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Full text of "The English spelling book"

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{*? * -. ^ 



V> 



♦ 
4 




Delightful Task! to rear the tender T/ionght, 
To teach the young Idea how to shoot, 
To pour the fresh Instruction o'er the Mind, 
To breathe th' enlivening Spirit, and to fix 
The generous Purpose in the plowing breast, 

Thomson. 



BBS 


As&M 




THE 

ENGLISH SPELLING-BOOK, 

ACCOMPANIED BT 

A PROGRESSIVE SERIES 

Easy and Familiar Lessons, 

intended as 

AN INTRODUCTION 

TO 

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 



By WILLIAM MAVOR, LL.O. 

RECTOR OF 8TONESFIELD; VICAR OF HURLEY; 

CHAPLAIN TO THE EARL OF 1IOIRA; AUTHOR OF THE BRITISH NEPOtj 

NATURAL BISTORT FOR SCHOOLS, UNIVERSAL SHORT-HAND, 

&c* &c« &c> 



Two Hundred and Seventeenth Edition, Revised and Improved* 



LONDON: 

*. 

PRINTED FOR LONGMAN, HURST, REES, ORXE, AND BROWN, 
PATERNOSTER-ROW ; AND TO BE HAD OF ALL BOOKSELLER* IX TOWN 
, ' AND COUNTRY. 

WWtafuRandWxralattowaneetoSchooki 



PRICE MGHTEEXFENCX, BOUND. 
1818. 



\ 



OTHER WORKS BY DR. MAVOR, 

For (he Use of Schools ■> 
Which may be had of all Booksellers. 



I. THE BRITISH NEPOS, or LIVES of ILLUSTRIOUS BRITONS who 
have bten distinguished by their virtues, talents, or remarkable 
advancement in life ; written on the obvious principle, that example is 
nwreforcibk and more seductive than precept. With engravings. Price df. 

II. SELECT LIVES of PLUTARCH, abridged for the use of Schools, con- 
taining the examples of the gr eatest Characters of Greece and Rome. 
Price 5s. bound. 

III. THE ELEMENTS of NATURAL HISTORY, containing popular de- 
scriptions of Animated Nature, with EngravingB of two hundred of the 

. principal subjects. Price 7«. bound. 

IV. CLASSICAL ENGLISH POETRY, consisting of afl the best short 
Pieces contained in the works of the British Poets, with some Originals. 
Price St. 6d. bound. 

V. A UNIVERSAL SYSTEM of SHORT HAND WRITING, by means 
of which that useful art may be taught in Schools, and acquired in a few 
lessons. Price 7*. 6<L boards. 



Adapted to precede and accompany this Spelling-Book. 

1. Pelham's London Primer, sewed, 6d. 
?. Ditto, ditto, with the Collects and Catechisms, 
half bound, 1*. 
• 3. PELHAto's Parent's Catechism, 1/. 

4. Blair's Reading Exercises, 2s. 6<L 

5. Aikin's Poetry foe Children, 2* 



'~'o 



i 

» 



\ 



i , i ■ ite^aMBfcwJIMtf^BWaafcta^UjrifcwwaN 



Ttomst mismamlSoat, Primers, Wt*~<kuegaM, Tori. 



PREFACE. 



The parts of this Spelling-Book, comprising elementary 
knowledge of peculiar importance, and which should be coin* 
mitted to memory before the child is ten years old, are the 
three Spelling Tables of Proper Names in the ! 08th and foU 
lowing pages; the definitions of the Arts and Sciences begin* 
ning in page 120; the list of Countries and their chief Cities 
in page 124 and the following pages to \WJ; the Pence, Mul» 
tiplication, and other Tables, at pages 151 and 1 52 ; and Old 
definitions of the Parts of Speech, with the short Syntax, in- 
pages 141 to 143. In giving these articles as tasks, the 
Editor recommends that they should always be divided into 
small portions, and on no occasion b* made of such length a# 
to create fatigue, or distress the Pupil. 

The Church Catechism, the two short Catechisms by 
Dr. Watts, and the Social Catechism of Mr. Barrow, as weu 
as the Prayers and the pieces of Poetry, should be com* 
mitted to memory as the understanding enlarges, and the 
capacity to read improves. The list of resembling words 
at page 11 6; the Stops and Marks at page 1 47; the French 
and Latin Words and Phrases at pages 147 and 148; the 
Abbreviations which follow these; Dr. Franklin's Advice, 
in page 106; the Moral and Practical Observations at page 
102; and the Survey of the Universe at page 131; may 
be intermixed with other studies, according to the discre- 
tion of the judicious Tutor. 

When the pupil has made 6ome progress in this work, 
he will be qualified to proceed to Blair's Reading Exercises, 
and .from thence to the Class Book and British Nepos. 

It was a remark of the Publisher, (to whom British youth 
are under singular obligations for furnishing them with many 
valuable opportunities of improvement,) when he pressed the 
execution and plan of this work on the Editor, " That a 
Spelling-Book frequently, constitutes the whole library of a 
poor child, unless- when charity puts a Bible into his hands; 
and it consequently ought to contain as great a variety of 
useful matter as the price will permit." The compilation 
.has been formed strictly on this principle; and it will be 
felt by every candid Reader, that the child who may be 
, unable to acquire any other literary knowledge than what 
can be learnt even in this elementary book, need never have 
reason to blush from total ignorance, or to err from want of 
a foundation of moral and religious principles. 

A2 



4 ' Tlie English Alphabet. 

A a Bb Cc 




Ape , Bell Cock 

Dd Ee Ff 




Dog Krf'-gle J Fo 




Goose Horse. " Inn 



T/ie English Alphabet. 

J j Kfc LI 




Jug Kite Li-o 



Mm N n O o 




Mouse ' Nest Owl 



P p Q q R r 




Plough Queen Ilab-bit 

A3 



r» * 



•-V 




-. 1 




-* 
\ 



^ % 



i 



The Alphabet. 

The Letters promiscuously arranged. 

I) B C F G E H A X IF Y M V R W N K P 

JOZQISLT 

z wxoclybdfpsmqnvhkrtgj 

e j a u i 



The Italic Letters. 

JBCDEFGHIJKLMN0P2H 

STUVIVXYZ 

abcdefghijklrnnapqrst 

u v w x y z 



Double and Triple Letters. 

afhfofcftflflfififfffiffiffl 
ct sh sb sk st fl si fi si ff ffi ssi ffl 

X 



& 


(E 


ae 


oe 


& 


AE 


OE 


ae 


oe 


and 



The Oki English Letters. 

abcDefgiHjUmnopqratutitory 5 



Stops used in Reading, 



Comma. 



Semi- 
colon^ 



Colon. 



Period. 



? 

Inter ro- 
gation* 

A 4 



Excla- 
mation. 



S Syllables o/two Letters. 

' Lesson 1. 

r 

ba be * bi bo bu by 

ca ce ci co cu cy\ 

da de di do du dy 

fa fe fi fo fu : fy 

Lesson 2. 

ga ge gi go gu gy 

ha he hi ho hu hy 

ja je ji jo ju jy 

ka ke ki ko ku ky 

la le li lo . lu ly 

Lesson 3. 

ma me mi mo mu . my 

na ne ni no nu ny 

pa pe pi po pu py 

ra re ri ro ru ry 

sa se si so su sy 



•*•— i »«—^fi*t 



Lesson 4. 

% 

ta te ti to tu ty 

va ve vi vo vu vy 

wa ■ we wi wo wu wy 

ya ye yi yo yu 

za ze zi zo zu zy 



Syllables of TWO Letters. 







Lesson 5. 






ab 


ac 


ad af 


ag 


a) 


eb 


ec 


ed ef 


eg 


el 


ib 


ic 


id if 




ii 


ob 


oc 


od of 


og 


ol 


ub 


uc 


ud uf 

* 


Ug 


ul 






• 

Lesson 6. 






am 


an 


ap ar 


as 


at 


em 


en 


ep er 


es 


et 


im 


in 


ip ir 


is 


it 


om 


on 


op or 


OS 


ot 


um 


un 


up ur 


us 


ut 


« 




Lesson 7. 






ax 


am 


on yo 


me 


so 


ex 


of 


no he 


be 


wo 


ix 


ye 


my at 


to 


lo 


ox 


by 


as up 


y e 


go 


ux 


an 


or ho 


we 


do 






Lesson 8. 


• 




in 


so 


am an 


if 


ha 


a y 


oy 


my ye 


be 


as 


oh 


it 


on go 


no - 


us 


me 


we 


up to 


us 

AS 


lo 



-1 



bad 

dad 



big 
dig 



cam 
ham 



Easy Words of THREE Letters. 

Lesson 1. 

lad pad bed led red , 
mad sad fed ned wed 





Lesson 4. 


■^ 




wig 
bog 


<log jog 
fog bug 


hug 
j"g 


P u g 
rug 



log 



ho^ 



S * 



duo: 



mug 



gem 
hem 



Lesson5. 

dim rim hum 
him ^ gum, mum 



tug 



sum 
rum 



12 



> 


r 




Lesson g. 






bid 
did 


hid 
kid 


lid 
rid 


god 
hod 


nod 
rod 


bad 
mud 








Lesson 3. 






fag 


g a g 

hag 


lag 
nag 


rag 

* ta g 


wag 
beg 


leg 
P e g 

■a- , i.. 



cap 

hap 



I' " ' ' " 







Lesson 6. 






can 


pan 


zan hen 


din 


kin 


fan 


ran, 


den men 


fin 


pin 


man 


van 


fen y- pen 


gin 


sin 



tin 
bon 


4 

don 
yon 


Lesson 7. 

bun fun 
dun gun 


pun 
run 


sun 
tun 



Lesson 8. 



lap 

map 

nap 



pap 
rap 
sap^ 



tap 
dip 
hip. 



1 i p 
nip 



rip 

sip 
tip 



IS Easy Words qf THREE Letters. 

Lesson 9- 

hob rob bob hop mop sop 
lob fob fop lop pop top 



/ * 



■ '■ i ' 



Lesson 10. 

tar far mar car fir cur 

bar jar par war sir pur 







Lesson 1 1 , 






bat 


mat 


bet let 


wet 


kit 


cat 


pat 


fet met 


bit 


»it 


fat 


rat v 


get net 


fit 


dot 


hat 


sat 


jet pet 


hit 


wit 



got 
hot 


jot 
lot 


Lesson IS. 

not rot 
pot sot 


but 
hut 


nut 
put 


shy 
thy 


flv 

ply 


Lesson 13. 

sly cry 
bry dry 


fry 


try 
wry 



Lesson 14. 

for was dog the you ape} 
may art egg see eat fox 
are ink had off boy has 

Lessons, in words not exceeding three Letters. 
Lesson 1 . Lesson 2. 

His pen is bad. > Let me get a nap, 
I met a man. My hat was on.- 
He has a net. His hat is off. 
We had an egg. We are all up. 



Lessons of three Letters. 13 

Lessons. 

His pen has no ink in it 
Bid him get my haU- 
I met a. man and a pig*. 
Let me go for my top. 

Lesson 4. • 

Let the cat be put in a bag. 
I can eat an. egg. 
The dog bit my toe. 
The cat and dog are at war. 

Lesson 5. 

i 

You are a bad boy if you pull off 
the leg of a fly. 

A fox got the old hen, and ate her. 
Our dog got the pig. 

Do as you. are bid, or it may be 
bad for you. 

Lesson 6. 

The cat bit the ra£, and the doer 
bit the cat. ■ ■ . t> 

Do not let the cat lie oh the bed. 
Pat her, and let her lie by you. 
See how glad she » now I pat her. 
Why does she cry mew ? 
Let her run ou$. 



1* Words not exceeding FOUR Letters, 



cart 
dart— ^ 
hart 

mar L/. 
part A 

tart 

wart- 

band 
hand 
land 
sand 

gall 

hall 

mall 

pall 

tall 

wall 

fang 

gang 
hang 

P^g 
rang 

bard 

card 

hard 

lard 

nard 

pard 

yard 

ward 



bark 

dark 

hark 

lark 

mark 

park : 



*\ 



ft 



barm 
farm 
harm 
warm 

cash 

hash 

gash 

lash 

mash 

rash 

sash 

cast 

fast 

last 

past 

vast 

hath 

bath 

lath 

path 

balk~ 

talk 

walk 



halt 

malt 

salt 



half 
pelf 
wolf 



bilk 

milk 

silk 

folk 

bulk 

hulk 



bell 
cell 
fell 
hell 
sell 
tell 
well 

yell 



bill 

fill 

gill 

kill 

mill 

pill 

till 

will 




balm 
calm 
palm 
helm 



yelp 

help 

belt 

felt 

melt 

pelt 

welt 

gilt 

hilt 

tilt 

bolt 

colt 

jamb 
lamb 



bomb 
comb 
tomb 



hemp 

limp 

bump 

dump 

hump 

camp 

damp 

lamp 

jump 

rump 

pump 



bend 

fend 

mend 

rend 

send 

tend 

vend 

bind 

find 

hind 

kind 

mind 

rind 

wind 

bond 

pond; 



fond 
fund 



Words not exceeding four. Letters. 15 



ling 

ring 

sing 

wing 

long 

song 

bung 

dung 

hung 

rung 

sung 

bank 

rank 

link 

pink 

sink 

wink 

monk 

sunk 

pant 

rant 

bent 

dent 

lent 

rent 

sent 

tent 

vent 

went 

dint 

hint 



lint 

mint 

tint 

font 

hunt 

runt 


fern 

born 

corn 

horn 

morn 

lorn 

torn 

worn 

burn 

turn 

carp 
harp 
warp 

bars 
cars, 
tars 

sort 
fort 
port 
wort 


rusk 
tusk 


gasp 

hasp 

rasp 

wasp 

lisp 

• 

bass 

lass 

mass 

pass 

less 

mess 

hiss 

kiss 

miss 

boss 

moss 

loss 

toss 


barb 
garb 
herb 
verb 
curb 

herd 
bird 

cord 
lord 
ford 
word 

cork 

fork 

pork 

work 

lurk 

murk 

turk 

marl 
hurl 

purl 

form 
worm 

barn 
yarn 


dish 

fish 

wish 

gush 

rush 

bask 

mask 

task 

busk 

dusk 

husk 

musk 


best 
est 
lest 
nest 
pest 
rest 
test 
vest 
west 
zest 
fist 
hist 



list 

mist, 
host 
most 
post- 
cost 
lost 
dust; 
gust 
just 
must 
rust 



pith 
with 
both 
doth 
moth 

cow 
bow 
vow 
now 

nigh 
sigh 
high 



gnat 
gnaw 



awl 
bawl 
owl 
fowl 



16 

crawl . 
drawl 

growl 

■ » 

smith 

troth 

sloth 

wroth 

broth 

cjloth 

froth 

welch 

filch 

milch 

haunch 

launch 

bench 

tench 

arch 

march 

parch 

batch 

hatch 

latch 

catch 

fetch 

itch 

ditch 

pitch 

witch 

rhyrtie 
thyme 

knack 
knock 



Words of 

kneel 
knob 

know 

fight 
knrght 

light 

might 

night 

right 

sight 

tight 

blight 

flight , 

plight 

bright 

breeze 
sneeze 
freeze 

small 
stall 
dwell 
knell 

quelL 

shell 

smell 

spell 

swell 

chill 

drill 

skill 

spill 

still 

swill 



five and six Letters. 



droll 
stroll 

qualm 
psalm' 
whelm 
^whelp 

smelt 
spelt 
spilt 
stilt 

thumb 
dumb 

cramp 

stamp 

champ 

clamp 

plump 

stump 

trump 

brand 

grand 

stand 

strand 

blend 

spei^d 

blind 

grind 

bring 

cling 

fling 

sling 

sting 



swing 

thing 

wring 

spring 

string 

twang 

wrong 

strong 

throng 

prong 

clung 

strung 

flung 

stung 

swung 

wrung 

crank 

drank 

flank 

prank 

shank 

blank 

plank 

thank 
brink 
chink 
clink 
drink 
blink 
slink 
1 think 
slunk 
drunk 



trunk 

scythe 
scheme 
scene 
school 

plant 

grant 

slant 

scent 

spent 

flint 

front 

blunt 

grunt 

third 
board 
sword 
hoard 

dwarf 

scarf 

wharf 

scurf 

■ » ■ 

shark 
spark 
frank 

snarl 
twirl 
whirl 
churl 

stern • 
scorn 



Words not exceeding six Letters, 17 



thorn 
shorn 
sworn 
churn 
spurn 

smart 

chart 

start 

quart 

shirt 

skirt 

spirt 

short 

suort 

sport 



clash 

crash 

flash 

plash 

smash 

trash 

quash 

fresh 



brush 
crush 
flush 
plush 



brisk 
whisk 

clasp 
grasp 

brass 

glass 

bless 

dress 

stress 

bliss 

dross 

gloss 

gross 

blast 

blest 

chest 

crest 

( twist 



ghast 

ghost 

thrust 

crust 

trust 

crost 

frost 

dog 
man 
boy 
girl 

e gg 
hen 

cock 

book 

bee 

coach 

cart 

pie 
tart 
milk 
jack 



torn 
sam 
will 



fire 

smoke 

sun 

moon 

stars 

rod 

stick 

house 

cow 

gate 

east 

west 

north 

south 

dark 

light 

night 

day 

rain 



snow 

hail 

wind 



stone 

rock 

teeth 

eyes 

nose 

lips 

tongue 

throat 

cheeks 

legs 

arms 

feet 

hand 

head 

face 
neck 

hisi 



[wnisp 
warm 
itonh 



And 

an 

the 

of 

for 

from 

to 

on 

by 






Words to be known at Sight. 



this 

that 

but 

no 

not 

with 

up 

or 

if 



all 

as 

he 

she 

it 

him 

her 

we 

us 



our 

they 

them 


your 
what 
these 


their 


those 


1 who 


there 


whom 


some 


whole 


when 


which 


be 


you 


am 



art 

18 

are 

was 

were 

been 

have 

has 

had 



will 

would 

shall 

should 

may 

might 

can 

could 

must 



18 


Words to be known at Sight. 




The 


Up 


She 


Might 


From 


Who 


Your 


An 


Or 


It 


Would 


That 


Their 


What 


Of 


But 


Him 


Shall 


Whole 


Them 


These 


And 


If 


Her 


May 


Has 




Those 


There 


For iNo 


We 


Can 


Am 




With 


Was 


On 


All 


Us 


Should 


Art 




They 


Were 


To 


Not 


Our 


Could 


Is 




When 


Been 


This 


He 


You 


Will 


Whom 


Some 


Have 


By 


As 


Be 


'Had 


Are 




Which 


Must 


Lessons on the e 


final. 


Al ale 


fan 


fane j mop 


mope 


sam same 


bab babe 


fat 


fate 


mor 


more 


sid side 


bal bale 


fin 


fine 


mut 


mute 


sir aire 


ban bane 


fir 


fire 


nam 


name 


sit site 


bar bare 


for 


fore 


nod 


node 


sol sole 


bas base 


gal 


gale 


nor 


nore sur. sure 


bid bide 


gam 


game 


not 


note 


tal tale 


bil bile 


gat 


gate 


od 


ode 


tarn tame 


bit bite 


gor 


ffore 
hare 


pan 


pane 


tap tape 


can cane 


bar 


par 


pare 


tar tare 


cam came 


hat 


hate 


pit 


pile 


tid tide 


car care 


her 


here 


pin 


pinje 


tim time 


cap cape 


hid 


bide 


pol 


pole 


ton tone 


con cone 


hop 


hope 


por 


pore 


top tope 


con cope 
dal dale 


hoi 


hole 


rat 


rate 


tub tube 


kit 


kite 


rid 


ride 


tun tune 


dam dame 


lad 


fade 


rip 


ripe 


van vane 


dar dare 


mad made 


roh 


robe 


vai vale 


dat date 


man 


. mane 


rod 


rode 


vil vile 


din dine 


mar 


mare 


rop 


rope 


vin vine 


dol dole 


mat 


mate 


rot 


rote 


vot vote 


dom dome 


mil 


mile 


rud 


rude 


wid wijle 


dot dote 


mod mode 


rul 


rule 


win wine 


fam 


fame 


mol 


mole 


sal 


sale 


1 wir 


wire 



Lessons of ONE Syllable. lg 

Lessons, consisting of easy words of one syllable. 

Lesson 1. 



A triad ox 
An old man 
A new fan* 



A wild colt 
A tame cat 
A lean cow 



A fat duck 
H&can call 
You can tell 
I am tall 



Lesson 2. 

A lame pig 
You will fall 
He must sell 
1 shall dig 



A live calf 
A gold ring 
A warm mjifF 



A good dog 
He may beg 
I will run 
Tom was hot 



She is well 
You can walk 
Do not slip 
Fill that box 



Lesson 3. 

He did laugh He is cold 
Ride your nag Fly your kite 
Ring the bell Give it me 
Spin the top Tqke your bat 



Lesson 4. 

Take this book Toss that ball Buy it for us 
A good boy A sad dog A new whip 
A bad man A soft bed Get your book 
A dear girl A nice cake Go to the door 
A fine lad A long stick Come to the fire 



Lesson 5. 

Spell that word Do you love me Come and read 
Do not cry Be a good girl Hear what I say 
I love you I like good boys Doasyouarebid; 
Look at it All will love you Mind your book 



SO Lessons of one Syllable. 

Lesson 6. 

Come, James, make haste. Now read your 

book. Here is a pin to point with. Do not 

tear the book. Spell that word. That is a good 

boy. Now go and play till I call you in. z6^ 

Lesson 7. 
A cat has soft fur and a long tail. She looks 
meek, but she is sly ; and if she finds a rat or a 
mouse, she will fly at him, and kill him jspon. 

She will catch birds and kill them. £c? '-^ 

, , i~» , — ^ 

Lesson 8. 

When you have read your book, you shall go 
to play. Will you have a top, or a ball, or a 
kite to play with ? If you have a top, you should 
spin it; ir you have a ball, you must toss y it; if 
you have a kite,' you ought to fly it. *,q'' _ 



*=«—•« 



Lesson 9. 
The sun shines; Open your eyes, good girT. 
Get up. Maid, come and dress Jane. Boil 
some milk for a poor girl. Do uot spill the milk. 
Hold the spoon in your right hand. Do not 
throw the bread on the ground.* Bread is made 
to eat, and you must not waste it. , ,; 

Lesson 10, 

What are eyes for ? — To see with. 
What are ears for? — To hear with. 
What is a tongue for ? — To talk with. 
What are teeth for ? — To eat with. 
What is a nose for ? — To smell with. 

* 

What are legs for? — To walk with. 
What are books for ? — To learn with. 



Lessons of ONE Syllable. 2 1 

Lesson 11. 

Try to learn fast. Thank those who teach you # 
Strive to speak plain. Speak as if the words 
were your owti. Do not bawl ; nor yet speak 
in too low a voice. Speak so that all in the 
room may hear you. Read as you talk, j^j 



Lesson 12. 

.Look ! there is our dog Tray. Fie takes good 
care of the fyouse. He will bark, but he will 
not bite if you do not hurt him. 

Here is a fihe sleek cat. She purs and frisks, 
and wags her tail. Do not teaze her, or she will 
scratch you, and make you bleed. , 

See what a sweet bird this is. Look at his 
bright eyes, his fine wings, and nice long tail. 



Lesson 13. 

Miss May makes all her friends laugh at her; 
if a poor mouse runs by her she screams for an 
hour; and a bee on her frock will put her in a 
fit; if a small fly should get on her hair and 
buz in her ear, she would call all in the house 
to help her as if she was hurt. 

i ■ ■ i ■ ii ■ ..... i ■ 

Lesson 14. 

* 

You must not hurt live things. You should 
not kill poor flies, nor pull off their legs nor 
wings. You must not hurt bees, for they do 
good, and will not sting you if you do not 
touch them. All things that have life can feel 
as well as you can. 



22 Lessons of one Syttabte. 

Lesson 15. 

Please to give me a plum. Here is one. 

I wjnt more, I want ten if you please. Here 
are ten. Count them. I will. .One, two, three, 
four, five, six, sev.-en, eight, nine, ten. 



Lesson 16. 
Tom fell in the pond ; they got him out, but 
he was wet and cold ; and his eyes were shut ; 
and then he was sick, and they put him to bed • 
and he was long ill and weak, and could not 
stand. Why did he go near the pond? He 
had been told not to go, for fear he should fall 
in ; but he would go, and he did fall in • it 
was his own fault, and he was a bad boy. 
Mind and do not do the same. 



Lesson 17. 

Jack Hall was a good boy. He went to school, 
and took paras to learn as he ought. When he 
was in school, he kept to his books, till all his 
tasks were done ; and then when he came out 
he could play with a good heart; for he knew 
that he had time ; and he was so kind that all 
tn e boys were glad to play with him. 

When he was one of the least boys in the 
school he made all the great boys his friends, 
and when he grew a great boy he was a friend 
to all that were less than he was. He was not 
once known to fight, or to use one of the boys 
ill, as long as he staid at school. 

Be Hke Jack Hall and you too will gain the 
love of all who know you. 



Words o/ONE Syllable. 



S3 



Exercises in Words of one syllable contain* 

ins the DIPHTHONGS 

ai, ei, oi, ea, oa x ie, ue, ui, au, ou. * 



JD \ 


• > 
air 


spoil 


screak 


leap 


lid 1 


fair 


coin 


squeak 


reap 


laid 


hair 


join 


deal 


cheap 


•aid 


pair 


loin ^ 


heal 


ear 


aid 


chair 


groin 


meal 


dear 


vaid 


stair 


joint 


peal 


fear 


Maid 


bait 


point 


seal 


hear 


)laid 


gait 


pea 
sea 


teal 


near 


>taid 


wait 


steal 


sear 


gain 


plait 


k tea 


sweal 


year 


main 


faith 


flea 


beam 


blear 


pain 


saith 


plea 


ream 


clear 


rain 


neigh 


each 


seam 


smear 


blain 


weigh 


beach 


team 


spear 


brain 


eight 


leach 


bream 


ease 


chain 


weight 


peach 


cream 


pease 


drain 


rein 


reach 


dream 


tease 


Sjrain 


vein 


teach 


fleam 


please 


slain 


feign 


bleach 


gleam 


seas 


stain 


reign 


breach 


steam 


fleas 


swain 


heir 


preach 


scream 


cease 


train 


their 


beak 


stream 


peace 


twain 


height 


peak 


bean 


grease 


sprain 


voice . 


leak 


dean 


east 


strain 


choice 


weak 


mean 


beast 


faint 


void 


bleak 


lean 


feast 


paint 


soil 


freak 


clean 


least 


saint 


toil 


sneak 


glean 


eat 
^beat 


plaint 


broil 


fspeak 


heap 



24 

feat 

heat 

meat 

neat 

peat 

seat 

teat 

bleat 

cheat 

treat 

wheat 

realm 

dealt 

health 

wealth 

stealth 

breast 

sweat 

threat 

death 

breath 

search 

earl ' 

pearl 

earn 

learn 

earth, 

dearth 



Words with Diphthongs. 



Ache 
adze 
aisle 
yacht 



hearth 

heart 

great 

bear 

pear 



coach 

poach 

roach 

goad 

load 

road 

toad 

woad 

loaf 

oak 

coal 

foal 

goal 

shoal 

roam 

foam 

loam 

loan 

moan 

groan 

oar 

boar 

roar 



soar 

boast 

roast 

toast 

boat 

coat 

goat 

moat 

float 

throat 

broad 

groat 

brief 
chief 
grief 
thief 
liege 
mien 
siege 
field 
wield 
yield 
shield 
fierce 
pierce 
tierce 
grieve 
5 thieve 




suit 

fruit 

juice 

sluice 

bruise 

cruise 

build 

guild 

built . 

guilt 

guise 



fraud 

daunt 

jaunt 

haunt 

vaunt ' 

caught 

taught 

fraught 

aunt 

loud 
cloud 



plough 

bough 

bound 

found 

hound 

pound 

round 

sound 

wound 

ground 

sour 
flour 
bout 
gout 
doubt 
lout 
pout 
rout 
bought 
thought 
ought 
though 
| four 
pour 
tough 
rough 
yonr 



Words of Arbitrary Sound. 



laugh 


lieu 


drachm 


quoif 


toe 


quay 


hymn 


aye 


choir 


schism 


nymph 


quoit 


pique 


iczar 


gaol 


ewe 



Lessons a/ 1 one Syllable. 2$ 

lessons in words of one syllable. 

Lesson 1. 

I knew a nice girl, but she was not good: she 
was cross, and tokl fibs. One dav she went out 
to take a walk in the fields, and tort* her frock 
in a bush; and when she came home, she said she 
had not done it, but that the dog had done it 
with his paw. Was that good ? — No. 

Her aunt gave her a cake ; and she thought 
if John saw it, he would want to have a bit ; and 
she did not choose he should : so she put it in 
a box, and hid it, that he might not see it. The 
next day she went to eat some of her cake, but 
it was gone ; there was a hole in the box, and 
a mouse had crept in, and eat it all. She then 
did cry so. much that the nurse thought she 
was hurt ; but when she told her what the 
mouse had done, she said she was glad of it ; 
and that it was a bad thing to wish to eat it 
all, and not give a bit to John. 

Lesson 2. 

Miss Jane Bond had a new doll ; and her 
good Aunt, who bought it, gave her some cloth 
to make a shift for it. She gave her a coat too, 
and a pair of stays, and a yard of twist with a 
tag to it,, for a lace; a pair of red shoes, and a 
piece of blue silk to make doll a slip, some 
gauze for a frock, and a broad white sash. 

Now these were fine things, you know : but 
Miss Jane had no thread, so she could not make 
doll's clothes when she had cut them out ; but 
her kind Aunt gave her some thread too, and 

B 



t6 Lessons qf OWE Syllable. 

then she went hard to work, and made doll 
quite smart in a short time. 

Lesson 3. 

Miss Rose was a good child, she did at all 
times what she was bid. She got all her tasks 
by heart, and did her work quite well. One 
day she had learnt a long task in her book, and 
done some nice work ; so her Aunt said, you 
are a good girl, my dear, and I will take you 
with me to see Miss Cox. 

So Miss Rose went with her Aunt, and Miss 
Cox was quite glad to see her, and took her to 
her play-room, where they saw a Doll's house, 
with rooms in it ; there were eight rooms ; and 
there were in these rooms chairs, and stools, and 
beds, and plates, and cups, and spoons, and 
knives, and forks, and mugs, and a screen, and 
I do not know what. So Miss Rose was glad 
she had done her work, and said her task so 
well ; for if she had not she would have staid 
at home, and lost the sight of the Doll's house. 

Lesson 4. 

Charles went out to walk in the fields ; he 
saw a bird, and ran to catch it ; and when they 
said, Do not take the poor bird ; what will you 
do 'with it ? He said, I will put it in a cage and 
keep it. But they told him he must not ; for 
they were sure he would not like to be shut up 
in a cage, and run no more in the fields— why 
then should the poor bird like it ? So Charles 
let the poor thing fly. 

Lesson 3. 

£rank. Pitt w#s a great boy ; he had such a 
pain of fat cheeks that he could scarce see out 



Lessons of ONE SyMable. Of 

of his eyes, for you must know that Frank would 
sit and eat all day long.' First he would have a 
great mess of rice milk, in an hour's time he 
would ask for bread and cheese, then he would 
eat loads of fruit and cakes: and as for meatand 
pies, if you had seen him eat them, it would have 
made you stare. Then he would drink as much 
as he eat. But Frank could not long go on so, 
no one can feed in this way but it must make 
him ill; and this was the case with Frank Pitt- 
nay, he was like to die : but he did get well at 
last, though it was a long while first. 

Lesson 6. 

Frank Pitt went out to walk in the fields: he 
found a nest, and took out the young birds; he 
brought them home, but they did not know how 
to eat, and he did not know how to feed them: 
so the poor things were soon dead; and then he 
went to see if he could get more, but he found 
the poor old bird close by the nest ;— her young 
ones were gone, and she was sad, and did cry; 
Frank was sad too, but he could not. bring them 
back^ they were all dead and gone. Poor Frank I 
I know he did not mean to let them die ; but 
why did he take them from their nest, from the 
old bird, who would have fed them, and could 
take care of them ? Hbw would he like to be 
stole from his home ? 

Lesson 7. 

Look at Jane, her hand is bound up in a eloth; 
you do not know what ails it, but I will tell you. 
She had a mind to try if she could poke the fire 
though she had beea told fche must not do it; 



'N 



28 Lessons of ONE Syllable. 

and it would have been well for her if she had not 
tried ; for she had not strength for such work as 
that>and she fell with her hand on the bar of the 
grate ; which burnt her much, and gave her 
great pain ; and she can not work or play, or 
do the least thing with her hand. It was a sad 
thing not to mind what was said to her. 

Lesson 8. 

In the lane I met some boys ; they had a dog 
with them, and they would make him draw a cart; 
but it was full of great stones, and he could not 
draw it. Poor dog ! he would have.done it to 
please them if he conld : but he could not move 
it ; and when they saw that he did not, they got a 
great stick to beat him with, but I could not let 
them do that. So 1 took the stick from them, 
and drove them off; and when they were gone, 
I let the dog loose, and hid the cart in the 
hedge, where I hope they will not find it. 

It is a sad thing when boys beat poor dumb 
things : if the dog had not been good, he would 
have bit them ; but he was good, and ought 
not to have beea hurt. 

Lesson 9- 

I once saw a young girl tie a string to a bird's 
leg, and pull it through the yard. But it could 
not go so fast as she did ; she ran, and it went 
hop, hop, to try to keep up with her, but it 
broke its poor leg, and there it lay on the hard 
stones, and its head was hurt; and the poor 
bird was soon dead. So I told her maid not 
to let her have birds, if she was to use them 
so ill; and she has not had one since that 
time. 



Words of TWO Syllables. S9 

WORDS ACCENTED ON THE FIRST SYLLABLE. 

Observation. — The double accent (") shews that t4ie following 
consonant is to be pronounced in both syllables; as co'Vpy, 
pronounced cop-py; but. the Author has divided' the word* 
so that, as often as possible; each syllable is a distinct sound*, 
and each sound a distinct syllable. 



AB-BA 

ab-bot 

ab-ject 

a-ble 

ab-scess 

ab-sent 

abs-tract 

ac-cent 

a'-eid 

ac-orn 

a-cre 

ac-rid 

act-i ve 

act-or 

act-ress 

ad-age 

ad-der 

ad-dle 

ad-vent 

ad-verb 

ad-verse 

af-ter 

a-ged 

a-gen t 

a*-gile 

a-gue 

ail-ment 

ai-rv 

al-der 



al-ley 
al-mond 
a*-loe 
al-so 
al-tar 
al-ter 
al-um 
al-\vays 
am-ber 
am-ble 
am-bush 
am-ple 
an-chor 
an-g-el 
an-ger 
an-gle 
an-gry 
an-cle 
an- rials 
an-swer 
an-tic 
an-vil 
a-uy 
ap-ple 
a-pril 
a-pron 
apt-ness 
ar-bour 
i arch-er 



arc-tic 

ar-dent 

ar-dour 

ai'-gent 

ar-gue 

ar-id 

arm-ed 

ar-mour 

ar-my 

ar-rant 

ar-row 

art-ful 

art-ist 

art-less 

ash-es 

ask-er 

as-pect 

as-pen 

as-sets 

asth-ma 

au-dit 

au-thor 

aw-ful 

ax-is 

a-zurc 

Bab-ble 

bab-bler 

ba-by 

back-bite 



back-wards 

ba-con 

bad-ger 

bad-ness 

bat-fle 

bag-gage 

bai-liff 

ba-ker 

bal-ance 

bald-ness 

bale-ful 

bal-lad 

bal-last 

bal-lot 

bal-sam 

band-age 

baad-box 

ban-dy 

bane-ful 

ban-ish 

bank-er 

bank-rupt 

ban-ner 

ban-quet 

baa-ter 

bant-ling 

bap-tism 

barb-ed 

bar-ber 

B3 



so 

bare-foot 

bare- n ess 

bar-gain 

bark-ing 

bar-ley 

bar-on 

bar-ren 

bar-row 

bar-ter 

base-ness 

bash-ful 

ba-sin 

bas-ket 

bas-tard 

bat-ten 

bat-tie 

bawl-ing 

bea-con 

bea-dle 

bea-niy 

beard-less 

bear-er 

beast- 1 y 

beat-er 

beau-ty 

bed-ding 

bee-hive 

beg-gar 

be-ing 

bed-lam 

bed-time 

bel-fry 

bel-man 



Words of TWO Syllables. 



bel-low 
bel-ly 
ber-ry 
be-som 
bet-ter 
be^-yy 
bi-?s 
bib-ber 
I bi-ble 
bid-der 
big-hess 
big-ot 
bil-let 
bind-er , 
bind-ing 
birch-en 
bird-lime - 
birth-day 
bish-op 
bit-ter 
bit-tern 
black-en 
black-ness 
blad-der 
blame-less 
blan-dish 
blan-ket 
bleak-ness 
bleat-ing 
bleed-ing 
blem-ish 
bless-ing 
blind-fold 



blind-ness 
blis-ter 
bloat-cd 
blood-shed 
bloo"-dy 
bloom-ing 
blos-som 
blow-ing 
blub-ber 
blue-ness 
r blun-der 
blunt-less 
blus-ter 
board-er 
boast-er 
boast-in g 
bob-bin 
bod-kin 
bo"-dy 
bog-gle 
boil-er 
bold-ness 
bol-ster 
bond-age 
ban-fire 
bon-net 
bon-ny 
bo-ny 
boo-by 
book-ish 

boor-ish 

boo-ty 

bor-der 



bor-row 

bot-tle 

hot-torn 

bound-less 

boun-ty 

bow-els 

bow-er 

box-er 

boy-ish 

brace-let 

brack-et 

brack-ish 

brag-ger 

bram-ble 

bran-dish 

brave-ly 

bfrawl-ing 

br^w-ny 

bra-zen 

break-fast 

breast-plate 

breath-less 

breed-ing 

brew-er 

bri-ber 

brick-bat 

brick-kiln 

bri-dal , 

bride-maid 

bri-dle 

brief-ly 

bri-ar 

bright-ness 



Wards of TWO Syllables. 



31 



brim-mer 

brim-stone 

bring-er 

bri-ny 

bris-tle 

brit-tle 

bro-ken 

bro-ker 

bru-tal , 

bru-tish 

bub-ble 

buck-et 

buc-kle 

buck-ler 

buck-ram 

bud-get 

buf-fet 

bug-bear 

bu-gle 

bul-ky 

bul-kt 

bul-rush 

bul-wark 

bum-per 

bump-kin 

bun-die 

bun-gle 

bun-gler 

bur-den 

bur-gess 

burn-er 

burn-ing 

bur-nisb 



bush-el 1 


care-less 1 


bus-tie 


car-nage 


butch-er 


car-rot 


but-ler 


car-pet , 


but-ter 


cart-er 


biit-toek 


carv-er 


bux-om 


case-ment 


buz-zard 


cas-ket 


Cab-bage 


castor 


cab-in 


cas-tle 


ca-ble 


cau-dle 


cad-dy 


cav-il 


ca-dence 


cause-way 


call-ing 


caus-tic 


cal-lous 


ce-dar 


cam-bric 


ceil-ing 


cam-let 


cel-lar 


can-eel 


cen-sure 


can-c*r 


cen-tre 


can-did 


ce-rate 


can-die 


cer-tain 


can-ker 


chal-dron 


can-non 


chal-ice 


cant-er 


chal-lenge 


can-vas^ 


cham-ber 


ca-per 


chan-cel 


ca-pon 


chand-ler 


cap-tain 


. chan-ger 


cap-tive 


chang-ing 


cap-ture 


chan-nel 


car-case 


chap-el 


card-er 


chap-lain 


care-ful 


chap-let 



chap-man 

chap-ter 

char-coal 

char-ger 

diarm-er 

charm-ing 

char-ter 

chas-ten 

chat-tels 

chat-ter 

cheap-en 

cheap-ness 

cheat-er 

cheer-ful 

chem-ist 

cher-lsh 

cher-ry 

ches-nut 

cliief-ly 

child-hood 

child-ish 

chil-dren 

chim-ney 

chis-el 

cho-ler 

chop-ping 

chris-ten 

chuc-kle 

churi-ish 

churn-in j> 

ci-der 

cin-der 

ci-pher 

B4 



32 



Words of TWO Syllables. 



cir-cle 


cod-tin 


con-sul 


crook-ed 


cis-tern 


co f- fee 


con-test 


cross-ness 


cit-ron 


cold-ness 


con-text 


crotch-et 


ci"-ty 


col-lar 


con-tract 


crude-ly 


clam-ber* 


col-lect 


con-vent 


cru-el 


clam -my 


col-lege 


con-vert 


cru-et 


clam-our 


co!-lop 


con-vex 


crum pie 


clap-per 


co-Ion 


con-vict 


crup-per 


clar-et 


col-our ; 


cool-er 


crus-ty 


clas-sic 


com-bat 


cool-ness 


crys-tal 


clat-ter , 


come-ly 


coop-ef 


cud-gel 


clean-ly 


com-er 


cop-per 


cul-prit 


clear-ness 


coni-et 


co"-py 


cum-ber 


cler-gv 


com- fort 


cord-age 


cun-ning 


clev-er 


com-riia 


cjor-ner 


cup-board 


cli-ent 


corn-men t 


cos-tive 


cu-rate 


cli-mate 


com-merce 


cost-ly 


cur-dle ' 


.ding-er 


com-mcn . 


cot-ton 


cur-few 


clog-gy 


corn-pact 


cov-er 


curl-ing 


clois-ter 


corn-pass 


council 


cur-rant 


clo-scr 


corn-pound 


coun-sel 


curt-sey 


clos-et 


com-rade 


coun-ter 


cur-rent 


clou-dy 


con-cave 


coun-ty 


cur-ry 


clo-ver 


con-cert 


coup-let 


curs-ed 


cloven 


con-cord 


court-ly 


cur-tain 


clown-ish 


con-course 


cow-ard 


cur-ved 


clus-ter 


con-duct 


cou-sin 


cus-tard 


clum-sy 


con-duit 


crack-er 


cus-tom 


clot-ty 


con-flict 


crac-kle 


cut-ler 


cob-ler 


con-gress 


craf-ty 


cyn-ic 


rob-nut 


con-quer 


crea-ture 


cy-pre?$ 


i-ob-web 


con-quest 


c red- it 


Dab-ble 


cock-pit 


con-stant 


crib-bage 


dan-ger 













Words of TWO Syllables. 


5, 


dag-ger 


dis-mal 


dwell-ing 


ev-er 


dai-ly 


dis-tance 


dwin-dle 


e-vil 


datn-ty 


dis-tant 


Ea-ger 


ex-it 


dai-ry 


do-er 


ea-gle 


eye-sight 


dal-ly 


dog-ger 


east-er 


eye-sore 


dam-age 


dol-lar 


eat-er 


Fa-ble 


dam-ask 


dol-phin 


ear-ly 


fa-bric • 


dam-sel 


do-nor 


earth-en 


fa-cins: 


dan-cer 


dor-rnant 


ec-ho 


fac-tor 


dan-die 


doub-let 


ed-dy 


fag-got 


dan-driff 


doubt-ful 


ed-ict 


faint-ness 


dan-gle 


doubt-less 


ef-fort 


faith-ful 


dap-per 


dough- ty 


e-gress 


fal-con 


dark-ness 


dow-er 


ei-ther 


fal-lovv 


darl-iug 


dow-las 


el-bow 


false-hood 


das-tard 


dow-ny 


el-der 


fam-ine 


daz-zle 


drag-gle 


em-blem 


fam-ish 

• 


dear-ly 


drag-on 


em-met 


fa-mous 


dear-n ess 


dra-per 


em-pi re 


fan-cy 


dead-ly 


draw-er 


emp-ty 


farm-er , 


death-less 


draw-ing 


end-less 


far-row 


debt-or 


dread-ful 


en-ter 


far-ther 


de-cent 


dream-er 


en-try 


fast-en 


de-ist 


dri-ver 


en-voy 


fa-tal 


del-uge 


drop-sy 


en-vy 


fa-ther 


dib-ble 


drub-bing 


eph-od 


faul-ty 


die-tate 


drum-mer 


tp-ic 


fa-vour 


di-et 


drunk-ard 


e-(jual 


fawn-in g 


dif-fer 


uii-ei 


er-ror 


fear-ful 


dim-ness 


duke-dom 


es-say 


featii-er 


dim-pie 


dul-ness 


es-sence 


fVe-ble 


clin-ner ,• 


du-rance 


ech-ic 


feel-iug 


dts-cord 


clu-ty t 


e-ven 

> 


teism-ed . 



B5 



34 

fel-low 

fel-on 

fe-male 

fen-eer 

fen-der 

fer-tile 

fer-vent 

fes-ter 

fct-ter 

fe-ver , 

fid-die 

fig-ure 

fill-er 

fil-thy 

li-nal * 

fin-ger 

fin-ish 

firm-ness 

fix-ed 

flab-by 

flag-on 

fla-grant 

flan-nel 

fla-vour 

flesh-ly 

flo-rist 

flow-er / 

flus-ter 

flut-ter 

fol-low 
fol-ly 
fonn-ler 
fool-ish 



Words of two Syllables. 



\. 



foot-step 

fore-cast 

fore-most 

fore-sight 

fore-head 

for-est 

for-mal 

for-mer 

fort-ijight 

for-tune 

found-er 

foun-tain 

fowl-er 

fra-grant 

free-ly 

fren-zy 

friend-ly 

frig-ate 

fros-ty 

fro-ward 

frow-zy 

fruit-ful 

full-er 

fu-my 

fun-nel 

fun-ny 

fur-nace 

fur-nish 

fur-row 

fur-ther 

fu-ry 

fus-ty 

fu-tile 



fu-ture 
Gab-ble 
gain-ful 
gal-lant 
gal-ley 
gal-Ion . 
gal-lop 
gam-ble 
game-ster 
gam-mon 
gan-der 
gaunt-let 
gar-bage 
gar-den 
gar-gle 
gar-land 
gar-ment 
gar-ner 
gar-nish 
gar-ret 
gar-ter 
gath-er 
gau-dy 
jga-zer 
geld-ing 
gen-der 
gen-tile 
gen-tle 
gen-try 
ges-ture 
get- ting 
i gew-gaw 
ghast-ly 



gi-ant 

gib-bet 

gid-dy 

gjg-gte 
gild-er 

gild-ing 

gim-Iet 

gin-ger 

gir-dle 

girl-ish 

giv-er 

glad-den 

glad-ness 

glean-er 

glib-ly 

glim-mer 

glis-ten 

gloo-my- 

glo-ry 

glos-sy 

glut-ton 

gnash-ing 

gob-let 

god-ly 

go-er 

gold-en 

gos-ling 

gos-pel 

gos-sip 

gou-ty 

graceful 

gram-mar 

gran-deur 



Words of TWO Syllables. 



35 



grassy 

gra-tis 

gra-v6r 

gra-vy 
gra-zing 

grea-sy 

great-ly 

great-ness 

gree-dy 

green -ish 

greet-ing 

griev-ance 

griev-ous 

grind-er 

gris-km 

gris-ly 

grist-ly 

groaning 

gro-cer 

grot-to 

ground-less 

gruff-ness 

guilt-less 

guil-ty 

gun-iier 

gus-set 

gus-ty 

gut-ter 

guz-zte 

Hab-it 

hack-ney 

had-dock 

hag-gard 



hag-gle 

hail -stone 

hai-ry 

halt-er 

hamlet 

ham-per 

hand-ful 

band-maid 

hand-some 

han-dy 

hang-er 

hang-ings 

han-ker 

hap-pen 

hap-py 

har-ass 

har-bour 

hard-en 

har-dy 

harm-ful 

barm-less 

har-ness 

bar-row 

har-vest 

bast-en 

hat-ter 

hate-ful 

ha-tred 

haugh-ty 

haunt-ed 

haz-ard 

ba-zel 

ba-zy 



hea'-dy 
heal-in g 
hear-ing 
heark-en 
heart-en 
heart-less 
bea-then 
heav-en 
hea # -vy 
he-brew 
i hec-tor 
heed-ful 
hel-met 
help-er 
help-ful 
help-less 
hem-lock 
heritage 
herds-man 
ber-mit 
her-ring 
hew-e* 
hic-cnp 
hig-gler 
high-ness 
hii-lock 
hil-ly 
hin-der 
hire-ling 
hob-ble 
hog-gish 
hogs-head 
bold-fast 



hol-land 

hol-low 

ho-ly 

horn-age 
home-Iy 
hon-est 
hon-our 

hood-wink 

hope-ful 

hope-lesS 

hor-rid v 

hor-ror " 

host-age 

host-ess 

hos-tile 

hot-house 

bour-ly 

house-holrf 
hu-roan 
hum-ble 
hu-mour 
hun-ger 
: hunt-er 
h ur-ry 
hurt-ful 
hus-ky 
hys-sop 
I-dler 
i-dol 
im-age 
in-cense 
in-come 
ia-dex 

B6 



v 



36 

in-f^nt 
ink-stand 
iu-let 
sn-mate 
i n-nlost 

• 

in-qu^st 

in-^oad 

ih-sect 

in-sult 

in-sight 

irr-stance 

in-stant 

in-step 

in- to 

in- voice 

i-ron 

is-sue 

i-Jtem 

Jab-ber 

jag-ged 

jan-gle 

jar-gon 

jas-per - 

jeal-ous 

jestrer 

Je-sus 

jew-el 

jew-ish 

jin-gie 

join-er 

join-ture 



Words of TWO Syllables. 

jour-nal 

jour-n6y 

joy-fui 

joy-less 

joy-ous 

judg-ment 

j"g-gle 

jni-cy 

jum-ble 

ju-ry 
just-ice 

just-ly 

Keen-ness 

keep-er 

ken-nel 

ker-nel 

ket-tle 

key-hole 

kid-nap 

kid-ney 

kin-die 

kind-ness 

king-dom 

kins-man 

kit-chen 

kna-vish 

kneel-ing 

know-ing 

know-ledge 

knuc-kle 

La.-bel 

ia-bour 

lack-ing 



lad-der 


lim-ber 


la-ding 


lim-it 


la-dle 


lim-ner 


la-dy 


lin-gui&t 


lamb-kin 


li-on 


lan-cet 


list-ed 


land-lord 


lit-ter 


land-irlark 


lit-tle 


land-scape 


live-ly 


lan-guage 


liv-er 


Ian-guid 


liz-ard 


lap-pet 


lead-ing 


lar-der 


lob-by 


lath-er 


lob-ster 


lat-ter 


lock-et 


laugb-f er 


lo-cust 


law-ful 


lodg-ment 


law-yer 


lodg-er 


lead-en 


lof-ty 


lead-er 


log-wood 


lea-ky 


long-ing 


lean-ness 


loose-ness 


learn-ing 


lord-ly 


leath-er 


loud-ness 


length-en 


love-ly 


lep-er 


lov-er 


lev-cl 


lovv-ly 


1 H / 

le-yy 


lovv-ness 


; li-bel 


loy-al 


li- cense 


lu-cid 


life-less 


lug-gage 


light-en 


lum-ber 


light-ning 


lurch-er 



Words of two Syllables. 



lurk-er 

luc-ky 

lyr-ic 

Mag-got 

ma-jor 

ma-ker 

mal-let 

malt-ster 

mam-mon 

man-drake 

man-gle 

man-ly 

man-ner 

man-tie 

ma-ny 

mar-ble 

maT-ket 

marks-man 

mar-row 

mar-quis 

mar-shal 

mar-tyr - 

ma-son 

mas-ter 

mat-fer 

max-im 

may-or 

may-pole. 

meanly 

mean-ing 

mea-sure 

med-dle 

meek-ness 



mel-low 
mem-ber 
men-ace 
mend-er 
men-tal 
mer-cer 
mer-chant 
mer-cy 
mer-it 
mes-sage 
met-al 
meth-od 
d-dle 
gh-ty 
l-dew 
ld-ness 
U-stone 
1-ky 
U-er 



m 
m 
m 
m 
~m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
in 
m 
m 



m-ic 

nd-ful 

n-gle 



s-chief 

-ser 

x-ture 
ii.ock-er 
mod-el 
mod -em 
mod-est . 
mois-ture 
mo-ment 
m on- key 
mon-ster 



month-ly 

mor-al 

mor-sel 

mor-tal 

mor-tar 

most-ly 

moth-er 

mo-tive 

move-ment 

moun-tain 

mourn-ful 

mouth-ful 

mud-die 

mud-dy 

muf-fle 

mum-ble 

mum -my 

mur-der 

mur-mur 

mush- room 

mu-sic 

mus-ket 

nms-lin 

mus-tard 

mus-ty 

mut-ton 

muz-zle 

my r- tie 

uiy s-stic 

NaiUer 
na-ked 

name-less 

nap*kin 



37 

nar-row 

nas-ty 

na-tive 

na-ture 

na-vel 

naugh-ty 

na-vy 

neat-ness 

neck-cloth 

need-ful 

nee-dle 

nee-dy 

ne-gro 

neigh-bour 

nei-ther 

ne-phew 

ner-vous 

net-tie 

new-ly 

new-ness 

nib-ble 

nice-ness 

nig-gard 

night-cap 

nim-ble 

nip-pie 

no-ble 

nog-gin 

non-asje 

non-sense 

non-suit 

nos-tril 

nos-trmn 



S3 

noth-ing 

no-tice 

nov-el 

nov-ice 

num-ber 

nurs-er 

mir-ture 

nut-meg 

Oaf-ish 

oak-en 

oat-meal 

ob-ject 

ob-long 

o-chre 

©-dour 

of-fer 

of-fice 

oflF-spnng 

o-gle 

oil-man 

oint-ment 

old-er 

ol-ive 

o-men 

on-set 

o-pen 

op-tic 

o-pal 

or-ange 

or-der 

or-gan 

oth-er 

o-ral 



Words of TWO Syllables. 



!ot-ter 
o-ver 
out-cast 
out-cry 
jout-er 
out-most 
out-rage 
out- ward 
out- work 
own-er 
oys-ter 
Pa-cer 
pack-age 
pack-er 
pack-et 
pad-die 
pad-dock 

pad-lock, 

pa-gan 

pain-ful 

paint-er 

paint-ing 

pal-ace 

pal-ate 

pale-ness 

pal-let 

pam-phlet 

pan-cake 

pan-ic 

pan»try 

pa-per 

pa-pist 

par-boil 









par-eel 

parch-ing 

pbrch-ment 

par-don ' 

pa-rent 

par-ley 

par-lour 

! par-rot 

par-ry 

par-son 

part-ner 

par-ty 

pas-sage 

pas-si ve 

pass-port 
.pas-ture 

pat-en t 

pave-ment 

pay-men t 

pea-cock 

peb-ble 

ped-ant 

ped-lar 

peep-er 

pee-vish 

pelt-ing 
1 pen-dant 

pen-man 

pen-ny 



pen-sive 
peo-ple 
pep-per 
per-rect 



per-il 
per-ish 

per-jurc 
per-ry 

per-son 

pert-ness 

pes-ter 

pes-tle 

pet-ty 

pew-ter 

(phi-al 
phren-sy 
phys-ic 
pic-kle 
pick-lock 
pic-ture 
p?e-ces 
pig-my 
pil-fer 
pil-grira 
pil-lage 
pill-bo* 
pi-lot 
pim-ple 
pin-case 
pin-cers 
pinch-ing 
pi*per 
pip-pin 
pi-rate 
pitch-er 
pit-tance 
pi'-ty 



Words qf TWO Syllables, 



piv-ot 

pla-ces 

pla'-cid 

plain-tiff 

plan-et 

plant-er 

plas-ter 

plat-ted 

plat-ter 

play-er 

play-in g 

pleas-ant 

pleas-ure 

plot-ter 

plu-mage 

plum-met 

plump-ness 

plun-der 

plu-ral 

ply-ing 

poach-er 

pock-et 

po-et 

poi-san 

po-ker 

po-lar 

pol'-ish 

pom-pous 

pon-der 

po-pish 

pop-py 

port-al 

pos-set 



post-age 

pos-ture 

po-tent 

pot-ter 

pot-tie 

poul-try 



pounce-box prod-uct 
pound-age prof-fer 
pound-er 



prin-cess 

pri-vate 
pri'-vy 

prob-lem 

proc-tor 

prod-uce 



pow-er 

pow-der 

prac-tice 

prais-cr 

pran-cer 

prat-tle 

prat-tler 

pray-er 

preach-er 

preb-end 

pre-cept 

pre-dal 

pref-ace 

prel-ate 

prel-udef 

p res-age 

pres-enee 

p res-en t 

press-er 

pric-kle 

prick-ly 

priest-hood 

pri-mate 

prim-er 



prof-fer 

prof-it 

prqg-ress 

project 

pro-logue 

prom-ise 

proph-et 

pros-per 

pros-trate 

proud-ly 

prow-ess 

prowl-er 

pru-dence 

pru-dent 

psalm-ist 

psalt-er 

pub-lie 

pub-lish 

puc-ker 

pud-ding 

pud-die 

pufF-er 

pul-let , 

pul-pit 

pump-er 






39 

punc-ture 
pun-gent 
pun-ish 

pop-py 

pur-blind 

pure-ness 

pur-pose 

pu-trid 

puz-zle 

Quad-rant 

quag-mire 

quaint-ness 

qua-ker 

qualm-ish 

quar-rel 

quar-ry 

quar-tan 

quar-ter 

qua-ver 

queerriy 

que^-ry 

quib-ble 

quick-en . 

quick-ly 

quick-sand 

qui-et 

quin-sy 

q uint-al 

quit-rent 

quiv-er 

quo-rum 

quo-ta 

Rab- bit 



40 

rab-ble 

ra-eer 

raeu-et 

raci-ish 

raf-fle 

raf-ter 

rag-ged 

raii-er 

rai-ment 

rain- bow 

rai-ny 

rais-er »• 

rai-sin 

ra-kish 

ral-ly 

ram-ble 

ram-mer 

ram-pant 

ram-part 

ran-cour 

ran-dom 

ran-ger 

ran-kle 

ran-sack 

ran -so m 

rant-er 

rap-id 

r^p^ine 

rap-ture 

rash-ness 

ra-ther 

rat-tie 

rav-age 



Words of TWO Syllables. 

\ 



ra-ven 

raw-ness 

ra-zor 

rea-der 

rea-dy 

re-al 

reap-er . 

rca-son 

reb-el 

re-cent 

rec-kon 

rec-tor 

ref-use 

rent-al 

rest-less , 

rev-el 

rib-and 

ricb-es 

rid-dance 

ricUdle 

ri-der 

ri-fle 

vight-ful 

rig-our 

ri-ot 

• 

rip-pie 

ri-val 

riv-eF 

riv-et 

roar-ing 

rob-ber 

rock-et 

roil-er 



ro-man 

ro-mish 

roo-my 

ro-sy 

rot-ten 

round-ish 

ro-ver 

rov-al 

rub-be r 

rub-bish 

}u-by 

rud-der 

rude-ness 

rue-ful 

ruf-fle 

rug-ged 

ru-in 

ru-ler 

ruin-ble 

rum-mtfge 

ru-mour 

rum-pie 

run-let 

run-mug 

rup-ture 

rus-tic 

rus-ty 

ruth-less 

Sab-bath 

sa-hie 

sa-bre 

sack-cloth 

sad-den 



sad-die 

safe-ly 

safe-ty 

saf-fron 

sail-or 

sal-ad 

sal-ly 

sal-mon 

salt-ish 

sal-vage 

sal-ver 

sam-ple 

san-dal ' 

san-dy 

san-guine 

sap-ling 

sap-py 

'sat-chel 
sat-in 
sat-ire 
sav^age 
sau-cer 
sa-ver 
sau-sage 
saw-yer 
say-ing 
scab-bard 
scaf-fold 
scam-per 
scan-dal 
scar-let 
scat-ter 
schol-ar 




Words of TWO Syllables. 



sci-ence 

scoff-er 

scol-lop 

scorn-ful 

scrib-ble 

scrip- 1 ure 

scru-ple 

scuf-fle 

scuil-er 

sculp-ture 

scur-vy 

seam-less 

sea-son 

se-cret 

seed-less 

see-ing 

seem-ly 

sell-er 

sen-ate 

sense-less 

sen-tence 

se-quel 

ser-mon 

ser-pent 

ser-vant 

ser-vice 

set-ter 

set-tie 

sbab-by 

shac-kle 

shad-ow 

shag-gy 

»hai-low 



sham-ble 

shame-ful 

shame-less 

shape-less 

sha-pen 

sharp-en 

sharp-er 

shat-ter 

shear-ing 

shel-ter 

shep-herd 

sher-iff 

sher-ry 

shil-ling 

shi-ning 

ship-wreck 

shock-ing 

short-er 

short-en 

shov-el 

should-er 

show-er 

shuf-fle 

shut-ter 

shut-tie 

sick-en 

sick-ness 

sight-less 

sig-nal 

si-lence 

si-lent 

sim-per 

sim-pie 



sim-ply 

sin-evv 

sin-ful 

sing-ing 

sing-er 

sin-gle 

sin-ner 

si-ren 

sis-ter 

sit-tfrig 

skil-ful 

skiWet 

skim-mer 

slack-en 

slan-der 

siat-tern 

sla-vish 

sleep-er 

slee-py 

slip-per 

sli-ver 

slop-py 

sloth-ful 

siub-ber 

slug-gard 

slum-l3er 

smell-ing 

smus:-a:le 

smut-ty # 

snaf-fle 

snag-gy 
snap-per 

sneak-ing 



41 

snuf-fte 

sock-et 

sod-den 

soft-en 

sol-ace 

sol-emn 

sol-id 

sor-did 

sor-row 

sor-ry 

sot-tish 

sound-ness 

span-gle 

spar-kle 

spar- row 

spat-ter 

speak-er 

speech-lesa 

spee-dy 

spin-die 

spin-ner 

spir-it 

spit-tie 

spite-ful 

splint-er 

spo-ken 

sport-ing 

spot-less 

sprin-kle 

spun-gy 

squan-der 

squeam-ish 

sta-ble 



4» 

stag-ger 

stag-nate 

stall-fed 

stam-mer 

stand-ish 

sta-ple 

star-tie 

state-ly 

sta-ting 

sta-tue 

stat-ure 

stat-ute 

stead-fast 

stee-ple 

steerage 

stic-kle 

stiff-en 

iti-fle 

still-ness 

Stin-gy 

stir-rup 

stom-ach 

sto-ny 

stor-my 

sto-ry 

stout-ness 

strag-gle 

s trail -gle 

s trie-Hen 

strict-ly 

stri-king 

strip-ling 

struc-ture 



Words ff two Syllables. 



stub-born 

stu-dent 

stum-ble 

stur-dy 

sub-ject 

suc-cour 

suck-ling 

sud-den 

suf-fer 

sul-len 

sul-ly 

sul-tan 

sul-try 

sum-mer 

s'ujn-mit 

sum-mons 

sun-day 

sun-der 

sun-dry 

sup-per' 

sup-pie 

sure-ty 

sur-feit 

sur-ly 

sur-name 

sur-plice 

swab-by 

swad-dle 

$wag-ger 

swal-low 

swan-skin 

s war- thy 



swea -ty 

sweep-ing 

sweet-en 

sweet-ness 

swcl-ling 

swift-ness 



swim-ming ten-der 



sys-tem 
Tab-by 
ta-bie 
tac-kle 
ta-ker 
tal-ent 
tal-low 
taWy 
tame-ly 
tam-my 
^tam-per 
y \- tan-gie 
tan-kard 
taivsy 
ta-per 
tap-ster 
tar-dy 
tar-get 
tar-ry 
tar-tar 
taste-less 
tas-ter 
tat-tle 
taw-dry 
taw-ny 



teller 

tem-per 

tem-pest 

tem-pie 

tempt-er 

ten-ant 



swear-ing [ tay-lor 



ter-race 
ter-ror 
tes-ty 
tet-ter 
thank-ful 
thatcb-er 
thaw-ing 
i there-fore 
thick-et 
thiev-ish 
thim-hle 
think-ing 
thirs-ty 
thor-ny 
thorn-back 
thought-fuj 

thou-sand 

thrash-er 

threat-en 

throb-bing 

thump-ing 

thun-der 

thur$-day 

tick-et 

tic-kle 

ti-dy 



tight-en 

t ill-age 

till-er 

tim-ber 

time-ly 

tinc-ture 

tin-der 

tin-gle 

tin-ker 

tin-sel 

tj>-pet 

tip-pie 

tire-some 

ti-tle 

tit-ter 

tit-tie 

to i-let 

to-ken 

ton-nage 

tor-men t* 

tor-rent 

tor-ture 

to-tal 

tot-ter 

tow-el 

tow-er 

town-ship 

tra-ding 

traf-fic* 

trai-tor 

tram-mel 

tram-pie 

tran-script 



Words of TWO Syllables. 

]trans-fer 

trea-cle 

trea-son 

treas-ure 

trea-tise 

treat-ment 

trea-ty 

trem-ble 

trench-er 

tres-pass 

trib-une 

tric-kle 

tri-fle 

trig-ger 
I Jrinj-iner 

tri"-ple 
trip-ping 
tri-umph 
troop-er 
tro-phy 
trou"-ble 
j trow-sers 
tru-ant 
truc-kle 
tru-ly 
trum-pet 
trun-dle 
trus-ty 
tuc-ker 
tues-day 
tu-lip 
tum-ble 
tum-bler 



43 



tu-mid 

tu-mour 

tu-mult 

tun-nel 

tur-ban 

tur-bid 

tur-key 

turn-er 

tur-nip 

turn-stile 

tur-ret 

tur-tle 

tu-tor 

twi-light 

twin-&|$ 

twit-ter 

tym-bal . 

ty-rant 

Um-pire 

un-cle 

un-der 

up-per 

up-right 

up-shot 

up- ward 

ur-gent 

u-rine 

u-sage 

use-ful 

ush-er 

ut-most 

ut-ter 

Va-cant 



va-grant 

vain-ly 

val-id 

val-ley 

van-ish 

van-quish 

var-let 

var-nish 

va-ry 

vas-sal 

vel-vet 

vend-er 

ven-om 

ven-ture 

ver-dant 

ver-dict 

ver-ger 

ver-juice 

ver-min 

ver-sed 

ver-vain 

ve'-ry 

ves-per 

ves-try 

vex-ed 

vic-ar ' 

vic-tor 

vig-our 

vil-lain 

vint-ner 

vi-ol 

vi-per 

vir-gin 



44 

vir-tue 

vis-age 

vis-it 

vix-en 

vo-cal 

voi-ley 

vom-it 

voy-age 

vul-srar 

vul-ture 

Wa-fer 

wag-gish 

wag- tail 

wait-er 

wake-ful 

wal-let 

wal-low 

wal-ker 



Words ef TWO Syllables. 

weal-thy 

weap-on 

weath-er 

weep-ing 

weigh-ty 

wel-fare 

wheat-en 

whisker 

whis-tle 

w hole-some 

wick-ed 

wid-ow 



wal-nut 

wan-der 

want-ing 

wan -ton 

war-fare 

war-like 

war-rant 

war-ren 

wash-ing 

wasp-ish 

waste-ful 

wa-ter 

watch-ful 

wa-ver 

way-lay 

way-ward 

weak-en 



wea-ry 



will-ing 

wind-ward 

win-ter 

wis-.dom 

wit-ness 

wit-ty 



wo-ful 

won-der 

wor-ship 

wrong-ful 

Year-ly 

yearti-ing 

yel-low 

yeo-man 

yon-rder 

young-er 

young-est 

youth-ful 

Za-ny 

zeal-ot 1 

zeal-ous 

zen-ith 

ze"-phyr 

zig-zag 



Entertaining and instructive Lessons, in T¥<>ri\ { 
not exceeding. TWO Syllables. 

Lesson 1. 



The dog barks. 
The hog grunts. 
The pig squeaks. 
The horse neighs. 
The cock crows. 
The ass brays. 
The cat purs. 
The kit-ten mews. 
The bull bel-iows. 
The cow lows. 
The calf bleats. 
Sheep ai-so bleat. 



The li-oh roars. 
The wolf howls. 
The ti-ger growls. 
The fox barks. 
Mice squeak. 
The frog croaks. 
The spar-row chirps. 
The s wal-low twit-ters. 
The rook caws. 
The bit-tern booms. 
The tur-key gob-blcs. 
The pea-cock screams. 



Lessons of TWO Syllables. 45 

The bee-tie hums. The screech-owl shrieks 

The duck quacks. The snake his-ses. 

The goose cac-kles Little boys and girls 

Mon-keys chat-ter, talk and read. 

The owl hoots. 

Lesson 2. 

I want my din-ner ; I want pud-ding. It is 
not rea-dy yet : it will be rea-dy soon, then 
Thom-as shall have his din-ner. Lay the cloth. 
"Where are the knives, and forks, and plates ? 
The clock strikes one ; take up the din-ner. 
May I have some meat ? No : you shall have 
some-thing ni-cer. Here is some ap-ple dump-, 
ling for you ; and here are some peas, and some 
beans, and car-rots, and tur-nips, and rice-pud- 
ding, and bread. 

Lesson S. 

There was a lit-tle boy ; he was not a big boy, 
for if he had been a big boy, I sup-pose he would 
have been wi-ser ; but this was a lit-tle boy, not 
high-er than the ta-ble. and his pa-pa and mam- 
ma sent him to school. Jt was a very pleas-ant 
morn-ing ; the sun shone, and the birds sung on 
the trees. Now this lit-tle boy did not love his 
book much, for he was but a sil-ly lit-tle boy, as 
I said before, an.i he had a great mind to play in- 
stead of go-ing to school. And he saw a bee fly* 
inga-bout, first up-on oweflow-er, and thenup- 
on an-oth-er; so he said, Pret-ty bee! will you 
come and play with me ? But the bee said, No, I 
must not be i-dle, I must go and gath-er hon-ey. 

Lesson 4. 

Then the i-dic boy met a dog: and he said, 
Dog ! will you play with me ? But4;he dog said* 
No, I must not be i-dle, I am go-ing to watch. 
' my mas-ter's house. I must make haste for fe^ - 



46 Lessons of TWO Syllables. 

bad men may get in. Then the lit-tle boy went 
to a hay-rick, and he saw a bird pull-ing some j 
hay out of the hay-rick, and he said, Bird ! will 
you come and play with me ? But the bird said, 
No, I must not be i-dlc I must get some hay to 
build my nest with; and some moss and some 
wool ( So the bird flew away. 

Lesson 5. 

Then the i-dle boy saw a horse, and he said, 
Horse ! will you play with me ? But the horse 
said, No, "I must not be i-dle; I must go and 
plough, or else there will be no corn to make 
bread of. Then the lit-tle boy thought to him- 
self, What, is no-bo-dy i-dle? then lit-tle boyfc 
must not be i-dle nei-ther. So he made haste, and 
went to school, and learn-ed his les-son ve-ry 
well, and the mas-ter said he was a ve-ry good boy. 

Lesson 6. 

Thom-as, what a clev-er thing it is to read ! 
A lit-tle while a-go, you know, you could on4y 
read lit-tle words ; and you were for-ced to spell 
tliemc-a-t, cat; d-o-g, dog. Now you can read 
pret-ty sto-ries, and I am go-ing to tell you some. 

I will tell you asto-rya-boutalamb. — There 
was once a shep-herd, who had a great ma-ny 
sheep and lambs. He took a great deal of care 
of them ; and gave them sweet fresh grass to eat, 
and clear wa-ter to drink ; and if they were sick, 
he was ve-ry good to them ; and when they climb- 
ed up a steep hill, and the lambs were ti-red* he 
u-sed to car-ry them in his arms ; and when they 
were all eat-ing their sup-pers in the field, he 
u-sed to sit upon a stile, and pky them a tune, 
and sing to them ; and so they were hap-py sheep 
and lambs. But always at night this shep-herd 
HHsed to pen them up in: a fold* 



» 

Lessons of TWO Syllables. 49 

♦hat do you want, you black dog ? We do not 
pow you. Then the dog went to Ralph the ser- 
knt, and pull-ed him by the coat, and pull-ed 
Sm till he brought him to the ditch; and the 
|)g and Ralph be-tween them got the lit-tle 
Dy out of the ditch ; but he was all over mud, 
kd quite wet, and all the folks laugh-ed at him 
e-cause he was a cow-ard. 

Lesson n. 

One day, in the month of June, Thoma9 had 
{ot all his things ready to set out on a little 
aunt of pleasure with a few of his friends, but 
he sky became black with thick clouds, and on 
hat account he was forced to wait some time in 
uspense. . Being at last stopped by a heavy 
hower of rain, he was so vexed, that he could 
tot refrain from tears; and sitting down in a 
ulky humour, would not suffer any one to 
iomfort him. 

Towards night the clouds began to vanish; 
;he sun shone with great brightness, and the 
Irholeface of nature seemed to be changed. Ru- 
pert then took Thomas with him into the fields, 
M the freshness of the air, the musicof the birds, 
\nd the greenness of the grass, filled him with 
"Measure. " Do you see," said Robert, " what 
change has taken place ? Last night the ground 
'as parched: the flowers, and all the things 
jemed to droop. To what cause must we im- 
Lite this happy change?" Struck with the tolly 
If his own conduct in the morning, Thomas *vas 
>rced to admit, that the useful rain which fell 
lat morning had done all this good. 

* C 



50 



Word* of TWO Syllables. 



Words of TWO Syllables, accented on the seconi 



Ac base 

a-ttate 

abwhor 

ab-jure 

a-bove 

a-bout i 

ab-solve I 

ab-surd 

ac-cept 

ac-count 

• 

ac-cuse 
ac -quaint 
ac-quire 
ac-quit , 
adduce 
ad -here „.. 
ad-jure 
ad-just 
ad-mit 
a-dorn 
•d-vice 
atl-vise 
a~far 
af-fair 
• af-fix 
af-flict 
af-front 
ai-fraid 
a-gain 

a-gaiast 
ag-gress 

ag-grieve 



I 



a-go 

a-larm 

a-las 

a-lert 

a*like 

a-live 

al-lege 

al-lot 

al-lude 

al-iure 

al-ly 

a-loft 

a-lon£ 

a- long 

a-loof 

a- maze , 

a-mend * 

a-niong 

armuse 

an-noy 

ap-peal 

ap-pear 

ap-pease 

ap-j>laatf 

ap-ply 

ap-point 

ap-proach 

ap-prove 

a-rise 

ar-raign 

ar-rest 

as-cend 



as*cerit 

a-shore 

a-side 

as-sault 

as-sent 

as-sert 

as-sist 

as-sume^. 

aa-sure 

a-stray 

a-stride 

a-tone 

at-tend 

at- test 

at-tire 

at- tract 

a-vail 

a- vast 

a-venge 

a-verse 

a-vert 

a-void 

a-vow 

aus-tere 

a-wait 

a- wake 

a-ware 

a- wry 

Bap-tize 
be-causc 
be-come 
be-dawb 






be-fore 
be-head 
be-hold 
be-1 ie ve 
be-nenth 
be*nign 
be-numb 
be-quest 
Be-seech 
be-seem 
be-set 
J bedsides 
Be-siege 
be-smeaj* 
be~sfytoke 

Jfre-speak 
be-*tir 
be-stow 

| bestride 

Ibe-tide 

jbe-times 
be^ay t 
be4*oth • 
be^Rreen 

be«Yl3 

beMvare 

be.#ttih 

be»i 




Words of TWO Syllables. 



i-hance 
i-join 

i-large 

ti-rage 

ti-rich 

n-robe 

n-rol 

n-slave 

h-sue 

n-sure 

n-tail 

n-throne 

n-tice * 

n-tire 

n- tomb 

n-trap 

n-treat 

n-twine 

-quip -* 

-ras6 * 

-rect 

s-cape 

s-cort 

!S-pou*e 

:-spy " # 

:s-tate 

s-teem 

-vade 

-vent 

^vert 



ex-act 
ex-ceed 
ex-cel 
ex-cept " T 
ex-cess 

. ex-change 

,.ex-cise 

ex-cke 

ex-claim 

ex-clude 

ex-cuse 

ex-empt 

ex-ert 

ex-hale 



ex-tinct 

ex-tol 

ex-tort 

ex-tract 

ex-treme 

ex-ude - 

ex-ult 

Fa-tigue 

fer-ment 

fif-teen 

fo-ment 

for-bade 

for-bear 

for-brd 



-viet 

-vince 

pvoke 



ex-hort \ 
ex-ist 
cx-pand 
i| ex-pect 
-^'ex-pend 
; ex-pense.\ 
ex-pert : ") 
ex-pire 
ex-plain 
^ex-plode 
ex-ploit 
ex-plore ,. 
ex-port , 
ex-pose 
ex'*pomid 
ex-press 
ex-pan^e 
ex-teud 
ex-tent 



ex-haustL. fo're-Jiode 



fore-close 

fore-do oin 

fore-go 

fore-know 

fore-run 

fore-shew 

fore-see 

fore-stal 

•fore-fel yj/iu-cn 

fore-warn /Jin-bline 

for-give in-elude 



53 

grim -ace 

gro-tesque 

Im-bibe 

im-bue 

im-mense 

im-mersc 

im-mure 

im-pair 

im-part 

im-peach 

im-pede 

im-pel 

im-pend 

im-plant 

im-plore 

im-ply 

im-port 

im-pofee 

lin-press 

im-print 

im-prove 

im-pure 

im-pute 

/in-cite 



-for-loi n 
for-sake 
for-swear 

forth-with" 
ful-fil 
Gal-loon 
ga-zette 
gen- tee I 



in-crcast 

in-cur 

in-deed r 

iu-dent 

iu-duce 

iu-dtiige 

, in-fecf 

/ iu-fer 



1 
> 



c 









Words of TWO Sylhbtfs. 



fcst\ 

•firm 

•flame 

flate 

fleet 

flict 

form 

fuse 

grate 

herej 

ject " 

lay 

list 

quire 
saae 
scribe 
sert 

>ist 

mare 

pect 

pire 

tall 

till 

itruct 

ult 

end 

ense 

cr 

hral 

rencli 
ngue 

1c 

«t 



i< 



r*we 



:. 



I 



in-veigh 

in-vent 

in-vert 

in-vest ' 

in-yite 

in-voke 

in-volve 

in-ure 

Ja-pan 

je-junc 

jo-cose 

Larinent 

TFani-poojjL 
Maraud 
ma-c)iune 

, , m^ia-tain 
malign 
ma-nur? 
ma-rine 
ma-ture 
mis-£al 
mis-cast 
mis-chance 
mis-count 
mis-deed , 
mis^deem 
mis-give 
mis-hap 

mis-judge 

mis-lay . 
mis-lead 
mis-name 
mis-spend 






1 mis-print 
_ mis-quote 
mis-rule 
mis-take 
mis-teach 
mis-tru$t 
mis-use 
mo-lest 
mo-rosfe 9 
Neg-lect 
O-bey 
ob-ject 
ob-lat£ 
o-bliffc 

ob-lique 

ob-acure 

ob-serve 

ob-struct 

ob-tain 

ob-tend/ 

foB^Hiide 
ob-tuse 
oc-cult 
oc-cur 
of-fend . 
op-pose 4 
op-press 
or-dain 
out-bid 



out-leap 

out-live 

out-right 

out-nin 

out-sail 

out-shine 

out-shoot 

out-sit 

out-stare 

out-strip 

out-walk 

out-weigft 

out-wit 

Panradf 

pa-role 

par-tafcq 

pa-trol 

per-cuss 
per-fojm 
per-fiime 
per-fuse 
per-haps 
per-mit_ 
per-plcx~ 
j per-sist 
per-spire 
per-suade 
per-tain 
per-vade 









mis-place ( out-gww 



out-brave per-verse 
out-dare 1 per- vert 
out-do 'pe-ruse 
outpace pla-card 

pos-sess 



post-pone 

pre-cede 

pret-clude 

pre-tdict 

pre-fer 

pre-fix 

pre-judge 

pre-mise 

pre-pare 

pre-pense 

pre-sage 

prescribe 

pie-sent 

pre-smq., 

pre-side " 

pre-sume 

pre-tenc£ 

pre-tend 

pre- text 

pre-vaii 

pre- vent m 

nro-ceed 

pro-claim 

pro-cure 

pro-duce 

pro-fane 

pro-fess 

pro-found 

pro-fuse 

pro-ject 

pro-late 

pvo-lix 

Mo-long 

"lo-mote 



IVords o/TWO Syllables. 

pro-mulge 
pronounce 
i pro-pel 



5* 



«•« v 



re-cline 
re-cluse 
re-coil 



re-cord 



pro-pense .re-corn 
pro-pose 
pro-pound 
pro-rogoel 
j>ro-scribe 
pro- tec t 
pro- tend 
pro-test 
pro- tract, 
pro-trude 
jup-vide 
pro-voke 
pur-loin 
pur-sue 
pur-suit. 

Ipur-vey 
Re-bate 

re-bound 

re-buff 

re-build 

re-buke 

re-call 

re-cant 

re-cede 

re-ceipt 

re-ceive 

re- cess 



re-hear 

re-ject 

re-joice 

re-joiu 

re-lapse 



re-count f re-late 



^L, 



re-course fi Pretax 



re-cruit 

re-cur 

re-daub 

re-deem 

re-donbt4-US:lieve 

re-dound re-light 



re-lay 

re-lease 

re-lent 

re-lief 



-\. 



re-charge 

re-cite 
re-ciaim 



re-dress 
re-duce 

re-fect 
.resfier 

re-fine 
re-fit 

re-flect 

re-ftoat 

re-flow 

re-form 

re-tract 

re-frain 

re-fresh 

"re-f u nd 

re-fuse 

re-fute 

re-gain 

re-gale 

re-gard 

re-grate 
re-gret 



re-lume 



i 



re-iy 



t 



re-mam 
re-maud 

re-mark 

re-mind , 

re-mi s$ 

re-morse 

re-mote 

re-move 

je-roount 

re-new 

re-nounce 

re-nown 

re-pair 

re-past 

re-pay 

re'-peal 

re-peat 

re-pel 

re-pent 

C4 



li 



J£j!i , 



^y 



^^ 



*m 



■V 



w .♦ 



56 

re-pine 
re-place 
re-plete 
re-ply 
xe-port 
xe-pose 
re-press 
xe-prieve 
re-print 
xe-proach 
xe-proof 
xe-prove 
xe-pulse 
xe-pute 
xe-quest 
.xe-quire 
xe-quite 
xe-seat » 
xe-scind'j/ 

xe-serve 

xe-sign 

xe-sist 

revive 

xe-spect ■ 

xe : store 

re-tam 

xe-tard 

xe-tire 

re-treat . 

re- turn 

re-venge 

re-vere 



Words of TWO Syllables. 



<^ 



re-volve 

re-ward ' 

ro-mance 

Sa-late 

se-clude 

se-cure J 

se-dan -"* 

se-datc 

se-duee 

se-lect 

se-rene 

se-vere * 

sin-ceue • f 

sub-due 

sub-duct 

sub-join 

sub-lime 

sub-mit *• 

siib-oriu 

sub-scribe- 

sub-side- 

sub-sist 

sub- tract 

sub-vert^ 

suc-ceed 

•aic-cinct 

■suf-fice 
^usj-opest 



un-clas|» 

un-close 

utl-coiiilj 

un-do 

un-done 

un-dress 

un-fair 

un-fed 



re-vile 



.sup-ply 
sup-porM; 
sup-pose 
sup-press'- 

sur-round 

suv-vev 



sus-pend v 

sus-pense / 
There-on [ 
there-of 
there-with 
torriuent 
tra-duce 
trans-act 
trans-cend* |ui 
trans-cribe un-fold 
trans-fer un-gird 
trans-fonpf un-girt 
'Trans-giess un-glue 
trans-latejjin-hinge, 
trans-mitH un-hook 
trahs-pire un-horst 
trans-plant uh-hurt 
trans-pose u-nite * 
Fre-pan f un-just 
trus-tee "* fc 

Un-apt 
un-bar 
un -bend 
un-bind 
un-blest 
un-bolt 
un-born 
un-bought 
un-bound 
un-brace 
un-case 
un-caught 
un chain 



un-knit, 
un^iirfr^ 
un-lacc 
un-ladf 
un-Tiki 
un-Jottl 
ijjui-lock 

Ihft-loOSf 

it n -man 

un-masl 

un-moo: 

un-paid 

un-ripe 

un-saff 



1 



iir.*. , Ii->si'j ■! un-sav 



Lessons of THREE Syllables. 



.57 



un-seen 
un-shod 
un-sound 
un-spent 
'unstop 



tfn-.taught ] up-braid ' 



un-tie 4 

un-true 

un-twist 

un-wise 

un-yoke 



4 ,i— - 



up-hold 

u-si*rp 

Where-as' 

with-al 

with-draw 

with-hold 



with-in 
with-out 
with-stand 
Your-self 

your-selves 

» 

i 

> i . 



Entertaining and instructive Lessons \ in xoords 
- not exceeding three Syllables. 

Lesson i. 

GOLD is of a deep yellow colour. It is very 
pretty and bright. It is a great deal heav-i-er 
than any thing else. Men dig it out of the 
ground. Shall I take my spade and get some? 
No, there is none in this country. It cqmes from 
a great way off; and it lies deeper a great deal 
than you could dig with your spade. 

Guineas are made of gold; and .so are. half 1 
guineas, and watches sometimes. The looking* 
glass frame, and the picture frames, are gilt with 
gold. What is leaf gold ? It is gold beaten very 
thin, thinner than leaves of paper. 

; --LgSSON % 

Silver is white and shining. Spoons are made 5 
nf silver, and waiters, and crowns, and half- 
crowns, and shillings, and six-pen-ces. Silver 
conies from a great way off; from P^rvi. 

Copper is red. The kettles and pots are made 
of copper ; and brass is made of copper* -Brass is 
bright and yello w 3 almost like gold. The sauce- 
pans are made of brass ; and the locks upon the 
(iopr, and the can-dle-3ticks. W hut is that. green 

C 5 



- - ■*- 



-- -*- 



*!*— 



5ft lessons qf THREE Syllables. 

upon the sauce-pan? It is rusty; the green is 
called ver-di-gris ; it would kill you if you were 
to eat it 

Lesson s. 

Iron is very hard. It is not pretty ; but I do 

* not know what we shall do without it, for it 
makes us a great many things. The tongs, and 
the poker, and shovel, are made of iron. Go 
and ask Dobbin if he can plough without the 

$ lough-share. Well,, what does he say ? He says 
Jo, he cannot. But the plough-share is made 
of iron. Will iron melt in the fixe ? Put the po- 
ker in and try. Well, is it melted ? No, but it 
is red hot, and soft ; it will bend. But I will 
tell you, Charles; iron will melt in a very, very 
hot fire, when it has been in a great while ; then 
it will melt. 

Come, let us go to the smith's shop. What is 
ke doing ? He has a forge : he blows the fire 
with a great pair of bellows to make the iron hot. 
Now it is hot. Now he takes it out with the 
tongs, and puts it upon the anvil. Now he beats 
it with a hammer. How hard he works \ The 
sparks fly about : pretty bright sparks ! What 
is the blacksmith making ? He is making nails, 
and horse-shoes, and a great many things. 9. 

Lesson 4. 

Steel is made of iron. Steel is very bright an4 

' hard., Knives and scissors are made of steel. - 

i Lead is soft, aqd very heavy. Here is a piece : 

lift it. There is lead in the casement ; and the 

[ spout is lead, and the cistern is lead, and bullets 

* are made of lead. Will lead melt in the fire? 
Try: throw a piece in. Now it is altn^Jted, 



fc 






Lessons of THREE Syllables. * Sq 
apd runs dawn among the ashes below the grate. 
What a pretty bright colour it is of now! 

Tin is white and soft. It is bright too. The 
dripping-pan and the re-flect-or are all cov-er- 
ed with tin, 

Quick-sii-ver is very bright, like silver; and 
it is very heavy. See how it runs about ! You 
cannot catch it. You cannot pick it up. There 
is quick-sil-ver in the weath-er-glass. 

Gold, silver, copper, iron, lead, tin, quick-sil- 
ver; one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, met* 
als. They are ail dug out of the ground. 

Lesson 5. 

There.was a little boy whose name was Harry, 
and his papa and mamma sent him to school. 
Now Harry was a clever fellow, and loved his 
book ; and he got to be first in his class. So his 
mamma got up one morning yery early, and 
called Betty the maid, and said, Betty, I think 
we must make a cstke for Harry, for he h^s learn- 
ed his book very well* And Betty said, Yes, 
with all my heart. So they made tym a nice 
cake. It was very large, and scuffed full of 
plumbs and sweetmeats, orange and citron ; and 
it was iced all over with sugar : it was white and 
smooth on the tqp |ike snow. So this cake wa$ 
sent to the school When little Harry saw if 
he was very glad, and jumped about for joy ; 
anc| he hafcjly staid for a knife to cut a piece, 
but gnawed it with bis teeth. So he ate till 
the ]?ell rang for school, and after school he ate 
again, and ate till lie went to bed ; nay, he laid 
his cake under his pillow, aqd sat up in th# 
uight to eat some. 

C6 



60 Lessons of three Syllables. 

•He ate till it was all gone. — But soon after, 

this little boy was very sick, and ev-e-ry body 

said, Iwonder what is the matter with Harry ; 

he used to be brisk, and play about more nimbly 

than any of the boys; and now he looks pale 

and ifc very ill. And some-bo-dy said Harry has 

liad a rich cake, and eaten it all up very soon, 

and that has made him ill. So they sent for 

Doctor Rhubarb, and he gave him I do not 

know how much bitter physic. Poor Harry did 

not like it at all, but he was forced to take it, 

or else he would have died, you know. So at 

last he got well again, but his mamma said she 

would send him no more cakes. 

Lesson 6. 

Now there was an-oth-er boy, who was one 
©f Harry's school-fel-lows; his name was Peter: 
the boys used to call him Peter Careful. And 
Peter had written his mamma a very clean pretty 
letter; there was not one blot in it all. So his 
mamma sent him a cake. Now Peter thought 
with himself, I will not make mvself sick with 
this good cake, as silly Harry did; I will keep 
it a great while. So he took the cake; and 
tltgged it up stairs. It M r as very heavy: he 
could hardly carry it. -And he locked it up in 
, his box, and once a day he crept slily up stairs 
and ate a very little piece, and then locked his 
box again. ' So he kept it sev-er-al weeks and 
it was not gone, for it was very large; but be- 
hold \ the mice got ii\to the box and nibbled j 
some. ~And the cake grew dry and mould* 
and at last was good for nothing at all. Sb m 
was o-bli-ged to throw it away, and it grievfd 
him to the ver> heart. 

.J 



Lessons of three Syllables. 6\ 

Lesson 7.' 

Well; there was an-oth-er little boy at the 
same school, whose name was Richard. And 
one day his mamma sent him a cake, because 
she loved him dearly, and he loved her dearly." 
So when the cake came, Richard said to hii 
schooi-fel-lows, I have got a cake, come let us 
go _and eat it. So they came about him like a 
parcel of bees; and Richard took a slice of 
cake himself, and then gave a piece to one, and 
a piece to an-oth-er, and a piece to an-oth-er, 
till it was almost gone. Then Richard put the 
rest by, and said, I will cat it to-mor-row. 

He then went to play, and the boys all 
played to-geth-er mer-ri-ly. But soon after an 
old blind Fiddler came into the court: he had 
a long white beard; and because he was blind, 
he had a little dog in a string to lead him. So 
he came into the court, and sat clown upon a 
stone, and said, My pretty lads, if you will, I 
will play you a tune. And they ail left off 
their sport, and came and stood round him. 

And Richard saw £hat while he pUu.> l * } ' 
tears ran down his cheeks. And Richanr- ,_ 
Old man, why do you cry? Andtheoldmaasaai, 
Because I am very hungry: I have no-bo-dy 
to give me any dinner or supper: I have 
nothing in the world but this little dog-: and I 
cannot work. If I could work I would. Then 
Richard went, without saying a word, and 
fetched the rest of his cake, which he had in- 
tend-ed to have eaten an-oth-er d iv, a.;.. I lie 
*aid, Here, old man, litre is some c; k'. d.: you. 

The old man said, Where is it? Ioj J a»;i 1 ^iud, 



% 



4 



62 Lessens of THREE Syllables. 

I cannot see it. So Richard put it into Iifs 
hat. And the Fiddler thanked him, and 
Richard was more glad than if be had eaten 

ten cakes. 

Pray which do you Ipve best? Do you love 
H^rry best, or Peter best, or Richard best ? 

Lesson 8. 

The noblest em-ploy*raent for the mind of 
man is to study the works of his Cre-a-tor. 
To him whom the science of nature de-light- 
eth> er-e-ry object bringeth a proof of his God 
[ His mind is lifted up to heaven every moment, 
and his life shews what irde-a he en-ter-taius oi 
e-ter-nal wisdom. If he cast his eyes towards 
| the clouds, will he not find the heavens full oi 
its wonders ? If he look down on the earth, 
doth not the worm proclaim to him, "Less than 
in-fi-nite power could not have formed me ?* 
While the planets pursue their courses; 
I while the sun re-main-eth in his place; while 
-; the comet wai*-der-eth through space, and re- 
\ tinm-eth _f* its des-tin-ed spot again ; who hut 
(3o-I***uld have formed them? Behold how 
-v, • *i "their splendour! yet they do notdi-min- 
ish; !o, how. rapid their motion! yet one run- 
neth not in the way of an-oth-er. Look down 
upon the earth, and see its produce; ex^^m-iue 
its bowels, and behold what they contain: have 
not wisdom and power or-dain-ed the whole? 
Who biddeth the grass to spring up ? Who 
wa-rter-eth it ^t due seasons ? Behold the ox 
croppeth it ; the horse and the sheep, do they 
not feed upon it ? Who is he that pro-vi-deth 
< for them, but th$ Lord? 



-vir 



Words of THREE Syllables. 



6$ 



Words qf three Syllables, accented on the first 

Syllable, 



Ab-di-cate 

ab-ju-gate 

ab-ro-g&tc 

ab-so-lute 

ac-ci-dpnt 

ac-cu-rate 

ac-tu-ate 

ad-ju-tant 

ad-mi -ral 

adrvo-cate 



af-fa-ble 

ag-o-ny 

al-der-mai* 

a-Ii-en 

am-nesrty 

am-pli-fy 

an-ar-chy 

an-ces-tor 

an-i-mal 

an-i-mate 

an-riu-al 

ap-pe-tite 

ar-a-ble 

ar-gu-ment 

ar-mo-ry 

ar-ro-gant 

av-a-rice 
au-dit*or 
au-gu-rjr 
au-thor-ize 



: "«^ 



J8ach-e-lor 
back-sli-der 
back-ward-ness 
bail-a-ble 
bal-der-dash 
ban-ish-ment 
* bar-ba-rous 
bar-ren-ness 
baF-ris-ter 
bash-ful-ness 
bat-tie-man t 
beau-ti-ful 
ben-errfice 
beu-e-fit 
big-ot-ry 
blas-phe-my / 
bleod-suck-er" 
blun-der-buss 
blun-der-er 
I blun-der-ing 
blus-ter-er 
bois-ter-ous 
book-bind-er 
bor-ro-wer 
bot-tom-less 
bot-tom-ry 
boun-ti-ful 
bro-ther-Jy 
bur-den -some 
bur-gla-ry 
bu-ri-al 



- r 



Cab-in-et 

cal-cu-Iate 

cal-en-dar 

cap-it-al 

cap-ti-vate 

car-di-nal 

care-fuMy 

car-mel-ite 

car pen-tec 

cas-u-al 

cas-u-ist 

cat-a-logue 

cat-e-chise 

cat-e-chism 

cel-e-brate 

cen-tu-ry 

cer-ti-fy 

cham-ber-maid 

cham-pi-oii 

char-ac-ter 

char-i-ty 

chas-tise-ment 

chiv-al-ry 

chem-i-cal 

chem-is-try 

cin-pa-inon 

cir-cu-late 

cir-cum-llex 

cir-cura-spect 

cir-c iin 1 -btanc* 

clam-orovs 



64 

clar-i-fy ■ 

clas-si-c»l 

clean-U-ness 

co-gen-cy 

cog-ni-zance 

col-o-ny 

com-e-dy 

com-fort-less 

com-ic-al 

com-pa-ny 

com-pe-teot 

coui-pl&'ment 

cpm-pli-nie'it 

com-pio-mise 

con-fei-ence 

con-fi-dence 

con-fta-cnce ■ 

cori-gm-oui ■ 

con-ju-gai 

con-quer-or 

con -se-c rate 

\ con-se-queuce 
con-sou-ant 

i con-starble 
* con-stan-cy 

^.con-sti-tute 
■ eon-ti-nence 
■con-tra-ry 
con-ver-sant 
co-pi-ous 

■ c'or-di-al 
cor-iiio-iant 
*or-o-uer 

fitH 



Words of three Syllables. 

del-i-cat€ 
dep-u-ty 
der-o-gate 
des-o late 



cor-pu-lent 
cos-tive-ness 
cost-H-ness 
cov-e-nant 
cov-er-ing 
cov-et-ous 
coun-sel-lor 
coun-ten-ance 
covin- ter-fe it 
couii-tei-paue 
cour-te-ous 
court-li-ness 
cow-ard-ice 
craf-ti-ness 
cied-i-ble 
cred-i-tor 
cfim-i-nal 
crit-i-cal "■-. 
crooo-dile 
crook-ed-ness 
cru-ci-fy 
cru.-cli-ty 
cru-el-ty 
crus-ri-ness 
cn-bi-cal 
cu-cum-ber 
cul-pa-hle 
cul-tUvate 
cu-ri-ous 
cus-to-dy 
cus-tom-er 
Dan-ger-ous 
de-cea-cy 
'"' *-cate 



ded-i. 



des-pe-rate 
des-ti-ny 
des-ti-tute .' 
det-ri-ment 
dev-i-ate 
di-a-dem 
di-a-logue 
di-a-per 
dil-i-gence 
dis-ci-plme 
dis-lo-cate 
doc-u-ment 
do-lo-rons 
dow-a-get^- 
dra-pe-ry ' 
dul-ci-mer 
du-ra-lde 
EI>-o-ny 
ed-it-or 
ed-u-cate 
el-e-gaut 
el-e-ment 
el-e-phant 
el-e-vate 
el-o-quence 
em-in-ent 
em-pe-ror 
em-pha-ais 
em-u-late 
i-e-njjr ... 



en-er-gy 
en-ter-prise 
es-ti-mate 
ev-e-ry 

ev-id-ent 

ex-cel-lence 

ex-cel-Ient 

ex-cre-ment 

ex-e-crate 

ex-e-cute 

ex-er-cise 

ex-pi-ate 

ex-qui-site 

Fab-ti4ous 

fac-ul-ty 

faith-ful-ty 

fal-la-cy 

fal-li-ble I 

fa-ther-Ws 

faul-ti-ly 

fer-ven-cy 

fes-ti-val 

fe-ver-ish 

filth-i-ly 

fir-ma-ment 

fish-e-ry 

flat-te-ry 

flat-u-lent 

fool-ish-ness 

fop-pe-ry 

for-ti-fy 

for-ward-ness 

fiank-in-cense 

frau-du-lent 



Words of THREE Syllables. 

. \ free-hold-er 
friv-b-ldus : 
fro-ward-ly 
fu-ne-ral 
fur-be-low 
fu-ri-ous 

fur-ni-ture 

fur-ther-more 

Gain-say-er 

gal-lant-ry 

gal-le-ry 

gar-den-er 



gar-m-ture 

gar-ris-on 

gau-di-ly 

gen-er-al 

gen-er-ate *, 

gen-er-ous 

gen-tle-man 

gen-u-ine 

gid-di-ness 

gin-ger-bre«\d 



j glim-mer-ing 
glo-ri-fy 
glut-ton-ous 
god-li-ness 
oor-man-dize 
gov-em-ment 
gov-er-nor 
grace-ful-ness 
grad-u-ate 
grate-fut-ly 
grat-i-fy 
grav-it-ate 



65 

J gree-di-ness 
griev-ous-ly 
gun-pow-der 
Hand-i-ly 

hand-ker-chief 
har-bin-ger 
harm-less-ly 
I har-mo-ny 
haugh-ti-ness 
heav-i-ness 
bep-tar-chy 
her-ald-ry 
her-e-sy 
her-e-tic 
her-it-age 
ber-Tiiit-nge 
hid-e-ous 
hind-er-most * 
his-to-ry 
hoa-vi-ness 
ho-li-ness 
hon-es-ty 
hope-tul-ness 

hor-rid-ly 

hos-pi-tal 

hus-band-man 

hyp-o-crite 

I-dle-nt'ss 

ig-no-rant 

im-i-tate 

im-pli-nu'nt 

im-pli-care 

im-po-tcnce- 

im-pre-ciue 



JP »"Y L I 



66 



4 



^ 



im-pu-deut 
in-ci-dent 
in-cR-eate 
in dngtnt 
in-do-lent 
in-dus-try 
in-fa-jay 
in-fan-cy 
iu-fi-nite 
in-flu-ence 
In-jiwy 
in-ner-most 
in-no-cence 
in-no-vate 
in-so-lent 
in-stant-ly 
in-sti-tute 
in-stru-ment 
*in-ter-course 
in-tcr-rdict 
.in-ter-est 
in-ter-val 
in-ter-vi$w 
in-ti-mate 
in-tri-cate 
Joc-u-lar 
jol-li-aeas 
jo-vi-al 

ju-gu r lar 
jus-ti-fy 

Kid-nap-per 
kil-der-kin 
kins-wo-tnan 
kria-visk~ly 



Words of THREE Syllables. 

mel-low-ness 

mel-o-dy 

melt-ingJy 



knot-ti-ly 
La-bour-er 






ar-ce-ny 
at-e-raf 
eg-a-cy 
en-Uty 
ep-ro-sy 
eth~ar-gy 
ev-er-et 
ib-er-al 
ib-er*tine 
ig-a*ment 
ike-H4iood 
i-on-ess 
it-er-al 
of-ti-neas 
ow-li-ness 
u-na-oy \ 
u-na-tic \ 
ux-u-ry 
Mag-ni-fy 
ma-jes-ty 
main-ten-ance 
mal-a-pert 
man^age^ment 
man-ful-ly 
man-i-fest 
| man-li-ness 
man-u~al 
man-u*script 
mar-i-gold 
Hiar-in-er 

mar-rqw-borie 
mas-cu-line 



mem-o-ry 
men-di-cant 
mer-can-tile 
mer-chan-dise 

mer-ci-ful 

mer-ri-inent 

min-e-ral 

min-is-ter 

mir-a~cle 

mis-chiev-ous 

mod-e-rate 

mon-u-ment 

moun-te-bank 

mourn-ful-ly 

mul-ti-tude 

mu-si-cal 

mu-ta-ble 

mys-te-ry 

Na-ked-ness 

nar-ra-tive 

nat-iural 

neg-a-tive 

neth-er-most 

nighMu-gale 

nom-i-nate 

not-a-ble 

no- ta«-ry 

no-ti-fy 

nov-el-ist 

nov-el-ty 






Words qf three Syllables. 



nour-ish-ment 

nu-me-rous 

nun-ne-ry 

nur-se-ry 

nu-tri-roent 

Ob-du-rate 

ob-li-gate 

ob-lo-quy 

ob-so-lete 
ob-sta-cle 

ob-sti-nate 

ob-vi-ous 

oc-cu-py 

oc-u-Hst 

o-di-ous 

o-do-rous 

of-fer-ing 

om-i-nousu 

op-*i-ate 

op-po-site 

op-u-lent 

or-a-cle 

or-a-tor . 

or-der-ly 

or-gau-ist 

or-i-gin 

or-Qa-ment 

or-tho-dox 

o-ver-flow 

o-ver-sight 

out-ward-ly 

al-^a~ble 



*- ml-m. 



67 



b wgue^ 



pa-pa-cy 

par-a-dise 

par-a-dox 

par-a -graph 

par-a-pet 

par-a-phrase A 

par-a-$ite 

par-o-dy 

pa-trirarch ^ 

pat-Ton-age 

peace-a-ble 

pec-to-ral 

pec-u-late 

ped-a~gcx_ 

pcd-^ant-ry 
pen-al-ty 

pcn-e-trate 
pen-i-tence ! 
pen-sive-ly 
pen-u-ry 

per-fect-ness 
per-ju-ry 

per-ma-nence 
pcr-p^-trate 

per-se-cute 
per-sou-age 
per-ti-uence 
pes-ti-lence 

pet-ri-fy 

pet-u-lant 

phys-ic-al 

pi-<>ty 

pil-ftr-er 
I ^i.i-ra«ole 



plen-.ti-.ful 

plun-der-er 

po-et-ry 

pol-i-cv 
poM-tio 
pop-u-lar 
pop-u-lou$ 
pos-si-ble 
po-ta-ble 
po»ten-tate 
pov-er-ty 
prac-ti-cal 
pre-am-ble 
pre-ce-dent 
p res- i- dent 
prev-a-ient 
prin-ci-pal 
pris-on-er 
priv-i-lege 
prob-a-ble 
prod-i-gy 
prof-li-gate 
prop-er-ly 
prop-er-ty 
pros-e-cute 
pros-o-dy 
pros-per-ous 
prot-eat>ant 
prov-en-der 
prov-i-dence 
punc-tu-»al 
pun-ish-i 
fpu-ru-le* i 



. r.f 



-* 
A 



.68 



Words of THREE Syllables. 



T 



Qual-i-fy 

quan-ti-ty 

quar-rel-some 

quei-u-lous 

qui -< t-ness ' 

llad-i-oal 

ra-kish-ness 

rav-e-nous 

re-cent-ly 

rec-om-pence 

ren>e-dy 

ren-o-vate 

rep-ro-bate 

re-qui-site 

ret-ru-graJe 

rev-e-rend 

rhet-o-iic 

rib-ald-ry 

rijjht-e-ous 

riv-u-kt 

rob-be-ry 

rot-ten-uess 

roy-al-ty 

ru-mi-naie 

rus-ti-cate 

Sac-ra-ment' 

sac-ri-iice 

sal-a-ry 

sanc-ti-fv "* 



•^s 



sa-vou-ry 
scrip-tu-ral 
scru-pu-lous 
se-cre-cy 
sec-u-lar 
sen-su-al 
sep-a-rate 
ser-vi-tor 
sev-er-al 
sin-is-ter 
sit-u-ate 
slip-pe-ry 
soph-is-try 
sor-ce-ry 
spec-ta-cle' ' 
stig-ma-tize \ 
strat-a-gem *~~7 
straw-ber-ry "-\ 
stren-u-ous 
sub-se-quent 
suc-cu-lent 
suf-fo-cate 
sum-ma-ry 
sup-ple-ment 
sus-te-nanee 
syc-a-more 
syc-o-phant 
syl-io-gism 
sym-pa-thize 
syn-a-gogue 
Tom-pome . 
i len-dtii-cy 
; ten-der-ness 



- 



tes-ta- 
tit-u-1 
tol-e-: 
trac-t; 
treacl) 
tur-bi 
tur-p< 
tyr»-ar 
U-su- 

U-SU-1 
U-Sll-1 

ut-ter 
Va-ea 
vac-U- 
vag-a- 
ve-he- 
ven-e- 
ven-. • 
ver-i-1 

m 

vet-e-: 
vic-to- - 
viHa : f 

Wzy-t? 

j 

wil-dei 
w-on-dt 
wor-tli; 
wrong-, *f 
Yel-lou ■aJr" 

youtl>" . 
Zeal-- "-• 



i 






z rfH 

.-- xsr-Wfc 

* 

*R*fc 



ra 



:i 









H:EE Syllables. 




^jViut | un-com 




■-ly Vice-gt 




B-thy | vin-dtc 




H 




ewer^ 






^Hffi/w, accented 




■IWf, 








■=L: 


m-ler- 




^K-e 


in-ter- 
in-ter- 




nl 


m-ter- 




tar 


in-tcr- 




fcitit 


in-lcr- 




^Brovc 






•\c 


in-ter- 




nieiid 


m-ter- 




jl<>.<' 


Mag-a 




cent 


mis-ajj 




bant 


tuis-bt 




;:>, 


1 >-ver< 




,,, 






ill 


o-\ei- 




^ftiu 


■ 




B-;i,k- 


■ i 




^Bcr 






...11 


O-VCL- 




■ re 






— Eue 


Pet-ae 




rate 


Rec-ol 




■ ■ fete 


I'CC-Oll 

re-ton 




Bt 


rc-ta-i 




D 







68 Words of three Syllables. 

Qual-i-fy j 5a-vou-ry 
quan-ti-ty scrip-tu-ral 

quar-rel-some scru-pu-ious 
quct-u-lous se-cre-cy 



qiu-tt-ness" - 

Kad-i-caT 

ra-kish-ness 

rav-e-nous 

re-eent-ly 

rec-om-pence 

rem-e-dy 

ren-o-vate 

rep-ro-bate 

re-qui-site 

ret-ru-irmJe 

rev-e-reiid 

rliet-o-iic 

rib-ald-ry 

rijyht-e-ous 

rit-u-^l 

riv-u-Ict 

rob-be-ry 

rot-ten-ness 

rov-al-ty 

ru-mi-nale 

rus-ti-cate 

Sac-ra-ineut' 

sac-ri-fice 

sal-a-ry 

sane-ti-f V "* 



sec-u-lar 

sen-su-al 

sep-a-rate 

ser-vi-tor 

sev-er-al 

sin-is-ter 

sit-u-ate 

slip-pe-ry 

soph-is-try 

sor-c«-ry 

spec-ta-cle 

stig-ma-tize 



- 



*»* 



--•*JlJl 



strat-a-gem 
straw-ber-ry 
stren-u-ous • 
sub-se-quent 
suc-cu-lent 
suf-fo-cate 
sum-ma-ry 
sup-ple-ment 
sus-te-nanee 
syc-a-more 
syc-o-phant 
syl-io-gism 
sym-pa-thize 
syn-a-gogue 
Tcm-po-rize, 
i ten-dtii-cy 
ten-cter-ness 



tes-ta-ment 

tit-u-lar 

tola-rate 

trac-ta-ble 

treach-er-ous 

tur-bu-lent 

tur-pen-ticc 

tyr-an-nise 

U-su-al 

u-su-rer 

u-su-ry 

ut-ter-ly 

Va-can-cy 

vac-U-um 

vag-a-bond 

ve-he-ment 

ven-e-rate 

ven-^m-ous 

ver-i-ly" - . 

yet-e-ran 

vic-to-ry 

vil-lai-Tty 

vi-o-late 

Way-far-ing 

wick-ed-'&e&s 

\vil-der-nesa ' 

vvon-der-fal 

wor-thi-ness 

w long-ipl-ly 

YH-low-ness 

ycs-Ur-day 

yout!>ral-ly 






'■jfrw 



L_^ 



/i>»*2»W 



A 1 



.1— 



ti iec-tive. 

ef-ful-gent 

e-!ec-tive 

C-lev-en 

c-U'-cit 

P-lon-gate 

e-lu-sive 

em-bar-go 

em-bel-Iish 

enr-bez-zle 

em-bow-el 

em-broi-der 

e-mer-gent 

em-pan-nel 

em-pIoy-m*i*t 

en-a-ble " 

en-am-el . 

€n-caiirp-ment 

em-chant-er 

en-count-er 

en-cour-age 

en-croach-ment 

en-cum-ber 



Words of THREE Syllables. 

en-vi-rons I im-mor-tal 



7* 



e-pis-tte 
er-ra-tic 
es-pou-sals 
e-stab-lish 
e-ter-nal 
ex^alt^ed 
ex-hib-it 
ex-ter-uai' 
ex-tiri-guish 
ex-tir-pate 
Fa-nat-ic 
fan-tas-tic 
fo*ment-er . 
for-bear-ahce / 
for-bid-derT r 
for-get-ful 
1 for-sa-ken 
ful-fil-led 

Gi-gan-tic 

fri-mal-kin 
lar-mon-ics - 
hence-for-ward 



en-deav-our here-af-ter 
en-dorse-ment t her-met-ic 
en-du-rance I he-Jro-ic 



e-ner-vatfe 

eu-fet-ter 

en-large-merit 

en-light-en - 
CD-su-rante 
eu-tice-ment 
^n-vel-ope 






hi-bef-nal 

hu-mane-ly 

I-de-a 

il-lus-trate 

im-a'-gine 

im-mod-est 

im-pair-ment 



im-peach-ment 

im-pel-lenfc 

im-port-er 

im-pos-lor 

im-pris-ori . 

iui-pru-deat 

in-car-nate 

in-cen-tivc * 

in-clu-sive 

in-cul-cate 

in-cum-bcnt 

in-debt-ed 

ia-de-cent 

in-den-ture 

in-duce-ment 

ib-dul-gencc 

in-fer-nal 

in-fla-mer 

in-for-mal 

in-form-er 

m-fringe-men 
in-hab-it 
lli-he-rent 
ifc-her-it 
in-hib-it 
in-hu-man 
in-qui-ry 
in-sip-id 
' in-spir-it 

ih-stinct-ivfe 
in-struct-or 
in-ven-tor 



V*" 



#« 



Words of three Syllables] 



in-ter-ment 

in-ter-nal 

in-ter-pret 

in-tes-tate 

in-tes-tine 

in-trin-sic 

in-val-id 

in-vei-gle 

J^-ho-vah 

La-con-ic 

lieu- ten-ant 

ma-lig-nant 

ma-raud-er 

ma-ter-nigil 

ma-ture-ly 
nie-an-der 
• me-clian-ic 
mi-nute-ly 
nus-conrduct 
mis-no-Hier 
»°OTiia&-tic 
: : ore-o-vcr i 

IsVg-Uct-ful 

Hoc-tur-nal 

Ob-jectxor 

ob-ii-ging 

ob-lique-ly.. 
i'J> scrv-anep * 

t'f--(.'iid-er 

of-f'en-fiive 
op-po-hent 
or-jran-ic. 



» •» 



Pa-cif-ic 

par-ta-ker 

pa-tbet-ic 

pel-1 u-cid 

per-fu-mer 

per-spec-tive 

per-verse-ly 

po-lite-ly 

po-fli&*tum 

per-cep-tive 

pre-pa-rer 

pre-sump-tive! le-cure-Iy 

pro-ceed-ing 

pro-due- tive 

pro-phet-ic 

pro-po-sal . 

pros-pect-ive 

pur-su-ance 



re-sem-bic 

re-sist-ance 

re-spect-ful. 

r£-venge-ful 

re-view-er 

re-vi-ler 

re-vi-val 

re-volt-er 

re-ward-er 

Sar-cas-tic 

scor-bu-tic 



se-du-cer 
se-ques-ter 
se-rene-ly 
sin-cere-ly 



spec-ta-tor 
sub-mis-si ve 
^Quint-es-sencc tes-ta-tor 
Re-coin-age i thanks-giv-ing 



re-d^em-er 

re-dun-jlant 

re^lin-quish 

re-Iuc-tant 

to-main -der 

re-m^m-ber 

n*-mem-brance 
^miss-ness 

^-morse-less- 

re-no\vn-ed 

re-p!en-ish 
ire-plt/'-vy 
fre-proach-ful 



to-bac-co / 
to-getb-er 
trans-pa-rent 
tri-bu-nal 

tri-um-phant 
Un-cov-er 
un-daunt-ed 
.lin-e-qual 
un-fVuit-ful 
un-god-Iy 
un-grate-ful 
un-ho-ly 
un-learn-ed 



r * . 



Words of THREE Syllables. 



73 



un-ru-ly 

un-skiUful 

un-sta-bte 



un-thanlc-ful 

un-tinie-ly 

un-wor-thy 



un-com mon 
Vice-ge-rent 
vin-dic-tive 



/ 



Words of THREE Syllables, accented on the 

last Syllable. 



Ac-qni-esce 

af-ter-noon 

al-a-mode 

am- bus-cade 

an-ti-pope 

ap-per-tam 

ap-pre-hend 

lial-us-trade 

bar-ri-cade 

bnm-ba-zm 

brig-ardier 

buc-ca-ueer ■[ 

Car-a-van \ 

cav-al-cade " 

cir-cum-scribe 

cir-cum-vent 

co-in.-cide 

coiu-plai-sance 

cora-pre-hend 

con-de-scend 

con- tra- diet i 

con-tro-vert 

cor-res-pond ' 

couri-ter-inini . 

coun-ter-vail 

13ck-o-nair 



dis-a-buse 

dis-a-grce 

dis-al-low 

dis-an-nul 

dis-ap-pear 

clis-ap-point 

dis-ap-prove 

dis-be-iieve 

dis-com-mend 

dis-com-pose 

dis-con-tent 

dis-en-cbant 

dis-en-gage / 

dis-en-thral 

dis-es-tcem 

dis-o-bey 

En-ter-tain 

Gas-con-ade 

g«iz-et-teer 

Here-up-on 

Jm-ma-ture 

im-por-tune 

in-com-inode 

iu-coin-plete 

in-ct/r-rect 

in-dis-creet 



t- 

i 



in-ter-cede 

in-ter-cept 

in-ter-cbange 

in-ter-fere 

in-ter-]ard- 

in-ter-lopc 

in-ier-mit 

in-ter-mix 

in-ter-vene 

Mag-a-zine 

mis-ap-ply 

mis-be-have 

O-ver-charge 

enver-flow 

o-ver-lay 

over-look 

o-ver-spread 

o-ver-take 

o-ver-throw 

o-vcr-turn 

o-ver-whelm 

Per-se-vere 

Rec-ol-lcct 

rec-om-niend 
re-c6n-vene 
re-ia-fcrce 
D 



rr 



74 W 

ref-u-gce 

rep-ar-tee 

rep-re-hend 

rep-re-sent 

rep-ri-Hiand 

Ser-e-nade • 



Words of THREE Syllable 



/ 



J su-per-scribe 
su-per-sede 
Thcre-up-on 
Un-a-ware 
un-be-lief 
un-dei>go »/ 



un-der-mine 
un-der-stand 
un-dcr-teke 
un-der-worth 

Vi-o-lin 
vol-un-teer 

n 



Words of three Syllables, pronounced as two 
and accented on the first Syllable. 

RULES. • - 



Cion, sion, tion, sound like 
shon, either in the middle, 
or at the end of Words. 

Ce 9 ci, sci, si 9 and ti t like sh. 

Cialy tialy sound like shal. 



Cian, lion, like tiara. 

Cient, tient, like thtnt. 

Cious, scious, and tious, like 

shus. 
Science, tience^ like sht&e* 



Ac-ti-on .. 


Man-si-on 


po-ti 


-on 




« 


an-ci-ent 


mar-ti-al 


pre^-ci-ous 




auc-ti-on 


men-ti-on 


Quo-ti-ent 




Cap-ti-ous 


mer-si-on 


Sanc-ti-on 




cau-ti-on 


mo-ti-on 


sec-ti-oa 




cau-ti-ous 


Na-ti-on 


spe^fcintf 




con-sci-ence 


no-ti-on 


spe'^ciih* 




con-sci-ous 


nup-ti-al J 


sta-fi-aft 




Dic-ti-on 


O-ce-an "~f "" 


r suoti-o* 




Fac-ti-on 


op-ti-on 


Ten-hi-oi 




fac-ti-ous 


Pac-ti-on 


ter-tMa 




frac-ti-on 


par-ti-al 


trac-ti-MI 


■ 


frac-ti-ous » s 


pas-si-on 


Uiic-ftoi* 




Gra-ci-ous 


pa-ti-ence 


ul-ti*oo. 




Junc-ti-on 


pa-ti-ent 


Vec^tinBit ;*' 


1 


Lo-ti-on 


pen-si-on 


ver-*i*:J 


L; ' 


lus-ci-dus 


por-ti-on 


VI -sj 




If 


/T 


• 


■ 




^H^^^ 


J. 




i 


DLi ^^^^m 


^HA 



Words of FOUR Syllables. 



75 



fVords of TOXjr Syllables, pronounced as THREE, 
and accented on the second Syllable. 



A-dop-ti-on 
af-fec-ti-on % 
af-flic-ti-on 
as-per-si-on 
at-tcn-ti-on 
. ajr.-traoti-on 
au-spi -ci-ous 
Ca-pa-ci-ous 
ces-sa-ti-on 
col-la-ti-on 
com-pas-si-on 
com-pul-si-on 
eon-cep-ti-on , 
"Tfbn-clu-si-oii 
con-fes-si-on . 
con-fu-si-on # 
con-junc-ti-on 
con-struc-ti-on 
con-ten-ti-ous 
con-ver-si-on 
con-vic-ti-ou 
con-vul-si-oxi 
cor-rec-ti-on 
cor-rup-ti-on 
cre-a-ti-on 
De-cooti-on 
cle-fec-ti-on 
de-ii'-ei-ent 
de-jec-ti-on 

de-li'-ci-ous 
de*acrip-ti-on 



de-struc-ti-on 

de-trac-ti-on 

de-vo-ti-on 

dis-cus-si-on 

dis-sen-si-on 

dis-tinc-ti-ou 

di-vi*-si-ou ~" 

E-jec-ti-on 

e-leoti-on 

e-riip-ti-on 

es-sen-ti-al 

ex-aoti-on 

ex-clu-si-on 

ex>j4an-si-on 



Ma-gi"-ci*an 
mu-si"-ci-an 
Nar-ra-ti-on 
Ob-jec-ti-on * 
ob-la-ti-on 
ob-struc-ti-on 
'op-pres-si-on 
op-ti*-ci-an 
o-ra-ti-on 
Per-feoti-on 
pol-lu-ti-on 
pre-dic-ti-on 
jprc-srrip-ti-on 
/pro-mo-ti-on 



ex-pres-si-mi.^ 

ex-pul-si-on ' 

ex-tor-ti-on 

ex-lrac-ti-on 

Fal-la-ci-ous 

foun-rla-ti-ou 

Im-mer-si-nn 

im-par-ti-al 

im-pa-ti-eut • 

im-preb-si-on 

in-junc-ti-on 

in-serip-ti-on 

in-struc-ti-on 

in-ven-ti-pn 

ir-rup-ti-on 

Li-cen-ti-ous 

Jo-gi"-ci-an 



j>ro-por-ti-on 

pro-vin-ci-al 

lle-iec-ti-on 

re-la-ti-on 

rc-ten-ti-on 
Sai-va-ti-on 

'jiib-jec-ti-on 

sub-stan-ti-al 

sub-trac-ti-oii 

sub-ver-si-oti. 

suc-ees-si-ou 

suf-fi^-ci-ent 

sus-pi"-ci-oii 

Tempt-a-ti-on 
rrans-la-ti-oix 
Va-ca-ti-ou 
vex-a-ti-on 

D2 



76 



Words of four Syllables. 



Words of FOUR Syllables, accented on. the FIRST 

Syllable. 



"~Ab-so-lute-ly 
ac-ces-sa-ry 
ac-cu-ra-cy 
ac-cu-rate-ly 
ac-ri-mo-ny 
ac-tu-al-ty 
ad-di-to-ry 
ad-e-quate-ly •■ 
ad-mi-ra-ble 
ad-mi-ral-ty 
acl-ver-sa-ry 
ag-gra-va-ted 
al-a-bas-ter- 
a-li-en-ate 
al-le-go-ry 
al-ter-a-tive 
a-mi-a-ble 
am-ic-a-ble 
am-o-rous-Iy 
an-im-a-ted 
an-nu-al-ly 



*-f 



Bar-ba-rous-ly |cor-ri-gi~ble 



beau-ti-ful-ly 
ben-e-fit-cd 



cred-it-a-ble 
cus-tom-a-ry 



boim-tt-f utaie$s cov-e t-ous-ly 



biil-li-an-cy - J 
bur-go-mas-ter 



Cap-i-tal-ly 

cas-u-ist-ry 

cat-er-pil-lar / dil-i-gent-ly 

cel-ib-a-cy "" ; tfTs-pu-ta-ble 

cen-su-ra-bley 



cer-e-mo-ny 
cir-cu-la-ted 



Dan-ger-ous-Iy 
del-i-carcy 
des-pi-ca-ble 
dif-fi-cul-ty 



cog-ni-za-ble el-e-gant-ly 



an-ti-cham-ber 

an-ti-mo :iy 

an-ti-qua-ry 

ap-o-plec-tic 

ap-pli-ca-ble 

ar-bi-tra-ry 

ar-ro-gant-ly 

au-di-to-ry 

a-vi-a-ry 



eom-fort-a-ble 

com-men-ta-rv 

com-mis-sa-rv 

com-mon-al-tv 

com-pa-ra-ble 

com-pe-ten-cy 

con-fi-dent-ly i 



an-swer-a-blje. ^qn-quer-a-bte^'^b-ru-ar^ 



con-se-quent-h 
con-sti-tu-ted 

con-ti-nent-ly 

con-tro-ver-sy 

con-tu-ma-cy 

cq : pi-ous-ly " 

co^-py-hold-er 

cor-po-ral-ty 

cor-pu-ient-Iy 



drom-e-da-ry 

du-ra-ble-ness 

Ef-fi-ca-cy 



el-i-oi-ble 
m-i-nent-ly 
ex-cel-Ien-cy 
^x-e-cra-ble 
ex-o-ra-ble 
ex-qui-sitffljjp» 
Fa-vour : a3dy 



fig-u-ra-tffte '* 
tluc-tu-a-tfefcg" 
for-mid-a«fa& 

« 

for-tu-nafl 
frau-du- 
friv-o-L 
Gen-er 

gen-er-i 
gil-ii-fl< 



gov-ern-a-ble 

gra-da-to-ry 
- +Iab-er-dash-er 
hab-it-a-ble 
het-er-o-clox 
hon-our-a-ble 
hos-pit-a-ble 
hu-rnour-ous-ly 
j Ig-no-mi // -ny*" 
^44*n-i-ta-tor 
i iu-do- 1 en t-ly 
in-no-cen-cy 



Words of FOUR Syllables. 

mod-e-rate-Iy 

mo-men-ta-ry 

mon-as-te-ry 

mor-al-i-zer 

mul-ti-pli-er 

mu-sic-al-ly 



77 



in-tnn-a-cy 

in-tric-a-cy lOb-du-ra-cy 

iu-ven-to-rv f : ob-sti-na-cy 



Jan-u-a-ry 
ju-di-ca-ture 

Lap-i-da-ry 

lit-er-al-ly 

lit-er-a-tiir&~- It 

lo*-gi-cal-ly 

lu-mi-na-ry 4 

Ma'-gis-tra-cy 

mal-le-a-ble 

uian-da-to-ry 

mat-ri-mo-ny 



mu-ti-nous^Tyn"5ac-ri-ii-cer 

Nat-u-ral-ly " 

ne^-ces-sa-ry 

aec-ro-man-cy 

neg-li-geiit-ly 

i.or-a-ble-ness,' 

nu-nuT-ous-lV",, 



cy 
ob-vi-ous-ly 
oc-cu-pi-er 
oc-u-lar-ly 
op-er-a-tive 
or-a-to-ry 
or-di-na-rv"' 
Pa^-ci-fi-er 
pai-a-ta-ble 
par-don-a-ble 
pat-ri-mo-ny . 
pen-c-tra-ble * 
per-isb-a-ble 



mel-an-cbo^y^rac-ti-ca-ble 
mem-o-ra-ble v preb-en-da-ry 
men-su-ra-ble pref-er-a-ble 
mer-ce-na-ry pres-by-te-ry 
mtl-it-a-ry prev-a-lent-ly 

mis-er-a-ble prof-it-a-ble 



prom-is-so-ry 
pur-ga-to-ry 
;>u-ri-fi-er 
Rat-if-i-er 
rea-son-a-ble 
:>h-te-ous-ness 



sanc-tu-ary 
sat-is-fi-ed 
sec-re-ta-ry 
sep-a-rate-ly 
^er-vice-a-ble 
slo-ven-li-ness 
sol-it-a-ry 
sov-er-eign-ty 
spec-u-la-tive 
spir-it-u-al * 
' '|stat-u-a-ry 
sub-lu-na-ry 
Tab-er-na-cle 
ter-ri-fy-ing 
ter-ri-to-ry 
tes-ti-mo-ny 
tol-er-a-ble 
tfan-sit-o-ry 
Val-u-a-ble 
va-ri-a-ble 



ve /; -ge-ta-ble 
ven-er-a-ble 
vir-tu-ous-ly 
vol-un-ta-ry 
War-ran t-a-ble 



D3 






HO 



IVQrds of FOUR Syllables. 



m-pov-er-ish 
m-preg-na-ble 
m-prove-a-ble 
m-prov-i-dent 
n-an-im-ate 
n-au-gu-rate 
n-ca-pa-ble 
n-clem-en-cy 
n-cli-na-ble 
n-con-stan-cy 
n-cu-ra-ble 
n-de-cen-cy^?/ 
n-el-e-gant . 
n-fat-u-ate 
n-hab-it-ant 
n-grat-it-ude 
n-sin-u-ate 
ia-tcg-ri-ty 
n-ter-pret-er 
n-tract-a-ble 
n-trep-id-ly 
n-val-i-date 
n-vet-er-ate 
n-vicM-ous -• 
r-rad-i-ate 
-tin-e-rant 
Ju-rid-i-cal 
La-bo-ri-ous 
le-git-i-mate" 
le-gu-mi-nous 
lux-u-ri-ous 
Mag-nif-i-cerit 



ma-te-ri-al Z%C 

me-trop-o-lis 

mi-rac-u*lous 

Na-tiv-i-ty 

non-sen-si-cal 

no-to-ri-ous 

O-be-di-ent 

ob-serv-a-ble 

om-nip-o-tent 

o-rac-u-lar 

o-ri*-gi-nal 



re-gen-e-rate 

re-luct-an-cy 

re-mark-a-ble 

re-mu-ne-rate 

re-splen-dent-ly 

res-to-ra-tive 

re-su-ma-ble 

Sa-ga*-ci-ty 

si-mil-i-tude 

sim-pli'-ci-ty 

so-lemn-i-ty 



Par-ti-ca-laf^yUso-li^-cit-or 
pc-nu-ri-ous ' so-li^-cit-ous 



per-pet-u-al 

per-spic-u-ous 

phi-los-o-plier 

pos-te-ri-or 

pre-ca-ri-ous 

pre-cip-i-tate 

pre-des-ti-natc 

pre-dom-i-nate 

pre-oc-cu-py * 

pre-vai-i-cateT" 

pro-gen-i-tor * 

pros-per-i-ty 

Ka-pid-i-ty 

re-cep-ta-cle 

re-cum-ben-cy 

re-cur-ren-cy 

re-deem-a-ble 

re-dun-dan-cy 

re-frac-to-ry J 



sub-ser-vi-ent 

su-pe-ri-or 

su-pei-la-tlve 

su-pre-ma-cy 

Tau-tol-o-gy 

ter-ra'-que-ous 
the-ol-o-gy 
tri-um-phant-Iy 
tu-mul-tu-ous 
""ty-ran-ni-cal 
U-nan-im-ous 
u-bi*-qui-ty 

un-search-a-ble 

Va-cu-i-ty 

ver-nac-u-lar 

vi-cis-si-fude 

vi-va'-ct-ty 

vo-lup-tu-ous 



Lessons in Natural History. t 

LESSONS IN NATURAL HISTORY. 
I. THE HORSE. 




THE, horse .is a noble creature, and very use- 
ful to man. A horse knows his own stable, 
he dis-tin-guish-es his com-pan-i-ons, remem- 
bers any place at which lie has once stopped, 
and will find his way by a road which he has 
travelled. The rider governs his horse by 
signs; which he makes with the bit, his foot, 
his knee, or the whip. 

The horse is less useful when dead than some 
other animals are. The skin_is useful for col- 
lars, traces, and other parts of harness. The 
hair of the tail is used for bottoms or' chairs 
and floor-cloths. What a pity it is that cruel 
men should ever ill use, over work, and torture 
this useful beast 1 

D5 



Lessons in Natural History. 
S. THE COW. 




OX is the general name for horned cattle ; 
ami of all these the cow is the most useful. 
Tlie flesh of an ox is beef. Oxen are often used 
to draw in ploughs or carts. Their flesh supplies 
us with food. Their bipod is used as manure, as 
well as the dung; their fat is made into candles; 
their hides into shoes and boots ; their hair is 
mixed witli lime to make mortar; their horns 
are made into curious things, as combs, boxes, 
handles for knives, drinking cups, and instead 
of glass for lanterns. Their bones are used to 
make little spoons, knives and forks for chi£, 
dren,- buttons, Sec. 

Cows give us milk, which is excellent diet; 
and of milk we make cheese; of the cream. we 
make butter. Thcyoung animal is a calf: its 
flesh is veal; vellum and covers of books are 
made of the skin. The cow may be con-sicl-er- 
edas more u-ni-ver-sal-ly .conducive to the com- 
forts of mankind than any other animal. 



Lxstons in Natural History. 



3. THE HOG. 




THE hog has a divided hoof, like the ani- 
mals called cattle; but the bouts of his feet 
are really like those of a beast of prey,, ami a 
wild hog is a very savage animal. Swine have 
always been esteemed 'very un-tiact-a-ble, stu- 
pid, and in-ca-pa-ble of in-struc-ti-on ; hut it 
appears, by the example of the learned pig, that 
even they may be taught, 

A hog is a disgusting animal ; he U filthy, 
greedy, stubborn, and dis-a-gree-a-Me, whilst 
alive, but very useful after his death. Hogs' 
are vo-ra-ci-cus; yet where they find plentiful 
and de-li-ci-ous food, they are very nice in their 
choice, will refuse unsound fruit, am! wait the 
fall of fresh; but hunger will force them to eat 
rotten putrid substances. A hog has a strong 
neck, small eyes, a long snout, a rough and 
hard nose, and a quick sense of smelling. 
' Off 



J4 Lessons in Natural History. 

4. THE DEER. 




DEER shed their horns an-nu-al-ly in the 
spring: if the old ones do not fall off, the ani- 
mal rubs them gently against the branch of a. 
tree. The new horns are tender; and the deer 
walk with their heads low, lest they should hit 
them against the brandies : when they are full- 
grown and hard, the deer rub them against the 
trees to clear them of a skin with which they 
are covered. 

The skins of deer are of use for leather, and 
the horns make good handles for common 
knives. Spirit of hartshorn is extracted, and 
hartshorn shavings are made from them. 

Rein-deer, in Lapland and Greenland, draw 
the natives in sledges over the snow with pro- 
di-gi-ous swiftness. 



Lessons in Natural History. 
5. THE CAT. 



THE cat has sharp claws, which she draws 
hack when you caress her ; then her foot is as 
soft as velvet. Cats have less sense than tlogs : 
their attachment is chiefly to the house ; hut the 
dog's is to the persons who inhabit it. 

Kittens have their eyes closed several days 
after their birth. The. cat, after suckling her 
young some time, brings them mice and young 
birds. Cats hunt by the eye; they lie in wait, 
and spring upon their prey, which they catch 
by surprise ; then sport with it, and torment the 
poor animal till they kill it. Cats see best in 
the gloom. In a strong light, the pupil of the 
cat's eye is contracted almost to a line ; by night 
it spreads into a large circle. 

Cats live in the house, but are not very o-be- 
di-ent to the owner: they are self-willed and 
wayward. Cats love perfumes; they are fond 
of va-le-ri-an and marjoram. They dislike wa- 
ter, cold, and bad smelis; they love to bask in 
the sun, and to lie pn soft beds. 



Lessons in Natural History. 
6. THE SHEEP. 




SHEEP supply us with food: their flesh is 
called mutton. They supply us with clothes; 
for their wool is made into cloth, flannel, and 
stockings. Their skin is leather, which forms 
parchment, and is used to cover books. Their 
entrails are made into strings for fiddles; and 
their dung affords rich manure for the earth. 
The female is called an ewe. 

A sheep is a timid animal, and runs from a 
dog; yet an ewe will face a dog when a lamb 
is by her side: she tliinks not then of her own 
danger, hut will stamp with her foot, and push 
with her head, seeming to have no fear : such 
is the love of mothers ! 

Sheep derive their safety from the care of man, 
and they well repay him for his at-ten-t't-on. 
In many countries they require the attendance 
of shepherds, and are penned up at night to pro- 
tect them from the wolves; but in our happy 
land, they graze in se-cu-ri-ty. 



Lessons in Natural History. 



7. THE GOAT. 




A GOAT is somewhat like a sheep; but has 
hair instead of. wool. The white hair is va-lu- 
a-blefor wigs;' cioth may also be made of the 
goat's hair. The skin of the goat is more use- 
ful than that of the sheep. 

Goats seem to have more sense than sheep. 
They like to rove upon hills, are fond of brows- 
ing upon vines, and delight in the bark of trees. 
Among mountains they climb the steepest rocks, - 
and spring from brow to brow. Their young 
is called a kid: the flesh of kids is esteemed ; 
gloves are made of their skins. Persons of weak 
con-sti-tu-ti-ons drink the milk of goats. 

Goats are very playful; but they sometimes 
butt against little govs, and knock them down, 
when they are teazed and pulled by the beard 
or horns. 



Lessons in Natural History. 



8. THE DOG. 




THE dog is giftfd with that sa-ga-ci-ty, vi- 
gilance, and fi-del-i-ty, which qualify him to be 
the guard, the com-pan-i-on, and the friend of 
man ; and happy is lie who finds a friend as true 
and faithful as this animal, who will rather die 
by the side of his master, than take a bribe of a 
stranger to betray him. No other animal is so ■ 
much the com-pan-i-on of man as the dog. The 
dog understands his master by the tone of his 
voice ; nay even by his looks he is ready to obey 
him. 

Dogs are very ser-vice-a-ble to man. A dog 
will conduct a flock of sheep, and will use no 
roughness but to those which straggle, and then 
merely to bring them back. The dog is said to 
be the only animal who always knows his mas- 
ter, and the friends of his. family; who dis-tin- 
guish-es a stranger as soon as he arrives ; who 
understands his own name, and the voice of the 



Lessons in Natural History. 89 

domestics ; and who, when he has lost his mas- 
ter, calls for him by cries and la-men- ta-ti-ons. 
A dog is the most sa-ga-ci-ous animal we have. 
and the most capable of ed-u-ca-ti -on. In most 
dogs the sense of smelling is keen : a dog will 
hunt his game by the scent; and in following 
his master, he will stop where the roads cross, 
try which way the scent is strongest, and then 
pursue that. 




THE ass is humble, patient, and quiet.— Why 
should a creature so patient, so innocent, and 
so useful, be treated with contempt and cruelty ? 
The ass is strong, hardy, and temperate, and 
less delicate than the horse; but he is not so 
sprightly and swift as that noble and generous 
animal. He is often rendered stupid and dull 
by unkind treatment, and blamed for what ra- 
ther deserves our pity. 



Lessons in Natural History, 
10. THE LION. 




THIS noble animal has a large head, short . 
round ears, a shaggy mane, strong limbs, and a 
long tail tufted at the ex-trem-i-ty. His general 
colour is tawny, which on the belly inclines lo 
white. From the nose to the tail a full-grown 
lion will measure eight feet. The lioness is 
somewhat smaller, and destitute of a mane. 

Like other animals, the lion is affected by the 
influence of climate in a very sensible degree. 
Under the scorching sun of Africa, where his 
courage is excited by the heat, he is the most 
terrible and undaunted of all quadrupeds. 

A single .lion of the desert will often rtith 
upon a whole caravan, and face his enemies, in- 
sen-si-ble of fear, to the last gasp. To bis 
keeper he appears to possess no small degree of 
attachment ; and though his passions are strong, 
and his appetites vehement, he has been tried, 
and found to be noble in his resentment, ina£- 
nan-i-mous in his courage, and grateful in his 
dis-po-si-ti-on. His roaring is so loud, that it 
pierces the ear like thunder. 



Lessons in Natural History. 
1 1. THE ELEPHANT. 



THE elephant is not only the largest, but 
tlie strongest of all quadrupeds; in a state of 
nature it is neither fieree nor mischievous. Pa- 
cific, mild, and brave, it only exerts its powers 
in its own defence, or in that of the com-mli- 
ni-ty to which it belongs. It is social and 
friendly with its kind ; the oldest of the troop 
always appears as the leader, and the next in 
se-ni-or-i-ty brings up the rear. As they march, 
the forest seems to tremble beneath them ; in 
their passage they bear down the branches of 
trees, on wliich they feed; and if they enter 
cul-ti-va-ted fields, the labours of ag-ri-cul-ture 
soon disappear. 

When the elephant is once tamed, it is the 
most gentle and o-be-di-ent of all animals. Its 
attachment to its keeper is re-mark-a-ble, and 
it seems to live but to serve and obey him. It 
is quickly taught to kneel in order to receive 
its rider; and it caresses those with whom it is 
acquainted. 



Lessons in Natural History. 
12. THE BEAR. 




THERE are several kinds of bears ; such as 
the black bear, the brown bear, and the white 
bear. 

The black bear is a strong powerful animal, 
covered with black glossy hair, and is very com- 
mon in North A-mer-i-ca. It is said to subsist 
wholly on ve-ge-ta-ble food ; but some of them, 
which have-been brought into' England, have 
shewn a preference for flesh. They strike with 
their fore feet like a cat, seldom use their tusks, ; 
but hug their assailants so closely, that they al- 
most squeeze them to death. After becoming 
pretty fat in autumn, these animals retire to their 
dens, and continue six or seven weeks in total 
in-ac-tiv-i-ty and abstinence from food. 

The white, or Greenland bear, has a pe-cu-li- 
ar-ly longhead and neck, and its limbs are of 
pro-di-gi-ous size and strength; its body fre- 
quently measures thirteen feet in length. Tfce 
white bear lives on fish, seals, and the dead 
bodies of whales. 



Select Fables. 
SELECT FABLES. 

I. THE FOX AND THE GRAPES. 




A Fox, parched with thirst, perceived some 
grapes hanging from a lofty vine. As they 
looked ripe and tempting, Reynard was very 
desirous to refresh himself with their de-li-ci-o us 
juice; but after trying again and again to rea. h 
them, and leaping till he was tiled, he found it 
im-prac-ti-ca-ble to jump so high, and in conse- 
quence gave up the attempt. Pshaw ! said he, 
eyeing them as he retired, with affected in-dif- 
fer-i-nce, I might easily haveac-com-plish-ed this 
business if I had been so disposed ; but I cannot 
help tlii nking that the grapes are sour, and there- 
fore not worth the trouble of plucking. 

The Vain, contending for the prize 
'Gainst Merit, si-e their labour lost} 

But still sdf-kive «ill say — " Despise 
" What others gain at any cost f 

" I cannot reach reward, 'lis true, 

" Then lei me sneer at those who do." 



St 



Select Fables, 



IT. THE DOG AND THE SHADOW. 






A Dog crossing a river on a plank, with a 
piece of Qesh in iiis mouth, saw its re-flec-ri-on 
i.i tlie stream, and fancied he had dis-cov-eMjfl 
another and a richer booty. Ac-cord-in g-ly, 
dr pping the meat into the water, which was 
ins i ant ly hurried away by the current, hesuateh*. 
ed at the ■ hadow ; hut how great was his vex- 
a-ti-on to find that it had dis-ap-pear-ed ! Uo- 
happj creature that I am! cried be: in grasping 
at a shadow, I have lost -the substance. 



With moderate blessings \>e content, 

Nov idly grasp at every shade; 
Peace, competence, a life well spent, 



And he who weakly sighs fur more, 
Augments his misery, not his store,. 



Select Fables. 9$ 

III. THE SHEPHEKD-BOY AND THE WOLF. 




A Shepherd-boy, for want of better employ- 
ment, used to amuse himself by raising a false 
alarm, and crying " the wolf! the wolf!" and 
when his neighbours, believing he was in earnest, 
ran to his assistance", instead of thanking them 
for their kindness, he laughed at them. 

This trick he repeated a great number of 
times; but at length the wolf came in re-al-i-ty, 
and began tearing and mangling his sheep. 
The boy now cried and bellowed with all his 
might for help ; but the neighbours, taught by 
ex-pe-ri-ence, and supposing him still in jest, 
paid no regaid to hiin. Thus the wolf had time 
and op-por-tu-ni-ty to worry the whole flock. 



To sacred truth devote your heart, 
Nor ev'n in jest a lie repeat ; 

Who acts a base, fictitious part, 
Will infamy and ruin meet. 

The Hat ne'er will be believ'd 

By those whom he has once deceiv'd. 



96 



Select Fables. 



IV. THE DOG IN THE MANGER. 




A surly Dog having made his hed oh sot*. 
hay in a manger; an Ox, pressed by huna.;. 
came up, and wished to satisfy his appetite urifc 
a little of the provender; hut the Dog, soarlflf 
and putting himself in a threatening posltK. 
prevented his touching it, or even approach^ 
the spot where he lay. 

Envious animal, exclaimed the Ox, how/i- 
dic-u-lotisisyour be-ha-vi-our! You caniwW 
the hay yourself; and yetyou will notallovfW, 
to whom it is so de-si-ra-ble, to taste it. 



The Miser who hoards up hi* gold, 
Unwilling to use or to lend, 
\&M in the ilog may behold, 
he ox in his indigent friend. 
To hoard up what we can't enjoy, 
Is Heaven's good purpose to <l««ir«y, 



Thee 



Select Fables. 

V. TffE KID AND THE WOLF. 




A She-Goat shut up her Kid insafety at home, 
while she went to feed in the fields, and advised 
her to keep close. A wolf watching their motions, 
as soon as the Dam was gone, hastened to the 
house, and knocked at the door. Child, said he, 
counterfeiting the voice of the Goat, I forgot to 
embrace yon; open the door, I beseech you, that 
1 may give you this token of 'my affection. No ! 
no ! replied the Kid (who had taken a survey of 
the deceiver through the window), I cannot pos- 
sibly give yon admission ; fc. though you feign 
very well the voice of my Dam, 1 perceive li) 
every other respect that you are a Wolf. 

l.ti every yutllh, »'ilh cautious breast, 
Allurcment'ii fata] (lungers shun. 

Takes llie sure road to be undone, 
A I'iiri'm's counsels e'er revere, 
And mingle confidence with fear. 

E 



Select Fables. 



yi. the iroLr and the lamb. 




A Wolf and a Lamb, by chance came to the same stream to 
quench their thirst. The water flowed from the former towards 
the latter, who stood at an humble distance; but no sooner did 
the Wolf perceive the Lamb, than, seeking a pretext for bis de- 
struction, he ran down to him, and accused him of disturbing 
the water which he was drinking. How can I disturb ilr said 
the Lamb, in a great fright: the stream flows from you to mc; 
and I assure you, that 1 did not mean to give you any offence. 
That may be, replied the Wolf; hut it was only yesterday that 
I saw your Sire encouraging the Hounds that were pursuing me. 
Pardon me! answered the Lamb, my poor Sire fell a victim to the 
Butcher's knife upwards of a month since. It was your Dam, 
then, replied the savage beast, My Dam, said the innocent, 
died on the day I was born. Dead or not, vociferated the Wolf, 
as he gnashed his teeth in rage: I know very well that all the 
breed of you hate mc, and therefore I am determined to have 
niy revenge. So saying, he sprung upon the defenceless Lamb, 
and worried and ate him. 

Injustice, leagu'd with Strength and Pow'r, 

Nor Truth nor Innocence can stay ; , ■"' 

In vain they plead when Tyrants lour, L, '-f 1 

And seek to makr the weak their prey. I ( \ \: 

No equal riahts obtain regard \i v ;V. 

When passions fire, aim •pjils regard. n n^.V" 



Words of six Syllables. 



99 



Words of Six Syllables, and upwards, property 

accented. 



/ 



A-b6m-i-na-M.e-<ness 
au-thor-i-ta-tive-ly 
Con-cil-i-a-to-ry 
con-grat-u^-la-to-ry 
cop-sid-er-a-ble-ness 
De-clar~a-to-ri-ly 
E-j&c-u-la-to-ry 
_ex-pos-tu-la-to-ry 
In-t6I-er-a-ble-ncss 
i n-v61-un-ta-ri-ly 
Un-par-don-a-ble-ness 
\in-pr6f-it-a-ble-ness 
un-rea-son-a-ble-ness 
A-pos-t61-i-cal-ly 
Be-a-tif-i-cal-ly 
Cer-e-m6-ni-ous-ly 
cir-cum-ani-bi-ent-ly 
con-sen-ta-ne-ous-ly 
con-tu-m^-li-ous-ly 
Di-a-b61-i-cal-ly 
cl i-a-ru^t-ri-cal-ly 
dis-o-be-di-ent-ly 
Em-blem-at-i-cal-ly 
In-cbn-sfd-er-ate-ly 
in-con-v^-ni-ent-ly 
in-ter-r6g-a-to-ry 
Ma-gis-t6-ri-al-ly • 
mer-i-to-ri-ous-ly 
Re-com-roend-a-to-ry 
Su-per-an-nu-a-ted 
su-per-nu-me-ra-ry 



An-te-di-Ju-vi-an 

an -ti-mon-arch-i-cal 

arch-i-e-pfs-co-pal 

a-ris-to-cr&t-i-cal 

Dis-sat-is-fac-to-ry 

E-ty-rmo-lc/'-gi-cal 

ex-tra-ipa-ro-cbi-al 

Fa-mi-li-Ar-i-ty 

G e-ne-a-lo'-gi-cal 

ge-ne-ral-isrsi-mo 

Re-ter-o-g£*ne-ous 

liis-to-ri*6g-ra-pher 

Im-mu-ta-bil-i-ty 

in-fal-li-bil-i-ty 

Pe-cu-li-ar-i-ty 

pie-des-ti-na-ri-an 

Su-per- in-t£nd-en-cy 

U-ni-ver-s&l-i-ty 

un-phi-lo-s6ph-i-cal 

An-ti-trin-i-ta-ri-an 

Com-men-su-ra-bfl-i-ty 

Dis-sat-is-fac-ti-on 

Ex-tra-6r-d i-na-ri-]y 

Im-ma-te-ri-al-i-ty 

im-pen-e-tra-bil-i-ty 

in-com-pat-i-bfl-i-ty 

in-con-sul-er-a-bIe-i*es$ 

in-cor-rupt-i-bil-i-ty 

in-di-vis-i-bil-i-ty 

Lat-i-tu-di-na-ri-an 
Val-e-tu-di-na-ri-an 

E2 



J 00 Wit Ham and Thomas, 

INDUSTRY and INDOLENCE CONTRASTED. 

A Tale hy Dr. Percival. 

IN a village, at a small distance from the metropolis, 
lived a wealthy husbandman, who had two sons, William 
and Thomas ; the former of whom was exactly a year 
older than the other. 

On the day when the second son was born, the hus- 
bandman planted in his orchard two young apple-trees 
of an equal size, on which he bestowed the same care in 
cultivating ; and they throve so much alike, that it was 
a difficult matter to say which claimed the preference. 

As soon as the children were capable oi using garden 
implements, their father took them, on a fine day, early 
in the spring, to see the two plants he had reared for 
them, and called after their names. William and 
Thomas having much admired the beauty of these trees, 
now filled with blossoms, their father tofd them, that he 
made them a present of the trees in good condition, 
which would continue to thrive or decay in proportion 
to the labour or neglect they received. 

Thomas, though the youngest son, turned all his at- 
tention to the improvement of his tree, by clearing it of 
insects as soon as he discovered them, and propping up 
the stem that it might grow perfectly upright. He dug 
about it, to loosen the earth, that the root might receive 
nourishment from the warmth of the sun, and the mois- 
ture of the dews. No mother could nurse her child 
more tenderly in its infancy than Thomas did b« tree. 

His brother William, however, pursued a very differ- 
ent conduct ; for he loitered away all his time in the 
most idle and mischievous 'manner, one of his principal 
amusements being to throw stones at people as they 
passed. He kept company with all the idle boys in the 
neighbourhood, with whom he was continually fighting, 
and was seldom without either a black eye or a broken i 
skin. His poor tree was neglected, and never thought J 
of, till one day in autumn, when, by chance, seeing his 
brother's tree loaded with the finest apples, and almost 
ready to break down with the weight, he ran to his own 
tree, not doubting that he should find it in the same 
pleasing condition. 



a Moral Tale. iOl 

Great, indeed, were his disappointment and surprise, 
when, instead of finding the tree loaded with excellent 
fruit, he beheld nothing but a few withered leaves, and 
branches covered with moss. He instantly went to his 
father, and complained of his partiality in giving him a 
tree that was worthless and barren, while his brother's 

Sroduced the most luxuriant fruit ; and he thought that 
is brother should, at least, give him half of his apples. 
His father told him, that it was by no means reason- 
able that the industrious should give up part of their 
labour to feed the idle. " If your tree, 11 said he, "has 
produced you nothing, it is but a just reward of your 
indolence, since you see what the industry of your brother 
has gained him. Your tree wad equally full of blossoms, 
and grew in the same soil ; but you paid no attention 
to the culture of it. Your brother suffered no visible 
insects to remain on his tree ; but you neglected that 
caution, and suffered them to eat up the very buds. As 
I cannot bear to see even plants perish through neglect, 
I must now take this tree from you and give it to 
your brother, whose care and attention may possibly 
restore it to its former vigour. The fruit it produces 
shall be his property, and you must no longer con- 
sider yourself as having any right in it. However, 
vou may go to my nursery, and there choose any 
other you may like better, and try what you can do 
with it ; but if you neglect to take proper care of it, 
I shall take that also from you, and give it to your 
brother as a reward for his superior industry and at- 
tention." 

This had the desired effect on William ; who clearly 
perceived the justice and propriety of his father's rea- 
soning, and instantly went into the nursery to choose 
the most thriving apple-tree he could meet with. His 
brother Thomas assisting him in the culture of his tree, 
advised him in what manner to proceed ; and William 
made the best use of his time, and the instructions he re- 
ceived from his brother. He left off all his mischievous 
tricks, forsook the companv of idle boys,' applied him- 
self cheerfully to work, and in autumn received the re- 
ward of his labour, his tree being loaded with fruit. 

E 3 



< 102 ) 

M*tfA£ ani PitA'CTTcAfi Obsmvathws, t»Atcft eug&i to . 

— - - IM e&nMtifctov to mtrfmry at <n* tarty &jge. 

ftosperity gajns friend?, and adversity tries thein. 

It is wiser ro prevent a quarrel than- to reVenge^f. 

Custom is thepague of wise men ; but is the idol of fools. 

To eft* is human ; to forgive, divine. <*^ 
' ifte is always rich, who considers himself as having 
enough. -~ 

The golden rule of happiness is to be moderate in 
your expectations* **- 

It is 4 oetter to reprove, than to be angry secretly. ~ 

Diligence, industry, and submission to advice, are 
material duties of the young. - * - 

Anger may glance into the breast of a wise man, hut 
it rests only in the bosom of fools. — *<~. 

Sincerity and truth are the foundations of all virtue. - . 

By others* faults wise men correct their own.— — 

To mourn without measure, is folly; not to mourn 
at all, is insensibility. ,^. fc 

Truth and Qrror, virtue and vice r are things of an 
immutable nature. 

When our vices leave us, we flatter ourselves that 
we leave them. 

Let no event or misfortune make a deeper impression 
oh your mind at the time it happens,, than it would 
after the lapse of a year. 

Do unto others as you would they should do unto you. 

A man may have a thousand intimate acquaintances, 
and not a friend among them all. 

Industry is the parent of every, excellence. 

.The finest talents would be lost in obscurity,, if they 
were not called forth by study and cultivation. 

Idleness is the root of all evil. 

The acquisition of knowledge is the most honourable 
occupation of youth. 

Never expect lawyers to settle disputes; nor justice 
from the decisions of lawyers. 

Ifeware of false reasomng when you are about to inflict 
an injury which you cannot repair. 

He can never nave a true friend who is often changing 
his friendships. 



Moral Observations. . 109 

Virluous y 011 thgradttally produces flourishing manhood. 

None more impatiently suffer injuries, than those that 
are most forward in doing them. 

No revenge is more heroic, than that which torments 
envy by doing good. 

Bloney , like manure, does no good till it is spread. 

There is no real use in riches, except in the distri- 
bution of them. 

Deference to others is the golden rule of politeness and 
of morals. 

Complaisance renders a superior amiable, an equal 
agreeable, and an inferior acceptable. 

Excess of ceremony shews want of breeding. 

That politeness is best which excludes all superfluous 
formality. 

By taking revenge of an injury, >a man » only even 
with his enemy ; by passing it over, he is superior. 

No object is more pleasing to the eye, than the sight 
of a man whom you have obliged. 

No musk is so agreeable to the ear, as the voice of 
one that owns you for his. benefactor. 

The only benefit to be derived from flattery is, that by 
hearing what we are not, we may be instructed in what 
we ought to be. 

A wise man will desire no more, than that he may get 
justly, use soberly, distribute cheerfully,, and live con*- 
tentedly. 

A contented mind, and a good conscience, will make a 
man happy in all conditions. 

- Ingratitude is a crime so shameful, that no man was 
ever found who would acknowledge himself guilty of it. 

Truth is born with us ; and we do violence to our 
nature when we shake off our veracity. 

The character of the person who commends you, is to 
be considered before you set much value on his praise. 

A wise man applauds him whom he thinks most vir- 
tuous ; the rest of the world him who is most powerful or 
most wealthy. 

There is more trouble n accumulating the first hun- 
dred, than in the next five thousand 

E 4 



104. Moral Observations. 

He who. would become rich within a year, is generally 
a beggar within six months. 

As to be perfectly just is an attribute of the divine nature; 
to be so to the utmost of his abilities, is the glory of man. 

No man was ever cast down with the injuries of for- 
tune; unless he had before suffered himself to be deceived 
by her favours. # 

Nothing engages more the affections of men, than a 
polite address, and graceful conversation. 

A more glorious victory cannot be gained over another 
man, than to return injury with kindness. 

Philosophy is only valuable, when it serves as the law 
of life, and not for purposes of ostentation. 

There cannot be a greater treachery, than first to 
raise confidence and then deceive it. 

It is as great a point of wisdom to hide ignorance, as 
to discover knowledge. 

No man hath a thorough taste of prosperity, to whom 
adversity jiever happened. 

Truth is always consistent with itself, and needs no 
invention to help it out. 

There is a tide in the affairs of men, which taken at the 
flood leads on to fortune. 

In the career of human life, it is as dangerous to play 
too forward, as too backward a game. 

Beware of making a false estimate of your own powers, 
character, and pretensions. 

Alieis always troublesome, and sets a man'sinvention up- 
on the rack, requiring the aid of many more to support it.. 

Fix on that course of life which is the most excellent, 
and habit will render it the most delightful. 

A temperate man's pleasures are durable, because they 
are regular: Sand his whole life is calm and serene, be*, 
cause it is innocent. 

We should take prudent care for the future; but not so 
as to spoil the enjoyment of the present. 

It forms no part of wisdom to be miserable to-day, 
because we- may happen to become so to-morrow. 

Blame not before you have examined the truth ; un- 
derstand first, and then rebuke. , 

An angry man who suppresses his opinions, thinks 
worse than, he speaks. 



Moral Observations* ' <105 

Itis the infirmity of little minds tp be captivated by every 
appearance, and dazzled with every thing that sparkles, j 

The man who tells nothing, or who tells every tiling, 
will equally have nothing told him. 

The lips of talkers will be telling such things as ap- 
pertain not unto them ; but the /words of sucn as havQ 
understanding are weighed, in the balance. 

The heart of fools is in their mouth, but the tongue 
ol the wise is in his heart. t 

He that is truly polite knows how . to contradict with 
respect, and to please without adulation. , r . 

The manners of a well-bred man are equally remote 
from insipid complaisance, and low familiarity. 

A good word is an easy obligation ; but not to speajc 
ill, requires only our silence, and costs us nothing. 

Wisdom is the grey hairs to a man, and unspotted life 
is the most venerable old age. 

Let reason go before every enterprise, and counsel be* 
fore every action. 

Most men are friends for their own purposes, and, 
will not abide in the -day of trouble. 

A friend cannot be known in prosperity ; and an ene* 
my cannot be hidden in adversity. 

He who discovereth secrets loseth his credit, and will"* 
never secure valuable friendships. 

Honour thy father with thy. whole heart, and forget 
not the kindness of thy mother ; how canst thou recom- 
pense them the things they have, done for thee ? 

The latter part of a; wise man's life is taken up in 
curing the prejudices and fajse opinions he had con- 
tracted in the former part, 

He wlio tells a lie, is not sensible how great a task, 
he undertakes ; for .he must be . forced to invent 
twenty more to maintain it 

The prodigal robs his heir, the miser robs himself. 

True wisdom consists in the regulation and govern- 
ment of the passions; and not in a technical knowledge 
of arts and sciences. 

Some men miss the prize of prosperity by procrastina* 
tion, and others lose it by impatience and precipe 
tancy., , Eft 



t46 Advice to Young Persons. 

, RfcftdittJ fe WiBsgtzce : it Is better to live on a litfle, 
1km 4* tffcflto * gftat deal. 

JUttdsl 41 eWlctdties are to bfc cfterconte by industry 
and perseverance. 
A «ta*B tajjury flotte to another is a great inj dry done 

He that sows thirties *iH Hot reaf> wheat. 

Tlte #eajJ6fc a£ th^f Wise is reaspij; the weapofi of 
Cods is steel 

Never deft* that till to-morrow, ithich can be as well; 
performed to-day. 

lh four intercourse With the worfd, ,a\sJ>oon^of oH 
goes furthet than a quart of viftfegsfcr/. 

Fools go to law, and knaves prefer the arbitration of 



must cdnvince inen before you can Reform them. 



lawyers. 

Yoti must convince men before you can fcetorm them. 

A man's fortunes may always be retrieved,. if ne has 
stained habits of sobriety and industry. 

No man is ruined who has preserved an unblemished^ 
character. 

Habits of tenderness tdwards the meanest animals, 
beget habits of charity and benevolence towards our, 
feffc 



low-creatures. 



ADVICfe TO tOUNG PERSONS iNTENDEt) FOR TRADE, 
fy Dr, Benjamin u Franklin» 

-REMEMBER tltat time is moyey, — He that can earn 
ten shillings a day at his labour, wid goes abroad, or siis 
idle orte half of that day, though he spends but sixpence 
during his diversion, or idleness, ought not to reckon that] 
the only eapence; he has spent, or rather thrown away, live 
shillings besides. 

Remember that -credit is money.«~-lf a man lets his money. 
lie in my hands after it is due, bi cause, he has a godd. opinion 
of my credit, he gives me the inn rest, or so much ds I can 
make of the money during ih.t time. This amounts to & 

considerable sum where a mat| has large credit, and makes. 

good use »tf it. 

Remember that money is of a prolific or multiplying iwt- 

iure. — M«ney can produce money, and its offspring can 

produce more, and so on. Five shillings turned is six. 



Advice to Young Persons. *07 

turned again it is seven and threepence: and soon, till it 
becomes a hundred pounds. The more there ig of it, the 
more it produces every turning, so that the profits rise 
quicker and quicker. He that throws a*way a crown, de- 
stroy* all that it might have produced, even scores of 
pounds. 

Remembe* that si* pounds to.ge<in ft hit a groat a dagr-* 
For. tj|is Utile sum (which may be dally wastedj either in 
time or ex pence, un perceived] a man of credit may, oh his 
awn security, have the constant possession and use of a 
hundred pounds. So mutfa in stock, briskly turned by an 
industrious man, produces great advantage. 

Remember t/Us saving, « The gdbd paymaster is lord of 
another mftfi's. purse. '-*-iit that is linown to pay punctually 
and -exactly to the time he* fyromises,- may at any tittle*, arid 
on any occasion, raise all the money hti friends can spare. 
This is sometimes of great Use* Next to industry and frti* 
gality, nothing contribute* more to the raising of a man in 
the world, than punctuality aild jdsticejn all his dealings: 
therefore never kvep borrowed money an hour beyond the 
time promised, lest a disappointment shut up your, friend's 
pur«e for ever. 

The most IrtHing actions, that affect a masts credit are to 
he regarded.*— The sound of the hammer at five iii the 
morning, or nine at nigjit, heard by a Creditor, nvihes him 
easy six months longer; but if he sees you at n bi'liard*. 
table, or hears your voice at a. tavern, when you should b« 
at work, he sends for his money the next day, and demands. 
i| before it is convenient for you 10 pay him. 

Beware of thinking all gw own that you possess^ And of 
liping accordingly. ,«*-l!his is a mistake that many people 
who have credit fall into. To prevent this, keep an exact 
account, for some time, both of your expences. and your 
income. If y» *u take the pains at ftist to < numerate parti- 
culars, it will have this good effect: you will discover hjM 
wonderfully small trifling expenses mount up to large sums * 
and will discern what might have been* and may for th$ 
future be saved, without occasioning tiny greaf incomes 
tience. 

In shou* the wa/to wealth, if you desire it, is as plain 
as the way to market. It depends chiefly on two things, 
industry and frugality, that is, waste neither time nur. 
rnQTicy, but. make the best use of both. 

5 6 



108. Proper Names of three or more Syllables. 



Proper Nam* which occur in tm/iti and New Testaments, with 

the Syllables divided and accented. 



A-bad'3on 

A-be-d'ue-go 

A-bi'a-thar 

A-bim'e-iech 

A-bii/a-tlab 

A' bra-ham 

Ab'sa-lom 

Ad-o-ni'jah 

A-grip' pa 

A-has-u-e'rus 

A-him'e-lech 

A-hit' o-phel 

Am'a^lek-jte 

A-min'a-dab 

An'a-kims - 

A-nam'e-lech 

An-a-ni'as 

An'ti-christ 

Ar-che-la us 

Ar-chip'pus 

Arc-tu'<rus 

A-re-op'a-gus 

Ar-i-ma-the' a 

Ar-ma-ged' don 

Ar-tax-erx' es 

Ash'ta-roth 

As ke-lon 

As-syr'i-a 

Ath-a-li'ah 



Au-giis' tus 
Ba' al Be* nth 
Ba'al Ham' on 
Bab'y-lon 
Bar-a^chi' ah 
Bar-je' sus 
Bar'na-bas 
Bar-thol'o-mew 
Bar-ti-me' us 
Bar-zit'la-i 
Bash'e-math 
Be-el'ze-bub 
Be-er'she-ba 
Bel-shaz'zer 
Beri' ha-dad 
Beth-es'da 
Beth' le-hem 
Beth-sa' i-da 
Bi-thyn i-a 
Bo-a-ner' ges 
Cai' a-phas 
Cal'va-ry 
Can-da' ce 
Ca-per'ua-um 
Cen'cre-a 
Ce-sa' re-a 
Cher' u-bim 
Cho-ra' zin 
Cle* o-phas 



Co-ni'ah 
Dam-as* c us 
Dan' i-el 
Deb'o-rah ' 
Ded'a-nim 
Del' i-lah 
De-me' tri-us 
Di-ot' re-phe§ 
Did'y-mus 
Di-o-nys' i-us 
Pru-sil'la 
E-bed' me-lech 
Eb-en-e' zer 
Ek' rons 
El-beth' el 
E-le-a'zer 
E-li'a-kim 
E-li-e'zer 
E-li' hu 
E-lim'e4ech 

* 

EJ'i-phaz 
E-liz'a-beth 
El'ka-nab x 
El na-than 
El' y-mas 
Em ma- us 
Ep'a-phras 

E-paph-ro-di' tuft 

E-phe' si-ans 



1 



Proper Nantes of three or more Syllables 1 09 



Eph'e-sus. 

Ep-i-cu-re'ans 

E'sar-lW don 

E-thi-o'pi-a 

Eu-roc' ly-don 

Eu' ly-chus 

Fe'lix 

Fes'tus 

For-tu-na'tus 

Ga'bri-el 

Gad-a-renes' 

Gal-a'ti-a 

Gal' i-lee 

Garma' li-el 

Ged-a-li 7 ah 

Ge-rba'zi 

Ger-ge-senes' 

Ger 7 i-zim 

Gib* e-on-ites 

Gid'e-on 

GoK go-tha 

Go-mor'rah 

Hadrad-e 7 zer 

Ha-do 7 ram 

Hal-le-lu'jah 

Ha-nam'e-cl 

Han'a-ni 

Han-a-ni'^h 

Haz 7 a-el 

Her-mog'e-nes 

He-ro 7 di-a$ 

Hez-e-ki 7 ah 

Hi-e-rop'o-lis 

Hil-ki'ah 



Hor~Q-na 7 im 
Ho-san 7 na 
Hy-men-e' us 
Ja-az-a-ni 7 ah 
lch 7 a-bod 
Id-u-mae 7 a 
Jeb 7 u-site 
Jed-e-di 7 ali 
Je-ho 7 a-haz 
Je-hoi 7 a-kim 
Je-hoi 7 a-chin 
Je-ho 7 ram 
Je-hosh'a-phat 
Je-ho 7 vah 
Je-phun 7 nah 
Jer-e-mi'ah 
Jer 7 i-cho 
Jer-o-bo 7 am 
Je-ru' sa-lem 
}zz! a-bel 
Im'-man'u-el 
Jou 7 a-rdab 
Jon 7 a-than, 
Josh 7 u-a 
Jo-si' ah 
I-sai 7 ah 

Ish' bo-slietU 
Ish 7 ma-el 
Is' sa-char 
Ith'a-mar 
Kei 7 lah 
Ke-tu 7 rah 
Ki-ka 7 i-ou 
La'chish 



La' mech 
La-o-di-ce'a 
Laz 7 a-rus 
Leb'a-non 
Lem 7 if-el 
Lu 7 v i-fer 
Lyd' i-a . 
Ma 77 ce-do-ni-a 
Mach-pe'Jah 
Ma-ha-na'im 
Ma-nas 7 seh 
Ma-no' ah 

Mar-a-nath'a 
Mat' thevv 
Maz-za 7 roth 

Mel-chis'e-dek 
Mer 7 i-bah 
Me-ro 7 dach 

Mes-o-po-ta'mi-a 

Me-thu'se-lah 
Mi-chai'ah 
Mi'cha-el 
iMir'i-am 
Mna' son 

Moi'de-cai 

Mo-ri all 

Na'a-man 
Na'o-mi 

Naph'tha-li 
Na-than 7 a-el 

Naz-ar-reue' 
Naz 7 .a-reth 
Naz 7 a-rite 
Neb-u^chad-ne^' $ir 



110 Prdper flames of three or more Syllables! 

TFhy-a-fi'ra 
•f i-mo' the-us 
To-bi'ah 
Vash' ti 
tJ-pha/sia 
tJ-r/jali 
jUz-zi'ah 
Zac-che' us 
Zar* e-phath 
leb' e-ctee 
Zech-a-ri ah 
Ze-de-k/ah 
Zeph-a-nif ah 
Z.e-orul/ barbel 
Ze-lo' phe-ad 
Zer-u-/ ah* 



Ne-hu-zaf > drtbm 
Ne-he-m'/ ah 
Rem-a-li' ah 
Kepi/ a-im 
Keu'ben 
Kin/ nion 
lit/ ha-niah 
Sa-be'ans 
Sa-maf ri-a 
San-ba/ hit 
Sap-pht' ra 
Su-rep' ta 
Sen-a-che' rib 
Se/ a-phim 
Shi-lc/ah 
Shim' e-i 
ShU' latn-ite 



Shu'nam-ite 
Sib'bo-leth 
Sil'o-ah 
Sil-va' nus 
Sin/ e-on 
Sis' e-ra 
Soi'o-mon 
Stepl/a-nas 
Su-san'nah 
Sy-r6-phe-nic'i-a 
Tab' e-fa 
Tab'i-tha 
Te-haph'ne-h£& 
'Tex* a-phim 
Ter-tul' lus 
The-opl/i-lus 



Thea^sa-lo-ni'fca'Zip-po' rab 



*rf 



> « H 



Proper Names which occur in ANfci£N? and Modern Geo* 
craphy, mill the Syllable m^ed which ktobe aoeerited. 



Apfpen-nine* 
Atk/li-ai/gel 
Au-reix-ga' bad 
Ba-bel-mai/ del 



Ab' er-deen 

Ab-er-isth'\vit& 

Ac-a-pul' co 

Ac-ar-na' ni-a 

Ach-ae-me* iu«a IBab'y-ion 

Ach-e-ron' ti-a. [Bag-na'gar 

Ad -ri-a-n o' pie Bar-ba' does 

AUe$-sai/dri-a 

A-mer''i-ca 

Am~phip'o-tis 

An-da-U/si-a 

An-nap' o-iis 

An-ti-pa' rbs jfe 



Bar-ce-lo'na 
Ba-va' ri-a 
Bel-ve-dere' 
Be-ne-Ven' to 
Bes^-sa-ra'bi-a 



is. na' gar 



Bok'ha-ra 
Bo-tia-vis' ta 
Bos'pho-rus 
Bo~ry&' ths-nes. 
Bra-gan'sa 
Brai/den-burg. 
Bu-thra'tes 
Bus-so' ra 
By-zan' ti-um. 
Cafrtra'-ri-a 
Cag-lj-a' ti- 
Ga l-a-ttia' ta, 
Qtf-cut'ta 



Proper Names of three ort tnom Syllables* fVk 



Cal-i-for'ni-a 
Ca<-pra'ri-a 
Car-a-ma' ni-a 
Car-tha-ge'na 
Cat-a-lo' ni-s, 
Ce-pha-lo' ni-a 
Ce-pba-le' na, 
Ce-raiifni-a, 
Cer-cy-phaf \v$ 
Ch*"-.ni ni-a 
ChaUce-do'ni-a 
Chan-dfcr-tfa-gore / 

Chris-ti-a' na 



|t)o-min' i-ca 
Dus' sel-dorf 
DyNrach'i-um 
Ed' in-burght 
El-e-phan ta 
E-leu*tIi£-rre. 
Ep-i-dam' nji& 
Ep-Udau'rus, 
Ep-i-pba' ni-a 
Es-c^'ri-al 
Esrqui-maux'* 
Es-tre-ma-du'Va 



E-thi-o' pi-a 
Chris-tirayi-o'pk Eu-pa-to' 1 i-a 
Con-nec' tt-cut Eu-rira-nas' s 



Con-stan-ti-no' pie 
Co-pen-ha' gen 
Cor-o-man' del 



sa. 

Eas-cel'li-na 
ttyrtQan'agh; 
Eon-te-ra' bi-a. 



Cor-y-pha'si~nm For-te-yen4u'r* 
Cyc/ la-des. IFred'er-icks-burjj 



Da-glies'tan, 
Da-le-car 7 li-a 
I)al-ma' ti-a. 
Damri-et' ta, 
Dar-da-nelles'' 
Dar-da'ni-a. 
Dau'phi-ny 
De-se-a' da 
Di-ar-be'ker r 
Di-orny-sip'o lfa 



Gol-con'da 

Gua-de-loupe* 

iGruet /# d0i > -U < nd 

Gu'za-raJt 

HaJri-car-nas'sua. 

He/ del-burg 

Hel-voet-sfuy& # 

H^r-ihanrttadtf' 

Hi-e-rap'o-lis 

His-pa-ni-o' la, 

Hyr-ca' ni-a, 

Ja-ma/ ca 

ll-lyr 1 i-cum 

In-nis-kilMing. 

ts-pa-han' 

fcamts-chat'kau 
Kim-bol'ton 
Ron' igs-burg 
La-bra-dor' 
Lac-e-dae-mo' ni-a. 



Fri-u'li 
Frott-tign-i-ajcf 
Eur' sten- burg 
GaWi-pa' gos. 
Gal-lij/o-rlis 

G/ilrlo-grae'ci-xC 
Gan-gar' i-dae 
Gar-a-man' tea, 
Gas'co-ny. 
Ge-ne'va 



Di-os-cu' ri*as. Ger'nia-iiy 
I>o-do'tia, Gib-ral' tar 

Dom-in' g^ Glou'ces-ter 



Lamp'su-cus 
t^an 7 gtie-doc 
Lau'ter-buru: 
;,eo-min'ster 
Li-thu-a'ni-a 
Li-va'di-a 
Loft r don T der / ry 
Lou' is- bun* 
Lou-irsi-a na 
Lu'ncn-burg 
Lu x' em-burg 
Lyc-a-o'ni-a 
Ly s-i-tna'chi-1 



US Proper Names of three or more Syllables. 



Ma-cas'ser 
Mac-e-do' ni-a 
Mad-a-gas' car 
Man-ga-lore' 
Mar 7 a- thou « 
Mar-tin-i'eo 



Ma-sii-li-)m-tam'Pon-di-cher'ry 

Med-i-ter-ra'ne-an| Py r-e-nees' 
Mes-o-po-ta' rai-a 

Mo-no-e-mu'gi 
Mo-no-mo-ta'^a 

Na-to' li-a 

Ne-ga-pa-tam' 

Ne-rius'koi 

Neuf-eha-teau' 

Ni-ca-ra-gua' 

Nic-o-me'di-a 

Ni-cop' o-lis 

No-vo-oo' rod 

Nu' rem- berg 

Oc'za-kow 

Oo-no-ias' ka 

Os' na-burg 

O-ta-hei' te Si-be' n-a 



O-vcr-ys scl 

Pa-lut' i-nate 

Paph-la-go'ni-a 

Pat-a,-go'ni-a 

Penn-syl-va'ni-a 

Phi-lip-ville' 



Qui-be-ron' 
Qui-lo'a 
Quir-i-na' lis 
Rat'is-bon 
Ra-ven' na 
Ra' vens-bursr 
Ro-set ta 
Rot'ter-dam 
Sal-a-man' qa 
Sa-mar-cuad' 
Sa-moi-e'da 
Sar-a-gos' sa 
Sar-di'ni-a 
Sc half -ban' sen 

Se^rin-ga^pa-tam ' 



Spitz-ber' gen 
Switz'er-laud 
Tar-ra-go' na 
Thi-on-ville' 
Jhu-rin'gi-a 
J ip-pe-ra' ry 
To-bols'koi 
Toh-ga-ta-boo' 
rraii'Syl-va'ni-a 
Tur-co-ma' ni-a 
Val-en-cien-nes 
Ver-o-ni' ca 
VV-su' vi-us 
Vir-gin' Ua 
U-ran' irberg 
VWst-ma'ni-a 
West-pha' li-a 
WoM'en-but'tle 
Xy-le-nbp'o-lis. 
Xy-l'»|/ o-li& 
Zau-gue-bai' 
Zan-zi-bar' 
Zen-o-do'ti-a 
Zo-ro-an' der 



Proper Names which occur in Roman and^ Grecian 
History, divided* and tlie Syllable marked which is required 
i<i be accented. 



jEs-chi'nes 
Ag-es-i-la' us 
Al-ci-bi'a-des 
AUex-an'der 
Al-ex-an-drop' o-lis 



A-nac' re -on 
An-ax-i-man' der 
An-doc' i-des. 
Ad-tig' o-n us 
An-tim'a-chus 



An-.tis' the-nes 
A-pel' les 
Ar-chi-me' des 
Ar-e-thu' sa 
Ar-is-tai 7 chus 



Proper Names of three or more Syllables. . 113 



A-ris-ti' des jCol-la-ti'nus 
A-ris-to-de'musCoim-a-ge' na 



Ar-is-toph'a-nes 
Ar'is-to-tle 
Ar-tem-i-dorus 
Ath-en-o-dorus 
Ba'ja-zet 
Bac-chi'a-das 
BeHer'o-phon 
Ber-e-cyn' thi-a 
Bi-sal' tae 
Bo-a-dic' e-a 
Bo-e' thi-us 
Bo-mil' car 
Brach-ma'nes 
Bri-tan' ni-cus 
Bu-eeph'a-lus 
Ca-!ig'u-la 
Cal-lic'ra-tes 
Cal- lie-rat' i-das 
Cal-lim'a-chus 
Cam-by' ses 
Ca-mil' lus 
Car-lie' a-des 
Cas-san' der 
Cas-*i' o-pe 
Cas-si-ve-lau / nus 

Ce-the' gus 
Char-i-de'mus 
Cle-oc' ri-tus 
Cle-o-pa' tra 
Cli-tom'a-chus 
Clyt-em-nes'tra 



Con' stan -tine 

Co-ri-o-la' nus 

Cor-ne' li-a 

Cor-un-ca'nus 

Cor-y-ban' tes 

Cra-tip'pus 

Ctes' i-phon 

Dam-arsis' tra-tus 

Da-moc' ra-tes 

Dai' da-nus 
Daph-ne-pho' ri-a 

Da-ri' us 

De-ceb'a-lus ' 
Dem-a-ra' tus 
De-man' i-de* 
De-moc' ri-tus 
De-mos'the-nes 
De-mos' tra-tus 
Deu-ca' li-on 
Di-ag'o-ras 
Din-d v-me' ne 
Di-nom' a-che 
Di-o-scor' i-des 
Do-don' j-dea 
Do-mitfi-a'nus 
E-lec' try-on 
El-eu-sin' i-a 
Em-ped' o-cles 
Eu-d\m'i-on 
E-pam-i-non' das 
E-paph-ro-di' tus 



Eph-i-al' tes 
Eph'o-ri 
Ep-i-char' mus 
Ep-ic-te' tus 
Ep-i-cu'i;us 
Ep-i-men' i-deis 
Er-a-sis' tra-tus 
EF-a-tos'the-nes 
Er-a-tos' tra-tus 
Er-ich-tho'ni-us 
Eu' me- nes 
Eu' no-mus 
Eu-rip' i-des 
Eu-ry-bi' a-des 
Eu-ryt' i-on 
Eu-thy-de'mus 
Eu-tych' i-des 
Ex-ag' o-nus 
Fa' bi-us 
Fa-bric' i-us 
Fa-vo-ri' nus 
Fau-sti'na 
Fau'stu-lus 
Fi-de'nae 
Fi-den'ti-a 
Fla-min'i-us 
Flo-ra'li-a 
Ga-bi-e'nus 
Ga-bin'i-us 
Gan-gar'i-dae 
Gan-y-me'de 
Gar-a-man'tes 

Gar 7 ga-ris 



1 J 4 Proper Names of three or mere Syllables. 

Ger-roan' i-cus 
Gor-di-a' nus 
Goi/ go-ne& 
Gor-goph'o-Be 
Gra-ti-a'nus 

Gym-nos-ophis'tae 
Gyn-awso-thoe'nasiLa-om' e-don 
HaJ-i-car-nas'sus Le-oa'i-cks 

Har-poc' ra-tes Le-oty ctf I4es Ne' o-cks 
IfecaHtom-phoniJU-os'tbe-Bes Ne-op-toKe-mus 
Heg-e-sis'tra-tus Lib^phoe-ia'ces JNi-cag' O-ras 

Heg-e-tor'i-des Lon-gim'a-nus Ni-ccteh' ra-tes 
He-li-o-do' rus Lu~per-ca' li-a Nic-o-la' us 



Iph-Nge-rri'a 
I-soc'ra-tes 
lx-i-or*'i-de& 
Jo-cas' ta 
Ju-gur'tha 
Ju-H-a' 11 us 



MiUY a-des 
Mith-ri-da' tes 
Mne-mos' y-ne 

Mne-sim'a-chus 

Nab-ar-za' nes 
Na-bonaeu' sis 
Nau' era- tes 
IN td to-ne-bus 



Hel~i«co-ni' a-des 
He-li-o-gcu-ba lus 
Hel-kunoc ra-tes 

He~lo' tes 
He-phaes'ti-on 
Her-a-cli' tus 
Her'cu-les 



Lyc-o-omeMes 



Her- 



mag o-ras 



Lye' o-piiron 



Ni-com'a-chus 



Nu-rne-ri-a'nus 



Ly-cur' gi-des Nu' mi-tor 
Ly-citr'gus . Oe-ta-vi-a' uus 
Ly-s tin* a-ehus GE d* i-f>us 
Lv-si*' tra-tus O-lym-pi-o-do'Fus 
Mau-ti-De' us Qm-o-pha' gi-a 
Mar-cel-lr 4 nus On-e-sic / ri-tivs 
Her-maph^KKdi'tua M as-i-ais*' sa On-cvmac'ri-tus 
Her-ini' o-iue Mas-sag 7 e-tae Oi -thagf o-ras 
Her-mo-do' rus Max-im-i-a' »u* Os-cho-pho A ri-a 
He-rod' o-tus Meg y a-ra Pa-ca-ti-a' nus 

Hes-per' i-des Me-gaa'the-tves Pa-teph' a-ttis 
I Ii-e-ron'y-mus Me4a-nip pi-dea Pal-a-me* des 
Hip-pag' o-ras M el*e*ag' ii-de& Pal-i-aur' rus 
Ilip-poc'ra-tes Me-nal' ci-das Paurath.-e-n»'a 
Hy-a-ch/thus Me-nec' ra-te& Pai -rha' si-us 
Hy-dro-pho'i us Mau-e-la' u& Pa^tro' ctus 
Hys-tas'pes Mfe-nce' ce*u* Pau-sa' ni-as 
I^phic' ra-tes [Met-argU' ni-a [feto-pon-ne'su* 



Proper Name* of three or more Syllables. 115 



Pen-the-si-le' a 
Phi-lip' pi-des 



Phil-oc-te' tes Hbad-a^man'thus 



Phi-lom'bro-tus 
Phil-o-me'la 
Phi l-o-poa' men 

Plii-lo-steph-a'nus 



Phi-los' tra-tus Sat-ur-na'li-a 
Phi-lox' e-nus Sat»ur-ni' nus 



Pin' da-rus 



Pis-is-trat' i-des Sci i-bo-ni-a'nus 
Plei' a-des Se-leu' ei-dae 

Pol-e*mo-cra'ti*a Se-raii' a-m is 

Se-ve-ri-a'iurs 
Si-mon' i-des 
Sis' y-phus 



Qui-ri' nus 
Qui-ri' tes 



Rom A u-lus 
Rtt-tu-pi' nas 
San-cho-ni'a^thon 
Sar-dan-a-pa'lus 



Sea-man^ der 



Pol-y-deu'cea 
Pol-y-do' rus 

Pol-y-gi'ton 

Pol-yg-na' tns fSoc' ra'-tes 
Pol-y-phe'mus Sog-di-a'nus 
Por-sen' na Soph' o-eles 
Po^-i*ck/ ni-its Soph-o-nis' ha 
Prax-rt' e-Ie$ Spith-ri-da' tes 
Pro-tes-i-la' us , Ste-sim' bro-tus 
Psam-met'h-LhusSre-sich' o-rus 
Pyg-tna' li-on Stra-to-nK cus 
Py-faem' e-nes Sys-i-gam'bis 
Py-tfrag' o-ras Sy-sim' e-tbres 
Qui n-til-i-a'ntts Te-len/ a-ebns 
Quir-i-na' li-a Tha-les' tri-a 



The-mis'to-cles 
The-oc' ri-tus 
The-oph' a-nes 

The-o-pol' e-mus 

Ther-mop'y-te 
Tb€s-*i%o th'e- 1* 
Thi-od*a-mas 
Thu-cyd' i-des 
Tim-ode' mus 
Ti-moph'a-nes 
Tis-sa-pher' nes 
Tryph-i-o-da'ru* 
Tvn' da-rus 

* 

Val-en- tin-i*a' nus 
Va-le-ri-a' nus 
Vel-i-ter' na 
Ven-u-le' i-us 
Ver-o-doc A ti-us 
Ves-pa-si-a' nua< 
Vi-tel' li-us 
Xan-tip'pus 
Xe-nag o-ras 
Xe-noc' ra-tes 

Xe-noph'a-ne$ 
Xen'o-phon 
Zen-o-do' rus 
Zeux-id-a^mus 
Zor-o-as' ter 



Rules for pronouncing Proper Names* 



C has generally the sound of k 

et at the end of names is generally 

a long syllable like double e, as Thates, 

Tha'-les; Archimedes, Ar-chinV-e- 

dcs. 



The diphthong as sounds tike long e. 
t$ seunds like single c 



e at the end of many words forme 
a syllable, as Penelope, Pe-no?-o-pe. 

Pt sonnds like t by itself; a« 
Ptolomy, Tol'-o-ray. 

O has its hard sound inmost names, 



The dUplUhong aasounds like short «. , Ch sounds like &, as Christ » KxiSt; 



or Antioeh, An-U-ok'. 



na 



Words of nearly the same Sound, 



Alphabetical Collection of Words, nearly the same in 
Sound but different in Spelling and Signification. 



* 



Accidence, a book / \ 
Accidents, chances 
Account, esteem 



Accompi, reckoning Bale, large parcel ? j Bred, brought up 



Acts, deeds 
Ar. Latchet 
Hac.'iS,^ doth hack 
Adda, doth add 



Adze, a cooper's 7Tx H Bear, to carry 



dinger, carpenter's 

tool 
Bail, a surety 



Boy, a lad 

Buoy, a water-mark 

Bread, baked flour 



Ball, a sphere ~/'/|\ 
Bawl, to cry out 
Beau, a fop 
2?pw, to snoot with 



Ail, to be sick, or 
to make sick t 
^/:, ?.-»:Jt liquor J » 
//. ;."'. t-.) salute 
JPi //. tVozen rain 
JF/«/f, strong 
v4«r, to breathe 
Jic'/r, oldest son \\1 
Hair, ef the heattTO 
Hare, an animal * 
<4rc, they be 
Ere, before 
All, every one 
J4W, to bore with 
Hull, a large room 
Haul, to pull 
Allowed, granted 
Aloud, with a noise 
Altar, for sacrifice 
^4#er, to change 
Halter, a rope 
; Ant, an emmet 
' "Aunt, parent's sister 
Haunt, to frequent 
Ascent, going up 
Assent, agreement 
Assistance, help 
Assistants, helpers 



in 



>i 



itear, a beast 
Bare, naked 
Base, mean 
Bass, a part 

music 
2?o?e, bottom 
Bays, bay leaves t . 
Be± the verb 
fee, an insect -*... 
^ecr, to drink / 
Bier, a carriage for 

the dead 
Bean, a kind of 

pulse 
Been, from to be 
Beat ? to strike 
Beet, a root 
j?e//, to ring 
Belle, a young lady 
Berry, a small fruit 
Bury, to inter 
j8&w, did blow 
Blue, a colour 
Boar, a beast 
Boor, a clown 
/>»re, to make a hole 
jBore, did bear 
Bolt, a fastening 



Augur, a soothsayer £o?/& a to sift meal 



'Burrow, a hole in 

the earth 
Borough, a corpo* 

ration 
By, near 
Zfyy, to purchase 
Bye, indirectly 
Brews, breweth 
Bruise, to break 
m But , except 

*T*fS3T#,two hogsheads 
Calendar, almanack 
Calender, to smooth 
Cannon, a great gun 
Canon, a law 
Canvas, coarse cloth 
Canvass, to examine 
Ccrr^, a carriage 
Chart, o. map 
Ce/Z, a cave 
Sell, to dispose of 

, ^ Xy^ r,under ground 
Seller, one who sells 
Censer, for incense 
Censor, a critic 
Censure, blame 
Cession, resigning 
Session, assize 
Centaury, an herb 
Century, 100 years 
^Sentry, a guard 
Choler, anger, 
Collar, for the neck 
Ceiling, of a room 



but of different Sighyjlations. 



w 

tuJTcat 



117 



Seating, of a letter 
Clause, of a sentence 
Claws, of a bird or 

beast 
Coarse, not fine 
Course, a race 
Corse, a dead body 
'Complement, the re- 
mainder 
Compliment, to 
speak politely 
Concert, of music ^. 



Consort, a comp#- Yeast, barm 



nion 
Cousin, a relation 



Doe, a she deer ~" 
Doughy paste 
Done, performed 
Dun, a colour 
Dmw, a bailiff 
Draught, of drink 
Draft, drawing 
Urn, a vessel 
JB«rw, to gain byl 

labour I 

East, a point of the 

compass 



Cozen, to cheaU* ~4*--' J fng 



Eminent, noted 
j Imminent, impend- 



Council, an assemt 

bly 
Counsel, advice 



Ewe, a female sheep 
Yew, a tree 
You, thou, or ye 



Cruise, to sail up Hew, to cut 

and down Hue, colour 

Crews, ship's com- Hugh, a man's name 

-Tinies Yovr, a pronoun 



Ct rrani, small fruit f 



tar rent, a stream" 
Cr<>ek, of the sea 
Creak, to make a 

noise 
Cifgnet, a 

swan 



Ewer, a kind of jug 
ifye, to see with 
/, myself 

jFWn, desirous ! * 
Fane, a temple 
young ] Feign, to dissemble 
Faint, weary. 



Sin-net, a seal ' Fewt, pretence, 

Dear, of great vahte " 77wr, handsome 



Deer, in a park 
Dew, moisture 
Due, owing , 
Descent, going do wji 
Dissent, to disagree 
Dependancc, trust 
Dependants, those 
who are subject 
Devices, invention 
Devises, contrives . 
Decease, death 
Di tease, disorder 



the 



Fair, merry- 
making . 

Fare, charge 

Fare, food 

Feet, part of 
body 

Feat, exploit 

File, a steel instru- 
ment 

Foil, to overcome 

Fillip, a snap with J 
. the finger ' 



Philip, a man's 
name 

Fir, a tree 

Fur, of a skin 

Flee, to run away 

Flea, an insect 

Flew, did fly, 

Fft/e, down 

Flue, of a chimney 

Flour, for bread 

Flatter, of the field 

Forth, abroad 

Fourth, the number 

Frays, quarrels 

Phrase, a sentence 

Frances, a woman's 
name 

Francis, a man's 
name 

Gesture, action 

Jester, a joker 

G*7f, with gold 

Guilt, sin 

Grate, for fire 

Great, large 

Grater, for nutmeg 

Greater, larger 

Groan, sigh 

Grown, increased 

Guess, to think 

Guest, a visiter 

//a?7, deer , 

Heart, in the stom- 
ach 

y4rf, skill 

/Tea/, to cure 

xlce/, part of a sho* 

Tfc/, p fish - 

Helm, a rudder 

.EZ?/t, a tree 

Pear, the sense 

Here, in tin's' place 

Heard, did hear 

Herd 3 cattle 



118 



Wards of nearly die same Sound, 



s 



I, myself 
Hie, to haste 

High, lofty _. 

Hire, wages 
/me^great anger 
Him, from he 
Hymn, a song 
Hole, a cavity 
Whrte, not broken 
JHoop^ -for a tub 
Whoop, to halloo 
/?0£l,agreatnumber 
Host, a landlord 
IHfe, lazy 
Idol, an image 
yft$/e, of a church 
Isle, an island 
Impostor, a cheat ' 



Knot, to untie 
iVb£, denying 
Know, to under* 

stand 
No, not 

Lea£, to run out 
Leek, a kind of 

onion 
Lease, a demise 
Lee«, dregs 
'Tkash, three 
2>a</, metal 
Led, conducted 
Least, smallest 
Lest, for fear 
Lessen, to make less 
Lesscfn, in reading 
Lo, behold 



In, within j 

Inn, a public house 
Incite, to stir up 
Insigld, knowledge 
Indite, to dictate 
Indict, to accuse 
Ingenious, skilful 
Ingenuous, frank % i 
Intense, excessive 
Intc?its, purposes 
KUV, to murder 
Kiln, to dry malt 
Knave, avrogue 
Nave, middle of a 

wheel 
Knead, to work 

dough 
Uleed, want 
Knew, did know 
New, not worn 
Knight, a title of 

honour 
Night, darkness 
Key, for a lock ; 
Quay, a wharf / 



Imposture, deceit — f Tknv, mean, humble 



t 



Lbose, slack 
Lose, not win 
Lore, learning 
Lower, more low 
M&de, finished 
Maid, a virgin 
Main, chief 
Mffpe, of a horse 
'Male, he 
Mail, armour 
Mail, post-coach 
Manner, custom , 
Manor, a lordship 
Mare, a she-horse 
Mayor, of a town 
Marshal, a general 



Owe, to be indebted 

_, Old, aged 

Martial, warlike (J Hold, to keep 



Meddler, a busy* 

body 
Message, errand 
Messuage, a house 
Mekd, substance 
Mettle, vigour 
Might, power 
MzYe, an insect 
Moan, lamentation 
Mown, cut down 
Moat, & ditch 
Mote, spot in the 

eye 
Moor, a fen, or 

marsh 
More, in quantity 
Mortar, to pound in 
Qfortar, made oi 

lime 
Muslin, fine linen 
Muzzling, tying the 

mouth 
Naught, bad 
Nought, nothing 
-Afay, denying 
Neigh, as a h orse 
jVfawe, a knot 
Netvs, tidings 
Oar, to row with 
Ore, uncast metal 
Of, belonging to 
Off, at a distance 
alas! 



»%..' 



Mean, low 
Mean, to intend 
Mean, middle 
M*e&, behaviour 
Me«^, flesh 
Meet, fit 

Mete, to measure \ 
Medlar, air nit 



One, in number 
Won, did win- 
0wr, of us 
Hour, sixty minutes 
JP«t7, bucket' 
P«fe, colour 
PaZe, a fence • 
1 Pain, torment 



but of different Significations. 



119 



Pane, square of glass 
Pair, two 
Pare, to peel 
Pear, a fruit 
Palate, of the 

mouth 
Pallet, a painter's 

board 



Pallet, a little bed Scent, a smell 



Pastor, a minister 



Pasture, grazmg~'"f?ea, the ocean 



land 

Patience, mildness 
Patients, sick 

people 
Peace, quietness 
Piece, a part 
Peer, a noblemen 
Pier, of a bridge 
Pillar, a round co- 
lumn '' 
Pillow, to lay the 

"head on 
Pint, half a quart 
Point, a sharp end 
Place, situation 
Plaice, a fish 
Pray, to beseech 

2* r £y> booty 
Precedent, an ex- 
ample 
President, governor 
Principal, chief 
Principle, rule or 

cause 
Raise, to lift 
Hays, beams of light 
Raisin, dried grape 
Reason, argument 
Relic, remainder 
Relict, a widow 



Right, just, true 
Right, one hand 
J?t fe, ceremony 
#«*'/, of a ship 
Stile, the act 

selling 
Salary, wages 
Celery, an herb 



of 



aSW, ordered away 



See, to view 
Seam, joining . 
Seem, to pretend 
So, thus 

Sow, to cast seed 
«&w, with a needle 
Sole, alone 
Sole, of the foot 
Sow/, the spirit 
Soar, to mount 
Sore, a wound 
Some, part 
*Sw?», amount 
Straight, direct 
Strait, narrow 
Sweet, not sour, 
»SWte, attendants 
. Surplice, white robe 
Surplus, over and 

above 
Subtile, fine, thin-- 
Subtle, cunning 
Talents, good parts 
Talons, claws 
Team, of horses 
Tfeem, to overflow 
Tenor, intent 
Tenure, occupation 
Their, belonging to 

them 



Hiere, in that place 
Threw, did throw 
Through, all along 
Thyme, an herb 
Time, leisure 
Treaties, convene 

tions .' 

Treatise, discourse 
Vain, foolish 
Vane, a weathercock 
Vein, a blood-vessel 
Vial, a small bottle , 
Viol, a fiddle 
Wain, a cart, er 

waggon 
Wane r %e decrease 
Wait, to stay 
Weight, for scales 
Wet, moist 
Wfa/, to sharpen 
Wail, to mourn 
Whale, a fish ._' ..._ 
Ware, merchandise 
Wear, to put on 
Were, from to £e 
Where, in what 

place 
W«y, road 
Weigh, in scales 
W 7 ey, a measure 
Whey, of milk 
"Week, seven days 
Weak, faint 
Weatlier, state of 

the air 
Wlietlier, if 
Wither, to decay 
Whither, to which 

place 
Which, what 
Witch> a sorceress 



( 120 ) 

Brief Introduction to the Arts and Sciences, including 
Explanations of some of tJic Phenomena of Nature. 

1. Agriculture^— Agriculture, the most useful and important 
of all pursuits, teaches the nature of soils, and their fwoper 
adaptation and management for the production of food for 
man and beast.— See Young's Farmer's Kalendar. 

2. Air. — The air is* a transparent, invisible, elastic fluid, 
surrounding the earth to the height of several miles. It 
contains the principles of life and vegetation; and -is found 
by experiment to be eight hundred times lighter than water. 

3. Anatomy. — Anatomy is the art of dissecting the human 
body when dead, and of examining and arranging its parts ; 
in order to discover the nature of diseases, and promote the 
knowledge of medicine and surgery. 

■ 4f. Architecture. — Architecture is the art of planning and 
erecting all sorts of buildings, according to the best models. 
It contains five orders, called the Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, 
Corinthian, and Composite. 

5. Arithmetic. — Arithmetic is the art of computing by 
numbers : and notwithstanding the great variety of its- ap- 
plications, it consists of only four separate operations, Ad- 
dition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and Division,-— See Joyce's 
Arithmetic of real life and business. 

6. Astronomy. — Astronomy is that grand and sublime 
science which makes us acquainted with the figures, dis- 
tances, and revolutions, of the planetary bodies; and with 
the nature and extent of the universe. 

The Planets of our system are Mercury, Venus, the Earth, Mars, Jupiter* Saturn, 
Herschel, and the small' planets situated between Jupiter and- Mars, lately discovered, 
and named Juno, Ceres, and Pallas. These revolve about the Sun ; and to Jupiter, 
Saturn, and Herrehel, there are thirteen moons attached, like that which attend* the 
Ear tii. Besides these there are Cornels; and millions of Fixed Stars, which are probably 
Suns to other systems — if/ BUiir's Crammar of ?hiio*Gphy* 

7. Biography. — Biography records the lives of eminent 
men, and may be called the science of life and manners. 
It teaches from experience, and is therefore moist useful 
to youth. — ±ee the British Ncpos and abridged Plutarch. 

8. Botany. — Botany is that part of natural history, which 
treats of vegetables. It arranges them in their proper 
classes, and describes their structure and use. 

9. Chemistry. — Chemistry is the science which explains the 
constituent principles of bodies, the results of their various 
combinations, and the laws by which these combinations are 
effected. It is a very entertaining and useful pursuit. 

10. CArowo/o^/.— Chronology teaches the method of com* 
puting time, and distinguishing its parts, so as to 'determine 
what period has elapsed since any memorable event. 



Brief Introduction to the Arts and Sciences. ltl 

1 1. Clouds.— CUmds are nothing but collections of valours 
suspended in the air. They are from a quarter of a mile t* 
four miles high. A fog is a cloud which touches the earth. 

12. Commerce.—Cornmerce is the ait of exchanging one 
commodity for another, by buying or selling, with a view to 
gain. Though private emolument is its origin, it is the bond 
of society, and by it one country participates in the produc- 
tions of all others. 

_ • 

18. Cosmography. ^^Cosmogrs^hy is a description of the 
' world, or the universe, inducting the earth and infinite space. 
It divides itself into two parts, Geography and Astronomy* 

14. Criticism. — Criticism is an art which teaches us to write 
with propriety and taste ; but greatly abused by writers in ano- 
nymous reviews, who make a trade of it, and sell their opinions. 

15. Dew.— Dew is produced from extremely subtile parti- 
cles of water floating in tfie air, and condensed by the cool- 
ness of the night. 

16. Electricity.— -Electricity is a power in nature which is 
made to shew itself by friction. If a stick of sealing- wax, or 
a piece of glass be rubbed upon the coat, or upon a piece of 
flannel, it will instantly attract pieces of paper, and other 
light substances. The power which occasions this attraction 
is called electricity. 

In larger experiments, this power appears in liquid fire, and is of the 
same nature as lightning. In a particular kind of new experiments, it ha* 
lately acquired the name of Galvanism.—- See Blair* $ Grammar of Natural 
and Experimental Philosophy. 

17* Earthquakes.— Aw earthquake is a sudden motion of the 
earth, supposed to be caused by electricity ; but the differ- 
ence in the mode by which earthquakes and lightning are 
effected, has not yet been clearly ascertained. Others ascribe 
it to steam generated in caverns of the earth. 

18. Ethics. — Ethics, or Morals, teach the science of proper 
conduct according to the respective situations of men. 

19. Geography. — Geography is that science which makes 
us acquainted with the constituent parts of the globe, and its 
distribution into land and water. It also teaches us the limits 
and boundaries of countries ; and their peculiarities, natural 
and political. It is the eye and the key of history. 

20. Geometry. — This sublime science teaches the relations 
of magnitude, and the properties of surfaces. In an extended 
sense, it is the science of demonstration. It includes the 
greater part of mathematics, and is generally preferred, to 
logic in teaching the art of reasoning. 

21. Hail.— Hail is formed from rain congealed in its de» 
scent by the coolness of the atmosphere* 

F 



122 Brief Introduction to.tke Arts **d Sciences* 

22. Hwfory.— History is a narration of post facts and everts, 
relative to all ages and: nations. It is the guide of the .states* 
man, and the favourite study o£ the enlightened scholar. ' It 
is, or ought to be, the common school of mankind, equally 
open and useful to princes and subjects* . 

23. Law* — The rule of right; but owing to professional soph- 
istry and chicanery, too often the rule or wrong. To correct 
its abuse in England, Juries of twelve honest men are ap- 
pointed to decide all questions according to common sense, 
and the decisions or arbitrations of lawyers are always care* 
fully avoided. 

24. jLflgtc.— Logic is the art of employing reason effica- 
ciously in inquiries after truth, and in commnnicating the 
result to others. 

25. Mechanics, — Mechanics teach the nature and laws of 
motion, the action and force of moving bodies, and the con- 
struction and effects of machines and engines. 

26. Medicine. — The art of medicine consists in the know- 
ledge of the disorders to which the human body is subject, and 
in applying proper remedies to remove or relieve them. 

27. Metaphysics* — Metaphysics may be considered as the 
science of the mind. From the nature of the sutgects about 
which it is employed, it cannot lead to absolute certainty; 

28. Mwfo.— Mists are a collection of vapours, commonly 
rising from fenny places or rivers, and becoming more visible 
as the light of the day decreases. When a mist ascends high 
in the air, it is called a cloud. 

2p. Music. — Music is the practice of harmony, arising from 
a combination of melodious sounds in songs, concerts, &c. 

30. Natural History. — Natural history includes a descrip- 
tion of the forms and instincts of animals, the growth and 
properties of vegetables and minerals, and whatever else is 
connected with nature. 

31 . Optics. — The science of Optics treats of vision, whether 
performed by the eye, or assisted by instruments. It teaches 
the construction and use of telescopes, microscopes, &c. 

32. Painting. — Painting is one of the fine arts ; and by a 
knowledge of the principles of drawing and the effects of co- 
lours, it teaches to represent all sorts of objects. A good 
painter must possess an original genius. 

33. Pharmacy. — Pharmacy is the science of the apothecary. 
It teaches the choice, preparation, and mixture of medicines. 

34. Philosophy. — Philosophy is the study of nature, of 
mind, an4 of morals, on the principles of reason. 

35. Physics — Physics treat of nature, and explain the phe- 
nomena of the material world, 



Brief Introduction to the Arts and Sciences. 123 

$6. Poetry*— Poetry is a speaking picture; representing 
real or fictitious events by a succession of mental imagery, 
generally delivered in measured numbers. It at ©rice refines 
the heart, and elevates the soul. 

37. Rain.— Rain is produced from clouds, condensed, or run 
together by the cold ; which, by their own weight, fall in 
drops of water. When they fall with violence, they are sup- 
posed to be impelled by the attraction of electricity. 

38. Rainbow.— The rainbow is produced by the refraction 
and reflection of the sun's beams from falling drops of rain. 
An artificial rainbow may be produced by means of a garden 
engine, the water from which must be thrown in a direction 
contrary to that of the sun. 

SQ. Religion.— Religion is the worship offered to the Supreme 
Being, in the manner that we conceive to be the most agree- 
able to his will, in order to procure his blessing in this life* 
and happiness in a future state. 

40. Sculpture. — Sculpture is the art of carving or hewing 
stone and other hard substances into images. 

41. iStoow.— Snow is congealed water or clouds; the par- 
ticles of which freezing, and touching each other, descend in 
beautiful flakes. 

42. Surgery. -^Surgery is that branch of the healing art 
which consists in manual operations by the help of proper in- 
struments, or in cutting wounds by suitable applications. 

43. Thunder and Lightning.— These awful phenomena are 
occasioned by the power called electricity. Lightning con- 
sists of an apparent stream of the electrical fire, or fluid, pas- 
sing between the clouds and the earth ; and the thunder is 
nothing more than the explosion, with its echoes. 

Thunder and lightning bear the some relation to each other as the flash 
and the report of a cannon ; and by the space of time which occurs between 
them in both cases, their distance from a particular spot mav he known, 
reckoning 1142 feet for every moment. 

44. Tides. — The tides are the alternate flux and reflux of 
the sea, which generally takes places every six hours. The 
tides are occasioned by the united attraction exercised by 
the moon and sun upon the waters. 

45. Versification. — Versification is the arranging of words 
and syllables in such equal order, as to produce that harmony 
which distinguishes poetry from prose. Verse may be either 
blank or in rhyme. In blank verse, the last words of the line 
do not correspond in sound as they do in rhyme. 

IV. B. For further particulars on all these and many other subjects , the 
tutor should put into the hands of his pupils, Blair* s Universal Preceptor 9 or 
General Grammar of Arts* Science*, and Knowledge ,• or WatkMs Portable 
Bncydopajdia; or Blair's Grammar of Natural and Experimental Philosoph 



( 124 ) 

0VTUNE8 OF GEOGRAPHY* 

The circumference of the globe is 360 degrees; each de« 
gree containing 69 and a half English, or 60 geographical 
miles: and it is divided intp four great divisions.; Europe, 
Asia, Africa, and America. 

The figure of the earth is that of a globe or ball, the cip« 
cumference of which, or a line surrounding ks surface, mea- 
sures about twenty-five thousand miles : the diameter, or a 
line drawn through the centre, from one side to the other, is 
nearly eight thousand miles. The whole is a vast body of 
land and water. 

The parts of land are continents, islands, peninsulas, 
isthmuses, promontories, capes, coasts, and mountains* 

A Continent is a large portion of land containing several 
regions or kingdoms, which are not entirely separated by 
seas; as Europe, Asia, Africa, and America. 

An Island is a tract of land surrounded by water; as 
Great Britain, Ireland, and Iceland. 

A Peninsula is a tract of land surrounded by water, except 
at one narrow neck, by winch it joins to the neighbouring 
continent ; as the Morea in Greece, the Crimea, in Tartary. 

An Isthmus 'is that neck of land which joins „a peninsula 
to the continent; as Corinth, in Greece; and Precop, in 
Tartary. 

A- Promontory is an elevated point of land stretching 
itself into the sea, the end of which is called a Caps ; as the 
Cape of Good Hope, and Cape Verd, in Africa; and Cape 
Horn, in South America. 

Mountains are elevated portions of land, towering above 
the neighbouring country ; as the Apennines, in Italy ; the 
Pyrenees, between France and Spain ; the Alps in Switzer- 
land; and the Andes, in South America. 

The parts into which the waters are distributed are oceans, 
sea, lakes, straits, gulphs, bays, creeks, and rivers. 

The land is divided into two great continents, besides 
islands, the eastern and the western continents. 

The Eastern Continent comprehends Europe, on the 
north-west; Asia, on the north-east; and Africa, joined to 
Asia by the isthmus of Suez, which is only sixty miles in 
breadtn, on the south. 

The Western Continent consists of North and South 
America, united by the isthmus of Darien, which, in the nar- 
rowest part, is only twenty-five miles across from ocean to 
ocean* 



Outlines of Geography. 125 

Europe, Asia, Africa, and America, with some impropriety, 
are denominated the four quarters of the world. They 
differ greatly from each other in extent of country, in the 
nature of the climate, and the productions of the soil; in the 
manners, complexion, and character of their inhabitants; and 
in their forms of government, their national customs, and 
religion. 

The population of these grand divisions of the globe is 
by no means equal and proportionate. Asia, which has always 
been considered as the quarter first occupied by the human 
race, is supposed to. contain about 500,000,000 of inhabitants. 
The population of Africa may be 100,000,000; of America, 
25,000,000 ; and 150,000,000 are assigned to Europe ; whilst 
New Holland and the isles of the Pacific probably do not 
contain above half a million. 

The immense spaces, which lie between these great con* 
tinents, are filled by the waters of the Pacific, the Atlantic/ 
and the Indian Oceans, and of the seas about die Poles. 

The Pacific Ocean occupies nearly half the surface of the 
globe, from the eastern shores of New Holland to the western 
coasts of America. Separately considered, the Pacific receives 
but few rivers, the chief being the Amur from Tartary, and 
the Hoan Ho, and Kian Ku, from China ; while the principal 
rivers of America run towards the east. 

The Atlantic or Western Ocean, which is the next in 
importance, divides the old continent from the new. 

The Indian Ocean lies between the East Indies and 
Africa. 

The seas between the arctic and antarctic circles and the 
poles, have been styled the arctic and antarctic oceans ; 
the latter, indeed, being only a continuation of the Pacific, 
Atlantic, and Indian Oceans ; while the Arctic sea is partly 
embraced by continents, and receives many important 
rivers. 

EUROPE. 

Europe is the most important division of the globe, though 
it is the smallest. The temperature of the climate, the fer- 
tility of the soil, the progress of the arts and sciences, and the 
establishment of a mild and pure religion* render it eminently 
superior to the others. 

It is divided into several powerful kingdoms and states; 
of which Great Britain, France, Spain, Germany, and Russia, 
are the principal. 

FS 



J 26 



Outlines of Geography. 



The names of the chief nations of Europe, and their capital 
cities, &c. are as follow: 



Capitals. 
Copenhagen 



Countries, 
Norway and } 

Oenrnark. J 

Sweden Stockholm 

Russia Petersburgh 

Prussia Berlin 

-Austria Vienna 

Bavaria ~ Munich 

Wirtemburg Stutgard 

Saxony :. Dresden 

England London 

Scotland Edinburgh 

Ireland . Dublin 

Batavia (or ) 
Holland) \ •••"'"" 



Amsterdam 



Countries. 
x^rjance ...... 

Spain 

Portugal 

Switzerland • 

Italy 

Btruria 

Pppedom .... 

Naples 

Hungary 

Turkey 

Greece ...*.... 
liepubli 
the 
Islands 



•** • • * • ••« • ■ 



lblic of J 
e Seven > 
lands ) 



Capitals. 

Paris 

Madrid 

Lisbon 

Bern, Ac" 

Milan 

Florence 

Rome 

Naples 

Buda 

Constantinople 

Athens 

CefaloRia, 



ASIA. 



Though, in the revolutions of times and events, Asia has 
lost much of its original distinction, still it is entitled to a 
very high rank for its amazing extent, for the richness and 
Variety of its productions, the beauty of its surface, and the 
benignity of its soil and climate. 

It-was'm Asia that the human race was first planted : it was 
here that the most memorable transactions in Scripture history 
touk place ; and here the sun of science shot its morning-rays, 
but only to beam with meridian lustre on Europe. 

The names of the principal Asiatic nations, and their capital 
title.?, are: 

Countries. Capitals* 

India Calcutta 

Tibet La»a 

Japan Jeddo. 

In Asia are situated the immense islands of Borneo, Suma- 
tra, Java, Ceylon, New Holland, and the Philippines. 

AFRICA. 

This division of the Globe lies to the south of Europe ; 
and is surrounded on all sides by the sea ; except a- narrow 
neck of land called the Isthmus of Suez, which unites it to 
Asia. It is about four thousand three hundred miles long, 
and four thousand two hundred broad ; and is chiefly situated 
within the torrid zone. 

Except the countries occupied by the Egyptians, those venera- 
ble fathers of learning, and the Carthaginians, who were once the 
rivals of the powerful empire of Rome, this extensive tract has 
alwaysbeensunk in gross barbarism, and degrading superstrtioii. 



Countries. Capitols. 

China. Pekin 

Persia Teheran 

Arabia Mecca 



Outlines of Geography. 



1«7 



The name* of the principal African nations, and their 
capital cities, are : 



Countries* •,.- . Capitals. . 

Morocco *••*«-« Morocco, Fez 

Algiers *>j J...... Algiers .. . 

Tunis ...•».«<» ... Tunis . . 

Tripoli „. . Tripoli 

Egypt 4..... Cairo 

Biledulgerid ......... Dara. 



Countries. Capital*. 

Zaara Tegessa 

Negroland Madinga 

Ckjinea ...., Benin 

Nubia Dangoia 

Abyssinia Gondar 

Abcx — . Suaquam. 



I...- 



»:<•»: 



AMERICA. 



TV*s division is frequently called *he New - WorfcL. It was 
unknown to.tfee rest of the globe till discovered by Colum- 
bus, in the year 1492* Its riches and its fertility allured ad- 
venturers, and the principal nations of Europe planted cole* 
nies on its coasts. 

Spain, Portugal, England, and France, occupied such tracts 
as were originally discovered by their respective subjects; 
and with little. -regard to the rights of the original natives, 
drove them- to the internal parts, or wholly extirpated them. 
1 The soil and climate of America are as various as nature 
can produce. Extending nearly nine thousand miles in length, 
and three thousand in breadth, it includes every degree of 
heat and old, of plenty and sterility. 

The great division of the continent of America, is into 
North and South ; commencing at the isthmus of Darien, 
which in some places is little more than thirty miles over. 

The numerous islands between these two divisions of this 
continent -are known by the name of the West Indies. 

NORTH AMERICA is thus divided: 



UNITED STATES. 



Countries'. 


Capital*. 


Georgia ....... Savannah 


South Carolina ........ Columbia 


North Carolina .. 














Philadelphia 






New York 


New York 










Connecticut Hartford 


New Hampshire 


..... Portsmouth 


















Ohio 


f 



SPANISH POSSESSIONS. 

Countries. Capitals. 

Florida St. Augusta. 

Mexico Mexico 

New Mexico ..... St. Fee 
California St. Juan 



BRITISH POSSESSIONS. 

Countries. Capitals* 

Upper Canada ) uebec 

Lower Canada \ '"' ** uei)ec 
Hudson's Bay ........ Fort York 

Newfoundland ....... St. John's 

Nova Scotia Halifax 

New Brunswick ...... St John'i 

F4 



1 98 OutHHes of Geography. 

SOqTH AMERICA is divided Mo Ae foUswhig parts: 



Countries. 
Terra Firma 

Peru 

Amazonia .. 



Gofana 



CMc) Place*. 
Panama 
Lima •• 



•••••••••••••••••••a* 



Surinam 

.Cayenne .. ... 

St. Sebastian . 
Buenos Ayres 
St Jag* 



Belongs to 

9pain 

Ditto 



HoOand 



Brazil M | St. Sebastian Portugal 

Paraguay Buenos Ayres Spam 

Chni *-.. ••••• St. JatfD Ditto 

Patagonia 

GREAT BRITAIN is an island 760 miles kxur and from 
150 to 300 broad/ bounded on the North by the FroMn 
Ocean, on the South by the English Channel, en the East 
by the German Ocean, on the West by St George's Channel; 
and contain England, Wales, and Scotland. 

ENGLAND is divided into the following Counties: 
Counties* Chief Towns. 

Northumberland ........ Newcastle 

Durham Durham 

Cum's^rland ......... Carlisle 

Westmorland Appleby 

Yorkshire York 

Lancashire Lancaster 

Cheshire Chester 

Shropshire Shrewsbury 

Derbyshire Derby 

Nottinghamshire Nottingham 

Lincolnshire Lincoln 

Rutland ; Oakham 

Leicestershire Leicester 

Staffordshire M Stafford 

Warwickshire Warwick 

Worcestershire Worcester 

Herefordshire Hereford 

Monmouthshire Monmouth 

Gloucestershire Gloucester 

Oxfordshire Oxford 



Counties. Chief 

Bucldnghamshire ..... Aylesbury 
Northamptonshire ... Northampton 

Bedfordshire „ Bedford 

Huntingdonshire ..... Huntingdon 

Cambridgeshire Cambridge 

Norfolk Norwich 

Suffolk , M Bury 

Essex Chelmsford 

Hertfordshire «. Hertford 

Middlesex London 

Kent Canterbui* 

Surry Guildford 

Sussex _ Chichester 

Berkshire M . Abingdon 

Hampshire Winchester 

Wiltshire Salisbury 

Dorsetshire 

Somersetshire Wells 

Devonshire' •• Exeter 

Cornwall 



SCOTLAND is divided into thefoUomng Shires: 



Sliires. Chief Towns. 

Edinburgh Edinburgh 

Haddington Dunbar 

Merse Dunse 

Roxburg Jtdburg 

'Selkirk Selkirk 

Peebles Peebles 

Lanark Glasgow 

Dumfries Dumfries 

Wigtown ..I...... Wigtown 

Kirkcudbright Kirkcudbright 

Ayr Ayr 

Dumbarton Dunbarton 

Bute & Caithness ... Rothsay 
Renfrew ....«*••. ...... Renfrew. 

'ling Stirling 

Uthgow — Linlithgow 



Sftres. Chief Towns. 

Argyle Inverary 

Perth Perth 

Kincardin Bervie 

Aberdeen Aberdeen 

Inverness Inverness 

N ^rtie & .?~" \ Nalnie ' <*»** 

Fife ".'....... St Andrew's 

Forfar Montrose 

Bamff Bamff 

Sutherland Strathy, Darnoch 

Clacmannan % 1 Clacmannan* 
and Kinross} Kinross 

Ross Taine 

Elgin M Elgin 

Orkney „.. Kirkwall 



— -•» w -»- 



Outlines Geography. — Chronology* 

WALES is divided into tite following Counties : 



129 



Counties, • Chief Towns* 

Flintshire FHnt 

Denbighshire Denbigh 

Montgomeryshire Montgomery 

Anglesea Beaumaris 

Caernarvonshire Caernarvon 

Merionethshire Harlech 



Counties. Chief Towns. 

Radnorshire Radnor 

Brecknockshire Brecknock 

Glamorganshire Cardiff 

Pembrokeshire .. ....... Pembroke 

Cardiganshire <»...;. Cardigan 

Caennarthenshire Caermarthen 



IRELAND, 300 miles long and 150 broad, is divided into 
four Provinces ; Leinster, Ulster, Connaught, and Munster. 
These four provinces are subdivided into the following 
bounties : 

Counties. C/def Towns. 

Antrim Carrickfergus 

Londonderry .... Derry 

Tyrone Omagh 

Fermanagh ...... Enniskflling 

Donegal Lifibrd 

Leitrim Carrick on Shannon 

Roscommon Roscommon 

Mayo .., Ballinrobe 

Sligo Sligo 

Gal way Gal way 

Clare Ennis 

Cork Cork 

Kerry Tralee 

Limerick ,. Limerick 

Tipperary Clonmel 

Waterford Waterford 



Counties. Chief Towns. 

Dublin Dublin 

Louth Drogheda 

Wicklow Wicklow 

Wexford Wexford 

Longford ................. Longford 

East Meath Trim 

West Meath Mullingar 

King's County Philipstown 

Queen's County Maryborough 

Kilkenny Kilkenny 

Kildare Xaas& Athy 

Carlow Carlow 

Down 4 Downpatrick 

Armagh v Armagh 

Monaghan Monaghan 

Cavan 4 Cavan 



%* For further details of Geography, the PupU should consult tlte various 

Geographical Works of Goldsmith. 



EPOCHS IN HISTORY, 

From the Creation of the World, to the Year 1815; abstracted 
from Dr. Robinson's Grammar of History. 



Before Christ. 

4004 Creation of the world 

3875 The murder of Abel 

2348 The deluge 

2247 The tower of Babel buik 

2100 Semiramis, queen of the As- 
syrian empire, flourished 

2000 The birth of Abraham 

If 2d Joseph mid into Egypt 

1571 The birth of Moses 

1451 The Israelites under Joshua, 
pass the river Jordan 

1400 Sisostris the Great, king of 
Egypt. 

1184 Troy taken | .- 



Before Christ. 

1117 Samson betrayed to the Phi- 
listines 
1095 Saul anointed 
1070 Athens governed by archons 
1048 Jerusalem taken by David 
1004 Solomon's dedication of the 
temple 

926 The birth of Lycurgus 
907 Homer supposed to have flou- 
rished 

753 The building of Rome 
587 Jerusalem token by NebuchacU 

ne?zar 
539 Pythagoras flourished 



5 



\ 



150 



i^kronologj/* 



B.C. | 

536 Cyrus founded the Persian em- \ 

pire 
525 Cambyses conquered Egypt 
520 Confucius flourished 
515 Trie temple of Jeraadem finish- 
ed 
490 The battle of Marathon 
431 Beginning of the Peloponne- 

sian war 
390 Plato* and other eminent Gre- 
cians flourished 
336 PhOip of Maccdon killed 
323 The death of Alexander the 
Great, aged 33, after founding 
the Macedonian empire 
322 Demosthenes put to death 
264 Beginning of the Punic war 
218 The second Punk war began. 



B.C. 

187 Anuochus the Great defeated 

and killed . 
149 The third Punic war began 
146 Carthage destroyed by PubUuf 

Scipio 
107 Cicero born 
55 Caesar's fifift expedition against 

Britain 
48 The battle of Phazsana, be- 
tween Pompey and Caesar 
44 Caesar killed in the senate- 
house, aged 56 
31 The battle of Acthnn. Marc 
Antony and Cleopatra defeated 
by Augustus 

8. Augustus became a e mperw of 
'Rome, and the Roman empire 



f/Jy was at its greatest extent 
m Our Saviour's bi 



x v 



14 Augustus died at Kola 

27 John baptized our Saviour 

33 Our Saviour's crucifixion 

36 St. Paul converted 

43 Qaudius'sexpcdition into Britain 

53 Caractacus carried in chains to 

Rome 
61 Boadicca, the British queen, 

defeats the Romans 
70 Titus destroys Jerusalem 
266 The Roman empire attacked 

by the northern nations 
319 The Emperor Constantine fa- 
voured the Christians 
325 The first general Council of Nice 
400 The Goths and Vandals spread 
* into France and Spain 
410 Rome taken and plundered by 

Alaric 
426 The Romans leave Britain 
449 The Saxons arrive in Britain 
455 Rome tuteni by Genseric 
536 Rome taken jby ft^iwriuK 
£97 St Augustin arrives in England 
606 The power of the Popes began 
f;22 The Jiight of Mahomet 
637 Jerusalem taken by the Saracens 
771 Pavia taken by Charlemagne 
828 The seven kingdoms of Eng- 
land united under Egbert 
836 The university of Oxferd 
founded fey Alfred the Croat 




Hannibal passed the Alps T A. Uur bxv ^ UTS D"^ 1 * 

Christian /Era. 

] 1013 The Danes, utioer Sueno, got 
possession of England 

1065 Jerusalem taken by the Turks 

1066 The conquest of England, un- 
der William, duke of Normandy, 



since called William the Con- 
queror [Land 
1096 The first crusade to the Holy 
1 147 The second crusade 
1172 Henry II. took possession of 

Ireland 
1189 The kings of England and 

France went to the Holy Land 

1192 Richard I. defeated Saladin, at 

Ascalon [John 

1215 Magna Charta signed by king 

1227 The Tartars under Gingis- 

kan. over-ran the Saracen empire 
1283 Wales conquered by Edward 

the First 
1293 The regular succession of the 

English parliaments began 
1346 The battle of Cressy 
1356 The battle o£ Poictfers 
1381 Wat Tyler's insurrection 
1299 Richard IL deposed and mur- 
dered. Henry IV. became king 
1400 Battle of Damascus, between 

Tamerlane and Bajazet 
1420 Henry V. eorquered France 
1420 Constantinople ta*en Vy the 
Turfcji 



Chronology.— Survey of the Universe. 



131 



1423 Henry VL an infant, crowned 

king of France, at Paris 
1440 The art of seal-engraving ap- 
plied to printing with blocks 
1483 The two sons of Edward the 

Fourth murdered in the Tower, 

by order of their uncle Richard, 

who ascended the throne 
1485 The battle of Bosworth, be- 

tween Richard III. and Henry VII. 
1497 The Portuguese first sail te 

the East 'Indies 
1517 The Reformation begun by 

Luther 
1534 The Reformation begun in 

England, under Henry VIII. 
1588 The destruction of the Spanish 

Armada 
1602 Queen Elizabeth died, and 

James I. of Scotland, ascended 

the English throne 
1608 The invention of telescopes 
1642 Charles I. demanded the five 

members 
1645 The battle of Naseby 
1649 King Charles beheaded 
1660 The restoration of Charles H. 
1 666 The great fire of London 
1688 The Revolution in England, 

James II. expelled, and William 

jand Mary crowned 



1 1704 Victory over v the French, at 

Blenheim, gained by John, duke 
of Marlborough 

1714 Queen Anne dies, and George 
the First, of Hanover, ascends the 
throne of England 

1718 Charles the Twelfth of Swe- 
den killed, aged 36 

1727 Sir Isaac Newton died 

1760 George II. died 

1775 The American war commenced 

1783 America acknowledged inde- 
pendent 

1789 The revolution in France 

1793 Louis XVI. beheaded 

1798 The victory ofthe Nile, by Nelson 

1799 Bonaparte made First Consul 
of France 

1303 War re-commcnccd betweett 

France and England 

1805 The victory of Trafalgar, gained 

. by Nelson, who was killed 

180*8. The empire of the French, ua« 

der Napoleon Bonaparte, extend* 

ed over France, Italy, Germany 

Prussia, Poland, Holland and Spain. 

1811 George, Prince of Wales, de- 
clared Regent. 

1812 The Burning of Moscow 

1814 Napoleon abdicated the Throne 
of France ,and the Bourbons restored, 

1815 Napoleon returned from Elba. 



A BRIEF SURVEY OF THE UNIVERSE, 

WHEN the shades of night have spread their veil over the plains, 
the Jirmament manifests to our vie\v its grandeur and its riches. The 
sparkling points with which it is studded, arc so many suns suspended 
by the Almighty in the immensity of space, for the worlds which roll 
round them. 

•• The Heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament shew- 
eth his handy-work." The royal poet, who expressed himself with such 
loftiness of sentiment, was not aware that the stars which he contem- 
plated were in reality suns. He anticipated these times; and- first 
6ung that inajestic hymn, which future and more enlightened ages 
should chant forth in praise to the Founder of Worlds. 

The assemblage of tjiese vast bodies is divided into different Systems, 
the number of which probably surpasses the grains of sftnq which the 
sea cast? on its shores. . 

Each system has at its centre a star, or sun, which shines by its own 
native light: and round which several orders of opakc globes revolve; 
reflecting with more or less brilliancy the light they borrow from it, 
and which renders them visible. 

What an august, what an amazing conception does this give of th£ 
fcorks of the Creator! 'thousands of thousands of suns, multiplied 

F 6 • 



139 Survey bfite Universe. 

without end, and ranged all around us at immense atstotflces from each 
other: attended by ten thousand times ten thousand worlds, all in ra- 
pid motion, yet calm, regular* afrd harmonious, invariably keeping 
the paths prescribed them; and these worlds, doubtless, peopled with 
millions of beings, formed for endless progression in perfection and 
felicity ! 

From what we know of our own system, it may be reasonably eon. 
eluded that all the. rest are with equal wisdom contrived, situated, and 
provided with accommodations for rational inhabitants. Let us then* 
fore take a survey of the system to' which we belong, the only one ac- 
cessible to us; and thence we shall be the better enabled to judge of 
the nature of the other systems of the universe. 

Those stars which appear to wander among the heavenly host, are 
the planets. The primary or principal ones have the sun for the com- 
mon centre of their periodical revolutions ; while the others, ' or secon- 
dary ones, which are called satellites or moons, move round their pri- 
maries, accompanying them in their annual orbits. 

Our Earth has one satellite or moon, Jupiter four, Saturn seven* 
and Herschel six. Saturn has, besides, a luminous and beautiful ring, 
surrounding his lx>dy, and detached from it 

We know that our solar system consist* of twenty-seven planetary 
bodies, but we are not certain that there are not more. Tlie number 
known has been considerably augmented since the invention of teles- 
copes; and by more perfect instruments, and more accurate obser- 
vers, may perhaps be further increased. 

Modern astronomy has not only thus shown us new planets, but has 
also to our senses enlarged the boundaries of the solar system. The 
comets, which, from their fallacious appearance, their tail, their beard, 
the diversity of fyeir directions, and their sudden appearance and dis- 
appearance, were anciently considered as meteors, are found to be a 
species of planetary bodies: their long tracks are now calculated by 
astronomers; who can foretel their periodical return, determine their 
place, and account for their irregularities. Many of these bodies at 
present revolve round the sun : though the orbits which they trace round 
him are so extensive, that centuries are necessary for them to complete a 
single revolution* 

In short, from modern astronomy we learn that the s^ars are innu> 
merable; and that the constellations, in which the ancients reckoned 
but a few, are now known to contain thousands. The heavens, as 
known to the philosophers Thales and Hipparchus, were very poor, 
when compared to the state in w^ich they are shewn by later astro- 
nomers. 

The diameter of the orbit which our earth describes, is mote than a 
hundred and ninety millions of miles; yet this vast extent almost va- 
nishes into nothing, and becomes a mere point, when the astronomer 
uses it as ^ measure to ascertain the distance of the fixed stars. What 
then must be the real bulk of these luminaries, which are perceptible 
by us at such an enormous distance ! The sun is about a rmuion times 
greater than all the earth, and more than five hundred times greater 
than all. the planets taken together; and if the stars are suns, as we 
\iave every reason to suppose, they undoubtedly equal, or exceed It in 

While the planets perform their periodical revolutions round the sun, 
by w*hich the course of their year is regulated, fhey turn found their 



Survey ofihe Universe. 13S 

own centres, by Which they obtain the alternate succession of day and 
night. 

Our earth or globe, which seems so vast in the eyes of the frail be- 
ings who inhabit it, and whose diameter is above seven thousand nine 
hundred and seventy miles, is yet nearly a thousand times smaller 
than Jupiter, which appears to the naked eye as little more than a shining 
atom. 

A rare transparent, and elastic substance, surrounds the earth to a 
certain height. This, substance is the air or atmosphere, the oegion of 
the winds: an immense reservoir of vapours, which, when condensed 
into clouds, either embellish the sky by the variety of their figures and 
the richness of their colouring; or astonish us by the rolling thunder, 
or flashes of lightning, that escape from them. Sometimes they melt 
away ; and at other times are condensed into rain or hail, supplying 
the deficiences of the earth with the superfluity of heaven. 

The moon, the nearest of all the planets to the earth, is that of 
which we have the most knowledge. Its globe always presents to us 
the same face, because it turns round upon its axis in precisely the 
same space of time in which it revolves round the earth. 

It has its phases, or gradual and periodical increase and decrease of 
light, according to its position in respect to' the sun, which enlightens 
it, and the earth, on which it reflects the light that it has received. 

The face of the moon is divided into bright and dark parts, The 
former seem to be land, and the latter to resemble our seas. 

In the luminous spots there have been observed some parts which are 
brighter than the rest; these project a shadow, the length of which has 
been measured, and its track ascertained. ' Such parts are mountains, 
higher than ours in proportion to the size of the moon: whose tops 
may be seen gilded by the rays of the sun, at the quadratures of the 
moon; the light gradually descending to their feet, till they appear 
entirely bright. Some of these mountains stand by themselves, while 
in other places there are long chains of them. 

Venus has, like the moon, her phases, spots, and mountains. The 
telescope discovers also spots in Mars and Jupiter. Those in Jupiter 
form belts: and considerable changes have been seen among these; as 
if of the ocean's overflowing the land, and again leaving it dry by its 
setreat. 

. Mercury, Saturn, and Herschel, are comparatively but little known: 
the first, because he is too near the sun; the last two, because they 
are so remote from it. 

Lastly; the Sun himself has spots, which seem to move with regu- 
larity ; and the size of which equals, and very often exceeds, the sur- 
fare of our globe. 

Every thing in the universe is systematical; all is combination, 
a^Snrty, and connexion. 

. Prom the relations which exist between all parts of the world, and 
by which they conspire to one general end, results the harmony 6t the 
world. 

The relations which unite all the worlds to one another, constitute 
the harmony of the universe. 

The beauty of the world is founded in the harmonious diversity qt 
the beings that compose it; in the number, the extent, and the quality* 
df their eflects; and m the sum of happiness that arises from it. 



134 



Survey of the Universe. 



TUB SOLAR SYSTEM AND ZODIAC. 

THE Sun revolving- on his axis turns, 
And with creative fire intensely burns ; 
First Mercury completes his transient year, 
Glowing, refulgent, with reflected glare ; 
Bright Venn* occupies a wider way, 
The early harbinger of night and day ; 
More distant still our globe terraqueous turns, 
Nor chills intense, nor fiercely heated burns ; 
Around her rolls the lunar orb of light, 
Trailing her silver glories thro* the night : 
Beyond Our globe the sanguine Mars displays 
A strong reflection of primeval rays ; 
Next belted Jupiter far distant gleams, 
Scarcely enlightened with the solar beams ; 
With four unfix*d receptacles of light, 
He towers majestic thro* the spacious height s 
But farther yet the tardy Saturn lags, 
And six attendant luminaries drags ; 
Investing with a double ring his pace, 
He circles thro* immensity of space. 
On the earth's orbit see the various signs, 
Mark where the Sun, our year completing, shines : 
First the bright Ram his languid ray improves ; 
Next glaring wat'ry thro* the Bull he moves i 
The am'rous Twins admit his genial ray;. 
Now burning, thro* the Crab he takes his way ; 
The Lion, flaming, bears (he solar power; 
The Virgin faints beneath the sultry shower. 
Now the just Balance weighs his equal force, 
The slimy Serpent swekers in his coarse ; 
The sablcd Archer clouds his languid face ; 
The Goat .with tempests urges on his race 
Now in the Water his faint beams appear, 
And the cold Fishes end th&jjhrcling year. 



-.^ii 



-.* 



Periods, Distances, Sizes, and Motions of the Globes, composing 

the Solar System. 



Sun and 
Planet* 



>•*• •».♦♦ 



SUN. 

Mercury..., 

Venus »••?.< 

Bartb 

Moon.. 

Mars»»* 

Jupiter 

Saturn 

Hersche}.... 



Annual Period 
round the Sun* 



1 



»•* 



87 d. 

224 d. 

365 d. 

365 d. 

686 d. 

4332 d. 

10759 d. 

3484-5 d. 



23 h. 
17 h. 

6h. 

6h- 
23 h. 
12 h. 

7h. 

In. 



Diameter 
i»mUcs. 



820,000 
3,100 
9,300 
7,970 
2,180 
£.150 
94,100 
77,950 



t>ist. from the Sun 
in E. miles, 



37,000,000 

69,000,000 

95,000,000 

95,000,000 

145,000,000 

495,000,000 

908,000,000 

1800,000,000 



Hourly 
Mmtkm* 



95,000 
69,000 
58,000 

2,200 
47,000 
25,000 
18,000 

7,000 



35,109 

Besides several hundred Comets which revolve round the Sun in toed, 
but unascertained periods! and four small planets between Mar* and Jimiter, 
cjUta} Asteroids* 



( 135 ) 

POETRY, 



1. THE BEGGAR'S PETITION. 

PITY the sorrows of a poor old man," 

Whose trembling steps have borne him to your door, 
Whose days ave dwindled to the shortest span; 

Oh ! give relief, and Heav'n will bless your store. 

These tatter'd clothes my poverty bespeak, 

These hoary locks proclaim my lengthen'd years, 

And many a furrow in my grief-worn cheek 
Has been a channel to a flood of tears. J J 

Yon house erected on the rising ground, ~r/ 
With tempting aspect drew me trom the road ; 
For Plenty there a residence has found, 

And Grandeur a magnificent abode. 

Hard is the rate of the infirm and poor ! 

Here, as I crav'd a morsel of their bread, 
A pamper'd menial drove me from the door, ' 

To seek a shelter in an humbler shed. 

Oh ! take me to your hospitable dome*; 

Keen blows the wind, and piercing is the cold : 
Short is my passage to the friendly tomb ; 

For I am poor, and miserably old. 

Pity the sorrows of a poor old man, 

Whose trembling steps have borne him to your door, 
Whose days are dwindled to the shortest span \ 

Oh! give relief, and Heav'n will bless your store. 



1 

i 



2. THE TWENTY-THIRD PSALM. 

By Addison. 

THE Lord my pasture shall prepare. 
And feed me with a shepherd's care : 
His presence shall my wants supply, 
And guard me with a watchful eye ; 
My noon-day walks he shall attend, 
And all my midnight hours defend. ., 

When in the sukry glebe I faint, ' 
Or on the thirsty mountain pant ; 
To fertile vales, and dewy meads, 
My weary wand'ring steps he leads ; 
Where peaceful riven, soft and slow, 
Amidst the verdant landscape flow/* 

Though in the paths of death I trea4* 
With gtoomy horrors overspread ; 
My steadfast heart shall fear no ill; 
For thou, Lord! art with me still. 
Thy friendly crook shall give me aid, 
And guide me through the dregful ahAd* 



» 35 Select Pdetry. 

Though in a bare and rugged way* 
Through devious k>ne]y wilds 1 stray, 
Thy bounty shall my pains beguile: 
The barren wilderness shall smile. 
With sudden greens and herbage crown'd« 
And streams shall murmur all around, 



3. THE POOR MOUSE'S PETITION, 

Found in the Trap where he had been confined all NiglU. 



By Mrs. Baubauld, 

OH ! hear-a pensive prisoner's prayer, 

For liberty that sighs; 
And never let thine heart be shut 

Against the wretch's cries. 

For here forlorn and sad I sit 

Within the wiry grate; 
And tremble at th' approaching morn, 

Which brings impending fate. 

If e'er thy breast with freedom glow'd. 
And spum'd a tyrant's chain, 

Let not thy strong oppressive force 
A free-born mouse detain. 

Oh ! do not stain with guiltless blood, 

Thy hospitable health, 
Nor triumph that thy wiles betray 'fl 
. A prize so little worth. 

So,, when destruction lurks unseen, 
Which men, like mice may share f 

May some kind angel clear thy pad), 
Ahd break the hidden snare! 



4. MY MOTHER. 

By Miss Taylor. 

WHO fed me from her gentle breast, 
And hush'd me in her arms to rest; 
And on my cheek sweet kisses prees'd? 

My Mother. 

When sleep faraook my open eye-, 

Who was it sung sweet lullaby, 

And sooth'd me thaM should not cry? 

My Mother. 

Who sat and watch'd my infant head, 
When sleeping on my cradle bed; 
And tears of sweet affection shed ? 

My Mother* 

When pain and sickness made me cry, 
Who gaa'd Upon my heavy eye, 
And wept^ for fear that I should die? 

My Mother. 



Sekct Poetry. 457 



Who lov*d to see me pleas'd and gay, 
And taught me sweetly how to pllay, 
And minded all I had to fifty? 

My Mother. 

Who ran to help me when I fen, 
And would some pretty story tell, 
Or kiss the place to make it well? 

My Mother. 

Who taught my infant heart to pray, 
And love God's holy book and day; 
And taught me Wisdom's pleasant way ? 

My Mother. 

And can I ever cease to be 
Affectionate and kind to thee, 
- Who wast so very kind to me, 

My Mother? 

Ah, no! the thought I cannot bear; 
And if God please my life to spare, 
I hope I shall reward thy care, 

My Mother 

When thou art feeble, old, and grey. 
My healthy arm shall be thy stay; 
And I will sooth thy pains away, 

My Mother. 

And when I see thee hang thy head, 
Twill be my turn to watch thy bed; 
And tears of sweet direction shed, 

My Mother 

For God, who lives above the skies, 
Would look with vengeance in his eyes, 
If I should ever dare despise, 

My Mother. 



5. CRUELTY TO ANIMALS. 

By Cowper, 

1 WOULD not enter on my list of friends 

(Though grae'd with potishM manners and fine sense, 

Yet wanting sensibility) the man 

Who needlessly sets foot upon a worm. 

An inadvertent step may crush the snail 

That crawls at evening in the public path; 

But he that has humanity, forewarn'd, 

Will tread aside, and let the reptile live. 

For they are all, the meanest things that are, 

As free to live and to enjoy that life, 

As God was free to form them at the first, 

Who in his aov'rejgn wisdom made them all. 



ISt Select Pwlry. 

6. OMNIPOTENCE. 

By Addison. 

THIS spacious firmament on high, 
With all the blue ethereal slty , 
And spangled heavens, a shining frame, 
Their great Original proclaim!^. 
TV unwearied sun, from day to day, 
Does his Creator's power display, 
And publishes to inrery land 
The work of an Almighty hand. - 

Scon as the evening shades prevail, 
The moon takes up the wond'rous tale, 
And, nightly, to the limning earth, 
Bejieats the story of her birth: — " 
While all the stars that round her burn, 
And all the planets, in their turn, 
Confess the tidings as they roll, 
And spread the truth from pole to pole. 

What though in solemn silence all 
Move round this dark terrestrial ball* 
What though no real voice nor so und 
Amid their radiant orbs be found* 
In Reason's ear they all rejoice,' 
And utter forth a glorious voice ; 
For ever' singing, as they shine, 
•* The Hand that made us is divinc'V^ 

7. THE UNIVERSAL LAW. 

From BaRKOw's Young Christian''* Library. 

BLESSED Bedeemer, how divine, 
How righteous is this rule of thine; 
- Never to deal with others worse 

Than we would have them deal with us I . 

This golden lesson, short and plain, 
Gives not the mind or mem'ry pain; 
And ev'ry conscience must approve 
This universal law of love. 

'Tis written in each mortal breast, 
Where all our tend'rest wishes rest; 
We draw it from our inmost veins, 
Where love to self resides and reigns. 

Is reason ever at a loss?— 

Call in self-love to judge the cause; 

And let our fondest passion show, 

How we should treat our neighbours too. 

How blest would every nation prove, 
Thus rul*d by equity and love! 
All would be friends without a foe, 
And form a paradise below. 



Vv 



i t» 






Select Poetry.— Appendix. }$9 

8. THE BIBLE THE BEST OF BOOKS. 

From Bab&0W*0 Ytomg Christian's Library. . 

WHAT taught me that a Great First Cause 
Existed ere creation was, 
And gave a universe its laws? 

The Bible* 

What guide can lead me to this power, 
Whom conscience calk me to adore, 
And bids me seek hira more and more? 

The Bible* 

When all my actions prosper well, 
And higher hopes my wishes swell, 
What points where truer blessings dwell? 

The Bible. 

When passions with temptations join, 
To conquer every power of mine, 
What leads me then to help divine? 

The Bible, 

' When pining cares, and wasting pain, 
My spirits and my life-blood drain, 
What sooths and turns e'en these to gain? 

The Bible. 

When crosses and vexations teaze, 
And various ills my bosom seize, 
What is it that in life can please? 

The Bible. 

When horror chills my soul with fear, 
And nought but gloom and dread appear, - 
What is it then my mind can cheer P 

The Bible. 

When impious doubts my thoughts perplex, 

And mysteries my reason vex, 

Where is the guide which then directs? 

The Bible. 
And when affliction's fainting breath, 
Warn me I've done with all beneath, 
What can compose my soul in death ? 

The Bible. 



APPENDIX. 

Sect. I.— Of Letters and Syllables. 

The general division of letters is into vowels and consonants. 

The Vowels are a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes w and y ; and 
without one of these there can be no perfect sound : all the 
other letters, and sometimes rv and y, are called consonants. 



140 General Rule* for Spellimg. 

A diphthong is the uniting of two vowels into one syllable ; 
as, plain , fair. 

A triphthong is the uniting of three vowels into one sylla- 
ble ; as in lieu, beauty. 

A syllable is the complete sound of one or more letters ; as, 
a 9 am, art. 

Sect. II*— General Rules for Spelling* 

Rule I.-r-AU monosyllables ending in f, with a single 
vowel before it, have double U at the close ; as, mill, sell 

Rule II. — All monosyllables ending in /, with a double 
vowel before it, have one / only at the close ; as, mail, sail 

Rule III.— Monosyllables ending in /, when compounded, 
retain but one I each ; a*, fulfil, skufuL 

Rule IV.— All words of more than one syllable,ending in /, 
have one / only at the close ; as, faithful, delightful. Except, 
befall, recall, unwell. 

Rule V. — All derivatives from words ending in /, have 
one / only, as, equality from equal ; fulness from pdL Except 
they end in er or ly ; as, mill, miller ; futt,fuUy. 

Rule VI.— All particles in ing from verbs ending in e, lose 
the e final; as, have, having; amuse, amusing. Except they 
come from verbs ending in double e, and then they retain both ; 
as, see, seeing; agree, agreeing. 

Rule VII.— All adverbs m ly, and noting in <ment, retain 
the e final of their primitives; as, brave, bravely; refine, 
refinement. Except judgment and acknowledgment. 

Rule VlII.— All derivatives from words ending in er, 
retain the e before the r; as, refer, reference. Except At»- 
drance from hinder; remembrance from remember ; disastrous 
from disaster ; monstrous from monster. 

Rule IX.— All compound words , if both end not in /, retain 
their primitive parts entire ; as, millstone, changeable, graceless. 
Except always, also, and deplorable. 

Rule X.— All monosyllables ending in a consonant, with 
a single vowel before it, double that consonant in derivatives ; 
as, sin, sinner ; ship, shipping. 

Rule XI. — ^11 monosyllables ending in a consonant, with 
a double vowel before it, double not the consonant in deriva- 
tives ; as, sleep, skepy ; troop, trooper. 

Rule XII. — All words of more than one syllable ending 
in a consonant, and accented on the last syllable, double 
that consonant in derivatives; as, commit, committee ; compel, 
compelled. 






i 



I 



Of the Parts of Speech. 141 

SicT. lit— Of the Parts of Speech, or Kinds qf* Words 

tnto which a Language is divided. 

The parte of speech, or kinds of words in. language, are 
ten; as follow: 

1. An Article is a part of speech set before nouns, to fix 
their signification. The articles are, a, an, and the. 

2. A Noun is the name of a person, place, or thing. What- 
ever can be seen, heard, felt, or understood, is a noun ; as 
jfafet, London* honour, goodness, book, pen, desk, slate, paper, 
ink ; all these words are nouns, 

3. An Adjective is a word that denotes the quality of any 
person, place, or thing. 

An. adjective cannot stand by itself, but must have a noun 
to which it belongs ; as, a good man, a Jine city, a noble 
action. 

Adjectives admit of comparison ; as, bright, brighter ; bright* 
est : except those which cannot be either increased or dimi- 
nished in their signification ; as, full, empty, round f square, 
entire, perfect, complete, exact, immediate* 

4. A Pronoun is a word used instead of a noun. Pronouns 
substantive are those which declare their own meaning ; and 
pronouns adjective are those which have no meaning, unless 
they are joined to a substantive. 

The pronouns substantive are, I, thou, he, she, it, we, ye, they, 
their. Pronouns adjective are, my, thy, his, her, its, our, your, 
who, this, that, those, these, which, what, and some others. 

5. A Verb is a word that denotes the acting or being of any 
person, place, or thing ; as, I love, he hates, men laugh, horses 
run. la every sentence there must be a verb : in the above 
short example, love, hates, laugh, run, are verbs. 

An s is always joined to a verb after a noun in the singular 
number, or after the pronouns he, she, or it ; as the* man ruiu, 
he run*, or she runs. 

The verb be has peculiar variations: as, I am; thou art; 
he, she, or it, is: we are; you are; they are: I was; thou 
wast; he, she, or it, was: we were; ye were; they were. 

6. A Participle is formed from a verb, and participates 
of thenature of an adjective also; as. loving, teaching, heard, seen. 

7. An Adverb is a part of speech joined to a verb, an ad- 
jective, a participle, and sometimes to another adverb, to ex- 
press the quality or circumstance of it : as yesterday I went 
to town } you speak truly; here comes John. 

Some adverbs admit of comparison: as, often, oftener, 
oftenest; soon, sooner, soonest. Tnese may be also compared 
by the other adverbs much, more, most, and very. 



I4« . Of the Paris of Speech. 

Adverbs have relation to time ; as, now then, lately ,- Sfc. : to 
place; as, here, there, $cr. and to number Or quantity; as, 
once, twice, much, §c. a . 

8. A Conjunction is a part of speech which joins words 
or sentences together: as John ana James; neitner the one 
nor the other. Albeit, although, and, because, but, either, else, 
however, if, neither, nor, though, therefore, thereupon, unless, 
whereas, whereupon, whether, notwithstanding, and yet , are 
conjunctions. . ^ 

The foregoing are always conjunctions : but these six fol- 
lowing are sometimes adverbs; also, as, otherwise, since y like- 
wise, men. Except and save are sometimes verbs ; for is some- 
times a preposition ; and that is sometimes a pronoun. 

9. A r reposition is a word set before nouns or pronouns, 
to express the relation. of persons, places, or things, to each 
other: as, I go with him ; he went/row me; dividethis amorigyou.. 

The prepositions are as follow: about, above, after, against, 
among, at, before, behind, below, beneath, between, beyond, by, 
for, from, in, into, of, off, on, upon, over, through, to* unt9, 
towards, under, with, within, without 

10. An Interjection is a word not necessary to the sense, 
but thrown in to express any sudden emotion of the mind ; as, 
ah! Oar oh! alas! hark! 



EXAMPLE OF THE DIFFERENT PARTS OF SPEECH ; 

With Figures corresponding to tlie Number of the preceding 

Definitions r over each Word. 
1 2513 3 3 2 8 4 5 13 

The bee is a poor little brown insect ; yet it is the wisest 

93 2 7 5 12 9 4, 3 2 

of all insects. So is the nightingale with its musical notes, 

4 51 2 8 5 12 9 12 13 

which fill die woods and charm the ear in the spring; a little 

3 277 381 2 1 231 

brown bird not so handsome as a sparrow. The bee is & 
292 8 2 3512S 

pattern of diligence and wisdom. Happy is the man, and 
3 5 12 4 7 5 3 13 

happy are the people, who wisely follow such a prudent 

2 

•sample. 

5 1210 4 2 745 545 t 

Praise the Lord, O my souli While I live will I sing praises 

94287453^ 

unto my God, and while I have any being. 



' Of Sydax<-~Of Emphasis* US 

Sect. IV.— Syntax, or Short Rales for Writing dnd Speaking 

Grammatically. < • 

Rule 1. A verb must agree with its noun or pronoun ; as/ 
the man laughs, he laughs ; the man is laughing ; they are 
laughing. It would be improper to say the man laugh* he 
laugh; or the men & laughing; they laughs. 

Rule 2. Pronouns must always agree with the nouns to 
which they refer ; as the pen is bad, and it should be mended. 
It would be improper to say, the pen is bad, and she 
should be mended, or he should be mended, or they should 
be mended. 

Rule 3. The pronouns me, us, him, her t are always put 
after verbs which express action, or after prepositions ; as he 
beats me ; she teaches him ; he runs from us. It would be 
improper to say, he beats /,• she teaches he ; or he runs from 
we. 

Rule 4. When two nouns come together, one of which be- 
longs to the other, the first noun requires to have an s annexed 
to it ; as, George's book, the boy's coat. 

Rule 5. The pronoun which refers to things, and who to 
persons; as, the house which has been sold, or the man who 
boHght it. It would be improper to say, the house who has 
been sold, or the man which bought it. 



See oho Murray'* English Grammar, or Blair's English Grammar, 
and Adair's 500 Questions o» Murray and Irving* 



Sect. V. — Of Emphasis. 

WHEN we distinguish any particular syllable in a word 
with a strong voice, it is called accent ; but where any par- 
ticular word in a sentence is thus distinguished, it is called 
emphasis, and the word on which the stress is laid., is called 
the emphatical word. 

Some sentences contain more senses than one, and the sense 
which is intended can only be known by observing on what 
word the emphasis is laid. For example: Shall you ride to 
London to-day ? This question is capable of four different 
senses, according to the word on which the emphasis is kid* 
If it be laid on the word you t the answer may be, " No, but 
I intend to send my servant in my stead." If it be on the word 
ride, the proper answer may be, ,€ No, but I intend to walk" 
If the emphasis be placed on the word London, it is a differ-* 
ent question : and the answer may be, " No, for I design to 
ride into the country." If it be laid on the word to-day > the 
answer may be, " No, but I shall to-morrow." 



144 Directions fkr Readmg.-~Capit*b; Stops, %c. 

SlWT. VL~I)itectionsfor Reading with Propriety. 

BE careful to attain a perfect knowledge of the nature and 
*0«nd of voweb, consonants, ditthtfce-ngs, &c, and give every 
syllable, and every single word, its just and full sousic}. 

If you meet with a word you do not understand, do ox>t 
guess at it, but divide it in your mind fnto its proper number 
af syllables. 
. Avoid hem's, Gs 9 and ka's, between your words* 

Attend to your subject, and deliver it just in the same wanner 
as you would do if you were talking about it. This is. the 
great, general, and most important rule of all : which* if care- 
fully observed, will correct almost all the faults in reading* 

Let the tone and, sound of your voice in reading be the same 
as in talking;, and do not aflvct to change that natural and 
easy sound with which you then speak, for a strange* new, 
awkward tone. 

Take particular notice of your stops and pauses, but make 
no stops where the sense admits of none. 

Place the accent upon its proper syllable, and the emphasis 
upon the proper word in a sentence. 



Sect. VII* — Of Capital Letters. 

A CAPITAL, or great letter, must never be used ia the 
middle or end of a word ; but is proper in the following cases: 

1. At the beginning of any writing, book, chapter, or pa- 
ragraph. 

2. After a period, or full stop, when a new sentence begins. 

3. At the beginning of every line in poetry > and every verse 
in the Bible. 

4 At the beginning of proper names of all kinds: whether 
of persons, as Thomas ; places, as London ; ships, as the Hope* 
well, &c. 

— * 

5. All the names of God must begin with a great letter; as 
God, Lord, the Eternal, the Almighty $ and also the Son of 
God, the Holy Spirit or Ghost. 

6. The pronoun J, and the interjection O, must be written 
in capitals: as, " when I walk,' 9 " thou, O Lord !** 



Sect. VIII.— Stops and Marks used in Writing. 

A COMMA, marked thus (,) is a pause, or resting in 
speech while you may count me; as in the first stop of the 
following example : Get wisdom, get understanding ; forget it 
not: neither decline from the words of my mouth. 



Stops and Marks used in Reading. 1 45 

» . . - ~ . • • * » 

A semicolon (;) is a note of breathing, or a pause while you 
may Count two; and is used to divide ihe classes of a sen- 
tence, as in the second pause of the foregoing example. 

A 1:0 Ion ( : ) is a pause while you may count three, and is 
used when the sense is perfect but not ended ; as in the third 
stop of the foregoing example. 

A period or full stop (.) denotes the longest pause, or while 
you may count four ; and is placed after a sentence when ic is 
complete and fully ended,* as in the stop* at the end of the 
foregoing example. 

A dash (— •) is frequently used to divide clauses of a period 
or paragraph; sometimes accompanying the full stop, unci 
adding to its length. When used by itself, it requires no varia- 
tion of the voice, and is equal in length to the semicolon. - 

An interrogation (?) is used when a question is asked> and 
requires as long a pause as a full stop, it is always placed 
after a question ; as, Who is that ? 

A note of admiration or exclamation (!) is used when any 
thing is expressed \uth wonder, and in good pronunciation 
requires a pause somewhat longer than the period ; as, How 
great is tky mercy, O Lord of Jtosts! - 

A paretn nests () is used to include words in a sentence, 
which may be left out without injury to the sense 1 as, We ail 
(including my brother J went to London. 

A caret (a) is used only in writing, to denote that a letter or 

good 
word is left out : as, Evil communications corrupt manners. 

A 

« The hyphen (-) is used to separate syllables, and the parts 
of compound words: as, watching, wetLtaught. 

The apostrophe ('), at the bead of a letter, denotes that a 
letter or more is omitted ; as, lon'd, tko\ for loved, though, &c« 
It is also used to mark the possessive case; as, the king's navy,. 
meaning the king Ids navy. 

Quotation, or a single or double comma turned, ( >r ) or (") 
is- put at the beginning of speeches, or such lines us are ex- 
tracted out of other authors. 

An asterisk, and obelisk or dagger, (*f) are wed to direct 
or refer to some note or remark in the margin or at the foot 
of the page. 

A paragraph (%) is used chiefly in the Bible, and denotes 
the beginning of a new subject. 



ii$ Writing Cupitok *nd mall LdUn. 




al^cdefaAijAirnnohaTdtut^w-^^ 

fr * ; •• • K / -* 1*&4-4t67fyQ. 
jCoiiour tAu SratAer a/noK^4totht , t 

in tAe §Dclu4 of tAu QfoutA. 

S)o unto all %^4£&n a<* <uoa> weM 
tAat tAeu dAould do unto uou. 
&h*an, "~Q>ov cma Aeneuv the *JCvfo 
Cs&eru man dAould make m 
cade of tAe ifriureo Aid enm. 

rre o tea At to hay, rethect to iAjfi» 
uecaute we a#e> all detivoud ofUvM$ 
to tte old. 

%Jmhratw Au tAe ewortofotwM) 
ratAev tAan find fault nUtA tlwM» 
JKn *toAildAqod> <A$ moded; ^ 
fyoutA, tcmherate ; in %srCavn'W} 
ttut ; and in old testae, htudent. 



ftwick Worth and Phrases. 



UY 



LIST of FPJSNCB and other FOREIGN WORDS and PHRASES in 
common Use, w'Ult their Frommiiatton and EjtphnatiotL, 



[ The Editor consider* tlte two following Articles as by no means likely to prove 
the least useful in Ms book to a great majority oftltose in a situation to profit 
by it. lie hopes, therefore, that in endeavouring to express the trhepronttn- 
ciation of the foreign words, he shall not be thougftt to have disfigured flit 
pages beg/and what the occasion warrants. Those who wish to pursue the 
study of the French langmtge in the simplest manner, and to commit other 
•words and phrases to memory, should consult Bossut'* First Bock of 3000 
Words, and his little Phrase Book.] 



Aid-de-camp (aid*dc-cong). Assist- 
ant to a general. 

A-la-mode (al-a-mode). In the 
fashion. 

Antique (an-teek). ATteient, or An- 
tiquity. 

A propos (ap-ro-po). To the pur- 
pose* Seasonably, or By the bye. 

Auto da fe (aute-da-fd). Act of faith 
(burning of heretics.) 

Bagatelle (%ag«M). Trifle. 

Beau (bo). A man drest fashionably. 

Beau lnonde (bo-mond). People of 
fashion. 

Belle (bell), A woman of fashion 
or beauty. 

Belles fettres (beU4etser). Polite 
literature. 

BUlet doux (biUUMo). Love letter. 

Bon mot (btm-m6j. A piece of wit 

Bon ton (bou-toug). Fashion. 

Boudoir (boo^dmar). A small private 
apartment. 

Carte blanche (cart-tiunsh). Un- 
conditional terms. 

Chateau (sftat-6). Country-seat 

Chef dVaeuvre (she-deuvre). Mas- 
ter«fiece. 

Ci-devant (see-de-vang). Formerly. 

Comme il fiaut (com-e-fo). As it 
should be. 

Con araore (con*a~m6-re). Gladly. 

Conge d'elire (congee de-leer) Per- 
' mission to choose. 

Corps (core). Body. 

Coup de grace (coo-de-grass). Fi- 
nishing stroke. 

Coup de main (coo-demdin) Sud- 
den elite price* 



Coop d*oefl (coo-deU). View, or 

Glance. 
Debut (dc-bu). Beginning. 
Denouement (dc-nooa-mong). Fi- 
nishing, or Winding up. 
Dernier ressort (dem-yair res-s6r). 

Last ressort. 
Depot (dee-po). Store, or Magazine* 
Dieu et moft droit (dew-a-num* 

drwau). God and my right. 
Doubteentendrefdoo-ofe an-tan-dcr). 

Double meaning. 
Douceur (doo-seur). Present, tir 

Bribe. 
Eclairdssement (cc4air-cit-m6ng). 

Explanation 
Rclat (ecM). Splendour. 
Eleve (el-ave). Pupil. 
En bon point (ait-bon-p6int). Jolly* 
En flute (anjtutc). Carrying guns 

on the upper deck only. 
Kn masse (an-mdss). In a mass. 
En passant (an^passang) By the way 
Ennui (an-wke). Tiresomeness. 
Entree (an-tray). Entrance. 
Faux pas (fo-pd). Fault, or MSs> 

conduct 
Honi soit qui mal y pense (fiS-nto 

swau kee m&l epanss). May evfl 

happen to Iran who evil thinks. 
Ich dien (ik detn). I serve. 
Incognito. Disguised, or Unknown; 
In petto. Hid, or In reserve. 
Je ne scais quoi (ge-ne-saq-Jmau). 

I' know not what. 
Jeu de mots (zheu-dc-m6). Flay 

upon words. 
Jen d*esprtt (zheu de*spr1e)*^ PIa# 
I of wit, 

G2 



l£8 y^ Latin Words and Phrases. 



I/argent (lar-zhang). Money, or 
Silver 

Mal-a-propos (mat ap^rop-6). Un- 
seasonable, or Unseasonably 

Mauvaise honte (mo-vaiz houte). 
Unbecoming bashfulness 

Nomde guerre (nongdesguiir). As- 
sumed name 

Nonchalance (non-shal-ancc). In- 
difference 

Otttre (oot-r&v). Preposterous 

Perdue (pcr-due). Concealed 

Petit maitre (pette e tnditer). Fop 

Protege (ptt-te-zh&y). A person 
patronised and protected 

Rouge (rooge). Red, or red paint 



Sang froid (tang-froau). Coolness 

Sans (tang). Without 

Savant (sav-ang). A learned ma*. 

Soi-disantf rootf-dce-zon^ J. Pretended 

Tapis (topic). Carpet 

Trait (tray). Feature 

Tete a tete (taU-a-tatt). Face to 

face, or Private conversation of 

two persons 
Unique (yew-neck). Singular 
Valet dechambre (vaV-e^de-shamb). 

Footman 
Vive la bagatelle (vcev la bagm-tel). 

Success to trifles 
Vive le roi (ecv-kr-wau). Long 

live the king. 



EXPLANATION of LATIN WORDS and PHRASES m common Ute 

among EngMsh Authors. 

JV* B. The pronunciation is the same at if Que words were EngUsJt; but divided 
into distinct syllables, and accented at below. 



Ad ar-bit'-ri-um. At pleasure 

Ad cap-tan'-dum. To attract 

±d in-fin'-i-tum. To infinity 

Ad luY-it-um. At pleasure 

Ad ref-er»end'-umt For consideration 

Ad va-lo'-rem. According to value 

A for-ti-o'-ii. With stronger reason 

A'-li-as. Otherwise 

Al'-ib-i. Elscxltere, or Proof of 

having been elsewlicre 
Al'-ma ma'-ter- University 
Ang / -li-ce. In English 
A pos-tc-ri-o'-ri. From a latter rea~ 

son, or Behind 
A pri-o'-ri. From a prior reason 
Ar-ca'-na. Secrets 
Ar-ca'-num. Secret 
Ax-gu-dnen'-tura ad hom'-in-em. 

Personal argument 
Ar-gu-men'-tum bac-u-li'-num. Ar- 
gument of Wows 
Au'di al-ter-am par'-tem. Hear 

botii sides 
Bo'-na fi'-de. In reality 
Cac-o-e'-thes scri-ben'di. Passion 

for writing 
feom'-pos men'-tis. In one's senses 
Sre'-dat, or Cie'-dat Ju-dse'-us. A 

Jem may bcUgvc it (but I wiU not) 



Cum muF-tis a'-li-is. With many 

others . 
Cum priv4,le / .gi-o. With privilege 
Da'-tum, or Da'-ta. Point or points 
' settled or determined 
De fac'-to. In fact 
DeMgra'rti-a. By the grace or favour 

of God 
Deju'-re. By right 
De'-eunt c&f-er-a. The rest is vanU 

ing 
DoriV-in-e ^di'-ri-ge no& O Lord 

direct us 
Dtam'-a-tis per-so'-naB. CJtaracten 

represented 
Du-ran'-te btf'-ne pla"-ci-fco. During 

pleasure 
Du-ran'-te vi'-ta. During life 
Ey-go. Therefore 
Er-ra'-ta. Errors 
Est'-oper-pet'-u-a. May itlastjbr ever 
Ex. Late* As, Tltt- ex-minister 

means The late minister 
Ex of-fi"-ci-o. Official^ 
Ex par'-tei On tJte .part qfi or 

One side 
Fac sim'-i-le. Exact copy or retem- 

blance ^ 
Fe / -lo de se. Self-murderer . 



Latin Words and Phrases.— Abbreviations. * 149 



Fi'-at. Let it be done, or made 
Fi'-nis. End 
Gra'-tis. For nothing 
Ib-i'-dem. In tiie same place 
I'-dem. The same 
Id est. That is 

I m-pri-ma'-tur. Let. it be printed 
Im-pri'-mie. In the jirst place 
Incoe'-loqui'-es(se'-loqiu'-ese). There 

is rest in heaven 
In for'-ma pair'-per-is. As a pant' 

per, or poor person 
In com-men'-dam. For a time 
In pro'-pri-a per-so'-na. In person 
In sta'-tu qua In the former state 
In ter-ro'-rem. As a warning 
Ip'-sc dix'-it. Mere assertion 
Ip'-so ratf-to. By the mere foot 
I'-tem. Also, or Article 
Ju'-re di-vi'-no. By divine right 
Lo'-cuxn te'-nann. Deputy 
- Mflg'-na char'-ta (kar'-ta). the great 

cJtarter of England 
Me-men'-to mo'-ri. Remember that 

thou must die 
Me'-um and tu^um. Mine and thine. 
Mul-tum in par'-Vo. Much in a 

small space 
Ne'-mo me. im-pu'-ne la-ces'-set. 

Nobody shaU 'provoke me with 

impunity 
Ne pins .ul'tra. No further* or 

Greatest extent 
KoMens voMens. Willing or not 
Non com'-pos, or Non com-pos 

men'-tis. 'Out ofone % s senses 
O tem'-po-ra, O motaes. O ike 

times, O the manners 
Om'-nes. AM 
O'-nus. Burden 
Pas'-sim. Every where 
Per se. Alone, or By itself 
Pro bo'-no putf-lkco. For the pub- 
lic benefit 



Pro and con. For and against 
Pro for'-ma. For form's sake 
Pro hac vi'-ce. For this time 
Pro re na'-ta, For the occasion 
Pro tem'-po-re. For the ■ time, or 

For a time 
Quis sep-er-a'-bit. Wl%o shaU sepa- 
rate us $ 
Quo air*-im*o. Intention 
Quo-ad. As to 
Quon'-dam. Former 
Re-qui-es'-cat in pa'-ee. May Kg 

rest in peace / 
Re-sur'-gam. / shall risk ogam ' 
Rex. King 

Scan -da-lum mag-na-tura. Scanj&\ 
against tJie nobility ! 

Sem'-per e-a'-dem, or sem'-per 

i'-dem. Always the same 
Se-rUa'-tim. In regular order 
Si'-ne di'-e. Without mentioning any 

particular day 
Si'-ne qua non. Indispensable re 

quisite, or condition ^ 

Spec'-tas ct tu spec-taV-e-re. You 

see and you tciU be seen 
Su'-i gen'-e-ris. Singular, or UupOm 
- raUeled 

Sum'-mum bo'-num. Greatest good 
Tri'-a junc'-ta in u'-no. Three join- 
ed in one 
U'-na vo'-ce. Unanimously 
U'-ti-le dul'-ci. Utility with pleasur* 
Va'-de me'-cum Constant companion 
VeV-u-ti in spec'-u-lum. As in a 

looking-glass 
Ver'-sus. Against 
Vi'-a. By t)tc way of 
Vi'-ce, In the room of 
Vi'-ce ver'-sa. The reverse 
Vi'-de. See 
Vi-vant rex et re-gi-na. Long Hvi 

the king and queen 
Vul-go. Commonly 



Abbreviations commonly used in Writing and Printing. 



A. B. or B. A. (ar'^tUum bac-co- lau*- 

re-us.) Bachelor of arts 
A. D. (an'-no Dovi'-in-iJ. In the year 

of our Lord 
A. M. (an'-te me-rid'-i-em). Before 

noon. Or (an'-nn mnri'^di). la the 

year of the world 



A. U. C. (an'-no ur*-bis cont-di taj» 
In the year of Rome 

Bart. Baronet 

B. D. {baoca4avf-re^us div-in-iftafm 
tis). Bachelor of divinity 

B. M. (bac-ca-lau'- re-us med»i-c?»Mt 
Bachelor of medicine 

G3 



15Q 



in RmU*g*nd Writing*— Figures. 



Co. Cempany 

D. D. (ftiv-Ut-iUt-Ut «V-frr> Doc- 
tor of divinity 
Do. (Ditto). The like 
R A. & (Jra-Ur-ni-ta?*tU anUi-qva- 

rUtf-rum $&-ci-us). FeUew of the 
, antiquariap society 
F. L. S. {fra-ter*ii-ia'4U Un-w-a'- 

nee t&-ci-ufy. Fellow of the I£mean 

society 
F. R. S. & A. S. (Jra-ter-nt-taf-H* 

re'mgi^e s&-ci-tu et a»-tQ-ci-<i-tn*). 

Fellow of the royal society, and 

associate 
F. S. A. Fellow of the society of arts 
CI*]*. (Georgiu* re*), George king 
1. e. (id est). That is 
Inst. Instant (or, Of this month) 
Ibid, (ibidem). In the same place 
KnU Knight 
JC. £. $night of the flath 
If. G. Knight of the Garter . 



JL L. D.(i^3tm4io-tor). Doctor of 

laws 
M. D. {med-i-cUup detwfer> Doctor 

of medieme 
Mem. (me-men'-io). Remecnbae 
M. B. (medArcfawB fry eg Hurt* nt), 

Bqchefev et nedicine 
Messrs. or MM, Messieurs, or Mia* 

ten 
M. P. Member of parliament 
N. B» <*o4z bt-ne)> Take notice 
Nem con. or Nero. dies. (nem**+tt 

con-tf4hdinc*$t-4e, or NbnLi*nc oYf» 
1 9en~ii-€n~4c). yoaj&aoualy 
jNo> (»£~ira«-rQ). Nambe? 
P. M. (eosi wrrt'-i-emfr Afternoon 
iSt. Saint* pr Street 
IU1L (tfWi-wo). Last, or Of last 

month 

Viz. (vi-&l>+c*ty Namely 
l&c <e* cet*4r-4% And so* e% Ami 

aneh Wee, or* And the rest. 



FIGURES AND NUMBERS, 



.. 2 



Arabic, Roma*. 

I. 

II. 



.III. 

. IV. 

.. v. 

. VI. 
VIL 



One 

Two 

jlnree ..»««.•*••«*• 9 

Four „. 4 

Five 5 

Six 6 

Seven 7 

Eight 8 ..... Vllt 

Nine : ♦. IX. 

Jl en ».tf«. .. ••••*.«•• it) ....«#*••. Jv. 
Eleven ........... 1 1 ......... XI. 

Twelve 12 ....... XII, 

Thirteen ...... M IS ..... XIII. 

Rmrteen ....... 14 ...... XIV. 

Fifteen 15 .. XV 

Sixteen .... — 16 XVI. 

Seventeen 17 .... XVIL 

Eighteen ....... 18 ... XVIlI. 

Htneteeit ....... 19 •••«• XIX. 

Twenty •»♦...♦.• 20 .«.».••• XX. 

One Thousand Eight Hundred and 



Twenty-one ... 21 ... XXI. 
Twenty-five ... 9,6 «. XXV. 

J. iWty •«..*•••»••« . 9Q~ .. AAA. 

Forty 4&*—« • XL. 

Fifty 50 ......... L. 

Sixty 60 ...... LX. 

Seventy ........ 70 ... LXX. 

Eighty ......•—. 80 LXXX. 

Niilety 90 ...... XC. 

One Hundred 100 .....•»•. C. 

Two Hundred 200 CC. 

ThreeHundredSOO .... CCC. 
Four Hundred 400 .. CCCC. 

Five Hundred 500 D. 

Six Hundred 60O ...... DC. 

SevenHundred700 ... DCC. 
Eight Hundred80G .. DCCCi 
Nine Hundred 900 DCCCC. 
OneThousandl 000 ......... M. 



Fifteen 1815 ... MDCC€XV. 



( wi ) 

A complete Set <tf ARITHMETICAL TABLES. 



CHARACTERS. 



■b EquaL 

— Mimi8*ov teas. 

4* Vina, or more. 



X Multiplied by. 
<•*- Divided by. 
: Is to. 



::Softt 
: To. 
i Quarter. 



{ One-third. 
Half. 
f 3 Quarters. 



12Fenceis 
80 

so 

40 

so » 

60 

70 

80 

90 

lOO 

110. 

120 



Money Table. 
*» d. L. 

20 Shillings I 

1 

2 



1 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
5 
6 
7 
8 

10 



8 
6 



30 
40 

4f 50 



2 


10 

8 



130 10 10140 7 

140 11 8150 7 

144 12- 0160 B 

1*0 15 0170 8 

240.. ....... 161 848Q 9 

2 40 ........ 20or 190 

onePoand. 200 



60 
70 
80 
90 



2 
3 
3 

4 
4 



6100 5 

4110 5 

2120, 6 

130 6 



9 

10 

a. at 



a. 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


K> 

e 



MiJtijilicatioti Tatte. 
Twice 2 are 4(5 times dare 



A Boater is ... 4 

HaltVa-Croam t 

ACsown & 

H ai fa Gui nea ...... 10 

AftiiawHt 91 

uUMBOi ........ .... IOJL 

A. ^tooie •««».«««...«• o> 
A Mark ....... 13 



9 
6 
O 

6 


ft 

4 



Practice 
Aliquot parts of 
aPotuvi 

d. 

.... j 
.... j 
..... j 

o •••••• 



10 

5 
3 

1 





a 
o 



i 



■••• IS 



•••• 



Tables. 

Aliquot parte 
a Shilling. 

6 

4 
3 
2 

I 



•f 



t 
I 

5 
r 

i 

V 
a 



•MM« 



24 Grains make 1 Pennyweight 
20 Pennyweights 1 Ounce 
1£ Ounces 1 Pound* 



i ....»•«. 



4 .... V 

5 .... 10 

w •••• A*v •••»• 

7 .... 14 

••••..•• 8 .... r6 

........ 9 .... XO 

r. 10.... 20 

11 .... 22 

Stimea 3 aw 9 

......... 9 . 

5. 

...•••••• 6 ... 18 

......... $ ... J6JI 

8 ... 24 



12(7 
15 



. 10 ... 

. 11 ... 

12 ... 

©times 6 are 

7... 

8 .*• 

sr • •• 

...m.... XV ... 

11 ... 

•»«••»••• IS ... 

7ave 

9 • .. 

»«.«..*• if ... 

• •MM... XV »•» 

... II ... 



40 
4* 
50 
55 
60 
36 
42 
48 
54 
60 
66 
72 
4ft 
56 



.-lO... 30 A times 8 arc 



.- 11 ... 33 



Mjf ... ov '».....♦.. iU 



4tintea 4 are 16 

.....a... 0* ... JBvJ 



8 
9 



32 

30 



11 
12 



44 

48 



.«.< 



9 



...««•..« 



.* xx ... 
12... 



... 6... 249timea 9 are 

• *. 7 ... Zo mmi.im XU ... 



... ...... 



11... 

12 ... 



70 
77 
*4 
64 
79 
80 

89 

96 
81 

90 

99 
108 



10 ... 40 lOtixoes lOarelOO 
...11 ...110 
12.. .120 



•*•*•». 



5 times 5 are 25,11 times 11 are 121 

6 ... 301 12. ..132 

7.. S5[l2tin*3l2arel44 



Avoirdupois Weight. 
16 Drams make 1 Ounce 

16 Ounces 1 Pound 

28 Pounds 1 Quarter 

4 Quarters or 1121b. 1 Hund.wL 
20 Huncbwt 1 1>n. 



Bread. lb. oz. 

A peck loaf weighs .,....,.•• 17 6 

A Half Peck 8 11 

A Quartern 4 5{ 

G4 



15* 



Arithmetical Tables . 



Wum Measure. 

t Pints make 1 Quart 

4 Quarts 1 Gallon 

10 Gallons ...... 1 Anker 

314 Gallons .«.»..... 1 Barrel 

42 Gallons ....—..• 1 Tsnae 

63 Gallons 1 Hogshead 

84 Gallons 1 Puncheon 

t Hogsheads 1 Pipe 

2 Pipes lTun 



Hay. 

A Load contains ..... 36 Trusses 

A Truss. ... weighs 56 Pounds 



Ajfotftecaries* Weight. 
20 Grains make 1 Scruple 

3 Scruples 1 Dram 

8 Drains .... 1 Ounce 

12 Ounces 1 Pound 

» — i ■ — i - * ■ — 

Long Measure. 

4 Inches make 1 Hand 
12 Inches 1 Foot . 

3 Feet 1 Yard . 

6 Feet -.... 1 Fathom. 

54 Yards .. 1 Rod or Pale 

40 Poles 1 Furlong 

8 Furlongs ....... 1 Mile . 

3 Miles .......... 1 League 

•94 Miles „... 1 Degree 



Square Measure. 

144 Square Inches 1 Square Foot 

9 Square- Feet ^1 Square Yard 

30$ Squaie Yards 1 Square Pole 

40 Square Poles 1 Square Rood 

4 Square Roods 1 Square Acre 

040 Square Acres 1 Square Mile 

Cubic Measure. 
1798 Cubic lnche~ 1 Cubic Foot 
27 Cubic Feet 1 Cubic Yard 

_ j 1 r t — ■ r ~- — 1 *• ■' — — mMM^m—mj— 

Square and Cube Numbers. 



JVfa. 


Squares. 


Cubes. 


2 


4 


8 


3 


9 


87 


4 


16 


64. 


6 


25 


125 





36 


216 


7 


49 


343 


8 


64 


512 


9 


81 


729 


10 


100 


1000 



Cloth Measure. 

2\ Inches make 1 Kail 
4 Nails 1 Quarter 

4 Qn. or 36 Inches 1 Yard 

5 Quarters 1 EH 

Ate and Beer Measure 

2 Pints make 1 Quart 

4 Quarts ... 1 Gallon 

9 Gallons .. 1 Firkin 

2 Firkins 1 Kilderkin 

2 Kilderkins 1 Barrel 

54 Gallons „, 1 Hogshead 

2 Hogsheads 1 Butt 



Dry Measure. 

% Pints make 1 Quart 

4 Quarts 1 Gallon 

2 Gallons ,...« 1 Peck 

4 Pecks I Bushel 

8 Bushels, or 2 Sacks 1 Quarter 

36 Bushels 1 Chaldron 

Time. 

60 Seconds make 1 Minute 

60 Minutes ....... 1 Hour 

24 Hours 1 Day 

7 Days 1 Week 

4 Weeks .••....*• 1 lunar Month 

12 Calendar. Months, or 365 Days 

and 6 Hounv make 1 Year. 

Paper and Books. 

24 Sheets ...... 1 Quire 

20 Quires 1 Ream 

2 Reams ....... 1 Bundle 

4 Pages 1 Sheet FeKo 

8 Pages 1 Sheet Quarto 

16 Pages 1 Sheet Octavo 

24 Pages 1 Sheet Duodecimo 

36 Pages ....... 1 Sheet Eightaens 



Tfie Months. 
Thirty days' hash September, 
April, June, and November; 
February hath twenty-eight alone, 
And all the Test have thirty-one; 
Except in leap-year, at which time 
February's days are twenty-nine. 

N. B. For ther^rrect TaUa, fte Joyce's Arithmetic 



( 153 ) 
THE CHURCH CATECHr&l. 

Question* What is your name? 

Answer. N. or M. 

Q. Wlio gave you this name? 

A. My godfathers and my godmothers in my baptism ; if herein I 
was mode a member of Christ* the child of God, and an inheritor of the 
kingdom of heaven. 

Q. . Wtat did your godfathers and godmother* then fir you$ 

A. ' They did promise and vow three things in my name. First, that 
I should renounce the devil and all his works, the pomps and vanities of 
this wicked world, and all the sinful lusts of the flesh. Secondly, that 
I should believe all the articles of the Christian faith. And, thirdly, 
that I should keep God's holy will and conunandments, and walk in the 
same all the days of my life. 

Q. Doit Hum not Mink thai thou art bound to believe and to do at they 
have promised for tiiccf 

A. Yes* verily; and by God's help, so I wiQ. And I heartily thank 
our heavenly Father, that he hath called me to this state of salvation, 
through Jesus Christ ou* Saviour. And I pray unto God to give me hie 
grace, that I may continue in the same unto my life's end. 

Catechiit. Rehear** the artickt of thy belief 

A. I .believe in God the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth*' 
And in Jesus Christ,, his only Son our Lord;, who was conceived by 
the Holy Ghost, bom of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pi*. 
late, was crucified, dead,, and buried, Re descended into hell; th* 
third dey be rose again fisora the dead: He ascended into heaven, and 
sitteth on the right hand of God the Father Almighty ; from thence he 
shall come to judge the quirk and the dead* 

I believe in the Holy Ghost, the holy catholic church, the commun 
njon of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and 
the life everlasting. Amen. 

Q. Wliat dost thou cldcjfy learn hi these article* of tiiy beliefs 

A, First, I learn to belfeve in God; the Father,, who hath, made me and 
a}l the world, 

Secondly, in God the Son, who hath redeemed me and. all mankind. 

Thirdly, in God the Holy Ghost* who sanctifieth me and all the elect 
people of God, 

Q. You mid that your gcdfatiicr* and godmother* did promise for you t that 
ffou should keep. Gvav* cowfuandment* Te% me Itow many there be* 

A, a en* 

Q. Which he they f 

A. The same which God snake in the twentieth, chapter of Exodus £ 
paying, I am the Lord thy Goc*, who brought, thee. out. of the land of 
Egypt, and out of the. House of bondage. 

I. Thou shait have no other Gods bat me,. 

II, Thpu shalt not make to thyself any graven image,, nor the like- 
ness of any thing that is in heaven above, or in. the earth beneath, or 
in the water under the earth. Thou shalt not. bow down to them, ner 
worship them: for I the Lord thy. God am a jealous God, and visit the 
sins of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth gerera* 
tions of them that hate me; and shew mercy, unto, thousands in them 
that love me, and keep my commandments. 

G 5 



1 54 The Church Catechism. 

III. Thou ahalt sol take the name of to Lord thy €od in vain, k 
the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vajn. 

IV. Remember that thou keep holy the sabbath-day. Six days shtt 
thou labour and do all that thou hast to do; but the seventh day istSe 
sabbath of the Lord thy God. In it thou sbalt do no manner of wak; 
thou, and thy son, and thy daughter, thy man-servant, and thy mai 
servant, thy cattle, and the s t uiHg ci that is within thy .gates. Fori: 
six days the Lord made het ven and earth, the sea, and all that io usi 
is ; and rested the seventh day : wherefore the Lord blessed the seveS? 
day, and hallowed it. 

V. Honour thy father and thy mother, that thy days may belong a 
the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee* 

• Vf. Thoui shalt do no murder. 

VII. Thou shalt not commit adultery. 

VIII. Thou shalt not steaL 

IX. Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour. 

X. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's house, thou shalt not not 
thy neighbour's wife, nor his servant, nor his maid, nor his ox, W& 
aag, nor any thing that fe I is. 

Q. What dost thou clilfjtif learn oy these commnnArncnts f 
A. I learn two things ; my duty towards God» and my duty town* 
my neighbour. 

* Q. What tt thy duty toxardt Gti 9 

A. My duty towards God is to believe in him; to fear him; *&* 
Krre him with all my heart, with all my mind, with all my soul & 
with aB my strength: to worship him, to give him thanks, to pctnj 
whole trust in him, to call upon him, to honour his holy name and W 
word, and to serve him truly alt the days of my life. 

Q. What U thy dttty tarxards thy neighbour? 

A. My duty towards my neighbour is to love him as mysdfc and * 
do to all men as I would they should do unto me ; to love, honour, *» 
succour my father and mother; to honour and obey the king, aid ** 
that aie put in authority under him; to submit myself to all mjp** 
don, tftftchetsj spiritual pastors and masters; to order mysdfto* 1 / 
aad reverently **> all my betters; to hurt nobody by word or deed; ^ 
be true and just in all my dealings ; to bear no xnance nor hit** tt 
my heart; tft keen, my hands from picking and stealing, and nw tflftj* 
from evil-speatjfc^ lying, and slandering; to keep my body ■ "*; 
perance, soberness, and chastity ; not to covet or desire other o*d» 
goods; but to learn and labour truly to get mine own living, tm ** 
do my duty in that state of life unto which it shall please God to aE** 

CatecMst, My good child, Jcnow this, that thou art nd(dtetob m 

0ti*g* Of ihyself, nor to walk in the commandmcuU of God* anito^ci 

Mm, without hit special grace, which thou must learn at flfl&^fjv 

for by diligent prayer, het me hear^thcrefbrc, if thou canst say to*"** 

A. Out Falter which art in heaven, hallowed he thy same; *J ^ 
aVan come; thy win be done in earth, as it is in heaven, ^^r* 
day our daily bread ; and forjgrve us our trespasses, as we faff* ** 
that trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, butted 
fcomeviC Amen. 

Q. What dearest thou of God in Otis prayer* 

A. I desk* my Lord God, our heavenly Father, who fc the &** ■ 
all goodness* to send his grace unto me and to all people; Unties*? 



The Church Catechism. 155 

worship him, serve him, and obey him, as we might to do. And I 
pray unto God, that he will ajrnd ua all things thai be needful, both for 
our souls and bodies ; and that he will be merciful unto us, and forgive 
us our sins ? and that it will please him to* save and- defend ua in a}t 
dangers, ghostly and bodily ; and that he will keep us from all sin and 
wickedness, and float our ghostly enemy, and rrejm everlasting death. 
And this I trust he will do of his mercy and goodness, through, our Lord 
Jesus Christ; and therefore I say Amen, so be it. 

Q. Hew maw/ sacraments hath Christ ordained in his church? 
A. Two only, as generally necessary to salvation ; that is to say, 
baptism, and the supper of the Lord. 

Q. What meanest thou by this word sacrament $ 

A. 1 mean an outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual 
grace, given unto us* ordained by Christ himself, as a means 'whereby 
we receive the same, and a pledge to assure us thereof. 
<& How many part* arc there l» a saenament £ 
A. Two.; -the outward visible sign, and the inward sptrftuat grace* 
' Q What is the outward visible sign, or firm in baptism* 
A. Water, wherein the person ia baptised in the name e# the Fathea, 
and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost 

Q. What is the inward and spiritual Grace * 

A. A death unte sin, and a new birth unto righteousness ; lbs, being 
by nature born in sin, and the children ef wrath, we are hereby mad* 
the children of grace. 

Q, What is required of persons to be baptized* 

Au Repentanee, whereby they forsake am ; and faith, wheaaby they 
stedfastly believe the promises of God made to them in that sacaamejtt, 

«). Why tjien are infant* baptitca), *>Itcn. by neason, of their tender age they 
cannot perform themf 

A. Because they promise them both by their sureties) which psemjsa, 
when they eome to age* themselves are bound to perform. 
Q. Why was the sacrament of the Lord's supper ordained % 
A. For the continual remembranee ef the sacrifice of the death, of Ghxjst, 
and of the benefits whieh we receive thereby, 

Q. Wliot is the outward part, or sign* of the Lord's Supper? 
A. Bread and wine, which the Lord hath commanded to ha received. . 
Q. What is the inward part, or thing signified % 

A. The body and blood of Christ, which are vejafly and indeed taken and * 
received by the faithful in the Lord's supper. 

Q. What are the benefits whereof we are partakers thereby $' 
A. The strengthening and refreshing of our souk; by the body and bloocVi 
of Christ, as our bodies are by the bread and wine. 

Q. What is required of them who come to the Lone?* supper % , 
A. To examine themselves, whether they repent, them truly of their* 
former sins : stedfastly purposing to lead a new life ; have a lively faith, in 
God's mercy through Christ, with a thankful remembrance of his death f » 
and he in charity with aU men. 



N. S, The Editor, fortiie accommodation of every claseof students, %as an- 
nexed tit* valuable Catechisms of Da, Watts, and a very instructive Social 
Catechism by Mr. Barbow. These, with the aid of M&a. Pelka* '* Firjt 
Catechism, wig convey much valtu&e information ta every juvenile mi#a\ 

G 6 



: The Fimt Catechism, by Da. Watts. : 

Qubtimox. Cm you tell me, efiisa\ who made you ?-**Ajt8WEB. The great 
God, who made heaven and earth. 

Q. What doth God do fir you$—A. He keeps me from liana by night 
and by dav. Mid is always doing me good. 

Q, And w/iat must you dj for this great G>d\ who is so good to you $ 
— A. I must learn to know him first, and. then I must do every thing to 

p';oaee him. * 

Q. Wliere doth God teach tu to know him and to please Afe*?— A. In his 
holv word, which is contained in the Bible. ^^ 

Q. Have yom learned to know wto God is £— A. God is a-spirit ; and 
tlvough we cannot see him, yet he sees and knows all things, and he can 
do ail things. 

Q. What must you do to please him*— A. I must do my duly boCktowards 
God and towards man. 

Q. What is your duty to God?— A. My duty to God, is. to fear and 
honour him, to love anil serve him, to pray te him, and to praise him. 

Q. What is your duty to man t—A. My doty to man, is to obey my 
parents, to speak the truth always, and to he honest and kind to alL 

Q. Who* goad do yon hope for by seeking to phase Godfr-A. Then I shall 
be «. "H* of Goo, am* have God lor my lather and my friend for 

ever. 

Q. And what if you do not fear Qod % nor love 7*ij», nor seek to please 
him$-*Ak Then, I. shall be a wicked child* and the great God will be 

very angry with me. 

4 Why are you afraid of God's anger^—A. Because he can KB my 
body, and he can make my soul miserable after my body is dead. 

jQ. But have you never done any thing to make God angry withjjou aU 
ready?— A. Yes; I fear f have too often sinned against God, and de- 
served his anger. . 

.Q. What do ym mean by sinning ugabsei Godt—A. To sm against God, 
is to do anything that God forbids me, or not to da what God commands 

me* 

Q, -And what must you do to be saved fiem the anger of God, which 
yiur sine have deserved?— A- I must be sorry for my sins; I must pray 
to God to forgive me what is past, and to serve him better for the time to 

come. ... 

a, WiU God forjfre you if you pray for H%—K. I hopehewfflfor- 
gfrve me, if 1 trust in his mercy, for the sake of what Jesus Christ has 
done, and what he has suffered. . 

Q, Bo you know who Jesus Christie*— A* He is God's own son; who 
eime down from heaven to save us ftem our sins,. and from God's anger? 

Q, Wlxxt has Christ done towards the saviag of men ?—*A* He obeyed 
the law of God himself, and hath taught us to obeykateo. 

Q. And what hath Christ suffered in order to save w*?— A. Hedied 
for sinners who have broken the law of God, and who deserved to die 

themselves. ..,».-,. ^ * *~ 

Q. Where is Jam* Christ now9—A» He is ahve agamv and gone to 

heaven ; to provide there for att that serve God, and lave his Son Jesus. 
Q. Can you of yourself love and seme God .and Christ &p~A. No; I 

cannot <*> it of mysejfc hut God wi£ help me by his own Spirit, if I ask 

turn for it. 



Catechism of 



Names* 



157 



Q. Will Jesus Christ ever com* again ?— A. Christ will cone agate* and 
call me and all the world to account for what we have done.. 

Q. For what purpose is this account to he given?— Pu That the chil- 
dren of God, as well a* the wicked, may all receive accosdmg to their 
works. 

Q, What must besom* of you if you are wi&cea\?— .A. If I am wicked 
I shall be sent down to- everlasting fire in hell,, among wicked and 
miserable creatures. 

Q* -And whWier wiU you go if you are d child of Cod?-— JL If I am a 
child of God 1 shall be taken up to heaven, and dwell there with God 
and Christ fox eve* Amen, 



Ttie Catechism of the Scripture Names m the Old Testament, by 

Dr. Watts. 



QWBS'SJCN. . Who was A dam 9— 
Answer- The first. man that God 
made, and the father of us all. 

Q. Who was £ve?—A. The first 
woman, and she was the mother of 
us alL 

Q. Who was €bs«$-~A. Adam's 
eldest son, and he killed his brother 
AbeL 

Q. Who was Abel? — A better 
man than Cain, and therefore Cain 
hated him. 



—A, The twelve sons of Jacob, and 
the fathers of the people of Israel. 

Q. Wlio was Pharaoh ?— A. The 
king of Egypt* who destroyed the 
children; and he was drowned in 
the Red Sea. 

Q. Who was Moses? — A. The 
deliverer and lawgiver of the people 
of Israel? 

Q. #7*o was Aaron?— A. Moses's 



(brother* and he wag the fiwrt high- 
priest of Israel. 
^ rr-.vw^x.^r — «. » >K1U ,.. Q. WItQ were the Priests,?— A. 
who pleased God, and he was taken > They who offered sacrifices to God* 



up to heaven without dying; 

Q.Who was Noah?—\, The good 
man who was saved when the world 
was drowned*, 

Q. Who was Job?— A* The most 
patient man under pains and losses. 
Q. Wlw was Abraham ?— A- The.. 
pattern of believers* and the friend 
of God. 

Q. Who was Isaac ?— A. Abra- 
ham's son, according to. God's pro- 
mise. 

Q. Wlio was Sarah? — A. Abra* 
ham's wife, and she was Isaac's 
mother. 

Q, Who was Jacob? — A* Isaac's 
younger son, and he. craftily ob« 
tained his father *s blessing. 

Q. What was Israel ? — A. A new 
name that God gave himself to 
Jacob. 

Q. W7a> was Joseph ? — A# Israel's 
beloved son, but his brethren hated 
htfn, and sold him. 
Or Who were the twelve PajHarchst 



and taught his laws to men* 

Q. Who was Joshua-. ?— A. The 
leader of Israel when Moses was 
dead* and he: brought, them into the 
promised land. 

Q. Wlio was Samson?— A. The 
strongest man, and he slew a thou*. 
sand of his enemies with a jaw-bone* 

Q. Win was. Eli ?• — A* He was a 
good old man, but God was angry, 
with him for not .keeping his chil- 
dren from wickedness. 

Q. Win u:as Satwicl%~A. The 
prophet whom God called when he 
was a child* 

Q* Who were tfie Prophets 9— A, 
Persons whom God taught to foretel 
things to come* and to mqke known 
his mind to the world, 

Q.. Who was David%^-A. The man 
after God's own heart,, who was 
raised from a sheoherd to.be a king. 

Q. Who was Coliah ?— A. The 
gjant.whpm Da^wlftlew- wiUva slipg 
arid & stonft 



*% ■ \ • * 



1 



Cutoc&Um of tkApb*r# iwnw** 



▼id's wicked son, who rebelled 
against his father, and he was kili- 
ei as he hung on a tree.. 

Q. JTfco was Solomon 9— A. Da- 
i4d*8 beloved Son,- the king ot Israel, 
and- the wisest af men. 

Q. Who was Josiah$—~A. A very 
young king, whose heart was tender, 
and he feared God. 

Q. Who waslsaiedrt — A. The pro- 
phet who spoke more of Jesus Christ 
tj}f \n the rent* 

Q. W7to was Elijah?— A. The pro- 
phet who was carried to heaven in a 
chariot of fire. 

Q. Who wa* jGft#fa9-~A. The pro. 
mtiet whowas mocked by the children, 
and a wild bear tore them to pieces. 



Q. Who was <>****£— A. The 
prophet** servant who told a lie, 
and he was struck wim. a leprosy* 
which could never be cured. 

Q. Who was Jonah £— A. The pro- 
phet who lay three days and three 
nights tn the befly of a fish. 

Q. Who was Daniel 9 — A. The 
prophet Who was saved in the lion's 
den, because he prayed to God. 

Q, Wlio were Skddrachi Meshach, 
and Abedncgo 9— A. The three Jews 
who would not wor&bfy an rraage $ 
and they were cast into the fiery 
furnace, and were not burnt. 

Q. Who was Nebuchadmexnar $— 
A. The proud king of Babylon, who 
ran mad, and was driven- among the 



The $c*iptut<* Names in the New Tkstemad. 



Q. Who -was Jesus Christ?-* A. 
The Son of God, and the Saviour of 
men. 

, Q. Who was the+Vtrgin Mary fc— 
A, The mother of Jesus Christ. 

Q. Who was Joseph the Carpenter? 
. —A. The supposed father of Christ* 
because, he married his mother. 

Q. Who- were the Jews %*— A. The 
tenHy of Abraham, Isaac, and Ja- 
cob; and God chose them for his 
own people, 

Q. Who were the Gentiles % — A. 
All the nations before the Jews. 

Q. Wtye was Ccesar? — A. The em- 
peror of Rome, and the ruler of the 
world. 

Q. Who was Herod the Great}—, 
4L The long of Judea, who killed 
aH the 'children in a tovyn in hopes 
to kill Christ. 

Q. Who wajt John the Baptist ?«— 
A- The prophet who told- the Jews 
that Christ was come. 

Q. Wfto was the other Herod ? — 
The king pf Galilee, whp cut off 
Jbhn the Baptist's head* 

Q. Who were the disciples of Chrisf? 
w^A. 'Those who learnt of hin\ as 
Ihelr master. ' / 

<*. Who was NdVUmaet^A^A 



disciple of Christ, and a man with- 
out guile. 

Q. Who was Ntcodemusf — A, The 
fearful disciple who came to Jesus 
by iriglit. 

Qf Who was Mary Magdalene?— 
A. A great sjnner, who washed 
[Christ's Jfeet with her tears, and 
wiped them with her hair. 

Q. Who wus Lazarus?— A. A 
friend of Christ, whom he raised to 
life, when he had been dead four days, 

Q, ipho was Martfia ? — A. Laza- 
rus's sister, who was cumbered too, 
much in making a feast for Christ 

Q, WhQ.wasMary y thesisterQf Mar- 
tha? — A. The woman that chose the, 
better part, and heard Jesus preach* 

Q. Who were the Apostles £— rA. 
Those twelve disciples whom Christ 
chose for the chief ministers of his 
gospeL 

Q. Who was Simon Peter?*— A. 
The apostle that denied Christ and 
repented.' 

- Q. W%o was. «7p&«?— A. The 
beloved apostle mat leaned on, the 
bosom of Christ. 

Q. Who was Thomst— a. the. 
apostle who was hard to be persuaded 
t^ C^uist ro^fjcpm the deadp 



A Mamd or Bntcm't Cmtedum. 



1« 



Q. Who was Judas 9— A. The 
wicked disciple who betrayed Christ 
wHh a kiss. 

Q. Who was Caiaph&s &*-»A« The 
high-priest who condemned Christ. 

Q. Who was Pontius PUaU %-^A. 
The governor of Judea, who ordered 
Christ to be crucified. 

Q. Who was Joseph ofArimatheo9 
—A. A rich man, that buried Christ 
in his own tomb. 

Q. Who were the font Evangehsis9 
-•-A. Matthew, Mark, Luke, and 
John; who wrote the history of 
Christ's life and death. 

Q. Who were Ananias and Sap- 
phlra ?«— A. A man and his wife who 
were struck dead for telling a lie. 

Q. Who was Stephen ?—A. The 
first man who was put to death for 
Gtmst's sake. 



Q, Who was Pmiitm+A. A young 
mart who was first a persecute*, and 
afterward* an apostle of Christ. 

Q. Who was Dor eas i~~A. A good 
woman, who made eiothes for the 
poor, and sua was raised from th* 
dead. 

Q. WJwwas Ehfmas$~~A. A wick- 
ed maa, who was struck blind tor 
speaking against the gospel. 

Q. W/w was Apollos9—A. A warm 
and lively preacher of the gospel. 

Q. Whv was Eutychusf—A. A 
youth who slept at sermons and 
falling down, was taken up dead. 

Q. Who was Timothy 3— A. A 
young minister, who knew the 
• scriptures from his youth. 

Q. Who was Agrippa9—A* A 
king, who was almost persuaded to 
be a Christian* 



A SOCIAL or BRITON'S CATECHISM, 
(From Barrow's Young Christian's Lihrcury.J 

Q WJuti are your social duties 9 

A. As a subject ,of the King of England. I am bound to obey the laws 
of my country. 

<?. Why mne titey made $ 

A. For the protection and security of ail the people. 

Q. Wftat mean you by pi otidion 9 

Am I mean protection against violence, oppression, injugtine,. and un- 
governable passions, which would often lead men to Injure and destroy on* 
another, if they were aot restrained by wise laws. 

Q. Wliat do you mean by security 9 

A. I mean me security of my property, which is the reward of my own 
industry, or that of my parents and ancestors, and is secured to me for 
my own benefit and enjoyment by the Constitution. 

Q. How are Die laws of England made 9 

A. By the three estates of the rental in pattiasnent* consisting of Sing; 
Lords, and Commons ; eanh of which must agree to every new law. 

Q. What Is the King* 

A. The supmme power entrusted with the execution of the laws, the 
fountain of honour and mercy, th* feauLof the church, and the director 
of the naval and military forces of the empire. 

Q. Witat is the House of Lords 9 

A. It consists of the Archbishops and Bishops, of the Dukes, Marquisses, 
Earhv Viscounts, and Baron* of the realm, and is the court of final appeal 
is all law-suits.. * 

Q. What is the House of Commons 9 

A. it consists of £5& reptesentatbes of the people, freely and in. 
dependontiy elected so assist io making laws, and to grant such tajt«Mo 
1fee crowm as they dona necessary ur the u*e of the stotn. 



lft) A Social or Briton** CmleAUm. 

Q. What im the chief objects of the law* t 

A* Far the prevention of crimes, by psuusbment for the example ol 
others, such as death, traosportatioar imprisonment, whipping, and pillory. 

Q. For what crimes is the punishment of death injUcted 9 
•A. For treason, murder, housebreaking, hoiise-burning, highway 
robbery, piracy* rioting, forgery, coining, robbing employers, and many 
other heinous crimes. 

Q. H&w art criminals put to death f 

A. By being hanged by the neck; traitors are afterwards quartered; 
and murderers dissected ; and highway robbers and pirates are s om e time s 
hong in /chains on gibbets. 

Q» For whet offences are criminal* transported $ 

'A. For buying stolen goads,, for perjury, for small thefts, picking pockets, 
and many other crimes. . 

Q. Where are they transported 9 

A. Those who are transported for life are sent to- Botany Bay, a country 
thirteen thousand rules from England ; and those for fourteen or seven 
years, are kept to hard labour in prison ships. 

Q. For what crimes are offenders whipped, imprisonedyor put in thepBornf 

< A. Chiefly for various kinds of thefts and frau s .and for not getting 

their livelihood in an honest way ; and also for sucn irufccmevou* practice* 

as hurting or maiming dumb animals, cutting down- young trees, and 

other offences. 

Q. How is the guilt qf an offender ascertained % 

A. By public trial in a court of law, in which twelve impartiai.ners(ms 
are a sworn jury , to decide truly whether they all mink him guilty or not guilty. 

Q. Is there no other investigation 9 

"A Yes, before a magistrate, when the accuser must swear that the 
accused committed the crime; and afterwards before a grand jury of 
twenty-three gentlemen, twelve of whom must agsee in opinion that he 
ought to be put on ru&triah . 

Q. When and where do trials of criminals take place % 

A At Sessions held quarterly in every county town ; or at Assizes held 
twice in every year, before one or two of the king's twelve judges. 

Q. What becomes of a culprit after his, crism has been sworn against 
him before a justice of Vie peace, and before hh ttiali9 

■ A. He is allowed to give bail for his appearance, if his crime is a bailable 
offence; but if it is a high crime, as theft, nighwqy robbery, house breaking, 
forgery, or murder, he in committed to the oounty gaol,, to await his. 
trial at the next sessions or assizes. 

Q. After hin trial what becomes of him f 

A. If he ieacquitted, he is a freeman as soon as the jury have pnanounced 
him KOT guilt y. But i£ they find him guilty, he receives the sentence 
of the law, and- is either whipped* imprisoned* transported, os hanged, 
unless some favourable circumstances should, appear, and he, should, receive 
the king's pardon. 

Q. Does the law punish first and second offences alike % 

A. Yes, the law makes* no distinction, and considers all crimes as equally 
meriting puiushment;. but. for second offimees these la less cjuvnee of 
obtaining pardon from the king. 

Q. What are Hie means of avoiding offence* fr 

A. Constantly to avoid temptation; to shun bad or .loose company; 
neVer to spend-more than your income ; never to do what your conscience 
tells you is wrong* and always to ronensfaer you an? in the presence of 



A Social or Bf lions Catechism. 161 

God, who will punish you hereafter, if you escape the punishment of the 
laws in this world. 

Q. What are the other motives for avoiding crime* ? 

A. The experience of all wicked men, that a life of crime is a life of 
anxiety, trouble, torment, and misery ; their frequent declarations that they 
would give the world itself to be restored to a state of innocency and virtue ; 
and also the known fact, that content, health, cheerfulness, and happiness, 
atteVid a good conscience, and an honest and virtuous life. 

Q. What is a Cotutabk? 

A. An officer of the king, who is sworn to keep the peace, and to seize all who 
break, the peace in his presence; he also takes into custody, under the autho- 
rity of the warrant of a magistrate, all persons charged with offences. While 
in the execution of his duty his person is held sacred, and to assault him is se-> 
verely punished by the laws. 

Q. What is a Magistrate^ or Justice of the Peace? 

A. A gentleman who holds a commission. from the king, or n a corporation, 
under some royal charter, to hear charges against offenders, and* in heinous 
cases, to commit them for trial ; in others, when so empowered by law, to 
inflict small punishments. He also hears and determines questions relative to 
vagrants, soldiery, publicans, &c. and he forms part of the court of session* , 
before which offenders are tried. 

Q.What'ts a Sheriff? 

A. The king's civil deputy in the county, whose duty it is to keep in safe ■ 
custody, without unnecessary severity, all persons committed by justices for 
trial; to keep and maintain the courts of law; to summon grand and petit 
juries honestly and impartially; to preside at county elections; to execute all 
writs civil and criminal, and to put in force all the sentences of the courts of 
law. 

Q. What is a Lor A Lieutenant? 

A. The king's military deputy in the county, whose duly H is to regulate 
whatever regards the military force of die county., 

Q. Wfiat is a Grand Juryman? 

A. One who is summoned by the sheriff to attend the sessions and assises* 
there to hear the charges against offenders on oath, and honestly determine^ 
whether they are so satisfactorily made out, in regard both to fact and inten* 
tion, m to justify the putting of the accused on his trial, which decision must 
be affirmed by at least twelve of the jury. 

Q. What is a Petit Juryman? 

A. One who is summoned by the sheriff to attend the sessions and assizes* 
and who is sworn with eleven others, to hear and carefully weigh the evidence 
on every trial; and according to that evidence to declare, without fear or aflfec 
tion, whether he thinks the accused guilty or not guilty, as well in regard to 
the fact as the intention. 

<?. is the duty ofu Petit Juryman important ? 

A. Yes—it is the most important and most sacred duty which a British sub- 
ject can be called upon to perform. The life, liberty, p roperty, honour, and 
happiness of individuals and famines being in the disposal of every one of the 
persons composing a jury; because every one must agree separately to the 
verdict before it can lie pronounced ; and because every juryman is sworn and* 
bound to decide according to his own private view of the question, and not ac- 
cording to the views or wishes of others. 

Q. What is a Member ofPariiament? 

A. A gentleman chosen freely and independently by the electors of towns or 
counties, on account of their high opinion of his talents and integrity, to repxe* 



1« A Tubk of Kixgr. . • 

tent them in the house of commons or great council of the nation, where it is 
hie duty to support the interests, liberties, and constitution of the realm. 

Q. Who are Electors? 

A. Persons who are authorised' by law -to elect members of parliament fn 
cities or towns they consist of freemen, burgesses or house k ee pe r s ; and in 
counties, of persons who possess a freehold in land or house worth forty shil- 
lings per annum. Thev are obliged to swear that they have not accepted or 
r ec e iv e d the p ro mis e of any bribe, and, in truth, the honest performance of 
the duty of an elector is as important to the country, as that of a juryman to an 
individual. 

Q. Why are Taxes crMeetrd? 

A. For the maintenance of the state; for the support of the king's forces; 
tor the protection of the nation against foreign invaders; and for alt the pur- 
poses which are essential to the true end* of soeMiurion arid the happiness of 
a nation. Of the nature and amount of all taxes, the glorious constitution of 
England makes the representatives of the people in parliamentthesotearbittrs 
afedjudges. 

Q. What hi tht dieh/ qfgmd subject*? 

M To honour the king and his magistrates, and obey the laws ; openly to pe. 
tttfon the king or paruament against any real grievances, and not to harbour 
or encourage dissatisfaction ; to earn by honest and useful industry, in their se- 
veral callings, the means of subsistence; to maintain the public peace ; to reve- 
rence and respect the duties of religion ; and to perform- every, relative or so- 
cial office, whether of father, husband, son, or brother; constable, overseer, 
cfemrhwarden, juryman, or roagistrate, vrrh honour, humanity, and honesty, 
•ft ail occasions doing towards others as they would br done unto. 



MINGS and QUEENS of ENGLAND from the CONQUEST to 18U. 



Kings* 

• Nam*. 

W. Conq. 
W Ruffes- 
Henry 1 

Stephen 



I 



'Began iJieir 

The Normans* 

1066 Oct 14 

lOOTSept. 9 

: HOOAug. 2 

1135 Dec. 1 



Kings' 

Y* M. L JfasHets 



I 



Biga* their 
Mgfi* 



I 



y.M. 



12 ie tf^wy 



The Bouses Unite* 



35 S 

*8 10 



The Normans and Saxons. 



Henry 



Jot* 

Henry 

Ecfetn* 

Edward 

Edward 

Bfetad 



2 

1 

a 

i 

2 

3 

2' 



1154 Oct 25 

tl90 Apr, 6 
m*Geb]» 
lOTfcNor.lfr 

1907 July 7 
1327 Jan. 25 
i 13317 Jurrf2l 



Thtlfonse of Lancaster. 



Henry 4 | 1399Sept.29 
Henry 5 1413Mar.20 
Henry 6 [ 1*22 Aug- 31 

TIu; House of York. 

Edward 4 1461 Mar. 4 
E*ward 5 • DftftS Apr. O 
Bichavd a gt*88June22 



7 
; Henry fc 
Edward 6 
QiMary 
Q. Elizabeth 



34 
9t 

56 
34 
19 
50 
22 



8 

9- 





t Tht Union oft?* txeo Crowns qfSng- 
land, and Scotland, 



13 

9 

38 

22 
O 

t 



6 

4 
3. 

5 
$ 
6 

1 

2 
2 



U66A«e.2* 

[1547Jao28 
1553 July £ 
1558 Not. IT 



23 

37 

f 

5 

44 



8 
9 
5 
4 
4 



Jamet 



7 Charles 



Charles 
Jamee 



1 
1 
2 
2 



lOOSlVfar.24 
lOettMar.*? 
M 49 Jan. SO , 

Idas Feb. a I 




George 
George 



The Bevatot*nt+ 

1699 Feb. 13 f 13 
1702 Mar. 8'!? * 
1714 Au» f 12 10 
1727Junell S3 4 
I70frOct. M 
Crowned Sept. 22, 1761. 

Ireland united, Jan. IB0U 



Wfifc&Mary 
Q. Anne 
George 1 
2 
S 



* Each King began to reign on the day hit predecessor died. 



Prayers far the Use of Schools. id 

PEAYERS. 
A Morning Prqysr te be publicly read m Schools* 

O LORD, thou who host safety brought us to the beginning of this 
day ' defend us in the same by thy mjgfcty power, and grant that this dajr 
we fall into no sin, neither ran- Into, any kind of danger ; but that all our 
doings may be ordered by thy governance, to do always that which is 
righteous in thy sighfe 

Particularly we beg thy blessing- upon ow present undertakings. Prevent 
us, O Lord ! in all our doings with thy most gracious favour* and further 
us with thy continual help ; that in these and all our works begun, con- 
tinued, and ended in thee, we may glorify thy holy name, and finally by 
tky mercy obtain everlasting lite. 

We humMr acknowledge, O Lord, mat errors and misdeeds ; that we 1 
are unable to keep ourselves, and unworthy of thy assistance : but we 
fcefleedh thee, through thy great goodness to pardon our offences, to en- 
lighten oup understandings, to strengthen our memories, to sanctify our 
hearts, and to guide our lives.— <Help us, we pray thee, to learn and to 
practise those things which are good ; that we may become serious 
Christians, and useful in the world ; to the glory of thy great name, and 
our present and future well-being 

Bless and defend^ we beseech thee, from all their enemies, our most: 
gracious Sovereign, Lord King George, our gracious QujvEX Charlotte,, 
His Royal Highness the Prince Regent, the Princess of Wales, and all the 
Royal Family. Let thy blessing be also bestowed upon all those in 
authority under his Majesty, in Church and State ; as also upon all our 
friends and benefactors, particularly the conductors of this school. ._, 

These prayers, both for them and ourselves, we humbly offer up in tht 
name of thy Son Jesus Christ our Redeemer ; concluding in his perfect 
form of words ; 

Our Father wJtich art in heaven, haUotecd be tJty name : thy kingdom 
come i thy will be done an earth* as it is in heave*. Give us this day our 
daily bread ; and forgive us otir trespasses* as we forgive them that trespass 
against us. And lead us not into temptation, hut deliver us from evil f 
far thine is the kingdom* the purser and the glory, for ever and. ever. Amen, 

x An Evening Prayer, to be publicly read in Schools, 

ACCEPT, we beseech thee, O Lord ! our evening sacrifice of praise 
and thanksgiving, for all thy gsotess and loving-kindness to us, 
particularly for the blessings of Uu> day ; for thy gracious protection and 
preservation; for the- opportunities we have enjoyed for the instruction 
and improvement of our minds ; for all the comforts of this life ; and 
the hope of life everlasting, as declared unto us by Jesus Christ our 
Redeemer. 

Forgive, most merciful Father, we humbly pray thee, all the errors 
and transgressions which thou hast belisld in us the day past ; and- help 
us to express our unfeigned sorrow for what has been amiss, by our care 
to amend it. 

What we know not, do thou teach us ; instruct us in all the particulars 
of our duty, both towards thee and towards men; and give us grace, 
always to do those things which are good and well-pleasing in thy sight. 

Whatsoever good instructions have been here given this day, grant 
that they may be carefully remembered, and duly followed. And what- 
soever good desires thou hast put into any of our hearts,, grant that, by 
the assistance of thy grace, they may he brought to good etffcct ; that thy 



164 Prayers Jbr the 'Use of Schools. 

name may have the honour; and we, with those who are assistant to us 
in this our work of instruction, may have co mfo r t at the day of account 

Lighten oar darkness, we beseech thee, O Lord f . and by thy great 
mercy defend us from all perils and dangers of this night. Continue to 
us the blessings we enjoy * and help us to testify our thankfulness for 
them* by a due use and improvement of them. 

• Bless and djefend, we beseech thee, from. aU their enemies, our peat 
gracious Sovereign Lord King George, our gracious Queen Charlotte, 
His Royal Highness the Prince Regent, the Princess of Wales, and aft the 
Royal Family. 

Bless all those in authority in church and stale ; together with all our 
friends and benefactors, particularly the conductors of this school, for 
whom we are hound in an especial manner to pray. Bless this and all 
other seminaries lor religious and truly Christian education $ and direct 
and prosper all pious endeavours for making mankind good and holy. 

These praises and prayers we humbly offer up to thy divine? Majesty, 
in the name, and as the disciple of thy Son Jesus Christ our Lad; ia. 
whose words we sum up aU our desires. Oar Faster, £c 



A Morning Prayer to be used by a Child at Home. 

GLOB Y to thee, O Lord ! who hast preserved me from the perils of 
the night past, who hast refreshed me with, sleep, and raised me up again 
to praise thy holy name. 

Incline my heart to all that is good : that 1 may be modest and humble, 
true and just, temperate and diligent, respectful and obedient to my 
superiors ; that^I may fear and love thee above all things ; that I may 
love my neighbour as myself, and do to every one as I wouMFtfcey should 
do unto mo. 

Bless me, i pray thee, in my learning: and help me daily to increase in 
knowledge, and wisdom, and all virtue. 

I humbly beg thy Messing upon all our spiritual pastors and masters, 
all my relations and irfemte, [particularly my Jhther and mother* my 
brothers and sitters, and every one in this house]. Grant them whatsoever 
may be good for them in this life, and guide them to life everlasting. 
• I humbly commit myself to thee, O Lord! in the name of Jesttf 
Christ my Saviour, and in the words which he himself hath taught me s 
Out- father, $& 

An Eiyening Prayer to be need by a Chiid at Home, 

GLORY be to thee, O Lord ! who hast preserved me the day past, who 
hftst defended me from all the evils to which I am constantly exposed 
in this uncertain life, who hast continued my health, who hast bestowed 
upon me all things necessary for life and godliness. 

I hunlbly beseech thee, O heavenly Father! to pardon whatsoever 
thou hast seen amiss in me this, day, in my thoughts, words, or actions. 
Bless to me, I pray thee, whatsoever good instructions have been given me 
this day z help me carefully to remember them* and duly to improve them : 
that I may be ever growing in knowledge, and wisdom, and goodness. 

I humbly beg thy blessing also upon, all our spiritual pastors, and 
masters, all my relations and friends [particularly my father and mother, my 
h-otfters and shier s, and every one in this hottse}. Let it please thee to guide 
us all in this We present, and to conduct us to thy h eavenl y kingdom. 

1 humbly commit my soul and body to thy care this night; beggin* 
thy gracious protection and blessing, through Jesus Christ our only Lord 
and baviour ; in whose worda I conclude my prayer* Qur Father £<. 



List of Valuable School Booh. Ifa 

t ixL^' Prayer m ^ Tsi gongteo the Seat at Church 

r^^T^f"- hy H ° ly Spirit M P "^ infirmities ; disposing mv 

ntml l^^tT"*"'^ d T?° ,l: to the honour TTh/h^ 
name, and the benefit of my soul, through Jesus Christ our Saviour. Ami 

RT *<wim k- *. Be S we ^^ n g the Seal. 

th~Z 2 ^ th7 f" 6 '. L ° rd! for this opportunity of attending 

^ J? 7 * iTif ^.^T 3 - Make «*. I A thee/a doer of thy 

I^mE? ♦ *?" ^ Ac< ? pt ^ us and our ^'ices, ttirough oZ 
•nly Mediator, Jesus Chriat our Lord. Amen. 

Grace before Meals. 

*J »« £ 1 I Fy * °- ^J We , b f eech thce » these **? Pa***** to our use, 
and us to thy service, through Jesus Christ our Lofd. Atnet* 

'Grace after Meals 
BLESSED and praised be thy fioly name, O Lord, for this and all thv 
e ther blessines bestowed upo n us* through Jesus Christ our Lord. Awn. 

Improved Elementary Books, for the Use of Schools and Youn* 

Persons. ° 

READING EXERCISES for SCHOOLS, on a' new and very popular 

p an, tang a sequel to Mayor's Spelling, and an Introduction to the 

Uass Book, amilar in plan and arrangement to Brown's Testament. 

By the Rev. David Blair. Price 2s. 6cL bound. *««anient. 

This Work recommends itself to general adoption in all seminaries 

by the following peculiar features: 

1. It is printed in a large clear Type. 

2. It is rendered interesting by numerous Embellishments 

3. l*he subject matter is adapted to the capacity of Children, and is 
at once entertaining, moral, and instructive. 

4. All the dimcult and long words are selected, divided, and printed 
at the head of each Lesson, in the manner of Brown's Testament. 

POETRY for CHILDREN, consisting of selections of easy and 
interesting pieces from the best Poets, with original Pieces, by Mu* 
Aikin ; adapted to Children between the age of Six and Twelve. Price 2a, 

The CLASS-BOOK; or, THREE HUNDRED and SIXTY-FIVfe 
READING LESSONS, for Schools of either Sex c combining the elements 
of all knowledge* with a greater number of reading exercises, from the 
best authors, than axe to be found in any other work of the same 
description; every lesson having a clearly defined object, and teaching 
some important truth* or some principle of science or morality. By 
the Rev. David Blair. A new edition, price 5s. 6d\ opund. 

The ARITHMETIC of AEAL LIFE and BUSINESS, adapted to the 
practical Use ot Schools: including a complete Reformation of all the 
Tables of Weights and Measures; the Calculation of Annuities, Leases, 
Estates, Lives, Stocks, Exchanges, &c? and more numerous examples 
under every rule than are to be found in any other book of. this kind. 
By the, Rev. J. Joyce ; closely printed, price 3s. 6<L bound. 

The following are the peculiar and superior features of this Arithmetic: 
1. The Tables of Weights and Measures, corrected throughout, and 
* Iff <nrtrm\ iwf M"i 



160 List of Valuable School Books. 

2. Obsolete and useless Rules eapanged, and a mttchr larger portion 
applied to Stocks, Estates, Annuities, Discounts Reversions, Tontines, 
Banking, Insurances, Brokerage, Chances, Exchanges, tyc &c as ptne- 
tised by the Brokers and Commercial Companies of the City of London 

3. More Examples under each Bule than are to be found in any 
other Work. ^ 

4. Logarithms applied to calculations of Annuities, Compound In- 
terest, &c 

A KEY to Ditto, for the Use of Teachers ; to whieli is subjoined a 
System of Mental Arithmetic, and a concise mode of setting sums in the 
first four Rules. Price 3s. tid. 

The ELEMENTS of LAND SURVEYING, in all its branches, praclicnlly 
adapted for the use of Schools and Students : illustrated by highly finished 
engravings, plain and coloured ; complete Tables of Signs and Tangents, 
Logarithms, &c. &c eVc. By AbraJiom Crocker. 7s. Cd. bound. 

An EASY GRAMMAR of GEOGRAPHY, being an Introduction, and 
Companion to the larger Work of the same Author, published under the 
title of ** Geography on a Popular Plan," and esteemed the most practical 
work of this kind extant. By the Rev. J. GoXdsmWi. Illustrated u itli a 
variety of Maps, &e. Price 3s. 6d. bound in red* 

GEOGRAPHY ILLUSTRATED en a POPULAR PLAN, for the use of 
Schools and Young Persons. Containing all the in te re sti ng and amusing 
features of Geographical knowledge, and calculated to convey instruction by 
means of the striking and pleasing associations produced by the peculiar 
manners, customs, and characters of all nations and countries. By the Rev. 
J. Goldsmith. A new edition, enlarged and unproved, illustrated with 
upwards of sixty beautiful engravings, representing the dresses, customs, 
and habitations of all nations, with numerous maps, &c. Price 1 5s. 

CLASSICAL ENGLISH POETRY, selected for the Use o* Schools ani 
Younjr Persons, from the best authors, with some Original Pieces. B; 
Dr. Manor and Mr. Pratt ; with a Preface, indicating the several specie! 
Of poetry, and their best modes of recitation. Price Gs. 6*d. bound. 

A GAZETTEERofthe BRITISH ISLANDS; or a TOPOGRAPHICAL 
DICTIONARY of the UNITED KINGDOM, containing f ml modern De- 
fccriptkms from the best Authorities, of every County, City, Borough, Town, 
Village, Parish, Township, Hamlet, Castle, and NobiemmVs Seat, in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Benjamin Pitts Capjtcr, Esq. of the Secretaiy <rf 
State's Office; Editor of the Imperial Calendar, of the Population Returns, 
fee &c. Illustrated with forty-six New County Maps. Price II. 6s.bouoa 
and lettered, or 1 L lis. 67L elegantly bnund, and the Maps coftoiTrttt 

The UNIVERSAL BfOGRAPHfCAL, HISTORICAL, and CHRONO- 
LOGICAL DICTIONARY, including Thirteen Thousand Live* of eminent 
Persons of all Ages and Nations, the Succession of Sovereign Princes, antf 
above twenty-fi veThousand Dates, revised, enlarged, and brought down » 
the present Time. By John WatHtts, LL. D. trice 19s. in boards, 
or 20s. bound: ami lettered. 

The THEOLOGICAL, BIBLICAL, and ECCLESIASTICAL DIC» 
TIONARY, serving as a general Note-book to all Passages, Names, art 
Facts, connected with the OH and New Testament, and serving as a Cyclo- 
pedia of Religious Knowledge. By John Rdbbtsm, D. D. "dec. With map* 
Price 2fc& in boards, or 80s. bound. 

The BRITISH NBPOS, consisting of Select Live* of the illustrious Briton 
who have been the most distinguished for their Virtue* Itdehfe, or remark!*! 



List of Valuable School Books. 167 

kdvaiiaeutentin Life, interspersed with practical Reflections; written pur- 
©sely for the Use of Young Persons, on the obvious and important prinoi- 
te—47tat example is more powerful and more seductive titan precept. By 
VHliam Mavor, LL.D. The Tenth Edition. Price 5s. bound. 

A SELECTION of the LIVES of PLUTARCH, abridged for the Use ot 
Schools. By William Mavor, LL. D. &c. Price 5s. bound, and contain- 
tig Accounts of the most illustrious and estimable Characters of Antiquity. 

SERMONS for SCHOOLS, containing one for every Sunday in the Yean 
nd also for Christmas-Day, Good-Friday, Easter-Sunday, and 'Fast-Days $ of 
jugths and on Subjects adapted to Young Persons of either Sex ; elected and 
bridged from Home, Blair, Gisborne, Zollikofer, Palcy, Porteus* Jortin, 
infield, Horsley, Seed, &c &c Bv the Rev. S. Rarrov. Price 6s. 6d« 
The ELEMENTS of BOOK-KEEPING, by SINGLE and DOUBLE 
ENTRY : comprising several Sets of Books, arranged according to present 
Practice, and designed for the Use of Schools. To which is annexed, act 
Introduction on Merchants* Accounts, tvith engraved Specimens. By James 
M >rison % Master of the Mercantile Academy at Glasgow. In 8ve, price Ss. 
half bound. 

The above Work divests the art of Book-keeping of its pedantry and 
usual intricacy; it commences with a Set of Books, in the simplest form, 
which are adapted to initiate beginners to a Retail Trade, highly useful 
to a numerous class of Students who have been perplexed by the com- 
plicated Systems of some Authors. Other Sets of Books follow, which 
are adapted to the most extensive Wholesale Concerns. The whole are 
illustrated by Questions for Exercise, and by engraved Forme of the 
various Documents used in Business. t 

W ATKINS'S PORTABLE CYCLOPEDIA, an invaluable and indis- 
pensable work for Students And Schools, with nlates. Price 15s. bound. 

The ELEMENTS of NATURAL HISTORY, for the Use of Sehools. 
Founded on the- Linnaean Arrangement of Anknak, with popular Descrip- 
tions, in the manner of Goldsmith and Rufibn. By William Manor, LL. D. 
The Simth Edition. Price 7s. bound, illustrated by fifty new Engravings* 
representing Two Hundred of the most curious Objects. 

" It is to be regretted that Buffon, with all Ins excellencies, is absolute- 
ly inadmissible into the library ef a young lady, both on account of his 
immodesty and impiety. Goldsmith's His tory of Animated Nature has 
many references to a divine Author ; and it is to be wished that some 
person would publish a new edition of this work, purified from the indeli- 
cate and offensive parts." — Miss Moie^t Strictures on Female Education* 
UNIVERSAL STENOGRAPHY; ora Complete andPractical SYSTEM 
of SHORT-HAND. By William Mavor, LL. D. The Eighth &fition, 
in 8vo. Price 7s. fid. boards. 

BARROW'S FIVE HUNDRED QUESTIONS on 4he NEW TESTA- 
MENT ; being the only means ever devised for practically teaching the 
Elements of Christianity. Price Is. 

The GRAMMAR «f MEDICINE, with its Four Hundred Questions; 
being the only elementary work adapted to the me of Junior Students in 
Medicine. Price 7k. 

BLAIR'S UNIVERSAL PRECEPTOR, or General Grammar of Arts, 
Sciences,, and Useful Knowledge. Cbaracterifled by many eminent teachers 
te " the Sun of School Books." 4s. 6d. 

BLAIR'S SIX HUNDRED' QUESTIONS on his UNIVERSAL 
j PRECEPTOR, (called " the Sun of School Books;") being the only means 
ever devised for practically teaching the Elements of aU Aits and> Sciences 
during the period of ordinary Education. Price Is. 



j (5 8 List of Valuable School Books. 

ADAIR'S FIVE HUNDRED QUESTIONS on GOLDSMITH'S 
ABRIDGED HISTORY of ENGLAND ; being the only means ever 
devised for teaching British Youth to reason on the causes and effects of the 
Events in the History of their native Country. Price Is. 

ADAIR'S FIVE HUNDRED QUESTIONS on MURRAY'S GRAM- 
MAR and IRVING'S ELEMENTS of COMPOSITION; being the onlj 
means ever devised for bringing the principles of Grammar and Taste intt 
contact with the thinking powers of Youth. Price Is. 

GOLDSMITH'S GRAMMAR of BRITISH GEOGRAPHY, with its 
Four Hundred Questions; teaching to British Youth, for the first tame, the 
Geography, Produce, Resources, and Government of their native Country 
and its Colonies all over the World. Price 4s. <kL 

ROBINSON'S GRAMMAR of UNIVERSAL HISTORY, with its Four 
Hundred Questions;' being the only means ever devised fer practically 
teaching History in Public Schools. Price 4s. 

BLAIR'S GRAMMAR of NATURAL ana EXPERIMENTAL 
PHILOSOPHY, CHEMISTRY, &c with its Four Hundred Questions 
being the only means over devised for practically teaching Natural Philosophy 
in Public Schools. Price 5s. 

BLAIR'S ENGLISH GRAMMAR, with its Four Hundred Questions; 
being the sunniest, completes!, and easiest Grammar ever published. 2s. Gd. 

The TUTOR'S KEY, or Answers to the Questions, for the ease of Tutors, 
in ten several Works ; viz. The Universal Preceptor—- the' Grammar of 
Geography— the Grammar of British Geography— the Grammar of History — 
the Grammar of Philosophy— Blair's English Grammar — Barrow's New 
Testament Questions— Adair's English History Questions — Adair's Questioiis 
on Murray and Irving— and the Grammar of Anatomy and Medicine. & 

GOLDSMITH'S GEOGRAPHICAL COPY-BOOKS, demy 3s. royal 5s. 
. GOLDSMITH'S PROBLEMS on MAPS, with a Royal Atlas. 12s. 
. BOSSUT'S FOUR FRENCH BOOKS.— 3000 Wortjs, Is*— 2000 
Phrases, Is.— Easy Grammar, 2s. — Exercises, 3s. 

HAMILTON'S ELEMENTS of DRAWING, with 60 Engravings. 27s. 

BLAIR'S MODELS of JUVENILE LETTERS. 4s. 

PELHAM'S FIRST CATECHISM, with a Clock-free and moving 
Hands. Is. 

ROBINSON'S ANCIENT and MODERN HISTORIES. 0s- each. 

WATKINS'S SCRIPTURE BIOGRAPHY. Ts. 

IRVING'S ELEMENTS of ENGL^H COMPOSITION, being a Sup- 
plement to all English Grammars, 7s. Gd. 

BARROW'S YOUNG CHRISTIAN'S LIBRARY; or, Present on 
going Apprentice, or into Service. 4«* 

THE BOOK of TRADES ; or, Library of the Useful Arts, illustrate* 
by 66 Engravings, for the Instruction of Young Persons designed for Trade. 
3 vols. 10s. 66. 

AN EASY GRAMMAR of SACRED HISTORY; or, Guide to the Events 
of the Old and New Testament, with plates. By Mary Ank Rundalj- 4s. 

The SOCIAL CATECHISM, of the Constitutional Rights and Legal 
Duties of Young Britons. By the Rev. & Barrow. Price Cd. 

The SIXTY WONDERS OF THR WORLD, Natural and Artificial, de- 
scribed from the best authorities, with 80 cuts. By the Rev. J. Adair. 
Price 7s. 6d. bound. , ^ 



Thomas WiUmand 9otn,PrMUrs,Higk-0*»fatt t York, 






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