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Full text of "Entomological news, and proceedings of the Entomological Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia"

BKKE 



Entomological NevJs 



AND 



Proceedings of the Entomological Section 



OF THK 



Academy ol' Natural Sciences 



OF 



PHILADELPHIA. 



VOLUME X, 1899. 



K i >n OK : 

HENRY .SKINNER, M. D. 
PHILIP P. CALVERT, Ph. I)., Associate I-:ditor. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE : 

Kzra T. Crosson. i liarles A. Hlakr. William . I. Fox 

Philip Laurent, riiarlcs Li. beck. < 'luirlfs W. . 



PHILADKLPH1A: 
ENTOMOLOGICAL Koo^is OK 
THK ACADKMV OF NA.TTRAL Scii:.\< K>, 
;\x SQUAIU:. 
189?. 



INDEX TO VOLUME X. 



GENERAL ENTOMOLOGY. 

Albany, Entomological Society of, 

208. 
American Entomological Society, 

51, 108,219, 32. 
Appeal in behalf of entomology 45, 

295. 
Apple trees in Europe, Scales on 69 

Bananas, Spiders among 44 

Biscayne Bay, Collecting on ... 94 

Bui tei flies, The (poem) 19 

Chicago Entomological Society 107 
Directory of American Entomolo- 
gists, 178,247, 296. 

Diseases and flies. 109, 154 

Diseases, Mosquitoes spread .... 69 
Doings of Societies 20, 51, 78. 107, 

152, 189, 219, 252, 271, 302. 
Economic Entomology 134, 207, 

29 r. 
Editorials 13.41, 67. 101, 132, 176, 

205, 246, 264, 290. 
Entomological Literature 15, 47, 74 

104, 147, 182, 209, 248, 266, 296 
Entomological Section, Academy 

of Natural Sciences 20, 79, 154,273 
Kaunistic entomology of Ohio . 134 
Keldman Collecting Social 20, 51, 

/8. 107, 152, 178, 189, 2T 9> 252, 

272, 303. 

Fruit pebt, Allorhhin iiilid.i as a 43, 
__ 71, 102, 144. 

Ga "s 154, 193 

Galls, N ames of. So 

Grape-cane gall-maker. . . 53 

Killing large insects, Best method 

for, 178. 

Kissing hug -,,5 

Mexico, Notes on remotest corner 

of, 45. 

Mosquito, To a (poem) 265 

Natural History specimens in the 

foreign mails again, 132. 

Nature Studies 258 

Newark Entomological Socieiy 22, 

78, 108, 155, 189, 271, 302. 
Votes and News 14,42,68, 102, 144, 

i?3, 208, 247, 265, 294 
Oak-gall in the world. Largest 193 
Obituary. 

Costa, A. . 82 

Cross, E. W 190 



Griffith, H. G ...... .. ... ____ 252 

Hubbard, H. G .......... 80 

White, H. G ................ no 

Ohio, Faunistic Entomology of 134 
Peach-mite, New ............ 14, 73 

Philadelphia Entomologists and 

Entomology, 152. 
Physiological species again .... 39 

Poison-ivy, Galls on .......... 154 

Reflections on realizing dreams, etc., 

ii A. 

Southwest, Letters from the ____ 83 
Sudden appearance, etc., of insects, 

, 7 " 

Sugar beets,, Meqetra vittata injuring, 

44. 

U. S. Natioial Museum, Collection 
of insects in, 273. 

ARACHNIDA 



trgas ///</;// ............. ..... 170 

Castle-building spider ...... 23, 168 

Lycosa domifex* ............... 168 

Mite, New peach ........ 14, 73, 207 

Spiders among bananas ....... 44 

COLEOPTERA. 

Adulia bipunctata .............. 146 

Allorhina nitida ..... 43 71, 102, 144 

Ampeloglypter sesostris ......... 53 

Ceanothus, C. found on ........ 162 

Cocci nellids, Massing of ...... 68 

Collection of C. in New York Citv, 

69. 
Colorado, C. of ......... S^zo, 196 

( 'remastochilus lencostictiis ...... 243 

Cyrhrus Eastern N. American 174 
Lychnis Guyoti vs. C. Audi ewsii var. , 

191. 
Dinapate Wrightii ............. 83 

Gall maker, Grape cane ...... 53 

Horn collection of carabid mouth 

parts. 302, 304 . 
Lema fi i/i>it'<itii ..... .......... 58 

L^ng life of C ................ 219 

Mt-^-tnivitt-itit injuring sugar beets, 

44- 
Mordellidae notes. ... ....... i_i 

New Jersey, C of ........ 20, 22, 78, 

107, 152, 189, 190, 219, 220, 252, 

272. 304. 
/' //i/'/tus <>/'ncHs* ..... . ' ....... q 7 



"Denotes new Kpecitic or generic 



11 



IM>EX. 



Pennsylvania, C. of 20, 295 

Rare species, So-called 303 

Recollections of Old Collecting 

Grounds, 5, 120, 196. 

Safer da later a Us 108 

Sexes of C., Proportions of. ... 219 
Sound-producing Organ of Lema 

ttilineata, 58. 

Trap for C 1 45 

Utah, C. from 302 

DIPTERA. 

Crtlliphorina;, North American gen- 
era of, 145. 

Dacus cucurbittz* 129 

Fleas, New and known. ...... 37 

Flies and disease 109. 1555 

Hystrichopsylla amcricana* 37 

Mosquito larvae, Long life of. . 102 
Mosquitoes spread disease .... 69 
New Jersey, D. of. .20, 79, 220, 272, 
303. 

Pennsylvania, D. of 220 

Pericoma, 7 nn. spp* 33-35 

Poison. ivy root galls 154 

Pulex irritam dugcsii* 37 

Psychoda schizura* 3 2 

Psychoda sigma* 3 r 

Psychodidse of Pacific coast ... 30 

Sciara inconstant 2OI 

Stenoxenidae ( >o 

Stenoxenus* johnsoni* OI 

Sycorax lanccolata* 35 

Trypetid f-ora Hawaii, A new. 129 
Utah, D. from 303 

HEMIPTERA 

Acnnth'ni It'ifiilar'ni in Cape Colony, 
291 . 

Athysanus al pi nits* 173 

. Ithysanus arctostaphyli* 172 

Athysanus frig id us* 17'^ 

Chinch bug 144 

Cicada septemdecim $i, I&I 

Coccid, Ants' nest 57 

Cotton-scale, Fitch's,. 146 

Dicyphus minimus* 59 

Kmpoasca, Remarks on . .. 90 

Fitch's cotton-scale insect. ... 146 

..Pulvinaria phaiee* 237 

Ripersia minimus .' 57 

Scales on apple trees in Europe '19 

HYMENOPTERA. 

Ancistrocerus birenimaculatus.. . . 180 
Andrena 3 nn. spp.* 253 



iidi'icus champiom r 94 

Ants' nest coccid 57 

Ants, Remarkable use of 247 

Bees destroyed by dragon flies. 219 

Bees of California '57 

Bees of Kansas . 3 

California, H. of T57> lS() 

Cataglyphus viatica 247 

Chrysis schlettereri 1 78 

Dieger wasp. 262 

Diploplectron. 3 nn. spp.* .... $(> 

Harpactus cockerelli* 9 

Ilarpactus howardi* <i 

Hypomiscophus 4" 

Kansas, H. of 3, 253 

Miscophinus 4 

Nesting habits of wasps iSo 

Niteliopsis striatipcs'"' 9 

Nomada 3 nn. spp.* . 159-101 

Pisonopsis triangular i s* . ....... 9 

Sphex elegans i7 l > 

Synergus dugesii* . 195 

Texas, Aculeata of . . . 2^4 

Torymus me xicanus* 195 

Wasp as an engineer 52 

Wasps, Four new 9 

LEPIDOPTERA 

Alaskan J. 21, 130 

Archonias .r<-yw<' w 106 

Arctiidae. Alaskan 13 

Automcris lending 179 

Biscayne Bay. Collecting on 94, 124 

Butterflies, Notes on in 

Callidryas eubiile iuniig ration . . 7 [ 

Catocala, Art of collecting. ... 25<> 

Catocalae of Virginia 2X2 

Catocalae, Request for eggs of 295 

Ceratomia catalpae 43, IQ i -73 

ChrysQphanus helloides . 4^> 

Collections of L. , A aierican 1 1 4, 209 

Cossid from Texas, A new. . 129 
Cranberry, N.C., Ailditions to 1.. of. 
128. 

Dcih'phila lincatn in Utah 4^ 

Ephestia Kuhniclla 207, 29' 

Epiphilf zipa* 1 66 

Erebia from Alaska 21 

Euptoieta claudia '-94 

Evergestis ftinalh larva ''^ 

Exyra Rolandiana 294 

/', -. ', il'ni jocosa 1X9 

Florida, L. of 94- '24 

Fourth ofJuly 2S(> 

Haploa triangular is*- 126 

Hermaohrodite Camcadt-s 252 



*DentU's ne\v spc'cjllc or 



Hybrid Limcnitis i - 1 

ftyphoraia suluiebulosa.* 130 

fnguromorpha ml>c/oi<tcs 129 

f.imenitis, Distribution of 245 

/.iiiienitis, Hybrid 131 

Mediterranean flour-moth 207, 291 
Mesosemia vaporogosa*, -,..,...., 167 

Migrations' of L _> i , 7 i 

Missouri Sphiugidae 10 

Neumoegen collection of L.. . . 209 
New Hampshire, Noctuidae of 221 
New Jersey, L. of 22, 78, 79, 156, 

2-0. 271, 272. 
N'octuidae of New Hampshire. --21 

North Carolina, L. of . , . 128 

. \ otodonta georgicn 202 

Orgyia tettcostigma on Boston Com- 
mon, 262. 

/''itnphila mystic . . 1,5 

/'tnipJrila oslari* 112 

Pampkila scuddei-i* . . ...... n r 

Pennsylvania, L. new, etc., 20, 219, 

294. 
/'icris in Utah ..... 46 

/V//J-/X Study of 265 

Preservation of larvae 71 

Pyromorphid, The smallest. . . 99 

^t'tiodts bahamensis* . 100 

Sisemc nigrescent* [68 

Sphingidae. Missouri. . 10 

Telea polyp/ic/ints 204, 293 

ThyrettsAbbottii i 

Utah, L, of . , 16/263, 286 

Virginia, Catocalae of 282 

NEUROPTERA lEXCL ODONATA.) 

Acantliaclisls lut^cm 1 '' r 70 

Brachynemurtts nun -it/osus* . .... 170 

Rrachyiiemui us pal lit! us* 171 

Psocidsof an old snake fence . 260 

PsOCIfS .<//><<' t\>.( its 266 

ODONATA. 

Rees destroyed by O Jiy. 252 

Riologia Ceutrali- Americana. 

O. of 103 

C nlopteryx an^ ;/.///</////> in Penn- 
sylvania, 199. 

Calopteryx a/>i< n/ts 

Celithemis fasciata r 

Copulation among O. . . 42 

fncrease or decrease of O ?. . . . 206 

/sfhnura kellin>tti, habits 68 

Kellicott collection of O i.j j 

New Jersey, O. of So, -74. 

Utah, O. o'f 302 



ORTHOPTERA. 

Albino katydid ...... . ..... 247, 265 

Allotettix*' ............... 275, 27 h 

. illotitlix* pfdlotigatus* ......... 27') 

( 'onocephalus atltiuticKs* ....... 39 

Grasshoppers in New Mexico . \\ 
Kansas, New .\'in,>tetti.\ from 
Mantis in Pennsylvania ..... 20, 27; 

\ i'iclli.\ huii tlh* ...... ..... 277 

\oniotcttix tHiiiniiiiilii* * ........ 

:\'<wt>/i'f/i.r siiinfrons* .......... -2-* 

S/ii-tii/taiiti\ ,an'liim in New York, 

288. 
Tenodera sinensis ........... 71), 275 

Tettigian studies, vSome ....... 27') 



j.^ i 



THYSANURA. 

M > 'iili> , ,'it/iinifii ..... ........ - I 

AUTHORS. 

Ashmead, W. H ......... y. s-. i'i; 

Baker. C. F ............... ^7. qo 

Ball. E.D ................ .. i 7 a 

Banks, \ ............ 45, 170, 260 

Barrett. O. W. ........ 45, 179, 29; 

Uirkman, '> ........ .... . . 244 

Bowditch, F C ............... i i 

Browning, O . W .......... 46, 26^ 

Bruuer. L .................... 38 

Calvert, P. P. 15, 12. 47. 08 69, 74, 

103, 104, 132, 147, 182, 1 88, P. i. 

209, 248, 266. 271, 206, 301. 
Casey, T. 1 ................... 07 

Cockerell, T. I). A . 3. i >, 4 J. 4 1- '' s - 

71, 178, 253, 2<>(>. 

Coquillett. D. W ...... ____ '>o, 120 

Uageett, F. S ............. . 2..j 

Davidson, A . . ....... 17'), iSn, i^i 

Davis, C. A ............ ...... 7 ' 

Davison, J ............. ...... ' 

Dunning, S. N ...... . ........ 262 

Dvar, H. G . . . . ....... 99. 1 29, 202 

Ehrmann, G. A . . ........ .... 171 

Field, \V. ! \V .............. ;.; 

Fiske, \V . F .......... ...... 29? 

Foster, E ................... iSi 

Fowler. C ........ . .. ......... 157 

Fox. W. J., 2.-, 51. 7<i, D/, i si. ' 

206, 220, 252, 27;,, 30). 
Fuller. C. . ....... ..... . 2O> 

Gillette, C. P . . .............. $; 

Ooodhue, C. F ..... ..... ... 221 

Graef, R. L ................ 2oq 

Hancock, T. I ........ S, 23, 168, 275 

Hardy, R. T., Jr ............ ;h> 

Mealy, J. I ............ ..... 47 



^ IH'M -| -III.- ..I _ -IH-l-jr IKllllr- 



IV 



INDEX. 



Hine, J. S i, 201 

Holdredge, L. I 131 

Hopping, R 162 

Hough, G. de N 62, 145 

Howard, L. O 71 

Howard, W. R 258 

Hubbard, H. G 83 

Johnson, W. G 102, 207 

Jones, F. M 43 

Kellojjg, V. L 102 

Kemp, S. T 108 

Kincaid, T 30 

King, G. B 57 

Klages, E. A 45. 295 

Knab, F 147, 245 

Kusnezow, N 295 

Kwiat. A 107 

Liebeck, C 191, 243 

Lister, A. E. 294 

Lounsbury, C. P 293 

Lovell, J. H 39 

Lull, K.S 237 

Marlatt, C. L 146 

Mengel, L 166 

Newcomb, H. H no 

Osborn, H 144, 145 



Ottolengui, R 265 

Rolfs, P. H 73 

Rowley, R. R 10 

Schmitz, T. H 178 

Schwarz, E. A 70, 89 

Schwarz, H 256 

Skinner, H., 13, 19, 21, 41, 52, 67, 
80, lot, no, ill, 152, 155, 176, 
219, 274, 286, 290, 296, 303- 

Slingerland, M. V 288 

Slosson, Mrs. A. T 94, 124 

Smith, E. J 263 

Smith, J. B 82, 126 

Smyth, E. A., Jr 144, 282 

Snyder, A. J 114 

Thomas, L 128 

Tinsley, J. D 57 

Uhler, P. R 5Q 

Walker, C. M 58 

Warren, J. C 296 

Webster, F. M 14. 53, 71, 134 

Weidt, A. J..22, 78, 156, 189,272, 
302. 

Wickham, H. F 5, 120, 196 

Williamson, E. B 43, 68, 199 

Young, 1"). B 146 



KNT. XK\VS, Yol 10 



PI 1 




ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS 



AND 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICflL SECTION 

ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, PHILADELPHIA. 



VOL. X. 



JANUARY, 1899. 



No. 1. 



CONTENTS : 



Mine Notes on Celithemis fasoiata 1 

( 'orkerell The bees of Kansas 3 

Wickham Recollections of old col- 
lecting grounds "> 

Hancock A new species of Noino- 

U'ttix from Kansas s 

Asliniead Four new entomophilous 
wasps il 



Rowley Notes on Missouri spliin- 



10 
Editorial ........................ ........ |:; 

Notes and News ................... 11 

Entomological Literature ........... |.~> 

Doing of Societies ..................... _'() 

Exchanges .............................. i 



THYREUS ABBOTII (Swains). 

Our illustration of this curious Sphinx moth was made from 
a pen and ink sketch drawn many years ago by Titian K. I Vale. 
The larva- feeds upon species of I'/V/.s- and .1 ///y>r/oy>.s/.s-. The 
distribution of the species is Canada, eastern United States, 

westward to Iowa. 

o 

(NOTES ON CELITHEMIS FASCIATA (OdonataX; 
With a Short Description of the Female, 

IJy .1. S. HIM:, Columbus, Ohio. 

Very little has appeared in literature regard ing ('i'litlir,nix 
/(iwiiifd. Within the last two years I have seen no less than 
a do/en specimens of the species, and during the past summer 
1 had I he pleasure of observing in t he field and collect in.u half 
that number near Akron, Ohio. To my knowledge the female 
has never been described, so I -jive below a short description 
of that sex. 

Mature Female. Head with vertex and dorsil rdi- of IVoiisdark 
shining brown, with a violet tinge from xnnevieu-: eyes, antennae, 
mandibles and distal edges of labrum and labium dark : other part> 
yellow. Thorax yellow with a wide median, a humeral and ->mr 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[January 



side blotches dark ; legs black ; fore wings hyaline with the follow- 
ing dark ; a regular, transverse band before the apex, an irregular 
blotch on the costal half between the pterostigma and the nodus, 
and a patch extending from near the base to the nodus, occupying 
a third or more of the width of the wing. This latter is divided 
longitudinally from its base for at least two-thirds of its length, 




Right wings of six specimens of Celithetnisfasciata 

and touches the costa at its distal extremity only. The hind 
wings have the same pattern as the fore wings, but the apical 
band is wider, and consequently the hyaline space at the ex- 
treme apex is smaller. There are two isolated spots, one be- 
hind the apex and the other behind the base of the basal patch, 
which, on this wing, extends clear to the base, where it sends back 
a triangular projection. Abdomen black, slightly pruiuose, with a 
small dorsal patch on 2, a larger, nearly triangular one on each of 
3, 4, 5 and 6, and a small one on 7, yellow. Length of abdomen, 
21; hind wings, 28 mm. 

Teneral Female. This specimen differs from the other female, 
1st, in the coloration of the hind wing, Instead of the isolated spot 
behind the apex of the basal patch, the inferior angle of that patch 
is produced without interruption. The other isolated spot is re- 
duced and appears as two small dots. 2nd, the abdomen shows 
yellow markings laterally and veutrally. Laterally these markings 
appear as patches on segments 1 to 6. Length of abdomen, 20 : h iud 
wing, 27 mm. 

The species has the same habits in the tu-Ul as r/ixa <>r CJHHUIUI. 
It flies very nervously over the water before you for a moment, 
and. then with a sudden turn vanishes from sight. In the 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 3 

after part of the day they may be ton IK! resting on the tips <f 
reeds or sticks in the vicinity of water. When the collector 
approaches they flit away, but in case no effort is made to 
capture them they come to rest again on the same perch. I 
have seen an individual duplicate this performance no less 
than four times. 

I have before me at the present time four specimens from 
Akron, Ohio, taken by myself on June 23 and July 20, 1898 ; 
and two specimens from Indiana, taken by E. B. Williamson. 
Chas. Diiry has taken the species at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The accompanying drawings will explain themselves. The\ 
represent the right wings of six different specimens. I made 
them to show the variation in the outline of the da rk mark- 
ings. [ have never seen two specimens exactly alike in this 

respect. 

o 

THE BEES OF KANSAS. 

My T. I). A. COCKKRKI.L. X. M. Agr. Exp. Sta. 

The bee fauna 1 of Xew Mexico and Illinois are fairly well 
known, and have very few species in common. It is interest- 
ing to ask. where do the eastern types find their extreme 
western limit, and at what points do they give way to those 
of the West and South .' With these questions in mind, any 
informal ion about the bee-fauna of K a n*as is particularly wel- 
come ; and I have been very glad to learn from Mr. ,!. C. 
Bridwell, of Baldwin, that he is about to make a study of the 
bees of his region. 

Baldwin is in Douglas count \, at the eastern end of tin- 
State. A box of bees collected at that place has just been re- 
ceived from Mr. Bridwell. and the species, so far as I have de 
termined them, are the following: 

Honilmx riri/lninix. Oliv.. /'. xfi>nrtttnx, Cres*.. /,'. />ni iixt/lru 
, Deg.. Ant/i(>j>li<n'<t ti/>ni/>tti. Say, Synhcdonia f rater, Cress., 
hhiHiriilttfa, Lep.. ^^. <>h/H/n<i, Say, .17. / r/i/t'.ca, Cres^.. 
EpeoJuN hifdxcidhix. Cress.. Colliopsis andrenifornis, Smith, Pro 
/(iiiiIiTini cod,-' IT//!. Dunning. I'rnxiijtix />/></ ,n<t <i. Cress., Sjtlirm 
tlrx i<ni<lihnl<n-is. Cress., Aini<x-hl<>rii lunnmi/ix. Patton. .1. riri 
<lula, Smith, A. Kiniilis. Kob., .1. mufuxn, K'ob., Hal iff us in- 
<ill<'lnx, Say. 77. /it/alii*. Sax . II . fiixcititux. N\l.. A n<lrrn<i ni<iri<r . 
Rob., A. <"////// ro//"*/' 1 ". . \shin. ..I. rirhia. Smith, . I . xH<'hn'll<i. 



4 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [January 

Ckll., .1. <i<'i-<niii, Bob., A. clai/tonine, Rob.,^1. *"//, Rob., and 
also an Hnlictux which might be /or/"'*/, Koh., but for its dark 
wings. 

This list shows that the Baldwin bee-fauna is essentially the 
same as that of Southern Illinois. There are two western 
types only : And rend utt/icinfUtt, hitherto only known from 
New Mexico, and the rrafinidremt, a Kansas species of a west 
ern genus. It is to be remarked that Mr. Baldwin sends both 
sexes of Protandrena cockeretti, the species being hitherto know n 
only by a single 9 from Topeka. The $ is practically iden- 
tical with that of P. asclepiadis, Ckll., of which the is 9 un- 
known ; but it does not necessarily follow that cockerell'i is a 
synonym of asclepiadis, since mejcicanorum, the 9 of which is 
quite distinct from cockereUi, has also a nearly identical $. 

It is worth while to remark that Andrena claytonite is so like 

A. hippotea that they would certainly be confused by one not 
specially looking for the differential marks, the best of which 
is in the shape of the process of the labrum. 

From Northwestern Kansas we have a list of bees collected 
by Dr. Williston, and recorded by Mr. Patton in Bull. U. S. 
Geol. Surv., Vol. V. The species are Colletes <(nn<it, Patt., 
Auyochlont InrmcraliK, Patt., Nomia nortoni, Cress., 
l><n-ll<'litK, Say (occidental IN, Cress.), Calliopsix colo 
Cress., Epeolus occidentalis, Cress., Nomada texana, Cress., 
l>ux iH'HiiKi/lrimicits, Deg., B. scutettaris, Cress. This is a mix- 
ture of Eastern and Colorado types. 

From Barber county, in Southern Central Kansas, border- 
ing on Oklahoma, we have a list of species collected by Prof. 
Cragin, published in Bull. Washburn College Lab. of Nat. 
Hist. (1885). The species are Bombiix pennsylvanicus, Deg., 

B. M-nfcl!riN, Cress., Anthophora occidrnlalix, ( 1 ress., A. xmithii, 
Cress., Synhaloma albata; Cress., Me/i.^ndc.^ IIICIIIHIC/HI, Cress., 
.17. tripes. Cress., Centrix hniom, Cress., Mclccta intcn'ti/tfti. 
Cress., Nomia nortoni, Cress., Agapoxlcuion i'(tili<itnH, Say (///' 
color L<'j>. i, .liif/ochlora viritlii/n. Sin. (hit-idnlti. Sin.), I^cinlo- 
l><tii<irr/itx <rlliit>))x } Cress. 

Tliis list is very different from the ollirrs, and nearly agrrcs 
\vith the fauna of Central Texas. The Ccntris is ((iiile a Mcxi 
can type. There are other Kansas bee-records, but without 
precise localities, so it is not worth while to enumerate them. 



1SJW] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



RECOLLECTIONS OF OLD COLLECTING GROUNDS. 

IJy H. F. WirKHAM, Iowa City, Iowa. 
VII. The Vicinity of Colorado Springs. 

Two years ago, in company with my wife and a friend, I 
spent a few weeks in the mountains of Colorado. Our h'rst 
stop was made at Colorado Springs, which we reached on the 
fifteenth of .June, apparently in the very height of the collect 



ing season. 



The town lies on the extreme eastern edge of the IJocky 
.Mountain region proper, in a rolling piece of country lroken 
l>y many small hills which rise to the westward until they are 
lost in the grander heights of the Clie\enne Mountains and the 
numerous summits which surround the snow-covered apex of 
Pike's Peak. The lower levels are covered with the character 
istic weeds and shrubs of the arid plains, while at a height of 
two or three hundred feet above the creek the scrub oaks put 
in an appearance. The numerous canons which open from the 
hills support an almost entirely different class of plants, the 
oaks becoming more plentiful and being intermixed with nu- 
merous conifers and flowering shrubs. These shrubs often ex- 
tend out of the mouths of the canons along the courses of the 
little creeks, and in consequence the accompanying insect 
fauna which we might otherwise consider as being confined 
to the mountain ranges is carried out some distance on to the 
adjacent plain. 

The altitude of Colorado Springs is approximately li.OOO 
feet. I>ut since it is the most favored summer resort in the 
State and much frequented by a class of health and pleasure 
seekers, business enterprise has resulted in the construction oi 
railroads or electric lines to many points of interest in the \ i 
cinity which would otherwise be diflicnll of access without the 
expenditure of considerable time. Thus it is easy to visit the 
< iarden of the (iods. the canons in the Che\emie Mountains 
and those near Manitou without any great exertion. Some ot 
these are very rich in insects, particularly Williams' Canon, 
which lies close to Manitou. The railroad to the summit of 
Pike's Peak offers a smooth walk for the pedestrian, but the 
results of our high altitude collecting here, by no means encour- 
age a recommendation to ot hers. 

While not wishing to present a complete list of our capt nres 



<; ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [January 

here, it seems worth while to mention some of the most strik- 
ing characteristics of the coleopterous fauna, particularly since 
the region is one likelv to be visited by any transcontinental 

o i/ t 

traveler. By a perusal of the following notes some idea of the 
character of the beetles obtained may be secured. 

The only delude/it seen in June was ('. rcfximla, which was 
common along the creek in the north < 'heyeuue canon . i u July 
I took some f\ }>i<)ictnl<it<nm muddy flats in fields near the Rock 
island railroad tracks ; they were hardly typical, but approx- 
imated the yariety in lean* very closely. A single example of 
rt-nnxto was taken during this month, running along a sandy 
road . 

Among the Carabidee we met with comparatively few spe- 
cies, and the genera Xchriu, \<>ti(>i>/ii/itx. Dywhiriux and Clirhm, 
all of which we expected to see, were quite absent. Many 
I'dNiiiHicltitN rloitf/dtiitt were found in the sandy soil beneath ties 
along the Rock Island tracks, but none occurred elsewhere, 
with the single exception of a specimen from the north Chey- 
euue canon. Benihidiiiin hif/iibrc and />'. l>ii<icii!tt<i>i were both 
rather abundant along small streams, particularly in Williams' 
( 'anon, where we also found an example of Carabus serratus. 
B. bifoxxitluttuti, roitximHc and rcrxicvlor were rather common 
on a small saline mud-flat near the town. I'tcroxtirhu* htcixHN 
occurred with r<iNinirltttN in moderate numbers ; sometimes it 
was also accompanied by I', hic-.otii, which, however, was more 
common in the damp canons. Dictrhix wuljrtili* was captured 
under stones in sheltered spots in Williams' and Cheyenne 
canons. About roots of plants we scratched up Ci/iiiimlix i>!ni- 
)H'itiii, I'hilojthiif/H (iinii'iKi. and nicclinix iilt/rimix, with an occa- 
sional I'iomniHt wfoxinii, though this last species is quite as fre- 
quently seen under boards in open spaces, in company with 



Dytiscida 1 were not very abundant, and we could lind none 
whate\er in the lit t le st ream which is followed by the Pike's 
Peak road. However, we got a fine lot of .l</<iln<x c<ir<l<tfnx in 
a rill which I'uns-l lirough \\'illiams' Canon. This species is 
easily taken by lifting up small stones, under which it hides; 
and, being by no means agile, capture readily follows detec- 
tion. .1. litf/ciix, two species of IIifdroiHtniN and a <'<rfi>ihi<K ac- 
companied it. /)/7/o/M- xlriultix was very abundant. Iflnintiin 



],X!)in ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 7 

&woiaw was once taken in some numbers in a small muddy 
pool amonii the low hills near the town. 

Of the rlavieorn beetles only a lew seem to require mention. 
, tntnciitti and /<i/>/><>ni<-<t were met with on earrion. 
occurred under ties alon.u the railroad track. 
imn-f/hiipcHiiix and its variety <illtio/>x was l>eaten 
from sa.ue-brush. K/>i/<n-/ttt<i r<>rriii>l<t was swept from planN 
on low ground. II//i><Ts/>ix 4-rittaltt was not rare, Itein- 
scratched up from about the roots of plants. A very pretix 
little insect which I have referred with some doubt to /////*T- 
<tx)ti(lii<K h-inicit/titx was secured in abundance on cacti, where 
they evidently feed on the Aphides which infest these plants 
so badly. Krotijlitx l><>i<lnrlii was seen quite frequently in the 

canons, usually resting on the under sides of pine logs. S 

few Ltnif/iifid Iccontci were found in low meadows. ('in-jH>i>liilitx 
briirlitiittcritx was very abundant on cactus blossoms. 

Buprestida- were not very common as a rule. However, in 
rheyenne Canon we look />///>rr.s7/'\ iiiiicnlirt'nfrix and Cliri/xu 
hntlirix h-inciTHi on pine lo.ys, Af/rUttx (tn.riiiN on ])o|)lar. and 
Antlnt.t'i (r/in>!/<ix/<'i' on tlowers. In Williams" Canon .\<-ni<> 
th'i'K ]>i<lclictl<t was extremely abundant on flowers in July, while 
with it occurred .1. sparsa in much smaller numbers. 
cntu N<ntf/iiiitiiH'ttnix fre(|uented the same situations. 
hifniin-ttnx was plentiful on low plants in damp spots near the 
town. Tri<-lnnli'x oniatux was partial to tlowers on the higher 
all it udes. while dent* ((/>rii/>tiix occurred mostly on plants in 
the arid districts. 

In the (iarden of the (iods Kit}ilitn-i(t kmiii was found in some 
numbers on (lowers of AI-</<'HH>II<' inc.ficdini . A sinule E. fl 
was taken al the mouth of the Cheyenne Canon, while 
<(lfi>iix \\-as abundant on Mowers of shrubs above the Seven 
Falls, a few occurring also in P>ear Creek and William's 
< 'afions. 

The Cerandncida- were liai'dly as plentiful as one would e\ 
peel, liati/lr xittitniliN and ii/iilt-olli* both occurred on thistle and 
other blossoms rather commonly, chielh in the hills about 
town. L('i>hn-<i cliriixncuiiKi and /,. suin/nin<'<t were found along 
the Pike's Peak road above Manilou. .lrnni<>/>.^ hmf/irnnii* 
was occasionally seen on tlowers near Hear ('reek. .!/<///</ 
xciitt'lltitii* and .Yti/otrivlnix uii<ln/ntitx \\ere taken Irom 



^ ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [January 

pine logs in Cheyenne < 'anon, while Monilantt >inii/<itinn was 
obtained in small numbers on cacti. 

Chrysornelidae were very abundant. Euryscopa Ict-onfri was 
beaten from scrub oak, in company with Coscinoptrrti ilomin- 
IcfDHt. ('. ajciUaris was very plentiful on various low plants, in 
company with the much less abundant ( 1 . ritt if/era. The other 
members of the family must mostly be passed over without 
notice; but it seems worth while to record the capture, near 
the town, of numbers of Microrliopa/a ci/aura, varying from blue 
to green, and well up in Williams's Canon we found a few 
Odontoid cotltn-ix on grass blades. The Tenebriouidae offer little 
of interest, most of the species taken having been found under 
ties along the railroads. Mention may be made of Askla opaca, 
A. polita, Eleodes extricata, obxolctn, tricoNtotu, loni/icoHix, Icron- 
tfi and niyrina, and Entlxip liioii iniirimfinn . Melee- sublcevis was 
taken in considerable numbers on a sandy Hat inside the city 
limits, crawling about during the morning hours. Zoiiifi* 
hilhicdtft was found rather rarely on composites in July. 

Ehyuchophora were abundant in individuals ; no sweeping- 
could be done in patches of weeds on low ground without 
yielding some of the forms belonging near Sniicrony.r. On 
various flowers Ithi/itrliift'x ('.rhnius occurred in great numbers, 
Ix-ing one of the very commonest insects during June, though 
much rarer in July. I never met with this beautiful weevil 
at any other point, and it seems quite uncommon in collections, 
in spite of this wonderful local abundance. 

o 



A NEW SPECIES OF NOMOTETTIX FROM KANSAS. 

BY DR. J. L. HANCOCK. 

Among some Tettigidae kindly scnl to me by Prof. Hugo 
Kalil, of the Kansas University, I find an example of a species 
of Xontotettiji' which is not referable 1o any described species. 
I append the following brief description, pending the appear 
ance of a more extensive paper on the whole group, which 
will contain a figure of this species. 

Nomotettix acuminatus, sp. nov. 

Similar to ^\. purritN. (littering a> follows: Larger stature, includ- 
ing- relative proportions of body, vertex trom above more acute- 
ungulate, the mammillae of occiput more distinct, the anterior mar- 
gin <>f dorsiim a little more produced over the head. Wings pos- 
teriorly reach slightly beyond the apical process. From cristiitu* 
it is distinguished by the more slender form of the body, besides 
having the median carimi of the pronotum less arched longitudinally. 

Length of ?,9 mm.; pronotum. 8 ; hind femora. 5; antenna.:.") 
Loealitv, Lawrence, Kan. Prof. Hugo Kahl. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. ; 

Four New Entomophilous Wasps- 

BY WILLIAM H. ASHMEAD. 
PISOXOPSIS Fox. 

(1) Pisonopsis triangularis, u. sp. 

$. Length 6 mm. Stature of /?o///////o.v/r/// //.> <1ixli', ictus Fox, 
Black, closely, opaquely punctate. Ocelli arranged almost in an 
equilateral triangle. Eyes slightly convergentabove, with a median 
eimrgination within, but not deeply emarginated, as in J'fxon. 
Clypeus with a median triangular production Mandibles beneath 
strongly emarginate at basal third and rufous from the emargination 
to apex. Metathoraxrugulose, with a median furrow and adelicat e 
carina, the furrow liueated on either side trom the carina. Wings 
subhyaline. the tegulae, stigma and veins brown-black: the snip- 
median cell is distinctly shorter than the median : the first recurrent 
nervure is interstitial with the first transverse cubitus, while the 
second recurrent joins the second submarginal cell at its apical 
fourth. Abdomen distinctly punctate, the dorsal segments 1-4 
br, > idly depressed at apex ami clothed with a silvery or at least glit- 
tery pubescence, especially noticeable later.illy: vcnlril segments 
2-~> mrrowly testaceous at apex anl finely, closely punctate. 
Longer spur of hind tibiae ueirly as long as the basal joint of tarsi 

Hab Colorado. Carl F. Biker Collection, No. 2()i!l. 

Type, No." rii KM. I'. 8. N. M. 

XITKLIOF'SIS S;iiiml'i-s. 

(2) Niteliopsis striatipes, u. sp. 

?. Length G.5 mm. Head anil thorax black, finely, do-ely. 
.-ribrately punctate, the face, temples, prouotum and pleura with 
a silvery pubescence; abdomen rufous; legs black, the tarsi more or 
less rufous, brownish at ba>e. while all the tibiae have a white stripe 
outwardly. The clypeiiB is strongly produced medially and again 
produced medially into a <|iiiilr.ite production. AVings hyaline, 
broadly fuscous at apical margins: the second submarginal cell rc- 
'i-ives both recurrent nervures; while the <ubmedian and median 
cells are nearly of an equal length. 

llab -California. Cirl F. li iker ( 'ollc-cl ion. \>. iMT.') . 

Type, No 5:)fio. U. 8. N. M. 

HAK'I'ACTrs Jarine. 

(3) Harpactus howardi. n. >p. 

?. Length f>.r> mm. Head andthorix hlack : ahdumeit rufous, 
.-moot h, i m pun 'late; inner orl)its from base of clyp;-us and ntirrowe.l 
iliovc to beyond t! e middle of face, tin- anterior margin ot i lie cly- 
peus, the scape heneath. a stripe on the front tibia- anteriorly and a 
slight line on middle tibia- ne ir I he base, yellow : m i ml i hies. r\,-rpi 
apex. black. The metatlmrix !ia~ a d i-l i nrl t ria uvular area at 1> 
which is smooth except some liiieitions at extreme ha-e. \Ving> 
hyaline the stigma ami vein brown-bl.ick : the siibmedian cell i.- 



10 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [January 

much longer than the median ; both recurrent nervures join the 
second submargiual cell, the first at the middle, the second before 
the middle, of its apical half, 

Hab. Claremont. Cal. Collected April 18, 18i)S. by Dr. L. (). 
Howard 

Type. Xo. 5070, U- S. X. M . 

(4) Harpactus cockerelli, n sp. 

. Length 5 mm. Head and thorax black, but clothed with a 
short whitish or silvery pubescence, and giving the insect a very 
hoary appearance; inner orbits narrowly anteriorly, the anterior 
margin of clypeus the palpi, the mandibles basally, the antenna- ex- 
cept the scape, pedicel and first three or four joints of flagellum 
above, the tegulae, knees, tibiae at base, the anterior and middle tibia 1 
in front, and more or less of the tarsi, nouey-yellow or pale ferrugin 
ous. Wings hyaline, the costa and stigma brown black, the inter- 
nal veins paler: I he venation agrees with H. hotrardi, except tint 
the second recurrent nervure joins the second submarginal cell af tltc 
niiildli of Us apical half. Abdomen rufous, the dorsal segments 
rather broadly ma giued with a whitish or silvery pubescence at 
apex. 

Hab. Mesilla Park, X M. Collected June !), 18!>S. by Prof. 
T. D A. Cockerel I. 

Type. Xo. 5071, TJ S. X. M. 



NOTES OF MISSOURI SPHINGIDAE. 

BvE. E. ROWLEY, LOUISIANA. Mo. 

Of the genus Philampelus, chnon is our commonest spe- 
cies. and may be said to be faiiiy plentiful most years. The 
larva is much like that of jHttidoruN, but may be known by the 
oblong instead of round, lateral yellow spots. Both want the 
caudal horn at maturity and are remarkable for their short, 
thick appearance at rest, the head being withdrawn into the 
swollen thoracic segments. Both feed on grape and woodbine. 

Of live larva 1 of m-lu'moit taken September ;>0, 1S!>7, two had 
a light pea-green ground color ; two. smoky, yellowish brown 
and one ;: deep reddish brown. The young larva 1 of r/iiianijH'/ii* 
have long, slender caudal horns that curve toward the head 
like a dog's tail, but only a polished wart at maturity. Both 
species mentioned above are double brooded and the August 
imagoes of funnlornx have rosy patches on the hind margins of 
both wings, as I have seen in Mr. (). ('. I'oling's collection. 
I have found the larva- of {Minium* rare, but have taken more 
imagoes at light than achnnnn . Mr. Poling has informed me 



1S9D] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. | | 

that he obtained during the past summer a *<>< nlly iiuinl)er of 
the former on wild jjrape. 

/'. r/7/.v is unknown to me, but may be looked for in southern 
Missouri. 

Although a number of weeds are ^iveu as the food plants of 
Ih'ih'jtliiln HiK-ald, I have never found the larva on anything 
but purslane ; .have taken the moth at flowers at mid-day as 
well as at dusk. 

/>. r/nniiiinit'rii is probably not found here, though its food 
plants are abundant. 

The larva of Huloicn* ^/C/K-IHN feeds on trumpet creeper and 
lilac, but I have not found it common. Have taken the i 



at li<iht. Mr. Poling finds some noticeable variation in the 
moths. 

I captured a beautiful apparently fresh ima.uo of l>il<>i>lm- 
iiota <'!/<> ou the railway station at Mexico. Mo.. October 10. 
IS',17. It had the appearance of a home-bred moth. Could 
this insect have flown from the tropics to Missouri without 
disturbing the scales on its win^s .' 

/>o/h(t Iti/hriix is one of our commonest hawks. The larva 
feeds on paw-paw and the speeiesis probably double-brooded. 
The color lines that shade the sph initial bauds are very bright. 
especially on the \ounti' larva. The little pupa is much like 
that of the <ienus S/tltin.r, and larva and pupa alike closelx 
ally this hawk to jtlfln'iits. 

Two specimens of S/i/ihi.f crruiHiix have been taken at (lowers 
by Mr. Poling, but we have searched the mints in vain for the 
larvae. 

Sphinx gordius is & rare species with us. 1 have not taken 
the larva, but Mr. Sweet has a record of several found feeding 
on apple. 

X/thiii.r r//r/'.s/.x, as well as N. ilri</>ij'rritni m . are uncommon in 
eastern Missouri. Mr. Sweet found the larva of the former 
on ash and the latter on apple and plum. 

N. /,-(i!nii(i is another probable member of our Sj>liin.i fauna. 



but larva ami imago alike are unknown to the writer. Search 
for the larva on ash and lilac. 

Of the Macrosilos, Carolina is most abundant. I have found 
the larva feeding on tobacco, tomato, red pepper. Around 
cherry, potato, jimson weed and matrimony vine. M. cc/t'/is 



li> ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [January 

is less common. Have found the larva on tomato and potato. 

I have neither taken the larva nor imago of N. riitf/ulata in 
Missouri, though 1 found it a common hawk at Fort Smith, 

Ark. 

The pupa is easily distinguished by its doubly-curved tongue 

case, so unlike that of cdcux or Carolina. 

Mr. Otho C. Poling has taken <'/>i</v!<it<( at Quincy, Illinois, 
and thinks it feeds on a solnaceous plant. Search for the 
larva on convolvulus plants (sweet potato, bind-weed, morn- 
ing glory, etc). 

Out of twenty lar\;r. September, 1S97, I obtained but one 

pupa of J/. Carolina. Nineteen of ithem were parasitized. T 
have found dark brown larva 1 of .17. caro/itm only on jimson. 

IhirciiuiHt iiii(lii!oMt is common about ( 'urryville, and Mr. 
Poling has found the larva? plentiful at Quincy. 

I have found the larva 1 on ash in August. There is much 

variation of color in the caterpillars. The moth looks not un- 
like ('ci'iitoniid (nni/n1oi\ but some large males have a faint 
grayish green tinge that gives a handsome appearance to the 
fly. The larva- of Ceratomia amyntor are quite common some 
years. Unlike the larv;e of other hawks, the\ have four 
fleshy horns behind the head. The whole larva has a rough, 
granular appearance, in perfect harmony wit li the harsh, 
toothed foliage on which it feeds. Mr. Ealph Sweet took quite 
half a hundred larva- of <itiii/iif< . one September, from a single 
elm tree. 

Of Tlii/rriix (ihhotii I have seen but one larva taken on grape. 

II is probably common, though I have not found it so. .Mr. 
Poling showed me a number of pupa- of ithhotii from larva- 
taken at Quincy. The larva of Thi/rcii* has no caudal horn. 

JEllopos titan and .luijt/iion //r,s.sm-, as well as Lepisesia flavo- 
faxciata, may be sought at early flowers, as serviceberry and 
lilac. They fly at mid- clay and are early spring species. T 
have seen no one of them in Missouri. 

ffciii<iriK tcmtiN, if it be a good species, is probably an inhab- 
itant of Missouri. The writer has Taken a mot h at Mowers in 
April that answers to the description of t his hawk . //./////////* 
is very common. I have taken the My at horsemint Mowers 
in Max and thistle blooms in August. The larva feeds on 
buckberry, snowberry and I'everwort . II. flii/xhc, like </ijjiii/*, 
hovers o\ er eai'ly (lowers and thistle blooms in the hot sun- 
shine in August. Both dijjin /.s and Ilii/xhc ai'e double-brooded. 

The larva of /////.s//r is common on black-haw and snow-ball, 
and may be known by the toothed yellow collar behind the 
head. 



1.S99] 13 

ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[The Conductors of ENTOMOLOGICAL XK\VS solicit and will t hank I'M \\\ 
items of news likely ID in It-rest its rentiers from any source. The author's name 
will be given in each case, for the information of cataloguers ami iiiMioin-aph- 
ers.] 

To Contributors. All contributions will he considered ami passed upon ai 
our earliest convenience, ami, as far as mny lie. will be pulilished according to 
date of reception. KNTOMOI.HCICA i. XKWS lias re-iched a circulation, hot h in 
mimhers and circumference, as to make il necessary to pul "copy" into the 
hands of the printer for each number three weeks before date of issue. This 
should be remembered in sending .special or important matter for a certain 
issue. Twenty-five "extras," without channe in form, will be uiven free, when 
they are wanted: and this Should be so stated on the MS., alonu with the num- 
ber desired. Tlie reccipi of all papers will be acknowledged. Kn. 

PHILADELPHIA, P.V.. ,1 \\l \ RY, 18D9. 

THE NEWS is ten years old, <>r. rather, is entering its tenth 
year. Since Tin-: XFAVS entered on its career there have been 
many changes. Since our first number, of sixteen pages ap- 
peared, Entomology has wonderfully advanced; more persons 
are interested; it is largely taught in our schools and colleges; 
economic Entomology is recogui/ed as a valuable study. A 
number of our valuable workers have joined the silent major- 
ity, but let us hope that their places may be tilled by others 
just as enthusiastic, industrious and able. We are not iiifre- 
(jiiently confronted with the criticism that the subject has lo-.t 
its poetry and the delicate touch of Nature has been swept 
away, and, in its place, there is left a dreary list of scientific 
names, whose meaning can oul\ be known to a favored fe\\ . \\ith 
large" scientific libraries at their elbow \\"e try to remedy this 
in Tin: N i:\vs, but receive no help from the critics; they talk, 
but do not act . We admit that descript ions of new species an- 
as dry as the dust under an infested specimen; but we owe 
more to the systematic worker than to the growler, who pro- 
claims from the housetops what should lie. but has never 
put pen to paper. One good friend says we should give less 
space to " duns " for subscription money and devote t he space 
to original entomological observations, and charge two dollars 
for T HI-: Xi;\\s. When we lie awake half the night de\isiug 

means to get the one dollar due us, could we be expected to 
Stay up all night trying to get two.' Dollars with some en- 
tomologists seem to be as scarce as the males of I'r >> 



14 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [January 

Notes and News. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL GLEANINGS FROM ALL QUARTERS OF THE GLOBE. 



THE NEW PEACH MITE IN OHIO. Apropos to the statement of 
Prof. W. G. Johnson, in the December, 1898, Dumber of ENTOMO- 
LOGICAL NEWS, regarding' the occurrence of this pest in Maryland, 
I will say 'that in August, 1898, my assistant, Mr. C. vV. Mally 
while inspecting two nurseries in this State, found the injury so 
characteristically described by Prof. Johnson, but ws not able at 
the time to determine the nature of the depredator, and for want 
of time the matter was not followed further. In one very extensive 
nursery the damage was quite serious, the greater portion of a block 
of upwards of 500,000 young peach trees showing more or less of the 
effects of the insect. I may add that the twoaft'ected nurseries were 
located near to or south of lat. 40 degrees north. F. M. WEBSTER. 

THE new synonymic catalogue of North American butterflies. 
by Dr. Henry Skinner, is now ready. See advertisement on cover. 

OWING to the fact that we have placed THE NEWS with another 
printing establishment, not familiar with scientific work, it is un- 
avoidably late. We will depend on our printer to do better in the 
future. EDITORS. 



NOTES. Having occasion to overhaul my Mordel- 
brings a few memoranda that may be of interest. From Pres- 
cott, Arizona. I have examples of a species of Penfaria, which 
seems undoubtedly to be decolor Cham])., as described in " Bio- 
logia,"' vol. iv. pt. 2, p. '256 

A specimen from Yera Cruz, which seems to tit the description of 
Pentaria brericontis Champ., 1 cannot distinguish from my num- 
erous specimens offt(*cn/<t Lee from Colo. a:id N. Mex. ; the possi- 
bility of such identity is spoken of by Mr. Champion (p. 254), but 
my one specimen does not enable me to do more than partially con- 
firm this suspicion. A fine example of Tomoxia hilaris S:iy, is 
among my (Vera Cruz) specimens. 

Mr. Champion gives one distinction (p. 272) between M<>rd<>1l<i 
melcfna Germ, and urifte/far/a Fab. which is not mentioned bv Smith 
in his Mordellida-. vol. 10, Trans. Am. Ent Soc.. p. S2, /. < -.. me- 
Icuna " differs from sciitcllarix by its short clavate antenna-." I find 
it much the easiest character for separating species. MordcUa xcr- 
/v//, Say, seems rather a northern species I have one pair from Sal- 
isbury, Vt., another pair from the subalpiut region of Ml. Wash- 
ington, N. II., and one specimen from Brookline, Mass. 

Among the material sent me by Mr, Wickham from Mrownsville, 

Texa< (-JS<M. is a single specimen of an interesting' new species of 

Min'ilc/ld. which seems to come near fc//i>i/>fs Champ.; also (298) 

one example of a minute new species of M<>r<l< llixtctnt near 

i if Champ. F.KKD. C. Bowurn n. 



1S5HI] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. l."> 

Entomological Literature, 



COMPILED BY I'. 1'. CALVERT. 



Under the above head it is intended- to note such papers received at the Acad- 
emvof Natural Sciences of Philadelphia pertaining to the Entomology of tin 
Americas i. North and South). Articles irrelevant to American entomology 
will not he noted. Contributions to the anatomy, physiology and embryologj 
of insects, however, whether relating to American or exotic species. will In- re- 
corded. The numbers in n KA\ v-i ACKD TVI-K refer to the .journals, as niim- 
iiei-ed in the following li^t, in which the papers are published ; * denotes thai the 
paper in question contains <lescri]itions ol' new North American forms. Titles 
of all articles in foreign lamjna^es are translated into English; usually sucli 
article- are written in the same la niiuauv' as the title of the journal coin :<i n - 
ing them, but when such articles are in other lan^uatjes than English, French, 
< ierman or Italian, this fact is indicated in parentlic is. 

5. Psyche, Cambridge, Mass., Dec. ,'98. 7. U.S. Department of Ag- 
riculture, Division of Entomology, Washington: Bulletin 17, new 
-erics '08. 15. Biologia ( 'entrali- Americana, London. p-irl cxliv. 
Oct.. 'OS. 19. florae Societatis Entomologiese Rossiea-, St Peters- 
burg, '08, 41. Entomoiogische Nachrichten Berlin. Nov., '9849. 
Termeszetrajzi Fiizetek, xxi.,Buda pe-t . Oct, 1, '98. 50. Proceedings, 
t'nitetl States National Museum. Washington. '98. 56. Mittheilun- 
o-eu. schweizerischen entomologist-hen Gesellschaft. x. 4. S'-liatl'- 

~ * 

hausen, Oct., '98. 58. Revista Chilenti de Historia Natural, ii, 9. 

Valpiraiso. Sept. .'fs. -87. Revue Scieutitique, Paris, '98. 97. Zcit- 
schrit't fiir wissenschat'tliche Zoologie, Ixv, 1. Leip-ic. Nov. 15. 
'!H. 98. Travaux, Socictc Imperiale des Xaturalistes de St. Petcr-- 
bourg. 

The General Subject Anon. White wax of insects. 87 Nov. lo.- 
II t-the. A. A comparative study of the functions of the central 
nervous s\ >icin of Arthropods (transl. by W. W.Xornian). .loiirnal 
of Compar.itive Neurology, viii, UJJranville, O., Nov.. "its. (' oc k- 
ercll. T . D: A. Entomological Ethics. 7. Distant, \V L 
Biological suggestions: Assimilative colouration, ii, Zoologi>t. 
London. Nov.. 'MS. D o ra n , E. W. Vernacular names of in 
SIMMS, 7. lie y in o us. R. [Notice of] Packard's Text Book of 
Entomology. Zoologisches Caentrlblatt, Leipzig. Nov. 17. 'os. 
K mi Ih, P. Handbuch der Bliitenbiologie. II Band : die bishea 
in Kuro|a und im arktisdien Gebiet geraachten blutenbiologischen 
Beobni-htunjion 1. Teil: R-inunculacca' bis ( 'oinposii;c . Leip/ig. 
P^ngelmann. 1808. s\-o. 210 figs. M e u n i e r . F. The insects 
of svoiuhry times 1 , so p] s . Archives du Musce Teyler (2) vi, 2. 
Haarlem, 'os. i; a n e, F. W. Notes on the fertilization of musk- 
melons by insects. 7. 

Economic Entomology. A n o n . Flies and typhoid fever [ in Amer- 
ican ramp- in Cuba], 87. Nov. 10. A no n . A new tobicco juice 
iiiM-clii-ide, .Journal Socii-tc des Aviculteur- Fran;ais. Puri-. ( )ct.. 
'08. B 1 a n d f o rd . N\' . F. II. Xi/.'rfturiix ///</y///ry//.v. tigs., 

(iardener's Chronicle. London, Nov. 26, *98,Br i tto n, W. !: . 
The San .Jose scale in Connecticut. 7. C bitten d en. 1' II . 
Insect injury to millet, 7. C o o 1 e y . If. A. Notes on M.IIM- 
Ma achu-ett- < 'occida-. 7 . F e 1 t . K. 1*. Note- on some o 



HJ ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [JaUlUirY 

the insects of the year in the State of New York, 7. F e r n a 1 d . 
C. H. The brown-tail moth (Eup)'octis <-liri/xrrli(i'(i . L), 7. 
F o r b u s h , E . H . Recent work of the Gipsy-moth Commis- 
sion, 7. (4 r a s s i , B. Malaria propagated by means of special 
insects, Atti d. Reale Accademia dei Liucei. Rome, Nov. (i, '98 - 
Hopkins, A . D. Some notes on observations in "West Vir- 
ginia, 7. H o w a r d . L . O, Two beneficial insects introduced 
from Europe, figs .7; Notes on house flies and mosquitoes, 7; Ptil- 
> ///if rin (ic< j i-fco!(i( W. & R ) and P. innumerabilis, Rathv. , tigs.. 7. 
J o h u s o n , W . G Hydrocyanic acid gas as a remedy for the 
San Jose scale and other insects, 7; Notes from Maryland on the 
principal injurious insects of the year, 7. K a n t h a c k, A . A , 
D u r h a m , H . E , and B 1 a n d f o r d, W . F . II . On na- 
gana or tsetse fly disease. Report made to the Tsetse fly Com- 
mittee of the Royal Society, of observations and experiments 
carried out from November, 1896, to August, 1898. Proceedings. 
Royal Society. Ixiv, 404, London, Nov 19, '98.- K e u y o n, F, 
C. Abstracts of recent publications. Experiment Station Rec- 
ord, x. 3, '98. 7. M a r 1 a t t , C . Proceedings of the tenth an- 
nual meeting of the Association of Economic Entomologists. 
Aug 19 and 20,1898,7: Notes on insecticides, 7. (3s b or u , H. 
The duty of Economic Entomology, 7.~ Q u a i n ta n c e . A . L . 
A preliminary report upon the insect enemies of tobacco in 
Florid-i, figs., Bulletin 48. Florida Agric. Experiment Station. 
Delaud, Fla., Oct., '98. S c h . S. The tsetse-tiy. Insekten Borse. 
Leipsic, Nov. 24, '98: A new means against phylloxera, Natur 
wissenschaflliche Wochenaehrift, Berlin, Nov. 27. '!s. S m i th . J . 
B. The distribution of the Sun Jose or pernicious scale in New 
Jersey, 7. W e b s t e r , F . M . The Chinch Bug: its probable 
origin and diffusion, its habits and development, natural checks and 
remedial and preventive measures, with mention of the habits of an 
allied European species, figs. Bulletin No. 15, new series, '98, 7 - 
Webster, F . M .. and M a 1 1 y , C . W . Insects of the 
year in Ohio, 7. VY e d , C. M. The feeding habits of the chip- 
ping sparrow, figs. Bulletin 55, New Hampshire College Agric. 
Experiment Station, Durlmm.N. H , July, '98; Notes on tent -cater- 
pillars, 7. W e e d , C. M .. and Fiske. W. F. Note* on 
prnce bark-beetles, 7. 

Arachnida. C a m brid g e. O. P. Arachnida Aram-idea, pi. 
xxx, 15.- Sc h i m k e w i t s c h . W . Note on the dorsal organ 
of the Arancina, 98, '97. 8, Dec.; On the origin of the alimentary 
canal in some Arachnids. 98, '9S, 1, Jan S c h u 1 t / . E . On re- 
generation of the feet of spiders, 98, '!s. -j. Keb. 

Myriopoda. C o o k , O. F. American oniscitid Diplopoda of 
the order Merochaeta,* 50, no. 1154. 

Orthootera. Burr, M. Aquatic Orthoptera, Entomologists' 
I'ccord London. Xov. 15, 98. Hunter. S. J. On the occur- 
rence of l)f*Nt>xl<'ir<t IOIKJI iK'iniix, Thomas, [and] Dis*uslc!r<i in 



lX<<n ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 17 

( 'olorado. 5. Hunter, S. J . [and H ouj.li, G . d e X.] 
Pai'asiti,- influences on Mel(tiio/>hix, tig-s. Kansas University 
Quarterly, vii (A), 4, Lawrence. Oct., '98. Morse, A. P. 
Notes on Xesv England Acridiida- iv, Acridiida' '>. 5. 1* i c t e t , 
A . and d e S a u s s u r e , H . Orthoptera.* pp 4i)l-41(i. 15, 

Neuroptera. K o \\ a u t . R. Odonata of Hungary, 3 pis,. Kir- 
Magyar Termeszettudornanyi Tarsulat Megbizasabol, Budapest. '!)<;. 
[In Magyar.] . 

Hemiptera. -A I w o o d , W. B. Notes on the life-liistory of 
the wooly aphis of apple ( ^<-li/z<>n<'iir<t liuiii/cru), 7.- C h a m p ion 
G. C. Rhynchota Heteroptera.* vol. ii, pp. 153-176, pis. ix, x, 15 
C h o 1 o d k o v s k y , X . Contributions to a monograph of 
the Conifer-lice, ii. '.i pis, 19. xxxi, 4. C ockerell, T. D.A. 
New North American insects.* Annals and Magazine of Natural 
History. London, Nov., '98. C o o 1 e y , R . A. See Economic 
Entomology. K ing;, G . B . , and T i n s I e y . J . D. A new 
ant-nest Coccid. tig's., *5.R e e d , E. C. Synopsis of the He- 
mipteri of Chili (cont . ), 58 . AV e b s t e r . F. M. Sec Kco- 
nomic Entomology. 

Coleoptera. B u r < e s s , A . K . An abnormal coccinellid. 7. 
Horn. W . Ten new species of Cicindelida?. Notes from the Le\ - 
den Museum, xx, 2-3, Sept. 98. v . K i e s e n w e t t e r , H . and 
Seidlitz, (r. Coleoptera. N' Bd. 1 Hiili'te. 5 Lieferung. 
Naturgescliichte d*'r Insecteu Deutschlands beg'onuen von Dr. \\'. 
F. Erichson. Berlin, Nicolaische Verlag-s-Bucbhandlung. '98. 
Sc h oc h . (i . Supplement \'III to "Genera and species of my Ceto- 
nid collection." 56. S p a e t h . F . Description of some new Cas- 
-idid.c. \vilh synonymic remarks. Verhandlung'en z-b. Gesell^chaft 
in NVien. xlviii. s. Xov. 17. '!)8 T s c h i t s c b c r i n e . T. 
Materials for study of the Feronines. 19. xxxii. 1-2. - W c e d . < ' . 
M . and Fiske, W. F. See Economic Entomology. 

Diptera. II o u g- h . G . d e X .* See Ortlioptera. -K . [ Wan- 
dolleck on the phylog-eny of the Hea and on the Stethopathidae] Na- 
turwwsenschaftliche Kundschau, Braunschweig'. Nov. Ki. 'J)S. 
P o r t s c h i n s k y . .1. Biology of the coprophagous and IMHTO- 
phag'oiis (lies, ii: Studies on Lin-ilia hn fimiroi-n . parasitic on aiiur<>u- 
Batrachia, tig's, [in Hus>ian], 19. xxxii. 1-2. Va n d e r \V u 1 p . 
F. M. DiptcM-a.* vol. ii. pp. :577-:;si. 15. -V a n der Wulp. F. 
M. and d c M e i j c r e . J . C . 1 1 . New check list of the Nether- 
land Diptera (Bijvoeg-el tot deel xli. Tijdschrifl voor Kntomolo- 
g-ie). The Hag-lie. '9S.W a g- n e r, -I. Aphanipterulnuiral -Ind- 
ies. H )>]>., 19. xxxi, 4. 

Lepidontera. -A I wood. W. 15. On the life history of J'fo/n- 
/><i/-c<> c<i rait no. 7 Ii a e r. M . On the structure and colors ot 
the wing'-scales of butterflies, 97. Ii a r t 1 e t t-( ' a 1 v e r t . \V . 
Revised Cat-.ilogue of the Lepidoptera of Chile 'cont.). 58 < ' o r k- 
erell. T. I). A. Second note on a new H<'inil<'ti<'<i , 5: See 
llerni|)tera. i: ' D ru ce. H. Lepidoj)tera Heterocera. vol. ii. pis. 



18 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [.Jailliarv 

xcvi, xcvii, 15. K e n u e 1 , J . The destruction of butterflies by 
birds, Biologisches Ceutralblatt, Erlana'en, Nov. 15, '98. v. Lin- 
den, M, Researches on the development of the markings of the 
butterfly wing in the pupa, 3 pis., 97, aud lllustrierte Zeitschrift 
fur Entomologie, iii, 21. Neudamm. Nov. 1, '98. M o o r e , F. 
Lepidoptera Indica. parts xxxii, xxxiii. London, L. Reeve & Co., 
'98. (VoL iii, pp. 145-192, pis 247-262.) Rec'd Dec 13, '98. P a g e n - 
s t e c h e r , A . The Lepidoptera of the high mouutains,Jahrbucher 
des Nassauischen vereins fur Naturkunde, li, Wiesbaden, '!)8. R i p - 
pon, R. H. F. Lcones Ornithopterorum, part 12 London- 
Published by the author. 4 pis. Rec'd Dec. 13, '98. 8 in i t h , J . 
B., and D y a r, H. G. Contributions toward a monograph 
of the Lepidopterous family Noctuidae ol boreal North America : a 
Revision of the species of Acronycta (Ochsenheimer) and of certain 
allied genera. 50, no. 1140. Soule, C. G. A curious cocoon 
of Attacus cfcfopia. 5; Callidryas cn/nt/e [in Mass-], 5. 

Hymenoptera. B e t h e, A. Psychological studies on bees, 87. 
Nov. 5. C o c k e r e 1 1 . T . D . A. Arctic aud sub-arctic bees. 
Nature, London, Nov. 24, '98. F . M . The "sail va" or leaf cutting 
ant, Naturwissenschaftliche Ruudschuu, Braunschweig, Nov, 26. '98. 
-F r e y-G e s s n e r . E . Hymenoptera Helvetia? (cont.). 56. 
Howard, L. O. On some new parasitic insects of the sub- 
family Encyrtinae,* 50, no. 1142-K a r s c h . F On the etiology 
of the Ichneumonid genus Poli/t<i.>lu'in-1<i Grnv.. 41. Kohl, F. F. 
New Hymenoptera, 1 pi., 49. K o u o w , F. W. On some new 
Chalagastra species,* 41. K r i e c h b a u m e r , J Contribution 
to a monograph of the Joppina?, a sub-family of the Ichueumonida?. 
2 pis.,* Berliner Eutomologische Zeitschrift, xliii, 1 and 2, Xov 
'98. M a r s h a 1 1 , T. A.. Braconidae in Species des Hymenop- 
tt'-res d'Europe et d'Algerie foude par Edmond Audr6 et continue 
sous Ernest Andre. 64e fascicule. Paris, Vve Dubosclard. Oct. 1. 
'98. (Tom. V. pp. 225-288. pis. x-xii ) M o s a r y . A. New 
species of the genera Kn<ilus>t<i Litr. aud Ei>i<-lmrix Kluar.* (in 
Latin), 49. Selvvyn, P. H. Honey bees acclimatised, Ot- 
tawa Naturalist, Oct. and Nov., '98' S u u d w i k , E . E On 
the wax of bumble bees (Bo'iitbns spp ), Iloppe-Scyler's XcitM-hrift 
t\ii- physiologische Chemie. xxvi, 1 and 2, Strassburg. 'us. 



"TiiE BUTTERFLY BOOK. APopnlnr Guide to a Knowledge of the 
Butterflies ot North America. By W. J. HOLLAND. Ph D . D 1 >.. 
LL.D. With 48 plates in color photography New York. Double- 
day & McCIure Co." This is a large octavo of 400 paes. nnd con- 
tains chapters on the Life-History aud Anatomy of Butterflies: 
the Capture, Preparation and Preservat ion of Specimens : the ( 'lassi 
tication of Butterflies; Books about North American Hut Icrllic- 
Through the work are interesting 1 essays under the title of Digres- 
sions aud Quotations. The plates represent the highest type of 
what is known as the three-color process and are successful to a re- 



185H)] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



raarkable degree. Where they are not quite satisfactory it is owing 
to the fact that the forms figure:! are so closely related as to make 
any process insufficient. The majority of the tisnires leive nothing 
to be desired, as they are close to perfection. The work is excellent ly 
done, and the author is to be sincerely congratulated. This book 
will do more to stimulate an interest in these insects than anything 
heretofore printed. The works of the past that were of any value 
had a prohibitive price, but on looking over this work one is 
amazed at what i-; given for sucli a comparatively small money out- 
lay. The young and the old can find any amount of interest in such 
a book, and \ve can heartily recommend it to all lovers of the beau- 
tiful in Nature. It is intended as a popular work, but still has a 
scientific interest, as many types are accurately figured, and it will 
not be out of place in any scientific library. We can hardly say too 
much in its praise, and can find but few faults, and in a work of its 
magnitude it is surprising there are not more that might be criti- 
cised. On page 80 the caterpillar is spoken of as emerging from the 
chrysalis a typographical error of small moment. The locality of 
Arr/i/ini/x /i//>po/</fft is not given. Figures 14 and 15, on plate -!<;. 
represent as male and female two widely different species. Figure 
39, on plate 47, is not t>ocfr/tt>nf(is. but the normal female of Prim. 
Zdbiilon. Ptate 47, fig 40 i< not hrHtus but /ilii/ln'itx. Plate 48, fig. 
15 is not TlmiHinx hm-nHns ^ but the 9 of a different species. 
We think as a, book for the tyro the time of seasonal appear- 
ance of the species should have been given. The author has 
slighted his descriptions on account of the perfection of the plates. 
but where sexes differ and under sides are not shown more descrip- 
tive matter would have been an advantage. If the specimens had 
been properly and symmetrically expanded, they would have looked 
much better to the eyeof the lepidopterist. Our space is too limited 
to say more of this be intiful book. We hope it will tim! a place in 
every library. II. s. 

THE Hl-TTKKI I.I K-. 

Afli'i Coftpei'. Pom la Coinoinir ' 
At sixteen years she kne\\ no care : 

I low eoiild she, sweet and pure as li^ht ? 
And there pursued her every where 

Kuttertlies all white. 

A lover looked. She dropped her exes. 

That plowed like pansies wet with dew. 
And lo ! I here eanie lYoin out the skies 

Itllttertlies all Mile. 

lie fore she guessed, her heart was ^one ; 

The tale of lo\ e was swift ly told. 
And all about her wheeled and shone 

Uultertlies of i;old. 

Then he forsook her one sad morn. 

She wept and sol.bed. " ( I. love, come hiick." 
There only eame to her forlorn 

Hllttertliesall lilaek. .loH.v DAVISON. 



20 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [January 

DOINGS OF SOCIETIES. 

At the November meeting of the Feldman Collecting Social, 
held at the residence of Mr. H. W. Wenzel, 1523 South 13th 
street, eleven members were present. On behalf of Mr. Lau- 
rent, Mr. Wenzel exhibited a collection of Lepidoptera made by 
himself and Mr. E. Weuzel at North Mountain, Pa., in July, 
calling- particular attention to En<h-oj>iu xcrrata, which had 
been taken abundantly; also to I'/UHHI <r/vwVr.v and P.u-aureum, 
which were probably not before recorded from Pennsylvania. 
Among the unidentified material Dr. Skinner called attention 
to a specimen of the rare Plusia formosa. 

Mr. H. Weuzel reported the capture of Cufmonid liloririna 
and other interesting species of Coleoptera, in New Jersey, on 
October 12th. The same speaker referred to the forthcoming 
new edition of Smith's Catalogue of the Insects of New Jersey, 
and to the diversity of opinion of authorities as to the abun- 
dance or rarity of certain species in the old work, and suggested 
the advisability of having more consistent data in the new 
work. Discussed bv Messrs. Johnson, Bland, Fox, H. Weuzel 

/ 

and Castle. Mr. Johnson spoke of the extension of the Caro- 
linian fauna into New Jersey. He had collected ninety-seven 
species of Syrphids: in that State, of which only ten were 
Southern species; of the Tachiuida? ninety-six species, of which 
twenty-seven may be said to lie Southern. Five out of forty- 
eight species of Tabanida- had not been recorded from so far 
north, while out of thirty-four species of Bombylidee only six 
are Southern. He did not think the Diptera formed as good a 
basis for indicating faunal limits as did the ( Weoptera or some 
of the other orders of insects. Mr. H. Wenzel exhibited a 
species of /,/.*//*, from Anglesea, N. J., taken in August, which 
he had only before known from Louisiana. The absence of 
Maniix <-<n-<>tin<i from the fauna of Southern New Jersey was 
commented on by Mr. Seiss. Dr. Castle stated he had re- 
ceived specimens of the Monti* from Chester county, l*a. 

WM. J. Fox. Secretary. 

A meeting of the Entomological Section of the Academy of 
Natural Sciences was held November 17th, Mr. C. S. Welles. 
Director, presiding. Dr. Calvert stated that he had recently 
mounted some specimens of the San Jose scale ( .lt<ifiiliotnx JUT- 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 21 



), and presented them for exaiiiinat ion. He said the 
specimens fairly represented the figures in the current literature 
<ni the subject. The specimens had been boiled in a solution 
of caustic potash, which had removed all but the chitin. 
Twigs of apple, showing the scale in position, \\ere also shown, 
as well as those of Chionaspis furfur us. Dr. Skinner exhibited 
a living specimen of lidixitni fm-<t. and also two species of 
En'hio from Northern Alaska. The latter were in poor condi- 
tion and looked much alike, but, on careful examination, 
differences were marked, the species being E. >-oxxii and E. 
var. iiiiniriiiux. The former seldom has but two ocelli and the 
latter three or four. Maud mix also has a small white spot on 
the middle of the edge of the baud which crosses the centre 
of the under side of the inferiors. Mr. Liebeck exhibited an 
interesting conglomerate cocoon of C(ri1o<inii ci/nt/iia. Three 
well-made cocoons were enclosed in a bag of silk, the whole 
1< >okiug like one large pear-shaped cocoon. Dr. Skinner exhib- 
ited his new Synonymic Catalogue of American Rhopolocera. 
The body of the catalogue, exclusive of the index, bibliography, 
list of authors, etc., consists of ninety-nine pages. There are 
45 species listed, and each reference is a separate line, thus 
greatly helping the eye. Where a species is found outside of 
our faunal limit the distribution is given. A few species 
listed as valid in former lists have been placed in the synon- 
ymy, but only in cases where it seemed well warranted. It is 
hoped the catalogue may prove useful. 

Mr. Lancaster Thomas exhibited a female specimen of (jri> 
to connmi, captured at Cranberry, X. C., which was very dark 
on the under side. He had taken two specimens, one no\\ 
being in the collection of Dr. Skinner. He also mentioned 
seeing ('(t/lidri/dx ctilmlc Hying in one direct ion, a specimen 
passing every five or ten minutes. He also saw .hnnnini <<, ,/iii. 
living South, in the same way. in pairs. In both cases the 
butterflies were going against the wind. .Mr. Johnson said he 
had seen /'/Vr/.s- iiioiutxtr in immense numbers at St. Augustine. 
Fla., going Xorth, for three days. Same speaker had seen 
Agraulis vanilloe, going South, in Florida, in September, when 
the passion-vine, their food plant, further North, was wither 
ing, but in Florida was still fresh. 

HKXKY SKINNKU, M. I)., Recorder. 



22 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [January 

A regular meeting was held by the Newark Entomological 
Society at Turn Hall, Sunday, December llth, at 4 p. rn., 
with President Scleckser in the chair and the following mem- 
bers present : Messrs. Augiemau, Kircher, Broadwell, Seille, 
Herpers, Bischoff, Kemp, Bunso\\ , Weidt, Buchholz and 
Prof. John B. Smith. 

The genus Datan-a was selected for study and identification 
for the following meeting. 

Mr. Kemp gave a list of captures made in one locality, at 
Clementon, N". J., for three successive seasons, as follows : 
May 10, 189(>, Pamjthihi metea $ was abundant; 9 not so 
plentiful. Specimens were fresh. Syneda graphica, none seen. 
Ei>in-(i)tthi# ohfininirin, none seen. May 9, 1897, I\ wclra ^ 
abundant; v more scarce than the preceding year. ft. f/i-(ij>h- 
ica very abundant ; mostly in fresh condition. E. obfirnwri, 
none seen. May 10, 1898, P. metea, one ^ taken ; ti.graphica, 
none seen; E. obfinmtrin, abundant and in good condition, 
but difficult to capture on account of their keeping so close to 
the underbrush. 

Mr. Weidt remarked that an early spring one season and a 
late one the following would make a difference of two or three 
weeks in the appearance of certain broods of insects. 

Mr. Kemp mentioned that he found Cuirimlela <-<nuu'nt<i.nt' 
moderately abundant on very warm days all through Septem- 
ber, in 1897, at Atco, N". J. 

Mr. Weidt remarked that he noticed ants preying on young 
larva of Rphin.r liixcitioxtt, and he added that he seldom found 
eggs on bushes that were infested with ants. 

The following officers were elected : 

President, Edward Bischoff. 

Vice President, S. T. Kemp. 

Treasurer, Simon Seib (re-elected). 

Secretary, A. J. Weidt (re-elected). 

Librarian, John Augelmau (re-elected). 

Mr. Bischoff and Mr. Weidt volunteered to act as curators 
for Coleoptera and Lepidoptera, respectively, for the follow 
ing yea i 1 . A. J. WEIDT, Secretary. 



KNT XKVVS, Vol 10 



PI II 




UiffiTcnt forms of burrows of the Cast.U- lnuldiHK Spider. 

a occupied iiy I'uM IM i.rs MAKGINATL'S. Original. 

From nature by the author. 



ENTOMOLOGICflL NEWS 



AND 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICflL SECTION 



ACADK.MY Hi' NATURAL si [KM Ks, PII I LA I 'KLI'I I I \. 



VOL. X. 



FKIUM'ARY, IS! Ml. 



Xo. 2. 



CONTENTS: 



Hancock The Cast Le-building Spider 23 
Kincaid The I'svHiodida- of bhe 

Pacific Coast :n 

Baker On Two Nr\v ;-iid <inc I'iv- 

viously Known l-'li ;i -7 

Brunei 1 A New ( 'mion-ph.' In- :!* 

Lovell Physiological Species .\-.'i;i :;;i 



Kditorial , . 

Notrs and News J- 

Kntoinolo<_:iral Litrrat lire I" 

I lohr-lS of Surirtir* -M 

Wa i> . - a n Engineer fi - 

i 



THE CASTLE-BUILDING SPIDER, 

r,\ Di;. J. L. IF \\COCK. 
ffiixfrulinitN /ii/ I/if .litf/inr. 

The sandy wastes bnrdcrinji-ilic hnvcr end of Lake Michigan. 
in Xorthern Illinois. ;;i-c inluiliitrd \>\ several species of tube- 
constructing spidei-s. Though ;iny one ot the forms occurring 
here would re])a> study, lor Hie present I will consider a spe- 
-ie> which, from the peculiar liahit of build ing a little castle or 
nest at the opening to the lube, makes it of more than ordi 
nary interest. This Lycosid is likely to be taken at first glance 
for the turret spiders L. t/rrnico/n or L. Inrrirn/d, but it is 
quite distinct from either of them. The spider is equally c\ 
pert whether engaged as a carpenter, \\ea\er. mason or digger, 
all of which att ribiiles she brings 1o bear some 1 ime or other 
in making her completed retreat. The female shown in the 
illustration. Fig. 1. is al\\a\s found in the burrows when du.u 
out of the ground, unless some mishap has overtaken her. 

In the Fall oflS!H> I found my wa\ into an uncultivated lot 
where weeds in profusion had unbounded -.\\ -\\ . cenchrus 
being particular!;, in e\ idence. Patches of high grass, sedges 
and ragweeds made I he open lax of ground a paradise of run 
uiug spiders. Here it \\asthe castle- building species seemed 
perfectly at home, shoxviug its \arie(l accom])lishmeuts to best 



24 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[February 



advantage. The artfully hidden castle is not apparent to the 
uninitiated while walking- over the ground, as it is commonly 
secreted in a recess of overhanging dried grasses. Frequent 
visits to several localities added greatly to my observations, 
and, though the greater number were made in the late fall, at 
the suggestion of Mr. Kmertou, some time was spent in June, 
in the following and present year, in anticipation of finding 
them mating. In this I was disappointed and all efforts to 
find the male was fruitless. 




FIG. 1. (a i The Castle-building Spider, ventral view, (b) Same, dorsal surface. 
(c) Female epiginum. Original from nature. 

One of the castles which 1 alluded to above, the first of my 
discoveries, will be described as a means of furnishing a gen- 
eral idea of the kind of nest made, afterwards recurring to the 
subject of castles further on. when considering the tubes 
throughout. When one remembers the average size of the 
adult castle, only five-eights of an inch high, and a little over 
one-half inch in diameter, it is obvious that close inspection is 
quite essential. 

This castle was situated beside a half-buried piece of branch, 
a, site which was chosen often. Around it was growing little 
seedlings and lichens which grew from the superficial deposit 
of vegetable mould, and giving to the surroundings the effect 
of a small garden colored with sienna and green. The nest 
proper was quite round ; fragments of duckweed, bark and 
rootlets, woven together with silk, went to make up nioest of the 
structure, while to one side a dried leaf of ragweed was ;esthet- 
icallv curved around and attached, leaving other bits of leaves 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL XEWS. o;-, 

incorporated into its margin. Two grass leaves were brought 
down iron i a plant near by and festooned lo two sides, the I'm 
ishing touch being a dagger-pointed bur poised on the margin. 
By tlie time several nests were examined I found e\ idence of 
the most whimsical tastes in the selection of material for nests, 
an enumeration of which is here given : 

(ireen and dried grass leaves, dried line sedges, spikes and 
leaves of foxtail grass, fibrous roots, ragweed leaves curved by 
drying, cenchrus or burgrass spikes and burs, wing of beetle. 
\veatlier beaten white paper, piece of brown st ring, twi^s of va 
rious kinds in bits, dark bark, seeds of weeds, bird excrement, 
sand made into pellets, small stones and gravel from soil. 

Exploring the tubes with a straw was not without reward, 
for I found b\ feeling the way down carefully, until meeting 
resistance, the live spider when touched communicates a mo 
tion to the straw sticking above the ground . To learn more of 
the occupant one has but to dig a hole down at Hie side to 
avoid injuring the castle, then making an undercut below ex- 
tending to the tube; follow it down to the bottom where the 
spider rests with its head pointing upwards. The Kail of the 
year finds various si/ed individuals of different ages prepar- 
ing to pass the winter in burrows. Sometimes just within the 
castle a tine screen of silk is woven across I he entrance as an 
obstruction against Hoods or the possible entering of hymenop 
terous enemies, which is again torn awa\ after all danger is 
passed. 

The young, even down lo the smallest, show a wonderful in 
stinct for castle building. This I saw depicted in tin- dainty 
character of many of their works. Activity is expressed on 
every side at thisperiod of the year. Lilt leyellow sand pellets 
encircling the openings told plainly lhat I he spider's year is 
nearing a close. They had a forewarning of the coming win 
ter and sought refuge by deepening their retreats to get safel\ 
below the free/ing line. The love of warmth \\ as exemplilied 
even after the first fall of MIO\\ . for 1 he a p pea ranee of t he \\ a rm 
sun's rays enticed them to come up lo get a last glimpscof the 
sun from the top of the caslle. Krom what I gleaned, old 
spiders live in their burrows for more than a season and often 
remodel them after being injured by storms. The\ hold great 
fondness for their homes and 1 rv resolutel\ lo slick b\ them. 



26 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[February 

going out long enough only to catch insect food . Even this is 
seldom, for much food is taken in at the very 1 hreshokl of the 

7 * 

castle. Younger specimens re-dig outgrown burrows, enlarg- 
ing them as occasion requires. It was interesting to observe 
neighborly beetles and other species of spiders, not to be out- 
done, with one accord churn up the soil by their diggings. 




FIG. '2. A oawtle or nest of tin- < ',: >t Ic-huildiiiy spider. u:>.tur;!l .-i/r. IVmn n:iturc. 

liy I lie author. 

When the vernal spell is changed by lowering temperature, 
quiet creeps upon the scene. I'sually the spider's lube is 
constructed vertically in the ground unless. as is shown in Un- 
reduced plate illustration, obstructions cause some deviation. 
The four different examples here shown \\ereopened from tin- 
side, being careful to preserve their form. A silk lining is put 
on by the spider, which is continuous with the inside of the 



1890] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 07 



castle. In the construction of th- tube damp eartli facilitate* 
working materially, but being c<|ual to the occasion the spider 
can dig a tube in dry sand, requiring extra effort and a 
good deal of ingenuity. The proce** is so simple, however. 
when compared with the complicated mechanism used by one 
contemplating- sinking such a shaft on a large scale that it is 
worthy of special note. In setting out to make the tube she 
proceeds with some slight variation in the following wa\ : 
Standing on tiptoe the spider moves her abdomen around 
almost in a circle between her legs, touching the ground here 
and there with the spinnerettes at the end of the l>ody. The 
silk pouring out catches last in the soil, and in a moment an 
adherent round Mooring of altout ten millimeters across is 
formed. Then she turns about, digging up the little silk mat 
entangled with sand, and in a twinkling has made it into a 
parcel, which is laid to one side. Again she spins out silk over 
the same spot and dexterously lifts up the mass, lays the pel- 
let beside the preceding, until by repetitions she has tempo- 
rarily encircled the newly-made pit with her internal diggings. 
At times she stands head down in the hole and pats down 
the new-formed mouth with her inverted abdomen. Within 
an hour she is down the depth of her body and the hole exca- 
vated sufficiently large to turn around in, but now each parcel 
after being made is snapped from her mandibles with a sudden 
motion of the palpi when up to the entrance. As she pro- 
gresses the tube is lined \\ith silk, often going over the surface 
to prevent any caving in of the earl It. Xow we lind her tak- 
ing a well-earned rest, and not until darkness is fully estab- 
lished does she commence her castle. In vivarium 1 watched 
spiders b\ artificial light under conditions quite natural. 
Coming out of her tube I saw her grasp a prickly sphere of 
burgras.x. and taking it to the burrow she adjusted it to the 
border of the opening. In a few moments *he gathered two 
more of the burs, one at a time placing them to form a partial 
border; the intervening Spaces bel \\een them \\ere tilled with 
sand pellets, which she made and brought up from the inside 
of the tube. Taking this to be the foundation of her future 
castle, I took the opportunity of tr\ing an experiment, that 
is, of furnishing material. The ground, quite bare near her 
tube, was strewn with a selection of short pieces of bleached 



_S ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

grasses, the top of a foxtail grass, which I liatl seen composing 
other nests, beside some weed steins, and three little rolled 
pieces of red. white and bine paper. The spider, which had 
disappeared for a time below the surface, now came to the 
opening, and walking over to one of the grasses she picked it 
up and carried it to the edge, where, letting it go, she turned 
around within the tube and attached it at the middle to the 
entrance with multiple st rands of silk. Another grass stem 
was next taken, which she laid crossing the tirst. on top of the 
half buried, burs. Then her attention was drawn lot he weed 
stems, which in like manner were disposed of and imbedded 
in silken pellets. In their turn then came the red paper, a 
straw and sand bundle, placing them with the same scru- 
pulous neatness. The bit <>f white paper was drawn to the 
side and fastened, and lastly the bine paper found a resting 
spot, all the material which I supplied having been used in 
embellishing the towering castle, which was now nearly an 
inch in height. Referring attain to the plate illustration, o. 
shows a tube which penetrated ten inches of the soil; it was 
finished with a curious castle, having as an ornamentation on 
top two spikes of the bristly foxtail grass. The interior was 
slightly enlarged just within. A slight difference is shown in 
the tube/;, the Avork of a larger spider with somewhat faded 
abdomen. As is often the cast' in old specimens, she had not 
exercised all her latent talents, fora few bits of twigs and a 
dilapidated leaf constituted her castle, scarcely raised above 
the ground. Quite a contrast is presented by the tuber, made 
by a younger individual. Her artistic culture was more 
freely displayed in an excellently built castle, which I have 
drawn as a separate illustration. Fig. 1*. Surprising industry 
is shown in the length of the tube, nearly two feel. As if for 
tilled against invasion the east le was adorned with a spike of 
nine prickly heads of burgrass ; beside t he side of t he passage 
was also placed a cluster of burs almost touching t he cut ranee. 
At the margin a small twig was se! on transversely, serving 
as a little stepping pillar on which the spider chose to climb 
in getting in and out. The tube <l has the middle slightly 
enlarged, showing the ending 1 of what was formerly the Sum 
mei' quarters, while no\\ it is continued down asa Fall or Win- 
ter extension. The spider found in I he bottom of this cellar 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. Oft 

was fully grown, measuring nearly three-quarters of an inch 
in length. Several eastles are sometimes found naturally 
grouped near together, within a radius of twenty feet or there- 
abouts, but the tube last mentioned was isolated in a lonely 
h'eld. The castle presented no special interest and will be 
passed over without further comment. It will be seen that 
the castle builder, unlike the known turret spiders, rarely 
builds the nest in a strictly pentagonal form, as has been fre- 
quently observed ; for instance, in Lycosa arenieola. In the 
gradation between the young and older spiders 1 nests there is 
the widest diversity. Young specimens not infrequently build 
a perfect little tower, almost entirely of stones, and one I have 
in mind had nine such particles made into a compact edifice 
live millimeters high. The masonry was exquisitely put up, 
every stone bearing out true proportions, about the central 
opening of four millimeters diameter. Silk used as cement 
held the whole together securely. 

I once saw a reflection of sombre forebodings when exposing 
an immatu re spider's tube ; the light fell into the palatial cellar 
only to find it changed into a chamber of horrors, for instead 
of the spider a black insect like a nervous villain commenced 
jerking her wings of mourning like one in secret hiding bent 
on some treacherous mission. An orange spot on the upper 
part of her body, together with other markings, told the spe- 
cies, Pompilus marginal us. 

Pompilux is figured in the plate illustration a, and from her 
position the inference may easily be imagined. When teased 
with a straw so her patience is sorely tried, the castle builder 
will stand her ground in self-defense and present as formid- 
able a picture as can be supposed. She instantly responds to 
such threats with open jaws, at the same time raising up the 
two front pairs of legs high in the air. In this attitude she 
favors the conspicuous display of black under the outer three 
joints of the extremities, which in repose is not shown. 

I succeeded in keeping specimens alive several years and 
discovered quite a number of interesting traits during this ac- 
quaintance well worth the care bestowed on them. Reserving 
the technical description for a separate article, 1 may add 
finally that the name Lycosa domifex is given to the species. 
wherebv it may be known hereafter in scientific nomenclature. 



;;o ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

THE PSYCHODIDAE OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

BY THHVOK KIXCAID, I'niversity of Washington. 
Through the kindness of the KY\ . A. E. Eaton, the British 
authority on the Psychodidas tlie writer has been made ac- 
quainted with the classification of the family as accepted by 
European students. In Europe there are live genera, which 
are tabulated by Halliday in the following inaniier: 
(a) "With two simple uervures between the forked vcin.- 

(b) Proboscis compressed, with maxilla 3 ni-arly as lony . 
Wings pointed exactly at the end of the second simple 
vein. I'sticlnxlii. 

( bb) Proboscis with broaO., pointing liplels Maxilla 3 ob- 

solete. Labrum shorter than the labium. 
c Wings broad, ovate, with an upward bellying siuu> in 

the middle in the male. I'lunnikt. 

'\cc) A\'i'g-s even in both sexes. l'< 'i-ii-onm . 

'.an With one simple uarmre b3twec:i (lit- forked vein> 

(b) Hindermost vein not much shorter than the rest. An- 
tenna 1 , with obcooical joint?, 14-jointed. 

Trichomym. 
> bh) Hiuderiiid-t vein al)breviaicd. Antenna 1 , with linear 

joints, 15-joiuted. b'ycoi-f>.>-. 

To these five genera, a sixth. /V/V^o/i*;////*. has l)een added. 
This genus seems to be more or less intermediate between 
Halliday's primary divisions of the family, since Mr. Eaton 
states that it has two simple veins between the forked uer- 
vures, but is otherwise more closely related to Si/cf>r<i.> -and 
Trychomyia. 

Mr. Eaton records forty-one species of PsyrimniP.K tor the 
British Islands, distributed as follows : ('!<ni/i<i i 1 sp. ) ; I^ri 
count ('.\'l sp. i : I'.si/rlHHlit ( (> x|. , : 'l'ric/i<>iin/i \ -p. i ; Si/cdiii.i 
(1 Sp.. 

All of the North American I'svciK l)t i>-i: so far described 
ha\c been placed under the genus I'si/i-hoila. but there is little 
doubt that part of these will be referred to /Vr/Vo//m. 

It is the purpose of the present paper to describe a number 
of new species of PsvciidDiD.i: from various points . .11 the Pa 
cilic coast and to record certain notes in connection with species 
previously described. In the discrimination of I lie species in 
the group very little use has apparently been made of the ven- 
tral plate of the female. The writer belie\ es thai this struc- 
ture is of great importance in this connection. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS 31 

Psychoda oacifica Kinciid. Ent. Xew>, VIII. 6. 

This species, originally described from Sei tile, seems to ran^e 
along- tbe whole Pacific coast. -in<-e rcpn-e;it -itives have been ex- 
amined from Alaska, Oregon, eastern Washington and California, 
which, although varying in -ome respects from the type speci- 
mens, seem to lie specifically tin- same. Tin- Alaska specimens were 
secured by the writer during the summer of isjts at Sitka. Unala-ka 
and the Pribilof Islands in Bering Sea. The variety found upon 
the Pribi lot's di tiers considerably trom the type form. They are ou 
the average much smaller than the la Her: the antenna?, are 14- 
jointed, owing to the absence of one of the small terminal articles, 
and the inferior appendages of the male ^enit'.ilia are much more 
trongly curved towards the tip. The Vnalaskan and Sitkau ex- 
amples resemble the types quite closely, about the only difference 
being that the wings are more acutely pointed than is usual in the 
latter. The Oregon specimens were taken at Corval Its, Oregon, 
during tlic month of June, 1898, while the California!) example- 
were included in a collect KM: of Psychodid; - >c:it to the writer 
through the courtesy of Mr. R. lv Sr,odirr:is> from the Leland 
Stanford Junior University. From Pn>t'e--<,r Charles V. Piper, of 
the Washington Agricultural College, four specimens of P.pa- 
cfftca were recently obtained, which were colic -led at Pullman. 
Washington, the specimens being dated from July 12 to July 27, 
1898. 
Psychoda oiympia Kincaid. Ent. Xews, VIII. ( : . 

This isa Pencomn. The posterior bifurcation is much nearerthe 
base of the wing than is the anterior one: thcwinir i- ])oinicd ex- 
actly at the tip of the tirst simple vein. 
Psychoda sigma, n. sp. 

? Body yellowish white, clothed with creaip- colored hair; wings 
ovate, apex obtusely rounded, more than t \vioe as long as broad, 
clothed with rrram-rolored hair upon the veins, except an indis- 
tinct S-ximped band of black across the middle; fringe quite dense 
and Jong, cream -colored, except t wo pa \c\\c- of black at the anterior 
and posterior tarminations of the s-shapcd dU;-al band: length .f 
wing '2.5 mil). Legs yellowish white, clothe. 1 wit h cn-im-colorc 1 
hair and scales. Aiileniin- longer than the width of the wing. 1 I 
jointed, with verticillatc whorls of cream colored hair upon the 
nodes; joints 1-2 small, closely united ; joint- ;;-]:; globular, -epa- 
rated by slender pedicles ; joint 14 minute. Ventral plate yellow- 
ish, very narrow at ba^e, broadening toward^ the apex, which i.- 
prodaced in two divergent lobe-: o-.ipo-itor yellow. >hort. almo-t 
straight. 

Sun Her than , with t he bl irk band upon the wing- lerlearl\ 
evident. (Jenitalia conspicuous, brown, clothed with long crcam- 
colored hair. Inferior apiiendagc^ ::-jointcd : joint 1 stout, cyliu 
dvical ; joint 2 twice as long as 1. -lender. -lighi iy swollen ::t la>c. 
curving upw inl- : joint :: very slender, cylindri il t-ipering at ape\. 






32 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

Superior appendages Dot MS long a- basal joint of inferior ; ~2 jointed : 
joint 1 slior* ; joint 2 tapering to an acute point. 

Habitat: Olympia, Washington. June 24toJul\ !. ls<>7. 
Many specimens were colleeted on a wall shaded by hop 
vines. 
Psycho 'a schizura, n sp. 

+ Body whitish, clothed with griy hair on the thorax and silver}' 
white on the abdomen. Legs whitish, becoming darker basilh. 
clothed with white hairs and scale?. Wing a little more than twice 
as long as broad, rather acutely pointed at the apex : hair upon the 
veins white and black, distributed in alternate patches, so a.s to give 
the surface of the wings a mottled appearance ; well marked patches 
of black at the apices of the veins : fringe on posterior margin gray : 
length of wing 2.7 mm. Antenna' not as long as the width of wing. 
15 jointed; basal joints not ranch larger than succeeding ones; 
joints 3 15 globular, separated by slender pedicles, whih are about 
as long as the length of the nodes, each joint bearing a vertieillate 
tuft of white hair. Ventral plate V shaped ; ovipositor short. 

<$ S.ualler than V- Inferior appendages extremely long, 3-jointcd 
joint 1 stout, cylindrical ; joint 2 almost twice as long as 1, enlarged 
at the base and tapering to the apex; joints minute, clavate. Su- 
perior appendages as long as first joint of inferior, two jointed, 
tapering to an acute point. 

Habitat: Seattle. Wash.. August l.S to September !. IStts. 
On windows. 
Pericoma tridactila, n. sp. 

Body light brown, densely clothed with gray hah-. Wing- 
ovate, one and one half times as long as broad, apex moderately 
acute, clothed over the whole surface with gray hair, except an 
irregular baud of white across the middle: fringe with basal third 
gray, remainder white, as long as the width of three cells: length 
of wing 2.5 ir.m. Legs light brown, clothed with gray hair and 
scales. Atteuna? as long as the width of the wing, li;- ointed. with 
dense whorls of gray hair upon the nodes; joint 1-2 nol larger than 
succeeding joints ; joints3 15 globular, separated by -lender pedicle-. 
which are slightly longer than the leusrth of the node* : joints l-l-l i; 
minutely, closely apposed. Ventral plate longer than br>>ad. >idc- 
not emarginate, narrowing strongly to\\ ir,l> the apex, whirh is 
bilobate. 

rf Geuitalia conspicuous, clothed with gray hail's Inferior ap- 
pendages elongate, 2-jointeJ ; b vsil j >intssh>;il, cyliii.lric il. i'n-e I in 
the median line; second joint as long as first, straight, cylindrical, 
tapering to a rounded apex, and bearing at the tip thre:- divergent, 
slender clavate processes, which are almo-l as loni: a> the s.-eond 
joint itself Superior appendages half as longa* inferior, 2-jointed : 
joint 1 cylindrical, stout ; joint 2 as long a- first, slender, tapering 
to an acute point. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 33 

Habitat : Seattle. Washington. March 1'i.to June !.">. IS'.IS. 
raptured on a basement window. 

In this species the bifnreat ions of 1 he veins are so obscureh 
indicated that it was difficult to place pMierieallv : the ante 
rior bil'nrcatioii is very close to the apex of the \vin<; and the 
posterior one quite close to the base. The win^s are folded 
rool'-like in repose. 
Pericoma sitchana, n. sp. 

Body black, clothed with <:T,IV luiir. Le^> lilack, clotlicd with 
"ray hair and scales. W in.u-> o\ 'ate. broadly rounded at the tip. the 
tirst simple nervnre terminating just before the a]>ex : bifurcation- 
c(|iiidistant t'roin the luse of the wiiiir: hair upon the veins mixed 
lilack and -white, the black beinjr most proiionuced at the apice- 
of the veins and at the hifmvat ions ; lei-.irth of winir -2.:> mm.: fringe 
irny. with a patch of white at the apex. Antennas one-half as long 
a* the width of the wing. ](i-joii;ted : joint 1 cylindrical : joint _' 
lav^c. "'lobular: joints .VKi globular, separated l>> vci-y ,-hort jtedi 
eels, the nodes sparsely clothed with <ray hair, (ientalia not con- 
-picnous, black, clothed with Tay liair. 

Habitat : Sitka. Alask;;. July 1L'. 1S'.7. 

Pericoma triloba, n. >p. 

IJod\ brown, densely clothel with jrray hair. \Vin^ hroadly 
ovate, not <|iiite twice as lonj>- as broad, ape x di-tinctiy pointed, es 
actlyat end of tirst simple nervure. clothe. 1 with yray hair upon 
the v..'in.>: fringe dark i- ray : length of Avinii' :> mm.: posterior bifur- 
cation much nearer the h:i-e of the win.ir th.in the anterior one. 
I. en- In-own, clothed \\ ith :ray hair and scales. Antenna' one-halt' 
a> lony as the widtli ot the \\iiir. not much longer than tin- maxil- 
lary palpi: 17-iointed: joint I moderately lar.u'e: joint Jexiremcly 
lar<i'e. su!)i'loliose toward- apex, ch.thed with scattered M'horN of 
loiiji- i"iy hair: joint 17 minute. Ventral plate hroad at ha>c 
rmar-i-inatc laterally ant' termiiiatiii"' in three di-tinct lobes: ovi- 
positor yellow, -liirhtly curve 1. 

(ientalia incon-picuon.-. \ cry hairy. h.ferior appenda.iio _' 
jointed : joint 1 lai-.ii'e and stout: joint _' -hoi-t. cylindrical, curving 
towards the apex, which i- hroadly and obliquely truncate. Supe- 
rior appendages l-jointed. <hort. -traiyht. taperiim' from the ba-e to 
an acute point. 

Habitat : Seattle. Washington. Numerous s|)ecimens \\ere 
secured in a railroad culvert situated on the campus of the 
university. March I '_' to ,1 line 1. 1S!>S. 
Pericoma variegata. n >p. 

Body bhi''k. clothed \\ilh white hair, excepi a -mill patch of 
black hair near the ba.-e ot the win^. Le:>> black, clot lied with 
black and white hair. AVin^s rather acutely rounded at the tip. 
more than twice a? long as broad: hair upon the veins deep black. 



34 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

except u pon a broad transverse band near the base and au outwardly 
curved row of small patches just beyond the middle, which are 
white; fringe both on anterior and posterior margin, with alter- 
nate patches of white and black hair; length of wing 2.S mm. An- 
tennae black, as- long as the width of the wing, 17-joiuts; joints 1-3 
.stout, cylindrical, densely hairy; joints 4-17 small, fusiform, thinly 
clothed with long white hair. Ventral plate brown, s'.iallowly 
emarginate at apex: ovipositor brown, rather long, almost straight. 

Habitat: Seattle, Wash. Swept from bushes May 8, 1898. 
Pericoma bipunctata, n sp 

9 Body brown, clothed with white bair. Legs brown, clothed 
with white hair, some of the latter being long Wings broadly 
rounded at the tip, about twice as long as broad, clotheJ upon the 
veins with white and black Iriir. the black most pronounced at the 
apices of the veins and upon the bifurcations, the white most evi- 
dent near the base and towards the apex, where there are small, ir- 
regular patches of this color; fringe black, except a spot extending 
from the apex of the third longitudinal vein to the end of the 
seventh and a small patch between the eighth and ninth vein, which 
are white; bifurcations equidistant from the bass of the wing; 17- 
joiuted ; joint 1 rather large, cylindrical ; joint 2 broader taanl. 
globular ; joints 3-17 fusiform, clothed with scattered w r hite hairs; 
joints 3-4 bear dorsally a row of strong erect black setas. Ventral 
plate squarely produced, slightly emarginate at apex. 

$ Gentalia conspicuous, black, clothed with white hair. 

Habitat: Seattle, Wash. (U); Santa Cruz Mountains, Gal- 
(1J; 1?); from the collection of Lelaucl Stanford Junior 
University. 
Pericoma furcata, n. sp. 

9 Body brown, clothed with white hair, among which a few 
black hairs are scattered. Wing twice as long a? broad, narrowly 
rounded at the apex, which is pointed between the simple veins; 
vieus clothed with black and white hairs as follows: Two curved 
rows of prominent black tufts across the middle of the wing, be- 
tween which the hair is principally white: the area betv/een tho 
outer row of black tufts and the apex of the wing principally with 
black hair 1 area between the inner row of black tufts and base of 
wing, with mixed black and white hair : friuge black, with white 
tufts at apices of all the veins; bifurcations equidistant from the 
base of the wing: length of wing 2.8 mm. Auieun;r a~ long as the 
width of the wing, 16-jointed; joints 1-2 >liirhtly larger than the 
succeeding ones; joints 3-1G swollen at base and be'iring loo>e tul't- 
of black hair. Legs with alternate annulations of black and white 
hair. Ventral plate dilated basal ly, a ml strongly produced in the 
middle, the production bilolie:! and angularly emarginate at apex: 
ovipositor moderately long, almost straight . 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. ;{.-, 

Habitat: Pullman, Wash. Collected by Mr. R. \V. Doane. 
of the Washington Agricultural College, 

Pericoma trunca'a, n. sp. 

9 Body brown, densely clothed with mixed white and dark- 
brown hair. Wings ovate, broadly rounded at the tip, not quite 
twice as long as broad ; hair upon the veins principally dark brown, 
with a rather large patch of white ueir the middle of the wiug and 
its ape:: fringe dirk brown, on posterior margin as long as the 
width of three cells and with small patches of white hair alternating 
with the brown in It- at the apices of the veins; bifurcations of the 
veins equidistant from the base of the wing ; length of wiug 4 mm. 
Legs brown, clothed with brown hair and scales, interspersed with 
a few longer white hairs. Antennae black, not quite as long as the 
wid f h of the wing, 17-joiuted ; joint 1 rather large, cylindrical ; 
joint -2 large, globose ; joints 3-1G fusiform, covered with scattered 
hairs; joint 17 minute; ventral plate longer than broad, broadly 
truncate at the apex : ovipositor yellow, long and slender, strongly 
cur veil. 

Habitat : Palo Alto, Cal. From the collection of the Leland 
Stanford Junior University. Collected by Mr. E. E. Snod- 
grass. 
Sycorax lanceolata, n. sp. 

Body brown, clothed with brown hair, which appears black in 

some lights. Wings extremely narrow, four times as long as broad, 

apex sharply acuminate and pointed exactly at the tip of the single 

simple nervure; anterior and posterior bifuiv it ion- di-taut from 

the l'i-e of the wing, respectively, two-thirds and one-third the 

wing's length ; veins unevenly clothed with brown Ir.iir, similar to 

that upon the body ; fringe very he ivy. colored similarly to the hair 

upon 1 he veins, on the posterior margin somewhat shorter : length 

of \\ing - nun. Leg- brown, clothed with bro\\ n hair, except on 

the basil joints ol' all the tarsi, which are covered with white hair 

Antenii -hoi I. -tout, about three- fourths as loiiir a- the width of 

the winn'. 15-jointed; joint 1 cylindrical ; joint 2 globose, larger 

than succeed inn- joint-- joint- :'-15 linear and sparsely clothed with 

brown hair. Yentr.il plate elongate, broad at the base, and nar- 

vowe I towards the apex, which is bilobed and linearly emar^inate. 

Habitai: Palo Alto, Cal. August 3, 1898. ( >ne specimen : 

S;;ii1a Crux Mnuulains. August !>, IS'.)."). Three spccininis : 
colh-ctimi :i|' l he 1, eland Stanford .Junior l"ni\ ci^it \ . A I mot a. 
\Y;;-h. Ten specimens, collected by Mr. H. W . Doane. of tlie 
\\'ashing1<)ii Agricultural College. 

This inlen-sl ing species belongs lo Ilallida\ '> -x-cond di\ ision 
of the Psychodida?, containing genera with a single simple 















10 




II 





nil-: I'svciioDiD.i-: <>K TIU: I-ACIKIC COAST. 



ISD1IJ ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. ;{; 

vein between the forked nervures, and since it agrees in every 
essenli:il generic character with Sycorax it has been referred 

to that .uToup, although ;i comparison with the European mate 
rial max necessitate the erection of a ne\\ "'enns for its reci-p 
tion. 

i:\IM. A! NATION (! I'l.ATK. 
1-11. Ventral plate of I'syeliodidie. < .1 . ) 

l, II. SJ). (2.) J'rriro/nil tri<l<tcli/l<t, ll.sp. (3.) 

<>!t/iiijti(i Kinc. (4.) /'i/<-//o</ii jx/d/ifii Kinc. (.">.) rx>/rliinln 
flrf/iiiis Kinc. i(J.) /'crn'oiiiii lri!o/><t, n. sp. (7.) r<rt<'<nn 
rtiricf/d/n, n.sp. (S.) I'n-iroiiHt hifni iiclohi , ll.sp. i <). ) I'rri 
/ir.in-d. n.sp. (10.) I'n'lronnt fntitcn/ti, n.sp. ill.) 
!ticrn!<il<t. n.sp. Fij>'. ( 12.) Win.ii' of tit/rord.r /tnn-'n 
Inln. denuded of hair to show venation. ('KVi Ventral plate of 
I't'riroiiiii 1'iirciilti. ]). sp. 

o 

ON TWO NEW AND ONE PREVIOUSLY KNOWN FLEA, 

BY < 1 . V. B.\KI-:I{, Auburn. Ala. 

I'nlc.i- /loiriinlii Baker. In the ^I'oup wliieh inelndes tlli^ 
liea and faxr'uiliix and its allies, tlie males determine the s|c 
eies. 1'or this reason iricklninii and //iJ/rfri are not \\cll 
founded. 'Fhey were separated on characters whose valin^ 
could not have been correctly estimated at the time. The\ 
sliould be reduced to synonyms of lioin/rilii . 
Pulex irritans, var dugesii, n. var. 

Dr. DUI^T- In- -ni! MM- a tloa taken on Spertnophihl-S nnn-roarus 
at (Ju ma .iialo. Me\-.. n h'n-li agrees very closely in its character* 
with /'. irritans, Ini! is vi nailer, pal ei and! he le^-s are more > lender. 
I n 1 hc-e ji'irl iciilar- it aiijiroaclie- /inH/<li:s. but the male cla-per> arc 
I a r-e and half oval, and the mandibles about ct|iii! the torecdx.-e. 
Named for its discoverer, who Ins feen diligently investigating 
the .Mr \ii-:i n Si|>ln>irij>!rr,i for many ye:ir>. 

Hystrichopsylla americana. n -i). 



',;._:, nun. A typical Hystrichopsylla. &\\o. i- lovely iv- 
<>!> I !!!<;<< i,.<. Color dee] i che-l i.ut l.rown. I lead not an^n- 
l-itcil in Iron! almve. luit evenly roundi-l troai (M-ripiit to month. 
! I !:!(! ron di not perpendicular, as in <ibfn>ii<-c/>x. I nit. ou lowi-r margin 
of head, and consisting of ft.nrieci: spb;e> on cai-h -\(\c. 1'mnotal 

coml) of alniiit iifly >ma 1 1 . -.lender, t 'lose-set teeth. First aluioinina 1 
segment only with a comb of about forty teeih. Abdomen \tr\ 
heavily bristle. I. as in o/,//>.v/V<yw Seventh dor- d Moment witli ten 



3$ ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

large, very long, black spines on posterior border, which surpass 
apex of abdomen. Bristles on joint 2 of antennae exceeding joint 3 
in length. All tibiae heavily armed on posterior margins with very 
numerous, long, stout, black spines. Tarsi slender: proportional 
lengths of tarsal joints as iu o/////.w'<v//.v. The posterior apical spines 
on hind tibiae and first and second joints of hind tarsi are in each 
case longer than the succeeding joint. 

Described from u single female received from Prof. F. L. 
Harvey and taken on .Vt'otomi/x at Orono, Me. The specimen 
may not be quire mature. 

I have seen a flea from lluplodon of remarkable structure 
and great size, which may ha\e been an Hystrichopsylla, The 
single specimen which came into my hands \vas destroyed by 
an accident in the laboratory. 

The occurrence of this peculiar genus in America is a matter 
of the greatest interest. The fact of its coming from an animal 
that has lived beside walks trodden by our entomologists for 
many years shows how the Siphonaptera have been neglected, 
and indicates the fertility o I' a Held easily worked. An op- 
portunity for a piece of splendid work is open to collectors of 
mammals and those interested in hunting. Such persons 
could easily do more than any others towards building up our 
knowledge of the Siphonaptera of America, and that b\ 
simply saving what actually passes tli rough their hands. The 
only apparatus needed is small vials of alcohol and tweezers. 
It should be borne in mind that all species should be col 
lected in !)</<' series, and everything must be carefully labeled. 

o 

A NEW CONOCLPHALUS. 

I>y LANVKKNCK I>i;rM:i;. 

Conocephalus aUanticus n. sp. 

Grass green, very rarely flecked with dusky spots, moderately 
slender, with rather short wings and long ovipositor. 

Fastigium oithe vertex short, a trifle longer than bioad. rounded 
in front and furnished below with a blunt tooth at base. It i,- hor 
dered above at sides and in front by a yellowish line, below Avhicli 
it is more or less heavily marked in iron! by a transverse line of 
black. Prcnotum usually with lateral cnrin:;- yellowish, the disk 
flattened, quite coarsely punctate and granulate; the lateral lol.<- 
with anterior and posterior angles rounded. Tegmiua extending 
beyond the apex of the hind femora from one-fi ft h to one-third 
their length, their tips acuminateh rounded. Femora of front and 
middle legs below with 0-3 spines, those of hidd legs with spines 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 39 

on both sides. Tibia; of all more or less infu-cnted. Ovipositor 
rather long and slender, as long or longer than the body, a little 
curved near the base. Antenna- rufous, becoming inl'iiscatnl api- 
cal ly. 

Length of body, male, -21--21 mm., female, iii-is mm.: of fasli- 
gium, male, 1.4mm.. female. l.G mm.: of prouotnin, male. 1:1 mrn.. 
female, G.7-7 mm.; of tegmina, male. :!;J mm., female, :>S-;;G mm.; of 
hind femora, male. 19 mm., female. 19-21 mm.: of oyipositoi, :!-..") 
31 mm. 

HABITAT. Xew ,lerse\, Philadelphia neck, Pa. (,!. B. 
Smith); Maryland, Virginia (Bruner) ; Virginia (Pergaude). 

This insect approaches the C.yhH<it<- Ifedtenbacher in the 
length of its ovipositor ami wings, but differs from it in other 
respects. It is too small for ('. iUxximHix Sen. and has to 
short hind legs to be placed with C. retustis Sciidder. while C. 
obtusus Buruieister seems to beau insect with a much shorter 
ovipositor. Described from 14 specimens. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL SPECIES AGAIN. 

JOHN H. LOVELL, Walcloboro, Maine. 

In an editorial in THK X i:\vs for November, 1S97, the editor 
tells of a strange tune sung (?) lv a Cicada along the ,Jerse\ 
shore, and raises the query : " Is there such a thing as ph\si 
ological species .'" In the December number Pi'of. ( 'ockerell 
expresses his belief in such species and advises naturalists to 
be mi the watch for them, while in the succeeding issue Mr. 
RobertsMii asks why the term physiological species i^ used and 
re<|uests examples. 

Let us broaden the question to include all animal and plant 
life, and ask: a Do systemat isls eyer constitute species on 
physiological characters alone. 1 ' Cliques) ionably they do 
and numerous instances can readil\ be gi\ en. Pro!'. Karlow. 
than \vhom we can have no betteraut horit y. sa\s in his recent 
article on " The Conception ol' Species": ct \\'e cannot fail to 
not ice 1 he increasing tendency aniMiig cr\ ploganiic botanists to 
give more and more weight to physiological characters in lim- 
iting their species." ( >ne who takes up the recent deserip 
li\ e works on I' redinacea- is surprised to see the number of 
species which depend on physiological characters." "The 
tendency to split up species on physiological grounds become-- 
more and more marked." "The explanation is to be sought 
in the fact that descriptive botany in certain groups of plants 



;<) ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

has reached a point where the ordinary morphological charac- 
ters no longer suffice to classify what we know or wish to know 
about the plants themseKes." -i \Ve also feel warranted in 
believing that hereafter physiological characters will assume 
even a "'renter importance than at present in the character!/ 
ation of species." 

Anyone who is familiar with the systematic literature of 
botany knows how difficult it is to distinguish species even 
among the higher forms of plants on morphological grounds 
alone. The varieties of one botanist are apt to become the 
species of anot her : while both species and genera are trans 
ferred back and forth in a most astonishing manner. Dr. 
Gray once expressed theopinion that not more than one-third 
of the described species of oak were valid, and in one of his 
letters writes that the asters threatened to reduce him to 
blank despair. A well known authority in reviewing a recent 
work on grasses declares that six or eight good and valid spe- 
cies have been compressed into a single polymorphous one. 
The fact is that if minute differences were to be noted ever\ 
plant would represent a species. Something like this seems 
really to have happened in the case of the genus Sphagnum in 
regard to which a European bryologist remarks. SH 
u Tot sped mina, <ii>l 



o 



01; Hvromsc orni >? It turns out that 
A>lmi., ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, October, 1893. is identic:) I with 
Hypomtscophus, Ck\\./Ann. Ma.tr. X:i(. Hist., October, 1898. Dr. 
Skinner cannot find out just w'.en the October ENTOMOI.IM.I. \i 
NEWS appeared, but 1 e >tates that it "is usually m-iilcd on or before 
t he last day of each month." Mc.-^rs. Taylor and KIMIUM^ inform 
me that the October Annals and Mnir. of Xat. Hist, wa* issued to the 
pulilic on September :ol li. at s.:{: i. in., which would be about ..;{( 
a. m. in I'biladeljibia. Such are the facts, and they leave us -.till in 
uncertainty. Unless more light is forthcoming, 1 am inclined to 
favor the use of M>'>-(>i>lif>ii<x. as A.shmead desci'ibed three specie- 
under it, while my Tfypomiscophits was based on a single species. 

T. D. A. COCKERELL. ' 

P. S. Mr. Aslimeid kindly informs m;- that his copy of KNTOMO- 
LOGIGAL NEWS COUtLining Mixcniihfiuts w;i- reeei\-ed onthe mom 
ing of the first of the month, and he re:id it at the l>ivikta>t table. 
Lt must therefore li:i\c been mailed on September 30th, and owing 
to the diilerence of longitude, the London publication has priority 
of several hours. T. D. A. < '. 



1S1>>] 41 

ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

I he < 'dud iictors of KNTO.MOI.O(;IC \ i, \ i:\vs -olieit ;i ml will t hank full. viveei \ e 
iteiii^ of news liki-ly to interest its readers from any source. The author's name 
will be given in each case, for the Information of cataloguers and iiihii<r.:raph- 
ers. | 

To Contributors All contributions will he considered and parsed upon at 
our earliest convenience, and, as far as may he-, will he published according to 
date of reception. ENTOMOLOGICAL Nl-:ws has readied a cii'cnlat ion. hot li in 
nunihers and circumference, as to make it necessary to put "copy" into the 
hands of the printer for each numher three weeks hefore date of issue. Thi> 
should he remembered in sendinir special 01- important mattei- Tor a certain 
issue. Twenty-five "extras." wit hout change in form, will be given free, when 
they are Wanted; and this should he so stated on the MS., alomi \\ it h t he num- 
her desired. Tin- receipt of all paper's will be acknowledged. Ki>. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., FKBKl'ARY, 1SU9. ' 



SoMKtime a.u'o an appeal tor assistance to advance the in- 
terests of entomology \\ as asked from a very wealthy woman 
in (bis city, and sncb assistance declined, on tbe ground thai 
sbe bad never wavered from a dislike to amateur collec- 
tions of insects immolated on pins and whose loii"- su fieri ni: 
no one could reali/e." Xow this all raises tbe question as to 
whetber tbe lady is correct in ber ideas on tbe subject. Iv :-n 
it' entomologists did immolate live insects on pins, it is probable 
I hat tbey would not sutler pain, but as a matter of fact tbe\ 
are killed before beinj;- ])inned. as otherwise tbey would be 
ruined as specimens. \\"hile insects do bave sensory ner\ e-. 
they are probably by no means as well developed as the motor 
nerves, which are essential in such active creatures. In the 
bibber orders of animals and those which brini;' forth fe\\ 
you !!<>, pain is necessary to protect life, and tbe loss of this 
protection in insects is compensated for by fecundity. There 
are also direct experiments to prove that insects do not suffer 
pain. It is said that a dragon -lly will eat from the end of its 
abdomen ;;s far as it may be fed toil. A I so if I he same insect be 
deprived of its abdomen and supplied with one of wax of the 
same si/.e and weight, I be insect will ,uo about its business and 
pursue mosquitos for food as I Inm.uh its anatomy had not been 
abbreviated. The nocturnal moths are also very tolerant of 
pins thrust through them in da\ time, but when niji'bl comes 
lhe\ endeavor to depart, pin. tree and all. if pinned to the 
latter. The writer has been accused of cruelty by lady friend-* 
in starviii",' to death the larti'e bombycid moths, which by tbe 
\\a\ , liave no moul h parts and only feed in tbe larva- condition. 
When our lady friends cease to wear sealskin coats, the plum 

age of beautiful birds and have the tails of their horses less 

Like effete dusl brn-he>. we \\ill be \\illin.u- to bear from them 
on the subject of eruelt\ to iusect>. 



42 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

Notes and. Ne\vs. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL GLEANINGS FROM ALL QUARTERS OF THE GLOBF.. 



NOTICE. Will correspondents kindly note that my address is now 
MESILLA PARK, New Mexico (Not Mesilla nor Las Graces)? T. 

D. A. COCKERELL. 

" THE regents of the University of New York have appointed Dr. 
Ephraim Porter Felt, State Entomologist. In the autumn of 1896 
he was appointed Assistant State Entomologist under the late Dr. 
Lintner. The tenth to the twelfth Reports of the State Entomolo- 
gist were issued after his connection with the office." 

ADMIRAL DEWEY, it seems, is a great collector of butterflies, in 
addition Spanish vessels and other bric-a-brac. Philadelphia 
Ledger. 

Remark. If Admiral Dewey handler his specimens the way he 
did the Spanish fleet, he would not receive much in exchange for 
his duplicates. However, we aro pleased to learn that he is an en- 
tomologist. EPS. 

A NOTE ON COPULATION AMONG ODONATA The statement that in 
pairing the male dragonfly grasps the female by the prothorax or 
neck seems to have been generally accepted While this is true for 
AgrionicUe, so tar as I have had opportunity of observing, it is pos- 
sibly not true for JEschnida? and Libellulidse certainly r>ot true for 
all of them. During July, 1898, while collecting about Round 
Lake, in Northern Indiana, a pair of Celilln /n/x fnxciata was 
taken, and the male was found to be grasping the female by the 
head, the inferior appendage covering the occiput, while the supe- 
rior appendages rested against the reir of the head. In this case 1 
held the pair in my fingers and separated the male from the female. 
Although unable to make so -positiA r e an observation in any other 
case, by carefully approaching pairs- of Celitlnin/x elisa. ('. (//<>iitn<i 
and: Jfesofhem fs sfm/tft'ct roll is? .ast hey er sted on the grass a nd sedges . 
I was able to de'ermine, in the case of these three species also, that 
the female was grasped by the head, The structure of the parts in- 
volved might indicate that this Inbit belongs to all the ./Eschuida? 
and Libellulida?.* 

A comparison of the action.- of En<tlhi</in ,-</</, m/tn/t and ('<-i;tl- 
niixj'awiuta while pairing and ovipositing is interesting. In flight 
when the male Eit<ill<t</in is carrying the female, grasping her by 
the pro thorax, the legs of the latter are drawn up close to the body, 
and, while resting in copulation, they usually hang extended on 
either side of the ahdomen of the male, or they may remain in their 
original position, folded to the body. While ovipositing the male 

* In my collection is ;i pair of Aetc'iti t -nn.-t> ,cta Sny, taken in copula. October 
i. 1893, in Delaware County, 1'a.. !>\ myself, killed ami pinned in the copulatory 
position. The appendages of the 'male -41 asp the head of the female In the man- 
ner above described by Mr. Williamson. P. P. CALVEKT. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 43 

and female are usually submerged. II if male - -ra-ping the female and 
both clingirg to some aquatic ]tlnn( in which the eggs are being 
placed- In the ea-e of Cettthemis fasciata in flight the male iM-a.-p.- 
the female by the head. the leg- ot the latter hangini extruded. 
Tu copulation the abdoiy.eii of the male i- grasped by all the leg- of 
the female, or the second and third pairs of legs m i v gr.isp the ab- 
domen of the female herself. In ovipositing n, ( . UKl ] ( . illl( i female 
hover and flit about "in couple." the female frequently touching 
the tip of her abdomen to the water. E 15. AV n.i ,i \ M->N. < 'ar- 
negie Museum, Pittsburgh. 



iiflithi Linn. A> A FRUIT PKST. I do not remember to 
have seen a mention of this insert as a fruit pest I recently re- 
ceived a number of the beetles from Mr- George F. I'.reuiuger, who 
obtained them at Phoenix, Ariz , and writes corccrning them as 
follows: " They are the most destructive insect on fruit I have ever 
seen. They begin with the lir-t pen-lies that ripen ;:nd continue 
until about the first of October, when they dVippeir I ha ,-e -ecu 
so many on a peach as to completely hide it. and they go to the 
ground with much buzzing when the fruit drop> You will notice 
tbe cutting apparatus on the top of the head with which it dig- 
up the flesh of the fruit. It also feeds to -ome extent on melons 
and tomatoes." C. P. GILLETTE. 

Is Ceratomia catalpoz sp read ing northward? In t lie November 
number of THE NEWS (page 231 ) this southern species is recorded from 
Delaware County. Pa. In 1893 I received through Prof. Bcekwith. 
then of Delaware College, two -pecimens of this moth from Sussex 
County, Del., and in 189J. in a large <|uantity of electric light mn 
terial taken in this city (Wilmington, Del.), 1 found a single speci 
men; but this year the larvse have appeared on the catalp-i tier- 
in great numbers, and the moths v ere not rare at the lights: >< 
that in this Stale ('i-rltnnl<i cdlnl/f.-' appears to have spread north- 
ward, and has certainly greatly increa>ed in number-, where it ua- 
formerly very rare. FRANK M. JONES, Wilmington. Del. 

GRASSI-IOPPKK> r. NKW M I.XK . Tlii- \car IMI-^ i v. e have had 
qnitea plague of gra hopper- in the Me-ilh ^'aliey. The -pccie- 
couceraed were all residents. The princi])al otl'ender beinti" M<l<ni<> 
/////\ (li_t)'ri-i-nlitih'x. with M. ft niiir-i-iiiii-iiiii a tair-cci.nd. M. nfitf/is 
was common, but seemed to re-trict it-eW almo-t entirely to t he 
native graes Tlic interesting feature of the attack \\a- that it 
\\asirt participated \D by three Melanopliiii (I prefer Ilii- term 
for the tribe to Melauopli). which were very common in the ina 
mediate vici nit v. Melanoplus herbaceus occui'l'eA in immen-e num- 
bers on the I'luriicu borealis,^ 7-.'./'o////\ eleyans was equally abundanl 
on .1 ////)/( .r cnmx,-, ,,.-. while HI-.-/H f<>i'< lli\ riri<Iis wa> i|uite com- 
mon on JJ/t/c'nr/ti 'or loscoma] heterophylla VAr^ wriyhtii. Kaeh 
of tlie-r >iicrics is (H>lorcd like its food- pi i nt . and never by an\ 
chance leave- it for the cult ivaled tield-. 



H ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

At Tularosa.X. M., this tall. I was surprised to find great num- 
bersof a Mdrinot>lnx quite new to me, allied to M. bfrfllntiifi. It 
proves to be J/ ihtnn<i*i; (Scudd.TCevis, Melanopli.p, :!(>8,) a species 
only known hitherto by a single male captured by Bruner in the 
State of Durango, Mexico ! Its lial)its are quite like those of differ- 
entialtfi and birtff<tfnx,w it will undoubtedly prove injurious. The 
specimens were taken in the yard at the back of the hotel, where 
grape vines and fruit trees were cultivated The genuine M bfrittn- 
/its is common enough in Xevv Mexico in the Transition Zone, MS ai 
Santa Fe, but is never seen at the lower levels. 

T. I ). A ( 'OCKKHKI.I.. 

M K(.KTKA v ITT AT \ iN.iruiN<; SI:<.AK HKKTS -Now that so much 
interest is being taken in sugar beets, it may be worth while to re- 
cord that Mr. ('. K. Mead sent me two specimens of this curious 
Meloid on Sept. M, with the information that they were injuring 
sugar beets at A/lcr. X. M. The specimens differ slightly from the 
form of the insect found in the Organ Mts . \. M.. in that the dull 
orjnge murks on Hie elytra are confined to the subcostal region, in- 
stead of forming a well marked network covering the greater part 
of the elytra T. l> A. ('<>< KEHELL. 

We are accustomed !o heur of large spider^ coming from tropical 
regions in bunches oi b mams. The ordinary statement about these 
spiders is that they are " tarantulas" The genuine "tarantulas" 
belong to the family Theraphosidae. and the known habits ot these 
spiders are not such as would lead o.ie to suppose th it They would 
seek shelter in banana bunches. " Tarantulas" are ground spiders 
and rarely climb tivcs. So it is not surprising tint the large spid- 
<T.S found occasionally in bunches of bananas prove to belong to 
quite different groups. 

During the past few yeurs I have had several large spiders sent me 
that were taken from bananas. Tl ese spiders belong to two species. 
The larger and heavier one is (''ICHII* JITII* Perty. The family 
Ctenidie is a small one. and by most arachnologists considered close 
to the common Lycosida 1 . They are wandering s|iders. making no 
web. and arc often found on trees Two species occur in our South 
ern States This particular species was first known from IJrax.il. but 
is now known 10 inhabit various parts of South and Central Amer- 
ica. It has been sent me from Albany, X. V.. Xew York City, Ft. 
Collins, Colo., and lately I have seen a specimen from Corva His. 
Ore. || has stout j i w>. long le>anda hairy body, -o it is probable 
tint most of t he " tarantulas " from bananas ai e referable to thi> 
species 

The other spider -enl me as occurring amoiiy bananas is licit r<>- 
/iixld rciKiton'ii l/inn . the so-called huntsman spider, a common 
inhabitant of all tropical countries. Specimens have been seen from 
Xew York City and Corvallis. Ore. This spider belongs to the 
family Sparassida 1 . ch>>ely related to I lie Thomisid.-c. They spin no 



1399 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS | , 

webs, but wander hi seuvh of prey Thi- species ts quite flat, and 
has very long' lei:s. The female cairi;-- her co-o-_ >:lr under th--- hod\ . 
Xothinir i> known n-i: irdin;r the poisonous qualities of tluse spider-. 
lni they are probably ranch les> danirerons than the true " i aran- 
tul;i>." NATHAN II \NV-. 

AN ArrEAL IN IlKii \ 1.1 'U KN I<>MC>I.<>< <, AND l\ INMI;I;D Si II-.NI i .-. 
In the interest of entomology, it Mould lie a irood plan if"ver\ ento- 
moloiiist in ( lie Tinted States would petition their representative** 
in ( 'oniiTe.-s lo li;i , e paragraph (iM! of tlie tariff l:iw of |S'.:7 amended, 
so that specimens of natural hi-tory tor -cientilic collert ions l,e 
admitted free of duty, whether intended I'm private or puldi<- u-'. 
The paragraph in (|iie>ti:>n come- under I h; 1 free li>l . and read> a- 
follows: "Spei'imei> of irilural liistory. hotiny and ii)ineralo'\ 
v, hen imported for scientific puMic collections, and not for -ale." 

A law that tends to discourau'e private scientific iv-eirch in natu- 
ral history should be h lot ted out imuiedht"l\ . a> it is a di-Li'raee (o a 
civilized nation. Kntoiuolo^y. especi \]\\ , merils all t lie encourage 
meut possible, and one of I lie best ways of helping I he can -e \\ ould 
be to remove the barrier from the private >tudent. All who re-id 
this are earnestly requested iminedi-ili 1\ to petition their repre-eni 
ativesnt Washing ton, urging 1 1 ha f the section in ([iie-tion be amend 
ed.and that \\ithout dela\. KDV/AUH A. KI.A--: -. 

\<>TK> ON in; lii-;.\n I P I . >'i <'I>I;NI;I; m MKNKO. At present the 
northern part o!' the State of (inerrero i- onsidered to be the lea-i 
known di.-trict of the rei)iiblic. Lyin- belwei'ii the route from 
Toluca to ('olima and the old road from Acapulcoup to Chilpan- 
cino'o ;n;d Mexico ('ity. it is almost mil raveled. < >n ac.-oiinl of 
the lon- drv season it is but little cultivated, and the hills. are 
sparsely covered with stunted tree-. The alt ilude ranges from l.iion 
to -J (KM feiM. with " eerros" of :!.'<><) to :).uni) feet . The numerous 
gold and quicksilver mines of the region and the "(.ran Paciiico" 
railroad, which is building, will s:on brin^ I he >: HI n I ry i nlo ]ir;>mi- 
iien -e 

Though at the present lime Dec., '98] lliedrx s-is'in i-onl\ fairly 
begun," the apparent in-e-t fauna is hardly :> percent, of that of the 
rainy season. There is still a ^ood \ariei\ of Orthoptera, especially 
L< ic 1 1 -I id,' a i (1 ( Jry II id a-. ( tdonata are. of cour-e. to be found ahum 
the Hio Mescala and Uio ( 'ociila : <ioiii])hii:.-e not me! with- Taran- 
tulas st ill prowl and scorpions -till lurk. The \\nod-boriiii:- < 'ole- 
optera 'hold their own" in the narrow timber strips aloiiu' the 
rivers: but all the Phytophaga are hibernating. <)!' hiptera and 
Lepidoptera there i- left s.-arcely a trace. A hot (b -strlate count r\ 
jn>t now. but one of ! he 1110-1 intei est in- corner- of l he neot ropica I 
re>ioii i. -Inn ii I'IU'HS O N\' . I ' A I;I;K ri . Tacnlaya. \^. V . Mexico. 

IN Mr \Vellc-' ariicle i I )e-u ud ive Work of l>arcmma Calal- 
la- '. in your hecember number, the menfion of unusual abundance 



46 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

of Deilephila liuenta larvae calls to mind a similar occurrence in 
this section in 1897. which, judging from reports from other locali- 
ties in the great western dry belt at that time, was probably of far- 
reaching extent. From even as far south as the Rio Grande Valley 
came a newspaper report, with the usual journalistic coloring, say- 
ing that millions of large striped worms, large as a man's finger, 
each with a horn on the end of its tail, were marching across the 
country in a body. These worms had never been seen there before, 
and no one could classify them. They did not stop nor turn back 
when they came to the Rio Grande River, but deliberately took to 
the current, and tlio-'e that were not swept away continued the line 
of march from the other side. This of conr-e. is the reporters 
sensational description of an extraordinary appeirance of some 
sphiugid caterpillar, possibly that of I), lineit<<. 

While 1 was engaged in netting Catocalas about a wooden station 
building of the railway at Green River, Utah, in August of the 
same year, a resident who observed me ventured the information 
that I should have been there in June. " for the whole desert wa 
then alive with big green striped worms.' 

The foot hills about Salt Lake City were, during the same period, 
over-run with countless myriads of the larvae of D liueata. They 
always preferred as food plant Clarkia rhomboidea. Rosa fend- 
l.eriana and Salix longifolia. Duringthe previous year (1896) these 
larva? Avere quite uncommon, but the moths were abundant I re 
member counting thirty ol the latter about a single electric lamp at 
one time, but during the season just past (18981 1 failed to find a 
single larva of this species, and but very few of the moths. - G. 
WESLEY BROWMM-. Salt Lake City. Utah. 

THE remarks in the December number of THE NEWS, about the 
prevalence of the different species of Pieris, interested me very 
much, because I find among my field notes -dine observations of the 
same nature. 

In 1895 P. oleracea was everywhere in the vicinity of Salt Lake 
City, from the. bottom of the valley to the neighborhood of nine or 
ten thous ind tVet above sea level. Since that tine it has steadily 
decreased until, during the last season, it has been almost a rarity 
her :, and as it has disappeared, P. rapae, which was not abundant in 
189a, has increased prodigiously. P. protodiee. -o hra- 1 can judge, 
has remained of about the same numbers, being every year common 
hut at no time specially plentiful, f have often wondered what are 
l lie conditions that govern the limitations of lhe-e specie?. G- 
WKSLEY BROWMNC;. Salt Lake City. I'tah 

NOTE (IN CiiuYsxjPHANrs HKLI,<>II>I>. In 1S!>:> I leeeived from 
Ci'ih s(>me>|Hvimens of Chrysophanus helloides, and in September 
of the same year took at Roby. Ind., 7 specimens of what I at the 
timeof capture thought wa^ ('. li/r/>/>/t/< "* VVhen spread I com- 



|,S9J>] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 4- 

pared them with my cabinet specimens and fuuml them to be C. 
helloide-. On reporting this to some collectors who had been in- 
terested in this (Chicago) field for upward of 25 years, I was sur- 
prised to learn that the species had never beeu reported so far Eai 
An inquiry through the columns of THE ENTOMOLOGICAL NEW.* 
brought the information that its furthest previous Eastern appear- 
ance had been in Western Nebraska. 

1 notified all the Chicago collectors to be on the lookout tor it in 
Is'Hj, with the result that it was reported from all parts of the dis- 
trict, and both in thespring and fall It is now found throughout 
the summer. as I have this year taken it in each mouth from May to 
September. 

Last fail, in making exchange with a Minneapolis, Minn., col lec- 
tor. 1 received a lot of Chrysophanus sp.? and at the same time a 
request for (."'. heUoides. In the lot received from my correspond- 
ent were nine specimens of heUoides, thus establishing a new local-- 
ity for the species. It seems to be spreading eastward, and I would 
like to hear from any one noting its occurrence further East or South 
than Chicago- JOHN L. HEALY. Sec. Chicago Entomological S. t 
ciety. 

o 



Entomological Ivi.teratu.re, 



COMPILED BY 1'. P. CALVERT. 



ruder the above head it is intended to mention papers received at tin- Acad- 
emy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia pertaining to the Entomology of the 
Americas i North and South). Articles irrelevant to American entomology 
will not he noted. Contributions to the anatomy, physiology and embryolo^ 
of inserts, however, whether relating to American or exotic species, will he iv- 
eonled. The numbers in HEAVY-FACED TYPE refer to the journals, as n um- 
bered in tli- following list, in which the papers are published ; * denotes that tin- 
paper in question contains descriptions of new North American forms. Title- 
of all articles in foreign languages are translated into English; usually such 
articles are written in the same language as the title of the journal contain- 
ini; them, hut when s eh art ieles are in other lannuaues than Km:lish. French. 
trerman or Italian, this fact is indicated in brackets. 



4. The Canadian Entomologist, London, Out . J >tv. 'its. 5. Psyche, 
Cambridge', Mass., Jan '!',). 7. Bulletin No. 18, new series, U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture, Division of Entomology. Washington, "'.is. 
-9. The Entomologist, London, Jan. '!!!). II. The Annals and Maga- 
zine of Natural History. London, Dec. ? 98 21. The Entomologist - 
Record, London, Dec. 15, '98. 22. Zooloijischer Anzeiger, Leipsic, 
Dec. 12. '98. 33d. Denkschrifteu, kais Akademie der Wissenschaft- 
cn, Mathematisch-Naturwisserischattliche Classe, Ixiv, Vienna, '97 
-33s Sitzuugsberichte of same, 84. Insekteu BOrse. Leipsic, '98. 



4s ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

99. Bulletins. Cornell (/Diversity Awriciiltnr.il Experiment Sta- 
tion, Ithaca, X. Y., Dee. '98. 

The General Subject. The Zoological .Record for 1897. London. 
'08. Brown, A. W. Araclvnida 50 pp., Myriopoda and Pro- 
totracheata 10 pp.; S h a r p , D., Insecta. 300 pp. B ra u d i- 
court, V . Protective colors, Bulletin, Societe Linneenne du 
Xord de la France, Amiens, Sept. -Oct., '97. C a r r et, A. M.F. 
Guillebeau and his entomological works (cont.), Lr'Echange, Re- 
vue Liuueenne. Lyon. Dec. '98. Com stock, J. H., and 
\eedham. J . G . The wings of insects iv, tigs., The Ameri- 
can Naturalist, Boston. Dec '98. D a n b y . W H . and G reen . 
C. DeB. Report on the Entomology of British Columbia, 1 pi. 
Bulletin of the Natural History Society of British Columbia. Vic- 
toria, 1893. H e y n e, A Hints on use of duplicates for the enrich- 
mentof one's own collection, 84, Dec. 22. H o w a r d , L . O. The 
dispersion of terrestrial species in general and of insects in particular 
hy the agency of man. [Fi-ench transl.] Notes et Revue, Archives 
de Zoologie Experimental et Geuerale (3) vi, 3. Paris, '98. 
On d em an s. ,} T h . De Nederiandscbe Insecten. Aflever- 
ing 9 s Gravenbage. Martinus Nijhoft'. '98. (Lepidoptera pp. 
385-432. Diptera pis. xx-xxii.) S c h a u f s u s, C . The signifi- 
cance of formol for the insect collector, 84, Dec. 8. S e m p e r , G . 
Die Nachtfalter-Heterocera, ZteLieferung, 7 pis. Reisen im Archi- 
pel der Philippine!! von Dr. C- Semper, /ter Theil. "Wissenschaft- 
liclie Kesultate, 6 ter Band. Wiesbaden. C. W. Kreidel's Verlag. 
1898. T i c h o m i r o w , A . On the anatomy of the insect te>tis. 
h'gs., 22. W e 1 1 e r , S . A bibliographic index of North Amer- 
ican Carboniferous Invertebrates. United States Geological Survey. 
Bulletin 153. Washington, '9s. 

Economic Entomology. A n o n. The introduction of beneficial 
lady birds from Australia into India. 7: Recent injury by the sugar- 
cane beetle and related species. 7: A new enemy to the grape vine in 
Mexico, 7 : Cotton field insects, 7 : An interesting case of myiasis, 
7; A radical novelty in chinch hug work, 7. B an d o i n, ]\I . 
The employment of ants in operative medicine, Revue Scieutifiquc 
du Bourbonuais, Moulin*. Dec- !5, '9S. B e h r , H . H. Notes on 
ticks, 7. B r a n e r. F . Contributions to the knowledge ot extra- 
European CEstrid;p and parasitic ]VIiHcari:i', 1 pi., 33d. C h i 1 1 en - 
den. F. H. Biologic note on C<nioli'ticli<'[tine1('{i<inK Say. 7; Anew 
sugar-beet beetle \_31ono.rfn /nun-ticollis Say], 7; A leaf-beetle 
[Chrysomela (Zygogramina} exclamationis~\ injurious to cultivated 
sunflower, 7 : A flea beetle living on purslane, 7: Recent injury by 
bark-beetles a correction, 7: Twig primers and allied species, figs.. 
7 ; A destructive borer enemy ot birch trees, with notes on related 
species, figs.. 7. C lenient. A. L. Bees and wasps living in 
superposition in the same hive, ti<;.. Bullet in. Socictc National*- 
d'Acclimatation de France, Paris. Aug. '1)8.- C o q u i 1 1 e,t t , D. 
W . A cecidomyiid injurious to seeds of sorghum,* 7 1) i x s o u . 



1S!>0] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. |<) 

H . Cyanide ot potassium as an insecticide. (Gardeners' Chronicle. 
London. Dec. 17. '!s. E 1 e t c h c r . -F . Tlie Hessian fly attack- 
ing' timothy, 4. ( o u Id. II. 1'. Second Report on the San 
.lose scale, with remarks on the effects of kerosene on foliage, tigs . 
99.no loo. (i r a s s i , B. Relations between malaria and arthro- 
pods, Kendieonti, Accademia dei Lincei, Home, Dec- 4. -'98. H o \v - 
ard, L. O. The work against /<<'///<( />//n7m.sV in Portugal. 
with an account of the introduction from America of A'o/-///\ cur- 
.l : The San .lose scale on dried fruit, 7. H u h bard . H . (i. 



andPergande, T. AnewCoccidonbirch,fig8.,*7. Ki ng. (i. B. 

China asters infested by a Coccid.5. () s b o r n . 11 . The Hessian 
fly [Oc/V/o//////V/ ilt'sfruchtr'} in the United Stales. 8 text tigs., 2 pl>_ 
Bulletin Ki, new series. U. S. Dep't. of Agriculture. Division of 
Entomology. Washington. I). C.. 'its. P e r g a n d e . T. The 
peach Lecanium, tigs.,* 7: A new plant louse on tobacco.* 4- 
S 1 i u g e r 1 a n d . M . V . The grape-vine flea-beetle, tigs.. 99. 
No. 157. Numerous minor " Notes from Correspondence" in 7. 

Arachnida. K o w a I c v s k y . A . A new lymphatic gland in 
the European scorpion, 2 pis.. Memoires. Academie Imperiale des 
Sciences, St. Petersburg, v, 10 . r f)7. Rec'd Dec. 20, '9s.- N a I e p a , 
A . To knowledge of the Phyllocoptina-. o ]ils.. 33d. 

Thysanura Becker, K. Some remarks on the anatomy of 
Min-tiilix imn-itiiiifi Ltitr.. 22. 

Hemiotsra. Anon. The European bat bug [Artnilhiti />/'/ii*- 
//v7//J in America. 7. B e r g , (.' . Descriptions of new Hydro- 
metrida- ot the Argentine republic. Comunicaciones del Museo 
Xacional de Buenos Aires, i, 1. Aug. 24. '!)S. B r e d d i n . (i' 
llemipterological studies iv, Jahresbericht u. Abhandlungen, Xatnr- 
wissenschaftliche Verein in .Magdeburg, '98. C o c k e r o 1 1 . T. 
I). A. Two new genera of Lecaniine Coccidae, 9; Se? Hymenop 
tera. Cockerel I, T. I). A. and King, (i . B. Tin- 
Coc.-id genus Sitlm-rocoiTtis in Massachusetts,* 4. II u b It a r d . 
11 . (, . and 1' e r g a n d e, T . See Economic Entomology. *- 
K i r k a 1 d y . (i . W . A guide to the study of British wnter- 
bugs (aquatic Kliyndiota). 9. M arlatt, C. L. A new nomen- 
clature for the broods of the periodical Cicada. 7. M ok r / h e 1 - 
ski. S. Some observations on the cycle of flic >e\nal devclop- 
menl of the " blood loiise" i \<-lti-.<ni< n rn In n ii/crti llausm.) (Transi. 
lrt)inthe Ku>siaii by \\ Fireman). 7. M < n tgo m cry. T. II .. 
Jr. The spcrmatogenesis in r<-nl<il<>in<i up to the formation of the 
spermatid, ^ pR. Zoologische Jahrbucher (Anat.u. Ontog. Abtheil.) 
xii, 1, Jena, Nov. 15, '98. P erga nde, T. See Economic Ento 
mology.* 1{ e u t e r. O. M . llemiplera < ;ymnocer;:ta of Europe, 
the Mediterranean Icisin. and Asiatic Ku>sia, iv, (i pis.: v. K) pis. 
fin L'ltin], Ada Societali- Scienl iarum rennica-. xxiii. Hehing- 
fors. '!)?. Keird Dec. 21. '!)s. S < n d d e r . S. 11. An unknown 
trad ou American insects l\ Thorn i- Siy. 5. S \> e i ^ e r . 1* . A 



50 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

uew bat-parasite of Hie order Heiniptera, tig., 22. T i n s 1 e y , J . 
D . Notes oil Coecida?, with descriptions of new species, figs.,* 4. 

Coleoptera. A n o n . Westward spread of the common asparagus 
beetle \_Criocerii asparayt"], 7. C li i t t e 11 d e 11 , F . H . See 
Economic Entomology. Pic, M. Description of Coleoptera 
[Melyrodes], Le NaturaJiste, Paris. Dec 1, 'its. 

Diptera. B r a u e r , F. Contributions to the knowledge of 

o 

the Muscaria schizometopa and description of two species of Hypo- 
derma.. I pi, 33s, cvi, 4-7, April-July, '97. Rec'd Dec. 20. '98. 
C o q u i 1 1 e 1 1 . D . W . See Economic Entomology *-K e 1 - 
logg, V. L. The month parts of the nematocerous Diptera. i. 
5 S c u d d e r , S . H . See Hemiptera. 

Lepidoptera. B a c o t , A. Notes on hybrids (2nd and 3rd crosses) 
between Tephrosia hixfortaia and T. c.r<'ininctil(ti-i<i.2\.'R n t 1 e r. 
A. G. On the Pierine butterflies of the genus Catophaga. II : 
Notes ou the genus Evcliloe Hiibner. a genus of the Pierinae, 9. 
C ha p m a n , T . A . A note on the action of the clasps in Ere- 
l>i<i, 2i. C h i 1 1 e u d e u , F. II. A leaf tyer of gripe and 
elderberry. 7. D o d . F . 11 . W . Notes on some Alberta but- 
terflies, 4. D y a r, H. G. Life-histories of North American 
Geometrida?, 5. M e r r i f i e 1 d. F . and others. Protective 
coloration of Lepidopterou* pupa, 21. M o o r e , F . Lepidoptera 
Indica. Part xxxiv. London, Lovell Eeeve & Co. -'98. Rec'd 
Jan 9, '99. (Vol. iii, pp. 193-216, pis. 263-270. Nymphalhue- 
Limenitina). R u h m e r , G. \Y. How does Araschnin levanu 
ab . porirna O. arise in nature? Entomologische Nachrichten. Ber- 
lin, Dec. '98. - S h e r b o r u , C . D . and D u r r a n t, J . H . 
On the dates of Jacob Hiibner'? "Sninmluug europiiischer Schmet- 
terlinge," II. S k i n n e r , H. A Synonymic Catalogue of the 
North American Rhopalocera. The American Entomological Soci- 
iety. Philadelphia: issued Dec. 15. '98. Pp 100. xiv. See THE 
NEWS for January, pige 21. Smith. J. B. Descriptions of 
new Noctuids.* 4. S o u 1 e, C. G Early Stages of Trfptogo-n 
inodesta, 5. 

Hymenoptera. A s h m e a d . "W . II . Classification of the horn- 
tails and sawflies, or the sub-order Phytophaga, 7 (concl.), 4. 
A n g 1 a s , J . On the histolysis and histogenesis of the digestive 
tube of Hymenoptera during metamorphosis, Comptes Rendus, 
Societe de Biologic, Paris, Dec. 17, '98. A n o n. An invasion of 
the digger wasp [Jfec/astizits sped'osus], 7. C ^ c k e r e 1 1 . T 
I). A. New and little known Fly raenoptera taken by Prof. C H. T. 
Townsend and Mr. C. M. Barber in New Mexico in 1898.* M ; Notes 
on the nomenclature of some Hymenoptera, 9 ; Some synonymy, 
[and] Segregates from Perdita, 5. M a r 1 a t t . C . L. Some 
new Neftiatids,* 4. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 51 

DOINGS OF SOCIETIES. 

At the December meeting of the Feldman Collecting Social, 
nine members were present. Mr. H. Wen/el, on behalf of Dr. 
Griffith, read a communication on the coleopterous fauna of 
the Salt River "Valley, Ari/.ona. The northern fauna com- 
mingles with the Souoran of Mexico. The paper contained a 
list of five species of Cicimlelida- and seventy-four species of 
Oarabidte taken by Dr. (Jrifrith. 

Dr. Smith referred to a change of faunas due to the intro- 
duction of sheep. On one side of a wire fence the lower an 
stial fauna of the region existed, whereas on the opposiir 
where the sheep pastured was the common widely distributed 
fauna of the United States. 

He also exhibited some advance sheets of his forthcoming 
new editionof the k> Catalogue of the Insects of New Jersex ." 
pertaining to the Othoptera. The new list will contain 142 
species of this order against 114 in the old, and every species 
has a definite record, whereas in the old list many records were 
merely guess work. The same large percentage of increase 
was shown in the other orders. He further stated that some 
specimens of Cmi'icr/i/Hi'iix recently taken in the ''Xeck," 
Philadelphia, had proven to be ('. </!<i<i;<i!<>r Hi-dt . heretofore 
only known to occur in Texas and Mexico. 

Mr. Johnson exhibited a specimen of ('innln .sv^/r/m/rm// 
taken at Edge Hill, Montgomery county, in .June last l>y Mr. 
H. S. Viereck. It evidently represented brood seventeen due 
in this State in is.)s, but the speaker had observed no speci 
mens himself. 

Dr. Smith said the brood due in New .lersex this yeai INKS 
was peculiar in its distribution ; it crossed the state diagonally 
from Trenton and then struck northward, though small iso 
lated broods occurred at Vim-land and near New IJruuswiek. 

\V:\I. .1. F<>\. Secret a rv. 



At the annual meeting of t he American Entomological So 
ciety held December '_'!', IS'.tS. the following were elected to 
serve as officers for the year IS'.K); President. Henry < '. Me 
Cook: Vice President. ('. \\ . .lohnson : Treasurer. !]. T. Cre 
son ; Kecordinu Secretary. Henry Skinner ; < 'or res pout ling Sec 
retarv. \V. ,T. Fox; Curator. Henrv Skinner : Librarian. \V . .1 . 



50 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

Fox ; Publication Committee, E. T.Cresson, ('. F. Seiss, I>. F. 
Smith; Executive Committee, P. Laurent, ('has. Licbeck, H. 
W. Wen/el ; Finance ( 'oinmittee, .1. YV. McAllister. ('. S 
Welles. C. ('. Cresson. HKNKY SKINXKR. Secretarv. 



At a business meeting of the Entomological Section (tt'the 
Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, held December 
ii2, ISDN, the following were elected to serve as officers for the 
present year: Director, Philip Laurent; Vice Director, H. 
YV. YVen/e] ; Treasurer. E. T. Cresson: Conservator, Henry 
Skinner; Recorder. Henry Skinner; Secretary. "W. ,1. Fox. 

HKNKY SKINNKK. Recorder. 

t \ 

THE WASP AS AN ENGINEER, 

Several members of the United States Engineer Corps were wit- 
nesses receutlv of a feat of insect engineering- near the road on which 
they were working. One of their number found a blue ground 
wasp dragging along the ground a dead swamp spider one-quarter 
the size of a full-grown tarantula Whether the wasp killed the 
spider or found it dead isa question beyond solution. He was hav- 
ing a hard time dragging 1 his prey along, and presently left it to go 
prospecting for his abode. The discoverer of the wasp called his 
companions, and one of them in coming stepped upon the wasp's 
ground hole, crushing down some blades of dried grass across it . 
This caused no little trouble to the insect, who, upon locating the 
hole, nipped away at the obstrutciug stalks with his strong mandi- 
bles until he had cleared a passage Then he went back and sized 
up the spider, walking around the big body and surveying it from 
all sides. 

"He's reckoning that the hole isn't big enough," s'lid one of the 
engineers. 

"That's all right: he'll h'x it," said another, as the insect went 
back and began vigorously widening the entrance to his domicile. 

Again he returned to the spider, seized it and dragged it to within 
a toot of the orifice. To the spectators it was evident that more 
work would have to be done before the spider could be dragged in. 
This struck the wasp, too. for again he ran around Ihe body, exam- 
ing it carefully, and returned to the hole to take measurements 
He went to digging a second time. Having dug for two minutes 
he brought his prey to the edge of the hole, nipped out a piece ol 
dirt here, cut away a grass stem there, and a Her liiteen minutes ol 
hard and skilful labor disappeared under ground, dragging the 
spider after him. douhiK-^to form the /in'rc ilc /vv/.v/r///rr in a win- 
ter storehouse. The engineers then resumed I heir \\ ork. exchanging 
c .>m merits of admir it ion. Cltfrat/o ln1rr-( train. 



January ninnhti- //x.v imiilcd .Itntmn'i/ .'<>tli. 



KNT NKWS, v.,1 10 



1-1 III 




k ( } 

AMPELOGLYPTER SESOSTRIS 



ENTOMOLOGICflL NEWS 



AND 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SECTION 

ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, PHILADELPHIA. 



VOL. X. 



MARCH, 1899. 



No. 3 



CONTENTS : 



Webster Some Notes on the Grape- 
Cane Gall-Maker, Ampeloglypter 
Sesostris "tf 

Ashmead Three New Species in the 
Genus Diploplectron Fox 55 

Tinsley and King The Tenth Ants' - 
Nest Species of Coccid from Mas- 
sachusetts 57 

Walker The Sound-Producing Or- 
gans of Lenia Trilineata 58 

Uhler A New Destructive Capsid .. 59 



Coquillett A New Dipterous Family 

Related to the Chironomid;e 60 

Hough Some North American Gen- 
era of the Dipterous Calliphdri M;I- 

Gerschner <>- 

Editorial 67 

Notes and News 68 

Entomological Literature 71 

Doings of Societies 7S 

Obituary *0 

Exchanges i 



SOME NOTES ON THE GRAPE-CANE GALL-MAKER, 

AMPELOG LYPTER SESOSTRIS (Coieoptera ) * 

BY F. M. WEBSTER. 

In his First Report as State Entomologist of Missouri, p. 131, 

Dr. C. \ . Ki ley describes this species under the name Maduni* 
//7/.S-, stating- that the larva formed its gall in the Fall, pupating- 
in June and developing to the adult about two weeks later. 
He therefor gave as a remedial and preventive measure the 
collecting and burning of infested canes during Winter. In 
the " American Entomologist," Vol. II, p. 10"). the same 
writer states that the galls first become visible towards the 
latter end of July, the larva- producing them wintering over 
within these galls, but not becoming full grown until the 
Spring of the following year, pupating during the latter part 
of June and in a couple of weeks developing to adults. 

On May <>, ISDN, a lot of dried leaves were brought from 
a vineyard near the lake shore about (iypsum, ()., where 1he\ 
had fallen the Autumn before and been blown 1>\ the winds 
into bunches along an Osage orange hedge, remaining there 
throughout the Winter and placed in a breeding cage in 1 lie 
insectary. From among these leaves adults of .1. 

* Read before I he < thin stair Academy <>!' Science, I >c<-cml>er '."A 



54 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

began to appear May 23, and continued t do so in consider- 
able numbers for several days. 

On June 24 my assistant visited the vineyard Jfrom which 
the leaves had been taken, and found a large number of galls 
on the new growth of cane, and within these galls were larv;e 
of considerable size. The same vineyard was again visited 
by myself on August 11, when all stages of development ex- 
cept the egg were found within the galls, the larvae now being- 
all of them nearly or quite full grown, while some of the 
adults were observed in the act of making their way out from 
the galls. I visited this vineyard again on September 15, and 
could then find only a single pupa (), after long and patient 
searching, this being in a gall in the latter growth of cane, all 
other galls, except for parasites, being entirely empty. A 
later examination, made early in November, revealed not a 
single adult in the galls, but a solitary one (a, ft) was discov- 
ered among the fallen leaves, where it was probably in hiber- 
nation. In this series of observations it seems to me that we 
have conclusive proof that in Northern Ohio at least the species 
is single brooded, the adult wintering over among fallen leaves 
and other similar rubbish, coming forth in Spring in time to 
begin ovipositiou in the earliest growth of cane. The greater 
abundance of galls in the earlier growth of cane points to the 
fact that the adults are abroad in numbers, and ready to begin 
ovipositiou, as soon as there is sufficient growth of young cane 
to afford them the necessary nidus, and while the period of 
ovipositiou for the species in any one locality may be, and 
probably is, considerably protracted, though, as previously 
shown, the season of development is over by the first of 

October. 

From within the galls I have taken pup?e from which a par- 
asite, Catol('ci<* ti/lodrniid (//), known loalso attack the larva- 
of Ti/lodfrtiHi fort'olatuiii, was also reared. and also pupa; (//) of a 
small fly, Myiophasia (citrtt (/). Of three of these latter pupa-, 
two gave me adult flies, while the third developed a secondary, 

hymeuopterous parasite (/), ('(tli/jtfit* tih'mtoi-. 

As the locality where these observations were made is fully 

three degrees of latitude north of St. Louis, Mo., it is quite 
possible that there may be a considerable difference in the 
habits of this species, and this seems all the more likely from 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. ;,;, 

the fact that while the climate along the lake shore is really 
milder iu Winter than it is a few miles farther inland, vet the 
ice in the lake, in Spring, usually remains long- enough to 
delay the putting forth of the early growth of cane, and also 
tends to keep the insect longer in hibernation. It is also inter- 
esting to note that although the hibernating adults were 
placed under a comparatively high temperature, probably 
from 65 to 80 Fah., yet they did not bestir themselves until 
about the time when proper facilities for oviposition would be 
offered them in their native haunls. 

KXIM. A NATION OF PLATK. 

Am/pelogtypter sexostris (Lee.) : , />, respectively, back and 
side view of adult ; r, larva ; d, pupa ; <\ galls in grape cane; 
/, Mi/iojilmxid IIIIKI; //. pupa case of same; //. ('tiln/iicriiN t>/Io- 
dermct! ; I, Cali/jita* tih'mtor. 

o 



THREE NEW SPECIES IN THE GENUS DIPLOPLECTRON 

FOX ' Hynieuopterai. 

I*>Y WILLIAM H. ASIHIKAD, 

Ctu-f<n\ IHrision of Jnxccfx. l'nifc<l ,SY<//r.v 

MUNCH in . 



Up to the present time but a single species is known in 
genus Diploplectron Fox, the type D. (Liris) bruiuicijH-* ( 'r-s 
son. Recently, in arranging a large collection of Hymenoptera , 
presented to the t T nited kStates National Museum by I'rolV-ssor 
Carl F. Bader, three additional species were recognixed, which 
are described below : 

TAIIU: OK si'i:<'ii:s. 

Black or mostly black. 2. 

Uniformly pale ferruginous, except a spot between tlie ocelli 
base of metathorax above and more or less of the three 
or four apical abdominal segments, which are black ur 
dusky. (1) I), ferrugilous Aslnn., n SK. 

2- Proiiotnm and tegnla- brownish-yellow. 

Mandibles, exce])t tips, four basal joinl> of antenna 1 , tegnhe. 
anterior and middle legs and bind tiba 1 pale t'errngiiK.n-. 

(2) D. bnmneipes ( 'r. 



.::; ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

Pronotum black. 

Face with a triangular white spot at lower angle of inner 
orbits; clypeus white bidentate anteriorly, the anterior 
edge and teeth black; mandibles except tips white; an- 
terior femora beneath their tibia? and tarsi, and the mid- 
dle and hind tibia? and tarsi, rufous. 

(3) D. bidentatus Asm., n. sp. 

Face black; clypeus anteriorly rulous, simple, not dentate; 
mandibles except tips, anterior and middle tibia? and 
tarsi, hind tarsi and usually the tip of abdon ci.. rufous. 

(4) I), foxii Atl.n:., n. sp. 

(1) D. ferrugineus, u. sp. 

$ Length 4.6 mm. Uniformly pale ferruginous, except apex 
of mandibles, a spot between the ocelli and base of metathorax 
above, which are black. The three or four apical abdominal seg- 
ments are also more or less dusky or blackish. Wings hyaline, with 
a large smoky blotch behind the third cubital cell and including 
the apical half or more of the cell. Head and thorax, except meta- 
thorax, smooth, polished. 

Hab. Colorado. Type, No. 5061, U. S. N". M. (Baker Toll.) 

(2) D. bidentatus, n. sp. 

9 Length 7 mm. Black; face with a triangular spot at base of 
inner orbits, a narrow line beneath the eyes, the clypeus except 
anterior margin, and the mandibles except tips, white. Clypeus 
produced .anteriorly into two black teeth ; flagellum brownish 
beneath ; legs black, the anterior femora beneath and all tibia? and 
tarsi, rufous. The head anteriorly is closelv punctate, the vertex 
coriaceous, with some scattered or sparse punctures; thorax .shining, 
but sparsely punctate. Metathorax rugulose, opaque; abdomen 
shining, but veiy delicately microscopically reticulated . Wings 
hyaline, with a large smoky cloud behind the marginal cell and in- 
cluding the apex of the cell ; stigma and veins piceous or dark 
rufous. 

Hab. Colorado. Type, No. :><><;:;. I . S. N . M . ( Baker Coll. > 

(3) D. foxii, n. sp. 

$ Length 56.5 mm. Bhu-k: mandibles, except tips, the ante- 
rior and middle tibite and tarsi, hind tarsi and terminal ahdrminal 
segment, rufous. Wings subhyaline, with a dusky cloud behind 
the truncate marginal cell. Hind tibia? behind. Avith a white line 
formed of silver y white hairs. Head and thorax, except metathorax, 
polished, impunctate; metathorax finely rugulosc. 

Hab. Colorado. Type, No. r.O*)!'. I" . S. X . M . < I'.akcr ( Wl.) 



1899 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 




Antenna- and les of 
Riper sia minimus. 



THE TENTH ANTS'-NEST SPECIES OF COCCID FROM 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

BY J. D. TIXSLEV and GEO. B. Ki\<;. 

Ripersia minimus, ij. sp. 

Alult v. L3n^th biraly 1 nrii.; coverd.'l with while secretion; 
color re Id ish brown : rather plump. No lateral or caudal fi laments 
observed with a hand-leuse. Ovisac, en- 
closing the female, ellipsoidal, about 2 mm. 
long and 1 1 4 mm. wide. Clear white, rather 
compact, cottony nutter. Eggs oval, pale 
yellow, quite small Antennae concolorous 
with the body or nearly so ; 7-jointed. 7 long- 
est aul thickest, 65-75 u long ; 2 and 3 usual- 
ly subequal, although 2 may be the longer, 
and 1 is sometimes longer than 3,2 and 3 about 
40 u long : joint 1 is usually about 30 u long ; 
6.5 and 4 ara more or Iss^ globular in shape 
and usually 6 is the longer and 4 and 5 are 
subequal, although 4 may be the shortest ; 
G i':> oat 23 u loii?, 4 and 5 about 25 u Ion?. Tiie following formulae 
have been observed: 

7213(46)5-721(346)5. 

7(23) 1645-7(12)3465. 

7(23)16(45) 

7231654 

All the joints bearing rather large hairs. Legs concolorous with 
tha body, rather stout and largecomparad with the size of the body 
Femur 101 u long x 45 m wide; tibia 93 u long ; tarsus 60 u long ; 
tarsal digitules slejder hairs without knobs ; claw stout, with rather 
large denticle, 17 ulong; digitules of claw long, slender knobbed. 
Epidermis beiring rather numerous gland spots and some scattered, 
rather large hairs. The margins of the abdominal segments beat- 
groups of conical spines, usually two conical spines in a group. 
Anal ring with the usuil six hairs. Caudal tubercles normal, each 
with a r it her large seta, 100 u long, and several large hairs anil 
conical spines. 

Habitat. South Lawrence, Mass., October 15, 1898, on the 
root of a plant in the nest of Lnx!ns .Intrririi.inis Em. 

This is the smallest Dactylopiid with which we are yet ac- 
quainted, being probably a little smaller than liifnTxhi nnni- 
< /'.% Mask, which is given as 1-24 inch = 1 mm. This dill'crs 
from R. rn>ii ; <-ix Mask, in being 7 -jointed and not having the 
antennae so close together. 




FIG. 1. Upper side of posterior seg- 
ments of abdomen, showing position 
of sound-producing organ. 



- s ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

THE SOUND-PRODUCING ORCANS OF LEMATR1LINEATA. 

BY C. M. WALKER, Amherst, Mass. 

When Leuia fri/htcata is irritated or disturbed in any way it 
makes a curious shrill, squeaking sound, and if the insect be 
carefully watched, it may be 
observed that in producing 
this sound the tip of the ab- 
domen is raised and vibrated 
very rapidly, causing it to 
move back and forth against 
the underside of the elytra. 
Upon examining the struc- 
ture of the parts concerned, 
a hard horny area was found 
on the dorsum of the last 
segment of the abdomen 
(Fig. 1), composed of regular transverse ridges and divided by 
a median depression. This hard chitinous area is somewhat 
triangular in shape 
with the base at the 
middle of the ante- 
rior margin of the 
segment and the 
rounded tip near 
the middle. There 
are numerous hairs 
and spines]scattered 

tne remaining F](J o _^ p p er s j c } 6 of posterior segment of abdomen. 
portion of the S eg- 8howins ouml-prodm-in -orsan. 

ment (Fig. 2). 

With the aid of the compound microscope each elytron, 
especially on the tip and along the inner edge, was found to 
be covered with short spines directed posteriorly. The spines 
appeared to be of two kinds. Those along the extreme edge 
were larger and longer and fewer in number than those just 
back of the edge, which were of the character of modified 
scales. These scales were more or less flattened and were 
elevated at a slight angle, as seen when observed laterally. 
In order to produce the sound the beetle raises the end of the 




1S<>9] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



abdomen, ami, bringing it in contact with the spines on the 
elytra, sets the tip of the abdomen in vibration. By the con- 
stant rubbing of the spines against the roughened portion the 
curious sound is made. The spines being directed posteriorly, 
the sound is produced only when the tip of the abdomen is 
raised. The sound is therefore intermittent, although it 
appears continuous because of the rapidity of the vibrations of 
the abdomen. 

Since both sexes possess these organs, it does not seem prob- 
able that the sound is used for sexual attraction. This beetle 
has a pungent, disgusting odor, which possibly makes it dis- 
tasteful to birds or other enemies. It may be that this sound 
is used as a note of warning. 



A NEW DESTRUCTIVE CAPSID. 

BY P. E. UHLEK. 
Dicyphus minimus, n. sp. 

A slender, cylindrical, black, polished, resembling D.('(il(f<n'ni<-nx 
Stal, but much smaller and more slender. Head much wider than 
the front of pronotum. highly polished, bald, moderately narrowed 
at base, front strongly convey, the line bounding it-below deeply 
defined, cly peas prominent; antenna? black, slender; the basal joint 
scarcely as long as the head, whitish at base, second fully twice as iong 
as the basal and almost ;i< thick, third and fourth more slender, the 
third longer than the others, the fourth nearly of the same length as 
the second ; rostrum testaceous, piccous at tip, reaching behind the 
posterior coxae. Pronotum black, a little wider than long, with 
the calloseties transverse, middle line impressed, pale in less mature 
specimens, collum narrow, very distinct, testaceous or lemon- 
yellow, surface tranvcr-ely wrinkled, more -onvexor the posterior 
lobe, lateral margins distinctly reflexed ; sternum, coxa? and legs 
yellowish-white, with the tarsi piceous at tip. Scutellum black, 
polished, longitudinally carinated, marked with two yellow, triang- 
ular spots. Hemelytra translueent. pule yellow or testaceous du.-k\ 
on the inner half throughout, minutely, remotely punctate, the base 
ofcuueus with a la rye black >pot ; membrane dusky, veins and veins 
of wings blackish. Abdomen greenish, more or less black on the 
sides and at tip. 

Length to tip of venter :?!%, 92 mm., to tip of hemelytra -J , 
mm- Width of pronotum }.> mm. 

Numerous specimens of both sexes have been sent to me 
from various parts of Florida. 



60 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[March 



A NEW DIPTEROUS FAMILY RELATED TO THE CHI- 

ROINOMIDAE. 

BY D. W. COQUILLETT, Washington, D. C. 

Among a very interesting collection of Diptera recently re- 
ceived from Mr. C. W. Johnson for naming is a female speci- 
men of a very singular fly, which I am unable to locate in any 
known genus or family. The shape and structure of the head, 
body and legs, and the unusual development of the first an- 
tennal joint, appear to indicate its nearest approach to the 
genus Ceratopogon of the family Chironomidce ; but the vena- 
tionj as well as the general appearance of the insect, is very 
different from anything now located in that family. The pat- 
tern of venation is apparently a modification of that of a O/v/- 
topof/ott, in which the third vein coalesces with the first and 
the fourth vein is forked (see the figure by Winnertz in Lin 
nre Entomologica, vol. VI, plate VI, figure 41). By a further 
union of the veins, resulting in the coalescence of the median 
portion of the first and fourth veins, and by the addition of a 




second fork to the fourth vein, the venation of the present 
form would be produced. 

Although its relationship to the genus O/vr/o/>w/o;< is thu s 
seen to be a rather intimate one, still the general aspect is 
strikingly different ; besides the difference in venation already 
ready referred to, the unusually long and narrow wings, the 
widely separated eyes of the female, the concave instead of 
strongly convex vertex of the head, unite in giving the new 
form a very different appearance as compared to a ft'ntto- 
pogon. The antennte, which are broken off at the tip of the 
first joint in the single specimen before me, which, Mr. John- 
son writes me, is the only one he succeeded in capturing, and 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



the possession of a male specimen, may brim/ to light other 
differences than those revealed by the present .somewhat mu- 
tilated specimen. Even these differences an-. 1 believe, of 
sufficient importance to demand the establishing of a new 
family, the StenoxenidaB, an opinion also shared by Mr. .John 
sou. The description of the m-w genus and species is as fol- 
lows : 

Stenoxenus johnsoni, new genus iind species. Head narrower than 
the thorax; when viewed from iu front twice as broad as high . 
vertex slightly concave, lower half of face sparsely covered with 
bristles, eyes of female widely separated, deeply emarginate oppo- 
site the antennae, bare, wholly covered with facets of a uniform 
size; ocelli absent; proboscis about one-third as long' as heighth 
of head, very thick, les< than twice as long- as wide: palpi about 
one-half as long' as heighth of head, pendulous, sub-cylindrical. 
composed of three distinct joints which are sub-equal in length, and 
apparently with a very short one between the last two; first joint 
of antenna? unusually large, compressed, about one and one-half 
times as broad as long, eimrgiuate at the apex (remainder of an- 
tennae wanting). Body destitute of bristles, thorax truncate in 
front, not projecting over the head, destitute of a transverse suture 
abdomen slightly narrower than the thorax aud nearly twice as 
long, tapering posteriorly, the apex blunt. Legs slender, destitute 
of bristles, hind tibia? each bearing a short stout spur at the apex Of 
the inner side, the others destitute of apical spurs ; front tibia* 
twice as long as the first tarsal joint, the latter on all the tarsi much 
longer than any ot the other joints : tarsal claws sin.'ple, empodium 
and pulvilli wanting. Wings bare, unusually long and narrow, 
projecting about one-third of their length beyond the tip of the 
abdomen, venation as iu the accompanying figure: costal vein con- 
tinued around the tip of the wing, but becoming obsolete on the 
basal part ot the posterior margin; auxiliary, second and third 
veins wanting, first vein distinct at its base and apex only, else- 
where united with the fourth, which is forked near its middle, 
the upper branch also forked near its base: fifth vein forked near its 
middle. Halteres normal, color black, polished, lower part of face. 
mouth parts, coxa-, from and middle femora and the hind ones ex- 
cept their apices, also the middle tibia- and their tarsi vellow, 
apices of hind femora, front and hind tibiae and their tar-i ln-osvn; 
halti-rcs brown, their bases yellow: hairs of the body very short. 
light yellow: wing< whitish-hyaline, the vein- dn>kv yellowish- 
those near the po-t error margin only slightly lighter in color than 
ilm-e along the COSta, apical portion ot first vein faint. Length X 
nun. Delaware Water (Jap. New Jersey. A Dingle female -peri- 
men raptured July llth by Mr. ('. \V. .Join i-on. and \>\ him kind I y 
presented to the National Museum. Type No. 



62 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

SOME NORTH AMERICAN GENERA OF THE DIPTEROUS 
GROUP, CALLIPHORINAE GIRSCHNER. 

BY GARRY DE N. HOUGH, M. D. 

The masterly researches of Herr Ernst Girschuer have 
thrown a flood of light upon the Cimmerian darkness of the 
classification of the Muscida?. One of the groups clearly es- 
tablished by him is that of the Calliphorime, the ISTorth 
American genera of which form the subject of this paper. 

The super- family Muscidse is thus defined by Prof. Willis- 
ton : 

Proboscis functional or rudimentary. In the former case usually 
short and with pseudotracheate labellse, but sometimes elongate 
and adapted for piercing ; palpi sometimes rudimentary, never 
jointed. Antenna? always three-jointed, the third joint simple, 
pound, oval or elongate, compressed and always (except in Crypto- 
chaetnm, where it is entirely absent), with a bare, pubescent or 
plumose, dorsal or subapical arista. Auxiliary vein sometimes ru- 
dimentary, often more or less coalescent with the first longitudinal 
vein, usually distinct in its entire course; never more than one 
submarginal and three posterior cells present; the submarginal 
and marginal cells always open; basal cells never large, the second 
basal sometimes coalesceut with the discal cell, the anal cell present 
or absent; posterior cross vein rarely absent. Pulvilli always pres- 
ent ; empodia wanting ; claws of the male often larger than those 
of the female. 

For over sixty years dipterologists have divided the Mus- 
Hdie into two great series : Calyptratre and Acalyptrata-. 
In general there is no difficulty in determining to which series 
a given form belongs, but to this rule there are exceptions. 
Girschner's definitions seem better than any others known to 
me. They are as follows : 

Acalyptratae Squamula alaris always distinctly developed, hut 
never very large; squamula thoracalis usually lacking, at most 
present as an insignificant widening of the f re num squamulare. 
Posthumeral and intraalar rnacrochaetse not simultaneously pres- 
ent. Thorax usually without a complete transverse suture. Pos- 
talar callus absent. Hypopleural macrochaet* absent. 

Calyptratae. Squamula alaris always distinctly developed: squam- 
ula thoracalis very variable in size, in the higher forms larger than 
the squamula alaris, often very much larger. Both posthumera 
and intraalar macrochaBtae present. Thorax with a complete transl- 
verse suture. Postalar callus present and separated by a distinct 
suture from the dorsurn of the thorax. Hypopleural macroclwt:r 
present or absent. 

Even these definitions, as Girschner has pointed out. are 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. ,;;; 

not absolute, certain forms, especially among the Seatomy- 
/Maraud Sapromyzidse, being; by the definition. < 'al\ ptrat;e. 
while other very closely allied species are, by the definition. 
Acalyptratae. Both these families are considered as families 
of the acalyptrate series l>y the best anthoiities. 

(firschuer separates the Calyptrata 1 into two grand divi- 
sions: Authoiuyidae and Tachinid;e. which are by no m*an> 
identical with the families usually understood by those nann->. 

Anthomyidae. Hypopleural maerocluietae absent, If three steruo- 
pleuril macrochaetse Jare present their arrangement i> always i;-2. 
Elbow (if any) of the fourth longitudinal yein witliout appendix. 
Ventral membrane usually present. Development of the squamuh; 
thoracalis very variable. 

Tachinidae. Hypopleural macrochaeta? present. If three steruo- 
pleural macrochsete are present their arrangement is always 2:1 or 
1:1:1. Fourth longitudinal vein almostalways with an elbow, which 
frequently has an appendix. Ventral membrane usually not pres- 
ent. Squaniu la thoracalis always well developed, larger than the 
squamula alaris, sometimes very large. 

(Jirschner splits np his Tachinidu 1 into nine groups, one of 
which is the Calliphorinae, which may be thus defined : 

Calliphorinae. Hypopleural bristles present. Ventral membrane 
very rarely visible. Second ventral segment, in both sexes, lyini; 
with its edges upon and covering the edges of the correspond in_ 
dorsal segment, the other ventral segments lying free, at any rate 
in the male. Fifth ventral segment of the male frequently greatly 
developed, with its caudal border incised to a point beyond the 
middle. Usually only two posterior intraalar bristles. Color very 
frequently metallic. Arista, as a rule, long, plumose. Stigmata 
sometimes very large. Front of the male narrowed (eyc> som 
times in contact), that of the female wide. ^ 

The following American genera belong to this group: !'<>! 



l, r/iorniiti and Protocalliphora. It is (juite probable that 
the Mexican genera, TI/I-COHIIIHI and ('/i/<n-<>i>i't>r/<t. also belong 
here, but of these I have as yet seen no specimens, and Mr. 
van dcr NVulp's descriptions do not permit undoubted ronclu 
ssious to be drawn in the matter. 

Pol/cilia and ('<n>i]>xoiiii/i(i differ from the other genera ot 
the group in having the vibrissal angle some diMance dorsad 
of the edge of the mouth opening. I'ltllni'm has the thorax 
thickly beset with line, soft, woolly hair in addition to the 
inacroeh;rt;v. Fresh specimens show this very well, but if 



4 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

the specimen is somewhat worn the woolly hair can often only 
be seen on the mesoplenra or on the pteropleura beneath the 
wing. Compsomyia has no woolly hair and the clorsum of 
the thorax is distinctly striped. For this latter genus the 
name C7*/7/.s'on//a, proposed by Desvoidy in 1830, should 
have priority over Compsomyia. Of PoTlenia I have seen but 
one Xorth American species, P. mdis Fabr. Of Chrysowi/io 
I have two species, the common (\ m<i<-fUri<t Fabr. and an 
undescribed species from California. 

MeNciithrhiclld may be distinguished by the following char- 
acters : Elbow of fourth longitudinal vein not angular, but 
forming a gentle curve much as Graphomyia, the apical cn>s 
vein convex outwardly. The third longitudinal vein either 
without spines or with a very few at the extreme base. Genae 
naked. 

Cjinomia is a genus for which 1 find structural characters in 
the male sex only. The arista is usually plumose for not more 
than two- thirds! its length. The hypopygium is very prominent ; 
the apex of the abdomen ends with a pair of large, slightly 
curved, pointed processes, which are directed eephalad along 
the ventral surface of the abdomen, and usually more or le^- 
concealed by the fifth ventral segment ; this fifth ventral seg- 
ment is split in the median line from its caudal border about 
half way to its cephalic border. The female presents the 
most striking likeness to female Calliphorse. Neither the 
shape of the head, the extent of plumosity of the arista, nor 
the chsetotaxy being invariably such as to enable the sepa- 
ration to be made. It is true that an anterior iutraalar, 
or a third posterior achrostical macroclueta, is rarely present, 
but their presence, though rare, is a bar to making their ab- 
sence a generic character. I have found myself obliged to 
rely upon the rather more elongate form of CI/HOIIIHI and still 
more upon the pure metallic color of the abdomen, which is 
almost absolutely free from pollinose coating (except in ('. 
<'/<>IK/<I/<I Hough), to distinguish female Cynomyise from < 'alii - 
phorae. 

Of ('i/ii<>ini I know four species: nioi'litonnii \<, tniici-ictnid 
Hough, cl<ni</<tt(t Hough and lihlu Hough. 

The genera ( 1 <t//i/>lior<t. LiH'il'm and I'lionnni. established b\ 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 65 

Eobineaii-Desvoidy in 1830, have not been accepted by all sub- 
sequent writers on diptera. 

Macqnart in 1834-1835 accepted Cullijtliora and Ludlia ; 
Meigen in 1838 accepted Lucilia : Zetterstedt in 1845-1849 
and 1859 agreed with Meigen. Roudani in lS5(i and 1862, 
finding no characters on which to separate them, puts all three 
in one genus, Myaor N<> HUHIII/H. Schiner in 1862 recognizes 
CallijrfnH'd and Lin-ilia and includes Phormia in the latter. 
Finally at the present time Prof. Brauer accepts C<i//i/>/ior 
and Liir!H, but does not mention Phonnia. 

The fact is that a satisfactory characterization of these 
genera is very difficult. Still, I believe that it can be found 
in the arrangement of characteristic macro- and micro- cheetae 
of the geuae, thorax and third longitudinal vein of the wing. 
To these characters I would add the form of that part of the 
thorax which is candad the transverse suture. To complete 
the satisfactory distribution into genera of all the species of 
this group known to me I must establish a fourth genus, which 
I propose to call P>-o1<><-<iUii>ln>r for the two species Miinrti 
<r. a red Fall, and MUNCH cln-t/Non'litnt Meig. 

I consider riioniiid and I'rotocdHi/i/iord as less highly de- 
veloped, more primitive, than Luc/lid and Cd/lijtliord. because 
they combine characters of the latter and because their chse- 
totaxy is less regular, more \ariable and the individual ma 
crochceta 1 are frequently less well developed. The two former 
have the thorax candad the transverse suture distinctly flat- 
tened, \\ liile iii Luc Hid and < 'n/liji/iorn no such Hat ten ing exists. 

In Liid/id and < 'd//i/>/>ord the number of dorsocent ral and 
achroslical bristles caudad the suture is unvarying lor an\ 
species, and each individual macrochu-ta is well developed. 
In all the species that I have seen these dorsocent rals number 
three and these achrosi icaU either two or three. 

In riioniiid and I'ro/ontl/i/i/inni the posterior dorsocent rals. 
and achrosticals, one or both, vary in number or are poorh 
developed. 

Calltphora.Type ('. /-O////YO/VV/ L.thonix not flattened, caudad 
the transverse suture. Iii any sp cies the number of posterior dor- 
socentrab aud achrosticals is const-int, and botli seric> ron>i-t of 
well developed marrodueta 1 . Tlie geua? seen with an amplification 
of twenty diameters are distinctly hairy. The third longitudinal 



<66 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

vein has spines at its base only. The dorsal sin-face of the squamula 
thoracalis is hairy . 

The species known to nie which belong here are : vomitoria 
"L., erythrocephala Meig., violacea Meig., anthmcina Meig., 
latifrom nov. sp. and ni.gr ibticca nov. sp., which is, perhaps, 
only a variety of erythrocephala. 

Lucilia. Type L., camar L, Thorax not flattened caudad the 
transverse suture. In any species the number of posterior dorsocen- 
trals and achrosticals is constant and both series consist of well de- 
veloped macrochsetse. The genas seen witb an amplification of 
twenty diameters are absolutely naked. The spines of the third 
longitudinal vein are not limited to the extreme base, but extend 
well along the vein toward the small cross vein, say from two fifths 
to three quarters of that distance. The dorsal surface of both 
squamulae is bare. 

The species of Lucilia known to me are: cct'scir L., wrieat.a 
Meig., nobilis Meig., sylraritm Meig. and spinicosta Hough. 
Phormia Type Phormia regina Meig. Thorax somewhat flattened 
caudad the transverse suture. In any species the number of posterior 
dorsocentrals and achrosticals is inconstant; moreover, the macro- 
chaeta? of each series are notequally well developed, the most caudad 
being much the largest, and each succeeding one, as we passcephalad 
along the series, being usually smaller until the last one or two are 
so small as to be distinguishable with difficulty or not at all fi-om 
the surrounding- microchaetae. The geuae seen with an ampli- 
fication of twenty diameters are distinctly hairy. The spines of the 
third longitudinal vein are not limited to tne extreme base, but 
extend, roughly speaking, half way to the small cross vein The 
dorsal surface of the squamula thorcalis is bare. 

The species of Phormia known to me are: ret/hut Meig. and 
grintJamlica Zett. 

ProtocaJlt'i>li<ii-(i. Type P. azurea Fall. Thorax somewhat flat- 
tened caudad the transverse suture. The number of posterior dor- 
socentrals i> f urly constant, though not so absolutely invariable in a 
species as in Lucilia and Calliphorn ; eich macrochaetse of the series 
is well developed and all are of about the same size The posterior 
achrosticals are less well developed than the dorsocentrals, are va- 
riable in number in the same species and even on the two sides of 
the same specimen; in any specimen they may vary in si/e, these 
farthest cephalad being smallest. Thegenae seen with an amplifi- 
cation of twenty diameters are distinctly hairy, the hairs being 
much coarser than in Phormia or ( '/t/'i/i/iora. The spines of the 
third longitudinal vein are not limited to the extreme base, but ex- 
tend about balf way to the small cross vein. The dorsal surface of 
both squamnUe is bare. 

I am acquainted with two species of this genus: .:ur<' 
Fall, and chri/Horrhwa Meig. 



1899] ;: 

ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[The Conductors of ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS solicit and will thankfullyreceive 
items of news likely to interest its readers from any source. The author's n.-imi- 
will be given in each case, for the information of cataloguers and bibliograph- 
ers.] 

To Contributors, All contributions will be considered and passed upon at 
our earliest convenience, and, as far as may be, will be published according to 
date of reception. ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS has reached a circulation, both in 
numbers and circumference, as to make it necessary to put "copy" into the 
hands of the printer for each number three weeks before date of issue. This 
should be remembered in sending special or important matter for a certain 
issue. Twenty-five "extras," without change in form, will be given free, when 
they are wanted; and this should be so stated on the M.S., along with the num- 
ber desired. The receipt of all papers will be acknowledged. En. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., MARCH, 1899. 

EDITORIAL. 

Prof. Smith, in his obituary notice of the late Mr. Hubbard, 

in this number, says : "A pupil of Mr. Schwarx in methods 

of collecting, he soon equaled his master, while in getting at 

tin I't'ti/li/ rlttirurfcrisfir fdinid of a ret/ion he irx mic.rrt'llctl."' 

There are few collecting entomologists in this country Unit 

have this happy faculty of getting at the characteristic fauna, 

and it is this and this alone that is of value in the study of 

geographical regions and the distribution of species. The 

ordinary superficial collector picks up all the cosmopolitan 

species and all the showy things that are widely distributed, 

and often overlooks everything else. Some time ago the 

writer received a small collection of butterllies from Tucson. 

Arixona, and there was not a single species in the lot that is 

not found in Pennsylvania. Another lot from Arixona was 

almost entirely made up of common Eastern species. \Ve are 

constantly in receipt of local lists for publication in Tin: Xi;ws 

that show this defect of superficial collecting, and. therefore. 

they are hardly worth the room they take up. Mr. Hubbard's 

letters and Held notes will be published in Tin: N i:\vs. and. 

doubtless, much information on these points will be available 

from this prince of collectors. We wish our collectors of expe 

rieuce would publish more about their methods, for the bene 

lit of the entomological fraternity. 



68 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

Notes and News. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL GLEANINGS FROM ALL QUARTERS OF THE GLOBE. 



ON THE LARVA OF EVERGESTIS FUNALIS, GROTE.- Late iu July. 
1898, I noticed that the Portulacca which grows abundantly on the 
campus of the N. M. Agricultural College, Mesilla Park, N. M., 
was shrivelling up and turning brown. A closer examination showed 
that it was attacked by enormous numbers of pyralid larvae. Some 
of these larvae, collected July 28th, were described as follows : 

20. mm long, green, sage-green on back, with a transparent 
dark (not pigrnented) dorsal stripe; sides becoming darker (because 
more transparent) than the green subdorsal areas, until the level of 
the spiracles, where there is a greenish- white longitudinal band 
with a jagged upper edge; below this baud and beneath, is very 
pale green, with a pinkish suffusion above each leg. The piliferous 
tubercles just above the spiracles are darkened, and on the last two 
segments they are all dark, the dorsal ones variegated with whitish. 
Head pale ochreous, marbled with brown Legs all pale. A varie- 
ty has the sides and the ventral surface between the abdominal legs 
strongly suffused with pink. 

The moths bred from these larvae (emerging from August 6th on) 
are of two types, identical in markings, but differing iu color. One 
type, identified by Dr. H. G. Dyar as Emergent in fun-alt's, has the 
markings on the upper wings strong and blackish. The other has 
them very pale ochreous, quite inconspicuous. From the larvae I 
bred a parasite in fair numbers: this was identified by Mr. W. H. 
Ash mead as Tenielucha (formerly Porizori) facialis (Cresson). 

On September 4, 1895, the college campus at Mesilla Park was 
invaded by great numbers of another variable pyralid (Loxostege 
xiinil<ilis< Gn. det. Dyar). but Idid not find the larvte. 

T. D. A. COCKERKLL. 

MASSING OF < '<>< CINELLIDS. As a very much belated addition to 
the notes on this subject, published in the News, volumes viii and 
ix, the following items tiny be of interest, while their non-entomo- 
logical source may cause them to be overlooked by the Coleopterol- 
ogists In recently re iding Sir William Martin ( 'ouway's " The 
Alps Irorn End to End " (Westminster,Archibald ( 'unstable & Co , 
1895), I found on page 194 "Near the foot of the [Oberaar] glacier 
were countless lady-birds grouped on stones and even on the ice it- 
self [July 18th] ;" and on page '207 " The stone-covered Winter 
glacier, where there were again a quantity of lady-birds on the 
stones [July 21st] " P. P. CALVKRT. 

HABITS OF ISCHNURA KELLICOTTI (order Odouata). (See the NEWS 
tor November, 189S, page 209.) Writing of this species, in a per- 
sonal letter, itsdescriber, Mr. E. B. Williamson, si\ s : The first male 
1 took I thought was Enallagma getni/i<t/t/, which latter species, to- 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. <j9 



ether with E. siy/n/fiim, was abundant about the lily-pads. At 
the last I could tell it from E. <n'in!n<i1a as far as I could see them, 
either in flight or at rest. In its attacks upon Diptera and in 
alighting 1 , there was none of the hesitancy and fluttering of the 
Enallagmas. The Kellicotti RQW directly from one leaf to another 
as though they had determined on a new location before deserting 
their former resting-place. I never saw one at rest on any other 
location than a flat-floating leaf of the white water-lily. They 
were quarrelsome neighbors and frequently attacked E. yenifitnln 
and E. styii'ifum, though apparently without serious injury. At 
rest, the abdomen did not lie extended straight as is usual with 
Enallagmas and L rcrtir/ilis* They always seemed to stand on 
the leaves with the abdomen curved [convexly upward]. "VVheu a 
dash was made for a fly and the prey escaped, the disappointed 
dragonfly would open and close his wings nervously several times, 
and the abdomen would be drawn into a greater curve I found 
them at only two places the west end of Shriner and the west end 
of Round lakes, Indiana. 

SCALES ON APPLE-TREES IN EUROPE Since the appearance of the 
San Jose scale, the attention of European observers has been 
directed to determine whether the scale insects occurring on their 
own fruit trees do not lead a similar life Frank and Kriigf-r have 
regarded certain scales on Tirolese apples as a variety of the Sm 
Jose scale, on account of their resemblance. Mini raided the question 
whether such species as Asi>i<lio/iis ustrcirformfx. D/HX/)/* /tir/cola 
and Mytilaspis pomorum attack the fruit itself. The Hungarian 
entomologist, J. Jablonowski, in an article in Rovartani Lapok 
(Budapest) for January, 1899. answers that the first and the third of 
these three do, but that he has not yet found the second- mentioned 
upon fruit. 

COLEOPTERA COLLECTION IN NEW YoitK CITY. At the meeting of 
the New York Entomological Society, May 17, 1898, Mr. Beulcn 
miiller. curator of insects in the American Museum of Natural His- 
tory, stated that the Museum's collection of ( oleoptera was then 
being arranged, and he estimated that it contained at lea-t i:>n,(>on 
specimens. 

MOSQUITOES SPREAD DISEASE. London, Jan. 31. The Colonial 
Office has determined to institute an earnest inquiry into the 
causes of the increase of tropical diseases. The inquiry will have 
especial reference to the alarming spread of malaria in India and 
Africa. 

Recent research by eminent scientists in all parts of Kurope has 
traced the epidemics to mosquitoes and other insects bred in I lie 
marshes and on the shores of rivers and seas. Under the auspices of 

* This is contrary to my recollection of tin 1 i>rh:i\ i<>r c>r the individuals I <-oi- 
Icdcd ill New ,li-rsi'\ . I'll I 1.1 r I', t ' \ I.VKKT. 



70 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

the Colonial Office the scientists connected with the British Mu- 
seum are collecting mosquitoes from every part of the world. 

They have requested missionary societies and pioneer colonization 
companies to ask their missionaries and agents to assist in the work 
by sending as many specimens as possible, live bugs being pre- 
ferred. 

The object of the scheme is to classify the various species, in order 
to distinguish the disease-spreading kinds from such as are com- 
paratively innocuous. After this methods will be devised for a 
wholesale slaughter of the parasites. Philadelphia Press. 

" LET it alone, Willie," said the bad boy's mother. " Don't try 
to tear it open. It will be a beautful moth next year." 

" Mebhe it will, and mebbe it won't," replied the bad boy, pro- 
ceeding to dissect it. " All co " coons" look alike to me " - Chica- 
go Tribune. 

ALL friends and correspondents of the lamented Mr. H. G. Hub- 
bard, who have not yet received copies of his papers, " The Insect 
Guests of the Florida Land Tortoise"' (with "Additional Notes," 
etc. \ and " The Ambrosia Beetles of the United States," may obtain 
such by sending their addresses to the undersigned at the United 
States Department of Agriculture, "Washington, D. C. Various 
other papers bv Mr. Hubbard, mostly published in the Proc. 
Entomological Society, ot Washington, are also still available for 
distribution. E. A Schwarz. 

ON THE SUDDEN APPEARANCE AND DISAPPEARANCE OF SOME SPE- 
CIES OF INSECTS. Apropos to the several notes in the February 
number of ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, relating to the sudden appear- 
ance of some insects in great numbers, where they had before been 
rarely, if at all, observed, and the equally sudden disappearance of 
other species, it may be interesting to know of similar phenomena 
in Ohio. For years I had been trying to rear hymenopterous para- 
sites from tfcolytus ruyulosus, but invariably failed to do so. though 
other entomologists were seemingly able to accomplish this with 
little trouble In 1897 several young fruit trees were killed by the 
experimental use of kcroseLe. ai.d were later attacked by Ihisbeetle 
These trees were cut in sections and placed in small boxes in the 
insectary, and during the winter and spring of 1897-8 hundreds of 
individuals of Chiroplatys colon, an English species, previously 
known iu this country, emerged therefrom, whereas before I had 
not been able to rear a single one. In the fall of 1897 some canes of 
wild blackberry were taken from a gully near Wooster and placed 
in the insectary of the Experiment Station . These canes were badlly 
infested by Diaspi* i-o.w, and from these scale insects there emerged 
myriads ot females of Arrhenophagus clii(>ii<tx/>i<lis Aur., while 
canes from precisely the same spot, brought in in the Fall of 1898, 
have not given us a single individual, though the Di axpix was 
present in great numbers. In 1890 the Harlequin Cabbage bug. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 7^ 

Muryantia h/strt'onica, appeared about Wooster and developed in 
considerable numbers. It was also found both to the north aii'l 
the south in numbers sufficient to attract attention, but it has not 
since been observed farther north than fully forty miles south of 
Wooster until 1898. when it seemed to be working slowly north- 
ward again. "F. M. WEBSTER. 

ALLORHINA AS A FRUIT PEST. With reference to the note on p. 
48 it may be well to state that the Arizona species is A. innfuhilis, 
not A nitida. This A. mutabilis is a well-known fruit pest in New 
Mexico and Arizona, as may be seen by reference to Insect Life 
and the reports of the Association of Economic Entomologists. 

T. D. A. COCKERELL. 

MACHILIS COX.TUNCTA, Folsom.- This is to be added to the fauna 
of the United States. I found it at Dripping Spring, Organ Moun- 
tains, New Mexico; it was identified for me by Mr. Folsom him- 
self. The species was originally described from Mexico- T. D. A. 
COCKERELL. 

PROFESSOR GILLETTE'S NOTE ON ALLORHINA NITIDA LINN AS A 
FRUIT PEST- I am sorry that Professor Gillette did not notice 
my article on Allorhnia nitida in Bulletin No. 10, New Series, of 
the Division of Entomology, published in January, 1898, pp. 20 26. 
If lie had done so he would have seen that the insect which damages 
fruit at Phoenix, Ariz., was probably Allorhina wutdbilis &iA not 
Allorliina nit (da He would further have noticed that damage to 
fruit by Allorhina miitabilis has been a matter of record for several 
years, and, further, that similar damage to fruit by Allorhina ni- 
tiiln is also well known. L. O. HOWARD. 

PRESERVATION OF LARV.E. Prof. Packard and Mr. C- V. Riley 
both mention various methods of pi'eserviug larva?, but I find the 
following to be the cheapest, simplest and least dangerous of all : 

Drop the larvae as soon as collected into a pint or quart jar of 2 per 
cent formalin solution. Date the same and let it stand for a week. 
Remove the larvae, putting several ot each species into a (J or 8 dr. 
"shell bottle," filling with fresh 2 per cent, formalin Soak all 
corks in pa'-atin and keep bottles upright. L have had especially tine 
results withl ight green Sphingidir and Bombycidae. which have re- 
mained in perfect condition since July, 1897. 

Live pupa 1 may be injected and placed in the same bottles, making 
an inexpensive but beautiful collection. 

I have several Sphingidu> in the original leaf, covered with 
ichneumon in all stages of development. 

Some writers advise boiling specimens, but this \ have never 
tried. Should be pleased to hear from others on this subject. 

C ABBOTT DAVIS, B. S., Providence, H I. 

CALLIDKYAS EUBULE IN MKIKATION. The account of a migra- 
tion of Callidriia.* etibiile, communicated by Mr. Lancaster Thoma> 



70 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

to the Entomological Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, 
and briefly presented in ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS (x, 21), recalls some 
observations made upou the same species in the autumn of 1894. 
These observations demonstrated in a remarkable way the exist- 
ence of a phase of insect migration hitherto seldom recognized the 
tendency of the migrants, when their number is not excessive, to 
proceed in Indian file over long- distances. 

The migration in question passed through the village of Guilford, 
Conn., near the shore of Long Island Sound, in the course of three 
days, September 22, 23 and 24. It was carefully studied by Mr. II. 
C. Dudley, Mr. E. G. Dudley and myself, with the valuable co- 
operation of several friends living in the town. Throughout the 
period the wind blew from the south, and the butterflies journeyed 
southwest, with swift and steady flight, for the most part in one dis- 
tinct, unwavering line. During one day only (September 23) a 
second line of flight was detected, parallel to the first and half a 
mile farther inland- 

The main path of the migration passed through gardens and 
farms, over marshes and streams; obstacles were avoided by rising 
into the air, with scarcely any lateral deviation, while in open coun- 
try an elevation of some five feet was maintained On the first and 
second days the flight began at about 9 a- m and lasted until about 
5 p. m. ; on the third it began at 11 a. m . and ceased altogether in the 
middle of the afternoon. During the first day individual migrants 
passed the point of observation at intervals ranging from five to ten 
minutes; thereafter the average interval tended to increase 

Few of the migrants were captured, it being considered of pri- 
mary importance to watch their flight. The males appeared to be 
about twice as numerous as the females, and all were somewhat 
worn, though not to such an extent as might have been expected. 
When struck with the frame of the net, but not secured (three cases), 
the insects darted to one side, and sought temporary retreats in 
clusters of leaves, or fruits whose color harmonized with their own. 
Their quick perception of occasional yellow patches amid the pre- 
vailing green of the vegetation was significant. 

Before, during and after the migration many lazy stragglers of the 
same species were found among the flower beds of the village They 
showed no tendeucv to follow their more active brethren, but lin- 
gered behind until too weak and battered for lengthy flight. One 
elderly lady was able to capture seven of them in her fingers. 

Whence the migration proceeded is an unsolved question ; doubt- 
less in some favored locality to the northeast these persistent in- 
vaders from the South had maintained themselves for a short time, 
only to be forced to retreat, like many a generation of their ancestor-. 
before the early frosts. The recent abundance of fresh specimens of 
eubule at Nouquitt, on the Massachusetts coast (Psyche, vol. 8. p. 299), 
is an exampleof the way in which this species has repeatedly sought 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 7;; 

to extend its range into' New England, and may have terminated in 
another homeward pilgrimage. 

Lastly, by what means the migrants were enabled to follow one 
another so unerringly upon their journey we have no means of learn- 
ing. A possible clue to the situation lies in the fact that both sexes 
il' < iilmlc exhale a faint odor, which has been compared to the fra- 
grance of violets, [f we assume that from hour to hour, nay even 
from day to day, sufficient of this fleeting perfume lingered in the 
air to show the way to succeeding but terflies, then we are confronted 
by a wonderful phenomenon indeed. 

WILLIAM L. W- FIELD, Milton, Mass. 

THE NEW PEACH MITE Prof. Johnson's note in December 
EXTOMOLCK AI. XKWS and Prof. Webster's in January remind me 
that it may be interesting to note that the peach mite, to which 
Mr, Johnson refers, is quite widely distributed in the United States. 
It was first pointed out to me by Prof. Waite. After that I found 
it at the following stations in Florida: "Macclenny, Glen St. Mary. 
DeFuniak, Lake City, and, very recently, at Cocoauut Grove. It 
also occurrs in the Missouri Botanical Garden on an almond-tree. 
The effect is the same as in the case of the peach-tree, causing what 
may be termed a silvering of the leaves. While attending a meeting 
of the Georgia Horticultural Society I found it at Savannah, in 
'97. and a >'e.ir later at Columbus. It occurs also on the peach-trees 
of the Experiment Station ot Georgia, at Experiment, Ga , and at 
the Iowa Experiment Station, at Ames, la. It is also found in 
Eastern Iowa, at Le Claire. These observations stretch over a 
considerable time and likewise over a considerable area. I think 
the mite may occur in any section where the almond or peach is 
growing. In Florida it rarely causes any perceptible damage to 
nursery stock, from the fact that as soon as the rainy season sets 
in the mite is almost eradicated. As Prof. Johnson is making a 
study of this mite, I thought it would be interesting to note it- 
occurrence . 

Another mite, which seems to belong to this same genus and U 
possibly the same species, occurs on rose leaves, causing on these a 
somewhat metallic appearance' P. II Hoi.i s. 



74 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

Entomological Literature, 



COMPILED BY P. P. CALVERT. 



Under the above head it is intended to mention papers received at the Acad- 
emy of Natural (Sciences of Philadelphia pertaining to the Entomology of the 
Americas (North and South). Articles irrelevant to American entomology 
will not be noted. Contributions to the anatomy, physiqlogy and embryology 
of insects, however, whether relating to American or exotic species, will be re- 
corded. The numbers in HEAVY-FACED TYPE refer to the journals, as num- 
bered in the following list, in which the papers are published ; * denotes that the 
paper in question contains descriptions of new North American forms. Titles 
of all articles in foreign languages are translated into English; usually such 
articles are written in the same language as the title of the journal contain- 
ing them, but when such articles are in other languages than English, French, 
German or Italian, this fact is indicated in brackets. 



4. TheCauadiau Entomologist, London, Out., Jau.,'99. 5. Psyche, 
Cambridge, Mass., Feb., '99. 6. Journal of New York Entomolog- 
ical Society, Dec. ,'98. 7. TJ. S. Department of Agriculture, Division 
of Entomology, Washington; publications of, '98. 15. Biologia Cen- 
tral! Americana, London, part cxlv, Dec. '98. 21. The Entomologist's 
Recoi'd, London, Jan. 15, '99. 36. Transactions, Entomological So- 
ciety of London, '98, part 4, Dec. 22. 38. Wiener Entomologische 
Zeitung. xvii, 10, Dec. 31, '98. 45. Deutsche Entomologische Zeit- 
schrift, '98. 2, Berlin, Dec. 55. Le Naturaliste, Paris, Jan. 15, '99. 
67. Entomologiske Tidskrift, xix, Stockholm, '98. 89. Zoologische 
Jahrbiicher, xii, 1, Jena, Dec. 30, 98. 100 Verhaudluugen, Deutsche 
Zoologische Gesellschaft, 8te Versammlung, Leipsic, '98. 

The General Subject. B u t 1 e r, A . G. On some new species of 
African Pierinae in the British Museum, with notes on seasonal 
forms of Beleuofs, 36. D a h 1 . Dr. Apparatus for thequantita 
tive determination of visits to flowers by insects, 100. L a m e e r e , 
A. Notice of Dr. Ernest Candeze, portrait, Aunales, Societe Ento- 
mologique de Belgique, xlii, 12,^Brussels, Dec. 26, '98. L u c a s . 
R., Stadelmanu, H., Waudolleck, B., Kolbe, 
H . J . , V e r h o e f f , C . Scientific works on Entomology during 
the year ]895. 748pp. Archiv fur Naturgeschichte, Ixii, ii, 2. Ber- 
lin, Dec., 1898. M e r r i f i e 1 d , F . and others. The coloring of 
pupa? of P. machaon and P. napi caused by the exposure to colored 
surroundings of the larvae preparing to pupate, 36, Proceedings. 
N u s s b a u m , M . On parthenogenesis among butterflies, Archiv 
fur Mikroscopische Anatomic liii, 3, Bonn, Dec. 1!. '!)S. P a u 1 s. 
On the Experimental Zoological Studies of Dr. M. Standfuss. Soci- 
etas Entomologica, Ziirich-Hottingen, Jan. 1, 9!). P o u 1 t o n , 
E. B. [Seasonal dimorphism in the genus /Vrr/VJ. 36, Proceed- 



18<M>] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 75 

ings. S a v i 1 1 e- K e u t , W . The Naturalist iu Australia. 
London : Chapman & Hall, Limited. 1897. 4to. 302pp. 59 pis., 
104 text figs. Chap. ix. Insect Oddities, pp. 252-265. 

Economic Entomology. A n o n. Abstracts of recent publications, 
7, Experiment Station Record, x. 5. '!)!. A n o n. On the San Jo-' 
scale. Wiener 11 lustrirte Gar ten Zeitung, Dec., '98. B e u t o u, F. 
Bee Keeping, figs.. 7, Farmers' Bulletin Xo. 59 B 1 a n d t'o r d , 
W. F. II. On some Oriental Seolytida? of economic importance, 
with descriptions of five new species, 36. D a m m e r, U . The 
San Jose scale. Gardener's Chronicle, London, Jan. 14, '99. D a- 
g u i n , A . Edible insects of antiquity and of our own days, 55. 
Felt, E . P . Fourteenth Report of the State Entomologist on 
injurious and other insects of the State of New York. Bulletin of 
N. Y. State Museum, v. pp. ir>:<-2 ( .>:>. Albany, N. Y"., Dec., '98. 
Fletcher. J Evidence before the Select Standing Committee 
of the House of Commons on Agriculture and Colonization. May 
1898. Printed by order of Parliament [Ottawa, Canada]. Gil- 
lette, C. P. Lite-history of the sheep scab-mite, Psoroptes 
<-iiiiiiiiitiif<, 4. G r i 1 1 , C. The [Swedish] State Entomological 
Institute. 2 pis. [in Swedish], 67. K e n y o n , F . C . Abstracts 
of some recent publications, 7, Experiment Station Record, x, 4. 
L a m p a . S . [Report of work of the State Entomological Insti- 
tute, etc., for 1897 in Swedish], 67. M a . r c h a 1 . P. Aspidfotu* 
pernfcios ts, or the San Jose scale of the United States Bulletin, 
Societe Nationale d'Acclimatation de France, Paris, Sept., '98. 
M a r 1 a t t , C . L . The principal insect enemies of the grape, 7, 
Farmers' Bulletin Xo. 70. M otter, M . G. A contribution to 
the study of the fatiua of the grave. A study of one hundred and 
fifty disinter raents, with some additional experimental observations, 
6. R enter, E . A serious attack on the apple fruit by Aryi/- 
resthfa conjuf/ella Zell. iu Europe, 4. S a n d e r s o u, E. D 
Sweet potato insects, figs., Bulletin 59, Maryland Agric. Exper. 
Station, College Park, Md. Jan., '99. S m i t h , J. B. Ento- 
mological circulars Xos. 1-20. State of Xew Jersey. State Board 
of Agriculture. [Xot dated. Leaflets for distribution to farm- 
ers, etc.] 

Arachnida. C a m b r i d g e , O . P. Arachnida- Araueidea.* pp. 
281-8, 15. K r a e p e 1 i n . K . Protest concerning the Limit- in -]><- 
cies of the genus Scorpio, Zuologisi-her Anzeiger. Lvipsic. !)(. _'!>. 
'98. P i e r s ig, R. The By drachuida of Germany (cont.), 13 
pis. Biblinthf.i Zoologica, heft 22. v. Stuttgart. Rec'd. Feb. 2, 
'99. S c h i m k e w i t s c li . W . On the development of the ali- 
mentary canal in some Arachnida. .'! pls..Travaux, Socit'-tt'- Imperiale 
des Naturalistes, St. Petersbourg, xxix. 2. '98. S 1 o s s o n . Mrs. 
A. ;T. List of Aruiea? taken in Franconia, N. H., 6. S Iran d, 
E. Revision of the Scandinavian >pecies of the genus 
(Latr.) [in Swedish]. 67. 



76 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

Orthoptera. Bordage, E . On the localization of the regen- 
erative surfaces in the Phasmida? (trans.), Annals and Magazine of 
Natural History, London, Jan., '99. B u r r. M. See Green, E. 
E. G r e e u , E . E . Further notes on Dyscritina Westw. With 
an appendix on the species of Dyscritina reared by Mr. Green, by 
M. Burr. 2 pis., 36. M o r s e , A. P. The distribution of the 
New England locusts, map. 5. d e S a u s s u r e, H. and P i c- 
tet, A. Orthoptera,* pp. 417-456, pi*, xx-xxii, 15. S h a r p , 
D. Account of the Phasmida?. with notes on the eggs, 3 pis. 
Zoological Results based on material from New Britain, New 
Guinea, Loyalty Islands and elsewhei-e, collected during the years 
1895, 1896 and 1897, by Arthur Willey Part I. Cambridge: at the 
University Press. 1898. 4to. Tutt, J. W- Migration and 
dispersal of insects; Orthoptera, 21. 

Hemiptera. C h a m p i o n , G. C. Rhynchota Heteroptera* 
vol. ii, pp. 177-192, pi. xi. 15. E h r h o r u, E. M. Five new, 
Coccidae.* 4' F o w 1 e r , W" W . Rhynchota Homoptera,* vol. 
ii, pp. 201-216, pi. xiii, 15. P a r r o t t, P. J. Aspidiotus fer- 
ndldi (Ckll.), sub-sp. cockerelli sub-sp, nov.. figs,* 4. Q u a i n t- 
ance, A. L. New, or little known. Aleurodidae, i. 1 pi., 4. 
Webster, F. M. On the relations of a species of ant, Lasnis 
amer/i'ftiitis.to the peach root louse, Aphis pr> mi cola, 4; Odor of the 
San Jose scale, Aspidiotus perniciosus, 4. 

Coleoptera. -Born, P . Ceroglossus dynastes KOV. sp., Verhand- 
lungen kk. zoologisch-botanischen Gesellschaft in Wien, xlviii, 9, 
Dec. 23, '98. - C h a in p i o u , G . C . A list of the Clavicorn Coleop- 
tera of St. Vincent, Grenada, and the Grenadines, 36. C ockerell, 
T. D. A. Life-zones in New Mexico, ii. The zonal distribu- 
tion of Coleop^ra. Bulletin 28, New Mexico College of Agricul- 
ture and Mechanic Arts, Mesilla Park, N. M., Dec., '98. E s c h e r- 
ich. K. On the anatomy and biology of Paussus turcicus, figs., 
2 pis, 89. F 1 e t c h e r , J . The bite of Ottorhynchus ovatus,4. 
G o r h a m , H . S . Coleoptera,* vol vii, pp. 249-256, 15. v . 
H e y d e n. L . Catalogue of the Coleoptera of Siberia, including 
those of the eastern Caspian i-egiou, Turcrnenia, Turkestan, North- 
Thibet and the Amur region. Supplements IL and III. Heraus- 
gegeben von der Deutschen Entomologischeu Gesellschaft. Berlin, 
'98. H o m u g r e u, N. Contribution to the knowledge of the 
bursa copulatrix in theElaterida?.2 pis. [in Swedish], 67 II o r n , 
W . On types of Cicindelidtf in some English collections, 45; Four 
new Cicindelid species, 45. Lea, A. M. Revision of the 
Australian Curculionidae belonging to the sub-family Crypt orhyn- 
chides, ii. Proceedings, Linneau Society of New South Wales, '98, 
pt ii, Sydney, Aug 30, '98. P i c , M . Description of new Cole- 
optera, 55. S c h e n k 1 i n g , S . Ten new Clerida> with remarks 
on already described species,* 45. W a 1 k e r, J . J. Coleoptera 
of an old ash-tree, 21. X a m b e u, C a p t , Habits and uietamor- 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 77 

phoses of insects (Longicornes) (cont.), 1'E change Revue Linneenne 
Lyon, Dec., 1897. 

Diptera. C o q u i 1 1 e t t, D. W- Description of a new P*/- 
fopa,* 4 M i k, J. On the life history of Ilhayoletis cerasi L., 
with some remarks on the larvae and puparia of the Trypetida? and 
on the antennae of the Muscid larvae. 1 pi , 38. 

LepidoDtera. B u t 1 e r , A. G . Notes on the American forms 
of Km'hloe Hiibn.. 4. C h a p m a n . T. A. The larva of Erio- 
cephala allionella, 36 C o q u i 1 1 e t t , D . W . Descriptions of 
some Lepidopterous larvae. 6. -D r u c e . H . Lepidoptera Fletero- 
cera,* vol. ii, pp 521-536, 15. -D y a r . H . G . Notes on certain 
South American Cochlidiidae and allied families, 6; The life- 
histories of the New York slug caterpillars, xvii, 1 pi., 6 
F 1 e t c h e r , J . Papilio njax var. mfHTrtlus\n British Columbia , 
4. M of fat. J. A. A southerner arrested in Canada, 4. 
Nussbaum, M. See the General Subject. O u d e m a n s, 
J . T. Butterflies from castrated larva?, their appearance and be- 
havior, figs., 3 pis., 89. R e b e 1 , H. To knowledge of the 
respiratory organs of aquatic Lepidopterous larvae, 1 pi., 89. 
Renter, E. The system it ic position of P*<>tn/o/>i>t/f/ti, 21. 
R i p p o n , R . H . F . loones Ornithopterorum : A monoafnph 
of the Rhopalocerous genus Ornithoptera, or bird wing butterflies. 
Published by the Autnor. London. Pt. 13. Rec'd Feb. 2. '99.- 
S k i n n e r ,H . A new butterfly from Utah.* 4. S m i t li , H . G . 
Rhopalocera Exotica, being Illustrations of New, Rare or Unn'gurel 
Species of Butterflies. With colored drawings and descriptions. 
Part 47. Jan., 1899. London : Gurney and Jackson S p ii 1 e r , A 
On the recent results of Lepidopterology and the classification of the 
Tineins, figs., 103. U r e c h , F . Communications on the results 
of this yeir's aberrative and " chromitotara^h iischeu" experiments 
on species of Vftiirvstr, Bulletin, Socit'-tt- Zoologique Suisse, '98 
Geneva. 

Hymetnptera A u o n . Mr and Mrs. G. W. Peckham's " Ou the 
instincts and habits of the solitary wasps," Revue Scientifique, Piris t 
Jan. 21, '99. C o c ke r e 1 1, T. D. A. Postscript ,011 Perdi/a, ' 
5. F orel. A. Piribiosis of ants, Archives des S Men -es P.iys- 
iques et Naturelles, ciii, (4), vi, 12. Geneva, Dec. 15, '98. K i r b y , 
W. F. Marvels of ant life. London: S W. Partridge & Co. 
189S. 12mo. 174 pp , figs K o n o w , F . "VY . A new system o f 
the Chalastogastra? [A criticism of that lately proposed by W. H. 
Ashmead.], 38. S e u r a t , L . G Observations on the gfenitil 
organs of the Braconida?, figs., Aunales des Sciences Naturelles, 
Zoologie, (8) vii, 5-6. Paris. O^t., '98 ; On the formation of the he id 
of the Hymenoptera at the moment of their passing into the nymph 
stage, Comptes Reudus, 1' Academic des Sciences, Paris. J in. 2, 99. 
Strand, E . List of the Hymeuoptera of Norway [in Latin], 
67. W e b s t e r , F . M . See Hemiptera. 



78 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

DOINGS OF SOCIETIES. 

A regular meeting of the Newark Entomological Society was 
held at Turn Hall, Sunday, January 8th, at 4 p. ra. President Bis. 
choft" presided, ten members present. Mr. Broadwell gave a list of 
captures made by himself and Mr, Weidt at Boonton. N- J., August 
20, 1898, with notes whether rare or common. 

Crocota rubicundaria, corumou locally. 

Noctua Inbvicans, very commou at Sugar. 

Mamestra legitirna, rare at Sugar. 

Hadena spntatrix, common at Sugar. 

Hadena devastrix, rare at Sugar. 

Hadena modica, rare at Sugar. 

Perigea xanthioides. common at Sugar. 

Hyppa xylinoides, common at Sugar. 

Euplexia lucipara, rare at Sugar. 

Leucania albilinea, rare at Sugar. 

Leucauia pseudargyria, common at Sugar. 

Orthodes infirma, rare at Sugar- 

Pyrophila pyramidoides. very common at Sugar. 

Erastria carneola, common at Sugar. 

Pararellia bistriaris, rare at Sugar. 

Psendoglossa lubricalis, common at Sugar. 

Endropia amcenaria, common in field. 

Metrocampa margaritata, rare in field. 

Acidalia inductata, common in field. 

Boarmia crepesculina. commou in field- 

Xarithorhoe fluctuata, rare in field. 

Phlycteenia tertialis, very common in field. 

Pyrausta in sequalis, rare in field. 

Pyrausta argyralis, common in field. 

Evergestis straminalis, common in field. 

Crambus vulvigellus, common in field. 

Mr. Angleman remarked that he bred Tlydroecfa cat<ij>lu'<t<-t<i on 
wild lettuce. 

Mr. Weidt reported the capture of Hydroecia necopina at light 
at Newark. 

Donations were made to the Society's collection by Messrs. 
Brehme, Weidt, Herpers and Seib. 

Mr. Broadwell remarked that he took a specimen of Hm>t'ii 
scabra from under the bark of a tree December 24, 1898. 

Mr Augelmau proposed Mr. Ernest Mourner, who was unani- 
mously elected a member, A. J. WEIDT, Secretary. 

At the meeting of the Feldman Collecting Social held January 18, 
at the residence of Mr. H. W Weuzel, 1523 South Thirteenth street, 
Philadelphia, ten persons were present. The President, Dr. D. M. 
Castle, read his annual address, reviewing the origin and progress of 
the society. Mr. Wenzel recorded the capture, by silting, of Apion 
permmut-um, Phtsnonotum exstrfatinn and J'hithi/f/nix cunsor, along 
the New Jersey shore of the Delaware river, opposite Philadelphia. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 7 

They had not before been reported from Xew Jersey. He described 
the method of sifting' for Coleoptera, aud spoke of the good results 
obtained bv allowing the iV/6/v'.v to remain in a warm place for a 
longer period than is usual with collectors. 

Mr. Johnson remarked on several new species of Diptera, and on a 
number of species not before recorded from New Jersey, which he 
had collected at the Delaware Water Gap during a few days in 
July, 1898. Of the Diptera taken during that short period he had 
so far identified 131 species. He also referred to a recent paper by 
Stein on the Anthomyiidae. and stated that miuy of the new species 
described therein are no doubt identical with some of Walker's 
species, whose descriptions had been entirely disregarded by Stein, 
although they are not always entirely useless for identification. At 
any rate, the speaker held, Walkers species will retain precedence 
when his types are restudied 

Dr. Skinner suggested that when the type of an unidentified and 
poorly described species is no longer in existence, it is advisable to 
decide on a type to be known thereafter as the species in question- 
He also referred to a species of Painphila from Clementon, N. J., 
August 3. taken by Mr. Fox, which he had believed to be a new 
species, but he is now satisfied that it is simply a variety of P attains. 
a Southern species. Another specimen had been taken by Mr. H. 
Wenzel. at DaCosta, N. J., July 19. The species had been searcher! 
ior subsequently on several occasions, but none others had been found 
in Ne w Jersey . The speaker possessed a specimen of the variety from 
Florida. He also recorded the capture of Ntsomades ausonius a.n& 
.2V". petrolling ii} southern New Jersey, both being new to the State- 

The following officers were elected for 1899: President, Dr. D. 
M. Castle; Vice President, Charles W Johnson: Secretary, Wil- 
liam J. Fox ; Treasurer, Henry W "Wenzel. 

At the invitation of Dr. Skinner the social will meet at his resi- 
dence. 71(! North Twentieth street, on March 15th. 

WILLIAM J. F<>\. Secretary. 

A MEKTIX<; of the Entomological section of the Academy of 
Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was held January 2i. 1S99 Mr. 
Philip Laurent, director.presiding : nine persons present The ne\v 
Director, in taking the chair, said that he appreciated the honor of 
his election, that lie accepted the office and would do what he could 
to further the interests of the Section. Mr Laurent donated to the 
collection two males of the Chinese mantid, Tenoilera .v//>r//.sY.v 
S MISS., taken at Mei-han's nursery, (icrmaiitown. Philadelphia, in 
the past reason. A notice of the death of Dr. J. A. Lintner was 
read. 

Mr. L'Uirent stated that he had seen a specimen of siai/omuntis 
Carolina which had been taken on a wharf in this city. He al>o 
exhibited both >e\e- of 'l'rno<li-ra .v///r//.v/X and called attention tu ;i 
noticeable color difference : in the temale the upper wing is entirely 



gO ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

green, whereas in the male the costal margin only is green. He 
said there was no doubt that the species had gained a firm foothold 
in Median's nursery and was well established there; in the abdo- 
men of this mantid he had found parasitic worms. 

Mr. C. W.Johnson spoke of a class of names in Dipterological 
literature based on the galls only, the imago and in most cases the 
larva being unknown. Referring to Cecidomyia raccinif Osten 
Sacken ( Monog. 1, 19G, 18(52), based on a " cock's comb "-shaped gall 
on the leaves of the huckleberry ( Vaccinium) and Cecidomyia vac- 
ciini J. B. Smith, which infests the cranberry <N. J. Agric. Expint. 
Sta., spec, bull K, Feb. 90). its complete life history described and 
figured and its generic determination correct ; while the imago of 
C. vaccinii O. Sacken mar prove to be a different genus or perhaps 
belong to another family. Which name should stand? Further 
discussed by Messrs. Skinner and Calvert for and against Prof. 
Smith's species, Dr. Calvert insisting that no matter what genus 
Osteu Sackeu's species proved to be, his name would have priority 
and Prof Smith's name would have to bechanced. Mr. Johnson 
proposes the name Cecidomyia oxycoccana for Prof. Smith's spe- 
cies 

Dr. P. P. Calvert showed a pair of C'alopteryx <i/>ic<ilts Burin., 
taken at Tom's River, New Jersey, in 1889, by Mr- L. Riederer of 
New York City, the interest of this locality (not previously re- 
corded) being that, although Burmeister's types are said to have 
come from Philadelphia, the species has not been taken near there 
formany years. He also showed an immature Coleopterous larva 
stated to have come from the bed jf a consumptive patient ; it was 
of a species of Tenebroides and probably came from the bed-filling. 

Mr. Howard A. Snyder, of Hermit Lane, Roxborough, Philadel- 
phia, was elected an Associate of the Section. 

HENRY SKINNER, M. D 

Recorder. 
o 

OBITUARY. 



''Our poor friend, HENRY GUERNSEY HUBBARD, died here yester- 
day, January 18, 1899, at 11 o'clock p. m." signed E. A. Schwarz, 
and dated at Crescent City, Florida. 

This brief note marks the passing of an Entomologist who de- 
serves much more than a casual notice because of his pre-eminence 
as a scientific collector, particularly of Coleoptera, and of the in- 
fluence which in a quiet way he exerted upon the condition of our 
American collections. 

Mr. Ilubbard was born May 6, 1850, and was thus less than forty- 
nine years old at the time of his death. He entered Harvard in 189, 
graduated in due course in 1873, and continued his Entomological 
studies with Dr. Hag-en during the summer ot that year. Mr. G. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 81 

R. Crotch was at that time working at Cambridge, as was also Mr. 
E. A Seh warz, who became his instructor in methods of collecting. 
During the winter of 1873-4 Messrs, Hubbard and Sdi\virz sys- 
tematically investigated the hibernating quarters of the Coleoptera 
near Cambridge, turning up species theretofore undreamed of, in 
utterly unheard of numbers. Mr. Hubbard's share of this became 
the property of the Cambridge Museum, and is known as the 

'Winter Collection." 
The friendship formed between Messrs. Hubbard and Schwarz 

during this period was based upon mutual esteem and admiration 
on the part of each of qualities not possessed by the other, and it 

lasted without break to Mr. Hubbard's death. 

In the summer of 1874 they collected near Detroit, Mich., which 

was Mr. Hubbard's home, and at this time the Detroit Scientific 
Association was organized, with the view of getting up a local col- 
lection of Natural History and other specimens in time for the meet- 
ing of the A. A. A. S., which was to be held in 1875 

During the winter of 1874-5 Mr. Hubbard collected in Florida, 
returning in time to get all the material in shape before the meeting 
of the American Association, then under the presidency of Dr. 
John L. Lecoute An unusual number of the working entomolo- 
gists of the country attended this meeting, of whom Dr. Leconte 
and the Messrs. Grote, Lintner. Osten-Sacken and liiley, became 
the guests of Mr. Bela Hubbard, the father of Mr. H. (i. Hubbard. 

The little outbuilding in the Hubbard grounds, containing the 
collection of insects, immediately became a centre of interest, the 
material there stored being unparalleled for wealth of specimens 
and with so many new forms that Dr. Leconte declared that it 
made it necessary to re- write part of his "Classification." Here 
was formed that personal friendship with Dr. Leconte which lasted 
to the death of the latter, and no better correspondents did Dr- 
Lecoute ever have than the Messrs. Hubbard and Schwar/ 

[ri 1876-77 our collectors investigated the Lake Superior region. 
and made the phenomenal collection which formed the basis of the 
paper published by Dr. Leconte, in April, 1878. 

In 187!> Mr. Hubbjird was engaged as the naturalist of the Stale 
ideological Survey of Kentucky, under Prof. Shaler, and amoni: 
other matters explored the Mammoth Cave, making known its 
peculiar fauna of blind insects. 

Becoming pos-e-^ed of a piece of laud near Cres.-ent City, Florida, 
in 1880, he devoted himself for a time to the horticultural interest - 
f that State, coin inning indeed to the time of his death. 

In issi he was engaged ;is ;i >pechl agent for the Division of En- 
tomology by Dr. C V. Kiley. working lirst on cotton insects, and 
afterward on those injurious to the orange: there-ult- nt the latter 
study being published as a bulletin of the department in issr>. It 
Was in the course of this work that he discovered and |iertectcd a 
practical method of emulsify ing kenene -o a> to allow it- dilution 
with water for insecticide purpose-. 



82 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

The semi-tropical region of Florida had always interested him 
greatly, and this be outlined in 1885, paving the way for the rich 
finds made by Mr. Schwarz a few years later 

Always on the look-out for unusual faunas, that of the Hot 
Springs in the Yellowstone Park was studied in 1890 and 1891, and 
a year later a trip through the northwest with Mr. Schwarz, 
yielded accumulations which have not been even yet reported upon. 

The burrows made by (he Florida Land Tortoise or "Gopher" 
were investigated in 1895 and an altogether new fauna was there 
discovered. A new visit to the Lake Superior region in 1896 re- 
sulted in an admirable study of a Coccid infesting- the Birch, and 
this was followed in 1896 by a study of the "Ambrosia" beetle-. 
opportunity for which was given by the enormous increase of these 
beetles in the dead and dying trees, killed or seriously injured by 
the "great freeze," which caused a loss to Mr Hubbard and other 
orange growers of many thousands of dollars. 

In 1896 the pulmonary consumption from which he suffered had 
made such inroads that Mr. Hubbard was compelled to spend the 
winter in southwestern Arizona, where he immediately began an 
investigation into the fauna of that region and discovered an unsus- 
pected mine in the giant cactus. 

In 1897-98 he was joined by Mr. Schwarz, and the material 
gathered is now in process of arrangement. The letters written by 
Mr. Hubbard describing his method of collecting this character- 
istic fauna will be published in connection witli the descriptions of 
the numerous new forms that were turned up 

Personally, Mr. Hubbard was agentlemau in all that that term im- 
plies, and his most notable character was his unselfishness Scienti- 
fically he had a genius for investigation. A pupil of Mr. Schwarz 
in methods of collecting, he soon equalled his master, while in get- 
ting at the really characteristic fauna of a region be was unexcelled- 

He was as neat in preparing as he was thorough in collecting, and 
insisted on well-mounted, clean and properly labelled material. It 
is due to Hubbard and Schwarz that the importance of exact local- 
ities and dates of capture have become gradually appreciated. 

The loss to American Entomology is heavy, and I know of none 
fitted to fill the place left vacant by him. J 13. SMITH. 

PROF ACHILLE COSTA. Professor of Zoology in the University of 
Naples, died in Rome, November 18, 1898. He was born in Lecce. 
August 10, 182,3. He wrote extensively upon Italian insects, es- 
pecially the Hymeuoptera, personally exploring the Neapolitan 
provinces and the Island of Sardinia. The entomological results of 
these researches are embraced in his memoirs on the " Fauna del 
Regno di Napoli," and on the " Geo- fauna Sarda " A translation 
of some notes on the entomological collect ions at Naples, which he 
kindly furnished for the NEWS were published in volume vii, page 
290 A brief notice of his life is given by Sign. A. Delia Valle in 
the " Rendiconto" of the Naples Academy for December, isjis. 



ENT NEWS, Vol 10 



PI IV 




HENRY G. HUBBARD. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS 

AND 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SECTION 

ACAKKMV OF NATURAL SCIENCES, PHII.ADKI.I-HIA. 

VOL. X. APEIL, 1899. Xo. I 

CONTENTS : 



Hubbard Letters from the South- .Editorial in] 

west 83 xotes and News HU 

Baker Remarks on Emposca no 

Entomological Literature loi 

siosson Collectingon Biscayne Bay 91 

Casey-New Spec-its of I'emphus and I'oingsof Societies 



Tragosoma 97 

l\ar On the Smallest Pyromorphid 
and its Larva... . 99 



Obituary no 

Exehan-j. . . .i. ii 



LETTERS FROM THE SOUTHWEST. 

MY H. (I. HUBBARIV- 

The Home of Dinapate wrightii Horn, 

PALM SPKINCS, CAI.A.. February s, 1S97. 
I have just returned this afternoon from a visit to Palm canon 
and am somewhat sore and tired from contact with the saddle 
and also from my frantic excel ions to iind a sperimen of Dhut- 
)nilc tn'it/lifii. The Washingtonia i);:lms \r:>irtivliinnlfnti<t ji/i 
fcrti > in this small canon are few in number, several hundreds 
perhaps strung aloni; in a si ratlin. if line and most of them 
bnrneil by the Indians who set (ire to the fans as a smoke 
offering to their dead. There are very few youn.u' palms, as 
the freshets wash away m;>-t of (he seed. However (here are 
occasional clumps of not \ery old plants on the higher benches 
and these are sheathed with immense accumulations of dead 
fans. Kvery part of this tree is so hu^eand tou^h (hat I. 
with my small hatchet, can make but lilt le impression upon 
it. Even to cut through one of the handles of the dead Leaves 
is almost beyond m\ strength, and where I here are accumnla 



* [These letlrr* \\<'iv addi'i'^i'd l<> llr,- iinilfrsii; ncd at Waslii nirtoii. 1 >. '.. a n d 
an- DOW, after the death of the author, |niMisiu-d wit IHMH an\ alterations. E. A . 
SCHWABZ.] 



$4 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

tions of leaves upon the ground, the long handles armed with 
knife-like points are so interwoven, that it is a severe task to 
overturn them. I found no living specimen of I) hi a pate in 
any stage, but I uncovered a dead and disintegrated specimen 
of this gigantic Bostrychid beetle lying between dead fans at 
the foot of a young palm. Many of the old palms are uprooted 
by the flood waters, and T saw probably .">(.) of these prostrate 
trunks upon the ground. Almost all of them are perforated 
all over, with round open holes, into most of which 1 can in- 
sert the end of my thumb. Some of the holes will however 
only admit the little finger. These holes evidently made by 
Dhiapate larva- open directly into a huge pupa chamber which 
is two inches long and lies vertically with the grain not more 
than one or two inches from the surface. The remainder of 
the gallery is solidly packed with sawdust and leads into such 
a labyrinth of borings into the interior that most of the at- 
tacked logs are completely riddled, and at the heart there is 
very little of the original texture left. So solid is the saw- 
dust, however, that these bored logs hardly lose any of their 
strength and, in fact, are used as gate posts at several of the 
ranches and at the hotel at the Springs, where the people 
think the holes are made by carpenter bees (Xylocopa). It is 
very certain that a log once vacated by a colony of I.) hi a pate 
is never afterwards entered or again attacked by them. I 
should say that most of the logs showed from 100 to 250 exit 
holes of the beetle, and, at the time of emergence, the person 
lucky enough to discover such a colony would find no difficulty 
in filling several Mason jars with the beetles. Of course, until 
they begin to emerge, there is no sign upon the outside of the 
'presence of the insects within a palm trunk. I could find no 
trace of the living larvae and heard no sound of them in un- 
perforated logs. 

Dr. Murray, the landlord of this little hotel, tells me that 
Mr. Wright comes almost every year in September to this 
place and always goes without a word up the canon, so that no 
one here has ever heard of the existence of DhmjHitc. I could 
easily trace the operations of Mr. Wright among the fallen 
palm trunks. He has even cut down a number of the largest 
and tallest trees, no doubt in the hope of attracting the beetles 
to the fresh cut timber. But these logs lay upon the ground 



1399] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEV.'S. s."i 

untouched except for the marks of Mr. W. are where he has 
subseqently cut into them, in the vain search for live beetles. I 
would almost suspect that they had become extinct here if it were 
not for my discovery of a dead specimen, which from its posi- 
tion between leaves still attached to the tree, could not have 
been there much over a year and probably not many months. 

Several logs, which Mr. W. has laid open to the heart, gave 
me an excellent chance of examining the old borings of the 
beetle, and I found some dead larvae and always, in each gal- 
lery examined, the pair of great jaws and the clypeus of the 
larva packed in the sawdust at the bottom of what was the 
pupa cell. 

I think, from my own observations and the evidently fruit- 
less visits of Mr. Wright, that colonies of the beetle are rare 
and very hard to find. This is probably its northern limit, 
but in Baja California it may possibly be more abundant. 

PALM SPRINGS, CALA., February 27, 1897. 

I have searched far and wide for a living brood of Dinapnt<\ 
as I have made an arrangement with Dr. Murray to secure the 
beetles later on in the season in case I find a colony of the 
larvae. With this object I explored Andreas canon on the 
16th but did not go far enough and found only a few vigorous 
young trees. On the 2th I again visitel this canon, but 
did not reach the best part of it, being stopped by precipitous 
side walls and by the stream, which is now swollen to a dan- 
gerous torrent by heavy snows in the San Jacinto Mts. The 
bottom of these small canons is always nearly impassable by 
reason of huge bowlders and tangles of gr.ips vines, mesquite 
cat's claw aoacias together with, in the case of Andreas canon, 
thickets of quite large Alder trees, <'.ttomv.ods. Sycamores 
and piles of dead brush from the same, through which there 
is no forcing a passage. It is nesessary to make one's way 
along the stesp slopes, often 200 feet above the valley, and 
often to cross over and ascend the other wall in order to pass 
some vertical face of rocks. All this takes time and strength. 
I found however in Andreas canon a thorax of IH>i<ij>titf\ in a 
pile of stream drift, showing that the beetle occurs there. I 
finally left the m:iin cnuon and crawled over a divide into a 
still smaller valley, also very difficult, but within halt a mile I 



gfi ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

found a group of seven of the most magnificent palms, 70 to 
80 feet high, and clothed with dead fans from foot to crown so 
that they looked like huge towers. It is the first time I have 
seen this magnificent tree in full size and with all the fans still 
clinging to it. It seems almost beyond the strength of man to 
penetrate these dense coverings of dead fans which cover the 
trunksSor 10 feet thick on every side so thatthediameter of the 
covered trunk is often 20 feet. T found in this little side canon 
among the group of living palms a single huge dead fallen 
trunk which had lain prostrate many years and had been 
covered up with grape vines and leaves of the cotton woods. 
This trunk was so entirely disintegrated that I was able to 
pull it away in pieces with my hands. It was bared in every 
direction with Dinajxttc galleries, and I had at last the good 
fortune to find, still in its pupa cell, a dead specimen of the 
beetle, the chitin of which was still perfect, but every ligament 
dissolved away so that the different sclerite-; adhered loosely 
in the surrounding sawdust. I found the specimen to be a 
male and preserved two small curiously twisted chitinons 
claspers which were within the abdomen. 

Yesterday accompanied by an Indian I visited again Palm 
canon and made straight for a certain palm tree which I had 
observed on my first visit, but too late in the day for a close 
examination. This is a young tree, not over 20 feet high, and 
still retains its clothing of fans. It is dead but the bud leaves 
are still in place. It has evidently been killed by something, 
and I cannot help suspecting that this has been done by the 
females of Dinajxttc before depositing their eggs. Xo //>/// 
tree is ever attacked by them, nor do they enter any trunk 
that has been long dead or fallen or cut dawn. 1 suspect that 
the female c.inuat deposit her eggs in any trunk deprived ot 
leaf bases. 

In this young palm examined by me the trunk was of very 
large diameter, and the first chips we removed with our axes 
showed galleries of IHimjHttr of full si/e and filled with frass 
quite fresh and light in color, together with evidently much 
older galleries of smaller si/e in which I he frass had turned 
dark with age. I found some of the sm::ll barings a! their 
beginning under the fibres of the leaf bases, where they were 
not larger than a friction match. \Vc finally uncovered a 



1S<>I ENTOMOLOGICAL NK\VS. S? 



living larva of IHmijmlr, I'ull-.uTown ;iml apparent 1 v forming 
its pup;! cell )i- preparing 1o do so. After several hours' 
work we secured four specimens only one of which could be 
taken out uninjured, the oilier three specimens beinj; more 
or less cut 1o pieces or crushed between thetou.u'h fibres. All 
these larva- were thoroughly dormant and very flaccid: evi- 
dently they had eaten nothing for some months. 

I feel sure 1 hat 1 hey are more than one year and probably 
more than 1 wo years old, but no doubt they would have issued 
by .July or Au.u'iist of this year. All the larva- in this trunk 
appear 1;> lie not deeper than one or two inches beneath, the 
surface of the wood. It is possible however, that they may 
not issue until next year, and for 1 his reason I hesitate to have 
the tree cut down. The fibres of the wood are still moist and 
very li.u'ht in color showing very slight fermentation except 
where the juvenile ^allerie^ of a year or two ajj'o have pene- 
1 rated. There are no younj;' larva-, and evidently all are of 
the same a.^e an 1 nearly or quite adult, and there are no exit 
holes in the tree. There may be ."><) to TOO larva- in the trunk, 
but of course this is only a surmise. Dr. Murray promises to 
watch the tree during the summer and will try to secure 
specimens of the beetle ;;s they emerge. 

I leel quite certain now that there are comparatively lew 
broods of I>!IIII/HI!(' existing in this region, and unless- it exists 
also in Haja California or on the southern slope of the San Ber- 
nardino ran<4'e, any year may witne^ its complete extinction ; 
because unless the females, in ima,u'o, feed upon and kill the 
buds of living palms in which they then oviposil. the number 
of trees in lit condition to rear the youn^ is exceedingly lim- 
ited. I have in fact seen but this one f ree in any of the canons 
I have visited. It is absolutely certain that only the Washing 
Ionia palm is capable of supporting the lar.nv broods of this 
.ui.uantic borer, and if the females should f;,il lo lind a suitable 
tree in any year, they must inevitably perish without issue. 
When I consider 1 he limited number of these 1 ree>> in existence 
in a wild state, ; .ml the slender chance the female beetle mils) 
have of finding a dyin^lree in the li^ht condition and at the 
ri^'ht lime, I am more than ever inclined to suspect that the 
beetles deliberately kill the 1 ree in which the\ oviposil. If 
they killed the tree merely by feeding as adults upon the bud>. 



88 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

there would be many trees killed ; for often more than 200 
adults issue from a single infested trunk. In the case of the 
tree I have examined, it is probably not the presence of the 
larvae that have killed it as they have not apparently pene- 
trated deeply into the interior and their galleries are not suffi- 
ciently numerous to seriously impede the circulation of the 
sap, even in the outer portion of the trunk. 

I feel highly elated at having discovered a living brood, and 
I think there is no doubt that Dr. Murray will be able to secure 
living specimens of the imago. It is so difficult to cut out 
large or small chunks of the wood without injuring the larvae 
that I have not thought it advisable to secure any in this way. 

PALM SPRINGS, GALA., March 13, 1897. 

On March 5 I made a serious expedition with a wagon and 
mules and an Indian to help, to Palm canon where I spent the 
day getting out more pieces of palm wood containing Dinapate 
larvae. I secured four pieces weighing each from 2 or 3 to 6 
or 8 Ibs., and each containieg one or two living larvae. The 
largest piece undoubtedly contains several of the larvae. These 
pieces I now have in my bedroom and I can occasionally hear 
the larvae cutting the fibre with a snap like a pair of shears. 

I discovered much to my surprise that the interior of the 
palm trunk is entirely filled with galleries. I had before 
concluded that all the work had been done nearer the sur- 
face, the trunk being an extra thick one. I find however 
that this trunk like all the rest, has the interior entirely rid- 
dled with burrows and very little solid wood left by the larva-. 
Many of the larvae are still in the interior, although some of 
them are already forming cells near the exterior. AVe cut 
into a great many of the grubs in getting out these chunks of 
wood, and I secured several good additional specimens in 
alcohol . 

It is hard to realize the enormous extent and dimensions of 
the Dinapate galleries. Not the largest of our Florida 
palmettos could support more than three or four of these 
larvae; they would eat it all up and then die of starvation. 
If there are 20 or 30 holes in one of the \Vashingtonia palms, 
one finds the interior entirely eaten out from end to end, and 
one can follow the galleries, over one inch in diameter for 20 



j S (,( ( j 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



feet up and down the trunk following the grain and without 
diminishing sensibly in diameter. Then think of the yards and 
yards of smaller galleries made by the larva while still young. 
Such extensive and prodigious borings cannot be made in one 
or two years, and certainly not in any tree trunk of moderate 
size. There is certainly no other plant here than this Washing 
tonia palm that is capable of supporting a brood of these huge 
and voracious grubs. Therefore, I do not hesitate to assert 
that they exist only in the Washingtonia, and that they are 
very certain soon to become extinct . 1 regard the discovery of 
a colony as one of the most interesting entomological events of 
my life and I can assure you that if we breed the imagos 
this year from this trunk, they will not soon be duplicated by 
others. 

There are some thousands of the trees left, but they are in 
small groups scattered miles apart in a few of the most inac- 
cessible canons of the Sin Jacinto range. Here the beetles are 
nearly extinct, but it is possible that in Baja California they 
may survive a few centuries longer. In tunes past they were 
abundant here, as evidenced by the numerous old trunks rid- 
dled with their burrows. But the trunks that have fallen in 
recent years are all free from their attacks, and as the Indians 
have burned all the trees that are accessible, so that their 
trunks are now bare of fronds, it must be now quite difficult 
for the female beetle to find a n't receptacle for her eggs. I 
am sure now that they do not oviposit in bare trunks or in 
healthy trees, although it is possible that the beetles kill the 
tree in which they ovipost their eggs.* 



* [Subsequently, in .nine. Mr. Huhhard forwarded to Washington the piec< - ol 
1 tal i n wood ; and, niter some un Ton-seen aeciilenls and misfortunes, a small nuni- 

berof Imago beetles were bred from thew l at the Department of Agriculture 

during the latter part of August. In O'-tolier, IS'.IT, Mr. Iluhhard received a letter 
from Dr. Murray, of P'lm Springs, stating that, owing to the excessive heat in 
August, lie had lieen unable to visit Palm canon, and that, for the same reason, 
none of his Indians had been willing to underta ke t he trip. The imago and larva 
of liinapuie have been described and figured by the late I>r (i. II. Horn i Trans. 
Amer. Knt. Soc , \\\, ISSli, pp 1-1. plate I i. While at San Diego, Pa la.. Mr. Muhhard 
ascertained thai the type locality of /1i'Kif"t/f -n'l-ie/itn is I'alni Springs, I 'ala . 
and not theMojave Desert, as stated by Dr. Horn The full-nrown larva' col- 
lected by >[r ub bard are fully twice larger than that fitrured by Dr Horn. 
M r. W. <;. Wright, the discoverer of 1 Una pate, has, as far as known to me, never 
published anything on the food-plant or habits of this remarkable' species 
E- A. s 



<K) ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 



REMARKS ON LMPOASCA < 

HY ('. F. BAKER. 

The following remarks are called forth by Mr. Gillette's 
treatment of this genus in his late paper on the tribe Typhlo- 
ci/hini ( Proc. Nat. Mns., XX). My statements are based on 
the examination of a larger amount of American material than 
has previously been accessible to any one person. First of all 
I have examined the types of all Mr. Gillette's species. My 
own collection, the largest of American species in existence, 
c:>iil;;ins most of the species in generous series, all but one 
being represented (and this, pcryamlei, of doubtful validity). 

1 know thai it is easier to pull down than to build up, and 
appreciate very fully the difliculties arising in the study of 
KiiijHHftrii. The attempt is not made herein to finally settle 
the question. This paper may be considered simply a contri- 
bution to our knowledge of what constitutes a species in Eni- 
l>w. There is good reason to believe that Mr. Gillette's 
S3paration of his various "species" is highly artificial, and 
that in many cases his distinctions are based on individual in- 
stead of on specific characters. 

The species of this genus arrange themselves naturally in 
two groups : 

I. Those having the vertex very broadly rounded apically , 
not even sub-angulate, rarely slightly longer at middle than 
at eyes; third apical cell of elytra usually sub-linear, its base 
more nearly /^'-angled ; including the larger green, yellow or 
smoky species of (lie genus. 

II. Those having a distinctly angulated vertex, though 
often very obtusely so, and sometimes not longer at middle 
than at e\ es. this being due to the fore margin being paralleled 
by the anterior pronotal margin ; third apical cell of elytra 
usually more or less strongly widened apically, its base dis- 
tinctly ^-/-angled ; including the smaller species of the genus, 
which are of ten, vari- colored. 

Mr. Gillette had this same idea when lie first planned his 
"Analytical Key." to my certain knowledge. But he does 
not follow it out. Instead, he breaks up the continuity of the 
first group by int reducing nigra, pulchella, x)>!<';nli<l<t, <t!/><>!i>ie 
;l nd ittruldhr*. \ have examined the types and many other 



1S09] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 9] 

specimens of these species. To me the vertex appears sub- 
angnlate and the other characters those of group II. Even 
superficially they show a far closer relationship with the spe 
cies cited under group II than with Niim>-(i;/<lul<i and its allies. 

In a study of the characters of Empouwa it is an exceedingly 
difficult matter to elimiuateall possibilities of error in observa- 
tion. Possible errors may be attributed to two causes, (1) 
malformation produced by drying, and ("2) optical illusions 
due to varying position of parts. 

Among the Typhloeybids we find insects almost as delicate 
and frail as some of the Capsids. The great delicacy of the 
body walls renders the proper preparation of specimens a very 
difficult matter. When mature specimens are selected and 
prepared with great care, the distortion caused by drying is 
reduced to a minimum ; but as in the case of Aphida and the 
little yellow and green culicid-like flies that fly about our 
lamps, an examination of fresh, uudried material is almost 
imperative. I know from observation that drying produces 
marked changes in the form of vertex and face, and the usual 
collapsing of the abdomen throws the genital organs out of 
their natural position. 

With the parts thus distorted errors are still more likely to 
occur in viewing various details under the microscope. Even 
under ordinary circumstances there is the widest chance 
for error (and this is true of many other Homoptera). In fo- 
cusing a half or two-thirds objective on a convex vertex the 
proper reading of the width can be readily made, but a very 
slight change in the angle of the long axis of the body or in 
the focusing will produce differences of specific or even sec 
tional value. The same is true of the face. Unless the point 
of the vertex and the tip of the clypeus are equi-distant from 
the lens, an error in the reading of the lens will surely be 
made. 

Xo part is more difficult to study than the last ventral se- 
incut. Collapse of the abdomen frei|Uentl\ throws it out 
almost perpendicular to the body axis. It assumes something 
of this form when the ovipositor is in use. There is but one 
accurate point of view, and this is obtained when the base of 
the segment and its apex are eqiii-distant from the lens. This 
is a view rarely obtainable on the specimen as ordinarily 



92 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

mounted. The errors resulting are obvious. To illustrate, 
try the following experiment : Hold a sheet of ordinary note 
paper before the eyes, flat surface parallel to the face, but 
slightly bent, as the last ventral segment usually is over the 
convexity of the venter. Its upper edge, if evenly held, will 
be truncate. Tip this edge very slightly toward the face and 
it becomes distinctly incurved ; tip it away and it becomes 
" broadly rounded. 1 ' Now fold Ihe sheet along the middle 
line, spread it nearly but not quite to its original position, and 
repeat the experiment. This represents some very ordinary 
conditions in the last ventral segments. Tipped very slightly 
towards the face it becomes deeply angularly emargmate ; 
tipped away it becomes strongly angularly produced at middle, 
with a concavity on either side. These widely different ap- 
pearances can all be produced by variations in the position of 
a rectangular sheet of paper. Now if the sheet be cut into 
some of the various shapes which the last ventral segment really 
does assume, and its position varied as above, still more re- 
markable changes are readily produced. To such causes in 
part are due several of Mr. Gillette's species, and perhaps the 
effects observed by Osborn and Ball, and mentioned on p. 737 
of Gillette's paper. 

Under these circumstances individual variation is greatly 
accentuated. The necessity of correct observation, then, is of 
first importance. Xext in importance measurements should 
be made directly from the specimen. Measurements made 
from camera lucida drawings, especially if the drawings are 
taken on a flat surface, are very inaccurate, sometimes showing 
almost a specific difference between the two sides of the draw- 
ing. Delicate calipers or an eye-piece micrometer should be 
used directly, i 

The forms remaining in group I, as above mentioned, I 
would arrange as follows : 

1. SMARAGDULA, representing the only speritu- type in the group. 

a. variety CLYPEATA. 

(limngstonii}. 

b. variety AUREOVIRIDIS. 

(incisa). 

c. variety OBTUSA. 

, dcnliciilu ami 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NET;S. 93 

fl. variety TRIFASCIATA. 

I am not a " lumpgr," and so do not believe in the establish 
ing of varieties except where the evidence is very unusual. I 
have series of hundreds of specimens in this group from va- 
rious localities, and these are now in the National Museum, 
where they may be examined by students. I consider color 
as not of specific value here, and the slight variations (real, 
not apparent') in form of last ventral segment of varietal value 
only. The color varies from green (aureoviridix and obtnxa i 
through yellow and brown (clypeata to entirely black above 
i lirhif/Ntoirii >. The size varies from rather small in H tricolor to 
large in anreoriridlx, which is one of the largest Typhlocybids 
These names represent geographical varieties, ranging from 
the East (represented by the forms of oMum), through the 
Rocky Mountain region (represented by the cJypeata and aure- 
oriridis forms) to the Pacific coast (represented by cli/pcata and 
liriiH/xloiiii). Specimens approaching typical smnraadnht are 
found throughout the United States, which is a significant 
fact. Trifasciata is paralleled by virdii and a variety of punt 
with smoky marked elytra. 

All the species of group II need further study, and I would 
recommend that entomologists all over the West sweep Ar- 
tf'iirisias especially, thoroughly, and not to pause until they 
have laid in series of hundreds of specimens of the species 
found on these and other Western plants. 

Atr<>/((b<'x and simitis are synonymous with splendida, which 
is a common species in the South. Xhirilix is entered in Gil- 
lette's table, but I find no description of it in the text. 1 
have seen the types. 

The types of paUiiht were collected in 1.S71) and are totally 
decolored by their twenty years' experience in collections. I 
have swept the cotton plant in various parts of the South and 
have found on il only Empoawn JlarcuraiN and I>!crancnr(( itni- 
imitcla. Other than on the color, or rather lack of color, I 
cannot separate jut/lid't from Jl'.ircwnix (compare Gillette's de- 
scriptions and figures). Mr.riraiia and riridfxcrnx are insi-p 
arable in large series, running one into the other. 

Mr. Gillette mentions my original specimens, which he 
agreed with me was punt, yet he describes xnoiri, the descrip- 
tion of which is very good of the original specimen of jmnt. I 



94 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

have series of pura from the far northwest and series from 
Arizona, which are his -SHO/H, and I cannot separate them. 
Some of the specimens from the northwest have the golden 
coloration which he mentions and some from Arizona are with- 
out it. 

The peculiar venation sho\vu in Mr. (Jillelte's drawing of 
the elytron oilmnid'i is a malformation, most other specimens 

not showing it. 

o 



COLLECTING ON BISCAYNE BAY. 

BY ANNIE TRUMBULL SLOSSOX. 

T came to Miami this year on January tHh. The weather 
was very warm when I arrived, but soon grew cooler. It has 
been very changeable and uncertain since then. We have 
had much more rain than is usual at this season and many 
cold nights. On the whole, the conditions have not been fa- 
vorable for collecting. During the summer over seven thou- 
sand soldiers were encamped here. Their camp occupied the 
place of a dense hammock of tropical trees and shrubs, which 
were cut down and cleared away for this purpose. The growth 
of Vegetation in this climate is almost miraculously rapid. 
The soldiers left here the last of the Summer, and their former 
camping ground is now a luxuriant tangle of vines, bushes 
and plants. Among these 1 have done the greater part of my 
collecting this season. The custard- apples (Car tea papaya), 
from four to ten feet high, are covered with their yellow flow- 
ers, which seem very attractive to butterflies. CatopsUia eu- 
bule and C. agarithe are always hovering over the blossoms, the 
former hardly to be distinguished from the flowers themselves. 
Masses of a white bur-marigold (Bidens leucantha) cover the 
ground, and around these fly hymenoptera, diptera and the 
smaller butterflies. A tall, shrubby nightshade (Holanum ver- 
bascifolium) is now in flower and fruit, too, and attracts many 
insects. On its greenish white flowers one often seas the odd 
long-snouted Breuthid, B. ancliomgo. I have taken some 
thirty or forty specimens on these blossoms. A tiny Anth<n>- 
mus is also found on this plant. I took many last season here, 
and it is just as common now. It is apparent 1 v undescribed 
unless West Indian, A large purple convolvulus, the cream- 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 95 

white moonflower, periwinkles both piiik ami white, a spurge 
with its desp gr33:i Igive? oddly marked with blood-red, capsi- 
cum, or red pepper, with purple flowers and scarlet berries, 
these and many m >re make this jungle a bright and fragrant 
spot. Among these tropical plants one finds some strangers 
now which seem quite out of place. Seeds scattered by the sol- 
diers while hero have sprung up and tomatoes, melons, 
squashes, potatoes, Indian corn and other homely though 
useful wanderers from the kitchen-garden grow here 
placidly among the brilliant exotics. And the tropical 
insects accept them calmly and adopt them as food plants. 
I have found the pretty chrysomelid, Lema solan i, which 
have fed hitherto on the wild nightshades here, eating the 
tomato now, while different insects of the tiny wild gourd 
i Mi'lothr'm jinnhi/n ) transfer their affections to its country 
cousins, the watermelon and squash. Insects are good bota- 
nists. The black nightshade (Solatium niynan) is plentiful 
here, as elsewhere, and has many insects on and about it. The 
pretty little II - 1 b 'tie, Ejltrix i> IITH'IU, abounds on this plant. 
A larga Hemipter, a yellowish brown bag, tipzi'tocera diffuxtt, 
is always found on it, too, while a dainty little "hopper," 
of brilliant green and black, Acutalis sp., lives on the stem and 
leaves. The handsome day-flying moth, Syntomeida <']>i/(tix, 
with wings of metallic green, spotted with white, and blue, 
red -tipped body, is common now among the flowers, while the 
tiny N. iniiiliiri. its copy in miniature, is occasionally seen, and 
I have taken one specimen of N. ii><nn.e<r, with its brilliant body 
striped with orange and black. The little melon moth, with 
white transparent wings bordered with dark brown, has already 
found out the introduced melons and flies among the vines by 
hundreds. The large cabbage butterfly, P. i>i<nnixfi' : its daint- 
ier cousin of pearly white, Trht/rix i/oirr, YVrms- iiiripjic, of 
deep orange, the striped zebra, Ht'linniiuv rli'irifimiii* ; the p.is. 
sionilouer butierlly, Agraulis vanillce ; the richly tinted AIHKI 
j>:>rtia, and, m >sl plentiful of all, the pretty little Kumrnui 
alula, called hole the '" < 'omptie fly." A II t hese lovely winged 
creat nres kn:i\\ I he soldiers' descried camping ground and visit 
it in the sunshine. The Airi i found here, and which I have 
distributed under t lit- naiii" of ti-nr/litili/ln. is, 1 am assured, the 
\Vest Indian />!! I'\i'). In lif.-, and for a few honr> after 



t)<; ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

death, this butterfly has a delicate bluish bloom over the deep 
rich red of its wings, entirely absent from the dried insect. I 
have as yet seen but two shabby specimens of Timetes dcuclm. 
I found a pupa under some dock leaves the other day, and 
from it has just emerged a fine shining golden moth, Ptusio 
rcrrtica. I have seen but one specimen of Composia fidelliH- 
sima this season, nor have I seen Alypia wittfeldii, so common 
last winter here around the white bur-marigold. 

Skippers (Hesperidce) are fairly numerous, two or three spe- 
cies very common. The little P. hayhurstii is everywhere; 
Pamphila ethliux is common, and its odd larvae are ruining the 
cauuas in the hotel grounds. Erycidcs amyntas is not rare 
this season. Dr. Dyar discovered its life history here two 
years ago. Its food plant is Jamaica dogwood (Piwidia eryth- 
rina), a shrub or small tree of the Legumiuosa?. The most 
common Lycaeua, or " little blue," is L. aininon. Here, and 
also at Lake Worth, it is very common, flying all day about 
flowers in the sunshine. L. file nut and L. thevnu-t, the latter 
having the wings of female white faintly shaded with blue, 
are not rare. But a few specimens of Thecla arix have as yet 
appeared, and I have seen only one T. wn-tialis. I have 
done but little collecting at light this season. The evenings 
have been too cool or too windy as a general thing. As usual. 
the chocolate brown sphinx, E.i>/:> ln;/uhris, is very common, 
both at flowers in the twilight and at light, while the lovely 
green sphiugid, Perffesathorat.es, not yet included in our printed 
lists, is not uncommon. The larger green Art/eux /ahriixnt is 
occasionally seen, as is also the still larger sphinx, r.idiylla 
iicux. One very warm still evening this month thousands of 
small beetles came swarming to the lights. Hundreds of the 
little water beetle, Helochnwx ocliracriix, came into doors and 
windows, and many small Scolytids and Lougicorns rested on 
floor of piazza near the electric lights. Last night I took a 
moth I have never before seen, and which I suppose to !>< 
Halisidola striffoxa. It is a beautiful insect, with crimson ab 
domeu tipped with black and thinly scaled brownish wings, a 
West Indian species. 

(To he Continued.} 
MIAMI, FLA., February th. 



1,S<)9] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 97 

NEW SPECIES OF PEMPHUS AND TRAGOSOMA 

i < 'oleoptera). 
P>Y THOS. L. CASEY. 

The tribe Cyehrini of the Carabidae has ever been a favorite 
with coleopterists, because of the large size and elegant form 
of the species, although the colors are usually not so brilliant 
as in ('ambus in fact throughout the entire genus Brennus, 
excepting iitnrf/iiuthn and a few allied forms, the species are of 
an intense black. Pemphus is similar in this respect, the lus- 
tre however being invariably dark and not shining as in Breu- 
nns. The genera of the books are, in my opinion, valid and 

not sul )gen era. 

I'KMi'HUS Motsch. 

The following species belongs near lon-yipes, and Mr. Kick- 
seeker, to whom I am indebted for a fine pair, writes me that 
the habits are similar to those recorded under my description 
of the latter (Col. Not., VII, p. 331) ). the motions being rather 
sluggish and the gait deliberate. 
Pemphus opacus, u. sp 

Moderately convex, the elytra somewhat ventricose, broadening 
to about apical third, black throughout and dull in lustre. Head 
elongate, the eyes small ; vertex feebly convex, very slightly wrin- 
kled transversely ; antennae long and slender, the basil joint thicker, 
claviform, 2.7-3.0 mm. in length. Prothorax apparently very 
slightly longer than wide, dilated and broadly rounded at the sides 
distinctly before the middle, the sides sinuate toward base; surface 
very feebly convex, the side margin moderately reflexed . Elytra 
about a third longer than wide, nearly two and a half times wider 
than the prothorax; sides broadly arcuate, the hnmeri not well 
marked; surface finely and irregularly punctate throughout, each 
elytron with two or three di*:;:il intervals which are nearly regular ; 
side margins feebly concave, coarsely and unevenly punctate, the 
reflexed edge smaller than tint of the prothorax. Under surface 
more shining than the uppyr, the legs long and slender. Length 
21.5-27.0 mm.; width fl 5-11.4 mm ; length of head and mandibles 
6.0-G.7 mm.; length of hind (ib'r.i !). 5-11.0 mm. 

California (Sonoma Co. ). 

The male is smaller and Uss ventricose than the female and 
has the anterior tarsi moderately dilated, with the basal joint 
densely pubescent beneath in distinctly less than apical half. 

Since completing my revision of Brenuus ( 1. c., p. 305), I 
have received a pair of B. fuller I Horn, from Mr. Wickham, 



98 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

and find that it ni ust be associated with the mirglnatiis group 
by reason of the fourteen elytral strias as stated by Dr. Horn. 
It is abundantly distinct from that species, or any of its al- 
lies, however, in general form, and is distinguishable at once 
from any other of the group by its black coloration ; it can in 
no sense be considered a variety of 



TRAGOSOMA Serv. 

Two species of this holarctic genus have previously (Col. 
Not. ,11, p. 491) baan made known by the writer, making, with 
the two previously described, four well-characterized species. 
Two more equally distinct are now added in the following- 
table, which includes also the European form for comparison : 

Elytral sculpture uniform throughout, the punctures coarse and 
subcontinent ; tine ridges distinctly traceable to the basal mar- 
gin; antennae glabrous ......................... ................ 2 

Elytral sculpture not uniform, the punctures distinct and widely 
isolated throughout, becoming much coarser, deep and conspic- 
uous toward base, where the flue subcostitbrm lines become ob- 
solete in about basal third ; antenna: pubescent ................ 

2 Anterior tarsi rather strongly dilated in the male; prothorax 

nearly twice as wide as the head and conspicuously hairy ...... : 

Anterior tarsi narrow and very feeblydilated in the male; prothorax 
small, only slightly wider than the head, very broadly aud 
feebly rounded at the sides, with the process slender, abrupt 
and spiculiform ................................................ ;> 

3 Sides of the prothorax acutely triangular between the apical and 

basal angles, with the sides of the angle nearly straight aud the 
lateral process anguliform, broadening continuously from its 
apex. Northern United States and Canada ........ HARRISI Lcr- 

Sides of the prothorax broadly roundei, with the process spicu 15- 
form and abruptly projecting from the arcuate limb ........... 4 

4 -Elytraabouttwiceaslongas wide, the side margins rather widely 
and very distinctly reflexed. Europe ........... DEPSARIA Linn- 

Elytra more than twice as long as wide, the lateral edges extremely 
narrowly reflexed ; body brown in color, shining, the antennae 
very slender and paler; prothorax strongly and closely, but 
evenly punctured and shining, conspicuously clothed with long^ 
erect, fulvous hair; elytra glabrous. Length 26.0-28.0 nun .' 
width 9.6 mrn. Colorado ......................... SOD ALTS, n. sp. 

5 Pronotum rather finely punctate and conspicuously hairy, deeply 
and transversely impressed throughout along the apical margin : 
antennas relatively a little thicker than in the group with more 
dilated tarsi; in general color, lustre and sculpture very similar 
to sodalis, the body smaller. Length 24.8 mm ; width 8.0 m in 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 99 

Utah (southwestern) Mr. Weidt PARVICOLLIS. n -p. 

Prouotum very coarsely punr.tale and glabrous, or very nearly so. 
the surface not deeply impressed along the apical margin, at 
lea?( toward the middle: antennre much stouter, darker in color 
than in any other species. New Mexico SPICTLT'M Csy. 

6 Prothor.ix hr^e, transverse, the lateral process long:, slender, finely 
aciculate and abruptly formel, the surface unusually convex 
longitudinally-, very coarsely and somewhat sparsely punctate 
and glabrous, with short erect hairs toward the sides only ; an- 
lennse slender and filiform. California (.Mt. Diablo). 

PILOSICORNIS Csy. 

The sexual characters are very feeble in this genus, and there 
is a strong and persistent similarity of type throughout ; the 
male characters evince themselves, however, in the slightly 
longer antennae, with more elongate outer joints and in the 
rather more dilated tarsi. In harri.fi there is a large transverse 
discal area of the prouotum, which is very finely and densely 
punctate, and of which there is no trace in the female or in 
the male of sodalis. Pilosicornis is the most aberrant species 
of the genus, and is wholly isolated from the other five in 
many very radical structural characters. 

o 

ON THE SMALLEST PYROMORPHID AND ITS LARVA. 

BY HARRISON G. DYAR. 

The smallest known I'yroiuorphid is the Cuban genii-. Si 
tiinlf-s II. -S. I have met with a tor in of this in the Unhainas. 
which I describe herewith : 

Genus SETIOI>I> II. S. 

;-';; Setiodes Herrich-Schaffer, Corr, Blatt min.zool.ver. Rc- 
gensb., xx TOO. 

is ;: Fonniculus (irote. Pro.'. Ent. So.-. IMiil.. vi. 184. 

Palpi i-udi'pentary ; antenna? pectinate, the terminal pectination- 
thickened, the Whole organ somewhat >hori and slightly clubbed ; 
legs withoui >purs: wings very long and narrow, more -<> than in 
Harrisina, the hind wini^ especially reduced; fore wings with II 
veins, vein !i absent. 10 and 11 stalked, the re.-l ;n-i>ini: >eparatel\- 
from the cell, which is divided by the distinct d'lM-il vein: hind 
wini:-> with very small internal area, the internal veins all lacking 
\eins 2 to 7 evenly spaced from the cell. s absent . L'and .". short and 
down curved. 

The peculiar <:-enn< has t wo spe :-ies. or local forms, separable ;u 
follows ; 

Hind win with a white spot; spot of to. - c wing- large. ..nana, II. S. 
Hind wing entirely black ; spot of fore wing :iv!ll..bahamensis.ii sp. 



100 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [ApriJ 

1. Setiodes nana H. S 

This is the Cuban species, redescribed by Grote as Fjrmicu- 
luspyf/Hioeus. I have the Grote type before nie, through the 
kindness of Dr. Skinner. It shows decidedly the effect of the 
lapse of time, having lost the abdomen and having been bored 
through by museum pests, but what is left corresponds evi- 
dently with Herrich-Schaffer's very characteristic description. 
Grote seems to have had only females and Herrich-Schaffer 
only males. 

2. Setiodss bahamensis, n. sp. 

Blue black; front, spot below eye, tips of rmlimantiry pilpi. 
sides of collar, point at base of patagia. points on coxae, tips of hind 
femora, bases of middle and hind tibiae outwardly, a row of minute 
lateral points on abdomen becoming" streaks on the sixth segment 
and a row of ventral points on the posterior e3ge? of the segments 
white; fore wing with a small whitish hyaline patch in the end of 
the cell, divided by the discil vein, the base of cell and submeclian 
interspace more thinly scale! thin elsewhere. Hinil wing uni- 
formly black. Expanse 15 mm. One in lie, the last two segments 
tufted on the sides. 

Hab. Xassau, Xew Providence, B. W. I. Xational Mu- 
seum, type Xo. 4,167. 

Larva. Flattened as usual in the family, thick and rather square; 
feet normal ; five warts on thorax, four on abdomen, the warts low. 
simply tufts of short dark hair with three of four long pale ones at 
the extremities. Centrally the color is bluish white, a dorsal, two 
subdorsal (one above and one below wart iii) and asubtravental (be- 
low wart iv. and v), straight, narrow, purple-brown lines, connected 
anteriorly by a transverse band on joint 5 ; the ends (joints 2 to 4 and 
and 12 to 13) light red ; a conspicuous pale yellowish spot behind 
wart i. and ii. of joint 12, like a pair of eyes ; joints 13 and also 2 to 4 
rather broken up by pale spots, but not much contrasting. Head in 
the hood about 1 mm, wide or a little over Skin with clear gran- 
ules; hair smooth, pointed, not bulbous. Length 8 mm. 

The larva span the characteristic white web of flocculent silk 
which is usual in the species of this family. A moth emerged 
in four mouths. 

Food plant a species of Ampelopsis. 



1899] 101 

ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[The Conductors of ENTOMOLOGICAL, NEWS solicit and will thankfullyrecelve 
items ni m-\\s likelv to interest its readers from any source. The autlior's name 
will be given i" each case, for the information of cataloguers and bibliograph- 
ers.] 

To Contributors. All contributions will be considered and passed upon at 
our curliest convenience, and, as far as may be, will be published according to 
date of reception. EXTOMOLOGICAL, NEWS has reached a circulation, both in 
numbers and circumference, as to make it necessary to put "copy" into the 
hands of I lie printer for each number three weeks before date of issue. This 
should be remembered in sending special or important matter for a certain 
issue. Twenty-five "extras," without change in form, will be given free, when 
they are wanted; and this should be so stated on the MS., along with the num- 
ber desired. The receipt of all papers will be acknowledged. ED. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., APKIL, 1899. 

EDITORIAL 

We are very busy people here at the Academy, and we 
must catch the moments as they fly. We haven't the time to 
read all the journals that come here; and, in fact, we are not 
interested in all the subjects of which they treat. However, 
we do like to look over the journals devoted to entomology, 
both for our pleasure and profit, as we may wish to jot down 
a record or two of some interesting new point or other. We 
don't feel inclined to look through every page of a journal, as 
that is wasteful of our precious time, but in some cases it is a 
necessity, especially for the compiler of the literature, as some 
journals do not publish an index to their contents. After 
much circumlocution we have arrived at the point. Among 
onr distinguished contemporaries who merit our dire dis- 
pleasure in this respect may be mentioned the i- Entomologist's 
Record and .Journal of Variation'' and the '''Canadian Kn 
tomologist." Could one imagine '-Psyche" without its table 
of contents on the cover page.' Such a thing is inconceivable 
and would he like trying to tind a paper published by the 
I". S. Department of Agriculture. At once one's brain would 
begin to seel he with Old Series, New Series, Special Series 
and other combinations we can't unravel. 



102 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

Notes and. Ne\vs. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL GLEANINGS FROM ALL QUARTERS OF THE GLOBE. 

ALLORHINA NITIDA Linn. As a Fruit Pest. lu addition to what 
Prof. Gillette quotes Irani one of his correepoi. dents at Phoenix, 
Ariz , about this insect as a fruit pest in the NEWS for February, I 
wish to say that Allorhina niiida has been very abundant in our 
Western Maryland peach orchards alor.g the Blue Ridge Mountains 
during the past season They were conspicuous upon the variety 
salway in September, and not infrequently from fifty to a hundred 
were seen clustered upon a peach. "We noticed that fruit which 
had begun to rot upon the tree was especially subject to their at- 
tacks They were easily disturbed, and would very often take 
flight when one approached the tree. 1 have not seen them attack- 
ing the peach in its normal condition; but I have no doubt they 
would. We have seen from one to five clusters of these beetles up- 
on a tree at a time, and when one is disturber! the others take flight 
immediately afterward, causing much confusion and buzzing. 

W. G. JOHNSON, College Park, Md. 

LONG LIFE OF MOSQUITO LARVAE - Vernon L. Kellogg, Stanford 
University, California. 

The normal life of a mosquito wriggler is. for those mosquito 
species whose life history has been studied, only one or two weeks. 
*Dr. Howard found the normal life of the wrigo'ler of C'n/>.,- 
piaigens,a mosquito common at Washington, to be seven or eight 
days. " The length of time." he adds, " which elapses for a gener- 
ation * is almost indefinitely enlarged if the weather 
be cool. Larvae were watched for twenty days, during 
which time they did not reach full growth." 

Eggs were laid by a mosquito in my laboratory at -!.:{<) p. in., 
October t), 1898. The larvae issued from the eggs on the night of 
October 10th. I kept these wrigglers in a small jar of water, on my 
writing table. The direct rays of the sun did not strike the jar, but 
the laboratory is well lighted, and the wrigglers were in a normal 
condition as regards light. The temperature of the laboratory dur- 
ing the day time was about G5-75 F. ; at night, never as low ;i> 
:-tt, F.. usually not below J0-50 F. Occasionally a little water 
was put into the jar to replace that lost by evaporation. There were 
14 larvae on October 10th, They increased in size vary slowly and 
one after another died. On December lf>th there were six larva- 
alive, and apparently about full-grown. ()u December 2!)t h live 
larva? were alive: on January ll.lS'.m, 3 were alive: on January 
17th, 2 were alive, and on January ;5()th there wa. but one alive. 
This one lived until February 16th, when it died at the "ripe old 
age" ot four mouths and a week. No larva pupated. 

* I Inward and Murlatt, The Principle Household Insects of the United stnti>. 
Hull. 4, X. $., Div. of Ent., U. S. Kept., AirrirulMirc-, 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



Why did no larva pupate? The environment w:is not abnormal. 
unless, perhaps, the food .supply was scanty. Perhaps the reison 
lies iu the condilions of the " boruinjr ' These slow -gro win g, long- 
lived, non-pupating wrigglers issued from eggs which were laid by 
a virgin female The female issued from it.s pupal case and almost 
immediately laid eggs. There was no other mosquito in the jar. 
and there was certainly no mating. Perhaps parthenogenesis is not 
unknown among mosquitoes. I do know that it is known. l>ul it' 
all the parthenogenetically produced la r vie fare out their lives as 
these I have watched did. parthenogenesis among mosquitoes is in- 
fanticide. 

Tin; ODONATA <>i TIII: ''BiOLOGiA CENTKALI- AMERICANA." - Hav- 
ing recently been asked by Mr. F. D. G-odmau, of London, to under- 
take the preparation of the part of this work relating to the Odonata, 
and having accepted this offer. I desire to make this part as complete 
as possible. As the " Biologia" aims to embrace all Mexican and 
Central American specie?, whether include! in the joint collections 
of Mr. Godmau and the late Mr. Silviu or not. 1 shall be great lv 
indebted to any persons who will loan me Odomta (" drogonflies," 
" darning-needles") from those countries for examination, the re- 
sults of such study to be included in this work. In this connection 
I will identify unnamed material for a very moderate return in 
duplicates. As some recent collectors have distributed specimens 
from that region quite widely, I suggest that any one willing to 
aid me should write to me before sending the insects and let me 
know the sources of their material, as, some time, labor and expense 
may thereby be saved PHILIP P. CALVERT, Academy of Natural 
Sciences, 19th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

" (Jo to the ant, thou sluggard I " commanded the Proverb. 

Accordingly the Sluggard went to the Ant. 

" Go to the devil I " exclaimed the Ant. 

'Talk about red tape!" sighed the Slugg-ird Detroit Journal. 



104 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

Entomological Literature, 



COMPILED BY P. P. CALVEKT. 



Under the above head it is intended to mention papers received at the Acad- 
emy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia pertaining to the Entomology of the 
Americas (North and South). Articles irrelevant to American entomology 
will not be noted. Contributions to the anatomy, physiology and embryology 
of insects, however, whether relating to American or exotic species, will be re- 
corded. The numbers in HEAVY-FACED TYPE refer to the journals, a* num- 
bered in the following list, in which the papers are published ; * denotes that the 
paper in question contains descriptions of new North American forms. Titles 
of all articles in foreign languages are translated into English; usually such 
articles are written in the same language as the title of the journal contain- 
ing them, but when such articles are in other languages than English, French i 
German or Italian, this fact is indicated in brackets. 



4. The Canadian Entomologist, London, Ont., Feb., '99. 5. Psyche, 
Cambridge, Mass , March, '99 9. The Entomologist, London, Feb.. 
? 99. II. The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, London, 
Feb., '99. 12. Comptes Rendus, L'Academie des Sciences, Paris, 
Jan. 23, '99. 21. The Entomologist's Record, London, Feb. 15, '99.- 
25. Bolletino dei Musei di Zoologia ed Amtomia Comparata d. R. 
Uuiversita di Torino, 189835. Annales, Societe Entomologiqne 
de Belgique, Brussels, '93. 45. Deutsche Entomologische Zeit- 
schrift, '98, zweites lepidopterologisches Heft, Berlin. Feb. 10, '99. 
61. Natural Science, London, Feb. '99. 74. Naturwissenscbaft- 
liche Wochenschrift. Berlin, '99. 81. Biologiscb.es Centralblatt, Er- 
langen. '99. 84. Insekten Burse, Leipsic, '99.-IOI. Rovartaui Lapok, 
Budapest, Feb., '99. 

The General Subject. A i g n e r- A b a f i . L . The scientific ar- 
rangement of an insect collection [in Hungarian], 101. B o r d age. 
E . On the probable mode of formation of the fusion between the 
femuraud troshanter in Arthropods (transl. from French), II. C o 1 - 
lin, A. Determination of the date of publication of Liune- 
Gmelin. Editio XIII Regnum Animale, Pars, vi, Zoologischer Au- 
zeiger, Leipsic, Jan. 16, '99. E s c h e rich. Iv . On myrmeco- 
philous Arthropods with especial reference to the biology [life- 
history], Zoologisches Centralblatt, Leipsic, Jan 17, '99. J a net. 
C. On the mechanism of flight in insects, 12. K e r r e m a n s , 
C. Sexual dimorphism, 35, xlii. i;$, Jan- '24. M c C 1 n n g, C . 
E. A peculiar nuclear element in the male reproductive cell?; of 
insects, figs., Zoological Bulletin, Boston, Feb '99. -W i 1 1 o y . A. 
Trophoblast and serosa : a contribution to the morphology of the 
embryonic membranes of insects, Quarterly Journal of Microscop- 
ical Science, London, Jan., 99. 

Economic Entomology. A u o n. An/ti<//'ofns /icr/ii<-in*t/s.\\\i\ Amer- 
ican dried fruits, Revue Scieutifique, Paris, Feb. IS. '99. -I? a b, A. 
The grasshopper plague in South America, 74, Jan. 1. (' raw- 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. ]Q5 

shay, R . , and B 1 a n d f o r d , "W . F . H . Larvae in antelope 
horns, Nature. London, Feb. 9, '99. F rank. New communica- 
tions on the European fruit scale in comparison with the Sin Jose 
scale, Gartenflora, Berlin, Feb. 1. G r a s s i , B . , B i g n a in i . 
A . , and Bastiauelli, G. Further researches on thecycle of 
human malarial parasites in the body of the mosquito. Rendiconti 
R. Accademia dei Liucei, Rome, Jan. 8, '99. H o w a r d , L . O . 
The Economic Status of Insects as a class, Science, New York, Feb. 
17, '99. J a b 1 o n o w s k i , J. The home of the " bloo.l louse '' 
[in Hungarian]. 101 L i n t n e r , J. A. Thirteenth report o f 
the State entomologist on injurious and other insects of the State 
ot New York', 1897. Fifty-first Report N. Y. State Museum, Al- 
bany, '98. N u t t a 1 1 , G II- F . The mosquito-malaria theory. 
Central blatt fiir Bakteriologie, Jena, Feb. 14, '99. R enter, E 
Argyresthia conjugella Zell., a new enemy to the apple fruit, 21. 
"Webster, F . M . Report of Committee on Entomology, tigs. 
Annual Report Ohio Horticultural Society, 1893. No phcs of pub- 
lication or indication of volume, paging, etc., giveu ! X . On the 
life-habits of the pine-gall-roller ( Tortri\rre*itirr/f/ L ), 74, Jan. -2-2 

Arachnida. D u b o s e q , O On the histogeuesis of the venom 
of the Scolopendra, Notes et Revue, Archives de Zoologie Experi- 
mentaleet Generale, (3) vi, 4. Paris, '93. P e r k i u s, R. C. L. 
On a special Acarid chamber formed within the basal abdominal 
segment of bees of the genus Koptortkosomrt (Xylocopina?), Ento- 
mologist's Monthly Magazine, London, Feb , '99. R o b i n s o n . 
N . M y pet scorpion [ Thelyphotins giganteus],A.pyletou's Popular. 
Science Monthly, New York, March, '99. 

Myriopoda. S i 1 v e s t r i , F . l)iplopo;V.i from the voyage of 
Dr. E. Fe<ta to the republic of Ecuador, tigs . 25, No :5-Jl. Sept. -.\. 

Orthoptera. B u r r, M. Further new species of Forficularia- 
II ; Mimicry in Orthoptera. 21. M c N e i 1 I . J . Arkansas Me 
lanopli, i, 5. de Saussure, H. Analecta Entomologica, i. 
Orthopterologica, 1 pi . . Revue Suisse de Zoologie, v. Geneva, ''.is. - 
Tntt, J. W. Migration and dispersal ot insects: Orthoptrrn. 
Cont.), 21. W a 1 k e r, E. M. Notes on some Ontario Acridiidae, 
part Hi (cont.), 4. W e b s t e r , F. M. A prolonged season of 
occurrence for X<-}it'*fi>rcrctt Ann'r/cn/ia, 4. 

Neurontera. o m s t o c k . J. H.. and X c c d h a m . J. d- 
The wings of insects, iv (cont.) [Ephemeridae], figs , American 
Naturalist, Boston, Feb.. '91). 

Hemiptera. B erg, r . T*v,> mw Argentine -i> -ie< of the genii- 
(iypona [in Latin], Anales, Sociedad Cientitici Argentina, xlvii', 
1. Buenos Aires, Jan. '99 C o e k e r e 1 I . T . I) . A . Note, on 
Central American Coccidse, with descriptions of three new spivu-s,* 
II; The odor of ( 'o:-<-id;t>, 4: Three new ('itr.-il:e from Br.i/il. 4.- 
tving. G. B. A new variety of ( hiomis/iis /'////'/////< Fitch 



106 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

and notes on other species,* 5. K i r k a 1 d y , G . AY . On some 
aquatic Rhynchota from Jamaica,* 9. T i n s 1 e y, J. D. Con- 
tributions to Coccidology, i. 4. 

(bleoptera. B o r d a s, L . Researches on the anal glands of the 
Carabidte, 12. F let iaux, E. Note on some Eucnernidce and 
description of new species. 35. xliii, 1, Feb. 11. -G a n g 1 b a u e r , 
L . Die Kiifer von Mitteleuropa. Dritter Band, erste Hiilfte. 
Familienreilie Staphylinoidea. 2. Theil Scydmsenidse Histerida?. 
Wien. Carl Gerold's Sohn. 408 pp. Svo- :-}() text, figures K a r a - 
waiew, AY. On the anatomy and metamorphoses of the ali- 
mentary canal of the larva of Aitobiinii pa)u'ceum,figs.,8\, Feb. 15 
K nan 8, AY. Collecting- notes on Kansas Coleoptera, 4 P i c . 
M. Attempt at a study of the Ptfnnsof Brazil, 35, xliii, 1, Feb. 
11. AY i c k h a m , II . F . The habits of American Cicindelida.-. 
Proceedings, Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences, vii. Daven- 
port, Iowa, '99; The Lucanidse of Ontario and Quebec, figs., 4. 

Diptera. A u s t e n , E. E. Oa the preliminary stages and 
mode of escape of the imago in the Dipterous geuus Xylomyia Roud, 
(Subula, Mg. et auct.), with especial reference to X. maculata F. 
and on the systematic position of the genus, 4, !l. K e 1 1 o g g. 
V . L . The mouth-parts of the nematocerous Diptera, ii, figs., 5. 
AY i 1 I i s t o n , S . W . Oo the genu.s Tklipwr/aster Bond., 5. 

Lepidoptera B ii r g e r, O. Sr;m:l file's " Experimsntelle 
Zoologische Tjuiersuchuugen mit Lepidoptera,'' 81, Jan. 15 
Chapman, T. A. Lepidoptera Phalfenas of the whole 
world, 9 ; Lepidoptera with a general inland distribution in 
Europe, but confined to coast habitats in England, 2i Dy ar- 
il. G . Description of larva of liif/ura delineata Gueu, 4. 
A suggestion for the Pterophoridae, 1 pi., 21; D ascription of 
the larva of Calocampa curvimacula,5. F i s c h e r , E . Experi^ 
mental critical researches on the perc3utage-o^curreiice of abar- 
rations in Vanessa caused by gi'ext cold, Societas Entomologicas 
Ziirich-Hottiugen, Feb. 15, '99 F y 1 es, T. VY . Early stage, 
of Trigonophora periculosa Gn .4 G r i f f i n 5 , A O >serv i- 
tions on the genus Nannagroecia Redteub .with description of a 
new species (Voyage of Dr. E Festa to Ecuador) tig , 25, No. \\1 .!. 
Sept. 14 II o f m a u u , O- Tiie OrneoJidte (Alucitidae; of the 
palasarctic region, 1 pi , 45 N e w b i g i n . M.I. The colors 
and pignaentsof butterflies, 61. R e b e 1 , II . On the present posi- 
tion of classification of the Lepidoptera, 45. S c h u 1 t z , O . On 
the relative frequency of gyuanclromorphous structures in the vari- 
ous palsearctic species of Lepidoptera, 84, Jan. 20 S m i t h , J . 
B. A new species of Asteroscopus Bd,* 4. S t a n d f u ss, M 
Summary of the temperature and hybrid!/, ilion experiments hith- 
erto undertaken, 84, Jan 5 S t a u d i n g er, O On ihc species 
and forms of the genus Ayrias, 45, S t i c h e 1 , II . Ne\v // '/- 
contA'S from Southern Brazil, Eutomologische Nichvidilc.:. '!>!>, _>, 
Berlin, Jan. T r i m e n , R. Seasonal diinoriihisiu in Lepidop- 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 1()7 

tera. Transaction*, Entomological Society London, 'its. pt. v. Pro- 
ceedings. Feb. li. 'its. Tut t, J . W. The L isiocampids. tig.. 
Proceedings South London Entomological ami Natural History 
Society, ''.is. pt. 1. 

Hymenoptera. A s h m e ad, AV . 11 . Four nev; specie^ belong- 
ing to the genus ri<-,,n<-iihtx Fox,* 5. li u 1 in a n . (i . AV . Bees 
and the origin of flowers. 6! P c r k i n s. I!. (', L See Arach- 
nid _Y o u n g . C . Descriptions of sawny '.arva'. 4. 



DOINGS OF SOCIETIES. 

A regular ineetinii of Hie (.'hicayo Entomological Society \va- 
hcld on Thursday. Fc'liruary It-. IS!)',), at tlie ( rerar Library. >.'cni- 
bers present. ]2: visitors, i;. Prof. James (i. Needbain, of Lake 
Forest I" Diversity, gave a very interesting talk on the Odoiiata, 
their habits and the bc-l method of obtaining speriniens for study. 

The Society now has over twenty members and more are confi- 
dently expected. < und (juarters and access to a well stocked library 
have placed it on a tirui footing, and it is contemplated to issue a 
volume of proceeding* in the near future. 

A . K AVI AT. Sec. 

At the February meeting of the Feldnmi Collecting Sochi, held 
at the residence of Mr H. W. Weuzel. 1.VJ:! South 13th street, i\ 
persons were present. 

Mr. Boerner recorded the cap tu re of Bar in tm <//bt ! xc<'tixiii \Vostvilk-, 
X. J., July 24th. It was not before recorded from so far North. 

Mr H AVenzel reported tint he had identified specimens t iken 
by Mr. Boeruer at Brigantine Bench. N. J , as I'/ihi'n/i/tnt/i'x 
*l>m1f.i\ an introduced >pei'ies. 

Mr. Bosruer stated the specimeas in quostion had been taken on 
limber washed up on the beach. 

Mr. II. AVen/el al-.> i < -orded. f he cap lure of no less i Inn inn ^peciex 
of Coleoptera trom a bag ot nnlerial gatheied for sifting, on .Ian 
uaryJStli at \Vcstvilk-, N. J. The bag held about one-half bushel of 
debris. Eight specie- of S -ydm ie:nd ie were taken, and a specimen 
of ('(jiniti'dclu'liit crihrffiillis, a -out hern -pecies. Also a specimen 
O? OllSthopUS inn-dn^ and six sjMvie- of J'/'i //////'.-'. 



Mr. Boerner referred to a former communication on the hiber- 
nation of Conotrachelus fissunguis, and slated be had taken a speci- 
men hibernating on January 2'M. \V J. Fox, Secretary. 



JOS ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

A REGULAR meeting of the Newark Entomological Society was 
held Sunday, February 12tli, at 4:00 p. m . with President Bischott' 
in the chair, and ten members present. Mr. Weidt proposed Mr. 
W. D. Kearfott, who was unanimously elected a in amber. Mr. S. 
T. Kemp read the following article on Saperda lateral-is: 

" During the winter of 1897-9S I found in a patch of under- 
growth in the neighborhood of Merchantville. N. J.. numerous 
coleopterous larvae infesting the young shoots of hickory and oak. 
One species which attracted my attention more than others, on ac- 
count of the apparent impossibility of collecting the larvae in their 
natural abode, proved, on maturity, to be&aperda lateralis. I only 
found them on breaking off the dead shoots of hickory, which ap- 
peared to grow out of old stumps of the original trees, cut off or 
worn away close to the ground- They inhabit these shoots right at 
the very base of them, and appear to burrow almost laterally and 
slightly upwards. On breaking off these shoots, which were from 
one to two inches in diameter, and which, when infested, break 
de.su off easily at the base, the larva becomes almost entirely ex- 
posed, sometimes even falling out on to the ground. Not recognizing 
the species at the time. I visiled the same patch about the IstofMay, 
1898. and collected a number of them which by this time had pup- 
ated in th^ same situation, and when these matured, towards the 
end of May, they gave me the information I desired, viz.: the name 
of the species of larva? I had been studying I found,on close exam- 
ination, that the wood attacked by this borer was invariably a 
shoot that had bean bored during tha previous season, and been 
broken off three er four feet above the ground by the larvas of Ela- 
phidiou parallelum. 

" It appeared to ma from my observation, that the latter species 
commences the work of destruction,and that the wood is not in a tit 
condition to suit the requirements of Saperda lateralis until the 
following season. 1 found mostly one, sometimes two, and occa- 
sionally in the largest shoots three of the larvae in the same shoot, 
but always in a separate burrow . The above noted habits of thee 
larvae may not be of much interest to experienced coleopterists, but 
may be read with interest by beginners, judging from my personal 
experience a few years back, and may tend to lead them to closer 
observation while on their ramblesin the country. 

S. T. KEMP. 

Elizabeth, S. J. 

Mr. Kearfott exhibited a series of blown larvae of the genus Dat- 
Meeting adjourned A. J. WEIDT, Secretary. 



A meeting of the American Entomological Society was held Feb- 
ruary -2:5d, Kev. II. C. McCook, I) D., president, in the chair. Dr. 
( 'alvert exhibitedaSphinx larva from the collection of the Biologi- 
cal School of the Vniversitv of Peimsvlvania, which was so covered 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 109 



with the cocoons of a parasite as to almost obscure- tin- larva from 
view. The specimen was found on the red mangrove at Osprer, 
Florida. The parasites were Braconida?. Two hundred and fifty 
larvae were counted, although there were many more. As. high as 
twelve hundred parasites have been reported from a single larva 
Dr. Skinner made some remarks on insects in relation to pain and 
emphasized the fact that the greit numbers of progeny produced 
compensated for pain as a means of protection to lite, so necessary 
in the higher order of animals. Mr. Sc-i<s siid h had kept a speci- 
men of Pn'onidus crislnl it* \\Y\ve for two months impaled jna pin. 
and it took its food and ate, for that period, as though nothing 
were wrong. Dr. McCook mentioned that iuss^ts deprived of their 
abdomens would suck honey or sweet fluids which would enter the 
mouth and come out the end of the thorax where severed from the 
abdomen. He also spoke of soldiers during the heat of battle, hav- 
ing severe wounds and suffering little pain. The experience of 
Livingston, the African traveler, was als,> related, in which a lion 
munched his arm and no pain was felt- !>; Skinner madesoine re- 
marks on the subject of insects as carriers of disease, and especially 
mentioned the probability of M>ixc domestica carrying the Bacil- 
nis ti/phoxtis, the cause of typhoid or enteric fever These insects 
settle on fecal matter, from patients sutfjrin > from this disease and 
then settle on food, and the poison of the disease is carried into the 
alimentary canal of other persons. The flies foot is admirably 
adopted for picking up "germs "and cirrying them about. The 
life history of Mw-t domesticpt ha-; 10 bairing on this subject, ex- 
cept that they are more numerous whei-3 hor-e miumv is plentiful. 
All latrines in camps should be covered, as diurnal ins^cfs avoid 
dark places. Dr. McCooksiid he had visited every principal camp 
in this country and Cuba during the lit? war and found the flies 
simply disgusting at times. At Camp Alger.in June, flies swanm-d 
around the mouths of patients suffering frjin variou* diseises. In 
the mess tents of the o/ftVo-.s- it was impolitic to eit with any de- 
gree ot comfort, without an abundant supply of mosquito netting. 
The president said while in Cub i h;- w is to > b;i ;y to study insi- sts, 
but did DOtice the "cutting ants" while g,>;ni up theliillto Morro 
Castle. A black spe-ie< was cHinbing up t'n pit'is and tlu-cu-pi- 
dor shaped openings were observed and the ants seen carrying in 
the little bits of leives and probably \\ o.rh-rini:- wlntall the din ot 
battle had be3n about. At Sin .Fuanridg;- they were airiin notice 1 
and around a tree a Iarg3 tormiciry of the- an!- w.i- fouinl- They 
seem to have the sens? of dire -lion iv.u irk i ! )ly w,-ll dcy, -loped and 
their burrows, on line< through a rank tro])ical grass and wci-ils, run 
almost as accurately as an engineer run- a siraiirht lint- !'r a rail- 
road. At Sintiau'o twj hand<.:ii;- 8p83i - of -jiidcrs wen- ols:>rvcd, 
which hadtiirovvn th;-ir \\ '- lor forty fes . making a canopy over 
a path, covered on either side by rich tropical loli.agt- about eight 
feet in hei"-ht. These interesting natural scene- uvre i:i greit con- 



1|() ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

irist to tli-' horrors of war as seen in the hospital rear by. The 
spiders saen were a common Nep!'l sp. and an Ar</i/i'<><'j><'i r . 
The Treisurer reporter! that the bequest of m,<m) from the late Dr. 
Gci>. II . Horn had been received. 

DH. HENRY SKIXM.TJ, Secretary. 



OBITUARY. 



It is with sorrow I record the death, on February 25th, at Mai- 
den. Mass., of my friend and fellow collet-tor, Henry G. White. For 
the past seventeen years he had been in poor health from Avhat wa- 
supposed to be a form of Bright's disease, and two or three times a 
year would have severe and painful attacks, which would confine 
him to his bed for weeks at a time. The last and what proved to 
be fatal attack c line upon bin: in August, since which time he had 
been unable to leave his room. He suffered greater agony than be 
falls the lot of most men. but. in spite of his affliction, was always 
cheerful and contented, and a most indefatigable collector of 
/eptdoptertt, in which he specialized. 

Mr. White was born in Worcester, England. November 23, is.'nt. 
and came to this country when eighteen years of age. After spend 
ing a few rears in Pittsburg, Pa., he traveled extensively through 
the West and finally returned to the Eastern States, and spent the 
greater part of his life in or near New York city. 

In the spring of 1895 he came to Maiden, and for about a year 
was connected with the Gipsy Moth Commission, but his con- 
tinued poor heilth compelled him to resign his position, since 
which lie has devoted himself to collecting insects, rearing larv;e 
and the many other pleasures which a true lover of nature enjoys 
while pursuing his favorite hobby ; and what a blessing this hobby 
has been to him, helping to while away the weiry hours and bring 
days of contentment to this poor sufterer. 

By profession " Harry' 1 White was a mechanical engineer, by 
birth and education a gentleman. His \vas a most generous nature, 
and often would he give from his own collection to help out a less 
fortunate friend. If he found a choice collecting ground he wanted 
all his friends (and all entomologists were his friends) to enjoy it 
with him. His unselfishness was well illustrate:! by a remark I 
once heard him make when remonstrated wiih for giving so freely 
from his cabinet. '' What are they good for," said he. " except to 
give awny 'i I cannot take them with me when I die." 

We have all of us lost a friend indec I . 

He leaves a wife whose untiring devotion helped to prolong his 
life manv years Two brothers survive him. one in Colorado, the 
other in England, also his mother. HARRY 11 NKWCOMB. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS 



AND 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SECTION 



ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, PHILADELPHIA. 



VOL. X. 



MAY, 1899. 



No. 5. 



CONTENTS : 



Skinner Notes on Butterflies, with 
Descriptions of New Species Ill 

Snyder Reflections on the Realiza- 
tion of One of Boyhood's Dreams-114 

Wickham Recollections of Old Col- 
lecting Grounds 120 

Slosson Collecting on BiscayneBay.124 

Smith Description of Haploa Trian- 
angularis, N. Sp 126 

Thomas Additions to the List of 
Cranberry, N. C., Butterflies 128 

Dyar A New Cossid from Texas 129 



Coquillet A New Try pet id from Ha- 
waii 129 

Dyar Notes on Alaskan Arctiida-. !'!<) 
Holdridge A Hybrid Between Li- 
mentis Ursula and L. Archippus.,131 

Editorial 132 

Economic Entomology 134 

Notes and News 144 

Entomological Literature ; 147 

Doings of Societies 152 

Exchanges i, ii 



NOTES ON BUTTERFLIES, WITH 

NEW SPECIES. 



DESCRIPTIONS OF 



BY HENRY SKINNER, M. D. 

Pa m phi la ttcmMeri, n. sp. Male. Expands U inch. Supe- 
rior wings yellow fulvous, with a darker border, -about an 
one-eighth inch in width; the yellow fulvous runs into this 
darker color along the nervures ; the stigrna is long and nar- 
row, and becomes thinner as it approaches the subniediau iier- 
vure. Inferior wings yellow fulvous ; costal margin fuscous ; 
edge of wing fuscous ; fringes whitish-yellow. Under side of 
superiors with a large black patch at the base; remainder 
nearly immaculate. Inferiors light yellow-fulvous, immaeu- 
late. 

Female. Expands but slightly more. Superiors darker in 
color, with a row of yellow spots extending across the \\i 



from the cost a to the inner margin ; tirst come three distinct 
subapieal spots, then two small ones further toward the outer 



112 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

margin, and below these one between each two nervures until 
the inner margin is reached ; these spots become larger as the 
inner margin is approached. Inferiors as in the male. Under- 
sides as in the male. This species is more nearly allied to napa 
Edw. than any other, bnt is more nearly immaculate both 
above and below ; the stigma is larger and narrower than in 
napa. Described from [a pair sent to me by Dr. S. H. Scudder 
who has a good series in his collection. They were taken on 
the White Elver, Colorado, between July 24th and August 
13th. 

Pamphila oslari, n. sp. Male expands one and five-six- 
teenths inches. Upperside : All four wings light fuscous, with 
an almost obsolete black stigma. Underside : Superiors im- 
maculate, excepting that there is a black basal dash with red- 
dish-yellow color above it . Inferiors hoary under a lens show- 
ing numerous white scales on a dark brown back-ground. 
This species has a superficial resemblance to fusca Grote and 
Robinson. Described from four males taken in Chimney 
Gulch, Colorado, by Mr. E. J. Oslar on the 18th of June. 

I have received a fresh specimen of Lycorea cleobcea var, 
atergatis Doub-Hew, taken January the 19th at Miami, Dade, 
county, Florida. This specimen was taken by Mr. S. K. 
Ehoads and adds a rather handsome uymphalid to our fauna. 
It is a wanderer from further south, being found in Brazil 
and Central America. From the same locality has been re- 
ceived Danais berenice strigosa. Eudamiift titi/nisan& E. zestox fly 
together at Miami and neither seem to vary toward the other, 
and I think it likely that they are distinct species. It has 
been suggested that zcstox is a variety of titifni*. 

A series of specimens of Eimica tatlla from Miami, Florida, 
show wonderful variation on the inferiors below, hardly any 
two specimens being marked alike. Erycides amui/tax is very 
abundant at Miami. Nisoniades petronius found at this same 
place has been taken by myself in ^"ew Jersey not far from 
Philadelphia. Specimens of P<tinp/ii/ nniinid ctiffna Stand, 
from Switzerland and Norway are absolutely identical with 
specimens from Laggan, Alberta, which I have labelled P. 
com in a nidititohtf Scudder. If the locality labels were removrd it 
would be impossible to separate them. I now have a large 
number of the forms of comma from many localities. They 



1899 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

number 150 specimens. The southernmost locality from 

whence I have received specimens is Blanco county, Texas. 
The heretofore almost unknown Erch'm /m-.v// is common on 
the Kuskoquiru Biver, Alaska. The specimens of PapUin 
troihtK from southern Florida show interesting differences 
when compared with the specimens found in the Xorth. 

Since the description of Pamplnhi onhtri was written I have 
received the following interesting account from its discoverer, 
Mr. E. J. Oslar, of Denver, Colorado : " P. oslari I take in the 
foot hills, altitude about 8,000 feet in Jefferson county at 
Chimney Gulch and Clear Creek Canon. I find it sitting on 
the rocks all the time until disturbed, and then it is gone in 
an instant, and no eye can trace its flight ; but if you exer- 
cise a little patience, stand still and wait, it will come to 
the identical spot again. The color of the insect assimilates 
to a nicety the rocks on which it sits, with its wings closed, 
and it takes a practiced eye to detect one while at rest. .Y/.so- 
iiiiiilcn in<n-ti<ili* I take at the same'time and place and have 
never seen it anywhere else ; it is therefore yery local and 
most difficult to capture. I find them right on the tops 
of the mountains that rise perpendicular from the canon, 
and they are to be seen in little colonies of eight or ten, 
and are continually on the wing gyrating round and round 
some favorite rock. They attack everything that flies within 
their radius of flight. I never saw them feeding or taking 
any rest, except for a minute or two, when something would 
come along, a J'j>!li<> or Col i a a, when at them they would 
go until the larger species would be chased out of sight. 
After a time they would come back and resume the same cir- 
cular flight, one behind the other. In order to capture any, 
HIM- is obliged to stand perfectly still for five or ten minutes in 
the path of their flight, until they get used to your presence, 
and then they get nearer and nearer to your net which you 
must hold in position to strike as quickly as possible. It is a 
case of hit or miss ; if the latter you will not see them again 
for quite awhile. 1 have waited fora half-hour before they 
would put in an appearance again at the old spot and then 
they took good care to keep out of range of my net. Il i> 
single brooded I believe; I have never seen or taken it after 
July." 



114 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

REFLECTIONS ON THE REALIZATION OF ONE OF BOY- 
HOOD'S DREAMS. 

BY PROF. A. J. SNYDER, Belvidere, 111. 

[Not intended for those who live within the rnagic circles 
whose boundaries circumscribe the cities of Boston, Philadel- 
phia, New York, Reading, Pittsburg, Newark, nor for the in- 
habitants of any other city which is the proud possessor of an 
Entomological Society, are these lines written ; but for the 
poor, isolated 'f bugologist " who lives one thousand miles from 
"nowhere," who seldom meets a congenial spirit, but who is 
considered an irredeemable crank, even by his relatives, and 
who must send all his rara aves within the charmed circle in 
order that they may be properly christened ; to you, fellow- 
creatures in lonesomeness, who frequently write me about how 
your n. sp. have been annexed while in pursuit of cognomens, 
this epistle is inscribed.] 

My first thought concerning these remarks was to label them 
" Post Mortem Examinations," for they are based on the fact 
that the past summer found me in the East examining the re- 
mains, u legs, thoraxes, abdomens," etc., of all those insects 
which you poor collectors have been sending there for years and 
about Avhich at least semi-annually a wail goes up from the 
editorial page of entomological journals. You remember how 
we are instructed to always "pin firmly, pack in one box 
which is enclosed in another, all around which must be several 
inches of springy packing material, the whole branded on each 
of its six faces. " Fragile ! ! With Care ! ! ! " etc. It is useless 
to extenuate you know how they ought to be packed, or at least 
you should know ; but really, brethren, now that, like Caesar, 
I may say, " Veni, vidi," the greatest marvel of the age is how 
those Eastern collectors can so skillfully patch up specimens ; 
for, within the magic circle, I actually saw (believe it, if you 
can) whole drawers full of butterflies without a single antler 
missing ; and, name it not in Gath, but some of those butler 
flies met their death at our hands. I know it, for occasionally 
some of them still bear our labels. 

Probably every boy who inclines to scientific pursuits 
dreams of some day visiting the Smithsonian and the National 
Museum ; and if, as in my case, his dream is not realized until 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



he reaches man's estate, he has by that time learned of other 
great collections in the East which he longs to see. 

Our magazines sometimes contain articles describing visii- 
to the great collections of insects in Europe, bnt I fail to re- 
member a single description of America's collections. Only 
two years ago a friend, whose collection I was viewing, said : 
F was down East last summer and visited all the collections ;" 
yet, to my sorrow, that was about all that he said about 
them, and he, like the rest, kept to himself all that he had 
seen and we must excuse him, for he is a very busy man. 
By the way, is it generally known that nearly all of the great 
collections of insects in America to-day have been made by 
men who were very busy men who earned their ' ( bread 
and butter ' - in some way not connected with entomology, or 
by a few fortunate mortals born with enough of this world's 
goods to need to give no attention to ' ' bread and butter, ' ' but 
so interested in entomology that their time was devoted to it 
with no other remuneration than the pleasure it afforded! 

These reflections are not written in the spirit of one who 
knows all about the great collections, but with the feeling that 
something has been gained which should be passed on and 
with a fervent wish to help the less fortunate. 

Were any one to ask me to-day, " Where is the greatest 
collection of Lepidoptera in America? ' : I should be compelled 
to say, "I don't know." At least three times in the past 
have I gained access to a great collection and the owner has 
siid, "You now stand in the presence of the greatest collec- 
tion of Lepidoptera in America," or words to that effect. I 
have never disputed the statement, but I dare not tell where 
these collections are; for I have a feeling that at least half a 
dozen others would rise in wrath and say to those who make 
such claims words unsuitable to reproduce here. You can 
s\ mpathize with such pride in one's collection ; for where is 
the cabinet. e\eu of the tyro, that does not contain specimens 
which he would not exchange for gold or others .' 

To return to the story. Last July found me in the company 
of thousands of pedagogues roaming the streets of " the City of 
M aguificent Distances. ' ' K\ en as some men approach Xiaga ra 
Falls, with both desire to see and reluctance to have realized. 
or as the moth approaches the flame in ever narrowing circles. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[May 



yet irresistibly drawn to the centre, we approached the Smith- 
sonian and the National Museum. First we visited the Cap- 
itol, called on the President of the United States, viewed the 
Government Buildings, the Monument, Mt. Veruou; but 
finally, having sent our lady friends upon an errand sure to 
detain them all day, and having found my congenial friend, 
Mr. James E. McDade, of Chicago, an early morning attack 
upon the United States Entomologist, Mr. L. O. Howard, was 
then planned, with a determined attempt to gain access to the 
goverment collections of insects. 

Our peregrinations about the government buildings assisted 
us somewhat in locating the Entomologist's office. We had 
neglected to bring letters of introduction, so presented our 
cards. I enjoy finding what may be accomplished without the 
assistance of that too frequently used power known as a " pull . ' ' 
We had no excuse for an intrusion upon government officials 
except our interest in entomology, but found that all-sufficient. 
and were soon chatting pleasantly with Mr. Howard, whom we 
fonud to be a genial, business-like man, with unusual ability 
to rattle off scientific names of insects, even if they consisted 
of some twenty-six or more syllables. 

After some minutes of pleasant conversation on insects and 
men, Mr. Howard gave us a note of introduction to Mr. Ash- 
mead, one of his assistants, whom we found by entering a 
dark hole in one corner of the National Museum and then 
ascending a winding stair. 

E\ r ery possible courtesy was extended us, and soon Mr. Mc- 
Dade was examining the Odonata of the National Museum, 
^hile my attention was given to taking notes on the Argyn- 
uids. Before noon Mr. McDade joined me, and we then made 
a hasty examination of most of the American species. After 
thanking the authorities for their assistance we could hardly 
"wait to get around a corner before turning to gaze at each 
other in amazement, for the collections in both Lepidoptera 
and Odonata were far below what we had anticipated. Out 
side the Noctuidae and Bombycidre, where the labors of Prof. 
J. B. Smith and Harrison G. Dyar are plainly evident, the 
National Collection falls far below many private collections I 
have seen in the West. Just why this should be so F am 
somewhat at a loss to explain, but two probable reasons sug- 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 1 ] 7 

gest themselves: First, the government has not provided 
adequate means for building up a great collection of insects, 
and departmental workers have had to build up private col- 
lections in the special orders in which they work at their own 
expense, which the government has neglected afterward to 
purchase; secondly, collectors and scientists have not shown 
the proper spirit of generosity and donated to the Rational 
Museum duplicates of new and rare specimens which they have 
captured. 

At reasonable cost and within a few years, by placing at the 
disposal of the head of each department (Lepidoptera, Odo- 
nata, Coleoptera, etc.) a reasonable financial support, and 
tli rough a system of exchange and purchase, a collection could 
be built up which would be second to none, as a National Col- 
lection should be. Such a collection would be of inestimable 
value to all scientists, but especially would it be an inspiration 
to young scientists and give them an advantage unknown to 
the entomologists of to-day. 

Economic entomology, which has dealt mainly with larval 
forms, would be immensely aided by a Rational Collection 
containing long series in both adult and larval stages, and no 
thinking person can doubt that such a collection would pay 
financially in the added ability which it would give to cope 
with insect pests and their depredations. 

Xo criticism upon the present officials is intended, for they 
are doing all in their power, but a plea is offered for a gen- 
eral awakening among legislators and others to the need of 
increased appropriations for such work. Too many rare speci- 
mens have already crossed the ocean to swell the collections of 
more appreciative collectors, who are willing to pay some- 
thing near the real value. 

Does not America possess a millionaire who would willing! v 
devote one of his millions to build up a great American col- 
lection of insects? If not, at least we who do not possess the 
millions we may contribute something from our duplicate list> 
for the love which our hearts bear this great nation and for 
the benefit of those who in future shall care for its interests. 
The Rational Museum contains, practically, no types of Ar- 
gyimids. Among the rather rare species represented there are 
nokomis, iHitixlma, electa, cohunb'm, lilinini. 



118 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

eurynome and arge. There are a few examples of nevadensis 
and meadii, but the species are not separated. Bulletin No. 
44 of the National Museum, by Prof. Smith, gives the names of 
the Catocalw in the collection, and few if any additions have 
been made since its publication. 

Experience taught nie that it was useless to try to remember 
or even to take notes on all that one sees in a great collection ; 
hence throughout my trip special attention was paid to Argyn- 
nids and CatocaUe. 

It is but a few hours' ride from Washington to Philadelphia, 
where I soon stood in the presence of the collection of the 
Philadelphia Academy of Sciences. With less than a week for 
the purpose it would be useless to attempt to see or speak of 
the collection as a whole, and besides a glance at a few of the 
beautiful exotics, and the method of mounting them with 
glass above and below, so that both surfaces niay be seen 
without removing the specimens, the time was devoted to the 
two genera mentioned above. Here, as at the National Mu- 
seum, I soon realized that to see what I most wished to see 
I must seek private collections. Of especial note were Arg. 
bischoffi (the vars. saga and arctica~), hiornata, clio, astatic, bois- 
<lnr<ilH (var. chariclea) and alberta. 

Admission to the Academy collection was gained through 
the courtesy of Dr. Henry Skinner, who then took me to view 
his private collection of American diurnals. Many types are 
in this collection, more among the Hesperidse than elsewhere, 
I believe ; and it is unnecessary to expand upon the beauties 
of a collection which is known to contain many rarities in 
excellent condition. So particular is the doctor that he even 
objects to a Western collector's raising the hair-lock of a Patu- 
pliila ; he says he even likes to know what color the hair of a 
new species may be, but we who have seen them alive proba- 
bly know better than the doctor how u greasy " a live Pant- 
phila is and how easily its scalp is removed. 

Among the excellent features of the collection is the long 
series which one finds of many species and the ease with 
which similar species may be compared. One may find proof 
of many of Dr. Skinner's theories by examining the collection 
with its owner. Good series of the types of Arg. plat hut and 
snt/deri are here and co-types of others, among them Arg. 
which no one could mistake for another species. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

The afternoon and evening with this collection sped nil too 
rapidly, and the following morning our train passed through 
historic Valley Forge, on its way to Reading. Had Washing- 
ton spent a summer in Valley Forge, and been inclined to en- 
tomology, he could have forgotten many of the nation's trou- 
bles in the pursuitof insects ; for the thought comes to me, as 
I remember the beautiful valley, "What a delightful country 
for a ramble ! ' : 

To be cordially welcomed to the home of Dr. Hermann 
Strecker, and to spend the greater portion of a day with the 
doctor, examining his marvellous and beautiful collection of Lep- 
idoptera, was a treat which I had not even dreamed of realizing. 
We looked at drawer after drawer of great beauties, taken 
from every conceivable nook of the globe. Tailed butterflies 
and tailless butterflies were there, great butterflies and small, 
handsome and dull ones, common ones and rare ; in fact , 1 
know no other collection which contains so many uniques. 
Here are a number of the types of both Argynnis and Cutomlu . 
Time, space and ability prevent my saying half that is in my 
mind as I think of this and the other great collections viewed 
during this trip. Dr. Strecker has types or co-types of Ar- 
f/i/nniN baal, t'<hc<ir<lK<i, coronis, monticola, arye and krianhihl, 
to say nothing of other types and oddities which one is not 
likely to see elsewhere. 

A few evenings later a dusty, weary traveler might have 
been seen seeking his way in ' i The Smoky City, ' ' trying to find 
the Carnegie Museum, and its director, Dr. W. J. Holland, and 
gain a glimpse of the collection formerly owned by Mr. W. H. 
Edwards. Success crowned the seeker's efforts and the next 
forenoon was spent in fairly reveling over the types of Xorth 
American Argyuuids named by Mr. W. H. Edwards. Just 
take Smith's list of Lepidoptera and turn to the genus J /////// 
nis, and note how many of the names are followed by the 
abbreviation "Edw.," and yon will know just what t\pes I 
examined that forenoon. One needs but to see these hundreds 
of Argynuids, many of them still labeled in Mr. Edwards's 
handwriting, as I trust they always will be. to recognize the 
marvellous ability of the man who has contributed so much to 
our knowledge of the Lepidoptera of Xorth America. Trou- 
bles in securing proper identification of Argynnids have at 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[May 



times driven many of us nearly wild, but a half-day with Mr. 
Edwards's types convinced me that he knew just what he was 
doing when his collection was at hand, no one better. 

There are many collections yet in the East and Northeast 
which it is niy ambition to visit, but enough was seen during 
this trip to convince that it would be wise to go home and 
permit what had been seen to soak in, reserving other treats 
for other times and to avoid the utter confusion which results 
from seeing too much . 

In but one case was there failure to see a collection which 
it was planned to see, and then the owner was out of town. 
From him soon came a letter of regret that he was not able to 
show me his collection. Such unlimited hospitality and cor- 
diality as I met from those upon whom I had no claims but 
the common interest in entomology speaks volumes for the 
people who have collections. 

Even the western spirit of il help each other" was equaled ; 
for one of the great collectors insisted upon filling a box with 
species new to my collection, which he compelled me, I trust 
not too unwillingly, to bring home. 



RECOLLECTIONS OF OLD COLLECTING GROUNDS. 

BY H. F. WICKHAM, Iowa City, Iowa. 

VIII. The Buena Vista Valley. 

We left Colorado Springs on the 29th of June, and after a 
few hours' ride through beautiful mountain scenery arrived, 
late in the afternoon, at the station of Buena Vista. The rail- 
road on which we came does not enter the valley proper until 
it has paralled it for some distance, and the depot lies on the 
mountain -side, high above the town, affording the new-comer 
a very comprehensive view of the surroundings. From this 
point of observation in the foot-hills of the Park range he sees 
at his feet the wide valley of the Arkansas River, extending 
across to the Saguache range, which here forms the Contin- 
ental Divide. The town is a neat-looking one, considering its 
size and location. It lies near the head of the valley proper, 
which soon narrows to a mere gorge as the river bed is as- 
cended towards Leadville. Looking in the other direction, 



1S99] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 121 

however, one sees a long broad stretch of tillable land extend- 
ing downward along the course of the Arkansas, and the num- 
erous farms which dot the landscape show the neighborhood 
a well-settled and thriving one. 

The altitude of this valley, in the vicinity of Bueua Vista, 
is between 7,900 and 8,000 feet. The soil is sandy, often grav- 
elly or stony, the waste places covered more or less thickly by 
a growth of scrubby pine, the open spots supporting a flora 
more characteristic of the plains than of the mountains. The 
creek bottom is grown up with willows and cottouwoods, and 
has a sufficiently deep layer of dead leaves and forest mould 
to harbor many species of beetles which would certainly not 
be met with on bare sands. Cottonwood Creek, as it is called, 
is a clear stream, in favorable contrast to the Arkansas, which 
is a muddy yellow torrent rushing- along at the bottom of a 
rocky gorge, affording at this place none of those broad reaches 
of damp meadow often so prolific of insects. A number of 
small marshes exist in the neighborhood of town, however, and 
help to give variety to the collecting. 

In.Ciciudelidae we found but few species ; one example of 
C. vulgar is was picked up dead and proved to represent the 
form (tl>H</it(it with extremely wide markings. C. rc/xnnld was 
rather common. 0. cinrfiprnni.^ was taken at one spot only, 
along a sandy little- frequented road in the creek-bottom, not 
close to the water however. By dint of hard work the three of 
us managed to get about seventy specimens during the course 
of the morning. It is less shy than many of the larger species, 
though not particularly easy of capture. The series shows a 
wonderful range of variation in elytral markings, though none 
approach the form iwper/eeta very closely. The\ art' all ob- 
scure or blackish above, none showing the brilliant green tints 
which are to be seen on specimens from Arizona. 

Some of the Carabida? are well worthy of note. Under logs 
among the cottouwoods we got Carabux o/r//o//o/.s-/.s- and ('. .sv/ 1 
ratus, though but sparingly. Two species of Elaphnix, out- of 
which is cloirrillt'i, the other doubtful ly tcrontci, were found in 
marshy spots. A number of Bemb'nlhnn were captured on 
muddy banks of large pools near the railroad tracks; they 
were mostly him-tfidntmn, lin-ithim, fii.scicrtim, nitiilnni, iifhra* 
kense, nigripes, prcecinctum and. dubitans, the tirst three rather 



122 ENTOMOLOGICAL. NEWS. [May 

common, the remainder rare or less abundant. Patrobus loiif/i- 
r(n-ni$ was taken under stones in the same locality and with it 
a lot of Platyiu^ errant and ciiprippiin-i*. Pterostichus protrac- 
tu$, P. luczotii, and (Wat hit* <lnbiux were to be seen under logs 
near the creek. Pliilophur/a amrna was found about the roots 
of yuccas. Cymlndis planipennis and Cratacanthus dubius were 
rather plentiful beneath stones on dry sandy spots. One pair 
of Chlwnim inter ruptm was taken in a very grassy little marsh. 
They seemed to me hardly referable to that species but Dr. 
Horn so decided. It was previously known from the Pacific 
coast only, so its occurrence here is of much interest. Harpa- 
lus ochr opus, f alia x, clandestine, ohlitim and amputate were tol- 
erably abundant on open spots under rubbish and stones. 

A number of Cocci n ell idee were beaten from herbage, among 
which may be mentioned Hippodamia 5-nignata, lecontei, con- 
nTt/enx, spur ia Bind, parenthesis, Cjccinella transversoguttdta and 
monticola, and Harmonia picta. Ejcochomus marf/inipcunis and 
variety oefhiops occurred occasionally but not in any abun- 
dance. Of Braehyacantha we found a form of i<rnina closely ap- 
proachiug albifrons. Hyperaspis ^-r/Y/ffY^ occurred about roots 
of plants. We also met with the Hyperaspidim mentioned in 
my last paper, where T unfortunately, by a slip of the pen, 
wrote of it as occurring with aphides on cacti. I should have 
written with Coccidje. 

Elm IK corpulentu? was seen in small numbers in Cottonwood 
Creek, clinging to submerged logs. Tripopifys punctatus was 
met with'once, under a tie near the railroad track. Of Corym- 
bites planuluK a few were taken from isolated stalks of rather 
high grass, where they were resting in the fashion often ex- 
hibited in|the East by Limoniux f/risens. C<<(r<l!ophorun ctl Iranian 
was beaten|from dwarf pines but was quite rare. It is a western 
beetle, previously known from Nevada and California. 

A great stack of telegraph poles, some of which were quite 
recently cut,|wasjpiled up just on the edge of the town. On 
this pile, by careful search, we got quite a number of timber- 
beetles of different families. lu the Buprestidre we took Bup- 
restis snborttata and B. coHNitlaris, Melanophila (lrutnnion</i, 
Chrysobothris dmtiprx and Chrt/sobothriN trhicrria. A couple of 
C. ignicottis\\vere taken at large. PodabntN latent fix was beaten 
from herbage along the road leading to the base of Mt. Prince- 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



ton. Collopx bipiuir/iitiiH was seen, not very abundantly, on low 
Compositae near town. Trichodfx ornatux was taken on flowers, 
particularly those growing- on the higher altitudes among the 
foot-hills. C le nix ttif/riccntris, C. mceMux and Thaiuiximux inr 
duffitus were all found running about the wood-pile in company 
with the aforementioned Buprestidae. 

Few Scarabseidre were met with, among them ^Ef/itilia Incux- 
trix, Aphodius hamatus (this latter under dung close to the lit- 
tle swamp which furnished the Clihcuinfo, A. dcntirnlntm and 
A. rittafiiK. Asingie male of Od<if<ntx <>h<'*nx was secured and 
is of particular interest, since it is 'Pacific in distribution. Mr. 
Schwarz had, however, previously taken one at Veta Pass, al- 
titude 9,400 feet. We took two species of Serica, one of them 
like vesperthia, while the other approaches trod for mix in ap- 
pearance but differs in sculpture. A female Lachitoxtrnnt ni/> 
it/iiioxct was found floating in an irrigating ditch. 

Of Loughorns we took several. Prionux ctd/foniicux was 
seen rarely, one specimen deserving note on account of reach- 
ing a length of but 25 mm., about half the usual size of the 
spenies. Xylotrcrltii* tiitdidatux, Plagithmysus muricatulus, A<-m- 
d'opx protens, Monohammus maculosus and M.,xcuteUhix were all 
dwellers on the wood-pile. Some Chrysomelidse observed are 
asfollows: Coscinoptera </<>i>iiiiic<ni<i on scrub oaks, ('. 
rather common on various low plants in company with 
4-f/"l(<it(t, Xn.ciiiix onrxjcra, one specimen, Playiodf-nt ori 
and Ti-'u-linbilu converf/cnv. On willows we saw Galcnict-lht decora 
with Disoiti/c/iH ~>-rift<it<t and CrcjtiiliHlrrH licl.chn'x. Teuebrionida; 
\\ ere not numerous, but we took Trhiiiti/x )>riunox<( under stones 
or al)out the roots of plants, in company with (_'<ntionfix ohcxn, 
C.ovali8wn&.Eleode8brunnipe8. I'nderties along the railroad 
were found a few each of Kh-n<l<'x lii<nit'>'<t/ix, /;. c.>ti-ic<it and E. 
niiirina and a single Asida o/xira. ll< /o/>.v d((fit-ifix \\ as not rare 
under pine needles or in the rubbish about the roots of plants. 
It seems not worth while to enumerate the other Hrteromerous 
beetles found, and the rather small series of Khynchophora. 

A collector going into this valley will find it interest ing as an 
example of the encroachment on rather high altitudes ol'manx 
species belonging more properly to the plains fauna. This 
seems to result from the very gradual slope of the Arkansas 
valley and the peculiar characteristics of the soil. 



124 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

COLLECTING ON BISCAYNE BAY. 

BY ANNIE TRUMBULL SLOSSON. 
( Continued from page 94.) 

But there are other collecting grounds besides the deserted camp. 
I spend many hours along the shore of the bay. There are several 
accessible stretches of sandy beach whei-e at low tide 1 find some in- 
teresting things. Under wet seaweed or beneath bits of coral rock or 
pieces of wood are many beetles, some very rare ones. But it is not 
easy to discover or to capture them, for there are so many other liv- 
ing creatures to distract the eye and mind. As one turns over a 
heap of seaweed, hundreds of small shrimplike crustaceans, " sand 
flees" as they are called jump and wriffgle about in a bewildering 
way. As they strike the sand there is a pattering sound as of rain 
drops. Then large brown shining ear wigs glide rapidly out from 
under the seaweed, looking much like big Staphyltmdce, or slender 
Carabs. Pinkish earthworms crawl sluggishly along, tiny ants run 
on the sand, and occasionally an immature cricket, soft and pallid, 
hops up. All this movement and life is at first distracting, but 
the trained eye soon learns how to distinguish reidily what it seeks. 
Platynus fl,oriden,sis,& graceful Carab of greenish black runs swiftly 
out, Bembfdni.m const rictum darts from the heap of seaweed and 
Ardistomis obliqua with its two bright red oblique spots steals out 
more slowly. Here too I always find Tachys capax, a tiny beetle 
of shining black, with pale legs and antennae, and Anthicus vicinos, 
more slender and graceful. I have taken lie re also LoxaiK/rus fior- 
ideusis. L. celer, Oodes lecontei, Dyschirius hcemorrhoidaUs. Chin ' 
ni'tt-s en'ctirnciitctns, Ardistomis schaumif, Att-cenius Icognatus, A. 
yracilis, and several others. There are also many Staphyliuids. the 
most common one being the little Bltdhts basalts which is always 
running over the white sand. Philonthns a turn mis isalso plentiful, 
while there are two or three species of /Stenus and at least two of 
fhinius. When tired and stiff with sitting on the damp sand I 
change my position, take my net and going to the sandy stretch a 
little farther from the water I chase tiger-beetles, flies, and aquatic 
.bugs. There are two or three species of tialda which fly over the 
sand, one of them very pale in color, almost white and very diffi- 
cult to detect on the white sand. Ii. diptera there are some very 
pretty Dollchopodidae, most of them of whitish green, to harmonize 
with the tints of the shore, an occasional robber fly and Borhums 
renaficits by thousands. I find also on the damp sand a species of 
the little three-toed cricket, Tridactylus, looking like a miniature 
mole-ericket. It is very agile and hard to capture. Still farther 
back from the water and on higher ground grow many flowers. and 
there I hunt bees, wasps, butterflies and bugs till time to wend my 
way homeward over the glaring white, hot coral road. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 125 

Sometimes I spend a mornieg on the Miami River in a rowboat. 
We row along the shore under the mangrove and search the leaves 
for larvae on coccoons. Here can be watched the whole lite history 
of the dark blue butterfly, E rye idea ba1abno, which was fully re- 
corded a year or two ago by Dr. Dyar. It is a beautiful life in 
every phase, from egg to imago. Ft is still fascinating to me, after 
seeing it so many times, to peep into the carefully folded mangrove 
leaf fastened with finest, strongest silk, and see the lonely larva of 
rich purple red, the color he wears until his last moult, Theu he 
becomes quite a different creature, of soft bluish white with head 
still of crimson. Theu comes the graceful white chrysalis and last 
the butterfly of rich dark blue. On the mangrove too the little 
white moth, Eupoeya slossonice lives its life. The genus is no 
longer Eupoeya, but I have forgotten its latest name and have noth- 
ing here to tell me of it. The larvaa are lovely, soft, silvery green 
things, hard to distinguish when flattened and motionless on the 
green leaves, and the small white cot-coon of parchment-like tex- 
ture is a dainty cell in which to await its snow white wings. 
Among the mangroves fly several species of small dragon flies, easily 
caught from the boat with a net. And over and across the blue 
water are always flying scores of little gray and white Pyralid 
moths, a species of Nymphaella, I think ; perhaps the same one we 
have by our northern waters, N. macidalis. They often fly within 
reach of our nets, sometimes even coming into the boat and resting 
there. Our mornings among the mangroves are pleasant ones. It is 
an indolent, luxurious way of collecting, not such hard work as 
grubbing in wet sand or hunting under dank seaweed, and I like it 
fora change. Sometimes \ve take a little naptha launch and go far 
up the river almost to the everglades. There, the other day, I 
landed and hunted about for half an hour. I took, tor the first time 
on the east coB.st t JBurtia belce, a pretty day flying moth, with scar- 
let body and transparent wings. I have taken many at Punta Gorda 
on the west coast, but these are much larger than any I have seen 
there. I took also the other day, on some flowers near the river, a 
moth I suppose to be Ilitrriximt australi's, Stretch. The type came. 1 
think, from Florida. It is greenish black, with orange collar, and 
about the size of //. <in/eric<rtt<t. perhaps a trifle larger. I caught 
tooa ragged specimen of the butterfly A/tft/in-tt Horn, the first I have 
taken. Butterflies and moths are not nearly so abundant a^ in 
former years The freezing weather of February 13th and one or 
two later cool waves destroyed much insect life. The flower! n- 
plants, too, were killed or temporarily injured, leaving few blo-- 
soms to attract inx'Ms. Our evenings have been very cool, a.- a 
general thing-, and 1 have h id link- MU-CCSS in collecting at liirht. 
Last week a warm, still evening, following light showers, brought 
hundreds of beetles to the lighted |>'n/./.:is. Uut the number of spe- 
cies was small. PtUodactyla s<-rric<n'iu' came in great number.-, and 



126 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

there were Ardistonis obliqiia, Oodes lecontei and scores of 8ele r no- 
phorus palliatus. 

But one evening 1 I found on the floor under an electric light a 
specimen of C'asnonia hidovicfana the secor.d I have ever taken. 
The first I found at Lake Worth in the sand near the water. I have 
taken also at light this season two specimens of the handsome longi- 
corn, Euryscelis suturalis, Q\\\. It is much like a Neoclytus in ap- 
pearance. Another showy loughorned bettle not uncommon at light 
is Layochrnts araneiformis, Elaphidion inerme\s abundant, two 
or three species of Laptostylus come occasionally, as does also Hip- 
popsis lemniscata. 



DESCRIPTION OF HAPLOA TRIANGULARIS N. SP. 

BY JOHN B. SMITH, Sc. I>. 

Ground color white; the markings smoky brown or blackish; 
head rusty or orange yellow ; legs ot the same color, save that the 
anterior and middle tibiae and tarsi are black ; antennas black ; 
collar red or orange yellow, with two black or brown spots 
at the centre; thorax with a blackish baud through the 
centre and this is continued more or less obviously over the 
centre of the abdomen There is a yellowish shading at the 
junction of the thorax and abdomen, and in the male the 
anal tufting is also tinged with yellow or rusty. The primaries 
have a black or brown costal stripe which extends nearly to 
the apex. A similar stripe extends along the inner margin, but 
does not quite reach the base. There is a narrow outer margin, 
wh'ch may or may not reach the apex and rarely reaches the inner 
angle. From the inner angle, in fully marked specimens, a stripe 
runs diagonally toward the costa, which it reaches about ^ from 
base. From the middle of this stripe runs another, reaching the 
outer margin just below the apex. This leaves a triangular white 
patch just within the outer margin above the inner angle, and a 
narrow white band from the basal third to the apex. This band in 
fully marked specimens is divided by two nai rower smoky bands 
into three white spots. In this case there is a broad white stripe 
running approximately through the centre of the wing below the 
median vein, but not reaching the inner angle. A large white tri- 
angular spot just above the inner angle and three white spots below 
the costa, the outer covering the apex. This complete maculatioii 
is rarely present. The first break occurs in the narrow cross bands 
separating the three white spots, and then we have a continuous 
white shading extending below the costa to the apex. The next 
to break is the connection between the white stripe miming- below 
the median vein and the triangular white spot above the inner 
angle. Finally, the connection between the oblique stripe running 
below the apex is broken, and this leaves as the simplest marking a 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 127 

triangular smoky or blackish blotch, the apex resting- at the middle 
of the median vein, the base extending- from vein 1 to vein 5 or 
thereabouts. Every intermediate form is represented. Second- 
aries white, with or without a black or blackish dot on vein -2 near 
the outer margin. Beneath white, with a more or less marked yel- 
lowish tinge and with the markings of the upper side showing 
through and sometimes rather distinct. 
Expands 1-25 to 1.50 inches' 31 to 38 mm- 

Habitat : Near Newark, N. J. 

A series of eleven specimens, representing both sexes, is be- 
fore me by the courtesy of Mr. J. B. Augelmau, of Newark, 
N. J. Mr. Augelnian has taken this species rather commonly ; 
and, considering it one of the normal forms, has made no special 
effort to preserve it in numbers. At first sight it is easy to 
mistake it for confiixa Lymau ; but when the markings are 
carefully examined it will be seen that they are almost identical 
with sufi'iiNd Smith. This seems now to be considered a white 
form of colona Huebner ; but, whether that is so or not, it is 
certain that the type of niaculatiou in the new species is pre- 
cisely that of the forms which I named xuffuM. It is, how- 
ever, a distinctly smaller species, more sordid in appearance, 
and the contrasts between the dark and white markings are 
much less evident. Furthermore, the tendency toward the 
breaking up of the markings shows itself in a different way ; 
and in every case, in the new species, perhaps the most prom- 
inent feature is the triangular black patch toward the inner 
angle of the fore wing. It seems remarkable that there should 
be a good new species belonging to this genus in a region that 
has been so well collected over as has the eastern part of New 
Jersey, and. the species indeed does not seem to be at all rare. 
Dr. Dyar has a specimen from Plattsburg, N. Y. It is cer- 
tainly as good a one as any other in the genus ; and, though 1 
have seen hunreds of specimens, from all sources, since the 
time that I published on this subject in the Proceedings V. S. 
N. M., I have seen no reasons to change the conclusions as to 
the validity of the species therein recogiii/.ed. unless indeed it 
be admitted that the white forms arc simply varieties of those 
that are normally maculate. No one has, so far as I am 
aware, bred any of the species from egg to adult, and until 
this is done it may not be possible to decide finally on the 
specific values of these insects. 



128 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIST OF CRANBERRY, N. C., BIT- 

TERFLIES. 

BY LANCASTER THOMAS, Philadelphia, Peuua. 

In ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, 4,80,1894, Dr. Henry Skinner gave a 
listof the butterflies taken at Cranberry, Mitchell county, North 
Carolina, in the two weeks extending- from July 7th to July 21st. 
This list contained the names of thirty -one species. Since that 
time I have visited Cranberry every season, and remained there 
from June until October, and collected nearly every favorable day. 
In addition to the list given by Dr. Skinner I can now add thirty- 
five species as follows, making a total of sixty -live species for this 
locality. 

LIST. 

Agraulis vauillae I Colias caesonia 

Melitaea phaeton Terias jncuuda 

Phyciodes nycteis Terias delia 

Thecla m-album Pamphila campestris 

Thecla calanus Pamphila zabu Ion 

Thecla poeas Pamphila phylaeus 

Feniseca tarquiuius Pamphila accius 

Vanessa antiopa Pamphila fusca 

Grapta interrogationis Pamphila peckius 

Grapta comma Pamphila verna 

Grapta progue Pholisora catullus 

Pyramies cardui Nisouiades juveualis 

Junonia coeuia Nisoniades petrouius 

Neonympha eurytus Amblyscirtes vialis 

Satyrus alope Pyrgus ttssellata 

Pieris protodice Eudamus pylades 

Callidryas eubule Eudamus bathyllus 

Eudamus lycidas 

It will be noticed that in the above list there occurs three species 
that are new to the locality,one Grapta prot/ne, reported byScudder 
and Holland as not having been taken south of Pennsylvania, and 
the other two Terias jucunda and delia, reported so far from the 
gulf States only. P.progne can be taken in proper season in large 
numbers, &udji<cunda and delta were taken here last season, in nil 
about a dozen specimens. Argynius diana is also found here and is 
sometimes plentiful, but for the summers of '97 and '98 rather scarce, 
but unusually large and fine. 

The altitude, 3,250 feet at Cranberry, makes the fauna of the re- 
gion almost Canadian in character, and therefore the more remark- 
able that butterflies of the north and the extreme south should be 
found flying together. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 129 

A NEW C055ID FROM TEXAS. 

BY HARRISON G- DYAR. 

liHjiii-oiiioriihd arbeloides,u. sp., with the structure of 7. basalts, 
but vein Icof fore wings absent except at its tip beyond the point 
at which it joins vein 1, thus approaching- i n structure the Indian 
genus Arbela. The species resembles Arbela nais Druce most 
nearly of the Mexican species. 

Male. Light brown, mottled with darker, purplish brown. 
Fore wings heavily strigose-mottled in a series of spots between 
the veins, most heavily along the internal margin, in a broad sub- 
marginal area and at end of cell; disc-ally the spottiugs are more 
sparsely placed and terminally they are smaller, though equally 
numerous. Hind wings paler, faintly mottled all over; a large, 
dark, discal spot ; inner area towards base without spottings. Head 
and thorax in front dark brown; abdomen about the color of fore 
wings. Expanse 27 mm. 

One male, Brownsville. Texas; C. H. T. Townsend, llth June, 
1895; No. 606. U S. Nat. Museum, type No. 4249. 



-0- 



A NEW TRYFETID FROM HAWAII. 

BY D. W. COQUILLETT. 

Dacus cuctirbitce, u. sp. Head light yellow, the occiput, except 
the sides and upper margin, reddish yellow, an ocellar black dot, 
front marked with a brown spot in front of its center and with three 
pairs of orbital brown dots, a black spot on each side of the face 
near the middle and a brown spot on the middle of each cheek; 
antenna;, palpi and proboscis yellow, the latter mottled with 
brown. Thorax reddish yellow, the burner!, a median vitta on the 
posterior half of the mesouotum, another on each side above the in- 
sertion of the wings, uniting with an irregular band which extends 
upon the pleura to the upper part of the sternopleura, also a large 
spot on each side of the metanotum, encroaching upon the hypop- 
leura, light yellow ; scutellum, except itsextreme base, light yellow, 
bearing two bristles. Abdomen light yellow on first two segments, 
reddish yellow on the others, the extreme base, a fascia at the bases 
of the second and third segments, usually a lateral spot on the 
fourth and fifth, also a dorsal vitta on the last three segments, 
blackish or brownish; first segment of the ovipositor of the female 
slightly longer than the fifth segment of the abdomen. Wings 
hyaline, the apex of the subcostal cell from a short distance in front 
of the apex of the auxiliary vein, the marginal and submaroinal 
cells the median third of the first basal cell and a large spot in up- 
per outer corner of tli3 first posterior cell, brown ; anal cell brown, 
this color encroaching on the third posterior cell and bordering the 



130 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

sixth vein almost to its apex ; posterior crossvein bordered with 
brown, this color exteudiug- to the hind margin of the wing ; upper 
end of the small crossvein also bordered with brown. Halteres 
light yellow. Legs light yellow, the broad apices of the femora 
and the last four joints of the tarsi reddish yellow, hind tibia? red- 
dish yellow or dark brown. Length 6 to 8 mm. 

Honolulu, Hawaii. Two males and two females bred by Mr. 
George Compere from larvae living in green cucumbers. Type 
No. 4207, U. S. Nat. Museum. 



-o- 



INOTES ON ALASKAN ARCTIIDAE. 

BY HARRISON G. DTAR. 

Phragmatobia fuhginosa , Linn. 

This possibly occurs in Alaska. The National Museum has a 
specimen collected by Dr. Stejueger on Bering Island, off Kam- 
chatka. 

Arctinia rubra, Neum. 

Nusagak, Alaska, May 13, 1882. (McKay.) 

Hyphoraia yarrow i. Stretch. 

St. Michael's, Alaska (Turner); Bethel, Kusokquim River. 

In the color of the wings the specimens resemble var. remissa 
Hy. Edw., but the markings of the hind wings are as in yarrow f. 
The fore wings are chestnut brown, the spotting sorbid white, not 
yellow; hind wings ocherous, the markings gray black. Below 
both wings are more or less strongly suffused with crimson out- 
wardly and along costa. All the specimens are males, expanse 35 to 
38mm. 

I suspect that this is really the hyperborea of Curtis, the expanse 
of which is given as 1 inch 11 lines, whereas parthenos Harr is 
much larger and probably distinct from hyperborea. The larval 
skin and chrysalis accompany one specimen. The larval hairs are 
dense, spiuu lose, uniform and rather short, whitish, mixed with 
black. The slender pupa is^ black with strong cremaster, the seg- 
mental incisures polished. The cocoon is weak and largely of silk. 

Hyphoraia subnebulosa, 11. sp. 

d" Fore wings reddish chestnut brown, marks pale yellow: a basal 
streak along vein 1 to middle of wing; another shorter streak on 
base of median vein, joined to costa by a short bar, at the end an ob- 
lique bar joins the center of the streak on vein 1 ; an oblique angu- 
lar spot in center of cell and a second at the end of the cell ; a trans- 
verse posterior baud from costa, dentate inwardly in the interspace 
between veins 5-6 arid again very strongly in the submedian inter- 
space; a submarginalbaud, bent in dentately to touch the t. p. baud 
in the interspace 6-7, again at 3-4 and again in the submedian inter- 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 131 

-pice, but here not so as to touch the t. p. line. This outer line may 
be broken. Hiud whiff* translucent, diffusely clouded, the disk 
yellowish, the marginal and inner areas and discal spot darker 
gray, relieved by a small light spot in the submedian interspace at 
the margin. Below shaded with crimson on the margins. Head, 
thorax and legs reddish, collar yellow; abdomen ochreous at sides 
and tip. Expanse 32mm. 

9 Wings partly- aborted and apparently not functional for flight- 
Coloration as in the male but the markings broader and heavier and 
the ground color of a more crimson shade Expanse 27 mm. Outer 
edge of patagia and stripes on thorax yellow ; abdomen dull crim- 
son, a few ochreous hairs along the sides and tip ; legs all red- 

Nushagak. Alaska (McKay), Point Barrow (Murdock) and Be- 
thel, Kuskoquim River (through Dr. Skinner). 3$. I ?. United 
States National Museum, type No. 4,250. 
Arctia caja. Linn. 

The Alaskan specimens are smaller than usual, but have the 
bright reel hind wings of the caja form. The white markings of 
the fore \vings are very extensive, more so than in var. ntaheusis, 
but not so much as in the type of opuleata. They seem to be the 
normal arctic form of which opulent a is probably an aberration. 
Parasemia petrosa. Waik. 

This species mav reach Alaska. We have the true modesta form 
from Kluchavski, Kamchatka (Dr. Stejueger), indistinguishable 
from Coloradan examples, and I think that our species is the same 
as the European iiluntti<iin.ts. At any rate, the break, if there is 
one, is not coincident with the dividing line between North Amer- 
ica and Asia. 

o 

A HYBRID BETWEEN LIMENTIS URSULA AND L 

ARCHimJS. 

BY L. I. HOLDREDGK. 

This specimen was captured at Oueonta, New York, June 
llth, 1895. The uppevside is the color of Daimis Ix-rencie and the 
fore wings are marked as in L. arch/'/tjtux , the hind wings are also 
like thisspecio except that the space beyond the black line cross- 
ing the limbal area is entirely black with a band of large brick-red 
spots parallel to the black line ; on either side of these is a row of 
<mall blue crescents. The underside is nearest ursula as it has the 
brick red spots of that species; "it differs from urtniJn in having in- 
terior to the row of red spots on the inferiors, a line of white spots 
extending from the costa to the intarior margin. The specimen is 
a male and is about the size of the male of L. <irrf,i/>/>ii.^. It is 
quite a handsome butterfly and should probably be called Limeti- 
itis tn-xtilii in-rkii>i>nx, hybrid. Fanciful names for hybrids are ob - 
jectionable. It is best to indicate by the name what they reillv 
are. 



132 [May 

ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[The Conductors of ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS solicit and will thankfullyreceive 
items of news likely to interest its readers from any source. The author's name 
will be given in each case, for the information of cataloguers and bibliograph- 
ers.] 

To Contributors. All contributions will be considered and passed upon at 
our earliest convenience, and, as far as may be, will be published according to 
date of reception. ENTOMOLOGICAL, NEWS has reached a circulation, both in 
numbers and circumference, as to make it necessary to put "copy" into the 
hands of the printer for each number three weeks before date of issue. This 
should be remembered in sending special or important matter for a certain 
issue. Twenty-five "extras," without change in form, will be given free, when 
they are wanted; and this should be so stated on the MS., along with the num- 
ber desired. The receipt of all papers will be acknowledged. ED. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., MAY, 1899. 

NATURAL HISTORY SPECIMENS IN THE FOREIGN MAILS 

AGAIN. 

The Wash iiigton Congress of the Universal Postal Union, 
held in May, 1897, adopted a convention, one paragraph of 
which admits articles of natural history to the mails of the 
Union at the rate for, and under the conditions applicable to, 
samples of merchandise. The Congress fixed January 1, 1899, 
as the date when this convention should go into effect. 

Since the beginning of the present year the editors of the 
NEWS have received several letters, from persons in various 
parts of the United States, to the effect that postmasters have 
refused to accept specimens of natural history intended for 
foreign countries at the rates permitted by the Washington 
Convention. At the wish of certain correspondents, we have 
investigated the possible reasons for such refusals. The fol- 
lowing letter from Mr. N. M. Brooks, Superintendent of For- 
eign Mails of the United States Post Office, will therefore 

prove of interest. 

WASHINGTON, March 24, 1899. 
Mr. Philip P. Calvert, Philadelphia. 

SIR. I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 21st 
inst. calling attention to the circumstance that, since the 1st of 
January last, postmasters at certain United States Post Offices have 
refused to receive packages containing " Specimens of Natural His- 
tory '' whi ch were presented for mailing to foreign countries as 
*' samples." 

In reply L have to inform you that such refusals must be attrib- 
uted to ignorance on the part of the postmasters in question due 
to their failure to observe the instructio ns published in the 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 133 

(,'t/i//c issued by this department in the mouths of September (page 
10) and January last (page 1086) as follows, viz.: 

" Specimens of natural history, such as dried or preserved suii- 
mals or plants, geological specimens, etc., which are not sent for 
commercial purposes, are admitted at the postage rate and un- 
der the conditions of weight and size prescribed for samples." 

The same information in given in Section 10 on page 19 of the 
Postal Guide for the current month (March). 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

[Signed] N. M. BROOKS, Superintendent of Foreign Mails. 

In this connection we reprint, for the benefit of correspond- 
ents, the following extracts from the Washington Convention, 
given in the NEWS for February, 1898, page 46. 

The conditions which must be observed for the transmission of 
samples of merchandise are the packages to admit of easy inspec- 
tion, not to " bear any manuscript other than the name or the social 
position of the sender, the address of the addressee, a manufacturer's 
ora trade-mark, numbers of order, prices and indications relating 
to weight and size, as well as to the quantity to be disposed of, or 
those which are necessary to precisely indicate the origin and na- 
ture of the merchandise," while articles of glass, liquids, oils, fatty 
substances and dry powdersmust be packed to prevent their dam- 
aging, or escaping into, the other contents of mails (chap, iii, art. 
xvii). 

" Packets of samples of merchandise may not contain any article 
having a salable value; they must not exceed 350 grams [12.35 
Avoirdupois ounces] in weight, or measure more than 30 centime- 
tres [11.8 inches] in length, 20 centimetres [7.87 inches] in breadth, 
and 10 centimetres [3.93 inches] in depth, or, if they are in the form 
of a roll, 30 centimetres [11.8 inches] in length and 15 centimetres 
[5.9 inches] in diameter " (chap. 1, art. 5, sect. 5). 

" It is forbidden : First, to send by mail : (a) samples and other 
articles which, from their nature, may prove dangerous to the 
postal employees, soil or injure the correspondence ; (6) explosive, 
inflammable or dangerous substances, animals and insects, living or 
dead, excepting the cases provided for in the Regulations of detail " 
(chap. 1. art. 16, sect. 3). 

The " Regulations of detail and order for the Execution of the 
Convention" form chapter iii, in which the following occurs as 
paragraph 5 of article xvii. "There are likewise admitted at the 
rate applicable to samples, articles of natural history, dried or pre- 
served animals and plants, geological specimens, etc., which are not 
transmitted for a commercial purpose, and which are wrapped in 
conformity with the general stipulations concerning samples of 
merchandise." 

Finally, the rate of postage for samples N ti \nl : it :> centimes for 
every fifty grams, that is one cent for every two ounces. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY 

Edited by Prof. JOHN B. SMITH, Sc. D.. New Brunswick, X, J. 

Papers for this department are solicited. They should be" sent to the editor, 
Prof. John B. Smith, Sc. D., New Brunswick, N. J. 



A CONTRIBUTION TO A KNOWLEDGE OF THE FAUNISTIC 
ENTOMOLOGY OF OHIO.* 

BY F. M. WEBSTER. 

During- the last seven years I have been able to study the insect 
fauna of Ohio with more or less care, and have been much impressed 
by the rapidity and trend of diffusion in several species of insects, 
some of which have appeared within the boundaries of this State 
since a comparatively recent date. Insects make their way into 
Ohio from other States, coming- from almost all points of the com- 
pass, except the North, which is protected, to a large extent at 
least, by Lake Erie. As my duties have obliged me to pay particular 
attention to such species of insects as possess habits of economic in- 
terest, I have studied these with greater care, and, in fact, others 
may have made their way into the State without my having observed 
them. However, injurious insects have some characteristics which 
tend to give them a value iu fauuistic studies, for, though they must 
become quite destructive before they are likely to attract the atten- 
tion of the husbandman, yet often the time nnd place where their 
depredations are first observed offers no mean basis for working out 
the problems of introduction and diffusion. In a majority of cases,, 
perhaps-, an insect will have made its appearance a number of years 
before it will be discovered by entomological collectors, and then it 
may be several years before it has increased in sufficient numbers to 
become destructive. But, other things being equal, it is likely to 
become a pest first somewhere near the point where it first gained a 
foothold. The data here given, while not as full in all cases as 
could be wished, yet it is not only the best that can be secured at 
present, but it is practically all that we have on which to base fu- 
ture investigations of this character. This information has been se- 
cured by personal observation and by correspondence, the latter 
being used after rigid inspection and sufficient evidence of its accu- 
racy obtained . 

The direction taken by a species on first entering the State is often 
influenced by rivers. Perhaps this element has had a greater influ- 
ence than any other in shaping, directly or indirectly, the course of 
diffusion in a majority of the species included in this paper. Rail- 
ways comeiu for a share of the credit for diffusing some species, while 
commerce also may be credited with shaping the course of other spe- 
cies. Of course the most potent factor in both shaping and defining 
*Read before the Ohio .State Academv of Science, December 29, 1898. 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



135 



the insect fauna of any section is the nature of the flora, both natural 
and cultivated, as, without food plants, it will be impossible for a 
herbivagous insect to exist at all. 

The two beetles, Phytotwimi* /m/ictalus (the Clover Leaf weevil) 
and Hylastes trifolii (Clover Root-borer), both came to Ohio via 
Western New York, spreading out over Western Pennsylvania into 
Eastern Ohio. (See Mapl.) I saw the former quite abundant at 




novr\uS 'ovx.Yvc.V'Avii. 
vilckSles tnyAu. / 



MAP No. i. 



Chautauqua Lake in the most western county in New York, in the 
autumn of 1888, while the late Dr, John Hamilton, of Allegheny. 
Pennsylvania, records it as occurring in Westmoreland county and 
also in Allegheny county', also in 1888, but stated that up to Decem- 
ber, 1891, it had not become abundant enough to attract attention. 



136 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

In 1892 it was reported to me as abundant, in the larval stage, at 
Perry, Lake county, northeastern Ohio, and during the same year 
Mr. Charles Dury collected the beetles near Cincinnati, nearly in the 
extreme southwestern part of the State. The stomach of a crow 
shot in Michigan, also in ,1892, contained an adult of this species, 
but it was known to have been first introduced into this latter State 
by a lady, who unknowingly and unintentionally brought it in her 
trunk from some of the more eastern States, where she had been 
spending the summer. Mr. Hine found it the following year in 
the northwestern part of Ohio, but it must have spread less rapidly 
to the south, as it was not until 1893 that it made its first appear- 
ance at Wooster, about fifty miles from localities where it had oc- 
curred in great abundance two years earlier. Specimens now began 
to be received from localities along the Ohio river throughout its 
entire length in this State, some of these localities being situated 
at a considerable distance away from the river, especially in the 
southwestern part of the State, and it was plainly to be seen that 
the Phytonomus was spreading toward the centre from all points 
of the compass except the west. The late Dr. Kellicott reported its 
first discovery at Columbus in 1895, and there was yet a limited 
section to the west of this that was not known to be infested. In view 
of all the' data at hand it seems clear that Phytonomus punctatus 
spread westward from New York, through western Pennsylvania 
and northeastern Ohio, and was here washed into some or all of the 
tributaries of the Ohio river in this region during high waters, and 
carried down stream, probably clinging to drift wood and other 
debris. This drift was often carried by back waters far back into 
the country, and with the receding of the waters left not only high 
and dry, but often in the midst of clover fields. As I have found 
the sexes pairing in autumn, it is not unlikely that more or less 
females are thus fertilized in the fall, and if carried down stream, 
however isolated they might ultimately find themselves, they would 
be able to start a colony in the adjacent clover fields, and their pro- 
geny would spread still farther inland. At the time I observed the 
species at Chautauqua Lake, New York, the adults were floating 
about in the waters of the lake, seemingly little, if at all, affected by 
their bath. 

Hylastes trifolfi doubtless spi'ead from nearly the same locality 
in New York, and so far as my information extends followed almost 
precisely the same course, though its diffusion, except so far as this 
was due to being carried down the Ohio river, was slightly less 
rapid. It was first observed in northeastern Ohio, though it proba- 
bly preceded Phyloiioimts by several years, and spread westward, 
and seemingly less rapidly to the southward. While its pi-ogress 
across the northern part of the State, where it also attacked peas as 
well as clover, was being noted, my source of information being 
largely reports, accompanied by specimens from farmers, one of 
these reports was unexpectedly received from southeastern Indiana, 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



L37 



a direction almost directly opposite to where it already occurred in 
Ohio, and in the 3ounty adjacent to the one in Ohio, where Mr. 
Dury had first discovered the Phytonomus. From material received 
from correspondents and from personal observations, I am led to 
believe th^t, as with the Phytonomtm, it was washed into the upper 




ltM.* f 

bh ern e r 6fc\o r m ^ v' 



bh 



MAP No. 2. 



tributaries of the Ohio river and left along 1 its course by the falling 
stream, thus becoming established over the same territory, the out- 
break iu Dearborn county, Indiana, originating from adults carried 
into the lowlands about the mouth of the Big Miami river and 
below. From this point it made its way north and eastward into 
Ohio, meeting the south-bound tide of diffusion probably in or near 



138 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

Mercer county, but leaving aceutral area to be occupied later by 
the slow but steady advance of the species now from all directions. 

The species had been reporter! from extreme southeastern Michi- 
gan as early as 1889. the introduction being- attributed to specimens 
having probably been brought across Lake Erie by the winds from 
some eastern locality. A year later a tew specimens were found at 
Lansing, but it was not until 1892 that it began to make its pres 
ence felt, and then only over a strip of country extending from 
Monroe to Grand Rapids, As the insect was abundant enough in 
Paulding county, Ohio, to work serious injury to the clover crop in 
1893, L am disposed to doubt the above mentioned theory of tirst in- 
troduction into southeastern Michigan by way of Lake Erie and to 
ascribe it to a continuation of the Ohio invasion. This seems all the 
more probable, as it would be only after the insect had become seri- 
ously injurious that information would be likely to reach me 
through farmers, and the pioneers might be and probably were sev- 
eral years in advance of this. A year later, in 1894, came the re- 
ports from Mercer county, Ohio, which might have been due to the 
southern diffusion of the northern Ohio and southern Michigan in- 
vasion, but the outbreak in Dearborn county, Indiana, could not be 
accounted ioriu thesame way, and this must, therefore, beattributed 
to a separate introduction, for which there appears to be no other 
explanation than that the species, like Phi/foiioH/us, was carried 
down this river and left stranded in the lowlands in that section. 

Besides this, both correspondence and personal observation shows 
that the species became noticeably numerous in eistern Ohio before 
it did in the central portion of the State. It was not until 1896 that 
it was observed on the Experiment Station grounds at Wooster, 
which is slightly over 75 miles in a direct line from Columbus, and 
slightly less 50 miles, also in a direct line, from Cleveland. 

The influence of rivers on the diffusion of Diabroticn iongicornis 
is probably indirect, but, uevertheless,clearly defined. (See Map 2.) 
In a previous paper presented before this body* I called attention 
to the peculiar adaptation of this species in the corulields of the 
middle West, and there called attention also to the fact that it had 
probably long ago made its way over ihe country, but was able to 
retain its hold only in small and widely separated localities, until 
the second tide of diffusion with the more highly developed food 
habits of the larvae rendered its establishment in Ohio in its present 
abundance possible. 

The trend of diffusion is now certainly parallel with the course 
taken by rivers, (hough not necessarilv in the same direction as the 
water flows. This insect cannot breed in great numbers in fields 
that are subjected to a rotation of crops. The same ground must be 
devoted to maize for a series of years in order to enable the insect to 
become even numerous, and it is the bottom lauds that border the 

* Fifth Report Ohio Academy of .Science, \>. 11. 



1899 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

sti-eams which are more frequently than any other devoted (o corn 
year after year, simply because the soil will stand this sort of man- 
agement, and, indeed, in some localities, like the lower Scioto val- 
ley, it is impossible to raise any other crop there. Next to this 
rich level lands are kept more continuously in corn, and thus the 
low rich lands, generally speaking, form the highways along which 
this species makes its way in its eastward spread. This information 
was gained on my part from years of study and observation in Illi- 
nois, supplemented by eight years of equally careful study and ob- 
servation in Indiana, before coming to Ohio, all of which prepared 
me for further investigations in the latter State. While in Indiana 
I had been able to trace the species throughout the entire length of 
the valley of the Wabash river, whose upper tributaries intermingle 
with those of the Maumee and the Big Miami in northeastern In- 
diana. Knowing the habits of this insect, it will require but a 
study ot the topography and soil of northwestern Ohio to fully 
understand the ease with which it would make its way from the 
country about Fort Wayne, Indiana, to the vicinity of Toledo and 
Sandusky, in Ohio. I have not as yet found it to the eastward of 
Sandusky and Seneca counties, except across Sandusky bay in Ot- 
tawa county, and farther southward it holds to about this distance 
east, even to the vicinity of Columbus, where it is now known to 
occur, though none were to be found there or in that vicinity in 






But, precisely as in case of flyl'ixft'x. we had a separate outbreak 
in the vicinity of the mouth of the Big Miami river, this time, how- 
ever, in Hamilton county. Ohio, and it was here that serious injury 
was first observed* though it is probable that it was also destructive 
at this time in the region of the upper Maumee river, away to the 
north. It is very significant that while so abundant in western 
Hamilton county so good a collector as Mr. Dury should not have 
been able to find it in the vicinity of Cincinnati, in the eastern por- 
tion of the same county, the reason probably being that it did not 
then occur there. 

There seems every probability that it had found its way to the 
bottom lands about the mouth of the Big Miami river, and owing 
to the fact that in that vicinity there is a large permanent area of 
corn, developed there in greit abundance, spreading northeastward 
up the Big Miami valley until the corn fields enabled it to span the 
region intervening between thN and the valley of the Little Miami 
down which it made its way, and when it reached the vicinity of 
Cincinnati a couple of yetrs later Mr. Dury was able to collect it in 
abundance. The species also probably continued on its northeast- 
ern course until it mingled with the diffusion fro in northern In- 
diana, and then the trend of diffusion was southward down the val- 
ley of the Scioto river to the Ohio, as I found it in limited numbers 
in the bottoms of the former stream a couple of years ago. It may 
be stated again that the bottom lauds of the lower Scioto have in 



140 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

some places been devoted to corn continuously for over a century, 
but this insect known to be so destructive to this crop is just find- 
ing its way to that locality. The species may be expected to spread 
eastward in the centre of the State until it reaches the Muskingum 
river, when it will likely spread throughout the valley of this 
stream, where corn is the principal crop and is grown continuously 
on the same laud for a series of years. With any amount of search- 
ing we have never yet found asiugle specimen of Dtabrotica lonyi- 
cornis about Wooster, though the future will doubtless see it 
abundant in the bottoms of the Killbuck, a small stream with wide 
bottom lands on either side. 

In Murgantia histrionica we have a different problem of diffu- 
sion to solve, and whatever influence rivers have had in shaping 
the trend of such diffusion, this has been by such as are located in 
adjoining States, except possibly in a single instance, where the 
Ohio river may have had something to do with its course of migra- 
gratiou for a comparatively short distance. See Map 3. 

As is well known, this species is a native to Central America, the 
West Indies and probably Mexico. Our first record of its appear- 
ance in the United States gives its area of distribution as * k Louisi- 
ana and Texas," and extends back to 1864. Since that time it has 
spread to Long Island, New York, on the Atlantic coast, and inland 
it is now found in Colorado, Missouri, southern Illinois, extending 
northward in Indiana to Indianapolis and in Ohio to within twenty 
miles of Lake Ei-ie. 

It has never been a seriously destructive insect in Illinois, and in 
Indiana only so along the Ohio river below Louisville. Kentucky, 
where it first began to attract attention in 1890. When I came from 
Indiana to Ohio in 1891 there was in the insect collection of the 
Experiment Station a single specimen, said to have been collected 
in Warren county a year or so before. Prof. A. D. Hopkins has 
since informed me that he took a specimen in Wood county, West 
Virginia, in 1891. Being already interested in the distribution and 
diffusion of .this species I was 'on the watch for its appearance in 
greater numbers and in other localities, but was not able to sub- 
stantiate its occurrence in Warren couhty, or, indeed, find it at all, 
either in the vicinity of Cincinnati or elsewhere to the westward 
to the Indiana line, the direction from which I naturally expected 
it to enter the State. 

In 1895 I was surprised to receive it from a locality nearly 120 
miles in a direct line east of Cincinnati and up the Ohio river. 
Within a week after this first report came a second from a point 
about eighty miles southeast of Cincinnati and also on the Ohio 
river. In both instances it was stated that the pest had worked 
serious ravages the year before, 1894. Still the species could not be 
found anywhere about Cincinnati, although the large acreage of 
cabbage, its principal food plant in that vicinity, would imply its 
appearance there as soon as elsewhere, especially as its appearance 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



141 



east of Missouri, where it appeared about the year 1870, had been 
uniformly more aud more recent until the present, in Ohio. It was 
not until 1896 that it was observed about Cincinnati, from whence 
it has gradually but steadily moved northward for a distance of 
about sixty miles. From the locality where the species was first 
reported it has made its way northward fully 140 miles, and through 




Wvi.Ygarvlv.Cx W\5trioni 



c<x. 



MAP NO. 8. 

a section where the cabbage is less cultivated than in the Cincin- 
nati region, and other food plauts like mustard, etc., not more abun- 
dant . 

The first of the two earliest reports received came from a point 
about fifteen miles from where the Big Keuawha river empties into 
the Ohio, while the second came from a point about thirty-five miles 
below the mouth of the Big Sandv river and at the month of the 



142 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

Scioto river, the latter flowing- down from the north, while the two 
former flow upward from the south, the Kenawha, in fact, rising in 
western North Carolina, and its upper tributaries being inter- 
spersed with those of theYadkin and the James, which flow into 
the Atlantic ocean, and also the Tennessee river, which, after a 
winding course, empties into the Ohio river, not very far above its 
junction with the Mississippi. 

These two occurrences, the first observed in Ohio, have puzzled 
me greatly, and I have been wholly at a loss to account for them. 
Even now 1 do not feel altogether sure of my ground, and state 
what I do at present with the hope that some one else will study 
the problem, and, it is to be hoped, throw more light upon it The 
upper Keuawha almost piei'ces the Allegheny Mountains, and 
it is a question if it does not open a gateway whereby Mitrgan- 
tia may have made its way from North Carolina or Virginia, 
through the mountain region, and followed down its valley to the 
Ohio river, this junction being, as I have staled, only about fifteen 
miles from where the insect was first reported as destructively 
abundant. If future studies show that this species thus made its 
way over the mountains by way of the valley of the Big Kenawha, 
from the Atlantic coast, where it has been known to occur for nearly 
twenty years, it will solve my problem, for, once thickly scattered 
along the Ohio river in this section, the insect might easily be car- 
ried down stream and left along the river below, an J especially 
might this occur at the mouth of the Scioto. 

The chinch bug, Blissus leu copterus, \\ns\n all probability entered 
the State from three directions. As 1 have recently writeu on this 
species, it will be only necessary to explain that, like 31urc/a)t(i<i, 
it is of southern origin, and hundreds of years ago, perhaps, spread 
from Central America over the eastern and central portions of the 
United States, as well as along the Pacific coast. Along both sea- 
coasts we have what seems to be an environmentally specialized 
form, composed largely of individuals, whose wings are so aborted 
as to render them valueless as applied to locomotion. On the other 
hand, except as farther stated, over the western and central portion 
of the country, by which 1 mean the country laying between Ion. 
105 and the Allegheny Mountains, we have a form, all individuals 
of which have fully developed wings. 

The Atlantic coast form is found in northeastern Ohio, to which 
locality it has evidently made its way. as in case of other species 
mentioned, by way of western New York and Pennsylvania, being 
at present confined here, so far as known to the extreme north- 
eastern counties of the State, though there appears to have been a 
farther spread westward,through Canada,aloug to the north of Lake 
Erie, crossing into Michigan and pushing its way southward into 
northern Indiana and northwestern Ohio, where it evidently min- 
gles with the western macropterous form. As intimated, the Atlan- 
tic coast form is made up of this brachypterous form largely, but. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 143 

except along the Florida coast, there are among these many indi- 
viduals possessing fully developed wings, which, so far as we know, 
interbreed with the short winged form. ID Ohio both forms are 
found pairing together, but whether the western macropterous 
form will interbreed with the eastern brachypterous form has not 
yet been determined. There is a bare possibility that what we have 
been considering a single species may in reality prove to be com- 
posed of two, but I hardly think this the case, and am more inclined 
to consider the brachpyterous form in an evolutionary period, not 
far enough advanced as yet to be considered a distinct species If 
Columbus had appeared several hundred years later, and the coun- 
try along the Atlantic coast remained longer in a condition unin- 
fluenced by the white man, we might then found two distinct 
species of Blfssus in thecjuutry now included within the United 
States of America, or that portion of it laying between the Missis- 
sippi River and the Atlantic Ocean. 

The Asparagus Beetle, (.'rioceris asparag!,\s also an imported 
species, having been introduced into the eastern part of the country 
many years ago. See map 3. It has made its way westward 
through New York to northeastern Ohio, probably over about the 
same ground as that passed over by Hylastes and Phytonotims. 
At present it occurs in Cuyahoga, Medina, Wayne, Stark and 
Columbiaua counties, these marking the extreme front of its ad- 
vance in the State It seems to be progressing slowly westward, 
and even less rapidly south and south west ward.* 

Judging from its relative abundance, and also from its recent ap- 
pearance in several localities, it would seem that Thyriodoptery.i: 
epJiemeroeformis spread northward into Ohio long ago. tirst estab- 
lishing itself in the southwestern part of the State See map 2. It 
has been known about Cincinnati for many years and is now more 
abundant there than elsewhere in Ohio; in fact it has only been 
found about Columbus within the last tiveor six years, and the 
same is ti-ue of Springfield and other points in that vicinity. At 
present "Washington county appears to be about its eastern limit of 
diffusion in this State, the border line probably trending north- 
westward to Franklin county, thence, rarely, to Mercer county, 
with a single appearance of the species at Grand Rapids, Wood 
county, in nearly the extreme northwestern part of the State, and 
within -25 miles of Lake Erie. 

In the foregoing I have given as correct an idea of the trend of 
diffusion in several of our species of insects as the data at hand will 
permit- It is not expected that this is absolutely correct in all of 

*\IITK. The outbreak of this species in southwestern Michigan can not be 
considered as belonifint; to I lie westward hound < 111 io in vasion. as t he most | in- 
sistent searching over much of thai portion of the latter state west of rie\e- 
land has utterly failed to reveal a single individual. I am inclined to believe 
that the M ielii^an outbreak is either I he result of what 1 >r. Howard would term 
a commercial leap," or else to the north of Lake Krie, t hnumh < Mitario, t here 
has been an i n dependent t ide ol ' in Jurat ion. t hoiiirh, it' t he latter were t he case, it 
should have been observed and reported in that section of t 'anada, before thU 
late day. 



144 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

the details, though iu the main I believe that it will be found ac- 
curate, and my hope is tliat it will serve as a nucleus to which 
others with more light and further studies will be able to build, 
and if the future structures are better than mine, so much the 
better. F. M. W. 

o 

Notes and News. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL GLEANINGS FROM ALL QUARTERS OF THE GHLOBE. 



ALLORHINA NITIDA L., again. As Prof. Gillette's note on the 
above insect has called forth remarks from Mr. Cockerell and Prof. 
L. O. Howard, I feel that I will be in good company when I call at- 
tention to the tact, that in the second annual report of the South 
Carolina Experiment Station for 1889, as Entomologist to the 
Station, I gave a short notice on page 105. of the damage done the 
Fig crop in the South, by Allorhina nitida or the " Fig-eater"' of 
the Children's vocabulary, (pronounced "Fig-gater.") 

ELLISON A. SMYTH, JR. 

THE Ohio State University has purchased from Mrs Kellicott the 
extensive collection of Odouata, which had been brought together 
by the late Prof. D. S. Kellicott. Aside from the complete series 
of Ohio species forming the basis of Prof. Kellicott's published 
papers on the group there is a representative series of North Ameri- 
can species and a number of exotics, making altogether a most ex- 
cellent study collection. It is fortunate that the collection is assured 
permanent preservation and the University is very fortunate in the 
acquisition Prof. Kellicott had nearly finished, the manuscript of 
a descriptive catalogue of the Ohio Odouata based on this collection, 
written especially for the use of students. The species not treated 
in the original manuscript have been covered by Mr. J. S. Hine, 
and the work is being printed by the Ohio Academy of Sciences. 

HERBERT OSBORN. 

BULLETIN 15, Div. of Entomology, U. S. Dept. Ag., by Prof. F. 
M Webster, devoted to the Chinch-bug, is a valuable contribution 
to the literature on this widespread pest. Could its teachings be 
thoroughly distributed and heeded by the class of farmers who suf- 
fer most froni the ravages of the pest it would accomplish great 
things Unfortunately the farmers most needing it are likely to 
give it the least attention. 

Asa study in geographical distribution it is a valuable contribu- 
tion to science as it contains a very complete presentation of Prof. 
Webster's view as to the original habitat and lines of dispersal of 
the insect, a view to which he certainly brings a strong array of 
evidence His statements concerning the probable conditions pro- 
ducing dimorphism are perhaps less fully supported, but there is 
here the possibility of so many factors having been operative that 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 145 

it is not safe to be too dogmatic. It would seem most probable that 
the winged forms are the more primitive, and the brachypterous 
forms the derivatives, and while it is possible that prairie fires may 
have had something to do in preventing- the development of 
brachypterous races in the west, I can hardly see how they could be 
a primary factor since it appears to me more a matter of adaptation 
to constant or inconstant food supply. 

His discussion of the experiments with fungous diseases of the 
chinch-bug and their utility is very candid, and on the whole ap- 
pears judicious. He might have cited numerous other experiments 
indicating the effect of their use, none however, having the cer- 
tainty of an experiment under absolute control.as such experiments 
are practically out of the question in a case of this kind. With his 
presentation and conclusions the practical farmer ought not to be 
too strongly encouraged to expect immediate and complete relief 
by this method nor will he feel that the method is entirely worth- 
less. HERBERT OSBORN. 

GERMAN physiology isattacking the intelligence of the ant. Pro- 
fessor Bethe, of Strasburg, thinks he has found a purely material 
reason for their recognizing each other. He cleansed the ants taken 
from one hill in a solution of alcohol, dipped them in a decoction 
made of ants from another hill, and placed them in thestrange hill. 
They were not attacked as strangers, even when of different color 
and conformation. On the other hand, ants treated in this manner 
when put back in their own hills were not recognized by their 
tribe, but at once attacked and killed. Professor Bethe infers from 
this that ants must give out some liquid whose odor guides them 
and that each colony must have its own peculiar smell. Ban, 
Francisco Examiner. 

I NOTE (to my horror; that in the article on Calliphorinae in 
March NEWS, page 63, I omitted one of the most important char- 
acters that defines the group. 

Lateral post humeral bristle situated laterad the prexntnr<il 

GARRY DE N. HOUGH. 

A TRAP FOR COLEOPTERA. - As some requests have been made for 
hints on collecting, I send the following note, not remembering to 
have *eeu it in print, and it may be new to some. 

Many beetles of the family Siaphyliuidae seem to be very fond of 
the sap of the buvli, and may be taken in numbers by smearing 
leaves thickly with it, placing them in a sheltered place, preferably 
beside the birch stump, from which the sap exudes and coverinir 
with chips to keep out the rain. 

Look sharp when you uncover the heip for Trichopterygidas of 
which there will undoubtedly be some specimens, or better still 
throw the mass on a sieve over white paper. Go over the whole 
mass carefully and you will have your reward. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[May 



After preparing the trap, let it stand three or four days or longer 
if the weather is had, and the result will he better than to uncover 
too soon. D. B. YOUNG. 

FITCH'S COTTON SCALE INSECT. In his 3d report (Nov. 16,1856), 
Dr. Asa Fitch described as Aspidiotus gossypii u. sp., a scale insect 
occurring on a leaf of a cotton plant, Gossipium relt'giosutn, sent to 
him from Nicgpo, China, by the Rev. M. 8. Culbertsou of the 
Presbyterian Board of Missions. Dr. Fitch described this insect 
in a gei.eral way, comparing it to the apple bark louse. Signoret 
(Essai, etc., Ann. Ent, Soc., France, 1870, p. 109). quotes Fitch's re- 
marks entire, but refers the insect to the genus Diaspis. 

In 1895 Mr. Wm. H. Ashmead, in an article entitled ' Notes on 

cotton insects found in Mississippi" (Insect Liie, vol. viO, refers 

(p. 323) a species of Aleurodes discovered by him on cotton to the 

insect named by Dr. Fitch, and suggests that Dr. Fitch had mis- 

taken a dried pupa of an Aleurodes for a coccid belougirg to the 

genus Aspfdiotus. 

In ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS for 1895, p. 157. Mr. T. D. A, Cockerell 

protests against this reference of Mr. Ashmead of the insect to 

Aleurodes, and prefers to consider Fitch's species as belonging to 

the genius Chfonaspis, or perhaps Diaspis, as suggested by Sig- 

noret. 

Fortunately it is now possible to remove the obscurity and un- 
certainty Ir.therto attaching to Fitch's insect. Fitch's original type 
specimen, labelled in his own handwriting as " Aspidiotus yossy- 
pii," and answering to his discription, was found in the old Fitch 
collection in Philadelphia by Mr. Theo. Pergande, and proves to 
be a single example of the larval stage of an Aleurodes. The speci- 
men is now in the collection of the Department of Agriculture. It 
is interesting to discover that Mr. Ashmead's inference as to the 
relationship of the insect is correct, although it is very improbable 
that the Aleurodes found in Mississippi is identical w T ith the spe- 
cies occurring on cotton in China. As China becomes more acces- 
sible to exploration it may be expected that an Aleurodes will be 
found to infest cotton in the province of Ningpo and probably else- 
where to which Fitch's name will apply. 

C. L. MARLATT. Washington, D. C- 

ADALIA BIPUNCTATA LINN , and its varieties Although the use- 
less multiplication of scientific names is an impediment to the 
student, it seems desirable that well marked varieties should be 
designated by a name. The names of such varieties are of course 
subject to the rules of priority and I was therefore surprised to tind 
in reading the interesting article " An Abnormal Coccinellid." by 
A. F. Burgess (Proc. of the Tenth Ann. Meeting of the Association 
of Economic Entomologists), that the name A. humeral is of Say 
seems to be still in common use among American Entomologist-. 
This should give way to A. 4-maculata of Scopoli, or perhaps 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 147 

A. 6-pustulata of Linueus. which last differs only in the presence 
of an additional spot at the tip of each elytron. Careful compari- 
son of specimens of A. 4-m-nni'nta from England and France, and 
the description in AVeise's tables of European Coccinelliflae (Zeit- 
schvift fur Entomologie. Breslau. 1879), with our A humertifix 
proves their identity. Specimens in my collection are from Wor- 
cester, Southbridge, Chicopee. Mass., and Brattleboro, Vt. Two 
specimens collected by Dr Geo. Dimmock in Springfield, Mass., 
are of the form A- 6-i>nstnl<it<i. 

I also have a specimen with the red humeral and apical spots 
present, but without the merliau pair of spots, thus corresponding 
with the European variety, A. Xiin<>nf. of Weise. 

FREDERICK KNAB. 



-o- 



Entomological Litera.tu.re, 



COMPILED BY P. P. CALVERT. 



Under the above head it is intended to mention papers received at the Acad- 
emy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia pertaining to the Entomology of the 
Americas (North and South). Articles irrelevant to American entomology 
will not be noted. Contributions to the anatomy, physiology and embryology 
of insects, however, whether relating to American or exotic species.will be re- 
corded. The numbers in HKAVV-FACED TYPE refer to the journals, as num- 
bered in the following list, in which the papers are published ; * denotes that the 
paper in question contains descriptions of new North American forms. Titles 
of all articles in foreign languages are translated into English ; usually such 
articles are written in the same language as the title of the journal contain, 
ing them, but when such articles are in other languages than English, French- 
German or Italian, this fact is indicated in brackets. 



4. The Canadian Entomologist, London, Ont., '99. 5. Psyche, 
Cambridge, Mass., April, '996. Journal of the New York En- 
tomological Society, March, '99. 8. The Entomologist's Monthly 
Magazine, April, '99. II. The Annals and Magazine of Natural 
History, London, March, '99. 12. Comptes Rendus, L' Academic 
des Sciences, Paris, March 6, '99. 21. The Entomologist's Record. 
London, March 15, '99. 22. Zoofogischer Anzeiger,Leipsie,'99. 35. 
Annales, Socictc Entomologiquede Belgique, Brussels, xliii. '2, March 
i;. '!>!). 40. Societas Entomologica,Zurich-Hottingen,'99 51. Novi- 
tates Zoologic-fc, v. 4, Tring, England, Dec. HI, '98. 60. Comuni< M 
ciones, Museo Nacioual de Buenos Aires, i, 2, Dec. 17, '98. 68. Sci- 
ence, New York, '99. 82. Centralblatt fiir Bakteriologie, Jena, '99.- 
84 Insekteu B<">rse, Leipsic, '99. 87. RivueScieutitique, Paris, '99. 
102. Proceedings, Entomological Society of Washington, iv. 3. '!>'.). 
103 p. Occasional Papers, California Academy of Sciences, vi, San 
Francisco, Feb. 28, '99. 104. Mittheilungen, Naturhistorisches 



J4S ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

Museum in Hamburg, xv, '98. 105. Videuskabelige Meddelelser, 
Naturhistoriske Foreniug i Kjobeuhavn. Copenhagen, '98. 106. 
Buletinul Societalii de Sciinte din Bucarescu, Eomauia. vii, Bucar- 

est, '98. 

The General Subject. A n o u. Gustav Schoch [obituary], portrait, 
84, March 16. B erg, C . Substitution of generic names, 60 c- 
Bethune, C. J. S. The rise and progress of entomology in 
Canada, Transactions, Koyal Society of Canada (2) iv, 4, Ottawa, 
'98. C ockerell, T. D. A. Color in nature, 68, March 24 - 
Kunckel d'Hercnlais. On moulting in insects considered 
as a means of defense against animal or vegetable parasites; special 
roles oftracheal and of intestinal moults, 12. Pauls. Experi- 
mental zoological studies of Dr. M. Staudfuss, 40, March 15 
Poulton, E. B. The instincts of wasps as a problem in evo- 
lution, figs., Nature, London, March 16, '99. S c h u p p , A. On 
the "place-sense" of insects, 84, March 2. Vire, A. The sub- 
terranean world : the blind animals, figs., 87, Feb. 25. W a 1 s i n g- 
h a m . Transmission of natural history specimens abroad by sample 
post, 8. 

Economic Entomology. An on. Abstract of recent publications, 
Experiment Station Record, x, 6. 7. U. S- Dept. Agriculture, 
Washington, '99- Berg, C. On the enemies of the migra- 
tory locust (Schistocerca paranensis Burm. [in Spanish], 60 c. 
C lement, A. L. On a retarded escape from the cocoon of 
Attacus cynthia, Bulletin, Societe Nationale de Acclimatatiou de 
France, Paris. March, '99. Levat, L. A. The disappearance 
of the bird and the multiplication of the insect, 87, March 18. 
Lounsbury, C. P. Report of the Government Entomolo- 
gist for the year 1897 Cape of Good Hope Dept. of Agriculture. 
Cape Town, 1898; Entomology, figs., The AgriculturalJournal pub- 
lished by the Department of Agriculture, Cape of Good Hope, xiv, 
4. Cape Town, Feb. 16, '99. L o w e, V. H. i. The raspberry 
saw-fly, ii. Preliminary notes on the grape-vine flea beetle, 7 pis.. 
Bulletin No. 150. New York Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Geneva. X. Y. Dec., '98. Two destructive orchard insects: i. the 
apple-tree teut-cattei-pillar; ii. spraying experiments against the 
spring canker-worm, figs. ,4 pis., Ibid, Bull. No. 152. M ar pma n u . 
On the occurrence of rnites in urine, 82, March 13.- N u t a 1 1 , G . H . 
F . The mosquito-malaria theory, 82, March 13, etc. S a g n i e r 
The San Jose scale, Bulletin des seances, Societe National d' Agricul- 
ture de France, Paris, Feb., '99. S m i t h , J . B . Report of the 
Entomological Department of the New Jei-sey Agricultural College 
Experiment Station for the year 1898. N. J. Agr. Col. Exper. Stat. 
Rep. 1898. pp. 371-467, 15 figs. Trenton, '99. W e b s t e r , F . 
M . A serviceable iusectary, 2 pis., 4, April. 

Arachnida. B e r g , C. On Ihelyphonas maximits Taruani.60c- 
Hentschel, E, Contributions to knowledge ot spiders' 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 14 

eyes, 2 pis., Zoologische Jahrbiicher, (Abtheil. Auat. Outog ) xii, 
3, Jena, Feb. 22, '99. K r a e p e 1 i 11 , K. New pedipalpi and 
scorpions of the Hamburg 1 museum,* 104. Pocock, R. I- 
The geographical distribution of the Arachnida of the orders Pedi- 
palpi and Solifngae, maps, Natural Science, London, March, '99- 
Soreusen, "W . Arachnida Groeulandica ( Acaris excepta; [iu 
Danish],* 105. S u p i u o, F . Considerations on the classifica- 
tion of the Ixodes, Atti, Societa Veneto-Trentina di Scieuze Natu- 
rali, (2), iii 2, Padua, '!)9. 

Myriopoda. C o o k, O. F. The Diplopod family Strinriidae,* 
2 pis., Proceedings, U. S. National Museum, No. 1109. Washington 
'99; African Diplopoda of the family Gomphodesmidae, 7 pis., 
Ibid . No. 1170, "99. S i 1 v e s t r i, P , New Argentine Geophiloi- 
dea [in Latin] 60 c. 

Thysanura. S i 1 v e s t r i , F .First notice on the Argentine 
Thysauura [in Spanish], 60 c. 

Orthoptera. v . B r u n u , M . Parthenogenesis in Phasmidae 
observed by a transmarine merchant, 104. B u r r . M . On the ab- 
breviation of organs of flight in Orthoptera, 21. M c N e i 1 1 , J . 
Notes on Arkansas Truxalina 1 .* 4, March : Arkansas Melauopli, ii,* 
5. S c u d d e r , S . H. The Orthopteran genus Schistocerca* 
Proceeding's, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, xxxiv, 15, 
Boston, '99; Supplement to a revision of the Melauopli,* 3 pis. .Pro- 
ceedings, Davenport [Iowa] Academy of Natural Sciences, vii, '99. 

Neuroptera. B a n k s , N. A classification of the North Ameri- 
can Myrmeleonidse,* 4, March. K e 1 1 o gg , V. L. Mallo- 
phaga from birds of Panama. Baja California and Alaska,* 4 pis., 
103 p K e 1 1 o g g , V . L . and C h a p m a n , B . L . Mal- 
lophaga from birds of California,* 5 pis., 103 p. M c L a c h 1 a n , 
R. Notes on certain pahearctic species of the genus Hemerobiti*. 
figs., 8. S u o d g r a s s , R . E . The anatomy of the Mallophaga, 
8 pis , 130 p. Voiuov, D. N. Digestive epithelium ot the 
nymphs of ^EiscItHfi, 106; Physiological researches on the digestive 
apparatus aud the adipose tissue of Odonate larva?, 2 pis.. 106. 

Hemiptera C o c k e r e 1 1 , T . D . A. A date-palm scale in- 
sect, 68, March 17. C o c k e r e 1 1 , T. D. A. and King, 
G. B. An apparently new Xecffftiwm found on white cedar,* 5. 

D o 1 b y - T y 1 e r , C H . Leconfum hunjuhnii Douglas para- 
sitized by LecatHtbiii* cockf-rcUi Ash mead. Secondary parasite 
Holrn/H'lt,'. n. sp., Ash in , 8. H o w a r d , L . O. The odor of 
Coccidae. 4. April. II u u t e r, S. J. The Coccidas of Kansas,* 
7 pis , Kansas University Quarterly, viii., ], Lawrence, Kan., Jan., 
'99.- J o h n s o u, W. G. The odor of Coccidic, 4, April. - 
King, G. B. Two new Coccids from Bermuda, 5. M o u - 
tandon, A. L. A new form in the genus Ramitrn, descrip- 
tion of a new species, 106; Hemiptera cryptocerata, notes and de_ 



150 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

scriptions of new species, 106. M o n t g o m e r y , T . H . , J r . 
Chromatin reduction in the Heraiptera: a correction, 22, Feb. 20. 
Quaint a nee, A. L. New or little known Aleuroclklae, ii,* 
figs., 4, April. S c.h w a r zr, E . A . Note on the Cedrela Psyl- 
lids (genus Freysuila Alemau),* 102, March 16. 

Coleoptera. B erg, C . Description of a new genus of Cerara- 
bycidae of the Argentine Republic [in Latin], 60 c. B o r d a s 
L. Anatomy of the anal glands of the Coleoptera of the tribe 
Brachinina?, figs., 22, Feb 20. C hag no n, G- A chase for 
Coleoptera at Boucherville. Le Naturaliste Canadien, Chicoutinii 
Quebec, Feb., '99. C h a m p i o n , G . C . A list ot the Rhipi- 
dophoridte and (Edemeridae supplementary to the " Munich" Cat- 
alogue, 35. D i e r c k x , F . Researches on the defensive glands 
of the bombardier Carabidae, 12. F all. H. C Synopsis of the 
species of Acma?odera of America north of Mexico,* 6. H e y - 
m o 11 s. R . The development of wings in the larvae of Tenebrio 
molitor L. (transl?), 21. Linelll, M. L- Descriptions of 
some new species of North American heterotnerous Coleoptera 
[posthumous],* 102, March 7. P 1 a n e t , L . Monographic essay 
on the Coleoptera of the genera Pseudolucanns and Lucanns, Le 
Naturaliste, Paris, March 15, '99. S c h e n k 1 i n g , C . On the 
habits of our Apions, 84, March 9, 23 W i c k h a m , H . F . 
The Coleoptera of Canada : xxi. The Pythidas of Ontario and Que- 
bec, figs-, 4, March; xxxii., Supplementary remarks to earlier 
papers, figs., 4, April. 

Diptera. K c 1 1 o g g , V. L. The month-parts of the uemato- 
cerous Diptera, iii, figs., 5. L u n d l> e c k , W . Diptera Groen- 
landica,* figs., 2 pis-. 105. Robertson, E. H The singing- 
fly [Syrphidas]. Science Gossip, London, April, '99. Roths- 
child , N . C . Contributions to the knowledge of the Siphou- 
aptera, 3 pis., 51. 

Lepidoptera. B e u t e u m ii 1 1 e r , W. Notes on the American 
forms of Enchloe Hubner, 4. March. B u 1 1 e r , A . G . A 
revision of the Pierine genus Hiiphinrt, with notes on the seasonal 
phases and descriptions of new species, II. C h a p m an, T A . 
British Lepidoptera, Entomologist, London, March. '99.- C o c k- 
erel 1, T. D. A. Notes on some New Mexico butterflies, 4, 
March ; On a synonymic catalogue oi theNorth American Rhopalo- 
cera by Henry Skinner, 68, Mai-ch 10 D r u c e , H . Descriptions 
of some new species of Heterocera from Tropical America, Africa 
and the Eastern Islands,* II D y a r , H. G. On the larva? of 
North American Nolidae, with descriptions of new species,* 4. 
March ; The life-histories of the New York slug-caterpillars, xviii., 
1 pi. ,6; Life-history of Diphthera fallax H.-S. ; Spathulate head 
setae on the larva of Chamyrls cerintha Treits, 5 Dyar. H> 
G - and Chapman, T. A. Color change in the adult larva 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 151 

of Scoliopteryx libatrix, just previous to pupation, 21. Fab re 
J. H. Entomological souvenirs: i. The great peacock; ii. The 
Bombyx of the oak, Archives de iZoologie Generale et Exper- 
imentale, (3) vi. 3, Paris, '98. F i s c h e r, E. Critical exper- 
imental researches on the occurrence per cent, of Vanessa aberra- 
tions produced by intense cold, 40. March 1 . Grote, A. R. 
Synonymy [of Cochlidionidae, i e., Limacodidas, etc.], 4, March. 
H a n h a m, A. W- A list of Manitoba moths, part ii, 4, March. 
H e a t h , E . F . Manitoba butterflies, 4, April H ever, 
E. Hybridation among Bombycidre. 40, Dec 15, '98 Kay e, 
W . J . Collecting Lepidoptera in Trinidad, 21. v Linden, 
M . , F r i e d e 1 , E . Are flying butterflies followed by birds? 
Naturwissenschaftliche Wochenschrift, Berlin, Feb 5, 19, '99- 
Mackenzie,J.D.B.F. A preliminary list of the moths of 
Miramichi [New Brunswick], with note* thereon Proceedings of 
the Natural History Association of Miramichi, No 1. Chatham* 
N. B , 1899. M o o r e , F . Lepidoptera [udica, part xxxv. Lon- 
don, Lovell Reeve & Co- 1898. Rec'd March 13, '99 (Vol iii, pp. 
217-232, pis. 271-278. Nymphalinte-Limenitiua). R o t h s c h i 1 d , 
W. , and J o r d a u , K. A monograph of Cha raxes and the 
allied Prionopterous genera, 11 pis., tigs., 51. -S m i t h , J. B. 
Notes on Scotogramma and Oncocnemis, with descriptions of new 
species,* 6; Description of the gopher moth,* 4, April. 8 tan cl- 
fuss, M. Summary of the temperature and hybridation experi- 
ments hitherto undertaken [on Lepidoptera], 84, March 16. 
U r e c h , F . Notice and critical remarks on terminology, and on 
evolution of heat and color in aberrations of Vanessa to and nrtfcat 
produced by me, figs , 22. March 13 V e r s o n , E . The evolu- 
tion of the intestinal tube in the silk worm, ii, Archives Italieunes 
de Biologie, xxx. 3, Turin, '98. 

Hymenoptera. A s h m e a d , W . H. Super-families in the 11 y- 
menoptera and generic synopses of the families Thynuidoe, Myrmo- 
sidae and Mutillidie, 6 D o 1 b y - T y 1 e r , C . H . See He 
miptera. Harrington, "W . H. Six new Ottawa Procto- 
trypidae, 4, April. K o k o u y e w , N. On some preoccupied 
names of Braconidae, 35. K o n o w , F . W New contribution 
to the synonymy of the Chalastogastra, EntomologischeNach rich ten, 
Berlin, March '99. P o u 1 t o u , E . B . See the General Subject. 
R u d o w . Some exotic bees' buildings, 84. March ->:>. etc. 
W a s m a n n , E. Last its fli</ iiinstis as a predatory ant, 22. 
Feb. 20. 



152 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

DOINGS OF SOCIETIES. 

At the March meeting- of the Feldmau Collecting: Social held at 
the invitation of Dr. Skinner at his residence, 716 N. 20th Street, 
twelve members and two visitors were present. 

Prof. J. B. Smith recorded a specimen of Phengodes Inticolli* 
from New Jersey, it being new to the State. 

He also exhibited a series illustrating the variation of Crocota 
aurantiaca. They showed a greater range of variation than the 
speaker had ever known in any other species of Lepidoptera. 
Knowledge of the life history will be necessary in determining 
whether one or more species were represented. 

Mr. Liebeck referred to a previous communication on Plesiobaris 
albilatus and stated he had taken two specimens at Bueua Vista, N. 
J. They were beaten from the yellow daisy. 

Mr Johnson showed hickory twigs girdled in the form ofaspii'al 
by an unknown larva 

Mr Liebeck read a communication from Prof. Caulder on the 
variation of Cicindela scutellaris. The two varieties C modesta 
and C. r uy if rons occurred simultaneously, and were taken in copu- 
lation at Warwick, R I. 

Prof. Smith said the varieties of this species occurred simul- 
taneously at Manchester, N. J. 

Dr Skinner referred to the larg-e number of species of lepidop- 
tera, which had been taken by collectors at Miami, Fla. He has 
recorded about seventy species of diurnal lepidoptera, all taken in 
about one month. He showed two specimens of Papilio trotfiix. 
from Allen Co., Fla., which differ considerably in markings from 
the typical form. He also exhibited Papilio alia ska, a geog- 
raphical race of Papilio machaon, a European species, ali<isk<i oc- 
curring in Alaska Other species of Papilio were shown, including 
Pa2)ilio turnus, whose variations were pointed out. The same 
speaker read a paper on Philadelphia Entomologists and Entomol- 
ogy as follows : 

"The 'Quaker City' has raised a standard of entomological 
work under which some of our friends seem at times restless. It 
must be remembered that entomology is no new thing in Philadel- 
phia, and our city was the cradle of the study in this country. The 
father of American Entomology, Thomas Say, was born here in 
1787, and in 1812 became a member of the Academy of Natural 
Sciences of Philadelphia, and 'turning- his back on the financial 
world as it were, began his entomological labors in earnest.' Ever 
since that time entomology has flourished and men of mark have 
made the city famous as a centre for the study- In 1859 the first 
Entomological Society in America was founded, and it still flour- 
ishes, along with its sister organizations, the Kutomlogical Section 
of the Academy and the Feldman Social. I said we had raised a 
standard of work or technic, and perhaps we deserve no credit for 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 153 

this as we have had the benefit of time and the transmitted training 
and experience of such men as Say, Melsheimer. Haldeman, Le- 
coute, Horn. Fel'iman and other bright lights of Science. In addi- 
tion to all this we have flue libraries, and a number of the best 
known and oldest scientific societies on this continent ; in tact there 
is an atmosphere of science which allows no decadence. We are 
particular and like to see things done properly, aud when they are 
not, and our friends and correspondents complain that we are fussy 
and hypercritical, it 'jars ' us. If we are lepidopterists we like to 
see the scales on the wings where nature has placed them ; we like 
to see the color and character of the thoracic hair of the Hesperi- 
da? ; we know that it is an anatomical fact that butterflies aud 
moths each have two antennas ; we don't like Sphinx pins in Ly- 
casnidse aud Lycseua pins in Sphiugida3 ; we like the specimen 
pinned through the middle of the thorax and nowhere else, and 
not at an angle of 45; we like specimens symmetrically spread at 
the same height on the pin and with the antennae parallel, aud on 
the same plane as the costa of the fore-wing ; we object to pin labels 
on specimens as big as bill posters; we are never so tired that we 
can't write a few numbers for specimens, and don't resort to the 
very largest numbered calendar we can find ; we are not satisfied to 
know what State an insect comes from, as there is some difference in 
the character of the country around San Francisco, the top of Mt. 
Whitney or the Mohave desert for instance ; we are also curious to 
know whether our butterfly was taken Christmas day or the Fourth 
of July; we do not put specimens in the same shape aud make of 
papers that the confectioner uses for " sour balls ; " we are satisfied 
with one specimen in a paper, as we lise a pair of antennae on each 
of them. As to packing insects for transportation, we know some- 
thing about that, but it is a long story. We have collections here in 
the different orders that should be seen to be appreciated and col- 
lectors that are not surpassed anywhere in America. We are proud 
of our record aud can't lower our stand-mi for anybody, and our 
friends North, East, South or West must do as well or drop out of 
the race. As to collectors, we have them in almost every order, 
and they know their work well. Take a trip with me to the ' Neck ' 
or Anglesea, and watch our jovial fellow member, H. W. W., coat 
off', white umbrella in hand, beating for Coleoptera. Where is his 
equal as a keen collector, who gets there in spite of every obstacle ? 
Go with me on a spring day to Cletneutonand see our friend, I', L , 
taking in Pamjthila metea, Thecla niphon, /Synedd f/raphica and 
other good things which, when spread, will go in one of the best 
ordered collections in the country. Our Dipterist is an indefatig- 
able collector and finds new families aud genera right across the 
Delaware. There are few like him. We have an Orthopterist 
and Hemipterist, who is a mighty good fellow too, but he won't 
work very hard so long as the other people bring him plenty of 
material for study. In the Odonata we have a collector of repute, 



154 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

who is leading in the race in this ccmntry, and we predict that it 
won't be long before the gentleman will be the leading authority 
of the world in his specialty. I must now refer to 'my youug 
friend,' as a Washington man puts it -he is young in years, but a 
perfect terror on new species of Hymeuoptera, which he claims, of 
course, are all good. We also predict a great future for him; he 
may be young in years now, but will soon be a grey-beard in 
science. We have another lepidopterist who finds any species of 
butterfly in North Carolina you may mention, and the object of his 
life is to prove we have but a single species in America, and that it 
is found in but one place in the world, and that place is Cranberry. 
It is always customary to speak of your neighbors; what shall we 
say of our great collecting ground, Jersey and its State Entomolo- 
gist? I said Slate Entomologist It does not follow that a State 
Entomologist is necessarily an entomologist, but Jersey, is the proud 
possess >r of an entomologist, and an entomologist is one who has a 
broad guage knowledge of insects, and also of the economy of in- 
sects. The best compliment I can pay our friend from ''Spain'' is 
to say that entomologists are scarce. It does not follow from whatl 
have said that these are the only good men we have in the societies 
mentioned. Those to whom I have alluded may be more con- 
picuous by reason of their fondness for the " annex " or other rea- 
sons, but space and time do not permit me to mention all, but they 
are equally great." \VILLIAM J. Fox, Secretary. 



A mealing of the Entomological Section of the Academy of 
Natural Sciences was held March 23d, Mr Laurent, Director, pre- 
siding. Eleven persons were present. Dr Calvert stated that he 
had recently been studying some galls found in the roots of the 
poison ivy. Some of the roots and galls were preserved in a flower 
pot and some were placed in alcohol. From these latter a number 
of dipterous larvre were taken. Some of the live galls were 
opened and two flies found. A living fly was also reared from the 
galls. There were also found some small Hymeuopterous insects, 
presumably Chalcids. These were parasitic on the flies The flies 
belong to either Cecidowyia or Mycetophilfl.. Mr. C. W- Johnson 
exhibited specimens of the family Acroceridae. All of these insects 
are extremely rire, the speaker having taken only but two or three 
specimens. Very little is known of their life habits. Those known 
are parasitic on spiders or their cocoons. Dr Skinner spoke ot the 
possibility of flies carrying the ch.olera bacillus and quoted as fol- 
lows from an article by the late Dr. John A. Ryder : 

" Suppose a case; imagine a cholera victim upon street or any- 
where else vomiting; the flies present are attracted and drink 
until sated, and have their feet and mouth parts wetted with the 
vomit containing the germs. They then perhaps fly out in the 
street, take a place on a horse-car, ride several miles, dismount, fly 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL, NEWS. 155 

into another house "/here the family is at dinner and contaminate 
the food set before them with the germs of the cholera carried in 
the mouth parts and feet ot the insects. Some of the family sicken 
and die, yet no one of them will ever, perhaps, suspect that the flies 
may have carried the germs, as supposed above. for miles from some 
other case. The safeguards are to at once clear away, disinfect 
with corrosive sublimate solution or scald the spots where the 
vomit has been tin-own, and to be vigilantin the use of fly-screens. " 
During the civil war, Professor Joseph Leidy pointed out, with 
beneficient results, that the common house-fly was instrumental in 
spreading the contagion of hospital gangrene. The same speaker 
stated that he thought it probable that there was in nature an 
almost mathematically exact percentage of immunity from all 
diseases in man and the lower animals. This accounts for the fact 
that many people drink water contaminated with the bacillus of 
typhoid fever and do not get the disease. In insects the same idea 
holds good, as a certain amount of immunity from parasitism pre- 
vents the destruction of the species. This immunity may vary 
from year to year, but will probably average about the same. Dr. 
John B. Smith said that the general law of immunity and parasit- 
ism was of interest in economic entomology, the balance between 
organisms being nicely adjusted, and seldom materially disturbed. 
The larva of the moth,Te)'as oxycoccana,i never parasitized in the 
first brood, frequently in the second brood, and almost certainly in 
the third brood. The life history of the "Elm Leat Beetle" was 
mentioned, and a statement made in regard to the effect of weather 
in favoring parasitic disease on this species. Mr Johnson men- 
tioned the effect of cold in driving away Heliconius charttoiinis 
from the vicinity of St. Augustine, Fla. Mr. Laurent exhibited a 
blown larva of Tolype velleda, and spoke of its wonderful resem- 
blance io the twig on which it was found. He also reported the 
capture of a 9 of Pttmphila mystic at Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, on 
the 5th of June. HENRY SKINNER, Recorder. 



The regular meeting of the Newark Entomological Society was 
held Sunday, March 12th, Vice President Ke-np presiding, and 12 
members present. 

A series of the genus Do tana and Crocota were exhibited by the 
most ot the members for study and identification. 

Prof. Smith exhibited a series ot Knlxi/tfic ( CrocoftH, illustrating 
the species found in this territory. Especial attention was called 
to the varieties of nurnntfaca and the differences exhibited, not 
only in the marking, but to some extent in the wing form. It wa- 
suggested that no broods of the species had ever been raised, and 
that this would give a good chance for an original piece of work 
that could be completed in one season. The common form- in his 
experience are riilHrinnlario and ^/vr/Vf>/v> /.-,. which shade into each 



156 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [May 

other very gradually. The white spotted form he has not taken. 
The others bad in New Jersey. 

Mr. Keartbtt reported the capture of Xylina vmmoda and Atiis- 
opterix pometaria at Montclair, N. J., March 5, 1899. 

Mr. Augleman exhibited a series of the new species Callimor- 
pha triangulata, taken near Newark, N. J., in the latter part of 
June. 

Mr. Kearfott remarked that he had taken a specimen of the same 
species at Erie, Pa.. July 18th. 

The family Notodontidae was selected for study and comparison 
at the next meet ing. Adjourned. A. J. WEIDT. 



ENT. NEWS, Vol 10 



PI. V 











NEW LEPIDOPTERA (Mengel) 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS 



A N I 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SECTION 


ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, PHILADELPHIA. 



VOL. X. 



JUNE, 1899. 



No. G. 



CONTENTS : 



Fowler California Bees of the Genus 
Nomada ir>7 

Hopping Some Notes on Coleoptera 
Found on Species of Ceanothus 1(>2 

Mengel Four New Species of Butter- 
flies from South America ItiG 

Hancock The Castle-Building Spider 
( Lycosa Domifex) ' ItiS 

Banks New Myrmeleonidse 170 



Ball Some New Species of At hy.sanus 172 
Ehrmann Notes on Eastern N. A. 

Cychrus 174 

Editorial 17ii 

Notes and News. 178 

Entomological Literature 1*2 

Doings of Societies isit 

Obituary , I'.IO 

Exchanges i , ii 



CALIFORNIA BELS OF THL GLNUS NOMADA, 

BY CARKOLL FOWLEK, Berkeley, Cal. 

Among the most characteristic of our early spring bees are 
those of the genus Nomada, which are to be found rather 
of the University of California. The species exhibit a great 
deal of variation in color and also in the wing venation. The 
latter character cannot be used at all in classifying because in 
abundantly upon our yellow wild tlowers. This article is based 
upon a study of the species Nomada in my collection and that 
the single species hivif/nata, of which we have a large series- 
all the extremes of variation in the venation are to be found. 
The color pattern, although variable, seems to be the most 
reliable character. The following synopsis is an attempt at 
the natural classification of the species known to me, with the 
probable position of the other California species indicated in 
foot notes. 

Bright yellow markings on blaek ground, with very little 
brown. 



158 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

Second abdominal segment broadly yellow ; two large 
yellow spots on metathorax.* .... YINNDLA. 

Yellow on second segment narrowed or interrupted ; 

metathoracic spots feeble, usually wanting. 
Legs largely yellow ; fifth abdominal segment almost 

entirely yellow. Yellow band on second abdominal 

segment not interrupted. 
Second joint of the nagellum slightly shorter than the 

third CIVILIS. 

Second joint of the nagellum about one-third the 

length of the third RIVALIS. 

Legs black with brown markings ; broad basal portion 

of the fifth abdominal segment black. 
Yellow bauds of the abdomen entire. . . FRAGILIS. 
Yellow bauds on segments 2-4 broadly interrupted. 

INTERRUPT A. 

Eeddish brown and black, sometimes with pale yellow 

lateral markings on the abdomeu. 

Second abdomiual segment with large whitish, lateral 
markings connected by a narrow, medially inter- 
rupted line near the posterior edge. . . CROTOHII. 
Lateral markings, when present, yellowish and not exteud- 

iug medially. 

On the sides of the abdominal-segments a large basal 
black spot crowding the yellow into a narrow ob- 
lique liue OBLIQUA 

Black spots small or wanting. 

Broad base of segments 1-4 black. . . OBSCURA. 
Little or no black on base of segments 1-4. 

Fifth abdomiual segment with two yellow spots 
or a baud.f 
Scutellum sub-bilobate, with yellow spots. 

YIMTA. 



* Citrina, edwardsii and suavis, which are unknown lo me, also appear to go 
here Swaz/wdifTers from vinnitli in that the fifth abdominal segment is entirely 
yellow; edwzrdsii from both of these, in havinu : yellow markings on the disc of 
the thorax ; and citrina from all these, in that the second joint of the Ilanellnm 
is shorter than the third. 

t Opposila may be distinguished by its pale ferrutrinous color from :.'< la and 
lepida, which are dark. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 159 

Seutellum not prominent, black. LEPIDA. 
No yellow on fifth segment. 

Thorax black, abdomen reddish. 

MELLIVENTRIS. 
Thorax and abdomen reddish. 

Unicolorous RUBKA. 

Marked with black, abdomen often with 
lateral yellow spots. BISK ;\ ATA. 

1. NOMAD A YIXXULA Cress. Fresno, Cal., May 4, two 
specimens collected upon MrUlotm intlicti Alhambra and Po- 
mona, Los Angeles county, June, five specimens (H. O. Wood- 
worth). Previously recorded from Nevada. 

L'. NOMADA SUAVIS Cress. California. Unknown to me. 

3. NOMADA EDWARDSII Cress. California. Unknown to me. 

4. NOMADA CITRIXA Cress. California. Unknown to me. 

5. NOMAD A CIVILIS Cress. Berkeley, Cal. (H. O. Wood- 
worth), March 28. Four males, collected upon Eanuin-uliix 
I'ltliforniea and Br<i **!< cn.HiiH'xtris. Previously recorded from 
Colorado. 

6. NOMADA RIVALIS Cress. Berkeley, Cal. (H. O. Wood- 
worth), April 18. Two males. 

7. NOMAD A FLAVIPE? Prov. Los Angeles, Cal. Unknown 
to me. 

8. NOMADA FRAGILIS Cress. Berkeley, Cal., May 19. One 
male. Previously recorded from Colorado. 

9. NOMADA INTKRRUPTA, U. Sp. 

7.5 mm. Black, abdomen with interrupted yellow bauds. 

Head black, densely punctured, clothed with thin, brown- 
ish pubescence ; lower anterior orbits, anterior margin of the 
clypeus, labruui and mandibles (except tips) yellow ; anten- 
na- black above, brown beneath, third joint about half the 
length of the fourth. Thorax black, immaculate, clothed with 
thin brownish pubescence; legs black, anterior trochanters at 
apex, their femora and tibia beneath and at apex, the inter- 
mediate femora on apical portion beneath and at apex, the 
posterior femora and tibia at their apices, and the tarsi 
(excepting the posterior metatarsi) yellow ; the claws are 
black. Abdomen black, with very short, thin, pale pubes- 
cence, longer on apical segment ; tirst segment with a --mall 
yellow spol on each side, the remaining segments with yellou 



160 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Jvme 

bands broadly interrupted on the middle of 2-4 and nar- 
rowly on 5 ; a small black spot near the lateral apical margins 
of segments 4-5. Ventor yellow, with irregular black mark- 
ings. 

Habitat, Berkeley, Cal. (H. O. Wood worth), March 16. 
One specimen. 

10. NOMADA CROTCHII Cress. San Mateo, Cal., April 13. 
One specimen. 

11. NOMADA OBLIQUA, n. Sp. 

7 mm. Small, black, with brownish abdomen. 

$ Head black, densely punctured, clothed with white 
pubescence, thin on vertex ; the lower anterior and posterior 
orbits, the anterior margin of the clypeus and mandibles (ex- 
cept tips) yellow ; nagellum black above, brown beneath, 
second joint nearly as long as third. Thorax black, immacu- 
late, densely and finely punctured, clothed with white pubes- 
cence, thin and short on nietathorax ; wings dusky on narrow 
apical margins; legs black, with short white pubescence, 
longer on anterior and intermediate femora behind ; anterior 
femora in front and behind yellow, above and beneath black ; 
intermediate and posterior femora with a little yellow on the 
apical portion beneath ; all the tibiae and tarsi yellow beneath, 
obscurely so in the posterior pair. Abdomen smutty red, 
pale on apical segments, clothed with thin white pubescence, 
rather long and thick on apical segments ; the first segment is 
black except a narrow subapical reddish line; the apical mar 
gin of the second, a subapical line on the third, and the base 
of the remaining segments black ; the sides of segments 3-4, 
with a large black spot, following which is an elongate, 
oblique yellow spot. Venter black ; segments 2-5 with yellow 
or reddish bands, more or less interrupted laterally by large 
black or brown spots, which are usually continent with the 
basal black of the segments. 

Habitat, Berkeley, Cal. (H. O. Woodworth), March 2S to 
April 12. Two specimens, collected upon l\i<int>tctiln* <-<tH/<-- 
nica. 

12. NOMADA OBSCURA, 11. Sp. 

7.5 mm. Black, abdomen with dull red bands. 
r? Head black, densely punctured, clothed with pale pubes- 
cence, thin on vertex ; lower corners of the face, narrow ante- 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



rior margin of the clypeus, labrum and mandibles (except 
tips) yellow; flagellum dull red, with a black line above, 
second joint about half the length of the third. Thorax black, 
immaculate, opaque, densely punctured, clothed with white 
pubescence, rather thin above and dense beneath ; wings hya- 
lin, faintly dusky at tips ; legs black ; underside of the fem- 
ora and tibia? of the anterior and intermediate legs, the tips of 
all the tibia?, the anterior tarsi, the middle and posterior 
metatarsi and the apical portion of the succeeding joints yel- 
low. Abdomen black, opaque, finely punctured, clothed with 
short griseous pubescence, longest on apical segments ; the 
apical margins of the segments are dull reddish brown. Venter 
dull red, the apical segment and the basal portion of the first 
black ; the broad apical margins of the other ventral segments 
dusky, merging into large dark spots on the lateral portion. 
Habitat, Berkeley, Cal., March 18. One specimen, col- 
lected upon Itaitiiiinifiix ciilifornica. 

13. XOMADA opposiTA Cress. California. Unknown to me. 

14. NOMADA VINCTA Say. Berkeley, Cal, May. Two speci- 
mens. Previously recorded from the Eastern, Middle and 

Western States. 

15. XOMADA LEPIDA Cress. Berkeley, Cal., February, March 

and April. Twenty-six males, collected upon Ranunculus 
calif or a icd and Bra^ica rtnnpcfffrix. Many of these specimens 
have the scape entirely black instead of yellow in front, and 
the legs generally have more black than Cresson's type. Pre- 
viously recorded from Colorado, Illinois and Texas. 

16. XOMADA MELLIVENTRIS CreSS. 

9 Differs from the male in that the pubescence on the fact- 
is much shorter; the third joint of the antenme is about one- 

half the length of the fourth. 

In all of my specimens the first segment of the abdomen is 

black at the extreme base, both above and beneath, the two 
black spots mentioned by Cresson sometimes fusing with this. 
Sometimes there is a little black on the apical margins of 
segments 2-4. 

Berkeley, Cal., March 15 to April 18. Ten specimens, col- 
lected upon liraxx'n-a cdiiijKxfrix and liannn<-nhix raiifontica. 

17. XOMADA RUBRA Prov. Fresno, Cal. (H. O. Woodworth), 

April 28. Six females collected upon Ewhwholl-Ja calif or n'n-a 
and 



162 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

18. XOMADA BISIGXATA Say. Berkeley, Cal., March 15 to 
April 1.3. Thirty-six specimens, collected upon Raniniculiix 
calif ormca. 

Var. RUBRICA Prov. Berkeley and Visalia, Cal., March, 
May, June. Seven specimens, agreeing quite well with Pro- 
rancher's description, but seeni to be distinctly a variety of 
bisignata. 

-0 

SGML NOTES ON COLEOPTERA FOUND ON SPECIES OF 

CEANOTHUS. 



BY EALPH HOPPING, Kaweah, Cal. 

The following list of Coleoptera has been formed from speci- 
mens collected during the past three years, 1896-7-S, on the 
various species of Ceanotlius found on the Kaweah river and 
tributaries, in Tulare county, California. 

The species of Ceauot/nix are hard to distinguish ; and, as 
many of these beetles are found on nearly all of the species 
when in flower, I have not tried to separate them. 

Geanotlni* is one of our prettiest flowering shrubs, varying 
from two to three feet at an elevation of 7,000 feet to eight 
and nine feet at an elevation of 1,000 feet. The flowers are 
generally white, but on one species they are pale blue. Ceano- 
thii* is variously known as ironwood, blue brush, deer brush, 
buck brush, snow brush, etc., and is generally one of the 
.species that goes to form chaparral . The species found in this 
vicinity are Ceanotlius cot'tlnlatna, C. cuitcatitx, C. diraricatiin, 
C. diversifolitis and C. pdrpifolhts. C. ciiiiciifus, although 
abundantly flowering, forms an exception, as beetles are not 
found on the flowers, but only on the leaves. I have found 
some curious color variation, due to difference in elevation, 
which is from 1,000 to 7,000 feet. 

This list is not considered complete, as I have several unde- 
termined species, and many will, no doubt, be added by fur- 
ther collecting. 

I have to thank Mr. Liebeck for many of my determina- 
tions and much help. 

um scuta tni Fauv. Very common at an elevation 
of 4,000 to 6,000 feet. 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



A^.thohhnn (turijlnnin Fauv. Found with saltation. These two 

species are found in the flowers in immense numbers. 
ExoclioiHiix marginipennis Lee. Rare ; from 1 ,000 to 3,000 feet ; 

on the leaves. 

Anthrenm scrophularice Linn. Common from 1,000 to 6,000 

feet. At 1,000 feet this species has a white saddle mark- 

ing- on the elytra, but the specimens taken from 4,000 to 

6,000 feet are like our pretty little eastern specimens. 

AntlircHii* w/vVv Fabr. Very common from 1,000 to 7,000 

feet, but varying much in size. 
Cryptorhopdlwm a picnic- Maun. Xot common; 1,000 feet to 

3,000. Found with the following species : 
OrphiliiH f/labrutiiK Fabr. A very common species at 1,000 feet, 

but becoming- rarer as the elevation increases. 
Gnjnwhdrix pilosida Cr. Common from 1,000 to 4,000 feet. 
A black variety is found with this, although not common. 
The black variety seems to be more plentiful as the eleva- 
tion increase^. 

Mncropogim Ic^nccipnmix Mots. Very rare. My one specimen 
is an odd color variation, the anterior part of the elytra 
being reddish, the rest black. Typical specimens are a 
pale color. My specimen was taken at an elevation of 
4.000 feet. 

<'iir<linplion(8 fcnestratns Lee. Rare. I have taken but eight 
specimens in eight years, at 1,000 to 2,000 feet. 

x Mots. K"ot common ; 1,000 to 5,000 feet. 
( 'and. Very common, but most common 
at .'5, 000 and 4,000 feet. 

tix Lee. Rare; found with Sericosomus jlampennis 
Mots. 

Athoii* (t.rilhn-ix Horn. Very rare ; 4,000 feet. 
ScriroMHinix Jl<iripcnnis M.ots. Very common ; from 1,000 to 
7,000 feet. Rarely varies, although sometimes a black 
specimen is found. 
Perot Imp* iritticki Lee. Very rare. One specimen at 4,000 

feet. 

Ant/in. rin ih'ti'ta Lee. Very rare. Have found but three speci- 
mens at 7,000 feet. 

i'ti ])l((f/i(ttic(iinl<i Horn. Rare. Have but three speci- 
mens, taken at 4,000 feet. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

Acmceodera mariposa Horn. Very rare, having taken but one 

example. 
Acmceodera dohrnii Horn. One specimen, doubtfully referred 

to this species, was taken with the above. 
Podabrus eavicollis Lee. Common from 1,000 to 4,000 feet. 
Malachius thevenetii Horn. Not common ; found from 1,000 

to 5,000 feet. 
Malachius macer Horn. A very common beetle, not often 

found on Ceanothus, but generally on a small Boer la. 
Malachius mixtus Horn. Very common, but, like the above. 

not often found on Ceanothus. 
Microlipm laticsps Lee. Very rare. Found on leaves at 1,000 

feet. 

List r us interruptm Lee. Common from 1,000 to 5,000 feet. 
Listrus difficiUs Lee. Very common ; found same as the above. 
Trichodes ornatus Say. Common at all elevations. 
Hoplia callipyge Lee. Our common rose beetle, but often found 

on the flowers of Ceanothus. 
Dichelonyclia truncata Lee. Rare. Found from 1,000 to 4,000 

feet. 
Poecilobrium clialybccum Lee. Not common. Found from 

1,000 to 5,000 feet. 

Cattimus cyanipennis Lee. Common from 1,000 to 3,000 feet. 
CaUimus ruficottix Lee. Common from 1,000 to 5,000 feet. 
Callimoxys fuscipennis Lee. Very common from 1,000 to 6,000 

feet. 

dlijitiH lanifer Lee. Not rare. Found from 5,000 to 7,000 feet. 
Acmwops longlcornls Kirby. Rare. I have three specimens. 

Strangalia deUcata Lee. Common at 1,000 feet, but becoming- 
rarer at higher elevations. 

Leptura laetifica Lee. Rare. Found from 5,000 to 7,000 feet. 

Leptura, n. sp. Found with hietijica and closely resembling it, 
the most conspicuous difference being in the color of the 
legs, which are red. while in laetifica they seem to be in- 
variably black. 

Leptura sanguined Lee. Found with the above two species. 
These are all rather rare beetles. 

Leptura molybdica Lee. Common. This species at from .1,000 
to 2,000 feet is evidently the typical form with red epau- 



1891>] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



lettes, hut at 7,000 feet this beetle is invariably a dark 
blue all over. 
Pachybrachys mclanoxticliix Suffr. Not common. Found on 

the leaves from 1,000 to 5,000 feet. 

Pachybrachys Instrans Lee. Not common. I have found three 
varieties of this at 4,000 feet. 

n ; x * uivi r i L33. Not C3in;n m. Like the above, found on 
the leaves, from :;,()(() to 5,000 feet. 

forj/imtiix Leo. Common at ahout 5,000 feet. 

melxlifiincri Cr. Not common, at 4,000 feet. 
Found on the leaves. 

Odontota cdlifornicd Horn. Found with the al>ove. Not 
common. 

gracilia'Le.c. Common. Found from 1,000 to 4,000 

feet. 

opaca Lee. Common from 1,000 to 5,000 feet. 
Isomira discolor IJQC. One of the commonest beetles from 1,000 

to 7,000 feet, 
Asclcra discolor Lee. Found in limited numbers at 4,000 to 

5,000 feet. 
Annxpi* atra Lee. Found in great quantities from 1,000 to 

6,000 feet. 

Anaspix collar is Lee, Rare; 4,000 feet. 

Mordelld scuMlaritt Fabr. Common from 1,000 to 3,000 feet. 
Corphyra punctnlata Lee Found from 1,000 to 7,000 feet. 

Common. From 1,000 to 4,000 feet this beetle is of a 

straw color, and much smaller than the Alpine varietv , 

the elytra of which are a shining black. 
< \mtfiaris xti/f/ica Lee. Common. At 1,000 feet this is not 

found on Ceanothux, and is a vivid green, hut at 3,000 to 

6,000 feet is a uniform dark blue. 

In the four species where I have noted color variation in the 
foot-hill and Alpine specimens I have not found any that were 
intermediate. 

From the number of determinations by Dr. LeConte, his 
specimens must have been collected on Ccanothux, as many of 
these species are found nowhere else. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

FOUR NEW SPECIES OF BUITERFLILS FROM SOUTH 

AMERICA. 

LEVI W. MENGEL, Beading, Pa. 

(See Plate.) 

Eplphile Zipa, sp. nov. Expanse about 2 in. Upper side 
of superior wings orange and dark brown. The orange dark- 
ens at base of wings to light brown ; otherwise uniform. The 
orange extends half way to the apex, along the anterior mar- 
gin ; from the base along the sub-median nervure almost to 
the inner angle and thence diagonally across the wing to the 
costa. The orange thus makes a large triangular patch, al- 
most surrounded by brown. The remainder of the superiors 
brown, uniform, with the exception of a strongly marked 
white spot near the apex. The inferiors are a rich blue, fad- 
ing to brown along the interior and exterior margins. There 
are two very light blue spots in the median nervures. Along 
the anterior margin, half way to the apex, is an orange diffu- 
sion fading to brown, along the sub-costal nervure. 

Under side of superiors very much paler than above, the 
orange changing to yellow, darker near base and extending 
along the sub-median nervure almost to the exterior margin. 
Eemaiuiug portion of wing very light brown, with a blue 
black ocellus, surrounded by a yellow edge, near apical angle. 
The ocellus is surmounted by a decided white spot. Inferiors 
pale brown, changing to light reddish brown along the irmer 
and exterior margins. A row of well-marked ocelli extends 
along margin. A triangular silvery yellow spot on the costa 
extends almost to discoidal cell, with the apex of the triangle 
pointing downward. 

Habitat : Neiva, Tolima, U. S. Columbia. 

Archonias xeque, sp. nov. Expanse l.i; in. Ground of su- 
periors dark, nearly black, with a row of well-marked white 
spots running from the apex to the inner margin, midway be- 
tween the base and the inner angle. Al.so a row of smaller 
white spots running parallel to the exterior margin, with a 
few white dashes near the apex. Base of inferiors black, with 
a bar of spots extending from anterior margin two-third* 
across the wing towards the inner margin. The upper part of 
this bar is white, while the remaining portion, including part 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. Ki7 

in cell, is deep orange. The exterior parts are black, though 
not so intense as the base. A row of decided white spots runs 
parallel to the exterior margin. There are a few faint whitish 
dashes on the margin. Interior margin, white. 

Under parts of superiors, general ground work black, the 
diagonal row of white spots of upper side showing through 
wing. The exterior margin is covered with a row of arrow- 
shaped luuules, which are yellow at apex, changing to white 
at inner margin. Under parts of inferiors yellow, with black 
diffusion, near base. A serrated black line extends from 
apex to inner angle, making a number of toothed or arrow- 
shaped markings along the margin. The uervures run to the 
apices of these marks. Body above and below black, with 
abdomen yellow. 

This species is nearest to .-1. chri/*<>/<>i>li<iini. Stgr., on upper- 
surface, but differs entirely in the arrangement of the white 
row of spot* on the superior*, while the bar of the inferiors is 
lemon yellow, no white being present, as in A. .'(/n<-. The 
under side of r/tri/H<>?<>j>h<iim is white, with only a few dashes of 
lemon yellow along the veins. 

The under side of .4. .r^/m- more closely resembles the under 
side of A. toca, Doubl., than ehrysolophana, but is again inde- 
scribably different, while the upper sides of both wings in 
toca are solid white, no yellow or orange being present. 

Described from examples in collection of Dr. H. Strecker 
and the author. 

Habitat : Xeiva, Tolima, U. S. Columbia. 

M> xi win in i/<ijxn'<>(/<>x<t, sp. uov. Expanse Is in. Superiors 
greenish blue, with black apices ; black extending to inner 
margin. A bar of white extends from the costa half way 
across the wing, fading into blue. Inside the white bar a 
band of black passes across the wing to inner margin. A large 
circular black spot cover* part of the discoidal cell, extending, 
however, partly beyond. This spot is half wa\ bet ween the 
base and the apex. One-third the extent of the wing, away 
from the base, another black line extends from costa to inner 
margin. Inferiors blue, same *hade a* superiors, with black 
margins extending ([iiite to inner angle. Two black bars p:io 
from interior margin, meeting at inner angle, enclosing a ere* 
cent of blue. Inner margin brown. 



168 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

Lower part of superiors grey brown, with white bar extend 
ing entirely across the wing. Black spot of upper side ap- 
pears enclosed in oval of brown. A second oval baud enclose 
the first. Lower part of inferiors generally brown, becoming 
paler towards exterior margins. Wing traversed by band of 
dark brown, extending from costa to inner angle, across middle 
of wing. Several paler bauds mark wing along onter margin. 
A black spot appears in discoidal cell. 

^^. yaparogosa is nearest to M. lamachm. Hew., differing in 
color and the arrangement of bars of upper surface. The white 
bar is also absent in lauiachus. On the under side the ar- 
rangement is totally different, besides the absence of a white 
bar in laniachus. Lamachus also has several ocelli and spots 
on under surface of superiors, while the brown ovals are 
absent . 

Habitat : Xeiva, Tolima, U. S. Columbia. 

Siseme nigrescens, sp. nov. Expands 1 3-16 in. Upper side 
of both wings black. On the superior wing a bar of very faint 
white spots extend from costa to inner margin. Another bar 
of the same faint marks runs parallel to outer margin. In- 
feriors marked with two red spots near inner angle. Under 
parts of superiors black, with faint marks of upper side devel- 
oped into well-marked white bars, the exterior row being 
made of separate spots, while the inner bar is solid. Base and 
inner margin of inferiors blue grey suffusion, passing to black . 
A decided white bar traverses the wing from the anterior mar 
gion almost to inner angle, while a row of faint spots, grey in 
color, runs parallel to outer margin. Two red spots near inner 
angle. Exterior margin tipped with white. Body above 
and beneath black, with abdomen grey. 

Under parts] resemble 8. caudal is, Bates, from which, how 
ever, it differs entirely. 

Habitat : Neiva, Tolima, U. S. Columbia. 

THE. CASTLE-BUILDING SP1DLR LYCOSA D0MIFEX) 

BY J. L. HANCOCK. 

The length of the adult female spider varies from sixteen to 
twenty-one millimeters (approximating three-quarters of an 
inch). Using the largest of these for a type specimen, the 
width of the abdomen is eight ; the cephalothorax is nine in 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



length, seven iu width and four and a half millimeters in 
height. The cephalothorax, or forward part of the body, is dark 
grayish brown, with a lighter yellowish wedge-shaped baud in 
the middle, extending nearly the entire length ; in old speci- 
mens the whole he.vd portion is nearly uniform light, gray . The 
middle pair of eyes (for there are three rows) are encircled with 
yellow hair, the extreme front being of the same color. The ab- 
domen in old specimens is yellowish brown, obscurely marked. 
A median narrow dark baud, visible for nearly the first half, 
joins a darker facing in front and gives off laterally a diagonal 
stripe, followed with a lighter interrupted stripe in the same 
direction ; the middle baud shades imperceptibly behind, with 
a broad, indistinct baud covering the whole remaining upper 
surface, becoming narrower and terminating at a point at the 
end of the abdomen ; frequently this band shows indications 
of being divided transversely by tive faint dark yellow thiu 
stripes ; its lateral margins are circumscribed by lighter spaces 
between the almost obscured stripes. Specimens just arriving 
at maturity have the abdomen a rich, dark brown ; the nar- 
row stripe in front on the abdomen is lighter, the broad baud 
is wanting ; five thin, transverse yellowish gray stripes divide 
the abdomen backwards, commencing with the most conspicu- 
ous one a little in advance of the middle. The abdomen often 
appears very dark at first glance, the markings upon it not being- 
apparent. In the adult underneath the abdomen is pinkish 
yelloAv, the sternum is light and the lip darker. The legs in- 
crease slightly in thickness, also becoming lighter colored from 
the fourth to the first pair ; the first legs are light gray, yel- 
lowish toward the body, densely clothed with a few scattered 
long dark hairs, and the hind legs are dark or yellow, with 
black isli spines. The first and second legs have the last three 
joints tibia, metatarsus and tarsus black beneath ; near the 
body these legs are lighter, the femurs are yellowish olive. 
The mandibles are covered with yellow hair on the front. 

I have recently examined a male specimen of /,//rosv/ ///W//V.r. 
Marx, kindly sent to me by Mr. Xathan Hanks. The speci- 
men, I am informed, has similar castle-building habits such 
as described in ENTOMOLOGICAL XHWS, February, ls>9. The 
type of n/V'7' .' has not been recovered in the Marx collection, 
but Mr. Banks sent rue the above specimen, taking it to be 



170 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

that species. It is closely allied, if not identical, with my 
do m if ex, and though the markings are different they are not 
any more, perhaps, than attains in different sexes of the Lyco- 
sidce. 

The points wherein the male n!dlf<\c differs from the de- 
scription given above are as follows : There is a dark band 
one-third the width of the abdomen on the venter and the 
whole coloring above and below on the body is darker ; a 
noteworthy difference occurs on the legs underneath ; the third 
and fourth joints of all the legs are darkest, getting lighter to- 
ward the extremities, while in d>(fe.r the dark mirkings are 
confined to the last three joints of the first and second pair of 
legs. There are apparently no markings on the upper surface 
of the abdomen in the alcoholic example under consideration. 

It is hoped a study of more material the coming summer 
will bring forth new light on these interesting members of the 

Lycosidce. 

-0- 

NEW MYRMELEONIDAE. 

BY NATHAN BANKS 

Acn.nthaclisis ha gen in. sp. 

Very similar to A congener, and may be best described by com- 
parison with that species. The vertex is shining black (not shining 
in A. congener) nnd there are transverse lines of white Imirs.and two 
patches of them behind ; pronotnm has two small spots in front far- 
ther apart than in A. congener, and outside of them two others, near 
the middle of each side is a large pale spot, and a transverse one each 
side on the hind margin, (in A. congener there are two pale spots in 
front, a row of three each side, and two transverse ones on the hind 
margin): on the middle of mesothorax in front there are two large 
oblique pale marks (in A congener there are four eubequal spots 
forming a square) : on mesoscutellnm the pale spots are much 
larger. The veins of the wings aie less interrupted with pale and 
those of the posterior part are almost wholly black. The wings are 
uari'ower than in A congener, especially noticeable in the middle of 
the hind border. The radial sector has ten brandies, seven before 
the last transversal before the pterostigma (in A congener there are 
eight branches, live before the last transversal before the pterostigma. 
Phoenix, Arizona, May [Dr. Kuuze]. 

Brachynemurus.mdculosus n. sp. 

Face yellow, between and above antennae a large dark area from 
eye to eye, sometimes showing a pale double spot in the center, the 
dark is continued over upon the vertex in the middle; antenna*, 
brown; palpi pale, last article dark at tip ; prothorax moderately 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



short, yellow, with four browu Hues, the lateral ones only reach 

the sulcus; anterior part of rnesothorax mostly dark brown, with a 

pale narrow stripe each side, each lateral lobe shows a small pale 

spot above the base of fore wing; scutellum of mesothorax pale 

with a medium dark stripe (not one each side as in most species) ; 

metathorax pale with a median brown spot forked and divergent 

in Iront, sides dark brown ; pleura of thorax almost wholly dark; 

legs pale yellow, without marks except base and apex of the tarsi 

dark; abdomen pale at base, lineate with dark, dark at tip ; wings 

hyaline, costal's iorked only near tip, three transversals before the 

radial sector, pterostigma pale, dark on base; veins dark, interrupted 

with pale, except the vein behind radial sector which is wholly 

pale, at oneei-d of most of the transversals (including those ending 

on radial sector ar.d fork of same) there is a large daik spot, also 

ore <it cr.d of each costal ar.d a lather larger mark terminating the 

pale vein near the tip of wiLg; hir.d wirgs much less marked. 

Length to tip of wings, 20 mm. 

Tehama, California, August [A. P. Morse]. 

This species belongs in the group of B. abdcmi'nah's wl\ich may 

be distirguished by having a median stripe on the mesoscutelhim, 

and a wholly pale vein behind the radial sector. The four species 

may be separated as follows: 

1 Radial sector wholly dark, four stripes upon the pronotum. . . .2 

Radial sector more or kss pale, a stripe on each side of pro- 
notum, ........................................................ 3 

2 Spots along radial sector, small species ................ MACULOSUS. 

Xo spots along ladial sector ........................... BLANIMS. 

2 Spots scattered, basal part of radial sector interrupted with 
dark ............................................... ABDOMINALIS 

Spots mostly arranged along the radial and median veins, basal 
part of radial sector wholly pale ........................ TEM i<. 

JBi-(K-lif//triiu/t'in< l>l<nithis Hag. 

B. coi/m/letti ( 'urrie. 

There is, I think, no doubt that dime's species is identical with 

Hagen's. The peculiar markirgs of the proLotum in B. coym'tUHi 

agree with those ascriled by Hagen to B bltnnln,*, ai:d to r.o other 

Jorm. There is considerable variation in size in this as in other 

-pfcies of the genus. 

Brachynemurus pallidus n. sp. 

Pale yellowish, dark around bases of antenna 1 , two dark >pots on 

vertex, tips of palpi dark, antem a i pale brownish: prothorax 

shows only the lateral stripes and these are very indistinct, but each 

tip shows a prominent dark dot at the sulcus; thorax with a few 

dark spots, no signs ol marls on mesoscutelhim ; al dcmen pale yel- 

low, with a median and lateral dark line, apex obscure; leg.- pale 

yellow, ur.markcd, except the joints of tarsi are tipped with dark ; 

wings clear, without marks, veins dark, interrupted with pale, but 

without any adjoining clouds, pterostigma darker at base; hii'd 



172 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

wing similar to fore wing; costals forked only iiear the pterostigma 
one to three transversals basad of radial sector. Length $ 18 mm> 
expanse 37 mm. Phoenix, Arizona, September [Dr. Kunze]. 

Nearer to B, minuvculus than to any other species, but easily sep- 
arated from that by the lack of median lines on the pronotum, un- 
marked hind femora, etc. 

o 

^SOME NLW SPECIES OF ATHYSANUS. 

BY E. D. BALL, Fort Collins, Colo. 
Athysanus frigidus, u. sp. 

General appearance of A. exitiosa broader and shorter. As 
broad as obso1etu8,wiih a rounder vertex. Length, 9 4-4.5min, 
cJ 1 3.5mni ; width, 9 l.Gnini, cT 1.2inrn. 

Vertex two and one half times wider than long, half longer on 
middle than against eye, the surface sloping and broadly rounding 
to the tumid front ; ocelli distant from eves ; front wider than long, 
twice wider at apex than the parallel margined clypeus ; prouotmn 
half longer than vertex, lateral margins very short, humeral mar- 
gins long, rotindiug; elytra slightly longer than the body in both 
sexes, narrowing behind, vemtion normal, apical cells rather short 

Color : Grayish or hrownish white ; a large oval spot on either side 
the middle of the anterior margin of the vertex, a large round one 
between the ocelli and the eyes, sometimes thrse small ones on 
the disc, forming a triangle, a pair of elongate marks on the 
pronotum back of the anterior margin and a pair of spots on the 
disc of the scutellum, black; elytra covered with a whitish 
" bloom," the uervures obscure; face light, a pair of large spots be- 
low those on the vertex, another pair, irregular in shape, near the 
apex of front. Light colored specimens may lack some of the spots 
on face, while darker ones and the males as a rule have brown 
stripes between the light veins of the elytra. 

Geuitalia : Female, ultimate ventral segment twice longer than 
penultimate, shallowly emarginate posteriorly, with a broad, 
slightly, roundingly, bilobed, median tooth: pygofers twice longer 
than wide, equaling the ovipositor; male, ultimate ventral segment 
long, half longer than valve, valve broad, obtusely rounding, plates 
broad at base, regularly narrowing to the slightly divergent points, 
scarcely twice longer than the valve. 

Described from numerous specimens collected at Fort Col- 
lins, Colo., and back into the lower foot-hills. Found only 011 
Artemisia friyida, to which the white color and powdery 
" bloom" of both larva? and adults well adapt it. 

Athysaiuix (irctoxtaphyli, n. sp. 
Shorter and stouter than A. inntabilis, with shorter elytra. 



1899 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 173 

deep chestnut brown ; vertex yellow, with transverse fuscous 
lines. Length, 9 4mm, c?3.5mm ; width, ? 1.6mm, c?1.2mm. 

Vertex obtusely annulate, twice wider than long-, not quite two- 
thirds as long against eye as on middle, anterior margin thick, 
rounding to the face; front a little longer than wide, but little 
wider at the apex than theclypeus; pronofum strongly arcuated 
anteriorly, the side margins very short ; elytra short and stout, 
reaching the end of the abdomen, appendix minute, apical cells 
short, sometimes a second cross nervure between the sectors. 

Color: Vertex tawny yellow, a line between the fulvous ocelli, 
broken forwards in the middle, a transverse band back of this, and 
a crescent near each basal angle connected by a curved line, dark 
brown; prouotum yellowish, irrorate with fuscous except on the 
anterior margin ; elytral uervures pale, testaceous, heavily margined 
with fuscous; face yellow, sutures, arcs of the front and a spot on 
the clypeus fuscous; below brownish fuscous, legs annulate with 
fuscous. 

Genitalia: Female, ultimate ventral segment little longer than 
penultimate, posterior margin shallowly excavated either side of the 
middle; pygofers over twice longer than wide, equalling the ovi- 
positer. Male, valve broad, obtusely rounding: plates broad at 
base, triangular, three times lonffer than valve, outer margin thickly 
set with coarse hairs. 

Described from numerous specimens taken in the mountains 
west of Fort Collins, Colo., between 7,000 and 9,000 feet alti- 
tude, and one specimen from Leadvile, Col. (C. P. Gillette). 
The Fort Collins specimens were all taken, together with their 
larvae, from bearberry (Arctostaphi/los um ursi). 

Athi/fHtiiiix (tljtiiiiix, 11. sp. 

General form and color of obxoletux, with the longer vertex 
of <'.ri ntxHs. Pale clouded yellow, with t\vo transverse fuscous 
bauds on the vertex. Length, 9 5.5-6mm, c? 4.5mm; width, 
? 2mm, c? l.fnnm. 

Vertex nearly as long as the pronotum, twice as long on the 
middle MS against eye, three-fifths as long as the basal width, ob- 
tusely angulate before, the margin blunt and rounding; front, no 
longer than its basal width, twice longer than clypeus; pronotimi 
two and one-half times wider than long: elytra shorter than the 
abdomen in the female, sligthly exceeding it in the male. 

Color: Dirty straw yellow, a fuscous, transverse band between 
the ocelli, angled forwards nearly to the apex of the vertex, a 
brownish fuscous band just behind and parallel with the first, fork- 
inir at cadi end, the anterior forks running forward to the ocelli, 
the posterior ones back to the basal angles; pronotum with four 



174 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

longitudinal stripes commencing back of the anterior margin, the 
outer pair divergent, the inner pair uniting across the scutellum ; 
elytral nervures light, apical cells fuscous margined in the male ; 
face yellow, a spot above either antenna and about seven arcs on the 
upper part of the front, fuscous. 

Geuitalia: Female, ultimate ventral segment half longer than the 
penultimate, outer angles rounded, a stout median process tipped 
with two divergent teeth, either side of which is a narrow angular 
emargination. Male, valve as broad as the ultimate segment and 
about half as long, plates triangular, two-thirds the width ot the 
valve and two and one half times as long, their margins straight or 
sligbtly concave. 

Described from fifteen specimens taken from a damp moun- 
tain meadow on the Little Beaver, Larimer county, Colorado, 
at an elevation of 9,500 feet. 

NOTES ON EASTERN N, A. CYCHRUS. 

GEO. A EHRMANN, Pittsburg, Pa 

Cychrus nitidicollis Chev. 

I have taken this species but once in this locality, a single 
specimen; I have, however, taken it several times at Charleroi, 
Washington county, and received it from Fairniount. W Va. 
All were found during the months of August aud September 

C. nitidicollis, var. brevoorti, Lee 

Of this extremely rare form I have found but one specimen, nt 
Charleroi, November 12, 1896, aud since then have not happened 
across it. 

C. stenostomus Web. 

I only found three specimens under dry leaves at base of beech- 
nut tree, on September 4, 1896, aud none since 

C. stenostomus, var. leconte', Dej. 

The most abundant of the Cyhcri found in this section. 
I have taken this form in every mouth of the year, sometimes 
during January imbedded in ice. and holding these in my In nd, 
the heat of which would soon resuscitate them. 

C. stenostomus, var bicarinatus, Lee 

I found one specimen only of this rather rare form on Seplem- 
ber 9, 1897. 

C. canadensis Chd. 

Is recorded as being found at Pittsburg. \ liud, however, after 
examining the collections in this section, that all specimens 
are from Prof. Jerome Schmitt, of St. Vincent's College, u ho 
has frequently taken it at Chestnut Ridge, Cambria county. Pa. 

C. elevatus Fab 

This is also recorded as found in this section. The specimen 
upon which the record in Hamilton's list of Coleoptera of 
Western Pennsylvania, is based, giving the locality as Jem- 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 175 

nette, Pa., was originally in iny possession and is from Green 
Ridge Mo. Am of the opinion this species does not occur in 
southwestern Pennsylvania. 

C. viduus Dej. 

I have apparently been more fortunate than most collectors in 
the capture of this species, yet all were taken in a small, re- 
stricted locality at Baldwin's station. 

Several specimens have often been found very close together, as 
many as four at one time under a stone about one foot in di- 
ameter. It has often been a great pleasure to me to hold this 
beautiful insect in my hand and admire its graceful form. 
Though I have had as many as three specimens in my hands at 
one time, it does not always happen that success rewards a 
search for this species, having many times turned over so many 
stones, logs, sticks and bark that my back felt broken from the 
exertion; on glancing backward over the route followed in the 
vain search, it looked as if it had been struck by a cyclone 
[ have held a live Cychrus vidttus in mv hand whose head was 
imbedded in the mouth of a shell of the large land snail, who 
was so intent on his occupation that transferring my hold from 
him to the shell and letting him hang suspended did not inter- 
fere with him in the least ; he seemed so absorbed in the pro- 
cess of feeding that continual maneuvering in this manner 
failed to distract his attention from his prey. 
The species is found here from April until the end of September. 

C guyoti Lee 

Tliis species is so rare that it is represented in but few collec- 
tions 

Prof. Jerome Schmitt,of St. Vincent, Pa., has a fine pair re- 
ceived some years ago from North Carolina. 
As for as recorded, this species occurs only in the mountain re- 
gions of that State. (A note concerning the above record will 
be published in the September number.) 

C ridingsii Bland . 

This very pretty little species, in appearance so much like a 
diminutive C. andreiesii, has only been found at Uuiontown 
ami Cressou, Pa., proving it to be a strictly mountain species, 
as is the case with C. cn<nh iixix. 

C. andrewsii llarr. 

The species is found here, though not so restricted as ( '. riihmx, 
nor found as often, yet the habits are similar. 
This has only been taken from June 28th to September 14th and 
does not SI.TIII to cover as lono- a perion as C. riditux. 
In looking for (.'i/c/irms, I find wherever land ~nails are abun- 
dant, some one of the species will be found. 
r//c///v/x should always besought after in damp, shady and 
stouyplace*. During mv collecting experience of twenty years, 
have never found anv species but (.'. Icconlci hibernating. 



176 [June 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[The Conductors of ENTOMOLOGICAL, NEWS solicit and will thankfullyreceive 
items of news likely to interest its readers from any source. The author's name 
will be given in each case, for the information of cataloguers and bibliograph- 
ers.] 

To Contributors. All contributions will be considered and passed upon at 
our earliest convenience, and, as far as may be, will be published according to 
date of reception. ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS has reached a circulation, both in 
numbers and circumference, as to make it necessary to put "copy" into the 
hands of the printer for each number thi-ee weeks before date of issue. This 
should be remembered in sending special or important matter for a certain 
issue. Twenty-five "extras," without change in form, will be given free, when 
they are wanted; and this should be so stated on the MS., along with the num- 
ber desired. The receipt of all papers will be acknowledged. ED. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA., JUNE, 1899. 
EDITORIAL. 

11 Prior to 1618 it was supposed that all small animals were 
spontaneously generated ; for instance, eels were supposed to 
be generated from the slime of the Nile, and maggots were 
thought to be spontaneously generated in meat. To the ex- 
amination of this very point the celebrated Francesco Kedi, 
physician to the Grand Dukes Ferdinand the Second and 
Coomos the Third, of Tuscany, and a member of the Academy 
del Cimeuto, addressed himself in 1618. He had seen the 
maggots of putrefying flesh and reflected on their possible ori- 
gin. But he was not content with mere reflection nor with 
the theoretic guesswork which his predecessors had founded 
on imperfect observations. Watching meat during its passage- 
from freshness to decay, prior to the appearance of maggots, 
he invariably observed flies buzzing around the meat and fre- 
quently alighting upon it. The maggots, he thought, might 
be the half -developed progeny of these flies. The inductive 
giiess precedes experiment, by which, however, it must be 
finally tested. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. \~- 

" Eedi knew this and acted accordingly. Placing fresh meat 
in a jar and covering the mouth with paper, he found that, 
though the meat putrefied in the ordinary way, it never bred 
maggots, while the same meat placed in open jars soon swarmed 
with these organisms. For the paper cover he then substi- 
tuted tine gauze, through which the odor of the meat could 
rise. Over it the flies buzzed and on it they laid their eggs. 
but the meshes being too small to permit the eggs to fall 
through no maggots were generated in the meat. They were, 
on the contrary, hatched on the gauze. By a series of such 
experiments Eedi destroyed the belief in the spontaneous gen- 
eration of maggots in meat, and with it doubtless many re- 
lated beliefs." 

Suppose after having been dead, say about 260 years, Eedi 
should come back to life and pick up a copy of The .V/r York 
Mnl'tcal Journal of December 10, 1898, and read an article en- 
titled, ''The Cultivation of the Plaxmoflium malaria," by L. 
H. Warner, M. D. A portion of this paper reads as follows : 
"Dr. Walter F. Scheele, of Xew York City, recently con- 
ducted a number of experiments and investigations in mos- 
quito development which prove that there are three distinct 
types of mosquitoes, each possessing a distinct degree of poisoning- 
power in its sting. His claims are that mosquitoes originate and 
develope in foul water, especially when vegetable or animal 
albuminous substances are present. In the first stage of its de- 
velopment the mosquito is a conglomerate mass of different bicteria 
and microbes, formed by decomposing matter, composed of 
vegetable and animal albumen. The latter being in a state 
of decomposition is a deadly poison. 

11 Upon emerging from the water the mosquito is charged with a 
surplus of albuminous poison, which must be got rid of immediately or 
death occurs ; hence it instinctively seeks to preserva its life by sting- 
ing and injecting the injurious albumen into the only objects that will 
racsivs it, man and beast." If Eedi came to life and read this 
rot, he would undoubtedly be disgusted with the nineteenth 
century and immediately desire to return to the "shades." 
The most charitable tiling we can say of the editor of Tin 
AV/r York A/ctl/cn/ Journal is that he never read the manuscript 
of the article, or he would not have permitted such stuff to 
appear in a respectable periodical. 



J78 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Jime 

Notes and News. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL GLEANINGS FROM ALL QUARTERS OF THE GLOBE. 



THE AMERICAN ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY intends to prepare a 
Directory of American Entomologist--, which shall contain the 
names, addresses, special orders studied, etc. Such a work can't 
faii to be extremely useful. Its success will largely depend on the 
interest entomologists take in it and the promptness with which 
they supply the necessary information. Please send to ENTOMOLOG- 
ICAL NEWS, the Academy of Natural Sciences, 1900 Race street, 
Philadelphia, the following information in regard to yourself and 
any friends interested in the study of insects: 

Name, 

Correct address. 

Special study, orders, etc., 

Have you a collection ? 

Do you exchange specimens? 

FELDMAN OUTING. The Feldman Collecting Social at its last 
meeting decided to hold a field meeting at Auglesea, New Jersey, 
on the coming July 4th. The undersigned committee of arrange- 
ments was appointed, with plenary power, and herewith extend a 
cordial invitation to members of the different Entomological So- 
cieties to be their guests on the above date. The Keystone Rod aud 
Gun Club will be the headquarters of the meeting. All collectors 
who desire to attend are cordially invited to be the guests of the 
Feldmau Collecting Social on Tuesday. July 4th. The quarters, 
however, will be open from Saturday, July 1st, until afternoon of 
July 4th, thereby enabling anyone desiring to spend several days 
collecting at this place to do so, in which case the committee will 
be pleased to furnish, upon application, any desired information re- 
garding several days' accommodations. It is important that those 
desiring to attend the meeting of July 4th should notify the com . 
mittee as early as possible, in order that they may know how many 
to provide for, and thus assure comfort and sufficient room for all. 

THEO. H. SCHMITZ, Chairman, 
No. 3104 Baring street, West Philadelphia. 

Charles Boeruei, H. "VV. Wenzel, Philip Laurent. 

CHRYSIS SCHLETTERERI, MOCSARY. A few years ago, I caught at 
Socorro, New Mexico, a beautiful species of Chrysis resembling 
both in color and structure the European ('. t<init<t, but smaller and 
more slender than that insect . I now find that it agrees with the 
deception of C. schleitereri, Mocs., from Tacubaya, Mexico; so that 
name is to be added to our faunal list. T. D. A COCKERELL. 

ON the best method for killing large insects. Having received 
several inquiries as to the easiest and quickest plan for killing large 
specimens, it may be of some interest to give my modus operand!. 
Here in the tropics the need for such a plan is greater, of course, but 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 179 

1 believe many a fine specimen has been ruined by the collector's re- 
lying 1 wholly upon the cyanide jar. 

My first *' suag" for the cyanide process was a quart of lively 
IIetero(i<nt>lni8 cften'olafiRwm, and Strataegus juliamis Uurm. 
They reveled in the cyanide. There was no boiling' water. I made 
a hypodermic syringe by drawing the tip of my medicine-dropper 
to a fine, slender point in an alcohol flame. By puncturing- the 
thick wall of the metasteruum with a strong setting-needle I could 
easily insert the" hypo" and inject three or four drops of gasoline 
directly into the body cavity. Death was instantaneous ; no second 
dose required I now use the same plan for all large insects. Even 
the largest sphiug-ids like Ainphonix medorUv, are killed in two 
seconds - without turning a scale. 

Care should be taken to have the bulb of the " hypo '' tit air-tight 
the tip should taper gradually and with a slight-curve It should 
be inserted from beneath into the middle of the thorax, and if well 
managed little or no gasoline should appear on the outside. The 
tip of the " hypo " may be protected by thrusting it into a good - 
sized cork. " Hypo " and small vial of gasoline may be carried in 
the same small pocket O. W- BARRETT, 

Tacubaya, T). F , Mexico 

ECDYSIS OF Aittottieffx leucaite Hbn. The thin cocoon is made 
of coarse, gluey, red-brown silk; 5 mm. inside the front end is a 
transverse wall or screen with meshes (usually) of about 1 mm. 
This wall is fastened rather loosely to the cocoon and is not "dis- 
solved," scarcely softened even, by the imago, but merely loosened 
at one side. The abdomen at once lengthens 5 mm. or 8 mm. after 
the pupa case is ruptured and so good " push power'' is developed. 
The hinges of the screen door being broken the ecdyis is completed 
in three to five minutes, the front end of the cocoon offering but 
little resistance. Twenty to thirty minutes alter the screen snaps 
back into place the wings are full-sized. O. AV. BARRETT 

A NEW RECORD IN AN ODD PLACE. In January of 1899, while in 
practice in Los Angeles, a patient presented himself complaining of 
pain and discharge of watery fluid from one of his ears. 

Examination revealed a tick that was easily removed The tick 
looked 11 nt a mi liar, and on forwarding it to the Dept. of Agriculture 
at Washington it was discovered to be Argasmegini, I )uges. origin- 
ally described from Mexico and not hitherto reported from the 
United State*. 

The patient had never beeu twenty miles away from Los Ange- 
les, and had intheautumn spent a few weeks in the country .but had 
not been sleeping out of doors. A. DAVIDSON, M. D., 

Clifton, Arizona- 

Si'HEX ELI:<;ANS. This wasp for some reason or other is very sel- 
dom found among the many other wasps one may capture in a few 
days of collectin: yet they must be common in summer, for their 






180 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

nests are frequently to be found in the stems of the white sage so 
common throughout South California. 

For nesting sites they prefer the larger stems, first gnawing 
through the thin partitions opposite the leaf insertions, which nat- 
urally divide au otherwise hollow stem. The parent wasp first 
packs the bottom of this tube with very fine, grass-like fibres; 
which, on investigation, prove to be fine strips of the loosely fib- 
rous bark of Audibertia polystacha, from 1-4 inch to 1 1-2 inches in 
length. On this is laid the larval food supply which consists of, on 
au average, of seven or eight tree crickets. The egg is laid on the 
breast of one of the tree crickets, a wad of bark ti'jre is placed on the 
top which forms the base for the next cell, elc. A copious wad. 
sometimes three or four inches in depth, protects the topmost cell. 

The cocoon when completed is one inch long and one quarter inch 
wide at its widest part at the cephalic end. It has two coverinirs 
the outer a loose sac resembling tissue paper, of a grayish brown 
color, the inner somewhat resembling that of the common mud 
dauber, but stouter and denser. 

The majority of the adult wasps hatch out in July and August 
and pass the winter concealed in crevices or other convenient shel- 
ters in trees and rooks; a few, probably not more than 15 or 20 per 
cent., remain in the larval stage till the following May. They 
make their escape by forcing their way through the fibrous divis- 
ions above, seldom cutting their way through the sides of the stem. 

P. trypoxylonisi Towns; may, as usual, be found to have con- 
sumed the larval food. Of genuine parasites there are few, all of 
them attack the larva after it has spun its coo^on. They are Epis- 
f< //ia cwrtdata, Pkotopsts unicolor, Photopsisferrugineo. 

A DAVIDSON, M. D.. 
Clifton, Arizona. 

NOTES ON CALIFORNIA WASPS. THE NESTING HABITS OF ANCIS- 
TROCEKUS BIRENIMACULATUS, SAuss. In the end of February or in 
the first week of March, before the increasing warmth of spring 
has yet stirred any of the other \vasps,this one has broken its way 
through its cell and begun building for its coming brood. It usually 
constructs its cells in the hollow stems of plants or in the deserted 
tunnel of some other species. If the cavity is a narrow one, these 
cells are placed in a single series; it 1 wide, they are grouped to- 
gether laterally, in sufficient numbers to till the cavity. The cells 
vary in size according to the cavity they occupy, their average ex. 
terual measurement being 710 inch long by 3-1!) wide. They are 
circular on section, truncate at the ends, and are built of little pel- 
lets of clay pieced together in a manner similar to that of the com- 
mon mud-dauber wasp of this section. The number of cells built 
by each wasp varies from 2 to 15. 

Immediately on exit they begin to build fresh nests and many 
may be found complete in April. The young are fed on the small 
green larvae found so abundantly on the leaves of the common Ar- 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



temesia; eight of these is the average number found in each cell. 
The egg is deposited after the cell is tilled. The larva 1 of this spe- 
cies, in common with many others, can devour more food than the 
parent wasp generally allows them; one of them tint 1 experi- 
mented witli had no difficulty in disposing of four small spiders 
immediately after consuming the maternal allowance. 

The parasites affecting these are few in number and are limited 
to one species, viz . Chrysfs cti'rn/initf, Fabr. 

This wasp, I believe, possesses the distinction of having a smaller 
percentage of parasites than any other 1 have investigated. Of the 
hundreds of cells I have examined only h've contained parasites. 

This immunity is probably wholly due to the nests being com- 
pleted mon hs earlier than the majority of parasites usually appear. 

A. DAVIDSON, M. 1).. 
Clifton, Arizona. 

Prof. F. W. Mally. of Hulen, Texas, has recently been elected, by 
the directors of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texn-. 
State Entomologist and Professor of Entomology in the college. 

Dr. A.. Feuyes has started on a collecting trip to Mexico, Texas, 
New Mexico and Colorado, and will begone live months. 

Dr- William Barnes is collecting Lepidoptera in Southern 
Arizona. 

Dr. Henry Skinner, Prof. A J. Snyderand Mr. Philip Laurent 
are planning a collecting trip to the Rocky Mountains. 



The following is of interest as an early reference to Ci<-tnf<> w/if en- 
dec ini. The brood referred to seems to be that due in 1902. 

E. FOSTER, New Orleans. La 

" A respectable old gentleman, who has seen and observed the 
locust at the different periods of their appearance, as noted below, 
has favored the editor of the Register with the following memo- 
randa : 

" ' The locust appeared 

" ' In 1749, in the month of May. 

" ' In 1766, they came out of the ground from the 14th to the 17th 
of May. 

" ' In 178', they c-.ime out frou the 16th to the 10th of May. 

" ' In 1800, from the 19th to the 26th of May. 

" ' In 1817, they did not appear until the beginning of June. It is 
supposed the cold and wet weather retarded their progress. 

" 'They continue from four to six weeks, and arc harmless, except 
to young and tender fruit trees or the twigs of older trees, wherein 
the female deposits her eggs, which in a few days vivify, and the 
twigs either break oh" or the young locust emerges and falls to the 
ground, aiul mikes its way into the earth for another period ot 
seventeen vears ' " JW/e.v' Weekly Rr<iixt<-r. .lnl>i /:?. IS 17. A"//, 
p. 310. 



182 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

Entomological Literature, 



COMPILED BY P. P. CALVERT. 



Under the above head it is intended to mention papers received at the Ac-ad- - 
einy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia pertaining to the Entomology of the 
Americas (North and South). Articles irrelevant to American entomology 
will not be noted. Contributions to the anatomy, physiology and embryology 
of insects, however, whether relating to American or exotic species, will be re- 
corded. The numbers in HEAVY-FACED TYPE refer to the journals, as num- 
bered in the following list, in which the papers are published ;' * denotes that the 
paper in question contains descriptions of new North American forms. Titles 
of all articles in foreign languages are translated into English ; usually such 
articles are written in the same language as the title of the journal contain- 
ing them, but when such articles are in other languages than English, French, 
German or Italian, this fact is indicated in brackets. 



3. The American Naturalist, Boston, May, '99. 4. The Canadian 
Entomologist, London, Out., May. '99. 5. Psyche, Cambridge, 
Mas , May, '99 9. The Entomologist, London, May, '99. 10. Na- 
ture, London, '99. II. The Annals and Magazine of Natural His- 
tory, London, April, '99. 14. Proceedings of the Zoological 
Society of London, '98, pt. iv, April 1, '99. 15. Biologia 
Ceutrali- Americana. London, pt. cxlvi, Feb '9922. Zoologischer 
Anzeiger, Leipsic, '99. 35. Aunales, Societe Eutomologique de 
Belgique, Brussels, xliii, 8, March 30; 4, April 27, '99. 38. AViener 
Entomologische Zeitung, xviii, 2-3, March 31, '99. -40. Societas 
Eutomologica, Ziirich-Hottingen, '99. 46 Tijdschrift voor Euto- 
molog'ie, xli, 3-4. The Higue, March 28, '99. 55. Le Naturaliste, 
Paris, April 1, '99 59. Sitzungsberichte der naturforschenden 
Frenude, Berlin. 75. Twenty-ninth Annual Report, Entomological 
Society of Ontario, Toronto, '99. 84. Insokten Borse. Leipsic, '99. 
86 a. Aunales, Societe Eutomologique de France. Paris. '97; 1, Dec. t 
'97; -2-3, April, '98; 4. July, '98; all received May, '99 86 b. Bulletin 
of the preceding. '97, received May, '99. - 107. Revista do Museu 
Paulista, iii, 5, S Paulo, Brazil, '98. 108. The Agricultural Jour- 
nal. Published by the Department of Agriculture, Cape of Good 
Hope, Cape Town, '99. 109. Proceedings, Royal Society of Queens- 
land, xiv, Brisbane, '99. 110. Bulletin, Societe d'FIistoire Naturelle 
de Colmar, nouvelle scria, iv, '98. 

The General Subject. B a e h m e tj e w, P. The critical point 
and the normal solidification point of insect juices, 43, April 1. 
B r a i n e r d , D. The preparation of specimens for the exhibition 
of life-histories in the cabinet, tigs., 75 B r i n d 1 e y, H . H . 
On certain characters of reproduced appendages, particularly in the 
Blattida 1 , 1 pi , 14 Com stock. A. B. Hints on making 
collections of insects, Teacher's Leaflets, for use in the public schools, 
prepared by the ! ollege of Agriculture, Cornell University, Ithaca. 
N. Y., No. 7, June 1, '97 E vans, J . D . Notes on insects of 
theyear,divisiouNo. 2, Bay of Quintedistriet,75. H a r r i ngton . 
W. H . Notes on insects of the year, division No. 1, Ottawa dis- 
trict, tigs . 75. H u b b a r d , H . G . Insect fauna of the giant 
c.actus of Arizona: letters from the southwest, 5 K i 1 m a u , A. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. l,s;; 

H. Notes on insects of the year, division No. 4, Niagara district, 
figs., 75. K ii n c k e 1 d'Herculais, J. Moulting 1 in insects 
considered as a means of defense against vegetable or animal para- 
sites; special roles of traoheil and intestinal moult ing, Auales 
Sociedad Cientitu-a Argentini, Buenos Aires, March, .'99. 
L e m o i u e , V . On the application of the Roentgen rays to the 
study of Arti 'ulates 85 b. L o c h h e a d , W Entomology in 
schools, figs.. 75. -Lyra an, H II. The President's annual 
address, 75; The freezing- of inserts. 75 M a r c li a 1 , P. The 
Ceoidomyids of cereils airl their puvisites, figs., 8 pis.. 86 a, 1. 
Mayet, V. Note on t 1 e insects of the salt lands 86 b.~ 
M o f f a t , J . A . Notes on the seison of 1893, 75. -N orris, 
A. E. Cabinet pest deterrent, 4. d e P e y e r i m h o f f , P- 
Sexual variation in the Arthropods. 86 a. 2-3. R e n u i e. R. W . 
Notes on insects of the year, division No. .">, London district, figs., 
75. R o u s s e a u , E Oa a projes? parmitting the study of the 
internal anatomy of inserts without dissection (preliminary com- 
munication), 35. 4 S c h e n k 1 i n g , S . Ou myrmecophilous Ar- 
thropods,^, April 13; Springing b2aiis,84-, April 20. S c h w a r z, 
E. A. Clissifiel list of species observed by H. G. Hubbard on 
the giant c ictus, 5, supplement. W e b s t e r , F . M . The col- 
le -tor and his relation to pure and applied entomology, 75 

Economic Entomology. A n o n. Abstract of recent publications, 
Experimant Sration R?c >:\1, x, s, U. S. Dap 1 1 of Agriculture, Wash- 
ington, -'99. A u o n . Dragjnflies airl chicken-raising, 84, April 
27. Anon. The gypy moth and economic entomology, 3. 
Austen, E . E- Mosquitoes and malaria, the manner in \vhirh 
mosquitoes inteade;! for de'erinimtion should be collected and pre- 
served, 10, April 20. Benu, J. H., and others. Locust exter- 
mination, 108. M'uvh 3 >. - C a r e w -G i b s o n , E . A . , M a t - 
s i m u r a , M . [The apple fruit miner, Arf/i/resthm conjttf/eUa], 
4 C h i t t e n d e n. F . H. Soai3 in>3^ts injurious to garden 
and orchard crop?, figs., Bulletin No. 1!), new series, U. S Dep't 
Agriculture, Division of E itoniDlogy, \Vasliiugton, '99. (J h o - 
baut, A. O.2 a Xy.'eVv/v/v p irasite of an orchid in Kuro|H'in 
greenhouses, 86 a, 2-3. D a g u i n . E.lible insects in antiquitv 
and in our own day, 55. I) a n i e 1 s . C . W . On truismis-ion 
of profeosoin i to birds by the mosquito: a report to the Malaria 
(' mamittee of the Royil S>.-iely, Pi\)coe. lings of the Royal Society. 
London, Ixiv, 411, AprillS,'!!-) D e a r n e s s , J . The cotton boll 
worm in Canadian corn. 75. D u g ir a r , L> . M . Notes on the use 
of the fungus Xi>nrntrif'iin>i ij'.n'm'ift rimi for the --lest ruction ot the 
chiiich-!);i^ ; I5li ;i> Icn- .].icr.i-) in the Unite, 1 St:itt->. ( '.-ntralblatt 
tTir Hakteriologie. Jena. March 31. '!)!. K d i n g t o n . Locust ex- 
terniiu it i in by fie iiiein> of fungus. 103. Man-h l(i. F 1 e t c h c r . 
J . The brown- tail moth ; [njuriousinssctsin 1 s > *. ti^>.. 75. - !' o r - 
bush, E. II. Tliegvpsy moth, 75. F u 1 I e r , C. Tin- com- 
mon blue tick ot Cape Culony and it- relationship to the red water 



184 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

ticks of North America and Australia, figs, 108, March 16.- 
F y I es, T. W. The farmers' garden and its insect foes, figs., 
75. Hunter, S. J. Alfalfa, Grasshoppers. Bees : their rela- 
tionship, figs., Contributions from Entomological Laboratory, Uni- 
versity of Kansas, No. 65. Lawrence, Jan '99. H u t t , H . L . A 
few of the most troublesome insects of the past season (1898), figs., 
75 I 1 1 i d g 3 , R. Life-history, etc., of timber moths, 109. 
L o u n s b u r y , C . P . Coddling moth again, 108, March 2 
[L u g g e r O?] Butterflies and moths injurious to our fruit-pro- 
ducing' plants, 237 figs. Bulletin 61, University of Minnesota Agri c. 
Exper. Station, Division of Entomology. St. Anthony Park, 
Minn , Dec.. '98. M a r c h a 1 . P. See the General Subject; also 
numerous short note? in 85 b. M a y e r , C. A new remedy 
against phylloxera, 108, March 2. Pound, C. J. Not^s on the 
cattle tick, 109. R o b e r t s , L. Ticks and their destruction, 
108, March 16. S h i r 1 e y , J . Notes on bees and [as destroyers 
of] wax-scales, 109. S 1 i u s e r 1 a n d , M . V. Some new 
notions about some old insects, Reprint from Transactions, Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society, pt. 1, Boston, '99 ; Insect pests of 
1898, Reprint from Proceedings, Forty-fourth Annual Meeting, 
"Western New York Horticultural Society, Jan. 25, 26, '99. S p a 1 i - 
kovrski, E. New researches on the accidents caused by the 
stings of bees, 55. Webster, F. M. Some economic features 
of international entomology, figs , 75. "W e e d , C . M . The for- 
est tent caterpillar, figs., Bulletin 64, New Himpshire College 
Agricultural Experiment Station, Durlaim. N H., April. '99; 
[Report of] Department of Entomology, figs, Tenth Annual Report 
of the same. Nov., '98. W e 1 1 s , H. H. and others. Locust 
fungus operations, 108. March 2. 

Arachnida. B i r o, L . Mimetic spiders, [in Magyar, brief sum- 
mary in German], Rovartaui Lapok, Budapest, April '99. C a m - 
bridge, F . O . P . On new species of spiders from Trinidad, 
West Indies. 1 pi., 14. C a m b r i d g e, O. P. Arachuida- 
Araneidea, pp. 289-296*, 15. G i 1 1 et te, C. P. Life-history 
of the sheep scab-mite, Psoroptes communis.75.v anHasselt, 
A . W . M . The venom of spiders. 46. M o e u k h a u s , W . J . 
Contribution to knowledge of the Arachnida of San Paulo, 1 pi., 
107. Pocock, R. I. A new stridulating Theraphosid spider 
from South America, II. T r o u e s s a r t , E Note on the orgiu 
of fixation and of suction in the larva of Trornbidion, figs , 86 b. 

Myriopoda. H e n n i n g s . Tinnosvary's organ of Glomeris, figs.i 
59. '99, No. 3. V e r h o e f f, C. On the European cive fauna' 
especially Diplopoda and Chilopoda, 22, April 17. 

Thysanura. B ouvier. E. L. The genus Mtiimlroin'n, new 
type of the family Lepismidae, 86 b. C a 1 a n d r u c c i o , S. On 
the biology of Japyx solifuyus Hal . and Campodea staphylinus 
Westw., preliminary note, Bulletino d. Societa Entomologica Ital- 
iana, xxx, 1-2, Florence, Oct. SI, '98. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 185 

Orthoptera. B o 1 i v a r, I . Description of a new species of Or- 
thoptera from Peru, 86 b.B r i n d 1 e y , H. H. See the General 
Subject. C u e n o t , L. The absorbent region in the intestine of 
Blatta, figs., Archives de Zoologie Experimentale et Genera le, (3) 
vi, 5, Paris, '98. H u n t e r , S . J . See Economic Entomology. 
P e t r u n k e w i t s c h , A. On the physiology of digestion in 
Periplaneta onentnlis&ud. Blatia germanica, figs., 22, March 27. 
d e S a u s s u r e , H . and P i c t e t , A . Orthoptera, pp. 457-8*^ 
15.- S c u d d e r. S . H . The Stenopalmatiuae of the Pacific 
coast,* 4 S t ad e 1 m a u n , H. A case of parthenogenesis in 
Bacillus rossius, 59, '98. 

Neuroptera. K e 1 I i c o t t, D. S. The Odonata of Ohio (see 
the review*, post) M a r t i n , R. Description of new Odonaia* 
86 a, 4. T u ni p e 1 . R . Die Geradfliiger Mitteleuropas. Eisen- 
ach, Verlag von M. Wilckens Lieferuug 2-4. pp. 25-96, pis. iv- 
xiv and 24 text figs., Odonata and Ephemerida 

Hemiptera C h a m p i o n . G. C. Rhynchota-Ileteroptera T 
vol.ii, pp. 193-216, pi. xii,* I5.-C oc kerel 1 , T. D. A. On 
the habits and structure of the Coccid genus Margarodes* 3 ; Four 
new Diaspine Coccidae ,* 4 ; Aleurodicus rnirnbilis , 5; Some new 
Coccida? collected at Campinas, Brazil, by F. Noack (three papers), 
107. E h r h o r n, E - M . Three new Coccida?,* 4. F o w 1 e r, 
W . W. Rhyuchota-Homoptera, vol. ii, pp. 217-224, pi. xiv.* 
15. H e in p e 1 , A. Notes on Capuhnia Jaboticabai Ihering, 1 
pi.. 107 King, G. B. Contributions to knowledge of Massachu- 
setts Coccidae,M, 4. M a y e t , V . Longevity of the cysts of 31<n-- 
garodes, 86 b. Reed, E. C. Synopsis of the Herniptera of 
Chili (cont.) [in Spanish], Revista Chilena de Historia Natural, 
Valparaiso, Dec., '98. W e b s t e r , F M ., and Cockerel!, 
T. D. A. The odor of the San Jose scale, Aspidiolus per- 
n/'rfosus, 75. 

Coleoptera. B e d e 1 , L . , and Francois, p . On the stridu- 
latory apparatus of /svv/yo/m, figs., 86 b. B e 1 o u , R. P. De- 
scription of a new Lougicorn of the genus Hebestola, 86 b. 
B o r d a s, L . General considerations on the defensive glands of 
Coleoptera, Comptes Rendus, 1'Acadeniie des Sciences, Paris, April 
17, '99. B o u r g e o i s . J . Catalogue of the Coleoptera of the 
chain of the Vosges and of the adjacent regions. 110. C Ii a m - 
pion, G. C. A list of the Cantharida? supplementary to the 
" Munich " catalogue. 35, 4. C h o b a u t , A New observations 
on the biological relations of the Anthicidas with the vesicants, 86 b. 
C r o i s s a n d e a u , J . Monograph of theScydimenidre (cont.), 
5 pis , 86 a, 4 D eegener, P. Structure and position .>f the 
mouth-parts of llydi'vphilmt, figs , 59, '99, No. 3. D i e r k x , F . 
Structure and function of the defensive gland in the genus lii-udtt/- 
intfi. figs . 22, April 17. E s c h e r i c h , K . To knowledge of the 
coleopterous genus Zomihrfs Harold, 1 pi., 38 and heft 4, April 30 






18(3 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Jlllie 

'99 Everts, J. E. Ooleoptera Neerlaudica. De schildvleu- 
gelige Insecten van Nederland en het aangrenzend Gebied. Deel I, 
2de Gedeelte. 'sGraveuhage Martinus Nijhoff 1899. pp 369-677, 
figs. 28-62 [in Dutch]. F o r m a 11 e k , U On the period of 
flight of some Ooleoptera, 38- G adeaude Kerville, H. 
Physiological experiments on Dyticus marginalia, 86 b - G o r - 
ham, H . S . Coleoplera, vol. vii., pp. 257-276, i-xii,* 15 H a r- 
r i 11 g t o n . W. II. A lew Canadian Longicorus. 4. Hub- 
bard, H. G. On Thalassa montezumca Muls. (family Coccinel- 
lidae), figs , Proceedings, Entomological Society of Washington, iv^ 
3. April 28. '99. L e s n e , P . Revision of the Ooleoptera of the 
family Bostrychidae, part ii, figs., 86 a, 2-3 ; On a new species of 
Ooleoptera ot the family Bostrychidae* (Heterarthron subdepressus. 
n. sp.). 86 b. P ic, M. On the carnivorous instincts of the An- 
thieidae, 86 b - R a f f r a y , A. Revision of Batrisus and allied 
genera of Central and South America,* 1 pi , 86 a, 4. S c b w a r z , 
E. A. Description of new species of Ooleoptera,* 5, supplement. 
T h e r y , A. Descriptions of new Buprestida? and various re- 
marks, 86 a. 2-3 

Diptera. A u s t e n , E . E . See Economic Entomology 
Da hi, F. The flea and its position in the system, 59, '98- 
Elliot, R. Two avian parasites; notes on their meta- 
morphoses. figs., 75 K e 1 1 o g g , V . L . The mouth parts of 
the Nematocerous Diptera, iv, figs., 5 Ma re ha 1, P. See 
the General Subject. W e 1 t n e r, W . The spawn of Chironomus 
fit'ii-CNtri F. 59. '98. v a n der Wulp, F. M. Diptera. vol. 
ii.. pp 385-392, pi X,*I5. 

Lepidoptera. A u d r e , E. Suicide of caterpillars. Bulletin, 
Societe d'Histoire Naturelle de Macon, No. 12, Dec. 1, '98. B u t - 
ler, A. G. Chrysophanus thoe ot' Gray why is it not C. \vl- 
lus Cramer? 4. Dog n in, P. New Heterocera from South 
America, 35. 3. D r u c e , H . Descriptions of some new species 
of Heterocera from Tropical America, II ; Lepidoptera Heterocera, 
vol ii, p!. xcviii, 15. Dyar, II. G- A new Lithosiau,* 5. 
F e t t i g. Variability in t he order Lepidoptera a propos of some 
aberrations observed in Alsace, 110. F r i e d m a n u , F . On the 
formation of pigment in butterflies' wings, 1 pi. Archiv fiir mikro- 
schopische Anatomic, liv, 1. Bonn, March 27, '99. F rings, C . 
Preference of Lepidoptera for their own colors, 40, April 15. 
F y 1 e s , T . W . Observations upon tfpilosoma congrua Walk., 
4. G i b s o u , A . Muskoka as a collecting ground, figs., 75 ; On 
the Noctuida? occurring in Toronto, figs.. 75. H a in p s o n , G 
F . A revision of the moths of the subfamily Pyraustiuae and fam- 
ily Pyralidae. pt. 1, figs., 2 pis.,* 14. J o n e s , E. D. Emer- 
gence of a butterfly, figs., Science Gossip, London, May, '99. 
Lathy, P . L . Descriptions of new species of Syntomidas in 
the collection of Mr. H. J. Adams, 9. [L u g g e r , O?] See Eco- 
nomic Entomology. M a b i 1 1 e, P . Description of new Lep- 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

idoptera, 86 a, 2-3. -M c I n t o s h . W. The butterflies of New 
Brunswick, Bulletin, Xatural History Society of Xe\v Brunswick, 
xvii, St John. X. B., '99 M o f f a t . J . A . Random recollec- 
tions in natural history. tigs., 75 : A bit of history, 75. M core, 
F . Lepidoptera Indica, part xxxvi. [Vol. iii, pp. 2:5:5-254. pis. 
279-286, completing vol. iii.] London: Lovell, Reeve & Co, Ltd. 
1899. Rec'd Apr. 24. O b e r t h u r, C. Descriptions of new 
Lepidoptera, tigs.. 86 b. P i c t e t , A. Aerial development of 
the wing's of Lepidoptera. Archives dss Sciences Physiques et 
Xaturelles (4) vii, 3. Geneva, March 15, '99. S u e 1 1 e n . P . C . 
T. Some rein irks on Pynlidse, with description of new species 
[in Dutch], 2 pis , 46. S t a n d f u s < , M . Summary of the ex-' 
periments hitherto undertaken on Temperature and Hybridation, 
84. April 27. S t a u d i n e r , O . Lepidoptera of the Ham- 
burg Magellan Collecting Expedition. Ergebnisse der Hamburger 
Migilhaeusischen Simmelreisj, iv, '99. T r i in e u , R . Seasonal 
dimorphism in Lepidoptera. 13, April i:s. W inn, A. F. Xotes 
on Papilfo brevicauda Sauuders. 75. 

Hymenoptera. d u B u y s son. R . Study of the Chrysididse of 
the Museum of Paris, 2 pis.,* 85 a, 4. C a m e r o n . P . Hymen- 
optera, vol. i, pp. 4(37-474, vol. ii, pp. 401-404,* 15. C o c k e r e 1 1 , 
T. D. A. Xotes on American bees,* 9. D y a r , H. G. Larva 
of Xyelidse, 4. F e r t o u . C. Remarks on the habits of some 
species et' Prosopfs Fabr., 86 b. F ox, W . J . The Xorth Amer- 
ican Mutillidae,* Proceedings, Academy of Xitural Sciences of Phil- 
adelphia, 1899, April 17; Synopsis of the Uuited States species of the 
Hymen )pteraus genus C-'ittrit Fabr.. with des, -notion of a new 
species from Trini.lid,* Id- H u n t e r , S. J. See Economic 
Entomology. K i a e r. H. R3view of the Phytophagous Hy- 
menoptera of Arctic Xorway, 1 pi-. Tromso Museums Aarhet'te* 
xix, '93. K i e f f e r , J . J . Cvnipidre, pp. 289-36S, pis. xiii-xv, 
of Vol. VII, Species des HymJnopfcSres d'Europeet d'Algvrie fond e 
p-ir Klmjiid Anlr' ei continuS sous Ernest Andre, 65e Fa-i-icule 
P. iris. Vve Du'josclard, J in. 1, 1)9. K o n o w . F . W- On some 
new Chilastog'a.str.i,* 38 M a r s h a 1 1 . T. A . A monograph of 
British Bnconidie, pirt viii, 1 pi.. Transact ions. Entomological 
Society of London, 'i9, pt i. M o r i c e , F . D Pastor Konovr's 
proposils as to the classification of Hymenoptcr.i. Kntomologi-t-' 
Monthly Magazine. London, May. 'li!. \V a s m a n n , E . Sup- 
plement to " TJasius fuliginoms as predatory ant,'' 22. April 17; 
The psychical activities of ants, 3 pis., Zoologica, heft 2-;, XI B.I, 
1, Stuttgart, '99. 

THK ODOXATA OF Oim>. BY' DAVIDS. KI.I.I.U on. PH. D. Ohio 
State University. Contributions from the I >.[) irtmeut of Zoology 
and Entomology. Xo. 1. [Riprinteil from th> S|>e.-ial Paper- of 
the Ohio Academy of Sciences. X.). 2.] Columbus, Ohio. Pub- 
lished bv the State University, March. is!>:t. Svo. pj). viii, 11(J- 



188 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

Portrait of the author. Three plates, containing 39 outline figures 
of parts of species of Eiiallagma, Lestes, Diplax and Gomphus. 

This posthumous work of Prof. Kellicott is introduced by a pref- 
atory note from his successor, Prof. Herbert Osborn, stating that it 
has been prepared from the origin il manuscript left by its author. 
Of this the lirst 01 pages are unchanged. The remainder has been 
completed, in accordance with Professor Kellicott's plan of treat- 
ment, by his associate, Mr. J. S. Hiue, who also contributes a bio- 
graphical notice and a bibliography of his deceased colleague. 
Practically, therefore, the present essay is due to Messrs. Kellicott 
and Hine The figures have bsen drawn by Mr. W. E. Kellicott. 

We have previously expressed, in this journal, our high apprecia- 
tion of Prof. K3llicott's work on the dragouflies of Ohio. We are, 
therefore, much indebted to Mr. Hiue to? placing before us the 
present more extended results of that study. 

The subject matter proper begins with a brief introduction, in 
which the student is referred to other authors for a knowledge of 
the structure and metamorphoses of these insects. The 100 species 
found in Ohio are then described, with frequent keys to assist in 
their identification- Notes are frequently added upon the habits of 
flight and of ovipositiou. We incline to think that the localities in 
which the rarer species have been found have not always been suffi- 
ciently indicated. In the hurried perusal with which we have been 
obliged to content ourselves, it seems to us that the key to the 
species of Lestes (p. 15) is not very helpful ; that some names, such 
as fonscofombia and Diplax, have been continued which must be 
given up; and that an error has been made in the key to the genera 
of Libellulinre (p. 92) in using the character " sectors of the arculus 
pedicillate" for Dipl(M\_=jSympetru.m] and Leucorhinia, for the 
reason that a very considerable amount of variation exists in this 
regard. 

Very little change has been made in arrangement and classifica- 
tion. A considerable number of mistakes have been made by our- 
selves and others in treating of various species of the North 
American Odonata, and some of these errors appear in the present 
work. As the corrections have not yet been published, however, 
neither Prof. Kellicott nor Mr. Hine are responsible for the errors 
of their predecessors; but students will do well to be on their guard 
in identifying forms allied to EnnUfnima pollntinn, (r<>inj>/t>ix 
lie id us, fraternity and externus. 

In closing, we call attention to a remark in the Introduction, 
which is very cheering to the odonatologisl. Treating of the ques- 
tion of the decrease or increase in the number of species, we read : 
" It is the opinion of the writer that some few forms once resident 
are no longer within our limits, but that others have taken up their 
homes here at the same time: in fact, it appears probable that the 
number has increased, rather than diminished, up to the present 
time." PHILIP P. CALVERT. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 189 

DOINGS OF SOCIETIES. 

Regular meeting 1 of the Newark Entomological Society was held 
Sunday, April 9th, at Town Hall, President Bischott' presidium and 
fourteen members present. 

The family X<>t<i<l<>nti<liK was exhibited and was fairly well rep - 
resented by most of the members, Mr. Kenrfott's exhibit included 
an interesting series of blown larva and pupa- 
Mr. Weidt exhibited a series of Fevalici Jocosn among which 
were two specimens, the primaries of which were yellow instead of 
green, and read the following article : 

"On Sunday, April 2d, I took a trip to Forrest Hill near New- 
ark, N. J., with my friend, Mr. Broadwell. to collect one of the 
earliest noctuids of the season, Fevalfa jocosa . The weather \vus 
cold and before we reached our destination snow began to fall and a 
strong north wind was blowing which gave us small hopes of find- 
ing the insect, but after a search of two hours we had taken six 
specimens. The moth is taken on the bark of hemlock trees and all 
I have ever taken had just emerged, which made it an easy matter 
to capture them. It is necessary for the collector to carry a small 
box to put the specimens until thevare fully developed before put- 
ting them in the poison bottle. I took a specimen March 8th, last 
year (an early spring) and took one as late as April 19th this year. 

I have never seen the insect flying nor taken one at light. Prof. 
Smith remarked the tongue being very small, the moth is no 
feeder and does not fly much. He added that the insects mate early; 
usually in twenty-four hours and disappear soon after. Mr. An- 
gleman mentioned that he had taken specimens with the primaries 
half yellow and half green. Mr. Kemp stated that a half day's col- 
lecting of Coleoptera by him, in the vicinity of Elizabeth. N. J. , 
on March 30th, resulted in the cipture of over 1,503 specimens, 
among which lie recognized over l.~>0 species Of these species there 
were about 9 ) Carabids, 4i) Staphylinidos, 8 ( 'hrysomelide, 17 weevil s 
nnd the rest scattered throughout the order. They were mostly 
collected among dead leaves and debris, on the ground, under 
bushes." A. J. WEIDT, Sec. 

At the April meeting of the Feldimn Collecting Social, hold ;it 
the residence of Mr. II. "W. \Venzel. 1523 South Thirteenth street,. 
eleven members and one visitor were present. 

Mr. Wenzel stated that in the oldedition of the Catalogue of 
New Jersey insects there were but nine specif- of Xi-i/ilnnit'iiiilu 
listed, whereas the number will be iucreised to seventeen in the 
forthcoming edition as far as his own collecting is concerned. He 
had taken the following species of that family in New Jersey 
from January 2Sth to April liith: Brachycepsis subpunctatus, 

i ft /HTfuruhm, Srt/iiilHt'iliiX ffitrifiirsitx. X /'.v.v/r/r/-, ,S. l,i>- 

A' analis, &. brevicorm's, S. clnri/n j s, 

A'. /Wr//.v. < 'i'/>In'iifi/ IDII ci>r/,n rs ///,,. 



190 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

Mr. Laurent reported the abundance of pupi of Ceratomia ca- 
talpa at Moores, Delaware county. Pa. The pupa and many dead 
caterpillars liy justunder the sod at the base of trees. The irregu- 
lar appearance in abundance of the species was discussed by Messrs. 
Laurent, Skinner and Wenzel. 

Dr. Skinner referred to a recently received letter, the writer 
dwelling on the probable large number of sp3vues new to science 
which existed in the private collections of miny persons who were 
averse to sending them to specialists for study for fear that the spe- 
cialists would desire to retain the specimen in payment for the 
trouble in identifying. The speaker held that specialists have the 
right to retain desirable specimens in such cases, and spoke of the 
ingratitude existing as a rule with those who expect to have sci- 
entific workers devote their time and experience in naming their 
specimens without recompense. 

Discussed by Messrs. H. Weuzal and Bland, who concurred with 
Dr. Skinner. 

Mr. H. Weuzel recorded the capture of Erchomus lasvus in 
abundance at Anglesea, N. J., during the winter. 

WILLIAM J. Fox, Secretary. 



OBITUARY. 

We announce with sorrow and regret the death of Edward Win- 
slow Cross on April 23d, who resided in Manchester, N. H., and was 
bom in that city July 21, 1875. He was an ardent student of ento- 
mology and a contributor to the pages ot this journal. The Geome- 
tridse claimed his especial attention, and he had a fine collection in 
the family. He was the youngest sou of Judge David Cross, and a 
student at Harvard College Law School, and was graduited from 
Amherst College, class '97. 



The February NEWS was mailed February 3d. 
The March NEWS was mailed March 4th. 
The April NEWS was mailed March 27th. 
The Mav NEWS was mailed Mav :;d. 



ENT. NEWS, Vol 10 



PI. VI 









7 





10 







/3 



CYCHRUS, etc., (Liebeck) 



ENTOMOLOGICflL NEWS 

AND 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICflL SECTION 

A( AKK.MV OF NATURAL SCIENCES, PHILADELPHIA. 

VOL. X. SEPTEMBEB. 18!l. No. 7 

CONTENTS : 



Liebeck Cychrus Guyoti vs. C. An- Hine Sciara In onstans Reared 
clrewsii var.. ..!!! fronl Carnations I'd I 



A sb mead The Largest Oak-Gall in 

the World and its Parasites 193 

Wi ckham Recollections of Old-Col- 



Dyar Life History of Notodonta 



Georgica - H. S. 202 

Editorial .2iVi 

Kconomic Entomology '-N~ 

lecting Grounds !!> Notes an ,, NVws 20H 

Williamson Calopteryx August!- Entomological Literature 'JN 

pennisSelysin Western Pennsyl- l">innsof Societies 219 

\aiiia W> Exchanges i, ii 

CYCHRUS GUYOTI vs, C, ANDREWSII YAR. 

BY CHAKI.KS LIEBECK, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(See Plate VI.) 

In the recent paper on d/dintx by G. E. Ehrmann, atten- 
tion was called to a paragraph pertaining to certain specimens 
of C. dni/oti (No. 9 of plate), in the possession of Prof. Je- 
rome Schmitt, of St. Vincent's College, Pa. Some confusion 
regarding the identity of this species exists in many collec- 
tions, and the following notes are submitted with a view to 
preventing future errors. 

C. (riii/oti was described by Dr. Lecoute, Proc. Phila. Acad. 
Nat. Sciences in l,s(i(), p. : }(>:}, from a unique female collected 
in the Black Mountains of North Carolina. Later Dr. Horn, 
in his paper on ( 1 i/<-/inix ot N. A. Trans. Am. Knt. Sue.. 1S7S, 
Vol. 7.]). I 7.'M 7 I. submitted the characters of male tarsi, sep- 
arating these species as follows : 

A nterior tarsus of male with a slight papillose space at 
tip of first joint. (iinjnti. 

Anterior tarsus ot' maledensel\. spongy pubescent be 
neath, first joint clothed over nearly the entire surface. 

Andrewsii. 



192 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

When males are not present the position of the strial punc- 
tures of the elytron will readily separate the species. 
Punctures of striae regular and well centered. 

Andrewsii. 

Punctures of striae confused and encroaching on the 
intervals. Guyoti. 

This character pertains to the basal three- fourths of the 
elytra, as the striae and punctuation become confused at the 
apex in both species. 

But three authentic specimens of C. Guy at i have been ex- 
amined, and possibly forty of C. Andrewsii, all forms, and no 
deviation from the above rule occurs. 

There is a tendency in many specimens of C. Andrewsii to 
a broadly augulated form of thorax as is shown by the accom- 
panying plate, the series showing gradual development from 
No. 4 to 9 in regular order. 

A series of C. Riding-m, Nos. 10, 11 and 12, is also utilized 
to show the same character. 

Without types or authentic specimens at hand, and only 
females present, the student can very easily go astray, as can 
be seen by a glance at No. 9, a supposed Guyoti, or No. 5, a 
small Andrewsii, whi(Ji could very readily be confused with 
Ridingsii. The figures of plate show the comparative size of 
the various species, and it will be seen that Giiyoti is much 
larger than Andrewm, being quite as large as the larger form 
of C. viduus. 

Specimens of the several species from Pennsylvania have 
the thorax longer and narrower than those of North Carolina 
and Tennessee. 

I am indebted to Dr. Henry Skinner for the excellent pho- 
tograph of the specimens and to Mr. Roland Hayward for 
careful comparisons with the Leconte specimens in the Cam- 
bridge Museum. 

EXPLANATION OF PLATE. 

1. C Guyoti Lee. male (Horn Coll.). 

2. C Guyoti Lee female (Wenzel Coll.). 

3. C. viduus De.j . 

4. C. Andrewsii Harr. Pa. 

5. C. Andrewsii Harr. Va. 

6. C Andrewsii Harr. N C. 

7. C. Andrewsii Harr. N. C. 

8. C, Andrewsii Harr Sawyer's Springs, Tenn. 
q C. Andrewsii Harr. N. C. 

10. C. Ridingsii Bland, type female. Va. 

11. ('. Ridingsii Bland, Pa. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 193 

l-J. C. Ridinssii Bland, Tenn. 

13. < 'reniHstorhilus leuro^tirtiis Burin, male. 

14. Crernastocbilus leucost ictus Burin, female. 

O 

THE, LARGEST OAK-GALL IN THL WORLD AND ITS PAR- 

ASITES. 

BY WILLIAM H. ASH MEAD. 

Some two or more years ago, February 20, 1897, the Na- 
tional Museum received from Dr. A. Duges, of Guauajaro, 
Mexico, the largest oak-gall it has ever beeu my pleasure to 
see, and which is undoubtedly the largest Cyuipid gall yet 
discovered. Subsequently additional specimens of the same 
species, but much smaller and exceedingly variable in shape 
and size, were also received from Dr. Duges. 

The first and largest specimen received, and which is un- 
questionably the largest oak-gall in the world, is of an irregu- 
lar oblong, globular shape, and measures fully 4J inches long 
by 3 inches in diameter. Externally it is opague, more or 
less roughened, and of a greyish color or somewhat similar in 
color to the bark of our common white oak ; white internally it 
is brown and of a dense, hard, pithy substance. It is polytha- 
lamous ; the larvae cells being numerous and deeply imbedded, 
in the interior of the gall, as in those of similar structure. 

The other specimens, afterwards received from Dr. Duges. 
are, as stated before, much smaller, more irregular in shape, 
and dwindle down in size to specimens not exceeding an inch 
in diameter. All of them, as we are reliably informed by Dr. 
Duges, were obtained from the roots of an unknown Mexican 
oak tree. 

At the time of the receipt of the largest of these galls, I re- 
ported the gall was the product of an undescribed Cynipid, 
which would probably prove to belong to the genus Andri- 
cus. 

The rearing of three of the gall-flies by Dr. Duges con- 
firms my opinion in reference to the generic position of the 
gall -makers of this gigantic gall, but the gallitself is evidently 
similar to one described as (\i/ni)>N Clutinjtiotii by Mr. Peter 
Cameron, in Biologia Central!- Americana, Hymoptera, vol. 1, 
p. 70, the maker of which was unknown. 

Dr. Duges also bred from this gall two distinct parasites: 
;t Miquiline, Si/n rr/iix sp., and a Toryiuid, Tori/nntx sp.; also M 



194 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

beautiful uudeseribed rkynchopkorus beetle. Tke last tke 
late Mr. Martin Liuell kad intended to describe under tke 
name of - 

I believe with Dr. Culvert, tkat a name given to a gall 
alone, witkout a knowledge of tke gall-uiaker, will kold in 
most cases, but suck descriptions skould be discouraged, since 
tke identification of galls, witkout tkeir makers, is always at- 
tended with uncertainty ever afterwards. 

It is so in this case, but tke name given by Mr. Cameron 
must be retained, and I give below, for tke first time, tke 
description of its maker, and its parasites. 

Andrieus championi Cameron 

Cyuips ckampioui Cam. Biol. Ceutr. Am. Hyiu I, p. 70. 
(Gall). 

Gall-fly. ? Length 4.5 mm. Black, tke abdomen and an- 
terior and middle femora rufous. Head and tkorax rugoso- 
punctate, clothed with a sparse, glittering pubescence ; abdo- 
men smooth, polished, im punctate, tke sides of segments 1-7 
witk sparse glittering hairs, antenna? 14 jointed, long, fili- 
form, black, the third joint tke longest, more tkan six times as 
long as (kick, tke following joints to the 13th, gradually short- 
ening, the 13th joint being scarcely one-third the length of 
the third joint, the last joint almost as long as 12-13 united. 
Clypeus rounded at apex. Mandible strong, trideutate, pice- 
ous black, tke inner tootk minute, tke middle and outr tootk 
large, subequal. Mesotkorax witk tke parapsidal furrows 
distinct and posteriorly becoming obliterated just before at- 
taining tke base of tke scutellum ; a median furrow only 
slightly or vaguely defined on tke middle of tke disk; ante- 
riorly close to tke margin are two short,glabrous lines ; while 
tke scapulae have a long glabrous line ; scutellum rounded, 
rugose, the fovea? at base with raised lines; metatkorax short, 
witk too median carimi'. Wings kyaline, tke veins piceous- 
black, tke vein at base of tke open marginal being short and 
strongly augulated. Abdomen ovate, as long as tke kead and 
tkorax united, polisked impunctate except some sparse punc- 
tures on tkesides of tke seventh segment ; sheaths of ovipositor 
black, not at all prominent. 

Hab Guauaj uato, Mexi< -o . 

Type, No. 4304 U. S. X. M. 



1S99] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 195 

Described from 3 ? specimens, received from Dr. A.Duges. 

Synergus Dugesi, n. sp. 

-Length 3mm. Black, head, except the vertex, eyes, 
and occiput, the antenna?, the prouotum, except anteriorly, 
the trochanters, the knees, the tips of anterior and middle tib- 
iae and beneath, and their tarsi, brownish-yellow. Head ru- 
go>o-puiictate, the face and cheeks with strong 1 converging- 
stria 1 . Mandibles ferruginous, black at tips. Antennas 13-jointed 
the third joint very nearly as long as 4-5 united. Mesoiio- 
1um rather coarsely, transversely rngalose, the parapsidal fur- 
rows very nearly obliterated by the coarseness of the sculpture. 
Mesopleura longitudinally striated. Metanotum short ob- 
li(|iie, with two, rather widely separated, median cariua' and 
a distinct lateral cariua, the angles prominent, pubescent, 
with prominent spiracles. Wings hyaline, the teguhe pice- 
ous, the veins, except the subcostal and the median veins to- 
wards base which are pale yellowish piceous black. Abdo- 
men ovate, about one-third longer than the head and thorax 
united, highly polished, black, the second segment, except 
the very short petiole, occupying the whole surface, the ter- 
minal segments being retracted. 

-Length 2-6 mm. Agrees well with the ?, except the 
sides of the pronotum, the mesopleura, but not the mesopectus 
and the legs, except a dusty shade on the hind tibia> and 
tarsi, are wholly brownish yellow ; the parapsidal furrows are 
distinct, the tegnl;e brownish-yellow, while the antenna- are 
15- jointed, the third joint being somewhat thickened, slightly 
curved and fully as long a> joints 4-5 united, the following 
joints sube<|ual. 

Type, No. 4:505 U.S. X. M. 

Described from 1 ' and '2 specimens, bred by Dr. A. 
Duges from Andricus i ( '\ nipv) ( 'hampioni Cam. 
Torymus Mexicanus. n. sp. 

V. Length 4 mm.; ovipositor '>.5 mm. Head and thorax 
metallic green, the hind margin of the mesopleura violaceous 
followed by a bright cupreous band ; abdomen broii/.ed-black : 
tlagellum black ; scape, teguhe and tarsi brownish-yellow : 
co\;e metallic green; anterior femora towards lase and the 
hind femora except tips, metallic brown, the rest of the legs 
rufous wings hyaline, the veins, except the subcostal at base, 



196 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

dark brown. Head shagreened and punctate, the face clothed 
with a white pubescence ; mandibles ferruginous, the teeth 
black. Thorax sparsely pubescent, transversely shagreeued 
and punctured, the punctures more distinct and coarser along 
the hind margin of the pronotum, on the parapsides along 
the furrow of same, and on the scutellum. Mesopleura except 
the hind margin sculptured, the hind margin smooth, impunc- 
tate. Hind coxa? large, reticulately sculptured. Abdomen 
finely or microscopically reticulated, the dorsal flap bluish. 

cf. Length 3. 2 mm. Agrees well with the 9 in color and in 
the structure of the head and thorax, but the tegulae and the 
femora are bluish-green, the tibia? dark brown, the tarsi, except 
the terminal joint, whitish, while the abdomen is bluish-green 
scarcely as long as the thorax, with the dorsal flap bright green. 

Type, Kb. 4306 U. S. K. M. 

Described from ] ? bred from the small gall. 

o 

RECOLLECTIONS OF OLD COLLECTING GROUNDS. 

BY H. F. WICKHAM, Iowa City, Iowa. 
IX. The Alpine Districts about Leadi-We. 

Leaving Buena Vista, the railroad follows the Arkansas 
Valley very closely in the long climb to Leadville. As the 
mountain summits draw nearer and nearer the waters of the 
turbulent stream become ever less muddy and by the time the 
great mining camp is reached the dwindled Arkansas is trans- 
formed into a clear brook, flowing over a pebbly bed or glid- 
ing more slowly on a torturous course through broad marshy 
meadows. The altitude has now exceeded ten thousand feet 
and the fauna and flora are essentially modified in conse- 
quence. 

We arrived at the station late in the afternoon of July 7th, 
during a heavy rain. Every afternoon of our eight day so- 
journ was marred by a like precipitation of moisture and this 
detracted materially from the pleasure of the trip as well as 
interfering with collecting. These showers are very cold and 
quickly result in benumbed hands which are slow to grasp the 
ground-inhabiting insects, and the saturated dripping foliage 
precludes successful use of the sweep-net or umbrella. The 
little butterflies (apparently some species of Li/cwna) fold 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 197 

their wings and hang quite still upon the shrubs while a cold 
storm cloud is passing over, only to awake to active flight al- 
most the instant that the sun comes out again. 

The dirty, smoky city covers a great deal of ground and it 
is something of a walk from the " up town " hotels into the 
wooded hills which rise on every hand. The large timber, if 
there ever was much of it, is now mostly gone and the re- 
maining trees are chiefly so dwarfed or undersized as to be of 
no use for commercial purposes. To this they owe their ex- 
istence and as they still support some insects let us hope that 
they may long remain undisturbed. Many of the large ra- 
vines and gulches have been ruined entomologically by exten- 
sive mining operations but a few spots were- found which 
yielded tolerably well. The stony porous soil of most of the 
hillsides holds but very little water and supports a fauna, 
which is in strong contrast to that of the marshy valley region. 

\Ve saw no living C'u'in<1<'li<l<r. duringour stay, but some dead 
C. ciiirtijK'nnis served to show that the species extends up the 
valley from Buena Vista, where it was seen rather abun- 
dantly. On the higher slopes of Moose Mountain, which lies 
near enough to Leadville to make the summit, though far 
above timber line, tolerably easy of access on foot, we took 
('(iraliitx fdddti/s, of the form which I have always considered 
as representing <>rr</ti<'itxiN and have distributed as such. It 
was scarcely common, but we managed to get several under 
stones and logs in the valley of a little stream which heads on 
the mountain. The banks of this stream were lined with 
stones under which we found a few .\<'/>ri<t <>hli<[u and .V ///- 
t'dfiii, I'dfrobiix (ifcrrinius and some Staphyliuida-. while I!>'in/>!- 
</i/iin iiiccftii in, 11. t/ni/til and Tree/in* clitili/ln-un were secured 
with them but in more abundance. All of these bank loving 
('aral)idu' were found in the wettest, coldest spots. oft en in the 
spra\ from a small cataract and their capture was attended 
with a good deal of bodily discomfort, owing to the rains and 
the very low temperature of the water in these mountain 
si reams which are mainly fed from snow fields lying higher 
up. 

Following the ravine we finally emerged from the timber 
and found ourselves on the bald, rocky head of the mountain, 
where no trees grow, for after leaving the fringe of gnarled, 



j<)S ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

wind-twisted stunted evergreens that mark the timber line, 
the rest of the vegetation consists only of low herbs which be- 
come of less and less height as we ascend until at last we find 
the flowers blooming almost on the level of the ground from 
which they emerge a scanty circlet of leaves, crowned by a 
stalkless blossom and the spaces between the boulders are 
clothed with a flower-studded carpet of vegetation which has 
the general effect of moss, though really very different. Between 
timber line and the summit we secured Pterostichux zuryenx, 
Amara hyperbot'ea, Cymindix crihriro/Jix, Ct/tihtx tririttatits, Ap- 
hodius aleutus, A. /t/uto/itfrux, A. ritfatttx and fragments of the 
before mentioned ('arabnx and of Entomoscelix <i<l<iidis. 

The lower hills near town were worked for Carabidse by 
careful search under stones. As a result we got Notiophihtx xi- 
birirus, Pleroxtichus protractus, Pt. luczotii, innumerable Amaru:, 
CalathiiK hit/ratus, Cymindis unicolor, C. cribricollis, Harpalux in- 
noduus and H. montanus. Incidentally we secured some beetles 
of other families in the same situations, Cytifux tririttahix. 
Cryptohypnus \abbreviatus } \C. nocturnus, C. tumescenx, Gruplwp* 
crinH, Adimonia externa and a species of Macrops. Foliage 
of the dwarf evergreens on these hills was beaten over an um- 
brella with results as follows : Scymnus utilis, one specimen, 
Athens simplex, rather scarce, Podubni* hit fr alia more abun- 
dant, Dasytes hmlsonim, a few,Callidium liirt<'/luni,-<i couple, and 
PtK'lit/hi^tchyfi xitbvittatuft, several. On poplars we found a Di- 
cerca (tcHcbt'OHH ?) and numerous Zeuyophora ahum-mix, the lat- 
ter eating irregular holes in the leaves. Some dead tops of 
coniferse yielded several Mti;/d!ix, Plagithmysus iiuiricatnlnx 
in plenty^ and a specimen of Sniping it x rirrxcciix. Flower 
working and miscellaneous sweeping showed up (besides some 
commoner things) Coscinopteravittigera, Trichodes ontatiix, Epi - 
canta pruinosa and Entomoscelis adnnidix. Rhynchites hicolor was 
not uncommon on wild roses. A few pieces of wood and the 
rubbish accumulated by a former rush of water through a 
deep ravine, furnished shelter for Pcrifa.i'ia ntf/ico/lixnud <x'/*'- 
phanocleonus cristatus. The insects of the marshes are mostly 
Staphyliuidse, not yet worked out ; however I can name a iV\\ 
beetles from these spots, as follows : 'Elaphrus dairvittei, rare, 
Tacltittux anymtatuxj Mycetoporus sj)., and an firycux which 
seems to be morio. 



]899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 199 

Here, as at Buena Vista, we found it well worth while to 
search piles of logs ami of sawed lumber in the railroad yards 
and about mills. We got in this way a very good lot of spe- 
cies as the accompanying list will show: Melanophila loHf/ijtcN, 
M. dniinntoudi, Chryxobothrix caurhta, Jhiprrxtix l<otf/ii, />'. tnl 
jecta, Clerux nif/riw'ntrifi, C. xphct/ritx, Thniuishnux nndul<itiin. 
Axeiinan mwfam, Criocephalm agrextix, C. prodm-fiix, Pfn/tmito 
den <liini<li<ifitx, Pachyta lifurata (light and dark forms), Acmwopx 
protcitx. A . prutenxix, Leptura ()-mafnlata, L. sanguined, Mono- 
h(()H,Htu-x xcutellatux and Paffonocherus i>il.iinx. Altogether we 
considered our visit to this vicinity as being a successful one, 
although the neighborhood is probably by no means as rich 
as in former days before the development of its mineral re- 
sources so ruined the beauty which must have marked it pre- 
vious to the ad vent of the railroad and the smelter. 





CALOrTERYX ANGUSTIPENNIS 5ELYS IN WESTERN 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

BY E. B. WILLIAMSON, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Oil June 18th of this year Mr. 1). A. Atkinson, ,T. L. <raf ; 
H. I). Merrick and myself visited Ohio Pyle Falls, where in 
the course of a few hours we succeeded in taking about 40 
specimens of the species named above. Males predominated. 
Ohio Pyle is situated on the Youghiogheny Elver. This river 
rises in (Jarrett and Preston counties, West Virginia ; flows 
north into Pennsylvania, thence flowing north by northeast 
and emptying into the Mouougahela at McKeesport, about 15 
miles from the Ohio River. The Youghiogheuy in its euti it- 
course is about 100 miles long. Ohio I'yle is in Fayette 
county, in the Laurel Ridge of the Allegheny mountains, at 
altitude of about ii,0i)0 feet. It is about T2 miles north of tin- 
State line, in latitude .'W and .10' north and longitude 79 and 
.'5U 1 west. At Ohio I'yle the Youghiogheny has an averagr width 
of about ."io yards. Hills, several hundred feet in height, 
covered with drriduous trees, rise abruptly from the banks of 



*Thi brief paper is remarkable in that it liives an account of what is pi-ohal.l\ 
the most remarkable case of re-discovery of a rare species ever made annum I he 
North American Odonata. No other male of angusiit>f>mis lias been known to 
exist than t hat in the Hritish Museum, sent l>y Ahhot from Georgia S century 
ano. Three females have been previously known See llauen, Psyche, v, p. 211. 
P. P. CAI.VKKT. 



200 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[Sept 



the river. The bed of the stream is filled with large sand- 
stone and conglomerate boulders, past which the current 
rushes with great velocity. 

The Calopteryx in its flight and habits much resembles 
Hetaerina americana, flitting over the rapids, resting on the 
boulders and on the few bushes and grasses margining the 
stream. They are swifter in flight and more difficult to take 
than Galopteryx maculata. Only adults were seen. One pair 
was taken in copulation. 

Compared with Hagen's description, published in Psyche in 
1889, the following may be noted : 

Hind wing, d\ 36 ; 9, 38. Width at nodus of hind wing, 
c? and 9,8. Ante-cubitals, front wings, cT and 9, about 28 ; 
ante-cubitals of hind wings, c?, about 22 ; 9, about 25. Ab- 
domen, c?, 46 ; 9, 43. 

d\ Second joint of antennae, labruiu and a small inferior 
median spot on rhinarium greenish white ; labrum with a 
round black spot just below the white spot on rhiuarium ; la- 
bimn black, outer lobe narrowly margined with greenish 
white ; upper part of head, especially about the ocelli, with 
brassy reflections ; eyes brown, thorax and abdomen bright 
green ; sutures of thorax black ; pectus pruiuose with a trans- 
verse green band before the base of 1. Wings with the re- 
ticulation largely green, most noticeable when seen from the 
front ; subcostal apparently black ; median vein and princi- 
pal sector closely joined for the distance of four or five aiite- 
cubitals ; principal sector apparently arising from the sub- 
nodal. Abdomen darker anteriorly with bluish reflections, 
tending to brassy posteriorly, greenish black underneath ; 
sternum of 1 chalky white ; base of sterna of 3 to 8, with two blu- 
ish spots ; appendages dark greenish brown, as competed with 
C. viryo and C. maculata relatively longer, possibly with more 
teeth on the exterior dorsal edge of the superiors. 

Since the above was written I have had the privilege of ex- 
amining a male and female of this species collected by Mr. E. 
C. Osburn and Mr. J. B. Parker, on June 10th, in cent nil Ohio, 
eight days before the species was taken at Ohio Pyle. The 
specimens were taken along Pine Creek, a tributary of Clear 
Fork, which in turn empties into the Mohican. They offer 
no differences from the western Pennsylvania specimens. 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



L'Ol 



ISCIARA INCONSTANS-REARED FROM CARNATIONS. 

BY JAMES S. HINE. 








In his second report Fitch described ;is 
an insect which he found common in December on the win- 
dows of his room. He states that in all probability they 
emerged from earth in some flower-pots. 

In January of the present year the complaint came' in that 



202 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

carnations in the greenhouse were dying from some unknown 
cause. I investigated the matter and found no cause except 
numbers of minute white larvae which were boring inside of all 
the stems that showed serious injury. 

From these larvae I reared several adults which were easily 
traced to the genus Seiara, but not being sure of the species I 
sentspecimens to the Department of Agriculture at Washington 
where they were labeled inconstant. From what I knew of the 
habits of the larvae of the Mycetophylidae I supposed at first 
that the plants were killed in some other way and then were 
attacked by these insects, but by farther observation I was 
convinced that they fed upon the growing plants. 

In the accompanying drawing, figure 1 represents the adult 
female, figure 2 the adult male, figure 3 the ventral view of 
pupa, figure 4 side view of pupa, figure 5 the la i va and fig- 
ure 6 the last abdominal segment of the male. 

o 



LIFE HISTORY OF NOTODONTA GEORGICA-H S 

BY HARBISON (I. DYAK. 

This larva is here described for the first time. Dr. Pack- 
ard's description (Mon. Notodout., p. 154) of georgica larva 
was taken from some specimens in the National Museum which 
appear to have neverjbeen bred. What reason led to theij 
identification as georgica is unknown to me, but they are in 
reality evidently larvae of Heterocampa obliqua. 

It will be remembered that Abbott and Smith figure N. 
georgica and N. anguloxa as sexes of one species. My breeding 
explains this matter, since the larvae of these species have the 
same food plant and habits and moreover resemble each other 
almost to identity. The main difference is the colored tuber- 
cle on the eighth abdominal segment of georgica. Apparently 
Abbot, overlooking this slight difference, figured the two spe- 
cies as sexes of one, since he probably bred them from what 
he considered the same larva. 

Egg. I have not found these in nature. Eggs from the ab- 
domen of the female moth are apparently hemispherical, white, 
coarsely granular rather than reticular and about 1 mm. in 
diameter. 



189i>] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 203 

Stage /. Head rounded, brown, a black shade over the ver- 
tex and behind ; width .55 mm. Body slender, smooth and 
vshining, sordid snioky greenish ; a diffuse dark dorsal shade; 
a reddish baud subventrally, joined to large blackish spots on 
joints 5, 6, 11, 12 subventrally with smaller spots on joints 3 
and 4. Feet all black. Joint 12 a little enlarged ; seta 1 short, 
pale ; tubercles minute, black, normal, primary ; cervical 
shield small, quadrate, dusky. 

stage II. Head rounded, bilobed, sordid green, a black 
line at the junction with neck and a blackish shade from the 
jaw to base of antenna ; width 1 mm. Body opaque greenish 
white, dorsal vessel dark; a narrow white lateral line and 
yellow substigmatal one ; subventral region olive brown the 
whole length. Thoracic feet, tubercles and leg plates black ; 
anal plate dusky ; cervical shield not distinct ; joint 12 a lit- 
tle enlarged, its tubercles i large, contiguous, not elevated. 

Stage III. Head green, a faint yellow line on each side be- 
hind the ocelli ; width 1.4 to 1.8 mm. Body much as before, 
the tubercles and leg plates green ; tubercles i of joint 12 
large, at first concolorous, later yellowish. 

stage IV. Head higher than joint 2, flattened before, cly- 
peus small, median suture a deep groove ; deep green, finely 
mottled with white, a yellow line from antenna over lower 
ocellus to back of head ; width 2.1} to 3 mm. Body slender, 
joint 13 tapering, its feet weak. Skin smooth except tuber 
cle> i of joint 12 which are high contiguous yellow tubercles 
with a seta at the apex of each, (ireen, the back heavily 
shaded with white, a broad dorsal baud, streaked on the an 
nulets (which are (', divided by a greenish central line: a 
narr.iw subdorsal and lateral line, faintly white. The white 
shading extends between all these to a yellow stigmatal line 
with a black dasli below it on joints 3 to <>, 11 and 12. A few 
white dots snbvent rally ; feel green, the thoracic ones with 
three black dots. In another example the stigmatal line was 
narrowly bordered above witli black, below with red. 

Mage I'. Head high. wide, rounded, green. thickl\ white 
mottled; jaws and aline to back of head opposite spiracle of 
joint 2 yellow, continuing the yellow stigmatal line of the body 
and like it narrowly red -edged below. Width 3. J) to 5 mm. 
Body slender, setae minute, joint 12 a little enlarged dorsally. 



204 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

with high, contiguous, yellow, orange-tipped tubercles i. 
Marks as before, except that instead of the later lateral white 
line is a row of dots. Dorsum all white shaded, subventral 
region white dotted; stigmatal line narrowly black edged 
above with black dashes present on the legless segments, bu t 
not conspicuously. 

The larva? lives on a perch as .V. uiif/uloNa and X. fernii/i nea 
in the earlier stages. 

Cocoon. A few threads between leaves. 

Pupa. Cylindrical, tapering a little behind, dark mahog- 
any brown; the edges of the segments next to the three move- 
able incisures sharply cut and nearly black. Cases slia- 
greened, segments punctured sparsely on the anterior two- 
thirds. Cremaster two low, divergent cones, each with a 
short, thick, capitate spine at the tip with one or more small 
hooks on the lower aspect. Length 29mm., width 7mm. 

Food plants. Oaks (Qii a rciis rrliitina, (}. niin/ir). The lar- 
vae will feed on the rough leaved oaks, contrary to the habit o f 
JV. angulom. The species is double brooded. 



-o- 



TELEAPOLYPEMUS is nota rare in 5th in the E ist, but tha fi i ding 
of a large number of -their cocoons on apple, prune and willow in 
the vicinity of Los Angeles certainly is of interest, as I c in tiud no 
record of their having been taken here before. 

Mr. O. W. Howard sent me 50 cocoons taken as above noted, and 
lie succeeded in raising about 75 by enclosing the moth with uetting- 
on our common pepper ti-ee, thus establishing a new food plan 
for polyphemus. Early in January three dead cocoons were found 
well up in the Cahueuga Mountains, northwest of the city, ami a 
number in the brush about the mouth of the San Gabri I Canon. -28 
miles away, so the moth is evident! v pretty well established. 

All the Eastern cocoons that I have seen are wrapped in leave* 
with no attempt to fasten the stems to the twigs, and reidily de- 
tach and fall to the ground, but these were closely woven the full 
length of the stem, and including the twigs adjoining thus being 
permanently attached to the tree. The moths begin to emerge May 
30, and continued to cement the rate of three or four a week until 
the past few warm days, when tive appeared on the board this 
morning. KKANK S. DAUGK.TT, 

Pasadena, Cal. 

NOTB. Prol. A. J. Snyder took ail irua^o of pjlyphemus at Salt i,akeCity, July 4th , 
iS.,9. -ED. 



1899] 205 

ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[The Conductors of ENTOMOLOGICAL NKWS solk-it and will tliankfullyrec-eive 
items of news likely to interest its readers from any source. The author's name 
will be given in earn case, for the information of cataloguers and bibliograph- 
ers.] 

To Contributors All contributions will be considered and passed upon at 
our earliest convenience, and, as far as may be, will be published according to 
date of reception. ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS has reached a circulation, both in 
numbers and circumference, as to make it necessary to put "copy" into the 
hands of the printer for each number three weeks before date of issue. This 
should be remembered in sending special or important matter for a certain 
issue. Twenty-five "extras," without change in form, will be given free, when 
they are wanted; and this should be so stated on the MS., along with the num- 
ber desired. The receipt of all papers will be acknowledged. ED. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA., SKITKMBKR, 1899. 

EDITORIAL. 

During the past summer the newspapers of the Atlantic 
coast have been exploiting numerous instances of individuals 
being attacked or ''kissed' by an insect which, in conse- 
quence of its asserted habit of swelling the lips of its human 
victims by its bite or sting, received the fatuous name of 
11 kissing bug." Originating in the neighborhood of Wash- 
ington, 1). C., the report spread from newspaper to newspaper 
and with the lay people became a veritable midsummer mad- 
ness. The United States Department of Agriculture identified 
the insect as Melanolestes jtiri/tfn^ a hemipter of previously 
good character, which fact went a great way in making ento- 
mologists in general sceptical as to the whole story, and we 
arc glad t<> record that the much maligned Melanolestes has 
proven an alibi, as far as the evidence presented at the Acad- 
emy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia goes. Out of the 
many specimens brought to the Academy as the "kissing bug" 
(many of which had been pronounced the true thing by medi 
ral men) -of otic was Mi'lunolcxh'* pirijtrx. To be sure the lat- 
ter has a Latin name which might cast suspicion on any bug. 
and many of his relatives have a bad reputation, but by stick 
ing to his old time habits of dwelling in secluded spots it has 
come out of the fray with a spotless reputation. The next 
time the newspapers wish to make a martyr let them steer sh\ 



200 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

of Melanolestes picipe*, who has proven himself too much for 
their sensationalism. 

The following species have been brought to the Academy of 
Natural Sciences of Philadelphia as the " kissing bug " : 
Diptera. Tabanus sp.; Erax bastardi. 
Hymenoptera. Camponotus pennsylvanicus (queen) ; Thal- 

ass(( lun-ator ; Tremex columbasericeus. 
Lepidoptera. Scepsis fulvicollis. 
Neuroptera. Perla Jiavescens ; Corydalus cormttus. 
Coleoptera. Orthosoma brunnea; Phytonomus punctatus; 
Monohammus titillator ; Alaus ocidatus ; Harpalus caligino- 
sus ; H. pennsylvanicus ; H. sp. ; Tenebrio molitor ; Creop- 
Mliii villow-t: Eaphid'wn sp. Balaninus quercus. 
Hemiptera. Benacus yriwus ; Prionidus cristatus ; Peiifn 

toma xp. 

Many of the foregoing were brought in several times by dif- 
ferent persons. W. J. F. 

o 

INCREASE OR DECREASE OF DRAGON-FLIES? [Our quotation iu 
the June NEWS, page 188, from Prof. Kellicott aud Mr. Mines' 
" Odonata, of Ohio," has produced the following :] 

" Do you think Prof. Kellicott's re marks a bout the increase in the 
number of species for the State of Ohio altogether correct ? Such 
observations are hard to make Butterflies aud other insects, as all 
collectors have observed, 'will have llieir years' A frieud in 
Beaver county during 25 years observation found Junoniacceiiiu 
only one season when it was very common. Dr Holland, during 
20 years, never saw Melitoea phaeton in this country, but a few days 
ago I took about 15 specimens. Last season on July 4 visited an 
old gravel pit neir Blufftou, and there took 21 spp. of Odonata- 
On July 5 I visited the same pond at the same time 
of day ; the weather was as nearly like the preceding day 
as two consecutive mid-summer days can be, aud yet I found only 
about a dozen spp Tramea lacerata and onnxta were numerous on 
the fourth, but were not seen on the fifth. 1 have, as a boy, seen the 
Wabash flowing iike a silver ribbon between its blue grass-clothed 
bauks,its waters teeming with fish aud its ripples alive with Uuion- 
id$e. Last summer I walked along mud flats by as foul smelling 
pools as could be imagined for miles lain sure there isn't a live 
Uuio. I siw black bass come to the surface, gasp and float, belly up, 
down stream. Even old slimy Neciurus crawled out on the laud to 
die, and their bodies lay along the banks of the river by dozens. 
Certainly it is an a priori argument that the Odonata are perishing 
when sunvmnde.1 bv sucn con liti >u< E . B. WILLIAMSON. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 207 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY 

Edited by Prof. JOHN B. SMITH, Sc. D.. New Brunswick, N. J. 



Papers for this department are solicited. They should be sent to the editor, 
Prof. John B. .Smith, Sc. D., New Brunswick, N. J. 



SEVEN NEW LOCALITIES FOR THE MEDITERRANEAN FLOUR MOTH, 
Ephestia ktiehm'ella. - In response to a brief article of mine in The 
American Miller for May, T89f), I have received matted flour con- 
taining larvae and pupae; of the Mediterranean flour moth, Eitln-st in 
kuehniella, from seven ditt'ereut sources, none of which having been 
previously reported, so far as I am aware. One lot is from Stark 
county, Ohio, the first reported from that State, and represents a 
very serious outbreak. The mill is being torn down Another 
package is from Los Angeles county, California. Three lots are 
from New York State representing Erie, Allegeuy and Oswego 
counties. Two are from Canada, one of which conies from York 
district along Lake Ontario, while the other is from Leeds district 
along the St Lawrence River. Each one of my correspondents 
reports the same disastrous results formerly reported by myself and 
others, following the establishment of this insect in a mill lam also 
impressed with the fact that this pest is gradually spreading along 
the water courses of the Great Lakes, and inland along the lines of 
the railroads. It will certainly be to the advantage of all millers 
to be on their gu-ird.and take immediate steps for the suppi'ession 
of the pest should it appear on their premises. I am now making 
some experimental tests with hydrocyanic aciil gas for the des- 
truction of this and other insects in mills and closed buildings. Re- 
sults thus far are very satisfactory, and I believe the gas will come 
into extensive use for such purposes very soon. 

W <; JOHNSON, 
College Park, Md. 

THE NEW PEACH MITE. With regard to the several references to 
" The New IVach Mite," which have appeared in ENTOMOI.OUK M. 
NEWS -in. -c last December, it may be interesting to some of your 
readers to learn that in all probability the same or a very similar 
pest occurs in Western Australia. 

During my stay in that colony (lS!<>-7) I had several opportuni- 
ties of observing a peculiar silvering of the upper surfaces of the 
leave* of some deciduous fruit trees This was due to the attack of 
a very smale Plii/tophix. The injury appeared to me more pro- 
nounced during autumn, coming into evidence after most of the 
peach crop had been marketed. It did not semi to be of a very 
serious nature and was taken into little account by orchardists : and 
though no doubt a great deal of the functions of the affected leave- 



208 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

was lost, still there was no particular evidence in the growth of the 
trees which I have iu mind to show that such was the case, and u n- 
less my memory deceives me the leaves did not fall before their 
time. It often happened, particularly with nectarines, that every 
leaf upon the tree would be affected. 

Judging from Johnson's note alone, I should never have connected 
his pest with the Western Australian mite, as similarly affected 
nursery stock never came under my notice; but that the effect and 
nature of the mites' attack upon young plants in the nursery and 
vigorous growing trees might differ considerably I have little 
doubt. It is from Rolf's remark, however, to the effect that the 
mite causes " what might be termed a silvering ot the leaves " that 
the possibility of the Western Australian pest being the same, oc- 
curred to me. This mite was also well known to my then cjl- 
leagues R. Helms and A.M. Lea, and the latter has a short note 
upon it in the Journal of the W. A. Bureau of Agriculture, (p 
1194, April 17, 1897,) in which he describes the affected leaves as 
having a" glassy or silvery appearance on their upper surfaces." 
and correctly reters to this as due to the destruction of the surface 
cells by the mite, and their subsequent drying out and bleaching. 1 
have only seen the peach, nectarine, almond and apricot so affected . 
but Lea adds the plum, quince and apple. 

As far as I am aware this peach mite only occurs iu the Swan 
River district, W r esteru Australia, as 1 have not seen it iu New 
South Wales nor the neighborhood of Melbourne or Adelaide, nor 
has it been reported so far by others from the remaining colonies of 
Australasia. CLAUDE FULLER, F. E. S. 

Department of Agriculture, 

Capetown, April 24, 1899. 

Notes arid News. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL GLEANINGS FROM ALL QUARTERS OF THE GLOBE- 



THE Entomological Society of Albany has recently been organ- 
ized with an initial membership of about twenty under the follow- 
ing officers: Dr. E. P. Felt, President: Prof. Charles S. G.iger, 
Vice Pi-esident ; Mr. ChaHes S. LVink.s, Recording Secretary ; Miss 
Margaret F. Boyuton, Corresponding Secretary ; Prof. H. M. Pol- 
lock, Treis- Ti)3 h^ajlqu ircsrs oi' Ili3 S:>_;istv \vill be, for the 
present, at the office of Dr. E. P. Felt, the State Entomologist, 
where the regular meeting will be held the second Friday of each 
mouth. The objects of the organization are the promotion of inter- 
est in entomological science and the furtherance of fellowship 
among those interested, for their mutual benefit and enjoyment. 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY has this year conferred the degree of Doc- 
tor of Science upon Justus W. Folsom, of Cambridge, Mass., for a 
thesis entitled, "Studies Upon the Mouth parts of Apterygotu." 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, 209 

You will no doubt have heard of the purchase by the Brooklyn 
Institute of Arts and Sciences of the Xeuomegen collection of lepi- 
d optra, and the donation of my own collection. I have parted with 
everything relating to entomology, books, and all. I still retain 
my interest in the study, and have been appointed to the honorary 
position of curator of entomology to the Institute. 

The Brooklyn Institute has now the best and largest collection of 
North American Lepidoptera in the world. 

* Referred to Prof. A. J. Savd^r to ai I to his list of largest American collection 

Ei>w. L. GKAKF. 



-o- 



ECntomological 



COMPILED BY I'. P. CALVKRT. 



Under the above head it is intended to mention papers received at the Acad- 
emy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia pertaining to the Entomology of the 
Americas i. North and South). Articles irrelevant to American entomology 
will not be noted. Contributions to the anatomy, physiology and embryoloi;> 
of insects, however, whether relating to American or exotic species, will be re- 
corded. The numbers in IIKAVY-FACKD TYPK refer to the journals, as num- 
bered in the following list, in which the papers are published ; * denotes that the 
paper in question contains descriptions of new North American forms. Title-* 
of all articles in foreign languages are translated into English; usually such 
articles are written in the same language as the title of the .journal contain- 
ing them, but \vhen such articles arc in oilier languages than English, French, 
(ierman or Italian, this fact is indicated in brackets. 



I. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadel- 
phia, 1899. 2. Transactions of the American Entomological Soci- 
ety, Philadelphia, '99. 4. The Canadian Entomologist, London, 
Out., '99. 5. Psyche, Cambridge, Mass. .'99. 6 Journal of the New 
York Entomological Society, June. '99. 8. The Entomologist's 
Monthly Magazine, London, '99 9. The Entomologist, London 
'99. 10. Nature, London. '99. II. The Annals and Magazine of 
Natural History. London, '99. 12. Comptes Reudus, F Academic 
des Sciences, Paris, '99. 21. The Entomologist's Record, London, 
'99. 22. Zoologisrhrr Auzeier, Leipsic, '99. 24. Berliner Ento 
niologis;'lie Zeitschrift, xliii, :$, 4. May, '99. 25. Bolletino dei Musei 
di ZAoloii'ia ed An itomia Comparata d. R, Universita di Torino, "9!t. 
-30 Memoires de la Soci'-t<' Zeologique de France. \i. '!>S. 30 b. 
Bulletin of the same, xxfii, '93. 32 llulleiindu Mus&um d'Hidtoire 
Xat urelle, .Paris. 35. Ann lies, Socit'-ti'- Entomologique de Bel- 
gique, xliii, Brussels, '99 36 Transactions, Entomological Society 
of London, '99, pt. ii, .Mine -^2. 37. Le Naturaliste auadien, Chi- 
coutimi, (^uebei-,'99. 40. Societas Kutomologica, /tirich-llottingcn, 
'99 41. Entonioldt' ischc Nachrichten, Berlin, \xv, '99 44 VT- 
handlungen, Zoologisch-botanischen ( JesL-llscliatt in Wien. xlix, 
'99. -49. Termcs/ftrajzi Fiizetek. xxii. -2, Biitla]i.'si. Muy ti. '99. 52. 
Transactions. South African Philosophical S-n-iety, x, :5. Cape 



210 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

Town, '99. 55. Le Naturaliste, Paris, '99. 56. Mittheilungeri 
scb weizerischeu entomologischen Gesellschaft, x, 5, SchafFhausen, 
April, '99. 58. Revista Chilei.a de Historia Natural, iii, 3, 4, Val- 
paraiso, March. April, '99. 68. Science, New York, '99. 79. La 
Nature, Paris, '9981. Bioloarisches Centralblatt. Erlangen, May 
15, '99. 82. Centnlblatt fur Bakteriologie, Jena, '99. 84 lusekten 
Borse. Leipsic, '99 87. Revue Scieutifique, Paris, '99. 102. Pro- 
ceedings. Entomological Society of Washington, iv, 3, May 24, '99. 
III. Seventh Annual Report, Ohio State Academy of Science, Colum- 
bus, '99.- 112 Bulletins, New York State Museum, vi, Albany. '99. 
113, Archives Italiennesde Biologic, xxxi, Turin, '99. 114. Rivista 
diPatologia Vegetale, Florence, '98. 113. Oversigt Kongelige Danske 
Videuskabernes Selskabs Forbandlinger, '98, 6, Copenhagen. 

The General Subject. A n o n. Insects from the higher latitudes 

of North America 21, June 1. A s h m ead, W. H., L i n e 1 1 , 
M . L . , S c h w a r z , E . A . , D y a r , H . G . , C o q u i I - 
lett. D. W., Banks, N.,. Cook. O, F. Reports upon 
the Insects, Spiders, Mites and Myriapods collected by Dr. L Stej- 
neger and Mr. G E. H Barrett-Hamilton on the Commander 
Islands, in: The Fur Seals and Fur-seal Islands of the Northern 
Pacific Ocean by David Starr Jordan. Part 4. Washington: Gov- 
ernm3ul Printing Offi -e, 1893. Rjj'd Juns 13, 'J9. A u r i v i 1 - 
1 i u s, C . On the Linneau types of insects at Upsala, 84, June 15. 
Berlese, A. Phenomena which accompany fecundation in 
some insects, figs.. 114. vi, vii. C u e n o t , L . The means of defense 
of animals, 30 b. Felt, E. P. Collection, preservation and 
distribution of New York insects, tigs , 112, 26, April. F o 1 s o m 
J . W Thessgmeutation of the insect head. 5, Aug. F r i t s c h ^ 
A. Fauna der Gaskohle und der Kalksteine der Permforinatiou 
Biihmens, Bd. iv, heft I Insecta, Myriopoda. Pars I. Prag, 1899, 
12 pis., tigs. II a r r i u g t o n , W . H . Entomological recollec- 
tions, 37, May. H o w a r d , L . O . The Thomson Mayr prior- 
ity question settled, 102. H u a r d . V. A. The study of ento- 
mology, 37, June. J ii u i c hen, R . Acetic ether a good insect- 
killiug medium. 84, July 13. K i e n i t z-G e r 1 o f f . F. Pla- 
teau's new researches on the relations between insects and flowers: 
study on the role of some organs called vexillary. 81. K ii u c k e 1 
d ' H e r c u 1 a i s , J . On ecdysis in insects considered as a means 
of defence against animal or vegetable parasites special roles of the 
tracheal and intestinal ecdyses [trausl from C. R. Acad Sci. Paris]^ 
II, July. M e 1 d o 1 a, R. Mimicry and warning colors, 10. May 
18. O u d e m a n s , J . T . De Neilerlandsche Iinecten. Aflever- 
ingll. s'Graveuhage Martinus Nijhoff, '99. P late a u , F. New 
researches on the relations between insects and plants, 30. -Por- 
ter, C. E. Catologo metodico provisional de las coleccioues 
Zoolojicas, I Artropodos i Vermes Chilenos, Museo de Historia 
Natural de Valparaiso, 1899. [213 Insects, 5 Arachnids, 2 Myrio- 
pods] . Data for a knowledge of the insects of the department of 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 211 

Quillota [Chile- iu Spanish]. 58. R i s . F. Obituary of Prof. 
Gustav Schoch, 56. Roy, E. Vitality of insects, 37. June. 
S h e r b o r n , C . D . An index to the generic and trivial names 
of animals, described by Linnaeus, in the loth and 12th editions of 
his " Systema Naturae," publication 25, Museum Handbooks, the 
Manchester Museum, Oweus College, '99. S p e i s e r , P. On 
reduction of the wings in ectoparasitic insects, 84. May IS, 2.V 
Trotter, A. Did Redi indeed believe that galls and their 
makers were generated by a " anim i vegetativa" >f plants? Bul- 
letiuo, Societa Veueto-Trentiim di Scieuze Naturali, vi, 4, Padua. 
'99. T u t t , J. W . The scientific aspects of entomology, [and] 
Presidential address [on study of natural history as a science]. Pro- 
ceedings, South London Entomological and Natural History S,>ei- 
ety, '98, pt. ii, '99. W a s in a n n . E G. D. Havil ind s observa- 
tions on the termitophily of Rhoimloiin'hix ii/it/i/Kfirit/fin Boh., 44, 
4, May 9. W heeler. W . M . Anemotropism anil other ti-op- 
isms in insects, Archiv fiir Entwicklungsmechanik, viii. 3. Leipsic. 
June -27. '99. 

Economic Entomolo y. A n o n . Abstracts of recent literature, 
Experiment Station Record, x, 9, U S Dep't of Agriculture, Wash- 
ington, '99. A n o n Amarican literature on tli3 Sin Jos> scale* 
24 A n o u. The San Jose scale, 87. May 27 - A u s t e n , W ' 
Bookworms in fact and fancy, Appleton's Popular Science Monthly. 
New York. June. '99, B e r 1 e s e. A., and L e o n a r d i . G 
American Coccid* which threaten European fruit-culture, figs . 
Ii4, vi, vii. C o c k e r p 1 I. T. D. A. Note^s on Australian 
Coccida?, Victorian Naturalist. Melbourne May, '99 (' r u in p, 
W . The pear midge. Gardener's Chronicle, London. May 27, '99 - 
Felt, E . P Shade tree pests in New York State, tigs . :> pis.. 
112. 27, May. F i n 1 a y , C J . Mosquitoes considered as trans- 
mitters of yellow fever and malaria, 5, July. F u 1 1 e r , C . A 
n -\v poultry pest (Xi'iimltim,, ^ }, tigs.. Agricultural Journal, Cape 
Town, Jan. 5. '99 G r a s s i . B . Relations between malaria and 
certain special insects, 113 ; Malaria propagated by the means of cer- 
tain special insects, 113. H e r i court, J. Contagion through the 
medium of insects [in Spanish, translated from Revue des Revues 
Paris. April 1, '99], Anales Sociedad Cientiti.-a Argentina. IJuenos 
Aires, May, '99. Hopkins, A. I). Report on investigations 
to determine t lie cause- of unhealthy conditions of the spruce and 
pine trom 1SSO-1S9.S. tigs.. Bulletin 5i. West Virginia Agr. Exper. 
Station. Morgantovvn. W- Va., April, '99. H o w a r d . L. O- 
The principal insects atl'ecting the tobacco plant, tigs . Yearbook- 
I'. S. Dep't of Agriculture. Washington. IS ( ,K>; Pesis of the hop 
crop, tigs., advance sheets ^pp li:5-ir>8) of a work on the Hop Indus 
try, Orange Judd Co II u n t e r, S. J. The commotion iu Kan- 
sa> and Missouri upon the appearance of 7>/.v.--"x/'//v/ in Colorado. 5, 
July. J o n n s o n, W. G. Tlu- Mediterranean flour moth 
again, 4, June; Isaac P. Trimble, economic entomologist, 102, 



212 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

Kir by. W. F. The gipsy moth and its introduction into 
America, figs., 10, May 25. L a r b a 1 e t r i e r , A . The fly of 
the olive, 79, May 27. M a r 1 a t t , C . L. A dangerous Euro- 
pean scale insect [Aspidiottia osfrecBformis Curtis], not hitherto re- 
ported, but already well established in this country, 68, Julv 7; An 
investigation of Applied entomology in the Old World. 102 M ii h 1 - 
ng. P T.ie cirryinj of diseisj by bugs an I leeches, 82, May 
29. N u t a 1 1 , G . H- F . Liter researches on the role of mos- 
quitoes in the distribution of malaria, 82, June 19. R a i u b o w 
W. J The Queensland cattle tick, Records of the Australian 
Museum, iii. 5, Sydney. April 17, '90 Schenkling-Prevot- 
The apple-tree spinner ( Hy/>o/ioietifa maUnella Zell), 84, May 11 . 
Scott. W. M. Legislation agiinst crop pests Dangerou* 
pests prescribed by t.'ie Bjird, with remedial suggestions, figs_ 
Bulletin No 1 GeorgiaSlate Board of Entomology, Atlanta, April , 
'99 Sirrine, F- A Com biting the striped beetle on cucum- 
bers, tij,--:., B'ille;ij !">:> X^.v Y-uvv A'fi'ic. Exper. Station, Geneva^ 
N. Y., May. '99. -W e b s t e r . F M. Fatal temperature for 
Diaspis <nny<j<lali Try on, 4. June; The tobacco flea-beetle (Epftrix 
parvula) attacking tobacco in barn. 4. July - Z i in in e r in a n u ' 
H. On the life-history of. and on combating the apple-spinner, 
84, June 8. 

Arachnida. Banks, N A new species of the genus Hala- 
rachne, tigs ,* 102; An American species of the genus Ccuctilus.* 
fig., 102; Some spiders from northern Louisiana,* 102; Tarsonfinux 
in America, figs .102 ; A new Solpugid from California.* 102 ; Arach- 
nida,* See the General Subject, figs Berlese, A. On the 
mesinte^tiue of some Arachuida. 114. vii B o r e 1 1 i , A. Travels 
of Dr. A Borclli to the Argentine Republic and Par.iguay. xxiii. 
Scorpions, 25, 336 ; Scorpions collected at Darieu by Dr. E. Festa, 
25.338; Travels of Dr. E. Festa to Ecuador and the neighbor- 
ing regions, xviii. Scorpions. 25. 345 -Calandruccio. S 
The ectoparasitic Ixodidae of man, Bulletino, Accademia Gioenia di 
Scienze Natural! in Catania, April, '99. C a n e s t r i n i . G . and 
Kramer, P Demodicida? and Sarcoptida 1 . Das Thierreich. 7 
Lieferuug. Berlin. April, '99. pp. xvi, 193 31 text-fig*. C o o k ( 
O . F Hnbbardia. a ne*v genus of Pedi palpi,* 1 pi-. 102. G o e 1 - 
d i, E . A. Arachnological studies relating to Brazil [in Portu- 
gese], Boletim do Museu Paraense de Histcria Natural e Ethno- 
grapbia. ii, 4. Para, Dec., '98; Kpeft'oifles bahiensits Keyserling, 
a twilight spider of Brazil, fig., 1 pi., Zoologische Jahrbiicher (Ab- 
theil. f. System.), xii-, 2, Jena, April 25. '99 - K r a e p e 1 i n , K 
Scorpiones and Pedipilui. Das Tierreicb. 8 Lieferung, Berlin 
R. Friedliinder u-Sohn. March. 1899 Pp xviii, 265 94 text-figs; 
-M e i n e r t , F . On the Pycnogonida collected by the " Ingolf ' 
expedition [in Danish], 115. P o k r o w s k y , S. Observations 
on oviposition of Phelcus, [and] Still a pair of bead-tubercles in 
spider embryos, figs. 22, June 26. S a b b a t a n i , L . Anti-coagu- 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 213 

lating ferment of Ixodes ricinus. 113 . 8 c h e n k 1 i n g - P r e v o t 
Obtainance of food and nest- building' of Theridiim/ rifxri-tmii 
(Blacw.) Thor., 84, June 1. S u p i n o, F . Observations on the 
anatomy of the pseudoscorpions, figs.,Rendiconti, Reale Accademia 
di Lincei,Rome. June 18. '99. W o 1 c o t t, R. H. On the North 
American species of the genus Ata.r (Fabr ) Bruz , 5 pis- Transac- 
tions, American Microscopical Society, xx, Lincoln, Nebraska, 
Hunter Printing Co , May, '99. 

Peripatus and Myriopods. B o a s , J. E. V. On the place of 
Peripatm in the animal kingdom [in Danish], 115. C o o k , O. 
F . The Geophiloidea of the Florida Keys. 2 pls.,*!02; Myriapoda. 
See the General Subject D u b o s c q , O . Researches on the 
Chilopods. 7 pis., Archivede ZoologieExperimeutale et Generale,(3) 
vi, 4, Paris, '98. Rec'd . June 9, '99 K e n y o n . F .C. A new Mexican 
Diplopod Decaporodesmus motzoranginis. type of a new family 
Decaporodesmidse, 102. P each, B . N . On some new Myria- 
pods from the Palaeozoic rocks of Scotland, 1 pi . , Proceedings, Roynl 
Physical Society, Edinburgh. Session '97-'98, Feb , '99 P o r t e r , 
C E . Introduction to the study of the Myriapods of Chile 
(cont), [in Spanish], 58 P u r c e 1 1 , W. F. On the South 
African species of Peripatidae in the collection of the South African 
Museum, Annals, South African Museum, i,2, (London), March, '99. 

Apterygota C o o k . O . F New Dicellura. 2 pis ,* 102. 

Orthoptera. B o 1 i v a r , I . Revision of the Pyrgomorphinae of 
the section Ommexecha? [i n Spanish], 58. B o r d a g <3 , E . Re- 
generation of the limbs in the Mantidae and constancy of the tetra- 
mery of the tarsus of regenerated limbs after autotomy in the pent- 
amerous Orthoptera, 12, June 26 ; On the absence of regeneration of 
the hind limbs of the jumping Orthoptera and its probable causes, 
12, July 10. Burr, M. Abbreviation of winars in Orthoptera, 
21, June 1; Exotic Conocephalidse in England, 21, May 15; Para- 
sites of Orthoptera, 21, July 1 C o m s t o c k , J . H . . and 
N e e d h a m , J . G. The wings of insects, chapter iv (concl.), 
tigs. [Orthoptera]. American Naturalist, Boston. July, '99. 
C o u p i n , H . Natural history of the praying mantis, 87, July 1 . 
L e g e r . L . . and I) u b o s c q , O . On the Malpighian tubes 
of the cricket* Observations on the preceding note by A Giard, 
Comptes Rendus, Societe de Biologic, Paris, June 24, '99. Mc- 
Neil 1 , J . Arkansas Mclanopli, Hi.* 5, June S c udder, S . 
H . The North American species of Orfiltnlclla* 4 July ; An index 
to Stal's genera of Orthoptera. supplement to, 5, Aug.- T u t t > 
J. W . Migration and dispersal of insects; Orthoptera, 21. 
May 15. 

Neuroptera. B a n k s, N. Descriptions of New North American 
Neuropteroid insects,* 2, xxv. :!. Jan ; Neuroptera. See the General 
Subject. C a 1 v e r t , P. P. Odonata troiu Topic, Mexico, with 
supplementary notes on those from Baja California, h'gs.. i pi." Pro- 
ceedings, California Academy of Sciences (3) i, 32, San Francisco 



214 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

May 22, '99; Parallelisms in structure between certain genera of 
Odonata from the Old and the New Worlds, I. H i n e , J . 8 . 
Additions to the list of Ohio dragon-flies, III. K i r b y , "W F . 
On a collection of Odonnta (Dragon-flies) from Panama,* 1 pi , II- 
May. M cLachlan, R. Notes on certain Palaearctic species of 
the genus^Hemerobhts, Nos. 2, 3, figs., 8, June, July T u 1 1 , J 
W. Migration and dispersal of insects: dragon-flies, 21, June 11 
July 1. 

Hemiptera. A shmead, W. H. Rhynchota * See the Gen- 
eral Subject. B all, E . D . Some new species of Dellocephalus* 
4, July. B i a u c h i , V. Enumeration of the works pertaining 
to the Hemipter-Heteropterous fauna of the Russian Empire, 1798- 
1897, Annuaire. Musee Zoologique de 1' Academic Imperiale des 
Sciences de St. Petersburg, '98, 3-4. Buff a, P. Contribution 
to the anatomical study of Helfothrips hctmorrhoidaUs, 5 pis., 114 
vii. C ockerell, T. D A. First supplement to the check, 
list of the Coccida3, Bulletin, Illinois State Laboratory of Natura 
History, v. 7, Urbana, Jan., 99; A reply to Mr. Marlatt's article 
on sources of error in recent work on Coccidae, 68, July 21. 
Cocker ell, T. D. A., and Parrott, P. J. Contribu- 
tions to the knowledge of the Coccida?,* figs , The Industrialist, 
March, April, May, 1899. Place of publication ? D i s t a u t , W . 
L. Rhynchotal notes Heteroptera: Scutelleriua? and Graphosomi- 
nae, II, July. G r e e u , E . E . The Coccidas of Ceylon, part ii< 
30 pis., London ; Dulan & Co, 1899. H e i d e m a n n . O . Het- 
eroptera found on an ox eye daisy (Chrysanthemum leucanthemum)^ 
102. H e m p e 1 , A. Two new Coccida? of the sub-family Leca- 
ninse, 4, June ; Descriptions ot three new species of Aleurodida? from 
Brazil, 5, Aug H o r v a t h , G . Monograph of the genus Aphe- 
locJieinis, tigs., 49. H u u t e r, S. J. The Coccidae of Kansas.i'u* 
5 pis., Kansas University Quarterly, viii, 2, Lawrence, April, "99. 
King, G. B. Contributions to the knowledge of Massachusetts 
Coccidse, ii, 4, June. K i r k a 1 d y, G. W. On some aquatic 
Rhyuchota from South America, 25, 347; Travels of Dr. E. Festa 
to Ecuador, xix Aquatic Rhyncota, 25, 350; Travels 01' Dr. A. 
Borelli to the Argentine Republic and Paraguay, xxiv. Aquatic 
Rhynchota, 25, 351 ; Travelsof Dr. A. Borelli to the Bolivian Chaco 
and the Argentine Republic, xvi. Aquatic Rhynchota, 25, 352 - 
L e o na r d i , G . Monograph of the genus Aspidiotits (contJ, figs., 
114, vii. M outandou, A. L. Hemiptera Heteroptera. fain 
Coreidae, Notes and descriptions of three new American species,* 
Buletiuul Societatii de Sciinte, viii, 1-2, Bucarest, Jan. -April, '99 - 
Parrott, P. J. Aspt'dfotus ( Targionia) heliantht sp. uov., 
tig. ,4, July. R e ed , E. C. Synopsis of the Hemipteraof Chile 
(coat ), [in Spanish], 58, and 1-2, Jan.-Feb. 

Coleoptera. A r r o w , G . J . On sexual dimorphism in beetles 
of the family Rutelidae. 36 ; Notes on the Rutelid genera Aitoim/ftr, 
Mimela, Popiliia and titriyoderma, 36. B a c h in e t j e w , P. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. _> \ ;, 

On body-temperatures of Bulgarian Lepidoptera and Coleoptera- 
Verhaudlungen der Gesellschaft deutscher Naturforscher und 
Aerzte, 70. Versammlung zu Diisseldorf, 19-24 September, '98. 
Leipzig:, '99 B 1 a c k b u r n , T. Revision of the genus Pa /<>/>- 
.sv'.v. part iv. Proceedings, Linueaii Society of New South Wales, 
'98. pt. iv, Sydney. May 19, '99. B o r das, L . The anal glands 
of the Aphodiina?, Natural Science. London, June, '99; The 
defensive glands or anal glands of the Coleoptera, An- 
nales de la Faculte des Sciences de Marseille, ix, 5. 
Brenske, E . The Serfca species of the world, monograph- 
ically treated (cont. ) B. Oriental region. 24 C a s e y , T . L . A 
revision of the American Coccinellidae* [with appendix on some 
African and S. American Cocciuellida?], 6. D i e r c k x , F . On 
the structure of the anal glands of the Dytiscida- and the pretended 
defensive role of these glands, 12, May 1. E s c h e r i c h , C . On 
the natural history of Paussus F<tri<>r! Fairm., figs., 44, .">, June 12 
Fal 1. H. C. Revision of the species of Apion of America 
north of Mexico,* 4 pis., 2, xxv. 8, Jan. F 1 e u t i a u x , E . Note 
on two Elateridae of Chili belonging to the Tribe Ludiid;r. 30 b ; 
Eucnemidae of the Fry Collection, 35, 5, May 26. 'G a d eau de 
K e r v i 1 I e, H . Physiological experiments upon ])<iti<-i<* 
mdryhxilis [transl. from Bull. Soc. Ent. France. '97], 9. July. 
G r i f f i n i , A . Travels of Dr. Festa to the Republic of Ecuador 
and neighboring regions, xv Note on some Brenthidae, 25. .'!.'!" ; 
Travels of Dr. E. Festa to Ecuador ami neighboring regions, xvii. 
Observations on the genus Lin-coix-chi* Motsch, 25. 842. Har- 
rington , W. H. Ottawa Coleoptera: Cerainbycid.-c. Ottawa 
Naturalist. June. '99 H u b b a r d . IT. (I. Habits of Pho<l<j<i 
ulticeps Lee. ,102; On Tlmlussn montc-.H/n/i Mills, (family Cocci - 
nellida?). ligs., 102. K i r k 1 a n d , A. II. r/7////<;/7/ ////<// n* 
/ft/><ff//i L. ill Massachusetts, 5. June. L e w i s, G - On new spe- 
cies of Ilistcrida- and notices of others, tigs* U, July. L i n el I . M . 
L. and Schwarx, E. A- Coleoptera. See the General Subject. 
Olivier, K Typical Lampyrida 1 in the Mu>eum, 32. '99, \u. 
2. P e r i n g u e y . L Descriptive catalogue of the Coleoptera 
of South Africa, supplements to Cicindelidae,Carabidae and Pau.>i- 
dae, 52. I* i c , M. Description of a new genus and seven new 
species of exotic Coleoptera, 30 b. If a f f ray, A. Descriptive 
catalogue of the Coleoptera of South Africa, family. Pselaphidse ; 
first supplement. 52. R e g i m ba r t . M- Travels of Dr. E- 
Festa to the Republic of Ecuador and neighboring regions, xvi- 
Dytiscida? and C-yrinida-, 25. :!41. S 1 o s s o u , A. T. A new 
( 'ON.WHHN.* 4. .July. S ]> a e t h . F . Description of -onic new < 'as- 
sidida?, with synonymic remarks, 1 pi., 44. 4, May 9. X a m I) e u ^ 
('apt. Habits and metamorplio-c- .1!' insects (continued), [two 
papers]. Anuale-% Societe Linneenne de I, yon, 1S9S, tonic 47>. 

Diptera. B i r o, L . Commensal ism in tlio>, 49. ( ' o q u i 1 1 e 1 1 , 
I). W. Diptera.* See the General Subject. I) a h 1 , F. Tlieplace 



216 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

of the Pulicidse iu the system, Archiv 1'iir Naturgeschichte, Ixv, i, 1. 
Berlin, April, '99. H e y m o n s , Rich. The systematic posi- 
tion of the Pulieidae, 22, No. 588; Supplement to the preceding, 22, 
July 3. Hiue, J. S. Twenty- five species of Syrphida? not 
previously reported for Oil io, III. Hough. G. de N. Studies 
inDiptera Cyclorhapha: 1. ThePipunculidae of the United States,* 
Proceeding's, Boston Society ot Natural History, xxix, 4, July, '99. 
Howard, L. O. A Dipterous parasite of L(ichnoa1enin, 
102. K e 1 1 o g g- , V . L . The mouth-parts of the nematocerous 
Diptera, v, 5, June. K o o r e v a a r , P. The larval stage of 
Hypoderma bovis [trausl- from Tijds Ned. Dierk. Y r er-, '98], II, July. 
Meade, R. H. A descriptive list of the British Cordyl- 
uridae, 8, July. Mik, J. On the Dipterous genus Microdon, 
"VVieuer Entomologische Zeituug-, xviii, 56, June 10, '99. P r a t t , 
F . C . A note on a bred /Sciara larva, 102. S i k o r a, F . A new 
conservation method for Diptera and Microlepidoptera, 84, July (> 
V i g n o n , P- On the histology of the digestive tube of the 
larva of Chironomus plumosus, 12, June 26, V i 1 c o q , A- The 
Oestridae. animal parasites, 79, May 6. W a s m a n u , E. J. 
Pantel on Ihrtxton Halidayanum Roud, 81. 

Lepidoptera. B a c h m e t j e w , P . On the dimensions of Bulga- 
rian butterflies in comparison with those from Western Europe, 40, 
May 15, June 1. 15, July 1 ; See Coleoptera. B a c o t , A. On the 
relationship of the Lepidopterous pupa to its larva, 21, July 1. - 
B e u t e n m ii 1 1 e r , W Synopsis of the species of Melittia of 
America north of Mexico, with description of a new species,* Bul- 
letins, American Museum of Natural History, xii, art. 8, New 
York, June 30, '99. -B i r d , H . Southern Noctuids at Rye. N.Y., 
4, June- B u c k 1 e r , W (the late). The Iarva3 of the British 
butterflies and moths, vol. viii. (the concluding portion of the Ge- 
oinetra?). Edited by G- T. Porrit. London : Ray Society, '99. PLs. 
cxxviii-cxlvii- B u t 1 e r , A . G A revision of the Disinorphina 
of the New AYorld, with descriptions of new species, II, May. 
Chapman, T- A- A classification of butterflies by their 
antennae (coiit), 21, May 15; Classification of the Acrouyctas, 21 
July 1. D o g n i n , P. New Lepidoptera from South America' 
35, 5, May 26. D y a r , H . G Identification of the Euclid larva? 
figured iu Glover's " Illustrations of North American Entomology," 
102; Descriptions of the larva? ot fifty North American Noctuidte, 
102; The phytogeny of the Lasiocampids, 1 pi.. 21, June 1; /Spil- 
osoma congrua Walk., 4, June; [Hampson's Syutomidte, vol. 1 of 
the Catalogue of Lepidoptera Phalteua? of the British Museum], 4, 
June ; Note on the secohary abdominal legs in the Megalopygida?, 1 
pi., 6; Note on two Hifrtroecia larvae, 6 ; The Megalopyg id genus 
Trosia, with description of a new species,* 6; New species 
of Syntomidae, 6 ; Life-histories of North American Geomet- 
ridse, ii, iii, 5, July, Aug. ; Lepidoptera. See the General Sub- 
ject. D r u c e , H. Descriptions of some new species of Heter- 



]S1W] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 217 

ocerv from tropical America,* etc. 1 1, June. F r i n g s, C- Ex- 
periments with low temperature in 1*!)^, 40, June 15, July 1 , 15. 
Grote, A. R. Ctenuflm cressonawa, 4, July ; Specializations 
of the Lepidopterous winy: Parnassi-Papilionidse [two parts], 3 
})ls.. Proceedings. American Philosophical Society. Philadelphia, 
No- 159. Rec'd. August 1, '!)!). (r u p p y , F . L. On a small col- 
lection of butterflies made chiefly in the Tunapuna valley. Proceed- 
ings. Victoria Institute of Trinidad, pt. 3, Port-of-Spain, March, 
'!)!). 1 1 a m p s o u , G . F . A revision of the moths of the sub- 
fainily P\ raustina- and family Pyralida-, part ii, figs . Proceed - 
ings, Zoological Society of London.'!)!), pi. i. June 1 ; Catalogue of the 
Syntomida? in the collection of the British Museum [being] Vol. 1 of 
the Catalogue of the Lepidoptera PhaUeuae. London: Printed by 
order of the Trustees. '98. 559 pp., 285 tigs.,* separate atlas of I" 
colored plates. H a in p s o n. fl . F. et al. Nomenclature of 
Lepidoptera. 9, July. Heat h, E. F. LeitcobreplxiK mnl<l<'n- 
ilnifi, 4. Julv II i n e , J. S. Additions to a list of butterflies 
known to have been taken in Ohio. III. II o w a r d . L. O. But- 
terflies attracted to light at night, 102. J a u i c h e u, R. Con- 
clusions on carbon dioxide, acid-rigor (heat rigor.) and winter sleep 
in caterpillars, 84. May 11. K a y e , W. J. Collecting Lepidop- 
tera in Jamaica, 31, June 1. L a t h y, P. I. A monograph of 
the genus Calisio Hiibn., 1 pi.,* 36. M of fat, J A. Twnio- 
ctiiitjHt /'/////7WV//.V Walk., 4. June. Moore, F. Lepidoptera 
Indica. Parts xxxvii. xxxviii. London: Lovell, Reeve & Co , '99. 
Rec'd July 17. [Vol. iv. pp. l-:!2, pis. 287-302. Linienitina .]- 
P a g e n s t e c h e r , A. The lepidopterous fauna of the Bismarck 
Archipelago, part i, 2 pis., Zoologica, xi, heft 27, Stuttgart, '99. 
P o u 1 t o u , E . B. Illustrations of mimicry and common 
warning colors in butterflies, tigs., 10, July (> R i f f a r t b , H. . 
New forms of ll<'lir<mius, 24. d e R o q u i g n y - A d a n sou. 
(; . Instinct of the chrysalis of Pnr<trye mnra. 55. July 15. 
Schultz, O. On the anatomical disposition of the sexual 
organs of two gynaixlromorphous Lepidoptera i Xim-riiiUm* /m/n/h 
L. and |V///f.sw/ <niti<>/i(i L.) 24. S i k o r a . F. SeeDiptera. 
Skinner, H.. and L y m a u , II. H. [On Skinner's "Syno- 
nymic Catalogue of North American Butterflies,"] 4. July. 
Smith, J. B. Contributions towards a monograph of the Noc- 
tuida- ol l'>orcil North America,* 2 pis ,2, xxvi. l.June; />'"//,////., 
(mien and Si>flnsnin<t roiii/riKi, 4. July S t a n d fu 88, M . 
Summary of the experiments hitherto undertaken on temperature 
a nd hybridation, 84, May 18, June 8, 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20 -S t i c h e I , 
II . New < 'atonephelae, preliminary diagnoses, 24. S t r e c k e r . 
H. Lepidoptera, Rbopaloceres and Heteroceres, indigenous and 
exotic. Supplement No. 2.* Reading, Pa. 18!)!) Printed for the 
author. June MO, '!)!. T u t t , J. \V . Kelat ionship of the Micro 
Psychids and the Tineids. 21, June 1 . W a I s i n g h a m . Lord- 



218 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

J W. Tutt's " A Natural History of the British Lepidoptera," etc. 
Vol. I, 8, July. 

Hymenoptera. A n d r e , E. Contribution to a knowledge of the 
Mutillidae of Australia, 30. A s h m e a d , W . H . On the genera of 
theCleonymidae, 102; On the genera of the Eucharidae, 102; Classifi- 
cation of the old family Chalcididae, 102 ; Classification of the bees, 
or the superfamily Apoidea, 2, xxvi, 1. June; Classification of the 
entomophilous wasps, or the superfamily Sphegoidea, 4, June; A 
generic table of the family Panurgidae : a reply to Mr. Cockerell's 
critique on the segregation of Perdita Cockerell, 5, June; Classifi- 
cation of the entomophilous wasps, or the superfamily Sphegoidea- 
ii, 4, July; Description of the type of Polydontoscelis Ashm.,* 5. 
Julv: Hymenoptera.* See the General Subject. C o c k e r e 1 1 
T. D . A. On some Panurgine and other bees,* 2, xxv, 3, Jan. ; 
Notes on American bees (cont,),* 9, June; Four new bees of 
the genus Pcrdila collected by Dr. L. O- Howard in Mexico,* II, 
June. C o u p i n , H . The odor of the nest among ants and bees, 

55, May 1. Dyar, H. G. Some structural points in saw-fly 
larvae, 102: Note on an external feeding Hymeuopterous parasite. 
102: A new saw-fly,* 102. For el, A. Three tnyrmecological 
notes, 35, 6, June 28. Fowler, C. The Synhaloiua of Cali- 
fornia,* 4, June F ox, W . J . The North American Mutillidae,* 
2, xxv, 4, March ; Contributions to a knowledge of the Hymeuop- 
tera of Brazil No. 6: a collection from Rio Grande do Sul and SMC 
Paulo, I. Frey-G essner, E. Hymeuoptera Helvetia? (cont.)' 

56. F r i e s e, H . Monograph of the bee genus Euc/lossa Latr .* 
49. J a n*e t , C . Studies on the ants, wasps and bees. Note r.i. 
Anatomy of the thorax of the queen of Mt/rmica rubra. 30 K i e - 
n i t z - G e r 1 o f f , F . Do ants possess intelligence ? Naturwis- 
senscbaftliche Wochenscrift, Berlin, May 14 and 21, '99 - - K o n o \v . 
F . W Some new species and a new genus of Chnlas tog astro.* 41. 
10, May K o s c h e v n i k o v , G .A. To knowledge of the 
skin glands of Apida?. and Vespidae, tigs. Anatomischer Anzeiger, 
Jena, April 26. '99 Mai 1 y , C . W A female of the purslane saw- 
fly, &chizoceriiii&\)., with a mile antenna, flg., Ill M o c s a r y , A. 
New species of the genus Centris Fabr.,* 49. M o r i c e , F . D . 
Illustrations of specific characters in the armature and ultimate veu- 
tral segments of Andrena <$, 3 pis. ,36. Sen rat, L. G. On the 
post embryonal development of the Braconida\ 32, '98, No. (i ; Ob- 
servations on entomophagous hymenoptera, 32, '98, No 7 ; Biological 
observations on Hymenoptera of the forest, 32, '98, No. 8; Develop- 
ment of the female genital organs in the Bracouidae, 32, '99. No 1. 
Steiner. On a female saw-fly, Ertocampoides r<n-//>< j x Klug^ 
with male hind wings, figs., 41, 8 April. S t e u e r, A. E. Was- 
mann's" Die psychischen Fiihigkeiten der Ameisen," 44,5, June 12. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 219 

DOINGS OF SOCIETIES, 

A meeting 1 of the American Entomological Society was held 
June 22, Vice President Johnson in the chair. Thirteen pers.-n- 
were present. A large collection ofcoleoptera was presented by Mr 
S. N Dunning, of Hartford. Conn. Mr H W. Wenzel presented 
200 specimens ot Orthoptera. The thanks of the Society were tend- 
ered these two gentlemen for their generous donations. Mr. Liebeck 
spoke of the long life of a barkbeetle, Hhagodcrd tubcn-nhttu , 
which had been sent, gummed on a card, from Los Angeles, Cal . 
to South Dakota and thence to Philadelphia, and was received in 
the latter city alive. Mr Johnson exhibited a small saw-fly, Clatt- 
tli /K-rtinii-oriiis, which had been determined by Mr. Ashmead. 
He had bred them in rearing the larvae of the rose leaf roller, 
tortricid. It is probibly an introduce.! spscies. Mr. licit stated 
that he had found about 500 larvae of Apdtttra celtift on Celtfs occi- 
i/i ,t/n//.-< ;it Bethlehem, Pa. The larva 3 is pale green with an an- 
tlered headard a forked tail. It is rare in the State, Dr. Skinner re- 
ported the capture by Mr. Wilmer Stone, of Mclilni'ii Iliirrfnii at 
Lopez, Sullivan county, Pa. The proposed directory of Amer 
ican Entomologists to be published by the Society was mentioned 
by the same speaker and ways and means of getting information 
for it were discussed. The chairman announced the death of our 
fellow member, Dr. Horace G. Griffith, and said his interest in na- 
tural science was well known to the members, and that his loss 
would be keenly felt. HENRY SKINNER. 

Sec. 



-o 



At the May meeting of the Feldman Collecting Social held at the 
residence of Mr. II. W. Wenzel. 1523 South Thirteenth street, Phila- 
delphia, twelve persons were present. 

Mr Seiss read an article from a recent number of (;/i'///i//n/x /// 
Bee < 'nltnri'. in which it \v as asserted that dragon-flies are not in- 
jurious to bees in northern climates. The writer accounted for the 
devouring of bees by dragon- flies in the South by saying that the 
males migrated in the fall, at which time they apparently changed 
their diet from mosquitoes and other insects to bees. The speaker 
regard td this theory as ridiculous. 

Mr. Johnson stated that AcNrlnut /HI/I'/I* is extremely destructive 
to bees in Florida. 

Mr. Boerner exhibited specimens of 7'/vr//o/</r, //./ ///i/< ///"/</' 
from near Gloucester. N. J. 

Dr. < 'astle exhibited some recent captures of Coleoptera including 
Dichelonychafuscula. Out of 4!) specimens taken on May M. onlv 
one female was present; on May i;,r>o per cent were females, and 
on May 12 and l.~> over MO per cent, were of that sex. 

Dr. Skinner pointed out that discrepancy between the sexes as 



220 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [.Sept 

to numbers is not as great a has often been supposed by writers 
Knowledge of the life history of the species will no doubt show 
that the sexes are nearly equally proportioned as to numbers. 

Mr. Seiss stated that out of 30 specimeus of Cryptus niinciirs 
reared there were 28 females and in another series of 30 reared two 
days later, only tour were females- 

Dr. Skinner remarked that ou April 30th, near Westville, N. H. 
heobservedadngoii fly chisiu^aspeninaa of Atithocharis yentitia. 
The dragon-fly kept along a road running through the woods where 
insects were easily seen, which act was probably au indication of 
intelligence on the part of the dragon-fly. A specimen ot butterfly 
which hai been droppaA by the odcuiat had the wings and thor.ix > 
intact but the soft body parts had been devoured. 

Mf. Johnson exhibited Psychoda tilossoni, superba, alternatu 
and murriiualis. The latter was described from New York State 
and he had recently found abundantly near Rlverton, N. J. Also 
specimens of Stictocephala ran which he had found commonly in 
the larval state under b:trk, near Overbrook, Pa. He also recorded 
the capture by C. Greene, nejr Darby, Pa., on May 7, of Braclii/- 
opa vacua. It had not before been recorded from so far south 

Mr. Johnson recorded the occurrence of Atithocharis yenutio, 
April 23 and April 30 at Riverton, N. J. On former date two 
males were taken and on April 30 four females, three males 

Dr. Skinner reported the capture of the same species at Clemen- 
ton, May 7 and at Westville on April 16, 23 and 30. 

Mr. H. Wenzel stated that in the old list of insects of New Jersey 
there were thirteen species of Pselaphidw mentioLed. I n the forth" 
coming list the number will be increased to 32 species as far as his 
own collection is concerned These were all taken between January 
28 and April 14. The late fall and winter niDuths seem to be 
the bast time for collecting these insects by means of sieving. He 
had taken several specimens of Psehiphus fust if er and six speci- 
mens of Bf then us tychoides. both of which had been described from 
unique specimens. Pselaphus fust if er had been referred by Breu- 
del as a synonym of P. /ongiclaftu* with which conclusion the 
speaker did not concur. He also recorded the capture of a specimen 
of Cychrii* elevatus&t Auglesei, N. J., on May 7. 

Dr Skinner stated that the senshore representatives of many spe- 
cies show marked differences from those found further inland. 

WILLIAM J. Fox, Secretary. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS 



A x n 



PROCEEDINGS OE THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SECTION 

ACADEMY n] XATI'KAL .-I'lEXfEs, I'll 1 I . A I >KLPHIA. 



VOL. X. 



OCTOI'.KR. 1S91). 



Xo. s. 



CONTENTS: 



'oodhue Xcictuid:i L of Welisler. 

X. H 21 

r,ull-A Xe\\ Species of Pqlvinaria...237 

I lie beck Cremastochilus Lem-ost ic- 
tus Burin Mule and I-'eiuale lM:t 

I'.irknian List of Aculeate Mynieii- 
<)|>tera .. 2-14 



Editorial -!; 

Notes and Xews. 2-17 

Entomological Literature .-< 

Doings of Societ ies 2V_ 

K.M-haniies... ..i. < 



NOCTUIDAE OF WEBSTER. N. H, 

BY CHAKLKS F. GOODHUE. 

The town of Webster is in central Xew Hampshire, abou 
sixteen miles northwest of Concord, the capital of the State. 
The country is hilly and well wooded, with but very little low 
meadow, land . We have collected here every year, more or less . 
for twenty years, beginning early in the season and only stop 
ping with cold weather late in the fall. We do not mean tha- 
we have collected every day or even every week, but such time 
as we could spare from the usual work which falls to the lot o 
a Xew Hampshire farmer. We usually have a small cyanidt 
pot in our pocket most of the time from March until Novem 
bcr. and by this means we get many a rare thing that woul< 
not otherwise have been found. We wish to extend our 
thanks 1o Prof. . I. B. Smith in particular for the naming o 
many species unknown l< us and for time spent in verifying ; 
large number of our more common species ; also for man\ 
other favors best known to those interested. 

No species are included in the following list that have no; 
been taken here either by us <r that we know personally !< 



_'2l_' ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Oct 

have been taken in town by others. Mr. W. F. Fiske col- 
lected two or three years at the south end of the town, and 
during that time he found some dozen or more species that 
we never met with here, for which credit will be given as they 

occur in the list. 

THYATIRA. 

ticriptn Gosse. Rather rare ; middle June. 

El'THYATIRA 

Pit dens Gn. Rare. Last of April and first of May. 

PSEUDOTHYATIRA. 

Cymataphoroides Gn. Not common ; middle June. 

We would like to ask if any one has ever bred this and the 
following form from the same lot of eggs, or if any one has 
intergrades that till the gap between the two. We have never 
seen any variation in the form expultrix, and where any occurs 
in cymataphoroides it is away from expuUrix, the ground color 
being lighter with a pinkish shade and the markings heavier 
and darker. 
KxpuUrix Grt. Rather common ; middle to last of June. 

LEPTINA. 

Donbh-dayl Gu. Rare ; .Tune to July. 
Ophthahn-ica Gn. Rare ; June to July. 
Jhtniiituitfi Gn. Common ; May and June. 

PANTHKA 
h'tirrilta Pack. Hare; last of May. 

DEM AS. 

Mart'cornix Smith. Rare; last of June. 
Propin<iHi]i)ie<t Grt. Rare; middle of July. 

RAPHIA. 

AVfffrv Grt. Very rare; July. 

CHARAI>KA 
Ib'ridcii*. Very rare ; .fane. 

F KHALI A. 

./oco.va (in. Not common ; last of April, tirst of May. 
Major Smith. Hare ; middle of April. 

MOMOPHANA. 

OomstoC'ki Grrt. \'w\ rare; Api'il. 

/ 

MoMA. 

'Fall.r H. Sch. Uncommon; last of July. 



1,S<><)] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 223 

AKSILONCHE. 

Albooenosa Goeze. Not common ; July. 
Ab.fumosum Morr. One specimen ; last of May. 

ACRONYCTA. 

Amerinntii Harris. Common; Jane and July. 
Dactyl imi Gt. Common ; middle of July. 
Leporiua Linn. Rare; August. 
fnnotata Gn. Rather common ; June and August . 
Monila G. and R. Rare ; middle of June. 
Occidentalis G. and R. Not common ; May and June. 
HaJtta Gn. Rare ; last of June. 
Rnddiffei Harr. Not common ; May and August. 
Pmn-l Harr. Not common ; June and July. 
Knnnom Gn. Not common ; May and June. 
tiuperanx Gn. Common ; May and June. 
Tfitotia Hubn. Quite rare ; last of June. 
Funmdix G. and R. Very rare. Have never met with this 

species but twice ; June. 
/'/W////.V Gn. Rare. 

\'iiiiin/a Gt. Rare. Mr. Fiske has taken one specimen. 
(rt'isi>a \Vlk. Quite rare. 
Omta Gt. Rather common ; July. 
Modica \Ylk. Rare; last of June. 
Gn. Common; June. 
x (TU. Not common : June. 
l{''t(ir<l<it<t Wlk. Xot common ; June and July. 

<i. and R. Rather rare ; last of May. 
Gt. Rare ; hrt>t of June. 

ii\ . Common; last of May. 
t \\'lk. Common ; May, July and August. 
S. and A. Rather common ; .June. 
irid (Jt. Very rare ; June. 
J><>nt<it Gt. Very rare; Mr. Fiske took one in 1S1M!. 

HAKRISMKMNA. 
TrixitfiHthi \\'lk. Rare: June and July. 

CERMA. 

Cora Hl)ii. \"erv rare: last of June. 

POLYGRAMMATE. 

H>'ln-(ii<-iini llltii. N'ery rare; middle of Juh to middle of 
August . 



!>24 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [< ) e t 

MlCROCELIA. 

Diptheroides Gn. Common ; middle May to last of, June. 
Var. obliterata Gt. More common than the last. 

BRYOPHILA. 
Is'pidula (it. Rather common ; June and July. 

CHYTONIX. 

PalUatricula Gn. Common ; May aud June, again in August. 
Larva on elm, several on the same twig, but hardly gre 
garious, though they may be during the early stages. 

RHYNCHAGROTIS. 

(iilviprnnix Gt. Rather rare; middle July. 
A nrh .owtioiflc* Gn. ( 'Oiumou ; July and September. 
I'lac'ula (Jt. Not common ; July and August. 
G1 . Common; last of July. 

ADENPHAGROTIS. 

Fabr. Not common ; July. 

PLATAGBOTIS. 

(ill. Rare; last of June. 
( in. Very rare; one specimen in June. 

EUEEKTAGROTIS 

(in. Rare ; middle of July. 
Atlanta Grt. Rare; middle of July. 
(irt. Very rare; in July. 

SEMIOPHORA. 

( in. Rather c(mmon ; last of July an<l first of Au- 
gust. 

The larva feeds on the white pine. We have found it the 
lirst of November full fed. It is pale green in color, almost the 
same shade as the needles, on which it feeds. There is a nar- 
row white dorsal line and one of black edged with white on 
the sides. It makes a cell beneath the leaves on the top of 
the ground and remains in the larva state until the next June, 
when it changes to pupa without having fed since the No- 
vember before. The moth comes out the last ofJuly. Guenee's 
description of the larva and food plant do not agree with this 
at all, and it is just as likely to have been the larva of what 
Morrison and Grote describe as rtilnc'uhi and jaimnlis, as of 



Morr. Rather rare: September. 
his species and the one preceding have been considered as 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL. NEWS. L'l>f> 

the same, but we feel very sure they are distinct, elimata, 
showing but little variation and comes the last of July. Di- 
tucida varies much and conies the first of September. Be- 
sides, the length of time taken by elimata in the larva state 
will not admit of two broods. 
Ti'iichrifera Wlk. Two examples ; last of April. 

PACHNOBIA. 

ff cen i tana Wlk. One specimen ; last of May, at light. Walk- 
er's specimen came from the Rocky mountains. 
rtalicartiiH. Wlk. (Common ; last of April. 
Fixhii Grt. Xot common ; last of April. 

AGROTIS. 

Bailhio'ulcx Grt. Common ; last of August, first of September. 
Violar-ix G. and R. Rare ; one specimen last of August. 
Ypsilon Rott. Common ; May and June, September to No- 
vember. 
< ini iculntti G. and R. Xot common ; August. 

PERIDROMA. 

(><'cii/td Linn. Rare ; June. 

Morr. Rare; July and August. 
Him. One specimen ; last of August. 

XOCTUA. 

H(tj<i Fabr. Common ; June to first of August. 

Grt. Common ; July. 
Gn. Xot common ; July and August. 
C-n if/rum Linn. Xot common : June and October. 
lui'iinan \Vlk. Hare: August. 
RubiJ'crn (ill. One example ; last of , Inly. 
r/ti/b/<>j>/x>r<i. Quite rare; middle of July . 

Tausch. One specimen ; middle July. 
Linn. Rather common ; May and July. 
ix G. an<l R. Common ; August. 

Grt. Common ; July. 
Glandestina Harj-. Common; .June and July, 
(in. Common: July and August. 

FKLTIA. 

Uarv. Common; July and August. 
Gn. Rather rare; last of August. 
Grt. Rather rare ; last of A ugust . 
\\'lk. Common; September. 



1>1>(; ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Get 

Volubilis Grt. Bather common ; May and June. 

We take a peculiar variety of this species here, that Prof. 
Smith at first thought to be ceneipennix. 

POROSAGROTIS. 

Vetusta Wlk. Rare ; last of August. 
Catenula Grt. Rare ; one specimen ; last of September. 
Mamallonis Grt. Rare ; Mr. Fiske has taken one example. 
Triparis Wlk. Rare ; August and September at light. 

OARNEAPF.S. 

Fumalis Grt. Rare ; last of May. 
Velleripennis'Grt. Rather rare : August. 
Deter m Wlk. Common ; September. 
Boston iennis Grt. Rare ; August. 
Messoria Harr. Common ; August and September. 
Pleuritica Grt. Rare ; Mr. Fiske has taken one specimen. 
Ensulsa Wlk. Rare ; last of July. 
Tessellata Harr. Common ; July and August. 
Albipennis Grt. Rare ; August. 
Obeliscoides Gn. Common ; July and August. 
Redlmacula Morr. Common ; July and August . 
Direryrnx Wlk. Rare; one specimen ; June. 

AXYTUS. 
Pri.vatus Wlk. Common ; September. 

MAMESIRA. 

Ximhoxa Gn. Rare ; August. 
fmbfifera Gu. Hare; July and August. 
PurpuHssata Grt. Rare; August. 
Meditata Grt. Common ; August and September. 
Litsti'dlis Grt. Rare ; one specimen. 
Dctracta Wlk. Common ; July. 
Habjiuicta G. and R. Common ; July and August. 
Grand-is Bdv. Common ; June. 
Trifolii Rott . Rare; June. 
llowa Harv. Common ; last of May. 
Con.f/erni<tna Morr. Rare; May. 
RubeftH'tn Mori'. Rai'e ; June. 
Picta Harr. Common ; May and .September. 
Crifitifrra Wlk. Xot common ; May. 
Aftshnilis Morr. Hare; July. 
Liit<'.t (in. ComiiKMi ; June. 



tStMtJ 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 227 



Adjuncta Bdv. Rather rare ; May and June. 
Legitima Harv. Not common ; May and June. 
TAlacina Harv. Not common ; July. 
GoodeUi Grt. Bare ; July. 
Renigem Steph. Common ; July. 
Olivacea Morr. Common ; August. 
Lorea Gn. Common ; June. 
Any nrn a Grt. Bare ; June. 

ULOLONCHB. 
Mo<lrtit Morr. Common ; May and June. 

LUPERINA. 
r,wi- Gn Not common. Mr. Fiske has taken it. 

XYT.OPHASIA. 

tfewisxa Hbn. Eare ; July. 
Apamiforinis Gu Eare ; July and August. 
N///'M.sm.Mon. Bare; last of July. 
raltintm Grt. Bare ; last of June. 
Fin it i IIHI (in. Common ; May and June. 
Lnt<'i-itia Hfn. Rare ; June. 

x Wlk. Common ; August. 

. Rare; July. 
l><Tx1<itrix Brace Common : July. 
An-t.ia Bdv. Common: .July. 
Vci-baxcoiih-H Gn. < 1 ommon : July. 
}'til</rix (i. and E. Rare; July. 
Liff ni color Gn. Common ; July. 

HADENA. 
d (rrt. Common; July and August. 

Morr. < )ne specimen. 
Gn. Common; July and August. 
ird (in. Common ; August. 
IHrrfNirolor Morr. Raiv ; September. 

UlLLiA. 
f'niHit \\. Sell. Raiv ; one s|x-ciiiH-ii ; Mr. Fiske. 

OLIGIA. 

l'\-stiro'uh '\ Gn. Common ; JUIH- and July. 
<'lt<i/<-f(l(>iii(t .Hbn. Rare; August. 

PEKIGIA. 

/'x ( in. Rare; August. 



228 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [( >,-t 

DlPTERYGIA. 

Scaburiscula Linn. Common ; June. 

HYPPA. 

Xylinoides Gn. Common ; June and September. 

The full-grown, large, dark, browuish larva we find early 
in spring, often crawling over the ice and snow round low 
ground . 

M ACRONOCTUA. 

Oinista Grt. Rare; July; one specimen. 

ACTINOTIA 
Ramosnla (in. (Common ; June and August. 

CONSEKVULA. 

Anodonta Gn. Rare ; Mr. Fiske has taken two examples in 
August, we believe. 

TRIGOXOPHORA. 
riruliHiHt (~ln. Common; August. 

BROTOLOMIA. 

/* Gn. Common ; .June. 

EUPLEXIA 

Lucipara Linn. Common ; June. 

NEPHELODES. 
.\[i>ii(tn* (in. Common; September. 

TRICHOLITA. 
SignataWYk.. Rather rare; August. 

HELOTROPHA. 

Rritiforwix Grt . Not common ; August. 

HYDRCBCIA 

U- album Gn. One specimen ; last of July. 
Velata Wlk. Common ; June and July. 
yictitanx Linn. Common ; .Fuly. 
Pttrpurifawia G. and R. Rare; August. 
In<nnrxit<i G. and R. Rare ; September. 
Liiitpidtt (\\\. Rare; September. 
Nitela Gn. Rare ; September and October. 
Var. AW>/-/.s Gn. Common; September and October. 

AOHATODES. 
Zeoe Harr. Rare ; .Mr. Fiske has taken two or three. 

PLATYSENTA. 

\'idf>iK (in. Rare ; July. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 229 

LEUCANIA. 

Fallens Linn. Common ; June. 
Albilinea Hbn. Common ; June and August. 
Phragmatidicola Gn. Common ; June and September. 
Tnsueta Gn. Common ; June. 
Coinniu'uU's Gn. Common ; June. 
Unipunctfi Haw. Common ; June and September. 

This species fairly swarmed during the fall of 1896. Over- 
ripe apples rubbed on trees were completely covered. 
Pseudargyria Gn. Common; May and July; sp. nov.; one 
example. 

Prof. Smith writes me that he has received this species 
from Calgary during the past summer and thinks it new. 

UFEUS. 
Satyricm Grt. Rare ; October, November and April. 

fllVULA 

nqiutHx. Common ; June and July. 

AMOLITA 
Grt. Rare ; July. 

BALSA. 

Fitch. Common; May and June. 
Tristrigella Wlk. Common ; May and June. 

CRAMBODES. 
Talidifoninx. Rare ; June. 

CARADRIXA. 

A-/inunln Grt. Common ; June. 
Mcndi* Morr. Rare; last of July. 
.]fnltifer<i Wlk. Quite common ; August and September. 

AMPHIPYRA. 

Tragopoyinix Linn. Rare ; August ; taken by Mr. Fiske. 
Pyramidoides Gu. Common ; August and September. 

OBTHODBS. 

CiTntdiitd Butler. Common; June and July. 
Ci/itica (in. ( 1 oinmon ; June and July. 
lV<v>r.s- (in. Rare : July and August. 

HlHELLA. 

rtt* Wlk. Common ; Jnnr and .Inly. 



\ortiHini (irt . Common; April and May. 

T.*:io< AMl'A. 

J'rri'iHn (ii't . Rare ; July. 



230 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Oct 

Oviduca Gn. Common ; May and June. 
Alia Gn. Common ; April and May. 
Rubrescens Wlk . . Rare ; April and May . 
Subterminata Smith. Common ; April and May. 

This species shows more variation than any other found 
here, unless it be some of the Homoptera. 

CALTMNIA. 
Orina Gu. Rare; July. 

ANCHOCELIS. 
7>/// i tails Grt. One specimen; August. 

PYRRHIA. 

Umbra Hufn. Common ; May and June. 
Var. ejcperniH'ii* Wlk. Rare ; June. 

ORTHOSIA. 

Bicolora<i<t Gu. Common ; September . 
Euroa G. and R. Rare ; July. 
Helva Grt. Common ; July. 
Lutosa Andrews. Not common ; July. 

HOMOGLvKA. 

Ilirdim Morr. Rather rare ; April. 

Lx 

Garnosa Grt. One specimen ; September. 

GLJEA. 

Inulta Grt. Common ; September. 
Morr. Rare ; September. 

EPIGL.EA. 

Grt. Rare. Have taken throe or tour in October 
among cranberry vines in a very wet bog. 
Dcdira Grt. Rare ; September. 

XANTHIA. 
Flitntf/o Fabr. Very rare ; September. 

ClRRCEBIA. 

I'(ini)tin<i Gn. Common ; August and September. 

SCOLIOPTERYX 

Lih<ttri,f Linn. Xol common ; .May, .Inly. October. 

S< OPELOSOMA. 

Iiidh ('<{<(, Wlk. Common; November and April. 
7W//7/ Grt. Hare ; April. 

Trixti</int. Common ; November and April. 
UV///,YT/ (irt. Kaiv; April. 
N/V///.S- Gn Rare; Novoinl>cr and A]>ril. 



1SD9] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. l_';;i 

Morrisoni Grt. Common ; November and April. 
Devia Grt. Bare ; April. 

LiTHOLOMIA. 

Napa- Morr. Not common ; October and April. 

XYLINA. 

Morr. One specimen ; April. 
Wlk. Common ; October and April. 
/>rm(//.s' Grt. Common; October and April. 
liinomint<i Smith. Common ; October and April. 
Hcthunci G. and E. Common ; October and April. 
('(nttcnta Grt. One specimen ; May. Prof. Smith gives the 

Habitat as California. 

Faf/ina Morr. Common ; October and April. 
<i<>ur</ii Grt . Eare ; April. 

Wlk. Common ; September and April. 
Grt. Common ; October and April. 
Grotfi Eiley. Eare ; October. 
r>ii>ix>i/<t Liutn. Common; October and April. 
7\'j>itl(( (Jrt. Xot common ; April. 
Biti/ct/i (Jrt. Xot common ; October and April. 
Lcplda Lintn. Eare ; April. 

(Jrt. Common ; September and April. 
i-i (Jrt. Rai-c ; October and April. Two species not 
yet determined. 

MORRISONI A, 

,sv-r//Y/.s- ( in. Common; April. 
Cimfiimi Him. K'are ; May. 

XYLOMIGES. 

]><>/ox(t (Jrt. Hare ; May. 

LlTHOMIA. 

Morr. Hare ; in September. 

CAI.OI AMI-A. 

Lintn. Xot common ; October and April. 
(Jrt. Common; October and April. 
I^it. Cram. Common; OctolxM- and April. 
This is as (list inct a species as any of the ot hers belon^in^ to 
the genus. The species of ( 'alocampa show but \ cry little va- 
riation ; in fact, we ha\e never seen a specimen that could 
be called a var. out of hundreds taken. 

Since the above was written I'rof. Smith writes me that he 



232 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



tinds cinentia and thoracica distinct species in genital charac- 

ters. 

Curvimacula Morr. Common ; October and April. 

CUCULLIA. 

Convexipennis G. and R. Not common ; June. 
Postera Gu. Not common ; May and June 
Speyeri Lintn. Not common ; August. We can see no dif- 

ference between this and dor sails from Colo. 
Intermedia Speyer. Common ; June. 

MARASMALUS. 

Injicita Wlk. Rare ; July. 
Ventilator Grt. Rare June. 

ALETIA. 

Aff/iUacea Hbn. Rare; September. 

OGDOCONTA. 
C'itiereola Gu. Not common ; August. 

DEVA. 
Purpuriyera Wlk. Rare; middle of July. 

PLUSIA. 
Hbn. Not common ; July. 

Grt. Not common ; July and September. 
BaUuca Geyer. Rare ; July. 
ContextaGrt. Rare; June and August. 
Putnami Grt. Rare ; June. 
Formosa Grt Rare ; July. 
Thyatioidcs Gn. Rare ; September. 
Precationis Gu. Common ; July, August, September. 
Mortuorum Gn. Rare. 

Octo-scripta Grt. Rare ; July and August. 
Kpiycea Grt. Rare ; June and July. 
Amp! a Wlk. Rare ; July 

<".* (in. Very common ; several broods. 

CALPE 
!*!.* Beth. Not common ; July. 

flELlOTHUS. 

Annif/rr Hbn. Only two or three specimens ; August. 

DERRIMA. 
Henrietta Ort. Two examples ; last of July. 

ALARIA. 
Florida (Jii. ( 1 ommon; July. 



1X99] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 233 

SCHINIA. 

Nundina Dm. Rare ; July. 

Marglnata Haw. Sometimes cominon ; July and August. 

Ercvift Grt. One specimen ; last of August. 

M EL APORPH YRI A. 

Immortutt Grt. Rare. Mr. Fiske has taken several in June. 

ACONTIA. 

Erastroides Gu. Rather rare ; May. 

rfut'ta Hbu. Common; May and June. 

CHAMYRIS. 
Tr. Common ; middle of June. 

PKOTHYMIA. 
t Wlk. One specimen ; June. 

METATHOKASA. 
tit'cru Gn. Common ; June. 

EDHERRICHIA. 
Gn. Rather rare ; June and July. 

LlTHACODlA. 

HI >n. Common; June. 

ERASTRIA. 

(In. Common; .June. 
<'(t<-i>i>iiin<t<-it/ Gn. Xot common ; .May. 
-hitcx (J. and R. Common; July. 

(in. Common; July. 
Haw. Common; August. 
(Jn. Common; May and June. 

THALPOCHARES. 

.-Ethrhi Grt. Several specimens; June ami July. Florida 
lias heretofore been given as its habitat. 

DRASTERIA 
Kwhh'tt Cram. Common ; May, July, September. 

EUOLIDIA. 

{'ii*l>i<l<- Him. Common ; .May and June. 

SYNEDA. 
(ii(i/>/iii;i Him. One specimen ; middle of June. 

M I.I.IPOI i>- 
l/nnholttrix (ieyer. Xot common ; middle of June. 

OATOOALA. 
\nhiUx Hbn. Common; ,lnne and July. 



234 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [OH 

Arnica Hbn. Common ; July and August. 

Var. lineella Grt. Common ; July and August. 

GraeiUs Edw. Common ; July and August. 

Grynea Cram. Common ; July and August. 

Pr cedar a G. and R. Common ; July and August. 

Micronympha Gn. Eare ; August. 

Similis Edw. Eare ; August. 

Amasia S. and A. Eare ; August. 

Cmtcegi Sauud. Common ; July and August. 

Cerogama Gn. Common ; July and August. 

Var. bunkeril Grt. Eare ; July and August. 

Ultronia Hbn. Common ; July and August. 

Coccinata Grt. Rather rare ; July and August. 

Ilia Cram. Common ; July and August. 

Parta Gn. Very rare ; last of July. 

Unijuga Wlk. Bather common ; August. 

Briseis Edw. Bather common ; last of July. 

Concumbem Wlk. Common ; July to September. 

Relicta Wlk. Eare ; August to September. 

Tristis Edw. Eare ; August. 

Epione Dm. Bare; July. 

Antinympha Hbn. Common ; July to September. 

Badta, Var. Phoebe Grt. Eare ; July to September. 

Subnata Grt. Bare ; July to September. 

Retpcta Grt. Eare ; August. 

FAGITANA 
Littera (in. Hare ; May and June ; ag-ain in September. 

POAPttlLA. 

iliirix Him. Hare; last of June. 

PARALLELI A. 
ix Film. Common; June and .fuly. 

AGNOMONIA 

Anilix Dm. Bare; last of June. I am indebted to Mr. Fiske 
for a Webster specimen. 

PAXAPODA. 
Vai 1 . cirnilcoxtH. Common; June and July. 

EREBUS 
Linn. Very rare ; July. 



1809] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 235 

ZALE. 
Horrida Hbn. Common ; May and June. 

PFUKOCYMA.. 
Lunifera Hbn. Common; May and -June. 

HOMOPTERA. 

Edma Dm. Bare ; September. 

Wuierea Gu. Common ; May and June. This species and 

Phceocyme lunifera vary immensely. 
Cingulifera Wlk. Common ; May and June. 
Unilineata Grt. Not common ; May and June. 
Obi i qua Gn. Eare ; May and June. 

YPSIA. 

1'iulnlurix Dm. C>mmou; May and June. 

PMEUDOSTHRCECIA. 
(fn. Rather common ; May and June. 

HOMOPYtfALIS, 

Grt Not common ; July. 
Contracta Wlk. Common ; June. 

HYAMIA. 
l Stalin Wlk. One specimen. 

Grt. Rather rare ; June and July. 

PANG RAPT A. 
Hbn Common ; June and July. 

PHAL.KNO.STOTA. 
(Ji't. Rare ; July and August. 

PSEUDAGLOSSA. 

Luhrh-alia Geyer. Common ; .July. 
IfntiuntnUs Wlk. ('ommon ; July and August. 

EPI/,EJ'.\I>. 

Hbn. Common; July. 
( in. Common ; .Inly. 



ZANCLOGNATHA. 

Hbn. Common ; June and .July. 
Wlk. Rather rare ; July and August. 

.Smith. Rat her rare ; August. 
Isrriyata Grt. Common ; July. 
r<-<lij>il<i1ix Gn. Hair; last of June. 
(Jn. Hare; middle of July. 

Wlk. Rare; liistot'Julv. 



236 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Oct 

Marcidilinea Grt. Rare; last of July 
Ochreipennis Grt. Common; last of July. 
One species not yet described. 

HORMISA. 
Absospatalis Wlk. Common ; June and July. 

PHILOMETRA. 
Melon ali s Wlk. Common ; June and July. 

CHYTOLITA 

MorMdalisGu. Common; June. 
Petrealis Grt. Rare; June and July. 

BLEPTINA. 
CiiwulriHaHs Gn. Common ; June and July. 

RENIA. 

Sobrialift Wlk. Rare ; last of July. 
Factiosalis Wlk. Rare ; July and August. 
Ftavipunctalis Geyer. Common ; July and August. 

HETKKOGRAMMA. 
Piframusalia Wlk. Common ; May ami June. 

PALTHIS 
AngnlaUs Hhu. Common ; June, August and September. 

TAPIS. 
dirrala Grt. Rather rare ; June and July. "Usually found 

in wet meadows. 

BOMOLOTHA. 

Munuli* AVlk. Rare ; June. ; 

Haiti moral ix Gn. Common; May, June, July, August. 
Bijugalis Wlk. Rare ; July. 
Sciitelldrift Grt Common ; June and August. 
Abalmealis Wlk. Quite rare ; June and July. 
Deceptali* \\lk. Quite rare ; July. 
iK (in. Quite rare ; July, 
(irt. Rare; last of July. 

LOMANALTKS. 

alix \Vlk. Cckinmon ; June. 

PhATHY'PENA. 

i' V\n\ Common. We have taken this species every 
month from June to November. 

HVPENA 
lliniinfi Ifarr. Not common ; April, May and July. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 237 

A NEW SPLCIES OF PULVINARIA, 

BY R. S. LULL. M. S. 

Pulvinaria phaia', n. sp. 

A new but very typical species of Pulcfnarin wa- discovered iu 
the plant house of the Massachusetts Agricultural College by Mr. 
R. A Cooley in April, 1897. The species was quite abundantly 
scattered over the under side of the leaves of a species of orchid, 
Phafus HKtc.H.latus and of another Phaius somewhat similar, but 
undetermined. As all stages were represented, good opportunity 
was offered for some biological studies in this interesting genus. 

The FEMALE, just before gestation, is oval in shape, measuring 
about 3mm. in length by 1.75mm. in breadth, though the size varies 
evidently with the abundance or scarcity of nourishment. In color 
the creature is in general a light, yellowish green, varying some- 
what in different individuals, so as to approach very nearly to the 
general color of the leaf, rendering it nearly invisible. 

The antennae, curiously enough, show at least two distinct types 
with regard to the relative leno-ths of the various segments, and 
there are minor variations as well. The two types, A and B, which 
are both figured, are found about equally distributed among indi- 
viduals, even on the same leaf. This fact leads me to wonder if too 
great stress may not have been laid on this much used specific char- 
acter. A series of about twenty-five individuals was carefully ex- 
amined with regard to theanteunae as well as other features. In type 
A segments 3 and 8 are equal and longest; next, segment 2 : then. 
4 ; next, 5 ; then, 6; and finally 7, the shortest of all being only one- 
third the length of segment 8. The apparent length of the basai 
segment varies so decidedly, depending upon the point of view, 
that I have thought it best to uefflect it. Formula (38) 2 (4) 5 (6) 
7. The basal segment bears three or four hairs, segment 2 bear- 
two rather long hairs; segment 3, one, somewhat shorter; segment 
4, none ; segment 5, two long ones ; 6, one : 7, one; while segment 8 
bears seven or eight, one, apparently the longest, being terminal in 
position. 

Type B shows the following relative length of segments : s is the 
longest ; 5 almost equalling it ; next 3, then _': 4. <; and 7 being sul>- 
equal and shortest. .-even being -3 the length of 8. Formula (S.Y) 3, 
2 (467). The hairs born by the various segments are approximately 
as iu Type A, A series of four long and three short hairs, arranged 
symmetrically across the head, extends from the base of one an- 
tenna to that of the other. I have never seen them mentioned in 
any description, though my own observations prove to me that 
they do occur iu other species, though varying in number and ar- 
rangement. These inter-autennal hairs are shown ii. the nearly 
mature female figured in figure.'!. 

The legs (see fig. 10) are normal, somewhat -tout in proportion to 



238 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Qct 

their length, tibia about the length of the femur ; tarsus about two- 
thirds the length of the tibia. The tarsal claw is stout, quite 
strongly curved, and the tarsal digitules are slender, slightly more 
than one-half the length of the tarsus and with oblique knobs 
at the tip. The digitules of the claw extend beyond the tip of the 
claw, the knob of one being set very obliquely, that of the other 
straight. There is a long hair at the apex of the coxa; a long sen- 
sory hair at apex of trochauter and another shorter one near the 
base. The femur bears three or more short hairs and the tibia 
three. 

The mouth structure is as follows: The meutum is monomerous, 
almost semi-circular in outline, and bears eight short hairs, only 
discernible under a high power. The rostral tilaments are very 
long, the loop when entirely withdrawn reaching well into the 
abdomen. (See fig. 13.) 

The anogeuital structure (see fig. 11) presents quite a degree of 
complexity. The ring itself is difficult to see as such, as its plane 
is vertical in position, so that most preparations, as the one figured 
show only its edge. Tne ring bears eight tapering hairs, which 
are not analogous to the ordinary clothing or sensory hairs found 
elsewhere, but seem rather to be the chitinous stiffenings to a sort 
of membranous tube arising fronvthe anogenital ring and extending 
to the middle, nearly, of the dorsal lobes. Putnam (Proc. Daven- 
port Acad- Sci , Vol. II, p. 293 on) claims that this tube is waxy 5 
but if so would it have withstood the treatment of boiling in pot- 
ash and glycerine, which the specimen underwent during prepara- 
tion ? Every other bit of waxy secretion disappeared entirely 
during the process. His idea that the tube functions as an egg 
guide is undoubtedly correct. The dorsal lobes are triangular, the 
lateral angles forming almost a right angle, and each dorsal lobe 
bears about nine hairs of the sensory variety, as shown in the figure. 
A feature which I have never seen mentioned, though possibly oc- 
curring in other species, is the presence of four large hairs on the 
abdomen (see figs. 3 and 11), two on either side, a little in front of the 
anogenital apparatus. The two anterior ones are farther apart 
than the two posterior. 

The marginal spines under very high power show, on the part of 
some at least, a peculiar branched condition at the tip (see fig 14). 
Those at the stigmatal depressions are in threes, one long, flanked by 
two short hairs. S- The stigmata themselves are situated some 
distance in from the margin of the scale, near the coxa of the fore 
and middle legs, with a sort of groove leading outward to the 
beforemeutioued spines This group is filled with a conspicuous 
line of dense, white cottony wax secreted by glands, whose open- 
ings lie scattered in an irregular row beneath it (see fig 12). 

The ovisac is white, elongated, 8mm. long by 25mm. broad, with 
sides nearly parallel Conspicuously fluted and with slight tranverse 
markings, apparently impressions of the hinder end of the body. 




IOA. 



PrLVINAKIA I'HAlvK I.C1.I. 



240 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Oct 

The material of which the ovisac is composed is very close grained 
arid felty, but so readily adhesive to any object that the slightest 
touch destroys the characteristic appearance of the structure. At 
the time of the formation of the ovisac a sparse covering 1 of flocculent 
material makes its appearance on the dorsal surface of the scale, 
similar to that of certain other species, notably that described by 
Westwood (Gard. Chron., 1870, page 308). whose description of the 
ovisac also corresponds more or less closely to that of the present 
species ; but as no technical description of the insect itself is added, 
there is no proof of the identity of Pulrinariu pfiaice and P.floc- 
cifera. 

The EGG is minute, regularly oval, pale yellow in color, with no 
discernible sculpturiugs or markings thereupon. The eggs are 
numerous, but the number, together with the size of the ovisac, 
varies apparently with the abundance or scarcity of food. 

The newly hatched LARVA is active, pale yellow in color, in form 
an elongated oval with comparatively few marginal spiues. The 
anogenital plates reach quite to the margin of the insect and the 
anal setae are strong and nearly one-third the length of the insect. 
All appendages are proportionately far larger than in the adult 
(see fig. 1). Antennae are of six segments. Segment 3 is the long- 
est, though about equal to 6; segments 4 and 5 are equal and next 
in length; segments 1 and 2 equal and shortest. Formula 3,6 
(4, 5) 1. 2. Three hairs are born on segment 3; the 4th bears one 
rather long hair, while 6 bears seven, of which the terminal one and 
one other are very long 

The legs are long and stout The tibia is longer than the tarsus, 
which is, as Mr. Maskell says (Trans Royal Society, S. Australia, 
XI, p. 103), " an exceptional character in larvae." He cites it as 
being true of P. 

Flavicans., mask,' larva. Digitules are similar to those of the 
adult. The rostral loop is long, being over one-half the entire 
length of the insect. 

The MALE test is 2.5 mm. long by 1 mm broad, elongated oval in 
outline, with two notches, one on each side, in the anterior one- 
eighth ; two similar notches lie about two-sevenths of the distance 
from the posterior end, and one deep anal notch or cleft lies ter- 
minally in the median line Color hyaline, the semi-transparent 
pupa showing through the test with greater or less distinctness. A 
row of ten oval, lustrous, pellucid markings lie along the medium 
line of the test. Two main cariua?, arising from tlieauterior margina 1 
notches, approach to within about .3 mm. of each other, then run 
nearly parallel until nearly opposite the posterior lateral notches 
whence they converge to form a single line ending in the posterior 
median notch. Two transverse eariiue connect the main ones, one 
about .5 mm. from the anterior end and one about .7"> mm. from the 
posterior end. Other carinae describe reversed curves connecting 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 241 

each a posterior lateral notch with the main carina of its own side 
just, behind the posterier transverse keel, (See fig. 2.) 

The carinae are lustrous in appearance like the oval markings be- 
fore mentioned. 

The male pupa may be seen within the test described. It is about 
two-thirds the length of the test. The head with its two dorsal 
eyes is distinctly visible. The wing pads are already conspicuous 
and the two tubercles which later give rise to the anal filaments are 
also seen flanking the partially developed stylus. 

The MALE of this species was rather plentiful in May, 1897, when 
the form was first discovered ; but, while male tests have been found 
since, no perfect males have been secured since. A drawing was 
made, at the time mentioned, of a living male; but it was done 
without a camera lucida, and, as the creature was somewhat active, 
the result was unsatisfactory. Mounted specimens, both in glycer- 
ine and Canada balsam, became so distorted as to make either a 
drawing or an adequate description well-nigh impossible. Thus it 
was thought best to publish a meagre description of the sex rather 
than await the reappearance of so evanescent a creature as a male 
Pulvinariau. 

The male is a delicate two-winged fly, about 1.5 mm. long 
and about 3 mm. in alar expanse: breadth of thorax about 
.5 mm. The auat setae were nearly equal to the trunk in 
length, though, as these are merely waxy secretions and are 
continuously grooving, the length undoubtedly varies in differ- 
ent individuals. The color was the terueral color, that of the 
newly emerged individual, which changes somewhat as the insect 
flies about. General ground color pale brown, darker on the thorax, 
with a dark brown band crossing the mesothorax at the level of the 
wings. The legs and antennae pale yellow ; wings hyaline, with a 
rose-colored basal portion ; anal filaments white. The head is free, 
rounded, but with the front! produced into an obtuse angle. The 
dorsal and ventral eyes are conspicuous, equal in size and very dart 
brown in color ; the ocelli are not discernible in the mounted speci- 
men. The antennae are long, slender and pilous, and of ten segments 
(See fig. 9.) Segment 4 is much thelonsrest; segments 6, 5 and 10 sub- 
equal and next in size, being about three-fifths the length of seg- 
ment 4. Next in length is segment 7 ; next 8; next 1 and 3, nearly 
equal; next segment 9; while 2, nearly spherical in shape, is the 
shortest of all- The antennae in general compare closely with those 
of the male P. iiiinniirriihilis (see above), except that no knobbed 
hairs were observed on the di-tal segment. In fact, except for some 
characters not observed in my species, and hence possibly over- 
looked, the whole description.)! /*. //////////'/"/>///> tallies fairly 
well with that under consideration, thus hinting that the true dis- 
tinguishing specific character- are yet to he found. This, however, 
i- not true of the female, nor yet of the male te-i. 

As to the distribution: The insect was found on no other 



242 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Oct 

plants than the two species of Phaius mentioned. Thus there 
is reason to believe that it was imported with one or the 
other of the original plants, which are natives of Japan, and 
this would render the insect palrearctic in origin ; but, as is 
sometimes the case with plant house-insects, the subject is 
clouded in considerable obscurity. 

The plants seem able to thrive even when infested with 
considerable numbers of the scale, though one plant has died 
presumably as a result of infestation, though scales of another 
sort, which were present, doubtless aided in bringing about 
the result. 

One curious fact was noted, that while the female was as a 
rule sedentary, at the same time up to the period of gestation 
she was capable of free locomotion and was very apt to seek 
for pastures new, especially if feeding was poor ; not always, 
however, with very great success, as, for instance, when an 
infested leaf was pinned up against the window casing numbers 
of the insects left the leaf and actually made their ovisacs on 
the wood work itself, sometimes at a distance of several inches 
from the leaf. The ovisacs were appreciably smaller than 
where the insects remained at rest, however, showing that the 
secreting power of the glands is limited where fresh food is 
not obtainable. I further noticed that as the ovisac grew in 
size the insect was pushed forward, the ovisac itself remain- 
ing stationary. 

Natural enemies : I bred a parasite from the scale, which 
Dr. Howard kindly identified as Coccopliagus lecanii Fitch, a 
form which infests many of our local Goccidce. 

An artificial remedy was discovered to be very effectual 
through an oversight. The student in charge of the insectary 
green -houses wherein the insect was being bred was instructed 
to fumigate the houses with tobacco smoke, which he did 
without removing the Phaiits plants, to the utter destruction 
of every specimen of the scale. 

DESCRIPTION OF PLATE 

Figure 1, Newly hatched larva. 
Figure 2, Male pupa within test. 
Figure 8. Female, nearly mature. 
Figure 4, Female with fully formed ovisac. 
Figure 7, Female antenna, type " A." 
Figure 8, Female antenna, type " B." 
Figure 9, Male antenna. 

Figure 10, Fore leg of femalei lOa, claw enlarged 
Figure 11, Anogenital structure of female. 

Figure 12, Stigma and stigmatal glands and spines, "a" equals "a "en- 
larged . 

Figure 18, Female mouth 

14, Margin of female scale showing branched spines. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 243 

CREMASTOCHILUS LEUCOSTICTUS BURM-MALE AND 

FEMALE. 

BY CHAS. LIEBECK, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

[See Plate VI, Figs. 13 and 14.] 

Two specimens, male and female, of this very rare species 
were received by courtesy of R. J. "Weith, of Elkhart, Ind., 
that " were taken in Clarendon county, South Carolina, about 
60 miles from Charleston, near the Sautee River, sometime be- 
tween the 1 and 9 of August, 1896. The specimens were fly- 
ing together in a broom -grass clearing near a swamp." 

The male shows the most curious departure from the gen- 
eral appearance of the other species of Cremaatochilus, the up- 
per surface of thorax and elytron being covered with a dense 
pubescence, the base of head, two-thirds of thorax bordering 
side margins, and entire margin on upper surface of elytron 
being yellowish white (as shown in plate) the pubescence of 
the remaining portions being a dense, velvety black, though 
not so heavy as the whitish. 

The female is entirely devoid of pubescence, black, shining. 

The first three ventral segments of male are strongly, longi- 
tudinally depressed at middle ; the anterior tibue, though 
bidentate externally as in the female, the upper tooth is incon- 
vspicuous, the apical much recurved, not so long nor acute as 
in the female ; the apex strongly notched at middle, inner 
edge of emargination resulting in short, acute tooth ; inner, 
apical edge of tibia? being abruptly incurved from midway be- 
tween upper and apical teeth. 

In the female the apex is obliquely straight to point of api- 
cal tooth, though very feebly sinuate. 

The punctuation of head, thorax and pygidium of male is 
sparser and finer than in the female, that of scutelluin much 
more numerous and finer, the elytron being about equal in 
both sexes. 

It seems rather surprising that no record is given of the 
male to date, Buruieister, Handb. III. p. 677, ISlU.liusing his 
description on a female specimen, and Dr. Horn, Proc. Am. 
Philosophical Society, 1879, Vol. xviii, redescribing the spe- 
cies from a unique female taken in Maryland by Mr. Ulke. 



244 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Oct 

LIST OF ACULEATE HYMENOPTERA, 

Taken at Fedor, Lee Comity, Tex. By G. BIKKMAN. 

/ *- / */ 

By far the greater number of the following species were, 
determined by Mr. William J. Fox. 

Mutillidae. Mittilla month-aga, tisiphone, californica, occidentalis, comanche, 
orcus, gorgon, connectens, brazoria, sciwola, waco, venifica, mollissima, vesta, sini- 
illima, caneo, j.-guttata, 4-guttata v.'ir. electra, cypris, mutata ,balteola, prceclara, 
dubitata, grandiceps, pygmcza, euterpe, auripilis, pensvlvanica, castor, fulvohirta, 
zelaya, fcnestrata, canella, macro., bexai\promethea,lixagona. SCOlMdaB. Tiphia 
inornata; Paratiphia albilabris; Myzine fuliginosa, hamata, dubiosa, 6-cincta, 
fumipennis; Scolia nobilitata; Elis plumipes, j-maculata. SapygidaB. Sapyga 
ccntrata. PompilidcB. Poinpilus philadelphir.iis, maurus, tenebrosus, fuscipennis, 
tropicus, interruptus, ferruginous, marginatus, argenteus, cylindricus, cinctipes, 
a/githis, americanus; Priocnenris flamipennis, fulvicornis, marginatus; Agenia 
belfragei, mellipes, accepta; Notocyphus dorsalis; Parapoinpilus vicinus; Aporus 
fasciatus; Ceropales bipunctata,fulvipcs: Mygnimia usttilata: Pepsis formosa, lu- 
teicornis. Sphegidae Sphex ichneumonea, pcnnsvlvanicus, texana, lauta, bel, 
fragei, tibialis, atrata, thormcE, abdominalis; Pelopoeus cementarius; Chalybion 
caruleum, texanum; Amnwphila grossa, gryphus, pictipennis, vu/garis; Chlorion 
(-(zrnleum. LarridcC. Tachytes aurulentus, elongatiis, validus, breriventris, rufo- 
fasciatus,fuh;iventris, texanus, pepticus, abdominalis, obscurus, sericatus; Tachv- 
spJiex punctifyons , terminata, montana, fusus; Notogonia argentata; Ancistroinma 
consimilis. Bembicidse. Sphecius speciosus, Mcgastizus brempennis, Bembecinus 
neglectus, Stiziis unicinctus, Beinbex nubilipennis, texana; Momdula Carolina, 
pictifrous, ventralis, speciosa; Bembidula fodiens, ventralis, capnoptera, insidia- 
trix. NySSOnidcB. Gorvtes monediiloidcs, phaleratus,p/ialeratus var. rufoluteusi 
propinquus; I/oplisus bollii, Alyson texanus, Nysson texann*. Philanthidae. 
Philanthus ventilabris, punctatits, dubiis, politus; Cerceris mimica, gnara, fumi- 
pennis, venator, dufourii, bicornuta, fasciola, clvpeata, compacta, kennicottii, rufi- 
noda, Jinitima ; Eucerceris. MJmesidae. Psen tibialis. Crabronidae. Try- 
boxylon albitarse, politum, clai'atuin, bidentatiun, texense, fastigium; CrabrO 
lo-macitlatus, riijifemur, scaber, cognatus, flai'iilypeus, propinquus; Entomogna' 
thus texanus var. ; Oxybelus connitits, su/>uli~itus, 4-notatus var. monta- 
n us, packardi var. texana, e marginatus. Eunienida?. Zethus spinosus; Eu- 
menes fratcrnits, americanus (belfragei), bollii, Monobia quadridens; Odynertts . 
dorsalis, fitsus,cli4sinus,hidalgi, du(tu<,< veetus, annulatns, manifest us, an>en\is, 
foraminatus, campestris, firmus ; anormis, fundatus, colon, fulvipes, austrinns, 
pedestris, taos, cap) a, tigris, del feat us var., nniftiscititus, qit -.idriseetiis . 
rtcrochilus 3 fasciiitits. Vespidae. Polistes incertus, minor, annularis, 
pcrplexns, t'ariatus, ameruanus, texanus, fuseatus det S-'llllltli: 1'espa 
Carolina, gennanica, cuncata. Andremida? aiul Apidae. Collctes amer- 
iciiiuis, comp.ictus? det. Friese ; Prosopis rarifrons, ajjinis: Sp/iccodes 
(ue:ir mandibularis}-; Halictus tegit!ans, coctctus, ligatus, pectoral is ^ 
/'an/us, armati:eps det. Frieze; Aiignchliwa piti-a, sii/nptiie>s,i, humeral is; ./.v.'- 
peistemon ni^rieoniis, texana, ifniginosa; Audi-cut i'ritnnr<-cntris, ticljragci, 
miscra/iilis / Pi-i>tandreini ,sp. det. Friese.' \tnia norfonii, foxii, birk- 
mannii Friese MSS.; Calliopsii ornatipes, rhodaphHus del. Friese 



1899 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. i'jr> 



abdominalis; Perdita, 4 to 5 Undet. Sp.; XomaJa te.vani, /'<//></;''''''. 
electra? Epeolus occidental!*, texaniis, rcmigatus; Epeolus lunatus, scutellaris; 
Phileremiis, sp./ Melee ta inter rupta; Xtelis costal is; Ccelioxys insita, tcxana; 
Osmia texana, bucconis? det. Friese, ch-ilvbea, (let. Friese, subfasciata; 
Heriades variolosiis, dcnticulatus det. Friese; Andronicus, sp.; Alcidamea, sp.; 
Anthidium zebratuni, ,-,ni:innum; Lithurgus gibbosus, compress Us; Megac/nle 
facunda,pruinosa, optiva, albitarsis, month'aga, latimana, fortis, exilis,pollicaris > 
pugnata, frigida det. Friese, inimica, brevis, perbrevis, coniata; Ceratina 
strenua det. Friese/ Mellissodes confusa det. Friese, menuacha, suffusa 
fimbriata, rustica det. Friese, afflicta, intorta, texana, intermedia ? obliqua, 
det. Friese, comam-he, atripes; Synhalonia alb.ita; Synhilonia honcsta: Po- 
dalirius smithii det. Friese; Anthoplh'ra texana, montana,abrupta; Xylocopa^ 
micans, texana, virginica; Centris birkinann Friese.' Apithns variabilis, elatus: 
Bombus pennsylvanicus, scutellaris, americana. Addendum. Exomalopsis, sp. 

det. Friese. 

- O - 

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF LIMEMTIS WELL ILLUSTRATED. 
In the Geographical and Geological Exhibition now being held at 
the new Science Museum Building in Springfield. Mass , is a curi- 
ous map. the work of Miss Anna Dimmock, a grammar school girl 
of that city. This map illustrites the distribution of the two but- 
tertlies Lmienitis <"'f//cntis and L. ursula in relation to their inter- 
mediate form L. prowpiiia. On the map of the United States and 
British North America, which is perhaps 10x18 inches in size, the 
area from which L. arthemis is known is indicated by oblique blue 
shading, and the area occupied by L nrsida by yellow shading in 
the same direction. Where both species occur the yellow lines in- 
terlace with the blue ones, thus giving a mild greenish shade to 
that portion ot the map. Where L- proserpina has been found is 
indicated by green shading 1 lines at right angles to the other shad- 
ing-lines. At one side of the map hangsa box with four specimens 
of Limenitis, grading from L. arthemis through L. proserpina to 
I,, ui-siiia. 

At the other si;le of the map, which is entitled "A Study in 
Geographical Distribution." hangs a sheet with brief explanation 
of the facts concerning' these butterflies, and a short statement of 
Mr Scudder's opinion that L. />i-ose/-/x'/i<> is a hybrid form of L. 
art/tern** and L. ni'xiila, and Mr. Edward'; rc.isons for the view 
thnt L . i>i-<>*ci-/>/n(t is a variety of L. arthemis. Miss Dimmock ha.- 
not only indicate;! the distribution of the species as given in Scud- 
der's " Butterflies of the Eastern United States," puoli-ln'il in isss. 
but has carefully compiled, from the various entomological period- 
icals, later recorded rupture*, so that her map i> a graphic pi-r-i-ii- 
tationof the liybrid-variety (|iiLstion in regard to I. . /n-<>s< r/'n<i, 
brought down to 18!)!). It is unneces-ary to add that tlii- map 
not a part of its author'- -.-hool \vork in natural science. 

K \ AB, Chicopee, 



246 [Oct 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[The Conductors of ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS solicit and will thankfullyreceive 
items of news likely to interest its readers from any source. The author's name 
will be given in each case, for the information of cataloguers and bibliograph- 
ers.] 

To Contributors. All contributions will be considered and passed upon at 
our earliest convenience, and, as far as may be, will be published according to 
date of reception. ENTOMOLOGICAL, NEWS has reached a circulation, both in 
numbers and circumference, as to make it necessary to put "copy" into the 
hands of the printer for each number three weeks before date of issue. This 
should be remembered in sending special or important matter for a certain 
issue. Twenty-five "extras," without change in form, will be given free, when 
they are wanted; and this should be so stated on the MS., along with the num- 
ber desired. The receipt of all papers will be acknowledged. ED. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA., OCTOBER, 1899. 
EDITORIAL. 

" HARRISBURG, PA., August 17. Senator "Jim" Mitch- 
ell's son-in-law, Benjamin F. McCartney, has landed in the 
place of Economic Zoologist, and will take his place on Sep- 
tember 1st. , McCartney's qualifications for this scientific po- 
sition consist in his having clerked in Senator Mitchell's 
grocery store in Jefferson county and having known coon 
pelts when the natives traded them for brown sugar." 

The above is a clipping from The Philadelphia Record, and as 
far as we know is literally true and gives a good idea of the 
status of scientific work in Pennsylvania as far as public posi- 
tions are concerned. This State appears to have the distinc- 
tion of being politically the most corrupt of any in the Union. 
The Economic Zoologist]of Pennsylvania gets a salary of $2,500 
and has an assistant at $1,500. It can be safely said that the 
return the people get from this department (Economic Zool- 
ogy) may be computed in copper pennies. The damage done, 
except by insects, is immaterial, and an economic zoologist 
who only knows coon skins could hardly be expected to ad- 
vise farmers and others in regard to injurious insects. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 247 

Notes and News. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL GLEANINGS FROM ALL QUARTERS OF THE GLOBE. 



THE Directory of Americau Entomologists is progressing rapidly, 
but there are still a number of persons who have thus far failed to 
send in their names, etc. We feel that those who carelessly neglect 
to send their names will greatly regret it when the Directory ap- 
pears. Persons desiring to insert advertisements on the cover 
sheets will communicate with Mr. E. T. Cresson, Box 248, Philadel- 
phia. 

ON A REMARKABLE USE OF ANTS IN ASIA MlNOR. Under this 

heading we quoted, in the NEWS for October, 1897, page 200-1, an 
account given by R. M. Middleton of ants being used to hold to- 
gether the edges of incised wounds by means of their strongly 
hooked and sharp mandibles. Tn the recently published proceed- 
ings of the Linnean Society of London, 110th session, page 2, the 
name of the species in question is given by Mr. Middleton as Cata- 
fjlyphiis viatica Fabr. 

DR. HERMAN STRECKER has recommenced scientific literary work 
and has recently published additions to his well known Lepidop- 
tera Rhopaloceresand Heteroceres. Supplement No. 2, was no- 
ticed in the September literature of the NEWS. This paper con- 
tains descriptions of fifty new species of moths and butterflies Of 
course such things as the insects described must be made known to 
science, but the work would be far more valuable if the species were 
figured as in the doctor's previous numbers of the work. He is at 
present engaged in writing a descriptive list of the types in his 
collection, and also has ready for the press an index to the spe- 
cies mentioned in Kirby's Catalogue of Lepidoptera Heterocera 
Vol. 1. These publications maybe had from the author. 

A VERY RARE INSECT FOUND IN BOONE COUNTY YESTERDAY. A 
very irare insect was found in Booue county yesterday, says the 
Belvidere, III., North westerner, 'August 17, 1899. It was tound out 
in the country and presented to C. Fred Lewis, of this city, who in 
turn presented it to Superintendent A. J. Suyder, of the North 
Schools, who will add it to his large collection of insects. 

The little pink creature is certainly an oddity. It is an Albino 
that out-Albinos anything often seen. Superintendent Snyder says 
he only knows of two other specimens of this kind being found in 
this country. One was found by him at Evanstou, this State, and 
the other was captured at Wood's Holl, Mass. , the great biological 
center. 



248 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Qct 

Entomological Literature, 



COMPILED BY P. P. CALVERT. 



Under the above head it is intended to mention papers received at the Acad- 
emy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia pertaining to the Entomology of the 
Americas (North and South). Articles irrelevant to American entomology 
will not be noted. Contributions to the anatomy, physiology and embryology 
of insects, however, whether relating to American or exotic 'species, will be re- 
corded. The numbers in HEAVY-FACED TYPE refer to the journals, as num- 
bered in the following list, in which the papers are published ; * denotes that the 
paper in question contains descriptions of new North American forms. Titles 
of all articles in foreign languages are translated into English ; usually such 
articles are written in the same language as the title of the journal contain- 
ing them, but when such articles are in other languages than English, French, 
German or Italian, this fact is indicated in brackets. 



4. The Canadian Entomologist, London, Ont., '99. 5. Psyche, 
Cambridge, Mass.. September, -'99. 8. The Entomologist's Monthly 
Magazine, London, '99. 9. The Entomologist, London, '99. II. The 
Annals and Magazine of Natural History, London, August, '99. 
14. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, '99, part ii, 
August 1. 21. The Entomologist's Record, London, August 1,'99. 
22. Zoologischer Anzeiger, Leipsic, '99. 32 Bulletins du Museum 
d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, '99. 37. Le Naturaliste Canadien, Chi- 
coutimi, Quebec, '99.- 38. Wiener Entomologische Zeituug, xviii.7, 
July 31, '99. -42. Journal of the Linnean Society. Zoology, London, 
No. 172 Dec. 15, '98, No. 173 April 1, '99. 60 a. Anales, 60 c. Com- 
unicaciones, Mtiseo Nacional de Buenos Aires. 84 Insekten Burse, 
Leipsic, '99. 87. Revue Scieritifique, Paris, ? 99. 89. Zoologische 
Jahrbiicher, Abtheiluiig t'iir Systematik, xii, 3, Jena, August IT, '99- 

The General Subject A n o n. W- M. Wheeler's anemotropism in 
insects, 87, August 12 B e r g , C . Substitutions of generic names, 
iii, 60 c, i, 3, May, '99. C a r r e t , A . M. F. Guillebeau and his 
entomological works (cont.), L'Echauge Revue Linneenne Lyon, 
August, '99. Distant, \V . L. Biological suggestions : mim- 
icry (cont.), Zoologist. London, July 15, August 15, '99. F r i n g s, 
C . Experiments with low tempei-aturein 1898, Societas Entomolog- 
ica, Zurich-Hottingen, August 1. '99 H a r r i n g t o n , W . H . 
Extra limital insects found at Ottawa, Ottawa Naturalist, August. 
'99. H e y m o u s , R . The morphological structure of the insect 
abdomen : a critical review of the most important results of research 
in anatomical and embryological tields, Zoologiscb.es Centralblatt, 
Leipsic, August!, '99. [H u a r d, V.] Tragi-coinic entomology 
in our large newspapers, 37, July. K a r 1 , P. . A. Ou the 
fauna of the caves of the Moravian Devonian Limestone. 22, July 
24, 31. P o u 1 t o n, E. B. Natural selection the cause of mim- 
etic resemblance and common "/arniug colors, 5 pis , 42.172. 
Robertson. C . Flowers and insects, xix. Botanical Gazette, 
xxviii, 1. Chicago, August, '99. [S c u d d e r , S. H .] Manu- 
script notes by the late T. ~W. Harris on Say's insects and papers, i. 
5. T h o m son, A . Report on the insect -hoiu-e for 1898 [Zoolog- 
ical Gardens. London], 14. T h o n , r. Some observations on the 
fauna which dwells in frogs' spawn. Verhandlunaen, Zoologisch- 
botanischeu Gesellschaft in Wieu, xlix, 7, August 4, '99. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 249 

Economic Entomology. A n on. A new case of contagion by an 
insect [Melnnolestes picipes], 87. August 26. B a s t i a n e 1 1 i, 
G-, Hignami, A. and G r a s s i , B . How one takes 
malaria] fever. Transmission of malaria by definite insects. Rearing 
of the malarial parasite of man in Anophelex <-lci<jer Fabr. (syn, 
A maculipi'Hiiis Meig ), Further researches on the life-histoiy of 
the human malarial parasite in the body of the moquito [four 
memoirs translated from Italian originals into German], Mole- 
echotts' Uutersucliuugen zur Naturlehre des Menschen uud der 
Thiere, xvi, 5 and 6, Gies.-en, '99 C o c k e r e 1 1 . T. D. A. 
1 occid pests on sugarcane, bulletin of Miscellaneous Information, 
Nos. 1-15-U6, Royal Gardens, Kew, Jan -Feb., '99. Rec'd August 5. 
Davis. T . W. The mosquito as a vehicle of malaria, New 
York Medical Journal. August 19, '99 F 1 c t c h e r, J Report 
of the entomologist and botanist, figs , airula Department of Ag- 
riculture, * eutral Experimental Farm, Annual Report for 1898 
Ottawa, '99. F u 1 1 e r, t'. Insect friends and foes: lady birds 
versus bugs, figs., A gricultural Journal, < ape Town, July 2U, '99- 
Green, E E. Observations on Asj>ii/ii>tnn In tan fee- -igu , 
figs ,8, August. K i r k 1 a n d , A . H Eleventh annual meeting 
ot the Association of Economic Entomologists. < olumbus, Ohio, 
August 18 and 19, 1899, cience, New York, ept. 8, '99. L e s n e , 
P. Extracts from a report addressed by M. "NYisser, inspector of 
plantations of the Nieuwe Afrikaansche Hanclels Vennootschap, to 
M. Ch. Chalot, Director of the experimental garden at Libreville, 
on various insects injurious to the coffee-trees in the region of Lo- 
ango and in that of the Kouilou. figs., 32, No, 3. P e a r s o n , L . 
and Warren, H . H. Diseases and Enemies of Poultry. 
Published by Authority of the Legislature [of Pennsylvania]. 
Clarence M Busch. -tate Printer of Pennsylvania, 1897. P 1 i m- 
m e r , H . G . , and Bradford. J R A preliminary note on 
the morphology and distribution of the organism found in the tsetse 
tly disease. Proceedings. Royal Society, No. 418. London. August 31, 
' ( .!i. K eh. L . News of the American scale insects. Naturwis- 
senschaftliche Wpchenschrift, Berlin. August 13. '!!. \V i 1 c o x. 
E. V. Abstracts of recent public itions. Experiment Station 
lieeord. x. 11, Washington, '99. 

Arachnida.- B e h r . H. H. and Marlatt. G. L. A 
California!! tick. 4. August P i c k a r d - C a in b ridge. F . 
O. On some spiders from Chili and Peru collected by Dr. Plate of 
Berlin, 1 pi. ,42, 17;5. P i c k :i r d -(' a m h r i d </ e. O. On some 
new >|>ecies of exotic Araneidea. ~2 pis. 14: ()n -ome arctic spider- 
collected during the Jackon -Harms Worth Pohr Expedition to the 
Fran/ .lo-i pli Archipelago,! i>l.. 42.172. R o \v b ot ha in, F. J, 
Maternal devotion of spiders. Nature, London. August :;i,'!i!i- 
S e u r a t . L. (i . Bioloiric.il Relations between h'/x'/rn lulnj- 
Mel'ookaud rini])/" nit'sfi-n an ( ';;meroii. Memories y le- 
Sociedad Cientifica " Antonio Al/ite." xii. 7-s. Mexico. V.i. 



250 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [() e t 

Myriopoda. A t te in s, G . New facts on palaearctic Myriapods, 
3 pis ,89. V e r h oe f f, C. Contributions to knowledge of palae- 
arctic Myriopods, viii. On the comparative morphology, phylo- 
geny and classification of groups and of speoies of the Chordeumidae, 
figs-, 5 pis., Archiv fiir Naturgeschichte, Ixv, i, 2, Berlin, June, '99. 

Collembola F o 1 s o m , J. W. The anatomy and physiology 
of the mouth-parts of the Collembolau Orchesella cincta L., 4 pis. 
Bulletin, Museum of Comparative Zoology, xxxv, 2, Cambridge, 
Mass , July, '99. L u b b o c k , J . On some Spitzbergen Collem- 
bola. 42, 172. 

Orthoptera. B o r d a g e , E . Tarsal regeneration and regenera- 
tion of the joints of the anterior two pairs of limbs in saltatory 
Orthoptera, Comptes Reudus. 1'Academiedes Sciences, P aris, July 
17, '99 ; The regeneration of limbs in the Mantida?, and the constant 
occurrence of a tetramerous tarsus in limbs regenerated after self- 
mutilation among the Orthoptera pentamera [translated from the 
French],!!. S c udder, S. H. Short studies of North American 
Tryxaliuae,* Proceedings, American Academy of Arts and Sciences* 
xxxv, 2, Boston, August, '99. 

Neuroptera. M cLachlau, R . Notes on certain palaearctic, 
species of the genus Hemerobius. No. 4, figs., 8, August ; On the vol- 
untary submergence of the female of Enallagma cyathigerun, 8' 
Sept. N e e d h a m , J . G . OpMogomphus, 4, Sept. T u t t , 
J. W. Migration and dispersal of insects: Odonata, 21. 

Hemiptera. Baker, C. F. On Alebra and related genera. 5. 
C ockerell, T. D. A. A new Dactylopius (fam. Coccidae) 
from Arizona, 4, Sept. D i s t a n t , W . L . Some apparently 
undescribed Neotropical Houioptera,* II. H u e b e r , T . Synop- 
sis of the German " blind wauzeu" (Hemiptera heteroptera, fam . 
Capsidte), pt. iv. Jahreshefte, Vereins fiir vaterlandische Natur- 
kuude in Wiirttemberg, Iv, Stuttgart, '99. K i u g , G. B. Con- 
tributions to the knowledge of Massachusetts Coccidae, iii, iv, 4- 
Aug , Sept. Kirkaldy, G. W. Notes on aquatic Rhyu- 
chota,* 9, August; A Guide to the study of British Rhynchota, 9r 
August ; On the nomenclature of the Rhyuchota, i, 9, Sept . M a r - 
1 a 1 1 , C . L . Aspidiotus convexus, Comst., a correction, 4, 
August. M a r t i u , J. Catalogue of the Hemiptera Platy- 
spinidae of the collections of the Museum of Natural History of 
Paris, 32, No. 5 M ontaudou, A. L. Hemiptera-Heter- 
optera : three new species of the genus Zaftha Am. et Serv., from the 
collections of the Museum of Paris, 32, No. 4 

Coleoptera. B erg, C . Coleopf era of Terra del Fuego collected 
by Sr. Carlos Backhauseu [in Spanish], 60 c, i, 3, May, '99. d e 
Bruyne, C. The follicle cell of the testis of Ht/ilro/ilii/ii* 
/>*'<<'((, figs , Erganzungsheft, Anatomischer Anzeiger. xvi, Jena, 
July 29, '99. D i e r c kx, F r. The pygidian glands of Stapbyl- 
inidae and Cicindelidas, 22, No. 592, Julv. - F e n y e s , A -Luca- 
Lee.. 4. August. H a r r i n g t o n . W . H . En- 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 251 

tomologica! recollections (cont.), 37, July. M e u n i e r , F. 
F. Dierckx's " Etude comparee des glandes pygidieunes chez les 
Carabides et les Dytiscides, avec quelques remarques sur le classe- 
ment des Carabides," Uevue Generale des Sciences, Paris, July 15 
'99. P i c, M .Description of Coleoptera, Le Naturaliste, Paris' 
August 15, '99. Rib be, C. Short introduction to collecting 
beetlesin tropical countries, 84, August 31. R o y , E . Entomo- 
logical news, 37, August. -Senna, A. On the species of the 
genus Jonthocerus Lac., Notes from Leyden Museum, xx, 4. 

Diptera Mik, J. On a hitherto disregarded touch-organ 
among Diptera, especially in certain Leptidae and Tabanidae, 38. 
Riibsaamen, E. H. On the living habits of the Cecidomyi- 
dae, figs, Biologisches Central blatt, Erlangen, August 15, '99. 
Speiser, P. A new species of Hippoboscidae living on le- 
murs, tig., 38. 

Lepidoptera. B erg, C . Observations on Argentine and other 
South American Lepidoptera [in Spanish], 60 a, vi, May 6, '99. 
B e u t e n m ii 1 1 e r , W . On some species of North American 
Lepidoptera, Bulletins, American Museum of Natural History, xii, 
10, New York, August 10, '99. C h a p m a n , T. A. On the 
unity of the Psychidae, 21. D y a r , H . G. A new Plat/odis,* 
4, Sept.; Life-histories of North American Geometridae, iv, 5. 
Grote, A. R. In re Spilosoma congrua Walk, 4, Sept. 
Hampson, G. F . et al. Nomenclature of Lepidoptera 
(cont.)-, 9, August. Han ham, A. W. A list of Manitoba 
moths, iii, 4, August. L y m a n, H. H. Dimorphism and 
polymorphism in butterflies, Canadian Record of Science, vii, l v 
Montreal, '99. P o u 1 1 o n , E . B. See the General Subject. S e u - 
rat, L . G. Habits and metamorphoses of a Pierid of the envi- 
rons of Mexico, 32, No. 3. Sharp e, E. M. B. A monograph 
of the genus Teracolus, part v, London, Lovell Reeve & Co., Ltd. 
1899. Rec'd August, pp . 45-56, pis. 16-19. S m i t h , J . B . Two 
British American Noctuids,* 4, August; Some new species of Ha- 
dena* 4, Sept. Suel len , P. C. T. New Notes on Py valid* [in 
Dutch] 2 pis., Tijdschrift voor Entomologie, xlii, 1-2, The Hague, 
August 18, '99, S p e u g e 1 , J . W On some aberrations of 
Papilio machaon, figs., 3 pis , 89. S t a n d f u s s , M . Summary 
of the experiments hitherto undertaken on temperature and hybri- 
dation, 84, July 27. Tut t, J. W. Congenital aberration of 
(lidlcosid rciioxa Walk., 21. 

Hymenoptera A shmead, W. H. Classification of the en- 
tomophilous wasps, or the superfamily Sphegoidea, Nos. 3, 4, 4 
August. Sept. d u B u y s s o n , R. Catalogue of the Hymen- 
optera of the family Chrysidida* of the Museum of Paris, 32, No 4. 
-Cocker ell, T. D. A. Notes on some Hymenoptera, 4, 
Sept. F o w I e r , C Some California bees* 5. K i e f f e r, 
J. J. Cynipida- in Species des llyim'-noptr-res (t'Kurope et d'Al- 
gerie fondr par Edmond And iv et continue sous Ernest Andi-i'-, 66e 



252 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Oct 

fascicule. Paris, Vve Dubosclrrcl- April 1. '99. pp. 369-432, pis. 
xvi-xviii of vol. vii. S e u r a t , L. G. Contributions to the 
study of the entomophagous Hymenoptera, tigs., 5 pis. [Anatomy 
and larval development] Annales des Sciences Naturelles, Zoologie, 
x, 1-3- Paris. August. '99; See also Arachnida. W i c k h a m 
H. F. E. "Wasmanu's "Psychical Powers of Ants," 4, Sept. 
Zander, E . Contributions to-' the morphology of the stinging 
apparatus of Hyir.enoptera, Zeitschrift f. "Wisseuschaftliche Zool- 
ogie, m Bd., 2 Heft, Leipsic, '99. 

-0- 

DOINGS OF SOCIETIES. 

At the meeting of the Feldman Collecting Social ;held June 21st 
at the residence of Mr. H. W. Wenzel, 1523 South Thirteenth street, 
Philadelphia, atwelve members were present. 

The death of Dr. H. G. Griffith, a member, was announced. 

Prof. Smith exhibited a hermaphroditic specimen of Carneades 
sp., received from "Washington. The antennae, wings and thorax 
show male characteristics on one side of the body, whereas on the 
opposite side they are female. Both the claspers of the male and 
ovipositor of the female are present He further stated that dragon 
flies had been reported to be very destructive to honey bees in Colo- 
rado, being especially partial to queen bees. The present unusual 
abundance of Odouata was mentioned, especial \y JEschna heros. 

Mr. Seiss also remarked on the abundance of this species. 

Mr. H. Weuzel recorded the capture of /Siphon robust us at Alco 
N. J. It was found abundantly in the larval and pupal state in 
Sphagnum! moss. He also exhibited specimens of Tmesiphorus 
costalis, new to this region, and (Jed f us Zieyleri and Adranes 
coccus, both quite rare, all of which he had taken at Clemen- 
ton, X. J. 

Prof. Smith read a newspaper clipping regarding the occurrence 
of fire flies in extraordinary abundance. He pointed out that at 
this early sensou the fire fly is rather scarce, and stated the article 
Avas no doubt greatly exaggerated as is most newspaper entomology. 

The following resolution was unanimously adopted: 

WHEREAS, death has recently claimed our fellow member, Dr. 
Horace Greeley Griffith. Be it 

Itesolved, by the Feldman Collecting Social at its regular meet- 
ing held June 21, 1899, that we express our sincere regret and grief 
at this serious loss. We honored and esteemed our fellow member 
for his ability as a collector and student, for his social qualities and 
for his many congenial traits that endeared him to us as a com parr 
ion and fellow worker. His loss is a serious one to us and to our 
science, and we tender our sincere condolence to the members ot his 
family whose loss is as great as our own. 

Resolved, further that a copy of this minute be sent to the family 
of the deceased. WILLIAM J. Fox, Secretary. 



ENTOMOLOGICflL NEWS 



AND 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SECTION 

ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, PHILADELPHIA. 



VOL. X. 



NOVEMBEE, 1899. 



No. <. 



CONTENTS : 



( <ii-Uerell Now Species of Andrena 
frein Kansas '-~k! 

S.>h\varz The "Art" of Collecting 
Catocala 256 

Nature Studies 258 

The Psocids of an Old Snake Fence. . . % JiiO 
The Digger Wasp 262 



Editorial 264 

Notes and News 265 

Entomological Literature 21 Hi 

Doings of Societies 271 

Exchanges i, ii 



NLW SPLCIES OF ANDRLNA FROM KANSAS. 

BY T. P. A. COCKKRELL, New Mexico Agricultural College. 

Audi-am /,YO/.V'//.S-;.V, u. sp.- ?. Baldwin, Kansas, April. 
(J. C. Bri<ltc<'ll.) Two. 

ln-i<l iri'lli, u. sp. cf. Baldwin, Kansas, April. 
irr/l.) Two. Also one from Hartford, Connecti- 
cut, April 30, 1893. (8. X. Dutniiny.) I formerly 
thought this a variety of A. crexwmi. 

i-i-iii/iiii. n. sp.- ?. Baldwin, Kansas, August. 
One. Named after Prof. F. W. Cragin, 
who published a list of Hymeiioptera, which he col- 
led<-<l in Barber Co., Kansas. 

These species will be best identified by means of the follow- 
ing table : 

Mule Ainli-i'iio of Xorth Atnrricti, icitli tin' nhilonii'ii not frn-ttf/i- 
IIOIIN, inn! /In- <-li/jn'itN and lateral face-marks yellow or whih . 
Abdomen of thetesselate and hardly or not punctured type 1. 

Abdomen distinctly punctured 4. 

J. Very small, not over 6 niillirn. long, face marks 
whitish per sonata Eob. 



254 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

Larger, between 7 and 9 niillirn. , face-marks yellow or 
yellowish 2. 

"2. Late summer and autumn species, lateral face-marks 

only a spot 3. 

Vernal species, lateral face-marks triangular. Length 
about 82 millilim.; pubescence dull white, long and 
quite abundant, on abdomen thin but conspicuous, not 
forming bands ; only two submarginal cells ; sixth ven- 
tral abdominal segment with a projecting point on each 
side ...... (Parandrena) andrenoldes Cress. 

3. Thorax with sparse, feeble punctures, its pubescence 

dirty white ; sixth ventral segment of abdomen 

normal aster is Bob. 

Thorax minutely tessellate, with very strong, quite numer- 
ous punctures, its pubescence pale ferruginous ; sixth 
ventral segment of abdomen with the apical margin 
broadly reflexed. Length Srnillirn., black, thepubescence 
pale ferruginous, or reddish-ochreous ; facial quadrangle 
about square ; clypeus with strong, well-separated punc- 
tures ; front very densely striate- punctate ; flagelluin, 
except the first joint, dull ferruginous beneath ; clypeus 
bright lemon-yellow, with two conspicuous black spots ; 
lateral marks reduced to small round yellow spots ; pro- 
cess of labrum broad, truncate, with a shallow emargi- 
nation ; enclosure of metathorax granular, hardly de- 
nned ; tegulae shining brown ; wings dusky, stigma and 
nervures ferruginous ; tarsi dark, but inclined to fer- 
ruginous ; abdomen rather shiny, more distinctly punc- 
tate than usual in the group ; hind margins of the 
second and following segments with pale ochreous hair- 
bands cragini Ckll., u. sp. 

4. Clypeus only partly yellow ; autumnal species . . 5. 
Clypeus light, except the usual dots ; vernal species 6. 

5. Sides of clypeus black, wings dusky at apex, first two 

abdominal segments with orange fulvous bauds. 

alicidrttm Ckll. 

Anterior margin of clypeus broadly black, wings clear. 

pulchella Eob. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL, NEWS. 255 

6. Face- markings lemon- yellow 7. 

Face-markings cream-color 9. 

7. Lateral face-marks in the form of a square, with the lower 

inner angle cut off by the clypeus, the upper side 
straight and about level with the lower edge of the 
antennal sockets, forming a right angle with the orbital 

margin 8. 

Lateral face- marks forming a nearly equilateral triangle, 
the upper angle about level with the top of the clypeus ; 
pubescence dull white ; flagellum dark ; process of la- 
briim truncate, but the edge concave ; stigma and 
nervures bright orange- fulvous ; apex of abdomen be- 
neath a little brush of dark hair, present also in cressoni. 
All else as in crc.wHti. . . . hridirrl/i Ckll., n. sp. 

. Pubescence dull white cressoni Eob. 

Pubescence orange- fulvous ; all the tarsi, and the hind 
tibia?, except a suffused spot within, bright ferruginous ; 
femora and first four tibiae black; process of labruni 
with a concave truncation ; antenna? dark ; sometimes 
a small yellow supraclypeal patch ; wings a little dusky 
at tips, stigma and nervures bright orange fulvous; 
other characters as in crcxxoiii . kanse^sis, Ckll., n. sp. 

9. Length 12 millim.; Hies in June . . ni<Un'<-kice, Eob. 
Not over 8 millim.; fly in March and April . . 10. 

10. Larger; flagellum dark . cajtrirorniti Casad and Ckll. 
Smaller (6 millim.), flagellum ferruginous beneath. 

primvMfrons Casad. 

Mr. Bridwell also sent an example of CnlliojMi* rcrbcnce Ckll. 
and Porter, iiied., collected at Baldwin, Kansas, in July. This 
species, the type locality of which is Las Vegas, N. M., is 
allied to C. atnli-cniforniis, but differs in the face-marks (9) as 
follows: Clypeus strongly but not closely punctured, shining, 
black, with the anterior margin broadly white; no supra- 
clypeal mark ; lateral white marks triangular, with the inner 
angle cut off, the upper angle not reaching the level of the 
antennae; labrum with a transverse light mark. 



256 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

THL "ART" OF COLLECTING CATOCALA. 

BY H. SCHWARZ, St. Louis, Mo. 

I suppose almost every collector of Lepidoptera has more or 
less made the acquaintance of collecting Catocala, and found it 
to be a most vexing task, owing to the difficulties involved in 
the undertaking. 

I have tried various methods. One is that of spearing them 
with a bow and arrow, only that 1 used the weapon on a small 
scale. It is made of a Mallow twig about eight inches long and 
three- fourths of an inch in diameter. This is hollowed out 
and a stick to fit the inside (one inch longer than the hollow 
one) is supplied. Three needles are then inserted into one end 
of the stick in a triangular form and so that their pointed ends 
are outward. A stout wire about three inches long is then fas- 
tened about three and one-half inches from one end of the hollow 
piece in such a manner that about one inch of wire will extend 
from each side of the wood. A medium-sized rubber is then 
fastened one end to each of the extending wires so that it will 
lay over the hollow piece without being expanded. Xow insert 
the stick (the one holding the needles) into the hollow one and 
your gun is ready for action. This instrument has a great 
drawback, owing to the experience needed to operate it. A 
novice AAdll invariably either damage the specimen, so as to 
render it unfit for the cabinet, or miss his would-be captive 
altogether ; probably the latter. 

Another method is " the cyanide bottle." This is very 
simple, but more profitable than the preceding. The speci- 
men must be approached with extreme care and the bottle 
placed over it with great dexterity. The last but most satis- 
factory method is collecting with the net. A little practice 
will enable the collector to secure his prize almost every time 
a hit is made ; at least such was my experience. 

As it may also be of interest to beginners in the " art" of 
collecting Catocala to know how this is done to the best ad- 
vantage, I will here give a description. During the months 
of June, July and August the Catocala-hunter of this section 
will find his game in dark, moist places, heavily timbered 
with oak, elm and other rough-barked trees. Owing to the 
similar coloration of the forewings (primaries) iu the genus 



189 ( .>] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 257 

CatocaJa to that of the bark of most trees they are not easily 
detected. Often a novice will be doomed to disappointment in 
seeing what he supposed to be a fine specimen, a piece of pro- 
jected bark, or the like. Again he will be misled by mis- 
taking what looks from a distance like a bit of tree-moss, bark 
or one of the many things that look so similar, for a splendid 
specimen of that large genus, Calontlit. In short, u experinrc 
teaches," and never have these words held truer than in this 
very instance. 

When a place like the one described is found the collector 
must exercise great care in moving among the trees. Always 
approach the tree you are about to examine from the shady 
vside. Do not get closer than is necessary in order to detect 
any specimen that may be hidden in the furrows of the bark. 
When having spied a specimen approach it very slowly and 
move as little foliage as possible. When the rim of the net 
will just about touch the object on which your Xoctuid is situ- 
ated place it very cautiously about three or four inches from 
the insect, iritli part of net -rim touch hi;/ free, of course with open 
side of net toward the moth. Xow, without waiting for the 
insect to fly, make a brisk dash toward it with your net, and 
(if you have been swift enough) the prize is yours, when it 
must be stopped from fluttering in the net at once. This is 
done by giving it no room to move about . Place your thumb 
and forefinger beneath the wings on thorax and give a smart 
squeeze, which will at once end its struggles to escape. Ex- 
perience has taught me never to wait for the insect to fly, for 
nine times out of ten you will miss it . 

To testify that net-collecting is a most satisfactory method 
I can do no better than state that on the L'lst of June, this 
year, my brother and I captured forty-three specimens in two 
and one-half hours. 



K. We do uot believe it is possible to collect ('utoftila' in a 
perfect condition by means of a net . ; ami there is no collector who 
would hare rubbed specimens. The best \\a\ i- t.ni>c_/'o///- needle- 
set iu a handle, at right angles to each other and between one-eighth 
and one-fourth inch apart. The needles arc thrust through the 
thorax and the specimens taken in this way are faultless. The ne\i 
best way is to use a well -charged, wide- mouthed cyanide jar. Ki>- 



258 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

NATURE STUDIES. 

The appended newspaper clippings describe the plan of 
work of an organization which was started in this place last 
spring, and the enclosed clippings, all from our local paper, 
give some idea of what we have accomplished. I send these 
to you, thinking that some of the readers of THE NEWS might 
like to try some such plan in other places. As a result of 
the organization here, the number of people very much inter- 
ested in entomology has increased from one to seven. 

Yours truly, W. E. HOWARD, 

Belfast, Maine. 

Those interested in nature studies met at the High School room 
last Monday evening and listened attentively to a talk on birds by 
Rev. A. A. Smith. Mr. Smith is a close observer of birds, their 
life and habits, and from a classification, in their common English 
names, written on the blackboards, and from specimens and pic- 
tures, talked interestingly for about an hour. The individual 
members of common families were taken separately and something 
of interest in regard to the name and habits was given. Mr W. R. 
Howard on " Moths and Butterflies.'' and Mr, Smith on " Bird 
Life," were very fortunate selections of speakers and subjects, arid 
for next week Rev. J. M. Leigh ton ou the " Early Spring Flow- 
ers'' must of necessity be as interesting from his love and knowl- 
edge of them. While these gatherings are informal in some re- 
spects, they are creating a deeper interest in nature at the season 
of the year most favorable. Mr. Howard, as hairiu'iii of the special 
committee appointed at the first meeting, reported that the com- 
mittee thought it advisable to form two associations. To form the 
Agassiz Chapter of the school children, and those out of school into 
an independent class not connected with the Chapters in anyway, 
but to jointly enjoy the general talks. 

A sensational article is going the rounds of the plate matter papers 
giving a feirful account of the work of a new and dangerous insect 
called the ''strangling bug,'' from its habit of striking its victims 
in the neck. The description, illustration and scientific name (lie 
nacus griseus), are those of a very common and Inrnilcss iiiMvi. 
commonly called the water boatman or electric light bug. It lives 
in the water, but is caught in July flying about electric street 
lights with the beetles and moths- One member of the Bella*! 
Nature Club has six specimens caught this season, and the insect 
was so common that many were allowed to escipc. This alleged 
terror belongs to the order Heint'plera- It is about two inches long. 
brown in color, with large gauzy wings, which fold closely upon 
the back. The hind legs are strong for swimming and it has 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



glassy bead like eyes. It is handled iu this vicinity us carelessly a- 
the common June bug" and no person has been hurt. 

Last Monday those of the Nature Club who are interested in 
botany and entomology went on a backboard, ride to Herrick's bog 
in Northport. The day was beautiful, the company jolly and every- 
thing pleasant, with the exception of the tramp on the bog. That 
was " simply horrible." It was a lost opportunity for the most 
-amateurish snap shot freak. The streams in a bog' are not very good 
places for a seat, as two of the party realized. But then it was in 
the interest of science. tl It was a great d iv for butterflies-" A 
member of the Fourth of July horribles committee improved some 
of the time in rehearsals. The doctor of the party disappeared and 
caused some uneasiness, but appeared just five minutes before the 
time fixed to start home and when some of the gentlemen had 
found courage to organize a rescue party. One of the ministers 
went on a foraging tramp ahead and caused just a few hoots to be 
sent up Everything- considered, it was'a very decorous crowd. Two 
entirely new flowers were added to the general collection a new 
(ini/liixxdcfii and a corydalis while the individual herbariums 
were increase,! by some common specimens. A recent convert to en- 
tomology, who had formerly flocked with the ornithologists, showed 
that he was not entirely free from the spell of his first love by vainly 
attempting to capture a hen in a butterfly net. After having 
driven about a mile and a half on the way home, it w i- found that 
one of the ladies had left her umbrella behind, and a dignified city 
official gallantly sprinted back to get it, making the round trip in 
something less than five minutes. The next outing will be with 
Mrs. E. S. Pitcher at the battery shore. . 

There was a small attendance at the meeting of the Xature ( lub, 
Friday evening, on account of several] members having other 
engagements. The roll-call showed that a large majority of the 
rnem'ie.s prefer the study of botany. The meeting adjourned to 
Monday evening. 

At the adjourned meeting Monday evening Rev. J. M. Leighton 
was chosen vice president an, I John It Dnnton treisurer, this com- 
pleting the organi/;itiou. The du:vs were fixed at live cents per 
month, li .v;iv voted to hold the regular meetings the second Mon- 
day evening of each month. Methods of work. ere.. weredi<cu--e,l 
and arrangements will be made for field work by the classes at 
once. The executive committee state. Cor the benefit of interested 
parties who have not yet joined, that the only ivqui-iies of mem- 
be.ship are signing the constitution and paying t he dues. Members 
may act their own pleasure or convenience a> to the amount or 
nature of their studies Mo-.! of the members will do individual 
field work, as many have done in I lie pa<l . anil in addition there 
will be das- work ai.d field work by small parties. Some member- 
col lee i or m ike ohscrvat ions of wh itever thev see in anv br inch of 



260 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

natural history that interests them, while perhaps they are spe- 
cially studying one branch. The outlook for the club is highly en- 
couraging, as the members are all enthusiastic, and others, vrho are' 
equally interested, expect to join at the next meeting. 

o- - 



THE PSOCIDS OF AN OLD SNAKE-FENCE. 

BY NATHAN BANKS. 

One evening in the later part of August, while engaged i'rt 
the occupation of wheeling the baby, I notieetl on> her dress a 
small black insect. The ever ready empty vial was brought 
into service; and, by the aid of a glass, I saw that tine- insect 
was a black Psocid, quite new to me. Several black Pxocids I 
had taken, but all with a paler area in the wings ; in this one 
there was no such pale space. In a few moments another speci- 
men was taken in a similar position. By the road- side were 
growing trees, cherry, wild cherry and maple, and I surmised 
that on the trunk of one of these the Psocid would be found in 
numbers. Early next evening I looked but saw none, so 
began vigorously beating the shrubbery ; but no black Pw'ul. 
While contemplating the situation I saw a specimen on the 
sleeve of my outing shirt. Somewhere around here they are, 
that's certain ; but trunk-gazing and bush-beating brought no 
reward. In a few days came a holiday, and at once I went to 
explore the region of the black Psocid. Near the row of trees 
commences an old snake or worm-fence, running back for 
some distance. On this, I thought, might be a Psocid. Sure 
enough ; but a pale- winged one ! Lots of them, eggs, nymphs 
and adults. It seemed at first to be Psocus quietus ; but, on 
examination, I saw it was different and agreed with specimens 
of Psocus perplexus Walsh. After taking a few of these I saw 
a few specimens plainly larger, much like P. xtriatux, but ICSN 
marked. These turned out to be Psocus }<n<s Walsh. Both 
of these I thought "good finds," and I laid in a supply of 
them ; but no sign of a black 7'sw/V. In the afternoon I 
started to explore the entire length of that fence. I had gone 
but a short distance w r hen I saw, on one of the lower rails, a 
dc<l black PsocuSj the one I was looking for. Examination of 
all the rails above showed only the two pale species. The 



189.0] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 261 

rails were old and full of cracks and crevices. For some 
unknown reason I pulled olf a partly loose piece, and there, on 
the under side, were four black Psocids, sitting, as happy as 
could be. "That,' 1 I said, -t is it; they are innide of the 
rails." Piece after piece I pulled off and found plenty of the 
black species. Finally, fearing the farmer's wrath, for the 
partial destruction of his fence, I hurried away to my room. 

While hunting for this species I came across a few specimens 
of that widespread but rarely seen little Psocid, Ampliientomum 
}i</( j )il Pack. This made four species of P.^x-ida from that old 
snake- fence a very good showing. 

Psocus pei-jtlr.ftts Walsh, the most common of all, is a pale- 
winged species, living in colonies on the outside of the rails. 
There egg masses were common and contained about twenty 
eggs on the average. Nymphs and adults were grazing together 
on the under surface of the rails. The nymphs transform to 
adults in the morning, clinging to the under side of a rail ; the 
soft white wings drooping while expanding. The adults are 
very pale at first, but in day or so get the proper colors 
and are then quite pretty. They will not fly readily, but run 
when disturbed. 

PJWI-HN /Hint* Walsh. Larger and paler than the preceding ; 
no markings on wings, except a black dot on posterior margin. 
These are less common and more scattered than P. pet-plexus, 
but have the same habits. 

Psocus, n. sp. Black ; the veins dotted with white. Found 
in groups of from three to six beneath loose pieces of the rails. 
They are not easily disturbed and do not run quickly. They 
evidently fly at twilight, for pairing and migration, and are 
then attracted to white surfaces. The nymph was not found. 

.1 iii]>/ii<'ii/<>iinini litif/rni Pack . This hides in a crack or under 
a piece of lichen. It has much resemblance to a Thieid moth. 
11 does not take readily to flight, but runs from one crack to 
another. The nymphs, contrary to the usual rule in P*oci<l(i\ 
is quite flat, and looks much like one of the bird-lice. 



262 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [N(>\ 

THE DIGGER WASP. 

(From H(trtfor<UCt.) Times, September 21, 18.99.) 

It appears that there are other inserts besides the ant that bur 
row in soils composed of a light sandy loams generally selecting a 
sidewalk flagging, or an old stump, under which they carry on 
their burrowing leaving, as our correspondent said, little heaps of 
the soil to show their industry The query of our correspondent 
(in Tuesday's Times) was answered that the insect was the ant. 
Now the ant does throw up such little sand-heaps as those men- 
tioned by our correspondent ; but so does the biga'er insect that 
makes the little mounds he speaks of. This larger insect is a spe- 
cies of fossorial wasp commonly culled the Digger Wasp, and 
which was described two years ago by The Times These formid- 
able looking wasps are useful as destroyers of grasshoppers It is 
an interesting part of Nature's great system of checks and balances 
by which an equilibrium is maintained, thus preventing the undue 
increase of any one species, whether ot insects or creatures. An ob 
server a tew days since found a female Digger Wasp tilling her nest 
with grasshoppers, to serve as food for the larvae until they are 
developed far enough to go through with their transformations 
The wasp here spoken of does not kill the insects with her sting, 
but paralyzes them, so that they will remain good food for the 
larvae. Some spiders do the same thing. The Digger Wasp is 
closely related to the "mud dauber" wasps, which make nests of 
clay in barns, sheds, garrets, etc., and we believe also paralyze the 
insects they store up for their progeny. It is the female that makes 
the nest and uses her sting. It is one of the many wonderful pro- 
visions in the insect world of wnat we call (but sometimea igno- 
rautly) "animal instinct." At present the wasps are filling their 
nests with grasshoppers 

NOTE. The wasp the article is trying to describe is undoubtedly Tachyt,-s, 
as the S. Speciosu a is not all common here, while tha .Tachvt/s is very common 
his year, S >,'. DTNMM. 

O 



NATICK, MASS., August 29, 1899. 

EDITORS OF ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. I enclose a clipping 
from The Boston TrarcUer for July 28th, which I think is de- 
serving of repetition in your paper. Having long been a stu- 
dent of insect life, it si ruck me that it would be an exceedingly 
interesting sight to see caterpillars emerging full grown from 
cocoons, and so made haste to investigate, but to my great sor- 
row none of the caterpillars were obliging enough to emerge 
to please me, and so I was denied a chance to record the won- 
derful occurrence for your readers. What I did find was that 
the trees were really loaded with cocoons of Orgyia leuco*ti>ii<t. 
Most seemed to be empty and many weie covered with the 



1809] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 263 

egg clusters left by the female. I only saw one living larva. 
and he did not come from a cocoon. 

Kespectfully yours, E. J. SMITH. 

Every lover of Boston Common lias reason for alarm and right- 
eous indignation. Its trees, especially the American elms and lin- 
dens, are literally covered with cocoons, each containing a well- 
developed caterpillar, almost ready to begin his career of devasta- 
tion. There are not simply tens of thousands of the voracious 
pests there are millions of them There are thousands on indi- 
vidual trees. Caterpillars are already to be seen crawling upon the 
trunks. The ends of branches are already eaten bare of leaves- 
Have we money to expend for the extermination of the English 
>parrow. whom everybody allows does occasionally at least attack 
a caterpillar, and none to spend for the destruction of the crawling 
nuisance itself? Are there thousands of dollars for artistic flower 
beds in the public garden, and nothing available for the glorious 
trees of Boston Common ? It is said that a whitewash of lime will 
instantly destroy the cocoons. Men should to-day begin this work 
and hasten it with every possible means. It should have been done 
weeks ago 



-o- 



PROF. SNYDER and 1 had another jaunt upiCity Creek canon before 
he left here and we caught some few things more. Thecla chrt/sd- 
lux was just coming out and we took a few fine specimens Speaking 
of this species,! visited one 'of the canons about twenty miles 
north of this city August 27th, where 1 found it by the thousand, 
but as it was so late in the season they were all worn, and after 
catching 1 two or three dozen of them and finding none that were 
good enough to keep, I ceased molesting them. Also took at the 
same time a rather poor specimen of Pamplu'lu s<-//i///cri The 
latter part of our summer, /. e., since about August 1st, the weather 
has been so cool and autumnal in its character, and the warm 
weather was so late coming, that it has made the season seem so re- 
markably short. But the past three weeks have been remarkable in 
the unusual appearance of the large, brightly silvered form of .!/- 
//////// /.N- XHII<I<TI. the one with the bright red on the lower side of the 
secondary wings. During previous years 1 have never found but 
two specimens of Aff/i/itn/s in Suit Lake Valley ; that is, outside of 
the canons, and those two were seen last year. Within the past few 
days, however, there have been dozens of toii/ilci-/ flying aboul the 
streets, even to the centre of the business portion of the town. 
These were nearly all apparently good clean specimens, and all of 
the large form lint one seldom has a net handy for such unex- 
pected thing>, and I only .-ucceeded in taking two *pecimen. of 
them. I suspect that this species has established itself on the garden 
violet in our city. Prof. Snyder has written me i hat he found this 
form just emerging in the mountains ei-l of Ogden about the h-i 
of .July. -(i WKSI.I.V l>i:mvM\<;, Salt Lake City. Utah. 



264 [Nov- 

ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



[The Conductors of ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS solicit and will thankfullyreceive 
items of news likely to interest its readers from any source. The author's name 
will be given in each case, for the information of cataloguers and bibliograph- 
ers.] 

To Contributors All contributions will be considered and passed upon at 
our earliest convenience, and, as far as may be, will be published according to 
date of reception. ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS has reached a circulation, both in 
numbers and circumference, as to make it necessary to put "copy" into the 
hands of the printer for each number three weeks before date of issue. This 
should be remembered in sending special or important matter for a certain 
issue. Twenty-five "extras," without change in form, will be given free, when 
they are wanted; and this should be so stated on the MS., along with the num- 
ber desired. The receipt of all papers will be acknowledged. ED. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., NOVEMBER, 1899. 

There is nothing like the amount of exchanging of specimens 
going on among entomologists as there should be, and one of 
the reasons for this is careless collecting. The person that is 
careful and neat does not care to have his or her collection 
marred by ragged and flown specimens and is thus deterred 
from exchanging. Many also think they have little to ex- 
change, but such is not the case, as there is probably no local- 
ity in this country that does not produce some desirable spe- 
cies. The local collector should make a special effort to get 
four or five good species in abundance and in faultless condi- 
tion, and there would be very little question but what many 
persons would be glad to have a set, no matter how long they 
have been collecting. The writer of this notice has been col- 
lecting for about thirty years, yet he never fails to replace poor 
specimens by better ones as opportunity offers. Let the be- 
ginners and even advanced students try this plan and put 
their exchange notices in THE NEWS and the results will doubt- 
less be gratifying. As an example, a Philadelphia lepidop- 
terist could put in a notice like this : "I have faultless exam- 
ples of PapiUo turnm glaucus ; Anthocharis genutia ; 
hcllona and idalia; Pleris protodice ; Terias nicippe ; 
canthus ; Thecla auf/mtux, PampliUa massasoit, metea, 
Now we feel quite sure there are many persons who would be 
glad to get a set of some of these species in faultless condition 
in exchange for some of those they could get equally perfect. 
'One fine specimen is worth no end of trash." 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 265 

Notes and Ne\vs. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL GLEANINGS FROM ALL QUARTERS OF THE GLOBE. 



THE insect mentioned on page 247 of the October NEWS was a 
pink katydid. The species was uot given EDS. 

TO A MOSQUITO. 

O, tiny insect, pity take ; 

Go hence ; the haunts of m:m forsake, 

We pray you. 

For should our baser passions wake, 
You'll rue the day make no mistake : 

We'll slay you. 

For many weary years, it's true, 
A table d'hote we've furnished you 

All gratis. 

When you had nothing else to do 
And that was pretty often, too 

You ate us. 

With cheerful hnzz you'd ply your sting, 
And then away would gaily wing, 

So fleet, oh"! 

But now you've had your little fling, 
Hegone-or we'll not do n tli/in/. 

Mosquito ! 

ROBERT T. HARDY, JR. 

MR. II. H. NEWCOMB, of Boston, Mass., announces the sudden 
death of Mr. M. C. Stevenson, of Salt Lake City, rtah, who died 
last June from an acute attack of appendicitis. The deceased was 
interested in Lepidoptera. 

I AM engaged in a special study of the Lepidopterous genus, 
Plusia, and hope at some time to publish an illustrated monograph 
of the N. A. species. I have at present examples of about fifty 
species, many, however, represented by but single specimens. I 
should welcome any assistance in this work, either in the form of 
specimens (for which I will give ample return in exchange or 
cash), or in the following manner : I earnestly request each collector 
who re ids this paragraph to send me a list of the species of Pluxin 
present in his collection, with a statement of the localities of cap- 
ture. If (ill collectors would aid me in this simple way, I shall 
very quickly be enabled to publish an article showing the geo- 
graphical distribution of the genus. I await the results of this re- 
quest, as it will in a meisure demonstrate who are ready to do a 
little work for the advancement of knowledge,and who are afflicted 
with what Mr Grote once aptly termed " the greed of possession '' 
possession being the sole aim of their labors. Due credit will be 
given to all who aid me in any manner. R. OTTOLKXGUI, 11 f> Madi- 
son avenue, New York City. 



266 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

Psocus SPECIOSUS, Aaron. A single specimen of this species was 
collected at Dripping Spring, Organ Mountains, New Mexico, 
August 20, 1898, by Martin D. Cockerell and Jose Meudoza T am 
indebted to Mr. N. Banks for assistance in its determination. This 
pretty species was described from North Carolina and was not ex- 
pected so far west. This is the first record of a Psoci'd from New 
Mexico. T. D. A. COCKERELL. 

o 

Entomological Literature, 

COMPILED BY P. P. CALVERT. 



Under the above head it is intended to mention papers received at the Acad- 
emy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia pertaining to the Entomology of the 
Americas (North and .South). Articles irrelevant to American entomology 
will not be noted. Contributions to the anatomy, physiology and embryology 
of insects, however, whether relating to American or exotic species,wlll be re- 
corded. The numbers in HEAVY-FACED TYPE refer to the journals, as num- 
bered in the following list, in which the papers are published ; * denotes that the 
paper in question contains descriptions of new North American forms. Titles 
of all articles in foreign languages are translated into English ; usually such 
articles are written in the same language as the title of the journal contain- 
ing them, but when such articles are in other languages than English, French, 
German or Italian, this fact is indicated in brackets. 



4. The Canadian Entomologist, London, Out. ,Oct ,'99. S.Psyche, 
Cambridge, Mass.. Oct., '99. 6. Journal of the New York Entomo- 
logical Society, Sept., '99.- 8. The Entomologist's Monthly Maga- 
zine, London, Oct., '99 II. The Annals and Magazine of Natural 
History, London, Sept. ,'99. 21. The Entomologist's Record, London, 
Sept. 15, '99. 35. Annales, Societe Entomologique de Belgique, xliii^ 
7, Brussels, July 29, '99. 41. Eutomologische Nachrichlen, Berlin, 
'99. 45. Deutsche Entomologische Zeitschrift, '99,Ites Lepidopter- 
ologisches Heft, Barlin, Sept. 15. 59. Proceedings, U. S. National 
Museum, Washington, xxii, '99. 55. Le Naturaliste, Paris, "99. 
58 Revista Chileua de Historia Natural, Valparaiso, '99. 60. An- 
ales, Museo Nacionnl de Buenos Aires, vi, '99. 64. Auualeu, K. K. 
Naturhistorischen Hofmuseums. xiii, 1-3, Vienna, '98, rec'd. Oct '99, 
70. Journal, Institute of Jamaica, ii, Kingston, '99. 79. La Nature. 
Paris, '99. 81. Biologisches Centralblatt, Erlaugen, '99 - 116. Zooi- 
ical Bulletin, ii, 0, Boston, Sept. '99. 117. Schriften des Vereines 
zur Verbreitung imturwissenschaftlicher Keuntuisse in Wieu, 
xxxix, '99. 

The General Subject. B o r d a g e , E . On the spiral mode of 
growth of appendages in course of regeneration in Arthropods, 
Comptes Rendus, L'Academie des Sciences, Paris, Sept. 4, '99. 
Boutan, L. Tracheates, Periplaneta ori'atlattx, figs., and 
Janet, C . Hymeuoptera, the Ant., figs, in : Zoologie Descrip. 
tive, Anatomic, Histologieet Dissection des Formes Typiques d'ln- 
vertebres [Redactenr L. Boulan] Paris, Octave Doin. -2 vols, 1900. 
B r u u n e r von "W a t t e u w y 1 , C. The coloration of in- 
sects, 117. d e B r u y n e , C . On the intervention of phagocy- 
tosis in the development of the Invertebrates, 5 pi?., Memoires 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. '_><;: 

Couronues et Memoires des ~avants Etrangers publics par 1'Ac'ide- 
inie Royaledes Sciences, etc.,de Belgique. xli, Brussels, Dec , '97, to 
July, '98. C a r p e u t e r , G . H . Insects, their Structure a, id 
Life. See review. post. C h a p man, T . A. The theory ot'em- 
boitement, 21. E n t e ni an, M. M. The unpaired ectoderma I 
structures of the Anteunata, tigs. .116. II a r r i s, T. W . Manu- 
script notes by the late T. "W. Harris on Say's insects and paper-, 
ii [S H. Scudder, editor], 5. P o r t e r , 0. E. Essay toward- 
a Chilian bibliography of Natural History, 58. July, Aug. 
P o u 1 t o n , E . B . , and Sanders, C . Au experimental in- 
quiry into the struggle for existence in certain common insects, 
Report of the Sixty-eighth Meeting of the British Association for 
the Advancement of Science, held at Bristol, Sept., '98, London, '99. 

Silvestri, F. Geographical distribution of Koeticnin 
iii/rabtlis Grassi and other Arthropods. Per/i><it<'<l<' lihtiitrt'llei 
(Blanch.), Zoologischer An/.eiger, Leipsic, Sept. 18, '99. 

Economic Entomology. A n o n . The present position of the inves- 
tigation of the malarial parasite, Nature, London, Sept 7, '99. 
Anon. [Results of the German Malaria Expedition], Insekten 
Borse, Leipsic, Oct. 5, '99 Boll e, J. The silk-worm of the 
mulberry trees, its culture, diseases and the means for combatting 
them, 117. F 1 e t c h e r , J . Worm snakes and snake worms, Ot- 
tawa Naturalist. Oct. '99. G r e e n , E. E. On a tea pest from 
India, tigs., 8 d el Guercio, G. Contributions to the study 
of the forms and the life-history of Phla-othn'ps olea* and on 
some new soip mixtures of carbon bisulphide and nicotine as 
insecticides, fig.. Bulletino, Societa Eutomologica Italiana. xxx, 
3-4, Florence, Aug 31, '99; Contributions to the study of the forms 
and of t lie life-history of Trama rin/tr/s Kaltenbach, with a note 
on the systematic position of the genus in the family Aphirfce, figs., 
ilnd.- Loch head, W. Dermestes lardarius in honeycomb. 4. 
-de Lover do, J. The tsetse fly disease, 79, Sept. 9. de 
M (' r i e 1 , P . Steam engine for insecticide powders, fig., 79. 
fept- 2 - P e 1 1 i t , li . H . The clover root mealy bug., figs.. 4. 

S c h a u d inn, F . Alternation of generations of the ( '<><</!/ /it 
and the new malaria researches, SitzuDgsberichte der G-esellschafl 
der Naturforschenden Freunde, Berlin, July 18, '99. - S 1 i n g e r- 
1 ;i nd, M. V. The cherry fruit- fly, a new cherry pest, figs. I 
pi.. Bulletin 172, Sept.. '99, [and] Emergency Report on Tent Cat- 
erpillars, tig-.. Bulletin 17n. Cornell University Agric. Ex per. Sta- 
tion, Ithacn. N. Y.. M;iy, '99. T r o o p , J. The San Jose .-md 
other scale insects and the Indiana Nursery Inspection Law. Purdue 
University Indiana' Agric- Ex per. Station, Bulletin No. 7s, La Kay- 
ette, lud., May. '99. W i 1 c o x, E. V. AIM i.-icts of recent liter- 
ature, Experiment Station Record, xi.l, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 
Washington, '99. 

Arachnida.- G o e 1 d i , E . A. Arachnological studies relating 
to Brazil (cout.) [in Portuguese], Boletim do Musen I'araensc de 



268 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [NoV 

Historia Natural e Ethnographia, II, 4, Pan, Dec-, '98. Rec'd* 
Oct., '99. 

Myriopoda. P o r t e r , C . E Introduction to the study of the 
Myriopods (concl.) [in Spanish], 58, June. 

Apterygota -Banks, N . The Smynthuridae of Long- Island, New 
York,* 6. S i I v e s t r i , F . Brief comparative description of 
Lepidocampa Oudms with Campodea "Westvv., 2 pis., 60. 

Orthoptera. B o u t a n , L . See the General Subject He y - 
mo us, R. On vesicular organs in grasshoppers, figs , "-itzungs- 
berichte der koniglicheu preussischen Akademieder Wisseuschaften, 
Berlin, June 15, '09. Morse. A. P. New "North American 
Tettigiuae, in.* 6. Tiiinpel, R. Die G-eradflugler Mittel- 
europas. Eisenach, M. Wilckens. LieferungS. [Pp. 97-136, figs. 
25-40, pis. xv-xvii.] Reo'd. Oct., '99. 

Neuroptera. K e 1 1 o g g, V. L. A list of the biting lice (Mal- 
lophaga) taken from birds and mammals of North America, 50, No. 
1183. Tut t, J. W. Migration and dispersal of insects : Odou- 
ata, 21. 

Hemiptera. Cocker ell, T. D . A. Tables for the deter- 
mination of the genera of Coccidae, 4. C o o 1 e y , R . A . The 
Coccid genera Chionaspis and Hemichionaspis, 9 pis Special 
Bulletin, Hatch Experiment f-tation of the Massachusetts Agric. 
College, Amhei>t, Mass. Aug. 10, '99 Distant, W. L. 
Rhynchotal notes, Heteroptera : Plataspinae, Tliyreocorinae and 
( yduiua?, II. G r e e u , E. E. Observations on some species of 
Coccidae of the genus Ceroplastes in the collection of the British 
Museum,! pi, II. del Guercio. G. See Economic Ento- 
mology - H e i d e in a n u , O . A new species of Tiugititia?,* 4 - 
King, G B . A new Pulvinaria from Massachusetts, figs , 5> 
K irkaldy. G. W. On some aquatic Rhynchota from Ja- 
maica [reprint from Entomologist, London, Feb. 1899], 70. L a u- 
d e r . B . Note on the seventeen-year Cicada. 6. M e 1 i c h a r , 
L . Monograph of the llicaniidae (Homoptera), 6 pis.,* 64. P a r- 
r o t t , P . J , New Coccids from Kansas,* figs.. 4. 

Coleoptera. C h o b a u t , A- Habits and metamorphoses of 
Platypsyllus castoris Rits , ftgs , 55, Sept ]. C o c k e r e I 1 . 
T. D. A. A :je~7 Meloid beetle parasitic on Anthophora, 4. 
Davis, T- W. Whirligig beetles taking a sun-bath, 6. 
Ganglbauer, L Die Ivifer von Mitteleuropa, III Bd, 2te 
Halfte. Familienreihe Clavicoruia. 16 text flgs Wieii. < arl Ger- 
old'sSohu. 1899. Pp 409 to 1046. H o r n , W- On the classifi- 
cation of the Cicindeiidse, 45 (Coleopteroloo'isches heft 1, July) - 
J a c o b y , M . Descriptions of new species of South American 
phytophagous Coleoptera, Entomologist, London, Oct., '99.- 
Kerremans, C . Contribution to the study of the American 
intertropical fauna, Buprestidae, ii,* 35. S c h u 1 z , W . A On 
^ he life- history of the South American Cerambycid genus Hippopsis, 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 269 

figs , 41. Jul y.-S e i d 1 i t z . G . Coleoptera Vter Bd , 2te Hiilfte' 
3te Lieferung, in Naturgeschichteder Insekten Deutschlands begon- 
nen von Dr. W. F. Erichsou, Berlin, '99. [Pp. 681-968 Oedem- 
evidae]. X a m b e u , C a p t. Habits of Atenc/it<x ln//<-<,///s L., 
a Coleopterof the group of coprophagous Lamellicorns, 55, Sept. 15- 

Diptera Coquillett, D. AY . New genera and species of 
Dexidae,* 6 D o a n e . R . W . Notes on Trypetidae, with descrip- 
tions of new species,* 2 pi-.. . 6. G i r s c b n e r , E. Contribu- 
tion to the life-history and classification of the Muscidae, figs., 41, 
June Hough, G d e N . Synopsis of the Calliphorinae of the 
United States,* figs.. 116 R ii b s a a m e u , E . H . Communica- 
tions on new and known galls from Europe, Asia, Africa and Amer- 
ica, figs., 2 pis., 41, Atig, and Sept.; On the living habits of 
the Cecidomyidae, ii, iii, 81, Sept. 1 and 15. W heeler, W M 
New species of Dolichopodidae from the United States.* 4 pis. 
Proceedings, California Academy of 'ciences (3) ii, 1, San Fran- 
cisco. Sept. 29, '99. 

Lepidoptera. A u r i v i 1 1 i u s , C Rhopiloeera aetbiopica : 
th e butterflies of the Ethiopian fauna 1 region, a systematic geograph- 
ical study. 6 pis., figs. Kongl. Svenska Vetenskips Akudeiniens 
Handlingar, xxxi, 5. Stockholm. '98. Ree'd Oct. 5, '99. v o n 
B o n u i n g h a u s e n . V. Contribution to knowledge of the 
Lepidopterous fauna of Rio de Janeiro, tribus Sphingidae, 45. 
Cocker ell, T. D. A. A new NocTuid of the genus Cirro- 
p1unn>f>* 4. C oquillett, D. W. On the early stages of 
some California Lepidoptera. 6.- D o g n i u . P . New Heteroeera 
from South America, 35. Druce, H . Descriptions of some 
new species of Heterocera, II. D y a r , H. G Description of 
the larva of Hadena tiiiselutdes Guen.,4 ; Life-history ofHi/jjsoro/i/ni 
hormos Hiibn ,4; Life-histories of North American Geometridae- 
v. 5 ; Life-history of a European slug-caterpillar. Cuclili/J/nn urcl- 
tiiiin, 1 pi , 6; A new genus of Cojlilidionulae from \ r irginia. 6. 
Gauckler, H. Double cocoons of ><i1nr>ii<t N/>////, 45. 
G r o s e- S in i t h , H . Rhopalocera F^xotiL-a, being illustrations 
of new, rare, or unfigured species of butterflies With colored draw- 
ing- and descriptions London : Guruey and Jackson. Part 49, 
July. "'.)!).- G r o t e, A. R. The diphylism of the diurnal Lepi- 
doptera, 4. H o f m a n n , O . Remarks on " ExperimentelleZpol- 
osfische Studien mit Lepidopteren by Dr. .M Standfast 45. 
L a t Ii y , P. J Butterflies and moths. 70. -v. L i n d e 11 , 
M . On Fran/. Friedmanifs " Ueber die Pigmentbildung in den 
Schmetterlingstlugrlii." 81. Sept. !.">. -M c y ri c k. E Macrole).)!- 
doptera in: Fauna Hawaiieusis or the Zoology of the S md\\ i-li 
( Hawaiian) Isles: Being re-nils of t he ex pi oral ions instituted by the 
joint committee appointed by the Royal Society of London.... 
and the British Association for the Advancement of Science and 
carried on with the assistance of those bodies and of the Trn>ici-s 



270 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum at Honolulu Ed- 
ited by David Sharp, vol. 1, part n, pp. 123--75, pis. iii-vii- 
Cambridge, University Press, June 8, '99. M o o r e , F. Lepi- 
doptera ludica, partxxxix London, Lovell Reeve & Co., '99- Rec'd. 
Sept. 28. [Pp. 33-64, pis. 303-308, Vol. 4 Xymphaliuae-Limeuitiua.] 
-R oths child, W . and J o r d a u , K . A monograph of 
Charaxes and the allied priouoplerous genera (cont ), figs Novi- 
tates Zoologica?, vi, 2, Tring, Aug. 15, '99 S c h a u s , W. New 
species of Lithosiidas from tr>>picil America,* 6. -S c h w a r t z e , 
E. To knowledge of the development of the gut of Lepidop- 
tera,4 pis.. Zeitschrift fiir Wissenschaf'tliche Zoologie, Ixvi, 3, Leip- 
sic, Sept. 22, '99. Smith, J. B. New species of nocturnal 
moths of the genus Cainpotnetra aud notes,* 50, No. 1184. Ste ven - 
son, C. Chloffppe ceftt's Bd. -Lee. captured on Montreal Island* 
4. Stic he 1. II. Critical remark on the specific determina- 
tion of butterflies, i, Catottephele and Nesswa lib u., figs , 1 pi., 
Berliner Entomologische Zeituug. xliv, 1-2, July, '99. "We y mer 
G . Papil/'o ortlutsilrnts, n sp., 41, July. 

Hymenoptera . Ash m e a d , W . H Classification of the ento- 
mophilous wasps, orthe supert'amily Sphegoidea, v, 4. B u r g e r - 
stein, A. Plants and Ants, Wiener Illustrirte Garten- Zeitung, 
Aug. and Sept., '99. -C ockerell, T. I). A. The Pauurgine 
bees, 5: See also Coleoptera.F o w 1 e r, C. The Habroj>oda and 
Didasfa of California.* 4 F r i e s e , H . Monograph of the bee 
genera Megacili'ssa, Caupolicana, l)i/>J/<//oxx<f and Oxa'a, 64. 
J a u et, C . See Boutau L. aud Janet C- in the General Subject. 
Kouow, F.W. New South American Tenthredinida?, 60.- 
Iv r i e g e r , K . On some Ichneu mould genera allied to Pittijt/x. 
1 pi.. Sitzungsberichte der Naturforscheuden Gesellschaft, Leipsic, 
'97-'9S. Rec'd Oct. '99. P e r e z , J. Three new JJepachile from 
Chili, 58, July . S 1 a d e u , F. W L. JBombf in captivity and 
habits of I i ta'tlii/nnf, 8. 

-o 

INSECTS, THEIR STRUCTURE AND LIFE. A PRIMER OF ENTOMOLO<;V . 

BY GEORGE H. CARPENTER, B. Sc. Lond Assistant Naturalist in 

the Science aud Art Museum, Dublin London: J M. Dent & 

Co., 29 and 30 Bedford street. W. C. 1899. 12mo Pp. xii, 404. 
183 figs in the text. Furnished by the New York publishers, the 
Macmillan Co., 06 Fifth avenue. Received from John "VYana- 
maker's. Price. $1 .75 

"Not one, even of the many books made in these days is likely to 
be thought superfluous by its author. Aud in spite of to a great 
extent indeed bec;aus3 of- the thousand aud more original works 
on Insects now published yearly, it saems that the student has need 
of a small, inexpensive. English book, sketching in outline the whole 
subject of entomology Such a volume as this is necessirily for the 
most part a compilation-' 1 So begins the Prefice, and the sources 
of the compilation arc tlr.'n given 



1890] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. -_'71 

Chap. I, The Form of Insects, using a cockroach as a typical mem- 
ber of this class, describes the structure of adult inserts by compar- 
isons willi this type. It is significant thateveu in such a handbook 
as this about GO pages of the 83 comprising this chapter are devoted 
to the internal organs. This leads us to expect that prominence will 
be given to embryonic development in Chap II, The Life-History 
of Insects, pp. 84-127. and such is the case, although, of course, larval 
and pupal stages and metamorphosis are also treated of. Chap. ITI 
The Classification ot Insects, pp. 128-159, contains also some clear 
and interesting summaries, necessarily brief, of causes known to 
effect modifications of insects. Chap. IV, The Orders of Insects 
briefly describes these groups and their component families, pp. 
160-280. Chapter V, Tnse;-ls and Their Surroundings, deals with 
habitats, geographical distribution, insects and flowers, food, para- 
sitic forms, methods of protection, mimicry, social communities, to 
p. 343. Chap. VI, The Pedigree of Insects, pp. 344-378, gives us a 
genealogical tree, among other interesting speculations. A valuable 
*' References to Literature,'' of 217 titles (pp. 379-392), classified by 
subjects, indicates the authorities for the statements in the preced- 
ing text. Index, pp. 393-404. 

There are few, if any. original illustrations. Their sources are ac- 
knowledged under each, and so many are copied from the publica- 
tions of the IT. S. Department of Agriculture that they fit the book 
even more for use by American students than by Englishmen. 

As the above summary of the contents shows, this work is quite 
encyclopedic as regards the number of topics discussed, and it can 
be strongly recommended to all those who desire a view of Ento- 
mology on its many sides. P. P. C. 



-o- 



DOINGS OF SOCIETIES. 

Minutes of Newark Entomological Society, September 1.01 li. 
Meeting called to order, with Vice President Kemp in the 
chair and six members present. 

A vote of thanks was tendered l>r. Kun/e, of Ari/.oiiu. who 
donated a lot of Lepidoptera lor t lie Society's collect ion. 

Mr. Anglemaii reported 'that ('t/niiiioi'/i/ni triiiin/u/n/a Smith 
was common at Newark June ISth, adding that this \\a-a 
week earlier than usual. 

The members, wit h some except ions, reported poor collect 
ing this season in the vicinity of Newark. 

Mr. S. T. Kemp remarked that he had a successful two 
weeks' trip. August 1 1 1 h-1* It h , at Swart/\\ ood Lake. N. ,1 . 
Among the captures were: .l<l"li>/nt;/i-<i/ix ymrsv/m, A;//-.>/ix 



272 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

geniculata, Peridroma occitlta, Noctua normaniana, Hadenafrac- 
tilinea, Trigonophora periculosa, Orihosia auriantigo, all taken 
at night. He remarked that he found the following Sphiiu 1 
on Evening Primrose : D. lineata, C. tersa, P. pandorm, 8. 
erimituH and P. celus. 

Mr. Seib remarked that Betuuia or Four O'clock was more 
attractive. 

The genus selected for identification and study for the next 
meeting was Garii(><l<'x. 

Meeting adjourned. A. J. WEIDT, Sec'y. 



At the September meeting of the Feldman Collecting Social, 
held at the residence of Mr. H. W. Wenzel, 1523 South Thir- 
teenth Street, thirteen persons were present. 

Prof. J. B. Smith exhibited a small apple-tree, to which was 
attached a cocoon of the bag worm, the silken thread by which 
it hung having girdled the tree in consequence of the latter's 
rapid growth. He also recorded the capture of Ommatostola 
lintneriana, at lights, at Auglesea, N. J., [September 3d. It is a 
coast species, hitherto quite rare, and was quite abundant on 
the date mentioned. 

Mr. Johnson reported the capture of a specimen of Pangonia 
chrysocoma, a rare Dipteron, at the Delaware Water Gap. 

Mr. H. W. Wenzel exhibited specimens of Lomechusa cava, 
from Newtown Square, Pa. It had not before been recorded 
from this region, and the present specimens were captured in 
the nest of Camponotus vlcinus. 

Dr. Castle showed Coleoptera from Hamilton Co., New York, 
among which were some interesting species. 

Mr. Haimbach exhibited a number of interesting Lepidop- 
tera from Holly Beach, N. J., collected in July last. 

Prof. Smith called attention to Trechus chalybceus, collected 
near South River, New Brunswick, N. J., by Master Harry 
Wen/el. They were associated with an ant, JAIHIHX iiiu-tux, 
under large stones. Calfornia and British Columbia speci- 
mens in hand were dated September, whereas the present 
ones were taken in July, and were not before recorded from 
New Jersey. 

Mr. H. Wen /el spoke of the impossibility of defining the 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 273 



geographical distribution of the Xorth American 
and ticydmcenidce, from our present knowledge, judging from 
his experience in collecting these insects during the past 
season, when species not before recorded from these regions 
had been taken abundantly. Hitherto these insects had 
not been collected in a careful way by coleopterists in 
general, and for this reason theories as to their distribu- 
tion are likely to be of little value at the present time. At 
a future date he expects to exhibit his collections of these in- 
sects to the members of the Social . He stated that the habits 
of the same species differ considerably as to its place of abode, 
being frequently found in ants' nests and in places where ants 
were entirely absent. 

The great abundance of several species of Harpalus during 
the past summer was discussed by several of the members. 

WILLIAM J. Fox, Secretary. 



A meeting of the Entomological Section of the Academy of 
Natural Sciences was held September 28th, Mr. Philip 
Laurent, Director, presiding. Fifteen persons present. 
Mr. Fox reported that some co- types of Crabro had been 
received from and presented by Prof. Trevor Kincaid. 
Mr. W. H. Ashmead spoke of the phenomenal growth of 
the collection of insects of the IT. S. Department of Ag- 
riculture, and said exotic species had been coining in 
by the thousands. In reply to Mr. Laurent Mr. Ashme;id 
stuted that he had estimated the number of specimens of 
insects in the collection of the National Museum as 1 ,.'"><), ooo. 
The strength of the collections in the various orders was dwell 
on. Mr. Laurent exhibited a living specimen of Htttf/iitoiimiifix 
Carolina, captured in this city on the river front. He had re- 
ceived four specimens of Tenodeni xin< //*/* this year, taken in 
Germantown, Philadelphia. He had received the first speci- 
men from Mr. Meehau in 189<>. The method of the Chinese 
in making Munt'lx fight in a bowl was mentioned. Mr. Ash- 
mead spoke of the value of these insects in destroying noxious 
species. Mr. Laurent stated that Ccnttnmiti nt/d/j,.,' \\as abun- 
dant this season, and that Mr. Keif had found 180 pupa' at 
Moore Station, Pa. Mr. Ridings said that in walking along 



274 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Xov 

Michaux avenue, iu Fairmoimt Park, he had met the Park 
gardener, who called his attention to the way in which the 
water lilies are destroyed by an insect burrowing in the stem. 
Specimens showing the damage were exhibited. The injury 
was probably done by Fi/r<ni*f<i iH'himbialis Smith. Mr. Ash- 
mead said a lily in the grounds of the Department of Agricul- 
ture had been injured by a Pyralid larva. Mr. Johnson said 
a species of Chironomous had been reared by Prof. Smith from 
the Victoria regia. Dr. Calvert stated that during the last of 
August he had made an expedition into Southern Xew Jersey, 
by means of the bicycle, with a view of getting data in relation 
to the Odonata for Prof. Smith's new Catalogue of the Insects 
of New Jersey, which is shortly to appear. The route was 
( 'amden to Hamnionton, Egg Harboi City, Gloucester, Abse- 
con, Bargaiutown, Soniers Point, Petersburg, Tuckahoe, Deu- 
uisville, Eldora, Millville, Bridgton, Alloway, Camdeu, thus 
making a circle through the lower half of the State. Isc/incura 
1,-cllicntti \vas found at seven places. He had also found it 
earlier at Block Island, R. I. At Bargaintown he had gotten 
interesting data in the cedar bogs through which the Hopat- 
coug Creek flows. The flight of the male Hetcerina was de- 
scribed. They dance up and down and at the same time make 
a circle of about four inches. The object of this dance was 
unknown. 

The species of SoiiHttorhlora were mentioned, the speaker 
keeping a lookout for them. They were not infrequently seen, 
but none were taken, on account of their rapid and high flight. 
At Clementon E.i(tll(i;/>int intllnhnu was taken, a species which 
he had rather expected would be found in the vicinity. The 
collections made by S. JS". Ehoads at Haddoufield were also 
examined and additional data secured. Mr. Liebeck exhibited 
the 200 specimens, 73 species, of Coleoptera purchased for the 
American Entomological Society from the Griffith collection. 
Various rare and interesting species were mentioned. Mr. 
Ashmead spoke of the large collection of beetles made by the 
late Mr. H. S. Hubbard in Arizona and said there would be 
.")()(> new species in the lot. Mr. Caspar Rehni was elected an 
associate of the Section. 

DR. HKNKY SKINNKR, Recorder 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS 

AMI 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SECTION 

AC. \DK.MY (>K X \Tl KAI, SCIKM'KS. I'l I I I .A I >KI,I'I ! I A. 



VOL. x. Di-:< KM iiKii. isii'.i. \ . 



( ONTKXTS: 



Hancock SOUK- 'IVtt iiiian jsi mlirs.. i'7. r > Economic Entomology 
Smtt h Catoral.-r nl Montgomery 



County. VH _>*> x " u-s : ""' Nrvvs ' 



SU inner Tin- Fourth of lulv ......... 1'Sii Kiit<iiimli>:ii<-al l.ilfrat lire ............ L'!"i 



s lir]gorlan<l Stuiromunt Is caroliiia hoiii^sol" Sociclirs ................... :!(l'J 

In Nfw York ....... ..-!!* 

Exclmnges ............. ............... i, 11 

Kclitonal .............. ...'J!Ki 



SOME TETTIGIAN STUDIES, 

I'.\ .1. I,. HANCOCK. 

In Prof. I.u'iiacio IJolivar's I'lssav. *s7. tlicrc i>> mllcdh civ 
Brought together under the genus I'tinilctti.i- ;i ninnlx-r of s|>c- 
<-ies which I have found necessary to revise. We find in (In- 
disposition of species there are three sections, the first, page 
L'70. being separated from the rest of t he series by t lie charac- 
ters of the posterior tarsi, as follows: Section one, first and 
third articles of the posterior tarsi equal in length, under 
which two species are thus grouped, nanielx : l'<ir<ilftli.<- j / -n- 
ri(nuiN JJol.and Ptinilt Iti.i r<ii/rnnciisifi ]>olivar. 

These two Species belong t< the same eategorv as the n<-\\ 
species described here and they form a distinct genus, to 
which I have given the new name. Al/u/r/tii. the type being 
prolongatus. They, moreover, approximate the M<lr<><l<n\t\ in 
stead of the Trftit/Ht'. and are in consequence dropped from tin- 
original Pttni'flti.r series entirel\ . 

It is but ]>roper to >talc that m\ csleeined colleague. I'rol. 
liolivar. in a eommunieal ion to me reeogni/ed I hat a eliange. 
sueli as 1 lia\ ' effecled . \\onld probably be uecessar\ . lull the 



276 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Dec 

species which is described us Allotettix prolonyatus ho identified 
as the same as his jx-riirlaiiii^. The latter is quite unlikely, as 
a careful comparison will show. 
Al'otettix, gen. nov. 

Body rugose, tii bercu late, face oblique, as seen in trout, narrow. 
Vertex narrower than an eye, middle carinate,sulcate on either side, 
the t-rown very short, the vertex on a higher plane than the occiput, 
which slopes backwards, and in front not advanced to the anterior 
border of the eyes; in prolile not visible. Anteriorly subtruncate, 
passing laterally into little short convextd flexures. Eyes promi- 
nent. Frontal costa narrowly divided. Antenna 1 inserted a little 
below the anterior inferior border: filliform rather short, consist- 
ing of fourteen articles, the superior ocelli scarcely perceptible in 
protile at the middle of the anterior border of the eyes. Pronotuin 
depressed, truncated in front, strongly prolougatecl posteriorly, 
ending in a sharp apical process, median marina scarcely elevated, 
humeral angles obtuse, posterior median lobule of lateral lobes 
feeblyideveloped, the subhumeral sinus shallow, the posterior angle 
directed obliquely downward and backwards. Elytra elongate 
The first and third articles of the posterior tarsus about equal in 
length . 
Allotettix prolongatus, sp. nov. 

P>ody strongly prolongate, rugose tubeivulate, fuscus. narrow, 
above depressed, tibia? annulated with flavus. Vertex a little nar- 
rower than an eye, snbuarrowcd in front, feebly carinated in the 
middle, on either side sulcate. anteriorly subtruncate. passing lat- 
erally into little convexed flexures, ending abruptly near the ante- 
rior inner border of the eye; not advanced as far as the anterior 
border of the eye, in protile not visible, being obscured by the 
prominent eyes ; frontal costa depressed between the eyes, a little 
protuberant opposite the antenna 1 , about on a line with their ante- 
rior border, the forks as seen in front gradually but narrowly sepa. 
rated, diverging to the middle ocellus. Pronotum anteriorly trun- 
cate, posteriorly strongly prolongate, subulate and acuminate, fre- 
queutly extending within one millimeter of twice the length of tin- 
post erior femora,' median carina sea reel yelevaied, sinuate more or less 
tnberculate in its backward course, dorstim between the shoulders a 
little unevenly swollen, rugose papillate, just behind strongly de- 
pressed, dorsal surface of the apical process rugose, uneven and cov- 
ered with numerous longitudinal tubercuhc. lateral angles obtuse, 
posterior angle of the lateral lobe obtuse, rounded. Elytra elong;i!e. 
impresao- punctate, with the apex snbacutely rounded: wingsabotit 
as long as the process or scarcely longer. Femora 1 uu modified. slen 
der, the posterior femora narrow, the carina'of tibia with rather 
small and scarcely more than five or six spines, on the inner carina 1 
as few as three or four bevond the middle: the tirsi nrtick- of the 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. ' 



_ i i 



posterior tarsus equal 5 u length to the third, the iir.-t and -econd 
pulvilli united about equal to the third, the tirst and second acute. 
the third straight below. 

Length body. 12-l.'5mm., pronot. l<; 17' ,111111.. post, feni., 7-7. "mini- 

Locality. Bolivia, South America. Hancock. 

Allotettix peruvianus, Bui. 

Obscure, ferrugiueus, ftlSCO variegated- Verti-x nearly a- wide a- 
an eye.- horizontal, anteriorly subnarrowed, in front scarcely trans- 
versely earinated: frontal co-ta between the antenna 1 obliquely de- 
pressed, obscurely sinuate. Pronotum posteriorly long and subu- 
late, median cariua between the shoulder- sinuate, between the 
shoulders with concavities, posterior angle of the lateral lobe with 
the apex widely rounded. Klytra oblong, subncuiiiiuale : winu'sa- 
loug as the process. Femoral carina unchanged, first article of the 
posterior tarsi not longer than the third, third pnlvillns -horter 
the second and tirst united, first pulvillus with the apex shortly 
spiued and acute. 

Length of body, '.) l.'i..~>nini., nronol . l.'!..Vl Mmn .. post. fern. 

5.5-7rara. 

Locality Pumamarco, Peru. Mu-enm of Varsovic. liolivar. 
Allofttix oayennensis, Bol. 

Pale In-cns, rugulo.se. vertex narrower than an eve. not produced 
in front of the eyes, middle earinated. lateral lobes externally 
rounded: frontal eosta between the eyes little sinuate. Pronotum 
narrow, posteriorly long and subulate, in front of the -boulders, 
crowded together, median carina a little elevated, between the 
shoulders subsinuate. Klytra narrowly rounded at the apex. <'a- 
rinas of the femora undulate, crenulate, posterior femora elongate, 
before the apex reduced, first and third articles of the posterior 
tarsi nearly equal in length, apical pulvillus i.cule. the third pul- 
VI I his scarcely shorter than the -econd and first united. Valves of 
t he ovipositor rather -borl. 

Body length, , . snini . pronot.. lOmm.. \n><{. lem.. .">..">nim. 

Locality. Cayenne (Coll. of M. Bruiincr). Bolivar. 

Among some Tettigid;! 1 received from Mexico, through the 
kindness of MY. <). \V . P>;irivtt. I ;im iiltle to record ;i nc\\ 
;md very interesting species of \f<>ftifi.<- Ihmcoek. 
Neotettix baiTetti, -\>. nov. 

Body small, rugose-granulate. Vertex fully twi>-e the width of 
an eye, anterior border con vexed and advanced considerably in front 
of the eye-, middle carinate, projecting a little in front and ending 
I >uck wards at a line drawn acro-s (he anterior third of I he eyes, feebly 
snlcate or rather depressed on eit her side, nriimni late po-leriorl\ : 
frontal COSta Straight and siibvcrtieal. the apex rounded angulate. 
-ecu in front the frontal co-ta strongly forked, the branche- starting 
opposite the middle of the eye, suddenly diverging in their de 



278 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Dec 

scension, being farther apart between the antennae where they are 
parallel, tending' to slight convergence at the median ocellus. An- 
tenna? very short, filiform and consisting of twelve articles They 
originate as seen in profile at a point a little below and in front of the 
anterior inferior border of the eye. The posterior ocelli are plainly 
visible a little in front of the middle of the eyes, midway between 
the anterior margin of the frontal costa and the eyes, Pronolum 
anteriorly truncate, the anterior margin of the dorsum crowded 
forward over the head, a little constricted in front of the shoul- 
ders, tectiform. rugose, a little broadened, the humeral angles ob- 
tuse, angulate. cavinated, the little anterior lateral, carinae prom- 
inent, median carina of the pronotum strongly elevated, thin, 
straight above, roundly curving near the anterior border, posterior 
angle of the lateral lobes widely and obtusely angulate. Elytra 
narrow, apex subacutely rounded, wings not visible. Anterior 
femora compressed below, with a small drawn out lobe, ending 
near the apex : middle femora compressed above, obscurely undu- 
late, interiorly undulate, with a little median prominence; poste- 
rior femora large, the first article of the posterior tarsi exceedingly 
long, being a third longer than the last article; pulvilli incon 
spicuous, the first small, the second and third longer and ne-irly 
equal in length. 

<-?. Body length, "mm., pronot. Tin in., post fern. 4 r>">m 
Locality, Tizipau. 1). F., Mexico. O W. Barrel t. 

Named in honor of Mr. Barrett, who I'mmd lliis very inter- 
esting species. ; 

The vertex is more produced in front of the eyes in lliis 
species than any other species of Xcotrtti.r with whieli I am 
familiar. In a series of specimens from Minnesota, which I 
have been able to examine through the generosity of I'rof. 
Otto Lugger, there was a single specimen of Xomotdti.r Morse, 
which though nearly allied to Xomotctti.i' cri*{titK Harris, has 
some distinguishing characters which seem suflieiently pro- 
nounced to separate the species, and which I herewith sel 
forth. 

Nomotettix sinufrons, sj>. nov. 

Body granulate, rugose. Vertex very wide, equal i<> about twice 
the width of an eye; middle rather feebly carinate, shallowly sul- 
catc on either side of the median ridge, front border broadly but 
roundly curved, the mid-c iriiri very little pr.>j vting. in pro 
tile strongly produced in Iron I of tin- eyes; Irontal co^ta sinuate 
opposite the middle of the eyes, protuberant between the antenna', 
dorsum of the pronoluni anieriorly acute angulale, a little pro- 
duced over the head, posteriorly subulate, between the shoulders 
stronfflv tect iform. behind <>n the dorsum with a number of 



|SJ.|J ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. -_'7 ( .l 

oblique wrinkle-, median carina prominent, cristate, depresso con- 
vexed, humoral angles obtu-e. Klytra narrow, apex -uhacmni- 
nate. wings not reaching to the end ot the apical process. Femora' 
unchanged : posterior femora large, the first article of the posterior 
larsi iniich longer than tlio third, strongly serrulate above. ])iilvilli 
straight below. 

, IJody lenutli. !) .~>mm., pronut . s ;,. p,M. I'em. (iinni . 
Locality. Si. Anthony Park, M inne-ota . Prof Otto Lugger. 

This pecies is nearly allied to X. n-ixtittux Harris, differing 
iVoin that species principally in the pronotum not being S( 
strongly compressed above, the sinuation not so deep in front 
of the eyes, the frontal cost a more advanced in front of the 
eves, the vertex more ol>t nsel\ eonico annulate. In .\.rrtiNtutnx 
the frontal costal is more deeply excavate and the median 
carina of the vertex more elevated. gi \ ing the crown of the 
head in profile a more arched appearance. Although de- 
scribed from one specimen, these differences are such as to 
warrant me without hesitancy in giving this species a place 
here. 

Another point which I would like to bring forward in the 
present connection is in regard to Tcflir i/nnni/ntux Kirby. 
This species is undoubtedly t he same as described by Prof. 
Polivar in his "Essay, 'S7, page iMKi. ligs. i'l'-'Jlia, as Trfti.i 
ln-iiiiin-ri, making the latter name synonymous, but on the 
other hand this is not the species commonly understood as 
Tettijc granulatus, found in the northeastern Tinted States and 
southward, which has a slender form with long subulate pro 
notum. On the contrary, the true f/niiiiildhix has the body 
compact, rather large, the wings only extending as far as the 
apical process, as more full\ described below. The result of 
these researches leaves no other way open but to name the 
species further southward or in the temperate region, and to 
make my contention more clear I have described the two spe 
cies in t|Uestion. 
Tettix granulatus Ki rby. 
Syn. Tettix brunneri Bo I. 

IJody lirainilate. fusco te-lacens. abo\v ireiiuenlly \\ itli two lilack 
spots. Vertex wider than the eye, middle -trough earinalcd. quite 
deeply snlcate on e.ich ide. anleri-jrly obtu ;o annulate, the facial 
frontal costal widely >ulcaie. (he lirandie- runniiig Mib-parallel, 
>li.ii'htly wulening at the middle ocelli^ in profile, the median earinii 
of vertex curved above the eye- ; in front oppu-ile the middl'-ol' the 



1>SO ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [ 1 >ec 

eye the frontal costa is shallowly sinuate'. 1'ronotum truncate pos- 
teriorly subulate, apex slightly passing the posterior femor, dorsuni 
tectiform, broad between the shoulders, tliemedian carina distinctly 
elevated, percurrent, near the front margin more compressed, hume- 
ral angles obtuse, cariuated. the little anterior lateral carina distinci 
and parallel. Elytra oblong, apex rounded, impresso- punctated, 
wings extended almost as far or to the apex of the process Ante- 
rior femora obscurely undulate, middle femora unchanged. th e 
posterior femora rather slender, becoming considerably narrower 
near the apex ; carina straight crcnulate, the first article of the pos- 
terior tarsus above finely serulate. very much longer than the last 
two united, the pulvilli below straight, the first quite small, the 
second about twice as long as the first, the third as long as the first 
two united. 

Body length, ,- . ii.rjmm . pronot.. in.i-Jmm.. post, fern . ."> ,V 
(iium. Bolivar. 

The specimen before me measures: Body. I hum., pronot . lo :>. 
post, fern., 6mm. 

Locality. Hudson Bay. Bolivar. 

.For the specimen above mentioned in my collection I am 
indebted to Prof. "Bolivar, of Madrid, Spain. 

A specimen is said to have been taken in latitude (>."> and 
White found, specimens oil Ihe borders of (he Mackenzie and 
Slave I'ivers, and at Foil Simpson. Beth vine relates that this 
is the species found in New England States and Minnesota, 
but this is an error. This species is closely related lo 
Tetti.r !>i<-iirr<(fiix Hancock and Tflti.r hijunirtuhix of Europe. 
The latter is much smaller in stalure, the median carina pro- 
portionately more cristate, approaching Xomofrff/.r and the 
frontal costa of the face is not sinuate. For specimens of Ihe 
latter species in my collection I am indebted to Mr. Malcolm 
Burr, of East (irinstead, England. The bibliography of !'<!- 
tit- f/i-atinladtfi. as above described, is as follows : Ivirby, Fauna. 
Bor. Amer. IV, p.-.">I : DeHann, Bijdr. Kenn, Oi'tbopt, 14:> ' 
White, Kicli. Arct. Search, Exp. II. ;;<;<>; Bethune, Kirby's 
Fauna, Bor. Amer. Insects, p. ll'l ; Bolivar. Fssai s. 1. Acrid, 
tribu. Tettig, AmerSoe. Fnt . Belgi(|iie. p. -Mill. figs. 2L > -L >% _'a. 

Tcttix morsel, ?p. nov. 

Syn. Tettix granulatus Kirby. 

liody granulate or very little rugose, slender, polyornate. N'crlex 
considerably wider than an eye. middle carinate, on each side sul- 
cate from the middle of the eye to the anterior margin, obtuse an 
gulate in front, the median carina not projecting beyond the apex, 



1S1MI] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. -_>Sl 

in profile annulate produced, the crown substraight showing a 
little above the eyes ; facial frontal co-tal^trong'ly in advance of thi- 
eve-, as seen in front bifurcating- near the apex, the branches gradu- 
ally and but little diverging- in their descension, slightly depressed 
opposite the eyes. Face strongly oblique, the posterior ocelli show- 
ing just in front of the middle anterior margin of the eye. 
Antenn;e short, not reaching to the humeral angle. 1'ronotum an- 
teriorly truncate or barely angulate. the dorsum lectiform. not very 
broad between the shoulders, median carina distinctly elevated per- 
current, neirly straight, sometimes rather undulating, a little more 
elevated near the anterior border, posteriorly long, slender, -ubu- 
late, passing considerably beyond the posterior femora, humeral 
angles, strongly obtuse or eubrounded. \Vings well developed. 
pa>sing beyond the apical process, posterior angle of the latera 1 
lobes very slightly and obliquely diverging. <trongly obtuse. Ely- 
tra oblong, apex subacutely rounded external surface minutely 
punctate. Anterior femora slender, unchanged, middle femora 
-lender, unchanged, middle femora Avith straight cariiue.lhe poste- 
rior rather slender, very much reduced near the apex, the lir-t 
article of tbe posterior tarsus but little longer than the other two 
united, the pulvilli straight below, the first acute, the -croud about 
twice as long as the first, the third as long a- the first two united 

llody lenfffh. . s liimm, pronot.. 1 I - |-J-.~>mm.. post. fern. 

5.5-6mm. 

This is Ihr (-(1111111011 form found in inosl collections. A 
specimen from Northern Illinois in the collection of Mr. A. 
P>olter. <>f ( 'hicago. measured sixteen millimeters in total 
length, this being the maximal six.e of any examined. 

A series of specimens from St. Anthony Park. .Minnesota. 
showed, some departure from the type form. There was va- 
riation in the angularit y of t lie vertex, some being very obt use ; 
the median carina of t he pronot um, instead of being st raig'ht . 
\\as undulating it] its backward course, the dorsum was de 
cidedly rugose, the posterior tarsus with the first article a 
little longer than the last two united, the pnlvilli straight be 
low. the first conieo-aeiite. t he second and third equal in leng! h 
were a little longer than the first. In this variety \ve see an 
approach to Tettix luggeri Hancock. 

Yar. '_'. Abbreviated examples with the pnmol mil not ex 
lending so far back wa rds. 1 he wings being coincident ly shorter. 

The Species above described is named in honor of my friend 
and co-worker. Prof. A. P. Morse. 



_> S1 > ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [ I >ec 

mi'.Lio<;i; APIIY or TKTTIX MORSKI. 

Scudder. Can. Xat. vii. 2XS ; Scudder. Most, .loiirn. Nat. 
Hist. vii.. 474; Scuddcr. (at. Orthopt.. X. Am., p. 4 49 ; 
Bentenmuller. Des. Cat. Orthopt., X. Y., 809; Blatchley, 
Can. Ent., XXVI, 220 ; Pdatchley List Orthopt. I ml. in Proc. 
hid. Hort. Soc. 22 ; Eernald, Orthopt., New England, 46, fig.; 
P>latchley, Can. Ent.. XXX, 64? Sendder, Alpine Orthopt,, 
6; Brunner List, Xeb. Orthopt., 2S ; Bolivar Essai, Acrid, 
tribn Tettigidiv, 91 ; Hancock Trans. Am. Ent. Soc., XXIII, 
2:!7 fig.; Lugger, Orthopt., Minn.. 107 lig.; Packard Kept, 
r. S Ent. Comiu. Appen. II. [2S] ; Morse. Psyche, Oct., ? 94. 
154 ; Morse, Psyche, Xov., '!>4. (>7 ; Morse, Psyche. Mar., '94, 
:>4 ; McXeil. Psyche, List. Orthopt . 111.. 'iU, 77 ; Eiley, 1st 
K'ept, IT. S. Ent. Connn., 77. 240 fig.; Uiley. Xat. Hist. Arth 
rop., Orthopt., II. 192 tig.; Smith, Econ. Ent., 'OK, 91 h'g. - 
Thomas, Syn. Acrid. X. Am. Y. 7;!. 1SL' : ^Yalker. Can.. Ent .. 
XXX, 123. 

THE CATOCALAE OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, VIRGINIA. 

r>y I'ljor. ELLISON A. SMYTH, .h;. 

The interesting commingling of Xorthcrn and subtropical 
I'onns in the Lepidoptera t' the Alleghanian fauna is well 
illustrated in the Catocalce of this county. The following notes 
apply to the immediate neighborhood of Blacksburg, Mont- 
gomery County, Virginia, among the Alleghanies and at an 
dvation of about 2,.'>()0 feet. 

As far as my observations extend, based upon my own col- 
lecting for a number of years, there are twenty-seven good 
species of Ctocalu\ or, counting varietal forms, nearly forty 
species and varieties found here. More strictly Northern arc 
such species as C. paiiti, concumbens, Imbilis. jHtlcoganHt, etc.. 
while the following Southern forms occur: ('. rldtiahi (in. 
( iiurxtom Halst. ), tfaxperufa (In., Im-hri/mowi and Mtpplto. The 
past summer was the fii'st occasion of my linding ri<luata here. 
This species was frequent, though not abundant ; and it was 
with intense surprise thai 1 eagerly bottled two specimens of 
('. sappho, which I had heretofore seen only once alive, in lower 
South Carolina. Mow these two species took me back to my 
old collecting grounds, in th^ swamps near Charleston. S. C.. 



ISD'J] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. -js:! 

where till* c\ press and gray moss made a twilight at middax. 
where Swainson's -i warbler hopped among the cane and the 
Anhinga birds soared over the black pools, and where <'<itncl<i 
riirixxiiiHi spread her gorgeous wings, as she Mew from tlie l>rown 
bark of the pine trunks, or from the Hat earth masses torn np 
by the roots of some prostrated tree known as a " hurricane 
root." 

The following are the species caught here : 
('<tlwal<i inthilis Him. Very common ; appearing late in May. 

< >ne of the fexx ('a local if pitching readily upon grass or 

weeds, of any description; comes readily to light. 
(\ <'/<nii/n<p/i<t Ilbn. Apparently rare. I have taken it 1ml 

once, in daylight, resting on oak. Very abundant in 

lower South Carolina. 

('. iiH'XMifhm (In. Only one specimen, taken at light. 

('. tunica. This and its varieties very common, usually on 
oak trees. It has a curious habit, w hen startled, of Hying 
around to the opposite side of the same tree, and, when 
followed, of repeating the performance, unless captured, 
again and again, getting higher and higher, until out of 
reach, but seldom thing oil' to another t ree. 

('. iiiiinitti Kdw. Only one specimen, taken at light. 

('. f/r/fHca i Y. Not common ; occasionally taken at light. 

<'. micronympha Gn. Xot common: a few taken on trunks 
and among branches and leaves of hawthorn and small 
"wild goose" plum trees. I have never seen it on trunks 
of larger trees. 

('. rrdhrf/i Saund. A few taken at light and among rr<il<t</nx. 

<'. ii/tronio Him. Common in thickets of wild plum, on \\liich 
trees the larva- feed. 

<'. Hi (Y. Quite Common in its various varieties ; have sel- 
dom seen two alike; frequently starts oil' before the t ree 
is closely approached ; is started readily by rapping : 
shows a preference for dense thickets of small trees, and 
lights in brush heads as well as on large trees; Avhen 
once startled it is very wary and must be approached 
\\ith great caution, equaling (\ hirliri/innsn in thU respect. 
In the South the larva- feed on live oak. 



L'S4 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [ | 



< 1 . jxirtd (in. Late in September several years ago I look a 
few on oak trunks; have not seen it since. 

C. coiK'iniihciiN Walk. Apparently very rare. Only one taken 
in daylight in oak woods. 

('.<><! (\\\. Also very rare, which seems strange; I have 
taken hut one here, in daylight, in a dark hallway. 

('. dtiKitri.!' llbii. 1 have only seen this occasionally here; all 
large, handsome specimens, like those from Southern 
swamps. One was secured after a twenty-foot climb up 
a hickory, the u catcher" holding on by his knees while 
he bottled the fly. Xeedless to say the "shinning" pro 
gress up the tree was slow and cautious. 

('. <'j>ioe Dru. Xot rare ; taken in apple orchards ami among 
small oak undergrowth. 

('. /nth/Us Cfrt. Xot rare; rests very quietly on large trunks. 
and is easily seen by the initiated and taken. 

C . paleogamq Gen. Most abundant ; usually one-third of the 
day's catch ; found in many varietal forms, the beautiful 
variety phalanya being the rarest . It is wonderful how 
difficult it is to see such a strikingly marked form as 
phala)if/<(, but I usually rapped them up before I could detect 
them ; while the uniformly colored normal form was read 
ily detected at rest. 1 found this tly very restless, often 
flying up when 1 was two or three yards away, but after 
lighting again it could readily be bottled with average 
caution. I noticed with interest how often, especially in 
the afternoon, a moth of this species, startled from one 
live and flying to another, would light directly on or very 
near another of the same species, startling the second and 
often several others away. 

C. iH'oyama S. & K. Quite common ; frequently roused from 
the smooth browuish trunks of small dog- wood trees, with 
the color of which il closely liarmoni/es. Very wary 
when once startled. 

('. Hithnata Grt. Frequent. I have never seen i>i<ilri.< here. 
which seems odd. 

('. 1-ohhixonii (irt . I have only taken it once here; have also 
taken it once near Charleston, S. C. 

('-. retecta (irt. and var. /Irhi/is < i rt . I found Jh-hili* more 



lS<>] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. _*;, 

abundant and less wild than 1 lit- I ypical rrtc<-l<i. though 
the latter was quite common. Have taken the former 
also in the Piedmont region of South Carolina Then- arc 
several intergrading forms found here. 

('. <h'x)H-r<if<i (in. Very eommon towards end of season i late 
Aug'ust). rarer in .Inly. Fasily seen and easily ea|lure<l ; 
frequently, after clapping the bottle over one. it would 
have to lie roused by moving the bottle against it. Kven 
after being 1 rapped up only ordinary caution is necessan 
for a seeond approach. 

('. ridiHtttt (in. (iinrstosa Halst . i This handsome Southern 
giant 1 found <|iiite frequent ly this summer, though it wa*> 
not common. Fts habits are the same as in the Southern 
swamps; it shows a preference for grey -barked trees, is 
not hard to see at rest, sits quietly and is not hard to 
bottle, and when startled by rapping often lights again 
on the other side of the same tree. The streets of 
Columbia. S. ('., with their double and often quadruple 
rows of aged water and willow oaks and hackberry 
trees, are a paradise for (.'alocala*. \ stroll down these 
shaded streets in August, with the mercury about 100 
degrees, will reveal such a quantity of C. ri<lit/<i and 
other nice Ctn<-<ilu\ to say nothing of the swarms of .l/xi 
hiniN. "///.sand chiton, and noetuids innumerable, and with 
all the conditions tor easy capture so perfect that one day 
alone in such a place throws all other Gitoni/n collect ing 
into the shade. Here have I taken ri<lnttt<t in such pr<> 
fusion that the desire to capture seemed almost to pall. 
and there would 1 direct any one wishing to know what 
<'tn<-<tld collecting is at its best. 

('. l<ic/iri/iix>fi (in. Fairly common, in endless variety, and 
very wild ; probably the wildest species. They often 
^lart up before the tree is closely approached, and a can 
lions chase from tree to tree often ends in their ascending 
out of reach. They seem to prefer dark-barked tree-.. 
x<i/>i>h<> St rk. I saw and captured two this summer, in 
September, and late in the evening : these are all 1 ha\ 
>een here, and are smaller a trille than the only other one 
I have seen alive taken in South Carolina. 1 !' uad no 



1>S(> ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [ | ><< 

difficulty in bottling these, though I scarcely dared 1 treat he 
as I slowly advanced tin- hoi tic. 
C. insolabilis Gn. (^uitc common, though not hard to deled, 

and not very wild . 

(.'. olwura Strk. l\are, or at least not easy to lind : have 
taken about five here. They prefer large trees, and sonic- 
times hide under the loose bark, and once I took one that 
had pitched in the grass. 

Cdfocalas were very abundant this season ; I often took lil'ly 
to sixty good specimens in a morning or evening's tramp. As 
usual I found the afternoon more productive than the morning. 
On hot days I found them plentiful in the morning, hut usually 
they "roosted" high, and began to descend towards the roots 
in the afternoon, becoming more and more abundant towards 
dusk. I found day collecting more profitable than sugaring, 
and. after several attempts, gave up the latter for C<t1<H-dhix. 
I have also found that medium si/ed oaks, with an abundant 
growth of small branches near the ground, such a growth as 
small white oaks frequently exhibit, were more thickly popu- 
lated than bare trunks, and, on rapping such a tree, after 
vainly examining it, a half-do/en or more C1<><-lx would often 
start away. Lacln-ymofut and riditald seemed to prefer bare 
trunks. From August 4th until September 5th this year I 
took over 500 Calocalaft, a large proportion being C. 



THE FOURTH OF JULY. 

Collect iii (/ iii tin 1 Gcinon^s Mouth. 

BY HKXUY SKIXXKU. 

\\ c could not be said to be "seeking the bubble reputation 
even in t he cannon's mouth, " but were after butterllies, not lo 
speak of moths and other insects. The 1'nd of July found us 
in the kt City of the Saints;" and, judging from the amount 
of noise, patriotism was rampant, and the racket increased 
every hour until the evening of the Fourth, when it gradually 
died away like a passing thunder-storm. On the.'Jd we went to 
lied T>utte Caiion, back of Fort Douglas, and had fair success 
collecting, and retired that night and tried to sleep through 
the fearful din. The morning of the Fourth was bright and 
propitious, and we started early for the home of our good 



IS'.M)] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. -_>S7 

iVicnd <i. Wesley UrowniliL;. \\liu was to be our miideto lii-- 
favorile collecting place, the < 'it \ ('reek ('ailou. in tin- Wa 
satch Mountains, near Sail LakcCity. A.fter partaking of an 

excellent breakfast with our hospitable friend and his g 1 

wife \ve started for the eafion's i:ioiitli with our iiu])leineiits of 
war i on insects i. ready for I he fray. Thus far I have said 
\ve." and 1 will stop a moment to explain who we were. 
The writer, from modest motives, can say nothing his name 
will he found at the be^i lining of the article, but his com 
panions are well known to the readers of Till. Ni:\vs. Mr. 
i'hilip Laurent, of Philadelphia, is a painstaking and careful 
collector, and has a really superb collection of moths and 1ml 
teillies and also of ( 'oleoptera. and his collect ions, for order 
and neatness, would be a revelation to many. I'rof. A. .1 . 
Snyder. of Kvanstown. III., is a most enthusiastic collector and 
camper, and his love for the "Rockies' makes them a mag- 
net that he finds irresistible as each summer approaches. He 
claims to be able to ^et over " sa.ue brush faster I han an \ 
li\ iiiii' man and labors under the delusion that if he lives to be 
as old as .Methuselah he will be able to untangle the ^eniis 
.li-i/i/miix. Irowiiin<j- is a man that loves Nat lire in all her 
phases and it is a pleasure to know him. He has done excel 
lenl work, in spile of the fact 1 hat he is practical^ alone, and 
we all know the value of the sympathetic aid and encourage 
ment of our entomological friends and com|)anions. lie is also 
an artist of ability and in the future will probably do all in 
his power to make the interesting fauna of his home belter 
known. With ^ood company, line weather and a new held of 
work we enthusiastically looked forward to a day of rare 
pleasure and were not disappointed. 

The canon reminds one of our own \\ issahickon. except 
that instead of hills its sides are mountainous, and t he st ream 
of ice cold water runs over its rock\ bed with ^real rapidity 
and in many places is while with loam and spray. In the 
damp places I'apilios were very abundant and lar.^c Imncho 
of them would be found standing >ide to side, sucking the 
moisture from the mud. and when dMnrbed would ri^e in 
ureat yellou clouds. I'rof. Snyder look I'/crm -ipceimeiis a I 
onetime, made up Ol tlmiinm. riilnlnx and innm* <l<>n . \\\ placing' 



L'NS ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [ Dec 

the lid o\ er them as they thus rested. The writer made a 
sweep of the lift into a cloud'' and secured seven at one 
stroke. Two other species of Papilio, iinlra and :<>li<-<i<i, were 
taken, but they were scarce. Imli'tt an<l :.<tlir(nt were found 
living over a narrow and shallow part of the stream at the 
"forks/- where the stream divides. riinKt.wiiix cfadiiix was 
occasionally seen and taken, but could not be said to be abund- 
ant. SniittUiciix was not seen, but Prof. Snyder in former 
years took it abundantly at Park City, Ttah. 

I'irrifi i'iij>. ( ' tlcracni and iHviilciitttlix not infrequently fell 
victims to our nets, and from time to time the green under 
side of Aiit/ior/Htrix (tiiKoii'nlcx would (lash in the sun and the 
delicate Julio would make its appearance in the open. Of the 
Xymphalida' we saw and captured \'<nir.^(i milhrrti and the 
almost cosmopolitan (iiiliojxi ; IJim-nitix weidemeyeri sailed 
leisurely by or rested on the tip of a branch, often too high for 
a successful stroke. <if<tptu .-.cplii/ntx and tfdtyrns jxinlnx \\cre 
taken, but only in one or two specimens. Of the polygamous 
genus An/yiuiln we captured xH.yd-cri, ni('<nlii. i>/<(tiim, /<'/<> and 
. M'HUr<i (intsf.iiN was plentiful in places and / ) A//r/V/</r.\ 
was taken. In the Lyca-nido: we took ChrysophanuH 
s and .'.croc : Li/<\<'int li/wo, cui. in<'Hxx<i. f//(tnron and 
. The only species of ('oliox was cin'i/f/innc var.r/-/y>// ///<-. 
llesperid;v \vere scarce, and we only look L'mlinitiix n<'ratl, 
l'<i ni))/iil<i lii.i-ilcK, PhoTisora colii/hix and Nisoniades jiimmlix. 
I-'/iicdl/iti rirf/iiilix in its multitude of variations was quite 
abundant. \Ve visited the canon also on the .">th and (>th of 
the month, and then left for Silver Lake, further in the moun- 
tains, where we eamptd at S,(iO<) feel and collected from this 
elevation to the tops of the peaks. Snow was fifty feel deep in 
places. I hope Prof. Snyder or .Mr. Laurent will write about 
I his portion of our on I ing and I he good 1 hings taken. 



-o- 



OCCURRENCE OF STAGMOMANTIS CAROLINA IN NEW 

YORK. 

PI;<H . .M . Y. SUNCKUI.AN I). 

1 am just in receipt of a letter from Mr. 11. !'. At wood. 
Rochester. N. Y.. in which he stales thai " this past season I 
have taken a number of specimens of Maul ids." I do no) know 
as they are rare here bnl as I have never seen them before I 



I.S'.IO] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. JV.l 

feel that perhaps I oii^lil to >peak of t hem. M\ home i> on 
the northern outskirts of Rochester. an<l 1 found many of 
tlicin about my house, and they were also taken altonl ('liar 
lotte and Summerville. I did not hear of any further South. 
Those that I observed were either u'reen or liu'lit brown, ap 
pa rent lv Iwo varieties. 

Early in the spring 1 found a cluster of the eggs on a t\\i^ 
that hud been blown from a tree. I identified it but not to my 
satisfaction, for until I saw the perfect insect 1 had no idea of 
their being found here. The specimens 1 observed were ",ood 
feeders and in my opinion they should lie encouraged, asthcir 
diet \\as entirely insects." 

Although this insect has doubtless been reared many times 
in this State, from es^'s received from the South, as we have 
done here at the insect a ry the past summer from et^s received 
from New Mexico, yet I liud but one recorded instance of such 
rcurinirs. (ilover has stated that "it has been successfully 
raised as far North as the Hudson River by bringing the egg- 
cases from the Middle States. Several cases were found fast 
cued to the t rees t he next autumn, but after that I hey cut i rely 

disappeared." It is said that the eggs probably could not en- 
dure our northern winters. It will be noted that Mr. A (wood 
found an egg-case in Rochester in the spring, but there is 
nothing to indicate that the egj^s were alive. Mr. Scudder in 
his ( 'atalogue of the ( )rl h opt era of North America " recorded 
two species of Mantids, chlorophdca and phri/ffanoideSj from 
New York State, the Ibrmer near AVaterlown. X. Y.. and the 
latter from Ne\\ York. Mr. Scudder just writes me t hat "no 
Mantida- are known to live normally in New York. One of 
the two species I recorded was probably imported in packing 
from Florida; the other was also either an accidental occur- 
rence or a mistake of locality. I have never heard of N/ff//- 
nioiiKiHlix fiiro/i/ni. our northernmost Mantid. from as far north 
as New York." I have asked Mr. At wood to continue ob 
servations upon the insect to determine if it survives the will 
ter and appears a pi in in the same locality next year. 

NMTK Mr. At \\ OIK I \\ riles me I'url ln-r under d;ite ol Octnlicr .'II. ISll'.l : " I h;i \ e 
no doillil lint \\lial I \vill In' ;ih|r In '^cl s | irci INC us I'm- von iii'\l SIIIIIMICT. IH-- 
I-:HISC snrt-1 \' \\ c <-:ui nul h:i \ i- ;i severe :i winter this cumini: ye:ir :is we luxltlie 
|i:i-i|. illid I li:i\e e\el'\- I'eMMin Id lelie\e lh:it I I H'Si i n sect > t h;i I I Observed here 
h;itelie<l out ne:i r in v house. 'I'here were s U \ er\ 111:111 \ of I hen i thut it COM Id IK )l 

have been accidental, their foniing here. I h;i\c ;ilso re.-ixm toi.elie\e tluit tin 

euus t lull I Inn lid i n I he II Hiss ill I he s|n'inu: were ;i I so :i I i \ e. I lie\ h:i \ i nu I h:il Up- 
|ie:ir;ince ami ln-i n^ not \ er\ liillch unlike the egKef the {Jl'USShOppei 1 The i use el 

tlid well in our latitude, it being quite slemlei 1 in .1 nl \ M IK I A n^iisi and IV.M chin a :i 

>l ronu Jllld Sl lird \UI I i\\ 1 h I he l:il I el' |>:l I'l ol' Se| i| etll lie) . I llei I :l I "l( linens I pel II'J ill 
ej(le(ll.\ eorpll lent." 



200 [Dec 

ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



1'1'lie ( 'onductors of ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS solicit and will thankfullyreceiN 
items of news likely to interest its readers from any source. The author's name 
will be given in each case. Tor the information of cataloguers and hihliogrnph- 
ers.] 

To Contributors. All contributions will be considered and passed upon at 
our earliest convenience, and. as Tar as may be, will be published according to 
date of reception. ENTOMOLOGICAL NKWS lias reached a circulation, botb in 
numbers and circumference, as to make it necessary to put "copy" into the 
hands of the printer for each number, three weeks before date of issue. This 
should be rein -inhered in sending special or important mutter for a certain 
Nsue. Twenty-live "extras," wit bout change in form, will be given free, when 
they are wauled: and this should be so stated on the M!S., alon<r with the num- 
ber desired. The receipt of all papers will be acknowledged. Ej>. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., DECEMHEK, is<)<>. 

TIN-; object of describing' new species of insects is to make 
them known to the scientific world, but this fundamental 
principle in many cases serins to be overlooked by some of our 
systematists who describe as species such slight variations, 
brought about by distribution, climate or other causes, and 
frequently from such insufficient material as to make it quite 
impossible to know what they have in mind or what they 
mean by their descriptions. Perhaps the entomologist of the 
future will be a being who spends all his spare time and money 
wandering over the earth seeking- types. Some day. perhaps, 
these names that have crept and unfortunately will creep into 
our future lists of species will be weeded out, but at the ex- 
pense of much valuable time and study, and it would have 
been better had thev never been described. Where there is 

i/ 

the slighest doubt about a single specimen supposed lobe new 
il would be far better to wait for adequate material than to 
rush into print and make a synonym. .More time should be 
given to careful collecting through a series of years with accu- 
rate data on all specimens particularly in one locality. If this 
were done many interesting problems could be solved. Dur- 
ing the past summer one of our subscribers spent considerable 
t i me collecting certain species, and his work shows conclu- 
sively that two names will have to be merged into one. This 
is more sclent i tic and useful than constructing two names out 
of nothing. Instead of the individual going around seeking 
types another plan might be inaugurated, and that is build- 
ing a cairn where I lie n. sp. is taken and putting all the in- 
formation, etc., in a steel t ube which should have a screw cap 
and be buried in 1 he cairn for the information of all students, 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. o<)J 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY 



Edited by Prof. JOHN B. SMITH, Sc. 0., New Brunswick, N. j. 



Papers for this department an- solicited. They should he sent to the editor 
I'rof. John 11. Smith. Se. |)...\e\v IJnmswiek, X. J. 



EPHESTIA KI'EIIXIKLI.A AXI ACANTHIA LECTULAKIA. lu couuec- 
tion with the note contributed by W. G Johnson iu the September 
number of the EXTOMOUHJK AI. NEW.N it may be of interest for me to 
add that 'Kftht'xtfn kuchnieUn occurs in this Colony. I have seen fi 
at several local mills and have been told by millers that it i 
known in other and distant parts of the < ountry. How long- it has 
been about Capetown I have been thus tar unable to ascertain, but 
there seems to be no evidence ot its being a newcomer. The mill 
people say it causes them some inconvenience, but is by no means a 
serious pest. The mill buildings here are, as a rule, well built and 
of brick, and a considerable measure of cleanliness prevails; *he 
principal one at Capetown is shut down twice a year and given as 
thorough clean-out, particular attention being bestowed lp dis- 
lodge all of the " web " in the spouts. I understand that similar 
methods prevail at the other important mills. Compared with 
many American establishments, our mills are small and there is, be- 
sides, a lack of that extreme rushtand bustle that characterizes most 
everything in Yankee-laud. Perhaps it is owing to these circum- 
stances that the flour moth is not very troublesome. No parasites 
have emerged in my rearing boxes, but there was no lack of Trih- 
olium in the spouts which I had drag-ged for my material. 

Mr. Johnson refers to the fumigation of buildings with hydrocy- 
anic acid gas. I have carefully refrained from advocating the oper- 
ation buta number of the foremen connected with the orchard fum- 
igation at work in diflerent parts of the colony, to my knowledge 
oblige their fruit-growing patrons by treating sleeping apartments 
in the dwellings. The results are said to be all that is desired. At 
my suggestion the Cape Government Iluilways some months ago 
adopted this fumigant to " disinfect " their rolling stock. For some 
years the problem of " what to do" sorely troubled even the head, 
of the department, and correspondence with railway managements 
in America and elsewhere elicited no information of value. Finally 
a measure involving the exhaustion of air from the coaches after en- 
closing them in a special chamber was proposed and a requisition 
sent to England for the necessary iron work : it \vas at this juncture 
that hydrocyanic acid gas \\;is brought to the rescue. The simplic- 
ity and. efficacy of the treatment was demonstrated by the fumiga- 
tion of eight particularly bad coaches and by laboratory experi- 
ments it was shown t hat no injurv betel any of the fittings, cloth, 



292 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Dec 

leather or metal: highly polished .steel.it is true, did become 
slightly blued, but only wheu exposed to a i'ar greater density of 
the gas thau what proved tatal to even the eggs of the insect. The 
relief of the authorities when the head trimmer reported that not a 
single living insect was discovered among the multitude gathered 
by his woi'Kmeu during their careful inspection of the treated 
coaches was really amusing, but the personally expressed thanks of 
the general manager, to say nothing of the calibre of the cheque left 
behind, was convincing of their appreciation of the service and of 
the past gravity of the situation- A corps of fumigators now takes 
charge of the through trains as they arrive from the north and for 
many months there has been but a single complaint ; this one tailed 
to be substantiated, tor although the coach accused was immedi- 
ately side tracked and overhauled no living bugs were found. Out of 
justice to the railroad management [ feel bound to add that the in- 
fested condition of the coaches was by no means due to neglect or 
indifference, and that the abundance of the pest may be safely at- 
tributed to circumstances of climate and travel. The climate is a 
warm one, the train journeys are very long, and it is usual for trav- 
ellers to carry their own bedding. The cape excels iu at least three 
productions, diamonds, gold and bed-bugs. 

Notwithstanding the potency of hydrocyanic acid gas as an in- 
secticide, I cannot say that I am iu favor of recommending it to the 
public for the destruction of house or granary pests. It is too ter- 
ribly dangerous to trifle with and the least infringement in the nec- 
essary precautions may mean death to someone. Cyanide is no\v 
largely used for the extraction of gold and, despite of the utmost 
care in its employment. I am told that fatal accidents to native em- 
ployees are not infrequent My suggestion to anyone who contem- 
platesusing the gas in a dwelling is to first administer a slight 
amount of solid cyanide to au animal. Most persons will be so ap- 
palled aud horrified by the suddenness of the end that they will 
have no desire remaining to assume risks in the house. 1 have re- 
peatedly inserted small particles in bits of dry meat and laid these 
as baits for feline disturbers of my evening labors, aud 1 am not ex- 
aggerating when T say that, as a rule,the creatures drop dead almost 
instantly and often with the meat still in their mouths; seldom do 
they die more than three or four feet from where the bait was laid. 
In house fumigation it is not danger to the operator that 1 fear, 
but such an happening as an unexpected intrusion by a party all 
unconscious of the danger. Accidents of such a nature are improb- 
able, sure enough, but they are possible, and when the chances favor 
fatal consequences even remote possibilities should have great 
weight. The story has reached me that not long ago a native la- 
borer,wholly unaware of his clanger, sought to enter one of the rail- 
way coaches undergoing treatment. It seems that he came up un- 
observed and, as luck would have it, went straight to the only uu- 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



locked door iu the train. One of the guards heard the door open. 
shouted just too late, but rushed up in time to drag the man out by 
the heels. Fortunately the gas was largely spent, but. although the 
man was a stalwart Kafir the effects of the short exposure \ver-: 
such as to thoroughly frighten all who saw him. Xow the opera- 
tors employed at the railway are exceptionally careful workmen, in 
fact they were selected largely because of habitual prudence, and 
this near approach to an accident simply illustrates how with what 
appears all necessary precautions there is a grave element of risk in 
such operations. The doors to the carriages are ordinarily locked 
the key holes plugged, but at the last moment something was found 
to be defecti ve with the lock of the door in questio u, and the watch- 
men chanced to be facing another way as the bare footed native 
came up. Might not an analagous circumstance occasionally hap- 
pen in mills and houses, where at the best the risks are immensely 
greater? It is not as if there were no alternative measures applic- 
able for granary aud house insects and to me it seems a plain case 
of prudence dictating to let well enough alone. Hydrocyanic acid 
gas for orchard fumigation and for the disinfection of nursery stock 
iu specially devised buildings is right enough, as it is also under 
proper precautions for the treatment of railway carriages that must 
be put into use again within a few hours, but to encourage its gen- 
eral use in closed buildings seems going to far. If to be used at all 
indwelling's, granaries and the like 1 think that all of the opera- 
tions should be under the personal superintendence of a responsible 
party licensed by law. We have had no accident in the colony in 
three years' work with the gas in special chambers and in the or- 
chard, but when disinfecting a tew rooms at a boarding school one 
of the orchard operatoi'S gave himself and several others violent 
headache and nausea- One after another he told me he had to give 
up and go lay down. The bad effects were all the result of ill-con- 
sidered procedure, but if an experienced fumigator makes mistake-; 
in judgment what might not be expected from an ignoront be- 

CHAS. P. Loi NSHIKV. 
Tnii',1. Smith Afn'ctt, October l<>. 189!). 

o 

NOT K on Telea polyphemus-Cr*, etc Since it appears that '/'. 
/Ki/tf/t/iciitn*- (Y. has not been reported troin Mexico 1 wish to put 
on record here the capture of a j by Prof. Luis Murillo at Jalapa. 
V. O.. this month (April). AV/c/r.v ///^r/vW/.s- Drury has come to 
stay though still very rare in t 'uernavaca, Mor .and in Jalapa, V. C. 
And Actias lima L. is getting settled at Jalapa and ?) Orizaba, 
V . ('. Although the last two moths are reported in the Biologia ) 
C. A., Prof. Murillo declares they have been in evidence in Jalapa. 
for only two or three years The city is almost entirely shutout 
from the north and at an elevation of :>,t>o<> feet. 

O. AV. BAKKKTT, Museo, Tacubaya.U. F., Mexico. 



294 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Dec 

Notes and News. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL GLEANINGS FROM ALL QUARTERS OF THE GLOBE. 



DR. HERMAN STRECKER has completed his valuable index to the 
species in Kirby's Lepidoptera Heterocera. Vol. 1, and is now pre- 
paring- a list of the 41 7 types in his collection. This will be Supple 
ment JII to his Lepid<.ptera Rl.op. et Heterocera. These publica- 
tions may be obtained from the author. 

MR. LANCASTER THOMAS has returned from his annual trip to 
Cranberry, N. C., and reports that the collecting was unusually 
poor owing to the very dry weather during the summer. 

DR. WILLIAM BARNES was fairly successful in his collecting trip 
to Southern Arizona. 

PROF. H. A. PILSBRY collected a lot of interesting Cychrus at 
Olingmau's Dome, Blouut Co., Tenn. They are now in the fine col- 
lection of Mr. H AY. Weuzel, of Philadelphia. 

I NOTICE in the report of the American Entomological Society . 
held June22d, that you reported Jlelitauea hurrisii as having been 
taken at Lopez, Sullivan county. Pa. I took one good specimen of 
same, June 15th, at Plymouth. Luzerne county, Pa. .but saw no 
others. This is the first specimen I have taken in my four years 
collecting in this vicinity and have not heard of its being taken by 
anyone else around here. 

I took one good fresh specimen of Enptoieta eland ia in Septem- 
ber, 1898 and another in September. 180!). ALFRED E. LISTER. 

NOTES ON EXTRA ROLANDIANA. While looking through some old 
volumes of Psyche recently I noticed in II., p 39. the description 
and an account of the habits of the larva of Es (//<( rolcmdiana by 
Mr. Thaxter. The species is quite common in Durham wherever 
its food plant (/Sarracenia) flourish es,and the larvae have been found 
not in the leaves as described by Mr. Thaxter. but within the flow- 
ers and buds the last of May and first of June. The imago appears 
the last of June and first of July, and has been observed resting in 
the leaves of its food plant. 

Mr. Thaxter says that the larva is "delicate and difficult to rear" 
but such was not my experience with those taken well along to- 
ward maturity. About half a dozen were collected the last week 
in May and placed in wide mouthed vials with a piece ef the ovary 
of the pitcher plant flower, securely plugged with cotton and left 
to themselves. Most of them completely finished the food that was 
given them and one or two were dwarfed for lack of more, but 
every one ot the lot produced a perfect imago. 1 would recom- 
mend collectors who have access to a swamp in which pitcher plain 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. l><|.-> 

grows to collect and rear these Jar vie for perfect specimens of this 
.dainty little aoetuid are acquisitions to auv collection. 

W. F. FISKE. 

AN APPEAL, IN BEHALF OF ENTOMOLOGY AND KINDHEO SCIENCES- 

In the interest of natural history it would be a good plan if every 
naturalist throughout the Uuited States would petition their rep- 
resentatives In Congress to have paragraph (iO(J of the tariff law of 
1897 amended, so that specimens of natural history for scientific col- 
lections be admitted free of duty, whether intended for private or 
public use. The paragraph in question comes under the " free list ' : 
and reads as follows : " Specimens of natural history, botany and 
mineralogy, when intended for scientific public collections and not 
for sale." 

Natural history, especially entomology, merits all the eii'-ourage- 
ment possible and an excellent way to further an interest in it 
would be to remove the barrier from the private .student. All who 
read this are earnestly requested immediately to petition their rep- 
resentatives at Washington urging that the section in question be 
amended and that without delay- EDW. A. KLAGES. 

IN studying the relations between the species of the genus Cato- 
cula I acquii'ed the conviction that for the solution of the problem 
it is indispensable to resort, to experiments with elevated and re- 
duced temperature after Standfuss. Some results from the breed- 
ing of European species are already obtained. Unfortunately the 
most interesting species, those with the black hind-wings, are in- 
accessible to the European experimenter, the eggs of American cato- 
calas not being on sale. 

I determined therefore, by your mediation, to address to the 
members of the American Entomological Society and others a re- 
quest to procure for me the living eggs of any species of Cntocalo r , 
which are so abundant in the United States. The black species are 
especially desired, the indication of the food-plant is also necessary. 

In exchange I can offer many species (well prepared) of my collec- 
tion of Russian Lepidoptera. St. Petersburg, Crimean, Siberian. 

NICHOLAS KTSNEZOW. Physiological Laboratory of University. 

S(. Petersburg, 



I HAVE had the pleasure of collecting Coleoptera a few days in 
Tioga county, Pennsylvania, during this summer (18!)!)), and a few 
notes I have kept that may be of interest to other collectors One 
pine tree trap, cut early in May, produced in four monl hs the follow- 
ing catch : llifliilinis /Miles, very abundant. /V.v.vor/r.v slmfti, not 
abundant, l-jiri/ini/clcr f'ttsc/d/nx, very abundant. T<nnt'ritx />i,i,\ 
very plentiful Hylurgop8pmifex,noto.\)\ua<La,nt. llfxti r /mi, //,/, \ n 



1>9<> ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Dec 



great numbers. Pytho dephntatus, very abundant. 
tfttiiator. M sctitellatus and M. cotiftisor were almost in swarrns, 
but Monohanvmus maculosus very scarce. Ju July and August Ac- 
Acanthocinus obsoletus and Liopns rariegatvs were taken in small 
numbers. Asemti-m atrum, quite plenty in August, Xylotrech/is 
undulatitSfilmt a few good specimens and Hhriginm It neat urn w:i> 
often present. Clems quadriguttatus, C. niyrfrons and C iiigi'i/>< * 
could be taken by the dozens. Later a good number of Uirysobo- 
fhrt's, dentipes aud C.femorata, were taken. So allot this catch was 
from a fe w pine logs carefu lly watched, and often rolled over on the 
grass. J. C. WARREN. Crooked Creek, Pa. 

THE Zoological Department of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College is doing good work in Entomology and has a strong teach- 
ing force. Prof. C. H. Fernald, Ph D , being ably assisted by 
Prof. R. S. Lull, M. S.. and his son, Dr H. F. Fernald, who for 
ten years past was Professor 'of Zoology in the Pennsylvania State 
College and for two yeirs Economic Zoologist. 

THOSE who have changed their addresses since reporting for the 
Entomologists' Directory will kindly notify the undersigned at 
once, as the copy will soon be ready for the printer. Those that 
miss the opportunity to have their names in the Directory will 
surely regret it. It costs you nothing. HENRY SKINNER, 

Box 248. Philadelphia. 



-o- 



Entomological L/itertituire, 



COMPILED BY P. P. CALVEKT. 



Under the above head it is intended to mention papers received at the Acad- 
emy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia pertaining to the Entomology of the 
Americas (North and South). Articles irrelevant to American entomology 
will not be noted. Contributions to the anatomy, physiology and embryologj 
of insects, however, whether relating to American or exotic species, will be re- 
corded. The numbers in HEAVY-FACED TYPE refer to the journals, as num- 
bered in the following list, in which the papers are published ; * denotes that the 
paper in question contains descriptions of new North American forms. Titles 
of all articles in foreign languages are translated into English; usually such 
articles are written in the same language as the title of the journal contain- 
Sui them, but when such articles are in other languages than English, French, 
German or Italian, this fact is indicated in brackets. 



I. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciencesof Philadelphia, 
1899. part ii. 3. TheAmericanNaturalist,Boston,Oct.,'99.- 5. Psyr-ho. 
Cambridge, Mass.. Nov., '99. 7. U- S. Department of Agriculture. 
Division of Entomology, Washington ; publications of, '99. 8. The 
Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, London, Nov., '99 9. The En- 
tomologist, London, Nov. ,'99. - 10. Nature. London, '99 12. Comptes 
Rendus, 1' Academic des Sciences, Paris, Sept. 25, '99. 15. Biologia 
Centrali- Americana, London, pt. cxhMi, April : pt. cxlviii, .rune; 



1SJM>] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 1><I7 

pt cxlix, Aug. '99. 21. The Entomologist's Record, London, Oct.' 
15, '9!). 26. Appletou's Popular Science Monthly, New York. Nov. 
'99. 35. Annales, Societc Entomologiquede Belgique, xliii, !>. Bru-- 
sels, Oct. 4. '99. 41. Entomologisohe Nachrichteu, xxv, 2<>. Berlin, 
Oct., '99 -84. [nsekten Borse, Leipsic, '99. 118- Memoirs and Pro- 
ceedings. Manchester [England] Literary and Philosophical Society, 
xliii, '98-'99; rec'd. Oct. 17. '99. 

The Gsneral Subject A x e n i'e 1 d . I). Some observations on 
the sight of Arthropods. Archives Italiennes de Biologic, xxxi, 3, 
Turin, Sept. 23, '99- -B o r d a g e , E. On a particular mode of 
protection of the appendages in course of regeneration after artificial 
section among insects. 12 C a r r e t . A . M. F. Guillebean and 
his entomological works (cont.). L'Piehange Revue Linneenne. 
Lyon.Oct., '99 C o n p in. IT. Singular mode of locomotion in 
insects, figs., La Nature, Paris, Sept, :-{(), '99. E n d e v 1 e i n , G 
Contribution to knowledge of the structure of the cross striped 
muscles of insects, l pi. Archiv fiir Mikrosoopische Anatomic und 
Eutwicklnngsgeschiclitc. Iv, 1, Bonn. Oct. 11. '99. H e u u e g u y , 
L. F. The modes of reproduction of insects. Bulletin. Soviet e 
Philomathiqtte. Paris (9), i, 2, '99. Jl e y m o n s . R . ( )n W. M . 
AV heeler's " Aneinotropism aud other tropisms in Insects," Zoolo- 
ffischer Centralblntt, Leipsic, Sept. :><;. '99. K n nth, P. I land - 
buch der Bliitenbiologie. II Band : Die bisher in Europa und in ark- 
tischenGebietgemachten bliiteubiologischen Beobachtuugeu, 2 Teil : 
Lobeliacefe bis Goetacea? . Leipzig Verlag von AV'ilhelm Engelmauu. 
1899. figs., 705pp. L cue ce k , O. Jumping beans, Verhaudlungen. 
Naturforschenden Vereius in Bri'iun. xxxvi, '98. P 1 a te a u , F . 
Vision in Anthidium manicatum L-. 35 P o u 1 t o n, E . B 
lieportof the Hope Professor of Zoology [on the Entomological col- 
lections, etc., at Oxford], Eleventh Annual Report of the Delegates 
of the Uni versity Museu m for 1898, Oxford . S c h w a r z , E . A . 
List of insects hitherto known from the Pribilof Islands, in : The 
Fur Seals and Fur Se:U Islands of the North Pacific Ocean, by 
David Starr Jordan. Part 3, Washington, Government Printing 
Office, 1899. S h a r p , D. Insects, part II. See review, fiost. 

Economic Entomology. A n o n . The investigation of the malarial 
parasite. 10. Oct. 5. A n o n . Some means for Combatting .sv7//~"- 
ncnr<i IIIHHJITII, Wiener lllustrirte Garten-Zeitung, Oct.. "99. 
Bane r oft. T. L . On the metamorphosis of the young form 
of Filaria bancrofti Cobb (F. sanguinis hominix Lewis. /''. HOC 
tnriKi Manson) in the body of ('i//>-.i- <-ili<iris L.. hou<e mosquito of 
Au>tralia. Alotractof Proceedings, Royal Society of Xew South 
Wales. Sydney, June 7, '99. -(' e 1 1 i , A., and (' a s a g r a n d i . 
O. On the destruction of mosquitoes: contribution to rc- 
-enrches with mosquito-killing substances. ( cut ralblatt fiir Bak- 
teriologie. Jena, Oct. 14, '99. ( ' h i t t e n d e n , F. H. The 
squash-vine borer ( Mclittiti mihirhiiforiiu* Him). figs., 7. circular 



1>>S ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Dec 



No. 38, sei-oiid series, Apr. 22; The common squash bug 
tristis DeG.), fig's , 7. circular No, 39, second series, May 5. 
F e r 11 a 1 d . H . T . Supplementary report of the Zoologist : some 
insects injurious in Pennsylvania, figs , Report of Department of 
Agriculture of Pennsylvania for 1898, pp. 373-443. [Harrisburg 
Pa.] Wm. Stanley Uay, State Printer of Pennsylvania, '99. 
Howard, L . O. Three inseot enemies of shade trees, figs, 7, 
Farmers' Bulletion, No. 99, May 26; Spider bites and "kissing 
bugs.' 1 figs., 26. L e o n a r d i , G . Pu.lrinariu camelicola. Sign, 
and method of combatting it, figs., Anuali, R. Scuola Superiore di 
Agricoltura in Portici, (2), i, 2, Naples, '99. L o u n s b u r y , C . 
P. Report of the Government Entomologist for the year 1898, 
Cape of Good Hope. Dep't. of Agriculture, Cape Town, W. A. 
Richards & Sons. Government Printer*. 1899, 9 pis. : Ibid. [Nu- 
merous Notes on Economic Entomology from the Cape of Good 
Hope Dep't of Agric., reprinted from the Agricultural Journal, 
Cape Town, '98 and '99. Many of these have been previously re- 
corded, but we add] 1899, No. 6. The Wattle bag-worm, fig?.; No. 
25, Bean Brnchna, tigs: No. 2(3, Cabbage Aphis, tigs. Mac- 
do n a 1 d , I, Mosquitoes in relation to Malaria, New York Med- 
ical Journal, Oct. 14, '99 M a r 1 a t t . C. L. The principal 
insect enemies cf the gi-ape, figs., 7, Farmers' Bulletin, No. 70, '98. 
The peach twig- borer: an important enemy of stone fruits, figs-. 7 
Farmers' Fulletiu. No. 80, '98. R o s s , R. The mosquito theory 
of malaria, 26. S c h g , C On the fioht against scale insects. 84. 
Oct. 19. S m i t . h , J . B . Crude petroleum as an insecticide, 4 
pis . Bulletin 138. New Jersey Agric. Exper. Stations, New Bruns- 
wick, Sept. 5, '99. W i I c o x , E . V . Abstracts of recent pub- 
licatious.7, Experiment Station Record, xi, -2. AY o o d s . A F . . 
and Do.rsett, P. H. The use of hydrocyanic acid gas foi 
fumigating greenhouses and cold frames, tigs., 7, circular No. 37. 
second series, Jan 10. 

Arachnida. Ca mb ridge , F. O. P. Anchuid-i Ar.uieidei, vol 
ii, pp. 41-50, pis. iii-iv,* 15. C a m bridge. O . P . Arachnida 
Araneidea, vol. 1, pp. 297-304, pis. xxxi-xxxii,* 15. N o r d e u s- 
k i o I d . E . Contributions to knowledge of the morphology'aml 
classification of the Hydrachnids-, 2 pis., Acta Societatis Seienti- 
arum Fennica?. xxiv, 5, Helsiugfors, Mir. 14. '98 : Rec'd. Nov. 7, '!Mi 
Osborn, H. Acarina,* figs, in : The Fur Seals and Fur Seal 
Ishnl, etc , by David S. Jordan, pt. 3, Washington, Gov't. Print- 
ing Office, '99. 

Peripatus and Myriopoda. P o u 1 t o n , E. B. Peripatus in tin- 
Malay peninsula, 10. Ort. 19. d e Z o g r a f . N. On the lateral 
cephalic organs of (ilonn-i '/'*, 12. 

Orthoptera B u r r , M. Notes on the Forficularia, Annala and 
Magazine of Natural History, London, Oct., '99. S c udder, s . 
H . Two genera of Norrh American Deeticinse,* Proceedings, 



199] ENTOMOLOGICAL, NEWS. 299 

American Academy of Arts and Science, xxxv, 5, Boston, Get ''''. . 
The species of Myrmecophila in the United States,* 5 ; A compari- 
son of the systematic distribution of European and North American 
Orthoptera, 5. 

Neuroptera. F 1 e t c h e r , J. f'/iri/yopa larva in a new role 
Ottawa Naturalist, Nov., '99. 

Hemiptera. C hampiou, G . C. Rhynchota Heteroptera 
vol. ii, pp. 217-264, pis. xiii-xv,* 15. -C o c k e r e 1 1 , T. D . A. 
Some notes on Coccidse, * I. D o 1 b y - T y 1 e r , C . If . The 
development of Ceroplastes roseatws Towns, "Ckll.,l pi. .Transac- 
tions, Entomological Society of London, '99. pt. iii, Sept. 30, '99. 
Fowler, W . W . Rhynehota Homoptera, vol. ii, pp. 225-248 
pi. xv, 15. H e y m o u s , R, . Contributions to the morphology 
:ind development of the Rhynehota, 3 pis., Abhandlungen, kais. 
Leopold .-Carol. Deutschen Akademie der Naturforscher, 74 Bd. 
Halle, '99, Webster. F. M . Have we more than one species 
of Blissiiii\\\ North America? 3. 

Coleoptera. A r r o w . G. J. Aiioinnla (loiionnii, Mnrslmm. 
synonymical note [<4. im>rat<i Blanch], 8. Carpenter, L. 
Hibernation of Coleoptera. Bulletin. Societu Linneeime du Xord de 
la. France, No. 317. Amiens. May,' 99. J a c o b y , M. Descrip- 
tions of new species of South American phytophagous Coleoptera, 
9,-vou L [ i n d e 11 , M]. On R. Escherich's Anatomy and 
biology of I'niisxiis hirciciis Frid., likewise a contribution to knowl- 
edge of myrmecophily, Biologisches Central'jlatt, Erhingeu, Oct. 1 
'99. M o r I e y, C.' . Mutilation or' Cryptophagi, 8 S h a r p. 
I). Coleoptera, vol. ii, pt. 1. pp. 497-552, pi. xvi.* [Cucujid.se], 15. 

Diptera. A 1 d r i c h . J . M . , and T u r 1 e y , L . A . A. 
balloon-making fly. tins. .3. See also Economic Entomology, various 
authors. 

Lepidoptera.- B a n k c s , E . R . [and W a 1 s i n g h a in . 
Lord.] LitlHH-ulli'h's concomitclld ^ n. sp., and its nearest allies. 
8 1) r u e e . H . Lepidoptera Heteroeera. vol. ii, pp. 537-5.V2. pi. 
\c-ix,* 15. D y a r. 11. G. Life histories of North American Ge- 

omeirida'. vi. 5. (i o d m a n . F. I)., and Sal v in, O. 
Lepidoptera Khopalocera, pp. 449-460, pi. xci [Hesperidae*], 15. 

II a in I y n - II a r r i s . Ii . Pi/i'timeix ntulu itta 500 mile> from 
laud, 21. M e r r i t' i e 1 d , F . Gradual formation of pigment on 
the dark pupa of J'd/n'lio i>i<i<-lt<i<>,i. 21. S c h n 1 t /. . () Li^t of 
the species of p-ila-an-tic M-icrolepidoptera hitherto found infested 
with thread-worm-;, 84. Oct. 2(! S e m p e r . (i. llelemceiM 
in : U ei<e 1 1 iui A re hi pel der Philippine!) von Dr. ( Semper. X weiter 
Theil. \vi--enschaftliclie Hesnltate. Bd. \' I. Liefenini: :f. \Vie-l)adeii. 
('. W. Kreidel'- \'ei lag. "nil 7 pis. S n y d e r, A . .1 Ameri- 
can Lepidoptera | col led ion-; of]. Popular Science. New York, Od .. 
'!)'.). S o n I c . ('. (i. (tearing larva- in tin boxes. 5. W a t - 



300 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Dec 

son. J. On L'ali:ii(i<i<t, the single genus of an aberrant sul>- 
family of butterflies, 118. 

Hymenoptera. A 1 f k e n , J . I). The Xyloco/>a species of the 

Hawaiian Islands, not X (Kneipennis DeG , but X. chloroptera 

Lep., 41. -C a in e r o u , P . Description of a genus and species- 

probably representing a new tribe of Hymenoptera from Chili, 118^ 

C ockerell, T. D. A. The species of the bee genus Dieu- 

nomia* 9. F o r e 1 , A. Hymeuoptera. vol. iii, pp. 1-80, pis- 

i-iii.* [Formicidse, Myrmicidse] 15 ; Letter from Faisons [North 

( 'arolina, dated July 28, 1899, containing observations on ants], 35. 

Fox, W. J- Contributions to a knowledge of the Ilymenoptei-a 

of Brazil, No. 7: Eumenidae (genera Zelhtts, Labxx, Zelhoides, Eu- 

menes. Montezumia and Nortotifa) I. Kouow. F. W. New 

Tenth redinidje from South America, 41. Paulcke, W On 

the question of the part henogeuetic origin of the drones (Apfsmellf- 

fica male), h'gs.. Auatomischer Anzeiger, Jena. Oct. 5, '99. 

Plateau. F . See the General Subject. 



INSECTS. PART 11. Hymenoptera continued (Tubulifera and Acu- 
leata). Coleoptera, Strepsiptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera, Aphaniptera, 
Thysanoptera. Hemiutera, Auoplura. By David Sharp, London 7 
Macmillan and Co. .Limited. New York : The Macmillau C o. 1899, 
8vo, pp. xii. 026; 293 figs. Received from John Wauamaker. 

This, the sixth volume of the Cambridge Natural History, edited 
by S. F. Harmer ami A. E. Shipley, concludes the account of the 
insects begun in Vol. V. This latter, published in 1895, dealt with 
Peripatus and the Myriapods by different authors, and devoted 483 
pages to a general account of Insects and of the orders Aptera, 
Orthoptera, Neuroptera (in the wide sense), and the Hymenoptera 
Sessi live litres and Petiolata-Parasitica. 

Those who know Dr, Sharp's previous volume need only be told 
that the present one is truly a continuation. By its completion we 
have now an excellent series of modern books of reference, none of 
which deals with precisely the same aspect of entomology, although 
they must and do repeat many facts of primary importance. Thus 
for a general sketch we have Carpenter's "Insects, their structure 
and life," noticed in the November NEWS, for uu introduction to 
taxonomy Comstock's "Manual ;" Packard's "Text Book of Ento- 
mology " is a store house for anatomy and physiology: Smith's 
'Economic Entomology' 1 presents the applied science; while 
Sharp s "Insects'" deeply interests us by the prominence which is 
given to habit&. 

Probably most persons will be puzzled, like ourselves, at the order 
in which the different groups of insects are discussed by Dr. Sharp. 
In a general way that order corresponds to increasing complexitx. 
but the position of the Hymenoptera in particular seems abnormal. 

As our readers may be interested in having presented to them an 



ISiW] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



abridgment of the classification of the larger order> a> cmplov cd in 
this volume, we add the following table : 



Hvmenopte 



, Tubnlifera. .Chrysidida-. 
ra J , Anthophila. 

/ ^ Diploptera. 

1 Aculeata... 



Fossores 

Heterogyna i r'ormicida- . 



Ooleoptera < 



Lamellicornia. 

Adepliao-a or Cavanoidea. 
Polyviiorplia- 
Ileteromera. 
riiyto])haa. 
Rhyncophora. 
(_ Streps! ptera. 



Lepidoptera. . . Khopaloceni and Heterocera. 



Dipt era . 



Orthorrhai)ha Xemocera. 
Orthorrhapha Brachycera. 
^ Cyclorrhapha Aschi/a, 
CycloiThapha Schixophora. 
Pupipara. 



\ Gvnmocerata- 
Heteroptem.. ( Cryptocerata . 

I 

ra . { \ Trim era 

| Homoptera... Di m cra. 

I Auoplura . 



Mouomera. 



The most interesting part of the book is probably the >ivti<-n on 
the llyuienoptera. by reason of the striking, various and won- 
derful habits of these insects. There are, however, many similar 
observations recorded for other groups and they prove must enticing 
rending when one opens the book at random . The illustrat ion> are 
as delightfully dear and clean as is the typography, so that the 
book is pleasing in every way, and we must expect weight in a vol- 
ume which treats of insects. Author and readers nrc alike to In 
congratulated on the results of Dr. Sharp's labors amid-t the be- 
wildering riches of entomology. 1'. !'.<'. 



302 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Dec 

DOINGS OF SOCIETIE 3 

MINUTES OF NEWAKK ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY- 

Regular ineetiug was held at Town Hall, Sunday, October 8th, 
at 3:00 p.m. Vice President Kemp presided and eight members 
were present, including Prof. Smith. 

Mr. Angleman and Mr. Buchholz reported Pieris protodice com- 
mon near Newark. 

Mr. Weidt exhibited a series Cleora umbrosaria,& Geometrid, 
showing the intergrades from the dark to the light forms. The 9 
as a rule were lighter. The insect was very common at Forrest 
Hill near Newark, on September 19th, and were taken on the trunks 
of hemlock trees. From eight to ten specimens were seen on one tree . 

Mr Buchholz found Bchinia brer is plentiful, locally, neir Eliza- 
bethport, September 9th. 

Mr. Kemp reported the capture of Pseudanthroecia coracms&t 
Elizabeth, July 7th. 

Mr. Weidt donated a pen to the society as the last one had been 
placed on the retired list on half pay, having been in service for 
over two years. Meeting adjourned A J. WEIDT, Secretary. 

A meeting of the American Entomological Society was held Oc- 
tober 26th. Mr. C. W. Johnson. Vice President, in the chair. Dr. 
Skinner presented 178 insects from Utah. Mr. Liebeck stated that 
the society had purchased 206 specimens, 73 species of Coleoptera 
from the Griffith collection. Dr. Skinner exhibited the mouth 
parts of the Cnrabidw from which illustrations had been made for 
Dr. Horn's paper on the family These spei-imeus were originally 
gummed on card board but had been lately remounted on glass mi- 
croscope slides by Prof John B. Smith. They are now inappro- 
priate boxes and all numbered in accordance with Dr. Horn's 
paper. Mr- Ulke of Washington, who was present and by the way 
was the first member elected to the society, spoke of the great 
value of Dr. Horn's work and aiso complimented Prof Smith for 
putting the material in a condition to be available for study for an 
indefinite period. A unanimous vote of thanks was tendered Prof. 
Smith for his valuable work. Mr. Laurent exhibited the Coleop- 
tera collected by Prof. A. J. Snyder and himself in Utah, princi- 
pally at the head of the big Cottouwood ('anon. The catch was a 
good one considering that less than 100 hours collecting was had. 
The speaker was surprised to see sucha small amount ot variation 
in Cicinaela longrtabris. Lucanus nifiz)n(i, Gun rotes crcssoni. 
Eleodes extricatn- and Pristoselis were specially mentioned: the 
hitter were abundant on thistles. The photographs taken on tiic 
trip were shown. Dr. Calvert exhibited the ()<tonta collected by 
Dr. Skinner in Utah. There werethirty-two specimens represent- 
ing fifteen species. A pair of Somatoc-hlora semicircularis in tine 
condition were mentioned. Plathernfn suhnrimld . .are much 



1891>] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. ;;<(;; 

like the Eastern species. They differed in that in the East the 
sexes are marked differently while the Western ones are alike. Li 
belhila forensis was said to he the Eastern representative of L. i>nl- 
chella. Ophif/oiii/i/tt'N <><-<-i<]<-ntis was taken. The difficulties of 
this genus were mentioned Enallftf/iin/ calrertt was said to be 
very close to annej-init The differences in the appendages were de 
scribed. The sexes of calverti were taken in coitn. Some New 
Jersey s})ecimens of Odoiiata received from Mr. Davis were also 
shown. Two specimens of what was supposed to be Art/iff fnnis- 
l(i fa were taken at New FouudUnd, N. J., and were of peculiar in- 
terest because they correspond most closely with specimens from 
Arkansas, Texas and Mexico. The types came from A'enezuela 
Dr. Skinnerexhibited the Lepidoptera taken by himself in Colorado 
and Utah during the past summer. Mr. Johnson exhibited the 
Dfptera taken by Dr Skinner in Utah and said there was a new 
species of tiyriiiihoroniyia and a Tiptda not yet determined. AV>vf- 
Inniujni net-nth? 9 was of much interest. The differences between 
the sexes were pointed out. The greater part were Pacific slope 
species. Dasyllix colinnbica was of interest because it mimics the 
bumble bee which has fulvous pile the same as the fly. The flies 
collected by Mr. Laurent were also exhibited. 

Mr. Ulke said he did not believe in rare species. It means igno- 
rance of locality, time or habits. Say described two water beetles 
received from Melsbeimer, as Hydrocampus rotiuulntns. Dr. 
Horn did not notice these in his studies and it subsequently turned 
up in Massachusetts. Mr. Ulke also found them in sornesmall pud 
dies and took 50 or GO in a day. A small species of &i'//>/i>'<lif, Pm<>- 
(tytes cryptophagoides agreeing with Maunerheinrs specimen* 
Ironi Alaska was also taken in the woods near 'Washington, D. C., 
and was found in a deep hole near a stump. It is a blind species 
and is found by sifting. Mr. Wenzel stated that his son had found 
a Pselajphus new to his collei-tiou, in the roots of sedge His expe- 
rience in sifting and finding rare ^pecies was given. lie corrobo- 
rated what Mr. Ulke said about so called rare species. 

DK. HENRY SKINXKK, Recorder. 

At the October meeting of the Feldmau Collecting Social held at 
the residence of Mr. 11 \V . Wenzel, 1528 South Thirteenth street, 
Philadelphia, twelve members were present. 

Mr. Johnson exhibited his collection of Chironomidse, containing 
1 he following number of species from New Jersey : ('hirunomiiHi, 
](',; ('//!/, foft/in, :>, : ('<iiii/>t(H-l(nliiis,A: OrUnx-Uuliiix. -J ; /:/!///<- 
IK-HI UN. \; Ttnit//mx.H; ( 'iTtr/u/ioi/oit, I'.l ; lldrmn, I/KI . 1 ; a total 
of .V>. 

Prof J. 15. Sin i tli stated the probable existence of many more -.pe 
i-iesof this family in New Jersey than were represented in the al>o\ e 
list. Very little is known of their early stages and while the larva- 
an- slid to live on decavinir vegetable ii. alter in water, there is one 



304 ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Dec 

species, Cricoptopus sylvesfris which is injurious to vegetation. 
the larva' mining the leaves of the water lily, Vx-lorifi ret/id- 

Mr Johnson referred to a former commmunication on spirally 
girdled hickory twigs, and stated he had since reared two speci- 
mens of Hi'tmtrliilK'K quadrimaculatus therefrom. 

Mr. II. Weuzel exhibited his collection ofScydmaenidae and P.-H 
aphida." containing 1 about 150 species and 900 specimens. Over NO 
specie- were from the vicinity of Philadelphia. 71) of which occur 
in New Jersey, although he believed all will eventually be found in 
both Pennsylvania and New Jersey. 

Prof Smith called attention to a collection of the mouth parts of 
Carabidse on which Dr. Horn's classification of that family was 
based. He had undertaken the mounting of these specimens on 
microscopic slides, the specimens being originally pasted on card 
board. In every instance the specimen was simply named gener- 
ic-ally. The slides will be arranged in boxes, the latter numbered 
to correspond to the plates of Dr. Horn's paper, and each slide is 
numbered the same as the corresponding figure on the plates. He 
stated that the figures are not exact, the author bringing out only 
certain salient features of the mouth parts and in the speaker's opin- 
ion thereby overlooking other important characters. 

A vote of thanks was extended Prot. J. B. Smith for tile-elegant 
collation given the members at the last meeting. 

Dr. Skinner related the experiences of his recent trip to the Wa- 
-atch Mountains, Utah, in company with Me.-srs. Snyderand Laur- 
ent. WILLIAM J. Fox. Secretary 




VOL, X 



iNO. i 




Entomological News 




Feniseca tarquinlus 
Chrysalis 



JANUARY, 1899. 



EDITOR: 
HENRY SKINNER, M. D. 

PHILIP P. CALVERT, Ph. D., Associate Editor. 



EZRA T. CHE8SON 
PHILIP LAURENT. 



Advisory Committee: 

CHARLES A. BLAKE. CHARLES LIEBECK. 

WILLIAM J. FOX. CHARLES W. JOHNSON. 




PHILADELPHIA: 
ENTOMOLOGICAL ROOMS OH 
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LIST OF COLEOPTERA of America North of Mexico, by Samuel 

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DUNNING (S N.) -Monograph of the species of Aphilanthops in- 
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A MANUAL FOR THK STUDY OF IN 7 SECTS. By John 
Henry Comstock, Professor of Entomology in Cornell University, and Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University, and Anna Botsford Comstock, member of the Soci- 
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A TEXT-BOOK OF ENTOMOLOGY, including the anatomy, 
physiology, embryology and metamorphoses of insects for use in agricultural 
ana technical schools and colleges, as Well as by the working entomologist, 
by Alpheus S Packard, Professor of Zoology and Geology, Brown University, 
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Insects of all families from Temperate and Tropical Mexico. Material care- 
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dealers and special attention to specialists' desiderata. 

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FOR -SALE" 

Chalcolepidius tartarus, N. Sp. Described by H C. Fall of Cala. 50 cents 
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W. J. HOLLAND, Carnegie Museum, Pittsburg, Pa. 

A RARE OPPORTUNITY 

To buy the male of Pelecinus polycerator Drury. It is only to br 
found in two collections in America. 

R. J. WEITH, ELKHART, INDIANA. 



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Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera, Neuroptera, 
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VOL. X NO. 2 



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Fenlseca tarquinius 
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FEBRUARY, 1899. 



EDITOR: 
HENRY SKINNER, M. D. 

PHILIP P, CALVERT, Ph. D., Associate Editor. 



Advisory Committee: 

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named and exact locality given. I also will identify carefully and promptly 
for anyone desiring it, any species of N. American or Foreign butterflies or 
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alina, buddha, etc , Morphos-cipris, amathonte. Some lots of 50 species So 
Am for only $12 oo Send for list 

H. K. BURRISON, West Newton, Mass. 



A MANUAL FOR THE STUDY OF INSECTS By John 
Henry Comstock, Professor of Entomology in Cornell University, and Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University, and Anna Botsford Comstock, member of the Soci- 
ety of American Wood Engravers The book consists of 711 pages, and is il- 
lustrated by 797 tigs in the text and six full-page plates, one of which is col- 
ored For sale by ENTOMOXOGICAI, XK.WS. Price, $4.(M). 

A TEXT-BOOK OF KNTOMOLOGY, including the anatomy, 
physiology, embryology and metamorphoses of insects for use in agricultural 
and technical schools and colleges, as well as by the working entomologist 
by Alpheus S Packard, Professor tf Zoology and Geology, Brown University, 
author of "< illicit- to Study of Insects," "Entomology for Beginners," ete ,\vith 
ov -r 4 10 illustrations Svo. For sale by ENTOMOJ.OGICAI. Xic\vs Price, 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 




TAXIDERMIST AND DEALER IN ENTOMOLOGICAL SUPPLIES. 

Fine Carlsbader Insect 
Pins a specialty Price- 
list sent on application. 

78 Ashland Place, 
Improved Entomological Forceps. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FINE MEXICAN MATERIAL FOR SALB. 

Insects of all families from Temperate and Tropical Mexico. Material care- 
fully put up ; specimens fresh and perfect Rates reasonable. Choice lots to 
dealers and special attention to specialists' desiderata. 

OTIS W. BARRETT, 

Museo de la Comision G. E. Tacubaya. D. F., Mexico. 



Thfl DllHnrflll Dnnl/ 

me bimeiny BOOK, 



FOR SALE. 

SF. Sp. .Described by H 
!5 cents. 

GHAS. A. GRIFFITH, Green Lane, Manayunk, Phila., Pa, 

By W. J. HOLLAND, large 8vo.. over 



Chalcolepidius tartarus, N. Sp. Described by H C. Fall of Cala. 50 cents 
per specimen C. webbii, 25 cents. 



rately colored plates, containing more than xooo figures, representing the 
types in the collections of W. H. Edwards, Theo. L,. Mead, Dr H. Skinner 
and others Indispensable to all students of North American Entomology 
$3.00 net. Sent upon receipt of price to any address 

W. J. HOLLAND, Oarnegie Museum, Pittsburg, Pa. 



A RARE OPPORTUNITY 

To buy the male of Pelecinus polycerator Drury. It is only to be 
found in two collections in America. 

R. J. WE1TH, ELKHART, INDIANA. 



IPOIES 

Colias behrii (in papers) c? or 9. Hypopta bertholdi r? or ?. Cat- 
ocala stretchii and vars. Catocala faustina and vars. Sent free 
by mail at 25 cents each. 

J. J. RIVERS, SANTA MONICA, CAL. 

Lepidoptera For Sale and Exchange. 

Native and Exotic, expanded and in envelopes, by the piece or in lots of loc , 
mixed ; various grades at various prices Morphos and Caligos in numbers. 
59 species of Papilios, many rare. Send for lists. 

ELLISON A. SMYTH, Jr., 
Va. Polytechnic Institute, BLACKSBURG, VA. 

WHEN WHITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 




VOL. X NO. 3 



Entomological News 





F 



Feniseca tarquinius 
Chrysalis (enlarged) 



MARCH, 1899. 



EDITOR: 
HENRY SKINNER, M. D. 

PHILIP P. CALVERT, Ph. D., Associate Editor. 



Advisory Committee: 

E2KA T. CRE83ON. CHARLES A. BLAKE. CHARL'SS L T EBECK. 

PHILIP LAURENT. WILLIAM J. FOX. CHARLES W. JOHNSON. 




PHILADELPHIA: 
ENTOMOLOGICAL ROOMS OF 
THE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, 
LOGAN SQUARE 

1899 




Rntor.M :it the Philadelphia l'..-t < trtl.-. as ^.ci-ml ''i:is-- Martcr 



Entomological News 

published monthly, excepting July and August, in charge of the Entomological 
Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, and the American 
Entomological Society. 

Annual Subscription, $1 .OO, in advance, 

Outside of the United States and Canada, $1.20. 

Advertising Rates: 30 cents per square inch, single insertion ; a liberal dis- 
count on longer insertions. No advertisement taken for less than 60 cents. 
Cash in advance. 

#Sr All remittances should be addressed to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy 
of Natural Sciences, 19th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

LEPIDOPTERA FOR SALE. 

From North America, Central and South America, India, Japan and Europe 
Many rare species. Send for lists 

HENRY ENGEL, 153 26th St., S. S., 

PITTS BU KG, PA. U. S A. 



WI FPinOPTFRl^TQ l have g reat numbers of N American 
L L-r\lO 1 O, and E xo tic Lepidoptera which I offer for 

sale by single example or in lots, at low prices. Also will exchange for good 
N. American species, BombycidEe, Noctuidae, etc. All offered are correctly 
named and exact locality given. I also will identify carefully and promptly 
for anyone desiring it, any species of N. American or Foreign butterflies or 
moths. Correspondence cordially invited from the beginner as well as thi 
advanced student Specimens neatly and properly spread at reasonable rates. 

HERMAN STREGKER, Box 311, Reading P. 0., Pennsylvania. 

Popular Science 

k Nature, Invention, 

|\|*\AfO Chemistry, Electricity, f| O fc I T It 

IUWWO Hygiene, Archaeology. llwCtll.ll 

Formerly BOSTON JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY 

ENLARGED AND IMPROVED. 

Contains a large number of Short, Easy, Practical, Interesting and Popular 
Scientific articles, that can be appreciated and enjoyed by any intelligent 
reader, even though he knew little or nothing of Science. 

Profusely Illustrated and Free from Technicalities. 

Newsdealers, 15 cents. $1.6O per year. 

Largest Circulation of any Scientific Paper in the World. 

I I >WARD F. BIGELOW, Editor 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 

BENJ. LILLARD & CO., 108 Fulton Street, New York. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION 'ENTOMOLOOICAL NEWS.' 



New Publications. 

COLEOPTER A - Revision of the species of Apion of American north 
of Mexico, by H. C. Fall (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc 1898) 
4 plates $I.OO 

LEPIDOPTERA Synonymical Catalogue of N. Am. Rhopalocera, 

by Henry Skinner, M. D., 1898 1 .OO 

HYMENOPTER A. -The species of /Vw inhabiting America, north 

of Mex., by Wm. J. Fox, (Trans. Am. Ent Soc. 1898) .20 

Monograph of the species of Aphilanthops inhabiting 

Boreal America, by S. N. Dunning (Trans. Am. Ent. 

Soc., 1898, .IO 

On some Panurgine and other Bees, by T. D. A. Cock- 

erell (Trans Am. Ent. Soc. 1898} .15 

OD3NATA Burmeister's Types of Odonata, by P. P. Calvert, 

-Trans-. Am. Ent Soc 1898,}! plate .75 

LIST OF LEPIDOPTERA of Boreal America, by Prof J. B. Smith. 

1891. pp. 124 listing 6020 species I.OO 

LIST OF COLEOPTERA of America North of Mexico, by Samuel 

Henshaw, 1885 1.25 

SUPPLEMENT to same, 1895 . .50 

CRESSON, (E. T ) -Synopsis of the Families and Genera of the 
Hymenoptera of Am North of Mex. together with a 
catalogue of the described species and bibliography. 
Parts i and 2 complete, 1887 3.OO 

Sent on receipt of price. Price Lists Nos. i, 2, 3 and 4 may be had on 

application to 

E. T. CRESSON, Treasurer, P: 0. Box 248, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

LEPIDOPTERA FOR SALE. 

Lowest prices. Indian, S. American and Australian. Papilios daksha, lam- 
alina, buddha, etc , Morphos-cipris, amathonte. Some lots of 50 species So. 
Am. for only $i 20. Send for list 

H. K. BURRISOIM, West Newton, Mass. 

A MANUAL FOR THU STUDY OF INSECTS. By John 
Henry Com^tock, Professor of Entomology in Cornell University, and Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University, and Anna Botsford Comstock, member of the S <ci- 
ety of American Wood Engravers. The book consists of 711 pages, and is il- 
lustrated by 797 figs in the text and six full-page plates, one of which is col- 
ored. For "sale by ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. Price, $4.Ot>. 

A TEXT-BOOK OF ENTOMOLOGY, including the anatomy. 
physiology, embryology and metamorphoses of insects for uso in agricultural 
and technical schools and colleges, as well as by the working entomologist, 
by Alpheus 8 Packard, Professor of Zoology and Geology, Brown University, 
author of "Guide to Study of Insects," '-'Entomology for Beginners," etc .with 
over 400 illustrations Svo. For sale by ENTOMOLOGICAL Nu\\s 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 




TAXIDERMIST AND DEALER IN ENTOMOLOGICAL SUPPLIES. 

Fine Carlsbader Insect 
Pins a specialty Price- 
list sent on application. 

78 Ashland Place, 
Improved Entomological Forceps. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FOR SALE. 

Chalcolepidius tartarus, N. Sp. Described by H C. Fall of Cala. 30 cents 
per specimen C. webbii, 25 cents. 

GHAS. A. GRIFFITH, Green Lane, Manayunk, Phila., Pa. 



TUft DnUArflu Dnnl/ B y W - J - HOLLAND, large 8vo., over 
II UOJRl 4oo pp. of printed matter, 185 engravings 
" J in the text, and 48 exquisitely and accu- 

rately colored plates, containing more than 1000 figxires, representing the 
types in the collections of W. H. Edwards, Theo. L. Mead. Dr H. Skinner 
and others Indispensable to all students of North American Entomology 
$3.00 net. Sent upon receipt of price to any address 

W. J. HOLLAND, Carnegie Museum, Pittsburg, Pa. 



7 



A RARE OPPORTUNITY 

To buy the male of Pelecinus polycerator Drury. It is only to be 
found in two collections in America. 

R. J. WE1TH, ELKHART, INDIANA. 

Lepidoptera For Sale and Exchange. 

Native and Exotic, expanded and in envelopes, by the piece or in lots of loc, 
mixed ; various grades at various prices Morphos and Caligos in numbers. 
59 species of Papilios, many rare. Send for lists. 

ELLISON A. SMYTH, Jr., 
Va. Polytechnic Institute, BLACKSBURG, VA. 



Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, bird-skins, eggs and other material in zoology; in- 
sect pins and other goods for collectors Send for lists Prices very low. 

ARN3LD VOELSCSOW, Scnwerin, Mecklbg, Germany. 

WE buy and sell all orders of Insects, Cocoons and pupa;, American and 
Foreign Offer life-histories of Lepidoptera, Fertilized ova, especially 
Catocala. Sphinges and Bornbycidee, Columbia and other rare cocoons. Give 
good exchange for desirable material. Patent pressed cork, best and cheapest 
ever offered, 9Xi2x, 1 ^, loc per sheet. Tools, pins, presses, nets and cabinets, 
Send sc for new catalogue. Prof. CARL BRAUN, Naturalist, Bangor, Me. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 




VOL. X NO. 4 



Entomological News 





Feniseca tarquinius 
Chrysalis (enlarged) 



APRIL, 



EDITOR: 
HENRY SKINNER, M. D. 

PHILIP P. CALVERT, Ph. D., Associate Editor. 



Advisory Committee: 

EZKA T. CRESriON CHARLES A. BLAKE. CHARLES LIEBEC'K. 

PHILIP LAURENT. WILLIAM J. FOX. CHARLES W. JOHNSON. 



PHILADELPHIA: 
ENTOMOLOGICAL ROOMS OF 
THE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES. 
LOGAN SQUARE 




1899 




Knter.-d at ihe Philadelphia Vst ( > ,-, ,nd ( "Mas* Mat r.-r 



Entomological News 

published monthly, excepting July and August, in charge of the Entomological 
Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, and the American 
Entomological Society. 

Annual Subscription, $ 1 .OO, in advance, 

Outside of the United States and Canada, $1.20. 

Advertising Rates: 30 cents per square inch, single insertion ; a liberal dis- 
count on longer insertions. No advertisement taken for less than 60 cents. 
Cash in advance. 



remittances should be addressed to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy 
of Natural Sciences, 19th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Coleoptera of North America For Sale. 

Many rare species. L,arge orders filled at very low prices. Will purchase 
any DYTISCID/E not in my collection. 

JOHN I). SHKRMAN, Jr., 
P. O. Box 1534, NEW YOKK CITY. 



I PPI nflPTFRIQTQ l have reat "Ambers of N American 
I L- J VI O 1 O. and E xot i c Lepidoptera which I offer for 

sale by single example or in lots, at low prices. Also will exchange for good 
N. American species, Bombycidee, Noctuidae, etc. All offered are correctly 
named and exact locality given. I also will identify carefully and promptly 
for anyone desiring it, any species of N. American or Foreign butterflies or 
moths. Correspondence cordially invited from the beginner as well as the 
advanced student Specimens neatly and properly spread at reasonable rates. 

HERMAN STRECKER, Box 311, Reading P. 0., Pennsylvania. 

Popular Science 

Nature, Invention, 

^'^"'i-H'.V, EIMMi-i<.it,v. 
Hygiene, ArclKvolo-v. 

Formerly BOSTON JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY 

ENLARGED AND IMPROVED. 

Contains a large number of Short, Easy, Practical, Interesting and Popular 
Scientific articles, that can be appreciated and enjoyed by any intelligent 
reader, even though he knew little or nothing of Science. 

Profusely Illustrated and Free from Technicalities. 

Newsdealers, 15 cents. S1.6O per year. 

Largest Circulation of any Scientific Paper in the World. 

EDWARD F. BIGELOW, Editor. 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 

BENJ. LILLARD & CO., 108 Fulton Street, New York. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 



New 



COLEOPTERA Revision of the species of Apt on of American north 
f Mexico, by H. C. Fall (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc 1*9*1 
4 plates $I.OO 

LEPIDOPTERA Synonymical Catalogue of N. Am. Rhopalocera, 

by Henry Skinner, M. D., 1898 1 .OO 

HYMENOPTERA -The species of /V,/ inhabiting America, north 

of Mex., by Win. J. Fox, (Trans. Am. But Soc. 1*98) .20 

Monograph of the species of Aphilanthops inhabiting 

Boreal America, by S. N. Dunning (Trans. Am. Ent. 

Soc., 1898, . . . ." ' .IO 

On some Panurgine and other Bees, by T. D. A. Cock- 

erell (Trans Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) .15 

ODONATA Burrneister's Types of Odonata, by P. P. Calvert, 

(Trans. Am. Ent Soc 1898,) I plate .75 

LIST OF LEPIDOPTERA of Boreal America, by Prof J. B. Smith, 

1*91. pp. 124 listing 6020 species I.OO 

LIST OF COLEOPTERA of America North of Mexico, by Samuel 

Henshaw, 1885 1.25 

SUPPLEMENT to same, 1*95 .50 

CRESSON, (E. T ) -Synopsis of the Families and Genera of the 
Hymenoptera of Am North of Mex. together with a 
catalogue of the described species and bibliography. 
Parts i and 2 complete, 18*7 ". 3.OO 

Sent on receipt of price. Price Lists N'os. i, 2, 3 and 4 may be had on 

application to 

E. T. CRESSON, Treasurer, P. 0. Box 248, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



LEPIDOPTERA FOR SALE. 

Lowest prices. Indian, S. American and Australian. Papilios daksha, tam- 
alina, buddha, etc , Morphos-cipris, amathonte. Some lots of 50 species So. 
Am. for only $1.20 Send for list 

H. K. BURRISON, West Newton, Mass. 



A MAM AL FOIl THK STUDY OF INSECTS By John 
Henry Com^tock, Professor of Entomology in Cornell University, and Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University, and Anna Botsford Comstock, member of the Soci- 
ety of American Wood Engravers. The hook consists of 711 pages, and is il- 
lustrated by 707 figs, in the text and six full-page plates, one of which is col- 
ored. For sale by ENTOMOLOGICAL NKWS. Price, $4. ot). 

A TUX T BOOK OF HNTOMOUMJ Y, im-luding the anatomy, 

physiology, embryology and metamorphoses of insects for nse in agricultural 
and technical schools and colleges > as well as by the working entomologist, 
by AlpVu-us S I'ai-kar 1, Professor of Zoology and Geology, Mrown rniversiu, 
author of "Guide to Study of Insects," "ivntomology for Beginners," etc , with 
ov.^r 4 YI illustrations *vo. I'or sale by ICsToMoi.oc. ICAI. N'i;\vs IV 
$4 50 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 



TAXIDERMIST AND DEALER IN ENTOMOLOGICAL SUPPLIES. 

Fine Carlsbader Insect 
Pins a specialty. Price- 
list sent on application. 

78 Ashland Place, 
Improved Entomological Forceps. Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Chalcolepidius tartarus, N. Sp. Described by H C. Fall of Cala. 50 cents 
per specimen C. webbii, 25 cents. 



The Butterfly Book, 



FOR SALE. 

"I. Sp. Described by H 
!5 cents. 

GHAS. A. GRIFFITH, Green Lane, Hanayunk, Phila., Pa. 

By W. J. HOLLAND, large 8vo., over 
400 pp. of printed matter, 185 engravings 

in the text, and 48 exquisitely and accu- 
rately colored plates, containing more than 1000 figures, representing the 
types in the collections of W. H. Edwards, Theo. L. Mead, Dr H. Skinner 
and others Indispensable to all students of North American Entomology. 
$3.00 net. Sent upon receipt of price to any address 

W. J, HOLLAND, Carnegie Museum, Pittsburg, Pa. 

A RARE OPPORTUNITY 

To buy the male of Pelecinus polycerator Drury. It is only to be 
found in two collections in America. 

R. J. WEITH, ELKHART, INDIANA. 

Lepidoptera For Sale and Exchange. 

Native and Exotic, expanded and in envelopes, by the piece or in lots of iuc , 
mixed ; various grades at various prices Morphos and Caligos in numbers. 
59 species of Papilios, many rare. Send for lists. 

ELLISON A. SMYTH, Jr., 
Va. Polytechnic Institute, BLACKSBURG, VA. 



Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, bird-skins, eggs and other material in zoology; in- 
sect pins and other goods for collectors Send for lists Prices very low. 

ARNOLD VOELSCBOW, Schwerin, Mecklbg, Germany. 



WE buy and sell all orders of Insects, Cocoons and pupae, American and 
Foreign. Offer life-histories of Lepidoptera, Fertilized ova, especially 
Catocala, Sphinges and Bombycidae, Columbia and other rare cocoons. Give 
good exchange for desirable material. Patent pressed cork, best and cheapest 
ever offered, 9xi2x>^, loc per sheet. Tools, pins, presses, nets and cabinets. 
Send 5c for new catalogue. Prof. CARL BRAUN, Naturalist, Bangor, Me. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAl NEWS." 




VOL. X NO. 5 



Entomological News 





Feniseca tarquinius 
Chrysalis (enl;u%ce<i) 



MAY, 1899. 



EDITOR: 

HENRY SKINNER, M. D. 
PHILIP P. CALVERT, Ph. D., Associate Editor. 



Advisory Committee: 

EZRA T. CRES3ON. CHARLES A. BLAKE. CHARLES LIEBECK. 

PHILIP LAURENT. WILLIAM J. FOX. CHARLES W. JOHNSON. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

ENTOMOLOGICAL ROOMS Ol 
THE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIEN* 
1 < )GAN SQUARE 








ivd :it t in- Philadelphia !' 



Entomological News 

published monthly, excepting July and August, in charge of the Entomological 
Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, and the American 
Entomological Society. 

Annual Subscription, $ 1 .OO, fn advance, 

Outside of the United States and Canada, $1.20. 

Advertising Rates: 30 cents per square inch, single insertion ; a liberal dis- 
count on longer insertions. No advertisement 'taken for less than 60 cents. 
Cash in advance. 

sg~All remittances should be addressed to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy 
of Natural Sciences, 19th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

THE undersigned offers for the next season, at low prices, cash 
payment, fresh Coleopters and Lepidopters from 
the Schleswich Mountains. Further information by direct 
correspondence. 

OSKAR HENSEL, Gottesberg, Schlesien, Germany. 
A. SMITH & SONS, 269 PEARL STREET, NEW YOKK. 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

GOODS FOR ENTOMOLOGISTS, 

Klaeger and Carlsbad Insect Pins, Setting 

Boards, Folding Nets, Locality and 

FOLOI'N J E S ET H Special Labels, Forceps, Sheet Cork, Etc. 
Other articles are being added, Send for List. 





VIENNA 1S93. 
Medal I. Class. 



BUTTERFLY NETS. 



GENEVA lS9tx 
Honorable Diploma 



The G.K. Net is made of the best material. 
The G.K. Net can be mounted or dismounted in a moment. 
The G.K. Net suits any stick, and may be carried in any pocket. 
The G.K. Net is every collector's delight. 



THE G. K. NET 

READY 
FOR USK. 

THE G. K. NET 

WHKN NOT 
IN USE. 




Steel ring 



Net of silk 



Diameter 14 inches. The most elegant net. 

Circumference 41 inches. The most piactiral net 
Depth of the net '-II inches. The most durable net. 

Dimensions 1 by I by II ini-he-.. 

The Lightest, the Handiest, the Cheapest Net. 

One equality, one Si/.e. one I'riee only. 



Send postal order *l.r><) and yon will get the G.K. Net free of all charge trom 

usi, Gais, SuuitzeMand. 



WHEN WRITING- PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 



New Publications. 

COLEOPTERA Revision of the species of Apion of American north 
of Mexico, by H. C. Fall (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) 
4 plates $I.OO 

LEPIDOPTERA Synonymical Catalogue of N. Am. Rliopalocera, 

by Henry Skinner, M. D., 1898 1 .OO 

HYMENOPTERA -The species of Psen inhabiting America, north 

of Mex., by Wm. J. Fox, (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) .20 

Monograph of the species of Aphilanthops inhabiting 

Boreal America, by S. N. Dunning (Trans. Am. Ent. 

Soc., 1898, . . . .' .IO 

On some Panurgine and other Bees, by T. D. A. Cock- 

erell (Trans Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) .15 

ODONATA Burmeister's Types of Odonata, by P. P. Calvert, 

(Trans. Am. Ent. Soc 1898,)! plate .75 

LIST OF LEPIDOPTERA of Boreal America, by Prof J. B. Smith, 

1891. pp. 124 listing 6020 species I.OO 

LIST OF COLEOPTERA of America North of Mexico, by Samuel 

Henshaw, 1885 1.25 

SUPPLEMENT to same, 1895 .50 

CRESSON, (E. T ) - Synopsis of the Families and Genera of the 
Hymenoptera of Am North of Mex. together with a 
catalogue of the described species and bibliography. 
Parts i and 2 complete, 1887 3.OO 

Sent on receipt of price. Price Lists Nos. i, 2, 3 and 4 may be had on 

application to 

E. T. CRESSON, Treasurer, P. O. Box 248, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

LEPIDOPTERA FOR SALE. 

Lowest prices. Indian, S. American and Australian. Papilios daksha, tam- 
alina, buddha, etc , Morphos-cipris, amathonte. Some lots of 50 species So. 
Am. for only ft 20 Send for list. 

H. K. BURRISON, West Newton, Mass. 



A MANUAL FOR THE STUDY OF INSECTS By John 
Henry Com^tock, Professor of Entomology in Cornell University, and Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University, and Anna Botsford Comstock, member of the Soci- 
ety of American Wood Engravers. The book consists of 711 pages, and is il- 
lustrated by 797 figs in the text and six full-page plates, one of which is col- 
ored. For salt by ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. Price, $-4.09. 

A TEXT-BOOK OF ENTOMOLOGY, including the anatomy, 
physiology, embryology and metamorphoses of insects for use in agricultural 
and technical schools and colleges, as well as by the working entomologist, 
by Alpheus S Packard, Professor of Zoology and Geology, Brown University, 
author of "Guide to Study of Insects," "Entomology for IJeginners," etc ,wiih 
over 400 illustrations Sv<>. For sale by ENTOMOLOGICAL \i\vs. Price, 
TO 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 



CTOIHIIbT 

TAXIDERMIST AND DEALER IN ENTOMOLOGICAL SUPPLIES. 

Fine Carlsbader Insect 
Pins a specialty Price- 
list sent on application. 

78 Ashland Place, 
Improved Entomological Forceps. Brooklyn, N. Y. 




FOR SALE. 

^. Sp. Described by H 
15 cents. 

GHAS. A. GRIFFITH, Green Lane, Manayimk, Phila., Pa. 



Chalcolepidius tartarus, N. Sp. Described by H C. Fall of Cala. 50 cents 
per specimen C. webbii, 25 cents. 



Tho DiiHnrflu Dnnl/ B ^ w - J - HOLLAND, large STO., over 

PU Jft, 400 pp. of printed matter, 185 engravings 

J in the text, and 48 exquisitely and accu- 

rately colored plates, containing more than 1000 figures, representing the 
types in the collections of W. H. Edwards, Theo. L. Mead, Dr H. Skinner 
and others Indispensable to all students of North American Entomology. 
$3.00 net. Sent upon receipt of price to any address 

W. J. HOLLAND, Carnegie Museum, Pittsburg, Pa. 

A RARE OPPORTUNITY 

To buy the male of Pelecinus polycerator Drury. It is only to be 
found in two collections in America. 

R. J. WE1TH, ELKHART, INDIANA. 



Lepidoptera For Sale and Exchange. 

Native and Exotic, expanded and in envelopes, by the piece or in lots of loc, 
mixed ; various grades at various prices Morphos and Caligos in numbers. 
59 species of Papilios, many rare. Send for lists. 

ELLISON A. SMYTH, Jr., 
Va. Polytechnic Institute, BLACKSBURG, VA. 

Patent Electric Collecting Lamp. 

(Hves astonishing results at "sugaring." Being a special manufacture, two 
weeks should be allowed to fill orders. This advertisement will not appear 
again this season. Send for circular. Sold only by 

S. T. KEMP, 637 Jefferson Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 



WU buy and sell all orders of Insects, Cocoons and pupae, American anil 
Foreign. Offer life-histories of Lepidoptera, Fertilized ova, especially 
Catocala. Sphinges and Bombycidae, Columbia and other rare cocoons. Give 
good exchange for desirable material. Patent pressed cork, best and cheapest 
ever offered, 9x12x5^, loc per sheet. Tools, pins, presses, nets and cabinets. 
Send sc for new catalogue. Prof. CARL BRAUN, Naturalist, Bangor, Me. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS 




I _ 

n ~ 1 ' VOL. X NO. 6 

Entomological News 





w 



Fenlseca tarquinius 
Chrysalis 



JUNE, 1899. 



EDITOR: 
HENRY SKINNER, M. D. 

PHILIP P. CALVERT, Ph. D./Assouate Editor. 



Advisory Committee: 

EZRA T. CRESSON. CHARLES A. BLAKE. CHARLES LIEBECK. 

PHILIP LAURENT. WILLIAM J. FOX. CHARLES W. JOHNSON. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

ENTOMOLOGICAL ROOMS OF 

THE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, 

LOGAN SQUARE 





;it th<- Philadelphia Post otlln- as s.-coml cia^~ M.iticr. 



Entomological News 

published monthly, excepting July and August, in charge o'f the Entomological 
Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, and the American 
Entomological Society. 

Annual Subscription, $1 .OO, in advance, 

Outside of the United States and Canada, $1.20. 

Advertising Rates: 30 cents per square inch, single insertion ; a liberal dis- 
count on longer insertions. No advertisement taken for less than 60 cents. 
Cash in advance. 

jg^All remittances should be addressed to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy 
of Natural Sciences, 19th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

THE undersigned offers for the next season, at low prices, cash 
payment, fresh Coleopters and Lepidoplerw from 
the Schleswich Mountains. Further information by direct 
correspondence. 

OSKAR HENSEL, Gottesberg, Schlesien, Germany. 
A. SMITH & SONS, 269 PEARL STREET, NEW YO KK. 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

GOODS FOR ENTOMOLOGISTS, 

Klaeger and Carlsbad Insect Pins, Setting 

Boards, Folding Nets, Locality and 
Special Labels, Forceps, Sheet Cork, Etc. 
Other articles are being added, Send for List. 




VIENNA 1S93. 73 y TTT" 1-TT? T7 T V 

Medal I. Class. _DU1 1 ILIX JT L> Y 



GENEVA 189. 
Honorable Diploma 



The G.K. Net is made of the best material. 
The G.K. Net can be mounted or dismounted in a moment. 
The G.K. Net suits any stick, and may be carried in any pocket. 
The G.K. Net is every collector's delight. 



THE G. K. NET 

READY 
FOR USE. 

THE G. K. NET 

WHEN NOT 
IN USE. 




Steel ring 



Net of silk 



Diameter 14 inches. The most elegant net. 

Circumference 4-1 inches. The most practical net 
Depth of the net 89 inches. The most durable ma. 

Dimensions 1 by 4 by 11 inche-. 

The Lightest, the Handiest, the Cheapest Net. 

One Quality, one Si'/.e, one Price only. 



Send postal order $1.50 and you will get the G.K. Net free of all charge from 

Gnaf^inisi, Gais, Suuitzepland. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 



New Publications. 

GOLEOPTERA- Revision of the species of Apion of American north 
of Mexico, by H. C. Fall (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) 
4 plates $I.OO 

LEPIDOPTERA Synonytnical Catalogue of N. Am. X/topalocera, 

by Henry Skinner, M. D., 1898 1 .OO 

HTHENOPTERA -The species of Psfn inhabiting America, north 

of Mex., by Wm. J. Fox, (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) .20 

Monograph of the species of Aphilanthops inhabiting 

Boreal America, by S. N. Dunning (Trans. Am. .Ent. 

Soc., 1898, .IO 

On some Panurgine and other Bees, by T. D. A. Cock- 

erell (Trans Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) .15 

ODONATA Burmeister's Types of Odonata, by P. P. Calvert, 

Trans. Am. Ent Soc 1898,)! plate .75 

LIST OF LEPIDOPTERA of Boreal America, by Prof J. B. Smith, 

1891. pp. 124 listing 6020 species I.OO 

LIST OF COLEOPTERA of America North of Mexico, by Samuel 

Henshaw, 1885 1.25 

SUPPLEMENT to same, 1895 .50 

CRESSON, (E. T ) - Synopsis of the Families and Genera of the 
Hymenoptera of Am North of Mex. together with a 
catalogue of the described species and bibliography. 
Parts i and 2 complete, 1887 3.OO 

Sent on receipt of price. Price Lists Nos. I, 2, 3 and 4 may be had on 

application to 

E T. CRESSON, Treasurer, P. O. Box 248, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

LEPIDOPTERA FOR SALE. 

Lowest prices. Indian, S. American and Australian. Papilios daksha, tam- 
alina, buddha, etc , Morphos-cipris, amathonte. Some lots of 50 species So. 
Am. for only |i 20 Send for list 

H. K. BURRISON, West Newton, Mass. 

A MANUAL FOB THE STUDY OF INSECTS. By John 
Henry Comstock. Professor of Entomology in Cornell University, and Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University, and Anna Botsford Comstock, member of the Soci- 
ety of American Wood Engravers. The book consists of 711 pages, and is il- 
lustrated by 797 figs, in the text and six full-page plates, one of which is col- 
ored For sale by ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. Price, $4.Oi>. 

A TEXT-BOOK OF EN TO MO LOG- Y, including the anatomy, 
physiology, embryology and metamorphoses of insects for use in agricultural 
and technical schools and colleges, as well as by the working entomologist. 
by Alpheus S Packard, Professor of Zoology and Geology, Brown University, 
author of "Guide to Study of Insects," "Entomology for Beginners," etc .with 
over 400 illustrations Svo. For sale by ENTOMOLOGICAL NKWS Trice, 

WHEN WHITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 



TAXIDERMIST AND DEALER IN ENTOMOLOGICAL SUPPLIES. 

Fine Carlsbader Insect 
Pins a specialty Price- 
list sent on application. 

78 Ashland Place, 
Improved Entomological Forceps. Brooklyn, N. Y. 




FOR SALE. 

*. Sp. Described by H 
15 cents. 

GHAS. A. GRIFFITH, Green Lane, Manaynnk, Pfaila,, Pa. 



Chalcolepidius tartarus, N. Sp. Described by H C. Fall of Cala. 50 cents 
per specimen. C. webbii, 25 cents. 



By W. J. HOLLAND, large 8yo., over 
400 pp. of printed matter, 185 engravings 



The Butterfly Book, tfi 1 1 s . . , . -, . 

* in the text, and 48 exquisitely and accu- 

rately colored plates, containing more than 1000 figures, representing the 
types in the collections of W. H. Edwards, Theo. L. Mead. Dr H. Skinner 
and others Indispensable to all students of North American Entomology. 
$3.00 net. Sent upon receipt of price to any address 

W. J. HOLLAND, Carnegie Museum, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Coleoptera of North America For Sale. 

Liberal discounts on large orders. Many rare and showy species 
on hand. 

JOHN D. SHERMAN, 

Box 1534, NEW YORK CITY. 

Lepidoptera For Sale and Exchange. 

Native and Exotic, expanded and in envelopes, by the piece or in lots of loc, 
mixed ; various grades at various prices Morphos and Caligos in numbers. 
59 species of Papilios, many rare. Send for lists. 

ELLISON A. SMYTH, Jr., 
Va. Polytechnic Institute, BLAGKSBURG, VA. 

Patent Electric Collecting Lamp. 

Gives astonishing results at "sugaring." Being a special manufacture, two 
weeks should be allowed to fill orders. This advertisement will not appear 
again this season. Send for circular. Sold only by 

S. T. KEMP, 637 Jefferson Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 

\A/E buy and sell all orders of Insects, Cocoons and pupae, American and 
W Foreign. Offer life-histories of Lepidoptera, Fertilized ova, especially 
Catocala. Sphinges and Bombycidae, Columbia and other rare cocoons. Give 
good exchange for desirable material. Patent pressed cork, best and cheapest 
ever offered, gxiax,^, loc per sheet. Tools, pins, presses, nets and cabinets. 
Send 50 for new catalogue. Prof. CARL BRAUN, Naturalist, Bangor, Me. 

WHEN WHITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 




VOL, X NO. 7 



Entomological News 





Fenlseca tarquinlus 
Chrysalis (enlarged) 



SEPTEMBER, 1899. 



EDITOR: 

HENRY SKINNER, M. D. 
PHILIP P. CALVERT, Ph. D., Associate Editor. 



Advisory Committee: 

EZRA T. CRESSON. CHARLES A. BLAKE. CHARLES LIEBECK. 

PHILIP LAURENT. WILLIAM J. FOX. CHARLES W. JOHNSON. 




PHILADELPHIA: 
ENTOMOLOGICAL ROOMS OF 
THE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, 
LOGAN SQUARE 

1899 




at the Philadelphia I'<>M Ofl utt.-r. 



Entomological News 

published monthly, excepting July and Angnst, in charge of the Entomological 
Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, and the American 
Entomological Society. 

Annual Subscription, $1 .OO, in advance, 

Outside of the United States and Canada, $1.20. 

Advertising Rates : 30 cents per square inch, single insertion ; a liberal dis- 
count on longer insertions. No advertisement taken for less than 60 cents. 
Cash in advance. 

g^T All remittances should be addressed to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy 
of Natural Sciences, 19th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

THE undersigned offers for the next season, at low prices, cash 
payment, fresh Coleopters and L,epidopters from 
the Schleswich Mountains. Further information by direct 
correspondence. 

OSKAR HENSEL, Gottesberg, Schlesien, Germany. 
A. SMITH & SONS, 269 PEARL STREET, NEW YORK. 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

GOODS FOR ENTOMOLOGISTS, 

Klaeger and Carlsbad Insect Pins, Setting 
JOINTED WW Boards, Folding Nets, Locality and 
FOLDING NET Special Labels, Forceps, Sheet Cork, Etc. 

Other articles are being added, Send for List. 





VIENNA 1893. 

Medal I. Class. 



TvT TT^TC GENEVA 1896. 

IN L 1 O. Honorable Diploma 



The G.K. Net is made of the best material. 
The G.K. Net can be mounted or dismounted in a moment. 
The G.K. Net suits any stick, and may be carried in any pocket. 
The G.K. Net is every collector's delight. 



THE G. K. NET 

READY 
FOR USE. 

THE G. K. NET 

WHEN NOT 
IN USE.v 




. 



Steel ring 



Net of silk 



Diameter 14 inches. The most elegant net. 

Circumference 44 inches. The most practical net 
Depth of the net 29 inches. The most durable net. 

Dimensions 1 by 4 by 11 inche-.-. 

The Lightest, the Handiest, the Cheapest Net. 

One Quality, one Size, one Price only. 



Send postal order $1.50 and you will get the G.K. Net free of all charge from 

GraiV^FUsi, Gais, Switzerland. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 



New Publications. 

COLEOPTERA Revision of the species of Apion of American north 
of Mexico, by H. C. Fall (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) 
4 plates $I.OO 

LEPIDOPTERA Synonymical Catalogue of N. Am. Rhopalocera, 

by Henry Skinner, M. D., 1898 1 .OO 

HYMENOPTERA The species of Psen inhabiting America, north 

of Mex., by Wm. J. Fox, (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) .20 

Monograph of the species of Aphilanthops inhabiting 

Boreal America, by S. N. Dunning (Trans. Am. Ent. 

Soc., 1898, .IO 

On some Panurgine and other Bees, by T. D. A. Cock- 

erell (Trans Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) .15 

ODONATA Burmeister's Types of Odonata, by P. P. Calvert, 

(Trans. Am. Ent. Soc 1898,) I plate .75 

LIST OF LEPIDOPTERA of Boreal America, by Prof J. B. Smith, 

1891. pp. 124 listing 6020 species I.OO 

LIST OF COLEOPTERA of America North of Mexico, by Samuel 

Henshaw, 1885 1.25 

SUPPLEMENT to same, 1895 .50 

CRESSON, (E. T ) -Synopsis of the Families and Genera of the 
Hymenoptera of Am North of Mex. together with a 
catalogue of the described species and bibliography. 
Parts i and 2 complete, 1887 3.OO 

Sent on receipt of price. Price Lists Nos. I, 2, 3 and 4 may be had on 

application to 

E. T. CRESSON, Treasurer, P. O. Box 248, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

LEPIDOPTERA FOR SALE. 

Lowest prices. Indian, S. American and Australian. Papilios daksha, tam- 
alina, buddha, etc , Morphos-cipris, ainathonte. Some lots of 50 species So. 
Am. for only $1.20. Send for list. 

H. K. BURRISON, West Newton, Mass. 

Coleoptera of North America For Sale. 

JOHN D. SHERMAN, JR., 
P.O. 80x1534, NEW YORK CITY, N. Y. 

A TEXT- BOOK OF ENTOMOLOGY, including the anatomy, 
physiology, embryology and metamorphoses of insects for use in agricultural 
and technical schools and colleges, as well as by the working entomologist, 
by Alpheus S Packard, Professor of Zoology and Geology, Brown University, 
author of "Guide to Study of Insects," "Entomology for Beginners," etc .with 
over 400 illustrations 8vo. For sale by ENTOMOLOGICAL. NEWS. Price, 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 




JOIHIIbT 

TAXIDERMIST AND DEALER IN ENTOMOLOGICAL SUPPLIES. 

Fine Carlsbader Insect 
Pins a specialty Price- 
list sent on application. 

78 Ashland Place, 
Improved Entomological Forceps. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Exotic Coleoptera For Sale. 

The Griffith collection of Exotics, comprising about 20,000 specimens, one- 
half named and arranged, representing 3800 species of 880 genera. The 
balance unarranged, though mostly, named. For further particulars apply to 
GHAS. LIEBECK, Academy Natural Sciences, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

HAVING enlarged our business in regard to other branches of natural 
history, we are prepared to furnish scientific collections in any branch 
of zoology. We offer mounted birds, bird skins, bird's eggs in sets, anato- 
mical preparation in Formalin, skeletons of animals, skulls, mounted 
fishes and batrachians, lizards, and other reptiles. We buy and sell all orders 
of insects, cocoons, and pupse American and foreign. Offer life histories of 
Lepidoptera, Fertilised Ora, of the rarer kind. Patent pressed cork, the 
newess, best and cheapest, 9x12x5-16, ten sheets for $1.00. Nothing less sold. 
Tools, pins, presses, nets and cabinets. Send 5 cents for catalogue. No 
postals. Prof. CARL BRAUN, BANGOR, ME. 



You learn all about Virginia lands, soil, water, climate, resources, products, 
fruits, berries, mode of cultivation, prices, etc., by reading the VIRGINIA 
FARMER. Send 10 cents, for three months subscription to FARMER CO., 
Emporia, Va. 




Entomological Supplies and Specimens for Teachers 

and Collectors. 

Collecting, mounting and preserving utensils, insect pins, specimen and 
museum jars, formaldehyde, metamorphosis collections, mimicry insects, etc. 
etc., etc. Write for information and catalogues to 

THE KNT-SCHEERER CO., DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCE, 
Dr. G. Lagai, 17 Park Place, NEW YORK, N. T. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 




VOL, X NO. 8 



Entomological News 





Feniseca tarquinius 
Chrysalis n'lilarnvd) 



OCTOBER, 1899. 



EDITOR: 

HENRY SKINNER, M. D. 
PHILIP P. CALVERT, Ph. D., Associate Editor. 




Advisory Committee: 

EZRA T. CRESSON. CHARLES A. BLAKE. CHARLES LIEBECK. 

PHILIP LAURENT. WILLIAM J. FOX. CHARLES W. JOHNSON. 



PHILADELPHIA: 
ENTOMOLOGICAL ROOMS OF 
THE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIIEN< 
LOGAN SQUARE 



1899 




at ilii' Philaili'lpliia l>"-t Ortio- ;i- ^.-i-mul i 'las- MattiT. 



Entomological News 

published monthly, excepting July and August, in charge of the Entomological 
Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, and the American 
Entomological Society. 

Annual Subscription, $ 1 .OO, in advance, 

Outside of the United States and Canada, $1.20. 

Advertising Rates: 30 cents per square inch, single insertion ; a liberal dis- 
count on longer insertions. No advertisement taken for less than 60 cents. 
Cash in advance. 

8@~A11 remittances should be addressed to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy 
of Natural Sciences, 19th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

THE undersigned offers for the next season, at low prices, cash 
payment, fresh Coleopters and Lepiclopters from 
the Schleswich Mountains. Further information by direct 
correspondence. 

OSKAR HENSEL, Gottesberg, Schlesien, Germany. 
A. SMITH & SONS, 269 PEARL STREET, NEW YORK. 

BIAMUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

GOODS FOR ENTOMOLOGISTS, 

Klaeger and Carlsbad Insect Pins, Setting 

Boards, Folding Nets, Locality and 
Special Labels, Forceps, Sheet Cork, Etc. 
Other articles are being added, Send for List. 




VIENNA 1893. 
Medal I. Class. 



BUTTERFLY NETS. 



GENEVA 189fi. 
Honorable Diploma 



The G.K. Net is made of the best material. 
The G.K. Net can be mounted or dismounted in a moment. 
The G.K. Net suits any stick, and may be carried in any pocket. 
The G.K. Net is every collector's delight. 



THE G. K. NET 

READY 
FOR USE. 

THE G. K. NET 

WHEN NOT 
IN USE. 




1 



Steel ring 



Net of silk 



Diameter 14 inches The most elegant net. 

Circumference 44 inches. The most practical net 
Depth of the net 3W inches. The most durable net. 

/ 
Dimensions 1 by 4 by 11 inche-.. 

The Lightest, the Handiest, the Cheapest Net. 
One Quality, one Size, one Price only. 



Send postal order $1.50 and yon will get the G.K. Net free of all charge from 

Gt*af~K lt tisi, Gais, StuitzeFland. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 



New Publications. 

COLEOPTERA Revision of the species of Apion of American north 
of Mexico, by H. C. Fall (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) 
4 plates $I.OO 

LEPIDOPTERA Synonymical Catalogue of N. Am. A'hopatocera, 

by Henry Skinner, M. D., 1898 1 .OO 

HYMENOPTERA- The species of Psen inhabiting America, north 

of Mex., by Win. J. Fox, (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) .20 

Monograph of the species of Aphilanthops inhabiting 

Boreal America, by S. N. Dunning (Trans. Am. Ent. 

Soc., 1898 ' .10 

On some Panurgine and other Bees, by T. D. A. Cock- 

erell (Trans Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) .15 

ODONATA Burmeister's Types of Odonata, by P. P. Calvert, 

(Trans. Am. Ent Soc 1898,) I plate .75 

LIST OF LEPIDOPTERA of Boreal America, by Prof J. B. Smith, 

1891. pp. 124 listing 6020 species I.OO 

LfST OF COLEOPTERA of America North of Mexico, by Samuel 

Henshaw, 1885 1.25 

SUPPLEMENT to same, 1895 .50 

CRESSON, (E. T ) -Synopsis of the Families and Genera of the 
Hymenoptera of Am North of Mex. together with a 
catalogue of the described species and bibliography. 
Parts i and 2 complete, 1887 " 3.OO 

Sent on receipt of price. Price Lists Nos. I, 2, 3 and 4 may be had on 

application to 

E. T. CRESSON, Treasurer, P. 0. Box 248, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

A FTNET6T OF BEETLES 

For sale. The best stock of North American Coleopterato be found anywhere. 
.May be had in sets or single specimens. Our yearly trips enable us to offer 
rare species at moderate prices. Let us quote prices on your desiderata. Ask 
for "Insect News," issued free, it will keep you posted on novelties as fast as 
they are secured. Lists always sent on demand. 

H. F. WICKHAM, Iowa City, Iowa. 

LEPIDOPTERA FOR SALE. 

Lowest prices. Indian, S. American and Australian. Papilios daksha, tani- 
alina, buddha, etc., Morphos-cipris amathonte. Some lots of 50 species So. 
Am. for only $i .25. Send for list. 

H. K BURRISON, West Newton, Mass. 

A TEXT- BOOK OF ENTOMOLOGY, including the anatomy, 
physiology, embryology and metamorphoses of insects for use in agricultural 
and technical schools and colleges, as well as by the working entomologist, 
by Alpheus S Packard, Professor of Zoology and Geology, Brown University, 
author of "Guide to Study of Insects," "Entomology for Beginners," etc ,with 
over 400 illustrations 8vo. For sale by ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS Price, 
O 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 




JOIHZIbT 

TAXIDERMIST AND DEALER IN ENTOMOLOGICAL SUPPLIES. 

Fine Carlsbacler Insect 
Pins a specialty Price- 
list sent on application. 

78 Ashland Place, 
Improved Entomological Forceps. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Exotic Coleoptera For Sale. 

The Griffith collection of Exotics, comprising about 20,000 specimens, one- 
half named and arranged, representing 3800 species of 880 genera. The 
balance unarranged, though mostly named. For further particulars apply to 
GHAS. LIEBECK, Academy Natural Sciences, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

HAVING enlarged our business in regard to other branches of natural 
history, we are prepared to furnish scientific colleciions in any branch 
of zoology. We offer mounted birds, bird skins, bird's eggs in sets, anato- 
mical preparation in Formalin, skeletons of animals, skulls, mounted 
fishes and batrachians, lizards, and other reptiles. We buy and sell all orders 
of insects, cocoons, and pupae American and foreign. Offer life histories of 
Lepidoptera, Fertilised Ova, of the rarer kind. Patent pressed cork, 1he 
newess, best and cheapest, 9x12x5-16, ten sheets for $1.00 Nothing less sold. 
Tools, pins, presses, nets and cabinets. Send 5 cents for catalogue. Ko 
postals. Prof. CARL BRADN, BANGOR, ME. 



IHIOIMIIES. 

You learn all about Virginia lands, soil, water, climate, resources, products, 
fruits, berries, mode of cultivation, prices, etc., by reading the VIRGINIA 
FARMER. Send 10 cents, for three months subscription to FARMER CO., 
Emporia, Va. 




Entomological Supplies and Specimens for Teachers 

and Collectors. 

Collecting, mounting and preserving utensils, insect pins, specimen and 
museum jars, formaldehyde, metamorphosis collections, mimicry insects, etc. 
etc., etc. Write for information and catalogues to 

THE KNY-SCHEERER CO., DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCE, 
Dr. G. Lagai, 17 Park Place, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

WHEN WHITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 




VOL. X NO. 9 



Entomological News 





r 



Fenlseca tarquinius 
Chrysalis (enlarged) 



NOVEMBER, 1899. 



EDITOR: 
HtNRY SKINNHR, M. D. 

PHILIP P. CALVERT, Ph. L>., Associate Editor. 



Advisory Committee: 

EZRA T. CRES.-ON. CHARLES A. BLAKE. CHARLES LIEBECK. 

PHILIP LAURENT. WILLIAM J. FOX. CHARLES W. JOHNSON. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

ENTOMOLOGICAL ROOMS OF 
HE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, 
LOGAN SOI ARE 




1899 




;it t-hP Philadelphia \'-< < Ulicr :i- Ser, iinl I M;iv- Mii 



Entomological News 

published monthly, excepting July and August, in charge of the Entomological 
Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, and the American 
Entomological Society. 

Annual Subscription, $1 .OO, in advance, 

Outside of the United States and Canada, $1.20. 

Advertising Rates: 30 cents per square inch, single insertion ; a liberal dis- 
count on longer insertions. No advertisement taken for less than 60 cents. 
Cash in advance. 

egg 1 " All remittances should be addressed to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy 
of Natural Sciences, 19th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Coleoptera of North America For Sale. 

Price list of 3200 species on application. Beginners supplied with repre- 
sentative series at a very low price. Lists of desiderata from advanced collec- 
tors solicited. Foreign business desired. Liberal discounts on large orders. 

JOHN D. SHERMAN, JR., 
P. O. Box (534, NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK. 



A. SMITH & SONS, 269 PKARL STREET, NEW YOKK. 

MANUFACTURERS ANU IMPORTERS OF 



R JOINTED 
JLOING NET 




GOODS FOR ENTOMOLOGISTS, 

Klaeger and Carlsbad Insect Pins, Setting 

Boards, Folding Nets, Locality and 
Special Labels, Forceps, Sheet Cork, Etc. 
Other articles are being added, Send for List. 



BUTTERFLY NETS. 



VIENNA 1H93. 
Medal I. Class 

The G . K . N et is made of the best material. 
The G.K. Net can be mounted or dismounted in a moment. 
The G.K. Net suits any stick, and may be Carried in any pocket. 
The G.K. Net is every collector's delight. 



GENEVA INim. 
Honorable Diploma 



THE G. K. NET 

READY 

FOR USE. 

THE G. K. NET 

WHEN NOT 
IN USE. 




Steel ring 



Net of silk 



Diameter 14 inches. Tht- most elegant not. 

Circumference 44 inches. The most practical net 
Depth of the net 2i inches. The most durable net. 

Dimensions 1 i>y 4 by II inchi".. 

The Lightest, the Handiest, the Cheapest Net. 

One Quality, one Size, one Price only. 



Send postal order *i..~i() and you will get the G.K. Net free of all char.ue from 

Graf^KFUsi, Gais, ScuitzeMand. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOOICAL NEWS." 



New Publications. 

COLEOPTERA Revision of the species of Apion of American north 
of Mexico, by H. C. Fall (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc 1898) 
4 plates $I.OO 

LEPIDOPTERA Synonyniical Catalogue of N. Am. Rfiopalocera, 

by Henry Skinner, M. D., 1898 1 .OO 

HYMENOPTERA The species of /'sm inhabiting America, north 

of Mex., by Win. J. Fox, (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) .20 

Monograph of the species of Aphilanthops inhabiting 

Boreal America, by S. N. Dunning (Trans. Am. Ent. 

Soc., 1898, . . . ." ,IO 

On some Panurgine and other Bees, by T. D. A. Cock- 

erell (Trans Am. Eut. Soc. 1898) .15 

ODONATA Burmeister's Types of Odonata, by P. P. Calvert, 

Trans. Am. Ent Soc 1898,)! plate .75 

LIST OF LEPIDOPTERA of Boreal America, by Prof J. B. Smith, 

1891. pp. 124 listing 6020 species I.OO 

LIST OF COLEOPTERA of America North of Mexico, by Samuel 

Henshaw, 1885 1.25 

SUPPLEMENT to same, 1895 .50 

CRESSON, (E. T ) Synopsis of the Families and Genera of the 
Hynienoptera of Am North of Mex. together with a 
catalogue of the described species and bibliography 
Parts i and 2 complete, 1887 3.OO 

Sent on receipt of price. Price Lists Nos. I, 2, 3 and 4 may be had on 

application to 

E T. CRESSON, Treasurer, P. O. Box 248, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



A FINE LOT OF BEETLES 

For sale. The best stock of North American Coleopterato be found anywhere. 
May be had in sets or single specimens. Our yearly trips enable us to offer 
rare species at moderate prices. I/et us quote prices on your desiderata. Ask 
for "Insect News," issued free, it will keep you posted on novelties as fast 
they are secured. Lists always sent on demand. 

H. F. WICKHAM, Iowa City, Iowa. 

LEPIDOPTERA^FOR SALE. 

Lowest prices. Indian, S. American and Australian. Papilios daksha, tam- 
alina. buddha, etc.. Morphos-cipris amathonte. Some lots of 50 species So. 
Am. for only $ i .2=;. Send for list. 

H. K BURRISON, West Newton, Mass. 

A TKXT-HOOK OF ENTOMOLOGY, including the anatomy, 

physiology, embryology and metamorphoses of insects for use in agricultural 
and technical schools and colleges, as well as by the working entomologist 
by Alpheus S Packard, Professor of Zoology and Geology, Brown University, 
author of "Guide to Study of Insects," "Entomology for Beginners," etc .with 
over 400 illustrations Svo. For sale by ENTOMOLOGICAL Xi'.ws Price, 

WHEN WRITINO PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS " 




TAXIDERMIST AND DEALER IN ENTOMOLOGICAL SUPPLIES. 

Fine Carlsbader Insect 
Pins a specialty. Price- 
list sent on application. 

78 Ashland Place, 
Improved Entomological Forceps. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hales of Pelecinus polyturator Drury 

VERY RARE. 

T?. j. wmTH, ELKHART, INDIANA. 



HAVING enlarged our business in regard to other branches of natural 
history, we are prepared to furnish scientific collections in any branch 
of zoology. We offer mounted birds, bird skins, bird's eggs in sets, anato- 
mical preparation in Formalin, skeletons of animals, skulls mounted 
fishes and batrachians, lizards, and other reptiles. We buy and sell all orders 
of insects, cocoons, and pupae American and foreign . Offer life histories of 
Lepidoptera, Fertilised Ova, of the rarer kind. Patent pressed cork, the 
newess, best and cheapest, 9x12x5-16, ten sheets for #1.00 Nothing less sold. 
Tools, pins, presses, nets and cabinets. Send 5 cents for catalogue. No 
postals Prof. CARL BRAUN, BANGOR, ME. 



ZEHIOIMIIES. 

You learn all about Virginia lands, soil, water, climate, resources, products, 
fruits, berries, mode of cultivation, prices, etc., by reading the VIRGINIA 
FARMER. Send 10 cents, for three months subscription to FARMER CO., 
Emporia, Va. 




Entomological Supplies and Specimens for Teachers 

and Collectors. 

Collecting, mounting and preserving utensils, insect pins, specimen and 
museum jars, formaldehyde, metamorphosis collections, mimicry insects, etc. 
'etc., etc. Write for information and catalogues to 

THE KNY-SCHEERER CO., DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCE, 
Dr. G. Lagai, 17 Park Place, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

WHEN WHITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 




VOL. X NO. 10 



Entomological News 





Feniseca tarquinius 
Chrysalis 



DECEMBER, 1899. 



EDITOR: 

-HENRY SKINNER, M. D'. 

PHILIP P. CALVERT, Ph. I). , Associate Eds 



Advisory Committee: 

EZRA T. CRESSON. CHARLES A. BLAKE. CHARLES LIEBECK. 

PHILIP LAURENT. WILLIAM J. FOX. CHARLES W. JOHNSON. 



PHILADELPHIA: 
ENTO.M< H.OGICAL R< )( >\\S ( >1 
THE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIEN< 

"IAN S(,H ARE 








Knifi-i.,1 ai th f - IMiilinlHlpln !;ittcr. 



Entomological News 

published monthly, excepting July and August, in charge of the Entomological 
Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, and the American 
Entomological Society. 

Annual Subscription, $ 1 .OO, in advance, 

Outside of the United States and Canada, $1.20. 

Advertising Rates : 30 cents per square inch, single insertion ; a liberal dis- 
count on longer insertions. No advertisement taken for less than 60 cents. 
Cash in advance. 

ggr All remittances should be addressed to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy 
of Natural Sciences, 19th and Race Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

FOR SALE. 

The entire collection of the late Capt. Gamble Geddes, A. D. C. the well- 
known collector of Toronto, Can., comprising Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, 
Lepidoptera, Diptera, etc., etc. For further particular apply to 

E. ". R1PPON 
129 HAZELTON AVE., TORONTO, CAN. 

A. SMITH & SONS, 269 PEARL STREET, NEW YOKKT 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

GOODS FOR ENTOMOLOGISTS, 

Klaeger and Carlsbad Insect Pins, Setting 
.. ,, Boards, Folding Nets, Locality and 

FOLD I'NG^ET lip Special Labels, Forceps, Sheet Cork, Etc. 
Other articles are being added, Send for List. 

American Entomological Co. 

1040 DeKalb A Ye., Brooklyn N. Y. 

LEPIDOPTERA PRICE LIST, NO. i, 

Of North American and Exotic Lepidoptera. Price 5 cents refunded to 
buyers. Postage of any country accepted. No attention paid to postals. 

Dealer^ ir> All Kirjd? of Entomological Supplies. 
Manufacturers of the original and celebrated 

SCtfMITT INSECT BOXES. 

BUILDERS OF 

CAB,NETS AND CASES FOR COLLECTIONS. 

Plans and drawings on applications. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 





New Publications. 

COLEOPTERA Revision of the species of Apion of American north 
of Mexico, by H. C. Fall (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc 1898) 
4 plates $I.OO 

LEPIDOPTERA Synonymical Catalogue of N. Am. Rhopalocera, 

by Henry Skinner, M. D., 1898. 1 .OO 

HYMENOPTERA- The species of /V inhabiting America, north 

^of Mex., by Win. J. Fox, (Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. 1898) .20 

Monograph of the species of Aphilanthops inhabiting 

Boreal America, by S. N. Dunning (Trans. Am. Ent. 

Soc., 1898, . .IO 

On some Panurgine and other Bees, by T. D. A. Cock- 

erell (Trans Am. Ent. Soc. 1898} .15 

ODONATA Burmeister's Types of Odonata, by P. P. Calvert, 

i Trans. Am. Ent. Soc 1898,)! plate .75 

LIST OF LEPIDOPTERA of Boreal America, by Prof J. B. Smith, 

1891. pp. 124 listing 6020 species I.OO 

LIST OF COLEOPTERA of America North of Mexico, by Samuel 

Henshaw, 1885 1.25 

SUPPLEMENT to same, 1895 .50 

CRESSON, (E. T ) - Synopsis of the Families and Genera of the 
Hymenoptera of Am North of Mex. together with a 
catalogue of the described species and bibliography. 
Parts i and 2 complete, 1887 3.OO 

Sent on receipt of price. Price Lists Xos. I, 2, 3 and 4 may be had on 

application to 

E. T. CRESSON, Treasurer, P. O. Box 248, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

A FINE LOT OF BEETLES 

For sale. The best stock of North American Coleopterato be found anywhere. 
May be had in sets or single specimens. Our yearly trips enable us to offer 
rare specie* at moderate prices. Let us quote prices on your desiderata. Ask 
for "Insect News," issued free, it will keep you posted on novelties as fast as 
they are secured. Lists always sent on demand. 

H. F. WICKHAM, Iowa City, Iowa. 

LEPIDOPTERA 

Lowest prices. Indian, S. American and Australian. Papilios daksha, tam- 
alina, buddha, etc., Morphos-cipris amathonte. Some lots of 50 species So. 
Am. for only $i .25 . Send for list. 

H. K BURRJSOIM, West Newton, Mass. 

A TEXT-BOOK OF ENTOMOLOGY, including the anatomy, 
physiology, embryology and metamorphoses of insects for use in agricultural 
and technical schools and colleges, as well as by the working entomologist, 
by Alplieus S Packard, Professor of Zoology and Geology, Brown University, 
author of "Guide to Study of Insects," "Entomology for Beginners," etc .with 
over 400 illustrations 8vo. For sale by ENTOMOLOGICAL N).\vs Price, 

WHEN WRITINO PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 




TAXIDERMIST AND DEALER IN ENTOMOLOGICAL SUPPLIES. 

Fine Carlsbader Insect 
Pins a specialty. Price- 
list sent on application. 

78 Ashland Place, 
Improved- Entomological Forceps. Brooklyn, N. Y 

Males of Pelecinus polyturator Orury 

i 

VERY RARE. 



. J. 



, ELKHA.RT, INDIANA. 



Compressed Cork 

For lining insect boxes and cabinet drawers. Best and cheapest. 
Send for sample. 

H. H. BREHME, 

Successor to Brehme & Stengele, 
295 Springfield Avenue, Newark, New Jersey. 



ARI7ONA 
/AlVlZj W INrV 



For Sale and 9 ollected in q11 orders. 

Mexican Latyrid, new to our fauna 
Epinephele Xicaque in papers. For Coleoptera address MR. CHAKLFS PALM, 
172 East 64th St., New York. 

DR. R. E. KUNZE, Box 554, PHOENIX ARIZONA. 




Entomological Supplies and Specimens for Teachers 

and Collectors. 



lin^, mounting and preserving utensils, insect pins, specimen and 
nmsfum jars, ' r-hyde, metaniorphoses.collections, mimicry insects, etc. 

c-tc., etc. Write for in'ormation and catalogues to 

THE KNY-SCHEERER CO., DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCE, , 
Dr. G. Lagai, 17 Park Place, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

WHEN WRITING PLEASE MENTION "ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS." 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



EXOHAIMC3 

NOT EXCEEDING THKEE LINKS FREE TO ST I'.x ];| BKKS. 



*tr These notices are continued as long as our limited space will allow ; the ne\i 

ones are added at the end of the column, and only when necessary 1 hose at I lie 
top (being longest Ini are discontinued. 

Identification of Insects [ Images | lor Subscribers. 

Specimens will be named under the following conditions: 1st, The numher of 
species to be LIMITED TO TWKXTY-KIVK for each sending; I'd. The sender to pa\ 
all expenses of transportation and the insects to become the property of Un- 
American Entomological Society ; 3d, Kach specimen must have a number at- 
tached so that the identification maybe announced accordingly. Exotic species 
named only by special arrangement with the Editor, who should be consulted 
before specimens are sent. Send a two-cent stamp with all insects for return of 
names. PLEASE PUT DATE OF CAPTUKE AND EXACT LOCALITY ox EACH .si-i-:ci- 
MEN. Before sending insects for identification, read page U, Vol. III. Address 
all packages to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy Natural Sciences, Logan 
Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WANTED. Live pupte of Luna. lo, Imperialis, Ecgahs, etc., will exchange 
bird skins, eggs, stuffed birds, etc. John Clayton, Lincoln, Me. 

FOR EXCHANGE. Iu*ect Life, vol. i, 1-2; vol. iii, 1-6. Price, lf>c. each. 
Eugene R. Fischer, 2707 Winnebagu St., St. Louis, Mo. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange wanted from all oiher parts of the United Stale-. 
and Canada for specimens from northeastern Pennsylvania. Correspondence 
solicited. Alfred F,. Lister, 921 Vine St.. Scranton, Pa. 

LONGICORN BEETLES and Parnar.sius and Pierids in papers wanted in ex- 
change for about 150 species of Orthoptera and Papilios (my own collection), 
rnauy rarities included. John Watson, 94 George St., Alexandra Park, Man- 
chester, England. 

ODONATA. I want dragouflies from any locality in America, and will ex- 
change for same. Will collect in any order in this region for cash. M. J. 
Elrod, University of Montana, Missoula, Mont. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange desired with collector* eveiy where. I offer l,e 
pidoplera, and will also collect in other orders. Send lists. Ernest N. Laing, 
Essex, Ontario, Canada. 

WANTED. Tingitida' especially from the United States. All specimen^ 
sent for determination will be returned. F. M. McElfresh, Urbana, III. 

TIPULID^E. Will exchange in any order for North American Tipulida?. C. 
V. Piper, Agricultural College. Pullman, Wash. 

AM open to collect any order that is required this season to be found in 
Colorado. Correspondence solicited. Ernest J. Oslar, 1858 Marion St.. Den- 
ver, Col. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have a very large number of rare species of American 
butterflies in duplicate. L'beral exchange given for desiderata. Dr. Henry 
Skinner, Acad. Xat. Sci., 1900 Race St., Phila., Pa. 

TETTIGID.E. Specimens of Ihis Orthoptenn group wanted from any lo- 
cality. J. L. Hancock, 3)48 Indiana Ave, Chicag), 111. 

WILL excbange butterflies of Missouri and the more c mini m ones of reii - 
tral Texas for others from any part of the United Siati>. Common one* 
taken. H. Schwarz. 1520 Lafayette Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

TEXAS LEPIDOPTERA. - Pure and well stretched to he exchanged. A 
good many specimens iu stock. Jos. Mattes, li/i A^b St., Logansport, Ind. 

LEPIDOPTERA AND COLEOPTEPA. 5,000 duplicates to exchanae; some 
rarities. Seud lists in either orJer to P. C. Truman Volsra, South Dakota. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Will purchase examples of lli-ntunx and Lepisesia. Ad- 
vise condition and price. Beverly Letcher, ."::; California Street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

BUTTERFLIES. I will give Indian and South American butterflies in ex- 
change for American. I will also pay cash for same Send list with lowest 
price to William I). Denton, Wellesley, 



ii ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Jaiiujry 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have for exchange pupa> of rare Sphinges : also good ma- 
tprial in papers. Will exchange for native and exotics. Send list. W. Rie- 
necker, 562 Nelson Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange wanted from all countries. Spbiugidae and 
Saturoidae especially desired. Rare cocoons wanted. Address Henry Engel, 
153 26tb St., S. S., Tittsburg, Pa. 

COLEOPTERA from United States for exchange. Send lists. Wish lo buy 
or exchange coleopterological works not yet in my library. Dr. A Fenyes, 
Pasadena, CaJ. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted, specimen* of the family Arctiidae. Will give 
other Lepidoptera in exchange. W. E. Longley, 115 64th Ave., Oak Park, 

LEPIDOPTERA. For exchange a large number of American butterflies and 
moths in papers, also pupa; and cocoons for native specimens or exotic pa- 
pilios. G Kircber, 573 Germania Ave., Jersey City. N. J. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange desired with collectors everywhere. Have 
also live pupae of Parasa chloris. Limacodes scapha, Datana major and Ant- 
sota stigma. Send lists. S. T. Kemp, 6^9 Jefferson Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 

WANTED. A microscope, dissecting or compound, in exchange for Coleop- 
tera or other insects. Frederick Knab, P. O. Box 249, Chicopee, Mass. 

LEPIDOPTERA. For exchange, pupae of Sphinx drupiferarum, Sphin-j- 
gordius, Philampelus actiemon, Triptogon modesta, Gastropacha americana 
and others. B. Neubarth. 1109 Nelson'St., Chicago, 111. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Aryynh'is zerfne, monticola, nevadensis, Anthocuris hyan- 
tis,sara and stella for exchange for Noctuida? or Geometrida? named or un- 
named. Lists exchanged.-- A. J. Weidt, 73 James St., Newark, N. J. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Argynnis diana, C. reyalis, P. achemon. P. pandorus 
wanted in exchange for New England or Australian Lepidoptera, Corre- 
spondence solicited. E. L. Sawyer, Winchendon, Mass. 

COLEOPTERA. Wanted to purchase or exchange, all species tf Bostrychi- 
da> of the United States. Rene Oberthnr, Rennes, France. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Would like cocoons of Eacles reqalis and imperials At- 
tac.ua coluntbia and others (in exchange for cash). J. E. Cottle, 1528 Jackson 
St., San Francisco. 

COLEOPTERA. --I desire to exchange local beetles, named or unnamed tin 
lots of 700 specimens), with collectors south, west < r abroad. I will colled 
other oiders for Coleoptera. C. Abbott Davis, 1131 Elmwood Ave , Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Moths of Cal. and C'tanothic.ocoons for exchange. Wanted 
particularly Attacus gicveri, Columbia and Cttheronia regalis. Gt. T. O. 
Mueller, 1014 Greenwich St., San Francisco, Cal. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have pupae of Pap.ajax,phile r or,troilus,Darp. Versi- 
eo/or, tiphinx lucitioa, Sam. c>anolhii; also South American pupae and co- 
coons in exchange for exotic butterflies or rare Nonh Amt-rican pupa* Send 
list to Charles F. Tiram, 62 Ralph St., Br< oklyn, N. Y. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Live cocoons hybrid j (cecropia x ceanothia) and cevro 
pia ?, hybrid 3 (ceanolhi x cecropia) and eeeropia , 9 Saturnia pavotnn, 
pupa 1 Thais cet i/sii for exchange. -E. Heyer, Rreitsstr. 44, Elberfeld, Ger- 
many. 

LEPIDOPTERA for exchange. Write for list. A. Troschel, 446 Larchmont 
Ave., Chica.o, 111. 

COLEOPTERA desin 'd. Wanted the following numbers (Hf nshaw's list) : 
115 to 20, 23, 25g, 30. 34, S4a :Ub, 50, in exchange for 43 and H6.--A Luelgens, 
14 West IHh St., New York. 

WANTED Cocoons of luna, polypliemus, cynthia, Promethia and io.--G. 
R. Pilate, 663 S. Main St . Dayton, Ohio. 

EUROPEAN COLEOPTERA giveu for Hymenoptera, from the South and 
Southwest, named or unnamed -R. J. Weith, Elkhart, Indiana 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



NOT KXC'KEDIN<; THKKK LINKS KKKI. To -IBM HIBKI. 1 -. 



#/r These notices are con tinned as hum as our limited space will allow : the new 
ones are added at the end of t he column, and only when necessary t hose at tin- 
top (being longest in i are discont i nued. 

Identification of Insects | Images | for Subscribers. 

Specimens will be named under the following conditions: 1st, The mnniier oi 

Species to be LIMITED TO TWENTY-FIVE for each sending: l!d. The sender to pay 
all expenses of transportation and the insects to become the property of tin 
American Entomological Society ; 3d, Each specimen must have a number at- 
tached so that the identification may tie announced accordingly. Kxotic species 
named only by special arrangement wit h the Kditor, who should lie consulted 
before specimens are sent. Send a two-cent Stamp with all insects for return of 
names. PLEASK PUT BATK OF e.vi'Triii-: AND KXACT LOCALITY <>-N KACII SI-KCI- 
>IEN. Before sending insects for identification, read page II, Vol. III. Address 
all packages to ENTOMOLOGICAL XKWS. Academy Natural Sciences. Logan 
Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 



TEXAS LEPIDOPTKRA. Pure and wull stretched to be exchanged. A 
good mny specimens in stock. Jos. Mattes, 115 Ash St., Logarsport, Ind. 

LEPJDOPTERA AND COLEOPTERA. 5,000 duplicates to exchange: f-oiu;- 
rarities. Send lists in either or ter to P. C. Truman Volga, South Dakota. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Will purchase examples of Hfinnris and Lepisesia. Ad- 
vise condition and price. Beverly Letch er, 5;!> California Street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

BUTTEEFLIES. I will give Indian and South American butterflies in e\ 
change for American. I will also pay cash for same Send list with lowest 
price to William D Denton. Wellesely, Mass. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have for exchange pupa? of rare Sphinges : also good ma- 
terial in i>ni>er-5. Will exchange for native and exotics. Send list. W. Rie- 
necker, 563 Nelson Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange wanted from all countries. Sphiuskls' and 
Saturnidae especially desired. Rare cocoons wanted. Address Henry En ire I, 
153 26tb St., S. S., Pittsburg, Pa. 

COLEOPTERA from United States for exchange. Send lists. Wish to buv 
or exchange coleopterological works not yet in my library. Dr. A. Fenyo, 
Pasadena, Cal. 

LEPIDOPTKRA. Wanted, specimen* of the family Arctmhe. Will give 
other Lepidoptera in exchange. W. E. Longley, 115 64th Ave., Oak Park. 

LEPIDOPTERA. For exchange a large number of American butterflies and 
months in papers, also pupa? and cocoons for na ive specimens or exotic pa- 
pilios. G. Kir.-ber, 578 Germania Ave., Jersey Cily. N. J. 

LEPIDOPTKRA. Exchange desired with collectors everywhere. Have 
also iiv^ pupae of Pai-nsa <-iilri*. I. nun- </* *cu/ilnt, l)nt</,i<i major and Ant- 
sola sliymu. Send lists. S. T. Kemp, (>;,) Jeffei>on Ave . Elizabeth. N. J. 

WANTED. --A microscope, dissecting or enmpotind, in exchange f'T Coleop- 
(era or other insects. Frederick Knab, P. (). Box -_'19, Chicopee, Mass. 

Li-:i > iD<)PTKi{A.--For exchange, pupa' of S/i/ii,i.'- /////, i/v/v/i mil, ,s/<A'...- 
gordius, Pnilampelus i/ffn'inn//, Tri/i/<ii/</ i//n<t, */,> Gastropacha americana 
and others. B Neubarth 1109 Nel.-on Sr,., Chicago, 111. 

LFPIDOPTEKA. . I. ;///// n/s ;;<<f->tr. moni'i-nln . ,\,-i-inli-nais Antkocoris hyan- 
tin, mr<i and >t?lln tor 'exchange for Nochiida- or Geomeinda- named or un- 
named Lists exchanged. A. J. Weid', T:; .lotnts St.. Newark. N. .1. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Ai-(/i/n/ti-i iliami, <'. rri/nfis, /'. m-ln-mmi. I'. / mnl< its 
wanted in exchange for New England or Australian Lepidoptcra. Corrt- 
spondence solicited. E. L. Sawyer, Windx mlon, Mas-. 

COLEOPTKRA. Wanted to purchase or exchange, nil species of /,'(/.-////'/" 
ite of the United States. Kene Oherthur, Hennes, Fi-anc. . 



ii ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [February 

LEPiDOPTERA.--Would like cocoons of Eacles regalis and imperials At- 
ta cu - co lu mbia and other? (in exchange for cash). J. E. Cottle, 1528 Jackson 
St., San Francisco. 

COLEOPTERA. --I desire to exchange, local beetles, named or unnamd with 
collectors south, west <r abroad. 1 will collect other oiders for Coleoptera. 
--C. Abbott Davis. 1131 Elm wood Are , Providence, R. I. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Moths of Cal. and f! awofftj cocoons for ( xcbangre. Wanted 
particularly Attacus (jlcveri, Columbia and C.lheronia rer/afis. G. T. O. 
Mueller, 1014 Greenwich St., San Francisco, Cal. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have pupae of Pap. ajar, phile-or, lioilus. Dorp. Vfrsi- 
c.olor, Sphinx lucitio*a, Sam. c-anotlni; also South American pupa? and co- 
coons in exchange for exotic butterflies or rare North American pupae - Send 
Jist to Charles F. Tiuim, 62 Ralph St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Live oocoons hybrid 3 (cecropiu x cevnothia) and cecro 
pict 9, hybrid cf (eeanolhi x cecropia) and eeeropia , ^ Saturnia pavonia. 
pupse Thais cerysii for exchange. E. Heyer, Breitsstr. 44, Elberfeld, Ger- 
many. 

LEPIDOPTERA for exchange. Write for list.- A. Troscbel, 446 Larchmont 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

COLEOPTERA desirrd. Wanted the following numbers (Hen*haw"s list) : 
Ifib, 20, 23, 25g, 30. 34, 34a. Sib, 53, in exchangs for 43 and 66.--A. Ltielgen*, 
14 West 17th St., Now York. 

WANTED Cocoons of Inna, polyphemus, cynthia, Promelbia and io.- G. 
R. Piiate, 663 S. Main St , Dayton, Ohio. 

EUROPEAN* COLF.OPTERA given for Hyiuenoptera, from the South and 
Southwest, named or unnamed --R. J. Weith. Ellcharr, Indiana 

LEPIDOPTERA AND COLEOPTERA, from Germany, to exchange for any- 
thing not in my collection. Send list?. Wm. Kayser, Wapakoneto, Ohio. 

LEPIDOPTERA For exchange: Arg. diana, leto. cltUone; Mel. acastus, 
gabbi, mirta ; Cyst, amymone ; Grovta faunus ; Lim. weidemeyerii, lor- 
quini : He.t brednw' ; Coenon. haydeni; Hip. dionysius, ridmysii; Sal. 
texana ; Chiqn. calijornica, chryxus ; Th. crysahfs, ' damon var. "discoid" J>* 
behrii, sJieridani ; Lye. fuliginosa ; Chrys. zcrue ; Anth. rosa. yenutia ; 
Parnas, clodivs ; Pap. bairdi, mylotes. AJSO many 01 her species and rare 
Hesperidse. Henry Skinner, Academy Natural Saencss, 1900 R-ice street, 
Philadelphia. 

LEPiDOPTERA.--Fine specimens in papeis, from Spanish Honduras, offered 
in exchange for desirable native wipae and nnagos. Regalis . gtoveri, luna. 
ceonolhi puptee specially desired. James L. Mitchell, 212 Indiana TnM 
Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

BOOKS. One complete set and first four volumes "Insect Life," bound 
and complete set Forbes's Illinois Reports, including miscellaneous essu\ . 
for cxehange. Wanted, Riley s Missouri Reports, Fitch's New Y.>rk Report^ 
and other entomological literature. W . G. Johnson, College Park, Md. 

I WILL COLLECT AND EXCHANGE California insects for live tarantulas or 
trap-door spideis. C 1. Hutchinson, 2631 Michigan Ave., Los Angele*, Cal. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted to purchase or exchange, all species of Maturat// 
;ind Bombi/x, with their cocoons. D. Levrat, 7 Rue St. Polycarpe, Lyons 
France. 

WANT BY EXCHANGE or will pay cash for Volumes 1, 2. 3 and 4, Buffalo 
Society of Natunl Sciences. Also Proceedings American Philosophical so- 
ciety of Philadelphia for 1873. John AUhurst, 18 Ashland Place. Brooklyn, 
Xew York. 

WANTED Scj dma-nida' and Pselopbida?, named ir unnamed. Will give 
good exchange in Coleoptera or will collect other orders. R. J. Crew, 225 
Wilton Ave., Toronto, Canada. 

LEPIDOPTERA --Will purchase or exchange native and foreign Lepidop- 
t< ra. H. K. Bui rison, West Newton, Mass. 

ODOXATA. I have tine specimens of Goniphux graslinellus, ' ?, which I 
wish to exchange for Odonata or Lepidoptera. James Tough, 164 OgdfU 
A.ve. , Chicago, 111. 

LEPIDOPTBBA and Coleoptera from Germany for exchange for any t hint: 
not in my collection. Send list to Win. Ka>><?r, kVapaitoneta, O. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

EXOHAIMGES 

NOT EXCEEDING THREE LINES FREE TO SUBSCRIBERS. 



4"- These notices are continued as long as our limited space will allow : the new 
ones are added at the end of the column, and only when necessary those at the 
top (being longest ini are discontinued. 

Identification of Insects |Imagos| for Subscribers. 



Specimens will be named under the following conditions: 1st, The number of 
species to be LIMITED TO TWENTY-FIVE for each send 1 :'_'d, The sender to pay 
all expenses of transportation and the insects to betutii> the property of the 
American Entomological Society ; :>d, Each specimen nc'ti, have a number at- 
tached so that the identification may lie announced accoi .'.ugly. Exotic specie- 
named only by special arrangement with the Editor, who should be consulted 
before specimens are sent. Send a two-cent stamp with all insects for return of 
names. PLEASE PUT DATE OF CAPTTKE AND KXA'T LOCALITY ox EACH SPECI- 
MEN. Before sending insects for identification, rend page 41, Vol. III. Address 
all packages to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy Natural Sciences, Logan 
Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 



LEPIDOPTERA. I have for exchange pupse of rare Sphinges : also good mate 
rial in papers. Will exchange for native and exotics. Send list. \V. Hienccker. 
r>ti:> Nelson Avc., Jersey City, X. J. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange wanted from all countries. Sphingida 1 and Saturida- 
especially desired. Rare cocoons wanted. Address Henry Engel, 153 '2(ith St.. 
S. S.. I'ittsburg, Pa. 

COLEOPTERA from I'nitcd States for exchange. Send lists. Wish to buy or 
exchange coleopterological works not yet in my library. Dr. A. Fenyes, Pasa- 
dena. Cal. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted, specimens of the family Arctiidse. \Vill give other 
Lepidoptera in exchange. W. E. Longley, 115 64th Ave., Oak Park, 111. 

LEPIDOPTERA. For exchange a large number of American butterflies and 
moths in papers, also pupse and cocoons for native specimens or exotic papilios. 
G. Kircher, 573 Gcrmania Ave.. Jersey City. X. J. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange desired with collectors everywhere. Have also live 
pupa? of Parasa chloris, Lhiiacodes seaplui, I>nl/niii ma'i/ii- and Aiiisutn xtiijuia. Send 
lists. S. T. Kemp, l>3!l Jefferson Ave., Eli/abeth, N*'. J. 

WANTED. A microscope, dissecting or compound, in exchange for Coleoptera 
or other insects. Frederick Knab, P. ('). Box 249, Chicopee, Mass. 

LEPIDOPTERA. For exchange. pupa j of Spliin.i- (Irnpiffnn-nni, S/thiiu- iini-ilina. 
Phttampdus achemon, 7'c//''"(/'"' '"'"It'xta Gas1n>/><icli<i min'rii-inin and others. B. Xeu- 
barth. Hot) Xclson St.. Chicago, 111. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Argytmis zerene, iiimitifiilu, iH'riulfiisix Antlim-orlx lu/mitis, sum and 
uti'lln for exchange for Xoctiiida- or ( ieoinet rida- named or unnamed. Lists ex- 
changed. - A. J. \Veidt, 73 James St.. Newark, X. J. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Arijymtiit dinnn, ('. i-i'i/ulix. ]'. nclii'iiiini, I'. jHitttliirnti wanted in 
exchange for Xew England or Australian Lepidoptcra. Correspondence solicited. 
E. L. Sawyer, \\'inchendon. Mass. 

COLEOPTKHA. Wanted to purchase or exchange, all species of Bostryc.hidce of 
the I'nited States. Rene Oberthiir, Kennes, France. 

LEPIDOPTERA. -Would like cocoons of Eacles regalis and im/tci-i/di* Aitm-Hx <<> 

linnliiii and others in exchange for cashl.--.!. E. Cottle, l.'^'s Jackson St. .San 
Francisco. 

COLEOPTKRA. I desire to exchange local beetles, named or unnamed, with 
collectors south, west or abroad. 1 will collect other orders for Coleoptera. ('. 
Abbott Davis, 1131 Elm wood Ave., Providence, K. I. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Moths of Cal. &n& C. anothi cocoons for exchange. Wanted 

particularly Altin'nt //orov. <-lm,il>i,i and < '. II,, ,-ii'in rc<i<tlit<.(l. T. Mueller, 101 1 
Greenwich St., San Francisco, Cal. 

LEPIDOPTEKA. I have pupa' of l'uj>. HJHS. jiliili-.rur, Irnilim, [>in'/i. \'i'i'sicn/(ii'. 
3phinx lucitiosa, Sam. ceanothii ; also South American pupa- and cocoon- in e.\- 
change for exotic butterflies or rare North American pupa'. Send list to 
F. Timm. fW Kalph St.. I',i-o,,klyn, N. Y. 



ii ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [March 

LEPIDOPTERA. Live cocoons hybrid 3 (cecropia x ceanofhi-a) and i cecropia ?, 
hybrid cf (ceanotlti x cecropia) and cecropia, 9 Satumia pavonia, pupae Thais cerysii 
for exchange. E. Heyer, Breitsstr. 44. Elberfeld, Germany. 

LEPIDOPTERA for exchange. Write for list. A. Troschel, 446 Larchmont 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

COLEOPTERA desired. Wanted the following numbers (Henshaw's list) : 16b, 
20, 23, 25g. 30, 34, 34a, 34b, 50, in exchange for 43 and 66. A. Luetgens, 14 West 
17th St., New York. 

WANTED. Cocoons of Luna, polyphemus, cynthia, Promethia and io. G. R. 
Pilate, 663 S. Main St., Dayton, Ohio. 

EUROPEAN COLEOPTERA given for Hymeiioptera, from the South and South- 
west, named or unnamed. R. J. Weith, Elkhart, Indiana. 

LEPIDOPTERA AND COLEOPTERA, i from Germany, to exchange for anything not 
in my collection. Send lists. William Kayser, Wapakoneto, Ohio. 

LEPIDOPTERA. For exchange: Arg. diana, leto, chitone ; Mel. acastus. gabbi, 
mil riii ; Ci/nt. imn/mone; Gropta fauniis ; Lim. iveidemeyrii, lorquini ; Het. bredovoi; 
('action, lini/ilfiii : Hip. diom/siiis, ridingxii : Hut. tc.n/na; Chum, calif ornicn, cliri/.i'iia : 
Tli. cri/nanns, diiiiioii var. discoidalis behrii, xlieriilnni ; Lye. fuligiiiofici ; Chrys. sera ', ; 
Auth. ronti. ijt'inifin : Panias, c lodius ; Pap. bairdi, mylotea. Also many other species 
and rare Hesperidse. Henry Skinner, Academy Natural Sciences, 1900 Race- 
street, Philadelphia. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Fine specimens in papers, from Spanish Honduras, offered in 
exchange for desirable, native pupse and imagos. Kegalis, gloveri, lima, ceonoilii pu- 
l>;e specially desired. James L. Mitchell, 212 Indiana Trust Building, Indianap- 
olis, Ind. 

BOOKS. One complete set and first four volumes "Insect Life," bound and 
complete set Forbes's Illinois Reports, including miscellaneous essays, for ex- 
change. Wanted, Riley's Missouri Reports, Fitch's New York Reports and 
and other entomological literature. \V. G. Johnson, College Park, Md. 

I "WILL COLLECT AND EXCHANGE California insects for live tarantulas or trap- 
door spiders. C. E. Hutchinson, 2631 Michigan Ave., Los Angeles, Cai. 
r LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted to purchase or exchange, all species of Saturnia and 
Bombyx, with their cocoons. D. Levrat, 7 Rue St., Polycarpe, Lyons, France. 

WANT BY EXCHANGE or will pay cash for Volumes 1, 2, 3 and 4, Buffalo So- 
ciety of Natural Sciences. Also Proceedings American Philosophical Society of 
Philadelphia for 1873. John Akhurst, 78 Ashland Place, Brooklyn, New York. 

WANTED. Scydmienidse and Pselophidae, named or unnamed. Will give good 
exchange in Coleoptera or will collect other orders. R- J. Crew, 225 Wilton Ave., 
Toronto, Canada. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Will purchase or exchange native and foreign Lepidoptera. 
H. K. Burrison, West Newton. Mass. 

ODONATA. I have fine specimens of Goniphiix finisHim-luti, J $?, which I wish to 
exchange for Odonata or Lepidoptera. James Tough, 164 ( >gdcn Ave.. Chicago, 
111. 

LEPIDOPTEKA and Coleoptera from Germany for exchange for anything not in 
my collection. Send list to William Kayser, Wapakoneta, O. 

COLEOPTERA. Carabidu- and ( icindellidte of North America wanted in ex- 
change for Carabidpe from Western Pennsylvania. John Bright, 127 Roup St.. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

LIVE PUPJE AND COCOONS. FERTILE EGGS, wanted in exchange I'm- Knropeau 
and exotic butterflies. Coleoptera. Hymeiioptera. Eemiptera. A. Yoclscliow, 
Schwerin, Meckhg, Germany. 

WANTED. HOMOPTERA from the South and West. Will give New Hampshire 
Lepidoptera in exchange.' Charles F. Goodhue, Webster. Mcr. County, N. H. 

WANTED. To exchange Coleoptera of Northern Texas for those of other por- 
tions of the United States. I will collect during this season, for exchange, speci- 
mens in all orders represented here. E. C. Lewis. Forney. Texas. 

Coi.Koi-TKRA. I will give 400 species and 1.200 specimens of Kimtpcan Coleop- 
tera in exchange for lio specimens of C^cAnts, any species except Lecontei. K. C. 
Klirmaim. 2314 Sarah Street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

COLEOPTERA. Desire to exchange with collectors of North American Coleop- 
tera. Have good series authentically determined. H. G. Griffith, M. !>.. Maua- 
yunk. Philadelphia. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

EXOHAING 

NOT EXCEEDING THREE LINES FREE TO SrBsORlRER-. 



/HT These- not ires are continued a- hum ax our limited space \\ ill alh>\\ ; the new 
ones are added at I he end of t In- column, and only \\ hen neeessa ry those at t lie 
top ( being longest ini are discontinued. 

Identification of Insects ( Images | fo? Subscribsrs. 



Specimens will be named under the following eomlit i-ms : 1st, The mimliei- of 
species to be LIMITED TO TWENTY-FIVE for each si-ndiiv-c; -d, The sender t" pay 
all expenses of transportation ami the Insects i become ilie property of the 
American Entomological Society ; 3d, Each specimen mu-t have a number at- 
tached so that the identification iua \ he aim on need accordingly. Exotic Species 
named only by special arrangement \\ith the Editor, who should he consulted 
before specimens are sent. Send a t\\ o-eent stamp with all insi-cts for i-eturn of 
names. PLEASE PUT DATE OF < APTI-IIK AXDK.\A<-T LOCALITY ON i AI 11 si-i-< i- 
ME>*. Before sending insects for identification, rea-l paue ti. Vol. III. Address 
all packages to KNTOMOI.O<;H AI, N KWS. Academy Natural sciences. Logan 
S(|iiare, Philadelphia, Pa. 



COLEOPTER.V from 1'niti'd Spill's fur exchange. S Mid lis!.-. Wi-h In blivor 
exchange coleopterological works not yet in my library. Dr. A. Feiiyes. l'a-:i 
dena, Cal. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted, soscirnsns of the family Aretmle. Will give other 
Lepidoptera in exchange. W. I-:, Longley. 11.") tilth Ave.. Oak Park. 111. 

LEPIDOPTERA. For exchange a lari:.' number of American butterllies and 
moths in papers, also pupa- and cocoons for native specimens or exotic papilm-.. 
(I. Kircher. 5T-5 < iermania A \ e.. ,ler> -v ( 'it v. N. .1. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Kxclianye desirecl with collectors everywhere. Have also live 
pnpie of I'm-uti i rh'nri.-'. I.iniiii'inlt's Ki-iijihii. I>'ilitn<i nuijiii- and (iiimitii st'iytiiii. Send 
lists. S. T. Kemp. (i:',! .letters.m Ave.. Kli/ahei h. N. .1. 

WVXTKD.A microscope, dissecting or compound, in exchange for ('oleoptcni 
or otlier insects. Frederick Knah. P. ( t. l',->\ :.'l!, ( hico]iee, Mas-. 

LEPIDOPTEUA. For exchange, pupa- of >'/</(/'/(.' tlriii>it'<'rin-iini. */>!i'nt.r <i<ii-<iin -, 

Philampelus achemon, 'lii/i/minii nr><lr-tri i^ixim/i'ii-lm inm-i-it-mm and otlu-rs. I!. Xeii- 
barth. lldli Nelson St.. Chicago, 111. 

LEPIDOPTERA. .1 /_</// ///N ('co/c. miniiiciiln, nevadensis Anthocoris hyantis, .//<; and 
steKa for exchange for Noctuidje or ( iennr'tridic nameil or unnamed. l.i.Ms ex- 
changed. A. J. U'eidl. 7:5 .lames St.. \e\\ark, N.,l. 

LKPIDOPTEUA. . I /;///// ix ilinmi. < '. i-i'<inli.. I'. nch<-m<i,i. I', fiiiiiilni-it.-. wanted iii 
exchange for New England or Australian I,opi<lopi"ra. ( 'orrespomlence Milieited. 
K. 1.. Sawyer. U'inchemlon. Mass. 

COLEOPTEEA. Wanted to pnrcha-.e or rxcliange. all specie-- of Bostrychida of 
the United States. Eene Oberthur, Kcnnes, France. 

LEPIDOPTERA. ^Would like 'cocoons of l-'.m-li'x i-i'ijuiix ami /// i-iuli* .{itm-u* co 
linuliin ami other- iin exchange lor cash). -J. F.. Cottle. l-V.'s .lackson St.. San 
Francisco. 

( ''U.KiU'TKi: A. I de.-ire I o e xcha nu:- local h.'vties. nane-d or un nameil. \\ il h 
collectors south, west or abroad. I \\ill collect other order- for < ' ileuptera. < '. 
Abbott Davis. li:51 Flm\\ I \\e.. Providence, K. I. 

LKIM DUI-TER \. Molh-'id' ( alifornia ami <-rn iiallii bocoonfi loi c \cli.-uiue. Wanted 
particularly Allm-ii* iilnri-ri. i-nlinnliin and >',lln run in ii'ijiili*. Li. T. Mueller. 101 t 
< ircenwicli St.. San Francisco, t'al. 

LEPIDOPTERA.] have pupse of /'('y/. iljnf, /iliil mu-. Irnilna. I>ir/i. I'ffsii-nliir. 

Sphinx lucitiosa, <</. rrinmiliii : alsn Smith .'.iiieriiau pupa' ami cocoon> in ex- 
change for exotic butterflies or rare North Ameri"an pupa-. Send list to I'harlo 
I 1 ', 'rimm. (>> Kalph St.. P.rooklyn. N. N'. 
LEPIDOPTERA. Live cocoons hybrid ' (ce-cropia \ i-mn'iHiin i ami ceeropia 

bybriil ' (i-i-nnnllii \ i-iTi-njiin ) anil CM i-n/iin. ^nlmnin iini-ii/ii'i. pupa- '/'/,,(/> i-i-i-i/.*ii 
for exchange.-- F. I lever. Unii-Mr. I I. Flberfelil, ( iermany. 

LEPinoi'TEi: v for exchange. \\'riti fur li>i. \. Troscliel. I i<: l.archmont 
Ave.. ( 'liicago. 111. 



ii ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [April 

COLEOPTERA desired. Wanted the following numbers (Henshaw's list) : 16h, 
20, 23, 25g, 30, 34, 34a, 3ih. 50, in exchange for 43 and 66. A. Luetgens, 14 West 
17th St., New York. 

EUROPEAN COLEOPTERA given for Hymenoptera. from the South and South- 
west, named or unnamed. 1\. J. Weith, Elkhart, Indiana. 

LEPIDOPTERA AND COLEOPTERA, ifrom Germany, to exchange for anything not 
in my collection. Send lists. William Kayser, Wapakoneto, Ohio. 

LEPIDOPTERA. For exchange: Anj. dinun, let<>, chif.one : Mel. acastui. gabbi, 
mill-in ; Cy.it. amym.one ; flrapfu fit/inns ; Lim. weidemeyni, lorquini ; Het. bredowi ; 
Coenon. hnydeni; Hip. dioni/^in.t, rid'nutxii ,- s it. t<'.r>m/i ; ('him*, californicfi, chryxus : 
Th. en/xahix, do mini var. iHx<-<>i<liiHn lii'lirii. tilii'fidiiiii : Lye. fiili/iiiiosa ; Chrys. zero?; 
Aiith. msa, genutia, ; Parnnx, clmlint: Pup. hnirdi, iitylofex. Also many other species 
and rare Hesperidse. Henry Skinner. Academy Natural Sciences. 1900 Race 
street, Philadelphia. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Fine specimens in papers, from Spanish Honduras, offered in 
exchange for desirable native pup;e and imagos. Heijnlis, glove ri, lima, ceouothi pu- 
pse specially desired. James L. Mitchell, 212 Indiana Trust Building, Indianap- 
olis. Ind. 

BOOKS. One complete set and rirst four volumes " Insect Life," bound and 
complete set Forbes' s Illinois Reports, including miscellaneous essays, for ex- 
change. Wanted, Eiley's Missouri Reports, Fitch's New York Reports and 
and other entomological literature. -W. G. Johnson. College Park. Md. 

I WILL COLLECT AND EXCHANGE California insects for live tarantulas or trap- 
door spiders. C. E. Hutchinson, 2631 Michigan Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

^LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted to purchase or exchange, all species of Safiirnia and 
Hini/lii/.r. with their cocoons. D. Levrat, 7 Rue St., I'olycarpe, Lyons, France. 

WANT BY EXCHANGE or will pay cash for Volumes 1, 2, 3 and 4, Buffalo So- 
ciety of Natural Sciences. Also Proceedings American Philosophical Society of 
Philadelphia for 1873. John Akhurst, 78 Ashland Place, Brooklyn, New York. 

Q WANTED. Scydmrenidne and Pselaphidse, named or unnamed. Will give good 
exchange in Coleoptera or will collect other orders. R- J. Crew, 225 Wilton Ave., 
Toronto, Canada. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Will purchase or exchange native and foreign Lopidoptera. 
H. K. Burrison, West Newton, Mass. 

ODONATA. I have fine specimens of {fomphu* {iranlUm-lii.*, J 9- which I wish to 
exchange for Odonata or Lepidoptera. James Tough, 164 Ogden Ave., Chicago, 
111. 

LEPIDOPTERA and Coleoptera from Germany for exchange for anything not in 
my collection. Send list to William Kayser, Wapakoneta, < >. 

COLEOPTERA. Carabidse and Cicindellidse of North America wanted in ex- 
cliange for Carabidse from Western Pennsylvania. John Bright, 127 Roup St., 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

LIVE PUP^E AND COCOONS, FERTILE EGGS, wanted in exchange for Eu ropean 
and exotic butterflies, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera. A. Yoel schow, 
Schwerin, Meckbg, Germany. ; 

WANTED. HOMOPTERA from the South and West. Will give New Hampshire 
Lepidoptera in exchange. Charles F. Goodhue, Webster, Mer. County, N. H. 

WANTED. To exchange Coleoptera of Northern Texas for those of other por- 
tions of the LTnited States. I will collect during this season, for exchange, speci- 
mens in all orders represented here. E. C. Lewis, Forney, Texas. 

COLEOPTERA. I will give 400 species and 1,200 specimens of European Coleop- 
tera in exchange for 50 specimens of Ci/fhrns. any species except Li'c<infei. E. C. 
Ehrmann, 2314 Sarah Street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

COLEOPTERA. Desire to exchange with collectors of North American Coleop- 
tera. Have good series authentically determined. H. G. Griffith, M. 1)., Mana- 
yunk, Philadelphia. 

HYMENOPTERA. Wanted, specimens of the common Saw-fly, Ciinbe.r aiuericana,, 
from any locality. Will give hints as to easy capture, etc., t > anyone interested. 
Named insects of any order given in exchange.- ( 'harles Hrues. 320 Hampden 
Court, Chicago, 111. 

A FAIR PRICE will be given for specimens of Tlnrln l;rtn and Tln'c/ii M. album. 
Apply to Entomological News. 

WANTED. Micro lepidoptera of the United States, especially Tini'ina Living 
larvie, especially leaf miners and case bearers desired. Will pay cash or give Cole- 
optera or Lepidoptera in exchange. W. G- Diet/,, M. I). .21 N. Vine St., ]Ia/el- 
ton, Pa. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

EXOHAIXJO 



NOT EXCEEDING THREE LINES FREE TO SUBSCRIBERS. 



These notices are continued as lonn as our limited spare will allow; tlie new 
ones are added at the end of the column, and only when necessary those at the 
top (being longest in) are discontinued. 

Identification of Insects [Imagos] for Subscribers. 



Specimens will be named under the following conditions: 1st, The number of 
species to be LIMITED TO TWENTY-FIVE for each sending; 2d, The sender to pay 
all expenses of transportation and the insects to become the property of the 
American Entomological Society ; 3d, Each specimen must have a number at- 
tached so that the identification may be announced accordingly. Kxot i<- species 
named only by special arrangement with the Editor, who should be consulted 
before specimens are sent. Send a two-cent stamp with all insects for return of 
names. PLEASE PUT DATE OF CAPTURE AND EXAT LOCALITY ox EACH SPECI- 
MEN. Before sending insects for identification, reud pageil, Vol. III. Addn-<- 
all packages to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy Natural Sciences, Logan 
Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 



LEPIDOPTERA. For exchange, pupse of *]iliiu.r drupiferarum, Sphiiu: g 
Philampelus achemon, Triptogon mnili'sln (rastropacha americana and others. B. Neu- 
barth, 1109 Nelson St., Chicago, 111. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Argynitis iliatui, C. regalis, P. achemon, P. jxiiiilin-Rs wanted in 
exchange for New England or Australian Lepidoptera. Correspondence solicited. 
E. L. Sawyer, Winchendon, Mass. 

COLEOPTERA. Wanted to purchase or exchange, all species of Bostrychidce of 
the United States. Rene Oberthur, Rennes, France. 

LEPIDOPTERA. -Would like cocoons of Fades regalia and inifii rialifAttm -us Co- 
lumbia and others (in exchange for cash). J. E. Cottle, 1528 Jackson St., San 
Francisco. 

COLEOPTERA. I desire to exchange local beetles, named or unnamed, with 
collectors south, west or abroad. I will collect other orders for Coleoptera. C. 
Abbott l>avis. 1131 Elmwood Ave., Providence, R. I. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Moths of California and rntntrthi cocoons for exchange. Wanted 
particularly Attacus gloveri, cohimliin and (.'itlt<-r<tin mjalis. G. T. Mueller, 1014 
Greenwich St.. San Francisco. Cal. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have pupse of Pap. njn.r, phiknor, froilus, Dnrp. rer/ncolor, 
Sphinx Incitiosa, Sam. ccaitdlhii ; also South American pupa- and cocoons in ex- 
change for exotic butterflies or rare North American pupa-. Send list to Charles 
F. Timm, ti2 Ralph St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Live cocoons hybrid j 1 (cffropia x ceanothia) and nn-o/iia ?, 
hybrid <* (ceanofhi x cecropin) and ci'i-rnpi/i, , Snturnin iinriniin, pupa- Tlmia a / i/*ii 
for exchange. E. Heyer, Breitsstr. 44. Elberfelil. Germany. 

LEPIDOPTERA for exchange. Write tor list. A. Troschel, 44'i Larclimont 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

COLEOPTERA desired. Wanted the following numbers (Hcnshaw's list) : 16b, 
20, 23. 25g. 30. 34, 34a, 34b, 50, in exchange for 4:5 and liti. A. l.u. tm us, 14 West 
17th St., New York. 

EUROPEAN COLKOPTKK A given for Hymenoptera, from the South and South- 
west, named or unnamed. K. .1. Weitli. Klkhart. Indiana. 

LEPIDOPTERA AND COLEOPTEEA,ifrom Germany, to exchange for anything not 
in my collection. Send lists. William Kayser. Wapakpneto, <liio. 

LEPIDOPTEBA. For exi-hange: .!/;;. <li<nin. Ifln. i-liitniii : Mil. <if<i!itii. <iabb i 
nm rin .- Ci/.-it. tiiiii/iiitnif : Grapta faunus ; /./'/. weidemeyrii, lorquini ; Hit. imilmri .- 

Coi'iio/i. linyilrni ; Hi/i. iliniii/niun, ritliiulxii ; *<it. ti'.riinii : Cli'/ini. nil'ifm-nii'ii. i'lu'1/.in^ ; 
Th. cryxulitx, tin, unit var. ilim-niilnlis lii'ln'/i. xlii-fiiliiui : /.(/''. fiiliiiinnsa ; Clu'i/x. zfTtt : 
Anth. riisn. genutia ; 1'nnins. i-lmlinx: I'n/i. Iminli. mi/lnti'x. Also many other -.pi . 11 - 
and rare HeSperidBE. Henry Skinner. Vc-ailemy Natural Sciciic-es, liHin Kaee 
street. I'hiladeliihia. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Fine Specimens in papers, from Spanish Honduras. otH-i-ed iii 
exchange for desirable native pupse and imasios. Hi'i/nli.*. ijlm-i 11. limn, unnutln pu- 
pa- specially desired. James L. Mitchell. :.'!:.' Indiana Trust Uuildin-. Indianap- 
olis, Ind. 



ii ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

BOOKS. One complete set and first four volumes " Insect Life," bound and 
complete set Forbes's Illinois Reports, including miscellaneous essays, for ex- 
change. Wanted, Riley's Missouri Reports, Fitch's New York Reports and 
other entomological literature. -W. G. Johnson, College Park, Md. 

I WILL COLLECT AND EXCHANGE California insects for live tarantulas or trap- 
door spiders. C. E. Hutchinson. '2631 Michigan Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted to purchase or exchange, all species of Saturnia and 
Bombyx, with their cocoons. D. Levrat, 7 Rue St., Polycarpe, Lyons, France. 

WANT BY EXCHANGE or will pay cash for Volumes 1, 2, 3 and 4, Buffalo So- 
ciety of Natural Sciences. Also Proceedings American Philosophical Society of 
Philadelphia for 1873. John Akhurst. 78 Ashland Place, Brooklyn, New York. 

WANTED. Scydmsenidse and Pselaphidae, named or unnamed. Will give good 
exchange in Coleoptera or will collect other orders. R- J. CYew, 225 Wilton Ave., 
Toronto, Canada. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Will purchase or exchange native and foreign Lepidoptera. 
H. K. Burrison, West Newton, Mass. 

ODONATA. I have fine specimens of Gomphus grasHinelus, cf ?, which I wish to 
exchange for Odonata or Lepidoptera. James Tough, 164 Ogden Ave., Chicago, 

LEPIDOPTERA and Coleoptera from Germany for exchange for anything not in 
my collection. Send list to William Kayser, Wapakoneta, O. 

COLEOPTERA. Carabidse and Cicindellidse of North America wanted in ex- 
change for Carabidse from Western Pennsylvania. John Bright, 127 Ronp St., 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

LIVE PUP^E AND COCOONS, FERTILE EGGS, wanted in exchange for European 
and exotic butterflies, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera. A. Voelschow, 
Schwerin, Meckbg, Germany. 

WANTED. HOMOPTERA from the South and West. Will give New Hampshire 
Lepidoptera in exchange. Charles F. Goodhue, Webster, Mer. County, N. H. 

WANTED. To exchange Coleoptera of Northern Texas for those of other por- 
tions of the United States. I will collect during this season, for exchange, speci- 
mens in all orders represented here. E. C. Lewis, Forney, Texas. 

COLEOPTERA. I will give 400 species and 1,200 specimens of European Coleop- 
tera in exchange for 50 specimensof C'ychnts, any species except Lecoi>tei. E. C. 
Ehrmann, 2314 Sarah Street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

COLEOPTERA. Desire to exchange with collectors of North American Coleop- 
tora. Have good series authentically determined. H.G. Griffith, M. D., Mana- 
yunk, Philadelphia. 

HYMEXOPTERA. Wanted, specimens of the common Saw-fly, Cimber americana 
from any locality. Will give hints as to easy capture, etc., to anyone interested. 
Named insects of any order given in exchange.- Charles Brues, 320 Hampden 
Court, Chicago, 111. 

A FMR PRICE will be given for specimens of Thecla Izeta and Tlieda N. album. 
Apply to Entomological News. 

WANTED. Micro lepicloptera of the United States, especially Tineina. Living 
larvae, especially leaf miners and case bearers desired. Will pay cash or give Cole- 
optera or Lepidoptera in exchange. W. G- Dietz, M. D., 21 N. Vine St., Hazel- 
ton, Pa. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Diurnals, which are as yet not represented, desired from all 
countries. California and Mexican species given in exchange. Send lists. E. 
K. Harvey, 1806 West Eleventh St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

I AM willing to collect any order that is required this season to be found in 
Colorado. Correspondence solicited. Ernest J. Oslar, 1853 Marion St., Denver, 
Colorado. 

WANTED Entomological News, Vol. 8, No. 3 (March, '97), to complete a vol- 
ume. Send to Henry Skinner, 1900 Race St., Philadelphia. 

WANTED. No. 3, of Vol. 6, Insect Life. Exchange or purchase. J.G.Jack, 
Jamaica Plain 4 , Mass. 

WANTED, in large numbers.- -Lima, In. prmnctliia, cytitliia, iiolyplienuts, h>ij><'- 
rialix, regalis, njnx, cresphonten and other chrysalids. ( Ht'er colnmbm, ceanothi, 
gloveri, J'ti/i. In-cr'n-nuiln and Si>hhi.r inoilesta. Carl Bra tin, Bangor, Maine. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange and correspondence desired ; beginners invited. 
Especially wish Lycaenidx- and Getn>irtri<lie from all parts of North America, de- 
siring varieties and intergrades ; returns in exchange or cash. -John L. Healy, 
4139 Bosworth Ave., Chicago, 111. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have New England species, also diurnals from South America, 
to exchange for Lepidoptera from all parts of the United States and Canada. 
Send list to H. H.iNewcomb, 178Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 



1899] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

EXOHAIMG 

NOT EXCEEDING THREE LINES FREE TO SUBSCRIBE!:.-. 



4=- These notices are continued its lout: as our limited space will allow I lit- new 
ones are added at the end of the column, and only when necessary those at the 
top (being longest in) are discontinued. 

Identification ol Insects [Imigos] lor Subscribers. 



Specimens will he named under the following conditions : 1st. The number of 
species to be LIMITED TO TWFXTY-FIVK for each sending : 'Jd, The sender to pay 
all expenses of transportation and the insects to become the property of the 
American Entomological Society : :id. Hitch specimen must have it number at- 
tached so that the identification may be announced accordingly. Hxot ie species 
named only by special arrangement with the Editor, who should be consulted 
before specimens are sent. Send a two-cent stamp with all insects for return of 
names. PLEASE PUT DATE OF CAI-TCHF ANI> K.\A< i LOCALITY ox KACII SI-KI i- 
MFN. Before sending insects for identification, reu d page 41, \"<>1. III. Addres* 
all packages to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy Natural Sciences, Logan 
Square. Philadelphia, Pa. 



COLEOPTERA. Wanted to purchase or exchange, all speck's of Bostrychidce of 
the United States. Rene ()l)erthur. Rennes. France. 

LEPIDOPTKRA. -Would like cocoons of Eiirl<-.* i-riinlix and imperialis Attacus - 
111,,,1,'xi and others (in exchange for cash). ,T. E. Cottle. l.'^s .lacksmi St.. San 
Francisco. 

COLEOPTERA. I desire to exchange local beetles, named or unnamed, with 
collectors south, west or abroad. I will collect other orders tor Coleoptera. (J. 
Abbott Davis. 1131 Elmwood Ave.. 1'rovidcnce, R. I. 

LEPIDOPTEEA. Live cocoons hybrid ' in fi'<i/>in \ c<-<ni<>tlii<i) and <vov//</'i/ j, 
hybrid -* (eeii unfit i \ r<rr>//)/'" and << ci-u/ii/i. $ Saiurnia pavonia, pupa- Tlmi* / ///>//' 
fur exchange. E. Heyer. Hreitsstr. 44. FJhcrfeld, (iermany. 

LEPIHOPTERA for 'exchange. Write for list. A. Troschel. 4'i Larchmont 
Ave.. ( 'hicago, 111. 

COLEOPTERA desired. Wanted the following numbers (Henshaw's list i : Itib. 
20, 23, 25g. 30, 34, 3ia, 34b. oil, in exchange for 43 and 13(5. A. Luetgens. it West 
17th ST.. New York. 

EUROPEAN COLEOPTERA given for Hymenoptera, from the South and South- 
west, named or unnamed. R. .1. Weith, Elkhart. Indiana. 

LEPIDOPTERA AND ('OLE')PTERA. 'from Germany, to exchange for anything not 
in my collection. Send lists. William Kayser. Wapakoneto, ( hio. 

LEPIDOPTERA. For ex-'nng-: .-!/;/. il'mit-i. /(>', i-liifini" : M'!. iii-ffilii-. iinliiii 
marin ; Ci/*t. unii/nifiiir ; Grapta faunus ; I.im. in'iili mi-i/i-ii. liiniiiiiii : Hit. bredowi ; 

Coennn. li'iiltlfHi ; Hii>. tliiiDi/xiiis. i-itliilijxii ; Suf. tt'.nnui; Chioii. ciiUfiii-iiii-n. C/I/V/.M/V .- 
Th. cryxitlnx, iliiiunn var. iHm-iiiilulix helirii, xlu'riilmii ; Li/c. 1'nliiiinnsit ; I'liri/*. -.im ; 
Anili. ;v<\"/, iicuit'i'i ; I'ltri/'ix, <-l<nlii ; Pii/>. Itnirili, mi/loti'*. Also many other specie, 
and r.t 1 " Hssparidge. Henry Skinnar, A'-adcmy Natural Sciences, in i > Bacs 
street. Philadelphia. 

BOOKS. One complete set and first four volumes "Insect Life." hound and 
complete set Eorhes's Illinois Reports, including miscellaneous essays, for ex- 
change. Wanted. Riley's Missouri Reports. Fitch's New York Reports and 
otlier eiit'iiinlogical literature. -W. (i. .lohnsun. College Park. Md. 

I S M-II.I. cm. i. FIT AND EXCHANGE California insect-, for live tarantulas or trap- 
door spiders. ('. E. Hutcliinson. 2H31 Michigan Ave., Los Angeles. Cal. 

I^Ei'iiini'TERA. Wanted to purchase or exchange, all specic-s ol' ."nlm-nfo and 
l',oi,ilni.r, with their cocoons. I). Lcvrat, ~ Rue St.. Polycarpe. Lyons. France. 

WANT BY EXCHANGE Or will pay cash for Volumes 1,^.3 and I. Itult'alo So- 
ciety of Natural Sciences. Also Proceedings American Philosophical Society of 
Philadelphia for 1S73. John Akhurst. ?s Ashland Place. P.rooklyn. New York. 

WANTED. Scydmsenidse and Psela]ihiihe. named or unnamed. Will uive good 
exchange in Coleoptera or will collect other orders. R. .1. Ci-ew. :.':.'."> \Vilton Ave., 
Toronto. ( anada. 

LF.i'ii"ii'TERA. Will purchase or exchange native and foreign L-.'pidoptera.-- 
H. K. Biirrison. West Newton. Ma--. 



jj ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [June 

ODONATA. I have fine specimens of Gomplmn (tradliiirlux, 1 ?, which I wish to 
exchange for Odonata or Lepidoptera. James Tough, 164 Ogden Ave., Chicago, 
111. 

LEPIDOPTERA and Coleoptera from Germany for exchange for anything not in 
my collection. Send list to William Kayser, Wapakoiieta, O. 

COLEOPTERA. Carabidse and Cicindellida? of North America wanted in ex- 
change for Carabida? from Western Pennsylvania. John Bright, 127 Roup St., 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

LIVE PUP.E AND COCOONS, FERTILE EGGS, wanted in exchange for European 
and exotic butterflies, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera. A. Voelschow, 
Schwerin, Meckbg, Germany. 

WANTED. HOMOPTERA from the South and West. Will give New Hampshire 
Lepidoptera in exchange. Charles F. Goodhue, Webster, Mer. County, N. H. 

WANTED. To exchange Coleoptera of Northern Texas for those of other por- 
tions of the United States. I will collect during this season, for exchange, speci- 
mens in all orders represented here. E. C. Lewis, Forney, Texas. 

( di.EOPTERA. I will give 400 species and 1,200 specimens of European Coleop- 
tera in exchange for 50 specimensof Cychnts, any species except Lecmitei. E. C. 
Ehrmann, 2314 Sarah Street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

COLEOPTERA. Desire to exchange with collectors of North American Coleop- 
tera. Have good series authentically determined. H.G. Griffith, M. D., Mana- 
yuiik. Philadelphia. 

HYMENOPTERA. Wanted, specimens of the common Saw-fly, Cimbf.r amencana 
from any locality. Will give hints as to easy capture, etc., to anyone interested. 
Named insects of any order given in exchange.- Charles Brues, 320 Hampden 
Court, Chicago, 111. 

A FAIR PRICE will be given for specimens of Theda htta and Tliecla M. album. 
Apply to Entomological News. 

WANTED. Micro lepidoptera of the United States, especially Tineina. Living 
larva?, especially leaf miners and case bearers desired. Will pay cash or give ( tole- 
optera or Lepidoptera in exchange.- W. G. Dietz, M. D., 21 N. Vine St., Hazel- 
ton, Pa. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Diurnals, which are as yet not represented, desired from all 
countries. California and Mexican species given in exchange. Send lists. E. 
K. Harvey, 1806 West Eleventh St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

I \M willing to collect any order that is required this season to be found in 
Colorado. < orrespondence solicited. Ernest J. Oslar, 1853 Marion St., Denver, 
Colorado. 

WANTED. No. 3, of Vol. 6, Insect Life. Exchange or purchase. J. G. Jack, 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

WANTED, in large numbers. --Luna. lo. promethia, cynthia, polyphemus, impe- 
rialin, miulis, f/jor. i-wphoHtex and other chrysalids. Offer Columbia, ceanotM, 
glort'i-i. i'ni>. brevlcauda and *i>hhu- modesta. Carl Braun, Bangor, Maine. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange and correspondence desired : beginners invited. 
Especially wish Lyriit'itidie and Gc<nnctri<!n> from all parts of North America, de 
siring varieties and intergrades ; returns in exchange or cash. - John L. Healy, 
4139 Bosworth Ave., Chicago, 111. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have New England species, also diurnals from South America, 
to exchange for Lepidoptera from all parts of the United States and Canada. - 
Send list to H. H. New-comb, 178 Tremont St., Boston. Mass. 

COLEOPTERA I otter unnamed Coleoptera of this locality for named 
named species of Coleoptera, Diptera and Hymenoptera of the 1 nited 
Correspondence solicited. G. Chagnon, Box 18li, Montreal, Canada. 

BOOKS. I will exchange Vols. 1 to 5 of Entomological News tor Comstock s 
Manual or Holland's Butterfly Book. Will also exchange Vol. 1 Entomologica 
Americana and Vols. 8 to 29, Can. Entomologist, for standard works on l.irds.- 
H. W. Nash. Pueblo. Colorado. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I will take in exchange for exotic and native butterflies in 
pupa? and cocoons of aia.r, /olicaon, cresphmites, astylus, modesta, opthaw 
vawouverensis, kalm'nr, chersis, minlis, ceunothi, Columbia, gloveri and others. 
Charles F. Tenim, 4s Ralph St . Brooklyn, New York. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Specimens of 'Hircla stri<i<>x<t wanted, Dr. Henry Skinner. 1 
Race St., Philadelphia. . . 

LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted in papers. American species of Catocol'i. *"'"' : ' 
>>/i ni<i'/<l:i' and Khnpolocera in exchange for European Lepidoptera. Will 
Coleoptera. E. M. Dadd, 3 Colina Villas, Green Lanes, Wood Green, LoncK 
England, (ireat Britain. 



1899] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

EXOHAISJGES 

NOT EXCEEDING THREE LINKS FREE TO SUBSCRIBERS. 



These notices are continued as long as our limited space will Si low ; the new 
ones are added at the end of the column, and only when necessary those at the 
top (being longest in) are discontinued. 

Identification of Insects (Imagosl for Subscribers. 



Specimens will be named under the following conditions : 1st, The number of 
species to be LIMITED TO TWKNTY-KIVK for ea<-h sending : L!d, The sender to pay 
all expenses of transportation and the inserts to become the property of the 
American Entomological Society ; 3d, Each specimen mnvt have a number at- 
tached so that the identification maybe announced accordingly. Exotic species 
named only by special arrangement with the Editor, who should be consulted 
before specimens are sent. Send a two-cent stamp with all insects for return of 
names. PLEASE PUT DATE OF CAPTURE AND EXACT LOCALITY ON HATH SPECI- 
MEN. Before sending insects for identification, rend page 41, Vol. III. Address 
all packages to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy Natural Sciences, Logan 
Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 



BOOKS. One complete set and tirst lour volumes "Insect Life." bound and 
complete set Forbes's Illinois Reports, including miscellaneous essays, lor ex- 
change. Wanted. Riley's Missouri Reports, Fitch's New York Reports and 
other entomological literature. -\V. <;. Johnson. College Park, Md. 

I WILL COLLECT AND EXCHANGE California insects for live tarantulas or trap- 
door spiders. C. E. Hutehinson. 2U31 Michigan Ave., Los Angeles. Cal. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted to purchase or exchange, all species of s<iturni<i and 
Boiiibi/.r, with their cocoons. D. Levrat, 7 Rue St., Polycarpe, Lyons. France. 

WANT KY EXCHANGE or will pay cash for Volumes 1. 2, 3 and 4, Buffalo So- 
ciety of Natural Sciences. Also Proceedings American Philosophical Society of 
Philadelphia for 1873. John Akhurst, 78 Ashland Place. Brooklyn. New York. 

WANTED. Scydnuenida 1 and Pselaphidse. named or unnamed. Will give good 
exchange in Coleoptera or will collect other orders. R- J. Crew, 225 Wilton A\e.. 
Toronto, Canada. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Will purchase or exchange native and foreign Lepidoptera. 
H. K. Burrison. West Newton, Mass. 

ODONATA. I have fine specimens of ii'iim/ilnis <if<isl/iiidus, tf $, which I wish to 
exchange for Odonata or Lepidoptera. James Tough, Ifi4 Ogden Ave.. Chicago, 
111. 

LEPIDOPTERA and Coleoptera from (Germany for exchange for anything not in 
my collection. Send list to William Kayser, Wapakoneta, O. 

COLEOPTERA. Carabidie and Cicindellida- of North America wanted in ex- 
change for Carabidie from Western Pennsylvania. John Bright, 127 Roup St., 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

LIVE I't I'.K AND COCOONS, FERTILE EGGS, wanted in exchange for European 
and exotic butterflies. Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera. A. Voelschow, 
Schwerin. Meckbg. (iermany. 

WANTED. HOMOPTERA from the South and West. Will give New Hampshire 
Lepidoptera in exchange. Charles F. (ioodhue. Webster. Mer. County. N. H. 

WANTED. To exchange Coleoptera of Northern Texas for those of other por- 
tions of the I'nited States. I will collect during this season, for exchange, speci- 
mens in all orders represented here. E. < '. Lewis. Forney, Texas. 

COLEOPTERA. I will give 40(1 species and 1.2(to specimens of F.uropean Coleop- 
tera in exchange fur 50 specimensof Ci/i-lu-ii*. any species except I.-ont< 1.- V.. ('. 
Ehrmann. 23 H Sarah Street. Pittsburgh 1'a. 

COI.EMPTKKA. Desire to exchange with collectors of North American Coleop- 
<<>ra. Have good series authentically determined. ]{.(>. (iriftith. M. !>., Mana- 
yunk. Philadelphia. 

HYMENOPTERA. Wanted, specimens ol the common Saw-tly. Ci,,ilif.r (iniii-ifdiiu 
from any locality. Will give hints as to easy capture, etc.. to anyone interested. 
Named insects of any order given in exchange.- Charles limes. 32(1 Ilampdcn 
< 'ourt, Chicago. 111. 

A FAIR PRICE will be given for specimens of 7Vr/,/ l : ,tn and Thecla M. ii/l/inti. 
Apply to Entomological Ne\\-. 



ii ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Sept 

WANTED. Micro lepidoptera of the United States, especially Thifhia. Living 
larvse, especially leaf miners and case bearers desired. Will pay cash or give Cole- 
optera or Lepidoptera in exchange.- W. G- Dietz, M. D., 21 N. Vine St., Hazel- 
ton, Pa. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Diurnals, which are as yet not represented, desired from all 
countries. California and Mexican species given in exchange. Send lists. E. 
K. Harvey, 1806 West Eleventh St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

I AM willing to collect any order that is required this season to be found in 
Colorado. Correspondence solicited. Ernest J. Oslar, 1853 Marion St., Denver, 
Colorado. 

WANTED. No. 3, of Vol. 6, Insect Life. Exchange or purchase. .T.G.Jack, 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

WANTED, in large numbers. --Lima, To. promethia, cynthia, pdlyphemus, impe- 
rialis, regalis, O'jnx, cresplwitfrft and other chrysalids. Otter Columbia, ceanothi, 
gloreri, Pap. brrricaitila and tfpMiu: motlexta. Carl Braun, Bangor, Maine. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange and correspondence desired ; beginners invited. 
Especially wish Lycaenidi? and GramHriilif from all parts of North America, de- 
siring varieties and intergrades ; returns in exchange or cash. John L. Healy, 
4139 Bosworth Ave., Chicago, 111. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have New England species, also diurnals from South America, 
to exchange for Lepidoptera from all parts of the United States and Canada. 
Send list to H. H. Newcomb, 178 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

COLEOPTERA- I offer unnamed Coleoptera of this locality for named or un- 
named species of Coleoptera, Diptera and Hymenoptera of the United States. 
Correspondence solicited. G. Chagnon, Box 186, Montreal, Canada. 

BOOKS. I will exchange Vols. 1 to 5 of Entomological N'ews for Comstock's 
Manual or Holland's Butterfly Book. Will also exchange Vol. 1 Entomologica 
Americana and Vols. 8 to 29, Can. Entomologist, for standard works on birds. 
H. W. Nash, Pueblo, Colorado. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I will take in exchange for exotic and native butterflies live 
pupae and cocoons of ajax, zolicaon, cresphontes, astylns, modesta, opthalmicus, 
vancouverensis, kalmiir, chersis, reijiiliy, ci'imofhi, Columbia, gloveri and others. 
Charles F. Tenim, 48 Ralph St , Brooklyn, New York. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Specimens of 7Vr/<; sirigosa wanted, Dr. Henry Skinner, 1900 
Race St., Philadelphia. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted in papers, American species of Ciitocula. An-tidn; 
Sphingidse and Rhnpolocera in exchange for European Lep"doptera. Will collect 
Coleoptera. E. M. Dadd, 3 Colina Villas, Green Lanes, Wood Green, London, 
England, Great Britain. 

WANTED. I am desirous of obtaining a copy of Cramer's Papilloiis Exotiques 
des. 3 part, du monde 1'Asie 1'Afii'ine. 1'Amerique, 4 vol. Any ))ookseller or 
other pel-son having a copy to sell can communicate their lowest price to Her- 
man Strecker. Box 311, Reading, Pa., I". S. X. A 

FOR EXCHANGE. 800 (eight-hundred) Papilio ajax (Chrysalis), and in pa- 
pers for Exotic Butterflies, or Foreign Bird Skins or Foreign Coleoptera. Ad- 
dress, Dr. W. H. Valway, 2671 Broadway, Cleveland, Ohio. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have a large number of Actias Luna, Citheronia Regales. 
Icicles Imperial] s and Calosamia Angulifera for exchange for exotics. Prof. 
Henry Wormsbacher, 122 Hutton street, Jersey City, N. J. 

WILL pay fair price for second-hand copies of Leconte and Horn's Classifica- 
tion of the Coleoptera. Win. J. Fox. 1900 Race St.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

WANTED. ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. Vol. 9, number 1. Address W. J. Fox. . 
1900 Race St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

MY collection of insects, comprising fully 8,000 specimens (including dupli- 
cates), mostly Coleoptera, to exchange for bird and mammal skins, sets of bird 
eggs or books and periodicals on " Zoology particularly " < (rnithology." W. E. 
Snyder, Beaver Dam, Wis. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT MOTHS. Wanted all species lepidoptera taken at light, in 
large numbers, especially from West and Southwest United States. Will pay 
cash or give good exchange in native on exotic specimens. W. D. Kearfott, 91 
Liberty St., New York City. 

TRICHOPTERA. Correspondent wanted, United States or Canada. Dr. F. l\is, 
Rheinau, Ct. Zurich, Switzerland. 

I HAVE pupae Of Sphinx eremitus, perelegans, Darapsa vcrsimlor, 1'ap a.jax, 
Lepisesia clarkiie, in exchange for pupa- of Sphinx luscitiosa, gonliu>. Darapsa 
chcerilus, Sm. Modesta, Call, angulifera, and other rare ones. -('has. F. Tiimn. 
48 Ralph St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Pn.viNARiA. Wanted Pnlrhtin-in species from all countries, for critical study. 
Address Geo. B. King, Lawrence. Mass. 



1S99] ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



NOT EXCEEDING THREE LINES FREE TO SUBSCRIBERS. 



4= These notices are con tinned as long as our limited space will allow ; the new 
ones are added at the end of the column, and only when necessary those at the 
top (being longest in) are discontinued. 

Identification of Insects |Imagos] for Subscribers. 



Specimens will be named under the following conditions: 1st, The number of 
species to be LIMITED TO T\VENTY-FIVE for each sending ; 2d, The sender to pay 
all expenses of transportation and the insects to become the property of the 
American Entomological .Society ; :->d. Kadi specimen must have a number at- 
tached so that the identification may be announced accordingly. Exotic species 
named only by special arrangement with the Editor, who should be consulted 
before specimens are sent. Send a two-cent stamp with all insects for return of 
names. PLEASE PUT DATE OF CAPTURE AND EXACT LOCALITY ON EACH SPECI- 
MKN. Before sending insects for identification, rend page 41, Vol. III. Address 
all packages to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy Natural Sciences, Logan 
Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 



OnoXATA. I have tine specimens tit' (iiniiplmn iirnsHiiiclus, 3 9, which I wish to 
exchange for Odonata or Lepidoptera. James Tough 104 Ogdcn Ave., rim-ago, 
111. 

LEPIDOPTERA and Culeoptera from < Jermany for exchange for anything not in 
my collection. Semi list to William Kayser, \Yapakoneta, O. 

CoLEOPTERA. -Carabidse and Cicindcllida- of Xorth America wanted in ex- 
change for Carahidie from Western Pennsylvania. John Bright, 127 Rouii St.. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

LIVE PUP.E AND COCOONS, FERTILE EGGS, wanted in exchange for European 
and exotic butterflies, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera. A. Voelschow, 
Scliwerin, Mcckbg, Germany. 

WANTED. HOMOPTEUA from the South and West. Will give New Hampshire 
L'pidoptera in exchange. Charles F. Goodhue, Webster, Mer. County, N. H. 

WANTED. To exchange Coleoptera of Northern Texas for those of other por- 
tions of the I'nhrd States. I will collect (luring this season, for exchange, speci- 
mens in all orders represented hero. K. ( '. Lewis. Forney, Texas. 

CDLEOPTERA. I will give 400 species and 1.200 specimens of European Coleop- 
tera in exchange for r>0 spccimensof ('i/i-lu-iis, any species except Ln-ntitfi. K. ( '. 
Kin-matin, 2311 Sarah Street, Pittsbiirg. Pa. 

II VMKNOPTERA.- Wanted, specimens of the common Saw-fly, I'iml/c.i- inni-rieana 
from any locality. Will give hints as to easy capture, etc., to anyone interested. 
Named insects of any order given in exchange.- Charles Brues, 320 Hampden 
Court, Chicago, 111. 

A FAIR PRICE will be given for specimens of Tlnrln hi-iu and Tlnrln M. ulliinii. 
Apply to Entomological News. 

WANTED. Micro lepidoptera of the United States, especially Tini'lun. Living 

lar\ ;e, especially leaf miners and case bearers desired. Will pay cash or give ( oh- 
optera or Lepidoptera in exchange.- \V. G. Diet/. M. D., :l\ N. Vine St.. Ha/el 
ton, Pa. 

LEPIDOPTKKA. -Diurnals, which are as yet not represented, desired from all 
countries. California and Mexican species given in exchange. Semi lists. --K. 
K. Harvey. l*Mi West Klevonth St., Los Angeles. Cal. 

[ AM willing to collect any order that is required this season to he found in 
Colorado. Correspondence solicited. Knu-M .l.(islar. ls.">:{ Marion St., Denver. 
( 'olorado. 

WANTED. No. 3, of Vol. 6, Insect Life. Exchange orpin-chase. .1. (i. .lack, 
.lainaic.i Plain, Ma>s. 

\\' \xTi-:i), in large numbers. Linm. In. iirmmtli'in, I't/nilii/i. pdyphemus, im/>i' 
/-(-(/(///.s-, n.jd.c. crriij>lii>titi'< and other clirysalids. (lifer fiili/mlnn, i-< mmthi, 
l'ii/>. lii'friniinlii and S/j/i/'i/.;- nmdi *ln. -Carl I'rann. Hanuor. Maine. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Qct 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange and correspondence desired ; beginners invited. 
Especially wish Lycaenidse and Geometridse from all parts of North America, de- 
siring varieties and intergrades ; returns in exchange or cash. John L. Healy, 
4139 Bosworth Ave., Chicago, 111. 

COLEOPTERA I ofler unnamed Coleoptera of this locality for named or un- 
named species of Coleoptera, Diptera and Hymenoptera of the United States. 
Correspondence solicited. G. Chagnon, Box 186, Montreal, Canada. 

BOOKS. I will exchange Vols. 1 to 5 of Entomological News for Comstock's 
Manual or Holland's Butterfly Book. Will also exchange Vol. 1 Entomologica 
Americana and Vols. 8 to 29, Can. Entomologist, for standard works on birds. 
H. W. Nash, Pueblo, Colorado. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I will take in exchange for exotic and native butterflies live 
pupre and cocoons of aja.r, zolicaon, crexphmites, astylux, modesta, opthnlmifnx, 
vancouverensis. Icalmioe, chersis, regatta, ceanotki, Columbia, gloveri and others. 
Charles F. Tenim, 48 Ralph St , Brooklyn, New York. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Specimens of Thecla strigosa wanted, Dr. Henry Skinner, 1900 
Race St., Philadelphia. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted in papers, American species of Caloculn. Arctidte, 
Xplrhtyidse and Rkopolocern in exchange for European Lepidoptera. Will collect 
Coleoptera. E. M. Dadd, 3 Colina Villas, Green Lanes, Wood (h-een. London, 
England, Great Britain. 

WANTED. I am desirous of obtaining a copy of Cramer's Papillons Exotiques 
des. 3 part, du monde 1'Asie 1'Afrique. I'Amerique, 4 vol. Any bookseller or 
oilier person having a copy to sell can communicate their lowest price to Her- 
man Strecker. Box 311, Reading, Pa., U. S. X. A 

FOE EXCHANGE. 800 (eight-hundred) Papilio ajax (Chrysalis), and in pa- 
pers for Exotic Butterflies, or Foreign Bird Skins or Foreign Coleoptera. Ad- 
dress, Dr. W. H. Valway, 2671 Broadway, Cleveland, Ohio. 

LEPIDOPTEEA. I have a large number of Actias Luna, Citheronia Regales, 
Eacles Imperial] s' and Calosamia Angulifera for exchange for exotics. Prof. 
Henry Wormsbacher, 122 Hutton street, Jersey City, N. J. 

WANTED. Insect Life, Vol. iii, 11, 12. Address W. J. Fox, 1900 i Race Street. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

M v collection of insects, comprising fully 8,000 specimens (including dupli- 
cates), mostly Coleoptera, to exchange for bird and mammal skins, sets of bird 
eggs or books and periodicals on " /oology-- particularly " Ornithology." W. K. 
Snyder, Beaver Dam, V\ is. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT MOTHS. Wanted all species lepidoptera taken at light, in 
large numbers, especially from West and Southwest United States. Will pay 
cash or give good exchange in native on exotic specimens. W.I). Kearfott, 91 
Liberty St., New York City. 

TRICHOPTERA. Correspondent wanted, United States or Canada. Dr. F. Ris. 
Rheinau, Ct. Zurich, Switzerland. 

I HAVE pupse of Sphinx ereiniHis, perclegans, Darapsa versicolor, Pap ajax, 
Lepisesia clarki;e, in exchange for pup;e of Sphinx luscitiosa, gordius. Darapsa 
chrerilus, Sm. Modesta, Call, angulifera, and other rare ones. ('has. F. Timm, 
is Ralph St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1'ri.VlNARlA. Wauled 1'itl ci mi ri<i species from all countries, for critical study. 
Address (ieo. 15. King, Lawrence. Mass. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Sphingidse, >'c.w//v,r, Arcdidn' and SiilirnitHu' from all coun- 
tries; also pupie and cocoons, of Snturnian and Sphimjrs desired in exchange 
for North American or foreign Lepidoptera. Henry Engel, P. < >. llox :?tii), Pitts- 
burg, 1'a., U S. A. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange solicited with collectors in I'uited States and Can- 
ada. Pupa- (if Xp/mi.r hicitinsn also to exchange for desiderata. Send lists. S. T. 
Kemp, <>37 Jetl'eron avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. 

COI,EOPTKR.\ of United States for exchange. Wisli to buy or to exchange any 
any paper on Coleoptera not represented in my library. Send lists to Dr. A. 
I'Vnycs, Pasadena. Cal. 

l.Ki'i Doi'TKRA. Live pupa of Inm'itliixii, drhpif"rarum, <(l>/><ittii, iiiwriptnm. nclii 1 - 
ni/jii, iiiiHiloriiK, mi/run, IH i/ops, (,'emiinihis. amQUnntor, inidiiloan. ii>ip<'rilin. in, <nninli- 
ii'i'n and others. Also good material in papers. II.. 1. Erb, 332 Kast Twelfth 
street. New York. 

Col.KOl'TKUA. 1 offer good species of North American beetles in exchange for 
others not in my collection. Correspondence desired with collectors in good lo- 
calities. Will identify captures for beginners. H. F. Wick ham. Iowa City. Iowa. 



1809] 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 

EXOHAIMO 

NOT EXCKI.mv; THREE LINES FREE T< -I \:-< i;ir.l.l>. 



tiSr These no) ices are continued as innii as our I i in in-, I space u ill :t I low I ln> new 
(i ncs are milled ul the end of I he coin in n, and only when necessarv I hose at 1 lie 
top i In-ill'^ longest in i are discontinued. 

Identification of Insects [ Images | for Subscribers. 



Specimens will be named under the following conditions : 1st. Tin- mnniier of 

Species to be LIMITED TO TWENTY-FIVE for each sending: lM, The sender lo pa\ 
all expenses Of transportation and the insects to heeonie the propert.v of the 
American Entomological Society ; :;d. Kach specimen ninst have a niimht-r at- 
tached so I hat the ident it'n 'at ion ma.\ he announced accordingly. K \otic species 
named only by special arrangement with the Kditor, who should he consul icd 
before specimens are sent. Send a two-cent stamp with all insects foi- return of 
names. PLEASE rr r DATK OK cAiTfi:)-: ANDKXA<'T LOCALITY ON i:\rn -JCKCI- 
MEN. Before sending insects for identification, read page 41. Vol. III. . \ddio~ 
all packages to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy Natural Sciences. I,oi;an 
Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 



WANTED. Micro lepidoptera of tlie I'nited suites, especially Tim-inn. Living 
larvae, especially leaf miners and case hearers desired. Will pay cash or give ( loll 
c.ptera or Lepidoptera in exchange. W. <! Diet/, -M. D.. :21 N. Vine St.. Ma/.el- 
ton, Pa. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Diurnals. which are as yet not represented, desired from all 
countries. California and Mexican species given in exchange. Send lists. E. 
K. Harvey, 1806 West Eleventh St., Los Angeles. Cal. 

I AM willing to collect any order that is required this season to he found in 
Colorado. Correspondence solicited. Krnest ,1. Oslar. 1853 Marion St.. Denver. 
Colorado. 

W\XTKD. No. 3. of Vol. (i. Insect Lite. Exchange or purchase.--.!. ( I. .lack, 
Jamaica Plain, .Mass. 

WANTED, in large numbers.- Luna, l<>. /irnimili//!, i-i/n/l/in. polyphemus, (/u/w- 
rialix. mi/i lit, njn.i, < J i-> 'xjilinuti :i and otlier chrysalids. Oiler <-<ilii,ii!>nt. <-i mmlhi, 
gloreri, Pap. In-rii-nmlii and .^/ili'ni.i mnili'sta. Carl Braun. Hangor, Maine. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange and correspondence desired : heginner* invited. 
Especially wish Lycnenidie and Geinm trithr from all parts of North America, de- 
siring varieties and intergrades : returns in exchange or cash. -John L. Mealy, 
4139 Bosworth Ave.. Chicago, 111. 

COLEOPTERA I otter unnamed Colenptera of this locality for named or un- 
named species of Coleoptera, Diptera and Hvmenoptera of tin- rniied st,-,ti>-,. 
Correspondence solicited. G-. Chagnon, Box IMS, Montreal, t'anada. 

BOOKS. I will exchange Vols. 1 to 5 of Entomoloiiical Ne\\> f,,i- < 'omstock's 
Manual or Holland's Butterfly Book. \Vill also exchange Vol. 1 Kntonio]n'_:ica 
Americana and \"ols. s to :>!, Can. Entomologist, for standard works on hirds. 
M. W. Nash, I'uehlo, Colorado. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I will take in exchange for exotic and native hutterllies live 
pupa- and cocoons of iiju.r. /olicaon, n-r.<.pliinili:t, iixti/lns. mode,ta. <i/>tliiilini> "<, 
vcmcouverensin, l:/ilniin, clii'rsix. ri'iinlin. ceanothi, columliia. gloveri and otliei-. 
Charles F. Tenim, (s h'alpli St . Brooklyn, New York. 

LKPIDOPTERA. Specimens of Tln'flu *ti-i<inx<i wanted. Dr, llenr.v skinner. IIHMI 

h'ace St.. Plliladelpllia. 

LKPIDOPTERA. Wanted in papers. American specie.-, of i 'nfm-nln. \ntiil;,, 
>/;'"'!/''''' 'and S^opoZocera in exchange for l-'.uropean Lepidoptera. \\'ill collect 
Coleoptera. K. M. Dadd. 3 Colina N'illas. (irceii Lane-.. \\'ood (Ircen. London, 
England, ( ireat Mritain. 

\\' VNTED. I am desirous of obtaining a copy of Cramer's 1'apillons l-]xotii|iies 
des. 3 part, dn monde 1'Asie l'AtVii|iie. I' Americ|iie, I \ol. Any hook-.e||er or 
other person having a copy to sell can communicate their lowest price to Mer- 
man Strecker. Box 311, Beading, Pa., U. S. N. A. 



ii ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [NoV 

FOR EXCHANGE. 800 (eight-hundred) Papilio ajax (Chrysalis), and in pa- 
pers for Exotic Butterflies, or Foreign Bird Skins or Foreign Coleoptera. Ad- 
dress, Dr. W. H. Valway, 2671 Broadway, Cleveland, Ohio. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have a large number of Actias Lnna, Citheronia Regates, 
Eacles Imperialis and Calosamia Angulifera for exchange for exotics. Prof. 
Henry Wormsbacher, 122 Hutton street, Jersey City, N. J. 

WANTED. Insect Life, Vol. iii, 11, 12. Address \V. J. Fox, 1900 i Race Street. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

M v collection of insects, comprising fully 8,000 specimens (including dupli- 
cates), mostly Coleoptera, to exchange for bird and mammal skins, sets of bird 
eggs or books and periodicals on " Zoology particularly " Ornithology." W. E. 
Snyder, Beaver Dam, Wis. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT MOTHS. Wanted all species lepidoptera taken at light, in 
large numbers, especially from West and Southwest United States. Will pay 
cash or give good exchange in native on exotic specimens. W. D. Kearfott, 91 
Liberty St., New York City. 

TRICHOPTERA. -Correspondent wanted, United States or Canada. Dr. F. Ris, 
Rheinau, Ct. Zurich, Switzerland. 

I HAVE pupse of Sphinx eremitus, perelegans, Darapsa versicolor, Pap ajax, 
Lepisesia clarkia>, in exchange for pupse of Sphinx luscitiosa, gordius, Darapsa 
chcerilus, Sm. Modesta, Call, angulifera, and other rare ones. Chas. F. Timm, 
48 Ralph St., Brooklyn, X. Y. 

PULVINARIA. Wanted Pidvinaria species from all countries, for critical study. 
Address Geo. B. King, Lawrence, Mass. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Sphingldse, Sessiidise, Arctiidas and Saturndiie from all coun- 
tries ; also pupa? and cocoons, of Saturn-las and Sphinges desired in exchange 
for North American or foreign Lepidoptera. Henry En gel, P. O. Box 369, Pitts- 
burg, Pa., U. S. A. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange solicited with collectors in United States and Can- 
ada. Pupa? of Sphinx Incitiosa also to exchange for desiderata. Send lists. S. T. 
Kemp, 637 Jefferson avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. 

COLEOPTERA of United States for exchange. Wish to buy or to exchange any 
any paper on Coleoptera not represented in my library. Send lists to Dr. A. 
Fenyes, Pasadena, Cal. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Live pupa of luscitiosa, drupifrarum, abbottii, inscriptum, achr- 
mon, pand'trus, myron, myop<i, i eminatus. aniymitor, luidnimtii, imperialis, io, an<iiili- 
fera and others, Also good material in papers. H. J. Erb, 332 East Twelfth 
street, New York. 

COLEOPTP:RA. I offer good species of North American beetles in exchange for 
otheirs not in my collection. Correspondence desired with collectors in good lo- 
calitAes Will identify captures for beginners. H. F. Wickham, Iowa City, Fowa. 

W NTED. Catalogue of North American Diptera and Odonata. Will give 
goo d exchange in American or exotic Coleoptera and Lepidoptera or American 
Hyni enoptera and Odonata. R. J. Weith, Elkhart, Indiana. 

LEP IDOPTERA. I have the finest of California flies on hand. Mel. chalcedon, 
entirely black, Mel. editlm, Mrliclrptriii uneta and many rare species. Send for 
list. J. E. Cottle, 1528 Jackson St., San Francisco. 

COLEOPTERA and Lepidoptera and specimens of all orders from Washington, 
Oregon and Pennsylvania, to exchange for Coleoptera of North America. Send 
lists to J. C. Warren, Crooked Creek, Pennsylvania. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Fernlia jocosn, Feniseca targwinius, Papilio mylotes and many 
others. Unnamed Noctuids and Micros accepted. R. J. Weith, 165 Summit St., 
Newark, New Jersey. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Large and healthy pupa 1 of Hyperchiria io for exchange. L. 
I. Holdi edge, 236 Main St-, Oneonta, New York. 

LEPIEOPTERA. Perfect examples of the very rare Hydra-da iinpi-fiiuiona Grt., 
as well as most of the other species, given in exchange for Noctuids of equal 
value. Henry Bird, Rye, New York. 

BUTTERFLIES. I have an immense, number of duplicates, many exceedingly 
rare species, to exchange. Butterflies named gratis. Henry Skinner, 1900 Race 
St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

COLEOPTERA from Florida Keys for exchange. Send lists to G. Beyer, 511 
East 117th St,, New York City. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Wanted, Ariiyiinix diana. Will give Thecla eryphon. H. Abel- 
jug, 328 High St., Torriugtou, Connecticut. 



ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. 



EXOHANO 

NOT K\c l.i:m\<. IIIRKK LINKS FREK T<> -riJMKir.il>. 



These notices are continued as long as our limiu-<l space will allow ; 1 hi- new 
ones are added at the end of the column. am) only when ncccssarv iln.-t at the 
top rbeing longest in) are discontinued. 

Identification of Insects |'Imagos| for Subscribers. 



Specimens will he named under the following condition*: 1*1. The number oi 
species to be LIMITED TO TWENTY-FIVE for each sending; 2d, The sender to pa\ 
all expenses of transportation and the insects to become the pro|>ni\ ol tin 
American Entomological Society ; 3d, Each specimen must have a number at- 
tached so that the identification may be announced accordingly. Exotic speci>c 
named only by special arrangement with the Editor, who should he consulted 
before specimens are sent. Send a two-cent stamp with all insects tor return of 
names. PLEASE PUT DATE OF CAPTURE AND EXACT LOCALITY ON K AC a SI-PIE- 
MEN. Before sending insects for identification, rend page41, Vol. III. Ad. in -> 
all packages to ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS, Academy Natural sciences. Lo^an 
Square. Philadelphia, Pa, 



WANTED, in large numbers.- Lumi, To. prmntthia, ///n/lii/i. polyphemus, in/i>i 
> inl'm. reyalis, njiu'. C/TN/W(KII/C.< ami other chrysalids. Oiler rnliimlmt. i;-<ninlhi. 
yloveri, Pap. brevicauda and. Sphinx modesta. -Carl Braun. Bangor. Maine. 

LEPIDOPTEKA. Exchange and correspondence desired: beginners invited. 
Especially wish Xj/caenitte and i;i'<>in<-i,-'i;t i'rom all parts of North America, de- 
siring varieties and intergrades ; returns in exchange or ca>h. -.lolin L. Mealy. 
ii:i Bosworth Ave.. Chicago, 111. 

CnLEOPTERA I offer unnamed Coleoptera of this locality for named or nn- 
named species of Cpleoptera, Diptera and llymenoiiiera of the I'nited states. 
< lorrespondence solicited. (4. Chagnon, Box 18ti, .Montreal. Canada. 

IJnoKs. I will exchange Vols. 1 to 5 of Entomological News for ( <>m>tuck's 
Manual or Holland's Butterfly Book. Will also exchange Vol. 1 F.ntomologica 
siuericaint and Vols. 8 to 29, Can. Entomologist, tor Mandard work.- on binl>. 
II. \V. Na>h. Pueblo, Colorado. 

LKPIDOPTEEA. I will take in exchange for exotic and native butterflies live 
pil[i;e and COCOOns of ajd.r, xolicaon. r/r\/;/i///rx, iisti/lnx. mode^ta. n^tlnil iiin'i'^. 

Vancouver ensix, kiilmiii-, C/ICCM'.V, i-t<i<i/i*, rc<i,n>ihi, Columbia, gloveri and othei's. 
Charles F. Tenim, 4s Ralph St . Brooklyn, New York. 

LEPIDOPTEHA. Specimens of 7V/ir/ *ti-iii<>xn wanted, Dr. Henrv Skinner. ISHMI 
h'ace St.. Philadelphia. 

LKPIDOPTEEA. .Wanted in pajx'rs, American species of I nl<n nln. Anii/ln. 
*iili'ni<ii<l;e and 22ftopoZocera in exchange for Kuropean Lepi<loptera. \\'ill collect 
Coleoptera. K. M. Dadd. 3 Colina Villas. ( Jreen Lanes, Wood (n-een. Lomlim. 
Kngland. (-Jreai llritain. 

WANTED. I am de.Mnms of obtaining a copy of Cramer's Papillons l'.\niii|tie> 
des. 3 part, du monde 1'Asie rAfri<|iie. rAmericme, I vol. Any bookseller 01- 
other person having a copy to sell can communicate their lowest price to llei 
man Strecker. Box :511. KYading, I 'a.. I". S. N. A 

FOB EXCHANGE. 800 (eight-hundred) Papilio a.jax (Chry-ali> <, and in pa 
pers for Exotic Butterflies, or Foreign ISinl Skins or Foreign Coleoptera. Ad- 
dress, Hr. W. II. Valway. -.'1171 Ki'oadway, Cleveland, Ohio. 

LKIMDUI-TFKA. I have a larue number of Actia> Luna. < 'itheronia T7egate-. 
Kacles Imperialis ami Calosamia Angulifera for 'xehauge for exotics.- Prol 
Henry \\'orm>li.ic|iei-. r.-J Mutton -trect, ,ler>ey < ity. N. .1. 

MY collection of insects, comprising fully 8,000 specimen.-, uncludiipj dnpli- 
ates), mostly Coleoptera, to exchange fbr bird and mammal skins. M nf hinl 

eggs or books and periodicals mi "Zoology- particularlv " Oruit I... t _ \\ . I. 

>nyder Beaver Dain V\ 'is. 



ii ENTOMOLOGICAL NEWS. [Dec. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT MOTHS. Wanted all species lepidoptera taken at light, in 
large numbers, especially from West and Southwest United States. Will pay 
cash or give good exchange in native on exotic specimens. W. D. Kearfott, 91 
Liberty St., New York City. 

TRICHOPTERA. Correspondent wanted, United States or Canada. Dr. F. Ri 
Rheinau, Ct. Zurich, Switzerland. 

I HAVE pupte of Sphinx eremitus, perelegans, Darapsa versicolor, Pap ajax, 
Lepisesia clarkire, in exchange for pupse of Sphinx luscitiosa, gordius, Darapsa 
rhoerilus, Sm. Modesta, Call, angulifera, and other rare ones. Chas. F. Timm. 
48 Ralph St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PULVINARIA. Wanted PuMnaria species from all countries, for critical study. 
- Address Geo. B. King, Lawrence, Mass. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Sphingidse, Sessiidise, Arctiidse and Saturndhe from all coun- 
tries ; also pupae and cocoons, of Saturnias and SpMnges desired in exchange 
tor North American or foreign Lepidoptera. Henry Engel, P. O. Box 369, Pitts- 
burg, Pa., U. S. A. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Exchange solicited with collectors in United States and Can- 
ada. Pnpse of Sphinx lucitiom also to exchange for desiderata. Send lists. S. T. 
Kemp, 637 Jeflerson avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. 

COLEOPTERA of United States for exchange. Wish to buy or to exchange any 
any paper on Coleoptera not represented in my library. Send lists to Dr- A. 
Fenyes, Pasadena, Cal. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Live pupa of liiscitiosa, dri<pif"rantm, (tbbottii, inscriptuiti, achf- 
tnon, pandurus, my ran, myops, geminatus. amynnior, undulosa, imperialin, io, augiili- 
fera and others, Also good material in papers. H. J. Erb, 332 East Twelfth 
street, New York. 

COLEOPTERA. I offer good species of North American beetles in exchange, for 
others not in my collection. Correspondence desired with collectors in good lo- 
i-alities. Will identify captures for beginners. H. F. Wickham, Jowa City.Iowa. 

WANTED. Catalogue of North American Diptera and Odonata. Will give 
good exchange in American or exotic Coleoptera and Lepidoptera or American 
Hymenoptera and Odonata. E. J. Weith, Elkhart. Indiana. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have the finest of California flies on hand. Mel. fihalcedan, 
entirely black, Mel. edit ha, Melicleptria sueta and many rare specie-;. Send for 
list. J. E. Cottle, 1528 Jackson St., San Francisco. 

COLE OPTERA and Lepidoptera and specimens of all orders from Washington, 
Oregon and Pennsylvania, to exchange for Coleoptera of North America. St- n<l 
lists to J. C. Warren, Crooked Creek, Pennsylvania. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Feralia jocosa, Feniseca targuinius, PapiUo mylotes and many 
others. Unnamed Noctuids and Micros accepted. R. J. Weith, 165 Summit St.. 
Xewark, New Jersey. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Large and healthy pupae of Hyperchiria io for exchange. I,. 
1. Holdredge, 236 Main St., Oneonta, New York. 

LEPIDOPTKRA. Perfect examples of the very rare Hydru'cia iinpfcmiwsa <iii.. 
as well as most of the other species, given in exchange for Noctuids of equal 
value. Henry Bird, Rye, New York. 

BUTTERFLIES. I have an immense number of duplicates, many exceedingly 
rare species, to exchange. Butterflies named gratis. Henry Skinner, 1900 Raci- 
st., Pniladelphia, Pennsylvania. 

COLEOPTERA from Florida Keys for exchange. Send lists to G. Beyer. 511 
East 117th St,, New York City. 

LKPIDOPTERA. Wanted, Argynnis diaua. Will give Thecla erijplitm. H. Abel- 
ing, 328 High St., Torrington, Connecticut. 

LEPIDOPTERA. Specimens of Argynnis and Militsea wanted in e.x<-hang- for 
other American or European Lepidoptera or cash. Alfred E. Lister, 921 Vim- 
St., Scranton, Pa. 

LEPIDOPTERA. I have pup* of P. chloris, I-. scaplui, A. torrt-facta, H. io, E. 
imperialis, A. luna and several other specif*. Send for list. S. T.Keiup, 637 
Jetferson Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 

WANTED. For cash, North Amsrican Butterflies in papars ; only tirst-daa* 
specimens. Send list and prices. -A. G. Fletcher, Keeseville, Essex Co., N. Y. 

CUBA. The advertiser, in collecting insects in Cuba, would like to hear from 
anyone wishing good specimens of any order of insects. R. J. Crew, Havana 
P, O,. Cuba. 




I 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION LIBRARIES 



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