; II, 366. 
Man and woman riding, no word spoken by either (or 
by one of them) for a long distance, I, 41-44 ; III, 
497 b ; V, 207 a, 285 a (in French, Italian, Spanish, 
Catalan, Scandinavian, Slavic ; not English). 



Communion-bread called " God," etc., HI, 103 n. ; V, 240, 

299, 359 (under mood). 
The Complaynt of Scotland, I, 336, 390 ; H, 51 n., 296 ; 

III, 292, 303, 317, 362 f.; V, 202. 
Compulsory marriage, woman carried off, III, 329; IV, 

232-54, 308-10; V, 168 f., 261-264. 

Confession, wife's, heard by husband disguised, HI, 258-64. 
The Constant but Unhappy Lovers, chap-book, V, 33. 
Constantine, Emperor, his leprosy miraculously cured, V, 

285. 
Conte du Graal, Gautier's, ugly lady in, V, 289 b. See also 

Chre*tien. 
Contes a rire, I, 268 n., 408 ; Nouveaux Contes a rire, I, 

408. 
Conversion, remarkably sudden, of Jean Livingston, IV, 

29 f. 
Copland, John of, takes David Bruce prisoner at Durham, 

IH, 286. 

Corgarf Castle, IH, 427, 434. 

Cork-heeled shoon, II, 20, 22 f., 27, 29 f., 88; FIT, 393. 
Corsabrin, King of Mont Oscur, V, 6. 
Cort Mantel, fabliau, I, 257, 266. 

Costumes enclosed in nut-shells or small bags, I, 260, and n. 
The Cotter's Son, Gaelic tale, III, 507. 
The Countess of Northumberland (Rising in the North), 

III, 403-5, 410, 417. 

La Coupe Enchanted, La Fontaine, I, 265. 
Craddocke, I, 264 n., 272 f. ; V, 289 a (Welsh Caradawc). 
Crawford, Earl, ballad, IV, 276 ff. 
Crecrynbroghe Castle, III, 430. 
Cre"qui, Sire de, I, 459. 
Crescentia, II, 181. 
Crichton. See under Family Names, 
Cries, three (four), maid about to be murdered asks and is 

allowed, I, 32-37, 39, 41 f ., 47, 487 b ; V, 207. 
Cromlet's Lilt, reply to, II, 317 n. 
Cromwell, Thomas Lord, ballad, III, 377. 
Din Crone of Heinrich von dem Tiirlin, I, 264, 266, 279 a. 
Cross burned or cut into the flesh, II, 240, 242, 513 a ; HI, 

514; IV, 476; V, 225 b. 
The Cruel Mother, German variations of (Die Rabenmutter, 

Kindesmorderin, u. s. w.), I, 219 f., 504 a; II, 500 a ; HI, 

502 b ; IV, 451 a ; V, 212 a, 287 b ; Slavic, Magyar, Croat, 

variations, I, 220, 504 a ; III, 502 b ; V, 287 f . 
The Cruel Mother, story of, blended with that of Magdalen 

and Samaritan women, I, 230 ; with that of the Samari 
tan woman simply, ib. 
Cuchulinn, Cuculin, IV, 463 b, 479 b. 
Culpepper, affair of the Earl of Devonshire with, IV, 111. 
Cunigund, name of Gunhild, wife of the Emperor Henry 

HI, after her marriage, II, 38. 
Cunigund, St., wife of the Emperor St. Henry II, her ordeal, 

H, 38. 
Cunningham, Allan, his handling of Scottish ballads, I, 62 

119 n., 142, 227, 436 ; II, 260, 302 f. ; IH, 265, 381 ; IV, 

9,80; V, 107; etc. 

Curse, mother's, I, 386; IV, 181, 186-9; V, 257, 301 a. 
Cursor Mundi, I, 240, 505 ; II, 2, 7 nn. 
Curtal Friar and curtal dogs, III, 121, 124 f. 

Dactyliomancy, III, 411, and n. ; V, 299 b. 

Aaiudiviov fjiffrifj.$fnv6v, IH, 505 f. See Mittagsfran and 

Noon-sprite. 
Dame Ragnell, I, 290. 



476 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Damiani, Pietro, I, 237 n. 

La damoisele hydeuse in Chretien's Perceval, II, 502 b ; IV, 

454 a ; V, 289 b. 
Damsel who prizes herself too highly marries and has a 

litter of nine pups, a pig, and a boy, I, 210. 
Dance, probation by, of young woman suspected of having 
had a child ; she dies in consequence ; she dances with 
all the men of the court, tires out successively all the 
courtiers, the king and the queen ; dances seven hours 
without breaking down, II, 102 (dance ordered, but 
deprecated, 103) ; jealous or offended lover makes his 
mistress dance till her boots are full of blood, II, 103 ; 
young woman who has just borne a child, married against 
her will, dances with her lover after the wedding and 
dies of the exertion, II, 104-8, 110; IV, 465; girl tires 
out fifteen partners (in Danish ballads), IV, 214; lass of 
Anglesey, dancing on king's party against English lords, 
tires out fifteen of them, 215. 
Daniel von Bliihenthal, I, 257 n. 
Dansekar, the pirate, V, 143. 
Dark complexions in women, not in favor, I, 120, 133, M, 

(10), 135 (1) ; H, 182-97 ; V, 167 f. 

Darnley, Lord (Henry Stuart), III, 382, 384-7, 390, 392-4, 
399-401, 442, 444, 446; IV, 507 f., 510, 512 ; murder of, 
in revenge for his complicity in the murder of Rizzio, III, 
399, 401 ; hanged on a tree, 401, 444. 
Dasakumaracharitam, I, 14. 
The Daughter of King Under-waves, Scottish-Gaelic tale 

(Nighean Righ fo Thuinn), I, 297. 
Davenant, Sir William, The Wits, II, 243. 
David, King of Judah, gives hard questions to his sons to 

determine his successor ; answered by Solomon, I, 13 n. 
David Bruce, King of Scotland, can brook no opposition 
and kills his own squire for warning him of the danger of 
invading England ; distributes portions of English terri 
tory among his chief men, before the battle of Durham, 
III, 284 f . ; is taken prisoner by John of Copland, 286 ; 
meets King John of France, also a captive, in London, 
287. 

De simplicitate viri et uxoris, tale of Sercambi, V, 97. 
The Dead. 

Dead body compromises the safety of a ship, I, 245 n. 
Dead body lying in a river, expedients for discovering, 

H, 143, 145, 147 f., 151, 155. 

Dead body may be caused to speak by setting door 
ajar or half open, H, 281, 282 (15) (Scott. Nothing 
said of the door being ajar in B, p. 283, or in the ori 
ginal of A, IV, 478). 
Dead brother admonishes his sister for her pride of 

dress, I, 428, 430 f. 
Carlin's three sons come back from Paradise with hats 

of birch, H, 238 f. 
Dead corpse of boy makes appointment to meet mother, 

HI, 244 f., 247 ; V, 241. 
The dead, love tokens asked back by ; gifts returned 

by, H, 228. 

Grief for the dead detrimental to their comfort and 
peace, II, 234-7, 512 f. ; HI, 513 ; V, 294 ; resent 
ment for the disturbance occasioned by, V, 62 ; tears 
for dead lover fill his coffin with blood ; cheerful 
ness causes his grave to be hung with rose-leaves, II, 
228. 

Kiss from the dead fatal, I, 439 ; II, 229-32, 236 f. ; 
HI, 512 f . ; IV, 474 f . ; bramble-leaf comes between 



the lips of maid and lover, and her life saved, IV, 
474. 

Maid demands answers of her dead lover to questions 
concerning state of the dead as condition of returning 
his troth, II, 231-3. 

Dead man coming on horseback to his mistress (wife, 
sister) and taking her with him, V, 60 ; tales, 60-3, 
303 ; ballads, 63-67, 303. 
Dead mother revisits her daughter, and would have 

torn her to pieces, V, 303 b. 
Dead mistress admonishes her lover, I, 426. 
Troth asked for and returned by maid to dead lover, or 

resumed by her, II, 227, 229-33. 
Father asks return of troth from his son, II, 512 b. 
Dead lover (like the Devil, Elfin Knight) sets maid 
tasks and would have taken her with him if she had 
not ' answered well,' baffled him by requiring pre 
liminary counter-tasks, IV, 439 f. 

Death feigned by maid (who takes a draught which pro 
duces insensibility) in order to get to her lover, II, 355 f., 
358-67 ; in, 517 ; IV, 482-6 ; V, 234 a ; save her honor, 
avoid becoming a king's mistress, avoid marrying a Turk, 
avoid a disagreeable suitor, or to move a lover, II, 356 ; 
HI, 517; IV, 482 b; V, 234 a, 296 b; painful or dis 
agreeable tests of her sensibility, II, 359, 361, 364-7 ; HI, 
517 b ; IV, 485 ; V, 296 b. 

Death feigned by wife to escape to lover, or apparent death 
operated by sleeping draughts administered by lover 
(woman is in some cases buried, disinterred and carried 
off), V, 3 f., 6, 280 ; tests of sensibility applied, V, 3, 6. 
Death feigned by lover in order to possess himself of maid 
when she comes to his wake, or his funeral, I, 247-53, 
506 f . ; II, 502 a ; HI, 503 a ; IV, 453 ; V, 212, 289 a. 
(The maid in a convent in some cases, and the body intro 
duced into the cloister ; nuns think it an angel that has 
taken maid off, and they wish the like for themselves, I, 
248 f.) 
Death of bridegroom, husband, concealed from bride, wife, 

by evasions, I, 376-9, 381, 383-7. 
The Death of Keeldar, ballad by Sir W. Scott, IV, 25. 
The Death of Robert, Earl of Huntington, play by Anthony 

Munday and Henry Chettle, III, 129, 519. 
Death-naming. See Naming. 
The Debateable Land, HI, 363 n., 473. 
Dee, Water of, H, 283, 468 ; HE, 360, 457 ; IV, 52 f ., 103. 
Delamere, Lord, ballad, IV, 110 ff. 
Deloney's Pleasant History of John Winchcomb (Jacke of 

Newburie), I, 111, 113. 
Demaundes Joyous, I, 13 n. 
Demoniac character of the murderous knight in No 4, 1, 

49 f. 

Derby, Earl of, incurs the anger of Henry VIII because 
Lancashire and Cheshire are maliciously represented by 
the Earl of Surrey to have failed to do their duty at 
Flodden, III, 355-7; the next day a letter from the 
queen gives all the credit of the victory to Lancashire and 
Cheshire and the Earl of Derby, and the Stanleys are in 
high favor, HI, 359. 

Derwentwater, ballad by Allan Cunningham, IV, 116. 
Derwentwater, Lord, ballad, IV, 115 ff. 
Derwentwater's Lights, IV, 117. 
Les deux Fiance's, tale of French Brittany, V, 64. 
Devil appears to counsel and take part in a murder, IV, 31. 
Devil gives riddles, I, 4 f., C, D, and tasks, 14 ; (represented 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



477 



as auld man) imposes tasks and is baffled by the maid, 
18 f., I ; the devil express, V, 283 ; seeks to nonplus boy, 

1, 22, 485 b. 

Devil takes lover to hell and shows him his mistress in tor 
ment, Breton ballad, I, 426. 

Devil would be a maid's leman, V, 283. 

Devonshire, Earl of, fights with a French or Dutch lord in 
defence of Lord Delamere, IV, 111-115. 

Diarmaid allows a hideous woman to come near his fire and 
under his blanket, she is transformed into the most beau 
tiful creature in the world, Gaelic tale, I, 298 ; cf . Irish 
story, V, 289 b. 

Diarmaid and Grainne, West Highland Gaelic tale, I, 8. 

Diarmaid and the Magic Boar, West Highland tale, H, 500. 

Diarmaid's wife tries the robe which is a test of chastity, 
Gaelic ballad, I, 261 f. ; V, 289. 

Dicing for prisoners, III, 378 f. 

Diderik, King, and Gunild, II, 36. 

Dietrichs Flucht, IV, 463 b. 

Dietrichsaga, I, 49. 

Dieu vous saue, Dame Emme, song or ballad, II, 38 n. 

Disenchantment effected by drinking of blood, or by draw 
ing blood from the bewitched, I, 178, 337, and n. ; by 
kisses given (or received from) a disgusting or terrible 
creature, or by touching the same, I, 307-11, 313, 338 n. ; 
U, 502 b, 504 f . ; IH, 504 a ; IV, 454 a ; V, 214, 290 a ; 
not completed without, often operated by, immersion in 
milk or water, I, 308, 338, and n., 339 n., 342, 344 ; II, 
505 b; HE, 505 b; V, 39 f. ; other processes or condi 
tions, I, 313, 315 ; V, 215. 

Disenchantment of hideous woman effected by obtaining 
absolute sovereignty over a man's will, I, 290-2, 295 f., 
299 ; by finding a man who would accept his life at her 
hands, kiss her, and share her bed, 293 ; by being ad 
mitted to a king's or hero's bed, 297 f . ; V, 289 b ; by 
getting king's brother for husband, 1, 507 a ; disenchant 
ment of seemingly ugly old man effected by gaining the 
love of a beautiful girl, V, 213 a ; of linden-worm, snake, 
by being admitted to maid's bed, 1, 298 ; IE, 502 b ; IV, 
454 a (cf. V, 289 b) ; of crocodile by girl's licking his face, 
V, 215 b. 

Disguises of outlaws, Fulk Fitz-Warine, Hereward, Eustace, 
Wallace, Robin Hood, in, 109 f., 117 f., 178-82, 184, 
191, 271, 273 f. ; other disguises, as beggar or pilgrim, V, 

2, 4, 5, 279 f. ; as charcoal man, V, 6. 

Dish made from ashes and bones of murdered man de 
nounces the murderers, I, 126. 
Dissawar, Disaware, name borne by Prince Roswall and the 

Lord of Lorn after exchanging positions with the steward, 

V, 44, 49, 55. 

Dobrynya, Russian epic hero, V, 295 a. 
Dodhead, the, IV, 5 f., 518 b ; V, 249-51. 
Dog who could indicate pregnant women, adulterers, etc., I, 

270 n. 

Dole-day, H, 436. 

Dolopathos, Latin (and French) romance, I, 392. 
Don Bueso, Catalan representative of Young Beichan, I, 

462. 
Don John of Austria meets the Earl of Westmoreland on 

the sea, takes him to Seville and recommends him to the 

queen, III, 420 f . 

Doon I'Alemanz, chanson de geste, II, 40. 
Doors and windows thrown on a combatant to take him 

prisoner, III, 24. 



Douglas. See under Family Names. 

Douglas, Northumberland betrayed by, ballad, III, 408 ff. 

Douglas, tragedy by Home, II, 263, and n., 264. 

Douglas, Gavin, Palice of Honour, II, 136, V, 69 n. 

Douglas, James, Earl, in the Scottish Otterburn alleged to 
have been stabbed before the battle by one of his own 
men, or a boy whom he had offended, III, 294, 299 ; V, 
244 ; in another version, to have gone into battle without 
his helmet, III, 300 ; challenges Percy to single combat 
in The Hunting of the Cheviot, III, 308 ; dreams that a 
dead man wins a fight and thinks that man is he, III, 300, 
IV, 501. 

Douglas, Jamie, ballad, IV, 90 ff. 

Douglas, Lady, of Lochleven, tries to protect the Earl of 
Northumberland from the treachery of William Douglas, 

III, 411-3 ; shows his chamberlain his English enemies 
waiting for him 150 miles off through the hollow of her 
ring, 412. 

Douglas, William, Earl of Angus, his encounter with the 

English at Piperden, III, 305. 
Douglas, William, knight of Liddesdale, III, 282 f., 284 f., 

288. 
Douglas, William, of Lochleven, HI, 409, 411-14, 443 f., 

446. 

Douns LioS, IE, 506 a; IIE, 518 b. 
D'Ouville, L'Elite des Contes du Sieur, I, 408 ; V, 96. 
The Downfall of Robert, Earl of Huutington, play by A. 

Munday, HI, 46, 122, 129, 130 n., 179, 218, 220, 227, 

519 b ; V, 100. 
Dramatic representation of ballads by young people, I, 249 ; 

IV, 439 b ; V, 90. 

Dreams : of bower full of red swine and bride-bed full of 
blood, IE, 200 ; room fu o red swine and bride's bed 
daubd wi blude, II, 292 ; chamber full of swine and bed 
full of blood, IV, 426 ; bowr lin'd with white swine and 
brid-chamber full of blood, II, 202, B, 11 ; chamber full 
of wild men's wine and bride-bed stood in blood, II, 202, 
C, 4 ; bower full of milk-white swans and bride's bed 
full of blood, IV, 433 ; of pulling green heather, IV, 164, 
167-9, 171-5, 180 (heather bell), 522; V, 255; green 
birk, IV, 176 ; apples green, IV, 523 ; other dreams, II, 
33 n., 41, 45, 205 ; to dream of blood bodes ill, IE, 292 f. ; 
to dream of ravens is the loss of a near friend, II, 293. 

Die drei Briider, tale, I, 125, 493 b. 

Drink which causes forgetfulness, I, 363, and n., 364. 

Drinking formulas, challenge and response, V, 71-73. 

Drinking to friends upon the eve of execution, IV, 30 n. 

Drolleries, nonplussing, I, 20-2, 417 f ., 485 a ; II, 507 b ; 
IV, 440 b. 

Drowned bodies, mode of discovering, II, 143, 512 a ; HI, 
509 a ; IV, 468 a. 

Drum, Laird of, ballad, IV, 322 ff. 

Drumclog, ballad, IV, 105 ff. 

Drummond. See under Family Names. 

Dsanglun, oder der Weise und der Thor, I, 11 n., 13. 

Duel in which innocent boy of fifteen vanquishes false ac 
cuser of thirty-three, IV, 371, 373. See Child-champion. 

Dumfounding, fool wins a princess by, I, 20, 485 a. 

Dunbar, William, Of Sir Thomas Norray, HE, 91 ; God gif 
ye war John Thomsoneis man, V, 8. 

Durham, Battle of, III, 282 ff. 

Dwarf -king, hill-king, beguiles a princess ; she has children 
by him, though remaining with her mother ; revealing 
the condition of things she is forced to go to the hill, 



478 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



where she dies or drinks a Lethean draught which makes 
her forget all her earlier history, I, 862, 363, and n. ; 
woman lives iu the hill and there has her children ; after 
eight or nine years is allowed to go home on terms ; vio 
lating these, is compelled to return to the hill, where she 
dies, or is given a drink which induces forgetfulness, I, 
363 f. See Merman. 

Dwarf Land, I, 259. 

Dying man, woman, directs that father, mother, wife, etc., 
be kept in ignorance of his, her, death, I, 436-40, 442 ; 
II, 14, and n. ; III, 380 f ., 507 b ; IV, 460, 508-10, 512 f. ; 
V, 247. 

Earl of Toulouse, romance, II, 33 n., 41 f., 43 n. 

Eating and drinking, personal contact, exchange of speech, 
etc., in Elfland, or any abode of unearthly beings, peril 
ous, I, 322-5, 327 f. ; II, 505 ; IV, 455, 458. 

Edda, the Elder (Smund's) : Voluspa, I, 21 ; )>rymskvioa, 
I, 298 ; Vafpriionismal, I, 13, 283 n., 404 ; Grfmnismal, 
I, 67 ; Alvissmal, I, 13, 419 ; HelgakviSa HjorvarSssonar, 
I, 94, and n. ; HelgakviSa Hundingsbana, I, 67, 94 f. ; 
H, 228, 235 ; III, 306 ; Faf nismal, I, 96, 392 ; Sigrdrff u- 
mal, I, 392 ; Sigurdarkvioa Fafnisbana, HI, 2, 127 ; Fjbl- 
svinnsmal, I, 281 n. 

Edda, Snorri's : Gylfaginning, I, 283 n. ; Skaldskaparmal, 
1, 94 n., 283 n. ; II, 127 ; IV, 479 b. 

Der edle Moringer, I, 196, 459 ; V, 291 b. 

Edward the III and the Tanner of Tamworth, play by T. 
Heywood, V, 68 n. 

Eger and Grime, Eger, Grime and Graysteel, romance, I, 
209; II, 56; 111,306. 

Egil's apple-shot, III, 16. 

Egils Saga ok Asmundar, IV, 443. 

Eildon Tree, I, 320 n., 324, 325, 327. 

EindriSi, HI, 18, 20 n. 

Der Eisenhans, tale, V, 46. 

Der Eisenhofen, tale, I, 307 n. 

Der eiserne Mann, tale, V, 46. 

Eleanor, Queen of Henry II of England, IU, 257 ff. ; of 
Edward I, 257. 

Eleusinian priests, holy names of, V, 285 b. 

Elf -dance, I, 375-77; IV, 459 a; V, 216 a. 

Elfin knight haunts a hill, 1, 15-7 ; elfin knight sets a maid 
tasks to be done before she can marry him, 1, 15-17. 

Elf-knight, hill-man, excites love-longing by the sound of 
his horn, I, 15-17, 23, 55, 367. 

Elf-queen would have taken out Tarn Lin's eyes and have 
put in eyes of wood, I, 343, 345, 356. 

Elf -queen and witches take out the heart of man and re 
place it with straw, stone, etc., I, 339, 345, 347 f., 353, 
356. 

Elf-rod controls the will, I, 362. 

Elf-shot, elf -stroke (= Elveskud), I, 374-7, 382, 385. 

Elie de Saint-Gille and Rosamonde, I, 458 n. ; in, 508 a, b. 

Ellensborg, Stolt, Jomfrue (Ellen), Scandinavian represen 
tative of Susie Pye, I, 459-61. 

Elliot. See under Family names. 

Elritch (eldrige) king haunts a hill in the night and fights 
with any comer, II, 58 f . ; fighting with elritch or spec 
tral knights, II, 511 a ; HI, 508. 

Elves, mermaids, or water-nymphs: ballads in which the 
results of dealing with or encountering them prove fatal, 
I, 372-389 ; inconstancy in relations with elves, mermaids, 
to., has fatal consequences, I, 372-5, 387-9 ; elf threatens 



man with sickness, knives, death, if he will not dance 
with her, I, 376 f . ; option of living with elves, marrying 
an elf, or dying, I, 377, 379, 381, 383 f . ; poison grains in 
drink given by elves, I, 375; elf, hill-maid, mermaid, 
promises man wonderful gifts if he will plight himself to 
her (dance with her), I, 314, 375, 376; III, 504 a; V, 

214 b ; offers man shirt as love-token, V, 284 ; elves, 
spirits and the like, reproaching or insulting, I, 21, 485 a ; 
II, 496 b, 509 a ; IV, 440 b ; elves and water-sprites 
desire help of mortal women at lying-in time and in nurs 
ing, I, 358-60; H, 505 f.; Ill, 505 f . ; IV, 459 a; V, 

215 b. See also Elf-dance, Elfin, Elf-queen, Elf-rod, 
Elf -shot. 

Emma, wife of Cnut the Great, her ordeal, and ballad con 
cerning, II, 38, and n. 

Enchantment, restoration from, after successive changes of 
shape, by drawing blood, I, 337 ; by drinking blood, etc., 
337 n. ; victim of enchantment, inoffensive before, be 
comes fierce and destructive, I, 289 f., 294 f., 316. 
L'Enf ant de Chceur de Notre-Dame du Puy, legend, HI, 240. 
Engelische Comedien und Tragedien, V, 97. 
Englishmen warned not to come to Scotland for brides, IV, 

219, 221 f., 224-8, 230. 

Epithets (as Fair Margaret, Sweet William, Child Maurice) : 
Bold, I, 453; 11,320. 

Bonny, II, 276 ; III, 447 ; IV, 52 f., 143, 233. 
Burd, I, 256 ; II, 71, 87, 91, 97, 140 ; IV, 418-421 ; V, 

227-9. 

Child, Chll, Chiel, I, 62 ; II, 85, 128, 133, 263 ; Child of 

Ell, I, 103 ; child of Wynd, Childy Wynd = Child 

Owyne, I, 312 f. ; II, 503 f. ; alternating with Gil, I, 

62 ; II, 130, 263. 

Clerk, I, 387-9; H, 158-161, 164 f. ; IV, 385 f., 428, 

468. 

Dove (Dow), II, 97. 
Fair, I, 341, 343, 345, 431 ; H, 63, 92, 100, 179, 200, 

207, 212, 213, etc. 
Hind, 1, 187, 369 f. ; II, 305. 
Kemp, Kempy, I, 300, 306. 
Love, II, 216 f ., 220-3, 293, 369 f ., 389, 395. 
May, I, 22, 369 ; II, 158, 164, 232, 305 ; III, 452, 455 ; 

V, 257 ; Maid Marian, HI, 218. 
Mild (Mile), II, 72, 315; III, 386, 395 f., 398; IV, 

507 f., 510 f. 
Sweet, I, 68 ; H, 97, 100, 168 f., 171, 179, 200, 226, 

291, etc. 
Young, I, 256, 367, 371, 432, 454; n, 51, 142,282,288, 

343 ; III, 452, 454 f., etc. 
Erl of Toulous, romance, II, 33 n., 41 f., 43 n. 
Errol, Earl of, ballad, IV, 282 ff. 
Essex, the young Earl of, V, 146. 
Estmere, nuncio of King Adler, II, 50 ; King, and brother 

of Adler, 51-5. 

Ettrick Forest, V, 187-9, 191-7. 
Eulenspiegel, I, 409. 

Eulogium Historiarum, I, 157. . ~ 

Eustace the Monk, III, 43, 53, 109, 191, 211, 476 n. 
Evils, a hundred, enter into a man who has proved false in 

love, IV, 419. 
Example-books, I, 292 n. 

Fa, Faa, Faw, Foix, Faux, IV, 61-70 ; Johnie, Jockie, Faa, 
61-6, 68-70; IV, 513 b, 522 a; V, 188; takes in one 
manuscript the place of Captain Car or of Edom o Gor 
don, IV, 513 b. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



479 



Fabliaux : Le mantel mautaillie 1 , Cort Mantel, I, 257, 266 ; 
La mule sanz frein, I, 417 n. ; Du povre mercier, III, 54 ; 
Du chevalier qui ooit la messe, etc., Ill, 96 n. ; Du che 
valier qui fist sa femme conf esse, III, 258 ; Le chevalier 
a l'espe"e, III, 508 a ; Des tresces, V, 22 f., n. ; Du cheva 
lier a la corbeille, V, 121. 

Fdfnismal, I, 96, 392. 

Fair Annie of Kirkland, ballad of A. Cunningham's, I, 436. 

The Fair one of the Castle, Persian riddle poem, I, 417. 

A fair pretty maiden she sat on her bed, IV, 439 b. 

Fairies, euphemisms for, good damsels, good ladies, I, 314, 
gude neighbors, I, 352 (cf. Romaic, I, 314 n.) ; failure of 
a husband to rescue his wife who had been carried off by, 
I, 336 ; ride white steeds, I, 216, 323, 325, 339 f . (Tarn 
Lin mounted, but not the rest of the fairy train, 342, 344, 
346, 348, 349, 351, 352, 355); ride dapple-gray steeds, 
324, 326 ; fairies, water-spirits, etc., solicit help of mortal 
women at lying-in time and as nurses, 1, 358-60 ; II, 505 f . ; 
HI, 505 f. ; IV, 459 a ; V, 215 b, 290 b ; fairy, at first ap 
pearance, taken for the Virgin, I, 319, 327 ; HI, 504 a ; 
IV, 455 ; fairy salve applied to mortals' eyes gives power 
of seeing fairies, but is dangerous to use, I, 339; II, 
S05b; III, 505 b; V, 290 a. 

False luve, and hae ye played me this, IV, 210. 

Family names, the principal : - 

Argyll, in, 397 ; IV, 55-60, 99, 131, 135, 271 ; V, 252, 

266 ; Gleyd Argyle, IV, 55, 57-60, 135. 
Armstrong, III, 363-71, 409, 419, 461-7, 469-83, 485 n. ; 

IV, 432; V, 298. 

Barnard, Bernard, Barnet, Burnett, Burnard, Lord, II, 

244-8, 251 f., 256-8, 266-74. 
Burnet, I, 453; IV, 82, 355-8. (Burnett for Barnard, 

n, 256.) 
Campbell, m, 427, 435-8; IV, 56-59, 142-4, 514; V, 

252. See Argyll. 

Cassilis, Earl of, IV, 62, 64-7, 70, 124, 133 ; V, 301. 
Crichton, III, 458-60 ; IV, 39-47. 
Douglas, HI, 282-5, 288-301, 304 f., 307-14, 409, 411- 

14, 443-6; IV, 36 f., 50, 90 f., 93-104, 499-501 ; V, 

190, 227, 243 f. 

Drummond, IV, 276, 282, 292. 
Elliot, in, 370, 471, 473; IV, 5 f., 34; V, 249-51; 

Martin Elliot, III, 409, 471 ; V, 249-51. 
Fenwick (Fennick, Fenix, Phenix, Phoenix), II, 312, 

442-55; IV, 140,371-5. 
Forbes, IV, 48 f., 51-3, 83, 86 ; V, 254. 
Gordon (Huntly, Aboyne), HI, 294, 296, 299, 301, 341, 

345, 349. 378 f ., 400, 424-6, 432-8, 447-9, 456 f. ; IV, 

39-47, /1-3, 80-7, 108 f., 124, 127, 129 f., 133-8, 295, 

312-22, 333-8, 341 f., 344, 347-50, 500 f ., 505, 513 f . ; 

V, 165, 243 f., 247 f., 254, 270-75, 301. 

Graham (Graeme, Gryme), I, 211 ; HI, 299, 318 ; IV, 

9-15, 76, 78, 105-7, 109 f., 146-8; IV, 157, 241 f., 

267-9, 500, 518-20; V, 265, 300. See Montrose. 
Hall, HI, 485, 487-94 ; IV, 24-8, 517, 520 f. 
Hamilton, HI, 285, 341, 382, 384-97, 428, 431, 442 ; 

IV, 36, 38, 64, 106, 108, 163, 505-13; V, 187, 191, 

193, 246 f., 298 f. 
Hay, IV, 41 f., 45, 48, 127 f., 136, 233 f., 282-4, 286- 

91 ; V, 267-9, 301. 
Howard, HI, 335-7, 339-45, 348-56, 359, 377; IV, 

503-7. 
Hume, Home, HI, 409, 412 ; IV, 12 f., 272 f., 281, 

293 f ., 296-8, 518 ; V, 270. 



Lindsay, HI, 291, 299, 301 ; IV, 256-66, 276-9, 500 f., 

524 ; V, 243 f ., 264 f. 
Livingston, H, 312, 314 f. ; HI, 381, 382 n., 389 f.; 

IV, 29-33, 233, 235-8, 431-3 ; V, 227-9, 246, 261. 
Macdonald (Macdonell), HI, 316-19 ; IV, 256-66, 271 f., 

274 f ., 524 ; V, 265-7. 

Macgregor, Rob Roy, IV, 243, 246-53 ; V, 263 f. ; Rob 
Oig, IV, 243-54 ; V, 262-4 ; James, IV, 243 f., 252 ; 
Duncan, IV, 244 ; Glengyle, IV, 245, 252. 
Maxwell, III, 292, 296, 298, 310, 313, 485 ; IV, 34-38. 
Murray, IH, 298, 310 ; V, 185, 187-97, 307. 
Neville, HI, 283 f ., 402-4, 406, 409, 417, 419-23. 
Ogilvie, III, 316 ; IV, 55 f., 58, 333 f., 336-8 ; V, 252. 
Percy, H, 383 f. ; IH, 282 f., 286, 289-301, 304 f., 307- 

14, 402-6, 409-14 ; IV, 500 f . ; V, 243 f. 
Scott, HI, 297 f., 469-74 ; IV, 5-8, 34, 163 f. ; V, 189, 

249 f. 

Scott of Buccleuch, HI, 410, 417, 469-74 ; V, 186, 189. 
Stanley, HI, 328 f., 331-3, 354-9, 377 f. 
Stuart, IH, 298, 316 ; IV, 109, 425 ; Charles Edward, 
the Young Pretender, IV, 55, 57-60 ; V, 252 ; Fran 
cis, Earl of Bothwell, III, 449 ; Henry, Earl of Darn- 
ley, IH, 382, 384-7, 390, 392-4, 399-iOl, 442, 444, 
446 ; IV, 507 f ., 510, 512 ; James, Earl of Murray, 
Regent, III, 400, 409, 417, 442, 447; James, the 
Bonny Earl of Murray, HI, 447-9 ; James Francis 
Edward, the Old Pretender, IV, 116, 118-23 ; V, 255. 
See Kings and Queens of England and Scotland. 
Farce d'un Chauldronnier, V, 97 f. 

The Farmer, his wife, and the open door, Indian tale, V, 281. 
Farmer Weathersky, Norse tale, HI, 507. 
Farrow cow's milk regarded as best, I, 224 ; II, 261. 
Fascinating horn (harp), I, 15-17, 50, 55 ; IV, 441. 
Fascinating song, I, 25, 28 b, 31-35, 37 f., 44, 485 ; IV, 441 ; 

V, 285 a. 
Les Favours et les Disgraces de 1' Amour, French tale from 

Bandello, I, 269. 

La Fe"e Urgele, melodrama of Favart, I, 292. 
The Felon Sow and the Friars of Richmond, I, 209 n. 
Fenwick. See under Family Names. 
La Fiancee du Mort, Breton tale, V, 303 b. 
Fiddle, parts of maid's body taken for, fiddle speaks, I, 

494; IV, 449. 

Fights, hand to hand, of Robin Hood or his men, duration 
of: one hour, HI, 64, 219; two hours, 93, 138, 151 ; three 
hours, 153 ; six hours, 125, 166, 169 ; a long summer's 
day, 131. 

Fikenild, Horn's false friend, I, 188-90. 
Filer le parfait amour, tale of Se'nece', I, 269. 
Fin, Finn, Finns, I, 21 ; II, 494, 496 b. See Finns. 
Fin, a diabolic personage or warlock, his wit-contest witn 

Harpkin, I, 21. 
Finger cut off, of maid substituted for mistress, exhibited as 

token of conquest of the mistress's virtue, V, 22-4, 27. 
Fingers knacked, knocked, cracked, wrung, for grief, II, 26, 
312-15, 319; III, 455, 477; IV, 418, 435; V, 227-9. 
(Some passages corrupted.) 
Finn, Gaelic hero, his wife tries the robe which is the test 

of chastity, I, 261 f. ; cf. V, 289 a. 

Finns, submarine, by donning seal-skin, enabled to ascend 
to land, losing the skin become subject to the power of 
man like swan-maidens, H, 494 ; HI, 518 ; IV, 495 a. See 
Fin. 
Finubury field, archery at, III, 197, 201, 203. 



480 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Fionn's conversation with Ailbhe, I, 3. 

Fionn's Questions, Gaelic tale, I, 3. 

Fire will not burn a maid accused but innocent ; burns her 
guilty mistress, II, 145 ., 148, 153, 155. 

Fish, frying, fly out of the pan to attest the taking of Con 
stantinople by the Turks, I, 241 ; H, 501 b ; IV, 452 a ; 
V, 288 b. 

Fitchers Vogel, tale, I, 47. 

Fjolsvinnsmal, I, 281 n. 

La Flauuto, French tale, I, 125. 

La Fleur du Rocher, Breton story, HE, 504. 

Floamanna saga, II, 35 n. ; V, 275. 

Flodden, Battle of, III, 351 ff. 

Floire et Blanceflor, Flor and Blancheflor, romance, I, 269 ; 
H, 500 a, 502 a, 510 b ; V, 175. 

La Flor del Lilild, Spanish tale, I, 125. 

Florent, in Gower's Confessio Amantis, I, 291 f. 

Florentina, De Historia van, I, 268, 459 n. 

Florimel's girdle, I, 267, and n. 

Das Flotenrohr, tale, III, 499. 

Flowers, costume of, IV, 212-14 ; V, 258 f . 

Flyting, baffling spirits by scolding, or by getting the last 
word, I, 20-2, 485 a; II, 496 b, 509 a; III, 496 a; IV, 
440 b. 

Foiling mischievous sprites and ghosts by prolonging talk 
till the time when they must go, IV, 440 b ; Thor detains 
Alviss till after sunrise ; being above ground at dawn, he 
is turned to stone, I, 419. 

Folk-drama, etc. See Robin Hood, St. George. 

Fool poses princess (and gets her in marriage), I, 20, 417 f., 
485 a; n, 507 b. 

Foot-ball match, II, 434 f . 

Forbes, family of Drumminor at the battle of Harlaw, III, 
319 ; encounters of the Forbeses with Adam Gordon, III, 
424-6 ; burning of the house of Towie (or Corgarf), 424 f., 
427 ; family of Craigievar, IV, 51-3. See under Family 
Names. 

Foresters, fosters, in, 3-11, 28, 152, 176, 215 ; V, 74, 
and n. 

Forgetfulness of earthly relations induced by draught ad 
ministered to a woman by hill-folk, I, 363, and n., 364 ; 
man made by magical or other means to forget a first 
love, suddenly restored to consciousness and to his pre 
dilection, I, 461, and n. 

Fornsvenskt Legendarium, I, 14 n., 237 n. ; II, 2, 7 n. 

Fortalicium Fidei of Espina, HI, 239. 

Forty Viziers, Turkish tales, I, 402 ; V, 13, 97. 

Fountain springs where maid has been murdered, V, 287 a. 

Fountains Abbey, IH, 121, 123 f., 126. 

The Four Elements, morality, H, 240 ; III, 42 n. 

Frater i turski car, Croatian tale, I, 409. 

Frau Tiisterat of Savoy, horn of, meistergesang, I, 263. 

Frendraught, Fire of, IV, 39 ff., 521 f. ; V, 251, 301. 

Frendraught, A Satyre against, etc., IV, 522. 

Friar in the Well, The, ballad and tune, V, 100. 

Friar of Orders Grey, Percy's ballad, and ballads like it, II, 
426f.;V, 201. 

Friar Tuck : not a member of Robin Hood's company in 
any old ballad, EH, 43 ; but in both the plays, 91, 127 f., 
in the latter representing the Cnrtal Friar of the ballad, 
who is even called Friar Fuck in the title of one version, 
though not in the ballad, 122 ; simply named as of Robin 
Hood's troop in two later ballads, 198, 209 ; a character 
in the May-game, and perhaps the morris, 44-6 ; Friar 



Tuck in Munday's play, The Downfall of Robert Earl of 

Huntington, in, 179, 519. 
Frio>j6fs saga, IV, 376. 

Froissart, III, 283 n., 289-94, 337 n. ; V, 297 b. 
Fruit, eating of in subterranean garden, entails going to 

hell, I, 322, 324, 328 f. 
Fulk Fitz-Warine, III, 40 n., 43, 49 n., 51, 53, 95, 109, 

476 n., 519. 

The Fuller's Son, Gaelic tale, HI, 507. 
Le Fumeur de Hachich et sa femme, tale, V, 304 a. 
La Furnarella, Italian tale = the ballad ' II Geuovese,' II, 

502 a. 
Fyvie, cheese of, as a love-potion, V, 305 b. 

The Gaberlunyie man, V, 109 f., 115 f. 

Gabs, brags, vows, I, 277, 281, 283, 285. 

Galerent, romance, IV, 463 b. 

Galien, romance, I, 274, 276 n., 278 n., 282 n., 507 a. 

Gamble Gold, a pedlar, otherwise Gamwell of the green 
wood, turns out to be Robin Hood's cousin (see Gam- 
well, Young), HI, 155 ; V, 240. 

Game-laws, offenders against (besides Robin Hood and his 
men), III, 3-11, 13 (?), 22. 

Gamelyn, tale of, III, 12, 22, 51-3, 144. 

Games, ballads turned into, I, 33 n. ; II, 346 ; III, 516 b ; 
IV, 439 b, 441 b. 

Games : gallant rides at the ring ; plays at the ba, and 
glove, III, 448 ; girl plays at ring and ba, IV, 354, A, b, 
1,2. 

Gamwel, Robin Hood's mother of that name, HI, 215. 

Gamwell, Young, nephew of Robin Hood according to late 
ballads ; afterwards called Scarlet, Scadlock, III, 146, 
150 ; Gamwell of the green-wood, an apparent pedlar, is 
discovered to be Robin Hood's cousin, V, 240. These, 
and Gamble Gold, III, 155, are the same person. 

Gandelyn, IH, 12-14. 

Die Gansemagd, Grimms' German tale, V, 47; Russian 
form, 281. 

Garrett, Sir (= Sir Gareth), I, 295. 

Garoariki, I, 460 n. 

Gasozein, gives himself out as Guenever's first love, I, 
279 n. 

Gautier de Coincy, H, 13 ; HI, 52 n., 239. 

Gautier de Doulens (Gaucher de Dourdan), Conte du Graal, 
ugly lady (Rosette) in, V, 289 b. 

Gawain, I, 285, 289 f., 294-296 ; V, 289 b. 

Gaya, Ramiro's wife, V, 5 f. 

Geiplur, Icelandic " rune," I, 275, and n. 

GelS, IV, 443 a. 

Genovefa, Die Legende von der Pfalzgrafin, H, 41, and n. 

Genoveva, falsely accused of adultery, H, 41. 

George a Greene, the Pinner of Wakefield, a play by Robert 
Greene, IH, 129, 130, and n. ; George a Green, a prose his 
tory, HE, 130. 

Gerhard, the Good, I, 197, 459. 

Geruth, the giant, I, 323. 

Gervase of Tilbury, I, 339 n., 359; H, 56, 511. 

Gesta Romanorum, I, 8, 13, 191 n., 268, 391, 393, 406, 416, 
418 n., 458 n. ; II, 137, 502; HI, 122. 

Gestr the Blind (Odin) and King HeioYekr, give each other 
riddles, I, 405. 

Der getheilte Trauring, tale, I, 198. 

Die getreue Frau, tale, I, 268 b, 4-6. 

Le Geu des Trois Roys, mystery-play, II, 7 f. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



481 



Geyti shoots a nut from his brother's head, HI, 18. 

Ghismonda and Guiscardo, in the Decameron, V, 29 ff., 303. 

Ghost tears to pieces lover going from his mistress, and 
hangs a bit over every seat in church, IV, 416 ; ghost of 
mother would have torn daughter to pieces, V, 303 b. 

Giant with five heads, II, 59 ; with three on his neck and 
three on his breast, V, 184 ; giant with three spans be 
tween his brows and three yards between his shoulders, 
II, 394 ; span between the eyes (brows) and three ells be 
tween the shoulders in ' The Wee Man,' I, 332. 

Gifts offered by elf, hill-troll, mermaid to obtain young 
man's love, I, 314, 375 f., 384 ; HI, 504 a ; V, 214. 

Gigantic Scotsmen, IV, 397-9. 

Gilbert of the White Hand, one of Robin Hood's troop in 
the Gest, HI, 70, 76. 

Gilbert Beket, his legend, I, 457. 

The Gipsie Laddie, ballad made over by Percy, IV, 62. 

Giraldi Cinthio, Hecatommithi, V, 13. 

Giraldus Cambrensis, Itinerarium Gambriae, I, 320 n. ; II, 
513 a ; Speculum Ecclesiae, V, 72 f . 

Girl enticed into an inn by the hostler's wife and put at a 
man's disposal, V, 153-6. 

GlammatSr, berserkr, IV, 443 a. 

Glascurion (Chaucer), II, 136. 

Glove, a game for braw gallants, III, 448, A, 5. 

Glove, woman being unfit to dance, lover says he will cut 
his glove in two and dance for both, II, 105, st. 18. 

Gloves, golden-knobbed, n, 133 ; siller-knapped, 134. 

Gmipr, IV, 502 a. 

God be with thee, Geordie, a tune, IV, 126 n., 454. 

God offered as security, IH, 52 n., 53 f., 519 a ; IV, 497 a. 

Golagros and Gawane, romance, I, 279 n. 

Gold castles promised by knight to lady, I, 112. 

Der GoldUpf elbaum und die Hollenfahrt, Greek tale, II, 
509. 

Golden apple thrown into the lap of a woman who has been 
made to consort with hill-man or merman, and who has 
been granted leave to visit her mother, to remind her of 
her obligations or to enforce her return, I, 364 f . 

The Golden Key or Ball, tale, with verses from the ballad 
of the Maid Ransomed from the Gallows, n, 353-5 ; V, 
201, 233. 

Golden Legend, I, 14 n., 229, 237, 242 n., 245 n., 505 ; H, 
235,507; IH, 51, 294 n. 

Der goldene Apfel, tale, I, 125. 

Das goldene Horn, meistergesang, I, 263. 

Goldgerte, Greek tale, I, 338. 

Goldsmith, Oliver, II, 276; HI, 367. 

G6ngu-Hr61fs Saga, I, 393 ; H, 127 ; IV, 459 a, 502. 

Goodnights, IV, 36. 

The Goose Girl, German tale, V, 47, 281. 

Gordon. See under Family Names. 

Gordon, Adam, III, 424-6, 432-8 ; IV, 513 f. ; V, 247 f. 

Gordon, Duke of Gordon's Daughter, ballad, IV, 332 ff. 

Gordon, George, hero of the ballad of Geordie, IV, 124 ff. 

Gordon, William, of Rothiemay, IV, 39 ff. 

Gorm's visit to Guthmund, I, 323. 

Gortmicheel, robber story, I, 488. 

Gorvb'mb, Icelandic tale, I, 507. 

Gosht-i Fryano, tale in ArdS-VirSf, H, 506 f. 

Gospels, apocryphal : Nicodemus, I, 239, 240 n. ; Thomas, 
Greek and Latin, II, 7 ; Protevangelium of James, I, 
271 ; Pseudo-Matthew, 1, 271 ; H, 1, 2 n., 7. 

Gower, Confessio Amantis, I, 10, 291, 292 n. ; V, 285. 
VOL. v. 61 



Graf Hubert von Kalw, German tale, I, 198. 

Graham. See under Family Names. 

Graham, Bewick and, ballad, IV, 144 ff. 

Graidhne and Fionn, I, 3 ; Graidhne and Diarmaid, I, 8. 

Gramarye, for magic, in King Estmere, H, 53-55, efficient 
to make armor invulnerable, a man too formidable to be 
undertaken (written on his forehead), and swords irresis 
tible. 

Gramatica Parda, Spanish story, I, 407. 

Grame, Hughie, ballad, IV, 8 ff. 

La gran conquista de ultramar, H, 43 n. 

Grant, James, ballad, IV, 49 ff. 

Grateful lion, I, 194 f. 

Grave : boy directs that he shall be buried with Bible at his 
head, chaunter at his feet, bow and arrows at his side, I, 
438 ; arrows at head, bent bow at feet, sword and buckler 
by his side, I, 440 ; Bible at head, Testament at feet, ITT, 
247-50 (also pen and ink at every side, 247) ; Bible at 
head, " busker " at feet, prayer-book by right side, Bible 
at head, prayer-book at feet, HI, 252 ; Bible at head, 
Testament at feet, prayer-book at side, IV, 497 f . ; prayer- 
book at head, grammar at feet, V, 241 ; Robin Hood 
wishes to be buried with sword at head, arrows at feet, 
bow and metyard by his sides, HI, 105 ; cf . HI, 104 ; V, 
297 b. 

Grave (for two) : Lay my lady on the upper hand (upper 
most), for she came of the better kin, H, 245, 247, 254. 
Lay my lady on the sunny side because of her noble kin, 
II, 251 ; IV, 477 ; Bury my bully Grahame on the sunny 
side, for I 'm sure he 's won the victory, IV, 148 ; Lay 
Munsgrove in the lowest flat, he 's deepest in the sin, 
H, 258. 

(Coffin for two), Lay my lady at the right hand, for she 's 
come of the noblest kin, H, 253, 255. 

Grave, living person descends into, and remains, V, 285 b. 

Grave to be made where arrow falls, I, 185. 

Graves, flowers from, in Miracles of the Virgin, I, 98 f . 

Graves, lovers', plants and trees from, I, 93, 94, 96-8, 101 f., 
200, 489 f., 492, 506 a ; H, 104, 108, 111, 183, 185, 190 f., 
198, 201 f., 205-8, 210-12, 219, 280, 285 f., 498 ; HI, 498,7 
510 b, 515 ; IV, 443, 450 a, 465 ; V, 31, 207, 224, 226, 
262, 285 f. 

Gray, Thomas, H, 264. 

The great bull of Bendy-law, V, 203. 

The Great Michael, a remarkably large and strong ship, 
commanded by Sir Robert Barton, HI, 335 n. 

Greek Anthology, V, 13. 

Green, unlucky color, blue fortunate, H, 181 f ., 184, 512 ; 
IV, 162 ; Fair Annie, nevertheless is dressed in green, H, 
196, and her men and maids in green (in an Irish copy), 
197 f. 

The Green Knight (Bredbeddle), I, 286 f. 

Die Greifenfeder, tale of Italian Tirol, I, 125. 

Grief, excessive, for the dead destroys their peace, H, 228, 
234-7, 512 f. ; HI, 513 b ; V, 62 f., 294. 

Grimms, Kinder- und Haus-Marchen, I, 9, 14, 47, 125, 126, 
198, 260 n., 408, 410 ; II, 127, 235, 502 ; IV, 17 ; V, 46 f. 

Grfmnismal, Edda, I, 67. 

Grlmr and Loptluena, I, 292 f . ; Grfmr consenting to three 
demands of a hideous woman, she turns into his beautiful 
true-love, Lopthama, who had been transformed by her 
step-mother (Grfms saga LoCinkinna). 

Grfms saga LoSinkinna, I, 292 f. 

Der Grindkopf , Italian tale, H, 513 b. 






482 



INDEX OP MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Gromer, Sir, Sir Grummore Grummorsum, Gromer Somer 
Joure, etc., I, 289, and n., 290, and n. ; V, 289 b. 

Growth, marvellous, and other pre'cociousness, especially in 
heroes of tales and romances, II, 303, 305 f., 513 b ; III, 
515 b ; IV, 35 n., 80, 479 b ; V, 226 a, 295 a. 

Guapos, Spanish ballads of, III, 49. 

Gudeman of Ballengeigh. I, 404. 

Gudrun, I, 94 n., 95 n. See Kudrun. 

Guenever, Arthur's queen, I, 257 f., 260-3, 271-3, 279 n., 
283, 293, 296 ; II, 43 n. 

Guerino, son of the King of Sicily, tale of Straparola, V, 46. 

Guillaume d'Orenge, V, 298 a. 

Guillaume de Palerne, romance, III, 505. 

Guinevere. See Guenever. 

Guingamor, Lay of, V, 290 a. 

Guiscardo and Ghismonda, Boccaccio's tale, V, 29. 

Gull-}>6ris saga, IV, 502 a. 

Gun charged with nine yards of chain beside other great 
shot, less and more, III, 341 ; IV, 505. 

Gundeberg, wife of King Arioald, accused of adultery, vin 
dicated by champion, II, 39. 

Gunhild, daughter of Cnut the Great, H, 37. 

Gunild, Gunder, wife of Henry, Duke of Brunswick, II, 34- 
36; Gunhild, daughter of Cnut the Great, wife of the 
Emperor Henry III, 37. 

Gunnlaugs saga, II, 35 n. ; V, 298 a. 

Gustav Adolf und der Abt von Benediktbeuern, tale, 1, 408. 

Guthmund, I, 323. 

Gwion and Koridgwen, Welsh tale, I, 402 ; H, 506 b ; HI, 

507 a; V, 216. 
Gypsies, IV, 62-74 ; V, 190. 

Gypsy Davy, IV, 67, 72, 74 ; Gypsy Geordie, 70. 

Die Hahnkrahe bei Breslau, Silesian tale, I, 196 n. 

Haig, James, IV, 281. 

Hair, worn loose or in a braid by maid, bound up by married 
woman, II, 64 n., 69, 74 (D 3, E 3), 78 (5). 

Hair, woman's, added to a rope to lengthen it, I, 40 ; man's, 
III, 516 b ; sea-king's daughter makes a rope of sixty 
ells' length with her hair ; maid with hair a hundred fath 
oms long, I, 486 (both used to draw a man out of a well 
or pit) ; maid's hair long enough to climb up by, I, 486 f . ; 
woman's hair five quarters long, III, 437 ; IV, 167 f. ; 
man's hair three, five, quarters long, IV, 172-4. 

Hair : woman ties her hair ronnd her dead husband's, lover's, 
waist, hand, and carries, draws, him home, IV, 166-8; 
V, 255 ; ties his 'hair (five quarters long) to her horse's 
mane and trails him home, IV, 173 ; twines his hair (five 
quarters long) round her hand and draws him out of a 
river, 174 ; twines her hair about his waist and draws him 
out of a river, 179. 

Hair of maid substituted for mistress cut off and exhibited 
as token of conquest of the supposed mistress's virtue, V, 
22, and u. 

Half's, King, ship saved from foundering by man jumping 
overboard (and drowning), II, 15. 

Halfs saga, I, 95. 

Hall. See under Family Names. 

Hall, Dicky, delivers his brother Archie from jail, III, 487- 
9,492-4 ; he is assisted by JockyHall, III, 487-9 ; Jocky 
is the leader and Dick second, 489 f., 491 f. 

Hall, knights and others riding into, II, 51, 54, 510 b ; III, 

508 a ; horses stabled in hall or bed-room, II, 51, 510 f. ; 
HI, 508 a. 



Halloween, I, 342, 25, 344, 24, 345, 6, 346, 16, 347, 8, 349, 
9, 351, 30, 352, 8, 507, 1, 2 ; IH, 505, ll ; IV, 456, 458 
(eve of All Saints, when fairy folk ride) ; hemp-seed sown 
by girls for a vision of their true love, V, 59, 286 a. 

Hamilton. See under Family Names. 

Hamilton, John, Archbishop of St Andrew's, III, 442, 445 f. 

Hamilton, Mary, maid of honor to Catharine, Tsar Peter's 
wife, her history, III, 382 f . ; agreements with the Scottish 
ballad, 383. 

Hamilton, Mary, in the ballad, scorns the offer of life after 
having been put to public shame, HI, 386, 388 ; historical 
foundation for the ballad of Mary Hamilton (No 299), 
views of Andrew Lang, the affair of the Frenchman and 
the Queen's apothecary, V, 298 f . 

Hamiltons in Russia, IH, 382 f . 

Hanpang and Ho, Chinese story, II, 498. 

Hans ohne Sorgen, tale, I, 408, and n., 409 n. 

Hans Sachs, I, 196 a, 267 ; II, 40 n., 42 ; III, 258 ; V, 210. 

Haraldr HartSraSr, III, 17. 

Hardy, Spence, Manual of Buddhism, I, 11 n. 

Harlaw, Battle of, ballad, IH, 316 ff. 

Harp, power of, I, 216 f., 439; H, 137, 139 f., 511 f. ; V, 
220 b, 293 a ; everybody harped to sleep but the king's 
daughter, etc., I, 55 ; II, 137, 139 f. ; V, 220 b ; all the 
lords harped asleep, IV, 18-21 ; Quintalin's harp decoys 
women, I, 50 ; harp, viol, or fiddle made from drowned 
maid's body, I, 121 f., 126-35 ; or from tree into which 
the drowned girl had grown up, 121, 124, 493 b ; the 
instrument of itself, or when played upon, reveals that 
the girl was drowned by her sister, 122, 126-35. 

Harpkin, I, 21. 

Harribie (Harraby Hill, about a mile from Carlisle, for 
merly the place of execution), HI, 463 f., 472. 

Hass-Fru, Swedish tale, I, 461 n. 

Hatherof = Athulf, Horn's faithful friend, I, 192. 

Hawk, riddle of : if not in good order, lady has been un 
faithful, I, 191, and n. 

Head, Halewijn's, Roland's, Gert Olbert's, Jan Albert's, 
SchSn-Albert's, speaks after it is cut off, I, 25, 26, 30, 49, 
485 f. 

Heads of men who have failed in an enterprise displayed 
on castle walls, or on palisades of stakes, with one place 
left, pour encourager les autres, I, 417 n. ; II, 507 b ; 
HI, 507 a ; IV, 459 b ; V, 291 a (three stakes for three 
adventurers, V, 216). 

Heads of thirty Portuguese sent home, salted, by Sir An 
drew Barton, to be eaten with bread, IV, 502, 505. 

Heart, lover's heart cut out and sent to his mistress by her 
father, or husband, V, 29-38, 303; the heart is sent 
cooked and is eaten by the lady, 31-34 ; heart (stewed) 
of a girl given her husband by jealous wife, 34 ; heart 
served by twelve husbands to their twelve wives, 34. 

Hearts, children's, man who had devoured nine would have 
power of flying, I, 34 n. 

Hecatommithi of Giraldi Cinthio, ix, 8, V, 13. 

Heimir, V, 243 b. 

Heinrich von dem Tiirlin, Der Mantel, I, 259 f . ; Din Crone, 
264, 266, 279 a. 

HeiSreks saga, V, 8. 

Heinz der Kellner, his Turandot, I, 418 a ; n, 507 b ; V, 
291 a. 

Helgakvio"a HjorvartSssonar, I, 94, and n. 

Helgakvioa Hundingsbana, n, I, 67, 94 f . ; II, 228, 235 ; 
in, 306. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



483 



Helgi and Sigrrfn, H, 228, 235. 

Heliodorus, Aethiopica, 1, 270. 

Hemingr and King Haraldr contend in feats : Hemingr 
shoots a nut from his brother's head, III, 17 f., 518 b. 

Hemings J>attr, HI, 17, 19 n. 

Hemp-seed sown by girls on the eve of All-Hallows to ob 
tain a sight of their true-love, V, 59, 286 a. 

Henning Wulf 's apple-shot, III, 17. 

Henri IV, La Partie de Chasse de, Colly's drama, V, 75. 

Henry V, of England, his conquest of France, ballad, HI, 
320 ff. 

Henry, Duke of Brunswick, and his wife Gunild, II, 34-6. 

Henry of Brunswick (Henry the Lion), Reinfrid of Bruns 
wick, I, 194-6, 197 n., 459, 502 b. 

Hereward the Saxon, IH, 43, 109, 476 n. ; V, 287 b. 

Herod and St. Stephen, I, 233 ff. 

Herodotus, I, 271 ; V, 212 b. 

Herr Peder den rige, Scandinavian representative of Young 
Beichan, I, 459-61. 

Der Herr von Falkenstein, tale, I, 459 n. 

Hervarar saga, I, 405 ; II, 50 n., 127. 

Das Herz, Das Herzmare, rhymed tale of Konrad von 
Wurzburg, V, 33, 303 b. 

Herzog Ernst, I, 197 n. 

Herzog Heinrich der Low, Historia, of Hans Sachs, I, 196 ; 
V, 210. 

Hey trollie lollie love is jolly, from a Yule medley, IV, 93. 

Heykar, Geschichte des weisen, I, 11 n., 12 f. 

Heywood's Hierarchy of the Blessed Angels, I, 85. 

Hideous woman will answer questions for Arthur (or other), 
whose life is at stake if he does not give the right reply, 
only on condition of her marrying Gawain, or the young 
man who is in danger, I, 289, 291, 292, 294 ; she turns 
into a beautiful young girl on being allowed to have her 
own way, 290, 291, 292, 295 f. ; hideous woman, magically 
transformed, restored to her proper beauty by being al 
lowed to have her whole will, I, 293, 297-9; hideous 
woman converted to beautiful one on being married to 
her will, I, 507 a. See V, 289 b. 

Highlander induces a Lowland lass to marry him in spite of 
the opposition of her parents, IV, 256-75, 524 ; he pre 
tends that his father is a shepherd, his mother a dey, etc., 
but after putting her to a severe trial turns out to be a 
gentleman of wealth and importance, a Macdonald, 255- 
66, 524 (Donald, Earl of the Isle of Skye, 271 f., 274 f.) ; 
Highlander preferred by girl to Lowland man or English, 
IV, 267 ; Highlander induces girl to go with him regard 
less of her father's opposition, V, 165 f., 306. 

Hildebrandslied, I, 196. 

Hildesage, I, 94, and n., 95 n. 

Hildina, in Shetland ballad, I, 94 n. , 95 n. 

Hill-king : see Dwarf -king, Merman, Hind Etin. 

Hill-maid promises man wonderful gifts if he will plight 
himself to her, I, 314, 375 ; IH, 504 a ; V, 214 b. 

Hind to be spared by hunter, I, 178, 183, 502 a ; n, 156 f . 

Hind Etin represents the dwarf -king, elf-king, hill-king of 
Scandinavian and German ballads, I, 361 : Hind Etin 
(Young Akin) seizes on a king's daughter in a wood, 
keeps her seven years in a cave, where she bears seven 
sons ; the eldest one day asks the father why his mother's 
cheeks are always wet and learns her story ; hearing mu 
sic while hunting he is moved to take his mother and 
brother with him, and they come to the king's gate ; they 
are kindly received, the wood is searched for the father, 



who is found tearing his hair, and the family live happily 
at court. See Dwarf-king, Merman. 

Hirlanda, volksbuch, II, 33 n., 43 n. 

Das Hirtenbublein, tale, I, 410. 

L'Histoire de Moradbak, I, 11 n. 

L'Histoire de Palanus, Comte de Lyon, prose romance, II, 
42. 

Histoire de Sinkarib et de ses deux Visirs, I, 11 n. 

Historia de Nativitate Mariae et de Infautia Salvatoris, II, 
1, 2 n., 7. 

De Historia van Florentina, etc., I, 268, 459 n. 

Hjalmar, Odd and Anganty, II, 50. 

Hjalmte'rs ok Olvere saga, I, 306 f., 315, 489 b. 

Hobby Noble, chief in the rescue of John o the Side, 131, 
477-9; helper, 479-83; Hobie Noble betrayed to the 
English by Sim o the Mains, IV, 1. 

Hobby-horse, IH, 45, 47 f. 

Hoccleve. See Occleve. 

Hdd, H6de, the name, III, 47 n. 

Holinshed, Chronicle of Scotland, H, 143 ; HI, 2, 517. 

Holofernes : Professor Bugge's suggestion that the Halewyn 
ballad (No 4) is derived from his story, I, 51-54. 

Home. See under Family Names. 

Homer, Iliad, I, 84 ; HI, 290 n., 306, 367 ; Odyssey, I, 322 n., 
338 n. ; H, 441 ; III, 510 b ; IV, 377 ; Hymn to the De- 
lian Apollo, I, 84. 

Homildon, the battle of, alleged to have been " done " to 
requite the death of Percy in the Hunting of the Cheviot, 
III, 304, 310, 313 f. 

Hood = Odin, I, 95; old Carl Hood, I, 67, 92, 95, and n., 
489 ; IV, 443 f . ; Auld palmer Hood, IV, 445 ; SiShottr, 
Deephood, I, 95. 

Hood, Thomas, his Lost Heir, HI, 234 n. 

Hoodening, Hood = Hooden = Woden (Kuhn), HI, 48. 

The Hoodie, Gaelic tale, I, 290 n., 503. 

Horn of elfin-knight inspires maid with longing for him, I, 
15-17, 55 ; so Quintalin's harp, 50 ; boon of blowing on 
horn (often asked by man in difficulty or about to be 
executed, and often three blasts), IH, 122 f., 125, 166, 
182 ; V, 2-6, 8, 127 (pipes, V, 3) ; see, also, III, 157 ; V, 
279 ; witch's horn, 1, 315 ; V, 215 ; hornblower, hornblase 
= witch, I, 314 ; horn which will furnish any liquor that 
is called for, I, 266 ; horn filled with pure water, the 
water turns to the best of wine, I, 263 ; horn out of which 
no cuckold can drink, etc., I, 263 if. ; horn and lease, ten 
ure by, HI, 360. 

Horn, fastnachtspiel of the, I, 263. 

Horn Childe and Maiden Rimnild, romance, 1, 188, 191-3, 
200, 269, 502 a ; IV, 401 ; V, 287 b. 

Horn et Rymenhild, French romance, I, 188, 190-3, 502 a. 

Horn, Hind, ballad, I, 187 ff., etc. 

Horn, King Horn, gest, I, 188-90, 192, 201 n. ; IV, 401. 

Horse, high-mettled, I, 199, and n. ; horse shod with silver 
before and gold behind, I, 341 ; II, 183, 185, 191, 194, 
266 f ., 315, 343 f . ; V, 224 ; horse, old white cut-tail pre 
ferred to a choice among thirty fine steeds, II, 444 f ., 450, 
453 f . ; Walter of Aquitaine's worn-out charger, H, 441 ; 
HI, 276. 

Horses stabled by knights in hall or bed-room, II, 51, 54, 
510 f . ; III, 508 a ; horses' shoes reversed to deceive pur 
suers, III, 476 n., 479 f., 487, 489 ; youth torn by four 
wild horses on the false charge of a woman, V, 157 ; pa 
trons of horses, St. Stephen, St. Eloi, St. Antony, I, 235 f . 

Horsley, William, a bowman employed by Lord Howard 



484 



INDEX OP MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



against Andrew Barton, HI, 339, 341-3, 345, 348-50 ; 

IV, 503, 505-7. 

Host, the consecrated. See Communion-bread. 

House of Marr, IV, 157 ; of the Rhodes, III, 433 ; of Rothes, 

V, 247 f . 

Housekeeping : lady's preparations to receive her husband, 
IV, 312-17, 319 f. ; V, 270 f., 301. 

How Fraud made entrance into Russia, Russian tale, IV, 
459 b. 

How long and dreary is the night, air, IV, 302. 

How the King of Estmure land married the King's Daugh 
ter of Westmure land, title in The Complaint of Scot 
land, H, 51 n., 296. 

Howard. See under Family Names. 

Howard, Katherine, said to have exerted herself to procure 
Thomas Cromwell's death, HI, 377. 

Hrafn and Gunnlaugr, V, 298 a. 

Hr61fs saga Kraka, I, 290 n., 297 n., 393, 489. 

Hro'mundar saga, I, 67, 95. 

Hugdietrich, H, 50 ; IV, 463 b. 

Huon de Bordeaux, I complement! della chanson d', 1, 502 a. 

Hugh Spencer, the ballad, resembles in a general way Rus 
sian bylinas, IH, 276 ; IV, 499. See Spenser. 

Hugh Willoughby, a comrade of Hugh Spencer, HI, 279 f . 

Hugo, Emperor of Greece, Charlemagne's visit to, I, 275-9. 

Hume. See under Family Names. 

Hume of Godscroft's History of the Houses of Douglas and 
Angus, HI, 292 ; V, 202. 

Hunt, an English captain, released on oath by Sir A. Bar 
ton, joins Lord Howard in an attack on the Scot, trusting 
that God will forgive his perjury, HI, 340 ; IV, 504. 

Hunter's (J.) identification of Adam Bell, HI, 21 f.; of 
Robin Hood, IH, 55 f. 

Hunting of the Cheviot has the battle of Otterburn for its 
foundation, EH, 304. 

Hyacinthus, flower from his blood, I, 99. 

Hysmine and Hysminias of Eustathius (Eumathius), I, 270; 
H, 13 n. 

Hystoria de la reyna Sebflla, Spanish tale, H, 40. 

I cannot eat but little meat, song in Gammer Gurton's Nee 
dle, V, 132 n. 

I have a good old woman (wife) at home, tunes, HI, 518. 

I have a Jong snster f er be^ondyn the se, riddle song, I, 415. 

I have four sisters beyond the sea, riddle song, I, 415 n. 

I sowed the seeds of love, song, V, 258 f. 

H'ja of Murom, captain of the march-keepers, will allow no 
one to pass ; has a fight with a young man who passes 
nevertheless ; is worsted at first : cf. Robin Hood and the 
Potter, IV, 497 a. 

Images in church turn their backs when abandoned woman 
enters, 1, 231 ; so when merman comes in, 1, 365 a ; every 
thing bows when merman's (human) wife enters, I, 365 b. 

Importance of asking brother's consent to marry, I, 497 f . 

Incestuous connection, I, 185 f., 411-54 ; III, 500 f. ; IV, 
450 ;V, 210. 

Ingenuity a transcendental virtue of Mahayana Buddhism, 
I, 11 n. 

Innocent blood turns, every drop, to a burning candle, I, 
172 ; n, 39 b. 

Interest on loan not obligatory, but the security forfeitable 
in case of non-payment, HI, 52, 60 (85-7), 62 (121) ; no 
interest paid by the knight to the abbot for the loan of 
400 for a twelvemonth, III, 62 ; present to Robin Hood 



of 20 mark for the same loan and time (besides 100 bows 
and 100 sheaf of long and handsome arrows), III, 62, 69. 

louenn Kerme'nou, Breton story, III, 501. 

Ipomydon, romance, II, 510 b ; V, 47. 

Iron band forged round a man's waist as penance, I, 172 ; 
man goes on pilgrimage, weighted with iron on hands and 
loins, n, 128. 

It was far in the night, and the bairnies grat, V, 203. 

Italian (Talliant, Tailliant), a champion, leaps over his ad 
versary's head and is spitted, II, 378, 383, 385, 387 f. 

Ivan CareviS i Marfa Carevena, Prince John and Princess 
Martha, Russian tale, V, 281. 

Ivanhoe, Scott's, IH, 43 ; V, 72 n. 

Jacinth, refuses to be worn by adulterer, V, 289 a. 

Jacques de Vitry, III, 54, 258 n. 

James, Protevangelium of, I, 271. 

James IV of Scotland threatens his queen with death for 
advising him not to make war with England, III, 351 f. 

Jane (Seymour), Queen of Henry VHI, her death in child 
bed, ballad, IH, 372 ff. 

Jatakas, V, 292 a. 

Jehan de Paris, Le Romant de, I, 191 n. 

Julian et Blonde, Old French romance, I, 191 n. ; V, 287 b. 

Jews charged with crucifying Christian boys in contempt of 
Jesus, III, 235-9, 241 ; with murdering a boy for singing 
the praises of the Virgin, 239 f . ; with murders to obtain 
blood for use in Paschal rites, 240-243 ; IV, 497 a ; reason 
not specified, IH, 243-54 ; IV, 497 f . ; V, 241 ; such mur 
ders the reason for the expulsion of Jews from France 
and Spain, V, 241. 

Jhonne Ermistrangis dance. HI, 362 f. 

Jock of Hazeldean, Scotfs, V, 160. 

John H, the Good, of France, HI, 283, 287 ; V, 132. 

John of Atherly, a comrade of Hugh Spencer, III, 279 f. 

John o the Scales, V, 14 f. 

John (Jock) o the Side, notorious thief, harbors the Count 
ess of Northumberland, IH, 409, 419, 475 ; taken in a 
raid and imprisoned at Newcastle, gallantly rescued by 
Hobby Noble, 477-9 ; by the Laird's Jock, with Noble as 
a comrade, 479-83. 

John the Reeve, rhymed tale, V, 69, and n., 71 n., 72 n., 73. 

John (Joan) Thomson's man, a history ; Scottish proverb, 
V,8. 

Johnstone, Willy, of Wamphray, the Galliard, HI, 458-60. 

Johnstones, IH, 296 ; affray with the Crichtons, HI, 458-60 ; 
with the Maxwells, HI, 485 ; feuds with the Maxwells, 
IV, 34-8 ; Sir James Johnstone killed by Lord Maxwell, 
35,51. 

Joie des Bestes a la nouvelle de la naissance du Sauvenr, I, 
240 f., 505 f. ; H, 501 b ; IV, 451 f . ; V, 288 a. 

Jonah, story of, perhaps the source of tales of ships arrested 
in their progress by having guilty persons on board, I, 
245 ; II, 14 n. 

Jonson, Ben, Bartholomew Fair, IV, 302 ; Discoveries, V, 
285 ; Masque of the Metamorphosed Gipsies, HI, 45 ; his 
admiration of ' Chevy Chase,' III, 305. 

Josefs Gedicht von den sieben Todsiinden, II, 507 a. 

Joseph, testy or suspicious towards Mary, II, 14, 6. 

Joseph and Mary subjected to an ordeal of chastity, I, 271. 

Joseph and the Angel, carol, II, 1. 

Josephus, I, 404. 

Joufrois, Old French romance, HI, 508 a. 

Jonrdains de Blaivies, romance, IV, 502 b. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



485 



The Jovial Crew, ballad-opera, II, 127 n. ; IH, 133 n. 

Joy of the beasts at the news of the birth of Christ, 1, 240 f., 

505 f . ; H, 501 ; IV, 452 a ; V, 288 a. 
Judas and the legend of the roasted cock, I, 240, 505 b ; 

Judas took tithes of all money that came into his hands, 

I, 242 ; legend of the thirty pieces, in Wendish ballad, 

242 f . ; in English ballad, 243 f. 
Judicial combats, H, 34-40, 42 f., 46, 48 ; HI, 508 a ; IV, 

371-3 ; oath in, II, 35 n. ; IV, 463 b ; qualified perjury 

in, II, 35. 

Judith, the Old German, I, 51 n. 
Judith and Holofernes, the relation of the story to Lady 

Isabel and the Elf-Knight, I, 51. 
Judith, wife of Louis le De"bonnaire, accused of adultery, 

H, 43 n. 
Der Jungherr und der treue Heinrich, rhymed tale, V, 

39. 
The Justice dealing with outlaws, III, 23-6. 

Kalevala, I, 445 f. ; H, 506 b, 507 b, 511 b ; HI, 367. 

KalidSsa, H, 235. 

Kampa Dater, Nordiska, Bjb'rner's, I, 50, 259; II, 57 n. 

Kanjur, Vinaya (Buddhist), I, 11 n., 12 n. 

Karl der Grosse (Enenkels Weltbuch), I, 199 n. 

Karl Meinet, II, 43 n. 

Karlamagnus Saga, I, 275, and n. ; IE, 39 f . 

Karodes, the mantle of, I, 261. 

Katha-sarit-sagara, I, 200 n., 268; II, 495, 502 a; IV, 
454 a, 463 a. 

Kay, Arthur's steward, I, 245 f., 272 ; Kay's wife, I, 272. 

Kay, Kempy, ballad, I, 300 ff., etc. 

Ker, Captain. See Car. 

Keraint. See Bardd. 

Ketilbjorn, IV, 502 a. 

Kidnapping women for compulsory marriage, IV, 232-54, 
309 f., 424 (?) ; V, 261-4. 

Kilhwch and Olwen, Welsh tale, I, 210, 279 n., 281 n. 

King and subjects, meetings of, V, 69, 75, n. ; 69-86 ; king 
harbored by reeve, collier, shepherd, etc., 69-74, 84-86, 
303 b ; his hosts have made free with his deer, 70-72, 
85 f. ; munificence of the king, V, 70 f., 73-5, 77, 80, 83, 
86. 

King found before his gate, II, 52, 4. 

King (queen) lets in maid (or other) that knocks, n, 387, 
393, 459, 461 f., 471, 474 f. ; Lady, Lord Bangwill, Lord 
Barnard, Earl Percy, or some principal person, does this, 
H, 150, 184, 186 f ., 187, 190, 253, 266 f., 284, 286, 383 ; 
IV, 467. 

King visits Robin Hood in the disguise of an abbot, I If, 
74 ; serves Robin Hood with a buffet upon Robin Hood's 
missing the mark, is recognized, and pardons the outlaws 
on condition of their entering his service, 76. 

King who regards himself as the richest, most magnificent, 
etc., in the world is told that there is one who outstrips 
him, and undertakes to see for himself whether this is 
so, threatening death to the person who has affirmed his 
inferiority in case this is disproved, I, 275, 279 n., 281, 
282 f., 283, and n. ; HI, 17 n., 503 b. Cf. Robin Hood, 
HI, 124. 

King, young, nice about choice of wife (or his guardians), 
and the princess proposed to him won with difficulty, II, 
51-5; IV, 463 b. 

The King and the Barker, rhymed tale, V, 68, 69 n., 78. 

The King and the Cobbler, a prose history, V, 74, and n. 



The King and the Miller of Mansfield, Dodsley's drama, V, 

75. 

King Alisaunder, romance, V, 297. See Alexander. 
King Edward and the Hermit, rhymed tale, V, 72, and n. 
King Edward Third and the Shepherd, rhymed tale, V, 71, 

72 n. 

King Edward the UUth and a Tanner of Tamworthe, A 
merye, pleasant, and delectable history betwene, V, 68, 
81. 
King HeiSrekr and Gestr, their riddle-contest, I, 405, 

and n. 
King Henry H and the Abbot, story in Giraldus Cam- 

brensis, V, 72. 

King Henry H and the Miller of Mansfield, V, 69, and n. 
King Henry the Eighth and the Abbot of Reading, The 

pleasant History of, I, 404. 

King Horn, gest, I, 188-91, 192, 201 n. ; IV, 401 ; V, 287. 
King John and the Bishop, similar tales, I, 405-10 ; n, 

506 f. ; IV, 459 b ; V, 216 a. 
King Orfeo, romance and ballad, I, 215 ff . ; II, 500 ; HI, 

502 ; IV, 451 ; V, 211. 

King Rabssaldschal and his minister's daughter-in-law, Ti 
betan tale, I, 12 f. 

King Ramiro, Southey's ballad, V, 4 n. 
Kinge and Miller, V, 69 n., 84. 
King's armor, knight's wearing it in battle, HI, 283 a ; V, 

297 b. 
King's receivers plundered by Robin Hood, HI, 229. See 

Robin Hood and Queen Katherine. 
The King's Son, Kraljev sin, Bosnian tale, V, 45 f. 
Kings and Queens of England : 
Charles I, IV, 56, 58-60? 
Edward I, HI, 43, 257 ; V, 69. 
Edward II, IH, 43, 55. 

Edward III, HI, 282, 284, 286 f . ; V, 71, and n. 
Edward IV, V, 68, 77, 83. 
Edward VI, HI, 378. 
Edward, HI, 73, 75, 78 ; V, 72. 

Henry II, HI, 257-64 ; IV, 498 f. ; V, 69, 72 f., 84, 242. 
Henry HI, HI, 236-9. 

Henry IV, III, 21, 310, 313 (see 304) ; V, 67, 75. 
Henry V, HI, 21, 321-6. 
Henry VH, HI, 328, 331-3, 356. 
Henry VIH, I, 404 ; IH, 198-207, 335 f ., 338 f ., 342 f ., 
345, 348, 350-52, 354-6, 358-60, 373-7, 401; IV, 
503, 506 f . ; V, 74, 245 f . 
Henry, IV, 17-22. 
James I of England and VI of Scotland, IH, 442-6, 

448-50, 452-6. 

James H of England and VH of Scotland, IV, 111-15. 
John, I, 410-14. 

Richard I, HI, 220, 223, 227, 229-32, 508 b. 
Richard III, III, 331-3, 356. 
William III, V, 74. 
Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen of Henry H, HI, 257-64 ; 

IV, 498 ; V, 241. 

Eleanor of Castile, Queen of Edward I, HI, 257. 
Elizabeth, HI, 406. 
Jane Seymour, III, 372-6 ; V, 245 f . 
Katherine, III, 198-204, 206 f. 
Kings and Queens of Scotland : 
Alexander HI, H, 19. 
David Bruce, HI, 284-7. 
James I, HI, 309, 313 (see 304) ; V, 73 n 



486 



INDEX OP MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



James HI, H, 19. 

James IV, III, 351 f., 355, 359 ; V, 187 f. 

James V, I, 404; HI, 364-71, 411; V, 73 n., 74, 109. 

(See James I, II, of England). 
Margaret (James IV), III, 351 f. 
Mary Stuart, HE, 378, 381 f., 384-404, 424, 426, 442, 

444, 446 ; IV, 508-13 ; V, 246 f . 
(Stuarts : 
Charles I, IV, 55 f . 

James Francis Edward, IV, 116, 118-23 ; V, 255. 
Prince Charlie, IV, 55-57, 60 ; V, 252. 
Captain Stuart, IV, 109. 
Lord Thomas Stuart, IV, 425). 
Kinmont, Will Armstrong of, EH, 469 ff. 
Ki6sut, Bulgarian tale, V, 281. 

Kiss of courtesy, II, 435 ; three kisses, to disenchant, I, 
307-11, 313, 338 n. ; n, 502 b, 504 f. ; HI, 504 a ; IV, 
454 a; V, 214, 290. 
Kissing of fairies, etc., puts one in their power, I, 322, and 

n., 325. 
Kit o Thirske, a pedlar, beats Robin Hood in fight, HI, 

172. 

Kitchie boy in ballads, II, 102, 114; IV, 403-5 (405, foot- 
boy), 407 ; V, 34-8, 277 f. 

Klephts, III, 49 ; Giphtakis, EH, 54; Dimos, HI, 104. 
Die kluge Bauerntochter, Huge Dime, kluge Hirtentochter, 

tales of The Clever Wench, I, 8-12. 

Knife which will serve f our-and-twenty men at meat all at 
once, I, 266 ; knife lost, figuring a lover, III, 501 a ; 
sheath and knife for mother and child, I, 183 f ., 186 ; V, 
210. 

Knight who has forced a woman, to marry her if bachelor, 
be hanged if married, II, 460 f ., 464, (466), 469, 471, 474 f. ; 
IV, 493. 

The Knight of Curtesy and the Fair Lady of Fagnell, ro 
mance, V, 33. 

Knight of the Swan, Elias, III, 515 b. 
Knighthood, distraint of, III, 51, 58. 

Knots loosed in Scotland at marriage ceremony and at the 
approach of parturition, so among Laps and Norwegians, 
1,85. 

Koadalan, Breton tale, I, 401, 402. 
Kongen og Bonden, Danish tale, V, 74. 
Konig Artus mit der Ehbrecher-brugk, Historia of Hans 

Sachs, I, 267. 

Konig Rother, 1, 197 ; EV, 463 b ; V, 2. 
Der Konigssohn und der Bartlose, Greek tale, V, 281. 
Korolevid i ego Djad'ka, The prince and his Guardian, Rus 
sian tale, V, 281. 

Korrigan, Breton fairy, refused by man whom she asked to 
marry her, gives him the choice of dying in three days or 
languishing seven (three) years, I, 379. 
Kraljev sin, The King's Son, Bosnian tale, V, 45 f. 
Kranzsingen, riddles, I, 2 n. 
Kristni saga, I, 96. 

Kron, das vasnachtspil mit der, I, 266. 
Die Krone der Konigin von Afion, meistergesang, I, 267. 
Kudrun, II, 137 b. See Gudrun. 
Kullervo, story of, in Kalevala, I, 445. 
Kung Lindorm, Swedish tale, I, 290 n. 
Die Kunigin von Frankreich, dy der Marschalk gegen dem 

Kunig versagen wart, u. s. w., meisterleid, II, 40. 
Diu Kunigin von Frankrich und der ungetriuwe Marschalk, 
German metrical tale, II, 40. 



Den kydske Dronning, poem of Jeppe Jensen, El, 42. 

Kyng Alisaunder, romance, H, 511 b ; EQ, 306 ; V, 297. 

Kyng of Tars, romance, II, 511 b. 

Kyng Orfew, romance, I, 216. 

Kynge Henry the IHJth and the Tanner of Tamowthe, The 

story of, V, 67. 
Kytice z basni, Polish tale, V, 60 b. 

La Fontaine, I, 265 ; HI, 258 ; V, 13. 

The Lad with the Skin Coverings, Gaelic tale, V, 216 a. 

Lady goes in search of lover ; warned by Billy Blin or 
fairy that that very day or the morrow is to be his wed 
ding day, I, 456 ; lady leaps the castle-wall and is caught 
by her lover, H, 407, 409 f., 413 ; lady solicited by knight 
discovered to be his sister, H, 481. 

Lady Bessy, a ballad-history of Henry VH's compassing 
the crown of England, HI, 331, 354 n., 378. 

Lai de Doon, II, 506 a ; HI, 518 b. 

Lai de Guigemar, EV, 377. 

Lai d'Ignaures, V, 34. 

Lai de Lanval, I, 339 ; H, 510 b. 

Lai d'Orphe"e. See Lay of Orfeo. 

Lai de Tydorel, II, 505. 

Lai d'Yonec, V, 39. 

Lai de 1'Espine, II, 500 a, 511 a. 

Lai del Fraisne, H, 67 f . ; old English version, Lay le Freine, 

I, 216 ; II, 67 n. 

Lai du Corn, I, 262 f. ; II, 43 n., 511 b. 

The Laird's Jock (probable nephew of Johnie Armstrong) 

IH, 462 f. ; rescues Jock o the Side, 479-83. 
Lancelot, the Dutch, I, 260. 
Lancelot, the French prose, I, 257 n., 267. 
Lancelott, Sir, I, 295. 
Lancilotto del Lago, I, 267. 
Landres rimur, II, 40. 
Lanet, I, 261, 266 f. 

Lanethen Mantel, meistergesang, I, 261, 267. 
Lanzelet, of Ulrich von Zatzikhoven, I, 260, 308, 338. 
Lass o Livingston, a song, IV, 232 n. 
Last word, importance of getting, when contending with 

mischievous personages and in wit-contests generally, I, 

II, 20-2, 485 ; HI, 496 a ; IV, 440 b. 
Launfal, I, 320 n., 339 ; H, 510 b. 
Lay of Orfeo, I, 216 ; H, 500 a. 

Lay of the Reedwater Minstrel, Roxby's, IV, 25. 
Layamon, I, 67 n. 

Lazarus. See Dives and Lazarus, No 56 (II, 10 ff., etc.). 
Leaf sent down a stream by a maid to warn mother, sister, 

that she is in danger, I, 40 b, 487 a. 
Learning unco lair (lear), H, 118 f., 174, 178; HI, 385; 

EV, 411 ; 467. 

Leather, corpses enclosed in, IH, 352 f . ; EV, 507 a ; V, 298 a. 
Left shoulder. See Shoulder. 
Legenda Aurea, I, 14 n., 229, 237, 242" n., 245 n., 505 a; H, 

235, 507 a; HI, 51, 294 n. 
Legitimacy of children, test of, by swinging or dipping them 

in the Rhine, I, 271 n. 

" Lenore," ballads and tales, I, 487 n. ; V, 59-67, 303 b. 
Leper, black beggar, young lad, thrall, scullion, dwarf, put 

into noble lady's bed, or introduced into her chamber, to 

incriminate her, II, 39-42, 44, 47. 
Leprosy, blood of children or virgins reputed a cure for, I, 

47, 50 n. ; IV, 441 b ; V, 285. 
Die Lerche, Kirghish lay, II, 506 b. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



487 



Leys, Baron of, ballad, IV, 355 ff. 

Libeaus Desconeus, romance, I, 308 ; V, 290 a ; its relations 
to the ballad of the Earl of Westmoreland (No 177), V, 
299 b. 

Liddesdale, Knight of, ballad, III, 288. 

The lie freely given in ballads, III, 367 ; V, 298 a. 

Light kindles where innocent blood falls, I, 172 ; II, 39 b ; 
V, 287 a. 

Lilies spring from innocent man's grave, I, 143. 

Lilliard at Ancrum Muir, III, 306. 

Lin, Linn, etc., stock ballad-locality. See Lin, in the Glos 
sary, V, 354. 

Lincoln, Linkuni, stock ballad-locality. See Linkum, in 
the Glossary, V, 543. 

Lindsay. See under Family Names. 

Lind-worm offers gifts to persuade a young woman to be 
come his love, I, 314. 

Lion killed by Sir Cawline without a weapon, by thrusting 
mantle in lion's mouth and holding him to the wall, II, 
60 ; tearing out of lion's heart by Richard Coeur de Lion, 
HE, 508 b ; London Prentice, the hearts of two lions, III, 
508 b ; Cuculin pulls liver and lights out of the throats of 
two lions, IV, 463 b. 

Lions in Scotland, II, 407, 409 ; m, 517 b. 

Little Billee, Thackeray, I, 457 n. ; IV, 370 n. 

The Little Boy with the Secret and his Little Sword, Ma 
gyar tale, I, 11 n. 

Little John : is Robin Hood's principal comrade, III, 41, 
56 ff. ; brings in the knight to Robin Hood's lodge, 57 J 
is lent to the knight as servant, 60 ; lent to the sheriff, 
whom he plunders and decoys into the hands of Robin 
Hood, 63-66 ; brings in the monk, 67 f . ; takes part in 
the sheriff's shooting-match, is wounded in the subse 
quent fight and carried off by Much, 70 f. ; roughly 
treated by Robin Hood, leaves him, and is made prisoner 
by the sheriff, 92 ; rescued by Robin Hood, 94 ; quarreled 
with and struck by Robin Hood, leaves his service, 97 ; 
is the only man that has his wits and courage when Robin 
Hood is taken prisoner, 98 ; kills the monk who has in 
formed against Robin Hood, and rescues his master, be 
having with singular nobleness, 99 f. See, also, 124 f., 
127. Later ballads : beats Robin Hood in a fight and is 
taken into his troop, III, 135 ; other fights of his, 137 
(see, also, 228) ; Little John disguised as a beggar at 
tempts to join himself to four beggars, is ill received by 
them, beats them and takes 603 from them, III, 190 ; 
Little John finds his match or superior, III, 109, 130, 155, 
166 f., 169, 171. Little John appears in the May-game, 
not apparently hi the morris-dance, III, 44-6. 

Livingston. See under Family Names. 

Loan miraculously restored, III, 52 n. ; V, 297 a. 

Localizing of ballad-stories, I, 24, 99, 173, 210, 340; IE, 
264, 321 ; V, 287 a. 

Locksly, Nottinghamshire, the birthplace of Robin Hood, 
IH, 215. 

Logan Water, or, A Lover in Captivity, a song, IV, 
184 n. 

Logie, Laird of, HI, 449 ff., 520 ; IV, 515 f. ; V, 299 f. 

Long Lonkin, tale, V, 295 b. 

Lord Derwentwater's Goodnight, ballad by Robert Surtees, 
IV, 116. 

Lord Livingston, Pinkerton's ballad, IV, 432. 

London Hill, ballad, IV, 105 ff. 

Loudoun Castle, HI, 435-8. 



Lousing of knight by maid, I, 27, 28, 32, 37, 46, 487, and 

n., 488 ; IV, 440 b ; V, 285 a. 
Lovely, Leeve, London, IH, 306. 
Lover runs mad after the death of his mistress, H, 110, 

124; throws himself into bonfire after his mistress has 

been burned, H, 115, 121 ; woman goes mad after lover 

and husband have killed one another, II, 130 f., 133 ; 

after the death of lover, 169. 
Lover's tryst with a lady anticipated by a low fellow, I, 

137-41. 
Lovmand, Lagman, representative of Horn in Danish and 

Swedish ballads, I, 193 f. 
The Lowlands of Holland, a song, H, 156, 317, and n. ; V, 

229 b. 
Loxly, assumed, or secondary, name of Robin Hood, HI, 

197 f., 201, 209. 
L. P., signature of No 147, IH, 208, 210 ; HI, 518 a, 519 a ; 

indicating Laurence Price. 
Lucian, De Lnctu, H, 236. 
Lndie, daughter of the emir of Orbrie, V, 6. 
Ludus Sancti Jacobi, Provencal mystery, I, 238. 
Lnnet, Laneth, I, 261. 

Der Luneten Mantel, fastnachtspiel, I, 261, 267. 
Lyne, brig o, n, 290. 
Lynn, stock ballad-locality. See Lin in the Glossary, V, 

354. 

Mabiuogion, I, 210, 266 n., 279 n., 281 n. ; II, 51 ; V, 24 n., 
216 a. 

Mable, Book of, a prophetical book, HI, 420, 422. 

Macaire, romance, II, 40. 

Macdonald. See under Family Names. 

Macgill of Lindores fights an Italian gladiator, II, 378. 

Macgregor. See under Family Names. 

Madel, Dutch representative of Fair Annie, II, 67. 

Madonna substituted for Lazarus in the legend of Dives and 
Lazarus, II, 10 ; Madonna and Jesus, III, 507 b. 

Magdalen, legend of, I, 228 f. ; in southern ballads, I, 
231 f ., 504 f. ; IH, 502 b ; IV, 451 b ; V, 288 a ; singular 
episode from, in Golden Legend and in Digby Mystery of 
Mary Magdalene, I, 245 n. ; legend of Magdalen blended 
with story of the Samaritan woman and with that of the 
Cruel Mother, I, 228-30, 232 ; H, 501 b ; III, 502 b ; IV, 
451 b ; V, 288 a. 

Magus saga, I, 283 n. 

Mahabharata, II, 495 ; V, 294. 

Maid cuts off her pap to release a man from a serpent and 
heal the wound made in his body, the pap grows apace 
when she bears a son, V, 177; maid leaps from castle 
wall into lover's arms, II, 410, 413 ; maid solicited by a 
man tricks him, and when safe jeers at him, II, 480-93 ; 
maid (noble), to vex knight who has been adjudged to 
marry her, pretends to be a carl's daughter, beggar's 
daughter, II, 462-4, 467, 469 f., 471 f., 473 f., 476 ; IV, 
494 ; V, 238 f . ; maid who has eloped with a pretended 
lover forced by him to strip, I, 31-3, 39 f., 42 f., 50, 56 f., 
59, 433, 486 b, 488 ; II, 496 b, 497 ; III, 496 f . ; IV, 442 ; 
maid will not give her faith to two brothers successively, 
I, 89, 91, 376, 378 n. 

Maid Marian, in ballads, HI, 43, 46; simply mentioned, 
198, 209 ; disguised, fights with Robin Hood disguised, 
219 ; in May-game and morris, 44-6 ; in the plays of The 
Downfall and the Death of Robert Earl of Hnntington, 
46, 519. 



488 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Mallet, David, and his Margaret's Ghost, II, 199 f . ; V, 
294 a. 

Malleus Maleficanun, I, 489 ; III, 18. 

Malory's King Arthur (Morte Darthur), I, 257 n. ; IV, 456 a ; 
V, 289 b; 298 a. 

Man in danger of his life dressed by landlady as woman 
and set to baking, IV, 151-4 ; man preparing to hang 
himself finds money, leaves the rope, with which the 
owner of the money hangs himself, V, 13 ; man who flies 
from home on account of enormous crime, in his despera 
tion commits his relations to miserable fates, I, 169 f., 
445 ; man who has assaulted maid, to marry her, if bach 
elor, be hanged, if married, II, 460 f., 464 (466), 469, 
471, 474 f. ; IV, 493. 

Mandeville. Sir John, his (fictitious) Voyage and Travel, I, 
308 ; HI, 501 ; V, 209. 

Les Manteaux, Caylus, I, 257. 

Der Mantel of Heinrich von dem Tiirlin, I, 259 f. 

Le Mantel Mautaillie', fabliau, I, 257. 

Mantle and costumes enclosed between two nut-shells, I, 
260, and n., 271. 

Mantle, as chastity chest. See The Boy and the Mantle, 
No 29, 1, 257 ff ., etc. ; Gaelic ballad of the mantle, 1, 261 f .; 
V, 289 a ; the mantle of Karodes, I, 261. 

Mantle Rhymes, see Skikkju Rfmur, I, 264 n. 

Mar fights when both his hands are off, IV, 502 a. 

Margaret Twynstoun, Twinslace, Vinstar, Weiksterne, 
frees her lover, Wemyss of Logie, condemned to death, 
by taking him through the royal bedchamber and letting 
him down from a window, III, 449 f., 452-5. 

Margaret's Ghost, David Mallet, II, 199 f . ; V, 294 a. 

Le Mari Confesseur, conte of La Fontaine, III, 258. 

Marie de France, Lai del Freisne, II, 67 f. ; Lanval, II, 510 ; 
Guigemar, IV, 377 ; Yonec, V, 39. 

Marineo, Lucio, I, 238. 

Marfu saga, I, 98 ; III, 52 n., 240. 

Markenfield (Martinfield), Thomas, IH, 418-22; knows 
every banner, whether any man he has laid eyes on is 
friend or foe, can speak any language, and has the gift 
of prophecy, 419 f. 

Marko Kraljevic, II, 357 ; HI, 499 a, 507 b ; IV, 463 b. 

Marr, house of, IV, 157. 

Marramiles, one of Arthur's knights, I, 279, 284, 287. 

Marriage ceremony interrupted by lover, who takes the 
bride, IV, 412-14. 

Marriage, forced, justified as happiest, IV, 244. 

Marriage: maid to wait, lover absent, seven (eight, nine) 
years and not marry, 1, 189 f ., 192-4, 459, 502 b ; maid and 
man parting, neither to marry for seven years, I, 191 n., 
464 f., 473, 477, 480 ; H, 508 ; IV, 461 ; man gives his 
troth to woman to marry no other for seven years, I, 469 
f . ; man parting with his wife engages her not to marry 
again for seven years, I, 195 f., 198, 200 n., 462 (three 
cases) ; for three, five, six, eight, nine or twelve years, 
nine years and nine days, year month and day, I, 194, 
197, 199, 200 (and 499), 461 ; Epirot and Albanian cus 
tom of betrothing or marrying early in youth and parting 
for long periods, I, 502. 

Marriage, second, of wife prevented by sudden (often mirac 
ulous) return of husband, I, 194-200, 502 f . ; II, 499 b ; 
HI, 501 ; IV, 450 b ; V, 210 b ; betrothed maid arrests 
marriage of lover to another woman, I, 502 f. 

Marriage-contract, seigneur miraculously conveyed home 
on the eve of his wife's marrying identifies himself by 



producing one half of his marriage-contract, which fits 
the other half left with his wife, II, 499 b. 

Marriages, unequal : serving man preferred by Lord Arun- 
del's daughter to Lord Phenix, II, 441-55 ; lady refuses 
nine gentlemen for servant-lad, ploughman, IV, 172 f., 
522 ; V, 255 ; Earl of Wigton's daughter marries footman, 
IV, 292-9 ; V, 270 ; lady of birth and fame loves a kitchen- 
boy, IV, 403-8 ; V, 277 f . 

Martial, Epigrams, IV, 186. 

Mary, Mild, H, 309, 315 ; Mary Mild, Myle, Moil, H, 72 ; 
HI, 386, 395 f ., 398 a ; IV, 507 f ., 510 f . ; Mary Miles 
(corruptly), IV, 511 ; maidens mild, II, 312, 314, 316 ; V, 
227. 

Maseniny Dzjadok, White Russian tale, V, 281. 

Mass, forced, exacted by Robin Hood, HI, 192, 199, 202, 
228. 

Massinger, The Picture, I, 269. 

Matthew, apocryphal Gospel of, I, 271 ; II, 1, 2 n., 7. 

Matthew Paris, Chronica Majora, H, 37, 143 ; HI, 235, 241, 
519. 

Matilda Fitzwalter, Maid Marian, HI, 56 n., 214, 218, 519. 

Matildas, three, popularly supposed to have been persecuted 
by King John, III, 519. 

Maximilian H (Emperor) and a charcoal-burner, Bohemian 
tale, V, 75. 

Maxwells : affray with the Johnstones, IH, 485 ; feuds with 
the Johnstones, IV, 34-8 ; Lord Maxwell kills Sir James 
Johnstone, IV, 35 ; Lord Maxwell's Last Goodnight, bal 
lad, IV, 34 ff. See under Family Names. 

May-game, III, 41-4.6. 

Meilyr, story of, in Giraldus Cambrensis, his ability to ex 
pose lies, I, 320 n. 

Meisterlieder der Kolmarer Handschrift, I, 269, 270. 

Meldrum, Squire, III, 306 n. 

Mellerstain, Laird of, ballad, IV, 281 f. 

Melusine, romance, V, 226 a. 

Mem and Zin, Kurdish poem, I, 98. 

Memering, Mimmering, Mimmer, Mimecan, smallest of men, 
champion of Gunild, H, 34-8. 

La menta y'l Gaitx, Catalan tale, H, 510. 

Merfolk apt to be ferocious, I, 366 n. (see 365 b, 366 a). 

Merlin, Roman de Merlin, I, 257 n. ; II, 113 ; IV, 454 a 
(English prose romance) ; (in Arthour and Merlin), IV, 
479 b. 

Mermaid, sight of, bad omen for ships, H, 19, 29 f., 32, 
510 b ; V, 149-52 ; one has betrayed seven ships, H, 19. 

Mermaiden affects man with some mortal ailment, I, 387-9 
(probably incited thereto by his inconstancy : see 1, 372). 

Merman entering church, all the images turn their backs ; 
when woman who has perforce been the merman's consort 
enters church, everything in it bows, I, 365. 

Merman takes maid (princess) to the sea-bottom, where she 
lives some eight years and has children ; hearing the bells 
of home, she longs to go to her mother and is allowed to 
pay her a visit, taking her children with her ; merman 
comes for her, she refuses to return ; merman says they 
must divide the children, three and three each, and half 
of the seventh, I, 364 f . ; merman tears the children to 
pieces and hangs himself, 366. See Dwarf-king. 

Merman's human wife, allowed to visit her mother, must not 
bow when the priest pronounces the holy name, or make 
an offering, I, 364 ; must not stay for the benediction, 
366. 

Message (deceptive) from dying man or woman to father, 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



489 



mother, etc., or prohibition of information to these of 
fact or manner of death, I, 436-40, 442 ; H, 14, and n. ; 
HI, 381, 384 f., 387-93, 395-8, 507 b ; IV, 460 a, 508-10, 
512 f. ; V, 247. 

Message repeated, II, 265 f., 268 f., 270, 272, 366 ; message 
sent down a stream by a leaf, or linden shavings, I, 40 b, 
487 a. 

Messer Guiglielmo Rossiglione and Messer Guiglielmo 
Guardastagno, Boccaccio's tale of, V, 33. 

Messer Torello, Boccaccio's tale, I, 197. 

Messire Gauvain, ou la Vengeance de Eaguidel, romance, I, 
257 n., 260; II, 51. 

Mesterm0, Norse tale, Asbj0rnsen, I, 461 n. 

Metyard, archer's, III, 103 n. ; V, 297 a. 

Midge, the Miller's son, HI, 202, 204. See 197, and Much. 

Mikkels Arvegods, I, 144 b. 

Mild Mary. See Mary. 

Milk running from reputed maid's breasts, 1, 102 f ., 179, 363. 

Milk, wash my son in, I, 71, (and lay him in silk) 74, 79 f., 
(and dress in silk) 221 ; II, 89, 91, 100, 408, 425, (and 
row in silk) 426. 

Les Mille et un Jours, I, 282, 283 n., 417 ; IT, 43 n., 499 ; 
V, 13. 

Les Mille et un Quart d'heure, Contes Tartares, V, 13. 

Miller, monk, without cares, sans souci, ohne Sorgen, utan all 
sorg, senza pinseri, pensa, sem cuidados, 1, 408 f . ; II, 507. 

Miller and King, V, 69 n. 

The Miller of Mansfield, in Sherwood, and Henry the Sec 
ond, King of England, The Pleasant History of, V, 69 n., 
84. 

The Miller of Mansfield in Sherwood and K. Henry the Sec 
ond, etc., a pleasant new ballad of, V, 69 n. 

Millers, priests, shepherds, etc., nothing else left in Eng 
land, at epoch of Durham and of Flodden Field, HI, 282, 
and n., 284-6, 352. 

Mjllq which grind sugar and cinnamon, mace and cloves, I, 
113 ; cinnamon, II, 65. 

Milon, steward, false accuser of Olif, wife of King Hugo, 
H, 39 f . 

Mimecan, dwarf, champion of Gunhild, II, 37 f. 

Mint cursed for not -concealing Joseph and Mary, II, 8 n. 

Miracle de la Marquise de Gaudine, II, 42. 

Miracles. See Light, Fountain, Lilies. 

Miracles following the murder of a Christian boy by the 
Jews, HI, 235, 237-40, 244 f., 247 f., 252 ; V, 241 ; the 
desecration of the Host, HI, 240, 242 n. 

Miracles of the Virgin, H, 7 n., 8, 13, 16, 42; HI, 52, 
239 f. ; V, 23 n. 

Un Miracolo di tre Pellegrini, play, I, 238. 

Miragaia, romance of Almeida-Garrett, V, 6. 

Mittagsfrau, I, 484 a. See AaipAviov ne<rrin&piv&v, Noon- 
sprite. 

Mitton, bailiff of Shrewsbury, knows no king but him that 
wears the crown, III, 332 f . 

Modi of Reynes, accepted suitor of Rymenhild, I, 189. 

Modun, Moging, to marry Rimild, Riminild, Horn's love, I, 
191 f. 

Money givsn by maid to lover with whom she is eloping, I, 
183 ; H, 369, 371, 406 f., 410. 

Monk, miller, without cares, I, 408 f. ; H, 507. 

Monmouth, Duke of, IV, 108-10. 

Montrose, IV, 51-3, 55 n., 57, 77-9. 

Moon, new, with old moon in her arm, sign of storm, II, 
20-27, 29, 30. 
VOL. v. 62 



Moradbak, 1'histoire de, I, 11 n. 

Moran (Murando), Piedmontese representative of young 
Beichan, I, 462. 

Mordred, Arthur's nephew, his death, V, 298 a. 

Moringer, Der edle, I, 196, 459 ; V, 291 b. 

Morris dance, III, 44 f. 

Morte Arthur, II, 510 b. 

Morte Darthur, Malory, I, 257 n. ; IV, 456 a ; V, 982 b, 298 a. 

Morton, Earl of, III, 443, 445 f. 

Mottuls saga, I, 258-60, 261 n. 

Mourning, excessive. See Tears. 

Le Moyen de parvenir, IH, 159. 

Much (the Miller's son), an original comrade of Robin 
Hood, III, 56, 59 f., 66, 70; carries off the wounded 
Little John on his back, 71 ; 97, 99 ; companion with 
Little John in killing the monk and the rescue of Robin 
Hood, 98-100; Midge, the Miller's son, III, 197, 202, 
204 ; Much the Miller's son, made one of the party that 
rescue John o the Side, III, 478 f., 483. 

La Mule sanz frain, fabliau, I, 417 n. 

Der Miiller ohne Sorgen, I, 409. See Miller. 

Mummers' play of St. George, V, 291. 

Munday, A., his play of The Downfall of Robert Earl of 
Huntington, III, 46, 129, 179, 519 b ; V, 100; his pageant 
Metropolis Coronata, V, 297 a. 

Munday, A., and Chettle, H., play of The Death of Robert 
Earl of Huntington, IH, 129, 519 b. 

Murder, compensation in money for, II, 297 f. ; disclosed by 
harp or fiddle made or furnished from parts of the body, 
or by pipe made from bone, or from plant growing from 
the body, I, 121-33, 135, 493-5; H, 498 b; HI, 499 a; 
IV, 447-9 ; V, 208 b, 286 a. 

Murder, revenge for, H, 297 f., 300 f., 304-7. 

Murdered boy appears immediately as bird and reveals that 
his brother had killed him, I, 126. 

Murdered man's body will emit blood upon being touched 
or approached by the murderer, II, 143. 

Murray. See under Family Names. 

Murray, Bonny Earl of, murder of at Doiiibristle, III, 
447-9, 456. 

Murray, The Outlaw, ballad, V, 185 ff. 

Murray, Regent, IH, 400, 409, 417, 442, 447. 

Murray, Morrow = Moor, black, V, 189 n. 

Music, harp, pipe, flute, song, powerful effects of, on ani 
mate and inanimate nature, II, 137 ; soporific influence, I, 
55; H, 137, 139 f., 511 f. ; IV, 18-21 ; V, 220 b, 293 a ; 
music, seductive, horn, harp or song, I, 15-17 ; 25, 28 b, 
31-5, 37 f., 44, 50, 55, 367, 485 ; IV, 441 ; V, 285. 

Muzicenko s Kulacenko, The little Peasant, Russian tale, V, 
281. 

Mythical interpretations of the story of Adam Bell, etc., 
and of Robin Hood, III, 21, and n. ; 47 f., and notes. 

Myvyrian Archaiology of Wales, I, 265 n. ; HI, 498 a. 

Maerpoll, Icelandic fairy tale, I, 392. 

Naisi (Naois) and Deirdre, Gaelic story, HI, 498 b. 

Naked man, injured husband will not Mil a, H, 245, 247-9, 
251, 253-6, 258 ; IV, 477 f. 

Naming, enfeebling or destructive effects of, on men en 
gaged in fight, on the devil, trolls, nixes, the horse Blak, 
a berserkr, the avenging sword, enchantment, etc., I, 3, 
5, 89-92, 95 f., 489 b ; IH, 498 a ; IV, 443 a ; V, 207 b, 
285 b. 

Nashe, Thomas, HI, 461. 



490 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Nasr-eddin Hodja, Les plaisanteries de, Turkish tale from, 

I, 410. 

Neh-Manzer, on Les Neuf Loges, Persian tale, I, 489 a. 
Nereid, captured by resolute perseverance, despite changes 

of shape, I, 337. 

Nereids, Greek, likeness to northern elves and fairies, 1, 314 ; 
euphemistic titles for, t6., and n. ; special trees endanger 
taking by, for those who lie under them, I, 340. 
Net, riddle of : if net has taken fish, lady has been unfaith 
ful, I, 191 n. 

Neville. See under Family Names. 
Newborn (unborn) children speak, III, 367, and n. ; IV, 

507 a. 

Nibelnngenlied, II, 143, 236. 
Nicodemus, gospel of, I, 239, 240 n. 
Nighean Righ fo Thuinn, The Daughter of King Under- 

waves, Gaelic tale, I, 297 f. 
El niilo de Guardia, El santo niiio de la Guardia, TTT, 241 b ; 

IV, 497 a. 

Nisami, his poem of The Seven Figures or Beauties, I, 417. 
Nix killed by maid with a knife, I, 23 n. 
No Song, no Supper, musical entertainment, by Prince 

Hoare, V, 96. 

Noble, Hobie, ballad, IV, 1 ff. 

Nonplussing: fool wins princess by dumfounding her, I, 

'20, 418 a, 485 a ; n, 507 b ; carlin foiled by boy getting 

the last word, I, 20 ; in, 496 a ; Fin by Harpkin, I, 21 ; 

f anse knicht (devil) by boy, I, 22, 485 b ; king's son by 

Tsano d'Oyme 1 , IV, 440 b. 

Noon-sprite, German, I, 484 a; Slavic, IV, 440 b. See 

Aaip.6viov fjtftri}fjiftpiv6v and Mittagsfrau. 
North side of burial grounds for nnbaptized children, II, 

498. 
Northumberland, the betrayal of the Earl of, HI, 409, 411- 

14. 

Norton, Christopher, III, 404 f. 

The Nortons, their part in the Rising in the North, HE, 
403-6 ; the father and two of the sons go to the Low 
Countries, 418 ; the father and four sons said to accom 
pany the Earl of Westmoreland to Spain, 419, 421. 
Number riddles or songs, I, 416, and n. 
Numbers, favorite : 

Seven. Seven years (service, absence, penance, etc.), I, 
41, 69, 72 f ., 77, 189 f ., 192, 194-6, 198, 202, 204-6, 211, 
224 f., 229-32, 255, 285, 323 f., 342, 344-6, 350, 354, 
366, 432, 462, 464 f ., 469 f ., 473, 475, 477 ; II, 52, 138, 
159, 162 f ., 166, 207-9, 233, 283, 500 ; HI, 23, 189, 371, 
441, 504 ; IV, 287, 290 f., 363, 366 f., 433, 454-6, 458, 
461 ; V, 207, 212, 219 ; seven brothers, I, 92, 94, 100- 
4, 107, 251, 433, 492 ; II, 158, 160-2, 165, 170, and 
n., 189, 201, 358 f., 361 f., 364, 366, 425 ; IV, 151, 468, 
483 ; V, 224 ; seven sisters, I, 69, 71 f., 74, 76, 80, 107 f., 
314-16 ; H, 295, 311 f., 362, 364, 366 ; IV, 477, 483, 
485 ; V, 207 ; seven sons, I, 362 f ., 365-7 ; H, 65-7, 
69, 71 f., 74 f., 77 f., 80, 159, 161 ; V, 41, 255 ; seven 
(miscellaneous), I, 41, 68,70, 72, 79, 91, 94, 111, 289, 
312, 362, 364, 367, 371 ; H, 70, 72 f., 75, 77, 79, 82, 
318, 365, 370, 467 ; m, 3, 6-11, 65, 67, 75, 77, 78, 
92, 117, 422 ; IV, 319, 363 f., 366, 368, 496; V, 108, 
127, 158, 184, 214, 224, 240. 

Twenty-four. Four-and-twenty knights, ladies, ships 
etc., I, 68, 70, 330-2, 341, 343, 370 ; II, 86, 88, 97, 129, 
132, 183, 194 f., 241, 291, 299, 312, 315, 357, 371 ; 
HI, 216, 297-9, 352, 370, 433, 436 ; IV, 84, 157, 221 f ., 



226-8, 239 f., 273, 284, 317, 323, 325-7, 368, 381 f., 
458, 461, 470, 472, 478 ; V, 41, 111-13, 117-19, 127, 
221, 276. 

Thirty-three. Thirty and three horses, years, etc., I, 
58 f., 212, 284, 467, 470, 472, 475, 479 ; H, 90, 92, 93, 
95, 399, 471, 497 ; III, 453, 464 f., 478 ; IV, 146, 148, 
195 f., 199, 204, 207, 371, 373, 470, 498 ; V, 36, 122-4, 
219. 

The Nutbrown Maid, English romance, I, 112 ; n, 84. 

Nuts (walnut, hazel-nut, almond), enclosing costumes, I, 
260, and n. 

Oath by thorn, II, 111, 154 ; by oak, ash and thorn, II, 138 ; 
by corn, II, 144, 149 ; grass and corn, II, 151. 

Occleve, Thomas, De Regimine Principum, V, 71 n. 

Octavian, metrical romance, II, 33 n., 41, 510. 

Ode und de Slang, tale, I, 298. 

Odin, I, 13, 67, 95, and nn., 283, 404 f. 

Ogier le Danois, I, 239, 275, 319, 340 ; II, 50 ; V, 243 b, 
290 a. 

Ogilvie. See under Family Names. 

Oh ono chrio, burden and couplets, II, 430. 

L'Oiseau bleu, tale, V, 40. 

Olaf r Tryggvason tries masteries with EindriSi, EindriSi to 
be baptized, if beaten ; shoots a chessman from a boy's 
head, HI, 18. 

<5lafs saga Helga, II, 127. 

Olafs saga Tryggvasonar, III, 18, 19 n. 

Olif, Oliva, Karlamagnus saga, accused of adultery, de 
mands ordeal, champion fights for her, II, 39 f. ; Oluvu 
kvseSi, Faroe ballad on her story, and Spanish prose 
romance, II, 40. 

Olive, will not grow if planted by unchaste person, V, 
289 a. 

Oliver, I, 277 f. 

Omens : buttons leap from breast, flee from coat, n, 118, 
121 (?), 308 (?), 327 f., 331 ; IV, 466 ; heel, lap, came off 
shoe, in, 384, 386 ; corks frae her heels did flee, III, 
393 ; horse stumbling, IV, 117, 120, 122 ; V, 254 ; nose 
bleed, II, 118, 308; IV, 117-20, 122, 189, 466, 522 a; 
rain upon setting out on a journey, IV, 122 ; rings break 
from fingers, IV, 120 ; burst, II, 324, 337 ; IV, 119, 122 ; 
drop from fingers, II, 331 ; IV, 118, 122. 

One shape by day, another by night, I, 290, and n., 291, 
295 ; IV, 454 a, 495 a ; V, 39 f., 289 b. 

Ordeal by hot iron (carrying iron and walking on steel), II, 
36 ; walking over hot plough-shares and carrying hot 
irons, 38 ; passing through fire in a waxed shift, or wear 
ing a waxed shift which is set on fire, 38 f. ; walking 
through blazing fire in simple shift, 40 ; by water, 38, 
40 ; being thrown into a fire of thorns, 43 n. ; sea, fire 
and snake-house, II, 510 b ; battle, H, 34-40, 42 f., 45-8 ; 
IV, 371-3. 

Orendel, II, 127 ; IV, 450 b, 463 b. 

Orfeo and Heurodis, I, 216. 

Orlandino of Folengo, I, 407. 

Orlando Furioso, I, 265 ; H, 113. 

Orlando Innamorato, I, 308. 

Orpheus and Eurydice, romance and ballad of, I, 216 f. 

Ortnit und die Wolfdietriche, IV, 463 b. 

Orvar-Odds saga, II, 50 n. ; IV, 479 b. 

L'os qui chante, IV, 447 b ; V, 208 b, 286 a. 

Otterburn, Battle of, ballad, III, 289 ff. ; Froissart's ac 
count of the battle, 289-92. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



491 



Outlaws (for venison); III, 22-30, 56, 73 f., 76-8 ; seven 
score the regular number of a band, III, 53. 

Ovid, Metamorphoses, I, 84, 99, 437. 

Owain, knight, legend of St Patrick's Purgatory, I, 306, 
308. 

Ox, slaughtered, comes to life, in attestation of the immor 
tality of a murdered Christian (Torsten), I, 505 b. 

The Paddo, Scottish tale, V, 201. 

Pair ride (go) a long distance and never speak, I, 41-4 ; III, 

497 b ; V, 207 a, 285 a. (In French, Italian, Spanish, 

Catalan, Scandinavian, Slavic ballads, not English.) 
Pal greive, false, I, 91 f., 95 n. 
Palace of Pleasure, Painter's, I, 269 ; V, 13, 29. 
Palanus, L'histoire de, Comte de Lyon, from romance, II, 

42. 

Palmerin of England, I, 267 ; V, 31 n. 
Pantschatantra, I, 270, 339 n., 402 n. ; H, 499 ; V, 14, 107. 
Paradise in modern Greek quite equivalent to Hades, I, 

322 n. ; paradise or wonderland, maid lured away by 

promise of being taken to one, I, 27, and n., 28, 41, 46, 49, 

89 f., 112 (?), 178, 182 (st. 1), 487 a; H, 496 f. 
Parcevals saga, I, 257 n. 
Parents, etc., not to know of death of son, daughter, or of 

the manner of it, I, 436-40, 442 ; II, 14, and n. ; III, 381, 

384 f ., 387-93, 395-8, 507 b ; IV, 460, 508-10, 512 f. ; V, 

247. 

Paria, Goethe's, II, 502 a. 
Parker, Martin, III, 227. 
Parodies, II, 204 ; V, 287 a. 
La Partie de Chasse de Henri IV, Colle 1 , V, 75. 
Parting, Epirot or Albanian custom of, for a long time after 

betrothal or marrying, I, 502 b. 
Partridge betrays the hiding-place of the Virgin, II, 8 ; 

quail plays partridge's part, swallow befriends the Vir 
gin, II, 509 f. 
Parts exchanged in different versions of stories, man for 

woman, etc., I, 459; II, 349 f., 514 a; III, 516 b ; IV, 

186 a, b, 481 f. ; V, 47, 213, 233 f., 296. 
Passional, das alte, I, 242 n., 505 a. 
Patraiiuelo of Timoneda, I, 408. 
Parzival, Wolfram von Eschenbach's, I, 257 n. 
Pauli's Schimpf und Ernst, I, 407,410; IH, 53, 208 ; V, 13. 
Pausanias, I, 84 ; III, 503. 
Du Pauvre mercier, fabliau, III, 54. 
A Peat carried to school by boy as a contribution to the 

firing, I, 21 f. 

Pecorone of Ser Giovanni Florentine, I, 392 f. 
Pedlar and Robin Hood, III, 154; V, 240. 
Pedlars and Robin Hood, III, 170. 
Peele, George, his Edward I, III, 48 n., 54 n., 218, 257. 
Peggie is over the sie with the souldier, a tune, V, 172. 
Peitevin, the Jew, HI, 237, and n. 
Penances, singular, I, 224, I, J, 225, K, L, 230, 232 ; V, 

212 a. See Austerities. 
Pepys, Samuel, his pleasure at hearing Barbara Allan, IE, 

276. 

Perceforest, romance, I, 240 n., 268 ; V, 23 n. 
Perceval le Gallois, I, 257 n., 261 n., 263, 265 n., 269; II, 

51, 502 b, 510 b ; HI, 503 b, 508 a ; IV, 454 a ; V, 289 b ; 

Roman de Perceval, prose, I, 257 n. See Parzival. 
Percy. See under Family Names. 
Percy, Harry, gives Douglas and his host a draught of 

wine over Newcastle walls after engaging to meet Doug 



las at Otterburn, HI, 296 ; asked by his father to put off 
the battle in order that certain gentlemen may see it, will 
not, 297 ; his generous lament for the death of Douglas, 
309, 312. 

Percy's, Thomas, treatment of his texts, his "old copies," 
H, 49; HI, 461 f. 

Peregrinus Compostellanus, Jesuitenkomb'die, I, 238 n. 

Der Peri, Siberian-Turkish tale, V, 46. 

Perjuries, close grazing on, II, 35, and n., 108, 110, 158-65, 
171 ; IV, 465, 468 ; V, 48, 51 f., 56. 

Peter Diemringer of Staufenberg, I, 372. 

Peter the Great, Tsar, HI, 382 f . 

Petronelle and Alphonso, tale of Gower, I, 10. 

Pfaffe Amis, I, 406. 

Die Pfeiferin, Esthonian tale, I, 124 n. 

Pheron, son of Sesostris, story of, in Herodotus, I, 271 ; V 
212 b. 

Philemon and Baucis, I, 99. 

Philiphaugh, Battle of, ballad, IV, 77 ff. 

Pickelheringsspiel, V, 97- 

Picken, Andrew, Traditionary Stories of Old Families, V, 
207. 

The Pilgrim to Compostella, Southey's tale, I, 238. 

Pinkie Cleuch, Battle of, HI, 378. 

Pipe, fiddle, made from tree growing out of murdered girl's 
grave, or from reeds from murdered boy's grave, or from 
bone, bones and skin, of murdered boy, reveals the mur 
der, I, 121-33, 135, 493-5; H, 498 b; HI, 499 a; IV, 
447-9; V, 208 b. 

Piping, young man obtains from the devil the power of mak 
ing' women follow his, I, 47. 

Pirie's chair, the lowest seat o hell, I, 439, st. 31. 

Pitto, alias Carellus, II, 39. 

Placability of the King in Adam Bell, the Gest of Robin 
Hood, and the tale of Gamelyn, III, 22. 

Plague in Scotland, IV, 76 f. 

Plants from graves, I, 93, 94, 96-8, 101 f., 200, 379 n., 489 f ., 
492, 496 b, 506 a ; II, 104, 108, 111, 183, 185, 190 f., 198, 
201 f ., 205-8, 210-12, 219, 280, 285 f., 498 b ; III, 498, 
510 b, 515 ; IV, 443, 450 a, 465 ; V, 31, 207, 224, 226, 
262, 285 f ., 293, 295 a ; plants from graves, or from dead, 
with inscriptions, I, 96 f ., 99 ; IH, 239. 

Pliny, Historia Naturalis, HI, 503. 

Pluck-buffet, III, 55, 75-7. 

Plutarch, Septem Sapientum Convivium, I, 13 ; Life of 
Numa, III, 496. 

Poisoning, I, 153-65, 375, 498-501 ; II, 284-7, 499 a ; HI, 
259, 261, 264, 499 b; IV, 427 f., 449 f., 498; V, 206 f., 
242, 286 b, 295 a ; poisoning of young man by sweetheart, 
wife ; child by grandmother, stepmother, I, 152 f., 158-66, 
498-501 ; IV, 449 f . ; V, 209, 286 b ; son poisoned by 
mother on account of his marrying unacceptably, II, 
284-7; mother attempting to poison son's wife, the pair 
exchange cups, and son is poisoned, I, 155 f . ; IH, 499 b ; 
V, 295 a ; mother poisons son's wife, I, 156 f . ; poisoning 
of false lover by his former mistress, IV, 427 f . ; brother 
poisoned by sister to remove an obstacle to her passion, 
Slavic and Lithuanian ballads, I, 156 b, 499 a ; II, 499 a ; 
HI, 499 b ; V, 286 b ; poisoning with snakes (" eels," 
" small fishes ") as food or with their virus in drink, I, 
153-65, 498-501 ; HI, 499 b ; IV, 449 f. ; V, 209 ; with 
the venom of a toad, I, 154, 157 ; poison grains in drink 
given by elves, I, 375. 

Poludnitsa, Russian sprite, I, 14 n. 



492 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Ponthiis of Galyce, The Noble History of, prose romance, 
III, 179. 

Porter thirty years and three, I, 284, 465, 467, 470, 472, 
475, 479 ; porter or warden has his neck wrung, is run 
through, etc., Ill, 25, 95 n., 100, 480, 482 ; Horn throws 
him over the bridge, I, 190. 

Posing of princess by fool (who gets her in marriage), I, 20, 
417 f., 485 a ; II, 507 b. 

Potter, disguise as, assumed by Hereward, Wallace, Eus 
tace, Robin Hood, HI, 109. 

Du Povre mercier, fabliau, IH, 54. 

Precocity of body and mind in heroes and champions, II, 
303, 305 f., 513 b ; III, 515 b ; IV, 35 n., 80, 479 b ; V, 
226 a, 292 a, 295 a. 

Le pre"t miraculeusement rembourse", V, 297 a. 

Prevarications of woman who is discovered to have been 
visited by a lover (not a knight, but a maid ; maid wears 
sword ? not a sword, but a bunch of keys, etc.) ; in 
tragic ballads, H, 157 f., 164, 512 a; III, 509 a; IV, 
468 a ; in comic, V, 88-95, 303 f. 

Priests, five hundred, say mass at Durham field and after 
wards take part in the fight, HI, 286. 

Primaleon, I, 269. 

Primrose (a place), H, 212. 

Prince, figuring as a menial, is successful in a thrice re 
peated battle, tourney, race, task, after which he is in 
condition to reveal his rank and history, V, 44-7. 

Prince Calaf, Persian story, I, 417. 

Prince Peter of Murom and his wife Fevronija, Russian 
legend, IV, 439 a. 

Prince who invites an angel to his wedding, legend, V, 290 a. 

La Princesse et sa Nourrice, Greek tale, I, 489. 

Prior of St Mary abbey withstands the cruelty and greed of 
the abbot, HI, 60. 

Prodigal son recommended by his father to hang himself ; 
the rope pulls down a concealed treasure ; the prodigal 
reforms, V, 12 f., 19 f. ; prodigal son remembers a paper 
left by his father, or a key left by his mother, by which 
he receives money, V, 1518. 

Propertius, II, 236 n., 502 a. 

Protesilaus, I, 99. 

Protevangelium of James, I, 271. 

Proud porter, I, 284, 464, 465, 467, 470, 472, 474, 479, 481 ; 
II, 53, 369-71, 468, 475 ; V, 219. 

Pseudo-Matthew's Gospel, I, 271 ; II, 1, 7. 

Psezpolnica, the Wendish, I, 484 a. 

Punishments (unusual) : rolling down a declivity in a spiked 
barrel, tun set with knives, H, 343 ; IV, 30 n., 32 ; drag 
ging in a barrel stuck with nails, V, 48 ; boiling in a cal 
dron, boiling in oil or molten lead, throwing into boiling 
oil, II, 321 n., 327 ; V, 230, 281 ; half-hanging, quarter 
ing, seething la boiling lead, cutting joints asunder, and 
burning, V, 53 ; half -hanging and seething in boiling 
lead, 56. 

Punker shoots a coin from his son's head, HI, 18. 

Pushkin, verses from The Three Ravens pass for his, I, 
253. 

Queen asks the lives of Adam Bell, etc., of the king, HI, 28 ; 
her extravagant partiality for Cloudesly and his family, 
30. 

Queen of Fairy's beauty destroyed (temporarily) by inter 
course with Thomas, I, 327. 

Queen of Sheba's hard questions, I, 404 n. 



Queen releases the Laird of Logie from prison by a trick, 
III, 452 S. ; IV, 516 ; V, 300. 

Queen's Maries, III, 381, 382 n., 385 f., 388, 391-9 ; IV, 508- 
12 ; V, 246, 298 f. 

Queens of England ; of Scotland. See under Kings. 

Questions and tasks offset by other questions and requisi 
tions, I, 6 ff ., etc. See Tasks. 

Quintalin, in the saga of Samson the Fair, I, 50, 54, 259. 

Rabssaldchal, King, and his minister's daughter-in-law, I, 

12. 

Radloff, Proben der Volkslitteratur der tiirkischen Stamme 
Siid-Siberiens, I, 10, 418, 486 ; H, 506 b ; V, 46. 

Rsevens Arvegods, III, 499. 

Ragnars saga loSbrdkar, I, 9 n. 

The Raid of the Reid Swyre, III, 317. 

The Rainbow, name of a ship, V, 143. 

Raja Rasalu, story of, V, 33 f. 

Rakshas, Indian, gives riddles, I, 14. 

Ramiro, King of Leon, V, 4-6 ; ballad of, 6. 

Ransom of woman refused by father, mother, etc., paid by 
husband, II, 346 f . ; III, 516 a ; IV, 481 a ; V, 231 a ; paid 
by lover, II, 347-54 ; III, 516 b ; IV, 481 ; V, 231-3 ; parts 
reversed, man ransomed by true-love, II, 349 f., 514 a ; 
III, 516 f. ; IV, 481 f. ; V, 233 f., 296 ; variations on this 
theme, IH, 516 f . ; IV, 481 a ; woman will dress in gay 
colors upon death of blood-relations, in black for hus 
band, II, 347 ; V, 231 ; maid imprecates curses on her 
relations, H, 348 b; IV, 481; V, 231 f . ; invokes bless 
ings on lover, V, 231 f . ; ransom of five thousand, five hun 
dred pound, ten thousand, one thousand, five hundred 
crowns, contributed by bystanders for a wife to save her 
husband's life, IV, 127, 129-31, 133, 135, 137,139. 

Das Rathsel, tale of the Grimms, I, 417. 

Rathselfragen, I, 2 n. 

Rathsellieder, I, 1, 2. 

Rauf Coilyear, rhymed tale, V, 69 n., 70 f., 74. 

Ravnlil, false accuser of Gunild, II, 35. 

H re alia caccia, play of Goldoni, V, 75. 

Li Reali di Francia, H, 68 n. ; V, 284 a. 

The Red Bull of Norroway, Scottish tale, I, 307 n., 461 n. 

The Red Etin, Scottish tale, The Red Etin puts trying ques 
tions, I, 484 b ; V, 201. 

Red Rowan, III, 471, 474. 

Der Reiger, rhymed tale, V, 23 n. 

De la reine qui tua son seneschal, conte, I, 489. 

Reinfrid von Braunschweig, I, 196, 459. 

Der Reiter in Seiden, German tale, I, 47. 

Rejuvenation of old woman by burning to bones and throw 
ing bones into tub of milk, I, 507 b. 

Remi, Philippe de, Sire de Beaumanor, his romance of Je- 
han et Blonde (Blonde of Oxford), I, 191 n. ; V, 287 b. 

Remorse, immediate, after a cruel deed, H, 242, 245 f., 252, 
266, 271 ; V, 35, 37. 

Renard le Contrefait, Old French romance, I, 263. 

Renold, miller's son, Reynolde, one of Robin Hood's men, 
HI, 54, 70. 

Repetition in dialogue, I, 157 ; V, 286 b. 

Rescue of Johnny More by gigantic uncles, IV, 398 f . 

Reserve in duels of a peculiarly formidable sword, II, 35. 

Reven og Bjonnen, Reven og Nils fiskar, I, 144 b. 

Reviling, reproaching, scolding spirits and elves, I, 21, 
485 a; II, 496 b, 509 a; IV, 440 b. 

Revolving palace, I, 277. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



493 



Rhodes, house of the, TTT, 428, 433 ; house of Rothes, V, 
247 f. 

Riccio, David, murder of, III, 399 ff. 

Richard (Coaur de Lion), III, 220, 223, 227, 230; the ro 
mance, I, 320 n. ; H, 511 b, 513 a ; III, 55. 

Richarda, or Richardis, wife of the Emperor Charles III, 
her ordeal, H, 38 f . 

Richars li Biaus, romance, III, 508 a. 

Rid Square, Song of the, V, 307 b. 

Riddle-craft practised by preternatural beings : the Devil, 
I, 4 f. (C, D), 14 ; V, 283 ; Odin, Thor, Vatyniomr, Alvfes, 
berggeist, dragon, rusalka, vila, rakshas, I, 13 f. ; baba- 
yaga, psezpolnica, mittagsfrau, serpolnica, Red Etin, I, 
484 ; air-sprite, ogre, II, 495. 

Riddles (songs, ballads and tales) : I, 1-5, 9-11, 13 f., 404- 
23, 426-30, 484; II, 495, 506 f . ; in, 496 a; IV, 439, 
459 f. ; V, 205, 216 f., 283 f., 291. 

Riddles : beautiful girl not to be had by any man who can 
not puzzle her father with a riddle, Gaelic tale, I, 417 b ; 
man wins wife by instructing her how to answer her 
mother's riddles, Lithuanian tale, I, 418 f . ; riddles at 
marriages of Russian peasants, I, 418. Penalty for not 
guessing is life, I, 10, 14, 404-6; 409, 411, 413, 447 ; II, 
495 b, 506 b ; III, 496 a ; IV, 439 a ; V, 205 a, 291 ; for 
feit of kingdom, possessions, place, paying tribute, etc., I, 
10-13, 404, 406-8, 410 ; IV, 459 b ; to be taken off by 
the Devil, I, 5, 205 ; by rusalka, 1, 14 ; rewards to guessers, 
I, 407 b, 409 f., 416 n. ; II, 495 a ; princess requires lovers 
to give her riddles, those who cannot pose her to lose their 
heads, I, 417 ; riddles to be guessed as condition of mar 
riage, German, I, 1 f ., 484 a ; Slavic, I, 2 f., 484 a ; n, 
495 a ; IV, 439 a ; Gaelic, I, 3 ; riddles guessed win a hus 
band, I, 1-5, 10, 13, 484 a; II, 495 a; IV, 439 a; win a 
wife, I, 416 f., 420-23, 426-30; IV, 439 a ; V, 216 f. 

Riddles in the Maha-bharata and Katha-sarit-sagara, n, 
495. 

Riddles (Chaldean), given by wise man to the gods, IV, 
439. 

The Ridere (Knight) of Riddles, West Highland Tale, I, 
417. 

Riding into hall, knights and others, II, 51, 54, 510 b ; III, 
508 a. 

Right-hitting Brand, IH, 43 b, n. ; V, 297 a. 

Rimild, Rimnild = Rymenhild, Horn's love, I, 190 f . 

Ring halved at parting by husband and wife (lovers), I, 
194-8, 457 n., 470, 502 b, 503 a; V, 5 ; such half -rings 
often dug up, I, 194 n. ; ring in betrothal, I, 199 a, n. ; 
V, 287 b ; ring, or half -ring, thrown into a cup of wine 
drunk of by woman, serves to identify husband or lover 
returned after long absence, I, 190 f., 194-8, 200, 202-7, 
502 b, 503 b ; V, 5, 287 b ; halves of ring run together, 
join of themselves, I, 194 f., 198 ; II, 66 n. ; IV, 463 b ; 
ring-stories, similar (not noticed in detail), I, 503 a, 508 b ; 
IV, 450 b ; ring, or arm bent into a ring, magical revela 
tions made by looking through, III, 411 ; V, 299 b ; brib 
ing to secrecy with an arm-ring, II, 51, 54 (?). 

Der Ring ehelicher Treue, German tale, I, 198. 

Der Hitter Galmi mit der Hertzogin auss Britanien, play by 
Hans Sachs, II, 42. 

Ritter Galmien, vom, volksbuch, II, 42. 

Der Ritter von Stauf enberg, I, 372-4, 387 ; HI, 52 n. ; V, 
290 b ; after a happy and prosperous connection with an 
elf, marries, and dies within three days, I, 373 f. 

Rizzio, David, murder of, HI, 399 ff. 



Roads to heaven, paradise, purgatory, hell, fairy-land (some 
or all) pointed out by Fairy Queen to Thomas Rymer, I, 
324 f., 328 ; IV, 454 f., 458. See I, 359. 
Rob Roy, ballad, IV, 243 ff. 
Robber-ballads, klepht, Magyar, Russian, Italian, III, 49, 

IV, 497 a. 
Robe and fee, chief-justice retained by, HI, 52, 61 (sts. 93, 

107). 

Robert le Diable, H, 303 ; III, 515 b ; IV, 479 b. 
Robert Earl of Huntington, Robin Hood represented as, in 
Munday's play of The Downfall of Robert Earl of Hunt 
ington, and in Munday and Chettle's play of The Death 
of Robert Earl of Huntington, III, 46, and n., 519 b ; 
subsequently, in a pretended epitaph, III, 107, 226, 233, 
and in late ballads, II, 413 f. ; III, 204, 218, 227. The 
author of The Birth, Breeding, etc., of Robin Hood knows 
nothing of the Earl of Huutington, HI, 214. For The 
Downfall, etc., see III, 179 ; V, 100. 
Robin and Marion, in French literature, III, 46. 
Robin Hood : 

his alleged noble extraction, III, 46, and n. ; as he ap 
pears in ballads, IH, 42 f. ; historical theories about, 
43 ; his comrades, 43. 
the ballads, dates and sorts, 42. 

his band = 7 score, IH, 65 (185), 67, 75, 78 ; 100 bow 
men, III, 41 n.; 300 yeomen, III, 180; 150 + 60 
mentioned, III, 181 ; kept 300 bowmen before his 
outlawry, then 100, IH, 228. 
beguiled and bled to death by the prioress of Kirkley, 

III, 78, 103, 105 f., or by a monk, friar, 226, 231. 
Bishop of Ely routed by, HI, 230. 
his bower, III, 518 f. 

builds an alrashouse, III, 213 ; eight almshouses, 230. 
captures a bishop and takes a large sum from him, HI, 
192, 195 ; makes him sing a mass, 192, 196, 199, 202, 
204 ; dance in his boots, 195. 
his comrades, III, 43, and n ; V, 297 a. 
connection of his name with natural objects and archaic 

remains, III, 46 f., and notes ; IV, 496 f. 
his courtesy, III, 56, 58, 67, 69 f. (270-80), 74 f. (376- 

85), 229 f., etc. 
ecclesiastics of all descriptions his chief prey (as of 

Gamelyn), HI, 41 n., 51, 57, 67. 
his epitaph, III, 107, 226, 233. 
game, pageant, or the like, called Robynhode, IH, 44, 

518. 
Gest of Robyn Hode, composition and argument of, HI, 

49 f . ; topography of, 50 f . 

Golden Prize : forces two priests, who pretend to have 
not a penny, to pray for money, and finds 500 pounds 
on them, HI, 209. 

how characterized in the older ballads, HI, 43. 
husbandmen and yeomen favored by him, HI, 57, 69, 

221, 230. 

identified by J. Hunter as a porter in the king's house 
hold under Edward H, III, 55 f. 
imitated by disorderly people, III, 41. 
in danger from a bishop escapes to his band in the dis 
guise of an old woman, robs the bishop of five hun 
dred pounds, and makes him sing a mass, IH, 192. 
in the fifteenth century, HI, 41 ; V, 240 a. 
kills fifteen foresters when fifteen years old, HI, 176. 
kindness to the poor, HI, 228 f. ; consideration for hus 
bandmen, HI, 57, 230. 



494 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Life of, in Sloane MS. 780, HI, 46 b, n., 103, 121 b, n., 
129, 173, 175. 

loves no man so much as his king, III, 75. 

marries Allen a Dale to his true-love in spite of the 
bishop, III, 173 f. 

meets with his match, or is disgracefully worsted, bal 
lads to this effect, in, 110, 123-5, 130 f., 134, 137, 
140, 145, 151 f., 154, 156, 159, 165, 168, 171. 

his name foisted into ballads which in no way belong 
to the cycle, I, 109, 302, 306, 412 f., 415-17, 421, 423. 

the name Robinhood occurs 1380-81, IV, 496. 

outlawed, HI, 46 n., 228. 

pay of his men : twenty marks a year and two suits of 
clothing, III, 64 (with bounties, 75) ; a noble every 
Sunday and a new suit every holy day, III, 126. 

his piety and special devotion to the Virgin, III, 41 n., 
51, 57, 59 f., 67 f., 93, 97 f. 

plays, HI, 41, and n., 44-6, 90 f., 108, 114 f., 122, 
127 f., 134, 518 b ; plays or games of archery, IV, 
496 b, Robyn Hod and the Shryff off Nottyngham, 
in, 90 n. 

the poor spared and befriended by, III, 41 n., 228. 

Potter, Robin Hood and the, and Great Russian bylinas, 
IV, 497 a. 

his profuseness, III, 69 f., 77, 228. 

relieves an impoverished knight, III, 57-60 ; will not 
take back a loan of 400, having been repaid by the 
Virgin, but gives him 400 more overpaid by the monk 
of St Mary, 69 f . 

rescues Will Stutly, III, 16. 

respect for women : would do no harm to any company 
in which there was a woman, III, 41 n., 57, 109, 228 ; 
will not suffer Little John to burn Kirklees (though 
the prioress has been his death), out of consideration 
for women, 105 f. 

his spite against the clergy, reasons for it, HI, 221, 228, 
230. 

stays with the king 15 months, sickens of the service, 
obtains permission to make a pilgrimage to a chapel 
at Barnsdale, remains in the greenwood 22 years, 
HI, 77 f. 

summoned by Queen Katherine to be of her side in a 
shooting-match with the king's archers ; wins for 
her, HI, 198-204, 206; is graciously treated, par 
doned, by the king, 200, 204. 

takes gold from the king's harbingers and presents it 
to the queen, III, 198, 200, 202. 

theories assigning him an historical character, HI, 43, 
56 f. ; a mythical, III, 47 f. 

turns fisherman, and takes a French ship, III, 211-13. 

will not dine until he has some guest that can pay for 
entertainment, III, 51, 56, 58, 66 f. 

will not eat or drink till he has seen a friar who, 
Scadlock says, will beat both John and Robin, HI, 
124. 

will not take God (Jesus), Peter, Paul or John as secur 
ity for a loan, but accepts the Virgin immediately, 
HI, 59. 

will not take small sums, or a man's spending-money, 
m, 58, 66, 75. 

a tune, HI, 145, 150 n. ; Bold Robin Hood, a tune, HE, 
198. 

Robin Hood and the Fifteen Foresters, tune, HI, 133 n. 

Robin Hood and Little John, a comedy, 111, 134. 



Robin Hood's bower, HI, 518 f. 

Robin Lyth, mistaken title of Ritson's, HI, 13. 

Robin's Tesment, I, 144 b ; Robin's Last Will, The, V, 

286 b. 
Robyn Hode in Barnysdale stode, mock song in The Four 

Elements, HI, 42 n. 

Rogutaja's wife, Esthonian saga, I, 124 n. 
Der Rohrstengel, tale, I, 125. 
Le Roi et le Fermier, play of Se*daine, V, 75. 
Le Roi et le Meunier, translation of a play of Dodsley's, V, 

75. 

Le Roi Hugon, by Nivelle de la Chausse*e, I, 283. 
Roig, the poet, I, 238. 

Roister Doister, play by Nicholas Udall, HI, 294. 
Roland, of the twelve peers, I, 277. 
Rond61fr, IV, 502 b. 
Rook hope, foray into, 111, 439 ff. 
Rosamonde and Elie de Saint-Gille, story of, I, 458 n. 
La Rose de Piniperle", tale, IV, 447 b. 
Rose, Sir James the, ballad, IV, 155 ff. 
Les roseaux qui chantent, tales, HI, 499 a ; IV, 447 b ; V, 

208 b. 
Rosemunda, Lombard queen of 6th century, relation of 

her story to ballad of Donna Lombarda, etc., V, 286 b, 

295 a. 

Rosette, ugly lady in Gantier's Conte du Graal, V, 289 b. 
Roswall and Lillian, A pleasant History of, V, 43-5 ; tales 

resembling, 45-57, 280 f. 
Rothes, house of, V, 247 f . ; house of the Rhodes, HI, 

433. 
Rowan-tree : spot where rowan-tree chest stands not affected 

by witchcraft, I, 83 f . 
Rune preservative of chastity, II, 506 a ; sleep induced by 

runes (charm), I, 28, 48, 55, 391 f. ; will controlled by 

runes, I, 362. 

Rusalka, Russian, gives riddles, I, 14 ; H, 495. 
Rymenhild, daughter of King Ailmar of Westerness, be 
loved of Horn, I, 188-90. 

Sacchetti, I, 406. 

Sachs, Hans. See Hans Sachs. 

Sad-der, Persian, H, 235. 

Sadko, story of, in Russian popular epics, H, 15, 510 a ; V, 

220 a. 
Sagas : Egils ok Asmundar saga, IV, 443. 

Fldamanna saga, H, 35 n. ; V, 275. 

Frib>j6fs saga, II, 376. 

Grfms saga loCinkinna, I, 292 f . 

GuU-p6ris saga, IV, 502 a. 

Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu, II, 35 n. ; V, 298 a. 

G6ngu-Hr<51fs saga, I, 393 ; H, 127 ; IV, 459 a, 502. 

Half s saga, I, 95 ; H, 15. 

HeiSreks saga, V, 8. 

Hemings J>attr, III, 17, 19 n. 

Hervarar saga, I, 405 ; II, 50 n., 127. 

Hjalmte'rs ok Givers saga, I, 307, 315, 489 b. . 

Hr61fs saga kraka, I, 290 n., 297, 393, 489. 

Hromundar saga, I, 67, 95. 

Karlamagnus saga, I, 275, and n. ; H, 39 f. 

Kristni saga, I, 96. 

Magus saga, I, 283 n. 

Marfu saga, I, 98 ; III, 52 n., 240. 

Mottuls saga, I, 258-60, 261 n. 

Olaf s saga helga, II, 127. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



495 



6laf s saga Tryggvasonar, III, 18, 19 n. 

Parcevals saga, I, 257 n. 

Ragnars saga loSbrdkar, I, 9 n. 

Samsons saga f agra, 1, 50, 259. 

Sturlaugs saga starfsama, II, 35 n. 

Svarf doelasaga, I, 96 ; II, 35 n. 

Sorla pattr, I, 94 n. 

piSriks saga, I, 49, 94 n. ; n, 35 n., 41 ; HI, 16 ; V, 

243 b. 

Tristrams saga ok Isondar, I, 98, 487. 
Vemundar saga ok Vfgaskutu, IV, 502 a. 
Vilkina saga, III, 16. 
Volsunga saga, I, 392 ; H, 127. 
Orvar-Odds saga, II, 50 n ; IV, 479 b. 
Sage (or parsley) hides the Virgin from. Herod, II, 8 n. 
La Sage-femme et la Fe*e, tale, V, 215. 
Saint Andrew, his legend, I, 14, and n., 484 b ; II, 495 b, 

507 a. 

Saint Anne, 1, 237 ; II, 379. 
Saint Bartholomew, I, 14, and n. 
Saint George, I, 487 n. ; II, 509 a ; called Our Lady's 

knight, III, 294, 297, 520 a ; IV, 499 ; V, 244 b, 297 b. 
Saint George play in Cheshire, V, 291. 
Saint James, Pilgrims of, legend, I, 236-9 ; miracles of, at 
tributed to San Domingo, 238. 
Saint Johannes Eleemosynarius, II, 235. 
Saint Mary's knot, III, 462 n., 465. 
Saint Olof, Swedish legend of, I, 95. 
Saint Oswald, IV, 463 b. 
Saint Serf, I, 14 n. 
Saint Stephen and Herod, I, 233 ff. 

Saint Stephen, patron of horses, a stable-groom in Swedish 
ballads, I, 235 ; his feast a great Horse Day, I, 235 n. ; 
this a continuation of heathenism, 236. 
Saint Stephen of Hungary and Saint Gunther, I, 239. 
Saint Tryphine, Breton mystery, V, 292 a. 
Saint Ulrich, Slovenian ballad, I, 14, and n. 
Saint Vicelin, II, 235. 

Saint William of Norwich, III, 241 a ; V, 297 b. 
Salman und Morolf, Solomon and Morolf, III, 122, 517; 

IV, 450, 463 b; V, 3 f . 

Salomon and Saturn, Anglo-Saxon, I, 2 n., 13 n. ; II, 507 a. 
Saltomi, Lord, and Auchanachie, ballad, IV, 347 ff. 
Salve. See Fairy salve. 

Samaritan woman, story of, blended with traditions con 
cerning Mary Magdalen and with that of The Cruel 
Mother, I, 228-30, 232 ; II, 501 b ; III, 502 b ; IV, 451 b ; 
with that of The Cruel Mother, without the Magdalen 
(Slavic), I, 230 f. ; III, 502 b ; IV, 451 b ; V, 288 a. 
Samson the Fair, saga, I, 50, 259, and n. 
Samson's, Solomon's, and Hiram's riddles, I, 404. 
San Domingo de la Calzada, Spanish legend, I, 238. 
Sangen om den Frikopta, Estlander's discussion of, IV, 

482 a; V, 231 a. 

Sant Oswaldes Leben, IV, 463 b. 
El santa nifio de la Guardia, III, 241 ; IV, 497. 
Santo Antonio e a Princeza, Portuguese legend, II, 513 a. 
Santo Stefano di Calcinaia, twentieth story of, II, 498 b. 
Sark. See Shirt. 
Saxo Grammaticus, I, 67, 94 n., 323 ; II, 14 f ., 127 ; III, 

16 f., 411 n. 
Scala Celi, III, 54. 
Scalachronica, 1, 261, 317 ; II, 19 n. 
Scathelock (in all copies of the Gest but a), Scadlock, Scar- 



lok, Scarlet, an original comrade of Robin Hood, and the 
most prominent after Little John, 1H, 56 f., 59 f., 66, 70, 
92, 99, 104, 124, 129 ; originally Young Gamwell (nephew 
of Robin Hood), according to late ballad, 146, 150 ; kills 
one of three giants and marries a princess, 150 ; finds his 
match, 169, 171 ; identified in a life of Robin Hood with 
Allen a Dale, 173 ; made the chief archer after Robin 
Hood, 197 n., 201. 

Schimong, Chinese emperor, V, 226 a. 

Eine schone und liebliche History vom edlen und theuren 
Ritter Galmien, II, 42. 

Die Schonste, Greek tale, I, 313. 

Schupp, Balthasar, I, 408. 

Scogin, The Jests of, I, 128 n. ; IV, 497 a. 

Scolding, reproaching, reviling of sprites and elves, I, 21, 
485 a; II, 496 b, 509 a ; IV, 440 b ; scolding or reviling 
will not be endured by the better sort of these, I, 485 ', 
IV, 440 b. 

Scolding woman too much for the devil, V, 107 f., 305 a. 

La Scomessa, Italian tale, V, 97. 

Scott. See under Family Names. 

Scott, Sir Walter (novels and poems), I, 210 ; II, 57, 227, 
234, 512 ; III, 43, 367 n. ; IV, 25, 106, 210, 218, 239, 
244 f., 450, 463 a; V, 72 n., 74, 160. 

Scroop, Lord, of Bolton, Henry, Thomas, Warden of the 
West Marches, IH, 462, 469 f ., 472-4 ; IV, 9. 

Seals (Finns) capable of casting their skins and taking 
human shape, II, 494; III, 518 ; IV, 495 a. 

Sebilla, Sibilla, romances of, II, 40, and n. 

Secrets revealed (sometimes after an oath of silence) to a 
stone, stove, a doll, a gelding, I, 488 a ; V, 48, and n., 
51 f., 56. 

Security : the Virgin as security for a loan, III, 51 f ., 59 
(62-6), 68 (249 f.) ; God for security, IH, 52 n., 53 f., 
519 a; IV, 497 a. 

Seductive music, horn, harp or song, 1, 15-17, 25, 28 b, 31-5, 
37 f., 44, 50, 55, 485 b ; IV, 441. 

Seneca, III, 306. 

Se'nece', Filer le parfait amour, I, 269. 

Sercambi, Novelle di, V, 97. 

Sermones Parati, V, 33. 

Serpolnica, I, 484 b. 

Service, fruitless, of seven years, for king's daughter, I, 
'204-6,255; V, 212 b. 

Serving man aspiring to match with an earl's daughter is 
strongly backed by his noble master, II, 443-5, 448-50, 
453. 

Seton, Bonny John, ballad, IV, 51 ff. 

The Seven Figures (or Beauties), Persian poem, I, 417. 

Seven Sages, Seven Wise Masters, I, 392; II, 511 b. 

Seyf El-Mulook, story of (Lane's Thousand and One Nights), 
H, 511 b. 

Seymour, Jane. See Jane, Queen. 

Shakspere, Cymbeline, V, 23 n. ; Hamlet, V, 201 n. ; Henry 
the Fourth, i, HI, 44 n. ; n, HI, 129; IV, 36; Henry the 
Sixth, HI, H, 181; King Lear, H, 240; V, 201; Merry 
Wives, I, 322 n. ; III, 129 ; Much Ado, V, 201 n. ; Peri 
cles, 1, 416 ; Richard the Third, II, 143 ; Taming of the 
Shrew, V, 201 ; Twelfth Night, IV, 507 a; V, 287 b. 

Shape, one by day, another by night, 1, 290, and n., 291, 295 ; 
IV, 454 a, 495 a; V, 39 f . 

Sheath and knife signifying mother and child, I, 183 f., 
186 ; V, 210. 

Shee an Gannon, IV, 479 b. 



496 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Sheet, sark, smock (for the dead), one half cambric, the 
other needle work, one side of beaten gold, the other 
needle work, one half silk, the other cambric, I, 506 ; II, 
358 f., 362, 366; IV, 471, 485. 

The Shepherd and the King, broadside ballad, V, 73. 

Shepherd's daughter (pretended) persists in marrying a 
knight whom the king has adjudged to her, II, 459-76 ; 
makes him think her a beggar's brat, carl's daughter, 
462-4, 466 f., 469-73, 476. 

Sheriff and outlaws (especially the Sheriff of Nottingham 
and Robin Hood), III, 26, 28, 57, 63-6, 70-3, 93 f., 97 f., 
100 f., 111-13, 117-19, 157, 180-7, 222-4. 

Ship, in a bad storm, promised that gold shall be her hire if 
she will behave well, gold nails for iron, IV, 379 f . ; V, 
276; silver and gold bolts driven in for iron and oak 
wanting, IV, 381 f. ; leaking badly, silken cloath and 
canvass stuffed in to calk her, II, 27; wrapped round 
with feather beds and canvass, or canvass, and pitched, 
II, 28 ; IV, 379-82 ; V, 276. 

Ships, intelligent and talking, IV, 376-80 ; V, 275 f . ; race 
of, forty-five, fifty-three, twenty-one ships, and all wrecked 
but one, IV, 378-82 ; V, 275 f. ; splendid ships, I, 72, 312, 
474 ; II, 13, 30, 217 f. ; HI, 340 ; IV, 472 ; V, 285 ; ships 
stopped or endangered ; sinful parties, or other persons 
determined by lot, being thrown into sea, or put out of the 
ship, or confessing, or vowing offerings, or a captive being 
released, the voyage proceeds, 1, 244-6 ; II, 13-16, 510 a ; 
IV, 452, 463 a ; V, 220 a, 288 a, 292 a ; ship stopped by 
serpents till a holy man whose instruction they desire 
shall be delivered to them ; he throws himself in, the ship 
moves on, II, 13 f. n. 

Shirt, custom of maid's making one for her betrothed, V, 
284 ; significance of a man's making such a request, 284 ; 
shirt demanded by Elfin Knight, I, 7 ; V, 284. 

Shoes slacked to run, II, 115, 177, 257, 313, 379, 395 ; IV, 
398 ; cast off to run, II, 125, 212, 287. 

Shooting from boy's (man's) head of apple, nut, chessman, 
coin, and similar feats, III, 16-21. 

Shooting under hand, III, 199, 202, 204. 

Shoulder, looking over the left shoulder, I, 100 (twice), 103, 
464, 490 (left collar-bane), 492 ; III, 259, 263 f., 339, 
368 f., 413, 465, 488 ; IV, 11, 13, 15, 17 f., 20, 52, 135, 
445, 518-20. (See V, 286 a.) 

Shovell, Sir Cloudesley (" Shawfield "), V, 147. 

Shrift saves a ship endangered by a storm, II, 15 ; sinner 
thrown overboard to save a ship taken to heaven by the 
Virgin for the shrift he has made, II, 16. 

Shukasaptati, Seventy Tales of a Parrot, I, 11 n., 12 n., 13, 
268 n., 270, and n. ; V, 289 a. 

Sibilla, wife of Charles the Great, suspected of unfaithful 
ness, various forms of the story, II, 40 f. 

Siddhi-Kiir, I, 402. 

Side, Armstrongs of the, especially Jock o the Side, HI, 
475 ff. 

Sidney's admiration of the song of Percy and Douglas, III, 
305. 

Le sifflet enchant^, Le sifflet qui parle, tale, I, 493 b ; II, 
498 b ; III, 499 a. 

Sigrdrtfumal, I, 392. 

SiguroarkviSa Fafnisbana, m, II, 127. 

Simon, Simond, Peter, a noble gunner employed by Lord 
Howard against Andrew Barton, III, 339, 341-5, 348-50 ; 
IV, 503, 505-7. 

Simon the Foundling, Servian hero, V, 295 a. 



Sinadab, story of, V, 12. 

Der singende Knochen, tale, I, 125. 

Das singeude springende Loweneckerchen, tale, I, 307 n. 

Sinkarib, Histoire de, et de ses deux Visirs, Persian tale, I, 

11 n. 
Sir Bevis of Hamptoun, romance, II, 499, 506, 513 ; III, 

520 ; the French romance, II, 511. 
Sir Broninge, knight, I, 210. 

Sir Eger, Sir Grahame, and Sir Gray-Steel, romance, I, 209. 
Sir Eglamour of Artois, romance, I, 209 ; II, 511 a. 
Sir Egrabell, I, 210. 

Sir Gawayn and the Green Knight, romance, I, 257 n. 
Sir Gowther, II, 303. 

Sir Hugh, ballad of A. Cunningham, II, 260. 
Sir Isumbras, romance, II, 513 a. 
Sir James the Ross, A Historical Ballad, by Michael Bruce, 

IV, 156. See Rose. 

Sir Olaf (Oluf), and the elf, I, 374-8 ; poisoned by the elf 
for inconstancy, 375 ; is run through with a sword for re 
fusing to consort with elves, 375; is struck by elf to 
whom he has declined to plight himself (being already 
betrothed) and dies in a day, 375 f . ; may choose between 
living with the elves and dying, 377. 

Sir Orpheo, Orfeo, romance, I, 216, 340, 504 a ; II, 128. 

Sir Perceval, English romance, II, 51. See Perceval. 

Sir Ryalas, I, 212 f. 

Sir Triamour, romance, II, 41 ; V, 176. 

Sir Tristrem, romance, I, 67, 317, 487 a; II, 127. 

Sisibe, wife of Sigmundr, falsely accused of adultery, II, 
41. 

Sister comes every Saturday to comb the head of a brother 
who has been transformed into a worm, 1, 315 ; the same, 
by sister changed to a mackerel, 316. 

Sister hunted to death by rival in love, V, 158. 

Sisters (sister) killed or maltreated by robbers who turn 
out to be their brothers, I, 171-7 ; Russian ballad, II, 
499 a. 

Skelton, John, Against the Scottes, Chorus de Dis, IV, 
499 a ; Colyn Cloute, V, 100 ; perhaps author of a Robin 
Hood pageant, III, 519 b. 

Skikkju Rfmur, or Mantle Rhymes, Icelandic, I, 259, 261 n., 
264 n. 

Skuin over de groenelands heicle, III, 502. 

Slangen og den lille Pige, Danish tale, I, 307. 

Slaughter in large numbers of relations of lady-love by 
lover : six or seven brothers and father and other kins 
men, I, 89 ; father, eleven brothers, seven brothers-in-law, 
91 ; father and six brothers, 92 ; six brothers, 94 n. ; father 
and seven brothers, 101 f. ; six or seven brothers, II, 170, 
and n. (eighteen thousand assailants, I, 91 ; fourteen of 
father's best men, I, 100, 108). 

Sleep, induced by charms, runes, I, 28, 48, 55, 391 f. ; by 
runes written on sheets of a bed, 391 ; by a letter inserted 
between sheet and coverlet, by an enchanted feather, by 
runes written on cushions, 392 ; by a soporific pillow, I, 
393 ; by sleep-thorns, -pins, I, 392 f. ; III, 506 ; IV, 459 ; 
by strewing broom-blossoms at a man's head and feet (on 
his neck), I, 394 f. ; by magic of some sort, V, 2 ; by 
music, see Music. 

Sleep : man in deep (unnatural) sleep cannot be roused by 
maid at a critical moment ; servant afterwards repeats to 
him what has occurred, I, 307, and n. 

Sleep you, wake you, the formula, H, 240, 513 a ; III, 514 a ; 

V, 201 b, 225 b. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



497 



Sleeping potion given to woman by lover to enable her to 

escape from her husband, or lover to carry her off, V, 

3 f., 6 f ., 280 ; sleeping potion taken by maid to enable 

her to escape to her lover, II, 358 (and evidently intended 

in other copies of the ballad, though not mentioned) ; 

given by friendly hostess, to save girl's honor, II, 356 b ; 

administered to a gallant who is to pass the night with a 

girl, I, 393 ; III, 506 b ; IV, 459 b. 
Sleeping under trees. See Trees. 
Slugobyl, Polish tale, V, 46 n. 
Small-maids Land, I, 259. 

The Smith and the Demon, Russian tale, I, 507. 
Solfager, Suolfar, King David's (Sir David's) wife, Solfot, 

V, 7 f., 280. 

Solomon and his wife, tales of, V, 2-4, 279. 
Solomon and Kitovras, V, 2. 

Solomon and Morolf , III, 122, 517 ; IV, 450, 463 b ; V, 3 f. 
Solomon and his queen, Russian, Servian, and German tale, 

V, 2f. 

Solomon and Saturn. See Salomon and Saturn. 
Solomon's riddles, I, 404. 
Solvi, IV, 502 a. 
Son of a king liberates a prisoner (prisoners) of his father ; 

the service is gratefully returned in a subsequent emer 
gency, V, 43-57. 
Song (Liedlein) von dreierlei Stimmen sung by one person, 

I, 34 ; V, 285 a. 
Song of the false knight (Halewijn = elf -knight) excites 

longing, I, 25 ff ., 485 ; V, 285. 

Song in ballad repeated, I, 478 ; V, 16, 51 f., 214 f., 218 f. 
Songs of the Ghilanis, Persian, II, 506 b. 
Soporific effect of music, I, 55 ; II, 137, 139 f ., 511 f. ; IV, 

18-21; V, 220 b. 
Sorla pattr, I, 94 n. 
Sorli, IV, 502 a. 

Souling, song so called, V, 291 a. 
Sovereignty, her will, is what a woman most desires, I, 290- 

295 ; V, 289 b. 
Sovereignty of Erin, given by a disenchanted hag to her 

deliverer, V, 289 b. 
Sower, Legend of the (miraculous harvest), II, 7-9, 509 f. ; 

III, 507 b ; IV, 462 b ; V, 220 a. 
Spectral or elvish knights, combats with, II, 56 f., 511 a; 

HI, 508. 

The Spectre Bridegroom, Cornish tale, V, 59, 64. 
Spell to recall a (dead) lover : boiling a dead man's head, 

bones, carcass in a pot ; burning a piece of the lover's 

clothing, or a cat, in a hot oven, V, 61. 
Spencer, Hugh, his (ballad) feats in France, HI, 275 ff. ; 

various historical Hugh Spensers, 276. 
Spenser, Fairy Queen, I, 267. 
Der Spiegel, of Meister Alswert, I, 267 n. 
Ein Spiel von dem Freiheit, I, 2 n., 415. 
Spiked barrel, punishment of rolling down a declivity or 

dragging in, II, 343 ; IV, 30 n., 32 ; V, 48. 
Ein Spil von einem Kaiser und eim Apt, farce, I, 407. 
Spirits, or malignant uncanny beings, baffled, by scolding, 

or by getting the last word, I, 20-22, 485 ; II, 496 b ; 

HI, 496 a; IV, 440 b. 
Spring, lady whose lover is absent is to look every day into ; 

if she sees his shadow, he is on the point of marrying an 
other, I, 192. 

Spring wells up where innocent maid's head falls, I, 172. 
Sprites, reviling or scolding of, an effectual way of baffling 

VOL. V. 63 



them, I, 21, 485 a ; H, 496 b ; will not be endured by the 

better sort of these, I, 485 ; IV, 440 b. 
Spumingen, Norse tale, I, 418. 
The Squire of Low Degree, romance, I, 255 ; II, 512 a ; 

HI, 501 a. 

S. S., signature of No 150, HI, 218 f. 
Staffans-skede, diversion of Swedish boys at feast of St 

Stephen, I, 234 n. 

Stanley. See under Family Names. 
Stephen and Herod, legend of, combined with legends of 

the infancy of Jesus, I, 233. 
Stephening, I, 234 n. ; V, 291. 
Stepmother (witch) transforms maid (generally) to hideous 

shape, tree, serpent, fish, wolf, I, 178, 290-3, 297, 307, 

309 f., 312 f. ; II, 503-5 ; V, 214 ; two maids, sisters, V, 

214 f. ; maid and brother, I, 290 n., 296, 315 f., 336 f. ; 

two maids and brother, I, 306 ; poisons child, I, 163-6 ; 

IV, 450 a ; V, 209 a (see I, 154 f.). 
Stev-stamme, I, 7 n. 
Steven, Sir, I, 293, 295. 
Steward, tutor or other servant, charged with the care of a 

young prince, or man of rank, forces a change of clothes 

and relative positions as a condition of drawing him up 

from a well into which the young noble had been let down 

by the legs (or of not drowning him in a river at which 

he was drinking), V, 44-7, 49, 54 ; the same of a princess 

and her maid, 47. 

T& 2To(x*?j"<*, Romaic ballad, V, 21. 

The Story of Conall Gulban, West Highland tale, HI, 507. 
Straparola, I, 401 ; II, 143 ; V, 46, 96. 
Strawberry Castle, II, 118 f., 121, 286, 442, 447, 452 ; IV, 

466 f. 
Stripping of maid by pretended lover who has carried her 

off, I, 31-3, 39 f., 42 f., 50, 56 f., 59, 433, 486 b, 488 ; H, 

496 b, 497; HI, 496 f. ; IV, 442. 
Stuart. See under Family Names. 
Stumps, fighting on, after the legs had been shorn at the 

knee, and fighting after other mutilations, III, 306, 310, 

313 ; IV, 502 ; V, 244, 298 a. 
Sturlaugs saga, II, 35 n. 
Stutely, Will, one of Robin Hood's troop in later ballads, 

HI, 135 ; rescued by Robin Hood from hanging, 185. 
Substitution of maid-servant (sister) for bride to conceal 

unchastity, I, 64-8, 70, 73 ; HI, 497 b ; substitution of 

maid-servant (niece) for mistress in cases of wagers 

against the mistress's virtue, V, 22-4, 27. 
Subterfuges of woman questioned as to evidences of her 

misbehavior, V, 88-95, 303-4 (comic) ; H, 157 f., 164, 

512 a; III, 509 a; IV, 468 a (serious). 
Siidai Margan, Siberian-Turkish tale, I, 486. 
Suddene, kingdom of Murry, father of Horn, I, 188, 190. 
Sulayman Bey and the Three Story-Tellers, V, 97. 
Svarfdoelasaga, I, 96 ; II, 35 n. 
Svend Bondes Sp0rgsmaal, V, 205. 

The Swepstacke, The Sweepstakes, name of a ship, V, 133. 
Swift, Tale of a Tub, II, 441. 
Sword laid in bed between man and woman, II, 127, and n., 

130, 135, 511 ; III, 509 a ; V, 292 b ; reduced sportively 

to straw, II, 127 n. ; III, 509 a ; V, 292 b. 
Sword, whetted on straw, grass, a stone, the ground, wiped 

or dried on sleeve, grass, before using, II, 131, 139, 159, 

161 f., 166, 169, 185, 243 f., 249, 256, 261, 266, 273,305 f., 

380, 390, 393, 396, 483, 492; IV, 491; V, 37, 226 f., 

235. 



498 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Sword and ring laid before maid ' to stick him wi the brand 
or wed him wi the ring,' II, 469 ; IV, 493 ; V, 28, 238. 

Swords, Adelring, Sudevind, and others of superexcellent 
quality, II, 34, 35, and n., 50. 

Swords, two in a scabbard, II, 133, 135, 245, 251, 256, 258; 
IV, 477. 

Sworn brethren, IV, 146 f. 

Syntipas, V, 13 f. 

Table, drawing a, explained, V, 304 a. 

Table jumped, kicked or thrown over, under the effect of 
exciting events or information, table furniture broken to 
flinders or hurled into fire, etc., I, 65, 217, 457 n., 465, 
472, 475 f., 481, 502 a, b ; II, 35, 94, 127 f., 128 n., 132, 
205, 271, 273, 312 f., 511 b; III, 509 a; IV, 316, 345, 
462, 508 ; V, 219, 271, 287 b, 292 b. In Slavic ballads, 
bride jumps over four tables (and knocks over a fifth) ; 
husband, hearing news, jumps nine, I, 502 b ; II, 511 b ; 
HI, 509 a ; person jumps seven and touches the eighth, V, 
287 b. 

Tales cited without title : 
Albanian, V, 47. 
Armenian (= King John and Bishop), IV, 459 b ; tale or 

ballad, I, 490 a. 

Breton, III, 504 a, 506 b, 507 a. 
Esthonian, I, 308. 

Gypsy (Transylvanian, etc.), IV, 459 b; V, 60. 
Lithuanian, II, 499 b, 511 a. 
Magyar, IV, 459 b ; V, 60, 216 a. 
Romaic, I, 97, 337, 401, 437, 461 n. ; H, 127, 511 a ; V, 

39. 

Roumanian, I, 85, 401. 

Slavic, 1, 124 f., 308, 401 f ., 417, 484 a, 499 b, 507, 513 a ; 
III, 52 n., 513 b ; IV, 439 b, 440 b, 459 b; V, 2 f., 6, 
46 f., 60, 74, 107, 241, 279. 

Talismans: ring with stone which by change of color, or 
breaking, signifies unfaithfulness of giver, I, 192, 201-7 ; 
II, 318 f. ; V, 210 f. ; by rusting or dimming shows that 
giver is dead, I, 201 ; ring which protects the wearer from 
all bodily harm, assures superiority in fight, doubles 
strength, keeps from sickness and captivity, 1, 189, 190 f ., 
201 n. ; V, 287 b ; gold-embroidered handkerchief, gold 
melting shows that giver is dead, I, 201 ; ring, sword, 
chain, which will stanch blood or prevent blood from 
being drawn, II, 61, 318 f. ; V, 183 f. ; the protective 
power of the ring conditional upon the wearer when in 
danger thinking of his leman, I, 189 ; with his keeping 
faith, 190 f . 

Talking Bird, Singing Tree, and Yellow Water, Arabian 
tale, I, 311. 

The Talking Dish, Chinese drama, I, 126. 

Tarn o Lin, Tom a Lin, Tammy Linn, etc., popular verses 
about, I, 340 ; III, 505 b. 

Tarlton's Jests, IV, 495 a. 

Tarn Wadling. See Tearne Wadling. 

Tasks and problems, difficult or impossible, I, 7-13, 15-20, 
418, 484 f. ; II, 495 f. ; III, 496 a ; IV, 439 f . ; V, 205 f. ; 
impossible tasks propounded by man as condition of 
love or marriage, offset by others preliminary, equally 
difficult, proposed by woman, I, 7 f., 15-19, 484 f. ; II, 
495 f. ; III, 496 a; IV, 439 f. ; V, 205 f., 284 (an Elphin 
knight gives the tasks, I, 15-17 ; an auld man, 18 f. (I), 
who represents the devil ; a dead lover, IV, 439 f., 
and the devil expressly, V, 283 ; the maid would have 



been carried off had she failed). Similar requisitions, 
not conditional to marriage, met in the same way, I, 
10, 13 ; in Babylonian Talmud, V, 284 ; similar per 
formances, ostensibly undertaken, to show the absurdity 
of a demand, I, 10, 11 ; an assertion offset by another of 
the same extravagance, 13 ; tasks in which no one of the 
only possible procedures is allowed, I, 8 f ., 418 ; problems 
ingeniously solved, I, 12 f . ; tasks propounded by one 
king to another, king rescued from attack or from a for 
feit by the sagacity of his minister or minister's daughter, 
1, 11 f. ; wife won by doing riddling tasks, Siberian-Turk 
ish tale, I, 418 ; dead lover propounds tasks to his true- 
love ; if she had not " answered " well she must have 
gone away with him, IV, 439 f. 

Taubenliebe, Albanian tale, I, 338. 

Tausend und eine Nacht, I, 11 n., 12, 269 ; V, 13. 

Tay, water of, I, 127, 129 ; II, 21, 24, 96, 314, 462, 465, 471 ; 
HI, 271 ; IV, 98, 100, 143 f ., 193. 

Tchinavar, the bridge, n, 235. 

Tearne Wadling, I, 294. 

Tears destroy the peace of the dead, n, 228, 234-7, 512 f . ; 
HI, 513 b ; IV, 474 b ; V, 62, 294. 

Tegau Eurvron, wife of Caradawc Vreichvras, I, 265. 

Teind (teene), tribute : teind taken of fairies by the fiend 
at stated periods, I, 328, 339, 342, 344-6, 350, 353 ; III, 
505 a ; IV, 456, 458 ; V, 215 b. 

Telfer, Jamie, ballad, IV, 4 ff. 

Tell, William, III, 16 f ., 18 n. ; IV, 496 b ; his apple-shot, 
in, 13, 21 n. ; his name, 19 n., 21 n. 

Tennis-balls in the ballad of Henry V, authorities, III, 
321 f. ; parallel in Pseudo-Callisthenes, 322. 

Testament, oral, or last wishes, of dying person, will good 
things to friends and ill things to the author of death, I, 
143-50, 153-6, 158-60, 162 f ., 166, 496-501 ; H, 498 b ; 

III, 499 ; IV, 449 ; V, 208 f . ; without animosity to au 
thor of death, I, 144, 156 ; other testaments, where there 
is no occasion for animosity, I, 144, 496 b ; V, 291 b ; 
parodies of these testaments, I, 144 b ; III, 499 b ; V, 
208 b, 286 ; bequest of sorrow to wife and children and 
a curse to mother by a man who had been instigated by 
her to kill brother or father, I, 169 f . 

Testament of fox, robin, ass, dog, etc., I, 144 b ; V, 208 b, 
286. 

Tests (molten lead or gold, burning with red-hot iron, cut 
ting off little finger, etc.) to determine the reality of a 
woman's apparent death, II, 359, 361, 364-7 ; III, 517 b ; 

IV, 485 ; V, 3, 6 ; other tests, III, 517 b. See Chastity. 
Thales solves riddles, I, 13 n. 

Thedel von Walmoden, poem and tale, I, 199 n. 

Ther wer three ravns, a tune, IV, 126 n., 454. 

Thetis, Proteus and Nereus made submissive by maintain 
ing a firm hold through their various transformations, I, 
337, 338 n. 

TheVenot, I, 240. 

Thirty pieces for which Jesus was sold, legends concerning, 
I, 243 f. ; history of, before birth of Jesus, 243. 

>ionks saga, I, 49, 94 n. ; II, 35 n., 41 ; HI, 16 ; V, 243 b. 

Thorn of Lyn, a dance, I, 336. 

Thomas, Gospel of, II, 7. 

Thomas Cantipratensis, Bonum Universale, II, 235, 513 a. 

Thomas of Erceldoune, Thomas the Rhymer, I, 317-19, 
321 f ., 335, 340 ; his prophecies, 317 ; Thomas of Ercel 
doune and Ogier le Danois, 319, and n., 320 n., 340 ; V, 
290 a. 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



499 



Thor, I, 283 n., 419; Thor's Hammer, I, 298. 

Thor, Tor, Herr, see Tor. 

Thorkill, his voyage, and visit to Guthmund, I, 323 ; II, 14 ; 
his ships stopped till three men are delivered to expiate 
an offence committed, II, 14 f . 

Das Thranenkriiglein, tale, II, 512. 

Three cries allowed a maid about to be murdered, I, 32, 37, 
39, 41 f., 47, 487 b ; V, 207, 285 a. 

Three horses, successively ridden in an emergency, of which 
the first two give out, the third holds out, II, 116 f., 
120 f., 309 n., 313 ; V, 228, 262 (all three burst, II, 212). 

Three hundred and sixty-five children at one birth, as pun 
ishment for slandering a woman who had borne twins, II, 
67 f., n. ; IV, 463 b. 

The Three Ladies of Leithan Ha', ballad of Cunningham, 
1,142. 

The Three Questions, a drollery, I, 418. 

J>rymskvioa, I, 298. 

Thurston, Irish king, takes Horn into his service, offers 
Horn Reynild, his daughter, I, 189. 

Thyme song, V, 258. 

TibuUus, II, 236 n. 

Time, illusion as to duration ot, I, 321, and n., 328 ; V, 
290 a. 

Tiran le Blanc, romance, I, 308. 

Titurel, Der jiingere, I, 98, 267. 

Der todte Schuldner, tale, HE, 501. 

Das Todtebeindli, tale, I, 125. 

Toilets, women's, in ballads, I, 31, 54, and n. ; n, 183-6, 
188-91 ; IV, 312 f ., 316 f . ; V, 301 b. 

Tokens sent a lady to legitimate a messenger : mantle and 
ring, H, 265 ; glove and ring, 266 ; gloves, ring, mantle, 
267 ; mantle, sark of silk (sleeve sewed by her), 268 f. ; 
mantle, smock (sleeve sewed by her), 270 ; mantle, silken 
sark (sleeve sewed by her), 272 ; sark, shirt, shift of 
silk, (with sewing by her), 379, 384 f., 389, 391, 395 ; IV, 
488 f. ; shirt from lady to man, II, 394 ; IV, 491. As to 
shirts as tokens, see V, 284. 

Tokens to identify man claiming to be husband or lover, or 
woman claiming to be true-love, II, 215 f ., 218-20, 222-5 ; 
III, 510 f . ; IV, 473 ; V, 225 ; demanded by mother of 
woman professing to be her daughter, V, 65 n. 

Tokens sent keeper of a prisoner as warrants of king's 
authority, king's comb, queen's knife, HI, 452 (IV, 515) ; 
king's glove, with his hand-writing, III, 455 ; V, 300. 

Toko's apple-shot, HI, 16. 

Toilet's painted window, III, 45. 

Tom Hickathrift, V, 226. 

To-names among the border clansmen, III, 461 n. 

Top-castles in ships, IH, 337 n., 340, 344, 349 ; IV, 504. 

Tor, Thor, representative of Horn in a Danish ballad, I, 
193 ; rival, 193 f. 

Torello, Messer, in Boccaccio's tale, I, 197 f., 459. 

Torrent of Portugal, romance, H, 510 b ; V, 297 b. 

La Tourandot, play by Carlo Qozzi, I, 417. 

Towie, Castle or House, burning of, III, 424 f ., 427 f . 

T. R., signature of No 122, B a, III, 116 ; of two copies 
of No 133, IH, 156 ; of No 169, B a, III, 371 (the last 
an absurd pretension). 

Transformations : maid transforms herself (or threatens to 
transform herself) into various shapes to escape the pur 
suit of a lover, who matches her at every step and finally 
prevails, I, 399-401, 402 f. ; II, 506 b ; HI, 506 b ; IV, 
459 b ; V, 216 a, 290 f. ; youth and maid (youth) pursued 



by sorcerer transform themselves variously, and finally 
escape apprehension, I, 401 b ; HI, 506 f . ; IV, 459 b ; 
apprentice to a sorcerer, or fiend, pursued by his master, 
transforms himself variously and at last takes on a 
stronger shape and destroys his adversary, I, 401 f . ; III, 
507 a ; IV, 459 b ; V, 290 f . 

Transformations, after extraordinary concessions, of hideous 
woman, into a beautiful lady, I, 289-93, 295-9, 507 a ; 

II, 502 b ; IV, 454 a ; V, 289 b ; of ugly old man to 
beautiful youth, V, 213. 

Transformations of step-children (generally to hideous and 
formidable shapes, to tree, serpent, fish, wolf) by malicious 
stepmother, I, 178, 290-3, 296 f., 306 f., 309 f ., 312 f., 
315 f . ; II, 503-5 ; V, 214 f. ; linden-worm, snake, admit 
ted to maid's bed turns into a king's son, I, 298; II, 
502 b ; IV, 454 a ; other similar cases, V, 289 b ; witch 
transforms young man who refuses to be her leman into 
an ugly worm, I, 315. 

Transformations, successive, of Tarn Lin by fairies to pre 
vent his disenchantment, I, 342, 344-9, 352 f., 355, 508 ; 

III, 505 ; IV, 457 ; successive transformations of young 
girl, apparently of the same nature, I, 336 f . ; of nereid 
to avoid union with man, I, 337 ; of Thetis, Proteus, 
Nereus to avoid doing man's will, I, 337, 338 n. 

Transformations: disenchantment by a kiss, three times 
given (mostly) to a repulsive or formidable creature, or 
by the same, or by touching such, I, 307-11, 313, 338 n. ; 
H, 502 b (partly), 504 f. ; IH, 504 a ; IV, 454 a ; V, 214, 
290 a ; Queen of fairies restores young man who has been 
transformed into a worm by stroking him three times on 
her knee, I, 315; see also Transformations, 2d and 3d 
paragraphs, above. 

Transformations from and to human shape require immer 
sion in milk or water, I, 308, 338, and n., 339 n., 342, 344 ; 
H, 505 b ; III, 505 b ; V, 39 f. (Cf . holy water, I, 346, 
351.) 

Traugemundslied, I, 2 n. 

I tre Indovinelli, Turandot tale, I, 417 n. 

Trees, special, dangerous to lie under, on account of taking 
by fairies, I, 216, 340, 350 ; H, 505 b ; III, 505 b ; IV, 
455 f. ; V, 290. 

Des Tresces, fabliau, V, 22 n. 

Le Tre*sor et les deux Hommes, La Fontaine, V, 13. 

Trespassing in a wood : pretence that a maid has been doing 
this, I, 41, 341, 343, 345 f., 349, 360, 367, 369, 450-3 ; HI, 
504 ; IV, 456 f. (a commonplace). 

Die treue Frau, tale, I, 268. 

Tristan, Sir Tristrem, I, 67, 98, 198 n., 264, 265 n., 284, 317, 
487 a; II, 127; V, 33. 

Tristan le Le"onois, II, 510 a. 

Tristrams saga ok I'sondar, I, 98, 487. 

Les trois Freres, tale = Le Sifflet qui parle, I, 493. 

Troth asked back by lover of true-love before he is put to 
death, II, 178 ; given back to dying man by maid, V, 
168 ; asked back by dead lover, II, 227, 229-33. (The 
process, straking on a wand, II, 230 ; touching three times 
on the breast with a silver key, 232 ; smoothing her hand 
on his heart, 233; striking on the heart with a white 
wand, V, 168.) Troth asked back by dead father of son, 
II, 512 b. 

True Thomas, I, 323 f ., 326, 508 ; IV, 455-7. 

Truls och hans barn, Swedish tales ( = No 14), I, 501 b. 

Tsar and deserter, Russian tale, V, 74 f. 

Turandot, I, 417, and n., German schwank, 418 ; V, 291 a. 



500 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



Des Turcken Vassnachtspiel, I, 437. 

The Turke and Gowin, I, 289 n. ; II, 505 ; HI, 55. 

Turpin, Archbishop, I, 277. 

Tutbury, bull-running at, III, 214, 217. 

Tuti-nameh, Tiitf Nama, I, 268 ; V, 100 f . 

The Two Fail- Sisters, ballad of Cunningham's, I, 119 n. 

Two mares, story of the, I, 11 n., 12 ; V, 284. 

Tweed, water of, I, 129, 131, 134-6 ; III, 308, 311 ; IV, 103. 

Twins an indication of incontinence in the mother, II, 67, 

and n., 511 a. 
Tyne, water of, II, 464, 314 ; HI, 299, 477, 480-3. 

Udivitel'nyj Muzicek, The wonderful Peasant, Russian tale, 

V, 281. 

Unco knicht= Devil, I, 5 ; cf. V, 283. 
Unearthly beings, peril of intercourse with them, I, 322-5, 

327 f . ; H, 505 ; IV, 455, 458. 
Unequal marriages, II, 441-55 ; IV, 172 f., 522 ; V, 255 ; 

IV, 292-9, V, 270 ; IV, 403-8 ; V, 277 f . 

Unnatural connection, I, 185 f., 444-54 ; III, 500 f. ; IV, 
450; V, 210. 

Vafpnionismal, I, 13, 283 n., 404 

Valerius Maximus, III, 503. 

Van den verwenden Keyser, Jan van Hollant, tale, I, 408 n. 

The Varietie, comedy by the Duke of Newcastle, II, 243 ; 

in, 176. 

Das Vasnachtspil mit der Kron, a farce, I, 266. 

Vega, Luis de la, I, 238, 239 n. 

Vemundar saga ok Vigaskiitu, IV, 502 a. 

Der verkgrte Wirt, rhymed tale, V, 23 n. 

Die verwiinschte Prinzessin, German tale, I, 13. 

Vesle Aase Gaasepige, Norwegian tale, I, 66, 268. 

II Viaggio di Carlo Magno in Ispagna, I, 275 n. 

Vidushaka, story of, I, 200. 

Die vierzig Veziere, The Forty Vezirs, Turkish tales, 1, 402 ; 

V, 13, 97. 

Vigoleis with the Gold Wheel, Danish romance, I, 269 n. 

Vila, Servian, gives riddles, I, 14. 

Vincent of Beauvais, Speculum Historiale, I, 229, 237 ; II, 
13 ; III, 52 n. ; Speculum Morale, I, 405 f. ; Speculum 
Naturale, I, 339 n. 

Virgil, ^Eneid, III, 306 ; Eclogues, I, 415 n., 437 a. 

Virgil, the philosopher, I, 267, 270, 392 ; II, 502. 

Virgilius, English story, II, 502. 

The Virgin as security for a loan, III, 51 f., 59 (62-6), 68 
(249 f.) ; the Virgin finds mint, broom, chick-pea un 
friendly (as to concealing her) during the flight into 
Egypt ; sage, parsley, juniper, friendly ; the swallow is 
friendly, the partridge, quail, beetle, hawk are unfriendly, 
n, 8n.,509f.; Ill, 507 b. 

Les Visions d'Oger le Dannoys au royaulme de Fairie, I, 
319 n. ; V, 290 a. 

Der Vogelritter, tale, V, 39 n. 

Volch. See Vol'ga. 

Le Voleur des Crgpes, French-Breton tale, III, 497 a. 

Vol'ga, Volch, in Russian bylinas, V, 295 a. 

Volsunga saga, I, 392 ; H, 127. 

Voluspa, I, 21. 

Vom schlauen Madchen, Lithuanian tale, I, 10. 

Vom singenden Dudelsack, Sicilian tale, I, 125. 

Vom weissen und vom rothen Kaiser, Wallachian tale, I, 
11 n. 

Vom weissen Wolf, Lithuanian tale, I, 307 n. 



Vom wilden Manne, Bohemian tale, V, 46. 

Von dem Brembergers End und Tod, German meisterleid, 

V, 32. 
Von dem Konig von Spanien und seiner Fran, German 

story, I, 268. 
Von dem Madchen das an Weisheit den Kaiser tibertraf , 

Servian tale, I, 9. 
Von einem Edelman welcher einem Abt drey Fragen anfge- 

geben, 1594, comedy, I, 408. 
Von zwein Kaufmannen, rhymed tale by Konrad von 

Wurzburg, V, 23. 
Vows of the Heron, V, 292 b. 

Wade, Weland, and Mimir Smith, I, 401 n. 

Wager, to win a woman's favor, of a man's lands against her 
brother's head, IV, 383-6 ; V, 276 f . ; wager of his head 
by a squire against a knight's lands that the squire will 
win the knight's wife, V, 25-8 ; wager against a woman's 
preserving her chastity (or dignity of character), strong 
evidence against the woman, she vindicates herself, V, 
21-5. 

Wager's comedy, The Longer thou livest the more foolthou 
art, 1, 340, 390. 

Waldis, Esopns, I, 407 ; El, 208. 

Wallace, Sir William, IU, 43, 109, 211, 266-74 ; V, 242 f. ; 
distinguishes himself on the sea, III, 266 ; aye a woman's 
friend, III, 273 ; disguises himself as a woman, III, 273 f . ; 
as a beggar, 271, 273 ; Blind Harry's Wallace, H, 265 f. 

Walls and mouseholes, man who had killed twelve maids 
would be able to pass through, I, 34 n. 

Walric the Heron, comrade of Hereward, III, 179. 

Walter of Aquitaine, I, 95 n. ; 106 f., and n., 493 a ; his 
worn-out charger, H, 441, 444 f., 450, 454 ; IH, 276 f. ; 
V, 243 b. 

Waltharius (Walter of Aquitaine), 1, 94, and n., 95 n., 106 f. 

Waly waly, gin love be bonny, song, IV, 92 f. 

Wamphray, Lads of, ballad, III, 458 ff. 

Wand, silver, cast up by Northumberland as he sails away 
from Loch Leven, III, 413 ; wand with lavrocks sitting, 
singing, thereon, 1,201 f., 205, 503, as a present. See 
Artificial curiosities. 

Wand, straking troth on. See Troth. 

Wariston, Laird of, murder, IV, 28 S. 

Was ist das Schonste, Starkste und Reichste ? tale, I, 9. 

Water : lady forced to wade, steps in to the knee, the mid 
dle, the chin, I, 55 f. ; forced to swim (on horse), I, 112, 
114 ; woman (pregnant) follows knight (who is on horse 
back) through deep water, swimming or wading, II, 86, 
88-90, 92, 94-7, 99, 459, 461 f., 464-6, 468, 471, 474 f., 
476 ; III, 508 b ; IV, 493 ; V, 221, 237 ; goes into the 
Clyde to rescue drowned lover, IV, 190 ; water comes to 
knee, middle, pap (neck), II, 88-90 ; knee, pap, H, 94, 
97 ; ankle, knee, chin, H, 96 ; IV, 190. 

Wax child to deceive woman who is delaying parturition, I, 
82, 84, 86. 

Ways, subterranean, to heaven, paradise, elfland, purga 
tory and hell (some or all), I, 324 f., 328, 359 ; IV, 454 f., 
458. 

Wearie's Well, I, 55 f. 

Webster, John, Dutchess of Malfi, TV, 117. 

Wedding at kirk-door, II, 131. 

Wedding procession : bride insists on having four-and- 
twenty men before her, twenty (four-and-twenty?) on 
each side, and four-and-twenty milk-white doves to fly 



INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 



501 



above her head, H, 132 ; bride is promised four-and- 
twenty men to ride between her and the wind, four-and- 
twenty maids between her and the sun, four-and-twenty 
milk-white geese to blow the dust off the high way with 
their wings, II, 315 ; Fair Annie going to her lover's 
wedding has four-and-twenty knights by her side and four- 
and-twenty maids, as if she had been a bride, II, 183 ; 
followed in some copies by four-and-twenty milk-white 
swans to blow the dust off the highway, II, 195 a ; four- 
and-twenty gray goss-hawks to flaff the stour from the 
road, four-and-twenty milk-white doves flying above her 
head and four-and-twenty milk-white swans her out the 
gate to lead, IV, 470. 
The Weddynge of Sir Gawen and Dame Ragnell, romance, 

I, 289 n., 291 n., 298, 301, 315. 

Wee man throws a huge stone a long way, I, 330-2, 334. 

Der weise Mann, Armenian tale of the King John and the 
Bishop type, V, 291. 

Der weise Mann und seine drei Sohne (Tausend und erne 
Nacht), V, 13. 

Der weisse, der rothe, und der schwarze Hahn, V, 294 a. 

Well : prince let down into a well by servant, who will not 
draw him up unless he consents to exchange positions, V, 
45-7, 281. 

Wells, at Carterhaugh, I, 341, 343, 347 (Lady well) ; IV, 
457 ; Richard's well, II, 148, 150 ; St Anton's, Anthony's 
well, IV, 93, 105 ; St Evron's well, I, 146 ; St Johnston's 
wall, II, 21 ; Usher's well, II, 238 ; Wall o Stream, wells 
of Slane, 1, 387 f . ; Wearie's well, 55 ; Well o Spa (Aber 
deen), IV, 286. 

Werewolves, III, 498 a. 

Wernhart von Strattlingen, Swiss tale, I, 197 ; II, 499 b. 

Westerness, Kingdom of Ailmar, father of Rymenhild, I, 
188. 

Westmoreland, Earl of, Charles Neville, III, 417 ; takes 
refuge in Scotland, but, finding himself unsafe, goes to 
sea to seek his fortune, 419; encounters Don John of 
Austria, and is taken by him to Seville ; the queen makes 
him captain over forty thousand, to war against the hea 
then soldan, 421 ; fights with the soldan and strikes off 
his head ; the queen offers to marry him, but he informs 
her that he has a wife ; she has him written down for a 
hundred pound a day, 422 f. 

Whale swallows the Magdalen, V, 288 a. 

What women love best, or most desire, Arthur or other to 
say rightly, or suffer, I, 289, 291, 292, 293 f. 

When ? answers indicating never : when crows are white, 
swans are black, stones float, etc., 1, 168, 437, 441-3, 448 f. ; 

II, 507 b ; in, 499 b ; 507 b ; IV, 94-6, 98-103 ; V, 173 f ., 
218. 

White willow wand on the mast sign of a merchant vessel, 

in, 340, 344, 349 ; IV, 504. 
White Ladies (German), I, 336, 338 n. 
The Whole Prophecie (of Merlin, Thomas Kymer, etc.), I, 

317. 

The Widow's Son, Gaelic tale, III, 506. 
Wie drey lantzknecht vmb ein zerung batten, tale in Pauli, 

III, 208. 

Wife evades the inquiries of her jealous husband by ex 
plaining away suspicious circumstances, V, 88 ff., 281, 
303 f. 

Wife pays 10,000 crowns to save her husband from the con 
sequences of an amour, IV, 356-8. 

The Wife lapped in Morrel's skin, V, 105. 



Wife wrapped a sheep's skin, etc., and beaten, V, 104 ff., 
304 f. 

Wigalois, romance, I, 257 n., 269 n. ; HI, 515 b. 

Wigamur, romance, I, 269. 

Wikel = Fikenild, Horn's false friend, I, 192. 

Wilkina saga, III, 16. 

Will, her, (sovereignty) is what a woman most desires, I, 
290-2,295,299; V, 289 b. 

William and Margaret, an Old Ballad, David Mallet, H, 
200; V, 294 a. 

William of Malmesbury, II, 37 ; V, 298 a. 

William of Orange, his gab and its performance, I, 277 f. 

Willoughby, Hugh, a comrade of Hugh Spencer, III, 279 f. 

Wine called for by girl about to be executed, to drink to 
her well-wishers and they to drink for her, HI, 384 f . (cf. 
388, 19, 20, 391, 13). 

Wisakhd, the history of, I, 11 n. 

The Wise Heykar, I, 12. 

Wit-combats with little or no story, I, 2 n., 7, 8, 13 ; HI, 
496 a; IV, 439. 

Witch can twist a rope out of flying sand, lay sun and moon 
flat on the earth, turn the whole world round about, 
twine a string out of running water, I, 83 ; witch offers 
gifts to persuade young man to be her lenian, I, 314. 

Witch of Berkeley, V, 298 a. 

Witchcraft imputed to noble ladies in Scotland in the 16th 
century, III, 410 f . ; professed by Lady Douglas of Loch 
Leven, 412. 

Witches blow horns, I, 314 f. 

De witte SwSne, tale, III, 501. 

The wolf in England and Scotland, I, 434 ; HI, 2, 4 f . ; IV, 
495 b. 

Wolfdietrich, I, 182, 196, 201 n. ; H, 127 ; III, 507 a, 515 b. 

Woman irregularly wived discovered to be the sister of the 
bride of an attempted union, II, 66-70, 72 f., 75-7, 79, 
82 ; IV, 463 b ; V, 220 b ; woman (leman, waif woman) 
who expects to be discarded wishes her seven sons were 
seven rats, and she a cat, or seven hares and she a hound, 
and she would worry them all, II, 70 f., 75, 79, 81 (corrup 
tions, 73, 77) ; so of woman who has borne seven bairns to 
a man living hi a wood (hill-man), I, 371. 

Woman offers to fight for man, IV, 433, 444 f . 

Women have long hair and short wits, I, 200 n. 

Women, jury of, IV, 13 (3). 

Wonderland or paradise, I, 27, and n., 28, 41, 46, 49, 89 f., 
112 (?), 178, 182 (st. 1), 487 a ; II, 496 f. 

Wood to come to see one king put another to death (cf . Bir- 
nam wood), V, 3. 

Woodcock, beware thine eye, proverb, HI, 199, 201. 

Wooing of Etain, Irish tale, its correspondences with Sir 
Orfeo, II, 500. 

Wrennok, III, 13. 

Wrestling-match : prize, ram, ram and ring, III, 52 ; bull, 
horse, gloves, ring and pipe of wine, III, 63. 

The Wright's Chaste Wife, English rhymed tale, I, 268 ; 
V, 100. 

Wulric the Heron, comrade of Hereward, UI, 179. 

Wuthering Heights, V, 203. 

The Wyfe lapped in Morrelles skin, rhymed tale, V, 104. 

Wyssenhere, Michel, poem on the Duke of Brunswick, I 
195. 

TSjnavalkya's Law-book, H, 235. 
Yarrow, I, 246; IV, 160 ff., 178 ff. 



502 INDEX OF MATTERS AND LITERATURE 

Ympe tree, 1, 178,216,340; II, 505 b; V, 290. See Apple- Young Beichan and Hind Horn, parts of the principal 
tree ; Trees, special. actors in one inverted in the other, I, 455. 

Yorkshire dialect in an American ballad, V, 296 a. Young Thomlin, an air, I, 336. 

Young Beichan : relations of his story to those of Henry Ywaine and Gawin, romance, 1, 306. 
and Reinfrit of Brunswick, the good Gerhard, Messer 

Torello, etc., I, 459. Zeyn Alasnam, Arabian tale of, I, 269. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



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