(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Entomology newsletter"

LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



CD 



CJ3 



595.705 

1LL1 




The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its return to the library from 
wS it was withdrawn on or before the 
Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books 
are reasons for disciplinary act.on and may 
result in dismissal from the University. 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LtBRARY AT URBANA.CHAMPA.GN_ 



lurn 



L161 — O-1096 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://www.archive.org/details/entomologynewsle01univ 



ILLI 



^TT 




~»~ ■*» 



cr>tOT»olodt| 



umvtisbtn OF ILLINOIS 



LIBRARY 



newsletter 

1965 




Annual Newsletter 



department of 
Entomology 



University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 



April 1965 



ZULU 



Table of Contents 

Page 

Message from the Department Head 1 

Activities of the School of Life Sciences 3 

Departmental Roster 1964-1965 4 

Sports Review 9 

Social Activities 10 

Recent Graduates 11 

Present Entomology Graduate Students 21 

News about the Staff Members 26 

Publications from the Department of Entomology 1963-64. . . .38 

Alumni News 41 

Addresses of Alumni 42 

Newsletter Information Form 55 



Cover Story 

The beautifully executed picture on our cover was prepared by 
Mrs. RaVae Ideker Marsh, who in addition to being an excellent student 
in the School of Fine Arts at the University of Illinois is also an 
accomplished Laboratory Technician in Dr. Larsen's lab. 

The significance (if any) of the subject material on the cover is 
left to the discretion of the reader. 

The Editor 



Message from the Department Head 

It has been over ten years since this Department sent out an annual 
newsletter. Because there appears to be a genuine interest among our 
alumni, as expressed by many during the past years, we have decided to 
begin again with an annual report of the Department of Entomology at the 
University of Illinois. 

For many years the Department was housed in Harker Hall, the oldest 
building on campus. In January 1963 a historic move took place when 
a new building was completed with laboratories designed specifically 
for entomological research in physiology, bionomics, and toxicology. This 
building, named Morrill Hall, provides over thirteen thousand net square 
feet of space for entomology , and includes cold rooms , dark rooms , 
insectaries, and temperature-humidity controlled rooms, in addition to 
offices and research laboratories. The research laboratories provide 
the facilities needed for bionomics, various phases of insect physiology, 
biochemistry, neurophysiology, and toxicology. It houses the members 
of the faculty and graduate students whose research falls within these 
areas . 

In September WBU, an addition to Morrill Hall was begun which will 
be completed sometime in 1966. Space is provided in the addition to 
house the remainder of the Department. When completed the Department 
will again be under one roof, except for a number of instructional 
laboratories for undergraduate courses. 

During the past ten years the Department has increased from eight 
faculty members to ten members whose appointments are solely in Entomology 
plus two with appointments partly in Entomology and partly in the School 
of Life Sciences. In addition, two members of the Illinois Natural History 
Survey and one with the Department of Horticulture hold joint appointments 
with Entomology. 

Graduate student enrollment has also increased and is now in the 
mid-forties. When the new addition is completed, we expect to accommodate 
approximately fifty graduate students as the upper limit. 

Much of the progress outlined above began while Professor Leigh 
Chadwick was Head of the Department, and the Department is deeply indebted 
to his foresight and efforts. In September, 1963, Professor Chadwick 



■■ 



! 



- 



. . - • 



-2- 

asked to be relieved of administrative duties to devote more time to 
his research activities. At that time Professor Clyde Kearns assumed 
the Headship. While Professor Kearns is on sabbatical during this 
academic year, Professor James Sternburg has been appointed Acting Head. 



'«•' '' v.- .• . ■:-;■. 



-3- 

Activities of the School of Life Sciences 

The School of Life Sciences was first organized in 1959 with 
Dr. H.O. Halvorson, former head of Microbiology, as its Director. The 
School is a unit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and 
includes the Departments of Botany, Entomology, Microbiology, Physiology 
and Biophysics, and Zoology. Some of the duties of the Director are 
to approve tenure appointments , budget requests , curricular changes 
and the life in the different departments , as well as to function as 
a liaison between the departments and the Dean of the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences. The School also administers interdepartmental needs 
such as the Biology Shop, Electron Microscope Laboratory, and studies 
building and space needs of the School. 

The School also is responsible for the administration of certain 
educational programs in biology that concern more than one department. 
For example, students who do not wish to limit their training to a 
single area in Biology can now receive the Master of Science in Biology; 
Master of Science in the Teaching of the Biological Science and General 
Science; and the Doctor of Philosophy in Biology. 

One of the outstanding contributions of Dr. Halvorson was his 
untiring efforts in getting new buildings for the Biology Departments. 
Burrill Hall, Morrill Hall and the Zoology-Botany buildings are structures 
which cost over four and a half million dollars each. Burrill Hall 
which houses Microbiology and Physiology and Biophysics was dedicated 
in 1959. Morrill Hall houses the research and graduate teaching of the 
Entomology Department and a few Zoology research laboratories. Morrill 
Hall was completed a year ago. The construction of the Zoology-Botany 
building has just started and will be completed in 1966. 

In June, 1965, Dr. Halvorson will retire. His place will be taken 
by Dr. Reino Emil Kallio, now Professor of Bacteriology at the State 
University of Iowa. He comes highly recommended, and we hope he will 
enjoy his work as Director of our School of Life Sciences. In conclusion 
we of the Entomology Department would like to say thanks to Dr. Halvorson 
for his unselfish, highly successful efforts as the initial Director of 
the School of Life Sciences. 



'• 



* . 



-4- 



Departmental Roster 1964-1965 
Faculty 



Balduf, Walter V. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Bouseman, John K. - Instructor 

Chadwick, Leigh E. - Professor of Entomology 

Decker, George C. - Professor of Entomology and 

Head of Economic Entomology Section 

Downes, William L. - Assistant Professor of Entomology 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. - Professor of Entomology 

Friedman, Stanley - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Ghent, Arthur W. - Assistant Professor of Entomology 

Hayes, William P. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Horsfall, William R. - Professor of Entomology 

Hurley, Richard L. - Instructor (DGS Biology) 

* Jaycox, Elbert R. - Associate Professor of Apiculture 

Kearns, Clyde W. - Professor of Entomology and Head of the Department 

** Larsen, Joseph R. - Assistant Professor of Entomology 

Milum, Vern G. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Ross, Herbert H. - Professor of Entomology and Head of Faunistic Surveys 

Selander, Richard B. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Sternburg, James G. - Professor of Entomology and Acting Head 

Waldbauer, Gilbert P. - Assistant Professor of Entomology 

White, Joan F. - USPH Post-doctoral Fellow 

Willis, Judith H. - Assistant Professor of Entomology 

* - Joint Appointment with Horticulture 
** - Joint Appointment with Physiology and Biophysics 



;•■'•; : . ■ 



:.. 



■••<■<■ 



' : 



Visiting Professors and Fellows: 1964-65 



V.N. Bhatnagar 



Regional Co-ordinating Organization 
National Malaria Eradication Programme 
Lucknow, India 



Assistant 
Director of 
Entomology 



D.J. Burdick 



Fresno State College 
Fresno, California 



Assistant Professor 
of Biology 



M.F. Osman 



Cairo University 
Faculte of Science 
Cairo, Egypt 



Lecturer in 
Entomology 



N.C. Pant 



Indian Agricultural Research Institute 
New Delhi , India 



Professor of 
Entomology 
and In 
charge of 
Insect 
Physiology 



• . ' • 



■ 















-6- 



Research Assistants 



Allen, Robert T. 
Banerjee, Amal C. 
Bharadwaj , Rama K. 
Brady, U. Eugene 
Chandran, Satish R. 
Eertmoed, Gary E. 
Fogal, Willard 
Hsiao, Catherine T. 
Hsiao, Ting-Huan 



Killmer, Paul 
Okonkwo, Augustine I. 
Randall, Robert F. 
Rotramel, George 
Storch, Richard H. 
Unzicker, John D. 
Wickramasinghe , Nallini 
Wilson, George R. 
Yamamoto, Toshio 



Teaching Assistants 

Abou-aly, Aly A. Reinbold, Keturah 

Cullop, Samuel Seligman, Morris 

Weddle, Richard C. 



.■ ■■■;$ '-; : : 



' , ■ . • •' ' ' 



.;-,.; • ■•••• 



Trainees and Fellows 

Benson, Robert W. - USPH Trainee 

Chang, Franklin - USPH Trainee 

Eaton, John L. - USPH Trainee 

Flattum, Roger F. - USPH Trainee 

Gemrich, Edwin G. - USPH Fellow 

Krysan, James L. - University Fellow in Entomology 

Maddox, Joseph - University Fellow in Entomology 

Mathieu, Jean M. - Rockefeller Foundation Fellow 

Newton, David C. - USPH Trainee 

Peterson, Lance G. - USPH Trainee 

Pinto, John D. - USPH Fellow 

Reynolds, Judith L. - AAUW Fellow 

Students not on Staff 

Fraembs , Frank 
Miller, James L. 
Patterson, William J. 
Sastrodihardjo, S. 
Schmidt, Fred 



-8- 

N on -Academic 

Bangeman, Judy 
Duvall, Eloise 
Hogan, Joseph 
Montrimas , Jean 
Plymire, Ruth 
Schoff, Gwynne 



Student Employees 

Broadbent, Alan Marsh, RaVae 
Brown, Sharon McConaghy, George 

French, Nancy Okonkwo, Augustine 

Mander, Lois Prickett , Alice 

Troxel, William 



-9- 
Sports Review 

On the sports scene, we have been participating in several different 
activities. Last summer our department fielded a softball team in 
the faculty-staff intramural league. We had much more fun than success 
but, not to be dismayed, the "Entomology Flycatchers", with the aid 
of new recruits , are looking forward to a bigger and better season 
this spring. 

A few of the more athletic among our number find the bumps and 
grinds of rugby to their liking and make a fine contribution to the 
University Rugby Team. Others are involved in some active intra- 
departmental handball competition, which serves as an excellent diversion 
from the academic tedium. 

A by-product of the sports world has been the nefarious activities 
of "Ma (Ruth Plymire) Barker" who will give you odds on everything 
from the worlds series to the cockroach races on the 2nd floor. If 
there is a sporting event worthy of rate you can be sure "Ma" will 
have a pool going. There has been a rumor that these pools are rigged. 
This, however, is due to a misunderstanding. Its just that the pools 
are so complicated it takes the entire office staff to interpret the 
results and inform the winner. 



-10- 

Social Activities 

Christmas Party 

The newly remodeled University Club was the scene of our annual 
Entomology Department Christmas Party held on Thursday, December 17, 1964. 
The attendance was even better than we expected in spite of cold , 
freezing weather and some ogre professors (in other departments) 
pouring on last minute exams before the long Christmas vacation. 
Refreshments including fancy open-faced sandwiches, nuts, and fruit punch 
which was served by faculty members and their wives. Ed Gemrich, a 
graduate student , tape recorded hours of music which was played in 
the background while everyone chit-chatted. The height of the evening 
came when Ed led the whole group in Christmas carols while Ruth Plymire , 
our office secretary, played the accompanyment on the piano. You 
haven't lived until you've heard Ed singing Silent Night to a rock and 
roll beat. 

Entomology Picnic 

Through the efforts of our enterprizing office staff (Ruth and Gwynne) 
we are in the processes of organizing a spring picnic for the students, 
staff and their families to be held sometime before the end of the 
current school year. 






>•.:■' . , ..• 



■ 



.. 






. 



-11- 

Recent Graduates 
John Frederic Anderson - 1963 
Advisor - William R. Horsfall 

John was born February 25, 1936 in Fargo, North Dakota. In 1957 
he received his B.S. from North Dakota State University with a major 
in Zoology and Chemistry. He stayed on at North Dakota State and took 
the M.S. degree in 1959. From April 1959 to September 1959 John filled 
his obligation with Uncle Sam as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Medical 
Service Corps. He took his tour of duty at the Army Medical Service 
School at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. In September of 1959 he entered 
graduate school in the Department of Entomology at the University of 
Illinois. While at the U of I he held positions of Research Assistant 
and Teaching Assistant in Entomology. The title of John's thesis is: 
EFFECT OF THERMAL STRESS ON DIMORPHISM OF SUBARCTIC AEDINE MOSQUITOES 
(DIPTERA, CULICIDAE). 

Dr. Anderson is currently at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment 
Station in New Haven, Connecticut where he hopes to continue working on 
the problem of dimorphism in mosquitoes. 

Ullman Eugene Brady, Jr. - 1965 
Advisor: James G. Stemburg 

Ullman Eugene Brady, Jr. was born July 18, 1933 in Selma, Alabama. 
After graduation from high school in 1951, he enrolled in Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute (now Auburn University). In 1954 he enlisted in 
the U.S. Air Force and returned to Alabama Polytechnic Institute in 1958 
where he received a bachelor of Science degree in March 1959 and a 
Master of Science degree in December, 1960 in Entomology. Mr. Brady 
was admitted to the Graduate College of the University of Illinois in 
February, 1961 and has held a Research Assistantship under Drs. C.W. Kearns 
and J.G. Sternburg since that time. He is married and has two sons. 
Mr. Brady is an associate member of Sigma Xi. The title of Gene's thesis 
is: STUDIES ON IN VIVO INHIBITION AND RECOVERY OF CHOLINESTERASE 
ACTIVITY IN ORGANOPHOSPHATE TREATED INSECTS. 

After Dr. Brady finished his thesis in December of 1961 he went to 
Gainesville, Florida where there was a position waiting for him with the 



. . . ... 

' ' '' ••••■■-:.' : :■ ;■■■■■- 

i \\ ■'■ . * • ■ \ ' ' . :'('./•■. . ' • ■- . ■ ., 

.... ..•.'. ■ • 

" ' " ' " ' ' - --■ ■ :■ ■ 

: ; ' • .- : 

■ : ' * " < - 

• '• ' : . ■ . .. . . _ 

. ' '■■■'• ■ ■ " . ■ ' 

• •.' ■■::•.-■- ....... _ 

■'■'■'■■■'■'■ ■ - : ■ - ■,..-.: ■■■■■■■..■ 

.-■ ■ v ' ..•.■■".■.■■..••■ - 

■ ■•■ - . is - 

■ . . ( i ■•'■■ '■ 

•'■■■■■ : • - . • . . 

■ ' ' '■ ' • ; :-.. 

; ' ' ' : ■■■ . ...... . 

' • ...... 

: ■.....;, ■ . .'. 

' ■ • ' ' •. 

' " ' ' ' : "' ' •' . .- ; 

■•.... 

■ ' • ' ■"■■•'■.,:••■.... 

■■'■••■■ • . ; 

'■'■ "■'•■' "•■ *< ■ . ■■■■■•','.-. 



-12- 

U.S.D.A. While at the U.S.D.A. lab in Gainesville, Gene will be working 
on chemosterilants and in his spare time will be looking forward to 
getting back to some long overdue fishing. He is also preparing his 
thesis for publication with Dr. Sternburg. 

Reinhart A. Brust - 1964 
Advisor - William R. Horsfall 

Reinhart Albert Brust, was born on February 7, 1934 in Sibbald, 
Alberta, Canada. He later moved to Swan River, Manitoba and attended 
the Swan River Collegiate where he completed his senior matriculation 
in 1952. He worked on his father's farm following graduation and 
entered the University of Manitoba at Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1955. 
He received the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture in 1959, 
and the degree of Master of Science in Entomology in 1960. He entered 
the Graduate College of the University of Illinois in the fall of 1960 
and began his studies on the bionomics of mosquitoes. He has held 
Teaching Assistantships in the Department of Entomology. He is a member 
of Sigma Xi. The title of his thesis is: EFFECT OF THERMAL STRESS 
ON ANOMALOUS DIMORPHISM OF AEDES COMUNIS (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE). 

After completing his work in the fall of 1964 Dr. Brust returned 
to Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada where he has accepted a position on 
the faculty of the University of Manitoba. He will be teaching and 
continuing his research on the effect of thermal stress on mosquitoes 
in the Department of Entomology. 

John Milton Campbell - 1964 
Advisor: Richard 3. Selander 

John entered the world on December 19, 1935 in Christian County, 
Kentucky. After early schooling in Hopkinsville he entered the Western 
Kentucky State College where he received the B.S. degree in 1957 in 
Agriculture and Biology. He then transferred to the University of 
Kentucky where he obtained an M.S. degree in 1959 in the field of 
Entomology and Bacteriology. While at Western Kentucky College and 
the University of Kentucky he held positions as Teaching and Research 
Assistant. He came to Illinois in 1959. While here as a graduate student 



■-:•! 



• 



. - -Si- 1 



- • . : 



■- . ■ 

... 



■ . :• 






. ■ 



-13- 

he held the position of Teaching Assistant and Teaching Fellow. He 
is a member of Sigma Xi and Phi Kappa Phi. The title of his thesis 
is: A REVISION OF THE GENUS LOBOPODA (COLEOPTERA: ALLECULIDAE) IN 
NORTH AMERICA AND THE WEST INDIES. 

Milt's thesis, which was submitted to the Graduate College on 
June 2, 1964, is a taxonomic monograph treating some 82 species of 
the neotropical genus Lobopoda. Part of the data on which it is based 
was obtained by Milt in the course of field work in Panama in 1961 
and Mexico in 1962. The thesis was completed in absentia, while he 
held the position of Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology, 
Eastern Kentucky State College, at Richmond. In the summer of 1964 
he resigned from this position to accept an appointment as entomologist 
with the Asociaci6n Nacional del Cafe in Guatemala under a program 
of research sponsored jointly by the association and the University 
of Kentucky. He is currently studying the bionomics and control of the 
coffee leaf miner (Leucoptera aoffeella) . 

Milt and Beverly have a new baby girl, born February 9, in Guatemala. 

Peter H. Hewitt - 1964 
Advisor - C.W. Kearns 

Peter Howie Hewitt was born September 24, 1937 in Greytown , 
Republic of South Africa. In 1949 he immigrated to Southern Rhodesia 
and is now a citizen of that country. He received his elementary school, 
high school and college education in the Republic of South Africa. In 
1959 he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture with a 
major in Entomology from the University of Natal. He was employed by 
the Entomology Division of Southern Rhodesia Department of Agriculture 
from January 1959 to June 1960. 

In 1960 he obtained a Research Assistantship under C.W. Kearns 
and was later awarded a Fulbright grant to travel to the U.S.A. 
Mr. Hewitt is a member of Phi Sigma. The title of his thesis is: 
THE DEGRADATION OF FOUR N-METHYL CARBAMATES AND THE REACTIVATION OF 
CHOLINESTERASE IN THE HOUSE FLY (MUSCA WMESTICA L. ) . 

After the completion of his Ph.D. Dr. Hewitt returned to his 
home in Southern Rhodesia for a few months (he claimed to go elephant 
hunting). His going also leaves a void in the U of I rugby team. 



-14- 



After his respite at home, Pete will journey to England where 
he has accepted a position at the Milstead Laboratory of Chemical 
Enzymology in Sittingbourne , Kent, England where he will continue his 
work in toxicology. 

Richard L. Hurley - 1965 
Advisor - William L. Downes 

Richard first saw the light of day on June 22, 1934 in Sault Ste. 
Marie in Ontario, Canada. He spent one year at the University of Toronto 
in Honors Science. He then transferred to Queens University where 
he received the B.A. degree with honors in 1957. His major areas of 
study were Zoology and Chemistry. While at Queens University he 
received a Queens University Scholarship and the Queens University Gold 
Medal in Biology. In his undergraduate years he spent his summers 
working for the Canadian Department of Agriculture (Systematics Branch) 
as a research assistant in entomology and ecology. He came to the 
University of Illinois in 1957 on a U of I Fellowship which he held 
until graduation. He is a member of Sigma Xi. The title of his thesis 
is: A REVISION OF THE NEARCTIC SPECIES OF HYDROPHORUS (DIPTERA, 
COLICHOPODIDAE). 

Dr. Hurley's thesis was completed and accepted by the University 
in November of 1964. He has accepted for the present time the position 
of Instructor in the Division of General Studies in the Biology Department 
here at the University of Illinois. 

Costas Alexander Kouskoleskos - 1964 
Advisor - George C. Decker 

Costas was born May 10, 1927 in Salonica, Greece. He attended the 
University of Salonica in Greece from 1946-1951 where he received a 
Diploma in Agriculture in June 1951. He then served as a 2nd Lieutenant 
in the Greek Army for two years. After an honorable discharge he 
accepted a position as teacher at the American Farm School of Salonica 
where he taught courses in field crops, pomology, vegetable production 
and grape production. In 1956 he entered the University of Missouri 
at Columbia where he received the M.S. degree in 1958. While at the 






■ ' ■. 



-15- 

University of Missouri he was a Research Assistant, this was the same 
position he held with the Natural History Survey while at the University 
of Illinois. Costos entered the U of I in 1958. The title of his 
thesis is: BIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON THE POTATO LEAFHOPPER, EMPOASCA FABAE 
(HARRIS) AS AN ALFALFA PEST. 

Upon completion of his studies he returned to Greece, his home 
country- He is located in Athens, Greece and is employed by Dixiadis 
Associates International, a consulting firm. He is taking part in a 
government-sponsored study which will serve as the basis for the 
reorganization of Agricultural Research in Greece. His main duties 
include the evaluation of the existing situation and the formulation 
of proposals for the reorganization of the Plant Protection Service. 

Ronald H. Meyer - 1963 
Advisor - George C. Decker 

Ronald Harmon Meyer was born on December 30, 1929, at Walsh, 
Randolph County, Illinois. He received elementary education in a rural, 
one-roomed, eight-cornered building and attended high school at the 
Sparty Township High School. He attended undergraduate college at the 
University of Illinois. He was Captain and Most Valuable Player of 
the Fencing Team in 1951. He was awarded B.S. degree in General 
Agriculture in June, 1951. After being drafted to military service he 
attended service school and was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in 
the Infantry. 

He returned to the University of Illinois in February 1954, and 
received a Master of Science degree in Entomology in June 1956. He 
began working with the Section of Economic Entomology of the Illinois 
Natural History Survey in June 1954, as a Field Assistant. He completed 
his Ph.D. program in 1963. The title of his thesis is: FIELD EVALUATION 
OF BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS BERLINER AS A MICROBIAL INSECTICIDE FOR USE 
IN INSECT CONTROL PRACTICES IN ILLINOIS APPLE ORCHARDS. 

Dr. Meyer moved to Carbondale, Illinois in 1956 where he assisted 
in fruit insect control research and extension until 1958 when full 
responsibility was assumed on the staff of Illinois Natural History 
Survey. At present his particular interest in research is practical 






. 



. 



-16- 

mite control in orchards, practical control of the lesser peach tree 
borer, general levels of pest populations in orchards and their control. 
He is also located on the campus of Southern Illinois University as 
adjunct Professor in Plant Industries. 

As a former Illini fencer, he and his wife are conscientiously 
rearing a three-man fencing team now - 11, 9 and 6 years of age. Being 
aware of the extreme importance of encouragement and the necessity of 
seconds in fencing, Mrs. Meyer was also quite certain that a cheerleader 
was required and Laura is now 2 years old. Gary, 11, is also champion 
leaf brusher* (collecting mites), and Jan, 9, has collected numerous 
jars of wooly worms, tent caterpillars and grasshoppers. 

James Leroy Miller - 1965 
Advisor - Richard B. Selander 

Jim was born June 18, 1924 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He spent 2 years 
at the University of Tulsa and then he transferred to Oregon State 
College where he graduated with Senior Honors from the School of Science 
in 1950. After receiving his B.S. he spent one year at the University 
of California in Berkeley. For the next few years his time was taken 
up with some free lance writing and two years working for the California 
Department of Fish and Game in the aquatic biology division. After 
a 3 year stint with Sperry Gyroscope Company, Jim entered graduate school 
at the University of Illinois. While here he held appointments as 
Teaching Assistant, Research Assistant and NSF Summer Fellow. The 
title of his thesis is: PRE-PREDATOR INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CERTAIN 
INSECTS (CHIEFLY MELOID BEETLES) AND LIZARDS OF THE GENERA PHRYNOSOMA, 
UTA AND CNEMIDOPHORUS. 

In this study, cage experiments were conducted to determine the 
effects of opposing adaptations on the outcome of encounters between 
likely niche associates. Insect size, coloration, defensive fluids 
and orientation behavior were considered in relation to lizard adaptations 
for discriminating, capturing and feeding on insects. The experiments 
were performed during successive summers in northern Mexico and 
southern Texas. 

Mr. Miller is registered at present a student in the Department of 
Entomology and will receive his Ph.D. degree in June, 1965. 






.. 









-17- 

Hilliam C. Moye - 1963 
Advisor - George C. Decker 

William Moye was born October 7, 1936, in Cottonwood, Illinois. 
He received his B.S. degree in June of 1958 from the University of 
Southern Illinois. He came to the University of Illinois in the fall 
of 1958 and obtained the M.S. degree in 1960 in the field of Botany. 
From the years of 1958 to 1962 he was a Full-Time Assistant in Entomology 
on the staff of the Natural History Survey working on insects affecting 
man and animals. He received his Ph.D. in 1963. The title of his 
thesis is: THE EFFECTS ON SOME ARTHROPODS OF LARGE-SCALE APPLICATIONS 
OF GRANULAR INSECTICIDES IN IROQUOIS COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 

After the completion of his graduate work Dr. Moye accepted a 
position as a technologist for the Shell Development Company in Modesto, 
California. His duties are evaluation and development of experimental 
pesticides including insecticides, herbicides, nematocides , and fungicides. 
The major portion of his effort is concerned with foliar insecticides. 
In the development of these experimental insecticides he conducts 
field evaluations with compounds which have shown activity in lab tests. 
In addition to the field evaluations he contacts and works with research 
scientists in New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Illinois, Indiana and Michigan. 

His family now consists of a wife, 2 children, 5 kittens and two 
promiscuous cats. The children are - Scott, 5 years, and Susan, 2 years. 

Francisco Pacheco - 1963 
Advisor - Richard B. Se lander 

Pancho was born October 10, 1922 in Navojoa, Sonora, Mexico. He 
attended the National School of Agriculture where he studied in the 
field of Agronomy. He graduated from the National School of Agriculture 
in 1949 and went to work for the Director of Agriculture of the Rockefeller 
Foundation i n the office of Special Studies at Calle Londres, Mexico. In 
1953 he went to the University of Massachusetts where he received the 
M.S. degree in entomology in 1955. He then returned to the Rockefeller 
Foundation where he was put in charge of research work in entomology 
at the experiment station in the State of Sonora. He came to the 
U of I in 1957 to complete his studies for the Ph.D. while he was here 
he held an appointment as a Rockefeller Foundation Fellow a 
distinct honor eiven to oromisinp Latin American scholars who 



-18- 

have been accepted for advanced studies in the United States. The 
title of his thesis is: SYSTEMATICS, PHYLOGENY, AND DISTRIBUTION OF 
THE VARIEGATED BEETLES (COLEOPTERA: HETEROCERIDAE) OF THE NEW WORLD. 

Pancho completed his work in the department in 1963. His thesis 
has just been translated to Spanish for publication as Monograph No. 1 
of the College of Post -Graduates of the National School of Agriculture 
of Mexico. 

After several years as Professor of Entomology in the National 
School of Agriculture in Chapingo, Mexico, Pancho moved in 1964 to 
Ciudad Obregon, Sonora, where he is in charge of entomological work at 
the Northwestern Center of Agricultural Investigations, an agency of 
the Mexican government. 

James Walker Sanford - 1963 
Advisor - George C. Decker 

James Walker Sanford was born December 31, 1930, in Urbana, Illinois. 
He attended the Urbana public schools and graduated from Urbana High 
School in 1948. He attended the University of Illinois from September, 
1948 to June, 1949. In December ,1950 Mr. Sanford entered the United 
States Navy and served until October, 1954. He re-entered the University 
of Illinois in February, 1955, and received his B.S. in June, 1958. 
From June, 1958 until the present time he has been employed as a 
Technical Assistant in the Section of Economic Entomology of the Illinois 
Natural History Survey. He completed his work for the Ph.D. in 
June of 1963. The title of his thesis is: OBSERVATIONS ON THE BIOLOGY 
AND CONTROL OF THE DUSKY SAP BEETLE, CAHPOPHILUS LUGUBRIS MURRAY, 
INFESTING SWEETCORN IN ILLINOIS. 

Since 1963 Dr. Sanford has been working with the United States 
Entomology Research Branch at Sugar Cane Field Station in Houma, Louisiana. 
His job is concerned with the chemical control of the sugarcane borer 
and vectors of the sugarcane mosiac virus. He also does some survey 
work to determine the abundance, damage, and survival of the sugarcane 
borer. In March he had a two week stay in San Juan, Puerto Rico as one 
of the U.S. delegates to the XII Congress of International Society of 
Sugar Cane Technologists. 



-19- 

Calvin F. Soo Hoo - 1963 
Advisor - G.S.Fraenkel 

Calvin was born March 22, 1934 in Santa Barbara, California. After 
early schooling in Santa Barbara he attended the Los Angeles City College 
from 1952-54 at which time he received an A. A. degree. He then transfered 
to the University of California at Santa Barbara where he received the 
B.A. degree in 1957 with a major in Zoology. While at the U. of California 
at Santa Barbara he held the position of Teaching Assistant. He came 
to the University of Illinois in 1957 to begin his graduate work with 
Dr. Fraenkel. While here he held positions both as a Teaching and 
Research Assistant. He is a member of Sigma Xi. The title of his thesis 
is: SELECTION AND UTILIZATION OF FOOD PLANTS BY THE LARVAE OF PRODENIA 
ERIDANIA (CRAMER), WITH ADDITIONAL UTILIZATION STUDIES ON THE SILKWORM, 
BOMBYX MORI ( LINNEAUS ) . 

After graduation Dr. Soo Hoo went to C.S.I.R.O. Division of 
Entomology, Canberra, Australia to do some work concerned with the 
attraction of pasture insects by the roots of their host plants. 

Calvin is now married and the proud father of one son and we have 
recent news that he is returning to the United States this fall. 

Earl A. Stadelbacher - 1964 
Advisor - George C. Decker 

Earl was born October 31, 1927 in Cobden, Illinois. He grew 
up in Cobden on his father's farm. In 1946 after graduation from 
high school he spent 2 years with the Navy as a sonar operator and 
instructor. He spent one year at the University of Illinois in 1949-50. 
He then transfered to Southern Illinois University where he received 
his B.S. in 1956. After one year of graduate study at Southern, Earl 
returned to the University of Illinois to complete his graduate studies, 
while he was completing his graduate work he held the position of 
Assistant at the Natural History Survey. The title of his thesis is: 
EVALUATION OF THE GROWTH AND YIELD OF CUCUMBER PLANTS AS AFFECTED BY 
THE FEEDING OF KNOWN POPULATIONS OF THE STRIPED CUCUMBER BEETLE, A CALYMMA 
VITTATA (FAB.). 

Dr. Stadelbacher is now living in Leland, Mississippi and working 



-20- 

with the U.S.D.A. , Cotton Insects Research Branch, Delta Branch Experiment 
Station, Stoneville, Mississippi. He is working on a study of the 
ecological factors affecting population dynamics and amount of damage 
caused by the bollworm and tobacco budworm. He is studying life 
histories, survival, movement and dispersal; to determine the occurrence 
of host specific strains; to develop improvements in procedures for 
mass rearing. 

D. Nallini Wickramasinghe - 1965 
Advisor - Clyde W. Kearns 

Nallini was born November 15, 1929 in Dehiwala, Ceylon. She 
attended the University of Ceylon from 1953-57 at which time she 
received the B.Sc. in Zoology and Chemistry. While at the University 
of Ceylon she was a Demonstrator in Zoology. After her graduation 
she accepted a position with the Department of Agriculture of Ceylon 
as a research officer in entomology. She came to the University of 
Illinois in 1961 upon the recommendation of Dr. Henry Fernando, who 
is Director of Agricultural Research in Ceylon. Many will remember 
Henry as a graduate student here in 1950. 

While Nallini was here she held the positions of Research Assistant 
and University Fellow. She brightened the laboratory while here and 
we shall all miss her. The title of her thesis is: OBSERVATIONS OF 
THE MODE OF ACTION OF 2-IMIDAZ0LIDIN0NE, A FEMALE STERILANT OF THE 
ADULT HOUSE FLY, MUSCA DOmSTICA L. (DIPTERA, MUSCIDAE). 

Upon completion of her thesis in November 1964, Dr. Wickramasinghe 
returned to the Division of Entomology in the Department of Agriculture 
to continue her work for the Ceylonese government. 



-21- 



Present Entomology Graduate Students 



Aly A. Abou-aly 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Medically important insects , their bionomics and 
relations to disease causing pathogens. He 
is working on the bionomics of Psorophora varipes. 
Dr. W.R. Horsfall 



Robert T. Allen 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Systematics (esp. Coleoptera: Carabidae) working 
on revision of the genus Loxandvus (Coleoptera: 
Pterostichini) - Systematics, Phylogeny, Biology. 
Dr. H.H. Ross 



Amal Banerjee 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



General area of insect bionomics specifically 
working on the bionomics of sod webworms (Cvarrbus 
sp.) with special reference to the economic 
species in Chamapign-Urbana, Illinois. Research 
is primarily on the life history and habits of 
Crarnbus trisectus. Studies are also made on 
the seasonal activities and other related bionomics 
of six more species of crambids which are generally 
abundant in this locality. 
Dr. G.C. Decker 



Robert L. Benson 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 

Rama K. Bharadwaj 

Research Interests: 



Advisor: 



On insect hormones, most likely on the hormonal 
relationships between insect parasites and 
their hosts. 
Un assigned 



Comparative morphology of insect musculature and 
the systematics of Dermaptera. Currently working 
on the post-embryonic development of cervicothoracic 
skeleton and muscles of earwigs. 
Dr. L.E. Chadwick 



John K. Bouseman 

Research Interests : 

Advisor : 



Taxonomic studies of the families Ripiphoridae 
and Cerambycidae . 
Dr. R.B. Selander 



Satish R. Chandran 
Research Interests: 



Advisor: 



Morphology and physiology. At present working on 
the morphological studies on the head and 
genitalia of normal and thermally modified 
Aedea stimulane (Diptera: Culicidae). 
Dr. L.E. Chadwick 



.■■ 






• 



.. 



' 












:•■ 



• 



. 



. 



• 



-22- 



Franklin Chang 

Research Interests i 



Advisor: 



"I have not thought too seriously on a research 
subject since I am in the process of taking 
courses and completing my course requirements , but 
I suppose that I will be working on some phase 
concerning intermediary metabolism in insects". 
Dr . S . Friedman 



Sam Cullop 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Insect behavior in general and especially in 
tobacco hornworms, Protoparoe sexta. At present 
working on the behavior of P. sexta including 
experiments and observations on all four stages 
of development. A few of these include the 
effect of starvation on larvae being reared 
under diapausing conditions, courtship and mating 
behavior, feeding from model flowers, time spent 
in each instar and in the premolt condition for 
each succeeding instar, developmental units, 
embryology., etc. 
Dr. G.P. Waldbauer 



John L. Eaton 

Research Interests: 



Advisor: 

Gary Eertmoed 

Research Interests: 



Advisor: 



Neurophysiological aspects of insect toxicology. 
Currently working on studies related to effect of 
DDT on sensory organs , and the possibility of 
sensory organs being the primary site of action 
of DDT. Also studies related to location and 
cause of the negative coefficient of DDT action. 
Dr. J.G. Sternburg 



Psocoptera taxonomy and biology. Right now 

working on a revision of Epipsocus (Psocoptera: 

Epipsocidae) 

Dr. R.B. Selander 



Roger F. Flattum 

Research Interests ; 

Advisor: 

Willard Fogal 

Research Interests: 



Advisor: 



Mode of action of insecticides. At present 
working with the effect of nicotine on cockroaches, 
Dr. J.G. Sternburg 



Chemoreception, hormone action, plant finding, 
physiology and metabolism of flight, mode of 
action of insecticides, and biological control. 
Now doing work on the cuticular proteins in flies , 
and tanning hormone. 
Dr. G.S. Fraenkel 



-23- 



Edwin Gemrich 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Insect toxicology and biochemistry. Presently 

working on the enzymatic degradation of carbamates 

by insects and the enzymatic mechanism(s) 

responsible for carbamate detoxification in 

insects. 

Dr. C.W. Kearas 



Catherine T. Hsiao 
Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Insect morphology and physiology. At the present 

time working in the neurosecretory cells of 

blowflies. 

Dr. G.S. Fraenkel 



Ting-Huan Hsiao 

Research Interests: 



Advisor: 



Insect physiology and biochemistry. Currently 
doing work on the physiological basis of 
host-plant selection in the Colorado potato beetle, 
Leptinotarsa deoemlineata (Say). 
Dr. G.S. Fraenkel 



Paul Killmer 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Histology and electron microscopy (histochemistry) 
at present working on the ultra-structure of 
Aedes aegypti - nervous system 
Dr. J.R. Larsen 



James L. Krysan 

Research Interests 



Advisor: 



Insect physiology. Now doing studies on the 
soluble and particulate portions of housefly 
cholinesterase . 
Dr. L.E. Chadwick 



Joseph Maddox 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Primarily in the area of insect pathology and 
insect ecology. Currently engaged in a study 
of the diseases of the armyworm, Pseudalatia 
impuncta. Now specifically working on micro- 
sporidian pathogens of Paeudalitia. 
Dr. G.C. Decker 



Jean H. Mathieu 

Research Interests: 



Advisor: 



Taxonomy and phylogeny of the families Elateridae 
and Meloidae. At present working on a comparative 
study of 7 species in a group of the genus 
Epioauta. Data have been obtained for ontogeny, 
sexual behavior, distribution (in time and space), 
morphology of larvae and adults and plant 
specificity. Interpretation of these data 
will shed light on the systematics of these 
species and species of related groups of the 
genus. Tentative Thesis Title: Biological studies 
of a group of closely related species of the genus 
Epicauta (Memoidae: Coleoptera). 
Dr. R.B. Selander 



. 



! 



■ '. . 












. • . 






" . ' 



:•• 






• 









-24- 



David C. Newton 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



General areas of apiculture , bionomics and 
animal behavior. Right now doing research 
concerned with the behavior of honey bees in 
relation to smoke. 
Dr. E.R. Jay cox 



Augustine I. Okonkwo 
Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Applied entomology. At present working on the 
effect of granular dieldrin on the population 
of arthropods. 
Dr. G.C. Decker 



William J. Patterson 
Research Interests: 



Advisor: 



Insect toxicology and physiology. Doing some 
studies concerning penetration of insect 
cuticle and mode of action of carbamate insect- 
icides. 
Dr. J.G. Sternburg 



Lance G. Peterson 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Insect physiology, insect immune responses, 
insect hormones . At the present time working 
on interspecific responses of transplanted 
insect tissues. 
Dr. J.R. Larsen 



John D. Pinto 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Insect behavior and taxonomy. Currently working 
on the sexual behavior and taxonomic studies 
in the genus Meloe (Meloidae). 
Dr. R.B. Selander 



Robert F. Randall 
Research Interests 

Advisor: 



Insect cholinesterases and studying the effects 
of inhibition upon these enzymes. 
Dr. L.E. Chadwick 



Keturah Reinbold 

Research Interests : 
Advisor: 



Insect bionomics or behavior. 
Unassigned 



Judith L. Reynolds 
Research Interests 



Advisor: 



Mosquito ecology. At the present time experiments 
are being carried out to determine the intensities 
of various environmental factors which are 
critical in terminating the latency experienced 
by embryos of Aedss stimulans Walker. 
Dr. W.R. Horsfall 



George Rotramel 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Evolution of Scolioid hymenoptera. Presently 
doing a generic synopsis of Formicidae based 
on male genitalia. 
Dr. H.H. Ross 



-25- 

Soelaksono Sastrodihardjo 

Research Interests: Insect tissue culture. Right now doing some 

work with Cecropia and Cynthia ovaries (pupa), 
on histology, physiology and tissue culture. 

Advisor: Dr. J.R. Larsen 



Isaac M. Seligman 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Physiological and genetic aspects of insecticide 
resistance ; and currently working on the tanning 
hormone in blowflies. 
Dr. C.W. Kearns 



Richard H. Storch 
Research Interests 



Advisor: 



The development and function of thoracic 

musculature and structure of insects. At the 

present time working on development of the 

cervical and thoracic musculature in the American 

Cockroach, Periplaneta amevicana (L. ) Dictyoptera: 

Blattidae). 

Dr. L.E. Chadwick 



John D. Unzicker 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Systematics of the Arachnida and the insect 
order Trichoptera. Currently doing an evolutionary 
study of the caddisfly genus Hydropsyahe 
(Insecta: Trichoptera). 
Dr. H.H. Ross 



Richard C. Weddle 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Insect behavior, taxonomy, and morphology. Right 
now working on an analysis of sexual behavior 
in blister beetles. 
Dr. R.B. Selander. 



George R. Wilson 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Diapause in cecropia and hornworm pupa and the 
relationship of the pupa brain to its control 
and to wound metabolism. Ecdysone and its 
possible relationship to wound metabolism. 
Ecdysone activities of mammalianactive steroids. 
Dr. J.R. Larsen 



Toshio Yamamoto 

Research Interests : 



Advisor: 



Taxonomic research in the aquatic orders of 
insects. Currently working on a revision of 
the genus Polyoentropus (Trichoptera, Psychomyiidae) 
Dr. H.H. Ross 



. 












-26- 
Dr. Walter V. Balduf 

As in other years following his retirement in 1958, Dr. Balduf is 
doing research on bionomics of parasitic entomophagous insects. Two 
host-parasite complexes are being investigated, both native to the still 
largely undisturbed forested area near Ely, in northeastern Minnesota. 
One project centers around Aavobasis Y*ubvifa&QieVla t a. case-making 
caterpillar on alder shrubs, the other around Tvichotccphe levisella, 
a leaf tying caterpillar on Aster maerophullus. 

To date, seven species of primary parasites have been reared 
from the larva and pupa of the alder case-maker, and at least eight 
from the same stages of the leaf-folder. No less than six species of 
hyperparasites have been found to attack the primary parasites of the two 
hosts. The life cycles and habits of both hosts and the parasites 
are the principal objectives in this program. 

A series of articles describing the host and parasites is in 
preparation. The March 1965 number of the Ohio Journal of Science 
contains an article on the ugly-nest caterpillar, Arohip8 aerasivoranus 
and seven of its parasites. This study was done near Ely, Minnesota, 
in 1959-1961. 

As usual, Dr. and Mrs. Balduf reside at Eaglesnest, near Ely, 
during June to September, inclusive, and at home in Urbana the rest 
of the year, with sometimes a few weeks in southern climates during 
midwinter. 

Dr. Leigh E. Chadwick 

Dr. Chadwick is currently concerned with the following courses in 

the department. 

Entomology 301 Introduction to Advanced Entomology, shared with 

Dr. S. Friedman and Dr. J.G. Sternburg 

Entomology 423 Insect Behavior, shared with 

Dr. G.P. Waldbauer 

Entomology 410 Insect Morphology, shared with 

Dr. J.G. Sternburg 

His present research interests include: 

Studies of insect cholinesterase: properties and purification of 

insect cholinesterases; kinetics of the reaction of insect ChE with 



-27- 

substrates and inhibitors; physiological role of ChE's in insects, 
including possible relation of the acetylcholine-cholinesterase system 
to events in growth and metamorphosis. This work is assisted by a 
research grant from the National Institutes of Health. Messrs. 
J.L. Krysan and R.F. Randall are participating in it, as candidates 
for the Ph.D. in Entomology. 

He is also working on the comparative morphology of insect musculature; 
this work is concerned primarily with the thoracic musculature of all 
insects, and starts from the premise that a single muscular pattern 
underlies the present thoracic muscular structure of all groups. Data 
bearing on this general problem and on details of muscular organization 
are sought in various insects. The stress is naturally on those insect 
types that have been least adequately studied in the past, and on the 
embryogeny of the muscular patterns and their subsequent development. 
The work is assisted by a research grant from the National Science 
Foundation. Messrs. R.K. Bharadwa j , R.S. Chandran, and R.H. Storch 
are participating in it, as candidates for the Ph.D. in Entomology. 

He is also spending considerable time translating from German to 
English two entomological books, tentatively to be entitled: 

1. The World of Insects, by W. Linsenmaier, to be published by 

Artists and Writers Press. 

2. The Language and Orientation of Bees, by K. v. Frisch, to be 

published by the Harvard University Press. 

Dr. George C. Decker 

For the past several years Dr. Decker has been dividing his time 
between an attempt to direct or at least correlate the activities of 
the Economic Entomology Sections of the Illinois Natural History Survey 
and the Illinois Agricultural Experiment Station, and extra-curricular 
activities such as organization and participation in symposia dealing 
with pesticide safety problems , working on active committees of the 
National Research Council, serving as the ESA's representative to the 
National Research Council, and similar assignments. 

Last summer he was privileged to attend and participate in the 
International Congress of Entomology held in London, and after the 
conference Mrs. Decker and he, in company with their good friends 



: . • 












-28- 

Mr. and Mrs. John Bigger, spent a month touring western Europe. While 
this tour was intended as a vacation, it turned out that he acquired 
more entomological knowledge than he had anticipated. For example, 
most of Europe has little trouble from the face fly. The reason, in 
most of western Europe cattle are kept indoors — no droppings in the 
field, no face flies. 

Looking to the future, he hopes to acquire more entomological 
knowledge through this delightful channel. Accordingly, he has asked 
to be replaced August 31, 1965, and has already purchased a heme and 
expects to retire in Miami, Florida, September 1. The Deckers' address 
after that date will be 6040 S.W. 29th Street, Miami, Florida. 

Dr. William L. Downes 

Dr. William Downes will be leaving to take a position in the 
Michigan State University this fall. 

Dr. Gottfried S. Fraenkel 

Since September of 1962 Dr. Fraenkel has been the recipient of a 
Research Career Award from N.I.H. He is no longer doing any formal 
teaching in the insect physiology course. Many of you, I am sure 
will recall with fond memories, time spent in his classical course in 
insect physiology. He and Mrs. Fraenkel spent 3 months (June to Sept.) 
in 1963 in Japan at Sericultural Experiment Station in Tokyo doing 
some research, with Dr. Toshio Ito, where he worked on host plant 
selection of silkworm Borribyx mori. After their visit in Japan they 
had an extensive trip through Europe visiting many labs and renewing old 
friendships . 

His current research interests are host plant selection of 
Colorado potato beetle, work that he is doing with Ting Hsiao and studies 
on the hormone which mediates tanning in the adult fly and other insects 
which he is doing with Cathy Hsiao. There is soon to be a comprehensive 
paper on the tanning in the adult fly which will be published in the 
Journal of Insect Physiology. 

Those of you who have known the Fraenkel Family while you were 
here as students will be interested to know that Gideon, now 33, married, 
and has two children. He is at the present time Assistant Professor of 



-29- 

Chemistry at Ohio State University at Columbus, Ohio. 

Dan, now 28, is a Research Associate in Molecular Biology at the 
Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. He has recently 
accepted a new appointment and after September he will be located in 
the Department of Bacteriology at the Harvard Medical School, Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Dr. Stanley Friedman 

Dr. Friedman, newly arrived' on the staff, comes here frcm Purdue 
University where he was Associate Professor of Entomology. During 
his tenure in that position (1958-1964), he was chosen as a Research 
Fellow by the Ross Institute of Tropical Hygiene at the London School 
of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and spent the year 1962-1963 working 
in London, England on the metabolism of Anophelines. His present 
interests include studies of metabolic interconversions in Diptera 
and the general problem of aging in insects. 

He obtained his Ph.D. in Biology at the Johns Hopkins University 
in Baltimore, Maryland in 1952 and was on the staff of this department 
as a Research Associate with G.S. Fraenkel from 1952 to 1955. He 
has returned here to succeed Dr. Fraenkel in the position of Insect 
Physiologist. He is married and has four children, each of whom 
has distinguished himself in some branch of biology. The youngest, 
Matthew Arnold, is a poet of some renown. 



: 









' : ■ 









-29a- 

Dr. Arthur W. Ghent 

Dr. A.W. Ghent was born in Toronto, Canada, and received his 
undergraduate and M.S. training at the University of Toronto. From 
1950 to 1959 he was employed as a Research Officer in the Division of 
Forest Biology, Canada Department of Agriculture, and during this 
period he completed his M.S. at Toronto and his Ph.D. at the University 
of Chicago. He began teaching in 1960, when he was appointed Assistant 
Professor of Zoology at the University of Chicago. He began teaching 
in 1960, when he was appointed Assistant Professor of Zoology at the 
University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma. During his four years at 
Oklahoma he taught a variety of subjects, including introductory 
statistics, nonparametric statistics, animal ecology, genetics, 
introductory zoology and library methods. 

Dr. Ghent joined the School of Life Sciences (attached to the 
Department of Entomology) at the University of Illinois in September 
1964, to take over the course in population biology (Biol. 351) in the 
Honors program, given last year by Dr. Tom Browning of the University 
of Adelaide, Australia. During the fall semester Dr. Ghent concentrated 
on reporting a backlog of unpublished studies , including a model of 
chromosome crossing over, a number-triangle method of generating 
numerators for the Wilcoxon two-sample rank test, a paper on his Tribolium 
behavior research, the fourth of a series of papers on forest 
tree regeneration following devastation by the spruce budworm in Canada, 
and a philosophic article entitled "Science, existentialism, and the 
search for a naturalistic ethic." This latter will appear in Bios, 
probably in the October issue. 

Dr. Ghent recently visited the University of Wisconsin, where he 
lectured on his most recent statistical contribution, a method of 



... .. 



■ ■■■••. 

• ■ . . 



••' - 



■ • 



- 



. 



• 






-30- 

employing the binomial to assess ecological contagion in two and three 
dimension. During the A.I.B.S. convention in Urbana in August, Dr. Ghent 
will appear as one of six symposia speakers discussing the logic of 
experimental design in the biological sciences. 

Dr. William P. Hayes 

Dr. Hayes sends his "Greetings!" and states that "It has been 
nearly 10 years since the old man was put on the shelf but it has been 
a most enjoyable retirement". His retirement consists mostly of 
golf and travel. About the golf, the least said, the better. He has 
not yet beaten Arnold Palmer although he keeps trying, both at Urbana 
in the summer and in California during the winter while visiting his 
two daughters at Sacramento and Long Beach. 

In 1960, he spent four months traveling in Europe where he was 
able to attend the International Congress of Entomologists at Vienna. 
It was also the year of the Olympics in Rome and the Passion Play at 
Oberammergau both of which he was fortunate enough to attend. 

In early 1962, he cruised around the world on the Rotterdam. On 
this trip he spent 6 days in Cairo as a guest of Harry Hoogstraal. 
While there Robert Lewis and his wife from Beirut , Lebanon visited with 
Harry and Abdel S. Shalaby, who at the time was with the World Health 
Organization in India, so they had a small Illini reunion. A high-light 
of this visit was two games of golf with a friend of Harry which caused 
him to miss the ship in Alexandria but Shalaby and two others drove him 
across the desert to catch the ship at Suez. In Ceylon he tried to 
contact Henry Fernando, but missed him. 

Later in 1962, after the Phoenix Entomology meeting, with George 
Decker, John Bigger and their wives they enjoyed two weeks in Hawaii and 
visited all of the islands. 

The winter of 1964 found him on a 60-day cruise to the South Seas 
visiting many of the islands on the way and spending two weeks in New 
Zealand and two weeks in Australia. In New Zealand the famous glowworm 
cave was a thrill. 

In January of this year he left New York on a sea-safari cruise 
which took him down the east coast of South America visiting Barbados, 
Rio, Montevideo and Buenos Aires. Then across the South Atlantic to 



-31- 

Capetown, South Africa with a stop at Christan de Kuhna, called the 
"World's Most Lonely Island". Then up the east coast of Africa, which 
included a visit to Zululand Country, Wow! He left the cruise at Suez, 
went into Cairo and then flew to the Holy Land visiting Jordan and Israel 
and returning to the ship via Athens, Rome and Naples. After a stormy 
crossing of the Atlantic with a fire on board one night, he reached 
New York safely and only one day late. The summer approaching, will 
include a trip to California and lots of golf. 

Dr. Hayes closes by saying "I've known but few of the recent 
Entomology graduates , but hope to meet some of them. I send to them 
and all the 'old soldiers* my best wishes. Retirement for me has been 
a 'hard life'. I miss grading papers!!!!!!" 

Dr. William R. Horsfall 

During 1964 he went on an extended trip across northern Europe 
to study subarctic mosquitoes in light of similar studies in the 
northern United States. A grant from the World Health Organization 
made the trip possible. Dr. and Mrs. Horsfall left Urbana April 14 
and returned on July 28. Bill began his observations in the Swiss 
Alps •> spent 5 weeks in Germany and 5 weeks were spent in Scandinavia 
mostly in Finland. Eggs of all of the northern species were returned 
to the laboratory here at Illinois. Much of his work in Germany was 
made possible through the splendid cooperation of Major H.W. Fowler, 
a former Illini. 

The trip ended with a visit to England and attendance at the 
International Congress of Entomology. Dr. J.F. Anderson, a former Illini, 
and Dr. Horsfall presented two papers on dimorphic responses of subarctic 
mosquitoes to abnormal temperature. 

Elbert R. Jaycox 

Dr. Elbert R. Jaycox, Associate Professor of Apiculture, came 
to Urbana in April, 1963 as successor to Dr. Milum. He is a graduate 
of the University of California, Davis, and came to Illinois from Utah 
State University, Logan, Utah, where he was an apiculturist with U.S. 
Department of Agriculture and taught insect ecology for the Department 



• ' ■ '■'■•'' ■• 

I I . 

■ ■•'■' - " " : ".- 

■_..."'■ ' . ■ , ■ . 

■■''--■'. : ■ ' . 












- ■ " 



■'•'' 






• ■■ - 









■ 



■ 



. 



..- 






• ' ■ •" 



-32- 

of Zoology and Physiology. His major projects include the behavior and 
systematics of the bee genus Anthidivm (Megachilidae) and the behavior 
of honey bees in relation to smoke. With agronomists and horticulturists, 
he is also working on the interrelations of injurious and beneficial 
insects on soybeans, and the pollination of apples. A cooperative 
project, with a geneticist and a psychologist, on genetics of flight 
behavior in honey bees is being developed. David Newton is working 
toward his Ph.D. with Dr. Jaycox on the behavior project. The bee- 
keeping course will be replaced this year by a new one dealing with 
individual and group behavior of honey bees. 

Dr. Clyde W. Kearns 

Professor Clyde Keams became Head of the Department in September, 
1963. His research interests in the past few years include work on 
the physiological and biochemical effects of chemosterilants , the 
metabolism of carbamate insecticides, and the physiological and 
biochemical effects of organophosphates. 

In August of 1964 Professor Kearns took a sabbatical leave and 
accepted an opportunity to spend a year with Drs. Pop jack and Cornforth, 
at the Milstead Laboratory of Chemical Enzymology, Sittingbourne, Kent, 
England. He is expected to return sometime this summer, "chuck full" 
of new ideas and a wealth of information to be included in next years 
newsletter. Dr. and Mrs. Kearns having survived two weddings in the 
past year (both Camille and Tom were married; June 27, 1964 in Champaign 
and December 27, 1963 in Urbana) they were in need of the rest and 
change afforded by a sabbatical. While letters have been scarce we did 
get word that they spent the Christmas Holidays in Spain. We are 
looking forward to Clydes' return in late summer. 

Dr. Joseph R. Larsen 

Dr. Larsen arrived at the University of Illinois in the fall of 
1963 from the University of Wyoming and four previous years working with 
Dr. Vincent Dethier at the University of Pennsylvania. 

The past few years he has been working on the ultra-structure of 



-33- 
insect chemoreceptors and has just been instrumental in setting up a 
new electron microscope laboratory in the Entomology Department which 
is now in the process of building. He is also interested in the 
insect hormones as they relate to reproduction. At the present time he 
is also working on a comprehensive study of the histology of the 
mosquito Aedes aegypti in the larval, pupal and adult stages. He is 
also getting involved in some nerve transmission studies for the 
Air Force with Dr. James Sternburg. 

In the teaching area Joe is involved in teaching the insect 
physiology courses with Stan Friedman and is also busy writing the new 
lab manual for the Biology 110-111 which is to be the new basic course 
offered in biology for all pre-professional and majors in all areas 
of biology. 

Spare time is taken up with trying to get grass growing around 
the new house, keeping up with teenage daughters and as voluntary 
(next time I'll know better) Editor of the Entomology Newsletter. 

Dr. Vern G. Milum 

With retirement now approaching three years, Dr. Milum realizes 
that time marches on. His first six months of retirement were spent 
in sorting and discarding. Then a 2-month vacation in Florida, followed 
by a 6-month siege in selling his library. "Bees sold better than Bugs." 

The task in 1964 was preparing a 100 page tyr>ed report of the 
"History of the National Beekeeping Organizations", dating back to 1960, 
the author having been its Secretary-Treasurer (American Honey Producers* 
League) from 1931 to 1935 and of the National Federation of State 
Beekeepers' Association during its formation in 1944-1945. This is 
to be published by the present National Beekeeping Federation. 

In September, 1964, the Milum 's flew to Rome to start a 33-day 
tour, including the Isle of Capri, Naples , Pompeii, the Volcanic Isles 
(Lipari, Volcano, etc.) then on to Catania, Sicily, to visit son George, 
there for 2 years on an engineering assignment. Then following a 
flight to Lisbon to begin a 13-day motor tour of Portugal and Spain, 
visiting such points as Seville, Gibralter, Furengercla, Granada, 
Madrid, Salamanca, Coimbra, Fatima, Sintra and Lisbon. Some 600 lantern 
slides tell the story. 

A 2-month rest at Sarasota, Florida brings the Milum' s up to date. 



-34- 
Dr. H.H. Ross 

Research activities , centered around leafhoppers and aquatic 
insects, have been aimed primarily at getting a better basis for 
studying the evolution of ecological communities. A study of the world 
species of Exitianus , a cosmopolitan genus of leafhopper, offers 
interesting clues concerning the dispersal of grassland forms, and also 
provided an intriguing exercise for Dr. Ross' phylogeny seminar. Last 
summer Dr. Ross spent 2-1/2 months studying types of European museums 
and collecting in Scandinavia in connection with continued work on the 
evolution of selected caddisfly genera. These studies are in 
collaboration with Mr. John D. Unzicker and Mr. Toshio Yamamoto. 

A project in winter stoneflies proved especially rewarding. These 
little black stoneflies, many of them flightless, that look like a 
cross between a black ant and a terminte, were selected for study 
several years ago because they appeared to offer evidence concerning 
biological conditions south of the glacial lobes. These little 
stoneflies habitually occur on the top balustrade of concrete bridges, 
and emerge from about early December to late March. In answer to appeals 
for help, over a hundred biologists have made collections of these, 
resulting in a remarkable wealth of material and records. With the 
aid of Mr. Toshio Yamamoto and Mr. George Rotramel, this material is 
now being organized and maps plotted. The results get more intriguing 
every day and bid fair to revealing a host of interesting information. 

Collecting and other trips included attending the Xllth International 
Congress of Entomology in London, a lecture in the animal behavior 
series at North Carolina State University, and a lecture forming part 
of the dedication ceremonies at the University of Wisconsin's new 
entomology building. Spare time was occupied chiefly in writing a 
paperback on evolution and preparing the third edition of "A Textbook 
of Entomology." 

Dr. Richard B. Selander 

Dr. Selander' s primary research project at present is a comparative 

study of patterns of sexual behavior in blister beetles , with particular 

emphasis on the taxonomic and phylogenetic application of ethological data. 

Behavior is recorded by means of tape recorded notes, still photography, 



■ 



• 



' 












-35- 

and motion pictures. Most of the survey work is, of necessity done in 
the field. He currently has more or less detailed records of 20 genera 
and 100 species. 

Dick spent three months during the winter recording behavior of 
species of blister beetles in central Chile and northwestern Argentina. 
In Chile he was fortunate to be able to work in close association with 
Mr. Luis E. Pena, of Santiago. In Argentina he was a guest of the 
Instituto Miguel Lillo, at Tucuman, and also visited the Museo de la Plata, 
near Buenos Aires. 

He is leaving April 15 to work for several weeks in the south- 
western United States. This trip will take him first to Tucson, Arizona, 
and then to Riverside, California, where he will be studying as an 
informal guest of the Department of Entomology, University of California. 
On the return trip he plans to visit museums in San Francisco and Davis, 
California. 

Dr. James G. Sternburg 

For the past two years, Jim has served as Acting Head of the 
Department on two occasions, first while L.E. Chadwick was on sabbatical 
and presently while C.W. Kearns is on sabbatical leave in England. He 
is also regularly the Executive Secretary of the Department. 

His research is primarily concerned with the effects of DDT and 
other insecticides on the nervous system of insects. In particular, 
the disturbances induced by toxic agents in synaptic conduction are 
being studied. He is also concerned with the purification of DDT-ase 
by methods that will permit kinetic studies , and a better understanding 
of the role of glatathione as a cof actor in detoxication. 

For those who have gone on through the years you will be glad to 
share in the delight of the Sternburgs in their growing (up) family. 
Ginny 9, now in 4th grade and a member of the Junior Audubon Society; 
Tommy 7, now in 2nd grade and Janet 5, in nursery school. 

Jim is Secretary-Treasurer of the Champaign County Chapter of 
the Izaak Walton League of America, and was instrumental in erecting 
a cabin at the Lake-of-the-Woods forest preserve dedicated for 
conservation purposes. He has also participated in the League's successful 
efforts to reforest several new tracts of land recently acquired by the 
Forest Preserve District. 



-36- 
Dr. Gilbert P. Waldbauer 

Gil's major research interests are the feeding behavior and 
efficiency of food utilization by photophagous insects. He has been 
working with the tobacco hornworm, but will now begin comparative studies 
involving other species. 

A secondary but no less fascinating interest is the taxonomy of 
the Syrphidae and a study of mimicry in this family. 

He is now involved in the teaching of two courses: Entomology 101, 
Agricultural Entomology and Entomology 423, Insect Behavior. He and 
Dr. L.E. Chadwick share instruction in the latter course. Next year 
(1965-1966) he will conduct a seminar in biology (Biology 199) for a 
group of twelve James Scholars. 

Dr. Joan F. White 

Dr. Joan F. White came to the Entomology Department in the fall of 
1963 as a post-doctoral appointee on the N.I.H. training grant. 

Joan received her A.B. in Zoology in 1945 at the State University 
of Iowa. From 1947 to 1949 she was associated in mammalian tissue culture 
work with Dr. Mary S. Parshley at Columbia University, College of 
Physicians ans Surgeons and while there she studied tissue culture methods 
with Dr. Margaret Murray. She received her Ph.D. in 1953 at Bryn Mawr 
College where she worked on capillary growth in vitro. 

At Cornell University she worked with Howard Schneiderman's group 
on insect endocrinology and became interested in insect tissue culture. 
At the University of Illinois (as N.I.H. Trainee) she has been culturing 
lepidopteran and dipteran ovaries and a number of mosquito tissues. Her 
interests continue to be tissue growth and differentiation, especially 
that of insects in vitro. 

Even though Joan lives in Charleston where her husband is on the 
faculty at Eastern Illinois University, she drives every day to Urbana 
to persue her interests in insect tissue culture. 

Dr. Judith H. Willis 

Dr. Willis arrived at the University of Illinois with her husband 
Dr. John Willis of the Physiology and Biophysics Department in 1962 from 






' 






-37- 

two years stay in the laboratory of Dr. Peter Brunet in Oxford, England 
where she was working on the hormonal control of colleterial gland 
maturation in cockroaches. 

She is now involved in the new undergraduate Honors Biology Program 
administered by the School of Life Sciences. Her responsibilities include 
concocting and supervising the laboratory for the first course, The Cell , 
and teaching all of the second course, The Organism . 

In regards to research, she is primarily interested in the hormonal 
control of post-embryonic differentiation in insects. Her research is 
thus directed at trying to determine whether the mode of action of the 
principal hormones can be elicidated by studying the biochemical and 
cytological maturation of epidermal cells. 

Having recently purchased a home, John and Judy now fall among the 
landed gentry of Urbana. 



' 


















: 



' 



-38- 
Publications from the Department of Entomology 1963-64 

CHADWICK, Leigh E. 

Chadwick, L.E. 1963. Actions on insects and other invertebrates. 

In Koelle, G.B. (edit.) Anticholinesterase Agents (Heffter-Heubner 

Handbuch). Handb. exp. Pharmakol. , Ergbd. 15:741-798. 
Krysan, J.L. and L.E. Chadwick. 1963. The effect of choline on 

measurement of the activity of fly head cholinesterase. Entomol. 

exp. 6 appl. 6:199-206. 
Chadwick, L.E. 1964. Inhibition of fly-head cholinesterase in vitro 

by pilocarpine and atropine. J. Insect Phys. 10:573-585. 
Chadwick, L.E. and F.M. Snyder. 1964. The course of poisoning of 

normal and pyrethrins-resistant house flies by pyrethrins-piperonyl 

butoxide residues: a kinetic analysis. Ent. exp. 6 appl. 7:229-240. 
Chadwick, L.E. and R.H. Storch. 1964. Serial sections of whole 

insects. Stain Technol. , 39(1): 59-60. 

DOWNES, William L. 

Downes, W.L. 1963. A reinterpretation of certain head structures in 
calyptrate Diptera. Proc. Ent. Soc. Wash. 65:293-298. 

FRAENKEL, Gottfried S. 

G. Fraenkel and C. Hsiao. 1963. Tanning in the adult fly: A new 

function of neurosecretion in the brain. Science 141:1057-1058. 
G. Fraenkel and C.F. Soo Hoo. 1964. The resistance of ferns to the 

feeding of Prodenia eridania larvae. Ann. ent. Soc. Amer. 57:788-790. 
G. Fraenkel and C.F. Soo Hoo. 1964. A simplified laboratory method 

for rearing the southern armyworm, Prodenia eridania , for feeding 

experiments. Ann. ent. Soc. Amer. 57:798-799. 
Nalbandov, Olga, R.T. Yamamoto and G.S. Fraenkel. 1964. Insecticides 

from plants. Nicandrenone, a new compound with insecticidal 

properties, isolated from Nioandra physalodes. Agric. Food Chem. 

12:55-59. 

FRIEDMAN, Stanley 

Bready, J.K. and S. Friedman. 1963. Cxygen poisoning of the termite 
Retioulitermes flavipes Kollar, and protection by carbon dioxide. 
J. Insect Physiol. 9:337-347. 

Bready, J.K. and S. Friedman. 1963. The nutritional requirements of 
termites in axemio culture. 1. Sterilization of eggs of R. flavipes 
Kollar and the requirements of first instar nymphs. Ann. Ent. Soc. 
Amer. 56:703-706. 

Bready, J.K. and S. Friedman. 1963. The nutritional requirements of 
termites in axemio culture. 2. Studies on the effectiveness of 
antibiotics in the sterilization of workers of R. flavipes Kollar. 
Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer. 56:706-708. 

GHENT, Arthur W. 

Ghent, A.W. 1963. Studies of the behavior of the Tribolium flour 
beetles. I. Contrasting responses of T. oastaneum and T. oonfusum 
to fresh and conditioned flours. Ecology 44(2) :269-283. 



- 



'. 



-39- 

Ghent, A.W. 1963. Studies of regeneration in forest stands devastated 
by the spruce budworm. III. Problems of sampling precision and 
seedling distribution. Forest Science 9(3): 295-310. 

Ghent, A.W. and Joan L. Larson. 1964. Regularities in the size and 
orientation of juniper fragments attached to the cases of the 
bagworm, Thyridopteryx ephemerae formis (Haw.). Can. Ent. 
96(8):1097-1106. 

HORSFALL, William R. 

Anderson, J.F. and W.R. Horsfall. 1963. Thermal stress and anomalous 

development of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). I. Effects of 

constant temperature on dimorphism of adults of Aedes stimutans. 

J. exp. Zool. 154:67-107 
Horsfall, W.R. 1963. Eggs of floodwater mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) 

IX. Local distribution. Ann. ent. Soc. Amer. 56:426-444. 
McDaniel, I.N. and W.R. Horsfall. 1963. Bionomics of Aedes stimutans. 

I. Amer. Mid. Nat. 70:479-489. 
Horsfall, W.R. and J.F. Anderson. 1964. Thermal stress and anomalous 

development of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) II. Effect of 

alternating temperatures on dimorphism of adults of Aedes stimutans. 

J. exp. Zool. 156:61-90. 
Horsfall, W.R. , J.F. Anderson and R.A. Brust. 1964. Thermal stress 

and anomalous development of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). 

III. Aedes sierrensis. Canad. Ent. 96:1369-1372. 

KEARNS, Clyde W. 

Corrigan, J.J. and C.W. Kearns. 1963. Amino acid metabolism in 
DDT-poisoned American cockroaches. J. Insect Physiol. 9:1-12. 

LARSEN, Joseph R. 

Larsen, J.R. and V.G. Dethier. 1963. The fine structure of the 

labellar and antennal chemoreceptors of the blowfly Phormia regina. 
Proc. XVI Internat. Cong. Zool. 3:81-84. 

Larsen, J.R. , V.G. Dethier and J.R. Adams. 1963. The fine structure 
of the olfactory receptors of the blowfly. In_ Olfaction and Tastes, 
Ed. by Y. Zotterman, MacMillan S Co., New York, pp. 105-114. 

ROSS, Herbert H. 

Ross, H.H. 1964. Evolution of caddisworm cases and nets. Amer. Zool. 

4:209-220. 
Ross, H.H. 1964. New species of winter stoneflies of the genus 

Allooapnia (Plecoptera, Capniidae). Ent. News 75(7) :169-177. 
Ross, H.H. 1964. The colonization of temperate North America by 

mosquitoes and man. Mosquito News 24(2) :103-118. 
Ross, H.H., G.C. Decker and H.B. Cunningham. 1964. Adaptation and 

differentiation of temperate phylogenetic lines from tropical 

ancestors in Empoasca. Evolution 18(4) :639-651. 
Ross, H.H. and W.E. Ricker. 1964. New species of winter stoneflies, 

genus Allooapnia (Plecoptera, Capniidae). Trans. 111. Acad. Sci. 

57(2):88-93. 



-40- 



SELANDER, Richard B. 



Selander, R.B. 1963. New species and new synonymy in Pyrota Dejean 

(Coleoptera: Meloidae). Coleopterists' Bull. 17:33-41. 
Selander, R.B., J.L. Miller and J.M. Mathieu. 1963. Mimetic associations 

of lycid and cerambycid beetles (Coleoptera) in Coahuila, Mexico. 

Jour. Kansas Ent. Soc. 36:45-52. 
Selander, R.B. 1964. Sexual behavior in blister beetles (Coleoptera, 

Meloidae). I. The genus Pyrota. Canad. Ent. 96:1037-1082. 
Selander, R.B. 1964. A generic homonym in the Meloidae (Coleoptera). 

Proc. ent. Soc. Wash. 66:11. 
Selander, R.B. 1964. The systematic position of the genus Linsleya 

(Coleoptera: Meloidae). Proc. ent. Soc. Wash. 66:216. 
Selander, R.B. and J.M. Mathieu. 1964. The ontogeny of blister 

beetles (Coleoptera, Meloidae) I. A study of three species of the 

genus Pyrota. Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer. 57:711-732. 

STERNBURG, James G. 

Sternburg, J. 1963. Autointoxication and some stress phenomena. Ann. 

Rev. Ent. 8:19-38. 
Eaton, J.L. and J. Sternburg. 1964. Temperature and the action of 

DDT on the nervous system of Periplaneta americana (L. ). J. Insect 

Phys. 10:471-485. 
Hawkins, W.B. and J. Sternburg. 1964. Some chemical characteristics 

of a DDT-induced neuroactive substance from cockroaches and crayfish. 

J. econ. Ent. 57:241-247. 
Sternburg, J. and U.E. Brady. 1964. Influence of anesthesia on the 

toxicity of TEPP and SD-3562. J. econ. Ent. 57:173-174. 

WALDBAUER, Gilbert P. 

Waldbauer,G.P. 1963. Crepuscular flower visits of adult Voluoella 
vesioularis Curran (Diptera, Syrphidae). Ent. News 74:135-137. 

Waldbauer, G.P. 1964. The consumption, digestion and utilization of 
solanaceous and non-solanaceous plants by larvae of the tobacco 
hornworm, Protoparoe sexta (Johan. ) (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae). 
Ent. exp. £ appl. 7(3): 253-269. 

Waldbauer, G.P. , Robert T. Yamamoto and W.S. Bowers. 1964. Laboratory 
rearing of the tobacco hornworm, Protoparoe sexta (Lepidoptera: 
Sphingidae). J. econ. Ent. 57:93-95. 






! 



- 



■ 






-41- 
Alumni News 

In as much as this is the first news letter to come out of the 
Entomology Department for a few years this part of our letter is 
necessarily blank as we have been out of touch and don't know what you 
are up to. We hope to remedy this void with the reestablishment of a 
yearly newsletter. But in order to do this we are going to need your 
cooperation. 

In future newsletters we would like to include news from our previous 
graduates. To contact you individually on a yearly basis would be quite 
impossible so we are asking for your help. 

The last page of the present newsletter is an information sheet 
which we would like you to remove , fill out and return to us . We are 
going to establish the policy of including only those in the newsletter 
who have responded to the information form. With this help from you 
the newsletter will be more meaningful each year and your colleagues will 
have an opportunity to keep track of your activities. 

As mentioned in our opening remarks the facilities of the Department 
have been greatly enhanced in the past few years. In addition to new 
buildings and research instrumentation there are ample funds available 
for graduate students in the form of Traineeships , National Defense 
Graduate Fellowships and Research Assistantships. So we would be most 
grateful for any really good students which you may send to us. 

In conclusion we send greetings to our alumni and friends outside 
the University of Illinois and we welcome any questions or comments you 
may have. 















i 
■ ■ 



■ " 






■ 






-42- 



ADDRESSES OF ALUMNI 



NAME 



DIRL-TORY 
Ph.D. NAME 



l^l 



Robert W. Alrutz 

Director 

Institute in Ecological Research 

Denison University 

Granville, Ohio 

John F. Anderson 1963 
Conn. Agric. Exp. Station 
123 Huntington - Box 1106 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Janes W. Apple 1949 . 

Department of Entomology 
University of Wisconsin 
Madison 6, Wisconsin 

Arni Pall Arnason 1942 
Res. Br., Program Directorate 
K.W. Neatby Building 
Carling Avenue 
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 

Elizabeth Heiss Arnason 1936 

c/o Arni P . Arnason 

Research Branch 

K.W. Neatby Building 

Carling Avenue 

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 

Roy Barker 1953 

3415 Pendleton Drive 
Silver Springs , Maryland 

Edward Coulton Becker 1952 
Entomology Research Inst. 
K.W. Neatby Building 
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 

Ross. Taylor Bell 1953 
Department of Zoology 
University of Vermont 
Burlington, Vermont 

Gordon Lawrence Bender 1950 
Department of Biological Sci. 
Arizona State University 
Tempe, Arizona 



George Yousuf Bijjani 
College of Emporia 
Emporia , Kansas 

George Henry Blake, Jr. 
Department of Zoology-Entomology 
Auburn University 
Auburn, Alabama 

Murray S. Blum 
Agricultural Center 
Entomology Department 
University Station 
Baton Rouge , Louisiana 

U. Eugene Brady 
U.S.D.A. 
P.O. Box 1268 
Gainesville, Florida 

Victor J. Brookes 
School of Science 
Sci. Res. Inst. 
Oregon State University 
Corvallis, Oregon 

Brian E. Brown 

Pesticide Research Institute 
University Sub-Postoff ice 
London, Ontario, Canada 

Willis Nels Bruce 
Illinois Natural History Survey 
167 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana , Illinois 

Reinhart A. Brust 
Department of Entomology 
University of Manitoba 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 

Barnard DeWitt Burks 
Division of Insects 
U.S. National Museum 
Washington 25, D.C. 



Ph.D. 



1954 



1958 



1955 



1965 



1956 



1961 



1953 



1964 



1937 



• .• •' • 



DIRECTORY 



John Milton Campbell 1964 
Asociacidn Nacional del Cafe 
Finca San Rafael de Olimpo 
Guyotenango, Suchitepequez 
Guatamala, C.A. 

Peh-I Chang 1949 

Department of Histology- 
University Medical School 
Houston, Texas 

Hung Fu Chu 1945 

Institute of Zoology 
National Academy of Peiping 
Peiping, China 

Charles Chalmer Compton 1940 
4501 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. 
Washington 8, D.C. 



Murray Irving Cooper 
2641 Mt. Carmel Avenue 
Glenside, Pennsylvania 



1951 



John Corrigan 1959 

Department of Biochemistry 
Tufts University Medical School 
136 Harrison Avenue 
Boston, Massachusetts 

George B. Craig 1956 

Department of Biology 
University of Notre Dame 
Notre Dame, Indiana 

Sister Mary Bertha Cregan 1940 
St. Xavier College 
103rd and Central Park Avenue 
Chicago 43, Illinois 

Hugh Cunningham 1962 

Assistant Taxonomist 
Natural History Survey 
287 Natural Resources Bldg. 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

Paul Adolph Dahm 1947 
Department of Zoology and Ent. 
Iowa State University 
Ames , Iowa 



Russell Myles DeCoursey 1927 

Department of Zoology 
University of Connecticut 
Storrs, Connecticut 

William Delaplane 1958 

R.R. 1 

White Heath, Illinois 

Richard James Dysart 1961 

State Natural History Survey 
171 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

Norman Williston Earle 1952 

Agriculture Center 
Ent. Res. 

University Station 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 



William Gibbs Eden 
Department of Zoology 
Auburn University 
Auburn, Alabama 



1950 



- Entomology 



John D. DeCoursey 
6104 Greentree Poad 
Bethesda 14, Maryland 



1941 



Abdel-Latif Amin El-Deeb 1952 
Faculty of Agriculture 
University of Alexandria 
Alexandria, Egypt, U.A.R. 

Richard William Fay 1940 

101 Virginia Avenue 
Savannah , Georgia 

William Clyde Ferguson 1947 

Niagara Chemical Division 
Middleport, New York 

Henry Eric Fernando 1952 

Division of Entomology 
Department of Agriculture 
Peradeniya, Ceylon 

Stanley Fracker 1914 

4545 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. 
Washington 8, D.C. 

Ellery W. French 1954 

154 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote , Pennsylvania 

Rachel Galun 1955 

National Biology Laboratory 
Ness-Ziona, Israel 



DIRECTORY 



Norman Gannon 1953 

Monsanto Chemical Company 
800 N. Lindbergh Boulevard 
St. Louis, Missouri 

Philip Garman 1916 

548 Woodlawn 
Glencoe, Illinois 

Robert Douglass Glasgow 1913 
1013 Washington Avenue 
Albany, New York 

Henry E. Gray 1953 

Dow Chemical 
Bioproducts Department 
Midland, Michigan 

Frank Edwin Guthrie 1952 
Department of Entomology 
North Carolina State 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Robert F. Harwood 1954 
Department of Entomology 
State College of Washington 
Pullman, Washington 

Frank F. Hasbrouck 1953 
Department of Zoology 
Life Science Center 
Arizona State University 
Tempe, Arizona 

William Brown Hawkins 1960 
Department of Biology 
Louisiana State University 
New Orleans, Louisiana 

Peter H. Hewitt 1964 

Milstead Lab. of Chemical Enzy. 
Broad Oak Road 
Sittingbourne, Kent, England 



Richard L. Hurley 
314 E. Clark 
Champaign, Illinois 



1965 



Clyde Wilson Kearns 1936 
Head, Department of Entomology 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 



Edwin Wallace King, Jr. 
Department of Entomology 
Clemson College 
Clemson, South Carolina 



1951 



Zoology 



George Edward King 1929 

Rexburg , Idaho 

John M. Kingslover 1961 

U.S. National Museum 
Washington 25, D.C. 

Kenneth Lee Knight 1941 

Iowa State University 
Ames, Iowa 

Costas Kouskolekas 1964 

40 Paulou Mela 
Salonika, Greece 

John Paul Kramer 1958 

State Natural History Survey 
68 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

James Phillip Kramer 1961 

Division of Insects 
U.S. National Museum 
Washington 25, D.C. 

Sol Kramer 1948 

State University of New York 
Long Island Center 
Oyster Bay, New York 

David R. Lauck 1961 

Division of Biological Sciences 
Humboldt State College 
Areata, California 

Robert Earl Lewis 1959 

Department of Biology 
American University of Beirut 
Beirut, Lebanon 

Siegfried Eric Lienk 1951 

Department of Entomology 
New York Agric. Experimental Station 
Geneva, New York 



directory 



Herbert Lipke 1954 

Army Chem. Res. and Dev. Labs 
Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland 

Paul Charles Lippold 1957 
Department of Entomology 
N.Y. State Agr. Exp. Sta. 
Geneva, New York 

James Byron Lovell 1956 
Woosamonsa Road 
Pennington, New Jersey 

John Lowe 1960 

Export Department 
Rohm 6 Haas Company 
1700 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

William Henry Luckmann 1956 
State Natural History Survey 
76 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

George Franklin Ludvik 1949 
Monsanto Chemical Company 
800 N. Lindbergh Boulevard 
St. Louis 66, Missouri 

Patrick T.M. Lum 1956 
Entomology Research Center 
Vero Beach, Florida 

Ralph Burton March 1948 
Department of Entomology 
Citrus Experiment Station 
Riverside, California 

John Matteson 1959 

No. Grain Research Laboratory 
Brookings, South Dakota 

James McAlpine 1962 

Taxonomy Section 

Canadian Dept of Agriculture 

Research Branch 

Entomology Research Institute 

Central Experimental Farm 

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 

Ivan Noel McDaniel 1958 
Agricultural ExDeriment Station 
University of Maine 
Orono, Maine 



John E. McFarlane 1955 

Faculty of Agriculture 
MacDonald College 
Montreal, Quebec, Canada 

Roy E. McLaughlin 1961 

R.R. 2 Box 139A 
Starkville, Mississippi 

Ronald Meyer 1963 

R.R. 2 

Carbondale, Illinois 

James Leroy Miller 1965 

710 S. Webber 
Urbana, Illinois 

Edward Mockford I960 

Department of Biological Science 
Illinois State University 
Normal, Illinois 



1934 
Parasitology 

1956 



Carl Otto Mohr 
University of California 
Department of Entomology 
Berkeley 4, California 

Thomas Edwin Moore 
Museum of Zoology 
University of Michigan 
Ann Arbor, Michigan 



Herbert Hughes Moorefield 1953 

Agricultural Res. Station 

Union Carbide Farm 

P.O. Box 156 

Clayton, North Carolina 

Moufied Abdel-Aziz Moussa 1956 
Department of Entomology 
Ministry of Agriculture 
Cairo, Egypt 

William Moye 1963 

Shell Development Company 
P.O. Box 3011 
Modesto, California 

Jai Krishen Nayar 1962 

Entomological Research Center 
Florida State Board of Health 
Vero Beach, Florida 



DIRECTORY 



Zenas Barnard Noon, Jr. 1962 

305 East 40th Street 

Apt. 8Y 

New York , New York 

John V. Osmun 1956 

Department of Entomology 
Purdue University 
Lafayette, Indiana 

Francisco Pacheco 1963 
Rama de Entomologia 
Colegio de Post Graderados 
Champingo, Mexico 

Robert Dale Pausch 1962 
State Natural History Survey 
163 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

Alvah Peterson 1915 

Botany and Zoology Building 
Ohio State University 
Columbus 10, Ohio 

Howard B. Petty 1955 

State Natural History Survey 
282 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

Jean Paul Pi card 1948 
National Defense Research Bd. Lab 
Valcartier, Quebec, Canada 



John E. Porter 

7521 S.W. 53rd Avenue 

Miami, Florida 



1955 



Dwight Powell 1943 

Department of Plant Pathology 
Hort. Field Lab 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

A. Mohan Rao 1957 

World Health Organization 
Palais des Nations 
Geneva, Switzerland 



Janet Cooper Rapp 

430 Ivy 

Crete, Nebraska 



1948 



William Robin Richards 

Taxonomy Section 

Research Branch 

Entomology Research Institute 

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 

Garland Tavner Riegel 
Department of Zoology 
Eastern Illinois University 
Charleston, Illinois 

Paul W. Riegert 

Entomology Section 

Research Lab 

Canada Department of Agriculture 

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada 



1956 



1947 



1954 



1921 



Lewis Bradford Ripley 
Cedara School of Agriculture 
Pictermaritzburg, Natal, Rep. of S. Afr. 

Clifford Creighton Roan 1950 

Department of Entomology 
Kansas State College 
Manhattan, Kansas 

Selwyn S. Roback 1951 

Academy of Natural Science 
19th and Parkway 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Reginald Roberts 1962 

Pastoral Research Laboratory 

CSIRO 

Private Bag 

Armidale 5N 

N.S.W. , Australia 

Herbert Holdsworth Ross 1933 

State Natural History Survey 
287 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

James Sanford 1963 

U.S. Entomology Research Branch 
Sugarcane Field Station 
P.O. Box 387 
Houma, Louisiana 

Herbert Frederick Schoof 1940 
Technical Development Lab 
Communicable Disease Center 
U.S. Public Health Center 
P.O. Box 769 
Savannah, Georgia 



DIRECTORY 



Richard Brent Selander 1954 
Department of Entomology 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

Abdel Shalaby 1954 

Entomology Department 
Faculty of Science 
University of Alexandria 
Alexandria, Egypt, U.A.R. 

Dan Leslie Shankland 1955 
Department of Entomology 
Purdue University 
Lafayette , Indiana 

Ruth Evelyn Slabaugh 1940 
Department of Entomology 
University of Missouri 
Columbia, Missouri 

Marion Estelle Smith 1938 
Department of Entomology 
University of Massachusetts 
Amherst , Massachusetts 

Marion Russell Smith 1927 
Bureau of Entomology-Plant Quar. 
Washington, D.C. 

Robert Snetsinr^er 1960 
Department of Zoology-Entomology 
Frear Lab 

Pennsylvania State University 
University Park, Pennsylvania 

Kathryn Martha Sommerman 1945 
Arctic Health Research Center 
Anchorage, Alaska 

Calvin Soo Moo 1963 

CSIRO 

Division of Entomology 

Box 109-City 

Canberra, A.C.T., Australia 

Charles Stockman Spooner 1936 

Box 102 

McLean, Virginia 

Earl A. Stadelbacher 196U 
U.S. Ent. Research Branch 
Leland, Mississippi 



Lewis J. Stannard, Jr. 
State Natural History Survey 
285 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

James Gordon Sternburg 
Department of Entomology 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

Philip Carlton Stone 
Department of Entomology 
University of Missouri 
Columbia, Missouri 

Milton Tinker 

578 Hardendorf Avenue, N.E. 

Atlanta 7, Georgia 



1952 



1952 



1942 



1957 



1935 



Lee Hill Townsend 

Entomology Department 

Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station 

Lexington , Kentucky 



Robert Traub 

5702 Bradley Boulevard 

Bethesda 14, Maryland 

Donald Monroe Tuttle 
University of Arizona 
Experimental Station 
Yuma, Arizona 

Massoud Varzandeh 
Homayoun High School 
Share za Avenue 
Tehran , Iran 

Eddie Borders Vinson 
2904 Central Avenue 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Gilbert Peter Waldbauer 
Department of Entomology 
University of Illinois 
Urhana, Illinois 

Clifford Wester 
911 N. Ninth Street 
Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania 



1952 



1952 



1953 



1952 



1960 



1954 



DIRECTORY 



Nallini D. Wickramasinghe 1965 
Division of Entomology 
Department of Agriculture 
Paradeniya, Ceylon 

Home Wong 1960 

Forest Entomology Lab. 

Box 6300 

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 



Robert T. Yamamoto 1957 

Insect Physiology Laboratory 

Entomology Research Division 

Building C 

ARC 

Beltsville, Maryland 

Hachiro Yuasa 1920 

International Christian University 
Tokyo, Japan 



DIRECTORY 



Terminal Degree at University of Illinois is Master of Science 

NAME M.S. NAME 



Mohammed Abdullah 1959 

8 Abinger Road 

Cheswick, London, W.4., England 

Harry E. Anderson 1952 
832 Maple 
Carrolton, Illinois 

Edward L. Atkins, Jr. 1947 
Citrus Experiment Station 
Riverside, California 

Curtis Benton 1924 

201 Fulwood Blvd. 
Tifton, Georgia 

Bernard Berger 1941 

Able Pest Control Company 
406 W. McCreight Avenue 
Springfield, Ohio 

Angel Berrios-Ortiz 1961 
22 Aguadilla Street 
Hato Rey 1, Puerto Rico 

John Henry Bigger 1942 
1018 W. John Street 
Champaign, Illinois 

Clarence W. Bills 1937 
419 Walnut 
Elmhurst, Illinois 

Wilbur K. Bingman 1942 

202 N. Franklin 
Staunton, Illinois 

Lusettie Blevins 1925 

Atwater, Illinois 

Milton T. Bodman 1950 

1617 E. Swan 
Brentwood 17, Missouri 

Eugene Bravi 1956 

1123 S. Monitor 
Chicago, Illinois 



David M. Brunfiel 
(Address Unknown) 

James E. Bussart 
815 Gamon Road 
Wheaton, Illinois 

Wayne P. Carlisle 

3157 Davis 

Granite City, Illinois 

Yu-Su Liu (Mrs. Hung Fu Chu) 
c/o Mr. Hung-Fu Chu 
Institute of Zoology 
National Academy of Peiping 
Peiping, China 

Glenna Joan Cor ley 

195 Pilgrim Road 

Boston 15 , Massachusetts 

Max D. Couch 

1-1 Reeves Terrace 

Orlando, Florida 

Henry Gordon Crawford 
673 MacLaren Street 
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 

William B. Cutts 
2002 McElderry Street 
Baltimore 5, Maryland 

Theodore Dashman 
34-G Georgian Court 
Bergenfield, New Jersey 

Leroy Frank Davison 
(Address Unknown) 

Carl K. Dorsey 
West Virginia University 
316 Brooks Hall 
Morgantown, West Virginia 

Manfred D. Engelmann 
121 Natural Science Building 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 



M.S. 
1913 

1935 
1947 
1946 



1952 



1949 



1917 



1961 



1951 



1955 



1936 



1955 



.'•. 



I 



DIRECTORY 



John Harwood Evans 1932 
327 S. Parker 
Janesville, Wisconsin 

Henry E. Ewing 1908 

(Address Unknown) 

Maj. Harland W. Fowler, Jr. 1960 
USAREUR Medical Laboratory 
APO, New York 09180 

John E. Fraley 1941 

300 Australian Avenue 
Palm Beach, Florida 

Justus C. Frankenfeld 1927 
Arwell, Inc. 
Waukegan, Illinois 

Jay Howard Gage 1919 

(Address Unknown) 

Lucian Percy Garrett, Jr. 1951 

4906 Northland 

St. Louis, Missouri 

Robert L. Gerhart 1954 
1508 N. San Jacento 
Conroe , Texas 

Perry A. Glick 1922 

P.O. Box 1033 
Brownsville , Texas 

Alfred G. Grosche 1925 
306 M. Jackson 
Waukegan, Illinois 

Robert E. Grossman 1957 
1483 W. Walnut 
Jacksonville, Illinois 

George W. Hahn 1953 

41 Elm Road 

Newtonville, Massachusetts 

Robert Hamman 1947 

15 Secor Road 
Ardsley, New York 

Jarett D. Hoffman 1960 

R.R. 2 

Oxford, North Carolina 



Gladys Hoke 1921 

Miss. State College for Women 
Columbus, Mississippi 

Henry Hoogstraal 1942 

Department of Medical Zoology 
Naval Medical Research - Unit 3 
American Embassy 
Cairo, Egypt, U.A.R. 

George E. Huff 1950 

R.R. 2 - Box 92 
Roachdale , Indiana 

Chi-ling Hwang 1946 

National Central University 
College of Agriculture 
Nanking, China 

James Lowell Hypes 1916 

University of Connecticut 
Storrs, Connecticut 

Louis Albert Jansky 1953 

8850 S.W. Cashmire Lane 
Portland, Oregon 

Abdul H. Junaid 1957 

Amin Manzil 10/19 
Nazimabad 
Karachi, Pakistan 

John C. Keller 1941 

Box 366 

Route 3 

Starkville, Mississippi 

Charles D. LeSar 1959 

913 E. Corrigan Avenue 
Peoria, Illinois 

Peter Tsing-Han Li 1932 

Animal Husbandry Department 
Kiangsu Provincial College 
Wusih, Kiangsu, China 

Bruce C. MacDonald 1951 

General Chem Division 
Agricultural Chemical Sales 
P.O. Box 70 
Morristown , New Jersey 



DIM 

Ronald B. Madge 1958 

1639 16th Street E. 
Calgary, Alberta, Canada 

Richard 0. Malcomson 1928 
Department of Biology- 
Central Michigan College 
Mt. Pleasant, Michigan 

Rene Paul Martineau 1941 

53 Grande Allee 

Quebec City, Quebec, Canada 

William E. McCauley 1936 

15. Vassar Place 
Scarsdale, New York 

Howe E. McClure 1936 

P.O. Box 180 

Tachikawa A.F.B. Hospital 

APO 323 

San Francisco, California 

Robert Metcalf 1940 

Citrus Experiment Station 
Riverside, California 

Stanley S. Miyake 1955 
3273 Lincoln Avenue 
Honolulu, Hawaii 

Carol Ann Morgan 1960 

16745 So. Pacific 
Sunset Beach , California 

Arthur P. Morris 1951 

954 Masefield Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Claud V. Myers 1940 

R.R. 

Fithian, Illinois 

Franklin C. Nelson 1926 
1437 Dunn Parkway 
Mountainside, New Jersey 

Guy J. Noerdinger 1951 

R.R. 

North Seal Rock, Oregon 



TORY 



Willis J. Nolan 1917 

507 Cumberland Avenue 
Chevy Chase Station 15 
Washington, D.C. 

Herbert T. Osborn 1910 

P.O. Box 207 

Nevada City, California 

Faustine Q. Otanes 1922 

2004 A Delas Alas 

Santa Ana 

Manila, Philippines 

Boyd B. Palmer 1928 

(Address Unknown) 

Gerard Paquet 1941 

Director, Bureau of Entomology 
Department of Lands and Forests 
Parliament Building 
Quebec City, Quebec, Canada 

Thaddeus H. Parks 1925 

1501 Doone Road 
Columbus 21, Ohio 

Glenn E. Printy 1949 

Citrus Experiment Station 
Department of Entomology 
Riverside, California 

Edmund C. Puddi combe 1938 

1719 W. Acre 
Joliet, Illinois 

William F. Rapp 1945 

430 Ivy Avenue 
Crete , Nebraska 

Arnold C. Rasso 1952 

17 Southern Boulevard 

East Patchoque , Long Island, N.Y. 

Eugene Ray 1938 

8808 Osceola 

Morton Grove, Illinois 

Robert C. Rendtorff 1939 

Federal Correctional Institute 
Seagoville, Texas 



f ■ • ? '■' ' 






DIRECTORY 



Arthur E. Ritcher 
821 16th Street 
Peru, Illinois 

Paul 0. Ritcher 
Department of Entomology 
Oregon State University 
Corvallis , Oregon 



1939 



1932 



1958 



Albert Salako 

39 Southwood 

Highgate , London N.6., England 



Murl Beauford Salisbury 
(Address Unknown) 



1939 



1958 



Isabel L. Sanabria 

(Mrs. de Arevalo) 

Centro Nacional de Investigaciones 

Agropecuarias "Tibaitata" 
Instituto Columbiano Agropecuario 
Apartado Postal No. 3493 
Bogata, D.E. 
Colombia, South America 



Lee A. Somers 1927 

(Address Unknown) 

George J. Spencer 1924 

Department of Zoology 
University of British Columbia 
Vancouver, B.C., Canada 

Shirley S. Statler 1951 

c/o B. Statler 
West Chester, Iowa 

Elmer D. Sweeney 1940 

401 S. Kensington 
La Grange , Illinois 

Capt. Martin L. Taylor 1964 

Department of Preventive Medicine 
Medical Field Service School 
Ft. Sam Houston, Texas 



Ying-Hsuan Hsuwen Tsou 
5 Chi Ysi Street 
Soochew, Kang Su, China 



1913 



Robert Schiffman 1949 

(Address Unknown) 

John W. Schaffnit 1941 
415 Kipling Street 
Wheaton, Illinois 

George K. Schumaker 1935 

279 Bay Avenue 

Glen Ridge, New Jersey 

Herbert F. Seiffert 1917 
(Address Unknown) 

Zile Singh 1959 

Rak Agricultural Institute 
Se Hore Mp. , India 

James A. Slater 1947 

Department of Zoology and 

Entomology 
University of Connecticut 
Storrs , Connecticut 

Edgar Henry Smith 1953 
12 Renwick Avenue 
London, Ontario, Canada 



Glenn A. Ulrich 
308 Suwannee 
Clinton Sherman 



1950 



A.F.B. , Oklahoma 



Shy am Wadhwani 1953 

Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd. 
P.O. Box 310 
Bombay , India 

Hubert Jack Walters 1947 

Plant Pathology Department 
University of Arkansas 
Fayetteville , Arkansas 

Margaret Washington 1913 

(Mrs. Benjamin S. Pfieffer) 
(Address Unknown) 

Miriam U. Welles 1904 

(Mrs. G.I. Reeves) 
1466 Edison Street 
Salt Lake City 15, Utah 

Carlos A. White I960 

Bioferm Corporation 
P.O. Bin B 
Wasco, California 



. '. 









. 



i 












' 



'... 



• . • ■" 



- 



'.:'■•' • . : -• :■ . ; . '. .-.:.,'; 



■ 



r. , ./ :..'.;.- 



:..•••■■ 






' 



••■)', 



• 



■■•..■.. . 



DIRECTORY 



Perry Homer Welley 1924 
Manlius , Illinois 

Roger W. Williams 1941 
School of Public Health 
600 W. 168th Street 
New York, New York 

Victor T. Williams 1962 
(Address Unknown) 

Warren Williamson 1911 

R.R. 4 

Galesburg, Illinois 

Margaret Windsor 1925 

220 Santa Rita 

Palo Alto, California 



Janina Wojciechowska 
641 Penn Avenue 
Aurora, Illinois 

Fo-Ching Woo 
Peyeechow, Pennu 
Kiangsu, China 

Richard J. Yero 
Libby, McNeill 6 Libby 
200 S. Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



1964 



1926 



1953 



: : 



-55- 



Newsletter Information for: 



year 



(Please print or type 
legibly of course!!) 



Name 



Last 



First 



Middle 



Give both addresses please and include Zip Codes : 
Home 



Business , institution or the like 



Recent publications or inventions: 



Recent travels for business or pleasure 



Additions to the Family (Names, Dates) 



Recent research interests 



Suggestions or comments concerning the "Newsletter" 



Other 



Return to: Newsletter Committee 

Department of Entomology 
320 Morrill Hall 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois, 61803 






ENTOMOLOGY 
NEWSLETTER 

1966 




the library of the 

cpr 2 91970 



DEDICATED 
TO 
DR. LEICH CHAVWICK 



BIOLOGY LIBRARY 



. « « "- P <Q"7n wwt»T LIBRARY 

APR vU 19/U 10J BURRILL HAti 



ANNUAL NEWSLETTER 



Department of 
Entomology 



University of Illinois 
Ur^a-'ia, Illinois 



February 1966 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

DEDICATION TO DR. LEIGH CHADWICK 1 

MESSAGE FROM THE HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 3 

ACTIVITIES OF THE SCHOOL OF LIFE SCIENCES— 5 

DEPARTMENTAL INSECT COLLECTION 6 

DEPARTMENTAL ROSTER 1965-1966 7 

VISITORS TO THE DEPARTMENT — 11 

SPORTS REVIEW 12 

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 14 

RECENT GRADUATES 15 

PRESENT ENTOMOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS — 19 

NEWS ABOUT THE STAFF MEMBERS 26 

PUBLICATIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY 1964-1965 38 

ALUMNI NEWS 41 

ADDITIONS OR CORRECTIONS TO THE DIRECTORY 52 

NEWSLETTER INFORMATION FORM 55 



The Newsletter comes to you a little earlier this year in the hope that you 
will have an opportunity to share it with your students who may be considering 
the University of Illinois as a possibility for graduate studies. 

I would like to thank all of those who have been so helpful in bringing this 
year's Newsletter to fruition. A special thanks is due our faithful secretary 
Ruth Plymire without whose help the task would have been impossible. All 
those intrepid souls who so willingly handed in write-ups of their activities 
are also due a kind word. 



The Editor 



■'■ . . 



DEDICATION TO 



DR. LEIGH E. CHADWICK 



This issue of the Annual Newsletter is respectfully dedicated to Dr. 
Leigh Chadwick who has announced his intention to retire from the Staff of 
the Entomology Department in June of 1966. 

"Chad" as he has been affectionately known by his colleagues for many 
years, was born August 9, 1904 in Washington, D.C. He received his early 
education at the Swarthmore Preparatory School in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. 
He then attended Haverford College where he received his B.S. in 1925 in the 
field of German and Chemistry. Upon graduation from Haverford he was 
nominated to Phi Beta Kappa. Chad went abroad for a year to study at 
Phillipps University in Marburg Germany. Upon his return from Germany he 
entered the University of Pennsylvania where he took a Masters Degree in 
German. During the period of 1925-1927 Chad taught foreign languages at 
various prep schools. From 1929-1934 he taught French and German at his 
Alma Mater, Haverford College. In 1936 he entered Harvard University where 
he received a Masters Degree and subsequently a Ph.D. in 1939. After 
graduation from Harvard, Chad taught Biology at Pueblo Junior College in 
Colorado for two years. He then moved to Rochester, New York where he 
taught physiology at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. In 1944 
Chad moved to Baltimore and there he assumed the position as Chief of the 
Entomology Branch of the Chemical Corps Medical Research Directorate. During 
his period of tenure with the Chemical Corps Chad was responsible for directing 
a large share of the research effort in entomology during the difficult years 
of the 2nd World War. He was also responsible for maintaining a pleasant 
research atmosphere for the large number of scientists who passed through 
the Chemical Corps labs as part of their tour of duty for Uncle Sam. 

Chad was appointed Professor and Head of the Department of Entomology 
at the University of Illinois in July of 1956. During this period of time 
while he served as head of the Department a great deal of progress was realized. 
A large part of the Department was able to move into new quarters in Morrill 
Hall. The rest of the Department will be able to move into the new addition 












• - . . 



. 















-2- 



in 1966. The department has increased from 8 to 10 faculty members, some 
of whom hold joint appointments with the Illinois Natural History Survey, 
Department of Horticulture, Physiology and the School of Life Sciences. 

Graduate student enrollment has increased to between 40 and 50 students. 
Many new research facilities and major equipment items have been added to 
the resources of the department. 

Much of the above mentioned progress began while Dr. Chadwick was head 
of the department and the department is greatly indebted to his foresight, 
judgment and effort. 

In September of 1963 Chad asked to be relieved of administrative duties 
to devote more time to his research activities. His major areas of research 
while at the University of Illinois have been studies on insect cholinesterase 
and the comparative morphology of insect musculature. He is the author or 
co-author of over 50 scientific articles. 

Dr. Chadwick has been honored with membership in the American Academy 
of Arts and Sciences. He is also a member of a number of scientific and 
honorary societies: American Association for the Advancement of Science, 
American Association of University Professors, American Physiological Society, 
American Society of Zoologists, Entomological Society of America, Harvard 
Chapter of Sigma Xi, New York Academy of Science, Society of General Physiology, 
and Phi Beta Kappa. 

Dr. Chadwick is a distinguished scientist and scholar and his absence 
will be greatly noted at the University. We of the Entomology Department 
would like to offer our most sincere thanks and appreciation for his years 
of service and dedication to his profession. We know that all of you as 
alums and former graduate students would like to join us in wishing 
Dr. Chadwick the very best for a continued active and productive life in 
the years to come. 



1 ■■ 



■ t ■ ■ 



. 



■ 



' 



:■' . -■ ■ 

■ 

■ . ■ ■ 






• . 



■ 






. 









■ 



MESSAGE FROM HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

It was my pleasure to have a sabbatical leave last year and return to 
find things much better than when I left. During my absence Dr. James 
Sternburg handled, in his typically proficient way, all the red tape and 
problems that confront a department head in a large University. I was most 
pleased to find that communication had been re-established with our alumni 
through the advent of a newsletter. Last year's newsletter and this years 
is the product of a relatively newcomer to our staff, Dr. Joseph Larsen. 
It is my hope that each of you will respond to Dr. Larsen' s effort and show 
your appreciation by providing him current information of your doings which 
will be of interest to your fellow Illini. 

Last year Dr. Stanley Friedman joined our staff and began directing 
graduate students interested in doing work on the biochemistry of insects. 
We felt that his acquisition would complement the work of Drs. Fraenkel, 
Chadwick, Larsen and Willis in insect physiology and lead to better inte- 
gration of toxicology into these basic studies. Judging from one year of 
experience the results are very encouraging, but more evident is the fact 
that a highly stimulating atmosphere has developed for both staff and students 
interested in these areas of study. 

During the past year Drs. Arthur Ghent and Judith Willis joined our 
staff. Although their formal teaching duties are in the School of Life 
Sciences they are to direct graduate students in our department. Dr. Ghent 
will supervise graduate students interested in various phases of population 
biology, statistics, etc. Dr. Willis will direct graduate students in 
insect physiology, particularly those interested in growth and development. 

The department has added numerous items of equipment to its inventory 
during the past year many of which are sufficiently sophisticated to deserve 
itemization in a newsletter of this sort. This year, however, we only admit 
to the acquisition of an electron microscope to facilitate among other 
things the work of Dr. Joseph Larsen on the fine structure of the insect 
sensory system. 

In the near future, perhaps June, we will occupy about 6,000 square 
feet of floor space in the addition to Morrill Hall. This will enable us 



... . - ' . 

... 
- ■• 

■ - 

...... 

i; lop.: 



..... 
.... J • • . - ■ 

■ 



... • 

: ■ 

I! 



• 



: 

■ 
■ 



. 



. 









■ 
■ 



i 



: 



. 






• 






-4- 



to move Dr. Selander and Dr. Ghent out of Harker Hall and bring the department 
together again under one roof in a modern air conditioned building. Besides 
providing a new location for Drs. Ghent and Selander it will furnish much 
needed room for Dr. Fraenkel and Dr. Friedman. Then Dr. Sternburg and I 
will hopefully be able to recover from the ravages which Dr. Friedman and 
his graduate students have inflicted upon us for the past 18 months while 
this space was being made into a laboratory. 

In most respects 1966 looks like a good year for the department. We 
will, however, lose Dr. Leigh Chadwick who will retire at the end of this 
year. I'm sure I express the sincere regret of every member of our staff 
on his decision to retire. With the retirement of Dr. George Decker in 
September of 1965 the department is obviously faced with the insoluble 
problem of adjusting to the loss of these two outstanding people. 

I hope you will take the earliest opportunity to visit us. The 
University and our department have expanded and the two towns have undergone 
an explosive building period. If you have not been here within the past 
five years I am sure you would have trouble recognizing the community. 

With best wishes to all, 

Sincerely, 
Clyde W. Kearns 



• 









- 









' 



•.'■'.. 



■• 



-5- 



ACTIVITIES OF THE SCHOOL OF LIFE SCIENCES 



The most significant news from the School of Life Sciences this past 
year was the arrival of a new director, Dr. Reino Emil Kallio. Dr. Kallio 
arrived on the scene in early spring to begin the process of taking over the 
reins of directorship from Dr. Halverson. 

By way of introduction to our former students, Dr. Kallio comes to us 
from the Department of Bacteriology at the State University of Iowa. He 
was born in Worcester, Massachusetts July 6, 1919. He did his undergraduate 
work at Alabama where he received his B.S. in 1941. With some time out in 
the Navy for Uncle Sam he received an M.S. and subsequently a Ph.D. from 
Iowa in 1950. The transition in directorship has been very smooth and we 
are delighted to have Dr. Kallio with us. 

The educational programs in biology are forging ahead with a large 
measure of success. The Honors Program in biology is well established. A 
new basic biology course for pre-professional students (Biol. 110-111) was 
established this fall and seems to be running smoothly. Those students 
who do not wish to limit their training to a single area of biology can 
now receive both the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy in Biology. 

The Morrill Hall addition which is moving to completion is more than 
twice as large as the present Morrill Hall. The new addition will house 
Zoology, Botany, part of Entomology, and the offices and staff of the 
School of Life Sciences. The completion date for the new addition is set for 
September 1966. 

All of the entomology alums will be happy to know that in spite of 
all the new construction "good old" Harker Hall still stands. Built in 1878 
only 11 years after the University was founded, it stands aloof between the 
modern campus buildings, a landmark of antiquity. It is now used primarily 
for teaching laboratories and research space. 

There are rumblings in the air about new buildings for undergraduate 
teaching in all of the biological sciences and a new building to house the 
museum collection of Zoology, Botany, Entomology and Geology. 

As a member department in the School of Life Sciences we are all looking 
forward to another highly successful year. 



■ 



. 






■ - 



■ ■ 

■ 












■ 






■ 



' 












• 



•' 






' 






: ' 






.... 



-6- 



DEPARTMENTAL INSECT COLLECTION 

A project to revise and modernize the insect collection of the Department 
of Entomology has been in progress for several years. Larval and other 
material preserved in alcohol has been transferred to standard-sized vials 
with rubber stoppers and arranged in three cabinets. The pinned material is 
being collated and arranged in the unit tray system. In the past two years 
the space available for pinned specimens has been increased by the acquisition 
of four cabinets, holding a total of 100 drawers. The preliminary and major 
task of putting the insect collection in working order under the new system 
will be completed by June. Thereafter emphasis will be placed on securing 
specific identifications for a large backlog of material, preparing and 
incorporating new material, and making the collection available to taxonomists 
engaged in research projects. The collection, which is of modest size, has 
as its main function providing a synoptic representation of families and 
genera. Nevertheless, it does contain, in some groups, material of interest 
to the specialist. At present G.E.Eertmoed is serving as curator, under the 
supervision of R.B. Selander. Others who have been engaged in the project 
are J.K. Bouseman and R.C. Weddle. Recent contributors to the collection 
include W.R. Horsfall, E. Jaycox, J.M. Mathieu, R.B. Selander, and 
G.P. Waldbauer. 



•' 



■ 



-7- 

Departmental Roster 1965-1966 
Faculty 

Balduf, Walter V. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Bouseman, John K. - Instructor 

Chadwick, Leigh E. - Professor of Entomology 

Decker, George C. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. - Professor of Entomology 

Friedman, Stanley - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Ghent, Arthur W. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Hayes, William P. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Horsfall, Willian R. - Professor of Entomology 

* Jaycox, Elbert R. - Associate Professor of Apiculture 

Kearns, Clyde W. - Professor of Entomology and Head of the Department 

** Larsen, Joseph R. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Luckmann, William H. - Professor of Entomology and 

Head of Economic Entomology Section 

Milum, Vern G. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Ross, Herbert H. - Professor of Entomology and Head of Faunistic Survey 

Selander, Richard B. - Professor of Entomology 

Sternburg, James G. - Professor of Entomology 

Waldbauer, Gilbert P. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

White, Joan F. - USPH Post-doctoral Fellow 

Willis, Judith H. - Assistant Professor of Entomology 

* - Joint Appointment with Horticulture 
** - Joint Appointment with Physiology and Biophysics 



■."■'■ 



■ ■- 






. 



; 



■ ' ' . 



■ 






-8- 



Research Assistants 



Allen, Robert T. 
Banerjee, Amal C. 
Bharadwaj , Rama K. 
Campbell, William R. 
Chandran , Raman S . 
Eaton, John L. 
Flattum, Roger F. 
Fogal, Willard 
Hsiao, Catherine T. 
Hsiao, Ting-Huan 
Killmer, Paul S. 



Maddox, Joseph 
Newton, David C. 
Randall, Robert F. 
Ronquillo, Consolacion R. 
Rotramel, George 
Storeh, Richard H. 
Unzicker, John D. 
Weddle, Richard C. 
Wilson, George R. 
Yatnamoto, Toshio 
Yang, Anna Y. 



Teaching Assistants 
Abou-aly, Aly A. Eertmoed, Gary E. 

Cullop, Samuel Reinbold, Keturah A. 

Dirks, Tobias (DGS) Seligman, Morris I. 



. 



' 









. 



: . •. . 



-9- 
Trainees and Fellows 

Ameel, John J. - NDEA Fellow 

Benson, Robert L. - NDEA Fellow 

Chang, Franklin - USPH Trainee 

Clegern, Robert W. - USPH Trainee 

Cupp, Edward W. - USPH Trainee 

Fox, Philip M. - NDEA Fellow 

Gemrich, Edwin G. - USPH Fellow 

Krysan, James L. - University Fellow in Entomology 

Mathieu, Jean M. - Rockefeller Foundation Fellow 

Peterson, Lance G. - USPH Trainee 

Pinto, John D. - USPH Fellow 

Reynolds, Judith L. - AAUW Fellow 

Sastrodihardjo, S. - Fellow 

Scarbrough, Aubrey - NDEA Fellow 

Students not on Staff 

Fraembs , Frank 

Gangrade, Govind 

Janicke, James F. 

Kulman , Donald E . 

Parshall, Stephen J. 

Patterson, William J. 

Randell, Roscoe (Instructor with Agriculture) 

Schmidt, Fred 



-10- 

Non-Academic 

Adams, Paula 
Bangeman, Judy 
Duvall, Eloise 
Plymire , Ruth 
Ransom, Terry 
Schoff, Gwynne 



Student Employees 



Black, Anne 
Brandon , Dennis 
Broadbent , Alan 
Frick, Mary 
Hanna, Bruce 



Lindstrom, Jon 
Marsh, RaVae 
Prickett, Alice 
Reynolds, Vera 
Weibel, Cheryl 



Williams, Elizabeth 



-11- 



VISITORS TO THE DEPARTMENT 



Dr. Geoffrey Chapman 
Botany Department 
University of the West Indies 
Mona, Jamaica 



Dr. A. G. Richards 

Department of Entomology, 

Fisheries, and Wildlife 
University of Minnesota 
St. Paul 1, Minnesota 



Dr. Marshall Hertig 

Gorgas Memorial Laboratory 
Canal Zone, Panama 



Dr. Peter Karlson 

Physiological Chemistry Institute 
Philipps University 
Marburg, Germany 



Dr. Lloyd Knutson 

Department of Entomology 
Comstock Hall 
Cornell University 
Ithaca, New York 



Dr. K. Slama 

Department of Insect Physiology 
Entomological Institute 
Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences 
Praha, Czechoslovakia 



Dr. David Smith 

University of Virginia 
Charlottesville, Virginia 



Mrs. Una Smith 

University of Virginia 
Charlottesville, Virginia 



Dr. E. J. Mostyn 
England 



Dr. David Novogrodsky 

Ministry of Agriculture 
Israel 



Dr. Frank Stark 

Director of Research 
Agricultural Division 
American Cyanamid Company 
Stamford, Connecticut 



Dr. Milan Trpis 

Bratislava, Czechoslovakia 



Dr. F. P. W. Winteringham 

Department of Biochemistry 
Pest Infestation Laboratory 
Slough, Bucks., England 



. ■ 



. 






• 



. 






■ 



- 






: 












• 









-12- 



SPORTS REVIEW 



Sports continue to be an attractive diversion for our graduate students. 
This past year we had an excellent turnout for our intermural Softball team, 
the "Flycatchers." With a much improved team we posted a season record of 
6 wins and 6 losses, tying for 3rd place in the league. 

With an eye on the championship for 1966, Zoology, the defending champion, 
is the team to beat. In three outings against Zoology the Flycatchers have 
yet to win a game, although each one has been close. We will have no trouble 
being up for that series this season. 

Due to graduation, we will have to replace our pepperpot catcher Dick 
Storch and speedy center fielder Ed Gemrich, but recruiting prospects are 
good. We have already acquired the arm of fast ball pitcher Bert Clegren and 
are expecting great things from him. Our coach, Lance Peterson, believes 
that the Flycatchers will be a staunch title contender for 1966. 

Handball also continues to be a major attraction for a large number of 
the students. Some of the lunch hours each week are taken up by inter- 
departmental competition, which has become quite keen since those of us new 
to the game have begun to master it. 

Golf also was a common word around the department in the summer time as 
several students took an interest and started to invest some time and money 
into learning the game. 

The Entomology Department has been intimately associated with the 
University of Illinois Rugby Team since its conception in the fertile mind 
of "breakaway" Isaac Morris Seligman in the fall of 1963. "Hooker" Peter 
H. Hewitt and "fly-half" Richard H. Storch were also among the founding 
fathers of the team. "Winger" Robert L. Benson joined the team in the fall 
of 1964 and he is the only entomologist presently participating. Persons 
interested in playing should contact Bob Benson immediately, if not sooner. 

The rugby team plays both a fall and a spring fixture list (schedule) 
with matches against such teams as Indiana U. , Chicago U., Notre Dame, 
Wisconsin U., Michigan U., and St. Louis U. as well as non-university clubs. 
During the first three seasons the team managed to win 23 and lose only one. 



• 



. 



' 






•' 



. 



. 



■ 

: 
■ 

I 






■ 









-13- 



They appeared on national television with the University of Wisconsin during 
the half-time of a Green Bay Packers game in the fall of 1964. Since that 
time the rubgy fortunes have run afoul and the team has won only half of its 
games the last two seasons. 

There is good student participation in a variety of sports activites. 
The overall effect is one of closer ties between the students in the department. 

Before closing out the sports section, we feel obligated to report that 
"Ma (Ruth Plymire) Barker" is still running the office pools. The fact that 
she won at least three of the major pools herself makes the honest investor 
wonder just a little. However, with her usual smiling face she makes the 
loser feel so good we just can't complain. If you want odds on anything, 
except preliminary oral exams, give "ma" a call. 



■.....'. 



■ ■■••■.■ ' • ' ;' 

■ • 

■ . . • . . 



■ -■ 

! 



■ 



-UN- 
SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 
Christmas Party 

December 16 proved to be another freezing night when the whole clan 
gathered together for the Entomology Christmas Party. It was held at the 
University Club on Oregon Street, once again, from 8 till 11 PM. We had 
lots of new faces in attendance and about 85 people were present. Thanks 
to Ruth and Gwynne everyone had a festive name tag to wear which was very 
helpful in putting a name with a face for those of us with short memories. 
Records provided the rhythm for dancing. We regret to say that Ed Gemrich 
did not lead us in Christmas songs as he did last year, but everybody seemed 
to have a good time in spite of this void. Small sandwiches and punch were 
the refreshments and an extra added attraction were the rum balls. 

Entomology Spring Picnic 

May 23 turned out to be a very hot, sunny Sunday; just the perfect 
kind of day for the Entomology Spring Picnic. Hessel Park was the site of 
the action and the faculty and graduate students came out with their families 
in droves; last count, we had more than 100 in attendance. 

Each wife made enough fried chicken for her family, plus , and also 
brought a salad or dessert. We had more fried chicken than we knew what 
to do with and about 57 varieties of potato salads. Everybody went for 
those good desserts that "Moms" know how to make. 

Everybody seemed to enjoy the pre-dinner volleyball game, but the post- 
dinner softball game was for "Men Only." The women did get into the act 
on the sidelines and did a few cheers to root the fellas on. Tennis and 
basketball were also available for those that really wanted to make the 
day into a decathlon. Swings and slides are always fun for the kids and 
they were kept busy all afternoon. 

Along about Sunday evening , there were a lot of pooped people driving 
home from Hessel Park trying to recuperate for Monday morning. 



• 






: 



■15- 



RECENT GRADUATES 

James Louis Krysan - 1965 

Jim was born March 12, 1934 in Calmar, Iowa. Jim is really a product 
of the mid-west. After graduation from Notre Dame High School in Cresco, 
Iowa in 1952 he entered upon his next academic persuit at Loras College 
in Dubuque, Iowa. After one year at Loras College he transferred to Iowa 
State Teachers College in Cedar Falls, Iowa. While at Iowa State Teachers 
College, Jim distinguished himself as an outstanding student. In addition 
to his nomination to Beta Beta Beta Jim was on the Dean's List, in the 
Hall of Scholarship, Hall of Recognition and graduated with honors with 
a B.A. in 1961. While at Iowa State Jim was both a laboratory assistant 
in biology and a graduate teaching assistant in his last semester. 

In the summer of 1961 he entered Graduate School at the University of 
Illinois in the Department of Entomology. 

While here at the University Jim has had positions both as a research 
assistant and University Fellow. He did his research under the direction 
of Dr. L.E. Chadwick on cholinesterase. The title of Jim's thesis is 
STUDIES ON SOLUBLE AND PARTICULATE CHOLINESTERASE FROM THE HOUSE FLY 
( MUSCA DOMESTICA L.). 

After Dr. Krysan finished his thesis in the summer of 1965, he and 
his wife, Carole and their two boys went to Winona, Minnesota where he 
accepted a position on the staff of St. Mary's College in the Biology 
Department where he will be teaching biology and continuing his research 
on cholinesterase. 

Richard Harry Storch - 1966 

Dick was born March 16, 1937 in Evanston, Illinois. He attended 
high school at the Maine Township High School in Des Plaines, Illinois. 
Dick entered Carleton College located in Northfield, Minnesota in September 
of 1955. He received his B.A. degree from Carleton College in June of 1959. 

Dick came to the University of Illinois in the fall of 1959 in the 
College of Education with a major in the teaching of biological sciences 



' 












■ 



. 



. ! 

■ 



• 



. 



: 



. 









. 












-16- 



in the teacher training program. In January of 1961 Dick switched rather 
than fight, to the Entomology Department. While in the Department of 
Entomology he held positions both as teaching assistant and research 
assistant . 

While here as a student Dick was married to Kay Saeger who was also 
very active in the Physiology Department. They have one son, Carl. 

He carried on his research under the direction of Dr. Chadwick in 
the area of insect morphology. He took his Master's degree without a 
thesis in 1961 and completed his Ph.D. in November of 1965. The title 
of his thesis is: DEVELOPMENT OF THE CERVICAL AND THORACIC MUSCULATURE 
IN THE AMERICAN COCKROACH, PERIPLANETA AMERICANA (LINNAEUS) ( DICTYOPTERA : 
BLATTIDAE). 

In September of 1965 Dick accepted a position in the Department of 
Entomology at the University of Maine located in Orono, Maine. His duties 
will include some teaching and he will have an opportunity to continue 
his research activities. We envy them in that beautiful country. 

Raman Satisa Chandran - 1966 

Raman Satisa Chandran was born March 2, 1935 in the coastal town of 
Quilon, Kerala, India where he attended elementary and high school. He 
graduated from the government English High School in 1949. He attended 
the Sree Navayana College in Quilon, India from 1949-1951 at which time 
he received an Intermediate in Science. In 1955 he obtained a B.Sc. in 
zoology and botany also from Sree Navayana College. Chandran worked for 
a year as a volunteer relief worker in the cyclone affected areas of 
Madras State. Then in 1956 he entered the University of Kerala at 
Trivandrum where he received the M.Sc. degree in zoology and entomology 
in 1958. For 3 years Chandran worked as research assistant under the 
Indian Council of Medical Research on the behavior and resistance of 
Anopheles mosquitoes and also as a technical assistant of entomology in 
the National Malaria Eradication program. He entered the U. of I. in 
the fall of 1961. While here he held the position of research assistant. 



■■-••. Ciri! 5.1 ■ ■ | ' 

'•'••■"' • • ■•.-..• 

■ "■' -••'"..■:• ■ 

'■•'•' . i ■. '•'•■..' 

•■•••■-•• ; - -■ :© 

' .' ■■:''.. - 

- ; .•'•■ )IV ■';'.• 
■ ■ ■ ■■■'■■■■■■:. ■ ; „• ■ ..- 

■ ■■ ,■ ••..-: .,-.-. 

I s i noli •.•■■'.' , : ' . ' ': 

• .'■-■. . ■■ ' ■•■ ■ ■ 

■■;.■.:•• ' . . ' v 

■'-■■•' : '-'- : ..- ■■ .•: ....:■ 

to .'. i ■ •'•'••.• 

; . : 

- : ■ .-■' . 

i " • ■ ■ ' ' . ■' • 

• •:'-:■ ■ • 

. ' ' ' 

I ' S ■ . ... 

••'.'. ••■'':" 

. . - ... •'■■■'• • - ' - 

•■■-.■■ 
'f ; . ■ • • . . ' 

■ ,' • i 

. ■ ■ • : ■ 



■17- 



He did his work under Dr. Chadwick on the effects of thermal stress on 
morphology. The title of his thesis is: THE EFFECT OF NORMAL AND HIGH 
TEMPERATURE APPLIED DURING DEVELOPMENT ON THE MUSCULATURE AND ASSOCIATED 
STRUCTURES IN AEDES STIMULANS (WALKER) (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE). 

Upon the completion of his work in November, Dr. Chandran decided 
to stay on at the University of Illinois doing some postdoctoral work 
under Dr. Horsfall on comparative morphological studies of Michigan and 
Finland mosquitoes reared in elevated temperatures and histological studies 
on thermally induced "female" mosquitoes. 

Dr. Chandran is at present looking for a position in a University 
where he can continue on with his research and do some teaching. 

Amal C. Banerjee - 1966 

Amal was born January 1, 1934 in Bengal, India. Before coming to 
the U.S. he lived in Calcutta, India where his parents still reside. 

He graduated from the Metropolitan High School in Calcutta in 1949. 
He entered the University of Calcutta in the fall of 1949 and in 1953 
he was awarded the B.Sc. with distinction from the Bangalasi College. In 
1959 he received the M.Sc. degree also from the University of Calcutta 
in the field of zoology and comparative anatomy. In 1958 Amal came to 
the United States where he entered the University of the Pacific in 
Stockton, California where he received a 2nd M.S. degree in Zoology in 
1960. While at the University of the Pacific he held the position of 
teaching assistant. While there he was also elected to membership in 
Beta Beta Beta. He is also a member of the Zoological Society of Calcutta 
and the Entomological Society of America. 

He came to the University of Illinois in 1960 to work on his Ph.D. 
While here he held research assistantships with the State Natural History 
Survey under the supervision of Dr. G.C. Decker. 

Dr. Banerjee also did his research under the direction of Dr. Decker. 
The title of his thesis is: THE BIOLOGY OF CRAMBUS TRISECTUS WALKER, IN 
ILLINOIS AND NOTES ON RELATED SPECIES. 



■18- 



In December 1965 he accepted a position as a research associate in 
Agricultural Entomology at the State Natural History Survey. His job is 
concerned with the laboratory and field studies on the biology and control 
of insects attacking forage crops, particularly the alfalfa weevil. 

Amal is married. His wife's name is Ranu and they have one child, 
a daughter named Renee, age 2. 

Rama Kant Bharadwaj - 1966 

Rama was born July 15, 1930 in Badli (Punjab), India. He received 
his high school and intermediate education at D.A.V. College in Dehra 
Dun, India. 

In 1951 he graduated from D.A.V. College, Dehra Dun with a B.Sc. 
degree. He then attended the Government College in Naini Tal, India 
where he received a M.Sc. degree in Zoology with a thesis in Entomology. 
At the completion of his work at Naini Tal he was awarded a Certificate 
of Merit for being the best all around student of the year 1957. He 
also secured first division and first position in M.Sc. at Agra University 
in 1957. From 1957 to 1961 he served as Assistant Professor in the 
Zoology Department of Meerut College, Agra University in Meerut, India. 

Rama was awarded a Fulbright Travel Grant to proceed to the U.S.A. 
in 1961. While here at the University of Illinois he has held the position 
of research assistant in entomology while working on the comparative 
morphology of insects. He has done his research under the direction of 
Dr. Leigh Chadwick. Rama is married and they have one child. They have 
both been very active in the campus social affairs of the international 
student group. 

The title of his thesis is EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE CERVICO- 
THORACIC SKELETON AND MUSCLES IN DERMAPTERA. 

After receiving his degree in February, Dr. Bharadwaj hopes to find 
a position in a University where he can continue his research and have 
the opportunity to do some teaching. 



• . ... 

- . . , 



■ 



. . 



I 

5 : 
'. ■ 

■ ■ •■ r> 



E . 

. '. 

. - 

■ • 

■ 

■ 



• ■ 
■ 






. 



-19- 
PRESENT ENTOMOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Aly A. Abou-aly 

Research: Medically important insects , their bionomics and relations to 
disease causing pathogens. He is working on the bionomics of 
Psorophora varipes . He is also doing some teaching in the 
laboratory of Dr. Horsf all's classes. 
Advisor: Dr. W.R. Horsf all 

Robert T. Allen 

Research: Working on the systematics of the family Carabidae (Coleoptera) . 
Recently published a paper on a taxonomic study of the Carabidae 
of Louisiana. La. Acad. Sci. 
Advisor: Dr. H.H. Ross 

John J. Ameel 

Research: Received an M.S. degree from Kansas State University in the 

summer of 1965. Worked on stress in cockroaches. He has not 
yet established a problem in his research at the U of I . He 
was in Costa Rica last year where he took a course in tropical 
insect ecology with the Organization for Tropical Study. 

Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg and Dr. J.R. Larsen 

Robert L. Benson 

Research: Insect hormones and their relationship to intermediary metabolism 

in insects. 
Advisor: Dr. S. Friedman 

John K. Bouseman 

Research: Systematic studies of the families Rhipiphoridae and Cerambycidae . 
Also during the summer of 1965, John continued his participation 
in the current series of South American expeditions of the 
American Museum of Natural History. He returned to the "Green 
Hell" of eastern Bolivia to join a field party working along 
the upper Rio Mamore" and its tributaries. This year's work was 
a continuation of a project initiated in 1964: The biological 
exploration of the little known area around the southern headwaters 
of the Rio Madeira. In 1964 the expedition worked along the 
Bolivian-Brazilian frontier in the area drained by the Rio 
Guapore . 

In addition to collections made for the Museum, John was 
able to collect a considerable amount of material in groups of 
personal interest to him, and he is looking forward to having 
the time to "work up" this material. 
Advisor: Dr. Richard B. Selander 

William R. Campbell 

Research: Completed a master's degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

in Blacksburg. Came to the U of I in the fall of 1965. Area of 

research not yet specifically determined. Bill presented a paper 

at the ESA meetings in New Orleans on the genetic factors for 
DDT resistance in the DDT-resistant strains of cockroaches. 

Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg and Dr. C.W. Kearns 






■ 



. 






• 



-20- 



Franklin Chang 

Research: My research activities the first semester of the 1965-66 school 
year were centered around the qualitative and quantitative 
determination of the sugars and their levels respectively in 
the honey bee ( Apis mellifica ) hemolymph and the problem of the 
diffusion of sugars across the midgut of the same insect. The 
majority of the semester was spent in developing a TLC method 
for separating hemolymph sugars in the honey bee and assaying 
the sugars in the hemolymph by an enzymatic and organo- chemical 
method now being employed by Dr. Friedman in his research. 
I hope to complete the course requirements for the doctorate 
next semester and take the preliminary examination sometime 
next fall. My major interest as of now falls along the line 
of carbohydrate metabolism in insects , but as of yet I have not 
determined my specific thesis problem in this area. 

The first semester was highlighted by a trip to New Orleans 
to attend the ESA meetings, the first of its kind for me. 

Advisor: Dr. S. Friedman 

Robert (Bert) Clegern 

Research: No chosen research area as yet; likely to be in control or 

behavior. At the present time my major interest is to develop 
a winning Softball team this spring. 
Advisor: Dr. S. Friedman 



Samuel Cullop 
Research : 



Advisor: 



Insect behavior in general and especially in tobacco hornworms , 
Protoparce sexta . At present working on the behavior of P_. 
sexta including experiments and observations on all four stages 
of development. A few of these include the effect of starvation 
on larvae being reared under diapausing conditions, courtship 
and mating behavior, feeding from model flowers, time spent in 
each instar and in the premolt condition for each succeeding 
instar, developmental units, embryology, etc. 
Dr. G.P. Waldbauer 



Eddie Wayne Cupp 

Research: Area of research not yet determined. 
Advisor: Dr. W.R. Horsfall 



Tobias Dirks 
Research: 
Advisor: 



Area of research not yet determined. 
Dr. G.P. Waldbauer 



John L. Eaton 
Research: 



Advisor: 



Studies of action of DDT on insect nervous system. John attended 
the ESA meetings in New Orleans where he presented a paper on 
the activity of the nervous system of DDT treated American 
cockroaches as related to visible symptoms of poisoning. 
Dr. J.G. Sternburg 



' 






•. 



. 






• 



• 












-21- 



Gary E. Eertmoed 

Research: Teaching assistant and curator of departmental insect collection. 
Have also been working on my thesis research: "A revision of 
the genus Epipsocus (Psocoptera: Epipsocidae)." Recently 
published a paper on "A life history study of Peripsocus 
quadrifasciatus (Harris) (Psocoptera: Peripsocidae)" in the 
Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society. 

Advisor: Dr. R.B. Se lander 

Roger F. Flattum 

Research: Investigating the mode of action of nicotine and curare in the 
insect nervous system. Also had the opportunity to attend the 
ESA meetings in New Orleans. 
Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg 

Willard Fogal 

Research: Have narrowed down my present interests to a study of the 

histology of cuticle and subepidermal cells in flies. 
Advisor: Dr. G.S. Fraenkel 

Philip (Mike) Fox 

Research: Research interests not yet determined. 
Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg 

Govind Gangrade 

Research: Working on onion maggot, Hylemyia antiqua Meigen. Came to the 

U.S.A. in September 1965 under A.I.D. program for one year. 
Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg 



Edwin Gemrich 
Research : 



Advisor: 



Insect toxicology and biochemistry. Presently working on the 
enzymatic degradation of carbamates by insects and the enzymatic 
mechanism(s) responsible for carbamate detoxification in insects. 
Dr . C . W . Kearns 



Catherine T. Hsiao 

Research: Insect physiology. At the present time v/orking on bursicon, the 
new insect hormone which controls tanning in the adult fly and 
other insects. Also attended the annual ESA meetings in 
New Orleans. 

Advisor: Dr. G.S. Fraenkel 

Ting Huan Hsiao 

Research: Insect physiology and biochemistry. Currently doing work on 

the physiological basis of host-plant selection in the Colorado 
potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say). Also attended 
the annual ESA meetings in New Orleans. 

Advisor: Dr. G.S. Fraenkel 



James F. Janicke 

Research: Area of research not yet determined. 
Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg 



. 









• 



• '. 












'. ■ 



■ 



■ ■•-• . ' 






■ ■■ 






. 



... , 

■ . : . _ ,. ■ • ■ ' . ... 






... rt j 

■ ■•• 






I 



- 

■ 

. - . 
I 



-22- 



Paul S. Killmer 

Research: Electron microscopy /histology of the brain of adult Aedes 

aegypti — normal and virus infected. With Dr. Larsen I have 
been working on the fine structure of the ommatidia of Phormia 
regina , particularly at the level of nerve integration. 

Mrs. Killmer and I spent the first week of September in 
Mexico where we had an unfortunate automobile accident. Mrs. 
Killmer broke her pelvis, but is recovering rapidly. 

Also included in the travel is a trip to Fort Dietrich , 
Maryland, site of the Army Chemical Corps, in the first week 
of February to acquire material infected with virus for thesis 
study. 
Advisor: Dr. J.R. Larsen 

Donald E. Kuhlman 

Research: Prior to enrollment in September, 1965, I was employed as 

Farm Adviser in Montgomery County, 1963-1965. Area of research 
not yet determined. 
Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg 

Joseph V. Maddox, Jr . 

Research: Primarily in the area of insect pathology and insect ecology. 
Currently engaged in a study of the diseases of the armyworm, 
Pseudalatia impuncta . Now specifically working on microsporidian 
pathogens of Pseudalitia . 

Also attended the North Central Branch Meeting of the 
Entomological Society of America and the National Meetings of 
the ESA. 
Advisor: Dr. G.C. Decker 

Jean M. Mathieu 

Research: I worked exclusively on my thesis the whole year on the biological 
studies of a group of closely related species of the genus 
Epicauta (Meloidae: Coleoptera). (Nothing exciting happened 
to me.) I will be going back to teach and do research in Mexico 
(March, 1966). Chances are I will be back shortly next summer 
for my final examination. 

Advisor: Dr. R.B. Selander 

David C. Newton 

Research: A profitable summer was spent perfecting techniques for observing 
various phases on honey bee behavior. On several week-ends the 
Newtons sallied forth to see various points of interest in 
Illinois. Recently published a paper on honey bee temperature 
regulation in the American Bee Journal. 

Advisor: Dr. E.R. Jaycox 

Stephen Parshall 

Research: Area of research not yet determined. 
Advisor: Dr. S. Friedman 



. • 



• 






•- . •■ . 









■ ■■ ■' .• ■■ ■ • • •• " ■ 



• - . 









. 






■ ■ ' 



- 



' 



■ 



■23- 



William J. Patterson 

Research: Course work leading to the requirements for a Ph.D. degree should 
be completed during the spring semester 1966. Preliminary tests 
will be given during September 1966. Word has been received 
from the Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army that the 
present contract with the University of Illinois due to expire 
in August 1966 will be extended to 31 August 1967. Major 
Patterson, Medical Service Corps, will hopefully complete his 
research and dissertation on carbamate insecticide research 
during his last year at the University. 

Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg 

Lance G. Peterson 

Research: Insect immunology. At the present time working on interspecific 
responses of transplanted insect tissue. Recently published 
a note on the environmental specificity for the development of 
insect ovarian tissue with Dr. Larsen. Also attended the ESA 
meetings in New Orleans. 

Advisor: Dr. J.R. Larsen 

John D. Pinto 

Research: Currently involved in studies on the sexual behavior and 

taxonomy of the genus Meloe (Coleoptera: Meloidae). 
Advisor: Dr. R.B. Selander 

Robert F. Randall 

Research: Insect cholinesterases and studying the effects of inhibition 

upon these enzymes. Also attended the annual meetings of the 

ESA in New Orleans. 
Advisor: Dr. L.E. Chadwick 

Keturah Reinbold 

Research: Did a problem on feeding behavior of tobacco hornworm adult to 
fulfill part of requirements for an M.S. in Biology. Will 
receive degree in February, 1966. Will be on campus next 
semester and probably teach next year. 

Advisor: Dr. J.E. Heath (Physiology) and Dr. G.P. Waldbauer 

Judith L. Reynolds 

Research: Investigation of effect of competition under conditions of 

constant temperature and relative humidity on the population 
dynamics of two species of flour beetles Tribolium confusum 
and Tribolium castaneum . 

Advisor: Dr. A.W. Ghent 

Maria (Nen) Ronquillo 

Research: Histopathology of thermal stress on subarctic aedine mosquitoes. 
Recently published with Dr. Ray L. Watterson a paper on the 
persistence of mesonephroi in chick embryos given amino 
guanidine sulfate at four days of incubation. 

Advisor: Dr. W.R. Horsfall 



■ 



. • - - 



. ..• 



V 

■ 
_ 



I 



: 






■ 



' 






■ 



- 



i-J 






-24- 

George Rotramel 

Research: Have been working on a survey of genital capsule morphology 
in male ants (M.Sc. thesis). Also working on distribution 
studies of winter stoneflies with Dr. Ross. In this connection 
I made trips to Ozark Plateau, Allegheny Mountains, Adirondock 
Mountains , and Mount Kutahdin area in Maine . 
Advisor: Dr. H.H. Ross 

Soelaksono Sastrodihardjo 

Research: Developmental histology of Cecropia ovary. Culture of Cecropia 
ovary from diapause and developing pupae. Attended the mid-west 
endocrinology meeting at Iowa State University, Iowa City with 
Dr. Fraenkel's group. Also gave a paper at the annual meeting 
of the American Society of Cell Biology in Philadelphia, Pa. 
which was introduced by Dr. J.F. White. 

Advisor: Dr. J.R. Larsen 

Aubrey Scarbrough 

Research: Due to course work and because of my first semester here, I 

have not yet chosen a specific area of research. 
Advisor: Dr. G.P. Waldbauer. 

Morris Seligman 

Research: Restricted to summers, weekends and other times of freedom 
from courses [trauma]. Action of bursicon with particular 
reference to the metabolism of tyrosine. Recently gave a paper 
at the regional meeting of the Society of Comparative 
Endocrinology in Iowa City. Also submitted for publication a 
paper in Science on Bursicon with Dr. Fraenkel and Cathy Hsiao. 

Advisor: Dr. S. Friedman 

John D. Unzicker 

Research: The comparative morphology and evolution of the female genitalia 
of Trichoptera. Also the evolution and dispersal of the 
Hydropsyche bifida group of caddisflies. Recently published 
on two new species of the genus Myrmecotypus from Central America 
(Clubionidae: Araneae) in the Jour. Kansas Ent. Soc. and the 
Micrasema rusticum group of caddisflies (Brachycentridae: 
Trichoptera) in the Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. Had the opportunity 
to attend the annual meetings of the ESA in New Orleans. 

Advisor: Dr. H.H. Ross 

Richard C. Weddle 

Research: Most of last summer was spent on further study and analysis of 
the behavior of blister beetles. In conjunction with this was 
a project involving the collecting and breeding of grasshoppers, 
eggs of which are used for the rearing of the beetles. 

Travel consisted of collecting trips to southern Illinois, 
Missouri, Kansas and attending the ESA meetings in New Orleans. 
Advisor: Dr. R.B. Selander 



• 



- 












■ 















■J 






' 






. 









-25- 

George Robert Wilson 

Research: Diapause in cecropia and hornworm pupa and the relationship of 
the pupa brain to the control of wound metabolism and diapause. 
Ecdysone and its role in wound metabolism. The structure 
activity relationship of ecdysone. 
Advisor: Dr. J.R. Lars en 

Toshio Yamamoto 

Research: Thesis research on genus Polycentropus (Trichoptera, Psychomyiidae), 
Publications this past year with Dr. Ross include papers on a 
new species of the caddisfly genus Polycentropus from eastern 
North America (Trichoptera, Psychomyiidae) in the Proc. Biol. 
Soc. Wash, and a phylogenetic outline of the caddisfly genus 
Mystacides (Trichoptera, Leptoceridae) . 
Advisor: Dr. H.H. Ross. 

Anna Ying Yang 

Research: I am currently taking courses in both English and Entomology. 
I expect to do research on the ultrastructure of the cockroach 
nervous system and the comparative biochemistry of the same 
system. I arrived in America on September 22, 1965 by plane 
from Taiwan (Republic of China). 

Advisor: Dr. J.R. Larsen and Dr. J.G. Sternburg 









■ 



■ 



I 






.'■■'■ ' • ' 



-26- 



NEWS ABOUT THE STAFF MEMBERS 

Dr. Walter V. Balduf 

Dr. and Mrs. Balduf spent six weeks in Mississippi and Texas during 
February and March* 1965. They also spent a week visiting relatives in Ohio 
in May. Following a delightful tradition of many years standing, Dr. and Mrs. 
Balduf returned to Olsen's Eaglesnest resort, near Ely, Minnesota where they 
stayed from June 1 to October 1, 1965. Besides enjoying the cool, and often 
rainy climate, Dr. Balduf again traced the life history of the Phycitid 
moth, Acrobasis rubrifasciella (Pack.) and the insect parasites of its 
caterpillar and chrysalis. This effort was particularly rewarding in that 
at least six parasites were reared from the chrysalis — some new, others 
heretofore infrequent, and all very interesting. A manuscript describing 
the life of the host moth and certain of its parasites is presently in the 
hands of an editor. 

Dr. Leigh E. Chadwick 

Dr. Chadwick is currently concerned with the following courses in the 
department : 

Entomology 301 Introduction to Advanced Entomology, shared with 
Dr. S. Friedman and Dr. J. Sternburg; 

Entomology 410 Insect Morphology, shared with Dr. J. Sternburg. 

His present research interests include a continuation of his studies of 
insect cholinesterase : properties and purification of insect cholinesterases ; 
kinetics of the reaction of insect ChE with substrates and inhibitors; 
physiological role of ChE's in insects, including possible relation of the 
acetylcholine-cholinesterase system to events in growth and metamorphosis. 
This work is assisted by a research grant from the National Institutes of 
Health. Mr. R.F. Randall is participating in it as a candidate for the 
Ph.D. in Entomology. Dr. J.L. Krysan completed his Ph.D. studies in this 
area in June 1965. 






: 



U 






'. 









-27- 



Dr. Chadwick is also working on the comparative morphology of insect 
musculature; this work is concerned primarily with the thoracic musculature 
of all insects, and starts from the premise that a single muscular pattern 
underlies the present thoracic muscular pattern of all groups. Data bearing 
on this general problem and on details of muscular organization are sought 
in various insects. The stress is naturally on those insect types that have 
been least adequately studied in the past , and on the embryogeny of the 
muscular patterns and their subsequent development. The work is assisted 
by a research grant from the National Science Foundation. Three students 
working in the area have recently completed work for the Ph.D. in Entomology. 
They are: 
Mr. R.K. Bharadwaj , who has studied comparatively the cervicothoracic 

musculature of Dermaptera, 
Mr. R.S. Chandran, who with the guidance of Dr. W.R. Horsfall has studied 

the musculature of the head and genital segments of Aedes stimulans , 

both of the normal sexes and of thermally-induced "males". 
Mr. R.H. Storch, who has studied the embryogeny of the cervicothoracic 

muscular pattern of the cockroach, Periplaneta. 

Dr. Chadwick is now completing work on the translation from German to 
English of two entomological books, the English versions of which are expected 
to appear shortly: 

1. The World of Insects, by W. Linsenmaier, to be published by Artists and 
Writers Press. 

2. The Language and Orientation of Bees, by K. von Frisch, to be published 
by the Harvard University Press. 

Dr. Chadwick is resigning from the department in June 1966. He expects 
to spend about 5 months a year at his summer home in Blue Hill Falls, Maine; 
and to continue entomological research at some as yet undecided location 
during the winters. 

A present tabulation on the Chadwick family include three married 
children: Frederick Latreille, of Rockville, Maryland; Pierre Latreille, 
of Baltimore, Maryland; Mrs. Frances Buhrdorf, of Newport News, Virginia, 
and at present count there are eight grandchildren. 



• 



''■■■■-. 
•...-■ • . ' • ■ ■■ . ■ 



■ : ■ _' 


, 






• 


. 


- .-: '• . 




• 




: " 














-28- 



Dr. Gottfried S. Fraenkel 

Dr. Fraenkel is carrying on a continuation of his research on bursicon, 
a new insect hormone of the nature of a protein which controls tanning in the 
adult fly and other insects. Connected with this research and working under 
Dr. Fraenkel's guidance are Catherine Hsiao, full-time research assistant, 
also M. Seligman and W. Fogal, graduate students. Dr. Fraenkel is also 
continuing his research on the heat resistance of inter-tidal snails. His 
other research activities include the thesis research of Ting Hsiao on 
nutrition and host plant selection of the Colorado potato beetle and pupal 
diapause in the fly, Sarcophaga falculata . 

Gottfried spent 6 weeks at Woods Hole during July, August and September, 
of last year and he is preparing to spend 3 weeks during February of this 
year at the Lerner Marine Laboratory at Bimini in the Bahamas . We have a 
feeling that the current 4° above zero weather in Champaign may have something 
to do with this trip. He attended meetings of the ESA at New Orleans in 
November and the AAAS meeting at Berkeley in December, and the meeting of 
Society of General Biology at Woods Hole in September. He also attended the 
regional meeting on endocrinology at Iowa City, with Catherine Hsiao, 
Willard Fogal and Morris Seligman who all read papers. 

A family report on the Fraenkel's tells us that son, Gideon, is now 
associate professor of chemistry at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 
and Dan is teaching bacteriology at Harvard Medical School. 

Dr. Stanley Friedman 

Stan is continuing his research activities on the mechanisms of 
metabolic interconversions in Diptera. He has just completed two articles on 
the enzymes involved with trehalose metabolism which will appear in Volume 7 
of Methods in Enzymology published by Academic Press. He is also getting 
involved along with his graduate students on the effects of insect hormones 
on intermediary metabolism in insects. 






- 






■ -. 



■ 

• ... - 

• - 



i 



-29- 



He spent a great deal of this past semester developing the new graduate 
level course in Insect Physiology. What started out to be a half semester 
of teaching turned into a very full semester of insect biochemistry. 

Stan is anxiously watching the progress of the construction of the new 
building with the anticipation of moving into his own permanent quarters. 

Travel for the Friedman family this past year consisted of an extensive 
trip in June by car through the northeast and back across Canada with time 
out for some research discussions at Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Stan also 
attended the Federation meetings at Atlantic City, New Jersey last spring. 

All of the biologically distinguished children of the Friedman clan 
seem to be well acclimated to life in Urbana and we are all looking forward 
to the first published poems of Mathew Arnold. 

Dr. Arthur W. Ghent 

During the past year, Dr. Ghent continued his writing and research in 
several fields of interest. His model of crossing-over, involving the 
postulated existence of alternately oriented dipoles along opposite surfaces 
of chromosomes, was accepted by the Journal of Theoretical Biology for 
publication early in 1966. His work on the use of the binomial in the 
assessment of contagion in three dimensions was completed during the summer 
of 1965, and prepared for publication during the fall. Biometric research 
now in progress includes the extension of Fisher's exact test for 2x2 
tables to larger tables. The problem with larger tables is not the 
mathematical formulation of an exact test, which has proven elementary, 
but rather the spatial representation of these larger tables in a manner 
permitting the isolation of more extreme tables than the one observed. 
Satisfactory methods have recently been found for 2 x 3 , 2 x U , and 3x3 
tables, which seem extendable, in principle, to any sized table. A second 
problem in biometry, also currently under study, involves the greater 
elaboration of analytic methods suitable to 3-dimensioned contingency 
tables. 



-30- 



New acquisitions in the Ghent family, in 1965, included a house in 
Urbana, and a Tom kitten named Gregor Mendel, so named because of a 
certain air of imminent genetic transmission about the beast. Gregor, a 
grey and white shorthair, has grown exponentially since his birth last 
spring in Canada. His parents were also genetically oriented, having 
represented evidently the descendants of many generations of rigorously 
non-selective, even indiscriminant , outbreeding. 

Dr. Ghent is offering a new course in Quantitative Biology in the 
spring semester of 1966. This course has attracted a pre-enrollment of 
over 30 graduate students. 

Dr. William P. Hayes 

Dr. Hayes tells us that after 10 years as a "Faculty Drop Out" he is 
spending his time with travel and golf. Last winter he took a cruise to 
South Africa and the Holy Land. This winter it will be a 77-day cruise in 
the South Pacific to New Zealand and return to Chili and the east coast of 
South America. He says all this luxury travel is hard to take and in the 
same sentence sends his regards to all the entomology graduates who might 
remember him. 

If retirement is this good, people will be standing in line to sign up. 

Dr. William R. Horsfall 

Dr. Horsfall is currently working on the histopathology of thermal 
stress on subarctic aedine mosquitoes. Bill has published rather extensively 
this past year with his former graduate students John Anderson and Reinhart 
Brust. They have put out some five papers on the effects of thermal stress 
on the anomalous development of mosquitoes. 

He also published with Dr. Ross a synopsis of the mosquitoes of Illinois. 

Having spent the better part of four months in Europe last year Bill 
has confined his travel to the good old USA this year. He has made collecting 
trips both to Minnesota and Wisconsin to obtain subarctic mosquitoes. 



-31- 



Dr. Elbert R. Jay cox 

Dr. Jaycox is continuing his work on the behavior of honey bees with 
two graduate students. David Newton, Entomology, continued his study of 
the bees' behavior in relation to smoke. Patrick Tyler, in psychology, began 
work on the genetics of flight behavior. 

Dr. Jaycox also arranged and presided at a half day program for the 
American Beekeeping Federation in Atlanta, Georgia in January. The program, 
a symposium, dealt with "The impact of pesticides on beekeeping". 

He was also responsible for a session on fruit and vegetable pollination 
for the National Pollination Conference at Texas ASM University in 
September, where he also presented a paper on "How bee behavior may affect 
pollination research." 

The Jaycox family camped to California and back during August. The 
whole tribe, including wife, 4 children, and dog (such courage). They 
visited Entomology Departments at Utah State University and University of 
California at Davis. 

Dr. Clyde W. Kearns 

Camille and I spent the 1964-1965 academic year in England where I 
worked with Dr. Cyril Donninger in the Milstead Laboratory of Chemical 
Enzymology at Sittingbourne in Kent. During my stay we made an unsuccessful 
effort to elucidate the nature of the acetylcholine receptors in insects , 
but in the course of our work we discovered a conformational difference in 
the cholinesterase of insects and that of mammals. I hope through continued 
efforts to use this information as a basis for explaining some of the many 
uncertainties concerning the cholinergic system in insects. 

We lived in the beautiful and ancient city of Canterbury. This meant 
a 20-mile drive for me each day over a narrow, winding road and over a very 
hilly terrain. For about a week this proved to be a formidable undertaking 
until I became more adept at driving on the left side of the road. The 
inconvenience of 30 minute drives each day to work was fully compensated for 
by the close proximity to our home of the excellent Canterbury Golf Club. 






: 



. 



■ . - 






: 



_ ■ 



. 












: 



- 



• 



| 



- 

! 



. 



' 









- 



■ 



-32- 



We went to Spain over the Christmas holidays to soak up some sunshine. 
We located at Torremollinas on the Costo del Sol and spent most of our time 
driving up and down the coast between Malaga and Gibralter. This vacation 
also included a one-day trip to Tangier which proved to be a very interesting 
city. 

We spent a long Easter vacation at Glen Eagles in Scotland. The main 
object in this trip was, of course, to play golf. We found the golf courses 
to be excellent, but the weather became gradually worse until on the last day 
of our stay it became intolerable even for me. 

This first visit to Scotland was enough to induce me to give it another 
try. In the middle of May I joined a friend of mine on a 10-day tour of 
Scottish golf courses. We made our headquarters in the town of Troon on 
the west coast of Scotland. There are no less than 20 championship courses 
in and around Troon. We found it possible to easily play two different courses 
each day and on one day of our stay we added a third course, where we left 
the last green at 10:00 PM in still bright sunshine. This trip left me 
feeling slightly over-golfed. 

Dr. Joseph R. Larsen 

The activities and research in Dr. Larsen 's laboratory during the past 
year have been concerned primarily with the continuation of a study of the 
chemo- and mechanoreceptors of insects. This study is being carried on 
presently at the ultrastructure level with the use of the electron microscope. 
In conjunction with this work have been some studies on the compound eye on 
the insect, particularly the blowfly Phormia . 

Recently Joe and Shauna attended a Symposium on the compound eye held 
in Stockholm, Sweden where Joe presented a paper. This was followed by 
subsequent visits to Karolinska Institute in Stockholm with subsequent 
visits to Copenhagen with Dr. Ellen Thomsen, with Dr. Dietrich Schneider 
in Munich and also laboratories in London before returning home. The trip 
was just long enough to wet the appetite and to want to go back and take 
the whole family. 



. ' . . - 
■''■'■•■-' ' ' . 

'■■.'■'■ ■ • ■ .- • 

■ 

•■ .- . ■ -"• f •■' •• ; - ■ 

■ '■' ■ 
'■■'■•.■• ' 

■ ■ • ■ 

. . ■ . : . • ' 

■'.'.•■ 

. . ... ■ ' 



• ' ' " '■ ' ' 

. . . 

■ 

. ■ ' ■ . '■ ■ 



-33- 



Teaching is divided between Insect Physiology with Dr. Friedman and 
Biology 110 and 111. 

The family number remains stable at 3. However, with Pam 16 and now 
at the wheel of the family chariot the stability is somewhat questionable. 
Having volunteered the second time to do the yearly newsletter my sanity is 
also somewhat suspect. 

Dr. William H. Luckmann 

When Dr. Decker retired last August and left for the sunny clime of 
Miami, Florida there was a void at the Natural History Survey. That void 
was most adequately filled as of the 1st of September by Dr. Luckmann who 
is now entomologist and Head of the Section of Economic Entomology for the 
State Natural History Survey. 

In his new position Bill has an abundance of administration. However, 
he still finds time to carry on his research on aphid resistance in sweet 
corn and induced sterility in the onion maggot. 

There are no new additions to the Luckmann family — just five children. 
However, the Luckmann' s share with the editor that certain pride only a 
parent can have in the Jefferson Junior High Orchestra where both Chuck and 
Nancy Luckmann play in the concert band. 

Our congratulations and wishes for success to Dr. Luckmann in his new 
position. 

Dr. V.G. Milum 

Even though he has been in retirement for going on 4 years, Dr. Milum 
still manages to keep very busy. He has just completed his History of the 
National Beekeepers' Association from 1860-1964. Over 100 years of bee- 
keeping covering 80 pages. He also has several articles in the American 
Bee Journal. 

After their trip last year to Italy, Spain and Portugal, they spent 
two months at Sarasota, Florida, golfing and watching the White Sox, 
shelling — ' shellebreties' . 






- 



■ 



























-31+- 



Dr. Milum tells us that he is the oldest grandfather with first 
grandson by George — Jeffrey Shedd Milum. Also second daughter-in-law by 
oldest son, Bob. We trust this is the first in a long line of grandchildren 
and heirs to the Milum fortunes. 

Dr. Herbert H. Ross 

For Dr. Ross as with most biologists on the campus, vivid memories 
for 1965 seem to center around the AIBS meetings, in particular his part in 
the organization, conduct, and later publication of the Biological Logic 
symposium. His research activities center around the caddisflies and the 
winter stoneflies. The "Winter Stonefly Club" now consisting of over 100 
members continues to send in winter stonefly collections from all over eastern 
North America and in addition staff members here made quite a number of 
trips in February and March and again in December of 1965. The aim with 
these little winter stoneflies is to try to convert them into thermometers 
registering the temperatures of glacial times. The project is a cooperative 
one with Dr. W.E. Ricker of the Canada Fisheries Board. Dr. Ross and 
Dr. Ricker spent a profitable week recently getting their notes synchronized 
in a conference at Vancouver, B.C. Considerable progress was made also with 
leafhopper studies, especially in cooperation with Dr. Leon W. Hepner who 
spent May at the Survey. 

Visitors to the Survey systematics group included Louise M. Russell, 
George B. Vogt, and Willis W. Wirth from the U.S. National Museum, Dr. K. 
Sakimura from the Pineapple Research Institute of Honolulu, Vernon H. Lee 
of the Rockefeller Foundation, Columbia, Dr. Marshal Hertig of the Gorgas 
Memorial Laboratory at Panama, and our old friend ex-Illini Edward Becker 
of the Entomological Research Institute of Ottawa, Canada. 

The Rosses enjoyed a delightful reunion with their son and daughter- 
in-law at Western Washington State College in October and with relatives 
in Louisiana at Thanksgiving. Both trips also netted elegant leafhopper 
collections. 



' 



. 



- • 









- 






• '.••■■ 






' 



■ . . 



. 



. : ' 



■ 






■■< • • " 



. 



' 



-35- 



Dr. Richard B. Selander 

The major research activities of Dr. Selander this past year include 
the organization and analysis of the behavioral and taxonomic information 
obtained during his recent sabbatical leave. The analysis and interpretation 
of an experiment to determine the effects of specific identity and body size 
on certain parameters of sexual behavior in Meloidae; and also a recently 
completed taxonomic study of one of the subfamilies of Meloidae. 

The Selander' s are building a new home in Champaign having surpassed 
the capacity of their present house. Also Dick informs us that Lorraine 
has received an undergraduate research grant from the NSF for a project in 
the Department of Psychology . 

Dr. Selander has written a report for the newsletter (page 6 ) on the 
state of the Departmental Insect Collection which should be of interest to 
all of you. 

Dr. James G. Sternburg 

Dr. Sternburg' s research this past year has been to continue studies 
on the mode of action of DDT, particularly through an electrophysiological 
approach to this problem. He is also continuing a study of the effects of 
organophosphate anticholinesterases on nervous tissues, with respect to 
amount of inhibition needed for production of visible symptoms. Jim has 
started, with Dr. Waldbauer, a study of certain features of behavior and 
biology of Cecropia . 

Travel this year has been to attend the Entomological Society Meetings 
in New Orleans. 

During this past year, Jim served as acting head of the department 
until August 31, 1965. It was a hectic year. Our hats off and sincere 
appreciation to Jim for an arduous task well done. 

Vital statistics on the Sternburg clan presently read Ginny 10, Tommy 7, 
and Janet 5. The Sternburg 's spent a delightful 2-week vacation in northern 
Wisconsin during late July, early August. 



-36- 



Dr. G.P. Waldbauer 

Dr. Waldbauer's research this past year has been on the feeding behavior 
of phytophagous insects, the biology of Hyalophora cecropia with Dr. Sternburg, 
and the mimicry and taxonomy of the Syrphidae. 

During late April and early May, Gil spent 3 weeks all over eastern 
Mexico collecting Syrphidae with Howard Weems of the Florida State Plant 
Board and Wally Boyes of McGill University. 

Gill informs us that wife Stephanie has completed her requirements 
for the M.A. in French this year. (Our congratulations!) She continues as 
a teaching assistant in the French Department. 

Dr. Waldbauer was also chairman of a session of a symposium on the 
Bioenergetics of Animals at the AIBS meetings here this past summer and gave 
an invited paper in this symposium of the food efficiency of phytophagous 
insects. Gil was also local arrangements chairman for the Animal Behavior 
Society for AIBS meeting. 

Dr. Joan F. White 

Dr. White is continuing her research on pupal moth ovaries in tissue 
culture. Also attempts are still being made to culture larval and embryonic 
mosquito tissues. 

Joan attended the Tissue Culture Association meetings in Miami, 
Florida in June, 1965, and she also read a paper at the American Society 
of Cell Biologists in Philadelphia in November 1965. She visited with 
Horikawa and Fox at the University of Wisconsin in early December to observe 
their culture techniques with Drosophila . 

Joan's two boys are in 1st and 6th grade this year. Her husband 
temporarily chaired the Department of English at Eastern Illinois University 
during the first quarter of this year, and she learned how hectic administra- 
tion can be. Dr. White hopes to go to Canberra, Australia next January to 
work in Dr. Grace's laboratory on insect tissue culture at his invitation. 

A virtually snowless winter in Champaign this year has made it 
considerably easier for Joan's daily drive to and from Charleston. 



-37- 



Dr. Judith Willis 

Dr. Willis' research this past year has been on the cuticular proteins 
and the node of action of the principal hormones on metamorphosis. 

In addition to her research, Judy is still very much involved in the 
undergraduate Honors Biology Program. She has just finished a semester of 
teaching "The Organism" and she is still responsible for the laboratory of 
"The Cell" course. 

This summer Judy helped to organize and participated in a special 
symposium at the AIBS meetings. The subject of the symposium was Modern 
Trends in Biology with the University of Illinois being the case study. 
This was one of a series of special symposia arranged to consider the 
problems of undergraduate teaching. 

This past summer Judy and her husband, Dr. John Willis of the Physiology 
Department, attended the meetings of the Society of General Physiologists 
in Woods Hole. The meetings were followed by some camping in the northeast 
and an opportunity to keep their canoeing arms in shape. 



-38- 



PUBLICATIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY, 1964-1965 



BALDUF, Walter V. 

Balduf, W.V. 1965. Observations on Archips cerasivoranus and certain 
parasites. Ohio Jour. Sci. 65:60-67. 



FRAENKEL, Gottfried S. 

Fraenkel, G. 1965. A brief survey of the recognition of carnitine as 
a substance of physiological importance. In_ Recent Research on 
Carnitine. Its Relation to Lipid Metabolism. Ed. G. Wolf. The 
M.I.T. Press, Cambridge, Mass. 1-3. 

Fraenkel, G. and C Hsiao. 1965. Bursicon, a hormone which mediates 

tanning of the cuticle in the adult fly and other insects. J. Ins. 
Physiol. 11:513-556. 

Hamby, R.J. and G. Fraenkel. 1965. Effects of high temperatures on 

the prosobranch snail, Littorina littorea. Biol. Bull. 129:406-407. 



GHENT, Arthur W. 

Ghent, A.W. 1965. Number triangles yielding the numerators for exact 
solutions of the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Canadian Entomologist 
97(7):701-715. 

Ghent, A.W. 1965. Sciences, existentialism, and the search for a 
naturalistic ethic. Bios 36(3) :103-125. 

Ghent, A.W. and B. Grinstead. 1965. A new method of assessing contagion, 
applied to a distribution of redear sunfish. Transactions of the 
American Fisheries Society 94(2) : 135-142. 

HORSFALL, William R. 

Anderson, J.F. and W.R. Horsfall. 1955. Dimorphic development of trans- 
planted juvenile gonads of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). Science, 
147:624-625. 

Anderson, J.F. and W.R. Horsfall. 1965a. Thermal stress and anomalous 
development of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) V. Effect of 
temperature on embryogeny of Aedes stimulans . J. exp. Biol. 158:211-221. 

Anderson, J.F. and W.R. Horsfall. 1965b. Dimorphic responses of trans- 
planted gonadal anlagen of mosquitoes. Proc. XII int. Congr. Ent. 
1965:154-155. 



-39- 



Brust, R.A. and W.R. Horsfall. 1965. Thermal stress and anomalous 

development of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) IV. Aedes communis . 
Canad. J. Zool. 43:17-52 + 8 pi. 

Horsfall, W.R. and J.F. Anderson. 1965. Dimorphism of mosquitoes. 
Proc. XII int. Congr. Ent. 1965:262. 

Ross, H.H. and W.R. Horsfall. 1965. A synopsis of the mosquitoes of 
Illinois (Diptera, Culicidae). 111. nat. Hist. Surv. Biol. Notes, 
No. 52, 50 pp. 



LARSEN, Joseph R. 

Larsen, J.R. 1965. Inability of metabolizable oils to mimic corpus 
allatum hormone stimulation of ovarian development in mosquitoes. 
Nature, 206:428-1+29. 

Larsen, J.R. 1965. A laboratory manual in biology. Stipes Publishing 
Co. 218 pp. 

Parks, J.' J. and J.R. Larsen. 1965. A morphological study of the 
female reproductive system and follicular development in the 
mosquito, Aedes aegypti (L. ) Trans. Amer. Micro. Sci. 84:88-98. 

Peterson, L.G. and J.R. Larsen. 1965. Environmental 'specificity for the 
development of insect ovarian tissue. Amer. Zool. 5:210-211. 



LUCKMANN, William H. 

Luckmann, W.H. 1965. The status of chemical control of root maggots 
of vegetable crops. Proc. North Central States ESA, Vol. 20. 



ROSS, Herbert H. 

Ross, H.H. 1965. The phylogeny of the leafhopper genus Erythroneura 

(Hemiptera, Cicadellidae) . Festgabe fur Wilhelm Wagner. Zoologische 
Beitrage: Neue Folge Band 11. Erstes-Zweites Heft: 247-270. 

Ross, H.H. 1965. A Textbook of Entomology, isew Third Edition. John 
Wiley 6 Sons, Inc., 539 pp. 

Ross, H.H. 1965. The nature and pattern of living things. In the 

Responsible Individual and a Free Society in an Expanding Universe. 
Centennial Symposium, The University of Denver, 38-55. 



-40- 



Ross, H.H. 1965. The evolutionary history of Phylocentropus 

(Trichoptera: Psychomyiidae) . J. Kansas Ent. Soc. 38(4) :398-400. 

Ross, H.H. and H.B. Cunningham. 1965. Characters for specific 
identification of females in the leaf hopper genus Empoasca 
(Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer. 58( 5) :620-623. 

Ross, H.H. and H.B. Cunningham. 1965. Twelve new tropical ercpoascans 
(Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer. 58(6) :836-843. 

Ross, H.H. and W.R. Horsfall. 1965. A synopsis of the mosquitoes 
of Illinois (Diptera, Culicidae). 111. nat. Hist. Surv. Biol. 
Notes, No. 52, 50 pp. 

Ross, H.H. and J. A. Ross. 1965. The identity of Hydropsyche tibialis 
McLachlan (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae). Proc. R. Ent. Soc. 
Lond. (B), 34(5-6) :69-70. 

Ross, H.H. and J.D. Unzicker. 1965. The Micrasema rusticum group of 
caddisflies (Brachycentridae, Trichoptera). Proc. Biol. Soc. 
Wash. 78:251-258. 

Ross, H.H. and T. Yamamoto. 1965. New species of the caddisfly genus 

Polycentropus from eastern North America (Trichoptera, Psychomyiidae) 
Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 78:241-246. 



SELANDER, Richard B. 

Selander, R.B. 1965. A taxonomic revision of the genus Megetra 

(Coleoptera: Meloidae) with ecological and behavioral notes. Canad. 
Ent. 97:561-580. 

Selander, R.B. 1965. The systematic position of Meloetyphlus, a 
genus of blind blister beetles (Coleoptera: Meloidae). Jour. 
Kansas Ent. Soc. 38:45-55. 



WHITE, Joan F. 

White, J.F. 1965. A study of the development and competence of the 
Cynthia ovary in vivo and in vitro . J. Cell Biology, 27 (Abst.) 



-41- 



ALUMNI NEWS 



We were gratified by the response of the alumni to our reincarnation 
of the annual newsletter. As a result of those who responded to our 
information sheet we have this year considerable news to pass on to you 
on the whereabouts and whatabouts of many of your former associates. 

We are most grateful to all of you who did cooperate by sending in 
information about your recent activities. Next year we would like to 
hear from all of you. 

In this newsletter as in the last and all future issues we are 
including an information sheet which we would like you to remove, fill 
out and return to us. If this becomes a yearly habit with you we will 
be able to maintain contact with and keep track of each others activities. 

Some of the alumni have suggested a reunion of all the graduates of 
the entomology department or a special symposium of some sort next fall 
when the new building is dedicated. If you would be interested in such 
an activity and be willing to support it, please let us know on your 
returned "Information Sheet." If enough heat is generated we might 
reach the point of combustion. 

We will be looking forward to hearing from all of you. 

John Fredric Anderson ('63) 

John was at the Entomological Society of America meetings at New 
Orleans, Louisiana and had a good visit with old friends. 

At the present time he is working on griseofulvin, an antibiotic that 
affects the morphogenesis of the cell walls of fungi which contain chitin. 
The exposure of larvae of mosquitoes to griseofulvin results in (a) gross 
anatomical changes in the cuticle, (b) the detachment of muscles from the 
integument, and (c) a prolongation of development. 

James W. Apple ( '49) 

My recent research is on the biology and control of field crop insects 
(northern corn rootworm, cereal leaf beetle, corn earworm). 



-42- 



Elizabeth Heiss Arnason C36) 

Dr. Elizabeth Arnason has informed us that her husband Dr. Ami Pall 
Arnason passed away in October of 1964. We all extend our sincere regrets 
at her loss. We are delighted to note that Dr. Arnason has resumed her 
own activities and is doing part time teaching in entomology at Carleton 
University. 

Angel Berrios-Ortiz ('61) 

In the summer of 1964 I attended a summer course in Desert Biology 
at the Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona and also traveled to Mexico. 
Recently I have completely devoted my time to the teaching of the freshman 
course in biology, general zoology and general entomology. Spare time is 
usually very scarce and most of it is dedicated to reading, studying and 
some administrative work. 

Lusettie Blevins ('25) 

My recent travels include trips to Florida and Washington, D.C. 

My recent research interests have been a study on how to grow 
vegetables without moisture in addition to my continued interest in 
gardening. Dr. Blevins is retired and living in Atwater, Illinois, 62511. 

Murray S. Blum ('55) 

1965-1966 was spent as a NSF Senior Postdoctoral fellow at the 
University of Bristol in England. My recent research interests are 
the pheromones, olfactory chemistry and reproductive biochemistry. Recent 
publications include various papers on pheromones, biochemistry of semen 
and insect defensive secretions. 

Under additions to the family Dr. Blum has passed on the following 
gem: "cuatro es suf f iciante" ! ! 



-43- 



Reinhart Albert Brust C6H) 

I have made recent trips to Flin Flon, Churchill, and Baker Lake 
(Northwest Territories) Canada. My recent research interests are the 
effects of thermal stress in northern Aedes mosquitoes and diapause (embryo) 
in univoltine mosquitoes. I have just published with Dr. W.R. Horsfall 
a paper on the thermal stress and anomalous development in the mosquito, 
Aedes communis . 

Wayne Price Carlisle ('47) 

We have had recent pleasure trips to New York, Canada, Ireland, Scotland, 
Great Britain, Holland, Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Monaco and 
France . 

At the present time I am teaching Biology and Physiology at Madison 
Senior High School in Madison, Illinois. 

John J. Corrigan ('59) 

This past summer I attended a seminar on insect biochemistry, 
sponsored by NSF in Chiba, Japan. I also toured universities in Tokyo, 
Kyoto, Osaka, Nagoya, and Sendai, Japan. I was there from June 26 to 
July 10, 1965. 

My research interests at the present time are metabolism of amino 
acids and enzymatic transformations in insects, particularly Lepidoptera 
and Coleoptera. Recent publications include a paper with N.G. Svinivasan 
and A. Meister on biosynthesis of D-serine in the silkworm, Bombyx mori . 

The present size of the family including additions are: Deborah 8, 
David 5, Judith 3, and Susan 2. 



c. 



-44- 
William B. Cutts ('61) 

I received my M.D. degree in June 1965 and at the present time am 
interning at Johns Hopkins Hospital. I have accepted a residency in 
Tucson, Arizona for 1966-1967. 

Our additions to the family are limited to one who is Daniel Bryant 
Cutts, born August 9, 1965 ( only 9-1/4 lbs). 

Stanley Black Fracker ('14) 

My recent travels include attendance at the International Congress 
of Entomology in London and a tour of Scandinavia. Other travel in the 
last three years includes Mexico, the Caribbean and Florida. 

My recent publications include the "Visiting Research Scientists 
Program, 1958-1961; Report of Field Survey," 35 pp. Jan. 1961, Nat. 
Acad. Sci. 

Our own issue having ceased we now have three married daughters and 
six grandchildren in Colorado, Virginia and Washington, D.C. 

Since I retired from the U.S.D.A. in 1958, my recent research 
interests have been geneology and family history in U.S. and England. 

Dr. Fracker informed us that with one exception (R.D. Glasgow) 
he is the only survivor who has had an entomology Ph.D. from Illinois 
for over 50 years. Hats off to continued long and happy life. 

Philip Garman ('16) 

In addition to correcting his address, Dr. Garman suggests the next 
cover of the newsletter might have a picture of a butterfly or dragonfly 
or honey bee. 

George Waldo Hahn ('53) 

The past few years my summers have been spent as a Park Ranger 
Naturalist at Yellowstone National Park, 1953-1959, and Canadian Rockies, 
1964. 

My recent research interests are cytology — cellular migration of 
cells of adrenal cortex (Escalator theory) as traced with tritiated thymine. 



-45- 
George Hahn, Continued 

Additions to our family are Ross, 1952 (after Herbert Ross) and 
Karl, 1954. 

I received an M.A.T. degree in Biology at Brown University in 1963 
and at the present time am teaching biology and physiology at Newton 
Junior College in Newtonville, Massachusetts. 

Robert F. Harwood ('54) 

My most recent travels were to attend the XII International Congress 
of Entomology in London followed by a visit to the Netherlands and 
Germany . 

My recent research interests are insect photoperiodism, daily 
rhythms, and nutrition and phagostimulation in phytophagous Lepidoptera. 
My recent publications include papers on photoperiod and mosquitoes. 

We have no recent additions to the family, still 1 boy and 2 girls. 

John M. Kingsolver ('61) 

I recently spent time at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at 
Harvard University to study types of Bruchidae. My recent research 
interests are taxonomy, evolution and phylogeny of the family Bruchidae. 
I have had some recent publications on the genus Neltumius (Bruchidae), 
and on a new fossil genus of Bruchids and also on the genus Abutiloneus 
(Bruchidae) all of which appeared in the Coleopterists Bulletin. 

John Paul Kramer ('58) 

In late July and early August (1965) I traveled to London to give an 
invitational paper at the Congress of Protozoology on microsporidian 
diseases of muscoid flies. 

John is now on the staff at Cornell University where he will be 
developing a course in insect pathology and biological control in addition 
to continuing his research on protozoan diseases of insects. 



-46- 
John Kramer, Continued 

His recent publications are numerous and he suggests we check 
Biol. Abstracts for 1964, 1965, and 1966. 

John claims no new additions to the family. He says he still has 
one wife (no age given), one son, age 7 and one daughter, age 5. 

Herbert Lipke ('54) 

In the past few years my travel has taken me to the London School 
of Hygiene 1961-1962 as a WHO Fellow, 1964 Grand Teton and Yellowstone, 
1965 France and England, San Francisco and Grand Canyon (summer). 

My recent research interests are the configurational changes in 
granulocyte membranes and Oligosaccharide sequences in structural tissues. 

Herb has had recent publications on DDT metabolism in Anophelines , 
Polysaccharide and Glycoprotein formation in cockroaches, gluthatione 
in dipterans and turnover of chondroitin sulfate B in rat skin which is 
now in press. 

Herb tells us there have been no new additions to the family. 

John A . Lowe ( ' 60 ) 

My recent travels are my major persuits at the present time as I 
am covering S.E. Asia for Rohm and Haas, primarily Thailand and Philippines 
at the moment. 

Even though I am presently living in Bankok, Thailand the home 
address is still the same. 

Edward Lee Mockford ('60) 

My travels in the 1963-1964 school year took me on leave to Mexico 
where I was teaching first semester in the Instituto Tecnologico at 
Monterrey. 

My recent research interests are on the taxonomy of Psocoptera, 
especially tropical and subtropical New World and polymorphism in Psocoptera. 

My most recent publications are on the genus Caecilius and on a new 
genus of hump-backed psocids from Mexico and southwestern U.S. which is 
in press. 



-47- 
Carl Otto Mohr ('34) 

Recent travels took me to Oahu, in June. 

My recent research interests are on the methods of evaluating 
infestations of vertebrates by arthropod parasites. 

The most recent publications are on louse and chigger infestation 
.-»<, rniateO lo host size and home ranges of small mammals and relation of 
flea infestations to spacing between cottontail rabbits. 

Dr. Mohr tells us that he will be leaving Berkeley in January of 
1966, possibly for Sand Key, an island in the sun, west of Tampa. (How 
green with envy can you get . ) 

Jai K. Nayar ('62) 

Recently I have visited several institutions in the midwest and 
eastern U.S. to talk about my present findings. 

My current research interests are the physiology of Circadian 
rhythms in insects. I am presently working on the circadian rhythms of 
pupation in mosquitoes and several manuscripts are in preparation. 

Dr. Nayar was married at the end of 1964. His wife's name is 
Gisela K. Nayar. 

Thaddeus H. Parks ('25) 

My recent research interests are on tree fruit insects. I have been 
and am now consultant for two large fruit farms in Ohio since my retirement 
from the University of Ohio. 

We would like to thank Dr. Parks for his suggestions for future 
newsletters. 

John E. Porter ('55) 

We spent most of 1965 trying to recover from a grand and glorious 
camping trip to the West made in 1964. 

My recent research interests as related to my duties have been studies 
connected with Aedes aegypti rearing and biology at the station. 






' 



•-.-.. . . ... 






' 



. 









' ' 



' 






! 



" 









' 



-48- 

John Porter, Continued 

My recent publications are on the significance of water-holding 
cavities of trees, re. Aedes aegypti control. Improved techniques in 
rearing A. aegypti and some recent work on analysis of aircraft application 
on med-fly spray on indices of A_. aegypti and the incidence and control 
of insects found in ships. 

Our family now stands at four: Sue, 1945; Nancy, 1947; Thomas, 1949; 
and Mary, 1953. 

Our U.S. Quarantine Station is due to move to our new location at 
Dodge Island Seaport in Florida in January of 1966. 

Reginald Joseph Roberts ('62) 

In May of 1964 I took a trip to Brisbane, Queensland, to address 
the Entomological Society of Queensland. In September 1964 I was 
involved in a Pasteur insect survey trip to Victoria and South Australia. 

My recent research interests are the behavior and ecology of 
Scarabaeidae a Coleoptera and Hepialidae (Lepidoptera) ; sex attraction 
in insects; epidemiology and ecology of soil insect diseases and plant- 
insect interactions under different environmental regimes . 

Most recent publications are on sex attraction in Rhopaea (Coleoptera: 
Scarabaeidae) . 

Since graduating in 1962 we have increased the family by two: Tania 
Louise, Sept. 14, 1962 and Stephen Anthony, Feb. 11, 1964. 

George K. Schumaker (*35) 

Since 1951 I have been associated with the Agricultural Chemicals 
Division of the Velsicol Chemical Corporation, in the northeastern area. 
As manager of this area, my entomological activities have been closely 
associated with the introduction and development of the pesticides we 
manufacture. This has brought me in close contact with all of the state 
universities and experiment stations in the 13 northeastern states. I 
find this work interesting and challenging, and, I might add, endless 
in scope. 



-49- 
Robert John Snetsinger ('60) 

This past summer I attended the Institute of Acarology at Ohio 
State University. 

I am presently working on the classification of Pymotid mites, 
spiders of Pennsylvania, tick distribution, host resistance to spider 
mites, biology and control of Pritchard mealybug, rodent control, 
mushroom pests, greenhouse and ornamental pests. 

I have recently published papers with C.P. Balderston, and Richard 
Craig on the resistance to the two-spotted mite in Pelargonium and with 
S.L. Chiang on environmental effects upon reproduction of a mushroom 
infesting cecid fly. 

Our newest addition to the family is Laurel Snetsinger, born 
December 6, 1962. 

Dr. Snetsinger was promoted to associate professor in June 1965. 
CONGRATULATIONS!! 

Kathryn Martha Sommerman ('45) 

My recent travels have taken me to the Philadelphia meetings and 
also to London, Copenhagen and back over the Pole to home. 

My recent research interests are trapping mosquitoes and black flies , 
Culicoides and snipe flies in Alaska. 

Dr. Sommerman has just published a note on the ideal way to collect 
insects in a car-top insect trap with the terminal cage in the auto. 

Calvin F. SooHoo ('63) 

Calvin is now returning after 3 years with C.S.I.R.O. in Australia 
via the Orient to take up a new post of assistant professor at Washington 
State University in January, 1966. 

His present research interests are plant resistance to insect pests, 
digestion in insects, chemical composition of roots, feeding and orientation 
behavior, sex recognition in Oncotera digestion of cellulose by scarabs 
and sex attraction in scarabs. 

Recent publications include sex attraction in Rhopaea , light sensing 
device for the measurement of insect feeding and cellulose digestion 
in scarabs. 



■ 









•■ 



' : 



. 















■' 



. . 















-50- 
Calvin SooHoo, Continued 

Recent additions to the family are: Brent Lyle, March 3, 1964; 
Garran Mark, August 15, 1965. 

Colonel Robert Traub (*47) 

Colonel Traub has been a world traveler for many years. His most 
recent travels have taken him to Pakistan, Japan, Malaya and Mexico. 

Research interests are Arthropod-borne diseases and ecology-classifi- 
cation of fleas and parasitic mites. 

Bob's publications list is now so extensive it takes 8 mimeographed 
pages to hold it all. 

He has also informed us that he took his degree in 1947 not in 1952. 
(Please excuse our slip.) 

Donald Monroe Tuttle ('52) 

We occasionally go to Mexico and California, also for the last two 
summers we have attended the Institute of Acarology at Ohio State 
University. 

Most recent publications are with E.W. Baker on the spider mites of 
Arizona (Acarina: Tetranychidae) , and the false spider mites of Arizona 
(Acarina: Tenuipalpidae) . 

My recent research interests are the plant mites, especially 
Tetranycoidea. 

Additions to the family include: Ronald J., 1956; Andrew W. , 1959; 
Timothy D. , 1963. 

Roger W. Williams ('41) 

Our most recent travels were in the 1964-1965 school year during which 
I was on the field staff of the Rockefeller Foundation working at their 
new Arbovirus lab in Ibadan, Nigeria, while on sabbatical leave. Also 
spent the summer of 1963 for the Rockefeller Foundation in Trinidad and 
Brazil. En route and returning from Nigeria we traveled in England, 



-51- 

Roger Williams, Continued 

France, Switzerland, Italy, Greece, Holland, Egypt, Uganda, Kenya, South 
Africa and the Congo. The family enjoyed Nigeria so much they didn't 
want to come home. 

My recent research interests are arbovirus investigations. 

Margaret Windsor ('25) 

Margaret Windsor is at the present time working in the library at 
Stanford and she tells us she has a rare collector's item; all of the 
old Illients (V 1-17, 1934-1950). Indeed years of great heritage. 



Since the re-initiation of the Newsletter last year, it has come to our 
attention that the following entomology alumni have passed away: 

Arni Pall Arnason ('42) 
Henry Gordon Crawford ( ' 17 ) 
Charles Stockman Spooner ('36) 



-52- 

ADDITIONS OR CORRECTIONS 
TO THE DIRECTORY 



Elizabeth Heiss Arnason 
Biology Department 
Carleton University 
Ottawa, Ontario 
Canada 



Charles Chalmer Compton 

Parktown House, Apt. A-2. 

11 Raritan Avenue 

Highland Park, New Jersey 08904 



U. Eugene Brady 
University of Georgia 
Athens, Georgia 



Lt. E.M. Bravi, MSC 

USN 

Box 14 

NAMRU-2 

APO, San Francisco 

California, 96263 



David M. Brunfiel 
Lake Placid, New York 



James E. Bussart 
Velsicol Chemical Corp. 
330 East Grand Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60611 



Wayne P. Carlisle 
Madison Senior High School 
6th and Farrish Streets 
Madison, Illinois 



Peh-I Chang 

Department of Histology 
University Medical School 
Galveston, Texas 



Max D. Couch 

3017 1/2 East Washington 

Orlando, Florida 32803 



William B. Cutts 

Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Box 183 

Baltimore, Maryland 21205 



William K. Delaplane 
198 Sunset Drive 
Westerville, Ohio 43081 



Richard James Dysart 

American Embassy 

Agriculture 

APO, New York 09230 



William Gibbs Eden 
Department of Entomology 
McCarty Hall 
University of Florida 
Gainesville, Florida 32603 



William Clyde Ferguson 
68 Windermere Road 
Lockport , New York 14094 



-53- 



Maj . Harland W. Fowler, Jr. 
Department of Entomology 
415b Morrill Hall 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



Philip Garman 

16 5 Thornton Street 

Hamden, Connecticut 



06517 



Patrick T.M. Lum 

Stored Product Insect Lab. 

US DA, ARS 

Savannah, Georgia 31403 



Bruce C. MacDonald 
Central Chemical Corp. 
49 N. Jonathan Street 
Hagerstown, Maryland 21741 



Peter H. Hewitt 
Department of Biology 
Natal University 
Natal, South Africia 



John W. Matteson 

Monsanto Co. Development Department 

800 N. Lindbergh Blvd. 

St. Louis, Missouri 63166 



Harry Hoogstrael 

NAMRU-3 

FPO, New York 09527 



John C. Keller 
An den Langen Lussen 11 
Stiege 3/Tur 3 
Vienna XIX, Austria 



Costas Kouskolekas 

16 Sifnou 

Athens 817, Greece 



John Paul Kramer 

Department of Entomology 6 Limnology 

Comstock Hall 

Cornell University 

Ithaca, New York 14850 



James L. Krysan 
Department of Biology 
St. Mary's College 
Winona, Minnesota 



Charles D. LeSar 

312 Cedar 

O'fallin, Illinois 62269 



Howe Elliott McClure 

Migratory Animals 

Pathology Survey 

Box 6119 

APO San Francisco, 96323 



Roy E. McLaughlin 

US DA, ARS 

Entomology Research Division 

P.O.Box 1518, Hwy. 12 

State College, Mississippi 



James Leroy Miller 
Biology Department 
Wichita State University 
Wichita, Kansas 67208 



Capt. Moufied Moussa, MSC 

U.S.A. SEAT0 Medical Research Lab. 

APO, San Francisco 96346 



Franklin C. Nelson 

815 Mountain Avenue 

Apt. A-4 

Springfield, New Jersey 07081 



-54- 



Willis J. Nolan 
4612 Beechwood Road 
College Park, Maryland 



Zenas Barnard Noon, Jr. 

251 E. 32nd Street 

Apt. 10E 

New York, New York 10016 



Francisco Pacheco 

Centro de Invest igacicn Agricola 

del Noroeste 
Secretarfa de Agricultura y Ganaderfa 
Apdo. Postal 515, Ciudad 
Obregdn, Sonora, Mexico 



Robert C. Rendtorff 
62 S. Dunlap St. 
Memphis, Tennessee 



Clifford Creigton Roan 

Geigy Agricultural Chemicals 

Hale Street 

Botany 

NSW. , Australia 



George K. Schumaker 
Velsicol Chemical Corp. 
3 50 Fifth Ave. 
New York, New York 10001 



Calvin SooHoo 
Department of Entomology 
Washington State University 
Pullman, Washington 99163 



Richard H. Storch 
Department of Entomology 
University of Maine 
Orono, Maine 04473 



Robert Traub 

Department of MicroBiology 
School of Medicine 
University of Maryland 
660 W. Redwood Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Margaret Windsor 
Catalog Division 
Stanford University 
Stanford, California 



Robert T. Yamamoto 
Department of Entomology 
North Carolina State University 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 



A number of Newsletters were returned due to insufficient addresses. 
If you know of the whereabouts of any of the following people, please let 
us know. 



Harry E. Anderson 
John E. Fraley 
Gladys Hoke 
George Edward King 
Ronald B. Madge 



Richard 0. Malcomson 
Jean Paul Picard 
Albert Salako 
Edgar Henry Smith 
Elmer D. Sweeney 



Perry Homer Welley 






' 



NEWSLETTER INFORMATION FOR 1966-1967 
Name: 
Home Address: 

Business Address (Don't forget Zip Code): 

Current Research and Recent Publications: 



Rerprit Travels for Business or Pleasure : 



Additions to the family (names, dates): 



Suggestions or comments concerning the "Newsletter": 



Comments on possible reunion or symposium 
next fall at dedication of new building: 



Return to: Newsletter Committee 

Department of Entomology 
320 Morrill Hall 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois, 61801 



■ 






■■- - . 



c "* 

1 




Th Z Library 



o^rwe 






ENTOMOLOGY 
NEWSLETTER 



2 $ Wo 



1 

9 
6 

7 



A PR 3 01970 




ANNUAL NEWSLETTER 



Department of 
Entomology 



University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 



March 1967 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

MESSAGE FROM THE HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 1 

ACTIVITIES OF THE SCHOOL OF LIFE SCIENCES - - 2 

DEPARTMENTAL ROSTER 1966-1967 3 

VISITORS TO THE DEPARTMENT 7 

SPORTS REVIEW 8 

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 9 

RECENT GRADUATES 11 

PRESENT ENTOMOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS 18 

NEWS ABOUT THE STAFF MEMBERS 25 

PUBLICATIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY 1965-1966 39 

ALUMNI NEWS 43 

ADDITIONS OR CORRECTIONS TO THE DIRECTORY-- 54 

NEWSLETTER INFORMATION FORM 55 



The Newsletter comes to you a little late this year, due to a full 
schedule. We do delight in sharing with you in this Centennial Year of 
the great University of Illinois our best wishes and take this oppor- 
tunity to let you know the activities of your entomology department. 

The cover this year I think is most significant as we look back on a 
hundred years of progress at the University of Illinois. Harker Hall, 
the oldest building standing on the campus having housed the Department 
of Entomology for many years in tandum with Morrill Hall which now 
houses the Department. It gives us a look at the old, the present, and 
a glance into the future. We trust that we will be able to bring to 
fruition a Centennial Celebration of some sort commensurate with the 
activities and accomplishments of our many distinguished alumni. 

Again, I would like to thank Ruth Plymire, our faithful secretary, without 
whose help this reincarnation of the Newsletter would be impossible. Also 
after much cajoling, pleading, begging and just plain threatening a word 
of thanks to all in the department who "willingly" shared with you their 
activities of the past year. With a resolve of "never again" the editor 
puts to bed the Newsletter for 1967. Until next year when trauma will 
be forgotten and hope will spring eternal. Best wishes. 

The Editor 



MESSAGE FROM HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

The addition to Morrill Hall was completed during the summer of 
1966 and Drs. Friedman, Selander and MacLeod quickly occupied the 
4,000 square feet which were made available to us. After about seven 
months of use there have been no serious complaints and no requests 
for remodeling which is unique in comparison to our experience when 
we moved into the original building. 

Dr. Ellis MacLeod joined our staff in September of 1966. He 
fills a position which had been vacant for several years. His primary 
teaching obligation will be our course in the division of general 
studies, and the instruction of graduate students interested in the 
cytological evidence of insect evolution. 

We are still hoping to stage a commemorative program in connection 
with the completion of Morrill Hall. The building is occupied by four 
departments and from time to time they each express a desire to have 
a single occasion to serve this purpose. At this time we have not 
been able to agree on programs so we shall probably be contacting you 
with an invitation to join us in an independent departmental venture. 

During the past year Dr. G.S. Fraenkel was notified his Career 
Award from the National Institutes of Health would be renewed for 
another five years. We are very happy to accept the benefits which we 
as a department receive from such an award, but we are most grateful 
to have a scientist of his stature in our department. The recognition 
is well deserved. 

Again we invite you to pay us a visit and inspect our new facilities, 

Sincerely, 
Clyde W. Kearns 



• ' . 



-2- 



ACTIVITIES OF THE SCHOOL OF LIFE SCIENCES 

After some minor delays the new addition to Morrill Hall has been 
completed and occupied. The month of September was filled with moving 
carts and jammed elevators as the accumulation of the century was moved 
into new quarters. It was a steady stream of traffic as people from 
Zoology, Botany and Entomology moved from Harker Hall and the Natural 
History Building into the new addition. Everyone seems to be well 
pleased with the new quarters. Now the entire complex of the School of 
Life Sciences is housed in Burrill and Morrill Halls connected by an 
administration bridge which houses the Director, Business Manager, and 
the Departmental Offices. The Natural History Building has been turned 
over almost entirely to Geology with some of the laboratories and 
classrooms maintained for the Botany, Zoology and Biology course work. 
Harker Hall is devoted now entirely to research and teaching laboratories 
for general biology, and entomology. 

The School of Life Sciences becomes more and more involved with 
academics. The Honors Program continues to increase in size and the 
new basic course in biology has become a requirement for all pre- 
professional students in the Life Sciences. Also the doctoral program 
in cellular biology is increasing in number and stature. 

As a member department in the School of Life Sciences we share 
with the entire University pride and admiration for the growth that has 
taken place particularly in this year 1967 as the University celebrates 
its Centennial Anniversary. We are both proud and grateful to be a 
member of such an excellent academic institution, which is continually 
striving for progress and development in graduate and undergraduate 
education. 

The past year has been a fruitful one in the School of Life Sciences 
with new acquisitions in instrumentation, facilities, and expansion and 
growth in all departments. Our congratulations to Dr. Kallio for a 
successful year in the School of Life Sciences and for his skill and 
ability to diplomatically mold the activities of the various departments 
into a unified division of the University. 



-3- 

Departmental Roster 1966-1967 
Faculty 

Balduf, Walter V. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Chadwick, Leigh E. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Decker, George C. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. - Professor of Entomology 

Friedman, Stanley - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Ghent, Arthur W. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Hayes, William P. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Horsfall, William R. - Professor of Entomology 

* Jaycox, Elbert R. - Associate Professor of Apiculture 

Kearns, Clyde W. - Professor of Entomology and Head of the Department 

** Larsen , Joseph R. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Luckmann , William H. - Professor of Entomology and 

Head of Economic Entomology Section 

MacLeod, Ellis G. - Assistant Professor of Entomology 

Maddox, Joseph V. - Assistant Professor of Agricultural Entomology 

Milum, Vern G. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Ross, Herbert H. - Professor of Entomology and Head of Faunistic Survey 

Selander, Richard B. - Professor of Entomology 

Sternburg, James G. - Professor of Entomology 

Waldbauer, Gilbert P. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

White, Joan F. - USPH Post-doctoral Fellow 

Willis, Judith H. - Assistant Professor of Entomology 

* - Joint Appointment with Horticulture 
** - Joint Appointment with Physiology and Biophysics 






••.■'■ . 

• ■■•- . ■■ 



■ - ■ 



■ : - ■ -i 



. - 






■• 






' ; '■ 



•■-.-. 



" 



/ 



■ . ' 



-I+- 



Hsiao, Ting-Huan 



Research Associates 



Unzicker, John D. 



Research Assistants 



Allen, Robert T. 
Campbell, William R. 
Eaton, John L. 
Flattum, Roger F. 
Fogal, Willard 
Hsiao, Catherine T. 
Janicke, James F. 
Keyt, Keith 



Morden , Robert 
Nordin , Gerald 
Randall, Robert F. 
Ronquillo, Consolacion R. 
Seligman , Morris 
Wilson , George R. 
Yu, Ching-Chieh 



Teaching Assistants 



Abou-aly, Aly A. 
Bouseman, John K. 
Eertmoed, Gary E. 
Killmer, Paul S. 



Reynolds , Judith L. 
Sanburg, Larry L. 
Weddle, Richard C. 
Yang, Stella 



• ' ;•■ . 



. ■■;: ,' . 



i:i'i 



.'.:'■•■ ■' ' 



• 



:■■ i-i ■• • •■ 
•■■■•:■■ ',:■■:■■" 
..'<■•■■■••• ■. ■. :..' ■• ■ 

. •■■■ i . • " ■ 

• J •: . . : ■ ■-/ 



• '• 



■. 



, ■ .••'.-.•• 



. •-' . ■ 

■ ■' 



■• 



: •. : •■ •' 






* 



-5- 
Trainees and Fellows 

Ameel, John 3. - NDEA Fellow 
Benson, Robert L. - MDEA Fellow 
Chang, Franklin - USPH Trainee 
Clegern, Robert W. - USPH Trainee 
Cupp, Edward W. - USPH Trainee 
Dirks, Tobias F. - USPH Trainee 
Fox, Philip M. - NDEA Fellow 
Gemrich, Edwin G. - USPH Fellow 
Peterson, Lance G. - USPH Trainee 
Pinto, John D. - USPH Fellow 
Sanburg, Larry L. - NDEA Fellow 
Sastrodihardjo, S. - Fallow 
Scarbrough, Aubrey - NDEA Fellow 
Sheldon, Joseph - NDEA IV Fellow 



Students not on Staff 

Fowler, H. Wade 

Fraembs , Frank 

Kuhlman, Donald E. (Instructor, Agricultural Entomology) 

Mathieu, Jean M. 

Newton, David 

Parshall, Stephen J. 

Patterson, William J. 

Randell, Roscoe (Instructor with Entomology Extension) 

Schmidt, Fred 



•• ; 



• • , * -.' 



- - . , 



.."(;. . 






• . . • 



-6- 
Non- Academic 

Adams, Paula 
Duvall, Eloise 
Etheridge, Jeanne 
Plymire, Ruth 
Ransom, Terry 
Reeves , E . Jean 



Student Employees 

Carter, Kenneth 
Creech, Cheryl 
DeMoss, Susan 
Fox, Stanley 
Hanna, Jean 
Kupelian, Lena 
Marsh, RaVae 
Meyer, John 
Prickett, Alice 
Rhoades, Bradley 
Speier, Pat 



-7- 

VISITORS TO THE DEPARTMENT 



Dr. Thomas J. Barr 

University of Kentucky 



Dr. Fotis C. Kafatos 
Harvard University 



Dr. Frank Kurczewski 
University of Kansas 



Dr. Hamilton Laudani 

U.S.D.A. Agricultural Research Service 



Dr. A. R. Main 

North Carolina State University 



Dr. Thomas E. Moore 

University of Michigan 



Dr. J. W. S. Pringle 
Oxford University 



Dr. Dan Shank land 
Purdue University 



Dr. Edward H. Smith 

North Carolina State College 



Dr. Milan Trpis 

Slovak Academy of Sciences, Czechoslovakia 



' 






• 






' 












.1 



- 



■'. ■; 



■ 



-8- 



SPORTS REVIEW 



As we sit down and look back over the activities of the past year, 
one might wonder when and how research and studies were included in the 
busy program. Last Spring the sport, of course, was softball where 
the Entomology Flycatchers posted a 6-2 record to capture second place 
in the faculty-staff league. Both losses were heart breakers making 
the entire season a very exciting one. When our present coach Lance 
Peterson completes his Ph.D. this spring, the baseball program will 
have to be overhauled. Lance has been an enthusiastic leader and his 
gung-ho sports enthusiasm will be missed by all. During the summer 
months, the sport was golf for those among us who could sneak off on 
a beautiful afternoon for 18 holes. With the coming on of winter, the 
action can be found on the handball courts where some of our students 
have become very good. A new addition for our physical fitness addicts 
is participation in noon-time programs of running, sponsored and directed 
by members of the physical education department faculty. The number 
of rugby participants from our department is down to one (Bob Benson) 
but the strength of the rugby club seems to be growing. 

One could not close out the sports review without a word about 
that sweet, lovable (put yer money in the beaker Jack) office pool 
manager "Ma (Ruth Plymire) Barker." After three years of making my 
regular contributions to the odds -on -anything office pool your faithful 
and intrepid editor now knows, they're RIGGED!! After three consecutive 
years of coming up 0, yours truly finally won a departmental pool. Just 
as I was sitting at my desk to count the loot , who should appear on 
the threshold but "Ma." "Sorry about that Jack, but I got to have that 
money back. You see, you only had 12 in the 27th frame and it was tied 
up in the 3rd quarter, which makes you an automatic loser of the 1/2 time 
portion. Besides, you bought all your chances with 1927 quarters and 
Terry's mother has brown eyes, so the pool naturally goes to Roger. r 
Oh well, maybe next year. 



:.■ • ' : 






-9- 

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 
Christmas Party 

There is at least one time during the year when all entomologists 
seem to be able to get together for a joyous occasion. This is the 
Annual Christmas party. This year the festive activity was held on 
December 15, 1966. We again invaded the University Club at 1201 West 
Oregon Street, Urbana, where a delightful time was had by all. The 
holiday spirit was in full swing from 8-11 PM and a few hanger-ons 
till 12. Each year there seems to be new faces in attendance, approxi- 
mately 80 people came. Again, thanks to Ruth, name tags were available 
so we could put names with faces. If, for no other reason, the 
Christmas party is excellent as it allows us to get together with 
entomologists from the Natural History Survey. If we all survive 
enough Christmas parties, sooner or later we are going to get to know 
each other. The usual array of goodies was- available for all to 
enjoy — punch, cookies, open-faced sandwiches, and something new 
this year a cheese dip. 

There is something good about the Christmas season and a Christmas 
party when everyone can just sit down and enjoy each other's company 
without talking shop, and get to know each other's families and make 
new friends. We say on with the Christmas party — bigger and better 
every year. 



. ! 



• S 



-10- 



Spring Picnic 

The Entomology Spring Picnic this year went past spring and moved 
into summer. The spring weather was so miserable in Champaign-Urbana 
this year that the picnic was not held until June 12, 1966. Hessel Park 
was the sight of the action. This seemed tb be a good place for the 
picnic from last year's experience. The picnic lasted from 1^-5. The 
day was delightful and we had a good crowd, but this year the entomologists 
seemed to come in bits and pieces and people drifted in anywhere from 
1-5 PM. As a result we did not eat together as a group. The park was 
extremely crowded probably due to the lateness of the season and the 
bad spring everyone was out enjoying good weather. We needed a few 
more tables and this year the entomologists were too lazy to participate 
in sports. We did have some volleyball and softball, but spring fever 
seemed to grip the atmosphere and nobody seemed to have the energy to 
get up and play. 

These kinds of activities are excellent because they allow us all 
to get together and give us the opportunity to meet each other's wives 
and children and get acquainted with the powers behind the throne. In 
a busy schedule of teaching and research these delightful moments of 
relaxation are few and far between, and should be continued for the 
enjoyment of all. 



-11- 

RECENT GRADUATES 

John LeRoy Eaton - 1966 

John was born September 21, 1939 in Macon County, Decatur. John is 
an Illinois boy - born, bred, raised and educated. John spent his younger 
years in Decatur, Illinois where he attended Stephen Decatur High School. 
After graduation, John entered Milliken University in September of 1958. He 
stayed at Milliken University for 2 years until June, 1960 where he majored 
in biology. After leaving Milliken, John entered the University of Illinois 
as an undergraduate where he majored in entomology. During his two years 
as an undergraduate at the University of Illinois, John served as an under- 
graduate laboratory assistant in the Department of Entomology. He received 
the B.S. degree in 1962 from the University of Illinois with a major in 
entomology and a minor in chemistry. At that time, he was accepted as a 
graduate student in the Department of Entomology where he pursued his 
graduate studies toward the Ph.D. from 1962 to 1966. 

Prior to coming to Urbana to study at the University of Illinois , John 
worked with the City Health Department in Decatur for the summer of 1960 
where he conducted mosquito population surveys trying his hand at applied 
entomology in the mosquito abatement system of this state, while John was 
a graduate student here at the University of Illinois , he held the position 
of research assistant in the laboratory of Drs. Kearns and Sternburg. He did 
his research under the direction of Dr. James Sternburg in the general area 
of toxicology and insecticides. The title of John's thesis is "Temperature 
and action of DDT on the cockroach nervous system." After completion of the 
thesis, in the fall of 1966, John accepted a position at Kalamazoo College 
in Kalamazoo, Michigan where he was awarded a Kettering Foundation Internship 
in teaching and research. A recent communication from John indicates that 
he has been invited by Kalamazoo College to stay on for another year and do 
teaching and research on the faculty and help them spend some $40,000 just 
awarded for new facilities and equipment. John is married and they have two 
children. 

John is a member of Phi Sigma and the Entomological Society of America. 



-12- 

Edwin Godfrey Gemrich II - 1966 

i 
Ed was born November 5, 1940 in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He grew up 

in Kalamazoo where he entered the University High School from which he 

graduated in 1958. At that time, he entered Michigan State University 

in East Lansing, Michigan as an honors student in sciences and art. 

While at Michigan State University, he majored in entomology and physical 

science. He received the B.S. degree in 1962. While a student at 

Michigan State University, Ed was honored by being nominated to Phi Eta 

Sigma. He was also in the Honors College and was on the Dean's list 

for 11 terms. He was also a member of the 4 Point Dinner for 4 terms. 

Ed was an outstanding student at Michigan State University and graduated 

with honors. In fact, Ed's ability as a student was recognized when he 

came to the University of Illinois in 1962 as a Ph.D. candidate in the 

Department of Entomology with a minor in biochemistry. At that time, 

he was awarded a Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship and also a University 

of Illinois Fellowship. 

Prior to coming to the University of Illinois, Ed worked at Edgewood 
Orchards in the summer of 1959. In the summer of 1960 and the academic 
year of 1960-1961 Ed was an undergraduate researcher on a National 
Science Foundation Award. In the summer of 1961 and 1962 Ed worked for 
the Upjohn Company as a researcher on agricultural chemicals. His 
work at the Upjohn Company was with developmental research on 
carbamate insecticides. In the fall of 1963 Ed was a research assistant 
in toxicology here at the University of Illinois. In his terminal year 
at the University of Illinois Ed was honored by being awarded a USPHS 
Predoctoral Fellowship in Entomology. 

While at the University of Illinois Ed worked under the direction 
of Dr. Clyde Kearns in the general area of insect toxicology. His 
Ph.D. thesis is "Metabolic enzymatic degradation of several aromatic 
carbamate insecticides." Ed's predoctoral USPHS Fellowship in entomology 
was terminated when Ed completed his thesis in August of 1966. At 
that time Ed felt the call of the north land and returned to his hometown 
of Kalamazoo, Michigan where he has accepted a position as Research 
Entomologist with the Upjohn Company. 






. 









-13- 



Ed is married and they now have one child. Ed was a pleasant 
fellow and a bright student and we will not soon forget his participation 
in the departmental Christmas parties. One has not lived until he has 
heard Ed Gemrich sing "Silent Night" to a "rock-n-roll" beat. 

Ting Huan Hsiao - 1966 

Ting was born on February 6, 1939 in Hangchow, China. He attended 
primary and junior high schools in Canton, China. He went to Taiwan, 
Formosa in 1951 where he continued his education in the high school of 
Taiwan Teachers College, Taipei, Taiwan. After graduating from high 
school he entered Taiwan Provincial College of Agriculture, Taichung, 
Taiwan where he received the B.S. in Entomology and Plant Pathology in 
1957. Ting came to the United States in 1958 where he entered graduate 
school of the University of Minnesota where he held a research assistant- 
ship under Professors H.G. Holdaway and H.C. Chiang. Ting received his 
Master's degree from the University of Minnesota in 1961 in Entomology. 
After graduating from the University of Minnesota in 1961 he was 
accepted in the Graduate School at the University of Illinois where 
he majored in entomology. While at the University of Illinois Ting held 
research assistantships under the direction of Dr. G.S. Fraenkel. 
Ting married Catherine Ling Tang in March of 1961; he met her while a 
graduate student at the University of Minnesota and they came together 
to the University of Illinois where Cathy has also earned her Master's 
degree under the direction of Dr. Fraenkel and has continued to work 
as a research assistant for Dr. Fraenkel. 

Ting worked as a research assistant during the entire time he was 
at the University of Illinois under the direction of Dr. Fraenkel. 
He received his Ph.D. in August 1966. His research thesis was "Host 
plant specificity of the Colorado potato beetle, Legtinotarsa 
decemlineata ( Say ) . " 

Ting is a member of Sipma Xi, AAAS, AIBS, the Entomological Society 
of America, Phi Sigma and the Royal Entomological Society of London. 



■ ■ •' 



• ,. , , 






-14- 

Upon completion of his Ph.D. degree in 1966 Ting accepted a position 
as research associate with Dr. Fraenkel to continue his work on plant 
specificity. Ting has just announced that he has accepted a position 
as insect physiologist at Utah State University at Logan, Utah. He and 
Cathy will be leaving in June to move to the Rocky Mountain country. 

Joseph Bernard Maddox, Jr. - 1966 

Joe was born in Montgomery, Alabama on April 1"+, 1938. He graduated 
from Sidney Lanier High School, Montgomery, Alabama in June 1955 and 
enrolled at Auburn University the following September. Joe received a 
B.S. degree in entomology in June 1959 and a M.S. in entomology in June 
1961 from Auburn University. 

While at Auburn Joe worked part time during the academic year and 
full time during the summer for the entomology department. His duties 
there involved assisting in a research project on the bionomics and 
control of economically important insects of corn, grain sorgum, 
peanuts, and long grasses. While a graduate student as a research 
assistant in entomology at Auburn Joe continued to work on the above 
mentioned projects and also assisted as a teaching assistant in the 
laboratories of general zoology and physiology. His master's thesis 
was a study on the European corn borer in Alabama concerned primarily 
with ecology and control of the European corn borer in that state. 

In September, 1961 Joe entered the University of Illinois to pursue 
a Ph.D. in entomology. His studies were interrupted from October 1961 
to September 1962 when his unit of the Alabama National Guard was 
called to active duty during the Berlin crisis. He returned to Urbana 
in September 1962 to resume his graduate studies at the University of 
Illinois. While a graduate student at the University here, he was 
employed as a technical assistant by the Illinois State Natural History 
Survey except for the period of September 1964 through June 1965 when 
he held a University Fellowship. 



-15- 



While working toward his Ph.D. degree in entomology his work was 
supervised by Dr. George Decker of this university, now retired. Joe's 
Ph.D. thesis was entitled "Studies on a microsporidiosis of the armyworm, 
Pseud?letia unipuncta (Haworth)." Upon completion of the Ph.D. require- 
ments Joe accepted a full-time position as Assistant Professor of 
Agricultural Entomology at the Illinois State Natural History Survey 
where he is at the present time still working. 

Dr. Maddox is a member of Gamma Sigma Delta, and Sigma Xi. Joe is 
still single and as the sage has said "a menace to society being over 
21 and unmarried." 

Soelaksono Sastrodihardjo - 1967 

Sono was born in Poerwokerto, Java, January 3, 1938. He attended 
public schools in Jogjakarta, Semarang and Pati from 1942 to 1957. 
He entered FIPIA which then became Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) 
in August 1957. September 1958 he was awarded a scholarship from P.P.K. 
He served as a student assistant of comparative anatomy from 1958-1962. 
In July 1962 he received the degree comparable to a Bachelor's degree 
in biology. His major topics were physiology, parasitology and plant 
pharmacology. Also in July 1962 Sono was awarded a fellowship to study 
in the U.S.A. on the program of ITB-Kentucky Research Foundation at the 
University of Kentucky. 

By September 1962 Sono realized that the training he desired was 
given at the University of Illinois and he applied here to enter this 
institution in September 1962. From 1962-1963 Sono worked under the 
direction of Dr. Chadwick and Dr. Downes on the larvae of Sarcophaga. 
In 1963 Sono began to work on insect tissue culture and did his thesis 
under the direction of Dr. J.R. Larsen. The title of his thesis is 
"The competence of the ovary of Hyalophora cecropia (Lepidoptera) in 
vitro , with special reference to the 'intermediate' cell." Sono has 
been actively engaged in insect tissue culture research and has been 
active in and a member of the American Society for Cell Biology and 
the Tissue Culture Association. He has already published part of his 



• 



■ 









■ 



. •• 



-16- 

work on myosis in pupal ovarian cells with Joan F. White. 

Upon completion of his Ph.D. thesis Sono returned to his native 
land where he assumed the position of Professor of Biology at the 
Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB). Having received a recent communica- 
tion from Sono we know that he left with mixed feelings; having been 
here long enough to have made good friends and feel sad at leaving 
but delighted to be home with his friends and relatives and to assume 
his position as Professor at the Institut where he began his academic 
career. We trust that he will continue to have an active career in 
both teaching and research having an influence on future generations 
of scientists from Indonesia. 

John Duane Unzicker - 1966 

John was born in Harvey, Illinois in May 1938. Another product of 
Illinois John received his elementary education in Tinley Park, Illinois 
and his high school education at Harvey and Midlothian, Illinois. In 
September 1957 John entered Thornton Junior College in Harvey where 
he received a two-year diploma in January 1960. At that time John 
entered the University of Illinois where from February 1960 to January 
1962 he continued his undergraduate studies with a major in entomology 
and received the B.S. degree from this institution. In February 1962 
John entered the graduate school at the University of Illinois where 
he majored in the Department of Entomology. During this period of 
time he received a Master's degree in 1963. His master's degree was 
on evolution in the genus Hydropsyche which was carried out under the 
direction of Dr. Herbert Ross at the Illinois State Natural History 
Survey. 

While pursuing the Ph.D. here at the University of Illinois John 
was employed as a research assistant at the State Natural History 
Survey and he did his thesis research under the direction of Dr. Herbert 
Ross of the State Natural History Survey. The title of his thesis is 
"Comparative morphology and evolution of the internal female reproductive 
system of Trichoptera (Insecta)." 






• 



' ■■ - . 



-17- 



John completed the requirements for his Ph.D. in 1966. While a 
student at the University of Illinois John acquired his wife Carol Ann, who 
is presently teaching at the University of Illinois High School. Upon 
completion of the degree requirements John accepted a position as 
research associate in the Faunistic Study Section under Dr. Ross with 
the Illinois State Natural History Survey. 



•' ■ 



.•• ■ 



.-,• 



',: 



-18- 



PRESENT ENTOMOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Aly A. Abou-aly 

Currently doing work on the bionomics of Psorophora varipes . 
He is also doing some teaching in the laboratory of Dr. Horsf all's 
classes. Advisor: Dr. W.R. Horsfall 

Robert T. Allen 

The systematics and evolution of the Carabidae (Coleoptera) 
especially the genus Loxandrus (Pterostichini). 

In February he made a trip to the U.S. National Museum, Washington, 
D.C. to study the Thomas L. Casey types of Loxandrus and to collect 
winter stoneflies for Dr. H.H. Ross. The collections were made in West 
Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. In May black light 
traps and pit fall traps were established in Brownf ield Woods , northeast 
of Urbana, and Hart Memorial Woods, northeast of Mahomet. These traps 
have been in continuous use since May and are yielding interesting 
information on the insect fauna and its seasonal distribution in 
these two decidious forests. Advisor: Dr. H.H. Ross. 

John J. Ameel 

The past summer was spent on a mimicry problem with the syrphid, 
Eristalis tena . But most of the year has been spent on course work in 
ethology and physiology. Advisor: Dr. G.P. Waldbauer. 

Robert L. Benson 

The last year was a successful one for Bob as he completed some 
more of the required course work. His research on the biosynthesis of 
glucosamine in insects is still in the early stages, but the future looks 
promising. Bob acquired a wife (Lois) last summer, so he is attempting 
to make home cooking and the thin waistline mutually compatable. The 
photographic urge was satisfied by the spring flowers, the western 
scenery, fall color, and the recent freezing rain which knocked out the 
power lines. Advisor: Dr. S. Friedman. 

John K. Bouseman 

Systematic studies of the family Rhipiphoridae. During the summer 
of 1966, John worked with the Center for Zoonoses Research on a survey 
of ectoparasites of birds and mammals in the land between the Lakes 
Recreation Area in western Kentucky. In the area of "extra curricular 
activities" John and Barbara were blessed by the arrival of a son, 
Thomas Carl, on November 10, 1966. Advisor: Dr. R.B. Selander. 






: • 



: 



-19- 



William R. Campbell 

Taking courses and attempting to maintain research programs have 
been a constant struggle. Bill attended and presented a paper at the 
Portland meetings of the ESA in December. He also took a couple of 
trips, strictly for vacation; one was for canoeing in the Canadian wilds 
and the other was for basking in the warm Mexican sun. Advisor: 
Dr. C.W. Kearns. 

Franklin. Chang 

Frank has been doing research in insect physiology. Frank was 
working on determination of sugar and sugar levels in honey bee hemolymph 
last year. This year Frank is involved in a study on lipid transport 
and glyceride synthesis in the fat body of the insects. Frank also 
attended the ESA meetings in Portland this year. Advisor: Dr. S. Friedman, 

Eddie Wayne Cupp 

Eddie spent the year 1966 concerning himself primarily with 
completion of course work. He and his wife did manage a week's vacation 
to Kentucky where they visited friends and relatives in various parts 
of the state. As of now his research interests have been confined to 
reviewing past work on thermal stress and anomalous development of 
mosquitoes. Advisor: Dr. W.R. Horsfall. 

Tobias Dirks 

Tobias is now in midst of his second year of course work. He is 
working on entomogenous fungi under Dr. D.P. Rogers to complete a botany 
minor requirement. Domestically he and Judy are rearing 3 children. 
Russell, the oldest, is in the first grade while Clarke and Lisa remain 
home. Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg. 

Gary E. Eertmoed 

In 1966 Gary was busy taking courses, working on his thesis, and 
assisting in Entomology 302. During the summer he was Dr. Selander's 
assistant, and part of this time was spent studying the insects in the 
Davis Mountains near Fort Davis, Texas. Advisor: Dr. R.B. Selander. 

Roger F. Flattum 

Roger has been studying the effect of curare on the insect neuro- 
muscular junction and possible production of a "toxin" by nicotine. 
He has also been working on an extraction of a biologically active 
material on insect CNS and muscle from muscle . He 

attended the ESA meetings in Portland, Oregon. Roger has published 
his first paper on the effects of d-tubocurare chloride on nervous 
activity and muscular contraction in the house cricket. (Congrats!). 



-20- 



The Flattum's are also expecting in March. Rumor has it that at 
the moment of delivery Roger will flip and Jean will have to drive him 
to the hospital. Advisor: Drs. J.G. Sternburg and J.R. Larsen. 

Willard Fogal 

Willard's research is continuing on the morphogenesis of the adult 
fly cuticle and its control by bursicon. He attended the ESA meetings 
in Oregon and the Annual Regional Meeting of the Society of 
Endocrinologists in Wisconsin. He is looking forward to the possibility 
of a year of postdoctoral work with Professor T. Weis Fogh at Cambridge. 
Advisor: Dr. G.S. Fraenkel. 

H. Wade Fowler, Jr. 

Bionomics of medically important insects. A study was initiated 
in 1966 on the bionomics of Aedes vexans . Field collection trips to 
obtain specimens for laboratory colonies were made to Flin Flon, 
Manitoba and Wilson Dam, Alabama. Advisor: Dr. W.R. Horsfall. 

Philip Mike Fox 

Mike's major activity in the past year has been learning to use 
the electron microscope. During this period he has been working on a 
developmental study of the fine structure of the conglobate or prostatic 
gland of the American cockroach. In the present (spring) semester he 
is beginning some research concerned with the ultrastructure of 
synapses and myoneural junctions. Advisor: Dr. J.R. Larsen. 

Robert G. Holt 



Bob comes to us from Utah State University and more recently from 
Dutch John, Utah where he was doing animal survey studies. His area of 
research is not yet decided. Advisor: Dr. E.R. Jaycox. 

Catherine T. Hsia o 

Cathy attended the ESA meetings in Portland, Oregon and presented 
a paper with Dr. Fraenkel on calcification, in the place of tanning, 
in the puparium of the face fly , Musca autumnalis . Her current research 
is on the fine structure of the neurosecretory system of the blowfly. 
Cathy and Ting are leaving in June for Logan, Utah where Ting has 
accepted a position at Utah State University. 

James F. Janicke 

Jim's area of research is not too clearly determined. He has 
accepted a position at the State Natural History Survey where he will 
be working on some aspect of economic entomology. Advisor: Dr. W.H. 
Luckmann . 



-21- 



Keith A. Keyt 

Keith graduatedin June, 1966 from Oregon State University 
receiving a B.S. in entomology. In late August he drove back here to 
attend classes and begin work on a M.S. He currently is a half-time 
assistant with the Natural History Survey. Advisor: Dr. H.H. Ross. 

Paul S. Killmer 

Paul finished some work on ultrastructure of the compound eye of 
blowfly Phormia regina and is presently working on the ultrastructure 
of the compound eye of the mosquito Aedes aegypt i. He is also working 
on the ultrastructure, pathology, and development of the yellow fever 
and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses, in the mosquito Aedes 
aegypti . He travelled to Fort Dietrich, Frederick, Maryland in 
February 1966 to pick up infected mosquitoes. Paul also went to San 
Francisco for the Electron Microscope Society of America meetings to 
present a paper on the ultrastructure of the compound eye of the 
blowfly Phormia regin a . He attended several meetings in Chicago for 
the Midwest Society of Electron Microscopy. He is also working part- 
time for Dr. A.M. Watrach in the School of Veterinary Medicine on dog 
wart viruses. The Killmer 's are hoping for a family expansion in 
October. Advisor: Dr. J.R. Larsen. 

Donald E. Kuhlman 

Don worked as an extension entomologist for the College of 
Agriculture and the Illinois State Natural History Survey. He travelled 
throughout Illinois doing insect surveys. He is starting on thesis 
research with rootworms. He went to the North Central Regional Meetings 
on rootworms recently. Don is married and has two children. Advisor: 
Dr . W . H . Luckmann . 

Marilyn Laverty 

Marilyn arrived in February, 1967. She comes to us from Ghana 
where she was in the peace corps teaching biology. Her area of research 
is not yet determined. Advisor: Dr. G.P. Waldbauer. 

Jean M. Mathieu 

Jean this year is a graduate student in absentia . He is continuing 
to work on his thesis research in the biological studies of a group of 
closely related species of the genus Epicauta (Meloidae: Coleoptera). 
Hopefully he will be back this summer for his final examiantion. 
Advisor: Dr. R.B. Selander. 



-22- 



Robert D. Morden 

Bob is a new student this year. His area of research is not yet 
determined. Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg. 

David C. Newton 

The past summer was spent in the study of honey bee behavior. In 
September Dave began teaching biology at the Rantoul Township High 
School while writing his thesis. The whole family looks forward to 
getting some camping in this spring. Advisor: Dr. E.R. Jaycox. 

Gerald I. Nordin 

Gerald received his B.S. in Forest Production from the University 
of Illinois in June of 1966. After graduation he accepted a position 
as Research Assistant at the Illinois Natural History Survey with the 
economic entomology section. He is working with Dr. J.E. Appleby of 
the Survey staff on insect pests of trees, shrubs, and ornamental plants. 
Advisor: Dr. W.H. Luckmann. 

William J. Patterson 

Major Patterson of the U.S. Army, Medical Service Corps, has 
completed all didactic course work and the preliminary examination 
leading toward the Ph.D. degree. Two field trips were completed during 
the year for collection of subarctic aedine mosquitoes; one of the 
trips to the northern peninsula of Michigan, and the other to Flin 
Flon, Manitoba, Canada. 

Research interests are progressing along nicely and concern 
histopathological effects of thermal stress in aedine mosquito larvae 
and pupae. Advisor: Dr. W.R. Horsfall. 

Lance G. Peterson 

Lance is a USPH trainee. He attended the ESA meetings in Portland 
where he presented a paper entitled "A study of the encapsulation 
reaction of the American cockroach to foreign tissue implantations." 
He has been continuing his thesis research on the insect immune response. 
Advisor: Dr. J.R. Larsen. 

John D. Pinto 

John has spent almost full time this past year on his Meloe research. 
He also went with Dr. Selander and Gary Eertmoed on a blister beetle 
collecting holiday in southwest Texas during the latter part of July. 
This past December he travelled to Oregon and California to attend the 
ESA meetings in Portland, examine type specimens of Meloe at the 
California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, and get his California 
driver's license renewed (we're safe again). Advisor: Dr. R.B. Selander. 



-23- 



Robert F. Randall 

During the past year Bob finished his course work and passed his 
preliminary examination. He is now starting research for his Ph.D. 
thesis. He attended the meetings of the ESA in Portland, Oregon and 
has recently been initiated into Phi Kappa Phi. Advisor: Dr. C.W. Kearns. 

Roscoe Randell 

Roscoe works full-time as an extension entomologist at the State 
Natural History Survey. He had a special project last summer evaluating 
gross damage caused by the corn leaf aphids. He travelled throughout 
Illinois working on this project. Advisor: Dr. W.H. Luckmann. 

Judith L. Reynolds 

During the past year Judy has been working on her Ph.D. thesis 
"The assessment by progeny rearings of early changes occurring in populations 
of the flour beetles Tribolium confusum Duval and Tribolium castaneum 
Herbst. when reared under conditions of competitive interaction." 
She expects to complete her work in June 1967. Advisor: Dr. A.W. Ghent. 

Maria (Nen) Ronquillo 

Nen's research is on the histopathology of thermal stress on 
subarctic aedine mosquitoes. She also finished her M.S. in Zoology 
under Dr. Ray L. Watterson. Advisor: Dr. W.R. Horsfall. 

Larry L. Sanburg 

Larry arrived in June 1966 from Humboldt State College in California 
and worked with Dr. Friedman on trehalose in Phormia . This work should 
be completed soon. Thesis work will begin in February and will deal 
with diapause in adult mosquitoes. He missed the ESA meetings this 
year but hopes to go next year. Advisor: Dr. J.R. Larsen. 

Aubrey Scarbrough 

Aubrey is in his second year of course work and has begun his 
research on the behavior of Hyalophora cecropia (Linn.) this fall. 
Advisor: Dr. G.P. Waldbauer. 

I. Morris Seligman 

Morris is one of Dr. Friedman's graduate students. Most of his 
time in Morrill Hall is spent worrying about the mode of action of 
the now well known hormone bursicon. Morris attended the regional 
meeting of the Endocrinology Society in Madison, Wisconsin. Advisor: 
Dr . S . Friedman . 






. 



. 









-24- 



Joseph Sheldon 

In June 1966 Joe graduated from The College of Idaho. The summer* 
was spent in his home town, St. Helens, Oregon, where he worked in a 
paper mill. The last part of August his wife Donna and he began the 
trip to Urbana where he is now beginning his graduate work. Advisor: 
Dr. E.G. MacLeod. 

Richard C. Weddle 

Nothing much has happened in the past year as far as extracurricular 
activities are concerned. Research has been going fairly well. At 
present Dick is working on the ontogeny and behavior of blister beetles 
in the genus Epicauta . Advisor: Dr. R.B. Selander. 

George R. Wilson 

George is continuing his studies on diapause in Cecropia and the 
hornworm pupae and the relationship of pupal brain to the control of 
wound metabolism and diapause. He is also hoping to continue work on 
ecdyson and its role in wound metabolism. He completed his morphological 
studies on the activity, relationship and structure of ecdyson. Advisor: 
Dr. J.R. Larsen. 

Stella P. Yang 

Area of research not yet determined. Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg. 

Ching Chieh Yu 

Research interests not yet specified. Advisors: Drs. C.W. Kearns 
and J.G. Sternburg. 



P.S. 

Christina Ann Flattum, 7 lbs. 10 oz. , born March 5, 1967. 

Trevin Dean Pinto, 8 lbs. 8 oz., born March 9, 1967. 



-25- 



NEWS ABOUT THE STAFF MEMBERS 

Dr. Walter V. Balduf 

Dr. and Mrs. Balduf had a rather usual year, most of it spent at 
home in Urbana. Both state their health remains good, and they continue 
to engage in social and community affairs as before. Dr. Balduf states 
that his well-equipped space in Dr. Hors fall's laboratory, Room 415, 
Morrill Hall is a constant source of satisfaction, and he appreciates 
also, as ever, the extraordinary facilities of the campus libraries. 
Several research projects, more or less have matured and are in the 
"writing" phase, so there is never a dull moment. 

June to September was spent at Eaglesnest Lakes, near Ely, Minnesota 
where they have gone since retirement in 1958. That area provides both 
the favorable climate and the entomological opportunities for research. 
Dr. Balduf returned there last June intending to carry on his work on 
the bionomics of the entomophagous parasites of two native caterpillars. 
A total of not less than 44 species had been secured, mostly reared. 

However, the severe winter of 1965-66, plus many primary parasites 
had all but eliminated the hosts. As a consequence, he continued work 
on a project initiated in 1963 — the insect fauna of the balsam fir, 
one of the dominant forest trees of that area. As usual, entomophagous 
parasites are well represented, including several species of the 
exciting Rhyssine group. This is the situation which they eagerly look 
forward to in mid-May, 1967. 

Dr. Leigh E. Chadwick 

Prior to his retirement in 1966, Dr. Chadwick had three of his 
students complete their Ph.D. work. Dick Storch finished in February, 
1966, Rama Bharadwaj and Satish Chandran in June, 1966. Dr. Chadwick 
also published papers with Jim Krysan a student of previous years. 
Dr. Chadwick' s grants, both NSF and NIH were either terminated or 
transferred to the supervision of Dr. Kearns. Chad sends us the following 
information concerning the activities of he and Maria. 



-26- 



"After retiring in June, Maria and I decided to settle permanently 
in Maine, to which we were already committed for summers, and bought 
an all-year house in the town of Sargentville , just 6 miles from our 
summer cottage in North Brooklin. Our idea is to live in the summer 
place during the warmer months when this is possible and then move over 
to Sargentville for the rest of the year. The place there is generally 
in excellent shape, having been completely renovated by the former 
owner, and suits our needs just perfectly. Our somewhat large furniture 
has gone in as though it had always belonged there. We moved in in 
late September, when our things arrived from storage in Urbana. In 
Sargentville we have wonderful friendly neighbors — quite a number of 
them — whom we have already come to know and enjoy in a rather short 
time. 

The first of December 1966, we went to Natick, Mass., where I had 
earlier made arrangements through Dr. Louis M. Roth to work temporarily 
at the U.S. Army Natick Laboratories, and expect to be here till about 
April 1st, then return to Sargentville. I am doing research on 
cockroach respiration primarily in relation to the ability of Eublaberus 
posticus (Erich. ) to survive for upwards of a year without food other 
than water. Even among cockroaches, many of which can stand quite a lot 
of starving, Eublaberus is exceptional in this respect. 

While here, we are sub-letting a furnished apartment just across 
the road from the post, so it takes less than 5 minutes to get from 
home to the laboratory. We are quite comfortably situated, and enjoy 
being in this area, although we do regret somewhat not having yet been 
able to spend our first full winter in Maine. 

On several occasions, we have seen Dick Storch, and Kay and the 
baby. Dick has been doing very well at the University of Maine and seems 
well satisfied, at least for the present. We have also talked on the 
phone several times to his colleague and former U of I Entomology 
graduate, Ivan McDaniel, and have plans to get up to Orono to see them all. 

This pretty well covers our news, except that we have been presented 
with our first great grandchild, a girl." 



-27- 



Dr. Gottfried S. Fraenkel 

1 1 i i 

In his usual cryptic fashion Dr. Fraenkel supplied the editor of 

the Newsletter with a few terse statements, the framework which we can 

build an account of his activities during the past year. 

Dr. Fraenkel spent last summer at the Marine Laboratories in France 
at the Villefranche and Banyuls where he continued to work on his research 
on the heat resistance of intertidal snails. Also while in Europe 
last summer, Dr. Fraenkel attended the International Symposium on insect 
hormones that was held at Brno, Czechoslovakia, and afterwards took 
a trip into the Carpathian Mountains. Dr. Fraenkel still continues to 
work on his new hormone, bursicon with two full-time graduate students, 
M. Seligman and W. Fogal. Also connected with this research and working 
under Dr. Fraenkel's guidance is Catherine Hsiao, full-time research 
assistant, who is also working on the calcification in puparium of 
the facefly and pupal diapause in Sarcophaga f alc'ulata . 

Ting Hsiao completed his doctoral dissertation on nutrition and 
host plant selection of the Colorado potato beetle with Dr. Fraenkel. 

Once again in the month of February Dr. Fraenkel has taken off 
for sunnier climes. This year he spent February at the marine laboratory 
at Bahia de Los Angeles, Baja California, 350 miles south of San Diego. 
Prior to his departure when accused of going to the sunnier climes 
because of the current ice storms, snow storms, and sub-zero weather 
in Champaign, he only smiled. Dr. Fraenkel also attended the Entomological 
Society of America Meetings in Portland this past November and also 
with some of his graduate students the regional meeting on endocrinology 
held this year at the University of Wisconsin. 

Dr. Stanley Friedman 

Stan with his hearty band of graduate students marched eastward 
down the hall in September and invaded the new building to establish 
permanent residency, taking with them everything but the paint on the 
walls. The move into the new laboratory was most advantageous for Stan. 









- 



-28- 

His able band of foragers having maintained keys to all glassware 
sources in the old building fortified themselves in their new bastion 
and locked the doors. 

Aside from a few trips to speaking engagements at Brandeis University 
and the Meetings of the Federated Societies of Experimental Biology 
in Atlantic City, Stan spent most of the year tidying his desk and 
engaging in polemic debate with the editor of the Newsletter. His 
vacation with the family was taken in the heat of the Illinois summer 
and consisted of a trip to Missouri where the fishing was awful but 
the swimming passable. During the year vol. 8 of Methods in Enzymology 
appeared containing a few short articles by the above named. University 
operations proceeded as usual in spite of his presence on some committees. 

Dr. Friedman and his graduate students are still working on the 
effect of insect hormones on intermediary metabolism. 

Dr. Arthur W. Ghent 

During the past year, Dr. Ghent, who now holds a joint appointment 
in the Departments of Entomology and Zoology, has been devoting most of 
his free time from teaching to the preparation of manuscripts on a 
backlog of earlier studies. These have included a recent paper on a 
theory of crossing-over, Tribolium flour beetle behavior, analysis of 
contagion in spatial distribution and several more philosophical 
papers on experimental design in biology, and allied subjects. Recently 
prepared manuscripts in press or in review include an extension of 
corner-association analysis to the analysis of contagion simultaneously 
in three dimensions in which Mr. Paul Tenczar, a graduate student in 
Zoology at Illinois, will appear as co-author for his contribution of 
a Monte-Carlo computor study of the chi-square distribution resulting 
from this test; the first two of a series of articles on selected 
problems in biometry, including as Part 1 some applications of 
elementary set theory in biology, and as Part 2 an article on the 
structure of the binomial distribution. Presently in review is an 
article on graphic enumeration and computation procedures that make 
possible the economic extension of the Fisher exact test of 2 x 2 
tables to 2x3, 2x4, 3x3 etc. tables. 



■"-'.:■ i 



i 



• 



. ■' ■ 



i . 



• 






. I. . .1 • 



-29- 



Dr. Ghent's teaching duties include the Honors Biology undergraduate 
course in Population Biology (Biol. 351), and a (predominantly) graduate 
course in methods of probability and statistics, Quantitative Biology 
(Biol. 371). During the fall semesters of the past two years, Dr. Ghent 
has also taken the Honors Biology Seminar (Biol. 203). During this 
coming summer, Dr. Ghent will be visiting the Biology Station at 
St. Andrews, New Brunswick, Canada, where he will begin a re -examination 
of the statistics of the correlation between rainfall and the Atlantic 
salmon fishery, first published by A.G. Huntsman in the 1930' s. 

Dr. William P. Hayes 

While Dr. Hayes has not been heard from directly at the time of 
the writing of the current Newsletter, we recall that he previewed his 
winter's activities by telling us that this winter would be spent 
taking a 77-day cruise in the South Pacific to New Zealand and return 
to Chile and the east coast of South America. We trust that Dr. Hayes 
is continuing the luxurious state of his retirement and will soon be 
back at home safe and sound in his bungalow. We wish him bon voyage in 
all of his diverse travels. 

Dr. William R. Horsfall 

Dr. Horsfall tells us that 1966 was a year of mixed activities so 
characteristic of the life of an academician. The teaching was particu- 
larly enjoyable this year thanks to enthusiastic groups of students. 
His research has progressed normally thanks to able assistants and a 
few breaks. Travel took Bill to the Canadian arctic and subarctic 
regions and to Europe. 

Dr. Horsfall 's group had with them for the whole year Dr. Milan 
Trpis from the Slovak Academy of Science. He carried out an investigation 
on conditioning and hatching eggs of Aedes sticticus , an important 
floodwater mosquito of his country. Dr. Trpis was here under the 
auspices of the World Health Organization as a Senior Research Fellow. 






i 















. 



.* 






■30- 



Summer travel included three trips for collecting live material 
for work during the winter. Trips were made to northern Michigan in 
June, to northern Manitoba in June and to Northwest Territories in July. 
The latter trip was made in a chartered plane in which two of us flew 
across the Canadian bush country and tundra to Baker Lake and return. 
In the fall a week was spent in Geneva working with a panel at WHO 
headquarters . 

A citation was received from Societas Zoologica Botanic Fennica 
Vanamo, Helsinki, Finland for work done there in 1964 and election as 
Fellow of MAS was received during the year. 

Dr. Elbert R. Jaycox 

Dr. Jaycox continued his work on honey bee behavior last year with 
the addition of a grant project to study the effects of queen substance 
on the industry of worker bees. A full-time research assistant, Mr. Ulf 
Soehngen, was hired to work on the project and a graduate assistant, 
Robert G. Holt, began work in 1967. In November, a new apiculture 
field laboratory and headquarters was completed on the Horticulture 
farm. 

Major trips of the year included a collecting trip with Dr. W.E. 
LaBerge to Big Bend National Park in April and the entomology meeting 
in Portland in November. Family plans for a vacation were rudely 
cancelled when the mumps hit Susan, 16, a day before a trip to the 
Ozarks in Missouri. 

Dr. Clyde W. Kearns 

"As I look back upon the past year I find it difficult to recall 
any experience which would make interesting reading. Camille and I 
manage to visit our children in California and Wisconsin a few times 
each year, other than that we hardly get out of the city limits of 
Urbana. Although I threaten each year to revive my old hobby of trout 



: 









. - 









-31- 



fishing in Wyoming. I usually find that I have used up my vacation 
time on the golf course before the month of August rolls around. It 
looks like this year will be a repetition of the past. 

The fine cooperation of all the members of the department have 
made it possible for me to keep my hands in research. With a team of ' 
technicians and graduate students I have been able to take part in a 
laborious undertaking of separating and characterizing some insect 
cholinesterases. We hope to have the results of some of this work in 
print in the immediate future." 

Dr. Joseph R. Larsen 

In putting together the Newsletter for the third consecutive year 
I realize that this could become habit -forming, and it is a frightening 
thought. My activities the past year have been a continuation of work 
on insect sensory receptors, primary emphasis being on the ultrastructure 
of the various receptors. 

The highlight of the year was a trip to San Francisco to attend 
the Electron Microscope Meetings, where Paul Killmer, a student, 
presented a paper on some work that we had been doing on the compound 
eye of the blowfly Phormia . Vacation was timed to visit various friends 
and relatives as we travelled across this great nation. 

Teaching is still involved with insect physiology and a persistent 
interest in Biology 110-111. Also a new activity acquired during the 
past year is advisor to the teacher training people in the biological 
sciences. These are a stimulating group of young people who are 
vitally interested in teaching biology at the secondary school level. 
While this particular chore takes a great deal of time, it has been 
most rewarding to help these young people who have a desire to go out 
and teach biology. 

The Larsen clan is about ready to be split asunder. Pam having 
reached the age of collegeability has made application and been 
accepted to Brigham Young University for the coming year. We have 



• 



' 



-32- 



during the past year acquired a pure white German shepherd. While 
hardly a replacement for Pam it does tend to give us something to 
think about , namely the stability of our minds in having been conned 
into such an acquisition by our children, who couldn't live without a 
dog so that the parents could take care of it. 

Dr. William H. Luckmann 

Dr. Luckmann having completed his first year as Head of the 
Section of Economic Entomology at the State Natural History Survey 
approaches Newsletter time with the following: 

"I see it is Newsletter time, and I do not have a lot of news for 
the year 1966. 

"Perhaps my greatest achievement was in obtaining joint appointments 
for all members of the Section of Economic Entomology in the College 
of Agriculture, University of Illinois effective September 1, 1966. 

"Also during 1966 I received a formal invitation from the Indian 
government to serve as a research advisor for four months at J. Nehru 
Agricultural University, Jabalpur, M.P. India. I will leave for India 
in May, 1967. 

"My family still remains at six — five children and one wife, and 
all are in excellent health and spirits." 

Dr. Ellis G. MacLeod 

Since the writing of the last Newsletter there has been a new 
appointment to the staff of the Entomology Department. Dr. Ellis G. 
MacLeod joined us in September, 1966. Dr. MacLeod was born in Washington, 
D.C. in 1928. He brings with him to the city of Champaign -Urbana a 
wife and three children, having come to us from the Biological Laboratories 
at Harvard University where he was doing post-doctoral work with 
Dr. Carpenter. 



-33- 



Dr. MacLeod did his undergraduate work at the University of Maryland 
at College Park, Maryland with time out for a stint in the U.S. Air 
Force. Upon return from the Air Force Ellis completed his undergraduate 
work at Maryland and continued there in the department of zoology 
obtaining a M.S. While at the University of Maryland he served as an 
instructor in charge of laboratories in a large course in introductory 
zoology. In 1961-1966 Dr. MacLeod was at Harvard. First as a graduate 
student where he received his Ph.D. in 1964 and then stayed on as a 
postdoctoral fellow. His Ph.D. thesis was a comparative study of 
the functional morphology of the head and cervix of the larvae of 
Neuroptera. His work on the postdoctoral fellowship involved a study 
of the ecology and taxonomy of the Chrysopidae. In the first of these 
areas work was begun on the mating behavior of the adults , defensive 
mechanisms and particularly the environmental control of diapause in 
all of the environmental stages. His taxonomic work was oriented around 
a reinvestigation of the relationships of the different groups using 
the chromosome cytology of a large sample species as an important 
guide. Work in all of these areas will continue here at the University 
of Illinois in his current research programs. Dr. MacLeod is also 
interested in insect behavior and insect paleontology. 

Dr. MacLeod's major teaching assignment in the department is 
Entomology 103, the undergraduate course for general entomology. He 
has done a great deal of overhauling and bringing up to date of this 
course and is doing an enthusiastic job of bringing entomology to the 
undergraduates at the University of Illinois. 

We are delighted to have Ellis' enthusiastic and diverse interests 
join us here in the Entomology Department. We are also delighted to 
have his wife and three children. The editor shares with Dr. MacLeod 
various PTA meetings at Jefferson Junior High School where we are both 
attempting to shepherd our children through the arduous rigors of 
modern education. 



-34- 



Dr. Vern G. Milum 

Dr. Milum tells us that having retired in 1962 he is now coming to 
the completion of the first 5-year plan or span. He points out that 
his contemplated ambition on retirement was to play golf everyday, as 
soon as he was released from his academic pursuits. He says, however, 
far from it — 9 holes once or twice a week is all that he can take. 

On retirement Dr. Milum inherited two colonies of bees, but like 
Topsy the number is now 5. He is still actively interested in his 
research program of observing the bee dances. He claims to have many 
theories. However he states that they remain just that — theories. 
He also claims that lack of heated glass enclosures prevent winter 
observations of the bee colonies. He hastens to add, however, that 
this lack of equipment and the inability to observe the bees in the 
winter time have necessitated prolonged winter vacations in warmer 
climes, such as Florida, Spain, Italy and Portugal. We agree with 
Dr. Milum. These are excellent substitutes for the lack of opportunity 
to observe and gain research data during the winter months. Every 
entomologist should have such an excuse. Dr. Milum sends his kindest 
regards to all. 

Dr. Herbert H. Ross 

Dr. Ross tells us that except for the end of the year, 1966 was 
pretty much a stay-at-home year for the Rosses. The 8:00-5:00 period 
was spent chiefly on caddisflies and ants, the ant part representing 
the completion of earlier keys for the common ants of Illinois, plus 
considerable expansion with the help of George Rotramel. The caddisfly 
work included considerable biogeographic analysis that pointed to 
extremely interesting thoughts concerning trans -Antarctic dispersals 
of these insects. The 5:00-8:00 watch was spent chiefly on the final 
editing of the Spectrum paperback Understanding Evolution and working 
on a presidential address for the Society for the Study of Evolution. 



-35- 



The year was highlighted by visits of two fellow taxonomists from 
England, Dr. Henry Stroyan of the Virus Laboratory at Harpenden and a 
keen student of aphids; and Dr. W.J. Knight of the British Museum who 
has cooperated with us on several intercontinental projects involving 
leaf hoppers. Dr. Ross also had a fine midge duo studying the Survey 
collections, Dr. John Martin of Australia and Dr. J.L. Sublette of 
New Mexico. 

In November the Rosses combined business with pleasure on the West 
Coast, including a tour of the Oregon coast, the Portland meetings, and 
a trip to Bellingham, Washington, and Vancouver, B.C., to see son, 
daughter-in-law, and parents. The end of December saw the pilgrimage 
to the Evolution Society and AAAS meetings at Washington, D.C., followed 
by a jolly taxonomic New Year's eve. (After the 5th round everyone 
was describing new species . ) 

Dr. Richard B. Selander 

The major research activities of Dr. Selander continue to be 
taxonomic and behavioral analyses of the meloid and the meloidae. 
Dr. Selander' s field work this past year was confined to a couple of 
weeks in the Davis Mountains of western Texas, where studies of sexual 
behavior in several species of blister beetles were made. The field 
party included, in addition to Dr. Selander, John Pinto, Gary Eertmoed, 
and Jean Mathieu. 

During this past year Dr. Selander had some visitors to his 
laboratory included among them were T.E. Moore, University of Michigan, 
R.D. Alexander, University of Michigan and E.L. Mockford, Illinois 
State University. 

In September Dr. Selander attended the AIBS meetings in College 
Park, Maryland, and also spent a day at the U.S. National Museum in 
Washington, D.C. 

The Selander 's have completed their new home in Champaign and are 
now permanently settled at their new address 171*+ Georgetown Drive. 



-36- 



Lorraine continues to be active in her academic pursuits in the 
psychology department, and will receive the B.S. degree in June. 
Dick is girding up his loins for another session at the annual junior 
high school science fair with his oldest son Mike. 

Dr. James G. Sternburg 

Dr. Sternburg' s research during the past year has been a continuation 
of previous work. Studies on the effects of insecticides and biologically 
active substances have progressed further, particularly with DDT in 
reference to its negative temperature coefficient of toxicity. 

In addition to his toxicological research, Jim has become involved 
with Dr. Waldbauer in certain phases of the biology of cecropia. This 
work began last winter, and will probably require a number of years for 
completion. 

The Sternburg's (all five of them) have done relatively little 
travelling this past year. They did go to northern Wisconsin near 
St. Croix for several weeks last August. During their vacation at 
St. Croix they saw the sun on only five days, a great disappointment 
after looking forward to much swimming, fishing, and collecting. Jim 
will just have to take the clan south next year if he wants to find 
sunshine . 

In addition to his research and directing graduate students, Jim is 
extremely involved as Executive Secretary of the department. With the 
process of admitting new students and taking care of a great deal of the 
administrative load in the department he is very busy. We are grateful 
to Jim for his continued, diligent efforts. 

Dr. Gilbert P. Waldbauer 

Gil tells us that his contribution this year will be a short 
paragraph since he was very busy preparing a review article on the 
consumption and utilization of food by insects for the 1967 volume of 
Advances in Insect Physiology . 



. 


















-37- 



Dr. Fraenkel and Gil teamed up to obtain a U.S.D.A. Grant which 

will support work on the consumption and utilization of food by stored 

i 
products insects. This Work is not Off the ground yet since the 

equipment hasn't arrived. Gil tells us it will be a relief to work with 

an insect that doesn't eat great quantities of fresh plant material. 

He can now buy his insect diets in the grocery store . 

Gil is involved in a study of the biology and behavior of cecropia 

with Dr. Sternburg. This work gets more and more interesting. Gil and 

Jim are collecting cocoons again this winter and look forward to finally 

collecting the data from controlled matings they made last summer. 

They claim they won't know what's what until the adults emerge this 

spring. Gil and Jim have both acquired the title of "cecropia snatchers" 

driving around Champaign-Urbana stealing cecropia cocoons from the front 

and back yards of every innocent law-abiding citizen in town. 

Dr. Joan F. White 

Dr. White having brought to completion much of her research here 
at the University of Illinois made arrangements to spend the coming 
year in Canberra, Australia. Joan is currently in Dr. Grace's 
laboratory, C.S.I.R.O., Canberra where she will spend the next year 
working on insect tissue culture in mosquito tissues and also on 
Dr. Grace's Lepidoptera. 

Joan has her two boys with her and her husband intends to join 
her in the summer. In the fall of 1967 they will all go to England 
where her husband will take a sabbatical to study English literature. 
We hope to see Joan back around the department in two year's time. We 
wish her a most pleasant stay down under. 



■ . 



■ 



-38- 



Dr. Judith H. Willis 

Dr. Willis is still involved in her studies on cuticular proteins 
and mode of action of the principle hormones on metamorphosis. She is 
also getting involved in studies on aging with Dr. Friedman and some 
others in molecular biology. Judy is still very much concerned with 
undergraduate Honor's Biology Program. This last year she has completely 
re-written and put out in book form the laboratory manual for the Cell 
Course, in addition to her teaching The Organism. 

Travels this past year for Judy and her husband John were to the 
AIBS Meetings in Maryland and they also attended the AAAS Meetings in 
Washington in December. Both trips were followed by visits with friends 
in several nearby universities in both these areas. Judy and her 
husband, Dr. John Willis are looking around the world for possible 
spots for sabbatical leave which is coming up for both of them in the 
very near future. The question is to go north and freeze or go south 
and stay warm. John who studies hibernation prefers the north; Judy 
who gets cold easily prefers the south. 



• ''" ■' .'.«. 



-39- 



PUBLICATIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY, 1966-1967 



BALDUF, Walter V. 

Balduf , W. V. 1966. Life of Acrobasis rubrifasciella , its main 

parasite, Agathis calcarata , and three hyperparasites . Ann. ent, 
Soc. Amer. 59(6) :1038- 1049. 



CHADWICK, Leigh E. 

Chadwick, Leigh E. and J. L. Krysan. 1966. Molecular weight of 

cholinesterase from the house fly Musca demestica L. J. Insect 
Phys. 12:781-787. 



FRAENKEL, Gottfried S. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and C. Hsiao. 1966. Neurosecretory cells 
in the central nervous system of the adult blowfly Phormia 
regina Meigen (Diptera, Calliphoridae ) . J. Morph. 119:21-38. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and C. Hsiao. 1966. Pupal diapause in 
Sarcophaga falculata (Diptera). Amer. Zool. 6:576-577. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. , C. Hsiao, and I. M. Seligman. 1966. Properties 
of bursicon, an insect hormone that controls cuticular tanning. 
Science, 151:91-93. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and T. Ito. 1966. The effect of nitrogen 

starvation on Tenebrio molitor L. J. Insect Phys. 12:803-817. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and R. D. Pausch. 1966. The nutrition of the 
larva of the oriental rat flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Rothschild). 
Physiol. Zool. 39:202-222. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and C. F. Soo Hoo. 1966. The consumption, 

digestion and utilization of food plants by a polyphagous insect, 
Prodenia eridania (Cramer). J. Insect Phys. 12:711-730. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and C. F. Soo Hoo. 1966. The selection of food 
plants in a polyphagous insect, Prodenia eridania (Cramer). 
Ibid . , pp. 693-709. 

FRIEDMAN, Stanley 

Friedman, Stanley. 1966. Trehalase in insects. In Methods in 

enzymology , ed. by Neufeld and Ginsburg, Academic Press, N. Y. , 
p. 600-. 

Friedman, Stanley. 1966. Trehalose-6-phosphatase from insects. 
Ibid . , p. 372-. 



• 



:. 






-40- 



GHENT, Arthur W. 

Ghent, Arthur W. 1966. Binomial corner-association assessment of 
contagion: a response to certain criticisms of the method. 
Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc. 95 ( 4): 4 3 7- 441 . 

Ghent, Arthur W. 1966. The logic of experimental design in the 
biological sciences. Bioscience , 16(.l) : 17-22. 

Ghent, Arthur W. 1966. A model of crossing-over based on alternately- 
oriented dipoles. J. Theoret. Biol. 11:87-111. 

Ghent, Arthur W. 1966. Studies of behavior of the Tribolium flour 
beetles. II. Distributions in depth of T. castaneum and T. 
con f us urn in fractionable shell vials. Ecology 47C3) :355-367. 



HSIAO, Ting H. 

Hsiao, Ting H. and F. G. Holdaway. 1966. Seasonal history and host 
synchronization of Lydella grisescens (Diptera: Tachinidae) 
in Minnesota. Ann. ent. Soc. Amer. 59:125-133. 

Hsiao, Ting H. , F. G. Holdaway and H. C. Chiang. 1966. Ecological and 
physiological adaptations in insect parasitism. Ent. exp. et 
appl. 9:113-123. 



JAYCOX, Elbert R. 

Jaycox, Elbert R. 1966. Observations on Dioxys productus productus 
(Cresson) as a parasite of Anthidium utahense Swenk (Hymenoptera: 
Megachilidae). Pan-Pacif. Entomol. U2(i):18-20. 

Jaycox, Elbert R. 1966. Beekeeping management records. 111. State 
Bkprs. Ass. Bull. 47(i):2. 

Jaycox, Elbert R. 1966. Crop pollination management. Farm Technol. 
22(5):8-9,21. 

Jaycox, Elbert R. 1966. Pesticides and honey bees. Univ. of 111., 
Col. of Agr. , Coop Ext. SERV. , CIR. 940. 



LARSEN, Joseph R. 

Larsen, Joseph R. 1966. A laboratory manual in biology (rev. ed.). 
Stipes Pub. Co., Champaign, 251 pp. 

Larsen, Joseph R. , D. M. Miller, and T. Yamamoto. 1966. d-Tubocurarine 
chloride: effect on insects. Science, 152:225-226. 

Larsen, Joseph R. , R. E. Pfadt, and L. G. Peterson. 1966. Olfactory 
and oviposition responses of the house fly to domestic manures 
with notes on an autogenous strain. J. econ. Ent. 59:610-615. 



-41- 

LUCKMANN, William H. 

Luckmann, William H. 1966. Status of chemical control of some maggots 
of vegetable crops. Proc. N. Central Branch, ESA 20:101-102. 

Moye , W. Charles, Lewis J. Stannard, and William H. Luckmann. 1966. 
Repopulation of Thysanoptera in areas previously treated with 
aldrin, heptachlor, and dieldrin. J. Econ. Entomol. 59( 3) :732-735. 

Moore, Steve III, H. B. Petty, W. H. Luckmann, and J. H. Byers. 1966. 
Losses caused by the Angoumois grain moth in dent corn. J. Econ. 
Entomol. 59(4) : 880-882. 



MACLEOD, Ellis G. 

MacLeod, Ellis G. and L. A. Miller. 1966. Ultrasonic sensitivity: 
a tympanal receptor in the green lace wing Chrysopa carnea 
(Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). Science 154:891-893. 



ROSS, Herbert H. 

Ross, Herbert H. 1966. The logical bases of biological investigation. 
Bioscience 16:15-17. 

Ross, Herbert H. 1966. Two new species of Oecetis occurring in 

eastern North America (Trichoptera, Leptoceridae). Trans. 111. 
St. Acad. Sci. 59:11-14. 

Ross, Herbert H. and T. Yamamoto. 1966. A phylogenetic outline of the 
caddisfly genus Mystacides (Trichoptera: Leptoceridae). Canad. 
Ent. 98:627-32. 

Ross, Herbert H. and T. Yamamoto. 1966. Two new sister species of the 
winter stonefly genus Allocapnia (Plecoptera, Capniidae). Ent. 
News 77:265-267. 

Ross, Herbert H. 1966. Understanding evolution. Prentice-Hall, Inc., 
Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 175 pp. 

SELANDER, Richard B. 

Selander, Richard B. 1966. On the systematic position of Protomeloe 
(Coleoptera, Meloidae). Proc. ent. Soc. Wash. 68:1-3. 

Selander, Richard B. 1966. A classification of the genera and higher 
taxa of the meloid subfamily Eleticinae (Coleoptera). Canad. Ent. 
98:449-481. 






' I 



-42- 



STERNBURG, James G. 

Sternburg, James G. and U. E. Brady, Jr. 1966. Recovery of cholines- 
terase activity in organophosphate treated insects. J. Insect 
Phys. 12: 1171-1185 » 



WILLIS, Judith H. 

Willis , Judith H. 1966. The micromorphology of the cecropia wing 
following pupation, during diapause, following injury, and at 
the onset of adult development. J. Insect Phys. 12:933-948. 

Willis , Judith H. and P. C. J. Brunet. 1966. The hormonal control of 
colleterial gland secretion. J. exp. Biol. 44:363-378. 



-43- 

ALUMNI NEWS 

We were again gratified by the response of the alumni in sharing 
their activities, publications, and point of interest which have concerned 
them during this past year. Many of the alumni had considerable news to 
pass on to you. We heard from many whom we did not hear from last year, 
and we would be delighted to hear from all of you so that your colleagues, 
past, present and future might have an opportunity to keep track of your 
recent activities. 

Many of the alumni have written in expressing appreciation for the 
Newsletter and a marked interest in its continuation. We are grateful for 
these words of encouragement and will continue to put out the Newsletter 
on an annual basis , so that we all might maintain contact with each other. 
At the end of the newsletter as in previous issues we are including a per- 
forated information sheet which we would like you to remove, fill out and 
return to us. We hope before too many years go by this will become a 
yearly ritual with all of you. 

In the last Newsletter we suggested the possibility of a reunion of 
all of the graduates of the Entomology Department to coincide with the 
dedication of the new building which also coincides with the Centennial 
celebration of the University of Illinois. There was considerable 
affirmative response from those who indicated an interest to participate 
in such an event. The Centennial year of the University runs from 
February , 1967 through February, 1968. An exact time for the dedication 
of the new building has not yet been set, but it is hoped that sometime 
during this period we might have such a gathering of former students in 
this department with a worthwhile symposium and social gathering where 
we might all get together and renew old acquaintances. We will keep you 
posted so you can make plans to attend such an event. 

Lusettie Blevins ('25) 

Lusettie tells us under current research and recent publications that 
it was too dry this past summer to even get much garden planted, let alone 
research. She also points out that we have given her credit for having a 
doctor's degree but states "Better correct that — I have a master's, not 
a doctor's. Don't want to sail under false colors." I guess we are just 



-44- 



too eager to give away degrees. Please excuse the slip. 

Lusettie had a very wonderful tour of Europe and the Holy Lands in 
October. This was her first visit to the Holy Land and she states she 
would like to see more of these ancient countries. 

She is delighted with the Newsletter and always happy to hear from 
former classmates and friends from the University. 

B. D. Burks ('37) 

My current research and recent publications include the usual round 
of papers on the classification of chalcid-flies (of no interest to anyone 
outside the field). However, in January 1966 I became Investigations Leader 
for Hymenoptera on the Agriculture staff here at the U.S. National Museum 
which means slightly more paper work. I did not get around to letting you 
know that I was a visiting lecturer at U.C. , Berkeley, last summer, so 
that is past history that may as well be forgotten. My real accomplishment 
while in California was the scaling of three mountains, one above 14,000, 
my highest so far (this was White Mountain Peak, 14,246). No, we did not 
go up by jeep nor helicopter, but zu fuss . 

George B. Craig Jr. ('56) 

George is now Professor of Biology and Director of the World Health 
Organization International Reference Centre for Aede s. His current research 
continues to be involved in the genetics of Aedes , particularly A^_ aegypti. 

George has a most prodigious research program going. He sends us a 
list of current projects in mosquito genetics and a list of publications 
encompassing four pages. He is really pushing back the frontiers in the 
genetics of mosquitoes. 

He tells us he is going to Senegal this summer for field study of 
speciation in A. aegypti . He has made yearly trips to Geneva, Switzerland 
for about five years on business for W.H.O. 

P. A. Dahm ('47) 

Paul Dahm returned the Newsletter Information Sheet for 1966-67. At 
least he gave us his current home and business address. While we didn't 
hear of Paul's recent activities or travels we do know that he is still 
in the land of the living and were delighted to hear from him. 



-45- 

Philip Garman ('16) 

I have not tried to publish anything lately. I make many business 
calls around Connecticut as consultant for a group that call themselves 
"The Laurel State Fruit Growers." It requires information on several 
phases of fruit growing besides insect control. 

This year it will be 50 years since my graduation from Illinois. I 
would certainly like to see the new quarters and will make it to a reunion 
if my physical strength holds out and my pocket book warrants. 

Robert D. Glasgow ('13) 

Since the publication of the last Newsletter we were very sorry to 
hear from Mrs. Josephine B. Glasgow informing us that her husgand Dr. Robert 
D. Glasgow passed away on July 15, 1964. This information was not available 
to us at the time of Dr. Glasgow's passing. Because of this and because 
many of you who might have known him were not aware of his passing we are 
including an orbituary which appeared in the New York Times, July 16, 1964, 
and extending to Mrs. Glasgow our belated sympathy. 

ALBANY, July 15 (AP) -- Dr. Robert Douglass Glasgow of Albany, state 
entomologist from 1928 until his retirement in 1949 died today at Albany 
Medical Center Hospital. He was 85 years old. 

During his years as the state's expert on insects Dr. Glasgow led many 
campaigns against flies, ticks, moths, mosquitoes and a variety of other 
pests.. 

Dr. Glasgow developed many methods of applying insecticides, and was 
a pioneer in the use of helicopters to spread DDT fogs. 

He also published a number of papers on the physiology and ecology 
of insects. 

Dr. Glasgow was born in Tennessee, Illinois and received his bachelor's 
and doctorate degrees from the University of Illinois. He taught at the 
University before taking up the state post here. 

Al G. Grosche ('25) 

This year we heard from Al Grosche who is now residing in Waukegan , 
Illinois and is in that blissful state of life for which we are all 
striving — retirement. Al tells us that he is spending most of his 
time these days working with "little league" groups in baseball and .' 



, . .■•• 



-1*6- 

basketball. That sounds like enough to keep a retired man young. 

In his euphoric state he has been able to spend two months in central 
Europe, three weeks in Southwestern United States and tells us that his 
next travelling plans are a trip to Washington and Oregon. Al tells us 
that he would also be delighted to attend a Centennial Dedicatory Symposium, 
which we hope we can bring to fruition. 

Robert F. Harwood ('54) 

Bob is currently working on daily and seasonal rhythms, especially 
with mosquitoes and the codling moth. He is particularly studying the 
effect of "skeletal" photoperiods on codling moth development. He is 
also involved with attempted mass rearing of the European pine shoot moth. 

His recent travels have been mostly trips to participate in meetings 
such as National ESA meeting in New Orleans, and Pacific Branch meeting in 
Monterey, California. He will be on sabbatical at Princeton University 
during the 1966-1967 academic year. 

In the recent additions to the family department he lists just one 
dog and two parakeets , names and dates unimportant . 

Thank you for your kind comments, Bob. I have indeed been persuaded one 
more year, though the efficiency is questionable. Bob tells us that he would 
be delighted to attend a Symposium in conjunction with a reunion if he 
can get himself away from his research problems. 

Bob also appends a P.S. to his Newsletter Information and tells us 
that they are enjoying having Calvin Soo Hoo with them in the Department 
at Pullman, Washington. 

J. David Hoffman ('60) 

My recent research is on some preliminary studies on mass rearing of 
the tobacco hornworm and attraction of male tobacco hornworm moths to 
blacklight traps baited with live virgin female moths. Also I am doing .;: 
some mass rearing of the tobacco hornworm. 

I recently spent two months on the island of St. Croix (U.S. Virgin 
Island) to study the possibility of conducting insect population control 
experiments on that island. 



-47- 



I was married September 9, 1960 to Mary Bishop whose home is in South 
Wales, U.K. We now have two children: Trudi Leigh and Jan Margaret 
Hoffman, 5 and 3 respectively. 

In September of 1966 I took a position at the Biological Control of 
Insects Laboratory at Columbia, Missouri (P.O. Box 329). 

George Earl Huff ('50) 

We heard from George Huff this year who tells us that while he has 
no current publications he has been doing some research as to the certain 
treatment of bee equipment for the control of American foulbrood using 
ethylene oxide. 

George gives us no information in the recent travels department so 
we guess that he is staying in Indiana keeping the home fires burning. 

No new additions to the family. George tells us that he would like 
to attend a symposium and thinks it would be a good idea if it will bring 
us together for a much needed reunion. And to quote George "We ought to 
do this more often as the old song goes." 

Donald Ross Johnson ('40) 

Don is now at the Malaria Eradication Branch, Communicable Disease 
Center, U.S. Public Health Service, Atlanta, Georgia and tells us under 
current research "No research! This is an international operational 
program jointly carried on by World Health Organization, UNICEF (United 
Nations Children's Fund) and USPHS (representing U.S. governemnt). U.S. 
Assistance is currently being given to 15 countries, CDC is doing some 
research for program, but the malaria eradication branch at the moment 
is only indirectly involved in this research. The eradication program is 
the largest organized health effort ever undertaken by man. Over one 
billion people are exposed to malaria." 

My publications are World Role in Mosquito Control and Status of 
Malaria Eradication in India, 1965. My recent travels for business or 
pleasure took me on an official business trip to India, Jordan, Syria and 
Geneva, Switzerland in January and February 1966, to observe , appraise and 
discuss malaria eradication program problems and progress. 



.' ..'O :', 



•:"i;v 



-48- 



Our current roster reads thus: 

Son, Gary R. 1/31/49 
Daughter, Lynn K. 7/1/50 
Son, Lee R. 10/21/54 
Daughter, Laura K. 11/2/62 

Don suggests more alumni news in the Newsletter. I agree with Don — 
it's up to you. Don would also enjoy attending a symposium. We will send 
notices and programs as early as feasible. 

Robert E. Lewis ( '59) 

From the Land of Lebanon my current research is still involved in 
a study of the fleas of the Middle East, Southwest Asia and North Africa, 
as well as their hosts. 

Bob has four or five new articles on distribution and collection of 
fleas from mammals and birds in Saudi Arabia. His recent travels read: 
"Last summer while I was on a five-month collecting trip to Afghanistan, 
Mike visited India, Nepal, Thailand, Hong Kong, Japan and the U.S.A. 

On the possible reunion or symposium Bob said it would not be possible 
for them to attend but think it's a good idea! 

Jai K. Nayar ('62) 

We heard from Jai Nayar again. Delighted to hear from those who are 
now in the Newsletter Information habit. 

Jai is still at Vero Beach, Florida at the Entomological Research Center. 
He is currently working on growth and development of mosquitoes and on 
biological clocks in mosquitoes and also continuing work on the nutrition 
of mosquito larvae. He tells us he has been enjoying Florida weather. 
After the Chicago snowstorm of 1967 and the fantastic ice storm in 
Champaign -Urban a which kept us all out of power and destroyed half the 
trees in town, we, too, would enjoy a little Florida weather along with 
Jai. There is a recent addition to the Nayar family. Veena Renate Nayar, 
a daughter, born December 11, 1965. Congratulations! Jai also expresses 
interest in attending a possible reunion symposium at the dedication of the 
new building. 






- 






' 












■ 



' 



-1+9- 



Angel Berrios-Ortiz ('61) 

Angel who is with the Biology Department, College of A ricultural 
and Mechanical Arts in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico says "T think it is wonderful 
to be able to read and to keep track of all people that shared the same 
experience of being at least for a very short time in contact with the 
Entomology Department at the University of Illinois. I would probably 
be able to attend a reunion or symposium if it could be held during a 
weekend." 

Faust ino Q. Otanes ('22) 

From Faustino who completed his graduate training from the University 
of Illinois in 1922 , a varitable encyclopedia of information which we are 
delighted to share with the rest of the alums. 

This year Faustino has not travelled abroad, but within the country 
to attend agricultural conferences, scientific meetings, etc. 

Faustino was formerly Senior Entomologist; Chief, Plant Pest and 
Disease Control Division; and later Assistant Director for Research, Bureau 
of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Manila. 
Also, he served as Officer-in-Charge of the Bureau at various times. 

He retired several years ago, after more than forty years of service 
in the Philippine Government, devoted chiefly to entomological and plant 
pest and disease control activities. 

He taught at the College of Agriculture, University of the Philippines, 
and also at the Araneta Institute of Agriculture (now Araneta University), 
as professor of Entomology and acting head of Department. 

Now as a member of the National Research Council of the Philippines, 
he is still keeping up his interest in certain entomological activities , 
especially on the biology and ecology of the Oriental Migratory Locust 
( Locusta migratoria man i lens is Mayen) and insects of coconuts in relation 
to a serious trouble that has already killed over eight million trees. 

The family includes three girls and four boys, all grown up and all 
professionals. Only one boy is married so far and has two children, a 
girl (four years) and a boy (two years). Can only speculate as to how 
many more grandchildren there will be. Hope there will be an entomologist 
or a biologist among them! 



-50- 

Faustino thanks us very much for the 1965 and 1966 Newsletters. "It 
is most gratifying to know that the Department of Entomology, for one, 
has been getting, and continues to get, what it needs to be able to have 
and maintain high standards of instruction and research 

"I have read and reread with pleasure and interest what the Newsletters 
say about the research activities of graduate students , alumni and faculty 
members . 

"That comparatively little research along fundamental lines is being 
done here is due chiefly to the lack of men and women with broad biological 
training and with adequate experience in research along such lines 

"What you stated in the 1965 Newsletter about available traineeships , 
fellowships and assistantships under the Department of Entomology, some of 
which are open to foreign graduate students, will accordingly be kept in 
mind. 

"I am happy to know from the Alumni Directory that those who did graduate 
work with me and with whom I had frequent association and whose friendship I 
enjoyed are still alive. I greet them all. I greet all fellow alumni, the 
members of the faculty and friends , and as we say here in the Philippines , 
"MABUHAY"! (meaning "May you live long"! Pronounced "Ma-boo-high"). The 
same is wished for the Newsletter." 

T. H. Parks ('25) 

Thaddeus is still consultant in pest control for two large fruit farms 
in central Ohio. 

He adds that the Newsletter serves as a "letter from home" for recent 
alumni and a measurement of growth for the older alumni. He also suggests 
that the reunion - symposium should feature the importance of entomology 
in the advancement of world economy in agriculture, public health and 
biological science education. 

Alvah Peterson ( ' 16 ) 

Dr. Peterson's current research is on the identification of eggs of 
insects, especially those of moths from various places in the U.S. Some 
ten papers have been published since 1960, most of which have been printed 
in the Florida Entomologist. 



-51- 

Several weeks to months have been spent in the following states collecting 
and photographing eggs of insects namely, at Gainesville and Homestead, 
Florida; Lake Itasia, Minnesota; Gull Lake, Michigan; Raleigh, North 
Carolina; Corvallis, Oregon; Postal Arizona and elsewhere. 

Dr. Peterson tells that when he was at Urbana, entomology was taught 
in the old Natural History Building, 1912-1916. 

Paul W. Riegert ('54) 

I am currently engaged in attempting to resolve the inter-related 
effects of photoperiod and temperature on the induction and termination of 
diapause in certain species of grasshoppers; also, determining the genetic 
relationships and inheritance of diapause. Recent publications include the 
effects of grouping, pairing and mating on the bionomics of grasshoppers; 
the effects of the fungus Entomophthora grylli on populations of grass- 
hoppers ; the suitability of native grasslands as habitats for certain 
species of grasshoppers. 

My recent travels included a summer trip through the Canadian Rockies 
and later a trip to attend the ESA meetings at New Orleans. On the latter 
tour, Betty and I travelled by car through 21 states for a distance of 
nearly 9,000 miles. We visited, more than a dozen research establishments 
and universities, visited with a host of new and old friends, acridologists 
and chemists, including a great number of old Illini. We are sorry that 
we had to miss the old University of Illinois, for we had intended to drop 
in, even if just to say hello. We did, however, manage to get out to the 
Bahamas for a bit of fun in the sun before returning to the cold winter 
of Saskatchewan. 

Regarding additions to the family "As I said after prelims: Gott sei 
dank, wir sind am Ende!" 

I certainly enjoy every minute I spend in reading the Newsletter. 
I used it as a guide to plan my tour through the U.S.A. last December. 

A reunion is a memorable occasion, one which always will be remembered. 
Do have one if it is at all possible. As for me, I live too far away to 
make definite commitments to attend. 



„■' 



-52- 



Robert Snetsinger (*60) 

We received a communique from Robert this year. He tells us that he 

is still working on rat control and tick distribution and also on pymotid 

mites. He just received a three-year ARS grant to work on the host 

resistance to spider mites. The communiques may be short, but we do 
enjoy hearing from all of you. 

George J. Spencer ('24) 

"Many thanks for the Entomology Newsletter 1966 which was read and 
enjoyed. 

"I date back to 1923-24, to the time of Professors C. L. Metcalf, 
Alex MacGillivray, Victor Shelford, W. V. Balduf , the Great van Cleave 
Dr. Shumway, Theodor Frison; fellow students were G. E. King, DeCoursey, 
Alvin Cahn, Curtis Benton, Paul Knight, Morris Steggarda. Margaret Windsor 
was an undergraduate. Since then I have encountered Kathryn Sommerman 
by correspondence. 

"After a serious operation, Clotho, Takesis and Atropos are hovering 
round my bed so please strike my name off your mailing list." 

We were delighted to hear from Dr. Spencer. We're sorry to hear of 
his serious operation and are grateful for the grand old men of entomology 
and refuse to take his name off the mailing list as he asks until he has 
made that final crossing of the River Styx. 

Donald M. Tuttle ('52) 

Don tells us that this year his current research and publications 
efforts still concern the plant mites, especially the Tetranychoidea. He 
has just published with E. W. Baker a treatise on the spider mites of 
Arizona and notes on the systematics .and represents a 3-year effort. 
Congratulations on this accomplishment, Don. 

Don's recent travels have taken him to the Rocky Mountain states for 
more plant mite materials. Also, he attended the regional meeting in Logan, 
Utah on Alfalfa Seed Production, and again attended the Institute of 
Acarology at Ohio State University. He says "Again in 1965, for the 6th time 
at the Institute." He claims to be a perennial attender and will be 
there again in 1966. 



. 



' 









-53- 

He tells us that the family situation is the same as in 1965. No new 
additions. Don also passes on the information that it would be very possible 
that he would be able to attend a reunion-symposium in connection with the 
dedication of the new building and the University Centennial. 



Since the publication of the departmental Newsletter last year, it 
has come to our attention that the following entomology alumni have 
passed away: 

Robert D. Glasgow 
James Lowell Hypes 



-54- 



ADDITIONS OR CORRECTIONS 
TO THE DIRECTORY 



John L. Eaton 
Department of Biology 
Kalamazoo College 
Kalamazoo, Michigan 49001 



Paul W. Riegert 

Canada Agricultural Research Station 

University Sub P.O. 

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada 



Edwin G. Gemrich 
The Upjohn Company 
301 Henrietta Street 
Kalamazoo, Michigan 49001 



Soelaksono Sastrodihardjo 

Dept. Kimia-Biologi 

Institut Teknologi Bandung 

Ganeca 10 Bandung, Java, Indonesia 



J. David Hoffman 
Biological Control of 

Insects Lab 
P.O. Box 329 
Columbia, Missouri 65202 



Mr. and Mrs. Ting H. Hsiao 
Department of Zoology 
Utah State University 
Logan, Utah 84321 
(effective 9/1/67) 



Sol Kramer 
College of Medicine 
University of Florida 
Gainesville, Florida 32601 



Ronald Meyer 
Rural Route #1 
Sidney, Illinois 61877 



Guy J. Noerdinger 

660 Tyrello Avenue 

Apt, 40 

Mountain View, California 94040 



Robert H. Schiffman 

28203 Ella Road 

Palos Verdes Peninsula, California 902 7» 



If you know of the whereabouts 
of any of the following people , please 
let us know. 

Harry E. Anderson 
David M. Brunfiel 
Peh-I Chang 
John E. Fraley 
Gladys Hoke 
Abdul H. Junaid 
George Edward King 
Ronald B. Madge 
Richard 0. Malcomson 
Jean Paul Pi card 
A. Mohan Rao 
Albert Salako 
Edgar Henry Smith 
Elmer D. Sweeney 
Perry Homer Wei ley 



NEWSLETTER INFORMATION FOR 1966-1967 

Name: 

Home Address: 

Business Address: 

Current Research and Recent Publications: 



Recent Travels for Business or Pleasure: 



Additions to the family (names, dates): 



Suggestions or comments concerning the "Newsletter": 



Return to: Newsletter Committee 

Department of Entomology 
320 Morrill Hall 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



• . 



:•.' 







MT©M©L©0Y 



NEWSLETT 








APR 3 1970 



ANNUAL NEWSLETTER 



Department of 
Entomology 



University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 



March, 1968 



i; .•!."••■ -■ '.■?■■ ,\v, j.VJ'm! 



-mi' 



» .•.' ■%«r;j:. 






*K : ; . :i\)'-.;"i 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

MESSAGE FROM THE HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 1 

ACTIVITIES OF THE SCHOOL OF LIFE SCIENCES 2 

DEPARTMENTAL ROSTER 1967-1968- 5 

VISITORS TO THE DEPARTMENT 9 

SPORTS REVIEW 10 

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES ■ 11 

RECENT GRADUATES 12 

PRESENT ENTOMOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS 21 

NEWS ABOUT THE STAFF MEMBERS 30 

NON-ACADEMIC EMPLOYEES 41 

PUBLICATIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY 1967-1968 43 

ALUMNI NEWS 46 

NEWSLETTER MAILING LIST - 1968 53 

NEWSLETTER INFORMATION FORM 68 



Hope did spring eternal and the Newsletter comes forth in what we hope will be a 
routine occurrence. Rather than admit the Newsletter comes late we will just say 
that March will be Newsletter month. 

As the centennial year of the great University of Illinois draws to a close we 
again send our best wishes and take the opportunity in these few pages to share 
with you the activities of your entomology department. The cover this year is 
most significant in that we borrowed the official centennial emblem from the 
University which has just completed the celebration of 100 years of progress. We 
have taken pleasure in reviewing the old, looking at the present and we now look 
forward to a more productive future. We are sorry that we weren't able to bring to 
fruition a centennial celebration for the entomology department. A number of pit- 
falls befell this undertaking and we decided perhaps the best way to get to- 
gether in the coming year might be an Illinois breakfast or dinner at the annual 
meetings of The Entomology Society. 

As the ink is drying on the pages I cannot close this tome without thanking 
once again our faithful secretary, Ruth Plymire, whose willingness and cooperation 
make it possible to continue the Newsletter each year. Also a word of thanks to 
the students and fellow colleagues who share with you their activities of the past 
year. Until next year when we will be back in spite of ourselves, best wishes. 

The Editor 



.•■ ' 



[( .. .-J 



■SB P. ffei.' 






■".'■ + ■.. ■ 



#■?• 






" !" Ti'iS\ 3'L.i! '^Vri"i Si'.'l . j fl.'r.'TI'T^K'+ttSfc v ",' ■" ■AOIilOj • ;-■•■■■■ .-. .-■••;•■.; •■'■;; ,. 

£>V.' . -vi'-' :-■>.-.,•< ■ ■ "•;..• i :. • • : •■ 1 ..' ;:..' 'V ; . 



■ ri't 

' ■ 



07 :>.• 



:!■:•■ 



.a. 
'.'/£•.' 



i .-...; . 



MESSAGE FROM HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

It is a pleasure to greet you again through the medium of this 
Newsletter. Events of the past year have created periods of uncertainty 
for our department which is unlike any previous period of my over 30 
years of experience here. At this time we find we cannot commit ourselves 
to support worthy graduate candidates due to the present inability of 
federal agencies to fund some of our training and research grants, all 
of which have been approved some months ago. We are also faced with the 
uncertainty of how many new and first year graduate students will actually 
be with us next year, in view of the present draft regulations. I'm 
sure these problems are not unique to our department but we derive little 
consolation from the fact that others may well be suffering from the same 
frustrations. 

It is indeed a pleasure to inform you that Professor Robert L, Metcalf 
will become a permanent member of our staff beginning in September of 
this year. I'm sure there is no need for me to point to his many scientific 
accomplishments, or elaborate upon the benefits which we as a department 
will gain his joining us. We sincerely hope that we shall be able to provide 
him with a stimulating atmosphere and the appropriate facilities to enable 
him to continue his highly productive research and writing program. 

As always I extend a sincere invitation for you to visit us. If you 
haven't been back in recent years I can assure you that you will find it 
interesting and rewarding to meet and talk with some of our new staff 
members . 

Sincerely, 



C . W . Kearns 

Head of Department 



■*■:.:..) T 



•.;"C ".'--5 



-2- 



ACTIVITIES OF THE SCHOOL OF LIFE SCIENCES 

As we consider the progress of the School of Life Sciences during this 
past year I think that it is fitting that we consider the 100th year anniver- 
sary of the founding of the University of Illinois. This celebration lasted 
from February 28, 1967, through March 11, 1968. The theme and the centennial 
colophon which is depicted on our cover was found on all the official literature 
of the University during this past year. The theme being "to- draw from a 
distinguished past and create a promising future." During the past year 
there have been many activities at the University by way of important symposiums, 
concerts, major art exhibits, all vying for time on a busy university calendar. 

In the School of Life Sciences the symposium that attracted the largest 
crowd of students and faculty was a two series program sponsored by the 
Zoology Department under the direction of Professor J.D. Kitzmiller. The 
first was a centennial symposium held in October, 1967, with the following 
participants: F.H.C. Crick, nobel laureate who spoke on vitalism and 
molecular biology; Sol Spiegelman from the University of Illinois who spoke 
on the synthesis of self duplicating molecules; R.C. Lowenten, University 
of Chicago, who spoke on the subject of evolution as a new world view; 
Marshall Nurenburg from the National Institutes of Health who spoke on genes 
and the future of man. Following the symposium were a series of talks and 
seminars in the areas of parasitology, ecology, embryology, and vertebrate 
zoology. These were a most stimulating series of seminars and symposia avail- 
able to all of us in the School of Life Sciences . 

As the centennial year comes to a close let us share with you some excerpts 
from a talk given by President David Dodds Henry of the University in his 
closing centennial address on March 11: 

"With this convocation, we close the Centennial Year of the University 
of Illinois. Its theme has been, 'From a Distinguished Past, a Promising 
Future . ' 

Examination of the past has been reassuring. We have noted great achieve- 
ments and they have stirred our pride as we identified the University with 
historical benchmarks - in science, technology, humanities, the arts and 
the professions. The agriculture, industry, business, government and social 
organization of the State and Nation have been influenced by what has been 



■ . m :r-".r ii'.- 



t c. ::■ 



■!-■•■-. t. 






■>■::.•'> to i. • ">J 



•■n- 



Tli ■ 



.. i :.\k i-'i "' ' 



,fij >tj 



. 



-3- 



discovered and encouraged at this University. People's lives have been 
enriched - through countless public services, from the outcomes of research, 
and from the contributions of the tens of thousands who have been formally 
enrolled . 

We have , however , looked forward even more than we have looked back . 
Aware that many now enrolled in the University will spend their most productive 
years in the 21st century, the centennial events have been designed for 
analysis of trends and potentialities in the long view. 

Students, facility, and alumni, in company with outstanding visiting 
commentators and observers, with artists, scholars, and public leaders have 
canvassed, among many subjects, science and the human condition; man and 
the multitude in the search for the values in our culture; the university in 
motion, a matrix for the arts; urban education and the study of urban affairs; 
changing concepts in all the major disciplines; business and social respon- 
sibility; world food needs; and education for the 21st century. 

From the inspiration of this year, we are moved to carry on with 
increasing energy and spirit, in the great academic tradition, described on 
a similar occasion three years ago by President James A. Perkins of Cornell 
University: 'From the very beginning, the idea of the university has been 
nourished by and it has contributed to the great universal imperatives of 
the Western world: the respect for reason, the distaste for unexplained 
inequality, the compassion for the individual spirit, and the compulsion to 
be of service to all mankind.'" 

President Henry continues: 

"As the University enters its second century, it is mindful of its strength 
and achievements. This fact does not induce complacency, however. The past 
is indeed prologue , and the agenda for the future suggest that the work to be 
done is of such importance that it will command the dedicated service of all 
who believe in the greatness of the University of Illinois. 

May this call to greatness continue to inspire us in the years to come!" 

We in the School of Life Sciences share with our President the promise 
of greatness in the future for the University and particularly in the life 
sciences where there is tremendous ferment the demands will be great from 
those of us who work in these areas . 



We are also grateful to Dr. Reno Kallio for .a successful year in the 
School of Life Sciences. His skill and his ability to coordinate the activities 
of the various departments into a unified division of the University will 
make possible the fulfillment of this promise of the future here at the 
University of Illinois. With our new building completed with fascinating 
new instrumentation available and wjth its faculty and students ', the potential 
of the 'SchSol Of Life Sciences is unlimited. 



.:.•;: I ! 



•■ 









IU:H 3 .:TJ .!.t.T.'.-. 



-■Si- 
Departmental Roster 1967-68 
Faculty 

Balduf, Walter V. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Chadwick, Leigh E. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Decker, George C. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. - Professor of Entomology 

Friedman, Stanley - Professor of Entomology 

*Ghent, Arthur W. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Hayes, William P. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Horsfall, William R. - Professor of Entomology 

**Jaycox, Elbert R. - Associate Professor of Apiculture 

Kearns, Clyde W. - Professor of Entomology and Head of the Department 

*ft*Larsen, Joseph R. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Luckmann, William H. - Professor of Entomology and Head of 

Economic Entomology Section 

MacLeod, Ellis G. - Assistant Professor of Entomology 

Milum, Vern G. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Ross, Herbert H. - Professor of Entomology and Head of Faunistic Survey 

Selander, Richard B. - Professor of Entomology 

Sternburg, James G. - Professor of Entomology 

Waldbauer, Gilbert P. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Willis, Judith H. - Assistant Professor of Entomology 

* - Joint Appointment with Zoology 
** - Joint Appointment with Horticulture 
*** - Joint Appointment with Physiology and Biophysics 



• ,- . . i j j. 



nap 



■T ' : : . . 



.LOiilO ".?*•" 



... :.'.i Trr 



qo.i.o-vro 



Lw 1'. .: 



- <-- 



" ' j! r XJfb.L£t 

••• ■:. • : '-- j riTfioJ , 5foiv;b>. .;J 

v. js'tc •"•' l ■' .■ -j ■"'" ~v >_' .isMn?s'i'3 

•T- .J '.;'■:■: a A tOflJ't. 4 j';ii3/ic' : 

■■ ; : : ~ .. h ••' . s ■ 



ismt-XBqsfl -ri .r t'.-. bs 1 



i.ECVJ 



■:■■-■ u c . "via- 

s.f.J J .:.!■•' •';^5: ! ■! : 



■■/9VTt.'i 



i rcirel to *;f ■ ah v*< 



r - ir.-sM 



ron 'fya;- : - , rzr.'n 



., b ' ■■ ' . o.i -rr 



.lire: 



' T.'d 






:. ,V''' I ' ' : ■'. 






[> •', 7:.' 



-6- 



•Research Associates 



Bhattacharya, A. K. 



Miller, Tom 



Research Assistants 



Campbell, William R, 
DeWitt, Jerald 
Eertmoed, Gary E. 
Flattum, Roger F. 
Fogal, Willard 
Harris, Todd 
Janicke, James 
Kan, Luping 
Killmer, Paul S. 
Lee, An-horng 
Ness , Dollie 



.Jordin, Gerald 

Randall, Robert F. 

Ronquillo, Consolacion (Men) 

Seligman, Torris 

Sill, Douplas 

Sprenkel, Richard K. 

VJeddle, Richard C. 

T 'ilson, Georpe C. 

"ilson, Thomas 

Yu, Ching-Chieh 



Bouseman, John K. 
Casaburri, Angelo 
Fox, P. Michael 
Krone , Larry 



Teaching Assistants 

Parshall, Stephen 
Peterson, Clifford 
Scarbrough, Aubrey 



ii;u\.) m'- r. 1 " r . i'H> 



r 1 1 ( 



:1T 



■;,:•.■ :'■ ■-:■ 



Jii< I 



:i: ;"J? '.< 



' 



Li/ '. .311 ! 









I ■■■. 



-7- 
Trainees and Fellows 

Ameel, John J. •-. NDEA Fellow 
Benson, Robert L. - NDEA Fellow 
Chang, Franklin - USPH Trainee 
Cupp, Eddie W. - USPH Trainee 
Denlinger, David - NDEA Fellow 
Dirks, Tobias - USPH Trainee 
Fox, P. Michael - NDEA Fellow 
Morden, Robert - USPH Trainee 
Olson, Jimmy K. - NDEA Fellow 
Pinto, John D. - NIH Fellow 
Sanburg, Larry Lee - NDEA Fellow 
Scarbrough, Aubrey - NDEA Fellow 
Seymour, Allison - USPH Trainee 
Sheldon, Joseph - NDEA IV Fellow 



Students Not on Staff 

Aboualy , Aly 

Allen, Tom 

Fowler, H. Wade, Jr. 

Kuhlman, Donald E. (Instructor, Entomology Extension) 

Patterson, William J. 

Randell, Roscoe (Instructor, Entomology Extension) 



■ "■ S. ! 



: ■•' 1! • L IHJ 



■■:: i ! ; 



■:■■:!■ :' 

^■.■nii-yt'i ..121: 
■OJ /: '/I ' !> : 



rr;lf?i • ' ** '* ■ 



:>T1"!' 



j,.;. ii jT"lTC: 



■ a 1 1. 



■n:.' : 



■ ■■ 



i "J r- .! ■', <v 



t, nor^rrsJx.'J 



.nil xod ii. . 



inoj.i tmj. 



■?'.' 






-8- 
Non- Academic 

Duvall, Eloise 
Michael, Judy 
Plymire, Ruth A. 
Ransom, Terry 
Reeves , Jean 
Yeh, Shaw-mei 



Student Employees 

Brooks , Ronald 
Chang, Cheryl 
Hanna, Jean 
Meyer, John 
Moe , Joanne 
Quinlan, Ellen 
Rhoades, Bradley 
Speier, Pa^ 
Sprietsma, Suzanne 
Zachary, Carolyn 






!:'■.'- 



Oj "■ i-i ■ 



VISITORS TO THE DEPARTMENT 



Dr. John Corrigan 

Department of Biochemistry 
Tufts University Medical School 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Dr. Stanley Kater 

Department of Biology 
University of Virginia 
Charlottesville , Virginia 



Dr. Robert MacArthur 
Princeton University 
Princeton, New Jersey 



Dr. Toshio Narahashi 

Department of Physiology 
Medical Center, Duke University 
Durham, North Carolina 



Dr. Kenneth Roeder 

Department of Biology 
Tufts University 
Medford, Massachusetts 



Dr. Herbert Roller 

Department of Biology 
University of Wisconsin 
Madison, Wisconsin 



Dr. George Salt 

University of Cambridge 
Cambridge , England 



Dr. Adrian Wenner 

Department of Biological Sciences 
University of California 
Santa Barbara, California 



Dr. Joan Whitten 

Department of Biological Sciences 
Northwestern University 
Evanston, Illinois 



fiJ f J ■ - ll 



• ' 



'5X0: 



1 - 



-10- 



SPORTS REVIEW 

The Entomology Department during the 1967-68 sports season fielded its 
first touch football team under the leadership of Ed Cupp. The team adopted 
the name "Mosquitoes," and in four hard-fought contests, the team came through 
with two wins and two losses. 

The basketball team christened the 'Tiger Beetles : ' with Terry Ransom 
as pivot man and captain, lost its first two games, but came storming back 
to take its last four games and a playoff for the championship. Congratula- 
tions to our hardy band of atheletes. 

The perrennial 'Flycatchers, the Softball team, lost a lot of its 
veterans through graduation. But a new injection of vitality with the incoming 
of new talent to the department this year should elevate the potential of our 
team to where it should be--on top. This year, the Softball team will be 
captained by Frank Chang. 

Bob Benson from our department is still an active member of the Rugby 
Club. The newsletter this year coincides with this Illinois State basketball 
tournament. Of course good old Ma (Ruth PlyMre) Barker' is right there 
clipping our coupons with the office pools. Oh well one doesn't mind loosing 
one's money when you know it's going to a pood cause (namely the rigger). 
With Terry acting as 'bag man'' we don't have a chance. 



:'■ . 



ni 



!-K; '. 



-11- 

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 
Christmas Party 

The Christmas Party once again was a success. He had over 80 people turn 
out at the University Club on December 13 from 8-11. We had an added 
feature of a new bar system'' this year. Of course the plain punch bowl 
was also provided for the editor as well as scrumptous chicken salad, 
cheese spread, etc. sandwiches. Beautiful music was provided for dancing, 
but apparently everyone this year was too bashful to ret out on the floor. 

Though we only meet formally once a year it does give us a chance to 
socialize with each other and bring our wives to get acquainted. It also 
fives an opportunity to maintain our ties and friendship with our colleagues 
at the Natural History Survey. 

Spring Picnic 

Because of our loyalty to our great Illini Football team the picnic 
was started this year late in the afternoon . Nevertheless we had a good 
turnout. Hot dogs and hamburgers were available for everyone. Mrs. Kearns 
provided a delicious pan of mexican-baked beans, and other members of the 
department brought lovelv salads, potato chios, and other goodies. Cider and 
cake was furnished by the deDartment. There was a before-dinner game of 
volley ball and after-dinner game of ping-pong. Hessel Park again provided 
the site and the weather man cooperated beautifully. '. T e didn't have as many 
people as we had hoDed but those who came really enjoyed themselves. 

Between our Christmas party and annual Spring picnic we do get a chance 
to meet each others families and see our children progress through the years. 
It is good to get together this once a year and enjoy fellowship with each 
other. 



ay 






'■/C<o."l 



- ■. - 



-12- 



RECENT GRADUATES 

Abdel Meguid Abou-Aly - 1968 

Abou-Aly was born November 28, 1934, in Kafr El Sheik, Egypt, United 
Arab Republic. Aly grew up and came to the University of Illinois from Rodah, 
Cairo, United Arab Republic. He attended public and primary schools in 
Cairo, United Arab Republic. After being graduated from secondary school 
in 1951, he entered the Ain Shans University and received a B.S. in 1955. He 
majored in entomology and chemistry. He received a Bachelor of Science 
degree with honors in 1955 and the Master of Science in 1960. Abdel held 
a research position at the National Research Center in Cairo, Egypt, from 
1955 to 1958. He also held a teaching assistantship at Ein Shans University 
from 1958 to 1961. While he was working as a teaching assistant at the 
University of Ein Shans in Cairo, Egypt, in the College of Medicine he was 
teaching in the parasitology department. Mr. Aly also had a scholarship 
from the National Research Center in Cairo, Egypt, in the entomology section. 
He also received one year of training in the World Health Organization working 
with Dr. Zahar. 

Abou was accepted as a graduate student in the Department of Entomology 
in September 1962. His financial support while here was from the United Arab 
Republic , and in his last 2 years he worked as a teaching assistant for 
Dr. Horsfall in the medical entomology courses. Aly arrived from Egypt to 
us single and he returned home single, one of the few graduate students to 
leave this department not having been overtaken by matrimony . 
',■,!■> While he was here at the university Aly conducted his research under 
the direction of Dr. William Horsfall in medical entomology. His research 
was done on a species of floodwater mosquitoes found locally in Illinois, 
Psorophora varipes . He stud~*:d the bionomics of Psorophora under controlled 
conditions and obtained considerable bionomic information used to develop 
the technique for colonization of this particular species. 

After completion of the thesis in October, 1967, Aly returned to his 
native home of Cairo, Egypt, where he will be engaged in teaching and research 
for the United Arab Republic. He is at present somewhat of an enigma inasmuch 
as none of us have heard from him since he left the University of Illinois. 
He is a member of Phi Sigma, the Entomological Society of Egypt and _..: 



rp.z 



x ■ . i. !■.'■:: :•: k 

LS't/' "jC-'' - t' r i 

r,-.-j ••- .. ' ... i- . 

• i V : ■ 
i 8 



;S'-' f'ti 



' - 



. 



, . ;...-f ;: y;/j; 



" 



r,{J , !-,-,, 



I 



f! ;. 



" r. ■ 



-13- 



the Entomological Society of America. 

Roger Franklin Flattum - 1968 

Roger Franklin Flattum was born in Lanesboro, Minnesota, April 18, 
1939. Roger completed his primary and secondary school education in Winona, 
Minnesota, graduating from Winona High in 1957. He attended Luther College 
for the academic year 1957-58 then entered Winona State College in September 
1959. While at Winona College he majored in biology and chemistry and 
received the Bachelor of Arts degree in June of 1963. While he was a student 
at Winona State he served as a laboratory assistant from 1901-63 and during 
the year of 1962-63 he was a research assistant on the National Science 
Foundation working with Dr. Friendling. Roger is a product of the midwest 
who did his undergraduate as well as his graduate work in this part of the 
country. While at Winona State College, Roger was an excellent student. 
He was on the honor roll in the biological sciences and was also president 
of the Winona Academy of Science. 

Roger entered the University of Illinois in the fall of 1963 and was a 
graduate student in insect physiology. His first year here Roger was on 
the US Public Health training grant and during his remaining four years as 
a graduate student he was supported by an Air Force research grant. Roger did 
his work under Dr. Sternburg in the general area of the insect central nervous 
system. As a result of his research based on recordings of the abdominal 
ganglia of the cockroach he suggested the action of nicotine involved the 
release of synaptically active materials through diaphasic reaction of 
nicotine on nicotine receptors and non-nicotinic receptors. He showed 
that spontaneous activity and synaptic propagation returned to normal in 
the presence of nicotine and the initial block. Also the nicotine solution 
from block cockroach preparation caused a second block when applied to a 
recovered animal. He found that non-nicotinic drugs were effective after 
recovering from nicotine whereas all nicotinic drugs tested were ineffective. 
He suggested that the synaptically active material originated in the abdominal 
nerve cord. 

While he was present in the department Roger was a very active graduate 
student in student affairs and departmental activities, being one of the 
stalwarts in the sports program and an extremely stimulating student in 



-14- 



seminars and classwork. After the completion of his thesis in December of 
1967 Roger accepted the job at his old alma mater and returned to Winona 
State College where he at the present time is teaching biology and in the 
process of setting up his own research program. 

Roger served with the United States Navy Reserve from March 1, 1961, 
to June, 1963. He was married to Jean Hunter in September of 1962 and their 
daughter, Christine Ann, was born in March, 1967. Roger is a member of the 
Entomological Society of America, the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science, and Sigma Tau Gamma. 

Willard Henry Fogal - 1968 

Willard Henry Fogal was born on June 12, 1939, in Laf leche , Saskatchewan, 
Canada. Willard completed his elementary and secondary school training 
in Laf leche. Upon graduation from high school in 1957 he entered the 
Saskatchewan Teachers College in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, where he graduated 
with an interim standard teaching certificate in 1958. Willard then taught 
school in grades 7 and 8 in the Lloyd Minister Saskatchewan Public School 
District for one year. In 1959 he entered the University of Saskatchewan 
where he graduated in 1962 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. He continued 
at the University of Saskatchewan and received a Master of Arts degree in 
biology in 1964. While he was a student at the University of Saskatchewan, 
Willard held a National Research Council Scholarship • as well as research 
and teaching assistantships . Willard came to the University of Illinois in 
September of 1964 where he entered graduate school in the Department of Entomology 
where he did his graduate studies under the direction of Dr.'s Gottfried 
Fraenkel and Stanley Friedman. During the time of his stay here he worked 
as a research assistant on Dr. Fraenkel 's grants. Willard was married in 
August of 1960 and he and his wife, Darlene , have two sons and a daughter. 

While at the University of Saskatchewan Willard was co-author of a 
paper on the development and structure of the achrosomes sperms of lumbricus , 
terristias which he published jointly with Dr. M.L. Cameron. 

While he was here at Illinois Willard did his research under Dr. Gottfried 
Fraenkel on a histological study of the pre- and post -emergence development 
of Sarcophaga argyrostoma . He was able to show that melanization of the 
exocuticle and endocuticle. deposition occurred simultaneously whether before 



... •■ i." 
Kaon-; 

aj ■.-•?= 



.:.■.: \ilV-J: 

: I .. '.r loo 



•■3-t-,,9i, ::, 



'. : 



:. .:■:...■■ : ■ ■ ' . 

.■'■■■ ! 7ir.:.'bB'1 ! ."SO ■ . • 
:.. ::; iJ ■■; .0 = 13! . 

■Xl'ltt: ■■■- ■ .: >-~i : 

i" :■; '.- Ln,.. : '." -,\:- ■ 

r. : I . ■ ; . .-■■ ■ ■ 






V LiO :. i^.iiOltflJ 



■ 



. 



S»1 



ftuo.. L.j.n; 






'J ..i'l ! 



■ ■ . '■ 



•1: 

■ 



-15- 



or after eclosion. He also did a time study of post-emergence differentiation 
in the cuticle of Sarcophaga bullata . He did electron microscope studies on 
the exocuticle Sarcophaga bullata and showed that the exocuticle was structur- 
ally distinct from the layers below. He also did considerable work with 
bursicon and was able to show that bursicon promotes complete differentiation 
between the cuticle including melanization and endocuticle deposition. 

On completion of his thesis in December of 1967, Dr. Fogal went to the 
Department of Zoology at the University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, 
where he intends to do post-doctoral research in the laboratories of Dr. Wiese 
Fogh for the next year. After completion of his post-doctoral studies it is 
Willard's hope that he might return to Canada where he can be engaged in a 
University in research and teaching. 

Jean Mario Mathieu - 1967 

Jean Mario Mathieu was born August 31, 1935, in Mexico City, Mexico. 
He received the degree of Ingeniero Agronomo from the Instituto Tecnologico 
in Monterrey, Mexico, in 1958. After completing this degree in Mexico Jean 
came to the University of Illinois where he entered the Department of 
Entomology as a graduate student and received the degree of Master of Science 
in Entomology in 1960 . Subsequent to 1960 he taught at the Instituto 
Tecnologico for 2 years after which time he returned to the University of 
Illinois in 1962 to begin work on his doctoral dissertation under the direction 
of Dr. Richard Selander. In March, 1966, he returned to Mexico completing 
his doctoral thesis in absentia . His studies at the University of Illinois 
were supported largely by scholarships from the Rockefeller Foundation. He 
completed the dissertation and defense of his thesis in December of 1967. 

His research was on the bionomics , sexual behavior , and adult anatomy 
of the Albida Group of the genus Epicauta, Coleoptera, Meloidae. After the 
completion of his dissertation, Dr. Mathieu returned to Mexico where he is 
currently on the staff of the Instituto Tecnologico. At that- institution 
he teaches entomology at both graduate and undergraduate levels . His main 
research interests continue to be in the area of insect systematics and 
behavior. He has already published several articles on insect taxonomy and 
bionomics . 

Jean is married and they have two lovely daughters . We shall be looking 
forward to hearing from Jean in the literature continually. 



'J - .1 



'('-■•'■ 



nni T ') 



O" 



hJ 



.■'" r : 



i.o.'.'j . . :<?> " ••. 



■ r- 



rj-'- 



: 






-•■-::■ 



■ ■ 






■ : 






-16- 

David Comstock Newton - 1967 

David Comstock Newton was born April 27, 1939, in Middletown, 
Connecticut. He graduated from Durham High School in 1957 after which 
he entered Central Connecticut State College and received the Bachelor of 
Science degree in biology in January of 1961. During the period of January, 
1961, to September, 1964, Dave taught science in the public, schools of 
Connecticut and also attended Wesleyan University during the following four 
summers where he earned the Master of Arts and Liberal Studies degree from 
Wesleyan University. He also is the recipient of National Science Foundation 
summer institute grants during the summers of 1962 through 1964. Dave taught 
junior high school science at Southberry Consolidated School in Connecticut 
and also high school biology and chemistry and physical sciences at the 
Northhaven High School. Dave had an excellent record while teaching in the 
public school system in Connecticut and is a dedicated teacher in the biolog- 
ical sciences and will undoubtedly make a very significant contribution i« 
the teaching of the biological sciences in the future. 

In the fall of 1964 he entered the Graduate College in the Department 
of Entomology at the University of Illinois where he began his studies of the 
behavior of honeybees under Dr. Elbert Jaycox. During the time that he 
was a student here Dave held research assistantships in the Department of 
Horticulture for one semester and United States Public Health Traineeships 
for three semesters and two summers . While he was here Dave worked on the 
behavioral response of the honeybees Aphus roelifora to colony disturbance 
by smoke, acetic acid, .'. isopentyl acetate , light, temperature and vibration. 
Dave found that the response of the honeybee to disturbance caused by 
opening and examining their colonies included aggression, cleaning movements, 
disturbance of departing foragers, gorging, guarding, trouping behavior 
and ventilatory fanning. 

Dave is a member of Kappa Kelta Psi Pi and the Entomological Society of 
America. Dave is married and they have two children. 

Upon the completion of his thesis in March, 1967, Dave accepted a job 
in the Department of Biological Sciences at the Central Connecticut State 
College in New Britain, Connecticut. 



-■" [.fir 



an: 



9C.li 



■ 



>o. r .r--io - 



:.;■ • :.f "i 



V j : J 



ri?.:; 






pvs' - ■•• 



rs i vn<. I 



" . i 5:1 ■• ' ! \f. : '■ ■ 



.: ' ■ ■■ 



r : 



- ■ - - 

' - . Vj 5V 









-17- 



Lance George Peterson - 1968 

Lance George Peterson was born January 1, 1940, at Duluth , Minnesota. 
After being the New Year's baby of the year, Lance completed his primary 
and secondary education in Duluth where he graduated from the Duluth High 
School in 1958. Upon graduation from high school he entered the University 
of Minnesota in Duluth where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Zoology 
in 1962. " 

While at the University of Minnesota in Duluth Lance majored in zoology 
and chemistry and with a minor in psychology. In 1962 Lance enrolled in 
the Graduate College at the University of Wyoming where he had a research 
assistantship in insect physiology where he was working with Dr. Joseph 
Larsen. While at the University of Wyoming, Lance worked on sensory 
reception and olfaction in housefly Musca domesticus and worked on the problem 
concerned with oviposition and various maneuvers. This research resulted in 
a publication of a paper with Dr. Larsen and Robert A. Pfadt at the University 
of Wyoming. In 1963 he left Wyoming with Dr. Larsen to come to the University 
of Illinois. where he continued his research in insect physiology as a 
US Public Health Trainee Fellow. 

While a graduate student at the University of Illinois Lance was active 
in and directed the sports program for the past two years . He was a 
stalwart in baseball, handball and any other sports the graduate students 
were engaged in. While Lance was at the University of Illinois he did his 
graduate work under the direction of Dr. Joseph Larsen. The title of his 
thesis was'Cellular Immune Responses of Insects to Foreign Tissue Implants. 1 ' 
During the course of his research he was able to show that closely related 
species did not demonstrate an immune response to interspecif ically implanted 
ovarian tissue. The species with more distant phylogenetic relationships 
reacted against interspecific implants . He was able to demonstrate that 
hemocitic capsule formation in ovarian tissue implants occurred between 15 
and 30 minutes after implantation. He was also able to show that capsule 
formation which is the immune response was inhibited by the presence of 
excess EDTA and sodium citrate. He has presented papers on his work in 
meetings of both the Entomological Society of America/and the American Society 
of Zoologists . 

Upon the completion of his thesis in November of 1967 Lance accepted the 
job with the Eli Lilly Corporation in Indiana. He is currently in charge of 



■J.".! 



■ T I ,yy .1 • [ ;i ■ .-' 



:1.' J-.L--X.- 
'". aJTIBlC;.TlJ 91/SH 

by:r w i m 

1 in r.- J ■ 






-18- 



their research and development area in insect physiology and is doing some 
rather fascinating research with insect hormones and the ways which they 
might apply to possible biological control of insects that are detrimental 
to agricultural products . 

Lance is married to Cleone and at the present time they have no children. 
He is a member of Sigma Xi and the American Society of Zoologists and the 
Entomological Society of America. 

Judith Louise Reynolds - 1967 

Judith Louise Reynolds was born Ocotober 12, 1937, in Sidney, Australia. 
She received her primary and secondary education in the Methodists Ladies 
College, Burwood, Sidney, after which she entered the University of Sidney. 
In 1955 she was awarded a Commonwealth Scholarship to the University of 
Sidney which she held for the duration of her undergraduate studies there. 
In 1959 Judy was awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science with honors in 
zoology from the University of Sidney and obtained a teaching fellowship 
in zoology at the University of New South Wales. While holding this fellow- 
ship at New South Wales she did research for the degree of Master of Science 
in zoology which was awarded in 1962. She was then appointed to a senior 
tutorship in zoology at the University of New South Wales . She held this 
position until September of 1963 when she came to the United States to enter 
the Graduate College in the Department of Entomology at the University of 
Illinois . 

While a graduate student at the University of Illinois she held teaching 
assistantships in biology and the Department of Entomology. In June of 1964 
she was awarded the Ethel M. Barber International Fellowship by the American 
Association of University Women. The following two years she held teaching 
assistantships in the Department of Entomology. While she was a graduate 
student here at the University of Illinois Judy worked under Dr. Arthur Ghent 
on the assessment by progeny of early changes in competing populations of 
Tribolium confusum and Tribolium casteneun . During the course of her studies 
she attempted to determine the pathways leading to the elimination of Tribolium 
confusum under conditions of comparative interaction. Successive generations 
of both species were found to pass through each developmental stage . From 
her research she postulated that the mechanism causing the reduction of 



;:-•!•'.! 



■ ■ ' i 



-19- 

various cohorts of the developmental stages is the same as that responsible 
for division of the population of both species to discreet cohorts, namely- 
intense cannibalism by the larvae . 

Judy was a member of Australian Federation of University Women, Australian 
and New Zealand Association of Advancement of Science and the Australian 
Ecological Society and the Entomological Society of New South Wales . She 
is also a member of the Ecological and Entomological Societies of America 
and the American Association of University Women. She is also an elected 
member of Sigma Delta Epilson. 

Upon the completion of her degree here at the University of Illinois 
in May of 1967 Judy accepted a position in the Department of Biology at 
the University of Massachusetts in Boston, Massachusetts where she is now 
teaching basic biology and pursuing her research in population biology. 

Isaac Moses Seligman - 1968 

Isaac Moses Seligman (Morris) was born September 20, 1937, in Johannesburg, 
South Africa. As a young boy he matriculated in the Athlone Boys High School, 
Johannesburg, from which he graduated in 1955. In 1956 he entered the Univer- 
sity of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. He received a Bachelor of Science degree 
with honors in 1962 from the University of Witwatersrand. 

In the fall of 1962 Morris entered the Graduate College at the University 
of Illinois and was a student in the new biology curriculum of the School 
of Life Sciences . His research and his teaching assistantship responsibil- 
ities were in the Department of Entomology. While he was a graduate student 
at the University of Illinois Morris held teaching assistantships both in 
the department of entomology and also with Dr. Judy Willis in the undergraduate 
honors biology curriculum. 

While Morris was a graduate student here at Illinois he married 
Malkah Pollack in 1963. They now have two sons. He worked under the direction 
of Dr.'s Gottfried Fraenkel and Stanley Friedman while he was completing his 
graduate study here at the University of Illinois. He worked on tyrosine 
metabolism and its hormonal control after eclosion in the adult fleshfly 
Sarcophaga bullata . The thesis was concerned with tyrosine turnover in insects 
during sclerotization and lead into two basic observations, (1) that 
tyrosine accumulates if sclerotization is inhibited and (2) the utilization 



CO! J '-■; 



I." :/ >.r D..; Of!'' ' 
■ """ i \T '' I ' 



■Pi 

.... 



' i»uj: 



r: 



, 3TU".: in.lBVjO ■ ,',•■■ . I";. '! ■:" ' >1 n . .1 

. .>o i~ i ■ -:vc-:i TK-.j.ri.tA ! 7 ;/" _■:■„- ' 

- -'.svirr'.. -r!- ' -- -■■ r; > ! V" ■ > ■' 

') -'"insft iDns-i'Ui '." . "> 1 a ; ■. '; r. .-! ■ ■■> 

. fifsa :'.tej£vri : • 
/.'•'.' :vvxr.U f : . "..:■- 3 stsubeiS 

.Loo'::-. o:i~i i< <Lu:*?tyuo ygoicL 

■ ; . !.-ff Srto . ■'■' .. ■ fl.SJ ' : '■ T . -J ; hfi^i- 

. •■'.. j ' . -:: ■.:..■.:' '■ .■> s-v. ■■•:; i iifW 

:'. -: 50J ': ' i(. : 



fro: ; ..-. ■;.'; ' ;;h d/r! fsbfii ■> : --!--v 

.' ^riijelcimor ... ••j ■: "h 

•■. ; . :■• "iv + «< '■■ :-;■■: v ■ • ••■ 
■■ -- : :-li ::l<;be ■ , ;i 

3 'J"'. :•>«?.' • ; •">. • i/«i ITL' ■'•-":'. 

: :>: frt ■ ' . • : ? c, vi 
■o; i'K.'.J..:. ;■'! . r. '. 



' '." j 

: tof' "' "' rv 



r 



• ■ 









: 



•20- 



of tyrosine was hormonally controlled. Upon completion of his thesis in 
December of 1967 Morris travelled to Tel Aviv, Israel, and visited with his 
brother and Dr. Fraenkel who is on sabbatical leave there. After the 
first of March he will be at his permanent location where he has accepted 
a position with CSIRO Division of Entomology in Canberra ACT, Australia. 



-21- 



PRESENT ENTOMOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS 



John J. Ameel 

The year has been spent finishing course work and starting research on the 
food utilization by the Cadelle, Tenebroides mauritanicas . Advisor: G.P. 
Waldbauer. 

Robert T. Allen 



In August R.T. Allen assumed his new position as Assistant Entomologist 
in the Department of Entomology, University of Arkansas. In addition to 
working on his thesis, Tommy is busy with projects involving biological control 
of economic insects, and hopes to establish some base lines representing 
normal levels of naturally occurring predation. Advisor: Dr. H. H. Ross. 

Robert L. Benson 

The last year was successful because 1) I finished my last course, 
2) I passed prelims, and 3) I found a good source of enzyme for my thesis 
"The biosynthesis of glucosamine-6 -phosphate in insects." I plan to finish in 
a few months. Wife's name, Lois. Advisor: Dr. Stanley Friedman. 

A.K. Bhattacharya 

I was born in Allahabad, India on August 28, 1942. I received my early 
education from Queen's College and Lucknow Christian College, and finally 
awarded B.S. from the University of Lucknow, Lucknow. Following this I entered 
the post-graduate school, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi. 
I was awarded a fellowship ,from the Ministry of Food and Agriculture, Government 
of India and completed my M.S. in Entomology in 1963. My thesis topic dealt 
with a study of amino acid requirements of khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium 
which was supervised by Dr. N.C. Pant. After finishing my M.S. I decided to 
stay at I. A. R.I. and continued my Ph.D. program in Entomology as Research Fellow, 
Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Delhi, under the direction of 
Dr. N.C. Pant. I obtained my Ph.D. in August 1967. My thesis topic was 
entitled "Nutritional behavior of J_. granarium on leguminous seeds with special 
reference to growth inhibition in Lens esculenta and Phaseolus vulgaris ." 

I arrived in the U.S.A. on August 25, 1967. After spending some time with 
my brother at Cleveland, Ohio, I joined this department on September 1, 1967 
as a Research Associate with Dr. G. Fraenkel and Dr. G.P. Waldbauer. I am 
interested in insect nutrition and presently doing research on the utilization 
of food by stored grain insects. 

John K. Bouseman 

I continued my work on the systematics of the family Rhipiphoridae. This 
past year I attended the ESA meetings in New York. Advisor: Dr. R.B. Selander. 



• 



.A- \ 

.id ■■■ 



..i_uf 



. . v 






i • ■ ■■ . 






- if ; ' ■■ ■ 



■ ■ 
>i : 



j 



St: 



!t:.5 



.j-s&j 



■J.:.fl M; 



U 1 . I' 






:■- i?M i'. 



-22- 

William R. Campbell 

Attended the New York ESA meetings, enjoyed the city; almost got snowed in; 
did get cut short on re-imbursement due to new rules for grad students (too bad). 
Believe it or not , have finally finished languages , pre-lims are in the near 
future. Research-wise, still exploiting cholinesterase. Advisor: Dr. C.w. Kearns. 

Angelo A. Casaburri 

Angelo is a new student this year. He arrived in September 1967 from 
Fresno State College in California where he received a B.A. in biology. Angelo 
is spending this year concerning himself with coursework. Advisor: Dr. J.R. Larsen. 

Franklin Chang 

I attended the ESA meetings in New York. I am doing research on lipid 
metabolism and transport in insects. I also got married. Wife's name, Cheryl. 
Advisor: Dr. Stanley Friedman. 

Eddie W. Cupp 

Ed spent a busy year completing required course work, initiating his 
thesis research and completing his doctoral preliminary exams. Of course there 
was still time to rally to the call of the "mosquitoes," the newly formed 
entomology intramural football team. Having received a LSU-NIH Inter-American 
tropical medicine fellowship, Ed is spending January and February of 1968 in 
several central American countries. Upon his return, he will be continuing 
his research involving thermal stress and an anomolous development in Aedes 
mosquitoes. Advisor: Dr. William R. Horsfall. 

David Denlinger 

I'm a newcomer to the Illinois scene. After receiving my B.S. degree in 
Zoology from the Pennsylvania State University last March, I completed the 
academic year by working under the guidance of Dr. William Yendol of Penn State 
on the lipid composition of several insects. At the beginning of summer school 
I came to Illinois. My research activities will probably focus on some aspect 
of diapause in Sarcophaga ; special problems last summer and this semester have 
directed my interest to this area. Other major events of the year include 
marriage and the hard-felt oppression of the new draft law. So my stay may 
be a short one! Advisor: Dr. G.S. Fraenkel. 

Gerald Ray DeWitt 

Gerald comes to the University of Illinois as a new student this fall 
having just received his Bachelor of Science degree from Eastern Illinois 
University where he was a student of Dr. Garland Riegal, a former graduate of 
Illinois. Gerald's research interests seem to be in biological control of 
insects. He is currently completing his course work as a first-year graduate 
student in entomology and plans to continue in the general area of insect 
control. Advisor: Dr. W.H. Luckmann. 



■ fr. ••- \t ■■ 



! . 



"1. ,''.-. 



-23- 



Tobias Dirks 

USPH trainee. I have been attempting to maintain and collect venom from 
wasps of genus Polistes . Trips to east central Kansas and areas in Illinois for 
collection of wasps. Attended ESA meetings in New York. New addition — 
Matthew Lyle — December 29, 1967. Advisor: Dr. J. Sternburg. 

Gary Eertmoed 

Last year was highlighted by a grant from The Society of the Sigma Xi 
which allowed me to visit the United States National Museum, the American 
Museum of Natural History, and the Museum of Comparative Zoology where I sorted 
through relatively large psocid collections in search of specimens for my 
thesis research. 

I ended 1967 with a big sigh of relief when I passed prelims, and am now 
looking forward to an exam-free year of research. Advisor: Dr. Richard B. Selander. 

H. Wade Fowler, Jr . 

Major H. Wade Fowler, Jr. of the US Army Medical Service Corps, returned 
to the University of Illinois in 1966 after a tour of duty in Germany. Wade is 
working on the bionomics of Aedes vexans. During 1967 Wade finished his 
course work and passed his preliminary examination. He is now devoting all 
his time to research for his Ph.D. thesis. Advisor: Dr. William R. Horsfall. 

Michael Fox 

Activities during the past year included finishing coursework and 
developing some skills in histochemistry for the electron microscope. I hope 
to take prelims during this spring semester and then to begin full-time thesis 
research probing the mysteries of the world of the ultraminute. Advisor: 
Dr. J.R. Larsen. 



Todd Harris 

Todd is a new student in the Department of Entomology here at the University 
of Illinois. He completed his B.S. degree in May 1967 where he graduated from 
Gustavus Adolfus College where he did his major area in biology with a minor in 
speech. While he was at Gustavus College he was a lab assitant in Biology, 
Zoology and Entomology. He also held an NSF research foundation fellowship 
in the summer of 1965. Todd has a desire to continue his research in the 
entomology field and to prepare himself to do both research and teaching in 
this area. At the present time he is at the Natural History Survey working 
with Dr. Weldon Larimore in the aquatic biology section. Advisor: Dr. H.H. Ross. 

Luping Kan 

Luping is learning to rear mosquitoes from Dr. Horsfall and going to 
study the physiology of Aedes mariae in sea water. Advisor: Dr. G.S. Fraenkel. 



r« 



■." ■ ■ i 



:in.: , < ■;. 






■24- 



Paul S. Killmer 

Course requirements and prelims have been completed. Research is centered 
around observations of female mosquitoes ( Aedes aegypti ) which have been 
infected with Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis and Yellow Fever virus using the 
electron microscope. Results to date are very promising. We are happy to 
announce the birth of a son, Jeremy Sedgwick, on October 15, 1967. Advisor: 
Dr. J.R. Larsen. 

NOTE : 

Since Paul Killmer had written the summary of his activities during the 
past year in the Entomology Department a great tragedy entered the lives of the 
Killmer family. Paul and Valerie Killmer were involved in a fatal automobile 
accident on January 28, 1968. They were both mortally injured as a result of 
the accident and Valerie passed away on February 8, 1968 and Paul died 
March 14, 1968, both as a result of the accident. They are survived by their 
son Jeremy. 

We would at this time like to pay our respects to Paul who was an excellent 
graduate student in the Department of Entomology. As indicated in his own 
words he has completed essentially all of the requirements for the degree with 
the exception of the writing of his thesis. He was an excellent electron 
microscopist and had the potential of making a great contribution to his 
chosen field. His memory is honored by his fellow students and professors and 
members of the Department of Entomology, here at the University of Illinois. 
Paul's thesis will be completed and his Ph.D. will be awarded posthumously 
by the University of Illinois. 

Lawrence J. Krone 

Larry came to the University of Illinois after receiving an M.P.H. from 
Yale University. As yet his area of research is not clearly defined. The 
fall semester had been spent on classwork and assisting in Medical Entomology, 
Advisor: Dr. William R. Horsfall. 

DonaM E . Kuhlman 

Don worked as an extension entomologist for the College of Agriculture 
and Illinois State Natural History Survey. He travelled throughout Illinois 
doing insect surveys. He is continuing on thesis research with rootworms. 
Don is married and has two children. Advisor: Dr. W.H. Luckmann. 

An-horng Lee 

Lee is a new student this academic year. His area of research is not yet 
determined. Advisor: Dr. C.W. Kearns. 



i. ^m,j<i7zc,r. b«»i:'it"' 






■\. 



■.I 



■ i . 



i 






, :■! 



or, 



-25- 



Tom Miller 

Graduated and received the Ph.D. from University of California at Riverside 
in June 1967 under Dr. Robert Metcalf. Arrived at Urbana September 1 for a 
postdoctoral year under Dr. Kearns. 

Main professional interests are neurophysiology-neuropharmacology. 
Currently pursuing a physiological study of the cockroach heart. Preliminary 
results will be published partly in 1968 in the Journal of Insect Physiology 
entitled "Site of action of pharmacologically active compounds on the heart of 
Periplaneta americana L . " 

Mrs. Hollace Miller after three years teaching government in a rural 
California high schcol and a confrontation with the war on poverty is engaged 
in full time work on a fiction mystery novel centered around her girlhood in 
South Dakota. 

Bob Morden 

I am in the second year of course work and presently working on super- 
sensitivity to nerve transmission among the invertebrates. Last November I 
attended the ESA meetings in New York. Last summer the sub-tropics of Florida 
and northern Minnesota were the sites of two vacation-collecting trips. 
Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg. 

Gerald L. Nordin 

Gerald Nordin received the Master of Science degree in February, 1968. 
His M.S. thesis was entitled "The bionomics and control of the juniper welworm, 
Dichoneris marginella (F.), in Central Illinois." Gerald is continuing work 
toward a Ph.D. under Dr. Luckmann at the Illinois Natural History Survey. 
Gerald and Linda became the parents of a baby girl, Michelle Renee, born 
December 15, 1967. Advisor: Dr. W.H. Luckmann. 

Jimmy K. Olson 

I am a native of Idaho, married, and have two children, the oldest 
(Teresa) being 2 1/2. I completed my undergraduate work at the University of 
Idaho and received a B.S. degree in Agriculture (major: entomology) in June 
1965. Prior to my beginning graduate work at Illinois, I spent two and a half 
years serving as an officer in the Army. During my tour of active duty, I 
was in charge of a field ecology and epidemiology research section which was 
concerned with the study of insect-borne diseases in Utah. Since my arrival 
at Illinois in September 1967 , I have been concerning myself with course work 
and a preliminary literature review in preparation for a research problem. 
Advisor: Dr. William R. Horsfall. 



H*r 



i.BY: 



-26- 



Sfcebhen J. Parshall 

This fall semester I have been taking three entomology courses plus a 
1/2 unit special problem under Dr. E.G. MacLeod. This problem has centered 
around determining whether hybrids from reciprocal crosses of Chrysopa carnea 
and Chrysopa downesi change color as diapausing adults — like carnea or stay 
green as diapausing adults — like downesi . Diapausing adults for both species 
can be had by rearing at short photoperiod (10 hours light per day). 

My results show that nearly all individuals show some degree of color 
change. However, hybrid males with carnea as the female parent show a 
significantly greater degree of color change than F, females from a carnea 
parent, F-, females from a downesi parent, and F, males of a downesi parent. 
Furthermore , these last three groups , compared with one another , do not show 
significant difference in degree of color change amongst themselves. Steve 
received the M.S. degree in February 1968. Advisor: Dr. E.G. MacLeod. 

William J. Patterson 

Major Patterson of the U.S. Army Medical Service Corps having completed 
all his course work, preliminary examination, etc. leading toward the Ph.D. 
degree is now working at a furious pace to complete the thesis on histo- 
pathological effects of thermal stress in aedine mosquito larvae and pupae. 
Bill has received word that he is to return to active duty at the end of 
Spring semester and is trying to bring all of his research to a close. 
Advisor: Dr. William R. Horsfall. 

Walter Clifford Peterson 

Mr. Peterson is a new student in the Entomology Department at the 
University of Illinois this year. Cliff received his bachelor degree in 1967 
from Western Maryland College. His major field was biology. While he was 
a student at Western Maryland he worked as a lab assistant in freshman 
biology, in invertebrate zoology and botany. He is a member of Beta Beta 
Beta National Biological Honors Society, was on the Dean's List in his 
sophomore and junior years at Western Maryland. Cliff is spending his first 
year here getting course work behind him and considering possible research 
areas. Advisor: Dr. E.G. MacLeod. 

John D. Pinto 

Basically another "rubber stamp" year. Most of my time has been spent 
finishing up my studies on the taxonomy and biology of Meloe . Also visited 
the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard and the Philadelphia Academy of 
Science to study Meloe types in June, and attended the ESA meetings in November. 
Advisor: Dr. R.B. Selander. 

Robert Randall 

Engaged in thesis research on cholinesterase. Advisor: Dr. C.W. Kearns. 



1.1 Z'SW 






\.<\IB ■-: 



:dP.i. . 



■ ]■■ J 












.... . .-.• .- 



-27- 



Roscoe Randell 

Roscoe works full-time as an extension entomologist at the State Natural 
History Survey. He had a special project last summer evaluating gross damage 
caused by the corn leaf aphids . He travelled throughout Illinois working on 
this project. He attended the Pesticide Safety Meeting in Fort Collins, 
Colorado. Advisor: Dr. W.H. Luckmann. 

Nen Ronquillo 

Sons arrival: last August 8, 1967. Carlos is 16 and a junior at Urbana 
High School. David is 14 and a sophomore at Urbana High School. They are 
enjoying school. Advisor: Dr. William R. Horsfall. 

Larry Sanburg 

I attended the Symposium on Regulation and Biological Time Constants at 
Argonne National Lab in October but missed the ESA meetings in New York. I 
hope to finish all course work by the end of the coming summer and then really 
get to work on diapause in Anopheles . I made a trip to Minnesota over semester 
break looking for diapausing mosquitoes. Vivienne has finished her course 
work for a B.A. in Psychology and will graduate with Honors in LAS in June. 
Advisor: Dr. J.R. Larsen 

Aubrey Scarbrough 

I am finishing my course work this year and continuing research on the 
behavior of Hyalophora cecropia . Advisor: Dr, G.P, Waldbauer. 

Douglas Keith Sell 

Educational background: University of Nebraska - 1960-1962. University 
of Nebraska, College of Dentistry - 1962-1965; North Dakota State University - 
1965-1967, B.S. June 1967. 

I was introduced to entomology by the USDA. Before coming to Illinois, 
I was in charge of the insect rearing section of the Metabolism and Radiation 
Research Laboratory, Fargo, North Dakota. I am employed full-time by the 
Section of Economic Entomology, Illinois Natural History Survey working under 
Dr. W.H. Luckmann on the biology and control of vegetable insects. Fifty percent 
of my time is devoted to basic or developmental research and fifty percent to 
applied research. My main area of interest at the present time is the effects 
of certain plant systemic materials, other than insecticides per se , on insects. 
Some of these materials are chelating agents , chelated metals , and certain 
fungicides. 

In November, I attended the National Meeting of the Entomological Society 
of America. This winter, I have represented the Natural History Survey at 
several vegetable growers meetings in the state. Advisor: Dr. W.H. Luckmann. 



-28- 



Joe Sheldon 

1967 has been a rather uneventful year. Course work has the primary pain 
in life but that is now nearing completion. My wife Donna is working at 
Champaign National Bank and enjoying her work there. We were able to take off 
a couple of weeks last summer and spent them on a delightful camping trip in 
Kentucky. At least there are a few smal l hills down there. In November I 
attended the ESA Meetings in New York and had my first opportunity to visit 
the East coast. I am looking forward in 1968 to getting a good start on my 
research and also a trip back home to Oregon for a few weeks. Advisor: Dr. E.G. 
MacLeod. 

Richard K. Sprenkel 

I received my MS degree in entomology in September 1967 from the 
Pennsylvania State University. The same month I began graduate study at the 
University of Illinois and with Dr. Joseph V. Maddox of the Illinois Natural 
History Survey, I began research in the field of insect pathology. In 
November 1967 I presented a paper at the National Meeting of the ESA entitled 
"Effect of chemosterilants on the alfalfa weevil." Advisor: Dr. J.G. Sternburg. 

Richard C. Weddle 

At present working on the ontogeny of blister beetles of the genus 
Epicauta and trying to finish the thesis. Travel: We took a three week trip 
down south. We spent about a week in Monterrey, Mexico visiting a recent 
Illinois graduate, Jean Mathieu. Advisor: Dr. R.B. Selander. 

George Robert Wilson 

Major event was marriage to Carol Jean Patterson on January 13, 1968. 
I am currently busy writing a thesis "Diapause in the Tobacco Hornworm" and 
several articles which should come from it. Current research interests include 
photoreceptivity of buried insects, ecdysone and wound metabolism, inhibitory 
hormones in insect development , and the histochemistry and morphology of insect 
endocrine organs . 

Job hunting is a big problem. Carol will earn her Ph.D. in Political Science 
before December of this year. We need to find a place where we can both work. 
Advisor: Dr. J. R. Larsen. 

Thomas Henry Wilson 

Thomas Wilson is a new student at the University of Illinois this year in 
the Department of Entomology. Thomas received his B.S. degree in 1965 from 
Onachiga Baptist University with major in Zoology and a minor in Botany. He 
received his M.S. degree in 1967 from the University of Arkansas with a major 
in Entomology and a minor in Zoology. Thomas was a member of the Entomology 
Club at Arkansas and also belongs to the Entomological Society of America. 
He had a graduate assistantship at Arkansas and also received a commission in 
the ROTC in 1965. He has spent his first year here catching up on subject 
matter and techniques and considering possible problems for research. He 
will probably be working on thrips with Dr. Lew Stannard. Advisor: Dr. W.H. 
Luckmann . 



-29- 



Ching-Chieh Yu 

I went to Canadian Rocky in last September with Bill Campbell and John 
Ameel. We had a very nice time camping and hiking there. I attended the New 
York Meeting of the ESA. Advisor: Dr. C.W. Kearns. 



-30- 
NEWS ABOUT THE STAFF MEMBERS 

Dr. Walter V. Balduf 

The summer of 1967 was again spent, both profitably and pleasantly, at the 
Olsen's resort, on Eaglenest Lakes, near Ely, Minnesota. Mrs. Balduf persuades 
beautiful flowers to grow in sandy soil. She really loves this work out-of-doors 
and has long since achieved remarkable "know-how," not only in gardening in the 
comparative coolness of the north woods, but continues hooking, crocheting, 
knitting and other types f anciwork . And has not lost the old art of baking and 
cooking! 

My main job is entomological as usual — it rates far ahead of angling. Now it 
is the complex of borers and parasites associated with balsam trees . What a 
treat — to sit out in the woods splitting chunks to find the insects, and sometimes 
be serenaded by the rose-breasted grosbeak . Spring and winter seasons mean having 
specimens determined and preparing the results of my research for publication. 

Best wishes to all my students of other years . 

Dr. Leigh E. Chadwick 

Until April 1 I was engaged in research at the US Army Ilatick Laboratories, 
Natick Massachusetts, working with Dr. Louis M. Roth on respiration ..of ^cockroaches . 
We then returned to Maine and spent the summer, until October, at Blue Hill Falls. 
When it got too cold at the shore we moved over to our winter home , which is near- 
by, at Sargentville, Maine. This is the first winter we have spent here, and so 
far we have been enjoying it greatly. We passed up our usual Christmas trip to 
see the children, who are in Newport News, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and 
Baltimore, Maryland, and intend instead to go to them in the Spring, about April. 
We have now 7 grandchildren, and 1 great grandson. 

I have not been doing any entomological work this year, but am still 
interested and read a good deal. Recently, two of my translations from the 
German have been published in English: THE SNOUTERS , by the Natural History 
Press, from DIE RHINOGRADENTIEN , etc. by H. Stumpke (G. Steiner) ; and THE 
DANCE LANGUAGE AND ORIENTATION OF BEES, by the Harvard University Press, from the 
German version by K. von Frisch . 



. v ,j-n- 



■■'••••';; •■ ■ ; . 



tax 



-31- 

Maria and I are very happy with our retirement . This a wonderful place to 
live, we have loads of friends, and are constantly busy, with more to do than we 
know how to attend to. Our best wishes are always with all at the department. 

Dr. George C. Decker 

Still retired and no real change contemplated. Yesterday I went to the 
Super Bowl (Yea, Packers) in a sport outfit, while my Yankee friends were 
frizzling in the drizzle, so why look back or look for a change. Mrs. Decker 
and I — in fact, the family (ore exception) — are enjoying the best of health. Mom 
and I went to a doctor last .reck for the first time in 3 years , not that we needed 
to, but just to make a contact in case of an emergency. Our youngest, Frances 
(the one exception), was in a serious car accident in May — unconscious for two 
weeks — but is recovering slowly. She spent November and December with us in 
Miami . 

Mrs. Decker and I attended the International Congress on Plant Protection in 
Vienna, Austria, Aug. 28-Sept. 5, where we met Dick Dysart, Dr. and Mrs. 
Dwight Powell, and a number of other friends and acquaintances. Later we drove 
from Vienna to Paris with Dr. Dysart. What a guide, and a wonderful companion on 
a most delightful trip. 

I am still active in the affairs of the Food Protection Committee, the 
National Research Council, and the Entomological Society of America, but am 
attempting to cut back gradually. 

We have enjoyed short visits from a number of friends and look forward to 
seeing more (the H. B. Mills next week), but note that some are passing us by. 

Have managed to get some three or four manuscripts off for publications, and 
have more in progress . 

This is retirement? 

Dr. Gottfried S. Fraenkel 

This year Dr. Fraenkel has flown the coop and avoided supplying the editor 
of the newsletter his usual few brief cryptic statements concerning his activities 
during the past year. However, he did leave us a very rich itinerary for a much 
earned sabbatical year. 



-32- 

Dr. Fraenkel working with his two students Dr. Willard Fogal and Dr. Morris 
Seligman spent a very busy first semester, 1967 helping them complete their thesis 
research and prepare themselves for the doctoral examination. With this parti- 
cular chore out of the way Dr. Fraenkel took off for an extensive Sabbatical 
travel. 

He left in December, 1967. His first stop was New Delhi, India where he 
spent considerable time visiting laboratories of Dr. Nayar . The first part of 
January he was at the Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute of Mandapam 
District of Ramanathapuram also in India. After his extensive visits in labora- 
tories in India, Dr. Fraenkel went to Israel where he is spending the rest of 
this year at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. I'm sure that Dr. Fraenkel 
will have a very interesting sabbatical year and will come back filled with 
enthusiasm and new ideas and will be following new research pursuits. We will 
be looking forward to his return. At the present time Dr. Fraenkel can be 
reached c/o Dr. Shulov, Division of Entomology, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 
Israel. 

Dr . Stanley Friedman 

Activities were limited to some similar to those pursued in the previous year. 
Not many changes around home except that we are all one year older. Attended meet- 
ings of various scientific societies throughout the year and learned much to help 
both research and teaching. Took summer vacation in the Missouri valley and found 
it lovely. 

Stan has published a number of articles this year on the effects of hormones 
on metabolism. Our faithful editor only had to retreive his request for news- 
letter activities from the wastebasket three times this year before Stan gave in 
to my nagging and wrote his usual 20 words or less . 

Dr. Arthur W. Ghent 

During the past year, A. W. Ghent received a grant from the American Sport 
Fishing Institute, to conduct a statistical re-examination of A. G. Huntsman's 
well-known correlation between salmon fishery and rainfall in the drainage basin 
of the Miramichi River in New Brunswick, Canada. This correlation is discussed, 
among other places in ''Principles of Animal Ecology'' by Allee, et al. 



-33- 

A part of this project is the substance of Mr. Bruce Hanna's M.A. thesis in the 
Department of Zoology. Dr. Ghent assures us that, despite the name of his grant- 
ing agency, he really did spend his time gathering research data during his visit, 
with his wife Jocelyn, to New Brunswick last spring. 

Dr. Ghent and Mr. Hanna have collaborated on another study during the past 
year, in which they found that the so-called "broken stick' formula, employed by 
MacArthur and others in studies of species abundance, was well suited to predict- 
ing the distribution of intervals between events occurring at random in time. In 
their study, scheduled to appear in the April issue of the American Midland 
Naturalist, they employ such examples as the intervals between twin births in the 
Champaign-Urbana area, and the intervals between crashes of commercial aircraft. 

Among other projects now in progress, Dr. Ghent has prepared four articles 
during the past year, under the series title :: Selected Problems in Biometry.' 1 
These are appearing in the Tri-Beta Honors Biology Journal, 'Bios,'" and will serve 
as early chapters in a planned book that will probably bear the same name . 

Plans for the coming year include another visit to New Brunswick and a trip 
to the University of Massachusetts in April to lecture on the New Brunswick 
salmon studies. Jocelyn Ghent is proceeding towards her M.A. in History this 
year, and holds a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship which she was awarded in the spring 
of '67. 

Dr. William P. Hayes 

Professor Hayes is out of the country aboard the Sagaf jord touring for three 
months. He is touring the coastal towns of Africa and South America. He has no 
publications for 1967. We will look forward to a complete report of his worldly 
travels in the next years newsletter. 

Dr. William R. Horsfall 

The past year has been a time of steady and significant progress in the study 
of the effects of thermal stress on development. This has been made possible by 
the tireless effort of a competent group of graduate students . Aly Abou-Aly com- 
pleted his work on Psorophora varipes . Nen Ronquillo and Bill Patterson stayed at 
their microscopes all year and have compiled a massive collection of information 
on what goes on inside mosquito larvae and pupae as Aede s mosquitoes acquire the 
plumbing and fixtures of adults. In addition to the thesis of Aly Abou-Aly, three 



-34- 

other papers have appeared from work done with others. Dr. Milan Trpis of 
Czechoslovakia completed his year as a post-doctoral fellow and his work has been 
or will be in print. During the summer we had John Boorman from the Animal Virus 
Research Institute of England here for study. As of the first of this year there 
were six graduate students, an artist and technician working with me on mosquitoes. 
It was a great pleasure late in the year to be in Hew York and meet with so many of 
our former students . An additional interesting experience this year has been that 
of being a visiting professor teaching medical entomology at Purdue University. I 
handled my regular work here and spent Friday afternoon and Saturday morning at 
Purdue. They have a fine group to work with there, too. 

Dr. Elbert R. Jaycox 

This was the year that Entomology 361 finally became a reality, with 14 
students studying honey bee behavior. Four entomology and 10 zoology students 
were included. 

The year's behavior studies on bees were made more interesting by the refusal 
of the bees to visit feeders with counters at the small entrances. When we learned 
how to entice them inside, they set up a team system with the inside team feeding 
the outsiders while one or the other sat in the light beam. This year we may 
change the project goals and study frustration among bee behaviorists . 

I attended the XXIst International Apicultural Congress in August at the 
University of Maryland. The weather was unusually good for Maryland and there 
was a fine representation from foreign countries , including about 15 from the 
USSR. After the meetings I visited Corm 11 University to collect and study the 
behavior of an introduced Megachilid bee new to the area. The rain and cool weather 
washed out my plans and almost washed away the family tent at Buttermilk Falls 
Park at Ithaca. 

Dr. C. W. Kearns 

Aside from a trip to Japan in August of the past year Camille and I have led 
a more or less routine existence. We became grandparents for the third time when 
Tom's wife Ann gave birth to a girl, Julia. We may spend most of next summer in 
England where I hope to finish up some work I started several years ago with 



-35- 



Dr. Cyril Donninger. Whether we go or not will depend upon the nature restrictions 
likely to be placed upon travel. 

We have had the pleasure and stimulating experience of having Dr. Tom Miller 
from the University of California at Riverside with us. He came last August and 
will remain until next August when he plans to do a year of post doctorate work at 
the University of Glasgow. Dr. Miller has done much to clear up some uncertain 
matters about the pharmacology and innervation of the cockroach heart. 

I still manage to get in some golf and I'm looking forward to next summer when 
our new staff member and expert golfer, Bob Metcalf arrives. I don't need his 
level of competition, but I expect that by playing with him I can learn to improve 
my game. This, of course, is just another of the many benefits which we expect 
to gain from Bob . 

Dr. Joseph R. Larsen 

Having committed myself to do the newsletter for the fourth year I realized 
that it says something; however, I am not willing to admit what. My activities 
this past year have been a continuation of my work with insect sensory receptors , 
the primary emphasis still being on the ultrastructure of the insect nervous 
system and the receptors themselves. 

We did very little traveling this year, other than a trip to Utah in August 
to take our oldest daughter Pam to Brigham Young University where she is happily 
horsed as a freshman toiling away at such ugly things as astronomy , and other 
requireds and hoping to purge herself of these as quickly as possible so she might 
labor in her areas of interest, music and drama. We did attend the electron 
microscope meetings in Chicago. 

Teaching responsibilities are still involved with insect physiology and con- 
tinued interest in biology 110-111 laboratories. This past year has been most 
successful in the teacher training program in the biological sciences in that we 
have been able to complete a new curriculum for these people and give them what we 
feel will be more meaningful education and better prepare them as teachers of the 
biological sciences. 

I'm happy to announce that Debbie has reached the last year of Science 
Fair-ism. When this is over I hope that her father might be excused from Science 
Fairs for at least four years until Jennifer comes along. 



-36- 

I would be remiss if I did not comment at this time on the great sadness 
that has come into my life and all of the people in the Entomology Department at 
the loss of one of my very fine students, Paul Killmer and his wife Valerie, who- 
were both killed as a result of an automobile accident on January 28 5 1968. The 
only survivor of the accident was their young son Jeremy who is being cared for 
by Paul's brother. This has indeed been a shock and a very tragic experience in 
my life and I feel a great loss as Paul was probably one of the finest students 
in electron microscopy that I have ever been associated with. I am delighted to 
say that the University has most graciously consented to award his degree post- 
humously. Paul's loss will be felt very deeply and we shall all be better people 
for having had the opportunity to know him. 

Dr. William H. Luckmann 

The highlights of 1967 most certainly centered on my trip to India and the 
funding of new offices and laboratories for construction in 1968 and 1970 . Under 
contract with U.S.A.I.D., I spent three months in Jabalpur , M.P., India, as advisor 
in research to J. Nehru Agricultural University. U. of I. graduates in entomology 
and other specialties are located there as well as at India Agricultural Research 
Institute, New Delhi. 

Funding was obtained for two new facilities in Economic Entomology, including 
greenhouses and temperature controlled rearing rooms for mass rearing of insects. 
The new facilities provide space for an additional 8 to 10 graduate students. 

I entered the ranks of the non-professional beekeepers and inherited all the 
public relations problems associated with this backyard hobby. As I was in 
India all summer, my wife and family automatically became beekeeping enthusiasts. 

Dr. Ellis G. MacLeod 

This year Ellis attended the meeting of the Soc. cell Biology. There was 

also some extensive travel to do. Summer field work in Maryland and Florida to 

secure chrysopid species to bring into lab culture. He made a short visit to 

Harvard for a Ph.D. exam of a former graduate student and to do some taxonomic work 
at the Museum of Comparative Zoology. 



-37- 

Ellis' current research is (1) continuing studies on the environmental control 
of diapause in a number of species of the Chrysopidae and on the chromosome 
cytology of the North-American species of this family and (2) "Classical 1, (i.e. 
old-style not epoch-making) revisionary studies on the subfamily taxonomy of the 
Berothidae . 

There were a number of visitors to his lab this past year: Dr. Philip A. 
Adams of California State University at Fullerton, California (a fellow neurop- 
terist); Dr. Howard E. Evans of the M. C. Z. of Harvard University (a specialist 
on the Hymenoptera and an old friend). 

Dr. Vern G. Milum 

Only a very brief report from Dr. Milum (retired) this year. He took an 
alumni tour to Hawaii in March, 1967. He also spent a week in southern 
California and a week in Aspen, Colorado, with his sons. At this stage of life 
what could be more pleasant than traveling about the world and enjoying one's 
family. 

Dr. H. H. Ross 

Travelwise, the H. H. Rosses were pretty much on a local basis, radiating 
from Urbana to Louisiana, New York, Washington , and other points east. In the 
research area, Dr. Ross is still trying to make 100,000-year-old thermometers out 
of the winter stonef lies , by teasing hints out of them concerning climates during 
the ice ages . Exciting new clues were furnished by H-'igh Cunningham from his 
beloved Alabama. Considerable progress was made on both the caddisfly evolution 
and the grassland leafhopper projects. The latter studies were greatly aided by 
Dr. W. J. Knight, leafhopper specialist of the British Museum, who was a 
Visiting Scientist at the Natural History Survey for three months last summer. 
He and Dr. Ross laid the ground work for a world revision of some of the groups 
of pertinent genera of grassland leaf hoppers . By extreme good fortune, ex-Illini 
Dr. R. F. Whitcomb is now cooperating on the project. Bob is at present with 
the USDA Pioneer Research Laboratory at Beltsville, Maryland, working on 
leafhopper vectors of plant viruses . 



-38- 



Dr. Richard B. Selander 

Dr. Selander continued his experimental studies of the environmental control 
of ontogeny of blister beetles which occupied most of his time during the past 
year. Field work was necessarily curtailed, although he did manage to work in a 
two-week collecting trip in the Davis Mountains of western Texas. He also found 
time to lay in copious amounts of sod around their lovely new home with the help 
of oldest son Mike. 

Dr. James G. Sternburg 

In late June and early July, the Sternburg family vacationed at Glen Lake, 
Michigan, one of the most scenic areas of that state. The weather was pleasant 
but cold; much too cold for swimming in fact. However, the fishing was good, 
and our 10 year old, Tom, caught several nice bass spin-casting. These were his 
first and certainly a thrill for him. Everyone had fun at Sleeping Bear Dunes, 
but no one enjoyed Lake Michigan and its beaches because of the enormous number of 
dead fish (alewives) washed up on the shores from the southern tip up to the 
Straits of Mackinack . On the return trip home , we went to Sault Saint Marie , 
spent the night in Canada, and then came down the Wisconsin side of the lake in. 
the rain. 

The rest of the summer was spent in Urbana, more or less struggling with the 
mess created by a bit of remodeling, which wasn't finished until September. Then 
the battle of the lawn began, which will be continued this spring. 

Current research concerns the physiological effects of DDT and organo- 
phosphates on the nervous system. 

Dr. G. P. Waldbauer 

Work on the consumption and utilization of food by stored grain insects is 
going well. Dr. Anoop Bhattacharya , a research associate from India, is beginning 
work on the biochemical aspects of food utilization and John Ameel, a graduate 
student, has mastered the art of using our new micro-bomb-calorimeter and has begun 
a study of the utilization of food by the cadelle. 

Jim Sternburg and I are still interested in the biology and behavior of 
Cecropia. We are now particularly interested in diapause phenology. A graduate 



-39- 

student, Aubrey Scarbrough., is working on the behavior involved in the selection of 
a spinning site and the spinning of the cocoon. Fortunately the winter of 1967-68 
is offering unusually good collecting for cecropia cocoons . We now have collected 
almost 900 in the C-U area. 

One of my main efforts during the past year was the completion of a review 
article on the consumption and utilization of food by insects which will appear 
in volume 5 (1968) of Advances in Insect Physiology . 

Last June Stephanie spent three weeks in France. Shortly after her return 
the whole family spent two exceptionally pleasant weeks on Glen Lake in Leelanau 
County, Michigan. From there we drove to Montreal to spend a week visiting 
Expo-67. While the rest of the family returned to Illinois our oldest daughter 
Gwen (age 10) flew to Paris to spend six weeks with her 10 year old cousin and her 
family. Her trip included a stay on the Italian Riviera and visits to Pisa and 
Milan. 

The whole family is excited about the start of construction on our new home 
which will be on the edge of a small lake just outside the city limits of 
Champaign. We hope to move in next summer and look forward to the swimming, boat- 
ing and fishing. With this kind of an announcement the entire department will 
be out to visit. 

Dr. Judith Willis 

Judy is continuing her diligent activities in the Honors curriculum in the 
School of Life Sciences. She has been instrumental in maintaining the excellence 
in the Honors Biology Curriculum and is an enthusiastic and dedicated teacher. 
This past year her research has been on the source and hormonal regulation of 
cuticular proteins . This year Judy was one of the co-recipients with three of 
her colleagues here at the University of a grant from the Child Development 
Section of the U.S. Public Health Service to study the cellular and comparative 
biology of aging. This is a four-year grant for some $246,000. Judy's parti- 
cular area is to study the effects of juvenile hormone and specifically to work on 
aging in insects . 

Judy and her husband, Dr. John Willis of the Physiology Department, are look- 
ing forward to sabbatical leaves next year. Judy will be working with Dr. Weis-Fogh 
in the Department of Zoology at Cambridge University, Cambridge, England, and John 



• ■ :.., I 






1 ' 












an 



- : 



-40- 



will be working with Dr. Peter Baker, Department of Physiology, at Cambridge 
University. They also plan to spend part of their time at Plymouth at the Marine 
Biological Station. They will be leaving this September for their sabbatical 
year. We wish them a bon voyage and look forward to their return armed with 
exciting new research interests. 



-41- 



NON-ACADEMIC EMPLOYEES 



Eloise Duvall 

Eloise continues to do her excellent job in rearing our departmental 
insects. She is in charge of all of the rearing and maintenance of all of the 
experimental animals. She does a tremendous job and without her skill and 
faithfulness to duty we would all be at a standstill. Eloise bettered her 
classification this year by becoming a Natural Science Laboratory Attendant III. 
Congratulations to her! She is very deserving of this new title. 

Judy Michael 

Judy joined our secretarial staff in August of this year. She is a 
clerk-steno III and has proved very competent in her new capacity. Judy was 
with us earlier on two different occasions as an Illini Girl until we convinced 
her that she really wanted to work full time. Judy's husband is a student at 
Parkland Junior College and they have one son, Jeff, 2 years old. 

Ruth Plymire 

Ruth was promoted to an Administrative Secretary in 1967. Along with her 
office duties her day includes a Spanish 104 class 4 afternoons a week. Her 
husband, Bill, is coaching cross country, sophomore basketball and track at 
Urbana High School. They have 3 daughters, Deanna 9, Pat 7, and Teresa 3. 

Alice Prickett 

Alice was appointed this year as a Scientific Artist in the department. 
She continues to prove her exceptional qualities as a fine artist. She is 
busy moving from room to room working for Drs. Selander, Horsfall and Balduf. 
We are also very pleased that she consented to do the cover of this year's 
Newsletter. 

Terry Ransom 

Terry is completing his second year with our department as our equipment 
attendant. He has his hands full running to Chem Stores, Office Supply, 
filling water bottles, keeping track of equipment, checking out orders, etc. 
Terry is married and has four children. 

Jean Reeves 

Jean joined the staff of Dr. Horsfall 's lab this year and is doing an 
excellent job as a histology technician. Jean is a NSLA III. 

Shaw-mei Yeh 

Shaw-mei Yeh began her position this year in Dr. Friedman's laboratory. 
She is a NSLA III and is doing a very fine job running his lab and helping 
with his experimental program. 



-42- 



Barbara Zegart 

Barbara began working this year as a technician in Dr. Larsen's lab doing 
electron microscopy. She has also learned to run the new scanning electron 
r:.croscope. But alas, her husband has been transferred and she is leaving for 
Hawaii this spring. 



-43- 

PUBLICATIONS FROH THE DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY, 1967-1968 



FRAEiiKLL, Gottfried S. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and C. Hsiao. 1967. Calcification, tanning and the 
role of ecdysone in the formation of the puparium of the facefly Musca 
autu mnalis . J. Insect Phys . , 13:1387-1394. 

FRIEDMAN, Stanley 

Friedman, Stanley. 1967. The control of trehalose synthesis in the blowfly, 
Phormia regina Meigen. J_. Insect Phys . , 13: 397-405 . 

Friedman, Stanley, R. F. Flat turn, J. R. Larsen. 1967. The effects of 

d-tubocurare chloride on nervous activity and muscular contraction in 
the house cricket Acheta d omesticus (L.). Life Science ,, 6.1-9. 

Friedman, Stanley and L. L. Keeley. 1967. Corpus cardiacum as a metabolic 
regulator in Bl aber us dis coidali s Serville . I . Long term effects of 
cardiatectomy on whole body and tissue respiration and trophic 
metabolism. Gen . Comp . Endocrin . , 8:129-134. 

Friedman, Stanley, H. H. Toba. ; J. D. Paschke. 1967. Crowding as the 
primary factor in the production of the agamic alate form of 
Ther ioaphis n.ac ulata . J_. Insect Phys . , 13 : 381-396 . 

GHENT, Arthur W. 

Ghent, Arthur W. 1967. On teaching Population Biology — whatever that 
may be. The Biologist, 49 , 1-2:1-11. 

Ghent, Arthur W. 1967. Selected problems in biometry. 1. Some applications 
of elementary set theory in biology. Bios , 38:7-21. 

Ghent, Arthur W. 1967. Selected problems in biometry. 2. The structure 
of the binomial distribution. Ibid . , pp. 115-134. 

Ghent, Arthur W. 1967. Selected problems in biometry. 3. Chi square as an 
index of disagreement. Ibid . , pp. 161-179. 

HORSFALL, William R. 

Horsfall, William R. 1967. Anomalous maleness of Aedes sticticus (Meigen) 
(Diptera: Culicidae). Iiosquito News , 27.203-204. 

Horsfall, William R. and M. L. Taylor. 1967. Temperature and age as factors 
in inducing insemination of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). Ann, ent. 
Soc. Am., 60:118-120. 



-44- 

iiorsfall, William R. and i-i. Trpis . 1967. Eggs of floodwater mosquitoes. X. 
Conditioning and hatching of winterized eggs of Aedes stict icus (Meigen) 
(Diptera: Culicidae). Ibid . , pp. 1021-1025 

Horsfall, William R. and M. Trpis. 1967. Eggs of floodwater Mosquitoes. 
XI. Effect of medium on hatching of Aedes sticticus (Meigen) 
(Diptera: Culicidae). Ibid . , pp. 1150-1152. 

Horsfall, William R. 1967. Mosquito ecology: Report of a WHO scientific 
group. Wld Hlth Org . Tech . Rep . Ser . 368. 22 pp. 

LARSEN, Joseph R. 

Larsen, Joseph R. 1967. A Laboratory manual in biology (rev. ed.). Stipes 
Pub. Co., Champaign, 269 pp. 

Larsen, Joseph R. 1967. The relationship of the optic fibers to the 

compound eye and centers of integration in the blowfly Phormia regina . 

In The functional organization of the compound eye , ed . by C . G . Bernhard , 

Pergamon Press, Oxford, N.Y., pp. 377-397. 

Larsen, Joseph R., R. F. Flattum, S. Friedman. 1967. The effects of d- 

tubocurare chloride on nervous activity and muscular contraction in the 
house cricket Acheta domesticus (L.). Life Science , 6_:l-9. 

MACLEOD, Ellis G. 

Macleod, Ellis G. 1967. Experimental induction and elimination of adult 
diapause and autumnal coloration in Chrysopa carnea (Neuroptera) . 
J. Insect Phys . , 13: 1343-1349 . 

ROSS, Herbert H. 

Ross, Herbert H. 1967. Aquatic insects and ecological problems. Bull . 
ent . Soc . Am. , 13 , 2:112-113. 

Ross, Herbert H. and Paul H. Freytag. 1967. The remarkable sympatry in the 
winter stonef lies Allocapnia indianae and A_. ohioensis , a pair of sister 
species. Ohio J. Sci . , 67 , 4:228-232. 

Ross, Herbert H., George L. Rotramel, John E.H. Martin, J. Frank McAlpine. 

1967. Postglacial colonization of Canada by its subboreal winter stone- 
flies of the genus Allocapnia . Canad . Ent . , 99 , 7:703-712. 

Ross, Herbert H. and Toshio Yamamoto. 1967. Variations in the winter stone- 
fly Allocapnia granulata as indicators of Pleistocene f aunal movements . 
Ann , ent . Soc . Am. , 60 , 2:447-458. 

SELANDER, Richard B. 

Selander, Richard B. 1967. A taxonomic review of the genus Protomeloe 
(Coleoptera: Meloidae). Pan-Pacific Ent., 43, 3:244-248. 






I 



I 



-45- 

Selander, Richard B. and J. D. Pinto. 1967. Sexual behavior in blister 

beetles (Coleoptera: Meloidae). II. Linsleya convexa . J_. Kansas ent . 
Soc . , 40, 3:396-412. 

STERNBURG, James G. 

Sternburg, James G. and U. E. Brady. 1967. Studies on in vivo 

cholinesterase inhibition and poisoning symptoms in housef lies . 
J. Inse ct Phys . , 13:369-379. 

Sternburg, James G. and J. L. Eaton. 1967. Temperature effects on nerve 
activity in DDT-treated cockroaches. J_. econ . Ent . , 60 : 1358-1364. 

Sternburg , James G . and J . L . Laton . 1967 . Uptake of DDT by the American 
cockroach central nervous system. Ibid . , 60:1699-1703. 

Sternburg, James G. and G. P. Waldbauer. 1967. Host plants and the 

locations of the baggy and compact cocoons of Hyalophor a cecropia 
(Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) . Ann , ent . Soc . Am. , 60_: 97-101. 

C !" Sternburg, James G. and G. P. Waldbauer. 1967. Differential predation on 

cocoons of Hyalophora cecropia (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) spun on shrubs 
and trees. Ecology , 48:312-315. 

WALDBAUER, G. P. 

Waldbauer, G. P. and J. G. Sternburg. 1967. Host plants and the locations of 
the baggy and compact cocoons of Hyalophora cecropia (Lepidoptera: 
Saturniidae). Ann , ent . Soc . Am. , 60: 97-10 1~ 

Waldbauer, G. P. and J. G. Sternburg. 1967. Differential predation on 
cocoons of Hyalophora cecropia (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) spun on 
shrubs and trees. Ecology , 48:312-315. 



' n o 



' ■ : , ' 









' 






i : ■'.::-<■[: ; 



' } XX ■■ 









■ in 






■■ 



. 



■ . 

■>■■ ':,,. 

. - i 



! . 



-47- 



Lusettie Blevins 



I enjoy my garden and flowers and although my garden was late, planted 
June 15, it produced all and more vegetables than I could use. I still have 
two friends living, one in Urbana and one in Champaign, which I visit 
occasionally. The campus is surely different from what it was in 1925. I 
spent six weeks in California last winter and visited my friends and relatives. 
I saw Mrs. C.L. Metcalf and Mrs. Robert Metcalf. I enjoy the newsletter 
although I know very few of the names mentioned. I am always glad to hear 
what Dr. Balduf is doing. 

Murray S. Blum 

From Murray the following activities: He is working on the chemistry and 
functions of pheromones (Brazilian bee heads look good this year); also the 
chemistry of insect spermatozoa; and the hymenopterous poison apparatus. He 
is working on insect olfaction; insect defensive secretions; insect lipid 
chemistry. He is working on the chemistry of the rodent ian sternal gland 
secretion which is a joint project with the University of Chicago. 

Most of 1966 was spent in Bristol, England, in the laboratory of H.E. 
Hinton. "We are now broke and we will probably collect seashells (not blister 
beetles) in Texas in '67." 

The Newsletter is first rate! (Bless you) 

Manfred Brust 

Manfred shares with us his research: (1) Effects of therapeutic doses 
of ultrasound on skeletal muscle; (2) Contractile physiology of isolated human 
skeletal muscle; (3) Basil physiology of muscular dystrophy and other 
myoppathics. 

In the past two years Manfred has published several articles on 
vertebrate muscle physiology. 

This past year included the following recent travels: Late summer 
(August) 1966: by car to Denver, Royal Gorge, Mesa Verde National Park, 
Navajo Reservation, Bryce Canyon, Zion National Park, Hoover Dam, L.A. , and 
San Francisco. Attended and gave paper at Annual Session of the American 



! 






-48- 



Congress of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in San Francisco. Then we 
flew back to New York (the whole family went). Gave paper at FASEB meeting 
in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in April 1966. Took family to Sarasota, Florida 
for 10 days in February 1967. 

The most current family data is the arrival of Jonathan Eli, June 10, 1966, 
That makes 2 boys and 1 girl, and the end. 

Robert W. (Bert) Clegern 

Bert reports that currently he is fairly far afield from his stomping 
grounds of Entomology, in that he is teaching Aviation Physiology to the 
student pilots at Vance AFB. He is keeping his eyes and net open for 
Oklahoma insects to add to his collection, and he hopes to do some basic 
research on the effects of high altitude on Tribolium confusum , if he finds 
the time. 

He has been to San Antonio, Texas, for USAF training schools (Brooks and 
Randolph AFB's); Denver, Colorado, for pleasure; Rantoul, Illinois (June) 
for USAF training school (Chanute AFB); and Homestead AFB, Florida, (July) for 
USAF Deep Sea Survival training. 

In the additions to the family he writes, "None as yet, but I'm now an 
uncle!" 

P.S. He's applied for further graduate work via the AF, but no news 
expected for another month yet. Also tell Dr. Waldbauer that he'll get those 
mimicry specimens to him if he has to bring them in person. 

Paul A. Dahm 

A very short note from Paul Dahm stating that he is working on insect 
biochemistry and metabolism of insecticides. 



:J 






;q ... 



-49- 



Robert F. Harwood 

Bob's current research is on photoperiodism and circadian rhythms in the 
codling moth and mosquitoes. He is also working with Dr. James on the next 
revision of Herms ' Medical Entomology . 

His recent travels include his just returning from sabbatical at Princeton 
University. The pleasure aspect of the return trip concerned camping in the 
Rocky Mountain National Park and Yellowstone National Park, both accompanied 
by lots of rain and hail! 

He states, "Keep up the newsletter - I enjoy it immensely and wish more 
people would contribute." 

John Paul Kramer 

Dr. Kramer sent the following complete report of his activities: His 
researches continue on microsporidians and microspodidian diseases of insects. 
He has several graduate students working with him in insect pathology. For 
the last year and one-half he has served on the Study Section for Tropical 
Medicine and Parasitology at NIH. He finds that evaluating grant proposals 
is harder than writing them! Other former Illini on this study section 
include Bob Traub and Ken Knight. 

His recent travels include being in Japan for an NSF-sponsored symposium 
on the microbial control of insect pests at Fukuoka, April 16-30, 1967. He 
also visited the Universities of Kyushu, Kyoto, and Tokyo. He saw "honorary 
Illini" Dr. Toshio Ito at the Sericulture Experiment Station in Tokyo who has 
pleasant memories of his stay in Dr. Fraenkel's lab. 

John still has one fine wife and two fine children. He states: "I enjoyed 
getting the Newsletter. Keep up the good work!" 

Robert E. Lewis 

Bob tells us his current research and recent publications are still the 
fleas of the Middle East. Presently he has a two-year Office of Naval 
Research grant to study the ectoparasites of Nepalese birds and mammals. 
He has recently put out five or six papers on fleas and their hosts. 

His recent travels include Turkey, Syria, Iraq, and Jordan on field trips. 



r ■» i 



rm/XcicqinV: 



V r : ■-■:' 



D5V "■' . ■ ■ 



■ 



■ T 



i ' 









.'•jp 



-50- 

Also a short trip to the USA last fall. Also he made a visit to Cyprus for 
Easter. 

In the additions to the family column - a brave man admits: We now 
have two Siamese cats. Gasp! 

Concerning the Newsletter: "This is a fine piece of work. Hats off to 
the editor! !!!!!!!!'• (Hats off to you too! ! ) 

Jai K. Nayar 

Dr. Nayar reports his current research and recent publications are on 
growth and development of mosquito larvae, and biological rhythms in mosquitoes. 

His recent travels have been during the summer of 1967. He, along with 
his family, spent a month in Germany and England. It was primarily a vacation 
trip but he took time out and visited several laboratories in Germany and 
University of Cambridge in England. He also attended Entomological Society 
of America meetings in New York. 

He states concerning the Newsletter: "It is nice to know what other 
Alumni are doing, but I think it would be beneficial to all concerned if we 
could meet sometime. I think that some sort of program can be arranged during 
the annual meetings after ESA, which most of the Alumni attend." (A good idea - 
we could at least have an Illinois breakfast.) 

Franklin C. Nelson 

Franklin retired January 1957 from Std. Oil Co. (New Jersey) and went 
into Real Estate and Insurance. He is not too active now as it limits his 
travels a little too much. Our major business activity is in a Broker's office 
following the stock market. (A nice way to grow old rich.) 

This past year we took a trip through Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and 
down to Florida in September. We purchased a new home and plan to move to 
Florida in late July and keep that as home base, at least in the winter 
months . 

Concerning the Newsletter: "I thoroughly enjoy the Newsletter and hope 
you can continue to publish. It is about the only way to keep up on former 
teachers and students. I was surprised to hear that Dr. Glasgow had passed on. 
I would be interested in what happened to George King as I was there with him 
and lost track of his whereabouts. I would like to hear when the date is set 
for the new building." (We had to abandon the idea of a reunion.) 



' . 



••r:. v. ■■$". 



:■ 



-• ,'- : 



r. ■- 



.l".TSW : ■■'■ •■ . 
B i. - : . n : '(. •' 



' = ' : . 



-> 






>■: :.y r.-n.: :Vi>J' 



■ <-.' 



. 



■51- 



Carl Mohr 

Carl now is retired but keeping busy. He is currently doing research on 
sectors of activity, topography, and parasitism in home areas of small 
mammals, and chiggers . His recent publications - the last one to date, not 
reported last year, "Calculation of area of animal activity by use of median 
axes and centers in scatter diagrams.'' Researches in Population Ecology VII: 
73-86, 1965. 

His recent travels this year were limited with trips to Clearwater, 
Florida to collect chiggers. (On yourself or in vials?) 



Since the publication of the departmental Newsletter last year it has 
come to our attention that the following entomology alumni have passed away: 
Dr. George J. Spencer (1924) died 24 July 1966. 

We have also learned with sorrow of the death of one of our colleagues , 
Dr. George Y. Bijjani. We extend our deepest sympathy to the family and share 
with all of you the following obituary notice: 

"Dr. George Yousef Bijjani, 1004 Rural St., head of the Biology Department 
of the College of Emporia, died Sunday afternoon, July 17, 1967, after suffering 
a heart attack in Springfield, Illinois. 

Dr. Bijjani had been head of the Biology Department at the College of 
Emporia since 1957. He also was a Presbyterian minister and for the past 10 
years had been pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Howard. He had served 
as interim pastor of several other churches in Kansas, among them the 
Presbyterian Church in Holton. 

The son of Yousef Abdullhad and Mithmne Bijjani, he was born May 10th, 
1907, in Kahale , Lebanon. 

A graduate of Gerard Institute, a Presbyterian mission high school in 
Sidon, he attended the American University in Beirut, Lebanon, for a year, 
then transferred to Alma, Michigan, College, where he received his Bachelor 
of Arts degree in 1934. His Master of Science degree and his Doctor of 
Philosophy degree were awarded from the University of Illinois. 



isaaij 



oocs::.' 



trfnn - 






Gj 



1 ,n 









ii'+o.r. vt>! i-ifid 






OJ : ■ 



. : 



:g9....i 



3 



-52- 



After teaching in the Bishop's School, Amman, Jordan, from 1937 until 
1939, he was a member of the faculty of the American University in Beirut 
until 1947, when he returned to the United States. Before coming to 
Emporia, he taught at the University of Dubuque, Iowa, Monticello College in 
Illinois and Westminster College in New Wilmington, Pa. Doctor Bijjani was 
a member of several professional organizations, among them the American 
Entomological Society and the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science. 

George Bijjani was married on June 26th, 1940, in Beirut, to Anabel 
Elizabeth Clark , who survives . Other survivors are three daughters , Grace 
Bijjani, of Tama, Iowa, and Alice Adel and Sylvia Ann Bijjani, of the home, 
and two sisters, Saada and Miladeh Bijjani, of the home. 



r. '•■:. :!■■ 



i 



-• :.• 



■53- 



NEWSLETTER MAILING LIST - 1968 



Mohammed Abdullah 
8 Abinger Road 
Cheswick , Lond, W. 4 
England 



Robert W. Alrutz 

Director 

Institute in Ecological Research 

Denison University 

Granville, Ohio 43023 



Amal C. Banerjee 
State Natural History Survey 
74 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

Roy Barker 
Bee Research Lab. 
2000 East Allen Road 
Tucson, Arizona 85719 



Aly, Abou Aly 
[Address Unknown] 



Harry E. Anderson 
[Address Unknown] 



John F . Anderson 

Connecticut Agriculture Experiment 

Station 
123 Huntington - Box 1106 
New Haven, Connecticut 06504 



James W. Apple 
Department of Entomology 
University of Wisconsin 
Madison, Wisconsin 53706 



Edward Coulton Becker 
Entomology Research Institute 
K. W. Neatby Building 
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 



Ross Taylor Bell 
Department of Zoology 
University of Vermont 
Burlington, Vermont 05401 



Gordon Lawrence Bender 
Department of Biological Sciences 
Arizona State University 
Tempe, Arizona 85281 



Curtis Benton 
201 Fulwood Blvd. 
Tifton, Georgia 31794 



Elizabeth Heiss Arnason 
Biology Department 
Carlton University 
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 



Bernard Berger 
Able Pest Control Co. 
406 W. McCreight Avenue 
Springfield, Ohio 45504 



Edward L. Atkins, Jr. 
Department of Entomology 
Citrus Experiment Station 
Riverside, California 92502 



Angel Berrios-Ortiz 
Biology Department 
College of Agriculture and 

Mechanical Arts 
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00709 



.rJ.l_.~ 






.'.-..( ! 



v; ■ 



Jv ;.- c 1 ' :. . 



'ir.J.iw f :;l!l 



:... .■■;■ 



- 



, Ji-uoiJ Jr;, 



j;r; 



i , ■ ■(•■? .•-• ... 



*■■•:» bfise 
j.:. ci : b.";i :- - .'1 i •. •. 
y j !. ■. :-•■••' i ■'.'. 

L:i' Je ; 



, ■ . >. : 



... 



t\ ic • .. • . 



• 



:•(• , 



Out. . ■i.ij 



- • 



.'j' ■■'- ' .La .> ■: • . ■;.-.• _■- 7 -• 



•54- 



Rama K. Bharadwaj 
IARI (Pusa Institute) 
New Delhi - 12 
India 



John Henry Bigger 
1018 W. John Street 
Champaign, Illinois 61820 



Clarence W. Bills 

419 Walnut 

Elmhurst, Illinois 60126 



Wilbur K. Bingman 
202 N. Franklin 
Staunton, Illinois 62088 



George Henry Blake, Jr. 
Department of Zoology- 
Entomology 
Auburn University 
Auburn, Alabama 36830 



Lusettie Blevins" 
Atwater, Illinois 62511 



Victor Brookes 
School of Science 
Science Research Institute 
Oregon State University 
Corvallis, Oregon 97331 



Brian E. Brown 
Pesticide Research Institute 
University Sub-Post Office 
London, Ontario, Canada 



Willis Nels Bruce 
Natural History Survey 
167 Natural Resources Bldg. 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

Reinhart A. Brust 
Department of Entomology 
University of Manitoba 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 



Barnard DeWitt Burks 
Division of Insects 
U.S. National Museum 
Washington, D.C. 20560 



Murray S . Blum 
Department of Entomology 
University of Georgia 
Athens, Georgia 30601 



Wilton T. Bodman 

1617 E. Swan 

Brentwood, Missouri 63144 



James E. Bussart 
Velsicol Chemical Corp. 
330 E. Grand Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60611 



John Milton Campbell 
Entomology Research Institute 
Central Experimental Farm 
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 



U. Eugene Brady 
University of Georgia 
Athens, Georgia 30601 



Lt. E. M. Bravi, MSC 

Navy Medical Field Research Lab. 

Camp Lejeune, North Carolina 28542 



Wayne P. Carlisle 
Madison Senior High School 
6th and Farrish Streets 
Madison, Illinois 62060 



•' "'**•■ ! ■::;• -.a: 



. ■ 



i 



. > ■' j • :. 



• ■ . sH 



■ ■■-: - 






c. ! 



"!:■" 



•< a ■• 
. :-. • v. 



.1: 



■j.J r.fc . . bfif?'^i 
. .71.- .. 
■ i-ifS.lU . >3"; 



■ ■i.e.: ■C'.-'-'T... 



•■•j(!S 



■!i I.'" ■ ■ . 



B '.-■*:.-■ i,. 



AB> 



• ;. .. •: 



-I •- ' . 



■i T,, 



v ■X<! 1 :••' •. 



.C.L: ' ■ 






•:.'<; ..-.:■■•• v 



.-H .- , .•■■■:i- .[.:-.; 



9 7 U + £ •* .'. 

.:; f; '• 



'■"/jj... 






j ,; 



•i ■■ .2 &■ 

'■".■■•: ->' : • ^.l.r.o : -.., 
i.i - . , 



"■■'' '. ■>- " • 



XS 



i'.l.-v: j i 



1 j-.-:- .f) . v. 



■55- 



Satish R. Chandran 

Dept. of Biological Science 

University of Illinois 

Chicago Circle 

Chicago, Illinois 60600 

Peh-I Chang 
[Address Unknown] 



Hung Fu Chu 
Institute of Zoology 
National Academy of Peiping 
Peiping, China 



Mrs . Hung Fu Chu 
[Yu-Su Liu] 
Institute of Zoology 
National Academy of Peiping 
Peiping, China 



Robert W. Clegern 

Altitude Chamber 

Aviation Physiology 

3575th USAE Dispensary 

UAFB, 

Enid, Oklahoma 73701 



Charles Chalmer Compton 

Parktown House Apts. A-2 

11 Raritan Avenue 

Highland Park, New Jersey 08904 



Hurray Irving Cooper 
26H1 Mt. Carmel Avenue 
Glenside, Pennsylvania 19038 



Glenna Joan Corley 

195 Pilgrim Road 

Boston, Massachusetts 02115 



John J . Corrigan 
Department of Biochemistry 
Tufts University Medical School 
136 Harrison Avenue 
Boston, Massachusetts 21701 



Max D. Couch 

3017 1/2 E. Washington 

Orlando, Florida 32803 



George B. Craig, Jr. 
Department of Biology 
University of Notre Dame 
Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 



Sister Mary Bertha Cregan 
St. Xavier College 
103rd and Central Park Ave. 
Chicago, Illinois 60643 



Hugh Cunningham 
287 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 

William B. Cutts 

Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Box 183 

Baltimore, Maryland 21205 



Paul Adolph Dahm 
Department of Zoology 6 Ent. 
Iowa State University 
Insectory Building 
Ames, Iowa 50010 



Theodore Dashman 
34-G. Georgian Court 
Bergenfield, New Jersey 07621 



Leroy Frank Davison 
[Address Unknown] 



Capt. John D. DeCoursey 
6104 Greentree Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 20034 



• . 



■■);. 



i '•■■-.-, hr<;: S-r. J 



•-Ml. : ' 



-. • - ; ; r« J.;, 









aiQ.i 



■■■• ..Ur 

'•'•'•■ • 



• 'V- 



i;:rfa( 



«"- ■■-tiJ.'ix:- . i" 

-■»«■■ • ■ .■': .. 



.' ' i' . ■-• . ! ! [ 



, '">.; 






'•"'-. 



:'"••• ' 



■A- ."J:..- 



- 






;nu.! ■■ 



■ l 

- " '- ' • -...- 






-56- 



Russell Myles DeCoursey 
Department of Zoology 
University of Connecticut 
Storrs, Connecticut 06268 



Manfred D. Engelmann 
121 Natural Science Bldg. 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 48823 



William K. Delaplane 
198 Sunset Drive 
Westerville, Ohio 43081 



John Harwood Evans 

327 S. Parker 

Janesville, Wisconsin 53545 



Carl K. Dorsey 

2066 Agriculture Science Bldg. 

West Virginia University 

Evandale Campus 

Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 



Richard James Dysart 

American Embassy 

Agriculture 

APO, New York 09230 



Norman Williston Earle 

Cotton Insects Research Branch 

4115 Gourrier Avenue 

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70808 



John L. Eaton 
Department of Biology 
Kalamazoo College 
Kalamazoo, Michigan 49001 

William Gibbs Eden 
Department of Entomology 
McCarty Hall 
University of Florida 
Gainesville, Florida 32601 



Abdel-Latif Amin El-Deeb 
Faculty of Agriculture 
University of Alexandria 
Alexandria, Egypt, U.A.R. 



Henry E. Ewing 
[Address Unknosn] 



Richard William Fay 
101 Virginia Avenue 
Savannah, Georgia 31404 



William Clyde Ferguson 
68 Windermere Road 
Lockport, New York 14094 



Henry Eric Fernando 
Division of Entomology 
Department of Agriculture 
Peradeniva, Ceylon 



Roger Flattum 
Pasteur Hall 
Winona State College 
Winona, Minnesota 55987 



Willard Fogal 
Department of Zoology 
Cambridge University 
Cambridge , England 



Capt. Harland W. Fowler, Jr. 
Department of Entomology 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



X 



. - " •. ■ 









,it'..:.'. 



:i- -.- 



• 



u 



J ■ 



I fl 






. j 



■'iiH'J't- r j. 'V .,.;;, : 






urj. 



^ 



gv J. :';:.:■< i ••■ 



.■ ■"•:. ."'iii . i • 



■■■ ...OC:,: 



I ._■•.-: 3U." 



" ■ ' ■ V -' '^ I «•■'■ — 

■:■•■ 



i -< ' 



!.i .! L3 - i (!■■ 'i' 



. : .: ': i rtS: !' 

! ■! y * ; .'•;■;■;>.'" 



-57- 



Stanley Fracker 

1+545 Connecticut Avenue, NW 

Apt. 931 

Washington, D.C. 20008 



Robert L. Gerhart 
1508 N. San Jacento 
Conroe, Texas 77301 



John E. Fraley 
[Address Unkonwn] 



Josephine B. Glasgow 
137 Fairlawn Ave. 
Albany, New York 12203 



Justus C. Frankenfeld 

Arwell, Inc. 

Waukegan, Illinois 60085 



Perry A. Glick 
134 Highland Drive 
Brownsville, Texas 78520 



Ellery W. French 
154 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Henry E. Gray 
2812 Scott Street 
Midland, Michigan 48640 



Jay Howard Gage 
[Address Unknown] 



Rachel Galun 

National Biology Laboratory 

Ness-Ziona, Israel 



Norman Gannon 
Monsanto Chemical Company 
800 N. Lindbergh Blvd. 
St. Louis, Missouri 63141 



Philip Garman 

165 Thornton Street 

Hamden, Connecticut 06517 



Lucian Percy Garrett, Jr. 

4906 Northland 

St. Louis, Missouri 63113 



Edwin G. Gemrich 
The Upjohn Company 
301 Henrietta Street 
Kalamazoo, Michigan 49001 



Alfred G. Grosche 
306 North Jackson 
Waukegan, Illinois 60089 



Robert E. Grossman 
902 Hanlin Court 
Normal, Illinois 61761 



Frank Edwin Guthrie 
Department of Entomology 
North Carolina State 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 



George W. Hahn 
Newton Junior College 
Newtonville, Massachusetts 02160 



Robert Hamman 
15 Secor Road 
Ardsley, New York 10502 



Robert F. Harwood 
Department of Entomology 
Washington State University 
Pullman, Washington 99163 



(i a .■-■■ 



-58- 



Frank F. Hasbrouck 
Department of Zoology 
Life Science Center 
\rizona State University 
rempe, Arizona 85281 



William Brown Hawkins 
Department of Biology 
Louisiana State University 
dew Orleans, Louisiana 70122 



Richard L. Hurley 
Division of Biological Science 
Humboldt State College 
Areata, California 95521 



Chi-ling Hwang 
National Central University 
College of Agriculture 
Nanking, China 



Peter H. Hewitt 
Department of Biology 
tfatal University 
hiatal, South Africa 

David Hoffman 

Biological Control of Insects Lab. 

P. 0. Box A 

Columbia, Missouri 65201 



Sladys Hoke 
[Address Unknown] 



Louis Albert Jansky 
8850 S.W. Cashmire Lane 
Portland, Oregon 97200 



Abdul H. Junaid 
[Address Unknown] 



Clyde Wilson Kearns, Head 
Department of Entomology 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



rtarry Hoogstraal 

IAMRU-3 

APO, New York 09527 



Catherine Hsiao 
Department of Zoology 
Utah State University 
Logan, Utah 84321 



Ting H. Hsiao 
Department of Zoology 
Utah State University 
Logan, Utah 84321 



George E. Huff 

Department of Natural Resources 
Room 613 State Office Building 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46209 



John C. Keller 
[Address Unknown] 



Edwin Wallace King, Jr. 
Department of Entomology - 

Zoology 
Clemson College 
Clemson, South Carolina 29631 



George Edward King 
[Address Unknown] 



John M. Kingsolver 
Department of Entomology 
U.S. National Museum 
Washington, D.C. 20560 



-60- 



George Franklin Ludvik 
Monsanto Chemical Company 
800 N. Lindbergh Boulevard 
St. Louis, Missouri 63166 



John W. Matteson 
Monsanto Company 
Development Department 
800 N. Lindbergh Blvd. 
St . Louis , Missouri 63166 



Patrick T.M. Lum 

USDA, ARS 

Stored Products Insect Lab. 

3401 Edwin Avenue 

Savannah, Georgia 31405 



Bruce C . MacDonald 
Central Chemical Corporation 
49 N. Jonathan Street 
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740 



Joseph V. Maddox 
State Natural History Survey 
68 Natural Resources Bldg. 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



James McAlpine 

Taxonomy Section 

Canada Department of Agriculture 

Research Branch 

Entomology Research Institute 

Central Experimental Farm 

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 



William E. McCauley 
15 Vasser Place 
Scarsdale, New York 10583 



Howe Elliott McClure, Director 

Migratory Animals 

Pathology Survey 

AP0, San Francisco 96346 



Ronald B. Madge 
[Address Unknown] 



Richard Malcomson 
[Address Unknown] 



Ralph Burton March 
Department of Entomology 
University of California 
Riverside, California 92502 



Rene Paul Martineau 

53 Grande Allee 

Quebec City, Quebec, Canada 



Jean Mathieu 

Instituto Tecnologico de Monterrey 

Escuela de Agricultura 

Departamento de Parasitologia y Botanica 

Sucursal de Correos "J" 

Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico 



Ivan Noel McDaniel 
Agricultural Experiment Station 
303 Deering Hall 
University of Maine 
Orono, Maine 04473 



John E . McFarlane 
Faculty of Agriculture 
MacDonald College 
Montreal, Quebec, Canada 



Roy E. McLaughlin 

USDA, ARS 

Entomology Research Division 

P. 0. Box 5367 

Highway 12 

State College, Mississippi 39762 



-61- 



>bert Metcalf 
spartment of Entomology 
liversity of California 
.verside, California 92502 



Arthur P. Morris 

6250 N.W. 40th Street 

Miami Springs, Florida 33166 



maid Meyer 

iral Route 1 

.dney, Illinois 61877 



Capt. Moufied Moussa (MSC) 
Brooke Army Medical Center 
Ft. Sam Houston, Texas 78234 



imes Leroy Miller 
.ology Department 
.chita State University 
.chita, Kansas 67208 



William C. Moye 

Shell Chemical Company 

Agricultural Chemical Div. 

110 W. 51st Street 

New York, New York 10020 



:anley S. Miyake 
!73 Lincoln Avenue 
>nolulu, Hawaii 96800 



Claud V. Myers 

Rural Route 

Fithian, Illinois 61844 



Iward Mockf ord 

spartment of Biological Science 
Llinois State University 
)rmal, Illinois 61761 



Jai Krishen Nayar 
Entomological Research Center 
Florida State Board of Health 
P. 0. Box 308 
Vero Beach, Florida 32960 



irl Otto Mohr 

76-175th Avenue 

sdington Shore, Florida 33708 



lomas Edwin Moore 
jseum of Zoology 
liversity of Michigan 
in Arbor, Michigan 48104 



Franklin C. Nelson 
2862 N.E. 36th Street 
Lighthouse Point, Florida 33064 



David Newton 

Department of Biological Sciences 
Central Connecticut State College 
New Britain, Connecticut 06050 



srbert Hughes Moorefield 
lion Carbide Corp. 
rocess Chemicals Division 
70 Park Avenue 
aw York, New York 10017 



Guy J. Noerdinger 

1208 Marilyn 

Mt. View, California 94040 



arol Ann Morgan 
6745 S. Pacific 
unset Beach, California 90742 



Willis J. Nolan 

4612 Beechwood Road 

College Park, Maryland 20740 



-62- 



Zenas Barnard Noon, Jr. 
251 E. 32nd Street 
Apt. 10E 
New York, New York 10016 



Herbert T. Osborn 

P.O. Box 207 

Nevada City, California 95959 



John V. Osmun 
Department of Entomology 
Purdue University 
Lafayette, Indiana 47907 



Faustine Q. Otanes 
200i+ a Delas Alas 
Santa Ana 
Manila, Philippines 



Francisco Pacheco 
Centro de Invest igacion 

Agricola del Noroeste 
Secretaria de Agricultura 

y Ganaderia 
Apdo. Postal 515 
Ciudad, Obregon 
Sonora, Mexico 



Boyd B. Palmer 
[Address Unknown] 



Gerard Paquet, Director 
Bureau of Entomology 
Department of Lands 6 Forests 
Parliament Building 
Quebec City, Quebec, Canada 



Thaddeus H. Parks 
1501 Doone Road 
Columbus, Ohio 43221 



Robert Dale Pausch 
State Natural History Survey 
163 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



Alvah Peterson 
Botany and Zoology Building 
Ohio State University 
Columbus, Ohio 43210 



Lance Peterson 
Ely Lilly Co. 
Greenfield, Indiana46140 



Howard B. Petty 
State Natural History Survey 
282 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



Jean Paul Picard 
[Address Unknown] 



John E. Porter 

1015 Port Blvd. 

New Port of Miami, Florida 33132 



Dwight Powell 

Department of Plant Pathology 
Horticultural Field Lab. 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 

Glenn E. Printy 
Department of Entomology 
University of California 
Riverside, California 92502 



Edmund C. Puddicombe 

1719 W. Acre 

Joliet, Illinois 60431 



-63- 



A. Mohan Rao 
[Address Unknown] 



Janet Cooper Rapp 
430 Ivy Avenue 
Crete, Nebraska 68333 



William F. Rapp 
430 Ivy Avenue 
Crete, Nebraska 68333 



Arnold C. Rasso 

17 Southern Boulevard 

East Patchoque 

Long Island, New York 11100 



Eugene Ray 

8808 Osceola 

Morton Grove, Illinois 60053 



Robert C. Rendtorff 
62 S. Dunlap Street 
Memphis, Tennessee 38100 



Judith Reynolds 
Department of Biology 
University of Massachusetts 
100 Arlington Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02116 



William Robin Richards 

Taxonomy Section 

Research Branch 

Entomology Research Institute 

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 



Garland Tavner Riegel 
Department of Zoology 
Eastern Illinois University 
Charleston, Illinois 61920 



Paul W. Riegert 

Canada Agricultural Research Sta. 

University Sub P.O. 

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada 



Lewis Bradford Ripley 

Cedara School of Agriculture 

Pictermaritzburg 

Natal, Republic of S. Africa 



Arthur E. Ritcher 
821 16th Street 
Peru, Illinois 61354 



Paul 0. Ritcher 
Department of Entomology 
Oregon State University 
Corvallis, Oregon 97331 



Clifford Creighton Roan 
223 Rojen Court 
Tucson, Arizona 85711 



Selwyn S. Roback 

Academy of Natural Science 

19th and Parkway 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103 



Reginald Roberts 

Division of Entomology 

CSIRO 

c/o Pastoral Research Lab. 

Armidale 5N 

NSW, Australia 

Herbert Holdsworth Ross 
State Natural History Survey 
287 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



1-): 



■64- 



Mbert Salako 
[Address Unknown] 



lurl Beauford Salisbury 
[Address Unknown] 



George K. Schumaker 

279 Bay Avenue 

Glen Ridge, New Jersey 07028 



Herbert F. Seiffert 
[Address Unknown] 



Isabel L. Sanabria 

[Mrs . de Arevalo] 

Centro Nacional de Investigaciones 

Agropecuarias "Tibaitata" 
Instituto Columbiano Agropecuario 
Apartado Postal No. 3493 
Bogata, D.E. 
Colombia, South America 



James W. Sanford 

U.S. Entomology Research Branch 

Sugarcane Field Station 

P.O. Box 387 

Houma, Louisiana 70360 



Sono Sastrodihardjo 
Department Kimia-Biologi 
Institut Tecknologi Bandung 
Ganeca 10 Bandung, Jav*, Indonesia 



John W . Schaf fnit 
415 Kipling Street 
Wheaton, Illinois 60187 



Robert H. Schiffman 

2&2G3 Ella Road 

Palos Verdes Penninsula, California 90274 



Herbert Frederick Schoof 

3 Pinewood Avenue 

Parkersburg 

Savannah, Georgia 31406 



Richard Brent Selander 
Department of Entomology 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



Isaac (Morris) Seligman 
CSIRO Division of Entomology 
Canberra ACT 
Australia 



Abdel Shalaby 
Entomology Department 
Faculty of Science 
University of Alexandria 
Alexandria, Egypt, U.A.R. 



Daniel L. Shankland 
Department of Entomology 
Purdue University 
Lafayette, Indiana 47907 



Zile Singh 

Research Entomologists 

J. Nehru Agricultural University 

Jabalpur-4, M. P. India 



Ruth Evelyn Slabaugh 
Department of Entomology 
University of Missouri 
Columbia, Missouri 65201 



James A. Slater 
Department of Zoology 

and Entomology 
University of Connecticut 
Storrs, Connectcut 06268 



■ - . no'j ■ ' 



-65- 



Edgar Henry Smith 
[Address Unknown] 



Marion Estelle Smith 
Department of Entomology 
University of Massachusetts 
Amherst, Massachusetts 01002 



Marion Russell Smith 
519 N. Monroe Street 
Arlington, Virginia 22201 



Robert Snetsinger 

Department of Entomology 

101 Walker Lab. 

Pennsylvania State University 

University Park, Pennsylvania 15802 



Lee A. Somers 
[Address Unknown] 



Kathryn Martha Sommerman 
U.S. Public Health Service 
Arctic Health Research Lab. 
College, Alaska 99701 



Calvin Soo Hoo 
Department of Entomology 
Washington State University 
Pullman, Washington 99163 



George J. Spencer 
Department of Zoology 
University of British Columbia 
Vancouver, B.C., Canada 



Earl A. Stadelbacher 

915 6th Street 

Leland, Mississippi 37856 



Lewis J. Stannard, Jr. 
State Natural History Survey 
285 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



Shirley S. Statler 
Wellman, Iowa 52353 



James G. Sternburg 
Department of Entomology 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



Philip Carlton Stone 
1-87 Agriculture Building 
University of Missouri 
Columbia, Missouri 65201 



Richard H. Storch 
Department of Entomology 
University of Maine 
Orono, Maine 0UU73 



Elmer D. Sweeney 
[Address Unknown] 



Capt. Martin L. Taylor 
Department of Preventive Medicine 
Medical Field Service School 
Ft. Sam Houston, Texas 78234 



Milton Tinker 

Box 37 

Jones Town P. 0. 

Kingston 12, Jamaica, B.W.I. 



Lee Hill Townsend 
Entomology Department 
Kentucky Agricultural 

Experiment Station 
Lexington, Kentucky 40506 



• 



s" . ■ . 












: 



..>.-•:; .:o, uv 

.:•; . .r. • • • 



■ 



■ 



\i 



■ 



-66- 



Robert Traub 

5702 Bradley Blvd. 

Bethesda, Maryland 20014 



Ying-Hsuan Hsuwen Tsou 
5 Chi Ysi Street 
Soochew, Kang Su, China 



Hubert Jack Walters 
Plant Pathology Department 
University of Arkansas 
Fayetteville , Arkansas 72701 



Margaret Washington 

[Mrs. Benjamin S. Pfieffer] 

[Address Unknown] 



Donald Monroe Tuttle 
University of Arizona 

Experimental Station 
Rt. 1, Box 587 
Yuma, Arizona 85364 



Miriam U. Welles 

[Mrs. G. I. Reeves] 

1466 Edison Street 

Salt Lake City, Utah 84115 



Glenn A. Ulrich 

308 Suwannee 

Clinton Sherman A.F.B. 



Oklahoma 73632 



Perry Homer Welley 
[Address Unknown] 



John D. Unzicker 
Faunistic Survey Section 
State Natural History Survey 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61301 



Massoud Varzandeh 
Homayoun High School 
Shareza Avenue 
Tehran , Iran 



Eddie Borders Vinson 
2904 Central Avenue 
Birmingham, Alabama 35209 



Shy am Wadhwani 

Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd. 

P.O. Box 310 

Bombay , India 



Gilbert Peter Waldbauer 
Department of Entomology 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



Clifford Wester 
911 N. Ninth Street 
Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania 18360 



Carlos A. White 
1130 State Avenue 
Shafter, California 93263 



Nallini D. Wickramasinghe 
Division of Entomology 
Department of Agriculture 
Paradeniya, Ceylon 



Roger W. Williams 
School of Public Health 

and Administrative Medicine 
Columbia University 
630 W. 168th Street 
New York, New York 10032 



Victor T. Williams 
[Address Unknown] 



"i 



' 1 '-V T * ■ ' '' "i ~ "* ' J. 1 J 



: n ' '.'4. • 



-. 






-- 



■67- 



Warren Williamson 

R.R. ■» 

Galesburg, Illinois 61401 



Margaret Windsor 

Catalog Division 

Stanford University Libraries 

Stanford, California 94300 



Janina Wojciechowska 
641 Penn Avenue 
Aurora, Illinois 60504 



Home Wong 

Forest Entomology Lab. 

Box 6300 

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 



Fo-Ching Woo 
Peyeechow, Pennu 
Kiangsu, China 



Robert T. Yamamoto 
Department of Entomology 
North Carolina State University 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 



Richard J. Yero 
Libby, McNeill 6 Libby 
200 S . Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60604 



Hachiro Yuasa 

International Christian University 

Tokyo, Japan 



- . ■ i 



NEWSLETTER INFORMATION FOR 1^7-68 



Name: 

Home Address: 

Business Address: 

Current Research and Recent Publications; 



Recent Travels fcr Business or Pleasure: 



Additions to the family (names, dates): 



Suggestions or comments concerning the '"Newsletter": 



Return to: Newsletter Committee 

Department of Entomology 
32C Morrill Hall 
University of Illinois 
Urbr"=. Illinois 61801 



"> "lb , 7 C'\) 



U> i ex. 



f^feNTOMOLOGY 
NEWSLETTER 




THE LIBRARY OF THE 

370 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
-AIPM 



■ r\ n 



•s n 1Q70 



1969 



MCLOGY U BRAR y 



RUlLObY LIlifiARKl 



ANNUAL NEWSLETTER 



Department of 
Entomology 



University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 



April, 1969 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

MESSAGE FROM THE HEAD OF DEPARTMENT j_ 

ACTIVITIES OF THE SCHOOL OF LIFE SCIENCES 2 

DEPARTMENTAL ROSTER 1968-1969 4 

VISITORS TO THE DEPARTMENT 7 

SPORTS REVIEW 8 

CHRISTMAS PARTY 8 

RECENT GRADUATES 9 

PRESENT ENTOMOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS 14 

PRESENT POST-DOCS 21 

NEWS ABOUT THE STAFF MEMBERS 23 

NON -ACADEMIC EMPLOYEES 35 

PUBLICATIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY 1968-1969 37 

ALUMNI NEWS 40 

ADDRESS CORRECTION LIST 45 

NEWSLETTER INFORMATION FORM 47 



It's Newsletter time once again and we are delighted to bring to you a 
brief report on the activities of the Department . It appears that each 
year we push the Newsletter back a month. The rationale may be that if 
we keep moving it back a month we might skip an entire year, but we are 
happy to share with you the developments and advancements that are being 
made at Illinois. 

The cover this year depicts some of the complexity of research instru- 
mentation in the field of Entomology today. We have tried to indicate 
on the cover some of the equipment that we have available. We feel that 
we have the outstanding Department in the country and are in a position 
to offer to students the very best facilities to study Entomology. Insects 
are being used more and more to study biochemical, physiological, behavioral 
and u.ltrastructural phenomena. The Department now completely housed in 
new facilities boasts the finest in modern equipment and staff and we 
encourage you to send your students to the University of Illinois. 

We must, of course, give credits to our stalwart band of researchers who 
so willingly posed for the editor for this year's cover. At the 
sintillation counter is Dr. Stan Friedman, actively engaged in the study 
of biochemistry of insects. At the electrophysiological set-up is Willard 
Woodward, a student of Dr. James Sternburg, working on the effects of DDT 
on chemosensory receptors. At the automatic tritrator is Bill Campbell, 
graduate student of Dr. Clyde Kearns, working on cholinesterase . 



-1- 



-11- 



Standing at the constant temperature cabinets is Gary Eertmoed, a student 
of Dr. Richard Selander, who is actively engaged in a research program 
on the study of diapause and behavioral relationships in the Meloidae 
beetle (also photographer for the cover). The electron microscope is 
where your fearless editor works on the ultrastructure of sensory 
receptors . 

As one more Newsletter year comes to a close, the editor takes the opportunity 
to thank those faithful gals in the office without whose help and considera- 
tion this tome would never come to pass. We are most grateful for the 
willingness and excellent service that our office staff gives to the 
entire Department. Ruth Plymire , our executive secretary, with her 
associates Judy Michael and Carolyn Thrasher. Also a word of thanks 
to the students, fellow colleagues and all of the alumni who so willingly 
share their activities of the past year. Until next year then, best 
wishes . 



The Editor 



-1- 



MESSAGE FROM HEAD OF DEPARTMENT 

One of the most pleasant occasions of the past year was the Illini 
Breakfast which we had at the Dallas meetings of the Entomological 
Society of America. A total of fifty-two alumni attended the breakfast 
and from the favorable comments we received we have decided to make 
this an annual affair. I feel that much of the success of the event 
was due to the fact that you received notice from Joe Larsen in advance 
of the meeting concerning the time and place of the breakfast . We 
will continue this procedure in future years and look forward to many 
more pleasant meetings . 

We hope that you are making plans to attend the forthcoming 
meetings of the Entomological Society of America which are to be held 
in Chicago, December 1-4. We urge you to include in your plans either 
before or after the meetings a trip to Urbana for a visit with us and 
a chance to see some of the impressive changes which have taken place 
in the University and the community. 

Sincerely , 



C.W. Kearns 

Head of Department 



ACTIVITIES OF THE SCHOOL OF LIFE SCIENCES 

In our report of Departmental activities it is most fitting that we 
stop and consider the activities of the School of Life Sciences of 
which the Department of Entomology is proudly a member. One sees a 
great deal of progress in the School of Life Sciences with increased 
involvement in the biological programs . At the initiation of the 
•School of Life Sciences at the University of Illinois the rationale 
was promulgated that the School would become a framework for inter- 
departmental programs and the development of interdepartmental disciplines 
allowing the bringing together of the facilities of the various depart- 
ments in unified concepts of biological science and we are certainly 
seeing fruition of this under the directorship of Dr. Reno Kallio. 

From the early beginnings of the. honors biology curriculum followed 
by a basic core course in Biology, the School of Life Sciences has now 
taken over the old DGS sequence and under the direction of Dr. George 
Keefer has developed an excellent audio-tutorial program in basic biology 
for non-majors. This is developing into an extremely popular offering, 
drawing some 900 plus students, using the modern concepts of audio- 
tutorial teaching and developing an excellent program for non-majors in 
the biological science. Also we have seen such interdisciplinary programs 
developed as the cell biology program, which is an extremely active 
group administering a large training grant and recruiting excellent 
students. This program is directed by Dr. Leon Campbell and is a model 
for future interdisciplinary programs in the School. The genetics group 
on campus, including the people in the College of Agriculture and Vet. 
Medicine and the School of Life Sciences, has banded together to develop 
an interdisciplinary program in genetics. Just recently a new program 
in neurobiology under the direction of Dr. Ladd Prosser has been approved 
on an interdisciplinary basis, drawing not only from the various departments 
of the School of Life Science but also the very active group (Jerry Hersch 
and his colleagues) from the Department of Psychology. There is also now 
in an active stage a formation for the development of an interdisciplinary 
program in environmental biology. Dr. Robert Metcalf, new Head of the 



-3- 

Department of Zoology, is actively involved in formulating the plans 
for this new group. 

I think this year the key phrase from the activities of the School 
of Life Sciences would be the development and bringing to fruition of 
these very excellent interdisciplinary programs, utilizing the research 
facilities and the excellent faculty and staff of all of the departments 
of the School of Life Sciences. As you contemplate sending your students 
to the University of Illinois for graduate study, keep in mind that not 
only do the various departments still exist and exhibit a great deal of 
strength and stature in the scientific community but also there are 
interdisciplinary programs which allow students to cut across departmental 
lines and gain excellent training in the biological sciences. 

The School of Life Sciences has recently addressed itself to the 
problem of establishing a new doctoral program in the teaching of the 
biological sciences. This degree would be a doctor of teaching arts, 
similar to the program recently established at the Carnagie-Melom Institute. 
If one were to summarize the activities of the School of Life Science 
it would be one of a dynamic institution continually sending out pseudopodia 
in search of new ideas and the exploration of new concepts in the continual 
desire to completely encompass all that is good at the forefront of 
research in the biological sciences. We share with the other departments 
in the school our pride in being associated with this organization and 
are grateful to Dr. Reno Xallio for another successful year within the 
school framework. The facilities instrumentation and Physical Plant with 
its accompanying faculty cannot be excelled. 



Departmental Roster 1968-69 

Faculty 

Balduf, Walter V. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Chadwick , Leigh E. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Decker, George C. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. - Professor of Entomology 

Friedman, Stanley - Professor of Entomology 

"Ghent, Arthur W. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Hayes, William P. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Horsfall, William R. - Professor of Entomology 

""Jaycox, Elbert R. - Associate Professor of Apiculture 

Kearns , Clyde W. - Professor of Entomology and Head of Department 

:: ' : "Larsen, Joseph R. - Professor of Entomology 

Luckmann, William H. - Professor of Entomology and Head of 

Economic Entomology Section 

MacLeod, Ellis G. - Assistant Professor of Entomology 

Metcalf, Robert L. - Professor of Entomology and Head of Zoology Department 

Milum, Vern G. - Professor of Entomology, Emeritus 

Ross, Herbert H. - Professor of Entomology and Head of Faunistic Survey 

Selander, Richard B. - Professor of Entomology 

Sternburg , James G. - Professor of Entomology 

Waldbauer, Gilbert P. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

Willis, Judith H. - Associate Professor of Entomology 

" - Joint Appointment with Zoology 
"" - Joint Appointment with Horticulture 
""" - Joint Appointment with Physiology and Biophysics 



Research Associates 



Bhaskaran , Govindan 
Bhattacharya, A.K. 
Davies , Hugh 



Brattsten, Lena B. 
Campbell, William R, 
DeWitt, Jerald 
Eertmoed , Gary E . 
Fox, Michael 
Hamilton, Andrew 
Harris , Todd 
Kan , Lu-ping 
Kapoor, Inder 



Ameel, John J. 
Benson, Robert L. 
Casaburri, Angelo 
Krone , Larry 
Lee , An-horng 



Ronquillo, Consolacion (Nen) 
Zdarek , Jan 



Research Assistants 



Teaching Assistants 



Nordin, Gerald 
Penny , Norman D . 
Pierce , Henry 
Sangha , Gurcharan Kaur 
Sell, Douglas 
Sprenkel, Richard K. 
Wilson, Thomas 
Wu, Ming-fu 
Yu, Ching-chieh 

Lipsey, Richard 
Scarbrough , Aubrey 
Weddle , Richard 
Woodward , Willard 



Trainees and Fellows 



Burrell, Dudley - Fellow 

Chang, Franklin - USPH Trainee 

Cupp, Eddie W. - USPH Trainee 

Denlinger, David - NDEA Fellow 

Dirks, Tobias - USPH Trainee 

Dunwoody, John E. - Cell Biology 

Trainee 

Gardner, Francis - Cell Biology 

Trainee 

Morden, Robert - USPH Trainee 



Nigg, Herbert - USPH Trainee 
Olson, Jimmy K. - NDEA Fellow 
Randall, Robert F. - USPH Trainee 
Rustand, James L. - NDEA Fellow 
Sanburg, Larry Lee - NDEA Fellow 
Sheldon, Joe - NDEA IV Fellow 
Voorhees , Frank Ray - U of I Fellow 



Students not on Staff 
Allen, Tom (in absentia) 
Berrios-Ortiz , Angel 

Bouseman, John K. Moretti, Louis J 

Diem, Michael H. 
Fowler, H. Wade, Jr. 
Hsieh, Feng-kuo Wilson, Gary R. 

Hudson, Joseph W. , Jr. Yamainoto, Toshio (in absentia) 



Kuhlman, Donald E. (Instructor, 

Entomology Ext . ) 
Molina, Adolfo 



Randell. Roscoe (Instructor, 

Entomology Ext . ) 
Singh , Zile 



Non-Academic 



Duvall, Eloise 
Fisher, Mary 
Michael, Judy 
Millholin, E. Ruth 
Plymire, Ruth A. 



Meyer, John R. 
O'Neill, Patricia L. 
Speier, Patricia M. 



Ransom, Terry 
Thrasher, Carolyn 
Wright , Grace 
Yeh , Shaw-mei 



Student Employees 



Wojtowicz, Patrick J 
Broadbent , Alan H. 
Zachary , Carolyn J . 



VISITORS TO THE DEPARTMENT 

M arch 20, 1968 

Dr. Marshall Laird 

Head, Department of Biology 

Memorial University of Newfoundland 

St. John's, Newfoundland 

Canada 



May 9, 1968 

Dr. Stanley Beck 
Department of Entomology 
University of Wisconsin 
Madison, Wisconsin 



September U, 1968 

Dr. Peter N. Usherwood 
Department of Zoology 
University of Glasgow 
Glasgow, Scotland 



December 9, 196 8 

Dr. L.M. Roth 
Entomology Group 
Pioneering Research Lab 
Natick, Massachusetts 



-8- 



SPORTS REVIEW 



This year the department fielded only two athletic teams. Although 
we did not have the top teams in the league, a great time was had by 
all who participated. 

Last summer ('68) the "Flycatchers" once again took the field in 
the Faculty-Staff Softball league. Incidentally, in the field is where 
we spent the major portion of each game. In our supreme effort to stay 
out of the cellar, the "Flycatchers," with Frank Chang at the helm, 
compiled an amazing two win and four loss record. We are all eagerly 
awaiting the start of softball this spring. With all of the new people 
in the department who have expressed an interest in playing, we should 
field a very fine team. The team will have a new pilot this year, Toby 
Dirks . 

Winter found another group of hardy creatures on the basketball 
courts; they were called the "Dung Beetles." As the name might imply, 
we couldn't seem to get the ball off the floor and into the hoop. Even 
though we didn't win any games, we did manage to get a few people in 
shape for the coming softball season. 

Arrangements are being made for an athletic banquet, in which 
miniature ball gloves (with a large hole in the center) will be given 
to the members of the softball team and three carat, gold plated "dung 
ball" tie clips for the basketball players . For the handball players 
we have tubes of "Infra-Rub" and for the golfers we have hand counters 
(which cease to function after two strokes over par). 

To our fans and well-wishers we sincerely hope that you will "Keep 
the Faith." 

CHRISTMAS PARTY 

The Christmas Party this year was held at the University Club on 
December 11, 1968, from 8-11 p.m. We again used the "bar system" which 
proved to be successful last year and the punch bowl. 

This year the Christmas Party was not as successful as it has been 
in the past due to the lack of interest shown by the graduate students. 
Therefore, the "next" Christmas party will be left in the hands of the 
students and their wives to organize. 



RECENT GRADUATES 

Robert Thomas Allen - 1969 

Robert Thomas Allen was born December 14, 1939, In Farmerville , 
Louisiana. Tom grew up in Farmerville where he attended the Farmerville 
High School, graduating from there May 28, 1958. In September, 1958, 
Tom started his university career at Northeast Louisiana State College, 
which he attended for two years. After two years at Northeast, Tom 
transferred to the Louisiana State University and Agricultural and 
Mechanical College where he received his Bachelor's Degree in 1962. 
Tom stayed on at Louisiana State where he received a Master's Degree 
in Entomology in 1964. In 1964, Tom applied and was accepted to the 
University of Illinois, Department of Entomology, where he came to do 
graduate work at the Natural History Survey under the direction of 
H.H. Ross. 

While Tom was completing his graduate studies at the University 
of Illinois he spent one summer studying biology and evolution of tropical 
insects at the Organization for Tropical Studies in Costa Rica. Tom did 
his graduate research under the direction of Dr. H.H. Ross, working on 
the systematics and evolution of the Carabidae (Coleoptera) especially 
the genus Loxandrus . He completed his thesis work in January of 1969. 

In August of 1968, Tom assumed a position on the faculty as Assistant 
Entomologist in the Department of Entomology at the University of 
Arkansas . He is now a member of that department and is busy teaching not 
only entomology but working with undergraduate biology courses and carrying 
on his research. He is at the present time working on projects involving 
biological control of economic insects . Tom is a member of the Entomological 
Society of America. 

Robert L. Benson - 1969 
Robert Leland Benson was born October 27, 1941, in Tuscon, Arizona. 
Bob soon deserted the sunny climate of Arizona for Claremont , California, 
where he spent most of his youth attending Claremont High School from 
which he graduated in June of 1959. In September of 1959, Bob entered 
Pomona College where he graduated in 1963, receiving a Bachelor of Arts 
Degree cum laude in botany and zoology. Bob had a great deal of educational 



-10- 



experience before coming to the University of Illinois . He spent a 
summer session at the University of Colorado in July and August of 1961. 
He also spent a summer session studying entomology at the University of 
Michigan Biological Station in 1962-63. Bob was admitted to Stanford 
University in September, 1963, to work on a Ph.D. in biology. He 
stayed only one year at Stanford and then came to the University of Illinois 
in 1964 to pursue the Ph.D. While an undergraduate student at Pomona 
College, Bob majored in botany and biology and had adequate background 
in chemistry. While a graduate student at Stanford University, he held 
a teaching assistantship , teaching classes in both botany and cellular 
physiology. He was also recipient of a graduate teaching award at 
Stanford University. 

While a graduate student here at the University of Illinois, Bob 
also held teaching and research assistantships in the Department of 
Entomology. Bob's interest in entomology stems from childhood when 
he started a personal collection of Anisoptera. He continued his 
interest in this and now has a collection of some 2,000 specimens from 
47 states. While he was a graduate student here at the University of Illinois, 
Bob was active on the University rugby and soccer teams and was also very 
active in departmental sports. Bob did his graduate work under the 
direction of Dr. Stanley Friedman. He worked on metabolism in insects; 
the title of his thesis was "Synthesis of glucosamine-6-phosphate by 
the housefly, Musca domestica ." On the completion of his thesis research 
in December, Bob left Illinois where he accepted a postdoctoral position 
with Dr. Bertram Sacktor at the National Institute of Health in Washington, 
D.C., where he will continue his research in insect biochemistry. 

William J. Patterson - 1968 
William J. Patterson was born October 30, 1925, in Ford, Kansas. 
Bill grew up in Ford, Kansas, where he attended grade school and later 
moved to Manhattan, Kansas, where he attended Manhattan High School 
graduating from there in 1945 . At that time Bill entered the Kansas 
State College of Agriculture and Applied Science in Manhattan where he 
received a B.S. Degree in entomology in 1949. He received a Master's 
Degree in public health from Tulane University in 1958. Bill entered 
the University of Illinois in 1964 where he has done his graduate work 



-11- 



under the direction of Dr. William Horsfall. His thesis research was 
on the histopathology of the developing reproductive system of Aede s 
stimulans under thermal stress. Bill came to the University of Illinois 
from a tour of duty with the 485th Medicine Unit. Bill is a career man 
in the Army. He is currently holding the rank of Lt . Colonel in the 
Medical Service. 

In March 1968, Bill was assigned to Vietnam where he is serving as 
the Medical Entomology Consultant to the Surgeon, U.S. Army Vietnam. 
In this capacity, Colonel Patterson is the principal director of all 
aspects of the U.S. Army entomological program in Vietnam. Bill's tour 
of duty in Vietnam will be completed in April 1969 and it is expected 
that he will be assigned to the Medical Entomology Information Service, 
Forest Glen Section, WRAMC , Washington, D.C. 20012. His current address 
in Vietnam is as follows: LTC William J. Patterson, Office of the 
Surgeon, HQ US Army, Vietnam, APO San Francisco 96375. 

John D. Pinto - 1968 

John D. Pinto was born December 10, 1940, in Illinois. However, he 
soon forsook the state of Illinois where he moved with his parents to 
Banning, California, where he attended Banning High School, graduating 
in 1958. Upon graduation from high school, John entered Humboldt State 
College where he graduated with a Bachelor's Degree in Zoology in 1963. 

While still an undergraduate at Humboldt he was working on a National 
Science Foundation research problem under the direction of Dr. David Lauck , 
a former graduate of the University of Illinois. His interests in entomology 
grew while working on qualitative analyses of insects inhabiting the 
soil in the Redwood Forest in California. He also had teaching experience 
as an undergraduate assisting in the laboratory courses of general 
biology and general botany at Humboldt State College . 

John came to the University of Illinois in the fall of 1963 commencing 
graduate study under xhe direction of Dr. Richard Selander. While a student 
here at the University, John was the recipient of a U.S. Public Health 
Service pre-doctoral fellow in entomology which he held during his entire 
tenure as a graduate student . John worked on the taxonomy and biology 
of Meloe. His thesis was "Bionomics and taxonomy of Meloe (Coleoptera: 
Meloidae) with a classification of the New World species." Upon completion 



-12- 



of his thesis research John accepted a position at San Luis Obispo State 
College in their department of Biology. He is presently residing in 
San Luis Obispo, California. 

Maria C. (Men) Ronquillo - 1968 

Nen Ronquillo came to the University of Illinois from Manila in the 
Philippine Islands, where she was born and has lived all her life. She 
did her undergraduate education at the University of the Philippines where 
she received an Associate of Arts in 1948 and a Bachelor of Science Degree 
in 1950. From 1950-1963 Nen was employed by the University of the East 
in Manila in the Philippine Islands. From 1950-55 she served as an 
instructor and from 1955-63 as an assistant professor at the University 
of the East . 

In 1963 Nen came to the United States where she enrolled in the 
University of Illinois in the Department of Zoology. Her first work 
at Illinois was the completion of a Master's Degree under the direction 
of Dr. Watterson where she did research in experimental embryology of the 
chick. On completion of her Master's Degree, Nen transferred into the 
Department of Entomology and pursued graduate work under the direction 
of Dr. William Horsfall. Her thesis research had to do with the 
determination of the effect of temperature on the development of female 
characters in male mosquitoes. The title of Nen's thesis research was 
"Organogenesis of female reproductive system of an aedine mosquito." 
Upon the completion of her Ph.D. in 1968, Nen stayed on at Illinois 
where she accepted a post-doctoral position on the U.S. Public Health 
Training Grant where she is continuing her research on growth and development 
of mosquitoes . 

Nen has been extremely active in the Philippine Scientific Societies. 
She was a member of Phi Sigma, The Philippine Association for University 
Women, and the Philippine Association for the Advancement of Science. She 
is also a member of AAAS and an advisor to the University of the East 
Alpha Biological Society from 1958-63. We are delighted to have Nen's 
pleasing personality and scientific expertise continuing on here at Illinois. 



•13- 



George Robert Wilson - 1969 

George Robert Wilson was born April 16, 1936, in Baltimore, Maryland. 
He attended high school at the Baltimore City College in Baltimore, 
Maryland, where he graduated in June 1954. Upon graduation George entered 
Johns Hopkins University where he received his B.S. degree in 1960. While 
an undergraduate, George worked in the laboratories of Dr. Charles Hassett 
at the Army Chemical Center in Edgewood, Maryland, and also worked in the 
laboratories of Dr. Hans Laufer at Johns Hopkins. He worked on the anti- 
serum of protein fractions of cecropia blood. 

George entered graduate school in the department of entomology at 
the University of Illinois in September 1961. George spent the first 
part of his graduate career in the entomology department working on 
cholinesterase under Dr. Kearns and pursued a problem he was unable to 
solve due to technical difficulties . In 1964 he began doing research 
under the direction of Dr. Joseph Larsen where he worked on insect hormones 
He completed his research in January of 1969. George worked on diapause 
termination in the tobacco hornworm working out deep diapause , diapause 
maturity, and the effects on diapause of response to the hornworm 
photoperiod and wounding. Upon completion of his thesis. George accepted 
a post-doctoral fellowship with Dr. Stanley Beck at the University of 
Wisconsin where he is continuing his research studies on insect diapause . 



-14- 

PRESENT ENTOMOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS 

John J . Ameel 

As I passed my prelims in June, my time has been spent partially on 
research on food utilization by the Cadelle ( Tenebroides mauritanicas ) 
and teaching biology laboratories . 
Advisor: G.P. Waldbauer 

An gel Berrios-Ortiz 

Although no formal research has been attempted a lot of time has been 
devoted to collecting and classifying immature forms. An immature insect 
collection has already been started with the help of students in entomology 
courses . 

Very warming to have a chance of knowing about entomology department 
professors and students. Next September I will be back at Illinois for 
some more studying. [Taken from alumni news comments sent to the 
Newsletter Committee.] 
Advisor: no advisor officially assigned yet. 

Dudley (Doug) Burrell 

I received my B.S. from Olivet Nazarine College at Kankakee, Illinois. 
I began studying for my M.S. at the University of Illinois in September 
1968. I hope to teach at the college or high school level. I am interested 
in behavior and ecology. My research problem has not yet been selected. 
I am married and have one child. 
Advisor: J.R. Larsen and/or J.G. Sternburg 

William R . Campbe ll 

Regarding my research — it looks like maybe we will get some answers 
regarding fly acetylcholinesterase and its differences with the ell 
enzyme. Hope to be finished by June. Koorah! 

Publications (in preparation) — Some properties of flyhead 
acetylcholinesterase . 

Question? Does anyone know of a job? 
Advisor: C.W. Kearns 

Angelo Cas aburri 

Activities this year include course work -- among which is electron 
microscopy. Big major events are all my deficiencies are almost made up, 
except for calculus. I now have a new classification, IA , complete with 
physical. Wonder what they'll do to me next? 
Advisor: J.R. Larsen 

Franklin Chang 

"T T m~Tn the process of finishing my thesis in absentia at Alma College, 
where I am presently employed. Most of my time since the last newsletter 
was taken up by research. However, I took out some time in November to 
adjust to a new addition to the family, a baby boy. 
Advisor: S. Friedman 



•15- 



Eddie W. Cupp 

I am currently involved in thesis research and a separate investigation 
using the scanning electron microscope. During January and February of 
196 8 I was the recipient of an LSU-Interamerican Fellowship in Tropical 
Medicine which allowed me to travel in Central America and Mexico. This 
was quite a rewarding and educational experience . I went to the ESA 
National Meetings in Dallas this year. 

Other than the travel mentioned above my activities have largely been 
in finishing Ph.D. degree requirements. I was the co-author of a paper 
entitled "Anomalous Dimorphism in Aedes vexans (Diptera: Culicidae)" 
which has been submitted for publication to the Annals of the ESA. We 
have a new addition, Eleanor, who arrived on November 26. 
Advisor: W.R. Horsfall 

David Denlinge_r 

Course work has occupied most of my time this past year, and I suppose 
it will continue to do so until the end of the spring semester. 

My draft board reclassified me , but a few letters and an appeal 
evidently made them reconsider my case . They have now given me two years 
to get my degree, so I have to make my minutes count. 

My wife, Judy, is enjoying her year as a first grade teacher at 
Robeson Elementary School in Champaign. 
Advisor: G.S. Fraenkel 

Jerald DeWitt 

During the past year I have attended the North Central Branch Meetings 
in Denver, Colorado, and have vacationed in Florida and Minnesota. 
Research has continued on the diapause of the alfalfa weevil under the 
guidance of Dr. Edward J. Armbrust. 
Advisor: W.H. Luckmann 

Tobias Dirks 

The past year was largely devoted to research into Polistes venoms . 
Some collecting trips and attendance of the Dallas Meetings afforded 
respite . 
Advisor: J.G. Sternburg 

John E . ( Ernie) Dnnwoody 

I arrived at Urbana in September after working on the synergism of 
organophosphate insecticides to German cockroaches at UPI . I am currently 
a Cell Biology program trainee and plan to center my research around seme 
specific aspect of enzyme regulation. Until then course work remains 
the primary concern. 
Advisor: Cell Biology 

Gary E . Eertmoed 

Except for attending the meetings of the Entomological Society of 
America, I spent my entire last year doing research for my thesis. 
Advisor: R.B. Selander 



■16- 



Harland V, T ade Fowler, Jr. 

I was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel (US Army Medical Service Corps) 
during 1968. I am now in the final phase of my research on the bionomics 
of Aedes vexans and plan to take my final examination in May or June 1969 . 
During 1968, Eddie Cupp and I collaborated on a paper entitled "Anomalous 
dimorphism in Aedes vexans" , which was submitted for publication in the 
Annals of the Entomological Society of America. I participated in the 1968 
meeting of the Entomological Society of America in Dallas, Texas, and 
presented a paper entitled, "Colonization of Aedes vexans." 
Advisor: W.R. Horsfall 

Michael Fox 

During the past year I have been working with the enzyme, glutamic 
acid decarboxylase, of the honeybee brain. I am attempting to isolate 
a "synaptosome" fraction from central and, perhaps later, peripheral nerve 
and to test for a localization of the enzyme in such a fraction. 

One high point last year was my marriage to Glenda Ann Howlett . 
Glenda Ann is working with the Englemann Program for Education of Culturally 
Deprived Children. 
Advisor: J.R. Larsen 

Todd Harris 



I finished up all the requirements for Masters degree . I also 
attended the North Central Branch Meetings in Denver, went on two 
leafhopper collecting trips throughout the "prairie states." I worked 
for the Aquatic Biology section of Illinois Natural History Survey during 
the summer. 

Publication: "Notes on the Biology of Baccha fascipennis (Wied.)" 
Ent. News, Vol. 79, No. 8, October, 196 8. 
Advisor: H.H. Ross 

Lu- ping Kan 

I am in the second year of course work and working on the pigments of 
Caster semi looper, Achaea janatta . 
Advisor: G.S. Traenkel 

Inder Kapcor 

I am a transfer student from the University of California, Riverside, 
California . 
Advisor: R.L. Met calf 



Lawrence J . Krone 



During the past year, I have continued my classroom studies in addition 
to being a teaching assistant in Entomology 322 and 410. I have been 
doing preliminary work in preparation for my thesis research. The summer 
was spent as a LSU Tropical Medicine Fellow to Central America. 
Advisor: W.R. Horsfall 



-17- 
522Sld_E : jCuhijnan 



corn r t„ oms . thesL'es^chTot °V^ «--«r 

AjI^iprng__Lee_ 

Advisor:" ^k^ 1 " SGC ° nd *** °f course work. 

i^hardj^ipsey 

" y 4HS S ^s^^ — - "3 *» Dr . „ acLeod . 

study the biology of the famUy ^'l^f* 1 *° tha P«* service ?o 

My a ;Sf e M bUt Miti "S o„ y fu„ ds ' Y " ldae (Tr ""°Pt-a) i„ the pat*. 
^oL'tL^tZ- " ad " Cheryl *""" - >« I.-. Eve. 

Rcbert_ Morden 

the pheSJloTof 5e°bl Cerned . ith ^"S to discover facto,, m 

Advisor: d^stetbuT ""* SP6Cial ™ Ph -" « taXS.'^ 

L2ili£_ M ore 1 1 i 

I started work in +->,-: j 

M.S. in Zoolo Sy . current^ l^Sf ^ Septemb - ^er completing mv 
Advisor: W.R. Horsfall taking courses. F^ t .mg my 

Herbert M. N-fgp; 

This summer I assio+eH ■ n 
of "oueen-<;rK.f- „ " Lfca m Research under nr. p d 

prelimSar^c^": ! ° n ^ indw ™°™™^f™Z£\lT? ^ ^ ^^ 

T H x am dls ° a new 

«^:«~™ t:,Me -"' eekS - ><«ton Bay, Michigan. 
Gerald L. Norriin 



-18- 



J immy K. Olson 

The past year has been a continuation of course work , which should 
be completed by June 1969. The summer was divided between completing 
German and performing some preliminary research on the effects of tree 
canopies on insect distribution at Trelease Woods . In late August, the 
women in tie Olson family returned to Idaho for a visit with inlaws and 
outlaws while I was spending two weeks on Army Reserve duty in Utah. 
Advisor: W'.R. Horsfall 

Morman D . Penn y 

I received my B.S. degree in Entomology from Iowa State University 
in June 1968. As an undergraduate I worked part-time during the school 
year for Dr. Laffoon on the Iowa State University Insect Collection and 
during the summer for Dr. Erindley at the U.S.D.A. European Corn Borer 
Laboratory. However, last summer it was necessary to spend 6 weeks 
at Fort Benning, Georgia, as part of the R.O.T.C. program. My research 
interests are in the areas of insect ecology and biological control. 
I am currently completing my courses as a first year graduate student 
in Entomology and doing research on seed-corn beetles . 
Advisor: W.H. Luckmann 

He nry F. Pierce , Jr. 

I have a B.S. in Zoology from the University of Illinois and am now 
in my first year of graduate work. I hope to complete rny master's thesis, 
the life history and control of the leaf crumpler, by the end of the 
summer and begin Ph.D. work in the fall. My research is through the 
Economic Entomology section of the Natural History Survey. 
Advisor : W.H. Luckmann 

Robert F. Rand all 

Along with the thesis research of this past year, the fall of '68 
gave me the opportunity to assist in Entomology 301 laboratory. I found 
the experience quite valuable . 

Carlene and I enjoyed some time in Michigan this past year and are 
looking forward to this coning fall, and with it, the first addition to 
our family. 
Advisor: C.W. Kearns 

Roscoe Rande ll 

I have been busy as an Extension Entomologist with an office in the 
State Natural History Survey. I passed my prelims in June. My research 
has been in the area of behavior of the corn leaf aphid on the corn plant. 

My wife, Marjorie , and I have 3 children, Lorraine (11), Steven (8), 
and Linda (5) . 
Advisor: W.H. Luckmann 

L a r ry S anburg 

Attempting to gat a real start on my research into diapause in 
Anopheles punctipennis . Besides courses my main problem this past year 
has been the difficulty in maintaining a colony so I could start research. 
I made several trips to southern Minnesota for A nopheles and will soon 
take a trip to Florida with Dr. Kitzmiller of the Zoology Department. 
Vi/ienne has been working for the Illinois Department of Mental Health and 
has been accepted in the School of Social Work to work toward a Master's 
degree . 
Advj.scr: J.R. Larsen 



-19- 



Aiabrey Scarbrough 

1 completed my course work and passed my preliminary examination 
in the spring of last year. I attended the Meetings in Dallas, Texas. 
Presently, I am completing my work on the behavior of Hyalophora cecropia . 
Advisor: G.P. Waldbauer 

Joe Sheldon 

During the last three weeks of June 196 8 Donna and I visited our 
friends and relatives in Oregon. Naturally this included trips both to the 
mountains and the ocean. Shortly after our return I left for Florida where 
I spent about a month collecting different species of Chrysopidae and 
studying them in the field. I brought back a number of the species 
to Urbana where Dr. MacLeod and I are continuing our study of them. 

In 1968 I also finished up my course work and the next thing to get 
out of the way is the prelims . 

Publications: The nesting behavior and larval morphology of Pison 
koreense (Radoszkowski) (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae). Psyche 75(2) . -107-117 . 
Advisor: E.G. MacLeod 

Zile Singh 



My research concerns the "studies of the dietary requirements of the 
adult western corn rootworm, Diabrotica vergifera LeConte." 

Publications: 1) Studies on Caliothri ps indicus (Bagnall) and a 
note on assessment of damage to pea crops . Indian J . Agrl . Science , 
38(2): 295-297. 2) Further studies on the chemical control of C aliothrips 
indicus (Bagnall) on pea crop. JNKVV Res. J. (India) 1968. 
Advisor: W.H. Luckmann 

Richard K. Sprenkel 

During the past year I was able to begin my research on entornogenous 
fungi. In particular, I investigated Entomophthora spp . attacking 
Anthomyiids and the corn leaf aphid. 
Advisor: W.H. Luckmann 

Frank R ay Voorh ees 

I have been preparing for prelims. I presented a joint paper with 
Ed Cupp at the Dallas Meetings, Dec. 2-5, 1968. 
Advisor: W.R. Horsfall 

Richard Weddie 

Travel during the past year was confined to the Meetings in Dallas . 
Present activities include completion of thesis and job hunting, plus 
a bit of babysitting as there was an addition to the Weddle family in 
June. His name is Robert Wilson. 
Advisor: R.B. Selander. 

Willard E. Woodward 

Work during the past year has consisted largely of taking courses and 
assisting in Entomology 103 and ^23. Research is now underway concerning 
the effects of DDT on the response of sensory neurons in labellar hairs of 



-20- 



the house fly. I have recently transferred to an interdepartmental Ph.D. 
program in the Neurosciences , but will continue to be closely associated 
with this department . 
Advisor: J.G. Sternburg 

Ching-chieh Yu 

I have finished course work and passed the preliminary examination. 
I devote all my time on research now. My research is on the insect 
cholinesterases . Currently I am studying the kinetics of honey-bee 
ChE inhibited by bis-carbamates . I am expected to finish the thesis 
in September. I made trips to New Orleans and Dallas, Texas, last year. 
Advisor: C.W. Kearns 



-21- 

PRESENT ENTOMOLOGY POST-DOCS 
Govindan Bhaskaran 

I am a native of India (Kerala State). I received my Ph.D. from 
Bombay University in 1962, then joined the Biology Division of the 
Government of India 'a Atomic Research Center at Bombay. I joined this 
department on September 1, 1968, as a Research Associate with Dr. Fraenkel . 
My research interests include (a) hormones in insect development and (b) 
effects of ionizing radiations on insect development. 

My wife's name is Shyamala, and we have two children. 

A. K. Bhatt acharya 

I attended the Entomological Society of America meetings in Dallas. 
At present I am working on the consumption and utilization of food by 
stored grain insects . 

Maria C. Ronquillo 

I received my Ph.D. degree in June, 1968. My thesis title was 
"Organogenesis of the female reproductive system of an aedine mosquito." 
My research includes studying the development of the reproductive system 
of genetically induced dimorphic extremes of femaleness and maleness and 
intermediate forms induced by environmental pressure. I presented a 
paper at the Dallas Meetings — "Organogenesis of the female reproductive 
system of an aedine mosquito." I have a publication (in press) entitled: 
"Genesis of female reproductive system of an aedine mosquito." 

I have two sons: Carlos III who started this semester as a freshman 
at the University of Illinois and David a junior at the Urbana High School. 
My younger sister, Letty, arrived on campus from Manila, Philippines, last 
December and is at present a student in the College of Education. 

Jan Zdarek 

I came from Czechoslovakia in August last year, where I had worked 
in the Department of Insect Physiology (headed by Dr. V. Novak), Institute 
of Entomology CSAV, Prague. My M.S. thesis topic at the Charles University, 
Prague, dealt with some morphological and ethological problems of feeding 
in spiders. My earlier research in the Insect Physiology Department was 



-22- 

concsrned with the study of insect visual abilities, thermoreception in the 
stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans and with the insect repellents for veterinary 
use. I completed my Ph.D. thesis, the topic of which was the mating 
behaviour and its hormonal control in the bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus , in 
the laboratory of Dr. K. Slama. Since I joined this department as a 
Research Associate with Dr. Fraenkel I have been working on the mechanism 
of pupation in Sarcophaga. 

I am married; Eva works in the Entomology Department of the State 
Natural History Survey; we have a daughter, Paula (3). 



-23- 



NEWS ABOUT THE STAFF MEMBERS 

Dr. Walter V. Balduf 

Our travels in 1968 were limited to the habitual retreat near 
Ely, Minnesota, but hope to visit our Ohio folks in April. Minnesota 
affords escape from the summer heat of central Illinois, as well as 
plenty of opportunity to inquire into insect life in evergreen forests . 
Each summer now adds information about borers and their parasites in 
balsam fir. 

While at the Olsen Eaglerest resort, we were thrilled by the surprise 
visit of Dr. David Lauck and family, head of the department of biology 
at Humboldt College, California. Dr. Lauck was scouting the northern 
evergreen country in search of Scalytidae--his present research group. 

Dr. Leigh E. Chadwick 

Leigh and Maria Chadwick continue to live happily and busily 
in their Maine homes: summer in North Brooklin (P. 0. address Blue 
Hill Falls, Maine, 04615) and winter in nearby Sargentville (04673). 

Last fall we enjoyed a brief motor trip to Nova Scotia and Prince 
Edward Island. 

We are favored with occasional visits from Dick Storch and family; 
he is v/ith the Department of Entomology of the University of Maine, 
at Orono. It seems that whenever he comes he has just been fishing or 
hunting, and we profit accordingly. 

During summer 1968 I translated for the Natural History Press a 
short INTRODUCTION TO BIRD LIFE, by Adolph Portmann. So far as I know, 
the translation has not yet been printed. 

Dr. George C. Decker 

Another 1 year as interesting as all those that passed before. Good 
health, good friends, good weather (no hurricanes, no tornadoes, no 
snow) . 

Made a few local trips to Washington, New York, Chicago, St. Louis, 
Atlantic City, Gatlinburg, and even Champaign, but only for a few hours. 



-24- 

In November we were joined by our oldest daughter, Mrs. Mary Green, 
in a trip to Israel, Greece, and Italy. Aside from a minor bout with 
the flu and Mary's three-day stomach upset, the whole trip was most 
enjoyable . 

No real progress in research, but it goes without saying one 
cannot live in or near a semi-tropical area and not learn something 
new about insects. 

Have managed to do a little writing (2 papers published and 2 in 
the mill). 

Dr. and Mrs. Loren Steiner (of Vincennes and Honolulu) now live 
only a few miles from us , and we find we have much in common . For 
one thing the four of us hope to have coffee with world traveler W. P. 
Hayes when he docks at Port Everglades January 11. 

Incidentally, while we enjoyed visits by many old friends, except 
for Harlow and Esther Mills and Perky Weinman, Champaign and Urbanaites 
have failed to win, place, or show. 

Dr. G. S. Fraenkel 

Gottfried has current research projects on the biophysical and 
biochemical mechanism of formation of the fly puparium and hormonal 
and nutritional effects control of ovarian development in flies (together 
with Catherine Hsiao, now at Utah State University). He is also 
continuing his work on heat resistance of intertidal snails, and other 
intertidal organisms and is currently in teres ted in the melanization 
of soft-skinned insect cuticles. 

Dr. Fraenkel has been responsible for bringing two new research 
associates to the Department of Entomology. Dr. Jan Zdarek from Prague, 
Czechoslovakia and Dr. Govindan Bhaskaran from Bombay, India. 

Gottfried took a sabbatical leave between November 1967 and August 
1958, during which he did extensive traveling. In November, 1967, he 
attended the Fifth International Symposium on Comparative Endocrinology 
at New Delhi, November 23-28, 1967. 

From December until Januat^y 20, 1968, he made visits to about 
10 centers of learning and research in India, from the Himalayas to the 



-25- . 

southern tip, during which he gave lectures, seminars and discussions. 

This trip was organized and supported by the Rockefeller Foundation. 

From January to April, 1968, he did research at the Department of Entomology, 

The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. He also gave lectures at 

research centers at Jerusalem, Tel-aviv and Rehovot. 

From April to the end of July, 1968, he gave lectures and did 
research in France, as "professeur exchange" of the University of Paris. 
Most of the time he was stationed at the Laboratory of Zoology, Faculty 
des Sciences, Orsay (20 miles outside Paris). He also did four weeks of 
research at Laboratoire de Zoologie, Villefranche-sur-mer ( a marine 
laboratory) where he has worked on several occasions before. 

In August he attended the International Congress of Entomology 
at Moscow. He also visited Leningrad where he delivered two invited 
papers . 

To avoid the Illinois winter Gottfried and Rachel went south of 
the border where they spent three weeks in Mexico for vacation. 

Son, Gideon, is now Associate Professor of Chemistry (organic, 
N.M.R.) at Ohio State University at Columbus. 

Son, Dan, is Assistant Professor of Microbiology (biochemical 
genetics) at Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. 

The capstone of the year for Dr. Fraenkel was in April of 1968 
when he was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences . We 
of the Department of Entomology give our heartfelt congratulations to 
Gottfried for this singular honor so justly deserved and long overdue. 

Dr. Stanley Friedman 

Stan was unusually cooperative this year, being one of the first 
to return his faculty questionnaire. He shared with us his annual 
verbosity on his yearly activities writing "none" to all questions 
except for publications . 

I am delighted to report that "none" freely translated means that 
Stan has enjoyed a full year of activity. He continues his very active 
research program on the metabolic effects of hormones, and was involved 



-26- 

in seeing Benson and Chang, two of his graduate students, finish their 
research . 

Stan made his annual pilgrimage to the Federation Meetings in 
Atlantic City and did take the family into Missouri Valley again for 
a summer vacation. 

Dr. William P. Hayes 

If there is a stampede to retirement, Dr. Hayes will be the 
precipitator. His yearly travel itinerary looks like a page out of 
the tour guides . 

From January to April on a cruise around both South Africa and 
South America. In April San Antonio fair and Great Bend National 
Park. May and June in California with my two daughters. June and 
July (2 months) in Estes Park and Denver. August- -In High Sierras 
of California. From September to January at home in Urbana. In early 
January another cruise, this time to the South Pacific to wind up 
again in California. Regards to all former students! 

Dr. William R. Horsfall 
Research 

Thermal stress and anomalous development of mosquitoes with completion 
of two Ph.D. theses. 
Travel 

Trip to XIII int. Congr. Ent . , Moscow, August 2-9, with visits to 
laboratories in Czechoslovakia, Austria, England (July 29-September 7). 
Visitors 

R. M. Crowell, St. Lawrence University, Canton, New York. 

R. W. Gerhardt, USPHS, Atlanta, Gccx^gia. 

L. M. Roth, US Army Lab, Natick, Massachusetts. 

P. T. M. Lum, USDA Lab, Savannah, Georgia. 
Extra-curricular activities 

Numerous trips to southern Illinois in connection with an outbreak 
of St. Louis encephalitis. Assisted by John Meyer, an undergraduate major. 
Sabbatical leave for study in Europe and U.S. - June to february. 



-27- 

Dr. Elbert R. Jaycox 

The year 1968 was a good one for honey bee behavior studies. The 
bees and equipment cooperated to give us a clearer idea of the effects 
of the queen's pheromones on the activity of the workers. The primary 
pheromone, 9-oxodecenoic acid, appears to regulate nectar collecting 
activity with little effect on pollen collection. It also plays a 
role in worker longevity and when lacking, mortality is greater among 
the workers . 

Apiculture extension activities increased during the year because 
of greater interest in using bees for pollination of vegetable crops 
in Illinois. I wrote a new 100 page beekeeping manual that will be 
available in 1969 to replace Dr. Milum's popular Honey Production 
circular. Because of greatly increased costs of printing, the manual 
will be sold by the Extension Service. 

During the summer the entire family traveled to California for 
business and pleasure. The business included visits to the University 
of California at Davis and Utah State University. The pleasure took 
in San Francisco, Disneyland and Bryce Canyon. The cold and wet 
weather completely ruined the bee collecting. 

The utility of honey bees as research subjects is becoming 
increasingly evident in the Department. I received so many requests 
for them in 1968 that we finally had to refer them to commercial sources, 

Dr . C . W . Kearns 
We intended to spend last summer in England but finally had to 
settle for one month. We will probably make another trip to England 
this summer in preparation for an extended stay in 1970. Our other 
travels have taken us to California about four times this year, which 
has enabled us to have short visits with our son, David, and his 
family in Riverside and Camille in Berkeley. 

Dr. Joseph R. Lars en 
Work this past year on insect sensory receptors has been greatly 
enhanced by the addition to the central electron microscope facilities 



-28- 

of a scanning electron microscope. This is an exciting tool that will 
greatly enrich the study of external structures and morphology. Hopefully 
the work can be correlated with transmission electron microscope studies 
to better understand physiology of insect sensory reception. 

The Larsen's had a magnificant trip this year. We went north 
through International Falls across the Canadian Plains into Banf, 
Canada, where we spent the better part of a week. Leaving Banf, we 
went south through Waterton, and Glacier National Park, down through 
Yellowstone and on to Utah where we visited friends and relatives. 
We had a tremendous opportunity to take a look at some of the wonders 
of nature in this great country and had a most enjoyable time together. 
Our trip through the Canadian Rockies was dampened a little by rain 
but we did have an opportunity to observe the majesty of that great 
mountain range. 

Teaching responsibilities are about the same. Still involved in 
the Biology 110-111 series and Insect Physiology with Stan Friedman. 
The children are one year older, hopefully the parents one year wiser. 

Dr. William H. Luckmann 

Administrative duties were very demanding in the form of Program 
Committee assignments for ESA, building a new laboratory facility and 
insectary, and implementing new programs in research. A PL-480 grant 
was approved to support some research in India, and one NHS entomologist 
was on short-term assignment there in 1968. Research programs half a 
world away are very interesting. 

The challenges of entomology are more apparent each day, and we 
are fortunate in attracting more bright young graduate students to 
Economic Entomology each year. We encourage past students to visit 
when on the campus . 

Dr. Ellis G. MacLeod 
Travel 

None, spent the whole damn year cooped up in Champa ign-Urbana 
except for a 5-day camping trip to western North Carolina in June. 
Research 

1). Continuing studies on several aspects of the biology of the 
Chrysopidae including environmental control of diapause and, with J. Larsen, 



-29- 

a study of the infrastructure of an ultrasonic-sensitive, tympanal 
organ . 

2). A restudy of the Neuroptera fossils of the Baltic amber. 

3). Just received a 2-year NSF grant for a continuation of a 
study of the cytotaxonomy of the Chrysopidae. 
Visitors 

Lou Roth from Army Pioneering Research Lab, Natick, Massachusetts. 

Courtney Smithers from the Australian Museum, Sidney 

rj r>-i.c_noTno/-.v a -.• } fellow Ne urop teris t s 
Edgar Riek from C.S.I.R.O., Canberra, Australia r 

Publications 

MacLeod, E. G. 196 8. Studies on the systematics of the Berothidae, 
Part I. A redescription of the genus Sphaeroberotha Navas, with a 
critique of the taxonomic characters used in the Berothinae (Neuroptera), 
Psyche 74:342-352. 

MacLeod, E. G. and P. A. Adams. 1968. A review of the taxonomy and 
morphology of the Berothidae, with the description of a new subfamily from 
Chile. Psyche 74:237-265. 

Dr. Robert L. Metcalf 

We were most delighted in the entomology department this past 
year with the coming of Dr. Robert L. Metcalf to join our staff here at 
Illinois. In a sense it was a homecoming for Bob who returned to the 
University of Illinois where his father had been head of the department 
and where he had received both his bachelor's and master's degrees. 
Robert L. Metcalf was born November 13, 1916, in Columbus, Ohio. He 
attended the University of Illinois where he received his bachelor's 
degree in 1939 and his master's degree in 1940 working with Dr. Clyde 
Kearns who is the current head of the department. Dr. Metcalf went 
on to Cornell University at Ithaca, where he received the Ph.D. in 
1943. He served as a teaching assistant at Cornell from 1940-1943 
and taught at the University of California at Riverside from 1952 
to the present where he was professor of entomology. 

His curriculum vita and background read like a page out of Who's 
Who. During the war years (1943-1946) Bob worked at the U.S. Tennessee 



-30- 

Valley Authority where he did research on mosquito biology and control. 
He then went to the University of California where he served as Assistant, 
Associate and Professor of Entomology, eventually becoming Vice-Chancellor 
of the University of California at Riverside. He held this position 
from 1963-1966. 

Dr. Metcalf was recipient of the Faculty Research Lecture of the 
University of California at Riverside in 1958. He served as president 
of the Entomological Society of America in 1959 and received the 
Charles F. Spencer Award from the American Chemical Society in 1966. 
He also has received the Order of Cherubini from the University of Pisa 
in 1966. He was nominated a member of the National Academy of Science 
in 1967, making two of our 'faculty in entomology who are members of 
the National Academy. 

He has done research in malaria mosquito control for the Tennessee 
Valley Authority, the state of California, and the World Health 
Organization. He has been eminent in the field of development of new 
insecticides and their mode of action. He has done work on insect 
resistance to insecticides, and selected toxicity and metabolism of 
insecticides in biological systems. He has worked on the physiology 
of insect heart, physiology and biochemistry of the insect nervous 
system and recently he has been actively involved in the problems 
that face the world in environmental biology. His research has been 
recognized all over the world, particularly his discovery of in vivo 
metabolism of organophosphorus insecticides, the development of 
N-methyl-carbamate insecticides in the role of ehoiinesterase inhibition 
and in general the mode of action of insecticides. 

His membership in Societies reads like the National Register of 
Scientific organizations . In addition to a number of professional 
societies which he belongs, he is a member of the Presidential Science 
Advisory Committee on the Subpanel for Pesticides . He is a Consultant 
to the World Health Organization in the Agency for International 
Development and he is also a Consultant for the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, and Tennessee Valley Authority. He received the Chancellor's 
award for excellence in research from the University of California at 



-31- 

Riverside in 196 7. He continues to carry on the textbook initiated 
by his father, Destructive and Useful Insects. He is also author of 
Organic insecticides, their chemistry and mode of action and has over 
190 scientific publications. 

The coming of Bob Metcalf to this faculty can best be summed up 
by plagarising the words of another who made the following statement: 
''Comments concerning his research achievements seem to be superfluous. 
His record speaks for itself. He is the most productive faculty member 
this campus has ever known. He is regarded as a superb teacher and his 
lectures are models of inspiration." Dr. Metcalf s value, abilities, 
and capacities were soon recognized by the University as he recently 
has been invited to assume the headship of the Department of Zoology 
at Illinois. He will continue to carry on his research and teaching 
activities in the Department of Entomology. 

We are delighted to have Bob on the staff and he certainly makes 
an outstanding addition to the Department. When asked to give a 
contribution to the Newsletter, he modestly gave the following information 
which is appended to this brief introduction. 
Research 

Environmental biodegradability of insecticides . 

Interaction of carbamates and organophosphates with cholinesterase . 

Role of mixed function oxidases in insect life. 
Travel 

Geneva, Switzerland in September for Annual Meeting of Insecticide 
Development Committee, WHO. 
Family 

Daughter, Esther Lee, 24, Graduate Student, University of California, 
Davis . 

Son, Robert A., 20, Sophomore in Biology, University of Illinois, 
Urbana. 

Son, Michael R. , 16, Junior, Urbana High School. 

Dr. Vern G. Milum 
Over holidays Vern and Esther Milum visited son, George, wife and 
two grandsons at Lafayette, California; then motored with son Dick to 



-32- 
his home at Lampor and on to sister Ruth's home in Desert Hot Springs, 
finally heading home after a reverse bus ride to Los Angeles--account 
fog plus more of the same (fog and bus rides) from O'Hare to Champaign. 
Celebrated 3 / '4 century birthday February 6, 1969. 

Dr. Herbert H. Ross 

Principal activities during the past year for the Ross family were 
a trip to Alaska and preparations for the move to Georgia. The Alaska 
trip was part of a study on the evolution of the prairie biomes using 
leaFnoppers as index organisms . Collections were made every 50 miles 
on a zigzag transect from Bismarck, North Dakota, through southern 
Canada and along the various accessible routes in Alaska, the most 
northern collection being at Point Barrow. A highlight of the trip 
was a two-day visit with ex-Illini Dr. Kathryn M. Sommerman at Fairbanks, 
who has just received the government trailer which will be her base for 
mosquito collecting. The leafhopper transect was unusually successful, 
thanks to marvelous cooperation from the weather man. The transect 
was resumed after taking the auto ferry from Alaska to Vancouver Island, 
and collections were made on the southern route from northern Vancouver 
Island to Nebraska. Preparations for the move to the University of 
Georgia are still in progress. 

It is with a great deal of regret that we will be saying goodby 
to the Ross family. Herb has accepted a position as Professor at the 
University of Georgia. He will be working on developing an interdisciplinary 
biological program in systematics and evolution. He will also be continuing 
his research on caddisTlies. We know his new position will be a challenge 
and we wish him all the success in the world. Georgia's gain will be 
Illinois' loss. We will miss greatly the influence of Herb both at the 
State Natural History Survey and the Department of Entomology where countless 
graduate students cane under his astute guidance and direction. 

Dr. Richard B. Se lander 
Travel 

Twice to Dav5.d Mountains, Texas, to get material for rearing and 
to install continuous soil temperature recording equipment. 



-33- 

December in southeastern Brazil with Luis E. Pena, of the University 
Chile . Worked from Sao Paulo to Uberlandia and then eastward to Belo 
Horizonte and Rio de Janeiro, collecting and studying Meloidae . 
Research 

Continual experimental analysis of ecological factors controlling 
metamorphosis in Meloidae. 
Family 

Son, Hike (18), attempting to build electronic desk calculator for 
me. If successful will be seeking other orders. 

Dr. James G. Sternburg 
Research 

Biology and behavior of cecropia - coinves tigator with Gilbert 
Waldbauer. 

Mode of action of DDT. 

Effect of insecticides on nervous activity. 

Stress factors and their role in insecticidal action. 
Travel 

Dallas, Texas, for the Entomological Society Meetings in December. 

Vacation spent in northern Wisconsin during August. Some fishing, 
more collecting, and much loafing. 

Dr. G. P. Waldbauer 
Research 

With John Ameel and Anoop Bhattacharya the project on the consumption 
and utilization of food by stored-grain insects goes forward. 

Jim Sternburg and I are still deeply involved with our Cecropia 
work. We are at the moment spending much of our time trying to get some 
of our data ready for publication. Aubrey Scarbrough is doing his thesis 
work on this problem. 
Personal 

Most of the rest of my time was spent in getting settled in our new 
house. This year the family spent its vacation at home on Maynard Lake 
swimming or fishing for largemouth bass and bluegills. 



-34- 

Dr. Judith Willis 

Judy is on sabbatical this year in Cambridge, England, where 
her husband, John, is working in physiology. We hear very little 
from Judy. However, she did pass on a short note that she was enjoying 
Cambridge very much. She indicated that V. B. Wigglesworth was 
available every day at tea for visiting and talking about various 
research projects and she was taking full advantage of this opportunity. 
She is also spending considerable time with Weis-fogh and reports that 
he is unbelievabJy meticulous and a critical commentor on every 
imaginable aspect of biology, biochemistry and electronics, etc. 
Also she reports that many other people are insect oriented at Cambridge 
and she is finding this a most stimulating and enjoyable year. She 
also mentioned that she had an enjoyable visit with John Heslop who 
was here working in Dr. Kearns lab two years ago. She reports that 
he is joining Trehern's group in June. 

VJe will look forward to Judy's return and know that she will 
come back charged with new ideas for research. 



-35- 



NON-ACADEMIC EMPLOYEES 



E loise Duvall 

Having now been with the department for 6 1/2 years I feel like this 
is my second home. This is truly a great place to work and I have enjoyed 
the grad students of the past , some of whom I hated to see leave for 
greater things. I hope, with good health, to be here for many years to 
come — learning new things every day. 

Ma ry Fisher 

I came to the Entomology Department on October 1, 1968, from the 
Department of Botany. This has been a challenging change after spending 
many years with plants . The investigation of ultrastructure is yet 
another change from rny previous endeavors in the study of nucleic acids 
and most recently some work with plant viruses . I am looking forward 
to this new facet of work and a continuing association with those of 
the Entomology Department . 

Judy Michael 

I have kept busy another year in the Entomology Department. My 
husband, Den, is making progress at Parkland College while working at 
the Northern Illinois Water Corporation as a plant operator. My son, 
Jeff, is now almost three years old and as full of mischief as any could bs 

E. Ru th Millholin 

I joined the Department of Entomology here at Illinois on July 1, 
1968, coming from 5 years of experience at University of California, 
Riverside, with Dr. Robert Metcalf evaluating insecticides en mosquitoes 
and houseflies for the World Health Organization. It has been a very 
exciting year for myself and my 12 year old son, meeting lots of new and 
wonderful people, trying to adjust to the climate changes and is being 
topped off by the purchase of a house and looking forward to many more 
wonderful years. 

Ruth A. Plymire 

In the fall semester I tackled two English courses and this semester 
I am struggling with a physical geography course. This, of course, is 
taken care of in my "spare time." All three daughters are well and 
growing by leaps and bounds. The youngest will be giving the kindergarten 
teacher fits in the fall. My husband, Bill, has been switched from track 
to baseball coaching and is ready for the opening of a successful season. 

Ter ry R ansom 

I have just completed my third year as the Department's Equipment 
Attendant. I am married and have four children, Charles (9), Jenifer (7), 
Dawn (3), and James (2) and also a brother-in-law who is staying with us, 
Edwin (5). 



-36- 



Carolyn Thrash er 

I joined the Department in October of 1968, coming from the Champaign 
County State's Attorney's Office where I was employed by the former 
State's Attorney John Bresee. I am enjoying my work in the Department 
of Entomology, due mainly to the pleasant people and surroundings. My 
husband, Bill, is employed by the Special Projects Laboratory at the 
Coordinated Science Laboratory. We are anxiously awaiting the arrival 
of our first child in August. 

Grace Wright 

I am working in Dr. Horsfall's lab as a technician. My husband, 
a doctoral candidate in Electrical Engineering , is doing thesis research 
on lasers at the Gaseous Electronics Lab. 



Shaw - me i Yeh 

I am completing my second year in Dr. Friedman's laboratory as a 
NSLA III. I am busy running the experiment plus calculation Problem 
Set from my Statistics course. 



-37- 



PUBLICATIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY, 1968-69 



BALDUF, WALTER V., Professor, Emeritus 

Balduf, Walter V. 1968. On the life of V espula vulgaris (L.) and 
Y." m aculifrons (Buysson) , (Hymenoptera: Vespidae). Proc . 
Ent. Soc. Wash., 70:332-338. 

Balduf, Walter V. 196 8. Bionomic notes on the hexapodous parasites 
of Acrobasis rubrifasciella (Lepidoptera, Phycitidae). Ann. 
ent. Soc. Amer., 61:463-476. 

CHADWICK, LEIGH E., Professor, Emeritus 

Storoh, R.H. and L.E. Chadwick. 1968. Thoracic structure of 

the adult mecopteron, Bittacus strigosus Hagen (Mecoptera: 
Bittacidae). Jour. Morphol., 126(2) :199-210 . 

FRAENKEL, GOTTFRIED S., Professor 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. 1968. Decorative Music Title Pages. 

201 examples from 1500 to 1800. Dover Publications, N.Y., 
XVII + 230 pp. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. 1968. The heat resistance of intertidal 
snails at Bimini, Bahamas; Ocean Springs, Mississippi; and 
Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Physiol. Zool., 41:1-13. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and Catherine Hsiao. 1968. Manifestations 
of a pupal diapause in two species of flies , Sarcophaga 
a rgyr os tooa and S_. bullata . J. Insect Physiol., 14- : 689-705 . 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and T.H. Hsiao. 1968. The influence of 
nutrient chemicals on the feeding behavior of the Colorado 
potato beetle, Leptino tarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: 
Chrysomelidae) . Ann. ent. Soc. Amer., 61:44-54. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and T.H. Hsiao. 1968. Isolation of phagostimu- 
lative substances from the host plant of the Colorado potato 
beetle. Ann. ent. Soc. Amer., 61:476-484. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and T.H. Hsiao. 1968. The role of secondary 
plant substances in the food specificity of the Colorado 
potato beetle. Ann. ent. Soc. Arner., 41:485-4-93. 

Fraenkel, Gottfried S. and T.H. Hsiao. 1968. Selection and specificity 
of the Colorado potato beetle for solanaceous and nonsolanaceous 
plants. Ann. ent. Soc. Amer., 41:493-503. 



-38- 



FRIEDMAN, STANLEY, Professor 

Friedman, Stanley. 1968. Trehalose regulation of glucose-6-phosphate 
hydrolysis in blowfly extracts. Science, 159:110. 

GHENT, ARTHUR W. , Associate Professor 

Ghent, Arthur W. 1968. Selected problems in biometry. 4. The 
concept of randomness. Bioscience, 39(l):l-20. 

Ghent, Arthur W. and Bruce Hanna. 1968. Application of the "broken 
stick" formula to the prediction of random time intervals. 
Am. Midland Nat. 79(2) : 273-288 . 

HORSFALL, WILLIAM R. , Professor 

Horsfall, William R. and A. A. Aly. 1968. Bionomics of Psorophora 

varipes , a model laboratory mosquito, J. econ. Ent ., 61: 1657-1660 . 

LARSEN, JOSEPH R. , Professor 

Larsen, Joseph R. and A. Broadbent . 1968. The neurosecretory cells 
of the brain of Aedes aegypti in relation to larval molt, 
metamorphosis and ovarian development. Trans. Amer. Microsc. 
Soc, 37:395-410. 

MACLEOD. ELLIS G., Assistant Professor 

MacLeod, Ellis G. 1958. A review of the taxonomy and morphology 
of the Berothidae , with the description of a new subfamily 
from Chile (Neuroptera) . Psyche, 74:237-265. 

MacLeod, Ellis G. 1968. Studies en the systematics of the Berothidae, 
Part I: A redescription of the genus Sphaeroberotha Navas , with 
a critique of the taxoncmic characters used in the Berothinae 
(Neuroptera). Psyche, 74:342-352. 

METCALF, ROBERT L., Professor 

Metcalf, Robert L. 1968. Edited Advances in pest control research. 
John WiLey-Interscience , N.Y., 245 pp. 

Metcalf, Robert L. 1968. The role of oxidative reactions in the 
mode of action of insecticides. In Enzymatic oxidation of 
t oxicant s , ed. by Hodgson, Proc . Conf. North Carolina State 
Univ., Raleigh, pp. 151-172. 

Metcalf, Robert L- 1968. Economic poisons. In Encyclopedia 
chemi_cal technology , 2nd ed., vol. 15, ed. by Standen, 
John Wiley-Interscience , N.Y., pp. 903-923. 

Metcalf, Robert L., N. Eakry and T.R. Fukuto. 1968. Organothio- 
cyanates as insecticides and carbamate synergists. J. econ. 
Ent. , 61:1303-1309. 



•39- 



Metcalf, Robert L. and T.R. Fukuto. 19G8. The comparative 

toxicity of DDT and analogues to susceptible and resistant 
houseflies and mosquitoes. Bull. World Hlth Org., 38:633-647. 

Metcalf, Robert L., T.R. Fukuto and others. 1968. Metabolism 
of 2 , 2-dimethy 1-2 , 3-dihydrobenzof uranyl-7 -N-methylcarbamate 
(Furadan) in plants, insects, and mammals. J. Agr. Food Chem., 
16:300-311. 

Metcalf, Robert L., W.B. Gruhn and T.R. Fukuto. 1968. Electro- 
physiological action of carbamate insecticides in the central 
nervous system of the American cockroach. Ann. ent . Soc . Amer. , 
61:618-624. 

Metcalf, Robert L. and T. Miller. 1968. Site of action of pharmacologically 
active compounds on the heart of Periplaneta americana L. J. 
Insect Physiol., 14:383-394. 

Metcalf, Robert L., R.M. Sacher and T.R. Fukuto. 1968. Propynyl 
naphthyl ethers as selective carbamate synergists. J. Agr. 
Food Chem. , 16:779-786. 

Metcalf, Robert L. and R. Williamson. 1968. Salicylanilides : 

a new group of active uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. 
Science, 158:1694-1695. 

ROSS, HERBERT H., Professor 

Ross, Herbert H. 1968. The evolution and dispersal of the grassland 
leafhopper genus Exitianus , with keys to the Old World species 
(Cicadellidae: Hemiptera) . Bull. Brit. Mus . (Nat. Hist.) Ent., 
22:1-30. 

Ross, Herbert H. 1958. Relationships between vegetation, insects, 
and wildlife. Proc . Int. Union For. Org. Cong., 7:218-226. 

Ross, Herbert H. 1968. Process of ecological change. Bioscience , 
19:39. 

Ross, Herbert H. and W.E. Ricker. 196S. North American species of 
Taeniopteryx (Plecoptera, Insecta). J. Fisheries Res. Bd Can., 
25:1423-1439. 

Ross, Herbert H. , W.E. Ricker, Rene Malouin and P. Harper. 1968. 

Distribution of Quebec stoneflies (Plecoptera). Naturaliste can., 
95:1085-1123. 

WALDBAUER, GIL3ERT P., Associate Professor 

Waldbauer, Gilbert P. 1968. The consumption and utilization of food 
by insects. In Advances in in sect physiology , vol. 5, ed. by 
Beament, Treherne , and Wigglesworth , Academic Press, London, pp. 229-288 



-40- 



ALUHNI NEWS 

As always we are grateful for the response of the alumni in sharing 
their activities, publications and points of interest which have concerned 
them during the past year. We were delighted to hear from some we have 
not heard from in the past and we would like to reiterate that it would 
be good to hear from all of you as often as possible so that your colleagues 
past, present and future might keep track of your activities and travels. 
Many of the alumni have shared their appreciation for the Newsletter and 
also their interest in its continuation and their feeling for a desire 
to hear from more of you regularly so that they might keep track of your 
activities and whereabouts . We appreciate these words of encouragement and 
will continue to put out the Newsletter on an annual basis. 

As in past years we have included in the back a peirf orated information 
sheet which we would like you to fill out and return to us. If you continue 
to indulge in this yearly ritual the sharing of news with each other will 
become a standard and enjoyable part of the Newsletter. 

Probably the highlight of alumni activity for the year was a 
Breakfast for former Illini held at the Dallas Meetings . Such an activity 
had been suggested in last years newsletter and we were delighted with 
the response . Over 50 people attended the breakfast and had an opportunity 
to renew old acquaintances and hear Dr. Kearns give a resume of departmental 
activities . 

The breakfast was such a success that plans are already in the 
mill to have a similar activity at the meetings in Chicago this year. If 
any of you have any suggestions, or comments on this type of activity, 
we would be glad to hear from you. 

Manfred Brust 
My current research has been (l) effects of therapeutic ultrasound 
on skeletal muscles - mechanism of action. (2) Effects of temperature on 
contractions of fast and slow mammalian muscles and their fatigability. 
Publications: (1967 through April 1968) 

Brust, M. and H.W. Costa. 1967. Ccntractibility of isolated 

human skeletal muscle. Arch. Fhys . Med. Rehabil. 43:543. 
Ross, S.M. and M. Brust. 1968. A transistorized high-current, long- 
pulse amplifier for massive stimulation of isolated skeletal 
muscle. J. Appl. Physiol. 24:583. 



-41- 



I vacationed for one week in New Hampshire in August 1967. I attended 
meeting of American Academy for Cerebral Palsy in San Francisco, California, 
in December 1967. I attended FASHB meeting in Atlantic City, N.J., in 
April 1968. 

B.D. Suites 

The usual round of papers on the chalcidoidea--they are of no interest 
to anybody not working in Hymenoptera. 

My wife and I took a trip to New Hampshire last fall--climbed some 
mountains and, of course, took pictures and collected insects. We expect 
to go to West Virginia this year. 

Wayne P. Carlisle 
Took a pleasure trip in July, 1967, to Oahu, Kavai , Maui, and Hawaii. 
I spent 14 delightful days . 

I enjoy the "Newsletter" very much and relish memories of my graduate 
work in entomology department at the University of Illinois (January 1946 
to June 1947). A special "hello" to Doctors: Balduf, Hayes, Horsfall, 
and Milum. 

Robert W. (Bert) C legem 

I have done some very basic work in correlation of human responses 
in the Bar any chair to incidence of in-flight spatial disorientation. 
I am still collecting the Syrphidae of Oklahoma. 

My travels have been: Fall, 1967, Air Force sponsored trip to 
Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, and Pennsylvania for purpose 
of personal and survival equipment training. Fall, 1967, I went to Panama 
Canal Zone for Jungle Survival School. Spring, 1963, took trips to Kansas, 
Missouri, Illinois, Arkansas, and Ohio for personal and survival equipment 
upgrading. September 1968, took pleasure trip to Texas, Mexico, and 
California with wife Carol. 

John L. Eaton 
I am presently interested in insect sensory reception and I have 
begun preliminary studies on heat 'reception in Triato ma. I have also 
suddenly become very interested in pheromone reception, since I have 



-42- 



accepted a position at V.P.I, to do work in that area. (Effective 
July 1st) 

I attended a Summer Institute in Radiation Biology at the University 
of California at Berkeley this past summer. Needless to say, this trip 
involved travel for a great deal of pleasure while crossing the wide-open 
spaces between Kalamazoo and the west coast . 

No new additions to family. Two growing boys, Scott (6) and Marc (2), 
are enough to keep us busy. In addition, Peg stays out of trouble by 
playing in a local bridge group and working with the Faculty Women's Club. 

Suggestions for Newsletter -- Congratulations and keep up the good 
work . 

Robert F. Harwood 
My current research involves photoperiod and coddling moth, photoperiod 
and mosquitoes . As of July 1 I was appointed Chairman of the Department . 
I enjoy the information received each year. 

Edwin W. King 

My recent travels include a sabbatical leave to N.C. State University 
in 1967-68. Purpose: statistics and biomathematics. 

My recent research interests are biomathematics , weather effects . 

Is it really "quite impossible" to "contact everyone on a yearly baisis"? 
I did it once, and though I'm sure there are more names now it still 
seems like a good idea. 

Herbert Lipke 

My current research deals with (1) maturation of granulocyte nuclei 
(2) amino acid sequences in cuticle mucopeptides . 

Mrs. I.ipke is teaching in the elementary schools. Our oldest son 
is at the University of Chicago and our other children are in Jr. High 
and High School. 

William E. "Mac" McCauley 

Administration duties -- no publications. 

Our literature consists of labels for various formulation and uses 
of about 15 pesticides which Shell manufactures and has developed as basic 
chemicals: Aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, isodrin, phosdrin^, bidrin , Vapona , 



-t*3- 



. R J .R, J .R R , , . .., n . R 
no-pest strip , azodrrn , landrm , gardona , all insecticides ; planavin , 

allylacohol, aqualin , herbicides; and nemagon , and Shell-do nematocides . 

Travels: All around U.S.A. and an occasional trip to Europe. 

I truly enjoy the annual "Letter". May I suggest that your students 
mention their career interest. Many of your readers could possibly be 
helpful in finding employment for their fellow Illini. Some of us can 
even be helpful in finding useful situations outside the U.S.A. My 
career continues to be development of pesticides through registration -- 
a strictly red ink function. I now have a staff of over 20 engaged in 
this activity. 

David C. Newton 

The Connecticut Research Commission has granted $7514 to Central 
Connecticut State College to be used in establishing apicultural research 
facilities. These facilities will be used to extend behavioral studies 
begun at the University of Illinois . 

The summer of 1967 was spent moving to Connecticut and finding a 
home. With this half accomplished, we attended the XXIst International 
Apicultural Congress at the University of Maryland and later 1 camped for 
a week at Wellfleet , Cape Cod, during the only- warm sunny period of a 
cool, wet Hew England summer. 

Lance G. Peterson 

Research: Development of biological control mechanisms for insect 
pests . 

I was unable to get away but Cleone spent 3 weeks in England and 
Scotland visiting friends and new places. 

I attended Southeast Branch Meetings of the ESA in Charleston, 
South Carolina in January . 

I made a fishing trip into Minnesota's canoe country and had real 
good lake trout fishing. 

Morris Seligman 
I have two papers to be published soon with Dr. S. Friedman and 
G. Fraenkel, but don't hold your breath. 

My research interests center about insect halitosis. The stronger 



-44- 



the smell the happier I am. The Australian Government pays me to do 
research on the biosynthesis of defense secretions and pheromones . From 
this I make a living! 

We spent a very pleasant three months meandering to the antipodes 
visiting family and friends. While in Australia our excursions have been 
limited to weekends in the mountains or at the coast ---- amenities that 
the Illinoisians should arrange for their fertile state. 

Additions to the family: None, for a change. 

Comments concerning the "Newsletter": "Fine, jes' fine." 



-45- 



ADDRESS CORRECTION LIST 



Aly Aboualy 

Department of Entomology 
Ein Shans University 
Abbassia, Cairo 
U . A . R . 

Robert Thomas Allen 
Department of Entomology 
University of Arkansas 
Fayetteville , Arkansas 72701 

Robert L. Benson 

Gerontology Research Center, NIH 
Baltimore City Hospitals 
Baltimore, Maryland 21224 

Angel Berrios-Ortiz 
PRESENTLY at U. of Illinois 

Hung Fu Chu 
[Address unknown] 



Willard Fogal 

Forest Insect Laboratory 

Department of Forestry 

and Rural Development 
P.O. Box 490 

Sault Ste . Marie , Ontario 
Canada 

Robert L . Gerhart 
26 Woody Creek 
Conroe, Texas 77 301 

Todd Harris 

237 Natural Resources Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 

William Brown Hawkins 
Florence State College 
P.O. Box 597 
Florence Alabama 35630 



Mrs . Hung Fu Chu 
[Yu-Su Liu] 
[Address unknown] 



James Janicke 

720 S. Oakley Blvd. 

Chicago, Illinois 60612 



Hugh Cunningham 

Department of Zoology and Entomology 

Auburn University 

Auburn, Alabama 36830 

Theodore Dashman 
1.63 Pinewood Place 
Teanick, New Jersey C7666 

William K. Delaolane 

R # 1 

White Heath, Illinois 61884 

John L. Eaton 
EFFECTIVE JULY 1, 1969 
Department of Entomology 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 



John C. Keller 
321 E. Manhattan 
Tempe , Arizona 85281 



Keith Keyt 
Box 2 

Perrydale , Oregon 



97101 



Kenneth Lee Knight 
Department of Entomology 
North Carolina State University 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 

Herbert Lipke 
Department of Biology 
University of Massachusetts 
100 Arlington Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02116 



Roger F J at turn 
Department of Entomology 
Purdue University 
Lafayette, Indiana 1+7901 



John A. Lowe 

IRRI 

Manila Hotel 

Manila, Philippines 



■4b- 



Rene Paul Hartineau 
[Address unknown] 

Robert L. Metcalf, Head 
Department of Zoology- 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 

Carol Ann Morgan 
[Address unknown] 

Arthur P. Morris 
3328 Irish Lane 
Decatur, Georgia 30032 

Guy J . Noerdinger 

2215 Ralmar 

East-Palo Alto, California 94303 

Gerald Nordin 
1601 N. Kiler 
Champaign, Illinois 61820 

Stephen Parshall 
228 Myrtle Street 
Vinnetka, Illinois 60093 

LTC William J. Patterson 

H9, USARV (Office of the Surgeon) 

APO San Francisco 96375 

John D. Pinto 

San Luis Obispo State College 

Department of Biology 

San Luis Obispo, California 93401 

Judith Reynolds 
118 Homer Street 
Earlwood 
Sydney NSW 2206 
Australia 

Maria C. Ronquillo 
Department of Entomology 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61820 

Herbert H. Ross 
Department of Entomology 
University of Georgia 
Athens, Georgia 30601 



George Rotramel 
Department of Entomology 
University of California 
Berkeley, California 94720 



Robert H. Schiffman 
30325 Victoria 
Palos Verdes Peninsula, 
California 90274 

Herbert Frederick Schoof 
Technical Development Laboratory 
Communicable Disease Center (USPH) 
P.O Box 769 
Savannah, Georgia 31406 



Zile Singh 
PRESENTLY at U, 



of Illinois 



Marion Russell Smith 
Bureau of Entomology 
Plant Quarantine 
Washington, D.C. 20000 

Earl A. Stadelbacher 

U.S.D.A. Agricultural Research 

Service 
Entomology Research Division 
Cotton Insects Research Branch 
Delta Branch Experiment Branch 
Stonevdlle, Mississippi 38776 

Capt . Martin L. Taylor 

731 Byrnes Drive 

Apt. 3 

San Antonio, Texas 78209 

Robert Traub 

Department of Microbiology 
School of Medicine 
University of Maryland 
660 W. Redwood Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Glenn A. Ulrich 
[Address unknown] 

Robert F. Whit comb 

ERD, USDA Plant Industry Station 

West Building 

Beltsville, Maryland 20705 



-47- 
NEWSLETTER INFORMATION FOR 19G8-69 

Name : 

Home Address: 

Business Address: 

Current Research and Recent Publications: 



Recent Travels for Business or Pleasure: 



Additions to the family (names, dates) 



Suggestions or comments concerning the "Newsletter" 



Return to: Newsletter Committee 

Department of Entomology 
320 Morrill Kail 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 6.1801