(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The English drama; its rise and development to the closing of the theaters (1640)"

Digitized by tine Internet Arcliive 

in 2008 witli funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



littp://www.arcliive.org/details/englislidramaitsrOOpricricli 



1 



University pJ the State of New York Subject no 

Extension Department 822 

Albany, N. Y. 

Syllabus ao Jan. 1893 



THE ENGLISH DRAMA 

ITS RISE AND DEVELOPMENT TO THE CLOSING OF 
THE THEATERS (1640) 

By Thomas R. Price, LL.D., Professor of the English Language and 
Literature, George Edward Woodberry, Professor of Literature, and A. V. 
Williams Jackson, Adjunct Professor of the English Language and Litera- 
ture, Columbia College 

The course will be supplemented by special class lectures held on other days to 
be appointed. This extra work will give fuller details, present authors not treated 
in the regular lectures, and will show the connections between the periods. 

1 In preparing the syllabus for this introductory series all attempt at 

exhaustive treatment has been intentionally avoided; brevity and 
simplicity have been the chief aim. 

2 References at the end of each lecture have been purposely limited 

in number. The choice has been influenced by a variety of 
reasons; the practical view has not been lost sight of. It is de- 
sired that the student should acquire method by making his own 
bibliography for each subject. A convenient list to serve as a 
beginning follows lecture 10. 

3 In every case the student is advised, as far as possible, to read the 

plays themselves, and to form his own judgment before turning 
to the opinion of others upon the works. A general knowledge 
of each author's life, period and works is, at the outset, of course, 
essential. 

4 Topics for papers given under each lecture have, in every case, 

been limited to three. In preparing a paper on any topic sug- 
gested, the student is requested to use a 7x8 inch page; to write 
only on one side and to leave ih inch margin on right for com- 
ments; to number each page; to add on the last page, in tabular 
form, an outline of points treated in paper; to write name and 
address, with date. Above all, clearness and brevity of state- 
ment, logical method of treatment and sequence in the arrange- 
ment of paragraphs are requested. 
E95n-Je93-2So 



2 UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SYLLABUS 

Lecture i 
RISE OF THE ENGLISH DRAMA 

Drama in general 

Its nature and importance. 
Question as to origin. 

History of the drama 

Dramatic literatures of the world. 
Greece, Rome, Medieval Europe, etc. 
Position of England's drama. 

Oldest dramatic compositions in England 

No Anglo-Saxon drama. 

English Mysteries, Miracles and Moralities. 

Dramatic representation 

Religious festivals. 
Pageants, processions. 
Scenic effects, etc. 

Cycles of Early English plays 

York, Towneley, Chester, Coventry, etc. 
Details. 

Moralities and Interludes 

Nature and character, the Castell of Perseverance. 
Heywood's Interludes. 

« 
Summary 

Importance of these early productions. 



ENGLISH DRAMA 3 

References 

Texts, see general list under L. T. Smith, Stevenson, Wright, Halliwell, Pol- 
lard, York Plays, etc. 

Encyclopaedia Britannica (gth ed.) art. Drama (Ward) v. 7, p. 391-96, 

412-15- 

Golden. English drama, p. 1-28. 
Pollard Miracle plays, p. 1-125. 
Ward. Dramatic literature, p. 1-53. 

Topics for papers 

1 Sketch of the history of the drama to its rise in England. 

2 Presentation of a pageant (place, procession, costumes, 
properties, etc.) 

3 An early play, or cycle of early plays, (treating plot, 
character, relation to biblical sources, originality, merit, 
etc.) 

Lecture 2 
THE PREDECESSORS OF SHAKSPERE 

Beginnings of the regular drama 

Transition to the drama proper. 
Impulse of the classics. 
Comedy, tragedy, history. 

Rise of English comedy 

Nicholas Udall's Ralph Roister Doister. 
The comedy Gammer Gurtons needle. 
Other early comedies. 

Earliest tragedies 

Norton and Sackville's Gorboduc. 
Other early tragedies. 

Chronicle plays 

Historical subjects. 

Foundation laid by these dramas. 



4 UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SYLLABUS 

Immediate predecessors of Shakspere 

Kyd, Lyly, Greene, Peele, Nash, Lodge and Marlowe. 
Debt of the English drama to these men. 

Summary 

Estimate and importance. 

References 

Texts, see general list under W. D. Cooper, Dyce, Fairholt, Hazlitt, Ward. 
Golden. English drama, p. 34-73. 
Minto. English poets, p. 224-56. 
Ward. Dramatic literature, p. 88-270. 

Topics for papers 

1 Influence of the classics upon the early English drama. 

2 An early English comedy or tragedy (plot, characters, 
dramatic treatment, etc.) 

3 Life and works of one of the immediate predecessors of 
Shakspere. 

Lecture 3 
MARLOWE 

Marlowe's personal career 

His life, surroundings and his opinions. 

How far he represents the spirit of the renaissance. 

The play in Shakspere's time 

1 Change from the Latin tradition. 

2 Increased value of character and plot. 

3 Style of blank verse. 

Literary qualities of Marlowe 

1 As poet. 

2 As playwright. 

3 As dramatist. 



ENGLISH DRAMA 5 

Plays of Marlowe 

Analysis and criticism. 

Summary 

Marlowe's historical position. 

References 

Dowden. Essay on Marlowe {in his Transcripts and studies). 
Lowell, Marlowe {see his Old English dramatists, p. 28-54). 
Marlowe. Works; ed. by A. A. BuIIen. 

Separate plays {in Clarendon press ser.) 

Ward. Dramatic literature, p. 173-203. 

Topics for papers 

I Compare Marlowe's Edward II with Shakspere's Richard 
'2 Compare Marlowe's Jew of Malta with Shylock. 
3 Marlowe: He was the herald that dropped dead in an- 
nouncing the victory in whose fruits he was not to share. — 

Lowell, 

Lecture 4 
SHAKSPERE AND HIS TIMES 

Elizabethan England 

Historical sketch. 

Life, character, manners and customs. 

Shakspere and his era 

Life and surroundings. 

Stage in Shakspere's day 

Theaters and audiences. 
Production of a play. 

Shakspere and his work 

Divisions of his plays. 

Dramatic value, language and style. 



6 UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SYLLABUS 

Method of study. 
Editions of Shakspere. 

Later contemporaries 

Ben Jonson, Webster, Chapman, Dekker, Thomas Hey- 
wood, Middleton, Beaumont and Fletcher, Massinger 
and Ford. 

References 
Text: Globe Shakespeare; Cambridge Shakespeare. 
Editions: Dyce, Knight, Collier, Grant White, Furness, Clark 
and Wright, Rolfe. 

Commentaries: Gervinus, Dowden, Hazlitt, Hudson, Ulrici, 
Furnivall, Fleay. 

Life: Hallivvell-Phillips, Ingleby; also, Stubbes' Atiatomy of abuses 
and Harrison's Description of England {New Shakspere society). 

Topics for papers 

1 The theaters and audiences in Shakspere's time. 

2 Shakspere and his contemporaries. 

3 Historical sketch of Shaksperian study in the 19th 
century. 

Lecture 5 
SHAKSPERE'S DRAMATIC CONSTRUCTION 

Dramatic construction 

Aristotle's statement of laws of dramatic construction. 
Inadequacy of statement when applied to Shaksperian 

drama. 
Gustav Freytag's Technik des dramas. 

Ethical foundation of dramatic structure 

Connection between dramatic poetry and ethics. 

Dramatic problem and dramatic situation 

Illustrations from Shakspere. 



ENGLISH DRAMA 7 

Dramatic emotion and dramatic action 

Freytag's definition. 

Dramatic unity 

. Discussion. 

Creation of climax-scene 

Illustration of Shaksperian method. 

Action and emotion 

Two forms of dramatic action. 

Management of the dramatic emotion: (i) by climax, 
(2) by antithesis. 

References 

Aristotle. Poetics (translation in Bohn's librarjO- 
Encyclopsedia Britannica, art. Poetry (Watts), v. 19: p. 256-73. 
Freytag. Technik des Dramas. 

Price, T. R. Construction of A Winter's Tale {see Shakespeariana, 
V. 7: p. 195-207). 

Topics for papers 

1 Dramatic construction and its importance as a study. 

2 Connection between dramatic poetry and ethics. 

3 How Shakspere treats the climax-scene. 

Lecture 6 
PARTS OF THE SHAKSPEREAN DRAMA 

Character 

Dramatic delineation of character. 
Shakspere's methods of delineating character. 

Scene 

Construction of the scene. 



8 UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SYLLABUS 

Parts of the action 

Five essential parts of the dramatic action: protasis, 

epitasis, climax, catabasis, catastrophe. 
Scene of ' opening action.' 
Scene of * dramatic reverse.* 
Unity of the five parts. 

Summary 

Shakspere as a dramatic artist. 

References 
Aristotle. Poetics (translation in Bohn's library). 
Encyclopjedia Britannica, a7-t. Poetrj' (Watts), v. ig, p. 257-73. 
Freytag. Technik des Dramas, ch. 2, § 2. 
Ward. Dramatic literature, v. i, p. 10-16. 

Topics for papers 

1 Shakspere's methods of delineating character. 

2 How a scene is constructed. 

3 Discussion of the five essential parts of the dramatic 
action. 

Lecture 7 

LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST. STUDY IN DRAMATIC 
CONSTRUCTION 

Grouping of the characters 

Symmetrical groups. 

Succession of scenes and scenic effects 

Eight shiftings of scene. 

Development of action 

Bad arrangement of acts. 

Division by protasis, epitasis, climax, catabasis, catastrophe. 



ENGLISH DRAMA 9 

Protasis 

In eight stages of action. 
Merits and defects of protasis. 

Opening of action 

Point at which this is to be placed. 

Epitasis 

In eight stages of action. 
Defects of epitasis. 

Climax 

Beauty of climax-scene. 

Catabasis 

In eight stages of action. 
Defects of catabasis. 

Catastrophe 

Action sinks into rest. 

References 

Same as given for Lecture 5. 

Topics for papers 

1 Grouping of the characters in Love's labour's lost. 

2 Vivid coloring of the scenes. 

3 Climax-scene of the play, and arrangement, in relation 
to each other, of epitasis and catabasis. 



10 UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SYLLABUS 

Lecture 8 

ROMEO AND JULIET, EXAMPLE OF DRAMATIC 
CONSTRUCTION 

Introduction 

Predominance of romantic feeling over dramatic form. 
Meaning of climax-scene, 3:5, 1-58. 

Problem and situation 

The dramatic problem and the dramatic situation chosen 
by Shakspere in this play. 

Protasis 

Protasis complete in nine stages of action. 
Scene of opening action, i: 5, 91-107. 

Epitasis 

Complete in 12 stages of action. 

Climax 

Culmination at 3: 5, 1-58. 

Scene of dramatic reverse, 3: 5, 37-234. 

Catabasis 

Complete in 12 stages of action. 
Examples of emotional antithesis. 
Examples of tragic irony. 

Catastrophe 

Complete in four stages of action. 

Conclusion 

Shakspere's progress in constructive skill from time of 
Love's labour's lost to time of Romeo and Juliet, 



ENGLISH DRAMA II 

References 

Same as given for Lecture 5. 

Topics for papers 

1 Significance of the dramatic problem of Romeo and 
Juliet and how Shakspere has dealt with it. 

2 Character of Mercutio. 

3 Lyrical passages of Romeo and Juliet. 

Lecture 9 
HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH MASQUES 

The masque as a branch of dramatic literature 

Nature and character defined. 

The song, dance, scene, dialogue, fable. 

Development of the masque 

The masque on the continent, specially in Italy; carni- 
vals, processions, masques. 
Intrpduction into England. 

The masque in England 

Popularity as a court entertainment from the time of 
Queen Elizabeth to Charles i. 

Manner of production, stage-machinery, costumes, costli- 
ness. 

Inigo Jones as architect and Ben Jonson as writer of 
masques. 

The antimasque 

Origin, growth and connection with masque. 

English writers of masques 

Masques incidentally introduced by Shakspere into his 
plays. 



12 UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SYLLABUS 

Masques of Ben Jonson, Beaumont, Fletcher, Dekker, 

Ford, Shirley, Carew. 
Milton's famous masque of Comus. 

Summary 

Interest in these performances. 
Influence of Ben Jonson's masques. 

References 

Collier. Annals of the English stage, 
Symonds. Predecessors of Shakespeare. 
Ward. English dramatic literature, p. 82, 587-95. 
Warton. History of English poetry, v. 2, p. 319. 

Topics for papers 

1 Plays of Shakspere in which the masque incidentally is 
introduced. 

2 Masques of Ben Jonson. 

3 Milton's Comus, a mask. 



Lecture 10 

SUCCESSORS OF SHAKSPERE. EVOLUTION OF THE 
LATER DRAMA 

Characteristics of a decadent period 

Tendency to elaboration, complexity and detail after 
Shakspere. 

Modes of elaboration 

1 Plot becomes overlaid with incident; striving after 

novelty and unusual effects. 

2 Characters become romantic, picturesque, conventional. 

3 Situations selected are extreme, novel, unlikely. 

4 Emotion becomes more affected. 

5 Diction grows rhetorical, eloquent, sententious. 



ENGLISH DRAMA I3 

Beaumont and Fletcher as an illustration 

Question of romantic beauty. 

Webster as an illustration 
Question of crime and pain. 
' Miscellaneous plot.' 

Massinger and Ford 

Question of conventionality. 

Principles of literary expression 

What art affords. 

References 

Texts. Beaumont and Fletcher ed. by Dyce; Ford ed. by Gifford, revised 
by Dyce; Massinger ed. by Cunningham; Webster ed. by Dyce. 

Encyclopaedia Britannica, art. Beaumont and Fletcher; Ford; 
Massinger; Webster. 

Golden. English drama, p. 110-53. 

Stephens, L. Essay on Massinger, see his Hours in a librarj', 
p. 1-49. 

Swinburne, A. C. John Webster {see 19th cent., 19:861-81). 

Topics for papers 

1 Beaumont and Fletcher and their works. 

2 Characteristics of Webster as a dramatist. 

3 Resume of the present course on the English drama. 



14 UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SYLLABUS 



APPENDIX 

Besides the regular class work after each evening lecture, the following subiects 
were dealt with in special supplementary lectures held on other days appointed. 

Class lecture i 
CHESTER CVCLE OF MIRACLE PLAYS 
Early accounts of the Chester plays. Question of authorship. 
Question of sources. Manuscript copies of the Chester plays. Pro- 
duced in Whitsun-week (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday). Reading 
of the banns. Contents and analysis of the Chester cycle. Estimate 
of their merit. 

Class lecture 2 
MORALITIES, INTERLUDES, EARLIEST ENGLISH COMEDY 
Morality play defined. Performance of the morality Castle of Perse- 
verance (Pollard, p. 197). Plot, characters, moral. Other moralities. 
Interludes of John Heywood. The four P's, or the Palmer, Pardoner, 
'Potecary and Peddle}-. Transition to the regular drama. Earliest 
English comedy. Palph Roister Bolster. Name. Date (before 155 1). 
Author (Nicholas Udall). Outline of plot. Source of plot (compare 
Plautus' Miles Gloriostis, Braggart soldier). Language, style, versifi- 
cation. Dramatis personse. Analysis of plot. Estimate of play. 

Class lecture 3 
GORBODUC, EARLIEST ENGLISH TRAGEDY 
Earliest English tragedy. Authors of Gorboduc (Norton and Sack- 
ville). Performance (Christmas festivities, 1561, Inner temple). 
Outline of plot. Source of story (Geoffrey of Monmouth's chronicle). 
Choice of subject. Division of work by authors (Norton, first three 
acts; Sackville, last two acts). Language, style, versification (blank 
verse). Argument (dumb show, chorus, etc.). Success of the play. 
Its publication (pirated). 

Class lecture 4 

WORKS OF MARLOWE 

Marlowe's characteristics as dramatist and poet. Marlowe's life 

and works. His style (metaphors, similes, imagery). Versification 

(Marlowe's 'mighty line'). Selections from Tamburlaine and Faustus. 

Marlowe's Jew of Malta and Shylock. 



ENGLISH DRAMA 15 

Class lecture 5 
METHODS OF SHAKSPERIAN STUDV 
Life of Shakspere. Chronological study of his works. Reading 
plays in groups (comedies, tragedies, histories). Cycles of plays 
(British cycle: Lear, Macbeth, Cynibeline; Roman cycle, Italian, etc.) 
Character studies (Shakspere's portrayal of kings, of young men, 
of children, etc.) Study of sources (Plutarch, Holinshed, etc.) 
Historic studies. Literary, esthetic, linguistic study. Minute 
examination. Cursory reading. 



Class lecture 6 
MERCHANT OF VENICE, EXTERNAL STUDY 
The play. Text (first and second quarto). Date (between 1594- 
98). Choice of theme (the Jew in medieval times). Character groups. 
Outline of plot. Possible sources. 

Class lecture ^ 
MERCHANT OF VENICE, INTERNAL STUDY 
Two stories interwoven (the love story and the bond story). Minor 
episodes (Jessica's elopement, etc.). Dramatic construction (culmi- 
nation of plot in fine climax in the third act, the dramatic center of 
the play). Trial scene. Fifth act. Estimate of the play. 



Class lecture 8 
HAMLET AND SOME FAMOUS HAMLETS 
Hamlet as a drama. Sources of the story (Saxo Grammaticus, de 
Belleforest). Early allusions to a play on the subject of Hamlet. 
Text of the play. Relation between first and second quartos. Pro- 
duction of Hamlet. Importance of actors' interpretation. Famous 
Hamlets of the stage. 

Class lecture 9 
MILTON'S MASQUE OF COMUS 
Milton's two masques {Arcades, Comus). Name Comus. Occasion 
of this masque (Earl of Bridgewater, 1634). Milton and Henry 
Lawes. Characters in Comus. Threefold shifting of scene. Con- 
struction (climax). Estimate. 



l6 UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SYLLABUS 

1 Class lectu7-e lo 

CLOSING OF THE THEATERS, 1642 
After Shakspere. Dramatists: Thomas Heywood, Beaumont and 
Fletcher, Webster, Chapman, Massinger, Ford, Shirley, etc. De- 
cadence of the drama. Hostility of the Puritans to the stage. 
Prynne's Histnornastix. Closing of the theaters, 1642. Summary 
and conclusion. 



LIST OF AUTHORITIES REFERRED TO 

Abbott, E. A. Shakespearian grammar. S. N. Y. Macmillan, 
$1.50. 

Archer, W. "Webster, Lamb and Swinburne (see New rev. 8: 
q6-io6.) 

Aristotle. Rhetoric and poetics. N.Y. Macmillan, $1. (Bohnlib.) 

Beaumont and Fletcher. Works; ed. by Alexander Dyce. 2 v. 
O. N. Y. 1S78. Appleton, $5. 

Brink, Bernhard ten. Early English literature; tr. by W. C. 
Robinson, v. 2. N. Y. Holt, $1.60. 

Craik, G. L. English of Shakespeare; ed. by W. J. Rolfe. Bost. 
1886. Ginn, $1. 

Coleridge, S: T. Lectures and notes on Shakespeare and other 
English poets, including Mr Collier's transcript of the lectures of 
1811 and the Bristol lectures of 1813; ed. by T. Ashe. N. Y. Mac- 
millan, $1. (Bohn lib.) 

Collier, J. P. English dramatic poetry . . . and annals of the 
stage. Ed. 2. 3 v. Lond. 1879. Bell, 70s, 

Dodsley, Robert, comp. Select old English plays ; Ed. 4. enl. 
with notes by W. C. Hazlitt. 15 v. Out of print. 

Doran, J : Annals of the English stage. 3 v. O. Lond. 1887. 
Nimmo, 54s. 

Dowden, Edward. Shakespeare. N. Y. Am. Book co. 35c. 
An admirable little introductory book. Contains also a bibliography. 

Shakespeare ; a critical study of his mind and art. D. N. Y. 

n. d. Harper, $1.75- 

Transcripts and studies. O. Lond. 18S8. Paul. 12s. 

Elze, K. Biography of Shakespeare ; tr. by L. Dora Schmitz. 
N. Y. Macmillan, $1.50. 

Fleay, F. G. Shakespeare manual. Ed. 2. S. N. Y. Macmillan, 
$1.25. 

Ford, J : Works ; ed. by W : Gifford. 3 v. O. Lond. 1869. 
Toovey, 36s. 



ENGLISH DRAMA I7 

Freytag, Gustav. Technik des dramas. Lpz. 1886. Hirzel, 5m 

Furnivall, F. J. Introd. to Leopold Shakspere. Q. Lond. 1889. 
Cassell, 3s. 6d. 

Gervinus, G. G. Shakespeare commentaries; tr. by F. E. Bunnett. 
Ed. 5. O. N. Y. 1877. Scribner, $5.25. 

Greene, Robert and Peele, G. Dramatic and poetical works; ed. by 
Alexander Dyce. N. Y. 1861. Routledge, $3.50. (Old dramatists.) 

Golden, W. Brief history of the English drama. N. Y. 1890. 
Welch, Fracker and Co. 90c. 

Halliwell-Phillips, J. O. Outlines of the life of Shakespeare. 
2 V. N. Y. iSgo. Longmans, $6. 

Harrison, W: Description of England. 4 pts. Lond. 1877-87. 
(New Shakespeare soc.) Out of print. 

Hase, K. A. Miracle plays and sacred dramas; tr. by A. W- 
Jackson. O. Bost. 1880. Houghton, $3. Out of print. 

Hazlitt, W: Lectures on the dramatic literature of the age of 
Elizabeth. N. Y. Macmillan, $1. 

Hudson, H. N. Shakespeare; his life, art and characters. 2 v, 
Bost. 1888. Ginn, $4. 

Ingleby, C. M. Shakspere hermeneutics. O. Lond. 1875. 
Paul, 6s. 

Jonson. Ben. Works ; ed. by W : GiflFord. New ed. 1861. O. 
N. Y. Routledge, $4. (Old dramatists and poets.) 

Lamb, Charles. Specimens of English dramatic poets of the time 
of Elizabeth [with notes and extracts from the Garrick plays] N. Y. 
Macmillan, |i. (Bohn lib.) 

Tales from Shakespeare; ed. by A. Ainger. i8mo. N. Y. 

Macmillan, $1. (Golden treasury ser.) * 

Lilly, J : Dramatic works. 2 v. D. Lond. 1858. Reeves and 
Turner, 6s. 6d. 

Lowell, J. R. Old English dramatists. Bost. 1893. Houghton, $1. 

Ludus Conventriae, a collection of mysteries formerly represented 
at Coventry ; ed. by J. O. Halliwell-Phillips. The Shakespeare 
soc. 1843. 

Marlowe, Christopher, Doctor Faustus and Greene's History of 
Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay; ed. by A. W. Ward. New ed. S. 
N. Y. Macmillan, $1.60. (Clarendon press ser.) 

Edward H; ed. with introd., notes etc. by O. W. Tancock. S. 

N. Y. Macmillan, 75c. (Clarendon press ser.) 

Works; ed. by Alexander Dyce. O. N. Y. 18S7. Rout- 
ledge, $2.50. (Old dramatists.) 

ed. by A. H. Bullen. 3 v. D. Bost. 18S5. Hough. 

ton, $9. (English dramatists v. 1-3.) 



iS UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SYLLABUS 

Massinger, Philip. Works; ed, by Cunningham. O. Load. 1872:. 
Chatto and Windus, 6s. 

Milton, John. Comus, a mask; ed. by W. Bell. N. Y. 1890. 
Macmillan, 40c. 

Minto, W: Characteristics of the English poets. Bost. 1S90. 
Ginn, $1.50. 

Chapters on Dramatists before Shakespeare, Shakespeare and Shakespeare's suc- 
cessors. 

Moulton, R. G. Shakespeare as a dramatic artist. D. N. Y. 
Macmillan, $1.50. 

Norton, T : and Sackville, T : Gorboduc, in Shakespeare soc. 
pub. Lond. 1847. Sup. to Dodsley"s Old plays, v. 3, p. 92-160. 

Peele. G. Works; ed. by A. H. Bullen. 2 v. O. Bost. i8S8. 
Houghton, $8. (Eng. dramatists, v. 15, 16.) 

Price, T. R. Construction and types of Shakespeare's verse as seen 
in Othello. N. Y. 188S. (Shakespeare soc.) Out of print. 

Pollard, A. W. ed. English miracle plays, moralities and inter- 
ludes. Specimens of the pre-Elizabethan drama ; with introd., notes 
and glossary. D. N. Y. Macmillan, $1.90. 

Ransome, C Short studies of Shakespeare's plots. O. N. Y. 
Macmillan, $1. 

Shakespeare, W : Works ; ed. by Clarke and Wright. Globe ed. 
N. Y. Macmillan, .$1.25. 

ed. by J : P. Collier. 6 v. O. Lond. 1858. Whittaker, 

80s. Out of print. 

ed. by Alexander Dyce. 7 v. S. N. X. 18S5. Holt, $7. 

ed. by H. H. Furness. 8 v. O. Phil. 1888-90. Lip- 

pirtcott, %\ ea. 

ed. by Charles Knight. 3 v. S. N. Y. 1883. Rout- 
ledge, $3.75- 

ed. byW: Rolfe. 40 v. N. Y. Harper. 56c. ea ; or 

in 20 V. $25. 

ed. by R : Grant White. Riverside ed. 6 v. Bost. 

Houghton, |io. 

ed. by W. Aldis Wright. Cambridge ed. 9 v. O. 

N. Y. Macmillan $3 ea. 

For bibliography (Tedder) jy'<? Encyclopsedia Britannica, art. Shakes- 
peare, V. 21, p. 768-71. 

Sharp, T. Dissertation on the pageants or dramatic mysteries 
anciently performed at Coventry. Coventry and Lond. 1825. 

Stephens, L. Hours in a library. Lond. 1879. 

Stubbes, Philip. Anatomie of abuses. 2 v. O. Lond. 1S81. 
(New Shakespeare soc.) Out of print. 



ENGLISH DRAMA I9 

Symonds, J: A. Shakespeare's predecessors in the English drama. 
N. Y. Scribner, $6.40. 

Taine, H. A. History of English literature. N. Y. Holt, $1.25. 

Tha)'er, W. R., ed. Best Elizabethan plays [six dramas]. Best. 
1S90. Ginn, $1.40. 

Towneiy mysteries; ed. by Joseph Stephenson. Lond. 1836. J. 
B. Nichols and son. (Surtees soc). Out of print. 

Udali, Nicholas. Ralph Roister Doister in Shakespeare soc. pub. 
Lond. 1847. (Sup. to Dodsley's old plays, v. 3, p. 1-89.) 

Roister Doister; ed. by E: Arber. S. Birmingham, [Eng.] 

1S69. E: Arber, 50c. (Eng. reprints no. 17.) 

Ulrici, Hermann. Shakespeare's dramatic art; tr. with additions 
and corrections by the author by L. Dora Schmitz. 2 v. N. Y. 
Macmillan, $1 ea. (Bohn lib.) 

Ward, A. W. History of English dramatic literature to the death 
of Queen Anne. 2 v. O. N. Y. Macmillan. (New ed. in pre- 
paration.) 

Old English drama. Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, Greene's 

Friar Bacon. Ed. 2. S. N. Y. Macmillan, $1.60. 

Warton, J : History of English poetry, v. 2. O. Lond. 1871. 
Tegg. Out of print. 

Webster, J : Works ; ed. by Alexander Dyce. O. N. Y. 1885. 
Routledge, $3.50. (Old dramatists.) 

York plays. Ed. with introd. and glossary, by Lucy Toulmin Smith. 
O. N. Y. Macmillan, $5.25. 




TC T»TTTl C!! T" 



14 DAY USE 

RETURN TO DESK FROM WHICH BORROWED 

LOAN DEPT. 

This book is due on the last date stamped below, or 

on the date to which renewed. 

Renewed books are subject to immediate recall. 

REC D LD 



JflN3 '64 -10 AM 



M^'' 



^ 



».k«w U k^O 



N0W.19*6A^apM/^PR^P 



M, 



^ 



«^ 



"<^C'D LD 



M5 '65 -9P.il 



JAN 5 1966 3^ 



REC'D 



gEC30-65-gPM 



LOAN DEPT. 



APR 2 6 J9G8 6 9 
R^CTD LP 



498^ 



LD 21A-40Tn.-4,'63 
(D6471sl0)476B 



General Library 

Uaiversity of California 

Berkeley 



1 



'W 



M 



P 



VB 



i78)5 



ll'^^l-'> 




THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY